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Патент USA US3095110

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June 25, 1963
L. E. RUSSELL. _ETAL
3,095,100
CAN HANDLING PROCESS
Filed March 29. 1957
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CAN HANDLING PROCESS
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L. E. RUSSVELL ETAL
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LEE 5. RUSSELL,
FRANKLIN f,’ ROBINSON
June 25, 1963
3,095,100
|_. E. RUSSELL ETAL
CAN HANDLING PRQCESS
Filed March 29, 1957
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Patented June 25, 1963
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canner in a more efficient manner than has heretofore
3,695,109
CAN HANDLING PRQCESS
Lee E. Russell, Plant City, and Franklin P. Robinson,
Lakeland, Fla, assignors of one-third to Ira B. Russell,
Plant City, Fla.
Filed Mar. 29, 1957, tier. No. 649,501
8 Claims. ((31. 214-152)
The present invention pertains to a process and means
been known.
It is a further object of this invention to provide a proc
ess whereby cans may be automatically fed from a trans
port means into can-?lling and closing apparatus so
rapidly as to enable the latter apparatus to operate at its
normal rated speed.
It is another object of this invention to provide a proc
ess of conveying cans utilizing a novel can magazine into
for handling large numbers of cans or similar articles in
a rapid and facile manner, and more particularly relates
to a novel bulk can carrier employed in such processes.
which cans may be substantially automatically loaded and
from which cans may be substantally automatically un
loaded.
Present-day can-forming apparatus has attained such
It is a further object of this invention to provide a
efficiency that the rate of can production is so high as
novel can magazine, which is divided into a plurality of
to create a handling problem. The extremely fast rate 15 longitudinal cells holding substantially more cans than
of can production made possible by modern machinery
an equivalent volume will accommodate when utilized
militates against the e?icient and economical manual
for storing packaged can members contained in re-ship
packing of empty cans in transporting cartons in ac
ping cartons.
cordance with the practice heretofore commonly em
It is a still further object of this invention toprovide a
ployed. In addition, the space required in the factory
can magazine divided into a plurality of longitudinal cells
area for storing the empty cans prior to shipment to the
de?ned by parallel Wall members which may have the in
place ‘of utilization is of necessity quite large and ob
terval therebetween regulated to accommodate cans of
viously imposes an additional expense on the can manu
facturer.
An even more serious problem confronting the can
varying length.
It is another object of this invention to provide a novel
25 can magazine which is constructed so as to prevent dam
ning industry, however, comprises the difficulty expe
aging impact to the individual cans in the course of load
rienced in manually feeding the cans at the speed required
to keep pace with the latest can-?lling and closing ma
ing and unloading said magazine.
The above and other objects of this invention will
become more apparent upon proceeding with the follow
?ll and close up to 1,000 cans per minute. This latter 30 ing detailed description ‘of one practical embodiment of
chines. Present-day canning lines utilize apparatus which
speed, however, cannot be used efficiently if su?icient
personnel are not present to manually feed the cans fast
enough to keep these high-speed machines running at
the invention, when read in the light of the accompanying
drawings and appended claims.
The following description will outline the general pro
their rated e?iciency. This needed added labor offsets
cedure followed in conveying cans from the can-manu
the greater part of the reduction in cost resulting from 35 facturing apparatus to the can-?lling apparatus in the
the high ?lling speeds.
'
course of practicing the process herein disclosed.
A canner is usually located so as to be substantially
A high speed can-manufacturing machine is allowed to
in the center of a plurality of outlying satellite can sup
discharge its normal output onto a moving conveyor.
pliers. The distance obviously should not be too great
The latter conveyor communicates with an automatic
for reasons of transportation economy, plus other rea 40 feeding device having a plurality of discharge chutes.
sons such as desired ready accessibility of cans to meet
unexpected demand such as may occur to a canner of
Each of the chutes terminates ‘over one of a plurality of
entire distance between the can manufacturer and can
ner. Once the cans arrive at the canner, they must be
by means of power rollers ‘onto a tilting crib‘ member
which may also employ power rollers to assist magazine
open top longitudinal cells which de?ne a unitary maga
beverages during an extremely hot spell.
zine structure. Each of the cells has an opening disposed
It is to the can manufacturer’s advantage, therefore,
at one end limit thereof, the size of which is governed
45
to manufacture large numbers of cans so as to most ef
by a reciprocally movable gate member, The feeding de
?ciently use his can-forming apparatus and readily re
vice proceeds to ?ll all of the magazine cells. The latter
move the same from the can-making plant to the place of
magazine is detachably mountable on a truck trailer bed
usage. The means most commonly used in transporting
and, upon being ?lled, is mounted on such a bed and co11~
the cans comprises trailer trucks because of the short dis
veyed to a canner. Upon reaching the canner destina
tances generally involved plus their ability to move the
tion the magazine may be removed from the trailer bed
movement.
rapidly fed into the ?lling and closing apparatus if ad
vantages resulting from the apparatus speed are to be 55
After locking the magazine to the crib by suitable lock
obtained.
ing means, the same may be tilted to an appropriate angle,
with the gated end portion of the magazine disposed in a
The problems confronting the canning industry are
lower-most position. Selected cell gates are opened, al
thus apparent. The can manufacturer must manufac
lowing cans ‘contained in the ‘corresponding cells to move
He then must deliver them 60 by gravity into a conventional powered can line merger
or “blending boot.” In this latter manner, all of the
to the canner without incurring heavy labor, storage and
magazine cells are emptied. The latter boot is connected
transportation costs, which costs will erase and perhaps
to a conventional oi‘fbearing conveyor which automati
at times exceed the savings effected by the high produc
cally conveys the cans to the ?lling machines.
tion rate of his plant equipment. Once the cans arrive
The empty can magazine is returned to horizontal posi
at the canner, they must be fed into the can-?lling and 65
ture cans at the rated speed of his machines so as to most
ei?ciently utilize the same.
closing apparatus at such speed that the latter apparatus
may be most efliciently employed without allowing the
labor charges to again erase the advantages of high-speed
operation.
tion, removed from the tilting crib, reassembled to a truck
trailer bed, and returned to the can manufacturer, where—
at it may again be re?lled on a loading dock after removal
from the truck bed as before described.
The can magazine employed in the above~described
Thus, it is an object of this invention to provide a proc 70 system is of novel design and constitutes an important
ess of conveying cans from can-making apparatus to the
part in the over-all e?iciency of the provided system. The
3,095,100
a
a
4
magazine enables larger numbers of cans to be hauled
than had heretofore been possible because of the novel
arrangement of the longitudinal cells contained therein.
(In addition, the magazine is so constructed that the width
of the magazine cells is adjustable to conform with the
length of different size cans. Each magazine 'cell possesses
ba?le members which prevent damage being inflicted on
for purposes of packing cans in a transport magazine and
automatically feeding the latter cans from the transport
magazine at the canner to the ?lling and closing apparatus.
The drawings disclose the various steps employed in
the provided process plus detailed views of the bulk can
magazine utilized in the practice of the process. In FIG.
the cans in the course of loading. Also, the baf?e mem
bers act as a reinforcement maintaining the cell walls in
trated in the process of receiving cans 70, one of which
is illustrated in FIG. 2, from a can-making apparatus (not
desired spaced relationship.
illustrated) by means of a conveyor 12.
For a more complete understanding of this invention,
reference should now be made to the drawings, wherein
then discharged from the distributor 10 by means of a
15 a rotary can distributor 10 known in the art is illus
The cans are
?exible chute portion 14 into a plurality of longitudinal
cells 16 of a bulk can magazine 29. Although schemat
ically illustrated the can distributor 10 may be mounted
trating the magazine when locked on a ?at bed trailer 15 on a carriage which is disposed above the cells on tracks
and adapted to automatically travel thereover in the course
and also when locked on a tilting cribmember;
of discharging cans. The chute 14- may also be telescopic
FIG. 2 is a perspective view of a can body as it emerges
in nature and have its end limit mounted on a movable
from a can-manufacturing machine;
.
carriage 15 illustrated in FIGS. 15‘ and 17. The cells 16
FIG. 3 is a plan view of a roller bed utilized for sup
porting the can magazine of FIG. 1 in the course of carry 20 of the latter magazine may be more clearly seen in FIGS.
5 and 17 . It should be noted that the number of chutes
ing out the provided process or system;
14 emerging from the distributor 10 may equal the num
FIG. 4ris aside elevational view partly in section of
ber of cells 16. The structural details of the magazine 20
the bulk can magazine of FIG. 1 on an enlarged scale;
will hereinafter be ‘described in greater detail.
FIG. 5 is a transverse sectional view taken on line 5-5
After the magazine 20 has been loaded by means of
25
of FIG. 4;
the distributor 10, it may be moved with the assistance
FIG. 6 is an end elevational view of the bulk can maga
'of roller members 22 over dock portions 23 and 24, after
zine of FIG. 4 as viewed in the direction of the arrows
which it may engage the adjacent rollers 22 of roller
6-6 in FIG. 4;
bed '26 disposed on the ?at bed trailer 28 of FIG. 15.
FIG. 7 is a perspective view of a gate member utilized
30 The dock portion 24- enables a loaded magazine to be
'with the bulk can magazine;
available for attachment to a flat bed trailer while one
FIG. 8 is a top plan view of the bulk can magazine of
FIGURE 1 is a side elevational view of a bulk can
magazine embodying one form of the invention and illus
FIG. 4;
FIG. 9, 10, 11 and 12 are sectional views taken on lines
9—9, 10—10, 11——11 and 12~—12, respectively, of FIG. 4
magazine is being made ready for transport and another
is being loaded. The bulk can magazine 20 is now ready
for transporting to a canning factory wherein the latter
35 cans contained in the bulk can magazine will be auto
and illustrated on a scale enlarged thereover;
matically fed into can-?lling and closing apparatus (not
FIG. 13 is a fragmentary, enlarged detailed view of a
shown).
,
' joint construction utilized in forming the longitudinal cell
FIG. 18 comprises a ?gure illustrating a system which
is somewhat similar to that of FIG. 15 with the excep~
40 tion thatrthe docks 25' therein illustrated utilize power
FIG. 13;
driven conveyor portions 27. The latter portions com,
FIG. 15 is ‘a side elevational view of mechanism used
prise elongate slats a?ixed to a link chain 29 more clearly
'in one process for loading the bulk can mechanism pro
seen in FIG.,19‘ which is driven by means of a power
vided by this invention, the latter mechanism being illus
driven sprocket wheel 30 also illustrated in FIG. 19.
trated on a loading platform and on a ?at bed trailer;
The sectional view of FIG. 20 illustrates in greater
FIG. 16 is an enlarged view of the can-distributing ap 45
detail the outside frame channels 32 and inner I beams
paratus and adjacent conveyor portions illustrated in
34 which supportingly engage the links of the driven
FIG. 15; '
r
.
chain 29 as they move the slat portions 27 of the power
FIG. 17 is a fragmentary elevational view taken along
driven conveyor. The rotary can distributor 1i) illus~
:lines 17-——17 of FIG. 15 and illustrated on a scale enlarged
50 trated in FIG. 18 and the appurtenant conveyor sections .
thereover;
13 and 14 are precisely the same as those illustrated in
FIG. 18 is a view similar to FIG. 15 illustrating the
FIG.
16.
‘use of power-driven conveyors on the illustrated docks
It is thus seen from the above described FIGS. 15 and
and ?at bed trailer;
18 that the output of a high-speed can-making machine
FIG. 19 is a fragmentary side elevational view partly
in section of one of the power-driven dock conveyors of 55 (not illustrated) may be readily removed by means
of conveyor belts utilizing twist portions (such as por
FIG. 18 illustrated on a scale enlarged over that of
tion 13 illustrated in FIG. 15) to a rotary distributor
FIG. 18; 5
10 which is particularly adapted to handle cans of a
FIG. 20 is a fragmentary sectional view taken on line
predetermined size. The distributor in turn discharges
20—20 of FIG. 19;
the ‘?ow 'of cans into the cells of a bulk can magazine
FIG. 21 is a fragmentary top plan view of a power
20 illustrated in ‘FIGS. 15' and =18.
driven roller bed conveyor illustrated in FIG. 18;
The ?lled magazine may be either pushed from a dock
FIG. 22 is a sectional view taken on line 22-22 of
over freely rolling roller members in a manner employed
FIG. 21 and illustrated on a scale enlarged thereover; and
in conjunction with the apparatus illustrated in FIG. 16,
FIG. 23 is ‘a sectional view taken on line 23—23 of
or else it may be moved by means of power driven roller
FIG. 21 and illustrated on a ‘scale enlarged thereover.
conveyors in the manner illustrated in FIG. 18. It will
Process Operation Outline
be noted from the latter ?gure that the ?at bed 28 of
the illustrated trailer member may have mounted thereon
As has above been explained, it is one of the purposes
a conveyor bed :19 which may also employ power-driven
of this invention to provide a process whereby cans emerg
ing from high-speed can-fabricating apparatus may be 70 rollers 36, which are interconnected by means of link
chains 37 (see FIG. 21) which engage sprocket wheels
transported therefrom in a ready and facile manner to
39 of the rollers 36. The power-driven rollers 36 com
can-?lling and closing apparatus. The high speed and
'wall portions of the bulk can magazine;
FIG. 14 is a sectional view taken on line 14—14 of
e?iciency of modern apparatus employed in the canning
prise the magazine-engaging means of the conveyor beds
19, one of which is clearly illustrated in ‘FIGS. 21 through
industry cannot be utilized to its full extent unless addi
'
tional apparatus also of an automatic nature is utilized 75 23.
3,095,100
5
It will be noted from FIG. 21 that the latter bed com
prises channel frame portions 21 on which the power
driven rollers 36 are mounted by means of bearings 23.
The frame channels 21 de?ning opposed sides of the bed
19 ‘are intermittently braced by means of the cross ties
25, and the opposed end portions of the bed 19 are
further reinforced by means of the diagonal frame brace
portions 27. The power conveyor portions of the docks
25 of FIG. 18 and the ?at bed trailer 28 may be pro
6
be noted ‘from these latter ?gures that each gate 54, as
here shown, ‘comprises an elongated slotted strip which
engages two bolt members 56 having enlarged head por
tions or washer portions whereby the latter gates may
be retained to the supporting magazine structure in the
course of moving and forming openings in each cell where
by cans contained therein may be discharged.
Detailed Description of the Bulk Can Magazine
cally stop the roller movement after the bulk can maga
zine has reached a predetermined position either on the
As has been previously mentioned, the bulk can maga
zine ‘243’ comprises a container structure having a plurality
of longitudinal cells 16. The individual cells ‘are de?ned
dock or on the trailer bed.
by a plurality of wall members 60 which are maintained
vided with limit switches (not shown) which automati
Unloading of the Bulk Can Magazine
in spaced relationship by interposed vertical spacer mem
bers 62, more clearly seen in FIG. 10‘. It will be noted
After the bulk can magazine 28» has been locked to 15 from FIG. 4, however, that the vertical spacers 62 termi
the ?at bed trailer of ‘the vehicle 35 in either of the
nate a substantial distance above ?oor portion 64 of the
magazine. The gap thus provided enables all of the cans
manners described in FIG. 15 or 118, the latter vehicle
proceeds to its point of destination which is usually a
in a single cell 16 to ?ow along the ?oor of the magazine,
canning factory. As has been mentioned above, a can
through the end opening 66 illustrated in FIG. 4 which
ning factory is preferably located in the center of a
is regulated by the previously discussed gate member 54,
number of surrounding can-manufacturing plants. Thus
one of which is illustrated in FIG. 7.
a ready supply of cans is always assured even on short
An additional means maintaining the wall portions 66
of each magazine cell in a rigid condition comprises ba?le
notice.
Upon arriving at the canner or a canning factory,
vehicle 35 pulling the magazine 20 and trailer 28 ap
proaches a tilting crib member 38 in the manner illus
members 68, more clearly seen in FIG. 4 and illustrated
in transverse section in FIG. 11. It will be noted from
the latter ‘sectional View that the surface of the ba?le
trated in ‘FIG. 1. The latter crib may employ the freely
members 63 which engage ‘a can member such ‘as a can
rotatable roller members 40, more clearly shown in FIG.
member 7-9 illustrated in perspective in FIG. 2 is routed
3, or may employ power-driven roller members similar
or grooved at 72 ‘(see 1G. 11) whereby less surface
to those used on the loading docks ‘25 and the bed 19 of
r'ction will be exerted between the can and the bathe.
H6. 21.
in addition, the opposed end circumferential portions of
After the driver of the vehicle 35 has aligned his trailer
differing diameters (see dotted line representation of the
with the magazine crib, identical motor means (not
can in FIG. 11) of each can will not engage a baf?e
surface portion, thereby eliminating the possibility of
shown) driving the trailer ?at bed rollers and the crib
rollers may be energized whereby the loaded can maga 35 jamming of the can members in the cells.
zine will be conveyed from the ?at bed trailer to the
The most obvious function of the baffle members 63
tilting crib 38; a limit switch mounted at one end of
is, of course, to prevent the direct fall of a can member
the crib will automatically stop the magazine when it
from the chute 14 of the rotary can distributor >10 to the
is completely and properly positioned thereon. The 40 ?oor 64 of the can magazine. It is seen that a can dis
driver of the trailer truck may then secure an empty
charged from the chute 14 will ?rst rotatably engage the
magazine to the now empty trailer bed for return to the
grooved surface of the upper angularly disposed ba?‘le
can-manufacturing plant.
member after which it will drop and engage the second
The loaded bulk can magazine after being locked in
place as illustrated in dotted lines in FIG. 1 is tilted into
the elevated full-line position of FIG. 1 by means of
tilting apparatus 42. The latter apparatus which is given
by way of illustration only is seen to comprise a plu
rality of mechanical linkages; a hydraulic piston means
vangularly disposed ba?le member 68 preliminarily to
dropping to the ?oor 64 of the magazine. This latter
or other equivalent power means, however, will function
to equal advantage for purposes of tilting the overlying
crib and attached can magazine 29.
In the latter tilted position, gate members 54 which
engagement between the can and baffles in the normal
course of magazine loading is apparent from an inspec
tion of ‘FIG. 4. Through bolts 84 illustrated in FIGS. 10
and 11 traverse the entire width of the cell 259 passing
through walls 69, vertical spacers 62 and baffles 68 in the
course of effecting a stable over-all cell construction.
It will be noted ‘from FIG. 9 that end wall 30 of the
bulk can magazine 29 comprises a plurality of discrete
wall lengths 82 which are grooved at their opposed lateral
are disposed at one end, the lowermost end, of the maga
zine 2i) and which are used to regulate the discharge of
edge portions of their inwardly disposed surface so as
cans from each cell disposed in the magazine are then
to avoid contact with the enlarged end portions of the
opened. The cans in certain cells are then allowed to
cans '76 in the manner illustrated in FIG. 9. it will also
move by gravity from the bulk can magazines into a
be noted from this latter ?gure that the wall sections 82,
can-blending boot 46, more clearly seen in FIG. 1, and,
interposed between magazine walls 64:? and the sectional
from the latter boot, to a can line merger 48. Both the
?oor 64 of the provided magazine are all maintained in
blending boot and can line merger are well known in 60 assembled relationship by means of through bolts 34, in
the art and are schematically illustrated. The moving
cooperation with a nut member not shown. The sectional
cans then move onto an oil-‘bearing conveyor 5t} which
nature of the magazine floor 64 is clearly seen in H6. 12,
automatically moves the cans discharging from the tilted
which illustrates ?oor sections 86 which are routed at
can magazine to a can-filling and closing apparatus (not
opposed lateral portions similarly to the manner in which
shown).
the end Wall portions 82 are routed. Floor sections 86
are also maintained in assembled relationship with the
It is thus seen from the latter description that the
can magazine 20 upon arriving at the canning plant may
magazine walls 16 by means of the through bolts ‘84.
This latter sectional nature of the magazine ?oor and
porting vehicle 35, placed upon a tilting crib member
walls imparts to the latter magazine an advantage assist_
38, after which the cans will discharge by ‘gravity from 70 ing its adaptability to cans of varying size in the normal
selected cells 16 of the can magazine, into a blending
course of operation. By varying the width of the baffle
boot from which they will be automatically conveyed
members 68, the bottom ?oor sections 86, the vertical
to a high-speed ?lling and closing apparatus.
wall sections 82 and the gate members 54-, bulk can maga
The gates 54 for the cells 16 disposed in the can maga
zines having cells of varying width to accommodate cans
zine 20 are more clearly seen in FIGS. 6 and 7. It will 75 of varying length may be readily fabricated. Such modi
be automatically move ‘from the trailer bed of the trans
3,095,100
8
?ed cells would use the through bolts 84 and cell-de?ning
Walls 69 above described, in addition to solid end wall
portion 88 illustrated in FIG. 6.
Magazine Cell Walls
Following the loading operation, the magazines 2%) are
moved onto the flat beds of the vehicles ‘35 and conveyed
to the canning plant whereat the magazines 26 may be
removed by means of a power conveyor disposed on the
truck trailer bed and a series of powered conveyor rollers
disposed on a tilting crib member. The magazine is
locked to the crib and tilted in the manner illustrated in
An additional structural feature of the bulk can maga
zine coniprises'the manner in which the vertical cell
de?ning walls 6%} engage each other at the point of over
FIG. 1; after which the gate members 54 regulating the
lap. It is apparent that the cell walls 60 cannot con—
openings 65 in each cell end portion, see FIG. 4, may be
veniently be composed of integral members which ‘run 10 raised, allowing the cans to enter a blending boot from
the entire length of the magazine because of the length
which they will automatically move to a conveyor belt 50.
of the latter member. Consequentl , a plurality of sec
It should be noted from FIG. 3 that, although two
tions are utilized to de?ne a unitary wall member which
blending boots 46 are illustrated as being in operation, at
runs the entire length of the magazine.
any one time, a larger number, or one blending boot, may
FIGS. 13 and 14 are enlarged detailed views illustrat 15 be employed at any one instant. The procedure to be
ing the manner in which wall section 60a disposed away
followed when two boots are to be utilized is apparent
from the direction of can travel in the course of can
from FIG. 3. The two boots are spaced a distance apart
discharge has its end portion cut into a plurality of
preferably equal to half the number of cells. The gates
square portions 99. The square portions 96 are bent or
of the two cells with which the boots are in alignment are
deformed in opposite lateral directions whereby they 20 opened, and can discharge takes place until the cells are
de?ne a channel adapted to engage a straight edge por
empty. The two boots' are then moved laterally to the
tion of a wall section 60b disposed in the direction of can
next adjacent'cells and a similar discharge procedure is
travel in the course of can discharge from the magazine.
followed until all of the cells have been emptied.
Referring to FIG. 14, it will become apparent that the
Thus it is seen that cans may be substantially auto
rotatably moving cans of the magazine cells are not ex 25 matically conveyed from a bulk can magazine to can-?lling
posed to a projecting cell wall edge surface on which a
and closing apparatus. The process herein disclosed en
can end may become caught or wedged in a cell space
ables the cans to be conveyed throughout Without the
because of the dovetailing effect created by the wall
danger of damage occurring to any of the cans.
squares 90 of section 66a disposed over the straight edge
Various closure members for the open top of the pro
portion of adjacent wall portion 60b. In the absence of 30 vided magazine may be utilized. However, such closures
a sharp projecting wall edge on which to catch, a smooth
continuous discharge of the can members from each of
the magazine cells is assured in the normal course of the
unloading operation.
Magazine Locking Means
The projecting apertured lug portions 94 illustrated in
FIG. *8 comprise one means whereby a locking means
such as pin member 96 illustrated in FIG. 4 may traverse
the same and secure the magazine 20 either to the tilting
crib member in the course of can unloading or to the ?at
bed of a trailer in the course of ‘being transported.
The latter description of the bulk can magazine aids in
understanding the manner in which the latter magazine
may be utilized in the course of adding to the efficiency
of can removal from a can-making machine and can
feeding to a can-?lling and closing apparatus.
It is believed apparent from the above description that
the advantages which the bulk can magazine provides in
are usually not necessary especially in climates where un
favorable weather is the exception. In these latter cli
.mates tarpaulins may be used to cover the open tops of
the cells whenever rain or other type of unfavorable
weather threatens.
It is believed apparent that modi?cations may be ef
' fected in the illustrated process and apparatus which will’
still remain within the ambit of this invention and within
the scope of the claims.
We claim:
‘
' 1. The process of transporting cylindrical cans from a
can-manufacturing plant to a can-using plant comprising
providing a portable, elongated, open-top magazine di
vided into a plurality of laterally spaced, substantially
vertically disposed, open-top cells having a width slightly
greater than the length of such cans to be transported
as measured along the can axis of rotation and having
can-supporting means at the bottom thereof, discharging
the course of conveying cans from the can-manufactur 50 cans as they come from a can-fabricating machine into
cells through the open tops thereof so that the discharged
ing apparatus to the can-?lling and closing apparatus have
cans form a regular, close-packed arrangement in said
been made apparent. The volume of cans which may be
cells with the length of said cans as measured along the
held by a bulk can magazine 20 exceeds by approximately
can axis of rotation disposed substantially transversely to
80 percent the number of cans which a trailer of equal
the walls of said cells until the cells are ?lled, transporting
size would be able to hold if the cans were merely packed
the filled, portable magazine to a canning plant, tilting
in cartons. In addition, the manual labor involved in
the magazine so that one end thereof is elevated to dis
removing cans from a conveyor in communication with
pose the can-supporting means at the bottom at an in
a can-making apparatus has been dispensed with by allow
clination, and discharging cans from said cells through
ing the cans to move directly from the can-making appa
ratus to a rotary can distributor and from thence by means 60 the lower end of the magazine onto means conveying the
cans to ?lling apparatus.
of ?exible chutes 14 into the various longitudinal cells
of the can magazine 20. This latter portion of the pro
vided system is illustrated in FIGS. 15 and 18.
It will be noted from the latter two ?gures that the
2. The process of transporting cylindrical cans from a
can-manufacturing plant to a can-using plant comprising
providing a portable, elongated, open-top magazine di
end limits of the chutes 14 may be mounted on movable 65 vided into a plurality of laterally spaced, substantially
vertically disposed, open-top cells having a width slightly
carriage portions 15 which may automatically move over
' greaterpthan the length of such 'cans to‘be transported as
the longitudinal cells 16 of each magazine 20 and reversi
_ measured along the can axis of rotation and having can
bly move in the opposite direction by means of limit
”supporting means at the bottom thereof, discharging cans
switches not shown which may be disposed overthe op
posed end limits of the latter cells. It is, of course, 70 ' into ‘said cells through the open tops thereof so that the
‘ discharged cans form a regular, close-packed arrangement
obvious that manual labor may be substituted for cer
in said cells with the length of said cans as measured
tain portions of the illustrated system. For instance, an
along the can axis of rotation disposed substantially trans
, attendant along a catwalk disposed atop the magazine
versely to the walls of said cells until the cells are ?lled,
may regulate the discharge of the can members from the
. rotary distributor 10 into the cell 16.
75 transporting the ?lled, portable magazine to a canning
3,095,100
10
9
plant, tilting the magazine so that one end thereof is
as measured along the can axis of rotation arranged sub
elevated to dispose the can-supporting means at the bot
tom at an inclination, and discharging cans by gravity
the latter magazine to a vehicle means and conveying the
stantially transversely to the walls of said cells, securing
same to the can-processing destination, detaching the
loaded magazine from the vehicle and securing the same
to a tiltable dock means, tilting the secured magazine until
the magazine cell gates are in a lowermost position, open
from said cells through the lower end of the magazine
onto means for conveying the cans to ?lling apparatus.
3. The process of transporting cylindrical cans from a
can-manufacturing plant to a can-using plant comprising
ing predetermined cell gates whereby the cans disposed
providing ‘a portable, elongated, open-top magazine di
in the cells ‘are allowed to discharge by gravity into a
vided into a plurality of laterally spaced, substantially
vertically disposed, openatop cells having a width slightly 10 blending boot means, and automatically conveying such
discharged cans from said blending boot means to a can
greater than the length of such cans to be transported as
measured along the can axis of rotation and having can
supporting means at the bottom thereof, discharging cans
?lling apparatus.
7. In a method for conveying ceans, the steps compris
ing automatically loading the cans into a portable maga
cells through the open tops thereof so that the discharged 15 zine, comprising a plurality of discrete substantially ver
tical, open-top cells, each of said cells having a width
cans form a regular, close-packed arrangement in said
slightly greater than the length of such cans to be con
cells with the length of said cans as measured along the
veyed, each of said cells being provided with at least one
can axis of rotation disposed substantially transversely
closable opening for the discharge of the cans, said open
to the walls of said cells until the cells are ?lled, secur
ing said portable magazine to a vehicle chassis, trransport 20 ing being located at a lower portion of at least one end of
the cells, all of the cans in each of said vertical cells being
ing the ?lled, portable magazine to a canning plant, re
as they come from a can-fabricating machine into said
dischargeable through said opening, said cans being dis
moving said portable magazine from said chassis and
charged into such magazine as to assume a regular close
packed arrangement with the length thereof as measured
so that one end thereof is elevated to disposed the can
supporting means at the bottom at an inclination, and 25 along the can ‘axis of rotation arranged substantially trans
securing the same to a tilting means, tilting the magazine
versely to the walls of said cells, placing the magazine
discharging cans from said cells through the lower end of
the magazine onto means for conveying the cans to ?lling
on a transporting means and conveying the same to a
can-processing destination, ‘moving the cells in such direc
apparatus.
tion as to result in a lowering of at least one of the dis
4. In a method for delivering cylindrical cans or similar
receptacles from a fabricating machine to a ?lling machine 30 charge openings of the cells relative to parts inwardly
thereof and opening the closable openings disposed in
for said earns, the steps comprising depositing said cans
the lowered position whereby said cans may be dis
from said fabricating machine onto a conveyor means,
charged.
conveying said cans to ‘a dispensing means, dispensing said
8. In a method for conveying cans, the steps compris
cans into a multicelled magazine means having a plurality
of open-top longitudinal cells each of which has a gated 35 ing dispensing cans into a portable magazine comprising
a plurality of discrete, gated, open top substantially ver
discharge opening at one end limit thereof so such ‘cans
tical cells having a width slightly greater than the length
assume a regular, close-packed relation with surrounding
of such cans to be conveyed, said cans being discharged
cans in both the vertical and horizontal planes with the
into such magazine so as to assume a regular, close-packed
can axis of rotation arranged substantially parallel to said
gated openings, conveying said latter magazine means to 40 arrangement with the length thereof as measured along
the can axis of rotation arranged substantially transversely
a transport-unloading means, tilting said magazine means,
to the walls of such cells, conveying such magazine to a
discharging said cans from said transport means to a con
predetermined destination, tilting the magazine until the
veyor means, and conveying said cans from said transport
magazine cell gates are in a lowermost position, and open
unloading means to said ?lling machine.
5. In a method for delivering cylindrical cans or similar 45 ing predetermined cell gates whereby the cans disposed in
the cells ‘are allowed to discharge by gravity.
objects from a fabricating machine to a can-processing
machine, the steps comprising discharging such cans to
References Cited in the ?le of this patent
be delivered from the fabricating machine to a conveyor
UNITED STATES PATENTS
means, conveying said cans to a dispensing means, dis
pensing said cans into a multicelled, detachable magazine 50
699,690
Leetham _____________ __ May 13, 1902
means having discharge gates for each of said cells,
1,196,700
King ________________ __ Aug. 29, 1916
each of said cells having an open top; said cans being
1,383,318
McCormick ___________ .__ July 5, 1921
delivered being discharged into said magazine cells in such
a manner so vas to assume a regular, close-packed arrange
ment with the length of said cans as measured along the 55
can axis of rotation disposed substantially transversely
1,409,053
1,588,156
1,694,897
McDonald ____________ __ Mar. 7, 1922
Anderson _____________ __ June 8, 1926
Washburn ____________ __ Dec. 11, 1928
1,857,653
Meyercord et al. ______ _.. May 10, 1932
6. In a method for conveying cylindrical cans from a
2,136,068
2,146,533
2,246,728
2,304,455
2,382,191
2,457,841
2,556,188
2,712,390
2,727,641
2,741,379
Allen ________________ __ Nov. 8,
Erickson _____________ __ Feb. 7,
Gordon _____________ __ June 24,
Guerard _____________ __ Dec. 8,
Weichselbaum ________ __ Aug. 14,
Smith et al. ___________ __ Jan. 4,
Jakob _______________ __ June 12,
Scholtz ______________ __ July 5,
Tomkins ____________ __ Dec. 20,
Stryker _____________ __ Apr. 10,
can-fabricating apparatus to a can-?lling apparatus, the
2,788,136
Hebert et al ___________ __ Apr. 9, 1957
steps comprising automatically loading the can output of
2,815,874
Kowal _______________ __ Dec. 10, 1957
a can-fabricating machine into a portable magazine com 70
2,843,278
Que?ander ___________ __ July 15, 1958
prising a plurality of discrete, gated, substantially vertical,
2,928,522
Anderson ___________ __ Mar. 15, 1960
to the Walls of said cells, conveying said latter means to
a tiltable dock means, securing said detachable magazine
means to said tiltable dock means, tilting said magazine
means until the discharge gates thereof are in a lowermost 60
position, and opening selected gates whereby the cans in
predetermined cells of said magazine are allowed to dis
charge therefrom by gravity, rotatably discharging said
close-packed cans into a blending boot means in commu
nication with a conveyor means and conveying said dis
65
charged cans to can-processing apparatus.
open-top cells having a width slightly greater than the
length of such cans to be conveyed until full, said cans
being discharged into such magazine so as to assume a
1938
1939
1941
1942
1945
1949
1951
1955
1955
1956
OTHER REFERENCES
Publication, “Flow,” September 1956, pp. 114, 115.
regular, close-packed arrangement with the length thereof 75 (Copy in Div. 4.)
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