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Патент USA US3085390

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April 16, 1963
E. E. DILLMAN ETAL
3,085,380
ADSORPTION PROCESS
4 Sheets-Sheet 1
Filed Oct. 25, 1959
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April 16, 1963
E. E. DILLMAN ETAL
3,085,380
ADSORPTION PROCESS
Filed 00'0. 23, 1959
4 Sheets-Sheet 2
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April 16, 1963
E. E. DILLMAN ETAL.
3,085,380
ADSORPTION PROCESS
Filed Oct. 25, 1959
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Edward E. .0H/man
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_ April 16, 1963
E. E. DILLMAN ETAL
'3,085,380
ADSORPTION PROCESS
4 Sheets-Sheet 4
Filed Oct. 25, 1959
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of the process with a minimum requirement of fuel, ad
sorbent and equipment investment for the process.
3,085,330
Another object of this invention is to provide a new
ADSQRPTKON PROCESS
and improved process employing adsorption beds for
Edward E. Dillman and Dan Ringo, Houston, Tex., and
Farwell C. Boston, Shreveport, La., assignors to En
gineers & Fabricators, Inc., Houston, Tex., a corpora
tion
.
Patented Apr. 16, 1963
treating gases wherein a portion of the treated gas is
used in a countercurrent series flow through two of the
adsorption beds which are on the regeneration and purge
phases so as to obtain a preheating in the regeneration
Filed Oct. 23, 1959, Ser. No. 850,504
16 Claims. (Cl. 5S--62)
phase and substantially complete removal of the adsorbed
components in the purge phase with a reduced quantity of
such gas being required as compared to flowing such gas
This invention relates to new and useful improve
ments in adsorption processes, and particularly to adsorp
tion processes for removing hydrogen sulfide (H28) from
through only the regeneration phase.
The preferred embodiment of this invention will be de
scribed hereinafter, together with other features thereof,
and additional objects will become evident from such de
a gas containing same.
This application is a continuation-in-part of U.S. patent
application Serial No. 818,576 filed June 8, 1959, now
scription.
The invention will be more readily understood from a
abandoned.
In the gas industry, field or natural gas containing hy
reading of the following specification and by reference to
the accompanying drawings forming a part thereof, where
drogen sulfide (H28) is known as sour gas and gas from
which the hydrogen sulfide is substantially removed iS
in an example of the invention is shown, and wherein:
FIG. 1 is a simplified schematic view of the process of
this invention;
known as sweet gas. The field or natural gas is principally
formed of gaseous hydrocarbons, as is Well known. Gen
erally some water is also present in the gas along with the
hydrogen sulfide as the gas comes from the field. AIt iS
FIG. 2 is a more detailed schematic view of the process
usually desirable to remove the hydrogen sulfide and the 25
water from the gas before transmitting the gas to the users.
of this invention;
FIG. 3 is a schematic view of a modified form of the
process of this invention; and
The sweetening and dehydration processes heretofore used
have employed expensive chemicals such as glycols for de
hydration and amines for sweetening and therefore such
processes have been relatively expensive. Other processes
have employed adsorption beds but they have been gen
erally uneconomical because of large losses of the hydro
FIG. 4 is a more detailed schematic view of the modi
fied process of FIG. 3.
Briefly, the process of this invention involves the re
30 moval of hydrogen sulñde, and in the usual case water
carbon gases in purging and for other reasons which have
been overcome by the present invention.
It is therefore an object of this invention to provide a
pane, butanes, pentanes, hexanes, heptanes, octanes, and
new and improved process for removing hydrogen sulfide
from natural gases containing same which process elimi
also, from a feed gas which is principally composed of
one or more hydrocarbons such as methane, ethane, pro
in some cases even longer chain hydrocarbons. As will be
explained in detail hereinafter, the process employs a plu
rality of adsorption beds B-1, B-Z, B-3 and B-4, which
are used for adsorbing the hydrogen sulfide, and usually
nates the necessity for the relatively expensive chemicals
water, from the feed gas in a predetermined cycle of op
erations. While a plurality of the adsorption beds are
large losses of the hydrocarbon gases which occurred in 40 connected in series for the adsorption cycle on those beds,
one of the beds is on a regeneration cycle using gas which
other prior processes.
has been stripped by passing through at least one of the
Another object of this invention is to provide a new and
adsorption beds on the adsorption cycle. The gas which is
improved process for sweetening sour gas wherein a plu
thus used as a regeneration gas is subsequently treated, as
rality of adsorption beds are used, and wherein a portion
of the gas which is sweetened in the process is also used 45 will be explained, to separate the hydrogen sulfide and
water from the gas so that such gas is recycled back to the
for regenerating one of the adsorption beds and is there
adsorption beds which are on the adsorption cycle and the
after recycled in the system to obtain sweetened product
product gas is obtained from the adsorption beds with the
gas therefrom.
An important object of this invention is to provide a
recycled gas included therewith. As will be more evident
new and improved process employing adsorption beds for 50 hereinafter, with the process of this invention, there is sub
stantially no loss of the hydrocarbon gas. Also, the hy
treating sour gas to sweeten same wherein sweetened gas
heretofore used in some processes and also eliminates the
from one of the beds in the process is used as a regenera
drogen sulfide is obtained in a relatively pure form so that
tion gas for another of the beds in the process, and where
in such regeneration gas with a high concentration of
the sulphur may be obtained therefrom by subsequent
processing if desired. Additionally, the process of this in
hydrogen sulfide is treated to separate the hydrogen sulfide
therefrom and to thereafter recycle the regeneration gas
55 vention may be operated without the use of a pump or
to another bed in the process.
A further object of this invention is to provide a new
and improved process employing adsorption beds for
other gas circulator device for the circulation of the gas
from the point of introduction through the process to the
point of discharge as product gas.
Considering first the simplified schematic illustration
sweetening and drying sour natural gases in which a sweet 60 lof the process as shown in FIG. 1 of the drawings, the
and dry regeneration gas is obtained from the process and
is circulated and recycled without requiring a pump or
other mechanical gas circulator for such purpose.
Still another object of this invention is to provide a new
feed gas is introduced through line 10 directly from the
well producing such gas or from any other source produc
ing gas which contains hydrogen sulfide and therefore iS
called a sour gas. Such gas will normally also have water
and improved process for treating sour hydrocarbon gases 65 present therewith, although this process may be used for
removing only the hydrogen sulfide if the gas has been
wherein high purity hydrogen sulfide is removed and at the
previously dehydrated or dried. The gas, as previously
same time hydrocarbon flare gas loss is substantially elimi
pointed out, is a hydrocarbon gas in which the hydrocar
nated.
bons are in a gaseous condition at the temperature and
A particular object of this invention is to provide a new
pressure of the gas as it enters and flows through the
70
and improved process employing adsorption beds for the
process of this invention.
sweetening of sour gases wherein the adsorbent in each
The :feed gas which is introduced through the line 10
bed is substantially completely regenerated in each cycle
3
8,085,380
flows to a separator 11 where any of the liquid water or
hydrocarbons are separated from the gaseous hydrocar-bons and the gaseous hydrogen sulfide and water therei
with. The separated water is discharged through line
11a having a valve 11b therewith while the hydrocarbon
liquids are separated through line 12a having valve 12b
therewith. Such separation is accomplished in any known
manner such as by cooling below the temperature at
4
exchange relationship with the incoming gas flowing
through -line 15 to line 17, as previously pointed out.
Since the regeneration gas flowing through line 32 is
warmer than the incoming gas through line 15, the re
generation gas in line 32 is cooled while the incoming
gas in lline 15 is heated in the heat exchange relationship
of the heat exchanger 16.
The regeneration gas with its high concentration of
hydrogen sulfide i ows from the heat exchanger 16 through
which it comes from the feed rline 1f). The gas then
passes from the separator 11 through a conventional 10
the line 34 to an absorber tower 35 for countercurrent
filter 14 which filters Iany foreign particles from the gas
flow with respect to water which is introduced through
the line 37. The water absorbs hydrogen sulfide from
the hydrocarbon gas ‘and therefore the hydrocarbon gas
relationship with the regeneration gas, as will be more
is discharged from the absorber 35 through line 40 for
fully explained hereinafter, «and then the gas flows through 15 recycling
or return to the adsorption phase of the system.
line 17 to the first »adsorption bed B-1. The bed B~1, and
If water is present in the gas from line 32, it is condensed
also the other adsorption beds, each has an adsorbent
prior to the absorber by the exchangers 33 and 16 and
therein which is `cap-able of preferentially adsorbing hy
is separated from the gas 4-in the accumulator 46. The
drogen sulfide. Also, preferably the adsorbent adsorbs
the water vapor present in the gas yalong with the hydrogen 20 regeneration gas from line 40 is mixed with the gas flow
ing from the first adsorption bed B-1 to the second ad
sulfide. Preferably, the natural zeolites or any of the
sorption bed B-2 through the line 18 Iand the line 19.
synthetic zeolites such »as manufactured by the Linde
Thus, the line 4f) is joined with the line 18 and the gases
Company ycould be used as the adbsorbent because such
from both lines flow together through line 19 to the second
zeolites are capable of adsorbing the hydrogen sulfide
adsorption bed B-Z. Thereafter, the mixed gases flow
and the water preferentially.
25 through the ,adsorption bed B~2, line 20, the third ad
As shown in FIG. l of the drawings, the adsorption
sorption bed B-3 and then they «are discharged through
beds B-l, B-2 «and B«3 are connected in series so that
line 21, the cooler 22 and the product »line 23. The pres
after the gas leaves the adsorption bed B-l it flows
sure of the gas in line 40 as it is mixed with the gas in
through line 18 to line 19 and then through bed B-Z.
The Iga-s i-s then -discharged from «the adsorption bed B-Z 30 line 18 Iis at substantially the `same pressure as the gas in
the line 18 and such pressure is controlled lby the setting
through line 2t) and flows in ser-ies through the bed B-3.
of
the differential pressure control Valve 30. Such control
The gas is subsequently discharged from the adsorption
is obtained by setting the differential pressure control valve
bed B-3 through line 21 and an atmospheric cooler or
30 -so that the drop in pressure from the upstream side
heat exchanger 22 to the product discharge line 23.
Normally, the first two adsorption beds B-l and B-Z in 35 of the valve 30 to the downstream side thereof in line
18 is substantially equal to the pressure drop of .the por
series will accomplish the adsorption and the bed B-3
tion of the gas flowing from line 25 to line 40.
will be principally on a cooling cycle to cool same pre
The hydrogen sulfide and the water 'are also separated
paratory to placing it in the second position of the cycle,
from each »other yby any suitable procedure such as illus
as will be more evident hereinafter.
While the beds B-l, B-2 :and B-3 are on the adsorption 40 trated schematically in FIG. 1 wherein the water with
the absorbed hydrogen sulfide is discharged through a
cycle, the bed B-4 is on the regeneration cycle. In
liquid levell control valve 45 to a flash Itank 46. Since
order to provide a regeneration gas for the regeneration
the gas flowing through the system will normally be
of the adsorption bed B-4, a portion of the gas from line
at a pressure above atmospheric, the flash tank 45 is
18 is directed »through line 25, through »a heater 26 to in
crease -the temperature of the gas, and then to the adsorp 45 operated at Vatmospheric pressure so that the hydrogen
sulfide »is flashed »or is vaporized from the water and is
tion bed B-4. Lt is to be noted that the portion of the gas
released
or `discharged from the tank 46 through the line
which is `taken from line 18 Iis taken upstream from a
prior to its discharge through line 15. The gas flows
from line 15 through a heat exchanger 16 in heat exchange
47 as a gas. Such hydrogen sulfide gas may l@hen be
differential pressure control valve 30 of known construc
burned in an open flare or it m-ay be passed to a sulphur
tion which has suitable control leads 38a and 30h extend
recovery plant for further processing. It is to be pointed
ing to the sides of the line 18 on each side `of the valve 30. 50
out
that the »concentration of the hydrogen sulfide in the
The valve 30 is controlled so that only a relatively smald
gas which Ais discharged through line 47 is high as com
porti-'on of the gas from the line 18 is directed through
pared with «the hydrogen sulfide in .the incoming gas and
the line 25 andthe main stream continues to flow through
it contains a very small amount of hydrocarbon gas there
the valve 30 to the line 19 and the ladsorption bed B-2.
Since the regeneration gas which is fed from the dis 55 with so that there is substantially no hydrocarbon gas
charge of the first adsorption bed B-l through line 25
to and through the adsorption lbed B-4 is stripped of all, or
substantially all, of of its hydrogen sulfide and water, the
regeneration gas is therefore capable of absorbing the
maximum quantity of the hydrogen sulfide -from the ad 60
loss with the flaring or Iother disposal of the hydrogen
sulfide gas from the flash tank 46. The water is separated
in the known manner with a liquid level control valve
48 discharging the water through line 49 when the level
of the water in the tank 46 reaches a predetermined point.
However,
a majority of the water is recirculated with a
sorbent present in the adsorption bed B--4. In that Way,
pump 5t) connected to line 51 leading from the flash tank
the adsorbent in the adsorption bed B-4 is regenerated
46. The pump 50 pumps the water through line 37 to
by the removal or stripping of the hydrogen sulfide from
the
absorber tower 35. The pump 50 may be driven by
the bed B-4 with the lean or stripped gas being used for
any suitable power source, but preferably a gas driven
the regeneration. Of course, if any water is present in 65 engine
51 wouid be used.
-the adsorbent in lthe bed B-4, such water will also be
It
is
-to be noted that in carryingk out the process or
removed or stripped from the bed with the regeneration
system of this invention, no pump is required for the
circulation of the gas through the system. Such elimi
nation of the pump is possible when the -feed gas intro
the bed B-4 as compared to the amount of hydrogen sul 70
duced through line 1t)l is at the normal pressures obtained
fide in the feed gas introduced through line 10.
from the field which usually exceed 250 pounds per
The regeneration gas is discharged from the adsorption
square inch. However, so long as the pressure of the
bed BJ» through discharge line 32 and an atmospheric
feed gas is sufficient to recycle the regeneration gas at a
cooler '33 to ñow through the heat exchanger 16 in heat
pressure above atmospheric and discharge the product or
gas passing therethrough. A high concentration of the
hydrogen sulfide is thus obtained in the gas coming from
3,085,380
The valve 711 has its outlet connected to the discharge
line 18 and it has inlet lines 7la, "ilb, 71C and 7=1d which
are connected to the discharge side of the adsorption
sweet gas through the line 23 at atmospheric or slightly
above atmospheric, the system will be operative without
a pump. Normally, when a pump is not employed, the
system therefore requires a pressure of at least about 50
pounds per square inch, although it is to be understood
that the invention is not to be limited to any particular
pressure. If a pump is not used, the pressure must be
beds B-I, B-Z, B-3 and B-4, respectively. In the par
ticular cycle illustrated in FIG. 2, the line 71a -to the
valve 71 is open >for ilow through the valve 71 to the line
sufficient to accomplish the driving -force for the recycling
of the regeneration gas and the obtaining of the product
gas as explained. When the feed gas is at the pressure
above atmospheric pressure for the feeding of lthe gas.
through the system without a pump, the flask tank is
at atmospheric pressure for the flashing of the hydrogen
suliide from the water which occurs spontaneously be
cause of the drop in pressure in the tank. However, if 15
the system is operated with a pump to force the gas
through the system, the llask tank may be operated at a
»18 from the adsorption bed B-1.
The valve 72 has its outlet connected to line 20 and it
has inlet lines 72a, 72b, 72e and 72d connected there
with and also to the lines "71a, 7'1b, 7|1c and 71d, respec
tively. In the particular cycle illustrated in FIG. 2, the
line 72b is open to the valve 72 and therefore the dis
charge from the adsorption bed B-2 flows through the
line 72b and the valve 72 to the line 20.
The valve 73 has its outlet connected to the line 211 and
it has its inlet connected to the lines 73a, 73h, 73o and
73d, which are connected to Ithe lines 71a, 71b, 71e and
71d, respectively. In the particular cycle illustrated in
pressure below atmospheric pressure for the flashing of
FIG. 2, the inlet line 73C -to the valve 73 is open so that
the hydrogen sulfide from the water.
the discharge from the adsorption bed -B-3 lñows through
20
Referring now to FIG. 2 of the drawings wherein a
the valve 73 to the line 2‘1.
The valve 7-4 has its outlet connected to the line 32 and
more detailed flow sheet of the process is shown, the parts
which are the same in FIGS. 1 and 2 have the same nu
it has inlet lines 74a, 74h, 74C and 74d connected 4thereto
merals and letters. Basically, the process of FIG. 2 is
and to the lines 71a, 7db, 711e and 71d, respectively. In
identical with the process of FIG. l, except that multi
the particular cycle illustrated in FIG. 2, the line 74d is
port rotary valves are included in the system of FIG. 2.
open to the valve 74 so that the discharge from the bed
for changing the phase with respect to each of the adsorp
B-4 which is on the regeneration cycle is directed
tion beds periodically in accordance with the cycle con
-through the valve 74 to the line 32.
trol designated at 60 in FIG. 2. Such cycle controls may
The process disclosed in connection with the ilow sheet
be any standard controls for regulating the switching of 30 of FIG. l of the drawings is identical with the process
the valves to the beds B-1, B-2, B-3 and B-4 in accord
which is disclosed in connection with FIG. 2 when the
ance with the temperatures of the gases iiowing rfrom the
valves are positioned as illustrated in FIG. 2 of the draw
>lines to which the cycle controls 60 are connected.
ings. In other words, the beds B-l, B-2 and B-3 are
In FIG. 2, -the multi-port rotary valves `611, 6,2, -63 'and
connected in series for adsorption, with the principal
64 are the inlet multi-port rotary valves and the valves 35 adsorption of the hydrogen sulfide and water occurring
71, ’72, 73 and 7‘4 are the outlet multi-port rotary Valves.
in the first two adsorption beds B-l and B-2 and with
Such valves are preferably of the construction disclosed
the bed B-3 being cooled preparatory to being moved to
in United States patent application Serial No. `669,753
the second position. Such cooling is desirable because
fried Jul-y 3, 1957.
the bed B-3 has previously been on the regeneration
The valve 61 has its inlet connected to line 17 and its 40 cycle, as will be more evident hereinafter and when on
outlet connected with lines 61a, 61h, 61e and 61d. Only
such regeneration cycle is warmed or heated by the
one of such outlets is open at a time and in the illustra
warmed regeneration gas.
tion of FIG. 2 of the drawings, the outlet line 61a is
the only outlet open so that the gas from line 17 passes
through t-he valve 61 and out through the opening for the
line 61a to ñow through the adsorption bed B-'1. As
The bed B-4 is on the re
generation cycle and the regeneration gas is ñowing there
through.
The cycle controls indicated at 60 are con
nected with suitable Átemperature control lines 60a and
60h to the ilow lines 21 and 32, respectively, so that the
temperature controls are actuated to rotate the valves
61-64 and 71-74 to the next phase or cycle when the
will be more evident hereinafter, as the valve 61 is ro
tated, the openings 61a, 61h, 61e and 61d are consecu
tively opened for 4iiow to the adsorption beds B-d, B-2,
temperature condition in the lines 21 and 32 have reached
The tempera
ture of the gas being discharged through the line 21 is
indicative of the extent of the adsorption in the beds
B-tl, B-2 and B-S which are on the adsorption phase
lines 61a, 61b, 61C and 61d, respectively. In the par
or cycle and the temperature of the gas in t-he line 32
ticular cycle illustrated in FIG. 2, the valve `62 is open 55 is indicative of the extent of regeneration of the gas in
to the outlet line 62h and therefore to the line 61h for
the bed B~4 which is on lthe regeneration cycle, so that
flow to the second adsorption bed B-Z.
when both of the phases, namely the adsorption and the
The lmulti-port rotary valve 63 has its inlet connected
regeneration have reached their desired temperatures and
to the line Ztl and it has outlet lines 63a, 63h, »63e and
optimum operating conditions, then the cycle controls 60
63d which are connected with lines 61a, 6-1b, l611C and
operate to shift the multi-port rotary valves to change the
61d, respectively. vIn the particular cycle illustrated in
beds
to the next position.
FIG. 2, lthe outlet line 63C is the only outlet line from
Such shifting of the valves will place the bed B-Z in
the valve 63 which is open so that there is ñow through
communication with the line 17 and therefore it will be
the valve 63 from the line 20 to the line 63C and then to
the first adsorption bed which will be connected in series
the line 61C and tinally to the adsorption bed B-3, as 65 with the adsorption beds B-3 and B-4. Therefore, the
will be more fully explained.
bed B-4 will actually be the third bed in series and will
rIihe multi-port rotary valve 64 has its inlet connected
be cooled by the gas liowing therethrough. Since such
to the flow line 2S -for receiving the regeneration gas and
bed was previously on the regeneration cycle, the cooling
such valve «64 has outlet lines 64a, 64b, »64e and 64d
is desirable prior to its being placed in the second and
’ which are connected with lines 61a, 61h, 6‘1c and 61d, 70 then the first adsorption positions. The bed B-l is
B-3 and B-4, respectively.
'
The inlet valve 62 has its inlet connected to the line
19 and it has its outlet connected to outlet lines 62a, 62b,
62e and 62d, which are in turn connected with the flow
50 the desired or predetermined conditions.
respectively. In the particular cycle illustrated in FIG. 2,
shifted to the regeneration cycle so that the regeneration
the line 64d is the only outlet `from the valve 64 which
gas from line 25 flows through the valve 64 to the bed
‘ is open so that the viiow occurs through the line 64d to
B-1.
the line 61d and then to the bed B-«4 which is on the
regeneration cycle.
,
75
.
Subsequent shifting of the multi-port rotary valves
snee-,eed
l
Y
,
.
8
places the bed B-3 as the first adsorption bed, the bed
regulator 82 is connected to the line 119 with a standard
B-4 as the second adsorption bed in series and the bed
oritice connection 82b and line 82a and such regulator
B-l as the third adsorption bed in series. In that in
works in conjunction with the controller 81 through line
stance, the bed B-Z is on the regeneration cycle.
87a to control the amount of by-pass around the pump
The next shift in the multi-port rotary valves places
50 through the valve 87.
the adsorption bed B-4 in the ñrst adsorption position,
The gas flowing through the valve 121a is directed
the bed B-1 in the second adsorption position and the
through
a heater 122 which heats the sweetened gas prior
bed B-Z in the third adsorption position. At that time,
to its flow to the bed B-3. The temperature of the gas
the bed B-3 is on the regeneration phase or cycle. When
from the heater 122 may ‘be varied, depending
the multi-port rotary valves are again shifted, they will be 10 flowing
upon
the
particular conditions of operation and the par
returned to the positions indicated in FIG. 2 so that the
ticular adsorbents used, but in the preferred form of the
beds will then be on the positions previously described
invention the gas ywill be heated to approximately 550°
wherein the beds B-l, B-Z and B-3 are on the adsorp
F.
prior to passing through the bed B-3. The heated gas
tion cycle or phase and the bed B-4 is on the regenera
passes
from the heater 122 to the bed B-3 through flow
tion cycle or phase. Therefore, it can be seen that the
line 83 and is discharged therefrom through line 84. It
process of FIG. 1 is identical with the process of FIG. 2
is to be noted that the direction of the ñow of the heated
except that the process of FIG. 1 is a continuous process
gas
through the bed B-3 is countercurrent or opposite
with the beds -being shifted with suitable controls. The
from the direction of the gas flowing through the beds
shifting of the beds may be accomplished with any suit
B~1 .and B~2 which are on the adsorption phase of the
able equipment, including time control devices.
20 cycle. The gas flows Áfrom the line 84 to the -bed B-4
In FIG. 3 of the drawings, a modified form of the
and is discharged therefrom through line 132. Again, it
invention is illustrated, wherein those parts which are
should l‘be-noted that the flow of the gas through the bed
identical with parts shown in the flow diagram of FIG.
B-4 is countercurrent or opposite from the flow of the
1 bear like numerals or letters. Generally speaking,
the method illustrated in FIG. 3 differs `from the methods 25 gas through the beds B-l and B-Z which are on the ad
sorption phase of the cycle. It should also be evident
illustrated in FIG. 1 and 2 in that in the FIG. 3 method,
`from FIG. 3 that the beds B-3 and B-4 are in series
the sweetened gas from the second adsorption bed in
with each other, with the bed B-3 being on the purge
series is passed through two other adsorption beds which
’phase and with the bed B-4 being on the regeneration
are on the purge and regeneration phases. As will be
more fully explained, with the modiñed form of the proc 30 phase. An atmospheric cooler 133 is connected in the
line 132 for partially cooling the hot gases discharged
ess of this invention as illustrated in FIG. 3, a preheating
from
the bed B-4 and also there yis a further cooling
of the adsorption bed on the regeneration phase is ac
in heat exchanger 16 as the gas flows through a three-way
complished so that substantially complete removal of
valve 85 to the absorber tower 35 for countercurrent ñow
the adsorbed components in the purge phase is accom
in
the usual manner with respect to water which is in
plished with a reduced quantity of the sweetened gas. 35
troduced through the line 37. The feed of the water
Considering the form of the invention shown in FIG. 3
through line 37 to the absorber tower 35 is accomplished
more in detail, the incoming feed gas is introduced
with the same equipment and procedure as explained pre
through the feed line 10 and it flows to the separator 11
viously
in connection with FIG. 1 and the same parts
which is used in the same manner as heretofore ex
plained in connection with FIG. l. Also, as previously 40 have the same numerals. An -additional bypass line 86
is preferably provided in the form of the invention shown
explained in connection with FIG. 1 the separated water
in
FIG. 3 with a valve 87 connected in such line 86,
is discharged through line 11a having valve 11b there
which, as previously mentioned, is connected to the con
withwhile the hydrocarbon liquids are separated through
troller 81 so that the amount of water circulated to the
the line 12a having the valve 12b therewith. The sep
tower
35 through the line 37 is regulated in accordance
arated gas passes from the separator 11 through the ñlter 45
with the amount of the feed gas entering the system.
14 to the discharge line 15. The gas flows from line 15
The hydrocarbon gas from which the hydrogen sulñde
through the heat exchanger 16 to line 17 which has a
and
water have been removed is discharged through line
three-way valve 80 therein. The line 17 is connected
A140 to a vapor or mist extractor 88 which removes any
with the adsorption bed B-l. The bed B-l as well as
the other beds B-2, B-3 and B-4 have an adsorbent there 50 entrained mist or water vapor in the hydrocarbon gas
and returns same through line 88a, the ñow of which is
in which is capable of preferentially adsorbing hydrogen
sulfide, and also preferably the adsorbent adsorbs the
controlled »by means of a valve 89 or any other suitable
gas is thus substantially dry as
water vapor present in the gas along with the hydrogen.
sulfide. Any of the adsorbents previously identiiied in>
extractor 83 through line 90
connection with the method illustrated in FIGS. 1 anfl 55 and such gas is pumped by means of a gas circulator or
compressor 91 which recycles the gas through line 92 to
2 of the drawings maybe used in FIG. 3. The gas leav
line 17 which returns the gas to the adsorption bed B-I.
ing the bed B-1 flows through line 118 to the adsorption
The valve y85 is connected with a ñow line 94 which
bed B-Z which bed B-2 is thus in series with the bed
Hows
into the line 90 and therefore, as will be more fully
B-1. The sweetened gas liowing «from the bed B-Z is
explained, when the valve
‘
discharged through line 120 which connects with lines 121 60
and 123. The line 123 flows to the product line or to
through the line 9‘4 rather than to the absorber tower 35,
storage through a suitable valve 123m which preferably
the gas in line 94 is recirculated or cycled back through
has a known type of ñow meter 12311 connected there
the adsorption bed B~1 with the pump or compressor 91.
with. The sweetened gas which flows from line 120 into
The three-way valve 85 and the three-way valve 80 may
line 1'21 flows through a control valve 121a which regu 65
be controlled manually or by any suitable automatic
lates the flow of such gas to the adsorption beds B-3 and
means, but as illustrated in the drawings, a pair of tern
B-4. The flow through the valve 12in may be controlled
perature controllers 95 and n9.5 are mounted in conjunc
manually or by any suitable known equipment or appara
tion with cycle controls schematically shown at 97 for
tus, `and as schematically illustrated in FIG. 3, the valve
controlling such operation. The temperature controller
121a is connected with a conventional iiow ratio controller 70 95 is connected with the three-way valve 85 through line
81 through a line 121b. The flow ratio controller 81 is
35a and lwith three-way valve 80 through line 80u so that
connected with the inlet line 10 through line 81a and .a
when
the temperature in the line 132 reaches a predeter
standard orifice connection 81h so that as the inlet flow
mined point, the valves 811 and 85 are shifted to direct
of gas varies, the amount of regeneration gas flowing
the flow of gas through the valve `85 to line 94 and
through the valve-12111 will vary. Another conventional
through the valve 80 to line 98. The temperature con
3,085,380
troller 96 is connected With the line 132 through line 96a
and to the cycle controls 97 through line 97aI for the
purpose of shifting the multi-port rotary valves, as ex
plained hereinafter in connection with FIG. 4 so as to
shift the ñow of gases to the beds.
In carrying out the method or process of this invention
as illustrated in the form thereof shown in FIG. 3 of the
drawings, the incoming feed gas is caused to flow in series
through the beds B-1 and B-2, and a portion of the gas
10'
ess of FIG. 3, except that Vthe multi-port rotary valves
are included in the illustration of FIG. 4 for changing the
cycle or phase with respect to each of the adsorption beds
periodically in accordance with the cycle control designat-
ed with the numeral 97 in FIGS. 3 and 4. Such cycle
controls, as previously explained, may be any standard
controls for regulating the switching of the valves to the
beds B-1, B-2, B-3 and B-4 of FIGS. 3 and 4 in accord
ance with the temperature and ñow conditions of the gases
flowing from the line or lines to which the cycle controls
10
discharged from the yadsorption bed B'-2 through line _120
97 are connected.
is discharged as a sweetened gas through line 123. A
In FIG. 4, the multi-port rotary valves 161, 162, 163
portion of such sweetened gas from the bed B-2 is passed
and 164 are the inlet multi-port rotary valves and the
through line 21 and heater 122 to the bed B-3 which is
multi-port rotary valves 1171, 172, 173 and 174 are the out
on the purge phase. Since the bed B-3 was previously
let multi-port rotary valves. Such valves are preferably
on the regeneration phase when it was in the position of 15 of the construction disclosed in United States patent ap
the bed B--4, the bed B-3 has been previously heated and
plication Serial No. 669,753 filed July 3, 1957.
therefore the initial gas ñowing through the line 83 and
The valve 161 has its inlet connected to the line 17 and
then through the bed B-3 is able to remove substantially
its outlet connected with lines 1i61a, 161b, 4161e- and 1611i.
all of the adsorbed hydrogen sulfide and water in the bed
Only one of such outlet lines is open at a time and in the
B«3 with the gas and with a relatively small quantity of 20 illustration of FIG. 4 of the drawings, the outlet line 161@
the sweetened gas. This is because the bed B-3 has been
is the only outlet which is open so that the gas from the
preheated by the previous regeneration phase. Thus, the
line 17 passes through the valve 161 and out through the
hot gas with the entrained or adsorbed components of
opening for the line 161a to flow through the adsorption
the hydrogen sulfide and the water in the extremely con
bed B-l. As ywill be more evident hereinafter, as the
centrated form are then passed to the bed B-4 and the .25 valve 161 is rotated, the lines 16101, 161b, ‘161e and 161d
heat of the gas heats up the bed B-4 until it has come up
are consecutively opened for flow to the adsorption beds
to the desired temperature, which is preferably in the
B-1,
B-2, ’I3-3 and B-4, respectively.
order of about 550° F. Very little, if any, of the ad
The inlet valve 162 has its inlet connected to the line
sorbed components in the bed B-4 are removed with the
118 and it has its outlet connected to outlet lines 162a,
gas in the regeneration phase indicated by the bed B‘-4 30 16217, 162C and i162d, which are in turn connected with
in FIG. 3, but instead the bed B-4 is actually being pre
the iiow lines 161a, 161b, 161C and 161d, respectively.
heated for the subsequent purging when it reaches the
In the particular cycle illustrated in FIG. 4, the valve 162
position of the bed B-3 on the purge phase. The gas with
is open to the outlet line 162b and therefore to the line
the concentration of the hydrogen sulñde therein then
161b for ñow to the second adsorption bed B-2.
35
Hows through the line 132 from the bed B-4 and to the
The multi-port rotary valve 163 has its inlet connected
absorber tower 35 for the extraction and separation of the
to the line 83 and it has outlet lines 163a, 1631;, 163C and
hydrogen sulfide, as previously explained. The valve 85
1634i which are connected ywith lines 15101, 151b, 151C
would be open during such period for the liow to the
and 151d‘ which are in turn connected with the adsorption
absorber 35 from the line 132 and would -be closed for
beds
B-1, B-2,lB-3 and B-4, respectively. In the partic
ñow from the line 132 to the line 94. However, since 40 ular cycle illustrated in FIG. 4, the outlet line 163e is the
the amount of the regeneration gas which ñows through
only outlet line from the valve 163 which is open so that
the line 83 to the bed B-3 and ultimately to the bed B44
there is flow through the valve 163 from the line 83 to
is relatively small as compared to the amount of regenera
the line '151C and finally to the adsorption bed B-3, as
tion gas Which would be required if only a single regenera
be rnore fully explained.
tion step were utilized, the time for such regeneration 45 willThe
multi-port rotary valve 164 has its inlet connected
cycle is shortened and therefore when the bed B-3 has
to the rflow line 84 and it has outlet lines 164:1, 164b,
been fully purged, the gas which then flows through the
164e and 164d which are connected with the flow lines
bed B-4 has practically no hydrogen sulñde or water
151a, ‘151b, 151C and 151d, respectively. yIn the par
therewith for the latter part of the stage and that gas is
ticular cycle illustrated in FIG. 4, the line 164d is the only
preferably returned or recycled back to the hed B-1. To 50 outlet from the valve 164 which is open so that the flow
accomplish such recycling of the lean hydrocarbon gas
occur-s through the valve 164 to the line 164d and the
which is coming off of the bed B-4 through the line l132
line 151d and then to the bed B~4.
during the latter part of the regeneration phase, the three
rlîhe outlet valve 171 has its outlet connected to the
way valve 85 is manipulated so as to close the flow of the
ñow line 11S and it has inlet lines 17111, 171b, 171C
gas from the line |132 to the absorber tower 35 and to 55 and 171d which are connected with the ñow lines 151a,
open same to the line 94. At the same time the valve 85
151b, 151C and 151d, respectively. _In the particular cycle
is so manipulated, the valve 80 is manipulated so that in
illustrated in FIG. 4, the line ‘171a is open while the
stead of the gas ñowing in the line 15 flowing through the
other lines 171b, 171e and 171d are closed so that the
line 17, such gas is caused to flow through line 98 from
fluid
flows from »the -bed B-1 through line 171a and then
the valve 80 to the absorber tower 35. This gives the 60
through
the valve 171 to the line 118.
incoming feed gas an initial pass through the absorber
The valve 172 has its outlet connected to line 120 and
tower 35 and removes some of the hydrogen sulfide and
it has inlet lines 172a, 172b, 172C and 172d connected
water therewith prior to the liow through the bed B-1.
therewith, which lines are connected to the ñow lines
After the complete adsorption has taken place in the bed
B-l and B--2 then the beds are all shifted to the next 65 151a, 151b, 151C and 151d, respectively. In the particu
lar cycle illustrated in FIG. 4, the line 172b is open
phases, as will be more fully explained and the valves 85
While the lines 172a, ‘172e and 1‘72d are closed and
and 80 are switched back to the positions in which they
therefore the flow from the bed B-2 ñows through” the
line 172b and the valve 172 for discharge through the
the valve 80 directing ñow from the heat exchanger 16
line 120.
70 outlet
'I'he outlet valve 173 has its outlet connected to the
to the line 17.
flow line 84 and it has its inlet connected to the lines
In FIG. 4 of the drawings, a more detailed ñow sheet
173a, 173k, 173e, and 173d, which are connected to
of the modified process described above in connection with
FIG. 3 is shown, and the parts of which are the same in
the lines 161a, 161b, 161e and '161d, respectively. In
FIGS. 3 and 4 have the same numerals and letters.
the particular cycle illustrated in FIG. 4, the inlet line
Basically, the process of FIG. 4 is identical with the proc 75
are originally located, namely, with the valve -85 directing
flow from the line 132 to the absorber tower 35 and with
3,085,380
l
173C tov the valve 1‘73 -is the only inlet line to the valve
73 which is open so that the discharge from the adsorp
tion bed B-S which is on the purge phase flows through
the valve 173 to the line 84.
The valve 174 has its outlet connected to the line 132
and it has inlet lines 17411, 1'74b, 174e and 174d which
are connected with the lines 161:1, 161b, 16h` and 16161,
respectively. In the particular cycle illustrated in FIG. 4,
12
with the lines 162e, 162b and 162d in the closed posi
tion, the ilow of the gas through line 118 passes through
the valve 162 and line 162C to the bed B~3. The dis
charge from the bed B-3 ñows through line 151e to the
line ‘172e ofthe valve l172 and since the valve 172 has
also been shifted, the line 172e is the only inlet opening
to the valve 172 which is open and therefore such gas
passes through the valve 172 and is discharged through
the line 120. A portion of the' gas in line 120 is dis
charged as product through the product line 123 and the
other portion of the sweetened gas passes through the
heater 122 and the line 83 to the multi-port rotary valve
the inlet line 174e' is the only inlet line to the valve 174
which is open so that the discharge from the bed B~4
which is on the regeneration phase is directed through
the valve 174 to the line 132.
The method disclosed in connection with the flow sheet
163. The valve 163 has also been shifted `so that the
of FIG. 4 of the drawings is identical with the method
which is disclosed in connection with FIG. 3 of the draw 15 line 16Std therewith is the only outlet opening or line
from the valve 163 which is open and therefore the gas
ings when the valves are positioned as illustrated in FIG. 4
ñows
therethrough to the line 151d and then to the
of the drawings, and as previously explained. Thus, the
bed B-4 which is thus on the purge phase. Since the
beds B-1 and B-2 are connected in series for adsorption
bed B-4 was previously on the regeneration phase, such
of the feed gas, and the beds B-3 and B-4 are connected
bed
has been previously preheated to the temperature of
for series countercurrent ñow `as expla'med previously in 20
approximately 550° F. by way of example, at which 4the
connection with IFIG. 3. As previously pointed out in
optimum purging or regeneration occurs. Therefore, the
connection with FIG. 3, any suitable cycle controls of
removal
of the adsorbed hydrogen sulfide in the bed B-4
conventional construction as indicated at 9‘7 in FIGS. 3
occurs
with
a relatively lsmall amount of the gas flowing
and 4 may be used Vfor shifting the multi-port rotary valves
through the lbed B-4 and such gas with the removed hy
161, 162, 163, 164, 171, 172, 1’73 and 174 when it is 25 ydrogen
sulfide from the bed B-4 ñows to the line 161d
desired to changel the cycle or phase through the various
and
then
to the open line 173d of the valve 173. The
adsorption beds B~`1, B-2, B-3 »and B-4. Such shifting
regeneration gas ñows from the valve 173 through line
of the multi-port rotary valves occurs, by way of example,
84 to the valve 164 which has been shifted to open the
when the temperature in the line 132 reaches a predeter
line
164a to cause the gas to ñow in the line 164a to
mined point which is detected by a temperature controller 30
the line 151a and then to -flow countercurrently through
of conventional construction indicated at 9‘6 which is con
the bed B-1. Such countercurrent iiow through the bed
nected with the cycle controls 97. However, in the pre
-1 is on the regeneration phase and accomplishes the
ferred manner of operation of the form of the invention
heating
of the bed B-1 for the subsequent purging opera
disclosed in FIGS». 3 and 4, the temperature controller 95
which is also connected to the line 132 will normally shift 35 tion. The regeneration gases then flow from the bed B-1
through the line 161a to the inlet opening 174a on the
the three-way valves 80 and 85 prior to the shifting of
the multi-port rotary valves 161-164 and 171-174. Such
shifting of the three-Way valves >8€)k and S5 is for the
purpose of returning the rela-tively lean regeneration or
valve 174 for discharge through the line 132.
The
regeneration gas from the line '132 is then treated as previ
ously explained.
After the cycle has been completed with the beds in
sweetened gas from the line 132 which is being discharged 40
such
shifted position, the valves 161-164 and »the valves
from the bed B-4 during the latter portion of the cycle
171~174 »are again shifted to next place the beds B-3
or phase so that such lean sweetened gas returns through
and B-4 in series for the absorption and to place the
the line 94 back to the adsorption bed B-1. The shifting
bed B-1 on the purge phase and the bed B-Z on the
of the three-Way valve 80 causes the inlet or feed gas
regeneration phase. The next shift in the multi-port
in line 15 to pass through the absorber tower 35, as ex 45
rotary valves places the beds B~4 and B-1 in series on
plained in connection with FIG. 3 so as to remove a por
the adsorption phase and places the beds B-Z and B-3
on the purge and regeneration phases, respectively. The
final shift in the multi-port rotary valve returns the beds
When the cycle controls 9‘7 are actuated to shift the
to the position shown in FIG. 4, and of course, the
multi-port rotary valves 161-164 and 171-174, the three 50 valves
may be rotated through as many cycles as desired.
way valves 80 and 85 are returned to their original posi
From
the foregoing description, it will be appreciated
tions wherein the gas from the line 132 is directed t-o
that each bed which is on the regeneration phase or cycle
the absorber tower 35 and thel incoming or feed gas is
is shifted so that it is placed on the purge phase or cycle
directed from line 15 to line 17 for flow to the ñrst bed
in the next cycle 4of operations. Because _of that fact, the
on the adsorption phase.
55 bed which is on the purge phase has been preheated
When the multi-port rotary valves are shifted from the
i during the regeneration phase and such preheating en
positions shown in FIG. 4, they are actually rotated and
ables the removal of the adsorbed components from the
each moves to the next position which in effect accom
tion of the hydrogen sulñde and water from the feed gas
prior to its flow through the adsorption phase.
plishes a shift in the iiow of the gas to the beds in a
bed on the purge phase with a minimum amount of the
consecutive order. Thus, the first shift of the multi-port 60 sweetened gas which is being used for the regeneration.
In fact, the amount of gas is approximately half of that
rotary valves from the position shown in FIG. 4 will place
required for the regeneration of a single bed on a re
the 'bed B-Z in Athe position of the first bed in the series
generation phase or cycle. Also, as previously explained
on adsorption and the bed B-3 is the second bed in series
because of the fact that the amount of gas for the re
on the adsorption phase. Such result occurs because the
valve 161 is shifted to position the opening or line 1616 65 generation and purging is reduced in quantity, an addi
tional preliminary recovery of the hydrogen sulfide is
in the open position while the other outlet open-ings or
lines 161e, 161C and 161:1.' from the valve 161 are closed
obtained by the circulation of a part of the incoming or
and therefore the feed gas from the line 17 flows through
feed gas through the absorber tower 35 before it passes to
the valve 161 and the line 161b to the bed B-2. Simi
the tirst adsorption phase.
larly, the outlet valve 171 shifts so that the line 171b 70
From the foregoing description, the advantages and
thereto is open Wh-ile the other inlet lines or `openings
objects of this invention are believed evident.
to the valve 171 are closed so that the ilow from the bed
The foregoing disclosure and description of the inven
B-2 is then directed through line ‘171b and through the
tion is illustrative and explanatory thereof and various
valve 171 to line 118. Since lthe valve 162 has also
changes in the size, shape and materials, as well as in the
shifted so as to place the line 162e in the open position 75
details of the illustrated construction, may be made with
3,685,380
i3
in the scope of the appended claims without departing
from the spirit of the invention.
What is claimed is:
1. A process for removing hydrogen sulfide from hy
drocarbon gas, comprising the steps of, directing a hy
drocarbon feed gas having hydrogen sulfide therewith
through a plurality of adsorption beds in series wherein
the beds have an adsorbent therein capable of adsorb
ing the hydrogen sulfide from the gas preferentially,
withdrawing a portion of the gas after it has passed
through one of said adsorption beds and directing same
to another adsorption bed which had previously adsorbed
14
by stripping the hydrogen sulfide therefrom so that such
gas leaves such bed with a high concentration of hydro
gen sulfide therewith as compared to the amount of hy
drogen sulfide in the feed gas, thereafter absorbing the
hydrogen sulfide from such regeneration gas, and there
after returning the regeneration gas from which hydrogen
sulfide has been separated to the plurality of adsorption
beds to obtain sweetened product gas therefrom.
5. A process for removing hydrogen sulfide from hy
drocarbon gas, comprising the steps of, feeding a hydro
carbon gas under pressure through a plurality of adsorp
tion beds in series having an adsorbent therein capable
of adsorbing hydrogen sulfide, withdrawing a portion of
the gas after it has passed through one of said adsorption
hydrogen sulfide, such portion of the gas serving as a
regeneration gas after it is heated for regenerating such
beds and while still under pressure directing same to an
bed by stripping the hydrogen sulfide therefrom so that 15 other adsorption bed which had previously adsorbed hy
such gas leaves such bed with a high concentration of
drogen sulfide, such portion of the gas serving as a re
hydrogen sulfide therewith as compared to the amount
generation gas after it is heated for regenerating such
of hydrogen sulfide in the feed gas, thereafter absorbing
bed by stripping the hydrogen sulfide therefrom, absorb
the hydrogen sulfide from such regeneration gas, and
ing the hydrogen sulfide from the regeneration gas, and
thereafter returning the regeneration gas from which 20 thereafter returning the regeneration gas from which hy
hydrogen sulfide has been separated to the plurality of
drogen sulfide has been separated to the second of the
adsorption beds to obtain sweetened product gas there
plurality of adsorption beds at substantially the same
from.
pressure as the main stream of gas fiowing from the first
one of said adsorption beds and directing same to another
capable of preferentially adsorbing the hydrogen sulfide
2. A process for removing hydrogen sulfide from hy
to the second of the plurality of beds, ‘whereby a pump
drocarbon gas, comprising the steps of, directing a hy 25 for circulating the regeneration gas is obviated.
drocarbon feed gas having hydrogen sulfide therewith
6. A process for removing hydrogen sulfide and water
through a plurality of adsorption beds in series wherein
from hydrocarbon gas, comprising the steps of, directing
the beds have an adsorbent therein capable of -adsorbing
a hydrocarbon feed gas having hydrogen sulfide and
the hydrogen sulfide from the gas preferentially, with
Water therewith kthrough a plurality of adsorption beds
drawing a portion of the gas after it has passed through 30 in series wherein the beds have an adsorbent therein
adsorption bed which had previously adsorbed hydrogen
and water from the gas, withdrawing a portion of the
sulfide, such portion of the gas serving as a regenera
gas after it has passed through one of said adsorption
tion gas after it is heated for regenerating such bed by
beds and directing same to another adsorption bed which
stripping the hydrogen sulfide therefrom so that such gas 35 had previously adsorbed hydrogen sulfide `and water, such
leaves such bed with a high concentration of hydrogen
portion of the gas serving as a regeneration gas after it
sulfide therewith as compared to the amount of hydrogen
is heated for regenerating such bed by absorbing the hy
sulfide in the feed gas, thereafter .absorbing the hydrogen
`drogen sulfide and water therefrom so that such gas
sulfide from the regeneration gas with water, and there
leaves such bed with a high concentration of hydrogen
after returning the regeneration gas from which hydrogen
sulfide and water therewith -as compared to the amount
sulfide has been separated to the plurality of adsorption
of hydrogen sulfide and water in the feed gas, thereafter
beds to obtain sweetened product gas therefrom.
absorbing the hydrogen sulfide and water from such re
3. A process for removing hydrogen sulfide from hy
generation gas, and thereafter returning the regeneration
drocarbon gas, comprising the steps of, directing a hy
gas from which hydrogen sulfide has been separated to
45
drocarbon feed gas having hydrogen sulfide therewith
the plurality of adsorption beds to obtain sweetened prod
through a plurality of adsorption beds in series wherein
uct gas therefrom.
the beds have an adsorbent therein capable of adsorbing
7. A process for removing hydrogen sulfide and water
the hydrogen sulfide from the gas preferentially, with
from hydrocarbon gas, comprising the steps of, feeding a
drawing a portion of the gas after it has passed through
hydrocarbon gas under pressure through a plurality of
one of said adsorption beds Iand directing same to an 50 adsorption beds in series having an adsorbent therein
other adsorption bed which had previously adsorbed hy
drogen sulfide, such portion of the gas serving as a re
generation gas after it is heated for regenerating such
bed by stripping the hydrogen sulfide therefrom so that
capable of adsorbing hydrogen sulfide and water, with
drawing a portion of the gas after it has passed through
one of said adsorption beds and while still under pres
sure directing sarne to another adsorption bed which
such gas leaves such bed with a high concentration of 55 had previously adsorbed hydrogen sulfide and water,
hydrogen sulfide therewith as compared to the Iamount
such portion of the gas serving as a regeneration gas after
of hydrogen sulfide in the feed gas, thereafter absorbing
it is heated for regenerating such bed by stripping -the
the hydrogen sulfide from such regeneration gas, and
hydrogen sulfide and water therefrom, absorbing the hy
thereafter returning the regeneration gas from which
drogen sulfide and water from the regeneration gas, and
hydrogen sulfide has been separated to the second of the 60 thereafter returning the regeneration gas from which
plurality of adsorption beds to mix with the main gas
hydrogen sulfide has been separated to the second of the
stream flowing from said one of said adsorption beds
plurality of adsorption beds at substantially the same
to said second bed for flow therethrough to obtain sweet
pressure as the main stream of gas liowing from the first
ened product gas.
to the second of the plurality of beds, whereby a pump
4. A process for removing hydrogen sulfide from hy 65 for circulating the regeneration gas is obviated.
drocarbon gas, comprising the steps of, directing a hy
8. A process for removing hydrogen sulfide and water
drocarbon feed gas having hydrogen sulfide therewith
from hydrocarbon gas, comprising the steps of, feeding
through at least three adsorption beds in series wherein
a hydrocarbon gas under pressure through a plurality of
the beds have an adsorbent therein capable of adsorbing
the hydrogen sulfide from the gas preferentially, with 70 adsorption beds in series having an adsorbent therein
capable of adsorbing hydrogen sulfide and water, with
drawing a portion of the gas after it has passed through
drawing
a portion of the gas after it has passed through
one of said adsorption beds and directing same to an
one of said adsorption beds and while still under pres
other adsorption bed which had previously adsorbed hy
drogen sulfide, such portion of the gas serving as a re
sure directing same to another adsorption bed which had
generation gas after it is heated for regenerating such bed 75 previously adsorbed hydrogen sulfide and water, such
15
3,085,380
portion of the gas serving as a regeneration gas after
it is heated for regenerating such bed by stripping the
hydrogen sulfide and water therefrom, absorbing the hy
after absorbing the hydrogen sulñde from the regenera
tion gas, and thcreafter'returning the regeneration gas
to one of said adsorption beds.
.
drogen sulfide and water from ‘the regeneration gas, there
13. A process for removing hydrogen sulfide from hy
after reducing the pressure on the separated hydrogen C1 drocarbon
gas, comprising the steps of, directing a hy
sulfide and water to vaporize the hydrogen sulfide and
drocarbon
feed gas, having hydrogen sulfide therewith
discharge same as a gas from the water in liquid form,
through
a
plurality
of adsorption beds having an adsor
and returning the regeneration gas to the adsorption beds
bent therein capable of adsorbing the hydrogen sulfide
after the separation of the hydrogen sulfide and water
from the gas preferentially, Iwithdrawing a portion of the
therefrom.
t.
gas after it has passed ‘through at least one said plurality
9. A process for removing hydrogen sulfide from hy
of adsorption beds and directing same to another adsorp
drocarbon gas, comprising the steps of, directing a hy
tion >‘bed which had previously adsorbed hydrogen sulfide,
drocarbon feed gas having hydrogen sulfide therewith
such portion of the gas serving as a regeneration gas
through a plurality of adsorption beds in series wherein
after
it is heated for regenerating said another bed by
the beds have an adsorbent therein capable of adsorbing 15 desorbing
the hydrogen sulfide therefrom so that such
the hydrogen sulfide from 4the gas preferentially, with
regeneration gas Vleaves said another adsorption bed with
drawing a portion of the gas after it has passed through
a high concentration of hydrogen sulfide therewith as
one of said adsorption beds and after it is heated direct
compared to the amount of hydrogen sulfide in the feed
ing same countercurrently once through a plurality of
gas, thereafter absorbing hydrogen sulfide from such
adsorption beds which are connected in series and which
gas, and thereafter returning the regenera
had previously adsorbed hydrogen sulfide, such portion 20 regeneration
tion gas to one of said »first adsorption beds.
0f the gas serving as the entire regeneration gas for re
14. A process for removing acid gas from hydrocar
moving substantially all of the adsorbed hydrogen sulfide
Ibon gas, comprising the steps of, directing a hydrocarbon
feed >gas having acid gas therewith through a plurality
of adsorption -beds having an »adsorbent therein capable
sulfide from the regeneration gas, and thereafter return 25 of adsorbing the acid lgas from the hydrocarbon gas, with
ing the regeneration gas to one of said adsorption beds.
drawing a portion of the kgas after it has passed through
10. A process for Yremoving hydrogen sulfide from
at least onel of said plurality of adsorption beds and di
hydrocarbon gas, comprising the steps of, directing a
recting
same to -another adsorption bed which had previ
hydrocarbon feed gas having hydrogen sulfide therewith
ously adsorbed the acid gas, such portion of the with
through a plurality of adsorption beds in series wherein 30 drawn
gas serving as a regeneration gas after it is heated
the beds have an adsorbent therein capable of adsorb
for
regenerating
said another `bed by desorbing the acid
ing the hydrogen sulfide from the gas preferentially,
gas therefrom so that the gas leaving said another ad
withdrawing a portion of the gas after it has passed
s-orption bed has a higher concentration of the acid gas
through one of said adsorption beds and after it is heated
directing same countercurrently once through a plurality 35 therewith than the feed gas, thereafter absorbing acid
gas from such regeneration gas, and thereafter returning
of adsorption beds which are connected in series and
the regeneration gas to one of said first adsorption beds.
which had previously adsorbed hydrogen sulfide, such
I15. A process for removing hydrogen sulfide ‘from hy
portion of the gas serving as the entire regeneration gas
from at least one of the beds through which such re
generation gas flows, thereafter absorbing the hydrogen
for removing substantially all of the adsorbed hydrogen 40
sulfide from the first one of the beds through which such
regeneration gas iiows, thereafter absorbing the hydrogen
sulfide from the regeneration gas, and thereafter return
ing the regeneration gas to one of said adsorption beds.
1l. A process for removing hydrogen sulfide from
hydrocarbon gas, comprising the steps of, directing a hy
drocarbon feed gas having hydrogen sulfide therewith
through a plurality of adsorption beds in series wherein
drocarbon gas, compri-sing the steps of, directing a hy
drocarbon feed gas having hydrogen sulfide therewith
through a first adsorption bed having an adsorbent therein
capable of adsorbing the hydrogen sulfide from the gas
preferentially, withdrawing a portion of the gas after it
has passed through said first adsorption bed »and directing
45 same to a `second adsorption -bed which had previously
adsorbed hydrogen sulfide, such portion of >the gas serving
as -a regeneration gas after it is heated for regenerating
such bed ‘by desorbing the hydrogen sulfide therefrom so
the beds have an adsorbent therein capable of adsorbing
that such regeneration gas leaves said second adsorption
the hydrogen sulfide from the gas preferentially, with
Ydrawing a portion of the gas after it has passed through 50 bed with a high concentration of hydrogen sulfide there
with as compared to Vthe amount of hydrogen sulfide in
one of said adsorption beds and heating and directing
the feed gas, thereafter absorbing 4hydrogen sulfide fro-rn
same once through to a plurality of adsorption beds
such regeneration gas, and thereafter returning the re
which are connected in series and which had previously
generation gas from which hydrogen sulfide has :been sep
adsorbed hydrogen sulfide, such portion of the gas serv
arated to said first adsorption bed to obtain sweetened
ing as the entire regeneration gas for removing substan 55 product
gas therefrom.
tially all of the adsorbed hydrogen sulfide from at least
16. A process for removing ac-id gas from hydrocar
one of the beds through which such regeneration gas
Ibon gas, comprising the steps of, ‘directing a hydrocarbon
flows, thereafter absorbing the hydrogen sulfide from the
feed gas having acid gas therewith through a first ad
regeneration gas, and thereafter returning the regenera
60 sonption «bed having an ladsorbent therein capable of ad
tion gas to one of said adsorption beds.
sorbing the >acid gas from lthe gas preferentially, with
12. A process for removing hydrogen sulfide from hy
drawing a portion of the gas after it has passed through
drocarbon gas, comprising the steps of, directing a hydro
said first adsorption bed and after it is heated directing
carbon feed gas having hydrogen sulfide therewith
same to 4a second adsorption lbed which had previously
through a plurality of adsorption beds in series wherein
adsorbed acid gas, such portion of the gas serving as a
65
the beds have an adsorbent therein capable of adsorbiug
regeneration gas Vfor regenerating `such |bed by desorbing
the hydrogen sulfide from the gas preferentially, with
the `acid gas therefrom so that such regeneration gas
drawing a portion of the gas after it has passed through
leaves said «second Vadsorption Ábed with a high concen
one of said adsorption beds and heating and directing
tration `of -acid gas therewith as compared to the amount
same countercurrently to a plurality of adsorption beds
of acid gas in the lfeed gas, thereafter absorbing acid gas
which are connected in series and which had previously 70 from such regeneration gas, and thereafter returning the
adsorbed hydrogen sulfide, suchportion of the gas serving
regeneration gas from which acid gas has been separated
as a regeneration gas for removing substantially all of
to said first ladsorption hed to obtain sweetened product
the 4adsorbed hydrogen sulfide from at least one of the
gas therefrom.
beds through which such regeneration gas flows, there
(References on foiiowing page)
3,085,380
18
17
References Cited in the ñle of this patent
2,823,764
Miller _______________ __ Feb. 18, 1958
Miller _____________ __ Nov. 25, 1958
UNITED STATES PATENTS
2,995,208
Hachrnuth et al ________ __ Aug. 8, 1961
2,665,769
2,747,681
Walker et al. _________ _„ J-an. 12, 1954
schuf-tan et al _________ __ -May 29, 1956 5
2,799,361
Miller ______________ __ Ju1y 16, 1957
2,861,651
FOREIGN PATENTS
Great Britain __________ „_ I une 5, 1929
286,622
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