close

Вход

Забыли?

вход по аккаунту

?

Патент USA US3088123

код для вставки
April 30, 1963
F. E. SMITH
3,088,108
AIR INTERCEPT COMPUTER
16 Sheets-Sheet l
Filed Feb. 20, 1958
Fig. 1
1
l I I l |
|
|
| |
l
l |
|
l
l
l |
l l l
|
|
l
|
|
|
l I
lI
TO TARGET
DOT GENERATOR
I
91
\
r'"" f"
:
i
1
i
‘9
'
CLUTCH
:
l
:
I
I
'
|
|
i
i
9-i
I
I
2
g
}
,8
,r ““““““ "
I
i
'
{"7
l
4“
!
TARGET
: TIME
2
SPEED CONTROL
I POTENTIQMETER
1 R14
:
I
POTENTIOMETER, R80
i-
i|
TO
:
CIRCLE GENERAYOR
:
i
Y
I
i
g
:
INTERCEPTOR
I
i
I
16
|
TIME MOTOR
INTERCEPTOR
SPEED CONTROL
TIME
POTENTIOMETER,
POTENTIOMETER, R90
R13
Fig. 2
INVENTOR.
FREDERICK
E. SMITH
BY
/muromvsvs
4%.?»
April 30, 1963
F. E. SMITH
3,088,108
AIR INTERCEPT COMPUTER
Filed Feb. 20, 1958
16 Sheets-Sheet 7
a-
2
>
;
mm.
q
m
Q
U
m.m
mm:
0
m mo
$02
April 30, 1963
F. E. SMITH
3,088,108
AIR INTERCEPT COMPUTER
Filed Feb. 20, 1958
l6 Sheets-Sheet 9
Omnm Man:
April 30, 1963
F. E. SMITH
3,088,108
AIR INTERCEPT COMPUTER
Filed Feb. 20. 1958
l6 Sheets-Sheet 10
22—
JJ
>Oml
whnz h m
mhnm
osm
hwm
nmnu
mw m
INVENTOR.
FREDERICK
BY
E_ SMITH
April 30, 1963
F. E. SMITH
3,088,108
AIR INTERCEPT COMPUTER
Filed Feb. 20, 1958
16 Sheets-Sheet 11
cm
In
|
..
e
-m
u
S31
ova:
&
mono
IMF!)
INVENTOR.
4
02
2;22
xx
April 30, 1963
F. E. SMlTH
3,088,108
AIR INTERCEPT COMPUTER
Filed Feb. 20, 1958
16 Sheets-Sheet 12
"3003
INVENTOR.
FREDERICK
E. SM ITH
BY
RADAR
VIDEO ‘NPUT
ATTORNEYS
April 30, 1963
3,088,108
F. E. SMITH
AIR INTERCEPT COMPUTER
Filed Feb. 20. 1958
16 Sheets-Sheet 13
0
_A_
TRIGGER IN
TERMINAL 23
!;
mm; IIIIIIIIIII.
CATHODE OUTPUT
V9076
_¢_
RESOLVER DRIVER
INPUT CATI-IODES
v30, v31
I
u
I
,
I
I
I
AAAAMJMM/L/L/L/L/L/L/L/L
_0_
CATHODE OUTPUT
V907A
i
OUTPUT PPI SIDE
vs, J2
i
OUTPUT
SIDE
CURSOR
v10, .13
i
CATHODE OUTPUT
V908
i
CATHODE OUTPUT
VII
L
GRID INPUT V916,
V924, V944, V949
L
REPRESENTATIVE
SIGNAL INPUT
van, V925,
V945, V950
CHARG E CURVE
GRID VSB
M
OUTPUT TEST
JACK J1
_’V_
PLATE
V68
OUTPUT
1%é
Q'IQEI I.T"
.2
INPUT VTA
(WITH TUBE OUT)
p
CATHODE
V 313A
OUTPUT
R
CATHODE OUTPUT
V3138
INVENTOR.
T/ME (f) —>
Fig. 5
FREDERICK
E. SMITH
BY
7/”
ATTORNEY
{0,
April 30, 1963
F. E. SMITH
3,088,108
AIR INTERCEPT COMPUTER
Filed Feb. 20, 1958
6 She ‘Ls-Sheet 1s
:mmmm mm
,
,
-
.
1mill llllilllm
a:
Imllllllim
18
INVENTOR
FREDERICK
E. SMITH
TORNEVZC
Apn'l 30, 1963
3,088,108
F. E. SMITH
AIR INTERCEPT COMPUTER
16 Sheets-Sheet 16
Filed Feb. 20. 1958
“lmllllllllllllm‘h“
I"
‘
8
Fig.
S301
‘i
mamas?
‘um
I:
IiMlillh;
i
w.
“m:
\
INVENTOR.
FREDERICK
E. SMITH
09
nfroausvs
United States Patent O? [ice
1
3,088,108
AIR iNTERCEPT COMPUTER
Frederick E. Smith, Southampton, Pa., assignor to the
United States of America as represented by the Secre
tary of the Navy
Filed Feb. 20, 1958, Ser. N . 716,518
3,088,108
Patented Apr. 30, 1963
2
cates the ?ight time remaining for the interceptor travelling
a predetermined rate of speed to intercept the target. This
information is continually available during the course of
an intercept problem and is relayed to the ‘friendly inter
ceptor aircraft by a conventional data link transmission
means. Thus, a combat information center (ClC) incor
porating the instant invention is capable of directing the
intercept of enemy aircraft with dispatch. The instant
invention has been successfully employed with a mobile
The invention described herein may be manufactured 10 C10 in conjunction with an airborne early warning radar.
and used by or for the Government of the United States
The presentation under such operational circumstances is
of America for governmental purposes Without the pay
both north and ground stabilized so that the conveying
ment of any royalties thereon or therefor.
aircraft may be in motion, and yet stationary targets will
29 Claims. (Cl. 343—7)
[Granted under Title 35, US. Code (1952), see. 266)
The present invention relates to an intercept computer
remain in a ?xed position on the face of the cathode ray
and more particularly to an intercept computer in which 15 tube (CRT), as is understood.
the plan position data of an early warning radar is used
for computing the heading and time required for an in
terceptor aircraft to intercept a moving target at a remote
unique point in space.
Various methods have been devised for computing a 20
collision course approach and the ?ight time required for
an interceptor aircraft to successfully intercept a moving
target at a remote point in space. The problem is capable
of solution by means of analog computers which have
An object of the present invention is to locate the point
in space where the ?ight paths of two aircraft may be
made to intersect by having control over the ?ight of
one of the aircraft.
Another object is to provide an intercept computer in
which the heading and the ?ight time required to inter
cept a target from the position in space of an interceptor
aircraft may be readily determined in a ?nite time inter
val consonant with tactical requirements.
been previously programmed. Hand calculators using the 25
Still another object is to provide an intercept computer
display data of a plan position indicator (PPI) in an early
in which the heading and the time required to intercept
warning radar have also been employed. However, the
a target at a remote point in space from the position of
devices of the prior art generally possess various inher
an interceptor aircraft is uniquely determined by the
ent limitations which preclude a feasible solution of the
point at which a target strobe superposed on a slewable
problem, especially in view of the supersonic speeds of 30 cursor sweep mutually intersects a circle of radius pro
contemporary aircraft. Further, because of space and
portional to the instantaneous product of time and a pre
weight considerations, analog computers, in general, do
determined interceptor speed.
not conveniently adapt for airborne use, in addition to
A still further object of the present invention is the
the fact that they are susceptible to operational dilliculties
provision of an intercept computer in which a collision
peculiar to these instrumentalities. Hand calculators lack 35 course approach and the time required to intercept a
accuracy and fail to have a facility commensurate with
moving target from the position of an interceptor aircraft
the tactical requirements.
is computed in accordance with the equation
The intercept computer of the instant invention utilizes
the video data presented on the screen of a PPI scope in
Distance=Speed ><Time
ator is enabled to readily compute both a collision course
mined by the coincident travel of target video with an
electronically generated strobe superposed on a cursor
an early warning radar and augments the presentation to 40 such that the respective distances traversed in equal inter
include an electronically generated slewable cursor and
vals of future time by the interceptor aircraft and the
circle which are displayed in time shared relationship
target is predicated upon the known speed of the friendly
with the normal radar sweeps so that the radar scope opcr~
interceptor aircraft and the speed of the target deter
approach to an enemy aircraft and the time required to
make the interception from the position of a friendly air
craft.
The aforesaid cursor and circle are each asso
ciated with the target and interceptor video, respectively,
sweep angularly disposed to coincide with the target
heading.
A ?nal obicct of the present invention is to provide in
under selective control of the operator such that an inter
an intercept computer a timing mechanism for rendering
section therebetween yields the desired solution in ac 50 a chronometric rate of rotation required in the multiplica
cordance with the simple equation
Distance=Speed >< Time
With the aid of a selectively controllable cursor strobe
or dot superposed on the cursor sweep which itself is 55
rotatably controlled about its origin, a determination of
the target course and speed is initially made from a
tion process, wherein the current time established by the
aforesaid chronometric rotation may be manually pro
jected into future time to effect determination of a target
intercept point.
The exact nature of this invention as well as other
objects and advantages thereof will be readily apparent
from consideration of the following speci?cation relating
knowledge of the immediate history of the target video,
to the annexed drawings in which:
which remains momentarily visible due to screen per
FIG. I is a plan position view of the electronically gen
sistence. Corterminous with this determination, the circle 60 erated cursor and circle representatively displayed in rela
of radius proportional to the instantaneous product of
tive orientation on the screen of a PPI scope,
time and a predetermined interceptor speed is superposed
onto the interceptor’s position as viewed on the screen.
FIG. 2 is a simpli?ed diagram of the speed and time
Under control of the radar scope operator, a timing mech
multiplication system incorporated in the instant inven
simultaneous with an increasing interceptor circle radius
diagram of a preferred embodiment of the instant inven
until an intersection occurs therebetween at a unique inter
tion,
anism provides for extrapolating current target position 65 tion,
FIGS. 3a, 3b, and 3c is a composite functional block
into future time position by varying the time parameter,
FIG. 4a through FIG. 4k is a composite detailed elec
cept point. A circle azimuth dot movable about the pe
riphery of the circle facilitates the determination of an in 70 trical schematic drawing of the invention,
tercept heading. A “Time-to-Intercept” indicator is auto
FIG. 5 is a timing chart particularly showing the rela
matically set during this operation and continually indi
tive amplitude and timing relationships of the more perti
3,088,108
3
4
nent wave forms found at various points in the electrical
Apropos of the structure depicted in FIG. 2, and under
standing of the multiplication process performed in the
circuits of the inventive intercept computer,
inventive intercept computer may be had by a considera
FIG. 6 is a diagrammatic view in isometric form of
tion of time potentiometer R14 with target speed control
the timing mechanism of the instant invention,
potentiometer R80. Assuming a constant D.C. voltage X
FIG. 7 is a diagrammatic view of the portion of the
to be impressed across potentiometer R14, the wiper there
timing mechanism more pertinently associated with the
on linearly fractionates this voltage in direct proportion to
running mode of operation, and
the elapsed time by virtue of the constant speed drive
FIG. 8 is a diagrammatic view of the portion of the
transmitted from chronometric motor 16. Since coeffi
timing mechanism, more pertinently associated with the
reset mode of operation.
10 cient K1 has a range between 0 and l, the potential be
tween the wiper and ground is KIX, an analog voltage
Referring now to the drawings, wherein like reference
which thus relates to the elapsed time in the computer.
characters designate like or corresponding parts through
With the aid of time modi?er control 19, time may be
out the several views, there is shown in FIG. 1 a represen
projected into the future, and accordingly, any future time
tative PPI display of an early warning radar set which in
corporates the inventive intercept computer. Cursor 11 15 interval mayr be expressed as a proportionate voltage.
The voltage KIX will be observed to be the reference
and circle 12 are portrayed typically disposed wherein the
voltage for target speed control potentiometer R80. Con
size of the circle has ‘been expanded during the advance
sequently, K1X is further modi?ed by a second coel?cient
time mode of operation of the timing mechanism to inter
K2, which has a similar range and is set according to
sect the cursor at the intercept point P. This mode of
operation will be subsequently described with greater 20 the target speed. Hence, the analog voltage KIKQX avail
able at the potentiometer 21 relates to target distance,
particularity with relation to FIG. 6. Cursor 11 is illus
already traversed or anticipated during a selected time
trated in prolongation with successive plots of target video
interval. This voltage is then applied to the circuits of
T, thus establishing coincidence of the cursor with the di
the cursor dot generator.
rection of ?ight of the target, the speed of which is deter
Inasmuch as the function and operation of potentiom
mined by coincident travel of the target viedo T with an 25
eters R13 and R90 are similar to that of potentiometcrs
electronically generated cursor dot or strobe S movable
R14 and R80 with regard to the multiplication process,
along the cursor and shown superposed onto the intercept
the explanation set forth above is deemed sufficient. A
point P in the view of FIG. 1. The interceptor circle 12
minor but signi?cant variation exists in that the reference
is portrayed with its center at the friendly interceptor air
craft video I. Since its radius is directly proportional to 30 voltage Y is sinusoidal in this instance to facilitate the
electronic generation of a circular pattern. The magni
the product of the interceptor speed and time, the mutual
tude of analog voltage ClCzY relates to interceptor dis
intersection of cursor sweep 11 and expanded circle 12
tance, traversed or anticipated in the same selected time
coincident with projected cursor dot S at point P yields
interval. This voltage is thence supplied to appropriate
the intercept heading a, measured from a north reference
as indicated. To facilitate a measurement of this angle, 35 circuits for the generation of the interceptor circle.
a circle azimuth dot D is provided. Upon retracting to
Referring next to FIG. 3a, FIG. 3b, and FIG, 30, there
current time operation from advance time operation, a
time~to-intercept indicator is automatically set, and there
is shown in a consecutive arrangement of these views, a
functional block diagram of a preferred embodiment of
the instant invention. As hereinbefore mentioned, the
after indicates continuously the ?ight time remaining for
the interceptor travelling a predetermined rate of speed 40 electronically generated cursor and circle are presented in
time shared relation with the radar PPI sweeps. The
to intercept the target.
early warning radar set which incorporates the instant
FIG. 2 portrays a simplified showing of the speed and
invention has a pulse repetition rate (PRF) of 300 per
time multiplication system incorporated in the instant in
second or thereabouts, and in accordance with this de
vention. The speci?c computation hereinbefore denoted
involves only the multiplication of speed and time to pro 45 sign criterion, the instant invention provides for every
tenth sweep to be alternatively displayed on the PPI
duce distance. The basic technique for performing a
solution of this equation is best delineated with respect to
screen either as a cursor sweep or as a circular pattern.
the simpli?ed showing provided in this view. Accord
Therefore, the recurrence rate at which either the cursor
or circle is presented occurs at a 15 cps. rate, which is
ingly, there is schematically illustrated in FIG. 2 a tim
ing mechanism 90 comprising a motor 16 having constant 50 compatible for comfortable viewing without evidence of
?icker. The sweep generating means including numerous
speed characteristics serving in the instant invention a
components represented by various blocks in FIGS. 35
chronometric function, a dilferential 17 including a time
and 3c is arranged to accomplish this objective in the
modi?er control 19, a time dial 18 utilized as a time-to
manner described below. A transmitter pulse ampli?er 24
intercept indicator, and time potentiometers R13 and R14.
The elements herein set forth are mechanically coupled, 55 is depicted in FIG. 3b, the twofold purpose of which is to
amplify a positive radar trigger appearing at input tcr
as indicated by the dotted lines, and will be discussed
subsequently in greater particularity with respect to FIGS.
rninal 23 and invert the phase of the signal in order that
it may be of a desired negative polarity required in sub
6, 7 and 8. The chronometric rotation of motor 16 will
be seen in FIG. 2 to be transmitted through differential
sequent applications thereof. Transmitter puise cathode
17 and time dial 18, to the time potentiometer housings 80 follower 25 functions to provide isolation in addition to
supplying a low impedance trigger of approximately 80
or resistive portions proper of R13 and R14, which there
volts to the multivibrator gate 26 and phantastron cathode
by rotate at a constant rate of speed relative to the re
spective wipers. Time modi?er control 19 is a manual
follower 77. The sweep limiter and charging clamp 27
input to differential unit 17 operable to modify the rela
is interrelated in its actions with multivibrator gate 26 to
tive positions of the potentiometer wipers with respect to 65 concurrently produce a pair of bistable output voltages of
the respective housings or resistive portions of the poten—
a substantially square wave character and the requisite
tiometers. The setting of target speed control potentiom
sawtooth waveforms necessary for effecting sweep lengths
corresponding to 2G, 50, I00 and 200 mile ranges. The
eter R80, a function of target speed as determined by
square wave voltages of approximately 80 volts in ampli
progression of target video on the face of the PPI scope
is inserted by manual adjustments as necessary to main 70 tude are opposite phase and occur in response to the
triggers appearing at terminal 23. The respective charac
tain cursor dot S coincident with the target T as it ad
ter of these voltage waveforms in relative amplitude and
vances along the cursor. Similarly, the setting of the in
phase relation may be observed in the tinting chart of
terceptor speed control potentiometer R90 is manually
adjusted to the known speed capability of the interceptor
FIG. 5, waveforms B and D being typical outputs of
aircraft.
76 multivibrator gate 26 for a selected range sweep length.
3,088,108
5
The sawtooth ampli?er 2S ampli?es the sawtooth volt
age which is thus applied to a synchro driver 29. The
latter stage is a power cathode follower which feed into
the rotor windings of synchro resolvers 31 and 32, the
respective stator windings of which are disposed ninety
electrical degrees apart. The purpose of these resolvers
is to convert the applied sawtooth voltage into NS and
EW sawtooth components, which are proportional to
tion rate which is one-half the incoming signal. There
fore, the respective contacts of these relays complemental
ly switch back and forth at a 15 cps. rate, that is to
say, when the alphabetically designated contacts of K301
are in the down position shown, the lower alphabetically
designated contacts of K302 are in the up position, and
vice versa. Switch gate generator 47 also is a source of
gating signal to the PPI and cursor switch stages 34, 35,
the angular displacement of the respective rotors. The
36 and 37, the PPI and cursor driver cathode followers
rotor of resolver 31 is indicated by the dotted line nota 10 55 and 56, and video and strobe switches 52 and 53.
tion to be mechanically coupled with the servo follow
The pertinence of these PPI and cursor gating signals
up drive of the antenna system, and its rotation is thereby
will become more apparent in subsequent description of
in synchronism with the radar antenna. The rotor of
the system operation in relation to the timing chart de
resolver 32 is angularly displaced under manual con
picted in FIG. 5.
trol of the operator by means of cursor bearing control 15
With respect to the description set forth in connection
33. The sawtooth components from both resolvers are
with the representative PPI display shown in FIG. 1, the
applied to the PPI and cursor switch stages 34, 35, 36
cursor strobe S and azimuth circle dot D including radar
and 37, comprising dual triode type envelopes which are
video are selectively inserted on a time shared basis into
responsive to appropriate gating pulses, permitting se
the video channel of the instant intercept computer. In
lective application of the PPI and cursor sawtooth voltage 20 FIG. 30 radar video is applied at terminal 49 and under
components to the N-S and E-W push-pull de?ection
goes ampli?cation in video ampli?er 51 where it emerges
ampli?ers 38 and 39, in accordance with the successive
as a positive signal voltage. A video switch 52 upon re
presentation of nine PPI sweeps for each circle or cursor
ceipt of a PP! gating signal from switch gate generator
sweep. With respect to either the circle or cursor pres
47 permits passage of the video to cathode follower 54
entation, N-S and E-W components of clamping voltage 25 during generation of the radar PPI sweeps. Strobe switch
maintained at the level of the slewing input signal are
53 functions in a comparable manner to alternately in—
supplied to ampli?ers 38 and 39. Provision is made to
sert into the video channel positive spike voltages repre
clamp the normal PPI sweeps at ground potential, pre
senting the azimuth circle dot D and cursor dot S upon
venting the location of the start of the trace from shifting
being conditioned by the gating signal from the cursor
due to rotation of the sweep. It will be observed in this 30 side. Hence, the positive waveform presented at cathode
respect that the sweep signal outputs of the switch stages
follower 54 consists of a composite signal voltage which
are in common connection with the respective outputs of
includes azimuth circle and cursor dot voltages and radar
the PPI and cursor gated clamp stages 41, 42, 43 and 44.
video. The positive signal from cathode follower 54 is
Thus, in general it may be presently noted that a com
appropriately clamped by clamper 60 and applied to the
posite sweep signal which includes a DC. slewing com~
grid of CRT4S. Thus, in the manner herein described
ponent is supplied to the push-pull de?ection ampli?ers,
the video channel comprising the elements set forth above
the output load of which contains an inductive yoke L907
facilitates the generation of a coordinated time shared
display.
having de?ection coils which are quadrantally disposed
about the neck of the cathode ray tube 45. Coherent un
The structural elements particularly portrayed in FIG.
blanking or lowering of the cutoff bias on the CRT is
3:: provide in general for the consummation of the multi
provided by a brilliance and blanking circuit 48. Hence,
plication processes of the instant invention, the generation
as summarily described above with respect to the com
of sinusoidal components for presentation of a circular
posite functional block diagram of the instant invention,
pattern, the development of the aforesaid cursor dot and
PPI and cursor sweeps are generated and selectively dis
azimuth circle dot, and the development of D.C. posi
played coincidcntly with intensity modulation of CRT45. 45 tioning voltages to permit selective slewing of the cursor
In addition to being of transcendent importance in the
and circle. In this regard, oscillator 57 ful?lls a major
generation of sweep signals, the square wave output of
role, being a stable Source of sinusoidal voltage having
multivibrator gate 26 is supplied to count-down multi
a frequency of 1000 c.p.s. or thereabouts. The voltage
vibrator circuit 46. As previously denoted, this wave
of oscillator 57 is applied across circle time potentiometer
form has a recurrence rate which is equal to the PRF of 50 R13 and cascode resolver driver 66. Timing motor and
the radar triggers. It is the purpose of multivibrator 46
differential unit 15 is shown to be mechanically ganged
to fractionate or count down this recurrence rate by ig~
with cursor and circle time potentiometcrs, R13 and R14,
noring a certain number of differentiated waveforms, pre
which rotate, each producing a voltage proportional to
cisely nine cycles, and responding to the tenth waveform.
time. A time modi?er hand control 19 is provided to
Multivibrator 46, therefore, functions to generate a sub 55 augment the rotation of the potentiometers relative to
stantially asymmetrical bistable voltage at a recurrence
their respective wipers. A time dial 18 is also mechanical
rate of 30 c.p.s. This voltage is supplied to switch gate
ly connected as denoted and indicates the time remaining
generator 47 wherein two square waves of opposite polarity
for interception, or as more familiarly termed the “time
are produced having stable limits which vary between
to-go.” The AC. voltage of potentiometer R13 is ap
+110 and —249 volts. The cyclic period of these speci?c 60 plied to circle speed potentiometer and cathode follower
bistable voltages is unchanged, being of the same duration
58, wherein a magnitude of AC. signal voltage is resolved
as the output from count-down multivibrator 46. To
which is proportional to the product of the interceptor
better delineate from a systems point of view the plu
speed and time. Manual interceptor speed control 72
rality of gating functions served by these particular square
is set in accordance with the predetermined speed of the
wave signals, they have been designated the PPI and 65 interceptor. The 90° phase shift network and push-pull
cursor side outputs, which are representatively indicated
ampli?er S9 transforms the applied sinusoidal signal into
in FIG. 5 by waveforms E and F, respectively.
two discrete voltages 90 electrical degrees apart to facili
The brilliance and blanking circuit 48 is of a design re
tate the generation of a circular pattern. These A.C. com
quiring both the PPI and cursor gating signals in addi
ponents thereupon undergo push-pull amplification and
tion to the bistable signal of multivibrator 26 to provide 70 are supplied to an A.C. and DC. component mixer 61,
time shared intensity modulation of the cathode of
which functions to superimpose these components onto
CRT45, and of particular note, relay driver 50 in FIG.
3a is fed the signal associated with the PPI side. The
latter stage effects actuation of a pair of differentially
operated high speed relays K301 and K302, at a repeti 75
a DC. positioning voltage developed in circle positioning
circuit 63. A joystick control 62 is mechanically linked
by means of a conventional gear arrangement to effect
movement of a plurality of potentiometers which develop
3,088,108
positioning voltages having magnitudes and polarities
which correspond to displacement of the joystick from
its neutral position. Thus, at the lower contacts a—b-——
c—~d of relay K301 are presented A.C. components in
requisite phase relation for generation of a circular pat~
tern, and which are each superimposed on a DC. level,
the magnitude and polarity of which are a function of
the position of the joystick. In a comparable manner,
the purpose of cursor positioning circuit 65 is to estab
lish a quadrantal number of discrete DC. voltage levels
work, and a blocking oscillator. Collectively the elements
making up azimuth dot generator 71 convert the phase
shifted signal into a strobe voltage, which is made avail
able at the upper paralleled a—b contacts of relay K302.
The armature of this relay in its up position, as shown,
provides continuity to the video channel for insertion of
the strobe voltage at strobe switch 53. It is of course
manifested on the screen of the PPI scope as the azimuth
circle dot D, depicted in FIG. 1.
The slewing potentials which locate the start of either
which correspond to the position of joystick 64, thereby
the cursor or circle trace on the PPI screen are shown in
providing control over the location of the cursor on the
face of the CRT.
FIG. 3a and FIG. 3b to be selectively applied to the re
Cursor time potentiometer R14 is supplied a DC. volt
age, a fractionated amount thereof being continuously
apportioned according to time. Cursor speed potentiom
eter and cathode follower 73 accepts the fractionated volt
age and produces in the output circuit thereof a low im
pedance DC. voltage of exceptionally linear characteris
spective N-S and E-W inputs of slewing cathode followers
83, 84, 85 and 86 through the contacts of relay K301.
The respective outputs of these stages are thence directly
applied to PPI and cursor gated clamp stages 41, 42, 43
and 44, which upon receipt of appropriate gating signals
permit the de?ection ampli?ers of the instant computer to
be clamped at the level of the slewing potential. Provision
tics that is proportional to distance. Cursor speed con 20 is made for clamping the normal radar PPI sweeps at a
zero level potential by grounding the respective inputs of
trol 74 which modifies the relative position between wiper
stages 41 and 43, as indicated. Thus, the clamping means
and the resistive portion of the potentiometer proper is
set forth assure that the various traces start from the
manipulated under control of the operator to assure coin
same point of reference on the PPI screen. The gating
cidence of the cursor dot S with the target video as dis
played on the screen of the PPI scope. A DC. ampli?er 25 signals for the PPI and cursor gated clamp stages are
obtained from the PPI and cursor driver cathode followers
75 performs ampli?cation of the voltage level in addition
55 and 56. The latter stages are selectively fed in time
to providing a measure of isolation. A two position selec
shared relation by PH and cursor gate ampli?er 87, which
tor switch 76, illustrated in FIG. 3b, is arranged to ac
has dual output gating pulses. one of which is directly
cop! the output of DC. ampli?er 75 in the computer posi
tion. In the alternate radar position, switch 76 affords a 30 coupled to cathode follower 55. The other output is sup
plied to cathode follower 56 through contact c of K302
convenient input from the range delay circuits of the
when the armature is disposed downwardly, its normal
radar, and in this respect, its speci?c application will be
disposition in cursor application. When disposed upward
more apparent in later discussion in connection with the
ly, the normal disposition for circular pattern presenta
detailed schematic drawings of the instant invention. As
suming switch 76 to be in the computer position, the 35 tion, contact 0 supplies a cutoff bias to stage 56. In a
similar manner, contact d of K302 in the downward posi
phantastron cathode follower 77 and phantastron 78
tion is effective to lower the cutoff bias on cursor switch
combinatively provide a bistable voltage having a dura
stages 36 and 37, rendering these tubes conductive during
tion in one of its stable states which is directly propor
cursor application. The precise functional signi?cance of
tional to the magnitude of the voltage level of DC. am
the gating and conditioning potentials associated with
pli?er 75. This bistable voltage waveform is applied to
a delayed trigger ampli?er 79, whose output is a posi
switch contacts c and d of relay K302 will be better ap
ing. Thus, a strobe or cursor dot is provided in accord
ance with inventive concepts of the instant intercept com
sweeps. In addition, cursor and azimuth circle dot volt
ages are developed and superposed onto the cursor and
preciated in subsequent reference to the timing charts of
tive differentiated spike voltage of approximately 35 volts,
FIG. 5 in connection with discussion of the system op
selectively delayed an amount proportional to the DC
eration.
output level of ampli?er 75. This spike waveform is ap
Hence, the structure as denoted in the functional block
plied to blocking oscillator 81, shown in FIG. 3c, which
responds thereto and produces a low impedance strobe or 45 diagram of the inventive intercept computer provides for
a plurality of integrated functions to be performed. Elec
cursor dot voltage which is made available at the lower
trical circuit provisions have been set forth for performing
paralleled a-b contacts of relay K302. Actuation of
the multiplication process, consonant with the generation
K302 ‘positioning its armature in the down position per
of a coordinated time shared presentation consisting of
mits the strobe voltage to be inserted into the video chan
nel at strobe switch 53 in FIG. 30 upon appropriate gat 50 cursor and circle traces integrated with normal radar PPI
puter.
circle, respectively, for application in accordance with
inventive concepts. The composite display as viewed on
In contrast to the speci?c use of essentially ‘a DC. signal
for generating the cursor dot voltage, the structure for 55 the PPI screen is coherently intensi?ed by appropriate
brilliance and blanking circuits.
effecting an azimuth circle dot relies upon the sinusoidal
Referring now to the views of FIGS. 4a through 411,
voltage of oscillator 57. A cascode resolver driver 66,
there is illustrated in a composite showing of these views
illustrated in FIG. 3a, obtains its signal excitation from
a detailed electrical diagram of the instant invention. It
this source as previously denoted. The purpose of resolver
driver 66 in addition to providing isolation is to present 60 is to be noted that the alphabetical designations border
ing these views are to be understood as points of common
an exceedingly low impedance 1000 cycle signal to circle
connection between the various sheets of the drawing,
azimuth control resolver 68. The latter element resolves
provided to facilitate relative orientation of the several
the applied input signal into two right angle voltage com
sheets comprising FIG. 4.
ponents as a function of the angular displacement of
Apropos of the matter of coordinating the views, it is
manual intercept heading control 67, which is mechanical 65
deemed appropriate to consider ?rst the sweep generating
ly linked in common with intercept heading indicator 82
and a rotor winding, not illustrated in FIG. 3a.
Phase
means of the instant invention with ‘relation to the sche
matic showing thereof in FIG. 4g. While the sweep gen
erating means illustrated therein is of a type existing in
recombines the components in a manner to e?fect phase
shift of the AC. signal in direct proportion to the angular 70 the indicator portion of the radar set incorporating the in
stant invention, it has been necessarily modi?ed to facili
rotation of control 67. The resultant sinusoidal signal
tate time shared PPI display in accordance with inventive
emerging from mixer 69 may have its phase retarded
concepts. FIG. 4g, ‘therefore, is a schematic illustration
0-360“ with respect to the output of oscillator 57 and is
of a modi?ed form of sweep generating means, and, it is to
thence applied to azimuth dot generator 71, which com
be further noted that the numerical underlined designa
prises a two stage clipper ampli?er, an RC shaping net
shift mixer 69 comprising a resistive~capacitive network
Документ
Категория
Без категории
Просмотров
0
Размер файла
4 012 Кб
Теги
1/--страниц
Пожаловаться на содержимое документа