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Патент USA US3083962

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April 2, 1963
A. M. GOODLOE ETAL
CAPILLARY STRAND MATERIAL
Filed 001.. 7, 1955
3,083,952
United States Patent
"
3,833,952
Patented Apr. 2, 1963
2
l
formed thereby so as to support capillary ?lms of the
liquid along the strand surface. The ?exible capillary
3,®S3,§52
strand body 10 can be fabricated in various ways to pro
CAPILLARY STRAND MATERIAL
Alfred M. Goodloe, Westlield, and Ralf L. Hartwell,
tl'ranford, N1, assignors, by mesne assignments, to
vide a cylindrical'contact unit diametrically sized for in
serting into a fractionating column or the like so as to
bridge across the interior thereof.
Metal Textiie Corporation, a corporation of Delaware
Filed Oct. 7, 1955, Ser. No. 539,251
2 Claims. (Cl. Zeb-8%)
If said ?exible capillary strand is wound upon itself
and thus convolved to form a contact unit, it is desirable
to provide the same with self-contained means to retain
This invention relates to contact devices for effecting
contact between liquid and vapor or gas in fractionating 10 its associated ?laments against undue separation one
from another. Such means may comprise the provision
vof helically twisted sections t along the length of the
strand 10‘ (see FIG. 2), or may comprise the provision
said contact devices can be produced.
of a gimping member g which is helically wound around
The invention contemplates provision of ?exible capil
lary strand material of indeterminate or inde?nite length 15 and along the strand body (see FIG. 3).
'Another form of the ?exible capillary strand accord
formed from ?ne continuous ?laments of metal or other
non-absorptive substance; the ?laments being so related ~ ing to this invention (see FIG. 4) is produced by knitting
columns, scrubbers and the like, and more particularly
pertains to ?exible capillary strand material from which
a metallic wire or other non-absorptive continuous ?la
in the strand formation produced therefrom as to pro
merit of the approximate'diameter of .0045 of an inch,
vide spaces therebetween of such size that they will seal
with the liquid being treated so as to support a capillary 20 into a tubular knit formation which is then ?attened into
?lm of said liquid between said ?laments and along the
strand formation; such ?exible capillary strand material
being adapted to be wrought, in various ways, into cy
i
.
a strip s, which strip is rolled transversely upon itself into
a linear body I of substantially circular cross-section.
The linear body I thus provided is then drawn through
a compacting die, whereby to compress the same into a
lindrical bodies of diametric size to bridge across the
interior of a fractionating column or the like in stacked 25 relatively dense interstitial strand 11, the interstices of
relation throughout the length thereof.
which are adapted to be readily sealed by liquid contact
\ing the strand so as to support capillary ?lms of liquid
along the surface of the strand body. A similar form
of the ?exible capillary strand (see FIG. 5) can be simi
be associated in various ways to obtain the strand for
mation. This will be understood from the following de 30 larly produced from a strip s’ of braided or woven ?ne
metallic wire or other non-absorptive continuous ?la
scription when considered in connection with the accom
The ?lamentary constituents making up the ?exible
capillary strand material according to this invention can
panying drawings, in which:
HS. 1 is an elevational view of a portion of an in
ment, said strip s’ being then rolled transversely upon
itself into a linear body I’, and said body I’ being there
upon likewise drawn through a compacting die to com
determinate or inde?nite length of ?exible capillary
strand material formed from a plurality of continuous 35 press the same into a relatively dense interstitial strand
body 11', the interstices of which will be readily sealed
?laments bunched together in longitudinal parallel rela
by liquid contacting the strand body so as to support
tion; FIG. 2. is a similar view showing a flexible capillary
capillary ?lms of the liquid along the surface of the same.
strand formed from a plurality of contiguous longitudi
The ?exible capillary strand material, in the forms
nally extending continuous ?laments, said strand being
helically twisted to hold the ?laments in contiguous 40 thereof last above described, can also be fabricated in
various ways to provide a cylindrical contact unit adapted
bunched together relation; and FIG. 3 is a similar view
to be inserted within the interior of a fractionating col
showing a ?exible capillary strand formed from a plu
umn or the like. These respective forms of the flexible
rality of continuous ?laments bunched together in paral
capillary strand may be wound upon themselves into a
lel longitudinal relation, about which is helically wound
a giznping ?lament to hold the bunched ?laments in con 45 convolved, substantially cylindrical contact unit. Before
so winding the strand material upon itself, it is prefera
bly crirnped to provide the same with successive small
transverse serrations 0 extending along its length, said
determinate or inde?nite length of ?exible capillary
small serrations 0 being, for example, of a pitch approxi
strand material formed from a strip of knitted wire and
then laterally compressed to a compacted strand 50 mating 1A; of an inch and of a depth approximating 1Ag
of an inch. Preferably, the thus crimped strand is again
formation.
crimped to provide a succession of relatively large trans
FIG. 5 is an elevational view of a portion of an in
verse serrations c', for example, of a pitch approximating
determinate or inde?nite length of ?exible capillary
9% of an inch, and a depth approximating 3716 of an inch.
strand material formed from a strip of braided or woven
wire and then laterally compressed to a compacted strand 55 When the thus crimped ?exible capillary strand is wound
upon itself into a convolved, substantially cylindrical,
formation.
contact unit, the crimps therein function to space adja
FIG. 6 is an elevational view of the ?exible capillary
cent convolutions thereof one from another, thereby
strand formation which is provided with a succession of
forming, through the interior of the contact unit, a multi
transverse crimps throughout its length.
60 plicity of intercommunicating open areas which provide
Referring to the drawings, the ?exible capillary strand
tortuous paths through which vapor or gas can readily
material in one form thereof (see FIG. 1) comprises a
traverse the contact unit or body mass, and in so doing
plurality of ?ne continuous ?laments j‘ which are assem
make contact with counter?owing liquid which travels
tiguous relationship.
RIG. 4 is an elevational view of a portion of an in
bled together in contiguous, longitudinally extending,
along the capillary strand portions contiguous to said
substantially parallel relation to form the strand body it}. 65 paths.
For example, a very satisfactory flexible strand body is
Since all of the above described forms of capillary
obtained by an assembly of twelve nickel-steel wire ?la
ments of .0045 inch in diameter, although it will be un
derstood a more or less number of wires or other ?la
ments of suitable diameter can be utilized. The ?laments
1‘ so associated provide slight spaces therebetween which
will be readily sealed by liquid contacting the strand
strand material are ?exible and can be provided in any
suitable length, any thereof can be suitably manipulated
or Wrought into a contact unit, the intercommunicating
open areas or interstices of which are uniformly dis
tributed, across and upwardly through the contact unit
so as to form diversely interconnecting tortuous passages
3,083,952
3
4
which assure good through put of vapor movement in
contact with counter?owing liquid which runs along and
through the capillary passages or spaces of the strand
2. A ?exible capillary strand of inde?nite but great
length adapted to be wrought into a contact unit for use
in vapor and liquid contact apparatus, said strand com
prising a mesh strip fabricated from ?ne continuous ?la
mentary material rolled transversely upon itself into a
per se. Since the'vapor ?ows through the communicat
ing interstices or open areas of the contact unit in tor
tuous and intersecting paths, repeated division and re
combination of vapor streams occurs, thereby e?’iciently
linear body, and‘ said linear body being laterally com
pressed to form a relatively dense contact material, the
interstices of which are adapted to be readily sealed by
promoting thorough mixing of the vapor. The’ liquid
similarly ?ows along the capillary strand material until.
liquid contacting said material, whereby to support capil
it reaches points where two portions of the latter’ touch 10 lary ?lms along the surface of said material, said strand
each other, at’ which points part of the liquid may leave
being crimped to provide the same with a succession of
one strand portion and transfer to the other strand‘ por
transverse small serrations along the length thereof and
tion, whereby the liquid streams are also repeatedly di
having another succession of superposed transverse large
serrations along the length thereof.
vided and recombined with other streams, thereby assur
ing thorough mixing of the liquid.
Inasmuch as variations in the form of the ?exible
15
References Cited in the ?le of this patent
capillary strand material may be made without departing
from the principles of this invention, it will be under
stood that the invention is not to be limited except by the
scope of the herefollowing claims.
What is claimed is:
1. A ?exible capillary strand‘ of inde?nite but great
length adapted to be ‘wrought into a contact unit for use
in vapor and liquid contact apparatus, said strand com
prising a mesh strip fabricated from ?ne continuous ?la 25
mentary material rolled transversely upon itself into a
linear body, and said linear body being laterally com
pressed to form a relatively dense contact material, the
interstices of which are adapted to be readily sealed by
UNITED STATES PATENTS
437,902
Herder _______________ .._ Oct. 7, 1890
452,103
459,462
1,692,627
Harris ______________ __ May 12, ‘1891
Smith ______________ __ Sept. 15, 1891
Clark ______________ __. Nov. 20, 1928
1,976,491
2,029,994
2,226,792
2,376,039
2,583,769
2,615,832
Gottscholk ____________ __ Oct. 9,
Fabel ________________ __ Feb. 4,
Walters _____________ __ Dec. 31,
Driscoll et a1. ________ __ May 15,
Gaugler _____________ _. Jan. 29,
Dixon ______________ __ Oct. 28,
2,702,460
1945
1952
1952
Gaugler _____________ __ Feb. 22, 1955
912,201
Germany ____________ __ May 28, 1954
1,043,959
France ______________ _. June 17, 1953
liquid contacting said material, whereby to support capil
lary ?lms along the surface of said material, said strand
being crimped to provide the same with a succession of
transverse serrations along the length thereof.
1934
1936
1940
FOREIGN PATENTS
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