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Speeches and Toasts: How to Make and Propose - Forgotten Books

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Cornell
PN
University
Library
6341.S74
Speeches
and
toasts:
how
malie
to
and
pro
3
1924
027
293
103
BY
THE
Price
THE
AUTHOR
SAME
Shilling:
One
GUIDE
CHAIRMAN'S
AND
COMPANION
SECRETARY'.S
Choice
Includes
Chairman
of
Duties
cf
Rules
of
a
;
"
Chairman
Meetings
General
a
"
Meetings
"
Motions
Amendments
and
Furnis,
"
"
Withdrawals
Construction
and
Pliraseology
"
and
Polling
Points
Voting
of
Procedure,
etc
"
"
WARD,
tOCK
"
CO.,
LTD.
SPEECHES
ffOlV
MAKE
TO
TOASTS:
AND
THEM.
PROPOSE
AND
t'
VI
HANDBOOK
A
SOCIAL
SPEECH-MAKING
FOR
BY
AUTHOR
With
OF
a
THE
List
Toasts
of
Arrangement
Directions
;
Rules
and
Precedence.
Social
EDITION.
;
ETC.
Parliaments;
Addresses
OF
t/Elf
GUIDE,"
Local
of
Temperance
"
THE
Sentiments
and
TOASTS
ADDITIONAL
WITH
LONDON
LOCK
WARD,
HOUSE,
WARWICK
NSW
YORK,
"
CO.,
LIMITED,
SQUARE.
SALISBURY
MELBOURNE
"
.-
OCCASION
EVERY
CHAIRMAN'S
"THE
OF
-^
I
'
AND
SYDNEY.
E.C.
foe
CONTENTS.
HINTS
On
Aet
the
TO
SPEAKERS.
Speaking
of
g
_.
Common
Errors
Speaking
in
...
SECTION
I."
ROYAL
PERSONAGES
PATRIOTIC
Toast"
The
Queen
The
Prince
The
Royal
The
Aemy,
la
_
AND
TOASTS.
17
Princess
and
of
"o.
Wales,
ao
Family
22
..
Navy,
and
the
Foregoing
Reserve
Forces
"
23
.
Speeches
in
Reply
to
for
Response
the
"
24
"
Navy
,,
25
...
for
Response
the
"
Forces"
Reserve
,,
25
...
Toast
The
"
in
Speech
The
Toast
Army
26
Response
for
the
"
for
the
"
"
Army
27
Navy
27
"
in
Speech
Response
"
Navy
28
...
The
Toast
"
in
Speech
Volunteers
28
for
Response
the
'*
Volunteers"
...
The
Toast
29
..
Militia
29
"
in
Speech
Reply
for
the
"
Militia
"
..
The
Toast
in
Speech
The
Toast
and
Response
to
Naval
Naval
the
the
Reserve
31
preceding
31
Volunteers
33
"
in
Speech
Toast
Navy
"
The
"
Speech
in
Toast"
The
Speech
in
"
Reply
to
the
preceding
Reply
by
the
Services,
Reply
Toast
(proposed
Volunteers
Senior
33
officially)
by
Sir
Army,"
by
the
Navy,"
by
Lord
the
"
for
the
"
33
Officer
Volunteer
proposed
for
30
35
Leighton
F.
Duke
of
35
Cambridge
36
...
Northbrook
...
...
37
CONTENTS.
CONSECRATION"
A
AT
AND
ECCLESIASTICAL
TOASTS
POLITICAL.
II."
SECTION
Toast
"
pagh
The
Church
The
Clergy
The
Vicar
Our
AND
Bishop
..
39
.
4"
"
Parish
of the
.
"
Reply by the
Speech
in
Toast
The
"
..
41
.
LEGISLATURE.
THE
III."
SECTION
41
,.,
of the District
Clergy
40
..
..
"
Vicar
"
.
Toast
"
Speech
Toast"
House
The
Lords
of
Lord
the
Reply by
Her
Majesty's
in
House
The
43
Chancellor
43
...
Ministers
45
45
Commons
of
"
Speech
Toast"
Reply
in
Commons,"
for "The
The
Members
The
County
FOR
Sir W.
by
Harcourt
46
48
Borough
THE
Members
49
,,
Speech (i) Proposing
(2)"Another
,,
on
"
...
like occasion
a
.
IV."
SECTION
Toast
for Parliament
Candidate
a
"
Her
Majesty's Judges
The
Lord
Lieutenant
LEGAL.
52
of
County
the
...
"
The
.
Magistrates
"
Lieutenant
Lord
The
and
Magistrates
the
County
Magistrates
Borough
the
The
Speech
in
reply by
a
54
SS
Magistrate
v."
SECTION
53
53
of
"
Toast"
50
50
56
TOASTS
SOCIAL.
/
WEDDINGS"
Toast
"
The
Bride
The
Newly
Bridegroom
and
...
Married
Couple
...
The
another
on
same
occasion
,,
...
Speech
in
,,
Reply by
by
,,
the
"
the
"
Bridegroom
Bridegroom
in
Reply
to
Toast
"
59
"
and
proposing
"
The
"The
Bridesmaids
Bridesmaids
Speech
in
"
"
The
"
Best
Man
by the
"Groomsman"
"bythe
"
Groomsmen
The
Reply
58
58
59
to
,,
,,
J
"
Bridesmaids"
Speech
g)
to
"
60
60
61
The
Groomsmen
"
61
...
CHRISTENINGS"
Toast
"
The
The
Little
Health
,,
Speech
"
in
Reply
J,
Stranger
of
the
62
Baby
the foregoing
of " The
to the Toast
6a
to
6f
Godparents
'
63
CONTENTS
7
BIRTHDAYS-
pagb
Toast
Hero
The
"
Speech
in
Toast
The
"
Speech
Toast
Reply
Day
THE
to the
64
foregoing
65
65
Heir
Reply by
in
The
"
OF
the Heir
66
Tenants
67
"
The Tenants
Speech in Reply to
Speech by the Squire in acknowledgment
"
drunk
...
...
SECTION
67
of his health
being
68
...
...
VI."
...
SPORTING
...
TOASTS.
CRICKET
DINNERS"
(OR FOOTBALL)
Our
Opponents
Reply by the Captain of the opposing team
Toast
Success
Cricket
Club
to
the
Speech in Reply by the Secretary and
Toast"
70
71
"
Captain"
...
...
Toast
The
"
Speech
in
REGATTA
Toast
"
Speech
Toast
"
Speech
AN
DINNERS"
Success
the
to
Speech
Toast
The
Speech
AT
The
78
to
PENNY
in
Angling
the
HOUSE
Club
80
""
DINNER
Firm
to
80
a
Partner
8t
...
,
"
The
Employ"
83
84
84
85
85
"
..
Visitors
Reply by
The
a
Visitor
a
Bachelor
...
Ladies
Reply by
86
READINGS"
87
87
by the Chairman
Opening Address
by the Chairman
Concluding Address
VII.-
SECTION
Toast"
The
78
79
Reply
Toast
77
.
Employes
in
in
77
Club
Reply by
Speech
"
76
Distribution
"'
The
"
Regatta
the
Prize
at the
in
Toast
75
MEETING"
Toast"
Speech
Host
Archery
ANNUAL
"
74
...
Reply by the Secretary to the Committee
The
Health
Competing
Crews
OF
the
in Reply by the successful Stroke
ANGLING
CLUB"
Prosperity
Toast
AN
74
Host
the
.
"
AT
73
...
Eleven...
in
"
AN
of
reply by
ARCHERY
The
Toast
Speech
Health
"The
proposing
...
Response by the Captain of the
71
...
MISCELLANEOUS
8g
Press
Speech in Reply
Laying
to the above
the Foundation-Stone
Toast
of aMuscu:n
Toast"
The
Ladies
TOASTS.
9^
92
'"9
CONTENTS.
At
School
a
Festival
.
Address
A
at
"
Prize-giving
"
a
New
Line
Railway
Speech in Reply
Toast
Town
"
"
"
for
The
first sod
Toast
of
"
a
Speech upon
the
to
...
Line
...
Member
TEMPERANCE
Temperance
BLUE
AND
Blue
and
"
Ribbon
Army
Abstinence
Total
"
98
.;.
...
What
Temperance
is it ?
Question"
SECTION
Speech
RULES
IX."
FOR
LOCAL
Manning
104
Blaikie
by Lord Claud
...
...
Hamilton
FORMATION
THE
OP
PARLIAMENTS.
Regulations of the
Specimen Speeches in Debate
and
SECTION
THE
X."
no
no
iti
in
112
'
House
"
113
114
CHAIRMAN
AND
Of the choice of a Chairman
at a Meeting
Elected
Of the Duties
of an
Chairman
Of the Chairman
at Social
Meetings
Of his Duties on such occasions
The
The
Chairman
HIS
DUTIES.
120
...
...
..
120
...
121
122
of the Guests
Arrangement
..
Public
at a
...
...
...
...
Dinner
TOASTS
XL"
Sentiments
Military Toasts and Sentiments
Naval 'toastsand Sentiments
Love
Toasts
AND
SENTIMENTS.
and
Toasts
Loyal
and
124
..
...
.
Toasts
and
Toasts
and
Toasts
Miscellaneous
124
125
and
...
...
Pjilesof Precedence
...
...
and
...
...
...
Sentiments
PRECEDENCE
...
...
126
127
128
Sentiments
...
THE
...
...
127
...
...
Toasts
...
...
Sentiments
Convivial Toa.sts and Sentiments
and Sentiments
Toasts
Comic
Sporting
...
Sentiments
,.
Friendship
124
..
Sentiments
...
Masonic
122
122
...
SECTION
105
lo^
Of Standing Orders
Of the Officers of Parliament
Of the Council
Of the Formation
of a Ministry
the
of
Of
the Parliament
Meetings
Rules
100
102
by Cardinal
by Professor
Speech
Speech
,,
,,
96
MEETINGS.
of the
"
95
'
97
VIII."
Ribbon"
The Blub
Total
Abstinence
The
Success
Trade
and
RIBBON
by
94
...
SECTION
Address
93
..
"
turned
..,
to the
...
Sports
OF
..
.
...
129
129
GUESTS.
t^
HINTS
SPEAKERS.
TO
I.
THE
ON
Silence
occasions
there
are
but
for
good
not
will
all
if
great
Deeds,
and
done
fruit.
Deeds
incites
to
"
and
;
to
result
of
study
attained
Uian
are
will be
will
is
that
upon
motto
power
but
deeds
and
bear
;
builds
up
of
mainspring
the
any
the
grow
;
it
nearly all,
going by
oratory
;
stammer,
is
a
and
action,
it handed
down
essential
manner
the
Now
oi;r
nervous
turn
names
posterity ?
qualifications for
repose
man
clearness
"
by
oratory
minds
men's
of
power
how
must
to
recognized
and
and
is a grand
eloquence
in
in
parliament,
of
sign
inscribe
we
immediately
to
audience
application.
can
world,"
power
an
away
certain
of
the
by persuasive
theatre
or
How
have
of
The
actions
and
?
and
deliberation
then,
queen
carry
pulpit,
which
the
their
in
There
destroy
or
fact
calm
or
Still
well
good
can
desired.
be
speak
set
a
excite
power.
court,
of fame
words,"
Speech,
is
influence
possession
be
is
influence
speaker
to
but
missible
ad-
only
the
audience.
a
;
of peace.
fame
and
been
have
create
deeds.
it is
certain
not
greatly
can
and
;
is
speech,
powerful
his
who
Words
may
Eloquence
comes
enchain
man
a
not
over.
advocate
the
evil)
a
a
possession
movements,
"
a
is
following
a
of
it,on
protracted
spealcing
power
can
that
have
speech.
are
as
be
may
that
hearers,
denied
subject
for
has
proverb
strife
The
speaker
every
be
not
his
the
as
seasons
well
SPEAKING.
when
necessary.
over
cannot
if
and
(as
exercise
But
golden,"
by speaking
when
times
OF
"
be
may
ART
of
will
mien.
flounder
brain,
this
upon
Let
the
the
power
the roll
us
see
speaker
of utterance,
The
hurried
in his
talk-
!
HINTS
IC
"
will
unready
The
SPEA/TERS.
TO
"
hum
"
and
Some
bore to his audience.
by hurry, which they think
haw
men
until he
"
a
spoil all
fast and
too
are
becomes
fluency. So there are many
essential
to gain. Study is a very
thingsto avoid and some
Just as a writer should read
point,study of good models.
and
form
his style,so
a
speaker should study for oratory.
said
is
this ?
Lord
Brougham upon
The
beginning of the art is
be had.
speaking,"and it must
What
acquire a habit of easy
The
learning to speak is
"
foundation
the
of
custom
a
be
of
habit
love
than of sayinganything well."
rate
any
a
proved hard reading);
; by speaking in
company
littleattention
sayingsomething at
got by
said
in
talkingmuch
debating societies with
of
it must
writing(which as Wyndham
easy
by
"But
of all.
to
rule,and
to
more
speaking is gradually acquired.
But of course
to speak easily
subjectyou
upon
any particular
know
about.
This
what
must
are
knowledge
talking
you
alone gives you
wards.
to keep it afterconfidence,and helps one
So
the art
"
The
step is
next
into chaste
model
or
Sheridan
from
Cicero
or
;
Lord
instances
gives
as
to
The
and
Demosthenes
of
good plan
a
to
upon
such
to
good
debaters,such as Mr. Gladstone and others in
importantquestions. Upon such speakers one
style,and
will be
There
confidence
when
well
are
in
has
a
measure
join a debating societyor
number
of parliamentsin and
to
a
the present
time, and
other
any
person
of them
may
small
by paying a
If,however, speaking does not come
better to write the speech and
commit
one
or
method
has
tending to
letter
"
we
This
been
ease
have
leads
in
by
Lord
speaking.
alreadyquoted, says
me
writingbeforehand
is
recommended
ancient
Zachary Macaulay
to
settingup
listen
Burke, Fox,
as
amongst
in his letter
usefulness
of addresses
It is also
speaking
easy
this is to take a good
orators, such
composition
Demosthenes'
speeches.
the
styleof
to do
way
modem
Brougham
of the
this
convert
eloquence."
models
orators.
and
of easy
habit
or
such
models,
masterly lines
parliamentary
the House, on
foim
can
his
been gained it
local parliament
about
become
entrance
London
at
member
a
of
fee.
easy, it will be much
it to memory.
This
of oratory as
Brougham, from whose
masters
in this
regard
that though speaking without
to remark
is very well tillthe habit of easy speaking
"
write too much
acquired,yet after that he can never
: this
"
is quiteclear."
italics
is
It
(The
are
ours.)
laborious,no
difficultbeyond comparison than speakdoubt,and it is more
ON
Ing off
THE
ART
OF
SPEAKING.
u
hand
to perfect
; but it is necessary
oratory, and at any
it is necessary
of correct
to acquire the habit
diction.
But I go farther,
and
of
end
man's
life he
the
to
a
say even
word
for word
must
of his finer passages."
most
prepare
Thus
much
for spealcing,
and learning to make
speeches.
The
essentials amongst
two
minor
are
points
many
easy
rate
speaking and
study. There
such
and
as
the
and
acquisitionof eloquence by models
also be natural
must
qualifications
present,
correctlybetween
sense, to steer one
of discord
and bad taste.
common
rocks
There
shoals
be
must
gence,
intelli-
but a power
necessarilyintellectual superiority,
of
grasping points in an
adversary'sspeech, in turning
and
in planning a speech,particularly
his arguments,
when
is
need
speaking
hardly insist
required. We
extempore
and
such
attributes
which
as
imagination
earnestness,
upon
have
already been referred to. The studies to be pursued
not
will be
touched
later. At
upon
speaking,and add a few
present
air"
addresses.
simple
will
we
rules
"
to
turn
open
respecting such
which
Open air speakers often fail from the very cause
they imagine will ensure
viz.,loudness of address.
success,
we
mere
mean
By loudness
shouting and great muscular
strain of the voice.
the essential
by
points to
the
filling
common
to
say
readily to
more
Let
tongue
energy.
form
should
well
open
so
which
words
be
lungs before
sense
words
clearness
But
as
to
carry
and
observed,
they
utterance
hearers
all vowels
of
than
It is
wiU
utterance
amount
any
are
obtained
are
beginning the sentence.
that distinctness
the
distinct
and
only
carry
of indistinct
clear.
The
particularly
the syllablesclearly
should
; the mouth
certain
utterance
to
give the rounded
conviction
to
be
the
audience.
An
earnest
appropriateaction,a composed energeticand
not
too
rapid enunciation, with regularity of diction,will
Of
send
a
course
across
"winged words"
large space.
total ; but
the power of the speaker is a factor in the sum
clearness
and
a moderately strong man,
by attention to
even
of
enunciation
and
the distinct
vowel-sounds,
pronunciation
with
manner
make
may
We
himself
understood
at
a
considerable
distance.
of the speaker.
to the attributes
have only been referring
with
to do
The condition of the atmosphere will have much
of the speech, for air is very hostile to the prothe success
pagation
certain conditions.
of sounds under
At any rate, whether
we
speak extempore, by rote, in the
hall
or
be the
air,the grand objectto be
We
have,
gaining of the audience.
the open
aimed
whether
at
should
it be
a
or
We
; and
true
that
in earnest, and
are
then
them
make
must
we
opponents
their remarks
by strong argument
by feeling that
his aim
puttinghimself
in the
is
good
place of
Such
shreds.
opinion to
successfully.
own
a
He
a
of
force
his
bend
stingfrom
can
do
this
imagination,
such
has
who
man
of oratory that
is the power
and
turn
bring forward arguments,
his
by
object
Politically,
our
to
the
ridicule.
; or,
Such
us.
draw
to
or
a
good,
wishes
He
speaks to win suffrages.
rate
to his views,or at any
the orator
is
that
the notion
with
with
act
om
object, for
speak to win
We
motive
our
of
definite
with
are
we
adherence
the
win
address, to
an
a
speaking
the
all
is
it
same.
influence,
audience
must
impress our
If
money,
hearts.
we
lecture,or
a
sermon,
hearers.
SPEAKERS.
TO
HINTS
"2
views.
versatile speaker may
tear
himself and
upon
been
feat has
performed
concerning the speaker here.
all study, are,
and
above
Emphasis, clearness,intelligence,
for
has
natural
if the person
aptitude
speaking, all
any
for public speaking. We
cannot
go into many
necessary
minor pointsin this brief sketch.
Every one will be able to
thrown
have
down, and we hope any
gather the hints we
do glean may
wtio
profitby them.
But
need
we
say
no
more
II.
of words
Pronunciation
foregoingpages,
dailyuse which have
privatespeaking,to
the
unnaturally every
of such
"
errors
SPEAKING.
IN
ERRORS
COMMON
has
but there
already been
are
many
errors
insisted
of
on
in
speech in
public and
frequentlynoticed in
Not
we
fairlycall attention.
may
will repudiatethe commission
sion
one
or omisand forms, but did any
one
ever
an
see
been
which
"
h-less
?
sensible of his error
We
have
speaker who was
heard a fluent speaker, and
one
quite equal to writinghis
"
"
'eld
'ee
speech correctly,
say
up 'is 'at," 'ee put 'is'and to
'is 'ead,"quiteunconscious
that he was
infringing
any grammatical
rule ; and
he
would
proper
have
yet had he written the sentences
quoted
them
with
quitecorrectly,
put
aspiratesin the
places.
Any reader can imagine how such
will militate against a speaker ; and
very ridiculous
and
worse
to tnunt
a
errors
in
though
man
pronunciation
it may
with such
appear
mistakes,
COMMON
Stillan
a
SPEAKING.
IN
r;,
in debate
will find means
hold
to
up such
ridicule ; and even
audience
will laugh
a mixed
mistakes
and
the
whole
as
these,
imperil
lecture,
opponent
to
person
such
at
ERRORS
"
"
H
is the one
The letter
sinned
most
speech,or sermon.
in London.
As an aspirate
againstin England, particularly
it is condemned, and
often when
of a
hiding in the centre
word
it is dropped, like as iu
fore'ed," be'old," w'en,"
for "forehead," "behold," "when."
The
Irish are
apt to
"
"
accentuate
"
for
"
h
"
what,"
aspirateswith
Letter
we
pu,;
"
for
say
"
what
to
she
anytljinkmade
Here
There
"
are
"
git for
But
to
"
have
ive
"
instances, such
other
will
as
to
to
occur
who
ought
pronunciation.To
is
with correctness
in these "
a
treat
too
a
to
chapter in
seldom
is
would
one
in it. We
attend
to
hear
for
"
ask,"
caieful
specially
"
others
"
GOD
Gaad," "Got,"
pror.ounced "Gawd,"
preachers. Indeed, the
Goad," by various
clergymen is curiously faulty, and yet these
it
correct
wit,in reply
reader.
every
preachers should be
correctly. The word
and
words
ast
"
all
"
her friend ill."
I didn't say
"made
hill
she
lived
Maiifor
'ill ! "
'er
at
; 1 said
"
"
ink
for
ing,"another error in Cockneydom.
clergymen
of
strong
affection^or
frequentlymispronounced, and yet
almost impossibleto make
a mistake
men
dooin'
"
get,""c., which
pronounce
"
"
and
said
many
"
hwhat
affectation
it
words
have
many
"
"
all recall
for
idear
can
"Victoriar"
for "Victoria."
it w,
We
for "saw,"
"ic'ea," and "sor"
Puyxji suppliesus with an excellent example,
as
"
say
These
"c.
when,"
Some
makes
"
final vowel.
a
and
for "a,"
long vowels, like ah
"
up a peculiar brogue."
is also misused.
"R"
after
on
is necessary,
"
the
almost
may
"
hwhen
"doing," make
for
than
more
"
"
"
most
one
imagine
have
heard
Gord,"
elocution
are
it
the
and
of
elocution
very
and
the
read
vouchsafed
need not
We
Bible
to
a
gregation
con-
do n-.ore
intoning days.
day
than refer to the vulgar London
accent, which makes
but
tempting.
anything
straightway
hideous,and the
the
been
next
has
Pronundation
mastered,
thing to
When
"
"
"
"
"
The consonants
Enunciation.
to in this part of the
letters to be attended
the principal
are
study of speaking. Slurring will then be completely put
connected
with its
by itself,
aside,and every word will run
be
acquiredis articulation
predecessors and
or
followers,but
not
collidingwith
them.
in speech and this every speaker
wish clearness
When
we
be particularly
should
of course
we
will desire as a matter
The
careful concerning the articulation of the consonants.
"
"
vowels
give
us
sonorous
and
open
sounds, intensity and
ffmrs
14
"
of
element
vowel
well-sustained
pure,
articulated
the firm,clearly
volume.
The
speaking both
audibility,"
says
"
and
we
in
"
is the
reading
is
and
It v/ill do
be combined."
distinctness
some
"
"
of distinctness
consonant,
practisefor
of our
catch
sentences
youth.
be quoted, but the following sentences
possibly:
some,
harm
no
writer,
a
element
the
:
should
elements
if
SPEAKERS.
TO
of
Peter Piper
will prove
"
us
old
the
need
not
trial to
a
"
"
sister is
His
and
thistle-sifter,
a
sifts thistles with
she
a
thistle-sifter."
"
lecturer."
itinerary
literary
after year the o'er ripeear
Year
An
"
"
"
Truly rural
many
But
is another
will
others
and
to
occur
is lost."
known
better
and
example,
reader.
every
in speaking will fail,unless
the
distinctness
even_
tone and pitch wherewith
speaker happens to hit the correct
his audience.
It is particularly
to a
to address
distressing
listener
which
to
be
able
come
and
soon
ceases,
is to
apathy
of
Practice
continue
force have
voice
excited
of
any
discourse
in
rule
and
there
very
cognized
generallyre-
part of the
remote
a
of
the
tones
and
perfect,
the
needful
return
ascertained.
modulating the
describing. A
with
here
in the
A
auditor
the
by
will make
been
words
supervenes.
an
expended, and no more.
to speak at full power
be
soon
fact
the
alone
few
interest
him.
The
speaking,and address
you are
fill the room,
and
the speaker will become
will then
aware
only a
All
fix upon
the hall in which
voice
catch
to
far between.
bold
state
It is
after
Good
according to
to
his
ear.
force will
only exhausting
the
pitch and
correct
effects may
to
be
made
the circumstances
by
are
you
deed, an assertion,angry quotation,or
mind, triumph, "c., should be rendered
description,"c., of
in a gentler voice.
course
Pain, secrets, caution,fatigue,or
fears,in a low tone or whisper ; all these tones varying in
relative intensity
according to the size of the building and
of the audience
But pitch is not force.
the mass
addressed.
a
loud
Conversation
tone.
and
in a high tone, and a low tone
be made
Soft speeches may
loudness.
is compatible with
The
higher the voice the
A shrill whistle will penetrate
greater distance it will travel.
farther
than a low one, and, besides, bass tones
The
indistinct.
ordinarytone of conversation
to
use
under
very
action
necessary.
is
as
a
rule
cient
quitesuffi-
ordinary circumstances.
Action, again,has
suitingthe
are
to
a
the
True
great deal
word
it is
and
we
see
do
to
the
with
word
most
to
speaking,and
the action
is
clergymen utterly
COMMON
devoid
ERRORS
Iff SPEAKING.
'5
of action
in the
mistaken
pulpit; but this may in many
cases
a
notion, and a fear of appearing
"theatrical."
if eloquence is to
But
hit the mark"
and
is
its
aim"
surelypreaching
then gesture should be
highest
arise
from
studied to " ram
In pictures of
the
extended
most
home
arms
"
the shots
be fired in earnestness.
find the
great Apostle preaching, we
eloquent. Why then should Paul's
to
be
less earnest, and, we
may
say, less dignified.
refer merely to appropriategestures- -no
strainingafter
effect or inelegantmovement.
The
movement
helps
successors
We
the
speaker
conviction
To
those
it,as
to
; it
speak
where
desirous
proper
his
audience, and
impresses
carries
the inactive speaker will fail to impress.
of studyingaction,
Addison's
opinionupon
attribute of oratory, may
be commended.
found in the Spectator.
an
The
will be
passages
Action
should
wait
not
the
upon
has
words, although it
"
been
said that it should wait upon
our
speech." But there
who
attendants
wait upon
and yet precede ; so let
are
one
it be as the herald to the monarch, the leader of a king.
So
action should
be graceful,easy, and to the word.
All
stiffness should be avoided,and on the other hand
frequent,
rather unceasing,action should
be
or
by no means
indulged
in. But this is a mistake.
Some
actors
are
ever
moving ;
quietactingis
but
of Fenelon
arms
is useful
because
animated
move
to appear
before
in
we
are
animated
by moving
Thus, briefly,
we
noted
and impressive.
telling
this regard. We
should
most
we
can
impression by
our
our
examined
have
must
; we
advice
make
our
The
endeavour
not
arms.
of the
some
expect to speak so as
The
numerous
oratory.
to
pointsto
create
real
any
speeches
in
which
extend
the following pages,
over
of
fitted
for
social
display
talking,are
subjects
any
meant
so
much
models
as
"
crushingly
"
cluded
in-
most
not
which the speaker
as
outlines,
ideas to clingto.
find some
"
the diffident speaker may
We
think it is Thackeray, in " Lovel
"
I could have
says something like this :
"
be
the
Widower,"
who
retorted most
tively
effecof
did
think
I
not
only, unfortunately,
Now
in bed."
to say
venture
we
ideal experience. Many persons
means
an
they
are
unready with their tongue at the time when
their legsand say something,have
wanted
to get upon
the
repartee
this is by no
who
most
within
an
until I
hour,
or
speech they
the
"
There
as
was
they proceeded homewards,
would
have
had
they only had
are
hundreds
of
that
made
one
people
and
"
idea
who
made
to
wiU
rehearsed
very
tively
effec-
going !
speak fluently
set
them
ffWTS
i6
enough
if
write
a
road
for
commence
with
wound
only
are
when
and
them
set
mastered
have
you
will
hundreds
as
the
right
the
upon
push.
gentle
a
them,
just
up,
letter
respectable
very
to
way
they
SPlEAKBR^.
TO
referred
have
as
we
speakers, particularly such
to, wf
will
and
useful.
the
toasts
following speeches
hope
prove
orations
in
included
There
bond
after-dinner
several
fide
are
the
all plainly distinguished
from
the
these
sections, and
are
To
rest
by
the
rest
of
the
There
are
for
at
Speeches
and
efforts
and
Toasts
propose
impossible
be
sporting
will
gay
and
upon,
we
others
are
on
when
they
they
suitable
and
think
for
have
in
matter.
social
toasts
We
food
all
not
social
in
original
;
written
many
so
serious.
assured
if
original
wholly
quite
ample
any
be
toasts
been
think,
upon
found
furnish
and
have
we
to
speeches
and
toasts
toasts
their
rate
will,
The
them.
to
speeches
and
and
any
grave
;
it is
toasts
sections
separate
make
will
and
toasts
volume,
"
of
"
political
this
idea
matter
subjects
model
for
attached
speakers
the
suggested
specially
original in
the
of
names
the
beginners
studied
will
know
to
these
how
to
occasion.
H.
F,
II. THE
[Proposed by
QUEEN.
Lords
and
My
Gentlemen,
Chairman.']
the
"
it is my
duty and
which
I am
is one
which
first toast
The
TOASTS
AND
SPEECHES
[8
privilegeto
put
all present
the health
evening
cordiallyin drinking^I mean
be intruding upon
It would
of Her
Majesty the Queen.
would
fail
I to enumerate
me
were
patience indeed, time
your
hearts
has
claims
Her
our
the many
Majesty
upon
attachment
and
as
our
loyal
subjects.
individuals,
as
upon
in what part of our
No
matter
Empire the toast is proposed,
know
that it will be most
sincerelyand warmly responded
we
this
before
you
will unite with
sure
me
"
"
to
and
;
here
of it.
reckon
I may
I
beg
long
Gentlemen,
give
to
hearty recognition
most
a
upon
you
reign over
Majesty the Queen,
and
:il. THE
{Proposedby the Chairman
QUEEN.
she
may
of Her
Health
the
us.
at a
Charity
Dinner.]
[Ladiesand] Gentlemen,
Before
request
Queen,
to
all to
you
who
inscribe
We
proceed
we
has
her
I
thanking
am
to
be
welfare
of
her
in her
evening, I must
of Her
Majesty the
pleased to permit us
health
the
to
of the
head of
the
of
you
honour
the
will all
list of Patronesses.
our
concur
conferred
thus
with
me
in
for her condescension.
poor
have
her
relations
in
afflicted finds
rejoiced with her in her
or
her
of wife
the
bereavements.
and
mother
upon
respectfully
our
good
It is
governed by a Sovereign who has
ready
people at heart,and whose
We
with
mourned
us
sensible
for the
heart*.
our
at
Majesty
fortune
business
graciously been
most
sure
Her
sympathy
drink
name
highly
are
us, and
the
to
"
the
words
echo
an
true
of
in all
gladness,and
The
is of the
example
set
highest,and
the ladies present in the gallerywould
be amongst
their daughters the necessity to follow
the first to urge upon
the example in their domestic
relations set by Her
Majesty
I
sure
am
Queen
Victoria.
Health
of Her
IV,
THE
Gentlemen,
Majesty
the
I
request
to
drink
the
Queen.
{Proposed by
QUEEN.
you
the
Chairman
at
a
Public
Dinner^
My
The
is the
Lords
first toast
Health
and
Gentlemen,
which
of Her
I have
"
to
Majesty
'.\ndeiordinary circumstances
to you this evening
propose
the Queen.
I confess
that
it is
not
an
easy matter
for
me
HOW
to
MAKE
TO
toast
a
propose
AND
all.
at
PROPOSE
But
THEM.
speaking of
when
19
Her
Majesty
the diffidence
you
are
and
we
less,because
usually present with me becomes
all aware
of the many
virtues of our
Sovereign Lady,
noble
all appreciate her goodness and
qualities.I
of
speak
familiar
a
dilate
the
upon
"
man
who
Englishman
true
womanly
realms.
purityof
can
well
estimate.
the
the
nation
will
members
also
positionof England to
brightexample set by
and
My Lords
long upon
may
long
remain
the
Queen
to
corrupt
the
and
in
parent
of these
land.
our
all,for I
am
drink
to
you
the
to
perhaps
you
you
social
too
sure
loyally
that
realms.
she
men,
Gentle-
!
[Speechat
Banquetl\
a
Royal Highness, my
first duty is to call upon
Your
My
nation
a
Queen Victoria, and
the throne
more
be
England,
induce
to
of
Health
upon
QUEEN.
THE
familiar
is
owe
detained
I have
of mine
owe
nation
We
august
most
topic already
the
of
mothers
the
we
these
household, the
successivelybased, and
tainted.
the
life
an
of the
of
head
is
example
of
Sovereign
English nation
all
there
sure
excellent
and
court
are
be
Gentlemen,
requireno words
the
respectfully
you
and
V.
a
the
leaders
If the
!
the
deny
of
The
the
households, and upon
the
t
he
family,
village, town,
become
to
am
political
as
responsibilities
his
to
of
I
fore,
there-
not,
what
to
belong,
her
need
matter
excellences
the
To
we
topic, I
No
toast.
will venture
and
than
welcome
here assembled
may
dead "
with soul so
parties we
no
and
Lords,
you
and
Gentlemen,
drink
to
of
health
the
to
"
Majesty the Queen, the gracioushead of this Academy.
virtues through
It is,perhaps,the highest tribute to the many
for so long reigned on the only
the Queen has now
which
Her
unassailable
each
class
throne, tW% hearts
and
of
group
of her
subjects,to
Englishmen
to
seems
say
have
that
some
of British
loyalty
common
especialground besides
wherever
this
toast
enthusiasm
with
her
for receiving
name
the
are
is given,so far-reachingin their effect and influence
gracious sympathies of which Her Majesty gives so many
the
not
gratitudemust
rich, then, in manifold
proofs. How
bond
the
enthusiasm
table, round
be
which
various
which
with
loyalty
such
and
or
a
Majesty
are
forms
sincere
more
the
which
with
Queen.
that
is received
name
of
gathered representatives
of life.
I propose
response.
this
could
Nowhere
toast
I ask
you
find
to
a
more
drink
at
this
many
so
the
deep
certain
to
Her
Vl.
The
"'
Prince
The
time
a
in
task
ask you to drink is that of
and the rest of the Royal
of Wales
doing
delicate
most
"
I have
Princess
and
My
Family."
same
which
toast
next
Gentlemen,
and
Lords
My
Chairman..']
the
[Proposed by
FAMILY.
ROYAL
THE
AND
WALES
OF
PRINCESS
AND
PRINCE
THE
TOASTS.
AND
SPEECHES
2"
to
is
so
if,on
; for
one
the
but at
grateful,
the one
hand, I
most
a
am
feelings of affectionate respect
of their Royal Highnesses to inspire
which
it is the privilege
not in the hearing of the
in the hearts of Englishmen, I may
here
who
honour
us
to-night dwell with
high personages
those feelings
to which
embarrassing emphasis on the qualities
impelled to
those
express
with which
the
the unvarying warmth
Meanwhile
is ever
received
of the Prince of Wales
must
by
year
due.
are
name
him, if he needed
unwavering are the
remind
year
and
which
the clamour
and
his august
than
Highness more
imposes on
me
Royal Family in all its members
of the
attachment
Englishmen,
might enlarge
I
aware
which
refrain
I cannot
with
sympathy
topic
a
which
on
great length, there
at
from
the Duke
circumstances
of articulate praise. But
in any allusion to the
restrictions
personalclaims
of
animate
which
sentiments
words
many
if taste
fastly
stead-
reminded, how
us,
fails to greet that of the Princess,
I think,but convey
to his Royal
never
cannot,
consort,
be
to
giving words
and
Duchess
to
you are
is a feelingto
namely, our
Edinburgh
"
of
deep
under
deprive us of the presence
Royal Highness this evening. I need not remind you
black
crime
has brought griefand
which
mourning
the
is dearest
who
the cause,
the motives
we
evening.
I
the
VII.
but
which
THE
THE
Lords
My
next
Princess
AND
OF
Duke
of
and
toast
of Wales
a
ROYAL
OF
hearts
our
Health
Wales
AI^D
WALES
[Proposed by
FAMILY.
I have
"
is that of the Prince
propose
of
the
rest
Royal Family. The
to
the
increasingpopularity of the Prince
regard and
her
on
Banquet.]
Gentlemen,
and
of the
respectful
sympathy
from
this
us
Edinburgh
PRINCESS
THE
at
of his
appreciatewith
the
PRINCE
the Chairman
of the
deplore
we
from
"
REST
The
him, and,
cannot
while
keep
give you, my lords and gentlemen, The
Royal Highnesses the Prince and Princess of
rest ot the Royal Family."
of their
and
which
to
the
well
respect in which
of Wales
he
is
must
assure
constantlyheld
and
ever
him
by
ff-QlV
TO
MAKE
AND
PROPOSE
THEM.
21
the nation
at large,while the enthusiasm
that always greets
the name
of his august and charming consort
is spontaneous.
With
the Princess and Prince of Wales
I must
include the
Duke
and
of Edinburgh, latelyin such
Duchess
tion,
afflic-
deep
and
the
of the
the Queen's
Royal Family.
constantlyamongst us, doing their duty as soldiers and
and I am
that no one
sailors,
sure
work
harder
than the
can
Prince
of Wales, who
is always ready to lay a foundation
hold
or
a
stone,
lev^e,or to assist any good work by his
rest
We
have
sons
I
presence.
Princess
VIII.
give
of Wales
THE
therefore
you
and
PRINCE
the
AND
the Chairman
posed by
rest
the health of the Prince
of the Royal Family.
PEINOESS
at
a
Public
OF
and
\_Pro-
WALES.
Dinner^
Gentlemen,
privilegeand pleasurethis evening to ask you to
drink a toast
which
I am
in which
sure, after the loyalway
have
the toast
of the Queen's health,will be
received
you
welcomed
I mean
the health
of the
Prince and
cordially
"
It is my
"
Princess
throne
in
of Wales.
There
popular
so
similar
the
as
have been few heirs
Heir Apparent, and
to the
no
English
royal lady
will
position,
acknowledge, can compete
you
in the regard, I may
of the people of all
say in the affection,
with
of
classes
Wales.
The affability,
the Princess
courtesy,
a
as
dignity,and
all
won
have
good-nature of the Prince and his consort
sympathy and regard personally. He mixes in
our
and
midst
is in the
our
without
libertyof
fear, knowing
the
people
he
that
will
the
true
day
example
be
of Wales
and
one
safety
called
follow
the
him
to
he
set
May
govern.
upon
throne
his
the
his
and
domestic
on
by
august mother,
may
No
be
assured
and
hers.
ever
as
as
happiness
permanent
words
of mine
needed
this toast to
to you
to recommend
are
of the
the health
first gentleman and the most
respected
Gentlemen, I give you the health of their
lady in the land.
Royal Highnesses
the Prince
and
Princess
their
children.
IX.
posed
on
any
Gentlemen,
I
most
Public
"
PRINCESS
OP
WALES.
\Pro-
Occasion^
"
call upon
the health of the
to drink
now
you
Princess of Wales, and I am
sure
request will
my
the
cordiallyand loyally complied with. Smce
have
Prince and
be
AND
PRINCE
THE
to
sustained
bereavement
beloved
the
us
amongst
presence
it has devolved
upon
of Wales
"
illuminated
to
a
The
realize the
of
actions
immense
undergone by
amount
Prince
the
of
Few
contrast.
bodily and
of Wales
always
throne,"
are
the
upon
dental
any acciof us
can
fatigue
mental
in their
the Princess
and
their
acted
have
clearly,while
more
by
Royalty, and
of
Prince
a
by the fierce lightthat beats
every detail is brought out
shadow
is blackened
and
regret
we
"
difficult parts.
most
her
of
loss
bereavement
of the functions
perform many
how
loyallyand popularlythey
to
all know
we
a
"
the
great extent, deprived us of her
as
formerly since that sad calamity
the Heir
Apparent and the Princes,
it has,
because
more
Albert
in
Queen
the
by
Prince
consort
TOASTS:
AND
SPEECHES
22
to the
endeavours
to give countenance
to be present at and
various
ceremonies
to which
Royalty always brings success
and
dclat.
Those
who
will take the trouble to consider will
find that there are
few hours
of the day which the Prince can
his
call
and
own,
amusement
know
we
when
even
that
his
apparently seeking
his presence
renders
own
occasion
the
mingling with the people he is
and giving them
an
studyinghis future subjects,
opportunity
that
be
the day may
to study him.
Though we loyallytrust
; and
popular
yet distant when
of
this
he
X.
the
THE
at
a
ROYAL
The
see
past
time
at
to
our
be
givingyou
Royal Family.
to
the
toast
proclaim
Heir
to
"
may
to the
traditions
you
responsibilities
that
sure
he
when
English nation, and
and
all to drink
Princess
future
our
Health
and
is
rule
hopes.
ness
Happi-
of Wales.
{Proposed by
the
Chairman
!\
toasts
disposaland the numerous
got through this evening preclude me
You
health
of the various
have
members
which
from
of the
to the
responded
and
I
call
now
Queen
upon
you
attachment
to her children,
and particularly
and
his ever
throne
popular Princess by
that of the
your
the
be
"
in detail the
former
the duties and
FAMILY.
Charity Dinner
have
we
respond
our
Gentlemen,
I
assume
I call upon
Prince
and
Gentlemen,
to
he will
will
becomes
as
is
mighty Empire,
called upon
us
he
when
like
true
Britons
"
I need
dilate upon
not
the many
drinking their healths.
and
of
good
qualities the Royal Family. Wherever
generous
there is a social duty to be performed, or where the suffering
of the afflicted can
be relieved,
or
popular sympathy can be
Invoked
for a deservinginstitution or other object vou
will
HOW
TO
MAKE
AND
find the name
of one
Princes
of the Royal
talent
in
PROPOSE
least of the
House
are
ever
at
THEM.
23
Royal Family.
ready
The
recognize
to
and
in the studio or on
the stage.
literature,
find them
We
the
Art
Galleries
and the Theatres,
patronizing
popularizingentertainments,and layingfoundations of good
useful institutions.
and
We
of Edinburgh
latelysaw the Duke
art
food
to starving Irish men
distributing
and women,
Leopold taking part in scientific pursuitsby
and
opening a museum
a town
The
Prince and
hall,"c.
Princess of Wales
and the Duke
of Connaught, with his wife
and
of Cambridge, Prince
Royal Sisters,the Duke
Teck,
and the Princess
Mary, are always ready listeners to the call
of charity,
and to consent
to keep the stalls at bazaars
with
other distinguished
in order to help the cause
of
personages,
and
Prince
their
sure
and
poor
I need
drink
of Wales
XI.
and
\By
Lords
My
those
Queen
and
Navy, and
the
THE
in which
the
we
express
Royal Family,
which
safeguard
Reserve
we
our
nation
Our
Forces.
so
different,
being liable
accustomed
are
exist for the
of
to
protection of the
the Army, the
"
is
Army
to
allegianceto
our
It is
any other European force.
the
conditions
under
which
service, and
is
RESERVE
Banquet^
a
footingto
engaged
Princess
Gentlemen,
services
for the
AND
and
"
toasts
Sovereign and
to
subjects. Gentlemen, I am
filla bumper,
will,I am certain,
THE
NAVY,
the Chairman
at
and
the
to
drink
You
more.
ARMY,
FORCES.
Next
fellow
say
the toast to the health of the Prince
and the rest of the Royal Family.
no
THE
the
afflicted
on
a
different
purely voluntary
it
frequentlyis
service in all climates,
to it,and
a great interest attaches
a great
responsibility
those
endeavour
who
rests
to
so
carefully
upon
carry out the
force.
organization of this detached
Although in some
that
instances
have
latelywe
troops outnumbered
man
hold
of disaster
to our
of
littlebands
for
were, stillwe believe that man
will
hold
and
his own, ay,
than
the British soldier
more
his own,
Our
officers
of
old,
againstany enemy.
are, as
brave, true,
Drift
we
heard
and
look
and
as
to
other
back
upon
be
they
depended
on
localities will at
the march
from
in e.nergency
remind
once
Cabul
to
"
as
you.
Yorke's
When
Candahar,
can
are
pluck and endurance
failingour troops and
has
had so much
not
their leaders ? The
Royal Navy
tunity
opporin
i
tself
of
late
for distinguishing
Egypt,
years except
the
and
invaluable
but the Naval
Brigade
Royal Marines, an
we
say
that
AND
SPEECHES
24
land, while
done
on
have
done
at
what
know
we
sea
.
work, and
when
foremost
always
force,are
TOASTS
work, is to be
ships and men
plucky Condor
real
our
the
do again, witness
they can
Beresford, lately. With
these, the Reserve
operate
always ready to coForces, the Militia and Volunteers, are
call
out
our
should
unfortunately again
war
; and
Lord
under
I
Reserves,
wanting, and that our
found equal to the occasion
be
homes.
and
; for
respond
for the
and
and
and
defenders
I
Navy
permitted to name
the Army,
I give you
with
Forces, coupled respectively
I
Forces
TO
I feel much
I have
when
I
always
a
is
Army
of
see
the
the
Service
soldier,
and
Gentlemen,
been
I have
and
towards
the
the
to
manifoldandarduous
"
called upon
to
the
to
honour
around
occasions
to
return
belong
It
me.
find that
is
the
good feelingon the part
is very
Service
gratifyingto
increase
its efficiency.You,
this
likely to
is
referred
these
on
the
ARMY.
THE
OF
which
to
remembered,
sir,have
the
foregoing^
having
at
pleasant thing
and
;
mentioned.
distinguishedofficers
many
public
the
Lords,
my
flattered
for the
"
am
TOAST
THE
Chairman,"
upon
.
Reserve
the
EEPLT
thanks
to
the
[Repliesto
Mr.
call
Army
must
be
hearths
our
the
distinguishedofficers' names
XII.
will
Volunteers
of
not
For
Reserve
Navy,
Reserves
brave
will
spirit
British
old
the
that
confident
am
smallness
of
duties it is called upon
and
Army
our
"
sometimes
the
very
to perform in an
suddenly called upon
inhospitablechmate
and against savage
is evident
enemies.
This statement
in
its truth,and the difficulties against which
and
officers
men
have
contend
be but very partially
estimated
can
frequentlyto
those
who
sit
has
home
at
Much
different
at
at
ease.
by
"
times
been
said
are
would
a
about
made
with
expenditure,and
foreign establishments,
? We
work-people like conscription
would
be exceedingly distasteful,
and
for the
Englishman
country's enemies.
But
voluntary entails great
down
to its very lowest
the
Army
British
course
from
the
some
M.P.
soldier be
not
on
one
well
^
Or
the
is
very
always ready
fact of
but
know
indeed
parisons
com-
how
such
necessary,
un-
fight his
our
system
being
has to be kept
to
expenditure,which
then we
have
outcries
point. Even
side or other objecting to it,
but if
fed and
he
will
not
paid
serve, and
his
name,
if he be titled.
AND
SPEECHES
26
allotted
them
to
in
a
TOASTS:
called
which
manner
forth
the
very
cient
effi-
always
be
Reserves
approval. We, as well as the other
Volunteer
regiments (many
splendid and efficient
called
when
ready
which
of
members
I
fight (or
to
upon
excels, and
"
all do
shall
we
and
I
found
for
Jackets
the
"
home
at
efficiencyof
country,
THE
the
again
to
"
Soldier
Citizen
abroad.
has
have
The
now
with
to
Chairman
at
be
to
be
not
ated
associ"
brave
our
Blue
and
the
increasing, and
the
Efficient
reason
no
will
honour
the
country,
our
Forces
annually
are
of
honour
Reserve
co-operate
Volunteers
\By
Reserve
of her
ashamed
be
I
the
am
lot to
my
about
to
is
gentlemen,
carried
the
Army
victorious
our
address
you,
and
I
am
to
your
all in this room.
British
the
"
all
colours
Army
the
over
This
"
world.
the
sure
will
notice
bring
from
hearty response
a
Dinner^
Public
a
"
falls to
which
toast
with
the
they
or
ABMY.
Gentlemen,
It
it that
or
hope,
we
the
line of defence.
second
XV.
Army
the
uphold
to
whenever
wanting
with
"
this
It is in
Africa.
"
best
our
answer
can
unforttmate
some
which, if his services should be required,we
I think
small
no
value, believe me.
in
his value
find
should
had
a
We
land.
native
our
good deal lately,and we
experience of sharp-shooting in South
particularthat the Volunteer"
very
heard
have
will
me),
around
see
public
and
meet
toast,
which
has
If
sess
pos-
we
also poswe
European power,
army
sess
any
efficient one.
a very
Notwithstanding all the criticism
that has been
must
our
soldiers,we
expended upon
young
remember
that these
have
than
men
proved on more
young
the smallest
one
can
occasion
fight when
whom
look
we
ranks.
of
that
they
endure
can
called
upon.
and
chiefly,
without
it is the
But
we
are
glad
complaint, and
old
retain
to
soldiers
them
to
in the
the profession
public has it in its power to make
of a
soldier
the
popular, and when
Army finds the
very
civilian appreciative,
a reciprocalgood
feelingis engendered,
and the Army
will go forth to fight with the enemies
of our
with
renewed
zeal
in
with
and, as
honour,
past times,
country
and
The
with
eventual, if
not
sure
Gentlemen, I am
you
our
gallant British Army
with
the
name
of
.
immediate
will
at
and
join
home
instant
heartily in
and
abroad,
the
success.
toast
coupling
of
it
ffOW
XVI.
by
the
I
PROPOSE
that until I heard
you
worthy
our
AND
THEM.
27
[Replyto the above.]
[Mr. Vice- Chairman] and Gentlemen,
Chairman
assure
now
MAKE
ARMY.
THE
Mr.
I
TO
chairman
profession to which
I had
proposing the
[orhave]the
be
that I should
just
pronounced
name
my
when
honour
health
to
called upon
"
of
belong,
address
quite
But fortunately
the able manner
in which
the toast
of
you.
the Army has been
proposed, and the cordialitywith which
it has been
received,takes a great weight from my mind.
You
all as
Englishmen are proud of the British Army, and,
I can
assure
highly apprespeaking as a soldier,
you that we
ciate
the good feelingand comradeship extended
to
us
by
the non-military portion of the population. In this town
we
habitant
have had frequentlyto acknowledge the kindness
of the inthe
displayed by all classes, towards
regiment to
was
unaware
I have
which
the
honour
to
to
belong (or to command).
We
and we
shall all regret the inevitable
appreciatethat feeling,
the occasion
of the friendly
ties when
severance
unfortunately
for
us
as
comes,
waste
your
come
time
duty, and when we
the old espritis stillin
brave
same
heart
are
called
corps, and
in which
for the kind way
this evening.
NAVT.
Gentlemen,
It is my
toast
not
red
the weapons
behalf of my
received
a
agreeable duty
very
can
I
and
myself
of the
Army
Dinner.]
Semi-official
"
to
request
and
the bold Drake
of Elizabeth, when
and
harass
out
to
finallyto conquer
we
toast
be
wearers.
comrades
the
do
pluck and
coat, whatever
I see
and to the audience
into any details concerning the
to the nation
by the British Navy.
rendered
to
will find that
of the
of the Navy,
enter
further
try
that the old
the
[Proposed at
We
Army.
be
you
I will not
battle,you
to
is beneath
facings,or whatever
thank you, gentlemen, on
THE
the
the
the
XVII.
Gentlemen,
by dwelling upon
our
the
it must.
point to
a
roll of
his
the
victoryat
you
to
before
drink
me
the
I need
splendid services
From
the
companions
"
sea
days
went
Invincible
extending
mada,''
Arfar
and
is the
nation.
that of any other
England was
been
have
not
Mistress of the Seas, and though happily we
who
doubt
that
can
engaged in any serious naval conflicts,
of
the ironclad will repeat the successes
called upon
when
walls of which
so
we
are
justlyproud ?
the old wooden
Gentlemen, the Navy, if you please,coupled with the name
beyond
of
.
28
AND
SPEECHES
TOASTS:
foregoing Toast.}
Gentlemen,
I was
ing
quiteunprepared for the honour done me in connectof
the
with the toast
name
Navy, and I regret for
my
or
hearers,that either my friend
your sakes, as my
called upon
both
not
to
those
was
distinguished
respond,
XVIII.
THB
Mr.
Chairman
officers
{Responseto
NAVY.
and
the
"
fitted than I to undertake
an
important
man
duty,pleasant though it be. Gentlemen, our worthy chairhas
alluded
services rendered
to the
by the British
old
in
Those
were
Navy
glorious days for England.
days.
being
more
But, gentlemen, if war
still glorious days
upon
a
I will
is
should
in
unhappily break
for
store
out, there
We
England.
may
are
enter
zation
campaign, as we have done, unprepared, our organibe incomplete, but in the face of all difficulties,
may
for it,the British
answer
will
proverbial,
as
ever.
to
come
I have
whose
sailor,
the front
as
Uttle to add.
light-heartedness
and as manfully
cheerfully
The
is
at
Navy
present
quiteefficient and
well manned.
As an old hand
I may
the great advance
of costly scientific mechanism
various
failure in which
leave us
at
a
purposes,
may
of
quite unexpectedly,but
gret
re-
for
the
hands
on
the
won't
strike
but
and
ready as ever,
ship
up ;
in one
it
will
and
strike
strike
!
home
hard,
Gentlemen,
way
most
cordiallydo I thank you on behalf of my colleagues
ind myself for the toast of the Navy.
"nercy
board
an
are
XIX.
as
THB
Social
Mr.
toast
3
mean
great
from
a
Vice-Chairman
at
a
Meeting^
which
and
this is
I
am
not
sure
the
of the
[Bji a
VOLUNTEERS.
Chairman
Although
a
enemy
the
Gentlemen,
official occasion,I
"
an
you will all
of England
Volunteers
United
Kingdom"
measure
alarm.
our
respond
perhaps I
patriotismwe
or
whose
securityfrom invasion
Some
great scare, and
"
we
to
rise to propose
to with warmth.
should
owe
say
in
a
and our
freedom
will
remember
there was
years ago
you
heard
of Battles of Dorking and other
The talented author
mythical sensational engagements.
of
that pamphlet, the late Colonel Chesney, depicted the Volunteers
as
behaving well. It was the unprepared condition of
the country that would
be, in the opinion of the writer,the
Let
great fear for England.
Englishmen then be prepared
for war
if they wish
to
be secured.
Not
in making
peace
in interfering
with other people'sterritories
war
or
; but let
all Volunteers
be good shots,perfectin discipline,
and atten
ffOW
TO
tive to drill.
that
our
and
would
I
Volunteers
XX.
of Great
REPLY
TO
In the
to
Gentlemen, let
act.
THE
TOAST
"THE
OF
of
presence
Regular Army,
diffident
Service.
But
hesitation
in
so
Gentlemen,
senior officers,
and
many
I may
perhaps be
returning thanks
in
is
there
point
one
speaking, and
they
upon
is the
that
second
are
their country, and
instances
In many
the
many
o(
to
for the
which
firm
the
feeling
Volunteer
have
I
and
no
universal
Volunteers.
in their
none
"
for
excused
feeling of patriotism existingamongst
you
to
VOLUNTEERS.
(or President)and
somewhat
assure
drink
us
Britain.
Chairman
Mr.
observations
own
my
29
by year increasingin efficiency,
of any
give a very good account
the defence
of the country, they
for
to
upon
from
THEM.
year
against whom,
be called
the
are
know
to
be able
now
PROPOSE
AND
glad
am
Volunteers
enemy
may
MAKE
wish
to
I
defend
to fighttheir country'sbattles if necessary.
Citizen Soldiers
our
latelywe have seen
perform their duties with a precisionwhich has called down
high praise from His Royal Highness the Field Marshal
Commanding-in-Chief and other officers in the Service.
When
that ninejudging the Volunteers, we must remember
of them
in
tenths
mercantile
are
or
engaged
professional
arrived
and
that
have
the
lence
at
they
degree of excelpursuits,
which
they
attained
have
There
attention.
intelligent
them, and
are
by strict self-denial and
hundreds
by
of first-rate marksmen
their
in camp
has
general conduct
fluences
Public
been
opinion,we know, invery satisfactory.
us
all,and as a Volunteer [and as one who has seen
militaryservice in former years]I can
speak with confidence
among
found
of
Citizen
our
Army, and
attention
appreciateany
I thank
conclusion
the
toast
received,and
opinionin
which
interested.
"THE
bestowed
all
upon
it will merit
it.
heartilyfor the very
Service
has been
to
and
Gentlemen,
kind
in
manner
proposed and
deserve
good
your
which
and
a
County
Gentlemen,
"
add my pleasure,to propose
I may
is closelyconnected
with the county
reside,and
You
[Proposedat
MILITIA."
Chairman^
duty, and
toast
we
convinced
the future.
It is my
a
am
Volunteer
it will continue
I trust
OF
XXI.
TOAST
Dinner
by the
Mr. Chairman
you
you
of the
I
wiU
prosperityof which we
have
doubtless
anticipatedme
in the
are
in
to
in
all
my
30
SPEECHES
announcement
of the
fillyour
health
County Corps,
presentlyunite
glasses and
and
of Colonel
Militia.
TOASTS:
AND
and
I
hope
with
me
in
drinking the
of the Royal
Men
Officers and
the
will all
you
very oldthe regulationsof the Service
Regiment is,as
The
and
are
you
a
aware,
although
of it,we
would
do not permit of us seeing much
gladly see
is
the Corps more
composed of
frequentlyassembled, for it
for powder," as any
and as good "food
fine a body of men,
as
regiment in the Service ; and we hope it will always continue
But
in as
good a state of disciplineas it is at present.
established
before
made
one,
I sit down
I must
of the
now
men
in the streets
in
to
the
there
men
owing
to
do
dread, the
the toast
give you
XXII.
REPLY
of the
ON
enrolled
such
us
the
rank
and
oi
; but
than others
discipline
excellent
of
file
large body
a
we
Officers,
instead
of their
duct
miscon-
welcome
our
dreading, as
enrolment.
some
I
Gentlemen,
Militia,coupled with the
Royal
.
BEHALF
OP
THE
MILITLA..
{By
the
(or Lieut.-Colonel)of the Corps.]
Colonel
Chairman
Mr.
response
who
has
,
rise
among
date
Colonel
[Lieut.-]
of
name
the
In
and
of
pass." But I am
magistrateto bear witness
feeling,and
Colonel
Regiment
County
towns
the
and
less well-conducted
some
County
by
a
in which
themselves.
be
must
the
maintained
In
capacityas
very
misconducted
have
passengers,
"on
out
instances
few
often read of attacks
upon
men
haviour
be-
concerning the
words
We
night by
at
official
my
few
a
embodied.
tipsymilitiamen
by
glad
say
to the
so
him
thank
and
Gentlemen,
"
call made
upon
kindly proposed the
friend Mr.
my
of the Militia,I
by
me
toast
and
in which
manner
you for the flattering
it has been
brought before us and received.
Gentlemen, 1
feel deeply grateful for the high opinion which
has been expressed
to
concerning
the honour
is
\e
ready
called
am
sure
service
to
and
willingto
to do.
upon
the Royal
[as
it has
done
County unstained,
have
be
the
command.
of the Corps which
I have
efficiency
I can
trulysay that the Regiment
and do anything it
go anywhere
may
Were
extra
any
troops required,I
Militia would
before],and
at
carry
once
the
volunteer
for
of
the
name
in battle
if need
be.
My poor services
but
I
need
to,
out
hardly tell you that withassistance
and
de
energetic
esprit corps no regiment can
been
referred
kept togetherby
great
measure
to
officer. It is in
any commanding
the excellent company
officers and
a
very
non-
HOW
commissioned
the
MAKE
TO
AND
officers under
good conduct
of the
Regiment is due. I
testimony to the character
that
men,
glad to hear
the Corps, and
am
31
and, I will add, to
the real efficiency
such independent
command,
my
zeal of the
and
THEM.
PROPOSE
it will
always deserve the title and prove worthy of the County with
which it is associated.
Gentlemen, on behalf of the Royal
Militia,I thank
XXIII.
THE
at
a
The
NAVY
AND
Dinner
because
on
importance of
Navy of England
in
sea,
list is
posed
[Pro-
RESERVE.
its
of
the
the
country
every
and
proposition,but
The
Naval
is the
toast
Reserve.
in
duty, and,
had latelyto
valuable
of the
as
have
we
But
in
had
scientific
as
The
The
THE
Mr.
which
none
has
in my
an
been
the
and
so
its
of
is
more
overcome
many
in the
the
to
brave
the
peaceful commerce,
Heart
hearty
as
of
Reserve
of
Oak
is
as
ever, hide
only
it
know, will do
So, gentlemen,
Royal Navy and
Reserve, we
called
drink
upon.
the
to
Foregoing Toast.}
RESERVE.
Gentlemen,"
unworthy
attachment
and
the
NAVAL
AND
NAVY
Chairman
Although
when
glasses,and
[Reply to
XXIV.
in
be
may
lives.
due
warfare
place
Navy,
is
comrades'
Naval
the
and
oak
and
Navy
their duty side by side
will you fill your
Reserve.
the Naval
in the
found,
armour.
may.
you
to
be
times
be, some-
doubtless,
are,
Modern
employed
now
men,
tenacityis
ploring
ex-
explosionssuch
valued
Bull-dog courage
that
in
doing their
again. We have
it
that
our
electricity
usurp
officers and
with
things.
know
we
of peace
accidents
of
will find
the loss of many
elsewhere.
It is a new
and
endanger
of old.
than
; but
covered
in time
should
by science, and
same
Pacific
these
conditions
altered
hands
the
to
in
sailors
our
do
Royal
accidents,and
several
service
of
some
Marines, ready
lament
lives
phase
will find
of
Gentlemen,
the world, you
sailors. In commerce,
attitude,you
like the
not
because
English
English ships
expeditions,in pleasant days and, it may
in warlike
Naval
attention,
your
itself.
toast
and
[ata great
which
one
command
to
sure
manner
the
every
NAVAL
the
my
this]is
of the
THE
"
toast
like
Station
trust
by
Chairman^
and] Gentlemen,
"
next
I
you.
Public
[SirW.
of
member
of
the
toasted
generously
for the Navy,
and
noble
by
you,
profession
I yield to
in the estimation
SPEECHES
32
which
in
manfully assists the
it.
for
It is not
the
splendid
parent profession if
it, and
hold
I
me
TOASTS:
AND
"
on
this occasion
Reserve
which
I may
designate
so
into the
to go
so
question
of the Navy.
As a member
organizationand efficiency
criticism would
be in bad taste, but
of the Service such
who
the crews
can
speak for the officers and men
compose
of the
squadrons have been of late
and we
confined to policeduties,
have had
no
ment
engageI
of
life.
But
that
cannot
loss
a
or
day
help feeling
ships. Fortunatelyour
of the
years
will
Then
and maritime
energy
I trust and
believe that we
ready
for action
all
when
come
needed.
sailors
as
and
our
will
Administration
the
I
that
see
the
find
shall
they were,
our
ships are
ever
as
strength will be
honour
our
I believe
and
in
good
as
of
our
equipped as
country
have
all
and
Ships
undergone changes ; the
guns
looked
are
now
as
biggest gun or the thickest armour
upon
for the Navy.
the thing needful
cool heads
But we
want
and
those
in
the guns, and
to man
we
strong arms
possess
condition
well
as
demands.
the
Naval
Reserve.
Come
what
may,
you
sailors
find
the
for
I
and
will, assert,
ready
action,
prepared
their homes, their wives and sweethearts, whenever
to defend
of the
they may be called upon.
Gentlemen, in the name
Service
your
the
and
Navy
and
the Naval
receptionof
XXV.
THE
Reserve,
I tender
you
our
thanks
for
the toast.
NAVAL
[Proposedal
VOLUNTEERS.
a
Count)
Gathering^
Gentlemen,
"
As
Chairman
of this
several
propose
toasts
meeting, it
to
this
you
fallen
has
to
my
lot to
evening. Under
I
capabilities,
my
the
circumstances,and looking to
may
in the
almost
concur
Song of the Policeman," and adapt it
to myself and
say :
varied
"
"
Taking
The
consideration with another,
one
CkairmaK's
lot is not a happy one.''
I have now
the toast
to ask
you
It
the
little
is
requires
explanation.
But
England. You
Many of
or
in the Naval
apt
which
The
to
all
you
are, I
But
decry Volunteers, that
our
Naval
Soldiers
Volunteers
have
let
it is
and
to
me
no
Sailors
fortunately
Volunteers
work
believe,enrolled
Volunteers.
Citizen
Naval
appreciatethe
can
honour
to
done
of
teers.
by Volun-
in various
tell those
Corps,
who
are
lightresponsibility
have
undergo
="
undertaken.
considerable
of these
outside
echo
It has
been
Volunteers
walls
I
"
which
when
have
now
ofBcial
of unofficial and
deal
think we
feather-bed
ridicule,I
It is
Force.
"
no
Regiments go
duties equallywith
their
perform
themselves
always proved
take
number
of years
criticism
and
fairlybe
into
some
proud
the
tell you.
can
have
they
camp
deserved
un-
of
to
regular troops. When
to Shoeburyness
they have
gone
artillerists of high calibre,and
have
Batteries
Volunteer
to
they have
course
soldiering,I
Volunteei
When
I must
existence,despitea
in
may
"
soldier
a
the
upon
been
of the
battalions
Of
Regulars.
back
Force.
quite able
are
corps
look
we
the Volunteers
good
Volunteer
the
mean
to command
many
privilege
my
of late years, and
speaking as
candidly tell you that many
their placesalongsideof our
faults, but
TOAS'tB-
AND
SPEECHES
34
the
of the School
of
] the Commandant
and
can
Gunnery
testifyto the uniform
good behaviour
All this work
soldierlike
we
bearing of the Volunteers.
is done
from
remember
siderable
must
patrioticmotives, at a conof
and
loss
at
holiday time,
great expense.
Some
I
it is
to
officers, am
chieflyyoung
officers,
sorry
say
friend
[my
Col.
"
in my
the Volunteers.
true
have
"
used
hearing
never
; and
Majesty
doubt
a
one
a
sense,
severe
valuable
Volunteers
And
I need
only
not
can
that
argument
their credit
strict in
have
of trained
had
tained
enter-
marksmen
We
in this
questionof shooting.
yet by steadiness
seasoned
our
and
now
in
their
forgettingthey
rank
who
one
could
Volunteers,and
insist upon
handle
the
battalions
there
troops.
"
learn
while
no
sure
do, English Volunteers
leads me
to another
point
having
to
am
of the Force
reserve.
overthrew
confidence
not
to
more
not
The
have, unfortunatelyin
opinion fortunatelyfor the country, had
but
shootingthey
I
in those
in my
lesson in Africa
were
led.
judging
that
most
a
Boers
work.
good
fightis no
to
it is all the
Windsor.
at
of
opportunities
had
they are
;
their efficiency
to increase,
as
they are
up, and even
We
have
latelyseen the Volunteers
paraded before
keep
doing.
to
we
wanted
their spare
occupy
of
capable
are
ing
respect-
instituting
any
militaryofficers
many
be
againsttheir existence
Her
volunteers
many
deficient in intellect,
and
fact that they may
terms
confess,without
I must
comparison, that I think
time quiteas wisely as
contemptuous
men
are
"
but which
the necessityof
viz.,
their
and
officers.
make
dealing with
file must
can
What
do, if
to
in
discipline.Obedience
The
and
Dutch
properly
perhaps
the soldiers
The
officers should
the best use of them,
material
intelligent
all cases
is the
be
first
obedient
duty
of
;
and
the
BOfV
soldier.
the
I
at
ask
to
I
THE
drink
the Volunteer
to
of
name
Sir W
B
35
a
of Great
Force
very
distinguished
.
[Reply
VOLrrNTBBBS.
Volunteer
Senior
THEM.
Gentlemen, I have the welfare oi
and usefulness,
recognize its efficiency
Britain, coupled with the
viz.,Col. [theHon.]
officer,
XXVIII.
PROPOSE
and
heart.
you
AND
MAKE
Lords
My
Force
and
TO
to
foregoiiigby
OfficerI\
Col.
^(Chairman), my Lords,and Gentlemen,
in which
and very handsome
kind,considerate,
way
has just proposed the health
of the Volunteer
Force,
and
The
responded
deeply. I
from
sentiments
judge
The
and
words
"
"
the hearty manner
his invitation
to
have
its
all present have
to the
me
toast, has touched
associated
with the Volunteer
ment
move-
been
in
which
infancy,and am
glad to hear
respectingthe organizationfrom so
such
an
as
experienced commander
he
treasured
has
used
thousands
will be
of
such
kindly
qualifieda
Col.
.
and
eagerly read
Citizen Army.
carefully
kind
our
by
recognition of their merit, and the no less kindly advice
teers
bestowed, will be fullyappreciated. Gentlemen, the Volunof men,
of thousands.
tens
are
a fine body
numbering many
We
necessary,
put 100,000
can
and
such
a
number
men
field for service if
of drilled troops, with arms
in the
which
to use,
they are accustomed
in a campaign.
We
are
glad that
recognized. Such recognition will
and
thank
and
would
the
has
been
paid them
tell for
Volunteers
increase
stimulate
them
devotion,
in
the
of
name
heartily
you
compliment that
The
to
their
something
being
are
patriotism
I
exertion.
for the
Volunteers
further
the
this
evening.
\Speech,inproposing the Services
by Sir F. Leighton at the Royal Academy^
Your
Royal Highness, my Lords, and Gentlemen,
in order to the toasts
in which
Next
we
our
loving
express
and
Her
affection
the
to
our
Majesty's
loyal
loyaltyto
Queen
those
which
drink
Services
which
that
in
is
to
we
family,
The
exist for the safeguardingof the Queen's dominions
A little realm
Forces,"
Army, the Navy, and the Reserve
controllinga vast empire, along the wide skirts of which
into
often
and
too
smouldering,leaps fitfully
war,' ever
but voluntary service,
flame, a people which tolerates none
without
i
nto
the
battle front a force
and
effort,
places,not
which only the highestqualitycan make adequate to its needs,
THE
XXIX.
delivered
SERVICES.
"
"
"
SPEECHES
36
must
ever
look
small
but
famous
with
from
brilliant
the
be
in
shining out
Cabul
from
and
unto
gallant
and
than
more
reaped,
threatened
flag,as if to prove to
to
be
high deed
lives
of
a
nation's
an
uneventful
faith that
With
it,as
represented.
honour
to
Art
For
turn
the
on
brook.
to
First
but
they
bravery
;
one
heroic
once
where
in
death
that
only
struggle round
more
a
incentive
what
symbol
is,I
that
the
Army,
the
equal
Navy
Royal
the
The
to
it
action, when
and worthy of its
have
I
Highness
for the
of the
gathering up
couples as usual the
Volunteers,in the ranks
hope, not discreditably
forces
and
unshaken
an
toast
venture
his
day
of
its task
to
our
land
"
the
mean
recorda
the
Lord
give you
I
death,
the
Services
Commanding-in-Chief,
call
the
us
Forces, the Militia and
force
ing
gather-
Unlike
ever,
these
not
in the folds of that hallowed
strength,and
of which
I
"
year ; but the country preserves
this period of its rest our
fleet is
in
will find
Reserve
ever
honour.
accumulated
comes,
fame.
this
Candahar
to
resistance
"
could
the
incidents of devoted
gratification
redeeming a less bright page
will also recall with
record
of its achievement
thoroughness
march
bility
responsito
divides
which
the
on
proud satisfaction a feat of
surpassed,I believe,in our military
prudent audacity of its conception or
for the
famous
now
of such
turning back
Englishmen,
of the
readily to
annals, whether
burden
a
year
last,will recall with
our
not
arms
which
on
records
unchequered
unfalteringinterest
and
deep
a
army
And
is thrown.
TOASTS.
AND
I
Navy
the
permitted to
Earl
and
Navy,
the
Field- Marshal
am
Admiralty,the
Army,
again
once
the
of
the
North-
Reserve
Forces."
XXX.
SPEECH
BY
THE
DUKE
OF
OAMBBIDGE
IN
REPLY.
Sir Frederick
Leighton,your Royal Highness, my
Gentlemen,
and
I have
that
so
often
I feel rather
been
Army
by
so
shades
a
called
say
to
upon
embarrassed
fearingI should
occupy,
It is always
Lords,
"
by
very
great satisfaction
to
the
much
respond to this toast
position I annually
what
those
I said
connected
before.
with the
feel that
these occasions
they are remembered
on
an
distinguished
of various
assembly, composed of men
of opinion and
ferent
occupying a high positionin the difof life which
walks
It shows
the sentiment
they adorn.
to
which
for
so
many
of
this
public
country, and
years
which
has
pervaded
I trust
will
ever
the
general
continue
HOW
for it has
TO
MAKE
much
do with
to
of the Service
with
PROPOSE
AND
which
THEM.
35
good feelingand
the
the honour
I have
efficiency
connected.
be
to
His
Royal Highness the Prince of Wales has alluded to the
whom
wont
we
were
by the removal of some
gaps occasioned
to meet
at this anniversary. No
one
more
deeply deplores
than
I do
been
taken
that
such
Mr.
which
Millais,
and
permanent
be
portraitof
admirable
an
allowed
will,I have
in
that
him
a
a
We
this
as
gives us
have, therefore,
I may
Army,
the various
free constitution
our
the
which
"
by
of great
source
a
is in
and
followingcommerce
trade, and seeking prosperityand
life which
secured
been
to
such
country
military nation,but
say
has
respect
has
recently
to find
satisfactory
doubt, be
no
With
interest.
to
respect
no
who
the death of that great statesman
from among
us, but it is very
a
have
we
"
of
advantages
scription.
con-
no
it
and
army,
in various
parts of
is infinitely
army
small
very
has
duties to perform
great and onerous
the world.
The
expenditure upon such an
than
for an
is
of
greater
necessary
army
conscription. In
time of peace, therefore,the expenditureis kept at the lowest
comes
arises it beor
figure,and when
difficulty
emergency
any
the efficiencyof the Service to
to bring up
necessary
the
highest point. Therein
and
I, therefore,think
indulged not quite in
principleswhich pervade
is
exhibit
forces
in
together by
emergency
of the
one
a
again
most
to
the
that
general
the
great nation.
may
and
this tribute
spiritof the
are
brought
to
The
any
Corps
glad
am
them.
meet
of
MiUtia
is
the
is
conclusion, I will only beg
In
for the kind
you
to
I
and
Volunteei
Artists'
the
efficient.
most
force.
valuable
these
views
The
the
manner
Of
criticism
severe
are
arise.
smartest
thank
this
when
entirely civil,and
of Englishmen
determination
opportunityof paying
also
of the Service,
great difficulty
a
it wrong
accord
with
remarkable
a
forces
These
country.
hes
reception
you
have
given to
the toast.
XXXI.
THE
FOB
REPLY
NAVY
BY
NORTH
LORD
BROOK.
Frederick
Sir
Leighton, your
Lords, and
In
behalf
of
Aonour
you
have
done
Navy
are
call for any
to-night,and I
to
them.
As
you,
I thank
Sir
you
for
the
Frederick, have
particularcircumstances
connected
special remarks
turn, therefore,gladly to the
no
my
"
Majesty's Navy,
Her
rightlysaid,there
seem
Gentlemen,
Royal Highnesses,
which
with
the
associa-
of the
tions
causes
have
and
which
country,
distinguished society.
the
maritime
produced
power
this
with
Navy
that
TOASTS:
AND
SPEECHES
38
to
secure
in
welcome
the
of
assembly
every
the
of
toast
The
same
of
Navy
our
tionate
affec-
an
have
Englishmen,
artists
of our
the attention
constantly and naturally directed
the
has
Ruskin
Mr.
eloquently described
to naval
subjects.
difficulty,if not the impossibility, of adequately representing,
to
his
use
unity of
he
that
sea
and
for
painted
and
battle
ship
of
modern
our
to
roused
brush
of
men
of
in the
old
the
treatment
the
school
of
will
ships,
of
but
show
and
the
of
our
modern
which
painting.
craft,
am
afraid
that
which
from
he
a
that
has
line-offorms
the
picturesque as those
and
Canning
inspired the
so
that
the
so
we
have
may
little
ships,
branch
and
of
and
officers
qualities in
conditions
new
will
Academy
of
same
success,
ploits
ex-
of Edward
expect
we
the
meet
wonted
position
British
as
the
with
I
of
eloquence
;
Navy
their
members
artistic
Turner
the
with
the
with
names
delicacy
not
are
works
them
reasons,
wherry.
men-of-war
which
many
and
British
Cook, too,
but, perhaps, particularly
manner
every
Thames
a
their
works
The
of
direction,
left behind
have
associate
faithfulness
for the
drawn
may,
Navy.
justly appreciated
are
I
efforts, in that
ever
British
of the
furious, fantastic, tame
the
think, accept
praise
wild,
Stanfield
will
which
we
the
on
Turner
genius
but
;
bestowed
artists.
of
"
the
"the
words,
own
of
the
new
naval
as
fare
war-
hope that
difficultyin
main-taining
art
holds
in
the
the
cessfully
suc-
the
SECTION
TOASTS
11.
ECCLESIASTICAL
AND
POLITICAL.
The
Church
A
XXXII.
JHB
at
Gentlemen,
The
We
once
work
of
has
prayers
of
the
the
my
shadow
the
at
the
our
those
natural
in
for
regret
the
connection
Bishop
eloquent
life he
of mine
for
a
the
leads,
as
echo
an
his
on
We
a
We
are
of
pleasing
have
only
to
blissful
Church
Church
our
position,
usefulness
of
his
praise.
We
must
have
the
us,
knelt
occasion
Church,
if
even
with
tinged
before
gone
not
for
only
us,
And
It
his
ments,
attain-
office, and
of
sermon
needs
all cherish
a
ceived
re-
beloved
and
worthy
revered
quented
fre-
have
Triumphant.
never-ending
for
all.
us
example
the
We
played
important
very
mitted
ad-
been
We
profit.
cerned
con-
confine
have
spire.
or
with
of
experiences
have
font.
associations
foremost
and
example
to
the
with
tower
and
who
and
the
which
been
and
to
Church
directly
more
Church.
hope,
us
those
true
occupies
but
the
churchyard,
I will
at
The
years.
the
into
of
youth
our
maturer
the
the
"
the
edifice
against
recollections
Christ
with
prevail
have
building we
building
let
church,
in
altar
of
of
Church
at
the
worthy
and
another
a
in
most
our
appreciation
"
is
engaged
never
the
with
children
the
with
which
been
which
Church
will
which, as
anticipated.
have
consecrated
earliest
associated
been
beneath
have
the
Our
in
in
one
ceremony
a
have
the
of His
is
it is with
as
in
it
But
remarks.
have
We
of discontent
England.
:
with
will
at
We
is
you
you
act
an
"
performed,
waves
to
propose
interesting.
all.
you
of God
and
glory
all
to
assisting
Consecration
Bishop
Banguet.l
Englishmen,
been
and
solemn
[Proposedby
BISHOP.
Consecration
first
as
to-day
have
OUB
"
and
Christians
AND
a
I have
toast
Dignitaries.
her
CONSECRATION.
CHURCH
Chairman
the
and
that
no
an
the
holy
words
instinc-
TOASTS:
AND
'SPEECHES
40
.
live
for
reverence
of
toast
Church
the
all
must
we
;
her
revere
in
will you
please unite with me
the
of England and
Bishop
Gentlemen,
bishops.
Church
our
the
this
of
Diocese.
XXXIII.
the Chairman
{Proposed by
CLERGY.
THE
at
a
County Dinner^
Gentlemen,
There
before
is,I
"
of
Diocese.
Of
those
to
I
see
evening than that I am about to propose, viz.,
our
respected Bishop and of the Clergy of this
and it is
the latter I see
a
goodly sprinkling,
satisfaction that
clergy at the
As
county.
highly
toast
this
me
the health
with
welcome
more
no
sure,
am
to
the presence
note
we
of
so
many
and
of
our
in
our
gatherings
meetings
themselves
commend
gentlemen they
body
ministers
of religion that have
as
friendship,
social
innocent
of
a
our
proved themselves
able
of its truths.
exponents
I
am
sure
will honour
that, acknowledging them as we do, you
with
Mre Clergy of the Diocese
of the Bishop and
and
heartfelt
enthusiasm
regard. Gentlemen, the Bishop
therefore
the toast
and
his
Clergy.
XXXIV.
THE
cultural
Mr.
of
health
work
of
this
in church
with
Vicar,
here.
in
us
us
in
glad
to
greatly in
the
may
and
of
progress
finds fresh
Gentlemen,
I
the
give
v.'ho have
who
are
they hope
religionin
the
to
not
win.
is
our
the
well
as
in
us
Our
a
here
who
man
with
weep
as
our
and
are
the
places
his
sistants
as-
glad
to
disconnected, from
not
them
see
has
tunes
misfor-
our
joice
Clergy reus
in
our
to-night,and the
the agricultural
interests
himself
heart, who
within
our
agricultdre
borders,I
fields for his energy
continually.
toast
faithfully
put
looking
we
good
or
at
county
you
Vicar
homes
the
time
one
bereavements.
mirth
our
are
as
men
In
our
you
prosperity of
and
of
consolations
all know,
"
all at
Clergy
They sympathize with
We
say,
have
acquaintance with
end
console
sadness.
We
office.
holy
and
all to fillyour glasses and
his coadjutorsin
Vicar and
quiteapart, but
our
of the
drink the
toasts
you
our
not
"
miscellaneous
of the
any
felt the
; but
does
welcome
Gentlemen,
worthy
large parish.
our
other, I hope,
their
and
I propose
I call upon
evening,
Agri-
an
Dinner^
Chairman
Before
\At
PARISH.
THE
OP
VICAR
back,
of the Vicar
their
but
and
the
Curates
to
the
plough,
hands
forward
to
the great
prize
refer
who
minister
AH
are
all
I
We
for
of
Clergy
the
a
and
of
the
Good
and
of
tolerance
District.
upon
who
in
of
wants
of
and
it
to
you
during
and
and
the
charity
:
year.
I
opir.ion.
join
us
heartily
of
all
as
the
to
see
We
tarians,
sec-
toast
the
emulate
in
the
thanking
denominations
Gentlemen,
propose
not
in
me
Let
Priests
I
accommodate
we
friend.
and
of
with
unite
no
such
as
Christians,
as
Hospital
has
Samaritan,
Ministers
is
consolation.
and
shades
many
oi
particularly,
need
who
charity,
poor.
distinction
Hospital
our
those
the
of
Samaritan
him
attention
their
spirit
call
I
ours
wayfarer,
charity
Christians,
hope
call
and
the
and
without
district,
individuals
addressing
am
suffering
the
this
supporters
are
that
the
spiritual
TOASTS.
of
town,
our
the
present
of
Clergy
in
to
service
the
the
to
creed,
1
in
hourly
and
I
AND
SPEECffES
i2
in
you
the
the
true
Clergy
III.
SECTION
THE
HODSES
LEGISLATURE.
Parliament
OF
Lords
"
Commons
and
Locai
"
Members.
XXXVII.
THE
Chairman
of
to
House
be
old
In
him
as
the
in
a
State
this
Honourable
the
occasion
of
toast
to
the
above
drink
the
England,
health
been
have
this
of
one
evening.
the
lord
land-
English
Lords
of
ticularly
par"
all, an
of
House
fully,
faith-
House
example
and,
peer
a
Lordships'
excellent
Upper
have
we
us
the
and
who
amongst
come
and
all, gentlemen,
you
this
the
for
and
ways,
on
has
magistrate,
With
gentleman.
who
bright
good
I venture
when
long
work
who
some
in
have
country
of their
Member
a
a
other
me
England
We
done
But
peerage.
honour
the
or
for
day
is the
you
principle,
on
their
served
in
have
and
upon
have
around
are
exists.
longer
no
aristocracy
we
sad
very
to
propose
chamber
have
by
the
a
to
there
Commoners
to
of
be
who
men
it may
rewarded
now
i^i
by
"
honour
though
Hereditary
Lords
who
the
[Proposed
LORDS.
Gentlemen,
it will
of
House
Dinner^
; and
the
to
that
say
Public
and
Lords
object
OF
have
I
toast
House
may
a
Lords
My
The
at
HOUSE
1
the
call
Right
H
Lord
.
XXXVIII.
THE
OF
HOUSES
PARLIAMENT
Chancellor^
{Reply by the Lord
Ladies, and Gentlemen,
Lords,
My
association
the
The
first feeling which
THE
"
LORDS.
"
Lords
at
and
the
present
I dare
present,
poet
in
during
which
a
in
Commons
is, perhaps,
time
say,
he
tremendous
toast
one
can
call
speaks
storm
of
to
a
man
and
suggest
may
one
mind
of
of
the
to
lines
our
Many
contrast.
the
of
ol
names
the
minds
here
Roman
the
sea-shore
standing on
seeing ships labouring in
a
troubled
I
afraid
am
in the
gratification.We
labours, and
these
the
at
we
time
present
feel still more
we
one
Parliament, which
of
troubles
glad
was
hear
to
duties
Mayor
this
the
great
; and
other
sympathize
of the
speak
of
interests,
common
of
but
cannot
Lord
and
work
is the
other
the
after
are,
is the
the
one
Houses
all,two
great Legislature of
we
country ; that we have common
of the one
and that the work
the
the
all events,
that
But
little of
have
may
House
of Commons,
has, perhaps, too much.
feel that
at
it
altogether of
one
Lords
of
House
may
too
is not
feeling
the
from
safe
at being
gratification
of
degree
some
himself.
struggle,but
not, indeed, taking part in the
sea,
feeling
TOASTS.
AND
SPEECHES
44
with.
I
of
House
in a very
true
so
sense.
popular assembly.
of the great historical names
It is the representative
by which
been
illustrated.
In
this
the gloriesof this country
have
this occasion
one
assembly and on
naturally thinks, in the
of tracingthe great
first place, of the law and
of justice,and
Lords
a
as
from
names
the
time
the
to
It is
of Lords
of the
illustrious
most
recruits
ranks
from
diplomacy, from
other
branches
that
though
of
gusts
I
a
word
good
largely and
yet you
to
the
which
one
word
has
on
are
the
wants
the
people.
the
I
by
means
reverential
to
the
It is
of
past
the
to
rejoicethat
institution
the
for the
whole
will defer
and
we
from
good
such
have
commerce,
from
been
the
passing
stability
associations,
yet
principleof
party
is
"
in
"
somewhat
that
well-considered
in the
the
mindful
certainlya remarkable
do
assembly,
sympathies of the House
people. They understand
have
which
and
only
Conservatism
it that
on
to
of its
and
navy,
the result has
preponderatingly represented
depend
them
House
and
is free
the
many
from
but
; and
of Lords
The
law
not
army
public service
the
sense,
may
of Lords
future.
law,
the
Plantagenets
day.
own
of the
society. And
of
House
of the
retained
popular opinion,although
preferthat
has
our
ranks
has
among
of the
the
the
from
received
been
of
and
members,
in all other
service
from
times
the
Chelmsfords
received
has
of
Foitescues
judgment
House
present
of the
can
of Lords
be
interests
at
of
an
once
of
the
thing that the very great
House
of Lords
power
by the representatives
is called
of what
Conservative
opinion in the country has
if
been
seldom,
At the
unreasonably or unwisely used.
ever,
critical
and
this
is
anxious
time
it
at
period
present
sible
imposnot
to feel intenselydesirous
that the House
of Lords
shall be stillmore
and
distinguishedby that characteristic,
J
confidentlybelieve that so it will be.
possessed in the
ffOU'
XXXIX.
TO
HER
Lord
MAKE
AND
MAJESTY'S
PROPOSE
THEM.
45
the
[Proposedby
MINISTERS.
Mayor. ]
Lords
My
From
and
Gentlemen,
who
"
peacefulways aloof from the
and gusty turmoil of political
is due
storm
a deep debt
strife,
to those who, castingtheir lot on
that troubled
sea, guide,in
the Queen's name,
the steaming vessel of the State. A warm
men
of that
sense
debt
"The
you"
the
is
Health
requiresno
their
pursue
expressed
the
I
toast
offer
now
Majesty's Ministers."
that 1 may
rejoicethe more
of
to
That
Her
I
comment
in
it
therefore
make
for the illustrious statesman
whom
on
way
call
for
and
it
is
whom
our
am
privilegedto
great
response,
claim
officer
of
this
to
orator
as an
an
pride
honorary
body
in whose
mind
arid
the
most
transforming
topicsacquire a
sooner
I
"
and
grace,
whom
fail to
cannot
present
occasion
an
should, amid
and
surroundings such
And
eloquent words.
stir to
ordinary circumstances, resume
pardon
evokes
in
here
minds,
our
The
present.
"
in
as
in
of
toast
sadness,
us,
often
heard
voice,
of
It will be
grave.
whatever
their political
creed, cease
the
of a
memory
with admiration
calm
in its
and
I
career
so
this
toast
are
isters
Majesty's Min-
Her
Prime
great
a
Minister
my
Her
again to
once
Right Honourable
Lords
My
The
we
are
present
might
to
and
steadfast
and
living,
not
to
dwell
will
a
so
rich in
so
the dead,
or
not
Gentlemen,
is
one
"
of great
by every
of Commons,"
nation proud. I
of some
late behaviour
be
have
all
been
shocked
"
and
House
as
no
great
COMMONS.
welcomed
be
The
OF
toast
next
should
you
striking,or
manifold, on
the
by
.
HOUSE
THE
"
the
fascinated
to
livingstatesman
the answer
to this toast
belongs. I giveyou the health
of the
Majesty's Ministers, coupled with the name
turn
now
whom
XL.
so
is to the
toast
be
so
and
on
But
to
and
unique
giftsso rare
strength,on a purpose
resources.
se
colleagues
hushed
in
in response
to it,is now
long before the imaginationsof men,
whose
of
"
I
night
To-
those, probably, of all who
wonted
reminds
here
seat.
my
be satisfied,
should
would
not
nor
my
I
which
if
left
a
feeling
unexpressed
me,
I
the
as
a
more
matter
at
mindfial
what
certain
importance,and one
Englishman. I propose
an
am
our
scenes
to
institution of which per
far from
saying that the
members
of the
that
of that
Assembly
dignityof the House.
creed
political
which
have
"
we
We
have
taken
all
place
AND
SPEECHES
46
TOASTS:
and
classic walls, and regrettedthat the repose
should
turbed.
dishave
been
so
dignityof our National Chamber
make
swallow
does not
But as one
a
so
a summer,
obstructionists cannot
few discontented
destroythe character
within
of
tnose
the
of Commons
House
Assembly.
is great.
Representative
National
a
as
of each
responsibility
The
of the House
Member
and the
mouthpiece of his constituents,
it they be legitimate.
exponent of their views and grievances,
here amongst
us
a
To-night we welcome
distinguished
very
I
am
member, whose name
permitted to couple with this
He
I
toast.
have
is the
the
mean
been
and
we
,
benefit
"
The
you
the Hon.
Member
XLI.
of
House
your
whose
certain
the
that
SECRETARY.
the
Commons
found
and
grace
how,
is present with
you
hearts
with him.
are
whenever
"
Mr.
of
the wit
an
the
propose
an
upon
to
eye
judgment
partiesin
upon
word
it
to
as
whom
of advice
present
speak.
reaches
that
more
at
have
him
is
no
place,and
the
Mr.
with
,
all the
accomplished orator, has managed
House
of Commons,
coupled with
stagers,
may
it would
assure
There
am
pinch in the House
is always to be
wanted,
Mr.
such
as
we
go
be
to
of
men
depend.
But
make
a
you
may
the country,
about
form
good
glad that both
character and ability
can
a
are
if I may
little more
he gets into that
in the future he will not
knowing
and
,
before
opportunities
his friiends
night.
to-
I
But, whenever
two-year-olds,and we
their future running. We
they
and
spirit,
he
the
the State
present
belongs to a different politicalparty
with
admiration
and
long watched
old
we
be
in
Derby,
there is a
is
expectation the coming future of
have
should
impossible he
of one
who
the name
himself.
from
I have
depend
his
in
for
celebrate
to
and
advanced
met
are
we
place. Well, gentlemen,
delicatelyto
member
he
and
in his
senior
town
aware
are
your
arrives
of
name
replying in this place for the
have
more
properly fallen upon
this
to
it is
years,
You
know
the
of
would
you
with
to
propose
.
HOME
honour
Commons
of battle
coupled
to
Mr.
THE
OP
But
I wish
,
munificence
honoured
of
Commons,"
distinguished
townsman,
to-day.
day
add
for
SPEECH
I feel that
tenance
improvement and mainso
successfully
employed
Gentlemen,
.
of
efforts
whose
to the
may
of
House
for
,
usefullydirected
so
of
for the
Member
Hon.
give him
use
place in
be
therefore
length to-night. Among
which
allowed
what
happen when
may
I wish he had addressed
the
proposals that
a
of his
to
he
us
have
}fOtV
made
been
TO
is
but for which
that
no
There
the
not
is necessary
in ten
pains when they have
only take
when
they have a
it
is
really wonderful
substantives,
their
House
We
oratory.
of Commons
in
have
47
official opinion,
any
sympathy,
be allowed
to speak for more
which
very tew subjects
upon
are
and
adjectives,
out
I have
all that
say
would
THEM.
PROPOSE
great personal
a
should
minutes.
AND
for which
one
I have
man
cannot
MAKE
than
bad
been
people
leave
to
case
to leave
case
how
men
If
good
ten
most
minutes.
a
that is
and
could
they
out
press
com-
in the
endeavouring
Government
November
Session to do something
the
its habits.
Some
people have blamed
much
for calling Parliament
together in
very
November.
Well,
improve
to
the Government
after
November
a
the last
thing,you
would
do,
six months
would
of
depend
may
be
desire
to
to
it,
in
wearisome
and
unwearied
upon
meet
of the same
life,
labour,with a prospect of an early repetition
with
the duty of preparing their measures
in the interval.
You
depend upon
may
in that position
men
additional
it that
burden, except from
and
paramount
be afraid ; I do not
was
a
not
perfectlyaware
the
that
introduction
abuse,
proposed, and
of ten
they
are
to
say
a
or
Commons
the
could
it
to
retrieve
it
consideration
of the
have
but
question,
its
its
from
parties. There
true
was
or
be
Commons
has
within
an
the
been
the
limits
the
two
to
as
offendingthe
call upon
to
the
an
reputationand
it
desired
no
to
ranging
an
prevent
itself
in
on
to
I ask
especialreason
its
with
you
to
credit,
public
believe
could
a
approach the
party spiritthan myself.
considered
difficult in
any
the
sustain
intrusted
man
it to be
extremely
was
is
that
questionless
nevsr
habits
political
interest
would
It
am
than
hospitality.At
the Government
for
this, because
We
Do
I
taste
worse
topics.
worthy of any effort which men
task.
could make
to fulfil that
duties
in
it.
; and
one
any
be
there
objects on
susceptibilities
political
opinions. Well, the strong
word
occupied without
Commons
tend
was
that
an
the
extraordinary effort was
of
belief well founded, as I believe,that the House
of
ually
effectwas
transacting
becoming incapable
work
of the country, and, therefore,if any measure
of
result
alarm
could
such
necessity for
be, perhaps, allowed
whatever
his
man,
induced
conviction
which
House
conviction
deep
controversial
I may
minutes
which
of any
a
to
notbing
of
upon
overwhelming
wish
have
themselves
Mayor, of your munificent
of
the health
of the House
Mr.
time,
same
impose
to
induced
nothing would
great
lines
the
as
a
country
party
with
public question of
of the contending
why
those
who
com-
SPEECHES
48
mand
majority in
a
AND
the House
of
"
should
Commons
the
in the matter, because
interest
TOASTS
take
majority in the
an
of
House
responsibleto the country for the conduct of
if things go
it is they who
its business,and
are
wrong
I have
blamed.
no
particularaffection for majoritiesas a
I
should
always like a majority in the borough
rule,though
Commons
are
of
Derby. I
and, I might
spent
comfortable
more
be
been
in
his
and
Government
have
for the
of
one
friends
has
these
and
fine
Mr.
Gladstone
wished
be surprised
certainly
end
to
a
had
is
entered
Lord
I
man,
that
"
sufferingthat
that
never
said
had
he
people
That
occur.
of
often
endured
is
me
genius in
observed
is in
lesson
a
of
putting an
and
that
his
that
the
fcr Mr.
end
an
that
and
to
be
free
to
Mr.
Bass
The
late
remarkable
versations
privatecon-
the
greatest
anticipationof
not
that
say
I should
bitter beer.
"
The
stifle
to
debate.
put
Mr.
off.
people
suppose
down
the force
had
to
to
care
They
meet
attempt
an
a
Opposition
gloves
down
as
put
in
no
may
heard
have
conspiracy to
a
once
remember,
we
the
with
in
people desirous
they are the master,
just as
conspiracyto
Beaconsfield
be
days
put
reasonable
a
in, and
find
to
into
enter
to
to
of which
game
Gladstone
discussion
will
fight with
been
be
of the minorities.
they
charged
Parliamentary discussion, and I
even
interest
no
and
let it not
right. Then,
to
happen now
interests
Opposition,
again. Perhaps
the
on
they
Government
for,the rightsand
have
one
because
minorities,
pleasantestpart of my life,for
the left of the Speaker's chair
on
than
that,
supposed
majority,the
the
seat
a
life in
great part of my
a
perhaps
say,
always found
1 have
far
have
too
evils
doleful
;
be
always imagining things are going to the bad ; but,
far as
Her
as
Majesty's Government
are
concerned, they
believe that things are
decidedly going to be better, and,
I
therefore, certainly trust that all the apprehensions with
not
to
which
we
sometimes
are
unfounded,
and
always has
been,
England,
enhanced,
and
that
when
by
THE
its
House
of
of the
will
Commons
mainstays
reputationwill not
it becomes
die affairs of this
XLII.
one
that
the
entertained
of the
be
capable
unequalled empire.
MEMBERS
FOR
more
THE
vain
and
prove
will be, as it
BOROUGH.
greatness
of
diminished, but
of
attending
to
{Proposed
the
Chairman.']
Gentlemen,
"
1 must
ask
diffidentlyas
attention
your
I know
are
you
once
all
again, and all the less
ready to respond to tlie
their
but
politically,
am
endorse
sure,
their health
for the
acts
all,and you will,1
to
make, and drink
us
I have
Members
Gentlemen, the
all the honours.
of
.
PROPOSING
CANDIDATE
A
ELECTION,
FOB
of the Meeting^
the Chairman
\By
to
patent
are
proposal
the
with
County
XLIV.
TOASTS:
AND
SPEECHES
50
Gentlemen,
the pleasure
"
I have
introduce
to
to
this
you
evening
our
represent the Liberal
Candidate
to
townsman,
,
\orConservative]interests of this town
in Parliament.
You
have
study the address
which
respected friend
to
read
and
Mr.
probably taken
all
he put
it
I may
not
now.
say,
and
He
fair.
straightforward
think
gentlemen,
I
opinions,of
his
from
a
forth,and
what
and
integrity
it
what
knows
to
seems
want,
we
know
we
I need
therefore
that
however,
opportunity
an
of
me
and,
Mr.
's
he 'is the
determination,that
We
wish
to see
abolished, and a Bill
Mr.
has pledged himself
intioduced.
to look
after our
interests in both these matters.
Mr.
is a true
and has the v.'elfare of the party
Conservative
\pr Liberal],
at heart.
Chairman, for a
Gentlemen, I call upon
you, as
man
want.
we
for
show
of
hands, and
^Ir.
whom
J
,
have
the
will
and
views
hear
to
person
XLV.
to
upon
am
Gentlemen,
Mr.
ON
A
SIMILAR
moved
to
the
proceed
now
detain
those amongst
very
after
and
move
little doubt
our
you
you
who
that
interests.
in extent.
with the
the
honour
fittingand
a
to
proper
OCCASION.
chair,although
have
he
The
the business
to
long
great pleasurein introducingto
Candidates
for the Borough of
not
as
I have
"
I will
expectedly,
will
own
you, that you
may
mouth
his ments
senti-
topicsof the day ; and any
will answer
quitesure Mr.
,
ANOTHER
to
his
towards
in Parliament.
represent you
Gentlemen,
Having been
and
notice
your
from
wishes
your
the great
questions you may put, I
fullyto your satisfaction.
introduce
introduce
now
opportunityto
an
expression of
in
statingmy
you
,
,
perused
as
un
evening,
I have
case.
Mr.
and
somewhat
of the
of
one
I feel assured
his address
our
that
will feel
is the
we
person
require to look
is
Borcugh
increasingin prosperity
We
require some
times,and secure
representative who
to
us
the
will
advantages and
TO
jrOfV
privileges
of
stand
need.
in
MAKE
which,
interest,
which
of
and
AND
in
is
particularly
and
true,
permit
to
\or
Liberal
true
a
general
of
Eastern
questions,
which
practical
good
unusual
impertinent
in
the
him
cordially
to
me
opportunity
the
to
your
patience
his
to
to
me
and
detain
glove
you
explain
attention
which
be
is
I
you
will
have
not
him
the
to
or
the
policy
the
Irish
fare
wel-
of
and
display
the
an
but
It
quaintance
ac-
what
some-
would
will
and
the
leavened
strongly
Mr.
now
a
'tis
blind
to
politician.
views,
be
will
he
necessary,
longer.
his
; but
and
sense,
which
subjects
with
upon
will
party-man
a
town,
of
views
common
to
the
approves
appear
hand
the
to
take
for
both
of
"
moreover
politics
party
trade
the
you
principles
to
He
give
and
with
you
of
interests
views,
his
his
to
adherence
will
Ministry,
with
adherent
inhabitants.
the
by
is
"
questions
attention,
He
may
the
the
and
us,
him.
in
we
support
public
after
Conservative]
strict
bigoted
any
the
looked
to
by
occupying
now
51
community,
pledged
largely represented
,
more
THEM.
ever-increasing
an
Mr.
is
PROPOSE
be
now
commending
retire, thanking
listened
to
me.
SECTION
IV.
LEGAL.
Majesty's
Her
Judges
County
XLVI.
MAJESTY'S
HER
task
The
that
important
aware,
"
one,
Executions
and
therefore
I
diffidence
This
way
could
would
astonish
ordinary
by
its
hesitancy
of
Gentlemen,
and
with
of
been
to
propose.
we
to
to
propose
of
If
any
talents
be.
all
in
you
seriousness,
the
admiration,
and
respect
illustrious
such
see
in
not
cannot
Her
when
does
eulogy.
this
We
Majesty's
Judges.
this
prevented attending
evening
health
I have
for
But
speech.
sentiment
every
execute
the
to
subjects of a toast
person
which
I should
eloquence
display an
with
unacquainted
brilliancy those
my
have
I
"
are
you
to
part
my
as
to
by the
know
it, I
proposing
on
how
prepared
toast
material
of
want
a
conveyed
be
is the
line,
my
very
a
mind
in my
in
scarcely
am
which
hesitation
and
from
arise
much
not
are
is
evening
this
me
troubled
greatly
am
Majesty's Judges,"
Her
but
I
"
assigned
been
it.
execute
JUDGES.
has
and
thi
of
Magistrates.
Gentlemen,
and
Lords
My
The
"
Lieutenant
Lord
The
"
of
account
on
before
men
has
that
regret
us
;
and
as
,
and
we
Judicial
Perhaps
distinguished and
Majesty's Judges.
with
thorns,
"
uneasily
to
your
as
He
and
He
rule
He
any
is the
the
head
and
must
that
appeal
the
which
of
The
life and
determine
attentive
a
He
of
other
all, courteous
and
this
from
be
men
are
Her
stuffed
lie
I
as
recall
picture the
a
Judge.
to
upon
must
by
may
Need
devolves
wearying
knotty points
questions,
crown."
imagination,
most
to
wig
a
the
envy
be
may
wears
death.
weaknesses
the
present
Woolsack
wears
responsibility
here
you
position attained
that
your
sit out
doubtful
even
head
well
represented
the
important, upon
more
of
some
to
or
arbiter
be
is
honourable
But
the
decided.
must
thrice
and
minds,
tremendous
what
and,
company,
Bench.
is indeed
Justice
,
,
this
in
feel that
clear, cool,
not
for
him.
trial,balance
of
evidence,
complexity.
ready to reply to
Gordian
and
day
to
day.
To
note,
SPEECHES
AND
up, and lead a jury to a
lightwork for the best of men,
decision
sum
representedupon
Lords
and
in
ability
the
do
to
me
your
when
But
I
suggested to
Her
am
in
long
a
United
doubt
of
the
which
will credit me
you
honour
to
you
from
to
me
I have
with
commend
to
My
oi
want
must
pray
honour
an
weakly borne.
1
sinceritywhen
so
all
heartilythe
most
no
are
Kingdom.
conscious
so
is
case,
cannot
we
as
of the
and
me,
sure
call upon
words
no
I
53
justiceto the Judges, that I
temerityin acceptingsuch
indulgence for my
am
such
Bench
Gentlemen,
TOASTS:
which
toast
you
"
needed
"The
Health
THE
COUNTY.
of
Majesty'sJudges."
XLVII.
THE
LORD
{Proposedby
LIEUTENANT
OF
Chairman^
the
Gentlemen,
Next
to the Loyal
"
to
propose
It
.
in
hear
neighbourhood
of
of
the
of
he
enjoyinghis
him
wish
we
holds.
will not
for
intrude
any
that
even
if
"
us
drink
who
by
County
Health
The
and
those
such
on
politics
has
influence
nor
easy
all with
always
been
him
we
of the Lord
energy
livingin it.
staunch
must
now
to
to
has
We
this,but
as
admire
Lieutenant
sure
Happiness
and
occasion
an
ol
opportunities
many
Life and
Long
his
differ from
we
had
have
lence,
benevo-
does,
he
please, as
the
the
duties
condescension, and I am
years in the exalted positionhe
the
"
and
social
merely
ol
live in
and
let
Lieutenant,
who
performs
not
him
assure
kindness
he
We
more
many
much
know
we
and
as
kindness
Gentlemen,
the Lord
done
so
so
to
in contact.
comes
to
We
his
of
neighbour, duties
accomplishment,
whom
much
in which
manner
and
landlord
voice
my
is held.
he
so
honoured, I have
of this County,
Lieutenant
needs
which
have
you
Lord
of the
scarcely
estimation
the
which
toasts
the health
his party,
his
of the
sistency.
con-
County
."
of
XLVin.
MAGISTRATES.
THE
Gentlemen,
It is my
"
privilegeto-day
to
propose
the
of the
health
while
; and
Magistratesof the County and Borough of
of me, I cannot
I gladlycomply with the request made
help
expressing a wish that the task had fallen to other hands,
and a more
practisedtongue. Fortunately,however, what I
have to say has been no doubt
anticipatedby you all. We
of the estimation in which the Magistrates
all here aware
are
TOASTS:
AND
SPEECHES
54
their decisions
held,the general satisfaction with which
are
they devote
of justice
thankless office. The principles
to a
themselves
and
of society,
member
defended
are
by everj' right-thinking
and by them
have the exponents of these principles,
here we
and
trust
happiness as well as truth will be
we
peace
for generations. Those
us
gentlemen
established
among
acknowledged,
are
known
all ;
to you
good
much
done
the
and
so
are
most
IX.
Let
THE
the
but
I will not
your
you
will
Magistrates
varied
before
come
which
we
us
all respect,
their office.
They
their
and
of
the
of
Borough
."
MAGISTRATES
AND
\Proposed by
.
claim
detain
very
all unite
pleasure.
before,they have
state
respect
we
as
well
are
the Chairman^
"
a
I
the
OF
I must
more
notice
law
LIEUTENANT
COUNTY
Gentlemen,
Once
County
LORD
THE
OF
of
laws
our
efforts for our
happiness.
with goodwill and
we
regard them
officially
"
The
drink
their healths in a bumper.
us
Magistratesof
XL
of
generation. They
in their
us
respect them
in
disinterested
Sociallyand
respect.
served the
they have
representingthe majesty
let
in which
manner
administration
the
undertaken
have
who
and
you
longer
important
with
indulgence and
your
me
than
is necessary
toast, and
in
one
to
that
I
hearing,
bring to
sure
am
drinking
mean
the health of the Lord
of the
County.
We
a
are
most
with
great
very
Lieutenant
and the
of
us
of the
aware
duties these
gentlemen who hold responsiblepositions
have to perform. Their positionsare no hidden
positions.
They stand out againstthe sky-lineof publicduty,as it were,
and
are
all their
and report in the papers,
actions,by observation
brought clearlybefore us at the bar of popular opinion.
Under
circumstances
such
as
these
it would
indeed
be
to please everybody, and
I
astonishingif they contrived
would
be claiming for these gentlemen an
immortalitythey
would
be the last to claim were
I to say that they always
is manifestlyimpossible.
pleasedeverybody. Such a course
Human
minds
opinionsdiffer" many
men, many
; but if you
will consider
the
actions
approval
way
and
of
are
I think
you
will agree
with
me
that
with
the
Magistrates have always met
largemajorityof those who have heard the
their duties are
performed, and that justice
well balanced
in their judicialminds.
The
of the
in which
mercy
moment
a
our
ffOW
TO
MAKE
eminently successful
has
always carried
AND
his
out
qualitieshave
of
great satisfaction
made
themselves
it is
him
as
to
charity,the interest he takes in
meetings,is very gratifyingto
know
him
those who
only by name.
the
ornament
an
to
of
healths
"
"
,
present this
of Mr.
must
felt,
to
be
county
our
amusements
all his
neighbours, and
Publiclyand privately
the county, and I will ask you
the Lord
Lieutenant, and the
evening,couplingthe
the healths
somewhat
of
at
myself
loss
respond
to
the
in which
satisfaction
brother
and
such
name
the
terms
flattering
feel
I
that
magistrates,
his kind eulogium and the
has
been
which
; but
received
the almost
colleagues and
myself
when
universal
us.
stated
or
have
are
look
you come
that it is not
so
elicited
be
to
are
materiallyto
before
clear statement
put
law
the
administer
upon
been
our
pleased to
currence
common
critics.
of
sense
We
and
have,
as
our
assistance
us,
and
so
our
when
then
thus,
and
on
clearly
awarded,
so
friends
we
we
have
have
a
but
to
justiceand mercy.
we
are
all,I ain
have
acting we
integrityrender
at any
us
punishments
in our
opinion the facts
interpretedin such and such a
act
think that in
men
to
be
to
of
principles
the
privilegeto
such
have
we
whether
consider
to
It tends
certain
given
have
littleinto the matter, I think you will see
much
due to us
to the plain directions which
as
received,and the assistance that has been rendered
occasions by those who have put the facts
so many
There
by all
to
a
before
and we
trates.']
Magis-
very
mentioned
my
of the law
interpretation
our
to
toast
has
chairman
Your
present.
proposed in
has
a
manner
warm
sure,
trates
Magis-
"
chairman
Your
It has
drink
to
latter with the
{Replyfor
MAGISTRATES.
COUNTY
Gentlemen,
way.
cause
kindness
His
us.
a
.
L. THE
in
55
the Lord
Lieutenant
the way in which
his
duties,and
and
and
he is
THEM.
in which
manner
social
as
PROPOSE
here,
them
rate, endeavoured
had
the
very
to do
con
sound
whose
valuable
our
duty,
opinion,valuable
feel very happy in
it unquestionably
is,supports us we
as
in gaining your
applause. Gentlemen, in
having succeeded
of my colleaguesand myself I thank you heartily
the names
for the receptionyou have given the toast of the Magistrates
regardlessof pubHc opinion;
of this county.
but when
that
LI.
BY
REPLY
the
As
duty
twelve
o'clock,
I have
to
the
for
very
sentence
decide
to
the
find
it
it
upon
land,
there
are
would
be
mercy
suitable
severity may
that
only
a
in
severely
honest
not
of
a
the
citizen
But
offence.
the
So
you
when
for
have
I
places,
yourselves
done
again
toast
will
has
been
side
mercy
in which
and
are
an
old
sworn
fairly.
breadth
crop
of
of
up,
but
The
need
to
the
hand
"
put
and
the
prevent
is
leniency
is
true
a
A
law
fear
offender
leniency
and
fear.
as
necessary
case
and
and
citizen
that
when
cases
the
meet
This
is
here
some
crime.
honest
"
to
treated
balance
counted
prevent
No
and
of
severity
is the true
interpreter
experience teaches
us
that
pre-supposed
he
the
to
injured
poor
occasionally
may
it is found
that
"
is
the
law
not
will
mercy,
repetition
and
by the temperament
and
of
bringing up
the
accused.
surroundings
hear
of "Justices' justice"
in
put yourselves
hear
the
we
you
can
see
evidence
whether
likewise.
thank
the
length
the
on
misplaced
frequently
there
caution
condition,
their
it is
the
"
cases
when
force
serve.
when
to
through
evil-doers.
therefore
law, and
an
for
terror
hear,
cruelly
often
hold
the
here
any
to
husband,
difficult
"
justice, but
of
sure
have
and
if
if
man
or
hardly used
boy
told
widely differing stories
hard
though
cases
is not
the
general tendency
do not
We
forget
leniency.
the
am
and
blind
occasionally
have
we
aggravated
and
depend
may
tales
voured
endea-
always
be
must
We
ill-used
the
have
I
remarks.
my
gentlemen
present,
of the
Magistrates
We
justice
moving
in
brief
toast
and
It is oui
you.
with
liquor after
"
would
they
You
the
strained."
for
sometimes
girl,and
to,
the
oft-tried
the
wife,
other
severely,
very
to
sympathy
aside
all the
that
"
not
some
be
received.
mind
mercy
supplied
I must
which
and
in
listen
to
had
way
bear
of
quality
put
in
proposed
to
were
sir,and
you,
detain
not
not
are
therefore
and
kind
been
has
people
thank
I will
late
waxing
that
see
MAGISTRATES
THE
"
is
hour
to
OF
ONE
Gentlemen,
rOASTS
AND
SFFKCBES
56
you
would
Gentlemen,
very
received.
heartily
in
the
mass,
and
then
decide
knowing all they know,
will not
longer detain you,
not,
I
for
the
manner
in
which
the
LI 1 1. THE
I
loth
am
Gentlemen,
and
call upon
I must
"
attention for
your
their
and
and
moment,
a
fair
though
by proclaiming
partners
for I
me,
so
suddenly, still I think they will excuse
have
I
what
to
have
another opportunity
not
say
may
and
I
the
Newly
Bride
is
toast
All of
appear.
is
who
the
not
us
leaving
us
to
now
Couple, and
Married
This
them.
cases
they
sure
am
I have
will.
mere
the
between
little confidences
interrupt any
to
gentlemen
young
silence
COUPLE.
MARRIED
NEWLY
Ladies
TOASTS:
AND
SPEECHES
,8
say,
health
the
propose
life and
to
of
happiness to
long
formality it may in some
present
acquainted with
are
to-day,for
what
are
we
husband
the
will
sure
choice.
of her
a very
happy home, with the
prove
the
have
not
those who
know
all do not
We
him, but even
'
'
pleasureof his acquaintance I say the pleasure advisedly
be a good fellow and an
certain that he must
are
"
English
"
gentleman, or
would
friend,Miss
dear
young
for
her
Ufe's partner.
have selected him
gain,but we are nevertheless happy in
will rejoicewith her to-day,
and we
seeingher
husband
amongst
our
We
hopingat
to
her
welcome
and
her
manly
again. Ladies and gentlemen, I give you
and
happiness to Mr. and Mrs.
long life,
from
LIV.
the bottom
and
SIMILAR
OCCASION.
Gentlemen,
no
happy,
so
distant date
toast
us
"
; and
bless them
in her
all lose
once
Health,
I say,
!
"
neighbours, It is my privilegeto
the toast
of the day
the Bride and Bridegroom.
to honour
If a long acquaintance with the young
people who
in
lot
their
have this morning cast
together can constitute a
I think
I certheir
health
and
tainly
right to propose
prosperity,
I may
ask you
say friends
the
heart, God
A
ON
ANOTHER
Ladies
of my
not
,
and
"
"
have
a
claim.
known
them
pretty well aU their
rejoicesmore
trulythan I do to see
happiness thus assured.
They love each other wisely
and well. Tliey, I am
glad to say, have every prospect of true
and
of a very
esteem
happiness the love
large circle of
The
groom
Bridefriends, and enough of worldly goods to bestow.
has the satisfaction of feelingth.Tt he is envied by all
the young
in the parish ; and the Bride is perhaps conmen
scious
ladies regard her with as envious
that many
young
could allow to exist,
as hers
eyes as such an unselfish nature
and
much
as
jealousy as the regard all have for her will
permit any lady to feel. But this indeed is a very small
young
their
lives,and
I have
"
no
one
HOW
mattar
TO
; we
MAKE
AND
PROPOSE
THEM.
59
envy, but do not grudge her and her husband
certain they will find together. We
we
are
may
the
happiness
them
with silver and
a long and
happy life,
golden
surrounded
wedding-days in store for them
by those they
love.
Ladies
and gentlemen, I need
insist upon
not
your
the
all
I
feel
do.
toast
as
as
responding heartilyto
you
May every blessing and happiness attend the Bride and
Bridegroom, and long life to them !
wish
LV.
RESPONSE
OF
Mr.
and
THE
BRIDEGROOM.
Ladies
and
Gentlemeu,
extremely obligedto
,
dear
My
kind
very
wife
and
and
I
are
"
in which
friendlymanner
you for the
health has been
our
I am
deserve
all
I do not
sure
justproposed and received.
the good things that have been said of me, but I will try to
deserve
which
them, and to be worthy of the great treasure
Mr.
and
Mrs.
have
committed
to
my
I trust
care.
will
you
pardon the imperfectionof my speech the novelty of
position as a Bridegroom will perhaps plead for my
my
embarrassment
deeply sensible of your kindness,
; but I am
and my
dear wife wishes me
to thank
most
heartilyand
you
kind
for your
affectionately
expressionsand good wishes
"
towards
I can
her.
say
all for your kindness
you
LVI.
BY
REPLY
Ladies
and
than
more
in
that I
"THE
OF
sincerelythank
health.
drinkingour
INCLTJDINQ
BRIDEGROOM,
THE
TOAST
PROPOSED
no
A
BRIDESMAIDS."
Gentlemen,
"
I rise with great diffidence after the very
high terms
in which
been
proposed,
myself have
thank
Mr.
friend
am
sure
properly
my
nor
you, ladies and gentlemen,for the very kind way in which
good
you have responded to the toast, and for your generous
/ shall be happy,
for our
wishes
sure
happiness. I am
the health
of my
and
I will do
may
her
look back
and
home,
kind
But
my
,
utmost
to
make
the tokens
before
I sit down
of
regard you
I have
ladies
young
and
whom
I
to
greatlyindebted,
There
are
wife
my
so
; so that she
at having left
this day without
regret
upon
and in a measure,
so
loving relatives
also, many
friends.
We
both thank
greatly,and highly
you
appreciateall
us.
dear wife and
I cannot
for I
some
preparingher
for the
hymeneal
to
showered
propose
here
owe
have
to
a
to
whom
my
a
toast.
wife
is
gratitudefor
morning. I mean,
debt of
altar this
you
upon
Bridesmaids.
the
of course,
These
and
to the ceremony
grace
which
is acknowledged
a
my
that
I thank
own
their
to choose
as
attention,trusting
the happy position
in
all be
be
well
as
supported
"
a
MAIDS.
BRIDES-
THE
OF
Man.]
Best
you
TOAST
THE
Gentlemen,
before
see
and
and
name
this
TO
and
wife's
my
assembly
this
to
sure
Gentlemen, I am
morning.
health
and
drinking
speedy promotion"
to-day.
\_Bythe
You
each
been
RESPONSE
Ladies
in
bridesmaids, and
in
you will joinme
to the Bridesmaids
LVII.
all,and
by
may
own
has
Mrs.
beauty
a
added
ladies have
young
for their invaluable
them
long they
ere
TOASTS:
AND
SPEECHES
6o
"
and
fortunate
unfortunate
an
man
"
singlegentlemen rolled into one ! Fortunate
in being the mouthpiece of so many
charming young ladies ;
and
unfortunate
in being so
unfitted to give their views
sure
opinions due expression. I am
they are all delighted
been of use to-day. I can onlyguess at their feelings,
to have
certain
never
having served in a similar capacity; but I am
all pleased to
their
old friend so
see
they are
happily
determined
such
to follow
a
married, and
good example
a
of two
sort
when
gentlemen
turn
the eyes
of mankind
it is not
saying
fair friends
won't
confess
very
has been
such
air."
been
I will sit down
blossoms
to
LVIII.
on
whose
RESPONSE
I
hope
"
waste
and
partners,
I thank
THE
for
you
this
the
Bridesmaids
will
permit
not
the
on
and
my
part I
with
now
of the
bachelors
the
I confess
own
my
their sweetness
behalf
TO
"
the health
So, gentlemen, choose
Bridesmaids,
see
Where
they permit
For
again,thanking
in which
manner
if
taste
shall
!
tell ; but
again.
You
hearts
own
I cannot
bridesmaids
received,and
sweet
after their
"
for bachelor
much.
too
mysterious hint
cordial
much
be
to
up
have
lead
desert
out
the
[By
the
you.
BRIDESMAIDS.
Groomsman.]
Ladies
How
and
I to
aih
towards
'
us
I
Gentlemen,
thank
for
you
speak
as
a
would
gladly--well I mean
Bridesmaids.
Not
that
We
are
very happy" very
have
such
nice
men
to
"
very kind
Bridesmaid, and I
hope
we
we
are
happy
talk
to.
expressions
your
not
to
shall
we
happy
have
Indeed
"
been
I
am
not
oh
sure
again be
dear
of use, and
am
we
no
!
to
particularly
HOW
IV
MAKE
AND
sister Bridesmaids
my
for bringing such
requestedby
Bridegroom
ItiEM.
PROPOSE
offer
to
6i
thanks
our
to the
male
creatures
presentable
take
we
they are
good enough
may
them
them
to
some
compassion upon
day, and promote
husbandry ; but at present we preferour liberty. However,
we
are
we
very gratefulto you all for your good wishes, and
to
amuse
If
us.
thank
you
LIX.
THE
heartilyfor
very
"
buttered"
nicely
your
\Proposed by
GROOMSMEN.
toast.
intimate
an
friend of the family \
Ladies
and
I will not
wish
to
Gentlemen,
detain
sum
up
conduced
and
not
the toast
also
little to
a
if
"
trust
the
ere
playing
have
we
have
they
all
in
success
RESPONSE
THE
Speaking
hear
for
myself
of these
wooing.
please.
"
I
men
gentle-
young
similar
a
FOREGOING
Gentlemen
and
Ladies
have
their partners,
I
they have.
think
I
their
if you
TO
who
gentlemen
ceremony
to-day, and I
performed
seen
I
to-day by testifying
pleased with
faces
we
ladies,the Groomsmen,
LX.
been
may
principalpart in
a
the bachelors
of the
; but
two
or
heard
hilarityof the breakfast.
perhaps the ladies will honour
merry
is out
year
the
and
their
judging by
as
we
moment
a
have
usefulness
the Groomsmen;
mean
than
more
you
the toasts
the energy
to
"
sure
am
that
to
we
wish
and
Gentlemen
TOAST.
particularlyLadies,
"
and
fortunate
my
companions,
1
for honouring
thank you all very heartilyfor proposing and
had
such
We
have
healths.
a
our
pleasant easy task,for
have
been so excellently
all arrangements
planned, and the
honoured
have
who
ladies
uniformly
kind
would
uniform
and
to
be
and
"
reallydeserve
see
our
no
no
old friend
of the
we
it was
have
we
thank
you
proposed,
honoured
deserve.
"
it,which
society have
alike
have
we
But
we
had
are
their
a
so
conduct
good time,
and
one
been
all
glad
happy,
happiness be but a faint
perfectjoys that true married happiness
all very glad that we
have
been
are
this
on
joyful occasion,
appearance
and
so
wedded
under
such
the present
sincerelyfor
and
their
that
thanks.
pure and
We
attain to.
can
make
our
permitted to
and
with
all dressed
being
doubt
brightauspices. May
gleam
us
the
has
your
toast
flattering
manner
been
a
"
for the kind
in
which
greater recompense
way
you
thaH
7VASTS
AND
SPEECHES
62
PARTY.
CHRISTENING
LXI.
Goa-
[Proposed by the
STEA.NGEB.
LITTLE
THE
:
father.']
Ladies and Gentlemen,
and
trouble you to fillyour glassesonce
more,
I must
and
in wishing health,long life,
with me
prosperityto
into
have
this day introduced
we
Little Stranger whom
that
be
doubt
brotherhood.
There
no
Christian
can
"
"
I dare
That
as
serve
it
the
couple
"
even
may
and
happy
I wish
health
whose
with
model,
a
that
on,
go
may
and
we
to-day
pleasure of knowing
wife and
charming
made
my
quite hke
an
had
the
lived
ever
It
well
may
perhaps find,as years
be improved upon
by the young
proud parents of the little Christian
drink
all to
and
myself
the
had
and
years,
It is
if
his
actuallysuch old friends,she
are
not
visits
to
this
friend
find
I
I have
sponsor.
for many
Mr.
of
heartily.
most
pleasure that
capacity of
I
old
the
presently,
us
of.
the
shall
we
you
this
in
here
has
handsomest
all rest assured
little satisfaction
no
to
child that
is the finest and
say"
earth.
on
formally introduced
will be
boy [or girl] who
join
house
hers
so
also.
pleasant that
of
Many
I feel
here
you
more
happiness of knowing Mr. and Mrs.
in
than
will
I
have
but
I
to
none
intimately,perhaps,
yield
;
in my
wishes
for their happiness, and
the sincerityof my
good wishes for the long life and happiness of (here insert
of the child),who
will,if [he]follow in the footsteps
names
of [his]
to
to societyand
a comfort
parents, be an ornament
have
the
family. Ladies
the
of
the health
LXII.
and
Ladies
,
HEALTH
THE
and
express
my
this
in
the
"
feelingson
ushered
long life to
OF
THE
that
him
drink
BABY.
I rise in my
behalf
he
to
[orher]!
capacity of Godfather
vulgar tongue," according to
with
you
"
the
will
my
of the fine littlefellow
into the Church
day
acquaintance
my
I am
sure
slightest,
I call upon
and
Gentlemen,
It is with diffidence
to
gentlemen,
with all
young
reverence.
ship,
sponsorwe
have
Although
[gentleman] is of
the
to
permit me
speak of him by
his Christian name,
and to wish all prosperityand happiness
Such
to
an
auspiciouscommencement
as this has
he
surrounded
is
with
as
been,
luxury and comfort, under
of parents of whose
the care
friendshipwe are, as any one
well
with
such
be,
might
proud
advantages as these anything
I may
will
hurt
I
not
however
him,
badly
say
may
.
"
HOW
friend
their
THEM.
63
the rosy promises of his young
life
realized.
he
live
be
to
source
a
May
long
and
his
to
the
happiness
companion
parents,
of their middle
and
and
the
stay of
age,
prop
comfort
and
PROPOSE
than
more
of
AND
MAKE
myself. May
express
be
TO
decliningyears.
these
honours
It may
be
that
will
successors
come
of the
and I am
all most
sure
we
first-bom,
for
kind host and hostess that
our
everything
tend
their
to
complete
may
happiness. Fill your glasses,
bumpers please,ladies and gentlemen, and drink with all
the honours
to the health and
tion
long life of
(heremento
cordiallywish
names).
LXIII.
the
God
REPLY
bless
TO
him
THE
!
FOREGOING
\Spoken by
TOAST.
Father^
Ladies
and
Gentlemen,
"
in which
old friend
touching and hearty manner
my
kindlyproposed the health of my little child demands
warmest
acknowledgments, and your kindness in coming
my
the Little Stranger,
and to cheer him
here to-day to welcome
The
has so
first stage of his existence,my
wife and I accept as
a great compliment and
highlyappreciateit. I scarcelyknow
for all your
how
to thank
Many very
good wishes.
you
the
upon
and
handsome
flatteringthings have
said
been
of my
wife
it
But there is at any rate
myselfwhich we do not deserve.
I
and
that is the pleasure
which
can
point upon
speak,
has
here to-day. It
given us to be able to welcome
you
is
always
and
one
pleasure
a
to
to
us
see
friendshiphave
acquaintance and
friends, but
our
matured
been
when
by regard
it is doubly a pleasure to see one's friends,
as
on
shall
the present occasion ; and we
see
hope that we
you
if not under similar circumstances, at any rate often enough
We
are
to cheer
us
quiet home.
greatly
up and enliven our
have
consented
stand
the
friends
who
to
to
so
kindly
obliged
and
esteem
"
Sponsors
as
and
them
to
and
company
ask
for the littleone, and tender
for your presence
to you all,
to
you
your
drink
good
to
LXIV.
RESPONSE
HIS
Ladies
OF
have
Their
prosper
THE
and
presents, your
I sit down
Godmother
I would
and
the
healths and their families!"
GODFATHER
TO
THE
TOAST
HEALTH.
and
Gentlemen,
Speaking for myself and
who
"
they all live long and
may
Before
Sponsors, the
the
Godfathers, here to-day.
OF
wishes.
sincere thanks
our
shared
Avith
me
"
the ladies [orlady and gentleman]
the duties of Sponsors, I may
say
TOASTS:
AND
SPEECHES
54
before
such
to
shall find
persons of his dear parents, we
and
in training him
interference
for our
[her],
lose sightof the lad C'oung
hope we shall never
if opportunityarise we
hope to forward his views
in the
him
excuse
no
officiate upon
example and precept
given us
brieflyhow much
pleasure it has
With
occasion.
such, a delightful
though we
lady],and
only look back upon our self-imposedduty
with pleasureand a livelyrecollection of enjoymerit. It has
in
shall
we
life,
afforded
regard
for
very
and
Mr.
for
drinking the
and
Mrs.
kindly proposing
so
health, and
our
Thank
toast.
THS
by
[^Proposed
A
I
that
only regret
to
propose
request
returns
be
the
permitted
to
express
association
came
he
a
say
those
with
devolved
the
the
As
day.
to
the
his
words
and
here
goodness,and
sure
the
same
husband,
a hill,
as
and
to
of
us
I
may
him, and
to
that
gratification
great
me
happy
many
friends
all with
say how
have
had
experiencedhis
entertainment.
to
kind
whom
he
respected
examples
hospitality
recognize many
present
with
a
nd
it
is
our
a great
friendship,
grown
up
test of truth in friends when
we
see
year after yeai
generous
who
have
and
him
oldest
has
all have
and
Mr.
concerning
the
me
of
wishing
of
one
few
subject more
,
given me
in contact.
It is enough for
and
how
kind-hearted.
Many
is,
of his
DAY.
to-day,and
justice. I
me
upon
health
toast
around
him
THE
OF
"
do
you
drink
to
you
of
HEBO
THE
I cannot
to
heartily.
Friend.']
old
Gentlemen,
pleasant duty has
very
have
an
warmly
so
PARTY.
and
Ladies
our
Mr.
thank
for
you
all most
you
OF
HEALTH
we
,
BIRTHDAY
LXV.
testifyto
pleasant opportunityto
a
us
smiling faces
and
friend
as
We
round
Mr.
"
the
"
"
board.
is
as
a
Such
beacon
a
set
father,
upon
mariner,a guide,philosopher,
youth, publicbenefactor,both by the example
by the good he does in public and private life.
Ladies and gentlemen, I am
word
of mine
sure
no
you want
friend's noble and amiable
to convince
qualities,
you of our
I
will
nor
longer detain you from the graceful homage we
all
are
willing to pay in wishing Mr.
happy
many
of his Birthday,
returns
a
lighthouse to
and friend to
he sets, and
a
the
66
AND
SPEECHES
ceeds
family honours,
the
to
TOASTS:
all,I
we
sure, will find
am
in
English gentleman
good proverb,and all
of us here assembled
recognize in the Heir the imprint of
the manly
the
gentle disposition,
goodness of heart and
his
and
tenderness
distinguishes
parents.
pluck, which
this
will fill bumpers on
Ladies
and gentlemen, I beg you
ness
long life and happiimportant occasion,and drink with me
life
will
all
his
that
he
to the
Heir,
believing
young
of
without
continue
to hear
reproach the grand old name
him
and
have
grandfather before
gentleman," as his father
him
worthy
a
"
his father.
the
to
successor
father,like
Like
old
fine
"
is
son
a
"
LXVIII.
You
my
his
which
I
and
am
the
has
Mr.
of
them,
in which
kind
thank
nor
received
say much
it all ; but what
good
good
to
as
enough
I thank
can
have
you
him
the
of
for
you
toast.
I
me.
I possess
I owe,
Providence,to my parents primarily,and then to my
and patient instructor himself,who
have
taught me to
under
kind
look
the bright side,and to live as an
upon
English gentleman.
I am
of the great responsibility
I have
fullyaware
now
entered
look
in
so
I deserve
only hope
I cannot
sure
way
been
HBIB.
"
manner
for the
sufficiently
THE
OF
and touching speech
the very flattering
old friend has
so
generouslyproposed
kind
my
and
health,
words
TOAST
Gentlemen,
all heard
1"
Heir
THE
TO
and
have
The
"
REPLY
Ladies
with
"
Gentlemen
done.
and
upon,
me
upon
fault,but
all here
hope
their
as
positionby
a
find
I
friend,as
Providence
to do
make
all the
"
who
one
good
tenantry"
has
; not
to
been
will
placed
oppress
and
of the riches
committed
good use
to
and
to
Master
account
to
charge,
when
an
give
my
my
the great day of reckoning shall have arri\'ed.
My friends,
this is my
view of my position. My fathers and
your fathers
have
lived
each
other's
to
in
harmony and peace, in giving and taking fov
Can we
continue
in the
not
good, for centuries.
lines ? and
same
when
in time
called away
let us leave
fathers have left to us, a legacy ol
we
are
descendants,as our
and
freedom
with
mutual
self-respect,
goodwill and regard,
the
of owner
and
appreciating
responsibilities
occupier, ol
to
our
landlord
and
burdens, and
need
say
no
wishes, and
as
I
endeavouring
tenant,
live in
to
I
more.
trust
proceed on
that
my
charitywith
heartilythank
you
way.
will
Once
bear
to
all
men.
you
give me
again
each
other's
My friends,I
good
all for your
your kind assistance
I thank
you all most
HOW
TO
sincerelyfor
MAKE
the
AND
in which
manner
THEM.
PROPOSE
received
have
you
5?
the
toast.
LXIX.
THE
the
[Proposed by
TENANTS.
Landlord
ot
Agent.'\
Ladies
Before
and
while
I
heartilyjoin
here
this
in
me
ask
must
a
you
indulgencefor
your
toast, which
I
of
drinlcing. Many
am
sure
driving
witli the
I have
doubt, struck
no
were,
land ; and
of
were
pleased,I
many
you
drove
the kind
as
reception accorded
you
you
the
Well,
pleasant recognitionyou received.
and
and
the
gentlemen,
pretty
with,
and
decorations
have
welcome,
are
the
on
these
and
I would
health
of the
and
long
call upon
you to drink the
I have
been
life to them.
here
glad to say, in peace
and
duty [as a landlord],
harmony,
do
to
and
am
my
met
from
assistance
I
have
We
mortal
it not
this
were
so
of
the
tenants
and
excellent
came
all the
I trust
and
gentlemen
our
who
will unite with
the
friends
me
I
Tenantry,
thankful
am
got
wish
them
thingswhich I
I give you
secure.
LXX.
THE
Tenant
the Senior
As
,
the
oldest
here, I believe
very
and
so
heartfelt
drinking
kind
like
to
as
say
to
tenant
and
Gentlemen,
present
I
Mr.
thanks
to
health so
our
say
on
my
The
"
remember
together,
very
good
happiness
part
and
will leave
Tenantry."
[By
TENANTS.
THE
OF
TOAST
I understand
"
the
present^
Ladies
Mr.
of my
every
of
TO
worthy
had
well
so
the health
to
state
a
prosperity,
nothing undone to
REPLY
on
to
that
last for many
Ladies
years.
I
trust
here to-day,
over
you
come
and
be
not
have
I
whom
have
we
drinking
should
admit
with
may
have
in
had
candidly
always been most
women,
tryingtimes
kindness
many
without
I may
model
one.
a
I think
we
years,
trying
ever
must
have
estate
estates,
many
have
parish as
our
I
but
connection
and
We
"
"
for
the
Tenants
receivingmuch
here.
greatest pleasure to co-operate.
that amid
and
occasionally
and
men
tenantry
and
troubles
our
the
here, and
land
our
the
friends
my
since
improvements
vanity point to
of
work
kind
the
and
scenes
reception we
living,I
will
you
when
you
few
a
of the
hear, with
ladies
give
"
morning
appearance
along,
I
separate
we
minutes
Gentlemen,
something
something
about
"
and
"
as
best
am
and
warmly.
about
him
you
proposing
for
has
Mr.
Tenants, and
us
as
the oldest person
suited to return
our
a
landlord
and
been
I should
Squira
say much
all of it
and
I won't
him,
:
I couldn't
that
not
"
TOASTS
AND
SPEECHES
68
of
deal
great
a
say
good too ; but perhaps I ought not
by speaking. Still I can say for myself and
to
my
he's
that
a
the estate,
on
friends
here, for all the tenants
"
If
it.
are
we
and nobody can
perous
prosdeny
"jollygood fellow
has
he
the
our
into
and
needn't
question
we
go
If we are not
has always assisted us.
interest- at heart,and
detain
you
"
"
"
I
we.
for all of
speaking
am
glad and
when
us
try to do
try all we
We
well
rejoiceas
can
that
I say
visit
not
we
be comfortable.
and
rent
pay our
he is
succeed
if we
and
can,
knows
He
seasons.
best and
our
and
considerate,
will be
he
know
we
prosperous,
the results of bad
us
upon
as
are
we
a
and
landlord
parish,respecting our
Let
each
other, and glad to have such a Squire about us.
drink his health, and wish long life and happiness to him
us
and
the
and
Mrs.
children,with all the honours.
Hip, hip,hurrah !
contented
and
happy
he's
For
And
LXXI.
SPEECH
My
jollygood fellow,
SPOKEN
THE
BY
has
health
wish
that
prompted
to
it.
been
express
old
my
such"
as
but
carried
away
than
deserve.
by
but
generosity,
his
Mrs.
received,and
our
appreciationof
friend and
you
in
hears
am
feelingsto
Acre
I must
endeavour
minds
yonder"
neighbours
look
back
have
future
as
I
and
received
as
well
as
I
can.
the
your
as
m
of
myself
good feeling
Mr.
to
,
and
much
so
quite sure
set
up,
to
and
live up
try
to
to
passed
till I
to
you
of
good
it was
that
am
to
do"
the standard
the remake
mainder
amonc^st
you
carried
into
profitableand as pleasant to all my
with gratitude and thankfulness
can
recall much
at
toast
of all I wished
life" which
has been
will continue
to be passed here
God's
all most
the
good friend yonder was
in brightercolours
paint me
I will not
complain of his
rate
any
if I have fallen short
your
you
and
good tenant,
obhged to him
of my
and
HIS
afraid my
am
At
I feel I have"
have
I
I thank
in which
manner
We
meant,
lyell
and
OP
SQUIRE.
much
are
very
propose
all. It is very seldom
that a man
I have heard to-day. I
himself
as
I
TOAST
"
also
all
THE
Friends,
all present
upon
heartilyfor the enthusiastic
our
!
us
FOR
I look
For
all of
say
THANKS
OP
HEALTH,
a
so
kindness which I and
hands, my friends ; and I
the
past
our
mutual
my
family
hope in the
relations will
ffOfV
remain
for
do
I
worse,
part,
pleasant
friends,
their
pleasant.
as
us
names
MjilCE
TO
hope
and
I
relations.
for
your
and
For
I
"
AND
richer
Thank
welcome
my
own.
for
and
here,
am
believe
warm
PROPOSE
and
at
feel
THEM.
your
we
again
you
to
for
poorer,
myself
6e
better
not
"
disposal,
shall
very
and
till
death
continue
sincerely,
my
family,
our
my
in
SECTION
VI.
TOASTS.
SPORTING
Club
For
LXXII.
the
[Proposed by
Gentlemen,
to-day,
am
sure
captain
will
drink
of
health
the
make
to
and
keep
can
command.
the
friend
my
if close
do)
we
need
battle,
here
a
"
not
and
may
long
game
which
If obedience
Selfishness
captain
should
be
'
are
With
in
will
the
to
to
play
the
all the
am
glad
I
am
sure
to
me
the
as
working
lor
is the
aUeralioii
football
of
"
(as they
I trust
all of
us
noble
English game
qualities of the
patience, steadiness,
manly
of
aside
be
the
secret
a
in
eleven.
an
is
less
not
cricket
The
unfitted
in
the
a
eleven.
cricket.
declared
members
of technical
dinners
if
"
gentlemen, I
had
a
good
have
members
conduct
for
so
say
success
and
say,
to
I
Now,
a
be
necessary
equally well
permit
deserve
entirely put
until he
responsible, and
obeyed
by all playing
far
But
though
won,
glad
the
had
we
attempts
pluck, endurance,
enter
required when
we
first duty of the soldier,it
duty
harmonious
iviU do
am
that
in the
hard
our
hurry.
longer. We
much
trouble
a
all
is the
pavilion, as
This
again
if
as
work
in
opponents
if by
ready
field,
friends
bowling as our
the
play I really began to
team
steady
spared
must
is
we
of your
able
hands
defeated.
brings forth
important
very
and
be
obedience
and
of
that
is the
such
; it looked
club
what
be
to
toast
and
the
surely be
Our
Englishman.
know
we
avoid
us
honour
and
capital game,
it has
so
happened
a
Cricket
time
you
it,I
won
of
one
win
detain
had
a
animates
The
courteous
our
stumps,
the
fielding
pleasure.
At
captain
the
not
the
before
must
of
will
I have
to
laurels
our
honour
which
have
and
our
up
victory
snatch
of
match,
the
runs,
for
tremble
feeling
much
have
I
already passed
good
We
won
the
has
which
uncertainties
has
team
our
what
the
Eleven,
"
after
which,
with
field.
glorious
Eleven^
Victorious
pleasant meeting,
very
team
the
in
the
this
of
the
all, I
the
Captain of
to you
propose
and
judging by
to
OPPONENTS."
"
chairman
toast
Occasions
Convivial
and
ACRICKET"DINNER""OUE
AT
As
Dinners,
House
and
he
field
or
is concerned.
game
of success,
terms
these
and
cricket
by
a
..oasts
SPEECHES
AND
TOASTS.
71
in such a course, with plenty of
steady continuance
and goodwill,
crude at first,
need
no
eleven,however
of winning its way.
Gentlemen, I give you the
of Mr.
able
that most
coupled with the name
and cricketer,
and my
very good and kind friend.
practice
despaii
LXXIII.
TOAST.
Eleven,
^
"
"
captain
,
RESPONSE
[Spoken by
THE
TO
FOREGOING
oj"posingTeaml\
Chairman,
Vice-Chairman, and Gentlemen,
Your
plimentary
Captain has proposed our health in such very comand
himself
towards
so
terms,
kindly
expressed
his beaten
but not
humiliated
adversaries,that I cannot
his
mind
which
most
to admire
quite decide in my own
the
the
Captain of
Mr.
Mr.
"
"
prowess
with
the
bat
in
the
cabinet.
eloquence
decide
in
which
has
the
contested
excellent
going
to
intend
was
by
and
match,
the
or
field,
At
his
courtesy and
I need
not
try to
any rate
him
and
you, for the manner
proposed,and the way in which it
wellwon
a
you, gentlemen. You
thank
without
wishing
disparage
to
won.
team, I think the best men
sit down
and accept this issue as
and
"
toast
to
honoured
been
and
I have
now.
in
I think
we
final.
will agree with
friends
my
But
my
not
are
do
We
not
that
me
we
We
to give in.
hope you will
right we do not mean
tertain
enmeet
us
again,and on our own
ground, and if we cannot
have been
you as hospifablyand as generously as we
will
will
that
here
entertained
too
we
though we
try
rivalryin the cricket ground,
certainlymeet
you in friendly
battle over
and fightour
again. As we grow older these
are
"
"
"
harmonious
contests
the
cement
school
much
are
to
sure
matches
I will
the
only
very
add
kind
my
pleasure,and
real
LXXIV.
thanks
SUCCESS
CLUB
TO
THE
when
places in
shoulder
of
Gentlemen
receptionyou
CRICKET
A
the
won.
were
for
us
universityfriendshipswe
or
give us
jointedand unable to take our
and
of many
a pleasantgame,
They
influence
and
those
have
the
we
bats
"
"
of my
to
stiff-
are
tell
can
show
Cricket
and
mada.
have
field,we
the
our
good,
how
Club,
colleagues
foi
given us.
DINNER.
ANNUAL
CLUB.
[Proposed by
Chairman^
Gentlemen,"
You
char,
are
and
doubtless
anticipatingthe usual speech from
I will not keep you in suspense
very long nor
the
tire
TOASTS:
AND
SPEECHES
72
patience. The report
positionand the result of
already been placed before
club, showing its financial
of the
your
season's
the
last
you.
club
You
working,
has
noticed
that
will have
[and ground] engaged were
The
than in the previousyears.
last season
numerous
more
have
increased,
members, and subscriptions,
receipts from
with the
connected
and there are
two
points
very satisfactoryhaving
viz.,the funds are in good condition,we
past season,
in hand, and
the club has won
a
very respectablebalance
matches
the
which
in
the
[three]of
and
lost [four],
[nine],
drawn
engaged in with other
I am
glad to welcome
elevens.
but the number
must
necessarilybe
accommodation
for
occasions
two
or
there
done
solvent.
is to
be
they
provided,and
in
committee
the
ladies
mustered
would
suggest
match
days, or the issue
duly introduced.
a
larger numbers
to
slightlyincreased
of
This
cricket
very excellent
eleven,and
that there
some
has
I
been
in
for match
fee
entrance
to
upon
big
friends of the
give them a fund to
would
upon, and entitle the holders
There
have
been
accidents
no
some
;
not
keeping the
days
were
glad to see that
them, he
encourage
tickets
season
draw
excellent
have
We
Well, gentleman,the committee
have
succeeded
can, and
if
accommodation
Butmore
all
club
members
some
was
ranks
to our
certain number, and on one
dissatisfaction expressed at
a
of accommodation.
the want
have
than
more
it has
contests
members
limited.
new
many
so
the
to
seats.
of
any
shown.
to be
consequence,
We
have
and
now
s
able to
announce
happy
who will
promising colts in the district,
have
an
opportunityof tryingtheir mettle on an earlyday in
the ensuing season.
I am
glad to see that our noble and manly national game is
am
"
are
stilltaking hold
popular.
of the country.
We
have
seen
"
I do
not
think ciicket
in various
was
ever
parts of
England
carryingnearlyeverything before them
had
to be played, and
by patience when an up-hillgame
by
brilliant dash
and rapid scoringeventuallypull a
"out
game
of the fire." What
has done
man
man
do, and I hope
may
far distant when
the day is not
not
only one
English
will be able, by putting aside jealousies
eleven, but many,
and
victors against
working in full harmony, to come
out
On the other
team.
hand, we ought to rejoice
any Colonial
that our
kindred
beyond sea have such a relish for the old
and
so
English sport,
readilythat they are real chips
prove
who
of the old block
all the good qualities
of the
possess
of Englishmen.
is a good deal to be said about
There
race
more
a
Colonial
eleven
"
SPEECHES
74
LXXVI.
RESPONSE
THE
OF
friend
My
made
and
Chairman
Mr.
CAPTAIN
Gentlemen,
and
the
Honorary
so
speech
bristlingwith
a
almost
and
wicked!
in that
example
him
meet
there.
I
but
"
that
the
for the very
the last toast
so
friend
my
of cricket,so
attached
the
club
known
last
the
season
remark
was
if
of the
they
in
men
not
be
the
eleven
been
with
as
am
so
well
and
me,
and
or
or
in
The
eleven
fairness
mere
we
,
and
no
a
captain for the team
; and
defeat with,ordinaryluck, while we
such
possess
and
such
and
fieldsmen
sure
as
,
honour
to captain such
and
I feel it
a
team,
It is
have
such
there
need
fear of
no
bowlers
.
AT
LXXVI
A
LOCAL
I. THE
the Eldest
attempt
at
I
OF
an
assure
wishes,
to
my
oratory.
CRICKET
HEALTH
as
It is
so,
Gentlemen, I thank you heartilyfor your good
you.
and
for the kindness
with
which
have
listened
you
imperfectspeech
mination,
deterduties
,
question of
and
made
are
increased.
when
so
falls
of the game
and
,
add
trouble
together,the
immensely
fond
so
I may
me,
I must
we
all the
to
displayed pluck
worked
have
I
secretary.
and
you,
labour
claim
for
to
me
in which
demands
to
unwearied
one,
gratefultheme
a
and
The
lay
me,
known
had
not
to
the
or
good
had
"
off
score
gratefulto
pleasantmanner
inconvenience
very
our
to
him
and
traditions,
any
your
captainwould
always
men
a
if
that
claim
I cannot
themselves
friend
am
received.
necessities
make
by my
its
to
club,that
when
me
I
be
to
as
following his
quite unable
of
danger
attributed
has
attached
to the
terms
clever and
delightin physics pain," and
goodness
Secretary has
cricket
he may
;
less
and
was
"
honourable
in
proposed
or
FORE-
THE
TO
I forbear.
ground
none
am
feel
I
sense
on
But
gentlemen,
from
TOASTS:
TOAST.
GOING
to
AND
DINNER.
THE
{Proposed by
HOST.
Visitor^
Gentlemen,
"
I must
I
toast
ask
you
about
to fillme
a
and
bumper fair,
drink
to the
I feel I need
call upon
not
propose.
drink
it
to
for
will do when
you
heartily, that I know
I
you
tell you that it is the health of our kind
and
Host
am
to
worthy
which
he
has
is
to
ever
be
honoured.
been
to
us,
We
how
all know
he
park and to pitch our wickets in
he has always entertained
We
us.
how
considerate
his
permits us to use
his grounds, and
how
do not
need
reminding
ffOtV
TO
AND
MAKE
PROPOSE
THEM.
75
of these
things.
We
and
forward
with the greatest pleasure to our
is no
to dwell
necessityfor me
look
the
There
virtues of
park.
manly
all treasure
Host.
our
versaily
respected
He
them
is
that
from
year,
in
match
upon
and so
well known
so
to
year
the
uni
that
I might say could
nothing
by
add
his
to
the
to
o
r
possibility
any
popularity,
high position
he occupies in the minds
of all in the county and
beyond it.
will
Gentlemen, I
only ask you to give three hearty cheers
for Mr.
kind
entertainer ; and
while thanking him
our
for his hospitality,
let us show
ourselves
worthy of it by keeping
,
within
health
the
of
bounds
Mr.
wishes
Host, with
our
,
good
of cheerfulness
for Mrs.
LXXVlil.
REPLY
and
TO
THE
and
decorum.
and
hearty
family.
our
the
POBEGOING
The
respectful
\Spoker,
TOAST.
by the Host."]
Gentlemen,
friend
My
health,and
in which
"
has
Mr.
I
been
greatlyflattered
am
acquittedhimself
he
responded.
in
proposing my
gratifiedby
and
the
manner
in which
you
way
glad that you think it
the
say I am
very
here
for
I am
contest
at cricket.
to come
your
far as is in my
so
always glad to encourage,
healthy
power,
exercise and honest enjoyment. My park is open so long as
and
it,and I am glad to learn from my men
you wish to use
only
can
while
worth
from
observation
own
my
and
to
owner
an
sward
that
some
did
not
by thoughtless
respect
you
the
and
great
a
your
to
you
they
hospitalityI
pleasure to me
so
am
to
the visitors
I
glad
am
to
so
to
you
here.
I shall
watch
can.
your
I
now
game
have
for
and
to
only
enjoy themselves
to
thank
my
own
as
in
my
healths, and
to
you
drinking our
of the day
all
Many happy returns
all
to you
believe it has, a pleasant one
"
the
long enjoyed
dispense. It is as
here enjoying yourselves
now
happy
see
to
large park,
a
because
for
abuse
not
to close
so
appeal
be always glad to
to
come
you
wives and
children
and
and
hearts,
your
your sweetyou
time bring them
and when
with
next
over
you come
and
name
I
and
use
done
friends have
it is for
welcome
and
persons,
privilegethey enjoyed.
little
any
as
neighbours have
of my
that
think
men
gentle-
young
enjoy yourselves without
and good feelingsto
your good sense
have.
It looks
churlish
chances
you
but
other
It is very disheartening
the trees and grass.
of property to find his trees
injuredand his
about
cut
and
you
and
here
neighbourscome
harm
doing
for
I
kind
very
and
"
"
if it has
as
well
as
much
as
family's
wish
been,
to
you
as
I
myself
AND
SPEECHES
76
AT
LXXIX.
TOASTH
DINNER.
REGATTA
A
SUCCESS
{Proposedby
REGATTA.
THE
TO
.
the
Chairman.']
Gentlemen,
We
have
"
readily admit,
the
to
conne
it is
It is
failure
or
means
I
good deal,not
a
but
interested,
Club.
The
to be dismissed
and its
institution,
annual
an
now
to all who
only
mediately
im-
those
to
with
connected
are
able
be
will
you
all present.
to
interestingone
Regatta is no lightone
an
occasion of the
with a few words.
success
day, and, as
of the
toast
the
marked
chronicle
to
a
glad to
enabled
tribute
have
been
to diswe
success
to-day.
prizes
have
with approval and
met
acceptance ; and if our
off many
did not
laurels,they were, if defeated,
crew
carry
win
rather
them
see
certainlynot disgraced,and we would
other water
than their own.
We
preferour visitors to
upon
We
off the prizesif they can.
as
are
pleased to see
carry
am
The
win
them
that
win
to
as
ourselves,and
feel assured.
we
done
have
We
done
win
must
men
fairlywell,but
of
"
might
condoling with the unsuccessful
can
we
warmly congratulatethe victors upon their success.
Let us now
words
respectingthe club and the
say a few
finances
in a pretty
business side of the question. The
are
The
inform
treasurer
that we
can
good condition.
you
in hand
after all expenses
have "
are
providedfor. But
have
better,and
the best
I regret to see
do not
that
should
some
would
to
it is not
be
rule.
members
We
will
the
fair upon
arrear.
rules
with
the
omission
an
have
The
not
improved, and
if not
measure,
our
,
owe
most
deep
a
my
health
and
of
general arrangements
the
of
members
and
in
any
bye-laws,permitted,
have
been
much
of the arrangements
in a great
are
altogether,due to the untiringefforts of Mr.
efficient honorary secretary.
To
him
all
we
debt
of
of Mr.
,
popularityof
a
club
so,
they
others
success
remarks.
Gentlemen,
Secretary.
the
in
those
paid their subscriptionsto do
will proceed as by our
we
defaulting cases
and framed
for such a contingency.
who
mittee
com-
when
rule
one
call upon
once
The
unnecessary
members
that
other
ignore
overlook,
at
in
are
enforce
permitted to
neglect, nor
not
another
many
wish
strictness,but
while
and
gratitude,
with
I will call upon
to whose
tact and
the
bumper
club
if
you
is in
you
his
I will
name
all to
drink
to
clude
con-
the
patiencethe prosperity
a
please
great
for
measure
the
due.
Honorary
ffOiV
LXXX.
TO
A
MAKE
PROPOSE
AND
REGATTA
DINNER.
THEM.
77
[Reply of
the
endeavours
to
Hon
Secretary^
Mr.
Chairman
I trust
will
you
for your
and
Gentlemen,
"
excuse
me
if,in
my
thank
kind
of goodwill,I fail to make
expressioins
self
myI wish.
The honour
done me
as
as
intelligible
you have
is unexpected, and all the more
that
on
embarrassing to me
account.
It is very generous
of our chairman
to speak of
in such
terms.
me
to do my
Though I have endeavoured
duty I have never done more
conscientiously
therefore,
; and
But it is very
speaking,I have no claim to your thanks.
mation
nevertheless, to feel and to hear that in the estigratifying,
of one's friends,and in the opinion of the chairman,
you
has
in one's endeavours, which have at any rate
succeeded
the merit of disinterestedness.
has been
The Club House
a
one
very pleasantrendezvous, but all the efifortsof the committee
and secretary would
out
not have
accomplished everythingwithcombination
of
the hearty and
members.
the
pleasant
committee
The
have
been
and untiringin
indefatigable
their
the club and
efiforts to make
its arrangements
successful ;
and we
think we
have in a measure
succeeded.
Personally
feel
I
in which
much
the
gratifiedat the very kind manner
of my
health
has been
all
I
and
thank
toast
received,
you
me
heartilyand sincerelyfor the way you have honoured
by
proposing it.
LXXXI.
THE
HEALTH
\Proposed by
the
Gentlemen,
OP
THE
COMPETING
CREWS.
Chairman.^
"
I have
mind
it in my
double
to propose
to you
a
toast,
will all accept with pleasure. I mean
and one
which
you
the health of two
We
here present.
were
competing crews
much
interested
in
the
the
Grand
for
races
to-day
Challenge
the
of
final
issue
limited
which, as you are aware, was
Cup,
to
the
two
beaten, and
our
try
upon
have
to
boats
"
whose
well,not
defeat,but
We
here present.
were
We
badly beaten.
nation
accept with resigintend as soon
as
we
verse
possibleto recrews
are
There
will be opporthe verdict and claim the cup.
tunities
for us to retrieve our laurels soon, and we
intend to
of them
I call
Meanwhile
at any rate.
regain some
first to our
to drink
Crew, who
guests, the
you
so
well
will ask you
and
honourably defeated
keep a little cheer
gamely to pick up the
to
struggledso
they be opponents
in th"se contests,
for
us
; and
secondly
I
Eight,who
race.
Gentlemen, though
I couple with all amicable
our
own
SPEECHES
78
and good
feelings
the Eight of the
LXXXII.
Mr.
assure
and
TO
sir,have
met
cannot
at
hands
in which
had
I have
partlythe
nor
many
been
fallen
it has
to
my
of the
I
Eight of
in drinkingour
us
LXXXIII.
THE
President
having wrested
fold.
prizefourall,I assure
although I
you, and
will
to
expect me
say I hope you
was
a losing
one
thing : that never
and
here
are
it is my
several
the
value
and
in the
never
was
of
name
Gentlemen,
thank
ARCHERY
more
once
value
we
our
will pay
us
a
club, the
in the
more
honour
,
name
have
you
MEETING.
ARCHERY
[Proposed by
CLUB.
at
the Prize
the
Distribution^
Gentlemen,
"
assembled
amongst
on
you
a
very
interesting
occasion,
agreeable duty
the
prizesyou
^arraoz-mindedness
jokes and puns on the
to business.
a
need
on
part
subjectof
to be
that many
my
have
so
joke
to
well
of
present
won
the
day.
to-
young
would
only betray
I will spare
all
you
archery,and
told that
of
; so
to
have
There
is the old and
time-worn
ladies and beaux, the repetition
of which
rigin,and
defeat
a
our
for the
you
healths.
pleasingand
not
of the
"
Chairman
or
Ladies
do
can
courteously acknowledged.
pleasant meetings during the period
Club,
stroking the Eight of the
I
have
been
lot, am
glad to say, to
all welcome.
AN
You
I
more
and
you
to
all
and
winning some
prizes; but
highly. We trust your crew
means
I bid
and
which
having carried off the prize;
of
prizeto-day most
visit at our
Regatta,
We
and
toast
kindlyresponded to.
so
increases
you will not
certain of
am
sustained
have
done
proposed,
satisfaction in
our
pluckily rowed,
admirably
and
to
the
reply to
to
it is the generous
your
more
We
add
appreciateit
and
regainit,I
race
handsomely
so
a
We
"
"
noble
fine crew,
manner
received
that may
defeat has been
be temporary
welcomed.
Such
we
as
success
hearty kindness
our
have
Gentlemen,
here present have
are
very lucky in
we
such
in which
and
\By
TOAST.
diffidence that I rise
if anything can
it from
and
Crew
FOREGOING
THE
and
much
you
of the
toasts
Club.
Chairman
you,
members
your
the
of the SuccessfulBoat-I
It is with
which
wishes
REPLY
the Stroke
TOASTS:
AND
come
at
once
archery is of very ancient
England's victories are owing to
BOW
TO
her bow-men.
in those days
times
We
as
a
PROPOSE
for
famous
were
well
archery is
AND
MAKE
good
many
in front of the target, I assure
you,
and
gentlemen are practising. I
long-bow
But
in these
I
glad
pastime,though
mere
shots in this club.
79
the
drawing
the cross-bow.
as
THEM.
I should
am
be very
when
modern
to
see
sorry
to
so
be
ladies
young
congratulate the
you
winners
prize-
succeeded
who have not now
to those
heartily
; and
carrying off a prize,I say persevere,
practise: steady
hands
and
will
hearts
through much
hopeful
carry
you
in
greater
difficulties than
winners
to
well
come
the
I will now
call upon
these.
take their prizes,
which they have so
and
up
won.
LXXXIV.
SPEECH
BY
(OE
PRESIDENT
THE
CHAIKa
\After the Prize Distribution^
Ladies and Gentlemen,
Before we
separate to-day I have to say a few words ; and
in which
have
I will not detain you long,as the ceremony
we
have
been
time already. We
engaged has kept us some
had a most
interestingmeeting. I look upon archery and
MAN).
"
tennis,and
ladies and gentlemen
field sports in which
There
are
greatly beneficial to both sexes.
who
enabled
their timidity
to overcome
are
those
unite,as
can
shy men
many
in ladies' societywhen
or
the
The
racket.
a
lies in the
occupation of
the
than
archery
does
more
:
and
ladies
it trains
will
figureand
advantages,
but
ladies'
the
be
would
there
beneficial
a
no
were
these
on
sexes
appreciate this
These
pastime.
But
it
nerves
;
it
improves
perhaps merely physical
next
are
its moral
other
occasions, I
brain,it steadies the
the eye and
it has
If
talk.
cannot
carriage!
occupied with a bow
conversation, I believe
They work and talk ;
are
their hands.
mingling of
still think
the
of
secret
fidgets and
man
reason
their hands
reason
attributes.
"
It is recreation
and
healthy exertion
and friendship,
pleasantrivalry; it promotes good-fellowship
unkindness
stiffness ; and
removes
disappears,let us hope,
No
in the archery ground.
ill-feeling
ought to arise. No
innocent
jealousyought to find place in such a sport at once
as
and
interesting.Let us in our aims and amusements,
well as in our
higher occupations, put away all envy and
malice, and our pleasures will turn into blessings,and we
pure
and
shall
all be
Ladies
which
and
you
simple ;
it stimulates
the
nearer
attainment
gentlemen,
have
Archery
listened
Club.
to
I thank
to
me,
of the
for
good
you
and I wish
the
all
and
the true.
patience
success
with
to the
SPEECHES
8o
ANGLING
AN
LXXXV.
TO
PROSPERITY
{Proposed by
:
CLUB.
at
CLUB.
ANGLING
THE
the President
Gentlemen,
is only
There
TOASTS
AND
Dinner^
the Annual
"
one
which
toast
more
I will inflict upon
you
will heartilyrespond to it.
sure
evening,but I am
you
have
all
We
The toast is Prosperityto the Anglers' Club.
fish for combeen fishingto-day,but I am
pliments
sure
you do not
had
We
from me
have
successes.
respectingyour
a good haul
provided for our meeting, and though it is not
much
in my
line to make
jokes, I will say that every man
of
hook
his own
to be enjoyinghimself
on
Jack
you seemed
this
"
"
which
I venture
to
this remark
Now
sport itself. Old
make
a
is very
do not
are
Isaac
to
me
Walton
they
true
no
something
say
declared
recreation
will do
the
about
God
did
never
than
angling."
declare that fishing
fish. I maintain
we
the
torture
say we
fisherman
"
that
worthy people who
many
cruel ;
;
leads
fish did !
calm, quiet,innocent
more
there
But
if the
doubt
If,as
so.
we
judge
can
from our
own
experience,the terror of pain and death lies
in the anticipation,
then the fishes,
of
having no anticipation
I
death, do not suffer mentally at all. Bodily suffering,
think,is not great in fishes. That they give us play enough
know
times we
is not
the tough leatherymouth
; but
sensitive to the hook
estimate
and if we
kill
as
we
feeling,
fish
at
there
is
little
With
our
once
the bait it
or
no
pain.
is a different thing, and
I am
afraid we
must
plead guilty;
but fly-fishing
and artificial baits will serve
well on most
as
at
occasions.
Gentlemen, I have not much
long existent,and this is
been
the
pleasure of
had
a
glad
will
to
now
inform you
conclude
the
that
the
the
not
addressing you
increase of
satisfactory
to
to
more
from
first time
the
members
funds
by callingupon
are
Our
say.
chair.
of
in
you
We
late, and
good
to
club has
I have had
LXXXVI.
I
drink
prosperity
ANNUAL
THE
Senior
Employ/.]
"HOUSE-DINNER."
by the
[Proposed
FIRM.
Chairman, Mr. Vice-Chairman, and Gentlemen,
that it devolves
perceive by the programme
upon
this year
am
condition.
Mr.
that
I
Angling Club.
AN
I
have
to
propose
requires
some
to
you
rom-age
a
important toast,
very
and
firmness
to
and
undertake.
"
me
one
1
TOASTS:
AND
SPEECHES
J2
and
impartial, but by kindness
only by justice, strict and
which
assistance
money
well-timed
liberality,will have
and which
firm I believe
purchase
cannot
such
a
will
years
not
belief I
in that
to, and
belong
we
men,
Gentle-
out.
wear
to
all respectfully,gratefully,and
dutifully,
you
upon
of Messrs.
"
and
drink health
prosperityto the Firm
"
them
for giving us such a pleasant outing"
Co., and thank
call
to-day.
LXXXVII.
the Senior
Being
myself
and
TO
Partner
present^
and
Vice
Mr.
the
; but
I have
partners
to
occasion
pleasant Vice
prompt
I
me.
am
"
has been
proposed and
of having done
conscious
address
I cannot
ready to listen
and I speak also
of the kind
very sensible
health
our
\By
TOAST.
"
this
on
a
all are
we
"
FOREGOING
Gentlemen,
chairman
perhaps
THE
REPLY
me,
for my
in which
manner
received.
to
We
not,
are
quite all my friend Mr.
has
We
attributed
to
us.
will,however, accept his
made
ourselves
that we have
assurances
fairlyagreeable to
him
and the other gentlemen in our
employment, and we
existed in our
that in future the harmony that has
trust
be prolonged and increased.
establishment
may
is one
There
point in the speech just delivered which I
of the Firm
touch upon, and that is the responsibility
must
in the matter
of the employes. They are
not
children,and
in my
interference.
They
they would
opinion resent
any
however,
would
say
from
nine
business ; we
own
us, Mind
your
til! five or
six o'clock, but
after we
to
are
yours
leave
your
house
we
are
of
men
ments
pursuitsand amusedo not
concerned, we
accept any responsibility.
found that those pursuitsor amusements
gating,
derowere
in direct opposition to our
business,it would be our
our
are
are
But,
if we
duty
to
or
warn
and
our
So
masters.
own
concerned,
so
the individual
wishes, and
give
far
that
one
up
as
far
as
the outside life
their
as
he must
conform
the other
or
to our
of the
tice
prac-
opposing
pursuits.
\ye entirelyaccept
during office hours.
have
any
your
interests
development
at
of
the
We
wish
heart
energy
think
instance
every
it our
the back
on
for doing his
when
opportunity offers
we
of that
gentleman's worth
for
responsibility
in
as
you
well
as
to
our
employes
our
understand
own.
that
We
we
welcome
do not in
gladly ; and though we
duty to pat the employ^ openly
dut), yet we mentally note
and
will
some
openly proclaim
v.ay
or
other.
our
Be
sense
asS
ffOfV
that
TO
MAKE
AND
PROPOSE
THEM.
8?
all noted.
Very little escapes
us, and
many
with
we
have,
pleasure,intimated our appreciationof
efforts for the benefit of the house and for each other.
you
times
your
We
are
together
longer.
I will
as
have
we
There
at
we
resume
has
annually enjoy our
can
to-day ; and now
other toasts
many
are
once
which
toast
that
pleased
are
to
proposed and
highly gratifyingto the
I
come,
holiday
detain
in
received
you
so
perceive,
duties, thanking you
my
been
I will not
for
a
the
manner
Firm.
{Proposed by the Head
of
Department, or Junior Partner.]
Mr. Vice-Chairman, and Gentlemen,
Mr. Chairman,
is a very important one,
I have
The
toast
to propose
now
LXXXVIII.
THE
EMPLOYES.
"
importance indeed
in
next
have
we
have
head, unless
intellect and
is like
then
business
do
"
is
he
to
as
they
a
machine
good
no
In
the
hands
once
society and
working
order.
This
has
the
been
which
those
issued
It
by
has
the
been
reason
is the
employed
there
direction
are
he
:
no
the
of the
The
use.
retire from
must
or
of
our
success
carried
have
is
a
have
to
out
be
a,
"
a
:
great
the
the
in
good
honesty in
must
success
this in
and
man
he
case
So
up.
hands
or
Firm's
in that
perfect machine, the
a
secret
;
the
wrongfully,
; and
shut
the limbs
of
the
directs
be
must
in action
direction, obedience
houses
rapport with
en
to
criminal
speaking,perfect man,
clear,and
health
in business.
humanly
be
are
of gear
out
to
must
whose
Firm,
large
directed,they
nuisance
head
all
answer
are
and
vicious
be
to.
if the brain
hand,
the other
is said
at
of the
"
unless
limbs
the
that
body we
^justas in the human
what
the
limbs to perform
superior
hands
But
directs.
brain
On
and
head
a
directingbrain,and
a
man
responded
justnow
be
must
to
measure
in
manner
instructions
head.
a
of
matter
great satisfaction
to
Firm
the
to mark
steady increase in
during the past twelvemonth
the business,which
they attribute partly to better times,but
chiefly to the attention and diligenceof those gentlemen in
the
who
the business
directions issued
To
the
gf Mr.
manner
Employes
have
by
the
the
carried
out
the
suggestions
responsiblepartners
Firm
are
much
in the
indebted, and
and
house.
in
posing
pro-
their healths J wish to couple the toast with the name
all the gentlemen for the zealous
and to tnank
,
been
their various duties have
in which
performed.
LXXXIX.
\By
REPLY
I
have
and
thank
to
he has
in which
way
for much
kindness, and
annual
our
"
of Messrs.
for
Mr.
of them.
spoken
Gentlemen,
Firm
the
employed by
reason
and
Vice-Chairman,
Mr.
all those
sure
EMPLOYES.
THE
CUrk.]
Chairman,
am
:
OF
TOAST
THE
TO
the Senior
Mr.
TOASTS
AND
SPEECHES
84
We
the
are
dinners
very kind
all grateful
always looked
are
pleasure,and always looked back upon
As regards the efforts of the
with a feelingof contentment.
all
for it that they have
gentlemen in the house, I can answer
their duties,to the best of their abilities,
endeavoured
to do
willingly and conscientiouslyfor the benefit of the house.
has been
A great deal
are
done, and we
glad to think that
forward
with
to
much
the balance-sheet
far
So
as
shows
efforts
our
heartilyglad, and
the old
have
we
pleased
are
of
many
that
trust
We
is
sum
contributed
for which
house
round
good
a
this result
to
in any
case
have
worked
us
rightside.
the
on
we
to
for
efforts in the
are
find
that
long
so
future,if
our
we
prospering.
another
hear
the
be
will
to
meet
to
permitted
result,
year
and
that the mutual
at least as
to all parties,
satisfactory
and
esteem
regard which influences all in the house will
are
remain
even
firmlycemented.
more
of the
I thank
Employes
you
expressionsconcerning us.
XC.
Before
been
pleasureto
requested to
do
good as to come
dinner, drink our
Visitors
to-day
wine, and
for
likewise,
do
The
here
we
so
all strangers to us.
is well known
to all here
met, and
us
here
have
much
appreciatedhis
before
;
here
all
pleasure
me
to
all here.
cordiallv
in
our
great
me
have
been
sports,
eat
as
.
company.
by their
the
not
Another
so
our
Mr.
one
gentleman
we
have
has
genialityand
been
We
day
success
thank
a
them
brilliant
Gentlemen, 1 am
drinking the health
many
for their
success,
sure
of
our
often
with
good feeling
of the day. We
for
gentlemen,
leaving London
when
have
must
they
more
engagements.
made
the
has
which
gives
who
will,we
If I mistake
materiallyenhanced
indebted
to these
travellingdown
with
and
join in
it
which
toast
a
hope, come
again
delightedto see them.
kindly come
us
to-day
amongst
not
are
kind
shall all be
have
who
and
who
is
there
and
propose,
to the Visitors
I refer
so.
good
"
this afternoon
separate
we
I have
and
and
Chairman
for your
name
[Proposed 6y Vue-Chairtnan.]
Gentlemen,
VISITORS.
THE
Mr.
in the
wishes and
Gentlemen,
you
are
and
portant
im-
presence,
and
given
will
Visitors.
join
XCI.
HOW
TO
MAKE
REPLY
TO
THE
Chairman,
Mr.
I rise
first
because
I
to
VISITORS.
{^By
the fittest to
am
because
but
priority,
pleasantmeetings,and
honour
been
I
by
but
asks
any claim
have risen ;
say, not a stranger at these
excellent
speaker who did us the
the
in
quite correct
was
I remember
on
saying
one
sion
occa-
chairman, and I believe beai
your
and
inch or so ;
me
no
malice,
you see he bears
here
and
again to-day,
actually challenged me
ran
him
have
to
healths
our
propose
here before.
I have.
to
I had
glad
am
or
of my fellow-visitors
it will be as well to begin.
none
I
thanks
return
I think
time
as
"
return
presses
Gentlemen, I am,
an
me
with
race
a
I was
obliged to decline as
race, which
I notice your chairman
laughs ; but I am not
him, I can tell him, and some
day we will
I
another
to
lame
!
meet
to
I
"
assure
a
all here
itself.
I
can
all upon
you
asked
be
XCII.
whenever
the
to
happy
you
subjectupon
courteous
an
opportunityfor courtesy presented
you
attention
very
of the
tone
and
kindness
heartily,and congratulate
assembly I feel honoured
[Proposed hy a Gitesi.l
Gentlemen,
permit
me
to
which
I
shall I say whom
not
Perhaps I may
But
pleasant afternoon, and
very
and
or
youthfuland
off
run
meet.
Chairman
Mr.
afraid
fat meantime.
too
a
am
of
only thank
LADIES.
THE
Will
deal
great
I grow
passed
I have
you
received
from
unless
again
the match
to
THE
OP
85
Vice-Chairman, and Gentlemen,
for the generous
thanks
toast
just
has been
so
warmly welcomed, not
Mr.
which
and
proposed,
and
TOAST
THEM.
o/tkem.']
One
to
PROPOSE
AND
rise and
I take
be
say
a
few
words
upon
but in which
confessedlyignorant,
am
"
"
great interest.
a
accounted
a
fair
The
I hear
a
good
deal
"
!
still
am
of
the ways
of them.
We
"
Ladies
1
judge, as
entirely inexperiencedin
a
kind.
woman-
indebted
are
social pleasuresto the
of many
of our
for the greatest charm
societyof ladies. I need not quote Sir Walter Scott's verses
and
kindness
of women.
of the benevolence
to assure
you
need
nor
I believe
I
am
proverbialfickleness of the sex
be a quiteunfounded
aspersion.
there is nothing that I can
say in favour
I refer to the
to
sure
ladies which
your
for much
to them
hearts
will not
We
endorse.
look upon
we
happiness,and
rate, as superiorbeings.
respect at any
in them, in their virtue
welfare
of the
kingdom.
which
"
and
The
them,
than
strength,depends
mothers
are
indebted
are
More
of the
in
some
all else
the
the wealth
future
and
prosperityof
the
them
upon
am
them
too,
all to
you
what
for the
REPLY
TO
awkward
some
years
senior) he
my
their
to
and
certainly
have
been
afraid
their
But
they
I
absence.
Were
absence
if the
the
party
and
thanks
LADIES."
any
forth
of
their
the
was
thanks.
new
oratory
Alhambra
proposed,
and
fancy
would
tame
assure
of
I
"
I
you,
the
them
; in
chilled.
the
rills of
and
supervene,
suitable
in
from
am
presence,
return
presence,
the
at
praise
frozen
are
"
with
could
1
of
their
of
world,
only observable
present
songs
the
struck
I
is
the
world, for
the
been
health
diffidence
lighted by
flow
have
must
/, at
in which
in
from
sex
in
you
manner,
ladies
the
can
the
an
I believe
what
thank
to
giantess
ladies
of
Now
!
equally disgusted
this
founts
by
the
their
be
is rathei
me
throughout
sex
returning
am
were
the
warmed
the
would
them, that
assure
rhetoric
thus
wives,
return
(though
nothing about
knew
all
in which
inspirationbreathe
their
and
that
charming
not
not
placed
except
present, they
which
in
manner
may
upon
Knowing
!
"
health
say,
fair
of the
Ladies"
gracefulterms
am
"THE
just now
whole
the
only
course,
I
OF
confessed
the very
very nice way,
has been
toast
responded to.
the
to
has
the
could
them
present
love
call
I
sweethearts
our
Mr.
propose
life,have
of the
names
If
Bless
TOAST
to
of
time
my
in
Gentlemen,
which
He
one.
entitle him
to
Ladies.
THE
and
Chairman
positionin
The
is
and
Yowigest Bachelor!]
the
Mr.
he
So
of them.
one
I
already anticipated.
not
bachelor
youngest
say
myself respect them,
"
the
can
depend.
praise of the
must
in
sex.
XCIII.
[By
have
you
rather
or
perhaps
drink heartilyto the
blessings we possess
I call upon
I
that
equally with
all
you
sure
of
each
which
ladies
children, and
the
up
generations
future
nothing
is
there
Gentlemen,
of
fate
bring
They
rotion.
a
TOASTS:
AND
SPEECHES
?6
I
could,
thanks
for
them.
As
it
is,however, gentlemen,
I think.
Ladies,
I thank
and
collectively
happiness
of
array
for they
all,lower
you
call
to
female
are
the
than
wives
beauty
true
the
my
refuses
tongue
sincerelyon behalf
individually,whom
or
outside
consolers
angels" 1
sweethearts
of
our
of
mankind,
of
; and
lives
say
all
the
charming
we
have
for
I thank
and
to
"
the
vou
the
vast
too,
if
little,
at
HOW
TO
MAKE
AND
PENNY
XCIV.
ADDRESS
THEM.
PROPOSE
87
READINGS.
THE
BY
OB
CHAIBMAN,
Ladies and Gentlemen,
Before we
the programme,
commence
very attractive one, I will introduce
PROMOTER,
"
a
who
gentlemen
Their
names
are
have
you
that
here
are
forward
selection
the
bush,"
no
has
of these
profits
defraying the debt
fund.
necessary
of
number
seats
evening to assist
readingsduring the
seats
sixpence each
at
been
sixpenny places at
one
wishes of all.
and the committee
But
I
efforts
district
the
them,
for
may
make
to
and
meeting
hear
to
me
And
favour
to
play
AT
THE
as
and
Ladies
we
I wish
I
am
to
to
a
; to the
this will meet
suggestions
new
In
clusion,
con-
all your
people in
open
to
little opportunity
count
can
The
occupiersof
Many
upon
and
so
this
evening.
THE
EVENING.
request
will be
sure
I
for
all who
request
sented
kindly con-
"
I have
pass
us
OF
Gentlemen,
desire
work.
for
overture
CONCLUSION
separate
suffrages,which
I tell you
an
to
for the programme,
the solo she has
with
us
certain
of amusement
I think
way
for
debts.
the
think
public-houseshave
good
work,
equally
any
success.
means
any,
recreation.
assist us in our
to
Before
the
a
to
a
any such.
will use
you
that
once
halfpenny
one
We
by
will go towarc^,*,
our
pay
To
quiteopen
gladlyentertain
or
now
to
you
at
come
from
are
hope
meetings
few, if
at
wish
a
these
I will make
Miss
XCV.
we
express
except
detain
winter
not
"
each.
penny
will
have
us.
wisely made.
excellent
an
penny.
will be sold at
programmes
the
and
amuse
the schools, or
to some
upon
We
have
aside
therefore
set
we
exclusiveness,but because
of
majority
places cost only one
those
to
I will not
so
this
the
the ladies
you
enlarging upon the performers'merits,but
chief object in addressing you.
my
We
perceive is
and
I am
when
sure
programmes,
various
and
pieces
readings you will
needs
wine
I
the
the
me
to
kindly come
so
on
heard
with
agree
"
Good
have
which
vote
given
of thanks
your
very
to
attention
and
willinglywhen
the
ladies
and
their
given
ably and successfully
be able to
I
this evening.
services
will, think, now
of my
anticipations.We have had
judge of the correctness
evening ; onr interest and our laughterhave,
a most
delightful
gentlemen
who
have
so
You
SPEECHES
88
I
proved
hope,
kindly
and
their
On
again.
kind
your
much,
whether
such
that
I
in
or
which
value
friends
and
too
for
audience,
the
for
you
they
my
financially
both
them
see
thank
thank
cannot
highly
are
to
they
applause,
platform
evening,
desirous
say
part
gentlemen,
with
you
will
be
has
been.
as
excellent
and
creditable
has
thank
well
ofter
the
on
please
and
we
we
very
"
such
a
now
request
lullaby
your
all
to
and
much.
conclude
hope
we
their
stage,
I
"
as
by
assistance
we
be
to
able
and
programme,
smoothly
gone
you
will
week
next
another
pleasing
All
gentlemen,
Queen,"
the
the
and
provide
you
may
generously
so
efforts
success.
a
Ladies
sleep
I
own
my
on
make
to
are
have
their
only
discriminating
for
and
;
we
behalf
and
highly
eilorts
that
who
that
to-night
here
and
TOASTS.
performers
the
to
come
appreciated,
AND
concerned
as
Ladies
well.
am
sure
neard
in
just
"
singing
the
you
God
chorus.
to
it
trust
this
and
will
now.
save
all
II
the
SPEECHES
go
in
table
the
generally of
and
the
the
at
the
wish
that
continue
Look
press
; the
the
"
should
press
correctness
of writers
array
the compositors,
vast
press employs
the editors ; and
machinists,
the
the
at
can
free, and
be
wonder
we
that
it shall
exist.
to
What
England.
newspaper
of hands
number
readers,
our
of
north
the
TOASTS
AND
should
we
the
without
do
for
can
one
no
press
a
could
not
touchy travelling Briton
write
and
complain of incivility,or oppression, or extortion.
the Births, Marriages, and
ladies
would
The
no
longer see
Deaths
which
constitute
so
large a portion of their newspaper
would
miss
the theatrical
reading. The
report ; the
young
conceive.
moment
The
to which
philosophical discussion
the general reader
would
it gave
rise.
The
politicianand
miss
their
parliamentary intelligenceand their appetites for
scientist his
breakfast
books
and
in the
the
of
ensue
?
Can
the
were
would
absence
of
So,
then,
to
The
the
this
as
in
nothing
press.
civilization
of
?
day
wet
would
What
authors, and
their
generous
comparison
is
press
the
to
life to
as
universal
the
country,
world.
institution
carries
such
tremendous
a
and
all connected
responsibility,it behoves
power
and particularly the newspaper
portion of it,to exercise
supervision.
fate
of
paper
thrust
not
a
of the
an
or
a
soul,
book.
Press
of
publications,
printer alike.
not
am
I
with
the
man,
a
few
strict
ultimate
words
in
a
responsibility
great
a
and
numerous,
alluding to
disgrace to
now
are
a
speaking
am
Kingdom
heartily to its
advantages
upon
thus
are
a
a
it,
jealousies
grateful to testifyto the purity and ability
in which
it is
England, and the able manner
which
drink
critics
of
with
it is
I
United
have
Their
conducted.
the
marring
depend
may
Editors
them.
upun
few ; but
and
making
The
immortal
the
circulating libraries,
the
a
Then
paper.
of things as
would
fancy such a state
become
non-existent?
A
to
suddenly
all together,
strike, and a general revolution
cab
the
of
favourite
or
press
be
customary
seaside
the
we
strike,a
railway
and
at
the
become
writers
our
,:;rs
of
would
people
become
the
absence
What
!
publis
article,and
of
"
the
of
it possesses,
whom
I will
and
to
couple
and
the
the
and
call
upon
success,
of
indecent
editor
Newspaper
health
name
or
and
writer
the
world,
prosperity
scurrilous
to
and
Press
you
the
all to
great
its representatives,
of Mr.
.
of
BOW
XCVII.
I
a
REPLY
Mr.
Chairman
was
unaware
THE
and
be
I heard
the
honour
of
consideration
Press
responding
the
there
water
sonalityof the
toast
to
this
country,
and
in the
is
Press
Such
contemplate.
sant
I
of
undeserving
am
"
world, and
the
but
too;
notorious,and to
would
licence
editors
But
all most
you
free institutions
are
American
shorter.
kind
for your
posal
proGentlemen, the Press of the
the
to
the
thank
to
though
"
receptionof it and me.
Kingdom is the freest
Across
will be
speech
my
and
United
pronounced just
figurein the capacityof
that is perhaps
sense
name
my
to
upon
this evening. In one
advantage to you, for
I need
no
preparationor
on
heartily behalf of the
91
"
called
an
THEM.
PRESS.
Gentlemen,
until
speech-maker
PROPOSE
AND
FOR
that I should
now
MAKE
TO
exercise
us
"
discretion
wise
a
per
unplea
permittedin
be
not
purest.
the
in this
matter.
Reference
Press
;
has
but,
as
made
been
correspondenthas
to
his
deserved.
is not
success
had
not
accompany
get
at
the
that
gence
combatants
might
decision,and
Nothing is
development
now
than
each
other
have
"All
"Wheel
any
and
they
of the
of Fortune
These
used
Press.
be
to
men
are
"
to
I should
any
recollections
know
that
staff.
which
longer
no
gence,
Intelli-
much
turn
only
rpore votaries
professionalauthors jostle
of
Temple
of
in their
detain
her
they
; and
Fame
waiting
Men"
we
for the
direction.
you
long
too
reminiscences
of others.
from
has
of my
Literature
is
votaries.
But
a
the
career,
to
or
hard
mistress,
it is
gratifying
all
the fate of the working pressman,
long as the world lasts,a monument
I
were
own
worship her" that the true
as
proud of his callingas the soldier is of his.
great struggle sometimes, and thingslook black
to
could
of intelh-
considered.
Literature
and
Amateur
anecdotal
demands
he
"
endure.
did
particularly.He
general's table, or from his
specials undergoing hardships
the steps of the
upon
and
Conditions
Sorts
give you
pondent,
corres-
daring, tact, pronftpt
physical courage,
rapid writing,are attributes which the
its correspondents.
from
remarkable
in these
later days than
the
more
ever.
Gentlemen,
writer,a
a
less
demands
now
say whether
the
scarce
and
no
and
in the field ; he took what
thankful
for the amount
was
"
hacks
moral
Cigo
himself
worry
Army
have
we
Grub-street
Press
to
fell from
Now-a-days
the
need
no
Years
of the
success
the difficulties a
at
now-a-days,
encounter
distance,and
a
power
reason, look
additional
an
and
the
to
is
pressman
There
is
a
ever
; but whatPress will live as
of energy
and
worthy
SPEECHES
92
and
of all admiration
and
of the Press
for
again
TOASTS:
in
Gentlemen,
respect.
professionalmembers
its
kind
the
AND
which
in
manner
I
the
the
thank
name
you
been
has
toast
received.
XCVIIl.
{Speech by
MUSEUM.
and
Ladies
The
"
is
propose
Prosperity to the Museum
prosperityto
;
Art, which
with
things
Science, which
means,
Museum
is,1
of
Now
that
in
after-luncheon
an
is
and
imaginativerepresentation
be seen, and is capable
all ages have
lightand easy short
a
in
absurd
to
although
deal
to
heartilysuch
most
this Museum
be,
to
suppose
they have
because
that
all the
been
nobly
show
that
any
be
the
that
propose
a
advantage
to
that
I suppose
the cultivation
is the
real
nobody
can
no
one
of
doubt
the
it is called,whether
or
not, is
hands
be
doubted
such
this there
complete
that
means,
institution
moderate
views
I suppose
that
inevitable stream
of tendency,"
like it or not, whether
desire it
we
"
and
into
power
therefore, it cannot
more
1
more
am
sure
is,at all events,
but
I
the larger,
charitable,
be
popular opinion can
made, the
Now,
us.
pleasure that
in the
judgment and
true
knowledge.
that the ^^'iser,
the
for all of
as
we
moderate,
more
are
found
throwing day by day more
of the people. I suppose,
the
better
great
of charitable
that
Cartyle,
Cardinal
the greatest possible
it is connected.
countrj' with which
doubt that the surest
way towards
cultivation
as
and
can
The
still unfathomed.
are
I beUeve
the whole
art,
Arnold,
English language
tc you.
of this kind is to be
Museum
literature of
of
masters
them.
of the
exhausted, and that its resources
Therefore, gentlemen, it is with very
of
by
and
not
this toast
forms
by the great
the
I
pedantry and
narrow
exhibited
been
riches
as
But
I understand
multitudinous
handled
us
part of it.
institution
Matthew
Tennyson,
Browning,
with
an
have
Newman
ever
it would
before,have
gone
reflection
reminds
slightest
who
its very
ablest
and
thought and said.
subject to be dealt with
speech, especially
by one who is for the
part wholly unfit
most
advocate
of
can
being represented ; and Literature, which,
contains
all that the best
narrowest
significance,
of all times
suppose,
is connected.
the universe
of
men
I
the
knowledge
is the
the
Prosperityto
which
the
suppose,
of the creation which
of the whole
A
"
to
those
OF
Coleridge.']
Lord
Gentlemen,
I have
toast
Museum."
God
FOUNDATION-STONE
THE
LAYING
a
means
to
a
such
that
means,
an
in
an
institution
perhaps not the
Every piece
end-
HOW
of
TO
MAKE
reallyscientific
house
treasure
It
blessing.
AND
information
which
of mankind
is
of
not,
THEM.
PROPOSE
is,or
course,
been
has
be,
may
by the
93
added
to the
inestimable
an
institution
of
the
Museum
alone, by its lecture-rooms,by its teaching,by its
library,by its classes, and so forth, that the end I am
be achieved.
pointing out can
Possibly it is not by any
of ends in the power
of man
combination
alone to bring about
such
result
a
have
joined
have
an
men,
or
how
;
I
that institutions
certain
am
and
it should
them, from
teach
all are, how
little the
there
great
men
many
of the
have
present day are,
lesson
lesson
teach
view
that
those
the
who
have
what
pigmies
what
us, and
themselves
great men
with
which
us
before
think
compared
is another
There
been
who
persons
point of
stand
we
compared with
an
portion. That
surely is a
insignificant
should
humble
man.
History should
every
upon
we
will
and
upon
it forms
the universe,of which
is
earth
as
It will teach
scientific
a
such
I believe
increasingto-day ought,
in this respect.
important function
little we
tread
but
in
in tha
before
gone
historyof humanity,
if it is
only
wickedness,
rightlyread,
us, viz.,not
of
harsh
and
but the
severe
travagant
folly
judgments, and of exIf
is
there
be
which
can
anything
language.
it is to
gathered from the perusalof the historyof literature,
teach a man
to think
humbly of himself,so as to become
and more
more
capable of self-control,and therefore more
will
and
fit to govern
more
XCIX.
teach
others.
SCHOOL
A
the
\Spoken by
FESTIVAL.
of the Excursion?!^
Ladies and Gentlemen, Young
Before
we
leave
day,
delightful
place where
this
1 want
you
and
Old
Leader
Friends,
have
we
give
to
Friends
the
three
all spent such
cheers for Mr.
a
,
kindness
have
been
enabled
and
to
we
courtesy
by whose
is not
He
present with us now,
enjoy ourselves so much.
how
but I hope he will understand
fullywe appreciate his
here
and picnic and run
in permittingus to come
kindness
have all done to-day. We
are
glad to think there
races, as we
has
been
no
damage
well
girls,behaved
Such
good conduct
again are desirous
park.
His
kindness
done,
and
had
will,no
to
and
have
that you
all,boys and
plenty of rational enjoyment.
doubt, influence
have
deserves
an
afternoon
more
if
Mr.
,
in
his
we
beautiful
acknowledgment
than
can
give it,but I hope you, by a hearty cheer,
poor words
all value his goodness. I won't
how
much
will tell him
vou
my
SPEECHES
94
AND
TOASTS:
of this day ; still we
returns
may
you to wish him many
wish him
life
and
heartilylong
every happiness. Now, boys
and girls,
for Mr.
and long life to him
three cheers
!
,
ask
Now
is another
there
hoarse
after
before
I have
There
at
visitors
the
kind
cheers
C.
ourselves.
sure
am
I may
want
ladies and
some
all
not
more
gentlemen
willingly,
very
off
assisted
pass
so
well.
them
owe
will all unite
you
they have
for the
are
We
heartilyfor what
very
way
little treat
some
you
inconvenience, but
some
for the
liberally
materiallyto enjoy
our
are
hope
us
things go
I
I
to-day to assist us in our
sports, and to
smoothly. They have also subscribed
very
prizesyou have won, and helped us all very
with
thanks, and
"
cheers, because
done.
have,
present who
down
come
make
those
and
thing
with
they
all
us
in
me
have
thanking
done, and
day in making
then, all together
Now
of
vote
a
for
this
three
"
Visitors.
^Distributionof
FEAST.
SCHOOL
Prizes
for
Athletic
Sports.']
and
Ladies
I have
and
I have
as
that
the
have
run
but
the
I
their
have
deserve
them.
of the
Some
competitorsvery closelyin
judge's decisions
the
distribution
greatly in
witnessed
settled
have
parties,I
of all
but
am
"
requested to give
winners
satisfaction
wanted
Gentlemen,
the Prizes this afternoon,
away
I have very great pleasure in doing so, particularly
much
watched
the sports with
interest,and feel
been
of the
this afternoon
the
believe,and
are
or
two
events,
questionsto
nothing is
the
now
Prizes.
of Athletics.
favour
one
candidates
Such
calculated
exercises
to
as
bring
we
all
out
the
hardy qualiliesof boyhood. The lungs are exercised,
the muscles
are
strengthened, and we have, besides, several
moral qualities
developed. We learn to accept defeat without
and
obtain
to
victory without
ill-feeling,
any
ungenerous
failure.
Those
who
have
tliistime
won
over
must
triumph
persevere if they wish to keep ahead ; justas in your lessons
those who
to
desire to keep well up
applicationis necessary
m
the school.
Our
life is
v/hole
a
race
will fall behind.
There
everything,that
intense
So
success.
remember
vour
best.
1 trust
how
do
struggle in
is such
which
the
weakest
competition now-a-days
application is needed
people who
you
young
to
hear
in
ensure
me
will
have
gained your prizes,
viz.,
by doing
if you
this
idea
in your
out
lives
carry
best
the
of
not
best,
your
very
course, for
you
Now,
and
s;enerally,
all
a
"
"
HOW
TO
MAKE
AND
PROPOSE
others
beat
but your
may
you,
abilities and
opportunities,you
quicklyyou
that
run
will
we
hearts
".vork.
So
heart
and
as
moral,
that
so
us,
Judge.
If you
dll
rate, and you have
in the world
many
prizes to the
to
Ladies
We
will
of
the
with
and
life,
of
endeavour
the
of
crown
perance
tem-
evil
that
life
the
"
disgraced
be
winning,for the
if you
RAILWAY
FIRST
at
any
Prizes
are
please,I will hand
LINE.
[By
SOD.
its mark
in
Railway
Line
distance
of
carrier of their
Chairman:]
the
a
very great work, one
future.
We
have
to-day
the
which
prosperity,a
pay or serve
Landowners
regret
feeder
When
the
deemed
the
to
line
The
action, and
within
us
population
benefits conferred by a
our
once
so
dreaded
first
railways were
impossiblethat they
Now
the country.
we
who
drove the surveyor
their
bring
is to
The
produce.
scarcelybe estimated.
can
to
if you
can, my
and the verdict
competitors.'
sought by landholders.
brought before the publicit was
lived
of
race
Now,
come.
now
could
for
"
make
measurable
is
right
or
order
Gentlemen,
in
to-day been assisting
inaugurated the
railroad
a
and
have
a
run,
combat
ourselves
will not
chance
NEW
THE
TURNING
fail,you
successful
A
and
us
physical exercises,the
gain
may
in
strong
in the
longer detain you.
Remember,
and
the result
leave
best,
your
Do
to the
that
we
to
so
besets
in front
well
us
let
us, and
strength of our
that
train
must
your
how
Prize.
advice.
CI.
We
in
as
So
in the
right,and
well
bids
crown.
be
can
sobriety for the great
I will not
the
man
be
as
right.
St. Paul
fear,but
possible to keep
as
pursues
Eternal
heart
be
must
far
No
his
in
in
it,not
tc
astonished
be
all evil
over
bodies.
unless
front.
95
according
best
will
Heavenly
a
mastery
from
and
running
obtain
may
the
strivingfor
running away
the
to
come
THEM.
know
to
the
trary.
con-
off their property
people
earned annually.
of money
are
hope the short line which we have this
them
use
till
millions
We
of great benefit.
';he first place it will convey
I'illprove
daily in
sands
"
In
addressed
and
summer
; so
sporting with
giving
the
to each
prizes a
w'nner.
Let
you
us
within
the
few
cheap
hour
an
of
it will do.
fares
you
of which
waves
words
what
see
all at
day commenced
to
the
will be
your
on
In
side
sea-
the
children
congratuJa'ion should
b'
SPEECHES
y6
and
of your
is one
maybe
many
glimpse. That
a
trade it will be
:
have
neighbours
poorer
Then
benefit.
boon.
immense
an
TOASTS
AND
to
rapidly delivered,and your supplies from
and
quickly forwarded.
Speed, convenience,
populationwill all be results of the railroad.
I will
present
join with
the
and
to
turned.
hope
within
between
A
a
this
Line.
Bill
The
been
me
deal with, but
oppositionto
overcome.
has
work
great
short
very
who
increased
from
comfort
town
and
the
REPLY
TO
will unite
Until
my
name
a
mentioned
old
coaching days, and
young
B
in
man,
the
line.
rushing
Ladies
and
drinking the
Railway, coupled with
taken
such
usefid
a
[Bj/the
foUowing
was
railway.
to A
it
may
we
in
me
1
the difficulties we
visited
has
moter,
Pro-
"
I
getting up
sod
is
prosperityand
TOAST.
different from
very
all that
of the line.
FOREGOING
was
their
along
Chairman
thought
was
all
EiigineerJ]
and
Gentlemen,
or
of the
and
has
little
some
centres, carryingin
of the
with
promotion
THE
toast
that
all
is prosperity
locomotive
date
gladly
,
Mr.
of
see
opening
who
leading part in the
CII.
to
the
cluding
con-
imagine
had
say
the great county
gentlemen, I hope you
of Prosperityto the
toast
name
I may
Before
I
have
more
thriving
a
passed, to-day the first
has been
and
initiated,
will
of Mr.
We
I think
time
place and
its train hundreds
the
which
a toast
you
in drinking. That
to
propose
letters
your
more
will
and
commerce
will have
You
had
never
was
out
a
train
thinking
had, when
in the
winter
I
; and
all except in summer.
,
railroad will change all that now, and we
The
shall have the
satisfaction of finding a demand
for our
produce. Not only
but
the
shareholders
that,
will, we
a
believe,have
\ery
d
ividend
after
The
while.
a
satisfactory
Railway has
traffic over
promised to send all its
shall
it,and we
as
to
have
to
we
ask
never
shareholders
the
suggested agreement
whether
they
will
come
to
a
with
the company
and
accept a ceitain
let the old company
work
or
traffic,
the
of the
percentage
at
line.
But
be
these
all details of
are
discussed
Prosperity
to
here.
the
proposal has been
We
a
business
here
are
Railway, and
responded
great interest in the
to
nature, and
drink
to
the
manner
convinces
completion of
the
me
line.
need
not
the toast
of
in which
the
that all take a
I have person-
VIII.
SECTION
RIBBON
BLUE
AND
TEMPERANCE
MEETINGS.
Speeches
Temperance
The
"
cm.
THE
OP
MEMBER
A
BY
ADDRESS
Total
"
nence
Absti-
Addresses.
Various
"
Ribbon
Blue
BLUB
RIBBON
ARMY.
Friends,
My
I have
come
I
the
cause
all have
we
Remember
all
understand
heart
at
We
that.
to
of
conscious
am
I
"
we
venture
inabihty
my
to
justice
abstinence
total
mean
address
to
do
to
Gospel Temperance.
wish
first,and we
you
mean
Gospel
the
put
that
and
evening,
this
here
up
though
you,
"
toxicatin
in-
from
liquors.
Some
may
of
look
any
than
more
with
of
if
us
did
we
and
that
facts,
is
who
will
at
Now
for
a
suppose
"
as
moderate,"
pint
of
These
what
the
regular
and
that
very
he
a
would
effect
be
of
than
glass
this
equivalent
is
to
ought
to
a
low
figure
all,by figures
drinking
Richardson,
Dr.
not
of
of
to
nineteen
the
do,
and
extra
the
heart
well
as
beer,
and
water.
a
of
ounces
beat
it has
tons
case.
half
whisky
Richardson, six
make
but
question,
the
drinking
pint
such
quote
Farrar,
of
two
or
Dr.
says
advantage
of
his
;
declared
take
bearings
in
consumes
a
it
moral
No
a
Canon
aspect
be
contain,
more
and
man
beverages
day
Thompson
physical
?
day
very
I need
the
perhaps
The
authority
drink
with
you
of
us
lay
we
not
moderate
very
moment
wine, and
alcohol.
times
to
once
aside
the
Can
all
a
to
abstainer.
Henry
to
at
prove
the
on
total
Sir
as
pass
putting
even
can
is called
what
eminent
authorities
ourselves
I
;
parley
ready
let
I will
beer
or
we
was
estimate
harmful,
and
an
knew
we
I think
But
wine
ability
advis-
Now
it ?
that
pass
of
Would
so.
is
What
not
the
proclaim
drinking."
glasses
do
should
so.
is delusive
say,
who
one
We
.''
I will
three
or
openly
moderate
drinking.
cannot
we
enemy,
and
two
know
we
"
moderate
line
do
hundreds
"
permitting
this
at
down
say
1
to
weight
8,000
raise
one
THE
foot ; and
the extra
the
for
weak
to
and
and
body
look
But
physically. Too
hearts.
Drinking
us
the
at
99
will diminish
the quantitywe
Therefore
the
as
action
better
heart
diminish
we
of the heart.
on
so
RIBBON.
BLUE
drink
we
exercise
much
is
less
is detrimental
equallydetrimental
to
soul.
side of the
moral
Is not
question.
every
who
here
the influence
under
that,when
indulgesin drinking aware
of wine
other
will
do
which
h
e
or
liquor,
things
he would
have
?
Have
done
if
sober
not
never
we
perfectly
often heard
the expression, I'm sure
I never
would
have
Is
said so (ordone so) unless I had had a glass too much"?
intoxication
for all
not
pleaded daily in our courts as excuse
one
"
kinds
of
aware
that wine
which
offences,from
need
we
hand
other
the
sin
to
woman
not
doubt,
with
no
and
Bible,
pledge, it cannot
the
maintain
that
be
be
in
But
wrong.
of
sip
will
permitted by
as
partaken
of wine?
No
of
one
holy
a
in his
one
any
these
will meet
Sacrament
wine
good
drinking
a
if wine
the
the
on
ourselves
the
offered
excesses
we
perhaps inducing
Some
that
to
drinking
Can
even
is
sinning,and
argument
not
purityin a
taking to drinking,
a
is not
case,
us
Are
fall from
ask
we, as men,
in
the
?
affirmative
reply
the
Communion
?
too
questions,and
me,
of man's
cause
?
incites
and
creature
poor
the
is sometimes
the
downwards
blood,
our
of the
cause
despair,as
in
murder
particularize?If
not
is the
woman
heats
senses
in
Holy
assert
can
that.
Well, then, as
water
turned
was
alcohol
the
to
into
wine
Scripture.
wine, pure, good wine
in
mixed
and
alas ! women
take
things
obtain
pure
Another
are
no
let
drunkenness
on
drinking to say
entirelydifferent to
recorded
them.
drink.
in the Bible
The
There
it
no
no
the
loaded
Men
a
sins,and
"
until
we
can
deadly
us, and
sin.
Bible, is
it is
no
wines
find that
we
That
cases
of
fact ; but they
in favour
argument
a
permitted under circumstances
now
obtaining. Many sins are
was
for
time
and
that all mixed
helps
in the
those
priestswere
is
as
record
other
of
than
purer
it is the present
much
harm.
so
Scriptureis
the Bible
There
with
do
even
was
aostain.
us
is condemned
are
recorded
which
find in
point we
condemned.
was
they unfortunately are,
as
drinks
drunkenness
are
hurt
there
that
poisoned,intoxicated,by drugs. Pure
in moderation,I believe. But we
one
are
"
beverages will
must
grape
and beers
wines
It
and
juJp**,
ordinaryexpressed
and
it.
read
We
"
adulteration
or
of
our
warning,so
that
speciallyforbidden
when
Satan
is
more
we
may
to
use
likelyto
avoid
strong
assail
than
as
when
we
may
such
even
to
"
able
always
great deal
if
and
convert
entirely?
one
"
"
that
I
they
may
want
forward
you
to
and
use
abuse.
not
that
an
is
man
a
he
stop when
Granted
say,
Yet
you
are
who
"
abstain
example's sake
for
self-denyingChristians
more
moderate.
effect
I
is granting a
that
yourself and
a
can
by example and abstention make
you
drunkard's
home
happy, will you not abstain
Those
and
better
that
No," and
"
restrain
to
"
to
rate
any
I heard
at
or
sakes.
the
to
jay
I would
one
an
must,
others'
day
worthy of regard who can
had
It is better
enough.
has
We
for
other
opinion expressed the
more
fall !
we
point.
should, abstain
we
say
Oui
of drink.
influence
the
excited, and
another
is yet
There
under
are
then
passionsare
TEMPERANCE.
ON
SPEECHES
100
the sake
For
gain
this
take the
they become
who
are
weak,
as
!"
the weak
do
to
of the weak
even
are
those
than
of your
free
own
pledge honestly,and
with
will,and
come
full conviction
a
good. No children should be forced to take the ribbon in
firstbe convinced
of the necessity
my opinion. They should
then
made
of
the
for abstinence, and
wearers
Blue, and
of the Gospel Temperance
Union.
members
Pray for help,
will find rest unto
cut off the drinking,and
you
your souls !
of
CIV.
ANOTHER
My
I
am
I have
SPEECH
Friends,
glad to see
Ladies
such
ON
and
an
TEMPERANCE.
Gentlemen,
"
here
because
to-night,
I hope to
say, and
assembly
important things to
very
of you into our
Band
of Total
some
receive
many
evening. I want
you
"
we
want
you
look
to
"
Abstainers
at
this
this
ment
move-
Gospel Temperance fairly,and ask yourselves
think
drinking does you any good, morally or
you
I
do
not
to force you
want
to come
physically.
here, or to
remain
to take any pledge,unless
or
can
conscientiously
you
for
whether
do
But, nevertheless,I will put
so.
few
a
Firstly,do you require to drink .? Can
tell me
honestly that you find any wine,
facts before
any
of you
you.
present
cating
intoxior
spirit,
for
liquornecessary
well-being? Does it make
your
less
liable
or
better,
to feel hungry ?
If so,
you
warmer,
there may
be something to say in its favour.
But
it does
! There
is no
human
not
function
performed by strong
drink.
from
a
remain?
"
debilitated frame
glass of wine or
A
I
"
fillipfrom
think
the
use
not.
of
may
derive
brandy.
You
a
But
or
certain
does
satisfaction
the
benefit
receive
a
temporary
but
the reaction will be
stimulants,
may
THE
BLUE
and
cpnrespondingly great,
food
will
That
is
It is
do
much
fact.
a
curious
RIBBON.
depression will
for
more
loi
than
you
Good
ensue.
alcoholic
liquors.
easilyascertained
but
fact that in all isms
organthe
water
not
stimulant
is
the
fluid
for
any
necessary
of
the body.
There
that.
over,
Moreis no doubt about
support
when
is
introduced
there is a certain
any such stimulant
a
"
"
in the
change
for water,
When
which
we
an
agent
of
our
organization. Now
makes
alcohol
use
which
will
tissues.
dry
will
mouth
us
account
and
has
gi'eat affinity
a
of the
human
actuallyputtinginto
are
in time
This
the drunkard's
two-thirds
up
we
alcohol
stomach,
liquid,water, "c., which
to the exhausted
body.
body.
bodies
our
the fluid
up, and absorb
for the great dryness of
and his craving for cooling
will restore
of
the balance
fluid
that alcoholic drinks are
to suppose
great mistake
other
beneficial.
diseases are
Rheumatism, gout, and many
attributable
to indulgence in wine,
directlyand indirectly
It is
a
ideas
The
alcohol
are
times
at
have
we
in the
necessary
administer
doctors
concerning the strengtheningpowers of
main, if not entirely,fallacies. It may be
administer
to
brandy as a medicine, as
strychnine or other poisonsunder certain
; but
circumstances
no
will tell
one
in any
form
who
me
studied
has
the
is beneficial
to the ordinary
subjectthat alcohol
It
excitement
and destroys
causes
being.
temporary
and
the appetitefor food, and
by food the body is warmed
kept alive. Let any of you take a coupleof glassesof whisky
in the middle
of the day, even
and water
afterfood,and tell
human
the
me
back
go
to
and
You
know
not
well
as
you
You
wish
your
desk.
:
no
for
brain
And
then
tea, supper,
wish to eat.
and
a
man
objectis
The
alcohol
a
summed
(i)
It
(2)
It
had
is chilled
if the
In
a
or
the
no
I need
other,not
inform
and
soddened
form
tipsyman
quiet work at
The
appetiteis
such
and
you
this is the
indulgences
helpless
how
you
"
is
is warmed.
body
reaction.
not
hand
dulled,the
are
exaggerated
an
liquor?
alcoholic
perhaps dinner, supervene,
You
are
sleepyor dull,and
what
a
fearful
!
tipsywoman
conclusions
are
or
work, or not ? Can you
hour, or dinner hour,
if you had
The
senses
comes
tipsy,and
disgustingis
luncheon
excitement
some
result of alcohol.
make
as
cannot.
ready, the
so
gone
have
you more
after that
work
settle down
fit for
Are
result.
which
up
by
gives no
gives no
have
an
been
come
to
concerning
experiencedanalyst,
strength
warmth.
Oh,
take
do, only
as
some
to
let it remain
to
"
tone
the
remove
in your
coats
of the
from
Total
RIBBON"
BLUB
your
of
of
token
a
persist
badge, not
temptation,but
sobrietyand self-
wear
it in the hour
example to others
Gospel Temperance and
THE
body.
wavering one
pledge and
denial, an
CV.
of the
die I "
will ye
Israel,why
then, and
Come,
"
will any
facts
such
of
House
tissue.
up no
reduces the
of
face
the
In
TEMPERANCE.
builds
(3) It
(4) It
"
ON
SPEECHES
ro2
benefits
derived
be
to
Abstinence.
IS
WEAT
IT?
Friends,
here to-nightto explain to you what the Blue Ribbon
I am
and why it ought to be worn.
and how
Many of you
means,
members
of
I see are
the band, but I hope before
already
My
"
part this
we
who
evening many
have
perhaps
here
come
from
the ribbon
curiositywill accept the pledge and wear
when
let
they have heard
something concerning it. Now
me
speak of the pledge itself
mere
The
"
familiar
most
With
malice
form
towards
do
that
workers
What
is
the
"
this,and
my
responsibility
they have
temperance,
made
to
a
"
you,
work,
His
"
the
Tens
of thousands
pledge,hence
it
seems
desire
earnest
is that it may
donned
to
with
had
called upon
higher."
he has
now
been
we
has
Friend, go up
always
entails
dersigned,
un-
the Blue
Ribbon
of the
undertaken.
now
My friends,
instead of being put in place of the gospel is
forward
and
part of it. Temperance now
comes
have
now
who
one
and
servants
work
all,I, the
honour, God
important things temperance
explainthe Blue Ribbon
pledge."
to
every
the
pledge is,
most
serious
bids
and
and
remind
now
charityfor
abstain."
to
Ribbon
is
do
to
means
others
of
one
have
it
Ribbon
"
encourage
taking the Blue
me
Blue
"
means,
to
with
from
beer, and
are
none,
Vford
my
the
pledge
helping vie,
all intoxicating
as
a
liquors
beverage nine,
cider included
and that I will,
by all honourable
abstain
to
of
teach
malice
a
put
how
it is to
to none.''' We
us
high and
God
it into
holy
is still
the
be
hearts
done.
temperance
mission
; we
helping on
of
We
of
some
are
now
reformers
have
always
e.xercise courage
and determination,
and
"
work
With
must
malice to none."
Our caUing now
the laying aside of "all malice
all guile,and
and
to
and envies,and
all evil speakings,and to come
hypocrisies,
out boldly ; but, with
charityfor a/t,'
sufferinglong and
being kind, envying not, not behaving ourselves unseemly.
'
THE
seeking our
not
far
as
such
also true
that
shall
103
being easily provoked," and even
but having
thinking no evil,
charityfor
lies in us,
We
well
may
taking of
RIBBON.
not
own,
as
all."
BLUE
"
"
exclaipi, What
! the
high standard
a
It is : but it is
pledge is a serious matter.!
according to what ^e have br haVe not done
a
the
rejcei^
final
reward
our
day of,account
^ur
it
dutyftpftake the Blue
punishment ; hen^e may b?
take 'this plWge saying, God
remenlber
Ribbon, and
wefeel that of ourselves we
helping us, we will do this ; -wfeinay
If itbeen
that
can
had not
do.nothing,but
His ha\d wap^a
the greattesults which
are
now
we
at
or
Godfci'Hi'Tielp.
Sjgj-v^i^'
moulA
known
fct^cuis
have,
earnest
have
sent
qaen
Wd
^nsft'ered,
beem
brou^t
ha\e been
ri'M'er
and
a
pUin,
carried
being
very
these
an
out
deavour,
en-
with
t
famous badge
This
may
is
Many
throne,
aim,
an
of work, which
a^riiet^d
malice
His
to
have
we
about.
it,and
wear
stillenough
to
of
blye is
show
that
do
all who
pledge,and
Gospel Temperance
simple
so
most/fastidious
the
that
even
do not
child
object it,but
it have adopted the
cannot
take
a
to
intend
to
be
ashamed
of their
colours,but do their part, willinglyand readilygiving
"
"
be
it may
to others
to
friendlyassistance
go up higher ;
than
have
in
make
higher
they
higher helping to
gone before,
smooth
in
to
paths, higher
stumbling blocks,
helping remove
higher in joiningin
Hail
The
The
"
the heartfelt
song
"
comrades
with the signal,the emblem
of the true,
my
nation
is awaking to the wearing of the blue.
nation
awaking, but
higher,"but now
truly
Friend, go
higher."
myself ; I
is
up
I recommend
call upon
you
the land
Across
from
It is
longer,
no
"
is, Friend,
this,and I have
assist others
to
?
it
do
to
you
how
to
tip
come
done
il
up, for
come
to sea
sea
We're
fallinginto line,
Forsaking all the gilded haunts
Of
sin, and
Awaking to a
To proudly
and
shame,
better
dare
wine
;
life.
and
do.
few who
remain
outside our
There are stillsome
appeal,and
how
them.
have
To these we
need to know
to deal with
we
if
would
these we
must
we
a
work, and
among
message,
know
how,
let
with them
us
remember,
and
fullycarry out, our motto,
Appeal
charity,asking the help of God."
to
in all
endeavour
"
to
No
our
ings
deal-
malice,true
them
: Friend,
come
do
I will
higher ;
up
TEMPERANCE,
ON
SPEECHES
I04
best
my
the
you
of those
show
to
join the ranks
way,
who
Friend,
help me.
side
by side. Friend, give us your help
are
nobly standing
be
to a turning point,which
towards
one
may
bringing some
of God
after that peace
of leading them
to seek
the means
what
which
your
passeth all understanding. Friend, think
with
influence
some
example is doing, think that you have an
will
and
God
one
that
have
we
need
who
in
tellingthose
to
undertake, and
Heaven's
When
CVI.
could
for the
come
there
them
of the
said
such
drink
shame,
folly,and
the
not
poor
laws
who
religionthey
or
drink, and
as
a
rule
that
it
which
was
embrutes
found,
did
and
and
to
that
that
bestializes
not
shame
in
shame
upon
made
up
who
not
was
the
they
what
was
which
the
did
almost
drink
world,
which
was
carry
worse,
of the
above
world
with
a
to
was
be
a
brutal
which
be
Christian
was
Scotchmen
and
vice,
should
a
great
burning
"
for this reason,
into which
Britons
those
there
went
them
drink, and,
intoxicating
opium was
promoted
uncivilized people. A Christian
trade
of poor
carry the
all that
"
by their
he maintained
special and
a
the
intoxicating
no
women,
the
among
That
a
it
nor
for
and
but
were
Hindoos,
and
was
Empire
in the
destroyed races
people ought to
portion
world
British
not
and
Christianity
A
to
We
nevertheless
drunkenness,
Englishmen, Irishmen, and
country
a
where
Christian
poor
national
a
danger.
men
heathen,
among
poor
civilized people of the world.
and
was
Drunkenness
not.
civilized
shame
great
a
the
nor
all bound
they
moment
people,but
drank
were
in the Christian
found
'
Chinese,
poor
Mahommedans
this
civiHzed
a
were
everything they
they would not have
national
a
they
it
were
traffic at
if
might be well to remind
It was
working so hard.
night,but
people,and
that
to do
Cross, that
why they
for you
act
an
us
ABSTINENCE
TOTAL
quite sure
was
is
assist
to
you
upon
is done. *
ON
he
a
reasons
national
was
deed
grand
of the
League
on
the
a
will rest
in their determination
because
Christian
smile
duty
your
Here
told?
MANNING
Eminence
all red-hot
not
be
to
the
CARDINAL
His
is it not
Think
not.
in
and
benedictions
of
graces
civilisation could do to refine and
is taken
from
the
Temperance
Chronicli.
of
true
"rere
blessingsof
all the
if it were
of temperance
the gospel of
understood
and
at His
prophet, which
The
spiritof
the
the
to
drink.
captivityof strong
"
a
of which
out
the
deliver
himself,and
deliver
him, and
touching
been
too
made
was
a
strong
had
not
been
had
not
yet
a
"
often
him
to
of
liverance
de-
prisoner in the
wretched
captivity
the
very
It
cases.
appealed
was
often
captive had
a
tivity
cap-
sought
his fellow-men
to
in the most
in vain.
The
who
man
liveranc
de-
preach
to
me
proclamation
many
tones, but
to let him
by
come
Himself"
appeal often
the
stronger
wiUing
of the words
applied to
a
was
unhappy
and
terms
Lord
embraced
It
had
fulfilment
anointed
in
hop'^iesscaptivity
very
and
hath
It
offer of full and
made
guilt of intemperance,
just the
captive."
captive,and
the
to
Lord
he
that
so
and
blessed
our
true
blessingsof temperance
receive these blessings
the
Christ
was
be
must
blessings;
evil and
of
to
come
these
Christ
Jesus
offer
In fact it
hand.
of the
"
would
all who
to
free
full and
a
gospel,it
the
of
one
the
emancipation from
free
TEMPERANCE.
ON
SPEECHES
/o6
had
had
to
to
plaintive
jailerhad
him
in bonds
a
stronger
go, and
his deliverance.
He
than
he
believed
this
was
proclamation of temperance
part of the blessingsof
the gospel, and
the
was
offered, in consequence,
to
even
who
had most
of a
the power
hopelessly sunk under
person
of drink.
love
The
who
was
Lord,
high in might and
whom
to
power,
earth, was
able
to
as
He
much
just
as
all power
accomplish
leper who,
poor
and hopelessness of
said," Lord, if Thou
what
he
temperance.
this
of
form
the
power
be
would
if
kept
temptation
vehement
to
be
ways
which
They
knew
resist
the
pledging
and
in
it
an
sense
did
to
instance
that
themselves
ought
easy and
of the
be
of
off-hand
solemn
captive
of his disease
Him
to
and
clean."
me
That
by gospel
deliverance
from
all sins
a
through Christ and
means
whereby they
supported
all knew
to
an
A
waj', but
in
answer
should
promise made,
in
places
intemperate.
to
not
be taken
as,
could
men
once
pledge was
wished
who
and
them
young
comrades
delivered
pressing and
get persons
make
some
and
how
themselves
their
they gave
respected.
in
cleanse
to
understand
offer him
to
apt
temptations
to
from
They
very
touch
make
canst
merely
indulge
and
and
of the
position,came
they might
not
heaven
loathsomeness
efforts made
were
for
word
a
his outcast
come.
the
temperate
by
given in
deliverance
Spirit. It was
temptation,and
from
were
the
wilt Thou
sin, but
His
of
been
in all the
believed
It did
one
able
was
the
was
had
not
drink.
and
to
In
for
all,
be taken
with
a
due
according
to
the
LORD
words
C.
HAMILTON'S
SPEECH.
107
"
of
than
to vow
Scripture, Better was it not to vow
and not
all
who
took
the
He
perform."
urged upon
pledge
it.
to
told
them
that
Many people
drinking was
respect
going out, and in certain forms, no doubt, it was ; but in
other forms
it was
that during the
sure
coming in. He was
last
deal
circles than
least
with
his
tell about
The
in the
would
air
was
not
in
should
CVIII.
the
seen
brought
believed
curse
was
been
there
to
entirely
in the
begun
city
influence.
temporary
a
ing.
stay-
of drink
them,
who
other
places,and
God
for
HAMILTON,
QUESTION.
said this
a
been
mental
instru-
that
they
visit.
his
M.P.,
rather
was
had
ON
THE
TBM-
remarkable
Jubilee. They no
beginning with the
year
doubt
seven
"
were
of
men
a
this
thought
He
land.
he
to
was
the
with
of
resort
been
humble
small
and
commencement,
very
blessing of God it had spread throughout the
It
Preston.
been
thank
of the Temperance
year
of the history of its
aware
had
it permanent
make
it extensive
and
that God
might abundantly bless the
CLAUD
Chairman
The
removal
among
much
in
so
cause
PERANCE
the
seaside
a
he
went
"
hoped
LOBD
of
where
this movement
the
on
servant
doing
have
Blaikie
Professor
condition
health,but
trusted
He
evaporate
try to make
He
intensive.
labours
of his
was
during tlae short period he had
occurred
be ascribed
which
must
had
a
great
he
when
They had not the
ago.
had
yet to be done, and
vigour.
Edinburgh,
full of
place,and
them
the
work
"
drunken
from
intemperance.
but
bridle
the
miles
deaths
Let
forty years
and
ago,
there
than
in
drinking
more
forty years
was
increasing activityand
twenty
four
draw
to
deal
great
a
women
among
about
ministry
reason
to
not
was
there
drinking
more
began
on
there
generation
ceitain
about
two
was
within
of the
gloriousachievement
period of a human
a
were
men
seven
still alive
have
to
and
life,
the
to
witness
life he had
During his political
publicmind, and especiallyin the
might be called the enlightened classes.
result of their efforts.
changes in the
many
opinion
of what
He
in Parliament
was
was
introduced
did
his best
that the
in the
to
promote
members
fanatics, and
at
were
who
the
form
time
of the
it,but
the
supported
received
with
the
temperance
first Permissive
oppositionwas
it
were
derisive
looked
question
Bill,and
so
great
upon
laughter.
aj
This
SPEECHES
io8
of
state
sound
listened
be
to
thingswent
motion
important had
The
in
that
of the
one
made
that
invited
truly wonderful.
was
each
other
and
co-operate
to
act
eminent
over
day. Dr. Andrew
Clarke, had come
given a direct denial to the theory that
nutritious
food.
both
were
another
One
therefore
that
proved
had
been
much
ladies
they were
but they
able
not
well
in
sailors
without
labour
that
; and
this
enormous
result
of their labours
canteen
Europe there
who
wished
to
fear of
of these
the
by
In the
; and
these
and
the men,
the establishment
was
the
was
it induced
of
our
with
Army and
pleasure of
the enemy
within
our
Egyptians
Navy
in
to
hear
all the
places
drink
the
could
outcome
him
of the
to
to
the
of
ports
sea-
where
stay
of the
remind
them
perate
tem-
ladies
officers and
away
All this
Englishman
due
Army
officers,
both
now
so
ingly
exceed-
Robinson.
of their great influence, and
sex
to beseech
it in the cause
of temperance.
It had no
doubt
every
owed
mainly
fair
to
progress
was
from
and
ladies,
total
a
graciouslyby the
advantage of having
temptation.
two
was
should
been
not
in every
barrack, and at
had
latelybeen opened
be
It
it gratified
him
change
very
both
he
marvellous
say
and Navy, to whom
we
Miss
saw
after
one
positivehe
was
had
and
the
a
Kerr
side.
that
their control
temperance
he
successful
under
received
immediate
a
that
at first received
soon
to their
was
not
greatness
say
Weston
alcohol
was
a good
thing, except
medicine, just as poisons were.
a
Army
to
Miss
"
men
were
national
our
be
to
in the
their side
to
Dr. Norman
look how
over
pleased to
was
made
of
as
nearly so
He
been
come
alcohol
publiclystated
abstainer.
and
let them
but
professionhad
perhaps occasionally
have
the most
Richardson
Dr.
early converts,
the
Hanlan
of
in the
physiciansof
the
two
for
Take
brothers
as
against drink.
had
State.
various
war
not
in the
powers
religiousbodies, and they would find
the Cardinal
isters,
Archbishop, Wesleyan and Baptistminand the representatives
of almost
sect
religious
every
the
example
and
began
annua!
in fact so
way, and
the questionhad
great power
elections.
He
might even
say
become
it had
progress
impression,and
gradually the
sensible
more
a
Parliamentary
had
great
a
and
attention,
it grown
of
at the time
that temperance
time, but by putting forth
some
made
with
to
treated
was
for
on
they
arguments
TEMPERANCE.
ON
the
to
use
been gratifying
brilliant success
have
read
Egypt. They must
with
which
vigour
our
troops attacked
there
an
was
; but he would
at work
say
enemy
midst
harm
than
doing tenfold more
the
very
could
do.
It was
domestic
a
foe in every
way,
the
LORD
and
C. HAMILTON'S
they ought
SPEECH.
be
stimulated
with
that remained
course
to
crush that foe. Of
had every confidence,
seeingthat
done, they would
in the
on
go
a
determination
with them, and
had
much
so
same
tog
way
the
he
been
already
until
to
enemy
completely destroyed.
was
CVlIlA.
THE
{Generallyproposed by
LADIES.
Youngest Bachelor present?^
Mr. Chairman
and Gentlemen,
I rise to ask you to charge your glasses that
the
"
honour
the
to
at
propose
any
of " The
toast
be put so near
gentleman
delusion
important toast
most
feast of
flow of
and
reason
assumption to
and
do
may
possibleto
soul,namely, the
Ladies."
1 don't know
why this toast should
the
bottom
of the list,
unless it be that the
to
list is under
responsiblefor preparingthe
that
you
it is
that
is inferior
woman
be
to
libel upon
a
gross
wives, and
I hold
man.
our
and
sisters,
the sad
such
mothers, and
cousins, and
an
hearts,
sweetaunts.
Gentlemen, I
of the sexes.
If women
believe in the equality
inferior to men
in certain respects, they are
are
superiorto
them
in others.
I once
heard
make
out a
a
platformlady
At the conclusion
of her
strong case in favour of this view.
address
who
there
was
ventured
by
upon
"
women
a
to
the
discussion,during which
take
fair
an
oppositeview
"
orator.
one
man
poor
completely
was
If," said this unfortunate
sat
man,
intellectually
equal to men, how is it they have
Haven't
they,though ?
produced a Shakespeare?"
the lady. The roar
of laughterthat followed compelled
are
"
never
asked
"
lier opponent to sit down
in much
discomfort.
if
that
had
few
we
a
women
gentlemen,
young
of Commons,
old women
instead of the many
make
such
a
mess
for the government
before
so
politics,
that whatevei
of
thingsthere, it would
Rule
for Ireland, we
subject of Home
in thinking that all women
should
up
courage
sense, but
the
I must
over.
stronglyrecommend
experiment.
It is true
a
on
all be
home
not
bachelor
my
that
hold
of
rulers
the
one
ah
yet mustered
rule,in the matrimonial
home
subjectmyself to
to
I
that I have
confess
present
all the better
may
be
at
dropping into
I will just say
am
must
mind
the world
who
up
opinion gentlemen present
reallythink,
in the House
be
I
of the country.
But
the chairman
pulls me
1
Greek
friends
poet has
to
told
try
u"
that
"
then
domestic
but
them.
Two
The
1 don't
matters.
happy days a married man
prize;
may
day he weds his wife, the day she dies !
believe
that
poets
Gentlemen,
"The
are
"
the best judges of
Ladies!"
God
bless
IX.
SECTION
RULES
LOCAL
There
in
are
of
number
of
in
the
It has
have
of
in
caused
in
of
certain
the
been
in
talent, and
on
country
very
discovering
districts, and
therefore
important
upon
publishers
the
to
the
the
that
tions
ques-
believe,
the
local
to
hand.
The
be
; and
be
to
i-evised
parliamentary
useful
to
any
principally
by
Sir
Commons.
been
here
fully
use-
ingly
accord-
forth
set
as
of
duct
con-
be
may
have
they
"
have
and
compiled,
House
assistance
found
Societies
of
resumi
formation
Procedure
Regulations
adapted
experienced
of
rules
brief
a
the
volume
present
Clerk
and
Rules
necessary,
the
questions
instances
many
debating
following
Parliamentary
"
May,
The
in
the
actual
Erskine
social
and
in
to
points to be attended
such
Debating
Parliamentary
included
from
members
give
to
a
ments,"
Parlia-
day.
appeared
chief
the
"
procedure.
in
of
time
present
themselves
calling
organized
Parliamentary
the
at
ventilating political
developing
party preponderance
indicating the feeling
successful
the
been
Parliaments
These
Kingdom
Societies
have
of
basis
United
Debating
opportunity
the
PARLIAMENTS.
the
which
OP
FORMATION
THE
FOR
and,
when
necessities
given
an
lishers
pub-
in
mimic
based
upon
engaged
one
by
will, the
legislativedebates.
following
experience :
The
"
Rules
or
Standing
Orders
"
are
"
It will
must
enter
for
the
the
to
necessary
his
and
name
year,
for
or
have
a
book
address
the
in which
when
session,
he
as
may
every
his
pays
be
member
tion
subscrip-
decided
by
Council.
The
be
be
as
of
Officers
follows,
and
a
must
Parliamentary
be
members
Debating Society
of the society.
The
(i)
Speaker.
of Conmiittees
(2) Chairman
(3) .Clerk of the House.
(or Deputy-Speaker).
should
FORMA
TION
OF
(4) Deputy-Clerk and
(5) Treasurer.
The Treasurer, and
paid
House
vote
have
can
and
vote
Chairman
but, as
;
discretion
no
of
rule,it
a
TR
Y.
in
Secretary.
and
Deputy-Clerk
officials in the
they
case
MINIS
A
in
be
Secretary,may
of the
Council ; but in that
The
Clerk of the
division.
a
Committees
is better
if
consist
of
be permitted to
may
officials be allowed
to
no
into the lobbies.
go
The
the
Council
officers
The
should
of
the
Council
House
being
advisedly
may
seven
nine
or
members,
members
officio
ex
be
selected
of
it.
different
from
political
as
parties,as evenly balanced
possible. The Council
should
be elected
the first night of the session, and conon
tinue
in office until the first night of the ensuing session.
A
fresh election of Council
and Officers will then take place.
The
President
of the Council
is elected
by the Council,
which
in a body have
the control
of the funds through the
and
treasurer,
by
him.
body
A
at
the
inspectionof
vacancy
the
the
in the Council
first
meeting
"c., rendered
accounts,
be filled up by that
may
after the
of such
announcement
in session.
Five out of nine members
to the House
vacancy
form
and so on in proportion.
a quorum,
Notices
of a Council
be sent
out
meeting should
by the
for the
week
before
the date named
one
and
other
it
is
that
this
advisable
reasons
meeting. (For
the Secretary be a paid officialand responsible
to the Council.)
Secretary
least
at
FORMATION
The
"
of either
sufficient
Ministry should be
political
party whose
"
do
to
country.
rejectionof
so.
a
The
A
MINISTRY.
formed
by
the
and
means
Government
elected
Leader
are
opportunities
should
at
first,if
of
the actual Government
as
politics
be compelled to resign by the
But they may
Bill,or a Vote of Censure, "c., being carried
of the
possible,be
the
OF
same
against them.
The
Leader
and
when
He
must
find
of the
will
Ministerial
nominate
them
Party
to
his colleagues,
will choose
various
posts
sponding,
corre-
practicable,to those actuallyin the Cabinet.
the
Queen's
subjectsfor debate, compose
"
for discussion
Speech," and introduce Bills and other matter
with
the
of
the Opposition.
in correspondence
Leader
the Ministry resigns (or is defeated) the Leader
of
When
the Opposition will take office if prepared to do so ; or he
"
PARLIAMENTS.
LOCAL
112
and
business
session,if
The
hitherto
the
permit
may
his
party be
weekly,at
hour
an
This
members.
should
proposed
formulated
and
meeting
submitted
it.
conduct
be
called
the
at
can
of the Parliament.
be
of the
majority of the
at a preliminary
the
to
be fixed upon
who
members,
the officers "c.
elect
time
to
may
should
the
of
Parliament
convenient
most
time
general meeting
Local
a
the
resume
the end
sufficiently
strong
not
of
Meetings
to
until
the government
on
carry
existing Ministry
same
The
Regulations
preliminary
this
to
after full discussion.
elected
subscriptionsbeing paid, and the members
being present at the specifiedtime,the first proceeding will
in reading the Minutes
consist
of the previous meeting.
This
first after
the
must
always be done
Speaker has
The
taken
chair
the
if considered
or,
;
the
question
put
may
taken
read."
This will
as
After
the
to
the
The
their
of
names
up
be
Minutes
Speaker
Minutes
be
of the
previousmeeting,
newly
elected
should
and
proposers
floor of the
for the
of
Speaker
House
formally introduced
Members
the
time.
members
newly
respective
the
"
that
newly proposed members,
elected
advance
and
to the
House
save
reading of the
the introduction
and
the
desirable,the
him
to
Constituencies
Members,
will be recorded.
be
accompanied by
should
seconders, and
to the
Speaker'schair,
and
the
as
by name,
they have
severallyelected
to represent.
When
those
and
the
all the
whose
the
names
and
they
following Council
be introduced
may
of the
have
been
introduced, then
submitted,with their addresses,
and
proposers
will be elected
if
meeting
as
no
the
by
Council
objectionbe
members
new
seconders,are
at
the
read
at
lodged,
to
the
and
followingmeeting
Parliament.
When
his
members
have been
of their
names
House,
new
member
any
presents
the
subscription,
Clerk
himself
at
the
table
to
pay
Secretaryshall request him to
his
and
address
enter
and
name
Constituency in the
Members'
and
the
Book,
Secretaryor Clerk shall enter his
in the
name
Constituency Book ; and if the place have a
or
"
member
already allotted
represent another
Members
"
take
to
it,the member
must
choose
to
place.
their
Speaker, according as
places to the
their party is in
right or
or
out
front seats on the right are occupied by the
the left by the Leaders
of the Opposition.
on
After the introduction
of,and
the
left of the
of office. The
Ministry,those
proposalsfor,new
mem-
A
Motion,
; but
notice
Speaker the chair will be taken by
if it should
happen that the Deputy-Speaker
of the
; but
Deputy
absent, then the House
is also
choose
must
nomination
The
may
will decide the point,and
position.
the
of hands
show
one
it.
In the absence
his
without
previous
objects to it the proposer
made
be
unopposed, may
if subsequentlyany
if
withdraw
must
to
PARLIAMENTS.
LOCAL
114
of its members
one
challenged,and
be
on
so
a
tilla selection
approved.
be
for Divisions
Rules
The
of
House
Tellers
the
Commons,
those
are
generally in force in the
being appointed by th"
gentlemen in pairsreceive the votes as
left lobby, according as
file into the right or
the memlDers
Noes."
The
Tellers then respectfully
or
Ayes
they are
reads the numbers, and
hand
the papers
to the Speaker, who
; and
Speaker
these
We
only thus
can
the
indicate
advantage, in
of the
few
a
in the formation
observed
be
party has
which
declares
"
"
"
and
the
usual
way.
leading points to
of
arrangement
mentary
Parlia-
a
be
Every such
society must
conditions,which will change ;
Debating Society.
less by local
influenced more
or
but the chief pointsto be observed
are
the details can
easilybe tilled in from
touched
work
any
above
upon
"
mentary
Parlia-
upon
Procedure.
IN
SPEECHES
SPECIMEN
DEBATE.
speeches actually delivered in a
in London, the Kensington
well-known
Local
Parliament
Parliament,one of the best managed of these local societies.
Speaking on the Irish question in the resumption of debate
We
a
wished
forward
by
time
had
had
"
said
member
have
he
that
study
to
the
Hon.
he
had
the
proposal
Member
for
perused
to
object
his
speech
ascertain
and
that
the
when
they asked
establish
Local
Self-Government
not
able
to
as
them
time
had
A
but
with
he
been
brought
same
and
attention,
great
he could
as
of the
hon.
to
to
a
agree
in Ireland.
He
gather what
should
the
at
far
meaning
opposite
he
had
not
,
endeavoured
really the
from
extracts
annex
what
he
was
gentlemen
proposal
must
to
fess
con-
really their object
in caUing on them
such a Resolution
to pass
"if the aim and
of
the
Hon.
Member
object
decentralize
to
was
certain
from
the
Parliament
and
Imperial
to
introduce into
powers
Boards
Ireland a sort of Local
for purely local matters
if
they
was
were
going
to
deal
with
the
was
question of roads
merely,
SPEECH
A
ON
IRELAND.
115
railways,rating, and
admitted
it
of that kind, he quite
other matters
within debateahle
and practicalpolitics.
He
was
thought they might
one, perhaps, which
sides of the
forward
;
forward
the
brought
and
simply
way,
Local
met
that
Self- Government
but
it
was
Hon.
he
did
a
establish
say
very
Local
what
to
of
liament
Par-
for A
Member
to
not
method
Imperial
thought, in
them
He
better
a
that of the
the
on
in Ireland.
Government
with
Member
Motion,
called
interestingdebate,and
approval on both
oppositehad brought
very
questionthan
a
Westminster
at
had
a
have
show
to
arguments
such
would
if the Hon.
House,
dealingwith
had
have
vague
S elf-
that
extent
be
established,except that
of gas, water, roads, bridges,and
the like,
perhaps matters
to be relegated to the authorityhe proposed to establish.
were
He
how
it was
did not know
to be dealt with
exactly,except
with
that they were
deal
the
to
subjects of education
going
and
that was
the total amount
of information
and religion,
which
the
Hon.
powers
such a
that
he
given
in
respect
of
those
going to give to the Local Authority. If
was
going to be brought forward, he
not
see
why it should be brought forward
that
as
he
had
Member
was
measure
confess
must
to
was
did
regard to Ireland only. A question like the present
both
not
Ireland,but Great Britian as well
only concerned
If
centraliz
Scotland, England, and Wales.
they were
going to deof
the
the
liament,
Parpossessed by
Imperial
powers
any
be no
there would
difficulty,
perhaps, if they could
for the proposal ; but it must
show
be
reasonable
argument
done, he thought,by a Bill,dealing not only with Ireland,
of the
The
Hon.
United
but
with
the whole
Kingdom.
for
his
establish
this
said that
Member
reason
proposing to
with
"
in
measure
Ireland
was
of the
account
on
of
state
urgent
confessed
the state of Ireland
He
aiiairs in that country.
at
that instead of a
the present time would, to his mind, show
of that kind being given to it now, it ought to be
measure
for
reserved
a
had
order
when
and
country,
the
not
at
present
calm
when
time
time.
and
been
If any
existed
restored, which
peace
could
moment
be
in
it
the
was
opportun
in-
more
the present time,when
agitatorshad raised
of this
throughout the land ; and if any measure
a commotion
kind were
given to them now, it would be simply regarded
But he doubted
whether
as
a recognitionof their disorder.
it
that
that
the
was
if
because
a
was
objectof
the Member
such
It
.
Parliament
were
considered
it was
deal better with
for A
matters
to
in
meet
that
than
a
Dublin
Local
the
was
evident
it would
Parliament
be
could
Imperial Parliament
PARLIAMENTS.
LOCAL
Ii6
Had
the
place why they
Authority more
it
supposed
to
with
deal
the
about
than
matters
districts
which
to
the
men
He
?
were
able
better
knew
who
those
Local
a
who
perhaps,be
Districts would,
local
that
considered
he
first
the
to
power
Authority in London
Central
a
because
by the Local
elected
to
than
in
reason
any
to relegatethe
going
were
was
them
given
Member
Hon.
nothing
He
referred.
Parliament
to
a
matter
tured
ven-
^
think
to
London
that
wished
If you
local matters
local
he
governing,
be
the
knew
that
Hon.
Member
Bills
evidence
with
the
thought
a
separationof
the
whole
power
in Ireland
A
Radical
Member
Government
had
The
Bill
a
Hon.
for
Member
he
partieswho
the
plan
P
which
thought,
be
Rule
there
Rule
the
they first
they did
that
said
giving Home
would
granting of the
sittingin Dublin."
regretted that the
"
on
had
men
the
Parliament
the
of
politics.He
Ireland
to
question,and
establishingHome
for
heard
body
a
local
the
for
shown
reason
and
Rule
countries, and
changed
relegated
the
than
replied,and
bring forward
introduce
a
were
to
dealt
not
mittee,
relegatedto that Combetter able tc
body much
giving Home
two
the
were
between
these matters
local interests
of
result
presumed
Committee
the
to
respect
aU
Bill
against any
representing purely
to
and
probably they
They
were
but
at all,
the
and
he
as
Parliament
to
over
House,
and
decided
sides,
both
and
judge
give
than would
the matter
matters
of Parliament
of
for
appeared
such
relatingto
Houses
on
to
Westminster.
at
purely
of
the power
be a great
would
have
there
probably
Parliament
would
the
by
the
Committees
to
were
representatives
that
in
principlethat
the
in
in Dublin.
prejudicebrought into
with
case
as
Parliament
a
establish
to
thought
party
more
with
argument
appliedequallyto
"
deal
the
not
Ireland.
was
ficient
suf-
no
Ireland.
to
wish
in
posed
pro-
The
of the
people,
all very well to talk of propoptclisuprema lex. It was
fessional
the people who
did not desire
agitators.They were
Home
be gone.
It was
Rule, for their occupation would
no
but
new
were
thing they
asking for,
merely the restoration
of their rights,which, by bribery and
corruption,and by
filched from
them.
corrupt appointments, were
The
bes
strongest
reason,
was
vox
Irish blood
of
on
had
Rule.
Home
the
againstthe
advanced
see
?
whether
always been
Very strong
other
Motion.
The
Home
side
What
of
in favour
reasons
the
were
House
the
of
disintegration
Rule
would
of the
must
be
brought
to
induce
it to
vote
had
been
reasons
the
estEblishment
which
Empire
was
one
!
ward
for-
To
produce the disintegration
of
LOCAL
the
Empire
; we
Did
it do
in
GOVERNMENT.
had
similar
Wj
instances
in other
countries.
Hungary ? Did it produce the disintegration
Austro-Hungarian Empire ? On the contrary, it saved
the Hungarian nation from being a discontented
people. In
Switzerland
again, it afforded a good example, and surely
that might be regarded as a prosperous
in Germany
country
so
of the
"
also
the
"
each
divided
most
State
possessed one
said,also, that
and
that
the
world.
for
legislature
it would
effect
in the
country
produce
of it would
America,
local affairs.
in
anarchy
that
be
In
the
there
It
was
country,
would
be
two
partiesin Ireland,and that one would crush the other. That
in our
House
of
was
own
usually the fate of minorities,even
The
Commons.
minority must
go to the wall, and it would
be
of Commons,
the
not
peculiar if,in the Irish House
submitted
It
the
to
most
was
majority.
minority
important
that something should
be
the Irish people
done
to make
of the British
happy members
Empire, and to give them the
benefit
of a right which
stolen from
was
them, and what
they had a right to demand, and what they asked for in
Ever
since the union
between
a
right and moderate
way.
the
countries, there
what
they
they did
did
asked
had
been
not
for,but
want, and
it with
accept
not
to
give
then
it
to
give them
something
else which
attempt
an
them
wondered
was
as
gratitude. As soon
would
in
demands, contentment
prevail
not
their
until
then, there
would
Conservative
A
demands,
every
endeavour
to
be
not
of the
Member
grant the
"In
said:
Member
Irish
we
reasonable
to
knew
just and
that
reasonable
the
; but
prosperity."
regard
House
they
agreed to
Ireland
and
contentment
why
at
did
we
demands,
of the
on
but, like all the other members
the question of what
House, the last speaker had avoided
their reasonable
demands, and charged us with doing
were
scandalous
them
Gentleman,
and
the
who
House
forward
brought
to
Rule,
in
whole
do
would
on
the
adopt. Having
the
Motion
the
he
injustice. He
thought there
differed
were
of the
of Local
question of how
it
to
was
arrived
possiblybe
Secretary for
saying that he never
were
they to know?
manage
its
own
the
intended
Did
sewage
he
?
his
on
House
In
at
be
mean
that
that
case
of
sible
impos-
was
for Home
forward
That
a
raised
When
they would
getting up and
meant
Ireland
anything
side
managed.
it
what
Hon.
Motion
whole
Self-Government.
they thought they had
by
the
the paper
Motion
on
a
withdrew
it, and put
favour
met
side
from
many
The
same.
side
other
had
Member
Hon.
the
other
of the
sort
town
every
he would
How
!
was
to
grant
it
PART
LOCAL
Ii8
forbid
ileaven
that
rhumis
Rule
that
was
Ireland
for
he
had
for
Rule.
The
argument
that
it v/ould
was
countries.
the
on
years
during
that
showed
many
by
alternatives
a
Ireland
The
bers
Mem-
experience
an
outbreaks
had
Ireland
union
Irish
of re-conquest, he
Members
oi Parliament
Rule
had
were
familiar with
in Australia
succeeded
it ; but
and
when
pitchedheadlong
it
into
totallyunfit for it.
America
tried
was
it,it
While
in the
would
he
this
was
be
the
the
at
Home
why
reason
but
quences
conse-
Look
union.
The
now.
the
Fearing
England.
advocated
was
and
re-conquest,
was
of
for Ireland, for
feartul
most
one
"
and
other
they were
.'
The
Union
disgraced civilization.
saw
great English Minister, who
for
with
years
Home
good either to
of political
agitation
would
injure both
good
not
was
hundred
no
but
it was,
it
otthe
two
ever
about
said
torical
his-
point of
against
for Ireland
good
that
period
which
brought
Rule
side
other
twenty
occurred
Home
Was
that
a
The
House.
be
have
must
thought
he
; but
or
would
he
thought
England, and no amount
justifyus in doing that which
Ireland
two
the
separationbetween
who
spoltelast had given
of that
curse
Irish
the
touch
ever
Ireland
for Home
asking
been
and
in him
the
were
speech
the
Member
Celtic blood
of the
touch
total
a
eloquent speech,
an
should
England
! but it might mean
sewage
countries.
The
Hon.
two
them
LAMENTS.
they
"
dark, and
shown
that
wished
not
to vote
they were
Local
for
he
it
the
believed
was
against
Sell-Government,
best possibleeducator
the other
of the people, the Motion
on
side of the House
not
was
really lor Local Self-Government,
bound
and they were
to vote
against it. It could not be said
that the Irish had
shown
tact, generosity,and
temper, and
Parliament
supposing a
to
be
said
would
be
It was,
that
those
those
who
he
experience
there
of centuries
great protection
things,and
it
be
was
taken
on
no
one
House
that
House
against hurried
to
their
cause
?
Local
one
of Lords
be
a
we
Home
of
no
not
were
a
few
be
a
importance
to
Rule.
He
would
be
safe
in Ireland.
There
property
the
other
of
side
the House,
arguments on
want
a
England
legislation. What
Parliament
matter
not
was
in
all powers
for
except
basis
he believed
it would
to
The
two.
or
House
have
that
great failure. It seemed
did not
the millions,who
that
The
given the
said
be
shown
of government.
to
were
to
had
Was
told, but
it
was
on
was
proper
powers
to-morrow
advocated
now
would
mode
a
who
men
them
in harmony
legislation
carry
the question would
thought, impossible. Then
whether
come
given
were
believed
hazard
hapincluding
were
HOME
the
be
Idea
against
reasonable
on
of
on
us
Hon.
the
the
Ireland
He
Member
side
on
the
of
the
allude
to
Gloucester.
House
Conservative
this
had
that
must
America
m
Surely
matter.
for
1
millions
statements
man.
other
ten
were
melancholy
most
the
there
that
RULE.
It
to
try
ever
was
to
Government."
the
throw
of
one
the
fiom
come
raised
argument
one
would
who
was
habit
the
19
of
a
by
those
difficulties
X.
SECTION
A
at
public meetings,
invariably appointed
formal
character
less
of
more
or
a
gatherings
His
is expected.
duties, in the first instance,
is
CHAIRMAN
all social
in
and
speaking
public meetings
where
at
will
There
be
may
and
chairman,
be
aside
set
of
object
choose
to
necessary
by
of
and
others,
of
show
then
present
FIRST
in
Some
whose
business
may
be
friend,
so
decide
the
of
candidates
the
is the
nominated.
several
may
is
question
no
by
Of
a
not
may
of
disposed
wherein
cases
man,
appearance
first
the
a
it is very
well-read
and
and
is
spected
re-
than
worse
Therefore
firm,
chance
to
is
authority of his office,
the
audience, and the
several
to
way
and
chair
the
a
The
readiness,
chair
defeated.
propose
their
apply
of
DUTY
Minutes
have
the
read
(if there
objects
mind
of
course
chairman
is
officio.
ex
The
only
then
only
the
and
may
voting.
or
remarks
these
the
and
seconded,
be
present
hands
and
assembled,
chairman,
a
gentleman
One
has
and
making
the
really strong,
weight
carry
a
inspires respect.
When
the
meeting
appointment
be
may
will
opinion
whose
man
strong
a
and
in
authority,
meeting
the
much
order
weak
his
because
nobody,
can
A
appointment
will
depend.
the
intelligence
have
enforcing
all.
by
choice
the
must
of
in
difficulty
upon
capable
Chairman.
a
of
some
chosen
individual
briefly considered.
be
Choice
The
one
DUTIES.
HIS
AND
CHAIRMAN
THE
for
of
the
been
has
which
the
the
chairman
when
of
seated
is either
to
proceedings
previous meeting
the
a
previous meeting), or to state
has
been
and
meeting
called, clearly
the
distinctly.
He
and
probably
proceed to state
will
speech.
of
the
whole
The
read
his
the
views
and
upon
b";
able
convening
the
will
present
company
matter,
notice
to
subject
then
SD^ak
be
upon
the
in
in
meeting,
his
ing
open-
possession
the
various
MEETINGS.
PVBLTC
122
It
is
toasts
chairman's
of the Queen and
and
"c.,
to
he
inclined
music,
is his business
as
may
keep order amongst
good management,
to
and
tact, temper,
evening, and to see that no
He
generally takes
good taste.
of the
his intention
be
to
present"
There
or
are
many
which
will
upon
the
do
by
waiter
a
Navy,
"
of the
convivially
littlecourtesies
to
with
generally it
and
by
harmony
o(
guests, and
the
the toast
by
under
for instrumental
the bounds
master
"
if one
ordinary circumstances.
be observed
man
by a chair-
to
readilypresent themselves
position; and he generallyproposes
occupiesthe
Toast
; and
exceeds
wine
is intimated
so
Army,
the
company,
the
to preserve
one
loyal
the
be.
those
be determined
calls upon
usual
If the company
be
present for a song, or
it may
evening,"whatever
the
propose
Royal Family,
responders ; and also
the
name
to
duty
the
more
or
his sway.
under
board
of the
end
distant
the other
appointed,and keeps
is also
vice-chairman
who
any one
the health
before the meeting separates.
of the vice-chairman
disposalof the guests with reference to the chairman
or
president will be made
according to precedence, the
be
Royal Family having the lead, unless a certain personage
he will occupy
bidden
the
speciallyto be honoured, when
the
hand
of
the
the
and
eldest
right
chairman,
place on
the
of
left
hand.
The
representative Royalty present on
o(
guest of the evening is always seated at the right hand
the next
in honour
the chair,
the left,
and so on
on
according
rank
and
to
standing,honoured
guests being also seated
the high table, with notable members
of the society or
near
corporationin whose hall the dinner is given.
The
The
chairman
until all the
at
guests
chair, after grace
upon
they
comes
toasts
where
last,or
is
are
public
dinner
seated, and
said,dinner
at
rate
any
require; and to him
will remain
when
is served.
he will
that
see
he
and
the toast
there
is no
to
evening to
established
appropriate,and
anecdotes
hearing
of the
so
the guest
the club
loudly applauded
much
of
or
and
the
form
if he
defer.
has
But
have
all
When
it
the
in
loyal
cases
he will say
his
remarks
season
We
remember
once
the evening, when
institution he was
very
the
will be waited
propose.
of speech
can
better.
standing
assumes
He
the guests
all the guests must
to speaking after dinner, the
chairman
something
with
a
proposing prosperity
make
a
attending,
amusing speech simply by re-
DUTIES
anecdotes
counting
merely
very
story
"
anything
useful
a
of
toast
scarcely
of
from
went
the
OF
stock
of
such
University
his
to
as
will
it.
we
be
sat
days.
The
down
after
Anecdotes,
would
suited
123
Society,"
the
to
concerning
and
and
story,
Prosperity
speakers,
to
CHAIRMAN.
THE
the
ing
propossaid
having
therefore,
suggest
to
speaker
to
company.
all
are
men
chair-
XI,
SECTION
TOASTS
SENTIMENTS.
AND
TOASTS.
LOYAL
the
May
AH
the
all noble
Parliament,
hearts.
subjects'
hearts.
in the
valour
fortitude
and
field,
sea.
all
May
heart
in
in her
ever
and
Nobles
our
Firmness
on
live
Queen
of
a
Commanders
our
and
May
no
May
the
daughters
of
Hawke
a
and
the
Justice be swayed by the
hand
of
Mercy.
Queen.
true
of
son
hearts
of
modest
shrink
Neptune
our
and
the enemies
May
of
the eye
Wolfe.
? lay the sword
Church
have
be
sons
from
his gun.
and brave, and
honest
our
pure.
of
England
meet
never
friend in Great
a
Britain.
Rose, Shamrock,
and
Thistle.
MILITARY.
The
British
Army : firm in disaster,
courageous
in victory.
and merciful
Every soldier a pleasant halt, and every
in
danger,
rogue
a
long
halter.
May
British laurels
May
the
Honour
May
British
and
soldier
the
the soldier
British
fade.
never
sword
British
May
arms,
the brow
The
memory
of the brave
May
good
leaders
to
be
sacrifice but to
hands
them.
to use
and
of the
they never
: may
fall a
never
his back
turn
never
brave
always
never
who
have
want
a
fell at
good
a
foe.
parted.
glory.
laurel wreath.
.
followers.
NAVAL.
The
to
British
victoryby
Navy
the
:
may
gales of
it
ever
sail
on
prosperity.
a
sea
of
glory,wafted
LOVE
The
Sea
:
England.
May the
it
may
who
tar
TOASTS.
bring
loses
125
spring tide
a
one
in
eye
of
prosperityto
never
war
see
distress
with the other.
May
May
our
seamen
hearts
wear
of oak
if iron-clad.
even
Content
be our
pilotin the voyage of life.
Here's to the tar that sticks like pitch to his duty.
The memory
of Nelson
and the brave.
May rudders govern and ships obey.
Britain's sheet anchor
her ships.
"
Lots
of beef
Sweethearts
Foes
well
and
oceans
of grog.
and
wives.
tarred,and
well feathered.
tars
LOVE.
The
spring of
Love
May
The
in
a
love
cottage
lovers'
vows
to
without
of
enjoyment
none.
in lovers'
quarrels.
thorns.
any
health
to
all those
whom
A
health
health
to
all those
who
love us,
to all those
who
love
them
that
love those
that love them
who
love
us.
Who
love
those
Love, liberty,and
Laughing
and
lovers
bud
May
sincerity.
The
wings of
singlemarried
The
face that
maids.
merry
please,and
we
of affection
the
love
please those we kiss.
ripened by the sunshine
be
lose
never
a
the married
and
paints,and
nature
love,
we
friendship.
true
kiss those
we
the
May
harvest
A
A
May
the
envy
end
never
of love
rose
and
and
of
feather.
happy.
the heart
that
knows
no
deception.
one, friendshipto a few, goodwillto all.
be parted.
Constancy and kindness : may they never
The
lady we love,and the friend we trust.
Love
May
to
we
have
sense
Here's
a
to
win
health
to
a
heart,and
all
good
Pledge it merrily,fillyour
Let
Constancy
in
the
bumper
toast
go
merit
lasses I
glasses,
round.
love,sincerityin friendship.
to
keep
it.
AND
TOASTS
t26
fountain
The
in all its
of love
with
The
roses
of love
May
the
sparks of
SENTIMENTS.
purity.
of chaste
the sweetbriar
brighten into
love
afTection
flame.
MASONIC.
craft.
Queen and ancient
the Fraternityround
Our
All
The
Grand
The
Grand
the
globe.
Lodge of England.
Lodge of Scotland.
Lodge of Ireland.
well-disposedMasons.
The
Grand
All
To
and to Mason's
bairns,
with both wit and charms.
Masons
And
women
and
the compass
walk
in the line.
To
all that live within
To
all Masons
who
To
all ancient
Freemasons
the
May
be
place
Brethren
of the
induce
And
its
May
To
every
covetous
be
cares
The
heart
And
the tongue
Freemason
the innocent and
no
the
May
da
expire,
is
on
fire.
properlysquared.
distinguishedthree.
have
brother
to
be
Masons
as
of the
memory
Mason
a
fade tillthe world
gloriesne'er
actions
our
May
May
flourish tillnature
Masonry
May
The
dispersed.
distinguishedfor love,
Lodge.
May the prospect of riches never
that which
is repugnant
to virtue.
May
square*
harmony.
absent
The
in this
Lodges
and
peace,
wherever
the
a
heart
unknown
which
to feel and
to
to give
conceals
which
ne'er reveals.
the bitter
faithful craft.
taste
of
gentle spirit
a hand
Freemasons.
Love
apples of affliction.
animate
the heart
of every
Mason.
To
May
watch
happy meeting.
every brother learn
upon the square.
the
May
of every
As
next
our
we
square,
brother.
meet
upon
to
live within
plumb-line,and
the level may
level
we
the
compass
regulatethe
part
upon
and
conduct
the square
CONVIVIAL
Golden
to
eggs
lOAsrs.
127
goldfinches to
brother, and
every
our
Lodges.
May
in
find constancy in love and
Freemason
every
sincerity
friendship.
FRIENDSHIP.
the bark
May
of
friendshipnever
ieception.
May we be richer in
want
May we never
founder
friends than
friend to
a
in the
ol
well
in money.
cheer
us,
nor
a
bottle
to
cheer
him.
May old friends
the
May
serve
More
friends
friend,and
a
difference
May
forgot for
of
and
new
lightedby
honour
conceal
to
alter
opinion never
know
friend of distress never
Gratitude
iriends and grace to
to our
the
May
May
the
hinges
the
friendlybosom
friendshipnever
oi
in
our
cups
May
is true
friends
our
a
friend.
in
content
burden, and
present
no
foes.
our
loves.
our
of life.
"
have
sorrow.
and
the sunshine
To the secret
and silent.
All absent
friends on land and sea.
friend who
A
friendship.
rust.
lack
never
May friendshipsmile
sincerity.
it.
of them.
less need
May
ones.
the oil of
be
oi friendship
lamp
Abilityto
be
never
futurityno
terrors.
May
always
we
have
a
friend and
know
his value.
CONVIVIAL.
May
May
we
May
we
always
love
our
in
Cheerfulness
the
May
a
of wine
with
act
in
have
friend and
reason
our
make
never
cups,
when
us
the
content
a
bottle
to
give him.
forgetour
manners.
bottle circulates.
in our
minds, and
petency
com-
pockets.
our
moments
of mirth
be
regulatedby
the
dial
ol
reason.
Champagne
to our
real friends
and
real
pain
to our
friends.
juiceof
May
the
And
good
Old
wine
and
humour
young
enliven
each soul,
presideat the head of each bowL
the grape
women.
sham
128
We
met
feast of
All absent
A
friends
to-nightand
bottle
the
God
"
blind
to
and
reason
let
now
suffer the bottle
Nor
The
be merry,
lo
SENTIMENTS.
AND
TOASTS
flow
bless
a
Pledge
it
Let
The
health
Here's
the
morning.
divine,
the
grape
I ne'er
all
forgetmine.
lasses
good
merrily,fillyour
bumper
Ladies, and
!
in the
to
eyes.
of soul.
them
business
Oh, wine, the juiceof
In thy good spirit
may
part wise,
us
reason's
!
glasses,
go round.
toast
they always share
may
joys
our
and
sorrows.
Drink, boys, drink,and
For perhaps we
not
may
drive
sorrow
away
drink
"
again to-morrow.
COMIC.
May
May
you
to
shadow
your
hair of your
every
less.
be
never
head
be
mould
a
candle
light
to
glory !
May
chiclcen
the
hatched
be
never
that
will
scratch
on
!
your grave
The
earlybird and
The
V
nimble
the
he
worm
ninepence : may
days of
it
live all the
May we
good Sovereign, and
A
The
land
All true
joys"
but
may
may
we
maiden
Here's
to
the
housewife
Here's
to
the
here's
The
great
General
best doctors"
The
merry
to
Here's
to
a
florin.
pockets.
our
be sent
be
out
of it.
transported.
blushingfifteen,
thrifty,
that's
commanders
"
queen,
General
Peace,
General
Prosperity.
Dr. Quiet,Dr. Diet,and Dr. Merryman,
thought,and no ."black legs at table.
the poor heart that never
rejoices.
"
to the
noble
in
flauntingextravagant
of fifty
1
to the widow
three
Here's
Here's
of
into
grow
never
never
the
!
lives.
our
we
to
and
i'lenty,
Our
:
soon
image
Here's
And
The
live in
we
his
picked up
good
man
who
the old bird that
selves.
kept
was
not
a
dog and
barked
caught with
chaflL
self.
him-
'
TOASTS
jo
May
:ause
we
to
May
Love,
SENTIMENTS.
AND
never
without
murmur
and
cause,
have
never
murmur.
want
never
we
life,liberty,
Success
May
to
mirror
May
the
May
modesty
May
avarice
May
care
May
fortune
May
bad
May
poverty
of
rule
lose
be
a
and
example
never
fish
we
conduct.
for
friendship.
to
success
compelled
be
conscience
his
her
never
come
and
and
purse
to
to
show
desires
our
stranger
recover
when
army,
our
foes
our
bait
a
us
us
the
at
face
moderation
and
of truth.
our
find
distribute
youthful
without
feet.
our
wishes.
it.
heart.
honest
eyesight
to
down
bow
benevolence
every
corrupt
fleet,
our
morals.
hope.
her
gifts
THE
PRECEDENCE
There
the
manner
middle-class
who
of
exclusion
;
but
only
rank
be
not
much
very
unmarried
be
there
for
the
middle
the
classes,
precedence
with
must
reference
borne
from
a
better
of
is
and
dignity
Sir
can
Canterbury
are
their
from
not
alone
is
quoted.
included,
So
can
bestow
cases,
intimacy
entitled
the
to
"
would
respectively
rank
such
conferred
upon
the
no
"
arises
lady."
a
and
subject,
precedence
rank
By
upon
Archbishop,
an
rank
same
officeor profession.
even
amongst
of
position.
provided
rule
"
award
to
and
they
where
husband-
rule
standing
precedence
Burke's
of
majority
husbands
an
if
sticklers
careful
be
need
but
;
"
is
it
there
jealous
vast
local
and
themselves,
Bernard
be
the
social
gentleman
When
great
precedence
no
such,
widows
as
amongst
dignity
through
This
other
each
amongst
have
and
is
by
marriage
to
ladies
Married
ruled
be
may
to
older
an
strictness
the
apply
a
dinner
particularly
frequently
concerned
in
in
gentlemen
exceeding
There
is
table.
matter,
are
to
into
who
not
at
question
be
and
the
honour
her
place
to
hand
the
wives
take
it should
amongst
in
all
position.
correct
younger,
precedence
do
rank
higher
right
may
it behoves
So
a
present,
the
to
to
careful
the
and
him
and
so,
be
people
correctness,
rank.
whom
married
are
be
anxiety
to
ask
precedence
of
ordinary
if
be
for
wishes
of
her
upon
question
a
then
should
hostess
highest
a
if this
hostess
consequence.
hostess
person
a
But
rank
higher
the
under
house.
dining-room,
the
may
of
even
the
occur,
of
she
of
lady
that
the
ordinary
gentleman
take
escorted
be
of
master
to
great
and
guest,
friend
should
In
The
should
dinner,
to
placed.
difficulty.
rank
dinner-givet
down
sent
be
no
social
social
happen
may
the
to
the
her
escort
is
the
to
be
should
they
unmarried,
is of
ladies
shall
guests
wife
GUESTS.
interest
more
there
his
by
will
new
which
and
an
even
It
in
of
highest
circumstances
host
which
the
dinner,
or
in
society
holds
into
topics
order
the
or
few
are
than
OF
his
no
Grace
upon
his
PRECEDENCE
132
wife
his
by
except such
GUESTS.
OF
although he
office,
be Royal
as
may
precedence
takes
of
all peers
Dukes.
only
English peer, can
of his
confer precedence on his wife according to the date
of Privy
dignity. The wives of Bishops, Esquires, or even
Baronet's
the
or
pas to a
Councillors,would have to yield
even
a
"
Knight's daughter, because
dignity,"which
a
the
similarly would
wife
second
Chancellor, the
Lord
The
ladies
other
only
she
derives her rank from
do not do.
A
Judge's
if her
precedence
take
husband
knighted ; and then she would rank after the ladies of
of
The
Bath
come
wearers
Military Knights, of which
of
Michael
and
Star
then the
George,"
India,"and
first,
the
manders."
before
the
Grand
Crosses
ranking
Knights ComThe
wives
of Serjeants-at-Law rank, by old
statute, immediately after wives of Knights ; for Serjeantsat-Law
are
dignitaries.
were
"
"
"
"
"
"
"
RULES
Precedence
OF
PRECEDENCE.
depends upon the date of the
and governs
creation of their titles. This rule is invariable,
all ranks
of the peerage,
and
also baronets
and
knights.
careful
The
be
confound
must
not
to
inexperienced
courtesy
of dukes, marquises,
titleswith real peerages.
The eldest sons
Peers
amongst
of their father's other
and earls are
always called by one
of the Duke
titles. Thus the eldest son
of Athole
is Marquis
of
of
of Tullibardine
the
Marquis
Conyngham, Earl of
;
Charles
Mount
These
; of the
what
are
Earl
of
"
termed
are
Courtown, Viscount
courtesy
Stopford.
and
titles,"
their
bearers take rank not as marquises,earls,viscounts,
or lords,
the
of
but as
eldest sons
dukes, marquises,and earls. The
eldest son
of a duke takes rank after marquises and
before
earls ; the eldest son
of the Blood
dukes
dukes
before
and
of
a
marquis
Royal,
viscounts
and
;
after the
before
the
eldest
the
son
younger
younger
of
an
sons
sons
of
of
earl after
and
viscounts
before the younger
of marquises and
sons
of a viscount,who
eldest son
has no
courtesy
styled Honourable, after barons', and before
of a baron, also styled
sons
earls',
; the eldest son
younger
Honourable, after earls' younger
and
sons
before
privy
councillors and judges. The
precedence of the wives
of
bishops ; the
title,but is
is,
the
course,
sons
of
same
dukes
Hamilton,
son
as
and
of
that
of their
marquises
the
Duke
of
husbands.
lords :
Abercom
;
are
The
Lord
Lord
younger
Claud
Albert
PRECEDENCE.
SOCIAL
Seymour,
error
of the
son
Christian
greater
rank
after the
eldest
eldest
of
and
judges, and
the
eldest
and
sons
nothing
can
of earls and
of viscounts
privy councillors
after
of barons
sons
younger
take rank
.
before
of earls after those
of barons
baronets.
the
omit
of viscounts
the
before
sons
before
sons
common
a
to
but
Hamilton,
after those
marquises
eldest
is
of dukes
The
take
sons
younger
of marquises and before viscounts
sons
the eldest
; the
Lord
say
ignorance.
sons
bishops ;
barons
and
name,
show
the
It
Marquis of Hertford.
in
the
not
matter
au
fait
those
among
133
and
; while
after those of viscounts
take rank in order of their
Baronets
follow
creation, and after them
knights according to their
in chancery or
orders ; serjeants-at-law,masters
lunacy,
of
the
eldest
orders
of
several
sons
knighthood ;
companions
eldest sons, eldest
of peers, baronets'
of the younger
sons
of knights according to their orders,baronets'
sons
younger
the
followingstrictly
(their wives
sons
esquires.
The
daughters of
a
almost
house
always enjoy the
follow
brother, and
their eldest
precedence),
same
rank as
wife.
Daughters of dukes, marquises,and earls
ladies ; Lady Georgiana Hamilton, Lady Elizabeth
the Christian name,
to omit
It is a terrible solecism
or
Lady Campbell, but it is one
Lady Hamilton
"
committed, though
Lady Campbell
the wife of either a peer or
saying that a lady can never
the
a
Thus,
case.
daughter
if she marry
rank, and the
husband's
only keeps
She
her.
lose
her
a
of
It is
duke
say
or
a
precedence of
she takes
precedence of
baron
takes
countess
and
a
takes
viscount
Campbell.
very common
this is not strictly
rank, but
a
styled
are
frequently
imply
naturally
would
baronet.
a
; but
countess
her
the
"
same
immediately after his
"positive
precedence by marrying
marrying the eldest son
rank, and instead
of a marquis or of an earl retains her own
and
Viscountess
A., they are
styled
of being Viscount
and Lady Mary A.
When, however, her husband
Viscount
rank
;
thus, the daughter of
succeeds
his rank
to
his
and
her
is of the same
of a duke's
the case
or
a
becomes
rank, she
a
daughter marrying
married
to
children
instance of
retains
her
own
she
peer,
takes
birth.
a
peer'sdaughter marrying
esquirealways
a
If,however,
takes the courtesy title,
as
precedence of
marquis'sdaughter marrying
Of course,
her
duke
father's titleand
loses
lady
a
rank
duke's
a
;
an
a
in
eldest son,
marquis's eldest
either
the
baronet
earl's
son.
or
an
dajjghter
a
baroness, but
esquire takes precedence
derive no precedence from it,unless in the rare
her being a peeress in her own
right; for,as a
an
of
only in the male
rule,dignitiesdescend
letter
addressinga
of
GUESTS.
OF
PRECEDENCE
34
"
to
a
in
lady
her
method
The
line.
right,"as
own
the
of the peerage
are
"
The
The
being placed
termed, is
and
of
viscounts
The
the name.
daughters
a line above
on
addressed
Honourables
barons
are
; if married, letters are
"
"
Honble."
Honble.
Mrs. White,"
being on a line
to them,
"
"
if unmarried, Honble.
above
Mary Green," Honble.
; and
highest ranks
Lady Mary Jones,"
the
of
daughters
three
"
"
In commencing
a letter they are
styled,
Georgiana Brown."
Dear
Lady Mary Jones." The wife of
Lady Mary," not
is
of a knight
or
a baronet
styled Lady," like the wife of a
baron
; but in addressing a letter to the latter it is necessary
is not
used
The Lady A.," while the prefix The
to put
for the wife of a baronet
or
knight. A peer's daughter
married
to a baronet
or knight is
Lady Jane Black," or the
"
"
"
"
"
"
"
"
Honble.
Mrs.
When
Black."
gentleman is created a peer, his children become
or
Honourables, but it in no way affects the denomination
the precedence of his brothers and sisters,the patent making
mention
of them, but only of his own
heirs male.
no
When,
eldest
who
is
a
us
a
son,
however,
peer's (let say
marquis's)
a
married
and
has
children,dies before his father
his
marquis dies, and
peer's sisters
young
rank
of the
have
naturallybeen
in
sons
due
course,
courtesy title.
extended
her
is the
of the
theirs had
actual
actual
three
are
Emily,
"
Louisa, Dowager
of the
"
Duchess
her
late
; if she
the
is
that
case
is
There
in his
own
a
succeed
husband's
:
strange
grandmother
is,if
be styled
Dowager,"
that
"
"
"
If,however,
her
styled
son, but
"
Mary,
some
the
peer who
other relative
Marchioness
of
B.,"
of O."
who
if in the
dignity; thus,
John T. ;" but
"
his
A."
is not
addressinggentlemen
Honble.
is reversed
would
to
the title she would
Jane, Viscountess
of
Lady
she
peer,
precedesthe
their father lived
be
Dowager,"
husband
remembered
be
marquis, which
a
is styled Dowager when
peeress
and
It is only the
is married.
peer
who
is
chioness
Maror
simply Duchess
peer
Katherine,Countess
In
are
the title,
the
the
accorded
A
peeresses
"
succeeds
to
the
but his mother
retains simply her
This case
appliesto all peers ; the rule is not
Dowager
there
brothers
younger
daughters of
baronets.
to
son
mother
and
and
succeeds
grandson
when
"
are
Army
"
The
of peers, it should
Navy the official title
sons
or
Captain Lord
if they are
in
Honble.
and Rev.
belief entertained
by
parish a clergyman
G.,"
"
Colonel
the
Church
Oscar
H."
some
is entitled to take
persons
the
that
precedence
THE
of any
where
but
the
claim
no
135
above
this is
precedence
all the company
how
matter
no
SCALE.
how
matter
much
one, no
We
need
hardly say that
scale.
A clergyman can
cases
SOCIAL
him
in the
social
misapprehension.
a
whatever
such.
as
In
distinction,
slightand unimportant,is gladlyseized upon,
smallest
are
on
level,any
a
shadow
of social rank is sufficient to extinguish
town, where
any such pretensions. In a cathedral
almost
is
o
f
tinctions
all the dissociety
exclusivelyclerical, course
of clerical rank are
minutely observed ; and so in
naval, and
military,
distinct
various
the
legalcircles,
precedence amongst
have
professions
each
other,which it sometimes
pleases them to extend to their wives, though these ladies
have
claim to it. However, in general society,should
no
there be absolutelyno
precedence due to any of the ladies,
it would, as some
be natural
must
to give the
one
go first,
precedence to the wife of a general,admiral, or O.C. who
a
might be present. It should be
nothing to do with precedence,and
take precedence of a
lady would
understood
that
a
that
age has
unmarried
young
married
one
of inferior
rank.
The
of
officers of the
between
is very
A
intricate.
naval
post-captain
navy
in the army,
but when
he has served as
a colonel
arrangement
army
and
ranks
with
precedence
post-captainfor three years he ranks with a major-general
Naval
rear
precedence recognizes admirals, vice and
lieutenants.
admirals, post-captains,
commanders,
Military
has
precedence
generals,
lieutenant-generals,
major-generals,
colonels,lieutenant-colonels,majors, captains,lieutenants.
When
ambassador
is present he takes precedence of all
an
of his sovereign.
peers, being regarded as the representative
His wife enjoys the same
precedence ; but should he be a
of his house,
widower, with a daughter doing the honours
she is
rank
not
with
entitled
an
to
the
English
rank
of
ambassadress,
an
It is
countess.
but
would
impossibleto give any
preciseset of rules that will obviate doubt in every case, as
the
have
taken into account
to be
specialcircumstances
there is positively
no
occurring where
greatest difficulty
"
rank
;
for where
there
is,the
rules
clear and
are
followed.
have only to be implicitly
The only guide in the former case is that afforded
definite,
and
Where
will
be
not
hostess,her guests
the
old
offence, knowing, as
sense
and
good
taste.
littlecare
a
meant,"
generallyobviate any
and
and
these
on
conspicuous
are
the look-out
phrase
has
forethought
that
difficulty
by good
for
causes
in
a
ol
is
it,that " none
the matter
will
on
may
arise
irom
the
PRECEDENCE
136
question
of
which
have
we
The
of
the
arrange
in
precedence
already
foregoing
hints
in
precedence
the
OF
tables
so
some
will
give
society,
as
to
middle
the
made
offend
GUESTS.
classes,
respecting
observations.
eveiy
and
one
enable
none.
a
correct
notion
dinner-givers
tc
SPEECHES
138
Twenty-five
friends have
dear
For
existence.
mundane
virtues
elders
we
affection
the
and
thfc prop
at
which
with
the
branches
olive
with
watched
seen
"
growing
interest
We
house, but
we
alas
have
seen,
have
rejoicedand
the Christian
the pluck and
been
Let
trials have
endured.
1
and
us
detain
profitby it too.
you longer,ladies
.
.
and
sorrow
wondered
resignation
and
; let
I will not
"
"
hearth.
such
example
our
have
"
fortitude
the
We
all.
us
"
shadow
trouble
"
plants,and
springing up like the young
of the psalmist
graceful polished corners
of
temple, the ornaments
stay of the domestic
truly domestic
this
and
felicity
sons
the
girls,
the
for
have
we
our
these
All
bound.
be
can
the
seen
of
span
example of domestic
an
patterns
"
their table ;
round
up
as
long spelL
a
of time, however,
our
space
in hymeneal bonds, the most
mortals
we
have
we
"
that
united
been
sacred ties by which
years they have stood
of Christian
and
of the
one-third
It exceeds
gentlemen, is
generally alloted
ladies
years,
WEDDING.
SILVER
A
FOR
us
make
this
.
and
gentlemen
; it
only
for me,
this most
on
auspicious anniversary, to call
to fill your
glasses,full bumpers, and with all your
you
upon
hearts drink
the toast
I propose,
viz :
remains
"
Health, Happiness,
Prosperityto Mr. and Mrs.
with
Returns
of their
Happy
Wedding-Day.
many
attend
in
for evermore.
them
future
and
blessing
every
1
then, three times three ! Hip, hip, hurrah
and
ANOTHER
Ladies
and
Now
PROPOSAL.
Gentlemen,
friends,I have
,
May
"
been
take
requested this evening to underof
is
which
a
duty,
duty sense
entirelylost in the
it
affords
It
is
it.
to
ship,
me
of friendact
an
pleasure
perform
and
I feel honoured
in having been requested to propose
the toast
which
all anticipating. My object,as
you are
you
My
the
divined, is
have
future
continued
whose
Silver
that the
of
cup
to
call
upon
you
to
drink
the
Health
and
and
Happiness of our kind Host
Hostess,
Wedding we are celebratingto-day. We are sure
host's enjoyment is full as is his quiver
of our
of the parent trees.
offshoots, worthy branches
men
Gentleand
unite most
ladies, we
must
heartilyin this toast.
On
such
day mo melancholy retrospects, no
be permitted to intrude
unpleasantness, must
a
source.
Troubles
thinking
of the
come
crosses
in time
and
to
us
worries, the
all.
cares
feeling of
from
any
But
instead
of
and
difficulties
SPEECHES
which
let
Five
and
Time
health
has
I
the
to
twenty
has
about
am
a
lenientlywith
Mr.
to
come
had
and
strength to
!
possess
the
to
lifetime
us,
upon
the
young,
Mrs.
whose
,
Old
Time, the age-ing one,
finger on such kindly heads,
propose.
unkind
an
he
contrary,
139
blessings we
appears
lay
to
have
we
the
enjoy
have
years
that
years
dealt
dared
not
On
Heaven
and
them,
surmount
but
thank
rather
WEDDING.
SILVER
A
during twenty-five
may
us
FOR
them
spares
he
;
them,
respects
and
he
delights in plaguing less deserving mortals, he
smiling by our host and hostess year after year.
passes
Youthfulness, merriment, good-humour, cheerfulness, sil
and
board
at their
Age cannot
defy Time.
wither, and it
will
those
wither, those kindly hearts,
never
spirits,
generous
which
this
ward
off
his
household.
preside over
They
hearts
attacks
and
reach
the
Silver
with
Wedding-Day
and faces as bright as polished silver itself,
reflecting
young,
them
!
We
virtues
know
the Christian
happiness all around
and
kindness
the
bonhotnie
they practise,the
th"y possess,
desires
silent charity which
reward, the unostentatious
no
works.
practice of good
So, ladies and
merrily. It is
gentlemen,
ye"
uprouse
it is the
not
25th anniversary of a
our
"opening
day"
happy day, often to be overtaken, let us hope, in future
The
sparkling silver will change gloriouslyinto the
years.
Golden
long, happy vista of earthly
Wedding-Day
; the
though
"
"
bliss
for
the
adown
path of life. The
passing,perhaps
summer
is
autumn
of their
shall
seeds
needs
not
indicate
to
I
honoured.
in heartfelt
and
"
of the
my
; but
Day.
when
of
and
friends
for them
; the
good
loving
Golden
!
evermore
imperfect
way
in
words
which
as
I
am
sure
you
and
the
bless
them
!
halting speech
toast
should
be
it you, and
beg you
all will
drink
to
to Mr.
give
hearty congratulationson
Happiness in future,and Many
God
harvest
in
will,therefcre, merely
"
the
of
winter
with
and
is gone,
it may
be ; the
there is yet the golden-lined
imperceptibly,
happiness,
radiant
more
Eternity where, hand
friends
shall
walk
beloved
through
the
you
will extend
spring
troops
no
drink,
mingle
for
manner
Mrs.
Health
in
we
still
in life, our
as
unspeakable
It
to
the
health
come,
will be
will
peacefully,with
bliss
to
reaped
There
Wedding-Day
hand,
lives
be
memories.
in
friends, whose
dear
our
"
the
anniversary
Happy
Returns
SPEECHES
I40
TO
REPLY
FOR
"
OF
TOAST
WEDDING.
SILVER
A
the
\By
WEDDING."
SILVER
Husband.']
I.
Ladies, and
Mr.
,
You
will,I
which
I find
am
"
compassionate
sure,
I
myself.
state, but
matrimonial
Gentlemen,
am
to
position in
referringto the
in the
me
not, of
course,
the positionin which
I have
been
deserved
unpersonally concerned
friend
who
has
of
old
so
eloquently
eulogies
my
who
health
and
and
has
wife's
spoken
proposed my
my
own,
of
all
so
our
surroundings.
highly
Ladies
and
gentlemen, what can I say to thank you save
the
placed by
that my
of
that
but
do
we
?
In
unselfish
has
moulded
finer than
her
the
tact, the
dear wife our
has
been
iTiy wife
do
thank
and
name
for
the
I must
own
my
bottom
tell you
lavished
have
praiseyou
the
from
you
on
us
:
than
for
over
that
more
sympathy, that firmness of character,
of understanding,which
has made
power
my
guiding star and our chief object of admiration.
than
"more
twenty-five years" this influence
of
Yes
me.
it is with
the
twenty-seven
:
be, and
to
was
foreshadowing
now
"
twenty-five years
influence
for good upon
an
me
;
kind and
has she been, so
affectionate,that she
coarser
clay into something better and
my
it would
have
been
without
that gentle, loving
influence, that touch
I said
am
myself
deserve
not
I
as
I may
also tell you that
dear wife has exercised
my
so
wife and
dear
hearts
our
far
as
"
happier
Those
!
is
years
pardonable pride
I
that
happy days
were
to
yet
ones
can
I first met
ago
arrive
for
look
"
; and
us
around
me
of hard
house, after so many
to-day,here in my own
years
of
of
and
sickness at times,
work,
sorrow
struggle at times,
but always cheered
better
half
better half
: truly my
by my
and
in later times
by the companionship of my children
"
also.
Ladies
name
and
time
and
gentlemen,
of all my
if
we
reminds
spared
are
honour
me
family.
us
with
that
we
we
your
owe
one
We
and
are
hope
you
all, I thank
delighted to
will
vote
these, much
thanks
!
I
am
of
sure
see
at
Talking
presence.
you another
a
charming gifts,
kindly remembrance
For
again
you
here,
future
some
of
"presence"
of thanks
our
in the
you
for your
wedding-day.
will
excuse
you
has
touched
us
my
Your
kindness
now.
saying more
very
and
I
unable
to proceed further ; but
deeply,
am
will
you
how
understand
how
quite
highly,
sincerely,my wife, my
children, and myself appreciate and feel your
kind expres-
SPEECHES
sions,and
FOR
SILVER
A
reciprocateyour good
again we thank you
once
WEDDING.
wishes.
from
141
and
Ladies
the very
men,
gentleof
bottom
oui
hearts !
II.
Ladies
My
you
made
valued
not,"
or
strict
lightly.
confidence,
Father
Time,
like
touch
wife !
my
second
him
Oh,
!
to
see
if I
equal
splendid defence
"
within
and
she
fingers,as
all those
has
brave
turns
us
old
Time,
she
!
me
Just
"
She
is
she
can
that
my
keeps Time,
imps
don't
that
!
bay
at
know
what
a
strongminded
so
affectionate
if
would
what
wretched
She
!
she
"
keeps
by chance
they do get
sheer
affection
by
them
conquers
Friends
Mrs.
!
! you
so
:
often, perhaps
"
Ah
all I
her
them
sometimes
I
them
guard,"
her
makes
by
this is in
"
influence
her
her
off,generally,but
troubles
these
reason
/ know
Bless
and
; so
home
farther.
entirelyto
Mrs.
brave
so
mean
not
can-
take
said, "touches
present.
business.
it is
Care, Trouble, Worry,
to
; you
found
at
must
the
no
go
dare
not
were
is due.
youthfulappearance
is
tell him
must
his
about
And
We
assail us
not
heard,
roughly !
the
gentleman who would
roughly
But
he
wouldn't
do it
!
laugh
may
You
!
yes
be
to
friend
my
me
it
have
time, even
send
soon
glad
are
Let
and
you
Well, I'd
I
speech
!
gentlemen
and
we
after dinner
elders
"Time,"
you.
very
his
ladies
; and
us
you
I assure
you,
She
kind
than
more
,
chaff
to
looks,
our
find
as
do
whose
friend, Mr.
business
help
a
"
just heard, and so very graciouslyresponded to,
about
wife's age and
some
my
very personal remarks
he forgot that he is younger
than
I am,
and
!
But
no
us
Gentlemen,
have
mine
has
and
Turns
!
the
!
same
that
but
them
makes
I
round
am
no
a
her
Worry
difference.
guard,"and, in common
parlance
the detail
"hugged "till I am
conquered!
excuse
Yes,
so
a.s you
friends, this is why I am
youthful-looking,
say.
"
just taken
am
within
the
"
"
my
Because
I
"chancery,"
But
let
taken
am
you
heart in my
my
have
very, very
toast
which
our
Not
here
us
and
of;
in
a
gentle
in
put
manner
!
and
speak to you from
now,
and
in my
seriously. You
own,
levityaside
wife's
name
kindly
"
friend
"
most
our
for this
generously
"
valued
friend
responded
Mr.
but for
kindliness,
thank
You
most
heartily
you.
in word ; have
accepted in far
only
to-day,we
in deed
know
put
me
care
to
has
the
posed.
pro-
your
presence
have
honoured
too
generous
a
SPEECHES
142
sense
small
own
my
overestimate
has
friends
her
endorse
So
truly
again
let
tell
me
and
echo
in
are
for
the
;
name
of
rest
sentiments.
and
I
of
here
future
near
say
all
it
to
near
you,
and
as
"Mt
all
to
you
to
\MU
of
knows
Heaven
I
be
and
me,
me,
in
God
!
meet
the
more
I
gentlemen,
happy,
with
all
shall
again
trust
how
wishes
good
we
Ladies
dear
can
ladies,
and
and
I
you
and
she
hands
the
at
God,
please
hereafter.
May
you.
kindness
;
she
entirely.
thank
we
If
which
on
honoured
cannot
goodness
of
sense
respect
your
fulfilled.
haven
your
the
you
it, you
say
Gentlemen
this
again,
sincerely,
be
fully
acquaintances.
in
I
unalienable,
always
praises
your
distant
we
and
they
May
in
drafts,
heavy
this
In
estate,"
separate
though
but
:
wife.
dear
my
WEDDING,
SILVER
A
merits
"
her
draw
FOR
as
ail
bless
I
my
you
am
"
as
heart,
every
STANDARD
COOKERY
AND
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