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Патент USA US3071960

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Jan. 8, 1963
c. R. CHANEY
’
3,071,950
METHOD FOR PRODUCING RUN-RESISTANT SEAMLESS
HOSIERY AND HOSIERY PRODUCED THEREBY
Filed May 10, 1962
4 Sheets-Sheet 1
CLIFFORD R. CHANEY
Jan. 8, 1963
c. R. CHANEY
METHOD FOR PRODUCING RUN-RESISTANT SEAMLESS
HOSIERY AND HOSIERY PRODUCED THEREBY
Filed May 10, 1962
-
3,071,950
4 Sheets-Sheet 2
592a.
INVENTOR.
CLIFFORD P. (‘HA/V5)’
2”” 65%“
Jan. 8, 1963
c. R. CHANEY
3,071,950
METHOD FOR PRODUCING RUN-RESISTANT SEAMLESS
HOSIERY AND HOSIERY PRODUCED THEREBY
Filed May 10, 1962
4 Sheets-Sheet 3
120
:22
INVENTOR.
CLIFFORD A’. (‘l/AME)’
'BY
cam/0m; 1.. awn/400s a
041. as" u. smerr:
‘ ATT'OP/VEKS
Jan. 8, 1963
c. R. CHANEY
METHOD FOR PRODUCING RUN-RESISTANT SEAMLESS
HOSIERY AND HOSIERY PRODUCED THEREBY
Filed May 10, 1962
3,071,950
4 Sheets-Sheet 4
i9n4
y
..1
INVEN TOR.
CL IFF'ORD R. Cl/ANE Y
BY
CHIN/VINE L. RICHARD 8
DALBERT U. JHL'FTE
ATTORN£Y5
United States Patent ‘O??ce
1
3,071,950
Patented Jan. 8, 1963
2
other end tucked in the second needle wale across the
3,071,950
third course and knit in the fourth course. In the third
course, both ends are knit in a plain stitch in the ?rst
needle wale with one end ?oated across the second needle
Clifford R. Chaney, Concord, N.C., assignor to Harper
wale and the other end knit in the second needle wale
in a plain stitch with the fourth course. Thus both ends
METHOD FOR PRODUCING RUN-RESISTANT
SEAMLESS HGSIERY AND HOSIERY PRO
DUCED THEREBY
Hosiery Mills, Inc., a corporation of North Carolina
Filed May 10, 1962, Ser. No. 193,842
17 Claims. (Cl. 66-178)
of the ?rst course and one end of each of the second and
third courses are knit with the fourth course. The fourth,
?fth and sixth courses are knit in the same pattern as the
The present invention relates to the production of seam 10 ?rst three, but in opposite needle wales.
This pattern may be varied by increasing the number of
less hosiery knit in a particular pattern of tucked and
courses having both tucked and ?oated ends, similar to the
?oated stitches and with a controlled depth of draw such
above described second course, which will increase the
that a run-resistant hosiery fabric is produced that, in
lengths of the tucked yarns accordingly, thereby reducing
addition to being run-resistant, is desirably sheer and in
conspicuous and embodies compatible ‘welt and leg por 15 further the likelihood of the tucked stitches pulling out
trons.
of the succeeding stitches when a run develops.
The desirable characteristics of run-resistance, sheer
ness, and compatible proportioning have not heretofore
tern is knit with a substantially deeper draw than the pre
been obtainable in hosiery without sacri?cing one or the
other of these characteristics or using special yarns that
cedingly knit plain stitch welt portion. The amount of
this deeper draw may be, for example, approximately
produce an objectionable appearance and also undesirably
. twice the depth of draw in the welt portion depending
on the relative sizes of yarn in the welt and leg portions.
This is in contrast to conventional knitting where, rather
increase the cost of production.
This problem is am
pli?ed by the present day requirement for sheerness in
As mentioned above, this tucked and ?oated stitch pat
than drawing twice as deep in the leg portion, the draw
hosiery, for in order to obtain acceptable Sheerness it is
necessary to use ?ne yarns, which are delicate and there
fore readily susceptible to runs, and yet run-resistance is
more difficult to obtain with ?ne yarns and the run-re
sistant stitches that have been used are even more ob~
jectionable in these sheer fabrics than in prior heavier
fabrics.
,
By the present invention desired Sheerness is retained
while providing a run-resistant hosiery fabric by knitting
the desirably sheer boot or leg portion using two ends of
?ne yarn knit in a combination of tucked and ?oated
stitches while drawing the stitches substantially deeper
than the drawing of stitches in the preceding plain knit
welt portion. This deeper drawing is directly the reverse
of conventional drawing, where the heavier yarn in the
welt portion is drawn deeper according to the established
principle that heavier yarns must be drawn deeper to
provide compatible proportioning of stitches between ad
jacent portions of heavy and ?ne yarn.
‘
This deeper drawing substantially enhances the run
resistant characteristics of the particular tucked and ?oat
ed stitch pattern as the deeper draw increases the amount
of yarn in each tucked stitch, which yarn must be pulled
out of the succeeding stitch to permit a run to continue
beyond the tucked stitch. Further, the ?oated stitches,
which are not drawn and therefore are not increased by
25
is usually substantially shallower, particularly where the
yarn size in the leg is less than the yarn size in the welt.
This unconventional deeper drawing in the leg portion
may not be obtainable to an optimum depth with some
conventional knitting machines, which are capable of a
range of drawing depths by raising and lowering the cylin
der, but are limited to a maximum depth less than that
desired to obtain optimum results with the present inven
tion. Also, it is preferred not to use the cylinder to
accomplish the deep draw, but rather to allow the cylin
der manipulation to perform its normal function of shift
ing to change the shape of the various parts of the stock—
ing. Therefore, the present invention includes means
that can be incorporated in a conventional knitting ma
chine to accomplish drawing depths of the magnitude
contemplated herein.
These means comprise a stitch cam assembly mounted
for movement relative to the knitting needles in the direc
' tion in which loops are drawn so as to adjust the position
of the needles for drawing loops and thus adjust the
depth of draw. The stitch cam assembly is manipulated
by control means, such as a rocker linkage driven from the
pattern drum to shift the stitch cam assembly to draw the
needles deeper when the knitting cycle changes from knit
ting the welt portion to knitting the leg portion. A partic
the deeper draw, are arranged to extend across the tucked 50 ular embodiment of these means is described in detail
hereinbelow.
stitches and thereby prevent su?icient lateral spreading
Other and further features and advantages of the pres
of the fabric to allow the yarn in the tucked stitches to
ent invention will be apparent from the following descrip
pull through the succeeding stitches as is necessary for a
tion and accompanying drawings, in which:
FIG. 1 is a photographic reproduction of a seamless
In addition, the combination of the unconventional deep 55
stocking made in accordance with the present invention
drawing and the tucked and ?oated stitch pattern of the
and shown lying ?at in a relaxed condition;
present invention produces a leg portion proportioned corn
FIG. 2 is a magni?ed photographic reproduction of a
patibly with the welt portion. This is of particular im
segment of the stocking of FIG. 1 at the juncture of the
portance in hosiery where proper sizing and appearance
are essential and the welt portion and adjacent segment 60 welt and leg portion, such as indicated by the rectangle in
of the leg portion must be of similar proportions to be
FIG. 1, and showing the stitches in an extended condi
> acceptable.
tion, as when the stocking is worn;
The particular tucked and ?oated stitch pattern, which
FIG. 2a is a diagram of a theoretical stitch ‘construc
is combined in the present invention with deep drawing,
tion corresponding to the actual photographic stitch mag
comprises two ends of yarn knit in a repeating pattern of 65 ni?cation of FIG. 2, but showing the yarn ends following
two needle wales and six courses. In one course, both
a symmetrical regimentation to provide a clear illustra
ends are knit in a plain stitch in the ?rst needle wale and
tion
of the interlooping of the yarns, which is not readily
in the second needle wale both ends are knit in a tucked
run to advance.
apparent in photographic FIG. 2a;
or held stitch extending across the next two courses and
PEG. 3 is a perspective view of a preferred embodiment
knit with the fourth course. In the second course, both 70
of a mechanism for controlling the depth of draw accord
ends are knit in a plain stitch in the ?rst needle wale
with one end?oated across the second needle wale and the
ing to the present invention, shown in relationto the bed
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3
4
plate and pattern drum of a conventional circular knitting
machine to which the mechanism is attached;
peats every two needle wales and every six courses. In
each of these repeating patterns 29 there are two large
FIG. 4 is an elevational view of the mechanism of
tucked stitches 21, each encompassing three different
FIG. 3 looking radially outwardly from the center of the
courses in different needle wales 22 and 23.
circular knitting machine; and
course 24 of the ?rst group of three courses '25 the two
FIG. 5 is a vertical sectional view taken along line
5-5 of FIG. 3.
ends of yarn 26 and 27 are knit together in a plain stitch
in the ?rst needle wale 22 and are knit together in a
In the ?rst
The stocking illustrated in FIG. 1 is a typical example
tucked stitch in the second needle wale 23 extending
of a stocking made in accordance with the present in
across the second and third courses 28 and 29, respec
vention. This stocking 10 includes the usual welt por 10 tively, and knit with the fourth course 30, which is the
tion 11, leg portion 12, heel pocket 13, foot portion 14,
?rst course of the second group 31 of three courses of
and toe pocket 15. The welt portion 11 includes the usual
the repeating pattern 20.
shadow or after welt 16, which is a single ply continuation
In the second course '28 both ends are again knit in a
of the double thickness fabric of the main body of the
plain stitch in the ?rst needle wale 22, but in the second
welt 11 knit of the same yarn and in the same plain 15 needle wale 23 one end 32 is ?oated and the other end
knit stitch construction.
33 is held or tucked across the third course 29 and is knit
The leg portion 12 is knit in accordance with the
with both ends 26 and 27 of the ?rst course 24 in the
present invention and embodies the special stitch con
struction and deeper drawing that combine to produce
fourth course 39.
In the third course 29 both ends 34 and 35 are again
run-resistance, sheerness and compatible proportioning. 20 knit in a plain stitch in the ?rst needle wale 22, and
As seen in FIG. 1, the leg portion is very sheer, being
con'lparable in sheerness to conventional plain knit stock
ings. The stocking 1% of FIG. 1 also clearly illustrates the
in the second needle wale 23 one end 34 is ?oated while
the other end 35 is knit in a plain stitch with the fourth
course 311 along with the two ends 26 and 27 of the ?rst
compatible proportioning between the welt portion !11
course, and the one end 33 of the second course, all of
and the leg portion 12 obtained by the present invention, 25 ‘which ends combine to form one of the large tucked
and which is important to provide an acceptable stocking
stitches 21.
of proper size and dimension.
This compatible propor
tioning is obtained by the present invention notwithstand
ing the fact that the leg portion 12 is knit with di?erent
The fourth, ?fth and sixth courses, 30, 36 and 37,
respectively, which comprise the second group 31 of three
courses, are knit in the same sequence, but in opposite
yarn and a different stitch than the welt portion 11 and
needle wales to the ?rst, second ‘and third courses 24, 28
is knit with a substantially deeper draw.
and 29. Thus the ?oated stitches occur in the ?rst nee
Another feature of the present invention, which is ap
dle wale 22 and the plain stitches occur in the second
parent in the stocking 1% of FIG. 1, is the enhanced shap
needle wale 23 with the result that a large tucked stitch
ing obtained in the leg portion 12 to conform to the de
21 is formed in the ?rst needle Wale 22.
sired contour of the leg of the wearer. This is particu 35
With the above described special stitch construction
larly apparent at the narrow ankle portion 17, which is
knit with a deep draw a run progressing downwardly,
seen to be of greatly reduced diameter as desired to
which would occur in a sinker wale, will be stopped by
conform to the ankle of the wearer. This enhanced shap
the yarns forming the tucked stitches as these yarns ex
ing is obtained by the present invention even though the 40 tend from a loop in one needle wale across the sinker
leg portion stitches are drawn deeper, which would nor
wale to a loop spaced coursewise in an adjacent needle
mally produce a looser fabric. This enhanced shaping
wale and thus the yarns of these stitches will remain
is apparently due to the ?oated stitches of the present in
looped over a pulled yarn in the sinker wale and can
not themselves be pulled out to allow the run to progress
vention, which ?oat laterally across the tucked stitches
downwardly. Runs progressing upwardly in needle wales
and thus when shrunk during boarding and ?nishing con
tract directly across the stitches and thereby reduce the ' are stopped by the large tucked stitches 21, which have
su?icient yarn to extend across several courses and thus
lateral extent of the stitches and limit lateral extension
require substantial lateral spreading of the fabric to pull
of the loops that normally occur with fabrics that do
out of the preceding loop, but due to the ?oated stitches
not have ?oated stitches. The limited lateral extension
su?icient lateral spreading is prevented. The deep draw
is further restricted in the present invention by tensioning
ing of these tucked stitches 21 enhances the run resist
of the yarn supply for the ?oated stitch yarn during knit
ance as this pulls more yarn into the loops without sub
ting, which further limits the amount of yarn in the ?oated
stantially increasing the yarn in the ?oated stitches,
stitches.
The stitch construction of the present invention is illus
thereby requiring even greater lateral spreading, which
is resisted by the ?oated stitches.
trated in FIG. 2 and FIG. 2a. FIG. 2 is a magni?ca
This particular stitch pattern may be varied by in
tion of a small area of the stocking of FIG. 1 at the 55
creasing the number of courses similar to the second
juncture of the welt portion 11 and the leg portion 12
course 28, thus providing tucked stitches 21 of increased
in a location such as indicated by the rectangle in FIG. 1.
length, which would further resist the progression of
FIG. 2a is a theoretical stitch diagram of the same area
runs due to the additional amount of yarn that would
showing the same actual interlooping arrangement as FIG.
2, but modi?ed in symmetrical loop con?gurations for 60 have to be pulled out to allow a run to advance.
The above described special stitch construction can be
reasons of clarity and understanding. As seen in FIGS.
2 and 2a the welt portion 11 is formed with a relatively
heavy yarn knit in a plain stitch. Following the last
knit on conventional circular knitting machines with
a needle manipulation in which the needles form the
transition course 19 in a plain stitch pattern with each
course 18 of the welt portion 11 is a transition course
65
needle drawing both yarns and casting off the loop of
19 knit with the two ends of ?ne yarn used in the leg
the last course 18 of the welt 11.
portion 12 and in a plain stitch. Near the end of the
In the ?rst course 24 of the ?rst group 25 of three
knitting of this transition course 19 and during the knit
ting of the subsequent courses of the leg portion 12 the
courses each needle again draws both ends 26 and 27 and
stitches are knit with a substantially deeper draw than 70 casts off the loop of the transition course 19. In the
the stitches of the welt portion 11.
second course 28 alternate needles draw both ends 32
Following the transition course 19 the succeeding
and 33 and cast off the loops of the ?rst course 24 while
courses of the leg portion are knit in the special stitch
the other needles draw only one end 33 without casting
construction of the present invention. This stitch con
off the loops of the ?rst course, the needles allowing the
struction is formed in a repeating pattern 20 that re 75 other end 32 to ?oat. In the third course 29 alternate
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6
The pin 76 is also used to secure a plate 78 to the
cam assembly 62, which plate 78 has a forked ?ange 80 ex
needles again draw both ends 34 and 35 while casting off
the loops of the second course 28, while the other needles
draw only one end 35 without casting o? the ends 26
tending outwardly at the bottom of the cam assembly for
and 27 of the ?rst course 24 and the one end 33 of the
engagement with a stop screw 82 secured in the cam
second course 28, and while allowing the other end 34
bracket 54 and adjustable to engage the forked ?ange 80
to ?oat.
to limit upward movement of the cam assembly 62.
In the fourth course 39 all of the needles draw
The degree of rocking movement of the rocker shaft
both ends of yarn and cast elf all the loops of the preced
ing courses, thereby completing the tucked stitches 21.
The needles are then manipulated for the succeeding
64 is adjustably controlled {by a double armed stop mem
'ber 84 ?xed thereon. This member 84 has a downstroke
three courses in the same manner but in an alternate nee
limiting arm 86 carrying an adjustable screw 88 for con
tact with the annular bed plate 52 to stop movement of
dle sequence to form the tucked stitches 21 in the needle
wales between the alternate needle wales in which the
tucked stitches were formed in the preceeding three
courses.
the shaft 64 in a direction to lower the cam assembly 62.
‘Similarly an upward limiting arm 96 carrying an adjust
able screw 92 limits rocking motion of the shaft 64 in a
direction to limit the upward movement of the cam assem
bly 62. The upward limiting arm 96 also carries a con
This alternating sequence every six courses is
continued throughout the leg portion 12 and in the foot
portion 14.
trol shaft 94 extending parallel to the rocker shaft 64
In the above described stitch’ formation the floated
‘and spaced therefrom.
ends 32 and 34 in the second and third courses, 28 and
29, respectively, as well as one end, either 26 or 27, of
This control shaft 94- carries a
collar 96 for engagement by a shaft operating lever 98
the ?rst course 24, and the corresponding ends in sub 20 mounted for free rotation on the rocker shaft 64. One’
end 100 of the shaft operating lever 98 engages the collar
sequent courses are' knit from the same yarn supply,
§6 and the other end 162 extends outwardly from the
which is ‘tensioned, in any conventional manner, more
rocker shaft 64 and has secured thereon one end of a
than the otheryarn'supply. The difference in tensioning
can be obtained by using adjustable tensioning devices of
the type usually furnished with conventional knitting ma
chines. For example, conventional Scott and Williams
machines may be furnished with butter?y tensioning
mechanisms, each having three eyelets through which a
control wire 104 extending downwardly through a guide
coil 166.
The control wire 104 is connected to a pivoted 'bar
1% pivotally mounted by a pivot pin 110 to a ?xed bar
112 that is secured to the circular knitting machine. The
pivoted bar 108 carries an operating ?nger 116 that ex
tends across the ?xed bar 112 on the opposite end of the
pivoted ‘bar 1% from the control Wire 1194 and a coil
spring 114 connected to both the pivoted bar 168 and the
?xed bar 112 normally urges the pivoted bar in a posi
tion wherein the control wire 164 is at an upper position
and the operating ?nger 116 is in a lower position.
A thrust bar 118 extends vertically from a pattern drum
122 and is manipulated ‘by a cam 12ft carried on the pat
tern drum 122. This thrust bar 118 engages the operat
yarn is run and two tensioning rolls that are positioned
between adjacent eyelets and spring urged out of align
ment with the eyelets to impart a tensioning drag on the
yarn as it runs through the eyelets and over the rolls,
with the displacement of the rolls being adjustable so
that a greater tensioning drag can be imparted to the
yarn passing through one mechanism than to the yarn
passing through another mechanism. Various other types
of well-known tensioning devices can also be used to ac
complish this purpose. This tensioning facilitates the lay
ing ?nger 116 of the pivoted bar 108 to pivot the bar
ing of the yarn in a manner not to be picked up by the
needles in forming the ?oats. In addition the tension re
duces the amount of yarn in the ?oated stitches and there
by restricts lateral extension of the fabric so that the yarn
of the tucked stitches will not be pulled out when a run
in response to the pattern drum control. When the thrust
bar 118 rises the pivoted bar 108 pivots to lower the con
trol wire 1044, thereby pulling the end 102 of the shaft
operating lever 98 downwardly and raising the other end
160 to rock the rocker shaft 64 in a cam lowering direc—
develops, thus stopping the run.
tion. When the thrust bar 118 moves downwardly the
During the above described needle manipulation to knit 45 cam adjusting mechanism 50 operates in the opposite fash
the leg portion 12 and foot portion 14 the needle con
ion to raise the cam assembly 62, with the coil spring 114
trol means are shifted to produce deeper drawing of the
maintaining the pivoted bar 168 in following contact with
needles than in the welt portion 11. In the preferred em‘
the thrust bar 118.
bodiment of the present invention this deeper drawing
The cam assembly 62 comprises a mounting block 124
is accomplished by incorporating the mechanism of FIGS. 50 slidably mounted in the slot 60 of the upstanding ?ange
3, 4 and 5 in a conventional circular knitting machine to
S6 of the cam bracket 54. A conventional stitch cam 128
adjust the stitch cam position for lowering of the nee
and landing cam 126 are secured to the mounting block
dles farther during drawing of loops.
This cam adjusting mechanism 50 is mounted on the
annular bed plate 52 of a conventional knitting machine r
and comprises a conventional cam bracket 54 modi?ed
as described presently. This cam bracket 54 has an up
standing ?ange 56 arranged ?ush with the inner periphery
58 of the annular bed plate 52. This ?ange 56 has a
vertical slot 61) in which a cam assembly 62 is mounted
for adjustable vertical positioning.
Adjustment of the cam assembly 62 is accomplished
by a rocker shaft 64 rockably mounted in an upstanding
bracket 66 secured to the annular bed plate 52 for gen
erally radial extension of the shaft 64 from adjacent the
cam assembly 62. The shaft 64 is axially positioned in
the upstanding bracket 66 by collars 68 and 74) secured to
the shaft 64 on both sides of the upstanding bracket 66.
124 in ?xed relation for movement therewith as operated
by the rocker shaft 64 and associated elements. The cam
assembly 62. is maintained in’a normally raised position
similar to the position of cams on a conventional knitting
machine by a coil spring 136 secured to the bed plate 52
and the bottom of the mounting ‘block 124.
In knitting a stocking such as that shown in FIG. 1
the needles advance in the direction of the arrow at the
bottom of FIG. 4 and are manipulated by the stitch cam
123 to draw stitches. The cam adjusting mechanism 50
is normally inoperative during the knitting of the welt
portion 11, that is, the thrust bar 118 is in a lower posi
tion and the cam assembly 62. is in a normally raised
position equivalent to the position of conventional ?xed
cams. When the knitting cycle changes to knit the spe
cial stitch of the leg portion 12 the pattern drum cam
The rocker shaft 64 carries a cam operating arm '72 70 12%) raises the thrust bar 118 to lower the cam assembly
62, which results in the needles being drawn deeper in
?xed thereon adjacent the cam assembly 62. This cam
the leg portion 12. The cam assembly 62 is raised during
operating arm 72 is slotted at 74 to straddle a pin '76
knitting of the heel pocket 13 to position the stitch cam
extending from the cam assembly 62 so as to transmit
128 in a conventional position. The cam adjusting mech
rocking movement of the shaft 6? into vertical movement
of the cam assembly 62.
75 anism 50 again lowers the cam assembly 62 for knitting
8
the foot portion 14, following which the cam assembly is
raised for knitting the toe pocket 15.
By incorporating a cam adjusting mechanism, such as
that herein disclosed, it is possible to control the depth
of draw independently of the conventional stitch gradua
tor mechanism of conventional knitting machines. Thus
a stocking knit according to the present invention may
not only be knit with a deeper draw in the leg portion ‘but
may also be shaped in a conventional manner.
This
ends of yarn of less total denier than the yarn in said
welt portion and drawn at a substantially deeper relative
draw than said welt portion stitches in a repeating pattern
of two needle wales and two groups of at least three
courses with a tucked stitch in one of said two groups
of courses in one of said two wales and another tucked
stitch in the other group of courses in the other Wale,
each said tucked stitch comprising both ends of a ?rst
course, one end of at least one intermediate course and
shaping is shown in the stocking 10 of PEG. 1, particular 10 one end or" a last course all knit together in the ?rst course
ly at the ankle portion 17.
of the subsequent group of courses with the second end
In one particular embodiment, the above described cam
adjusting mechanism 59 is proportioned to raise and lower
the cam assembly 62 a distance of approximately .055”
on a conventional circular knitting machine wherein a
in the intermediate and last courses ?oating across said
tucked stitch.
4. Run-resistant, sheer, seamless hosiery according to
stitch graduator is capable of raising and lowering the
claim 3 and characterized further in that said second ends
are more greatly tensioned than said one ends.
cylinder .055". With this construction the stitch gradu
ator operates conventionally with the deeper drawing of
the present invention being accomplished by the cam ad
claim 3 and characterized further in that said relative
draw of said leg portion stitches is at least twice that of
5. Run~resistant, sheer, seamless hosiery according to
justing mechanism 50.
20 said welt portion stitches.
In knitting the particular stocking illustrated in FIG. 1
6. Run-resistant, sheer, seamless hosiery comprising a
the welt 11 is knit with one end of 40 denier multi?la
welt portion having courses of plain knit stitches, and a
ment nylon yarn and the leg portion 12 is knit with two
ends of mono?lament nylon yarn. The end that ?oats in
leg portion having courses of run-resistant stitches of at
the special stitch pattern is a 10 denier yarn and the
other yarn is a 7 denier yarn. With this yarn relation
ship in the welt and leg portions and using the cam ‘ad
justing mechanism 50 of the present invention the stitch
cam assembly 62 is manipulated when the knitting cycle
changes from knitting the welt portion to knitting the
leg portion to increase the depth of draw to approxi
mately twice the depth of the preceding draw in the welt
portion, in direct contrast with conventional knitting
wherein the stitch graduator operates to decrease the
draw in the leg portion to about 2/3 the depth of the
draw in the welt portion. It should be understood that
these drawing relationships are rough estimates as it is
dif?cult to determine precisely the actual depths of draw,
although the amount of change can be determined by the
least two ends of yarn of a total denier less than half
the total denier of the yarn in said courses of plain knit
stitches and drawn at a relative draw at least twice that
of said courses of plain knit stitches in a repeating pat
tern of two needle wales and two groups of at least three
courses with a. tucked stitch in one of said two groups of
courses in one of said two wales and another tucked stitch
in the other group of courses in the other wale, each
said tucked stitch comprising both ends of a ?rst course,
one end of at least one intermediate course and one end
of a last course all knit together in the ?rst course of the
subsequent group of courses with the second end in the
intermediate and last courses ?oating across said tucked
stitch.
7. Run-resistant, sheer, seamless hosiery according to
claim 6 and characterized further in that said second
amount of stitch cam manipulation.
4.0 ends are more greatly tensioned than said one ends.
The speci?c yarns mentioned above are set out for the
8. A method of knitting run-resistant, sheer, seamless
purpose of example only as various sizes and relative
sizes of yarns may be used satisfactorily with the present
invention. However, in order to obtain a sheer stocking
it is desirable to use a low total denier in the courses of
the leg portions while using heavier denier yarn in the
welt portion to obtain strength in that portion. Thus
normally the leg portion yarns are of a total denier of
about 1/2 or less the denier of the welt portion yarn. If
the total denier in the leg portion is closer to the denier
in the welt portion the cam adjusting mechanism 59 may
be adjusted to draw even deeper than double the draw
in the leg than in the welt to obtain results comparable
to those obtained with the above set out yarn deniers.
The present invention has been described in detail
above for purposes of illustration only and is not intended
to be limited by this description or otherwise except as
de?ned in the appended claims.
I claim:
hosiery comprising knitting courses of plain stitches to
form a welt portion, knitting a leg portion with courses
of run-resistant stitches of two ends of yarn of less total
denier than the yarn in the welt portion courses and knit
with a substantially deeper draw than the knitting of the
welt portion courses and in a run-resistant pattern having
tucked stitches extending across more than one course
with one of said two ends in at least one course of said
tucked stitches ?oating across said tucked stitches in a
manner to provide a run-resistant fabric.
9. A method of knitting run-resistant, sheer, seamless
hosiery comprising knitting courses of plain stitches to
form a welt portion, knitting a leg portion with courses
of run-resistant stitches of two ends of yarn knit with
a substantially deeper draw than the knitting of the welt
portion courses and with one end under greater ten
sion than the other, said run-resistant courses being knit
in a pattern having tucked stitches extending across more
1. Run-resistant, sheer, seamless hosiery comprising a 60 than one course with said one end in at least one course
of said tucked stitches ?oating across said tucked stitches
welt portion formed of courses of knit stitches, and a leg
portion having courses of run-resistant stitches of two
ends of yarn including tucked stitches with one of said
ends ?oated across said tucked stitches, said two ends of
yarn being or" less total denier than the yarn in said welt
portion and drawn at a substantially deeper relative draw
than the welt portion stitches.
2. Run-resistant, sheer, seamless hosiery according to
in a manner to provide a run~resistant fabric.
10. A method of knitting run-resistant, sheer, seamless
hosiery comprising knitting courses of plain stitches to
form a welt portion, knitting a leg portion with courses
of run-resistant stitches of two ends of yarn of a total
denier of less than half the denier of the yarn in the welt
portion courses and knit with a draw of at least twice the
depth of the draw in knitting the welt portion courses
claim 1 and characterized further in that said run-resist
ant stitches include stitches in which the one of said two 70 and with one end under greater tension than the other,
said run-resistant courses being knit in a pattern having
ends of yarn which is ?oated is more greatly tensioned
tucked stitches extending across more than one course
than the other of said two ends.
welt portion formed of courses oi knitted stitches, and a
with said one end in at least one course of said tucked
stitches ?oating across said tucked stitches in a manner to
leg portion having courses of run-‘resistant stitches of two
provide a run-resistant fabric.
3. Run-resistant, sheer, seamless hosiery comprising a
8,071,950
10
11. A method of knitting run-resistant, sheer, seamless
hosiery comprising knitting courses of plain stitches to
in said one needle wale with said one end, ?oated and
form a welt portion, knitting a leg portion with courses
of run~resistant stitches of two ends of yarn of less total
denier than the yarn in the welt portion courses and knit
with a substantially deeper draw than the knitting of
other needle Wale, both ends in the subsequent course
the welt portion courses and in a repeating pattern of
two needle wales and two groups of at least three courses,
with both ends in one course of one group knit in a plain
stitch in one needle wale and a draw loop for forming
said other end tucked across at least one course in said
knit plain in said one needle wale with said one end
?oated and said other end tucked in said other needle
wale, the other group of at least three courses being knit
in the same sequence as the ?rst group but in opposite
needle wales.
15. A method of knitting run-resistant, sheer, seam
10 less hosiery comprising knitting courses of plain stitches
a tuck stitch extending across at least two courses in
the other needle wale, both ends in the next at least
one course knit in a plain stitch in said one needle wale
with one end tucked across at least one course and the
to form a welt portion, knitting a leg portion with courses
of run-resistant stitches of two ends of yarn of a total
denier of less than half the denier of the yarn in the
welt portion courses and knit with a draw of at least
other end ?oated in said other needle wale, both ends 15 twice the depth of the draw in knitting the welt portion
‘courses and with one end under greater tension than
in the subsequent course knit plain in said one needle
the other, said run-resistant courses being knit in a re
Wale with one end tucked and .the other ?oated in said
peating pattern of two needle wales and two groups of
other needle wale, the other group of at least three
courses being knit in the same sequence as the ?rst group
but in opposite needle wales.
12. A method of knitting run-resistant, sheer, seamless
hosiery comprising knitting courses of plain stitches to
at least three courses, with both ends in one course of
one group knit in a plain stitch in one needle wale and a
draw loop for forming a tuck stitch extending across at
least two courses in the other needle wale, both ends
in the next at least one course knit in a plain stitch in
form a welt portion, knitting a leg portion with courses
said one needle wale with said one end ?oated and said
of run-resistant stitches of two ends of yarn of less total
denier than the yard in the welt portion courses and 25 other end tucked across at least one course in said other
needle wale, both ends in the subsequent course knit
knit with a substantially deeper draw than the knitting of
plain in said one needle wale with said one end ?oated
the welt portion courses and in a repeating pattern of six
and said other end tucked in said other needle wale,
courses and two needle wales, with both ends in one
the other group of at least three courses being knit in
course knit in a plain stitch in one needle wale and a draw
‘loop for forming a tuck stitch extending across two 30 the same sequence as the ?rst group but in opposite
needle Wales.
courses in the other needle wale, both ends in the next
16. A method of knitting run-resistant, sheer, seamless
course knit in a plain stitch in said one needle wale with
one end tucked across one course and the other end
hosiery by manipulating needles to draw loops and
?oated in said other needle wale, both ends in the third
manipulating a stitch cam to vary the depth of draw, said
course knit plain in said one needle wale with one end 35 method comprising manipulating said needles to knit
courses of plain stitches in a welt portion with the stitch
tucked and the other ?oated in said other needle wale,
cam in a raised position to limit the depth of draw, lower
the next three courses being knit in the same sequence
ing the stitch cam to substantially increase the depth of
as the ?rst three but in opposite needle wales.
draw by the needles for knitting a leg portion while
13. A method of knitting run—resistant, sheer, seamless
hosiery comprising knitting courses of plain stitches to 40 manipulating the needles and feeding two ends of yarn
in a manner to knit courses of run-resistant stitches in
form a welt portion, knitting a leg portion with courses
a repeating pattern of two needle wales and two groups
of run-resistant stitches of two ends of yarn of less total
of at least three courses, with both ends in one course
denier than the yarn in the welt portion courses and knit
of one group knit in a plain stitch in one needle wale and
with a draw of at least twice the depth of the draw in
knitting of the welt portion courses and in a repeating 45 a draw loop for forming a tuck stitch extending across
at least two courses in the other needle wale, both ends
pattern of two needle wales and two groups of at least
in the next at least one course knit in a plain stitch in
said one needle wale with one end tucked across at least
knit in a plain stitch in one needle wale and a draw loop
one course and the other end ?oated in said other needle
for forming a tuck stitch extending across at least two
courses in the other needle wale, both ends in the next 50 wale, both ends in the subsequent course knit plain in
said one needle wale with one end tucked and the other
at least one course knit in a plain stitch in said one needle
three courses, with both ends in one course of one group
the other end ?oated in said other needle wale, both
ends in the subsequent course knit plain in said one
?oated in said other needle wale, the other group of at
least three courses being knit in the same sequence
as the ?rst group but in opposite needle wales.
said other needle wale, the other group of at least three
hosiery by manipulating needles to draw loops and
courses being knit in the same sequence as the ?rst group
manipulating a stitch cam to vary the depth of draw, said
wale with one end tucked across at least one course and
needle wale with one end tucked and the other ?oated in 55
17. A method of knitting run-resistant, sheer, seamless
method comprising manipulating said needles to knit
but in opposite needle wales.
courses of plain stitches in a welt portion with the stitch
14. A method of knitting run-resistant, sheer, seamless
hosiery comprising knitting courses of plain stitches to 60 earn in a raised position to limit the depth of draw, lower
ing the stitch cam to substantially increase the depth of
form a welt portion, knitting a leg portion with courses
draw by the needles for knitting a leg portion while
of run'resistant stitches of two ends of yarn knit with
manipulating the needles and feeding two ends of yarn
a substantially deeper draw than the knitting of the welt
portion courses and with one end under greater tension
than the other, said run-resistant courses being knit in 65
a repeating pattern of two needle wales and two groups
of at least three courses, with both ends in one course
of one group knit in a plain stitch in one needle wale
and a draw loop for forming a tuck stitch extending 70
across at least two courses in'the other needle wale, both
ends in the next at least one course knit in a plain stitch
in a manner to knit courses of run-resistant stitches.
References Cited in the ?le of this patent
UNITED STATES PATENTS
2,1'00,86r1
2,163,557
2,887,860
3,027,737
Lochhead ____________ __ Nov. 30,
Holmes _______________ __ June 20,
Bellman _____________ __ May 26,
Matthews et a1 _________ __ Apr. 3,
1937
1939
1959
1962
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