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Патент USA US3076210

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Feb. 5,. 1963
3,076,204
L. J. NOWAK, JR
BOAT ASSEMBLIES
‘ Filed Jan. 20, 1960
4 Sheets-Sheet 1
A
F162
‘L2
T3
FIGJ
24
INVENTOR.
LEON J. NOWAK JR.
BY
ATTO RNEYS /
Feb. 5,1963
|_. J. NOWAK, JR
BOAT ASSEMBLIES
Filed Jan. 20, 1960
’
3,076,204
4 Sheets-Sheet 2
T8
T9
T0
INVENTOR.
/ O.
N
"
m
LEON J.NOWAK
JR.
‘
BY
KT.
m
ATTORNEYS.
Feb. 5,- 1963
|_. J. NOWAK, JR
I 3,076,204
.BOAT ASSEMBLIES
v
Filed Jan. 20, 1960
4 Sheets-Sheet 3
O
7.1/)
mm‘
INVENTOR.
LEONJ-NOWA K JR.
ATTO RNEYS
Feb. 5,1963
L- J. NOWAK, JR
3,076,204
BOAT ASSEMBLIES
Filed Jan. 20, 1960
4 Sheets—Sheet 4
--/ 56
INVENTOR.
LEON J» NOWAK JR.
ATTORNEYS
United States Patent 0
1
3,076,204
Patented Feb. 5., 1963
2
hull of FIGURE 6 taken on the section lines 8-8 of
3,076,204
FIGURE 6 and located rearwardly of the cross-section
BOAT ASSEMBLIES
of FIGURE 7.
Leon J. Nowak, Jr., 624 S. Knight, Park Ridge, 111.
FIGURE 9 is another transverse cross-section of the
Filed Jan. 20, 1960, Ser. No. 3,660
hull of FIGURE 6 taken on the section lines 9-9‘ of
13 Claims. (Cl. 9-6)
FIGURE 6 and located rearwardly of the cross-section
This invention is directed to boat assemblies and par
of FIGURE 8.
ticularly directed to power boats.
FIGURE 10 is another transverse cross~section taken
Most present day power boats, which may be charac
on the section lines 10-10 of FIGURE 6 and illustrating
t-erized as outboard or inboard, have relatively rigid hulls 10 the cross-section at the stern of the hull of FIGURE 6.
made up of wood and in some cases metal or plastic
FIGURE 11 is a plan view of the boat hull illustrated
material.
These hulls are oftentimes constructed with
in FIGURE 1 or FIGURE 6.
elaborate keel and rib frame reinforcing to provide
FIGURE 12 is a detailed cross-sectional illustration of
strength for the hull. These hull constructions, while
certain details of construction illustrated in FIGURES 1
entirely adequate for smooth waters, are limited in rough 15 through 11.
waters. The pounding action of the Waves imposes
FIGURE 13 is a top or plan view diagrammatically
severe stresses on the hull and in rough waters most pres
illustrating the engine unit shown in FIGURE 1.
ent day boat constructions must proceed at extremely low
FIGURE 14 is an end view diagrammatically illustrat
speeds to avoid damage to the hull. Furthermore, these
ing the engine unit shown in FIGURE 13.
relatively rigid hull constructions are oftentimes broken 20
FIGURE 15 is a detailed view of certain detachable
when encountering driftwood or other foreign objects in
fastenings used between the boat hull and inboard engine
the water. Another disadvantage of present day boats
unit.
is the vibration which is readily transmitted through the
Referring speci?cally now to the drawings wherein like
rigid hulls thereof.
elements are designated by like characters throughout,
A primary purpose of the present invention is to pro 25 and in the ?rst instance to FIGURE 1, the numeral 20
vide a new boat hull and a new arrangement of a prime
generally designates a power boat hull constructed in
mover therefor so as to overcome some of the de?ciencies
accordance with the present invention, and provided with
of prior ‘boat constructions.
‘
an engine unit generally designated at 21, the details of
Another object of the invention is to so construct a
which will be explained more fully in ensuing portions
hull construction and engine unit therefor so as to im 30 of this speci?cation. The hull 20 is formed around a
prove the safety of the boat.
deck 22. A keel 23 is ?xed to the deck and depends
Another purpose is to so construct a boat hull as to
from the general plane of the deck. The keel 23 has
enable variances in riding or planing qualities, while at
a tapered contour of expanding depth from the stern of
the same time improving the ability of the hull to stand
the hull to the forward portion thereof as is generally
shock from waves or ?oating debris, minimizing bottom 35 represented by the contour of the lower line of the hull
fouling, and minimizing the cost of construction.
designated at 24 in FIGURE 1. The sides of the hull.
‘Another purpose of the present invention is to con
struct a boat hull and an engine unit therefor which mini
are designated at 25 and 26 and extend upwardly from
the deck 22 at the sides thereof. The sides of the hull
mizes vibration of the boat assembly.
may be constructed from wood, metal or plastic in any
Another purpose of the present invention is to so ar 40 conventional fashion and contoured from the stem of the
range an engine unit for a power boat as to enable assem
bly thereof from standard ‘and readily accessible parts,
and at the same time so arrange the engine unit for easy
replacement of parts or the entire engine unit.
hull to the stern in conventional fashion as is more
or less illustrated by the contour of the hull in FIGURE
11. The deck 22 and sides 25, 26 may be reinforced
in conventional fashion by ribs which extend from the
Other purposes will appear from time to time in the 45 deck 22 upwardly, and by longitudinal strakes or‘ frame
course of the ensuing speci?cation and claims, when taken
members in a manner well known to the art. The hull
with the accompanying drawings in which:
de?ned by the sides 25, 26 and deck 22 may, of course,
be provided with variant forms of super-structure and
engine unit constituting the present invention.
internal accommodations. Since the super-structure and
FIGURE 2 is a transverse cross-sectional view of a 50 internal accommodations form no part of the present
forward portion of the hull illustrated in FIGURE 1.
invention they are neither shown nor described in detail
herein.
FIGURE 3 is a transverse cross-sectional view of the
hull of FIGURE 1 taken along the section lines 3-3 of
In accordance with the present invention, the bottom
FIGURE 1, which section is located rearwardly from
, of the hull is de?ned by a ?exible membrane 27 which
55 extends from stem to stem and from side to side of the
the section of FIGURE 2.
FIGURE 4 is another transverse cross-sectional view
hull as is illustrated by the various cross-sectional views
of FIGURES 2 through 5. The ?exible membrane of
of the hull illustrated in FIGURE 1, taken along the
FIGURES 1 through 5 is preferably made from a stretch
section lines 4-4 of FIGURE 1_ and at a point rear
able material such as sheet rubber or sheet rubber substi
wardly of the cross-section of FIGURE 3.
FIGURE 1 is a side view of the ‘assembled hull and
FIGURE 5 is a cross-sectional view of the after por
tion of the hull taken on the section lines 5-5 of FIG
URE 1 and at a point rearwardly of the cross-section of
FIGURE 4.
60 tutes so that it may be stretched relatively tight over the
keel 23 and ?xed to the sides of the hull in a manner
pointed out more fully hereinafter. The membrane 27
together with the deck 22 and keel 23 de?ne air compart
ments beneath the plane of the deck 22, which compart
‘FIGURE 6 is a side elevation of a further embodiment 65
ments are pressurized by means of an air inlet 28 and
any suitable source of air pressure as is more or less dia
of the invention.
‘ FIGURE 7 is a transverse cross-sectional view of the
hull of FIGURE 6 taken on the lines 7-7 of FIGURE 6.
FIGURE 8 is another transverse cross-section of the
grammatically indicated by the compressor 29 in FIG
URE 1. The hull is shown in plan or top View in FIG
URE 11.
3,076,204
4
3
In FIGURE 6, the hull has a shape and con?guration
quite similar to that of FIGURES 1 through 5 and 11,
and made up of the deck 32 and sides 33 and 34. In
FIGURES 6 through 10, however, the bottom of the hull
is de?ned by a ?exible but relatively non-stretchable
membrane 35, which membrane is so shaped as to provide
the sides of the hull. In some cases a single elongated
member 42 may extend from the bow to the stern on
each side of the hull with a sufficient number of screws
used to ensure efficient clamping action for effective seal
a bottom contour as is illustrated in FIGURES 7 through
1-0 inclusive. In FIGURES 6 through 10, no keel is nec
secured across the stern face of the boat or may be
ing of the compartment between membrane 27 and deck
22. The after portion of the membrane may be similarly
clamped simply to the bottom surface of the deck 22 at
the rearwardmost portion thereof.
essary. The membrane 35, together with the deck 32,
The air inlet 28 for the compartment is shown ?xed
de?ne air compartment means beneath the general plane 10
to a support 45, which in turn is ?xed to the under portion
of the deck, and this compartment may be pressurized
of the deck 22 as by suitable fastening screws. The
by means of the air inlet 28 and source of air pressure
air inlet 28 may extend within a protective upright tube
designated generally at 29. The membrane 35 may be
46 which is ?xed as by suitable screws to the deck 22.
made from plastic or rubber with reinforcing Wire or
fabric, the relatively non-stretchable nature of the mem 15 The protective tube 46 should extend upwardly above
the deck to a height su?icient that in the event of damage
brane 35 together with the shape thereof and the pres
to the membrane 27, water may ?ow upwardly slightly
sure in the compartment between deck 32 and membrane
within the tube 46 due to settling of the hull within the
35 maintaining the contour of the bottom of the hull.
water without spilling out into the. interior of the hull.
In all forms of the invention it is advantageous to pro
vide some rigid support for the ?exible membrane in the 20 In oher words, the upper end of the tube 46 should be
considerably above the water line of the hull. The tube
after portion of the hull. In FIGURES 1 through 5
for example, such support is provided by the section of
the keel between the section lines 4-—-4 and 5—5.
In
28 leads to a source of air pressure as has been designated
generally at 29 in FIGURE 1. In some assemblies the
compressor 29 may be driven from the main engines of
FIGURES 6 through 10, such support is provided by
depressing the deck 32 from the general plane thereof 25 the boat. Under other circumstances and especially in
as is indicated by the dotted line 36 between section lines
9-9 and Iii-10. The deck may have a downwardly
convex shape between the section lines 9-—9 and 10—10
as is indicated in the drawings. Thus the membrane 35
the case of small boats at hand actuated pump may be
provided to supply air through the inlet 44 to the com
partment beneath the deck. The line 44 leading to the
air inlet 28 may include a check valve 47 to prevent ?ow
of FIGURES 6 through 10 is ?rmly supported along the 30 of air from the compartment to the compressor and a
manually operable relief valve diagrammatically desig
longitudinal axis thereof at the rearward portion thereof.
nated at 48 for reducing pressure within the compart
Such support for the rearward or after portion of the mem
ment from time to time in accordance with the desires
brane prevents bulges in the membrane under the in?u
of the user of the boat. The line 44 from the compres
ence of the pressure in the air compartment. A short
keel section may be used, if desired, to ?rmly support 35 sor 29 to the tube 28 in FIGURE 6 may similarly be
provided with a check valve 47 and relief valve 48. Thus
the after portion of the membrane along the longitudinal
by operating the compressor, air is delivered to the com
axis thereof.
partment beneath the deck, and the compartments may be
If desired, a small keel-like section as indicated dia
pressurized to any desired and practical degree by opera
grammatically at 37 may depend from the deck 32 in
FIGURE 6 from a point approximating the section lines 40 tion of the compressor to increase pressure or by actuat
ing the relief valve 48 to bleed o? pressure to the atmos
7-7 to the bow so as to provide support along the longi
phere, from time to time, to reduce pressure.
tudinal axis of the membrane 35 at the forwardmost por
Both forms of bulls use bottoms provided with air
tion thereof.
compartment means which act as a cushion over the en
FIGURE 12 illustrates certain details of construction
which are applicable to both’ embodiments in FIGURES 45 tire bottom surface of the hull. No reinforcing ribs be
tween the sides and bottom are necessary as is the case
1 through 11. In FIGURE 12 numerical designations for
with most commercial boat constructions.
the deck 22, side 25, membrane 27 and inlet 28 are the
In operation the operator pressurizes the bottom com
same as the designations used in FIGURES 1 through 6,
partment in an amount consonant with desired riding
although it should be understood that the principles set
forth in regard to the details of FIGURE 12 are equally 50 qualities. For example, in relatively smooth waters the
operator may use a high level of air pressure in the com
applicable to the embodiment of FIGURES 6 through 10.
partment so that the bottom is relatively rigid while
In FIGURE 12 the deck 22 is shown as being sealed
yieldable to relatively heavy forces. In rough or choppy
by a relatively thin waterproof and airtight membrane
40‘ which extends over the entire under surface of. the
waters, the operator reduces the pressure in the compart
deck 22 and is opposed to the membrane 27. The seal 55 ment so as to allow a greater amount of ?exing of the
ing. member 40' may be used when the deck 22 is formed
bottom when encountering Waves.
from plywood or other equivalent material. If the deck
The action of the ?exible bottoms when encountering
22 is formed from metal, plastic or other airtight‘ and
waves may be described as progressive ?exing from the
bow to the stern of the boat as the boat progresses over
watertight materials, the sealing member 40 may be
omitted. The membrane 27 is illustrated as extended up 60 the wave. In other words, a wave may form something
wardly a short distance alongside the sides of the hull
in the nature of a dimple in the bottom of the boat, which
dimple moves rearwardly in progressive fashion as the
and ?xed thereto by means of screws 41 which are posi
tioned in mounting blocks 42 and extend through the
boat continues its movement over and through the wave.
Upon encountering debris such as ?oating planks or
sides 25 and into longitudinal stitfeners or strakes 43 so
that the ends of the membrane 27 are clamped tightly 65 timber in the water, the membranes may ?ex inwardly
against the action of the air pressure in the-compartments
against the sides 25 and 26 of the hull. The membranes
2‘7 and 40 may be bonded to each other with the sealing
and absorb the shock of the ‘blow of such foreign debris
without rupture of the membrane. During operation of
membrane 40 being bonded to the hull. If sealing mem
the boat the membrane de?ning the bottom will undergo
ber 40 is omitted, the membrane 27 may of course be
bonded directly to the hull. The clamping action exerted 70 some minor degree of ?exure at all times, which slight
degree of ?exure tends to prevent the attachment of moss
by the screws 41 and member 42 together with the bond
or fungus to the bottom of the boat.
between the membranes and the sides is sufficient to make
The form of the invention illustrated in FIGURES 1-5
the construction airtight and waterproof.
allows the use of relatively low cost air and water tight
A plurality of screws 41 and members 42 may be pro
vided at spaced intervals around the entire length’ of 75 materials such as sheet rubber.
3,076,204
The form of the invention illustrated in FIGURES 6
through 11 is more shock resistant than the form illus
trated in FIGURES 1 through 5, since the membrane is
a relatively heavier material.
It should be noted that the entire bottom of the boat
engine 57. ‘Any imbalance resulting can be taken care
of by suitable application of weights if needed.
By the transverse disposition of the engines, the engine
unit can be relatively short in the longitudinal dimen
is supported on a continuous mass of air from stem to
It should be noted that the spacing of the propellers
64 and 65 rearwardly of the rear wall 54 of the engine
stem. In FIGURES 1 through 5 the longitudinal keel
may divide this mass into two such longitudinally ex
tending and continuous cushions. In FIGURES 1 through
5, while the keel is relatively rigid, the keel does not ap
preciably affect the cushioning action of the air mass in
asmuch as each portion of the membrane on opposite
sides of the keel may yield under shock of a wave while
the ‘keel itself presents more or less of a knife edge for
S1011.
unit results in an avoidance of contact of water dis
_ placed by the propellers with the bottom wall 54 of the
engine unit thereby lessening vibration.
The outer ends of the propeller shafts may be sup
ported from straps 66 (FIGURE 1) depending from the
engine unit and having bearings for the propeller shafts.
Rudder posts 67 and 68 are rotatably mounted in rear
15 wardly extending supports 69 and 70 and have rudders
The hull construction herein described is highly ad
71 and 72 a?ixed thereto and operable by cable assem
vantageous from a safety standpoint inasmuch as the
blies 73 and 74 conventional to the art. The showing
cutting through the wave.
7
?exible membrane together with the airtight and water
of these rudder assemblies and the propeller shaft sup
tight deck de?ne a double bottom construction. If for
port straps has been omitted in FIGURE 14 for clarity.
any reason the lower bottom provided by the membrane 20
It should be noted that the propeller shafts have their
breaks, the hull will still ?oat due to the watertight na
axes directed forwardly at a slight angle to the lon
ture of the deck opposed to the ?exible membrane.
gitudinal axis of the hull. The propeller shaft axes are
A new engine arrangement is also provided for the
such that they intersect at or near the center of effort
boat. In FIGURE 1 ‘a separate and detachable engine
of the hull so as to provide greater stability of opera
unit generally designated at 21 is supported on the stern 25 tion when the boat is operated by a single engine.
transom of the hull. The engine unit is shown in detail
‘ The entire engine assembly is detachably mounted on
in FIGURES 13 and 14. The engine unit may be com~
the stern plate or transom of the hull by shock absorb_
prised of a generally box-shaped structure de?ned by
ing fastenings 75. Preferably three or more of such
side walls 50 and 51, a front wall 52, a rear wall 53, and
fastenings are provided in symmetrically spaced relation.
a bottom wall 54. A detachable top wall 55 may be 30 Each fastening is similar in construction and is illustrated
provided for the unit. The enclosure so de?ned by this
in detail in FIGURE 15. In FIGURE 15 the upright
wall is shaped and proportioned to in effect provide a
stern plate of the hull is designated at 76. Supports 77
continuation of the boat hull from the stern aft.
and 78 are ?xed to the stern plate 76 and have spaced and
The engine unit has a pair of engines diagrammatically
opposed members 79 and 80 ?xed thereto as by means
shown at 56 and 57, supported therein on any suitable 35 of suitable bolts or the like. The members 79 and 80
frame members and at opposite sides of the unit. En
have cylindrical openings or recesses 79a and 80a fac
gines 56 and 57 may |be of the conventional automotive
ing one another so as to receive the cylindrical ends
type for convenience in servicing thereof. The longi
of a-yieldable connecting element 81 therein. The con
tudinal axes of the engines and the ‘drive shafts 58 and
necting element 81 is preferably formed from rubber or
some similar elastomeric material. A pin which may
take the form of a bolt 82 is passed through the central
and forwardly. Drive shaft 58 leads to a conventional
enlarged portion of the connector 81 and is threaded
automotive bevel gearing 60, whereas drive shaft 59
into a block 83 which is ?xed to the forward Wall 52 of
leads to a similar gearing 61. Propeller shafts 62 and
the engine unit. Suitable lock nuts 84 may be posi
63 are driven by this bevel gearing and extend outwardly 45 tioned between the block 83 and the opposed surface of
beneath the bot-tom of the unit as appears in FIGURE
the connector 81 so as to securely hold the connector,
1. The propeller shafts are located at right angles to
engine unit and bull in the assembled relation.
their associated drive shafts. Propellers 64 and 65 are
, By varying the number of lock nuts 84 or by inserting
attached to the propeller shafts and positioned rear
spacers therebetween, the relative spacing of the forward
wardly of the rear wall 53‘ of the engine unit. The gear 50 wall 52 of the engine unit may be varied with relation
housings 60 and 61 may extend beneath the bottom wall
to the stern plate 76 thus allowing tilting of the engine
54 of the engine unit, the bottom wall being sealed around
unit about an horizontal axis for adjustment of the
the housings of the gears by means well known to the
planing angle of the hull or trim thereof. Such adjust
art. Whereas, the gear housings 60 and 61 are shown
ment may be. desired from time to time in order to vary
as extending below the bottom of the engine unit, they 55 the general plane of the boat with respect to the gen
may be positioned entirely within the engine unit, with
eral plane of the water.
59 thereof are angularly disposed and extend generally
transversely of the boat. They are inclined downwardly
the propeller shafts then being extended through con
ventional sealed openings in the bottom of the engine
Adjustment by remote control may also be provided
by using extensible hydraulic cylinders and rams as the
unit.
’
supports 77 and 78, or by placing a cylinder and piston
. The engines are located above the water line for drain 60 between the support 83 and pin 82.
age therefrom overboard. In this regard, suitable deck
Suitable throttle controls (not shown) and rudder con
ing may be positioned beneath the engines and above the
trols (not shown) may lead to a forward portion of the
water line so as to drain spillage from the engines over
hull in a manner well known to the art.
Similarly,
board through suitable scu-ppers 54-b.. Decking may,
suitable controls for the transmissions 58~a and 59-a
for example, be positioned on the engine support di 65 may lead to a similar forward station in the hull.
agrammatically represented at 54-a (shown in FIGURE
The particular engine unit described herein minimizes
14 only).
vibration of the hull. The positioning of the propellers
Transmissions 58~a and 59~a, which are of conven-.
rearwardly of the rear wall of the engine unit minimizes
tional type, are included between engines 56 and ‘57 and
the transmission of any vibration from the propellers to
their drive shafts to enable changes in direction of rota 70 the engine unit. The shock absorbing connectors 81
tion of the propeller shafts.
minimize the transmission of any vibration from the
It should be noted that the engines 56 and 57 are
engine unit to the hull.
offset with relation to one another so as to avoid in
terference between the drive shafts 58 and 59. For
The entire engine unit is easily removed from the
hull as by loosening the bolts 82 to allow detachment
example, engine 56 is located slightly forwardly of 75 of the connecting assembly. Entire engine units may
3,076,204
8
3. A boat hull as set forth in claim 2 wherein said hull
includes a keel depending from said innermost member
and said outermost member is comprised of a stretchable
thus be easily substituted, one for the other, while one
unit is being repaired or serviced.
The use of the conventional engines, transmissions and
gearing is highly advantageous inasmuch as units of this
material, the material being held under tension across said
keel and ?xed to the sides of the hull.
type are readily available on the market and may be
4. A boat hull as set forth in claim 2 wherein said outer
easily replaced.
member is formed from a ?exible but substantially non
The particular arrangement of the engine and hull as
stretchable material and is contoured to provide a pro
sembly is also advantageous from a safety standpoint.
gressively increasing spacing from said other member,
In this regard, it should be noted that if any ?re exists
in the engine unit, the connectors 81' may fuse or disin 10 which spacing increases from the stern region to a forward
portion of said hull.
tegrate so as to allow separation of the engine unit from
5. A boat hull including a waterproof and relatively
the hull in the event of ?re. Fuel storage tanks may be
rigid deck, means joined to said deck, extending upwardly
carried in the hull proper and have fuel lines leading to
therefrom and contoured to provide the sides, bow and
the engine unit, in which case detachable connections
may be provided in the fuel lines to allow for separation 15 stern of the hull, a watertight, airtight and ?exible mem
brane joined to the deck and the means providing the sides
of the fuel lines and detachment of the engine unit
and de?ning the bottom of said hull, said membrane being
from the hull. The fuel tanks may also be positioned
of greater area than said deck and de?ning, with said deck,
in the engine unit.
?uid compartment means from side to side and from stem
Whereas, the invention is illustrated and described
herein as applied to more or less conventional boat con 20 to stern of said hull, and means maintaining a predeter
mined pressure within said compartment means.
tours, it should be understood that the principles of the
6. The structure of claim 5 wherein said membrane is
invention are equally applicable to variant forms of
proportioned for maximum spacing from the general plane
hull contours. For example, the invention may be
of said deck at a forward portion of said hull and for
applied to scows and boats of the type having a relative
ly ?at prow extending transverse of the longitudinal axis 25 minimum spacing therefrom at the stern to de?ne a
normal planing contour.
of the boat, as is found in well known types of amphibi
7. The structure of claim 6‘ wherein rigid means are
ous craft. The ?exible membranes and air compart;
provided
to support said membrane along its longitudinal
ments herein described may be applied to catamarans and
axis in the stern region thereof and thereby maintain the
to supporting pontoons for aircraft.
It should also be understood that whereas the deck 30 shape of the membrane.
8. The structure of claim 5 wherein the side portions
depression 36 is shown as applied to the boat in FIG
of
said membrane are clamped to the sides of said hull.
URE 6, such depression may also advantageously be
9. A boat hull construction including means de?ning
used with the boat illustrated in FIGURE 1.
a bow, stern and sides of a hull, the bottom of said hull
Whereas, the invention is described in terms of main
being comprised of opposed waterproof and airtight mem
taining air under pressure in the ?exible double bottom 35
bers extending throughout the bottom portion thereof and
construction described herein, it should be understood that
spaced from one another to provide continuous air com
a wide range of various pressures may be used with the
partment means extending substantially continuously
double bottoms. For example, the pressure may be simply
from the bow to the stern, the outermost member being
atmospheric, rather than above atmospheric. This is
particularly true in form of the invention illustrated in 40 ?exible, means supplying pressure to said compartment
means, and means for regulating the pressure within said
FIGURES 1 through 5, wherein the shape of the ?exible
compartment means and thereby regulating the ?exibility
membrane 27 may be maintained by stretching of the
of said outermost member.
membrane 27 over the keel section 23.
10. A double-bottomed boat hull construction includ
Whereas, I have shown and described an operative form
ing rigid means de?ning the sides, bow and stern of a boat,
of the invention, it should be understood that this showing
an airtight and watertight rigid deck extending between
and description thereof are to be taken in an illustrative
said sides, and. a ?exible membrane ?xed to the sides of
said hull and de?ning the bottom of said hull, said mem
brane having a contour such that the spacing thereof from
spirit thereof and which will be apparent to those skilled
in the art. The scope of the invention should be limited 50 the deck increases from the stern to a forward portion of
said hull, and means for maintaining the space between
only by the scope of the hereinafter appended claims.
said deck and membrane under pressure, said membrane
I claim:
being capable of progressive and continuous ?exure
1. A boat hull construction including rigid means de?n
against the cushioning action of said compartment means
ing the bow, stern and sides of a hull, the bottom of said
when encountering a shock force moving from stem to
or diagrammatic sense only. There are many modi?ca
tions to the invention which will fall within the scope and
hull being comprised of opposed waterproof and airtight
members extending throughout the bottom portion thereof
and spaced from one another to provide continuous air
compartment means extending continuously from the bow
to the stern, and means for maintaining air under pressure
in the compartment means so de?ned.
55
stern.
11. The structure of claim 10 wherein said means in
cludes an air inlet tube communicating with the space
between said deck and said membrane and extending
60 through a tube ?xed to said deck in upright relation there
to, the upper end of vsaid tube extending above the water
line of said hull.
12. A boat hull including a waterproof and relatively
being comprised of opposed waterproof and airtight mem
rigid deck, means joined to said deck, extending up
bers extending throughout the bottom portion thereof and 65 wardly therefrom andv contoured to provide the sides,
spaced from one another to provide continuous air com
bow and stern of the hull, a watertight, airtight and ?exible
partment means extending substantially continuously from
membrane joined to the deck and the means providing
the bow to the stern, means for maintaining air under
the sides and de?ning the bottom of said hull, said mem
brane being of greater area than said deck and de?ning,
pressure in the compartment means so de?ned, the inner
most member being rigid, the outermost member being 70 with said deck, ?uid compartment means from side to
side and from stem to stern of said hull, said ?uid com
?exible against the mass of air in said compartment means,
partment means and said membrane providing a cushion
said ?exible member being capable of progressive and
ing action for said hull when subjected to shocks encoun
continuous ?exure against the cushioning action of said
tered in moving over a ?oatation surface.
compartment means when encountering a shock force
13. The method of operating a power boat provided
moving from stem to stern.
75
2. A boat hull construction including means de?ning, a
bow, stern and sides of a hull, the bottom of said hull
3,076,204
10
with a ?exible bottom, including the steps of maintaining
References Cited in the ?le of this patent
UNITED STATES PATENTS
a mass of air under pressure against the ?exible bottom
so as to exert an outward force over the area of said
bottom, and varying the pressure of said air mass, from
1,010,309
Pastorel _____________ __ Nov. 28, 1911
time to time, so as to thereby vary the resistance to ?exure 5
1,848,018
Maranville ___________ __ Mar. 1, 1932
planing qualities of said boat, the pressure being main
2,002,517
2,390,199
of said bottom in accordance with desired riding and
tained at a relatively high amount during operation in
2,722,194
smooth waters and maintained at a relatively low amount
during operation in rough waters.
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10
2,886,462
Balduf _______________ __ May 28, 1935
Walsh _______________ __ Dec. 4, 1945
Hoffman _____________ __ Nov. 1, 1955
Sigler _______________ __ Sept. 25, 1956
Jagiel _______________ __ May 12, 1959
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