close

Вход

Забыли?

вход по аккаунту

?

Патент USA US3096881

код для вставки
July 9, 1963
w. A. PATZER
3,096,864
COIN SELECTOR DEVICE
Filed Nov. 7, 1957
,0
2 Sheets-Sheet _1
'
xii-Gal
I6
Jr;
ma '
I48 [44
76¢
'
INVENTOR.
'
William ajaiyer
BY
’
July 9, 1963
' w. A. PATzER
3,096,364
COIN SELECTOR DEVICE
Filed Nov. 7, 1957
2 Sheets-Sheet 2
INVENTOR.
llJz'llz'anz CZ. Buyer
BY
'
ice
3,096,864
Patented July 9, 1963
2
produce a multiple coin-testing device which includes
3,096,864
COIN SELECTOR DEVICE
William A. Patzer, Chicago, 111., assignor, by mesne as
signments, to Reed Electromech Corporation, Rock
ford, Ill., a corporation of Delaware
Filed Nov. 7, 1957, Ser. No. 695,090
4 Claims. (ill. 194-102)
This invention relates to a device for separating coins
into their various denominations, and more particularly
means for testing coins having the size of a cent piece,
and it is a related object to produce a device of the type
described for the testing of coins to separate pennies from
dime-shaped counterfeits.
A further object of this invention is to provide 43 test
ing device of the type described for accepting quarters,
n-ickels, dimes and pennies, for separating the coins in
their various denominations, and for separating the spuri
to a device for separating coins on the basis of their
ous coins of the one denomination from legitimate coins
of the same denomination.
differences in size.
Devices for testing coins and separating them into
A still further object is to produce a coin-testing de
vice which is simple in construction and effective in the
various denominations, and for rejecting spurious coins,
separation of legitimate from spurious coins of various
are an essential part of most vending machines.
Some 15 denominations.
of these devices, such as those described in the copend
ing application Serial No. 405,936, ?led on January 25,
1954, now Patent 2,823,783, can separate coins into de
nominations of quarters, dimes, and nickels, and can
reject spurious coins without the use of any moving
parts. This is a particularly valuable feature, since many
of the previous devices that depended upon moving parts
These and other objects of this invention will become
more apparent when read in the ‘light of the accompany
ing speci?cation and drawings wherein—
FIGURE 1 is a front elevational View of the coin-test
ing and separating device constructed according to this
invention;
FIGURE 2 is a sectional view taken on the line 2-2
were unsatisfactory because corrosion or the accumula
of FIGURE 1 ‘and looking in the direction indicated;
tion of dirt in the device, after protracted use, would
jam the mechanism and require shutdown not only of
the testing device but the entire vending machine until
repairs could be e?ected.
The separation of the real coins from spurious imita~
FIGURE 3 is a fragment of the front elevational view
of the coin-testing and separating device with the outer
tions having the same dimensions is based on the fact
plate, magnet, and feeler removed;
FIGURE 4 is an inside view of the outer cover plate
showing the inclined guideway leading over the [trap
door;
that when a good electrical conductor moves in a mag
FIGURE 5 is a sectional view taken 'on the line 5——5
netic ?eld, eddying currents are induced in it, and these
are accompanied by the rise of a magnetic ?eld in the
conductor which interacts with the ?rst-mentioned mag
of FIGURE 1 and looking in the direction indicated;
FIGURE 6 is a sectional view taken on the line 6-6
of FIGURES 1 and 3 ‘and looking in the direction in
netic ?eld and causes an attractive force to be exerted
on the conductor. Accordingly, when coins are rolled
down a runway past a permanent magnet, the attractive
dioated;
force, or the degree they will be retarded by the at—
tractive force, will depend upon their conductivity, and
this in turn will depend upon their composition.
IFor example, to separate dimes from their counter
feits, a permanent magnet is positioned adjacent the
dime runway to slow the conductive dimes so that when
they leave the runway they will follow a controlled path
which will lead them to gently strike or graze a de?ecting
abutment.
FIGURE 7 is a sectional view taken on the line 7——7
of FIGURE ‘3 and looking in the direction indicated;
and
FIGURE 8 is a sectional view taken on the line 8—8
of FIGURES 1 land 3 and looking in the direction in
dicated.
Referring now to FIGURE 1 of the drawings, the
coin-testing and separating device indicated generally
by the reference numeral 10 comprises a housing 12,
including a pair of vertical front and rear plates or por~
This in turn will cause the dimes to fall 45 tions 17 and 19, see FIGURE 6. The housing also in
into the dime outlet chute. On the other hand, similarly
cludes a top portion with ‘a coin-receiving chute 16 rigidly
mounted thereon. Outlet chutes for quarters and nickels
is not retarded by a magnet will hit the de?ecting abut
and a coin reject chute for defective or spurious coins
ment with a greater force, and this will cause these
‘are inside the housing. These are de?ned by a flat plate
coins to bounce over the dime outlet chute and move 50 21 which is held by any conventional means (not shown)
downwardly in a path which leads them against still
in spaced relation to plate member 17 by means of
another abutment. This again de?ects the coins, caus
spacer members 23 for permitting the quarters and nickels
ing them to follow a V-shaped path through the device
to pass therebetween. An additional plate 25 is secured
which directs them into the coin reject chute.
to flat plate 21. This plate has an ‘offset portion 27 for
‘Changing economic requirements make it desirable to 55 letting the defective or spurious coins move therein, see
adapt the device described in the abovementioned co
FIGURE 2.
pending application for accepting pennies. Since pen
The housing is provided with a sorting means for sepa
nies are most similar to dimes in size, the dime runway
rating the coins dimensionally. These means, which are
might easily be modi?ed to accommodate them. If this
described more fully in the copending application Serial
is done, ‘the pennies Will also be slowed by the perm-a 60 No. 405,936, ?led January 25, 1954, include a plurality
net magnet because they too are made from a conduc
of vertically spaced slots or openings 18, 22 and 26 which
tive material, but inasmuch as they are not composed
are formed in the front portion or plate 17. Backing
dimensioned coins which are made from a material which
of silver, they will be a?ected differently by the perma
nent magnet, and this difference, along with their differ
plates 20, 24 and 28 integral with the front portion 17,
are upwardly inclined from the bottom edges of these
ences in size and Weight, will prevent them from follow 65 openings.
ing the controlled path for the dimes described above.
Consequently, the pennies will strike the two 'abovemen
tioned de?ecting abutments and will follow the path of
the defective or spurious dimes. These pennies must then
Opposite these openings and backing plates
in plate 17, are outwardly projecting arcuate portions 29'
in plate 19, one of which is shown in FIGURE 6.
Powerful permanent magnets 30‘ and 32 are rigidly
attached to the front portion 17 of the housing, and are
be separated from those coins which ‘are to be rejected 70 positioned closely adjacent the vertically spaced inclined
by the machine.
quarter and nickel runways 34 and 36. These runways,
It is therefore a principal object of this invention to
shown in dotted lines in FIGURE 1, are mounted on the
3,096,864
3
The upper portion of the front plate v17 is provided
inner surface of the front portion 17 along the bottom
edge of each of the abovementioned openings, and coop
with an arcuate slot 100, and an adjacent rectangular slot
161. A plate member 108 integral with and downwardly
projecting from lever arm 70 is provided with an oval
erate with the sorting means, so that each runway carries
coins within a particular dimensional range.
shaped opening 105. A cam-riding plate 102 is pivotally
A rectangular slot ‘44 is formed at the opposite edge
of the front portion 17 of the housing. A fork member
46, provided with a perpendicular abutment or anvil
member 48, is adapted to be secured to the front portion
mounted on the inner surface of the front portion 17 by
any conventional means (not shown). This cam-riding
plate has an integral actuating lug 1107 which projects
through the oval-shaped opening 105 in plate member
17 with the abutment or anvil member 48 inside the slot.
A lock bolt 50, in threaded engagement with the front por
103 and through the arcuate slot 1% in front portion .17.
A disk-shaped cam member 104 is rotatably mounted on
the rear plate 19 by any conventional means (not shown),
and a portion of the periphery of this cam member ex
tends through the rectangular slot 101. With this ar
tion 17, is adapted to adjustably clamp the tines of the
fork member to portion 17. The abutment member 48 is
positioned in slot 44 where it is adapted to be engaged by
coins having substantially the same dimensions as quar
ters, but which are not properly slowed by the permanent 15 rangement, depressing lever 70‘ forces the cam-riding plate
102 to ride over the periphery of the cam member 104,
magnets. This causes these spurious coins to engage abut
separating the spaced vertical plates 17‘ and 19, and per
ment member 48, with such force that they rebound over
mitting the jammed coins to fall through the housing to
the quarter outlet chute 65, see FIGURE 2, and into one
one of the coin reject chutes. The operation of this coin
of the coin reject chutes 52 inside the housing.
V'Spaced below slot 44 is another slot 54. A fork mem 20 reject and scavenging device is described more fully in
copending application Serial No. 365,011, ?led June 30,
ber 56 is provided with a lever member 58 which is piv
1953, now abandoned, to which reference is now made.
oted at 519. The end of this member is provided with a
To this point, the elements described have largely been
perpendicular abutment or lug 60 which is adapted to
employed in coin testers similar to that described in the
penetrate the slot 54 and engage its sides. The lever
member ‘58 is biased by a weight 62, so the edge of the 25 copending application Serial No. ‘405,936, ?led January
25, 1954, which is similar in appearance and operation
lug 60 always abuts the upper edge of the slot 54, when
to the one disclosed in this case, and to which reference
in rest position. The entire fork member is secured to
is again made for a fuller explanation of the various parts
the front portion 17 of the housing by means of a lock
so far disclosed. The main difference between that coin
bolt v64. The position of the abutments ‘i8 and 60 is
critical because the device is. designed so that a genuine
quarter will follow a controlled are after it leaves the
end of the runway, and this are will cause it to pass to
the right of abutment member 48 and to the left of abut
ment member 60. This additional abutment member 60
makes the compositional test for quarters much more 35
sensitive since, as stated above, if a spurious quarter
moves too fast after it leaves the quarter runway, it will
strike abutment member 48 and rebound into the coin
tester and the one disclosed in this case is in the ability to
accept and separate pennies as well as quarters, dimes
and nickels. In the preceding case, an abutment was posi
tioned adjacent slot 26 inside the housing which permitted
only coins the size of dimes to pass down the runway 38.
Since dimes and pennies are close together in size, re
moving this abutment permitted runway 38 to be utilized
for carrying both pennies and dimes.
As seen in FIGURES 1, 3, and 6, an adjustable mem
reject chute 52 inside the housing, while if the spurious
ber 31 is mounted on the inclined backing plate 28 by
coin is affected by the magnet so it moves too slowly when
it leaves the quarter runway, it will fall into engagement
with abutment member 60, which will also de?ect it into
the coin reject chute 52.
means of a bolt '33. This bolt extends through an elon
gated slot 35 ‘formed in member 31, and is in threaded
engagement with the backing plate 28. This adjustable
member has an inwardly projecting lug 37 which is posi
tioned so that spurious coins which are smaller than a
A coinreject and scavenging device for separating the
vertical housing plates and releasing jammed coins is pro 45 dime but which are too thick to pass through the outlet
vided. This device comprises an actuating arm 70‘ which
is pivotally secured to the front portion 17 of the hous
ing' at 72, see FIGURE ‘1. A coil spring 74' is secured
at one end to a ?xed lug 76 on the‘ front portion 17 and
is secured at the other end to an extension 7 8 on the actu
ating arm 70‘ for returning it to a rest position after it
is depressed. A plurality of link members 86 and 32 are
connected.v to the actuating arm, and these are adapted
to actuate a plurality of scavenging members for dislodg
slot 39 to the coin reject chute, see FIGURE 6, are held
by the lug and prevented from moving down the runway
38 and jamming the mechanism.
After the pennies and dimes and other similarly dimen
50 sioned coins move down the runway 38 past the abutment
or lug 37, they encounter an outwardly curved de
?ecting member 106, integral with plate 21, see FIG
URES 3 and 7. This member de?ects the coins so they
move onto a plate 108 which is parallel to the front por
tion 17 of the housing, and which is removably secured
thereto by any conventional means (not shown). At the
the permanent magnets. On one scavenging member 84
same time the coins engage the inwardly projecting spring
a‘ combined scavenging and coin-retarding and de?ecting
biased point 95 on the combined scavenging and coin
member ‘86 is pivotally mounted. This combined mem
retarding and de?ecting member 86, see FIGURE 8. This
ber includes a flat base plate 87 which is pivotally con
nected to the scavenging member 84 at a pivot 89. An 60 engagement slows the coins and again de?ects them into
sliding contact with the plate 108. An additional plate
elongated ?at leaf spring 91 is secured at one end 93 to
member 110 is secured to plate 108 by any conventional
the base plate by any conventional means such as a rivet.
means (not shown). This plate member has a down
A conical point "95 is secured to the opposite end of the
ing spurious coins magnetically held in engagement with
wardly inclined edge 112 which acts as a runway so that
ieaf spring. This point is perpendicular to the leaf spring
when the coins move onto plate 108 they encounter this
65
91 and projects through an opening 97 in the base plate,
runway and roll down it, see FIGURES 1 and 3.
see lFIGURE 8. In operation, coins passing down the
The powerful magnet 114 described above is rigidly
dime runway '38 graze the point ‘95, see FIGURE 8, and
secured, to a pivot plate 116. This pivot plate is pro
arede?ected and slowed thereby. 'Ilhis assists the perma
vided with spaced parallel shaft-receiving lug bearings
nent magnet 1114 in controlling the speed of the legitimate 70 ‘118. These lug bearings are closely adjacent to parallel
coins. if a. spurious coin should become jammed under
neath the point ‘95, depressing the actuating arm 70‘, it
will rotate the combined member 86- in the counter
l-ug bearings 120, outwardly projecting from plate 108. A
shaft 122 extends through the aligned openings in these
lug members pivotally securing the permanent magnet
clockwise direction and cause the point 95 to push the
to the plate member 108. A conventional coil spring 124
jammed coin into a reject chute.
75 mounted on shaft 122, acts to bias the magnet against
5
3,096,864
the plate, see FIGURE 1. This pivotal connection be
tween magnet 114 and plate member 108 permits the plate
member surface to be easily cleaned and polished when
6
the weight of a penny, so the trap door is adapted to
open and ‘let a penny fall through the outlet slot 155
when a penny rests on base 154 on the trap door 152.
dirt or corrosion form on it which would otherwise retard
A plate member 149 is adjustably mounted on plate
the speed of the coins.
5 153 by any conventional means to cause the penny to rest
After the coins leave the end of the runway extension
on the base portion 154 of the trap door 152. This plate
112, they pass between the inner surface of the permanent
member is provided with a downwardly inclined de?ect
magnet 114 and the plate member 103. This requires that
ing and wedging edge 157. The position of this plate
the clearance between the plate member 108 and the inner
member 149 on plate 108 is adjusted so the spacing 159
surafce of the permanent magnet be properly adjusted. 10 between edge 157 and the upper surface of the base of
This can be done by giving the plate member 110 a double
portion 154 of the trap door is less than the diameter of
function. As seen in FIGURE 1, the end lug or projec
tion 126 on plate 116 which supports the permanent mag
a penny, ‘but greater than the diameter of a dime.
secured to an outer plate member 132 by a bolt 133.
with some substances which affect their movement in the
With
this arrangement, when coins the size of pennies roll
net 114 is spring biased against plate member 110. Con
down the runway 150, they are stopped against continued
sequently, the plate 110, in addition to forming the run 15 movement over portion 154 of the trap door 152 by the
way extension 112, is made thick enough to hold the
wedging effect of this edge 157 with the upper surface
inner surface (not shown) of the permanent magnet 114
of the base portion 154 of the trap door, which prevents
far enough away from the outer surface of plate 108 to
further motion of the pennies or coins having that dimen
permit the dimes and pennies and other similarly dimen
sion. On the other hand, defective or spurious dimes are
sioned coins to freely pass between them.
20 undisturbed and roll over portion 154 of the trap door.
When coins leave the permanent magnet 114, they
before it has time to open, and move down to the exit
strike an abutment 128, see FIGURE 1. This abutment
coin reject slot 164. This is an important feature because
is integral with the fork member 139 which is adjustably
when genuine dimes become deformed or become coated
This outer plate member is removably secured to plate 25 machine, they will be rejected. In such a case, it is
member 188 by bolts 134 and rivet member 136. Spaced
essential that these genuine but unacceptable coins be re
below the fork member 130 is another fork member 138.
turned to their owner. The pennies and coins the size
This fork member is provided with a lever member 140
of pennies which come into engagement with the wedge
which is pivoted at 142. This lever member has an in
157 are cammed downwardly which, in combination with
wardly projecting abutment 144 which extends through 30 their weight, overcome the biasing force of Weight 162
the base of an L-shaped slot 146 which is formed in the
and cause the trap door to open, whereby they will leave
plate member 132. A weight 141 secured to the lever
the device 10 through the penny exit slot 155.
member 140 acts to keep the abutment 144 biased against
The invention may be embodied in other forms without
the upper edge of the base of the slot 146. This structure
departing from the spirit or essential characteristics there
is similar to the arrangement of the abutments 48 and 60‘ 35 of as set forth in the claims, and the present embodiment
is therefore to be considered as illustrative and not restric~
tive, and it is intended to include all changes which come
within the scope and range of the claims.
the same general dimensions. These abutments are ad
-I claim:
justed relative to each other so that genuine dimes 1413 4-0
1. A coin testing and separating device comprising in
which, as described above, separate quarters from their
spurious imitations. Here the abutments 128 and 144
act to separate dimes from pennies and other coins having
properly slowed by the permanent magnet 114 will graze
the right side of abutment 128 and then will drop and
graze the left side of the pivotal abutment 144 and fall
into the 'dime outlet chute 148, see FIGURE ‘2. Pennies
145 and defective or spurious dimes will follow another
path because of differences in size and composition from
combination a housing, said housing having coin inlet
and outlet openings and runways to permit the passage
of coins therethrough, a ?rst runway in said housing
carrying both pennies and dimes, means for separating
genuine dimes from spurious dimes and pennies on their
composition independently of their paramagnetic proper
the genuine dime or differences in their frictional resist
ance. This path will cause them to engage abutment 128,
and this engagement will de?ect these coins into abut_
ment 144. This engagement will de?ect these coins onto 50
one runway to an extent dependent on their composition,
This runway is formed in two sections which are sep
arated by an exit opening or penny outlet slot 155 which
is ‘somewhat larger than the diameter of a penny. A
first runway with the exit of said ?rst runway in vertically
spaced relation to the entrance of said second runway,
and means on said second runway for separating the
spurious and defective dimes from pennies on the basis of
their size.
ties, said means retarding the speed of the coins on said
means in spaced relation to the exit of said ?rst runway
and positioned to permit genuine dimes moving at pre
the downwardly inclined runway 150 leading to the coin
determined speeds to follow one path while defective and
reject slot 164 along the bottom edge of the inner surface
spurious dimes and pennies moving at different speeds
of the outer plate 132. The spacing ‘between the inner
are caused to follow a different path, a second runway
surface of the plate member 132 and plate 108 is just
positioned so it is part of the path followed by the defec
large enough to permit the coins to freely roll down the 55 tive and spurious dimes and pennies, said second runway
runway, but it is too small to permit them to topple off,
downwardly and oppositely inclined with respect to said
see FIGURE 2.
trap door, indicated generally by the reference numeral
152, is provided for closing this exit opening. The trap
2. A coin-testing and separating device comprising in
door has a base portion 154 which is aligned with and
combination a pair of verticaly disposed plates spaced to
forms a continuation of the runway sections 150 when
permit the free passage of coins downwardly therebetween
the trap door is closed. The outer plate 132 is provided 65 in response to gravitational forces, vertically spaced in
with a pair of integrally ‘formed, parallel, and outwardly
projecting lug bearings 156', see FIGURES 1 and 5. The
base 154 of the trap door has an outwardly projecting
arm 158 upon which are mounted spaced parallel lug
bearings 160, see FIGURE 8. A shaft is adapted to
penetrate the aligned openings in all the lug members
to pivotally hold the trap door 152 to the outer plate
132, see FIGURE 5. A weight 162 is secured to the
outer portion of arm 158 to bias the trap door to a closed
position, see FIGURES 4 and 8.
clined runways positioned between the plates in the path
of the coins passing downwardly therebetween, sorting
means associated with each runway for sorting the coins
dimensionally so that each runway carries coins within a
particular narrow dimensional range, said sorting means
including a plurality of openings in one of said plates, each
opening extending upwardly from the surface of a run
way, a backing plate for each opening, each backing
plate extending upwardly and outwardly from the lower
This weight is less than 75 edge of the opening, at least one runway adapted to carry
3,096,864
7
c)
different denominations of coins along a path, and means
associated with said one runway for separating the coins
on the basis of their composition independently of their
door forming a part of said one runway when in a closed
paramagnetic properties‘ and on the basis of their size,
said size separating means including a de?ecting and
trap door forming a part of said one runway such that
all coins above a predetermined size limit are wedged and
position, the separation between the de?ecting and wedg
ing edge of said plate member and said portion of the
wedging means and an exit means, said de?ecting and
wedging means positioned adjacent said one runway and
operating to stop all coins moving thereon beyond a pre
determined size limit at a point above said exit means,
stopped between said de?ecting and wedging edge of said
portion of said trap door, whereby the weight of said
able to permit said stopped coins to pass therethrough to
low said predetermined size limit are un'a?ected by said
plate member and pass undisturbed between its de?ecting
and wedging edge and said portion of said trap door to
stopped coins is su?icient to overcome the biasing means
on said trap door and cause it to open to permit said
said exit means connected to said one runway and mov— 10 stopped coins to pass therethrough, whereas all coins be
one exit opening, whereas all coins below said predeter
mined size limit remain unaffected by said wedging and
de?ecting means and continue undisturbed along said
another exit opening.
4. The apparatus set forth in claim 3 wherein said bias?
path to another exit opening.
15
ing means on said trap door comprises an arm rigidly
3. A coin-testing and separating device comprising in
connected to said portion of said trap door forming part
combination a pair of vertically disposed plates spaced
to permit the free pasage of coins downwardly there
of said one runway and projecting outwardly from said
between in response to gravitational forces, vertically
spaced inclined runways positioned between the plates in
the path of the coins passing downwardly therebetween,
housing, pivot means extending through said arm and
rotatably connected to said housing for pivotally con
necting said trap door thereto, a Weight mounted on the
sorting means associated with each runway for sorting the
coins dimensionally so that each runway carries coins
end of said arm on the opposite side of said pivot means
within a particular narrow dimensional range, said sort
ing means including a plurality of openings in one of 25
from said portion of said trap door and forming a part
of said one runway for forcing said trap door to a closed
position.
said plates, each opening extending upwardly from the
References Cited in the ?le of this patent
UNITED STATES PATENTS
surface of a runway, a backing plate for each opening,
each backing plate extending upwardly and outwardly
from the lower edge of the opening, at least one runway
adapted to carry di?erent denominations of coins,_and 30
means associated with said one runway for separating the
‘ coins on the basis of their composition independently of
their paramagnetic properties and on the basis of their
size, said size separating means including a plate member
and a trap door, said plate member adjustably mounted
on said housing in spaced relation to said trap door and
having a de?ecting and wedging edge portion, said trap
door pivotally connected to said housing, means biasing
said trap door to a closed position, a portion of said trap
-
459,673
Bolton ______________ __ Sept. 15, 1891
985,789
Demon ______________ __ Mar. 7, 1911
1,428,632
1,891,640
Hendrickson _________ __ Sept. 12, 1922
Gottfried _____________ _ Dec. ‘20, 1932
2,026,262
2,170,897
2,230,352
Wadsworth __________ __ Dec. 31, 1935
Hoban _____________ __ Aug. 29, 1939
Hoyt ________________ __ Feb. 4, 1941
2,292,628
Fry ________________ __ Aug. 11, 1942
2,442,890
Gabrielsen ____________ __ June 8, 1948
2,453,437
I-Iokanson ____V_-___Y_V____ Nov. 9, 1948
Документ
Категория
Без категории
Просмотров
0
Размер файла
840 Кб
Теги
1/--страниц
Пожаловаться на содержимое документа