close

Вход

Забыли?

вход по аккаунту

?

How to prevent ACL injuries - Perform Well

код для вставки
          How  to  prevent  ACL  injuries      By  David  Crane   Jumping  athletes  are  subjected  to  high  lower  limb  forces  when  landing  and  changing  direction  putting  them  at  risk  of  lower  limb  injury  (10).  Neuromuscular  (NM)  control  of  jumping  and  landing  has  been  established  as  being  important  in  mitigating  the  risk  of  ACL  injury  (5),  however  the  factors  contributing  to  NM  control  and  potential  mechanisms  predisposing  an  athlete  to  ACL  injury  are  complex  and  often  individually  specific  (2).  A  strategy  to  improve  the  NM  control  of  jumping  and  landing  of  an  athlete  thus  requires  a  multi-­‐faceted  approach  with  specific  consideration  for  the  individual  (2).  Female  jumping  athletes  demonstrate  a  particularly  high  risk  of  sustaining  lower  limb  injury,  in  particularly  anterior  cruciate  ligament  (ACL)  injury  (13)  with  gender  specific  mechanisms  identified  (9,  14).  Thus  gender  is  a  significant  consideration  when  developing  an  ACL  injury  prevention  strategy,  described  in  greater  detail  below.   The  most  effective  ACL  injury  prevention  approach  will  be  seamlessly  streamlined  and  embedded  within  the  athletes’  existing  sport  performance  training  plan  (6).  A  best-­‐practice  approach  will  also  thus  span  and  evolve  with  the  athletes’  annual  phases  of  training  and  competition  in  order  to  maximise  performance  and  minimise  risk  of  excessive  overload  on  tendons  and  joints  (4)  (see  table  1).    An  assessment  of  the  specific  individual  needs  requires  ongoing  evaluation  of  possible  mechanisms  of  injury  along  with  the  individual  specific  intrinsic  risk  factors.  Valgus  collapse  and  internal  rotation  forces  during  landing  has  been  proposed  as  prominent  gender  specific  mechanisms  of  injury  for  females  (10,  12).  Similarly,  compared  to  males,  females  have  been  found  to  land  with  a  relatively  extended  knee  with  reduced  muscular  pre-­‐load  and  co-­‐
contraction  around  the  knee,  increasing  injury  risk  (6,  11).  Relatively  weak  or  under  active  hamstrings  may  contribute  to  this  lack  of  co-­‐contraction  (6,  7).  For  both  males  and  females,  excessive  navicular  drop  (measure  of  pronation  tendency)  has  been  indicated  as  a  risk  factor  (1,  3).  These  factors  need  to  be  considered  and  addressed  with  an  individualised  approach  when  designing  an  ACL  injury  prevention  strategy  with  competence  based  logical  progressions.  For  example  hip  or  trunk  instability  will  cause  excessive  lower  limb  forces  (8)  and  thus  individuals  demonstrating  hip  and  trunk  instability  particularly  during  landing  tasks  may  require  more  movement  and  balance  training  than  an  athlete  who  is  already  competent  in  this  area.  Please  see  below  for  an  example  of  a  generic  ACL  injury  strategy  integrated  into  an  athletes’  annual  physical  performance  training.      General  Preparation   Pre-­competition  Competition  (~3-­4months)  (~3-­4months)  (~5months)                                                                        “Pre-­Season”   “Competitive  season”       -­‐   Individual  needs/risk  -­‐   Emphasise  any  identified  -­‐   Maintenance  of  Training  assessment   individual   needs  /  ACL  risk  adaptations  achieved  activities       factors.  during  preseason  and    pre-­‐competition  phases.    -­‐   ↑  General  lower  limb  &   -­‐   C
ontinue В g
eneral В s
trength/   strength/hip  stability/power  Objectives       power  development  of   -­‐ Continue  to  work  on  foundation  l
ifts В В В В (
i.e. В s
quats/  individually  identified    -­‐   Correction  of  any  bilateral  to  be  dead  lifts  etc)  ACL  injury  risk  factors.  strength  imbalances  achieved      -­‐ Ongoing  fatigue  and    -­‐    Quads:  Hams  strength  ratio  -­‐   Progress  bilateral  single  leg  strength/power  (
if В n
o В i
mbalance  training/competition       (specifically  strengthen  exists)  load  management   Hamstrings)      -­‐   Progression  of  plyometric/    -­‐    Trunk  /  hip  stability  /        jumping  training  (e.g.  jump              Abductor  strength  +  stick  landing  from  box,  single   leg  multi-­‐directional  bounding).    -­‐    Foot  /knee  alignment  on        landing  -­‐   Progression  of  Quad:  Hams   co-­‐
 -­‐ Small  frontal  plane  movements  activation  work.   (Hops)  -­‐   Progression  of  dynamic  trunk   -­‐ Introduction  of  low  intensity  stability  competence   jumping  -­‐   Stability/control  of  single  leg   landing  -­‐ Static  trunk  stability    -­‐ Dynamic  trunk  stability   (if   -­‐  Explosively  moving  in  frontal  plane,  particularly  uni-­‐laterally  competent)  (pushing  off  one  leg)  -­‐ Stability  in  single  leg  stance          (Include  dynamic  control               e.g.  perturbations  /  landing  if   -­‐   Progress  pivoting  and  lateral  cutting  manoeuvres  competent)    -­‐   Inclusion  of  more  competition  -­‐ Basic  agility  activities  specific  landing  and  cutting       tasks       -­‐   Progression  of  agility      complexity   Included  in   Dynamic     warm  up  for  all  sessions  –  Ongoing  technique  feedback  using  a  variety  of  methods  (visual/verbal/kinaesthetic/real  time  feedback)  -­‐  Implicit  motor  learning  strategies  to  be  all  phases  prioritised.  Ongoing  analysis  of  individual  priorities  and  needs  using  a  competence  based  progression  approach  Table  1:   Specific  strategy  of  improving  NM  control  of  jumping  and  landing  in  an  �at  risk’  female  volleybaler  ingrained  into  annual  physical  performance  training  plan.    References   1.  2.  3.  4.  5.  6.  7.  8.  9.  10.  11.  12.  13.  14.   Allen  MK  and  Glasoe  WM.  Metrecom  measurement  of  navicular  drop  in  subjects  with  anterior  cruciate  ligament  injury.  Journal  of  athletic  training  35:  403,  2000.  Bahr  R.  ACL  injuries—problem  solved?  British  journal  of  sports  medicine  43:  313-­‐314,  2009.  Beckett  ME,  Massie  DL,  Bowers  KD,  and  Stoll  DA.  Incidence  of  hyperpronation  in  the  ACL  injured  knee:  a  clinical  perspective.  Journal  of  athletic  training  27:  58,  1992.  Cook  J  and  Purdam  CR.  Is  tendon  pathology  a  continuum?  A  pathology  model  to  explain  the  clinical  presentation  of  load-­‐induced  tendinopathy.  British  journal  of  sports  medicine  43:  409-­‐416,  2009.  Hewett  TE,  Ford  KR,  and  Myer  GD.  Anterior  cruciate  ligament  injuries  in  female  athletes  Part  2,  a  meta-­‐analysis  of  neuromuscular  interventions  aimed  at  injury  prevention.  The  American  journal  of  sports  medicine  34:  490-­‐498,  2006.  Hewett  TE,  Myer  GD,  and  Ford  KR.  Anterior  cruciate  ligament  injuries  in  female  athletes  part  1,  mechanisms  and  risk  factors.  The  American  journal  of  sports  medicine  34:  299-­‐
311,  2006.  Hewett  TE,  Stroupe  AL,  Nance  TA,  and  Noyes  FR.  Plyometric  training  in  female  athletes  decreased  impact  forces  and  increased  hamstring  torques.  The  American  Journal  of  Sports  Medicine  24:  765-­‐773,  1996.  Hewett  TE,  Torg  JS,  and  Boden  BP.  Video  analysis  of  trunk  and  knee  motion  during  non-­‐
contact  anterior  cruciate  ligament  injury  in  female  athletes:  lateral  trunk  and  knee  abduction  motion  are  combined  components  of  the  injury  mechanism.  British  journal  of  sports  medicine  43:  417-­‐422,  2009.  Hohmann  E,  Bryant  A,  Reaburn  P,  and  Tetsworth  K.  Is  there  a  correlation  between  posterior  tibial  slope  and  non-­‐contact  anterior  cruciate  ligament  injuries?  Knee  Surgery,  Sports  Traumatology,  Arthroscopy  19:  109-­‐114,  2011.  Krosshaug  T,  Slauterbeck  JR,  Engebretsen  L,  and  Bahr  R.  Biomechanical  analysis  of  anterior  cruciate  ligament  injury  mechanisms:  three-­‐dimensional  motion  reconstruction  from  video  sequences.  Scandinavian  journal  of  medicine  &  science  in  sports  17:  508-­‐
519,  2007.  Lephart  SM,  Abt  J,  Ferris  C,  Sell  T,  Nagai  T,  Myers  J,  and  Irrgang  J.  Neuromuscular  and  biomechanical  characteristic  changes  in  high  school  athletes:  a  plyometric  versus  basic  resistance  program.  British  journal  of  sports  medicine  39:  932-­‐938,  2005.  Quatman  CE  and  Hewett  TE.  The  anterior  cruciate  ligament  injury  controversy:  is  “valgus  collapse”  a  sex-­‐specific  mechanism?  British  journal  of  sports  medicine  43:  328-­‐335,  2009.  Renstrom  P,  Ljungqvist  A,  Arendt  E,  Beynnon  B,  Fukubayashi  T,  Garrett  W,  Georgoulis  T,  Hewett  TE,  Johnson  R,  and  Krosshaug  T.  Non-­‐contact  ACL  injuries  in  female  athletes:  an  International  Olympic  Committee  current  concepts  statement.  British  journal  of  sports  medicine  42:  394-­‐412,  2008.  Shelbourne  KD,  Davis  TJ,  and  Klootwyk  TE.  The  relationship  between  intercondylar  notch  width  of  the  femur  and  the  incidence  of  anterior  cruciate  ligament  tears  A  prospective  study.  The  American  Journal  of  Sports  Medicine  26:  402-­‐408,  1998.  
Документ
Категория
Без категории
Просмотров
4
Размер файла
211 Кб
Теги
1/--страниц
Пожаловаться на содержимое документа