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Патент USA US3076235

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Feb. 5, 1963
E. c. HARDESTY
3,076,227
STRAND-CUIDING AND OPERATION-TERMINATING DEVICE
Filed July 25, 1960
4 Sheets-Sheet 1
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7INVENTOR
E. C. HARDESTY
NE 92 Q3
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A TTORNEV
Feb. 5, 1963
E. c. HARDESTY
3,076,227
STRAND-GUIDING AND OPERATION-TERMINATING DEVICE
Filed July 25, 1960
4 Sheets-Sheet 2
INVENTOR
E. C. l-MRDESTV
FIG. 3
A TTORNEY
Feb. 5, 1963
E. c. HARDESTY
3,076,22 7
STRAND-GUIDING’ AND OPERATION-TERMINATING DEVICE
' Filed July 25, 1960
4 Sheets-Sheet 4
INVENTOR
E. C. HA RDESTY
A T TORNE Y
United States
* atent
1
3,076,227
Patented Feb. 5, _ 1963
2
3,076,227
positioned normally within the ?eld of the magnet, but
outside of the point of maximum field intensity of the
STRAND-GUIDING AND OPERATION
TERMINATING DEVICE
Edwin C. Hardesty, Baltimore, Md., assignor to Western
Electric Company, Incorporated, a corporation of New
magnet a distance suf?ciently great so that the forces
exerted on the magnetic material by the magnet are in
su?icient to overcome the forces exerted on the magnetic
York
material by the urging means.
Filed July 25, 1960, Ser. No. 44,914
10 Claims. (Cl. 18—19}
ice
.
The movable guide is moved from the normal position
by an irrgular portion of the strand material passing be
'
tween the guides, which causes the spacing between the
The invention relates generally to strand-guiding and
operation-terminating devices for use on strand-handling 10 magnet and the magnetic material to become sufficiently
small so that the forces exerted on the magnetic material
apparatus and more particularly to a strand-guidingv and
by the magnet overcome the forces exerted on the mov
operation-terminating device for use in apparatus for coil
able guide by the urging means. The movement of the
ing strand material, such as plastic or rubber-jacketed
cordage into a helix on a rotating mandrel to form a
spring cord.
In the telephone ?eld and in the ?eld of various elec
trical appliances, it has been the practice in certain appli
magnetic material causes a snap action movement of the
15 movable guide as the magnetic material is moved toward
' the point of maximum ?eld intensity of the magnet against
the action of the urging means. The movement of the
magnetic material toward the point of maximum ?eld in-'
tensity causes rapid separation of the guides a su?’icient
example of which is the cord extending between the base
and the headpiece of a telephone handset. The spring 20 distance to permit the irregular portion of the strand ma
terial to move therebetween. Means, actuated in re
cords are formed so that a major portion thereof is in the
sponse to a predetermined amount of movement of the
form of a compact helical coil, which will extend when
magnetic material toward the point of maximum ?eld in—
slight tension is applied thereto but will return to a com
tensity of the magnet, are utilized for stopping the strand
pactly coiled con?guration when the tension is removed
25 handling operation a predetermined time later.
from the cord.
Other objects and features of the present invention may
In the manufacture of spring cords, straight lengths of
be more readily understood from the following detailed‘
plastic or elastomeric-jacketed cordage such as that dis
description of a speci?c embodiment thereof when read
closed in Patent 3,037,068, issued on May 29, 1962 to H L.
in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, in which:
Wessel, and issued as U.S. Patent No. 3,037,068, are
wound helically upon a rotating and axially moving 30 FIG. 1 is a fragmentary, front elevational view of a
coil-winding apparatus embodying certain principles of
mandrel. In the design of automatic machines for
accomplishing the helical Winding operation, it has been
the present invention, with portions thereof broken away
for purposes of clarity;
found desirable to provide means for tensioning the
FIG. 2 is an enlarged, fragmentary, plan w'ew of a por~
‘cordage, means for holding the cordage in contact with
7
the coiling mandrel, means for guiding the cordage into 35 tion of the apparatus of FIG. 1;
FIG. 3 is a fragmentary, vertical section of the appara
close, even convolutions on the mandrel, and means for
tus of FIG. 2, taken along line 3-—3 thereof;
terminating the helix-winding operation at a point where
FIG. 4 is an enlarged view of the apparatus of FIG. 3,
an irregular portion of the cordage (for example, a stay
with certain elements thereof in different operating posi
band or grommet) is positioned at a desired distance from
the mandrel. Apparatus of this type is disclosed and
tions;
FIG. 5 is an enlarged, fragmentary, vertical section
claimed in Patent 3,024,497, issued on March 13, 1962 to
E. C. Hardesty and D. L. Myers.
of the apparatus of FIG. 2, taken along line 5—5 there
An object of the present invention is to provide new
of;
FIG. 6 is an enlarged, fragmentary, vertical section of
and improved strand-guiding and operation-terminating
45 the apparatus of FIG. 1, taken along line 6—6 there
devices.
Another object of the present invention is to provide
of;
FIG. 7 is a fragmentary, vertical section of a portion
new and improved strand-guiding and operation-terminat
of the apparatus of FIG. 2, taken along line 7-7 there
ing devices for use in apparatus for coiling strand mate
rial, such as plastic or rubber-jacketed cordage into a
of;
helix on a rotating mandrel to form a spring cord.
PEG. 8 is an enlarged, fragmentary, elevational View
of a portion of the apparatus of FIG. 7, and
Another object of the present invention is to provide
new and improved devices for guiding and tensioning a
FIG. 9 is a schematic diagram of an electrical control
circuit forming a part of the apparatus of FIG. 1.
tipped and banded length of cordage being wound upon
Referring now to the drawings, there is shown an ap
a rotating coiling mandrel, detecting an irregular por
tion of the cordage adjacent to the trailing end of the 55 paratus for winding strand material into a helix and
cordage formed by a band, S-hook or grommet, and for
more particularly, apparatus for winding a predetermined
interrupting the coiling operation as the trailing end of the
length of jacketed cordage, designated generally by the
cations to utilize spring or retractile cords, a common
cordage approaches the mandrel.
A strand-guiding and operation-terminating device for
guiding successive portions of an inde?nite length of 60
strand material, detecting an irregular portion of the
strand material, and interrupting a strand-handling opera
tion, embodying certain aspects of the present invention,
may include a frame, a ?rst guide mounted on the frame
numeral 12, into helical turns 11—11 as a step in the
manufacture of spring cords.
The jacketed cordage 12 includes a core composed of
a plurality of individually insulated conductors 144-14,
preferably tinsel conductors, positioned parallel to each
other and enclosed in a paper tape (not shown). The
paper-covered core is then enclosed in a tough elastic
and a second guide mounted movably adjacent to and a 65 jacket 15 made of a material such as polyvinyl chloride.
predetermined distance from the ?rst guide for relative
The jacketing material is preferably extruded over the
movement with respect thereto. Means are provided for
paper-covered core to form a long, straight length of the
normally urging the guides toward each other, and a mag
jacketed cordage 12. Portions of this cordage 12 are then
net is positioned adjacent to the movable guide. Mag
70 wound into helical form, being cut to length either before
netic material is secured operatively to the movable guide.
The magnetic material secured to the movable guide is
or after winding, but preferably before the‘ helix-winding
operation. The coiled cordage 12 is thereafter cured‘
3,076,227
3
4
by appropriate heat treatment to set the jacketing mate
rial in its coiled form.
A portion of the jacket 15 adjacent to each of the
ends of the cordage 12 is stripped from the conductors
ternally threaded boss 29 projects from the wheel 27 on
the side opposite clip 28 and is formed with an in
ternal, conically tapered aperture (not shown) at its
extremity. A slit bushing (not shown), made of nylon,
14-14, a solderless terminal tip 16 is secured to the
end of each of'the conductors 14-14, and then a stay
cord band 17 is crimped about the jacket 15 adjacent to
one-extremity thereof and a grommet 18 or stay-cord
band 17. is secured tothe cordage 12 adjacent the other
polytetra?uoroethylene or other suitable resilient mate
rial, is mounted loosely on the mandrel 20 and is de
signed for partial reception in the conical aperture in
the wheel 27.
An outer knurled wheel 32 is also loosely mounted
on the mandrel 20 and has an internally threaded hub
end thereof. The stripping, tipping and banding opera
tions may be. performed after the helix-winding opera
33 facing the boss 29 for threadable reception there
about. The hub 33 is formed with an inner conically
tion as was the practice heretofore; however, in accord
ance. withcertain features of the invention, a predeter
tapered aperture (not shown) designed for partial recep
mined straight' length of the jacketed cordage 12 may
be cut andthe ends stripped, tipped and banded previous
This latter sequence of opera
tion of the bushing. The hub 33 of the outer wheel 32
is normally screwed on the boss 29 of the inner wheel to
a point where the bushing is received loosely within the
tion is preferred, since it is easier- to cut, strip, tip and
bandrthecordage 12- before coiling than after and such
the retaining member 26 and is slidable relative to the
to coiling in helical form.
opposing conical apertures.
mandrel 20 during the winding operation.
at sequence is more susceptible to mass-production assem
blyftechniques.
This assembly constitutes
After‘ the
20 winding operation, the retaining member 26 is slid into
In.FIGS. 2 and 5, a straight’length of vthe cordage 12
contact with the last wound turn 11, the free end of the
is shown'partiallyxwound. in‘ helical'turns 11-11 about
cordage 12 is placed in the notch in the clip 28, and
a'wwindingmandrel20. A square, notched?ange 21 is
then the outer wheel 32 is further tightened about the
secured1toqone end of‘the mandrel 20, which becomes
boss 29 to compress the bushing into contact with the
the ?rstiwound'or; lead‘end thereof. The lead end of 25 mandrel 20, thus locking the retaining member 26, as a
the. mandrel'20 is formedwith a pair. of opposed pins
unit, about the mandrel-20.‘
Av mandrel support, designated generally, by the nu
22-22‘ projecting radially therefrom, which may be in
se'rtediwithins a pair of L-shaped retaining slots 23-23
meral 34 (FIGS.v l and 6), includes a plurality. of sta
tionary mandrel-supporting blocks, designated generally
formed within aro'tary chuck, generally designated by.
the numeral '24. This pin-and-slot connection allows 30 by the numerals 35-35, which are mounted in spaced
intervals along the length of the coiling apparatus. The
the mandrel 20 to be readilyconnectedto ‘and disconnect
blocks 35-35 are formed with concave‘mandrel-receiv
ed :from the chuck24, but provides -a positive connection
ing seats 36-36 and aligned entrance apertures 37-37v
for rotating. the mandrel - 20.
extending between the outer surfaces of the blocks
Prior to the-coiling operation, a leading end of the
cordage'12 is threaded through a notch 25 inthe ?ange 35 35-35 and the seats 36-36, to permit lateral insertion
of the mandrel 20 through the entrance apertures 37-37
21; withsthewstay-cord‘band 17‘ contacting the outer sur
into the seats 36-36. The entrance apertures 37-37 are
face of the ?ange. The end of the jacket 15 is bent in
preferably sectorial apertures of‘ about 90° and are
wardly ‘toward the chuck 24 and placed under a beveled
aligned so that the mandrel 20 may be inserted into all
projecting tab 19 of the chuck 24 andthe individual con
ductorszl4-l4tp'rotruding from'that end of thecordage 40 or" the seats 36-36 of the supporting blocks 35-35 si
multaneously. The blocks 35-35are made entirely of,
12 are wrapped around. a ?anged rectangular block 30,
projecting from the‘chuck 24, and between the tab 19
and end ofv the jacket 15 to prevent ?apping thereof during
rotation of the mandrel 20. The bent portion of the
jacket 15 of the cordage 12‘ is urged resiliently toward 45
the tab .19 andcooperates therewith to con?nethe ends of
or their seats are lined with, a suitable Wear-resistant ma
terial, such as nylon, polytetra?uoroethylene or Rulon so
that the seats 36-36 may support the mandrel 20 for
both sliding and rotary motion therewithin.
The mandrel support 34 includes a number of clamp
ing blocks 38-38‘ which are secured to oscillatory arms
the conductors 14-14. If the ends of the conductors
14-14 tend to move out from under the tab 19, the con
41-41 which, in turn, are keyed to a shaft 42. The
clamping blocks 38-38 are designed to cooperate with
ductors 14-14:abut the extreme end of the jacket 15
to prevent such movement.
50 the mandrel-supporting blocks 35-35 to support and
guide the mandrel 21) during the helix-winding movement
The chuck 24 is then rotated to draw the remaining
thereof; Each of the clamping blocks 38-38 has an
portions-of the cordage 12 onto the mandrel 20 and the
overall con?guration similar to the entrance apertures
mandrel 20 and chuck 24 are moved simultaneously,
longitudinally, in predetermined synchronism with the
37-37 of- the blocks 35-35 and includes a seat 43
speed of rotationof the mandrel 20, to wind the follow 55 which is designed to ?t closely about the mandrel 2i)
and cooperate with the associated seat 36 to permit rotat
ingcordage'lZ, generally, in a uniform series of closely
ing and sliding movement of the mandrel 2t) therewithin.
packed helicalturns 11-11 along a desired portion of
A piston rod 44 of a piston-cylinder assembly, desig
the length'of the. mandrel 20. The longitudinal speed
nated generally by the numeral 46, is secured to one of
of-the' mandrel 20 should preferably be regulated to ap
proximately one cord-width (as Wound) for each revolu 60 the arms 41-41 to cause oscillatory motion thereof and
the remaining arms 41-41 secured to the shaft 42 to
tion of the mandrel 20 in order to provide, generally, for
move the clamping blocks 38-38 as a group between
windinglof the cordage 12 in a closely-packed helix;
an-open position and a clamping position. When the
however, it should be understood that various relative
clamping blocks 38-38 are in the open position, an
speeds might be employeddepending on the pitch‘of the
turns 111-11 desired.
A cordage-retaining clamp, designated generally by
65 operator may easily insert the mandrel 20 into the man
the numeral 26, is mounted on the mandrel 20 for sliding
drel support 34 with the major portion of the mandrel
being supported across the supporting blocks 35-35 and
movement therealong during the winding operation.
the lead or left-hand end of the mandrel, as viewed in
After the winding operation, the clamp 26 is designed to
FIGS. 1 and 2, protrudes from the mandrel support 34.
be tightened on the mandrel 20 in abutment with the 70
The piston-cylinder assembly 46 is equipped with a ?rst
last-‘wound helical convolution 11 to retain the trailing
solenoid'valve 40 (FIG. 9), energizable to induce move
end of the cordage on the mandrel. The cordage-re
ment of the clamping blocks 38-38 to their closed posi
tainingclamp 26 consists of an inner knurled wheel 27
tions, and a second solenoid valve 45 (FIG. 9) to induce
?tting loosely about the mandrel 20 and having a notched,
the reverse movement. A switch actuator 47 is secured
cordage-‘retaining clip 28 extending therefrom. An ex 75 to the shaft 42, which is connected to the piston rod 44,
8,076,227"
5
and is designed to close a normally open contact 4? of a
limit switch, designated generally by the numeral 48,
when the clamping blocks 38-38 are in their closed
positions.
As seen in FIG. 1, a limit switch, designated generally
by the numeral 51, is mounted above the mandrel sup
6
the chuck 24 and also prevents longitudinal movement
of the cordage clamp 26 on the mandrel during rotation
thereof. The corresponding ends of the cylinders of the
assemblies 46, 61 and 71 are interconnected by conduits
(not shown) and connected to the solenoid valves 40 and
do“ so that, when the roller 56 is moved to its extended
position, the support 66 is retracted into a position in
port 34. and has a movable actuator member 52 extending
into the support 34. The actuator 52; of the switch 51
which it engages the Cordage clamp 26, positioned
is biased to a lower position in the absence of a mandrel
against a stop 7%, and the clamping blocks 38-38 are
2i) and is pressed to an upper position upon insertion of 10 moved into clamping position to prevent lateral move
ment of the mandrel. _
a mandrel 20 in the support 34. The mandrel 2b, in a
before-coiling position with a major portion of the length
As seen in FIGS. 7 and 8, the guide plate 55; is pro
of the mandrel 2t? resting across and within the support
vided with a guide aperture ‘76', in the shape of a substan
34, is supported by the support 34 for both rotational and
tially inverted V extending from the lower end thereof,
longitudinal movement with respect thereto.
15 into which the cordage 12 automatically inserts itself
The lead end of the mandrel Ztl is then fastened to
when the cordageconstraining guide 55 is moved down
the rotary chuck 24 and one end of a length of cordage
wardly. The guide aperture 76 functions during the en
tire winding operation to guide the cordage 12 toward the
12 is secured to the mandrel 2t) by the flange 21 and
mandrel
The cordage 12 is forced to remain within
chuck 24, as previously described, to enable the winding
of the cordage in a helix on the mandrel. The cordage 20 the guide aperture ‘7'5 by a transversely extending ?nger
'77. The Cordage 12 is prevented from arcing above a
12 advances to the mandrel 2th through a helix-forming
line tangent to the mandrel 2d by the straight top surface
roller and constraining guide assembly, designated gen
'78 of the inverted V-shaped aperture 76, which is locked
erally by the numeral 53 (FIGS. 2, 7 and 8), for con
against vertical movement by the cam 63. The vertical
straining the cordage 12 to wind in closely packed convo
locking of the guide 55 by the cam 63 prevents the cord
lutions 11-11 and for forming the Cordage 12 as it is
age 12 from winding on top of the previously wound con
wound into a uniform, tight‘helix about the mandrel 2d.
volutions 11-11 and constrains the successive convolué
The helix-forming roller and constraining guide assem
tions 11-11 to lie, generally, side by side. The top and
bly 53 includes a freely rotatable roller 56 mounted on
side of the aperture 76 are preferably polished to prevent
a shaft 57 in a bracket so which is operatively con
nected to a piston rod 59 of a piston-cylinder assembly, 03 O excessive friction and it is contemplated that, for this
purpose, small antifriction rollers might be provided
designated generally by the numeral 61’, for selective
along the top and side of the aperture.
movement between an extended position and a retracted
- If the cordage diameter and the degree of ?attening
position. In the extended position of the roller 56, the‘
of the Cordage 12 by the roller 5d were always constant,
shaft 57 is spaced a predetermined distance from the
mandrel 2t? and is parallel to the mandrel so. that the 35 then a closely packed helix could be wound with a ?xed
roller 56 is positioned immediately adjacent to the coil
guide, occupying the place of the guide 55, by regulating
ing mandrel 20, onto which Cordage 12 is being wound
in a helix, and presses the cordage 12 against the mandrel
20.
In operation, the roller 56 is positioned so that the
periphery thereof engages compressively each cordage
the longitudinal speed of the mandrel 20 to one cordage
width, as ?attened, for each revolution of the mandrel 26.
convolution 11 as the cordage 12 is wound on the man—
drel 2t? in order to smooth and compress the cordage be
ing wound into a uniform, tight helix about the mandrel
However, certain slight variations in cordage dimeter
and degree of ?attening do occur, which variations make
absolute control by speed regulation with a ?xed guide
di?icult or impossible. For example, if the cordage 12 is
too thin or is insu?iciently ?attened, the turns 11-11 of
the helix will not be closely packed; whereas, the cord
N. This is the normal, winding position of the roller 45 age 12 is too thick or is overly ?attened, then the turns
11-11 will tend to wind on top of each other.
56 and is illustrated in FIG. 7. The roller ss preferably
To accommodate these variations, the guide plate 58
exerts suf?cient force on the cordage 12 being wound on
the mandrel 2%) to ?atten the cordage 12 slightly between
the roller 56 and the mandrel 2b, which ?attening is
desired in the ?nished spring cord (not shown),
A cordage-constraining guide, designated generally by
of the guide 55 is mounted for limited pivoting movement
transversely of the cordage 12, as best seen in FIG. 8,v
to facilitate the winding of the Cordage 12 in a closely
packed helix. For these purposes, the guide plate 58 is
mounted pivotably about a screw 81, which is carried by
the bracket 54 on the rocker arm 64. A tension spring 82
is secured at its upper end to a pin 33 in the bracket 54,
respect thereto. The guide plate 58 and a bracket 54 are 55 extends downwardly and is secured at the lower end of the
spring 82 to a pin 34 secured on the guide plate 53 eccen
secured to and depend from one end of a rocker arm
trically thereof.
64 which, in turn, is mounted for oscillation with respect
The normal winding position of the guide plate 58 is
to the mandrel 2t} about a pivot pin 62. The pin 62 is
illustrated in FIG. 8, wherein the guide plate 58 assumes‘
mounted in the bracket 6% in which the roller se is
a vertical position under the in?uence of two counter
mounted. The opposite end of the rocker arm 64 is pro
balancing forces: (1) the tension spring 82 urges the
vided with a cam-follower roller 65 which is received
guide plate 58 in a clockwise direction, as viewed in FIG.
slidably in a stationary cam 63. Accordingly, it can be
8, about the screw 81; and (2) the cordage 12 being
seen that, as the roller 56 is moved from the retracted
the numeral 55, includes a guide plate, designated gen~
erally by the numeral 553, mounted above the cordage 12
and close to the mandrel 2t) for pivoting movement with
position to the winding position, the pivotally mounted
cordage-constnaining guide 55 forming part of the as 65
sembly 53 is cammed into a position to guide the on
coming cordage 12 into uniform, closely formed convo
wound in closely packed helical turns 11-11 bears
against the right-hand side of the guide aperture 76 and
thus urges the guide plate 58 in a counterclockwise direc
tion about the screw 81. The position of the guide
plate 58, as shown in FIG. 8, is maintained as long as the
cordage diameter and degree of ?attening are normal, and
are thus precisely correlated with the established gear
1utions11-11 on the rotating mandrel 2%.
Further, a reciprocably movable support 615 for the
Cordage-retaining clamp 26, having a V-notched support 70 ratios for the movement of the mandrel 219.
ing surface 67, is connected operatively to a piston rod
if the cordage 12 becomes abnormally thin or is under
68 of a piston-cylinder assembly, designated generally by
flattened by the roller 5'6, the force exerted by the cord
the numeral 71. The support 66 supports the mandrel 2i}
age 12. on the right-hand side of the guide aperture 76 is
and prevents excessive vibrations in the unsupported span
diminished, and the tension spring $2 operates to pivot
of the mandrel 20 between the mandrel support 34 and 75 the guide plate ‘53 in a clockwise direction through the
3,076,227
slight distance necessary to re-establish the dominating
force of the winding cordage 12, in which position the
cordage 12 is winding in closely packed turns 11—11.
If, on the other hand, the cordage 12 becomes abnormally
thick or is over-?attened, the cordage cannot overlap the
last turn 11 due to the locked vertical position of the
a stud 105 secured pivotably to the bracket 99 by a bi
furcated member 100 and a pin 102 (FIG. 5). The
compression spring 104 functions to urge a free end of
the bracket 99 away from the frame 97 to urge the roller
93 toward the roller 92 to pinch or grip the cordage 12
as the cordage is advanced therebetween. The normal
amount of compression in the spring 104 may be adjusted
guide 55 and will thus pivot the guide plate 58, against
by turning an externally threaded sleeve 95.
the action of the spring 32, in a counterclockwise direc
Preferably, the roller 92 is formed with a V-shaped
tion about the screw 81 to the point where the cordage
12 Winds in closely packed turns 11—11.
10 annular groove 106, and the roller 93 is formed with a
substantially ?at periphery surface 107. An adjustable
A pin 86 is secured to the guide plate 58 of the guide
frictional drag element 108 is urged against the roller 92
55 and projects toward the arm 64. The pin 86 is designed
to impose a predetermined, adjustable drag on the roller
to engage the lower surface of the end of the bracket
92, which drag tensions the cordage 12 as the cordage,
54 in order to limit the amount of pivoting movement
of the guide plate 58 in the clockwise direction, as viewed 15 being pinched by the rollers 92 and 93 is wound on the
mandrel 20.
in FIG. 8, by the spring 82 to an extent that the cordage
A substantially annular permanent magnet 111 is spaced
12 is positively precluded from jumping out of its con
normally a predetermined distance from a piece of mag
stricted guide seat formed by the guide aperture 76 and
netic material 112 encircling the stud 105 secured to
the roller 56.
A second cordage guide, designated generally by the 20 the bifurcated member 100. The magnetic material 112
is secured threadedly to the stud 105 and is positioned
numeral 87 (FIGS. 2 and 5 ), is mounted generally to the
normally outside of the point of maximum ?eld intensity
left of the ?rst guide 55, as viewed in FIG. 5. The second
of the magnet 111 a distance su?iciently great so that the
guide 87 is preferably mounted below the line of advance
forces exerted on the magnetic material 112 by the magnet
ment of the cordage 12 on a substantially T-shaped guide
rail 89 and has a guide aperture 88, preferably a U-shaped 25 111 are insu?icient to overcome the forces exerted on the
roller 93 by the spring 104. The relative positions of
aperture extending from the top thereof, through which
the magnet 111 and the magnetic material 112 can be ad
the cordange 12 advances. The generally similar but op
justed by turning the magnetic material on the stud 105'
posing guide apertures 76 and 83 of the two guides 55
in the appropriate direction.
and 87, respectively, are aligned so that the two guides
cooperate to direct the advancing cordage 12 to the 30' When an enlarged portion of the cordage 12 (ea. the
metal stay-cord band 17 or the molded grommet 18)
mandrel 20. The U-shaped guide aperture 88 formed in
passes between the rollers 92 and 93, the roller 93 is forced
the guide 87 is restricted to ?t closely about normal
away from the roller 92 and causes the pivoted shaft
diameter portions of the cordage 12 advancing there
101 to pivot in a clockwise direction, as viewed in FIGS.
through to the mandrel 20. The sides of this aperture
88 should also be polished to reduce friction or anti 35 3 and 4, about the pin 103 against the action of the com
pression spring 104. As the distance between the magnetic
friction rollers should be provided.
material 112 and the magnet 111 is reduced, the forces
A‘ tension spring 91 is designed to maintain the guide
exerted on the magnetic material 112 by the magnet 111
87 in its ?rst solid line position, as shown in FIG. 5,
increase rapidly and overcome the forces exerted on the
against the force of friction due to normal-diameter por
tions of the cordage 12 passing through the restricted guide 40 pivoted shaft 101 by the spring 104 to cause a snap action
pivoting of the shaft 101 as the magnetic material 112
aperture 88. However, when an irregular portion of the
moves toward the point of maximum ?eld intensity of
cordage 12, such as that provided by the stay-cord band
the magnet 111 against the action of the spring 104.
17 or the grommet 18 at the end of the particular section
This snap action movement of the shaft 101 causes rapid
of cordage 12, approaches the guide 87, the irregular
separation of the rollers 92 and 93 a sufficient distance
portion will engage and catch in the restricted guide aper
for the enlarged portion of the cordage 12 to move there
ture 88 so that further advancement of the cordage 12 by
between so that the rollers will not damage the relatively
the rotating mandrel 20 will operate to slide the guide 37
weak conductors 14-14 or bend the tips 16-16 on the
to the right, as viewed in FIG. 5, against the action of
ends of the conductors or pull the tips 16~—16 there
the biasing tension spring 91 to the dotted, end-of-coiling
from.
position illustrated in FIG. 5. During this sliding move
A spherical de?ector 114 is mounted rotatably on a
ment, the guide 87 moves from its ?rst position, along the 50
pin 113 adjacent to the path of travel of the cordage 12
line of advancement of the cordage 12, toward the ?rst
and in front of the V-shaped annular groove 106 in the
guide 55 and the mandrel 20 and con?nes the end of the
stationary roller 92 for de?ecting an S-hook 109 (FIG. 5)
cordage 12 until the coiling process has been completed.
on the staycord band 17 from the annular groove 106.
Previous to the advancement through the guide 87, the
The spherical de?ector 114 causes the S-hook 109 to be
cordage 12 is advanced between a pair of spaced rollers
deflected so that the S-hook projects upwardly or down
92 and 93, of a strand-guiding and operation-terminating
wardly from the cordage 12 thus preventing the rollers
device, designated generally by the numeral 96, for guiding
and tensioning the cordage 12 during a major portion of
92 and 93 from having to be separated a su?icient dis
the coiling of cordage upon the coiling mandrel 20, for
tance to accommodate passage of the S-hook 109 there
detecting irregular portions, i.e., enlarged portions or rela 60 between in a horizontal plane.
tively hard portions of the cordage 12, such as the stay
The movement of the bracket 99, as the magnetic ma
cord band 17 or the grommet 13, adjacent to the ends
thereof, and for interrupting the coiling operation as the
trailing end of the cordage 12 is carried by the guide 87
and approaches the mandrel 20.
The strand-guiding and operation-terminating device 96
terial 112 moves into engagement with the permanent
magnet 111, operates a sensitive limit switch, designated
generally by the numeral 116, and closes a normally open,
end-of-coiling contact 115 which results in a clutch 117
being deenergized and a brake 119 being energized to stop
includes a frame 97 on which the two cooperating rollers
the coiling operation. The actions of the clutch 117 and
92 and 93, between which a cordage 12 passes as it is
brake 119 are timed so that coiling operation is stopped
wound helically upon a rotating mandrel 20, are mount 70 after the guide 87 has been moved a predetermined dis
ed. The roller 92 is mounted rotatably on a ?xed shaft
tance toward the mandrel 2t) and the stay band 17 or
98, whereas the roller 93 is mounted rotatably on a mov
grommet 18 is located a desired distance. away from the
able shaft 101 mounted on a bracket 99, which, in turn,
mandrel 20 at the end of the coiling operation. Before
is mounted pivotably on a shaft 103 secured to the frame
the next helix winding operation of a subsequent length
97. A compression spring 104 (FIG. 4) is positioned on 75 of cordage 12, the pivoted shaft 101 is restored to its
sprees?
9
10
normal position by a plunger 118 (FIGS. 2 and 3) ac
toothed driving pulley 123, to which the chuck 24 is’
tuated by a solenoid 121.
As seen in FIG. 1, the rotary chuck 24 is mounted at
one end of a shaft 120 for rotation therewith. The shaft
121) is journaled within hearings in a housing 122 and is
keyed to a toothed driving pulley 123, mounted on the
secured through the shaft 120 keyed thereto.
The means for rotating the pinion gear 133 to recipro
cate the carriage 126, as best seen in FIGS. 1 and 2,
includes, in sequence, the following intermediate ele
ments: the second gear-box output shaft 152; a toothed
pulley 168 keyed to the shaft 152; a toothed belt 171
other side of the housing 122. The housing 122 is
mounted on a reciprocable carriage, designated generally
by the numeral 126, for sliding movement therewith,
which sliding movement draws the rotating mandrel 20
passing around the pulley 168; a toothed pulley 172,
about which the belt 171 also passes and which is driven
thereby; a shaft 173 to which the pulley 172 is keyed;
a pair of meshing bevel gears 174—174 (FIG. 1) mount
ed within a gear box, designated generally by the nu
meral 176; and the upright shaft 136 connected to the
from right to left, as viewed in FIGS. 1 and 2, to en
able winding of the cordage 12 in a helix thereon. Dur
ing the winding operation, the mandrel 2t) slides par
tially out of and also rotates within the mandrel support
34. The carriage 126 as best seen in FIGS. 5 and 7 in
carriage-reciprocating pinion 133.
15
With the arrangement shown, the ?rst input shaft 146,
extending from the coil-controlling input pulley 143, may
cludes generally a long, ?at rectangular member 127 hav
ing a toothed rack 128 formed along a relatively long por
tion of the right side thereof. A T-shaped bar 131, gen
tromagnetic clutch. When the clutch 117 is energized,
erally coextensive in length with the carriage 126, is bolted
the clutch directs the coiling motion to rotate the chuck
be connected through the clutch 117, preferably an elec
to the under side thereof and is received for sliding move 20 24 and the mandrel 26 in a clockwise direction, as viewed
ment along the length of a pair of stationary guide mem
in FIG. 5, to Wind the cordage 12 passing over the top
bers 132~—132. A pinion gear 133 (P16. 1) is keyed
of the mandrel 2t) therearound, and causes the pulley
for rotation with a shaft 136 and is designed to mesh with
172 to rotate in a direction to drive the carriage 126
the teeth of the rack 128 for reciprocating the carriage
from right to left in FIG. 1.
The second input shaft 153, extending from the return
126 and the elements secured thereto upon rotation of 25
the shaft 136.
controlling input pulley 144, may be connected by means
of the electromagnetic clutch 145 to direct the return
A drive motor 137, which is a constant-speed, unidi
motion of the carriage 126. When the clutch 117 is
rectional motor of any conventional type drives a toothed
deenergized and the clutch 145 is energized, the pulley
output pulley 133, which is keyed to a motor shaft 141.
A toothed timing belt 142 passes around the output pul 30 168 and the pulley 172 are driven in a direction to re
ley 138, being driven thereby, and also around each of
two secondary, toothed control pulleys 143 and 144 of
different sizes, which may be selectively connected through
appropriate clutches 117 and 145 to direct the coiling
‘ movement and the return movement of the mandrel 20, 35
respectively.
ciprocate the carriage 126 back to its original position.
The brake 119 which is connected to the shaft 153 is
deenergized simultaneously with the energization of either
of the clutches 117 or 145 to permit movement of the
various shafts and pulleys and is energized to positively
stop movement of the shafts and pulleys simultaneously‘
with the deenergization of either of the clutches 117 or
The larger, coil-controlling pulley 143 is keyed to a shaft
145 upon completion of an operation.
146, which forms one input shaft to a gear box, desig
nated generally by the numeral 147. Gears within the 40
Control Circuit and Operation
gear box ‘are not shown in detail; but are illustrated and
The control circuit (FIG. 9) includes (in order of
described in detail in the above-mentioned E. C. Hardesty
operation starting with the carriage 126 in its extreme
et al. patent, which discloses a coiling apparatus of which
right position, as viewed in FIG. 1) the switch 51 (FIGS.
the apparatus of the present invention is an improvement
1 and 9), has a closed upper contact 181 when the
thereover. The inputs to and outputs from the gear box
147 will be described and the linkages connecting the 115 mandrel 20 is in place within the mandrel support 34
and a closed lower contact 182 when no mandrel is
outputs from the gear box to the chuck-rotating pulley
1'23 and the carriage-reciprocating pinion 133. The ?rst
input shaft 146 is designed, upon energization of the
clutch 117 within the gear box 147, to rotate the chuck 24
present; the limit switch 48 (FIG. 6), in which the
normally open contact 49 is closed when the mandrel
clamping blocks 33—38 have been oscillated into their
through a ?rst gear-box output shaft 151 and simulta 50 closed, mandrel-clamping positions by the assembly 46;
the limit switch 116 (FIGS. 2, 3 and 4), in which the
neously to reciprocate the carriage 126 from right to left
normally open contact 115 is open when the pivotable
as viewed in FIG. 1 through a second gearbox output
roller 93 of the strand-guiding and operation-terminating
shaft 152.
device 96 has been moved to the closed position, as
The smaller, return-controlling pulley 144 is keyed to
a shaft 153, which forms a second input to the gear box 55 shown in FIGS. 2 and 3, by the solenoid 121; and a limit
switch 186 (FlGS. 1 and 9), in which a normally closed
147 and is designed to drive the second output shaft 152
contact 187 is opened by an actuator 185 when each
in the reverse direction, and preferably at a much higher
cycle of operation has been completed and the carriage
rate of speed, to reciprocate the carriage 126 from left
126 has returned to its starting position at the extreme
to right, as viewed in FIG. 1, from the after-coiling posi
right
in FIG. 1.
tion of the chuck 24 to the mandrel-inserting position of
Also
included in the electrical circuit are the solenoid
the chuck.
valves 40 and 45 designed to control the pistons within
The chuck 24 is rotated by the rotation of the ?rst out
the piston-cylinder assemblies 46, 61 and 71. Also in
put shaft 151 through the intermission of the following
cluded in the control circuit are the energization circuits
elements: a toothed pulley 156 keyed to the shaft 151;
a toothed belt 157 passing around the pulley 156; a r for the drive motor 137, the electromagnetic clutches
117 and 145, and the electromagnetic brake 119.
toothed pulley 158, about which the belt 157 also passes;
a square shaft 161 to which the pulley 158 is keyed; a
p A ?rst control relay 191 is provided to initiate the
coiling motion which, upon energization, closes a ?rst
contact 192 to energize the electromagnetic clutch 117‘
toothed pulley 162 mounted for sliding movement along
the square shaft 161 and for rotation therewith, the pulley
and simultaneously opens a second contact 193 to de-7
162 having a square, central aperture 163 for receiving 70
the square shaft 161, the pulley 162 being slidable along
the square shaft 161 under the in?uence of the movement
of the carriage 126; and a toothed belt 166 passing about
energize the electromagnetic brake 119. This reversal of
connections functions to move the carriage 126 from right
to left as viewed in FIG. 1 and to rotate the chuck 24
in order to wind the cordage 12 in a helix along the length
both the slidable pulley 162 and the earlier-mentioned, 75 of the mandrel 20.
8,076,227
A second control relay 196 is provided to initiate the
return motion which, upon energization, closes a ?rst
contact 197 to energize the electromagnetic clutch 145
and‘simultaneously opens a‘ second contact 198 to deener
gize the electromagnetic brake 119, which reversal of
and at‘ the sametime the carriage 126 is moved from right
to left (FIG. 1) in predetermined syn'chronism with the
speed of rotation of the mandrel to wind the cordage 12
on the mandrel 20, generally, in a plurality of even,
CI
closely packed helical convolutions 11—11. The ad
vancing cordage 12 is guided as it approaches the mandrel
20 by the cordage guide 55 to constrain the cordage 12
to wind in closely packed convolutions.
connections functions to return the carriage 126 from
left to right, back to its original position.
The two-position selector switch 51 operates to select
the proper one of the control relays 191‘ and 196 for op
When the Cordage 12 is almost fully coiled on the
eration. Whenthe mandrel 20 is present (so that coiling 10 mandrel 20, the stay-cord band 17 or grommet 18 near
motion is desired), the upper contact 181 of the switch
the end of the eordage 12 urges the movable roller 93
51 is closed, which permits energization of the coil-con
away from the ?xed roller 92 and engages the restricted
trolling relay 191 and precludes-operation of the paral
aperture 88 of the guide 37, which causes the guide 87
l‘elly connected, return-controlling relay 196. When no
to slide from the coiling position shown in solid lines in
mandrel 20 is present (so that return motion is desired),
FIG. 5 to the end position illustrated in phantom lines
the lower contact 1820f the switch 51' is closed, which
in FIG. 5. When the movable roller 93 is moved away
permits energization of only the return-controlling relay
from the ?xed roller 92 an actuator 220 of the switch 116
196.
The coil-controlling relay 191 may be energized, as
suming that the upper contact 1810f the selector switch‘
51' is closed, indicating th'atIa mandrel 20 is in place,
Upon closure of the contact 115, the relay'214 (which
may be considered as the end-of-coiling relay) is energized
provided that the contact 49‘of the’switch 48: is closed:
signifying that the mandrel-clamping blocks 38—33‘ar'e
in their closed positions. The return-controlling relay
the coil-controlling relay 1911. Upon deenergization of
the relay 191, the contact 193 is reclosed to apply the
196 may be energized, assuming'th‘at the ‘lower contact’
1820f the selector switch‘51-v is closed indicating the
absence of a mandrel 20, providedithat the contact 187'
of'th'e‘switch 186 is closed (its normal position)‘signify‘
ing that'the-carriage 126 is not already in its extreme
rightward position.
A pair of power-supply switches 201-201 are'pro
is moved, thus closing the contact 115 of that switch.
and opens its normally closed contact 213 to deenergize
brake 119 to stop the coiling motion and the contact 192
is reopened to deenergize the clutch 117. The end'of-I
coiling relay 214 also closes the normally open contact
216, which energizes the solenoid 45 to apply ?uid to the
opposite side of the cylinders of the assemblies 4-6, 61 and
71"’ to retract the roller 56, pivot the guide 55 upwardly,
30 extend the support'6'6 and‘oscillate the clamping blocks
38438 upwardly to enable removal of the wound man
vided, a'?rst‘of which connects the motor 137 across a
?rst‘ pair of power-supply conductors 202—202.
drel'20 from the apparatus.
The
I
The push#button switch 286 is released and the trailing,
se‘co'nd'power-supply contact 201 connects the control
e'nd- of'the cordage 12 isv clamped to the mandrel 20 with
circuit across a' second' pair of power-supply conductors 35 the cordage clamp 26 (FIG; 2) and mandrel 20 is next
2'03‘—203; As seen, the motor 137' runs continuously
removed from the‘ chuck 24 and mandrel support 34,
a'nd'is selectively connected,.through alternate energize.
which removal operates to open the upper contact 181
and close the lower contact 182 of the selector switch 51
tion of thev clutches 117 and 145, to drivethe carriage
126 ?rst in the coiling‘ direction and'then in the return
to‘facilitate' operation of the return-controlling relay 196.
The starting push-button switch 206' is then closed again
direction during each 'cycle of operation;
After a lead end of a straight length of cordage 12
and,‘ because the lower contact 182 of‘ the switch 51' is
to vbe wound has'been‘secure'd to a mandrel 20'as seen in
now‘ closed (mandrel absent), the return-controlling relay
FIGS; 1 and 5; assuming ‘that'the power-sup'ply'switch'es
196'isv now energized't'n'rough the now-closed switch 206,
201-201 have been closed manually so that the motor
the now-closed contact 182, and the normally closed con
137 is'running, the'operating cycle‘ is‘ initiated'by the 45 tact'187 of'the switch 186.
closing of a starting, push-button switch 204 to close'a
The relay 196 closes its contact 197 and opens its con~
normally "open contact 205 to energize the solenoid 121'
tact‘ 198 to energize the clutch 145 and deenergize the
to openpthe contact 115 of the switch 116‘ and‘move the
brake 119, respectively. The energization of the clutch
roller 93 to its normal operatingp'osition. The push
145 connects the shaft 153 to the shaft 173 to. reciprocate
button 204 is'released and a second 'starting,.push-button 50 the carriage 126 back to its original position at a relatively
206 is''‘ pushed to complete‘ a circuit, through a normally
closed'contact 21301 a now"deen'ergized relay 214, and
high rate of speed.
When the carriage 126 has returned to its original posi
a- normally closed contact 216of'the now deenergized,
tion, the normally closed contact 187 of the limit switch
coil-controlling relay 191'to energize the solenoid'va'lve
186 is opened by the actuator 185 (FIG. 1), which opens
40‘, which operates to supply fluid. from a source, not' 55 the energization circuit for the control relay 196 to dis
shown, to the cylinder of the assembly 46, which functions
connect the clutch 145 and reapply the brake 119 to stop
to oscillate the mandrel-clamping blocks" from their'op‘en
the carriage 126 in its mandrel-inserting position. The
positions to their closed positions.
apparatus has now completed one full cycle of operation
When the clamping blocks 38--—3S' have been fully
and a succeeding mandrel 20 may now be inserted into
rotated to their closed, mandrel-clamping positions, ‘the 60 the the mandrel support 34 and connected to the chuck 24
switch actuator 47 (FIG. 6) depresses the switch 48 so
to start a succeeding cycle of operation.
that a normally open contact 49 of the switch 48 is closed.
‘It will be manifest that this invention is not limited to
At ‘this time the operator releases the switch 204 to permit
the speci?c details described in connection with the above
the contact-205 to open and deenergizes'the solenoid 121‘
embodiment of the invention, but that other modi?cations
to permit the movable roller 93 to be moved subsequently‘ 65 may be made by those'skilled in the art without departing
away from the stationary'roller 92 by an enlarged portion
from the spirit and scope thereof.
of the cordage‘ 12. Closure of ‘the contact 490i the
What is claimed is:
switch 48 causes the coil-controlling, relay 191 to‘ be ‘en
l. A strand-guiding and operation-terminating device
ergized, through- the now-closed contacts 181, 213‘and 49.‘
for guiding successive portions of a length of strand mate
The’ coil-controlling relay 191 opens its normally closed 70 rial passing therethrough, for detecting an irregular por
contact 193 to release the electromagnetic brake 119
tion of the'strand material and for interrupting a strand
and closes ‘its normally open contact 192 vto‘energize the
handling-operation at a predetermined time subsequently,
electromagnetic clutch 117.: Upon ener‘gization‘of'the'
which comprises means for moving successive portions of
clutch 117, the‘coiling operation proceeds at the desired
rate; The chuck‘ 24‘ is rotatedto rotate the mandrelv 20
7.5
a length of strand material, a frame, a ?rst guide mounted
on said frame, a second guide mounted adjacent to and
3,076,227
13
a predetermined distanm ‘from the ?rst guide for relative
movement with respect‘thereto, the normal spacing be
tween the guides being less than the maximum outer di
mension of an irregular portion of the strand material,
means for normally urging the guides toward each other,
a magnet, magnetic material secured operatively to a
movable one of said guides and positioned adjacent to
the magnet, the magnetic material being positioned
normally outside of the point of maximum ?eld intensity
of the magnet a distance su?iciently great so that the
forces exerted on the magnetic material by the magnet are
insu?icient to overcome the forces exerted thereon by the
urging means, the movable one of said guides being
id
to the trailing end of the cordage and for interrupting
the coiling operation as the trailing end approaches the
mandrel, which comprises a rotatable coil-winding man
drel, means for rotating the mandrel and moving the
mandrel longitudinally to wind cordage thereon, a ?xed
shaft, a stationary roller mounted rotatably on the ?xed'
shaft, a pivotably mounted shaft positioned adjacent to
and a predetermined distance from the ?xed shaft, a
movable roller mounted rotatably on the pivotably mount
ed shaft, the normal spacing of the rollers being less
than the maximum outer diameter of an enlarged por
tion of the cordage, resilient means for normally urging
the movable roller toward the ?xed roller to tension the
moved from the normal position thereof by the irregular
cordage being drawn therebetween by the coil-winding
portion of the strand material moving between the guides 15 mandrel, a magnet positioned adjacent to the movable
causing the spacing between the magnet and the magnetic
shaft, magnetic material secured to said pivotable shaft
and positioned adjacent to the magnet, the magnetic mate_
material to become su?iciently small so that the forces
rial on the pivotable shaft being positioned normally out
exerted on the magnetic material by the magnet overcome
side of the point of maximum field intensity of the mag
the forces exerted on the movable guide by the urging
means to cause a snap action movement of the movable 20 net a distance sufficiently great so that the forces exerted
guide as the magnetic material is moved toward the point
of maximum ?eld intensity of the magnet against the
action of the urging means for rapidly separating the
guides a sutlicient distance to permit the irregular portion
on the magnetic material by the magnet are ,insu?‘icient
to overcome the forces exerted by the resilient means,
the shaft being moved from the normal position by the
enlarged portion of the cordage passing between the
of the strand to move therebetween, and means for 25 rollers causing the spacing between the magnet and the
cessive portions of the strand material between the guides
magnetic material to become sumciently small so that
the forces exerted on the magnetic material by the mag
in response to a predetermined amount of movement of
net overcome the forces exerted on the movable roller
stopping the operation of the means for advancing suc
by the resilient means to cause a snap action pivoting of
the magnetic material toward the'point of maximum ?eld
30 the pivotably mounted shaft as the magnetic material is
intensity of the magnet.
moved toward the point of maximum ?eld intensity of
2. A strand~guiding and, operation-terminating device
the magnet against the action of the resilient means for
for guiding successive portions of a length of strand
materialpassing therethrough, for detecting a relatively
rapidly separating the rollers a suf?cient'distance to per
mit the enlarged portion of the cordage to move there
hard portion of the strand material and for interrupting
a strand~handling operation at a predetermined time 35 between, and to prevent damage to tipped conductors
projecting from the end of the cordage, means for stop
subsequently, which comprises means for moving suc
ping the mandrel in response to a predetermined amount
cessive portions of a length of strand material, a frame,
of movement of the magnetic material toward the point
a ?rst guide mounted on said frame, a second guide
of maximum ?eld intensity of the magnet, a bifurcated
mounted adjacent to and a predetermined distance from
guide through which the cord is passed for tensioning and
the first guide for relative movement with respect thereto,
holding the end of the cordage during the latter portion
the normal spacing between the guides being less than
the maximum outer dimension of a relatively hard por
of the coiling operation, and means for resetting the piv
tion of the strand material and less than the minimum
diameter of the strand material, means for normally urg
ing the guides toward each other to compress the strand
material, a magnet, magnetic material secured operatively
to‘a movable one of said guides and positioned adjacent
to the magnet, the magnetic material being positioned
normally outside of the point of maximum ?eld intensity
otally mounted shaft to its normal operating position.
4. A strand-guiding. and operation-terminating device
for guiding successive portions of a length of strand
material passing therethrough, for detecting an irregular
forces exerted on the magnetic, material by the magnet
rotatable guide mounted on said frame, a second ro
are insufficient to overcome the forces exerted thereon
tatable guide mounted adjacent to and a predetermined
distance from the ?rst rotatable guide for relative move
portion of the strand material and for interrupting a
strand-handling operation at a predetermined time subse
quently, which comprises means for moving successive
of the magnet a, distance suf?ciently great so that the 50 portions of a length of strand material, a frame, a ?rst
by the urging means, the movable one of said guides being
moved from the normal position thereof by the relatively
hard portionof the strand material moving between the
guides causing the spacing between the magnet and the
magnetic material to become sufficiently small so that
the forces exerted on the magnetic material by the mag
net overcome the forces exerted on the movable guide
by the urging means to cause a snap action movement
of the movable guide as the magnetic material is moved
ment with respect thereto, the normal spacing between
the rotatable guides being less than the maximum outer
dimension of an irregular portion of the strand material,
means for normally urging the rotatable guides toward
each other, a magnet, magnetic material secured opera
tively to a movable one of said rotatable guides and posi
tioned adjacent to the magnet, the magnetic material
being positioned normally outside of the point of maxi
mum ?eld intensity ofthe magnet a distance sufficiently
toward the point of maximum ?eld intensity of the mag
net against the action of the urging means ‘for rapidly
great so that the forces exerted on the magnetic material
separating the guides a su?icient distance to permit the
by the magnet are insufficient to overcome the forces
relatively hard portion of the strand to move there 65 exerted thereon by the urging means, means for adjusting
the normal spacing between the magnetic material and
between, and means for, stopping the operation of the
means for advancing successive portions of the strand
the magnet, the movable one of said rotatable guides
material between the guides in response to a predeter
being moved from the normal position thereof by the ir~
mined amount of movement of the magnetic material
regular portion of the strand material moving between
toward the point of maximum ?eld intensity of the 70 the guides causing the spacing between the magnet and
magnet.
the magnetic material to become sufficiently small so
3. A strand-guiding and operation-terminating device
that the forces exerted on the magnetic material by the
for guiding and tensioning a tipped and banded length
magnet overcome the forces exerted on the movable guide
of cordage being wound upon a rotating coiling man
by the urging means to cause a snap action movement of
drel, detecting an enlarged portion of the cordage adjacent 75 the movable guide as the magnetic material is moved to
3,076,227
15
ward the point of maximum ?eld intensity of the magnet
against the action of the urging means for rapidly sepa
material secured to said pivotable shaft and positioned
adjacent to the magnet, the magnetic material on the
rating the guides a sufficient distance to permit the ir
pivotable shaft being positioned normally outside of the
regular portion of the strand material to move there
point of maximum ?eld intensity of the magnet a distance
between, and means for stopping the operation of the Cl sufficiently great so that the forces exerted on the mag
means for advancing successive portions of the strand
netic material by the magnet are insu?icient to overcome
material between the guides in response to a predeter
the forces exerted by the resilient means, the shaft being
mined amount of movement of the magnetic material
moved from a normal position by an enlarged portion of
toward the point of maximum ?eld intensity of the mag
the cord-age passing between the rollers causing the spac
net.
10 ing between the magnet and the magnetic material to be
5. A strand-guiding and operation-terminating device
come su?iciently small so that the forces exerted on the
for guIding successive portions of a length of strand ma
magnetic material by the magnet overcome the forces
terial passing therethrough, for detecting an irregular por
exerted on the pivotable shaft by the resilient means to
tion of the strand material and for interrupting a strand
cause a snap action pivoting of the pivotably mounted
handling operation at a predetermined time subsequently,
shaft as the magnetic material is moved toward the point
which comprises means for moving successive portions of
of maximum ?eld intensity of the magnet against the ac
a length of strand material, a frame, a ?rst rotatable guide
tion of the resilient means for rapidly separating the
mounted on said frame, a second rotatable guide mounted
rollers a sufficient distance to permit the enlarged portion
adjacent to and a predetermined distance from the ?rst
of the cordage to move therebetween and to prevent dam
rotatable guide for relative movement with respect there 20 age to tipped conductors projecting from the end of the
to, the normal spasing between the rotatable guides being
cordage, and means for stopping the mandrel in response
less than the max'mum outer dimension of an irregular
to a predetermined amount of movement of the magnetic
portion of the strand material, means for normally urging
mater'al toward the point of maximum ?eld intensity of
the rotatable guides toward each other, adjustable means
the magnet.
for resisting the rotation of the rotatable guide means by 25
7. A strand-guiding and operation-terminating device
the strand material passing between the guides to main
for guiding successive portions of a length of strand ma
tain a predetermined tension in the strand material, a
terial passing therethrough, for detecting an irregular por
magnet, magnetic material secured operatively to a mov
tion of the strand material and for interrupting a strand
able one of said rotatable guides and positioned adjacent
handling operation at a predetermined time subsequently,
to the magnet, the magnetic mate'ial being positioned 30 which comprises a winding mandrel for coiling successive
no mally outside of the point of maximum ?eld intensity
portion; of a length of strand material, a frame, a ?rst
of the magnet a distance su?‘iciently great so that the
guide mounted on said frame, a second guide mounted ad
forces exerted on the magnetic material by the magnet
jacent to and a predetermined distance from the ?rst guide
for relative movement with respect thereto, the normal
are insufficient to overcome the forces exerted thereon
by the urging means. the movable one of said rotatable 35 spafing between the gu'des being less than the maximum
guides being moved from the normal position thereof by
outer dimension of an irregular portion of the strand ma
the irregular portion of the strand material moving be
tween the guides causing the spacing between the magnet
and the magnetic material to become sufficiently small so
ter'al, means for normally urging the guides toward each
that the forces exerted on the m"gnetic mater'al by the
magnet overcome the forces exerted on the movable guide
guides and positioned adjacent to the magnet, the magnetic
material being positioned normally outside of the point of
by the urging means to cause a snap action movement of
maximum ?eld intensity of the magnet a distance su?i
ciently great so that the forces exerted on the magnetic
material by the magnet are insu?icient to overcome the
forces exerted thereon by the urging means, the movable
one of said guides being moved from the normal position
the movab'e guide as the magnetic material is moved to
ward the point of maximum ?eld intensity of the mag
net against the action of the urging means for rapidly
separating the guides a suflicient distance to permit the
irregular portion of the strand material to move there—
between, and means for stopping the operation of the
other to compress the strand material, a magnet, magnetic
material secured operatively to a movable one of said
thereof by the irregular portion of the strand material
moving between the guides causing the spacing b tween
means for advancing successive portions of the strand ma
the magnet and the magnetic material to become sulfi
terial between the guides in response to a predetemined 50 cien'ly small so that the forces exerted on the magnetic
amount of movement of the magnetic material toward
material by the magnet overcome the forces exerted on
the point of maximum ?eld in'ensity of the magnet.
the movable guide by the urging means to cause a snap
6. A strand-guid'ng and operation-terminating device
action movement of the movable guide as the magnetic
for guiding and tensioning a tipped and handed length of
material is moved toward the point of maximum ?eld in
corda'ge being wound upon a rotating coiling mandrel, 55
cordage adjacent to the trailing end of the cordage and
for interrupting the coiling Operation as the trailing end
of the cordage approaches the mandrel, which comprises
a rotatable coil-wind'ng mandzel, means for rotting the 60
means for rapidly separating the guides a suf?cient dis
tance to permit the irregular portion of the strand material
to move therebetween without damaging the irregular por
tion of the strand material, a bifurcated strand guide hav
ing a restricted guide aperture designed to ?t closely about
mandrel and for moving the mandrel longitudinally, a
normal-diameter portions of the strand advancing there
?xed shaft, an annularly grooved stationary roller
mounted rotatably on the ?xed shaft, the groove form
through to the winding mandrel, said strand guide being
detecting an enlarged S-hook on a stay-cord band on the
ing a guide for banded cordage being wound on the man
tensity of the magnet against the action of the urging
mounted for movement towa"d and away from the man
drel substantially along the line of advancement of the
drel, a spherical deflector mounted ro‘atably adjacent to 65 strand. means for biasing said strand guide to a ?rst posi
the path of travel of the Cordage and in front of t'ee an~
tion spaced a ?rst distance from the mandrel, said biasing
nular groove of the stationary roller for de?ecting the
means being designed to maintain said strand guide in its
S-hook on the stay-cord band from the annular groove,
?rst position against the force of friction due to normal
a pivotably mounted shaft positioned adjacent to and a
diameter portions of the strand passing through the guide
predetemined distance from the ?xed shaft, a movable 70 aperture, the irregular portion of the strand being pro
roller mounted rotatably on the pivotably mounted shaft,
vided at a point therealong where it is desired to terminate
resilient means for normally urging the movable roller
the strand~handling operation, the irregular portion of
toward the ?xed roller to compress the cordage being
the advancing strand engaging and catching in the re
drawn therebetween by the coil-winding mandrel, a mag
stricted aperture of said guide so that further advance
net positioned adjacent to the moveable shaft, magnetic
ment of the strand is designed to move said guide toward
17»
18
the’ mand’r'ell‘a'gainstf the ‘action oft'said-‘biasing means; and‘
the guides toward each other’ to compress =the~strand ma
means for stopping thelcoilingi operation in response to'a
predetermined amount, of‘ movement; of they magnetic ma
terial, a-reciprocable roller mounted for rotation aboutan
axis‘paraLel to the mandrel andv positioned so'that the
terial toward the point,ofmaximunr?eldintensity of the
periphery of “the ' roller‘ engages‘ compressivelyeteachi strand‘
magnet.
convolution as the- strand is wound on’ the mandrel to‘
v
8'.
strand-guiding-and operation-terminating device
for‘ guiding. successive portions -of~a length of strand ma
terial passing therethrough, for detecting" an irregular por
smoohand compress the ‘strand being woundiinto uniform
tight helixes about the mandrel, at strand clamp mounted‘
slidably-on the mandrel for normal relative movement- with‘:
tion‘of‘ the; strand material‘ and for inzerruptingastrand
respect thereto, reciprocable means‘ for retaining the‘
handling operation atia predetermined time subsequently, 10 strand‘ clampin a predetermined position on the mandrel‘
which comprises a winding mandrel for ccilingsuccessive
relative to said‘ roller‘ for-preventing excessive deformaé
portions of’ a lengthof-strand'“ material, a frame, a ?rst
guide mounted on said frame, a second guide mounted
adjacent to and a p edetermined dis ance from the ?rst
guide for relative movement with respect thereto, the nor 15
tion of the mandrel as'a- result of forces exerted‘ thereon
material, means for normally urging the guides toward
by the roller and strand being wound thereon and for
damping out vibrations in an unsupported span of the
mandrel, a magnet, magnetic material secured operatively
to a movable one of said guides and positioned adjacent
to the magnet, the magnetic material being positioned nor
mally outside of the point of maximum ?eld- intensity of
each other to compress the strand material, a strand
the magnet a distance su?icien'ly great so that the forces
mal spacing between the guides being less than the maxi
mum outer dimension of an irregular portion of the strand
constraining guide having a guide aperture for directing 20 exerted on the magnetic material by the magnet are in
the strand toward the mand.el, said strand-constraining
guide being pivotable in a plane generally transverse to
the line of advancement of the strand, a tension spring
for bias ng said strand-constraining guide in the direction
of the helix being wound on the mandrel, the wall of the
guide aperture bearing on the advancing strand on the
side opposite to the helix being wound on the mandrel,
so that the guide may be moved by the preponderating
one of the forces exerted by the tension spring and the
strand, respectively, to assume a position where the strand
is wound in closely pazked helical convolutions on the
mandrel, a transversely projecting portion of the strand
constraining guide to engage the advancing strand and
force the strand to be retained within the guide aperture,
means for limiting the pivoting movement of the last
mentioned strand guide so that the strand is prevented
from jumping out of the guide aperture and prevented
from piling up on the mandrel, a magnet, magnetic ma
terial secured operatively to a movable one of said guides
and positioned adjacent to the magnet, the magnetic ma
terial being positioned normally outside of the point of
sut‘?cient to overcome the forces exerted thereon by the
urging means, the movable one of said guides being
moved from the normal position thereof by the irregular
portion of the strand material moving between the guides
25 causing the spacing between the magnet and the magnetic
material to become sui?ciently small so that the forces
exerted on the magnetic material by the magnet overcome
the forces exerted on the movable guide by the urging
means to cause a snap action movement of the movable
30 guide as the magnetic material is moved toward the point
of maximum ?eld intensity of the magnet against the ac
tion of the urging means for rapidly separating the guides
a sui?eient distance to permit the irregular portion of the
strand material to move therebetween without damaging
35 the irregular portion of the strand material, and means
for stopping the coiling operation in response to a prede
term‘ncd amount of movement of the magnetic material
toward the point of maximum ?eld intensity of the mag
net.
40
10. A strand-guiding and operation-terminating device
for guiding successive portions of a length of tipped
maximum ?eld intensity of the magnet a distance suf?
and banded cordage passing therethrough, for detecting
an irregular portion of the cordage and for interrupting
ciently great so that the forces exerted on the magnetic
a cordage coiling operation at a predetermined time
material by the magnet are insut?cient to overcome the
forces exerted thereon by the urging means, the movable 45 subsequently, which comprises a rotatable and longitu
dinally movable mandrel for coiling a length of tipped and
one of said guides being moved from the normal position
thereof by the irregular portion of the strand material
banded cordage into helical coils, a rotary chuck into
which one end of the mandrel is placed, a block project
moving between the guides causing the spacing between
ing from the chuck around which tipped ends of con
the magnet and the magnetic material to become su?i
ciently small so that the forces exerted on the magnetic 50 ductors protruding from a jacket of the cordage are
wrapped, a tapered tab projecting from the block under
material by the magnet overcome the forces exerted on
which the end of the jacket from which the tipped ends
the movable guide by the urging means to cause a snap
of the conductors protrude is bent and placed so that
action movement of the movable guide as the magnetic
the end of the jacket is urged resiliently against the tapered
material is moved toward the point of maximum ?eld- in
tensity of the magnet against the action of the urging 55 tab, the tipped ends of the conductors wrapped around the
block being placed over the top of the jacket and under
means for rapidly separating the guides a su?icient dis
the tab so that the end of the jacket forms a stop to
tance to permit the irregular portion of the strand ma
prevent the tipped conductors from moving between the
terial to move therebetween without damaging the irregu
end of the jacket and the tab and coming loose from
lar portion of the strand material, and means for stopping
the coiling operation in response to a predetermined 60 the chuck, a frame, a ?rst guide mounted on said frame,
a second guide mounted adjacent to and a predetermined
amount of movement of the magnetic material toward
distance from the ?rst guide for relative movement with
the point of maximum ?eld intensity of the magnet.
9. A strand-guiding and operation-terminating device
respect thereto, the normal spacing between the guides
for guiding successive portions of a length of strand ma
being less than the maximum outer dimension of an
terial passing therethrough, for detecting an irregular 65 irregular portion of the coradge, means for normally
urging the guides toward each other, a magnet, magnetic
portion of the strand material and for interrupting a
material secured operatively to a movable one of said
strand-handling operation at a predetermined time sub
guides and positioned adjacent to the magnet, the mag
sequently, which comprises a winding mandrel for coil
netic material being positioned normally outside of the
ing successive portions of a length of strand material, a
frame, a ?rst guide mounted on said frame, a second 70 point of maximum ?eld intensity of the magnet a dis
tance su?iciently great so that the forces exerted on the
guide mounted adjacent to and- a predetermined distance
magnetic material by the magnet are insui?cient to over
from the ?rst guide for relative movement with respect
come the forces exerted thereon by the urging means,
thereto, the normal spacing between the guides being less
the movable one of said guides being moved from the
than the maximum outer dimension of an irregular por
tion of the strand material, means for normally urging 75 normal position thereof by the irregular portion of the
3,0
227
2'?)
19
cordage moving between the guides causing the spacing
between the magnet and the magnetic material to be
come su?iciently small so that the forces exerted on
the magnetic material by the magnet overcome the forces
exerted on the movable guide by the urging means to
amount of movement of the magnetic material toward
the point of maximum ?eld intensity of the magnet.
References Cited in the ?le of this patent
UNITED STATES PATENTS
cause a snap action movement of the movable guide
225,039
Alioth _______________ __ Mar. 2, 1880
as the magnetic material is moved toward the point of
2,565,465
Ames _______ __ <~ _____ Aug. 28, 1951
maximum ?eld intensity of the magnet against the action
of the urging means for rapidly separating the guides 21
suf?cient distance to permit the irregular portion of the 10
cordage to move therebetween, and means for stopping
the coiling operation in response to a predetermined
2,881,982
Miller ____________ __ Apr. 14, 1959
2,898,630
Adams ____‘_‘______'_____ Aug. 11, 1959
711,688
Great Britain _________ __ July 7, 1954
FOREIGN PATENTS
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