close

Вход

Забыли?

вход по аккаунту

?

Патент USA US3088146

код для вставки
May 7, 1963
s. H. KAUFFMAN ETAL
3,088,136
RECOVERY PACK FOR AIR DROPPED TEST WEAPONS
Filed Dec. 8, 1959
4 Sheets-Sheet 1
|
lmf
— h
I8-
1!
i‘7345.3?
'
"-3
I
E
I
I
J
m
L!-
El
1,
O
D
Q
O
(2.
INVENTORS
s. H. KAUFFMAN
R. L. DETWILER
M. B.MOORE
BY
/§, W
May 7, 1963
s. H. KAUFFMAN ETAL
3,088,136
RECOVERY PACK FOR AIR DROPPED TEST WEAPONS
Filed Dec. 8, 1959
'
4 Sheets-Sheet 2
Ci
INVENTORS,
0
S. H. KAUFFMAN
R. L. DETWILER
M. B. MOORE
I-l
u.
BY
/
ATTORNEYS,
May 7, 19.53
s. H. KAUFFMAN ETAL
.
3,088,136
RECOVERY~PACK FOR AIR DROPPED TEST WEAPONS
Filed Dec. 8‘, 1959
'
4 Sheets-Sheet s
q‘
Q’
9|
<2’
N
:\
‘I?
#5
u
.
0-!
g
h
L1,,
:n
2
I0
Q’
Q
g
l
INVENTORS.
S. H. KAUFFMAN
R. L. DETWILER
IVL B. MOORE
BY
am
May 7, 1963 ‘
s. H. KAUFFMAN ETAL
3,088,136
RECOVERY PACK FOR AIR DROPPED TEST WEAPONS
Filed Dec. 8, 1959
4 Sheets-Sheet 4
INVENTORS.
S. H. KAUFFMAN
"
R.L. DETWILER
M. B.MOORE
BY
I
/3%W
~
"7'7 '
TTORNEYS.
United States Patent 0 "
2
1
3,088,136
RECOVERY PACK FOR AIR DRGPPED
TEST WEAPONS
Samuel H. Kautfman, Robert L. Detwiler, and Morrison
B. Moore, Silver Spring, Md., assignors to the United
States of America as represented by the Secretary of
the Navy
Filed Dec. 8, 1959, Ser. No. 858,296
4 Claims. (Cl. 9-9)
(Granted under Title 35, U.S. Code (1952), see. 266)
The invention described herein may be manufactured
and used by or for the Government of the United States
of America for governmental purposes without the pay
3,688,136
Patented May 7, 1963
a deep body of water, which pack affects only slightly
the underwater trajectory of the weapon.
It is another object of this invention to provide a com
pact, rugged, and reliable recovery pack for recovering
aircraft weapons from deep water.
Still another object of the invention is the provision
of a new and improved system for recovering a test wea
pon from deep water and having a recovery or marker
balloon wherein the weapon hangs from the balloon free
of the bottom and directly under the recovery balloon so
that it may be retrieved without parting the cable.
These and many other objects will become more readily
apparent when the following speci?cation is read and
considered along with the attendant drawings wherein like
ment of any royalties thereon or therefor.
This invention rel-ates to a new and improved system
for recovering a test weapon which has been dropped into
numerals designate like or similar parts throughout the
various views in which:
a body of Water; and is more particularly concerned with
FIGS. la-lh are diagrammatic representations of the
sequence of operations of a typical test for a weapon em
a new and improved recovery system which is suitable for
ploying this recovery pack;
recovering test weapons from deep water.
FIG. 2 is a cross sectional view of the recovery pack
It is common practice in the ordnance art when de 20
of the invention;
veloping a new weapon to test the weapon to determine
FIG. 3 is a cross-sectional view of the aft portion of a
its physical characteristics, the mode of operation of its
safing and arming system, aerodynamic and, where ap
propriate, its hydrodynamic characteristics by employing
a dummy weapon in a simulated tactical environment. 25
The warhead or explosive portion of these test missiles
are generally removed so that various instruments may be
substituted in their place and so that the missile may be
used over and over again during testing.
When the Weapon is to be used in water such, for ex
typical practice bomb containing a recovery pack con
struction according to the principles of this invention;
FIG. 4 is a section taken along line 4—4 of FIG. 2
showing the position of the gas bottles used to in?ate the
balloon; and
FIG. 5 is a section in which is shown the balloon par
tially in?ated.
ample as a torpedo, antisubmarine bomb or mine, or
Referring now to FIG. 1 the sequence of operations of
the apparatus of this invention Would in a typical case
missile designed to enter the water, a special problem
be as follows:
A typical Weapon 11 having fins 12 and a pack 13 af
arises—-t-hat of recovering the test weapon. When the
?xed thereto is shown in FIG. 1 just as it is about to enter
weapon is dropped in rather shallow water (up to 150
ft.) this problem is not critical since a length of cable can 35 the water. Upon water entry a cavity or air bubble im
mediately begins to form. This cavity increases in size
be attached to the weapon at one end and a buoy at the
and completely surrounds the weapon even after it has
other which buoy is released upon bottom impact of the
passed a considerable distance below the normal surface
missile thereby providing an easy method of recording the
of the body of water 14. Upon water entry the pack 13
location of the test weapon and recovering it. On the
other hand, when the water into which the missile or 40 is freed from the ?n 12 in a manner which will be more
readily apparent as the description proceeds so that it is
weapon is dropped is substantially greater than 150 ft. it
free to move away from the weapon after Water entry.
may be impossible to include a length of cable great
Upon collapse of the air bubble, the pack is buffeted free
enough to reach to the surface in the body of the missile.
of the weapon and ?oats toward the surface, paying out
Furthermore, the weapon being in deep water, it is im
practical or even impossible to send divers to the bottom 45 a length of cable 19, since it is positively buoyant. When
the recovery pack 13‘ travels a short distance from the
to search for it.
missile, a lanyard 16 between the weapon and the recovery
When a long cable is employed so that the weapon rests
pack opens a valve which allows gas to flow into the col
upon the bottom and the buoy floats on the surface an
lapsed balloon 18 Within thepack so that the balloon
other di?‘lculty is encountered. In such a prior art sys
begins rapid inflation knocking off the cover 17 which ?ts
tem, the buoy drifts so that it is not directly above the
over the container 13‘. The balloon becomes rapidly in
weapon. In retrieving the weapon by reeling in the re
dated and rises quickly to the surface paying out an ad
covery cable it therefore must ?rst be dragged along the
ditional length of cable 19* from the weapon. When
ocean ?oor until it is directly beneath the buoy before
the cable 19 is payed out, the balloon 1Sv is pulled below
it commences to ascend. At it is dragged across the
the surface and gradually slows the rate of descent of the
ocean floor, it may become snagged on irregularities on
weapon. When the weapon reaches its maximum depth,
the bottom thereby putting sufficient stress on the recovery
the entire assembly, being positively buoyant after the
cable to part it.
in?ation of the balloon 18, rises slowly to the surface and
Formerly, if it was desired to test a weapon designed
a portion of the balloon extends above the surface mak
to explode at depths greater than 200 ft., it was generally
necessary to test the missile in shallow Water. This is 60 ing it readily visible for recovery operations. When it
is desired to recover the assembly, a lariat of cable is
unsatisfactory since the arming and ?ring mechanism of
dropped around the balloon 18 and allowed to move be
the weapon is usually designed to operate at a certain
low case 13‘ Where it is snubbed. The entire assembly is
depth. If this depth is not reached, the behavior and op
then raised by a pick-up boat or other suitable recovery
eration of the ?ring and arming switches cannot be real
65 vessel.
istically evaluated under simulated tactical conditions.
Referring now to FIG. 3, the after portion of weapon
By this invention there is provided a novel recovery
11 contains a cable dispenser 21 in which cable 19‘ is
pack for weapons dropped into the sea at high speeds
initially stored. One end of the cable is secured to the
which pack can be used in shallow water but is especially
recovery pack 13 by‘ means of a swedge ?tting at 22 at
useful where the water is very deep so that the convention
70 foot plate 23. At the opposite end of the cable is formed
al recovery systems cannot be used.
a swedge (not shown) adapted to seat in a similar retainer
It is an object of this invention to provide a new and
improved recovery pack for an air drop weapon entering
25 when the cable is fully payed out. A rather small
3,088,136
3
conduit 24 along the outer surface of the weapon houses
lanyard 16 which is secured at one end to a valve 26 (FIG.
2) for in?ating the balloon. It is shown merely sche
matically in the drawings for the reason that it forms no
part of the invention per se. Any number of valves could
be employed for the purpose. However, the valve assem
bly manufactured by Knapp Monarch Co. (parts No.
4
ings as a liner for the balloon; when the balloon is in
?ated, however, the sleeve 44 does not expand but re
mains as a central sleeve disposed within the in?ated
balloon as shown in FIG. 5. The purpose of this sleeve
will be described hereinafter.
In order to in?ate the balloon as rapidly as possible,
a siphon tube 46 (FIG. 4) is disposed in each gas bottle
A-128—RTB) was employed for this purpose. A second
which preferably may contain CO2. Accordingly, upon
swedge ?tting is formed at 27 at one end of conduit 24
release of valve 26 the manifold 36 is connected to the
so that when the pack and the weapon separate and lan 10 conduit 37 by release of a spring biased plug 47 in the
yard 16 moves through conduit 24 it is arrested at 27
conduit, liquid CO2 is free to ?ow into the balloon un
and opens valve 26 when the pack and the weapon are
der the pressure of the gaseous CO2. Of course this
a few feet apart. The lanyard then pulls free of the
extremely cold liquid could damage the ‘balloon if it
valve.
were allowed to impinge upon sleeve 18 in a burst of
Foot plate 23 has a?ixed thereto a plurality of toes or 15 great violence. Therefore the sleeve 44 disposed within
lugs 28, FIG. 3, which match the feet 29 welded to the
the balloon acts as a diffuser to prevent direct contact of
?ns 12 on the weapon. A segmented clamping ring 31
liquid CO2 with the balloon 18. The advantage of rapid
maintains the feet 28 and 29 in mutual abutting relation
in?ation of the balloon is thereby accomplished since all
as the weapon moves through the air. When the missile
the CO2 is forced out of the bottles in a short time since
enters the water, a plurality of inertia weights 32 which
it is coming out in the form of a liquid for the most part
are disposed in appropriate eyelets in clamping ring 31
rather than a gas but does not involve the danger of any
release ring 31 in the conventional manner. That is to
damage to the balloon since the balloon itself is protected
say, upon water entry the inertia weights continue in the
by the central nylon liner.
direction of travel substantially unaffected by the decelera
The valving, the balloon and the manifold must be
tion of the missile thereby withdrawing themselves through 25 suitably supported by pillars or support blocks 48 since
eyelets 33. A soft C-ring 34 may conveniently be secured
the device undergoes shocks of great magnitude upon
to the inertia weights to prevent them from slipping out
water
entry and any cantilever portion would be snapped
of eyelets 313 except on rapid deceleration of weapon 1.1
off upon application of the deceleration ‘forces encoun
in which event, 'C-rings 34 are either deformed out of
position and allow inertial weights 32 to pass through the 30 tered in water entry. The thin liner 49 separating the
balloon of case 13 from the valve portion of the case is
eyelets or the C-rings may be actually snapped. It is to
supported by a platform or plate 51, resting upon pillars
be understood, of course, that instead of inertia weights
48. The cover is secured to the container 13 merely ‘by
a water paddle arrangement could also be used to effect
reason
of the fact that it is a close ?t or it may be se
separation of the weapon from the pack or container 13‘.
In any event, upon separation, at water entry the con 35 cured by a weak adhesive so that upon in?ation of the
balloon, the cover pops off readily. It should be apparent
tainer is free to move away from the weapon and it does
to
those skilled in the art that this invention provides a
so when the water bubble mentioned hereinbefore col
lapses thereby bu?ieting the pack or container free from
novel system for recovering a practice weapon from deep
protection. The balloon itself is constructed preferably
of any material suitable for the purpose such, for example,
as nylon impregnated with polyvinylchloride. This is in
balloon and connected to said valve to receive the dis
water which system is reliable and suf?ciently rugged to
the weapon. This withdraws the lanyard 16 through con
duit 2.4 as the container’s velocity is decreased due to its 40 withstand water entry at high velocities.
Although this invention has been described with ref
positive buoyancy so that the lanyard operates valve 26
erence to a single preferred embodiment it is by no means
and then pulls free of the valve mechanism and remains
so limited. It is susceptible of modi?cations and al
secured to the weapon.
terations
without departing from the spirit and scope of
Upon the opening of the valve 26 cover 117 is forced
45 this invention. Accordingly, the foregoing illustrative ex
off as the balloon 18 begins to in?ate.
ample is not to be construed as limiting this invention in
Reference should be now had to FIGS. 2 and 4. As
any manner; rather the scope of the appended claims de
seen in these ?gures, container 13 houses the valve 26
?ne the invention.
and a pair of ‘gas bottles 35 which are connected to a
What is claimed as new and desired to be secured by
manifold 36 and thence to a conduit 37 leading to the
Letters Patent of the United States is:
interior of the balloon through an anvil arrangement.
1. In combination with a test weapon for high velocity
As seen in FIG. 2 the anvil consists of a conduit 37 having
drops in deep water, a recovery pack comprising; a con
an enlarged end 38 which is disposed within the balloon
tainer, a plurality of releasable clamping means secur
18. This enlarged end is bevelled to cooperate with a
ing the weapon to said container, means for releasing
wedging device 39 threadedly secured to the outer por
tion of the conduit 37. The balloon is disposed about 55 said clamping means upon entry of said weapon into the
water, a lanyard operated valve disposed within said con
the enlarged end 38 of conduit 37 and a clamping ring
tainer, a lanyard secured to said weapon and connected
41 of a convex shaped interior is disposed about the
to said valve to operate said valve upon separation of
balloon. The wedge 39 is tightened so that the seal be
the weapon and the container a predetermined distance
tween the bevel-led portion of conduit 37, wedge 39 and
clamping ring 41 is air tight. As an extra precaution, the 60 after entry of said weapon into the water, at least one
high pressure bottle containing a gas and liquid and con
material of the balloon is drawn up on the outside of the
tained within said container said bottle being connected
clamping ring 41 and a metal ring 42, disposed about the
to said valve and, the discharge of said bottle being con
balloon, is tightened. Furthermore, this balloon material
trolled by said valve, an initially de?ated balloon within
may also be drawn over the outer side of the ring 42 and
another ring 43 clamped about the balloon for additional 65 said container, a ?exible, substantially non-expansible dif
the form generally of a sleeve so that it is closed off at
the opposite end in a manner similar to the closure method
described. Of course, there is no open conduit leading
into the balloon at the opposite end.
fusion liner located substantially centrally within said
charge from said bottle, cable dispensing means secured
to said recovery pack at one end and to the test weapon
at the other end and housed within said test weapon for
paying out a length of cable upon in?ation of said bal
loon whereby said balloon is in?ated shortly after entry
of said weapon into the water to retard the rate of the
This type balloon may be obtained commercially. Dis
underwater descent of the weapon and to rise to the sur
posed within the ‘balloon is a second nylon sleeve 44 of
rather coarse mesh. This sleeve is shown in the draw 75 face after said weapon reaches the limit of its descent.
3,088,136
5
2. In combination with a test weapon adapted to enter
deep water at a high speed, 1a recovery pack comprising;
a container, clamping ‘means releasably securing said con
tainer to the weapon, said clamping means being releas
able upon entry of the weapon into the water to effect
separation of ‘the weapon and said container, cable means
disposed within said weapon and interconnecting said con
tainer and the weapon, a normally ‘de?ated ‘balloon with
in said container, ?uid containing means mounted with
in said container and having a quantity of expansible
?uid consisting of a liquid portion and a gaseous portion
therein, conduit means interconnecting said balloon and
said ?uid containing means, a normally closed lanyard
operated valve disposed in said conduit means, lanyard
6
3. A recovery pack according to claim 2 further in
cluding siphon means ?xed within said ?uid containing
means to discharge the liquid portion of the fluid before
the gaseous portion is ‘discharged.
4. The recovery pack according to claim 3 further in
cluding a porous ?exible liner within said balloon and
connected to said valve to receive the discharge from
said ?uid containing means thereby to prevent the liquid
10 portion of the ?uid from impinging upon the balloon.
References Cited in the ?le of this patent
UNITED STATES PATENTS
means connected between said weapon and said valve 'for 15
opening said valve to initiate ?uid ?ow from said ?uid con
taining means into said balloon as the valve opens upon
separation of the weapon and said container a predeter
mined distance, whereby said balloon is in?ated shortly
after separation of said container from the Weapon to in 20
crease the aggregate lbuoyancy of the balloon and the
weapon thereby to gradually retard underwater descent of
the weapon and thereafter to rise to the surface.
sa"g-.K
940,506
1,473,148
2,192,450
2,508,303
Broomell ____________ __ Nov. 16,
Hammond ____________ __ Nov. 6,
Miller ________________ __ Mar. 5,
Sturtevant ____________ __ May 16,
2,752,615
2,825,803
1909
1923
1940
1950
Parker ________________ __ July 3, 1956
Newbrough __________ __ Mar. 24, 1958
2,903,717
2,949,853
Vintschger ___________ __ Sept. 15, 1959
Vogt ________________ __ Aug. 23, 1960
Документ
Категория
Без категории
Просмотров
0
Размер файла
639 Кб
Теги
1/--страниц
Пожаловаться на содержимое документа