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Патент USA US3087455

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April 30, 1963
3,087,445
J. R. IOANNILLI
SHOE OUTSOLE SEWING MACHINES
Filed Feb. 20, 1961
l7 Sheets-Sheet 1
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April 30, 1963
J. R. IOANNILLI
3,087,445
SHOE OUTSOLE SEWING MACHINES
Filed Feb. 20, 1961
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SHOE OUTSOLE SEWING MACHINES
Filed Feb. 20, 1961
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SHOE OUTSOLE SEWING MACHINES
Filed Feb. 20, 1961
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SHOE OUTSOLE SEWING MACHINES
Filed Feb. 20, 1961
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SHOE OUTSOLE SEWING MACHINES
Filed Feb. 20, 1961
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Filed Feb. 20, 1961
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Filed Feb. 20, 1961
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Filed Feb. 20, 1961
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SHOE OUTSOLE SEWING MACHINES
Filed Feb. 20, 1961
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April 30, 1963
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Filed Feb. 20, 1961
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United States Patent O? ice
1
3,087,445
Patented Apr. 30, 1963
2
ceptance of prior loop lock stitch shoe sewing machines
3,087,445
is the frequency with which stitches are missed com
SHOE OUTSOLE SEWING MACHINES
Joseph R. Ioannilli, Beverly, Mass, assignor to United
Shoe Machinery Corporation, Boston, Mass., a corpo
ration of New Jersey
Filed Feb. 20, 1961, Ser. No. 90,326
21 Claims. (Cl. 112-32)
pletely by the failure of the locking thread loop to pre
vent the needle thread loop from being pulled completely
through the Work.
-It is accordingly a general object of the present in
vention to improve the reliability ‘and uniformity of
stitch forming operations carried on particularly at high
speed in loop lock stitch shoe sewing machines.
This invention relates generally to improvements in
loop lock stitch shoe outsole sewing machines and more 10
It is another object to improve the accuracy in the
particularly to combinations of thread handling and Work
depth to which loop lock stitches are set in work pieces.
feeding devices for achieving more uniform stitches than
Still another object is to provide stitch forming in_
has heretofore been possible especially at the higher op
strumentalities capable of operation at high speed to
erating speeds in such machines.
form seams having the superior inherent qualities of loop
In many respects a well formed loop lock stitch seam 15 lock stitches While at the same time retaining the ex
is preferable to the conventional shuttlelock stitch usual
ternal appearance of the more conventional and here
ly employed to connect the outsole of the shoe to the
tofore acceptable shuttle lock stitch seams.
Welt. The present invention is directed to machines for
A further object is to gain a more uniform arrange
forming seams in stubborn or resistant material referred
ment of thread in the individual stitch holes of each
to generally in the speci?cation and the claims as “leather” 20 seam by more exact control of feeding movement im
but this term will be understood to include not only
parted to the work.
natural leather but rubber, plastic, composition and sim
Yet another object is to provide instrumentalities for
ilar materials for shoe soles. Since the formation of a
handling the needle thread in loop lock stitch sewing
loop lock stitch requires the passage through the Work
machines so that deposits of lubricating and adhesive sub
of only a fraction of the needle thread involved in the 25 stances may be carried by the needle thread to the work
formation of a conventional lock stitch, there is conse
without any possibility that these substances will be
quently less wear upon the thread and the speed of
stripped from the thread by the handling instrumentalities.
the sewing operation can therefore be accordingly in
A more particular object of the invention is to pro
creased While ‘at the same time preserving the needle
vide a loop lock stitch outsole stitcher in which the
thread in better condition in the completed stitches. It 30 Work piece is continuously clamped during the forma
tion and setting of each stitch.
will also be appreciated that in a well formed loop lock
Another particular object is to provide a loop lock
stitch seam there is a greater difference between maxi
mum and minimum cross sections of thread in each
stitch shoe sewing machine in which the setting of the
stitch is accomplished with accuracy by imposing the
stitch hole and the resultant seam is therefore character
ized by greater holding power particularly after the 35 full stitch setting tension upon ‘a short length of needle
thread subject to a minimum of erratic elongation.
locking thread has been cut by wear.
Yet another speci?c object of the present invention is
Inherent advantages also abound in favor of loop lock
to improve the accuracy of needle thread measurement to
stitch sewing over conventional lock stitch sewing in
contribute further to uniformity of stitch setting depth.
terms of machine concepts. For example, since less
The foregoing objects are attained in a loop lock
thread is moved through the Work during the formation
stitch outsole stitcher having a curved hook needle and
of each stitch the machine instrumentalities for expand
some stitch forming devices similar to those disclosed in
ing needle loops and for retracting needle thread may
be actuated more simply and reliably over the shorter
United States Letters Patent No. 2,877,725, issued March
17, 1959, in my name and in applications for United
necessary distances. Another example of a favorable
machine aspect is the elimination of the shuttle which is 45 States Letters Patent Serial No. 750,392, ?led July 23,
1959 and No. 831,735, ?led August 5, 1959 in my name
costly to manufacture, install and replace. Instead of
and that of Clyde A. Knott respectively. As in the ma
a shuttle, a loop lock sewing machine includes a com
chine of the Knott application, the needle cooperates
bination of inexpensive, individually simple thread ma
with a curved awl entering the perforations previously
nipulating instrumentalities each of which may be man
formed by the awl and retracting from the work piece
ufactured and replaced with ease and at low cost.
carrying loops of needle thread. The needle, awl and a
In spite of the inherent advantages both from the
work feeding clamp comprising a work support and a
point of view of the product and of the machine it has
presser foot cooperate in the present machine for con
heretofore been impossible to provide a loop lock stitch
tinuously advancing the Work throughout the full sew
shoe outsole sewing machine capable of inserting a seam
of such quality as to be entirely acceptable by the shoe 55 ing cycle but according to a feature 3of the invention in
a novel time sequence to achieve more uniform stitches
industry to replace conventional shuttle machines. Prior
while maintaining more accurate control over the work
loop lock stitch machines are not generally commercially
piece. The work feeding clamp engages the work piece
acceptable largely because these machines do not produce
early in the stitch forming cycle and maintains its con
seams which, from external inspection, exactly duplicate
conventional shuttle lock stitch seams. lPrior loop lock 60 trol uninterruptedly during the thread measuring func
tion, thereby improving the accuracy of needle thread
stitch machines do not simulate conventional seams be
cause of two different forms of defect in the seam.
The
measurement.
In accordance with another feature of the present in
vention the illustrative machine includes a stitch setting
bights on the tread surface of the outsole whenever the
sewing conditions are rendered difficult either by the sew 65 gripper which cooperates with a takeup similar to that of
the Knott machine for setting each stitch after the needle
ing speed or by abrupt conditions of curvature. Exposed
loop has ?rst been contracted by the takeup. The re
bights may also stem from the nature of the work piece
sult of this feature is that the full stitch setting tension
itself when, because of thickness limitations, extreme ac
is applied to but a short length of thread between the
curacy is necessary in the formation and setting of the
work piece and the gripper while a much lower tension is
stitches or the material interferes with the free movement 70 exerted upon a substantial length of needle thread during
of the thread. Another defect which hampers the ac
that part of the stitch forming cycle when, in contracting
?rst of these is the frequent appearance of locking loop
3,087,445
3
the needle loop, the thread moves with relative freedom
through the work piece.
Yet another feature of the invention is embodied in
actuating connections for the stitch setting gripper, ar
ranged for precise adjustment of the stitch setting motion
to be imparted to the thread in accordance with the char
acteristics of the work upon which the sewing operation
is being performed.
An associated feature relates to a
4
FIG. 5 is a view similar to FIG. 4 but showing the
thread lock set shallow in the work piece;
FIG. 6 is a view similar to FIGS. 4 and 5 but show
ing the thread lock set at a medium depth in the work
piece;
FIG. 7 is a view taken along the line VII—VII of FIG.
6 showing the maximum thread cross section;
‘FIG. 8 is a view of the minimum thread cross section
in a stitch hole taken along the line VIII—VIII of FIG. 6;
single set of actuating connections for opening and
1FIG. 9 is a view in cross section and on an enlarged
closing the gripper and for providing the stitch set 10
scale
showing a single stitch hole in which the thread lock
ting motion.
of a loop lock stitch is set deeply in the work piece;
Still another feature of the present invention relates
to an actuating cam included in the machine for oper
ating the stitch setting gripper to perform not only the
FIG. 10 is a view similar to FIG. 9 but showing the
thread lock set at a shallow depth in the work;
1FIG. 11 is a view similar to ‘FIGS. 9 and 10 but show
stitch setting operation but also an important and novel 15
ing the thread lock of a defectively formed loop lock
secondary function. The gripper actuating cam in addi
stitch set at a medium depth in the work;
tion to having a major lobe for the stitch setting function
IFIG. 12 is a view similar to FIGS. 9 to 11 and show
is also provided with a minor lobe which closes the grip
ing a correctly formed loop lock stitch set at a medium
per upon the needle thread during that part of the sew
ing cycle when the needle is being threaded. Along its 20 depth in the work;
FIG. 13 is a view of the maximum thread cross sec
entire path, the needle thread, after emerging from a
tion taken along the line XIII~X1H of FIG. 12;
wax pot of generally conventional design in the present
FIG. 14 is a view of an intermediate thread cross
machine, is entirely free of devices which control its
section taken along the line XIV--XIV of FIG. 12;
movement by static friction. In the present machine,
FIG. 15 is a view of the minimum thread cross section
therefore, it is possible to apply to the needle thread 25
taken along the line XV—-XV of FIG. 12;
thick coatings of substances which are carried to the work
1FIG. 16 is a view in rear elevation of the machine of
?rst to lubricate the thread and provide for its free pas
FIGS. 1 to 3 showing more particularly switches and
sage and thereafter to assist in bonding the thread to the
other control connections actuated in stopping the ma
work piece for improving the security of the seam. The
movement of heavy coatings rby the needle thread is pos 30 chine;
sible without loss of control over the thread because the
!FIG. 17 is a detailed view in right side elevation of a
treadle connected device actuated in starting and stopping
gripper maintains the needle thread taut for reliable
placement in the barb of the needle without causing re
the machine;
‘FIG. 18 is a view looking from the right side of the
moval of the coating by moving the thread through a
machine illustrating devices which are actuated in stop
device having a stripping action.
35
ping the machine, the parts of the devices being shown
According to still another feature of the invention the
in the relative positions occupied just before the machine
stitch setting gripper includes a secondary actuating means
effective for opening the gripper upon stopping the ma
comes to rest;
chine at the end of a seam to permit unhampered with
FIG. 19 is a view in side elevation, partly in cross sec
drawal of the work piece from the machine. During the
continuation of a seam the gripper is actuated twice dur
ing each sewing cycle, once to grip the thread as the
needle is being threaded and secondly to grip the thread
and impart to it a stitch setting motion at the end of each
tion, showing a thread severing control switch effective
at the end ‘of the seam;
'FIG. 20 is a view in left side elevation and partly in
section showing a carriage on which the needle and awl
are mounted and also the actuating connections for the
sewing cycle. These two regular motions of the gripper 45 needle and awl;
are cam actuated and entirely repetitive. After the ?nal
stitch of a seam has been set, however, the gripper, which
FIG. 21 is a plan view showing the needle and awl
carriage, a similar carriage for a Work clamp and con
would otherwise be closed, is opened to permit with
drawal of the work piece by an auxiliary action inde
pendent of the actuating cam.
ing motions;
Additional features of the invention cooperate with the
auxiliary opening of the stitch setting gripper to expedite
nections for imparting to these two carriages work feed
FIG. 22 is a detailed view taken in the direction of the
arrow 22 in FIG. 20 showing actuating mechanisms for
the needle and clamp carriages;
the removal of the work piece from the machine at the
‘FIG. 23 is a fragmentary view in front elevation show
end of the seam. Included among the additional features
ing stitch forming and work feeding instrumentalities
is an auxiliary thread measuring device which draws 55 about the sewing point of the machine;
through the wax pot a quantity of needle thread in prepa
'FIG. 24 is a view in left side elevation depicting a
ration for the stoppage of the machine and upon stop
stitch setting gripper according to a feature of the inven
ping the machine releases the excess thread so that the
tion together with its actuating mechanisms;
leading end may more easily be held in position for the
FIG. 25 is a view also in left side elevation illustrat
start of a new seam.
ing in addition to the stitch setting gripper of FIG. 24
In the achievement of the foregoing objects, the fea 60
a thread controlling takeup, thread locks and a thread
tures of the present invention are included in a loop lock
stitch shoe outsole sewing machine to be described with
reference to the accompanying drawings in which,
measuring device;
FIG. 26 is a schematic diagram showing connections
FIG. 1 is a general view in front elevation of a shoe 65 of electrically actuated devices in the machine;
FIG. 27 is a schematic illustration in perspective de
sewing machine including the features of the present in
vention;
FIG. 2 is a fragmentary view on an enlarged scale
picting the arrangement of thread controlling instrumen
talities of the machine;
FIG. 28 is a detail view of the parts of the stitch set
and in front elevation of the machine depicted in FIG. 1;
FIG. 3 is a view in right side elevation of the machine 70 ting gripper shown in exploded relationship;
FIG. 29 is a detail view in left side elevation show
of FIGS. 1 and 2;
ing a thread measuring device, thread locks and their
FIG. 4 is a view in cross section and on an enlarged
actuating mechanisms incorporated in the present ma
scale showing a work piece with a single stitch hole in
chine;
which a conventional shuttle lock stitch is positioned with
iFIG. 30 is a schematic view in cross section showing a
the lock set deep in the work;
3,087,445
6
‘work piece and including loop lock‘ stitches being formed
under optimum work feeding conditions;
simultaneously varying the extent of movement of the
two carriers 20 and 34in approximately the same manner
as in the Knott machine.
The mounting of the needle and awl on the stud 32
‘FIG. 31 is a view similar to FIG. 30 but showing a
later stage in the formation of a loop lock stitch under
optimum work feeding conditions;
is also similar to that disclosed in the Knott application,
‘FIG. 32 is a plan view of loop lock stitches being
there being in the present machine an adjusting and lock
ing arrangement for relatively positioning a needle seg
formed under the same conditions as depicted in ‘FIGS.
30 and 31;
ment 44 and an awl segment 46 so as to aline the needle
and awl in ‘a common vertical plane. The stud 32 which
1FIG. 33 is a view similar to FIG. 30 but showing the
formation of loop lock stitches under work feeding con
ditions which cause rearward de?ection of the needle
10 is adjustably ?xed in the forward end of the carrier 34'
also provides an axis for a conventional needle guide 48
and the arrangement for alining the needle and awl on
the stud is similar to that disclosed in United States Let
along the line of the seam;
vFIG. 34 is a view similar to FIG. 31 but showing the
action and relative position of the needle and the work
as the needle emerges from the work after having been 15
rearwardly de?ected by resistance to work feeding mo
ters Patent No. 2,271,611 granted February 3, 1942 upon
having been de?ected forwardly along the seam;
ported in the frame of the machine. Connecting the lever
an application of Fred Ashworth et al.
As may be seen particularly in FIG. 20, the needle
tion;
and awl are actuated for their work penetrating motions
(FIG. 35 is a plan view similar to FIG. 32 but depict
by mechanisms similar to those of the Knott machine.
ing the formation of loop lock stitches under conditions
The actuating mechanisms for the needle and awl include
of rearward needle de?ection;
20 two pairs of conjugate cams on the main cam shaft 12 and
\FIG. 36 is a schematic view similar to FIGS. 30 and
connections to the needle and awl segments. Between
33 but showing the formation of loop lock stitches while
the conjugate cams for actuating the needle, and the seg
the needle is de?ected forwardly along the line of the
ment 44 on which the needle is ?xedly mounted is a lever
seam;
52 and a similar lever 54 is interposed between the awl
FIG. 37 is a view similar to FIG. 34 illustrating the 25 actuating cams and the segment 46, both the levers 52
action of the needle upon emerging from the work after
and 54 being pivoted upon a fulcrum shaft 56 ?xedly sup
'FIG. 38 is a plan view similar to FIG. 35 but illus
trating the formation of loop lock stitches, under the con
ditions of forward needle de?ection; and
FIG. 39 is a time chart of the present machine.
The present machine is equipped with a curved hook
needle 2 (FIGS. 20, 23 and 25), a curved awl 4, a
thread hook 6, a work support 8, a presser foot '10, and
52 to the segment 44 is a short link 58 and a similar
link 60 is included between the forward end of the lever
54 and the awl segment 46. At its rearward end the
needle lever 52 carries a follower roll 62 engaging the
periphery of a cam 64, one of the pair of conjugate cams
for actuating the needle. A secondary follower roll 66
is mounted on an arm 68 pivoted on the shaft 56 and
loop lock stitch forming and work feeding devices gen 35 yieldingly coupled with the lever 52. The follower roll
erally similar to those disclosed in the Knott application.
66 engages the periphery of a cam '70 and the yielding
The work support and presser foot, as in the Knott ma
coupling between the arm 68 and the lever 52 allows
chine, comprise a clamp which cooperates with the needle
the distance between the rolls 62 and 66 to be varied
and awl for imparting a continuous feeding movement to
slightly to compensate for minor variations in the theo
the work. In the present mechine, however, a novel tim 40 retically correct cam pro?les. A similar arrangement is
ing sequence in the entry of the needle and awl into the
provided for oscillating the lever 54 to impart a work
work piece and the gripping and releasing movements of
penetrating
motion to the awl by conjugate cams 72 and
the clamp has resulted not only in improved uniformity
74 also mounted with the cams 64 and 70 on the main
in stitch length but also in a high consistency in the place
shaft 12. The periphery of the cam 72 is engaged by
ment of thread in successive stitch holes as will later be 45
explained.
The stitch forming and work feeding devices of the
present machine are actuated ‘by cams on a main and a
a follower roll 76 rotatable on the rearward end of the
lever 54 and a secondary roll 78 on an arm 80 is in en
gagement with the periphery of the cam 74.
The arm
30 is pivoted on the shaft 56 and yieldingly coupled to
secondary sewing shaft 12 and 14 respectively (see FIG.
3), the two shafts being geared together at a 1—1 ratio 50 the lever 54 to take care of minor irregularities in cam
contour.
and journaled in a machine frame 16 for rotation in
From the foregoing brief summary of the mechanisms
opposite directions. Movement is imparted to the work
for imparting work feeding motions to the carriers 20
feeding clamp 8, 10 by a grooved cam 18 mounted on the
main cam shaft 12 as shown particularly in FIGS. 21
and 34 and work penetrating movements to the needle
‘and 22. As in the Knott machine the work feeding clamp 55 and awl it will be appreciated that by retaining similarities
in general construction the present machine also retains
is supported upon a carrier 20 pivoted on a rearwardly
those advantages more fully described in the Knott ap
inclined shaft 22 ?xedly supported in the machine frame
plication. Among these advantages are two principal ones
16. The rearward end of the carrier 20 is connected
stemming from the rearward inclination of the common
through an adjustable toggle arrangement indicated gen
erally at 24 and more fully described in the Knott applica 60 pivot upon which the carriers 20 and 34 are fulcrumed
and the orientation with respect to the point of needle and
tion with a composite bell crank including a forwardly ex
awl penetration of the area of effective pressure applied by
tending arm 26 secured to a vertical shaft 28. At its for~~
the work feeding clamp. The retention in the present ma
ward end the arm 26 carries a follower roll 30 engaging
chine of the rearward inclination of the pivot for the car
the groove of the cam 18.
riers
results in a rising and falling motion of the work
The needle and awl as in the Knott machine are 65 support during feed thereby producing a crease opening
mounted for rotation about a common stud or pin 32 sup
action during backfeed and a desirable squeezing action
ported at the forward end of a carrier 34 also pivoted
during work advance. The movement of the area of maxi
upon the inclined shaft 22. For imparting a work feed
mum pressure imposed by the presser foot bearing on one
ing movement to the carrier 34 it is connected by a toggle
side only of the needle plane tends to draw the work piece
arrangement indicated generally at 36 to a bell crank 38 70 slightly into the machine during each sewing cycle there
which also carries a follower roll 46 in engagement with
by facilitating the guidance of the work.
the groove in the cam 18 at a position 180° from the fol
While the present construction retains the major ad
lower roll 30. The toggles 24 and 36 comprise respec
vantages of the Knott machine as already pointed out,
tively similar links and are provided with adjustably ?xed
the novel timing of the present machine results in the
coaxial pivots in a slide 42 which may be positioned for 75 seam having much greater uniformity both as to the
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