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Патент USA US3087197

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April 30, 1963
R. D. GARLOCK
CHAIN-LINK ROOFING MOP
Filed July 15, 1961
F/q. /
3,087,188
,
7
3,087,188
Patented Apr. 30, 1963
2
mop-mounting mechanism provides for moving of the
brackets 16 and framework 18 upwardly and downwardly
3,087,188
CHAIN-LINK ROQFING MOP
Russell D. Garlock, 5533 Mirror Lakes Drive,
Minneapolis, Minn.
by means of a linkage 19 connected through an arm 20v
onto shaft 21 which is rotated to one position or another
position by a handle 22 so as to raise and lower the mop
Filed July 13, 1961, Ser. No. 123,793
3 Claims. (Cl. 15—511)
17 into and out of tar-spreading relation with respect to
the roof surface.
The mop 17 has an elongate rigid frame member 23
This invention relates to apparatus for applying and
spreading hot asphalt, tar or the like, on a surface such
as a roof.
ce
10
Heretofore the most common device for spreading hot
tar or asphalt, commonly known as “hot stuff,” on a roof
surface has been a mop constructed of a multiplicity of
which is normally horizontally oriented adjacent the rear
side of the machine 10- and is clamped and supported by
the brackets '16‘. In the form shown, the frame member
23 has a substantially box-like shape with a rounded
lower edge portion 24. The frame member 23 has a plu
rality of slots or notches 25 in the lower rounded edge 24
strands or pieces of pliable ?berglass or other fabric-type
material. When new, such mops are satisfactory, but after 15 thereof.
The mop ‘17 also has a plurality of elongate ?exible
being used and then cooled, such mops harden with the
tar-spreading elements or chains 26 depending from the
hardened tar and are di?icult to subsequently thaw out.
frame member 23 in juxtaposed and free-swinging relation
This problem is particularly acute in the case of mops
with respect to each other. The chains 26 are disposed
chine so that the mop may not be easily immersed in a 20 close enough to each other so that when the chains hang
in their normal position as seen in FIG. 1, the chains
receptacle of hot stuff, as in the case of a hand mop.
which in their ordinary use are attached to a mobile ma
With these comments in mind, it is to the elimination
of these and other disadvantages to which the present in
vention is directed, along with the inclusion therein of
other novel and desirable features.
An object of my invention is to provide a new and im
proved mop for spreading hot stuff such as tar and asphalt
on a roof surface.
Another object of my invention is the provision of a
novel mop for spreading tar and the like and which may be
will engage each other. The uppermost link 27 of each
of the chains 26 projects slightly into one of the notches
or slots 25 in the lower edge of the frame member 23 and
is secured therein by an elongate rigid bar 28 which ex
tend-s lengthwise throughout the frame member 23 and
through the uppermost link 27 of each of the chains.
It is to be particularly noted that each of the links of
the chains 26 is constructed of metal, and it is preferred
30 that the links of the chains 26 be constructed of a ferrous
repeatedly used and cooled without necessitating being
cleaned or otherwise treated.
A further object of my invention is to provide an im
metal. The iron or steel links are smooth surfaced and
are smoothly contoured so that the. hot tar will ?ow
smoothly along the length of the chains, whereby to pro
duce a desirable spreading effect. It will be understood
stand cool, as overnight, need not be thawed out prior 35 that as seen in FIGS. 1 and 2 in full lines, the mop 17 is
elevated above the roof surface so as to be in inoperative
to being put back into use.
proved tar-spreading mop which, after being allowed to
A still further object of my invention is the provision
of a novel and improved hot tar-spreading mop with
?exible spreading elements of such a nature that the mop
will cause the hot tar to drain and drip off after a spread
ing job is complete and particularly to the extent that the
spreading elements are subsequently ready for immediate
use again.
position. Normally the mop 17 will be left in this condi
tion when the machine 10‘ is allowed to stand overnight.
In the use of the mop 17, the receptacle 11 of the ma
chine 10 is supplied with a quantity of hot liquid tar or
other similar material to be applied onto a roof surface,
and the handle 14 is operated to open the outlet openings
so that liquid tar can be applied onto the roof surface at
the rear of the machine 10. The tar is applied onto the
These and other objects and advantages of my invention
will more fully appear from the following description 45 roof surface immediately ahead of the mop 17. The
handle 22 is swung so as to lower the frame 18‘, brackets
made in connection with the accompanying drawings,
wherein like reference characters refer to the same or sim
ilar parts throughout the several views, and in which:
FIG. 1 is a perspective view of the invention;
FIG. 2. is an enlarged detail section view taken approxi
mately at 2—2 in FIG. 1.
One form of the present invention is shown in the
drawings and is described herein.
The machine, indicated in general by numeral 10 is
illustrated to typify apparatus for applying and spreading 55
hot stuff such as hot tar in liquid condition on a roof
surface. The machine 10 includes a receptacle 11 which
may actually constitute the frame of the machine, and a
16 and mop 17, whereupon the chains 26 will move down
wardly into engagement with the roof surface. As the
machine is pushed forwardly in the direction of arrow F,
the chains 26 will assume the dotted line position shown
in FIG. 2 wherein the dot-dash line S indicates the ap
proximate position of the roof surface. The chains 26
will drag along and pass over the roof surface and will
evenly spread the hot liquid tar on the surface. It will be
understood that the hot liquid tar will flow between and
through the chains and will be spread evenly over the
roof surface beneath the chains. The chains will not
cause any build-up of liquid tar, or squee-gee effect as the
chains are drawn along over the surface S.
When the machine is to be stopped at a particular lo
and making the machine mobile, and a handle '13 which 60
pair of mounting wheels 12 for supporting the machine
may be manually gripped for pushing the machine for
wardly in the direction of arrow F. Of course it will be
understood that the present invention may be used on ma
chines wherein the handle is arranged to be pulled or
cation, the handle 14 will be operated to stop the ?ow
of hot liquid tar from the receptacle onto the surface
and the handle 22 will also be operated to lift up the mop
v17 into the position shown in FIG. 1. When the mop 17
pushed. The receptacle is provided with substantially 65 is lifted to the position shown in FIG. 1 with the chains
26 hanging directly downwardly, the iron links of the
conventional outlet ports at its bottom, below the axes of
chains will retain a substantial amount of heat which has
the wheels and these ports may be controlled by valves
been absorbed from the hot liquid tar and the heat retained
which are operated by a handle 14 which operates the
in the chains is su?icient to maintain the tar on the chains
valves through a linkage mechanism 15.
The machine 10 also includes a mechanism including 70 in liquid condition which allows the tar to drain down
wardly along the chains and drip off the lower ends there
brackets 16 for mounting and supporting the spreading
of. The smooth surfaces of the chains and the smooth
mop, which is indicated in general by numeral 17. The
3,087,188
ly cur-ved contours thereof will allow the tar to drain
substantially completely off the chains so that not even
a ?lm of tar remains on the chains after a few moments.
The chains are essentially clean and there is not even
enough tar remaining at the points of interconnection be
tween the links so as to make it di?icult to ?ex the chains.
When the machine 10 is again put back into operation,
permit the tar to drain down said spreading elements and
drip off’.
2. A mop for spreading hot tar, asphalt and the like
onto a surface such as a roof, comprising mobile means
movable forwardly over said surface and carrying and ap
plying the hot tar onto the surface, an elongate frame
mounted on said mobile means and normally oriented in
a horizontal position, and a plurality of elongate ?exible
the hot tar in the receptacle is again allowed to drain out
tar-spreading elements having upper ends respectively se
when the outlet ports are opened and the mop 17
is lowered so that the chains again assume the dotted line 10 cured along said frame and depending therefrom in juxta
posed and free-swinging relation with each other, each of
position shown in FIG. 2 with respect to the roof surface
S.
As soon as the chains are lowered to the surface S,
said elements including a plurality of metal, smooth-sur
faced and smoothly contoured metal links each swingably
the chains will ?ex and will again absorb a quantity of
connected in end-to-end relation with other links, whereby
heat from the hot liquid tar being spread on the surface
S. Because the chains are made of metal, an absolute 15 the metal links absorb heat from the hot tar and retain
the heat to maintain the tar in liquid condition su?‘icient
minimum remains on the chains at the time the machine
ly long to permit the tar to drain from the smooth sur
is put back into operation, and furthermore, the chains
face and smoothly curved metal links so as to substantial
will absorb heat and will melt any small quantities of tar
ly clean the links and prepare the mop for immediate use
which might possibly remain on the links of the chain so
as to eliminate any obstructions along the links of the 20 in spreading tar again.
3. Apparatus for applying and spreading hot tar, as
chains and thereby allow the hot liquid tar to pass smooth
phalt and the like onto a surface such as a roof, said
ly through and between the chains and thereby properly
apparatus comprising mobile means movable forwardly
distributed and spread over the roof surface. It will be
over the surface and carrying and applying the hot tar on
understood that the bottom of the receptacle 11 has a plu
rality of outlet openings at its bottom between the wheels 25 to the surface, a spreading mop mounted on said mobile
means to engage the hot tar applied to the surface, said
‘12 so as to obtain a fairly even distribution of the tar on
mop having an elongate horizontally oriented frame and
the roof surface and then this tar which has been applied
in this manner is adequately spread by the chains.
It will, of course, be understood that various changes
may be made in the form, detail, arrangement and pro
portion of the parts without departing from the scope of
my invention which consists of the matter described here
in and set forth in the appended claims.
What I claim is:
l. A mop for spreading hot tar, asphalt and the like to
a surface, comprising means carrying and applying the hot
‘tar onto the surface, an elongate frame mounted on said
means and normally oriented in a horizontal position, and
a plurality of elongate ?exible tar-spreading elements se
cured to and depending from said frame in juxtaposed 40
and free-swinging relation with respect to each other,
each of" said elements including a plurality of metal links,
each connected in end-to-end relation with other links,
whereby the metal links absorb heat from the hot tar and
retain the heat to maintain the tar in liquid condition to
also having a plurality of elongate ?exible tar-spreading
elements having upper ends respectively secured along
said frame and said tar-spreading elements depending
from the frame in juxtaposed and free-swinging relation
with each other, each of said elements including a plurali
ty of metal links, each connected in end-to-end relation
with othe'r'links, and means lowering and raising the mop
and spreading elements respectively into and out of en
gagement with the hot tar on the roof surface for respec
tively spreading the tar evenly over the surface and al
lowing the tar to drain and drip off the spreading elements
to be ready for immediate usage again.
References Cited in the ?le of this patent
UNITED STATES PATENTS
791,726
Schutte ______________ __ June 6, 1905
1,150,936
1,183,238
Furnas ______________ __ Aug. 24, 1915
Robertson __________ __ May 16, 1916
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