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HOW TO USE - National Center for Civil Human Rights

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ACROSS
HOW TO USE
GENERATIONS
A GUIDE TO TALKING ABOUT CIVIL AND HUMAN RIGHTS
The Center for Civil and Human Rights was created with many
audiences and age groups in mind. It takes an honest look at some
events in our recent human history that future generations, including our children, can learn from. How? By teaching children
to identify—and prevent—one group’s attempts to violate another
group’s rights.
Many school-aged children will be introduced to the topics
presented inside The Center galleries by their classroom
curriculum in late elementary school or middle school. However,
all children know when something or someone is fair or not fair.
This sense of justice puts young children in a great position for
you to start introducing and reinforcing the concepts of empathy,
tolerance, and responsibility. These ideas are central to later
discussions about prejudice and discrimination.
The activities featured, and the individuals celebrated, in “Across
Generations: A Guide to Talking About Civil and Human Rights”
emphasize the potential for anyone to be a hero and the power that
people have when they work together for the common good. The
themes of belonging, acknowledging and appreciating differences,
and identifying injustices are appropriate for children of all ages.
The discussion questions and reflection activity will also help you
encourage learning from your own personal past.
We hope you will take advantage of this Guide to help empower
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В© NATIONAL CENTER FOR CIVIL AND HUMAN RIGHTS, INC.
INSPIRATION LIVES HERE
ACROSS GENERATIONS GUIDE
INTRODUCTION
the next generation with the knowledge that they, too, can make
a difference. Encourage them to speak up when others cannot
speak for themselves. Use your trip to The Center as a springboard
for important conversations about respecting other people—and
expecting other people to respect them, too.
We welcome you and yours to the Center for Civil and Human
Rights. Inspiration lives here.
IN THE “ACROSS GENERATIONS” GUIDE YOU WILL FIND
•
Welcome!: A letter of introduction for kids
•
Did You Know?: Civil Disobedience – An introduction to the concept of
civil disobedience along with brief biographies of Mahatma Gandhi and Martin Luther King, Jr.
•
Key People and Events: Who is a Hero? – Ten “ordinary” people featured in The Center who became heroes in extraordinary circumstances, ranging from a six-year-old girl and a math teacher
to an author
•
Discussion and Reflection Activity: What Would You Do? – Three
scenarios involving young people, included in The Center, that ask you to put yourself in the shoes of someone from a different time or place and encourage cross-generational discussions
•
Crossword: The ABCs of Civil Rights – A puzzle that identifies some
of the acronyms for civil rights groups used frequently throughout
The Center
•
Word Search: Roles People Play in Human Rights – A puzzle that introduces five ways people may help or hurt human rights
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В© NATIONAL CENTER FOR CIVIL AND HUMAN RIGHTS, INC.
INSPIRATION LIVES HERE
ACROSS GENERATIONS GUIDE
INTRODUCTION
ANSWER KEYS
• Crossword: Down: 1. NAACP 2. WPC 3. SNCC;
Across: 1. NCNW 2. MIA 3. SCLC 4. CORE
• Word Search: Over, Down Direction: BYSTANDER (11,4 S),
ENABLER (7,4 SW), PERPETRATOR (1,12 E), UPSTANDER
(1,1 SE), VICTIM (6,2 E)
FOR YOUR INFORMATION: KEY VOCABULARY AND TERMS
CIVIL RIGHTS: the right to full legal, economic, and social equality
under the protection of a country’s laws
CONGRESS OF RACIAL EQUALITY (CORE): an important group in the American
Civil Rights Movement that began in 1942; their work included
integrating buses and helping African Americans register to vote in
the South
CRIMINAL: a person who breaks the law
DEFEND: protect, keep safe
DISCRIMINATION: denying people their civil rights or treating them
unfairly based on the color of their skin or other traits such as
religion, age, or gender
DISOBEDIENCE: breaking laws or rules on purpose
ENFORCED: making sure something happens
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В© NATIONAL CENTER FOR CIVIL AND HUMAN RIGHTS, INC.
INSPIRATION LIVES HERE
ACROSS GENERATIONS GUIDE
INTRODUCTION
HUMAN RIGHTS: basic rights and abilities that every person has because
they are human, including civil rights; a set of globally accepted
standards that are the birthright of all people by virtue of their
humanity and that do not change from country to country
INDEPENDENCE: freedom from control by others
MONTGOMERY IMPROVEMENT ASSOCIATION (MIA): an important group in the
American Civil Rights Movement that was formed in 1955 and led
by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. to direct the boycott that ended
segregated buses in Montgomery, AL
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF COLORED PEOPLE (NAACP): an
important African American Civil Rights group that began in 1909
and helped lead the Civil Rights Movement of the 1950s and 1960s;
their legal teams helped bring lawsuits that ended segregation; the
term “colored” was once a name used to describe African
American people
NATIONAL COUNCIL OF NEGRO WOMEN (NCNW): a group that began in 1935
to improve life for African American women, their families, and
their communities; during the American Civil Rights Movement,
they helped organize the 1963 March on Washington under the
leadership of Dorothy Height; the term “negro” was once a name
used to describe African American people
NONVIOLENCE: protesting by using peaceful ways such as boycotts,
marches, and sit-ins
PROTECTED: kept safe
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В© NATIONAL CENTER FOR CIVIL AND HUMAN RIGHTS, INC.
INSPIRATION LIVES HERE
ACROSS GENERATIONS GUIDE
INTRODUCTION
PROTEST: oppose or disagree with something
RACISM: treating people unfairly because of their race or the
color of their skin; believing your own race or skin color is
better than others
SEGREGATION: separating or isolating a group of people; before the
American Civil Rights Movement, white people in the South often
used laws called “Jim Crow” laws to enforce segregation by race
SOUTHERN CHRISTIAN LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE (SCLC): an important group in
the American Civil Rights Movement, founded in 1957 and first led
by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.; they became one of the leading civil
rights groups using boycotts and other nonviolent forms of protest
STUDENT NONVIOLENT COORDINATING COMMITTEE (SNCC): an important group
in the American Civil Rights Movement first organized by
college students; they led many boycotts, sit-ins, and voter
registration drives
VIOLENCE: rough or dangerous treatment
WOMEN’S POLITICAL COUNCIL (WPC): an important group in the American
Civil Rights Movement that helped lead the bus boycott in
Montgomery, AL, in 1955 after Rosa Parks was arrested
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В© NATIONAL CENTER FOR CIVIL AND HUMAN RIGHTS, INC.
INSPIRATION LIVES HERE
ACROSS GENERATIONS GUIDE
INTRODUCTION
BOOK CLUB: RECOMMENDED READING
The books in this Recommended Reading list are divided into
three categories: Civil Rights, Human Rights, and Diversity,
Empathy, and Peace. The content and reading levels are
appropriate for children in pre-kindergarten through 3rd grade,
or ages four through eight. All of the books are nonfiction or
based on a true story, including biographies and autobiographies.
Historical fiction is also an excellent way to introduce some of the
more complex themes presented in the Center for Civil and Human
Rights. Use this list as a starting place to introduce your young
readers to the themes and events you encounter during your visit
to The Center. Check your local library for these titles!
CIVIL RIGHTS
Bridges, Ruby. Ruby Bridges Goes to School: My True Story
(Scholastic Reader, Level 2). Cartwheel Books, 2009
Brown, Monica. Side by Side/Lado a Lado: The Story of Dolores
Huerta and Cesar Chavez/La Historia de Dolores Huerta y Cesar
Chavez. Rayo, 2010
Coles, Robert. The Story of Ruby Bridges. Scholastic
Paperbacks, 2010
Evans, Shane W. We March. Roaring Book Press, 2012
Haskins, Jim. Delivering Justice: W.W. Law and the Fight for
Civil Rights. Candlewick, 2008
King, Jr., Martin Luther. I Have a Dream. Schwartz & Wade, 2012
Levy, Debbie. We Shall Overcome: The Story of a Song. Jump At
The Sun, 2013
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В© NATIONAL CENTER FOR CIVIL AND HUMAN RIGHTS, INC.
INSPIRATION LIVES HERE
ACROSS GENERATIONS GUIDE
INTRODUCTION
Lewis, J. Patrick. When Thunder Comes: Poems for Civil Rights
Leaders. Chronicle Book, 2012
Pinkney, Andrea Davis. Martin & Mahalia: His Words, Her Song.
Little, Brown Books for Young Readers, 2013
Shelton, Paula Young. Child of the Civil Rights Movement. Junior
Library Guild Selection, 2009
Rappaport, Doreen. Martin’s Big Words: The Life of Dr. Martin
Luther King, Jr. Hyperion Book CH, 2007
Ringgold, Faith. If a Bus Could Talk: The Story of Rosa Parks.
Reading Rainbow Book, 2003
HUMAN RIGHTS
Amnesty International. We Are All Born Free: The Universal
Declaration of Human Rights in Pictures. Frances Lincoln
Children’s Books, 2008
Castle, Caroline, adapter. For Every Child. Phyllis Fogelman
Books, 2001
Do, Anh. Little Refugee. Allen & Unwin, 2011
Gandhi, Arun & Bethany Hegedus. Grandfather Gandhi.
Atheneum Books for Young Readers, 2014
Landowne, Youme. Mali Under the Night Sky: A Lao Story of
Home. Cinco Puntos Press, 2010
Napoli, Donna Jo. Mama Miti: Wangari Maathai and the Trees
of Kenya. Simon & Schuster/Paula Wiseman Books, 2010
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В© NATIONAL CENTER FOR CIVIL AND HUMAN RIGHTS, INC.
INSPIRATION LIVES HERE
ACROSS GENERATIONS GUIDE
INTRODUCTION
Oelschlager, Vanita. I Came From the Water: One Haitian Boy’s
Incredible Tale of Survival. Vanita Books, 2012
Serres, Alain. I Have the Right to be a Child. Groundwood Books,
2012
Weiss, Ellen. Mother Teresa: A Life of Kindness. Bellwether
Media, 2007
DIVERSITY, EMPATHY, & PEACE
Gainer, Cindy. I’m Like You, You’re Like Me: A Book About
Understanding and Appreciating Each Other. Free Spirit
Publishing, 2013
Gilley, Jeremy. Peace One Day. Putnam Juvenile, 2005
Hines, Anna Grossnickle. Peaceful Pieces: Poems and Quilts
About Peace. Henry Holt and Co., 2011
Hoberman, Mary Ann. My Song is Beautiful. Little, Brown Young
Readers, 2009
Katz, Karen. Can You Say Peace? Henry Holt and Co., 2006
Kerley, Barbara. One World, One Day. National Geographic
Children’s Book, 2009
Kissinger, Katie. All the Colors We Are/Todos los colores de
nuestra piel: The Story of How We Get Our Skin Color/La historia
de por quГ© tenemos diferentes colores de piel. Redleaf Press, 2014
Rotner, Shelley & Sheila M. Kelly. Shades of People. Holiday
House, 2010
Stella, Pilar. Seeking Serenity. Morgan James Publishing, 2008
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В© NATIONAL CENTER FOR CIVIL AND HUMAN RIGHTS, INC.
INSPIRATION LIVES HERE
ACROSS GENERATIONS GUIDE
INTRODUCTION
В© 2014 The Center for Civil and Human Rights
All rights reserved. Except for educational fair use, no portion of
this document may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or
transmitted in any form or by any means – electronic, mechanical,
photocopy, recording, or any other without explicit prior permission.
Multiple copies may only be made by or for the teacher for
educational use.
The Center: http://www.civilandhumanrights.org
Content created by TurnKey Education, Inc., for The National Center
of Civil and Human Rights, Inc.
TurnKey Education, Inc.: www.turnkeyeducation.net
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