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Патент USA US3094986

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June 25, 1963
3,094,976
C. H. MAY
AUTOMOTIVE DEVICE
3 Sheets-Sheet 1
Filed April 19, 1961
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June 25, 1963
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INVENTOR.
United States Patent 0 ” ice
1
3,094,976
Patented June 25, 1963
2
FIG. 4 is a view similar to FIG. 33 showing the air-fuel
3,094,976
.
AUTOMOTIVE DEVICE
Claude H. May, Racine, Wis., assignor to Walker Manu
facturing Company, Racine, Wis., a corporation of
Delaware
Filed Apr. 19, 1961, Ser. No. 104,060
10 Claims. (Cl. 123-119)
This invention relates generally to internal combustion
engines and more particularly to a fuel system for a
injector in the induction position and with the intake valve
of the engine in the closed condition.
FIG. 5 is a cross sectional view taken substantially
along the line 5—-5 of FIG. 3;
FIG. 6 is a cross sectional view taken substantially
along the line 6-6 of FIG. 4; and
FIG. 7 is a cross sectional view of a modi?ed air-fuel
mixture injector shown in operative association with an
internal combustion engine having overhead camshafts.
gasoline~powered internal combustion engine.
Referring to FIGURE 1 of the drawings, a fuel system
The ‘fuel system of a conventional gasoline-powered
in accordance with the present invention comprises an air
fuel mixture injector 10 and is shown in operative asso
internal combustion engine operable on a carbureted air
fuel mixture generally represents a compromise between
ciation with an internal combustion engine 12, having
several diverse requirements. For example, it is desir 15 overhead valves operated by push-rods. The internal com
able that the fuel intake manifold have a relatively small
bustion engine 12 is of substantially conventional con
struction and comprises a cylinder block 14 that, in con
cross sectional area so that, at low power conditions, the
relatively small quantities of air-fuel mixture required by
junction with a reciprocal piston 15 and a cylinder head
the engine move through the intake manifold at a velocity
16, de?nes a combustion chamber 17. An overhead
su?icient to maintain the fuel droplets therein in suspen 20 rocker arm shaft 18 supports a rocker arm 20 which, upon
sion. Conversely, however, the intake manifold must
rotation, effects opening of an intake valve 22. The rocker
have a suf?ciently large cross sectional area to deliver
arm 20 is operable by a convention-a1 push rod 23 that
relatively large quantities of air-fuel mixture without ap
extends into operative relationship with a cam shaft (not
preciable pressure loss under high speed and power operat
shown).
ing conditions.
The cylinder head 16 includes an intake manifold 24
25
Attempts have been heretofore made to solve the prob
1 lem presented by these seemingly irreconcilable require
ments as by, for example, making the intake manifold as
that is vented directly to the atmosphere so that air only
is inducted therethrough under the control of a butter?y
valve 26. A convention-a1 carburetor 28 ‘having an ad
short as possible and minimizing bends or changes in
justable fuel metering jet, for example a needle valve 30,
j transverse section therein to improve ?uid ?ow there 30 is connected to the air-fuel injector 10 as by conduits 32
through. However, these expedients have not presented
and 33. It is to be noted that the butter?y valve 26 and
a wholly satisfactory solution to the aforementioned
fuel metering jet 30 in the intake manifold 24 and car
problem.
buretor 28, respectively, are connected by, for example,
A fuel system in accordance with the present invention
a mechanical linkage 34 that provides for control of the
presents a material advance in the internal combustion 35 fuel system, as will be described. Ignition of the air-fuel
engine art because no fuel is carried by the air that is
charge within the combustion chamber 17 is effected by
inducted through the engine intake manifold thereby per
a conventional spark plug 25.
mitting the cross sectional area thereof to be increased to
Referring to FIGS. 2, 3 and 4, the fuel injector 10 is
optimum dimensions without compromising the aforemen
shown operatively disposed in coaxial telescoping rela
tioned engine idle requirements. Distribution of an air 40 tionship about a stem portion 40 of the intake valve 22.
fuel mixture to the cylinders of the internal combustion
An opposite end portion 52 of the valve 22 is -of conven
engine is accomplished by a novel air-fuel mixture injec
tion-a1 construction and has a truncated conical face 54
tion unit that is compatible with and complementary to
thereon for seating in a complementary valve seat 56 in
the cylinder head 16.
the relatively large cross sectional area intake manifold.
A fuel system in accordance with the present invention 45
In accordance with the present invention, the intakeE
therefore provides for relatively smooth and economical
valve 22 is mounted for axial reciprocation within a cen
operation at idle conditions as well as relatively powerful
tral ‘bore 58 of an elongated tubular valve guide 60. The
operation at high speeds.
valve guide 60 has a plurality of axially extending and
Accordingly, one object of the present invention is an
ci-rcumferentially spaced grooves 62 on the outer periph
improved fuel system for an internal combustion engine. 50 ery of a cylindrical lower end portion 63 thereof that,
Another object is an improved fuel system for an inter
upon insertion of the valve guide 60 into a complementary
nal combustion engine wherein air only is inducted
bore 64 in the cylinder head 16, de?ne a plurality of
through the intake manifold.
circumferentially spaced passages 65 extending parallel
Another object is a fuel system for an internal combus
to and spaced radially outwardly of the central bore 58
tion engine wherein an air-fuel mixture is injected into the 55 therein. The passages 65 communicate with the intake
combustion chamber of the engine.
manifold 24 immediately above the lower end 52 of the
Another object of the present invention is an air-fuel
valve 22. The passages 65 also communicate with a
mixture injector for an internal combustion engine.
valve chamber 70 in an enlarged cylindrical upper end
Other objects and advantages of the present invention
portion 71 of the valve guide 60 through a like plurality
will ‘be apparent in the following specification, claims and 60 of apertures 72.
drawings wherein:
'
The upper end portion 71 of the valve guide 60 de?nes a
FIGURE 1 is a diagrammatic representation of a fuel
system including an air-fuel mixture injector in accord
radial shoulder 73 that is seated on a complementary face
74 on the cylinder head 16 thereby to locate the valve
ance with an exemplary embodiment of the present in
vention shown in association with an internal combustion 65 guide 60 axially within the bore 64 in the cylinder head
16. The upper end portion 71 of the valve guide 60 is
engine;
of relatively larger diameter than the lower end portion
FIG. 2 is a cross sectional view of the air-fuel mixture
63 thereof to accommodate the valve chamber 70, the
injector of FIGURE 1;
radially inner peripheral wall of which is de?ned ‘by a
FIG. 3 is an enlarged cross sectional view of the air—
fuel mixture injector of FIG. 2 shown with the injector 70 circular recess 74. The apertures 72 communicate with
the bottom of the chamber 70 to provide for the passage
in the injection condition and with the intake valve of the
of an air-fuel mixture downwardly and outwardly of the _
internal combustion engine in the open condition;
8,094,976
.
3
4
valve chamber 70 into the longitudinal passages 65 within
the lower end portion 63 of the valve guide 60.
The upper end portion 71 of the valve guide 60 has a
bore 82 aligned with the bore 58 therein for the accept
movable against a stop 154 de?ned by the housing 102
thereby to'de?ne the open position of the valve 150. It
is to be noted that because the housing 102 is of circular
horizontal cross section, the'valve 150 is engageable with
the stop 154 thereon in line engagement generally cen
ance of a complementary annular sleeve or slide valve
84 that is disposed about a lower end portion 86 of a
valve spring retainer 90. As shown in FIG. 3, the valve
84 is movable downwardly completely out of the bore
trally of the valve 150.
‘
As best seen in FIG. 6, the side wall of the housing 102
has a pair of circumfercntially spaced horizontally
82 in the upper end portion 71 of the valve guide 60
aligned apertures 160 therein for the passage of an air
thereby to provide clearance for the passage of an air 10 fuel mixture into the pump chamber ‘121 on the induction
fuel mixture through the bore 82 into the valve chamber
stroke of the injector 10, as will be described. Due to
70. When the valve 84 is in its upper position (FIG.
the ?at rectangular con?guration of the valve 150, en
4) it effects a seal with the bore 82 to preclude the pas
gagement thereof with the stop 154 on the housing 102
sage of the air-fuel mixture into the valve chamber 70.
maintains adequate clearance around the valve 150 for
The spring retainer 90 has a radially outwardly ex 15 the passage of air-fuel mixtuie through the apertures 160
tending ?ange portion 92 at the upper end thereof that
when the valve 150 is in the position shown in FIG. 4.
positions and supports a radially inwardly extending upper
The valve 150 and annular valve guide 152 are sup
end flange 94 on an annular plunger 100. "The plunger
ported by a complementary annular nipple 170 that is
100 is in the form of an inverted cup that is slidably
secured to the housing 102 as by welding. The nipple
received within a complementary annular housing 102. 20 170 has an annular radial ?ange portion 174 that defines
As best seen in FIGS. 3 and 4, a slidable seal is main
ascat for the valve 150 (FIG. 4) when the valve 150 is
tained between the plunger 100 and housing 102 by an
biased thereagainst by a pressure differential across the
annular gasket 110 that is disposed in a peripheral radially
valve 150 on the injection stroke of the injector 10.
outwardly extending bead 112 in the housing 102. There
Operation of the fuel injector 10 is initiated as the
fore, because the radially inwardly extending ?ange por 25 engine inlet valve 22 moves to the closed position at the
tion 94 of the plunger 100 is sealably biased against the
end of what may be termed the induction stroke of the
radially outwardly extending ?ange 92 on the spring re
piston 15 of the engine 12. As the: valve 22 moves up
tainer 90 and a radially inwardly extending ?ange portion
wardly under the bias of the spring 122, the plunger 100
120 on the housing 102 is scalably biased against the
moves upwardly within the housing 102 enlarging the
face 74 on the cylinder head 16, the plunger 100 and
pump chamber 121 and creating a partial vacuum therein
housing 102 de?ne a scalable variable volume pump
that draws an air-fuel mixture from the carburetor 28
chamber 121. It is to be noted that the ?ange portion
past the valve 150 and through the apertures 160 in the
120 on the housing 102 is sealably connected to the
housing 102 into the pump chamber 121. The air-fuel
valve guide 16 as by a press ?t. Relative movement
mixture resides in the pump chamber 121 until the start
between the plunger 100 and housing 102 effects a change 35 of the next induction stroke of the piston 15.
in the internal volume of the pump chamber 121 thereby
As the engine inlet valve 22 begins to open under the
?rst to induct an air-fuel mixture into the pump cham
bias of the rocker arm 20 on the induction stroke of the
ber 121 and subsequently inject the air-fuel mixture into
the combustion chamber 17 of the internal combustion
engine 12. as will be described.
The valve 22 is normally biased to the closed position
piston 15, the air-fuel mixture residing in the chamber
121 of the injector 10 is compressed due to downward
40 movement of the plunger 100 within the housing 102.
When the valve 84 on the lower end 86 of the retainer
90 is moved downwardly into the valve chamber 70 suf
?ciently to clear the bore 82 in the valve guide 60 (FIG.
with respect to its seat 56 in the manifold 16 by a valve
spring 122. The valve spring 122 is of conventional
construction and maintains a normal upward bias, as
3), the compressed air~fucl mixture is injected down
seen in the drawings, against the valve spring retainer 46 wardly through the bore 82 and pump chamber 70.
90 which is transmitted to the valve 22 through a pair
through the apertures 72 and passages 65, past the head
of conventional split valve keepers 123 and 124 that are
52 of the valve 22, and into the combustion chamber
engageable with suitable annular ribs 126 and 128 on a
17 of the engine 12. It is to be noted that the velocity
terminal portion 50 of the valve stem 40. Because the
of the air-fuel mixture upon injection is sufficient, due
valve 84 is affixed to the lower end portion 86 of the
to compression thereof prior to opening of the valve 84,
retainer 90, it also is normally biased to the closed con
to effect injection of the air-fuel mixture into the com
dition by the spring 122. Further, the normal bias of
bustion chamber 17 independently of‘ air ?ow through the
the spring 122 tends to maximize the volume of the pump
manifold 24 on the induction stroke of the piston 15.
chamber 121 by moving the plunger 100 upwardly with
respect to the housing 102. In addition, the spring 122
biases the ?ange 94 of the plunger 100 against the ?ange
55
However, injection of the air-fuel mixture by the injection
unit 10 is compatible and complementary to the induction
of air through the manifold 24.
Power output of the engine 12 is controlled by, for ex~
ample, varying the weight of fuel in the air-fuel mixture
92 on the retainer 90 and the ?ange 120 on the housing
102 against the face 74 on the cylinder head 16 thereby
to effect a ?uid seal therebetwcen, respectively.
inducted into the pump chamber 121 of the injector 10 on
The rocker arm 20 is engageable with the terminal por 00 the aforementioned closing stroke of the valve 22. The
tion 50 of the valve 22 in the conventional manner,
air-fuel mixture comprises a ?xcd air charge and a vari
counterclockwise rotation of the rocker arm 20 about the
able fuel charge as controlled by the needle valve 30 in
rocker arm shaft 18, as seen in the drawings, effecting a
the carburetor 28. Accurate metering of fuel by the mass
downward displacement of the valve 22 thereby to com
?ow of air through a carburetor is well known, inexpen
press the spring 122. The valve 22 is biased upwardly 05 sive andrelatively simple.
to the closed condition by the spring 122 upon release
. The weight of air inducted through the intake manifold
of the bias of the rocker arm 20 on the valve 22. .
24 into the combustion chamber 17 on the induction stroke
An air-fuel mixture is admitted into the pump cham
of the piston 15 is controlled by the butter?y valve 26 in
ber 121 of the injector 10 from the carburetor 28 through
the manifold'24. Therefore, because the valves 26 and
a plate type inlet valve 150. As best seen in FIG. 6, the 70 30 are interconnected by, for example, the mechanical
valve 150 is of generally rectangular con?guration and is
linkage 34, a stoichiometric or otherwise desired ultimate
positioned and supported by an annular guide 152 that
air-fuel mixture can be achieved in the combustion cham
has a ?at portion 153 at the bottom thereof to maintain _ ber 17 at all power settings of the engine. Obviously, in
the valve 150 in a predetermined orientation with respect
jection of the air-fuel mixture into the combustion cham
to the housing 102 of the injector 10. The valve 150 is 76 ber alleviates the aforementioned problem associated with
3,094,976
l
5
6
olperation of the engine 12 at low power settings. Veloc
respect to the bore 282 to preclude passage of the air~fuel
mixture into the valve chamber 270.
I
y su?icient to preclude precipitation of the fuel droplets
in the air-fuel mixture is imparted to the air-fuel mixture
A valve keeper spring 290 is disposed about the upper
end of the valve guide 260 and extends between an end
face 291 on the cylinder head 216 and a valve key keeper
292. The valve key keeper 292 is of conventional con
struction and normally retains a pair of valve keys 294 in
engagement with the upper end portion 286 of the valve
no to compression thereof within the pump chamber 121
f the injector 10 prior to injection of the mixture into
‘the combustion chamber 17. Further, the aforementioned
roblem associated with high speed, high power operation
of the engine 12, at which time relatively large volumes of
222. A valve spring retainer 2961 extends radially out
iir must be inducted through the manifold 24, is alleviated
by enlarging the manifold 24 to optimum cross sectional 10 wardly of the valve key keeper for engagement with the
upper end portion of a valve spring 300. The valve
dimensions without in any way compromising operation
of the engine 12 at low power conditions.
Referring now to FIG. 6 of the drawings, a modi?ed
form of fuel system in accordance with the present in
vention comprises an air-fuel mixture injector 200 shown 16
in operative association with an overhead cam-type of in
ternal combustion engine 212. The engine 212 comprises
a cylinder block 214, that in conjunction with a reciprocal
piston 215 and a cylinder head 216, de?nes a combustion
chamber 217. An overhead cam shaft 218 has a plurality
spring 300 extends between the retainer 296 and the face
291 on the cylinder head 216. A shim 302 for valve clear
ance is interposed between the retainer 296 and an en
veloping tappet 304.
The tappet 304 is of generally cup-shaped construction,
the downwardly extending side walls 306 thereof being
slidably accepted in a complementary cylindrical tappet
guide 310. The tappet guide 310 is accepted in a bore 312
20 in the cylinder head 216 and is seated in, for example, a
suitable annular recess 314.
of rotatable cams 220 thereon which, upon rotation, effect
The guide 310 has a threaded radial bore 320 therein
opening of an intake valve 222. The cam shaft 218 is
for the acceptance of a plate valve support housing 322.
driven as by a timing chain or suitable gears (not shown).
The housing 322 has an inlet aperture 324 communicating
The cylinder head 216 includes an intake manifold 224
that is vented directly to the atmosphere.
25 with a pump chamber 325, de?ned by the guide 310,
tappet 304 and cylinder head 216, and with a plate valve
As discussed hereinbefore, the ?ow of air is under the
chamber 326 within which a plate valve 328, similar to
control of suitable valve means, for example, a butterfly
the valve 150 discussed hereinbefore, is supported for
valve. An elementary carburetor having an adjustable
reciprocal movement. A suitable end plug 330 closes the
l fuel metering jet, for example, a needle valve, is con
valve housing 322. The valve chamber 326 communicates
nected to the air-fuel injector 200 as by suitable conduits.
with the pump chamber 325 when the valve 328 is in the
l The butter?y valve and fuel-metering jet in the intake
position shown in FIG. 6.
.r manifold and carburetor, respectively, are connected by,
I for example, a mechanical linkage that provides for con~
Assuming for the purposes of discussion that the injec
tor 200 is connected to the carburetor 28 in the manner
l trol of the fuel system. Ignition of the air-fuel charge
I within the combustion chamber 217 is effected by a con 35 of the injector 10 discussed hereinbefore, operation of the
i
l
i
l
ventional spark plug 225.
The fuel injector 200 is shown operatively disposed in
coaxial telescoping relationship about a stem portion 240
fuel injector 200 commences as the: engine inlet valve 222
moves to the closed position at the end of what may be
termed the induction stroke of the piston 215 of the en
gine 212. As the valve 222 moves upwardly under the
of the intake valve 222. A lower end portion 252 of the
intake valve 222 is of conventional construction and has 40 bias of the spring 300, the enveloping tappet 304 moves
upwardly within its guide 310, enlarging ‘the pump cham
a truncated conical face 254 thereon for seating in a com
ber 325 and creating a partial vacuum therein that draws
plementary valve seat 256 in the cylinder head 216.
an air-fuel mixture from the carburetor 28 past the valve
In accordance with this embodiment of the present in
328 into the pump chamber 325. ‘It is to be noted that
vention, the intake valve 222 is mounted for axial recipro
cation within a central bore 258 of an elongated tubular 45 upward movement of the inlet valve 222 also carries the
sleeve valve 284 into closed relation within the bore 282
valve guide 260. The valve guide 260 has a plurality of
in the valve guide 260. Therefore, the air-fuel mixture
axially extending and circumferentially spaced grooves on
resides in the pump chamber 325 until the start of the
the outer periphery of a cylindrical and lower end portion
next induction stroke of the piston 215.
263 thereof that, upon insertion of the valve guide 260
As the engine inlet valve 222 begins to open under the
into a complementary bore 264 in the cylinder head 216,
bias of the cam 220 on the camshaft 218, the air-fuel
de?ne a plurality of circumferentially spaced axially ex‘
mixture residing in the pump chamber 325 of the injector
tending passages 265 extending parallel to and spaced ra
200 is compressed due to downward movement of the
dially outwardly of the central bore 258 therein. The pas
enveloping tappet 304 within the guide 310. When the
sages 265 communicate with the intake manifold 224 im
mediately above the lower end 252 of the valve 222. The 55 valve. 284 on the stern portion 286 of the inlet valve 222
is‘moved downwardly into the valve chamber 270 suf
passages 265 also communicate with a valve chamber 270
?ciently to clear the bore 282 in the valve guide 260,
in an enlarged cylindrical upper end portion 271 of the
the compressed air-fuel mixture is injected downwardly
valve guide 260 through a like plurality of apertures 272.
through the bore 282 and pump chamber 270, through
The apertures 272.communicate with the valve chamber
270.to provide for the passage .of an air-fuel mixture 60 the apertures 272 and passages 265, past the head 252
of the valve 222 and into the combustion chamber 217 of
downwardly and outwardly thereof into the longitudinal
the engine 212.
passage 5265 within the lower end portion 263 of the valve
guide>260t,-¢ q
H
,
i
t
One outstanding bene?it to be derived from a fuel sys
tem in accordance with the present inventioin is that,
j Iheupper end portion 271 of the valve guide 260 has a
bore .282 aligned. with the bore 258 therein for the accept 65 at the moment of release from the compression chamber
of the injector, the rich air fuel ratio mixture‘ is normally
ance of a. complementary annular sleeve or slide valve 284
swept-into the combustion chamber by the main supply
that is disposed-‘about arr-upper end 286 of the stern por
of air through the intake manifold at the moment when
tion 240. of jthegvalve 222. The slide valve 284 is secured
this air is‘ ?owing at its peak velocity. ‘This action’al
tothe valve 222 as by a press ?t or a suitable pin orlock
ing ring-,(not shown)‘, .The valve 284 is‘movable down 70 leviates one of the. failings of the conventional fuel>'sys—
wardly- completely out. of the bore 282 in'the- upp'er‘end
temhin‘which fuel droplets coagulate ‘during the low—
portion 221,.of-thevalve guide‘ 260 thereby‘ tojprovide
clearance-‘for the passage of an air-fuel mixture through
velocity periods of air flow‘ at the start and at ‘the end of
the induction stroke. There is no doubt that some of the
the ‘1301594232 into the valve chamber 270. ‘ When the valve
larger droplet this formed, in fuel-systems heretofore
284 is inithe position shown in FIG. ,6, it effects a seal with 75 known and used, usually burn either late in‘ the expansion
8,094,976
7
stroke or‘ even during the exhaust stroke. Upon burning,
movable with the valve and ‘a housing supported in ?xed
these large droplets generate only negligible useful work
and add to the waste heat load.
relation to the manifold, movement of said valve to the.
closed condition effecting movement of the plunger with
_
From the ‘foregoing description it should be apparent
respect to the housing of the injector to increase the
volume thereof to induct an air-fuel mixture into said
injector, movement of the valve to the open condition
decreasing the volume of said injector to compress the
that a fuel system in accordance with the present inven
tion regulates and balances the distribution of fuel to the
engine in a manner that is relatively inexpensive, reliable
and compact. The fuel system accurately meters and
air-fuel mixture therein and inject the air-fuel mixture,
times the distribution of fur1 to the engine so as to provide
into the air intake manifold.
,
relatively smooth and economical operation at idle con 10
6. An air-fuel mixture injector for an internal combuséX
ditions and relatively powerful and economical operation
tion engine having a combustion chamber with a reciproj
at high power conditions.
cable piston therein, an intake manifold, and an inlet’
. It is to be understood that the speci?c construction of
valve between said manifold and combustion chamber,‘
the improved automotive device herein disclosed and de—
‘said air-fuel mixture injector comprising a plunger en-.
scribed is presented for the purpose of explanation and 15 gaged with the valve so as to be movable therewith, a.
illustration ‘and is not intended to indicate limits of the
housing supported in ?xed relation to the manifold for
invention, the scope of which is de?ned by the following
claims.
What is claimed is:
the acceptance of said plunger, movement of the valve
to the closed condition effecting movement of the plunger,
within the housing of the injector to increase the volume v
1. A fuel system for an internal combustion engine hav 20 of said injector and induct an air-fuel mixture into said‘.
ing a combustion chamber, said fuel system comprising
injector, movement of the valve to the open condition cf-1
an intake manifold for the induction of air into the com
fecting a decrease in volume within said injector to‘ com
bustion chamber, a pump chamber, means for inducting
press the air-fuel mixture therein and inject the air-fuel
an air-fuel mixture into said pump chamber, means for
mixture into the manifold for passage into the combus
compressing the air-fuel mixture within said pump cham 25 tion chamber.
ber, and means for injecting the air-fuel mixture into
7. An air-fuel mixture injector for an internal combus
the intake manifold upon induction of the air into the
tion engine having a combustion chamber with a recipro
combustion chamber.
cable piston therein, an intake manifold, and an inlet
2. In an internal combustion engine comprising a com~
valve between said manifold and combustion chamber,
bustion chamber with a reciprocable piston therein, an 30 said air-fuel mixture injector comprising a plunger en
intake manifold for the induction of air, and an inlet
gaged with the valve of the engine so as to be movable
valve between said manifold and combustion chamber,
therewith, a housing supported in ?xed ‘relation to the
a fuel system comprising an annular air-fuel mixture
engine manifold for the acceptance of the plunger of said
injector disposed about a stem portion of the valve,
injector, valve guide for the engine valve having a passage
means for inducting an air-fuel mixture into said injector, 35 extending between and communicating with the housing
means for compressing the air-fuel mixture within said in
of said injector and the manifold of the engine, move
jector, and means for injecting the air-fuel mixture into
ment of the valve to the closed condition effecting move
the intake manifold behind the inlet valve.
ment of the plunger within the housing of said injector to
3. In an internal combustion engine comprising a com
increase the'volume of said injector and induct an air
bustion chamber with a reciprocable piston therein, an 40 fuel mixture into said injector, movement of the engine
intake manifold for the induction of air, and an inlet valve
valve to the open condition effecting a decrease in volume
between said manifold and combustion chamber, a fuel
within said injector to compress the air-fuel mixture
system including an air-fuel mixture injector comprising
therein and inject the air-fuel mixture through the passage
a plunger movable with the valve within and with respect
in the valve guide and into the intake manifold for pas
to a housing supported in ?xed relation to the manifold,
sage into the combustion chamber of the engine.
movement of the valve in one direction effecting move
8. In an internal combustion engine having a combus
ment of the plunger with respect to the housing of said
tion chamber, an intake manifold, a reciprocable engine
injector to effect an increase in volume of said injector
inlet valve therebetween and a carburetor for producing
for inducting an air-fuel mixture into said injector, move
‘an air-fuel mixture, the improvement comprising an air
ment of the valve in the other directioncompressing the 60 fuel mixture injector comprising a plunger, a cylindrical
air-fuel mixture within said injector, and means for in
housing supported in ?xed relation "to the engine for the
jecting the air-fuel mixture into the intake manifold
acceptance of said plunger and de?ning a pump chamber,
behind the inlet valve upon opening thereof.
a valve guide for the engine inlet valve having a passage
4. In an internal combustion engine comprising a com
communicating with the pump chamber and with the
bustion chamber with a reciprocable piston. therein‘, an 55 intake manifold of the engine, an injector valve on the
intake manifold for the induction of air, and aninlet
valve between said manifold and combustion chamber, a
fuel system comprising an annular air-fuel mixture in
jector disposed about a stem portion of said valve, a
carburetor having means for controlling the weight of 60
fuel in an air-fuel mixture drawn therefrom, means for
inducting an air-fuel mixture from said carburetor into
engine inlet valve for opening and closing said passage
upon movement of the engine inlet valve to the open and
closed condition, respectively, and means movable be
tween an open and closed condition to'control the ?ow
of the air-fuel mixture from the carburator of the engine
to the injector.
9. A fuel system for an internal combustion engine
said injector, means for compressing the air-fuel mixture
having an intake manifold and a combustion chamber
within said injector, means for injecting the air-fuel mix
comprising means for inducting a charge of air through
ture into air charge inducted through the manifold, and 65 the intake manifold into the combustion‘ chamber of the
meansfor controlling the weight of air inducted through
engine,.means for compressing and injecting an air-fuel
the manifold ,operatively connected to said fuelucon
mixtureinto the intake manifold of the engine, and means
trolling-means to produce a desired ultimate air-fuel mix
for controlling the richness of the"air~fuel mixture. ' i
ture in the. combustion chamber."
,
j
, v
. I 10. .Inan internal combustion engine having‘an intake
5. 'In'aninternal combustion-engine comprising a‘oom 70 manifold for the induction of air, a combustionlchamb'er,
‘ bustion‘chamber with atreciprocablo: piston’gtherein, ‘an
intake manifold, and an inlet ,valve between said manifold
' and’combustion ‘chamber, a fuelsystem including'an an
vnular air-fuel mixture injector disposed‘about a stem por
ltio'ln ‘ofyjthe halve, said injector comprising; a plunger
a ‘ reciprocable‘ engine “inlet "valve therebetween and “ a
carburetor for producing 'an air-fuel mixture, the im
provement comprising an air-fuel mixture injector com
prising a plunger, a‘ cylindrical housing supported in ?xed
75 relation to the ‘engine for the acceptance of said plunger
3,094,970
9
and de?ning a pump chamber, a valve guide for the
‘engine inlet valve having a passage communicating with
the pump chamber and with the intake manifold of the
engine, and an injector valve on the engine inlet valve
for opening and closing said passage upon movement
of the engine inlet valve to the open vand closed condition,
10
References Cited in the ?le of this patent
UNITED STATES PATENTS
2,220,949
2,242,990
respectively, said injector valve being positioned so that
2,793,628
the compressed air-fuel mixture from the pump chamber
2,799,257
is released into the intake during the period of maximum
?ow velocity of the air from the intake manifold past 10 2,809,621
the intake valve to the combustion chamber.
Richards ____________ __ Nov. 12, 1940
Brown _______________ __ May 20, 194-1
Floyd ______________ __ May 28, 1957
Stump?g et al. ________ __ July 16, 1957
Layne ______________ __ Oct. 15, 1957
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