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Патент USA US3071311

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Jan. 1, 1963
3,071,301
G. E. BENSON ETAL
APPARATUS FOR FEEDING A MULTIFILAMENT STRAND
Filed July 11, 1960
3 Sheets-Sheet 1
INVENTORS
605ml 5 BEA/$0M &
By HERBERT Saunas/e5
$52. V 6 2
.
Jan° 1, 1963
G. E. BENSON ETAL
3,071,301
APPARATUS FOR FEEDING A MULTIFILAMENT STRAND
5 Sheets-Sheet 2
Filed July 11, 1960
IN VEN TORS
Gusmv 5 55/4/50”
HERBERT SAUNDERS
Jan. 1, 1963
G. E. BENSON ETAL
3,071,301
APPARATUS FOR FEEDING A MULTIFILAMENT STRAND
Filed July 11, 1960
5 Sheets-Sheet 3
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ATTORNEYS
33,071,301
Patented Jan. 1, 1963
2
be achieved from the following speci?cation and from the
drawings, in which:
3,071,301
FIG. 1 is a view in elevation of apparatus embodying
APPARATUS FOR FEEDING A MULTI
the invention as employed for the attenuation and feeding
FILAMENT STRAND
Gustav E. Benson, Greenviile, R1,, and Herbert M. 5 of a multi?lament glass ?ber strand;
Saunders, Newark, Ohio, assignors to Owens-Corning
Fiberglas Corporation, Toledo, Ohio, a corporation of
FIG. 2 is a view partially in section and partially in plan
of the apparatus shown in FIG. 1 illustrating the pulling
wheel and strand removal means and taken along the line
2-2 of FIG. 1;
Delaware
Filed July 11, 1960, Ser. No. 41,977
8 Ciaims. (Cl. 226-1é8)
10
FIG. 3 is a view taken along the line 3-3 of FIG. 2;
FIG. 4 is a view, partially in elevation and partially in
This invention relates to rotary apparatus for feeding
section of a pulling wheel illustrating a modi?ed type of
and/or attenuating a continuous multi?lament strand.
strand removal means which is driven in synchronization
More particularly, this invention is directed to rotary
with the pulling wheel;
means consisting of a high speed pulling wheel so designed
FIG. 5 is a fragmentary sectional view in elevation of
that its peripheral surface is in contact with the continu 15
a modi?ed type of pulling wheel which drives the strand
ous multifilament strand being fed, and a spider wheel hav
removal means in synchronization therewith; and
ing a plurality of protuberances that extend outward
through the peripheral surface of the pulling wheel during
a relatively small arc of rotation of both wheels for re
FIG. 6 is a sectional view taken along the line 6-6 of
FIG. 5.
mined point.
A multi?lament glass ?ber strand is commercially
formed by attenuating a plurality of individual glass ?bers
10 from individual streams of glass which flow through
which was rotated on its normal axis, was provided with
may be a size, adhesive, a lubricant or any liquid intended
moving the strand from the pulling Wheel at a predeter 20
In the past, multi?lament strands of continuous ?bers
minute ori?ces in the bottom of a glass melter or supply
have been fed by passing them around portions of the
tank generally indicated at 11. The ?bers 10 are associ
peripheries of wheels or other rotary instrumentalities
ated together to form a strand 12 by being led over a suit
25
and imparting to the strands high lineal speeds. How
ably shaped guide 13 after they have contacted an appli
ever, the throw of the strand from a wheel puller of the
cator generally indicated at 14 which transfers a controlled
prior art tended to be erratic because the ‘strand left the
quantity of liquid to the ?bers 10.
periphery of the wheel at various points.
The liquid applied to the ?bers 10 by the applicator 14
In an attempt to solve this problem, the pulling wheel,
a spider wheel which was mounted for rotational move
ment about an axis parallel to this normal aXis. The pull
ing wheel had spaced peripheral lugs, and the outer sur
to make the strand compatible with materials with which
it is later to be associated or it may simply be water. The
purposes of the liquid, in addition to any subsequent pur
face of these lugs formed an interrupted cylindrical periph 35 poses such as compatability, adhesion, etc., include: ?rst,’
to create intra-strand integrity and, ~second, to wet the
eral surface for strand contact and adhesion. The spider
strand and strand contacting portions of the rotary pulling
apparatus embodying the invention.
through the space between adjacent lugs on the pulling
After leaving the guide 13, the strand 12 is passed
wheel, and contact between the lugs and the spokes ro
around
an idler wheel 15 and guided into peripheral con
tated the spider wheel. Because of the high speed at 40
tact with a pulling wheel generally indicated at 16. The
which the pulling wheel was rotated, the impact of the
pulling wheel 16 has a rim 17 of general cylindrical shape
lugs upon the spokes was sut?cient to break the spokes,
and is mounted upon a shaft 18 which is driven by a motor
and this usually occurred when both wheels were rotating
19 and rotated at a high speed in the direction of the arrow
at some speed lower than normal operating speeds.
We have found that by providing means other than the 45 (counterclockwise) in FIG. 1.
The material from which the wheel 16 is fabricated and
engagement of the lugs and spokes to drive the spider
wheel had radial arms or spokes which were movable
the liquid with which the ?bers 10 are coated must be such
that the liquid applied to the ?bers 10 and carried to the
surface of the wheel 16 will “wet” the surfaces. It should
nization with the pulling wheel prevents the lugs from
also be noted that the liquid may be applied directly to
striking the spokes and breaking them.
50 the wheel 16 rather than to the ?bers 10, for example, by
It is, therefore, the principal object of this invention to
misting or ‘spraying the liquid onto the wheel 16 rather
I provide a means for continuously pulling a glass strand or
than
by applying it to the ?bers 111 which carry it onto the
a group of ?laments from'a ‘melting unit, bushing or other
surface of the wheel 16, as shown in FIG. 1.
source without winding the strand onto a tube or mandrel
Apparently the surface tension of the liquid wetting
so that the strand may be thrown into additional equip
the peripheral surfaces of the wheel 16 and also the strand
ment for further processing.
12 gives the wheel 16 ample tr-aotive force to pull the
A further object of the invention is to provide a rotating
strand 12 around the idler :15 and to attenuate the 200
pulling wheel upon which a strand of glass ?laments is
or more ?laments 10 of which the strand 12 is comprised.
partially Wrapped for feeding and consistently removed
wheel, these problems are eliminated. The addition of a
driving means to the spider wheel to rotate it in synchro
therefrom at the same point so as to provide a strand 60 It is also theorized that the inward tension on the strand
12 created by the “belt effect” of wrapping the strand 12
which is discharged linearly along a single, ?xed path.
‘around the exterior of the wheel 16 provides tractive or
attenuating force.
Referring to FIGS. 2 and 3, the pulling wheel 16 is
pendently driven in synchronization therewith.
provided
with a spider wheel 20 to remove the strand
An additional object of the invention is to provide an in 65
12 at a predetermined point. Independent drive means
dependently driven spider wheel which has a diameter that
in the form- of a gear train 21 is used to drive the spider
is substantially less than the diameter of the pulling wheel,
wheel
20 from the shaft 18. This gear train com-prises
and the spokes of which move outward through spaces in
a drivint7 gear 22 secure-d to the shaft 18 and a transfer
the periphery of the pulling wheel in a relatively small arc
70 or idler gear 23‘ which drives a driven gear 24 that is
of rotation of both wheels.
rigidly secured to the hub 25 of the spider wheel 20.
A better understanding of the objects, advantages, and
As shown most clearly in FIG. 2, the driving gear 22
operation of the apparatus embodying the invention will
A still further object of the invention is to provide a ro
tating pulling wheel with a spider wheel which is inde
3
3,071,301
is also secured to the pulling wheel 16 by means of suit—
able screws 26 to make centain that the driving gear 22
rotates at the same speed as the pulling wheel 16 and
to prevent slippage therebetween. A cover plate 27 is
rigidly secured to a housing 28 on the motor 18 by means
of suitable screws 29 as shown in FIG. 2.
A ring 30 is mounted on the rim 17 of the pulling
wheel 16. The ring 30‘ has an inwardly turned ?ange 31
adjacent the cover plate 27 and which overlies a circum
4
wheel 47 and the spider wheel 50. The timing belt 53 is
driven by the sprocket 49 and, in turn, drives the pulley
52 which is keyed to the shaft 51. This rotates the spider
wheel 50 at a-high speed in synchronization with the pull
ing wheel 47.
The pulling wheel 57 shown in FIGS. 5 and 6 has a
plurality of equally spaced slots 58 formed in its periph
ery. A shaft 59 which is substantially parallel to a drive
60 but located closer to the outermost periphery
ferential lip 32 which extends outwardly from the edge 10 shaft
of the pulling wheel 57 than to the drive shaft 60 carries
of the cover plate 27. The ring 30 rotates with the wheel
a spider wheel 61 having a hub 62. Circumferentially
16 and serves as a retainer for the rim 17 while guiding
spaced
outwardly extending spokes 63 positioned in radial
the strand 12. The arrangement of the ?ange 31 on the
slots in hub 62 protrude through the slots 58 to engage
ring 30 and the lip 32 on the plate 27 restricts the entry
the strand and push it out of contact with the pulling
of air as well as foreign material into the interior of 15 wheel 57.
the wheel 16. Such an arrangement prevents not only
The pulling wheel 57 which has a hub 64 that is se~
damage to the gear train 21 by the foreign material but
cured to the drive shaft 60 ‘by means of a key 65 is ro
also pumping of air radially outwardly from the interior
of the wheel 16 which would cause the strand 12 to leave
the rim 17.
The cover plate 27 mounts the spider wheel 20 for
rotation about an axis substantially parallell to the axis
of the shaft 18 and which is located closer to the periph
eral surface of the pulling wheel 16 than to the shaft 18.
More particularly, a stub shaft 33 extends through a suit
able aperture in the cover plate 27 and mounts a pair of
spaced ball bearings 34 having their inner races ?tted on
tated in synchronization with the spider wheel 61 by
means of a ring gear 66 which is secured to the inner pe
ripheral surface of the pulling wheel 57. A spur gear
67 is secured to the spider wheel 61 ‘by means of suitable
screws 68 extending through the hub 62 into the gear 67.
Thus, as the motor (not shown) drives the shaft 60 and
the pulling wheel 57 ‘which is keyed thereto, the spider
wheel 61 is driven in synchronization therewith by means
of the ring gear 66 and the spur gear 67.
A retaining ring 69 which is carried by the hub 62 is
the shaft 33 while their outer races are ?tted in the bore
received
in suitable slots 70 in the spokes 63, and the
of the gear 24. Endwise movement of the shaft 33 along
the bearings 34 is prevented by a shoulder 35 on one end 30 ring 69 is secured to the hub 62 by means of a plurality
of screws 71 extending therethrough. By removing the
thereof and a nut 36 on the opposite end.
screws 71 the retaining ring 69 is removed from the hub
The spider wheel 20 mounts a plurality of arms or out
62 and the slots 70 thereby permitting the spokes 63 to be
wardly extending spokes 37 which extend through tapered
withdrawn from their respective slots in the hub 62.
slots 38 in the periphery of the pulling wheel 16. As
While various embodiments have been shown in FIGS.
shown in FIG. 3, the slots 38 are between the circum 35
1—6 of the invention, each of the spider wheels is mounted
ferentially spaced elements that form an interrupted cy
for rotative movement about an axis which is located
lindrical peripheral surface on the wheel 16 for strand
closer to the peripheral edge of the pulling wheel than
contact and adhesion. The spokes 37 are received in suit
to
the axis of rotation of the wheel. Thus the spokes
able slots in the hub 25 of the spider wheel 20 and are
retained therein by means of a pair of retainer rings 39 40 extend through the space between adjacent spaced mem
bers forming the periphery of the pulling wheel for en
which are received in suitable recesses formed in both
gaging
the strand and pushing it out of contact with the
the hub 25 and the spokes 37. The retainer rings 39 are
pulling wheel. Each of the spider wheels is preferably
maintained in position by means of screws 40 which pass
less than one-half the diameter of the pulling wheel;
through the rings 39 and into the hub 25. By removing
thus the spokes extend through the pulling wheel for a
the screws 40 the rings 39‘ may be likewise removed and
relatively small arc of rotation of both the pulling wheel
the spokes 36 may be replaced in case of damage.
The idler gear 23 is mounted for rotation upon a double
race ball bearing 41 carried by a shaft 42 that is mounted
in a generally U-sh-aped bracket 43 that extends over the
and the spider wheel in order to ensure the removal of
strand at the same point on the periphery of the pulling
wheel.
We claim:
spider wheel 20. Each end of the bracket 43 is rigidly 50
1. In apparatus for longitudinally feeding a multi?la
secured to the cover plate 27 by means of a plurality of
ment continuous strand, comprising a substantially hol
screws 44 and the shaft 42 is mounted parallel to both
low rotary pulling wheel having a plurality of circum
the shaft 18 and the stub shaft 33 in a slot 45 formed in
ferentially spaced periphery forming elements for form—
the bracket 43. A hub cap 46 is mounted on the outer
ing
an interrupted cylindrical peripheral surface for
most surface of the pulling wheel 16 and serves to pre 55
strand contact and adhesion, a motor for rotating said
vent foreign material from entering the interior of the
pulling wheel at high speed, a cover plate positioned be
tween said motor and said pulling wheel, a ring encircling
said cover plate and mounted on said periphery forming
identical to the pulling wheel \16 shown in FIGS. 1 to 3. 60 elements for rotation with said pulling wheel to guide
said strand into engagement with said periphery forming
The shaft 48 which carries the pulling wheel 16 turns at
pulling Wheel 16 and damaging the gear train 21.
In the embodiment of the apparatus shown in FIG. 4,
there is shown a pulling wheel 47 which is substantially
a speed of approximately 4,000 rpm. and mounts a tim
ing sprocket 49 which forms a positive drive for a spider
wheel 50 which is substantially identical to the spider
wheel 20. More particularly, a stub shaft 51 mounts the
spider wheel 50 that carries a timing pulley 52 instead of
elements, a plurality of circumferentially spaced members
each movable through one of the spaces between adja
cent ones of said periphery forming elements on said
wheel for contacting said strand, means for mounting
said spaced members for rotational movement, and driv~
ing means within said pulling wheel operatively con
a gear. The pulley 52 is connected to the sprocket 49 in
nected to said mounting means for rotating said mount
timed relation ‘by means of a suitable timing belt 53.
ing means at high speed in synchronization with said
Referring to FIG. 4, the shaft 51 mounts the spider
pulling wheel.
wheel 50 for rotational movement about an axis located 70
2. Apparatus according to claim 1 in which the driving
closer to the peripheral surface of the pulling wheel 47
means comprise a gear train mounted within said sub
than to the longitudinal axis of the wheel 47 de?ned by
stantially hollow pulling ‘wheel inwardly of said inter
the shaft 48, and spokes 54 which extend outwardly from
rupted cylindrical peripheral surface.
a hub 55 move through slots 56 on the pulling wheel 47
3. Apparatus according to claim 1 in which the driving
in a relatively small arc of rotation of both the pulling 75
means comprises a ring gear within the pulling wheel
3,071,301
5
adjacent the interrupted cylindrical peripheral surface
and a spur gear on the mounting means.
4. Apparatus according to claim 1 in which the driving
means comprises a timing belt within said pulling wheel
operatively engageable between the means for rotating
the pulling wheel and the mounting means.
5. Apparatus for longitudinally feeding a multi?la
ment continuous strand comprising a substantially hol
low rotary pulling wheel having a plurality of circum
ferentially spaced, periphery forming elements for form
ing an interrupted cylindrical peripheral surface for
strand contact and adhesion, a motor for rotating said
pulling wheel at high speed, a plurality of circumferen
tially spaced members successively movable through suc
cessive spaces between said periphery forming elements
on said pulling wheel for contacting said strand, means
for mounting said spaced members for rotational move
6
tion with said pulling wheel, said driving means being
powered by the rotation of the pulling Wheel.
6. Apparatus according to claim 5 in which the driv
ing means comprises a gear train.
7. Apparatus according to claim 5 in which the driv
ing means includes a ring gear secured to the pulling
wheel in proximity to the peripheral surface thereof, and
a spur gear on the mounting means.
8. Apparatus according to claim 5 in which the driving
means includes a timing belt operatively engageable be
tween the means for rotating the pulling wheel and the
mounting means.
References Cited in the ?le of this patent
UNITED STATES PATENTS
2,581,866
2,761,936
Kershaw ______________ __ Ian. 8, 1952
Drummond __________ __ Feb. 15, 1955
2,868,358
ment, and driving means within said pulling member and
3,010,632
operatively connected to said mounting means for rotat
ing said mounting means at high speed in synchroniza 20 3,014,629
Russell ____________ __ Jan. 13, 1959
Brautigam __________ __ Nov. 28, 1961
Cunningham et al. ____ __ Dec. 26, 1961
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