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Патент USA US3091537

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May 28, 1963
w. M. BUSKES
3,091,523
PROCESS AND ucu'r-samsrnvs ms FOR THE
PRODUCTION OF Pmman'r IMAGES BY musm
Original Filed March 9, 1953
3 Sheets-Sheet 1
SUPPORT
l
/—‘LTGHT-SEI_NSITIVE
.2
MAT ER
PIGMENT MATTER
LIGHT-SENSITIVE
2 MATTER
PIGMENT MATTER
SUPPORT
LIGHT-SENSTTIVE
MATTER
2
PIGMENT MATTER
3
4l
SUPPORRT
SU PPO T L AYER
Fig‘. 4
MIXTURE
OF LTGHT
SENSITIVE MATTER
AND PIGMENT MATTER
SUPPORT
4|
J
5:- 5
l4
'
LIGHT-SENSITIVE
MATTER
‘1
2 PIGMENT MATTER
3 IN RECESSES
INTAGLIO SURFACE
OF SUPPORT
SUPPORT
INVENTOR.
WlL-LEM MAPuE BUSKES
BY
M,
AT
.
RNE'Y
May 23, 1963
w. M. BUSKES
PROCESS AND LIGHT-SENSITIVE SHEETS FOR THE
PRODUCTION OF‘ PIGMENT IMAGES BY TRANSFER
Original Filed March 9, 1953
3,091,528
3 Sheets-Sheet 2
TAPERED ELEVATIONS OF
SUPPORT SURFACE
1—RECEIVING SUPPORT
/////////%—B
-1——-9—TRANSFER
A
ZONE
3
TRANSFERABLE IMAGE
PORTION
!
"
“""“§I7—P|GMENT SHEET
i -NON-TRANSFERABLE
IMAGE PORTION
Fag- 5
RECEIVING SUPPORT
[-TRANSFEFI-~ IMAGE PORTION
REM NANT- IMAGE
PORTION
\——SU PPORT
-TRAN sFaER-lMAGE PORTION
D
A
REMNANT-IMAGE
a
.JL'XYL. “13:1
Y :-_-’.L_' \—
,. : } 7 SUPPORT
LREMAINDER 0F TRANSFERABLE
IMAGE PORTION
INVENTOR.
WILLEM MARIE BUSKES
BY
QM '
A-r
M
0R NEY
May 28, 1963
_
w. M. BUSKES
PROCESS AND LIGHT-SENSITIVE SHEETS FOR THE:
3,091,528
PRODUCTION OF PIGMENT IMAGES BY TRANSFER
Origmal Filed March 9, 1953
3 Sheets-Sheet 3
LIGHT SOURCE
REFLECTOR
l3
SCREEN MOVABLE TO
BLOCK EXPOSURE
LIGHT—PERVIOUS
EXPOSURE PANEL
l7
—--—-LlGHT-PERVIOUS
ORiGlNAL TO BE EXPOSED
PQGMENT SHEET
APRON FOR APPLYING
MATERIALS TO
EXPOSURE PANEL
F:
—-5
.. l a
ROLLER FOR APPLYTNG
THIN LAYER OF WATER
T0 EXPOSED PiGMENSHEET
EXPOSED P! GMENT SHEET
23
'
RUBBER
ROLLER
RUBBER
ROLLER
INVENTOR.
WILLE'M MARIE BUSKES
BY
A'r'ron NEY
United States Patent Ol?ce
3,091,528
Patented May 28, 1963
1
2
3,091,528
the transfer" or of “preventing the transfer.” Due to
the photochemical reaction, it must undergo an altera
PROCESS AND LIGHT-SENSITIVE SHEETS FOR
THE PRODUCTION OF PIGMENT IMAGES BY
TRANSFER
tion, which, upon the transfer-operation, will control
the transfer or non transfer of pigment onto the receiv
ing surface in the respective image portions; i.e. it must
bring about the necessary differences in the transferability
Grinten N.V., Venlo, Netherlands, a limited-liability
of the pigment in the exposed and the unexposed por
company of the Netherlands
tions of the pigment sheet respectively.
Continuation of application Ser. No. 341,198, Mar. 9,
According to the present invention the light-sensitive
1953. This application Aug. 19, 1958, Ser. No. 756,744 10 material
for achieving the above result, is a suitable di‘
19 Claims. (CI. 96-28)
azocompound, a suitable azido-styryl-ketone or a suit‘
This invention relates to a process for the production
able azido-styryl-aryl-azide, and the transfer operation
Willem Marie Bushes, Venlo, Netherlands, assignor, by
mesne assignments, to Chemisehe Fabrik L. van der
of a pigment image on a receiving surface, in which
is, by means of water, carried out in such a way that in
process another surface, carrying over its entire area
the transferable image portions the pigment is attached
light-sensitive material and pigment matter which con 15 to the receiving surface, whilst in the other image por
trasts visually with the receiving surface, the light-sensi
tions the pigment remains linked up with the surface
originally carrying it together with the light-sensitive
tive material and the pigment matter being linked up
material. Thereafter both surfaces are separated from
with each other, is imagewise exposed and in which
the imagewise exposed surface is pressed against the re
each other. Thus, upon this separation, the receiving
ceiving surface to obtain image transfer. The inven 20 surface will carry an image consisting of pigment origi
nating from the surface originally carrying the light
tion also relates to light-sensitive pigment sheets for use
in such a process.
sensitive material and the pigment matter, and this image
This application is a continuation of my co-pending
will hereinafter he referred to as the “transfer image.”
The image remaining on the surface originally carrying
application Serial No. 341,198, ?led March 9, 1953, now
abandoned.
25 the light-sensitive material and the pigment matter, will
hereinafter be refered to as the “renmant image.” This
The process according to the invention has for its pur
latter image will be dependant on the colour of the pig
pose the direct production of pigment images (without
need for lithographic operations as, for example, etch
ment matter and on that of the carrier, and dependant
on possibly incomplete transfer so that it will have, in
ing, inking, etc.) by pigment transfer directly from the
surface which carries pigment and light-sensitive mate 30 certain cases, only poor visibility.
rial.
The use of water as an auxiliary for the transfer has
been suggested above, and its essential function is that
Selective transfer processes are known from US. Pa
of “wetting." However, aqueous solutions, c.g. of salts,
tents No. 1,118,479 and No. 1,618,505 (there called
wetting-agents or alcohol, which will function like water,
“bodily transfer") and from HP. 655,274. These trans
fer methods are isolated disclosures in the literature. On 35 are to be understood as comprised by the term “water.”
Experiment shows which are the compounds suitable
the one hand they are to be distinguished from the decal
for the process. There are found compounds which
comania and the transfer of photographic image layers,
give less satisfaction and also some which cannot be
e.g. according to British Patents 510,233, 645,211 and
used in practice. This, in as much as diazo compounds
655,275 and “British Journal of Photography," 1928,
pages 393-395, and on the other hand from the selective 40 are concerned, may be illustrated by some data, drawn
up for a speci?c test case, for which Example XX is
image-transfer by imbibition (diffusion) as described,
chosen. When thus using, for the determination of the
for example, in British Patent 614,155. The following
suitability of a diazo compound, the assembly of pig
description relates to direct selective transfer exclusively;
ment sheet and the process according to Example XX as
for the sake of simplicity, however, it will be referred to
45 a testing method (in each test the exposure naturally will
as “transfer."
U.S.P. 1,618,505 does not provide or only insufficiently
have to be varied), it is found that p.diazo-ethyl~;S-hy
droxy-ethyl-aniline, p-diazo-ethyl-beta-dicthyl-anime-eth
provides data on the composition of the light-sensitive
material; the only indication being that as soon as the
transfer image is formed on the surface destined for
yl~aniline and tctrazo-4.4'-tetra-methoxy-2.2'-5.5’~trihen
yl-methane give results which essentially are as good as
lithography by means of the transferred image portions 50 those obtained with the simple diazocompound of Exam
originating from the light-sensitive material, a litho
ple XX. By the same test it is found that, for example,
graphic printing surface must be formed by adequate
tetrazo-diphenyl-amine (Example XXI), p.diazo-mono
treatment.
ethyl-aniline and tetrazo-4.4"dimethoxy-3.3’-diphenyl are
The process according to B.P. 655,274 is
based upon the use of silver halide emulsions.
less good but still suitable. Poor results are obtained
The present invention has for its object a process which 55 in the test with para-diazo-N-benzyl-diphenylamine, para
is considerably more simple, cheaper and sometimes
quicker; it also may dispense with chemical aftertreat
diazo-triphenylarnine and tetrazo-4.4’-diphenyl. No use
ful result is given in this test by diazo-l-hydroxy-Z
naphthalene sulfonic acid-4 and diazo-Lhydroxy-l-naph
ment. Moreover, in certain cases, the invention is found
optionally to allow the production of positive or nega
thalene sulfonic acid-5.
tive transfer images, from one and the same light-sensi 60
Naturally, various factors will influence a decision on
tive material.
whether one of these compounds is more or less suitable.
In the process according to the invention there is
When, for example, in Example XXV the transfer-pres
formed, by imagewise exposure, an image in a surface
sure be increased to 3.5 kg. the transfer is no longer
which carries over its entire area light-sensitive mate
selective. When in Example XXVI the treatment with
rial and pigment matter which contrasts visually with 65 heat is omitted, then likewise selective transfer will no
the receiving surface, the light-sensitive material and
the pigment matter being linked up with each other;
after the exposure, for the purpose of obtaining image
longer be achieved.
Among the particularly suitable diazo compounds are
those described in Netherlands Patent No. 35,423.
The
transfer, the imagewise exposed surface is pressed against
light-decomposition products of these diazocompounds
the receiving surface. The light-sensitive material func 70 will precipitate proteins.
tions in co-operation with the pigment, its function con
sisting either of “causing the transfer” or of “allowing
In a number of cases (compare also the examples) the
conditions hereinbefore formulated for achieving transfer
3,091,528
that of FIGURE 1 by a different sequence in the assembly
of the sheet. With respect to the manner of using this
compound (naturally with pigment matter), in particular
when the receiving surface carries a hydrophilic binding
agent. It has been found, however, that, in general,
better results are obtained if the light-sensitive material of
the pigment sheets consists of one of the light-sensitive
substances according to the invention in addition to a hy
sheet, the same considerations hold as stated above for
FIG. 1.
The pigment sheet according to ‘FIGURE 3 is assem
bled similarly to FIGURE 2; however between support 1
and pigment matter 3 there is provided a sub-layer 41.
This sheet is also used as above indicated. If imagewise
drophilic binding agent. Apart from the hydrophilic
binding agents commonly used for this sort of purpose,
such as gelatin, gum arabic, proteins, and ?sh glue, there
may be used agar-agar, dextrin, casein, gum tragacanth,
exposure is to be effected in the direction of arrow 4' the
sub-layer 41 also has to be suf?ciently pervious to the
photo-active light.
methyl cellulose, hydrophilic arti?cial resins, polyvinyl
compounds and the like.
For carrying out the transfer either the exposed pig
ment sheet or the receiving support or both may be im
mersed in water for some time, and thereafter pressed to
gether. ‘It has been found, however, that in the great ma
jority of cases it is better to apply the water in a quantity
of 8-22 g./m.2 transfer-surface to one or both surfaces,
in other words to provide one or both surfaces with a thin 20
layer of water. The pressing together then follows after
4
The pigment sheet of FIGURE 2 merely differs from
will be ful?lled in the mere presence of the light-sensitive
With little difficulty sub-layer 41 also can be arranged
to be a light-sensitive layer and then, even if the pigment
layer is not light-pervious, exposure can optionally be
effected in the direction of arrow 4 or arrow 4'.
Such a
pigment sheet then is, as it were, asesmbled according to
the principle of FIGURE 1 as well as according to that
of FIGURE 2.
In the pigment sheet of FIGURE 4, 1 is the support and
5 is a mixture of light-sensitive material and pigment mat
ter. When making an exposure the light will (via an
original) be incident in the direction of arrow 4, when
the support 1 is not, or only little, light-pervious. When
a longer or shorter period of time. In carrying out this
process the application of the thin layer of water and the
pressing together operation may in many cases advan
tageously be combined in one single operation. This pos' 25 support 1 is light-pervious then exposure may optionally
be effected in the direction of arrow 4 or that of arrow 4'.
sibility exists in those cases in which only relatively little
In the pigment sheet of ‘FIGURE 5, 1 is the support,
time is required between the ?rst contact of one or both
one side of which is provided with an intaglio surface
of the co-operating surfaces with the thin layer of water
consisting of cavities 6, ?lled with pigment matter 3. The
and the pressing together operation.
light-sensitive material is indicated by 2. Upon image
The process according to the invention offers the fol—
wise exposure the light is incident in the direction of arrow
lowing possibility:
4. When support 1 and pigment matter 3 are su?iciently
A pigment matter visually contrasting not only with
pervious to the light which is photoactive with respect to
the receiving surface but also with the surface originally
carrying it (and the light-sensitive material), is selected,
and in the transfer operation all or nearly all of the pig
ment available in the transferable image portions is trans
ferred onto the receiving surface. Then upon separating
the light-sensitive material 2, then imagewise exposure
may optionally be effected in the direction of arrow 4 or in
35
that of arrow 4'.
FIGURE 6 represents, in perspective view, the surface
After
?lling with pigment matter and super-coating with light
readily visible pigment image, the one (the transfer
image) being the subtractive image of the other (the 40 sensitive material a vertical cross section through a row
of elevations will appear as in FIGURE 5.
remnant image).
FIGURE 7 represents a pigment sheet 7, which after
In most cases the pigment matter and the light-sensitive
imagewise exposure and treatment with water is brought
material will in the light-sensitive pigment sheets be lo
into contact with the receiving support 8, the transfer
cated in practice at the surface of a sheet-like support, and
for this reason they will, in the following, for the sake of 45 zone being indicated by the dotted line 9. Dotted line‘ 9,
for example, can represent a thin layer of water. For
simplicity be referred to as “pigment sheets.” The ma
clearness’ sake the light-sensitive material is not shown,
terial onto which transfer takes place will be called the
merely the two supports 1 and 8‘ and the pigment matter
“receiving support.”
3 being represented in FIGURE 7. The portion A—B of
The accompanying drawings will illustrate the inven
the pigment matter 3 is transferable, and the portion B—-C
50
tion.
is non-transferable. When sheet 7 and receiving support
FIGURES 1-5 show schematic cross sections of possi
8 are separated, then, upon complete transfer, the portion
bilities for the assembly of the light-sensitive pigment
A—~B will form, upon the receiving support 8, an image
sheets according to the invention.
portion of the transfer image as is indicated in FIGURE
FIGURE 6 is a perspective view of a particular intaglio
8. The portion B—C has remained on the pigment sheet
55
surface.
7 and forms an image portion of the remnant image there.
FIGURES 7-9 show, in schematic cross section, various
FIGURE 9 illustrates the situation upon incomplete
phases of a transfer-operation.
transfer. In the imagewise exposed pigment sheet 7 there
FIGURE 10 is a schematic cross section of a printing
is split off from the portion A-B of the pigment matter
apparatus; FIGURE 11 a front-view of the apparatus for
pressing together the exposed pigment sheet and the re 60 3 the part D—E and this part has transferred to the re
ceiving support 8. The portion B—C, not being trans
ceiving support and FIGURE 12 is a schematic cross sec
ferable, naturally has remained on the original sheet 7.
tion of an apparatus for the combined moistening and
This incomplete transfer nevertheless may have yielded
pressing together of sheet and support.
a reasonably good transfer image on receiving support 8,
In the drawings identical reference numbers indicate
65 if the part D—E su?iciently contrasts (visually) with the
identical parts.
receiving support. However the subtractive remnant image
In FIGURE 1, 1 is a (light-pervious) support, .2 the
on 7‘ will be weak.
light-sensitive material and 3 the pigment matter. 1, 2
In the printing apparatus of FIGURE 10, 10 repre
and 3 form one entity, to wit, a light-sensitive pigment
sents a high pressure mercury vapour lamp having, for
sheet for use in the process according to the invention.
In the imagewise exposure the light is incident in the direc» 70 example, a length of 42 cm. and a wattage of 700', 11 is
an aluminium reflector and 12 a segment of a glass cylin
tion of arrow 4. If the pigment matter 3 is su?iciently
der having an outer diameter of, for example, 19 cm. A
pervious to the light, which is photoactive with respect
screen 13 rotatable about its axis (over the trajectory in
to the light-sensitive material 2, then optionally the ex
the two surfaces from each other, both will carry a
posure may take place in the direction of arrow 4 or in that
of arrow 4’.
6 of a support with pyramid-form elevations 42.
dicated by the dotted line) can screen off the surface to
75 be exposed from the light rays 14.
3,091,528
The pigment sheet 15 to be exposed and the light
pervious original 18 (plus image portion 16) are sand
6
case in which, according to circumstances, both conditions
will hold.
The alterations in the light-sensitive material are gen
face of cylinder 12. Thus contact between light-sensitive
erally coupled with, or are generally based upon, an al
pigment sheet and original is obtained. When screen 13 5 teration of its receptivity for water and, when it is com
is opened exposure takes place from lamp 10 right through
posed with a hydrophilic binding agent, upon its power
wiched together between the apron 17 and the outer sur
cylinder 12.
FIGURE 11 represents a simple apparatus for the
pressing together of pigment sheet and receiving support.
A rubber roller 19 is held in bearings 20 on the pedestal
21 and is driven by means of crank 22. A rubber roller
23 is held at both ends in frame 24 which is supported
to swell with water.
Naturally the composition of the light-sensitive ma
terial will to a large extent (and in the ?rst place) deter
mine its differing behaviour in unexposed and in exposed
condition.
However, is as much as the differences in
transferability of the pigment matter, brought about by
at its sides by suitable means (not shown). The springs
the differences in the light-sensitive material, are con
25 and 26 neutralise the weight of roller 23 and frame 24.
cerned, a number of other factors play a part.
On the top of frame 24 a weight 27 is placed, which weight 15
This may now be illustrated by a few examples, al
will control the pressure of roller 23 upon roller 19. The
though it should be understood that the considerations
rubber rollers have, for example, a length of 280 mm., a
here raised are of a more or less hypothetical nature.
diameter of 40 mm. and a hardness of 75 Shore. By feed
Assume a pigment sheet of an assembly according to
ing the imagewise-exposed pigment sheet and the receiving
FIGURE 2 be chosen, then the pigment matter 3 therein
support together with water through the rollers 23 and
(which may, for example, be black), will have a given
19, standing under the pressure of weight 27, the pressing
linkage with support 1 (which may, for example, be
together necessary for the transfer is achieved.
White). The light-sensitive material 2 may consist of a
FIGURE 12 schematically and in cross section repre
light~sensitive diazo-?sh-gluc-layer, soluble in water at
sents a transfer apparatus which combines in one single
room-temperature (according to Example IX). Upon
operation the wetting and the pressing-together of the 25 su?icient exposure this layer will lose its solubility, but
two surfaces for transfer. Roller 28 rotates according
to arrow 29 in the water 30 stored in trough 31. Roller
28 is coupled by suitable means (not shown) with the
it may still have, to some extent, the power of absorbing
water (swelling power).
When this pigment sheet is imagewise exposed in the
pressing rollers 23 and 19 (in the same way as described
direction of arrow 4 and thereafter immersed in water at
in FIGURE 11 and as in FIGURE 11 standing under 30 room-temperature for some time, the unexposed image
pressure), which rotate in the directions of the arrows 34
portions will (by dissolution) loose the diazo-fish-glue
and 35. This combined apparatus is operated in the fol
layer, whilst in the exposed image portions this layer will
lowing manner:
remain and will absorb water and thereby become adhe
Pigment sheet 36—image-side downwards—is conduct
sive. When thereafter, for the purpose of the transfer,
ed (via the slot 37 and over the moistening roller 28) to 35 the wetted pigment sheet, is pressed (see the illustration
pressing rollers 23 and 19. The trajectory over which
of FIGURE 7) with its imagewise-exposed side against
sheet 36 travels in moistened condition, Le. from the point
a white, non-adhesive receiving support 8, e.g. smooth
of contact with roller 28 to the point where the pressing
writing paper, then in the exposed image portions a link
together takes place, is 135 mm. long. The pressing rollers
age with the receiving surface will be effected and this
23 and 19 press the wetted pigment sheet 36 and the re
means, that in these image portions the pigment matter
ceiving support 38 (which latter——recciving side up
3 will be attached to the receiving surface 8. This result
wards—-has meanwhile been supplied via slot 39) upon
will fail to come about in‘ the ‘unexposed image portions
each other, whereafter the two sheets in pressed together
in which, as already stated, no more binding agent is
condition leave the apparatus in the direction of arrow
available. When the two cooperating surfaces are now
40. When in a particular case it is desirable to moisten 45 separated, as is illustrated in FIGURE 8, the receiving
the receiving support instead of the pigment sheet the
surface will carry an image, consisting of pigment origi~
situation remains as indicated in FIGURE 12, however
nating from the exposed image portions of the pigment
with the difference that 36 represents the receiving sup
sheet and the transfer image thus formed will be nega
port———receiving side turned downwards-and 38 the ex
tive. If upon the transfer all or nearly all the pigment
posed pigment sheet—image-side upwards.
50 transfers in the exposed image portions (compare FIG
In the foregoing description of the ?gures it has been
URE 8) then on the pigment sheet 7 there will remain
stated that in the pigment sheet according to FIGURE 1
a positive remnant image.
the light-sensitive material is situated between support
Assume the operation be carried out in otherwise ex
and pigment matter; that in the pigment sheet according
actly the same manner, but now so that the pigment sheet
to FIGURE 2, the pigment matter lies between support 55 is not immersed in water before the transfer-operation,
and light-sensitive material and that in the pigment sheet
but so that only a small quantity of water is applied be
according to FIGURE 3 the pigment matter is situated
tween pigment sheet and receiving surface, and this at
between the light-sensitive material and a sub-layer. As
the very moment of pressing~together, then the results will
indicated in FIGURE 4, pigment and light-sensitive ma
different. In the unexposed image portions the diazo
terial also may, just as in the ordinary pigment paper, be 60 be
?sh-glue-layer will not dissolve in the small quantity of
mixed with each other.
water but will form a moist adhesive mass with it. In
Now in the ?rst mentioned case (FIGURE 1), upon
the
exposed portions, in which the power of the ?sh
the action of light on the light-sensitive material there will
glue~layer to absorb water has been decreased by the
come about an alteration in the linkage which pigment
matter 3 has with light-sensitive material 2 and/or an 65 exposure, this result will practically fail to come about.
The result of the transfer now is that a positive transfer
alteration in the linkage between the light—sensitive ma
image and a negative remnant image will be formed.
terial 2 and the support 1, which alteration in the linkage
In between these two procedures of transfer, there
will become manifest upon the transfer operation (in
naturally must exist one (e.g. one in which the moisten
cluding the treatment with water).
Similarly, in the cases of FIGURES 2, 3 and 5, there 70 ing of the imagewise exposed pigment sheet is carried
out ‘with a larger quantity of water followed shortly
will come about an alteration, in the possibility for ma
thereafter by pressing together with the receiving sup
terial 2 plus pigment matter 3 to attach themselves to the
port) in which neither in the exposed, nor in the unex
receiving support, which alteration will again become
manifest upon the transfer operation (including the treat
pose-d image portions, will pigment transfer onto the
receiving surface, or in which everywhere the same quan
ment with water). FIGURE 4 represents an intermediate 75 tity of pigment will transfer, in neither of which cases
3,091,528
7
in consequence will an image be formed. The precise
point at which the process will just fail to yield an image
is difficult to de?ne. In practice it naturally is neverthe
less recommendable to avoid the point to a sufficient
degree.
It will be clear ‘that, for example, the quality of the
?sh-glue is an important factor and likewise that quite
different effects can come about when the ?sh-glue is
pigment from those portions which have remained unex
posed, remains attached to the receiving surface, whilst
the pigment in the exposed portions remains with the ori
ginally light-sensitive pigment sheet.
The process according to the invention is mainly used
for the production of transfer and/or remnant images
from originals having no medium continuous tones, e.g.
originals like line-drawings and half-tone pictures (auto
types). When by means of the process, copies are pro
When using diazo-gelatin layers (compare Example 111) 10 duced from continuous tone originals, copies will be ob
tained, in which the rendition of the medium tones will
similar variations of transfer results are likely to occur,
entirely or partially replaced by animal-glue or gelatin.
be poor.
now dependent not on the quantity of water used in the
According to the process, a multi-colour image may
transfer, but on the temperature at which the transfer
be produced by forming different images on a number of
is being carried out. It will also be clear that the prop
erties of the receiving surface will in?uence the result. 1 5 pigment sheets, each carrying a pigment matter of differ
ent hue, said images being transferred onto a receiving
When, for example, this surface will very readily absorb
surface, so as to ‘be superimposed in register.
water, then under given transfer circumstances image
portions in which the ‘binding agent is soluble may sink,
Many of the compositions for the light-sensitive mate
as it were, into the receiving surface and thus will no
rials suitable for the process are known per se for photo
face of a low power of absorbing water, an entirely dif
absorbent support then, upon moisten‘ing, binding agent
ucts of diam-compounds with compounds having a reac
tive carbonyl group yield excellent results in the process
according to the invention.
In as much as the construction of the light-sensitive
pigment sheets is concerned, reference is made to the fol
lowing literature: I. M. Eder: “Ausfiihrliches Handbuch
can sink right through ‘the pigment layer. If the trans
fer-water is slightly acidi?ed, or rendered alkaline, or if
on page 57 a light-sensitive pigment sheet having a con
longer be able to contribute to the attaching of pigment 20 graphic and photomechanical processes from Netherlands
Patents Nos. 35,423 and 35,480. The condensation prod
matter to the receiving surface. With a receiving sur
ferent result is obtained. By analogy also the sup-port
of the pigment sheet and the nature of the pigment mat
ter influence the results.
If a porous pigment layer is mounted over a water
salts or a wetting—agent are added, or if the transfer water
is mixed with alcohol or another liquid, then all these
circumstances may begin to play their part. The ex
amples will illustrate some of such cases.
An important point in the composition of light-sensi
tive pigment sheets suitable for the process according
to the invention is that the linkage or union between the
der Photographic,” vol. IV, 2nd part (1926), describes
struction corresponding to that of FIGURE 1; German
Patent No. 167,752 describes a light-sensitive pigment
sheet having a construction corresponding to that of FIG
URE 2, whilst light-sensitive pigment sheets, which in
their construction correspond to FIGURE 4, are described
in detail in Eder, ibid., 2nd part, pages 91-103, in L. P.
Clerc, “Ilford Manual of Process Work,” 5th edition,
page 298, as Well as in the extensive literature on intaglio
printing techniques. A construction according to FIG
Even if light-sensitive material is located between sup
port and pigment matter, as is indicated in FIGURE 1, 40 URE 3 has not been found in the literature.
Receiving supports may be of different nature. Pref
or if a sub-layer is located between support and pigment
erably a support having a surface which is as even as
matter, as indicated in FIGURE 3, it should be under
possible is chosen. A example of a good receiving sur
stood that in the ambit of the invention there is “linkage
pigment matter and the support be adequately adjusted.
between pigment matter and support.” If this linkage
(e.g. in moist condition) is too weak, then upon the trans
fer with water (after the imagewise exposure) exposed
and unexposed image portions may both transfer and if
this occurs there will, in consequence, be no question of
a selective transfer. If the linkage is too strong, then
face is that of glossy coated book paper.
Ordinary
calendered papers, however, were likewise found to have
45 suitable receiving surfaces, provided of course that the
factors in?uencing the transfer be sufficiently favourable.
Likewise transparent papers, ?lms, textile products with
a closed surface, glass, rubber and metals are suitable.
Additional adhesives are of use in the transfer, partic
under certain circumstances, no image portions will be 50
ularly when light-sensitive pigment sheets according to
transferred. The said linkage also must be adequately
FIGURE 1 are being used. These adhesives may be
adjusted to the forces of adhesion which the receiving
added to the transferewater, but they also may be located
support and the image side of the pigment sheet exert
at the transfer-side of the pigment sheet or at the receiv
upon each other when cooperating in the transfer under
ing side of the receiving support, e.g. in the form of a
a given wetting and a given transfer-pressure at a given
layer which ‘will become adhesive upon moistening.
temperature.
Roughly summing up the foregoing considerations, the
following cases may be distinguished:
For adequately controlling the earlier discussed link
age between the pigment matter and its support in the pig
ment sheets according to the invention, a support is
chosen, of which the surface enables even strength of link
(1) Pigment transfers onto the receiving support in the
exposed portions but not in the unexposed portions. 60 age to be obtained at all points of its area.
(2) No pigment at all is transferred.
The transfer being carried out with water, this surface
(3) In all portions part of the pigment transfers (every
of the support may become wet right through the pig
where the same amount).
(4) Everywhere all pigment transfers.
(5) Pigment transfers in the unexposed portions but not
in the exposed portions.
In practice it has now been found, that, generally
ment matter, and in some cases this circumstance will
have to be taken into consideration.
Thus, for example,
65 at the boundary between support and light-sensitive mate
rial plus pigment matter, it is preferable to avoid a situa
tion in which the linkage between support and pigment
matter will be strengthened upon moistening. On the
contrary a construction of the pigment sheet is preferably
speaking, the easiest and most reliable transfer is that of
(case 5). For carrying out this method, the composition 70
chosen in which this linkage will be weakened upon
of the light-sensitive pigment sheet, the manner of moist
moistening.
ening, the temperature, the transfer-pressure with which
Pigment sheets, which, from this point of view, will
the exposed pigment sheet and the receiving support are
pressed together in wetted condition, and the properties
reliably yield particularly good transfer, are composed
of the receiving support, are so chosen that upon separat
with a pigment matter, which is hydrophobic and at the
ing the pigmented surface from the receiving surface, the
same time porous to water.
3,091,528
9
Still better transfer will be obtained with these pig
ment sheets when the surface with which the hydrophobic,
to water porous pigment matter is linked up, is hydro
10
than 2 g./m.2. If the process is carried out with a layer
of light-sensitive material comprising a hydrophilic bind
ing agent, which layer, according to FIGURES 2, 3 and
philic. In this case, upon moistening for the purposes of
5, is located over the pigment matter, then the condition
the transfer, the transfer-water can penetrate right through
of this layer (exposed or unexposed) will determine the
the pigment matter (at any rate in the transferable image
fate of the underlying pigment matter upon transfer,
portions). It will then wet the surface with which the
e.g. on wetting and compressing. In those image por
pigment matter is linked up and thus will there weaken
tions in which the light-sensitive material is, upon trans
the linkage. This will favour the transfer.
fer, in such condition that it will attach itself to the re
In a suitable embodiment of such pigment sheets, the 10 ceiving surface, it will, at any rate if its linkage with the
side of the support with which the hydrophilic and porous
pigment matter is sutlicient, attach the pigment matter
pigment matter is linked up consists of completely or
(or at any rate a part of it) to the receiving support.
partially deacylated cellulose ester. In the pigment sheets
From the point of view of the transfer-image it is, in
according to FIGURES 2 and 5 the surface of support I
most cases, not necessary that all the pigment matter vbe
with which the pigment matter 3 is linked up will, in this 15 transferred; the transfer image may nevertheless be
case, consist of the (completely or partially) deacylated
satisfactory, particularly if the pigment has a strong
cellulose ester. In dry condition these pigment sheets
visual contrast ‘with the receiving surface.
may be reasonably resistant against damage upon manip
From the point of view of the quality of the remnant
ulating, and yet they will, with the aid of Water, allow
image it is, however, important that as much pigment
easy and reliable transfer to yield strong transfer images
matter ‘as possible should transfer from the transferable
and generally at the same time good remnant images.
image portions and the quality of an imperfect remnant
Likewise, good results are obtained when the side of
image can be improved by subjecting the pigment sheet
the support with which the pigment matter is linked up
to repeated transfer operations, each time using a fresh
consists (as in FIGURE 3) of a sub-layer (41) of a hy
suitable receiving support. In doing so, a number of
drophilic binding agent. Upon transfer, with moistening 25 good transfer images may be obtained until the trans
with water (subsequent to the imag-ewise exposure) the
ferable pigment matter available in the pigment sheet, is
binding agent 41 will—at any rate partially--be trans
exhausted.
ferred together with the pigment matter onto the receiv
Numerous organic and inorganic pigments, white,
ing surface and, after drying, it then will cover up the pig
black and of various hues, and under some circumstances
ment image and so form a protective layer thereon. The 30 also watersoluble pigments, may ?nd useful application
pigment image will thus ‘be more resistant against ?nger
in the process according to the invention, e.g. Heliogene
marking than it would be without the said binding agent.
Blue B, Lithol Echtscharlach R. N. Pulver, soot or carbon
A number of possible sequences in the assembly of
black, graphite, ochre, white lead, baryta, titanium
light-sensitive pigment sheets have already been brie?y
dioxide and iron-oxide. When the pigment is not mixed
described above, more in particular that in which the
with a light-sensitive material containing a binding agent,
pigment matter and the light-sensitive material have the
then binding agents such as Syrian asphalt, polymers
form of separate layers, and that in which the light-sensi
and cellulose derivatives are used.
tive material is then located at that side of the pigment
From the point of view of technique it may some
layer, which is remote from the support (FIGS. 2, 3
times be difficult to produce an even layer of pigment
and 5).
matter upon a support. These technical di?‘iculties are
With a reverse assembly (FIGURE 1) the support of
smaller when the surface carrying the pigment is given
the pigment sheet will preferably be light~pervious The
an intaglio relief, in which relief the ‘pigment matter is,
exposure can then be carried out through the support.
as it were, lodged (compare FIGURE 5). This also has
However, the pigment matter may be chosen so as to
the effect that the remnant image is more resistant against
be sufficiently pervious to those light rays which are
rubbing, scratching etc., because the pigment matter,
active with respect to the light-sensitive materials and
forming the remnant image, lies sunk in the intaglio re
which, nevertheless, make reasonably contrast with the
lief. It is advantageous ?rst to form a thin layer of a
receiving surface. This, for example, may be the case
hydrophilic binding agent, on the inta-glio relief, and then
with blue- or violet-coloured pigments or with other pig
to lodge the pigment matter in the surface. The thin layer
50
ments, e.g. red or black, when the pigment matter is so
composed that it has a reasonably low optical density
for the actinic light. Such pigment matter may neverthe
less contrast reasonably well with the receiving surface
(particularly if viewed by re?ection). The light-sensi
is so formed that the relief remains-—at any rate essen
tially—intact and thereafter the pigment matter is applied
and then the light~sen~sitive material. Such a light
sensitive pigment sheet will, after imagewise exposure,
yield a transfer image, which ‘is in as much as hydro
tive pigment sheets according to FIGURES 2, 3 and 5 55 phiiic binding agent is transferred, more resistant to
are preferably exposed in the direction of arrow 4.
?nger-marking, Whilst the remnant image possesses the
However, they can also be imagewise exposed through
advantage already described. The intaglio relief also
the support, if the pigment matter ful?lls the above de
may be located in a layer of matter overlaying the support
scribed requirements of light-perviousness, and if the
and differing from the support proper. It can, for ex
support is light-pervious. When, however, the remanent
ample, consist of a hydroph-ilic bin-ding agent. When
image or the transfer image, formed after transfer onto,
such a binding agent will, in the transferable image por
for example, transparent paper, is to serve for recopy
tions, entirely or partially transfer together with the
ing-—e.g. in contact printing with light-transmission upon
pigment, then from such pigment sheets transfer images
diazotype paper-then the pigment matter will be so
will be obtained which are more resistant to linger
chosen that it will have high absorption for the light, 65 marking.
which is photoactive on diazo-type paper, and the ex
A pigment sheet ‘with intaglio relief, offering particu
posure naturally is again carried out in the direction of
larly
good transfer possibilities, has the assembly of
arrow 4.
FIGURE 5. The side of support 1, which carries the
In the assembly according to FIGURES 2, 3 and 5
pigment matter 3, has the form of a smooth surface 6
the light-sensitive material preferably contains a hydro 70 with elevations 42 as indicated in FIGURE 6. In FIG
philic binding agent and has the form of a layer as
URE 6 ‘the elevations have the form of pyramids with a
represented in these ?gures. With these pigment sheets
square base. The base, however, can have any other
transfer is generally also possible onto a receiving sup
form, preferably that of a circle. Such pigment sheets
port with a somewhat rough surface. Such layers of
are resistant against damage upon manipulating, whilst
light-sensitive material are preferably of a weight greater 75 the transfer operation can be carried out particularly
3,091,528
11
easily and reliably. This ease of transfer probably is
due to the circumstance that upon pressing together for
transfer in ‘an apparatus as illustrated in FIGURE ll,
not only vertical but ‘also lateral pressure is exerted, which
latter pressure, in co-operation with the (pyramid- or
cone-form) elevations promotes the transfer of transfer
able pigment matter onto the receiving support. It has
been found that in pigment sheets of this construction
the mutual distance between the tops of the elevations
is preferably greater than 20 microns and smaller than
120 microns and their height over the base between 5
microns and 15 microns.
The nature of the images obtained (after the transfer)
12
paper No. S-l582 Super Transparent of 90 g./m.2 is
used in each case.
When the examples refer to “diazo aldehyde,” this
indicates the condensation product of p.-diazodiphenyl~
amine and formaldehyde, prepared according to Example
I of Netherlands Patent No. 35,480.
Similarly for the sake of brevity and for better com
parison the examples only mention “deacylating” with
out further indication. This deacylation was carried out
as follows:
The cellulose acetate sheet Was dipped for 1 second
‘and at a temperature of 28° C. in a solution consisting of:
600 cm.3 ethylalcohol
is dependent on the choice of the pigment and the re
50 cm!‘ water
ceiving surface. A good example of the astonishing re
43 g. potassium hydroxide
sults which can be achieved by means of the process ac
Thereafter the sheet was so dried that it became dry in
cording to the invention is the following: the pigment
layer of the pigment sheet is composed of at least two
different layers, the one turned towards the support of
exactly 20 seconds. Then it was again dipped for 11/2
seconds at a temperature of 27°C., in the following
and the one, turned away from the support, contrasting
with the support of the pigment sheet. The pigment
600 cm? ethyl alcohol
layers are so linked up with each other that they can be
transferred together. This may ‘be illustrated by ‘an ex
72 g. potassium hydroxide
the sheet, contrasting visually with the receiving support 20 liquid:
ample. A black support is chosen for the pigment sheet.
Upon this lies a pigment layer, subdivided into two layers,
the lower being black the upper white. Both pigment
layers are so linked up with each other that, upon trans
fer, they are transferred together.
Over the white side
300 cm .3 water
‘and it was dried so as to be dry in exactly ‘10 seconds.
The sheet was then washed in running ‘water for 30 sec
onds and immediately thereafter dipped for 7.5 seconds,
at room temperature, in a solution of the following
composition:
of the composed pigment layer, light-sensitive material
600 cm.3 ethyl alcohol
may be located which, in unexposed condition, will on
3150 cm.3 water
75 g. oxalic acid
Thereafter the sheet was so dried that it became dry in
exactly 12 seconds. This is but one of many suitable
methods for deacylating. The use of one single type of
wetting bring about transfer (of the complete double
pigment layer), but which in exposed condition will no
longer bring about ‘transfer. After imagewise exposure,
the transfer operation is carried out on a white receiving
support. Thus two images: a transfer image and a rem
the materials mentioned and the application of one single
nant image, which are ‘both positive, will be obtained.
method of deacylating in the examples should not be
The light-sensitive pigment sheets can be manufac
understood in any respect whatsoever as a limitation.
tured double-sided. The selected support will then be
This, as will be clear, also applies to the use of the
opaque. Both sides can be imagcwise exposed and both 110 printing apparatus according to FIGURE 10, and for
images can be transferred onto two receiving supports
the method of pressing together the exposed light-sensi
(if desired simultaneously).
One also may form transfer images on both sides of
one receiving support.
By far the greatest number of the examples, herein
after set forth is based upon the use of one and the same
diazocompound. These examples serve the purpose of
illustrating the various embodiments of the processes and
pigment sheets, and by always using the same diazo
compound the respective results of the examples are
comparable with one another. The diazo-compound
chosen is one of the most suitable for the purposes of the
invention. Apart from this a few examples utilizing
other compositions of light-sensitive material are given.
Further, for the sake of brevity, the terms “cellulose
‘acetate sheet” and “gelatin" are used ‘without further
indication. By “cellulose acetate sheet” is to be under
stood a sheet having an acetyl content corresponding to
tive sheet with the receiving support, for which manipula
tion, all the examples use the apparatus according to
FIGURE 11 or FIGURE 12.
For the sake of comparability all the examples use
the contact printing method with light-transmission. The
process, however, is not limited thereto.
By reason of
the high light-sensitivity of many of the light-sensitive
sheets according to the invention, they may also be used
for making enlargements, e.g. from micro?lms carrying
images of printed matter.
Example I
On one side of a transparent and colourless sheet of
cellulose acetate an even layer of the following solution:
2 g. diazo aldehyde
90 cm.a water
50% by weight of combined acetic acid, the sheet, if not 60 10 cm.3 ethyl alcohol
otherwise indicated, having a weight of 100 g./m.2. By
is applied and dried. The light-sensitive side is now
“gelatin,” without further indication, there is to the un
evenly coated by casting with a pigment suspension of
derstood the type Super Photo JO-S. This “acetate
the following composition:
sheet” ‘and this “gelatin” are merely examples of nu
240 g. carbon black
merous suitable qualities. The examples only use one 65 48 g. asphalt
single quality, of each, for the purpose of making the re
1000 cm.3 xylene
sults better comparable with one another.
200 crn.3 of a solution of 10% by weight of cellulose
The same considerations apply to- "carbon black,” “as
acetate butyrate
phalt” and “cellulose acetate butyrate.” By Way of ex
ample carbon black of the type Kosmos-20 has always 70 whereafter there is dried again.
There is thus formed a hydrophobic, to water porous
been used; the asphalt used is always of the type Ennjay
pigment layer of approximately 0.5 g./m.2.
Oxidized Asphalt 285/300 MP; the cellulose acetate bu
The light-sensitive pigment sheet thus obtained is now
tyrate used is ‘always of the type AB 500/].
exposed for 30 seconds in apparatus according to FIG
The same considerations apply to the term “transpar
ent paper"; for the reason mentioned, natural transparent 75 URE It). The exposure takes place through a line
3,091,528
13
14
drawing in India ink on transparent paper (in the fol
lowing examples each time referred to as: “the tracing”).
The light-sensitive pigment sheet is in close contact with
the tracing and the light passes through the cellulose
The transfer is carried out as follows:
The pigment sheet is immersed in water for a few sec
onds and thereafter it is fed together with the receiving
support, through the apparatus of FIGURE 11 at a speed
of 2.75 m. and a transfer-pressure of 2.5 kg. The sheets
are separated; the transfer image is positive and the rem
acetate sheet (this one of many suitable exposure methods
and in the following examples it will be referred to as:
“exposure under the tracing”).
nant image is negative.
In the transfer operation which follows a sheet of
If upon the transfer the exposed pigment sheet is im
transparent paper provided at its receiving surface with
mersed for 30 seconds in water at approximately 35° C.
a layer of gelatin of approximately 3 g./m.2 serves as 10 and immediately thereafter fed through the apparatus of
receiving support.
FIGURE 11 together with the receiving support, then
The transfer is carried out as follows: The receiving
after separating the sheets a negative transfer image and
support and pigment sheet are both immersed for a few
a positive remnant image are obtained. Both remnant
seconds in water at room temperature and thereafter with
images are suitable for recopying contact-printing with
their transfer sides turned towards each other, they are 15 light-transmission.
fed through the apparatus of FIGURE 11 at a speed
Example IV
of 2.5 m. per minute at a transfer-pressure of 2 kg. per
lineal centimetre.
At one side of a sheet of transparent paper there is
cast a solution of:
Immediately thereafter the sheets are
separated: the transfer image is a transparent positive
and the remnant image is a transparent negative. From 20 10 g. gum arabic
85 cm.3 water
the transfer image, positive copies can be produced on
15 cm.3 ethyl-alcohol
diazotype paper and from the remnant image positive
copies can be produced on negative photographic ma
and the sheet is dried. A gum layer of approximately
terials and on blueprint paper. If not otherwise stated,
1.5 g./m.2 is formed. Upon this layer a pigment layer
the transfer operation in the following examples will, as 25 is formed. 0n the pigment layer there is cast at 49° C.
above, be carried out at room temperature.
a solution of:
Example II
4 g. gelatin
2 g. diazo aldehyde
At one side of a cellulose acetate sheet a pigment layer
is formed. This is impregnated super?cially with a solu
tion of:
2 g. diazo aldehyde
30 100 cm.3 water
and the sheet is dried. A light-sensitive layer of approxi
mately 2 g./rn.2 is formed. The light-sensitive side of
the pigment sheet is exposed under the tracing for 18 sec
90 cm.3 water
10 cm.3 ethyl alcohol
and dried.
The light-sensitive side of the pigment sheet is ex
onds.
35
White smooth writing paper serves as receiving
support.
The transfer is carried out as follows: The pigment
sheet is immersed in water for a few ‘seconds and there
posed for 30 seconds under the tracing. Transparent
after it is fed, together With the receiving support, through
paper provided with a layer of gelatin of approximately
3 g./m.2, which contains 0.2% by weight of chrome alum 40 the apparatus of FIGURE 11 at a speed of 2 m. and a
transfer-pressure of 2.25 kg. The sheets are separated;
based on the dry weight of ‘the gelatin, serves as receiving
the transfer-image is positive and, after drying, highly
support.
The transfer is carried out as follows:
support is immersed in a mixture of:
resistant to ?nger-marking, and the remnant image is a
The receiving
1 part by volume ethyl alcohol
3 parts by volume water
transparent negative.
Example V
45
At one side of a cellulose acetate sheet there is cast at
40° C. a solution of :
for a few seconds and thereafter it is fed, together with
the pigment sheet, through the apparatus of FIGURE
4 g. gelatin
1 g. diazo aldehyde
11, at a speed of 2 m. and a transfer-pressure of 1.75 50 1'00 cm.3 water
kg. The sheets are separated; the transfer image is
negative and the remnant image is positive. From the
latter positive copies on diazotype paper can readily be
and the sheet is dried. A diazo gelatin layer of approxi
mately 1.5 g./In.2 is formed. On this layer a pigment
produced.
layer is formed. On the pigment layer there is cast at
If the alum content of the gelatin layer of the receiving 55 40° C. a diazo gelatin solution of the same composition
as above and the sheet is dried. A light-sensitive layer
support is slightly increased, then the alcohol content
of approximately 2 g./m.2 is formed.
of the transfer-water can be decreased. By addition
The pigment sheet is exposed under the tracing for 17
of some alum to the transfer-Water less alcohol can be
seconds through the cellulose acetate sheet. Smooth
used and a smaller quantity of alum is necessary in the
gelatin layer.
Example III
60 white writing paper serves as receiving support.
The transfer is carried out as follows: The apparatus
according to FIGURE 12 is put in motion. The trans
fer liquid in trough 31 is water. The sheet indicated at
A cellulose acetate sheet is deacylated at both sides.
At one side of this deacylated cellulose acetate sheet a
36 is the exposed pigment sheet, pigment side downwards
The apparatus is
pigment layer is formed. On the pigment layer there
is cast, at 40° C., a solution of:
8 g. gelatin
1 g. diazoaldehyde
65 and sheet 38 is the receiving support.
operated at a speed of 2 m. and a transfer-pressure of
2.5 kg. The quantity of water which roller 28 supplies
to sheet 36 is approximately 12 g./m.2. The sheets are
100 cm.3 water
separated.
and the sheet is dried. A light-sensitive layer of 2.5
g./m.z is formed.
The transfer image is positive and, after drying, it is
highly resistant to ?nger-marking. After having been
The light-sensitive side of the pigment sheet is ex
posed for 15 seconds under the tracing.
Woodpulp-free glossy coated book paper serves as re
ceiving support.
exposed to daylight for some time the transfer image will
become still more resistant to ?nger-marking and the ac‘
75
tion of moisture. The remnant image is negative. The
exposure under the tracing also can be carried out from
3,091,628
15
the other side of the pigment sheet and, upon the same
transfer operation, analogous results are obtained.
Example VI
Smooth white writing paper serves as receiving
support.
The transfer is carried out as follows: The apparatus
according to FIGURE 12 is put in motion. The trans
fer-liquid in trough 31 is water. The sheet indicated at 36
At one side of a deacylated cellulose acetate sheet there
is the exposed pigment sheet, pigment side downwards,
is cast a pigment suspension of the following composi
tion:
12 g. carbon black
5.5 g. diazo aldehyde
16
seconds.
and sheet 38 the receiving support.
The apparatus is
operated at ‘a speed of 2 m. and a transfer-pressure of 2.5
kg.
The quantity of water which roller 28 supplies to
The sheets are sepa
rated. The transfer-image is positive and the remanent
10 sheet 36 is approximately 12 g./m.2.
10 cm3 ethyl alcohol
image is a transparent negative highly resistant to ?nger
marlring. Instead of writing paper there may be used,
90 cm.3 water
and the sheet is dried. The pigment sheet is exposed un
for example, thin metal sheets, such as aluminium foil
der the tracing for 30 seconds. The exposure can op
and, in particular, metallized papers for example paper
tionally be carried out upon either ‘side. Transparent
which is provided with a thin matt aluminium layer.
paper, provided with a layer of gelatin of 3 g./rn.2, serves
as receiving support.
Example IX
The transfer is carried out as follows: The exposed
In one side of a cellulose acetate sheet a relief is pressed
pigment sheet and the receiving support are both im
mersed in water for a few seconds and thereafter, they 20 as shown in FIGURES 5 and 6. The shortest distance
between the tops of the pyramids is 80 microns, their
are fed through the apparatus of FIGURE 11 in contact
height is 10 microns and their top angle measured in the
with each other, at a speed of 2 m. and a transfer pres
plane through top and diagonal of base is approximately
sure of 1.75 kg. The sheets are separated; the transfer
90°. The cellulose acetate sheet is deacylated and there
image is positive and the remnant image is a transparent
is then cast upon the relief a suspension of:
negative.
25
Example VII
In one side of a cellulose acetate sheet a relief is
240 g. carbon black
48 g. asphalt
1000 cm.3 xylene
2010 cm.3 of a solution of 10% by weight of cellulose
acetate hutyrate in ethyl acetate
versed pyramid with a square base (upper plane). The 30
and
the sheet is dried. The operation is so carried out
linear distance from cupule to cupule is 120 microns and
that, after drying, the relief is ?lled up with pigment mat
their depth is 40 microns. The cellulose acetate sheet
ter. On the pigment there is cast at 310° C. a solution of:
is deacylated and the relief ‘is then entirely ?lled with
pigment matter. Upon the relief thus ?lled there is cast
35 25 cm.3 Le Page ?sh glue
at 40° C. a solution of:
1 g. diazo aldehyde
75 cm? water
8 g. gelatin
1 g. diazo aldehyde
and the sheet is dried. A light-sensitive layer of approxiv
100 cm.3 water
matcly 2 g./m.2 is formed. The light-sensitive side of
and the sheet is dried. A light-sensitive layer of approxi 40 the pigment sheet is exposed under the tracing for 20
pressed, consisting of evenly distributed cupules adjoining
each other, which each per se have the form of a re
mately 2.5 g./m.2 is formed. The light-sensitive side of
‘the pigment-sheet is exposed under the tracing for 15
seconds. White woodpulp-free glossy coated bookpaper
serves as receiving support.
seconds. Woodpulp-free white, glossy coated book paper
serves as receiving support.
The transfer is carried out as follows: The pigment
sheet is immersed in water for 10 seconds and thereafter
The transfer is ‘carried out as follows: The exposed 45 it is fed, together with the receiving support, through the
apparatus of FIGURE 11 at a speed of 2 m. and a trans
pigment sheet is immersed in water for a few seconds
fer-pressure of 2 kg. The sheets ‘are separated; the trans
and thereafter it is fed, together with the receiving sup
fer image is negative and the remnant image is a trans
port, through the apparatus of FIGURE 11 at a speed
parent positive, highly resistant to ?nger~marking
of 2.75 m. and a transfer pressure of 2.5 kg. The sheets
are separated; the transfer image is positive. The trans
Example X
fer, however, is incomplete, with the result that the
remnant image only shows a very weak negative image.
In one side of a cellulose acetate sheet a relief is
pressed as shown in FIGURES 5 and 6, however, with
cones instead of pyramids. The shortest distance between
Example VIII
the tops of the cones is 40 microns; their height is 8 mi
55
At one side of a cellulose acetate sheet a relief is pressed
crons and their top-angle is approximately 60°. The
as shown in the FIGURES 5 and 6. The shortest dis
cellulose acetate sheet is deacylated and there is then cast
tance between the tops of the pyramids is 130 microns,
upon the relief a suspension of:
their height is 12 microns and their top-angle measured
it’) g. Heliogene Blue B
in the plane through top and diagonal of base is approxi‘
mately 90°. The cellulose-acetate sheet is deacylated and 60 0.5 g. cellulose acetate butyrate
100 cm.3 ethyl acetate
there is then cast upon the relief a suspension of:
and
the sheet is dried. The operation is carried out so
200 g. carbon black
after drying the relief is ?lled with pigment matter. On
20 g. cellulose acetate butyrate
65 the pigment there is cast at 40° C. a solution of:
1500 cm.3 ethyl acetate
8 g. gelatin
and the sheet is dried. The operation is carried out so
1 g. diazo aldehyde
that, after drying, the relief is ?lled with pigment matter.
100 cm.a water
Upon the pigment there is cast at 40° C. a solution of:
and the sheet is dried. A light-sensitive layer of ap
70 proximately 2 g./m.2 is formed. A light-sensitive side of
8 g. gelatin
1 g. diazo aldehyde
the pigment sheet is exposed under the tracing for 15 sec
100 cm.3 water
onds. Smooth white writing paper serves as receiving
support.
and the sheet is dried. A light-sensitive layer of approxi
The transfer is carried out as follows: The exposed
mately 2.5 g. per m.2 is formed. The light-sensitive side
75 pigment sheet is immersed in water for a few seconds and
of the pigment sheet is exposed under the tracing for 30
I7
3,091,528
thereafter it is fed, together with the receiving support,
through the apparatus of FIGURE ii at a speed of 2.5 m.
and a transfer-pressure of 2 kg. The sheets are separated;
the transfer image is positive and the remnant image is a
transparent negative.
If the exposure of the light-sensitive pigment sheet un
der the tracing is effected at the non-light-sensitive side,
i.e. through the cellulose ‘acetate sheet and the pigment
matter, then the exposure will take 20 seconds. Receiv
18
the third and fourth transfer is carried out in the same
manner, now using respectively the third and fourth pig
ment sheet. Finally a true multicolour image of the
original multicolour line drawing is obtained on the re
ceiving support.
Example XII
At one side of smooth black paper there is cast at
40° C. a solution of:
ing support and transfer method can be the same as de
10 30 g. gum arabic
scribed above. By the method of this example one also
100 cm.3 water
can readily transfer onto glass, ceramic surfaces and the
and
dried. A gum layer of 2 g./m.2 is formed. On this
like and ‘also upon metal sheets, the latter then serving
for the production of templates.
Example XI
Four cellulose acetate sheets of 300 g./m.2 are pro
vided with a relief as in Example IX, deacylated, cast
with pigment suspension and dried, so that the relief is
?lled with pigment matter after the drying operation.
For the ?rst sheet the following suspension is used:
5.8 g. carbon black
0.6 g. cellulose acetate butyrate
there is formed a pigment layer (black). Over this black
pigment layer there is mounted a second, different, pig
15 ment layer as follows:
A suspension is formed of:
10 g. Lithol Echtscharlach R. N. Pulver
l g. cellulose acetate butyrate
100 em.3 ethyl acetate
and this is cast upon the ?rst (black) suspension and
dried, so, that the black pigment is well covered and seen
from the outside the pigment surface consequently is clear
100 cm.3 ethyl acetate
for the second sheet:
a solution of :
8.5 g. Hausa Yellow 10 G
2 g. cellulose acetate butyrate
4 g. gelatin
2 g. diazo aldehyde
100 cm.3 ethyl acetate;
for the third sheet:
8.5 g. Lithol Echtscharlach R. N. Pulver
2 g. cellulose acetate butyrate
100 cm.3 ethyl acetate
for the fourth sheet:
10 g. Heliogene Blue B
5 g. cellulose acetate butyrate
100 cm.3 ethyl acetate
Upon all the sheets there is cast, at 40° C., a solution of:
5 g. gelatin
1 g. magnesium sulphate
l g. diazoaldehyde
red. Upon this red pigment layer there is cast, at 40° C.,
100 crn.3 water
30 and the sheet is dried. A light-sensitive layer of approxi
mately 2.5 g./m.2 is formed. The light-sensitive side of
the pigment sheet is exposed under the tracing for 18
seconds. A clear red sheet of paper serves as receiving
support.
35
The transfer is carried out as follows: The pigment
sheet is immersed in water for 10 seconds and thereafter
it is fed, together with the receiving support, through the
apparatus of FIGURE 11 at a speed of 2.5 m. and a
transfer pressure of 2 kg. The sheets are separated; the
transfer image is positive in black on clear red; the
remnant image is likewise a black positive on a clear red
background. The images are thus both positive, although
they represent each other’s reversed image.
100 cm.3 water
Example XIII
45
and the sheets are dried. The operations are carried out
In one side of a cellulose acetate sheet a relief is
so that upon each of the sheets a light-sensitive layer
pressed as in Example IX. Upon the relief there is cast
of approximately 2.5 g./rn.2 is formed. A multicolour
a suspension of :
line drawing is taken, for example representing a ground
plan in which black lines indicate walls, yellow lines gas 50 4 g. gum arabic
1.25 g. gelatin
pipes, red lines the dimensions and blue lines the water
pipes. From this drawing there are made in register four
5 g. Lithol Echtscharlach R. N. Pulver
2.5 cm? glycerol
Indian ink tracings of exactly the same size as that of
2.5 g. diazo aldehyde
the multicolour drawing, the ?rst showing the black, the
second the yellow, the third the red and the fourth the 55 100 cm.3 water
blue image portions. The four pigment sheets are like
and the sheet is dried.
wise made exactly the size of the multicolour line draw
The operation is carried out so
that, after drying, the relief is ?lled with hydrophilic
ing. The light-sensitive side of the ?rst pigment sheet is
pigment matter. The pigment side of the pigment sheet
now exposed in register under the ?rst tracing for 30
seconds, the second likewise under the second tracing, 60 is exposed under the tracing for 18 seconds. Woodpulp
free, white, glossy coated book paper serves as receiving
the third under the third tracing and the fourth under the
support.
fourth tracing.
The transfer is carried out as follows: The apparatus
A sheet of white, woodpulp-free glossy coated book
according to FIGURE 12 is put in motion. The transfer
paper of exactly the same size as that of the multicolour
liquid in trough 31 is water. The sheet indicated at 36 is
drawing serves as receiving support and upon it there is
transferred the image of the ?rst pigment sheet by im 65 the receiving support and sheet 38 is the exposed pigment
sheet, pigment side upwards. The apparatus is operated
mersing the latter for a few seconds in water and there
at a speed of 1.5 m. and a transfer pressure of 2 kg.
after contacting it exactly in register with the receiving
The sheets are separated. The transfer image is a red
support and feeding through the apparatus of FIGURE
positive and the remnant image is a red negative. The
11 at a speed of 2 m. and a transfer~pressure of 2.25 kg.
The sheets are separated; the transfer image is a positive 70 exposure under the tracing also can be effected on the
other side of the pigment sheet and the transfer then can
black image of the ?rst tracing. The transfer image is
take place in the same manner and the same transfer- and
dried in a lukewarm air current and it is used, again in
remnant-images will be produced.
register for the same transfer-operation, but now from
If in the above given suspension the 5 g. Lithol Echt
the second pigment sheet. It is again dried and upon it 75
scharlach R. N. Pulver are substituted by 0.2 g. crystal
3,091,528
19
20
5 0111.3 glycerol
violet and if the operation is otherwise carried out in the
same manner then, upon transfer, a positive transfer image
100 cm.3 water
of a greenish colour is obtained, the colour of which will,
upon short exposure to daylight, shift to blue.
The transfer can be repeated several times, each time
upon a fresh receiving support, until the transferable pig
ment available in the pigment sheet is exhausted. The
remnant image is a transparent negative.
Example XI V
and the sheet is dried. A light-sensitive pigment layer of
approximately 5 g./m.2 is formed. The pigment side of
the pigment sheet is exposed under the tracing for 30
seconds. The transfer is carried out as in Example XIII
at a speed of 2.5 m. and a transfer pressure of 1 kg.
Woodpulp-free, white, glossy, coated book paper serves
as receiving support. The sheets are separated. The
10 transfer image is positive. The remnant image is practi
In one side of a cellulose acetate sheet a relief is pressed
as in Example IX. The cellulose acetate sheet is de
acylated and on the relief there is cast a suspension of:
cally invisible. The pigment sheet is now again submitted
to the same transfer operation, again upon the same paper.
A new positive transfer image is formed and the remnant
image is still nearly invisible. The transfer operation is
4 g. gum arabic
5 g. Lithol Echtscharlach R. N. Pulver
15 repeated each time from the same pigment sheet and each
time upon a fresh receiving support. A number of posi
tive transfer images is obtained and the visibility of the
negative remnant image each time improves. The oper
100 crn.3 water
ation is repeated until the transfer images begin to be
and the sheet is dried. The operation is carried out so 20 come of insut?cient strength.
that, after drying, the relief is filled with hydrophilic pig
Example XVII
ment matter. The pigment is now super?cially impreg
1.25 g. gelatin
2.5 cm.3 glycerol
nated at 25° C. with a solution of:
2 g. diazoaldehyde in
50 gm.3 water and
50 cm.3 ethyl alcohol
The light~sensitive side of the pigment is exposed under
the tracing for 18 seconds. Woodpulp-free, white, glossy,
In one side of a cellulose acetate sheet a relief is
pressed as in Example X.
Upon the relief there is cast
25 a solution of:
10 g. gum arabic
85 cm.3 water
coated book paper serves as receiving support.
The transfer is carried out as in Example XIII.
50 cm .3 ethyl alcohol
and the sheet is dried. The gum layer weighs approxi
mately 1 g./rn.2. The upper side of the gum layer essen
a red negative.
Upon this relief there is cast a suspension of:
The
transfer image is a red positive and the remnant image
Example XV
tially shows the same relief as the cellulose acetate sheet.
5.8 g. carbon black
‘In one side of a cellulose acetate sheet a relief is pressed 35 0.6 g. cellulose acetate butyrate
as in Example IX. The cellulose acetate is deacylated and
there is then cast upon the relief a suspension of:
240 g. carbon black
100 cm.3 ethyl acetate
and the sheet is dried. The operation is carried out so
that, after drying, the relief is ?lled with pigment matter.
48 g. asphalt
1000 cm.3 xylene
1000 cm.3 of a solution of 10% by weight of cellulose
acetate butyrate in ethyl acetate
and the sheet is dried. The operation is carried out so
that, after drying, the relief is ?lled with a hydrophobic
pigment matter. On the pigment there is cast at 40° C.
a solution of:
4 g. gelatin
1 g. diazo aldehyde
40 Upon the pigment layer there is cast at 40° C. a solu
tion of :
4 g. gelatin
2 g. diazo aldehyde
100 cm.3 water
and the sheet is dried. A light-sensitive layer of approxi
mately 2 g./m.2 is formed. The light-sensitive side of
the pigment sheet is exposed under the tracing for 18
seconds.
White smooth writing paper serves as receiving
support.
100 cm.3 water
and the sheet is dried. A light-sensitive layer of approxi
mately 2 g./m.2 is formed. The light-sensitive side of the
pigment sheet is exposed under the tracing for 20- seconds.
The transfer is carried out as follows: The pigment
sheet is immersed in water for a few seconds and there
after it is fed, together with the receiving support, through
the apparatus of FIGURE 11 at a speed of 2 m. and a
The transfer is carried out as follows: The pigment 55 transfer pressure of 2.5 kg. The sheets are separated;
sheet is immersed in water for 15 seconds and thereafter
the transfer image is positive and, after drying, highly
it is fed, together with the receiving support, through the
resistant to ?nger-marking; the remnant image is negative.
apparatus of FIGURE 11 at a speed of 1.5 m. and a
Example XVIII
transfer pressure of 2.25 kg. The sheets are separated‘, the
transfer image is positive and the remnant image is a 60
A cellulose acetate sheet is provided with a relief, and
transparent negative. The transfer image is highly re
it is deacylated. A pigment suspension is cast upon it
sistant to ?nger-marking and to moistening with water.
as in Example IX. On the pigment there is cast, at
The process, as described in this example, however, has
30° C., a solution of:
the drawback that the moistening takes relatively much
time and that transfer takes place at a low speed. Trans 65 15 g. gum arabic
0.5 g. diazo aldehyde
fer in the combined apparatus of FIGURE 12 would, in
100 cm.3 water
the process of this example, cause difficulties.
and the sheet is dried. A light-sensitive layer of approxi
mately 2 g./m.2 is ‘formed. The light-sensitive side of the
A cellulose acetate sheet is ?nely matted at one side 70 pigment sheet is exposed under the tracing for 30 seconds.
and deacylated. Onto the matted side there is cast the
Woodpulp-free, white, glossy coated book paper serves as
following solution:
receiving support.
Example XVI
10 g. gum arabic
10 g. carbon black
5 g. diazo aldehyde
The transfer is carried out as follows: The pigment
sheet is immersed in water for a few seconds and there
75 after it is fed, together with the receiving support, through
3,091,528
21
22
the apparatus of FIGURE 11 at a speed of 2 m. and a
(d) For sensitizing, there is used a solution, at 40° C.,
of:
transfer pressure of 2.25 kg. The pressed together sheets
are completely dried at room temperature.
Thereafter
10 g. dextrin
1 g. diazo aldehyde
100 cm.3 water
they are separated; the transfer image is negative and
the remnant image is a transparent positive which can
be re-copied on diazotype material. Alternative proce
dures can be followed:
and the operations are further carried out as above.
(a) For the sensitizing there is used a weakly am
moniacal solution of 40° C. of:
The transfer upon white, woodpulp-free, glossy coated
book paper is carried out as follows: The pigment sheet
10 is immersed in a mixture of:
12 g. casein in
100 cm.3 water
to which, after cooling down to 40° C., there has been
added 2 cm? ethyl alcohol. After drying, the layer is
super?cially sensitized with a solution of:
1 part by volume of ethyl alcohol with
3 parts by volume of water
15 for a few seconds and thereafter it is fed, together with
the receiving support, through the apparatus of FIG
2 g. diazoaldehyde
URE 11 at a speed of 2 m. and a transferpressure of 2
20 cm.3 water
kg. The sheets are separated; the transfer image is nega
tive and the remnant image is a transparent positive.
80 cm.3 ethyl alcohol
whereafter it is again dried.
The further operation is
20
Example XIX
carried out as above and the transfer is carried out upon
A cellulose acetate sheet is provided with a relief,
white, woodpulp-free, glossy coated book paper as fol
deacyla-ted ‘and a pigment suspension is cast thereon and
lows:
dried, as in Example IX. 0n the pigment there is cast,
The apparatus according to FIGURE 12 is put in 25 at 40° C., a solution of:
motion. The transfer liquid is water. The apparatus is
6 g. gelatin
operated at a speed of 3.5 m. and a transfer pressure of
1 g. 4-4’-diazido-stilbene-disulphonicacid-Z-Z'
2.5 kg. The sheet indicated at 36 is the exposed pigment
100 cm.3 water
sheet, pigment side downwards and sheet 38 is the receiv
ing support. The quantity of Water which roller 28 sup 30 and the sheet is dried. A light-sensitive layer of approxi
plies to sheet 36 is 10-12 g./m.2. The sheets are sepa
mately 2.5 g./m.2 is formed. The light-sensitive side
rated. The transfer image is positive and the remnant
of the pigment sheet is exposed under the tracing for 40
image is negative.
(15) For sensitizing, a solution, at 40° C. of
1.25 g. of an incompletely deacylated polyvinyl acetate
of the type Elvanol (grade 20—105) 43-50% deacylated
of Du Pont de Nemours & Co., Wilmington, Del.,
U.S.A.)
seconds.
White smooth writing paper serves as receiving
support.
The transfer is carried out as follows: The pigment
sheet is immersed in water for a few seconds and there
after it is fed, together with the receiving sup-port, through
the apparatus of FIGURE 11 at a speed of 2.5 m. and a
transfer pressure of 2 kg.
50 cm} water
The sheets are separated; the
40 transfer image is positive, and the remnant image is a
50 crn.3 ethyl alcohol
1 g. diazo aldehyde
transparent negative.
Example XX
is used and the operations are further carried out as above.
A cellulose acetate sheet is provided with a relief, it
The transfer is carried out upon transparent paper as 45
is deaeylated, pigment suspension is cast upon it and
follows: The pigment sheet is immersed in water for a
few seconds and thereafter it is fed, together with the
receiving support, through the apparatus of FIGURE 11
dried as in Example VIII.
On the pigment side there
is cast, at 40° C., a solution of:
8 g. gelatin
at a speed of 2 m. and a transfer pressure of 2 kg. The
sheets are separated; the transfer image is a transparent 50 100 cm.3 water
positive and the remnant image is a transparent negative;
This is dried and thereafter sensitized at a temperature
both can be re-copied.
of 20° C. with a solution of:
(c) For sensitizing, there is used a solution, at 25° C.,
of:
2 g. of the boro?uoride of para-diazo-aniline
55 100 cm.3 Water
10 g. blood albumin
I00 cm.3 water
and dried again. A light-sensitive layer of approximately
2 g./m.2 is thus formed. The light-sensitive side of the
which after drying is super?cially impregnated with a
pigment sheet is exposed for 120 seconds under the trac
solution of:
60 ing. White smooth writing paper serves as receiving
support.
2 g. diazoaldehyde
The transfer is carried out as follows: The apparatus
according to FIGURE 12 is put in motion. The trans
fer liquid is distilled water at 19° C. The apparatus is
20 cm.3 water
80 cm.3 ethyl alcohol
whereafter it is dried again.
The operations are fur
ther carried out as above.
The transfer upon white, woodpulp-free, glossy coated
book paper is carried out as follows:
The pigment sheet is immersed in water for a few
seconds and thereafter it is fed, together with the receiv
ing support, through the apparatus of FIGURE 11 at a
65 operated at a speed of 3 m. and a transfer pressure of
1 kg. The sheet indicated at 36 is the pigment sheet,
pigment side downwards and sheet 38 is the receiving
support. The quantity of water which roller 28 supplies
to sheet 36 is approximately 20 g./m.2. The sheets are
separated. The transfer image is positive and the rem
nant image is a transparent negative.
The
Example XXI
sheets are separated; the transfer image is positive and
A cellulose acetate sheet is provided ‘with a relief, it
the remnant image is a transparent negative.
75 is deacylated, pigment suspension is cast upon it and
speed of 2.5 m. and a transfer pressure of 2 kg.
3,091,528
23
24
operated at a speed of 3 m. and a transfer pressure of 1
dried as in Example VIII. On the pigment side there is
cast, at 40° C., a solution of:
8 g. gelatin
kg. The sheet indicated at 36 is the pigment sheet, pig
ment side downwards and sheet 38 is the receiving sup
port. The quantity of water which roller 28 supplies
100 cm.3 water
5 to sheet 36 is approximately 20 g./m.2. The sheets are
separated. The transfer image is positive and the rem
This is dried and thereafter sensitized at a temperature
nant image is atransparent negative.
of 20° C. with a solution of:
Example XXIV
2 g. of the chlorostannate of 4-4'-tetrazodiphenylamine
100 cm.3 water
and dried again. A light-sensitive layer of approximate
ly 2 g./m.2 is thus formed. The light-sensitive side of
the pigment sheet is exposed for 60 seconds under the
tracing.
A cellulose acetate sheet is provided with a relief, it is
deacylated, pigment suspension is cast upon it and dried
as in Example VIII. On the pigment side there is cast, at
40° C., a solution of:
10
White smooth writing paper serves as receiv
ing support.
15
The transfer is carried out as follows: The apparatus
according to FIGURE 12 is put in motion. The trans
fer liquid is distilled water at 19° C. The apparatus
is operated at a speed of 3 m. and a transfer pressure of
8 g. gelatin
100 cm.3 water
This is dried and thereafter sensitized at a temperature
of 20° C. with a solution of:
1 kg. The sheet indicated at 36 is the pigment sheet, 20 2 g. para diazo-ethyl-betadiethylaminoethyl-aniline
pigment side downwards and sheet 38 is the receiving
100 cm.3 water
support. The quantity of water which roller 28 supplies
and
dried again. A light-sensitive layer of approximately
to sheet 36 is approximately 20 g./m.2. The sheets are
2 g./m.2 is thus formed. The light-sensitive side of the
separated. The transfer image is positive and the rem
pigment sheet is exposed for 45 seconds under the tracing.
nant image is a transparent negative.
25 White smooth writing paper serves as receiving support.
Example XXII
A cellulose acetate sheet is provided with a relief, it
is deacylated, pigment suspension is cast upon it and
The transfer is carried out as follows:
The apparatus according to FIGURE 12 is put in mo
tion. The transfer liquid is distilled water at 19° C.
dried as in Example VIII. On the pigment side there is 30 The apparatus is operated at a speed of 3 m. and a trans
fer pressure of 1 kg. The sheet indicated at 36 is the
cast, at 40° C., a solution of z
pigment sheet, pigment side downwards and sheet 38 is the
receiving support. The quantity of water which roller
100 cm.3 water
28 supplies to sheet 36 is approximately 20 g./m.2. The
This is dried and thereafter sensitized at a temperature 35 sheets are separated. The transfer image is positive and
the remnant image is a transparent negative.
of 20° C. with a solution of:
8 g. gelatin
Example XXV
2 g. para-diazo-rnono-ethylaniline
100 cm.3 water
A cellulose acetate sheet is provided with a relief, it
and dried again. A light-sensitive layer of approximate 40 is deacylated, pigment suspension is cast upon it and
ly 2 g./m.2 is thus formed. The light-sensitive side of
dried as in Example VIII. On the pigment side there
the pigment sheet is exposed for '75 seconds under the
is cast, at 40° C., a solution of:
tracing. White smooth writing paper serves as receiv
8 g. gelatin
ing support.
The transfer is carried out as follows: The apparatus 45 100 cm.3 water
according to FIGURE 12 is put in motion. The trans
This is dried and thereafter sensitized at a temperature of
fer liquid is distilled water at 19° C. The apparatus
20° C. with a solution of:
is operated at a speed of 3 m. and a transfer pressure
2 g. tetrazo - 4 - 4’ - tetramethoxy - 2 - 2' ~ 5 - 5' - tri
of 1 kg. The sheet indicated at 36 is the pigment sheet,
phenylmethane
pigment side downwards and sheet 38 is the receiving 50
I00 cm.3 water
support. The quantity of water which roller 28 supplies
to sheet 36 is approximately 20 g./m.z. The sheets are
and dried again. A light~sensitive layer of approximately
separated. The transfer image is positive and the rem
2 g./rn.2 is thus formed. The light-sensitive side of the
nant image is a transparent negative.
pigment sheet is exposed for 60 seconds under the trac
ing. White smooth writing paper serves as receiving
Example XXIII
A cellulose acetate sheet is provided with a relief, it is
deacylated, pigment suspension is cast upon it and dried
as in Example VIII.
On the pigment side there is cast,
at 40° C., a solution of:
8 g. gelatin
100 cm.3 water
This is dried and thereafter sensitized at a temperature
of 20° C. with a solution of:
2 g. para-diazo-ethyI-hetahydroxyethyl-aniline
support.
The transfer is carried out as follows: The apparatus
according to FIGURE 12 is put in motion. The trans
fer liquid is distilled water at 19° C. The apparatus
60 is operated at a speed of 3 m. and a transfer pressure of 1
kg. The sheet indicated at 36 is the pigment sheet, pig
ment side downwards and sheet 38 is the receiving sup
port. The quantity of water which roller 28 supplies
to sheet 36 is approximately 20 g./m.2. The sheets are
65 separated. The transfer image is positive and the rern~
nant image is a transparent negative.
100 cm.3 water
Example XXVI
and dried again. A light-sensitive layer of approximate
A cellulose acetate sheet is provided with a relief, it
1y 2 g./m.2 is thus formed. The light-sensitive side of
the pigment sheet is exposed for 60 seconds under the 70 is deacylated, pigment suspension is cast upon it and
tracing.
White smooth writing paper serves as receiv
ing support.
dried as in Example VIII. On the pigment side there
is cast, at 40° C., a solution of:
The transfer is carried out as follows: The apparatus
8 g. gelatin
according to FIGURE 12 is put in motion. The transfer
liquid is distilled water at 19° C. The apparatus is 75 100 cm.3 water
25
3,091,528
25
This is dried and thereafter sensitized at a temperature
of 20° C. with a solution of:
2 g. para diazo mono-cyclohexylaniline
a strength greater than that of their adherence to other
100 cm? water
parts of the sheet, and thus being transferable bodily
and dried again. A light-sensitive layer of approximately
2 g./m.2 is formed. The light-sensitive side of the
pigment sheet is exposed for 120 seconds under the trac
ing. Thereafter the pigment sheet is exposed for 10
amine, at least pigment matter containing parts of said
structure being adherable to said receiving surface with
from said support to said receiving surface, by a wet
ting of said structure followed by a pressing of said re
ceiving surface against the outer surface of said struc—
ture and a separation of said receiving surface from said
outer surface; by said exposing subjecting said material
minutes at a temperature of 80° C. and thereafter it is 10 imagewise to said light until said light has divided said
cooled to room temperature. White smooth writing pa
structure imagewise into two distinct groups of latent
per serves as receiving support.
image portions respectively lying in the exposed and the
The transfer is carried out as follows: The apparatus
relatively unexposed areas of said structure and so dif
according to FIGURE 12 is put in motion. The trans
fering in their adhesion powers that the image por
fer liquid is distilled water at 19° C. The apparatus is 15 tions of one of said groups, including at least in part
operated at a speed of 3 m. and a transfer pressure of
the portions of said pigment matter located in the corre
1 kg. The sheet indicated at 36 is the pigment sheet,
sponding areas of said structure, are selectively adher
pigment side downwards and sheet 38 is the receiving sup
able to said receiving surface, and selectively transfer
port. The quantity of water which roller 28 supplies to
able, as aforesaid, after said exposing wetting said struc'
sheet 36 is approximately 20 g./m.2. The sheets are sep 20 ture and rendering pigment matter containing parts of
arated. The transfer image is positive and the remnant
one only of said groups of latent image portions more
image is a transparent negative.
adhesive to said receiving surface than to the other parts
What I claim is:
of said sheet; then pressing said receiving surface against
1. A photographic process for the production of a pig
said outer surface; and thereafter separating said receiv
mcnt image on a receiving surface, which comprises im 25 ing surface from said outer surface and thereby selec
agewise exposing to actinic light a sheet comprising a sup
tively severing and transferring from the other parts
port carrying adherently but transferably over only one
of said sheet at least parts of said one group of image
of its sides a composite structure consisting essentially of
portions, including at least in part the portions of said
visually perceptible pigment matter linked to a sensitive
pigment matter located in the corresponding areas of
organic colloid material containing a compound which 30 said structure, in the form of a pigment image obtained
upon exposure to actinic light materially alters an ad
in adherence to said receiving surface without further
hesion power possessed by said material upon a wetting
development.
thereof, said compound being selected from the group
3. A photographic process for the production of a
consisting of light-sensitive diazo compounds and light
pigment image on a receiving surface, which comprises
sensitive azido compounds, at least pigment matter con»
taining parts of said structure being adherable to said
receiving surface with a strength greater than that of
their adherence to other parts of the sheet, and thus being
transferable bodily from said support to said receiving
imagewise exposing to actinic light a sheet comprising
a support carrying adherently but transferably over only
one of its sides a composite structure consisting essen-*
tially of visibly perceptible pigment matter linked to
a sensitive organic colloid material comprising 4,4'-di~
surface, by a wetting of said structure followed by a 40 azido-stilbene disulphonic acid-2,2’, at least pigment mat
pressing of said receiving surface against the outer sur
ter containing parts of said structure being adherable to
face of said structure and a separation of said receiving
said receiving surface with a strength greater than that
surface from said outer surface; by said exposing sub
of their adherence to other parts of the sheet, and thus
jecting said material imagewise to said light until said
being transferable bodily from said support to said re
45
light has divided said structure imagewise into two dis
ceiving surface, by a wetting of said structure followed
tinct groups of latent image portions respectively lying
by a pressing of said receiving surface against the outer
in the exposed and the relatively unexposed areas of said
surface of said structure and a separation of said re
structure and so differing in their adhesion powers that
ceiving surface from said outer surface; by said expos
the image portions of one of said groups, including at
ing subjecting said material imagewise to said light until
least in part the portions of said pigment matter located in
said light has divided said structure imagewise into two
the corresponding areas of said structures, are selectively
distinct groups of latent image portions respectively ly
adherable to said receiving surface, and selectively trans
ing in the exposed and the relatively unexposed areas
ferable, as aforesaid; after said exposing wetting said
of said structure and so differing in their adhesion powers
structure and rendering pigment matter containing parts
that the image portions of one of said groups, including
of one only of said groups of latent image portions more 55 at least in part the portions of said pigment matter lo
adhesive to said receiving surface than to the other parts
cated in the corresponding areas of said structure, are
of said sheet; then pressing said receiving surface against
said outer surface; and thereafter separating said receiv
ing surface from said outer surface and thereby selec~
selectively adherable to said receiving surface, and
selectively transferable, as aforesaid; after said exposing
wetting said structure and rendering pigment matter con
tively severing and transferring from the other parts of 60 taining parts of one only of said groups of latent image
said sheet at least parts of said one group of image por
portions more adhesive to said receiving surface than to
tions, including at least in part the portions of said pig
the other parts of said sheet; then pressing said receiving
ment matter located inthe corresponding areas of said
surface against said outer surface; and thereafter separat
structure, in the form of a pigment image obtained in
ing said receiving surface from said outer surface and
adherence to said receiving surface without further de 65 thereby selectively severing and transferring from the
velopment.
other parts of said sheet at least parts of said one group
2. A photographic process for the production of a
of image portions, including at least in part the por<
pigment image on a receiving surface, which comprises
tions of said pigment matter located in the corresponding
imagewise exposing to actinic light a sheet comprising a
areas of said structure, in the form of a pigment image
support carrying adherently but transferably over only 70 obtained in adherence to said receiving surface without
one of its sides a composite structure consisting essen
further development.
tially of visually perceptible pigment matter linked to a
4. A photographic process for the production of a
sensitive organic colloid material comprising a condensa
pigment image on a receiving surface, which comprises
tion product of formaldehyde and a p-diazo-diphenyl 75 imagewise exposing to actinic light a sheet comprising
3,091,528
21?
28
the other parts of said sheet, then pressing said receiving
a support carrying adherently but transferably over only
surface against said outer surface; and thereafter sep
arating said receiving surface from said outer surface
one of its sides a composite structure consisting essen
tially of visually perceptible pigment matter linked to
and thereby selectively severing and transferring from
said other parts at least parts of said unexposed image
portions, including at least in part the portions of said
pigment matter located in said unexposed areas, in the
a sensitive organic colloid material comprising a hydro
philic colloidal binder and a compound which upon ex
posure to actinic light materially alters an adhesion power
possessed by said material upon a wetting thereof with
water, said compound being selected from the group con
form of a pigment image obtained in adherence to said
receiving surface without further development.
sisting of light-sensitive diazo- compounds and light-sen
6. A photographic process for the production of a pig
sitive azido compounds, at least pigment matter contain 10 ment
image on a receiving surface, which comprises im
ing parts of said structure being adherable to said re
agewise exposing to actinic light a sheet comprising a
ceiving surface with a strength greater than that of their
support carrying adherently but transferably over only
adherence to other parts of the sheet, and thus being
one of its sides a composite structure consisting essen
transferable bodily from said support to said receiving
tially of visually perceptible pigment matter linked to
surface, by a wetting of said structure with water fol
an organic colloid material comprising a hydrophilic
lowed by a pressing of said receiving surface against the
colloidal binder and a condensation product of formalde
outer surface of said structure and a separation of said
hyde and a p-diazo-diphenylamine which upon exposure
receiving surface from said outer surface; by said ex
to said light materially alters an adhesion power pos
posing subjecting said material imagewise to said light
sessed by said material upon a Wetting thereof with wa
until said light has divided said structure imagewise 20 ter, at least pigment matter containing parts of said
into two distinct groups of latent image portions respec
structure being adherable to said receiving surface with
tively lying in the exposed and the relatively unexposed
a strength greater than that of their adherence to other
areas of said structure and so differing in their adhesion
powers that the image portions of one of said groups,
including at least in part the portions of said pigment
parts of the sheet, and thus being transferable bodily
25 from said support to said receiving surface, by a wetting
matter located in the corresponding areas of said struc
ture, are selectively adherable to said receiving surface,
and selectively transferable, as aforesaid; after said ex
posing wetting said structure with water and rendering
pigment matter containing parts of one only of said
groups of latent image portions more adhesive to said
receiving surface than to the other parts of said sheet,
then pressing said receiving surface against said outer
sheet; and thereafter separating said receiving surface
from said outer surface and thereby selectively severing
and transferring from said other parts at least parts of
said one group of image portions, including at least in
parts the portions of said pigment matter located in the
of said structure with water followed by a pressing of
said receiving surface against the outer surface of said
structure and a separation of said receiving surface from
said outer surface; by said exposing subjecting said ma
terial imagewise to said light until said light has divided
said structure imagewise into two distinct groups of
latent image portions respectively lying in the exposed
and the relatively unexposed areas of said structure and
so differing in their adhesion powers that the image
portions of one of said groups, including at least in part
the portions of said pigment matter located in the cor
responding areas of said structure, are selectively adher
able to said receiving surface, and selectively transferable,
as aforesaid; after said exposing wetting said structure
corresponding areas of said structure, in the form of a 40 with water until the water has substantially reduced
pigment image obtained in adherence to said receiving
surface without further development.
5. A photographic process for the production of a
pigment image on a receiving surface, which comprises
imagewise exposing to actinic light a sheet comprising a
support carrying adherently but transferably over only
one of its sides a composite structure consisting essen
the cohesion of said binder in said unexposed latent im
age portions and rendered pigment matter containing
parts of only said exposed latent image portions more
adhesive to said receiving surface than to other parts of
said sheet, then pressing said receiving surface against
said outer surface; and thereafter separating said receiv
ing surface from said outer surface and thereby selec
tively severing and transferring from said other parts at
tially of visually perceptible pigment matter linked to
an organic colloid material comprising a hydrophilic
least parts of said exposed image portions, including at
colloidal binder and a condensation product of formal 50 least in part the portions of said pigment matter located
dehyde and a p-diazo-diphenylamine which upon ex
posure to said light materially alters an adhesion power
in said exposed areas, in the form of a pigment image
obtained in adherence to said receiving surface without
possessed by said material upon a wetting thereof with
further development.
water, at least pigment matter containing parts of said
7. A photographic process for the production of a pig
structure being adherable to said receiving surface with 55 ment image on a receiving surface, which comprises im
a strength greater than that of their adherence to other
agewise exposing to actinic light a ?exible sheet com
parts of the sheet, and thus being transferable bodily
prising a support having a hydrophilic surface over one
from said support to said receiving surface, by a wetting
side and carrying adherently but transferably over said
of said structure with water followed by a pressing of
surface a composite structure consisting essentially of a
said receiving surface against the outer surface of said 60 layer of visually perceptible pigment matter overlaid by
structure and a separation of said receiving surface from
and linked to a layer of an organic colloid material com
said outer surface; by said exposing subjecting said ma
prising a hydrophilic colloidal binder and a condensation
terial imagewise to said light until said light has divided
product of formaldehyde and a p-diazo-diphenylarnine
said structure imagewise into two distinct groups of la
tent image portions respectively lying in the exposed and
which upon exposure to said light materially alters an ad
hesion power possessed by said material upon a wetting
thereof with water, said layer of pigment matter being
hydrophobic and lying next to said hydrophilic surface
and being permeated with passages to admit water to said
surface, said structure being adherable to said receiving
the relatively unexposed areas of said structure and so
differing in their adhesion powers that the image por
tions of one of said groups, including at least in part
the portions of said pigment matter located in the cor
responding areas of said structure, are selectively ad 70 surface with a strength greater than that of its adherence
herable to said receiving surface, and selectively trans
to said support, and thus being transferable bodily from
ferable, as aforesaid; after said exposing wetting said
said support to said receiving surface, by a wetting of
structure with water and rendering pigment matter con
said structure with water followed by a pressing of said
taining parts of only said unexposed latent image por
receiving surface against the outer surface of said struc
75
tions more adhesive to said receiving surface than to
3,091,528
29
ture and a separation of said receiving surface from said
outer surface; by said exposing subjecting said layer of
colloid material imagewise to said light until said light
has divided said structure imagewise into two distinct
groups of latent image portions respectively lying in the
exposed and the relatively unexposed areas of said struc
30
with a strength greater than that of their adherence to
other parts of the sheet, and thus being transferable bod
ily from said support to said receiving surface, by a
Wetting of said structure with water followed by a press
ing of said receiving surface against the outer surface
of said structure and a separation of said receiving sur
ture and so differing in their adhesion powers that the
face from said outer surface, said structure being divisi
image portions of one of said groups, including the por
ble imagewise by an imagewise exposure of said light~
tions of said pigment matter layer located in the corre
sensitive layer to said light into two distinct groups of
sponding areas of said structure, are selectively adherable 10 latent image portions respectively lying in the exposed
to said receiving surface, and selectively transferable, as
and the relatively unexposed areas of said structure and so
aforesaid; after said exposing wetting said structure with
water so as to render one only of said groups of latent
differing in their adhesion powers that the image portions
of one of said groups, including at least in part the por
image portions more adhesive to said receiving surface
tions of said pigment matter located in the corresponding
than to the other parts of said sheet, then pressing said 15 areas of said structure, are selectively adherable to said
receiving surface against said outer surface; and there
receiving surface as aforesaid and severable from the
after separating said receiving surface from said outer
other parts of the sheet, and thus are selectively trans
surface and thereby selectively severing and transferring
ferable as aforesaid, to form an image of said pigment
matter on said receiving surface.
including the portions of said organic colloid material 20
10. A light-sensitive sheet for the production of a pig
and of said pigment matter located in the corresponding
ment image, comprising a sheet-like support carrying ad
areas of said structure, in the form of a pigment image
herently but transferably over only one of its sides a
from said other parts said one group of image portions,
adhering to said receiving surface.
8. A photographic process for the production of a pig
ment image on a receiving surface, which comprises im
agewise exposing to actinic light a ?exible sheet com
prising a support having a hydrophilic surface and carry
ing adherently but transferably over said surface a com
posite structure consisting essentially of a layer of vis
composite structure consisting essentially of a frangible
layer of a ?nely divided visually perceptible pigment
25 linked to a distinct layer of a light-sensitive mixture of
a hydrophilic colloid and a compound which upon ex
posure to actinic light material alters an adhesion power
possessed by said colloid upon a wetting thereof with
water, said compound being selected from the group con
30
ually perceptible pigment matter overlaid by and linked
sisting of light-sensitive diazo compounds and light-sen
to a layer of an organic colloid material sensitive to said
light, said material containing a compound which upon
exposure to actinic light materially alters an adhesion
power possessed by said material upon a wetting there
of with water, said compound being selected from the
group consisting of light-sensitive diazo compounds and
light-sensitive azido compounds, said layer of pigment
matter being hydrophobic and lying next to said hydro
philic surface, wetting said structure with water so as to
render one only of said groups of latent image portions
more adhesive to said receiving surface than to the other
parts of said sheet, then pressing said receiving surface
against said outer surface; and thereafter separating said
receiving surface from said outer surface and thereby
selectively severing and transferring from said other parts
said one group of image portions, including the portions
of said organic colloid materials and of said pigment mat
ter located in the corresponding areas of said structure, in
the form of a pigment image adhering to said receiving
surface.
9. A light-sensitive sheet for the production of a pigment
image, comprising a sheet-like support carrying adher
ently but transferably over only one of its sides a com
posite structure consisting essentially of a frangible layer
sitive azido compounds, said light-sensitive layer being
substantially free of pigment and said pigment layer sub
stantially free of said light-sensitive compounds, said
pigment layer lying next to said support and being cov
ered by said light-sensitive layer and adhering to said
light-sensitive layer more strongly than to said support,
said layers being permeable by water so as to admit
water to the interface of said structure with said sup
port, one of the surfaces at said interface being hydro
philic and the other being hydrophobic, said light-sensi
tive layer upon being wetted with water becoming read
ily tearable and adhesive to a receiving surface, said
structure being adherable to said receiving surface with a
strength greater than that of its adherence to said sup
port, and thus being transferable bodily from said support
to said receiving surface, by a wetting of said structure
with water followed by a pressing of said receiving sur
face against the outer surface of said structure and a
separation of said receiving surface from said outer sur
face, said structure being divisible imagewise by an im
agewise of said light-sensitive layer to actinic light into
two distinct groups of latent image portions respectively
lying in the exposed and the relatively unexposed areas
of said structure and so differing in their adhesion powers
of a mixture of a ?nely divided visually perceptible pig 55 that the image portions of one of said groups, including
ment and a binder therefor, linked to a distinct layer of a
the portions of said pigment layer located in the corre
light-sensitive mixture of a hydrophilic colloid and a com
sponding areas of said structure, are selectively adher
pound which upon exposure to actinic light material al
able to said receiving surface as aforesaid and severable
ters an adhesion power possessed by said colloid upon a
from
the other parts of the sheet, and thus are selectively
Wetting thereof with water, said compound being select 60 transferable as aforesaid, to form an image of said pig
ed from the group consisting of light-sensitive diazo
ment matter on said receiving surface.
compounds and light-sensitive azido compounds, said
ll. A light-sensitive sheet for the production of a pig
light-sensitive layer being substantially free of said pig
ment image, comprising a sheet-like support having a
ment and said frangible layer being substantially free of
hydrophilic surface over one side thereof and carrying ad
said compound, said light-sensitive layer lying next to
herently but transferably over said surface a composite
said support and being covered by said pigment layer
and adhering to said pigment layer more strongly than
to said support, said layers being permeable by water so
as to admit water to the interface of said structure with
said support, one of the surfaces at said interface being
hydrophilic and the other being hydrophobic, said light
sensitive layer upon being wetted with water becoming
readily tearable, at least pigment matter containing parts
structure consisting essentially of a frangible layer of
a hydrophobic mixture of a major proportion of a finely
divided visually perceptible pigment and a minor pro
portion of a hydrophobic binder linked to a distinct layer
of a light~sensitive mixture of a hydrophilic colloid and a
compound which upon exposure to actinic light material
alters an adhesion power possessed by said colloid upon
a wetting thereof with water, said compound being se
of said structure being adherable to a receiving surface 75 lected from the group consisting of light-sensitive diazo
3,091,528
31
32
said, to form an image of said pigment matter on said
compounds and light-sensitive azido compounds, said
light-sensitive layer being substantially free of pigment
receiving surface.
13. A light-sensitive sheet for the production of a pig
ment image, comprising a sheet-like support, said support
having a hydrophilic surface composed of at least par
tially deacylated cellulose ester and formed with a myriad
of uniformly interspersed recesses and minute elevations,
and said pigment layer being substantially free of said
light-sensitive compounds, said pigment layer being by
drophobic and lying on said hydrophilic surface and being
covered by said light-sensitive layer and adhering to the
latter more strongly than to said support, said layers
said surface carrying adherently but transferably there
over a composite structure lying at least in part in said
terface of said pigment layer with said support, said light
sensitive layer upon being wetted with water becoming 10 recesses and consisting essentially of a frangible layer
of a hydrophobic mixture of a major proportion of a
readily tearable and adhesive to a receiving surface, said
?nely
divided visually perceptible pigment and a minor
structure being adherable to said receiving surface with a
being permeable by water so as to admit water to the in
proportion of a hydrophobic binder, linked to a distinct
layer of a light-sensitive mixture of a hydrophilic colloid
to said receiving surface, by a wetting of said structure 15 and a compound which upon exposure to actinic light
material alters an adhesion power possessed by said col
with water followed by a pressing of said receiving sur
loid upon a wetting thereof with water, said compound
face aganst the outer surface of said structure and a sep
being selected from the group consisting of light-sensi
aration of said receiving surface from said outer surface,
tive diazo compounds and light-sensitive azido com
said structure being divisible imagewise by an imagewise
exposure of said light-sensitive layer to actinic light into 20 pounds, said light-sensitive layer being substantially free
strength greater than that of its adherence to said sup
port, and thus being transferable bodily from said support
of pigment and said pigment layer being substantially
free of said light-sensitive compounds, said hydrophobic
pigment layer being next to said hydrophilic surface and
covered by said light-sensitive layer and adhering to the
two distinct groups of latent image portions respectively
lying in the exposed and the relatively unexposed areas
of said structure and so differing in their adhesion powers
that the image portions of one of said groups, including 25
latter more strongly than to said support, said layers
the portions of said pigment layer located in the corre
being permeable by water so as to admit water to the
sponding areas of said structure, are selectively adherable
interface of said layer with said support, said light-sensi
to said receiving surface as aforesaid and severable from
tive layer upon being wetted with water becoming read
the other parts of the sheet, and thus are selectively trans
ferable as aforesaid, to form an image of said pigment 30 ily tearable and adhesive to a receiving surface, said
structure being adherable to said receiving surface with
matter on said receiving surface.
a strength greater than that of its adherence to said sup
12. A light-sensitive sheet for the production of a pig
ment image, comprising a sheet-like support having over
one of its sides a hydrophilic surface formed with a
myriad of recesses, said surface carrying adherently but
transferably thereover a composite structure lying at least
in part in said recesses and consisting essentially of a
frangible layer of a hydrophobic mixture of a major pro
portion of a ?nely divided visually perceptible pigment
and a minor proportion of a hydrophobic binder, linked
to a layer of a distinct layer of a light-sensitive mixture
of a hydrophilic colloid and a compound which upon
exposure to actinic light material alters an adhesion power
possessed by said colloid upon a wetting thereof with
water, said compound being selected from the group con
port, and thus being transferable bodily from said sup
port to said receiving surface, by a wetting of said struc
ture with water followed by a pressing of said receiving
surface against the outer surface of said structure and
a separation of said receiving surface from said outer
surface, said structure being divisible imagewise by an
imagewise exposure of said light-sensitive layer to actinic
light into two distinct groups of latent image portions re
40 spectively lying in the exposed and the relatively unex
sisting of light-sensitive diazo compounds and light-sensi
tive azido compounds, said light-sensitive layer being sub
posed areas of said structure and so differing in their
adhesion powers that the image portions of one of said
groups, including the portions of said pigment layer lo
cated in the corresponding areas of said structure, are se
lectively adherable to said receiving surface as aforesaid
and severable from the other parts of the sheet, and thus
are selectively transferable as aforesaid, to form an im
stantially free of pigment and said pigment layer being
age of said pigment matter on said receiving surface.
substantially free of said light-sensitive compounds, said
14. A light-sensitive sheet for the production of a pig
hydrophobic pigment layer being next to said hydrophilic 50 ment image, comprising a sheet-like support, said support
surface and covered by said light-sensitive layer and ad
having a hydrophilic surface composed of at least par
hering to the latter more strongly than to said support,
tially deacylated cellulose ester and formed with a myriad
said layers being permeable by water so as to admit
of uniformly interspersed recesses and minute eleva
water to the interface of said pigment layer with said
tions, said surface carrying adherently but transferably
support, said light-sensitive layer upon being wetted with 55 thereover a composite structure lying at least in part
water becoming readily tearable and adhesive to a re
ceiving surface, said structure being adherable to said
receiving surface with a strength greater than that of its
adherence to said support, and thus being transferable
in said recesses and consisting essentially of a frangible
layer of a hydrophobic mixture of a major proportion of
carbon black and a minor proportion of a hydrophobic
binder, linked to a distinct layer of a light<sensitive mix
bodily from said support to said receiving surface, by a
wetting of said structure with water followed by a press
ing of said receiving surface against the outer surface of
said structure and a separation of said receiving surface
from said outer surface, said structure being divisible
ture of a hydrophilic colloid and a light-sensitive con
relatively unexposed areas of said structure and so differ
being permeable by water so as to admit water to the
densation product of formaldehyde and a p-diazo-di
phenylamine, said light-sensitive layer being substantially
free of pigment and said frangible layer being substan
tially free of said light-sensitive mixture, said hydrophobic
imagewise by an imagewise exposure of said light-sensitive 65 pigment layer being next to said hydrophilic surface
and covered by said light-sensitive layer and adhering to
layer to actinic light into two distinct groups of latent
the latter more strongly than to said support, said layers
image portions respectively lying in the exposed and the
of said pigment layer with said support, said
ing in their adhesion powers that the image portions of 70 interface
light-sensitive
layer upon being wetted with water be
one of said groups, including the portions of said pig
coming readily tearable and adhesive to a receiving sur
ment layer located in the corresponding areas of said
structure, are selectively adherable to said receiving sur
face as aforesaid and severable from the other parts of
the sheet, and thus are selectively transferable as afore
face, said structure being adherable to said receiving sur
face with a strength greater than that of its aherence
to said support, and thus being transferable bodily from
3,091,528
33
34
said support to said receiving surface, by a wetting of
bodily from said support to said receiving surface, by a
said structure with water followed by a pressing of said
receiving surface against the outer surface of said struc~
ture and a separation of said receiving surface from said
wetting of said structure with water followed by a press
ing of said receiving surface against the outer surface of
said structure and a separation of said receiving surface
from said outer surface, said structure being divisible
imagewise by an imagewise exposure of said light-sensi
tive layer to actinic light into two distinct groups of la
tent image portions respectively lying in the exposed and
outer surface, said structure being divisible imagewise
by an imagewise exposure of said light-sensitive layer to
actinic light into two distinct groups of latent image por
tions respectively lying in the exposed and the relatively
unexposed areas of said structure and so liffering in their
the relatively unexposed areas of said structure and so
adhesion powers that the image portions of one of said
differing in their adhesion powers that the image portions
of one of said groups, including the portions of said pig
groups, including the portions of said pigment layer lo
cated in the corresponding areas of said structure, are
ment layer located in the corresponding areas of said struc—
ture, are selectively adherable to said receiving surface
as aforesaid and severable from the other parts of the
thus are selectively transferable as aforesaid, to form an 15 sheet, and thus are selectively transferable as aforesaid,
image of said pigment matter on said receiving surface.
to form an image of said pigment matter on said receiv
15. A light-sensitive sheet for the production of a pig
ing surface.
ment image, comprising a sheet-like support, said sup
16. A light-sensitive sheet as claimed in claim 9, said
port having a hydrophilic surface composed of at least
pigment layer mixture being a hydrophilic mixture of
partially deacylated cellulose ester and formed with a 20 said pigment and a hydrophilic binder.
myriad of uniformly interspersed recesses and minute
17. A light-sensitive sheet as claimed in claim 9, said
selectively adherable to said receiving surface as afore
said and severable from the other parts of the sheet, and
elevations, said surface carrying adherently but trans
pigment layer mixture being a hydrophobic mixture of a
major portion of said pigment and a minor proportion of
ferably thereover a composite structure lying at least
in part in said recesses and consisting essentially of a
frangible layer of a hydrophobic mixture of a major pro
a hydrophobic binder.
18. A light-sensitive sheet as claimed in claim 10,
said pigment layer being a frangible layer of a water-sol
portion of carbon black and a minor proportion of a hy
drophobic binder, linked to a distinct layer of a light
sensitive mixture of a hydrophilic colloid and 4,4'-diazido
uble visually perceptive pigment.
19. A light-sensitive sheet as claimed in claim 10, said
stilbene disulphonic acid-2,2’, said light-sensitive layer
being substantially free of pigment and said frangible
layer being substantially free of said light-sensitive mix
ture, said hydrophobic pigment layer being next to said
hydrophilic surface and covered by said light-sensitive
30
pigment layer being a frangible layer of a hydrophilic
mixture of a visually perceptive pigment and a hydropholic
binder.
References Cited in the file of this patent
UNITED STATES PATENTS
layer and adhering to the latter more strongly than to said
support, said layers being permeable by water so as to 35
admit water to the interface of said pigment layer with
1,118,479
Dodge ____________ __ Nov. 24, 1914
said support, said light-sensitive layer upon being wetted
2,100,063
Zahn ______________ __ Nov. 23, 1937
with water becoming readily tearable and adhesive to
a receiving surface, said structure being adherable to said
receiving surface with a strength greater than that of its 40
adherence to said support, and thus being transferable
2,602,741
Van der Grinten et al. ____ July 8, 1952
2,602,742
2,763,553
2,772,160
Buskes et al _____________ __ July 8, 1952
Clark ______________ __ Sept. 18, 1956
Hepher ______________ __ Nov. 27, 1956
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