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Патент USA US3090142

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May 21, 1963
L. J. NOWAK, JR, ETAL
3,090,132
COFFEE COOLING STRUCTURE
Filed 001.. 13, 1958
7 Sheets-Sheet 1
INVENTORS
LEON .J- NOWAK JR.
DANIEL KERWIN
PARKER & CARTER
AT TO R NEYS
May 21, 1963
L. J. NOWAK, JR., ETAL
3,090,132
COFFEE COOLING STRUCTURE
Filed Oct. 15, 1958
‘TSheets-Sheet 2
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INVENTORS
LEON J. NOWAK JR
BY DANIEL KERWIN
PARKER {S CARTER
ATTORNEYS
May 21, 1963
|_. J. NOWAK, JR., ETAL
COFFEE COOLING STRUCTURE
Filed Oct. 15, 1958
3,090,132
'
v Sheets-Sheet 3
INVENTORS
LEON .J‘ NOWAK 'JR.
'
- KER W I N
BY DANKEL
PARKER
& CARTER '_
ATTORNEYS
May 21, 1963
L. J. NOWAK, JR., ETAL
3,090,132
COFFEE COOLING STRUCTURE
Filed Oct. 15, 1958
7 Sheets-Sheet 4
rl
INVENTORS
LEON J. NOWAK JR.
BY DA N] E L KERWIN
PARKER <3 CARTER
ATTORNEYS
May 21, 1963
L. J. NOWAK, JR, ETAL
3,090,132
COFFEE COOLING STRUCTURE
Filed Oct. 13, 1958
‘7 Sheets-Sheet 5
BY DA N! Ev L _ K E RWlN
PARKER 2, CARTER
ATTORNEYS
May 21, 1963
L. J. NOWAK, JR, ETAL
3,090,132
CQFFEE COOLING STRUCTURE
Filed Oct. 15, 1958
7 Sheets-Sheet 6
'INVENTORS
LEON
J.
DANIEL
NOWAK JR
KERWIN
PARKER 43 CARTER
ATTO RNEYS
May 21, 1963
L‘ J. NOWAK. JR., ETAL
3,090,132
COFFEE COOLING STRUCTURE
Filed 061'“ 1a, 1958
7 Sheets—Sheet 7
INVENTORS
‘ LEON
J. NOWAK JR.
BY DANIEL
KERWIN
PARKER 8 CARTER
ATTORNEYS
United States Patent 0 "PIC€
1
3,090,132
COFFEE CGULING STRUCT
Leon J. Nowak, In, Park Ridge, and Daniel Kerwin, Lom
bard, Ill., assignors, by mesne assignments, to B. G.
Gump (30., a corporation of Hlinois
Filed Oct. 13, 1958, Ser. No. 766,823
24- Claims. (Cl. 34-4174)
\
37,®90,l32
Patented May 21, 1963
2
the conveyor and extends to the outer walls 2 and 5.
As will be noted in FIGURES 1 and 2, the screw con
veyor has its axis inclined to the horizontal. The angle
of inclination is of the order of the angle of repose of
granular material deposited in piles in the chambers 6
and 7, the slope of the conveyor axis approximating
the slope of the tops of the piles of material in the cham—
bers. This inclination of the conveyor facilitates the even
This invention is directed to a new and improved
structure for cooling granular material, such as co?ee.
distribution of incoming material over the top of the
piles in the chamber which of course aids in the ex~
posure of the material to the cooling ?uid. As will be
One purpose of the present invention is the creation
of a cooling structure which will rapidly lower the tem
noted in FIGURE 2, the material guiding member 10
perature of granular material from a temperature of
is parallel to the conveyor axis. A motor 12 is mounted
several hundred degrees to room temperature.
upon an upper portion of the housing, to rotate the con
Another purpose of the present invention is a cool 15 veyor and thereby move material upwardly from the
ing structure for granular material which operates ef
lower portion of the conveyor to the upper portion thereof.
?ciently on either relatively large or relatively small
A material ‘feeding hopper 13, preferably in the form
batches of granular material.
of a chute pivoted to the conveyor housing, is adapted
Another purpose of the present invention is the pro
to deliver material to the conveyor. An inlet v15 is
vision of improved material handling means in a granular
formed in the conveyor housing so that material de
material cooling structure.
posited in the chute or hopper =13 may {flow to the lower
Other purposes will become manifest from a reading
portion of the screw conveyor 11.
of the ensuing speci?cation and claims.
It should be noted that the chute 13 is comprised of
Referring generally now to the drawings:
upper and lower sections 13b and 13a. The two sec
FIGURE 1 is a side elevation of the present inven 25 tions are each hinged to the conveyor housing on op
tion with parts omitted for clarity;
posite sides of the inlet 15 as at 13c and 13a’. A link
FIGURE 2 is a view similar to FIGURE 1, but with
13:: pivotally interconnects the two sections so that when
parts in section;
the chute is swung from the full line position of FIG
FIGURE 3 is a sectional view taken substantially along
URE 1 to the dotted line position, the section 13b col
30 lapses within the section 13a.
the section line 3—3 of FIGURE 1;
FIGURE 4 is an enlarged view of certain elements
The top wall of the section 13b, the bottom wall of
shown in FIGURE 1;
section 13a and the side walls of the two sections de
FIGURE 5 is a sectional view taken along the section
?ne an enclosure for the material ?owing from the re
line 5-—5 of FIGURE 2;
ceiving end of the chute thus minimizing the possibility
FIGURE 6 is a sectional view taken along the section 35 of foreign matter dropping into the material.
line 6——6 of FIGURE 5 with parts omitted ‘for clarity;
As will be seen best in FIGURES 1 and 3, exterior
FIGURE 7 is a sectional view taken along the section
walls W and W’ may be positioned outside of the air
line 7-7 of FIGURE 1;
pervious walls 2 and 5 to de?ne air inlet spaces A and
FIGURE 8 is a schematic view of a control circuit 40 A’ between these walls and the outer walls 2 and 5 of
utilized in the invention;
the chamber. The walls W and W’ may extend over an
FIGURE ‘9 is a side elevation of a modi?cation of
area coextensive with the area of the upstanding walls
the invention;
2 and 5. Designated generally at B and B’ in FIGURE
FIGURE 10 is a sectional view taken along the section
3 are ducts which may, for example, lead to a header
line 1tl-—1tl of FIGURE 9;
45 for outside air, or to some other suitable supply of cool
FIGURE 11 is a sectional view of an automatic power
ing medium. The ducts are not shown in FIGURE 1
actuated system for the dampers of the cooler viewed
since they are not essential when room air is lbeing uti
from the right of FIGURE 3;
lized. In FIGURE 1, a portion of the exterior wall W
FIGURE 11a is a diagrammatic illustration of a variant
form of sensing devices;
is broken away in order to show the nature of the up
50 standing air pervious outer wall 2 of the chamber.
FIGURE 12 is a diagrammatic view of a control cir
The upstanding walls 2, 3, >4 and 5 are each pref
cuit used with the system of FIGURE 11; and
erably formed from screen mesh which extends over an
FIGURE 13 is a partial view of the structure shown
area generally de?ned by the guiding member 10, base
in FIGURE 11, taken on the line 13—13, and viewed
‘1, and a line extending from the upper portion of the
in the direction of the arrows.
55 conveyor to the base. Any suitable framework 16 may
Like elements are designated by like characters through—
be used to support the screen mesh in the position illus
out the speci?cation and drawings.
trated. Each of the walls 2, 3, 4 and 5 may include
Referring speci?cally now to the drawings and in the
two layers of screen mesh of different sizes, in which
?rst instance to FIGURE 1, 1 represents any suitable
case the smaller size screen may form the inner wall sur
base or frame casting which may be supported upon a 60 face of the chambers while the layer of larger mesh may
floor. Upstanding air pervious walls 2, 3, 4 and 5, as
form the outer wall surfaces of the chambers.
seen best in FIGURE 3, extend vertically from the base
The chambers are closed at the upper portion thereof
1 to de?ne a pair of material receiving chambers ‘6 and
vby the conveyor housing 11a, and by a plate 16a which
7, between the walls with an air space 8, between the
extends generally at right angles to the conveyor axis and
chambers. The upper ends of the chambers 6 and 7 are
from the upper portion of the conveyor downwardly
open and in communication with a conveyor space 9.
where it connects with an end Wall 16b. The end wall
The upper end of the air space 8 is closed by a material
16b for each chamber extends upwardly from the base
guiding member 10.
at an angle with the vertical generally equal to the angle
made by the conveyor axis with the vertical.
A conveyor 11 which preferably takes the form of a
Thus the pervious side walls of the chamber and the
screw conveyor is mounted in the conveyor space 9 in a 70
chambers themselves have the shape of an irregular
manner such that the axis of the conveyor overlies the
material guiding member 10. A housing 11a overlies
polygon.
3,090,132
.
'-
3
An air outlet duct 17 is joined to the base. The duct
17 is in communication with the space 8 from the lower
most portion thereof as designated at 18 to an upper por
tion thereof as designated at 19. The duct 17 may lead
to any suitable source of suction, such as a blower, for
drawing air or gases or both from the space 8.
The air space 8 is divided into a plurality of vertically
spaced air passageways as by means of the vertically
4
be associated with the switches 48 and 46 and an indicator
light 51 may be associated with the switches 47 and 49.
The lights 59 and 51 are lighted when their associated
switches 4-6 and 47, respectively, are closed, to indicate
whether the gates are open or closed. Thus, if the gates
are closed, switch as is closed and the indicator light 50
is energized. Light 51 is energized when switch 47 is
closed and the gates are open.
One or both of lights 50
and 51 are always lighted. When switch 47 is closed and
switch 46 open, as shown in FIGURE 8, the indicator
light 51 is lighted. The motor 35 will not be energized
inclined to the vertical at an angle on the order of the
however until switch 48 is closed.
angle of repose of material in the chambers. Thus, an
uppermost passageway is created at 24, a lowermost pas
A modi?cation of the invention is shown in FIGURES
9 and 10. In FIGURES 9 and '10 the assembly is essen
sageway is created at 2-8, and intermediate passageways
tially identical to the assembly illustrated in FIGURES 1
are created at 25, ‘26 and ‘27. Each passageway commu
through 8 with the exception that a positive conveyor dis
nicates with the chambers 6 and 7, through the pervious
walls and with outlet duct ‘17.
charge is utilized in FIGURES 9 and 10 whereas a gravi~
tational discharge is employed in FIGURES 1-8. It will
A valve or damper means is positioned to close o?f each
be noted, ‘also, that in FIGURES 9 and 10 the width of the
of the upper passageways to the duct 117. As shown, the
drying chamber or air space 8a is substantially less, in re
valve or damper may take the form of butter?y valves 29,
lation to the adjacent air chambers, than is the case in
30, 31 and 32, which are pivoted as at. 29a, 39a, 31a and
32a. As shown in FIGURE 4, a handle 32!) may be ?xed
the structure of FIGURES 3 and 7. It will be understood,
to each valve to allow the operator to move the valve be
of course, that there is considerable latitude in the pro
portioning of the parts and in the relative dimensions of
tween an open and closed position. Similar handles are
provided for each valve.
25 the various chambers. In this form of the invention plates
52 and 53 de?ne the bottom of the material receiving
The bottom of the chambers 6 and 7 is de?ned by
chambers 54 and 55 in place of the gates 34 and 33 of
pivoted gates 33 and 34. A motor operated mechanism is
FIGURES 1-8.
provided to move the gates 33 and ‘34 from the closed
The base casting 56 terminates at the lower portion of
position illustrated in FIGURE 3 to an open position
the upwardly inclined wall 57 of the material receiving
where material in the chambers i6 and 7 will fall by gravity,
chambers.
into the space beneath the gates.
Spiral conveyors 58 and 59 are positioned for rotation
The motor operated mechanism is shown in detail in
in the bottoms of the material receiving chambers 54 and
FIGURES 5 and 6. It is located beneath the lower end
spaced ba?ies 2t), 21, 22 and 23, which are joined to the
side Walls 3 and 4. The baf?es 20‘, 2'1, 22 and 23 are
55. The conveyors may be mounted on rods 60 and 61
of the conveyor 11. It includes a suitable motor means,
electric or otherwise, such as the motor 35 which is shown 35 which are journalled in the frame and driven by motors
as ‘driving a crank 36.
A connecting rod 37 is pivotally
connected to crank 36 at a location radially offset from the
axis of rotation of crank 36. Rod 37 is also pivotally con~
nected, as at 38 to a link 39. Link 39 is pivotally con
nected to crank arms at} and 41 on supporting hinge rods 40
62.
The conveyors extend through openings in the in
clined wall 57 and over a discharge Zone designated at 63.
It should be understood that any suitable conveyor means
(not shown) may be positioned beneath conveyors '53 and
59 to convey such material to a further processing area.
FIGURES Ill and 1?. illustrate an automatic control
42 and 43 for the gates 33 and 34. The linkage provides
system for the dampers in the cooler. In FIGURE 11
a full cycle of opening and closing movement of the
valves or dampers 129, 130, 131 and \132 are shown.
gates 33 and 34 for each full revolution of crank 36.
The structure illustrated in FIGURE 11 has been reversed,
The crank 36 preferably takes the form of a disk with
left and right, from the position of FIGURE 1, for ex
diametrically spaced notches 144 and 45‘. The notches are
also spaced from one, another along the axis of the disk. 45 ample, for purposes of description. It should be under
stood that these dampers or valves are associated with
The surface of the disk and notches actuate switches 46
the spaces or passageways in the upper portion of the
air outlet space as are the dampers 29, 30, 31 and 32 in
FIGURES 1 through 10. The valves are pivoted as at
FIGURE 6. It has been omitted from FIGURE 5 for 50 129a, 130a, 131a and 132a so as to be movable between
open and closed positions. In FIGURE 11 the valve 130
clarity. The notches 44 and 45 are arranged to be con
is shown in the open position as well as the valve 129,
tacted by switch actuating rollers 46a and 47a respectively
whereas the valves 13-1 and 132 are illustrated in the
when the rod 37 is at the top dead center and bottom dead
closed position. Valves i131 and 132 he in the same
center positions. As will be seen in FIGURE 8, each of
plane as the upper front wall of the structure, and ac<
the switches 46 and 47, one of which is always closed,
cordingly are co-extensive with said upper front wall when
is in one of the main lines leading to the motor 35.
viewed from a side elevation as in FIGURE lil. Their
Manually actuated switches '48 and 49, located at any con
relationship to valves 1129 and 130 can be seen in other
venient position such as at the control panel, are in paral
?gures, particularly FIGURE 13. When the two lower
lel with the switches 46 and 47. Thus, after a predeter
valves 129 and 139 are open while the upper valves
mined amount of travel of the cam 36, as when the gates
131 and 132 are closed, air may be exhausted through the
33, 34 have moved to the fully open position, the switch 46
passageways associated with the valves 129 and l130I
will move to the open position by reason of its actuating
while the passageways associated with the valves 131 and
roller 46a dropping into the notch 44. This terminates
132 become substantially dead air spaces.
energization of the motor 35 and movement of the gates
Electrical actuating mechanisms are employed to open
stop. To move the gates back to the closed position, the
and close the valves in direct relation to the level of
operator simply closes the open switch 48, thus bypassing
material in the cooling chambers. In the form of the
the switch 46 and energizing the motor. The motor 35
invention illustrated, a separate mechanism 133, 134, 135
then rotates the crank 36, and since rod 37 then moves
and 47 which terminate operation of the motor after a
predetermined amount of crank travel. A mounting
bracket for switches 46 and 47 is indicated in phantom in
and 136 is associated with each of the valves 129, 139‘,
in the opposite direction, the gates v33 and 34 will move
‘in the closing direction until the other switch roller 47a 70 131 and 132, respectively. Each of these mechanisms are
identical and for this reason only the mechanism associ
drops into the notch 45 and terminates operation of the
ated with the valve ‘13!? will be described in detail. Each
motor and the closing movement. In FIGURE 5 conduit
of the mechanisms 133, 134, ‘135 and 136 include actuat
receptacles 46c, ‘47c receive the'c'onduits 46d, 47d re
ing solenoids ‘137, 138, 139 and 7140, respectively, and
spectively, identi?ed in FIGURE 8.
Referring to FIGURE 8, an indicator light 50 may 75 thermally responsive switches >141, 142,. 143 and 144, re
3,090,132
spectively. The plungers of solenoids 137, 138, 139, and
142 has been closed. The circuit ‘for the solenoids 139
and 140 similarly include the thermally responsive switches
143 and 144, respectively, holding relays 153 and 1154 and
140 are shown in a de-energized condition in FIGURE 12.
In FIGURE 11, the plungers of solenoids 137, I138 are
shown in an energized condition, and the plungers of sole
noids 139, 140‘ in a de~energized condition.
Considering one actuating mechanism 134 as typical,
it will be seen that the plunger 145 of the solenoid 138
is attached to a ?exible member 146 which in turn is
switches 153a and 154a which are closed when their as
sociated relays are energized. The switches 151a, 152a,
153a and 154:: establish hold-ing circuits for the solenoids
137, v138, 139 and 140, respectively, when the associated
thermally responsive switches are actuated.
wound about and attached, as at 146a, to a hub 147 for
The circuit for each of the solenoids is interlocked with
the valve 131). A thremally responsive element '148 is 10 the circuit for the solenoid of the actuating mechanism
associated with the switch 142 and is mounted so as to
for the passageway next below so that once the particular
project into the passageway associated with the valve 130.
solenoid has been energized and it has opened its as
Thus the element 148 is subjected to the temperature in
sociated valve, it will not close until the actuating mecha
this passageway. A weight149‘ is mounted for movement
nism for the valve for the passageway next below has
with the hub 147 which supports the valve 130 and is 15 been de-energized. The closing of the valve for the
adapted to bias the valve 130 to the closed position.
lowermost passageway is dependent upon the opening of
In FIGURE 11a we illustrate a variant sensing means
a timer actuated switch 155 which is actuated by a timing
in which a suitable motor and blades are employed to
mechanism 156. The switch 155 is in the circuit for the
sense physical-1y the presence of the material to be cooled.
solenoid 137 between the switches 11411 and 151a and the
We illustrate, for example, the driven shaft ‘148a which 20 line L2. Thus the de-energization of the solenoid 137
carries a spinner ‘14812. It will be understood that when
which closes the valve for the lowermost passageway, is
the space is empty the shaft and spinner rotate freely
dependent upon the opening of the timer switch 155. In
due to motor 1143c. Any suitable means may be employed
order to interlock the circuits for the solenoids 1137, 138,
for using the interruption of this rotation to actuate suit
139 and 140, each circuit includes a switch which is closed
able switches, solenoids, or the like, such as are shown in 25 by the energization of the holding relay in the actuating
FIGURES 1'1 and 12 and described herein. A suitable
circuit for the passageway next below. For example,
make and ‘break circuit, not herein shown, may be in
switch 157 is adapted to be closed when the relay 151 is
cluded.
energized and is in the line between the switch 142 and
The ‘arrangement is such that when the heat in the area
the solenoid 138. The switch 158 is closed by the ener
adjacent to the element 148 reaches a predetermined de 30 gization of relay 152 and is in the line between the switch
gree, which may, for example, be a certain amount less
143 and solenoid 139. The switch 159 is adapted to be
than the temperature of the material deposited in the
closed in response to the energization of the holding relay
chambers, the thermal switch 142 closes and closes a cir
153 and is in the line between the switch 144 and the
cuit to the solenoid 138, thus energizing the solenoid and
solenoid 140.
retracting the plunger 145. This pulls the cable 146
Thus when the circuit of FIGURE 12 is employed, the
downwardly and rotates the supporting hub ‘for the valve
operator may set the timer .156 to any desired cooling time
131) in a clockwise direction as viewed in FIGURE 11 and
which may, for example, be on the order of two to four
opens the valve. When the temperature adjacent the ele
ment 148 has dropped a su?icient amount, the thermal
switch 142 opens and thus de-energizes the solenoid 138.
The weight 149 then moves the valve .130 to the closed
of the thermally responsive switches 141, 1412, 143 and 144
will be closed and each of the solenoids 137, 138, 139 and
140 will be energized, thus opening each of the valves
minutes. If the material receiving chambers are full, each
position.
leading to the passageways in the air outlet space. The
holding relays are energized at the same time and main
The solenoids 137, 138, 139 and 140 may be arranged in
parallel across circuit lines so that they are each individu
tain the energization of the operating solenoids irrespec
ally operated in response to the temperature adjacent to
tive of the opening or closing of the thermally responsive
the passageway associated with the particular solenoid. 45 switches, as long as the timer switch 155 is closed. If,
Then when the granular material adjacent to the passage
prior to the time that the timer switch 155 is open, one
way has been cooled to a suf?cient extent, the valve asso
of the thermally responsive switches should open, the
ciated with that passageway will be closed so that no air
solenoids are nonetheless kept energized by virtue of the
?ows through the passageway. It should be kept in mind
circuit established through the holding switches 151a,
that with reference, for example, to FIGURE 3, the mate 50 152a, 153a and 154a. When the proper elapsed time has
rial to be cooled is located between the pervious walls
passed, the timer switch 155 opens and this breaks the
2 and 3, on the one hand, and between the pervious walls
circuit to the solenoid 137 and the holding relay 151.
4 and 5, on the other hand. The heat responsive elements
When the circuit to the holding relay 151 is broken, the
148 of FIGURE ‘1 1, or the mechanical counterparts 148a
switch 157 opens, thus de-energizing solenoid .138 and
and 1481) of FIGURE 11a, are located in the spaces be 55 relay 152. ‘De-energiz‘ation of solenoid 152 results in
tween the pervious walls 2 ‘and 3, or 4 and 5, and are
opening of switch 158‘ and de-energization of solenoid 139
therefore subjected to contact with the material being
as well as the relay 153. Switch 159 is thereby opened
cooled. If the level of the granular material is such as
with the consequent de-energization of solenoid 140 and
to approach the height of the passageways associated with
the holding relay 154. The arrangement insures what is
the valves 129 and 130, only these two valves will open 60 equivalent to simultaneous closing of the valves for the
and the remaining upper valve will be closed. Thus the
various passageways after the proper elapsed timing pe
system is automatically responsive to the level of material
riod has passed.
in the chambers ‘for varying the height of the air outlet
If the level of material in the chambers is only such as
space in consonance with the height of such material.
to close the lower switches 141 and 142, only the sole
FIGURE 12 illustrates an automatic control circuit 65 noids 137 and v1'38 are energized and the upper valves
that may be utilized with the electrical actuating mecha
131 and 132 remain closed during the cooling cycle.
nisms of FIGURE 111. In FIGURE 12 the solenoids 1137,
It should be understood that while the structune shown
138, 139 and 140 are shown as disposed in parallel across
power lines L1 and L2. The circuit to the solenoid 137
includes the thermally responsive switch 141 and a hold
ing relay ‘151 which is adapted to close a switch 151a
when the thermally responsive switch 141 is closed. The
circuit to the solenoid '138 similarly includes its associated
thermally responsive switch 142, a holding relay 152
and described herein uses air as a preferred cooling me
70
dium, the structure of the invention can be used with
other cooling ?uids such as ‘gases. It should be under
stood rfurther that the pressure differential described with
respect to the material receiving chambers and
outlet
space is such as to produce ?uid ?ow in a direction from
the exterior and into the outlet space, the structure may
which is adapted to close a switch 152a when the switch 75 be used to cool material by ?uid ?ow in the opposite di
3,090,132
7
8
rection. In this case the blower is employed to direct a
and 7 approach only the level of the battle 20, the valve
forced stream of air intothe central space between the
receiving chambers, through these chambers and then
through the exterior walls of these chambers.
29 will be closed, while the valves 30, 31 and 32 are open.
Closing of the valve 23 prevents communication between
the portion of the chmbers 6 and 7 above the ba?le 2t!
and the air outlet space above ba?‘le 20. Thus, substan
tially all of the air pulled in through the pervious outer
walls actually passes through the material in the cham
bers. If the level of material in the chambers 6 and 7
approaches the level of the ba?le 21, both the valve 29
10 and the valve 30 will be closed, .while the valves 31 and
Whereas we have shown (and described an operative
form of our invention, it should be understood that this
showing should be taken in an illustrative or diagram
matic sense only._ There are modi?cations to the inven
tion which will be apparent to those skilled in the art.
The scope of the invention should be limited only by the
scope of the hereinafter appended claims.
32 will be open.
It the ‘level of the material is at the
level of baf?e 23, each of the valves 29, 30, 31 and 32
will be closed, so that the sole communication between
_We illustrate a cooling structure which is particularly
the duct 17 and the chambers is through the passageway
advantageous for use in cooling granular material, such
as coffee. The structure may be positioned closely adja 15 8. The number of valves may be varied. The division
The use and operation of our invention is as follows:
cent to a coffee roaster in a fashion such that roasted
of the air outlet space into passageways, which are se
co?iee, when removed from the roaster, is deposited in
the feed chute 13. As the material is deposited in the
lectively opened and closed to the source of suction, in
inlet 15, the screw conveyor 11 moves the material up
relation to the level of material or amount of the load
in the chambers, insures that most of the air Withdrawn
through the duct 17 has passed in heat transferring rela
wardly along an inclined path. The initial portion of the
tion with the granular material in the chambers 6 and
batch of material is deposited near the junction of the
'7 before it is drawn through the exhaust duct 17.
material guiding member with the base or bottom of the
The use of the exterior walls W and W’ are particular~
chambers 6 and 7. Successive portions of the material in
'ly advantageous in that such use permits the use of ducts
the batch move upwardly along the guiding member ‘10
until they spill out vinto the chambers 6 and 7. Thus, a 25 which may lead to a source of exterior air or a source of
some other cooling medium. Thus when the assembly
pile of material is built up in each chamber, the apex
of the pile rising ‘as the chamber ?lls. The angle ‘of the
'is utilized during colder periods of the year, relatively
conveyor axis approximates, or may be less than, the
cold air may be drawn in through the outer walls 2 and 5
angle of repose of the material in the chambers to pre
of the material receiving chambers and into heat trans
vent back up of the material into the chambers. The 30 ferring relation with the material in the chambers. This
leading edge of the growing pile in each chamber lies
results in a faster cooling time for the material in the
on the opposite side of the apex of the pile from the in
chambers without utilizing air from any heated space.
clined conveyor as can be most readily appreciated from
FIGURES 2 and 9.
It should be understood that under some circumstances
it may not be desired to employ a source of exterior air.
During the material ?lling stage of the operation, the 35 In this event the outer Walls W and W’ may be omitted,
air space 8 is subjected to a suitable source of suction,
thus leaving the outer walls 2 and 5 of the chambers ‘fully
through the duct 17, and air is drawn in through the
exposed to the ambient air about the assembly. Where
pervious outer Walls 2 and 5 and through the mass of
in the speci?cation or claims we employ the term “?uid,”
material in the chambers 6 and 7, to exhaust through the
duct 17. :The source of suction will continue after the
tull batch of material has been delivered to the chambers
6 and 7, and until the mass of material is cooled to the
‘desired temperature. A cooling time of two to four
minutes may be su?icient to rapidly lower the tempera
ture of granular material such as coffee from something
it may be understood to mean air, either unmixed or mixed
with other gases.
We claim:
1. In a cooling structure for granular material and the
like, a pair of horizontally spaced vertically extending
material receiving chambers formed by side walls, one
side Wall in each chamber being disposed opposite a side
on the order of 300 or 400 degrees down to room tem~ 45 wall in the other chamber, conveying means for deliver
. ing material to said chambers so as to form piles of mate
perature.
When the granular material has been cooled ‘to the
desired degree, the gates 33 and 34 are opened as by
actuating the switch 49 and the material falls by gravity
into the space beneath the chambers. The material may
then be moved or conveyed to a further processing
operation.
rial in each of said chambers, said chambers being sepa
rated from one another by an air outlet space, means pro
viding a path permitting air to be exhausted from said
air outlet space, the opposed side walls of said chambers
being air pervious through substantially the entire area
thereof to thereby allow the in?ow of exterior air to and
A particularly advantageous feature of the structure
through said chambers, and means for selectively varying
shown is the provision of narrow, extended chambers
the outlet area from said air outlet space in direct relation
with relatively large air pervious side Walls. This form 55 with the height of material in said chambers.
of air inlet structure provides an extremely ef?cient and
2. The structure of claim 1, wherein said outlet area
varying means includes a plurality of ba?les vertically
material. The air pervious area on each of the side
spaced in said air outlet space and closure means for
walls 2 and 5 has a shape which takes advantage of the
selectively closing the spaces between ba?ies to commu
60
natural shape of the piles of granular material in the
nication with said air withdrawing means.
chambers 6 and 7, conforming generally to the angle of
3. In a cooling structure for granular material and the
repose of the material. This insures that substantially
like, a base, and a screw conveyor extending upwardly
all of the air drawn by the source of suction applied to
from said base with its axis inclined to the vertical, a pair
the duct 17 will pass through the granular material in
of material receiving chambers de?ned by walls upstand
rapid cooling for relatively ‘large volumes of granular
heat transferring relation.
ing from‘ said base, said walls also de?ning an air outlet
space between said chambers and underlying said con
veyor, each of said chambers having air pervious outer
batches which are sufficiently large as to substantially
and inner walls, a material guiding member overlying said
?ll the chambers 6 and 7. ‘In the event that relatively 70 space and underlying said conveyor, the lower end of said
small batches of material are to be cooled, one or more
conveyor being in communication with an inlet for gran
of the passageways 24, 25, 26 and 27 are closed olf from
, ular material whereby upon rotation of said conveyor said
the source of suction and the duct 17, as by moving one
conveyor moves material upwardly for discharge over
or more of the butter?y valves to the closed position.
said guiding member throughout a substantial portion of
For example, if the'piles of material in the chambers 6 - 75 its length and into said chambers the angle of inclination
The structure is also advantageously used in connec
tion with relatively small batches of material as well as
3,090,132
.
of the screw conveyor to the horizontal being on the
order of the angle of repose of the material to be cooled,
said screw conveyor being constructed and arranged to
distribute conveyed material in layers onto a pile of ma
terial in said chambers, and means for withdrawing air
through said space to thereby cause a ?ow of exterior air
through said outer walls, inner walls and space and cause
10
outer walls, a source of suction positioned exterior-1y to
said air outlet space and in communication with said space
to thereby cause a ?ow of air through the outer walls,
inner walls, and air outlet space and transfer heat from
material in said chambers to the air so withdrawn, means
for closing off a selected upper portion of said space to
communication with said source of suctoin, and means
heat transfer from material in said chambers to the air so
for discharging material ‘from each of said chambers.
withdrawn.
10. The structure of claim 9 characterized by and
4. In a cooling structure for granular material and the 10 including conveying means associated with the lower por
like, a base, and a screw conveyor extending upwardly
tion of each of said chambers.
from said base with its axis inclined to the horizontal on
11. In a cooling structure for granular material, a base
the order of the angle of repose of the material to be
and a pair of upstanding perforate side walls de?ning a
cooled, a pair of material receiving chambers de?ned by
material receiving chamber, a third wall upstanding from
walls upstanding from said ‘base, said walls also de?ning 15 said base and de?ning, with one of said perforate side
a space between said chambers and underlying said con
walls, a second chamber, means providing a pressure dif
veyor, a material guiding member overlying said space
ferential between said chambers so as to allow ?uid ?ow
and underlying said conveyor, the lower end of said con—
through said chambers, and means responsive to the
veyor being in communication with a source of supply of
height of the material in the material receiving chamber
granular material whereby upon rotation of said con 20 for varying the ?uid ?ow area between said chambers
veyor, said conveyor moves ‘material upwardly for dis
while maintaining the height of such area in direct rela
charge over said guiding member throughout a substantial
tion with the height of such material.
portion of its length and into said chambers.
12. The structure of claim 11 wherein said second
5. In a cooling structure \for granular material and the
chamber includes a series of spaced battles to provide
like, a base, and a screw conveyor extending upwardly 25 passageways in said second chamber, and said responsive
from said base with its axis inclined to the vertical, a
means includes temperature responsive valves for closing
pair of material receiving chambers de?ned by inner per
said passageways to ?ow therethrough.
vious walls upstanding from said base, said inner walls
. 13. The structure of claim 11, wherein said responsive
also de?ning a space between said chambers and under
means include means for physically sensing the presence
lying said conveyor, a material guiding member overlying 30 of solids.
14. The structure of claim 11, wherein the responsive
said space and underlying said conveyor, the lower end
of said conveyor being in communication with an inlet
for granular material whereby upon rotation of said con
veyor, said conveyor moves material upwardly for dis
means include a rotary member and means for rotating
it, said rotary memberbeing formed and adapted to be
stopped by the presence of contacting Solids.
15. The structure of claim 11 characterized by and
including spaced ba?les in said second chamber to de?ne
charge over said guiding member and into said chambers
the angle of inclination of the screw conveyor to the hori
zontal being on the order of the angle of repose of the
material to be cooled, said screw conveyor being con
structed and arranged to distribute conveyed material in
passageways in said chamber, said responsive means in
cluding a valve associated with each passageway for
closing each passageway to ?uid ?ow therethrough, each
layers onto a pile of material in said chambers, each of 40 valve having an electromagnetic actuating mechanism,
said chambers having pervious outer walls, means pro
each mechanism including means responsive to the pres
viding a path permitting cooling ?uid to be withdrawn
ence of material in the receiving chamber adjacent its
from said space to thereby cause a ?ow of ?uid through
associated passageway for energizing the mechanism to
the outer walls, inner walls and space and transfer heat
open the valve for that passageway.
from material in said chambers to the ?uid so withdrawn; 45
16. In a cooling structure for granular material, a base
and means for discharging material from each of said
and upstanding pervious side walls de?ning a material
chambers.
receiving chamber, means de?ning a plurality of spaced
6. The structure of claim 5 wherein said last named
passageways adjacent one of said side walls and means
means includes pivoted gates adapted to close the bottom
providing a pressure differential between said chamber
of each of said chambers in one position thereof and to
and said passageways so as to allow gaseous ?ow between
open the ‘bottom of each of said chambers for gravita
said chamber and said passageways, an electrically ac—
tional discharge of material therefrom in another position
tuated valve associated with each passageway for opening
thereof.
each passageway to gaseous ?ow therethrough, each
7. The structure of claim 5 wherein the side walls of
valve having an operating circuit, which includes sensing
each of said chambers are formed by screen mesh extend
ing over polygonal areas whose sides are generally de?ned
by the bottom of each of said chambers, said guiding
55
means associated with the chamber e?ective to generate
a valve actuating signal in response to the presence of
material adjacent the passageway associated with the
member, a line inclined upwardly from the base and
valve, timing means in the circuit for the valve for the
generally parallel to said guiding member, and a line
lowermost passageway and adapted to break the circuit
60
extending from the upper portion of the conveyor to the
for that valve after a predetermined lapse of cooling time
top of said ?rst mentioned line.
and close the valve, and means for opening the circuits
8. The structure of claim 5 wherein said side walls are
for the other valves in response to opening of the circuit
formed of screen mesh.
for the valve in the lowermost passageway.
9. In a cooling structure for granular material and the
17. The structure of claim 16 wherein each circuit
like, a base, and a screw conveyor ‘extending upwardly 65 includes a switch adapted to be closed in response to the
from said base with its axis inclined to the vertical, a
attainment of a predetermined temperature adjacent its
pair of material receiving chambers de?ning an air outlet
associated valve and passageway, and a relay operative
space between said chambers and underlying said con
after closing of said switch, each relay for the valves
veyor, a material guide member underlying said con
70 below the uppermost valve being effective, when ener
veyor, the lower end of said conveyor being in commu
gized, to close a switch in the circuit -for the valve and
nication with a hopper for granular material whereby
passageway next above and maintain the circuit for the
upon rotation of said conveyor, said conveyor moves
valve and passageway next above irrespective of opening
material upwardly for discharge over and into said cham
of the ?rst named switch after initial closure thereof.
bers, each of said chambers having pervious inner and 75
18. In a structure for cooling granular materials and
3,090,132
12
11
the like, a pair of generally parallel vertically disposed
chamberrside walls, said walls being air pervious through
out substantially their entire area, each of the opposed
facing surfaces of the walls being substantially planar,
said walls ‘being impervious to passage of the granular
material to be cooled therethrough and being spaced apart:
a ‘distance substantially less than any major side wall.
dimension, edge walls bounding the side walls along the
bottom and a substantial distance about the periphery of
the side walls to thereby form a chamber for receiving".
a thin, generally vertical mass of granular materials to be
cooled, a conveyor inclined at the same or a lesser angle
than the angle of repose of the material to be cooled ex
tending along a portion of the unbounded edge of the
side walls and adapted to continuously discharge hot:
granular materials into the chamber from the apex of
the pile, the leading edge of the pile lying on the opposite
side of the apex of the pile from the conveyor, other wall
ing means, each valve being individually adjustable to
close off a space between battles.
21. In a structure for cooling varying sized batches of
granular materials and the like, a material receiving cool
ing chamber having a bottom formed and adapted to sup
port, in a position of rest, a substantial body of the par
ticles to be cooled, said chamber having generally parallel,
generally upright air pervious side walls separated by a
distance substantially less than the length and width of
said walls, whereby a space is provided in said cooling
chamber for a relatively thin, generally vertical mass of
particles to be cooled, a conveyor extending along an
upper edge of the cooling chamber de?ned ‘between said
upright walls, means ‘for delivering particles to be cooled
to one end of said conveyor, means actuating said con
veyor and for thereby conveying the material above the
space ‘between said air pervious walls, said conveyor being
angled upwardly at an angle approximating the angle of
repose of the material to be cooled to discharge the par
means de?ning, with the exterior surface of one of the
chamber side walls, an air space, air outlet means for 20 ticles substantially throughout its path, thereby to ?ll ?rst
the parts of the cooling chamber nearest the particle re
said air space, ‘means for creating a cooling ?uid pressure
di?erential across the granular cooling chamber "and
means for controllably varying the ‘air space in direct
relation with the size of the pile of material in the cham
ber between predetermined maximum and minimum
heights whereby a cooling ?uid may be passed generally
transversely through the chamber throughout substantially
ceiving end of the conveyor to thereby form a pile in
the cooling chamber, the leading edge of the pile lying
on the opposite side of the apex of the pile from the con
veyor, other wall means de?ning with one of said air
pervious walls an air space, an air outlet for said air space
whereby air passing through said upstanding air pervious
walls is removed, and means for controllably varying the
size of the air outlet in direct relation with the size of the
ber side walls, into the air space, and to discharge
30 pile of material in the chamber between predetermined
through the air outlet means.
maximum and minimum heights, to thereby insure pas
19. In a cooling structure for granular material and
sage of air through the pile irrespective of the size of the
the like, a base, and at least one material receiving
pile.
chamber de?ned, in part, by at least two generally ver
22. The structure of claim 21 characterized in that said
tically extending side walls on said base, the two said side 35
conveyor extends upwardly along an upper edge of the
walls of said chamber being pervious to air whereby air
cooling chamber at an angle of the order of the angle of
may be drawn through one side wall and into and through
repose of the particles to be cooled.
said chamber and out the other side wall, a material
23. The structure of claim 21 characterized by and
delivery conveyor mounted on said base and extending
upwardly from said base at an angle generally on the 40 including means for removing the cooled particles in the
cooling chamber after they have ‘been cooled.
order of the angle of repose of a mass of granular mate
24. The structure of claim 21 characterized in that
rial in said chamber, said conveyor, throughout a sub
the means for controllably varying the size of the air
stantial portion of its length, being disposed in discharg
outlet includes a plurality of ba?des located solely in the
ing relationship over only a portion of the material in
air space and formed and positioned to de?ne air passages
the chamber, and means for delivering material to ‘the
thereabove in communication with the air pervious walls
lower end of said conveyor, whereby said conveyor moves
of the cooling chamber, and valve means for selectively
material upwardly along a' path on the order of said
closing said passages.
angle of repose and discharges said material into the
chamber.
‘
References Cited in the ?le of this patent
20. In a cooling structure for use with granular mate- r
UNITED STATES PATENTS
rail and the like, a pair of upstanding walls de?ning a
245,274
Byerley ______________ .. Aug. 9, 1881
material receiving chamber, conveying means :for deliver
the entire granular material contacting area of the cham
ing material to said chamber so as to form a pile of
material in said chamber, structure de?ning an air outlet
space formed adjacent one side of said chamber, said air 1.5
outlet space having an outlet area, the side walls of said
chamber being pervious through substantially the entire
area thereof to thereby allow the inflow of air to and
through the chamber, and means for selectively varying
the outlet area from said air outlet space in direct relation
with the height of material in said chamber, said means
including spaced ba?ies in said air outlet space adjacent
the side wall of said chamber adjoining said air outlet
space, air withdrawing means and valves positioned in said (i5
outlet area between said air outlet space and air Withdraw
759,527
983,198
984,931
1,286,496
1,482,812
2,305,078
2,336,378
2,437,395
2,634,673
2,655,734
2,704,869
2,783,545
2,799,097
2,858,620
Irwin ________________ __ May 10, 1904
Applegate ____________ __ Jan. 31, 1911
Kent ________________ __ Feb. 21,
Barbieri ______________ __ Dec. 3,
Roberts ______________ __ Feb. 5,
Har-ford _____________ __ Dec. 15,
1911
1918
1924
1942
Uhlig ________________ __ Dec, 7,
Magnusson et al _______ __ Mar. 9,
Maho _______________ .__ Apr. 14,
Ohlheiser ____________ __ Oct. 20,
Meakin ______________ __ Mar. 29,
Booth ________________ .__ Mar. 5,
Williams et al. _______ __ July 16,
Naylor _______________ __ Nov. 4,
1943
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