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Патент USA US3075524

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Jim. 29, 1963
3,075,514
R. PAUGH
CALORIC ENERGY DEVELOPING DEVICE
2 Sheets-Sheet 1
Filed March 22, 1961
W99
29
INVENTOR.
Robert Paayh
BY
HAS
A ttorngz/
Jan. 29, 1963
R. PAUGH
3,075,514
CALORIC ENERGY DEVELOPING DEVICE
Filed March 22, 1961
2 Sheets-Sheet 2
.1. ll
E INVENTOR.
Robert Pauyh
551a
‘
H15
A it arnqy
o :i
2
1
by agitating the air molecules in successive steps and re
moving heat from the agitating mechanism to accomplish
3,075,514,
air heating and circulation in a structure to be heated.
A still further object of the invention is to provide an
air pumping device of the type referred .to above with a
cross passage for free communication between the lower
CALGRIC ENERGY DEVELOPHNG DEVICE
Robert Paugh, ltliiltl Newton Ava, (lieveiand 6, Ohio
Fiied Mar. 22, 1961, Ser. No. arms
11 Ciaims. (Ci. 125-247)
This invention relates in general to pumps, and more
particularly to air pumps, developing cheap, safe and use
ful caloric energy for house, factory, and industrial heat
ing systems.
.
ends of the cylinder chambers, and reciprocatory piston
rods, with recessed ?ats on their lower ends, to create
temporary openings in the piston rod guide plugs for
10 the discharge of part of the 'air below the pistons during
,
This application is a continuation-in-part of my co
pending application, Serial No. 772,771, ?led November
10, 1958.
The primary object of this invention is to provide an
'
air pumping device constructed to draw air thereinto
and e?ect its heating by the squeezing and the agitation
of the air molecules in successive stages.
Patented Jan. 2%, 1953
'
Another object of this invention is to provide an air ‘
pumping device of the type referred to above, capable
of Withdrawing caloric energy from heated air and using 20
this caloric energy for pre-heating air drawn into the
air pumping device.
A further object of this invention is to provide an air
pumping device of the type referred to above, which
includes two reciprocatory individual cylinder pumps
coupled with each other to continuously squeeze and
agitate air molecules drawn into the air pumping device
and further including heat transfer means for removing
heat from parts of said cylinders by transferring heat
to air drawn into the air pumping device.
Still another object of the invention is to provide an
air pumping device of the type referred to above, which
the upper part of each piston downstroke, and for the
intake of air into the cylinders below the pistons during
the upper part of each piston upstroke‘, the ?ats being
provided to utilize the irregular reciprocating movements
of the pistons, by which (when the piston rods are
sealed) to squeeze, agitate and alternatingly pressurize
and partially vacuu-mize the air in the cylinders below
the pistons.
'
Other objects and advantages more or less ancillary to
‘the foregoing, and the manner in which all the various
objects are realized, will appear in the following descrip
tion, which, considered in connection with the accom
panying drawings, sets forth the preferred embodiment of
the invention.
In the drawings:
FIG. 1 is a vertical sectional view through a caloric
energy developing device constructed in accordance with
the invention;
FIG. 2 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view taken
along line 2-2 of FIG. 1;
FIG. 3 is a cross-sectional view taken along line 3-6
of FIG. 1;
a
FIG. 4 is an enlarged fragmentary side view of the
includes reciprocatory individual pumps provided with
cylinders and reciprocatory unitary chambered pistons
lower end of the piston rod;
and piston rods adapted to form air squeeze passages
FIG. 6 is a view showing the yielding coupling yield
ingly connecting the crankshafts with each other, the cou
pling being shown in neutral position, and the section
communicating with the cylinders and permitting continu
ous squeezing and agitation of air molecules drawn into
the cylinders.
A still further object of the invention is to provide an
air pumping device wherein stationary tubular elements
are freely extended into the air squeeze passages, the
tubular elements being smaller in cross-section than the
FIG. 5 is a sectionalview taken on line 5-5 of FIG. 1;
being shown on line 6—-6 of FIG. 1;
FIG. 7 is a view similar to FIG. 6 showing the cou
pling members in yieldingly shifted position with respect
to each other;
FIG. 8 is a perspective view of one of the coupling
cross-section of the air squeeze passages and cooperating
members of the yielding coupling shown in FIGS. 6
therewith in plunger-like fashion to effect further squeez
and 7;
ing and agitating of air molecules forced through the
FIG. 9 is a perspective view of the other one of the
tubular elements.
coupling members of said yielding coupling;
Another important object of the invention is to pro
FIG. 10 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view of
vide an air pumping device of the type referred to above,
the
crankcase air vent;
which includes metering rods extending axially from 50' FIG.
11 ‘ is a fragmentary top view showing the
the piston rods into and through the stationary tubular
metering rod guide roller assembly; and
elements above referred to, and effecting metering of
FIG. 12 is a fragmentary detail view showing the ribs
‘volume, velocity, and pressure of the air molecules
between the radiating ?ns on the cylinder block and
forced through the stationary tubular elements.
‘ taken along line 12-42 of FIG. v1.
A still further object of the invention is to provide 55 Referring now to the exempli?ed form of the invention
an air pumping device with two reciprocatory cylin
shown in the vdrawings, and ?rst to FIG. 1, the reference
der pumps individually actuated by a driving mecha
numeral 3 denotes an oval-shaped cylinder block having
nism having individual ratchet pulleys controlling indi
. a pair-of cylinder chambers 5 formed therein and having
vidual belts engaged wtih individual ?ywheels on crank
a crankcase portion '7 for housing crankshafts 8 and 9
shafts which actuate the reciprocatory cylinder pumps, 60 to be described later. The cylinder ‘block 3 is provided
said crankshafts being yieldingly coupled with each other
with radiating ?ns, which include upper fins 91, radially
to permit limited movement with respect to each other.
extending ?ns it), overhanging ‘?ns 10a, and the enlarged
7 Another important object of the invention is to provide
overhanging bottom ?ns 10a which together cooperate
air pumping and handling apparatus for .adding heat to
with a jacket 11 to form air passages 12, 12a and 12b.
the air which is capable of generating frictional heat
‘8,075,514
4
The four air inlets 12 are provided at the lower end of
9 with an additional slot 55 being provided for a coupling
the cylinder block 3 which connect with passages 120,
56 which yieldingly couples the crankshafts 8 and 9
through cross chambers 12b at the top of the cylinder
with each other.
block 3, to air outlets 12c from which the air is conduct
The coupling 56 embodies two coupling members 59
ed to the building space to be heated. The overhanging
and 60, coupling member 59 being illustrated in FIG. 8,
?ns 10a are spaced from the short center ribs 10b, and
and coupling member 60 being illustrated in FIG. 9.
the radially extending ?ns 10 are spaced at the opposite
Member 59’ includes two radially disposed, symmetrically
end, from jacket 11, to provide a lengthwise staggered
arranged U-shaped portions 61 and 62 with curved webs
effect to the radiating ?ns, as shown in FIG. 1. A plu~
rality of ribs 10b in vertical alignment and integral with 10 63 and 64 connected by cross bar 65. Member 66 in
cludes two symmetrically arranged curved rods 66 and 67
and located between ?ns 10 and 10a, as shown in FIG.
supported by a cross bar 68. ‘Coupling member 59 is
12, divides the space between the ?ns 10 and 10a into
rigidly a?ixed to crankshaft 8, and coupling member
quadrants, as shown in FIG. 3, which results in four
60
is rigidly af?xed to crankshaft 9 at the inner ends
distinct inlets 12 and four distinct passages 1211, while
the two V-shaped ribs, which are a continuation of the 15 thereof. The curved rods 66 and 67 extend through
bores 69 and 70 formed in ?anges 71 and 72 of U-shaped
short center ribs ‘10b, and located between ‘the upper
portions 61 and 62 of the plate-like coupling member
?ns 9'1 and the uppermost radially extending ?ns 10,
59. The members 59‘ and 66 are yieldingly coupled
form the two V-shaped cross chambers ‘121:, as shown in
against relative rotation with each other by compression
‘FIGS. 1,2, 3, and 12. 'By'this means, the air travels
in distinct continuous paths through passages '12, 12a, 20 springs 75 which are sleeved on rods 66 and 67, thus abut
ting cross bar 68 and ?anges'71 and 72, the expanding
12b, and 12c in a serpentine-like movement, lengthwise
springs 75 force'the pistons into their correct position
of the radiating ?ns, as indicated by the arrows in FIGS.
for the beginning of each piston stroke.
1 and 2.
Flywheels '77 are'a'?ixed to the ends of the crankshafts
The cylinder chambers 5 are reduced in cross-section at
their upper ends to form valve chambers 15 for ?utter-like 25 8 and 9 ‘which ‘project outside the crankcase portion 7
and are driven by a motor 81. The ?ywheels 77 are
valves 17 and the thin, ?exible, reenforcing metal disk
vcounterbalanced to o?set the‘unbalance of the ‘reciprocat
ing and rotating parts and incorporate fan blades 78
radially disposed between the hub and rim of the ?y~
wheels 77. The‘motor 81 has a double-ended shaft 82
=18 which is interposed between the top wall 19 and the
rubber-like ?utter valve 17 in each of the valve chambers
15, as shown in FIG. 2. The valve chambers 15 have
their top walls 19 perforated by a pluraltiy of bores 21, 30
carrying a ratchet pulley 85 on each .end of the shaft 32
5. A cross passage 22 provides free communication be
in-alignment with ?ywheels 77. Pulleys 85 couple the
which provide intake openings for the cylinder chambers
motor v81 to the ?ywheels 77 by engagement with the
V-belts 79 for driving the heat pump. Each of the
ratchet
pulleys 85 include a hub 87 directly mounted on
tion 7 by piston rod guide plugs 23, as shown in FIG. 1. 35
shaft 82 and a ring-shaped sleeve 88, ‘which has a plu
An axially passaged piston 26 and an axially. cham
rality of pockets, rotatably supported on the hub 87 and
bered piston rod 27 integral therewith are slidably car
coupled
therewith by spring-loaded ratchet mechanism
ried by each of the cylinder chambers 5. Pistons 26 are
89, as best ‘illustrated in FIG. 5.
provided with rubber-like packing rings 26a facing in op
The jacket 11 extends above the cylinder block 3 and
posite directions, as shown in FIG. 2, for preventing 40
terminates in a dome-like shape to which the warm air
the ?ow of air past piston 26. All packings face the air
conduits are attached. The upper ?ns 91 above and
they seal, and the pressure of the air they seal makes them
spaced from bores 21 are centrally perforated to provide
air tight.
the two air outlets 120. Each of the upper'?ns 9‘1 carry
The elongated chamber 28 is closed at one end and
axially aligned with and blended into the through pas 45 a guide assembly 92 for each of a pair of metering rods
93 which are secured to piston rods 27 and reciprocate
sa-ge 29 in piston 26, as shown in FIG. 2. Piston rods 27
therewith. Each of the guide assemblies 92 is provided
reciprocate through a passage 30 and rubber-like packing
tween the lower ends of the cylinder chambers 5. The
cylinder chambers 5 are separated from crankcase por
rings 30a (which face in opposite directions) in the
piston rod guide plugs 23 into the crankcase portion 7,
with three rollers 94 symmetrically arranged and jour
in the piston rod guide plugs 23 and in plate 52 which
The lower portion of jacket 11 below the cylinder block
nalled for ‘rotation with their rims in engagement with
as shown in FIG. 1. The ends of the piston rods 27 50 the metering rods 93. The guide assemblies 92 provide
a frictionless and positive control of the metering rods 93
opposite to the pistons 26 are connected to crossheads
during their reciprocation cycle, as shown in FIGS. 2
36, which are slidably carreid for reciprocation in a
and 11.
straight path on pairs of slide rods 38 rigidly mounted
is a?ixed to crankcase portion 7. One .end of each of the 55 3 embodies ?anged openings 95 positioned opposite to
~ ywheels 77. The ?anges are used for the attachment
connecting rods 31 is pivotally joined to crank arms 32
of the air return conduits (not shown). Openings 95
of the crankshafts 8 and 9, and the other ends of the
provide air inlets through which air is drawn into the
connecting rods 31 are pivotally joined to crossheads 36.
jacket 11 by the suction of blades 78 on ?ywheels 77.
A bolt 42 is positioned at the axis of pivotal move
ment of the connecting rod 31 on the crosshead 36. The 60 The air thus ‘drawn into the jacket 11 is forced through
the air paths from the four inlets 12 through the four
bolt 42 passes through an axially elongated hole 43 in the
passages 12:: to the two cross chambers 12b and through
reduced extension 44 of the piston rod 27 which couples
the two outlets 12c, as indicated by the arrows in FIGS.
the piston rods 27 with the crossheads 36 and permits a
1 and 2.
lost motion of the pistons 26 relative to the crossheads
The two piston-and-piston-rod units 26 and 27 cooper
36 for a purpose to be described later. The reduced 65
ate with two elongated tubular squeeze and agitating ele
extension 44 extends into a bore 37 provided in cross
ments 99 centrally located in the cylinder chambers 5 and
heads 36, as shown in FIGS. ‘1, 2, and 4.
ai?xed to the top wall 19' from which it is suspended.
The crankshafts 8 and 9 extend through the wall of
The squeeze element 99‘ extends through the piston 26
crankcase portion 7 and are packed in said wall at 46 and
47. Bearings 48 are secured to cross plate 52 and carry 70 and into chamber 28 of the piston rod 27. Squeeze ele
ments 99 cooperate in plunger-like fashion with the
the crankshafts 8 and 9 for rotation. An oil pan 7a
chambers 28 of piston rods 27 when piston structures 26
is suspended from the lower end of crankcase portion 7
and 27 are on their upward stroke eifecting additional agi
and encloses the crank mechanism in cooperation with
the portion 7. The cross plate 52 is ‘provided with slots
tation and squeezing of the previously squeezed air mole
53 and 54 for the crank arms of the crankshafts 8 and 75 cules which have been forced downwardly into the cham
ber 28 by vthe upward movement of the piston 26. The
3,075,514
5
squeeze element 99 enters the chamber 28 in the manner
metering rods 93, affixed at one end to the piston rod 27
of a plunger and displaces the air contained therein
and located centrally in squeeze element 99, further regu
through the passage formed in the hollow squeeze ele
late the passage of air molecules through the squeeze ele
ment §9.
ment 9? by varying the length of the passage in relation
The metering rod 93, positioned centrally in the squeeze
to the position of the piston 26 in its path of travel.
element, forms a further restriction in cooperation there
The upper ends of the tubular squeeze elements 99
with which results in additional agitation and squeezing
communicate with cross chambers 12b and discharge
of the air molecules. The enlarged upper portion 164 of
extremely hot air for mixing with the air that has circu
the metering rod 93 provides an additional station of agi
lated through passages 12a. The squeeze elements 99 are
tation and squeezing which is varied when the portion
provided with an enlarged section 1st at their upper ends 10 194 enters the enlarged section 101 of the squeeze ele~
to provide passages of increased ?ow area which cooper
ment 99 as the piston 26 approaches the end of its pump
ate with metering rods 93‘ which have enlarged upper
ing stroke, and the air, at this point, ?ows freely from
portions 104 formed thereon. The squeeze elements and
the upper end of the squeeze element 99. The extremely
metering rods cooperate to generate heat by agitation at
hot air that is discharged from the upper end of the
successive positions of change in cross-sectional area of
the ?ow passage.
The ?utter valves 17 and the ?exible disks 18 are shift
ably supported on squeeze elements 99 and actuated by
15
tubular element 99, throughout the piston upstroke, en»
ters the cross chamber 12b where it is mixed with the
preheated air flowing therethrough. The hot air which
is discharged from the tubular element cannot expand in
air pressure, valves 17 and the disks 18 being limited in
the cross chamber 12b for the pressure of the air in the
20
their movement by snap rings 105- mounted on the tubu
cross chamber 12!) is greater than the pressure of the
air that is discharged thereinto. The air from each exit
lar squeeze elements 99.
'
The end of each ‘piston rod 27 opposite to piston 26
120 is alternatingly warm and very hot and it is dis
has recessed ?ats 106 formed thereon. Flats 1136, in co
charged continuously and simultaneously from the two
operation with the irregular reciprocating movements of
exits 12c into the upper dome-like portion of jacket 11
the pistons 26, form temporary openings in guide hole
where it combines to the correct temperature.
30, which permits the flow of air into and out of the cross
In operation, the air molecules gain heat at each suc
passage 22 and the cylinder chambers 5 below the pistons
cessive smaller agitating point, during each pumping
26, when the pistons 26 are in the upper end of their
stroke, and then transfer part of t eir heat to the pistons
strokes, as shown in FIG. 1. Vent ori?ce 107 is located
and piston rods, tubular elements and the metering rods.
30
in the wall of the crankcase portion 7 and allows the ?ow
During the passage of the air through the successively
of air into and out of the crankcase portion 7 when a
smaller air flow paths by which the pistons and piston
differential in pressure occurs. Filter material 168 is
rods, tubular elements and the metering rods gain heat
provided to prevent the ingress of foreign material to the
during each pumping stroke, these parts, in turn transfer
crankcase when the crankcase breathes, as shown in FIGS.
35 part of their heat to the air molecules that surround them
and these in turn heat their containing walls from which
1 and 10.
The cylinder block, with its radiatingr?ns, ribs, and
the heat is conducted to the outer surfaces of the heat
the long crankcase wall, is cast in one piece to prevent air
pump. By reciprocating into the crankcase, the piston
leakage from the various chambers and air passages, these
rods heat the air in the crankcase and this hot air heats
parts being preferably made of an aluminum alloy for
the crankcase wall. The outer walls of the heat pump
rapid heat conductivity. The metering rods, tubular ele
provide the necessary amount of heating surface area.
ments, and the pistons and'piston rods are made of metals
The ?ywheel fans continually supply air for circulation
that retain heatto a greater degree than does the above
and the heat from the outer Walls is transferred to this
aluminum alloy. The pistons and piston rods, with their
air which flows upward and through the continuous air
reduced extensions, are also made in one piece to elimi
passages between the radiating ?ns and into the warm air
45
conduits. When the heat pump reaches its maximum
nate air leakage.
In operation, air to be heated from the air return con—
temperature only the minimum amount of air molecules
duits (this air retains some heat) is drawn into jacket
can enter the cylinder chambers above the pistons (heat
11 through openings 95 by the rotation of fan-bladed ?y
expands air) and the temperature of the heat pump is
wheels 77 upon energization of the motor 81. Such air
maintained at this level while the air intake into the cyl
50
?ows freely through the four air inlets 12 in the cylinder
inder chambers above the pistons during the piston suc
lock 3 through the four passages 12a into the two cross
tion stroke ?uctuates slightly.
chambers 12b and up to the cylinder air intake vents 21
When the piston starts on its downstroke, part of the
where its path of travel is contracted by the Vsshaped
air below the pistons is forced out of the cylinders
cross chambers 12!) to ?ow directly over the cylinder air
through the space made when ?ats 1% are in guide open
intake vents 21 and then through the two small air outlets 55 ing 30 further heating the air in the crankcase. When
12c in the upper ?ns 91. The two» small air outlets
?ats 106 are out of guide opening 3d, the piston rods are
“slightly retard this flow of air which permits the ?ywheel
sealed, and the air molecules below the pistons and in
fans 7 8 to pressurize the air inside of jacket 11.
passage 22 are agitated and pressurized which exert pres
During each downward or suction stroke of pistons 26,
sure on the upstroke piston. When the upstroke piston
va part of the air passing through the cross passages 12b 60 gets past the center of the cylinder, a partial vacuum is
is forced into cylinder chambers 5. "Since pistons 26 are
formed below the pistons. This causes pressure to be
actuated by the crankshafts 8 and 9 having arms rota
exerted on the downstroke piston. When the upstroke
tionally displaced 180° with respect to each other, air is
piston nears the top of its stroke, air enters the cylinders
alternately drawn into one of the cylinder chambers 5
below the pistons through space made by ?ats res which
65
and then into the other cylinder chamber 5.
breaks the partial vacuum. The force exerted against the
When the piston 26 begins the pumping stroke, flutter
pistons is most effective when the heat pump has at
valve 17 is closed, air tight, by the air pressure, and the
tained its maximum temperature. These actions are made
air molecules above the piston are squeezed and agitated.
possible by providing ?ats 166 on the bottom end of each
Continued movement of piston 26 squeezes the air trapped
piston rod, which on reciprocation, make the pistons and
above the piston through the passage in the piston into 70 piston rods into ?oating valves, which in cooperation with
the chamber formed in the piston rod. The air mole
the irregular reciprocation of the pistons, automatically
cules are agitated at this point 'by being squeezed into
and accurately control the volume of air in the cross
the reduced cross-sectional area of the flow path bet-ween
passage 22. and the cylinder chambers below the pistons.
the chamber wall 28v and the outer wall of the'squeeze
The hub 87, of the ratchet pulleys 85, holds the ratchet
element 99. As the piston 26 moves upwardly, the 75
3,075,514
8
mechanism 89, the spring of which forces the ratchet
into one of the pockets of the ring-shaped sleeve 88 which
drives the ?ywheel fan belts. When the ?ywheels get
their brief added acceleration, the fan belts pull the
sleeve 88 freely over the ratchet to prevent binding of
the fan belts in the groove of the sleeves 88.
The irregular reciprocation of the pistons, alternatingly
compresses and expands each set of springs 75, which
are in. an oblique position in respect to each other, in the
yielding coupling 56, and ?exibly connect the crank
shafts 8 and 9.
When the piston 26 nears the upper end of its stroke,
2. A caloric energy developing device as described
in claim 1, wherein the cylinder of the piston-type air
pump includes at one end inlet passage means, and ?ut
ter valve means for said inlet passage means arranged
within said cylinder at said one end adapted to control
the passage of air through said inlet passage means into
the cylinder by the pressure within such cylinder.
3. A caloric energy developing device as described in
claim 1, wherein the metering rod includes portions hav
ing different cross sections to effect in dilferent positions
of the metering rod control of pressure‘ and velocity of
air forced through the stationary tubular member.
the enlarged portion lit-i of the metering rod 93 is com
4. A caloric energy'developing device as described in
pletely enclosed in the enlarged section 101 of'the tubu
lar element 99, which permits the free escape of the air 15 claim 1, wherein the stationary tubular member includes
a through passage of varying cross section, and wherein
from the cylinder chamber 5 above the piston, and simul
the metering rod includes portions having different cross
taneously the flats 106 of the ?oating valve are in the
sections to effect in different positions of the metering
guide hole 30 which permits the free ?ow of air through
rod control of pressure and velocity ‘of airforced through
the space made by the ?ats 106 to and from the cylin
der chambers below the pistons. At this point there is 20 the stationary tubular'tmernber.
5. A caloric energy developing structure embodying
no resistance to the movement of the pistons, which in
a pair of coupled caloric‘energydeveloping devices driven
cooperation with the ratchet pulleys 85, and the yielding
in timed relation with respect to. each other, each of
coupling 56 between the crankshafts 8 and 9, and the
said devices including a‘ piston-type air pump having a
lost motion connection or‘ the piston rods 27 to the cross
heads 35, allows for the self synchronization of the pistons. 25 cylinder, a piston movable" therein, a- piston rod means
for driving said piston, a plunger-type‘ air pump‘ aligned
The heat pump requires no outdoor air,‘ for the air
and mechanically coupled withv the piston-type‘ air pump
that is heated by the heat pump is continuously circu
and in open communication therewith, each plunger
lated through the home and back through the heat pump,
type air pump including a stationary tubular member
and as it does not destroy or contaminate the air, no
attached to said cylinder in coaxial relationship there~
chimney is required.
30 with forming the plunger, a‘ metering rod coaxially
A standard size heat pump can be made to heat more
aligned and directly coupled with the piston rod of said
air at no extra power cost, by expanding the air passages
piston-type air pump and adapted to be reciprocated
12, 12a, 12b and 120 and enlarging the ratchet pulley
therewith, the piston-type air pumps including ?utter
sleeves 88, which increases the revolutions per minute
of the ?ywheels and the strokes per minute of the pistons, 35 valves arranged within the cylinders of the air pumps,
and open passage means between the cylinders of the
which increases the volume of air heated per minute.
air pumps.
Larger size heat pumps can be operated for the same
6. A caloric energy developing structure as described
low power cost that is required to operate standard size
in claim 5, wherein said driving means includes individ
heat pumps. The agitating squeeze Space (in a straight
line) from the wall of the piston rods to the wall of the 40 ual crankshafts arranged in axial alignment with respect
to each other, and spring-actuated coupling means yield
tubular elements and from the Wall of the tubular ele
ingly connecting the crankshafts with each other and per
‘ments to the wall of 93v and 104 of the metering rods is
mitting limited acceleration and deceleration of the ca
the same for all models, while the squeeze space air ?ow
loric energy developing devices with respect to each other.
area is increased in the correct ratio as the area of the
7. A caloric energy developing structure as described
cylinder chambers and the air volume is increased. The
45 in claim 5, wherein roller guide means carried by said
Weight of the moving parts is the limiting factor.
devices engage the free end of said metering rod for
Having thus described this invention in such full, clear,
concise, and exact terms as to enable any person skilled
in the art to which it pertains to make and use the same,
and having set forth the best mode contemplated of
carrying out this invention, I state that the subject which
I regard as being my invention is particularly pointed out
and distinctly claimed in what is claimed, it being under~
stood that equivalents or modi?cations of, or substitutions
maintaining the axial alignment with said piston rod.
8.
A caloric energy developing structure as de?ned
in claim 5, wherein said cylinders have ?ns formed there
on adapted to transfer heat from the air pump apparatus
to air ?owing in contact with said ?ns.
9. A caloric energy developing structure as de?ned in
claim 5 wherein said piston rods have ?ats formed there
for, parts of the above speci?cally described embodiments
on at their lower ends which provide ?oatingvalves con
communicating through said passaged piston with the
crankshaft means, spring actuated coupling means yield
ingly connecting the crankshaft means, pulleys on said
of the invention may be made without departing from the 55 trolling the volume ofv air in the cylinders below the
pistons.
scope of the invention as set forth in what is claimed.
10. A. caloric energy developing structure as described
What is claimed is:
in claim 5 wherein ?ats are formed on the lower ends
1. In a caloric energy developing device, a piston
of the piston, rods for providing ?oating valves in the
type air pump having a cylinder and a piston structure
with an axially passaged piston and an axially chambered 60 cylinder, crankshaft means for. driving the piston rods,
a lost-motion connection between the piston rods and the
piston rod, said piston rod having its chamber openly
cylinder and closed at the opposite end thereof, a sta
tionary tubular member secured to said cylinder in axial
crankshaft means adapted for adriving connection with a
alignment therewith, said stationary tubular member be 65 power means, and a ratchet interconnecting each pulley
to the crankshaft means for synchronizing the operation
ing extended through said axially passaged piston into
of the pistons.
the chamber of the piston rod and forming therewith
.a plunger-type air pump, and a metering rod secured to
11. In a caloric energy developing device, a piston
the piston rod in axial alignment therewith and extended 70 type air pump having a cylinder and a piston structure
with an axially-passaged piston and an axially-chambered
through the piston rod chamber into and through the
piston rod, said piston rod having its chamber openly
stationary tubular member, said metering rod restricting
communicating through said passaged piston with the
the ?ow of air from the piston-type air pump and the
cylinder and closed at the opposite end thereof, a sta
plunger-type air pump .to and through the stationary
tionary tubular member secured to said cylinder in axial
tubular member,
.75 alignment therewith, said stationary tubular member’be
3,075,514
10
ing extended through said axially-passaged piston into the
chamber of the piston rod and forming therewith a
stituting a third agitation point for successively agitating
and squeezing the air into progressively reduced ?ow
plunger-type air pump, a metering rod secured to the
areas.
piston rod in axial alignment therewith and extended
through the piston rod chamber into and through the 5
stationary tubular member, said metering rod restricting
the ?ow of air from the piston-type air pump and the
hhhhhh-h/Ph ah pump to hhh though he hhhhhhhv hhhh:
lar member, the open end of said passaged piston consti
tuting a ?rst agitation point, the open end of said tubular 10
member
constituting a second agitation point, and one
end of an enlarged portion of said metering rod con~
References Cited in the ?le of this l3atent
UNITED STATES PATENTS
1,33%???
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FOREIGN PATENTS
1,098,125
France --------------- —— Mar- 2’ 1955
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