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Los Angeles Times - 22 October 2017

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$3.66 DESIGNATED AREAS HIGHER
latimes.com
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2017
© 2017 WST
Weinstein
built access
to models
The producer accused
of sexual misconduct
used his vast fashion
business as a pipeline
to attractive women.
By Daniel Miller,
Meg James
and Kim Christensen
FOUR of the five snapshots of the Miguel Cabrera painting “Española” that were included in an
enticing letter to a LACMA curator by a person purporting to be the masterpiece’s owner.
An 18th century
masterpiece appears
to be hiding in L.A.
A letter hints at the whereabouts of ‘Española,’
the long-lost work from a set by Miguel Cabrera
By Christopher Knight
A missing masterpiece of 18th century painting,
lost for more than 100 years, has apparently been
hanging in a Los Angeles home since the mid-1950s.
Nicknamed “Española” — Spanish girl — after the
primped and powdered child who is the painting’s focus, the lost work is from a brilliant set of 16 paintings
by Miguel Cabrera (circa 1715-1768), the greatest
painter of his age in Mexico. The paintings are believed to have left the country two years before the
artist’s death, but the whereabouts of “Española” has
long been unknown.
Now it seems the singular gem has been hiding in
plain sight — although the exact location of the domestic hideaway remains a nagging mystery.
Ilona Katzew, curator of Latin American art at the
Los Angeles County Museum of Art, has puzzled over
the bedeviling question for the last two years after re-
ceiving an enticing — and eccentric — letter. It was
written in the voice of Española, then signed as if by
the little girl, who in the elegant painting is being
adored by her proud parents, all three dressed in
sumptuous finery.
“You should know that I am well and living less
than two (2) miles from LACMA,” Española wrote late
in summer 2015. “I have been in the same family for I
believe 60 years, although I do not know how I was acquired.”
The Cabrera painting is part of a celebrated set of
casta, or caste, paintings. In a racial hierarchy devised
by white elites during the viceroyalty of New Spain,
casta paintings explored the theme of miscegenation,
or interracial marriage, among Indians, Spaniards
born in Spain, Creoles (Spaniards born in the New
World) and Africans.
[See Española, A14]
It was the kind of evening
Zoë Brock was accustomed
to, an intimate dinner party
at an Art Deco hotel on a
waterfront
avenue
in
Cannes. The Australian
model was ushered to an
empty seat at a long table on
a lush patio overlooking a
swimming pool.
She didn’t recognize the
man seated next to her, but
would quickly find out he
was Harvey Weinstein, a
brusque American producer
in town for the film festival.
That first encounter of
champagne and small talk
would end in a much less elegant fashion hours later in a
hotel room, where Weinstein
stood before Brock naked
and solicited a massage. She
said she locked herself in a
bathroom to escape him.
Still shaken by that night
in 1998, Brock believes the
events were set in motion by
men connected to Weinstein.
“Someone put me there
next to him — that was on
purpose. I am pretty sure
that there are a lot of people
that would like to sit next to
Harvey Weinstein,” said
Brock, 43, who was represented by a Milanese modeling agency at the time. “So
why was it me?”
Weinstein, 65, is best
known for his pioneering career in the independent film
industry, but over the last
two decades he has also
carved out a significant
business in fashion — executive-producing the television show “Project Runway,”
[See Weinstein, A8]
Deadly clash
in Niger could
happen again
Greater U.S. military
presence in Africa
boosts risks to troops
confronting militants.
By Robyn Dixon
JOHANNESBURG,
South Africa — As America
increases its military footprint in some of Africa’s
most dangerous trouble
spots, confronting extremist
affiliates of Al Qaeda and Islamic State, the risk of intelligence failures and more
combat deaths is mounting.
U.S. special forces who
accompanied Niger’s military at a meeting of village
leaders in Tongo Tongo on
Oct. 4 were working in the
country’s treacherous west-
ern borderlands, a region of
shifting tribal allegiances,
opaque motives and ethnic
grudges going back decades,
all feeding into a growing jihadi problem.
Four Americans and five
Nigerien troops died after
leaving Tongo Tongo and
being ambushed and heavily
outgunned
by
fighters
armed
with
automatic
weapons and rocket-propelled grenades. The militants are believed to be from
a Malian-led militia, Islamic
State in the Greater Sahel,
which declared allegiance to
the overall militant organization in 2015.
One error appears to
have been downplaying the
danger. The Tillaberi and
Tahoua regions in western
Niger have been under a
[See Africa, A4]
New monuments
to Confederacy
rise as others fall
By Jenny Jarvie
R ONALD M ARTINEZ Getty Images
Astros beat
Yankees 4-0 in
Game 7 of ALCS
Houston will face the
Dodgers in the World
Series, which opens
Tuesday at Dodger
Stadium. SPORTS, D1
Spain moves to
curb Catalonia
Madrid invokes a constitutional clause for
the first time to oust a
regional leader and call
a new vote. WORLD, A3
Weather
Sunny and hot. L.A.
Basin: 94/69 B10
ORANGE, Texas — Annette Pernell, a council
member in this Texas town,
was aghast when she heard
about plans to construct a
Confederate memorial that
would be visible from the
interstate and loom over
Martin Luther King Jr.
Drive.
But there was nothing
she or anybody else could do
about it. The land is private.
And so the Confederate
Memorial of the Wind slowly
went up on a grassy halfacre. A total of 13 concrete
columns — one for each Confederate state — rise from a
circular concrete pedestal.
Eventually it will be surrounded by as many as 40
poles topped with Civil War
battle flags.
“It’s as if we’ve gone
backwards,” said Pernell,
who is 54 and black. “I didn’t
think, at this age, I would
see what I’m seeing now. A
Confederate memorial is a
slap in the face of all Americans, not just African Americans.”
More than 150 years after
Robert E. Lee’s surrender at
Appomattox, local officials
across the Deep South are
removing contentious Confederate monuments from
prominent perches in busy
town squares and government buildings. In August,
violence at a rally of white
nationalists seeking to preserve a statue of Lee in Charlottesville, Va. — and comments by President Trump
opposing its removal —
brought renewed national
attention to the issue.
Less publicized has been
the quiet rise of a new generation of Confederate markers — on private land, in
cemeteries, on historic
battlefields.
In South Carolina last
month, a granite monument
dedicated to the “immortal
spirit of the Confederate
cause” was unveiled on a
spot where Civil War enthu[See Confederate, A10]
Mel Melcon Los Angeles Times
IN LOS ANGELES, Tere Caicedo packs donated items destined for her native
Venezuela. She and a group of volunteers have sent about 8,000 pounds of aid.
Lifeline for Venezuelans
Expatriates in U.S. ship food and other aid home
By Andrea Castillo
While video chatting with
relatives in Venezuela, Tere
Caicedo watched as they
opened a package she had
sent them stuffed with
clothes, shoes and a large
bag of oatmeal.
The bag had ripped dur-
ing transport, spilling oatmeal all over. Caicedo, a
Santa Ana resident who
cleans houses for a living,
told her relatives not to
worry. She would send more.
But her uncle carefully
picked out the package’s
contents, flipped the box
over and dumped the oatmeal into a bowl.
“No,” he told her. “This is
food. We can’t just throw it
away.”
That moment in January
brought home to Caicedo,
the only member of her immediate family in the U.S.,
the pressing needs of a country spiraling out of control
amid skyrocketing food
[See Venezuela, A12]
A2
S U N DAY , O C T O B E R 22, 2 017
S
L AT I M E S . C O M
BACK STORY
The scenes after the crimes
Some mass shooting sites are transformed into memorials, but not all
Melissa Etehad
What should be done
with the sites of mass shootings?
For some grieving families, tearing down a building and replacing it with a
memorial feels right. In
other cases, people prefer
no special marker.
MGM Resorts announced Friday that it does
not plan to rent out room
No. 32135 at Mandalay Bay
Resort and Casino, the
perch from which Stephen
Paddock shot and killed 58
people and injured more
than 500. The company did
not say what it plans to do
with the suite.
Here is what’s been done
with other sites:
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Pulse nightclub,
Orlando, Fla.
In May, the owner of the
nightclub, which was known
as a safe space for the city’s
LGBTQ community until
Omar Mateen killed 49
people there June 12, 2016,
announced plans to turn the
shuttered club into a memorial.
The owner, Barbara
Poma, said she plans to
open a new Pulse in a different location.
Poma hopes the memorial, which will include a museum, will be a space where
survivors can grieve and
people can honor the dead.
McDonald’s,
San Ysidro, Calif.
Two months after Oliver
Huberty killed 21 people and
injured 15 on July 18, 1984,
the fast-food corporation
bulldozed the restaurant.
The company then donated the site to San Diego,
so city officials could decide
what to do with the land.
Today, a memorial to
honor the victims of the
massacre stands in its
place. On the anniversary of
the shooting, victims’
friends and families adorn
the site with flowers.
Virginia Tech,
Blacksburg, Va.
It took university administrators years to determine
what to do with all the buildings and rooms where Seung Hui Cho killed 27 students and five faculty members on April 16, 2007.
The building where most
of the deaths occurred —
Norris Hall — underwent
$800,000 in renovation and
was reopened in 2009, the
second anniversary of the
massacre. Faculty, worried
about further traumatizing
students, decided not to use
that space as classrooms.
The area is now a study
space with no visible indication of its history.
West Ambler Johnston
Hall, the dorm where the
John Raoux Associated Press
MOURNERS’ tributes decorate the Pulse nightclub in Orlando a month after the
2016 massacre. Plans call for the club to be transformed into a formal memorial.
teacher died was gutted and
completely remodeled.
The library, where most
of the killings occurred, was
replaced with an atrium.
The ceiling features a mural
of clouds and evergreen
trees that was painted by
Virginia Wright-Frierson.
In 2000, a new library
named HOPE Columbine
Memorial Library was dedicated to the victims.
Bild Exclusive/Polaris
THE OWNER of the Mandalay Bay hotel in Las
Vegas does not plan to rent out room No. 32135, where
an assailant staged his mass shooting Oct. 1.
first two students were
killed, was renovated, renamed “residential college”
and reopened in the fall of
2012.
School officials established a memorial for the
victims elsewhere on campus.
Sandy Hook Elementary
School, Newtown, Conn.
In 2013, school officials
decided to demolish the
building where Adam Lanza
killed 20 children and six
staff members on Dec. 14 the
previous year.
After much debate,
officials agreed to build a
new school on the same site.
Students in the meantime
were moved to a temporary
building nearby.
In 2016, the building was
finished. The new 86,000square-foot school cost $50
million and can accommodate 400 students in preschool through fourth
grade.
To ensure a calm, safe
and welcoming space, its
designers included impactresistant windows and
video cameras to monitor
the surroundings. Green
landscape and treehouses
also line the building to
resemble nature and a
serene landscape.
Absent on the site of the
new school: a memorial.
Columbine High School,
Littleton, Colo.
Extensive damage was
done to the school where
teenage gunmen Eric Harris
and Dylan Klebold killed 13
people and injured more
than 20 others before taking
their own lives on April 20,
1999.
Bullet holes pierced the
window frame of the athletics department, blood
stained the carpets on the
stairs, and hallways and
shrapnel penetrated the
ceiling.
The school underwent a
multimillion-dollar renovation the summer after the
massacre. Construction
workers repaired damaged
walls and ceilings and replaced the hallway floors
and stairs with new tiles.
The science room where one
Century 16 movie theater,
Aurora, Colo.
After the shooting on
July 20, 2012, in which James
Holmes killed 12 people and
injured 58, city officials
conducted an online survey
and found that a majority of
residents wanted the theater reopened.
But the decision was
controversial, as not everyone agreed.
A renovation soon began. A bigger screen was
brought into Theater 9, the
auditorium where the
shooting took place, and the
number of available seats
was reduced.
The theater was also
renamed Century Aurora 16.
The auditoriums are now
identified by letters instead
of numbers.
Six months after the
massacre, the theater held a
ceremony for victims and
their families as well as first
responders.
City officials and Gov.
John Hickenlooper delivered remarks. Afterward,
people gathered inside the
theater where the shooting
took place for a showing of
the movie “The Hobbit: An
Unexpected Journey.”
The theater reopened to
the general public about one
week later.
melissa.etehad
@latimes.com
A WORLD SERIES PREVIEW
29 YEARS IN THE MAKING
LA
DODGERS
SPECIAL SECTION
10.24.17
Last time the Dodgers went to the World Series, they won it all.
Will they do it again nearly three decades later? This Tuesday, The Times’
award-winning sports team looks at how the Dodgers got this far, the
challenges they face and how they match up with the opposition.
For all the latest World Series news, sign up for our free Dodgers email newsletter at
LATIMES.COM/DODGERSDUGOUT
L AT I M E S . C O M
S
S U N DAY, O C T O B E R 22, 2 017
A3
THE WORLD
Spain moves to curb Catalonia
Under a never-used
constitutional clause,
secessionist region’s
leaders will be ousted.
By Lauren Frayer
MADRID — Spanish
Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy announced plans Saturday to fire the Catalan
president and force fresh
elections in the separatistled region, invoking a constitutional clause never used in
the four decades since
Spain’s transition from dictatorship to democracy.
It was a drastic crackdown after a flurry of ultimatums, street protests and violence that followed a disputed independence referendum three weeks ago. The
unrest has prompted an exodus of banks and businesses
from Catalonia, threatening
the economic stability of
Spain’s wealthiest region.
Word that Spain would
invoke Article 155 of its constitution — suspending Catalonia’s regional powers —
sent thousands of protesters
into the streets of the Catalan capital, Barcelona, and
prompted a harsh rebuke
from soon-to-be-deposed
separatist leaders there.
“We cannot accept this
attack,” Catalan President
Carles Puigdemont said,
looking ashen in a televised
address late Saturday. “It is
incompatible with a democratic attitude and the rule
of law.”
Outside,
protesters
called the takeover a “coup”
and chanted, “Not one step
Sean Gallup Getty Images
“WE CANNOT ACCEPT this attack,” said Catalonia’s president as anxious supporters listened in Barcelona.
more!”
When Spaniards ratified
their constitution in 1978,
survival of the then-fledgling democracy was thought
to rest on the devolution of
powers to 17 autonomous regions, which run their own
health and education systems but rely on Madrid for
tax collection and other
services. The arrangement
reversed the centralized
power of the late dictator
Francisco Franco.
Rajoy sought to upend
that arrangement for the
first time Saturday in Catalonia, where the local language and culture were repressed under Franco.
Pending Senate approval
late this week, the Spanish
central government would
take over governance of the
wealthy northeastern region, replacing all government ministers and taking
control of the local police
force, known as the Mossos,
as well as the public broadcaster TV3, according to a
document drafted by Cabinet ministers, a copy of
which was obtained by The
Times.
“The government had to
enforce Article 155. It wasn’t
our desire, nor our intention.
It never was,” Rajoy told reporters in Madrid. “But in
this situation, no government of any democratic
country can accept that the
law is ignored.”
Moments after Rajoy’s
speech, people emerged
onto balconies across Barcelona, clanging pots and
pans together in a chorus of
dissent.
On Oct. 1, Catalan separatist leaders presided over
an independence referendum that Spanish courts
had ruled illegal.
About 90% of ballots cast
were for secession, but more
than half of Catalans did not
participate, and the polling
Shiite Afghans worship at own risk
‘Every attack is a
massacre,’ says a son
of one victim in latest
mosque bombing.
By Shashank Bengali
KABUL, Afghanistan —
Dozens of men gathered in a
dust-blown graveyard Saturday to pay their last respects to 83-year-old Karbalai Mohammad Anwar
Noori, one of at least 50 people killed in a suicide bombing the night before at a
nearby mosque in west
Kabul.
As Noori’s sons and
nephews fought back tears,
a tall, turbaned cleric stood
above the mound of freshly
turned dirt where the
shroud-wrapped body was
laid to rest. Speaking into a
microphone, he invoked the
words of Imam Jafar Sadiq,
the sixth imam in Shiite Islam.
“Those who worship
must be cautious and clever,” said the cleric, Abdulaziz Amiri. “It is not only up
to the security forces to protect us. We must be prepared
at all times and ready for any
possible attack.”
Threats are increasing
for Afghanistan’s Shiite
Muslim minority, the targets
of a spate of recent attacks
that have highlighted the
government’s inability to secure places of worship and
added a troubling sectarian
dimension to the country’s
long-running conflict.
In the first nine months
of this year, 84 Afghan Shiites were killed and 194
wounded in attacks against
mosques or religious gatherings, according to United
Nations figures.
Those numbers rose
sharply after Friday evening, when a suicide bomber
hurled a grenade at worshipers before blowing himself
up near the front of the
crowded Imam Zaman
mosque, which sits along a
busy road in a predominantly Shiite neighborhood.
Dozens were wounded, officials said.
As in many of the previous attacks — including two
at Shiite mosques in Kabul
over the summer — Islamic
State’s South Asia affiliate
claimed responsibility for
the bombing. The Sunni extremist group views Shiites
as apostates and accuses
Photographs by
Marcus Yam Los Angeles Times
MOURNERS lay to rest Karbalai Mohammad Anwar Noori, 83. He was one of at
least 50 people killed when a suicide bomber targeted Shiite worshipers in Kabul.
SHIRA AHMAD after his father’s burial. Threats
are increasing for Afghanistan’s Shiite Muslims.
Afghan Shiites, particularly
members of the Hazara ethnic group, of fighting against
the militants as part of progovernment militias in Syria.
The bombings have become so common that even
the
perpetrators
have
seemed to lose track of
them. On Friday, Islamic
State incorrectly said it had
attacked the Imam Zaman
mosque for the second time
— confusing it with a Kabul
mosque by the same name
that it had attacked in August, killing about 40 people.
At funerals across Kabul,
the Afghan capital, on Saturday, grieving Shiites said
they understood the threats
but would not cease observing their faith.
“Of course people are
worried and scared — every
attack is a massacre,” said
Noori’s son, Ali Khan Noori,
44.
But as mourners filed
away from the cemetery,
Noori pushed back gently
against the cleric’s admonition.
“My father is martyred —
I am not upset about that,”
he said. “But it is the government’s responsibility to provide security, not the people’s responsibility.”
Shiites, who make up less
than 20% of Afghanistan’s
population, were rarely singled out for attacks in the
decade after the U.S.-led invasion that toppled the Taliban, a Sunni fundamentalist
regime. But since 2011, the
annual Shiite religious festival of Ashura has been attacked almost every year, according to the Afghanistan
Analysts Network, a Kabulbased research organiza-
tion.
The
biggest
attack
against Shiites came in July
2016, when Islamic State
claimed responsibility for a
bombing at a Hazara-led
protest in Kabul that killed
more than 80 people,
wounded hundreds and
sparked a major grass-roots
protest movement demanding that President Ashraf
Ghani’s government do
more to secure religious
sites.
Last month, weeks before Ashura, the government recruited civilian
guards and distributed
weapons at hundreds of Shiite houses of worship, a controversial move in a country
that is awash in guns and
has often struggled to control private militias.
The limits of that policy
were clear at the Imam Zaman mosque, where five
guards armed with aging
automatic rifles did not detect the suicide bomber —
carrying multiple grenades
— as he entered through a
gate along a busy road,
walked across a small courtyard, up a flight of steps and
made his way toward the
front of the prayer hall.
Witnesses said the bomber waited until the moment
that the evening prayer began, when worshipers were
bowing to the floor, to launch
one grenade across the room
and detonate his suicide
vest.
Blood was splattered
across the walls and bits of
hair and flesh were stuck to
the ceiling. The walls were
pocked with holes, probably
from ball bearings that were
packed into the bomber’s
vest. The blood-soaked carpets were torn off the floors
and rolled up in the courtyard, attracting flies.
The blast threw Mohammad Daoud, a civilian guard
posted behind a set of sandbags at the entrance to the
prayer hall, off his chair and
into a concrete wall, though
he wasn’t injured. Daoud acknowledged that the addition of weapons from the
government had not kept
them safe, and that many
people still entered the
mosque without being thoroughly frisked.
“It is not respectful to
search people all the time
when they come to pray,” he
said. “If a terrorist makes it
all the way up the stairs,
what can we do? It’s difficult
to stop them.”
In a paper published last
month, the Afghanistan
Analysts Network warned
that armed, lightly trained
civilians would not be able to
stop a major attack against a
crowd of worshipers. But
government officials have indicated the civilian guards
would remain in place for the
time being.
“All in all, the plan looks
much more like a symbolic
act of reassuring the Shia
communities that the government is ‘doing something,’ rather than achieving
a real improvement [in] security,” the group wrote.
The mosque attack came
at the end of a week that saw
more than 200 Afghan civilians and security personnel
killed.
On Saturday evening, another suicide bomber struck
outside a military training
academy as army officers
were on their way home,
killing 15 people, according
to Defense Ministry officials.
The Taliban claimed responsibility for the attack.
Many Shiites responded
with resignation when asked
about the deteriorating security.
“We can’t stop praying,”
Daoud said. “We can’t close
the gates of the mosque and
stay home.
“If I were to be killed defending this place, it would
be an honor.”
shashank.bengali
@latimes.com
Twitter: @SBengali
was disrupted by Spanish
police.
Puigdemont
nevertheless claimed a mandate
for independence.
“I’m a Catalan and only
that — not Spanish. They
don’t represent me,” said
Ana Carnet, 63, a homemaker and pro-independence
protester in the Barcelona
crowd Saturday. “Now our
[Catalan regional] government has to do only one
thing: Declare independence. We are waiting for
that.”
A small far-left pro-independence party in Puigdemont’s ruling coalition has
called for an immediate unilateral declaration, and suggested the Catalan government could go into exile
across the border in Perpignan, France. Puigdemont
said Saturday that he would
ask the Catalan parliament
to convene and debate, in
the coming days, what he
called the “liquidation” of
Catalonia’s self-rule.
But they have less than a
week before the Spanish
Senate is expected to pass
Rajoy’s Article 155 measures, under which the Catalan parliament would be
barred from passing any
new laws without approval
first by Madrid.
Puigdemont said such
limitations were an “attempt to humiliate” Catalonia. Speaking in the Catalan language, he said Article
155 represents “the worst attack” on Catalonia’s democracy since the Franco era.
Then he switched into
English, which he rarely
speaks in public, and addressed Europeans.
“We are doing what we
are doing because we believe
in peaceful democratic values,” Puigdemont said.
“What we are fighting —
what you are fighting for — is
exactly the same thing.”
At a European Union
summit in Brussels last
week, EU officials reiterated
their long-held position that
Catalan separatism is an
internal Spanish matter.
They said the bloc would not
send mediators.
Rajoy said he was not revoking Catalonia’s autonomy, but rather “restoring
normality and coexistence.”
He appealed to companies to halt an exodus from
the region. Dozens of Catalan banks and other businesses have relocated to
other Spanish regions, or
have indicated they would
do so, if Catalonia breaks
away from Spain and thus
the EU.
Rajoy reminded Catalans that the whole country
has just emerged from a
punishing economic recession.
“Economic recuperation
today in Catalonia is in danger — in evident danger —
because of the capricious
and unilateral decisions of
[separatist leaders] there,”
Rajoy said.
With 7.5 million residents,
Catalonia is Spain’s economic engine, contributing
about a fifth of the country’s
total gross domestic product and more than a quarter
of its exports. Its economy is
larger than Portugal’s or
Finland’s.
Two of the three other
main parties in Spain’s national parliament, besides
Rajoy’s conservatives, have
said they support the prime
minister’s crackdown on
Catalan separatists. But the
far-left Podemos (“We Can”)
party said it is opposed to
Article 155 measures and
wants the Spanish government to allow Catalans to
vote legally on their future —
like the U.K. allowed in Scotland in 2014.
“The most corrupt party
in Europe has 8.5% of the
votes in Catalonia and will
now govern there,” tweeted
Podemos lawmaker Pablo
Echenique, referring to corruption scandals that have
dogged Rajoy’s conservatives, and the party’s share
of the vote in Catalonia. “A
terrible day for any democrat.”
In
northern
Spain’s
Basque region, which for
decades saw its own violent separatist uprising, a
spokesman for the Basque
Nationalist Party tweeted
that Rajoy’s “lax and abusive” use of Article 155 “sets a
dangerous precedent.”
Frayer is a special
correspondent.
A4
S U N DAY , OC T O B E R 22, 2 017
S
L AT I M E S . C O M
High-risk missions across Africa
[Africa, from A1]
state of emergency since
March, as Niger has confronted the Islamic State offshoot, led by Malian extremist Abu Walid Sahrawi. U.S.
forces have been present in
the region to advise and assist Nigerien forces.
“It was reported that
both Nigerien and U.S.
forces underestimated the
risks in the area, which was a
mistake, since multiple
deadly attacks were recorded in the past year against
Nigerien forces,” said Rida
Lyammouri, a Washingtonbased independent analyst
on violent extremism.
On Saturday, gunmen
riding pickup trucks and
motorcycles killed 13 Nigerien paramilitary police
officers and wounded several others in an attack on
their base in southwestern
Niger, not far from where the
U.S. advisors were killed.
The United Nations has
cataloged 46 attacks by extremists in western Niger
since February 2016, including one in February of this
year that killed 15 Nigerien
soldiers, and one a year ago
that killed 22 Nigerien forces
at a refugee camp.
As a U.S. military investigation in Niger seeks answers on what went wrong
and reevaluates procedures,
Niger’s interior minister,
Mohamed Bazoum, said intelligence failures were to
blame for the nine deaths.
He said Islamic State in the
Greater Sahel is more entrenched in local communities than are government
forces.
“For us here in Niger, we
believe it was especially human intelligence that was
lacking,”
Bazoum
told
French radio Thursday.
“This is an area where [extremists] were able to be
more present than us, to inspire fear, and they certainly
have elements who were
able to give them very precise information.”
The operation was “more
of an information mission
than anything else, and was
not very vigilant and did not
conduct a mission with the
view that it could have to
deal with such an attack,” he
said.
Adam Sandor, an analyst
on violent extremism in the
Sahel at the University of Ottawa, said the attack was
well planned, citing local
sources who said the extremists had visited the area
several times.
Jerome Delay Associated Press
SPECIAL FORCES from Nigeria and troops from Chad hold exercises with U.S. advisors in 2015 in Mao,
Chad. The U.S. has about 6,000 troops across Africa, including about 1,000 special operations forces.
“Essentially, the attackers are believed to have been
scoping out and planning
the attack and must have a
knowledge of local communities in the area. Local communities most likely shared
with them the information
regarding
the
Nigerien
Armed Forces operating
with foreigners or military
advisors in this space,” he
said.
“From the testimonies
that we have about the attack, it seems the U.S. trainers felt that the villagers in
Tongo Tongo were stalling,
which struck them as a little
bit odd. At that moment,
they should probably have
high-tailed it out of there.”
Leaders of Tongo Tongo
village have been arrested,
amid suspicions they were
delaying the departure of
the Nigerien and U.S. forces
to pave the way for the attackers.
America has 6,000 troops
in 50 countries across the
continent, according to the
Defense Department, although many of the missions
are charged with guarding
U.S.
embassies.
The
counter-terrorism deployments include an estimated
1,000 special operations
forces, many posted in highrisk locations such as Soma-
FOR THE RECORD
“Where’s the Money”: In
the review of the movie
“Where’s the Money” in the
Oct. 20 Calendar section,
writer Ted Sperling was
misidentified as Todd Sperling.
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questions about The Times’
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practices, you may contact
Deirdre Edgar, readers’
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lia, Mali and Nigeria. An estimated 800 troops are in Niger.
The U.S. also operates a
string of drone bases
throughout Africa, including one in Niger.
Despite the substantial
troop footprint, U.S. forces
operating in often-austere
environments do not have
robust support systems.
Gen. Thomas Waldhauser, commander of U.S.
Africa Command, documented to Congress in
March his forces’ lack of
needed resources on the
continent. Only about 20%
to 30% of requirements for
“intelligence, surveillance
and reconnaissance” flights
are being met, he said, and
there are insufficient military helicopters to help locate missing, wounded or
slain service members.
Alex Thurston, Sahel analyst and author of a book on
the Nigeria-based militant
group Boko Haram, said
America’s footprint in Africa
began
expanding
with
George W. Bush’s presidency and the Sept. 11, 2001,
terrorist attacks.
“One big factor is the assumption that took hold after 9/11 that any ungoverned
space was a potential Afghanistan and any small
group was a potential Al
Qaeda and everything had
to be nipped in the bud very
early. That assumption
draws them further and further in, so they feel they have
to have some kind of presence wherever there’s a jihadist group,” Thurston
said.
“The U.S. sometimes
doubts the capacity of African governments to deal
with these problems, sometimes rightly, sometimes
wrongly,” he said.
Analyst Laura Seay, a po-
500 MILES
Mediterranean Sea
Tongo Tongo
MAURITANIA
MALI
NIGER
Red
Sea
CHAD
NIGERIA
SOMALIA
IVORY BURKINA
COAST FASO
Indian Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
Sources: Mapzen, OpenStreetMap
litical scientist from Colby
College in Maine, said the
mission in Niger had been
operating in difficult conditions and terrain. “Members
of Congress have chosen or
been led to believe that ‘advise and assist’ missions like
the one in Niger are low-risk.
They aren’t, and these types
of missions, where we have
large numbers of American
forces on the ground but
technically not at war in
places most Americans
can’t locate on a map, are increasingly common and, in
some cases, increasingly
dangerous,” she said in a series of tweets.
“Sadly, it was almost inevitable that something like
this would happen somewhere, and it’s likely to happen again,” she said.
In Somalia, Navy SEAL
Kyle Milliken, 38, was killed
in May accompanying Somali forces approaching a
compound occupied by the
Shabab, a terrorist group
P a u l D u g i n ski Los Angeles Times
linked to Al Qaeda. The
group, which has proved
nimble and adaptable in
years of hardened battle
against a United Nationsbacked African force, AMISOM, and Somali armed
forces, threatens to retake
territory with the planned
withdrawal of AMISOM
forces beginning later this
year.
Milliken’s death was the
first U.S. combat death in
Africa since 1993, when two
Black Hawk helicopters
were shot down in Somalia
and 18 U.S. soldiers were
killed.
The Shabab is the deadliest of Africa’s terrorist
groups and is believed to be
responsible for Somalia’s
worst terrorist attack: At
least 358 people were killed
Oct. 14, and 56 are still missing. The attack came weeks
after a U.S. drone strike
killed 10 civilians, including
three children, in Bariire,
west of Mogadishu.
The U.S. has carried out
at least 60 drone strikes in
Somalia since January,
according to the Bureau of
Investigative Journalism,
killing up to 510 people, including at least 38 civilians.
The Shabab has killed
2,745 people in 2017, carrying
out 987 of the continent’s
1,827 incidents of violent extremism in the first nine
months
of
the
year,
according to the analytical
group African Center for
Strategic Studies.
The U.S. has about 400
troops in Somalia and
stepped up its military involvement after President
Trump widened the powers
of American troops to take
offensive action this year.
The Shabab also has a
presence in Kenya, where it
launches regular attacks, including the 2013 Westgate
shopping mall massacre
that killed at least 67 people,
and the 2015 Garissa University College attack, where
147 people — mainly university students — were
killed. The terrorist group is
believed to have a presence
across East Africa.
Boko Haram, operating
in Nigeria, Cameroon, Chad
and southeastern Niger, was
responsible for 2,232 deaths
in the first nine months of
the year, according to the
Bureau of Investigative
Journalism.
In Mali, myriad armed
extremists operate, including Islamic State in the
Greater Sahel and its rival
the Group for the Support of
Islam and Muslims, formed
in March from several Al
Qaeda-linked
extremist
groups, including Al Qaeda
in the Islamic Maghreb. In
2012, Islamist militias took
over half of the country before the French military
drove them out of major cities.
The militias range freely
across rural areas, crossing
borders at will, launching
operations in Mauritania,
Ivory Coast and Burkina
Faso, including attacks on
hotels and resorts popular
with foreigners. The U.S.
Embassy in Dakar, Senegal,
on Friday warned of a credible threat of a terrorist attack in the city.
In the Democratic Republic of Congo, where myriad rebel groups vie for control over mineral resources,
a new organization emerged
recently declaring fealty to
Islamic State.
By comparison, Niger is
one of the more stable countries in the region, making it
the U.S. choice for a drone
base being built outside
Agadez, in central Niger,
that will launch strikes
across the region.
The Tongo Tongo attack
has focused attention on Sahel leader Sahrawi, who was
a spokesman for one of the
extremist groups that conquered the northern Malian
town of Gao in the 2012 fighting. He has a history of swapping sides and financing his
[See Africa, A5]
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S
L AT I M E S . C O M
S U N DAY , O C T O B E R 22, 2 017
A5
Soldier slain
in Niger is
laid to rest
The death of Sgt.
La David Johnson has
been at the center
of a political furor.
associated press
COOPER CITY, Fla. —
Mourners remembered not
only a U.S. soldier whose
combat death in Africa led to
a political fight between
President Trump and a Florida congresswoman, but
also his three comrades who
died with him.
Some of the 1,200 mourners exiting the church after
Saturday’s service for Sgt.
La David Johnson, 25, said a
portrait of Johnson was
joined onstage by photographs of Staff Sgts. Bryan
C. Black, 35, of Puyallup,
Wash.; Jeremiah W. Johnson, 39, of Springboro, Ohio;
and Dustin M. Wright, 29, of
Lyons, Ga. The four died
Oct. 4 in Niger when they
were attacked by militants
linked to Islamic State.
Johnson’s family asked reporters to remain outside for
the service.
“We have to remember
that one thing — that it
wasn’t just one soldier who
lost his life,” said Berchel
Davis, a retired police officer
who has six children in the
military. He said the minister who conducted the
service and Rep. Frederica
Wilson both made that a
part of their message. “That
was a good gesture on everyone’s part.”
He and others said the
fight between Trump and
Wilson was never mentioned
during the service.
Johnson’s pregnant widow, Myeshia, held the arm of
an Army officer as she led
her two young children and
other family members, all
dressed in white, into the
Christ the Rock Community
Church in suburban Fort
Lauderdale for her husband’s funeral. The modern
hymn “I’m Yours” could be
heard coming from inside.
Johnson’s sister, Angela
Ghent, said after the service
that it didn’t “feel real” that
her brother was killed.
“It hasn’t hit me yet. I
haven’t had time to grieve,”
said Ghent, who last spoke
to her brother a few weeks
before he died. She said she
was glad mourners got to
hear about Johnson’s love
for bicycles and cars, not just
his military service.
The public squabble between Trump and Wilson
had taken the focus off Johnson, whose widow is due to
have a daughter in January.
The couple, who were high
school sweethearts, already
had a 6-year-old daughter,
Ah’Leeysa, and 2-year-old
son, La David Jr. An online
fundraiser has raised more
than $600,000 to pay for the
children’s education.
Johnson’s mother died
when he was 5, and he was
raised by his aunt. His family
enrolled him in 5,000 Role
Models, a project Wilson began in 1993 when she was an
educator that pairs African
American boys with mentors who prepare them for
college, vocational school or
the military.
“We teach them to be a
good man, a good husband
and a good father. Sgt. Johnson typified all of those characteristics,” said mourner
Carlton Crawl, a public
school consultant who is one
of the program’s mentors.
In 2013, a year before he
enlisted, Johnson was featured in a local TV newscast
for his ability to do bicycle
tricks, earning the nickname
“Wheelie King.” He said he
learned his tricks by going
slow.
“Once you feel comfortable, you could just ride all
day,” he told the interviewer.
The war of words between the president and Wilson began Tuesday when
the Miami-area Democrat
said Trump told Myeshia
Johnson in a phone call that
her husband “knew what he
signed up for” and that the
president didn’t appear to
know his name, details later
backed up by Johnson’s
aunt. Wilson was riding with
Johnson’s family to meet the
body and heard the call.
Targeting jihadi
groups in Africa
[Africa, from A4]
operations through kidnappings.
He has recruited fighters
from among the Fulani nomads in western Niger, exploiting ethnic rivalries with
the Daoussahak people in
the region, some of whom
have formed a militia called
the National Movement for
the Liberation of Azawad.
Both Niger and France have
used the group as a proxy
force to fight Islamic State in
the Great Sahel, deepening
ethnic animosities.
“Abu Walid is a mover and
a shaker. This is someone
who has been reportedly
amping up attacks in the
Mali-Niger borderlands, in
part in order to demonstrate
his fealty and capacities to
support the IS,” said Sandor, the University of Ottawa
analyst, referring to Islamic
State. “Abu Walid has the required local contacts and a
background in kidnapping
for ransom. It’s probably one
of the main mechanisms of
his group’s financing.”
Sahrawi has held several
foreign hostages and could
be living off the multimilliondollar proceeds, he said.
It is not known which Malian extremist group is holding American aid worker Jeffery Woodke, who was kidnapped in Niger a year ago
and is believed to have been
taken to Mali.
The Sahel offshoot’s links
to Islamic State do not appear to be close, and the
group is a nimble, fast-moving organization, not set on
holding territory. Analysts
said it was not yet certain
the Tongo Tongo attack was
carried out by the terrorist
group.
“Even if an IS unit is behind it, the branch is not as
strong and powerful as
many assume they are,” said
Lyammouri, the independent analyst. “Militants in the
area are made of small
mobile units and constantly
changing locations.”
When U.S. and Western
forces intervene in Africa, jihadi movements seek to discredit them as corrupt outsiders interested in exploiting local people or backing
despised regimes. Their
task is made easier when
drone strikes kill civilians or
when local security forces
routinely ignore legal norms
and harass, arrest or kill
people.
The arrest of Tongo
Tongo village leaders, Sandor said, could exacerbate
tensions, “particularly if
there are any accusations of
abuse by the Nigerien military or the gendarmerie [police] of the people who are interrogated.”
Thurston warned that
scaled-up military action in
Africa could become a lightning rod and potentially a
trigger for recruitment.
“I think it makes ordinary
people nervous and confused. If people start to see
that as neocolonialism or an
infringement on their rights,
it might encourage them to
join some of these jihadist
movements,” he said.
Despite the horror in the
U.S. over the deaths of the
four American servicemen,
analysts see the U.S. as unlikely to wind back military
operations.
“The U.S. most likely will
not draw back because of
this incident. U.S. engagement and support to Niger
has been going on for
many years. Niger is important to the U.S. because of
the ongoing fight against
Boko Haram,” Lyammouri
said.
“Niger is also strategic to
fight all sorts of trafficking in
the region, so the U.S. and
other Western allies cannot
afford to see Niger being destabilized.”
robyn.dixon@latimes.com
Gaston de Cardenas AFP/Getty Images
MYESHIA JOHNSON , the widow whose condolence call from President Trump grew into a political fire-
storm, kisses her husband’s casket at his funeral in Hollywood, Fla. Three other soldiers died with him Oct. 4.
A6
S U N DAY, O C T O B E R 22, 2 017
S
L AT I M E S . C O M
THE NATION
Foraging for food, water and hope
day night to advance to the
World Series, says his
mother and other family
members in Puerto Rico
watched the game on a television powered by a generator.
Hernandez, who had
written “Pray 4 PR” on his
cap, and his fiancee set up an
online fundraising platform
that as of Friday had surpassed its goal of $100,000.
Enrique Batlle, who runs
a hot dog shop in Mayaguez,
says he’s an avid sports fan
and would have watched the
game if not for the lack of
electricity. He found out later how well Hernandez had
done.
“It’s tremendous,” Batlle
said. “Puerto Rico needs
good news with everything
that has happened after the
hurricane.”
Officials say the water
supply reaching about twothirds of the homes on the island is now considered safe
to drink, but they acknowledge that damage to the
main laboratories responsible for measuring water
quality has made it difficult
to conduct rigorous testing.
The Environmental Protection Agency has urged
residents to boil water before drinking it. Among the
warnings from government
officials was that people
should not take water from
natural streams because fluid from sewers was leaking
into some rivers.
The lake where Cotto and
Gonzalez were fishing is not
far from the La Plata River,
which officials say has been
contaminated by sewage
runoff.
The friends say they hope
for the best.
“I don’t think it is contaminated, because we have
eaten fish from it before,”
Gonzalez said.
Basics of living remain
elusive as Hurricane
Maria’s devastation
lingers in Puerto Rico.
By Milton
Carrero Galarza
MAYAGUEZ,
Puerto
Rico — Joel Cotto and Jesus
Gonzalez picked up their
fishing nets after a full day at
a lake in Cidra, Puerto Rico,
feeling good about their
bucket full of shrimp and
fish known as chopas.
The friends say they became fishermen after Hurricane Maria devastated the
island Sept. 20 because food
for their families had become so scarce.
Cotto, 50, says the hurricane ripped the roof off his
home in Aguas Buenas, a
municipality in the island’s
central region, and damaged virtually everything, including the refrigerator.
“The roof, the house —
everything
is
stripped
away,” Cotto said. “We have
to fish for what we are going
to eat today.”
Like Cotto and Gonzalez,
57, many Puerto Ricans are
making substantial adjustments to their lives based on
hurricane-related
devastation to the U.S. territory.
Despite some aid reaching
residents in the last four
weeks, many people have
had to find new ways to at
least temporarily feed their
families, filter water and
care for the young, elderly
and sick.
Food, water, medicine,
electricity and shelter all
remain desperately scarce.
The hurricane wiped out
thousands of homes, decimated crops and cut power
and phone lines, making
it difficult for most of
Puerto Rico’s 3.4 million
residents to communicate
Milton Carrero Galarza For The Times
“WE HAVE TO fish for what we are going to eat today,” says Joel Cotto, left, with friend Jesus Gonzalez. The
men have turned to fishing despite officials’ warnings that natural streams may be contaminated by sewage.
with family or aid services.
Some roads in mountainous regions contort and contract with mudslides that
expose precipices on both
sides. In some cases, collapsed bridges have left people isolated in communities
that already were off the
beaten path.
The number of deaths associated with the hurricane
rose to at least 49, Puerto
Rico Gov. Ricardo Rossello
said Friday, and that number was expected to go up
again.
Officials say dozens of
people were still missing.
Rossello was in Washington on Thursday trying to
secure more aid for the island, whose residents are
U.S. citizens at birth; he met
with President Trump,
whose administration has
been criticized for its response to the devastation.
Despite help from the
Federal Emergency Management Agency and other
agencies as well as private
fundraising and aid efforts,
many Puerto Rico residents
remain in trouble. Thousands have left the island to
be with or near relatives on
the mainland.
Magdanell Quiñones, a
teacher at the Luis Muñoz
Rivera school in the Rio
Piedras section of San Juan,
the capital, says the island is
in crisis despite a tendency
for many people to put on a
brave face.
“For everybody who
hears we are OK, that means
we are alive. But there has
not been a day when I have
not come home crying because I am thinking of a
NOW HIRING
THE THRILL
BEGINS WITH YOU
mother who came to me saying that ‘we have no food,’”
she said.
Quiñones says she feels
hopeful when she sees members of her community working to rebuild neighborhoods with their own hands.
She has a child with special
needs who has taken to
working in their vegetable
garden, which they replanted days after the storm
hit.
Marinilda Rivera Diaz, a
social worker in Rio Piedras,
is part of an interdisciplinary team of professionals
working at one of the “Stop
and Go” centers, part of a
government initiative to
provide food, medical care
and help filling out paperwork for federal aid.
“I am worried about the
people who have bedridden
family members living in
their homes who depend on
a respirator,” she said. “Can
you imagine what it is like to
need to breathe and not
have oxygen?”
Among those recently at
the Jose Celso Barbosa
school where Rivera Diaz is
working was Roberto Bonilla, who sought physical
and emotional care. He was
grateful for the warm plate
of food he received.
“I am 60 years old, and I
need food,” he said, kissing
the plate.
Many island residents remain without electricity,
with some of the more fortunate resorting to generators
for power.
Dodgers player Enrique
Hernandez, who hit three
home runs as his team beat
the Chicago Cubs on Thurs-
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S U N DAY , O C T O B E R 22, 2 017
S
L AT I M E S . C O M
How Weinstein reached models
[Weinstein, from A1]
investing in the clothing
brand Halston, and backing
the high-end womenswear
company Marchesa, which
was co-founded by his wife,
former model Georgina
Chapman. The foray generated a profitable TV franchise, lucrative partnerships and cachet among the
global jet set.
But that success was only
one of the benefits for Weinstein. In interviews with the
Los Angeles Times, nearly a
dozen people with ties to the
industry — including models, casting directors, publicists and executives connected to “Project Runway”
— said that he used fashion
as a pipeline to women. They
said that models, oftentimes
young and working overseas
far from home, were particularly vulnerable.
In addition to Brock,
more than 10 other former or
current fashion models — including Cara Delevingne
and Angie Everhart — have
accused Weinstein of a wide
range of sexual misconduct.
In a previously unreported incident, former Brazilian
model
Juliana
De Paula told The Times
that Weinstein groped her
and forced her to kiss other
models that he had taken to
his loft in New York a decade
ago. When she tried to leave,
she said, he chased her
through the apartment, naked. She fended him off with
a broken glass.
“He looked at me and he
started to laugh,” she recalled. “I was shocked. I was
completely in disbelief.”
Another model, Samantha Panagrosso, said Weinstein made unwanted sexual
advances toward her during
the Cannes Film Festival in
2003. When Weinstein began
touching her legs under the
water at a hotel pool and she
rebuffed him, he pointed at
another model, she recalled
in an interview with The
Times. “Look at her, I’m going to have her come to my
room for a screen test,” she
said Weinstein told her.
When Panagrosso told
friends about his continuing
advances, she said, they
laughed it off: “Sam, don’t be
so naïve, you know Harvey
can make you a star.”
Since the New York
Times and the New Yorker
first wrote about Weinstein’s
alleged assaults earlier this
month, more than 50 women
have come forward to describe their experiences, and
he has been fired by Weinstein Co., the indie studio he
co-founded in 2005 that has
released films including
“The King’s Speech.”
Six women have accused
Weinstein of rape or forcible
sex acts, and he is under investigation for sexual assault in Los Angeles, New
York and London.
Weinstein has entered
counseling and apologized
for some of his behavior. But,
through his spokeswoman
Sallie Hofmeister, Weinstein
has “unequivocally denied”
any allegations of nonconsensual sex. As for the accounts of Brock and Panagrosso, Hofmeister said,
“Their recollection of events
differs from that of Mr. Weinstein.”
Loic Venance Getty Images
GEORGINA CHAPMAN and her husband, Harvey Weinstein, arrive at the Cannes Film Festival in 2016.
Frank Micelotta Archive Getty Images
AN AUSTRALIAN fashion model met Weinstein over a dinner at the Majestic Hotel in Cannes in 1998.
A mogul becomes
a fashion fixture
Weinstein’s transformation into a fashion player
was an unlikely turn for a
movie producer at the zenith
of his career.
By 2000, films released by
Weinstein’s company, Miramax, had collected dozens of
Oscars, including best picture awards for “The English
Patient” and “Shakespeare
in Love.” Weinstein had garnered a reputation for his
bullying tactics and aggressive Academy Awards campaigns in pursuit of the gold
statuette that burnished his
reputation as a kingpin of
prestige films.
He was also among a
growing wave of major movie
producers to expand into
television. His “Project
Greenlight”
documented
the travails of would-be filmmakers and made a splash
when it launched on HBO in
2001.
Also around this time,
the fashion world was being
buffeted by change. Glossy
magazines, such as Vogue
and Elle, were putting A-list
Hollywood actresses on
their covers because they
helped sell more copies than
lesser-known fashion models. For high-end magazine
publishers — and for models
aspiring to break into Hollywood — Weinstein had the
right connections.
And he thrived on being
at the nexus of culture.
“For these powerful peo-
D Dipasupil FilmMagic
WEINSTEIN , who built the right connections, attends a “Project Runway” fashion show in New York in 2012.
ple, the most seductive currency is the one they do not
own,” said a current business associate of Weinstein.
“He used his Hollywood connections, which reflected
well in fashion and in television — and even politics.”
It wasn’t long before the
former fashion novice was
just as much a fixture at New
York Fashion Week as he was
on the red carpet of Hollywood movie premieres.
Interviews with six people connected with Weinstein’s cable television show
“Project Runway” help shed
light on his fascination with
fashion. These individuals
declined to be identified,
partly because of ongoing
business ties to the Weinstein Co.
They said the success of
“Project Greenlight” had increased Weinstein’s appetite
for television — and what he
wanted more than anything
was a program that featured
fashion models.
Weinstein’s spokeswoman said that “Project Runway” was developed as a replacement for “Project
Greenlight,” which was ending its run — and not as a vehicle to meet women. He
simply thought it was a good
idea for a television show,
Hofmeister said.
In the foreword of the 2012
book “Project Runway,” Weinstein wrote that he has “always been intrigued and inspired by the creative process.”
“I have learned along the
way that talent can come
from anywhere,” he wrote.
In the early 2000s, Weinstein introduced his Miramax executives to a German
fashion model, Daniela Unruh, who was in her early 20s
at the time, saying she had
an idea for a reality show.
Unruh pitched a program
called “Model Apartment,”
which would follow a group
of models living together.
Executives were skeptical that such a show would
be compelling, but optioned
Unruh’s idea for a token
amount — about $8,000, according to one former Miramax employee. Unruh receives modest royalties from
“Project Runway.”
Her concept was retooled
to focus on fashion designers
competing for their big
break. Development of the
show gained traction when
supermodel Heidi Klum
signed on, but the process
was slow — and Weinstein
was growing impatient.
“He kept asking: ‘Where’s
my model show?’” recalled a
former
employee.
“He
wouldn’t drop it.”
Fearful of Weinstein’s reaction — because the show
featured designers with
sewing machines and not
models — the producers figured they needed to amp up
the participation of beautiful women. The producers
concocted an awkward competition within the show
that allowed designers to
pick the model they found
most appealing, which resulted in aspiring models,
occasionally in tears, being
dismissed.
“That was designed as a
vestigial element for Harvey,” the television executive
said.
“Project
Runway”
launched in 2004, and over
the course of its 16-season
run, more than 200 models
have appeared, according to
the Internet Movie Database. The hit program grew
into one of Weinstein’s most
lucrative franchises. He leveraged its popularity to land
a huge $150-million, five-year
deal in 2008 with Lifetime,
where he moved the show
from Bravo.
And he eventually got his
model-themed reality show
on Lifetime: “Models of the
Runway,” which lasted just
two seasons.
But after dozens of wom-
en came forward this month
to discuss Weinstein’s alleged misconduct, his name
was quickly stripped from
the credits of “Project Runway.”
Weinstein’s ties
to fashion deepen
The same year that “Project Runway” debuted, Weinstein met his future wife.
Weinstein encountered
Chapman, a British model
and costume designer, at a
party in New York in 2004,
not long after he split from
his first wife, Eve Chilton
Weinstein, according to various published reports. Weinstein was in his early 50s and
Chapman in her late 20s
when they began dating.
That year she also cofounded the Marchesa fashion brand with Keren Craig,
her longtime friend and
classmate at Chelsea College of Art and Design. Weinstein worked behind the
scenes to help them launch
their label — again expanding his reach deeper into the
fashion world.
Vogue was soon featuring
the New York-based company’s clothes in its pages.
Weinstein also asked actresses to wear Marchesa
gowns to big award shows
and events.
Within months, Renee
Zellweger, fresh off winning a
supporting-actress Oscar
for
“Cold
Mountain,”
strolled the red carpet in a
strapless Marchesa dress at
the London premiere of the
Miramax-distributed
“Bridget Jones: The Edge of
Reason.” A procession of
Weinstein-connected stars
soon followed, among them
Cate Blanchett, Scarlett Johansson and Felicity Huffman.
Marchesa’s meteoric rise
raised eyebrows — and questions about what accounted
for it.
“Marchesa’s
breathtaking success has the fashion world talking — and
rolling its eyes too. Just how
much of that success, observers wonder, is due to the
Harvey Factor?” a Los Angeles Times article asked in
2006, a year before Weinstein
and Chapman wed.
Competitors complained
that stars wore Marchesa on
the red carpet because they
— and their agents, managers and lawyers — needed
to please the powerful Weinstein.
“Now we have Harvey
Weinstein married to the designer, who is able to put her
dresses on … anybody in
Hollywood,”
said
Julia
Samersova, a former modeling agent who works as a
casting director in New York.
“Yes, it is really that simple.
Who is going to say no to the
wife of Harvey Weinstein?”
Last week, amid the rapidly unfolding sex scandal,
the actress Huffman confirmed, via her publicist,
that Weinstein did demand
that she wear Marchesa
gowns at public appearances. But the publicist denied reports that he had
threatened to withhold
funding from her 2005 movie
“Transamerica.”
Chapman, in an interview for the 2006 Times
story, laughed off any suggestion that Weinstein was
Marchesa’s guiding force. “If
anybody looks at how Harvey dresses, they realize he
doesn’t have terribly much
to do with designing,” she
said.
Neither Chapman nor
Craig responded to requests
for comment.
In 2007, Weinstein expanded his fashion holdings:
Weinstein Co. and Hilco
Consumer Capital bought
Halston, the once-venerable
American fashion house
that had fallen on hard
times. Weinstein became a
member of the company’s
board, and Jimmy Choo cofounder Tamara Mellon and
actress
Sarah
Jessica
Parker also got involved in
the revival effort. But Halston soon foundered, and
Weinstein departed the venture in 2011.
Some in the business, like
Fern Mallis, the former executive director of the Council of Fashion Designers of
America, have now sought to
downplay Weinstein’s role in
the industry — while also expressing support for Marchesa’s founders.
“I’m appalled like everyone else about his behavior
and support all the brave
women speaking out,” Mallis
said. “He was not an ‘influence’ in the fashion industry,
and I feel very bad for Georgina and Keren, who are very
talented designers and built
a terrific business with
Marchesa.”
Other industry power
players with ties to Weinstein have also denounced
him, including Vogue editor
Anna Wintour, and designer
Tom Ford, whose 2009 film
“A Single Man” was distributed by Weinstein Co.
Chapman, 41, announced
this month that she was
leaving Weinstein and would
focus on caring for their two
children.
A pipeline to models
carefully crafted
While the fashion industry proved lucrative for
Weinstein and burnished his
reputation as a tastemaker,
it also filled his world with
even more young, beautiful
women.
Several women who have
publicly accused Weinstein
of misconduct described incidents in which he used his
fashion business ties and
ownership of “Project Runway” as enticements or pretexts for meetings.
Former aspiring actress
Lucia Evans told the New
Yorker that Weinstein said
during a meeting that she’d
“be great in ‘Project Runway’ ” before allegedly forcing her to perform oral sex.
Model Ambra Battilana
Gutierrez’s 2015 meeting
[See Weinstein, A9]
L AT I M E S . C O M
[Weinstein, from A8]
with Weinstein began with
discussions of her working
as a lingerie model before he
allegedly
grabbed
her
breasts and put his hand up
her skirt, according to the
New York Times.
In an interview with the
Los Angeles Times, a television actress claimed that
when she rebuffed Weinstein’s advances about a
decade ago — saying that
she had nothing suitable to
wear to events he wanted to
take her to, including the
Cannes Film Festival — he
would tell her that he could
deliver 10 Marchesa dresses.
Separately, a former
British model said that
when Weinstein was pursuing her about a decade ago in
London, he persuaded her to
switch modeling agencies to
a higher-profile one where
he had connections. She also
said he suggested he could
help her launch an acting career. “The whole thing was a
control thing,” said the
woman, who spoke on the
condition of anonymity over
concerns about repercussions from discussing the
matter.
This sort of behavior is
not new to the fashion and
entertainment industries,
which are plagued by a culture of exploitation, said Victoria Keon-Cohen, a model
who spearheaded a unionizing effort a decade ago in
London and is now a filmmaker.
“There’s a very dominant
feeling of favors for work,”
she said, adding that this is
especially the case in fashion, where “very vulnerable
young girls and boys are trying to advance their careers.”
An encounter at the
Cannes festival
Brock, the fashion model
from Australia, traveled to
Cannes in 1998 at the invitation of her Italian agent.
Fresh off of working Paris
Fashion Week, Brock, then
24, was eager to network.
Over dinner at the Majestic Hotel, Brock said, she
and Weinstein had “a really
good conversation,” chatting about a mutual friend —
a female director whose film
Miramax had recently distributed. “It felt like Harvey
was family,” she said.
Eventually, some in the
dinner group made their
way to the Hotel du Cap
S
S U N DAY, O C T O B E R 22 , 2 017
A9
told her then-roommate
about the alleged episode
with Weinstein. The roommate told The Times that he
remembered the conversation, recalling a “distressed”
De Paula describing the
events at Weinstein’s loft.
“Mr. Weinstein says the
story is a fabrication,” said
Hofmeister,
Weinstein’s
spokeswoman.
A few months after the alleged incident, De Paula
went to a Dec. 5 concert at
Cipriani Wall Street where
Aretha Franklin performed.
Weinstein’s attendance was
noted in a news release recapping the event.
“He came up to me, super
nice — it seemed like it was
somebody else,” said De
Paula, who now lives in
Brazil. “I didn’t have the
courage to look at him. I
looked down.” Weinstein
asked for her phone number.
She declined.
Fashion poised
to look inward
Jemal Countess Getty Images for Conde Nast
ANNA WINTOUR , the editor of Vogue magazine, with Weinstein at an industry event at the Lincoln Center
in New York in 2010. Wintour and other industry power players with ties to Weinstein have denounced him.
Eden-Roc, a luxury property
30 minutes away where Weinstein had a suite. Brock
said she soon found herself
alone in the room with Weinstein.
Before long, Weinstein
was naked and pleading
with her for a massage,
Brock said. When she declined, Brock said, he asked
to give her one. “I relented
and let him touch my back
and shoulders,” she said.
“But I couldn’t handle his
hands on me, so I bolted out
of there, and bolted into the
bathroom and locked the
door.”
She still had to ride back
to Cannes with Weinstein.
On the way, an apologetic
Weinstein offered to make
Brock “a star” and be her
“Rock of Gibraltar,” she
said.
That night, she called her
mother and actor Rufus
Sewell, who stars on Amazon Studios’ “The Man in the
High Castle,” to tell them
what had occurred. Both
confirmed speaking that
night to Brock and hearing
her account.
When she finally made
her way back to the yacht
where she was staying
around 5:30 a.m., she said,
she felt — and looked — like
“a whore.”
“I was wearing yesterday’s dress, with yesterday’s
makeup, and messed hair,”
she said. “Having to crawl
back into the boat looking
like that made me look like
the sort of person who would
have slept with Harvey Weinstein to further my career.
And I am not that person.”
‘This is not going
to be fun at all’
Nearly a decade later and
halfway around the world,
another former model experienced an upsetting encounter with Weinstein.
One night in 2007, De
Paula and some model
friends were introduced to
Weinstein during a karaoke
party at the lounge above
Cipriani Downtown, a buzzy
Italian restaurant in Manhattan.
Soon, a plan was hatched
to go to Weinstein’s loft in
Soho, said De Paula, who
previously modeled in Brazil
and has since had other jobs
in fashion, including as a
manager of a photography
studio in New York.
Once
Weinstein,
De
Paula and three models
were inside the elevator, he
began fondling the women’s
breasts and making them
kiss each other, De Paula
said. “Forcing. Like putting
both heads together,” she
said.
She said the women tried
to resist, but were “embarrassed” and unsure of how to
fend him off. The elevator
opened inside Weinstein’s
residence, and he began disrobing. “My [alarm] bells
rang,” she said. “It was, oh
my gosh, this is not going to
be fun at all.”
De Paula said that Weinstein ushered the three models into his bedroom, but she
ran into the adjoining bathroom. She heard at least one
woman yell “stop” multiple
times, but didn’t have a clear
view of the bedroom.
After a while, De Paula
said, she fled the bathroom,
ran through the bedroom
and into the kitchen. A nude
Weinstein
followed
her
there, she said.
“He was moving toward
me. I got scared, and I was
afraid,” De Paula said.
She reached for a wine
glass, broke it, brandished it,
and gave Weinstein an ultimatum: “You let me out of
here right now, or this is going to have serious consequences.”
She
said
Weinstein,
laughing, asked, “Are you serious?” before allowing her
to depart.
The next day, De Paula
As with Hollywood, the
Weinstein
scandal
has
prompted the fashion industry to ponder how women
are treated and whether it is
doing enough to protect vulnerable participants.
Several people interviewed for this article acknowledged that Weinstein
had, for years, a poor reputation in the fashion business,
but little if anything was ever
done to spotlight this. Some
are hoping for big changes.
On Tuesday, the Model Alliance, a nonprofit trade
group, issued a statement
saying, “No person should
tolerate any sort of unwanted or inappropriate
conduct, nor should our industry.”
Brock said that she
hopes her personal story
about Weinstein might help
spur change in the business.
“I hope that from this moment on, young girls, from
every country, start to value
themselves as more than the
objects the industry has always treated them as,” she
said.
daniel.miller@latimes.com
Twitter: @DanielNMiller
meg.james@latimes.com
Twitter: @MegJamesLAT
kim.christensen
@latimes.com
Twitter: @kchristensenLAT
Times staff writer Victoria
Kim contributed to this
report.
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18009-10/17
A10
S U N DAY , O C T O B E R 22, 2 017
S
L AT I M E S . C O M
Confederate memorials rise again
[Confederate, from A1]
siasts gather each year to reenact the Battle of Aiken.
In Alabama in August, a
gray stone memorial was
dedicated in a private Crenshaw County park to unknown Confederate soldiers.
In Georgia last year, a
black marble obelisk was
erected on public land in
the mountain town of
Dahlonega in memory of the
county’s nearly 1,200 Confederate veterans.
In all, more than 30
monuments and symbols to
the Confederacy have been
dedicated or rededicated
since 2000, according to the
Southern Poverty Law Center. A historian at the University of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill, W. Fitzhugh
Brundage, conducted an inventory of his own state and
found that 20 monuments
had gone up there over that
time — the most since the
early 20th century.
The people funding the
monuments — often the
great-great-grandchildren
of Confederate soldiers —
say they simply want to remember their loved ones
and ensure their legacies live
on. More controversially,
many also promote a revisionist history in which slavery was not a major cause of
the war.
“We just want to honor
our ancestors,” said Hank
Van Slyke, a 62-year-old engineering specialist and
commander of a local Sons
of Confederate Veterans
brigade that put up the
monument in Orange. The
group is an association of
male descendants of Confederate soldiers, and was
formed in 1896 to hail the
“hallowed memories of
brave men” and “record of
the services of every Southern Soldier.”
“Throughout
history,
whoever wins the war and
conquers the nation, they
get to write the history
books,” he said. “We’ve always studied that we had a
good cause and our ancestors fought for what they
thought was right.”
While most historians
agree that the root cause of
Brynn Anderson Associated Press
A CIVIL WAR reenactor kneels in August before a new monument in Brantley, Ala. — one of many Confederate memorials erected in
recent years. The monuments’ supporters often say the war was not over slavery, as most historians maintain, but over states’ rights.
the Civil War was slavery, a
significant
number
of
Americans, particularly in
the South, have been taught
the war was about states’
rights in general. Six years
ago, a Pew Research Center
survey found that 48% of
Americans said states’
rights were the reason for
the war, while 38% cited slavery.
The debate is particularly charged in Texas,
where the State Board of Education in 2010 adopted new
academic standards listing
slavery as third among the
causes of the war, after sectionalism and states’ rights.
“There’s a kind of historical symmetry, in that many
of these men now fighting
the battle to defend the Lost
Cause are predisposed to
see themselves as under
threat,” Brundage said.
The new monuments
tend to be more modest than
older ones. At the turn of the
20th century, when Confederate organizations enjoyed
enormous cultural prestige
in the South, large bronze
and marble monuments
were erected in conspicuous
public spaces and etched
with politically charged
plaques.
Now, Brundage said, they
often focus less on defending
the Confederacy and more
on memorializing unknown
soldiers or listing those who
died.
Even in its unfinished
state, the new Confederate
memorial in Orange has
stirred more public controversy than most new ones.
“We know this makes our
town look bad,” said John
“Jack” Smith, the city attorney for Orange, a town of
19,000 near the Louisiana
state line whose motto is
“Small town charm, world
class culture.”
Smith said the monument didn’t reflect the values of Orange residents, and
he slammed the Sons of
Confederate Veterans as a
“racist hate group.”
“We’re very concerned
that this could send the
wrong signal about Orange
as people drive down the
highway,” he said. “But what
can we do about it? It’s a
matter of free speech. We
cannot stop them from
building the thing on private
land.”
Just over a third of
Orange residents are black
— a greater share than in
any other town in the predominantly white county,
which has long grappled
with racism. In the 1990s,
members of the Ku Klux
Klan protesting federal attempts to integrate public
housing held marches in the
nearby city of Vidor, which
was notorious as a “sundown town” because African
Americans were not safe
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L AT I M E S . C O M
SS
S U N DAY, O C T O B E R 22, 2 017
A11
A ‘part of our history’
or a ‘slap in the face’?
[Confederate, from A10]
after dark.
In 2013, word spread that
Granvel Block, then Texas
division commander for the
Sons of Confederate Veterans, had quietly bought a
small plot of land near Interstate 10 for less than $10,000
and acquired a city building
permit to construct a Civil
War monument. The local
chapter of the National
Assn. for the Advancement
of Colored People and several residents attended a
City Council meeting to oppose the project.
The monument also
sparked an online petition
and an editorial from a local
newspaper, the Beaumont
Enterprise: “The last thing
Southeast Texas needs is a
large memorial to the Confederacy,” it said. “Simply
put, it would be divisive and
offensive.”
Still, when the newspaper conducted an online
poll asking, “Do you want
a Confederate monument
here?” more than 70% of respondents clicked “Yes. The
Confederate Army and Civil
War are part of our history.”
Block responded by publishing a lengthy “Call to
Arms” on his group’s Facebook page.
“If we do not stand up
when our ancestors are being attacked and break the
stigma that our opponents
attempt to attach to anything Confederate, we run
the risk of everything Confederate as we know it, being
condemned and exterminated,” he wrote. “These
new Confederate memorials
will be the turning point, and
will open the doors and dialog for an accurate account
of history to be taught.”
Rather than just follow
the “easy path” of honoring
ancestors “in the ways which
are acceptable,” he argued,
the group should focus on
challenging the idea that the
war was fought over slavery.
Yet in a sign of how controversial the monument
has become, Block now declines to meet with reporters
or speak on the record for
fear of upsetting his wife.
In a telephone interview,
Van Slyke, the local brigade
commander, said that although slavery “may” have
been a “small part” of the
war, it was pretty far down
the list.
Karen L. Cox, a history
professor at the University
of North Carolina at Charlotte, said that those putting
up new monuments to the
Confederacy represented a
minority point of view.
“They continue to believe
African American and retired plant operator who
lives on the other side of
the interstate less than a
mile away, believes the monument was a deliberate insult.
At first, Colbert said, it
really bothered him to drive
by the memorial. Now he just
whizzes on by in his pickup
truck, barely noticing it.
“It’s an affront, but I’ve
dealt with ignorance most of
my life,” he said. “Right now,
it’s just the beat of the
drum.”
Erik S. Lesser European Pressphoto Agency
Jarvie is a special
correspondent.
GEORGIA’S Stone Mountain relief of Confederate President Jefferson Davis and
Gens. Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson, from left, wasn’t completed till 1972.
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‘They’re
not honoring
history; they’re
commemorating
the principles and
objectives of the
war.’
“Let’s chat! Call and we’ll take the time to
personally provide the answers and the
guidance you need. We can even schedule
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—Karen L. Cox,
1-800-547-0899
UNC Charlotte professor
in the sort of version of history that mythologizes the
Confederacy and its heroes,
but it’s so obvious it’s disingenuous,” she said. “They’re
not honoring history; they’re
commemorating the principles and objectives of the
war.”
While Orange city officials decided they could not
legally stop the monument
there, they sought to limit its
impact by regulating the
size of the Confederate flags
and placing restrictions on
parking. In 2013, the council
passed an ordinance to limit
flagpoles to 35 feet tall
and ban any flags larger
than 4 by 6.
While many people prefer
not to talk about the monument, defenders aren’t hard
to come by.
John Broussard, 54, an
industrial electrician, and
John Shaver, 33, a millwright
machinist — both white —
said those who criticized the
monument, and its position
near a street named after a
slain civil rights icon, didn’t
understand it.
“I don’t think it’s intended to be malicious to
any race,” Shaver said. “A
Confederate memorial on
Martin Luther King Jr. Drive
could bring the community
and two racial groups together. Being a Confederate
monument, the first thing
that pops up in your mind is
segregation and slavery, but
it isn’t about that.”
Nathaniel Colbert, 68, an
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G10529 09/17
A12
S U N DAY, O C T O B E R 22 , 2 017
S
L AT I M E S . C O M
Expatriates mobilize to send aid
[Venezuela, from A1]
costs, political chaos and
shortages of nearly everything.
Caicedo is one of a growing number of Venezuelans
in the U.S. who regularly
ship necessities — beans,
rice and sugar — to Venezuela at great expense.
“Before it was out of enjoyment, a Christmas gift,”
Caicedo said of previous
packages. “Now it’s more serious. Now it’s necessity.”
Behind the efforts are individuals, large-scale organizations such as the nonprofit Humanitarian Aid for
Venezuela Program in Florida, and grass-roots groups
such as the one founded by
Caicedo.
Los Angeles is far from
the hub of Venezuelan
American life in Miami, but
expatriates in Southern California began organizing as
their home country plunged
deeper into disarray.
Their efforts caught the
attention of one crisis response organization late last
year, the Buena Park-based
Giving
Children
Hope,
which has since shipped
more than 30,000 pounds of
supplies to nonprofits in
Florida, which sends them
on to Venezuela. Venezuelan
actors living in Los Angeles,
including the telenovela star
Carlos Montilla, have helped
mobilize people through social media posts.
Venezuelans in the U.S.
tend to be professionals with
higher levels of education
than most Latino immigrants. Experts say the crisis is forcing the Venezuelan
population to become more
like the rest of Latin America, where relying on remittances is the norm.
Caicedo’s relatives never
asked for help — they only
spoke of how expensive
things had become. Her father owns a farm, but shortages of pesticides and vitamins started about three
years ago and have worsened, making them prohibitively expensive even when
they were available.
As the humanitarian crisis in Venezuela grew,
Caicedo asked her church
for donations of food,
Mel Melcon Los Angeles Times
OLARTE TRANSPORT in Los Angeles is among the shipping companies catering to Venezuelan expatriates.
Miguel Gutierrez For The Times
JOSE CAICEDO takes food and clothing that sister Tere shipped from Los Angeles to a home for low-income
retirees in Caracas. The Caicedo family keeps some necessities and gives away what it doesn’t need.
clothes and money. She held
a raffle and organized a carwash.
She and a group of volunteers have since shipped
about 8,000 pounds of food,
clothes and necessities,
such as toilet paper, diapers
and soap, to Venezuela. Her
brother, Jose, and other relatives keep what they need
and distribute the rest of the
goods to needy families.
Several boxes from one of
Caicedo’s latest shipments
went to the Providence San
Antonio Asylum, a retirement home for low-income
men located in southwest
Caracas.
There’s almost nothing
the shelter isn’t short on.
The director, Sister Ana Medina Suarez, said that although there is space for 70
people, only 52 live there because the foundation can no
longer afford to care for
more.
Suarez said that residents are losing weight and
that food shipments are vital.
“There is no adequate
phrase to describe what we
are going through,” she said.
The pantry’s contents
consisted of 22 pounds of
rice, nearly 9 pounds of black
beans, 4½ pounds of corn
flour, several bags of salt and
three avocados. The three
freezers and two refrigerators were empty. Meat is impossible to afford.
Food prices in Venezuela
have skyrocketed as production of oil, agriculture and
cars has plummeted. Inflation since the beginning of
the year has risen by more
than 536%. This month,
earnings for people who
make minimum wage were
the equivalent of just over
$8.50 per month at the black
market exchange rate.
“People are dying of
hunger now,” Caicedo said.
“Over there, a small bag of
rice is like pure gold.”
It costs $100 to ship a 7cubic-foot box, which can
weigh around 120 pounds.
Caicedo has spent about
$1,500 of her own money, plus
more than $11,000 in donations.
Boxes are shipped by air
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WST
L AT I M E S . C O M
‘People are dying
of hunger now.
Over there, a
small bag of rice is
like pure gold.’
— Tere Caicedo,
who ships food and other
necessities to relatives in
Venezuela
Caicedo and a volunteer
from her church, Immaculate Heart of Mary Catholic
Church in Santa Ana,
hauled bags of donations
into Olarte’s company on a
Friday in August. The sound
of salsa music mixed with
loud rips of packaging tape
securing boxes addressed to
Jose Caicedo, her brother in
Venezuela. They packed
heavy cans of beans and tomato sauce at the bottom,
then added bags of pasta,
sugar, flour and white rice
before a final layer of sweaters, underwear, pants and
shoes.
About 225,000 Venezuelan-born immigrants live in
the U.S., according to the
Pew Research Center —
more than double the population in 2000. In 2014, Los
Angeles was estimated to be
home to about 5,000 Venezuelans.
Venezuelans top the list
of asylum seekers in the U.S.,
with more than 21,000 such
applications filed in 2017.
Nearly 75% of the population involuntarily lost an average of 19 pounds last year,
according to a survey released this year by three of
Venezuela’s largest universities and a foundation that
tracks nutrition.
Venezuelans call the
weight loss the “Maduro diet,” a sarcastic reference to
life under President Nicolas
Maduro.
Severe
malnutrition
among children has risen
most dramatically. Reports
this year showed that11.4% of
children younger than 5 suffer from moderate to severe
malnutrition. The Venezuelan health minister was fired
in May after she released a
report showing that maternal deaths had risen by 65%,
while infant deaths were up
30%.
Across Venezuela, people
are using Facebook and
other social media to arrange food swaps— agreeing, for example, to hand
over some sugar in exchange
for corn flour.
The United Nations, the
U.S. and Latin American
governments have called
on Maduro to accept humanitarian aid. But the
Venezuelan president has
refused, instead offering
$5 million in aid to Texas after Hurricane Harvey and
then helping Caribbean island nations hit by Hurricanes Irma, Jose and Maria.
This year, the government banned a long list of
imports, including first aid
supplies and prescription
medicine. Courier services
keep shipments small to
avoid the attention of authorities and, as needed,
bribe customs officials to
look the other way and let
packages through.
Dassler Dazha, who runs
a Facebook page called
United Venezuelans in Los
Angeles, recalled the story of
a cousin who last year got
into a store line in Caracas at
4 a.m. and finished shopping
at 5 p.m. When she left the
store, thieves were waiting.
They beat her and stole her
food.
Dazha used to send
boxes of food but switched to
cash because relatives could
still find food in big cities or
on the black market. He, like
many expatriates, sends
money home using an
underground network of
Venezuelans with U.S. bank
accounts who trade dollars
for bolivars at the black market rate.
But the country is running out of cash. Dazha said
that to withdraw 30,000 bolivars from the bank in August, enough for less than a
week’s worth of groceries,
his sister had to go several
days in a row because the
bank would only let her
withdraw 5,000 bolivars a
day.
The situation — and by
extension, the best way to
help — changes constantly.
Dazha’s brother and sister had saved dry and
canned foods in anticipation
of hard times, but ran out of
their stores in mid-September.
He’s now thinking about
sending them boxes of food
again. But he worries the
shipments won’t arrive.
“I don’t know what to do,”
Dazha said. “That’s the dilemma of all Venezuelans,
the helplessness of not being
able to do anything for our
families.”
A13
Miguel Gutierrez For The Times
SISTER Ana Medina Suarez, second from right, takes delivery of a shipment of food and clothing sent by Tere
Caicedo in Los Angeles. Suarez runs a retirement home for low-income men in southwest Caracas, Venezuela.
OF HU
F R
FR ER RY
ID EN
AY DS
!
[Venezuela, from A12]
and sea. As in other parts of
Latin America, shipping to
Venezuela through the postal service comes with a
strong risk that packages
could be stolen. In the U.S.,
shipping companies have
popped up to meet the need
for an alternative.
Ralph Olarte built his
Los Angeles-based company, Olarte Transport, on
Venezuelan retailers who
bought goods in Southern
California and shipped them
home for sale. Shipments to
Venezuela are now dominated by people sending
food to relatives.
Olarte delivers in Caracas and surrounding areas,
coordinating with people
who live in high-risk areas to
meet couriers at the nearest
safe location. Other shipping companies have set up
pickup locations so people
can safely collect packages.
Olarte said some Venezuelan entrepreneurs who
used to fly to Los Angeles on
business are now seeking
asylum. Others who remain
in Venezuela send him grocery lists to fill out and ship.
“Most of our customers
actually live here in the
States now,” he said. “A lot of
them, one of the first places
they come to ask for work is
here.”
S U N DAY, O C T O B E R 22 , 2 017
EVERY SEAT COMES WITH
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andrea.castillo
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Twitter: @andreamcastillo
Special correspondent Mery
Mogollon in Caracas,
Venezuela, contributed to
this report.
NATURE & SCIENCE
November 4, 2017 | Dallas | Live & Online
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A14
S U N DAY, O C T O B E R 22 , 2 017
WS T
L AT I M E S . C O M
Painting’s location still a mystery
[Española, from A1]
More than 120 casta sets,
typically including 16 carefully numbered paintings,
are known. They were
painted in different formats
by artists of varied skill, including such talented painters as Juan Patricio Morlete
Ruiz and Juan Rodríguez
Juárez. Most sets have been
broken up and individual
paintings widely dispersed.
Cabrera painted only one
set, considered the genre’s
finest.
Two from his suite of 16
disappeared long ago. But
one of them — No. 6 in the set
— was discovered rolled up
and stored under a couch in
a Northern California home.
Passed down through descendants of mining tycoon
John P. Jones, a co-founder
of Santa Monica, the painting was a treasured family
heirloom about which they
knew little. Its owner, Christina Jones Janssen, a retired
corporate attorney, decided
to research the unusual picture.
In April 2015, her astonishing discovery was greeted
with great fanfare, landing
on The Times’ front page.
LACMA quickly acquired
the masterpiece. Katzew is a
leading scholar of casta
paintings. When she was a
young graduate student, her
very first research paper
analyzed Cabrera’s set. No. 6
went on view just in time for
the exhibition “50 for 50:
Gifts on the Occasion of
LACMA’s Anniversary.”
The owner of “Española”
went to see it.
“My owner has enjoyed
seeing #6,” Española’s letter
said, “and I am pleased that
we are all now accounted for
despite the diaspora.”
Five snapshots showing
details of the painting tumbled out from the envelope.
No pre-modern images or
even written descriptions of
Cabrera’s set are known, but
Katzew has little doubt of
the painting’s authenticity.
Certainty would require examining the canvas in person, but stylistically, and because of its superlative and
distinctive relationship to
others in the set, the attribution seems sure.
Philadelphia Museum of Art
FOURTEEN of the 16 casta paintings in Miguel Cabrera’s 1763 set were reunited for an exhibit at the Philadelphia Museum of Art in 2006.
Such works explored the theme of miscegenation, or interracial marriage, among Indians, Spaniards born in Spain, Creoles and Africans.
Los Angeles County Museum of Art
THE discovery of the missing No. 6 in Cabrera’s set
prompted the owner of “Española” to send the letter.
The most complete snapshot contains the reflected
burst of light from the camera’s flash near the bottom,
obscuring the folding fan
held in the right hand of Española’s father. It also shows
a fragment of the picture’s
modern frame at a raking
angle. Given these details,
the painting appears to
hang on a high wall.
But where? A two-mile
radius around LACMA
stretches from the edge of
Beverly Hills to Hancock
Park, from West Hollywood
in the north all the way to the
10 Freeway in the south.
That’s a lot of houses and
apartments.
Española’s
letter
dropped another bombshell:
“If you ever gather a reunion of all my siblings, I
would welcome the opportunity to be on display for a limited period of time. I am not
lost, I just do not wish to be
found.”
A nearly full reunion had
happened nine years earlier,
when 14 of the 16 paintings
were assembled from museums in Madrid and Monterrey, Mexico, as well as a
Los Angeles foundation, for
“Tesoros/Treasures/
Tesouros: The Arts in Latin
America, 1492-1820,” a major
exhibition at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. They
had not been seen together
in at least a century.
Española signed her letter, neatly typed in the style
of formal business correspondence. But she included no return mailing address, no telephone number,
no email address or any
other way to contact the
owner. The mailing label had
even been trimmed, apparently to remove a potentially
revealing bit of data.
Katzew’s heart sank.
The curator was well into
research on “Painted in
Mexico, 1700-1790: Pinxit
Mexici,” the most comprehensive museum survey ever
devoted to the period and
set to open at LACMA next
month. Cabrera’s castas
were painted in 1763, when
the century’s premier artist
was about 50 and at the
height of his powers.
“Painted in Mexico” would
be the ideal context into
which the lost masterpiece
could be reintroduced to
scholars and the public.
Work on the mammoth
show would soon occupy all
of Katzew’s time. It assembles 139 often monumental,
not widely known paintings,
many unpublished, and is
organized with her art-historian colleagues Luisa Elena Alcalá from Madrid and
Jaime Cuadriello from Mexico City. On view now in the
[See Española, A15]
L AT I M E S . C O M
[Española, from A14]
Mexican capital, the show
will travel to the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New
York next spring, after it
closes at LACMA. Pressed
for time, Katzew made a
few unsuccessful stabs at
trying to locate the mystery
owner.
Maddeningly, the stamps
on the envelope were not
canceled at the post office,
which might have narrowed
the area of town from which
the letter was mailed. Neither are the stamps recent.
Thirty-seven-cent stamps
were retired a decade before
the letter was sent, while the
commemorative stamp honoring writer Jack London
was issued in 1988.
Katzew took the five
snapshots to Samy’s Camera, where notations on the
back indicated they had
been printed. The store, just
a few blocks from the museum, further suggested that
the painting could be
nearby.
Yet, either for privacy
concerns or lack of identifying marks, Samy’s was unable to name the snapshots’
source.
Katzew believes Cabrera’s casta set was probably commissioned by no
less a personage than the
viceroy of New Spain,
Joaquin de Montserrat,
Marqués de Cruillas, who returned to Madrid when his
term in Mexico City concluded in 1766. The stature of
the patron matched that of
the artist, and the two were
acquainted. Many castas
were made for export to
Spain to demonstrate that
good order was being maintained in the colony; Katzew
surmises that Montserrat
brought the impressive set
home with him.
Eight paintings from the
full set are now in Madrid’s
Museo de América, Europe’s
finest collection of Spanish
Colonial and pre-Conquest
art. The casta that turned
up stashed under a Bay Area
sofa was bought in Madrid in
the 1920s, destined to decorate a Montecito mansion
during the Spanish Revival
design boom in Southern
California.
Could “Española” have
come with it?
It’s the third one linked to
Southern California. Another is in the collection of the
Rancho de la Cordillera
Foundation in Northridge,
established around the Mex-
S
S U N DAY, O C T O B E R 22, 2 017
LACMA
Los Angeles County Museum of Art
THE LETTER revealing that the painting is somewhere in L.A. was written in
Española’s voice. The stamps on the envelope were not canceled at the post office,
which might have narrowed the area of town from which the letter was mailed.
ican art interests of the late
Southwest Museum director Carl S. Dentzel and his
wife, Elisabeth Waldo, a violinist and scholar of pre-Columbian music.
Five from the set are in a
private collection in Monterrey, on loan to the city’s
Mexican history museum.
Most or all were acquired at
New York auctions in the
early 1980s, when international interest — and prices
— for castas were modest.
Experts in the Latin American market estimate the
“Española” painting’s monetary value at around
$1.5 million.
Katzew’s calls to the auction houses didn’t yield helpful results. She had to suspend her search.
Now, with her 18th century painting show finished
and set to open at LACMA
on Nov. 19, she’s hopeful the
owner of “Española” might
drop in to see it — and get in
touch again. She’s even prepared to make space for “Española” on the wall next to
her rediscovered sibling.
“3. From Spaniard and
Castiza, Spanish Girl,” its
full title, is an especially important picture in the set because of its uniquely sumptuous details. The Spanish
father, dressed in a dovegray frock coat and tri-corner hat, is an aristocrat. The
castiza mother, offspring of
a Spaniard and a mestiza
A15
(half Spanish, half Indian),
is dressed in regal splendor
— embroidered silks, delicate lace, pearls on her wrist
and an extravagant coral
necklace.
Her refined black-lace
mantilla, Katzew says, is virtually unique in the casta
painting genre.
So is the painted folding
screen in the background, a
legacy of expensively imported Japanese art. Mother
and father both carry folding
fans — a rarity for a man —
doubling the emphasis on
another Japanese import as
an exotic status symbol.
As for little Española,
who sports a diadem of flowers above her rouged-porcelain face, she’s swathed in
crisp pink and gold silks,
costly white lace and a profusion of pearls, often a Catholic symbol of purity. Cabrera’s composition casts
the proud trio as a veritable
Holy Family.
Why all the visual fanfare?
Perhaps because the
third in a casta set represents a momentous occasion: In the conquering
white culture’s fabricated
racial and social hierarchy,
it’s the first time a child miraculously returns mixedrace parentage to purely
Spanish identity. A Spaniard marries a Spanish Indian woman, and in the crazy
casta world, that’s enough
European blood to consider
their child fully Spanish.
“Española” represents a
homecoming to the pinnacle
of the power ladder. The
family is dressed for the occasion, sanctified by luxury.
Cabrera, whose genius as
an artist invented these extraordinary visual cues, may
have had personal reasons
to go over the top. Little is
known about him before he
emerged in the 1750s as an
artistic force in Mexico City.
Born in Oaxaca, his own ethnic identity, once thought to
be mestizo (Spanish and Indian), is a mystery.
Yet, as Cabrera became
successful in the competitive and racially obsessed
capital of New Spain, he insistently identified as Spanish. In the hidden remaining
link to his magnificent casta
set, “Española” just might
embody his anxiety over his
own identity.
christopher.knight
@latimes.com
Twitter: @KnightLAT
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Former anchor settled
the sexual harassment
case before his final
Fox News contract.
By Stephen Battaglio
Fired Fox News anchor
Bill O’Reilly paid $32 million
to settle a sexual harassment claim just before he
signed his last contract with
Fox News.
A report in the New York
Times published Saturday
said O’Reilly made the settlement with Lis Wiehl, a
longtime contributor to his
program who alleged that he
forced her into a nonconsensual sexual relationship and
sent her sexually explicit
material.
The settlement — a staggering figure for a sexual
harassment case — was
made in January, according
to the news report, just before O’Reilly signed a new
four-year
contract
for
$25 million annually to continue as host of his top-rated
prime-time program, “The
O’Reilly Factor.”
Fox News parent 21st
Century Fox acknowledged
in a statement that the company knew about the settlement, but said it was not
aware of the financial terms
at the time.
“When the company renewed Bill O’Reilly’s contract in February, it knew
that a sexual harassment
lawsuit had been threatened
against him by Lis Wiehl, but
was informed by Mr. O’Reilly
that he had settled the matter personally, on financial
terms that he and Ms. Wiehl
had agreed were confidential and not disclosed to the
company,” a representative
told the Los Angeles Times.
O’Reilly denied the harassment allegations to the
New York Times. “I have never mistreated anyone,” he
said, suggesting that his
downfall was “politically and
financially motivated.”
O’Reilly’s new deal included a stipulation that any
further sexual harassment
Richard Drew Associated Press
“I HAVE never mistreated anyone,” Bill O’Reilly said
of allegations by Lis Wiehl, a contributor to his show.
allegations could lead to his
termination.
That happened a couple
of months later when psychologist Wendy Walsh filed
a complaint with 21st Century Fox. She accused O’Reilly of reneging on a commitment to get her a position as a paid contributor at
Fox News after she rejected
his advances at a 2013 dinner
meeting at Hotel Bel-Air.
O’Reilly, long the highest-rated personality on the
cable news network, was
fired on April 19. Walsh’s
complaint had followed the
disclosure in the New York
Times that a total of $13 million in payouts was made by
O’Reilly and Fox News to five
women who said the host
had sexually harassed or
verbally abused them in the
last 16 years.
Debra Katz, a Washington-based attorney who specializes in sexual harassment cases, said the reported size of the Wiehl settlement was “tantamount to
a class-action suit.” She said
a settlement of that size typically includes a promise to
withdraw the allegation.
“It’s done as a way to put
a hammer over the individual who signs so they will never come forward and disclose the allegations,” she
said.
“If she does, the person
who has settled for an obscene amount of money can
pull the declaration and say
‘she recanted.’ ”
Mark Fabiani, a representative for O’Reilly, told
the New York Times that
21st Century Fox knew that
Wiehl had signed an affidavit
“renouncing all allegations
against him.”
In a statement to the Los
Angeles Times, Fabiani said
the New York Times report
on Wiehl’s complaint is
“based on leaked information provided by anonymous
sources that is out of context, false, defamatory, and
obviously designed to embarrass Bill O’Reilly and to
keep him from competing in
the marketplace.”
The disclosure of the new
settlement may derail any
hopes O’Reilly had of making a TV comeback.
There has been chatter
among TV news business insiders that he was looking to
get back on the air, possibly
as a commentator or host
with Sinclair Broadcast
Group.
O’Reilly has recently
made TV appearances to
promote his new book,
“Killing England,” including
on former rival Sean Hannity’s Fox News program.
The revelation of the settlement is another obstacle
in 21st Century Fox’s efforts
to get past the harassment
scandal that has engulfed
the company since last year,
when former Fox News anchor Gretchen Carlson sued
Roger Ailes, the division’s
founding chief executive
who died in May.
21st Century Fox has investigated
harassment
claims and settled a number
of them — including a $20million settlement for Carlson — but the company continues to be beleaguered by
the issue.
The treatment of women
in entertainment and the
media has become a hot
topic of national conversation also due to recently revealed claims of harassment
and sexual assault against
film mogul Harvey Weinstein.
The matter has intensified British regulators’ scrutiny of 21st Century Fox’s
proposed $15-billion deal to
take full ownership of Sky
TV in the United Kingdom.
stephen.battaglio
@latimes.com
JFK assassination
files near release
By Sarah D. Wire
WASHINGTON — President Trump tweeted Saturday that, pending more information, he plans to allow
the release of classified files
related to the November1963
assassination of President
Kennedy.
Several media outlets
had reported in recent days
that White House officials
expected the president to
block the release of thousands of classified files as security agencies voiced concerns that sensitive documents could be included if
the full trove of more than
3,000 files is released.
The Twitter statement
didn’t specify whether the
president intends to allow
all, or just some, of the information to become public,
and he stipulates that the
decision is “subject to the receipt of further information.”
The White House later
said in an unattributed
statement that “the President believes that these
documents should be made
available in the interests of
full transparency unless
agencies provide a compelling and clear national security or law enforcement justification otherwise.”
In an effort to stamp
down conspiracy theories,
Congress passed the JFK
Assassination Records Collection Act in1992 to hold the
files from public release for
25 years.
Trump has until Thursday to block the files’ release; otherwise they are
scheduled to be made public
by the National Archives.
sarah.wire@latimes.com
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S U N DAY , O C T O B E R 22, 2 017
A17
OPINION
EDITORIALS
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
LETTERS
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Reducing suburban fire risks
California suffered through its
deadliest wildfire season in 2017.
Now it’s time to prepare for more.
C
ountless research papers and
government reports have said it,
but the wildfires in Northern California this month brought it
home: Climate change is fueling
larger, more frequent and more devastating
wildfires in the state, and communities have
to start making themselves safer now.
This year’s fires in wine country have been
the deadliest in the state’s history, with 42
victims so far. Northern California is now experiencing the kind of wildfires that have
rampaged through Southern California in recent years: fast, ferocious blazes that can
wipe out suburban neighborhoods.
As higher temperatures and prolonged
droughts bring more fires, models predict
that the greatest property damage will be in
the wildland-urban interfaces where developments abut foothills, forests or other open
land. Roughly 6% of the state falls into this
category, mainly in coastal Southern California, the Bay Area and the increasingly developed Sierra foothills.
California has to reckon with the fact that
continued sprawl into previously undeveloped areas puts life and property at risk.
This is not easy. The state has an extreme
housing shortage, and it’s simpler in the
short term to keep building outward than to
redesign cities for greater density. But California has to change the way it grows.
Starting this year, cities and counties are
required by state law to develop policies to
address the risks that they face from climate
change. That should force communities vulnerable to more frequent wildfires to evaluate how — or whether — new homes can be
built safely on the urban edge.
The state requires that new buildings in
high-risk fire zones be made with fire-resistant materials, such as tile roofs. State and local governments should also consider requiring older homes and buildings in high-risk
zones to be retrofitted.
Unfortunately, urban areas often weren’t
included in high-risk zones because, well, nobody expected a wildfire to sweep through a
city. State officials are now revising the maps,
and the fires around Santa Rosa must surely
be a wake-up call that suburbia has to be
made more fire resistant.
Californians also must recognize that
making their communities more resilient to
more intense wildfires will be an expensive,
long-term proposition. That means removing dead trees and excess brush to reduce
the fuel for fires. That means educating residents about how to protect themselves —
like practicing for earthquakes, communities
in high-risk zones should be developing wildfire drills. That means investing in fire-resilient communication and alert systems.
The risk of a major wildfire is growing for
more California neighborhoods. State leaders, communities and residents must do a
better job planning for them.
The Antiquities Act attack
O
ver the past 111 years, U.S. presidents have repeatedly used the
Antiquities Act of 1906 to protect
areas of unique historical or scientific interest, designating 157
national monuments encompassing about
850 million acres in 27 states (including 10
monuments in California). Congress later
converted 32 monuments into national
parks; in fact, some of our most prized parklands — the Grand Canyon, Zion, the Grand
Tetons — initially were set aside by presidents under the Antiquities Act.
But now there’s a fresh movement in Congress to severely reduce a president’s authority to protect federal lands from development
and other uses that would mar their beauty
and damage our national heritage. Similar
attempts have failed in past sessions; the
new version deserves the same fate.
The disingenuously named National
Monument Creation and Protection Act
would cap new monuments at 85,000 acres,
cover only “objects of antiquity” and not natural or scientific wonders now eligible, and
require counties, states and governors to approve designations over 10,000 acres. The
Grand Canyon and Grant Tetons would not
have qualified under those limits.
We’ve already seen what happens when
the president is restricted from making such
designations. Political fallout after designations of monuments in Wyoming and Alaska
led Congress to require a president to get
lawmakers’ approval before establishing any
new monuments in those states (the Alaska
measure applies to designations of more
than 5,000 acres). No monuments have been
proposed in either one since then. The chilling effect is pretty clear.
Such efforts to limit the Antiquities Act
are not evidence-based reforms to improve
efficiency or policies that have not worked.
The Antiquities Act has worked splendidly.
The federal government already is required
to consult with local communities and stakeholders when moving toward a monument
designation. Washington should consider
the desires and needs of affected regions, but
that is not the same thing as giving local government effective veto power over what the
federal government does with federal lands.
That sort of local veto is the goal of the
bill’s author, Rep. Rob Bishop (R-Utah), who
recently pushed the measure through the
panel that he chairs, the House Natural Resources Committee. But the vast open
spaces in Utah do not belong to the people of
Utah. They belong to the people of the
United States.
The product of extensive study, the present designations and have served well the
interests of protecting some of the most
beautiful regions of the country. The Antiquities Act should not be undone to feed the appetites of land-hungry politicians.
An email warrant’s borders
I
n 2012, Chief Justice John G. Roberts
Jr. told a university audience that the
challenge for the Supreme Court for the
next 50 years would be “how we [adapt]
old, established rules to new technology.”
That comment is usually quoted in connection with technological changes that have
required the court to expand protections for
personal privacy. For example, in a 2014 opinion by Roberts, the court held that police
generally must obtain a warrant before
searching the smartphones of people they
had arrested.
But sometimes a shift in technology can
change the legal rules that come into play,
working against the legitimate needs of law
enforcement. That’s the case with a dispute
the court has agreed to hear involving an attempt by federal prosecutors to obtain
emails of a suspect in a drug investigation.
Although the government obtained a warrant based on probable cause, and although
the alleged criminal activity apparently occurred in the U.S., a federal appeals court
held that Microsoft didn’t have to turn over
the emails because they happened to be
stored at a data center in Ireland.
The U.S. 2nd Circuit Court of Appeals
ruled that the law under which the warrant
was issued — the Stored Communications
Act of 1986 — can’t be enforced outside the
United States. “Neither explicitly nor implicitly does the statute envision the application
of its warrant provisions overseas,” wrote
Judge Susan L. Carney.
Carney noted that when Congress passed
the law, electronic communications weren’t
ubiquitous or global. But today’s internet effectively eliminates the distance between the
computers connected to it, raising the question of whether emails that can be instantly
accessed from the United States should
really be considered as existing “overseas.”
In a concurring opinion, Judge Gerard E.
Lynch acknowledged that employees of a
firm such as Microsoft can “provide the relevant materials” to the government “without
ever leaving their desks in the United States.”
Lynch suggested that Congress should revise
this “badly outdated statute.”
Congress could amend the act to make it
clear that companies must comply with warrants such as the one in this case. But the
Justice Department believes that the court
can spare Congress the trouble by holding
that information obtainable “with the click of
a computer mouse” is subject to the law as it
exists. We agree.
Sometimes technology companies are
right to resist requests for cooperation from
law enforcement. We supported Apple, for
example, when it opposed a demand by the
Justice
Department
that
it
devise
technology to help the FBI break into the
locked iPhone of one of the San Bernardino
shooters. But in this instance, the government’s case is reasonable.
CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER
AND
PUBLISHER
Ross Levinsohn
News
INTERIM EXECUTIVE EDITOR
Jim Kirk
MANAGING EDITOR
Lawrence Ingrassia
DEPUTY MANAGING EDITORS
Colin Crawford, Scott Kraft
ASSISTANT MANAGING EDITORS
Christina Bellantoni, Shelby Grad,
Mary McNamara, Kim Murphy, Michael Whitley
FOUNDED DECEMBER 4, 1881
Opinion
Nicholas Goldberg EDITOR OF THE EDITORIAL PAGES
Juliet Lapidos OP-ED AND SUNDAY OPINION EDITOR
Olivier Contreras Sipa USA
JOHN F. KELLY, President Trump’s chief of staff,
speaks to reporters at the White House Oct. 19.
Explaining Trump
Re “Kelly defends Trump’s call to widow,” Oct. 20
Retired Marine Gen. John F. Kelly, the White House
chief of staff, attempted to explain what President
Trump meant when he spoke to the widow of Army Sgt.
La David Johnson.
Over these many months, I have heard too many
members of the present administration try to explain
what the president meant after he had spoken publicly.
I was a middle school teacher for 31 years and am
proud to say that I have received numerous kudos for the
way I did my job. Can you imagine the scenario if my
principal had to come into my classroom day after day to
explain to my students what I had actually said or meant
to say?
How this same scenario can be considered acceptable
today when our president speaks is beyond me. How long
would I have been allowed to keep my job?
Linda Lambert
Ojai
Like Kelly, I am also
surprised by the criticism
of Trump’s message to a
grieving widow. Not everyone thinks it is insensitive
to tell the family of a slain
soldier that “he knew what
he signed up for.”
A childhood friend of
mine and fellow Marine, 1st
Lt. Lee Roy Herron, died
heroically in Vietnam,
receiving the Navy Cross
posthumously. When I first
visited with his mother to
express my condolences,
she immediately told me
that he had died doing
what he wanted — fighting
for our country. It was
apparent to me that knowing this was her greatest
consolation.
Trump should not be
maligned over so-called
insensitivity in his statements. His message may
not be much consolation
right now to a grieving
widow, but she rightfully
can be proud that the
president expressed that
sentiment to her.
David Nelson
Houston
::
While I applaud Kelly
for trying to help Trump
say the right thing to Gold
Star families, there is a big
difference between a decorated Marine Corps general saying that a fallen
soldier “knew what he was
getting into by joining that
1%” and the same words
coming from the mouth of
someone who avoided
military service because of
bone spurs.
In this case, you can’t
separate the message from
the messenger.
Faith Morris
Laguna Niguel
::
I had such great respect
for Kelly, but that has now
diminished after he lauded
the president and even
alluded to him as being
brave. This, after Trump
politicized Kelly’s son, who
was killed in Afghanistan.
It appears only John
McCain has the courage to
stand up to Trump.
Peter Jansz
Reseda
Don’t call it
‘quackery’
Re “Perils for UCI as it
takes funding for shaky
science,” Business, Sept. 24
We take umbrage at
Michael Hiltzik’s column
challenging the Samueli
family’s $200-million donation to UC Irvine for integrative medicine. Hiltzik is
concerned that the donation will “integrate quackery” into the curriculum
and “tar” the reputation of
the medical school.
“Quackery” refers to
dishonest practices performed by those who pretend to have special knowledge and skill in some field.
In contrast, integrative
medicine, or IM, is defined
as healing-oriented medi-
cine that reaffirms the
importance of the relationship between practitioner
and patient, focuses on the
entire patient and body
systems, is informed by
evidence, and makes use of
all therapeutic and lifestyle
approaches to achieve
optimal health.
With more than 6,000
randomized controlled
trials on integrative medicine listed on the website of
the National Institutes of
Health’s National Center
for Complementary and
Integrative Health, the
science supporting IM
continues to grow.
These studies have
yielded robust enough
results that medical societies include IM in clinical
guidelines. For example,
the American Heart Assn.
states that meditation
“may be considered a
reasonable adjunct to
guideline-directed cardiovascular risk reduction,”
and the American College
of Physicians recommends
acupuncture and mindbody approaches for low
back pain.
We believe we have an
obligation to help our
patients be as healthy as
possible and think it is
important to advance
education and science in
integrative medicine.
Andrew Weil, MD
Tucson
Victoria Maizes, MD
Tucson
Ann Marie
Chiasson, MD
Tucson
Hilary
McClafferty, MD
Tucson
Marvin Singh, MD
Del Mar
Dr. Weil is founder of the
University of Arizona Center for Integrative Medicine, where Drs. Maizes,
Chiasson and McClafferty
serve as faculty members
and directors. Dr. Singh is
a 2017 graduating fellow at
the center.
Amazon-ification
of big cities
Re “The Amazon tax-cut
derby,” editorial, Oct. 17
I find it troubling to see
great cities across the
country so quickly bending
the knee to a corporate
behemoth that will, without question, change the
cultural fabric that makes
the bidding towns great in
the first place.
The cities vying for
Amazon’s second headquarters have spent generations establishing their
own cultural identities.
These cities are rooted in
communities who built
strong academic and artsbased institutions for
societal needs and not
those of an online disruptor whose main goal is
world domination.
I honestly wonder how
many representatives from
the bidding cities have
visited South Lake Union
in Seattle since joining
Amazon’s corporate kow-
tow. Because if they have,
they would see how bland
and ordinary this pocket of
Seattle has become with
Amazon as its biggest
presence.
I happily choose to be in
the minority while praying
Amazon doesn’t choose
Los Angeles as its new
second home. We choose to
live in cities for a reason
and prefer to leave the
suburban corporate office
parks where they belong.
Bill Harrison
West Hollywood
::
Is it just me, or does the
competition to woo Amazon smell just like those
NFL relocation dramas?
Yes, the ancillary benefits of having an Amazon
campus or distribution
center in a city would seem
to be much more obvious
than those of building a
new NFL stadium, but I
still question the wisdom of
giving up known benefits
for the unknown potential.
Amazon should provide
measurable guarantees as
to the benefits to be realized, with cities enforcing
penalties for any failure to
deliver.
Dale S. Weikel
Bullhead City, Ariz.
An exhausting
year for women
Re “How men can help
after Weinstein,” Oct. 19
Ann Friedman opens
her op-ed article with the
following statement: “It’s
been two weeks since the
‘open secret’ about Harvey
Weinstein landed in …
about every media outlet in
the country.”
My immediate reaction
was, “It’s been 54 weeks
since the open secret about
Donald Trump landed in
about every media outlet in
the country.”
On Oct. 7, 2016, it was
revealed that in 2005,
Trump bragged about
sexually assaulting women
to “Access Hollywood” host
Billy Bush. Touching a
person's genitals without
consent is sexual assault.
Trump’s unacceptable
behavior is not just “locker
room talk.”
Friedman writes that
this has been “two exhausting weeks for women.” I might add that since
that tape came out, it has
been an exhausting year
for women, children and
LGBTQ persons.
It's time for all of us to
stand up to those who have
sexually assaulted others.
Susan Kogan
Oceanside
Immigrant teen’s
right to abortion
Re “Texas abortion case
tests Trump’s policies,”
Oct. 20
The agency overseeing
refugee affairs won’t allow
Jane Doe, a pregnant
17-year-old Central American refugee, to undergo an
abortion pending a court
hearing on her immigration status. Why? The
agency claims that it opposes the U.S. becoming a
“sanctuary for taxpayersupported abortions”
through minors’ illegal
border crossings.
Really? What if a professed refugee were a male
with an urgent medical
condition — say, a fastgrowing testicular cancer
— and he was kept confined without access to
oncologists pending a
hearing on his status?
Should he be kept confined
to the point at which he
suffers harm from delayed
access to medical care?
Would it matter if the court
ultimately found that this
refugee had entered the
U.S. solely to seek better
treatment than was available in his home country?
Neither logic nor applicable law will dissuade the
Trump administration
from its ceaseless misogynistic affronts.
Roberta Helms
Santa Barbara
HOW TO WRITE TO US
Please send letters to
letters@latimes.com. For
submission guidelines, see
latimes.com/letters or call
1-800-LA TIMES, ext. 74511.
A18
S U N DAY, O C T O B E R 22 , 2 017
S
L AT I M E S . C O M
OP-ED
Trump wants to take on Iran, has no idea how
DOYLE McMANUS
L
ast week, U.S.-backed
forces in Syria expelled
Islamic State from its
self-proclaimed capital of
Raqqah, a major victory
after three years of fighting against
the “caliphate” that once terrified
much of the West. But there was
strikingly little celebration. President Trump made no formal announcement of success. There was
no banner declaring “Mission
Accomplished.”
That was partly because the
struggle against Islamic State is no
longer the main event. The Trump
administration has already declared a broader war in the Middle
East, this time against Iran.
“The [Iranian] regime remains
the world’s leading state sponsor
of terrorism,” Trump said Oct. 13.
“The longer we ignore a threat, the
more dangerous that threat becomes.” He said the United States
will escalate its efforts — political,
economic and military — to prevent Iran from expanding its influence across the Middle East.
Here’s the problem: The Trump
administration doesn’t actually
know how to accomplish that goal.
Or if it does, it’s not telling anyone.
Although the White House
released a “New Strategy on Iran”
this month, the four-page document was mostly a laundry list of
He hasn’t chosen
his course, and that
may be the worst
alternative of all:
drifting ahead without
a clear plan.
grievances against Tehran, with no
clear description of consequences
for alleged misbehavior.
“There is no strategic plan,”
complained James F. Jeffrey, a
former senior official in the George
W. Bush administration, who has
advised Trump aides. “There’s no
organizing principle.”
“He’s challenged Iran to a duel,
but he hasn’t gotten any pistols
out,” he said.
In Syria, Iran is projecting its
power already. The Damascus
government of Bashar Assad
depends heavily on Iran for military and economic aid. And U.S.
officials charge that most of the
troops fighting for Assad in the
Syrian civil war are Iranian-led
proxy forces, not Syrian Army
units.
Worse, Assad and his Iranian
allies appear to be winning. The
regime has gradually consolidated
its control over most of western
Syria, and now — amid the collapse of Islamic State — it’s moving into eastern Syria, too.
Last week, Iranian-backed
government forces moved into
Mayadeen, a town southeast of
Raqqah that U.S.-backed rebels
had hoped to seize. The area is
important for two reasons: It’s a
crossing point on the Iraqi border,
and it’s near an oil and gas field
that is a major prize in the war.
At this point the Trump administration faces a dilemma: Should
it continue to supply training,
weapons and air support to the
Syrian rebels who took Raqqah, at
the risk of clashes with government forces who not only have a
friend in Iran, but also Russia?
It also needs to decide if it will
keep hundreds of U.S. advisors
inside Syria. The rebels, unsurprisingly, have said they hope the
Americans will stay — “for decades
to come,” one spokesman said
recently.
Pulling them out would mean
withdrawing help from a force the
United States organized, trained
and — last week — praised for its
valor in battle. And it would deprive the United States of a tool to
help prevent the Assad regime and
its Iranian allies from taking over
the territory that the rebels now
hold.
“If you’re serious about pushing
back against Iran, you have to stay
Ordinary
life at
UC
Berkeley
depends heavily on Iran for military
and economic aid.
involved,” said Frederic C. Hof, a
former State Department official
who now heads the Atlantic Council’s Rafik Hariri Center for the
Middle East. “Otherwise, you’re
just standing by as the Assad
regime, the people who created the
vacuum that allowed IS to grow,
come back.”
But the advisors were deployed
to help Syrian rebels in their fight
against Islamic State, not in the
civil war against the Assad regime.
Jeffrey, now at the Washington
address.
The administration hasn’t
chosen its course. That may be the
worst alternative of all: drifting
ahead without a clear plan.
That, after all, is what happened in Iraq after an earlier military success, the U.S. conquest of
Baghdad in 2003. Military officials
coined a bittersweet term to describe the results. It was, they said,
a “catastrophic success.”
doyle.mcmanus@latimes.com
Don’t study English
Lit to acquire
marketable skills
By Rohan Maitzen
T
By Samantha Shadrow
O
n a Thursday morning in September, I
pulled up to the east
side of the UC Berkeley
campus and quickly
determined that it was going to be
one of those days. It was only 7:45
a.m. and already parking-enforcement officers had erected white
barriers, blocking off the street
where I usually leave my car. I had
no choice but to park where I was
and walk an extra-long route to
class, passing students with to-go
breakfasts and police officers with
bomb-sniffing dogs.
I soon learned that someone
named Ben Shapiro was coming to
campus. Ben Shapiro, I thought,
trying to ascertain if I knew the
name, I have a cousin named
Brian Shapiro. By noon, I had
figured it out: Ben Shapiro was yet
another conservative political
commentator scheduled to speak
on campus. His goal was obvious:
to stir up the student body and, by
extension, the media.
Few of my fellow students,
however, seemed perturbed by
Shapiro’s visit. We were more put
out by the administration’s decision to preemptively close six
buildings and hire what seemed
like a platoon of militarized police
officers. These security precautions would reportedly cost the
school an estimated $600,000. By
late afternoon, fearing that my car
would get stuck behind a blockade,
I decided to ditch my evening
class, a preemptive move not
unlike the calculation made by the
administration — potentially wise,
possibly unnecessary, definitely
disruptive.
I was used to such disruption,
of course. Ever since the former
Breitbart editor and alt-right
provocateur Milo Yiannopoulos
was evacuated from campus amid
violent protests in February,
Berkeley has been the site of sporadic culture-war battles, most of
them around pro-Trump rallies or
scheduled appearances by conservative speakers.
The media narrative around
these events has tended to frame
Berkeley students as the violent
protesters — and, very often, as
intolerant obstructionists and
militant liberals intent on destroying our university’s legacy of free
speech. We are also cast as excessively sensitive millennials who
fear the aggressions, micro or
otherwise, of conservatives and
the alt-right.
But in these moments of high
drama, very few of the actors are
actual Berkeley students. The
large pro-Trump rallies have not
been organized by Berkeley students, and, for the most part, the
large counter-protests have not
been organized by Berkeley students. Although a conservative
student group, Young America’s
Foundation, invited Shapiro to
campus, it wasn’t students who led
the angry response, but outsiders
such as the Refuse Fascism organization.
And even if that weren’t the
Saeed Khan AFP/Getty Images
SYRIAN President Basahar Assad
Institute for Near East
Policy, suggested another alternative: a stronger
U.S. alliance with Turkey,
Saudi Arabia, Israel and
other regional powers to
bolster the Syrian rebels
and keep Iran out.
“What we need to do is
form an alliance to keep
Iran from projecting its
power further,” he said.
“That’s not happening.”
As before, Syria offers
only unappetizing
choices. The United
States can keep its
troops in the country, at
the risk of enmeshing
them in Syria’s civil war.
Or it can pull them out,
which could mean acceding to increased Iranian
influence — the problem
Trump has promised to
UC BERKELEY students are now accustomed to the disruptions caused by high-profile speakers. They just try to carry on.
Most protests attract
just a few hundred
people, and they’re
usually outsiders.
case, even if every single protester
at such events were an undergraduate enrolled at Berkeley, the
selection would be far from representative of the student body.
Most on-campus protests have
attracted only a few hundred people. At a school of 30,000 undergraduates, a crowd of several
hundred does not impress.
The truth is that daily life at UC
Berkeley is, for the most part,
rather ordinary. Students work
and study, striving to rack up
credits and minimize debt. Professors lecture, do research and hold
office hours. An understaffed
administration slogs through the
mini mountain of paperwork that
accompanies each potential graduate.
Life gets out of whack only
when high-profile speakers descend on campus, at which point
the students become collateral
damage. We receive email alerts
advising us to avoid protest areas.
Teachers, citing safety concerns,
cancel classes that fall at the same
time as the speaking engagement.
The police materialize with unsettling speed.
The dissonance between these
two states is rivaled only by the
dissonance between the reality of
campus life and the story unfolding in the national media.
When Yiannopoulos was unable to speak on campus in February, our student newspaper, the
Daily Californian, reported that, in
a crowd of about 1,500 people, 150
or so violent protesters set off
fireworks, threw bricks and broke
windows. But those “masked
agitators,” as the school would
come to call them, were neither
students nor affiliates of the university. I repeat: No Berkeley students were involved in any acts of
violence.
You wouldn’t know this from
much of the media reaction,
though. “College students destroying their own campus to block free
speech they don’t agree with,” a
Fox News host narrated on air,
conflating the masked protesters
with Berkeley students. “The
birthplace of the free speech movement has become its graveyard,”
the conservative commentator
Todd Starnes said.
President Trump was quick to
up the ante, tweeting: “If U.C.
Berkeley does not allow free
speech and practices violence on
innocent people with a different
point of view — NO FEDERAL
FUNDS?” Perhaps most surreal,
the HBO talk show host and comedian Bill Maher invited
Yiannopoulos onto his show to
commiserate over Yiannopoulos’
poor treatment at the hands of
Berkeley students. Maher would
go on to rant about how Berkeley is
“a cradle for ... babies.”
In April, Berkeley administrators were unable to find a suitable place and time for Ann Coulter to speak safely, so her appearance was canceled. To read the
spin, you’d think Berkeley students had joined hands to refuse
Coulter entrance to some amphitheater.
In September, the four-day
“Free Speech Week” was canceled,
comically, by the small conservative student group that had organized. They’d encountered massive
logistical hurdles. Some openly
speculated that the whole point of
organizing the event was to cancel
it, to suggest, again, a volatile
campus atmosphere in which
intolerant students have the power
to shut down opposing opinions.
Although UC Berkeley is not
the explosive environment outsiders imagine it to be, these occasional blips make for a nervous
campus environment. In the last
month alone, the Berkeley Police
Department has sent students 15
protest-related alerts. These notifications give us a play-by-play of
road closures and reopenings,
inform us of where small crowds
gather and often quickly disperse,
and warn us about “suspicious”
activities that turn out to be nothing at all. Students also receive a
steady stream of emails from
figureheads in the administration,
always repeating the same refrain:
We condemn the hateful rhetoric,
we uphold speakers’ right to come
to campus, we implore you to stay
safe.
Through it all, we go to class,
study for tests, and try our best to
ignore the hype.
Samantha Shadrow is a senior at
UC Berkeley studying journalism
and media.
here’s a tendency
among English professors to pitch and
plead for our subject
as, counterintuitively,
a practical choice for the student
of today facing the job market of
tomorrow.
We aren’t wrong about that.
Study after study backs us up,
while at regular intervals yet another corporate CEO or Silicon
Valley guru trumpets the value of
a degree in English or Philosophy
or Classics. English majors are
making a perfectly pragmatic decision, one that will help them
cultivate the “soft skills” employers want — critical thinking,
communication, creative problem solving, collaboration —
while also nurturing the intellectual curiosity and mental agility that will serve them well when
the careers of the future turn out
to be ones we couldn’t predict. Liberal arts graduates are not
doomed to serve Frappuccinos
to MBAs: They are teachers and
journalists, writers and doctors,
artists and executives. Canadian
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau
was an English major; so were
Sting, Sally Ride, Clarence
Thomas and Emma Watson.
There is no straight line from a
BA in English to one specific job
— but that’s an advantage, not a
drawback.
Yet the myth persists that an
English degree is at best decorative and at worst debilitating,
and the number of English majors is declining. Why should this
be? How can it be, when the facts
are on our side? It’s both disheartening and baffling.
Lately, I’ve been thinking that
it’s partly our fault — that our
self-promoting
argument,
though a sound one, is the wrong
one, and also a self-defeating one.
Because here’s the truth: If your
priority is to improve your marketable skills, you certainly can
do that — indeed, you will do that
— in my class on the Victorian
novel, but you do not actually
need my class on the Victorian
novel, or any other literature
class, for that purpose.
Studying “Middlemarch” is
simply not a necessary condition
for learning critical thinking or
communication skills. Many
other classes will help with that,
and they might do it more efficiently. Reading “Middlemarch”
is taking the long way around to
those generic ends.
The only thing you’ll get in a
class on the Victorian novel that
you won’t get anywhere else is an
education in the Victorian novel.
If we want students to choose an
English degree over other programs equally able to improve
their soft skills, we need to make
our best case for that specific experience — not just for the value
of studying “Bleak House,” “Jane
Eyre” or “Middlemarch,” of
course, but for the importance of
engaging with our vast, diverse,
vexing and exhilarating literary
culture, from “Beowulf ” to the
Beat poets, from Tennyson to
Toni Morrison. The utilitarian
defense we’ve been relying on
tacitly concedes the fundamental irrelevance of our actual subject. No wonder we’re demoralized. No wonder it sometimes
seems as if our own students —
or, more to the point, our prospective students — don’t know
what we have to offer.
So what is the best case for
studying English? I could start
with the research psychologists
are doing on the crucial role that
reading fiction plays in developing empathy, or with the eloquent case philosopher Martha
Nussbaum has made for the ethical advantages of seeing the
world as a novelist does — one
like Henry James “on whom
nothing is lost,” or one like
Charles Dickens, who in “Hard
Times,” delivers a stinging rebuke to just the kind of reductive
economic utilitarianism currently dominating conversations
about higher education. Or I
could point to programs such as
Changing
Lives
Through
Literature, which show the transformative potential, both personal and social, of the imaginative exercise literature demands.
But these arguments still skip
over what made most of us readers first and English majors second: the thrill of discovering what
words can do, and of thinking
hard about what they mean. Literature is not just a means to
other ends. Like all art, it deserves attention for its own sake
— and also for ours. Literature is
the record of the many stories we
have told about ourselves and
our world, and of the many ways
we have found to use language
artfully and beautifully, but also
cruelly and obtusely. It both reflects us and shapes us. We don’t
need any excuses for taking it seriously.
Standing up for what we actually teach might turn out to work
better than we imagine. Even
those who claim to see no use for
literature often tacitly acknowledge its importance, especially at
times of high emotion or deep
significance — weddings, for instance, or funerals. How often do
people turn to poetry because
they recognize, on some level,
that it offers them something
they can’t find anywhere else?
But even if this isn’t a winning
strategy, at least we would be advocating for our classes in a principled way, rather than trying to
convince people that they should
study George Eliot to practice
their teamwork.
Don’t major in English if your
goal is to acquire marketable
skills. Or at any rate, don’t take
my class on the Victorian novel
for that reason. Take it because
you’ve heard that “Middlemarch”
may be the greatest 19th-century
English novel and you want to experience it for yourself. You’ll
probably end up a better thinker
because of it, but “Middlemarch”
itself is reason enough to be
there. It will be my job and my
pleasure to help you understand
why.
Rohan Maitzen is an associate
professor of English at
Dalhousie University in Nova
Scotia, Canada.
L AT I M E S . C O M
S
S U N DAY, O C T O B E R 22, 2 017
A19
OP-ED
Where have
we seen this
behavior before?
My teacher,
Harvey Weinstein’s
alleged pattern of
harassment echoes that
of child sexual abusers
in trusted institutions.
By Paul Mones
T
the predator
Wes
Bausmith
Los Angeles
Times
A
By Chloe Safier
few months ago, I sat in a small gray
conference room and listened as four
middle-aged men read aloud from my
high school diaries. They parsed each
line, asking me to explain the technicalities of my teenage abbreviations and cadence, searching for evidence that I had — unknowingly — witnessed a crime.
Joseph Thomas Koetters was my English teacher
at the Marlborough School in Los Angeles. In 2015, he
was sentenced to a year in jail on charges that he
engaged in sex acts with two underage girls in the
early 2000s.
Although I was oblivious to my teacher’s predations, I knew one of the young women he targeted.
Chelsea used to walk around with a half consumed
iced mocha latte and a soccer bag slung over her
shoulder. She explained our calculus homework to me
so often that I saved her number as “Chelsea Math.”
As I discovered years later, she found out she was
pregnant in a Carl’s Jr. bathroom, and
miscarried soon after.
Chelsea didn’t need to go through that.
No one should have to go through that.
The lawyers reading from my diaries
were taking my deposition for a civil suit
against Marlborough. They were building
a case that the school was negligent in
identifying my teacher’s behavior and
responsible for ignoring years of complaints that students had registered
against him.
I attended Marlborough from 7th to
12th grade. I loved it. The sprawling, wellkept campus and time-honored rituals
like pin ceremonies and senior class songs provided a
refuge from the chaos of adolescence. I trusted Marlborough, my parents trusted Marlborough, and I
trusted Koetters. He was a transgressive, effective
teacher who challenged us to think outside the box
and talked to us like the adults we thought we were.
He led class discussions on books with complex adult
themes like J.M. Coetzee’s “Disgrace,” in which a
professor rapes a vulnerable young student. He listened carefully to our thoughts and opinions. My
friends and I liked him so much that we referred to
ourselves as the “KFC,” the Koetters Fan Club.
Koetters never touched me, but in the years since
the case was made public, I have often thought that I
should have noticed and done something to stop his
abuse. As an adult reading back through my diaries, it
is glaringly obvious that something was wrong.
I once wrote: “Koetters told me I’m sexually repressed.” At the time, I wasn’t sure what that meant. I
also wrote about the time our senior class read D.H.
Lawrence’s short story “The Rocking Horse Winner.”
I wrote down that Koetters told us young people are
told not to have sex, and yet we’re bombarded with
sexual imagery, leaving us with no option but masturbation. The real answer, he said, according to my
notes, is to have sex freely and openly. I had never
known adults who talked so overtly about sex. It felt
grown-up, and a bit gross. In the discussion of the
story, Koetters focused on the masturbatory elements and then asked one of my classmates, “So,
how do you masturbate?”
I was a witness who did not see; I perceived my
teacher’s behavior through a guileless lens. I remember hanging out in the halls with Koetters and a couple of other girls. I saw he had something on his neck.
I asked if it was a hickey and he said, “No it’s a pimple.
But you can suck on it if you want and get out the
puss.” I remember giggling nervously in response. It
struck me then as weird; it strikes me now as egregious. When I recounted this memory to the lawyers,
they were visibly uncomfortable.
In hindsight, it seems that Koetters was carefully
pushing at the edges of normal-seeming behavior to
create an atmosphere in which his actions would go
unseen and unreported. He preyed upon my innate
teenage desire to break the rules, confirming what I
already thought might be true, that the boundaries
dictating appropriate behavior were arbitrary and
false. At 16, I believed that I was hastening adulthood
by accepting his radical seeming perspectives on sex
and student-teacher dynamics.
For these reasons, I never saw him as a threat to
me or my friends. I thought the men to fear were the
ones I imagined skulking around the dark edges of my
home at night, or the handsy boys who offered to
drive me home after a school dance. My former teacher’s pattern of abuse is a reminder that while some
sexual violence is overt and obvious, a lot of what
makes abuse possible happens in small, quiet, deceptive ways.
Like many people who commit sex crimes, Koetters didn’t operate in a vacuum: Marlborough maintained an institutional culture
that enabled him to abuse his power. As
students, we were taught to question
political and economic power, but we
weren’t encouraged to understand or
challenge abuses of power from within our
own ranks.
The attorneys asked me again and
again if I ever relayed Koetters’ sexual
comments to a teacher or an administrator. “No,” I said, that would have been
unthinkable. High school was a hierarchical microcosm in which the teacher’s
authority was absolute. I was not aware of
any secure channels to report abuse (though I understand they have since created these), and I doubt I
would have reported him if I had.
It was a small school and a tightknit community. I
always assumed that the administration knew how
Koetters behaved. To an extent, that assumption was
correct. Vanity Fair reported in 2015 that, after
Chelsea and I graduated in 2002, Koetters harassed
other teenage girls. Although some of them lodged
official complaints, the school did not fire Koetters. In
2013, he left quietly and took a job at another expensive private school.
I don’t think the school was part of a nefarious
plot. Why did they ignore Koetters’ behavior? Was it a
combination of indifference, ambivalence, assumptions about teenage girls’ proclivity for drama, and
fear of getting into a lawsuit? Regardless, by ignoring
allegations from students over the years, the school
sent a message to young women: sit down, shut up,
and suffer male entitlement.
Institutions, companies and communities need to
talk more explicitly about power, abuse and consent.
Schools especially must not only protect girls and
teach boys not to rape, but encourage everyone to
speak openly about power dynamics, even if it implicates the institution itself. We need to show young
people what wolves look like, and what kinds of
clothes they wear. We need to explain the difference
between transgression and crime, between sexual
exploration and sexual abuse. We must teach young
people to recognize environments that sanction
abuse, and highlight safe channels of reporting. We
must talk about how age, race, gender and ability
affect power dynamics. We need to investigate allegations old and new. “Trust women” is a common refrain in the anti-sexual violence discourse, but it has
to start with “trust girls.”
As an adult
reading back
through my
diary entries,
it is glaringly
obvious that
something
was wrong.
Chloe Safier is an independent consultant who
works on global women’s rights and gender justice.
She tweets at @chloelenas.
here are many striking aspects to the
breathtaking fall of
Harvey Weinstein —
the volume of women
who have come forward, the number of years his alleged behavior
remained an open secret, the
sheer brazenness of that alleged
behavior and, now, the ripple effects it is having well beyond Hollywood.
But as an attorney who has
represented scores of victims of
child sexual abuse, sexual assault
and sexual harassment across
the country, here’s what I find
most remarkable: The similarities between the pattern of harassment that Weinstein allegedly
engaged in, and the patterns of
abuse that emerge in an entirely
different context — namely, the
sexual abuse of children in
trusted institutions.
Although the specifics are different, the psychological and behavioral dynamics at play among
the perpetrators and victims are
virtually identical. The way in
which
Weinstein
allegedly
wielded power and relied on institutional silence echoes the manner in which Catholic priests were
able to perpetrate grievous
wrongs against generations of
children.
Child abusers are consummately skilled in identifying vulnerable kids and knowing exactly
what to say and do to accomplish
their goals. Little is left to chance.
They use their positions of power
to cajole, knowing, for example,
that praise and hints of special
treatment are necessary in order
to begin the process of initiating
control.
With the obvious difference
that Weinstein’s alleged victims
weren’t children, he reportedly
employed similarly manipulative
tactics to achieve his ends, promising movie roles and attempting
to normalize such propositions
by rattling off the names of other
actresses who had purportedly
complied.
Some child molesters engage
in overtly violent assaults, but it is
far more common for the abuser
to begin with seemingly innocent
touches — the stroke of a knee, a
rub of the shoulder, the casual
tussle of the hair — before moving
on to more invasive physical acts.
Predators perfect their modus
operandi through the exploitation of multiple victims, learning
along the way how to break down
a child’s boundaries and resistance.
Although Weinstein allegedly
used more of a shock-and-awe approach — the unbelted robe at the
business meeting — he, too, appears to have homed in on a certain kind of victim and fine-tuned
the process by which he allegedly
lured them into rooms, enlisting
the help of what one female executive at his company called a
“honeypot” of assistants and others to lend such meetings legitimacy.
Fifteen years ago, the dirty secrets of the Roman Catholic
Church exploded in big cities and
small towns across the country.
Since then, we have learned that
the church is far from the only
place where child molesters turn
up. Almost no type of major institution serving children has escaped this shame: Public schools,
including the Los Angeles Unified
School District; private schools,
including
the
Marlborough
School in L.A. and elite New England boarding schools, such as
Choate Rosemary Hall, Phillips
Exeter and St. Paul’s School; the
Boy Scouts of America and the
Boys and Girls Club; USA Swimming and USA Gymnastics. The
list goes on and on.
The perpetrators in these settings do not rely merely on the silence of their victims. They can
also count on the inaction and
complicity of others around
them, including co-workers and
superiors, for whom the avoidance of scandal and institutional
humiliation is a strong motivator
to look the other way. Tragically,
this only strengthens the abuser’s sense of omnipotence and reinforces the victim’s fear and isolation.
While there is no doubt that
child victims of sexual abuse are
in an infinitely more vulnerable
and powerless position than
adults subjected to sexual harassment and assault, it is equally
true that, with the exception of
very young children, both groups
of victims react in remarkably
similar ways to their treatment
and exploitation.
In the vast majority of these
situations, victims do not react by
physically or verbally resisting
the offender, reporting the offender or even fleeing at first
touch. Rather, victims become
psychologically and emotionally
paralyzed, overwhelmed by a
combination of fear, self-blame,
embarrassment and confusion.
They become gripped by an emotional maelstrom in which unanswerable and destructively selfcritical questions play over and
over again in their minds, often
for years on end: Why me? How
could I let this happen?
As time goes by, without treatment, these feelings corrode the
victim’s self-esteem and dignity,
and remaining silent becomes
their default coping strategy. The
perpetrators not only rely on such
silence, they deliberately act to
engender it.
It is widely believed by those of
us who spend our careers working with victims of sexual abuse
that most take their secrets to
their graves. When survivors do
gather the strength to come forward, it is typically only after
someone else has publicly accused the same person, and even
then only a minority speak out.
The majority of victims will never get any justice. Except in a
handful of states, the statutes of
limitations for sexual abuse, assault and harassment are draconian. For sexual abuse and assault, the time limits are generally just a precious few years.
These fleeting windows of time do
not take into account irrefutable
evidence about the long-term effects of sexual abuse and trauma.
We need to reexamine these laws
even as we dismantle the institutional and corporate environments in which abuse and harassment are allowed to persist.
Paul Mones is an attorney in
Los Angeles who represents
victims of sexual abuse and
assault.
Greg Houston For The Times
S
CALIFORNIA
B
S U N D A Y , O C T O B E R 2 2 , 2 0 1 7 :: L A T I M E S . C O M / C A L I F O R N I A
Mogul’s
threats
shook
director
Marion ‘Suge’ Knight
was enraged by his
depiction in N.W.A
biopic, records show.
By James Queally
and Marisa Gerber
F. Gary Gray was standing on a South L.A. street,
filming a scene for the N.W.A
biopic
“Straight
Outta
Compton,” when the acclaimed director received a
phone call from one of the
men depicted in the movie.
Marion “Suge” Knight
was on the other end of the
line, and he was angry, according to testimony by detectives this year. Knight,
the Compton-born former
rap mogul who founded
Death Row Records, was furious about his depiction in
the film and the fact that he
had not received any compensation, court records
show.
Eventually, Gray hung
up. At least two more phone
calls came, but Gray ignored
them. A text message soon
followed.
“I will see u in person … u
have kids just like me so let’s
play hardball,” Knight, 52,
wrote, ending the message
with a pair of expletives and
a racial slur, according to
court records.
The messages left Gray
so shaken that he spent
nearly two days dodging
questions about the incident during a grand jury
hearing this year, according
to transcripts made public
for the first time Friday
afternoon.
During the hearing, Gray
repeatedly said he could not
remember anything about
the messages, according to a
copy of the transcripts reviewed by The Times. At one
point, Gray seemed to have
difficulty even recalling details about the film he’d directed, which was nominated for an Academy
Award and received numer[See Gray, B6]
Shop
abuzz
over
Trump
STEVE LOPEZ
“Do you notice anything
different?”
Lawrence
Tolliver asked
Thursday
when I
walked into
his South Los
Angeles
barbershop.
Yes, as a matter of fact.
He’s really cleaned the place
up. Tolliver’s always had
photos of his heroes on the
walls, but he’s added many
more to the collection, turning the clip shop into a
museum. There’s Nelson
Mandela, Rosa Parks,
Muhammad Ali, Barack
Obama, Martin Luther King
Jr. and many, many more
African American athletes
and leaders.
And also, the last two
chiefs of the LAPD and the
current L.A. County sheriff
— all of whom are white.
Tolliver’s son is a police
officer, and lots of his customers are in law enforcement too.
So given the whole takea-knee controversy in the
[See Lopez, B6]
Photographs by
Genaro Molina Los Angeles Times
A FENCE is all that remains of Katrena and Steve Dursteler’s home in Redwood Valley. All 18 houses on their street were destroyed.
A life-or-death escape
As wildfire exploded, the residents of Redwood Valley were left to flee on their own
By Joe Mozingo
REDWOOD VALLEY, Calif. —
In his living room after midnight,
as he waited for “Alfred Hitchcock
Presents,” Frank Belford sniffed
smoke.
He stepped into his yard with
his dog, Sassy. Above the ridge to
the east, it looked like the glow of a
giant autumn moon rising, orange
as a jack-o’-lantern.
But he knew full moons did not
rise at midnight.
“Kathy, get out of bed.”
The escape from Redwood Valley began with no evacuation orders, no reverse-911 alerts, no warning whatsoever from authorities.
Residents were left on their own to
flee for their lives.
A mechanic trapped by fire on
the ground climbed a tree until it
passed. An elderly woman raced
out in her underwear. A mother
and her four children hiked
through the brush of a steep mountain ravine to safety.
Most who survived had to
thread a narrow road with trees
ablaze on both sides. Burning debris rained down on them as they
drove over fallen limbs in the
smoke.
Eight people did not make it out
of the valley alive.
Redwood Valley is one of the bucolic valleys dividing the vast
mountains of Mendocino County.
The braided West Fork of the Russian River wends through it from
the north as the valley opens from a
narrow canyon to a flat bottomland of vineyards, pastures, mod-
DEE PALLESEN , left, and daughter Emily Learn take in the rubble of Pallesen’s home. Eight people were killed in the fire.
RON LOCATELLI , right, and an insurance adjuster talk at the site
of the volunteer firefighter’s former home on Fisher Lake Drive.
est new homes and old farmhouses.
Thick forest of oak, fir,
madrone, redwood and maple cover the ridges to the east and west,
with off-the-grid homesteads and
marijuana plots scattered up old
logging roads.
The Belfords lived on Fisher
Lake Drive, a one-street subdivision of 18 houses built in the narrow
north end of the valley in the 1970s.
On their woodsy cul-de-sac
were teachers, firefighters, mechanics, shop owners, contractors,
at least one pot grower and several
retirees. They had swimming
pools, ATVs and backyard work
shops.
Tomki Road — one lane in each
direction — was the only way out.
On that Sunday night, Oct. 8,
Kathy Belford called the community’s volunteer fire department and
the closest Cal Fire station. No one
answered. She called 911, and the
dispatcher told her she was not
aware of any alerts or evacuation
orders in Redwood Valley.
The Redwood Valley Fire Department, including a volunteer
who lived across the street, had
been sent to a fire in neighboring
Potter Valley that erupted an hour
before.
Embers
and
spot
fires
leapfrogged the valley floor and up
the west ridge, and at 1 a.m., the
flame front was moving down the
other side — toward the 1,730 residents of Redwood Valley.
Frank Belford told Kathy to
wake up the neighbors while he
drove to warn his elderly aunt up
[See Escape, B4]
Sounding alarm for urban fire plan
On heels of deadly
wildfires, a shift from
defense to prevention
is needed, experts say.
By Thomas Curwen
Luis Sinco Los Angeles Times
THE TUBBS fire left the Coffey Park subdivision in Santa Rosa, Calif., in ruins.
The area was exempt from state fire rules meant to make buildings fire-resistant.
Historian Stephen Pyne
sees no coincidence in the
fact that on Oct. 8,1542 — 475
years to the day before the
wildfires began ravaging
Northern California — the
Spanish explorer Juan Rodríguez Cabrillo saw smoke
in the sky above Southern
California.
Cabrillo’s pilot, Bartolomé Ferrelo, dutifully recorded the phenomena in
the ship’s log, as the explorer
christened the San Pedro
roadstead “Bahía de los Fumos o Fuegos.”
“Fire isn’t going away,”
Pyne says on the phone from
his home near Tempe, Ariz.
Pyne, a onetime smoke
chaser on the North Rim of
the Grand Canyon, is the author of more than 30 books,
most on the cultural and social effects of wildland and
rural fires around the world.
He is completing a 10-volume history of fire in the
United States.
“Among the ancient elements,” Pyne writes, “fire is
the odd one out. Earth, water, air — all are substances.
Fire is a reaction. It synthesizes its surroundings,
takes its character from its
context. It burns one way in
peat, another in tallgrass
prairie, and yet another
through lodge pole pine.”
And it burns differently
still through communities.
The Northern California
fires have not surprised
Pyne, and as state and local
officials begin to comb
through the debris to see
how and why this tragedy occurred, he knows that the
answers will not be hard to
find.
“We’re not seeing some[See Strategy, B5]
S
L AT I M E S . C O M
S U N DAY, O C T O B E R 22 , 2 017
B3
ESSENTIAL POLITICS
POLITICAL ROAD MAP
Among GOP’s
woes, a dearth
of candidates
JOHN MYERS
When the votes were tallied in California’s 2014 primary, the political world buzzed that a Republican was
the top vote-getter in the race for state controller. That
kind of support hadn’t been seen in a statewide race since
2006.
Fast forward to four years later. There’s not even a
GOP candidate in that race.
As Republicans wrap up their weekend convention in
Anaheim, a lingering question is whether the party —
whose share of the registered electorate has shrunk by almost10 percentage points since 2007 — will continue to atrophy if it can’t produce viable candidates for a variety of
California’s statewide offices.
The candidate who won those 2014 primary election
votes for state controller, former Fresno Mayor Ashley
Swearengin, was later defeated by Democrat Betty Yee.
Swearengin’s political strategist later criticized GOP
leaders for not helping to raise enough money to allow the
Central Valley candidate to be competitive in the fall.
The party’s woes are well documented. It trails Democrats by almost 4 million registered voters, holds fewer
than a third of the seats in the Legislature and only about
one-quarter of those in California’s congressional delegation. Democrats remain the undisputed campaign
cash champions, and Republicans have spent decades
sparring over the party’s direction — including this year
when a handful of GOP legislators voted to extend the life
of the state’s cap-and-trade climate program.
Slowly, Republican candidates have emerged for
“down ticket” statewide races, those below the race for
governor. The latest is Mark Meuser, a Bay Area Republican who last week launched a challenge to Secretary of
State Alex Padilla, criticizing the Democratic incumbent
for inaccurate voter registration records — an accusation
based on a conservative think tank’s still-unproven
summertime analysis.
But as with Swearengin, who spent almost all of her
cash before the June 2014 primary, money is probably a
problem. In 2014, the seven Democrats running for the
statewide offices below governor collectively spent five
times as much as their Republican challengers. And
donors like to back candidates who they think can actually win.
Only two Republicans have won a statewide race since
1998 and both of those victories — former Gov. Arnold
Schwarzenegger and former state Insurance Commissioner Steve Poizner — were in 2006.
Even in the governor’s race, the Republican hopefuls
are far from household names. Thirteen party members
have opened exploratory committees of one variety or another, with Rancho Santa Fe businessman John Cox and
Huntington Beach Assemblyman Travis Allen leading
the pack.
Some wonder whether a weak GOP field, plus California’s top-two primary rules, could result in multiple statewide races on November 2018’s general election ballot being between two Democrats — as was the case in the June
2016 primary for the U.S. Senate.
The state GOP chairman, Jim Brulte, has focused
more on legislative races and shoring up the party’s finances than expensive high-profile campaigns. Before
last winter’s state convention, he told The Times that Republicans “believe there is” a path for victory in statewide
races come 2018.
First, though, the party needs credible candidates. Or
in the case of the California controller’s race, any candidate at all.
john.myers@latimes.com
POLITICS
County supervisors back
Sen. Feinstein for 2018
Members of the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors have all endorsed Sen. Dianne Feinstein, who is being
challenged by state Senate leader Kevin de León.
It’s a snub for De León, a native Angeleno who has represented part of the city for more than a decade in the Assembly and state Senate.
Board Chairman Mark Ridley-Thomas said all five
board members support Feinstein — including the lone
Republican, 5th District Supervisor Kathryn Barger, who
said in a statement that California needs Feinstein serving in the U.S. Senate.
— Sarah D. Wire
CAPITOL WATCH
Allen J. Schaben Los Angeles Times
HOUSE MINORITY Leader Nancy Pelosi speaks at The View From California summit in L.A. last week.
Pelosi says she hasn’t
been harassed in D.C.
Longtime lawmaker
praises the courage of
women sharing stories
of mistreatment.
By Javier Panzar
and Colleen Shalby
House Minority Leader
Nancy Pelosi, who has
served for three decades on
Capitol Hill, said she had not
seen or experienced the kind
of behavior that sparked the
vast #MeToo campaign for
victims of sexual harassment and assault.
The San Francisco Democrat made the comments
during a wide-ranging interview at a Los Angeles Times
and Berggruen Institute
event Wednesday in downtown Los Angeles.
More than 140 women in
California’s Capitol — including legislators, Capitol
staff, political consultants,
lobbyists and the congresswoman’s own daughter
Christine Pelosi — signed a
letter on Tuesday calling out
a “pervasive” culture of sexual harassment and mistreatment there.
“I don’t have that experience in Washington, D.C. I
just don’t,” Pelosi said when
asked if the nation’s Capitol
had the same problem. “I
have not seen that.”
She said that there
should be “zero tolerance”
when it comes to disrespect
for women and thanked
those who have shared their
stories.
“Your courage gives comfort to other women,” she
said.
The discussion also touched on Pelosi’s future in the
party’s leadership, the division within the Democratic
Party and the Democratic
showdown between state
Senate leader Kevin de León
and veteran U.S. Sen. Di-
anne Feinstein.
Pelosi, who beat back a
challenge by Ohio Rep. Tim
Ryan to win another term as
minority leader last December, is looking to lead her
party out of the wilderness
in the 2018 midterm elections.
Meanwhile, the party’s
more liberal base is growing
increasingly bold and testing its strength. Progressive
activism fueled a nearly successful effort by progressive
Kimberly Ellis to lead the
state party, as well as the acrimonious push for a singlepayer healthcare bill in Sacramento this year.
On Wednesday, Pelosi
pushed back against the
idea that the party is not
united.
“It has its diversity, and
that is what its beauty is, but
these are not big differences
within the party,” she said.
Pelosi tried to stay out of
the emerging fight between
De León and Feinstein, but
did tell the crowd she thinks
Feinstein’s
seniority
in
Washington is a valuable asset.
“People running against
each other for office, that is a
democracy,” she said.
“I do think that it is important to note how powerful Dianne Feinstein is in
Washington, D.C., and how
important that is to the
state of California…. Another case can be made as to
whether that is valuable or
not, and that is what the discussion is about.”
Pelosi says she’s “very
confident” her party will win
back a majority of the seats
in Congress during the
midterm elections, citing
the new wave of activism in
the party created by President Trump’s election.
Democrats have ambitious plans to take back the
House that depend in large
part on defeating Republicans in California districts
that former presidential
candidate Hillary Clinton
won last year.
The Democratic Party’s
strategy has involved tarring the GOP House members who voted to repeal
President Obama’s signature healthcare legislation.
With the Senate potentially moving toward a bipartisan deal to fix parts of the
law, Pelosi said she’s not
worried the deal could blunt
the
party’s
campaign
against vulnerable Republicans like Rep. Darrell Issa of
Vista.
“We don’t have to hold
the healthcare of the American people hostage to point
out why [Darrell Issa]
shouldn’t be in Congress,”
Pelosi said.
Pelosi, who previously
said she had considered retiring if Clinton had won the
2016 presidential election,
seems to be reinvigorated by
her role as a foil to Trump.
But she is navigating a
changing political landscape at home, too.
Last month, more than
four dozen immigration activists upset with Democrats for negotiating with
Trump drowned out Pelosi
at a San Francisco news
conference, shouting, “We
are not your bargaining
chip.”
Whittier Rep. Linda
Sanchez, a new addition to
House Democrats’ leadership team, recently said Pelosi and other longtime leaders need to make way for a
new generation.
Pelosi said Wednesday
that new leaders are emerging in California’s Democratic delegation, namedropping East Bay Rep. Eric
Swalwell and Los Angeles
Rep. Adam Schiff.
Asked about Sanchez’s
comments, she said that although she does not have
“100% of the people” in her
caucus in her “fan club,” she
Brown vetoes smaller
share of bills this year
$105,500
Amount Rep. Tony Cárdenas spent on tickets to
“Hamilton” for a fundraiser
that allowed him to raise
more than $300,000
LATIMES.COM/ ESSENTIALPOLITICS
>>> State GOP leader says the new gas tax
makes Democrats vulnerable in California
>>>Tom Steyer launches nationwide call for
Trump’s impeachment
Find these stories on our minute-by-minute newsfeed and
subscribe to the newsletter at latimes.com/essentialpoliticsemail
javier.panzar@latimes.com
Twitter: @jpanzar
colleen.shalby
@latimes.com
Twitter: @cshalby
ESSENTIALS
Gov. Jerry Brown signed 859 bills in 2017 and vetoed
just 118. That veto rate — 12% — is lower than the 15% of
proposed laws he rejected in 2016.
Brown’s rate of rejecting bills has grown since his first
stint as governor. He has reviewed more than 18,000 proposed laws over his four terms in office. Fewer than 8% of
those were vetoed.
Republican governors hold the record for the most
bills vetoed. Former Gov. George Deukmejian rejected
436 bills in 1990, and former Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger
vetoed 414 in 2008, the Senate Office of Research found.
— John Myers
>>>Far-right blogger Chuck C. Johnson gave
bitcoin donation to Dana Rohrabacher
does have an “overwhelming
majority” of support among
Democrats.
“I don’t want to be dismissive of this, but I’m not
worried about it,” she said.
The Times also asked for
Pelosi’s insight for women
starting out in politics. She
said she has run into plenty
of naysayers over the years,
but hasn’t let other people’s
doubt stop her. Her advice
for those at the beginning of
their career is simple.
“Know your purpose,”
she said in an interview
Wednesday night before the
Summit event. “Whether it’s
education, the environment,
equal rights, women’s health
— whatever it is. Master your
subject. Have a plan on how
you will implement your ideas and you will attract support.”
When she decided to run
for a leadership position in
Congress, Pelosi said a man
questioned her move.
“As if a woman had to be
told she could run,” she recalled. “We just laughed and
said ‘poor babies.’ ”
Pelosi also made headlines Friday in an appearance on ABC’s “The View,”
saying she needs to keep her
leadership position so there
is a “top” woman at the table
when decisions are made.
She noted she was interrupted by Cabinet officials
during her consequential
White House dinner with
Trump and Senate Minority
Leader Charles E. Schumer
(D-N.Y.).
“I was the only woman at
the table, and that’s why I
have to stay there, to be one
of the top women, top people, at the table,” she said.
Watch the conversation
at latimes.com/PelosiEvent.
Francine Orr Los Angeles Times
PARTY FA I T H F U L GAT H E R
Naweed Tahmas, spokesman for Berkeley College Republicans, led the pledge
of allegiance before former Trump advisor Stephen K. Bannon took the stage
Friday at the California GOP convention in Anaheim. See more coverage of
the state Republican Party convention at latimes.com/essentialpolitics.
‘My whole life,
I’ve been told to
wait my turn. ...
Well, it’s California’s turn to
... be a shining
example for the
world and a
stark contrast
to the failures of
Washington.’
— Kevin de León,
state Senate leader, at a
U.S. Senate campaign event
B4
S U N DAY, O C T O B E R 22, 2 017
S
L AT I M E S . C O M
Photographs by
Genaro Molina Los Angeles Times
DEBBY SEARS looks over the wreckage of her parents’ home in Redwood Valley. Her parents had lived there for 30 years. About 500 homes in the valley burned.
Neighbors’ small, life-saving acts
::
Up the hill from him,
Charlotte Scott had seen the
fire and raced her Volvo
down the three-mile dirt
road from her house. The 41year-old attorney had four
children ranging in age from
3 to 14 in the car. She
watched the fire coming
down the east ridge toward
the valley floor and needed
to make it to Tomki Road before the flames did.
She swung into her
neighbor Jan Hoyman’s
driveway, half a mile from
Tomki, and lay on the horn
to wake her up. No movement. Her Subaru was
parked. Maybe she’d left
with her tenants.
Scott pulled out, rounded
a bend and gasped. The pasture to the right was up in
flames, and trees next to her
were burning. She stopped
in front of a line of fire on
the ground. A burning tree
had fallen across the dirt
road.
Just beyond it, her escape route, Tomki, was
ablaze.
She reversed to do a
three-point-turn on the narrow road in the smoke. With
no visibility, she misjudged.
Her back wheels dropped
into a ditch, and the car
high-centered on the edge.
The tires spun.
“Everyone out of the car!”
she told the children in a
panic.
“We need to run.”
STEVE DURSTELER inspects the site where his Fisher Lake Drive home once stood. He and his wife, Ka-
trena, went door to door to alert many of their neighbors before fleeing with their three dogs.
At times, Belford
... thought he was
hallucinating. He
watched aerosol
cans launch like
errant missiles.
Bullets popped.
Fire tornadoes
screeched across
the street.
FRANK BELFORD on Thursday stands next to the
truck that helped him escape the flames on his street.
The fire’s deadly path
The eight people who died in Redwood Valley in the early
morning of Oct. 9 were forced to flee with little warning.
1:15-1:30
Roy Howard Bowman, 87,
Irma Elsie Bowman, 88
4141 Fisher Lake Drive
Tomki
Road
Margaret Stephenson, 86
12851 Tomki Road
Jane Gardiner, 83
12550 Tomki Road
Sweetland
Road
Janet Kay Costanzo, 71
Steve Bruce Stelter, 56
Kai Logan Shepherd, 14
11300 West Road
West Road
[Escape, from B1]
Tomki Road.
Kathy called Katrena
Dursteler next door.
The two women, both
schoolteachers, met in the
street as a Cal Fire SUV
drove up.
“Should we wake the
neighbors up?” Dursteler recalls asking the officer.
He seemed uncertain.
The fire was still distant.
“You might want to get
prepared,” he said.
As he drove away,
Dursteler, 45, went inside
and woke up her husband,
Steve, a 56-year-old crane
operator, and then ran
across the street to knock on
the door of her elderly neighbor.
The wind picked up.
Kathy Belford, 53, walked
to the next house to alert
Redhawk Pallesen, a retired
Cal Fire captain, and his
family. He came out and
looked at the orange light,
unable to gauge the threat.
He and his 20-year-old
daughter drove a half-mile
south on Tomki to a lookout.
He could see the fire was two
miles away.
By then, the wind was
turning
gale-force.
On
Fisher Lake Drive, clothes
flapped against skin as if the
residents had jumped from a
plane. Heavy tree limbs
snapped.
They shouted through
what sounded like a jet engine’s roar, with an eerie
keening.
Minutes later, when
Pallesen and his daughter
pulled back into the driveway, the fire had jumped a
good mile down the mountain.
“We’re leaving now,” he
said.
Elizabeth Charlene
Foster, 64
1921 Mohawk Trail
1,000 FT.
::
101
Detailed
Redwood
Valley fire
perimeter
Friday
Redwood
Valley
Fire origin
11:36 p.m. Oct. 8
::
When the power died,
embers and flaming chunks
of debris were hailing sideways across Fisher Lake
Drive. Katrena and Steve
Dursteler could not get near
the north half of the street to
alert those neighbors. They
had seen some drive out.
Katrena got in the car
with their three dogs, yelling
at Steve to come.
He stood in the driveway,
staring at the garage and the
safe with his guns — some
his dad had handed down to
him. He thought of all the
work he had done remodeling this house over13 years.
The rock hearth he built
with stone from a friend’s
property in the Sierra. The
picket fence he had just put
up. The wrought-iron garden ornaments he welded.
He knew he would not see
them again.
He jumped in his Dodge
pickup and followed his wife
and Kathy Belford and two
other neighbors out of the
cul-de-sac.
On Tomki, he watched
tendrils of fire swirl around
the slipstream of the caravan.
“Go, baby, go,” Steve said
to himself, to his wife in the
car ahead of him. “Go, go,
go.”
20
Lake Mendocino
Sources: Google Earth, Cal Fire. Graphics reporting by J o e M o z i n g o
Los Angeles Times
Pallesen
and
Frank
Belford stayed behind,
hopeful they could douse
spot fires before they ignited
their homes.
As the trees lit up around
him, Pallesen, 52, escaped
the intense the heat by driving around in his truck to
find cool spots.
Embers pelted Belford
relentlessly, and he kept hosing down his Levi jacket so it
wouldn’t catch on fire.
Houses across the street
erupted. Propane tanks exploded, tires blew.
At times, Belford, a 58-
year-old mechanic, thought
he was hallucinating. He
watched
aerosol
cans
launch like errant missiles.
Bullets popped. Fire tornadoes screeched across the
street.
He lost the water in his
front hose when the PVC
pipe supplying it melted.
The water pressure in the
back hose turned to a trickle,
and he had to whip the nozzle, flinging water under his
eaves.
Pallesen watched his
workshop ignite and fall.
Around 2 a.m., he turned to
see a small, white-haired
woman standing behind
him.
“How are you alive?” he
thought.
She had parked her
cloth-top Buick Regal behind his truck.
Cheryl Locatelli, 72, was
out of options. Her husband,
Ron, had left to fight the fire
in Potter Valley.
When her neighbor Steve
Dursteler knocked on her
door more than an hour before, Locatelli got dressed
and grabbed her dog to
leave. But the power went
out and she couldn’t open
the garage door. She tried to
call Ron. No answer. She
found a flashlight and then
remembered the pull cord
that released the garage
door. When she got on
Tomki, the fire was terrifying
and she turned back.
Pallesen dropped the
hose, deciding he needed to
get Locatelli to safety.
“Follow me closely,” he
said. “Don’t stop.”
A quarter-mile down the
road in his truck, he spotted
what looked like a power line
arcing. As he approached,
he realized it was a flashlight.
Two people in jeans were
standing in the road. Terry
Blair, 64, wore a bathrobe
over his; his wife Carol, 61, a
nightgown. They had woken
to their house and cars
on fire. She called 911 to say
they were trapped. She was
so scared she couldn’t remember her address. The
dispatcher could not help.
They had no choice but to
run.
When they saw headlights coming maybe 10 minutes later, Terry thought it
was a mirage. They had expected to die.
Pallesen stopped. Terry
opened the passenger door
and lifted Carol in.
Scott was pulling her 3year-old daughter out of her
stuck Volvo when her neighbor Jan Hoyman came racing toward her in the Subaru.
Scott pushed everyone
into Hoyman’s car, and they
headed back up the mountain, trying to outrun the
wildfire.
They drove to the top of
the mountain and bushwhacked through a ravine —
following deer trails, crawling through manzanita — to
an evacuated house, where
they found an ATV with the
keys in it. They hooked it to a
trailer, loaded the children
in and motored off.
Frank Belford was now
alone on Fisher Lake Drive.
He watched all of his neighbors’ homes collapse, including Pallesen’s. He kept
flinging water at his eaves,
but soon he saw smoke
streaming from the roof
vents. The attic was burning.
He took a brief video,
panning the glowing ruins of
the neighborhood.
His home of 23 years collapsed. He had just six more
payments on the mortgage.
The pine needles in his
frontyard
ignited.
He
doused himself with the
hose and climbed a few feet
up a fir tree to keep from getting burned.
He had maneuvered his
truck to keep it from the fire,
but he didn’t think it was
possible to drive out.
When he climbed down,
he saw two firetrucks go
north on Tomki. He ran out
to the road with a strobe
light and shined it at them,
he said, but they didn’t stop.
A couple of minutes later,
heading south, they passed
him again.
But if they could escape,
he figured, he could, too. He
got in his truck and made it
to his cousin’s at the south
end of the valley about 3
a.m., and then met his wife at
an evacuation center 20
miles north. He thought Kathy had taken Sassy, his beloved Jack Russell terrier
who went with him everywhere. But she hadn’t.
He broke down; Sassy
died in the fire.
::
The survivors of Redwood Valley praised their
neighbors’ small, life-saving
acts, even inadvertent ones:
The Belfords spotting the
fire and rousing others. The
Durstelers going door to
door. Pallesen staying behind, rescuing three people.
Hoyman appearing at the
critical moment when all
seemed lost for Scott and
her children.
But the loss around them
is staggering. Eight people
perished within three miles.
About 500 homes burned.
All 18 houses on Fisher Lake
Drive were destroyed.
When the residents returned to the street last
week to dig through the rubble, their minds couldn’t
help but wander to the two
closest victims, just two lots
north of the Belfords, the
couple at 4141 Fisher Lake
Drive, who were always so
cheerful — and so thankful
for help cutting trees and fixing fences. Roy and Irma
Bowman, 87 and 88, never
got a warning, and never got
out.
joe.mozingo@latimes.com
Twitter: @joemozingo
S
L AT I M E S . C O M
S U N DAY, O C T O B E R 22 , 2 017
B5
‘We can change our approach’
[Strategy, from B1]
thing utterly new or alien,”
he says, “just a ramping-up
of what has gone on for a
long time.”
Even though the current
fire season has burned less
acreage than in 2012 or 2015,
it has claimed the highest
number of fatalities. This
tragedy, as Pyne sees it, is
the culmination of nearly a
century of failed fire management practices that have
been unable to address the
increasing escalation — and
conflict — between California’s growing population
and development, and California’s intrinsic “fire proneness.”
Few fires in California are
without precedent. The
state’s history is written in
fire, each decade marked by
losses of life and landscape
that follow a cyclical pattern.
In 1919, fires raced
through the eastern San Gabriel Mountains burning
115,000 acres, and in 2009, the
Station fire claimed 160,000
acres to the west.
The 1956 Inaja fire killed
11 firefighters in the Cleveland National Forest, and
the 2003 Cedar fire, following
a similar track, killed 15. The
1990 Painted Cave fire in the
Santa Ynez Mountains
burned 427 homes, and the
nearby Jesusita fire claimed
80 in 2009.
Even this year’s Atlas and
Nuns fires are not unique,
says Jack Cohen, a retired
fire research scientist with
the U.S. Forest Service, living in Missoula, Mont. Look
at the destruction caused by
the 2015 Valley fire — 2,000
buildings lost and four fatalities — in Lake County a little
farther north.
“It’s a little frustrating
when we think these disasters are a first,” Cohen says.
“We need to realize that this
happened two years ago, 40
miles away, and start thinking about changing our approach and strategy to these
fires.”
The case for making this
change grows more compelling, especially as catastrophic fire, once the seasonal concern of rural communities, has moved into
cities, and the standard explanation — Westerners
building homes in the fireprone regions of the country
— no longer applies.
“It’s no longer just the
case that we’re building
homes where the fires are,”
Pyne says. “The fires seem to
be going where the houses
are.”
Wildland fires
entering cities
From Pyne’s perspective,
even as the country has become more savvy about
wildfire — he credits media
attention given to the 1988
fires in Yellowstone and Norman Maclean’s 1992 book
“Young Men and Fire” — cities and counties have become less proactive about
fire management, and the
lack of resources and political will have kept firefighting
strategies from evolving.
Cohen agrees. Take the
expression “wildland-urban
interface,” he says. Used to
describe landscapes vulnerable to fire, WUI — as it is
known — has outlived its
usefulness.
“We have gotten ourselves distracted by the
term,” he says. “It no longer
matters whether these are
cities or rural enclaves. We
have tried to classify or categorize these at-risk environments, taking a demographic or geographic approach to the problem, but
that is not relevant to the
physics of what is actually
happening.”
Location, Cohen adds,
does not determine the potential for home ignition,
and as development has
pushed into rural lands over
the last 30 years, the distinction between urban fires and
wildland fires has grown
more fuzzy.
Pyne points to the Tunnel fire in Oakland in 1991 as
the first example of how a
fire, burning on the fringes of
a city, could move into the
urban core.
“At the time,” he says, “it
was considered a freak of geography, but now we’re seeing more of it.”
Urban fires were once
common phenomena. History books document the
Chicago and San Francisco
conflagrations, but more recent fires have left their
mark: a 1973 blaze that destroyed a Boston neighborhood and a 1982 blaze that
took out four blocks in Anaheim. Subsequent reforms
led to the establishment of
codes and zoning, insurance
requirements and advanced
Luis Sinco Los Angeles Times
A LACK OF resources, political will and proactivity about fire management has kept firefighting strategies
from evolving, retired fire research scientist Jack Cohen says. Above, a charred vehicle in Coffey Park.
Don Kelsen Los Angeles Times
A 1982 wildfire in Orange destroyed 13 homes in the
Crest De Ville Orange Park Acres community.
Luis Sinco Los Angeles Times
ties must assess “the ignition vulnerability of our
houses,” so that the firebrands, blown ahead of the
flame front, fail to find
flammable materials.
“We can change our approach,” Cohen says. “We
don’t have to live in ammo
bunkers with steel doors and
concrete walls.”
Pyne and Cohen suggest
that agencies and officials
look less at individual fires
and instead at the repeated
cycles of destruction.
The same landscape
burning decades apart is evidence that the current approach to fire prevention has
failed.
“If we keep telling the
same story — fire as disaster,
the firefight as a battlefield
— we won’t advance our
understanding,” Pyne says.
Cohen adds that “wildfires are inevitable, especially under extreme conditions, but the disasters as a
result don’t have to be inevitable. We aren’t going to get
rid of wildfires, nor do we
want to.”
The damage from these
fires, he says, can be limited
and contained, and as the
2017 fire season continues to
claim more acres and potentially more lives, the motivation should be there.
Three years ago, a strategy for wildland fire was developed by federal fire agencies.
But this National Cohesive Wildland Fire Management Strategy has languished, says Pyne, who
would like to see California
take the lead in implementing its three major recommendations: develop fireadapted communities (protects cities and exurbs), create fire-resilient landscapes
(manage fire in rural landscapes) and increase capabilities to fight fire.
That last one, he adds,
gets all the attention. “I get
it. It’s good politics. It’s good
optics. But it is not solving
the fundamentals.”
We can live with fire, Pyne
insists. “We need to change
how we live.”
OFFICIALS MUST look at repeated events to cre-
ate a better fire management plan, experts suggest.
Above, Coffey Park residents sift through rubble.
Richard Misrach BAM/PFA
THE 1991 Tunnel fire in Oakland marks the first
example of how a fire, burning on the fringes of a city,
can move into the urban core, a historian says.
fire protection systems.
Fire codes have kept city
residents safe and property
intact, but their effectiveness has led to complacency.
“Since urban fires no longer
happened,” Pyne says, “fires
were deemed less a problem.”
As a result, some counties exempt development on
the outskirts from regulations that would make
homes and buildings fire-resistant. Pyne is reminded of
the decision by some parents not to vaccinate their
child, believing that vaccinations among other children
will keep their child safe.
Such
an
exemption
proved especially catastrophic for residents in the
Santa Rosa subdivision of
Coffey Park, as The Times
reported last week.
“We have forgotten that
this could happen, and we
have forgotten what we need
to do to prevent it,” Pyne
says.
As more fires spread into
subdivisions, Pyne and Cohen believe the time is right
to demand accountability
for the firefighting and prevention techniques — urban
strategies applied to rural
settings and land management overlooked — that
agencies have adopted.
Cal Fire, he has written, is
essentially “an urban fire
service in the woods.”
Before 2006, the agency
had been the California Department of Forestry and
Fire Protection, which as the
name implies, oversaw the
state’s wildlands and had a
fire prevention mandate.
But that mandate, he says,
has lapsed as the agency has
assumed a more defensive
posture, fighting fires when
they occur.
This approach, he argues, has been exported
around the country. The reasons are varied, but one factor dominates: California’s
fires, beginning with the 1961
Bel-Air fire, get national airplay.
“Wildfires in Southern
California that shot flames
and rained embers on cities
were violent, photogenic,
and distressingly frequent.
They were unavoidable,”
Pyne writes. “And California,
notably Southern California, became the national
center for fire suppression.”
Cohen describes the California model as “the highest
level of fire response anywhere in the galaxy,” which
would be fine if it worked.
“Yet even at that,” he
says, “firefighters are overwhelmed.”
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A question of
political will
Last January, Pyne attended a conference organized by the U.S. Forest Service and the National Academy of Sciences. During one
session, participants were
asked to consider “what scientific research and technological innovation will allow
us to get ahead of the problem?”
Fire management, Pyne
argues, is not a technological or scientific problem.
This is a societal and political problem.
It means counties relocate power lines and clear
forested corridors to eliminate that ignition source.
“Another, deeper approach,”
he says, “would be to have
more local power sources
like solar panels.”
It means changing how
fires are being managed.
Pyne recommends that California develop its urban fire
services in parity with land
management agencies that
have experience controlling
the state’s combustible wildlands.
It means allowing more
controlled burns, and it
means applying the same
citywide codes and zoning
requirements to rural subdivisions.
But Cohen adds, codes
won’t keep homes entirely
safe. “You can’t code for firewood on decks, pine needles
in rain gutters or dead fuel
accumulations covered by a
green cloak of leaves.”
Fire protection, he says,
cannot be the sole responsibility of fire departments.
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thomas.curwen
@latimes.com
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S U N DAY , O C T O B E R 22, 2 017
S
L AT I M E S . C O M
Dissecting NFL, military and Trump
[Lopez, from B1]
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attacking players and the
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When I got there, CNN
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widow of African American
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one of four U.S. servicemen
killed in Niger.
Rep. Frederica S. Wilson
(D-Fla.), also African
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the Trump call. She agreed
with the widow that the
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in the midst of a wrenching
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Before long, Trump was
accusing the lawmaker of
fabricating her account of
his conversation with the
widow. He followed that up
by claiming, “If you look at
President Obama and other
presidents, most of them
didn’t make calls.”
That isn’t true. But at
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keeps screaming about fake
news is not a surprise. And
to the regulars at Tolliver’s,
it wasn’t a surprise that
Trump had accused a black
congressional representative of lying and dragged a
black former president into
the conversation.
“It’s sick,” said Drew
Palmer, who thinks Trump
is obsessed with Obama.
“He tries to erase and obliterate every part of history
Obama has touched.”
If you ask me, personal
attacks are part of Trump’s
nature — and also part of
his plan. Maybe kicking
sand in people’s faces blinds
some, momentarily, to the
fact his self-proclaimed
deal-making powers have
not delivered a fraction of
the fast-and-furious fixes he
promised.
Trump’s obsession with
Obama goes way back. For
years, he led the charge in
insisting Obama was not a
U.S. citizen. Long after such
claims had been dismissed
as a crackpot conspiracy,
Trump kept insisting the
first black president of the
U.S. was African.
“And he never apologized,” Palmer said.
Carter Paysinger said
that when more NFL players began kneeling this
season during the national
anthem as a statement
against injustice in minority
communities, the language
of Trump’s criticism caught
his attention. Trump said a
player who kneels during
the anthem is a “son of a
bitch” who should be fired,
and the NFL should tell
them to stand.
“That brings you back to
slavery,” said Paysinger, a
former high school principal. “Tell them to stand up
goes deeper than what it
sounds like.”
“And we all hear the dog
whistle,” said Palmer, arguing that Trump seemed
Robert Gauthier Los Angeles Times
LAWRENCE TOLLIVER , shown in his barbershop
in 2012, says, “I hold the flag in high regard.”
more offended by “black
people kneeling for a cause”
than by white supremacists
rallying in Charlottesville,
Va.
On the subject of kneeling during the anthem,
Tolliver had this to say:
“I would never do it.
“I hold the flag in high
regard,” said Tolliver, but he
would “never let anyone tell
me what the American flag
represents.” He was in
ROTC in high school, Tolliver said, and he proudly
handled the daily duty of
raising and lowering the
flag. “But if they wanna
protest, they can do it,”
Tolliver said. “That’s what
America is.”
The kneeling began after
a Green Beret convinced
former quarterback Colin
Kaepernick that kneeling,
as soldiers do before fallen
comrades, would be more
respectful than sitting during the anthem.
“To me, they’re not protesting the flag,” Palmer
said. Nor, in his opinion, are
players dishonoring those
who served the country.
As he spoke, a story on
Arizona Republican Sen.
John McCain aired on TV.
“That man there is trying
to stick up for what’s right,”
Tolliver said.
“That’s a war hero,” said
Palmer, who brought up
that Trump — who did not
serve in the military — had
taken a shot at McCain for
having been captured during the Vietnam War.
McCain, who was tortured, refused to use family
connections to win early
release, telling his captors
he wouldn’t leave his crew
behind.
Trump said during the
presidential campaign that
McCain wasn’t a hero.
“If you’re a military person, in my humble opinion,
and you support Trump
after that statement right
there, I have no respect for
you,” Palmer said.
He cited Rosa Parks and
other African Americans
who, throughout history
and despite the risks, had
said enough is enough. You
don’t have to be the perfect
spokesman or most brilliant
visionary to take such a
stand, Palmer said. You
don’t even have to be a
leader. It’s enough to be
faithful to your conscience.
Those who kneel, he said,
are drawing attention to
social and economic conditions in minority communities and saying they cannot
tolerate the loss of black
lives in questionable police
shootings.
“Being a police officer is a
dangerous job,” Tolliver
said. “I would give a little
leeway to officers who may
be in a borderline situation.
Your life is on the line and
you say: ‘I wanna get home
tonight.’ But there are
shootings that are completely outrageous.”
I asked if it was fair for
some to suggest that civil
rights leaders and protesters ought to be at least
as outraged by all the lives
lost to black-on-black crime.
Is that not a cause worth
kneeling for?
Two different issues,
Palmer said.
William Taylor, whose
family ran a furniture store
in the neighborhood for
years, said those losses are
tragic, but police officers are
public servants whose misdeeds have to be addressed.
And yet, prosecutions are
relatively rare.
“If you took a bunch of
white kids and put them in
the same conditions these
kids in Chicago have to live
in, they’d kill each other
too,” said Rev. Jerrold
Smith of Los Angeles Third
Church of Spiritual Living.
“With black-on-black
crime, that’s bred for centuries and centuries, just
like the racist attitudes
we’re talking about. I’m not
excusing it, and I believe we
should march and raise hell
and protest every time a
black man gets killed by a
black man, just like we do
when a black man is killed
by police.” But the focus,
Smith said, should be on the
conditions that foster the
loss of so many lives.
That was another campaign promise, as I recall.
Trump was going to bring
prosperity and safety to
America’s inner cities.
If you’re waiting on the
details of that plan, do not
stand, because it could take
a while.
Better to take a knee.
steve.lopez@latimes.com
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senting Knight in the criminal threats case and is also
part of the defense team in
his pending homicide trial,
said she does not believe the
phone from which the text
messages were sent actually
belongs to her client.
The gang references in
the texts sound “ like law enforcement language,” said
Banos, who also pointed to
Gray’s testimony as a sign
her client should not be indicted.
“It was basically just
feeding the grand jury what
it needed to be fed in order to
get an indictment,” she said
of the testimony of police officers contained in the transcripts.
Banos also said she believes the threats case was
filed in order to bolster the
prosecution’s hopes of win-
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[Gray, from B1]
ous other tributes.
The director’s testimony
— or lack of it — illustrated
the level of fear Knight had
instilled in Gray, Deputy
Dist. Atty. Cynthia Barnes
told the grand jury.
“He’s so afraid he came in
here and lied under oath,”
Barnes said. “He’s perjuring
himself because he’s that
afraid.”
The February hearing resulted in grand jurors indicting Knight on a charge of
threatening Gray with death
or great bodily injury, one of
several turns in a now yearslong legal saga for Knight,
who is also awaiting trial in
separate homicide and robbery cases in Los Angeles
County.
Dominique Banos, a defense attorney who is repre-
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ning a conviction in the homicide case.
Prosecutors say Knight’s
frustration with the N.W.A
film boiled over in January
2015, when he rammed his
Ford F-150 Raptor pickup
truck into two men outside
Tam’s Burgers in Compton
after a dispute on the set.
Terry Carter, 55, died of his
injuries. Another man, Cle
“Bone” Sloan, was seriously
injured but survived.
Knight surrendered a
short time later and said he
was acting in self-defense. In
a court filing made public
this month, Knight contended his former business
partner and N.W.A member
Dr. Dre paid $20,000 to have
him killed, arguing that a hit
man was present at Tam’s
on the day of the killing. An
attorney for Dre, whose real
name is Andre Young, said
the accusation was “absurd.”
In the text messages sent
to Gray on Aug. 8, 2014,
Knight used gang terminology and made reference to
other N.W.A members, according to the transcripts.
“I’m from Bomton,”
Knight wrote, using wellknown Bloods slang. “I’m a
Blood criminal street gang
member from the city of
Compton … Time has arrived Faith in God keep ppl
safe. The Devil’s Money can’t
save No 1.”
Knight is a member of the
Mob Piru set of the Bloods
gang, according to detectives. He also wrote that he
would “make sure” Gray,
Young and Ice Cube — another N.W.A member and actor whose real name is
O’Shea Jackson — would receive “hugs,” slang for physical violence, according to
testimony given by detectives.
When police arrived at
the film set, Gray “seemed
extremely agitated as well as
extremely frightened,” according to the testimony of
Los Angeles Police Det. Jason Cook, who responded to
the scene that day.
Gray told detectives
Knight had threatened his
family and members of the
film crew and that he was angry over his portrayal, according to Cook’s testimony.
In the movie, Knight —
played by actor R. Marcos
Taylor — is a powerful and
often-menacing figure. During a scene inside a recording studio, Knight threatens
another N.W.A founder,
Eazy-E, and then watches as
two men beat him up.
In the grand jury hearing,
Gray was evasive when
asked by a prosecutor
whether Knight was depicted as violent in the film,
only acknowledging that the
character took part in a
“fight scene.” The director
repeatedly said he could not
remember anything about
the phone calls, text messages or any communication
he had that day with Knight.
“I can’t say I remember
being threatened by him
specifically,” Gray said, according to the transcript.
On several occasions,
prosecutors scolded Gray
for dodging questions. Gray
was ordered into two separate hearings about his refusal to answer questions,
but transcripts of those proceedings were not available
Friday.
As the hearing continued, prosecutors expressed
their frustration. Deputy
Dist. Atty. Valerie AenlleRocha asked Gray to detail
the films he had directed,
which include the most recent installment of “The
Fast and the Furious” series
and the South L.A.-based
“Friday.” She asked him to
name the actors involved in
each film, then questioned
how he could remember all
of that but draw a blank
when it came to the incident
with Knight.
Gray did not want to be
involved with the case in any
way, according to testimony
from Los Angeles County
Sheriff ’s Sgt. Richard Biddle, the lead investigator in
Knight’s homicide case. Biddle said he had trouble serving Gray with a subpoena to
appear at the grand jury
hearing, ultimately tracking
him to Los Angeles International Airport as the director
was about to board a flight
out of the country.
Gray asked the homicide
investigator to escort him in
and out of a downtown
courthouse
during
the
grand jury proceedings to
protect him from reporters
and “Knight’s gang members,” according to Biddle’s
testimony.
“You’re a bright guy.
You’re smart,” Barnes told
Gray during the grand jury
hearing. “You remember a
lot, and you seem to have a
black-hole memory when it
comes to this individual incident.”
james.queally
@latimes.com
marisa.gerber
@latimes.com
S
L AT I M E S . C O M
S U N DAY, O C T O B E R 22 , 2 017
B7
Schools official’s
ethics probe ends
State agency says
matter is closed amid
pending felony case
against Ref Rodriguez.
By Howard Blume
Gina Ferazzi Los Angeles Times
INVESTIGATORS examine the scene of a fatal crash between an L.A.-bound tour bus and a semitrailer last
year in Desert Hot Springs. The big-rig driver was charged Thursday with 42 felony and misdemeanor counts.
Big-rig driver in 2016 crash
that killed 13 people is held
Bruce Guilford fell
asleep while stopped
on I-10 in Desert Hot
Springs, officials say.
By Alene
Tchekmedyian
The driver of a big rig involved in the tour bus crash
in Desert Hot Springs last
year that killed13 people was
arrested Thursday in connection with the crash.
Prosecutors
charged
Bruce Guilford, 51, with 42
felony and misdemeanor
counts, including vehicular
manslaughter with gross
negligence and reckless
driving causing injury, according to the Riverside
County district attorney’s
office.
On Oct. 23, 2016, Guilford
fell asleep behind the
wheel of his big rig with his
parking brakes set when
California Highway Patrol
officers temporarily stopped
traffic on Interstate 10 for
construction,
authorities
said. When they reopened
lanes, Guilford did not move,
they said.
That’s when a Los Angeles-bound tour bus carrying
passengers from Red Earth
casino in Thermal plowed
into the back of the big rig at
76 mph, prosecutors said.
Thirteen people aboard
the bus, including its driver,
were killed, and 29 people
were injured in the crash.
Investigators
determined that in the days leading up to the crash, Guilford
violated 20 hours-of-service
regulations, which are designed to keep fatigued drivers off the road.
Prosecutors said Guilford regularly violated maximum driving-time regulations and lied about it on his
daily log.
Guilford was arrested in
Georgia by the U.S. Marshal
Southeast Regional Fugitive Task Force and is being
held on $500,000 bail.
Federal officials have
said the tour bus did not
comply with vehicle safety
standards because two of its
eight tires lacked sufficient
tread. The bus, a 1996 model
manufactured by Motor
Coach Industries, had no
seat belts and did not appear to have braked before
the collision.
alene.tchekmedyian
@latimes.com
Twitter: @AleneTchek
State regulators have, for
now, closed a conflict-of-interest complaint against Los
Angeles school board member Ref Rodriguez.
The decision does not exonerate Rodriguez or free
him from the issue indefinitely. It has more to do with
how cases are handled by
the state’s Fair Political
Practices Commission.
“In light of Mr. Rodriguez’s criminal indictment
in Los Angeles County, the
commission is closing this
matter without prejudice,”
Galena West of the FPPC’s
enforcement division wrote
in a letter Friday.
In the conflict complaint,
the charter school network
Rodriguez co-founded alleged that he may have improperly authorized the
transfer of $265,000 in school
funds to a nonprofit that he
ran.
An attorney working for
Partnerships to Uplift Communities said that so far the
charter network had found
little to no evidence that
services were provided to
the schools in exchange for
the funds.
The complaint noted
that there may be an additional conflict regarding
$20,400.
That payment was made
by Rodriguez, using PUC
Schools money, to a private
fundraising firm in which he
might have had an ownership interest.
The letter closing the
claim was addressed to Jim
Sutton, an election-law attorney who is representing
Rodriguez.
The board member also
has a criminal defense attorney.
PUC Schools has alerted
the Los Angeles Unified
School District, which is expected to investigate the po-
tential conflict of interest.
The issue also could be examined by prosecutors if
they determine that a crime
may have been committed.
The Los Angeles County
district attorney’s office declined to comment about the
matter.
At the very least, the
FPPC decision means Rodriguez won’t have to deal
with an investigation by the
commission while facing
charges of campaign-money
laundering.
“Per policy, we won’t
open a case while there’s a
pending felony case,” Jay
Wierenga, communications
director for the commission,
said in an explanation provided in advance of the official letter.
The felony case has no
apparent connection to the
conflict-of-interest allegations.
In the criminal complaint, Rodriguez is accused
of reimbursing 25 campaign
donors with nearly $25,000 of
his own money during his
successful 2015 run for the
school board.
Rodriguez could face
more than four years in jail if
convicted of three felony
counts and 25 misdemeanors, one for each illegal contribution.
Prosecutors
contend
that Rodriguez’s actions
prevented voters and the
public from knowing the
true source of support for his
campaign.
Rodriguez is due to appear in court Tuesday.
After being charged in
September, he resigned as
school board president but
retained his L.A. Unified
seat.
Rodriguez is part of a 4-3
majority supported by charter school advocates.
Rodriguez
told
The
Times last week that he
would not be able to comment on either the criminal
case or the conflict filing.
howard.blume
@latimes.com
Twitter:
@howardblume
GAIL SIMMONS
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talks with Curtis Stone, chef/owner of Maude and Gwen, and
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S
LOS ANGELES TIMES
OBITUARY NOTICES
Place a paid Notice: latimes.com/placeobituary
Search obituary notice archives: legacy.com/obituaries/latimes
COLLONS, Anna Weisman
BALFOUR, Noelle Marie
December 11, 1984 - October 11, 2017
Actress, beloved by
many friends and family,
has had her final curtain
call.
March 29, 1966 - October 11, 2017
October 25, 1934 - September 22, 2017
77yr resident of Santa Monica, Anna
passed peacefully September 29, 2017
at 102yrs of age. Daughter of Ezra
and Eva (Zabarsky) Weisman. Anna
was a loving wife of 52yrs to Joseph
(deceased) and most beloved by her
sons Aron and Mark (Cary).
Anna was a loving wife and was
a most loving and devoted mother.
Anna will be missed.
Services were held at Hillside
Memorial Park.
In Anna’s memory, a contribution
may be made to Hadassah--Kinneret
Group (5557 Corning Avenue, Los
Angeles, CA 90056). Anna and her
family would be most grateful.
Jonathan Geller, 51, of Mar Vista, CA
passed away suddenly on Wednesday,
October 11, 2017, while in his office
where he practiced law as Senior
Deputy with the LA County Counsel.
Born in Brooklyn, NY to Stephanie and
Bernard Geller. He is survived by his
parents Bernard and Pam Geller, and
Stephanie Geller and Jean Weishaar,
in Los Angeles. Jon leaves his beloved
wife of 23 years, Noelle, and his adored
sons Austin and Jayden. Survivors also
include his sister Jessica (Paul) Parsons,
and their children Ryan and Kelley
of Houston, TX, his step-brothers
Joshua, Aaron, and Paul, as well as the
Mullen, Brock, Conway and Lowenstein
families. Jon graduated from BHHS in
1983, from UCSD in 1988 and Loyola
Law in 1991. Jon was a devoted USC
Trojan fan and original member of
the Thundering Herd. A gentle giant,
and marathon runner, Jon radiated
kindness, and had a laugh that will
always be remembered by many
treasured friends. He was incredibly
proud of his sons and he will be deeply
missed. His life will be celebrated on
Friday, October 27th. Viewing 9-9:30
AM / Services at 10 am where Noelle
and the boys attend The Church of
Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints 3400
Sawtelle Blvd., Los Angeles. Memorial
contributions may be made to support
Austin and Jayden’s education at www.
gofundme.com/GellerCollegeFund
Martha E. Shearer Henry, born
October 25, 1934 went peaceably on
September 22, 2017.
Martha was born in Aberdeen, WA
to the late Frederick A. and Paula K.
Shearer, who were long term residents
of the Grays Harbor community.
Martha is preceded in death by her
late husband Ervin George “Gil” Henry,
parents Frederick A. and Paula K.
Shearer (Vaughan) and brother Peter
F. Shearer.
Martha is survived by her sister-inlaw, Agnes M. Shearer (McManus) of
Edmonds WA, her nephews, Frederick
T, Shearer of Edmonds, WA, Charles D.
Shearer of Everett, WA, and Jeffery A.
Shearer of Lynnwood, WA. Also, her
cousins, SharonVaughan of Bremerton,
WA, Delores ‘Dee’ Barrett of Union,
WA, Sharon Maghie (Barrett) of Clyde
Hill, WA, Susan Barrett of Poulsbo,
WA, and Brian and Sarah Barrett of
Tucson, AZ. and all her close friends
and co-workers from Capitol Records,
MCA Disco Vision and Universal
Home Video. Martha graduated from
Weatherwax High School, Aberdeen,
WA as class salutorian in 1952, went
on to Stephens College, Columbus, MO
graduating in 1954 and was a member
of Alpha PI Epsilon sorority.
Martha began her professional
career in the entertainment industry
as a campus radio station manager at
KWWC Stephens College Columbia,
MO. Martha worked in various
capacities in the industry starting with
Capitol Records artist relations in 1957,
and KING broadcasting where she met
the love of her life, Gil Henry. Martha
served as a past president of the
Stephens college alumnae association
of Los Angeles. She retired from
Universal Home Video as the Director
of Marketing Administration in 2002.
A memorial is planned to be held at
her friends local Los Angeles residence
on Saturday October 28th at 3pm,
please contact Valley Funeral Home
for the address at 818-845-3766 www.
ValleyFuneralHomeBurbank.com
In lieu of flowers please send a
donation/contribution to your favorite
local charity.
DEL BENE, Charles Anthony
January 4, 1936 - October 19, 2017
Beloved husband of Jane Ellen Harris
(deceased), devoted father of Amanda
(William “Joe”) Jones and Sharla
(Caleb) Stefanovich, and grandfather
of Phoebe, Ezra, Sonja, and Garret.
BEYER, LaVonne Ann
March 24, 1925 - October 12, 2017
LaVonne was born on March 24,
1925 in Spirit Lake, IA to Florence
(Mulvey) and (George) Harold Schafer.
In 1942, she graduated from Chaffey
High School in Ontario, CA, where her
parents wintered as Iowa“snowbirds.
After high school, she attended
junior college before marrying Gerald
(“Gerry”) Beyer in June 1943. Shortly
thereafter, they spent the last years
of World War II in Florida while Gerry
served in the US Navy. They returned
to Sheldon, IA after the war where
they ran a small municipal airport
until 1951 when they moved the
family to Chicago after Gerry joined
United Airlines. In 1954, they moved
permanently to Woodland Hills.
LaVonne and Gerry were married
67 years before Gerry passed away in
early 2011.
For the first ten years of her
marriage, LaVonne was a homemaker
raising their three children, born in
1944, 1949 and 1953.
After moving to Woodland Hills,
she pursued her life-long passion for
higher education, attending night
school earning her bachelor’s degree
and then a master’s degree, both from
California State University, Northridge
(CSUN). In 1984, she culminated
her education with an Ed.D from the
University of Southern California. She
had a long and successful career in
the Los Angeles Unified School District
(LAUSD), teaching 5th grade for many
years before focusing on special
education. She retired from the LAUSD
soon after surviving breast cancer. Still,
she was active mentoring and teaching
reading. She also endowed a small
graduate scholarship fund at CSUN.
LaVonne’s second life-long passion
was music, especially piano and
voice: she loved to sing! She also
loved playing bridge, cooking and
entertaining, traveling, and decorating
(and redecorating!) as they traveled
among homes in Woodland Hills,
Lake Arrowhead, and restoring an
old farmhouse in Vermont, leaving
homemade cookies in its freezer for her
grandsons to enjoy when they visited.
She remembered special occasions
with cards and remembrances and was
a true“Hallmark Delight.”
LaVonne is survived by her son Gregg
(Diane Lasichak), son Douglas Beijer
(Connie, pre-deceased), daughter
Jodie (Brian Francis), grandsons
Michael (Kimberly) and Stefan, and
great grand-daughter Alexa, as well
as numerous nieces and nephews.
In addition to her husband, she was
preceded in death by her parents and
her brother, Allan Schafer.
Interment will be at a private family
service at Forest Lawn, Hollywood
Hills.
In lieu of flowers, the family has
suggested donations be made to the
LaVonne Beyer Graduate Scholarship
Endowment at the Eisner College of
Education, CSUN, 18111 Nordhoff
Street, Northridge, CA 91330.
CHASSAIGNE, Susana
Mount Sinai Memorial Parks Simi Valley 800-600-0076
www.mountsinaiparks.org
COHEN, Aviad
Mount Sinai Memorial Parks Hollywood Hills 800-600-0076
www.mountsinaiparks.org
HENRY, Martha E. Shearer
GELLER, Jonathan H.
October 15, 1915 - September 29, 2017
Judge Del Bene was a naturalization
attorney, trial attorney and deputy
district counsel for the INS in Los
Angeles, served as Assistant Regional
Counsel, in Laguna Niguel, and in 1998
was appointed Immigration Judge. He
retired in 2005.
Services will be held at Pacific View
Memorial Park and Mortuary in Corona
Del Mar, CA, on Thursday, October
26 at 2:00pm. In lieu of flowers, the
family requests that friends and family
submit written memories of Charles
at http://www.dignitymemorial.com/
pacific-view-memorial-park-andmortuary/en-us/index.page.
EVERS, Jeanne Wolf
October 12, 1928 - October 4, 2017
Long-term resident of Lakewood,
California, Jeanne Wolf Evers (née
Sulenski), diedWednesday 5th October
2017, age 88, in Seal Beach, California,
while suffering from dementia.
Jeanne was born Jeanne Marie
Robinson on October 12, 1928 in
Chicago to George Robinson and
Florence Keane Robinson. Florence
remarried Raymond Wolf who became
the adoptive father to Jeanne and her
brother Don. Jeanne graduated from
Kelly High School in Chicago where she
met and married Joseph Sulenski with
whom she had three children. She
spent many years as a military wife
and mother and travelled extensively,
living in Korea, Japan and Germany
as well as across the United States.
After 24 years of marriage, Jeanne
and Joe divorced in 1969. Jeanne then
received a degree from Long Beach
State University and became a devoted
teacher in Garden Grove. In 1982 she
married Ace Evers who sadly passed
away in 1993.
Vivacious, fun and witty, Jeanne
was a kind and caring mother,
grandmother and great friend to many.
She was incredibly knowledgeable
and very entertaining. An excellent
cook who enjoyed good food, Jeanne
loved socialising and travel. Her many
adventures included venturing to the
bottom of the Grand Canyon on a mule,
hot air ballooning and white water
rafting. She had a great love for the
sea and once kissed a baby gray whale!
Jeanne was an extraordinary lady, very
loving and very loved. She enriched
our lives and will be sadly missed by all
her friends and family.
Jeanne was predeceased by her
older brother DonaldWolf and younger
half-brother George Robinson.
Survivors include three sons: Jay
Sulenski of Flagstaff, AZ, Jeff Sulenski
of San Jose, CA, and Jonathan Sulenski
of London, England; five grandchildren
and two great-grandchildren.
A private memorial service will be
held by the family.
DOI, Roy H.
March 26, 1933 - October 9, 2017
Roy H. Doi, Distinguished Professor
Emeritus of Molecular Biology at the
University of California, Davis, and a
member of the National Academy of
Sciences, passed away peacefully at
home, surrounded by family, at the
age of 84, on October 9, 2017.
To place
an obituary ad
please go online to:
latimes.com/placeobituary
Roy is survived by his wife Joan,
his children Kathryn (Jim Gold)
and Douglas (Amelia Rosales) and
grandchildren Tara Ohrtman and
Cristina, Caroline, and Calan Doi. He
is also survived by his stepchildren
Craig (Charlotte), Vicki (John), Karyn
(Jeff), Sheryl (Dave), and many more
grandchildren.
or call
1-800-234-4444
FELDHEIM, Rozann
October 14, 2017
Rozann (Rosie) Feldheim, age 74,
passed away peacefully at her home
on October 14, 2017. She is survived
by her beloved husband of 51 years,
Richard, children John, Robby and
Tracey Lee (Whitt), two grandchildren,
Amanda and Robby, a niece and
nephew, cousins and literally hundreds
of friends.
In 1961, Rosie entered the University
of Arizona where she met the love
of her life, Richard. In 1963, she
transferred to USC from which she
graduated in 1965 with a degree in
education. She and Richard married in
1966 at her parents’ home in Beverly
Hills. After a honeymoon traveling
Europe on $5 a day, Rosie and Richard
returned to Tucson where he was
attending law school and where Rosie
taught third grade at Catalina Foothills
School. They moved to New York City
in 1967, where she also taught third
grade. Her first child, John, was born
in 1969. In 1970 their second child,
Robby, was born and soon after they
moved to Richard’s home town of
Maplewood, New Jersey. Rosie was
an incredibly active person who began
teaching aerobics in New Jersey in
1971, and ultimately became an
instructor’s instructor. Their third
child, Tracey, was born in 1974. After
moving to Phoenix in 1978, Rosie
continued to teach aerobics. Rosie, in
addition to her aerobics classes, hiked
the Grand Canyon many times, both
with and without Richard, regularly
hiked Camelback Mountain and
Piestewa Peak, hiked across England
with a friend leaving Richard at home
to take care of the children, was a
volunteer at the Musical Instrument
Museum and the Arizona Historical
Society, traveled to Israel with a group
from Congregation Beth Israel in
2010, visited Jamaica, Hawaii, Costa
Rica, Ireland and Scotland. In 1996,
the Feldheims bought a home in
Hailey, Idaho, which she completely
“Rosiefied”meaning filled with vibrant
colors, flowers and more flowers, Pierre
Deux, ruffles and laces, all which Rosie
loved and showed her zest for life.
Rosie never had an unkind word to
say about anyone and was constantly
upbeat. To know Rosie was to love her,
and as her family and legion of friends
will testify, she returned that love in
spades. Simply stated, mere words
are impossible to properly convey just
how wonderful Rosie was, and how
greatly she will be missed. Those she
leaves behind are comforted by the
knowledge that her memory and her
smile will be with them forever.
A Memorial Service was held at
Congregation Beth Israel on October
19, 2017.
A memorial service for Roy will
be held at the Putah Creek Lodge on
the U.C. Davis campus on Saturday,
November 11, at noon (doors to open
at 11:30). In lieu of flowers, the family
requests that gifts be made to the Roy
Doi Memorial Fund at the University of
California, Davis. Gifts may be made
online at https://give.ucdavis.edu/
go/roydoi or checks made payable to
the U.C. Davis Foundation and sent to
U.C. Davis, Development and Alumni
Relations--Advancement
Services,
1460 Drew Avenue, Suite 100, Davis,
CA 95616.
Kenneth Robert Grossfeld, born
February 24th 1947, in Brooklyn New
York, passed peacefully in his home
surrounded by family. His Memory
will always be Cherished, Honored and
Loved by his Wife, Daughters, Brothers,
Nieces and Nephews, and all who
cared for him. Kenneth fought a long
courageous battle with Liposarcoma,
he outlived the original 6 month life
expectancy by 8 years. Donations
can be made in his memory at www.
curesarcoma.org/kenneth-grossfeld .
October 11, 1937 - July 22, 2017
GRIMES, Lucille Solari
March 21, 1922 - October 18, 2017
Lucille “Lucy” Solari Grimes, who
enjoyed a long and fulfilling career
in the Entertainment Industry,
transitioned to her new life on October
18, 2017 at her home in Redondo
Beach. She was 95.
Lucy was born in Giubiasco,
Switzerland on March 21, 1922, and
came to California as a child. She
worked for the San Francisco Museum
of Art from 1957 to 1964. Relocating
to Southern California, Lucy spent 30
years in television and motion picture
production for ABC-TV, Warner Bros.,
and Sony Pictures. She worked as a
Production Coordinator, Assistant to
the Producer, and Atmosphere Casting
Director on a variety of productions
such as The Young Marrieds, Day in
Court, General Hospital, and The Young
& the Restless.
A strong activist, dedicated to her
family and friends, Lucy was generous,
full of kindness and joy, and always
willing to help others.
In lieu of flowers, the family suggests
donations to the Stanford University
Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center
(med.stanford.edu/adrc.html) or to
Feeding America (feedingamerica.
org).
Roy will be remembered for his
intellectual curiosity, his humility, his
compassion, his avid support for the
Cal football team, the 49ers and the
Dodgers, his love of the arts, and his
love of travel. He will be greatly missed
by his family and his colleagues in the
scientific community here.
February 24, 1947 - September 25, 2017
HARDY, Allan & Healani
A rosary is scheduled for Monday,
October 23, at 10:30 a.m., followed
by a funeral mass at 11:00, at Holy
Family Catholic Church in Glendale.
A cemetery service at Forest Lawn
Memorial Park, Hollywood Hills,
immediately follows.
Roy was born in Sacramento,
California, on March 26, 1933, and
grew up in Loomis, California. His
parents had immigrated from Japan in
the early 1900’s and worked as migrant
farm laborers to support their family of
six children. Roy was a faculty member
in the Molecular and Cellular Biology
Department at U.C. Davis for over 40
years.
GROSSFELD, Kenneth
Robert
Allan James Hardy, 80, of Chino
Hills, CA passed away Saturday, July
22 in California. Healani, 81, passed
away Wednesday, October 11 in Chino
Hills, California. Memorial services for
the married couple of 59 years will be
held at 10 a.m. on Saturday, November
4, 2017 at Our Lady of Mount Carmel
Church in Waikane, Oahu, Hawaii
where friends and family may call from
9 a.m. until service time.
Allan, known to his friends and
family as “Dini” throughout his life,
attended Jefferson Elementary School
in Waikiki, St. Ann’s School in Kaneohe,
and graduated from St. Louis High
class of 1957. Allan was the owner
of Gemini Industries of Pomona, CA.
Gemini Industries was his passion until
his death. Healani, daughter of Rose
Akana and John Ignacio of Hanapepe,
Kauai, was a graduate of Waimea High
School. Survivors include daughters
Leidene Evans and Lanell Huizar; son
Shawn Hardy; and brothers Melvin
(Phyllis) Hardy of Honolulu, HI,
Edmund (Carol) Hardy of Portland,
OR, and Thomas C. Hardy of Ka’a’awa,
HI; sisters Frances (Masagi) Padeken
of Ka’a’awa, HI, Mililani (Franklin)
Hopkins of Hilo, HI, and Melanie Gibb
of Des Moines, IA; grandchildren,
great-grandchildren, nieces and
nephews.
To place
an obituary ad
please go online to:
latimes.com/placeobituary
or call
1-800-234-4444
KEATS, Robert A.
Rober Arthur Keats, (Bob, Bobio,
Bobbiata, Bobino Keats), 63, passed
away after a valiant fight with
pancreatic cancer in Agoura Hills, CA.
Born in Chicago, school at University
of Arizona, careers in Los Angeles and
San Francisco. A die-hard Cubs fan,
tv writer/scribe, head of the Writing
Dept. at Academy of Art University
in San Francisco, and beloved Pacific
Palisades Little League Coach.
He is survived by his mother, Gladys
Keats, pre-deceased by his father,
Sherman Keats, brother, Steven Keats,
sister and brother in law, Nancy and
Bruce Frankel, nephews Jay and
Jonathan, niece , Amy, partner, Heidi
Lloyd and a multitude of cherished
friends who loved his humor, his
humanity and his brilliance.
Warren Burton
October 23, 1944 - October 2, 2017
Born in Chicago, Illinois, Warren Burton was
preceded in death by his parents, Donald and
Lorraine (nee Stryska) Burton and his sister Gayle
Affinito (nee Burton). He is survived by his niece,
Victoria Affinito of Chicago, and many loving friends
and fans.
Warren won a Grammy in 1971 for his work as
a writer on Lily Tomlin’s “THIS IS A RECORDING”
in the category of Best Comedy Recording. He
started his TV/Film career in the early 1970’s on
the made-for-TV movie, “The Girl Most Likely
to…” He went on to star in several daytime soap
operas that included the role of Eddie Dorrance
on “All My Children” in which he won a Daytime
Emmy for Outstanding Supporting Actor at the
1980 awards broadcast. His other daytime roles
have included “Another World,” “Guiding Light,”
and Phillip Hamilton on “Santa Barbara.” Burton
portrayed Confederate general Henry Heth in the
1993 film Gettysburg. Since the mid 1990s, Burton
has been a voice actor for numerous video games
including the highly successful “Jak and Daxter”
franchise, “Battlezone II: Combat Commander,”
and “Nox” among several others. Warren was not
only a talented actor but one of the kindest souls
and will be missed on this earth by all those lucky
enough to have known him.
A celebration of Warren’s life will be held at
Hollywood Forever Cemetery on November 15,
2017 at 11a.m.
Frank H. Beckman, Jr.
February 17, 1923 - October 9, 2017
Celebration of Life Memorial will be held Friday,
November 3, 2017 at 2:30 pm at the Cornerstone
Lodge No 659 1701 W. La Habra Blvd. La Habra,
CA 90631
WHAT A RIDE
Share a memory
To sign a guest book please go to
latimes.com/guestbooks
Patricia Margaret Clark
April 13, 1926 - September 29, 2017
Patricia “Patty” Margaret Clark, 91, of Aliso Viejo, California, passed away
peacefully on Friday, October 29, 2017 at her home. She is survived by her
children, Stephen Clark and his wife Susan, daughter-in-law Margaret Clark,
Timothy Clark and his wife Shirley, Daniel Clark and his wife Cynthia, Scott Clark,
and Rebecca Clark Kane and her husband Stephen. She is preceded in death
by her beloved husband E. H. (Hubie) Clark, Jr. and her loving son, Kenneth
Clark. Patty was the loving and dedicated grandmother to fourteen and great
grandmother to nine.
Patty was born April 13, 1926 in Chicago, Illinois, to Donald Hamilton and
Leona (Jackson) Hamilton. The family moved to California in 1942 where she
attended Burbank High School. It was while attending high school in 1943 that
she met her future husband, Earnest Hubert “Hubie” Clark, Jr. Patty and Hubie
were sweethearts for the next four years while Hubie attended California Institute
of Technology (Cal Tech). Upon his graduation, Patty and Hubie got married and
started a life together that spanned 68 years.
Patty was a perennial volunteer, always ready to step in and help her
community. Though she was raising a family of six children, she found time to
generously give many volunteer hours to Our Lady of Perpetual Help Grammar
School, Pius X High School, the Downey YMCA, and other charity events. She
was the Chairperson for the successful Celebrity Tennis Tournament held in
Downey for the benefit of Downey Community Hospital. She was tireless in her
efforts to better the lives of others.
Patty’s greatest passion was to spend time with her family and share annual
“family” vacations that took the Clark Clan to many destinations, both near and
far. She was an avid scuba diver, logging more than 900 dives, and continued
diving into her eighties. Patty was also an accomplished tennis player and
enjoyed going to tennis tournaments with Hubie and friends from the Downey
Tennis Club.
Patricia “Patty” Margaret Clark will be remembered as a loving wife, a devoted
mother, grandmother and great grandmother, a dedicated friend, a tireless
volunteer, and a proud American.
Honor a loved one and share remembrances
To place an obituary or memorial notice in the Los Angeles Times, please visit our online site.
placeanad.latimes.com/Obituaries
C
BuSINESS
S U N D A Y , O C T O B E R 2 2 , 2 0 1 7 :: L A T I M E S . C O M / B U S I N E S S
Personal Finance: The tax implications of giving before you die. C9
THE WEEK AHEAD 2 :: HOW I MADE IT 3 :: ON LEADERSHIP 3
HIGHWAY 1
Tesla
TESLA anticipated a production rate of 20,000 cars a month by year’s end for its mass-market Model 3. But in the three months that ended in
September, it produced only 260 cars. The company blamed manufacturing “bottlenecks.” Above, a Model 3 event in Fremont, Calif., in July.
At Tesla, it’s trial by fire
Carmaker struggles to exit ‘production hell,’ deliver on Model 3 promises
By Russ Mitchell
SAN FRANCISCO — When Elon Musk talks about the
future of factory automation at Tesla, he envisions new
breeds of robots and smart machines compressed in dense
factories with little room for human operators, guided by
self-learning software.
“At the point at which the factory looks like an “alien
dreadnought” — a nod to a video game spaceship — “you
know you’ve won,” Musk has told investors.
But so far, the manufacturing of Tesla’s new all-electric
compact sedan, the Model 3, at its Fremont, Calif., factory is
moving at a more earthbound pace.
When Musk launched the car at an elaborate stage show
in July, Tesla was anticipating a production rate of 20,000
Model 3s a month by the end of December. Over three
months through September, though, Tesla had produced
only 260 Model 3s — about three cars a day. That’s well behind a normal auto-industry production pace of about one
car per minute.
Rising
expectations
83,922
2016 vehicle production
500,000
2018 estimated vehicle
production
1million
2020 estimated vehicle
production
Source: Tesla
The company blamed manufacturing “bottlenecks,”
without saying what they are. It promised a quick fix, and
contested a report in the Wall Street Journal that said the
assembly line remained incomplete by early September
with some body parts normally installed by robots being
employee-assembled by hand.
Still, the “production hell” that Musk acknowledged in a
tweet raises questions about whether the Silicon Valley
model he has followed — beta testing with early adopters
and launching updates via software — can be adapted for
Tesla’s first mass-market product.
Musk needs to fix things, fast. Demand for the car appears strong. The company intends to sell about 400,000
Model 3s in 2018 to customers who have placed deposits and
depend on the cash flow from those vehicles to keep the
thus-far profitless company running.
“This is a critical juncture for Tesla,” said David Keith at
the MIT Sloan School of Management. “They need to convert 400,000 orders into 400,000 happy customers.”
[See Tesla, C8]
Tesla declined requests to
Is new law enough
to fight bogus
stem cell clinics?
MICHAEL HILTZIK
On Oct. 2,
California
took a major
step to address an
emerging
public health
crisis. That’s
the day Gov.
Jerry Brown
signed a law imposing the
first regulations in the country aimed at direct-to-consumer marketing of unlicensed, unproven — and
sometimes disproven —
stem cell “treatments.”
These treatment clinics
have metastasized nationwide; roughly 600 were
identified last year by UC
Davis cell biologist Paul
Knoepfler and University of
Minnesota bioethicist Leigh
Turner. As befits a place
that always has been fertile
ground for entrepreneurs,
scrupulous or otherwise,
California hosted the largest
number, 113. Knoepfler and
Turner are certain that the
number is considerably
larger today.
As we’ve reported, the
clinics often list conditions
such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, multiple sclerosis,
diabetes, and cancer among
the conditions they can
treat — for prices in the
thousands, not covered by
insurance, without providing any scientific evidence
that they work.
Unlicensed stem cell
treatments aren’t innocuous — some have resulted in
permanent injury to customers. Among other cases,
three elderly women were
reported this year to have
lost all or part of their vision
after a “stem cell” solution
was injected into their eyeballs at a Florida clinic to
treat macular degeneration.
And bogus stem cell treatments can distract patients
from pursuing traditional
therapies that might actually work.
California’s law, which
takes effect Jan. 1, covers
any clinic offering stem cell
treatments not approved by
[See Hiltzik, C6]
Ann Johansson Getty Images
UCLA holds the patent on the compounds that were used to create the pricey prostate cancer drug
Xtandi and is seeking a patent in India. Above, Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center in 2009.
UCLA slammed for patent bid
By James F. Peltz
After scientists at UCLA created a
breakthrough treatment for prostate
cancer, it generated more than half a
billion dollars for the university.
But deals struck with drugmakers also obligated university officials
to help pursue patent protection for
the drug around the world. Now, consumer activists claim that UCLA’s ef-
forts are propping up the drug’s high
prices — which can top $130,000 a year
for a cancer patient in the U.S. — and
keeping poor patients in less-developed nations from getting cheaper
versions.
The university holds the patent
on the chemical compounds its researchers developed that were used
to create the drug called enzalutamide, which is sold under the name
Xtandi.
UCLA in 2005 licensed the drug to
San Francisco biotech firm Medivation Inc., which sells the drug in partnership with Astellas Pharma Inc. of
Japan.
Sales of the drug have skyrocketed since it received U.S. Food and
Drug Administration approval in
2012.
In 2015 — the final year Medivation
was a stand-alone company and
[See UCLA, C7]
C2
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16BR1801
Earnings week Microsoft
for large firms CEO to speak
Estimate on
growth slated
BAFTA awards
to laud actors
The quarterly earnings
of some of California’s
larger public companies
are due this week. Shutterfly in Redwood City
and Advanced Micro
Devices in Sunnyvale
will go first on Tuesday.
Avery Dennison (Glendale), Visa (Foster City)
and Amgen (Thousand
Oaks) will follow on
Wednesday. Twitter
(San Francisco) reports
on Friday, and Chevron
(San Ramon) wraps up
the week on Friday.
The Commerce Department will release the
first estimate of thirdquarter economic
growth on Friday. The
toll from major hurricanes is expected to
cause growth to slow to
an annual 2.4% pace
from 3.1% in the second
quarter. Still, the U.S.
unemployment rate has
hit a 16-year low, and
wages have ticked up.
Economists expect faster economic growth in
coming months.
Dick Van Dyke and
Matt Damon will be
honored Friday at the
AMD British Academy
Britannia Awards at the
Beverly Hilton. Van
Dyke will receive the
Britannia Award for
Excellence in Television, and Damon will get
the Stanley Kubrick
Britannia Award for
Excellence in Film.
“Selma” director Ava
DuVernay and “The
Crown” actress Claire
Foy also will get honors.
Satya Nadella, chief
executive of Microsoft,
will be a featured
speaker at GE’s Minds +
Machines conference
Wednesday and Thursday in San Francisco.
The conference focuses
on automation and
technology in fields
such as manufacturing,
healthcare and aviation.
Other speakers include
former CNN Chairman
Walter Isaacson, head of
the nonpartisan Aspen
Institute think tank.
THE WEEK THAT WAS...
Weinstein
scandal grows
Drug therapy
boosts Gilead
Sares-Regis
Tax deduction
widens empire reform fizzles
The Harvey Weinstein
scandal showed no signs
of slowing. The disgraced producer resigned from the Weinstein Co. board as he
faced more allegations
he sexually assaulted
and harassed women
over two decades. And
the LAPD launched a
criminal probe into an
alleged 2013 sexual assault at a Beverly Hills
hotel. Weinstein has
denied all allegations of
non-consensual sex.
Gilead Sciences’ stock
rose after the biotech
company’s Kite Pharma
unit gained federal approval for its flagship
cell-treatment therapy
for adults with advanced lymphoma. The
FDA’s approval of
Kite’s treatment represented a rapid payoff for
Gilead, which acquired
Santa Monica-based
Kite only last month for
nearly $12 billion in
what was a major bet on
Kite’s therapy.
Sares-Regis Group has
acquired the former
Toyota headquarters in
Torrance for $270 million — one of the biggest
real estate transactions
of the year in the region,
where there’s high demand for office campuses. The price was
nearly double earlier
estimates and indicates
the potential the Irvine
developer sees in the
sprawling office and
industrial park near the
405 Freeway.
As Congress wrestled
with tax reform, Senate
Democrats failed in
their first attempt to
save the state and local
tax deduction, which
helps many residents of
California and other
high-cost states reduce
their federal income
tax. Meanwhile, Treasury Secretary Steven T.
Mnuchin said that failure to pass the GOP tax
overhaul would trigger a
“significant” drop in the
rising stock market.
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S U N DAY, O C T O B E R 22 , 2 017
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WORK LIFE
HOW I MADE IT: AURA VASQUEZ
She’s not your typical tree hugger
Protecting the Earth:
Vasquez says she became an
environmentalist as a child.
At age 11, she learned about
global warming at a science
show in her native Colombia. Ever since, she says, she
has advocated to “bring
about a world that is not
only more just but is just
free of pollution.”
Activist Aura Vasquez
runs a consulting firm
and also serves as a
DWP commissioner.
By Ivan Penn
Aura Vasquez runs a
consulting business that
bears her name and is one of
five commissioners on the
Los Angeles Department of
Water and Power’s board.
Vasquez, 39, provides
environmental and political
consulting as the sole employee of her firm, which she
bolsters as needed by hiring
contractors. Her consulting
work includes the successful
push for a law that requires
utilities to produce 50% of
their electricity from clean
energy sources by 2030 and
to reduce greenhouse gas
levels to 40% below 1990
levels.
At the DWP, the nation’s
largest municipal utility, her
potential impact is broad as
the utility employs more
than 9,000 people and serves
647,000 water customers
and 1.4 million electricity
ratepayers.
Aiding the marginalized: In
her role as a consultant and
as a commissioner for the
DWP, Vasquez says, her aim
is the same: to help people
who don’t have a healthy
environment and safe
places to play.
“Both of my careers are
intertwined with my calling
to continue the crusade to
protect the environment, to
give a voice to people who
traditionally don’t have a
voice.”
Grass-roots organizer: In
2013, Vasquez founded her
consulting business, and in
May 2017 she was sworn in as
a DWP commissioner.
Those roles emerged from
her grass-roots campaigning and protesting as an
organizer for the Sierra Club
in its Beyond Coal campaign.
moved to the United States,
making their new home in
New York. After learning
English, she enrolled in City
University of New YorkLehman and earned a degree in political science.
She moved on to jobs
with the United Way of New
York and as a political advisor for U.S. Rep. Eliot Engel
(D-N.Y.), building experience in lobbying and politics
that would prepare her for a
move to California.
Christina House Los Angeles Times
AURA VASQUEZ of the Department of Water and Power’s board says her aim is
to help people who don’t have a healthy environment and safe places to play.
Vasquez led the effort to
convince Los Angeles to
wean itself from coal-generated electricity and to implement a single-use plastic
bag ban.
She recently completed
an executive education
program at Harvard Uni-
ON LEADERSHIP
Workers split on diversity
be “enough” when it comes
to the gender makeup of
their companies. For instance, in companies where
just 1 in 10 senior leaders is
female, nearly 50% of men
said women were “well
represented” in the senior
ranks, while only one-third
of women — somewhat
remarkably — said the
same.
“It really speaks to a
perception mismatch,” said
Lareina Yee, a senior partner at McKinsey. “I think
what this says is that when
you see almost no women —
and then when you see 1 out
of 10 and you think they’re
well represented — our
mind is taking a bit of a
shortcut. It’s settling into
the status quo.”
The report shows a disconnect similar to what
previous reports have found
about how important men
and women think gender
diversity is.
Last year, a survey by
PwC of more than 800 corporate directors found that
only about a quarter of the
men who responded
thought gender diversity on
the corporate board improved a company’s performance, while 89% of
female directors did. Only
38% of the men said diversity improved a board’s
effectiveness, compared
with 92% of the women.
The survey also found a
noticeable difference between the career aspirations
of women of color and white
women, despite a perceived
lack of encouragement and
help by their managers.
By Jena McGregor
Corporate executives
like to say gender diversity is
one of their top priorities.
They mount publicity campaigns, tout their equal pay
measures and start up
women’s networks to help
promote female leaders.
But the view of those
agendas — and companies’
success at achieving them —
is starkly different among
male versus female employees, according to a recent
survey.
The survey, by consulting giant McKinsey and the
Sheryl Sandberg-funded
women’s organization Lean
In, shows a sharp divide
between how men and women view their companies’
efforts at advancing women.
The annual report, which
in 2017 surveyed more than
70,000 employees working at
76 companies, shows that
63% of men said their company is doing what it takes
to improve gender diversity,
while 49% of women said the
same.
Fifty-five percent of men
said disrespectful behavior
in their workplaces is addressed quickly, while 34%
of women said the same.
Half of men said managers
consider diverse candidates
for open jobs, compared
with just 35% of women.
Although it may not be
surprising that men and
women have different opinions about gender diversity
efforts in the workplace, the
report also revealed conflicting views on what might
Some 44% of black women
said they want to be a top
executive at their company,
compared with just 33% of
white women. Yet just 28%
of black women, the survey
found, said they felt their
managers defended them or
their work, compared with
40% of white women and
43% of white men.
“These are not employees at large,” Yee said.
“These are the people you
have already hired, you’ve
already screened — you’re
investing in them.... Presumably you’d like to see
them succeed.”
McKinsey’s report shows
that at every rank the percentage of women holding
jobs is either flat or up just 1
percentage point since last
year, with the number of
women at the senior vice
president level 3 percentage
points lower than in 2016.
The survey points to
employees’ and their managers’ failure to grasp the
magnitude of the problem
as one reason for the glacial
progress.
“I don’t think there’s any
[malicious] intent; it’s a
pure blind spot,” Yee said. In
some companies, after
decades of there being no
women at the top, seeing
even one can look like headway.
“If you perceive that it’s
better than it actually is,
then how urgent you feel it is
to change is likely diminished,” she said.
versity’s John F. Kennedy
School of Government,
focusing on leadership,
organizing and action.
Early learner: In her tiny
hometown of Candelaria,
Colombia, Vasquez became
an early and quick study as
a student.
Her stay-at-home mom
taught her to read, write
and recite poetry. So by age
4, Vasquez entered first
grade. “I grew up in a very
sheltered environment
where my schoolteachers
were like my parents.”
They scolded and advised, she said, providing
guidance that has carried
her throughout her life.
That all helped develop a
strong sense of community,
Vasquez said.
Preteen community organizer: After that science
show about global warming
when Vasquez was 11, she
founded the first environmental club at her school.
“I went to my principal
and asked, ‘What are you
going to do about global
warming?’ She asked me,
‘What do you want to do
about it?’ ”
Already on a fast track,
Vasquez graduated from
high school just four years
later at age 15.
Strong women: Education
helped establish Vasquez’s
sense of self, seeing strong
female educators in her
family and community as
well as learning about women who helped with the
liberation of Colombia from
Spain, she said.
“It’s interesting because,
you know, in those days
women didn’t really have
that kind of rebellious role,”
she said.
The Big Apple: Vasquez
was 18 when her family
Coal-heavy L.A.: When
Vasquez began pushing for
Los Angeles to give up its
coal-fired power plants, the
city was producing about
40% of its electricity from
the fossil fuel.
As the campaign ramped
up in 2010, Vasquez used her
passion for the environment, knowledge of politics
and concern for people to
press for change.
It all led to what some
saw as her unlikely appointment to the DWP’s board of
commissioners — an unpaid, voluntary position —
by Mayor Eric Garcetti.
Tree huggers: Relatives
recently came to see her at
her Los Angeles home, and
“the first thing they did
when they came to visit me
here was hug that tree,”
Vasquez said with a laugh,
pointing to a towering sycamore in her backyard. That
hug reflected the passion
she and they have developed for the environment.
She said that as a consultant for nonprofit organizations, community groups
and others as well as at the
DWP, she’s optimistic about
having a positive influence
on the direction of environmental and social justice
policy in Southern California.
ivan.penn@latimes.com
McGregor writes a column
on leadership for the
Washington Post.
ADVERTISEMENT
Deposit & Loan Guide
Institution
Community
Commerce Bank
Int Chking Money
Acct
Mkt Acct
Min
Min
NA
NA
NA
NA
LA Times
3 mo
CD
Min
6 mo
CD
Min
0.40
0.90
12 mo
CD
Min
18 mo
CD
Min
24 mo
CD
Min
36 mo
CD
Min
60 mo
CD
Min
1.31
NA
1.51
1.61
1.92
10,000 10,000 10,000
NA
10,000 10,000 10,000
Member FDIC, Penalty for Early W/D, APY’s accurate as of 10-18-17
Synchrony Bank
NA
0.85
NA
NA
1.50
1.45
1.75
1.80
NA
30
NA
NA
2,000
2,000
2,000
2,000 25,000
Phone / Website
909-625-7891
www.ccombank.com
2.35
Great Rates + Safety = Peace of Mind. Member FDIC.
800-869-3813
www.synchronybank,.com
Savings Update
Why 15-year mortgages are worth a look
The 30-year fixed mortgage is the apple pie of home financing,
with roughly 9 in 10 borrowers choosing the long-term option.
But that doesn’t mean it’s your only or best choice. For many
homeowners, a shorter 15-year loan offers considerable savings.
There are just two differences between 15- and 30-year mortgages: first, the length of the term, and second, because the
lender’s risk with you lasts 15 years instead of 30, the interest
rate. A rule of thumb is that 15-year rates run about 0.75 percent lower than their 30-year siblings.
year option. Over 30 years, a $150,000 mortgage at 4 percent will cost about $258,000. Meanwhile, borrowing the same
$150,000 for 15 years at 3.25 percent will cost just $190,000,
saving you almost $70,000.
Of course, the benefit doesn’t come without its trade-off. The
monthly payment for the 30-year loan will run about $716,
while the 15-year mortgage will require committing to a $1,054
payment.
Still, if you can afford the higher payment and your income is
reliable, the 15-year term will save a considerable sum, and
For most borrowers, the choice comes down to affordability. A get you debt-free sooner. Indeed, it’s a particularly great option
30-year loan offers the lowest monthly payments, allowing the for those approaching retirement.
flexibility to buy a more expensive home than you could with a
15-year term, or leaving more money for competing priorities Want the 15-year savings but leery of committing to higher
such as retirement or college.
payments? A hybrid is to take a 30-year loan but make payments at the 15-year level, still saving a substantial amount
But with a higher rate and a twice-as-long term, the 30-year while retaining your option to make lower payments during
mortgage will ultimately cost a great deal more than the 15- lean times.
Rate Criteria: Rates effective as of 10/18/17 and may change without notice. RateSeeker, LLC. does not guarantee the accuracy of the information appearing above
or the availability of rates in this table. Banks, Thrifts and credit unions pay to advertise in this guide. N/A means rates are not available or not offered at the time rates
were surveyed. All institutions are FDIC or NCUA insured. Yields represent annual percentage yield (APY) paid by participating institutions. Rates may change after
the account is opened. Fees may reduce the earnings on the account. A penalty may be imposed for early withdrawal. To appear in this table, call 773-320-8492.
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SALES EVENTS
Auctions
Market Fixtures
Unlimited
Auction
Live & Online
13235 Woodruff Ave
Downey, CA 90242
Live auction begins
Thurs. Oct.26th
Featuring:
Grocery Equipment, Bakery
Equipment, Meat Processing
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Visit www.SAMauctions.com
or call 877.SAM.AUCT for
more information.
VEHICLE LIEN
SALE
Thurs. October 26th, 2017
10am Inspect 8:30am.
Cash Only! All Sales, As Is
1015 N. Mansfield, LA
Hollywood Tow
323-466-5421
Estate Sales
MARTIN
LANDAU
ESTATE SALE!
His Personal Library, Photos,
Memorabilia, Wardrobe, Person. Effects; Hats, Combined
w/ 4-Bdrm Home: Mahog.
Dining Set; Yamaha Upright
Piano; Sec. Sofa; Fine China,
Crystal, Sterling, Fine Art, Persian Rugs, Kitchen Stuff; Cos.
Jewelry, 1960’s Exec. Desk,
W/D, Patio Set, Ladies/Men’s
Clothes, Cos. Jewlry, More!
10/21-22, Sat-Sun, 9:30–3:30
1022 S. Alvira, 90035
Pix@EstateSales.net
323.793.0894
ESTATE SALE
Custom furniture, viking
stove, electronics, designer
clothes, custom pillows, holiday decorations, scooter.
14527 Valley Vista Blvd
Sherman Oaks, 91403
8am Saturday and Sunday
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Commercial Lots/
Acreage
18 Acres Agricultural
Land in Blythe
US Treasury Dept. Auction.
Bid Online Thurs. 10/26 at
9am (PT). 1834, 1854 & 1864
E. Chanslor Way - 3 parcels
w/ 3BR/2BA 2-car gar home,
unihabitable
bunkhouse,
haystack structure, office,
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crop. Approx 14 acres is
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INSPECT: Sa.t 10/21 from
1-4PM. www.cwsmarketing.
com 703-273-7373 sale#1866-801
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Social Security Disability? Any condition, top $ paid! Real Estate Wanted
Up to $2,671/mo. (Based on PLEASE LEAVE MESSAGE
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FOR SALE
Investment
Opportunities
Bankruptcy HOMES FOR SALE
Equity Position LA COUNTY
$50,000+ Required to step
into shoes of debtor's interest in chapter 11 bankruptcy
case, 16-13915. Complete
disclosure statement avail.
Call 714-319-3446
OUTSTANDING BUSINESS OPPORTUNTY
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HOMES FOR SALE
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Westside, South of
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Opportunities
EVENTS/ENTERTAINMENT
SERVICES
Locksmith Shop
For Sale
Simi valley Est 1964 serving
surrounding areas. InvenRecord Producer Look- tory & tools included. Owner
retiring. Contact
ing for Talent
805-432-1663 or
Recording Artist Wanted.
mwetzel9@aol.com
Call Mr. D. Michaels (310)
855-2083
Services For Seniors
General
Announcements
6 PRIME units on Roxbury
$3.8MM. Broker Coop.
Brice W. Head, MBA
310 344 8218
BRE #01330706
A PLACE FOR MOM. The nation’s largest senior living
referral service. Contact our
trusted, local experts today!
Our service is FREE/no obligation. CALL 1-800-9150992 (CDCN)
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only does newspaper media reach a HUGE Audience,
they also reach an ENGAGED
AUDIENCE. Discover the
Power of Newspaper Advertising. For a free brochure
call 916-288-6011 or email
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Santa Monica Mountains
and North of LAX
5745 Cleon Ave.Sat 123&Sun 1-4 Rare find in NoHo
art
district.3bdr/1bath.
Move-in or Expand.$580000
BRE#01984156 agentkate@
gmail.com
Amenities include: heated pool, jacuzzi, zen & barbeque
decks, outdoor fireplace, and business office, yoga studio,
gym. 2 protected parking spaces. 24x7 security.
Call 610-368-2082. Only serious inquiries please.
westside studio, bath 775 rent + 775 sec
Al 805-660-2184
Rentals Vacation
Palm Desert Luxury home for rent in exclusive country
club. 3 bdrm/3 1/2 bath.
$12,000.00 per month, must
allow potential buyers with
24 hour notice. (310)5456643
800-234-4444
ADVERTISING POLICIES
For Los Angeles Times advertising terms
and conditions go to:
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Rentals Other Areas
Rialto 3 bedrooms, 2 bath. 1 bonus room. $1750/mo
includes trash. Please call Sophia
626-552-6804
To advertise your pets, log on to
latimes.com/advertiser/category/pets
Pet Supplies/Services
Employment
Cal-Nev-Ari, NV
For Sale By owner. Country
living. 3Br/2Ba home.
1539sqft 0.62 acre lot. 2 car
attached garage Excellent
condition. $175,000.
702-297-1412
ACCOUNTING
KPMG LLP, Manager, Audit
(Multiple Positions), Los
Angeles, CA. Execute external audit engagements for
clients, incl. SEC registrants.
Req’ts incl.: Master’s deg. or
foreign equiv. in Acctg, Fin.,
Bus. Admin., or rel. field +
2 yrs of rel. work exp.; OR
Bach’s deg. or foreign equiv.
in Acctg, Fin., Bus. Admin.,
or rel. field + 5 yrs of postbach.’s, progressive rel.
work exp. Position requires
verbal fluency in Japanese.
Must have an active CA CPA
license. Travel up to 10%
req’d. Employer will accept
any suitable combo. of edu.,
training, or exp. Apply online at http://www.kpmg.
apply2jobs.com & type
req #68624 in the keyword
search box. Please contact
us-hrscatsadmin@kpmg.
com if you have difficulty applying through our website.
If offered employment, must
have legal right to work in
the U.S. EOE. KPMG offers a
comprehensive compensation and benefits package.
No phone calls or agencies
please. KPMG, an equal opportunity employer/disability/veteran. KPMG maintains
a drug-free workplace. ©
2017 KPMG LLP, a Delaware
limited liability partnership
and the U.S. member firm
of the KPMG network of independent member firms
affiliated with KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG
International”), a Swiss entity. All rights reserved.
ACCOUNTING
Core Assurance Manager
(Mult. Pos.), PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP, Los Angeles, CA. Examine acctng
recs, docs & tangible equip.
of clients. Req. Bach’s deg.
or foreign equiv. in Acctng,
Fin, Bus Admin or rel. + 5
yrs post-bach’s progress. rel.
work exp.; OR a Master’s deg.
or foreign equiv. in Acctng,
Fin, Bus Admin or rel. + 3
yrs rel. work exp. Must have
passed all 4 parts of CPA
exam or foreign equiv. Travel
up to 40% req. Apply by
mail, referencing Job Code
CA1478, Attn: HR SSC/Talent
Management, 4040 W. Boy
Scout Blvd, Tampa, FL 33607.
Chief Chemist (Gardena,
CA): Oversee agricultural
fertilizer mfr’s lab.; Resp for
R&D, QC & product dev.
REQ: PHD in Chemistry and
1 yr exp. Mail resumes: Grow
More, Inc., Ref #6377, 15600
New Century Dr., Gardena,
CA 90248.
Northern AZ WILDERNESS
RANCH - $197 MONTH - Quiet secluded 37 acre off grid
ranch set amid scenic mountains and valleys at clear
6,200’. Near historic pioneer
town & large fishing lake.
No urban noise & dark sky
nights amid pure air & AZ’s
best year-round climate. Evergreen trees /meadowland
blend with sweeping views
across uninhabited wilderness mountains and valleys. Self-sufficiency quality
garden loam soil, abundant
groundwater & maintained
road access. Camping &
RV’s ok. No homeowner’s
Assoc. or deed restrictions.
$22,900, $2,290 dn. Free brochure with additional property descriptions, photos/
terrain map/weather chart/
area info: 1st United Realty
800.966.6690. (CDCN)
HOMES FOR SALE
RURAL
PROPERTY
14 recorded lots
Mentone/Redlands
7 recorded lots Banning
landinca@live.com
DID YOU KNOW Information is power and content
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Search Feature. For more
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Bids Wanted
Vocational Schools
California State Parks Concession
Opportunity
The California Department
of Parks and Recreation is
accepting proposals for a
ten (10) year concession
contract to operate a camp
trailer rental concession at
Allied Prof. 562-808-2152
Carpinteria State Beach,
El Capitan State Beach,
Refugio State Beach, and
Gaviota State Park. Proposals are due by 2:00 PM on
November 21, 2017 at the
Department of Parks and
Recreation, 1416 9th Street,
Room 1431, Sacramento,
DOMESTIC
CA 95814. An optional
pre-proposal meeting
EMPLOYMENT
will be held on October
24, 2017 at 1:00 PM at the
Housekeeper
Channel Coast District
Office, 911 San Pedro Street, Day Work. Eng speaking. Loc
(310)729-2653
ref.
Ventura, CA 93001. For more
information, or to obtain
proposal forms, please
Employment
contact Anne Davigeadono
at (916) 653-8939 or anne. ACCOUNTING
davigeadono@parks.ca.gov.
Tax Manager, Private Company Services (Mult. Pos.),
PricewaterhouseCoopers
LLP, Los Angeles, CA. Facilitate the accntng, audit, tax
compliance & planning, &
bus. advisory needs of public interest entities, & private
companies & their owners.
Req. Bach’s deg or foreign
equiv. in Tax, Acctng, Bus
Admin or rel. + 5 yrs postbach’s progressive rel. work
exp.; OR a Master’s deg or
foreign equiv. in Tax, Acctng,
Bus Admin or rel. + 3 yrs of
rel. work exp. Certification(s)
req: U.S. CPA, Enrolled Agent,
or Member of the Bar. Travel
req. 20% of time. Apply by
mail, referencing Job Code
CA1482, Attn: HR SSC/Talent
Management, 4040 W. Boy
Scout Blvd, Tampa, FL 33607.
Tax Accountant: f/t; Analyze financial data for tax
credit solutions; BA in Taxation, Econ, or Acctg req’d;
Resume: Premus Solutions
3460 Wilshire Blvd, #900, LA,
CA 90010
ACCOUNTING
SR. ACCOUNTANT sought
by Dalton Investments LLC
in Santa Monica, CA. Req
Bachelor’s in any field + 5 yrs
of acctg, auditg & reportg
& financial anlysis exp, incl
evaluatg acctg issues, proposg & implementg solutions & intercompany reconciliations. Req CPA cert or
foreign equiv. Send resume
to: Erin Lavelle / Re: SA, Dalton Investments LLC, 1601
Cloverfield Blvd., Ste. 5050N,
Santa Monica, CA 90404.
ADVERTISING Skyvidyou
Inc. CEO-Founder /President
To advertise different Product Companies by airing
them to the sky; video, pictures, images of the product
through any game, sports
events, entertainment, technologies, religious, movies
etc.
Yasmin B. Garcia
310-405-4261
skyvidyou@yahoo.com
skyvidyou@gmail.com
skyvidyou@icloud.com
Corporation number
4072991
PHLEBOTOMY
CLASS
Senior Business Analyst
positions available with
McKinsey & Company, Inc. in
Los Angeles, CA. Determine
& apply appropriate analytical skills & tech expertise to
mgmt consult engagements
& complete discrete pieces
of study or work stream such
as data gathering, factual &
stats analys incl mathematical modeling & synthesis
of findings for specific bus
problem. Meet w/ clients
assess their needs & collect
appropriate data through
written surveys, interviews
& the like. Min ed req’s are
a Bachelor’s in Bus Admin,
Fin, Econ, or non-business
undergraduate
degree.
Applicants for these positions must have 2 yrs exp
as a Business Analyst with a
major-top tier int’l management consulting firm. Domestic & international travel
typically required. Destination and frequency impossible to predict. Email your
resume to CO@mckinsey.
com and refer to LAT1018.
No phone calls please. An
EOE
ANALYST
Senior Operations Data
Analyst (Northridge, CA) (2
positions) Collect and compile data for health service
plan; monitor operational
and financial activities of
groups. Rqt.s Master’s in
Information Science and
1 yr. exp. in job or 1 yr exp.
in alternate occupation of
healthcare data analyst. Fax
resume/ref.s to Lindra Frandinata (818) 654-3460. Heritage Provider Network Inc.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these six
Jumbles, one letter to
each square, to form
six ordinary words.
CEEXSS
©2017 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
All Rights Reserved.
GAVEYO
GIPSOS
RESSVU
VOROYG
SNIVHA
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
PRINT YOUR ANSWER IN THE CIRCLES BELOW
Commercial Property
for Lease
Marina Del Rey Waterfront, corner unit, large 2 bed/2
bath, 1600 sq ft apt. $5,150/month. Best views of the
Marina Del Rey Marina, two large balconies overlooking
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LOS ANGELES TIMES
BUSINESS
Employment
Employment
Employment
Employment
Employment
All In 1, Inc. in Glendale, CA
has openings for IT Business Analysts to assist in all
aspects of prod. Lifecycle,
incl. gather/document sys/
bus rqmts, user stories & use
cases. No trvl; no telcomm.
Mail resumes to: ATTN: HR,
All in 1, Inc., 327 W. Broadway, Glendale, CA 91204.
COMPUTER
Rudra Technologies, Inc.
has multiple openings at
multiple levels for Software
Engineers & Programmer
Analysts. Positions may require travel &/or relocation
to various unanticipated
client locations throughout
USA. Job Site: Valencia, CA &
various unanticipated client
locations throughout USA.
Resumes - HR, 27772 Avenue
Scott, Ste 127, Valencia, CA
91355 Details: www.
rudratechnologies.com
COMPUTER
Nuance Enterprise Solutions & Services Corp seeks
a Senior GIT/Build Master in
Agoura Hills, CA to oversee
and administer Atlassian
Stash (Git) & DevOps automated builds. Req’s MS in
Comp Sci, Elect Engin, Info
Syst or rel fld & 3 yrs exp
administering Git repositories (will accept BS+5 yrs
exp). Also req’s expertise:
performing scripting with
BASH, Python, or Perl for
automating test, and release
processes; and performing
Continuous Build Integration, maintenance. To apply,
submit resume referencing
Job Code # 34446 to Jason
Hewitt, Nuance Communications, 1 Wayside Road,
Burlington, MA 01803.
COMPUTER
Software Engineer Loot
Crate, Inc. seeks Software
Engineer (Los Angeles, CA)
-Responsible for implementing features & developing
applications through full
software development lifecycle, including design/
development/deployment/
maintenance phases. Mail
cover/resume to: LootCrate,
Inc. 3401 Pasadena Ave., Los
Angeles, CA 90031 | Attn: HR
& ref. job code: 20170823YK
Securities Analyst, TAS (Value & Bus. Modeling - Complex Securities) (Manager)
(Multiple Positions), Ernst &
Young U.S. LLP, Los Angeles,
CA Determine the value of
derivatives and other complex financial instruments
to support clients with regards to financial reporting
requirements, as well as for
tax planning purposes. Travel required to meet client
needs up to 25%. Employer
will accept any suitable combination of education, training, or experience. For complete job description, list of
requirements, and to apply,
go to: ey.com/us/jobsearch
(Job # - LOS00318).
Senior Systems Analyst
sought by Software Management Consultants, Inc.,
Glendale, CA to gather business reqmts & translate into
IT solutions that are secure,
robust & cost effective, etc.
Reqs Bachelor’s (or foreign
equiv.) deg in Comp Sci, Info
Technology or rltd & 3 yrs
of exp as Systems Analyst,
Systems Engr or rltd. Will accept 3 yrs of post-secondary
(college/university) educ in
Comp Sci, Info Technology,
or rltd & 2 yrs of exp as a
Systems Analyst, Systems
Engr or rltd. in lieu of Bachelor’s deg. Must be willing to
travel &/or relocate to work
at various client sites in unanticipated locs throughout
the U.S. Apply at www.smci.
com/job-seekers/job-search
or send resume to Software
Management Consultants,
Inc., 500 North Brand Blvd.,
Ste 1100, Glendale, CA
91203, Attn: Carolyne Tarverdians, MPA, Sr HR Mgr or
CT@smci.com. Refer to Job
# A170598.
APPAREL
MERCHANDISE DIRECTOR
Partner w/ other Merchandise leaders in Samil group
to create consistency of
product assortments, messaging & processes, etc.
Req’d: 5 yr exp of Merchandise Director or related &
any major in BA/BS. Resume
to: Samil Solution America,
Attn: H/R, 110 E 9th St.,
#B717, L.A., CA 90079.
Architectural Designer L28 – CallisonRTKL Inc., Los
Angeles. Req B Arch (5 yr) or
foreign equiv + 1 yr exp. Pls
review addl reqmts & apply
online at http://www.crtkl.
com/careers. EOE
Designer and Visual Artist in
Long Beach, CA: Responsible
to create project conceptualization and visual design
development; coordinate
design projects with architectural and engineering
professionals. Mail resumes:
Gibbs Architects, Attn: Job
ID SAC-2741, 3575 Long
Beach Blvd., Long Beach, CA
90807.
Computer/IT: Avanade Inc.
seeks Workplace Transformation & Outsourcing Lead
in El Segundo, CA to provide tech leadership across
mult function/geographic
teams in architecture, design, sales, & implementation of Workplace Solutions
in Microsoft & multi-vendor
environs.
Full lifecycle
phase of IT Infrastructure
includes: collaborate w/
sales reps for pre-sales support & develop/deliver tech
presentations; develop business justifications/perform
financial analysis; gather
business/tech reqs & translate into solutions; develop
go-to-market offerings; define project scope incl cost
projections/estimates, task
lists, plans, deliverables, &
implementation timelines;
create reusable estimating
models; respond to RFPs;
perform formal QA analysis
& track/report on in-flight
projects; create estimators
& solutioning tools; document solution architecture;
create reqs & strategy for
dev of in-house toolsets; &
create delivery methodologies & provide training for
global consulting staff. Position based in El Segundo,
CA, but 80% domestic travel
req’d. Must have exp as follows: 6 yrs working w/full
lifecycle (functional/technical) aspects of IT Infrastructure svcs; 6 yrs working w/
Workplace transformation
methodologies/solutions,
operating systems, & implementation
technologies
to incl Windows desktop
(Windows XP/7/8/10) & VDI,
SCCM, SCOM, DaaS, AppV, Microsoft Office, & ZTI/
LTI deployments; 6 yrs performing
project/program
architecture & estimation;
4 yrs performing functional
design, deploy & execution
of large-scale projects/apps,
incl at least 50K seats on
Windows 7 as min platform;
2 yrs leading onshore/offshore teams on creation of
MSI pkgs (100+ pkg./week);
4 yrs tracking app dependency models for future
state deployment scenarios
for Windows operating sys;
3 yrs working w/ LOB site
champions models; & 6 yrs
creating, leading, & driving
Workplace transformation
workshops in client settings.
Apply online at
www.avanade.com [Select
Careers; United States; El Segundo, CA; Job# 48390]
Computer/IT ADP Technology Services, Inc. seeks a
Lead Quality Assurance Engineer at our Pasadena, CA
location to dvlp test & QA
strategy, dvlp automated
testing strategy, & write automated test suites. Bach.
deg. in Electr. Engg., Comp.
Engg., Comp. Sci., Math,
Tech., Sci., or a related field
& 6 yrs of exp. req’d. ADP
will accept Master’s deg. &
4 yrs of exp. & will accept a
combo of degrees or diplomas as meeting either degree reqt. Exp. must incl.: C#,
Java, C++, Ruby, Python, or
Scala; Bldg & exe. Auto Func.
al Test suites using Jenkins &
Selenium; xUnit type frameworks incl. JUnit or NUnit;
Testing s/w & web apps using agile s/w dvlpmnt envt;
Automating UI tests with
Selenium; Web stds & testing REST based APIs; Configuring Jenkins & extending
with custom plug-ins; Enterprise level auto. needs & sols.
(parallelism & distribution);
SQL utilizing Toad for Oracle;
& Agile or Scrum method.
To apply, please respond to
req. 143917 at http://jobs.
adp.com. Alternatively, applicants may mail resume to
the following address referencing req. 143917: Employment Practices, 1 ADP Blvd.,
MS 248, Roseland, NJ 07068.
Chief Operating Officer
(Commerce, CA): Dsgn &
implmt business strategies,
plans & procedures with
regard distribution process
of food products including
purchasing,
coordinating
distributions, warehousing,
& sales. Oversee operations
of the company & the work
of sr mgmt. REQ: Bach’s deg
in Bus Admin is reqd for the
position. In addition, at least
5 yrs of exp in the job offd or
in a related role such as CEO,
Director of Operations, Investment/Mgmt Consultant,
or any position with similar
job duties is reqd. Full term
of exp must incl procurement exp. Must have 2 yrs
of qualifying exp dsgng &
dvlpg operations manual
& handbook, specifying all
processes from Order Placement to Final Shipments;
dsgng quality assurance
systems; & making final decisions as to supply chain
matters based on product
costs & pricing calculations.
RESUME: HR, Shah Distribu- Computer/IT: ADP Techtors Inc, 6260 Chalet Dr., nology Services, Inc. seeks
Senior Configuration/FuncCommerce, CA 90040.
tional Analyst at our Pasadena, CA location to build &
Lead Venture Architect - The maintain functional config.
Boston Consulting Group, & work with a SCRUM team
Inc. (Manhattan Beach, Cali- & participate in the dvlpmnt,
fornia): Lead cross-function- testing, & implmnt. of prog.
al team to define business Bach. deg. in Comp. Sci.,
cases & economic models Electr. Engg., Comp. Engg.,
for new business ventures Math, or a related field & 5
that deliver digital prod- yrs of exp. req’d. ADP will acucts. Requires Bachelor’s in cept Master’s deg. & 2 yrs of
business admin, engineer- exp. Exp. must incl.: SAP r/3
ing management, com- 4.7; ECC6; SAP Modules incl.
puter science, IT, or related FI-GL, CM, & FS-CD; Config.
(will accept foreign degree & custom. of SAP Modules
equivalent) and four years FI, FS-CD; Sys. analysis & deexp performing business sign; SDLC, incl. performing
strategy and advisory work analysis, design & dvlpmnt
for tech companies which activities; SAP IDOCs, Workmust include exp perform- flows & BTEs; SAP master &
ing strategic design and transactional data, pmt runs,
business planning for start- banking, incl. User Exits, as
ups. Will alternatively accept well as interfaces w/other
Master’s in fields previously modules; SAP app dvlpmnt
noted (including foreign using BDT’s; Analyzing bus.
degree equivalent) and two rqmnts, needs & objs. &
years exp performing busi- mapping them to the SAP
ness strategy and advisory processes, solns & prodwork for tech companies ucts that are being implewhich must include exp mented; & evaluating std.
performing strategic design SAP to determine areas for
and business planning for functionality needs & makstart-ups. Domestic/interna- ing recommendations on
tional travel (up to 50%) re- utilizing the std SAP funcs.
quired based on company/ To apply, please respond to
client need. Send resume to req. 143860 at http://jobs.
DV_LVA@bcg.com.
adp.com. Alternatively, applicants may mail resume to
the following address referChiropractor sought by Pe- encing req. 143860: Employter Wang Chiropractic Corp. ment Practices, 1 ADP Blvd.,
to exam, diagnose & treat MS 248, Roseland, NJ 07068.
patients in need of chiropractic treatments, etc. Job Computers: ERP Consultant.
site: El Monte, CA. Resume Job location in Torrance, CA.
to 9939 Garvey Ave. #A, El Please send resume w/this
Monte, CA 91733, Attn. Peter ad to Job Code20170988Wang.
EC, J. Page, Calsoft Systems, 19701 Hamilton Avenue, Suite 190, Torrance,
CA 90502
Computer/IT ADP Technology Services, Inc. seeks
an Application Developer COMPUTER
at our Pasadena, CA loc. to JAVA ORACLE APPLIparticipate in SDLC (perform CATION
ARCHITECT
analysis, design, & dvlpmnt) Bachelor’s Degree in Com& dvlp, implmnt, & support puter Sc. or related. 5 years
projects. Bach. deg. in Comp. experience in Java, Spring
Sci., Comp. Engg., Electr. Framework, Oracle, PL-SQL,
Engg., Info. Tech., or a relat- HTML5. Send resume to
ed field & 5 yrs of exp. req’d. Simplain Software Solutions
Exp. must incl.: Sys. analysis LLC, 680 Brea Canyon Road #
& design in more than one 168, Diamond Bar, CA 91789
SAP module, i.e. FS-CD, FIGL, CM; SAP ABAP program.; COMPUTER
Dialog program.; User-exits; ORACLE JAVA TECHNIALV; BADI; BDT; RFC; R/3 4.7; CAL LEAD Master Degree
ECC6; & SAP Master & Trans- in Computer Sc. or related.
actional Data, pmt. runs, and 2 + years of experience in
banking. To apply, please Java, Pl-SQL, Oracle, MS SQL
respond to req. 143910 at and .NET. Send resume to
http://jobs.adp.com. Alter- Simplain Software Solutions
natively, applicants may LLC, 680 Brea Canyon Road #
mail resume to the follow- 168, Diamond Bar, CA 91789
ing address referencing req.
143910: Employment Practices, 1 ADP Blvd., MS 248, Senior iOS Developer.
Lead the design, dvlpmt, &
Roseland, NJ 07068.
implmntion of cyber secuSR. RESEARCH QUALITY AS- rity sols for the messaging
SURANCE ENGINEER sought platform w/in the iOS oprtng
by City of Hope National system. Reqs: Master’s deMedical Center in Duarte, gree in Comp Sci or Cyber
CA. Prepare testing strate- Security Eng + 1 yrs of exp in
gies & testing plans, effort the job offered or a rltd pstn.
estimation, prepare unit test Skills/knowledge in iOS Core
cases, & release criteria for Data, Scrum, & Core Animaresearch software. Send re- tion. Exp acquired prior to
sume to: Sherri Pattanakiat, Master’s degree is acceptCity of Hope National Medi- able. 40hrs/wk. Job/Intvw
cal Center, 1500 E. Duarte Site: santa Monica, CA. Send
Rd., Duarte, CA 91010.
Resume to TigerText, Inc. @
recruiting@tigertext.com
Programmer Analyst
Provide analysis and development of reporting & analytics solutions, in support
of the Ambulatory Business
Intelligence team, for a univ
med sys. UCLA Medical
Center in L.A. Apply online
at www.uclahealthcareers.
org/#/welcome EOE.
COMPUTER
UI/UX Designer Dfne style
guidlns & dvlp fullstck dsgns. Dfine intrctn modls, usr
task flws & UI specs & use
frntend prgrmmng lang to
create clickble sltns. Reqs:
Bachelor’s in Grphic Dsgn,
Game Dsgn, or Comp Sci w/
crsewrk in grphc dsgn + 2 yrs
exp in job offrd or rltd pstn.
Skills/knwldge in Adobe Phtshp, Illstrtr & InDsgn, Sketch,
InVision, Origami, Atomic,
Marvel, HTML, CSS, JvScrpt &
React. 40hrs/wk. Job/Intvw
Site: Los Angeles, CA. Email
Resume to FabFitFun, Inc. at
jobs@fabfitfun.com
Your exclusive
guide to SoCal
real estate
listings.
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Employment
CUSTOMER
Service
Phone Agents
Woodland Hills, CA
Caine & Weiner has openings for energetic phone
agents to work PT or FT
in its Woodland Hills location. All shifts available.
Must have solid communication skills. Competitive wages and flexible
hours.
Please contact HR
Department at Caine &
Weiner E-mail hr@caineweiner.com or call 818
251-1733
Advertise Today
LA Times
Classified
(800) 234-4444
Advertising Supplement
Making
contact
The do’s and don’ts of networking
N
etworking can be
tricky. You want
information, advice
and assistance, but
you don’t want to
come across as a
pushy, know-it-all
loudmouth. “Want to make sure people
never recommend you for a job? Make
sure they feel like they’re being bullied
when you ask them for help,” says Aaron
Small, a St. Louis-based career consultant.
“The No. 1 rule of effective networking is
‘always be pleasant.’ The more aggressive
you are, the more you’ll turn off a person
who may be able to help you with your
career.”
To help set some other rules, Small
outlines several do’s and don’ts for
effective networking:
DO use your contact list for more
than just job opportunities. Today’s
job seekers need to keep constant tabs on
new trends in their respective Industries,
new interviewing techniques, areas of
declining opportunities and more. “You’ll
get the most stable information from your
contacts,” says Small. “Feel free to reach
out on occasion to ask someone what’s
happening with their profession. People
enjoy helping others when they’re trying
to find out new information.”
DON’T take personal offense if
someone can’t get you the exact
interview or opportunity you want. “It’s
impossible to understand the dynamics
of relationships between coworkers, and
even harder to understand the relationships
between workers and their supervisors,”
says Small. “Don’t assume that your
request went unfulfilled because your
contact thinks you’re incompetent. It
might just be a case of them not feeling
comfortable sticking their necks out for
a person — you — that they don’t know
that well or with a boss at their company
they’re not that familiar with.”
DO pay attention to your core circle.
You’ll always have contacts whom you
view in the highest light. Keep those
contacts close and make sure they’re
informed of your current situation. They’ll
be the ones you turn to when looking for
recommendations, and they should also be
the ones who feel the most comfortable
turning to you when they are in similar
situations.
DON’T stop networking. There’s
never a reason to close off your contacts
and make your list complete. In fact, it
should always be growing. You should be
adding new peers, coworkers, neighbors,
friends and relatives. “Think of your
network on LinkedIn and how it’s grown
to include friends of friends of friends,”
says Small. “There’s nothing wrong with
an ever-growing circle of contacts.”
DO reciprocate. If someone is helping
you in any way, whether it’s by putting
your résumé on the right desk or by
offering you some interviewing advice,
make sure you return the favor when
possible. At the very least, perform an
act of appreciation, whether it’s a short
note or an invitation to lunch. “People
remember those contacts who don’t say
‘thanks’ or fail to do anything for them in
return,” Small says. “It sounds petty, but
that’s the real world.”
DON’T assume anything. Before
you call someone to ask about any
opportunities at Company XYZ, make
sure they’re still working at company
XYZ. “There’s nothing worse than placing
a phone call to a contact who no longer
works at the company you’re calling about
or, in some cases, the industry that you’re
interested in,” says Small. “All it takes is a
few minutes on Google to check.”
DO respond. If someone reaches out to
you for information or advice, provide that
person with an answer, even if that answer
is “I don’t know” or “I’m not sure I can
help you with that.” “It’s one thing to tell
someone you can’t be of assistance, but
it’s another to ignore them,” says Small.
“In professional and personal circles, rude
behavior isn’t going to help you make any
new friends.”
DON’T mislead others. If you’re
passing on a name to another person in
your company, you don’t always have
to accompany that name with glowing
accolades, especially if you don’t know
that person that well. “A lot of resumes
are passed on with nothing more than a
‘hey, I don’t know this person too well,
but she asked me to pass on her resume,’”
Small says. “That way, you’re not setting
yourself up for any real or imagined
blowback if you recommend a person who
turns out to be a disaster.”
— Marco Buscaglia, Tribune Content
Agency
Oops, I didn’t know: Before you call
someone to ask about opportunities
at Company XYZ, make sure they’re
still working at company XYZ.
Employment
Dental Practice Administrator, F/T : Establish goals
& standards; supervise
staff, quality improvement
activities; oversee mgmt &
recruitment; supervise utilization mgmt/claims review;
manages staff incl determining needs/setting goals,
inter viewing/selec ting/
coaching/evaluating performance; provide leadership
& manage activities. Job loc
Los Angeles, CA. Doctor of
Dentistry or Dental Surgery
reqd. Mail resumes attn: HR,
Bijan Afar Dental Corp dba
Mid Wilshire Dental Care,
6200 Wilshire Blvd, #1508,
Los Angeles, CA 90048.
Interior Designer Interior
Designer (W Hollywood,
CA) Create deliverables, incl:
conceptual, dvlpmt & construction docs using CAD.
Review shop drawings for
furniture, millwork, & prototypes. Respond to & track
RFI’s & contractor submittals.
Bach’s in Interior Dsgn, Architecture or rltd + 2 yrs exp
as Interior Dsgnr or Architect
or rltd reqd. Resumes: SmithFirestone Associates, Inc.
dba SFA Design, Attn: Nicki
Parr, 136 W Canon Perdido
St, Ste 220, Santa Barbara,
CA 93101
Inphi Corp. seeks a Sr. Engineer, Validation in Westlake
Village, CA: Debug, optimize,
& validate TX & TIA semiconductor broadband analog
devices for fiber optical
comm sys. Req. MS in Electrical/Electronics Engrg or rel &
2 yrs of exp w/ RFcharacterization/sys design. Apply at:
resume@inphi.com & refer
to Req #17-503. EOE.
Applications Engineer (Calabasas, CA): Reqs Master’s in
Eng Mgmt, Electrical Eng or
rltd & knowledge of: electrical eng dsgn; micro-cntrlr
unit prgrmng incl low-level
hardware-software interface
devel; Bluetooth & WiFi; Android & iOS app devel. Mail
resume: DTS Inc, attn. K.
Metchis, 5220 Las Virgenes
Rd, Calabasas, CA 91302.
Principals only. EOE. Must be
legally authrizd to wrk in US
w/o spnsrship.
WST SUNDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2017
Employment
ENGINEERING
Simpson
Gumpertz & Heger is looking for Staff II-Structures
for its Newport Beach, CA
location to perform seismic
evaluations of nuclear facility structures, systems, and
components using deterministic and probabilistic
methods. Must have MS in
Civil Engineering w with
specialization in Structural
Engineering & 2 yrs experience in structural & seismic
analysis, including experience with key computer
codes, including SAP2000,
ANSYS, ABAQUS, GTStrudl,
Mathcad, & SASSI; & performing seismic evaluations
of nuclear power plant structures in accordance with associated industry standards
& codes including ASCE 4,
ASCE 43, AISC 360, & ACI
318.
Send resume to: Stella
Mereves-Carolan, SGH, 41
Seyon Street, Building #1,
Suite #500, Waltham MA
02453.
OPERATION
Executive Vice President,
Operations: Manage &
oversee the performance,
policies, & overall direction
of the Supply Chain, Operations, Engineering, & Business Development groups.
*International or domestic
travel required up to 50%
of the time. Mail Resume to
iamplus, LLC, Attn. HR, Job
ME004, 809 N. Cahuenga
Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90038.
Ref Job# ME010.
Software Engineer sought
by FPT USA Corp, El Segundo, CA. Crdn dvlpmt prcdrs
of sftw app prjcts. Trvl to
othr US offcs as nd’d.Apply @
www.jobpostingtoday.com
# 16830
Fashion Designer: Create
garment designs & products.
Req’d: Bachelor’s in Fashion
Design or related. Job Openings: 2. Mail Resume: JODIFL,
INC. 2511 S. Alameda St., LA,
CA 90058
Head of Fixed Income
Trading sought by Capital
Research and Management
Company in Los Angeles, CA
to mentor & dvlp the Global
Fixed Income Trading Team.
Req: Bach in Econ., Finance,
Business or foreign eq or
rel & 15 yrs exp. req. Send
resume to: Capital Group/
Brian Zimmer, 400 S. Hope
St., 22nd Fl., Los Angeles, CA
90071. REF. JOB CODE: VR-01
Food Service Worker:
Greet customers, take orders, prepare eat-in or
take-out plates, in a timely
manner. No previous work
experience is needed.
Mail your resumes to Poke
Bar, Inc. at 525 E. 1st St.,
Long Beach, CA 90802; Attn:
Data Engineers I
(Los Angeles, CA): Rsrch Mr. Park
& dvlp algrthms bsed on
mthds of Machine Learn- Restaurant Manager: Maning & Statistics to anlyze age & coordinate food ser& prvde actnble insghts vices for customers. Req’d:
from data; Resume to: Oath 2 years of experience as
(Americas), Inc. Attn: Kris- Restaurant Mgr., Food Sertin Faison, 22000 AOL Way, vice Mgr., or related. Mail
Dulles, VA 20166. Ref. job Resume: BCD Tofu House,
Inc. 869 S Western Ave. Ste.
#MBN1100NP
2, Los Angeles, CA 90005
Electrical Senior Engineers:
Skyworks Solutions, Inc.
seeks multiple Engineers
in Newbury Park, CA:
*Electrical Senior Engineer
(CA0517KC):
Responsible GRAPHIC
for dsgng & simulating all Graphic Designer Formupassive aspects of power late, create, design, develop
amplifier module dsgns & approve layouts & graphincluding low-loss output ics for website, promotion, ilmatching networks, high- lustration & marketing; mandirectivity
daisy-chain age projects from concept to
couplers, harmonic filters, design. Qualification: BA in
& high isolation layouts Art Design, Graphic Design
for SAW/FBAR duplexers. or related field; good skill
*Electrical Senior Engineer of Photoshop, Adobe Illus(CA0617SQ): Responsible for trator; Chinese calligraphy;
dsgng & simulating all pas- Chinese language. Mail resive aspects of power ampli- sume to Gesoo, Inc. at: 4401
fier module dsgns including Santa Anita Ave., Ste. 214, El
output matching networks, Monte, CA 91731. Attn: HR.
integrated passive devices,
high-directivity daisy-chain
couplers, harmonic filters, Cryptographic Key ManPlan, implement,
duplexer matching, & high ager:
isolation layouts for SAW/ document, maintain cryptographic
security assets &
FBAR duplexers. Must have
unrestricted right to work key management processes.
Reqs.
Bachelor’s
or equiv dein U.S. Mail all resumes to
Angela Ho, Skyworks, 5221 gree; 5 yrs exp incl 3 yrs in IT
California Ave., Irvine, CA security (PKI, logical & physical security, HSMs, IT secu92617. Must ref job code.
rity audits, risk mgmt, dev.
security policies). Reqs. up to
10% US/int’l travel. Must be
authorized to work F/T withIT Engineer II Fleet Projects, out employer sponsor. LocaPrincess Cruise Lines, Ltd., tion: Los Angeles, CA. Email
Santa Clarita, CA. Provide resume to: Internet Corp. for
network technology solu- Assigned Names and Numtions that meets or exceeds bers, icann-hr@icann.org
business reqmts. Research,
dsgn, engineer, implmt & Scopely, Inc. has the folsupport complex networks lowing openings in Culver
throughout the organiza- City, CA: General Manager:
tion, specializing in the Design the roadmap and
Princess fleet special proj- execute the feature develects including New Builds, opment for both in-develRefits, Television Refresh, opment and in-market caTelephone (VolP) refresh, sual mobile games. Position
data center modifications, requires travel up to 15%;
IDF enhancements, WiFi Director of Product Manenhancements, & 3rd party agement: Lead the strategy,
hw/sw integration to ship’s roadmap and development
work. Implmt network of data platform. To apply,
configuration based on mail resumes and ref. job
approved dsgns, establish title to S. Joseph, Scopely,
standards & guidelines. 3530 Hayden Ave., Suite A,
Monitor & analyze network Culver City, CA 90232
system performance & make
configuration change as
appropriate for optimization. Ensure corporate procedures, fleet procedures,
operations & configurations
Assistant Marketing Remeet specified quality & searcher to assist mktg recompliancy reqmts. Review search in Torrance, CA. Japacommitments to ensure nese Fluency Req’d. Resume
deadlines & other expecta- to Oriental Motor USA Corp.,
tion are met. Identify oppor- Attn: Kulie
tunities & use technology to kulief@orientalmotor.com
dsgn & dvlp new processes.
Bach’s Deg, or foreign equiv
in Comp Sci, Comp Engg, or, Medical Transcriptionist
related field. 2 yrs of exp in (Los Angeles, CA) Tranthe job or related core net- scribe medical reports
work & infrastructure tech- recorded by physicians/
nologies; dsgng, implmtg & other healthcare practitiosupport large layer 2/layer ners; Return dictated re3 networks. Knowl/Skills ports in printed/electronic
reqd: Cruise ship LAN, WAN, form for physician’s review,
VOIP, QOS, WiFi, & TV sys- signature&corrections and
tems. Cruise ship network for inclusion in patients’
security, & ship’s physical medical records; Review/
security, concepts. Ability to edit transcribed reports for
read & write complex net- spelling, grammar, clarity,
work device configurations. consistency&proper mediFrequent international travel cal terminology. 40hrs/wk,
reqd. Send resumes to: C. Min 2 yrs of Medical/Health
Wong, Sr Recruiter, Talent related experience req’d.
Acquisition, Princess Cruises Resume to Mission Home
Lines, Ltd., 24305 Town Health Services, Inc. Attn.
Center Dr., Santa Clarita, CA Joon T Choi, 505 S Virgil Ave
91355.
# 305, Los Angeles CA 90020
ENGINEERING
Manufacturing
Quality Engineer [PMP090517]
Parter Medical Products,
Inc.-Carson, CA.
Genrl.
mech. engnrg activities in
industrial mfctrng setting.
B.Eng.ME, or related, or
equiv., +1 yr quality engnrg exp. in mfg./assembly.
QA; ISO stds; 3D s/w (Solidworks); matl. Science (PP,
PS, HDPE and LDPE). EOE.
Send resume w/job code
PMP090517 to: PMP, 17015
Kingsview Av., Carson, CA
90746 or http://partermedical.com/careers.html. Principals only.
Software Engineer w/ E2
Consulting Engineers, Inc.
(Los Angeles, CA): deploy
& maintain sftwr prgrms
by analyzing cstmr & client
needs. Req’s incl. Bach or
Mstrs in Engg, Telecomm,
Netwrkng, or rel’d and prog.
post-bach exp. (5 yrs w/
Bach or 2 yrs w/ Mstrs). Req’s
pre-employment
bkgrnd
check.
AA/EEO/M/F/Vet/
Disability Employer. See full
req’s & apply online: bit.ly/
E2seNR
Systems Engineer (Burbank,
CA): Reqs MS in Comp Sci,
Comp Eng or rltd field + 1 yr
exp as Syst Eng or rltd position. Exp must incl: RedHat/
CentOS syst admin; virtualization with VMWare &
RHEV; Perl, Shell, Python &
Powershell scripting; set-up
& maintenance of virtualization envirnmnts. Mail resume: Deluxe Entertainment
Services Group, 2400 W.
Empire Blvd. #400, Burbank,
CA 91504 attn E. Gutierrez.
Principals only. EOE
C5
Employment
OPERATION
Senior Operations Data
Analyst,
Development
(Northridge, CA) (2 positions) Develop ASP.NET
server-side web appli. to
produce dynamic web
pages with large-scaled
healthcare transaction datasets for health service plan .
Rqt.s Master’s in Information
Science & 2 yrs’ exp. in job
or 2 yrs’ exp. in alternate occupation of healthcare data
analyst. Fax resume/ref.s
to Lindra Frandinata (818)
654-3460. Heritage Provider
Network Inc.
VP, Customer Operations
sought by Snap Inc. Job
sites: Santa Monica, CA &
Venice, CA. Lead customer
ops for Snap products &
services. 12 yrs exp. req. Resumes: HalehHR, Snap Inc.,
63 Market St, Venice, CA
90291; use Job Code #VPCO2017-RK. EOE.
PHYSICIAN
Physician assistant
wanted
A Spanish bilingual physician assistant needed in a
busy urgent care clinic. Salary is commensurate with
experience. A future partnership with the right candidate.
nmy10@aol.com or 626917-4481 or 626-539-6677
PRODUCTION SUPERVISOR
Bimbo Bakeries, Production
Supervisor, Montebello, CA,
supervise all production activities for food manufacturing facility. Travel Reqd. Mail
resume, Attn: C. Coscia, 7301
South Fwy, Ft Worth, TX
76134 indicate 11039.112.
Ad/Promo Mgrs: Internet
Brands, Inc. has an oppty
in El Segundo, CA for a Bus
Dvlpmt Dir. Mail resume to
Attn: HR, 909 N Sepulveda
Blvd, 11th Fl, El Segundo, CA
90245, Ref #ESJPE. Must be
legally auth to work in the
U.S. w/o spnsrshp. EOE
VP, Networks Mktg (Culver
City, CA) – Set goals for TV
Networks Mktg function.
Manage $1M budget. Oversee all global Brands (AXN,
SET) strategy for launches
(logo & off-air graphics).
Work w/ regions to position
Brands. Create/distribute/
launch global strategy templates for key tent pole for
Channels, to incl. orig program/acquisitions.
Train/
dvlp Mktg Dir & guide 2
mgrs. Run global/reg’l Mktg
mtgs. 40 hrs/wk. Req: Bach
in Mktg or foreign equiv +2
yrs exp. in job offrd or in
brand mktg, or 4 yrs in job
offrd or brand mktg. Mail
resume to: CPT Holdings,
c/o SPE-Morita 131D, Ref:
VPNET04, 10202 W. Washington Blvd, Culver City, CA
90232. Principals only. US
work auth req’d if hired. EOE.
Director, Programming
Acquisition needed by DIRECTV ENTERPRISES, LLC in
El Segundo, CA to negotiate
programming acquisition
agreements for network,
Video On Demand (VOD),
mobile and over-the-top
(OTT) content for DIRECTV
and U-VERSE’s International
and Hispanic broadcast content in the United States. Apply at http://att.jobs/, select
JOB SEARCH AND APPLY and
select Search by Requisition
Number at the left bottom
of the page and enter JOB
NUMBER: 1742684.
PROGRAMMER
Sony Interactive Entertainment LLC seeks a Programmer in Los Angeles, CA to
work w/designers & producers to create tools, improve
existing scripting tools &
functionalities. Req’s: Bachelor’s in Entertainment Technology, Comp Eng’g, CS, rel.
field or equiv & 2 yrs of exp
designing, implementing,
& maintaining syst’s & tools
to support gameplay incl
animation. Prior exp must
incl 2 yrs of writing clear,
maintainable, portable &
highly functional code; testing & documenting code
produced; performing fast
prototyping & implementing code in ideation phase
to create a proof of concept
to iterate & improve prototypes; profiling & performing tuning on code to remove bottlenecks; creating
debug options & menus to
improve production; ensuring smooth transitions between animations & player
control; creating, modifying
& supporting syst’s written
in C & C++; dvlping & extending code architecture; &
in executing duties, utilizing
linear algebra, & working in
audio, effects, animation,
collision, UI interaction,
physics, progression & optimization. Send resumes to
SNEI-Job-Postings@
am.sony.com & indicate job
code WH1011-17. NO CALLS
PLS. Sony is an EOE.
SALES
SALES ADMIN
General office task, reception, billing & customer service. You are dynamic, organized & ambitious. Contact:
elena@swiftech.com
Sales Associate: 2 yrs exp
sales,mrktng,or related req.
Mail Resume to:Lexus Santa
Monica,Attn:HR Mngr.,1501
Santa Monica Blvd., SM, CA
90404.
SCHOOL
Director,
Maintenance,
Operations and Transportation Plan, organize,
coordinate and supervise
maintenance,
custodial,
grounds and transportation
departments. Hands on position. Coast Unified School
District, Cambria, CA www.
coastusd.org for details or
call 805-927-6135. 10/26/17
application deadline.
Don’t let the
phone stop
ringing
Advertise with
LA Times Classified
LA Times Classified
(800) 234-4444
SALES
FLAVOR SALES
The correct applicant will be a California resident or willing to
become one and have experience selling flavors to the food industry . Our company is located in Fairfield , NJ and is expanding rapidly and becoming a leader in transformative flavors Responsibilities: 1) Planning and carrying out all sales activities and
appointments as requested or sourced 2) Building relationships
with new customers and maintaining relationships with existing
customers 3) Participating in sales events and trade shows 4) Entering sample requests for customers in our enterprise software
5) Following up with the lab on fulfillment of sample requests 6)
Following up with customers to assess satisfaction with samples,
to see if new samples are required, and turning sample requests
into sales . The right candidate will have excellent written and oral
communication skills along with being computer literate . Must
be energetic and confident with the ability to give an engaging
presentation . Minimum of 3 years sales experience required flavor industry experience a necessity . Please send resume and
salary history to : 973-256-4138
Sapphire Flavors
6 Commerce Road
Fairfield, NJ 07512
Pamela Flinn
Email: pflinn@adv-bio.com
Fax: 973-256-4138
C6
S U N DAY , O C T O B E R 22, 2 017
WS T
S
L AT I M E S . C O M / B U S I N E S S
Rules target stem cell ‘treatments’
[Hiltzik, from C1]
the Food and Drug Administration. That’s essentially
all of them, since the FDA
has approved only one
treatment, which uses cells
derived from umbilical cord
blood to treat “certain blood
cancers and some inherited
metabolic and immune
system disorders.” The
clinics will have to post
notices in their offices,
including at the entrance,
reading as follows:
“This health care practitioner performs one or more
stem cell therapies that
have not yet been approved
by the United States Food
and Drug Administration.
You are encouraged to
consult with your primary
care physician prior to
undergoing a stem cell
therapy.”
The print must be close
to a half-inch high or larger
and the same statement
must be handed to the
customer separately before
treatment begins. After the
first violation, subsequent
failures to comply are subject to a fine of up to $1,000
per incident.
The law also instructs
the California Medical
Board to compile statistics
on complaints and disciplinary or administrative
actions taken against doctors working with stem cell
clinics, starting next year.
In many ways, this law is
a good first step at putting
these clinics on a regulatory
leash. “When I started hearing about what’s going on
with stem cells, I realized
there aren’t any checks and
balances for this new evolving healthcare delivery
system,” the law’s sponsor,
state Sen. Ed Hernandez
(D-Azusa), told me.
“There’s no oversight whatsoever.”
Some experts think the
new law is a worthy advance. “It’s the only law that
ensures there’s disclosure”
that the nostrums being
offered aren’t approved or
licensed by the FDA, says
Beth E. Roxland, a bioethicist at New York University’s medical school. “That
alone is a big positive.”
Knoepfler believes the
disclosure could be a useful
Spencer Platt Getty Images
THE FDA has approved only one stem cell treatment, which uses cells derived from umbilical cord blood to
treat “certain blood cancers and some inherited metabolic and immune system disorders.” Above, Kristin
Martins-Taylor works with stem cells at the University of Connecticut’s Stem Cell Institute in 2010.
counterbalance to what he
told the Senate Business
and Professions Committee
earlier this year is “all the
buzz around stem cells,”
especially among customers
who may be on the fence
about pursuing the treatment. He also hopes that
California’s initiative might
encourage other states to
“jump on the bandwagon” of
regulation.
Yet there’s reason to ask
whether California’s law
goes far enough to regulate
businesses exploiting the
desperation of patients with
intractable diseases.
Start with the wording of
the required notification,
which refers to treatments
that have “not yet” been
approved by the FDA. This
suggests that FDA endorsement may only be a matter
of time — that the treatments may be premature,
but not fictitious. That’s
wildly optimistic and may
itself foster a false hope for
the treatments.
The law also imposes
enforcement responsibility
on one of the state’s most
reluctant regulators, the
California Medical Board,
while failing to give the
board any new resources.
It’s unclear how clinics’
compliance is to be verified;
the medical board almost
certainly doesn’t have the
money or staff to perform
spot-checks to make sure
the appropriate signage is
posted and notifications
handed to patients. The
board seldom takes a proactive approach to its oversight — it responds to complaints filed against physicians by patients or fellow
doctors.
The rise of the direct-toconsumer business model in
stem cell treatments flows
from the confluence of two
alarming and dangerous
trends in healthcare. One is
the penetration of nonscientific claims into medical
practices, abetted by established institutions risking
their reputations by accommodating “alternative”
medicine to build their
business base and funding
endowments. (We’re looking at you, UCI.) The other
is the “right-to-try” movement, which aims to give
sufferers of intractable or
incurable conditions the
opportunity to sample
almost any last-gasp therapy without interference
from government regulators.
The right-to-try movement is now supported by
laws in 36 states. In midJune, Texas Gov. Greg
Abbott signed a bill adding
“investigational stem-cell
treatments” that could be
accessed by patients with
“severe chronic diseases or
terminal illnesses” without
interference from government officials.
The measure specifies
that the treatments must be
overseen by an institutional
review board associated
with a medical school or
Employment
Employment
Employment
Employment
Scientist: Advanced Sterilization Products, a division
of Ethicon, Inc. is seeking
a Principal Scientist for our
Irvine, California facility to
oversee chemistry and formulation work in connection with the design, development and optimization of
new and existing biocides
and sterilization cycles.
Provide input to company
strategic and long-range
business plans and ensure
development projects further those goals. Negotiate
with other development
staff and departments to
resolve conflicts and bottlenecks affecting projects;
plan and conduct the design
and development of products for medical devices in
support of the company’s
strategic plan; and execute
all assigned projects and
develop future pipelines
for high-level disinfectant
and sterilization products.
Position will assist in the
coordination of shared laboratory resources to support
projects that are critical to
achieving the business objectives of the company;
evaluate results of research
and development projects
to ensure accomplishment
of technical objectives; prepare and present reports
outlining the outcome of
technical projects; and
make
recommendations
to achieve desired results.
Drive execution of the new
product development process and collaborate globally with various associates
as needed to accomplish
goals. Provide supervision
to five Laboratory Technicians and Scientists. Qualified applicants must have
a PhD degree in Chemical
Engineering, Biochemical
Engineering or related and
four years of product development and formulation
experience from concept
to commercialization of
biochemical processes. An
applicant will possess four
years of experience with the
following: Fermentation Processes, Media Optimization,
(Bio)process optimization,
Microbiology and statistical analysis (mixture design,
design of experiments, linear and non-linear regression analysis), and statistical
and engineering software,
including MATLAB, Minitab,
and Design Expert. Four
years of experience executing strategic and long-range
business plans in product
design is also required. Qualified applicants will possess
three years of experience
with the following: Metabolic Engineering, Metabolic
Flux Analysis, Biochemistry,
method development, and
GAMS. Employer will accept
experience gained pre-or
post- PhD conferral. Up to
20% international and domestic travel required. To apply for this position, please
submit your resume via
email, indicating Requisition
Code 1051170921 to: Paula
Phelps, Senior Recruiting
Specialist
PPhelps@ITS.JNJ.com
SOFTWARE
TECHNICIAN
Electronic
Technician Metrology Lab
seeks Electronic Tech with
PMEL training if possible.
DC, low frequency and RF
microwave experience. Ventura County. Email resume
to:
Cal@qsiinc.net Fax 805240-2451
TECHNOLOGY
Deloitte Consulting LLP
seeks a Project Delivery
Specialist, Technology, Application
Management
Services in Los Angeles, CA
and various unanticipated
Deloitte office locations
and client sites nationally to
Provide technology-enabled
consulting services to clients through implementing
application support and
technology solution. Deliver
components of client engagements that identity, design and implement Anthem
Wellpoint Group System
(WGS) solutions for large
companies. Requirements:
Bachelor’s degree or foreign
equivalent degree in Computer Science, Engineering
(any), Management Information Systems (MIS), Information Technology (IT) or
a related field. Two years of
experience providing IT consulting services to clients on
behalf of a global consulting
Company. Must have two
years of experience with:
Developing and maintaining IBM mainframe systems
for data management using
Mainframe programming
languages and tools; Automating performance tasks
and developing Mainframe
components using ChangeMan; Utilizing mainframe
tools to regulate complex
digital workloads, monitor transactions, diagnose
software problems, and automatically take action on
customer queries; Designing and tuning data storage
procedures for large-scale
batch and online transaction processes using COBOL;
Enhancing online transaction management and connectivity for applications in
mainframe systems in rapid,
high-volume processes utilizing IMS DB application
servers; Developing IMS
DB and DB2 data modeling
strategies and optimizing
system performance using
SQL queries; and Developing testing strategies, executing testing lifecycles,
delivering testing results
using JCL scripts and resolving defects using IBM Fault
Analyzer and IBM File Manager. 15% travel required. To
apply visit https://jobs2.deloitte.com/us/en/ and enter
XGGS18FC1017LOS2 in the
“Search jobs” field. “Deloitte”
means Deloitte LLP and
its subsidiaries. Please see
www.deloitte.com/us/about
for a detailed description
of the legal structure of Deloitte LLP and its subsidiaries. Deloitte LLP & its subsidiaries are equal opportunity
employers
Spokeo, Inc. in Pasadena, TECHNOLOGY
CA seeks applicants for the Mercedes-Benz Research &
Technical Lead
following full-time positions: Development North AmerAmericas, El Segundo, CA
ica is accepting resumes
to dev, des & mod SW apps
Software Developer (Back- for the following position
& specialzd progs for data
End): Develop software sys- in Long Beach, CA: Senior
ming & content suggtn sw
tem testing & validation pro- Development
Engineer
com. Send res to HR #TA01,
cedures. Reqs: MS or equiv. (SDEGK-CA) - Ensure that an
ThinkAnalytics, Inc. 361 Main
appropriate operating enviStreet, Ste 400, El Segundo,
Software Developer: Write ronment is available to supCA 90245.
web application code based port the application lifecycle
on specifications provided management,
including
by product managers. Reqs: testing, production, End-2Technical Brand Specialist
MS or equiv. & 1 year exp.
End virtual vehicle and virtu& Software Engineer: Inal customer environments.
terested candidates send
Sr. Data Scientist – Data/ Development
Engineer,
resume to: Google LLC., PO
Product Analytics: Collabo- Tuner & Antenna Systems
Box 26184 San Francisco,
rate
with
data
engineers
to
(DETRT-CA)
Assist
with reCA 94126 Attn: A. Johnson. Sr. SW Arch: ALE USA Inc. build & enhance analytics solving technical problems,
Please reference job # be- in Calabasas, CA is seeking: capability & build quantita- reporting errors, supporting
Job #2-Sr. SW Arch resp for
low:
tive modules to improve documentation and data,
Technical Brand Specialist arch, dsgn, implem of NMS customer experience & data and promptly communi(Venice, CA) Provide techni- for managing Enterprise intensive products. Reqs: cating technical and qualcal and product services for switches & WLAN Access Pts MS or equiv.
ity related issues obtained
Google LLC. #1615. 27330 to meet hi-scalability. No
from the testing, validation
Exp Incl: SQL & data mining; trvl. No telecom. Job #5- Sr. QA Developer: Modify and verification process.
PLM
Mkting
Spec
–
Cloud
XML, HTML, HTML5, JavaSexisting software to correct Position may require travel
cript, & Flash; Mediaplex, At- Svc to dev spec mkting plans errors, provide support for to various, unanticipated
las, & Doubleclick; DFP suite for ALE’s Cloud Svc Ntwrk In- identifying & debugging locations. Submit resume
frastr
prod.
10%
dom
&
int’l
of prod; ad serving tools,
software defects. Reqs: MS by mail to: Mercedes-Benz
yield optimiz platforms, & trvl. No telecom. Job #7-Sr. or equiv.
Research & Development
dig ad workflow mgmt & an- SW Dev Engr (Ntwrk SwitchNorth America Attn: Human
alytics tools; digital mrkting; es) to dsgn & implem SW sys To apply, please reference Resources at 309 N. Pastoria
& ad ops, trafficking, rich me- for managing, & controlling job title and mail resume Ave, Sunnyvale, CA 94085.
customized
hi-speed
comm
dia, or inventory mgmt.
and cover letter to: Spokeo, Must reference job title and
Software Engineer (Venice, HW & ASICs. No trvl or tele- Inc., Attn: F. Sandoval, 199 job code
CA) Design, develop, modify, com. Mail resumes to: ALE S. Los Robles, Ste. 711, Pasa&/or test software needed USA Inc., 26801 W. Agoura dena, CA 91101. Principals
for various Google projects. Road, Calabasas, CA 91301, only. EOE.
#1615. 29242 Exp Incl: Java; Attn: A. Jentis, HR. Must incl
Story Editor Assess, selct
distrib sys; adv algorithms; Job # and title in App.
& revise screenplays to be
APIs; Linux; & multithreaded
used for film prodctn. Prpre
programming.
rprts assessing audience
appeal of screenplays. Reqs:
Bachelor’s in Film & Vid,
Cinema-TV or Eng + 2 yrs
exp in job offrd or rltd pstn.
Skills/knwldge in screenwritAdvertising Supplement
ing s/w such as Final Draft
& Adobe Acrobat Pro, MS
Word, Excel & PowerPoint,
& stndrd screenplay frmt.
40hrs/wk. Job/Intvw Site:
Los Angeles, CA. Email Resume to Screen Engine ASI
LLC at hrjobs@
he average person now will have eight jobs before they turn
screenengineasi.com
Senior Data Engineer
Senior Data Engineer (Los
Angeles Metro Area) – Qual
cand with Masters deg in
Comp
Sci/Eng; 6 mth exp as Snr
Data Eng/Soft Eng; 40 hr/wk;
architect, design, dev ETL
processes
btw mult sys; create &amp;
maintain docs. Use SQL,
MySQL, Redshift &amp; Python. Send resume only:
Thrive Market, 4509 Glencoe Ave, Marina Del Rey, CA
90292 Attn: P. McKenzie
paul.mckenzie@thrivemarket.com
Thoroughbred Racehorse
Grooms David Hofmans/
David Hofmans Thoroughbred Trainer. Santa Anita
Racetrack, Arcadia, CA. 2
pos. avail. Tack rooms Avail.
Please call Dave Hofmans at
760-873-4726
Tax Accountant, Tax, GCR
(Asset Management) FSO
(Manager) (Multiple Positions), Ernst & Young U.S.
LLP, Los Angeles, CA. Work
on international tax engagements, applying knowledge
of US and foreign tax policies to resolve specific multinational client issues in
the areas of investment and
hedge funds, mutual funds,
and/or private equity. Employer will accept any suitable combination of education, training, or experience.
For complete job description, list of requirements,
and to apply, go to:
ey.com/us/jobsearch
(Job # - LOS002XF).
TEACHERS
Lead Kindergarten Teacher The Westside Waldor f
School seeks a Lead Kindergarten Teacher for its
Pacific Palisades, CA location
to teach kindergarten children according to Waldorf
pedagogy. Qualifications in
Waldorf Early Childhood Education are required. Please
forward resumes to Westside
Waldorf School, Attention:
Natalie Cargill, 17310 Sunset
Blvd, CA 90272 or email to
natalie@wswaldorf.org
Maintenance Technician
in Vernon, CA: Please send
resume to S & J Apparel, Inc.,
1901 E. 55th St., Vernon, CA
90058
TECHNOLOGY
Sr. Information Security Engineer: Manage engineers
to create security fixes
and evaluate security status. Provide security guidance on new products and
technologies. Assess and
respond to various internet
threats. Mail resume: Riot
Games, Job #H290, 12333 W.
Olympic Blvd, LA, CA 90064
TECHNOLOGY
Help build the next generation of systems behind Facebook’s products. Facebook,
Inc. currently has multiple
openings in Woodland Hills,
CA (various levels/types):
MM-Wave Hardware Engineer (9255N) Work closely
with multi-disciplinary engineers to develop the stateof-the-art high throughput
mm-wave communication
systems for airborne and
various terrestrial platforms.
Mail resume to: Facebook,
Inc. Attn: AA-USIM, 1 Hacker
Way, Menlo Park, CA 94025.
Must reference job title & job
code shown above, when
applying.
IT
Senior .Net Developer job
open @ Twentieth Century
Fox Film Corporation in Los
Angeles, CA. Full details &
rqmts@
www.foxcareers.
com. Job # 20T0000CH
TECHNOLOGY
Software
QA Lead (SQL-SA) Dsgn test
plans, scenarios, scripts, or
procedures. BS+5. Mail resume to Western Asset, Attn:
Gloria Sanchez, 385 E
Colorado Blvd, Pasadena, CA
91101. Must ref title & code.
?
A baby grand in the
baby’s room
Pass it on.
Sell your unwanted items
where they’ll be appreciated.
latimes.com/marketplace
09CL397
TECHNOLOGY
Intuit Inc. has openings
for Staff Data Scientists in
Woodland Hills, California
(Job code: I-3181): Provide
guidance and support to
Business leaders and stakeholders on how best to
harness available data to
convert business objectives
into mathematical/statistical tasks. To apply, submit
resume to Intuit Inc., Attn:
Olivia Sawyer, J203-6, 2800
E. Commerce Center Place,
Tucson, AZ 85706. You must
include the job code on your
resume/cover letter. Intuit
supports workforce diversity.
Employment
michael.hiltzik
@latimes.com.
Employment
TECHNOLOGY
Employment
hospital and performed at a
medical school, hospital, or
ambulatory clinic. But
Roxland doubts those provisions are going to provide
much protection for consumers in Texas, which
trails California only narrowly in its number of stem
cell clinics.
“I could poke ginormous
holes in the Texas law,”
Roxland says. Among other
shortcomings, “it doesn’t
say the treatment has to be
in an FDA-blessed clinical
trial or even a U.S. trial.”
The proliferation of
direct-to-consumer stem
cell clinics has unnerved
medical regulators and
legitimate stem cell scientists. A group of FDA officials warned last March in
the New England Journal of
Medicine that the claim that
stem cells can somehow
“sense the environment into
which they are introduced
and address whatever functions require replacement
or repair ... is not based on
scientific evidence.”
In a 2015 article in the
same publication, Hermes
Taylor-Weiner and Joshua
Graff Zivin of UC San Diego
sounded a similar alarm
that misleading publicity
and a lack of regulation had
created a “wild west” of
unlicensed stem cell clinics.
“Although stem-cell
therapy may hold great
potential, the field is less
advanced than the public
has been led to believe,”
they wrote. “Stem-cell clinics in the United States and
abroad have capitalized on
this confusion.” That’s an
indication that laws like
California’s are overdue.
The most common procedure offered by these
clinics involves liposuctioning fat cells from the
customer, subjecting them
to some mysterious manipulation ostensibly to
extract stem cells from the
tissue, and reinjecting them
into the customer’s body.
That has not been shown to
have any effectiveness whatsoever and isn’t in the mainstream of stem cell medical
research. Whether the clinics even perform the processing they claim to do isn’t
easy to verify.
Minnesota’s Turner asks
why businesses claiming to
offer treatments with no
evidence of efficacy against
Alzheimer’s or spinal cord
injuries should even be
allowed to operate. He
suspects that the notification requirement won’t
bother many of the businesses — many already post
on their websites FDA disclaimers that just get
glossed over by consumers
desperate for a cure.
Hernandez acknowledges that his measure is
just a first step. “Because
it’s so new, we’re trying to
figure out the best way to
start the conversation,” he
says.
But lawmakers and
regulators may need to
move faster. What will make
a difference in California
may not be how the conversation starts, but where it
leads.
Employment
TECHNOLOGY
Data Architect Los Angeles
(Nordstrom). Dsgn, implmnt
& maintain EDW. Req: MS
in CS, Eng or clsly rltd +2 yrs
exp as SW eng/dvlpr/tstr/
prog; or BS in CS, Eng or clsly
rltd +5 yrs prog, post-bacc
exp as SW eng/dvlpr/tstr/
prog. Skills: SQL; Python;
Java; R; Bash scripting; Hadoop; Hive; Pentaho Kettle;
Redshift & Tableau.
Resume to
hiringthebesttalent@
nordstrom.com. Ref #0023
careeradvice
Job-hopping, 101
T
30. And according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics,
employees who are 25 to 34 years old typically stay with a job
for three years. Job hopping can be a way to build your skills
and maximize your opportunities, instead of staying in a role
that may not fit your long-term goals. Job hopping can also
mean moving to different jobs within the same company if you
find other roles that fit better.
Experiences matter
Y
our career is not all about earning and spending.
Sometimes job satisfaction results from meeting daily
challenges head on, or simply trying and learning new things.
Jobs that are not satisfying beyond pay day will leave people
who crave these more elusive factors feeling empty. Though
money can help you buy things in your free time, you won’t
be able to enjoy those things without any free time. A career
with a punishing schedule certainly won’t allow you the
time for many of the experiences outside of the office that
constitute a fulfilling life.
Ask for help
N
ever underestimate the power of a third party to help
ground you if you’re feeling overwhelmed by your
workload. Get an outsider’s perspective. They’ll either tell you
to suck it up and get it done, or they’ll validate your feeling
that you’re really being asked to juggle far too much.
THERAPIST
Licensed Physical
Therapist D.O.R.
Looking for California Licensed PHYSICAL THERAPIST OR PHYSICAL THERAPIST WITH MASTERS IN
SPORTS SCIENCE and PHYSICAL THERAPIST ASSISTANT.
Send resume to Interface
Rehab, 774 Placentia Avenue, Suite # 200, Placentia,
CA 92870.
TRAVEL
Customer Sales
Consultants Needed
November 6th Class
**Will Train**
Bonus Incentives
Medical, Dental &
Vision Insurance
Available
Employment
Film & Video Editor Film &
Video Editor (Santa Monica,
CA) Work on picture mastering envrmt complying with
the technical specification of
the DCI. Use state of the art
Virtual Reality (VR) technology. Create HD Video masters from master Quicktime
files to HDCA-SR, HDCAM,
DigiBeta, & other. Work with:
DVS Clipster, Assimilate
Scratch, Avid Digidesign
Pro Tools, Adobe Creative
Cloud, Adobe Systems Adobe Illustrator, Adobe Flash
Player, Apple Final Cut Pro,
FX Continuum Complete,
Brightove, Final Cut Suite.
Reqmts are: Bach’s deg in
Film, Film Production, Video
Editing or Digital Media &
Film or closely related plus
6 mos of exp in the job offd
or as Audio-Visual Project
Developer or closely related.
Email resume to: Local Hero,
LLC, Attn: Shirley Till, HR Mgr,
jobs@localheropost.com
L AT I M E S . C O M / B U S I N E S S
S
S U N DAY, O C T O B E R 22 , 2 017
C7
UCLA takes
heat over
patent effort
[UCLA, from C1]
broke out its financial results — Medivation reported
worldwide Xtandi sales of
$1.9 billion, up 80% from the
prior year, and $1.2 billion of
those sales were in the U.S.
market. The industry journal FiercePharma.com estimates global Xtandi sales
could reach $4.78 billion by
2020.
The drug’s potential was
a major factor behind pharmaceutical giant Pfizer Inc.
buying Medivation for $14
billion last year.
UCLA currently gets no
money from sales of the
drug. The university and
others involved in the drug’s
discovery sold their royalty
rights in early 2016 to a firm
called Royalty Pharma for
$1.14 billion, with $520 million
going to UCLA itself. The
school said it would use the
cash for additional research,
scholarships and fellowships.
Now UCLA and the companies are seeking a patent
for the drug in India, sparking protests from at least
two consumer groups, the
Union for Affordable Cancer
Treatment (UACT) and
Knowledge Ecology International (KEI).
India is home to a major
generic-drug industry, and
the activists believe that if
UCLA and Xtandi’s makers
drop their efforts for a patent there, it will pave the way
for the making of cheaper,
generic versions of the drug.
They also believe that the
generics would become
more available in other
countries if those nations
knew that substantial generic supplies were available
from India.
The activists assert that
Medivation and Astellas
should not be allowed to sell
Xtandi “at excessive, unaffordable prices in India” because UCLA developed the
drug “using taxpayer funds”
through grants from the National Institutes of Health
and the U.S. Army’s prostate
cancer research program.
“This is a drug invented
on government grants that
has generated billions in
sales since entering the market,” Manon Anne Ress,
UACT’s acting director, said
in a Sept. 20 letter to Dr.
John Mazziotta, vice chancellor of UCLA Health Sciences.
“Astellas
is
pricing
Xtandi for high-income
countries and elites only in
developing countries,” Ress
wrote. “This is a direct consequence of UCLA management of its patent rights.”
But UCLA contends that
the school — because it owns
the intellectual property
underlying the drug — is
contractually obligated to
help pursue patents overseas under its licensing
agreement with Medivation.
“The [UC] regents are
obligated to use their best efforts to keep the patents licensed to Medivation from
lapsing,” Mazziotta said in a
Sept. 7 letter to the activists.
UCLA, as part of its sale
of its royalty rights, is entitled to possible additional
payments if the drug’s future global sales reach a certain level. But in its statement to The Times, UCLA
said it was “highly unlikely”
that threshold would be reached “even if the patent in
India is granted.”
Prostate cancer is the
most
common
cancer
among American men after
skin cancer, and there were
about 3.3 million American
men who were living with a
prostate cancer diagnosis as
of Jan. 1, 2016, according to
the most recent figures from
the American Cancer Society.
An additional 161,360
American men are expected
to be diagnosed with
prostate cancer this year,
Justin Lane European Pressphoto Agency
PFIZER last year paid $14 billion for Medivation, which sells Xtandi in partnership with Japanese firm Astel-
las Pharma. UCLA sold its royalty rights and currently gets no money from sales of the drug.
Damian Dovarganes Associated Press
UCLA says it is obligated to help pursue patents under its Medivation agreement.
Consumer advocates hope ending a patent effort in India would lead to cheaper,
generic versions of Xtandi. Above, Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center.
the society says.
A cancer patient typically
takes four Xtandi pills a day
or 120 a month, and 120 capsules in the U.S. market are
priced at $11,463, according
to the website GoodRx.com.
That would be $137,556 for a
year’s supply.
Prostate cancer is among
those cancers “showing significant increase in incidence rates” in India and the
prostate “is the second leading site of cancer among
males in large Indian cities”
including Delhi, according
to the U.S. National Library
of Medicine.
The activists last year
asked the U.S. government
to allow other companies to
sell Xtandi at lower prices in
the U.S. market, again arguing that Uncle Sam had that
right because UCLA scientists had used the taxpayerfunded grants to discover
the drug.
The government rejected
their request and, with
Xtandi sales protected from
that threat, Medivation
quickly became a takeover
target. The sale to Pfizer followed a bidding war that
more than doubled Medivation’s stock price.
Medivation, UCLA and
its partners already have
made one attempt for a patent in India but it was denied
by the Indian Patent Office.
UCLA’s group is appealing
to the Delhi High Court, an
appeal the activists have
urged the university to drop.
“What’s special about
this case is the fact that the
University of California is going against their own licensing policy by aggressively
seeking a patent in India on
this drug,” KEI Director
James Love said.
That policy, as UCLA
summarized in a statement
to The Times, is “intended to
facilitate all populations
having access to medications and other products
and services made possible
by UCLA innovation.”
But UCLA also acknowledged the “concerns about
prescription drug pricing”
among the activists and others and said it was willing
to explore the problem further.
The school said “we are
convening a working group
to evaluate our approach to
technology licensing in ways
that benefit California, the
nation and the developing
world” while also continuing
to give drug companies
enough incentive to commercialize its discoveries,
just as Medivation did with
Xtandi.
In the meantime, the activists contend that a daily
dose of Xtandi is selling in
India for roughly 40 times a
person’s daily income in that
nation, which they called
“excessive and shamefully
unaffordable.”
james.peltz@latimes.com
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C8
S U N DAY , OC T O B E R 22, 2 017
S
L AT I M E S . C O M / B U S I N E S S
Tesla Motors
MODEL S and Model X production has yet to exceed 100,000 automobiles a year, combined. Above, robots assemble vehicles at Tesla’s plant in Fremont, Calif.
Tesla struggles with production
[Tesla, from C1]
interview Musk or a manufacturing executive. The
company will release thirdquarter earnings Nov. 1, and
the status of Model 3 production will surely be discussed during the company’s conference call that
afternoon.
Silicon Valley is all about
disrupting old industries:
Uber with the taxi business,
Google and Facebook with
advertising and journalism,
Amazon with retail. Musk, a
native South African who
earned a fortune in Silicon
Valley as a co-founder of
PayPal, hasn’t yet disrupted
the auto industry. But the
success of Tesla’s luxury
Model S and Model X automobiles, with their all-electric powertrains, self-drive
feature, and over-the-air
software
updates,
has
woken up incumbent automakers to the emergence
of electric, autonomous and
connected transportation.
Yet the Model S and Model X production has yet to exceed 100,000 automobiles a
year, combined — a speck in
a global market where 88
million passenger cars and
trucks are sold.
“Automobile manufacturing is very hard,” said
Uday Karmarkar, a specialist in operations and
technology at the UCLA Anderson School of Management. “It’s amazing that
Tesla has been able to build
cars at all.” He meant it as a
compliment.
Tesla was founded in
2003. Its first product was an
electric roadster, based on a
platform from British sports
car maker Lotus. It was a hit.
Then came the Model S
sedan in 2013, which made
Tesla a household name.
The full-sized sedan was
sleek and powerful. It won
high praise from Consumer
Reports and other publications.
Auto
reviewers
Bell
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Tesla
TESLA plans to sell about 400,000 Model 3s in 2018 to customers who made de-
posits and use the cash flow to keep the thus-far profitless carmaker running.
gushed.
MIT’s Keith owns a Model S and loves it. “It’s quiet,
it’s fast, it’s smooth, it’s such
a delight to drive,” he said.
Tesla took the Model S
from design to full production faster than traditional
manufacturers would consider. Tesla’s breakthrough
over-the-air
technology
made software fixes a snap.
Code to fix battery management issues, add self-drive
features, or simply tweak the
music system can be downloaded via the car’s Wi-Fi
system.
Still, many owners complained that there were
more quality problems than
they expected in a $90,000
car.
Outside a private school
in Oakland last week, a parent waited for his child beside a spotless gray Model S.
When asked how he liked the
car, he shook his head. “It’s
mainly my wife’s car. She
loves it. I love the way it
drives. It drives better than
anything I’ve ever driven.
But there are all these rattles and noises.” To cover
them up, he plays the music
at high volume, said the
driver, who declined to give
his name.
The Model X sport utility
vehicle, launched in 2015,
was also considered great
fun to drive, with astonishing 2.9-second acceleration
from zero to 60 mph. It, too,
was fast-tracked to production — and was riddled with
quality problems, especially
with its exotic gull-wing
doors. “They’re still trying to
work out the bugs in that vehicle,” said Mike Ramsey,
auto industry analyst at
Gartner.
Musk copped to the problems and said lessons were
learned that would make the
Model 3 process better. He
told designers to put ease of
manufacturing at the top of
the requirements list.
The company’s assembly
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4205 W 6th Street
4/4.5
Loveland Carr Properties
$2,200,000
323-460-7606
Los Angeles
Hermosa Beach
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3/2
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RE/MAX Estate Properties / Tashia Hinchliffe
310-383-7057
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Claremont
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626-437-5354
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Architectural Compound in Beverly Grove
716 N Martel Ave.
4/6
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Fedida Proeprties, Inc./Tomer Fedida 323-577-4201
Desert Hot Springs
PRIVATE SPA near Palms Springs
10501 San Miguel Rd- Appointment Only
HUGO ROJAS, Tarbell Realtors
(760)333-1847
Hancock Park
Open Sunday 2PM-5PM
506 S Norton Avenue
4/4
Coldwell Banker BHN - Steve Frankel
Tesla. The first 30 Model
3s went to employees.
& BY APPOINTMENT
DIRECTORY
Hancock Park
Lake Forest
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1363 Stradella Road
6/6
$5,875,000
Coldwell Banker & E. Harandi Broker/ Harandi, Simon &
Mayhew
310-699-5559
Open House Sunday 1-4
820 Trinity Lane
2/2
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SETTE/EPA-EFE/REX/Shutterstock
ELON MUSK is CEO of
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310-508-5008
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7820 ELECTRA DR
WEA / Kurt Rappaport
5/6
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310-860-8889
NEW X - 1ST OPEN SUNDAY 2-5!
10582 Ohio Ave
4/2
Coldwell Banker / Michael J. Libow
$1,699,000
310-285-7509
Open House Sunday 2-5PM
10479 Wilkins Ave
6/6.5
$3595000
Razbannia Group, Inc./ Sina Razban-Nia 3108634325
Open Sunday 1-5
2023 Kendra Ct.
2/3
$1,995,000
Keller Williams Larchmont/Ken Church 323-762-2519
Hollywood
Open Sunday 2-5pm
6330 Quebec Drive
3/3.5
Coldwell Banker / Michael Dillon
$2499000
805-889-6560
$987,500
310-994-3003
Lancaster
Breathtaking 640 Acre Ranch!
8626 Jawbone Canyon Road, 93283 3/2 $1,275,000.
Rita D’Angelo Real Estate
760 417 0947
Open Sunday 2-5
9615 Bolton Road
6/8
$5,995,000
Coldwell Banker Beverly Hills South/ Judy Ross-Bunnage
310-285-7504
Open Sunday 2-5
9603 Beverlywood St
6/6.5
Coldwell Banker/Ron Wynn
Mar Vista
Playa del Rey
New Const! Open Sun 2-5
3959 Coolidge Avenue
4/3
The Agency - Sorensen & Sandorf
$1795000
3106254099
Open Sunday 1-4pm
3753 Ashwood Avenue
3/2
$1,439,000
Coldwell Banker/ Lydia Simon & Rose Mayhew
310-699-5559
Miracle Mile
Open Sunday 2-5
140 N Gardner Street
2/1.75
Coldwell Banker/Hilary Stevens
$1825000
310-776-0688
Mount Olympus
Open House Sunday 2-5 PM
2377 Jupiter Dr
5/3.5
Compass | Kennon Earl & Tom Davila
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424.230.7928
Malibu
Open Sunday, 10/22 2-5pm
3530 Shoreheights Drive 4/3
Klein Real Estate / Laura Klein
CALL FOR AN APPOINTMENT TODAY!
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Levi Wohl
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2789 Stinson Rd
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Keller Williams Kristin Ryner
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3102048976
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Palms
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3532 Greenfield Ave
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Keller Williams Santa Monica
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7974 W. 79th
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The Fineman Suarez Team / James Suarez
310-862-1761
Rancho Cucamonga
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10567 Blythe Ave
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3109639944
Santa Monica
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330 22nd St. Santa Monica, CA 90402
Campbell Wellman
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530 17th St
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1571 Queens Road
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734 Palms Blvd
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Westchester
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6927 Kentwood Court
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The Fineman Suarez Team/ James Suarez310-862-1761
310-437-5330
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3106174464
Open Sunday 2-5 | Bungalow for Lease
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Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage | CAITLIN TABIT
310-775-5264
Out of Area
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310-963-9944
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Twitter: @russ1mitchell
To advertise your property, log on to latimes.com/placead
Northridge
Inglewood
Live/Work Open Sunday 2-5
404 Warren Lane
2/1
Benjamin Leeds/Anastasia Bowen
plant, built in 1961 for General Motors and later shared
with Toyota in a joint venture, has room for two assembly lines. The Model S
and Model X are being built
on one line. A separate line
was built from scratch for
the Model 3.
Using Silicon Valley
nomenclature, Musk calls
the line as it exists now Alien
Dreadnought Version 0.5. By
the end of next year, enough
automation will be added to
deem it Version1.0, Musk has
said.
Tesla turned the first 30
Model 3s over to paying customers — all Tesla employees – at the July event. The
company said regular customers will begin receiving
Model 3s by the end of October.
It’s common practice for
carmakers to let employees
try out fresh cars as the assembly line is being tweaked
before production begins in
earnest. But those cars don’t
generate revenue for the
company.
“At GM or Ford or Toyota, they call those vehicles
‘production-intent prototypes not for sale,’ ” said Bob
Lutz, a legendary car executive whose career spanned
BMW, Ford, Chrysler and
General Motors. By selling
cars when the factory remains in “production hell,”
Lutz said, “you’ve got an increased risk of having problems with the vehicles.
You’re putting quality at risk
for the sake of a PR event.”
The online publication
Elektrek said some of those
first 30 cars were returned to
Tesla with battery problems.
Asked whether the story was
accurate, a Tesla spokesman declined to comment.
Some observers wonder
whether the Silicon Valley
approach is being taken too
far.
“If you find fault in a [motor vehicle] production
process, it’s not like your
[Apple] Watch app, where
they say, ‘No problem, our
next software release is in
seven days and we promise
it’ll be fixed,’ ” said Julian
Weber, an executive at BMW
who helped develop its i3
and i8 electric cars and the
author of a textbook on au-
tomobile manufacturing.
Weber now works with
digital information systems
for autos, and agrees that
the Silicon Valley “done is
better than perfect” approach to software releases
has some merit for infotainment and other electronics
because problems can be
fixed fast. Large objects with
moving parts are a different
story.
“If 1,000 vehicles have a
serious flaw, that’s not going
to be fixed in a few days,” he
said. “It means delays for
1,000 people waiting for their
car. In the worst case, 1,000
vehicles have to be scrapped.”
When a manufacturer introduces new manufacturing techniques to a line, Weber said, the results are often
unpredictable. Several years
ago, on a BMW 5 Series redesign, the mostly steel front
end was changed to a mix of
aluminum and other materials that required different
joining techniques. The
switch required “extensive
and costly testing to ensure
safety and functionality,”
Weber said.
The bodies of the Model S
and Model X are mostly aluminum. The Model 3 is a mix
of steel and aluminum. After
Musk recently posted a
short video clip of robots
working with body parts,
trade publication Automotive News showed it to a
manufacturing expert, who
said it appears that Tesla is
grappling with welding issues.
Barring some surprising
disclosure from Tesla during
its Nov. 1 earnings call, the
production level reached by
the end of December will be
the first public indication of
whether Tesla’s bottlenecks
are early fixable glitches or
problems that run deep.
Open Sat & Sun 1-4p
6427 W. 85th Street
3/2.5
$1,800,000
John Aaroe Group | Vanessa Glanzmann 310.923.2113
West Hollywood
Open Sunday 2-5
912 N. San Vicente Blvd #5 3/3
Ladd Jackson/Hilton&Hyland
$1549000
310-346-1744
Open Sunday 2-5pm
238 19th Street
5/6.5
Partners Trust / John Hathorn
$6,495,000
310-924-4014
Open Sat/Sun 2-5pm
934 25th Street
5/5.5
Partners Trust / Charles Pence
Open Sunday 2-5 PM
1003 N Orlando Ave
2/2
$3,195,000
Sotheby’s Int’l Realty / Alexis Valentin Ramos
3108674404
$3,895,000
310-403-9238
West Los Angeles
Open Sunday 2-5pm
100 Larkin Place
4/4.5
Partners Trust / Charles Pence
$4,600,000
310-403-9238
Open Sunday 2-5pm
2770 Stoner Ave
Coldwell Banker/ Ali Fall
3/3
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310-591-9172
OPEN SUNDAY 2-5PM
846 21ST ST #5
Jack Dunn / Jack Dunn
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2141 S Bentley Ave #202
Coldwell Banker/ Ali Fall
1/1
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310-591-9172
3/3
S
L AT I M E S . C O M / B U S I N E S S
S U N DAY, O C T O B E R 22, 2 017
C9
MONEY TALK
To give or not is
taxing question
A friend’s property
offer can create costly
consequences for the
giver and recipient.
By Liz Weston
Dear Liz: A good friend who
is childless wishes to give his
property to my daughter
before his death. He has
been an informal uncle for
the whole 50 years of my
daughter’s life, and we are,
in effect, his family. However, I am concerned that the
gift tax may be more than he
bargained for. He is not
tax-aware, and earns very
little. He owns his property
outright, however.
I know that someone can
give as much as $14,000
without having to file a gift
tax return and that there is
a “lifetime exemption” of
more than $5 million. If his
property is worth, say,
$500,000, can he be tax-free
on a gift of that magnitude
by, in effect, using his lifetime exemption?
Answer: Essentially, yes,
but he may be creating a tax
problem for your daughter.
Gift taxes are not something that most people need
to worry about. At most, a
gift worth more than $14,000
per recipient would require
the giver to file a gift tax
return. Gift taxes wouldn’t
be owed until the amount
given away in excess of that
annual exemption limit
exceeds the lifetime exemption limit of $5.49 million.
Capital gains taxes are
another matter and should
always be considered before
making gifts. Here’s why.
Your friend has what’s
known as a “tax basis” in
this property. If he sold it, he
typically would owe capital
gains taxes on the difference
between that basis — usually the purchase price plus
the cost of any improvements — and the sale price,
minus any selling costs. If he
has owned the property a
long time and it has appreciated significantly, that
could be a big tax bill.
If he gives the property
to your daughter while he’s
alive, she would receive his
tax basis as well. If she
inherited the property
instead, the tax basis would
be updated to the property’s
value at the time of your
friend’s death. No capital
gains taxes would be owed
on the appreciation that
took place during his lifetime.
There’s something else
to consider. If your friend
doesn’t make much money,
he may not have the savings
or insurance he would need
to pay for long-term care.
The property could be
something he could sell or
mortgage to cover those
costs.
If he gives the property
away, he could create problems for himself if he has no
other resources. Medicaid is
a government program that
typically pays such costs for
the indigent, but there’s a
“look back” period that
could delay his eligibility for
coverage. The look-back
rules impose a penalty for
gifts or asset transfers made
in the previous five years.
He should consult an elderlaw attorney before making
such a move.
Should grandma sue
over co-signed loan?
Dear Liz: You recently
answered a letter from a
grandmother who co-signed
a student loan for a granddaughter who isn’t paying
the debt. Although you did
Los Angeles County
not suggest it, a very viable
option would be for the
grandmother to contact an
attorney and sue her daughter and her granddaughter
for the debt owed.
It doesn’t appear that
they care for the grandmother anyway, so why feel
bad about holding their feet
to the fire? Surely the
granddaughter received the
benefit of the loan and
should ante up.
Answer: Suing a family
member is a pretty drastic
step that many people are
reluctant to consider. If the
grandmother is in fact
“judgment proof ” — if creditors who sue her wouldn’t
be allowed to garnish her
income or seize her property
— then the lender might
start focusing its collection
actions on the granddaughter. The grandmother
wouldn’t have to go to the
expense of suing the young
woman or trying to collect
on a judgment.
Either way, the bankruptcy attorney I suggested
she consult to help determine if she’s judgment proof
also could advise her about
filing such a lawsuit.
To reiterate, student
loans typically can’t be
discharged in bankruptcy,
but bankruptcy attorneys
understand the credit laws
of their states and can help
people assess how vulnerable they are to lawsuits and
other collection actions.
Liz Weston, certified
financial planner, is a
personal finance columnist
for NerdWallet. Questions
may be sent to her at 3940
Laurel Canyon, No. 238,
Studio City, CA 91604, or by
using the “Contact” form at
asklizweston.com.
Distributed by No More Red
Inc.
Andrew Harnik Associated Press
GIVING property while you’re alive transfers your tax basis to the recipient; be-
queathing it upon your death allows the basis to be adjusted to the current value.
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number of months in p
promo p
period until p
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p
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p
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p
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required for 36 months. Ashley Homestore does not require
a down payment, however, sales tax and delivery charges
are due at time of purchase. *See back page for details.
On purchases with your Ashley Advantage™ credit card
made 10/17/2017 to 10/30/2017 Interest will be charged
to your account from the purchase date if the promotional
purchase is not paid in full within 24 months. Minimum
monthly payments required. ††See back page for details.
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#1 IN CALIFORNIA, #1 IN AMERICA,
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BAKERSFIELD
8915 Rosedale Hwy
Bakersfield, CA 93312
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24001 El Toro Rd
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in Long Beach
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*Offer applies only to single-receipt qualifying purchases. Ashley HomeStore does not require a down payment, however, sales tax and delivery charges are due at time of purchase if the purchase is made with your Ashley Advantage™ Credit
Card. No interest will be charged on promo purchase and equal monthly payments are required equal to initial promo purchase amount divided equally by the number of months in promo period until promo is paid in full. The equal monthly
payment will be rounded to the next highest whole dollar and may be higher than the minimum payment that would be required if the purchase was a non-promotional purchase. Regular account terms apply to non-promotional purchases. For
new accounts: Purchase APR is 29.99%; Minimum Interest Charge is $2. Existing cardholders should see their credit card agreement for their applicable terms. Promotional purchases of merchandise will be charged to account when merchandise
is delivered. Subject to credit approval. ‡Monthly payment shown is equal to the purchase price, excluding taxes and delivery, divided by the number of months in the promo period, rounded to the next highest whole dollar, and only applies to the
selected financing option shown. If you make your payments by the due date each month, the monthly payment shown should allow you to pay off this purchase within the promo period if this balance is the only balance on your account during the
promo period. If you have other balances on your account, this monthly payment will be added to the minimum payment applicable to those balances.
††Ashley HomeStore does not require a down payment, however, sales tax and delivery charges are due at time of purchase if the purchase is made with your Ashley Advantage™ Credit Card. Offer applies only to single-receipt qualifying purchases.
No interest will be charged on the promo purchase if you pay the promo purchase amount in full within 24 Months. If you do not, interest will be charged on the promo purchase from the purchase date. Depending on purchase amount, promotion
length and payment allocation, the required minimum monthly payments may or may not pay off purchase by end of promotional period. Regular account terms apply to non-promotional purchases and, after promotion ends, to promotional
balance. For new accounts: Purchase APR is 29.99%; Minimum Interest Charge is $2. Existing cardholders should see their credit card agreement for their applicable terms. Promotional purchases of merchandise will be charged to account when
merchandise is delivered. Subject to credit approval.
§Subject to credit approval. Minimum monthly payments required. See store for details.
‡‡Previous purchases excluded. Cannot be combined with any other promotion or discount. Discount offers exclude Tempur-Pedic®, Stearns & Foster®, Sealy Optimum™ and Sealy Posturepedic Hybrid™ mattress sets, floor models, clearance items, sales
tax, furniture protection plans, warranty, delivery fee, Manager’s Special pricing, Advertised Special pricing, and 14 Piece Packages and cannot be combined with financing specials. Effective 12/30/15, all mattress and box springs are subject to an $11 per
unit CA recycling fee. SEE STORE FOR DETAILS. Stoneledge Furniture LLC. many times has multiple offers, promotions, discounts and financing specials occurring at the same time; these are allowed to only be used either/or and not both or combined
with each other. Although every precaution is taken, errors in price and/or specification may occur in print. We reserve the right to correct any such errors. Picture may not represent item exactly as shown, advertised items may not be on display at all
locations. Some restrictions may apply. Available only at participating locations. †DURABLEND® upholstery products feature a seating area made up of a combination of Polyurethane and/or PVC, Polycotton, and at least 17% Leather Shavings with a
skillfully matched combination of Polycotton and Polyurethane and/or PVC everywhere else. **Leather Match upholstery features top-grain leather in the seating areas and skillfully matched vinyl everywhere else. Ashley HomeStores are independently
owned and operated. ©2017 Ashley HomeStores, Ltd. Promotional Start Date: October 17, 2017. Expires: October 30, 2017.
D
D
SPORTS
S U N D A Y , O C T O B E R 2 2 , 2 0 1 7 :: L A T I M E S . C O M / S P O R T S
COLLEGE FOOTBALL :: WEEK 8
Defense
decks the
Ducks for
first time
in decade
Surprising showing by
Bruins’ maligned unit
sparks first win over
Oregon since 2007.
UCLA 31
OREGON 14
By Ben Bolch
UCLA found an unlikely
accomplice on the way to its
first victory over Oregon in a
decade.
A defense that had been
pummeled over the first half
of the season delivered a
wicked counterpunch during the Bruins’ 31-14 triumph
over the Ducks on Saturday
afternoon before 55,711 at the
Rose Bowl.
UCLA did not allow a
point in the second half for
the first time this season and
forced two turnovers while
committing none, a major
coup for a team that ranked
among the worst in the nation in turnover margin.
“We ended up getting a
whole lot of things fixed that
we needed to,” Bruins safety
Adarius Pickett said after
his team’s first victory over
Oregon since 2007, ending a
six-game losing streak in the
series.
Realizing that Oregon
would rely heavily on the run
while playing with backup
quarterback
Braxton
Burmeister, UCLA rolled up
11 tackles for loss and sacked
Burmeister four times after
having zero sacks in its previous three games.
Burmeister struggled in
his third start in place of injured Justin Herbert, completing eight of 15 passes for
74 yards with an interception and running16 times
[See UCLA, D11]
Carlos Osorio Associated Press
USC QUARTERBACK Sam Darnold is brought down by Notre Dame’s Khalid Kareem during the first half. Darnold threw two
touchdown passes, but he was sacked four times and had an interception before leaving in the fourth quarter because of a tweaked ankle.
BLARNEY RUBBLE
Sloppy Trojans are dominated
and humiliated by the Irish
NO. 13 NOTRE DAME 49
NO. 11 USC 14
By Zach Helfand
SOUTH BEND, Ind. — The first
players trickled out of USC’s locker
room and into the bowels of Notre
Dame Stadium late Saturday evening. They grabbed chicken sandwiches in white paper bags. Workers were buzzing nearby, hauling
equipment down a tunnel and
heaving duffel bags toward the
exit, when someone dropped a
heavy pallette.
It thundered — whap — and
echoed off the concrete hallway.
The players in line for food all
ducked in unison, as if they were
shellshocked.
Notre Dame had just annihilated USC, 49-14, in front of 77,622 at
Notre Dame Stadium, and the
players in the postgame procession did not even look despondent
or angry. That had worn off several
Notre Dame touchdowns ago.
[See USC, D10]
WO R L D S E R I E S
::
The Irish just keep running
and running and running
DAVID WHARTON
ON COLLEGE FOOTBALL
SOUTH BEND, Ind. — It was
late in the second quarter when
Brandon Wimbush dropped back
to pass and suddenly found himself under pressure.
The Notre Dame quarterback
ducked a rusher and took off,
sprinting toward the sideline. Pure
speed got him to the corner, where
he juked his way into more open
space.
Twenty-four yards later, Wimbush skittered past yet another
defender for yet another big gain
against a USC defense that
seemed outmanned all night long.
“It didn’t look like we were
ready to play,” strong safety Chris
Hawkins said. “We didn’t come out
with the fire that we needed.”
It was that sort of game for the
Trojans, who started the season
with a highly touted defense that
was supposed to keep opponents
bottled up.
[See Wharton, D10]
D O D G E R S VS . H OUS T O N
GAME 1: TUESDAY, 5 P.M. AT DODGER STADIUM, TV: CHANNEL 11
ASTROS
DEFEND
THEIR
TURF
Robert Gauthier L.A. Times
COLIN SAMUEL picks
off a pass for Oregon’s
Dillon Mitchell at the
Bruins’ four-yard line.
NFL WEEK 7
They win ALCS to
reach their first World
Series since 2005.
LOCAL GAMES TODAY
HOUSTON 4
NEW YORK 0
Rams vs. Arizona
By Pedro Moura
at Twickenham
Stadium, London
10 a.m., Channel 11
Figure this out: Rams
are leading the league
in scoring, but offense
has struggled. D6
Chargers vs.
Denver
at StubHub Center
1:15 p.m., Channel 2
Don’t think: Chargers
would rather not have
too much information
against Broncos. D7
Kings better
than they hoped
Kopitar scores twice to
lead a 6-4 victory over
Blue Jackets. D12
Irfan Khan Los Angeles Times
MITCH POOLE HOLDS a bat signed by Kirk Gibson, who bonded with Poole in the 1988 season.
Look who helped him come up
Gibson’s iconic 1988 home run might never have happened if it
hadn’t been for Mitch Poole, the guy who washed the jocks
BILL PLASCHKE
You’ve marveled at
the swing, laughed at
the brake lights,
cheered with the fist
pumps.
During the 29
years the Dodgers
were absent from the
World Series, you
think you have
watched every second of the greatest
moment from the last time they were
here, from the video of Kirk Gibson’s
1988 walk-off home run that inspired
a championship.
The play has been viewed more
than 2 million times on YouTube.
The call from Vin Scully has been
committed to memory. The photograph of Tom Lasorda running out of
the dugout with his arms raised has
been framed and immortalized.
You think you’ve seen all of it.
But now that they’re finally back
in the World Series beginning Tuesday night at Dodger Stadium, there
is something else you should know
before your vision moves beyond the
most enduring sports play in this
city’s history.
You never saw the batboy.
With the 2017 Dodgers marching
deep into October on the backs of
unsung heroes, we should remember
they are following a shadowed legend
both “improbable” and “impossible.”
His name is Mitch Poole. He was a
24-year-old kid who worked the
Dodgers clubhouse, installed air
conditioners on the side, and, for one
hidden yet glorious moment, helped
create a World Series legacy.
[See Plaschke, D14]
HOUSTON — Fifty feet
from home plate, Jose Altuve’s bat hit the ground.
The baseball touched down
314 feet farther, in the third
row of right-field seats. He
had swung hard, and he had
not let go. The smallest man
on the field carried his weapon until he was certain that
his home run was a home
run, that his Houston Astros
had a two-run fifth-inning
lead, that their season was a
step closer to lasting at least
another week.
Then, he flipped it. He
flipped it with so much joy,
and maybe a bit of revenge
seeking. Soon, his dreams
were fulfilled. Buoyed by
their star and two standout
pitching performances, the
Astros shut out the New
York Yankees 4-0 on Saturday night at Minute Maid
Park, surviving a hardscrabble American League Cham[See ALCS, D14]
D2
S U N DAY, O C T O B E R 22 , 2 017
SS
PRO CALENDAR
SUN.
22
MON.
23
TUE.
24
WED.
25
THU.
26
HOUSTON* HOUSTON*
5
5
Channel 11 Channel 11
DODGERS
RAMS
at Arizona
(in London)
10 a.m.
Channel 11
CHARGERS
NEW
ORLEANS
6:30
SpecSN
WASH.
7:30
ESPN, SpecSN
UTAH
7:30
Prime
at Portland
7
Prime
CLIPPERS
at Toronto at Ottawa
4
4:30
FSW
FSW
KINGS
at
Philadelphia
4
Prime
DUCKS
at Florida
4:30
Channel 13
at Dallas
1
SpecSN
GALAXY
Shade denotes home game *World Series
TODAY ON THE AIR
TIME
EVENT
AUTO RACING
Noon
Formula One, U.S. Grand Prix
Noon
NASCAR Monster Energy Cup Series,
Hollywood Casino 400
COLLEGE SOCCER
1 p.m.
Women, Oregon State at Stanford
2 p.m.
Women, UCLA at Washington
5 p.m.
California at Washington
GOLF
9 a.m.
LPGA, Swinging Skirts Taiwan Championship (tape
delay)
11:30 a.m. PGA Champions, Dominion Charity Classic
HOCKEY
11 a.m.
Women, U.S. at Canada
HORSE RACING
Noon
Trackside Live, Santa Anita
PRO BASKETBALL
6:30 p.m. New Orleans at Lakers
PRO FOOTBALL
10 a.m.
Carolina at Chicago
10 a.m.
Arizona at Rams (in London)
10 a.m.
1:15 p.m.
5:30 p.m.
SOCCER
5:15 a.m.
6:30 a.m.
6:30 a.m.
7 a.m.
7:45 a.m.
8:45 a.m.
8:45 a.m.
9:30 a.m.
CFL, Hamilton at Montreal
Denver at Chargers
Atlanta at New England
England, Everton vs. Arsenal
Germany, Freiburg vs. Berlin
Italy, Torino vs. Roma
Spain, Celta vs. Atletico Madrid
England, Tottenham vs. Liverpool
Germany, Wolfsburg vs. Hoffenheim
Italy, Udinese vs. Juventus
Mexico, Pumas UNAM vs. Monterrey
11 a.m.
Women, exhibition,
U.S. vs. Republic of South Korea
11:30 a.m. Spain, Real Madrid vs. Eibar
11:45 a.m. France, Marseille vs, Paris Saint-Germain
1 p.m.
MLS, Galaxy at Dallas
5 p.m.
TENNIS
4:30 a.m.
(Sun.)
Cole’s quiet excellence deserves
to be appreciated — and rewarded
KEVIN BAXTER
ON SOCCER
DENVER
1:15
Channel 2
LAKERS
L AT I M E S . C O M / S P O RT S
ON THE AIR
TV: 4, KFTR, UniMas
TV: NBCSN
TV: Pac-12
TV: Pac-12LA
TV: Pac-12
TV: Golf
TV: Golf
TV: NHL
TV: TVG
TV: SpecSN,
SpecDep
R: 710, 1330
TV: 2
TV: 11, FOXD
R: 100.3, 710, 1330
TV: ESPN2
TV: 2 R: 640
TV: 4
TV: NBCSN
TV: FS1, FOXD
TV: beIN1
TV: beIN2
TV: KVEA, NBCSN
TV: FS2
TV: beIN1
TV: KMEX, UDN,
Univision
TV: ESPN
Mexico, Veracruz at CD Guadalajara
TV: beIN2
TV: beIN1
TV: SpecSN,
SpecDep
TV: UDN
BNP Paribas WTA, finals
TV: beIN1
Mercifully, the Galaxy’s
disaster of a season will
come to an end Sunday
when the league’s worst
team staggers to the finish
line at FC Dallas.
For defender Ashley Cole,
however, it’s an end that’s
coming a bit too soon. Because when Sunday’s game
ends, so does Cole’s contract. And there’s no guarantee he’ll be offered another.
“In terms of the life and
enjoying my football, L.A.
gave me the chance to come
back and play,” he said in the
run-up to the game. “I’m just
enjoying the time while I
can.”
But have Galaxy fans —
and Major League Soccer in
general — taken the time to
enjoy Cole?
Last season, Steven
Gerrard and his balky hamstring limped to the bench in
stadiums all over the country and he was greeted by
thousands of fans wearing
his No. 8 Liverpool shirt in
tribute. Cole, meanwhile,
made 26 solid appearances
and was fourth on the team
in minutes. Yet he rarely got
so much as warm applause.
This season, as Jelle Van
Damme went from captain
to catastrophe and Gio dos
Santos went from designated player to disappointing player, Cole was a rock
again, leading the team in
minutes and starts while
anchoring a back line that
went through more candidates than the last Republican presidential primary.
And he did that at the age
of 36.
Not that anybody noticed. Cole is arguably the
best left back of his genera-
tion, a three-time World Cup
starter who played more
games at this position than
anyone in English national
team history. Yet he could
have been in the witness
protection program for all
the attention he’s gotten in
MLS.
“It’s a little bit the nature
of the position,” said his
coach, Sigi Schmid. “Ashley’s always been a workman
left back. He’s done his job,
he’s done his business, he’s
completed his assignment
on the field. But it hasn’t
been done with a lot of
splash.”
It has been done with a
great deal of skill and efficiency, though.
“Is he one of the top 100,
one of the top 200 that’s ever
played?” Schmid asked.
“He’s certainly somebody
who has to be bandied about
in this sort of situation.”
Schmid aside, the Galaxy
themselves can be lumped in
with those who haven’t fully
appreciated Cole’s brilliance
and legacy.
When Bruce Arena, the
team’s former coach and
general manager, signed
Cole to a $300,000 contract
22 months ago, it was a steal
for a guy who made that
much every 10 days when
he played for Chelsea in
the English Premier
League.
Cole will earn $377,625 in
salary and bonuses this year,
according to the MLS players union, still good by MLS
standards but by way of
comparison, former Chelsea
teammate Frank Lampard,
a midfielder whose career
accomplishments are similar to Cole’s, made $6 million
playing for New York City FC
last season.
Cole insists money won’t
be the deciding factor in
determining whether he
Ringo H.W. Chiu Associated Press
ASHLEY COLE leads
the Galaxy in minutes
and starts this season,
but may not return.
comes back to the Galaxy
next year. It will be considered, though.
“I don’t really want to
speak of the money situation,” he said. “It’s not that
I’m asking for millions of
dollars anyway.”
But, he added “if you play
well, sometimes you’ve got
to get what you deserve.
They’ve been great with me.
I’m thankful for what they’ve
given me. If the contract is
there and everyone is happy,
then for sure we can make a
deal.”
If there is a deal, it likely
will be one that benefits the
Galaxy more than Cole, who
is all but certain to play
somewhere next season. Yet
it makes sense for everyone
that he return to Los Angeles.
On a team that struggled
for locker room leadership,
Cole’s was a soft but effective
voice.
And on a rebuilding team
with several young defenders, he was both a mentor to
be listened to and a model to
be followed.
“You pick up on different
things watching him,
playing next to him. Just the
way he moves, the little
things that he does,” said
center back Daniel Steres,
who has joined teammate
Dave Romney on frequent
golf outings with Cole. “It’s
an experience most people
don’t get.
“If he’s saying something
to me, I’m taking every bit of
it in.”
That’s a role Cole has
embraced.
“If I see something I think
they maybe should have
done different, I speak to
them. And hopefully it’s
going to help in the long
run,” he said. “You try to get
them to understand certain
movements — positioning
and tactics.
“One good thing about
here is the kids want to
learn. If I do stay, hopefully I
can take a bigger role in
that.”
That’s the benefit to the
club. For Cole, returning to
L.A. would benefit him in
mind and body, if not so
much financially. After two
lost seasons at Roma, he
clearly has reinvigorated his
career in MLS, a league he
once derided.
“A lot of ex-players have
said to me, ‘You have to play
as long as you can because
once you’re retiring, that’s it.
You’re done,’ ” he said.
Whether he’s done in L.A.
will be Schmid’s decision.
Whether he’s someone the
team can afford will be the
front office’s decision.
So now it’s time for those
decision makers to step up
and reward Cole by making
sure he’s in a Galaxy kit next
season.
And that will give the rest
of us a chance to appreciate
a once-in-a-generation
player while we still can.
kevin.baxter@latimes.com
Twitter: @kbaxter11
SANTA ANITA RESULTS
Copyright 2017 by Equibase Co. 14th day of a 19-day meet.
8116 FIRST RACE. 61⁄2 furlongs. Claiming. Three-year-olds and up.
Claiming prices $16,000-$14,000. Purse $19,000.
P# Horse
Jockey
Win
Place
Show
1 Indavidualist
Elliott
2.40
2.20
2.10
5 Gentrified
Prat
3.20
2.40
2 Lindante
Baze
3.20
8 Also Ran: Real Big Deal, Gunslinger, Chromium, Mimis Big Boy.
8 Time: 22.32, 45.40, 1.10.42, 1.17.12. Clear & Fast. Trainer: Peter Miller.
Owner: Thrash, Ike and Dawn.
8 Scratched: Giro Candito.
8 Exotics: $1 Exacta (1-5) paid $3.20, $1 Superfecta (1-5-2-8) paid $22.70,
50-Cent Trifecta (1-5-2) paid $4.60.
8117 SECOND RACE. 51⁄2 furlongs. Maiden special weight.
Two-year-olds. Purse $50,000.
P# Horse
Jockey
Win
Place
Show
4 Italiano
Smith
16.80
7.20
4.40
5 Concur
Prat
6.80
4.00
2 Greyvitos
Espinoza
3.80
8 Also Ran: Curly’s Rocket, Blame the Rider, Crazy Uncle Rick, Big and Loud.
8 Time: 22.47, 46.28, 58.89, 1.05.73. Clear & Fast. Trainer: Jerry Hollendorfer. Owner: Al Graziani.
8 Scratched: Getaloadofthis.
8 Exotics: $2 Daily Double (1-4) paid $24.80, $1 Exacta (4-5) paid $46.60,
$1 Superfecta (4-5-2-8) paid $937.50, 50-Cent Trifecta (4-5-2) paid
$114.15.
8118 THIRD RACE. 1 mile turf. Claiming. Three-year-olds and up.
Claiming prices $40,000-$35,000. Purse $36,000.
P# Horse
Jockey
Win
Place
Show
5 Spanish Hombre
Bejarano
6.00
3.60
3.00
3 Defiantly
Blanc
8.40
5.20
4 Rocket Fuel
Maldonado
5.80
8 Also Ran: General Ike, Excessive Kid, Conquest Sabre Cat, Verraco.
8 Time: 22.56, 45.24, 1.08.97, 1.21.06, 1.32.92. Clear & Firm. Trainer: Richard Baltas. Owner: Mansor, Tom, Next Wave Racing, Robershaw, Richie and
Baltas, Richard.
8 Scratched: none.
8 Exotics: $1 Pick Three (1-4-5) paid $31.60, $2 Daily Double (4-5) paid
$49.80, $1 Exacta (5-3) paid $26.10, $1 Superfecta (5-3-4-7) paid $710.20,
50-Cent Trifecta (5-3-4) paid $88.80.
8119 FOURTH RACE. 6 furlongs. Maiden claiming. Fillies.
Two-year-olds. Claiming price $40,000. Purse $27,000.
P# Horse
Jockey
Win
Place
Show
3 Willows Babe
Solis
3.80
2.60
2.10
5
Dialed to Go
Pereira
4.80
3.00
7 Miss Kitaen
Roman
2.60
8 Also Ran: Millie Joel, La Chepis, Dovetail, Justabean, Ryan’s Star.
8 Time: 22.32, 46.50, 59.72, 1.13.68. Clear & Fast. Trainer: Richard Baltas.
Owner: Arslanian, Harry and Arslanian, Mrs. Harry.
8 Scratched: none.
8 Exotics: $1 Pick Three (4-5-3) paid $36.90, $2 Daily Double (5-3) paid
$10.60, $1 Exacta (3-5) paid $8.10, $1 Superfecta (3-5-7-4) paid $111.00,
50-Cent Trifecta (3-5-7) paid $11.75.
8120 FIFTH RACE. about 61⁄2 furlongs turf. California Flag Stakes.
Three-year-olds and up. Purse $100,000.
P# Horse
Jockey
Win
Place
Show
6 B Squared
Gutierrez
17.20
6.00
3.40
5 Richard’s Boy
Prat
4.20
2.40
7 Tribalist
Espinoza
2.10
8 Also Ran: El Tovar, Gold Rush Dancer, Dr. Troutman, California Diamond.
8 Time: 21.64, 43.22, 1.05.47, 1.11.38. Clear & Firm. Trainer: Doug F. O’Neill.
Owner: Reddam Racing LLC.
8 Scratched: none.
8 Exotics: $1 Pick Three (5-3-6) paid $55.90, 50-Cent Pick Four (4-5-3-6) 4
correct paid $201.90, 50-Cent Pick Five (1/3-4-5-3-6) 5 correct paid
$350.80, $2 Daily Double (3-6) paid $28.40, $1 Exacta (6-5) paid $29.80,
$1 Superfecta (6-5-7-4) paid $252.50, 50-Cent Trifecta (6-5-7) paid
$24.60.
8121 SIXTH RACE. 6 furlongs. Maiden claiming. Fillies. Two-year-olds.
Claiming price $40,000. Purse $27,000.
P# Horse
Jockey
Win
Place
Show
8 Fracas
Van Dyke
3.80
2.20
2.20
7 Mischievous Song
Espinoza
2.80
2.80
5 Angelina’s Heaven
Orozco
4.60
8 Also Ran: Shook, Halo Girl, Misty Slew, Anuska Thunder, Novafactum.
8 Time: 22.58, 46.65, 58.86, 1.11.82. Clear & Fast. Trainer: Simon Callaghan. Owner: Slam Dunk Racing, Bamford, Alice and Naify, Marsha.
8 Scratched: Gray Diva.
8 Exotics: $1 Pick Three (3-6-8) paid $26.50, $2 Daily Double (6-8) paid
$31.80, $1 Exacta (8-7) paid $3.70, $1 Superfecta (8-7-5-2) paid $48.50,
50-Cent Trifecta (8-7-5) paid $9.85.
8122 SEVENTH RACE. 61⁄2 furlongs. Claiming. Three-year-olds and up.
Claiming prices $12,500-$10,500. Purse $19,000.
P# Horse
Jockey
Win
Place
Show
5 Swiss Minister
Pena
13.80
6.20
4.20
7 Guy Code
Pereira
4.60
3.60
2 Heir of Storm
Conner
5.00
8 Also Ran: Frac Candy, Cherubim, Lambo Luxx, G. A. Betting.
8 Time: 22.07, 44.97, 1.10.88, 1.17.95. Clear & Fast. Trainer: Genaro Vallejo.
Owner: Battle Born Racing Stable, Casucci, Vito, and Ferrera, Nick.
8 Scratched: Sweetwater Gal.
8 Exotics: $1 Pick Three (6-8-5) paid $183.10, $2 Daily Double (8-5) paid
$33.20, $1 Exacta (5-7) paid $23.20, $1 Superfecta (5-7-2-1) paid $397.10,
50-Cent Trifecta (5-7-2) paid $58.55.
8123 EIGHTH RACE. 11⁄16 mile. Allowance optional claiming. Fillies and
mares. Three-year-olds and up. Claiming price $40,000. Purse
$51,000.
Win
P# Horse
Jockey
Place
Show
1 Pacific Wind
Bejarano
4.80
3.00
2.20
3 La Force
Gonzalez
3.80
2.60
5 Spooky Woods
Prat
2.10
8 Also Ran: Time for Ebby, Midnight Lilly, That’s a Lady.
8 Time: 23.82, 48.01, 1.12.65, 1.38.25, 1.44.66. Clear & Fast. Trainer: Peter
Eurton. Owner: Alesia, Sharon, Ciaglia Racing LLC, Brant, Peter M. and Savides, Dominic.
8 Scratched: Merirosvo.
8 Exotics: $1 Pick Three (8-5-1) paid $62.50, $2 Daily Double (5-1) paid
$39.20, $1 Exacta (1-3) paid $7.60, $1 Superfecta (1-3-5-7) paid $44.30,
50-Cent Trifecta (1-3-5) paid $6.25.
8124 NINTH RACE. 1 mile turf. Maiden special weight. Fillies.
Two-year-olds. Purse $50,000.
P# Horse
Jockey
Win
Place
Show
11 Casino Red
Bejarano
16.40
9.00
6.00
5 Ippodamia’s Girl
Theriot
9.20
5.80
12 Paved
Prat
8.20
8 Also Ran: Scat Home Lady, Blessed Union, Conformation, Polished, Temple
Princess, Rag Top, Sudden Light, All Net, Harmony Victory.
8 Time: 22.85, 47.76, 1.12.34, 1.24.23, 1.35.84. Clear & Firm. Trainer: Patrick Gallagher. Owner: Day, David and Fisher, Derrick.
8 Scratched: Biscate, Time to Play.
8 Exotics: $1 Pick Three (5-1-11) paid $176.50, 50-Cent Pick Four (8/9-5-111) 2757 tickets with 4 correct paid $201.60, $2 Pick Six (3-6-8/9-5-1-11) 7
tickets with 6 correct paid $10,205.80, $2 Pick Six (3-6-8/9-5-1-11) 159
tickets with 5 out of 6 paid $96.20, $2 Pick Six Jackpot (3-6-8/9-5-1-11) ,
Pick Six Jackpot Carryover $37,855, $2 Daily Double (1-11) paid $35.40, $1
Exacta (11-5) paid $89.30, $1 Superfecta (11-5-12-7) paid $4,322.40, $1
Super High Five (11-5-12-7-9) 1 ticket paid $23,724.40, 50-Cent Trifecta
(11-5-12) paid $480.75.
ATTENDANCE/MUTUEL HANDLE
On-track attendance-10,124. Mutuel handle-$1,238,587
Inter-track attendance-N/A. Mutuel handle-$2,192,579
Out-of-state attendance-N/A. Mutuel handle-$5,690,615
Total attendance-10,124. Mutuel handle-$9,121,781
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SS
L AT I M E S . C O M / S P O RT S
S U N DAY , O C T O B E R 22, 2 017
D3
CLIPPERS REPORT
Gallinari will
be cramming
for chemistry
By Broderick Turner
Jae C. Hong Associated Press
THE CLIPPERS’ Milos Teodosic, right, helps defend T.J. Warren. Teodosic later sustained a foot injury.
Teodosic injured
in Clippers rout
CLIPPERS 130
PHOENIX 88
By Broderick Turner
In a season already full of
too many injury issues, the
Clippers suffered yet another problem when guard
Milos Teodosic sustained a
left-foot injury late in the
second quarter and did not
return during his team’s 13088 victory over the Phoenix
Suns on Saturday night at
Staples Center.
Teodosic’s X-rays for a
broken foot were negative,
the Clippers said. The team
also said Teodosic would get
an MRI on Sunday morning
to fully determine the severity of the injury.
He was injured after stepping on Suns guard Devin
Booker’s foot and fell to the
court in pain with about 2:34
left in the first half.
Two of teammates ran
over and carried Teodosic
off the court. Once he got
near the Clippers’ bench, he
limped into the locker room.
Teodosic, a 30-year-old
rookie who played for CSKA
Moscow last season, had
scored five points and handed out two assists before he
left.
“He just said he felt something in his foot,” Clippers
coach Doc Rivers said. “It’s
definitely a foot injury. We
just don’t know what it is. ...
He’s never in bad spirits, he
really isn’t. He obviously
came over here to play
basketball, not to be injured.
So let’s hope he is not.”
But despite that down
moment in the Clippers’
home opener before 19,608
fans, Blake Griffin continued his assault and the rest
of his teammates followed
his lead.
Griffin poured in 29
points for the second consecutive game, collected
eight rebounds and handed
out four assists in 27 minutes, 31 seconds.
He powered, dunked and
shot his way into going seven
of 13 from the field, three of
five from three-point range
and 12 of 14 from the freethrow line.
His assist to Patrick Beverley gave the Clippers a 6846 lead in the third and his
dunk pushed the lead to 7046. That was just a sample of
what Griffin was providing
in helping the Clippers go to
2-0 in this young season.
Beverley did his part to
help out, scoring 15 points on
six-for-eight shooting, making both of his three-pointers and playing his standard
outstanding defense.
None of the starters
played in the fourth quarter
of a game the Clippers led by
as many as 43 points.
That was because the
Clippers reserves took care
of the rest of the game — and
all of 13 team members
scored.
The Clippers shot the
basketball well, making
54.6% of their shots, 46.2% of
their three-pointers.
But the story of the night
was the injury to Teodosic.
And unfortunately for
the Clippers, they have seen
this show before.
During training camp,
the Clippers lost Austin Rivers (left glute), Danilo Gallinari (strained left foot), Beverley (sore right knee), Sam
Dekker (left oblique), Sindarius Thornwell (strained
right shoulder) and Jamil
Wilson (back spasms) to injuries.
broderick.turner@latimes.com
SANTA ANITA ENTRIES
15th day of a 19-day thoroughbred meet.
8125 FIRST RACE (12:30). about 61⁄2 furlongs turf.
Starter allowance. 3-year-olds and up. Purse
$30,000.
PR
Horse (PP)
Jockey,Wt
Odds
6263 Waldorf,5
G Stevens,120
5-2
(8081) Awesome Heights,8 C Nakatani,120
3-1
6300 Chief Hosa,3
E Roman,X117
3-1
8094 Irish Goodbye,1
S Elliott,120
6-1
8033 Fly To Mars,4
F Prat,120
8-1
(8037) Reverend Al,7
T Baze,120
8-1
8011 Supreme Venture,2 D Van Dyke,124 10-1
8065 Have Some Pride,9 B Pena,120
20-1
7056 Proudtobesicilian,6 B Boulanger,120 50-1
8126 SECOND RACE. 61⁄2 furlongs. Allowance
optional claiming. 3-year-olds and up. Claiming
price $62,500. Purse $53,000.
PR
Horse (PP)
Jockey,Wt
Odds
8051 Edwards Going Left,5 T Baze,122
2-1
(9135) Hot Sean,2
M Pedroza,120
5-2
(9151) Mesa Sky,1
F Prat,124
5-2
(4115) The Critical Way,3
A Solis,XX113
5-1
6211 Aristocratic,4
R Fuentes,XX113 8-1
5049 Gonna Fly Now,6
E Roman,X117
8-1
8127 THIRD RACE. 6 furlongs. Anoakia Stakes.
Fillies. 2-year-olds. Purse $70,000.
PR
Horse (PP)
Jockey,Wt
Odds
(7055) Chatty,1
T Baze,118
9-5
8016 Just a Smidge,4
D Van Dyke,118
2-1
(8023) Secret Spice,2
R Bejarano,118
7-2
(6232) Artistic Diva,3
V Espinoza,118
4-1
(7013) Steph Being
S Elliott,118
5-1
Steph,5
8128 FOURTH RACE. 1 mile turf. Allowance optional
claiming. 3-year-olds. Claiming price $75,000.
Purse $51,000.
PR
Horse (PP)
8015 Kencumin (FR),7
Jockey,Wt
R Bejarano,119
Odds
2-1
8015
6258
8015
6261
6241
Ritzy A. P.,1
F Prat,119
5-2
Allaboutmike,2
E Maldonado,119
5-1
Buckys Pick,4
E Roman,X114
6-1
Hootie,3
V Espinoza,119
6-1
Royal Opera House T Pereira,119
10-1
(IRE),6
(8001) Bacoli,5
R Fuentes,119
12-1
8036 Swinging Star,8
C Nakatani,119
12-1
8129 FIFTH RACE. 6 furlongs. Maiden special
weight. Fillies and mares. 3-year-olds and up. State
bred. Purse $50,000.
PR
Horse (PP)
Jockey,Wt
Odds
6209 Hailey Rachele,6 B Pena,124
5-2
....
Mikenjane,5
T Baze,122
7-2
7048 Warm It Up,8
M Linares,122
5-1
....
Biscotti Gal,7
E Maldonado,122
6-1
6268 In Heat,2
T Pereira,122
6-1
....
Weather Market,4 E Roman,X117
6-1
7048 Lucky Hand,3
T Conner,122
8-1
8090 Bella Sierra,1
S Gonzalez,124
10-1
8130 SIXTH RACE. 1 mile turf. Maiden claiming.
Fillies and mares. 3-year-olds and up. Claiming
prices $50,000-$40,000. Purse $28,000.
PR
Horse (PP)
Jockey,Wt
Odds
6076 Arrowsphere,5
E Roman,X117
5-2
6274 Ciao Bella Rosa,1 F Prat,120
7-2
8039 Twirling Apples,6 M Gutierrez,122
4-1
6185 Fast Bid (IRE),2
D Van Dyke,122
5-1
6274 Ourroseofthenile,4 I Puglisi,120
6-1
6213 Miz Tianjin,9
T Pereira,122
8-1
2045 Victoria Falls,7
E Maldonado,124
8-1
6082 Alpha Pegasus,8 B Boulanger,122 30-1
7053 On a Toot,3
B Pena,122
30-1
8131 SEVENTH RACE. 6 furlongs. Claiming.
3-year-olds and up. Claiming prices
$32,000-$28,000. Purse $32,000.
PR
Horse (PP)
Jockey,Wt
Odds
(6299) Los Borrachos,2 M Falgione,XXX112 8-5
8049 Best Two Minutes,6 R Bejarano,122
7-2
(8063)
6207
6299
7067
6299
Papa Turf,1
Street Vision,3
Logan’s Moon,7
Magic Taste,4
Tough But Nice,5
J Talamo,122
4-1
T Baze,122
4-1
F Prat,122
9-2
S Risenhoover,122 15-1
B Pena,122
20-1
8132 EIGHTH RACE. 1 mile turf. Allowance.
3-year-olds and up. State bred. Purse $51,000.
PR
Horse (PP)
Jockey,Wt
Odds
(6253) Lovely Anzi,8
R Bejarano,124
7-2
8080 Popular Kid,6
S Elliott,120
4-1
(6215) Six Point Rack,2 F Prat,122
5-1
6300 Spiritual Warrior,3 D Van Dyke,122
6-1
6195 The Big Train,7
C Nakatani,124
6-1
6195 Accountability,1
G Stevens,122
8-1
7075 Lymebyrd,11
M Pedroza,122
8-1
6300 Highly Acclaimed,9 J Talamo,122
12-1
(6009) Hot Perfection,10 E Roman,X117
20-1
6195 Packin Heat,4
B Blanc,124
20-1
7075 Plain Wrap,5
S Gonzalez,124
20-1
Also eligible
(7079) Tribal Roar,13
E Maldonado,122 20-1
7041 Odin,12
A Solis,XX117
30-1
8133 NINTH RACE. 7 furlongs. Maiden claiming.
3-year-olds and up. Claiming price $20,000. Purse
$17,000.
PR
Horse (PP)
Jockey,Wt
Odds
8004 Inhibition,5
S Gonzalez,122
7-2
8032 Orejas,6
SRisenhoover,120 4-1
8032 Empire Ruler,2
R Bejarano,120
6-1
8032 Taste’s Legend,1
Mt Garcia,122
6-1
8037 Close to Midnight,10 E Roman,X115
8-1
8032 Southern Thunder,3 M Pedroza,120
8-1
6122 Californium,13
A Solis,XX113
12-1
8086 Colonial Power,4
R Sevilla,XXX112 15-1
7094 Fall Harvest,9
S Elliott,120
15-1
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Vin Scully
RETURNS TOO THE MIC
SATURDAY
NOVEMBER
4
at 6:00pm
The Pasaadena Civic Auditorium
300 EAST GREEN STREET IN PASADENA
Join us for this
unforgettable evening of
conversation, Dodger talk
& memorable stories.
ORDER
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Tickets start at $40
Available at Ticketmaster
or:
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CLIPPERS 130, SUNS 88
PHOENIX
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Jackson.............28 3-10 4-8 0-1 1 6 12
Warren ..............21 4-7 1-2 0-3 2 6 9
Chandler ...........23 3-4 0-0 2-14 0 1 6
Bledsoe.............23 1-4 2-2 0-1 4 1 4
Booker ..............31 5-14 3-4 1-4 2 1 13
Len...................24 3-6 9-11 1-7 2 2 15
James ...............24 3-9 4-5 0-3 6 3 10
Bender..............18 1-2 0-0 0-2 2 0 3
Chriss ...............15 2-5 1-2 0-1 0 4 7
Daniels ...............9 2-4 0-0 0-0 0 1 5
Ulis ....................7 0-3 2-2 0-0 0 1 2
Jones Jr. ..............6 0-1 2-2 0-0 0 0 2
Peters .................3 0-2 0-0 0-0 0 1 0
Totals
27-71 28-38 4-36 19 27 88
Shooting: Field goals, 38.0%; free throws, 73.7%
Three-point goals: 6-24 (Chriss 2-3, Jackson 2-5,
Bender 1-2, Daniels 1-2, Jones Jr. 0-1, Ulis 0-1, Bledsoe
0-2, James 0-2, Peters 0-2, Booker 0-4). Team Rebounds: 9. Team Turnovers: 19 (32 PTS). Blocked Shots:
3 (Jones Jr., Len, Peters). Turnovers: 19 (Bledsoe 4,
Bender 2, Booker 2, Jackson 2, James 2, Warren 2,
Chandler, Chriss, Daniels, Len, Ulis). Steals: 8 (Jackson
4, Chriss 2, James, Jones Jr.). Technical Fouls: coach
Suns (Defensive three second), 5:39 second.
CLIPPERS
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Gallinari ............29 4-14 1-1 1-8 1 2 12
Griffin ...............27 7-13 12-14 1-8 4 2 29
Jordan...............27 3-5 0-0 3-13 0 3 6
Beverley ............26 6-8 1-2 0-2 2 4 15
Teodosic............10 2-3 0-0 0-0 2 1 5
Rivers ...............32 2-7 1-4 1-3 4 4 5
L.Williams..........24 7-13 2-3 0-3 6 3 18
W.Johnson .........14 1-3 1-2 0-3 2 4 3
Dekker ..............13 3-6 0-0 1-2 2 1 7
W.Reed .............12 6-6 0-0 2-4 0 4 12
Harrell ................7 2-3 0-0 1-2 1 0 4
Thornwell.............6 3-5 2-2 0-0 1 1 8
B.Johnson............6 2-2 2-2 0-4 1 3 6
Totals
48-88 22-30 10-52 26 32 130
Shooting: Field goals, 54.5%; free throws, 73.3%
Three-point goals: 12-26 (Griffin 3-5, Gallinari 3-8,
Beverley 2-2, L.Williams 2-5, Teodosic 1-1, Dekker 1-2,
W.Johnson 0-1, Rivers 0-2). Team Rebounds: 5. Team
Turnovers: 12 (9 PTS). Blocked Shots: 2 (Griffin, Harrell).
Turnovers: 12 (Griffin 3, Beverley 2, Gallinari 2, Rivers 2,
B.Johnson, L.Williams, Teodosic). Steals: 12 (Beverley
5, Thornwell 2, W.Johnson 2, Griffin, Rivers, W.Reed).
Technical Fouls: None.
Phoenix
18 26 20 24— 88
Clippers
23 35 32 40— 130
A—19,068. T—2:13. O—Bennie Adams, Brett Nansel,
Nick Buchert
Not only was Danilo Gallinari unable to play in many
preseason games with new
teammates Blake Griffin
and DeAndre Jordan, but
the Clippers’ new starting
small forward was unable to
get in many practices with
the two.
A strained left foot put
Gallinari down in the second
exhibition game in Hawaii
against the Toronto Raptors, and the injury kept him
from practicing until last
Sunday.
So
when
Gallinari
started against the Lakers
on Thursday night at Staples Center, he found himself still trying to figure out
how best to operate with
Griffin and Jordan.
“I think we did a pretty
good job as far as chemistry
with us three,” Gallinari
said. “But everybody is trying to learn how to play with
each other. Everybody is
new so it’s going to take a
while. It’s going to be a learning process the whole season.”
Gallinari is a 6-10 forward
with a smooth shooting
touch. He can also play some
power forward. Now it’s just
a matter of finding his spots
on the court in support of
Griffin and Jordan.
“It’s something that we
are working on,” said Gallinari, who scored 11 points in
the opener. “It’s something
we kind of figured out already a little bit. But like I
said, it’s something that every game we’re going to get
better with that.”
They were open
The Clippers believe they
are a far better shooting
team than the 39.3% they
shot against the Lakers.
They believe Gallinari is
better than the three for 12
he shot, Austin Rivers is
better than one for 11, Patrick Beverley is better than
four for 12 and Milos Teodosic is better than two for
nine.
The Clippers believe this
because the shots they got
were with very little pressure
from the Lakers. For the
most part, the Clippers got
wide-open looks.
“We shot 39% and had 30
just point-blank, wide-open
shots at the rim, wide-open
threes,” Clippers coach Doc
Rivers said. “So that was
good news, that you can get
those shots. Now you have to
make some of them, which
would be nice.”
broderick.turner@latimes.com
Twitter: @BA_Turner
Marco Garcia Associated Press
NEW CLIPPER Danilo Gallinari injured his foot in a
preseason game against Toronto in Hawaii.
D4
S U N DAY , O C T O B E R 22, 2 017
SS
L AT I M E S . C O M / S P O RTS
LAKERS REPORT
NBA STANDINGS
Standings have been arranged to reflect how the teams will be determined for the playoffs. Teams are ranked 1-15 by record. Division
standing no longer has any bearing on the rankings. The top eight
teams in each conference make the playoffs, and the top-seeded
team would play the eighth-seeded team, the seventh team would
play the second, etc. Head-to-head competition is the first of several
tiebreakers, followed by conference record. (Western Conference
divisions: S-Southwest; P-Pacific; N-Northwest; Eastern Conference
divisions: A-Atlantic; C-Central; S-Southeast).
Kuzma rebounds from slow debut
By Tania Ganguli
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Team
1. Houston
2. CLIPPERS
2. Memphis
2. San Antonio
5. Portland
5. Utah
7. Denver
7. LAKERS
W
3
2
2
2
2
2
1
1
L
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
1
PCT
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
.667
.667
.500
.500
GB L10
3-0
1
⁄2 2-0
1
⁄2 2-0
1
⁄2 2-0
1 2-1
1 2-1
11⁄2 1-1
11⁄2 1-1
Rk.
S1
P1
S2
S3
N2
N1
N4
P2
7. Minnesota
7. Oklahoma City
11. Golden State
11. Sacramento
13. New Orleans
14. Phoenix
14. Dallas
1
1
1
1
0
0
0
1
1
2
2
2
3
3
.500
.500
.333
.333
.000
.000
.000
⁄2 1-1 N3
⁄2 1-1 N5
2
1-2 P3
2
1-2 P4
21⁄2 0-2 S4
3
0-3 P5
3
0-3 S5
1
1
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Team
1. Toronto
1. Washington
3. Cleveland
3. Detroit
3. Milwaukee
3. Orlando
7. Atlanta
7. Brooklyn
W
2
2
2
2
2
2
1
1
L
0
0
1
1
1
1
1
1
PCT
1.00
1.00
.667
.667
.667
.667
.500
.500
GB L10
2-0
2-0
1
⁄2 2-1
1
⁄2 2-1
1
⁄2 2-1
1
⁄2 2-1
1
1-1
1
1-1
Rk.
A1
S1
C1
C2
C3
S2
S5
A2
7. Charlotte
7. Miami
11. Boston
11. Indiana
13. Chicago
13. New York
15. Philadelphia
1
1
1
1
0
0
0
1
1
2
2
2
2
3
.500
.500
.333
.333
.000
.000
.000
1
1
11⁄2
11⁄2
2
2
21⁄2
S3
S4
A3
C4
C5
A4
A5
1-1
1-1
1-2
1-2
0-2
0-2
0-3
TODAY’S GAMES
Favorite
Line Underdog
New Orleans
4 at LAKERS
at Brooklyn
21⁄2 Atlanta
at Oklahoma City 4 Minnesota
Time
6:30 p.m.
12:30 p.m.
4 p.m.
RESULTS
Gasol, Grizzlies
hold off Warriors
MEMPHIS 111
GOLDEN STATE 101
Marc Gasol had 34 points and14
rebounds, and the Memphis Grizzlies built a 19-point third-quarter
lead over Golden State before
holding on to beat the defending
champion Warriors 111-101 on Saturday night in Memphis, Tenn.
Stephen Curry led the Warriors
with 37 points before being ejected
and Kevin Durant added 29 and 13
rebounds.
Orlando 114, at Cleveland 93:
Nikola Vucevic scored 23 points
and the Magic snapped a 17-game
losing streak against the Cavaliers.
San Antonio 87, at Chicago 77:
LaMarcus Aldridge had 28 points
and 10 rebounds for the Spurs.
at Utah 96, Oklahoma City 87:
Rudy Gobert had 16 points and 13
rebounds to lead the Jazz.
Detroit111, at New York107: Tobias
Harris scored 22 of his 31 points in
the second half.
at Miami 112, Indiana 108: Goran
Dragic scored 23 points, Dion
Waiters added 19 and the Heat
opened their home schedule with a
victory.
at Milwaukee 113, Portland 110: Giannis Antetokounmpo scored 17 of
his career-high 44 points in the
fourth quarter.
Lakers tonight
Lonzo Ball wasn’t the only
rookie who played better in his second game than his first.
After a blistering summer
league and preseason campaign,
Kyle Kuzma struggled in his first
regular season NBA game. While
Kuzma finished Thursday’s game
against the Clippers with eight
points on four-of-eight shooting,
he was 1-of-5 through three quarters. Kuzma made all three of his
fourth-quarter shots in garbage
time.
On Friday against the Phoenix
Suns, he made a bigger impact
much earlier.
In the second quarter, Kuzma
made four of five shots and
through three he had 13. Kuzma
finished with 15 points, two assists
and three rebounds. Although he
played only 18 minutes in the Lakers’ season opener Thursday, he
played 28 minutes Friday.
“Little bit less jitters,” Kuzma
said. “First game, opening game of
my NBA career. I was able to settle
down. Made some shots. Made the
game simple, really focused on defense, and everything else opened
up.”
Kuzma, who led the Lakers in
scoring during the preseason,
played the entire fourth quarter
Friday in Phoenix, including the
critical moments at the end of the
game as the Lakers closed out the
Suns.
at Toronto 128, Philadelphia 94:
DeMar DeRozan scored 30 points,
Serge Ibaka had 21 and the Raptors won their 10th straight home
game over the 76ers.
at Denver 96, Sacramento 79:
Paul Millsap had18 points and nine
rebounds in his first home game
with the Nuggets.
at Clippers 130, Phoenix 88
— associated press
When: 6:30 p.m.
On the air: TV – Spectrum
SportsNet, Spectrum Deportes;
Radio – 710, 1330
Update: After serving a two-game
suspension after pleading guilty
to operating a motor vehicle while
intoxicated, Kentavious
Caldwell-Pope will be in the
Lakers’ lineup. It will be his debut
with his new team. … Rookie
guard Josh Hart might see more
action after playing two minutes
on Friday. That was Hart’s first
regular-season game after he
missed the season opener
because of bursitis in his Achilles.
Christian Petersen Getty Images
KYLE KUZMA struggled in
his first game but had with 15
points, two assists and three
rebounds in his second game.
—Tania Ganguli
Ball threw two of his nine assists
to Kuzma, including his final one as
the Lakers made their final push.
“Any time me and him are on
the court, we have a little connection,” Kuzma said.
Ball said he never looks at statistics until after the game ends, so
he had no idea he was as close as he
was to a triple double.
His teammates didn’t either.
Even as he left the locker room Friday night, Kuzma still hadn’t
heard.
“What’d he fall short?” Kuzma
asked.
Told just one assist, he replied:
“He did it in summer league, why
not the NBA?”
Randle limited again
Julius Randle came off the
bench Friday, just like he did on
Thursday.
Before the game, Lakers Coach
Luke Walton said he thought
Randle’s mood was good Friday
and he expected Randle to have a
good game that night.
While Randle played a little over
17 minutes Thursday night, he
played even less on Friday.
Against the Suns, Randle
played only 12 minutes. He scored
Brewer offers energy
Walton went with Corey
Brewer in the starting lineup Friday after starting Luol Deng on
Thursday.
“It felt like we needed some
more natural energy in certain
parts of the game that we struggled
to find for some reason,” Walton
said. “That shouldn’t ever be the
case in a home opener but that
goes to being a young guy not seeing the ball go through the net. We
are going to change some things up
... and see if that helps.”
On Friday night he also offered
a spark in the starting lineup.
Brewer had the highest plus-minus rating of any Lakers player at
14. He finished with five points, two
assists, two rebounds and three
steals.
Update
After serving his two-game suspension for pleading guilty to operating a motor vehicle while intoxicated, Kentavious CaldwellPope will be in the Lakers lineup.
It’ll be his debut with his new team.
… Rookie guard Josh Hart might
get more playing time after playing
2 minutes 20 seconds on Friday.
That was Hart’s first regular season game after he missed the
season opener due to Achilles bursitis.
tania.ganguli@latimes.com
NBA BOX SCORES
Grizzlies 111, Warriors 101
Raptors 128, 76ers 94
Spurs 87, Bulls 77
Nuggets 96, Kings 79
Rockets 107, Mavericks 91
PHILADELPHIA
SAN ANTONIO
SACRAMENTO
DALLAS
GOLDEN STATE
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Covington.........14 2-7 0-0 0-3 0 4 5
Simmons .........33 7-16 4-8 1-10 8 0 18
Johnson...........14 2-3 2-2 0-2 1 2 6
Bayless............26 5-7 4-4 0-3 0 1 16
Redick.............26 2-8 2-2 0-2 3 1 6
Fultz................24 1-5 4-8 0-1 2 2 6
Saric ...............23 3-7 1-2 1-7 1 4 9
Okafor .............22 4-7 2-4 4-9 0 4 10
McConnell........18 1-4 0-0 0-1 3 4 2
Anderson .........17 4-12 2-4 1-1 0 3 12
Lwawu-Cabrrt ...10 1-5 1-2 1-2 0 1 4
Stauskas ...........8 0-1 0-0 0-0 0 0 0
Totals
32-82 22-36 8-41 18 26 94
Shooting: Field goals, 39.0%; free throws, 61.1%
Three-point goals: 8-24 (Bayless 2-3, Saric 2-3, Anderson 2-7, Covington 1-1, Luwawu-Cabarrot 1-4,
Johnson 0-1, McConnell 0-1, Redick 0-2, Simmons
0-2). Team Rebounds: 17. Team Turnovers: 20 (23
PTS). Blocked Shots: 4 (Okafor 2, Anderson, Covington). Turnovers: 20 (Bayless 3, Luwawu-Cabarrot 3,
Simmons 3, McConnell 2, Okafor 2, Redick 2, Saric 2,
Anderson, Fultz, Stauskas). Steals: 5 (Redick 2, Bayless, Johnson, Stauskas). Technical Fouls: None.
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Aldridge...........32 12-24 4-4 5-10 3 2 28
Anderson .........31 2-7 0-0 2-8 1 0 4
Gasol ..............19 3-8 4-5 2-7 4 0 10
Green..............28 4-9 0-0 0-3 3 1 9
Murray.............26 4-10 0-0 3-10 6 0 8
Ginobili ...........22 2-7 1-2 0-1 3 3 5
Gay.................22 6-13 0-3 1-3 1 2 12
Mills................21 1-2 0-0 0-2 3 4 2
Lauvergne ........17 2-6 1-2 0-6 1 0 5
Forbes.............16 2-7 0-0 1-2 0 2 4
Paul..................0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0 0
Totals
38-93 10-16 14-52 25 14 87
Shooting: Field goals, 40.9%; free throws, 62.5%
Three-point goals: 1-12 (Green 1-2, Forbes 0-1,
Gasol 0-1, Murray 0-1, Aldridge 0-2, Gay 0-2, Ginobili
0-3). Team Rebounds: 11. Team Turnovers: 11 (4 PTS).
Blocked Shots: 3 (Aldridge 2, Ginobili). Turnovers: 11
(Gasol 3, Mills 3, Anderson 2, Aldridge, Gay, Murray).
Steals: 8 (Gay 2, Ginobili 2, Murray 2, Aldridge, Green).
Technical Fouls: None.
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Jackson............19 2-5 0-0 0-1 0 2 5
Randolph .........20 5-13 0-0 4-9 0 3 11
Cauley-Stein .....26 1-5 0-2 1-8 1 2 2
Hield ...............22 1-10 1-1 0-3 3 2 3
Hill ..................22 1-5 2-2 0-0 1 0 4
Fox ..................28 8-13 1-1 2-5 1 4 18
Labissiere.........25 6-12 0-0 2-4 4 3 13
Mason .............17 2-9 2-3 1-2 1 0 7
Temple .............16 1-3 1-2 0-1 2 1 4
Koufos .............15 1-1 0-0 1-3 1 1 2
Richardson .......14 2-5 2-2 0-1 1 1 8
Sampson............5 1-2 0-0 1-1 0 2 2
Carter ................5 0-2 0-0 0-1 0 0 0
Totals
31-85 9-13 12-39 15 21 79
Shooting: Field goals, 36.5%; free throws, 69.2%
Three-point goals: 8-24 (Richardson 2-2, Fox 1-1,
Labissiere 1-2, Mason 1-2, Jackson 1-3, Randolph 1-3,
Temple 1-3, Carter 0-1, Cauley-Stein 0-1, Hill 0-2, Hield
0-4). Team Rebounds: 8. Team Turnovers: 13 (19 PTS).
Blocked Shots: 3 (Koufos, Labissiere, Temple). Turnovers:
13 (Hill 3, Fox 2, Jackson 2, Randolph 2, Temple 2,
Labissiere, Mason). Steals: 6 (Labissiere 2, Randolph 2,
Koufos, Temple). Technical Fouls: Randolph, 3:21 third.
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Barnes .............30 5-17 3-3 3-5 2 1 14
Finney-Smith.....15 0-1 0-0 1-1 1 1 0
Nowitzki ...........17 1-8 0-0 1-5 1 3 2
Ferrell ..............41 6-15 4-4 1-3 6 3 19
Matthews..........30 3-11 3-4 1-4 2 1 11
Clavell..............24 3-7 0-0 0-5 2 2 9
Barea ..............21 7-13 2-3 0-5 3 2 19
Powell ..............20 2-5 1-1 1-5 1 2 6
Noel ................15 1-2 2-4 0-5 0 3 4
Kleber..............12 2-3 1-2 0-1 1 1 5
Withey ...............8 1-2 0-0 0-2 0 0 2
Totals
31-84 16-21 8-41 19 19 91
Shooting: Field goals, 36.9%; free throws, 76.2%
Three-point goals: 13-31 (Barea 3-5, Clavell 3-5, Ferrell
3-6, Matthews 2-6, Powell 1-2, Barnes 1-3, Finney-Smith
0-1, Kleber 0-1, Nowitzki 0-2). Team Rebounds: 6. Team
Turnovers: 14 (19 PTS). Blocked Shots: 0. Turnovers: 14
(Barea 3, Barnes 3, Finney-Smith 2, Matthews 2, Noel 2,
Clavell, Ferrell). Steals: 6 (Barnes, Clavell, Ferrell, Kleber,
Matthews, Powell). Technical Fouls: Nowitzki, 10:27 third.
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Durant.............40 11-24 3-6 2-13 3 2 29
D.Green ...........36 1-6 1-2 1-7 6 5 3
Pachulia ..........12 0-2 0-0 2-6 0 4 0
Curry...............30 9-17 13-13 0-6 3 5 37
Thompson........38 5-16 2-2 0-2 1 4 14
Iguodala ..........28 0-5 0-0 2-2 2 3 0
Livingston ........18 4-7 0-0 1-2 0 2 8
McCaw ............12 0-1 0-0 0-0 2 0 0
West .................9 1-2 2-2 3-6 3 2 4
Young................5 0-2 0-0 0-0 0 0 0
McGee ..............4 1-1 2-2 0-0 0 0 4
Bell...................4 0-0 0-0 1-2 0 0 0
Cook.................0 1-1 0-0 0-0 0 1 2
Totals
33-84 23-27 12-46 20 28 101
Shooting: Field goals, 39.3%; free throws, 85.2%
Three-point goals: 12-38 (Curry 6-11, Durant 4-9,
Thompson 2-8, McCaw 0-1, Iguodala 0-2, Young 0-2,
D.Green 0-5). Team Rebounds: 9. Team Turnovers: 17 (24
PTS). Blocked Shots: 7 (Durant 3, Bell, D.Green, Iguodala, Thompson). Turnovers: 17 (Durant 6, D.Green 3,
Curry 2, Pachulia 2, West 2, Livingston, Young). Steals:
10 (D.Green 2, Iguodala 2, Pachulia 2, West 2, Durant,
McCaw). Technical Fouls: Iguodala, 3:21 second
TORONTO
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Ibaka ...............24 7-12 2-2 0-5 2 2 21
Powell ..............17 0-3 2-2 1-2 2 4 2
Valanciunas ......15 2-4 1-2 0-4 0 2 5
DeRozan...........26 8-12 14-16 0-3 3 3 30
Lowry...............28 6-12 1-2 0-5 5 3 17
Wright ..............31 3-9 7-7 0-5 1 3 14
VanVleet...........17 1-6 0-0 0-0 4 3 3
Miles ...............16 2-7 0-0 0-3 1 3 5
Poeltl ...............16 6-7 2-4 2-5 0 0 14
Nogueira ..........16 5-7 0-0 3-9 0 1 10
Anunoby...........15 1-3 0-0 0-3 2 3 3
Siakam ..............8 1-5 2-2 2-6 2 1 4
Caboclo .............6 0-2 0-0 0-1 1 1 0
Totals
42-89 31-37 8-51 23 29 128
Shooting: Field goals, 47.2%; free throws, 83.8%
Three-point goals: 13-44 (Ibaka 5-9, Lowry 4-10,
Anunoby 1-2, VanVleet 1-4, Miles 1-6, Wright 1-6,
DeRozan 0-1, Nogueira 0-1, Powell 0-1, Caboclo 0-2,
Siakam 0-2). Team Rebounds: 8. Team Turnovers: 13
(12 PTS). Blocked Shots: 10 (Poeltl 3, Ibaka 2,
Nogueira 2, Wright 2, Powell). Turnovers: 13 (Poeltl 2,
Powell 2, VanVleet 2, Wright 2, DeRozan, Ibaka, Lowry,
Miles, Nogueira). Steals: 5 (Nogueira 2, Anunoby,
Caboclo, Poeltl). Technical Fouls: None.
Philadelphia
19 30 22 23— 94
Toronto
36 26 40 26— 128
A—19,800. T—2:18. O—Bill Spooner, Ben Taylor, Jason Goldenberg
Pistons 111, Knicks 107
DETROIT
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Harris..............38 13-24 2-3 3-6 1 3 31
Johnson...........28 3-7 2-2 2-8 2 3 9
Drummond.......38 9-11 3-3 4-12 1 3 21
Bradley............22 2-9 0-0 1-5 3 4 5
Jackson ...........26 4-12 7-7 2-3 7 4 16
Smith..............21 5-9 0-0 0-0 3 2 10
Tolliver.............19 3-8 0-0 1-4 2 2 9
Leuer ..............19 3-4 0-0 1-2 2 1 6
Kennard ..........16 1-4 0-0 1-3 0 1 2
Marjanovic .........4 1-3 0-0 0-0 0 1 2
Ellenson ............4 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 1 0
Totals
44-91 14-15 15-43 21 25 111
Shooting: Field goals, 48.4%; free throws, 93.3%
Three-point goals: 9-30 (Tolliver 3-7, Harris 3-9, Bradley 1-2, Jackson 1-4, Johnson 1-4, Leuer 0-1, Smith 0-1,
Kennard 0-2). Team Rebounds: 4. Team Turnovers: 12 (15
PTS). Blocked Shots: 2 (Drummond, Tolliver). Turnovers:
12 (Drummond 5, Johnson 2, Kennard 2, Bradley, Ellenson, Smith). Steals: 5 (Bradley 2, Drummond, Marjanovic, Smith). Technical Fouls: None.
CHICAGO
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Markkanen.......37 5-14 0-1 0-12 0 3 13
Zipser..............25 1-5 0-0 0-4 1 2 3
Lopez ..............29 7-12 1-2 3-7 3 1 16
Grant ..............33 6-14 1-1 0-4 5 2 13
Holiday............36 5-18 2-2 1-4 3 1 15
Valentine .........26 2-7 0-0 0-5 0 0 4
Felicio .............18 1-3 0-0 4-6 2 4 2
Nwaba ............18 1-2 3-3 0-5 2 1 5
Felder .............14 3-7 0-0 0-1 2 1 6
Totals
31-82 7-9 8-48 18 15 77
Shooting: Field goals, 37.8%; free throws, 77.8%
Three-point goals: 8-28 (Holiday 3-8, Markkanen
3-8, Zipser 1-2, Lopez 1-3, Nwaba 0-1, Grant 0-3, Valentine 0-3). Team Rebounds: 3. Team Turnovers: 19
(23 PTS). Blocked Shots: 5 (Lopez 3, Grant, Nwaba).
Turnovers: 19 (Grant 4, Lopez 4, Felder 3, Markkanen
3, Holiday 2, Nwaba, Valentine, Zipser). Steals: 3 (Holiday, Markkanen, Zipser). Technical Fouls: None.
San Antonio
19 22 24 22— 87
Chicago
21 17 17 22— 77
A—21,640. T—1:59. O—Tyler Ford, Leon Wood, Tony
Brothers
Magic 114, Cavaliers 93
ORLANDO
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Fournier ...........26 4-9 2-2 0-3 4 1 13
Isaac ...............21 2-6 0-0 1-6 0 4 5
Vucevic ............28 11-16 0-0 1-7 5 2 23
Augustin...........26 4-6 1-2 0-4 10 2 12
Ross ................22 1-11 1-2 1-3 2 1 3
Hezonja............25 4-5 0-0 1-6 0 3 11
Mack ...............21 1-4 2-2 0-3 5 0 5
Simmons..........20 6-11 4-4 0-4 1 4 19
Speights...........18 4-10 0-0 2-5 0 2 10
Biyombo...........14 2-6 4-4 4-5 0 4 8
Iwundu...............5 0-3 1-2 0-2 0 1 1
Afflalo................5 0-0 2-2 0-0 0 1 2
Birch .................5 1-3 0-0 2-2 1 3 2
Totals
40-90 17-20 12-50 28 28 114
Shooting: Field goals, 44.4%; free throws, 85.0%
Three-point goals: 17-35 (Hezonja 3-3, Augustin
3-4, Fournier 3-5, Simmons 3-5, Speights 2-6, Mack
1-1, Isaac 1-3, Vucevic 1-3, Ross 0-5). Team Rebounds: 8. Team Turnovers: 12 (12 PTS). Blocked
Shots: 6 (Vucevic 3, Fournier 2, Biyombo). Turnovers:
12 (Hezonja 2, Mack 2, Simmons 2, Augustin, Biyombo, Fournier, Isaac, Iwundu, Ross). Steals: 7 (Augustin, Fournier, Hezonja, Isaac, Mack, Simmons,
Vucevic). Technical Fouls: None.
CLEVELAND
DENVER
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Chandler..........29 2-8 0-0 7-12 4 1 5
Millsap ............28 6-11 4-5 1-9 2 1 18
Jokic ...............30 0-3 0-0 0-9 7 4 0
Harris..............30 7-11 0-1 0-0 1 3 17
Murray.............19 1-9 0-0 1-2 2 1 2
Barton.............28 6-13 0-0 1-5 3 1 15
Mudiay ............28 4-11 2-4 0-8 4 5 10
Faried..............22 7-10 4-6 4-8 1 2 18
Plumlee ...........10 2-5 2-4 3-3 1 0 6
Hernangomez .....6 0-1 0-0 0-0 0 0 0
Lyles .................3 2-3 0-0 1-2 0 1 5
Beasley .............1 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0 0
Totals
37-85 12-20 18-58 25 19 96
Shooting: Field goals, 43.5%; free throws, 60.0%
Three-point goals: 10-30 (Harris 3-6, Barton 3-8, Millsap 2-3, Lyles 1-2, Chandler 1-3, Hernangomez 0-1, Jokic
0-1, Mudiay 0-2, Murray 0-4). Team Rebounds: 9. Team
Turnovers: 16 (13 PTS). Blocked Shots: 2 (Faried, Millsap).
Turnovers: 16 (Harris 3, Jokic 3, Millsap 3, Mudiay 2, Barton, Chandler, Faried, Murray, Plumlee). Steals: 7 (Faried 2,
Barton, Chandler, Harris, Jokic, Murray). Technical Fouls:
coach Nuggets (Defensive three second), 1:15 second.
Sacramento
18 16 18 27— 79
Denver
17 25 24 30— 96
A—19,520. T—2:26. O—Mike Callahan, Phenizee Ransom, Mark Ayotte
Heat 112, Pacers 108
INDIANA
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Bogdanovic ......20 3-6 1-1 0-0 1 1 7
T.Young............31 7-17 0-0 4-8 0 1 14
Sabonis...........30 6-10 6-8 3-12 2 4 18
Collison ...........31 3-9 2-2 1-3 8 1 10
Oladipo ...........36 10-22 4-4 2-4 5 4 28
Joseph ............27 4-10 0-2 0-4 0 1 8
Stephenson......18 2-9 0-1 1-2 1 3 4
Leaf ................16 2-3 0-0 0-3 0 1 5
Jefferson..........14 6-10 2-3 2-8 0 1 14
Wilkins ............12 0-0 0-0 0-1 0 1 0
Totals
43-96 15-21 13-45 17 18 108
Shooting: Field goals, 44.8%; free throws, 71.4%
Three-point goals: 7-19 (Oladipo 4-7, Collison 2-4,
Leaf 1-2, Jefferson 0-1, Sabonis 0-1, Stephenson 0-2,
T.Young 0-2). Team Rebounds: 9. Team Turnovers: 11 (16
PTS). Blocked Shots: 4 (Collison, Jefferson, Oladipo,
Sabonis). Turnovers: 11 (Joseph 3, Oladipo 2, Sabonis 2,
Stephenson 2, Collison, Leaf). Steals: 9 (Oladipo 4, Joseph 2, Sabonis, Stephenson, T.Young). Technical Fouls:
coach Pacers (Defensive three second), 1:41 second.
HOUSTON
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Anderson .........23 1-4 0-0 1-10 1 0 3
Ariza ...............30 3-7 1-1 0-4 1 0 8
Capela ............20 5-8 3-3 3-10 2 4 13
Gordon............24 5-11 7-8 0-1 2 2 18
Harden ............30 10-19 3-4 0-3 7 5 29
Tucker .............26 1-6 0-0 0-4 1 1 3
Mbah a Moute..26 2-6 2-3 1-5 1 3 6
Jackson ...........17 2-5 0-0 2-5 2 1 4
Black ..............12 2-2 0-0 0-6 0 3 4
Nene...............10 6-6 2-3 1-2 0 3 14
Qi.....................7 0-1 0-0 0-3 0 1 0
Brown ...............5 1-3 0-0 0-0 0 0 3
Williams ............3 1-4 0-0 0-1 0 1 2
Totals
39-82 18-22 8-54 17 24 107
Shooting: Field goals, 47.6%; free throws, 81.8%
Three-point goals: 11-47 (Harden 6-13, Brown 1-3, Anderson 1-4, Ariza 1-5, Tucker 1-5, Gordon 1-6, Qi 0-1, Jackson 0-3, Williams 0-3, Mbah a Moute 0-4). Team Rebounds: 4. Team Turnovers: 13 (13 PTS). Blocked Shots: 4
(Black 2, Ariza, Qi). Turnovers: 13 (Harden 5, Jackson 2,
Mbah a Moute 2, Ariza, Brown, Gordon, Qi). Steals: 12
(Ariza 4, Harden 2, Mbah a Moute 2, Tucker 2, Black, Jackson). Technical Fouls: coach Rockets (Defensive three second), 4:13 first
Dallas
20 19 19 33— 91
Houston
33 29 30 15— 107
Bucks 113, Trail Blazers 110
PORTLAND
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Aminu .............25 1-7 2-2 1-6 2 1 5
Harkless ..........37 5-10 1-2 0-3 0 3 13
Nurkic .............31 7-17 3-4 5-11 3 1 17
Lillard..............34 6-14 11-12 2-5 4 5 26
McCollum ........37 9-18 5-5 0-3 1 2 26
Turner..............32 3-7 4-4 0-2 7 5 11
Connaughton....18 1-4 0-0 0-0 1 1 3
Davis ..............16 1-1 4-4 4-11 0 4 6
Napier...............6 1-2 1-2 1-1 0 0 3
Totals
34-80 31-35 13-42 18 22 110
Shooting: Field goals, 42.5%; free throws, 88.6%
Three-point goals: 11-27 (Lillard 3-5, McCollum
3-6, Harkless 2-4, Aminu 1-3, Connaughton 1-3, Turner 1-4, Napier 0-1, Nurkic 0-1). Team Rebounds: 12.
Team Turnovers: 16 (22 PTS). Blocked Shots: 6 (Nurkic
3, Davis 2, Aminu). Turnovers: 16 (Lillard 6, Connaughton 2, McCollum 2, Nurkic 2, Turner 2, Davis,
Harkless). Steals: 10 (Lillard 4, Harkless 3, McCollum
2, Turner). Technical Fouls: Turner, 1:00 first.
MILWAUKEE
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Hardaway Jr. .....34 4-16 3-3 1-1 2 2 14
Porzingis ..........34 11-20 8-10 0-5 2 3 33
Kanter .............23 7-10 3-3 5-10 0 2 17
Lee .................28 2-8 0-0 0-2 1 2 4
Sessions..........32 2-8 6-8 1-7 5 5 10
McDermott.......27 2-5 0-0 1-3 1 2 5
O’Quinn ...........24 6-7 3-3 3-7 3 3 15
Beasley ...........17 2-6 2-4 1-4 1 1 6
Baker ..............15 1-1 0-0 0-0 5 1 3
Totals
37-81 25-31 12-39 20 21 107
Shooting: Field goals, 45.7%; free throws, 80.6%
Three-point goals: 8-30 (Porzingis 3-7, Hardaway Jr.
3-10, Baker 1-1, McDermott 1-4, Beasley 0-2, Lee 0-2,
Sessions 0-4). Team Rebounds: 11. Team Turnovers: 12
(17 PTS). Blocked Shots: 2 (McDermott, Porzingis). Turnovers: 12 (Lee 3, Hardaway Jr. 2, Porzingis 2, Baker,
Beasley, Kanter, O’Quinn, Sessions). Steals: 6 (Lee 2,
Beasley, McDermott, O’Quinn, Porzingis). Technical Fouls:
coach Knicks (Defensive three second), 6:34 fourth.
Detroit
19 32 28 32— 111
New York
28 36 16 27— 107
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
J.Johnson .........29 5-10 3-5 1-4 8 1 14
Richardson.......37 4-8 1-2 1-8 4 3 12
Mickey.............13 4-5 0-1 1-6 0 2 8
Dragic .............32 9-13 3-3 1-5 3 2 23
Waiters ............32 8-16 1-3 0-1 2 4 19
Olynyk .............27 5-10 0-0 1-9 4 3 13
T.Johnson.........26 4-9 0-0 0-3 2 3 9
Winslow...........25 3-8 0-0 1-6 0 1 6
Ellington ..........15 3-8 0-0 0-3 1 0 8
Totals
45-87 8-14 6-45 24 19 112
Shooting: Field goals, 51.7%; free throws, 57.1%
Three-point goals: 14-34 (Olynyk 3-5, Richardson
3-5, Dragic 2-2, Ellington 2-6, Waiters 2-6, T.Johnson
1-4, J.Johnson 1-5, Winslow 0-1). Team Rebounds: 8.
Team Turnovers: 14 (11 PTS). Blocked Shots: 11 (J.Johnson 5, T.Johnson 2, Olynyk, Richardson, Waiters, Winslow). Turnovers: 14 (Richardson 3, Dragic 2, Ellington 2,
Olynyk 2, J.Johnson, Mickey, T.Johnson, Waiters, Winslow). Steals: 6 (Olynyk 2, Waiters 2, Ellington, Winslow).
Technical Fouls: coach Heat (Defensive three second),
7:25 second.
Indiana
31 19 26 32— 108
Miami
26 37 28 21— 112
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Antetokounmpo 39 17-23 9-13 2-8 4 3 44
Middleton ........29 6-13 6-6
0-6 3 5 18
Maker .............18 0-3 3-4
0-3 2 5 3
Brogdon ..........30 5-14 3-4
1-1 6 2 13
Snell ...............34 7-8 0-0
1-2 1 1 17
Henson............24 3-5 1-2
3-9 0 4 7
Liggins ............18 0-2 0-0
0-1 0 1 0
Teletovic ..........16 3-4 0-0
0-2 0 2 9
Dellavedova......16 1-5 0-1
0-2 4 0 2
Monroe .............6 0-3 0-0
0-0 0 0 0
Terry .................4 0-0 0-0
0-0 2 0 0
Totals
42-80 22-30 7-34 22 23 113
Shooting: Field goals, 52.5%; free throws, 73.3%
Three-point goals: 7-18 (Snell 3-4, Teletovic 3-4,
Antetokounmpo 1-4, Liggins 0-1, Middleton 0-1,
Dellavedova 0-2, Maker 0-2). Team Rebounds: 7.
Team Turnovers: 14 (12 PTS). Blocked Shots: 7 (Henson 3, Antetokounmpo, Liggins, Maker, Teletovic).
Turnovers: 14 (Antetokounmpo 2, Brogdon 2, Henson
2, Maker 2, Middleton 2, Snell 2, Dellavedova, Liggins). Steals: 9 (Brogdon 4, Antetokounmpo 2, Maker,
Snell, Teletovic). Technical Fouls: coach Bucks (Defensive three second), 11:46 second.
Portland
26 29 25 30— 110
Milwaukee
24 36 24 29— 113
A—19,812. T—2:13. O—Courtney Kirkland, Lauren
Holtkamp, Marat Kogut
A—20,562. T—2:07. O—Pat Fraher, Derrick Collins,
Kevin Cutler
A—19,600. T—2:07. O—Mark Lindsay, Eric Lewis, Curtis Blair
A—16,211. T—2:21. O—Brent Barnaky, Zach Zarba,
Vladimir Voyard-Tadal
MIAMI
MEMPHIS
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Ennis III ...........25 6-6 1-2 1-4 3 4 13
Martin .............28 3-8 2-2 1-5 0 3 8
Gasol ..............36 8-16 16-17 2-14 2 1 34
Conley.............32 3-14 3-4 0-2 7 3 10
Harrison ..........14 1-3 2-2 0-0 0 1 5
Brooks ............32 4-7 0-1 0-2 2 5 9
Evans ..............22 5-12 0-1 2-7 2 0 12
Chalmers .........21 2-4 5-8 0-1 3 5 10
Parsons ...........15 3-6 0-0 0-1 1 2 8
Wright .............11 1-1 0-0 0-4 0 1 2
Totals
36-77 29-37 6-40 20 25 111
Shooting: Field goals, 46.8%; free throws, 78.4%
Three-point goals: 10-27 (Gasol 2-4, Parsons 2-4, Evans 2-5, Brooks 1-2, Chalmers 1-2, Harrison 1-3, Conley
1-6, Martin 0-1). Team Rebounds: 9. Team Turnovers: 14
(16 PTS). Blocked Shots: 4 (Gasol 2, Brooks, Chalmers).
Turnovers: 14 (Gasol 7, Brooks 2, Evans 2, Chalmers,
Conley, Wright). Steals: 8 (Martin 2, Brooks, Chalmers,
Ennis III, Evans, Gasol, Wright). Technical Fouls: None.
Golden State
26 25 20 30— 101
Memphis
31 25 32 23— 111
A—17,794. T—2:18. O—Scott Wall, Jacyn Goble, Brian
Forte
A—18,055. T—2:06. O—C.J. Washington, Matt Boland,
James Capers
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Crowder............18 0-3 0-0
0-2 0 4 0
James ..............31 8-15 5-6
0-4 2 0 22
Love ................27 8-17 3-4
1-9 1 2 19
Calderon ..........13 1-3 0-0
0-2 2 0 2
Wade ...............16 2-8 0-0
1-2 4 1 5
Shumpert .........29 5-14 7-10 1-7 2 1 21
Thompson.........25 2-4 0-0
4-9 1 1 4
Green ..............20 2-6 3-4
1-1 1 0 7
Smith...............20 1-6 0-0
0-0 1 2 2
Korver..............13 1-5 0-0
0-3 0 0 2
Osman...............8 0-1 0-0
0-0 1 2 0
Frye...................8 2-3 0-0
1-1 0 1 5
Zizic...................6 1-1 2-3
2-4 0 0 4
Totals
33-86 20-27 11-44 15 14 93
Shooting: Field goals, 38.4%; free throws, 74.1%
Three-point goals: 7-25 (Shumpert 4-5, Frye 1-1,
Wade 1-1, James 1-3, Calderon 0-1, Green 0-1, Crowder 0-2, Korver 0-2, Smith 0-4, Love 0-5). Team Rebounds: 11. Team Turnovers: 16 (12 PTS). Blocked
Shots: 7 (Zizic 2, Crowder, James, Love, Shumpert,
Thompson). Turnovers: 16 (Crowder 3, Calderon 2,
Green 2, Love 2, Smith 2, James, Korver, Shumpert,
Thompson, Wade). Steals: 4 (Crowder, Green, James,
Love). Technical Fouls: None.
Orlando
36 20 32 26— 114
Cleveland
18 27 20 28— 93
NEW YORK
at Houston 107, Dallas 91: James
Harden scored 29 points and the
Rockets beat the Mavericks.
VS. NEW ORLEANS
eight points with one rebound and
one assist.
Jazz 96, Thunder 87
OKLAHOMA CITY
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Anthony ...........36 12-26 0-0 0-3 2 3 26
George ............37 8-19 3-3 0-5 2 3 22
Adams ............32 3-6 3-6 3-5 0 1 9
Roberson .........13 1-1 0-0 0-2 0 0 3
Westbrook........36 2-11 1-4 2-13 9 2 6
Abrines............29 2-6 2-2 2-4 1 1 7
Felton .............18 3-5 0-0 0-1 1 2 8
Grant ..............12 0-1 3-4 0-2 0 1 3
Patterson .........12 0-2 0-0 0-2 0 1 0
Ferguson ...........9 0-0 0-0 1-1 0 2 0
Huestis..............1 1-1 0-0 0-0 0 0 3
Totals
32-78 12-19 8-38 15 16 87
Shooting: Field goals, 41.0%; free throws, 63.2%
Three-point goals: 11-33 (George 3-9, Felton 2-3, Anthony 2-8, Huestis 1-1, Roberson 1-1, Abrines 1-4, Westbrook 1-5, Grant 0-1, Patterson 0-1). Team Rebounds:
12. Team Turnovers: 17 (16 PTS). Blocked Shots: 4
(Grant 2, Anthony, Patterson). Turnovers: 17 (Westbrook
7, George 6, Adams, Anthony, Felton, Patterson). Steals:
14 (George 5, Felton 2, Westbrook 2, Abrines, Anthony,
Grant, Huestis, Patterson). Technical Fouls: coach Thunder (Defensive three second), 6:28 first
UTAH
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Favors .............25 4-6 5-6 2-3 1 1 13
Ingles..............26 7-12 0-0 0-3 2 3 19
Gobert.............32 8-11 0-0 3-13 2 4 16
Mitchell ...........21 1-7 0-0 0-2 6 4 2
Rubio ..............36 5-14 4-4 0-6 5 3 16
Sefolosha ........27 2-7 0-0 0-4 1 1 4
J.Johnson .........21 5-10 1-1 0-1 2 1 12
Burks ..............19 3-5 1-2 0-3 1 0 8
Udoh...............15 1-3 0-1 2-4 1 2 2
Neto ...............10 2-2 0-0 0-1 1 1 4
O’Neale .............0 0-0 0-0 0-1 0 1 0
Totals
38-77 11-14 7-41 22 21 96
Shooting: Field goals, 49.4%; free throws, 78.6%
Three-point goals: 9-29 (Ingles 5-9, Rubio 2-8, Burks
1-2, J.Johnson 1-2, Favors 0-1, Mitchell 0-3, Sefolosha
0-4). Team Rebounds: 4. Team Turnovers: 18 (24 PTS).
Blocked Shots: 4 (Burks, Ingles, J.Johnson, Udoh). Turnovers: 18 (Rubio 6, Ingles 3, J.Johnson 3, Neto 2, Burks,
Favors, Gobert, Sefolosha). Steals: 11 (Sefolosha 3, Ingles 2, Burks, Favors, Gobert, Mitchell, Neto, Rubio).
Technical Fouls: None.
Oklahoma City
14 20 23 30— 87
Utah
21 23 29 23— 96
A—18,300. T—2:05. O—Sean Wright, James Williams,
Kevin Scott
HIGH SCHOOLS
Malibu’s Lane has record-setting day at Mt. SAC
By Eric Sondheimer
Junior Claudia Lane of Malibu
puts on a show whenever she runs,
so those who came out to Mt. San
Antonio College on Saturday
morning for the 70th Mt. SAC
Cross-Country Invitational didn’t
leave disappointed.
Lane ran an all-time Mt. SAC
best of15 minutes 49 seconds to win
the girls sweepstakes race. She
broke the record of 16:00 set in 2012
by Sarah Baxter of Simi Valley.
“I’m super happy,” Lane said.
The defending national champion in cross-country keeps run-
ning faster. She won the state Division IV championship last season
in a course-record time of16:45 for a
sophomore. She was the Gatorade
state cross-country runner of the
year.
This year, she has run in fewer
races, making her eager for the
tougher competitions in November.
“I feel fresher,” Lane said. “I’m
extremely motivated.”
Senior night canceled
It was senior night at Desert
Hot Springs on Friday but the
game against Coachella Valley never got played. It was forfeited to
Coachella Valley for safety reasons
when a second pregame fight
broke out in the stands, according
to the Desert Sun.
One Desert Hot Springs player
went into the stands to aid his father. No arrests were made.
“This is really unfortunate for
the kids because a few people unfortunately made some decisions
that affected so many others in the
community,” Desert Hot Springs
coach Bill Johnson told the Desert
Sun.
“Everybody out here wanted to
play a football game. This was a
chance for two communities to
come together and do something
positive, and when poor decisions
get made and control gets lost,
then everybody loses.”
Kickers come through
El Camino Real moved closer to
winning a second consecutive West
Valley League football championship with a 24-21 victory over
Birmingham on a short field goal
by Jake Amigo as time expired.
Darrien Green rushed for more
than 200 yards and scored two
touchdowns.
Anaheim Servite pulled out a
29-28 win over Orange Lutheran on
Zachary Grisotti’s 19-yard field
goal as time expired.
East L.A. Classic
It’s Garfield-Roosevelt week,
meaning the East L.A. Classic is set
for Friday night at East Los Angeles College.
Narbonne rolls
Defending City Section Division I champion Narbonne was
struggling with its passing attack
early in the season. That’s no longer a problem. Jalen Chatman completed 21 of 23 passes for 360 yards
and four touchdowns in a 57-7 defeat of San Pedro.
eric.sondheimer@latimes.com
S
L AT I M E S . C O M / S P O RT S
S U N DAY , OC T O B E R 22, 2 017
D5
NFL WEEK 7
ALSO TODAY
BAL at MIN ............10
TEN at CLE ............10
JAC at IND .............10
NO at GB................10
10 A.M., CH. 11
10 A.M., CH. 2
1:15 P.M., CH. 2
5:30 P.M., CH. 4
ARIZONA vs.
RAMS in London
Rams are 0-2 in London;
it’s Cardinals’ first visit.
CAROLINA at
CHICAGO
Bears’ John Fox coached
Carolina from 2002-10.
DENVER at
CHARGERS
Broncos are 5-14 in L.A.,
with last visit in 1994.
ATLANTA at
NEW ENGLAND
Rematch of Super Bowl,
where no lead was safe.
FROM A TO Z
Rams-Arizona adds to
London’s NFL relevance
Compiled by
MATT WILHALME
Baltimore: The Ravens,
who visit Minnesota on
Sunday, had two specialteams touchdowns last
week. But they also had a
pick-six, giving them 12
turnovers, third most in
the league.
Buffalo: LeSean McCoy
will be trying for his first
touchdown of the season
Sunday against Tampa.
He’s never gone this long
without a score before.
Cincinnati: The Bengals,
who play at Pittsburgh
on Sunday, are averaging
25 points since making
Bill Lazor their offensive
coordinator in Week 3.
CHARGERS: Philip
Rivers hosts Denver on
Sunday seeking the 100th
win of his career. He has
started 182 straight
regular-season games
and has a record of 99-83.
Cleveland: Rookie Myles
Garrett leads the team
with three sacks in just
two games. The Browns,
who host Tennessee on
Sunday, have given up 16
TDs in 18 red-zone trips.
Denver: The Broncos
have won 11 of their last 14
against the Chargers,
including their season
opener on Shelby Harris’
blocked field goal.
Houston: Johnathan
Joseph was named the
AFC defensive player of
the week after defending
three Browns passes and
intercepting two more.
The Texans have a bye.
Indianapolis: T.Y. Hilton
faces Jacksonville on
Sunday needing a catch
to become the sixth Colt
with 400 receptions in his
career. He has 485 yards
on 25 catches this year.
Jacksonville: The Jags
enter Week 7 with a share
of the division lead (AFC
South) for the first time
since 1999 when they
were in the AFC Central.
Kansas City: Alex Smith
passed for 342 yards with
three touchdowns and
no interceptions, but it
wasn’t enough in the
Chiefs’ 31-30 loss to the
Raiders on Thursday.
Miami: The Dolphins are
the only team without a
rushing touchdown and
don’t have an offensive
touchdown in the first
half of a game this year,
which they’ll try to fix
Sunday against the Jets.
New England: Tight end
Rob Gronkowski heads
into Sunday’s Super
Bowl rematch against
Atlanta coming off a twotouchdown game. He has
15 career games with two
or more touchdowns.
N.Y. Jets: The Jets held
Dolphins running back
Jay Ajayi to 16 yards in
Week 3. New York ranks
28th in run defense,
giving up 138.8 yards per
game.
Oakland: Amari Cooper
had 210 yards receiving
and two touchdowns
against the Chiefs after
posting just 146 yards
and one score through
the first six games.
Pittsburgh: Three of
Antonio Brown’s four
punt return touchdowns
have come vs. Cincinnati.
He’s leading the NFL in
catches (48) and yards
receiving (700).
Tennessee: Marcus
Mariota has five
fourth-quarter comebacks in his career,
including last week’s
21-point rally to defeat
the Colts on “Monday
Night Football.”
TB at BUF ..............10
NYJ at MIA.............10
DAL at SF .................1
CIN at PIT............1:15
Hot rod Hundley
A compelling story line beginning
Sunday will be the quarterback situation in Green Bay, with former UCLA
standout Brett Hundley taking over
for injured Aaron Rodgers, who suf-
Arizona: Adrian
Peterson is making his
second trip to London
this season. He was there
with the Saints in Week 4
when he rushed for four
yards in four carries.
Atlanta: Second-year
linebacker Deion Jones
leads the Falcons with 38
tackles, a sack, an
interception and three
defended passes in five
games.
Carolina: Christian
McCaffrey leads all
running backs with 37
catches. David Mayo
could start for Luke
Kuechly (concussion),
who has been ruled out.
Chicago: Last week,
Tarik Cohen became the
first Bears rookie
running back to throw a
touchdown pass since
Hall of Famer Gale
Sayers.
Dallas: Dak Prescott can
join Tony Romo (three
times) and Don
Meredith (twice) as the
only Cowboys with three
touchdown passes in
three straight games.
Richard Heathcote Getty Images
NFL GAMES , such as the one between Oakland and Miami in 2014 at
Wembley Stadium, are attracting significant crowds to London venues.
fered a broken collarbone at Minnesota last Sunday. Hundley makes his
first career start against New Orleans
at Lambeau Field.
Rick Neuheisel recruited Hundley
to UCLA but never got a chance to
coach him as a starter because a
basketball injury sidelined Hundley as
a freshman, and Neuheisel was fired
after that season. But the coach will
never forget watching the Bruins’
opener against Rice the next season,
when Hundley ran for a 72-yard touchdown on his first play.
“I’m watching it and going, ‘Son of a
gun!’ I thought I needed to make it one
more year, and it turns out I needed to
make it one more play,” Neuheisel said.
“If the Packers incorporate the pieces
of the offense that will make it easier,
and they incorporate his legs — and it
doesn’t have to be [quarterback
Robert Griffin III] incorporate his legs
— he’s going to make plays.
“I know this about Brett Hundley: I
don’t know that he’s a great secondstring quarterback, the kind of guy
that’s engaged such to the point that
HOW THEY STAND
West
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
W L T Pct. PF PA NFC AFC Div.
RAMS
4 2 0 .667 179 138 2-2-0 2-0-0 1-1-0
Seattle
3 2 0 .600 110 87 2-1-0 1-1-0 2-0-0
Arizona
3 3 0 .500 119 158 2-3-0 1-0-0 1-0-0
San Francisco
0 6 0 .000 113 146 0-5-0 0-1-0 0-3-0
North
W L T Pct. PF PA NFC AFC Div.
Minnesota
4 2 0 .667 122 103 4-1-0 0-1-0 2-1-0
Green Bay
4 2 0 .667 147 135 3-2-0 1-0-0 1-1-0
Detroit
3 3 0 .500 161 149 3-3-0 0-0-0 1-0-0
Chicago
2 4 0 .333 105 148 0-4-0 2-0-0 0-2-0
South
W L T Pct. PF PA NFC AFC Div.
Carolina
4 2 0 .667 128 122 2-2-0 2-0-0 0-1-0
New Orleans
3 2 0 .600 145 116 2-1-0 1-1-0 1-0-0
Atlanta
3 2 0 .600 121 109 3-0-0 0-2-0 0-0-0
Tampa Bay
2 3 0 .400 118 121 2-2-0 0-1-0 0-0-0
East
W L T Pct. PF PA NFC AFC Div.
Philadelphia
5 1 0 .833 165 122 4-0-0 1-1-0 2-0-0
Washington
3 2 0 .600 117 113 2-1-0 1-1-0 0-1-0
Dallas
2 3 0 .400 125 132 2-2-0 0-1-0 1-0-0
N.Y. Giants
West
FROM A TO Z
Compiled by
MATT WILHALME
SAM FARMER
ON THE NFL
One of the reasons NFL Europe
didn’t survive is because football fans
across the pond became increasingly
discriminating as the years passed.
They wanted to see the sport played at
the highest level, so a second-tier
version didn’t cut it.
For the last decade, the NFL has
been playing regular-season games in
London, with the 20th of those taking
place Sunday when the Rams play
Arizona at Twickenham Stadium.
Although the London games have
never pitted two teams with winning
records, this one comes close. The
Rams are 4-2 and the Cardinals are 3-3.
More important, it’s a crucial game in
the NFC West, with Los Angeles looking to hold onto its division lead and
the Cardinals determined to build
momentum with just-acquired running back Adrian Peterson.
For London, playing host to a
record four games this season, it’s a
reminder of its increasing relevance in
the NFL mosaic. These aren’t just
throwaway games anymore, but sometimes key divisional matchups.
“I think the end game is to try to
build the popularity of the league over
there on a broad basis and they’ve
continued to do that,” said Rams
owner Stan Kroenke, who owns the
English Premier League club Arsenal.
“They’ve set a path, and I think they’re
doing a pretty good job of it.”
All but one of the 20 London games
sold out, and the NFL estimates its
United Kingdom fan base at 13 million.
“I think the most encouraging thing
we’ve done this year is a really improved performance on our media
consumption,” said Mark Waller, the
NFL’s executive vice president for
international. “We’re seeing really good
growth in terms of audience viewership and engagement. At the end of the
day, that’s what we’re trying to do.”
Whether that burgeoning interest
ultimately translates into an NFL push
to put a franchise in the UK remains to
be seen. There are daunting hurdles in
that regard, most significantly the
travel, scheduling and marketing
complications of putting a team across
the Atlantic.
“I think it’s premature to discuss a
permanent team,” said Steve Tisch,
co-owner of the New York Giants.
“This is still a work in progress that
seems to be working.”
Tisch said owners have not discussed staging more than the current
four games in London, but added: “If
the fan base supports it, and there
seems to be an interest in more games
being played there, that’s going to be
listened to by the league.”
SEA at NYG .........1:15
MONDAY
WAS at PHI ....... 5:30
OFF: DET, HOU.
1 5 0 .167 105 132 0-4-0 1-1-0 0-2-0
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
W L T Pct. PF PA AFC NFC Div.
Kansas City
5 2 0 .714 207 161 3-2-0 2-0-0 1-1-0
Denver
3 2 0 .600 108 97 2-1-0 1-1-0 2-0-0
Oakland
3 4 0 .429 155 156 3-3-0 0-1-0 1-2-0
CHARGERS
2 4 0 .333 116 131 1-3-0 1-1-0 1-2-0
North
W L T Pct. PF PA AFC NFC Div.
Pittsburgh
4 2 0 .667 118 102 3-1-0 1-1-0 2-0-0
Baltimore
3 3 0 .500 114 124 3-2-0 0-1-0 2-1-0
Cincinnati
2 3 0 .400 84 83 2-2-0 0-1-0 1-1-0
Cleveland
0 6 0 .000 94 157 0-6-0 0-0-0 0-3-0
South
W L T Pct. PF PA AFC NFC Div.
Tennessee
3 3 0 .500 146 164 2-3-0 1-0-0 2-1-0
Jacksonville
3 3 0 .500 156 110 3-2-0 0-1-0 1-1-0
Houston
3 3 0 .500 177 147 3-3-0 0-0-0 1-1-0
Indianapolis
2 4 0 .333 119 195 1-1-0 1-3-0 0-1-0
East
W L T Pct. PF PA AFC NFC Div.
New England
4 2 0 .667 172 159 2-1-0 2-1-0 1-0-0
Buffalo
3 2 0 .600 89 74 2-1-0 1-1-0 1-0-0
Miami
3 2 0 .600 61 84 2-1-0 1-1-0 0-1-0
N.Y. Jets
3 3 0 .500 109 130 3-3-0 0-0-0 1-2-0
he’s learning vicariously as much as
someone else would because he needs
to be in there. But I do know that when
he’s in there, he can flat play. … It’s
never going to be too big for him.”
Incidentally, former UCLA running
back Johnathan Franklin, who works
in community affairs for the Rams,
remembers something else about that
72-yard touchdown run: The ball was
supposed to go to him.
“Brett was like a little brother to me,
and throughout practice that week he
was nervous,” Franklin said. “He was
like, ‘Listen, I’m not keeping the ball.
I’m going to give it to you.’ The first
play comes up and he keeps the ball,
and I’m like, ‘The jitters done got the
best of you, huh, Brett?’ ”
Recalled Franklin with a laugh: “I
was like, ‘What are you doing, Brett?’
That’s the first thing I asked him when
he scored. I didn’t say congratulations.
I was like, ‘You were supposed to give
me the ball!’ ”
sam.farmer@latimes.com
Twitter: @LATimesfarmer
ASK SAM FARMER ...
Have a question about the NFL?
Ask Times NFL writer Sam Farmer,
and he will answer as many as he can
online and in the Sunday editions of
the newspaper throughout the
season. Email questions to:
sam.farmer@latimes.com
In setting up for a field goal or extra
point, must the offensive team have
the kick attempted exactly seven
yards behind the line of scrimmage? Or instead, could the kick be
attempted from eight, nine, etc.,
yards back?
Phil Weiss
Studio City
Farmer: For this, I called former
NFL kicker Michael Husted who
now coaches the discipline in San
Diego. He points out that the ball is
actually held eight yards back in the
NFL, and typically between seven
and 71⁄2 in college. The distance is a
rule of thumb, and not mandated.
There are a few factors in play, and
even the slightest of adjustments
can mean the difference between a
made kick and one that’s deflected
or blocked.
First, there’s the timing of the
snap-to-kick operation. If executed
correctly, that should take between
1.25 and 1.28 seconds. Moving the ball
back a yard would compromise that
because it would have to fly through
the air fractionally longer.
Then, you have to worry about
the defenders crashing in from the
ends and getting inside the blocker
on the end. That’s how Kansas City
got a hand on Oakland’s long field
goal try Thursday night. Eight yards
back creates a somewhat acute
angle for those rushers, making it
slightly more laborious to start
upfield then beat a blocker on the
edge. Were the kick back another
yard, that would be a fractionally
more gradual angle and therefore
easier to block the kick.
Finally, the kicker has to get the
ball up quickly to clear those towering linemen — both his own and
defensive ones with arms raised.
Move the hold in closer and that
angle becomes much more extreme.
“What a team will do if they bring
you in for a workout in the NFL is
they’ll put you through a crossbar
drill,” Husted said. “They’ll put you
five yards away from the goal post
and see if you have the trajectory to
clear that. You’ll be kicking from the
middle of the end zone. If you can do
that, they’re not too worried about
you getting the ball up and over the
line.”
::
A defensive player will be penalized
for any action that results in hitting
an opponent’s helmet or facemask.
So why can a running back can
viciously stiff-arm a defender in the
same area legally?
Marc Schwartz
Indio
Farmer: The stiff-arm rules are the
same for a runner and a tackler, and
for linemen on offense and defense.
They all can use their open hands on
an opponent’s facemask, as long as
that facemask isn’t grasped, twisted
or pulled. But straight stiff-arms are
legal, and the rules should be equally
applied. Officials clamp down on
defenders going to the facemask of
receivers coming off the line, so
sometimes there is disparity there,
but theoretically, all must adhere to
the same standards.
Detroit: No quarterback
has been sacked more
than Matthew Stafford
(23). Still, he’s managed
the 10th-most yards
(1,428) and the
sixth-most TDs (12).
Green Bay: Brett
Hundley will become the
first player not named
Aaron Rodgers (broken
collarbone) to start for
the Packers since Matt
Flynn in December 2013.
Minnesota: Teddy
Bridgewater returned to
practice this week for the
first time in 14 months
after dislocating his knee
and tearing the ACL and
other ligaments.
New Orleans: The
Saints have allowed a
league-low four sacks of
Drew Brees. New
Orleans is tied for fourth
in turnover differential
(plus-six).
N.Y. Giants: Eli Manning
attempted 19 passes last
week against Denver, his
lowest total in a full
regular-season game
since he had 15 at Buffalo
in December 2007.
Philadelphia: The
Eagles have scored more
than 20 points in 10
consecutive games. They
also lead the league in
third-down conversions
(50.6%).
RAMS: The Rams have
split their last 10 games
against the Cardinals,
with the visiting team
winning the last five
matchups. L.A. is the
“home team” in London.
San Francisco: Rookie
quarterback C.J. Beathard is set to make his first
start after going 19 for 36
for 245 yards with one
touchdown in relief of
Brian Hoyer last week.
Seattle: Safety Earl
Thomas had seven
tackles, a forced fumble
and interception in his
last game. He’s had an
interception in three
straight vs. the Giants.
Tampa Bay: Jameis
Winston (shoulder) is
supposed to start, but if
not Ryan Fitzpatrick will
go against Buffalo, where
he spent his first four
seasons.
Washington: Running
back Chris Thompson is
the only player in NFL to
lead his team in yards
rushing (175) and yards
receiving (340). He has
four touchdowns.
D6
S U N DAY, O C T O B E R 22 , 2 017
S
L AT I M E S . C O M / S P O RTS
NFL: WEEK 7
HOW THEY MATCH UP
RAMS
(4-2)
VS. ARIZONA
(3-3) at London
When Rams have the ball
Running back Todd Gurley appears to have recaptured
some of the form that made him the NFL’s offensive
rookie of the year in 2015. After failing to rush for more
than 100 yards in a game in 2016, Gurley has done it three
times in the last four games. Gurley ranks fourth in the
NFL with 521 yards rushing. Last week against the Jacksonville Jaguars, he gained 116 yards in 23 carries. He also
is the Rams’ leading receiver with 23 catches, three for
touchdowns. Quarterback Jared Goff has, of late, struggled to amass passing yardage or touchdown passes. But
as long as he does not commit turnovers, the Rams can
win. Goff is completing 60% of his passes, eight for touchdowns, with three interceptions. He has been sacked
only nine times. In a 27-17 victory over the Jaguars, Goff
completed 11 of 21 passes for 124 yards and a short touchdown on a shovel pass to tight end Gerald Everett. Goff is
still working to connect consistently with receiver
Sammy Watkins. The Cardinals feature linebackers
Chandler Jones, Deone Bucannon, Karlos Dansby and
Hassan Reddick. Cornerback Patrick Peterson and
safety Tyrann Mathieu lead the secondary. Safety Antoine Bethea has three of the Cardinals’ six interceptions.
When Cardinals have the ball
An offense that was struggling without injured running
back David Johnson got a lift from the trade for future
Hall of Famer Adrian Peterson. In his Cardinals debut
last week, the 32-year-old Peterson rushed for 134 yards
and two touchdowns in 26 carries against Tampa Bay.
Quarterback Carson Palmer, in his 15th NFL season, is
completing 62% of his passes, nine for touchdowns, with
six interceptions. Receiver Larry Fitzgerald has a teambest 42 catches for 465 yards and three touchdowns.
Running back Andre Ellington has 28 receptions, but he
did not practice Thursday or Friday because of a quadriceps injury. Rams defensive lineman Aaron Donald and
his teammates have to be looking forward to facing a
Cardinals line that has allowed 21 sacks, third most in the
NFL. Any rust that Donald accrued during his training
camp holdout is gone. Against the Jaguars, he recorded a
sack, three quarterback hits and forced a fumble. Linebacker Connor Barwin also enjoyed his most productive
game. He made seven tackles, recorded a sack and four
tackles for losses. Linebacker Mark Barron, the Rams’
leading tackler, is nursing a thumb injury. Safety Lamarcus Joyner, who was sidelined the last three games because of a hamstring injury, is on track to start against
the Cardinals.
Phelan M. Ebenhack Associated Press
JARED GOFF COMPLETED 11 of 21 passes for 124 yards against the Jaguars last week, all lows for season.
When they kick
Plenty of scoring, but
not that much offense
The Rams’ Pharoh Cooper was named NFC special
teams player of the week after returning a kickoff 103
yards for a touchdown against Jacksonville. It was Cooper’s first NFL touchdown, and the first kick return for a
touchdown by a Rams player since 2005. Cooper is averaging a league-best 31.7 yards per return. He also returns
punts. Greg Zuerlein has made 17 of 18 field-goal attempts. The Cardinals’ Kerwynn Williams averages 20.3
yards per kickoff return, which ranks eighth in the NFL.
Phil Dawson has made 10 of 14 field-goal attempts.
Gary Klein’s prediction
Many Rams players got used to traveling and playing in
London last season. The Cardinals are journeying across
the Atlantic for the first time. This is a case where experience will pay off for the Rams.
RAMS 24, CARDINALS 21
That’s the conundrum facing the Rams, who haven’t been clicking
with the ball and now must stop a rejuvenated Peterson in London
By Gary Klein
WHERE THEY RANK
LONDON — From a marketing perspective, the NFL
has lucked into a good scenario.
Fans expected to pack
London’s Twickenham Stadium on Sunday will see a
Rams team that leads the
league in scoring against a
Cardinals team that features future Hall of Famers
Adrian Peterson and Larry
Fitzgerald.
That is, arguably, quality
global entertainment.
But even though the
Rams might be averaging a
league-best 29.8 points a
game, coach Sean McVay’s
offense has, of late, not been
part of the show — at least
when it comes to reaching
the end zone.
Consider:
8 The Rams scored only
one touchdown in a loss to
the Seattle Seahawks on
Oct. 8.
8 Kicker Greg Zuerlein
kicked a team-record seven
field goals in a 35-30 victory
at Dallas on Oct. 1.
8 The kickoff-return and
punt-block units combined
with Zuerlein to score 20
points in last week’s 27-20
victory at Jacksonville.
8 The defense, which
scored two touchdowns in
the season-opening victory
over Indianapolis, and special teams units should be
celebrated as effective weapons that have helped the
Rams forge a 4-2 record going into their NFC West
“home” game against the
Cardinals.
How Rams and Cardinals offenses and defenses
compare statistically, with per-game averages:
POINTS SCORED
POINTS ALLOWED
RAMS
CARDINALS
POINTS ALLOWED
POINTS SCORED
RAMS
CARDINALS
TOTAL OFFENSE
TOTAL DEFENSE
RAMS
CARDINALS
PASS OFFENSE
PASS DEFENSE
RAMS
CARDINALS
RUSH OFFENSE
RUSH DEFENSE
RAMS
CARDINALS
TOTAL DEFENSE
TOTAL OFFENSE
RAMS
CARDINALS
29.8 (1)
26.3 (28)
23.0 (T19)
19.8 (16T)
359.8 (8)
340.7 (22)
243.8 (10)
250.0 (25)
116.0 (13)
90.7 (9)
350.2 (23)
356.0 (10T)
PASS DEFENSE
PASS OFFENSE
RAMS
CARDINALS
RUSH DEFENSE
RUSH OFFENSE
RAMS
CARDINALS
210.7 (13)
286.2 (3)
139.5 (29)
69.8 (32)
Injury report
Final injury reports for today’s games in Week 7 of the NFL
schedule were submitted to the league Friday:
CARDINALS: QUESTIONABLE — Linebacker Karlos Dansby
(hamstring), running back Andre Ellington (quadriceps),
defensive tackle Robert Nkemdiche (calf), defensive tackle
Olsen Pierre (ankle), defensive tackle Xavier Williams (knee).
RAMS: DOUBTFUL — Safety Cody Davis (thigh).
QUESTIONABLE — Linebacker Mark Barron (thumb).
But the offense’s inability
to score touchdowns in the
last three games is cause for
concern.
The Rams’ offense has
scored 18 touchdowns, tied
for sixth in the league. However, quarterback Jared Goff
has directed drives that resulted in touchdowns only
four times in the last three
games.
Running back Todd Gurley scored six touchdowns in
the first three games, only
one in the last three. And receiver Robert Woods, the
team’s second-leading receiver with 22 catches, has
yet to score.
McVay, the play caller,
said he must do better to put
his players in the right positions. The players must execute.
“It’s
about
scoring
points,” McVay said. “We’ve
got to do a better job offensively of producing touchdowns, and you know, we’ll
see if we can do that on Sunday.”
Goff completed 11 of 21
passes for 124 yards against
Jacksonville, all season lows.
The offense scored its only
touchdown on a four-yard
shovel pass from Goff to
tight end Gerald Everett.
Goff did not throw an interception, which has been a
part of the Rams’ winning
formula in all of their victories.
But McVay would like to
see improvement after evaluating Goff against the Jaguars.
“There was a couple
times where … he’s got to
make better decisions with
the football, or go where the
coverage dictates based on
his progression,” McVay
said.
Goff failed to connect on
deep passes to receiver
Sammy
Watkins,
who
scored two touchdowns in
Week 3 against San Francisco but has only two receptions in the last three games.
“We’ve done it before,”
Goff said of completing long
passes to Watkins. “I don’t
think we need to start
changing anything.”
Watkins’ frustration with
his role came through in social media a few weeks ago.
But the fourth-year pro said
this week that he was happy
to leave it in the hands of the
coaches.
“A couple weeks, my
mind was wrapped up into
it,” he said, “and it’s not good
for a player to be worried
about targets, or how many
targets you get.”
Less than two weeks ago,
the Rams thought they
would be playing a Cardinals
team devoid of a major backfield threat. Star David
Johnson suffered a Week 1
wrist injury, and the Cardinals had not found an effective replacement.
But nine days after
Peterson rushed for only
four yards for the New Orleans Saints in a game in London, the Cardinals traded
for the 32-year-old running
back.
Peterson rushed for 134
yards and two touchdowns
in last week’s victory over
Tampa Bay. He gave the
Cardinals “a bunch of juice,”
McVay said.
“He can go through you;
he can make you miss,”
McVay said.
There is a reason
Peterson’s nickname is “All
Day,” Rams defensive lineman Michael Brockers said.
Brockers was a rookie in 2012
when Peterson rushed for
212 yards for the Minnesota
Vikings against the St. Louis
Rams.
“He can give it to you all
day,” Brockers said. “If you
let him go, he can have 293
yards. … Man, we just have to
get him before he gets
started.”
gary.klein@latimes.com
Twitter @latimesklein
RAMS SCHEDULE
WEEK 1
WEEK 2
WEEK3
WEEK 4
WEEK 5
WEEK 6
WEEK 7
WEEK 8
WEEK 9
WEEK 10
WEEK 11
WEEK 12
WEEK 13
WEEK 14
WEEK 15
WEEK 16
WEEK 17
Sept. 10
Sept. 17
Sept. 21
Oct. 1
Oct. 8
Oct. 15
Today
Oct. 29
Nov. 5
Nov. 12
Nov. 19
Nov. 26
Dec. 3
Dec. 10
Dec. 17
Dec. 24
Dec. 31
LAR
46
IND
9
WAS
27
LAR
20
LAR
41
SF
39
LAR
35
DAL
30
SEA
16
LAR
10
LAR
27
JAC
17
(London)
ARI
10 a.m.
OFF
AT
NYG
10 a.m.
VS.
HOU
1 p.m.
AT
MIN
10 a.m.
VS.
NO
1 p.m.
AT
ARI
1:15 p.m.
VS.
PHI
1:15 p.m.
AT
SEA
1 p.m.
AT
TEN
10 a.m.
VS.
SF
1:15 p.m.
Win
1-0
H: 1-0
Loss
1-1
H: 1-1
Win
2-1
A: 1-0
Win
3-1
A: 2-0
Loss
3-2
H: 1-2
Win
4-2
A: 3-0
TV:
Ch. 11
Radio:
710
TV:
Ch. 2
Radio:
710
TV:
Ch. 11
Radio:
710
TV:
Ch. 11
Radio:
710
TV:
Ch. 11
Radio:
710
TV:
Ch. 11
Radio:
710
TV:
Ch. 11
Radio:
710
TV:
Ch. 11
Radio:
710
TV:
Ch. 11
Radio:
710
TV:
Ch. 11
Radio:
710
L AT I M E S . C O M / S P O RT S
S
S U N DAY, O C T O B E R 22 , 2 017
D7
NFL: WEEK 7
HOW THEY MATCH UP
CHARGERS
(2-4)
VS. DENVER
(3-2)
When Chargers have the ball
Teams spend a lot of time talking about “identity,” and
this Chargers team spent nearly two months trying to
find it. In wins over the New York Giants and the Oakland Raiders, the Chargers relied heavily on running
back Melvin Gordon. The results? Sixty touches, 313
yards gained and four touchdowns. It’s come with a cost,
though, as Gordon found himself limited in practice all
week because of a sore shoulder. Assuming he plays, the
Chargers also could use productive games from Branden
Oliver and Austin Ekeler. Another piece of the puzzle in
the victories has been Hunter Henry, who has been targeted 15 times in the last two games. Henry is a matchup
problem against any defense, and with Keenan Allen
questionable (shoulder), the tight end could be an even
bigger factor in the game plan. If Allen can’t play, the
Chargers will look to rookie Mike Williams, who will play
in his second NFL game, to make more of his opportunities. He caught the only ball thrown his way last week,
and he’ll see his workload doubled against the Broncos.
Denver’s got the best defense in the league, though, with
a top-notch secondary and an elite pass rusher in Von
Miller.
When Broncos have the ball
In the season opener, Denver quarterback Trevor
Siemian was sacked four times by the Chargers, but he
didn’t let the physicality force him into too many bad
decisions. Since that game, he’s had a couple of twointerception games, both losses. Edge rushers Joey Bosa
and Melvin Ingram will try to hit Siemian and force him
into bad throws. The Denver offense will be without a
handful of receivers, most notably Emmanuel Sanders,
and the Broncos are banged up on the offensive line.
Running back C.J. Anderson is coming off a putrid game
against the Giants, but the Chargers’ porous run defense
should allow for a bounce-back performance. With Chargers defensive tackle Corey Liuget bothered by back
issues, reserve tackle (and solid run defender) Darius
Philon could have a big impact on the outcome. Denver
might try to attack the Chargers’ linebackers through
the air, and tight end Virgil Green could be an X-factor.
Denver’s struggled on offense the last three weeks, while
the Chargers defense is trending in a positive direction.
When they kick
Chargers coach Anthony Lynn showed a lot of confidence in Nick Novak in Oakland, letting the veteran
kicker win the game with a short field goal as time expired. Novak missed earlier in the game, though, and the
inability to count on a kicker from 40 yards or deeper
should eventually catch up with the Chargers. It’s a
problem the Broncos are having as well, with Brandon
McManus missing all but one of his four tries from 40
yards or more. With parity throughout much of the
league, figure most games will be close, making the kicking game even more important.
Jae C. Hong Associated Press
“I REALLY NEVER rely on too much information,” says Chargers defensive end Joey Bosa, shown taking on
Kansas City’s Bryan Witzmann earlier this season. Bosa prefers playing freely with a limited set of worries.
TMI can be too much
of a burden vs. Denver
Dan Woike’s prediction
We’re now in the third week of me vowing I wouldn’t talk
myself into picking the Chargers after they started 0-4.
Yet this seems like a winnable game. The Chargers are
home, they’ve built momentum and they’ve got the
better quarterback. Defensively, they’ve been bending
like a yogi and the Broncos are really banged up, especially on offense. Bosa and Ingram should feast. It’s all
lining up for a third straight win, but a man is nothing if
his word means nothing.
BRONCOS 20, CHARGERS 17
Game preparation is always crucial for players, but when Chargers face
a familiar opponent, ‘overthinking things’ can become overwhelming
WHERE THEY RANK
By Dan Woike
How Chargers and Broncos offenses and defenses
compare statistically, with per-game averages:
POINTS SCORED
POINTS ALLOWED
CHARGERS
BRONCOS
POINTS ALLOWED
POINTS SCORED
CHARGERS
BRONCOS
TOTAL OFFENSE
TOTAL DEFENSE
CHARGERS
BRONCOS
PASS OFFENSE
PASS DEFENSE
CHARGERS
BRONCOS
RUSH OFFENSE
RUSH DEFENSE
CHARGERS
BRONCOS
TOTAL DEFENSE
TOTAL OFFENSE
CHARGERS
BRONCOS
19.3 (23)
Injury report
Chargers defensive end
Joey Bosa isn’t worried
about route tendencies. He’s
not concerned with whether
the quarterback throws the
football to the left side of the
field or the right side of the
field.
Bosa gets to play free —
and free means fast.
In the second quarter of
the Chargers’ game with
Oakland last Sunday, Bosa
had no other concern than
beating Raiders right tackle
Marshall Newhouse.
With two hands on the
turf, he exploded into the
backfield, pressing two
hands into Newhouse’s
chest before getting a paw on
the football, which Oakland
quarterback Derek Carr had
exposed.
From snap to sack, 2.25
seconds elapsed. According
to the NFL, it was the fastest
sack of the season.
“I don’t worry about
scheme,” he said.
That Bosa’s voice is commonly compared to that of
Sean Penn’s character in
“Fast Times at Ridgemont
High,” Jeff Spicoli, only
makes him sound even more
carefree.
There’s a lesson to be
learned in Bosa’s limited set
of worries. Too much information can paralyze a
coaching staff, it can freeze a
football player and it can
make playing fast a near impossibility.
19.4 (8)
21.8 (16)
21.6 (16)
345.2 (14)
261.8 (1)
266.2 (4)
191.6 (6)
79.0 (31)
70.2 (2)
338.5 (18)
355.4 (12)
PASS DEFENSE
PASS OFFENSE
CHARGERS
BRONCOS
186.0 (4)
231.8 (14)
RUSH DEFENSE
RUSH OFFENSE
CHARGERS
BRONCOS
152.5 (32)
123.6 (9)
Final injury reports for Sunday’s games in Week 7 of the NFL
schedule were submitted to the league Friday:
BRONCOS: OUT — Wide receiver Cody Latimer (knee),
quarterback Paxton Lynch (right shoulder), wide receiver
Isaiah McKenzie (ankle), linebacker Corey Nelson (elbow),
wide receiver Emmanuel Sanders (ankle), tackle Donald
Stephenson (calf), tackle Menelik Watson (calf).
CHARGERS: QUESTIONABLE — Wide receiver Keenan Allen
(shoulder), tackle Joe Barksdale (foot), running back Melvin
Gordon (shoulder), defensive tackle Corey Liuget (back),
safety Adrian Phillips (neck, concussion).
It’s something teams
deal with every week, but
Sunday against the Denver
Broncos, it’s a bigger deal
than usual.
The teams are divisional
opponents. The personnel is
largely unchanged from past
years, and just six weeks ago,
they played each other in
Denver.
“They know you well. It’s
only been five weeks since we
played them. It’s a team and
a defense that, they play
their scheme. They believe
in it. And they’re really,
really good at it,” Chargers
quarterback Philip Rivers
said. “It’s not, let’s turn on
the tape from five weeks ago
and going, ‘Gosh, they’re doing a lot of things different.’
They’re doing what they’ve
done, and they do it well.”
Sunday will be the 25th
time in Rivers’ career that
he’s played against the
Broncos — the most he’s
faced any opponent in his
career. “You get in on Monday morning, and you can
write up every player on the
defense and you know what
they play — here’s their top
coverage, there’s this — before you even look at a tape,”
Rivers said. “And they can
do the same for us.”
It can spiral out of control. Here’s Rivers trying to
explain it: “You can almost
get to where you overthink
things,” he said. “You overthink, well, they know that
we know this about them,
and we know they know this,
so maybe we need to do this.”
You start, in a sense trying to counter moves three,
four, five counters down the
road to the point where you
get overwhelmed.
“You can get to where you
overthink things,” Rivers
said. “It’s [got to be] like, ‘No,
we’re going to trust what we
do.’ ”
While it’s best for the
players to keep a narrow fo-
cus, coaches in divisional
games get to flex their creative muscles, using the familiarity the players have
with one another as an advantage.
“Both sides will have
some wrinkles to throw everyone off the scent,” Denver
coach Vance Joseph said.
“That’s what happens in divisional games.”
Sunday will be a test for
Joseph and Chargers coach
Anthony Lynn — the first
time in both of their careers
they’ll see a divisional opponent twice in the regular season.
They’ve spent the week
scouring the scouting material available, talking to the
players who know their AFC
West rival best, trying to find
the right tendency to deviate
from and the right one to
stick with.
But on the first thirdand-long of the game, when
Denver’s Trevor Siemian is
back to pass, No. 99 in the
powder blue jersey won’t be
thinking that Siemian is
more likely to throw it left
against the Chargers than
right or that he might try to
go underneath against the
Chargers’ cover-3 defense.
Nah, Bosa will just be trying to hit the quarterback
hard.
It’s easier that way.
“I really never rely on too
much information,” Bosa
said.
dan.woike@latimes.com
Twitter: @DanWoikeSports
CHARGERS SCHEDULE
WEEK 1
WEEK 2
WEEK 3
WEEK 4
WEEK 5
WEEK 6
WEEK 7
WEEK 8
WEEK 9
WEEK 10
WEEK 11
WEEK 12
WEEK 13
WEEK 14
WEEK 15
WEEK 16
WEEK 17
Sept. 11
Sept. 17
Sept. 24
Oct. 1
Oct. 8
Oct. 15
Today
Oct. 29
Nov. 5
Nov. 12
Nov. 19
Nov. 23
Dec. 3
Dec. 10
Dec. 16
Dec. 24
Dec. 31
DEN
24
LAC
21
MIA
19
LAC
17
KC
24
LAC
10
PHI
26
LAC
24
LAC
27
NYG
22
LAC
17
OAK
16
VS.
DEN
1:15 p.m.
AT
NE
10 a.m.
OFF
AT
JAC
10 a.m.
VS.
BUF
1 p.m.
AT
DAL
1 :30 p.m.
VS.
CLE
1 p.m.
VS.
WAS
1 p.m.
AT
KC
5:15 p.m.
AT
NYJ
10 a.m.
VS.
OAK
1:15 p.m.
Loss
0-1
A: 0-1
Loss
0-2
H: 0-1
Loss
0-3
H: 0-2
Loss
0-4
H: 0-3
Win
1-4
A: 1-1
Win
2-4
A: 2-1
TV:
Ch. 2
Radio:
640
TV:
Ch. 2
Radio:
640
TV:
Ch. 2
Radio:
640
TV:
Ch. 11
Radio:
640
TV:
Ch. 2
Radio:
640
TV:
Ch. 2
Radio:
640
TV:
Ch. 2
Radio:
640
TV:
NFL
Radio:
640
TV:
Ch. 2
Radio:
640
TV:
Ch.2
Radio:
640
D8
S U N DAY , O C T O B E R 22, 2 017
SS
L AT I M E S . C O M / S P O RT S
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
SPOTLIGHT
THE AP TOP 25
White = win | Black = loss | Gray = off
1
Alabama
8-0
8 Def. Tennessee, 45-7
8 Nov. 4 vs. No. 24 Louisiana State
2
Penn State
7-0
8 Def. No. 19 Michigan, 42-13
8 Saturday at No. 6 Ohio State
3
Georgia
7-0
8 Did not play
8 Saturday vs. Florida
4
Tex. Christian
7-0
8 Def. Kansas, 43-0
8 Saturday at Iowa State
5
Wisconsin
7-0
8 Def. Maryland, 38-13
8 Saturday at Illinois
6
Ohio State
6-1
8 Did not play
8 Saturday vs. No. 2 Penn State
7
Clemson
6-1
8 Did not play
8 Saturday vs. Georgia Tech
8
Miami
6-0
8 Def. Syracuse, 27-19
8 Saturday at North Carolina
9
Oklahoma
6-1
8 Def. Kansas State, 42-35
8 Saturday vs. Texas Tech
10 Oklahoma St.
6-1
8 Def. Texas, 13-10 (OT)
8 Saturday at No. 23 West Virginia
11 USC
6-2
8 Lost to No. 13 Notre Dame, 49-14
8 Saturday at Arizona State
12 Washington
6-1
8 Did not play
8 Saturday vs. UCLA
13 Notre Dame
6-1
8 Def. No. 11 USC, 49-14
8 Saturday vs. No. 16 N. Carolina St.
14 Virginia Tech
6-1
8 Def. North Carolina, 59-7
8 Saturday vs. Duke
15 Washington St. 7-1
8 Def. Colorado, 28-0
8 Saturday at Arizona
16 N. Carolina St. 6-1
8 Did not play
8 Saturday at No. 13 Notre Dame
16 South Florida
7-0
8 Def. Tulane, 34-28
8 Saturday vs. Houston
18 Michigan State 6-1
8 Def. Indiana, 17-9
8 Saturday at Northwestern
19 Michigan
5-2
8 Lost to No. 2 Penn State, 42-13
8 Saturday vs. Rutgers
20 Cent. Florida
6-0
8 Def. Navy, 31-21
8 Saturday vs. Austin Peay
21 Auburn
6-2
8 Def. Arkansas, 52-20
8 Nov. 4 at Texas A&M
22 Stanford
5-2
8 Did not play
8 Thursday at Oregon State
23 West Virginia
5-2
8 Def. Baylor, 38-36
8 Saturday vs. No. 10 Oklahoma State
24 Louisiana St.
6-2
8 Def. Mississippi, 40-24
8 Nov. 4 at No. 1 Alabama
25 Memphis
6-1
8 Def. Houston, 42-38, Thursday
8 Friday vs. Tulane
SOUTHLAND
UCLA 31, Oregon 14
Notre Dame 49, USC 14
Fresno St. 27, San Diego St. 3
Sacramento State 34, North Dakota 27
San Diego 63, Jacksonville 10
Chapman 38, La Verne 21
Redlands 42, Claremont-Mudd 25
Cal Lutheran 60, Whittier 34
Azusa Pacific 61, Simon Fraser 0
WEST
Utah St. 52, Nevada Las Vegas 28
N. Arizona 45, UC Davis 31
Arizona 45, California 44, 2OT
Weber St. 17, Cal Poly 3
Washington St. 28, Colorado 0
C. Washington 17, North Alabama 10
Linfield 12, George Fox 6
Pacific Lutheran 27, Willamette 14
S. Oregon 36, Coll. of Idaho 7
Whitworth 38, Puget Sound 23
EAST
Allegheny 44, Kenyon 35
Amherst 23, Wesleyan (Conn.) 19
Anna Maria 36, Alfred St. 34
Army 31, Temple 28, OT
Assumption 41, New Haven 6
Bloomsburg 38, East Stroudsburg 28
Brockport 45, Hartwick 0
Bucknell 13, Lafayette 7, OT
CCSU 31, Bryant 14
California (Pa.) 38, Gannon 35
Carnegie-Mellon 42, Thiel 10
Case Reserve 45, Geneva 7
Castleton 17, Dean 14
Colgate 45, Holy Cross 7
Columbia 22, Dartmouth 17
Concord 31, UNC-Pembroke 22
Cornell 34, Brown 7
Cortland St. 34, Morrisville St. 20
Curry 46, Nichols 16
Delaware 42, Richmond 35, 2OT
Drake 19, Marist 14
Duquesne 24, St. Francis (Pa.) 7
Edinboro 49, Slippery Rock 39
Elon 35, Rhode Island 34
FDU-Florham 49, Wilkes 31
Hall channels Pitt greats
as he runs wild on Duke
By Chris Foster
Pittsburgh running back Darrin Hall
seemed to be channeling Tony Dorsett on
Saturday … or was it George McLaren? He
certainly had the look of those two former
Panthers running backs, who are both in the
College Football Hall of Fame.
Hall, a junior, rushed for 254 yards, including touchdown runs of 79, 92 and four
yards to rally the Panthers in a 24-17 victory
over Duke. His 92-yard run cut Duke’s lead to
17-14 in the third quarter.
It also broke McLaren’s school record set
a century ago, almost to the day. McLaren
broke loose on a 91-yard run against Syracuse on Oct. 20, 1917.
That undefeated Pittsburgh team was
called “The Fighting Dentists” because of
the number of dental students in the lineup,
including McLaren. Getting this Pittsburgh
team to run the ball has been like pulling
teeth for coach Pat Narduzzi.
The Panthers’ run game ranked 112th in
the nation, averaging 113 yards per game, before Saturday’s game.
“We talked, the key to victory was being
able to run the football,” Narduzzi told reporters postgame. “And I think we proved we
can do that.”
Hall did, though he seemed like an unlikely solution. Hall, starting for the second
consecutive week, had 108 yards rushing
through the first seven games. Duke, meanwhile, ranked 16th against the run, allowing
108 yards per game.
Hall, though, announced his presence by
bolting 79 yards in the first quarter. His fouryard touchdown run gave Pittsburgh a 21-17
lead with 10 minutes left. The Panthers added a field goal to pick up their first Atlantic
Coast Conference victory.
“If he’s not the ACC player of the week on
offense or the back of the week, I don’t know
what’s going on,” Narduzzi said.
Hall, though, came up short on Dorsett’s
single-game school record. Dorsett had 303
yards against Notre Dame in 1975.
Lion kings
The most intriguing thing about Columbia football isn’t that NFL Hall of Famer Sid
Luckman played for the Lions, but that beat
writer Jack Kerouac was a running back at
the university for two seasons.
Kerouac quit the team in 1942, according
to his autobiographical novel “Visions of
Cody,” saying, “I’m gonna sit here in this
room and dig Beethoven, I’m gonna write noble words.”
But a new generation — one without
“beat” attached — of Columbia football has
emerged. The Lions went on the road Saturday and returned alone atop the Ivy
League standings after holding off previously undefeated Dartmouth 22-17.
The Lions led 22-7 in the second half, but
the defense stopped Dartmouth inside the
10-yard line twice in the final three minutes.
When Mike Hinton sacked Dartmouth
quarterback Jack Heneghan with 17 seconds
left, Columbia was 6-0 overall — its best start
since going 7-0 in1932 — and 3-0 in Ivy League
play.
This is new territory for Columbia, once
college football’s Dharma Bums. Even people at the school saw it as a joke. During the
Lions’ 44-game losing streak in the 1980s, the
school band would play the Mickey Mouse
theme instead of the fight song when the
team took the field. To prove that streak
wasn’t a fluke, the Lions lost 24 consecutive
games from 2012-15.
Fortunes changed when Al Bagnoli was
lured out of retirement in 2015. Bagnoli won
nine Ivy League championships as Penn’s
coach.
He has the Lions on track for only their
seventh winning season since 1950. A league
title would be the school’s second in 147 years
of football. The Lions won the Ivy League in
1961.
At the center of the new-found success —
or rather under center — is quarterback Anders Hill. He completed 27 of 35 passes for
298 yards and one touchdown in the Dartmouth victory, putting together the biggest
drives to come out of Columbia since Sal Paradise and Dean Moriarty.
Taylor made
What would Wisconsin be without a hammer at running back? Freshman Jonathan
Fairmont St. 18, Glenville St. 15
Fordham 17, Georgetown 9
Framingham St. 29, Westfield St. 14
Franklin & Marshall 56, Dickinson 0
Hamilton 27, Colby 24
Indiana (Pa.) 23, Clarion 17
Ithaca 35, St. John Fisher 10
Kean 26, College of NJ 3
Kutztown 55, Lock Haven 26
LIU Post 70, American International 21
Lebanon Valley 17, Misericordia 0
MIT 30, Coast Guard 21
Maine 12, Albany (NY) 10
Mercyhurst 35, Seton Hill 16
Middlebury 43, Bates 14
Monmouth (NJ) 56, Liberty 39
Moravian 20, Juniata 17
N.Y. Maritime 21, Mount Ida 13
New Hampshire 40, Towson 17
Norwich 24, Maine Maritime 22
Ohio Dominican 53, Alderson-Broaddus 13
Penn St. 42, Michigan 13
Plymouth St. 40, Mass. Maritime 14
RPI 30, Alfred 15
Rutgers 14, Purdue 12
S. Connecticut 28, Merrimack 9
Sacred Heart 21, Robert Morris 14
Salve Regina 41, Endicott 14
Shepherd 48, Urbana 14
Shippensburg 51, Millersville 14
Springfield 68, Catholic 20
St. Anselm 35, Pace 34
St. Lawrence 36, Rochester 14
Stonehill 41, Bentley 35, OT
Susquehanna 21, Ursinus 14
Trinity (Conn.) 63, Bowdoin 14
Tufts 21, Williams 13
Central Florida 31, Navy 21
Connecticut 20, Tulsa 14
Massachusetts 55, Georgia Southern 20
Union (NY) 28, Hobart 23
Utica 34, Buffalo St. 12
Virginia St. 73, Lincoln (Pa.) 21
W. Connecticut 27, Bridgewater (Mass.) 20
W. New England 45, Becker 0
W. Virginia St. 39, West Liberty 33, OT
WPI 41, Merchant Marine 7
Washington & Jeff. 34, Westminster (Pa.) 33, OT
West Chester 55, Cheyney 6
Worcester St. 45, Mass.-Dartmouth 40
Yale 24, Penn 19
SOUTH
Alabama 45, Tennessee 7
Appalachian St. 37, Coastal Carolina 29
Austin Peay 38, SE Missouri 31
Benedict 29, Morehouse 26
Berry 37, Millsaps 22
Bluefield South 22, Cumberlands 10
Boston College 41, Virginia 10
Bowie St. 40, Virginia Union 22
Bridgewater (Va.) 31, Emory & Henry 23
Campbellsville 52, Ave Maria 7
Catawba 40, Tusculum 13
Centre 42, Rhodes 35
Charleston (W. Va.) 27, Virginia-Wise 21
Charleston Southern 52, Savannah St. 27
Charlotte 25, Ala. Birmingham 24, OT
Chowan 28, Elizabeth City St. 18
Christopher Newport 37, William Paterson 19
Clark Atlanta 44, Albany St. (Ga.) 36
Dayton 48, Davidson 22
Delaware St. 17, SC State 14
E. Kentucky 31, UT Martin 21
E. Texas Baptist 68, Louisiana College 35
East Carolina 33, BYU 17
Florida Atlantic 69, North Texas 31
Fayetteville St. 34, St. Augustine's 31
Ferrum 27, Brevard 24
Florida Tech 41, West Alabama 39
Frostburg St. 62, Montclair St. 3
Furman 28, Mercer 21
Georgetown (Ky.) 59, Kentucky Christian 0
Georgia Tech 38, Wake Forest 24
Grambling St. 41, Alcorn St. 14
Guilford 45, Shenandoah 20
Hampton 31, Florida A&M 27
Howard 39, Morgan St. 14
Husson 48, Gallaudet 21
James Madison 46, William & Mary 14
Johnson C. Smith 13, Shaw 10
Kennesaw St. 17, Gardner-Webb 3
LSU 40, Mississippi 24
LaGrange 59, Greensboro 10
Limestone 27, Newberry 24
Gerry Broome Associated Press
DARRIN HALL of Pittsburgh is brought down by Joe Giles-Harris, rear, and Ben
Humphreys of Duke during the first half in Durham, N.C. Hall ran for 254 yards.
with1,925 yards for Oklahoma in 2004. Taylor
averages 160 yards a game.
BEST OF THE DAY
PASSING
DREW LOCK, Missouri
TAYLOR LAMB, Appalachian State
BAKER MAYFIELD, Oklahoma
WILL GRIER, West Virginia
BRYANT SHIRREFFS, Connecticut
RUSHING
DERRIUS GUICE, Louisiana State
DARRIN HALL, Pittsburgh
JOSH ADAMS, Notre Dame
LAMAR JACKSON, Louisville
DAVID MONTGOMERY, Iowa State
RECEIVING
JALEN VIRGIL, Appalachian State
TREY QUINN, Southern Methodist
J’MON MOORE, Missouri
DAVON GRAYSON, East Carolina
ALEVA HIFO, Brigham Young
Att Cmp
33 23
39 23
41 32
37 26
29 23
Att Yards
22 276
24 254
19 191
23 178
28 164
No Yards
5 186
17 186
11 174
10 164
9 148
Yds
467
427
410
375
372
Avg
12.5
10.6
10.1
7.7
5.9
Avg
37.2
10.9
15.8
16.4
16.4
TD
6
2
2
5
1
TD
1
3
3
1
0
TD
2
0
1
0
0
Taylor is the latest in the line that dates to
Alan “The Horse” Ameche and includes
Melvin Gordon, Montee Ball and Ron Dayne.
Taylor had a modest day — for him — Saturday with 126 yards and one touchdown in
the Badgers’ 38-13 victory over Maryland. He
has had three 200-yard games this season.
“Part of the reason J.T. came here was he
wanted to be a running back at a place where
there have been some good running backs,”
Wisconsin coach Paul Christ said after the
game.
Taylor joined another group of running
backs Saturday. His day gave him 1,123 yards
in seven games this season. Only five other
true freshmen have reached that milestone
so quickly on the Football Bowl Subdivision
level. The group includes two NFL Hall of
Fame members (Emmitt Smith and Marshall Faulk) and one destined for Canton
(Adrian Peterson).
The victory left the fifth-ranked Badgers
with a clear path to the College Football
Playoff. Wisconsin doesn’t play No. 2 Penn
State or No. 6 Ohio State during the regular
season, but could meet one of them in the Big
10 championship game. The winner will likely
go to the playoff.
Taylor, meanwhile, is chasing Peterson,
who set the rushing record for a freshman
Lindsey Wilson 44, Cumberland (Tenn.) 41
Louisville 31, Florida St. 28
MVSU 53, Va. Lynchburg 5
Maryville (Tenn.) 35, Methodist 14
McNeese St. 55, Incarnate Word 7
Miami 27, Syracuse 19
Miles 23, Lane 13
Mississippi St. 45, Kentucky 7
Morehead St. 29, Stetson 26
Muhlenberg 40, McDaniel 13
N.C. A&T 24, Bethune-Cookman 20
N.C. Wesleyan 21, Averett 15
Norfolk St. 28, NC Central 21
North Greenville 31, Carson-Newman 21
Pittsburgh 24, Duke 17
Randolph-Macon 63, Apprentice 14
Samford 24, Wofford 21
South Alabama 33, Louisiana Monroe 23
South Florida 34, Tulane 28
Southeastern (Fla.) 56, Webber 7
Southern U. 35, Jackson St. 17
St. Andrews 46, Point (Ga.) 19
Stevenson 26, Albright 23
The Citadel 20, Chattanooga 14
Thomas More 63, St. Vincent 13
Trinity (Texas) 27, Sewanee 21
Troy 34, Georgia St. 10
Tuskegee 26, Kentucky St. 21
Valdosta St. 34, Delta St. 13
Virginia Tech 59, North Carolina 7
W. Carolina 26, VMI 7
Warner 38, Edward Waters 10
Washington & Lee 36, Hampden-Sydney 6
Wesley 34, Rowan 3
West Florida 42, Shorter 29
West Georgia 28, Mississippi College 0
Wingate 42, Mars Hill 21
Winston-Salem 42, Livingstone 14
MIDWEST
Adrian 36, Kalamazoo 22
Albion 31, Alma 28
Ashland 38, Tiffin 24
Aurora 28, Rockford 21
Bemidji St. 44, Northern St. (SD) 17
Benedictine (Ill.) 43, Olivet 37
Benedictine (Kan.) 52, Culver-Stockton 7
Bethel (Tenn.) 54, Cincinnati Christian 0
Butler 37, Campbell 23
Cent. Michigan 56, Ball St. 9
Cent. Missouri 62, Washburn 42
Cent. Oklahoma 63, Missouri Southern 33
Chadron St. 29, S. Dakota Tech 17
Chicago 55, Beloit 12
Concordia (Ill.) 37, Concordia (Wis.) 17
Concordia (Mich.) 39, Marian (Ind.) 36
Concordia (Moor.) 42, Augsburg 20
Concordia (Neb.) 24, Dordt 17
Dakota St. 31, Valley City St. 28
Dakota Wesleyan 63, Briar Cliff 24
Denison 31, Ohio Wesleyan 20
Dubuque 28, Simpson (Iowa) 27, OT
Eureka 37, Mac Murray 20
Evangel 31, Mid-Am Nazarene 29
Ferris St. 28, Grand Valley St. 27
Fort Hays St. 38, Missouri Western 10
Fort Valley St. 24, Central St. (Ohio) 19
Franklin 29, Rose-Hulman 22
Friends at McPherson, ppd.
Grand View 61, Graceland (Iowa) 9
Hanover 49, Earlham 14
Hillsdale 38, Walsh 0
Illinois College 23, Knox 13
Illinois St. 37, South Dakota 21
Illinois Wesleyan 13, Carthage 10
Indianapolis 45, Lincoln (Mo.) 0
Iowa Wesleyan 24, Minn.-Morris 17
Jacksonville St. 30, E. Illinois 14
John Carroll 48, Capital 21
Lake Forest 70, Grinnell 6
Lakeland 48, Wis. Lutheran 0
Loras 44, Coe 38
Macalester 47, Ripon 31
Malone 24, Lake Erie 13
Manchester 28, Bluffton 21
Marietta 44, Heidelberg 21
Miami (Ohio) 24, Buffalo 14
Michigan St. 17, Indiana 9
Millikin 56, Carroll (Wis.) 35
Minn. Duluth 37, Minot St. 0
Minn. St.-Moorhead 49, Minn.-Crookston 7
Minnesota 24, Illinois 17
Missouri 68, Idaho 21
Monmouth (Ill.) 61, Cornell (Iowa) 10
Mount St. Joseph 71, Anderson (Ind.) 27
Rut 1, Rut 2
Rutgers is on a roll.
The Scarlet Knights survived for a 14-12
victory over Purdue on Saturday, after the
Boilermakers failed on a two-point conversion try with 25 seconds left. It gave Rutgers
back-to-back victories.
The Scarlet Knights won back-to-back
games last season, but they came against
Howard and New Mexico. This was the first
time they have won consecutive games in Big
10 play.
“I did not know it was the first time ever,
but it’s huge,” said punter Ryan Anderson,
normally Rutgers’ busiest player of game
day. “We are definitely making a name for
ourselves, we just need to keep going and do
what we do.”
Coach Chris Ash credited the punt team’s
work as a key to victory.
Ash, though, was not quite as giddy as his
punter.
“Obviously, this is a first, being in here,
back-to-back victories, so it’s a good feeling,”
Ash said.
But he later added, “We’ll celebrate this
one and we’ll move on to the next one.”
The next one, Ash is obviously aware, is
against No. 19 Michigan in Ann Arbor.
Paper Tiger
Missouri quarterback Drew Lock is
among the nation’s leaders with 23 touchdown passes. That number deserves an asterisk.
Lock tossed six touchdown passes in a 6821victory over Idaho on Saturday that ended
the Tigers’ five-game losing streak. He had
seven touchdown passes in a 72-43 victory
over Missouri State in the season opener.
Combined, Lock had 988 yards passing in
those two games. He has 735 yards in the
other five.
But a win is a win, right?
Missouri coach Barry Odom thought so.
He entered the postgame news conference
and said to the reporters gathered, “Quiet in
here after a win. You guys, it’s OK to breathe
a little bit.”
Maybe reporters were unsure how to act
after a Missouri victory, or maybe they were
still wondering why Lock was still in the
game, and passing, with a 51-14 lead late in the
third quarter.
sports@latimes.com
Mount Union 66, Wilmington (Ohio) 7
N. Dakota St. 24, W. Illinois 12
N. Illinois 48, Bowling Green 17
N. Iowa 19, Youngstown St. 14
NW Missouri St. 19, Lindenwood (Mo.) 0
Nebraska Wesleyan 14, Buena Vista 13
Nebraska-Kearney 42, Northeastern St. 27
North Central (Ill.) 54, Augustana (Ill.) 2
Northwestern 17, Iowa 10, OT
Northwestern (Iowa) 31, Doane 24
Northwestern (Minn.) 30, Martin Luther 14
Northwood (Mich.) 30, Davenport 27, OT
Ohio 48, Kent St. 3
Ohio Northern 7, Muskingum 6
Oklahoma 42, Kansas St. 35
Otterbein 37, Baldwin-Wallace 29
Peru St. 17, William Penn 14
S. Dakota St. 62, Missouri St. 30
S. Illinois 45, Indiana St. 24
SMU 31, Cincinnati 28, OT
Sacramento St. 34, North Dakota 27
Saginaw Valley St. 20, N. Michigan 12
Sioux Falls 27, Concordia (St.P.) 9
St. Cloud St. 33, Mary 7
St. Francis (Ill.) 43, Olivet Nazarene 31
St. Francis (Ind.) 56, Missouri Baptist 23
St. John's (Minn.) 41, Gustavus 17
St. Norbert 38, Lawrence 6
St. Olaf 29, Carleton 26
St. Scholastica 49, Crown (Minn.) 21
St. Thomas (Minn.) 84, Hamline 0
Tabor 37, Kansas Wesleyan 16
Taylor 63, Lindenwood (Ill.) 10
Toledo 48, Akron 21
Trine 50, Hope 14
Truman St. 24, William Jewell 14
Upper Iowa 21, Augustana (SD) 20
W. Michigan 20, E. Michigan 17
WV Wesleyan 20, Notre Dame Coll. 13
Wabash 35, Oberlin 24
Waldorf 48, Mayville St. 14
Wartburg 41, Luther 16
Wayne (Mich.) 20, Michigan Tech 14
Westminster (Mo.) 24, Greenville 14
Wheaton (Ill.) 56, North Park 0
Winona St. 42, Wayne (Neb.) 19
Wis.-Oshkosh 42, Wis.-LaCrosse 28
Wis.-Platteville 34, Wis.-Eau Claire 14
Wis.-Stout 23, Wis.-Stevens Pt. 17
Wis.-Whitewater 20, Wis.-River Falls 7
Wisconsin 38, Maryland 13
Wittenberg 52, DePauw 6
Wooster 58, Hiram 25
SOUTHWEST
Ark.-Monticello 35, S. Nazarene 23
Arkansas Tech 65, NW Oklahoma St. 10
Auburn 52, Arkansas 20
Birmingham-Southern 31, Austin 24
East Central 24, Henderson St. 16
Hardin-Simmons 33, Texas Lutheran 30
Harding 42, SW Oklahoma 0
Iowa St. 31, Texas Tech 13
Langston 21, Arizona Christian 20
Lyon 21, Texas Wesleyan 14
Mary Hardin-Baylor 45, Belhaven 7
Oklahoma St. 13, Texas 10, OT
Ouachita 52, Oklahoma Baptist 14
S. Arkansas 49, SE Oklahoma 19
SE Louisiana 56, Abilene Christian 21
SW Assembl. of God 29, Okla. Panhandle St. 21
Sam Houston St. 63, Lamar 27
Stephen F. Austin 27, Houston Baptist 10
Sul Ross St. 52, Howard Payne 15
TCU 43, Kansas 0
Texas A&M Commerce 34, Angelo St. 20
Texas-Permian Basin 42, Quincy 7
UTSA 14, Rice 7
Wayland Baptist 48, Bacone 21
ROCKIES
Montana St. 27, N. Colorado 24
Arizona St. 30, Utah 10
Idaho St. 59, Portland St. 30
S. Utah 32, E. Washington 28
Boise St. 24, Wyoming 14
Carroll (Mont.) 16, Rocky Mountain 3
Colorado Mesa 70, Adams St. 21
Colorado Mines 19, Dixie St. 17
Montana Tech 93, Montana St.-Northern 19
W. New Mexico 20, Fort Lewis 17
Western St. (Col.) 26, N.M. Highlands 16
CSU Pueblo 49, Black Hills St. 0
Montana Western 30, E. Oregon 21
Friday’s Late Result
Colorado St. 27, New Mexico 24
S
L AT I M E S . C O M / S P O RT S
S U N DAY, O C T O B E R 22 , 2 017
D9
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
CONFERENCE REPORTS
BIG TEN
TEAM
EAST
Penn State
Michigan State
Ohio State
Michigan
Rutgers
Maryland
Indiana
WEST
Wisconsin
Northwestern
Nebraska
Iowa
Minnesota
Purdue
Illinois
UP NEXT
Conf.
W L
4 0
4 0
4 0
2 2
2 2
1 3
0 4
W L
4 0
2 2
2 2
1 3
1 3
1 3
0 4
Overall
W L
7 0
6 1
6 1
5 2
3 4
3 4
3 4
W L
7 0
4 3
3 4
4 3
4 3
3 4
2 5
Saturday
Minnesota at Iowa
Indiana at Maryland
Michigan State at Northwestern
Nebraska at Purdue
Wisconsin at Illinois
Rutgers at Michigan
Penn State at Ohio State
Ohio State at Iowa
Penn State at Michigan State
Wisconsin at Indiana
Minnesota at Michigan
Northwestern at Nebraska
Illinois at Purdue
Maryland at Rutgers
Overall
W L
7 0
5 2
3 3
5 2
3 4
3 4
2 5
W L
8 0
6 2
6 2
5 2
5 2
3 4
2 5
Saturday
Tennessee at Kentucky
Arkansas at Mississippi
Missouri at Connecticut
Vanderbilt at South Carolina
Mississippi State at Texas A&M
Georgia vs. Florida at Jacksonville
Nov. 4
Louisiana State at Alabama
Auburn at Texas A&M
South Carolina at Georgia
Florida at Missouri
Southern Mississippi at Tennessee
Coastal Carolina at Arkansas
Mississippi at Kentucky
Massachusetts at Mississippi State
Western Kentucky at Vanderbilt
BIG 12
TEAM
Texas Christian
Oklahoma
Oklahoma State
Iowa State
West Virginia
Texas
Texas Tech
Kansas State
Kansas
Baylor
UP NEXT
Conf.
W L
4 0
3 1
3 1
3 1
3 1
2 2
1 3
1 3
0 4
0 4
Overall
W L
7 0
6 1
6 1
5 2
5 2
3 4
4 3
3 4
1 6
0 7
Saturday
Texas Tech at Oklahoma
Oklahoma State at West Virginia
Kansas State at Kansas
Texas at Baylor
Texas Christian at Iowa State
Nov. 4
Oklahoma at Oklahoma State
Kansas State at Texas Tech
Iowa State at West Virginia
Texas at Texas Christian
Baylor at Kansas
Overall
W L
6 1
6 1
4 4
5 3
4 4
2 4
4 3
W L
6 0
4 2
6 1
5 2
3 5
4 4
1 7
Saturday
Georgia Tech at Clemson
Louisville at Wake Forest
Miami at North Carolina
Duke at Virginia Tech
Virginia at Pittsburgh
North Carolina State at Notre Dame
Nov. 4
Syracuse at Florida State
Clemson at North Carolina State
Virginia Tech at Miami
Georgia Tech at Virginia
Wake Forest at Notre Dame
at No. 1 Alabama 45, Tennessee 7: Bo Scarbrough had two
fourth-down touchdown runs as Alabama continued its
domination of its rival. The Crimson Tide outgained the
Volunteers 604-108 in total yards even with reserves manning
the offensive backfield most of the second half. The Volunteers did manage to end a streak of 12-plus quarters without
a touchdown, but the final result was another blow to the
slumping Volunteers and embattled coach Butch Jones.
No. 21 Auburn 52, at Arkansas 20: Kamryn Pettway rushed
for 90 yards and three touchdowns as Auburn bounced back
from a loss to Louisiana State. The Tigers outgained the
Razorbacks 629-334 and have outscored their SEC West
counterpart 108-23 over the last two seasons. Jarrett Stidham completed 19 of 28 passes for 218 yards and rushed for a
touchdown for Auburn. Arkansas freshman Cole Kelley
finished 14-of-25 passing for 138 yards.
Nittany Lions avenge
last regular-season
loss behind Barkley
and McSorley.
NO. 2 PENN STATE 42
NO. 19 MICHIGAN 13
associated press
STATE COLLEGE, Pa.
— Penn State turned its
whiteout into a knockout of
Michigan.
Saquon Barkley and
Trace McSorley cut through
one of the nation’s stingiest
defenses, each scoring three
touchdowns, and the No. 2
Nittany Lions emphatically
avenged its last regular-season loss with a 42-13 victory
against the 19th-ranked Wolverines on Saturday night.
Barkley set the tone the
first time he touched the
ball. He took a direct snap on
the second play of the game
and blazed 69 yards for a
touchdown on his way to 161
yards from scrimmage that
are a nice addition to his
Heisman Trophy bid.
“Obviously we knew they
were
very
aggressive.
They’re a great defense, got
a great coordinator,” Barkley said. “Sometimes it
seems like a heavyweight
fight. They’re going to get
some and we’re going to get
ours. When you got your opportunity, you got to score.”
Justin K. Aller Getty Images
PENN STATE quarterback Trace McSorley ran for
three touchdowns against a stout Michigan defense.
McSorley ran for three
touchdowns for Penn State
(7-0, 4-0 Big Ten), including a
darting 13-yarder in the
third quarter that made it
28-13 and led the recordbreaking, white-out crowd of
110,823 at Beaver Stadium to
sing along to “Sweet Caroline.” McSorley and Barkley combined for the shot
that pretty much put Michigan away, a 42-yard pass
with Barkley burning linebacker Mike McCray and
then making a juggling
catch to make it 35-13 early in
the fourth quarter.
Michigan came in giving
up 223 yards a game and 3.68
yards per play. Nittany Lions
went for 506 yards and 8.3
per play, adding a few new
looks to its offense, like the
wildcat formation Barkley
broke for the game’s first
touchdown.
“Instead of lining up and
sending the quarterback out
wide we shifted to it at the
last minute so they couldn’t
go to a wildcat check,” Penn
State coach James Franklin
said. “We had some wrinkles
in there.”
Penn State has not lost a
regular-season game since
getting trounced 49-10 by
Michigan (5-2, 2-2) last season. That seems like a lifetime ago in Happy Valley,
where the defending Big Ten
champions look even better
than last year.
No. 24 Louisiana State 40, Mississippi 24: Derrius Guice
ran for a season-high 276 yards and a touchdown and Danny
Etling threw for 200 yards and two touchdowns as LSU
extended its win streak to three. The 5-foot-11, 218-pound
Guice ran for 126 yards in the first half, which was already
good enough for his season high. It was the biggest reason
the Tigers had a 13-6 lead before halftime.
at Missouri 68, Idaho 21: Drew Lock passed for 467 yards
and six touchdowns as the Tigers ended a five-game losing
streak. The game began ominously for Missouri. Armond
Hawkins intercepted Lock on the first play, and the Vandals
proceeded to score on a seven-yard pass from Matt Linehan
to Kaden Elliss, a linebacker who moonlights on offense.
at Mississippi State 45, Kentucky 7: Nick Fitzgerald had 270
total yards and three touchdowns for the Bulldogs, who
dominated the game from the opening quarter and never
trailed. Fitzgerald led all rushers with 115 yards and became
just the sixth SEC quarterback to rush for more than 2,000
career yards. Kentucky managed just 260 total yards.
Iowa State 31, at Texas Tech 13: Kyle Kempt threw three
touchdown passes, and the Cyclones made Red Raiders
coach Kliff Kingsbury pay for tinkering with the nation’s
seventh-most productive offense. Kingsbury bucked his
passing trend through the first half, running 22 rushing
plays for 79 yards against nine passes by Nic Shimonek for 18
yards, and was burned by back-to-back drives that ended in
fumbles by running backs Justin Stockton and Desmond
Nisby. Iowa State is enjoying its best conference start in 15
seasons and longest road winning streak since 1960.
at No. 4 Texas Christian 43, Kansas 0: Kenny Hill matched
his career high with five touchdown passes and the TCU
defense held the Jayhawks to 21 yards. Kansas tied an 81year-old NCAA record with its 44th straight loss in a true
road game. TCU outgained Kansas 305-3 in the first half.
KaVontae Turpin returned a punt 90 yards for a score after
going backward to the three. He slipped out of a tackle as he
turned at the three, broke another one inside the 10 and
outran everyone up the right side for a 43-0 lead. With severe
weather approaching, both coaches agreed to a running
clock from the 12:49 mark of the fourth quarter.
West Virginia 38, at Baylor 36: Will Grier threw for 375 yards
and five touchdowns, and David Sills had three touchdown
catches to increase his nation-leading total to 15. The Bears
scored 23 unanswered points in the fourth but fell to 0-6.
ATLANTIC
COAST
TEAM
Conf.
ATLANTIC
W L
North Carolina State 4 0
Clemson
4 1
Syracuse
2 2
Louisville
2 3
Boston College
2 3
Florida State
2 3
Wake Forest
1 3
COASTAL
W L
Miami
4 0
Georgia Tech
3 1
Virginia Tech
2 1
Virginia
2 1
Pittsburgh
1 3
Duke
1 4
North Carolina
0 5
UP NEXT
Friday
Florida State at Boston College
at Northwestern 17, Iowa 10 (OT): Wildcats running back
Justin Jackson caught a 23-yard pass in overtime, setting up
a one-yard touchdown run by quarterback Clayton Thorson. Following Northwestern’s score, Iowa moved the ball to
the 18-yard line, but Nate Stanley’s pass on a fourth-andthree play fell incomplete, ending the game. Jackson rushed
for 93 yards and had five receptions for 38 yards.
at Minnesota 24, Illinois 17: Kobe McCrary ran for 153 yards
and the go-ahead touchdown in the fourth quarter, and
Rodney Smith added 103 yards rushing for the Golden Gophers. Linebacker Jon Celestin returned an interception for
a touchdown in the fourth to provide the winning margin for
Minnesota. The Illini were held to 282 total yards.
SOUTHEASTERN
Conf.
W L
4 0
3 2
3 2
2 2
0 4
0 4
0 4
W L
5 0
4 1
3 1
3 1
2 2
1 3
0 4
at No. 18 Michigan State 17, Indiana 9: Brian Lewerke threw
a 10-yard touchdown pass to Felton Davis with 5:59 remaining to give the Spartans a 10-9 lead, and that proved to be
enough against the pesky Hoosiers. LJ Scott ran 18 yards for
a touchdown to extend the lead with 1:49 left, and the Spartans stopped the Hoosiers’ final drive at the Indiana 38.
at Rutgers 14, Purdue 12: Gus Edwards scored on a 74-yard
run on Rutgers’ second offensive play and Gio Rescigno
threw a 35-yard touchdown pass in the second half as the
Scarlet Knights posted consecutive Big Ten Conference
wins for the first time since joining the league in 2014. The
Boilermakers failed on a two-point conversion after scoring
a touchdown with 25 seconds left to play. Purdue outgained
Rutgers 474-217 and ran 30 more offensive plays.
Nov. 4
TEAM
EAST
Georgia
South Carolina
Florida
Kentucky
Tennessee
Vanderbilt
Missouri
WEST
Alabama
Auburn
Louisiana State
Texas A&M
Mississippi State
Mississippi
Arkansas
UP NEXT
at No. 5 Wisconsin 38, Maryland 13: Jonathan Taylor ran for
a touchdown and broke the 1,000-yard mark for the season
as the Badgers remained unbeaten. Taylor, a freshman, had
126 yards in 22 carries, a relatively ho-hum day following two
straight outings of 200-plus yards. Wisconsin quarterback
Alex Hornibrook shook off an interception on his second
attempt of the game and passed for two scores. He finished
16 of 24 for 225 yards to balance the offense.
Penn State turns the
tables on Michigan
at No. 14 Virginia Tech 59, North Carolina 7: Josh Jackson
threw three touchdown passes and the Hokies scored on
fumble, interception and punt returns to rout the Tar Heels.
Jackson passed for 132 yards and Virginia Tech dominated
in sending North Carolina to its fifth straight loss. North
Carolina got into Virginia Tech territory only three times.
Louisville 31, at Florida State 28: Blanton Creque’s first
game-winning field goal at any level of football came at the
opportune time for the Cardinals. The sophomore’s 34-yard
field goal with five seconds remaining lifted Louisville to an
emotional win over the Seminoles.
Boston College 41, at Virginia 10: Anthony Brown set what
proved to be the tone for the day on the Eagles’ third play
from scrimmage. Pinned at his own six-yard line and facing
third and five, the redshirt freshman quarterback took a
deep drop, sidestepped two Virginia defenders in the end
zone and took off, gaining a demoralizing 15 yards and a first
down. That drive ended 12 plays later with Colton Lichtenberg’s 30-yard field goal, and Brown added three touchdown
passes to lead Boston College to its second consecutive road
victory.
Pittsburgh 24, at Duke 17: Darrin Hall rushed for career
highs of 254 yards and three touchdowns, including the
go-ahead four-yard score with 10:48 to play, and the Panthers upset the Blue Devils. Hall broke a century-old school
record with his 92-yard touchdown run that came 18 seconds
after Duke took a double-digit lead, and also scored on an
early 79-yard run for Pittsburgh.
at Georgia Tech 38, Wake Forest 24: Yellow Jackets
quarterback TaQuon Marshall ran for two long touchdowns, including a 70-yarder with 1:57 remaining that
clinched a victory over the Demon Deacons. Georgia Tech
ran its triple-option offense to perfection, piling up 427
yards rushing against a team that had an off week to prepare.
— Compiled from wire reports
Ian Maule Associated Press
RODNEY ANDERSON scores the winning touchdown past Tanner Wood (34)
with seven seconds left. Anderson ran for 147 yards and scored twice Saturday.
Sooners outrun trouble
to score in final seconds
They rally from 21-10
halftime hole to keep
alive hopes for a spot
in the playoffs.
NO. 9 OKLAHOMA 42
KANSAS STATE 35
associated press
MANHATTAN, Kan. —
Oklahoma has made a habit
of squandering early leads
much of this season. The
Sooners went the other way
Saturday night.
Rodney Anderson ran 22
yards for the go-ahead score
with seven seconds left,
Baker Mayfield threw for 410
yards and accounted for four
touchdowns, and the nation’s ninth-ranked team
overcame a 21-10 halftime
deficit to beat Kansas State
42-35 and keep their playoff
hopes alive.
Anderson finished with
147 yards rushing and also
caught a touchdown pass for
the Sooners (6-1, 3-1 Big 12),
who shredded the overmatched defense of the
Wildcats (3-4, 1-3) over the final 30 minutes.
“Our guys at halftime
had a great look in their eye.
They were determined to
come out and play a lot better,” Sooners coach Lincoln
Riley said.
Kansas State sophomore
Alex Delton’s first career
touchdown pass with 2:25
left it tied at 35, but Mayfield
and Anderson calmly went
to work. The Heisman Trophy candidate hit a series of
throws down field before Anderson took a carry around
the left side for the decisive
score.
“As a leadership group,
we took care of it and handled it,” Mayfield said.
“That’s a huge win for us,
considering we haven’t
played well in the second
half most of the season.”
Making his second career
start, Delton finished with
161 yards rushing and three
scores while going 12 of 14 for
144 yards through the air. Alex Barnes added 108 yards
and a touchdown on just six
carries.
It was the Sooners’ nation-leading 14th consecutive true road victory, and it
extended their run of dominance in Manhattan, where
they haven’t lost since 1996.
“I’m tired of coming into
the locker room under such
circumstances,” said Kansas State coach Bill Snyder,
whose team has lost three
straight to the Sooners.
“We’ve lost far too many
games. You have to play
complete games in this conference. One half won’t do
it.”
Cowboys pick unusual way to win
OKLAHOMA STATE 13
TEXAS 10
associated press
AUSTIN, Texas — In 13
seasons as Oklahoma State
coach, Mike Gundy has built
a reputation for producing
dynamic offenses and less
than impressive defenses.
On Saturday, the Cowboys leaned on their defense.
Ramon Richards intercepted Sam Ehlinger’s pass
in the end zone in overtime,
giving No. 10 Oklahoma
State a 13-10 win over Texas.
Those 13 points were 36
below the Cowboys’ average
and their fewest since a 28-7
loss to Texas in 2014. Oklahoma State averaged 611
yards a game before Saturday, best in the nation, but
gained 428 against Texas.
The Cowboys (6-1, 3-1 Big
12) scored the winning
points on Matt Ammendola’s 34-yard field goal on
the first possession of overtime. He missed a 29-yarder
in the fourth quarter.
Texas (3-4, 2-2) had a first
down on the Oklahoma
State 12 after a pass interference penalty against A.J.
Green. But on third and four
from the six, Ehlinger, a
freshman, scrambled and
floated a pass to the only
player in the area, Richards.
“I
thought
Jerrod
[Heard] was going to circle
back up to the back of the
end zone for a jump ball,”
Ehlinger said. “That’s why I
put it up there for him for a
chance to win.”
Oklahoma State’s Mason
Rudolph passed for 282
yards, failing to reach 300 for
the first time in eight games.
“Forever around here, it’s
been the offense saved us,”
Gundy said. “For six, eight
years defense can’t stop anybody, offense saved ’em. So
(today) the offense stumbled over their own feet,
couldn’t make a play, and
the defense did.”
D10
S U N DAY, O C T O B E R 22, 2 017
S
L AT I M E S . C O M / S P O RTS
USC GAME REPORT
SEPT. 2
W. Michigan
SEPT. 9
Stanford
SEPT. 16
Texas
SEPT. 23
@California
SEPT. 29
@Wash. St.
OCT. 7
Oregon St.
OCT. 14
Utah
OCT. 21
@NDame
OCT. 28
@Ariz. St.
NOV. 4
Arizona
NOV. 11
@Colorado
NOV. 18
UCLA
W, 49-31
(1-0)
W, 42-24
(2-0, 1-0)
W, 27-24
(3-0)
W, 30-20
(4-0, 2-0)
L, 30-27
(4-1, 2-1)
W, 38-10
(5-1, 3-1)
W, 28-27
(6-1, 4-1)
L, 49-14
(6-2)
7:45 p.m.
ESPN
TBD
TBD
TBD
UP NEXT >>>The Sun Devils have won two games in a row, against Washington and Utah, and gave up a combined 17 points in those contests.
NOTES
Marshall is hurt
and Irish notice it
By Zach Helfand
Joe Robbins Getty Images
JOSH ADAMS RUSHED for 191 yards in 19 carries and had three touchdowns as the Irish ran for 377 yards.
Second-worst loss to Irish
[USC, from D1]
They look stunned. The
game was supposed to be an
elimination game, the loser
left with nothing but the
faintest traces of their playoff hopes. It turned into humiliation.
By the end, linebacker
Cameron Smith said, “We
were fighting for our dignity.”
Coach Clay Helton held
his postgame news conference in a small room directly
off the stadium concourse. A
short moment before he began, jubilant fans shouting
“Let’s go Irish!” screamed
right outside the door.
He stepped from the
locker room into the news
conference and said, “We’ve
got a sad football team in
there right now.”
No. 13 Notre Dame (6-1),
pulverized No. 11 USC (6-2)
for 377 yards and punished
the Trojans on each offensive
mistake, of which there were
many. The defense withered
under Notre Dame’s bruising attack. The offense again
failed to showed much improvement, a trend that began after Week 2. Its special
teams contributed another
big mistake and, eight games
into the season, have yet to
provide a single big play.
Quarterback Brandon
Wimbush ran wild for 106
yards rushing. He scored on
two rushes when he was
hardly touched at all. USC almost never took him down
with the first defender. For
variety, he threw for Notre
Dame’s first two scores, and
finished with 120 yards passing.
Running back Josh Adams steamrolled USC. He
ran19 times and averaged10.1
yards per attempt. He
scored on a three-yard
punch-in, a 14-yard rumble
and and an 84-yard jailbreak
run. He finished with 191
yards.
It was USC’s worst loss
since playing Alabama in the
2016 season opener. USC’s
51-0 loss to Notre Dame in
1966 was the Trojans’ only
defeat in this rivalry that was
more lopsided.
At no point did USC compete with Notre Dame. At no
point did it threaten to even
make it an entertaining contest. A half had elapsed, and
Notre Dame had scored 28
points, before USC scored a
point.
USC actually stopped
Notre Dame on its first possession. Things fell apart on
USC’s very first offensive
snap — as in, on the snap itself. Center Nico Falah
zipped the ball to the right
ear hole of Sam Darnold’s
helmet. Darnold batted it up
like a volleyball set, juggled,
corraled it then lost it again
in a pileup. One play. One
mistake. One turnover. Notre Dame scored three plays
later.
In the first half alone,
USC flubbed the opening
snap, Darnold hurled a pass
than was intercepted, Jack
Jones fumbled a punt inside
USC’s own 10-yard line, USC
failed on a third-and-one
near the end zone and then
missed a field goal. Notre
Dame scored touchdowns on
each of the three turnovers.
Turnovers have haunted
USC all season. It has yet to
play a game clean of any this
season. Entering the game,
only three teams in the nation had committed more
giveaways.
“We’re seeing now we
can’t overcome ’em,” offensive coordinator Tee Martin
said. “These teams are better and better, it’s going to
continue to get better and
better down the road. We’ve
just got to not hurt ourselves.”
If USC’s offense beat itself, USC’s defense was just
straight beat. Wimbush
picked on the secondary
early, but Notre Dame did its
work on the ground. The
Fighting Irish offensive line
manhandled USC’s front
seven with 377 yards rushing.
“I really don’t know how
to put it on anything else but
the fact that they were just
better than us tonight,”
Smith said.
Notre Dame outgained
USC 497 to 336 and did not
commit a turnover.
“I think we’re gonna get
back and look at the tape,
and it’s gonna be all the way
around,” Helton said. He
said he told the team in the
locker room, “It’s gonna
pretty much be all of us when
we look at it. And the kids
understand that. They appreciate the truth.”
The physical dominance
extended to both sides of the
ball. USC ran the ball 31
times for just 76 yards. Ronald Jones II led the team with
32 yards in 12 rushes. Deontay Burnett was the lone
bright spot, with eight
catches for 113 yards and a
score.
USC remains in control in
the conference race, but its
playoff hopes are all but
gone. A heckler joyfully, and
loudly, reminded Darnold of
this fact when ran off into the
tunnel after it was over.
Darnold completed 20 of
28 passes for 229 yards and
two scores, but he was
sacked four times. He threw
a pass into double coverage
that was intercepted. And he
finished with two turnovers.
When he emerged from
the locker room, he gripped
his sandwich, went through
a television interview and
said solemnly to reporters
that the team had experienced adversity, and “we’re
just gonna look at it straight
in the face.”
Staffers were still running
about to pack the buses.
Darnold thanked the media
contingent and walked silently outside and into the
night.
zach.helfand@latimes.com
Twitter: @zhelfand
Notre Dame 49, USC 14
USC ......................................0 0 14 0—14
Notre Dame ..........................14 14 14 7—49
First Quarter
ND—St. Brown 26 pass from Wimbush (Yoon kick),
12:45
ND—Stepherson 23 pass from Wimbush (Yoon
kick), 6:59
Second Quarter
ND—J.Adams 3 run (Yoon kick), 7:43
ND—Wimbush 4 run (Yoon kick), 3:54
Third Quarter
USC—Mitchell 5 pass from Darnold (McGrath kick),
10:00
ND—Wimbush 7 run (Yoon kick), 6:06
USC—Burnett 16 pass from Darnold (McGrath
kick), 3:26
ND—J.Adams 84 run (Yoon kick), 3:07
Fourth Quarter
ND—J.Adams 14 run (Yoon kick), 13:17
STATISTICS
TEAM
USC
ND
First downs ...................................18
23
Rushes-yards ............................31-76
47-377
Passing.......................................260
120
Comp-Att-Int..........................25-36-1
9-22-0
Return Yards................................192
87
Punts-Avg................................6-34.0
6-33.66
Fumbles-Lost................................2-2
0-0
Penalties-Yards ...........................7-40
7-51
Time of Possession ....................31:36
28:24
Individual Leaders
RUSHING: USC, R.Jones 12-32, Fink 3-17, Malepeai 4-12, Ware 3-8, Darnold 9-7. Notre Dame,
J.Adams 19-191, Wimbush 14-106, T.Jones 5-37,
Stepherson 2-24, Book 2-11, McIntosh 4-11, (Team)
1-(minus 3).
PASSING: USC, Darnold 20-28-1-229, Fink 5-8-031. Notre Dame, Wimbush 9-19-0-120, Book 0-20-0, (Team) 0-1-0-0.
RECEIVING: USC, Burnett 8-113, Mitchell 7-71,
Vaughns 6-65, V.Jones 1-8, Grimes 1-5, R.Jones 1-1,
Ware 1-(minus 3). Notre Dame, Stepherson 3-58, St.
Brown 3-29, Smythe 1-20, Claypool 1-13, Finke 1-0.
MISSED FIELD GOALS—USC, McGrath 27.
SOUTH BEND, Ind. —
Iman Marshall sat on the
trainer’s table in the first
quarter of USC’s loss to Notre Dame with his head
down and welcomed a procession of teammates and
coaches.
Marshall’s left knee was
propped up and wrapped in
ice. When coach Clay Helton
came over with about five
minutes left in the first quarter, he held the back of Marshall’s head and said a few
words. Marshall’s night was
over.
Marshall appeared to
sustain the injury early in
the first quarter after two series. The exact injury and its
severity was not immediately known.
USC used Isaiah Langley in Marshall’s place. Notre Dame tested him immediately. Equanimeous
St. Brown had Langley
beaten by two steps, but
quarterback Brandon Wimbush overthrew him. Three
plays later, Langley had
Kevin Stepherson covered
but Wimbush threw a backshoulder pass and Stepherson made an acrobatic catch
for a touchdown.
Marshall was only the latest in a rash of injuries for
USC. Eleven other starters
have missed a game because
of injury, the latest being defensive tackle Josh Fatu,
who missed Saturday’s
game after sustaining a concussion in a car accident this
week.
Receiver
Jalen
Greene, who was a starter
but isn’t currently, also
missed a game because of a
concussion.
Darnold banged up
Late in the third quarter,
Sam Darnold was trying to
slip through another fierce
Notre Dame pass rush and
had slipped past the last
rusher when he was caught
by his left ankle. It wrenched
unnaturally.
Darnold came up limping
and was pulled for one play.
The injury did not appear severe — he did not receive
medical attention on the
sideline. After a timeout and
a break for the start of the
fourth quarter, Darnold returned for one play, a fourthdown try that was unsuccessful.
But the next series, Matt
Fink replaced him and
Darnold did not appear for
the rest of the game.
Helton said Darnold had
tweaked his ankle in the loss
to Washington State and the
tackle Saturday aggravated
it.
Also, right tackle Chuma
Edoga and receiver Michael
Pittman Jr. left the game
with ankle injuries, and
guard Andrew Vorhees left
with a lower back injury.
Nothing automatic
USC was victimized by its
own field position in the second quarter on a rule that
might have cost USC a score.
On a third-and-four from
the six-yard line, Darnold
was sacked, but Notre Dame
was flagged for holding. USC
appeared to anticipate that
it would be a first down —
the television broadcast and
the official stats feed both indicated it would be a first
down. But the down marker
on the field still read third
down.
Helton called timeout
and talked animatedly with
the referees.
According to the NCAA
rulebook, the ruling was the
right one, if rarely occurring.
Usually, a holding penalty is
worth five yards — enough
to give USC a first down. But
USC was close enough to the
goal line that the penalty
gave them half the distance
to the goal.
The penalty is an automatic first down only if the
pass crosses the line of
scrimmage. Since Darnold
was sacked, there was no
automatic first down.
USC lost a yard on third
down, attempted a field goal
and missed.
Returner shuffle
USC made a switch at
punt returner, opting for
Jack Jones in place of Ajene
Harris, who had done that
duty in USC’s first seven
games.
Harris tended to let the
ball bounce without fielding
it. He had just six returns for
a total of 26 yards this season.
Jones fielded and returned the first two punts
USC saw against Notre
Dame for positive yardage —
though the second one was
negated by a penalty.
But on his third punt, disaster hit. Jones tried to fair
catch a punt inside USC’s
own 10-yard
line.
He
dropped it. Notre Dame recovered and scored three
plays later.
Jones finished with 48
yards on four returns.
Turnovers a
problem again
Before Saturday, USC’s
defense had only given up 10
points off 14 turnovers this
season. (The offense had
given up another two return
scores off an interception
and a fumble.)
Notre Dame, meanwhile,
had scored on 11 of the 14
turnovers its defense had
forced.
Something had to give. It
was USC. The Trojans had
three turnovers. They gave
up points on all of them.
zach.helfand@latimes.com
Twitter @zhelfand
Inability to stop the run puts damper on playoff hopes
[Wharton, from D1]
On an ugly Saturday in
South Bend, they lost 49-14
and saw their College Football Playoff hopes mortally
wounded by a persistent
inability to stop the run.
How bad was it?
At halftime, Notre Dame
had outgained them 190
yards to minus-4. By game’s
end, with some garbage
time thrown into the mix,
the advantage grew to 37776.
And it shouldn’t have
been a complete surprise.
No. 13 Notre Dame came
into this edition of “the
greatest intersectional
rivalry” with the sixth-best
rushing offense in the nation. No. 11 USC — facing a
number of challenges in a
season of massive expectations — ranked a fairly
mediocre 57th against the
run.
Wimbush sounded matter-of-fact when describing
the play of his offensive line:
“Being physical, using their
size, their dominance to
move guys. They’ve been
doing that all year. Why
change what you’re doing
when you’re being successful?”
USC coach Clay Helton
put his best spin on the
situation, insisting his 6-2
team still controlled its
destiny.
On the national level,
that seemed implausible.
In the brief history of the
CFP, no team has made the
final four with two losses. A
few have come close — Penn
State in 2016 and Stanford
the previous season — but
even with a recent spate of
upsets in college football, it
seems unlikely to happen
this fall.
The Pac-12 Conference
picture is brighter with no
ranked teams left on USC’s
schedule. But the next
opponent — Arizona State
— is starting to look dangerous and there are problems
that need to be addressed.
“We’ll watch the tape,”
Helton said. “Obviously
there are several corrections
that we’ve got to make.”
The run defense looked
Carlos Osorio Associated Press
NOTRE DAME quarterback Brandon Wimbush ran
14 times for 106 yards against USC on Saturday.
shaky as far back as the
season opener, surrendering 263 rushing yards to
Western Michigan, an unranked team from a Group
of Five conference.
Players said it was the
first instance of them not
staying in their gaps, miss-
ing too many assignments.
That performance might
have been dismissed as an
aberration when USC manhandled a normally physical
Stanford along the line of
scrimmage the following
week. But Washington State
had success on the ground
in its upset win over USC in
late September and Utah
forced the action early in a
close game last week.
Though injuries have
been an issue, especially in
the interior of the line, that
couldn’t explain the magnitude of the breakdown
against Notre Dame.
Even when the Trojans
scored twice after halftime,
threatening to make a game
of it, they struggled to force
a stop, raising questions
about their level of intensity.
“It’s definitely an area
that we need to get better
at,” linebacker Cameron
Smith said. “And we saw it
tonight.”
Or as Notre Dame coach
Brian Kelly put it: “This
game will be won by who’s
more physical. I think when
you run for 370-something
yards and you hold them to
70, I think we know who the
more physical football team
was.”
Late in the third quarter,
Irish running back Josh
Adams took a simple handoff and pushed into the
middle of the line. When
right guard Alex Bars set a
crushing block, the only
thing left in Adams’ way was
the umpire — the official
stationed at linebacker level
— as the 225-pound junior
sprinted 84 yards for a
touchdown.
Adams finished with 191
yards in 19 carries. Wimbush
ran 14 times for 106 yards.
The pair combined for five
touchdowns on the ground.
Falling so far behind, so
quickly, USC never really
had a chance to develop a
rushing game of its own.
Five sacks didn’t help the
overall yardage.
But it was the defense
that seemed a bigger concern.
“We didn’t fit up Western
Michigan the right way, we
didn’t fit up this team the
right way,” linebacker
Uchenna Nwosu said. “It’s
assignment-style football,
staying at home, playing our
gaps.”
david.wharton@latimes.com
Twitter: @LAtimesWharton
L AT I M E S . C O M / S P O RT S
SS
S U N DAY, O C T O B E R 22 , 2 017
D11
UCLA GAME REPORT
SEPT. 3
Tex. A&M
SEPT. 9
Hawaii
SEPT. 16
@Memphis
SEPT. 23
@Stanford
SEPT. 30
Colorado
OCT. 14
@Arizona
OCT. 21
Oregon
OCT. 28
@Wash.
NOV. 3
@Utah
NOV. 11
Ariz. St.
NOV. 18
@USC
NOV. 24
California
W, 45-44
(1-0)
W, 56-23
(2-0)
L, 48-45
(2-1)
L, 58-34
(2-2, 0-1)
W, 27-23
(3-2, 1-1)
L, 47-30
(3-3, 1-2)
W, 31-14
(4-3, 2-2)
12:30 p.m.
TBD
6:30 p.m.
FS1
TBD
TBD
7:30 p.m.
FS1
UP NEXT >>>UCLA has dominated its series with Washington in recent years, winning two consecutive games and 10 of the last 12.
Walk-on’s dedication is an inspiration
HELENE ELLIOTT
On a day
that UCLA
needed a
spark, an
exemplary
effort, a
smile, walkon wide
receiver
Christian Pabico delivered
on all counts.
His value to the Bruins
went beyond the obvious,
that his first career touchdown reception became
their second score in a 31-14
victory over Oregon on
Saturday at the Rose Bowl,
or that his 49-yard reception
on a third-down play in the
third quarter sustained the
drive that was capped by
Bolu Olorunfunmi’s vault off
a defender and into the end
zone.
What magnified the
impact of Pabico’s fourcatch, 99-yard, one-touchdown effort in UCLA’s best
all-around effort this season
is that his teammates and
coaches knew how hard he
has worked to be here. They
appreciate that he toiled on
the scout team in 2015 and
played in only one game last
season — a rout of Nevada
Las Vegas — and respected
that he learned all the offensive plays in the playbook,
not just his own.
The Long Beach Poly
High graduate didn’t even
get a scholarship this year
when one was available,
because it was given instead
to punter Stefan Flintoff.
But through it all, Pabico —
a four-time member of the
athletic director’s academic
honor roll — never quit.
Because he persevered and
because he stepped up on
Saturday when receiving
yards-per-game leader
Jordan Lasley was held out
for disciplinary reasons — he
became an inspiration to a
team that was coming off an
embarrassing loss at Arizona last week.
“He has made some good
catches for us this year,”
coach Jim Mora said. “It was
just that today, our backs up
against the wall, we really
needed him to come
through, and he did.”
Merely mentioning Pabico’s name brought a grin to
the face of offensive coordinator Jedd Fisch. “I made
Robert Gauthier Los Angeles Times
CHRISTIAN PABICO of UCLA celebrates his first
career touchdown reception in the first quarter.
the comment on the headset,” Fisch said, “that when
you saw Christian catch that
touchdown and you saw the
energy and the smile and the
passion, I said, ‘That’s why
you coach college football.
That’s why you do it,’ so you
can see those type reactions
from those kids that balance
academics and give everything they can on the football field.”
Pabico needed a bit of
inspiration himself last
week.
Benefitting from changes
in the coaching staff that
included appointing Jimmie
Dougherty as the Bruins’
wide receivers coach, Pabico
played in the opener against
Texas A&M and was targeted but had no catches.
He had three catches
against Hawaii and one each
at Memphis and at Stanford
but none against Colorado
and none at Arizona.
Dougherty reassured
him he still had a place in the
Bruins’ plans. That was
enough for Pabico.
“Coach Dougherty actually called me into his office
this past week and said,
‘You’ve just got to hit the
reset button and go hard,’ ”
Pabico said. “So I did that,
and thankfully I had the day
I did today.”
Pabico’s touchdown
came on a third-and-five at
Oregon’s 31-yard line. “To be
honest, the play that we had
called was a red zone play so
I wasn’t even expecting that
play call, because we were on
like the 30-yard line I think,”
Pabico said. “And when I
caught the ball, the [defender] had missed, thankfully,
and when I looked up field I
just saw green grass and I
just took off running and got
there untouched.”
Fisch described the call
as a pause-release slant. “He
was supposed to have a
two-count pause and then
after the pause is when he
comes underneath to fill the
vacated area we expected to
occur,” Fisch said. “It was a
tight window, though. It was
a heck of a throw and a heck
of a catch.”
On the play that preceded Olorunfunmi’s spec-
tacular touchdown, quarterback Josh Rosen connected
with Pabico for a 49-yard
play on third and 10.
“The funny thing is we
actually ran that play in
practice and it kind of
played out exactly like that,”
Pabico said. “Devon [Modster, the backup quarterback] actually threw me the
ball but it was kind of that
same deal, where I had to
box out the defender and go
up and catch the ball. Really,
you practice the way you
play.”
Rosen praised Pabico’s
execution. “I underthrew it a
little bit and he did a really
good job of slowing down
and boxing out the [defensive back] and just making a
good play,” Rosen said. “I’m
looking forward to seeing
more of that.”
So is Pabico. Quitting
was never an option for him.
He made sure it wasn’t an
option for UCLA on Saturday. “It was definitely
tough,” he said of his path,
“but I never had that in my
mind, to give up.”
helene.elliott@latimes.com
Twitter: @helenenothelen
UCLA REPORT
Olorunfunmi
brings back
Vick memories
By Ben Bolch
before. “So, yes.”
Lasley held out
Photographs by
Robert Gauthier Los Angeles Times
JACOB TUIOTI-MARINER chases Ducks quarterback Braxton Burmeister, who was sacked four times.
Bruins defense takes big step forward
[UCLA, from D1]
for only 27 yards, though two
went for touchdowns.
“We just knew we had to
lock him down and I thought
we did pretty well,” said
UCLA defensive end Jaelan
Phillips, who delivered a vicious sack in his return from
an ankle injury that had
sidelined him since Sept. 16.
UCLA (4-3 overall, 2-2
Pac-12) held Oregon (4-4,1-4)
to 320 total yards, including
246 rushing yards. It qualified as significant progress
for a team that entered the
game allowing an average of
523 yards per game, including 313 rushing yards.
Oregon tailback Royce
Freeman became the leading rusher in school history
with 160 yards in 29 carries.
That gave him 5,103 yards for
his
career,
surpassing
LaMichael James’ 5,082.
It wasn’t enough. Freeman produced only a few of
the long runs that have hurt
UCLA all season; his 25-yard
run was one of only two Oregon plays that went for more
than 20 yards.
“They broke a couple on
us,” Bruins coach Jim Mora
said, “but we were able to
contain like the huge run
that has been hurting us.”
UCLA’s defensive effort
wasn’t perfect by any means.
The Bruins helped Oregon
sustain its two first-half
touchdown drives with what
defensive coordinator Tom
Bradley called “dumb penalties” on third down.
But UCLA withstood a
wave of injuries including
the loss of linemen Jacob Tuioti-Mariner (internal injuries) and Matt Dickerson
(collarbone). The Bruins’
DARREN ANDREWS hauls in a one-yard touchdown pass, capping UCLA’s 17-0 second-half run.
linebacking corps was so
thin that defensive end
Keisean
Lucier-South
shifted to weakside linebacker and Pickett essentially became a linebacker at
times by creeping toward
the line of scrimmage.
The Bruins had to scrap
their plans to redshirt freshman Greg Rogers, which
paid off when the defensive
lineman beat his counterpart to get the penetration
that helped stop the Ducks
on fourth down early in the
fourth quarter.
UCLA quarterback Josh
Rosen was efficient one
week after a three-interception dud against Arizo-
na, completing 21 of 36 passes for 266 yards and two
touchdowns. He received
more than enough support
from the Bruins’ defense
and running game, which
generated 142 yards and two
touchdowns, including Bolu
Olorunfunmi’s wacky vault
into the end zone off the helmet of a defender at the end
of a 22-yard run.
“I didn’t really have to
push or do too much,” Rosen
said. “That’s why you see no
turnovers.”
His one-yard touchdown
pass to receiver Darren Andrews in the corner of the
end zone gave UCLA a 31-14
lead early in the fourth quar-
ter and provided the final
points during a second half
in
which
the
Bruins
outscored the Ducks, 17-0.
They held Oregon scoreless in three of four quarters
after yielding points in 19
consecutive quarters, beginning with the second quarter
of their victory over Hawaii
on Sept. 9. A big part of
UCLA’s defensive turnaround was its takeaways.
Safety Jaleel Wadood
stripped the ball from Oregon tailback Darrian Felix
on the Ducks’ first drive and
Tuioti-Mariner recovered at
the Ducks’ 45-yard line. It
was the Bruins’ first takeaway since the first quarter
of their game against Stanford on Sept. 23.
“We needed it,” Wadood
said. “It’s just me running
around, flying to the ball. No
real secret.”
The defense provided another boost late in the third
quarter when cornerback
Colin Samuel intercepted a
pass at the Bruins’ four-yard
line. He turned his head at
precisely the right moment
and wrestled the ball away
from receiver Dillon Mitchell, helping to preserve
UCLA’s 24-14 advantage.
Mora wrapped an arm
around Samuel’s neck afterward, a tender moment generated by a defense in need
of positive reinforcement after some epic struggles.
“Today at some point,”
Mora said, “all the hard work
and the resolve and the attitude and the commitment
and the investment, it starts
to pay off.”
ben.bolch@latimes.com
Twitter: @latbbolch
Bolu Olorunfunmi might
be hearing from federal aviation officials after his unscheduled takeoff at the
Rose Bowl.
The UCLA tailbackturned-hurdler went airborne at the end of his 22yard touchdown run in the
third quarter Saturday,
planting his feet onto the
helmet of Oregon safety
Mattrell McGraw and vaulting skyward before tumbling
backward into the end zone.
“I was like, ‘Oh wow, I’m
pretty high,’ ” Olorunfunmi
said after the Bruins’ 31-14
victory over the Ducks. “And
I just hope I don’t get hurt
when I get down. I got up,
and wasn’t in pain. And I was
like, ‘Oh, touchdown.’ ”
Olorunfunmi said his instinct was to leap when he
saw UCLA receiver Christian Pabico blocking a defender in his path near the
goal line. Pabico was among
those stunned by the move.
“I honestly had no idea he
was jumping, because I was
just trying to block,” Pabico
said. “And then I felt a body,
and then I looked, and he
was on top of my head. So
thank God he landed in the
end zone.”
UCLA offensive coordinator Jedd Fisch said he
gasped when he saw Olorunfunmi vault into the air because it left him vulnerable
to injury, not to mention
fumbling the football. That’s
exactly what happened,
Olorunfunmi losing the ball
before pouncing on it for the
touchdown that gave the
Bruins a 24-14 lead.
Olorunfunmi ran track in
high school but might have
missed his calling as a hurdler considering he also
made an impressive leap
during a touchdown run
against Hawaii earlier this
season.
“Honestly, I think I just
like to jump now,” said
Olorunfunmi, who finished
with a team-high 76 yards in
13 carries. “It’s just, any way
to get in the end zone, you’ve
just got to get into the end
zone.”
As much as the play
wowed fans at the Rose
Bowl, it was not new territory for UCLA coach Jim
Mora.
“Well, I’ll just say this: I
coached Mike Vick,” Mora
said, referring to the former
NFL quarterback known for
acrobatic plays, when asked
if he had seen anything like it
Mora
said
Jordan
Lasley, the Bruins’ secondleading receiver, did not play
because of an undisclosed
disciplinary matter.
“There was an action
that was taken that was
really contrary to what we
are trying to develop in our
program and what our
school stands for,” Mora
said, “and hopefully he’ll
learn from the mistake he
made and can come back
and can work his way back
into a position where he can
help this team.”
Lasley has 32 catches for
543 yards and three touchdowns.
Quick hits
UCLA tight end Austin
Roberts suffered a high ankle sprain, forcing receiver
Alex Van Dyke to switch to
tight end with the Bruins already shorthanded at the
position. … UCLA tailback
Jalen Starks and defensive
end Rick Wade did not play
after suffering undisclosed
injuries last week against Arizona. Bruins linebacker
Krys Barnes did not play after coming down with a case
of pneumonia last week. …
Right tackle Sunny Odogwu
made his Bruins debut after
missing the season’s first six
games with a variety of injuries.
ben.bolch@latimes.com
Twitter: @latbbolch
UCLA 31, Oregon 14
Oregon...................................0 14 0
UCLA ...................................14 0 10
First Quarter
0—14
7—31
UCLA—Jamabo 4 run (Molson kick), 6:16
UCLA—Pabico 31 pass from Rosen (Molson kick),
1:37
Second Quarter
ORE—Burmeister 7 run (Schneider kick), 10:34
ORE—Burmeister 4 run (Schneider kick), :37
Third Quarter
UCLA—FG Molson 42, 8:36
UCLA—Olorunfunmi 22 run (Molson kick), 3:14
Fourth Quarter
UCLA—Andrews 1 pass from Rosen (Molson kick),
9:03
STATISTICS
TEAM
ORE
UCLA
First downs ...................................24
22
Rushes-yards ..........................62-246
37-142
Passing ........................................74
266
Comp-Att-Int............................8-15-1
21-36-0
Return Yards..................................49
29
Punts-Avg................................4-40.5
4-46.25
Fumbles-Lost................................3-1
1-0
Penalties-Yards ...........................3-15
7-67
Time of Possession ....................30:21
29:39
Individual Leaders
RUSHING: Oregon, Freeman 29-160, Felix 7-30,
Burmeister 16-27, Mitchell 3-15, Benoit 7-14. UCLA,
Olorunfunmi 13-76, Jamabo 15-66, Stephens 4-12,
Gentosi 1-2, Roberts 1-(minus 1), (Team) 1-(minus 2),
Rosen 2-(minus 11).
PASSING: Oregon, Burmeister 8-15-1-74. UCLA,
Rosen 21-36-0-266.
RECEIVING: Oregon, Nelson 4-40, Schooler 1-16,
McCormick 1-11, Breeland 1-8, Redd 1-(minus 1).
UCLA, Howard 5-60, Andrews 5-44, Pabico 4-99,
J.Wilson 4-43, Olorunfunmi 2-12, Jamabo 1-8.
MISSED FIELD GOALS—Oregon, Schneider 32.
D12
SS
S U N DAY, O C T O B E R 22 , 2 017
L AT I M E S . C O M / S P O RTS
NHL STANDINGS
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Pacific
KINGS
Vegas
Calgary
DUCKS
Vancouver
San Jose
Edmonton
Arizona
Central
St. Louis
Chicago
Dallas
Nashville
Winnipeg
Colorado
Minnesota
W
6
6
4
3
3
3
2
0
W
6
5
5
4
4
4
2
L
0
1
4
3
3
4
5
7
L
2
2
3
3
3
4
2
OL
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
OL
1
2
0
1
0
0
2
Pts
13
12
8
7
7
6
4
1
Pts
13
12
10
9
8
8
6
GF
27
23
20
18
19
19
14
18
GF
29
32
23
21
22
23
22
GA
14
17
23
19
22
21
22
34
GA
24
22
21
21
26
21
22
Note: Overtime or shootout losses worth one point.
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Metropolitan
New Jersey
Pittsburgh
Columbus
Philadelphia
NY Islanders
Washington
Carolina
NY Rangers
Atlantic
Tampa Bay
Toronto
Ottawa
Detroit
Boston
Florida
Buffalo
Montreal
W
6
5
5
5
4
4
3
2
W
7
6
4
4
3
3
2
1
L
2
3
3
3
3
4
2
5
L
1
2
1
3
3
4
5
6
OL
0
1
0
0
1
1
1
2
OL
1
0
3
1
1
0
2
1
Pts
12
11
10
10
9
9
7
6
Pts
15
12
11
9
7
6
6
3
GF
31
30
25
28
24
28
17
24
GF
36
37
30
26
24
24
25
13
GA
24
39
21
18
24
31
16
32
GA
24
28
21
25
26
25
36
33
RESULTS
KINGS 6
AT COLUMBUS 4
AT N.Y. ISLANDERS 5
SHARKS 3
FLORIDA 4
AT WASHINGTON 1
BUFFALO 5
AT BOSTON 4 (OT)
AT OTTAWA 6
TORONTO 3
AT TAMPA BAY 7
PITTSBURGH 1
AT DALLAS 4
CAROLINA 3
AT N.Y. RANGERS 4
NASHVILLE 2
AT PHILADELPHIA 2
EDMONTON 1
AT VEGAS 3
ST. LOUIS 2 (OT)
CHICAGO 4
AT ARIZONA 2
MINNESOTA 4
AT CALGARY 2
Anze Kopitar broke a tie with 2:14 remaining with his
second goal of the game for the streaking Kings.
Anders Lee had two goals and an assist, helping the
Islanders overcome a hat trick by Logan Couture.
Backup goalie James Reimer stopped 41 shots to help
the Panthers end a three-game losing streak.
Ryan O’Reilly scored 2:59 into overtime for the Sabres,
who overcame a pair of three-goal deficits.
Derick Brassard and Mark Stone each had two goals and
an assist as the Senators got their first home win.
Tampa Bay’s Steven Stamkos and Nikita Kucherov
extended season-opening points streaks to nine games.
Tyler Pitlick scored two goals for the first time in his career
as the Stars won their fourth consecutive game.
Kevin Hayes and Jimmy Vesey each had a goal and an
assist to help the Rangers snap a five-game skid.
The Flyers’ Wayne Simmonds scored on a feed from
Valtteri Filppula with 2:15 left to break a tie.
William Karlsson scored at 4:36 of overtime to lift the
Golden Knights to their third consecutive victory.
Lance Bouma scored on a rebound with 4:24 left and
Corey Crawford stopped 27 shots for the Blackhawks.
Alex Stalock made 35 saves for the Wild and Chris
Stewart scored his sixth goal of the season.
For complete NHL summaries, go to latimes.com/sports/scores
TODAY’S GAME
Vancouver at Detroit, 4 p.m.
MONDAY’S GAMES
KINGS at Toronto, 4 p.m.
San Jose at NY Rangers, 4 p.m.
TUESDAY’S GAMES
DUCKS at Philadelphia, 4 p.m.
Edmonton at Pittsburgh, 4 p.m.
Arizona at N.Y. Islanders, 4 p.m.
Detroit at Buffalo, 4:30 p.m.
Vancouver at Minnesota, 5 p.m.
Chicago at Vegas, 7 p.m.
KINGS at Ottawa, 4:30 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Carolina, 4 p.m.
Florida at Montreal, 4:30 p.m.
Calgary at Nashville, 5 p.m.
Dallas at Colorado, 6 p.m.
Kopitar scores twice and
Kings continue hot start
His goals are set up by
Brown, who also
scores a goal, and L.A.
improves to 6-0-1.
KINGS 6
COLUMBUS 4
By Curtis Zupke
COLUMBUS, Ohio —
They didn’t see this coming.
They carried the usual
positivity into the season,
which usually gets ruined by
the first few losses. But the
Kings aren’t there yet, nor
did they predict being here,
at 6-0-1.
Not after Anze Kopitar
reached out and lifted them
to a 6-4 win Saturday against
the Columbus Blue Jackets
that kept the Kings the only
team in the NHL without a
regulation loss.
“No matter how good
your team is, you never really
envision that,” Doughty
said. “You can feel like you
have the best team in the
world and you probably
think you’re going to lose at
least one or two games in the
first eight or nine games.”
Said Dustin Brown: “I
don’t think you ever think
[that]. It’s the NHL. You
don’t expect to come out like
that.”
Brown played a big part
in setting up Kopitar’s two
goals. He outworked two defenders down low to get the
puck to Kopitar for a strike
in the first period, and he
found Kopitar back door for
the game-winning goal with
2 minutes 14 seconds remaining.
Brown scored an emptynet goal and had three as-
Jay LaPrete Associated Press
TREVOR LEWIS of the Kings gets the puck ahead of
Zach Werenski of Columbus in the first period.
sists. He and Kopitar have
scored 11 of the Kings’ 27
goals.
“It was kind of an up-anddown game, but they stayed
with it and it’s not surprising
they were the ones that put
the puck in the net at the end
of the game,” coach John
Stevens said.
“It’s really good to see
from those guys. I think
they’ve taken a leadership
role from day one.”
This is the first time the
Kings have won six of their
first seven games, and they
tied their longest streak to
start a season without a
regulation loss, also done in
1995-96 at 4-0-3.
It looked iffy when Columbus tied the score 4-4 on
Sonny Milano’s unassisted
goal that negated what had
been a textbook road period
by the Kings, who got goals
by Doughty and Jake
Muzzin in the first four minutes of the second period to
subdue the 15,329 at Nationwide Arena.
Muzzin wristed the puck
in through a screen, and
Doughty deflected Brown’s
shot that was sent from just
inside the blue line. It knuckled over goalie Sergei Bobrovsky.
“To be honest, I was a little surprised that I even got a
piece of it, but a good play by
Brownie,” Doughty said. “It
was kind of a flick shot,
that’s why I was kind of able
to see it to tip it. But it was a
smart play.”
The Kings trailed 3-2 after an opening period that
neither team will put on
their highlight videos. Lewis
lifted a backhand past Bobrovsky, and Columbus’
Matt Calvert and Oliver
Bjorkstrand got their first
goals of the season.
The teams were even in
the third period. Then Kopitar snuck behind the defense. Lewis created the ini-
tial change of possession
and Alex Iafallo drove to the
net.
“He kept the play alive for
a good five seconds, to allow
us to get on the ice,” Brown
said of Iafallo. “I kind of
snuck in behind coverage. I
knew Kopi was coming in off
the bench behind me, so I
just waited.”
An eastern Canada trip
waits the Kings, who have
sustained missing pieces
throughout this start. Saturday was their first game
without Jeff Carter. They
also played Brooks Laich in
Laich’s first NHL game since
April 9, 2016.
Stevens didn’t buy in to
their adaption so much as
winning without their best
game.
“We have to reset every
game here, and understand
that we gave up four goals
tonight,” Stevens said. “You
usually don’t win when you
give up four goals, so we’ve
got to learn from that. … We
told our guys, a win is a win,
and I think the guys found a
way to win.”
curtis.zupke@latimes.com
Twitter: @curtiszupke
KINGS 6, BLUE JACKETS 4
KINGS .....................................2
Columbus ................................3
2
1
2 — 6
0 — 4
FIRST PERIOD: 1. Clm., Foligno 2 (Panarin, Werenski), 5:43 (pp). 2. KINGS, Kopitar 5 (Muzzin, Brown),
6:51. 3. KINGS, Lewis 2 (Fantenberg, Cammalleri),
7:33. 4. Clm., Bjorkstrand 1 (Savard, Foligno), 8:00. 5.
Clm., Calvert 1 (Johnson, Anderson), 14:02.
Penalties—Kempe, KINGS, (tripping), 4:58. Forbort,
KINGS, (tripping), 11:38.
SECOND PERIOD: 6. KINGS, Muzzin 2 (Iafallo, Kopitar), 0:40. 7. KINGS, Doughty 3 (Brown, Forbort), 3:59.
8. Clm., Milano 5, 15:15. Penalties—Johnson, CBJ,
(hooking), 15:54.
THIRD PERIOD: 9. KINGS, Kopitar 6 (Iafallo, Brown),
17:46. 10, KINGS, Brown 5 (Muzzin), 18:27.
Penalties—Milano, CBJ, (hooking), 3:24. Cammalleri,
KINGS, (hooking), 4:07.
SHOTS ON GOAL: KINGS 9-11-12—32. Clm. 10-1214—36. Power-play conversions—KINGS 0 of 2. Clm. 1 of
3.
GOALIES: KINGS, Quick 5-0-1 (36 shots-32 saves).
Clm., Bobrovsky 4-2-0 (31-26). Att—15,329 (18,500).
T—2:36.
Hurricanes
are pushed
again but
hang on
NO. 8 MIAMI 27
SYRACUSE 19
associated press
Rick Bowmer Associated Press
ARIZONA STATE RUNNING BACK Kalen Ballage hurdles the Utah defense during the Sun Devils’ 30-10 victory at Salt Lake City.
PAC-12
Arizona stops Cal in second overtime
associated press
Quarterback Khalil Tate
ran for137 yards and a touchdown and passed for two
more, including a 22-yarder
to Bryce Wolma in the second overtime, and Arizona
held on to beat California 4544 on Saturday night at
Berkeley.
Zach Green scored the
Wildcats’ touchdown in the
first overtime and had a
three-yard run to open the
second extra period before
Tate scrambled in the backfield to avoid a sack and
found Wolma open near the
goal line to take a 45-38 lead.
California answered with
Vic
Enwere’s
one-yard
touchdown run but came up
short on a two-point conversion attempt when Arizona
linebacker Colin Schooler
deflected a Ross Bowers
pass intended for Jordan
Duncan near the back of the
end zone.
Bowers completed 29 of
49 for 301 yards and two
touchdowns, one in the first
overtime, but was intercepted twice.
The Wildcats (5-2, 3-1
Pac-12) wasted leads of 21-7
and 28-14 before holding off
the Bears (4-4, 1-4).
Tate continued to give
Arizona’s offense a lift. The
sophomore quarterback has
rushed for 694 yards and
passed for 468 in three
games since replacing Brandon Dawkins.
The teams combined for
984 yards of offense.
Arizona State 30, at
Utah 10: The Sun Devils suddenly resemble a serious
Pac-12 South title contender,
thanks to a surprisingly
stingy defense.
Utah could not figure out
how to move the ball for the
better part of four quarters
as Arizona State forced four
turnovers and allowed the
Utes to gain just 4.4 yards per
play.
The Sun Devils have given up only two touchdowns
in their last nine quarters.
“We just said early in the
year to keep plugging, keep
plugging, and something’s
going to break,” linebacker
Christian Sam said. “And
now the dam’s broke.”
Arizona State’s domination also extended to the
other side of the ball, breaking down the Utes with a
punishing running attack.
Demario Richard and Kalen
Ballage combined for 168
yards on the ground.
Manny Wilkins threw for
140 yards on 19-of-29 passing
to help Arizona State (4-3,
3-1 Pac-12) end a seven-game
road losing streak.
Tyler Huntley started for
Utah at quarterback after
sitting out losses to USC and
Stanford with a shoulder injury.
Huntley struggled in his
return, throwing for 155
yards and four interceptions
on 19-of-35 passing.
Arizona State’s defensive
domination it displayed
against Washington turned
out to be no fluke from the
beginning.
The Sun Devils shut Utah
down cold before halftime.
They allowed the Utes to
gain only 93 total yards and
seven first downs in the first
half.
Two first-half drives for
Utah (4-3, 1-3) ended with interceptions from Huntley.
“There were no surprises
out there,” Sam said. “We
saw everything we expected
from practice. We just had to
execute.”
No. 15 Washington State
28, Colorado 0
STANDINGS
TEAM
NORTH
Washington State
Stanford
Washington
California
Oregon
Oregon State
SOUTH
USC
Arizona
Arizona State
UCLA
Utah
Colorado
Conf.
W L
4 1
4 1
3 1
1 3
1 4
0 4
W L
4 1
3 1
2 1
2 2
1 3
1 4
UP NEXT
Thursday
Stanford at Oregon State
Saturday
UCLA at Washington
USC at Arizona State
California at Colorado
Utah at Oregon
Washington State at Arizona
Overall
W L
7 1
5 2
6 1
4 3
4 4
1 6
W L
6 2
5 2
4 3
4 3
4 3
4 4
MIAMI GARDENS, Fla.
— Travis Homer’s 33-yard
touchdown run with 2 minutes 48 seconds left helped
No. 8 Miami hold off Syracuse 27-19 on Saturday.
The Hurricanes (6-0, 4-0
Atlantic Coast Conference)
have won 11 consecutive
games, their longest streak
since winning 34 games in a
row from 2000 to 2002. Miami
has won its first four ACC
games for the first time since
joining conference in 2004.
“Well, we found another
way to make it really exciting,” coach Mark Richt said.
“Part of the reason was Syracuse is a really good football
team. We, for some reason,
can’t find a way to play really
good on both sides of the ball
at the same time.”
The Hurricanes needed
last-second plays to beat
Florida State and Georgia
Tech. This one had intrigue
remaining until Syracuse
turned the ball over on
downs near midfield with
1:31 left.
Malik Rosier threw for
344 yards and two touchdowns for Miami, Christopher Herndon had a careerbest 10 catches for 96 yards
and a touchdown, and Jeff
Thomas caught a 48-yard
touchdown pass.
“It’s always a good feeling
to win,” Homer said. “But
seeing your team stay strong
and pull through, it’s the
best.”
Cole Murphy had four
field goals for Syracuse (4-4,
2-2), including a career-best
53-yard kick with 5:23 left to
get the Orange within 20-19.
But Miami answered with a
nine-play, 85-yard drive
capped by Homer’s touchdown run that helped the
Hurricanes escape.
Syracuse’s Eric Dungey
had four passes intercepted,
all in the first half, and was 13
of 41 for 137 yards.
“It’s just, it’s hard to swallow when you don’t win,”
coach Dino Babers said.
“We’re 4-4, we’ve got the
toughest schedule in the
country and we’re 4-4. And
guess what. We’ve got two
more on the road and two
more at home in the loud
house and I guarantee you
we’re going to be ready to
play those four games.”
SS
L AT I M E S . C O M / S P O RT S
S U N DAY, O C T O B E R 22 , 2 017
D13
DODGERS REPORT
Seager to test back in simulated games
By Andy McCullough
After sitting out the National League Championship Series because of an
injured
back,
Dodgers
shortstop Corey Seager will
take part in simulated
games at Dodger Stadium
this week as the final step to
gauge his readiness for the
World Series.
“We’re certainly optimistic,” manager Dave Roberts said in a conference call
Saturday afternoon. “Corey
really doesn’t want to be denied.”
Seager suffered a sprained lower back Oct. 9 in the final game of the Dodgers’ division series sweep over Arizona. He received an epidural injection a day later, but
his body did not respond to
treatment in time to be
ready to play the Chicago
Cubs in the NLCS.
A stirring performance
by Charlie Culberson, who
started three games at
shortstop and batted .455,
negated Seager’s absence,
but the Dodgers would
eagerly welcome Seager
back if healthy.
Seager has been cleared
to run the bases and take
swings off a tee. He has not
faced live pitching since
playing the Diamondbacks,
when he posted a .467 onbase percentage.
“To simulate that game
speed, against an actual live
pitcher, will be telling,” Roberts said.
If Seager is healthy, the
team would consider using
him as the designated hitter
during the three games
played under the American
League rules. Because Sea-
ger injured his back while
sliding, Roberts said, the
team was unsure what activities might aggravate his
condition.
“We’re just trying to get
him as healthy as we can,
and with the training staff,
we’ll make that decision,”
Roberts said. “But, yeah, if
he can swing the bat and
isn’t compromised physically, that makes sense.”
Darvish started Game 3. Hill
has had better results at
home in 2017; Darvish has
pitched well on the road.
Darvish also spent his entire major league career, before joining the Dodgers in
August, in the American
League. So the order in
which they are used is unlikely to change in the World
Series.
Waiting game
Roberts offered a positive report on the health of
Kershaw, who missed five
weeks during the summer
with a lower back strain.
“Physically, Clayton feels
good,” Roberts said. “Obviously, you saw the emotion
after [the clinch]. He’ll be
ready to go Game 1.”
The Dodgers followed a
familiar drill in setting up
their rotation. Clayton Kershaw will start Game 1. Alex
Wood will start Game 4. But
Roberts indicated the club
had not determined how
Rich Hill and Yu Darvish
would line up in the second
and third games.
Hill started Game 2 in
each of the first two series;
THE DAY IN SPORTS
HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL
Giants shift
personnel
CITY
METRO LEAGUE
Locke 50, Mendez 7
SOUTHERN SECTION
AMBASSADOR LEAGUE
Aquinas 65, Arrowhead Christian 0
CROSS VALLEY LEAGUE
Big Bear 55, Silver Valley 21
INLAND VALLEY LEAGUE
Riverside North 30, Riverside Poly 21
SAN JOAQUIN LEAGUE
Santa Clarita Christian 42, Capistrano Valley
Christian 0
Webb 55, Southlands Christian 0
SANTA FE LEAGUE
St. Anthony 27, St. Genevieve 14
TRI-VALLEY LEAGUE
Bishop Diego 65, Santa Paula 0
INTERSECTIONAL
Bishop 60, Vasquez 14
CSDR 56, Phoenix (Ariz.) Phoenix Day School for
the Deaf 14
8 MAN
SOUTHERN SECTION
MT. PINOS LEAGUE
Villanova Prep 46, Thacher 20
NONLEAGUE
Chadwick 50, Downey Calvary Chapel 0
Faith Baptist 56, Price 0
Cate 34, Upland Christian 20
Friday's Results
CITY
CENTRAL LEAGUE
Bernstein 27, Belmont 24
Hollywood 34, Roybal 0
Legacy 19, Marquez 13
COLISEUM LEAGUE
Crenshaw 47, View Park 0
Dorsey 68, Hawkins 0
Manual Arts 46, Los Angeles 14
EAST VALLEY LEAGUE
Arleta 35, North Hollywood 21
Chavez 26, Sun Valley Poly 10
Verdugo Hills 40, Monroe 15
EASTERN LEAGUE
Garfield 55, South East 0
Huntington Park 54, Bell 40
South Gate 49, Los Angeles Roosevelt 20
EXPOSITION LEAGUE
Fremont 31, Angelou 0
MARINE LEAGUE
Carson 54, Washington 12
Narbonne 57, San Pedro 7
Wilmington Banning 47, Gardena 0
METRO LEAGUE
Sotomayor 22, New Designs Watts 20
NORTHERN LEAGUE
Eagle Rock 48, Los Angeles Marshall 7
Los Angeles Wilson 34, Franklin 28
Torres 36, Lincoln 0
VALLEY MISSION LEAGUE
Reseda 19, Sylmar 6
San Fernando 49, Granada Hills Kennedy 0
Van Nuys 30, Panorama 14
WEST VALLEY LEAGUE
Cleveland 41, Chatsworth 12
El Camino Real 24, Birmingham 21
Granada Hills 30, Taft 0
WESTERN LEAGUE
Fairfax 54, Los Angeles Hamilton 7
Palisades 18, Westchester 12
Venice 35, Los Angeles University 0
SOUTHERN SECTION
ALMONT LEAGUE
Bell Gardens 49, Alhambra 21
Montebello 49, Keppel 0
Schurr 49, San Gabriel 6
AMBASSADOR LEAGUE
Linfield Christian 59, Western Christian 0
Riverside Notre Dame 32, Ontario Christian 14
ANGELUS LEAGUE
Cathedral 49, La Salle 6
Harvard-Westlake 49, St. Paul 35
St. Francis 69, Salesian 0
ARROWHEAD LEAGUE
Anza Hamilton 18, Sherman Indian 12
BASELINE LEAGUE
Los Osos 29, Damien 26
Rancho Cucamonga 48, Etiwanda 7
Upland 56, Chino Hills 0
BAY LEAGUE
Mira Costa 50, Inglewood 21
Palos Verdes 45, Morningside 14
Redondo 35, Peninsula 7
BIG VIII LEAGUE
Corona Centennial 65, Corona 0
Eastvale Roosevelt 40, King 14
Norco 56, Corona Santiago 42
CAMINO LEAGUE
Calabasas 44, Newbury Park 24
Moorpark 43, Thousand Oaks 0
CANYON LEAGUE
Agoura 44, Royal 28
Simi Valley 21, Oak Park 14
CHANNEL LEAGUE
Dos Pueblos 34, Buena 10
Santa Barbara 10, Ventura 9
CITRUS BELT LEAGUE
Cajon 33, Yucaipa 16
Carter 35, Citrus Valley 14
Redlands 35, Eisenhower 6
Redlands East Valley 49, Miller 0
CRESTVIEW LEAGUE
Yorba Linda 32, Anaheim Canyon 0
CROSS VALLEY LEAGUE
Excelsior 22, Riverside Prep 14
DE ANZA LEAGUE
Rancho Mirage 32, Yucca Valley 28
Twentynine Palms 34, Desert Mirage 20
DEL RIO LEAGUE
California 34, Pioneer 13
La Serna 42, Whittier 7
Santa Fe 30, El Rancho 27
DESERT SKY LEAGUE
Barstow 60, Granite Hills 20
Silverado 55, Victor Valley 28
DESERT VALLEY LEAGUE
Indio 37, Cathedral City 34
Palm Desert 24, La Quinta 17 (3OT)
Shadow Hills 35, Palm Springs 14
EMPIRE LEAGUE
Cypress 17, La Palma Kennedy 7
Placentia Valencia 35, Tustin 10
FOOTHILL LEAGUE
Golden Valley 38, Canyon Country Canyon 0
Hart 35, West Ranch 6
Valencia 50, Saugus 3
FREEWAY LEAGUE
Fullerton 47, Buena Park 21
La Habra 40, Sonora 0
Sunny Hills 33, Troy 7
FRONTIER LEAGUE
Carpinteria 29, Malibu 14
Santa Clara 50, Fillmore 14
GARDEN GROVE LEAGUE
Garden Grove 47, Garden Grove Santiago 0
Westminster La Quinta 40, Rancho Alamitos 14
GOLD COAST - OCEAN LEAGUE
Sierra Canyon 51, Campbell Hall 7
GOLD COAST - VALLEY LEAGUE
Viewpoint 42, McAuliffe 6
GOLDEN LEAGUE
Antelope Valley 49, Knight 28
Eastside 27, Littlerock 18
Palmdale 63, Lancaster 6
Quartz Hill 42, Highland 18
GOLDEN WEST LEAGUE
Westminster 27, Ocean View 20
HACIENDA LEAGUE
Charter Oak 35, Walnut 0
Diamond Ranch 67, West Covina 14
Los Altos 41, Chino 30
INLAND VALLEY LEAGUE
Rancho Verde 42, Arlington 0
Valley View 77, Canyon Springs 13
LOS PADRES LEAGUE
Lompoc 17, Santa Ynez 7
Pioneer Valley 42, Lompoc Cabrillo 7
MARMONTE LEAGUE
Oaks Christian 23, Camarillo 21
Westlake 42, St. Bonaventure 18
MIRAMONTE LEAGUE
Garey 41, Ganesha 20
Pomona 42, La Puente 0
MISSION LEAGUE
Bishop Amat 21, Gardena Serra 14
Chaminade 45, Alemany 0
wire reports
The San Francisco Giants said Saturday they reassigned longtime pitching coach Dave Righetti to
special assistant to general manager Bobby Evans.
Bullpen coach Mark Gardner is moving into a
position assisting with pitching evaluations and assistant hitting coach Steve Decker is becoming an
assistant in baseball operations.
Righetti was the club’s pitching coach for 18 years
and was one of only five Giants coaches since 1900
with at least 10 years on the staff.
San Francisco ranked 16th in the majors with a
4.50 earned-run average in 2017.
Chris Bosio is out as pitching coach of the Chicago Cubs after six seasons.
A person familiar with the situation said the
team will not pick up his contract option for next
season. The person spoke on the condition of anonymity because the move has not been announced.
ETC.
NBA levels a $25,000 fine
against Pelicans center Cousins
New Orleans Pelicans center DeMarcus Cousins
was fined $25,000 by the NBA for directing inappropriate language toward a fan.
The league said Cousins was penalized for his actions that came with 50 seconds remaining in the
Pelicans’ 103-91 loss to the Memphis Grizzlies on
Wednesday night.
Receivers Kenny Britt and Corey Coleman were
sent back to Cleveland last week for missing curfew
while the Browns were in Houston to play the Texans, a person familiar with the situation told the Associated Press.
The person spoke on condition of anonymity because the team is not commenting on the matter.
The Browns lost 33-17 and fell to 0-6.
Justin Thomas fired a two-under-par 70 in windy
conditions to share the lead with fellow American
Scott Brown after the third round of the CJ Cup in
Jeju, South Korea.
Thomas offset a lone double bogey and a bogey
with five birdies to reach the clubhouse at nineunder 207.
Brown had bogeys on Nos. 10 and 11 but recovered
with two birdies on the back nine for a 71.
Anirban Lahiri of India moved into a share of
third place with Australian Marc Leishman (71) after a 69 that included four birdies and a bogey.
Bernhard Langer matched the course record
with a nine-under-par 63 to take a three-stroke lead
in the Dominion Energy Charity Classic at Richmond, Va. Vijay Singh was second after a 63.
Tournament host Sergio Garcia will take a oneshot lead into the final round of the Andalucia
Valderrama Masters after shooting a three-under 68
at Sotogrande, Spain. He is one shot ahead of Britain’s Daniel Brooks.
The Pittsburgh Penguins acquired forward Riley
Sheahan and a 2018 fifth-round draft pick from the
Detroit Red Wings in exchange for forward Scott
Wilson and a 2018 third-round draft pick.
Detroit also sent defenseman Ryan Sproul to the
New York Rangers for forward Matt Puempel.
Lewis Hamilton won the pole position for the
U.S. Grand Prix on Sunday at Austin, Texas, with
Formula One title rival Sebastian Vettel getting a
big push on his final lap to grab second. Hamilton is
chasing a fourth career season championship
and holds a 59-point lead over Vettel with four races
to go.
Christopher Bell raced to his first NASCAR
Xfinity Series victory, beating Joe Gibbs Racing
teammate Erik Jones after they made contact with
four laps left at Kansas Speedway in Kansas City,
Kan. Pole winner Tyler Reddick finished second,
Ryan Blaney was third and Jones was 15th.
Host Huddersfield Town won 2-1 for its first victory over English Premier League power Manchester United since March 1952. ... Manchester City took
a five-point lead in the EPL with a 3-0 victory over
Burnley and Sergio Aguero scored on a penalty kick
for his 177th goal, tying Eric Brook’s team record
that stood for 78 years. ... A slow start by the United
States let England take a quick two-goal lead and
cruise to a 4-1 victory and a berth in the semifinals of
the Under-17 World Cup at Goa, India. Rhian Brewster scored three goals. Josh Sargent scored for the
U.S., his third goal of the tournament.
Murat Gassiev (25-0) knocked out Krzysztof
Wlodarczyk (53-4-1) in three rounds in Newark, N.J.,
to retain the IBF cruiserweight title.
Kershaw read
Gina Ferazzi Los Angeles Times
andy.mccullough@latimes.com
Twitter: @McCulloughTimes
Loyola 17, Crespi 0
MISSION VALLEY LEAGUE
El Monte 51, Gabrielino 14
South El Monte 28, Rosemead 27
MOJAVE RIVER LEAGUE
Apple Valley 28, Serrano 7
Ridgecrest Burroughs 20, Oak Hills 17
Sultana 33, Hesperia 0
MONTVIEW LEAGUE
Azusa 56, Sierra Vista 21
Nogales 42, Duarte 7
Workman 14, Gladstone 5
MOORE LEAGUE
Lakewood 42, Compton 6
Long Beach Poly 81, Long Beach Jordan 0
MOUNTAIN PASS LEAGUE
Beaumont 23, West Valley 6
Citrus Hill 48, San Jacinto 14
Hemet 24, Tahquitz 0
MOUNTAIN VALLEY LEAGUE
Banning 18, San Bernardino 14
Moreno Valley 28, Pacific 20
MT. BALDY LEAGUE
Chaffey 30, Ontario 7
Colony 44, Montclair 0
Don Lugo 35, Alta Loma 20
NORTH HILLS LEAGUE
Esperanza 45, El Dorado 36
NORTHERN LEAGUE
Santa Maria 40, Morro Bay 19
OCEAN LEAGUE
Culver City 47, Hawthorne 0
Lawndale 49, El Segundo 14
Santa Monica 35, Beverly Hills 7
OLYMPIC LEAGUE
Maranatha 58, Whittier Christian 29
ORANGE LEAGUE
Anaheim 42, Santa Ana Valley 17
Savanna 29, Magnolia 18
ORANGE COAST LEAGUE
Estancia 44, Costa Mesa 20
Laguna Beach 32, Saddleback 28
PAC-5 LEAGUE
Arroyo Grande 38, Righetti 28
Atascadero 35, San Luis Obispo 14
PACIFIC LEAGUE
Burbank 37, Crescenta Valley 20
Muir 40, Burbank Burroughs 17
Pasadena 68, Hoover 6
PACIFIC COAST LEAGUE
Irvine 31, Irvine University 30
Woodbridge 31, Beckman 24
PACIFIC VIEW LEAGUE
Oxnard 42, Channel Islands 0
Rio Mesa 48, Hueneme 21
PALOMARES LEAGUE
Ayala 47, Diamond Bar 25
Claremont 36, Bonita 31
South Hills 27, Glendora 24
PIONEER LEAGUE
Leuzinger 20, Torrance 7
North Torrance 62, Compton Centennial 0
West Torrance 48, South Torrance 10
PREP LEAGUE
Rio Hondo Prep 59, Firebaugh 6
RIO HONDO LEAGUE
San Marino 49, Temple City 19
South Pasadena 41, La Canada 6
RIVER VALLEY LEAGUE
La Sierra 21, Hillcrest 13
Norte Vista 29, Patriot 21
Ramona 38, Jurupa Valley 16
SAN ANDREAS LEAGUE
Jurupa Hills 57, Indian Springs 6
Rim of the World 16, Arroyo Valley 6
San Gorgonio 34, Rialto 27
SAN GABRIEL VALLEY LEAGUE
Downey 62, Lynwood 6
Gahr 46, Warren 42
Paramount 48, Dominguez 0
SANTA FE LEAGUE
Mary Star 34, St. Monica 6
SEA VIEW LEAGUE
Capistrano Valley 52, Aliso Niguel 21
El Toro 40, Dana Hills 0
SOUTH CATHOLIC LEAGUE
Bishop Montgomery 26, St. Bernard 18
Cantwell-Sacred Heart 42, Bosco Tech 7
SOUTH COAST LEAGUE
Mission Viejo 63, Trabuco Hills 0
San Clemente 31, San Juan Hills 13
SOUTH VALLEY LEAGUE
California Military Institute 60, Temecula Prep 21
Rancho Christian 56, Calvary Murrieta 20
Santa Rosa Academy 47, Nuview Bridge 6
SOUTHWESTERN LEAGUE
Murrieta Mesa 41, Great Oak 21
Murrieta Valley 42, Temecula Valley 14
Vista Murrieta 41, Chaparral 10
SUBURBAN LEAGUE
La Mirada 42, Bellflower 7
Mayfair 35, Artesia 7
SUNBELT LEAGUE
Heritage 62, Perris 0
Paloma Valley 42, Elsinore 21
Temescal Canyon 27, Lakeside 7
SUNKIST LEAGUE
Fontana 40, Bloomington 0
Grand Terrace 53, Summit 14
Kaiser 28, Colton 0
SUNSET LEAGUE
Fountain Valley 35, Newport Harbor 7
Huntington Beach 28, Marina 20
TRI-VALLEY LEAGUE
Grace Brethren 48, Nordhoff 14
TRINITY LEAGUE
Mater Dei 45, JSerra 3
Servite 29, Orange Lutheran 28
St. John Bosco 40, Santa Margarita 38
VALLE VISTA LEAGUE
Northview 61, Rowland 23
San Dimas 56, Hacienda Heights Wilson 0
NONLEAGUE
Boron 46, Ribet Academy 8
Carnegie 44, Verbum Dei 6
Cerritos Valley Christian 56, Monrovia 20
8 MAN
CITY
VALLEY LEAGUE
Discovery 34, Fulton 20
North Valley Military Institute 52, East Valley 0
Sherman Oaks CES 56, Sun Valley 18
SOUTHERN SECTION
AGAPE LEAGUE
Academy of Careers & Exploration 41, Hesperia
Christian 40
California Lutheran 70, Lucerne Valley 22
COAST VALLEY LEAGUE
Santa Maria Valley Christian 72, Coast Union 34
Shandon 58, Maricopa 14
DESERT MOUNTAIN LEAGUE
Mojave 77, Lone Pine 0
EXPRESS LEAGUE
Avalon 38, St. Michael's Prep 28
Rolling Hills Prep 31, La Verne Lutheran 0
OMEGA LEAGUE
Hillcrest Christian 88, Lighthouse Christian 42
VICTORY LEAGUE
Bermuda Dunes Desert Christian 54, Bloomington Christian 42
Joshua Springs 60, Desert Chapel 0
WARRIOR LEAGUE
Public Safety Academy 50, San Jacinto Valley
Academy 42
Riverside County Education Academy 30, Noli Indian 12
NONLEAGUE
Mission Prep 51, Flintridge Prep 13
Windward 35, Lancaster Baptist 28
Cornerstone Christian 68, Calvary Baptist 56
INTERSECTIONAL
Edwards AFB Desert 26, Bright Star 20
Lebec Frazier Mountain 42, Cuyama Valley 38
Thursday's Results
SOUTHERN SECTION
ACADEMY LEAGUE
Crean Lutheran 17, Orange Vista 16
CRESTVIEW LEAGUE
Villa Park 56, Foothill 3
EMPIRE LEAGUE
Garden Grove Pacifica 68, Western 14
GARDEN GROVE LEAGUE
Los Amigos 21, Bolsa Grande 14
GOLDEN WEST LEAGUE
Orange 16, Segerstrom 15
Santa Ana 54, Loara 6
MISSION VALLEY LEAGUE
COREY SEAGER hasn’t played for the Dodgers
since suffering a sprained lower back Oct. 9.
GOLF
Arroyo 55, Pasadena Marshall 0
MOORE LEAGUE
Millikan 35, Long Beach Cabrillo 7
MOUNTAIN VALLEY LEAGUE
Rubidoux 56, Vista del Lago 20
NORTH HILLS LEAGUE
El Modena 31, Brea Olinda 14
ORANGE LEAGUE
Katella 34, Century 8
ORANGE COAST LEAGUE
Godinez 42, Santa Ana Calvary Chapel 14
PACIFIC LEAGUE
Arcadia 35, Glendale 0
PACIFIC COAST LEAGUE
Corona del Mar 56, Northwood 0
PREP LEAGUE
Pasadena Poly 54, Trinity Classical Academy 6
SAN JOAQUIN LEAGUE
Saddleback Valley Christian 48, Fairmont Prep 6
SUBURBAN LEAGUE
Norwalk 69, Cerritos 6
SUNSET LEAGUE
Los Alamitos 24, Edison 16
VALLE VISTA LEAGUE
Covina 56, Baldwin Park 28
8 MAN
SOUTHERN SECTION
NONLEAGUE
Laguna Blanca 78, Milken 12
TRANSACTIONS
BASEBALL
Atlanta—Assigned pitcher Armando Rivero
outright to Gwinnett (IL).
San Francisco—Reassigned pitching coach
Dave Righetti to special assistant to the general
manager, bullpen coach Mark Gardner to special
assistant for pitching evaluations; and assistant
hitting coach Steve Decker to special assistant
for baseball operations.
BASKETBALL
NBA—Fined New Orleans forward DeMarcus
Cousins $25,000 for directing inappropriate language towards a fan.
FOOTBALL
Green Bay—Signed safety Jermaine
Whitehead from the practice squad.
Jacksonville—Waived wide receiver Max
McCaffrey; signed wide receiver Jaydon Mickens
from the practice squad.
HOCKEY
N.Y. Rangers—Traded forward Matt Puempel
to Detroit for defenseman Ryan Sproul.
TENNIS
$1.5-MILLION KREMLIN CUP
At Moscow
Surface: Hard-Indoor
MEN’S
SINGLES
(semifinals)—Damir
Dzumhur (6), Bosnia-Herzegovina, d. Mirza Basic, Bosnia-Herzegovina, 6-0, 7-6 (9); Ricardas
Berankis, Lithuania, d. Adrian Mannarino (3),
France, 3-6, 6-4, 6-1.
WOMEN’S SINGLES (final)—Julia Goerges (7),
Germany, d. Daria Kasatkina, Russia, 6-1, 6-2.
$696,300 STOCKHOLM OPEN
At Stockholm
Surface: Hard-Indoor
SINGLES (semifinals)—Grigor Dimitrov (1),
Bulgaria, d. Fabio Fognini (6), Italy, 6-3, 7-6 (2);
Juan Martin del Potro (4), Argentina, d. Fernando
Verdasco (8), Spain, 6-7 (4), 6-4, 7-6 (1).
DOUBLES
(semifinals)—Aisam-ul-Haq
Qureshi, Pakistan-Jean-Julien Rojer (2), Netherlands, d. Jack Sock, and Nenad Zimonjic (3),
Serbia, 6-7 (3), 6-4, 10-6.
$696,300 EUROPEAN OPEN
At Antwerp, Belgium
Surface: Hard-Indoor
SINGLES (semifinals)—Jo-Wilfried Tsonga (2),
France, d. Ruben Bemelmans, Belgium, 6-3,
6-3; Diego Schwartzman (4), Argentina, d. Stefanos Tsitsipas, Greece, 6-3, 7-5.
DOUBLES (semifinals)—Santiago Gonzalez,
Mexico-Julio Peralta, Chile, d. Wesley Koolhof,
Netherlands-Artem Sitak, New Zealand, 7-5,
6-3.
$226,750 LUXEMBOURG OPEN
At Luxembourg
Surface: Hard-Indoor
SINGLES (final)—Carina Witthoeft, Germany,
d. Monica Puig, Puerto Rico, 6-3, 7-5.
DOUBLES (final)—Lesley Kerkhove, Netherlands-Lidziya Marozava, Belarus, d. Eugenie
Bouchard, Canada-Kirsten Flipkens, Belgium,
6-7 (4), 6-4, 10-6.
SOCCER
INTERNATIONAL
ENGLAND
Premier League
Chelsea 4, Watford 2
Stoke 1, Bournemouth 2
Huddersfield 2, Man United 1
Man City 3, Burnley 0
Newcastle 1, Crystal Palace 0
Swansea 1, Leicester 2
Southampton 1, West Brom 0
ITALY
Serie A
Sampdoria 5, Crotone 0
Napoli 0, Inter 0
SPAIN
La Liga
Levante 1, Getafe 1
Betis 2, Alaves 0
Valencia 4, Sevilla 0
Barcelona 2, Malaga 0
FRANCE
Ligue 1
Monaco 2, Caen 0
Angers 0, Toulouse 1
Amiens 1, Bordeaux 0
Rennes 1, Lille 0
Nantes 2, Guingamp 1
Metz 1, Dijon 2
GERMANY
Bundesliga
RB Leipzig 1, Stuttgart 0
Moenchengladbach 1, Leverkusen 5
Augsburg 1, Hannover 2
Eintracht 2, Dortmund 2
Hamburger SV 0, Bayern 1
THE ODDS
Pro Football
Today
Favorite
Line (O/U)
Underdog
Arizona
RAMS
3 (451⁄2)
at CHARGERS
PK (401⁄2)
Denver
Tennessee
51⁄2 (451⁄2)
at Cleveland
at Indianapolis
Jacksonville
3 (431⁄2)
Cincinnati
at Pittsburgh
51⁄2 (401⁄2)
at Minnesota
51⁄2 (38)
Baltimore
1
at Miami
3 (38 ⁄2)
N.Y. Jets
at Buffalo
3 (45)
Tampa Bay
Carolina
3 (41)
at Chicago
at Green Bay
New Orleans
4 (471⁄2)
1
at S. Francisco
Dallas
6 (48 ⁄2)
Seattle
4 (391⁄2)
at N.Y. Giants
1
Atlanta
at New England 3 (56 ⁄2)
Monday
Favorite
Line (O/U)
Underdog
at Philadelphia
5 (49)
Washington
Updates at Pregame.com
—Associated Press
PRO FOOTBALL
CANADIAN LEAGUE
Saturday’s Results
Toronto 29, Winnipeg 28
Edmonton 35, British Columbia 29, OT
$9.25-MILLION CJ CUP
At Jeju Island, South Korea—Par 72
Nine Bridges—7,196 yards
54-Hole Scores
Justin Thomas ................63-74-70—207
Scott Brown ...................66-70-71—207
Anirban Lahiri.................69-71-69—209
Marc Leishman...............66-72-71—209
Whee Kim .....................68-70-72—210
Cameron Smith ..............69-68-73—210
Lucas Glover ..................69-67-74—210
Byeong Hun An ..............71-73-67—211
Luke List .......................68-67-76—211
Jamie Lovemark..............70-74-68—212
Paul Casey ....................72-71-69—212
Brian Harman ................68-72-72—212
Nick Taylor .....................68-72-72—212
Kyle Stanley...................68-71-73—212
Chez Reavie...................66-72-74—212
Morgan Hoffmann ...........73-71-69—213
Jason Day .....................68-74-71—213
Rafa Cabrera Bello..........71-70-72—213
Branden Grace ...............72-67-74—213
Harold Varner III .............69-72-73—214
Thomas Pieters...............71-68-75—214
Robert Streb ..................69-71-74—214
Patrick Reed ..................66-72-76—214
Ian Poulter.....................71-71-73—215
Hudson Swafford ............68-73-74—215
Pat Perez.......................69-71-75—215
Ollie Schniederjans .........67-72-76—215
Patrick Rodgers ..............69-75-73—217
Kevin Tway.....................71-72-74—217
Tony Finau .....................67-75-75—217
Wesley Bryan .................70-72-75—217
Adam Scott ...................72-75-70—217
Charles Howell III............67-72-78—217
Seung-Yul Noh ...............79-65-74—218
Charl Schwartzel.............71-72-75—218
Jinho Choi .....................71-71-76—218
K.T. Kim ........................70-72-76—218
Stewart Cink ..................71-70-77—218
Jhonattan Vegas .............67-77-75—219
Russell Henley................67-76-76—219
Si Woo Kim....................70-75-74—219
Keegan Bradley ..............70-73-77—220
Kelly Kraft......................73-73-74—220
Emiliano Grillo................70-76-74—220
Young-Han Song .............75-71-74—220
Daniel Berger .................70-74-77—221
Jung-Gon Hwang ............76-69-76—221
Bud Cauley....................69-77-75—221
Camilo Villegas ..............71-75-75—221
Kevin Na .......................74-73-74—221
Chad Campbell ..............74-74-73—221
Chris Stroud...................71-75-76—222
Chris Kirk ......................72-74-76—222
Kyoung-Hoon Lee............71-76-75—222
Sung Kang.....................73-74-75—222
Graeme McDowell...........73-73-77—223
Adam Hadwin ................75-72-76—223
James Hahn...................74-73-76—223
Sangmoon Bae ..............71-76-76—223
Cheng Tsung Pan ............72-77-74—223
Danny Lee .....................71-73-80—224
Hyungjoon Lee ...............73-72-79—224
Gary Woodland ..............78-72-74—224
Seunghyuk Kim ..............77-73-74—224
K.J. Choi........................69-74-82—225
Rod Pampling ................68-78-79—225
Jonas Blixt .....................76-71-80—227
Jeunghun Wang ..............74-74-79—227
Gavin Kyle Green ............66-82-79—227
J.B. Holmes....................75-79-73—227
Junghwan Lee ................72-77-79—228
Xander Schauffele...........69-82-78—229
Ryan Ruffels ..................75-74-81—230
Cody Gribble..................73-81-76—230
Jim Herman ...................75-81-77—233
Grayson Murray ..............75-78-81—234
Gyu Min Lee ..................87-80-77—244
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-1
+1
+1
+1
+1
+1
+1
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+2
+2
+2
+2
+3
+3
+3
+4
+4
+4
+4
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+5
+5
+5
+5
+5
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+6
+6
+6
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+7
+7
+7
+7
+8
+8
+8
+8
+9
+9
+11
+11
+11
+11
+12
+13
+14
+14
+17
+18
+28
$2.2-MILLION SWINING SKIRTS CLASSIC
At Taipei, Taiwan—Par 72
Miramar Resort & Country Club—6,504 yards
54-Hole Leaders
Eun-Hee Ji.....................66-71-69—206 -10
Lydia Ko........................70-74-68—212 -4
Jenny Shin.....................70-67-75—212 -4
Chella Choi....................75-69-69—213 -3
Cristie Kerr ....................73-70-70—213 -3
Carlota Ciganda .............72-70-71—213 -3
Shanshan Feng ..............72-70-71—213 -3
Madelene Sagstrom ........72-68-73—213 -3
Brittany Altomare ............70-68-75—213 -3
Lizette Salas ..................76-68-70—214 -2
Alena Sharp...................75-68-71—214 -2
Angel Yin.......................71-71-72—214 -2
Megan Khang.................69-71-74—214 -2
Pei-Ying Tsai ..................74-69-72—215 -1
Brittany Lincicome ..........71-71-73—215 -1
Charley Hull ...................74-71-71—216 E
Nicole Broch Larsen ........71-74-71—216 E
Candie Kung ..................71-74-71—216 E
Nelly Korda....................73-71-72—216 E
So Yeon Ryu ..................73-68-75—216 E
Brittany Lang..................71-70-75—216 E
Yani Tseng .....................73-72-72—217 +1
Sei Young Kim................69-76-72—217 +1
Jacqui Concolino ............74-70-73—217 +1
Na Yeon Choi .................73-71-73—217 +1
Azahara Munoz...............70-72-75—217 +1
Wei-Ling Hsu..................72-75-71—218 +2
Minjee Lee ....................76-70-72—218 +2
Marina Alex ...................73-73-72—218 +2
Ally McDonald................73-71-74—218 +2
Ariya Jutanugarn .............69-75-74—218 +2
Su Oh...........................73-66-79—218 +2
Laura Gonzalez Escallon...73-75-71—219 +3
Jennifer Song .................72-75-72—219 +3
Haru Nomura .................74-72-73—219 +3
Sarah Jane Smith ...........72-73-74—219 +3
Jodi Ewart Shadoff ..........74-70-75—219 +3
Amy Yang ......................73-71-75—219 +3
Brooke M. Henderson......74-75-71—220 +4
Danielle Kang ................74-74-72—220 +4
Pernilla Lindberg.............75-72-73—220 +4
Sun Young Yoo ...............74-71-75—220 +4
Mo Martin .....................72-76-73—221 +5
Stacy Lewis ...................74-73-74—221 +5
Mi Jung Hur ...................77-69-75—221 +5
Mirim Lee......................74-72-75—221 +5
Jeong Eun Lee................72-72-77—221 +5
Jaye Marie Green ............75-76-71—222 +6
a-Ho-Yu An ....................77-72-73—222 +6
Katherine Kirk ................76-73-73—222 +6
Sung Hyun Park..............76-73-73—222 +6
Szu-Han Chen ................74-75-73—222 +6
Min Lee ........................70-78-74—222 +6
Caroline Masson.............75-71-76—222 +6
Ryann O’Toole ................75-71-76—222 +6
Joanna Klatten ...............82-69-72—223 +7
Karine Icher ...................77-74-72—223 +7
Kim Kaufman .................76-74-73—223 +7
Pornanong Phatlum.........77-72-74—223 +7
Peiyun Chien..................73-76-75—224 +8
Michelle Wie..................76-72-77—225 +9
Cydney Clanton ..............76-71-78—225 +9
a-Yu-Sang Hou ...............76-71-78—225 +9
Ha Na Jang....................81-73-72—226 +10
Tiffany Joh .....................74-78-74—226 +10
Tzu-Chi Lin.....................77-73-76—226 +10
Gaby Lopez....................76-73-77—226 +10
Sandra Gal ....................78-74-75—227 +11
a—Amateur
PGA EUROPEAN TOUR
$2.36-MILLION ANDALUCIA MASTERS
At Sotogrande, Spain—Par 71
Valderrama Golf Club—6,991 yards
54-Hole Leaders
Sergio Garcia, Spain .......66-71-68—205
Daniel Brooks, England....70-72-64—206
J. Luiten, Netherlands ......66-70-71—207
Jamie Donaldson, Wales ..73-67-68—208
Scott Jamieson, Scotland.69-68-71—208
Wade Ormsby, Australia ...73-70-67—210
Julian Suri, U.S. ..............73-73-65—211
Shane Lowry, Ireland .......72-70-69—211
Anders Hansen, Denmark.70-70-71—211
Ric Gouveia, Portugal ......69-70-72—211
Rob Rock, England .........67-70-74—211
Matt Manassero, Italy......70-74-68—212
Peter Hanson, Sweden.....69-75-68—212
Mark Wallace, England ....71-72-69—212
Soren Kjeldsen, Denmark.72-71-70—213
B. Ritthammer, Germany ..75-68-70—213
Rob Dinwiddie, England...71-71-71—213
Danny Willett, England.....70-72-71—213
Andrew Johnston, England69-71-73—213
Pablo Larrazabal, Spain ...67-73-73—213
Pad. Harrington, Ireland ...72-73-69—214
Paul Peterson, U.S...........68-72-75—215
M. Kaymer, Germany .......70-72-74—216
Sean Crocker, U.S. ..........73-73-75—221
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E
E
E
E
E
E
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+8
CHAMPIONS TOUR
$2-MILLION DOMINION CLASSIC
At Richmond, Va.—Par 72
The Country Club of Virginia—7,025 yards
36-Hole Leaders
Bernhard Langer..................67-63—130 -14
Vijay Singh .........................70-63—133 -11
Joe Durant..........................67-67—134 -10
Michael Allen......................71-64—135 -9
Scott Verplank.....................69-66—135 -9
Woody Austin......................70-66—136 -8
David Toms.........................67-69—136 -8
Jeff Sluman ........................71-66—137 -7
Lee Janzen .........................69-68—137 -7
Scott Dunlap ......................69-68—137 -7
Olin Browne........................68-69—137 -7
Colin Montgomerie...............71-67—138 -6
Wes Short, Jr.......................71-67—138 -6
Brian Henninger ..................70-68—138 -6
Gene Sauers.......................69-69—138 -6
Jay Don Blake .....................68-70—138 -6
Doug Garwood ....................73-66—139 -5
Kenny Perry ........................72-67—139 -5
Duffy Waldorf ......................71-68—139 -5
Billy Mayfair........................70-69—139 -5
Jesper Parnevik ...................70-69—139 -5
Rod Spittle .........................69-70—139 -5
Marco Dawson ....................69-70—139 -5
David McKenzie...................69-70—139 -5
Scott McCarron ...................72-68—140 -4
Corey Pavin ........................72-68—140 -4
Jay Haas ............................71-69—140 -4
Esteban Toledo....................71-69—140 -4
Mike Goodes ......................71-69—140 -4
Mark Brooks .......................71-69—140 -4
Mark Calcavecchia...............71-69—140 -4
Brandt Jobe........................70-70—140 -4
Kevin Sutherland .................70-70—140 -4
Fran Quinn .........................70-70—140 -4
Paul Goydos .......................69-71—140 -4
Glen Day............................68-72—140 -4
Steve Flesch .......................75-66—141 -3
Michael Bradley ..................74-67—141 -3
Kirk Triplett .........................73-68—141 -3
Miguel Angel Jimenez ...........72-69—141 -3
Todd Hamilton.....................72-69—141 -3
Fred Funk...........................71-70—141 -3
Tommy Armour III.................71-70—141 -3
Paul Broadhurst ..................71-70—141 -3
Russ Cochran .....................74-68—142 -2
Phillip Price ........................73-69—142 -2
Bart Bryant.........................72-70—142 -2
David Frost.........................71-71—142 -2
Larry Mize ..........................71-71—142 -2
AUTO RACING
NASCAR STOCK CARS
Xfinity Series
Kansas Lottery 300
At Kansas City, Kan.
Kansas Speedway
Track: 1.5-mile oval
1. Christopher Bell, Toyota, 200 laps. 2. Tyler
Reddick, Chevrolet, 200. 3. Ryan Blaney, Ford,
200. 4. William Byron, Chevrolet, 200. 5. Justin
Allgaier, Chevrolet, 200. 6. Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 200. 7. Elliott Sadler, Chevrolet, 200. 8. Matt
Tifft, Toyota, 200. 9. Ty Dillon, Chevrolet, 200. 10.
Ryan Reed, Ford, 200.
Average speed of winner: 141.158 mph.
Time of race: 2 hours, 7 minutes, 31 seconds.
Margin of victory: 2.670 seconds. Caution
flags: Four for 20 laps. Lead changes: Eight
among five drivers.
Monster Energy Cup
Hollywood Casino 400
At Kansas Speedway
Today’s Lineup
1. Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 188.029 mph. 2.
Kevin Harvick, Ford, 187.682. 3. Ryan Blaney,
Ford, 187.617. 4. Matt Kenseth, Toyota,
187.604. 5. Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 187.461. 6.
Daniel Suarez, Toyota, 186.909. 7. Erik Jones,
Toyota, 186.716. 8. Kyle Busch, Toyota, 186.329.
9. Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 185.637. 10. Clint
Bowyer, Ford, 185.599. 11. Brad Keselowski,
Ford, 184.849. 12. Austin Dillon, Chevrolet,
184.093. 13. Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet,
185.957. 14. Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 185.880.
15. Chase Elliott, Chevrolet, 185.765. 16. Kurt
Busch, Ford, 185.274. 17. Michael McDowell,
Chevrolet, 185.185. 18. Joey Logano, Ford,
184.976. 19. Ryan Newman, Chevrolet,
184.970. 20. Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet,
184.824.
21. Chris Buescher, Chevrolet, 184.679. 22.
Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 184.533. 23. Danica
Patrick, Ford, 184.496. 24. Paul Menard,
Chevrolet, 184.212. 25. Ricky Stenhouse Jr.,
Ford, 183.542. 26. Aric Almirola, Ford, 183.492.
27. A.J. Allmendinger, Chevrolet, 182.723. 28.
David Ragan, Ford, 182.088. 29. Trevor Bayne,
Ford, 182.063. 30. Ty Dillon, Chevrolet, 181.928.
31. Matt DiBenedetto, Ford, 181.830. 32. Landon Cassill, Ford, 179.146. 33. Brett Moffitt, Toyota, 179.110. 34. Gray Gaulding, Toyota,
178.660. 35. Corey LaJoie, Toyota, 178.601. 36.
Cole Whitt, Chevrolet, 178.542. 37. B.J. McLeod,
Chevrolet,177.667. 38. Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, 177.369. 39. Jeffrey Earnhardt, Chevrolet,
176.875. 40. Derrike Cope, Chevrolet, 0.000.
FORMULA ONE
U.S. Grand Prix
At Travis County, Texas
Track: Circuit of Americas
After Saturday’s qualifying; today’s lineup
1. L. Hamilton, Mercedes, 213.159 mph. 2. S.
Vettel, Ferrari, 212.613. 3. V. Bottas, Mercedes,
212.111. 4. D. Ricciardo, Red Bull, 212.091. 5. K.
Raikkonen, Ferrari, 212.091. 6. E. Ocon, Force
India, 209.693. 7. C. Sainz Jr., Renault,
209.240. 8. F. Alonso, McLaren Honda,
208.898. 9. S. Perez, Force India, 208.589. 10.
F. Massa, Williams, 208.573.
11. D. Kvyat, Toro Rosso, 207.757. 12. R.
Grosjean, Haas, 207.018. 13. M. Ericsson,
Sauber, 204.940. 14. S. Vandoorne, McLaren
Honda, 207.514. 15. P. Wehrlein, Sauber,
204.229. 16. L. Stroll, Williams, 204.885. 17.
M. Verstappen, Red Bull, 211.907. 18. K. Magnussen, Haas, 203.778. 19. N. Hulkenberg, Renault, 0.000. 20. B. Hartley, Toro Rosso,
204.841.
PRO SOCCER
MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER
WEST
W L T
Pts GF GA
Vancouver .....15 11 7
52 49 47
Portland .......14 11 8
50 58 49
Seattle .........13 9 11
50 49 39
Sporting K.C. .12 8 13
49 39 27
Houston........12 10 11
47 54 45
San Jose.......12 14 7
43 36 58
FC Dallas......10 10 13
43 43 47
R. Salt Lake ..12 15 6
42 47 54
Minn. United .10 17 6
36 45 67
Colorado ........9 18 6
33 31 48
GALAXY ..........8 17 8
32 44 62
EAST
W L T
Pts GF GA
Toronto FC.....20 5 8
68 72 35
N.Y. City FC ...16 9 8
56 54 41
Chicago ........16 10 7
55 61 44
Atl. United FC 15 9 9
54 68 38
Columbus .....16 12 5
53 51 47
New York.......13 12 8
47 51 46
New England .12 15 6
42 50 59
Montreal.......11 16 6
39 50 55
Philadelphia ..10 14 9
39 44 46
Orlando City ..10 14 9
39 38 52
D.C. United .....9 19 5
32 30 58
Three points for a win, one for a tie.
Today’s Schedule
GALAXY at FC Dallas, 1 p.m.
Chicago at Houston, 1 p.m.
Colorado at Seattle, 1 p.m.
Columbus at New York City FC, 1 p.m.
Minnesota United at San Jose, 1 p.m.
New England at Montreal, 1 p.m.
New York at D.C. United, 1 p.m.
Orlando City at Philadelphia, 1 p.m.
Sporting Kansas City at Real Salt Lake, 1 p.m.
Toronto FC at Atlanta United FC, 1 p.m.
Vancouver at Portland, 1 p.m.
For Santa Anita entries and
results, see pages D2, 3.
D14
S U N DAY, O C T O B E R 22 , 2 017
SS
L AT I M E S . C O M / S P O RTS
LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES
AL CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES
HOUSTON vs. NEW YORK
Houston wins series
GM
1
GM
2
GM
3
GM
4
GM
5
GM
6
GM
7
David J. Phillip Associated Press
YULI GURRIEL scores around New York Yankees catcher Gary Sanchez moments after Houston Astros teammate Carlos Correa
in a three-run fifth inning as Correa and plate umpire Mark Carlson watch. Houston will play the Dodgers in the World Series.
Houston has no problem winning
[ALCS, from D1]
pionship Series and securing their
spot in the 2017 World Series.
“I didn’t know what to do,” Altuve said. “I was just running. But
that bat flip was for my team. I love
my team.”
Several Astros said Altuve’s celebration was meant as a response
to Yankees reliever Tommy Kahnle’s fist pumps as he walked off the
mound earlier in this series.
“He got beat, and he showed
him up a little bit,” said right fielder
Josh Reddick, the ex-Dodger.
“There’s nothing wrong with that.
We felt like he was showing us up
over there at Yankee Stadium.”
The real revenge rested in the
outcome, the Astros winning backto-back elimination games to cut
short the upstart Yankees’ season.
Houston’s only World Series visit,
in 2005 when the Astros were in the
National League, ended in a sweep
at the hands of the Chicago White
Sox. This year, a date with the Dodgers awaits, beginning Tuesday at
Dodger Stadium. Dallas Keuchel
will face Clayton Kershaw in Game
1 in a matchup of left-handers.
In this series, no road team won.
The Astros have lost only twice at
‘BEAT L.A.! BEAT
L.A.!’
—Houston Astros fans,
chanting at Minute Maid Park after the
team advanced to the World Series
against the Dodgers
Minute Maid Park since Hurricane
Harvey made landfall Aug. 25.
Much of the sold-out crowd
stood through Saturday’s first inning. Each out fostered more excitement, as Astros starter Charlie
Morton sliced through the Yankees.
When Yuli Gurriel sliced a drive
to right to begin the second, Aaron
Judge quickly turned and chased it
15 steps to the right-field wall. He
left his feet as he neared the wall
and reached his glove out in time to
prevent a homer. Yankees starter
CC Sabathia raised his arms and
held them there for 10 seconds.
In the fourth, Evan Gattis
banged a Sabathia curve off the facade beyond left-center field, too
far to defend. New York manager
Joe Girardi stuck with Sabathia
three batters longer, summoning a
reliever only when Reddick, he of
the 0-for-22 start to this series, singled. Kahnle induced a doubleplay ball with his first pitch, holding the Astros lead at 1-0.
Morton’s first pitch of the fifth
elicited action: Greg Bird whacked
it into right for a double. Morton
struck out Starlin Castro, then
fired four consecutive balls to
Aaron Hicks. The last escaped
catcher Brian McCann, allowing
Bird to advance to third. Bird went
home when Todd Frazier chopped
a ball to third, but Astros third
baseman Alex Bregman fielded it
quickly and threw well and low to
McCann.
Somehow, McCann caught it
inches from the dirt, applied the
tag, and held on. The Astros were
soon out of it.
In the bottom of the inning, they
challenged the Yankees again. Altuve bashed the one-out blast before Carlos Correa and Gurriel
notched back-to-back singles. McCann saw five consecutive changeups from Kahnle and lashed the
fifth down the right-field line. Correa scored easily, and Astros third
base coach Gary Pettis liberally
sent Gurriel, trusting that catcher
Gary Sanchez would fumble the
throw home, as he did all series.
Pettis was correct.
After Morton’s exit, manager
A.J. Hinch used Lance McCullers
for four innings, so bypassing his
roster’s underbelly, its struggling
group of relievers. McCullers has
always been capable of dominance,
and Saturday he pitched at his best, spinning his vicious curveball
into and out of the strike zone as
desired, striking out six Yankees,
holding them to two baserunners.
His last 24 pitches were all curveballs.
“That’s my best pitch,” McCullers said. “I’m coming at you with
it.”
When McCullers finished the
eighth by striking out Judge on
three pitches, he let out a primal
yell. When a popup soared off
Bird’s bat for the final out, the stadium crescendoed into a frenzy.
Five minutes after it finished, fans
broke out into the first of what will
be many chants.
“BEAT L.A.! BEAT L.A.!”
pedro.moura@latimes.com
Twitter: @pedromoura
at Houston
HOUSTON..................................... 2
NEW YORK .....................................1
at Houston
HOUSTON..................................... 2
NEW YORK .....................................1
at New York
NEW YORK ....................................8
HOUSTON ......................................1
at New York
NEW YORK ....................................6
HOUSTON .....................................4
at New York
NEW YORK ....................................5
HOUSTON .....................................0
at Houston
HOUSTON .....................................7
NEW YORK ....................................1
at Houston
HOUSTON .....................................4
NEW YORK ...................................0
New York
AB R H BI Avg. Houston AB R H BI Avg.
Gardner lf
4 0 1 0 .148 Springer cf 4 0 1 0 .115
Judge rf
4 0 0 0 .250 Brgmn 3b
4 0 1 0 .167
Gregorius ss 4 0 0 0 .250 Altuve 2b
3 1 1 1 .320
Sanchez c
4 0 1 0 .192 Correa ss
4 1 2 0 .333
Bird 1b
4 0 1 0 .250 Gurriel 1b 4 1 1 0 .250
Castro 2b
3 0 0 0 .208 Gattis dh
4 1 1 1 .100
Hicks cf
2 0 0 0 .083 McCann c 2 0 1 2 .188
Frazier 3b
2 0 0 0 .182 Gonzalez lf 4 0 1 0 .136
Headley dh 3 0 0 0 .389 Reddick rf 4 0 1 0 .040
Totals
30 0 3 0
Totals
33 4 10 4
New York
Houston
000 000 000 —0
000 130 00x —4
3
10
0
0
Walks—New York 2: Hicks 1, Frazier 1. Houston 3: Altuve 1,
McCann 2.
Strikeouts—New York 11: Gardner 1, Judge 1, Gregorius 4,
Sanchez 1, Castro 2, Hicks 1, Headley 1. Houston 4: Altuve 1, Gattis
1, McCann 1, Reddick 1.
LOB—New York 5, Houston 8. 2B—Bird (2), McCann (2).
HR—Gattis (1), off Sabathia; Altuve (2), off Kahnle. RBIs—Altuve (4),
Gattis (2), McCann 2 (3).
Runners left in scoring position—New York 1 (Headley); Houston
4 (Correa, Gurriel, Gonzalez, Reddick). RISP—New York 0 for 3;
Houston 1 for 9.
Runners moved up—Bregman. GIDP—Springer.
DP—New York 1 (Gregorius, Castro, Bird).
New York
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
65 0.96
Sabathia, L, 1-1 .........31⁄3 5 1 1 3 0
25 4.26
Kahnle......................11⁄3 4 3 3 0 1
17 0.00
Warren......................11⁄3 0 0 0 0 0
Robertson....................2 1 0 0 0 3
27 9.00
Houston
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Morton, W, 1-1 .............5 2 0 0 1 5
54 7.27
McCullers, S, 1-1 ..........4 1 0 0 1 6
54 0.90
Inherited runners-scored—Kahnle 2-0, Warren 1-0.
WP—Morton.
U—Mark Carlson, Hunter Wendelstedt, Gary Cederstrom, Chris
Guccione T—3:09. Tickets sold—43,201 (42,060).
WORLD SERIES
SCHEDULE
Game 1: Tuesday, 5 at Dodgers
Game 2: Wed., 5 at Dodgers
Game 3: Friday, 5 at Houston
Game 4: Saturday, 5 at Houston
Game 5: Oct. 29, 5 at Houston
Game 6: Oct. 31, 5:15 at Dodgers
Game 7: Nov. 1, 5 at Dodgers
All times p.m. PDT
TV: Channel 11
Games 5-7 if necessary
Poole had blast with Gibson in ’88 season
[Plaschke, from D1]
It is a tale so compelling that
Gibson picked up the phone in
Scotland on Saturday to talk
about it.
“I’m laying on the trainer’s
table, and Vin Scully is on TV
saying I wasn’t going to play, so I
jump up and shout, ‘My ass!’ ”
recalled Gibson. “Then I look over
and there’s Mitch.”
::
Some days, he carried bats.
Other days, he played catch with
the outfielders. Most days, he
washed jocks and hung jerseys
and cleaned toilets.
Mitch Poole’s job as a Dodgers
batboy in 1988 paid $25 a day for
long hours with little recognition.
The San Gabriel native and former Pasadena City College pitcher
was content to be around the
game he loved.
Then Gibson showed up. The
notoriously cranky, competitive
outfielder joined the team that
winter as a free agent and quickly
made one thing clear: He cared
nothing about status or job description. He judged people only
on how hard they worked and how
much they cared. He connected
with Poole.
Said Gibson: “Mitch was always there for me. We developed a
bond.”
Said Poole: “All those days
playing catch in the outfield, all
the time doing things for him in
the clubhouse, we became close.”
When Gibson wanted to play a
food prank on Tommy Lasorda —
a common occurrence — Poole
served as co-conspirator. Shortly
before a game, Poole went into the
stands and purchased a hamburger and brought it to Gibson,
who opened it up and slathered
both buns with pine tar. Poole
then placed the burger on a water
cooler outside the manager’s
office, where Lasorda would see it
and impulsively eat it.
Sure enough, that’s what happened, Lasorda checked to see if
anyone claimed the burger, then
picked it up and took a huge bite
out of it before returning to his
office. When the two pranksters
realized what had happened, they
panicked.
“Oh my God, Mitch, we just
killed him!” Gibson whispered to
Poole.
Lasorda never said a word.
“Gibby was this big-time player, yet he was also just great to
hang out with,” Poole said.
And, on the evening of Oct. 15,
1988, when Gibson needed him
most, Poole was there.
It was Game 1 of the World
Series against the heavily favored
Oakland Athletics. Gibson, the
Dodgers’ best player, was suffering
from injuries to both legs, and not
expected to play.
It was late in the game and the
Dodgers were trailing 4-3. Gibson
had both knees encased in ice as
television told the world he was
not available.
Poole’s assignment that game
was to stay in the clubhouse and
wash uniforms. Protocol dictated
he could not step on the field. He
was picking up dirty towels in the
training room when Gibson spotted him and enlisted him in a
journey that would end in history.
“Mitch, get my uniform!” Gibson barked.
Poole hustled into the clubhouse and grabbed Gibson’s No.
23. Moments later, Gibson was
dressed and holding a bat and
looking for more help. He needed
to take some swings in the underground batting cage. He needed
someone to set the ball on a tee
and then later to toss him pitches.
Ben Hines, the Dodgers batting
coach, walked up the runway to
the field. Gibson asked Hines to
pitch to him, but the coach said he
was needed in the dugout.
“Get Mitch to do it,” Hines said.
Gibson was puzzled. The batboy? He had never helped anyone
take batting practice in his life.
Really? Mitch?
“Gibby looked at me funny,
kind of shrugged and said, ‘OK,
Mitch, let’s get to work,’ ” Poole
recalled. “Looking back, I really
Joe Kennedy Los Angeles Times
EVERYONE HAS seen Kirk
Gibson round the bases, but
Mitch Poole helped him get
ready for his at-bat.
believe I was placed there by God.”
Gibson wanted the tee moved
to where A’s pitcher Dennis Eckersley might be throwing back-door
sliders. Poole figured out the right
spot. Gibson strained with every
hack.
“He was grunting and wincing
with every swing, he was in so
much pain,” Poole said. “I thought,
‘How is this guy going to do this?’ ”
Poole then began tossing balls
and, again, Gibson wanted them in
a spot where Eckersley might
pitch him. Poole made the adjustment and kept tossing, the swings
becoming more fluid until the
slugger suddenly turned to him.
“Mitch, this could be the
script,” he said.
Years later, Poole still can’t
believe what he heard. “I still get
goose bumps just talking about it,”
he said.
When Gibson was ready, he still
didn’t want to show his face in the
dugout, fearing the A’s would see
him. He needed a messenger to
Lasorda. It was the ninth inning,
and he needed it done quickly.
“This was a World Series game
and Mitch was a low-level guy and
I knew it might be real uncomfortable for him to go out there and
talk to the manager, but we didn’t
have a choice,” Gibson said.
“Mitch had to do it.”
Creeping to the dugout corner
where he hopefully wouldn’t be
noticed by television cameras or
the A’s, Poole shouted down the
bench at Lasorda, who blew him
off.
“You could hear Tommy saying
something like, ‘I’m trying to
manage a game, kid, leave me
alone!’ ” Gibson recalled.
Poole shouted again, and this
time an irritated Lasorda walked
down to check on the commotion,
at which point Poole elucidated
from the bottom of his batboy
lungs.
“Tommy!” he shouted. “Gibby
says he can hit!”
The rest is history. Gibson hit a
two-out, two-run home run to give
the Dodgers a 5-4 victory that
ignited a run to the World Series
championship in five games.
You don’t see Poole on the field
during the celebration because he
didn’t want to violate protocol.
Hines gave Poole credit during
postgame interviews, but that
credit has largely been forgotten.
Because he was a part-time employee, Poole didn’t initially even
get a championship ring. He has
one now only because he was
allowed to buy one.
One person who consistently
honors the moment is Gibson,
who still talks about it in reverent
tones as an example of the power
of the 1988 Dodgers.
“That was our team, everybody
working so hard, nobody caring
who got the credit, everybody
contributing, from Mitch to the
players to the front office, our
internal organs were so strong,”
Gibson said. “What happened
with me and Mitch, that’s what
happened all season with our
entire team.”
Gibson, a part-time Detroit
Tigers TV analyst who now in-
spires in his fight against Parkinson’s disease — he was diagnosed
two years ago — is keeping that
same selfless mantra with the
current Dodgers World Series
team.
He won’t be attending any of
the games because he doesn’t
want to be a distraction. “I don’t
think it’s my place,” he said. “This
is their moment, let them do their
thing, this is about them.”
He’s watching, though. He even
sent a text message to Justin
Turner when, on the 29th anniversary of Gibson’s blast, Turner
dramatically hit the first Dodgers
postseason walk-off homer since
then in a National League Championship Series victory over the
Chicago Cubs.
“It was such a cool deal, I had to
text him, told him he’s worked
hard, he’s earned it, a class act, a
real pro,” Gibson said. “You know,
you never forget that feeling. Every
time I walk into Dodger Stadium, I
look up to right field, where my
ball landed, and I think of that
moment. I’m just glad somebody
else can have that feeling as well.”
His advice for the current Dodgers: “They’re in a good spot,
they’ve done such a great job in
dealing with everything ... but now
they gotta finish it.”
Which brings us back to Mitch
Poole.
After the 1988 season, Poole
was promoted to assistant clubhouse manager, and eventually
became clubhouse manager
for 15 years. He is now the visiting
clubhouse manager while finishing his 32nd year in the organization.
Five years ago, the Dodgers
held a bobblehead night for Gibson when he returned as manager
of the Arizona Diamondbacks. He
was scheduled to throw out the
first pitch, but he stayed in the
dugout, instead sending out a
replacement dressed in a Dodgers
polo shirt and khaki shorts.
It was Mitch Poole.
bill.plaschke@latimes.com
Twitter @BillPlaschke
L AT I M E S . C O M / S P O RT S
SS
S U N DAY, O C T O B E R 22 , 2 017
D15
DODGERS MOMENTS: NLCS GAME 5
Wally Skalij Los Angeles Times
THE GRAND SLAM
ENRIQUE HERNANDEZ had already hit one home run in Game 5 against the Cubs, but he really slammed
the door with his bases-loaded blast in the third inning, giving the Dodgers a 7-0 lead. And if that wasn’t enough, he
added a two-run shot in the ninth inning, becoming the first Dodger to hit three home runs in a postseason game.
D16
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2017
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E
S U N D A Y , O C T O B E R 2 2 , 2 0 1 7 :: L A T I M E S . C O M / C A L E N D A R
Christina House Los Angeles Times
THE 30-YEAR-OLD actor Miles Teller stops off in Beverly Hills to talk about his two new films, “Only the Brave” and “Thank You for Your Service.”
ONE ACTOR,
TWO HEROES
Miles Teller took special care playing a real-life firefighter and a soldier
BY JOSH ROTTENBERG >>> For any actor, playing a living, breathing person carries its own special weight. That goes
double when you’re chronicling the most traumatic moments in that person’s life.
“If you take pride in what you do, you always have a bar you’re trying to hit,” Miles Teller said on a recent afternoon
in Beverly Hills. “But playing a real person, there’s an extra obligation.”
Teller has been feeling that obligation a lot lately.
As it happens, this month the actor, who has starred in such films as “Rabbit Hole,” “The Spectacular Now” and
“Whiplash,” portrays two real-life unsung heroes who persevere through trying ordeals in a pair of high-profile movies opening one week apart.
In the action drama “Only the Brave,” which opened Friday, Teller stars as Brendan McDonough, a heroin addict
who received a shot at redemption when he joined an elite Arizona wild-land firefighting crew called the Granite
Mountain Hotshots, only to become the lone survivor of one of the deadliest firefighting disasters in American history.
In the emotionally wrenching “Thank You for Your Service,” opening Friday, he plays Iraq War veteran Sgt. Adam
[See Teller, E6]
Schumann, exploring how he and a handful of fellow soldiers struggle with post-traumatic stress
Late-night TV voices
seek more than laughs
BET’s ‘The Rundown With Robin
Thede’ adds to the ever-growing
chorus of hosts taking on a fusion
of comedy and commentary.
LORRAINE ALI
TELEVISION CRITIC
THE TOWERING TEAM
BEHIND ‘WONDERSTRUCK’
MOVIES, E5
Mary Cybulski Amazon Studios and Roadside Attractions
The opening monologue of “The Rundown With Robin Thede” would have been
unthinkable in the Jay Leno and David
Lettermen era — if not for its politics then
surely for its perspective.
Thede is a she, and she’s black, and her
new BET show speaks to viewers historically excluded from the late-night demographic.
Among the news clips the comedian lampooned during her debut episode this
month: a video displaying the difference in
how police treat black and white motorists
during traffic stops, and the mainstream
media’s hysteria over an anti-Trump song
by Eminem (a.k.a. Marshall Mathers). In
one clip a TV anchor decries that the rapper
labeled Trump a racist and asks what happened to civility?! “What happened to civility,” muses Thede, “President Trump! … I’m
here for everything Marshall Luther King Jr.
is saying right now.”
There goes Johnny, or at least the distance Carson and other hosts of yore put between their political leanings and their audiences.
While Carson, Letterman and Leno
weighed in on current events, their shows
were designed to take your mind off the
world outside: celebrity interviews, platespinning acrobats, zoologists with their unpredictable animals, and the inevitable
Charo cameo.
Now the news — and what hosts do with
it — is what makes the show. Namely, what is
their personal take, and does it speak for
their audience?
Thede is the newest arrival in a crowded
field of hosts — including Stephen Colbert,
Jimmy Kimmel, Jimmy Fallon, Conan
O’Brien, Samantha [See Late night, E7]
E2
S U N DAY, O C T O B E R 22, 2 017
L AT I M E S . C O M / CA L E N DA R
HOME THEATER
FEEDBACK
any day of the week. Except
maybe midsummer, when
thankfully, I have baseball
to turn to.
Laura Owen
Pacific Palisades
::
It’s refreshing to read an
insightful piece about a
genre that I find increasingly disturbing. Who needs
images of torture and gore
inside one’s head?
Connie Eakes
Los Angeles
::
Edel Rodriguez For The Times
The horror, the horror!
Kudos to Times critics Kenneth Turan and Justin
Chang for their fine pieces on horror movies [“The Age of
Horror: It Doesn’t Thrill Him” and “The Age of Horror: The
Ideal Genre for These Times,” Oct. 15]. As one who has
avoided horror films for many years, I was grateful to Turan
for explaining so cogently why he felt the same way. Then I
read Chang’s piece and found it all the more impressive for
making a case that the genre has a legitimate place in our
culture.
In particular, I found hugely therapeutic Chang’s
suggestion that we think of Donald Trump as a character
in a horror film. This angle not only provides added
distance but also reminds us that the show will at some
point be over.
Glenn Pascall
Dana Point
A thank-you to Turan for
validating my reluctance to
watch horror flicks. Like
him, I try to manage the
input of disturbing images
into my head if I want to
sleep at night.
I also avoid mainstream
movies with graphic brutal
“SEE
violence.
Though these films are
not labeled as “horror,” to
me, they are every bit as
horrific. Luckily, here in
L.A., there are many humane, thought-provoking
and entertaining films from
all over the world to be seen
IT IMMEDIATELY,
AND THEN AGAIN AND AGAIN.”
NEW YORK MAGAZINE
“★★★★ SHEER PERFECTION.”
“UNFORGETTABLE.”
You want something
truly horrifying? Forget the
chain saw-wielding psychos,
the big bug aliens with
multiple rows of razor teeth
and the devil himself. The
most horrifying film you will
ever see is German writerdirector Michael Haneke’s
original “Funny Games.”
All his movies exist on an
intellectual level of artistry
that towers above that of his
contemporaries. Watch
“Funny Games,” but don’t
hate me because I recommended it; too many people
already do.
Philip DiGiacomo
Pacific Palisades
The downfall of
a movie mogul
Thank you for your
thoughtful, cogent and
ultimately hopeful column
concerning the precipitous
downfall of Harvey Weinstein in wake of the mounting allegations of sexual
misconduct against him
[“How an Issue Got to Warp
Speed,” Oct. 16].
I sincerely hope you are
correct in your thinking that
the speed of his public demise, following similar rapid
downward trajectories
experienced by Roger Ailes,
Bill O’Reilly and L.A. Reid,
may reflect a much-needed
and overdue paradigm shift
concerning the need to
recognize, confront and
ultimately punish ugly
sexist behavior by powerful
men rather than ignore or
excuse it. It is unfortunate
indeed that Donald
Trump’s documented history of this behavior was not
punished either in law or at
the ballot box as it should
have been; hopefully, the
backlash against Weinstein
et al. will eventually catch
up to Trump as well.
George Legg
Rolling Hills
These two were
in ‘Zone’ too
NEW RELEASES
‘Girls Trip’
is a happy
surprise
By Noel Murray
Regarding “The Richard
Matheson Zone” [Oct. 15]: I
have been a fan of Matheson’s stories and screenplays since the 1950s.
Yes, he did write the best
episodes of “The Twilight
Zone.”
As did the two other
full-time residents of “The
Zone,” Rod Serling and
Charles Beaumont.
Ted Herrmann
Los Angeles
It’s the Boss,
baring his soul
Regarding “Serious
Boss” [Oct. 13]: I saw
“Springsteen on Broadway”
while it was in previews. I
was asked what it was
about, and the only way I
could explain it: “It was two
hours of just Bruce and me,
as he bares his soul.”
June Cafarella
Dumont, N.J.
::
I want to thank you for
your extremely well-written,
insightful review of the
show. You nailed it on every
level — right down to what
Springsteen’s duets with his
wife wordlessly say about
their relationship — that’s
some subtle, extremely
sensitive viewing you’re
doing — and expressed in a
way that conveys almost as
poetically as the moment,
the moment you are describing.
Billy Joseph
Topanga Canyon
latimes.com
/calendarfeedback
The conversation continues
online with comments and
letters from readers.
New on Blu-ray
Girls Trip
Universal DVD, $29.98; Blu-ray,
$34.98; also available on VOD
This raunchy comedy has
been one of 2017’s happiest
surprises, both creatively
and commercially. The
stealthy summer blockbuster stars Regina Hall, Queen
Latifah, Jada Pinkett Smith
and the revelatory Tiffany
Haddish as longtime friends
who try to renew their sisterly bonds with a drunken,
debauched New Orleans vacation.
Co-written by “black-ish”
creator Kenya Barris and
“Survivor’s Remorse” story
editor Tracy Oliver and directed by “The Best Man”
hitmaker Malcom D. Lee,
“Girls Trip” is a polished
piece of entertainment, with
memorable characters, an
engaging plot and sharp dialogue.
And at a time when too
many big-screen comedies
seem to draw from the same
small pool of funny folks, it’s
refreshing to see some actresses not generally known
for telling jokes spending
two hours having fun and
getting laughs.
Special features: A Lee
commentary, deleted
scenes, and featurettes
VOD
Dealt
Now available
Master “card mechanic”
Richard Turner refuses to
call himself a magician,
since what he can do with a
deck happens in plain sight
and has little to do with illusion or secrets. But given
that Turner is legally blind,
the huge crowds he’s played
to during his decades as a
professional entertainer can
be forgiven for thinking that
he’s performing miracles on
MARGARET
COHEN MEDIA GROUP
LAEMMLE ROYAL
11523 SANTA MONICA BOULEVARD
WEST LOS ANGELES 310-478-3836
10:40AM 1:00PM 3:10 5:20 7:40 10:00
QUALLEY
AGNES VARDA AND JR
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PASADENA 310-478-3836
in the hit “Girls Trip.”
stage.
Luke Korem’s engaging
documentary doesn’t lack
for astonishing card tricks,
but it’s mainly about Turner’s amazing personal story
and how he’s fought nearly
his whole life — sometimes
controversially — to avoid
being diminished or even
categorized by what he
lacks.
TV set of the week
American Gods
Season 1
Lionsgate DVD, $34.98; Blu-ray,
$39.99
Based on Neil Gaiman’s
popular picaresque fantasy
novel, the Starz series stars
Ricky Whittle as an ex-con
who takes a job as a bodyguard for a mysterious, gregarious character named
Mr. Wednesday (played by
Ian McShane) and soon
finds himself mired in a burgeoning war between the
“old gods” of ancient myth
and the “new gods” of
technology, media and materialism that captivate
modern humanity.
The series veers wildly
between the brilliantly satirical and an aimless melange of violence and weirdness, but for the most part
the level of imagination in
the first season’s eight episodes is impressive and
makes a promising start for
whatever’s coming next.
Special features: Commentary tracks on selected
episodes and multiple
featurettes
From the archives
Barry Lyndon
Criterion DVD, $29.95; Blu-ray,
$39.95
“EXQUISITE.”
A FILM BY
Universal Pictures
QUEEN LATIFAH stars
LAEMMLE
TOWN CENTER 5
17200 VENTURA BOULEVARD
ENCINO 310-478-3836
EDWARDS
WESTPARK 8
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IRVINE 844-462-7342
★★★★
“
THIS IS HIGH WIRE CINEMA.
IT SETS OUT TO MAKE YOUR JAW DROP. AND IT SUCCEEDS.”
JULIANNE
NICHOLSON
DIANNA MORGAN MADDIE
AGRON
SAYLOR
LIANA
HASSON LIBERATO
AND
MELISSA
LEO
“AN EXCELLENT FEATURE DEBUT FOR MAGGIE BETTS.
MELISSA LEO MAY BE THE STANDOUT ELEMENT–
THIS PERFORMANCE BECOMES A SMALL MASTERPIECE.”
-Justin Chang, LOS ANGELES TIMES
“FILLED WITH SUPERIOR PERFORMANCES AND PACKED WITH
SUCH RICH STORYTELLING. MARGARET QUALLEY
IS ITS REVELATION.”
-Kate Erbland, INDIEWIRE
PETER BRADSHAW,
‘‘THERE’S NEVER BEEN A PALME D’OR
WINNER QUITE LIKE ‘THE SQUARE.’ ’’
PATRICK RYAN,
“PIERCING, IMMERSIVE, AND SUPERBLY PLAYED.”
-Guy Lodge, VARIETY
‘‘TRULY UNLIKE ANY OTHER FILM
’
YOU LL SEE THIS YEAR.
WE DARE YOU TO FIND A BETTER ONE-SCENE PERFORMANCE THAN
TERRY NOTARY’S UNFORGETTABLE TURN.’’
After director Stanley
Kubrick delivered three consecutive zeitgeist-defining
masterpieces with “Dr.
Strangelove,” “2001” and “A
Clockwork Orange,” he
threw critics and fans a
curveball with this 1975 lavishly produced but bone-dry
adaptation of William Makepeace Thackeray’s episodic
1844 novel. It’s really only in
recent years that the movie
has gotten its due as one of
Kubrick’s best, with the filmmaker’s puckish wit and
keen eye trained on the preposterousness of the European class system, as experienced by a social-climbing
Irish rogue (played by Ryan
O’Neal). Gorgeous to look at
and fertile with meaning,
“Barry Lyndon” has endured because it rewards
multiple viewings.
Special features: New and
old interviews and visual
essays
EMILY YOSHIDA,
“BRILLIANT.”
calendar@latimes.com
RICHARD LAWSON,
‘‘OUTLANDISHLY
FUNNY AND BITING’’.
STEPHANIE ZACHAREK,
For the record
“A
MERCILESSLY FUNNY
COMEDY, LASER-POINT
PRECISE IN ITS HUMOR.’’
A.A. DOWD,
‘‘Östlund creates suspense the
old-fashioned way, setting up
scenes that make the audience
go: What in God’s name is
going to happen next?’’
OWEN GLEIBERMAN,
ELISABETH MOSS
DOMINIC WEST
CLAES BANG
TERRY NOTARY
THE SQUARE
FROM
R U B E N Ö S T L U N D,
STARTS
FRIDAY
DIRECTOR OF
FORCE MAJEURE
WEST LOS ANGELES
HOLLYWOOD
at W. Pico & Westwood
At Sunset & Vine
(310) 470-0492 landmarktheatres.com (323) 464-4226 arclightcinemas.com
Show Tracker
What you’re watching
latimes.com/ShowTracker
NOVITIATE
WRITTEN AND DIRECTED BY
MAGGIE BETTS
SONY PICTURES CLASSICS PRESENTS A MAVEN PICTURES PRODUCTION “NOVITIATE” MARGARET QUALLEY JULIANNE NICHOLSON DIANNA AGRON MORGAN SAYLOR MADDIE HASSON LIANA LIBERATO REBECCA DAYAN ELINE POWELL CHELSEA LOPEZ
DENIS O’HARE CHRIS ZYLKA AND MELISSA LEO CASTINBYG SIG DE MIGUEL AND STEPHEN VINCENT SUPERVIMUSISORC TYLER BRADLEY WALKER MUSIBYC CHRISTOPHER STARK DESICOSTUMEGNER VANESSA PORTER EDITOR SUSAN E. MORSE, A.C.E. PRODUCTIDESIGNERON JOHN W. SANDERS I
DIRECTOR OF
EXECUTIVE
PRODUCED
WRITTEN AND
PHOTOGRAPHY KAT WESTERGAARD PRODUCERS JESSICA BETTS ROLAND BETTS MAGGIE BETTS BY CAROLE J. PETERMAN CELINE RATTRAY TRUDIE STYLER DIRECTED BY MAGGIE BETTS
2017 NOVITIATE PRODUCTIONS, LLC ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
©
EXCLUSIVE ENGAGEMENT
WEST LOS ANGELES
STARTS FRIDAY
at W. Pico & Westwood (310) 470-0492
landmarktheatres.com
VIEW THE TRAILER AT WWW.NOVITIATEMOVIE.COM
Horror film history: An
Oct. 15 timeline of influential
moments in horror film history said that character Jason Voorhees killed people in
the original “Friday the
13th.” His mother was the
killer. The story also misspelled Voorhees’ name.
Halloween attractions:
An Oct. 15 article about how
movies influence Halloween-season theme-park attractions said that Warner
Bros. owns Six Flags Magic
Mountain. It does not. The
theme park uses characters
from Warner Bros. movies
through a licensing agreement.
Book review: An Oct. 15
book review of “The King of
Lighting Fixtures” misidentified author Daniel A.
Olivas as David.
How to reach us
Calendar Section
Phone: (213) 237-7770
E-mail: calendar.letters@
latimes.com
Mailing Address:
Los Angeles Times
Calendar Letters
202 W. 1st St.
Los Angeles, CA 90012
Letters: Submissions are
subject to editing.
S U N DAY, O C T O B E R 22 , 2 017
L AT I M E S . C O M / CA L E N DA R
E3
SUNDAY CALENDAR
UP FOR
CHANGE,
SCOT’S
HONOR
WHAT’S
COMING UP
IN MOVIES,
THEATER,
MUSIC AND
MORE
THE IMDB
FILES, E4
THE GUIDE, E8
THE SUNDAY CONVERSATION
UNDERRATED
Dunne profiles Didion
Katherine Hahn in “I Love
Dick”: “Transparent” creator Jill Soloway’s latest
series for Amazon has its
flaws, but there’s no denying
the impression made by
Hahn at the center of the
series. A mess of clumsy
neuroses and raw desire, her
character bumbles through
the absurdities of the uppereschelon art world as she
works through her troubled
marriage and an obsession
with the show’s title character (portrayed with inscrutable ruggedness by Kevin
Bacon) with comic grace.
Even as she runs roughshod
over most everything in her
path, you can’t help but be
on Hahn’s side.
By Meredith Blake
NEW YORK — Griffin Dunne
hadn’t always planned to make a
film about his aunt, the celebrated
essayist and novelist Joan Didion.
But when they collaborated on a
trailer for her 2011 memoir, “Blue
Nights,” he realized Didion was
long overdue for the documentary
treatment.
“I asked her and from the moment she said yes, I said, ‘Oh, boy,
I’m in for it now. This person means
a lot to a lot of people,’ ” recalls
Dunne over the course of lunch at a
Ukrainian diner near his downtown
apartment. The years-long labor of
love, aided by a Kickstarter campaign, has finally resulted in “Joan
Didion: The Center Will Not Hold,”
arriving Friday on Netflix.
The
actor-director-producer
has created a sometimes surprising
portrait of an author known for
writing about the cultural disintegration of the ’60s and ’70s and,
more recently, the deaths of her
husband and daughter. “She
laughs a lot, she’s really funny —
that was always something really
important to me to show rather
than ‘the queen of darkness,’ ” he
says.
As the film captures, Dunne
grew up surrounded by bold-faced
names. His father was TV producer
turned writer Dominick Dunne,
who chronicled high-society crime
in the pages of Vanity Fair. His uncle (and Didion’s husband) was
novelist John Gregory Dunne. That
carpenter who fixed up Aunt Joan’s
Malibu deck one summer? Some
guy named Harrison Ford.
Dunne, who rose to fame in “An
American Werewolf in London” and
“After Hours,” has been on a roll of
late in a number of other streaming
projects. He appeared in “I Love
Dick” for Amazon this year and is
now filming “Gore,” about another
famed writer, Gore Vidal, for Netflix.
What were your impressions of
your aunt growing up?
It was almost impossible to
think of Joan as a separate entity,
because they were John and Joan. I
rarely saw them separately, it was
always like talking to two people.
As a teenager, I was too intimidated to have a writing discussion
with Joan. “When you say ‘things
fall apart,’ what do you mean, Aunt
Joan?” That was not a conversation I was ready to have. I remember once attempting it, asking
Joan, “What are you writing?” She
looked at me funny and in the beat
of silence was broken by John
yelling from the other end of the
room: “You never ask a writer what
they’re writing!” Decades later, I
understood why that is. “If I could
tell you what my book is about
there’d be no point in writing it.”
She writes to know what she
thinks.
What’s the first thing she wrote
that you really remember making
an impression on you?
“The White Album.” That one I
think I read in galleys. At Christmas we’d get first editions of whatever book either of them had out
and it would be inscribed. Now I
have all those and all the ones
written to my sister and parents.
Unlike “Slouching Towards Bethlehem,” where she was talking about
the Haight in ’67, with “The White
Album,” I had the Doors’ and
Joplin’s records on my bookshelf,
the Sharon Tate murders happened right up the street. I felt
involved somehow in all of the
things that she was describing. She
made me think about journalism
and writing in a way I hadn’t before, that you could capture the
feeling of a decade and a sense of
place.
Were you nervous about showing
her the film first time?
Oh, yeah. I showed her a threehour cut. I thought what if she just
hates it — or worse, it bores her. I
think she allowed me to make it
because I was her nephew, but not
in a nepotistic way. She also knew I
was a director. She watches films,
and she knew exactly what she
didn’t want — something dry,
academic, obsequious. And she
knew she wouldn’t get that from
me, because if you’re making a
movie about somebody you’ve
known all your life, you’re going to
“Sky Music: A Tribute to
Terje Rypdal”: Spearheaded by Bay Area guitarist Henry Kaiser, this
sprawling compilation pays
tribute to a Norwegian
guitar hero who has been
blurring genre lines for more
than 50 years. Though the
contributors from the U.S.
are enough to merit seeking
out — Bill Frisell’s melancholy “Ørnen” and an atmospheric guitar-cello duet
from Nels Cline and Erik
Friedlander, to name two —
it’s the jazz-rock Scandinavian super group that includes members of Dungen,
the Thing and Supersilent
that burns brightest in
showcasing Rypdal’s timeless reach.
OVERRATED
Carolyn Cole Los Angeles Times
GRIFFIN DUNNE’S documentary on his famed aunt is “Joan Didion: The Center Will Not Hold.”
Overtime
What are you reading these
days?
I finished reading “Hue 1968”
in anticipation of the Ken
Burns Vietnam doc and started
a very disturbing novel in
memoir form from an S.S.
officer called “The Kindly
Ones.” Listening to a band I
somehow overlooked until
yesterday the Modern Lovers,
who have a Velvet
Underground/Ramones kind of
sound, and just finished the
“You Must Remember This”
podcast series about Jane
Fonda and Jean Seberg.
have a different take.
Did she give you any notes? I bet
she gives great notes.
She does. I’ve showed her early
cuts of movies I’ve directed, and I
will get pages of typewritten notes.
So I expected that and was prepared for whatever. I’m her nephew more than a muckraking documentarian, so whatever she didn’t
want or disturbed her, I would have
totally taken out. But if she said it
on camera, she owned it. She’s just
as tough on herself as she is on
[Dick] Cheney. She doesn’t have
any sort of regret. I think she was
very moved by the movie.
Is there anything you learned
about her in the process of making it?
I read all her books in order, not
just books, articles too, which start
with [the Vogue essay] “On Self-
Respect,” which she wrote maybe
when she was 22, 23. What struck
me was how little she changed. She
arrived in New York fully formed,
and formed not as a New Yorker
but as a Californian, as a descendant of homesteaders and with the
practicality of being from a family
that said no, we’re not going to
take the shortcut. You Donners,
you take that. We’re staying with
the map.
I’ve come to see that Joan has
always been a person that everyone worries about. It’s been like
that for a long time, but the other
thing I learned is why she’s outliving everyone. She’s strong. And not
just tough-minded, gimlet-eyed,
shrewd. Just formidably strong.
You also shared a wonderful moment with Carrie Fisher in the
documentary “Bright Lights.”
Tell me about your friendship.
[When I was 16], my younger
brother, Alex, came home and said,
“I have just met the most amazing
girl. Stay away from her.” And this
girl came in, really beautiful but
really funny. We just made each
other cry with laughter. It was love
at first sight — friendship love. We
both were witness to each other’s
greatest and worst moments.
We were roommates in New
York for a long time. I was a popcorn concessionaire at Radio City
Music Hall while she was off acting
in a movie in England. She’d call
me in the middle of the night from
London. I’d go, “How’s the movie?”
She’d say, “It’s the stupidest piece
of crap ever. I’m running around
with a big monkey.” “What’s it
called again?” “ ‘Star Wars.’ ”
And then I went with Carrie to
the very first screening at the
Ziegfeld. By this time I’d moved up
to being a waiter at Beefsteak
Charlie’s. We’re in this theater and
I went, “Well, life is never going to
be the same.” The next thing I
know it’s James Taylor and Paul
Simon and I’m counting my tips
from Beefsteak Charlie’s.
You just starred in “I Love Dick.”
Everyone who works with Jill
Soloway talks about the unusual
process she has on set.
It is like camp. I think Kevin
[Bacon] and I were the oldest
people on the set and had certainly
been acting longer than everyone
by a long shot. We would look at
each other with big grins on our
faces, this is just like acting school.
It wasn’t done in any cynical way.
This is the excitement we felt when
we were starting out that people
try to beat out of you over the
years. Her whole thing is just about
being emotionally safe, where
there’s no mistakes, you’re free to
try anything. So it was great.
What would your father, who
covered the O.J. Simpson trial,
make of the revived interest in the
case?
He’d be disgusted [by Simpson’s release]. I think he would
have really dug the doc [“O.J.:
Made in America”], and he really
would have enjoyed the series
[“The People v. O.J. Simpson:
American Crime Story”]. You
know they asked me to play him
before they cast [Robert] Morse,
but that was just too weird.
meredith.blake@latimes.com
Twitter: @MeredithBlake
“A Ghost Story” (2017): A
recent on-demand arrival,
this film from the director of
“Ain’t Them Bodies Saints”
has been praised as a meditation on mortality and the
passage of time. And although there are moments
of beauty and sly wit surrounding a deceased lover
(Casey Affleck) who spends
much of the film with a
sheet over his head, the film
stubbornly refuses to connect with its deeper themes
because of a vague, selfconsciously arty structure
and a pace so deliberate it
approaches a stand-still.
However, credit the film for
reviving the season’s easiest
Halloween costume.
The “Rick and Morty” fan
service feedback loop: A
nesting doll of twisted riffs
on sci-fi and family, “Rick
and Morty” is a series that
inspires cultish devotion
online. Which is why a fastfood chain, looking to draft
off that enthusiasm,
brought back a forgotten
condiment recently that
appeared as one of the
show’s many ridiculously
obscure references. Naturally, demand quickly exceeded supply, and an avalanche of nerd rage met
misplaced corporate branding in a cycle that made
considering the threat of
extinction-level nuclear
disaster suddenly not so
scary.
— Chris Barton
E4
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10:55
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KELLY MACDONALD , shown with Will Tilston, says she was happy
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The Internet Movie Database is one of
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HER ROLE in “Boardwalk Empire,” opposite Steve Buscemi, lifted her status in the U.S., Macdonald says.
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What you’re watching
Scottish actress Kelly Macdonald
was 19 when she joined the cast of
“Trainspotting,” her first movie. It was
a nerve-racking experience but one
that put Macdonald on a path to becoming a film and TV actress who
works easily in both the U.S. and the
U.K.
Her latest project, “Goodbye Christopher Robin,” follows the relationship
between “Winnie the Pooh” author
A.A. Milne and his son. Macdonald
plays Olive, Christopher Robin’s reallife nanny, in the tear-jerker of a flick
directed by Simon Curtis. “I think everyone needs an excuse to be in a dark
room crying right now,” the actress
notes.
Macdonald is also shooting the
comedy “Holmes and Watson” with
Will Ferrell and has a TV drama “The
Child in Time” out on PBS next year
playing opposite Benedict Cumberbatch. For her, the recipe for success is
simple, although sometimes hard to
find.
The actress doesn’t necessarily see
a connection between her many roles,
which range from “Gosford Park” to
“No Country for Old Men.” She prefers
period pieces to contemporary work a
lot of the time because it allows her to
more fully transform.
“They all look very like me — unfortunately,” she quips of her roles. “I walk
away from jobs generally feeling good
about it and that I’ve done a good job.
And it’s always slightly deflating when
I see the film thing because it’s still me
up there.”
Here Macdonald talks about some
of her most pivotal characters.
“It was a just lovely project to be involved in. The character is a kind and
And then when it came to shooting my
end of things it was all after they’d
finished the film, so I was on my own.
But they did, very sweetly, make a
cardboard cutout of Daniel Radcliffe
for me to work with.”
‘T2 Trainspotting’
Diane (2017)
‘No Country for Old Men’
“It was amazing to go back. It brought
back all the nerves of the first time,
even though 20 years have passed.
My body remembered it. It was just
nice to be with the guys again, and it
was a lot of the same Scottish crew, so
it was very nostalgic. What really took
me by surprise was that they included
bits from the original film. That I
found so moving. It brought a tear to
my eye.”
Carla Jean Moss (2007)
‘Boardwalk Empire’
Margaret Thompson (2010-2014)
“It definitely changed things as far
as my status in the States. I was quite
ready to leave Margaret behind.
I wish they’d killed her off, in a way.
I know that sounds really bad. But it
was lovely being there. I was there on
the very first day of filming the pilot,
and I was there the very last day of
filming. That was quite emotional.
I’ve not felt up to another [TV series]
since because it is a big commitment.”
‘Brave’
Merida (2012)
“I was one of the last people to be
involved, weirdly. Pixar will come to
wherever you happen to be filming or
they’ll record you via satellite link-up.
I liked that it wasn’t about some
prince. Her story was her story, and it
wasn’t about a guy coming in to rescue her. It was the first female protagonist in a Pixar film. There wasn’t a
lot not to like.”
‘Harry Potter and the
Deathly Hallows: Part 2’
Helena Ravenclaw (2011)
‘Goodbye
Christopher Robin’
Olive (2017)
latimes.com/ShowTracker
good person, so that’s nice to play a
good guy. With Simon at the helm and
the actors involved and the writing —
sometimes you have to pinch yourself
with these jobs that come along.”
“I flew over to be there for Daniel
Radcliffe’s side of the filming, but I
felt really daft because I was playing a
ghost but I wasn’t really in a ghost
costume. I was having to be spooky
around him while he was in costume.
“I know it’s been written online that I
lobbied for the part, which is not at all
the case. I just happened to be in New
York for a friend’s wedding and I went
in to meet the casting director because the Coen brothers were going to
be making this film. She said, ‘I think
you should actually meet Joel and
Ethan while you’re in town.’ So while
all my friends were partying around
New York I was locked in a hotel bathroom learning lines. It went well, but
months went by and in those months
they saw everybody. And then they
came back to me, the first person in
the room.”
‘Gosford Park’
Mary Maceachran (2001)
“Robert Altman was such an incredible person to have the privilege to
know and meet and have dinner with.
When I went to meet him at some
hotel in London for the part he spent
the whole time on the phone to someone — God knows who — talking
about me. ‘I have this wonderful actress with me.’ It was a bit odd. And
then I got a phone call from him saying, ‘Come play with us.’ ”
‘Trainspotting’
Diane (1996)
“The immediate feeling was nerves,
always. It was low budget so when we
were on location we shared a caravan,
but it wasn’t like a film trailer you’d be
used to now. It was like someone’s
grandparents’ caravan. When we were
at the self-made studio — we were
filming at an old cigarette factory in
Glasgow — there was a green room
there for the actors. I found them all so
intimidating and charismatic and
young and cool, so I was always to be
found in the toilets when I was needed
on set. I was always hiding there.”
calendar@latimes.com
L AT I M E S . C O M / CA L E N DA R
S U N DAY, O C T O B E R 22, 2 017
E5
Myles Aronowitz Amazon Studios and Roadside Attractions
YOUNG ROSE (Millicent Simmonds) is amazed by 1920s New York City in “Wonderstruck.” Sections of the new film were shot in the black and white of that era.
It took a village to make film
Todd Haynes turned to his
trusted creative team to
help unite the two eras
of ‘Wonderstruck.’
By Mark Olsen
“Wonderstruck” is a film that
takes place in two time periods, 50
years apart. In 1927, a young girl
travels alone to New York City; in
1977, a young boy does the same.
The mysterious connection between their stories becomes the
movie’s driving force.
What it also united was a creative team of collaborators that director Todd Haynes trusted to
bring this unusual story to the
screen. Cinematographer Ed
Lachman,
costume
designer
Sandy Powell, production designer
Mark Friedberg and composer
Carter Burwell all have long relationships with Haynes, and they
have come to collaborate with one
other in ways that are unusual.
Brian Selznick wrote the
screenplay for “Wonderstruck,” adapted from his own novel of the
same name. In both versions, the
young girl Rose is deaf from
birth, while the boy Ben becomes
deaf after being struck by lightning. (Actress Millicent Simmonds
is deaf in real life, while actor
Oakes Fegley is not.) For Haynes’
film, the style of each section aims
to evoke the way its young protagonist interacts with the world.
“I found the material to be
something out of the sensibility
and the experience of children,”
said Haynes. “Paralleling these
two stories and not relying on dialogue to tell the story, the cinematic language, all of the elemental arts of cinema, had to step up
and make the film work.”
Emphasizing the collaborative
nature of his process, Haynes went
on to mention not only Powell,
Friedberg, Lachman and Burwell
but also editor Affonso Gonçalves,
casting director Laura Rosenthal,
first assistant director Timothy
Bird and even the team involved in
casting extras.
A three-time Oscar winner, costume designer Powell was nominated for her work on Haynes’
“Carol” as well as Kenneth Branagh’s “Cinderella” in the same
year. It was Powell, who knew
Selznick from having worked on
“Hugo,” Martin Scorsese’s adaptation of the author’s work, who
brought
Selznick’s
“Wonderstruck” screenplay to Haynes.
“Todd is an incredibly visual director,” said Powell, also credited
as an executive producer on the
movie. “Having worked with him
on several projects, it’s so much
easier. You’ve already developed a
language between you. He’s very
articulate when talking about
visuals, and he has a keen eye. It’s
just a joy to work with someone
who is as excited by things as you
are. And Todd always gives so
much. At the beginning of a project, he always has a massive visual
reference, so you’re already halfway there.”
Haynes’ ongoing collaborations
help not just in his own relationships with each department but
also to get those departments
interacting as well.
“Because it’s a lot of the same
people again and again, at this
point, I [already] know people that
on most films the composer
wouldn’t really overlap with,” said
Mary Cybulski Amazon Studios and Roadside Attractions
THE SCENES set in 1970s feature the vibrant colors and more street-style photography reminiscent of New York cinema of the era.
Mary Cybulski Amazon Studios and Roadside Attractions
THE MOVIE features Jaden Michael, left, Oakes Fegley and Julianne Moore, a frequent collabora-
tor with “Wonderstruck” director Todd Haynes. “It was really about point, counterpoint,” he said.
Burwell. “We’ve spent time together, and I do actually know
them. It did feel like very much a
team.”
Lachman, nominated for Oscars for his work with Haynes on
“Far From Heaven” and “Carol,”
noted that he used research done
by Friedberg’s art department in
planning his own work. “Wonderstruck” provided Lachman with
the opportunity to shoot in black
and white, evoking the graceful
look of the silent era — there is even
a brief silent film within the film —
as well as the vibrant colors and
more street-style photography
reminiscent of New York cinema of
the 1970s.
“I like to think of the images creating the emotions, or as I said it,
that you’re hearing with the images,” said Lachman. “You’re seeing images that would obviously
have sound, but now they’re either
muted or natural sound. So we’re
trying to create the subjectivity
of someone who has lost their
hearing. It’s really a film about
listening with your eye.”
Friedberg worked with Haynes
on “Far From Heaven” and the
HBO limited series “Mildred
Pierce,” but the two have known
each other since both attended
Brown University. For Friedberg,
the collaboration with Haynes was
as much about evoking the times
they were portraying as the specific details of moldings and colors.
In re-creating 1970s New York
City, with scenes shot at a location
in Brooklyn meant to depict a
young boy’s arrival to the city’s
Port Authority, Friedberg had an
entire team adding trash to
the shots to bring them more in
line with the Big Apple of that
era, which faced a widespread
blackout and the notorious “Drop
Dead” headline.
“I’m really curious about the
cultures of the worlds we’re creating,” Friedberg said. “It’s impor-
tant to understand that as an organizing principle, so the work
comes from an idea, to understand
these times. The story we’re telling
is in the context of these places.
With Todd, on all the movies I’ve
worked on with him, there is always
an intellectual construct and an
emotional one.”
Powell is known for her dazzling
work in color, but for the 1920s section of “Wonderstruck,” she
worked in black and white for the
first time.
“What was most important
dealing with black and white was
texture, finding fabrics that had a
strong texture and a lot of contrast,” she said. “Ed Lachman
asked particularly for things that
had contrast. So I did all of that,
but I still at the end of the day
wanted Rose to wear things that
looked nice to the eye, looked nice
to us on set. I couldn’t send her
out with clashing colors — just because I didn’t want to look at it.”
Composer Burwell, nominated
for an Oscar for his score for “Carol,” began his work on “Wonderstruck” well before shooting. He
and Haynes discussed how to handle the film’s distinct periods, how
to evoke deafness in the score and
whether the music should suggest
the separate times or look to somehow unite them.
“We didn’t settle on real answers, but we have the discussions
just so we can open up the questions,” said Burwell. “While he’s
shooting, I’m doing research and
thinking of all the different ways to
address those questions. By the
time he’s got a rough edit of the
film, that’s when I’m really going to
start writing music, but we already
have a really firm grasp on the
questions the film raises and hopefully, a slew of possible answers.”
The emotional climax of the
1977 section takes place at the
“Panorama of the City of New
York,” an enormous scale model
housed in the Queens Museum and
originally constructed for the 1964
World’s Fair. (In a delightful coincidence, Lachman’s older brother
was involved in making the bridges
for the “Panorama.”) The seemingly separate strands of the movie
come together — in a sequence featuring another frequent Haynes
partner, actress Julianne Moore —
similar to how all of Haynes’ collaborators worked in concert.
“It was really about point, counterpoint,” said Haynes. “What I
love about Brian’s concept at the
core, and [what] felt so coherent, is
this is a mystery.
“And the mystery keeps being
furthered by the intercutting
between the two stories. Every
time you cut, that basic premise
is rephrased, which is ‘Why are
these two stories sharing one film?
What are the things that link
them?’ There is something underneath them we’re going to find out.
That structure was the most creative challenge and excitement
throughout the process.”
mark.olsen@latimes.com
E6
S U N DAY , O C T O B E R 22, 2 017
L AT I M E S . C O M / CA L E N DA R
Outside the showbiz bubble
[Teller, from E1]
disorder and the difficult readjustment to civilian life after returning
home from combat.
Teller, 30, has played fictional
heroes before — perhaps most notably as the shape-shifting Reed
Richards in the ill-fated 2015
superhero movie “Fantastic Four,”
an experience that left him feeling
bruised. (“It’s funny when people
want to blame the actor for a movie being bad — that’s not how it
goes.”) Stepping into the shoes of
McDonough and Schumann,
though, has given him a deeper
kind of fulfillment. “It seeps into
your skin a bit more,” Teller said.
That Teller himself has a somewhat cocky, swaggering public image that he feels detached from —
and at times misrepresented by —
may give him additional empathy
in handling someone else’s story.
“Nobody knows how to be famous,
man,” he said. “I know how to be
myself — and even that is getting
warped because you become so
self-aware and you’re dealing with
all this [stuff] you’ve never had to
deal with.
“I mean, everybody knows
you’ve got to have thick skin to be
in show business. But it can get to
you.”
Elevating the kinds of workingclass everymen who don’t typically
claim the spotlight, both “Only the
Brave” and “Thank You for Your
Service” seem likely to strike a particular chord in what Hollywood
often broadly considers flyover
country. And for Teller — who also
played real-life boxing champ
Vinny Pazienza in last year’s wellreviewed but largely overlooked
drama “Bleed for This” — that was
part of the appeal.
“I absolutely want to step outside my bubble,” said the actor,
who grew up largely in a heavily
military-recruited town in Florida.
“I like making movies about bluecollar guys. I don’t know if that’s
more my upbringing, but I want to
tell their stories. As far as who
wants to see it? Look, we just had
an election where the white middle
class and lower middle class felt
forgotten about, and that kind of
swung the election for Trump.” He
shrugged. “But I don’t know. I sign
up for the experience first and
then the movie comes later.”
Speaking to The Times in early
October, as raging wildfires were
beginning to spread devastation
across Northern California, Teller
said he hadn’t known much about
how such fires were fought before
signing on to “Only the Brave.”
“I thought planes fly overhead
and they drop the slushie and the
water and that takes care of it,”
said Teller, who underwent a grueling wild-land firefighting boot
camp along with his co-stars, including Josh Brolin and Taylor
Kitsch. “But then you realize, no,
it’s these dudes working 16 hours a
day. It’s just grit and toughness.
Usually they’re gone before anyone can even thank them. First responders, man — they don’t make
them better.”
To truly honor the Granite
Mountain Hotshots, 19 of whom
were killed in the 2013 Yarnell fire,
director Joseph Kosinski felt it
was crucial to depict them not as
two-dimensional heroes but as
fully fleshed-out human beings.
“The heart of this movie is:
What makes these guys tick?” Kosinski said. “This story is about
people more than fire. I felt like the
Columbia Pictures
“ONLY THE BRAVE” features Miles Teller (left, with Taylor Kitsch) as a real-life heroin addict
who gains redemption by joining an Arizona firefighting crew, the Granite Mountain Hotshots.
‘I like making movies about blue-collar guys.
I don’t know if that’s more my upbringing,
but I want to tell their stories.’
— M ILES T ELLER ,
actor
Francois Duhamel DreamWorks Pictures
IN “THANK YOU for Your Service,” Teller (with actress Haley Bennett) plays an Army sergeant
returning from duty in Iraq who struggles mightily trying to reintegrate himself into civilian life.
best way to do it was to present everyone as they are. No one is perfect, and the more that you dive
into that, the more real the characters become.”
McDonough, who chronicled
the Yarnell fire tragedy in his book
“My Lost Brothers,” didn’t shy
away from letting Teller delve into
the darker parts of his life.
“Once I read the script, I knew
there were going to be some scenes
that I wanted to talk to Miles
about,” he said. “We talked in great
depth about my addiction, becoming a father, becoming a Hotshot.
Miles asked the right questions,
and it was just very organic. He ne-
ver had an agenda to press for
something.”
For McDonough, the most important thing was to try to convey
the courage and camaraderie of
the men he’d worked alongside.
“Miles really took the time to make
sure he portrayed me in the way
that brought honor to my brothers
and how they changed my life,” he
said.
Teller had initially approached
“Thank You for Your Service,” adapted from journalist David
Finkel’s 2013 book, with more hesitation. At first, he resisted the idea
of playing a soldier with PTSD. It
just didn’t feel like his place somehow.
“A lot of my really good buddies
served in the military, and I think
that’s a sacred fraternity,” he said.
“The core of what we do as actors
is pretend — we’re faking it. I was
like, ‘That doesn’t feel right to me.
I don’t want to act that.’ ”
In the end, though, Teller decided that the benefits of raising
awareness of the struggles Schumann and other vets have faced
far outweighed his own discomfort.
“I was like, ‘You know what?
This is my responsibility,’ ” he
said. “As a vet, you get home, they
split you up from all your brothers
who were there with you — and
that’s it. Then it’s like, ‘OK, go get a
job at Walmart. Here’s 30 pills from
the VA.’ It’s [screwed] up.”
For his part, Schumann was
initially wary of seeing his story
brought to the big screen. “I didn’t
sign over my life rights until about
a week into filming,” he said. “I
didn’t know how they were going
to spin things. Yeah, there’s a
script in front of you, but what
happens when they start filming?
Are they going to use my name and
make me murder somebody? I
mean, it’s a movie — you don’t
know. But they really did an excellent job of welcoming me into the
process and letting me be a part of
it.”
At a time when virtually everything seems freighted with political resonance and both parties are
trying to claim the mantles of patriotism and heroism, “Thank You
for Your Service” is likely to viewed
by many through that lens. (The
right-leaning website Lifezette
.com recently listed it as one of “12
Conservative Movies Coming to
Theaters.”)
But writer-director Jason Hall
— who wrote the 2014 blockbuster
“American Sniper,” which itself became a political hot potato — says
he doesn’t see it in those terms.
“I don’t find it overtly political,
but I didn’t find ‘Sniper’ overtly
political either, and some people
certainly did,” Hall said. “I just
hope it strikes a chord of empathy
with people and helps us take a
step forward in understanding
what these veterans have been
through so we can find a better
way to welcome them home.”
Teller has seen up close how cathartic it has been for Schumann
and McDonough to tell their respective stories and how much it
has helped others as well. With
“Only the Brave,” he has spent
time with the family members of
the fallen Granite Mountain firefighters. With “Thank You for Your
Service,” he has watched veterans
hugging one another and crying
after screenings.
“These two projects have felt so
much bigger than all of us in terms
of how it affects these people,”
Teller said. “These movies will affect these people’s lives forever.
“If a movie can actually work as
therapy, then dude, it’s so much
more than a movie.”
josh.rottenberg@latimes.com
Twitter: @joshrottenberg
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TYLER PERRY’S BOO 2! A MADEA
HALLOWEEN C (12:00, 2:30), 5:00, 7:30, 10:00
THE FOREIGNER E (1:10, 4:30), 7:40, 10:25
HAPPY DEATH DAY C (11:50, 2:10, 4:50), 7:20, 9:50
BLADE RUNNER 2049 E (11:40, 3:15), 6:50, 10:20
THE MOUNTAIN BETWEEN US C (1:00, 4:10),
7:00, 9:35
AMERICAN MADE E (12:40, 3:40), 7:05, 9:55
BATTLE OF THE SEXES C (12:45 PM)
KINGSMAN: THE GOLDEN CIRCLE E (12:10, 3:30),
VICTORIA & ABDUL C (12:30, 4:00), 7:00
6:40, 9:45
Showtimes for October 22
S U N DAY, O C T O B E R 22, 2 017
L AT I M E S . C O M / CA L E N DA R
E7
TELEVISION
Voices grow
on late night
[Late night, from E1]
Bee, James Corden and Seth Meyers — who are all trying to strike the
right balance of comedy and commentary.
As more Americans feel as if
their voices are going unheard, it’s
late-night hosts — not D.C. representatives — who appear to be
speaking truth to power and channeling the frustrations of an outraged electorate.
The ever-expanding late-night
lineup (daily and weekly) also appeals to those who want their firehose feed of news filtered, distilled
and recast as something more
laugh-inducing than alarmist.
Want a whip-smart, researched
take-down of the latest corporate
maleficence, environmental mess
or congress’ squandering of your
tax dollars? John Oliver of HBO’s
“Last Week Tonight” is your avenging deconstructionist. If you like
your British hosts more on the silly
side, there’s always the playful antics of CBS’ James Corden and his
“The Late Late Show.”
How about an outsider view of
American race relations, from
someone raised in an apartheid
state? “The Daily Show’s” Trevor
Noah on Comedy Central is the
medium’s most astute observer.
For turning raw anger into laser-focused commentary, there’s
Samantha Bee on TBS. The “Full
Frontal” host is late-night’s other
female voice and often takes on
women’s issues in her weekly show.
She recently covered film mogul
Harvey Weinstein’s sexual harassment scandal and ripped into the
“I was raised in a different era” excuse he gave for his behavior. “Oh,
give me a break, White Cosby!,” she
said. “Nobody asked for your ‘all
about mea culpa.’ Don’t blame the
’60s and ’70s for your … decisionmaking. It’s serial sexual harassment, not a Monkees tattoo.”
While riffing on the news, Bee
made the news (see, we’re writing
about her here). It’s a circular
event — journalism outlets cover a
story, evening hosts comment on
said story, host’s monologue becomes part of the next morning’s
news cycle.
Bee, like Oliver and Colbert, are
all alumni of the Jon Stewart-era
“The Daily Show.”
Stewart popularized the casual
talk show-meets-political satire
format with his long run on the
Comedy Central favorite from 1999
to 2015. Colbert then took that
ethos to the broadcast networks
when he joined CBS’ “The Late
Show” after Letterman’s retirement. There were questions about
Colbert’s acerbic and odd sense of
political comicality (his Comedy
Central show “The Colbert Report” was a satire of right-wing
hosts like ex-Fox News firebrand
Bill O’Reilly) working on such a
broad platform. Then a reality star
ran for the White House and won.
Who better than to explain the
absurdity of modern politics than
an absurdist like Colbert? The perfect host for imperfect times.
No wonder the ratings of late
night’s court jester, Jimmy Fallon,
are slipping. Once a leader of the
pack, his prankster approach on
NBC’s “The Tonight Show” is apparently no longer the best medicine for an agitated public.
It’s Conan O’Brien who best
bridges the gap between old-school
hosts and the Jon Stewart generation of personalities on his nightly
TBS show. The wise-cracking host
generally remains apolitical, letting his guests explain why American healthcare is a mess or why
Trump can’t stop tweeting.
But even O’Brien isn’t immune
to the foundation-rattling events of
2017. The ex-“Tonight Show” host
made news when he spoke emotionally about the Las Vegas shooting in a recent opening monologue.
“[There are] plenty of people
more qualified than me who are reporting the tragic facts and asking
how this could happen,” he said. “...
I’ve been doing this job for more
than 24 years, and when I began in
1993, occasions like this were extremely rare. For me, or any TV
comedy host back then, to come
out and need to address a mass
shooting spree was practically unheard of. But over the last decade,
things have changed. Now, today,
when I came into work, my head
Mel Melcon Los Angeles Times
ROBIN THEDE’S topical “The Rundown” on BET is a new entry on the late-night TV front.
Carolyn Cole L.A. Times
Kirk McKoy L.A. Times
Jay L. Clendenin L.A. Times
Randy Holmes ABC
LATE-NIGHT television hosts with a heavy yet humorous presence: “The Late Show’s” Stephen
Colbert, left, Samantha Bee of “Full Frontal,” TBS’ Conan O’Brien and ABC’s Jimmy Kimmel.
writer was standing in my office
with a sheaf of papers. And he said,
‘Here are the remarks you made after the Sandy Hook shootings and
the Pulse nightclub attacks in Orlando. You might want to look at
them to see what you might want to
say tonight.’ And that, that struck
me. How could there be a file of
mass shooting remarks for a latenight host? When did that become
normal? When did this become a
ritual? And what does it say about
us that it has?”
Common sense, and maybe
even a little nation-healing, go a
long way now in a format once
meant for diversionary laughs: enter Jimmy Kimmel.
The ABC host emerged as the
heart and soul of late night after he
spoke of his newborn’s heart
surgery, delivering a teary plea to
the president and Congress to con-
sider the other lives like his son’s
they might affect with their repeal
of the Affordable Care Act.
Now Kimmel is as much comedic host as therapist and social advocate. He leaves the scathing
criticism and wonkier observation
to Meyers. The NBC “Late Night”
host — and former “Saturday
Night Live” head writer and “Weekend Update” anchor — has
emerged in recent months as the
guy who’s willing to let loose on
American policy and the president.
Where are the conservative
voices?
Not on late-night TV, at least in
any substantial way, unless Bill
Maher’s ideological flip-floppery
on HBO’s “Real Time” in the name
of ratings counts.
Comedy Central newcomer Jordan Klepper does satirize the hardright media à la Info Wars/Alex
Jones on his new show “The Opposition With Jordan Klepper,” which
airs after “The Daily Show.”
“I’m sick of this,” he said, in
character, of the reported flap between Secretary of State Rex Tillerson and the president. “Trump
has done everything for these people. He picked them seemingly at
random for positions of great importance, and now they’re calling
Trump a moron? Then I’m calling
moron a compliment! What, you
think ‘nasty women’ are the only
ones who can turn insults into a rallying cry?” And he ripped his shirt
open to reveal a “… Moron” T-shirt
underneath.
So it wasn’t a Superman logo,
but Klepper can’t be all things to all
people. That’s why there’s Thede
and Colbert and Kimmel and …
lorraine.ali@latimes.com
E8
S U N DAY, OC T O B E R 22, 2 017
L AT I M E S . C O M / CA L E N DA R
THE GUIDE
Classical
MOVIES
Compiled by Matt Cooper
Chicago Symphony Orchestra
Riccardo Muti leads the orchestra in
Brahms’ Symphonies Nos. 2 and 3.
Walt Disney Concert Hall, 111 S. Grand
Ave., L.A. Sun., 7:30 p.m. $54-$162.
(323) 850-2000.
Compiled by Kevin Crust
Openings
W E D N E S DAY
The Consul Long Beach Opera stages
The Work Three men engage in a four-
Gian Carlo Menotti’s musical thriller;
soprano Patricia Racette stars. Centinela Valley Center for the Arts, 14901
S. Inglewood Ave., Lawndale. Sun.,
2:30 p.m. $49-$150. (562) 470-7464.
day group therapy intensive with inmates at Folsom Prison in this documentary. Directed by Jairus McLeary.
Co-directed by Gethin Aldous. (1:29)
NR.
Escher String Quartet with Guitarist
Jason Vieaux Works by Bach, Boc-
F R I DAY
cherini, Mozart, et al. Soka Performing Arts Center, 1 University Drive, Aliso Viejo. Sun., 3 p.m. $32, $40. (949)
480-4278.
Acts of Vengeance
The murders of
his wife and daughter drive a highpowered lawyer to take a vow of silence and seek out the killer. With Antonio Banderas, Karl Urban, Paz
Vega, Robert Forster, Johnathon
Schaech. Written by Matt Venne. Directed by Isaac Florentine. (1:26) NR.
Al Di Qua
Italian documentary on
homelessness in Turin. Directed by
Corrado Franco. In Italian with English subtitles. (1:19) NR.
All I See is You A blind woman gains
her sight, drastically changing the dynamic of her relationship with her
husband. With Blake Lively, Jason
Clarke. Written by Sean Conway,
Marc Forster. Directed by Forster.
(1:50) R.
AlphaGo A master of the 3,000-yearold Chinese game “Go” takes on artificial intelligence in this documentary
that moves behind-the-scenes from
Cambridge to Bordeaux, London and
Seoul. Featuring Lee Sedol, Demis
Hassabis, David Silver. Directed by
Greg Kohs. (1:30) NR.
Atomic Homefront Documentary follows a group of St. Louis-area activist
mothers as they challenge government agencies over hazardous radioactive waste. It shines an urgent and
devastating light on the lasting toxic
effects that nuclear waste can have on
communities. Directed by Rebecca
Cammisa. (1:40) NR.
Brimstone & Glory Documentary on
the National Pyrotechnic Festival in
Tultepec, Mexico. Directed by Viktor
Jakovleski. In Spanish with English
subtitles. (1:07) NR.
Crash Pad
An affair with an older,
married woman goes wrong for a
young slacker when the cuckolded
husband decides to move in with him.
With Domhnall Gleeson, Thomas
Haden Church, Christina Applegate
and Nina Dobrev. Written by Jeremy
Catalino. Directed by Kevin Tent.
(1:33) NR.
Dealt
Blind card magician Richard
Turner is the subject of this documentary. Written by Luke Korem, Bradley
Jackson. Directed by Korem. (1:25)
NR.
Flesh and Blood Mark Webber wrote,
directed and stars as a man released
from prison attempting to make
amends with his broken Philadelphia
family. With Madeline Brewer, Cheri
Honkala, Guillermo Santos. (1:30)
NR.
God’s Own Country
A lonely young
Englishman working on his family’s
farm is drawn to a good-looking migrant worker from Romania. With
Josh O’Connor, Alec Secareanu,
Gemma Jones, Ian Hart. Written and
directed by Francis Lee. (1:44) NR.
Halloween Pussy Trap Kill! Kill!
An
all-female rock band is lured into a
vengeful mad man’s house of horrors.
With Sara Malakul Lane, Richard
Grieco, Demetrius Staer. Written and
directed by Jared Cohn. (1:26) NR.
Inheritance A young American woman returns to Belize where she grew
up to face the past with her new lover.
With Jessica Kaye, Mark Webber,
Daniel Ahearn. Written and directed
by Laura E. Davis and Kaye. (1:15)
NR.
Jigsaw Ten years after the "Saw" killer
supposedly died, police are faced with
either a copycat killer or a murderous
ghost. With Matt Passmore, Callum
Keith Rennie, Clé Bennett, Hannah
Emily Anderson, Laura Vandervoort,
Mandela Van Peebles. Written by Josh
Stolberg & Peter Goldfinger. Directed
by the Spierig Brothers. (1:31) R.
Joan Didion: The Center Will Not
Hold Documentary profiles the prolific author, her work for Vogue in the
1950s and ’60s, her novels, and long
marriage to writer John Gregory
Dunne. Featuring Vanessa Redgrave,
Harrison Ford, Anna Wintour, David
Hare. Directed by Didon’s nephew
Griffin Dunne. (1:32) NR. Story on
Page E3
Let There Be Light
Kevin Sorbo directed and stars as a bestselling author and proponent of atheism whose
views are radically changed after a serious car accident. With Sam Sorbo,
Daniel Roebuck, Donielle Artese.
Written by Dan Gordon, Sam Sorbo.
(1:40) PG-13.
Liberation Day Documentary follows
the ex-Yugoslavian cult band Laidbach as it becomes the first rock
group to perform in North Korea.
Featuring Boris Benko, Tomaz Cubej,
Milan Fras. Written by Morten
Traavik. Directed by Ugis Otte and
Traavik. Written by Traavik. (1:40)
NR.
Mansfield 66/67 Documentary combines interviews and archival materials with dance numbers, performance
art and animation to tell the “true
story based on rumor and hearsay”
about the final years of actress Jayne
Mansfield. Featuring Anton LaVey,
John Waters, Mary Woronov, Tippi
Hedren, Mamie Van Doren. Directed
by P. David Ebersole and Todd
Hughes. (1:25) NR.
Maya Dardel An acerbic woman writer announces on NPR that she plans
to kill herself and is searching for a
male author to be her heir and executor. With Lena Olin, Alexander Koch,
Nathan Keyes, Rosanna Arquette.
Written and directed by Zachary
Cotler and Magdalena Zyzak. (1:44)
NR.
Mully Documentary on Kenyan
Charles Mully, who after being abandoned at the age of 6, grew up to be a
successful businessman, then de-
Chamber
Orchestra
Mozart’s Sinfonia Concertante and
Symphony No. 35, “Haffner.” First
Presbyterian Church, Santa Monica,
1220 2nd St., Santa Monica. Sat.,
4 p.m. $20. www.vicentechaberorches
tra.com
Los Angeles Master Chorale The ensemble, led by guest conductor María
Guinand, performs works by Latin
American composers for its first-ever
Día de los Muertos concert. Walt Disney Concert Hall, 111 S. Grand Ave.,
L.A. Next Sun., 7 p.m. $29 and up.
(213) 972-7282.
Pacific Chorale 50th-season opener
includes Leonard Bernstein’s “Mass.”
Renée and Henry Segerstrom Concert Hall, Segerstrom Center for the
Arts, 600 Town Center Drive, Costa
Mesa. Next Sun., 5:30 p.m. $25 and up.
(714) 662-2345.
The Harmonious World of Telemann
Period-instrument ensemble Con
Gioia salutes the 18th-century German composer. Neighborhood Unitarian Universalist Church, 301 N. Orange Grove Blvd., Pasadena. Sun.,
5 p.m. $12-$30. www.congioia.org.
Aida’s Secrets
Two brothers separated as babies are reunited with
their elderly mother after the discovery of records from World War II in
this documentary. Featuring Izak
Sagi, Shep Shell, Aida Zasadsina. Directed by Alon Schwarz. In English
and Hebrew with English subtitles.
(1:30) NR.
Vicente
The Pearl Fishers
Hilary Bronwyn Gayle Paramount Pictures
JULIANNE MOORE, Matt Damon in ”Suburbicon.” George Clooney directed.
votes his life to saving orphaned children. Directed by Scott Haze. (1:22)
NR.
Novitiate In the 1950s, a young woman
discovers God through the Catholic
Church and follows a path to serving
him into the ’60s. With Margaret
Qualley, Melissa Leo, Julianne Nicholson, Dianna Agron, Morgan Saylor,
Liana Liberato, Rebecca Dayan, Eline
Powell, Chelsea Lopez, Denis O’Hare,
Chris Zylka. Written and directed by
Maggie Betts. (2:03) R.
Throwback Thursday The loveliest of
the last decade’s spate of young vampire movies, the 2008 Swedish-language Let the Right One In features
two winning performances with
young actors K&aring;re Hedebrant
as the bullied preteen Oskar and Lina
Leandersson as the unusual new
neighbor girl, Eli, who becomes his
unexpected avenger and friend. With
English subtitles. Laemmle NoHo 7,
5240 Lankershim Blvd., North Hollywood, (310) 478-3836. Oct. 26, 7:30 p.m.
$12; $9 ages 62+. www.laemmle.com
The Square
An art installation designed to inspire altruism sets a high
bar for a museum curator whose own
behavior leaves something to be desired. With Claes Bang, Elisabeth
Moss, Dominic West. Written and directed by Ruben Östlund. In Swedish
and English with English subtitles.
(2:25) NR.
Suburbicon The seemingly ideal appearances of a community in 1959 belie the dark world confronted by a
family man. With Matt Damon,
Julianne Moore, Noah Jupe, Oscar
Isaac. Written by Joel Coen & Ethan
Coen and George Clooney & Grant
Heslov. Directed by Clooney. (1:44) R.
Suck It Up Two friends hit the road to
deal with their grief. With Grace
Glowicki, Erin Margurite Carter.
Written by Julia Hoff. Directed by Jordan Canning. (1:43) NR.
Thank You for Your Service U.S. soldiers struggle with their lives after returning from active duty in Iraq. With
Miles Teller, Haley Bennett, Joe Cole,
Amy Schumer, Beulah Koale, Scott
Haze. Written and directed by Jason
Hall; based on the book by David
Finkel. (1:48) R. Story on Page E1
The Truth About Lies
A young man
moves in with his mother and weaves
a complicated mass of falsehoods to
cover his downward spiral. With
Odette Annable, Chris Diamantopoulos, Mary Elizabeth Ellis. Written and
directed by Phil Allocco. (1:34) NR.
Wexford Plaza A lonely female security guard’s life comes undone after an
unexpected relationship with a bartender. With Reid Asselstine, Darrel
Gamotin. Written and directed by
Joyce Wong. (1:22) NR.
MPAA categories: (G) for general audiences; (PG) parental guidance
urged because of material possibly
unsuitable for children; (PG-13) parents are strongly cautioned to give
guidance for attendance of children
younger than 13; (R) restricted,
younger than 17 admitted only with
parent or adult guardian; (NC-17) no
one 17 and younger admitted.
Events & Revivals
Compiled by Kathleen
Craughwell
The Nightmare Before Christmas
Tim Burton’s beloved stop-motion
animated tale about Pumpkin King
Jack Skellington, melancholy rag-doll
Sally, and the mischievous Lock,
Shock and Barrell, became an instant
Halloween classic upon its 1993 release despite Jack’s yearning to be
more of a Christmas kind of skeleton.
Songs by Danny Elfman. Directed by
Henry Selick. El Capitan Theatre,
6838 Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood,
(800) 347-6396. Oct. 22-Nov. 1. www
.elcapitantheatre.com
No Más Bebés Renee Tajima-Peña’s
2015 documentary about a 1975 landmark reproductive rights lawsuit filed
by a group of Mexican immigrant
women who were allegedly sterilized
either without their knowledge or
under coercive tactics while in labor
at the Los Angeles County-USC Medical Center. A discussion with TajimaPeña will follow the screening. Hammer Museum, Billy Wilder Theater,
10899 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles,
(310) 443-7000. Oct. 24, 7:30 p.m. Free.
www.hammer.ucla.edu
Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA Considered one of the most important
films of Mexico’s silent era, El Automóvil Gris is, sadly, one of the only
silents that survived the last century.
The title of the 1919 film, which was
originally shown as a serial, refers to
the real-life Grey Automobile Gang
that terrorized Mexico City society in
a crime wave early in the 20th century.
(Be warned that the shocking conclusion shows the actual executions of
the convicted gang members.) The
popular Mexican rock-jazz band Troker provides the live score. Skirball
Cultural Center, 2701 N. Sepulveda
Blvd., Los Angeles, (310) 440-4500.
Oct. 24, 8 p.m. $25; $20 for Skirball
members; $15 for full-time students.
www.skirball.org
Alex Film Society
Peter Cushing
reprised his role as famous vampire
hunter Dr. Van Helsing in The Brides
of Dracula, Hammer Films’ 1960 follow-up to its 1958 “Dracula” (a.k.a.
“Horror of Dracula”). The “brides” of
the title are actually victims, not of
the Count himself but a handsome
Transylvanian Baron turned vampire
(David Peel, who did the dreamy
vampire thing long before Brad Pitt
or Robert Pattinson). With the 1959
Bugs Bunny toon “A Witch’s Tangled
Hare.” Alex Theatre, 216 N. Brand
Blvd., Glendale, (818) 243-2539.
Oct. 26, 7:30 p.m. $16; $12 for ages 65+
and students with ID. www.alex
filmsociety.org
THEATER
Capsule reviews are by
Philip Brandes (P.B.), F.
Kathleen Foley (F.K.F.),
Margaret Gray (M.G.),
Charles McNulty
(C.M.), Daryl H. Miller
(D.H.M.) and David C.
Nichols (D.C.N.)
Compiled by Matt Cooper.
Openings
Bright Colors and Bold Patterns
A
gay couple prepare to tie the knot in
Palm Springs in Drew Droege’s solo
comedy. Celebration Theatre @ the
Lex, 6760 Lexington Ave., Hollywood.
Sun., 7 p.m.; Mon.-Wed., 8 p.m.; ends
Oct. 25. $30. (323) 957-1884.
An Enemy of the Pueblo Playwright
Josefina López puts a feminist Chicana spin on Ibsen’s classic political fable “An Enemy of the People.” Casa
0101 Theater, 2102 E. 1st St., Boyle
Heights. Sun., next Sun., 5 p.m.; Fri.Sat., 8 p.m.; ends Nov. 12. $15-$20.
(323) 263-7684.
Trial By Jury: A Case of Deportation
Interactive theater event examines
immigration policy. The Broad Stage,
1310 11th St., Santa Monica. Mon.,
7:30 p.m. $25 and up. (310) 434-3200.
Wet: A DACAmented Journey
Alex
Alpharaoh explores life as an undocumented American in this solo drama.
Ensemble Studio Theatre/LA, 3269
Casitas Ave., Atwater Village. Mon.,
8 p.m.; Sat., 2 p.m.; ends Oct. 30. $15$20. (818) 839-1197.
Sun., 2 p.m.; ends Nov. 19. $30. (323)
960-5521.
Taking Sides A German composer in
post-WWII Berlin is accused of having
been a Nazi sympathizer in Sir Ronald Harwood’s fact-based drama. Rubicon Theatre, 1006 E. Main St., Ventura. Sat., 7 p.m.; next Sun., 2 p.m.;
ends Nov. 12. $50, $55; opening night
only, $100. (805) 667-2900.
Strays: We All Feel a Little Lost
Sometimes Lisa Wharton explores
abandonment and adoption, both
human and animal, in this hourlong
solo show. The Secret Rose, 11264
Magnolia Blvd., North Hollywood.
Next Sun., 3 p.m.; ends Dec. 3. $28.
(800) 838-3006.
Critics’ Choices
The Absolute Brightness of Leonard
Pelkey If you enjoy human-centered
stories, James Lecesne’s off-Broadway sleeper about the disappearance
of a teen whose fabulousness doesn’t
conform to restrictive Jersey Shore
gender expectations is what you’ve
been waiting for. (C.M.) The Old
Globe, San Diego, 1363 Old Globe
Way, San Diego. Sun., next Sun., 2
and 7 p.m.; Tue.-Wed., 7 p.m.; Thu.Fri., 8 p.m.; Sat., 2 and 8 p.m.; next
Sun., 2 and 7 p.m.; ends Oct. 29. $30
and up. (619) 234-5623.
Fixed
Amid drag balls and crossdressing massage parlors, Boni B. Alvarez tells a tale of two people who
might find love if the world would just
leave them alone. (D.H.M.) Echo Theater Company, Atwater Village Theatre, 3269 Casitas Ave., L.A. Ends Sun.,
4 p.m. $20, $34. (310) 307-3753.
The Madwoman of Chaillot With this
tricky balance of sharp-edged social
satire and utopian fantasy, master
stylist Stephanie Shroyer’s direction
shows why Jean Giraudoux’s classic
fable resonates most vividly in times
of beleaguered idealism. (P.B.) A
Noise Within, 3352 E. Foothill Blvd.,
Pasadena. Thu., 7:30 p.m.; Fri., 8 p.m.;
ends Nov. 11. $25 and up; student rush,
$20. (626) 356-3100.
Thé&acirc;tre de la Ville &ndash;
Paris stages a revival of this dystopian fable by Albert Camus about a fortified city under strict government
rule; in French with English supertitles; presented by CAP UCLA.
Royce Hall, UCLA, 340 Royce Drive,
Westwood. Thu.-Fri., 8 p.m. $49-$99.
(310) 825-2101.
Resolving Hedda Hedda Gabler has a
bone to pick with Henrik Ibsen. After
126 years of being backed into a corner and left with suicide as her only
freedom, she’s had enough. So she’s
trying to wrest control of “Hedda Gabler” and disrupt its plot. In Jon
Klein’s boisterous new comedy she is
ferociously embodied by Kimberly Alexander. Maria Gobetti nimbly directs. Laughing audiences clearly are
on Hedda’s side. (D.H.M.) The Big
Victory Theatre, 334 W. Victory Blvd.,
Burbank. Sun., next Sun., 4 p.m.; Fri.Sat., 8 p.m.; ends Nov. 12. $24-$34.
(818) 841-5421.
Les Liaisons Dangereuses Members
Rhinoceros With darkly hilarious ur-
of the French aristocracy play games
of sex and seduction in a partner-cast
staging of Christopher Hampton’s
adaptation of the scandalous 18thcentury novel. Kiki & David Gindler
Performing Arts Center, 110 E. Broadway, Glendale. Thu.-Sat., 8 p.m.; next
Sun., 2 p.m.; ends Dec. 10. $30, $34.
(818) 506-1983.
gency, this superbly staged and disconcertingly timely revival illuminates playwright Eugene Ionesco’s
absurdist warning about the seductively corrosive lure of herd mentality
and the fragility of civilized norms we
take for granted. (P.B.) Pacific Resident Theatre, 703 Venice Blvd.,
Venice. Sun., next Sun., 3 p.m.; Sat.,
8 p.m.; ends Nov. 26. $25-$34; discounts available. (310) 822-8392.
L’État de siege (The State of Siege)
Mateluna Chile’s Teatro Santiago a
Mil presents the U.S. premiere of Guillermo Calderón’s dark fable about
art, politics, violence, etc.; in Spanish
with projected English subtitles.
REDCAT, 631 W. 2nd St., L.A. Thu.Sat., 8:30 p.m.; ends Oct. 28. $16-$25.
(213) 237-2800.
Solo Queens Fest Three shows in repertory: Kristina Wong’s “The Wong
Street Journal,” Elizabeth Liang’s
“Alien Citizen: an earth odyssey” and
Valerie Hager’s “Naked in Alaska”;
schedules
at
www.bootlegtheater.org. Bootleg Theater, 2220 Beverly Blvd., L.A. Thu.-Sat., 7:30 p.m.;
next Sun., 11 a.m., 1 and 3 p.m.; ends
Nov. 19. $15-$30; passes, $50. (213) 3893856.
Horror UnScripted
Impro Theatre
improvises scary stories based on audience suggestions. The Edye at the
Broad Stage, 1310 11th St., Santa
Monica. Fri., 8 p.m.; Sat., 5 and 8 p.m.;
next Sun., 2 and 5 p.m.; ends Oct. 29.
$45. (310) 434-3200.
Little Women Four Japanese American sisters try to find a place for
themselves in late-1940s Los Angeles
in Velina Hasu Houston’s reimagining of Louisa May Alcott’s
classic novel. Playwrights’ Arena at
Chromolume Theatre, 5429 Washington Blvd., L.A. Sat., 8 p.m.; next Sun.,
4 p.m.; ends Nov. 20. $25, $30; discounts available. (800) 838-3006.
The Radiant Nobel-winning scientist
Marie Curie carries on following the
tragic death of her husband in Shirley
Lauro’s new bio-drama. The Other
Space at The Actors Company, 916A
N. Formosa Ave., West Hollywood.
Fri.-Sat., 8 p.m.; next Sun., 2 p.m.;
ends Nov. 19. $30, $40. (323) 960-7712.
End of the Rainbow Legendary entertainer Judy Garland prepares for a
comeback concert in 1968 London in
this bio-musical; Angela Ingersoll
stars. La Mirada Theatre, 14900 La
Mirada Blvd., La Mirada. Sat., 8 p.m.;
next Sun., 2 p.m.; ends Nov. 12. $20$70. (562) 944-9801.
The Red Dress
Inspired by a true
story, Tania Wisbar’s new drama tells
a tale of romance, art and politics in
Germany between WWI and WWII.
Odyssey Theatre, 2055 S. Sepulveda
Blvd., West L.A. Sat., 8 p.m.; next
MUSIC
Pop
Picks by August Brown
Mitski One of last year’s best songs
was about failing to live up to the AllAmerican sweetheart ideal. The Japanese American singer-songwriter
Mitski had a breakout with “Your Best American Girl,” and found a potent
lyrical well in the pain of being othered by a lover. But she comes around
to embrace her divides in history and
perspective, and comes out stronger
for giving up on that old and useless
— but still somehow alluring —
dream. If you need more inducement:
the track absolutely slays, with one of
the heaviest and best-produced guitar sounds of this year. Fonda Theatre, 6216 Hollywood Blvd., L.A. 8 p.m.
Sun. $23. fondatheatre.com.
Yeah Yeah Yeahs Hard to believe
we’re in the era of extensive reissues of
all the early ‘00’s rock bands that kick
started the NYC scene. But time is relentless; fortunately the bands are
still still good. Yeah Yeah Yeahs were
perhaps the most explosive act to
come out of that scene, and still pack
a whallop almost 15 years after their
debut “Fever To Tell,” which they’ll revisit at this underplay. Fonda Theatre, 6216 Hollywood Blvd., L.A. 8 p.m.
Wed. $53. fondatheatre.com.
Linkin Park
The surviving members
of Linkin Park will reunite onstage for
the first time since singer Chester
Bennington’s death in July. The group
announced Monday morning a Bennington tribute concert at the Hollywood Bowl on Oct. 27. Though no lineup details have been revealed, the
band said in a statement that they’ll
be joined by a number of artists who
knew Bennington or were influenced
by his music. The band members will
donate their performance fees from
the show to Music for Relief ’s One
More Light Fundin honor of Bennington. Hollywood Bowl, 2301 N. Highland Ave., L.A. 7:30 p.m. Fri. hollywoodbowl.com.
Soprano Nino
Machaidze stars in LA Opera’s staging of Bizet’s tale about a love triangle
in a Far East fishing village. Dorothy
Chandler Pavilion, 135 N. Grand Ave.,
L.A. Sun., 2 p.m.; Wed., 7:30 p.m.; ends
Sat., 7:30 p.m. $25 and up. (213) 9728001.
Restoration Concerts The New Hollywood String Quartet plays pieces by
Beethoven, Schumann and Bernard
Herrmann. South Pasadena Public
Library, Community Room, 1115 El
Centro St., South Pasadena. Sun.,
4 p.m. $20. (626) 799-6333.
Santa Monica Symphony
Season
opener features Prokofiev’s Suite
from “Romeo and Juliet” and Shostakovich’s Symphony No. 5. Barnum
Hall, Santa Monica High School, 600
Olympic Blvd., Santa Monica. Sun.,
7 p.m. Free. (310) 395-6330.
The Music Guild Piano Trio Firenze
makes its U.S. debut with works by
Beethoven and Tchaikovsky. University Synagogue, 11960 Sunset Blvd.,
Brentwood. Mon., 8 p.m. Also, Cal
State Long Beach, Daniel Recital
Hall, E. Atherton St. between Merriam Way and Palo Verde Avenue,
Long Beach. Tue., 8 p.m. And, Adat
Ari El Temple, 12020 Burbank Blvd.,
North Hollywood. Wed., 8 p.m. $46$58; discounts available. (310) 5583500.
Brahms & Hillborg
Members of the
LA Phil play chamber music by Brahms, plus Anders Hillborg’s “Duet”
and “Duo”; with pianists Hiroyo Hatsuyama and Kevin Kwan Loucks.
Walt Disney Concert Hall, 111 S. Grand
Ave., L.A. Tue., 8 p.m. $20-$59. (323)
850-2000.
Sounding Limits: The Music of Pascale Criton U.S. premiere of works by
the contemporary French composer.
REDCAT, 631 W. 2nd St., L.A. Tue.,
8:30 p.m. $16, $20. (213) 237-2800.
MUSEUMS
Reviews by Christopher
Knight (C.K.). Compiled
by Matt Cooper.
Openings
Adrián Villar Rojas: The Theater of
Disappearance The Argentinian artist explores the concepts of past, present and future in this site-specific installation. The Geffen Contemporary
at MOCA, 152 N. Central Ave., Little
Tokyo, downtown L.A. Opens Sun.;
ends Feb. 26. Closed Tue. $8-$15 (includes same-day admission to
MOCA); jurors and under 12, free;
Thursdays after 5 p.m., free. (213) 6266222.
Made in Italy New five-room exhibit
explores the design and manufacturing of a Maserati luxury SUV. Petersen Automotive Museum, 6060
Wilshire Blvd., L.A. Now open. Museum open seven days. $7-$15; activeduty military and children under 3,
free. (323) 930-2277.
Lezley Saar: Salon des Refusés Survey includes includes three of the
multimedia artist’s most recent bodies of work. California African American Museum, 600 State Drive, Exposition Park, L.A. Opens Wed.; ends
Feb. 18. Closed Mon. Free. (213) 7447432.
Pursuit of Flora 18th-century drawings from Europe of exotic fruits, flowers, etc. The Huntington, 1151 Oxford
Road, San Marino. Opens Sat.; ends
Feb. 19. Closed Tue. $13-$29; children
under 4, free. (626) 405-2100.
The Reformation: From the Word to
the World Exhibit marking the 500th
anniversary of the Protestant Reformation includes rare manuscripts,
books and prints. The Huntington,
1151 Oxford Road, San Marino. Opens
Sat.; ends Feb. 26. Closed Tue. $13$29; children under 4, free. (626) 4052100.
Michael Dressen Trio
The electroacoustic chamber ensemble performs
with flutist/composer Nicole Mitchell.
Irvine Barclay Theatre, 4242 Campus
Drive, Irvine. Thu., 8 p.m. $14, $30.
(949) 854-4646.
Piano Spheres
Pianist-composer
Milen Kirov performs. Boston Court,
70 N. Mentor Ave., Pasadena. Thu.,
8 p.m. $10; students, free. (626) 6836883.
Trio Voronezh
The ensemble plays
classical works, etc., arranged for
Russian folk instruments. Théatre
Raymond Kabbaz, Le Lycee Francais
de Los Angeles, 10361 W. Pico Blvd.,
L.A. Thu., 7:30 p.m. $15, $25. (310) 2860553.
Los Angeles Baroque Players Period
instrument ensemble plays pieces by
Bach, Telemann, et al. Trinity Lutheran Church, 997 E. Walnut St.,
Pasadena. Fri., 8 p.m. Also, Contrapuntal Recital Hall, 655 N. Bundy
Drive, L.A. Next Sun., 2:30 p.m. $5$30. (323) 254-9613.
The Monkey’s Paw and The Medium
Pacific Opera Project pairs L.A.based composer Brooke deRosa’s
new musical terror tale with Menotti’s
supernatural thriller. Highland Park
Ebell Club, 131 S. Avenue 57, L.A. Fri.Sat., next Tue., 8 p.m.; also in Santa
Monica, Nov. 3-5. $20, $25; tables, $65
and $125. (323) 739-6122.
Susan Svercek The pianist performs
Messiaen’s Holocaust-themed work
“Quartet for the End of Time” and
more. Boston Court, 70 N. Mentor
Ave., Pasadena. Fri., 8 p.m. $20-$30.
(626) 683-6883.
Symphonie Fantastique
Principal
guest conductor Susanna Mälkki
leads the LA Phil in the Berlioz favorite plus the composer’s “Queen Mab”
Scherzo and the U.S. premiere of
Luca Francesconi’s “Duende — The
Dark Notes” featuring violinist Leila
Josefowicz. Disney Concert Hall, 111 S.
Grand Ave., L.A. Fri.-Sat., 8 p.m.; next
Sun., 2 p.m. $20-$188. (323) 850-2000.
Dracula
Philip Glass and Kronos
Quartet perform the composer’s own
score to accompany a screening of the
1931 vampire tale starring Bela Lugosi. Segerstrom Hall, Segerstrom
Center for the Arts, 600 Town Center
Drive, Costa Mesa. Sat., 7:30 p.m.;
next Sun., 2 p.m. $59 and up. (714) 5562787.
Kaleidoscope Chamber Orchestra
Season opener features Bach’s Brandenburg Concerti Nos. 1 & 5 plus
West Coast premieres from Stephen
Hartke and Gabriella Smith. Zipper
Hall, the Colburn School, 200 S.
Grand Ave., L.A. Sat., 10 p.m. Also,
First Presbyterian Church, 1220 2nd
St., Santa Monica. Next Sun., 2 p.m.
Pay what you can. www.kco.la.
La Belle et la B&ecirc;te (Beauty and
the Beast) The Philip Glass Ensemble and guest vocalists perform
the composer’s own score to accompany a screening of Jean Cocteau’s
1946 fantasy. The Theatre at Ace Hotel, 929 S. Broadway, L.A. Sat., 8 p.m.;
next Sun., 2 p.m.; also Tue., Oct. 31,
8 p.m. $41 and up. (213) 972-8001.
GALLERIES
Reviews by Sharon Mizota
(S.M.), David Pagel
(D.P.) and Leah Ollman
(L.O.). Compiled by Matt
Cooper.
Critics’ Choices
Dinh Q Le: The Scrolls: Distortion
Le’s work is driven by the unresolvability of competing narratives — personal experience, collective memory,
historical record, fictional accounts,
propaganda and more. He’s best
known for photographic weavings
that unite disparate images into a
pixellated field. Here, a selection of
those compelling works is joined by
gigantic, photo-montaged scrolls suspended high overhead and unfurling
onto platforms. Visual logic is subverted, legibility is compromised, but
the glossy images keep unspooling.
(L.O.) Shoshana Wayne Gallery, Bergamot Station, 2525 Michigan Ave.,
Santa Monica. Through Dec. 23.
Closed Sun.-Mon. www.shoshanawayne.com.
Jordan Nassar: Dunya If only negotiations between Palestinians and Israelis could proceed as respectfully
and inventively as Nassar negotiates
the divergent forces feeding into his
work. A Palestinian-American married to an Israeli, he was “born into
the conflict,” but a room full of his intimate, cross-stitched embroideries,
based on traditional patterns, feels
like an oasis of calm. (L.O.) Anat Ebgi
(AE2), 2680 S. La Cienega Blvd., L.A.
Through Nov. 4. Closed Sun.-Mon.
(310) 838-2770.
DANCE
Compiled by Matt Cooper
Forever Flamenco Leilah Broukhim
returns; with dancer Manuel Gutierrez, et al. The Fountain Theatre, 5060
Fountain Ave., L.A. Sun., 8 p.m. $30$50. (323) 663-1525.
Invertigo Dance Theatre The company launches its 10th season with a
retrospective. The Moss Theatre, 3131
Olympic Blvd., Santa Monica. Sun.,
6 p.m. $20-$125. (424) 229-2141.
Luncheon on the Grass Heidi Duckler Dance Theatre offers a site-specific work inspired by Manet’s classic
painting. Maguire Gardens at the
Central Library, 630 W 5th St., L.A.
Tue., noon. Free; reservations required. www.heididuckler.org.
Inferno
American Contemporary
Ballet revisits Dante’s supernatural
tale. The Bloc, 32nd floor, 700 S.
Flower St., L.A. Thu.-Sat., 8 p.m. $40$80. (213) 304-3408.
Fall showcase features scenes and arias from Bizet,
Mozart, Puccini, Strauss and more.
Zipper Hall, the Colburn School, 200
S. Grand Ave., L.A. Sat., 2 p.m. $5, $25.
(323) 356-0047.
Garth Fagan Dance The Rochester,
N.Y.-based company returns with two
West Coast premieres, plus an encore
of Fagan’s tribute to the late Geoffrey
Holder. Nate Holden Performing
Arts Center, 4718 W. Washington
Blvd., L.A. Fri., 8 p.m.; Sat., 2 and
8 p.m.; next Sun., 3 p.m. $25-$35.
(323) 964-9766.
So Percussion The ensemble is
joined by soprano Dawn Upshaw, et
al., for a program that includes works
by Caroline Shaw, George Crumb and
Shara Nova; presented by CAP
UCLA. Royce Hall, UCLA, 340 Royce
Drive, Westwood. Sat., 8 p.m. $29-$59.
(310) 825-2101.
Pushing Dance Boundaries Los Angeles Ballet performs Balanchine’s
“The Four Temperaments” and
more. Redondo Beach Performing
Arts Center, 1935 E. Manhattan
Beach Blvd., Redondo Beach. Sat.,
7:30 p.m. $31-$99; discounts available.
(310) 998-7782.
The Opera Buffs
L AT I M E S . C O M / CA L E N DA R
S U N DAY , OC T O B E R 22, 2 017
TV THIS W EEK
Sunday Prime-Time TV
Thriller night! The music
of the King of Pop serves as
the soundtrack to the new
animated tale “Michael
Jackson’s Halloween.”
8 p.m. CBS
By Matt Cooper
SUNDAY
“The Simpsons” get
their trick-or-treat on with
an all-new “Treehouse of
Horror.” 8 p.m. Fox
They’re putting the team
back together on a third
season of the action drama
“Blindspot.” Sullivan Stapleton and Jaimie Alexander star. 8 p.m. NBC
The bewitching Cassie
Nightingale (Catherine
Bell) is back in the new TV
movie “Good Witch: Spellbound.” 8 p.m. Hallmark
Channel
“The Walking Dead”
hits the 100-episode mark
with its eighth-season premiere. Followed by new
episodes of the after-show
“Talking Dead. ” 9 and 10:07
p.m. AMC
Nick Nolte is back as the
former president known as
“Graves” as this political
comedy returns. 10 and 10:30
p.m. Epix
“Michel’le: Still Standing” finds the R&B singer
discussing her life and career in this new special.
10 p.m. Lifetime
MONDAY
The night is dark and full
of terrors for assorted reality TV stars in the new competition series “Scared
Famous” hosted by rapper
Redman. 9 p.m. VH1
Ready for her close-up:
Veteran cinematographer
Kirsten Johnson points the
camera at herself for a
change in her new memoir
“Cameraperson” airing on
“POV.” 10 p.m. KOCE
TUESDAY
Baseball’s best will take
the field for the “2017 World
Series.” Joe Buck and Hall
of Famer John Smoltz call
the action. 5 p.m. Fox; also
Wed., Fri., Sat.
“Selma” director Ava
DuVernay explores her
family history on a new
“Finding Your Roots.”
8 p.m. KOCE
Netf lix
“STRANGER THINGS”
is back for a second season on Netflix. With
Gaten Matarazzo.
Nayyar attempt to spit mad
rhymes in the debut of the
competition series “Drop
the Mic.” 10:29 p.m. TBS
The star of the cult sitcom “Strangers with
Candy” is your hostess with
the mostest in the new
comedy/variety show “At
Home With Amy Sedaris.”
10:30 and 11 p.m. TruTV
WEDNESDAY
Why you, I otter: Those
water-lovin’ critters are
featured in “Charlie and the
Curious Otters” on a new
“Nature.” 8 p.m. KOCE
Who’s a good dog? Find
out at the “2017 American
Humane Hero Dog
Awards.” Beth Stern and
James Denton host the
seventh annual ceremony.
8 p.m. Hallmark Channel
You’ll fall in lava all over
again in the new “Nova”
episode “Killer Volcanoes.”
9 p.m. KOCE
“Frontline” ponders
why Russia’s president
might be meddling in U.S.
elections in the new twopart episode “Putin’s Revenge.” 10 p.m. KOCE
THURSDAY
The most evilest doll
that ever lived is back in the
2017 horror-franchise entry
“Cult of Chucky.” With
Brad Dourif and Jennifer
Tilly. 10 p.m. AMC
A hip-hop star follows in
the footsteps of Jack Barry,
et al., in “Snoop Dogg Presents The Jokers Wild,” a
new reboot of the classic
game show. 10 p.m. TBS
Nonrapping celebs like
“The Big Bang Theory’s”
Mayim Bialik and Kunal
Alpha male Charlton
Heston is “The Omega
Man” as this post-apocalyptic thriller kicks off a fivefilm mini-fest of 1970s-era
sci-fi flicks. Also included:
The futuristic 1976 fable
“Logan’s Run.” 5 and 7 p.m.
TCM
FRIDAY
Our boy heroes and the
mysterious Eleven are back
in action — but Barb, not so
much — on the return of the
super-fun 1980s-set sci-fi/
horror series “Stranger
Things.” Any time, Netflix
Andrew Garfield and
Adam Driver play a pair of
Portuguese missionaries in
17th-century Japan in Martin Scorsese’s 2016 drama
“Silence.” 8 p.m. Epix
The AIDS crisis impacts
an average American family
in the Tony-nominated
musical drama “Falsettos”
on a new “Live From Lincoln Center.” With Christian Borle and Andrew
Rannells. 9 p.m. KOCE
“The Life and Songs of
Kris Kristofferson” is a
star-studded salute to the
country-music veteran who
crafted such classic tunes as
“Sunday Mornin’ Comin’
Down” and “Me and Bobby
McGee.” With Emmylou
Harris, Willie Nelson, et al.
10 p.m. CMT
SATURDAY
A bridal-boutique owner
(Rachel Skarsten) gets a
chance at romance in the
new TV movie “Marry Me
at Christmas.” 8 p.m. Hallmark Channel
James McAvoy plays a
mentally deranged man
with “Split” personalities
who abducts a trio of young
women in M. Night Shyamalan’s creepy 2016 thriller.
8 p.m. HBO
The new TV movie
“Flint” dramatizes the
contaminated-water crisis
afflicting that impoverished
Michigan town. With Queen
Latifah. 8 p.m. Lifetime
Ozzy Osbourne and his
longtime bandmates hit the
stage one last time in the
2017 rock doc “Black Sabbath: The End of the End.”
9 p.m. Showtime
8 pm
8:30
Wisdom of the Crowd (TVPG)
CBS
9 pm
Sports News Movies (N) New Å Closed Captioning
9:30
10 pm
NCIS: Los Angeles (TV14)
Police want help on a major Weapons worth $1 million
murder case. (N) Å
are stolen. (N) Å
NBC Football (5:20) The Challenge News (N) Å
KTLA The Goldbergs The Goldbergs News (N) Å
Funniest Home Videos Scary
Halloween decorations. (N)
KCAL News (N) Å
ABC
KOCE
shirts for men. (N) Å
News (N) Å
11 pm
abeth tries to fund a power
grid in a refugee camp. (N)
lieves Pete took Lake. (N) Å
News (N) Å Sports Central Joel Osteen
The Simpsons Ghosted The
News (N) Å
Modern Family
Cops (TVPG)
Vietnam War
The Durrells in Corfu (TVPG)
Seinfeld Å
Seinfeld Å
Take Me Home Huey (2017) Å
Vera (TVPG) Å
El Chapo (TVMA)
The Collection (TV14) Paul
Poldark (TVPG) Ross gam-
Louisa has an idea to boost bles to rescue Dwight; Drake
Larry’s writing career. (N) Å joins Ross’ mission. (N) Å
KDOC Cadillac Man ›› (1990) Robin Williams, Tim Robbins. (R)
KLCS Antiques Roadshow (TVG)
Film School Å On Story Å
(TVPG) Å
presents his collection of
gowns. (N) Å
Noticias
Manners of
Downton Abbey
(TVPG) Å
Family Guy
Family Guy
Seinfeld Å
Global Spirit (TVG) Å
Money
Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars
The Walking Dead (TVMA) The The Walking Dead (TVMA) (Season premiere) Talking Dead (TV14) (Season
A&E
AMC
7th season finale with new
content. (N) (7:30) Å
ANP
BBC
BET
Bravo
CMT
CNN
Com
Disc
Disn
E!
ESPN
Food
FNC
Free
FX
Hall
HGTV
Hist
IFC
Life
MSN
MTV
NGC
Nick
OWN
Spike
Sund
Syfy
TBS
TCM
TLC
TNT
Toon
Travel
Tru
TV L
USA
VH1
Norah Jones brings her
sultry sounds to a new installment of “Austin City
Limits.” 11 p.m. KOCE
WGN
Tom Hanks voices an
animated version of his
kooky “SNL” character for
the “The David S. Pumpkins Halloween Special.”
11:29 p.m. NBC
HBO
Cine
Encr
EPIX
Show
Starz
TMC
10:30
Madam Secretary (TV14) Eliz- News (N) Å
Dateline NBC (TVPG) Å
News (N) Å
News (N) Å
News (N) Å
Shark Tank (TVPG) Premium Ten Days in the Valley Jane be- News (N) Å
Family Guy A The Last
special $1
Treehouse of office is on
Man on Earth
Horror. (N) Å lockdown. (N) bill. (N) Å
(TV14) (N) Å
MyNt Big Bang Å
Big Bang Å
Big Bang Å
Big Bang Å
KVCR Remember TV California Gold Red Green Å Red Green Å
KCET Father Brown (TVPG) Å
Miss Fisher’s Murder Mysteries
UNI
Mira Quién Baila (N)
FOX
E9
Rick’s group and their allies bring the fight
to Negan and the Saviors. (N) Å
premiere) Hosted by Chris
Hardwick. (N) (10:07) Å
Monsters Inside Me (TV14) (N) Monsters Inside Me (N) Å
Monsters In Me Brain
Monsters Å
Mission: Impossible III ››› (2006) Tom Cruise, Philip Seymour Hoffman. (PG-13) Å
Mission: Imp. 3
The Single Moms Club ›› (2014) Nia Long. (7) (PG-13)
BET Her Fights: Breast Cancer Martin (TVPG)
Shahs of Sunset (TV14) Å
Real Housewives: Atlanta
What Happens
Shahs of Sunset (TV14) (N)
The Goonies (1985) Sean Astin. (7) (PG)
Son-in-Law › (1993) Pauly Shore, Carla Gugino. (PG-13) Å
Anthony Bourdain (TVPG) Å This Is Life With Lisa Ling Å
Newsroom
This Is Life With Lisa Ling Å
Happy Gilmore Billy Madison › (1995) Adam Sandler. (8:25) (PG-13) Å
Superbad ››› (2007) Å
Alaska: The Last Frontier (N) Edge of Alaska (TV14)
Alaska: Last Frontier (N) Å
Alaska Å
Toy-TERROR! Mickey Mouse Stuck in Middle Bizaardvark
Raven’s Home Stuck in Middle Transylvania
The Kardashians (TV14) Å
The Kardashians (TV14) Å
The Platinum Life (TV14) (N) Kardashian Å
SportsCenter (N) Å
SportsCenter (N) Å
SportsCenter (N) Å
Guy’s Grocery Games (TVG)
Halloween Wars (TVG) (N)
Halloween Wars (TVG) Å
Best Baker Å
Objectified Å
Next Revolution: Steve Hilton Å Fox Report Å
Fox News Sun.
Addams Family Values (7:05) Hocus Pocus ›› (1993) Bette Midler, Sarah Jessica Parker. (9:15) (PG) Å
Pitch Perfect 2 ›› (2015) Anna Kendrick, Rebel Wilson. (PG-13) Å
Pitch Perfect 2 ›› (2015)
Good Witch: Spellbound (2017) Catherine Bell. Å
Countdown to Christmas (N) Å Golden Girls Å
Hawaii Life (N) Hawaii Life (N) Island Life (N) Island Life (N) Mexico Life (N) Mexico Life (N) House Hunters
Forged in Fire (TVPG) Å
Forged in Fire (TVPG) Å
Forged in Fire (TVPG) (10:03) Forged in Fire
Sherlock Holmes ›› (2009) Robert Downey Jr., Jude Law. (PG-13) Å
Sherlock-Game
Surviving Compton: Dre, Suge & Michel’le: Enhanced (2016)
Michel’le: Still Standing (N) Å Michel’le (N)
Lockup: Wabash (TVPG) Å
Lockup: Raw Å
Lockup: Raw Å
Dateline Extra
Friends With Benefits (2011) Justin Timberlake. (7:30) (R)
The Blind Side ››› (2009) Sandra Bullock.
Drain the Bermuda Triangle Å Drain Alcatraz (TVPG) (N) Å The Story of Us (TV14) Å
StarTalk (N)
Full House Å Full House Å Full House Å Full House Å Fresh Prince Å Fresh Prince Å Friends Å
Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom ›› (2013) Idris Elba, Naomie Harris. (PG-13)
Mandela-Walk
Berlin Station (TVMA) Å
Taken ››› (2008) Liam Neeson. (PG-13) Å
Safe ›› (R)
You Only Live Twice (6:30)
Die Another Day ›› (2002) Pierce Brosnan, Halle Berry. (PG-13) Å
A Nightmare on Elm Street 2: Freddy’s Revenge ›› (1985) (R) A Nightmare on Elm Street ››› (1984) (R)
To Be Announced
Catching Fire
Dracula Has Risen (G) (7) Å The Monster ›› (1925) Lon Chaney, Gertrude Olmstead.
Eyes Without
90 Day Fiancé: Before 90 (N) 90 Day Fiancé (TVPG) (N)
My Giant Life (TV14) (N)
90 Day Fiancé
We’re the Millers ›› (2013) Jennifer Aniston. (7:30) (R) Å Good Behavior (TVMA) (N)
Good Behavior
King of the Hill King of the Hill Bob’s Burgers American Dad Family Guy Å Family Guy Å Rick and Morty
Food Paradise (TVG) (N) Å
Screams (N) Screams (N) Haunted USA (TVPG) (N) Å Terrifying …
Jokers Å
Jokers Å
Jokers Å
Jokers Å
Jokers Å
Jokers Å
Jokers Å
Raymond Å
Raymond Å
Raymond Å
Raymond Å
Mom (TV14) Mom (TV14) King of Queens
Law & Order: SVU (TV14) Å Law & Order: SVU (TV14) Å Law & Order: SVU (TV14) Å Modern Family
Love & Hip Hop: Hollywood Å Love & Hip Hop: Hollywood Å Dinner Party Å Black Ink Crew: Chicago (TV14)
Bones (TV14) Å
Bones (TV14) Å
Elementary (TV14) Å
Elementary Å
Transcendence ›› (2014) Johnny Depp. (PG-13) Å
Rupture (2016) Noomi Rapace. Å
As Good as It Gets (6:39) Å The Haunting › (1999) (PG-13) Å
The Talented Mr. Ripley (10:55)
Jack Reacher: Never Go Back Berlin Station (TVMA) (N) Å Graves (N) Å Graves (N) Å Berlin Station
John Wick: Chapter 2 ›››
The Deuce (TVMA) Pimps
Enthusiasm
Vice Principals Last Week Tomay become obsolete. (N) Å (TV14) (N) Å (TVMA) (N) Å night (TVMA)
(2017) (R) (6:50) Å
Active Shooter: America Under Ray Donovan (TVMA) Ray
White Famous White Famous Ray Donovan
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Fire (TV14) Å
(TVMA) (N) (TVMA) Å
(TVMA) Å
Outlander Jamie and Claire reunite. (N) Å Outlander (TVMA) (9:16)
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I Am Number Four ›› (2011) Alex Pettyfer. (PG-13) Å
No Escape ›› (2015) Owen Wilson. (R) Å
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F
ARTS&BOOKS
S U N D A Y , O C T O B E R 2 2 , 2 0 1 7 :: L A T I M E S . C O M / C A L E N D A R
Marcus Yam Los Angeles Times
SZA — that’s pronounced like “scissor” — is in disbelief over the attention her music is getting: “I wasn’t expecting people were going to show a … lot of attention.”
FIERCE STORYTELLER
Sza is having a killer year with ‘Ctrl.’ Now she just needs to fight self-doubts.
BY GERRICK D. KENNEDY >>> Sza should have been celebrating. It was the day after her sold-out tour played downtown at
the Novo, and she had just learned that her breakout single, “Love Galore,” had gone platinum — yet she was agonizing over the
concert. ¶ “This is the second time I’ve had a really bad show … I was certain that I was gonna have an amazing show, and
I’ve never been that certain,” the 26-year-old sighed, sitting cross-legged at Runyon Canyon on a recent afternoon. ¶ A
nature enthusiast, Sza often walks these winding trails with her 3-year-old French bulldog, Piglet, but this day, she was
unwinding on a slab of concrete overlooking a busy dog park. ¶ She was upset over the show, which had had a few technical
snafus — minor ones, like her in-ear monitors going in and out. The glitches went unnoticed by an audience that had moved to
her every whim, but she couldn’t shake the feeling that she had “failed in front of a lot of people.” ¶ It will take more than
one glitchy show to slow down the singer-songwriter born Solána Rowe, although this drive for perfection has [See Sza, F4]
BUILDING TYPE
Climbing down
from the hilltop
After 20 years, the Getty
Center joins the L.A. art
scene from afar, thanks to
Pacific Standard Time.
CHRISTOPHER HAWTHORNE
ARCHITECTURE CRITIC
Last week in this space, to mark
the 20th anniversary of Frank
Gehry’s Guggenheim Museum in
Bilbao, Spain, I raised a series of
questions about how life in Los Angeles might be different had
Gehry’s Walt Disney Concert Hall
in downtown L.A., designed well
before the museum, managed to
avoid fundraising delays and open
before it as well. Would the muchtouted Bilbao Effect have been
ours, a Bunker Hill Effect, instead?
A different set of questions
might be asked about another major museum set to celebrate its
20th birthday this fall: Richard
Meier’s Getty Center.
To wit: What if the Getty, instead of hiring a New York firm to
design a single billion-dollar museum complex on a hilltop overlooking the 405 Freeway, had instead
built five $200-million campuses,
each in a different (ground-level)
section of the city and each by a different architect? Or 10 with a price
tag of $100 million each? Or 100 at
$10 million per? How might the cultural history of Los Angeles or contemporary architecture be different?
In the 1990s the Getty, of course,
was looking to consolidate its various activities rather than distribute them, which makes the idea of a
hydra-headed Getty Center ridiculous in purely practical terms. This
was not an institution looking to
radically redefine institutionbuilding or museum architecture
in that way. On top of that there
have always been many visitors
who treasure the Getty’s very isolation, who
[See Getty, F6]
HIS LANDSCAPE OF LOSS
AFTER SANTA ROSA FIRE
BOOKS, F8
Stefan Kiesbye
F2
S U N DAY, O C T O B E R 22 , 2 017
L AT I M E S . C O M / CA L E N DA R
ARTS & BOOKS
A RETURN
MEANT
TO BE
ANCIENT
TREES GET
A FRESH
LOOK
THEATER, F7
BOOK
REVIEW, F10
ON VIEW
POP & HISS
Another
take on
Dylan’s
‘Sand’
By Randy Lewis
Photographs by
Carolina A. Miranda Los Angeles Times
“SUPERFICIAL EXERCISES,” 2017, by Jose Carlos Martinat, a large-scale assemblage now at a pop-up gallery space in Chinatown.
Latino
artwork
pops up
By Carolina A. Miranda
The putty-colored warehouse bearing a sign
for the Fu Yuan International wholesaler on the
northern fringes of Los Angeles’ Chinatown
doesn’t look like a place you might stumble
upon a work by Jesús Rafael Soto, the famed
Venezuelan artist known for his finely rendered,
mind-bending optical works. Or an installation
of wooden totems by 20th century Uruguayan
sculptor Francisco Matto. Not to mention the
photographs of Mexico’s Lourdes Grobet, renowned for her images of Mexican wrestlers
(and who currently has work on view at the
Hammer Museum as part of “Radical Women:
Latin American Art, 1960-85.”)
But through the end of this month, this
industrial site is serving as the temporary home
for a pop-up art space called ProyectosLA, a
collaboration with nearly two dozen well-known
galleries from throughout Latin America, including OMR in Mexico City; Revolver Galería
in Lima, Peru; and Galeria Nara Roesler, which
maintains exhibition spaces in Rio de Janeiro
and Sao Paulo, Brazil, and New York.
The show, one of many Latin Americathemed gallery projects being held in parallel
with the Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA exhibitions across Southern California, was organized by independent curators Claudia Segura,
who hails from Colombia, and Luiza Teixeira de
Freitas, who lives in Lisbon.
“The notion of the border ... was a leitmotif of
the show,” the curators say in an email. “[It]
allowed us to intertwine concepts such as identity, syncretism, nationalism, indigenism,
utopia, reality.”
In one massive room, a series of filmy, houseshaped silhouettes by Los Angeles artist Carmen Argote hovers near totems by Matto. In
another, an assemblage by the contemporary
Argentine collective Mondongo hangs near an
installation of ceramics by Magali Lara, a Mexican artist whose works use language to explore
the nature of intimacy.
Even as ProyectosLA mashes up geography,
time periods, artistic movements and materials, it explores linkages. One room features
paper art by Mexican avant-garde artist Ulises
Carrión hanging alongside work by Brazilian
Japanese sculptor Tomie Ohtake and a photobased installation by Chilean poet Raúl Zurita.
“All of them dissimilar artists, from different
periods of time, but all interested in abstraction,” Segura and De Freitas write. “They compose a beautiful narrative that questions borders of nationalities, times and formats.”
To visit all 18 galleries during any other time
would require plane tickets to Buenos Aires;
New York; Guatemala City; Sao Paulo; Mexico
City; Lima; Santiago, Chile; and Bogota, Colombia. ProyectosLA makes the art-gazing infinitely easier.
ALBERTO BOREA’S installation sculpture “Combis: Tupac Metropolitano, Ciudad.”
carolina.miranda@latimes.com
JESÚS “BUBU” NEGRÓN’S “Ethnographic Abstractions,” 2016, is at the pop-up space.
Spirituality has been a
cornerstone of Bob Dylan’s
music.
Matters of God and faith
have infused his material
regularly, from early songs
such as “With God on Our
Side,” in which he questioned humankind’s ability
to justify most any behavior
according to one’s interpretation of religious beliefs,
right through “Duquesne
Whistle” on 2012’s “Tempest,” when he confessed, “I
can hear a sweet voice gently calling / Must be the
Mother of our Lord.”
Yet most fans and critics
alike were flummoxed in
1979 when he released “Slow
Train Coming,” the first of a
trio of albums that were
immersed in Christian
imagery and scriptural
references.
That period, which continued with “Saved” in 1980
and “Shot of Love” in 1981, is
one of the most polarizing of
his career.
Yet it’s an era his record
label is exploring in-depth in
“Bob Dylan: Trouble No
More — The Bootleg Series
Vol. 13/1979-1981,” coming
Nov. 3.
The Times online (la
times.com/music) premiered a track from the
forthcoming Columbia
Records/Legacy Recordings
set, and it’s one of the finest
songs to come out of that
period. The song, “Every
Grain of Sand,” originally
appeared on “Shot of Love.”
This version is from a
rehearsal on Sept. 26, 1980,
where he was accompanied
by guitarist Fred Tackett,
keyboardist Willie Smith,
bassist Tim Drummond
and drummer Jim Keltner.
It’s a strikingly different
take from the “Shot of Love”
rendition, which swayed
with a waltz pulse that
sounded designed for a
Sunday morning congregation.
In the album’s liner
notes, writer-turned-filmmaker Cameron Crowe says
Dylan told him, “That was
an inspired song that came
to me. It wasn’t really too
difficult. I felt like I was just
putting words down that
were coming from somewhere else, and I just stuck
it out.”
The deluxe version of the
latest installment in the
ongoing “Bootleg Series”
also includes the only live
performance of the song
Dylan delivered during the
1979-81 tours. They’re
among the 102 tracks — all
previously unreleased live
and studio recordings,
among them 14 songs never
released before — spread
over eight discs that make
up Vol. 13.
A ninth disc is a DVD
containing “Trouble No
More: A Musical Film” from
director Jennifer LeBeau,
consisting of footage from
his 1980 tours.
randy.lewis@latimes.com
Los Angeles Times
BOB DYLAN perform-
ing in November 1979 in
Santa Monica.
L AT I M E S . C O M / CA L E N DA R
S U N DAY, O C T O B E R 22 , 2 017
F3
ART
75 YEARS OF AUCTIONS
Mel Melcon Los Angeles Times
THIERRY NOIR’S “Freedom Boulevard” on a North Hollywood apartment marks a Berlin-Los Angeles bond.
CANVASSING THE CITY
From Berlin Wall to NoHo
By Deborah Vankin
When the Berlin Wall
tumbled in 1989, its Western
side was covered with graffiti art. French artist Thierry
Noir had been among the
first to mark the wall with
paint, he says.
“I lived very close to the
wall. It was depressing — the
death strip, watch towers
and soldiers coming and going, that was my view,” he
says by phone from his home
in Berlin.
“I wanted to change
something. So I started to
paint the wall. I wanted to
make some [statement]
against it, to resist the pressure of that life and the sadness.”
Now Noir — who has been
working steadily as an international public artist for
decades — has created a mural in Los Angeles, “Freedom
Boulevard,” on the side of a
stark white apartment
building in the North Hollywood arts district.
The 300-foot-long work,
meant to mark the 50th anniversary of Berlin and Los
Angeles as sister cities, depicts his signature elongated cartoon heads in profile. The images grew out of
what Noir calls his “Fast
Form Manifest” style, something he developed in Berlin
during the ’80s.
“It was forbidden to paint
on the wall. It was not an art
project but a deadly border.
So: Just paint and disap-
pear,” he says.
Noir has created several
murals in L.A. over the years,
including one on Wilshire
Boulevard as part of the
Wende Museum’s 2009 project commemorating the anniversary of the fall of the
Berlin Wall.
But “Freedom Boulevard” is his largest public
mural. With it, Noir hopes to
make a statement against
border walls and to elevate
the spirits of those who pass
by.
Where: Lofts at NoHo
Commons, 11136 Chandler
Blvd., North Hollywood
Commissioned
by:
MWest Holdings
More from the artist: “If,
when you look at ‘Freedom
Boulevard,’ you have one
second of smiling on your
face, it’s the best thing. I
think that’s the first important thing to me. The second
is, I did that style on a deadly
border, so it’s important to
note that on our side, on the
West Berlin side, we were
free; and on the East Berlin
side, we were not. So it’s a
statement of freedom. Today, there are a lot of crazy
things happening in the
world. So ‘Freedom Boulevard’ is like a defense, of
course symbolically, but a
firewall to protect Los Angeles against craziness of the
world.”
deborah.vankin
@latimes.com
Twitter:
@debvankin
Francisco José de Goya, Los Caprichos, first edition, complete with
80 etchings, circa 1799. Estimate $70,000 to $100,000.
Old Master Through
Modern Prints
NOVEMBER 2
Specialist: Todd Weyman • tweyman@swanngalleries.com
Visit our website for catalogues, previews and auction times
104 East 25th St, New York, NY 10010 • tel 212 254 4710
SWANNGALLERIES.COM
|
present
JOHN HODGMAN
live and in person.
Kevin McKenzie, Artistic Director
DECEMBER 7–17
Segerstrom Hall
Music: Peter Ilyitch Tchaikovsky Choreography: Alexei Ratmansky
WITH PACIFIC SYMPHONY
Mon., Nov. 6, 7:30 p.m. | The Theatre at Ace Hotel
Tickets start at $25
In his bestselling books and appearances on
“The Daily Show With Jon Stewart,” John Hodgman
found comedy in fake news and invented facts. Now
everyone’s doing it and that routine doesn’t seem quite
so funny to him anymore. Be there as the Los Angeles
Times’ Patt Morrison talks with him about his life,
Photo: Gene Schiavone
career and first book of nonfiction, “Vacationland.”
The Center’s International Dance Series is made possible by:
Audrey Steele Burnand Endowed Fund for International Dance, The Segerstrom
Foundation Endowment for Great Performances. Media Partner: Coast Magazine
ORDER TICKETS TODAY!
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F4
S U N DAY, O C T O B E R 22 , 2 017
L AT I M E S . C O M / CA L E N DA R
POP MUSIC
Music teeming with honesty
[Sza, from F1]
often impeded her young career.
“It was the worst-case scenario,” she said. “The whole thing was
off. But I’m trying to become more
malleable. Experiences like that
help me toughen up.”
Rowe is amid a breakout year
with “Ctrl,” her fierce debut album
that explores love, sex, black womanhood and identity with a bluntness typically reserved for gossip
sessions with friends.
Released in June, “Ctrl” hit a
vein — particularly among young
black women. It topped the R&B
albums chart (the third album by a
woman to do so this year) and recently went gold.
Her songs have scored HBO’s
hit series “Insecure,” Lorde and
Maroon 5 have tapped her for collaborations and Beyoncé and Solange are among her biggest fans.
Then there are the Grammys — expect to see her nominated for new
artist.
This time last year, however,
Rowe was ready to hang it up.
“I actually quit,” she tweeted
last October, adding, Top Dawg
Entertainment Co-President Terrence “Punch” Henderson “can release my album if he ever feels like
it. Y’all be blessed.”
The cryptic dispatch was
quickly deleted, but her fans and
the media noticed. Sza is a fierce
self-critic, and it was one of many
moments of self-doubt that curbed
the singer — and threatened “Ctrl.”
“I’m a Scorpio with a Pisces
moon. I am very critical of myself.
I’m actually way less critical of others than I am of myself,” she said.
“I’m in my own head a lot. It’s hard
and really discouraging.”
An accidental singer
Rowe was born in St. Louis and
raised an Orthodox Muslim in
Maplewood, N.J. (she was aggressively taunted in school after 9/11);
her stage name, pronounced like
“scissor,” was inspired by Nation of
Islam teachings.
She had a strict childhood —
television and radio were forbidden — and Rowe didn’t grow up
with dreams of singing. Instead,
she focused on the Olympics, training as a gymnast for 13 years.
At gymnastics camp, she got
her first taste of music outside the
classical jazz her father preferred
when she found an iPod loaded
with Björk, Jay-Z, Common, WuTang Clan, Nas and Outkast.
After dropping out of college
(she cycled through four schools,
studying marine biology) and
burning through a string of odd
jobs, she started recording at the
insistence of a friend.
In 2011, Rowe met Top Dawg Entertainment’s Henderson at a
showcase
for
a
then-rising
Kendrick Lamar. She was working
for a streetwear brand and was
handing out merchandise. Henderson overheard the music she
had recorded with her brother
Daniel, who raps under the name
Mnhattn, and the two struck up a
rapport.
It was only after she self-released 2012’s “See.Sza.Run” and
“S” the following year that Rowe
signed with TDE, making her the
first female performer on the L.A.
hip-hop indie that launched
Lamar, Schoolboy Q and Ab-Soul.
“What caught my attention was
her approach to how she writes
songs,” Henderson said. “She approaches them as a lyricist — how
she puts words and metaphors together. But then there’s her voice,
it’s so distinctive.”
“Z,” her 2014 EP released
through TDE, earned the singer
buzz for its chilly vibes and her
sultry rasp. Before the year was
over, Rowe was playing festivals
and writing for Beyoncé and Nicki
Minaj.
Things only took off from there.
Rihanna enlisted Sza to write and
sing on her latest album, “Anti”;
she toured with Jhené AIko; and
RCA teamed with TDE, having
seen how the indie steered Lamar
to rap stardom, to release her debut album.
But as Rowe’s star rose, so did
her anxiety and self-doubt. And
her fears began to affect work on
her album.
“I don’t have a background in
music … and I have a short attention span. If you put me in the studio every day, I’m gonna get lost,”
she said. “It’s hard to keep going
when you bore yourself. My anxiety
dragged [the process] on like two
extra years.”
Frustration — mostly with herself — and weariness from the pressure she put on herself to deliver to
her label and her growing following
pushed Rowe to the brink of quitting (and that Twitter missive).
“I was signed, and now it’s like,
‘Oh, no. I have to turn in something.’ My sounds are … worth
money,” she said between drags on
a joint.
“I was scared. I’ve never sold
anything before. Why can’t I just be
like Chance [the Rapper, who eschews commercially releasing his
music]?”
After more than two years of delays, Sza had amassed upward of
200 songs for the album. She
Marcus Yam Los Angeles Times
SZA “has a viewpoint that is not being heard everywhere,” RCA Chairman Peter Edge says. “What she’s saying really stands out.”
Andrew Chin Getty Images
THE SINGER-SONGWRITER performs at the Pemberton Music Festival in Canada in July.
prefers to freestyle her lyrics over
writing them down — “The pen just
does not move as fast as my
thoughts,” she said — and the
process led to near constant revision from the singer.
The label intervened, Rowe
said, snatching her hard drive and
culling what ultimately became
“Ctrl.” If it hadn’t happened, she’d
still be tinkering in the studio.
“[The album] was probably way
better like a year and a half ago,”
she said. “I sat on it too long and …
[messed] it up. I didn’t make a 10
out of 10 album, and I knew I didn’t
when I dropped, but I didn’t have
any more time to go back in on it.”
Fans and critics disagreed.
“Ctrl,” like her earlier work, is
aching, brazen and teeming with
unflinching honesty: “Let me tell
you a secret / I been secretly bang-
ing your homeboy,” she confesses
on the album’s opening track.
Unlike earlier work that saw her
voice shrink behind atmospheric
beats and esoteric lyrics, Rowe
emerges as an unabashed storyteller on “Ctrl,” as she candidly details her insecurities and anxieties.
“I get so lonely, I forget what I’m
worth,” she riffs on the album’s first
single, “Drew Barrymore.”
‘She’s 100% honest’
Self-doubt and uncertainty are
explored with as much depth as
lust and loneliness. She sings of her
desire to be a “Normal Girl,” ruminates on aging on “Prom” and navigates a shared lover on standout
“The Weekend,” a record that
sparked a rather intense Twitter
debate on gender politics.
“The things she’s saying is what
a lot of people are thinking but are
scared, or even embarrassed, to
say,” Henderson said. “People connect to honesty. And she’s 100%
honest.”
RCA Chairman Peter Edge echoed
Henderson’s
sentiment.
“[Rowe] made a coherent statement,” he said. “She is a woman of
color who has a viewpoint that is
not being heard everywhere, and
therefore, what she’s saying really
stands out in today’s musical landscape.”
She sings of self-esteem, toxic
relationships, twentysomething
angst and sexual freedom over
dreamy productions that weave
R&B, hip-hop, electronic and indie
rock textures.
“People grapple with labeling
me as hip-hop, R&B or pop, and it’s
interesting to me. I’m just making
music,” she said. “I listen to Stevie
Nicks. I love classical jazz. I love
folk. I love rap. I love Modest
Mouse. I’m making an album with
Tame Impala and Mark Ronson.
When you try to label it, you remove
the option for it to be limitless. It diminishes the music.”
Rowe is still in disbelief over the
attention her music has received
this year. Miguel and Khalid went
viral with covers of her songs, her
headlining tour sold out in minutes
and she’s joining Bryson Tiller on a
European tour, Solange is set to direct her next video and a deluxe
edition of “Ctrl” is in the works.
“I wasn’t expecting people were
going to show a … lot of attention,”
she said. “Every moment, I’m
shocked. It’s taught me a lesson on
energy and expectation. The biggest songs on the album — ‘Love
Galore,’ ‘The Weekend,’ ‘Supermodel,’ ‘Broken Clocks’ — are the
easiest songs I’ve ever made. Just
free-flowing energy and not me resisting.”
As Rowe trotted onstage at the
Novo hours before her show, she
was trailed not by a parade of handlers but by her dog, which scurried off the stage when the boom of
the kick drum started up for “Go
Gina.”
She was rehearsing the song
while texting with Lamar over
plans to surprise the audience with
a performance of “Doves in the
Wind,” her brazen ode to vaginas,
when a moment of doubt washed
over her. “My nerves are crazy,” she
sighed.
“I worry so much. Like, ‘Damn,
how can I be excellent?’ But it’s a
journey,” she said. “I have to decide
what’s excellent to me. Because
I’m so stressed out, I have so many
words. The next album is going to
be the best I ever made in my life.”
gerrick.kennedy
@latimes.com
Twitter:@GerrickKennedy
S U N DAY, O C T O B E R 22 , 2 017
L AT I M E S . C O M / CA L E N DA R
F5
Allen J. Schaben Los Angeles Times
“AS AN ARTIST, it’s my job to put [history] in a way that reaches people in a different way than a lecture,” says Rhiannon Giddens, playing Stagecoach in April.
A passionate musical explorer
Rhiannon Giddens sees her
MacArthur fellowship as
confirmation of her work.
But ‘genius’? Not really.
By Randy Lewis
Technically speaking, she’s now
entitled to bragging rights as the
world’s first officially crowned “genius” banjo player.
The idea elicits a chuckle from
Rhiannon Giddens. To be honest,
she says, she isn’t a fan of the “genius grant” nickname that’s been
widely used to describe the MacArthur Foundation Fellowship reward she has just collected from
the nonprofit organization.
“I know they hate that term,”
she said with a laugh, reached by
phone last week in Cape Breton,
Canada, the morning the foundation revealed the names of about
two dozen recipients of the 2017 fellowships. The award includes a
$625,000 grant that’s paid out over
five years with no strings attached.
“I understand why they don’t
like it,” said Giddens, who coincidentally will be making her Walt
Disney Concert Hall debut on
Wednesday on a bill with L.A. singer-songwriter M. Ward. “It’s a very
reductive term. It is very evocative
and sort of encapsulates this idea
of what it is, so I understand why
some people like it. But I wouldn’t
use it myself.”
Giddens, 40, caught the attention of the foundation with her
passionate exploration of underrecognized facets of African
American music and culture.
Starting with her role as a founding member of the Carolina
Chocolate Drops, an ensemble
specializing in the forgotten role
of African American musicians in
the development of string band
and country music, to her blossoming career as a solo artist, Giddens
has been singularly devoted to
highlighting connections among
this nation’s social, political and
cultural history.
The financial component of the
recognition from the MacArthur
Foundation will provide a tangible
boost for projects she’s wanted to
pursue.
“There’s so much I want to do,
try to facilitate, to add to the conversation,” she said. “This will allow that in way I hadn’t previously
dreamed.”
For starters, she cites a historical incident from her native North
Carolina that she’s long wanted to
explore: the 1898 Wilmington Massacre, in which white supremacists
carried out a political coup in the
black-majority city and destroyed
the community’s African American-owned newspaper, prompting
thousands of black residents to flee
their homes.
“There are a lot of parallels to
what’s happening today,” she said.
“I think the main point of bringing
these pieces of history up is connecting them to now. If you can’t do
that, it’s pointless.”
Being able to count on funding
from the MacArthur fellowship,
she said, will aid in her pursuit of
the creative side of her career.
“In the commercial music
world, the folk world, we sell records and concert tickets — this
is the way I make a living,” she said.
“You go out, you make your art
and hopefully people will put their
money down for it. But it’s getting
hard. I have to be on the road so
much to keep the lights on. I
love being on the road, and I love
my band but also need to be with
my kids more, and I need to be creating more.”
Consider the award a welcome
confirmation of the path she’s been
pursuing.
“Sometimes you wonder,” she
said. “When you’re constantly
pushing forward and trying to get
something done and highlight the
history, there are times when you
think, ‘Is anybody out there hearing this?’ Then you get a call like
this, and I guess they really are.”
It’s not as if she’s been working
in a vacuum. The Chocolate Drops
took a Grammy Award in 2010 for
their album “Genuine Negro Jig”
and were nominated again in 2012
in the folk album category for
their follow-up, “Leaving Eden.”
Giddens also has earned three additional Grammy nominations for
her solo work.
She’s also been a regular presence among nominees and winners
for the annual Americana Music
Assn. Awards. And she’s earned
the respect and support of Americana kingpins such as musician
Bonnie Raitt and producer T Bone
Burnett, who produced her 2015
Rhiannon Giddens
Where: Walt Disney Concert Hall,
111 S. Grand Ave., Los Angeles
When: 8 p.m. Wednesday
Tickets: $41-$105
Info: (323) 850-2000,
www.laphil.com
debut album, “Tomorrow Is My
Turn.”
“There is nothing about her
that wouldn’t appeal to anyone, in
any genre,” Raitt told The Times in
2015.
Around the same time, Burnett
ranked her in the pantheon of
American artists whose music has
spoken to the broadest swath of
listeners.
“We have had performers
who’ve been able to take the music
of this country all the way around
the world several times, from Louis
Armstrong to Bob Dylan to Johnny
Cash — you can name a long line of
performers who’ve had that sort of
power,” Burnett told The Times. “I
believe she’s one of those people.”
Giddens had a remarkably diverse upbringing, raised in North
Carolina and immersed in mountain music traditions of that region, and then studying opera at
Oberlin Conservatory of Music in
Ohio. She now divides her time
among homes in North Carolina,
Limerick, Ireland — her husband is
Irish — and Nashville, where she’s
had a recurring role in the country
music-rooted prime-time series
“Nashville.”
That’s all contributed to her impressively broad facility for traversing folk music, blues, gospel,
French chanson, jazz, elegant pop
and even traditional Celtic music
authoritatively.
“As an artist, it’s my job to put
[history] in a way that reaches people in a different way than a lecture,” she said. “Music affects people in a way that bare facts can’t.”
Her choice of Richard Fariña’s
“Birmingham Sunday” for her latest album, “Freedom Highway,” released in February, drew the kind
of then-now connection she often
strives to make. The song was
prompted by the 1963 bombing of a
Baptist church in Alabama that
killed four young churchgoers but
carries striking parallel to the 2015
mass shooting at the Emanuel
AME Church in Charleston, S.C.,
and other recent incidents of racially motivated violence.
That, she said, doesn’t require
genius as much as another term
she prefers.
“It’s not just ‘expertise,’ ” she
said. “There’s also a fearlessness.
Look at all the people who receive
these grants: These folks are going
after something regardless of
whether they can make a living at
it. They’re going after something —
it’s not just being good at something. It’s putting that with wanting to make something of it, wanting to progress and not being
afraid of where that’s going to go.”
randy.lewis@latimes.com
CALIFORNIA SOUNDS
Dark notes to get in the Halloween spirit
By Randall Roberts
As with life itself, there exists in
music a dark side, a realm where
grim themes swirl through musical
notation as if bats through catacombs.
For every “Walking on Sunshine” there is a “Hell Awaits.”
Judy Garland might wonder on the
heaven that lives “Over the Rainbow,” but be careful not to fall into
Johnny Cash’s “Ring of Fire” along
the way.
Despite L.A.’s lack of dark and
stormy nights, the city is a master
of disguises and, as sure as it can
transform Nicolas Cage into a
bankable star, has been known to
conjure thunder-cracking evil on
command.
Below, a special Halloween edition of California Sounds: Thirteen
grim songs from the city’s cabinet
of horrors.
Kendrick Lamar, “Blood” (2017)
The eerie opening song of the
Compton rapper’s album “Damn”
suggests the first scene of a horror
movie. Vocalist Bekon opens with a
four-line soliloquy: “Is it wickedness? Is it weakness? You decide. Are we gonna live or die?”
We’re introduced to a seemingly
helpless blind woman pacing a
Compton sidewalk. As Lamar approaches to help (spoiler alert!),
she kills him.
Julia Holter, “Horns
Surrounding Me” (2017)
Are they devil or goat horns?
Al Seib Los Angeles Times
CHICANO BATMAN’S “Black Lipstick” conjures deadly love.
Maybe Hyundai or Audi horns? It’s
hard to tell, but the eerie textures,
including the sounds of muffled
footprints, suggest a grim walk
through a moonlit graveyard.
“swindle your heart” comes with a
warning. Like a zombie from “The
Walking Dead,” she’ll remove your
blood-pumper and “she’ll tear it
apart (she’ll tear it, she’ll tear it
apart).”
Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross,
“Halloween” (2017)
This just-issued cover of the
theme to John Carpenter’s classic
horror film, by film composing collaborators Reznor and Ross, honors one of the grimmest works in
the canon.
Off!, “You Must Be Damned”
(2014)
As if deemed so by Beelzebub
himself, punk singer Keith Morris
rages in support of eternal fire.
“Into the flame to lose the fight! I
see something I don’t like!”
Chicano Batman,
“Black Lipstick” (2015)
This snapshot of an undead
goth woman whose blood turns
from red to blue and will likely
Gnarls Barkley, “The Boogie
Monster” (2006)
Best known for its smash,
“Crazy,” the team of Danger Mouse
and CeeLo Green warned of this
titular monster on the same album. The boogie monster “waits
till the midnight hour to come / To
torture me for the wrong that I’ve
done.”
an attic where “Lucretia waits impatiently, cobwebs make me
squint” and “moonbeams surge
through the sky — the crystal ball
is energized!”
Queens of the Stone Age,
“Song for the Dead” (2002)
When singer Mark Lanegan details a night “late enough to go driving and see what’s mine” he might
be the Grim Reaper looking for
souls. Featuring an overturned
hearse and an empty noose, the
song’s unanswered questions
make it doubly scary.
Dream Syndicate, “Halloween”
(1982)
The centerpiece of the early ’80s
band’s “The Days of Wine & Roses”
is set in “a place you might wanna
go.” As tangled, Neil Young-suggestive electric guitar lines wail,
Steve Wynn describes a spot where
“you might look and see the light
shining.” What’s there? Halloween.
Aimee Mann, “Frankenstein”
(1995)
“It’s rare that you ever know
what to expect / From a guy made
of corpses with bolts in his neck,”
explains Mann in her song about
the expectations that arrive with
new love. “If the creature is limping,
the parts are in place / With a mind
of its own and a fist for a face.”
The Doors, “Peace Frog” (1970)
Jim Morrison and band may
have been focused on the bloody
politics of the late 1960s when he
sang about “blood in the streets”
up to his ankles, but the images are
haunting across the song: “Blood
stains the roofs and the palm trees
of Venice / Blood in my love in the
terrible summer / Bloody red sun of
Phantastic L.A. / Blood screams
her brain as they chop off her fingers.”
Sparks, “The Ghost of Liberace”
(1994)
In which the brothers Ron and
Russell Mael document a town’s
encounter with the late entertainer’s spirit, who “hums ‘Evita’ and
‘Moon River’ and ‘Michelle’ / Maybe that’s why the people scream
out ‘Go to hell.’ ”
Megadeth, “Lucretia” (1990)
Screaming leader Dave Mustaine cackles like a witch to open
this creepy headbanger. “I stalk the
cobwebbed stairways — dirt grits
beneath my feet,” he wails. He’s in
Johnny Otis, “Castin’ My Spell”
(1959)
In this uptempo R&B rocker,
the late L.A. icon describes his recipe for keeping his woman around.
The ingredients include a black
cat, a cave bat, a ghost tooth, an old
shoe, an old dish, a dried fish, a
goose egg and a frog leg. (A bouquet of roses every now and then
wouldn’t hurt.)
randall.roberts@latimes.com
F6
S U N DAY, OC T O B E R 22, 2 017
L AT I M E S . C O M / CA L E N DA R
ARCHITECTURE
Robert Gauthier Los Angeles Times
THE GETTY CENTER, shown in 2011, was built on a hilltop above the 405 Freeway, opening in 1997. The museum is redefining itself through Pacific Standard Time.
Rethinking its place in L.A.
[Getty, from F1]
appreciate the ways in which a trip
to its galleries is also a trip outside
the city.
But that doesn’t mean the
questions aren’t worth asking. A
Getty Center whose architectural
personality matched the polycentric quality of Los Angeles
rather than bucking it is a fascinating thing to contemplate — even
simply as a thought exercise, a way
to test our assumptions about cultural philanthropy and why the
city and region look the way they
do.
And it turns out that the Getty
has discovered a way to climb down
from its hilltop. It’s just not a strategy that involves a famous architect or a building campaign.
With its Pacific Standard Time
series — whose third iteration, focusing on the cultural traffic between Southern California and
Latin America, is now in full swing
— the Getty has managed to do
what it so dramatically declined to
do when it opened its new campus
to the public on Dec. 16, 1997. By
mounting its own exhibitions but
even more powerfully by supporting shows, events and publications
at other local museums and galleries — this time around to the
tune of $16 million — it has
threaded itself into the contemporary cultural life of Los Angeles and
Southern California.
The Getty has not only paid for
and otherwise supported important scholarship on the cultural
history of Los Angeles, helping topple cliches and complicate oversimplified narratives about its art
movements in the process. It has
also used the PST effort to redefine
itself.
This fall, as the Getty has both
rolled out the third PST and prepared to celebrate its 20th anniversary in Brentwood, the power and
appeal of that redefinition have
been thrown into clear relief. Any
effort to revisit the history of the
complex, to examine the process
that led the Getty to settle first on
the site and then on Meier as its
architect, makes entirely clear just
how differently the institution sees
itself now — and just as important
how differently it aspires to be seen
by the city, other museums and the
culture at large.
Take “Condemned to Be Modern,” among the strongest of this
year’s PST offerings. The show, organized by the Los Angeles cultural affairs department and running
through Jan. 28 at the Municipal
Art Gallery, was supported with
$310,000 in PST funding from the
Getty Foundation. Organized by
Clara Kim, ex-gallery director at
REDCAT in Disney Hall and now
senior curator of international art
at the Tate Modern in London, it
features work by artists who grapple in a range of ways with the legacy of modernist architecture and
city planning in Latin America.
Just as important, the show
shines a light on L.A.’s own history.
The Municipal Art Gallery is right
next door to the 1921 house Frank
Lloyd Wright designed for Aline
Barnsdall, known as Hollyhock
House for its ornamental details
featuring Barnsdall’s favorite
flower.
“Ch’u Mayaa,” a short film in the
exhibition by Clarissa Tossin featuring the choreographer Crystal
Sepúlveda, is shot in and around
the house and explores the pre-Columbian aspects of Wright’s design. Sepúlveda’s gestures in the
film, mimicking poses found
among other places in Maya pottery, clarify the debt the architect
owed to pre-Hispanic cultures, the
way in which he saw them — in both
naive and sincere ways — as fodder
for a new Southern California
architecture that would bypass
both the Spanish Colonial Revival
and Bauhaus-style Modernism.
The relationship between the
film and Wright’s work gains layers
of richness and power because the
exhibition is being held next door
to Hollyhock House. After you
watch the film you can visit the
house yourself, tracing with your
own fingers the details of its preColumbian concrete frieze and abstracted hollyhocks.
That sense of adjacency between exhibition and city at large,
each rubbing off on the other, is
something Meier’s Getty Center —
alone on its hilltop, all but inaccessible for anybody without a car —
has never been able to offer its visitors. Or its curators, for that matter: Given its themes and preoccupations, Kim’s show would be thinner and less persuasive if it were
held at the Getty Center.
The museum’s distance from
the city below has become only
harder to ignore — and easier to
measure — as the Los Angeles
Basin, the landscape Reyner Banham called the “Plains of Id,” has
grown denser, more urban and
more vital. And as the cultural center of gravity in the city has moved
steadily eastward, leaping the 405
in the process. It is as if the Getty’s
campus has extended in Seussian
fashion higher and higher into the
clouds, its details harder to make
out from down below.
Yet the Getty, to its credit, has
learned that exhibitions and other
kinds of programming can begin to
make up for that isolation. More to
the point it has learned that PST
can be more flexible and nimble
than architecture, a way of at least
attempting to reach across the
broad gaps — of geography, race
and class, to name just three —
that continue to mark Los Angeles.
It can be a kind of software to
the hardware of the Getty Center
campus, with the ability to be
quickly updated as conditions
change. (The evolution of PST
from its first two iterations to the
current one, from an initiative the
Getty controlled relatively tightly
to one it is now willing to let sprawl,
with perhaps more unevenness but
also more curatorial surprises, is
one example of this.) It can be, finally, an effective antidote to a
sense of detachment that Meier’s
architectural ensemble, for two full
decades now, has both symbolized
and fostered.
christopher.hawthorne
@latimes.com
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S U N DAY , OC T O B E R 22, 2 017
L AT I M E S . C O M / CA L E N DA R
F7
THEATER
Michael Owen Baker For The Times
“I DON’T know what ‘acting’ means. This is all I have to work with, my body and my experiences, and that’s what you’re going to see,” says actress Tonya Pinkins.
She was meant to do this role
A story of gun violence
and a mother’s loss brings
Tonya Pinkins back to the
stage for ‘Time Alone.’
‘Time Alone’
Where: Los Angeles Theatre
Center, Theatre 2, 514 S. Spring
St., Los Angeles
When: 8 p.m. Friday, 5 p.m.
Sunday, 7:30 p.m. Monday, 8 p.m.
Oct. 26-28, 3 p.m. Oct. 29
Price: $30-$55
Info: (213) 489-0994,
bellerevetheatre.com
By Margaret Gray
The Hollywood adage that directing is 90% casting holds just as
true in the theater, especially with
a new play: Those first performances can turn heads, build buzz,
entice other theaters to give the
script a spin — or not.
So when Bart DeLorenzo
agreed to direct the world premiere
of Alessandro Camon’s “Time
Alone” at the Los Angeles Theatre
Center, he knew he needed to find
the perfect Anna, a middle-age
Texas woman mourning her son, a
police officer slain in the line of
duty. Anna is lonely and miserable
and furious, and her only real goal
for the rest of her life — the one
hope that keeps her from suicide —
is to watch the execution of her
son’s killer.
“Our casting director had a long
list of really exciting, famous people for the part,” DeLorenzo recalls
during a pre-show chat at the
LATC. “But I felt it was really important to have a real theater artist. It’s immensely challenging, this
piece — the depth that the character has to go and also to maintain
our interest through monologues.”
DeLorenzo thought the role
would be difficult for a great film or
television actress if she weren’t
steeped in theater. “So I was thinking about different people, and
then I was having my taco over at
Guisados with Alessandro, the
playwright, and I thought, ‘You
know who would be great? She’d
never do it. But you know
who would be great would be
Tonya Pinkins.’ ”
Well, yes, Camon agreed. Obviously. Pinkins, who won a Tony
for “Jelly’s Last Jam” in 1992 and
originated the lead in Tony Kushner’s 2003 Broadway musical “Caroline, or Change,” would be an awesome Anna. World peace also
would be cool.
“Yeah, she’d never do it,” De Lorenzo said regretfully.
But after lunch, he called his
close friend Annabelle Gurwitch,
also a friend of Pinkins’.
“Do you think she would do anything like this?” De Lorenzo asked
Gurwitch.
“I don’t know,” she said. “Maybe. Why not ask?”
Cut to another day in a restaurant in Silver Lake at lunchtime,
where Pinkins — spoiler alert, she
said yes — takes up the story. She’s
wearing an ankle-length dress
of brilliant purple and lipstick in
the same shade as she orders hot
water with lemon and a seared
tuna salad.
“I got an email from my friend
Annabelle about this play before
my manager sent me the offer,” she
recalls. “Like, the same day. And I
thought to myself, ‘Hmmm, do I
want to do a play?’ I hadn’t done a
play in a couple of years.”
She could think of at least three
arguments against it.
David Morrison
PINKINS plays a grieving mother in the world premiere of “Time Alone” at L.A. Theatre Center.
The first was money. Pinkins
had been working mostly in TV, including playing the creepy doctor
Ethel Peabody on “Gotham.” She
was enjoying it. And as much as
she would have loved do to a play,
“you could make that much money
in two days on a TV series,” she
says. “So you’re always having to
think, ‘I would have to really, really
love this to give up even the opportunity to make as much money in
such a short amount of time.’ And
that, in this point in my life, is always a consideration.”
Brush with Carell
Gurwitch offered that Pinkins
could stay at her place in L.A. The
two women met when they were 15
at Northwestern University’s summer theater program.
“Annabelle tells me Steve Carell
was also there,” Pinkins says. “But
we didn’t know him. I’m like,
‘Damn, why didn’t we know him?’
There were only about 25 of us.
He must have been a real dweeb,
because we didn’t pay him any attention,” she adds with an infectious chuckle.
A place to stay couldn’t answer
Pinkins’ second argument, which
was: Did she really need the stress?
“The last two or three theater
things I had done were really traumatizing for me,” she says. She has
been originating roles in new plays
for 40 years and is accustomed to
collaborating with writers and directors in shaping her roles. “I feel
really comfortable talking with a
writer about my perspective inside
of it as the actor,” she says. “Like,
‘This doesn’t feel good in my
mouth,’ or ‘I think I could show you
this and I don’t have to say it. Listen to this. What do you think?’ ”
In at least the last two plays
she joined, “Rasheeda Speaking”
and “Mother Courage and Her
Children,” Pinkins says, she and
the creators didn’t see eye to eye
about her characters. The experiences didn’t feel like just aesthetic
disagreements but, as she puts
it, like “a bunch of white people
denying [my] reality of what it is
to be a black person.” At the end
of 2015, she made headlines when
she dropped out of the Classic
Stage Company production of
Brecht’s “Mother Courage and Her
Children” during previews. The
show went on, with Kecia Lewis in
the lead.
Pinkins released a statement
saying that her role had been
“neutered” by “the filter of the
white gaze.” Some of the press coverage hinted that Pinkins had overreacted or that she was “difficult”
to work with.
She says she’s gotten about six
play offers since — and turned
them all down.
When she was deciding on
“Time Alone,” she says, “I had to
go, ‘OK, are you ready to go back in
the room again?’ And once again
being the only woman in a room full
of men, and what that’s like. And
I’m a very comfortable woman. I’m
comfortable in being powerful and
being assertive, and there are certain rooms where that’s not OK.”
Gurwitch had worked with DeLorenzo — he directed a stage
adaptation of her book “I See You
Made an Effort” at the Skylight
Theatre in 2015 — and could assure
Pinkins that his room wouldn’t be
that kind of room. Pinkins also
talked with Camon, who had been
inspired to write “Time Alone” by
his experiences teaching writing in
correctional institutions, and although he is an advocate of prison
reform, he wanted the play to explore a range of views.
“I appreciated his humility
about writing this character,”
Pinkins says. “He told me, ‘I wrote
Anna as a white woman, because I
thought I could write a white woman, and I don’t know that I could
write a black woman. Do I have to
change it to write a black woman?’
And I said, ‘Well, you wrote about
grief, which is universal and
doesn’t really have a color, so I
don’t think there’s anything you
need to change for me to play it.’ ”
“Time Alone” is a two-hander;
the other character is Gabriel
(Alex Hernandez), a convicted
murderer serving a life sentence in
solitary confinement. He tells his
story to the audience in a series
of monologues interspersed with
Anna’s that reveal the darkness of
prison life.
“There is a lot of humor in the
play,” DeLorenzo says. “It’s beautifully written, but, yeah, it’s intense.” The effectiveness of the
work as a whole, though, hinges on
the audience’s willingness to spend
time with both characters.”
‘Deeply personal’
Which brings us to Pinkins’
third argument: Did she want to go
there? Pinkins hasn’t been the sort
of actress to pay lip service to a
character’s pain.
“I’m the character,” she says. “I
don’t know what ‘acting’ means.
This is all I have to work with, my
body and my experiences, and
that’s what you’re going to see:
these words as interpreted
through this body and in the light
of me. It’s deeply, deeply personal
for me, and I’ve got to go through it
every day. The body doesn’t know
that it’s imaginary.”
So when she started reading the
script, her first thought was,
“Whoa, this is really dark.” She has
four children, ranging from 18 to 30.
“And as a parent, it’s like, ‘Uh, do I
want to inhabit that? I’m already
feeling raggedy, and do I want to
add some more raggedy on there?’
So I had to think on that.”
But in the end, her choice didn’t
involve thinking at all.
“At that point in time, I was con-
ducting these women’s circles,
where women connect with women
across the generations to reconnect to our sacred feminine self
and where our real power is, and
it’s not here,” she says, pointing to
her head. “And that’s what comes
out across all our meetings, is that
when anyone can get us to go
here [the head] first, we’re not going to make a decision that’s in
our best interest. So we were really
focusing on just, ‘Let’s ask our
bodies,’ and my body’s like, ‘I think
I’m supposed to go to L.A.’ And my
agent was like, ‘Well, you know
you’re up for these three series,’
and I was like, ‘I don’t think that’s
going to happen. I’m supposed to
go to L.A.’ Something instinctively
said, ‘This is where you need to
be right now.’ ”
If this process sounds out there
or New Age-y, Pinkins in person
describes it with such low-key,
matter-of-fact conviction that it
makes perfect sense. She’s not only
exceptionally glamorous — she
says she’s never been the type of
performer who likes to be looked
at, but it’s hard to look anywhere
else — but she also exudes an aura
of trustworthiness and warmth
that makes people want to confide
in her.
At this point, the waiter sets a
seared-tuna sandwich in front of
her. “Oh, I thought this was a salad!” she exclaims. Everybody
freezes — waiter, publicist, reporter alike. Is this when we’re going to
meet the storied Broadway diva?
Pinkins takes a breath. “It’s OK,”
she says, setting the top slices of
bread to the side. The waiter hurries away, and the show goes on.
De Lorenzo said he’d heard
about Pinkins’ disagreements with
previous directors but he wasn’t
nervous about working with her.
“I’ve worked with a lot of opinionated, strong-willed performers,
and I actually like that,” he said.
“She had some strong ideas right
at the beginning, and I thought
they were great, and I’ve just tried
to support her thoughts.
“I suppose if she’d had an idea
that I thought was terribly wrong
and we’d had a huge fight about
it,” he adds contemplatively, “I
might feel differently. But that
wasn’t my experience. Tonya’s
really smart, and her mind works
faster than anybody’s I’ve ever
seen. She’s really quick with everything. She’s quick with her
thoughts and quick with her feelings, and I just kind of hang on for
the ride. She’s a force of nature in
the best way. I’m not sure what this
show would be without her.”
calendar@latimes.com
F8
S U N DAY, O C T O B E R 22 , 2 017
L AT I M E S . C O M / CA L E N DA R
BOOK REVIEW
Photographs by
Stefan Kiesbye
THE FIRE descended upon the Coffey Park neighborhood of Santa Rosa in the early morning of Oct. 9. Stefan Kiesbye and his wife, Sanaz, lost their home, above.
Ladybird, ladybird, fly away
‘I never thought of saving my filled notebooks, my glasses,’ writes novelist and teacher Stefan Kiesbye
d
By Stefan Kiesbye
On Monday night, we drove the
20 miles to northern Santa Rosa.
The city had asked everyone to
stay away, but how can you?
Once we turned into the Coffey
Park area, we drove along the
roads we had run with our dogs
every morning, and we didn’t
recognize a thing. We knew, and
yet nothing matched up. Small
fires were still burning, smoke was
still rising from some structures.
Only the chimneys of the houses
with fireplaces still stood, like
monuments in a cemetery.
At first it was difficult to make
out our plot of land, even though
we were standing right in front of
it. Everything was flat, borderless,
of the same palette of gray and
black. Even our graveled backyard
looked black. The fire had been
fanatically thorough. What we
found was our first dog’s old food
dish. We’d kept it as a souvenir on
the kitchen wall. I picked it from
the ashes, blackened and rough to
the touch, and put it in the trunk of
our car.
Even when I left my house at
2:30 in the morning, and my wife,
Sanaz, and I were afraid that the
fire behind us would catch our car,
which was still stuck on Hemlock
Street in the anxious gridlock of
other evacuees, I couldn’t escape
the irony. The reason why we
moved to the North Bay in 2015
was my job teaching fiction in
Sonoma State University’s English department. And the book
that was largely responsible for
the job and our new home was the
gothic novel “Your House Is on
Fire, Your Children All Gone.”
d
Writing and moving have been
intertwined for many years, and so
the story of this fire starts with
Kurt. Kurt is a German shepherd
and bloodhound mix. He barks at
garbage trucks and breathes so
noisily that our neighbors always
knew who was coming down Hemlock Street long before they could
see us.
In 2012, Kurt appeared in our
yard in Portales, N.M., where I
taught before moving to Santa
Rosa. He wasn’t house-trained, he
wasn’t car-trained. He couldn’t
settle down. Even now, Kurt is
never calm. He is in your face. He
won’t let you escape.
On a recent Sunday night, we
did not receive a phone alert. No
sirens blared in Santa Rosa. Kurt
woke us at 1:30 a.m. He banged
against our bedroom door. He
does that when he hears fireworks
or a thunderstorm approaching. I
finally got up, and while I was
walking through our dark house —
a small wooden ranch in the Coffey
Park neighborhood — I smelled
smoke.
I checked all the rooms, I
opened the outside door. Something that sounded like far-away
thunder became audible, and I
thought I saw lightning beyond
Hopper Avenue. Smoke was filling
the air like fog. It was a windy
night. Before I opened my laptop
to see what was going on, I thought
of North Korea.
d
About 2:15, Sanaz said, “We
should pack a bag.” She was
scheduled to fly to San Diego in
the morning to work at a conference she had organized. I took a
duffel from the garage, but I
couldn’t make sense of the situation. I looked for my passport and
grabbed our three iPads. That was
it. I never thought of saving my
filled notebooks, my glasses. This
inability to focus strikes me as a
moral failing of sorts. In other
d
THE PLACE the author and his wife called home was a small ranch house on Hemlock Street.
moments, I believe I understood
that saving a favorite jacket or
painting wouldn’t help. It wasn’t
about two or three precious items.
What tied us to our life on Hemlock Street was the web of routines
we had established with the help
of small and big items.
And yet, lost items become
phantom limbs. I still want to
reach for the signed copy of “The
Tattoo Hunter” that lay on my
nightstand. I still want to go into
the garage to open the first of two
cans of green paint I had bought
the day before to start work on our
siding.
Every morning, Sanaz and I
made coffee and sat either in the
kitchen or outside on the patio.
That usually took half an hour.
Sometimes longer. It was my
favorite part of our day. I was
extinguishing burning weeds in
my neighbor’s front yard when we
got the evacuation order from a
police car driving up Hemlock.
Ten minutes later, we left.
d
Before the end of the night, a
friend texted me and invited us to
her house. She and her husband
gave us a room, and all morning,
we searched for updates about our
neighborhood.
Around noon, we looked at
photos the local paper had posted
online. The very first one showed a
street with burned-out cars on
A second picture followed a bit
later. The photographer had
turned 90 degrees, was now facing
east. There was the charred weeping willow that belonged to our
neighbor but extended generously
into our yard. In the far back stood
a redwood, only the upper
branches intact. And there was
our apple tree, whose fruit Kurt
had eaten all summer long.
The photographer had been
standing in our driveway. He
shouldn’t have been able to see the
apple tree.
KURT, their restless rescue,
woke Kiesbye and his wife in
the middle of the night.
either side. It was a beautiful
picture, nearly black and white
because of the devastation. The
fire had moved through and left
behind a flat landscape. Gone
were the fences, the bushes and
the hedges. Gone were the wooden
houses.
Then I discovered that it was
Patrick’s burned work truck
standing in the driveway to the left
and that it was Marty’s truck he
had inherited from his father on
the right. The mangled car and
boat in the middle of the street
belonged to my next-door neighbor. The photographer had been
standing in front of our house to
take this shot.
d
I’m a pessimist and don’t believe that humanity will find a way
to save our planet. Conversations
with me can turn painfully depressing. But what happened after
I posted the photograph of our
nonexisting house on Facebook
has me crying at times. We’ve been
receiving invitations from around
the country. People have offered
rooms and are sending food and
toys for our dogs. They are sending
clothes. Friends from Portales set
up a GoFundMe account, and the
response has been stunning. The
association whose conference
Sanaz had organized all summer
dedicated the event to her, and
board members and attendees
have donated money to help.
People have called and emailed all
week to make sure we’re out of
harm’s way. People are the best.
Writing and moving have been
intertwined for a long time. One
night shortly after moving into the
house on Hemlock, we came home
from the grocery store, opened the
garage door but felt too exhausted
to get out. We kept sitting in the
driveway. We stared at the moving
boxes piling up in front of us.
Sanaz said, “How about we leave
the garage door open? People will
come and take the boxes away.”
I turned her remark into a story
based on Jack London’s “To Build
a Fire.” A couple not unlike ourselves leave the garage door open.
Things start to disappear, and
their lives slowly dissolve. In the
end, the man returns from work to
find that his house “wasn’t burning anymore, the fire trucks had
gone leaving behind a gray and
black sludge. White wisps of smoke
ascended unhurriedly from a few
places. He rested against the
fence, the ruined house in his
sight. It was of no importance
where they went, they just needed
to go.”
We had coffee this morning
together with our friends Cathy
and Jorn. Kurt was standing by
the window, barking at the trucks.
The fires keep spreading, but it
was garbage day in Petaluma.
Kiesbye, his wife and two dogs
safely escaped the Stubbs Fire in
Santa Rosa. Kiesbye teaches
creative writing at Sonoma State
University; his novels include
“Knives, Forks, Scissors, Flames,”
“The Staked Plains” and “Your
House Is on Fire, Your Children All
Gone.”
L AT I M E S . C O M / CA L E N DA R
S U N DAY , O C T O B E R 22, 2 017
F9
BOOK REVIEW
Private Archive Peraz
ORIANA FALLACI’S interview with Iran’s Ayatollah Khomeini in 1979 ended with the religious leader fleeing the room after Fallaci removed her chador in protest.
The fearless interrogator
Writer Oriana Fallaci, who could make the powerful wilt in her presence, comes to life in a new biography
By James Marcus
Oriana Fallaci
The Journalist, the Agitator,
the Legend
Cristina de Stefano,
translated by Marina Harss
Other Press: 288 pp., $25.95
The journalist, novelist and
irascible force of nature known as
Oriana Fallaci never wanted her
life story to be written. “I have never authorized, nor will I ever authorize, a biography,” she once told
an enquiring academic. That
didn’t stop at least one contender,
the American scholar Santo L. Aricò, who even managed to obtain
his subject’s cooperation for 1998’s
“Oriana Fallaci: The Woman and
the Myth.” Yet Fallaci maintained
an iron grip on the project, constantly finessing what the dogged
author called “her official image.”
Not exactly the recipe for a living
likeness, let alone the sort of threedimensional portraiture that was
Fallaci’s stock-in-trade as an interviewer.
In some ways, Cristina de Stefano has had an easier task with
“Oriana Fallaci: The Journalist,
the Agitator, the Legend.” Unlike
Aricò, who conducted several interviews with his subject before her
death from cancer in 2006, De Stefano never met Fallaci. Nor did she
have to contend with Fallaci’s obstructive behavior and truly fearsome temper. (Hearing Fallaci
scream at somebody else on the
telephone, as I did more than once
while translating her novel “Inshallah,” made me want to take three
Advil and lie in a dark room.) The
subject’s absence turns out to be a
kind of blessing, leaving the author
a free hand to recount what is, by
any measure, a fascinating and ut-
terly sui generis life.
Fallaci was born in Florence, in
1929, to an indomitable mother and
a penniless, Proust-loving father,
who made his living as a woodcarver. Disappointed that the first
of his offspring was a girl, Edoardo
Fallaci taught her to shoot, hunt
and absorb physical pain without
complaint. All of this would come
in handy soon enough. In1943, after
the fall of Mussolini, the Germans
occupied northern Italy. Edoardo
joined the Partisans — and so did
his 13-year-old daughter, who conveyed leaflets, messages and supplies on her bicycle. The experience
shaped her personality and her
politics alike. It marked her, she
would later recount, just as the
“Pentecost left its mark upon the
apostles.”
After the war, she gravitated
toward journalism, with the encouragement of her Uncle Bruno,
who worked at “La Nazione.” A tiny
teenager in flats, she was initially
dismissed as “the kid” by her Florentine colleagues. But Fallaci was
a tough, precocious talent. She
worked her way up the ranks, and
by the early ’50s, she was writing for
“L’Europeo,” which sent her to
Hollywood for a month in 1957.
Fallaci’s initial collision with
America, where she would spend
much of the second half of her life,
was fortuitous in all sorts of ways.
It exposed her to a wider world and
taught her that celebrities were
often hollow shells: Potemkin Village personalities. It also seemed
to crystallize her peculiar mixture
of vulnerability and high-decibel
truculence. “She was fragile,” recalled one companion, “but she
used aggressiveness as a shield.
She attacked first. As a result,
Americans were often terrified of
her.”
And not only Americans. By the
late ’50s, she had begun to turn
Other Press
what Orson Welles called her
“sharp, Tuscan eye” on the rest of
the world. First, “L’Europeo” sent
her on a proto-feminist tour of
Turkey, Pakistan, India, Malaysia,
Hong Kong and Japan. Always
attuned to the paradoxes of
progress, she wrote about her encounters with “Muslim women
who no longer wear the veil and are
respected and free, but also unhappy, just as we are in the West.”
She published this reportage as a
book, “The Useless Sex,” in 1961,
and followed up the next year with
“Penelope at War,” a thinly fictionalized novel about her turbulent
love life. But before she could be
pigeonholed as an anatomist of the
nascent gender wars, Fallaci
changed tack and spent almost a
year reporting on the U.S. space
program. Then she headed for Vietnam.
Fallaci was herself a celebrity by
then, and perhaps that made her
uneasy. Plunging into a combat
zone took her back to the funda-
mentals she had absorbed in 1943
and reignited her contempt for hypocrisy, which made her wary of
both the Americans and the Viet
Cong. In her final dispatch from
the conflict, written as the North
Vietnamese marched into Saigon,
she anticipated both the victory
and its aftermath of Stalinist rule
and reeducation camps: “The
Communists are splendid while
they fight, and intolerable once
they have won.”
While she continued to function
as a war correspondent, Fallaci
found another way to vent her rage
at the abuse of power: the interview. There is a wonderful irony
here. Having cut her teeth interrogating the merely famous, she upgraded to the high, the mighty, the
Shakespearean movers-and-shakers. They were mostly men, and
they were mostly intimidated by
this wily, theatrical, fearless woman with a microphone. “To what
degree does power fascinate you?”
she asked Henry Kissinger. (The
answer, predictably and unconvincingly, was not at all.) Talking
with the Ayatollah Khomeini in
1979, she responded to a jeering
comment about her respectability
by ripping off her chador: “I’m going to take off this stupid, medieval
rag right now. There. Done.” (Khomeini fled the room at once.)
Many of these interviews were
collected in “Interview With History,” which I suspect will outlast
much of Fallaci’s output. The conversations are sharp, informed,
often entertaining: They are twopart inventions in which the interviewer is a major presence, a player. In that sense, they may have
helped to shape our contemporary
media landscape, with its preference for the shouting match or polemical dunk tank.
What followed was less inspiring. Fallaci spent almost a decade
on “Inshallah,” a giant novel about
the war in Lebanon, which exposed
her weakness for melodrama and
metaphysical kitsch. She deserves
some credit, as De Stefano argues,
for predicting that “radical Islam
[would] expand beyond the Middle
Eastern arena and confront the
West in a much wider war.” But her
disdain for the faith, fed initially by
its oppression of women, got the
better of her. The Muslim characters in “Inshallah” are queasy-making cartoons: killers, traitors, homosexuals (always a black mark in
Fallaci’s book). And a decade later,
after the Sept. 11 attacks, she published a Muslim-hating polemic,
“The Rage and the Pride,” whose
hyperventilating scorn made it, in
the
words
of
Christopher
Hitchens, a “sort of primer in how
not to write about Islam.”
De Stefano, who has filled in
some important biographical
gaps, is less reliable as a critic of
Fallaci’s work. She seems not to
recognize that these final productions, with their depressing quotient of egotism and Islamophobia,
ended Fallaci’s career on a low
note. As it happens, they also made
this lifelong anti-fascist into a hero
of the right — an irony that may
have tickled her, if she dwelled
on it at all. But her entire life was a
war on the party line, the politically
expedient, the prefabricated opinion, and she never stopped fighting, at least not on the page. Blame
it on Uncle Bruno, perhaps, who
drilled his main journalistic precept into Fallaci’s head as a child:
“First of all, don’t bore the reader!”
Early and late, she almost never
did.
Marcus is the editor of Harper’s
Magazine and the translator of
seven books from the Italian, the
most recent being Giacomo
Casanova’s “The Duel.”
Places to stop at North Hollywood’s Lit Crawl
Like a pub crawl with a literary
bent, the fifth annual Lit Crawl
L.A. parades through North Hollywood’s Arts District on Wednesday
for an evening of readings, live storytelling, literary quizzes and
more. Spanning just a few blocks,
Lit Crawl takes over local galleries,
restaurants and bars for an overlapping list of literary happenings
— all within walking distance. This
year’s crawl has more than 40
events; here are a few top picks.
adds an element of theater to its
live literary show, placing the clack
of typewriter keys front and center
of a stage performance. Members
of the Bureau type impromptu poems based on audience suggestions, and for a dash of healthy competition they also face off against
one another in poetry duels. How
many people can say they’ve witnessed a live, typewritten poetry
battle in a design-your-own pizza
shop? Here’s one chance.
7 p.m. at the Pizza Press, 5077
Lankershim Blvd., North
Hollywood
Duel of the Typewriters: Melrose
Poetry Bureau Squares Off
Part poetry reading, part improv, the Melrose Poetry Bureau
Shades and Shadows: Eat Your
Heart Out!
The theme of this reading is
“matters of the heart,” but consid-
By Agatha French
ering the lineup, it may skew more
scary than sappy. Shades and
Shadows is a reading series and
nonprofit organization that promotes the visibility of horror, sci-fi,
dark fantasy, noir and speculative
fiction in Southern California, and
for Lit Crawl L.A. it has collected
authors to share potentially
spooky, or at least surreal, stories.
Hear from Mallory Reaves, who cowrote “The Silver Dream” with Neil
Gaiman, Ben Loory, whose latest
collection is “Tales of Falling and
Flying,” and more.
8 p.m. at the Pitfire Pizza Patio,
5211 Lankershim Blvd., North
Hollywood
Out of the Mouth and Into the
Fire: Jack Jones Presents Black
Women Poets Reading from the
Body
Established in 2015 by writer
Kima Jones, Jack Jones Literary
Arts is a local book publicity company that works predominantly
with women of color and has already gained a national profile, including representing the 2017 Pulitzer Prize winner in poetry, Tyehimba Jess. For Lit Crawl, Jack
Jones presents Natalie Graham,
winner of 2016’s Cave Canem poetry
prize, Allison Conner, Ashaki Jackson and Shauna Barbosa. Readings will touch on “the segregation
of southern California, the cruel
beauty of the deep south, murdered black children, queer lovers
making love despite the world outside, celebrity, domestic violence
and what it means to be black, female, alive, determined, bruised.”
Hosted by Lilliam Rivera, author of
“The
Education
of
Margot
Sanchez” and deejayed by Peter
Woods of L.A.’s Writ Large Press.
9 p.m. at NoHo Plaza, 5223-5225
Lankershim Blvd., North
Hollywood
Still standing? The crawl
crosses the finish line with a closing party, where guests will have a
chance to mingle with favorite
readers and any presenters they
missed.
10 p.m. at the Eclectic, 5156
Lankershim Blvd., North
Hollywood
agatha.french@latimes.com
F10
S U N DAY, O C T O B E R 22, 2 017
L AT I M E S . C O M / CA L E N DA R
BOOK REVIEW
BESTSELLERS
LOS ANGELE S TIME S
OCT. 22, 2017
Fiction
Photographs by
Diane Cook and Len Jenshel
SIXTH-GRADERS are dwarfed by El Árbol del Tule in Santa María del Tule in Oaxaca, Mexico, in a photo from “Wise Trees.”
Visions of towering grace
A new photography book, ‘Wise Trees,’ is a thoughtful arboreal tour of the world
By Agatha French
“What trees do in their own quiet way is allow us to think about
scale,” writes Verlyn Klinkenborg
in the introduction to “Wise Trees”
(Abrams, $40). “In our world, we’re
dwarfed, outlasted, even humbled
by trees. What little modesty we
have as a species may depend
partly on that fact.”
The culmination of two years of
traveling, Diane Cook and Len Jenshel’s photography book “Wise
Trees” offers an arboreal tour of the
world where background scenery
becomes the centerpiece. When
documenting historic and landmark trees across five continents,
the photographers sought out “inspirational trees — ones that had
witnessed history, survived calamities, or were the focus of spiritual
veneration” and found more than
60 examples around the globe.
In Tokyo, married couple Cook
and Jenshel photographed the
child-giving gingko. More than 700
years old, the tree is thought to
grant fertility to women who worship the goddess Kishimojin-do.
(Despite its association, as a dioecious species, this particular
gingko is male.) The photographers caught the child-giving
gingko in autumn, when it blankets
the grounds of a Buddhist temple
with yellow leaves.
The origins of other hallowed
trees — all visually arresting — are
murkier. California’s Hallelujah
DOZENS OF SHOES hang from the “shoe tree” on a flat
stretch of U.S. Highway 395 in California’s Hallelujah Junction.
Junction, on a flat stretch of U.S.
Highway 395, would be unremarkable save for the shoe tree, named
for the dozens of old shoes — many
scrawled with wishes — dangling
from its branches, like sneakers
hanging from a telephone wire.
“This is the American version of a
wishing tree,” the photographers
write.
Not every example in “Wise
Trees” is so joyous. The photographers are careful to include trees
with dark histories, like a killing
tree in Cambodia and a hanging
tree in Texas, and those that serve
as reminders of solemn events, like
the survivor trees of Hiroshima
and Nagasaki. These trees are wise
not because they fulfill hopes but
because they have born witness.
In Santa María del Tule, Mexico, the 137.8-foot circumference of
El Árbol del Tule’s trunk grows in
the town center and is old enough
to have witnessed the Spanish conquest of Mexico. Depicted in “Wise
Trees” ringed with schoolchildren
to convey a sense of scale, its story
embodies a slice of Oaxacan history. To the indigenous Zapotec
people, the tree symbolizes life;
thought to have been planted more
than a thousand years ago, it defiantly towers over a nearby Roman
Catholic church built by the Span-
ish in the 18th century.
Trees as sources of life appear in
myths and stories across cultures
and religions. Humanity’s relationship to trees is symbiotic — they
help to provide the air we breathe
— and some of the most inspiring
photographs in “Wise Trees” show
our increasingly rare deference to
nature.
In the hills of West Bali, a tree
known as Bunut Bolong shares a
characteristic with certain California redwoods: a paved road runs
clear through its center. As a sacred banyan tree, however, villagers continue to worship Bunot
Bolong. Black and white cloth lining its tunnel represents the Hindu
principle of universal balance between light and dark: To drive
through it is a reminder of harmony on both a spiritual and physical level. Similarly, a store conducts daily business around the
sweet shop tree in Varanasi, India.
In Cook and Jenshel’s photograph,
saffron-colored cloth adorns its indoor trunk, which is also hung with
plastic bags. The trunk shares
space with, among other things, a
refrigerator and a ceiling fan.
Cook and Jenshel call these
“landscapes of complexity — where
nature and humanity converge.” In
light of climate change, they remind readers of the importance of
honoring that convergence. “Trees
can live without us,” they write,
“but we cannot live without them.”
agatha.french@latimes.com
She broke codes and tripped up Nazis
the 1930s. Working with that team,
she monitored, tracked and
hunted a number of groups of Nazi
spies who were spreading out from
Germany into the Western Hemisphere. And once the messages
were intercepted, she would look
at these garbled fields of text, and
she would solve them.
By Kristen Evans
In the 1930s, Elizebeth Friedman graced the covers of newspapers and was profiled by Reader’s Digest. She was a tireless and
talented code breaker who
brought down gangsters and Nazi
spies. But after World War II, her
story was lost, partly because of
forced government secrecy and
also because her husband, William
Friedman, was often credited for
work they did together.
Philadelphia-based journalist
Jason Fagone waded through archival research and recently declassified documents to write “The
Woman Who Smashed Codes: A
True Story of Love, Spies, and the
Unlikely Heroine Who Outwitted
America’s Enemies” (Dey Street
Books: 464 pp., $27.99).
What emerges is not just Friedman’s forgotten contribution to
code breaking but also a fascinating swath of American history that
begins in Gilded Age Chicago and
moves to the inner workings of our
intelligence agencies at the close of
WWII. We talked via phone; this
interview has been edited.
So much of Elizebeth Friedman’s
story intersects with our current
moment: citizen surveillance,
anti-Semitism, sexism. Were
these parallels obvious to you
from the start?
The book began with the Edward Snowden disclosures. That’s
when I started reading about the
history of the NSA [National Security Agency]. Like a lot of Americans, I didn’t really know much
George C. Marshal Foundation
ELIZEBETH FRIEDMAN, whose work had been forgotten, in
1940 puzzling out a problem with junior analyst Robert Gordon.
about the NSA. Where did this big
intelligence agency come from?
How did it grow to the size that it
did? That led me to William Friedman, and in reading about William
Friedman, who’s considered the
godfather of the NSA, I also happened to read about his wife, Elizebeth Smith Friedman. I looked for
more information about her, and
there really wasn’t that much.
There wasn’t a book.
What changed?
Her papers have always been
there. She died in 1980, and she left
22 boxes of materials to a private
library in Lexington, Va. The only
people who really knew what was
inside were the archivists who
work at the library, who are won-
derful and have taken terrific care
of her papers. I started reading her
letters, and her voice just leapt off
the page. She was so funny and
witty and sometimes bitingly
sarcastic. Yet there was this mysterious gap in the record between
1939 and 1945. And if somebody has
meticulously documented their
life, and they were a code breaker
in the U.S. government, and if the
years 1939 to 1945 are not there,
that’s kind of a red flag.
What was she up to during this
time period?
During WWII, she hunted Nazi
spies. She worked for the Coast
Guard as a code breaker with a
team of elite code breakers that
she had founded and trained in
One of my favorite details about
this part of the story is that
there’s a romance novel involved
in some of the decryptions.
Yes. “All This, and Heaven Too”
by Rachel Field. It’s a potboiler
about a French governess who was
falsely accused of murder and
thrown in a dungeon. It was based
on a true story. Elizebeth reverseengineered the Nazi cipher that
was based on this potboiler. Her
team solved more than 4,000 messages sent by Nazi spies, and then
she would give those messages to
Allied intelligence services. It
ultimately allowed the Allies to
track down these Nazi spies on the
ground, arrest them and put them
in jail, and destroy their spy ring.
How much did you try to learn
about code breaking yourself?
I ended up taking a lot of encouragement and inspiration from
Elizebeth’s own writing. All her life,
she insisted that anyone could
understand codes and ciphers. On
top of that, Elizebeth herself was
not a mathematician. She was a
poet and a literature scholar. And
yet she was able to use her abilities
to see deeply into this world of
secret communication.
Evans is a writer in New York.
weeks
on list
1. Origin by Dan Brown (Doubleday:
$29.95) A discovery by a futurist
and former student of Robert
Langdon sends him on a quest to
uncover the questions of human
existence.
1
2. Manhattan Beach by Jennifer
Egan (Scribner: $27) The first
female diver at the Brooklyn
Naval Yard during World War II
seeks to uncover the reason for
her father’s disappearance.
1
3. Legacy of Spies by John le Carré
(Viking: $28) A retired British
Secret Service agent is
interrogated about his past and
former colleague George Smiley.
6
4. Little Fires Everywhere by
Celeste Ng (Penguin Press: $27)
A new family and an adoption
upend a quiet Cleveland suburb.
4
5. A Gentleman in Moscow by Amor
Towles (Viking: $27) In 1922, a
Russian count is sentenced to
house arrest in a hotel for the rest
of his life.
57
6. The Girl Who Takes and Eye for
an Eye by David Lagercrantz
(Knopf: $27.95) Lisbeth Salander
is back, teaming with a journalist
to uncover the secrets of her
childhood.
4
7. Sleeping Beauties by Stephen
King and Owen King (Scribner:
$30) In an Appalachian town
women who fall asleep become
shrouded in mysterious cocoons.
Waking them up causes
problems.
2
8. The Cuban Affair by Nelson
DeMille (Simon & Schuster:
$28.99) An Army veteran turned
charter boat caption is hired to
find $60 million stashed
somewhere in Cuba.
3
9. My Absolute Darling by Gabriel
Tallent (Riverhead: $27) A
self-sufficient 14-year-old girl
fights to save herself from her
abusive, survivalist father.
6
10. Forest Dark by Nicole Krauss
(Harper: $27.99) Two alternating
stories, about an elderly man and
a woman with writers block, find
themselves adrift in Tel Aviv.
2
Nonfiction
1. We Were Eight Years in Power by
Ta-Nehisi Coates (One World:
$28)Eight essays previously
published in The Atlantic, plus
additional material from the
award-winning social critic.
2
2. What Happened by Hillary
Rodham Clinton (Simon &
Schuster: $18) The former
presidential candidate’s memoir
of losing the 2016 election.
5
3. Astrophysics for People in a
Hurry by Neil Degrasse Tyson
(Norton: $18.95) A quick and
easy introduction to the cosmos
from the astrophysicist.
23
4. The Four by Scott Galloway
(Portfolio: $29) The dominance
of Amazon, Apple, Facebook and
Google, and how to apply their
strategies to your business.
1
5. Unbelievable by Katy Tur (Dey
Street: $26.99) The NBC News
correspondent writes about
covering Donald Trump’s 2016
presidential campaign.
4
6. Devotion by Patti Smith (Yale
University Press: $18) The
rocker-writer’s exploration of the
nature of creative invention
featuring a love story concerning
an Estonian skater.
5
7. From Here to Eternity by Caitlin
Doughty (Norton: $24.95) An
American undertaker travels the
world to discover how other
cultures care for their dead.
1
8. Braving the Wilderness by Brene
Brown (Random House: $28)
Cultivating the power of
belonging in an era of
disconnection.
4
9. The Subtle Art of Not Giving a
F*ck by Mark Manson
(HarperOne: $24.99) How trying
not to be positive all the time will
make us better, happier people.
28
10. Killing England by Bill O’Reilly
and Martin Dugard (Holt: $30)
The Revolutionary War told
through the eyes of America’s
Founding Fathers and King
George III.
3
PAPERBACKS
Fiction
1.Milk and Honey by Rupi Kaur ($14.99)
2.Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro
($15)
3.It: A Novel by Stephen King ($19.99)
4.The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret
Atwood ($15.95)
5.1984 by George Orwell ($9.99)
Nonfiction
1.Being Mortal by Atul Gawande ($16)
2.How to Fight by Thich Nhat Hanh
($9.95)
3.You Are a Badass by Jen Sincero ($16)
4.On Tyranny by Timothy Snyder ($7.99)
5.The War of Art by Steven Pressfield
($12.95)
Rankings are based on chain
results and a weekly poll of 125
Southland bookstores. For an
extended list: www.latimes.com/
books
latimes.com
/books
Craving
more?
Join us online at Jacket Copy
for the latest book news, live
video chats, quizzes, author
interviews, photo galleries
and reviews.
An Advertising Supplement to the LOS ANGELES TIMES
WSCE SUNDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2017
G1
NissaniBrosCDJR.com
NissaniBrosChevy.com
com
NISSANI BROS.
CHEVROLET
NISSANI BROS.
CHRYSLER DODGE JEEP RAM
Chevrolet SIlverados and Colorados
0% APR
FINANCING
for 72 Months!
s!
VIP LOYALTY PROGRAM*
$13.89 per $1,000 financed based on $0 down.
buye
yers
rs
Must finance through GM Financial. Not all bu
buyers
will qualify. Offer ends 10/26/17.
NET SAVINGS
30% OFF MSRP
on Select 2017 Chevy
Cruzes and Malibus!
When You Purchase Any New or Used Vechicle Include:
• Lifetime Complimentary Lube, Oil & Filter Changes
• Lifetime Courtesy Car Washes
• Lifetime Courtesy Loaner Vehicle (for up to two days)
More than 5 at this offer.
2017 CHEVROLET CRUZE
2017 CHEVROLET MALIBU
MSRP .....................$20,400 Flex Cash: ................. $1,000
Dealer Discount ........ $120 Competitive Lease: $1,500*
Sales Price: ..........$20,280
Factory Rebate ..... $3,500 NET COST .......... $14,280
MSRP ......................$24,160 Flex Cash: ................. $1,000
Dealer Discount .....$1,248 Competitive Lease: $1,500*
Sales Price: ...........$22,912
Factory Rebate ..... $3,500 NET COST ...........$16,912
Must be current lessee of an eligible competitive vehicle. Prices do not include government fees and taxes, any finance change, any dealer
document processing charge, any electronic filing charge, and any emissions testing charge. Customer requested dealer installed options at
retail. All financing and leasing requires credit approval. Consumer must qualify for all incentives. See dealer for details. Offer ends 10/26/17.
2017 Dodge Challenger SXT
$
99
Nissani Bros. Chevy is the #1 Bolt EV Dealer in Southern California!
† Based on September 2017 Sales.
UP TO
Remaining 2017 Silverado’s
$13,000
NET SAVINGS OFF MSRP!
2017 Chevrolet Silverado 1500
Crew Cab LT 2WD All Star Edition
MSRP.........................................$4
MSRP.........................................$45,985
$45,
5 98
985
5
Dealer Discount......................$4,500
Sales Price...............................$41,485
,
Consumer Cash Program...$1,000
GM Consumer Cash...............$1,000
32,985
Chevy Bonus Cash Program$3,250 Net Cost
Flex Cash.......................................$1,000
Chevy Bonus Cash Program $1,250
Chevy Trade In Allowance......$1,000 More than 5 at this offer.
$
Prices plus government fees and taxes, any finance charges, any dealer document processing charge, any electronic
filing charge, and any emission testing charge. See dealer for details. Offer ends 10/26/17.
LT Sedan or Hatchback
79
/mo.
Lease + tax
for 24 mos.
More than
5 at this
lease.
$3,499 cash or trade equity due from customer + $1,000 GM Financial Supported Lease Program + $1,000 Flex
Cash + $1,500 Competitive Lease Cash (must be current lessee of an eligible competitive vehicle) = $6,999 total due
at lease inception plus tax and license. No security deposit required. On approved credit. Must finance through GM
Financial. Mileage in excess of 12,000 miles/year at 25 cents/mile. Offer ends 10/26/17.
2017 Chevrolet
Trax LS
89
$
/mo.
Lease + tax
for 24 mos.
More than
5 at this
lease.
2018 Chevrolet
Equinox LS
99
/mo.
Lease + tax
for 24 mos.
More than
5 at this
lease.
2017 Chevrolet
Bolt EV
149
$
Lease + tax
for 36 mos.
More than
5 at this
lease.
$3,499 cash or trade equity due from customer + $1,250 GM Financial Support + $3,250 Select Market Inc. + $1,000
Flex Cash + $500 Loyalty/Competitive Lease Cash (must be current lessee of an eligible Chevy or competitive vehicle)
= $9,499 total due at lease inception plus tax and license. No security deposit required. On approved credit. Must
finance through GM Financial. Mileage in excess of 10,000 miles/year at 25 cents/mile. Offer ends 10/26/17.
2018 Chevrolet
Malibu LS
149
/mo.
$
Lease + tax
for 39 mos.
More than
5 at this
lease.
$3,499 cash or trade equity due from customer + $1,000 Select Market Inc. + $1,000 Flex Cash + $1,500
Competitive Lease Cash (must be current lessee of an eligible competitive vehicle) = $6,999 total due at lease
inception plus tax and license. No security deposit required. On approved credit. Must finance through GM
Financial. Mileage in excess of 10,000 miles/year at 25 cents/mile. Offer ends 10/26/17.
2017 Chevrolet
Colorado Crew Cab
189
$
/mo.
Lease + tax
for 24 mos.
More than
5 at this
lease.
$3,499 cash or trade equity due from customer + $1,000 Flex Cash + $1,500 Competitive Lease Cash (must
be current lessee of an eligible competitive vehicle) = $5,999 total due at lease inception plus tax and license.
No security deposit required. On approved credit. Must finance through GM Financial. Mileage in excess of 12,000
miles/year at 25 cents/mile. Offer ends 10/26/17.
199
$
Lease + tax
for 36 mos.
More than
5 at this
lease.
$3 499 cashh or trade
$3,499
d equity due from customer + $4,400 GM Financial Support + $1,000 Select Market Inc. + $1,000
Flex Cash + $500 Competitive Lease Cash (must be current lessee of an eligible competitive vehicle) = $10,399 total
due at lease inception plus tax and license. No security deposit required. On approved credit. Must finance through GM
Financial. Mileage in excess of 10,000 miles/year at 25 cents/mile. Offer ends 10/26/17
Call: (310) 439-8074
NissaniBrosChevy.com
129
mo
Lease + tax
for 36 mos.
$3,999 Customer Cash + $1,000 Conquest Rebate (must be current registered owner of an eligible competitive vehicle)
= $4,999 due at lease inception + tax and license. Zero security deposit. On approved credit. Mileage charge $.25/mile
over 10,000 miles per year. Offer ends 10/26/17.
2017 Ram 1500 Quad Cab 6”4
$
169
mo
Lease + tax
for 24 mos.
$3,999 Customer Cash + $1,000 Conquest Rebate (must be current registered owner of an eligible competitive vehicle)
= $4,999 due at lease inception + tax and license. Zero security deposit. On approved credit. Mileage charge $.25/mile
over 10,000 miles per year. Offer ends 10/26/17.
2017 Jeep Grand Cherokee
$
179
mo
Lease + tax
for 36 mos.
$3,999 Customer Cash + $1,000 Conquest Rebate (must be current registered owner of an eligible competitive vehicle)
= $4,999 due at lease inception + tax and license. Zero security deposit. On approved credit. Mileage charge $.25/mile
over 10,000 miles per year. Offer ends 10/26/17.
2017 Dodge Durango
$
199
mo
Lease + tax
for 36 mos.
MORE THAN 5 AT THIS OFFER.
$3,999 Customer Cash + $1,000 Conquest Rebate (must be current registered owner of an eligible competitive vehicle)
= $4,999 due at lease inception + tax and license. Zero security deposit. On approved credit. Mileage charge $.25/mile
over 10,000 miles per year. Offer ends 10/26/17.
2017 Dodge Grand Caravan
$
199
mo
Lease + tax
for 36 mos.
MORE THAN 5 AT THIS OFFER.
$3,999 Customer Cash + $1,000 Conquest Rebate (must be current registered owner of an eligible competitive vehicle)
= $4,999 due at lease inception + tax and license. Zero security deposit. On approved credit. Mileage charge $.25/mile
over 10,000 miles per year. Offer ends 10/26/17.
2017 Dodge Charger SXT
$
229
mo
Lease + tax
for 36 mos.
MORE THAN 5 AT THIS OFFER.
$3,999 Customer Cash + $1,000 Conquest Rebate (must be current registered owner of an eligible competitive vehicle)
= $4,999 due at lease inception + tax and license. Zero security deposit. On approved credit. Mileage charge $.25/mile
over 10,000 miles per year. Offer ends 10/26/17.
$
249
mo
Lease + tax
for 36 mos.
MORE THAN 5 AT THIS OFFER.
$3,999 Customer Cash + $1,000 Conquest Rebate (must be current registered owner of an eligible competitive vehicle)
= $4,999 due at lease inception + tax and license. Zero security deposit. On approved credit. Mileage charge $.25/mile
over 10,000 miles per year. Offer ends 10/26/17.
NISSANI BROS.
CHRYSLER DODGE JEEP RAM
NISSANI BROS.
CHEVROLET
6101 W. Slauson Ave., Culver City, CA 90230
$
2018 Chrysler Pacifica
2017 Chevrolet
Volt LT
/mo.
2018 Jeep Compass Latitude
MORE THAN 5 AT THIS OFFER.
$3,499 cash or trade equity due from customer + $750 Select Market Inc. + $1,000 Flex Cash + $1,500 Competitive Lease Cash (must be current lessee of an eligible competitive vehicle) = $6,749 total due at lease inception
plus tax and license. No security deposit required. On approved credit. Must finance through GM Financial. Mileage
in excess of 12,000 miles/year at 25 cents/mile. Offer ends 10/26/17.
/mo.
MORE THAN 5 AT THIS OFFER.
$3,999 Customer Cash + $1,000 Conquest Rebate (must be current registered owner of an eligible competitive vehicle)
= $4,999 due at lease inception + tax and license. Zero security deposit. On approved credit. Mileage charge $.25/mile
over 10,000 miles per year. Offer ends 10/26/17.
MORE THAN 5 AT THIS OFFER.
$3,499 cash or trade equity due from customer + $750 Select Market Inc. + $1,000 Flex Cash + $1,500 Competitive Lease Cash (must be current lessee of an eligible competitive vehicle) = $6,749 total due at lease inception
plus tax and license. No security deposit required. On approved credit. Must finance through GM Financial. Mileage
in excess of 12,000 miles/year at 25 cents/mile. Offer ends 10/26/17.
$
Lease + tax
for 36 mos.
MORE THAN 5 AT THIS OFFER.
2017 Chevrolet Cruze
$
mo
405
t
aS
ay
Pl
NISSANI BROS.
CHEVOLET
90
Slauson Ave
M
es
m
d
n
so
er
ff
Je
Blv
er
Av
e
5750 Mesmer Ave., Culver City, CA 90230
Call: (310) 439-8075
NissaniBrosCDJR.com
90
G2
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2017 WSCE
For the best car deals,
speed matters.
Don’t miss out on getting
the biggest savings on a new or
used car or truck. Simply go to
Auto Dealer Specials.
Here’s where you can quickly
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compare offers from dealerships
in your area, as well as all across
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Do it now, the best deals go fast!
For new vehicles, visit:
latimes.com/DealerSpecials/New
For used vehicles, visit:
latimes.com/DealerSpecials/Used
An Advertising Supplement to the LOS ANGELES TIMES
An Advertising Supplement to the LOS ANGELES TIMES
WSCE SUNDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2017
G3
THINGS GOT BETTER SALE!
NEW 2017
BUICK
NEW 2017
BUICK
REGAL
GS
Adaptive Cruise/Front Auto Braking/Blind Zone/Sunroof/20” Wheels
LEASE $
*MO
FOR
PLUS TAX
REGALSunroof/Navigation/Leather
SPORT TOURING
LEASE $
**MO
FOR
PLUS TAX
249
349
1 AT THIS OFFER 19251/167780
2 AT THIS OFFER 19298/179537, 19320/187074
**39 Month Closed End Lease on Above Average Approved Credit with GM Financial. Includes $1,500 Rebate, $500 CCR, $1,500 Competitive
Lease (Must have current non-GM lease in household). $.25 per mile in excess of 10,000 miles per year. Total due at least signing $2,000.
NEW 2017
BUICK
**39 Month Closed End Lease On Above Average Approved credit with GM Financial. Includes $1,500 Lease Rebate, $500 CCR, $1,500 GM
Competitive Lessee Program (Must have current non-GM lease in household). $.25 per mile over 10,000 miles per year. Total due at lease signing
NEW 2017
BUICK
ENCLAVE LEATHER AWD
Leather/Heated Front Seats/Power Liftgate
For Current
Buick & GMC
Lessees
34,690*
279
$
$
LEASE
BUY
OR FOR
FOR
1 AT THIS OFFER 18996/107758
**MO
PLUS TAX
BUY
FOR
ENCLAVE
PREMIUM
Navigation/Bose/Sunroof/Articulating Headlights/Heated & Cooled Front Seats
PLUS
FOR CURRENT BUICK $
PLUS
OR
TT&L*
GMC LESSEES
TT&L**
38,450
$
34,450
**39 Month Closed End Lease on Above Average Approved credit with GM Financial. Includes $350 Rebate, $1,500 Competitive Lease
(Must have current non-GM Lease in household). $.25 per mile in excess of 10,000 miles per year. Total due at lease signing $2,000.
NEW 2017
BUICK
115
PREFERRED
24 Month Closed End Lease on above average approved credit with GM Financial. Includes $200 Lease Rebate, $1,500 Select Market CCR, $2,500 Buick/
GMC Lease Loyalty (Must have current Buick/GMC lease in household). $.25 per mile in excess of 10,000 miles per year. Total due at lease signing $2,000.
0% FOR 72 MONTHS
ON ALL NEW
2017 GMC YUKON & YUKON XL!
See FULL Inventory at
www.ThorsonMotorCenter.com
*ON ABOVE AVERAGE APPROVED CREDIT WITH GM FINANCIAL. $13.89 PER $1,000 FINANCED.
CANYONSHORTBOXCREWSLE
Locking Rear Diff/Remote Start/Auto A/C/Rear Sliding Window/V6
BUY $
*Mo
* LEASE
$
Plus Tax
FOR
FOR
NEW 2017 GMC
27,495
309
OR
2 AT THIS OFFER T46725/302363, T46766/305267
*(MSRP: $33,570 - $1,575 THORSON DISCOUNT - $1,500 BONUS CASH - $3,000 CONQUEST CASH (MUST HAVE CURRENT NON-GM VEHICLE IN HOUSEHOLD)
= $27,995 **24 MOS CLOSED END LEASE ON ABOVE AVERAGE APPROVED CREDIT WITH GM FINANCIAL. INCLUDES $3,000 CONQUEST CASH (MUST HAVE
CURRENT NON-GM VEHICLE IN HOUSEHOLD). $.25 PER MILE IN EXCESS OF 10,000 MILES PER YEAR. TOTAL DUE AT LEASE SIGNING $2,000.
SIERRA15002WDCREWSLT
Leather/Navigation/Park Assist/20” Wheels/Chrome Assist Steps
BUY $
LEASE$
**Mo
FOR
Plus Tax
FOR
NEW 2017 GMC
38,495
399
OR
2 AT THIS OFFER T46603/448501, T46599/446423
*(MSRP: $49,815 - $4,070 THORSON DISCOUNT - $500 REBATE - $1000 INC CASH - $3,750 BONUS CASH - $2,000 GMC BONUS CASH = $38,995) ** 36 MONTH
CLOSED END LEASE ON ABOVE AVERAGE CREDIT WITH GM US BANK. INCLUDES $500 REBATE, $1000 INC CASH, $3,750 BONUS CASH, $2,000 GMC BONUS CASH,
$500 LEASE CASH (MUST HAVE CURRENT LEASE IN HOUSEHOLD). $.25 PER MILE IN EXCESS OF 10,000 MILES PER YEAR. TOTAL DUE AT LEASE SIGNING $2,000.
PREMIUM
365
$
*MO
PLUS TAX
2 AT THIS PAYMENT 19232/286128 19209/262958
*36 Month Close End Lease on above average approved credit with GM Financial. Includes $760 Rebate, $2,100 Select Market CCR, $2,360 Buick CCR, $3000 Buick/
GMC Lease Loyalty (Must have current Buick/GMC Lease in household to qualify). $.25 per mile in excess of 10,000 miles per year. Total due at lease signing $2,000.
2017
BUICK
ENCORE PREFERRED
LEASE $
*MO
FOR
PLUS TAX
99
*MO
PLUS TAX
2 AT THIS PAYMENT 19428/229886, 19429/245820
ENCLAVE
Navigation/Bose/Sunroof/Articulating Headlights/Heated & Cooled Front Seats
LEASE
FOR
OR
*(MSRP: $49,950 - $4,000 Thorson Discount - $4,500 Bonus Cash - $2,000 Down payment Assist (Must finance with GM Financial) - $1,000 Rebate = $38,450) **(MSRP: $49,950 - $4,000 Thorson Discount $4,500 Bonus Cash - $2,000 Down payment Assist (Must finance with GM Financial) - $4,000 Buick GMC Lease Loyalty (Must have current Buick/GMC lease in household) - $1,000 Rebate = $34,450).
ENCORE
LEASE $
FOR
*MO
PLUS TAX
1 AT THIS OFFER 19321/121231
2 AT THIS OFFER 19232/286128, 19209/262958
NEW 2017
BUICK
389
$
LEASE
FOR
*(MSRP: $46,690 - $1,000 Rebate - $2,000 Down Payment Assist (Must finance with GM Financial) - $5,000 Thorson Discont - $4,000 Buick/GMC Lease Loyalty (Must have current BUick/GMC lease in household to qualify) = $34,690)
**36 Month Closed End Lease on above average approved credit with GM Financial. Includes $760 Rebate $4,100 CCR, $3,000 Buick/GMC Lease
Loyalty (Must have current Buick/GMC Lease in household to qualify). $.25 per mile in excess of 10,000 miles per year. $2,000 Due at Lease signing.
NEW 2017
BUICK
CASCADA
PREMIUM
Leather/Navigation
Prior Loaner
1 AT THIS PAYMENT 19146/041409
24 Month Closed End lease on above average approved credit with GM Financial. Includes $200 GM Financial Lease Program, $1,500 Buick CCR, $2,500 Buick/
GMC Lease Loyalty (Must have current Buick/GMC lease in household to qualify). $.25 per mile in excess of 9,250 miles per year. Total due at lease signing $2,000.
NEW 2018 GMC
LEASE
FOR
TERRAIN SLE1
239
$
*Mo
Plus Tax
5 IN STOCK
*24 MONTH CLOSED END LEASE ON ABOVE AVERAGE APPROVED CREDIT WITH GM FINANCIAL. INCLUDES $500 CCR,
$1,500 LEASE REBATE (MUST HAVE CURRENT LEASE IN HOUSEHOLD). $.25 PER MILE IN EXCESS OF 10,000 MILES PER
YEAR. TOTAL DUE AT LEASE SIGNING $2,000.
NEW 2017 GMC
BUY
FOR
CANYON4WDCREWSHORTBOX
**Mo
* LEASE
$
Plus Tax
FOR
All Terrain X Package/Bose/Nav
33,995
$
329
OR
1 AT THIS OFFER T46410/171404
*(MSRP: $40,635 - $2,145 THORSON DISCOUNT - $1,500 BONUS CASH - $3,000 CONQUEST CASH (MUST HAVE CURRENT NON-GM VEHICLE IN HOUSEHOLD)
= $34,135 **24 MOS CLOSED END LEASE ON ABOVE AVERAGE APPROVED CREDIT WITH GM FINANCIAL. INCLUDES $3,000 CONQUEST CASH (MUST HAVE
CURRENT NON-GM VEHICLE IN HOUSEHOLD). $.25 PER MILE IN EXCESS OF 10,000 MILES PER YEAR. TOTAL DUE AT LEASE SIGNING $1,500.
NEW 2017 GMC
LEASE
FOR
TERRAIN SLE1 FWD
149
$
*Mo
Plus Tax
1 AT THIS PAYMENT T46994/353404
*24 MONTH CLOSED END LEASE ON ABOVE AVERAGE APPROVED CREDIT WITH GM FINANCIAL. INCLUDES
$1,100 REBATE, $1,500 CCR, $1,500 COMPETITIVE LEASE (MUST HAVE CURRENT NON-GM LEASE IN
HOUSEHOLD). $.25 PER MILE IN EXCESS OF 10,000 MILES PER YEAR. TOTAL DUE AT LEASE SIGNING $2,000.
NEW 2017 GMC ACADIA SLE1
ACADIA
LIMITED
FWD
Leather/Navigation
7 Passeger
LEASE $
BUY$
FORCURRENTBUICK BUY $
LEASE $
*Mo
*
**
FOR
FOR
GMCLESSEES
FOR
Plus Tax
FOR
NEW 2017 GMC
389
1 AT THS PAYMENT T45514/130298
*36 MONTH CLOSED END LEASE ON ABOVE AVERAGE APPROVED CREDIT WITH GM FINANCIAL. INCLUDES $3,000
BUICK/GMC LEASE LOYALTY (MUST HAVE CURRENT BUICK/GMC LEASE IN HOUSEHOLD). $.25 PER MILE IN EXCESS OF
10,000 MILES PER YEAR. TOTAL DUE AT LEASE SIGNING $2,000.
26,870
OR
22,870 219
OR
***Mo
PlusTax
1 AT THIS OFFER T46220/170116
*(MSRP:$33,870-$3,000THORSONDISCOUNT-$4,000GMFDOWNPAYMENTASSIST(MUSTFINANCEWITHGMFINANCIAL)=$26,870)**(MSRP:$33,870-$3,000THORSONDISCOUNT-$4,000GMFDOWNPAYMENTASSIST
(MUSTFINANCEWITHGMFINANCIAL)-$4,000BUICK/GMCLEASELOYALTY(MUSTHAVECURRENTBUICK/GMCLEASETOQUALIFY)=$22,870)***36MONTHCLOSEDENDLEASEONABOVEAVERAGEAPPROVEDCREDIT
WITHGMFINANCIAL.INCLUDES$3,000BUICK/GMCLEASELOYALTY(MUSTHAVECURRENTBUICK/GMCLEASEINHOUSEHOLD).$.25PERMILEINEXCESSOF10,000MILESPERYEAR.TOTALDUEATLEASESIGNING$2,000.
GM CERTIFIED PRE-OWNED
2014 Buick Verano Convenience
Reverse Camera/Blind Zone Alert,
1 Owner! 14,867 Miles (8769/160208)
$14,491
2012 Chevrolet Tahoe LT
1 Owner, 55,882 miles, 20” Wheels, Leather
Heated Seats. (87758/186808)
$28,495
2016 Chevrolet Trax LTZ
2014 Buick Encore Convenience
Reverse Sensors, Prior Rental, 37,561
(8755/169123)
Blind Zone Alert/Heated Seats, 1 Owner,
Mileage - 19,261 (8771/784680)
$14,998
,
$16,995
2016 Buick Enclave AWD
2015 GMC Terrain Denali FWD
$28,998
$29,495
Prior Rental Power Lift Gate, Quad Seating
39,120 Miles. (8666/116456)
1 Owner, V6, Sunroof, Navigation, 15,597 Mi.
(8783/127421)
2014 Buick LaCrosse
1 Owner, Leather Heated Seats
43,368 Miles. (8792/166406)
$17,995
2015 Buick Encore Premium AWD 2017 GMC Terrain SLT FWD
Nav, Sunroof, Remote Start, Forward/Rear Sensors,
Leather, 1 Owner, 12,013 Miles (8787/146277)
$22,995
2015 Buick Enclave Premium FWD
2015 Chevy Silverado Z71
$34,895
$34,895
1 Owner, Heated/Cooled Front Seats/20” Whls,
NAV./Sunroof/DVD, 16,052 Mi. (8751/139894)
Nav, Tonneau Cover, Back Up
Camera. (46681A/521192)
1 Owner, Leather/Navigation/Side Blind
Zone Alert, 4,401 Miles (46228A/194255)
$26,995
2015 GMC Yukon XL SLT
Leather/2nd Row Buckets/Sunroof/Nav/DVD/20” Wheels
1 Owner, 56,797 Miles (46837A/139176)
$42,325
PRE-OWNED SPECIALS
$8,169
2007 Chevy Monte Carlo SS Cpe 2012 Toyota Prius Three Hatchback
One Owner, 72,177 Miles Moonrf, Rear Spoiler,
Cruise Control. (19133A/233679)
$8,495
2016 Dodge Grand Caravan SXT
54,295 Miles (8729/418388)
Prior Rental 43,090 miles.
(8722/250012)
$12,293
$14,968
626-795-8851
3456 E. Colorado Blvd.,
Pasadena
2015 Honda CRV
1 Owner, 21,913 Miles, Moonroof, Heated Seats.
(194058/501550)
$20,895
Thursday-Friday 8:30am-7:30pm
Saturday 8:30am-6pm
Sunday 12noon-5pm
Monday 10:30am-7:30pm
2017 Nissan Frontier
Prior Rental, AC/PW Sliding rear
window, 11,285 miles.
$21,277
More Specials at
www.ThorsonMotorCenter.com
All prices exclude government fees and taxes, any finance charges, any dealer document preparation charge, any electronic filing and any emission testing charge. **Conquest Cash Must Have ‘99 Or
Newer Non-GM in Household. Subject to prior sale. On approved credit. *See dealer for complete rebate qualification. Offer exp. date of publication close of business.
LAA5252525-1
Leather/Sunroof
85,257 Miles (19311B/241940)
Hours
2010 Chevrolet Impala LTZ
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2017 WSCE
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G4
SUNDAY COMICS
DILBERT
By Scott Adams
DOONESBURY By Garry Trudeau
GET FUZZY By Darby Conley
PEARLS BEFORE SWINE By Stephan Pastis
LA CUCARACHA By Lalo Alcaraz
H
OCTOBER 22, 2017
H2
S U N DAY, O C T O B E R 22 , 2 017
MUTTS By Patrick McDonnell
L AT I M E S . C O M
BLONDIE
By Dean Young
& John Marshall
ZITS By Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman
BABY BLUES By Rick Kirkman and Jerry Scott
MARMADUKE
By Brad & Paul Anderson
PRICKLY CITY By Scott Stantis
S U N DAY, O C T O B E R 22 , 2 017
L AT I M E S . C O M
ASK AMY
Dear Amy: Several years
ago, my parents and godparents got into business together. In the past couple of
years, the business relationship has gone sour, and they
have since dissolved the
business.
This involved a lot of false
accusations, name-calling
and general nastiness on
both sides.
How do I continue a healthy relationship with my
godparents, who I love
dearly, without feeling like I
am disrespecting my own
parents?
Feeling Torn
Dear Torn: Your feelings
are your own to manage. I
suggest you become well-acquainted, and accepting, of
the
awkwardness
that
emerges when you are all together. Children of divorce
struggle with this and often
master these situations by
compartmentalizing, not engaging in conversations
about the other, and basically putting relationships
into discreet boxes.
You should convey honestly to both parties that you
love them both and that you
want to maintain good relationships.
Send questions to Amy
Dickinson by email to
askamy@amydickinson
.com.
Mending
Things
Edited by Rich Norris
and Joyce Nichols
Lewis
By Garry Morse
ACROSS
1 "Take —!"
5 Follower of Zeno
10 Revelatory moments
14 Concert site
18 Gives a shine to
20 Conveyor connected to
a pump
21 Norse trickster
22 Mayberry redhead
23 Result of failing to
catch a wascally
wabbit?
25 Viral video about Dre's
headphones?
27 Ultimate
28 Barak of Israel
30 Victim of Casca
31 Litany from a lying
perp
32 Pasta wheat
34 Ad hoc gp.
35 ISP alternative
36 "C'mon, bro!"
37 Landlocked African
land
41 "Are not!" evoker
44 Holiday seasons
46 Underwater stabilizer
48 Embellish
49 Tops off
51 Zip
52 Seriously hurt
54 StubHub parent
company
55 Young Darth's
nickname
56 "I'm the best on the
runway," e.g.?
62 Hang-thread link
63 Inviting words
Last week’s solution:
“Eats Up”
HOROSCOPE
Holiday Mathis
Aries (March 21-April 19):
If you’re going to make an effort, you want to know what
the point of it is. To feel
there’s a point that you
haven’t seen or understood
yet will not be enough.
Taurus (April 20-May 20):
You can cast a spell on another person with your
words.
Gemini (May 21-June 21):
Your freedom is so important to you that there’s not a
lot you’d exchange for it.
Cancer (June 22-July 22):
You’re not exactly nosy;
rather, you’re a curious student of human nature. You
watch, learn and predict.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22):
Many a truth is spoken in
jest. Arguably, the very nature of joking is turning all
that pain into a phrase, a
look, a crystalized communication of this acute shared
human experience.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22):
The answer to “Why?” is,
“Why not?” “How?” “Just do
it and you’ll find out.”
“Should I?” “Probably not,
but you’d be a fool to let that
stop you.”
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23):
You sometimes wish you had
a little more direction. A direct order by someone you
trust is a kind of gift.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 21):
You are a self-directed person living in a world in which
everyone wants to tell you
where to go, what to do there
and how to do it.
Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec.
21): Self-esteem is all about
how you rate in the assessment test written by you, given to you and taken by you.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan.
19): This will be a sweet spot
of days. As much as you love
an adventure, you need rest.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb.
18): Patience and fortitude
will be required of you. Go to
bed early; this challenge will
continue through tomorrow.
Pisces (Feb. 19-March
20): You see what others
don’t. Unless you communicate it somehow, they will never know.
Today’s birthday (Oct.
22): There’s mystery in the
air. The solar journey ahead
is a prize behind the curtain.
Education is a part of this in
2018. You’ll meet many new
people. Your lucky numbers
are: 42, 13, 33, 1 and 17.
Holiday Mathis writes
her column for Creators
Syndicate Inc. The
horoscope should be
read for entertainment.
CHESS
65 Risk it
66 Like some R-rated
films
68 Took an arduous trip
69 "Sexy" Beatles woman
70 Pathetic
73 Walk obediently
74 Biceps exercise
75 "You're not done
talking, are you?"
76 Soccer phenom Freddy
78 Herb served only on
trains?
82 Wore (away)
83 NASA vehicles
85 Court entry
86 Barrel contents
87 Any of three Ottoman
sultans
89 Beef recall cause
91 Poetic foot
93 Mideast capital at
7,380 feet
95 Hefty refs.
96 Toyota compacts
98 Somewhat high
100 Not cloudy: Abbr.
102 Tidy the garden, in a
way
103 Charge
104 It precedes some
hockey games
108 Creativity result
111 Hall of Fame catcher
Carlton
112 Sweater type
113 Floral stench?
115 Poor prompt to a
friend who's been
asked what the capital
of Alaska is?
118 A risk might be taken
on one
119 Rickey flavoring
120 — nous
121 Half a '60s-'70s pop duo
122 Poker game starter
123 2000, for one
124 Poker game betrayals
125 Where Nike has no "i,"
briefly
26
29
32
33
34
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
45
47
— bean
Inappropriate look
Sp. lasses
2016 film subtitled
"Miracle on the
Hudson"
Latin dance
Eye-opener at the gym
Live
Uncertain sounds
Eyelashes
Not from around here
Enthusiasm
British cop's
heartthrob?
"King Kong" (1933)
actress
"Dark Sky Island"
musician
"It's —!": "True!"
Bouncer's concern
Some "Ghostbusters"
jokes?
Reversed
Host
50 Barbecue equipment
using wood
53 Sister of Moses
57 Swimmer's unit
58 Panhandle state
59 Gymnast Comaneci
60 Tedious work
61 Kathy of country
64 Barely get, with "out"
67 Co. in Cannes
69 "Get lost!"
70 Kingdom subdivisions
71 "¿Cómo está —?"
72 — United: English
soccer team
75 Sniveling
76 Smart guy?
77 Art —
79 Homeric epic
80 Beethoven strolled in
them for inspiration
81 Done for
84 Highway hazard
88 Interfere with
90 Intestinal section
92
93
94
97
99
101
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
110
111
112
114
116
117
A/C measure
Day or nail follower
West African capital
Uncork, so to speak
Laser alternative
— man
"Star Trek: TNG" first
officer
Refreshment spots
Extreme pain
Condemns
In the blink of —
Beatles nonsense
syllables
— Bator
Battery, e.g.
Low-cost home loan
org.
Bottom row PC key
Turn often
prohibited,
slangily
French article
Home of the NHL's
Blues
Tribune Content Agency © 2017
DOWN
1 Suit material
2 Cut in two
3 Corporate heavies
4 Young star
5 They go on for
generations
6 Turnpike fee
7 Medalla de victor
8 Skater Midori
9 Smartphone feature
10 "Dark Sky Island," e.g.
11 Did some gardening
12 Alias preceder
13 Without ads, it's
usually about 21 or 22
minutes
14 Like much jam
15 Copies
Bill Cornwall
In January 2012, 29-yearold Armenian Levon Aronian enjoyed exceptionally
high recognition being a
member of the “2800 Club.”
That is the small group of SuperGrandmasters
whose
ratings exceed 2,800 points.
He was the sixth person
whose number reached that
level. Even more pertinent to
his ambitions then was his
achievement of second ranking in the world.
By the time he became
rated No. 2, Aronian had
earned an impressive number of titles, medals and
other prizes. Among the
most important were his
World Cup and Grand Prix
victories. Especially notable
were his results in events
which included Carlsen. For
instance, in the SuperGM
Tal Memorial in Moscow in
December 2011, he shared the
title with Carlsen. The next
month at the Tata Steel
Chess Tournament in the
Netherlands, another SuperGM competition, he finished clear first a full point
ahead of him.
For more than 21⁄2 years
thereafter, Aronian maintained his No. 2-rating status with few interruptions.
Unfortunately, during that
period, his chief ambition of
becoming the official title
challenger was thwarted.
Twice, he failed to qualify for
that match at the International Chess Federation’s
World Candidates Tournaments. Probably from discouragement, his rating level
began eroding over the years
since. By 2015, he had slipped
even out of the Top10. Apparently, his title chances had
vanished.
Or so it seemed until recently when he took clear
first in this year’s Chess
World Cup, a knockout tournament held in Tbilisi, Georgia. The competition started
with 128 of our planet’s best
players. All of the World’s
Top-10 participated which included Carlsen and former
World Champions Vladimir
Kramnik and Viswanathan
16
17
19
24
H3
Oct. 22, 2017
Position No. 4491: White
mates in two.
Position No. 4490: 1.Qf7! Hint:
White mates next with: Nxc5,
Ne5, Qh7, c5, Bf1, Nc5, Bxf1.
Anand. The two top-finishers would qualify for the next
candidates tournament. Not
only was Aronian back in
form, but his rating surged to
No. 2 on the Live Chess Ratings site, 2700chess.com.
In the final, Aronian took
on China’s current hope,
Ding Liren. He had not lost
once in the 20 games he had
played until then. Even in
their finals match, the first
four games were drawn. The
Armenian finally proved superior, though, taking down
his opponent in the final two
contests. In the last game,
featured in this column, Liren had to play for a win.
Both sides went all out for
their opponent’s King. It
ended when Aronian was
about to mate.
Game of the week
Ding, Liren-Aronian, Levon
FIDE World Cup
Tbilisi, Georgia
1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nf3 d5
4.Nc3 Bb4 5.cxd5 exd5 6.Bf4 c6
7.e3 Bf5 8.Be2 0–0 9.0–0 Be7
10.Nh4 Bg6 11.Nxg6 hxg6 12.Qb3
Qb6 13.Qc2 a5 14.g4 Nbd7 15.g5
Ne8 16.e4 dxe4 17.Nxe4 Qd8 18.h4
Nb6 19.Be5 Nd5 20.Bg4 Kh8
21.Rae1 Nef6 22.gxf6 gxf6 23.Bh2
f5 24.Bxf5 gxf5 25.Qd1 Rg8+
26.Kh1 Rg4 27.Ng3 Rxh4 28.Nxf5
Rh7 29.Nxe7 Nxe7 30.Re5 Nf5
31.Rfe1 Qh4 32.Re8+ Kg7 33.Rg1+
Kf6 0–1
ccsknight@bellsouth.net
POKER
Chad Holloway
Earlier this year, the
World Series of Poker hosted
the third-largest $10,000buy-in Main Event in its 48year history. The tournament attracted 7,221 players
and saw New Jersey’s Scott
Blumstein emerge as the
world champion. Blumstein
took $8.15 million in prize
money.
One of the most talkedabout hands occurred early
on Day 1. With blinds at 75150, Vanessa Selbst, who sits
atop the women’s all-time
money list with nearly $12
million in earnings, raised to
400 from early position holding A♠ A♦. Gaelle Baumann
called from the button with
7♦ 7♥. Noah Schwartz, who
held J♣ 8♥, came along from
the big blind, and three players saw a flop of A♣ 7♣ 5♣.
Schwartz, the only player
with a club, checked to
Selbst, who bet 700 with top
set. Baumann, who held
middle set, just called, and
Schwartz got out of the way.
Little did Baumann know
that she needed the case seven to take the lead, and
amazingly she found it when
the dealer burned and
SUDOKU
Vanessa
Selbst’s
hand
Gaelle
Baumann’s
hand
Flop
Turn
River
turned the 7♠.
Selbst, who held a full
house, aces full of sevens,
checked. Baumann bet 1,700.
Selbst thought for a little
while and then check-raised
to 5,800. Baumann called.
The river came 4♦, and
Selbst bet 16,200 into a pot of
14,275. Baumann responded
by moving all in for 36,500,
which sent Selbst, who had
20,300 behind, shooting back
in her chair with a big grin.
What most players found
interesting about the hand
was that Selbst considered
folding. She’s one of the top
players in the world, though,
and given the way the hand
played out so early in the biggest poker tournament of the
year, it was safe to assume
Baumann was only going to
shove with a top-three hand.
That meant she held either
quad sevens, aces full or sevens full of aces.
It was impossible for Baumann to have aces full, since
that’s what Selbst had. So
Baumann had either aceseven or pocket sevens.
Furthermore, Selbst assumed (and rightly so) that
Baumann wouldn’t call a
preflop raise with ace-seven
unless it was suited, meaning
Baumann would have to
have the ace-seven of hearts.
If Selbst held the ace of
hearts, she probably would
have folded, knowing the
only hand left in Baumann’s
range was quad sevens.
It was a truly brutal bad
beat, and the hand took
place on Selbst’s birthday.
Holloway is a 2013 World
Series of Poker bracelet
winner.
H4
S U N DAY, O C T O B E R 22 , 2 017
IN THE BLEACHERS By Steve Moore
CANDORVILLE By Darrin Bell
FRAZZ By Jef Mallett
L AT I M E S . C O M
NON SEQUITUR By Wiley
TRAVEL
L
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2017
D
TRAVEL
Photograph of La Serena Villas in Palm Springs by
Allen J. Schaben Los Angeles Times
SUBLIME REDISCOVERIES
Palm Springs took a long look in the mirror a few years ago and (gasp!) realized it had let itself
go. After investing millions in nips-and-tucks, the city is hot again, attracting many with its
sophisticated yet laid-back lodgings, its fun vintage shops and its cool, well, everything. L4
L2
S U N DAY , O C T O B E R 22, 2 017
L AT I M E S . C O M / T R AV E L
BEFORE YOU GO
NEED TO KNOW
ON THE SPOT
Ai Weiwei turns N.Y.
into his artful landscape
Car rental fees take a toll
Chinese artist Ai Weiwei has turned New York City into
his personal canvas in crafting another way to communicate what it means to be uprooted and what it means to feel
trapped.
“Good Fences Make Good Neighbors” is a public art display of sculpted cages, fences and banners at 300-plus locations in the city from Manhattan to Brooklyn to Queens. It
runs through Feb. 11.
Check out the interactive map on the Public Art Fund’s
website at lat.ms/weiweimap.
— Mary Forgione
Question: I recently rented a car at the airport in Albany, N.Y. It came with a toll device. I
did not want to use it; I wanted to pay at the booth. And I did except for one time when the
device flipped open by itself. When I went to pay at the booth, the attendant told me I had
already paid. I taped the device closed. When I told the car rental rep about the problem,
he told me the device belonged to a third party, not to the rental car agency. What is the
consumer supposed to do?
Ahmed Rafi
Lakewood
Take a lesson on holiday travel
Travelers preparing for one of the busiest times of the
year can bone up on tips and tricks to make their journeys
easier by attending Times Travel Talks from 1-4 p.m. Nov.
12.
The event will offer tips on packing, holiday travel and
finding airfares.
To reserve a space for the event (no cost, but we want to
ensure that everyone has a seat): lat.ms/TimesTalksTips.
— times staff
1st/ BIZ Class
All You Need to
Shandong, China !
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Discount Travel SOT#2039095-40
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Introducing the
free Hot Property
newsletter.
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VERANDA
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Prices per person, double occupancy; port charges included; gov’t fees, taxes and fuel surcharges additional; service fee of
$19.95 may apply; limited availability. Prices shown are min. fares for select departure dates. Other dates higher. Not
responsible for last minute changes of price or itinerary by cruise line, or any errors or omissions in the content of this ad.
Some restrictions and cancellation penalties may apply. Ships’ registry: Bahamas and USA. CA2006278-40.
Ann Tu
Irvine, Ca.
Independently Owned & Operated
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CATHARINE HAMM
Answer: Take a bus or a
train or use a ride-share
service. Take your own transponder. Drive on back
roads. Dispute the charge
with your credit card company. Carry cash. And don’t
travel the Golden Gate
Bridge in a Hertz rental.
When you rent a car, you
enter another dimension
we’ll call the Toll Road Zone.
The zone is growing. As of
January 2015, there were
5,882 miles of U.S. tollways
(which include roads,
bridges and tunnels), an
increase of 1,161 miles in a
decade, according to a report
by the International Bridge,
Tunnel and Turnpike Assn.
That’s less than 1% of our
national highways, but it
may seem as though that’s
all you’re driving on in the
nearly three dozen states
that have such roads. Which
state is the tollway leader
differs depending on which
stats you look at, but New
York ranks near the top of
the list. (So do Florida, New
Jersey, Oklahoma and Delaware.)
In the olden days, you
carried a wad of cash and
coins, but today many tolls
are collected electronically.
Depending on your level
of cynicism, you may feel
helped by rental car agencies
that let you use their e-device
to collect tolls, or you may
feel cheated because you
didn’t realize you could be
charged a convenience fee
(generally starting at about
$3.95) each day you used the
e-pass or, worse, for each day
of your trip.
You may not, for instance,
have wanted to use the car
company’s e-device, but on
that one occasion when you
didn’t have the money, it
charged your rental carequipped device, then made
the fee retroactive to the
beginning of your trip and
charged you every day you
had the car, not every day
you used the e-pay option.
Here’s where consumers
must be aware, because it’s
confusing: Not every company plays by the same rules
even if the rental car agencies are under the same
corporate umbrella.
Hertz, Dollar and Thrifty
are affiliated, but their rules
are different, Hertz said in
an email:
“Hertz’s PlatePass service costs $4.95 for each day
of the rental plus the cost of
each incurred toll. There is
an administrative fee cap of
$24.75 per rental agreement.
“Dollar and Thrifty
PlatePass is all-inclusive —
meaning [the renter] pays
one flat daily or weekly rate,
which includes the cash
price of tolls incurred, regardless of the number of
tolls incurred.”
The Enterprise, National
and Alamo groups “charge
only for the days a customer
incurs a toll, not to exceed
$19.75 per rental period plus
all incurred toll charges,”
Enterprise said in an email.
Avis and Budget, also
sister companies, have
similar language for their
rules on their websites.
Here’s Budget’s version: “If
you do not pay cash for tolls,
you automatically opt into
our e-Toll service. … Under
the e-Toll program, once you
pass through an electronic
toll, you will be charged a
convenience fee of $3.95 a day
for each day of the entire
rental period, including any
days on which e-Toll is not
used, up to a maximum of
$19.75 a month.”
Both sites also say “plus
incurred tolls at the maximum prevailing rates posted
by the toll authority.” This
means that if tolls fluctuate
depending on when you drive
(rush hour more, wee hours
less) you’ll be paying the
rush-hour rate.
Your hackles may now be
raised and you may be thinking, “I’ll just carry cash and
I’ll pay for this out of my own
pocket and to heck with
them and their convenience
fee and making me pay the
max toll when I should be
paying the minimum.”
OK. You usually can opt
out. But here’s the problem:
There is sometimes no option to pay in cash; it’s all
e-collected.
The Golden Gate Bridge
is one such place. Maybe just
this once you decide to use
the auto-toll-device. But if
you’re in a Hertz car, the
rules say this: “Hertz customers who do not have their
own transponder or do not
pay with cash will be treated
as having opted in to the
PlatePass service when
going through a toll booth
and will be responsible for
resulting tolls and PlatePass
convenience fees.”
You have no choice but to
use the Hertz device.
That didn’t sit well with
San Francisco City Atty.
Dennis Herrera, who filed
suit against Hertz in March,
saying, “Customers neither
FEEDBACK
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12-nts round-trip Sydney
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Up to $1,880 in Overall
Value - Call for details
Prices per person, double occupancy; port charges
included; gov’t fees, taxes and fuel surcharges additional;
service fee of $19.95 may apply; limited availability. Prices
shown are min. fares for select departure dates. Other
dates higher. Not responsible for last minute changes of
price or itinerary by cruise line, or any errors or omissions in
the content of this ad. Some restrictions and cancellation
penalties may apply. Ships’ registry: Malta and Ecuador.
CA2006278-40.
ALASKA TRACY ARM
7-nts Vancouver to Seattle
Juneau, Tracy Arm Fjord/Glaciers,
Skagway, Ketchikan, Victoria BC
VERANDA from
STATEROOMS $
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1499
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choose the service nor receive sufficient notice to
avoid it. They neither receive
its supposed benefits nor
consent to its charges.
“Instead, by simply driving over the Golden Gate
Bridge a single time, as
millions of tourists do each
year, each Hertz customer is
charged not only the undiscounted toll rate but up to
$24.75 in extra fees.”
Part of the pique is based
on this: If you don’t have
PlatePass, you can pay before you go across the bridge
or after “in person, online, by
phone or by mail,” the suit
notes. You don’t get that
option with PlatePass.
The suit is pending.
Until then, you can follow
the suggestions in the first
paragraph. But if you’re Rafi,
you will need to contact the
rental car agency. If you
receive no relief from the
agency, you will need to
dispute the charge with your
credit card company.
From a renter’s perspective, it may seem as though
you’re being gouged (and you
are if you didn’t open the
transponder). But rental car
companies also are gouged
by renters who blow through
toll booths without paying,
said Chris Brown, executive
editor of Auto Rental News,
an industry publication.
In the end the relief could
be legislative, Brown said,
although that brings with it
the issue of badly written
laws. But clear disclosure by
the rental company may be
the better option, he said.
Brown may be right.
You’ll pay a toll one way or
the other. Somehow, though,
it just feels better if you know
where the bill is coming from.
Another tip for
Maui shopping
Re: “Saving Money in
Paradise,” by Debbi K. Kickham, Oct. 15: From chocolate-covered macadamia
nuts to Kona coffee, we have
always found Maui’s WalMart to be the best place for
variety and prices.
It is a few minutes from
the airport and has a section
devoted to souvenirs and
gifts.
Leslie Nagby
Riverside
A Brit tip too
Re: “Real Fantasyland,”
by Rosemary McClure, Oct.
8: I have just returned from
England, where I discovered
I was eligible for a senior rail
card for about $40.
This saves 30% off rail
fares, and anyone over 60 is
eligible even if traveling from
a foreign country. There are
some restrictions,but it
saved me quite a sum. It is
available online or at a station. Info: senior-railcard
.co.uk
Alison Davis
Rancho Palos Verdes
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Sailings in: Mar, Apr, May, Jun,
Aug, Sep, Oct, Nov
Sailings in: Mar, Apr, May, Jun,
Jul, Aug, Sep, Oct, Dec
7-NT BURGUNDY
& PROVENCE
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2795
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*Prices and availability will vary based on departure date and do not
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requirements. Other restrictions may apply, call for complete details.
Cliffs’ close-up
Thanks for the article
featuring the Puye Cliffs of
northern New Mexico
[“Carved Into History,” by
Frank O. Sotomayor, Oct. 8].
Matthew Broderick shot
some scenes of a 1996 movie
called “Infinity” at Puye
Cliffs.
It’s not a bad little film.
Jeff Padilla
East Hollywood
How to reach us
Phone: (213) 237-7730
E-mail: travel@latimes.com
Mailing address: Los Angeles Times, 202 W. 1st St., Los
Angeles, CA 90012
Subscription services:
(800) 252-9141
For the record
Hawaii town: In the Oct.
22 story on saving money on
Hawaii Island, the name of
the town of Honokaa was
mispelled Konokaa.
S U N DAY , O C T O B E R 22, 2 017
L AT I M E S . C O M / T R AVE L
L3
YOUR WEEKEND
WHAT’S UP
Thrills
and chills
By April Orcutt
Plenty of zombies, ghosts,
jack-o’-lanterns and
costumed creatures roam
the weekend before Halloween, but you can also
find crafts, music and fun
carnival rides.
Pasadena
It may be Halloween
weekend, but here’s a
chance to get a jump on
the December holidays
and peruse high-end art
gifts. The Contemporary
Crafts Market in Old
Pasadena features pieces
from 140 artists who have
created wearable, ornamental and functional
art. Jewelry, blown glass,
pottery, wood carvings,
weavings and handloomed rugs will be on
display.
When: Oct. 27-29
Cost, info: Adults $8,
children 12 and younger
free. Service animals only.
(310) 285-3655, craftsource
.org
VIEW THE Marble Canyon sites via rafting, hiking, helicopter tours and more.
Lancaster
Sara Lessley
THE UNUSUAL rock formations in Horseshoe Bend near Page in northern Arizona are fun to explore and snap photos from on high.
ESCAPE TO MARBLE CANYON, ARIZ.
WHERE THE RIVER
GREETS THE ROCKS
BY SARA LESSLEY >>> When we sisters-in-law (one in California, the other in Nevada) agreed to a midway Western
weekend for the brothers, we should have known better. The setting and scenery would be grand, the river inviting and
the amenities, well, less so. Arizona’s Marble Canyon and the upper Colorado River near Glen Canyon Dam are
jaw-droppingly beautiful in spring and fall. But for those wishing to stay close by and partake of the great outdoors in
this Arizona Strip region, historically cut off by the river, with its renowned rafting, hiking, slot-canyon exploring,
fly-fishing and bird watching — well, certain niceties go by the wayside. The tab: Each couple spent $275 for three
nights in remote Marble Canyon (abandoning one motel for more comfortable lodging nearby), excluding taxes; $585
for fishing guides and rafting; and $200 for meals and lunch supplies.
THE MEAL
Our favorite: the
bountiful one-stop
breakfast buffet at Marble
Canyon Lodge, with hefty
portions of oatmeal,
scrambled eggs, bacon,
sausage, fruit and yogurt.
Mornings are crowded
with rafting groups
Marble Canyon Lodge,
U.S. Highway 89 A, Marble Canyon, Ariz.; (928)
355-2225, www.marble
canyoncompany.com.
Some wheelchair-accessible rooms.
Colorado River
Discovery,
130 6th Ave., Page, Ariz.;
(888) 522-6644, www.raft
thecanyon.com. Half-day
rowing trips through Nov.
30, $93 for ages 13 and
older; full-day motorized
trips are through Nov. 13,
$113 for ages 13 and
older.
Cliff Dwellers Lodge,
North U.S. Highway 89A,
Marble Canyon, Ariz.;
(928) 355-2231, lees
ferry.com/cliff-dwellers
-lodge. One wheelchairaccessible room.
Condor viewing,
lat.ms/condorviewing
Glen Canyon National
Recreation Area,
lat.ms/glencanyon
Glen Canyon
National
Recreation
Area
89
UTAH
Vermilion
Cliffs
National
Monument
Page
Marble Canyon
89A
Col
ora
do
Riv
er
THE BED
The friendly personnel
at Marble Canyon Lodge
go above and beyond
(Diabetes meds need
refrigeration? No problem.
Off-hours move-in? OK),
but serene patio vistas,
high-thread-count sheets
or speedy Wi-Fi? Not so
much. We voted Marble
Canyon Lodge our favorite
for comfort and service,
and it has the best access
to the river landing at Lees
Ferry and historic Navajo
Bridge. Nearby Cliff
Dwellers Lodge caters to
hard-core fishermen.
89
89
ARIZONA
5 MILES
Sources: Mapzen, OpenStreetMap
Los Angeles Times
chowing down before
departing for Lees Ferry.
During our stay, the
restaurant shut down
after breakfast and
opened again for
home-style dinner. Down
the road, the Cliff Dwellers
restaurant gets raves for its
grilled fish tacos.
THE FIND
Colorado River Discovery offers numerous
options for raft trips,
including a raft/slot canyon
tour, a raft/helicopter
excursion and even a rowing
trip. The best choice for us:
a leisurely motorized raft
ride on the Colorado River
casting off from Page, Ariz.,
an hour north of Marble
Canyon. Our guide regaled
us with tales about
adventurer-geologist John
Wesley Powell and his band,
exploring here in the 1860s
and 1870s without a motor or
knowing what lay ahead. We
gazed at the cliffs, odd rock
formations and the tiny
spectators waving from atop
precarious Horseshoe Bend.
THE LESSON LEARNED
Don’t miss the
condor-watching at the old
Navajo Bridge in Marble
Canyon or at the viewing site
along House Rock Road in
Vermilion Cliffs National
Monument. With a pair of
good binoculars, the
re-introduced California
condors (down to a few
dozen in the 1980s) came
into view — either perched
atop the cages at their
release point high above or
swooping rapturously by the
dozen off the colorful cliffs.
travel@latimes.com
CALIFORNIA BUCKET LIST
GET SOME FACE TIME
WITH ELEPHANT SEALS
When: Oct. 28
Cost, info: Free, but fees
for some activities. Family-friendly. Well-behaved
dogs on nonretractable
leashes OK. (661) 7236077, cityoflancasterca
.org/boolvd
Santa Monica
The zombies are back in
time for Halloween. At the
fifth annual Zombie
Crawl, undead creatures
moan and roam from
Santa Monica Pier to the
Official Zombie After
Party apocalypse by the
Third Street Promenade.
That’s where costume
contests and dancing to
DJs transpires.
When: Oct. 28
Cost, info: $15.16 until
Friday, then $18.31. Adults
21 and older. Leashed
dogs only permitted
outdoors. lat.ms/smzombies
Los Angeles
The sixth annual Camp
Flog Gnaw Carnival at
Exposition Park is as
upbeat as a music festival
and as optimistic as a
community gathering.
Entertainers include
Tyler the Creator, Roy
Ayers, Migos and Alison
Wonderland, offering rap,
jazz, soul, pop and electronic dance music.
When: Oct. 28 and 29
Cost, info: $208 for twoday general admission
pass, children 5 and
younger free. Familyfriendly. No dogs.
campfloggnaw.com
San Diego
Aimed at a younger,
calmer crowd, the Trick
or Trot 5K /1 Mile Fun
Run in Balboa Park also
has a much shorter
Pumpkin Sprint Run:
Grab a pumpkin, decorate it with a Sharpie,
hold your pumpkin over
your head, and run as if a
ghost is chasing you. The
Pumpkin Sprint is about
the length of 1,000 pumpkins side-by-side. It’s
more fun if you’re in costume.
When: Oct. 29
Cost, info: Adults $20,
children 15 and younger
$15. Family-friendly.
Leashed dogs OK but not
encouraged. (619) 7339024, trickortrotsd.com
Why: Because this stretch of Highway 1 often features hundreds, sometimes
thousands, of portly pinnipeds flopped on the sand at the Piedras Blancas
Elephant Seal Rookery.
What: In the early 1990s a growing number of northern elephant seals began
gathering here. Since then they have claimed about six miles of shoreline for
birthing, breeding, molting and rest. Although they spend most of their lives
at sea, something happens here most months. There are several vista
points, some wheelchair-friendly.
Info: www.elephantseal.org. Main viewing areas are five miles north of
Hearst Castle in San Luis Obispo County.
— SARA LESSLEY
Armando Arorizo EPA
For the full California Bucket List, go to latimes.com/cabucketlist.
It’s full-on Halloween at
the BooLVD Halloween
and Harvest Festival at
the BLVD Farmers Market with trick-or-treating,
pumpkin and cookie
decorating, a corn maze, a
ghostly train ride and a
kid-friendly haunted
house. Harvest festivities
include sampling dishes
from local vendors and
restaurants.
A PUP at Piedras Blancas Elephant Seal Rookery in San Simeon.
Note: Always check
before you go because
weather or other factors
can affect events.
Children should always
be accompanied by an
adult. Assume dogs must
be on a leash. To suggest
an event that’s cool and
close to home, email
travel@latimes.com.
L4
S U N DAY, O C T O B E R 22 , 2 017
L AT I M E S . C O M / T R AV E L
Photographs by
Allen J. Schaben Los Angeles Times
THE VIEW is splendid from the Kimpton the Rowan Palm Springs. From here, visitors can take in the rugged San Jacinto Mountains and the desert playground.
CAPITAL OF COOL
Palm Springs is hot again,
with hotels popping up to
cater to Midcentury
Modern-loving hipsters.
By Rosemary McClure
Remember the old Palm
Springs? A sunny desert town
where Frank Sinatra, Bob Hope
and many other Hollywood types
partied in the ’50s and ’60s?
It crashed and burned when
new
communities
developed
nearby. Stores closed. Restaurants
died. Builders abandoned construction sites.
But a funny thing happened
as the decades rolled by: The
city discovered a way to turn back
the clock.
Everything old is new. Once
again, this town is hot, hot, hot.
Once again, it’s the capital of cool.
The proof is in the clubs, restaurants and hotels that are popping
up and in the hipsters who are flying in from San Francisco and New
York City.
They marvel at the Midcentury
Modern architecture, shop in vintage stores, spend the rest of the
day lazing around the city’s
sparkling blue pools, then cap the
night drinking single-barrel bourbon and craft beer in bars such as
the Truss & Twine and the Amigo
Room at the Ace Hotel.
There’s also proof in a younger
generation of celebs who are buying property here. Forty-two-yearold Leonardo DiCaprio, for instance, took over actress Dinah
Shore’s former home.
You can also find evidence in
the evolving city, which is trying to
preserve its Midcentury Modern
heritage while catering to new visitors and longtime residents.
I spent some time in Palm
Springs last month, talking with
city officials, hoteliers and visitors
about the changes.
The biggest turnaround is in the
heart of downtown, where a sevenblock patch of dirt used to remind
visitors that an enclosed mall
called the Desert Fashion Plaza
failed here in 2002.
A lot of the dirt is gone now. In
its place is a $450-million redevelopment project that includes
restaurants, shops and hotels.
Some of these are scheduled to
open this fall, including the sevenstory hotel anchor, Kimpton the
Rowan Palm Springs.
I dodged workmen and piles of
construction material on a hardhat tour with general manager Abe
Liao, who showed me some of the
153 guestrooms, plus the public
spaces. I found a sunny mix of minimalist design and contemporary
colors. Nice. But then we moved to
the top-floor conference rooms,
and I caught a glimpse of the panorama. Amazing.
Spread before me was the entire
desert valley, the craggy San Jacinto Mountains and Palm Springs
glinting in the afternoon sunlight.
“This is going to be a popular
place,” Liao said. “Wait until you
see the rooftop pool.”
We moved outside. The pool
was every bit as impressive as he
indicated, with luxury cabanas,
fire pits, lounge areas and a bar.
“It’s the only rooftop pool in
Palm Springs,” he said.
THE DECOR is as over the top as the art collection at the Holiday House, a recently remodeled
Midcentury Modern hotel. Among the many changes are a new lobby bar, pool and lounge areas.
If you go
WHERE TO STAY
Many accommodations in Palm
Springs require a two-night stay
on busy weekends.
Kimpton the Rowan, 100 W.
Tahquitz Canyon Way, Palm
Springs; (800) 532-7320, www
.rowanpalmsprings.com.
Multistory downtown hotel is set
to open in November, but that
date may slide. It will offer great
views of Palm Springs, a cool
design and a rooftop pool.
Doubles from $249 per night.
La Serena Villas, 339 S. Belardo
The opening date is listed as
mid-November, but I tried to make
a reservation and couldn’t do so
until December, so perhaps the hotel is hedging its bets.
The facility’s completion has
been a long time coming. There
have been problems along the way,
including an FBI raid at City Hall
two years ago that resulted in criminal corruption charges against
former Mayor Steve Pougnet and
two developers. The case is making
its way through the court system.
(The hotel is not involved in the
corruption charges.)
Chris Pardo, project designer,
said the furor that surrounded the
criminal case “definitely took the
wind out of the project for a while,
but we worked through it.”
The almost-finished Kimpton is
consummate Palm Springs — Midcentury Modern, only better.
“What I was trying to do was
build off the architectural heritage
that was already here. I didn’t want
to mimic it, but build off of it,” said
Pardo, who also designed and
owns a popular local hotel named
Arrive and a string of restaurants.
Kimpton the Rowan isn’t the
only new hotel in town.
Two nearby lodges opened in
the last few months. Both helped
Road, Palm Springs; (844)
932-8044, www.laserena
villas.com. This 1933 historic
hotel has been completely
renovated, offering stylish rooms
and grounds. Pet-friendly,
restaurant, pool. Doubles from
$299 per night.
Holiday House Hotel, 200 W.
Arenas Road, Palm Springs;
(760) 320-8866, www.holiday
houseps.com. Recently
renovated Midcentury Modern
boutique hotel is drawing raves
from guests. Pet-friendly,
me remember why I love this city
and its beautifully designed hotels.
La Serena Villas, built in 1933,
spent decades as a community eyesore before its renovation and reincarnation as a super-chic downtown hotel. Its 18 cottages, stark
white and accented by bougainvillea, are at the edge of the imposing
San Jacinto Mountains.
Rooms are plush and have patios, fire pits and outdoor claw-foot
tubs. The pool is busy, and Azúcar,
a new Frida Kahlo-inspired restaurant, keeps guests and visitors
happy with tapas, shareable plates
and dinner entrees such as a spiced
tempeh bowl ($22) and Moroccan
roasted chicken with saffron rice
and dates ($25).
I found another winner at the
nearby Holiday House. The hotel,
designed in 1951 by Herbert Burns,
considered a top Palm Springs
modernist, was most recently
named the Chase. It was sold and
remodeled with an emphasis on
preserving its original Midcentury
Modern bones. Among the many
changes are a new lobby bar, pool
and lounge areas.
I loved the airy blue-and-white
color scheme and the over-the-top
art collection that features works
by David Hockney and Roy Licht-
restaurant, pool. Doubles from
$149 per night.
TO LEARN MORE
Bureau of Tourism, 2901 N. Palm
Canyon Drive, Palm Springs;
(800) 347-7746, www.visitpalm
springs.com
Greater Palm Springs
Convention & Visitors Bureau,
70-100 Highway 111, Rancho
Mirage, Calif.; (760) 770-9000,
www.visitgreaterpalm
springs.com
enstein, among others.
Also undergoing renovation in
the same neighborhood is the Ingleside Inn (www.inglesideinn
.com). The 30-room inn is a Spanish Colonial Revival-style lodge
that dates to the 1920s. The plan is
to restore the hotel to its original
glam, complete with vintage tiles.
The Ingleside sits next to
Melvyn’s Restaurant, which is also
undergoing a face-lift. Melvyn’s
was a favorite of Frank Sinatra,
who held the reception for wedding
No. 4 here. Back in the day, the Ingleside-Melyvn’s complex was a
Hollywood favorite, drawing stars
such as Elizabeth Taylor and Marlon Brando, and more recently
Goldie Hawn and Kurt Russell.
What do the longtime residents
think of the town’s renewed popularity and growth?
“Palm Springs is being reborn,
and is repositioning itself for a new
generation of visitors and locals,”
said Eric Chiel, a nine-year resident and neighborhoods advocate.
“Some development reflects our
architectural and cultural heritage, and some moves us beyond
that legacy. Maintaining that balance is an ongoing challenge.”
As evidence of that balance,
Chiel pointed out new commercial
development on the west side of
downtown and a planned low-rise
Agua Caliente Cultural Center and
Museum complex on the east side.
“This
juxtaposition
alone
speaks to the balance between
past and future, commerce and
culture, and the diversity of our
community,” Chiel added.
Mayor Robert Moon said keeping residents happy and moving
ahead with changes is a balancing
act. “But we’re working hard at it.”
Moon, a retired Navy commander and financial advisor in
the Reagan White House, said the
city “used to focus on golf; now
we’re getting a younger, hip generation of people from Los Angeles,
San Diego, San Francisco and New
York. This is a new demographic
that has rediscovered Palm
Springs and enjoys what we have.
“We’ve spent millions of dollars
on bike paths” and are emphasizing hiking and encouraging entrepreneurs to develop high-end food
and beverage outlets, he said.
But they haven’t forgotten golf.
“There are more than 100 courses
here, and we work hard to keep
them
in
good
condition,”
he said. “Golf is not the booming
thing it once was, but it’s important to us.”
And to some of those longtime
residents.
New digs in
Palm Desert
Palm Springs isn’t the only
desert city that’s getting a chic new
downtown hotel.
Palm Desert, 15 miles southeast, is the site of Hotel Paseo, a
150-room property adjacent to the
city’s primary shopping district, El
Paseo, which desert dwellers call
the “Rodeo Drive of the Desert.”
I toured the site with general
manager Gil Reyes, who said the
new three-story facility would be
“the first luxury hotel built in Palm
Desert in more than 30 years.”
The hotel appeared to need
more work before opening, but
Reyes said he hoped to start welcoming guests in December.
Among the interesting guest
suites in the works are a billiards
room with a wet bar, lounge and
bed, and a glamour room with
space to get prepared for a wedding or other big event.
Another unusual feature is a refurbished Airstream trailer in the
Backyard, an outdoor space that
will feature a stage and activities
courts for boccie ball, shuffleboard
and cornhole toss. A pool, spa, cabanas and bar will also be built.
The lounge will have a rotating
art gallery and installations, Reyes
said. It will also have a restaurant
with a pedigree: AC3 Restaurant +
Bar will be created by three wellknown desert restaurateurs, Trio
owner Tony Marchese and Andrew
and Juliana Copley, owners of Copley’s on Palm Canyon.
The hotel will also have a fullservice spa and offer yoga and tai
chi classes.
Rates are expected to start
at about $200, depending on the
season.
— Rosemary McClure
travel@latimes.com
A D V E RT I S I N G S U P P L E M E N T
S U N DAY , O C T O B E R 22, 2 017
L5
{Destination}
Winter Travel Insider
of Taiwan is subtropical,
its rugged interior rises to
nearly 13,000 feet at Yushan
(Jade Mountain) — the
highest peak in East Asia.
The summit is reached via
an adventuresome day hike,
but the view from the top —
snow-covered ridgelines set
against a deep blue sky with
Skiing with Glacier National Park in the background in Whitefish, Montana.
Winter travel isn’t just about snow – “summer” in exotic locales
ummer may be in season when it comes to vacations. But winter actually presents
more choice in where you can go and what you can do after arrival. That’s because the
months between November and March offer both hot and cold possibilities. Read on
to warm up or cool down this winter.
HOT PURSUITS
Shaped like the lucky
number seven, Cancun
is the star of Mexico’s
Caribbean coast. During
spring break, the island
can descend into collegiate
chaos. But the water is
just as warm and the
weather even better during
the milder winter months.
From beaches that feel
like talcum powder on your
toes and limitless water
sports to upscale shopping
and Mexico’s best nightlife,
there’s plenty to keep you
occupied in Cancun. But the
island’s location astride the
Yucatan Peninsula opens
up even more possibilities.
Scuba dive or snorkel in
the world’s second largest
barrier reef (after that “great”
one in Australia). Explore the
UNESCO World Heritage
Site at Chichén Itzá and
other ancient Mayan ruins.
Soar over the jungle on zip
lines or get adventurous on
off-road tours.
Hawaii also sparkles
beneath the winter sun —
six islands to choose from,
each with its own personality.
Try super-laid back Lanai
(pronounced “La-nah-ee” by
locals). Once home to the
world’s largest pineapple
producer, the island is now
devoted to preserving the
native flora, fauna and
customs of the Hawaiian
Islands. You’re more likely to
hear native Hawaiian spoken
in Lanai City than anywhere
else in the state. Learn about
ancient ways at the town’s
small but excellent museum.
Beyond town, the island is
largely unpopulated — a
mosaic of forest, grasslands,
towering sea cliffs, volcanic
badlands and refreshingly
empty beaches. Stay in town
at the historic Hotel Lanai,
opened in 1923 by pineapple
mogul James Dole.
Our winter is actually
summer in the Southern
Hemisphere, so in places
like Chile, the heat is
definitely on between now
and March. Santiago has
evolved into one of the most
modern, dynamic cities in
South America, notable in
its eclectic dining scene
fueled by talented chefs.
Looking for a pairing? Chile
offers more than a dozen
different wine regions and
some of the best vintages
found anywhere, and given
its German immigrant
population; there are
great craft beers too. The
landscapes are even more
diverse, ranging from the
Atacama Desert in the
north to way down south
in Patagonia, where
summer means trekking
legendary routes like the
“W” Circuit in Torres del
Paine National Park.
COLD COMFORTS
There are plenty of places
to ski in the Western U.S.
and Canada, but none quite
as charming as Whitefish,
Montana — a one-time
railroad town turned
adventure sports center.
Ranked as one of the top
ten resorts in North America
by readers of Ski Magazine,
the slopes feature more than
3,000 acres of accessible
terrain with an average of
300-plus inches of snow per
year. Located just outside
of Glacier National Park,
Whitefish is also awesome
for après ski. Restaurants
LAND
—JOE YOGERST
Custom Publishing Writer
Photo courtesy of iStock
Getting hotter, getting colder
S
a sea of clouds all around
— is well worth the effort.
Afterwards, warm up on the
beaches of the Hengchun
Peninsula at Taiwan’s
southernmost extreme,
strands that lie at roughly the
same latitude as Honolulu.
range from the New Orleans
flavors of Tupelo Grille
and the Spanish tapas of
Latitude 48 to local hangouts
like Buffalo Café. Spotted
Bear Spirits shakes up craft
cocktails from locally made
vodka and berries harvested
in the nearby mountains,
while Great Mountain is one
of the oldest craft breweries
in the Rocky Mountains.
For urban adventure,
consider a winter getaway
in the Big (Frozen)
Apple. There’s nothing
quite like New York City
during the holidays: The
huge Christmas tree at
Rockefeller Plaza; the
flamboyant window displays
at Macy’s, Bloomingdale’s
and Saks Fifth Avenue; the
holiday market at Grand
Central Station. Central
Park becomes a winter
wonderland of ice-skating,
snowman building and
snowball fights. Stay at
one of the historic grand
hotels overlooking the park,
like the Sherry-Netherland
Hotel and its extravagant
Neo-Renaissance lobby
— recently restored to its
1920’s glory after decades
hidden under 13 layers of
white paint.
For something really
different, hop across the
Pacific to the exotic island
of Taiwan. Although much
Sweetheart Rock on the rugged Lanai coast.
Photo courtesy of iStock
MORE WINTER TRAVEL
Take in Taiwan’s ‘Most Beautiful Bay’
Praised for its pristine coastal scenery and abundant marine life, the
Penghu Islands were once home to successful fishermen. Today, the
islands may depend less on fishing, but Penghu’s beauty remains with a
diverse ecology and slowpaced coastal lifestyle that
attracts curious explorers.
As the host of the upcoming “Most Beautiful Bay in
the World” conference in
2018, Penghu’s mysterious
beauty is surely keeping its
spirits alive.
This supplement was produced by LA Times Custom Publishing.
It did not involve the editorial or reporting staffs of the Los Angeles Times.
Contact us with comments or questions at brandpublishing@latimes.com. For advertising
inquiries, contact Eric Ma at 213.237.7210 or email him at eric.ma@latimes.com.
L6
S U N DAY, O C T O B E R 22, 2 017
L AT I M E S . C O M / T R AV E L
THE CONCIERGE
GEO QUIZ
TOURS &
CRUISES
Which state is the
only one that
includes areas of
flooded grassland
and savanna?
SRI LANKA
Surfing,
sunning,
sailing
* Louisiana
* Georgia
* Florida
Answer below. Source:
National Geographic Bee
TIP SHEET
Christmas
trips riding
the rails
Ruffwear
McNaughton
By Mary Forgione
Dates: Departures in February, March, April, November
and December 2018.
It’s not cool to write about
Christmas before it’s Halloween, but we break that rule
today because some things
can’t wait. If you promised
your kids or grandkids a
holiday train journey, buy
your tickets now. Here are
some ideas to get you started:
Williams, Ariz.
Santa will be in the remote
desert town about 32 miles
west of Flagstaff aboard the
Grand Canyon Railway for
rides to and from the 1908
Williams Depot. The 90minute Polar Express ride to
Santa’s Village mimics the
journey in the children’s book
and 2004 movie. Expect
chocolate chip cookies and
hot chocolate. Many dates
already are sold out.
When: 5:30 and 7:30 p.m. on
select dates Nov. 11 to Jan. 6.
Cost, info: $41 to $53 for
adults, $31 to $43 for children
2 to 15 years old. You can take
a Dec. 24 ride for $163. lat.ms/
AZPolarExpress
Jamestown, Calif.
The Railtown 1897 State
Historic Park southeast of
Sacramento runs an hourlong journey during which
you’ll hear a reading of “Polar
Express” while dancing
waiters serve hot chocolate.
When: Rides are at 4:30, 6 and
7:30 p.m. Nov. 25 and 26, Dec.
1-3, 8-10 and 15-17.
Cost, info: Tickets, available
online only, cost $50 to $70 a
person. www.railtown1897.us
Hood River, Ore.
The Mt. Hood Railroad takes
passengers on a storybook
adventure on “The Train to
Christmas Town,” the 2012
book that tells the story of a
girl’s magical train journey.
Santa’s elves, hot chocolate,
characters from the book and
music are part of this theatrical celebration.
When: Select dates Nov. 11 to
Dec. 28.
Cost, info: $37 to $87 per
person, depending on seat
selection. lat.ms/MtHoodTrain
Washington’s Cascades
The Snow Train leaves Seattle on an all-day excursion
through the Cascade Mountains and into the Bavarianstyle town of Leavenworth.
On-board entertainment
includes magicians, singers
and oompah bands. It delivers passengers to the town’s
Lighting Festival.
When: Dec. 2, 9 and 16 only
Cost, info: $229 to $359 a
person, including a continental breakfast and dinner on
board the train. leavenworth
snowtrain.net
travel@latimes.com
Price: From $1,319 to $1,699 a
person, depending on departure date. Includes meals,
accommodations, guided
excursions and shore visits,
plus activities such as kayaking, snorkeling and standup paddling. International
airfare not included.
DexShell
Florida
1 Voice
LET YOUR DOG pull his weight and yours (clockwise from top left); pamper your feet after a long hike;
drift into sleep comfortably with headphone eye shades; keep your feet dry even if they are submerged.
Info: G Adventures,
(888) 800-4100,
www.gadventures.com
— Rosemary McClure
GEAR
Creature comforts galore
BY JUDI DASH >>> On your next trip, get a sound snooze, soothe your soles, go into the
wild without fear of getting wet and connect — with your dog.
Dog power
Happy feet
Vacationing with your dog can
strengthen your connection, especially if you’re connected by the
Omnijore Dog Joring System from
Ruffwear.
Jor-what? Joring is the sport in
which your canine friend pulls you
while you’re atop a skateboard or
cross-country skis or other conveyance.
The system includes a specially
designed, five-adjustment-point
halter with a detachable girth strap
for your dog; a beefed-up padded hip
belt with multiple pockets and detachable leg loops (for stabilizing the
hip belt) for the human; and a tow
line.
The two of you are attached by
that last piece, an extendable 6½foot tow line/leash with a shockabsorbing elasticized section, strong
talon harness clips and a quick
quick-release hip belt hook-up that
lets you free your dog quickly if necessary.
My rescue hound Shayna seemed
comfy yet controllable in the Y-style
padded harness; unlike most harnesses I’ve imposed on her, this one
didn’t irritate sensitive spots.
After a day exploring the city or
hiking in the wild, here’s a kindness
to your feet: the Soapy Toes TravelSized Foot Scrubber from McNaughton Inc. It’s a smaller version of the
larger mat and weighs in at less than
7 ounces.
The integrated polyvinyl bristles,
bubbles and bumps clean, massage
and stimulate like a team of personal
spa attendants. All you add is soap
and the “ahhh.”
Cost, info: Ruffwear Omnijore Dog
Joring System costs $174.95. lat.ms/
joring
Cost, info: Soapy Toes travel size
comes in six colors and costs $12.95.
lat.ms/soapytoes
Sleep-time sounds
Comfy memory foam Sleep Headphones Eye Mask from 1 Voice has
embedded over-ear sound disks on
each side that won’t poke when you
roll over.
An integrated audio port connects to cellphones or MP3 players
with the included audio cable with
3.5mm jack.
No battery is needed because
your electronic device provides all
the oomph. An inline volume control
knob lets you turn the sound level up
or down.
Cost, info: 1 Voice Sleep Headphones
Eye Mask comes in black, blue, gray
or pink and costs $49. lat.ms/eye
maskphones
For dry tootsies
Hiking or cycling on muddy trails,
crossing streams or traversing snow,
slush or ice usually mean wet feet,
but not if you’re wearing DexShell’s
new waterproof socks.
They have a three-layer design;
the middle layer is a slim, flexible
polyurethane micro-porous membrane that bars water. I tested them
by standing in a tub of water for
nearly an hour; when I peeled them
off, my feet were dry.
The company makes 18 waterproof styles, from crew length to
knee-highs, ultra-light to thick thermal. The middle layer is always the
same waterproof membrane.
The outermost layer usually is
made of a chemically treated waterresistant nylon elastine. It’s not
waterproof but it is quick-drying.
The socks come in four unisex
adult sizes; one style is sized for
children.
Cost, info: DexShell Waterproof
Socks cost $29.99 to $52.99; children’s
socks, $20.99. lat.ms/dexshellsocks
COSTA RICA
For sporty sorts
Raft down the Pacuare River
on two half-day white-water
trips, zip line through the
rainforest and hike through
the tree tops on a trail that
includes 15 suspended
bridges on a nine-day excursion organized by Western
River Expeditions. Other
highlights include a guided
nature walk in Manuel Antonio National Park, home to
the endangered squirrel
monkey, and time to lounge
at Playa Manuel Antonio.
The tour begins and ends in
San José and can be customized by adding or deleting
activities or lengthening or
shortening the trip.
Dates: Year-round on spaceavailable basis
Price: From $3,395 a person.
Includes accommodations,
14 meals, activities, guides
and in-country transportation. International airfare
not included.
Info: Western River Expeditions, (866) 904-1160, lat.ms
/costaricapackage
— Anne Harnagel
MEXICO
A double boost
Feel good while you’re doing
good on a vacation in La Paz,
Mexico, where a wellness
and fitness program is combined with volunteering in
the community. The spring
tour, organized by yoga
instructor Michelle Gierst
and activist Juli Schulz,
includes a four-night stay at
Costa Baja Resort & Spa,
plus stand-up paddling,
daily yoga and meditation
classes. Participants will
spend a day working withCare for Kids La Paz. They’ll
also visit Isla Espíritu.
travel@latimes.com
Twitter: @latimestravel
DEAL OF THE WEEK
Modern tall ship
line cruises Europe
Star Clippers is offering solo travelers
a break on select 2018 sailings.
The deal: Solo travelers can expect to
pay $1,385 for a five-night Spain and
Morocco cruise on April 23; $1,690 for a
weeklong cruise starting June 2 to the
French Riviera; and $2,350 for a 19night transatlantic sailing from the
Caribbean to Portugal on March 31.
Port charges are extra. Star Clippers’full-rigged ships carry 170 to 227
passengers.
Info: Star Clippers, (800) 442-0551,
www.starclippers.com or contact a
travel agent
— Mary Forgione
GEO QUIZ ANSWER:
Sail away to a land of
beaches and ruins on a sixnight catamaran Indian
Ocean voyage off Sri Lanka.
The round-trip voyage, along
the southern coast of the
nation, will visit remote
beach towns, fishing villages
and an old trading fort.
Participants also will have
time for snorkeling, surfing
and visits to UNESCO World
Heritage sites. The 53-foot
catamaran has four cabins
with en suite bathrooms,
portholes and rooftop popup skylights and is staffed by
a skipper, cook and guide.
Date: March 15-19
Price: From $1,499 per person, double occupancy;
single supplement $350.
Includes accommodations,
meals, beverages, yoga,
meditation and ground
transportation. Isla Espíritu
excursion ($125) and international airfare not included.
Star Clippers
THE STAR CLIPPERS line is waiving single supplement charges
on selected voyages as it sets sail for the French Riviera and more.
Info: La Paz Retreat, (424)
252-2142, lapazretreat
.splashthat.com
— Rosemary McClure
AIRFARES
ATLANTA
CHICAGO
DENVER
HONOLULU
LAS VEGAS NEW YORK/NEWARK, N.J.
LAX
$312
$260
$192
$496
$88
SNA
345
296
266
544
88
PHOENIX
SAN FRANCISCO
SEATTLE
WASHINGTON, D.C.
$318
$162
$96
$156
$344
364
162
96
188
374
BUR
396
331
287
558
108
352
162
112
177
374
LGB
N/A
351
N/A
N/A
92
349
162
97
240
416
ONT
364
381
184
516
88
397
162
128
168
354
INT’L
AUCKLAND, NEW ZEALAND*
CABO SAN LUCAS, MEXICO
LONDON*
PARIS*
SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA*
TOKYO*
VANCOUVER, CANADA
$1,192 - $1,509
$199
$523- $724
$648 - $924
$1,094 - $1,520
$682 - $1,293
$239
LAX
Restricted round-trip airfares are researched on Thursday, the day before the Travel section goes to press. Fares change daily, and availability is not assured. Fares, which may involve a change
of planes, are for airlines serving Los Angeles International (LAX), Orange County/John Wayne (SNA), Burbank/Bob Hope (BUR), Long Beach (LGB) and Ontario (ONT). Domestic fares and international airfares include taxes and fees. *These international fares vary because of differing fuel surcharges on different airlines. Sources: Sabre reservation system, airlines and Web.
MALAYSIA FOR $390
Fare: $390 round trip,
including all taxes and
fees, from LAX to Kuala
Lumpur, Malaysia, on
United.
Restrictions: Ticket must
by purchased by Wednesday. For travel MondaysThursdays Jan. 9-April 30.
Maximum stay: three
months. No minimum stay.
Info: (800) 864-8331,
www.united.com
Source: Airfarewatchdog
.com
IMAGE
DESIGNERS :: BEAUTY :: THE RUNWAYS
JEWELRY :: SHOPPING :: THE RED CARPET
Actor Chris Hemsworth.
STYLE
SCENTS
AND
SENSIBILITY
Frederic Auerbach
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2017
Let animal
spirit run
wild
ESSENTIALS
A triple play
THE RUNWAYS
Stefani’s new vision
DESIGNERS
P2
S U N DAY, O C T O B E R 22 , 2 017
L AT I M E S . C O M / I M AG E
{ SHOPPING }
His
lavish
looks
return
RE TAIL H APPE NINGS
From points north
Northern California
designer Erica Tanov
shifted her sights south
and opened a boutique
Oct. 15 at retail and
entertaining complex
the Row DTLA in Los
Angeles. The 650square-foot space is the
latest in Tanov’s retail
portfolio — her other
standalone California
boutiques are in Berkeley and Marin. Tanov
sells her eponymous
fashion, accessories and
home pieces, and she
Gabrielle Stiles
also champions the
work of other designers
A GAUZY sheath dress is
such as lingerie brands
from Erica Tanov’s fall line.
Vivien Ramsay and
Araks, footwear from Officine Creative and fashion from
Elsa Esturgie.
For fall 2017, Tanov perpetuates her signature look of
delicate, artisanal layers. Colors such as pallid rose and
chartreuse are inflected with gold, and prints are inspired
by nature. Expect to pay about $400 for a crepe de chine
blouse or $1,100 for a metallic tapestry coat with bell
sleeves.
The new store is at 1318 E. 7th St., Unit 120, in Los Angeles and will be open on Sundays during October before
moving to a daily schedule starting in November.
A collection of his fashion
pieces celebrates the opulent
lifestyle of Gianni Versace.
By Sari Anne Tuschman
The name Gianni Versace has long
been associated with glamour, his
namesake label well known in the fashion world for its bright colors, bold patterns and over-the-top opulence.
Two decades after the fashion designer was killed at his Miami Beach
home, Farfetch and London’s vintage
mecca William Vintage have teamed up
by amassing a vast collection of pieces
from the house, which are being sold at
the William Vintage store, on william
vintage.com and on Farfetch.com.
“We wanted to mark the 20th anniversary with 20 years of his work,” says
William Banks-Blaney, founder of
William Vintage.
The collection is said to be the largest ever assembled, consisting of 500
pieces from the late 1970s through 1997,
the year of the designer’s final collection and his death.
“We focused on pieces which are
uniquely and unmistakably Gianni,”
says Candice Fragis, Farfetch’s buying
and merchandising director. “There
are a number of very rare and high-value pieces within the collection — the
1992 Harness dresses from the Bondage Collection and Gianni’s spectacular Oroton metal pieces amongst the
more expensive and important.”
Ranging in price from $300 to
$60,000, the collection covers all facets
of Versace’s designs and has been gathered over the years thanks to stylists,
models and private collectors. “There
are so many superb discoveries within
the collection,” Banks-Blaney says.
To celebrate the collection, Farfetch
and William Vintage threw a party at a
private home in Beverly Hills this
month, hosted by Banks-Blaney and
stylist Elizabeth Stewart.
In homage to Versace’s decadent
approach to life, there was a pool, extensive gardens and installations of
some of the exceptional vintage pieces
as well as Speedo-clad male models
lounging poolside.
“The party was a real celebration of
not just the collaboration and launch
but of Gianni himself,” Banks-Blaney
says. “We wanted to honor his designs
and his approach to life, and L.A.
seemed the perfect location.”
The soiree drew A-listers, fashionworld heavyweights and vintage addicts, including Amal Clooney, Rachel
Zoe, Kate Bosworth and “It” girl Caroline Vreeland.
“Gianni was always about pure, unadulterated joy, and there was so much
romance and happiness within his
work,” Banks-Blaney says. “That’s
something that has never been as relevant as right now. His use of color, embellishment and his widely diverse inspirations shaped nearly every designer.”
Fragis agrees, saying though 20
Andreia
Rodrigues
THE COUTURE
Erica Tanov, ericatanov.com
Nike in ‘Force’
Fantasia Scozzese
printed silk shirt
from the spring/
summer 1993 Miami
Collection, above,
$2,486, and Couture
wool and animalprinted faux-fur
jacket from the fall/
winter 1994 collection, below, $7,601,
are for sale.
If you’re like many an
Angeleno and your
colors are purple and
gold, Nike has a pair of
sneakers for you. New at
Nordstrom is the latest
women’s style from
Nike’s Special Force Air
Force 1 collection: a
white leather “urban
utility” sneaker with
Nike
purple and gold details,
PURPLE and gold accent
with the “Force Is FeNike’s women’s sneakers.
male” lettering on the
thick laces and “Los
Angeles” embroidered on a strap across the ankle. The
sneaker ($225) is available now at the recently opened
Nordstrom X Nike space at the new Nordstrom store at
the revamped Westfield Century City mall.
And if you’re shopping online, take a look at the new
Riccardo Tisci collection named after a fictional sports
team, the Victorious Minotaurs. The sportswear-influenced offering extends to four pieces for men, three for women and several accessories from $40 to $595.
Nike selections are available at Nordstrom at Westfield
Century City, 10250 Santa Monica Blvd. Los Angeles.
www.nike.com and shop.nordstrom.com
The Office of Angela Scott
Iga Marzec
A NEW handbag line takes its place alongside the
Office of Angela Scott’s menswear-inspired shoes.
A brand new bag at the Office
years have passed, Versace’s relevance
hasn’t waned. “[Versace] celebrated
fashion, form and fit, and that still resonates today,” she says. “It’s important
for us to celebrate the man who was instrumental in the history of fashion.”
image@latimes.com
Don’t expect delicate stilettos from Los Angeles brand
the Office of Angela Scott. The menswear-inspired women’s shoes are more loafers and combat boots than mules
and kitten heels. The label debuted its handbag line in
October, which embodies the same strong-yet-simple
aesthetic of the shoes. You won’t find bling or in-your-face
monograms here — just sleek zippered leather pouches,
wristlets, backpacks and laptop cases; pieces have toneon-tone embossing and discreet hardware. Prices range
from $135 to $535.
The Office of Angela Scott, theofficeofangelascott.com
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JEWELRY
CONTACT
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After setting up
global boutiques in the
South Kensington area
in London and in the
Mandarin Oriental hotel
in Bangkok, Marie
France Van Damme
made her U.S. debut
earlier this month with a
store — her ninth — at
the Peninsula hotel in
Beverly Hills.
“Everything I make is
for the Los Angeles
lifestyle,” said Van
Damme, who lives in
Hong Kong, where she
has two stores. “The big
houses, pools, people
always entertaining, the
warm weather. It’s the
Marie France Van Damme
perfect choice.”
THE METALLIC skirt is a
The 460-square-foot
space carries a selection Van Damme top seller.
from Van Damme’s
various categories: resort wear, pieces for day and night
and sophisticated travel separates. In addition to her
boutiques, her collection sells online and at retailers including Bergdorf Goodman, Harrods and Le Bon Marché.
The brand started in 2011 offering resort selections and
swimwear, then expanded into dresses for day and night.
Her aesthetic, she said, has always been “flowing, easyto-wear dresses in lightweight silk you throw on for day,
and then put on your heels and you’re set for dinner. It’s a
whole wardrobe that is easy to travel with.”
Other top sellers include elongated cardigans and her
“Boubou” dresses — think high-glam caftans perfect for
at-home entertaining or a swanky dinner party. Selections
from the collection range from $365 to $1,800.
Marie France Van Damme, 9882 S. Santa Monica Blvd.,
Beverly Hills, www.mariefrancevandamme.com
— Kavita Daswani
S U N DAY, O C T O B E R 22 , 2 017
L AT I M E S . C O M / I M AG E
P3
{ DESIGNERS }
Shades of Gwen Stefani
The glam singer reveals a practical inspiration for her new optical and sunglasses lines: She needed them
By Ingrid Schmidt
At a late-summer event at the
London West Hollywood hotel for
her eyewear labels, L.A.M.B. and
GX by Gwen Stefani (which now
includes kids’ styles), Gwen Stefani sat down to talk fashion shop.
Last year, the Grammy Awardwinning singer-designer-TV personality introduced her optical
and sunglasses lines, crafted by
New York eyewear manufacturer
Tura Inc., and fall styles shipped to
stores last month.
Donning a lace-trim, polka-dot
dress from Zimmermann’s fall collection and black suede thigh-high
boots by Casadei, Stefani said, “We
were talking about what we were
going to do tonight, and we were
like, ‘Let’s go ‘La Dolce Vita’ [referencing Anita Ekberg’s femme fatale look in the 1960 film].”
On her personal
prescription
“I had been wanting to do sunglasses forever because they are
something I wear so much,” said
the 48-year-old mother of three
boys with ex-husband Gavin Rossdale. “People would send me stuff,
and I love buying glasses and, finally, I got a partner who vibed
with me! It ends up that after that
last baby [Apollo born in 2014], I
really needed glasses, which is
crazy, because it took a long time.
But I started noticing that I
couldn’t see as well. Everybody in
my whole family wears glasses. So I
was lucky that it didn’t happen until then. But it is really inspiring to
design them — when you actually
need them.”
On designing for the
masses
“I’m working on my fourth collection, and I’ve become a lot more
flexible and open because you
learn what works for you and what
you get sick of and what you love,
but also that everyone’s face is so
different. …,” said Stefani, whose
latest ski-wear collection with ski
apparel brand Burton is out now.
“When I collaborate with people, I
feel like sometimes they go too
crazy. So I find that you need to
have a balance of personality and
what’s going to work. It’s an accessory. So sometimes it can be the focus, but sometimes you don’t want
it to be the focus. … For inspiration,
we look at whatever is in the magazines and things that I’ve collected for years; I have hundreds of
glasses!”
On her personal style
“I feel like my personal style’s
been the same since I was a little
girl,” Stefani said. “People always
try to bring out things that are going to embarrass me or make me
say, ‘I regret that.’ But I never do!
Even back to the pink robe I wore
when I was 7 years old. Because you
think, ‘That was me right then, and
I know why I wore that; my mom
bought it for me.’ Or that peach
prom dress. Yeah, it was horrifying.
But my mom made me that, and it
was from the ’80s, so it made sense
at the time. There’s no regret. We
Photographs by
Jerritt Clark
all evolve, but I always see a thread
of myself.”
On a stellar sunglasses
moment
“I can remember an amazing
moment where a pair of Christian
Dior sunglasses showed up at
my house that were worth whatever, back in the day when I was nothing,” Stefani said. “I was so excited
about someone giving me something that I could never think of
buying myself or getting my hands
on. And then I ended up wearing
them in the ‘Hella Good’ video.”
GWEN STEFANI, top, at the
London West Hollywood for a
preview of her GX and
L.A.M.B. eyewear lines. At
left, a detail of the sunglasses
at the party, and a dog turns a
pair into a toy.
image@latimes.com
Mona Moore enlarges its Westside footprint
By Sari Anne Tuschman
Lisa Bush, owner of luxury
women’s boutique Mona Moore,
says her interest in fashion began
when she was growing up in
Williamsburg, Va.
Her grandparents owned a
shoe store, which opened in 1913
and is operated by one of her cousins today. Each time she visited,
she says her passion for all things
sartorial grew. Years later, Bush
studied philosophy and women’s
studies at the University of Virginia, ultimately becoming a social
worker, but her fascination with
fashion never waned.
“I loved fashion and clothing in
the ’80s, but there was a certain
kind of feminism that was in style
that was a very ‘don’t-care-aboutfashion’ type of thing,” Bush says.
“I really struggled with that. I
wanted to open a store because I
realized there was this whole side
of myself that was being hidden.”
Bush found her creative voice
through opening her first Mona
Moore boutique, with its impeccable range of luxury shoes, in
Montreal in 2002. Years later, she
moved her family and the store,
which sells women’s fashion and
footwear, to the U.S., opening on
Abbot Kinney Boulevard in Venice
in 2009. “To me, women’s clothing is
a feminist issue,” says Bush, who
has two daughters. “My whole
team is women. I feel like I am still
on this feminist trajectory, and
now there’s the freedom to unapologetically love fashion.”
Reva Santo Mona Moore
MONA MOORE’S Lincoln Boulevard store has the fashion and footwear the retailer is known for.
That trajectory led Bush to
move the boutique from Abbot
Kinney Boulevard to Main Street
in Venice in 2015. Now it has her
opening her door in a new Westside
location again — this time, on a
burgeoning retail street. The new
store, at 208 Lincoln Blvd., opened
with a party hosted by Bush and
sisters Kate and Laura Mulleavy,
founders of Rodarte, this month.
The move was motivated by
business: Bush has bought the
building in which the store is located. “About a year ago, I spotted
the space on Lincoln and thought,
‘I think that would work,’ ” Bush
says.
The new location houses the
same superbly edited selection of
women’s shoes Mona Moore has
become known for such as the Row,
Maison Margiela, Robert Clergerie
and other labels, but it also has
more space to accommodate the
ready-to-wear pieces Bush has expanded into during the last 18
months. “I happened to get into
shoes probably because of my
background,” Bush says. “But a lot
of vendors told me they would love
to work with me if I ever got into
clothing, and at a certain point, it
just made sense to jump in and do
it. I’m so glad I did.”
A self-proclaimed “fan of beau-
tiful objects,” Bush carefully curates her store with extraordinary
and thoughtful brands obsessed
with craftsmanship and detail.
Often she’ll scour New York,
Paris and Milan, Italy, for lesserknown collections. In the mix are
selections from Marni, Haider Ackermann, Alexa Chung, Comme des
Garçons and Rodarte as well as
small brands such as Japan-based
Visvim.
“Right now the world is pretty
small, but I am trying to bring
things from far away that are harder to find,” she says. Those fashion
treasures will be easier to display in
the larger space with 2,000 square
feet. The new space also has 2,000
square feet of parking. “I am really
hoping it will be a place where people will come and hang out,” she
says. “We are going to have a mini
kitchenette so we can really offer
hospitality. These days if you’re going to do brick-and-mortar, then
you have to do something special.
You have to do something so people want to put in the effort to come
and hang out.”
The decor of the space stays
true to the minimal aesthetic
Mona Moore has mastered with
chairs, sofas, concrete floors, white
walls and furniture that moves, enabling the setup to change at any
time. “It’s like a living room,” says
Bush. “We don’t have a lot of fixtures or things that are set in place.
I like it so that we can merchandise
and move things around. I like a
combination of minimalism with
some theatrics and playfulness.” In
a prior life, the space was actually a
car-repair garage, a fact Bush is
not attempting to hide. “The cement floor has the patina of the garage,” she says. “I think it’s this cool
idea of gowns and garages, and I
think that is very Mona Moore.”
With the new location and expanding range of sartorial offerings, Bush says she hopes her store
finds its place in L.A.’s fashion history. “In the world of fashion, there
are stores that come up as iconic,
and for me as a fashion person,
they are on my bucket list. I want
Mona Moore to be that for the
Westside of L.A.”
image@latimes.com
P4
S U N DAY, O C T O B E R 22 , 2 017
L AT I M E S . C O M / I M AG E
{ ESSENTIALS }
SERPUI
Serpui’s 100% straw,
pooch-shaped clutch bag
features a brightly hued
pom-pom straw necklace
and a removable strap.
$525. Available at
www.Farfetch.com.
JES MAHARRY
Ojai-based designer
Jes MaHarry’s 14karat yellow gold
wise owl “Good
Times” bracelet is
peppered with
white conflict-free
diamonds. $12,000.
Available at
JesMaHarry.com.
Charlotte
Olympia
CHARLOTTE OLYMPIA
Charlotte Olympia’s laser-cut
“Cool Cats” sneakers are based
on her iconic kitty flats and sit
atop a bouncy, white rubber
sole. $585. Available at
www.CharlotteOlympia.com and
select Charlotte Olympia boutiques.
Jes MaHarry
GUCCI
The mythical dragon
stands in as a nod to
all reptiles in Gucci’s
vibrant and heavily
embroidered emerald-green satin
boots. Removable
exaggerated crystal
bows and gold-mirrored, crystal-decorated block heels
offer over-the-top
sparkle. Also available in black satin.
$3,790. Available at
www.Gucci.com.
Farfetch
All creatures,
great and small
Justin Tunis Twist Online
BIBI VAN DER VELDEN
Dutch designer Bibi van der Velden’s
playful hand-carved fossil frog ring is
set with 18-karat yellow gold star
eyes and a tsavorite-encrusted 18karat yellow gold leaf under foot.
$4,200. Available at TwistOnline.com.
Gucci
BY JANET KINOSIAN >>> Let’s tip a fur-free hat to the animals with whom we share our
planet and give our appreciation for the myriad ways they enrich our lives. (After all, World
Animal Day was Oct. 4.) ¶ Why do people never seem to tire of wearing animal images? “I
believe people resonate with the purity of animals and wear animal-inspired jewelry [and
accessories] to hold animal magic close to their hearts,” says Southern California designer
Jes MaHarry, whose eponymous jewelry line is populated with a plethora of animals, big
and small. “Animals need us to be their voice.” ¶ Here are designers and brands offering us
a variety of clever and creative ways to admire our animal brethren.
HERMÈS
Hermès’ vibrant Appaloosa des
Steppes square scarf features a
prancing horse and an abundance
of bright colors and geometric
designs. $395. Available at
www.Hermes.com.
AQUAZZURA
Aquazurra
Jaguars prance and pounce all over
Aquazzura’s rich, black Brooklyn bootie
with a timeless round toe, block heel
and zipper side. $825. Available at
www.Aquazzura.com.
Ioana Ciolacu
IOANA CIOLACU
Romanian designer Ionana Ciolacu’s
thick gray cotton-blend ruffle-sleeved
Daisy sweatshirt showcases a cheery
screen-printed bird on front and back.
$129. Available at
www.IoanaCiolacu.com.
GUCCI
Gucci’s red-ribbed
cotton jersey Tshirt has a thick,
textured sweet
bunny floral applique, navy cotton
raglan sleeves and a
pierced “love” heart
on the back. $950.
Available at
www.MyTheresa.com
Gucci
image@latimes.com
ALEXANDER
MCQUEEN
Alexander McQueen’s swallow
covered, sweetheart-necked
dress has a background of light
nude pink and
endless black
flying birds.
Available also
in black and
white.
$1,995.
Available
at Farfetch.com
Hermès
Farfetch
L AT I M E S . C O M / I M AG E
S U N DAY, O C T O B E R 22 , 2 017
P5
{ BEAUTY }
Photographs by
Genaro Molina Los Angeles Times
Aiming to spruce up L.A.
Bluemercury chain is placing its bets on the city’s skin-care-obsessed culture
By Melissa Magsaysay
In the age of digital shopping, Barry
Beck, co-founder and chief operating officer
of upscale beauty chain Bluemercury, is going another route. He’s betting big on brick
and mortar — and Los Angeles plays a starring role in all of it.
In 1999, Beck opened the first Bluemercury store in Washington, D.C., where the
company is based. Bluemercury, now owned
by Macy’s Inc., has 153 stores in 25 states,
competing with beauty brands such as
Sephora and Ulta Beauty.
Beck says he believes there is major potential for the chain to become a ubiquitous
upscale neighborhood drugstore. Think a
fancy 7-Eleven for Angelenos looking to pick
up a Tom Ford lipstick or Acqua di Parma
aftershave balm on the go.
“I’m going to blanket Los Angeles with
stores,” says Beck, citing the City of Angels
as a key market for growth, on a fall morning
from the pristine, product-filled interior of
Bluemercury’s Sunset Plaza location. “I’m in
the neighborhood business, and there are so
many incredible neighborhoods in L.A. I
think I could open 100 stores here.”
There are 12 Bluemercury locations in
Los Angeles with two more scheduled to
open by early 2018, including a flagship location at 8500 Melrose Ave. in West Hollywood
next month.
What’s behind Beck’s desire to expand in
L.A.? Turns out the prestige cosmetics industry is thriving regardless of the dramatic
shifts in how people shop. In 2016, prestige
beauty products purchased in specialty or
department stores totaled $12.8 billion in
sales nationwide, according to a report by
market research company NPD Group.
BARRY BECK, Bluemercury chief operating officer, wants more stores in L.A.
For Bluemercury, clean beauty and men’s
grooming and cosmetics are particularly
strong areas of growth in the L.A. market. In
2012, Beck created a clean skin-care line
called M-61 in part because of the buying
power and interest in natural products of
L.A. shoppers. In addition to M-61 and the
brand’s in-house makeup line, Lune + Aster,
there are designated sections in Bluemercury stores dedicated to clean beauty, or
chemical-free products. Currently, the PowerGlow Peel pads from M-61 are Bluemercury’s most popular item with one box sold
every eight seconds, according to Beck.
Beck says making the curated prestige
beauty retailer as common as Starbucks locations are might appear aggressive. However, he thinks L.A. residents are forwardthinking customers with an advanced
knowledge of clean beauty and men’s grooming.
“Seventy-five percent of our Los Angeles
customers all live within a one-mile radius of
the store they frequent,” Beck says. “I’m always studying the data to see where the California clients are. They’re actually a little bit
further ahead than the New York client.
They’re chic like the New York client, but
they’re always a little bit ahead of the curve.
Clients here are trendsetters.”
Los Angeles shoppers are also leaders in
the men’s beauty space. Beck says the new
flagship store on Melrose will have an increased offering of men’s-related products
beyond shower gel and shaving cream.
“For the first time in history, men are actually purchasing in the makeup category in
a significant way, and it’s happening here in
L.A.,” Beck says. “They used to come in for
shower gel, shaving cream, shampoo, but
now they’re buying bronzers, concealer, eyebrow gel.”
He attributes the surge to the strong
selfie culture as well as the film and
technology industries that thrive in the city.
“They’re in the movie business,” Beck says.
“They are doing a TED Talk. They’re going
on CNBC. They’re going on Fox Business,
and they know that they’ve got to purchase
the makeup category. This is a big trend. …
We’re going to be pioneering men’s in a big
way at our flagship.” Each Bluemercury location has a spa with various services featuring an extensive facial menu and waxing, microdermabrasion and makeup application.
The 2,500-square-foot Melrose flagship
will feature a robust men’s section as well as
naturals. According to Beck, it will also be a
hub for digital innovation for finding and socially sharing beauty products.
Mirrors called Bluemercury Connect, he
says, will be set up in the new flagship. They
are equipped with technology to tell a customer everything about a product including
price, reviews and how-to videos. The mirror
can also sync up to a smartphone and text
customers product information so they can
order an item to be delivered to their home.
image@latimes.com
Bullish
on the
blemish
Diesel’s ‘Go With the Flaw’
campaign is a classically
edgy, provocative message
from denim-and-more firm.
By Melissa Magsaysay
In a social-media-heavy society
fueled by curated photos and flattering filters, one in which having a
high number of followers appears
to be everything, the Diesel label,
which makes denim, accessories
and footwear for men, women and
children as well as home goods, has
decided to go against the grain
with a strong message leading its
fall 2017 campaign.
This season, the brand’s messaging centers on the idea of “Go
With the Flaw.” The slogan informs
campaign imagery, a film and a collaboration with Chinese pop star
Chris Lee.
The messaging isn’t surprising
considering the 39-year-old Italian
brand is well known for controversial advertising and provocative
communication. You could say “Go
With the Flaw” urges people to embrace imperfection and unique-
Diesel
“DIESEL has always challenged conformity,” says the Italian brand’s founder, Renzo Rosso.
ness rather than conform to the
Facetuning and glossy veneers of
Hollywood.
“Diesel has always challenged
conformity,” says the brand’s
founder, Renzo Rosso. “Today’s
conformity is social-media perfection — perfect holiday, perfect pictures, perfect life. In the past, when
we were the first company to do a
campaign with two sailors kissing
each other, that was, at the time,
the conformity to challenge. ... I
have always been more interested
in imperfection because it stands
out from the crowd, and it’s more
real.”
The brand has also released a
campaign manifesto that includes
the lines, “Go with no plan, go with
not sure, go with what makes you
feel insecure. Go with mistakes, go
with remakes, go without knowing
if you have what it takes.”
In a show of commitment to the
message, Diesel, according to a
news release, “decided to delete
everything [from its Instagram
feed] for an imperfect, new beginning.”
The brand’s 1.2 million followers
appear to be sticking around, and a
series of “imperfect images” have
popped up on Diesel’s Instagram
feed.
The “Go With the Flaw” campaign started with a party and
fashion show in Beijing. That’s
where Lee, the androgynous Chi-
nese singer, was present to show
her collaboration with the brand,
and she appears in ads that read
“Go With Square Face,” a reference
to Lee’s square jaw and what she
has said sets her apart from traditional Chinese beauty standards.
“Chris has a square jaw, and a
lot of people [in China] have
surgery for a more European look,”
says Diesel’s creative director,
Nicola Formichetti. “She now loves
it and wants it to be her signature.
She’s turned her insecurity into
something of power and strength.
It’s about embracing flaws and
making them cool. It’s a message
that’s really deep within the DNA
of Diesel.”
Rosso and Formichetti say that
the ethos of “Go With the Flaw” will
continue beyond this season.
“It’s a message that is here to
stay,” Rosso says. “Moving forward, we will apply the message by
exploring different flaws.”
From a design standpoint,
Formichetti likens the motto to the
company’s beginning in denim.
“We’re rooted in denim, and
denim is a product where you make
the flaw of the denim into something beautiful,” says the creative
director. “Denim is not luxurious.
It’s not high fashion, but it has all of
these great connotations because
of its past and rebellious nature. In
fact, Diesel was the first brand to
take ripped jeans and market it to
sit next to luxury brands. So we’ve
always taken the idea of unconventional or strange and made that
cool.
“We always did it, but now that
we have this motto that is much
more crystal clear.”
image@latimes.com
P6
S U N DAY, O C T O B E R 22 , 2 017
L AT I M E S . C O M / I M AG E
{ THE RUN WAYS }
Our very own wow moments
BY TARA PANIOGUE AND INGRID SCHMIDT >>> Fashion Week (or more accurately weeks) in Los Angeles occurs each spring and fall with multiple
organizations (currently including Art Hearts Fashion, L.A. Fashion Week and Style Fashion Week) holding events throughout the city after
the twice-yearly Paris women’s ready-to-wear shows have wrapped. (And, in the case of Art Hearts Fashion, before they’ve wrapped.) Although the local shows rarely feature the instantly recognizable brands of fashion weeks in New York, London, Milan and Paris, they provide
much-needed exposure for emerging and lesser-known labels. Here are memorable moments from the recent L.A. runway shows.
Art Hearts Fashion
Burning Guitars, Datari Austin
and Siwy Denim presented spring
and summer 2018 collections at Art
Hearts Fashion’s Sept. 29 show at
the Beverly Hilton in Beverly Hills.
The evening got off to a rocky start
with the shows starting more than
an hour late and the first two designers — Datari Austin and Burning Guitars — showing collections
that were entertaining yet failed to
meet the mark. Burning Guitars’
collection was bold, brash and too
over-the-top for anyone but a rock
’n’ roll frontman, while Datari
Austin used fabrics that came
across as a little blasé and — dare
we say — cheap.
The highlight of the evening
was the L.A.-based brand Siwy
Denim and its spring and summer
2018 “Zip Me Up!” collection, which
featured apparel that blended a
modern ’80s vibe with sporty/edgy
details. Think zippers, snaps,
stripes and holes all placed in unexpected areas and designed for
versatility and the capacity to
transition an outfit from a casual
day look to a bold night look in just
one zip. The color palette included
a sea of blues, white, black, light
gray and olive. Kris Park, chief executive of Siwy Denim, wants the
brand to be viewed as a lifestyle
brand for all women and for all occasions.
“We wanted to show something
different. Clothes that could be
worn to work, then unzipped to
something more trendy to wear
out,” Park told us.
We couldn’t help but notice that
each of the models hit the catwalk
carrying a cellphone, which could
have been intended as a commentary on the ubiquity of technology,
but for us simply turned the runway from exotic adventure into everyday occurrence.
Photographs by
Mark Gunter
Photographs by Getty Images
LOOKS BY Moods of Norway, clockwise from top, Mario De La Torre, and Something by Sonjia.
Style Fashion Week L.A.
THE SIWY “Zip Me Up!” looks, top right and right, were edgy
and sporty; and a Burning Guitars Clothing outfit was bold, left.
Maybe because it was Friday
the 13th or maybe it was coincidence, but night two of the fournight run of Style Fashion Week
LA this month at the Pacific Design Center in West Hollywood
proved to be a mash-up of horrific
musical performances mixed with
an assortment of fashion looks.
The lineup for the evening included Moods of Norway, Something by Sonjia and Mario De La
Torre.
Moods of Norway kicked off
the shows with the collection “In a
Killer Mood,” which featured
men’s and women’s looks that
transported us to a James Bondlike world with models as spies. It
had a strong retro feel with women’s slinky silk jumpsuits and floral motifs along with fitted plaid
suits, leather jackets and suspenders for the men.
Next up was Something by
Sonjia, one of the best collections
of the night. Sonjia Williams is a
Boston native and former “Project Runway” and “Project Runway All Stars” contestant. She’s
one of the few designers to show a
fall/winter 2017 collection, “Architexture,” which was inspired by
her fascination with the clean
lines and geometry of architecture and the interesting textures and tactile nature of fabrics.
Her collection had an assortment
of chunky/structural sweaters,
high-waisted
skirts,
flowy
dresses, scarves and gold platform sandals paired with black
socks and black beanies.
“I make strong pieces, not tim-
id pieces,” Williams said. “My
woman knows who she is and is
not afraid to be that person.”
Two memorable looks were
the oversized shearling vest and a
coat dress that the designer said
is so stiff with padding it can stand
up on its own like a suit of armor.
Closing out the show was De
La Torre, who presented an allwhite collection named “City of
Angels,” with a range of different
silhouettes. Fitted see-through
cocktail dresses, evening dresses,
A-line skirts paired with crop tops
and bodysuits were some of the
standout looks. The monochromatic white collection proved to
be a nice palette cleanser that left
us thinking maybe the City of Angels could use a little more of De
La Torre’s angels.
L.A. Fashion Week
L.A. Fashion Week staged a fiveday run of spring and summer 2018
shows at the Alexandria Ballrooms
in downtown Los Angeles Oct. 4-8.
The Oct. 7 slate of shows we attended (along with a celebrity slate
that included “Insecure” actor
Sarunas J. Jackson, model Selita
Ebanks and Shani James) kicked
off more than an hour and a half after its scheduled 7 p.m. start time
with the debut of L.A.-based
Radka Salcmannova.
A self-described “visual artist,”
Salcmannova is a painter, photographer and indie filmmaker who
began creating costumes for her
own films two years ago. The armor-like, body-contouring dresses
and matching face masks crafted
from metallic silicone melted on
mesh, had painterly texture accented by dangling threads and
gold chains. The result was more
theatrical than wearable. (“Mad
Max” and “Game of Thrones” were
overheard whispered audience
commentary.) But that’s kind of
her point. “I told the models that I
wanted them to be a character like
Wonder Woman,” said Salcmannova, who recently relocated to
L.A. from New York. “My goal is to
work with singers, actors and artists.”
Next up was self-taught, 26year-old Baltimore-based designer Bishme Cromartie, who already has a Hollywood following.
(His e-commerce site is set to
launch Feb. 16.) Cromartie told us
that fans include singers Ashanti,
Jill Scott and Andra Day as well as
“Orange Is the New Black” stars
Dascha Polanco and Jackie Cruz.
Evening dresses and jumpsuits in
fuchsia and silver hues (some in
glittery stretch mesh) had architectural ruffled detailing, peaked
shoulders and cape-like tops that
Cromartie said were inspired by a
butterfly’s transition. The accessories — vegan croc-print belts and
mirrored butterfly earrings —
stood out. “I sent two pairs of the
earrings to Beyoncé. I work with
her stylist Zerina Akers,” Cromartie said. “Once she wears them, it’s
over.”
Amsterdam-based fashion duo
Marie Burlot and Jimmy Rinsum
rounded out the night with a presentation of their 7-year-old label,
Mary Me Jimmy Paul. The show
contrasted evening gowns (some
with macramé-like texture) with
utilitarian jackets — one had a
built-in backpack that Burlot
noted has been donned by Ariana
Grande. The brand focuses on costuming musicians (styles are available by special order and have been
worn by Rihanna, Kesha and Lady
Gaga).
“Since we’re in L.A., we did our
take on the red carpet look,” Burlot
said. “There’s always a sense of humor in what we do. Some of the
dresses were literally made of curtains, but we tried to make them
flowy and glamorous. We call it
‘haute sportswear.’ ”
Craig Bennett Celebatography Inc.
Nina Hawkins
Craig Bennett Celebatography Inc.
A LOOK from Bishme Cromartie, left; a vibrant look with macramé touches by Mary Me Jimmy
Paul; and armor-like, contouring dress and face mask from visual artist Radka Salcmannova.
S U N DAY , OC T O B E R 22, 2 017
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{ STYLE }
Photographs by Frederic Auerbach Boss Bottled
CHRIS HEMSWORTH is the new international fragrance ambassador for Hugo Boss, one of the “Thor” star’s first colognes as a 16-year-old surfer in Australia.
Boss move for a superhero
BY ADAM TSCHORN >>> Chris Hemsworth, the Australian actor best known for playing the hammer-wielding superhero Thor on the big screen
(a third “Thor” film hits theaters next month and the next installment of the “Avengers” franchise lands next year), recently landed a sweetsmelling side gig as Hugo Boss’ new global fragrance ambassador, the face of its Boss Bottled line and star of its latest “Man of Today” advertising campaign. ¶ To kick off the campaign — and unveil Boss Bottled Tonic eau de toilette (a fresh jolt of citrusy ginger with a woody dry
down, the new juice launched exclusively at Macy’s this past summer and widened retail distribution last month), Hemsworth popped by New
York Fashion Week: Men’s over the summer, where he screened the new TV campaign for the media, answered a few softball questions from
ESPN broadcaster Will Reeve (son of Christopher Reeve, who starred in four “Superman” films) on stage, and took in the Boss spring/summer
2018 runway show. ¶ That’s where we caught up with Hemsworth for a fragrance-focused face-to-face that touched on surfing, a mixed bag
of lollipops and Scarlett Johansson as the top note of the “Avengers” films. Here are excerpts from that conversation.
I’ve read that the sense of smell is
more closely linked with memories than any of our other senses.
What are some of your earliest
scent memories?
Funny enough, I had Hugo
Boss cologne given to me when I
was, like, 16 by my mum. It was one
of my first fragrances — and one of
the few I’ve ever had. Smelling the
cologne brought me back to that
period of my life.
It’s funny how the sense memory [related to] smells [makes] you
instantly remember, “Oh, wow, I
remember who I was dating then,
who I liked, who my friends were.”
It was like [being] back in high
school.
There’s a certain plant, a bush/
shrub on the coast in Australia
that was very prominent in this
one surf spot where I learned to
surf. I think it’s called bottlebrush.
It has quite a sweet scent to it, and
on the track down to the surf spot
where we spent most of our youth,
you would just be overwhelmed by
the smell. And if I smell it now, it
takes me instantly back to that
time.
What are some of the other smells
you associate with growing up?
Surfboard wax, sunscreen,
coconut oil and the beach.
Once you were tapped as Hugo
Boss’ global fragrance ambassador, how did it work? Did you
get a short course in fragrances
and how they’re created?
We sat down and talked
through the different scents and
fragrances and [learned about]
top notes and so on.
What did you take away from
that?
I wouldn’t say I’m an expert,
but it was fascinating. I met the
lady who designed the [original]
Boss Bottled Classic [fragrance],
which was inspired by apple
strudel. My wife’s favorite dessert
is apple strudel, and she loves the
fragrance, which is good because if
she didn’t like it, I wouldn’t be
wearing it.
Is there a scent you like to smell
on her — or women in general?
I like a lighter, more floral sort
of scent but nothing overbearing. I
don’t want to smell it from 6 feet
away, but if we’re having a cuddle
…
The way the top, middle and base
notes interact in a particular
fragrance reminds me of the way
the different members of a movie’s ensemble cast play off each
other. Because you know the
lingo, who from the “Avengers”
films epitomizes each class of
notes? For example, the top or
head note is the one that catches
your attention right away like a
citrus or a ginger.
I’d say that’d be Scarlett [Johansson] — beautiful, prominent,
competent, strong. [She’s] right
there, and it’s like she’s the only
one in the room.
Who’s the heart or middle note?
Captain America — Chris
Evans. He’s the heart and soul of
the team, isn’t he?
And the the base note?
That’s the stronger foundation
— Robert Downey Jr.
I’m going to name some of the
characters you’ve played over the
years and I want you to tell me —
in fragrance-speak — what they
smell like. Let’s start with Thor.
I’d apply the intense, nighttime,
stormy version of Boss Bottled to
Thor — the older Thor. The newer
Thor? I’d say he’s more of the
classic, lighter citrus vibe.
What about Kim Hyde, the character you played on Australian
soap opera “Home & Away”?
He’d be all sorts. He’d be a bag
of mixed lollies — because as you
do on a soap opera, you’re the
villain one week and the heartthrob the next.
What about your Kevin Beckman
character from last year’s
“Ghostbusters”?
Marshmallows.
Captain Kirk’s father, George
Kirk, in “Star Trek” (2009) and
“Star Trek Into Darkness”
(2013)?
I don’t know why, but I think
something strong, a foundation,
redwood forest — the father to
young James [Kirk].
Eric the Huntsman in “Snow
White and the Huntsman” (2012)?
Well, he probably belongs in the
forest too, doesn’t he? I say he’d be
something colder — kind of a
stormy mountain scent.
Is there any co-worker, costar,
anyone you’ve ever met, onscreen or off, whose scent profile
was so memorable you can still
remember what the person
smelled like the first time you
met?
[“Thor” and “Thor: The Dark
World” costar] Natalie Portman.
There was always a warm, nurturing, kind sort of energy to her
scent. It felt like so comfortable. It
wasn’t like it was abstract or intimidating.
Kinney, [there’s] a lot of little
boutiquey sort of stores with all
sorts of funky local designers and
smaller, unique brands. I liked to
go there because you could find all
kind of different things.
BOSS Bot-
tled is the
brand’s
newest fragrance, a
woody and
citrus-ginger scent.
Where do you live? Do you have a
place in Los Angeles?
No, we sold that place. We’d
bought a place there right before
we had kids — a beautiful place we
loved up in Point Dume, that was
the first place that my wife and I
bought together. Then we had
kids, and it was just kind of a
nightmare because of the paparazzi. We couldn’t do anything or
go anywhere.
On a trip back to Australia,
we fell in love with this place we
live [in] now, a place called Byron
Bay on the coast. It couldn’t be
more different from L.A. either. We
have horses and live on the beach,
and there’s a whole lot of organic
farming, a coastal sort of atmosphere. And [it’s a] quiet country
surf town. It’s good, though, because I like coming to L.A., not
living there. I [can] appreciate it,
and it’s kind of cool. But living
there, for me, was a little bit suffocating.
When you are in L.A., do you have
any favorite shopping spots?
Before Malibu, we lived in
Santa Monica, and down Abbot
Being the face of the brand essentially means a guy who wants to
smell like you can get there by
simply buying a bottle of Boss
Bottled Tonic, but the “Man of
Today” campaign sounds like it’s
urging something more. If some
guys want to not just smell like
Chris Hemsworth but emulate
Chris Hemsworth, what should
they do?
What I’d really liked about the
[campaign] messaging is that it’s
a largely positive message about
being kind and compassionate
and appreciative and being ambitious and chasing your dreams —
but doing it with integrity and
honesty and having respect for the
people involved in that journey
and that path. … [So] I think,
“Staying true to yourself.” Actions
speak louder than words.
Do you work with a charitable
organization?
I do. It’s the Australian Childhood Foundation. They work in
child protection, in raising awareness about child abuse, and they
provide very therapeutic counseling care for children who have
suffered from abuse, neglect and
family violence.
What are you working on right
now?
We just shot No. 3 of the Avengers [franchise], and we’re shooting
No. 4 pretty soon.
adam.tschorn@latimes.com
Twitter: @ARTschorn
P8
S U N DAY, O C T O B E R 22 , 2 017
L AT I M E S . C O M / I M AG E
{ PA RTIES }
All smiles
for amfAR
By Ellen Olivier
Accepting the Award of
Courage on Oct. 13 at amfAR
Gala Los Angeles, Julia Roberts said she would like to
consider the evening her
“two-week-early, 50th-birthday party,” a remark greeted
by whistles, cheers and applause.
And no wonder — such an
early celebration seemed
like a good idea. The blacktie affair would have been
hard to top, especially after
Coldplay frontman Chris
Martin, appearing as a surprise guest entertainer, sang
four songs, including a new
tune he called “Julia’s Smile”
and a duet with James Corden, the night’s host. To top
things off, Tom Hanks presented the award to Roberts,
and
eight-time
Grammy
Award-winning
singer Fergie closed the evening with a high-powered
performance.
The event
Taking place at entrepreneur Ron Burkle’s sprawling
Greenacres estate in Beverly
Hills, the gala, presented by
Hong Kong-based financial
group AMTD, jewelry brand
Harry Winston and beauty
line MAC Viva Glam with additional support from Moët
Hennessy, Cadillac, PatBo,
Fiji Water and others, benefited amfAR, the Foundation for AIDS Research. Given the star power in the audience, Corden started with a
few words about fired movie
mogul Harvey Weinstein,
who faces accusations of
misconduct against dozens
of women.
The crowd
The A-list gathering included Sean Penn, Kate
Hudson, Cheyenne Jackson,
Busy Philipps, Diane Sawyer, Sophia Bush, Melanie
Griffith, Goldie Hawn, Victoria Justice, Ryan Murphy
and others.
Clothing designer Kenneth Cole, producer Jason
Weinberg and Burkle cochaired the event with talent
agents Kevin Huvane, Bryan
Lourd, Richard Lovett and
Ida Ziniti as honorary
chairs.
The scene
Guests lounged in the
manicured gardens before
moving into a tent for dinner,
performances, the official
ceremonies and an auction,
which heated up quickly. No
sooner had bidding begun
for a lunch with Roberts,
Matt Bomer and Murphy
did Hanks, Corden and
Penn jump in to participate
in the lunch, bringing the final bidding to $110,000.
“Never ever sit at Julia
Roberts’ table while an auction is going on,” Hanks said.
“Never. Don’t do it. She tells
you to buck up the price. She
tells you to bid something.
Next thing you know you’re
having lunch with strangers.”
To the auction winners,
Hanks said, “I’m going to tell
you right now. You’d better
be so … fascinating at this
lunch. ... You’d better be
loaded with funny anecdotes
because I’m not talking. …
We’re not going to entertain
you. I’m telling you that right
now. You are going to entertain us — simple as that. And
if we find out you’ve got [a]
bad attitude, guess what?
We’re just going to put you in
my Ford Transit [van]. And
we’re going to drive you to In
& Out, and that’s going to be
it. And you’re paying for it
still. So it’ll be about $110,000
and $24.96.”
The two-time Oscar-winning actor then turned to his
introduction of Roberts. On
a more serious note, he
spoke of her devotion to her
family and her charitable
pursuits and how, in “the
language of quality,” a comparison to Roberts is the
“apex of a compliment.”
Kevin Mazur Getty Images for amfAR
SINGER Fergie gives a high-powered performance at the amfAR Gala Los Angeles benefit in Beverly Hills.
The quote
For her part, Roberts
said, “I’m just an actor. I try
to make the right choices in
life and in art, and the truth
is, I wish I were Frances McDormand, but I’m not. I’m
not Diane Sawyer. I’m not
Sheryl Sandberg, people
that are just so authentic
and talented and dazzling
and people who are just inspiring and good and true
and gifted at saying things to
wonderful people like you
and making you rise up and
believe in that.”
Mentioning the progress
made in the fight against
HIV and AIDS, the Oscarwinning actress said, “[On]
a night like this, if we don’t
take our foot off the gas, then
by 2020 we can insure that no
children will be born with
HIV anymore, becoming the
first HIV-free generation.
And if we get to that milestone, then by 2030 we can
rid the world of AIDS altogether.”
Alberto Rodriguez Getty Images for amfAR
AWARD OF COURAGE honoree Julia Roberts with
Kevin Mazur Getty Images
Kate Hudson
Kevin Mazur Getty Images
Sophia Bush
actor Dermot Mulroney at the star-studded event.
The numbers
More than $2 million was
raised from tickets for the
450 guests, which ranged
from $3,000 each to $75,000
for a table of 12.
Kevin Mazur Getty Images for amfAR
AMFAR GALA host James Corden is flanked by
image@latimes.com
Goldie Hawn, left, and Melanie Griffith.
Alberto Rodriguez Getty Images for amfAR
TOM HANKS presented the award to Roberts, say-
ing she was devoted to family and charitable pursuits.
Five honored for philanthropic efforts
Stevie Wonder, Neil Young,
Metallica’s Lars Ulrich, Ashley Tisdale, Chrissy Metz,
Brandy, Jaime King, Emmanuelle Chriqui and Constance Zimmer.
By Ellen Olivier
From the podium at Variety’s Power of Women event,
host Judd Apatow told the
invitation-only
audience
of Hollywood insiders that
he’d been given the OK to
“go for it.”
And he did just that, taking on newsmakers, including disgraced movie mogul
Harvey Weinstein, director
James Cameron and President Trump during a luncheon that celebrated the
philanthropic efforts of actresses Priyanka Chopra,
Octavia Spencer and Michelle Pfeiffer as well as
singer-songwriter
Kelly
Clarkson and “Wonder
Woman” director Patty
Jenkins.
“Women did a lot of powerful things this week, don’t
you think?” the “Trainwreck” director said Oct. 13,
giving a shoutout to the journalists who broke the Weinstein story and all the women who spoke up in the
widening sexual assault and
harassment scandal involving the producer, “ending
this nightmare and preventing other people from being
victimized by him.”
“It takes no effort not to
be a creep,” Apatow added,
before joking, “I’ve never
pushed Seth Rogen to give
me a back massage or tried
to get Paul Rudd in the tub.
… If I’m in the office and the
door is closed, my staff
knows I’m secretly eating
red velvet cupcakes.”
The scene
Guests caught up with
friends and colleagues and
checked out several charity
and sponsor event displays,
including an Audi TT RS,
and booths for Derm-store,
Moroccanoil and the Venetian Las Vegas, where
bracelet maker MyIntent
custom-crafted charms in a
choice of words such as
“fearless,” “strength” and
“blessed.”
The quote
Rob Latour Variety
GATHERED at Power of Women luncheon at Beverly Wilshire Hotel are the honorees: director Patty Jenkins,
left, actresses Priyanka Chopra, Michelle Pfeiffer and Octavia Spencer and singer-songwriter Kelly Clarkson.
Apatow said fatherhood
wasn’t required to take offense by these recent assault
scandals that have hit Hollywood. “As the owner of a
bird, I think this is horrible,”
he said.
Apatow didn’t spare “Avatar” director Cameron
about his vocal criticism of
the fan favorite and box office hit “Wonder Woman.”
“Poor James Cameron,”
Apatow said. “Got a little
jealous when ‘Wonder Woman’ became a huge hit. His
ego got a little hurt when we
weren’t talking about his
movie [from] 1991.”
And as for Trump, Apatow said, “We want him to go
away, don’t we?”
The event
The affair, which was held
at the Beverly Wilshire Hotel
and presented by Lifetime,
recognized the philanthropy
of Chopra for her work with
UNICEF, Spencer for City
Year, Pfeiffer for the Environmental Working Group,
Clarkson for her work with
the XQ Institute and Jenkins for the Anti-Recidivism
Coalition.
Additional awards were
given to Salesforce Chairman and Chief Executive
Marc Benioff and Sato Project founder and President
Chrissy Beckles.
The crowd
Gwyneth Paltrow, Gal
Gadot, Blake Shelton, Viola
Davis, Nikki Reed, Arianna
Huffington and 16-year-old
Ava Cardoso-Smith, who
represented UNICEF, took
turns onstage introducing
the honorees, while Variety
co-editor-in-chief Claudia
Eller and publisher Michelle
Sobrino-Stearns welcomed
an audience that included
After gushing over seeing
“Wonder
Woman”
star
Gadot, Clarkson considered
how the story about the fearless Amazonian princess
stacked up against the story
of a popular children’s tale as
old as time.
“I mean the story of
‘[Beauty] and the Beast’ —
it’s a little scary. [Belle] was
in a dungeon, trapped, and
then they fell in love.” The recording artist said that her
3-year-old daughter loved
“Wonder Woman” and that
after seeing the film, she
“started acting it out, and I
couldn’t have been more
proud. … ’Cause you’re like,
‘You’re cute in the Belle
dress,’ but you’re more
proud when she’s like
[swinging a sword].”
image@latimes.com
L AT I M E S . C O M / I M AG E
S U N DAY , O C T O B E R 22, 2 017
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{ PA RTIES }
Worlds collide at Hammer gala
John Salangsang BFA.com
Emmy Rossum
Billy Farrell BFA.com
Evan Rachel Wood
John Salangsang BFA.com
John Salangsang BFA.com
January Jones
Priyanka Chopra
John Salangsang BFA.com
Marisa Tomei
John Salangsang BFA.com
Ava DuVernay
John Salangsang BFA.com
Trevante Rhodes
John Salangsang BFA.com
John Salangsang BFA.com
Sarah Jessica Parker
Jessica Chastain
BY L INDZI S CHARF >>> The worlds of fashion, film and art con-
verged at the Hammer Museum’s 15th annual Gala in the Garden soiree. The night proved to be a stylish affair as Sarah Jessica Parker, Jessica Chastain and Evan Rachel Wood mingled
inside the Westwood museum while wearing Bottega Veneta,
the evening’s sponsor. ¶ “Fashion is an art form in its own
right,” said Zachary Quinto, who served as co-chair of the affair alongside Jessica Lange, Jenni Saree, Maggie Kayne and
Bottega Veneta’s creative director Tomas Maier. “The Hammer is a museum that celebrates unique voices and encourages
JOIN US ON THE TRAIL OF
crossover and integrated thinking. So I feel like it’s appropri-
ART THEFT IN
ate that they would team with a fashion [house] for this event.
Art influences fashion and vice versa.”
VIENNA
The event
The Oct. 14 benefit raised $2.4 million
for the institution’s ongoing initiatives.
Actor Armie Hammer, the great-grandson of the museum’s founder, Dr. Armand Hammer, attended with wife Elizabeth Chambers. “It’s fantastic to be
part of a museum that does so much in
terms of creating an accessibility of art
for a community,” Hammer said, “and to
have a great night in the meantime is icing on the cake.”
Meanwhile, Chambers said it was a
“happy coincidence” that their outfits
matched because the couple hadn’t had
time to coordinate in advance. “With two
kids, we have a lot less time,” she said
with a laugh.
Plunder: Art Theft
in World War II Vienna
With Deborah Vankin, L.A. Times arts and
culture writer
With Jessica Gelt, L.A. Times arts and
culture writer
The scene
During cocktail hour, January Jones
chatted by the bar with Priyanka
Chopra, Ashley Olsen caught up with Susan Bay, and Diane Keaton kept close to
Hammer Museum director Ann Philbin.
Shortly after, the group sat down for a
three-course meal by chef Suzanne Goin
of Lucques. The evening concluded with
a performance by Los Angeles-based girl
band Haim.
The crowd
The benefit also attracted Rashida
Jones, Marisa Tomei, Edgar Ramirez,
Emmy Rossum and husband Sam Esmail, Trevante Rhodes, Ellen Pompeo,
Frank Gehry, Rufus Wainwright, Camilla
Belle and Tessa Thompson.
The honorees
Director Ava DuVernay and Pulitzer
Prize-winning writer Hilton Als were
honored with tributes by J.J. Abrams
and author Maggie Nelson, respectively.
“Great-looking crowd,” DuVernay remarked. “If I had my camera with me, I’d
frame you up real nice and shoot something beautiful.”
The looks
“It’s Bottega Veneta — obviously!”
Ruth Wilson said of her delicate chiffon
dress from the label’s cruise 2018 collection. While a few such as Jane Lynch went
rogue, opting to wear other designers,
most attendees wore sophisticated gar-
John Salangsang BFA.com
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Between 1933 and 1945, hundreds of thousands
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Zachary Quinto, left,
Miles McMillan
den party pieces by the Italian fashion
house. “They dressed me,” explained
Wilson who chose the gown because it
featured her favorite colors. “There’s also
loads of butterflies and creatures on it.
So I feel like it suits the event.”
Hailey Baldwin opted for a turtleneck
sweater and striped wool skirt from the
label’s fall/winter 2017 collection.
“This is really comfortable and very
chic,” she said, explaining that she appreciated that the look was “ladylike”
and “sophisticated.”
Male guests including Patrick
Schwarzenegger also stepped up their
game. “I don’t think I’ve ever worn a suit
quite like this one,” Schwarzenegger said
of his gray cotton jacquard ensemble
from the brand’s fall 2017 collection. “It’s
unique and interesting.”
The quote
“Art’s not just someone putting a
brush on a canvas,” remarked Schwarzenegger, as a caterer dropped a tray of
glasses in the distance. “Oops! But even
that could be art — a bunch of glass on
the ground. You never know.”
image@latimes.com
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855-890-5298
(MONDAY – FRIDAY, 7 A.M. – 5 P.M. PT)
LATexpeditions.com/vienna
TRAVELERS:
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SUNDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2017
LOS ANGELES TIMES
PLUS
Halloween Mocktails
& Cocktails, p. 18
What
S
K
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,
SPthO
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e star
p. 12
If you love E.T., The Goonies & Alien, check out the
thrills & chills of Netflix’s Stranger Things
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WALT
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WALTER SCOTT ASKS
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BENNETT
The Girl on the Train and Rules Don’t Apply
actress, 29, stars in Thank You for Your
Service, in theaters Oct. 27. She plays the wife
of a U.S. Army veteran (Miles Teller), one
of several real-life soldiers depicted in the
movie who are trying to adjust to civilian life
after returning home from war in Iraq.
How do you think people will feel about how
Thank You for Your Service portrays PTSD and
the horrors of war after the fighting is over?
My hope is that it will get people talking. My father
er
and my grandfather were both veterans. Also, myy
first boyfriend became a Navy SEAL. I come from
m
this world. It got me asking a lot of questions. The
e
story took on a personal meaning for me.
Are your feelings about the film more intense
e
because it is based on real people? It’s very
much based on a true story and real families and
what their struggles are. I had a real human connection. When I read the script, it was like an alarm
m
went off, and I had to get in there and untangle the
wires and detonate the bomb.
You’re on location so much; how do you make
it feel like home? I travel with these beautiful
vintage trunks filled with blankets, sheets and
pillowcases—everything but the dining room
table. Everyone always says, “You’re going to pulll
out a Persian rug or a lampshade, like Mary
Poppins.” The art of travel: I’ve nailed it.
What are your interests when not working?
I just took a dive into Russian literature. It’s so fun.
I do quite a bit of knitting as well. So knitting and
Russian literature, preferably at the same time.
What’s her next project—that she’s not supposed to talk
about? Go to Parade.com/bennett to find out.
The quest to take down Negan (Jeffrey
rey
Dean Morgan) on The Walking Dead begins
anew Oct. 22 with the premiere of season
eason
eight of the popular AMC horror series.
ies.
And Daryl Dixon may want some payback
yback
for the torture he underwent last season.
ason.
“He’s going rogue a little bit in the beginning,”
eginning,” says
Norman Reedus, 48, who plays him.. Meanwhile,
Reedus does more driving
than walking as host of AMC’ss
Ride With Norman Reedus,
a travel show that has him
motorcycling around the
country. The second season
premieres Nov. 5.
5
THINGS
Moore, Please!
It is a busy fall for Julianne Moore, 56. She starred last
month in Kingsmen: The Golden Circle and last week in
Wonderstruck. This week she stars with Matt Damon in
Suburbicon, director George Clooney’s tale
of an idyllic ’50s community with a very
dark underbelly. Here are five facts about
the Academy Award–winning actress.
Her very first role was playing the Little
H
Red-Haired Girl in a sixth-grade production
Redof You
You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown.
A self-described “proud army brat,” she attended nine
different schools as a child.
differ
Her own freckles were the inspiration for her
Freckleface Strawberry children’s book series.
Moore didn’t learn to drive until age 27.
In the mid-1980s, she played half
sisters on As the World Turns, for
which she won a Daytime Emmy.
E M A I L Y O U R Q U E S T I O N S FO R W A LT E R S C OT T TO
P E R S O N A L I T Y @ PA R A D E . C O M
CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: AMANDA EDWARDS/WIREIMAGE/GETTY IMAGES; GENE PAGE/AMC; MARK SCHAFER/AMC; CBS/GETTY IMAGES;; RICH POLK/GETTY IMAGES FOR IMDB; RUNE HELLESTAD/CORBIS/GETTY IMAGES
DRIVING
2 | OCTOBER 22, 2017
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HAUNTING ROLES
FROM TOP: J. MERRITT/WIREIMAGE/GETTY IMAGES; SLAVEN VLASIC/GETTY IMAGES
In the horror film The Killing of a
Sacred Deer, in theaters now, Colin
Farrell plays a surgeon forced to
do something unthinkable when
the behavior of a teenage boy he
has taken under his wing turns
sinister. “I remember being in a
little bit of a funk by the end of
the film because every day got
darker,” says the actor, 41, who
also has starred
in other unsettling
films, including The
Beguiled, Solace and
The Lobster. “You
get that it is
only a job, but
if you inhabit
that space
for 10 or
12 hours a
day, it goes
in.”
How is Tracy Morgan doing after
his accident?
—Michael F., Salisbury, Md.
A: The former Saturday Night Live and
30 Rock actor, 48,
returned to movies
and TV in various
small roles after
recovering from injuries sustained in the
2014 vehicle crash in New Jersey
that killed his friend and comedic
collaborator James McNair. On
Tuesday night, Oct. 24, he’s back as
the star of The Last O.G., a new TBS
comedy about an ex-con released
from prison who finds that his beloved Brooklyn neighborhood isn’t
exactly how he remembers.
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Trending
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HIGH-TECH TOYS
Edited by Alison Abbey | FOLLOW US AT INSTAGRAM.COM/PARADEMAGAZINE
M.COM/PARADEMAGAZINE
Type
Cast
>Be like skateboarding
>Word around Sesame Street
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“Gift of Hope”
Plays the melodies of
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Snowman with Pre-Lit Tree
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01-17672-001-MI2
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ADVANCED
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BOOKS WE LOVE
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Last year, readers
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3
A RELIABLE WIFE (Algonquin),
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Available in bookstores and online
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M
on
New amplified phone lets you
hear AND see the conversation.
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n
Fe
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N hly
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Co
Breakthrough technology converts phone calls to captions.
The Hamilton® CapTel® Captioned Telephone converts phone conversations
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81135
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alone
Ask Marilyn
.
By Marilyn vos Savant
Say you have a coughing spell
while eating. People invariably
offer you a drink of water. Does
this really help?
Life Alert is always
there for me,
®
—Dan Cowles, Cumming, Ga.
At the back of your throat are two
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trachea) leads to your lungs. If
the coughing is caused by food
dawdling in your esophagus, a
drink of water may help wash it
down. But if it's caused by food in
your trachea, water will just get
in your way of coughing it out.
Regardless, even if you stop
coughing, any bit of food that gets
down into your lungs can cause a
serious problem and needs prompt
medical attention.
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Send questions to
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Marilyn vos Savant Numbrix puzzles
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8 | OCTOBER 22, 2017
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My Spirit Will Live on Forever,
There Within Your Heart
Genuine White Topaz
•
Solid Sterling Silver
•
Includes Poem Card
Meaningful Message
Featured on
Reverse Side
M essenger fromH eaven
Crystal Pendant
A Fine Jewelry Exclusive from The Bradford Exchange
A S immering Reminder of Love from Heaven Above
Gracefully perched among the treetops, the red cardinal is a gentle reminder that a loved one is near. A
comforting message of love, hope and encouragement when we need it the most, this precious visitor has been
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A Glittering Crystal Heart and Genuine White Topaz
Expertly crafted, our pendant features an intricately-faceted crystal heart that celebrates the meaningful
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©2017 The Bradford Exchange
01-26318-001-M
www.bradfordexchange.com/26318
PRIORITY RESERVATION
SEND NO MONEY NOW
the
BRADFORD E XC HANGE
j e w e l ry
9345 Milwaukee Avenue · Niles, IL 60714-1393
Yes! Please reserve the “Messenger from Heaven” Crystal
Pendant for me as described in this announcement.
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after initial payment for shipment. Sales subject to product availability and order acceptance.
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10 | OCTOBER 22, 2017
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A little bit
Goonies,
a little
bit Alien,
n
STRANGER
THINGS
serves up
plenty of
thrills and
chills. And
here comes
season
two.
DUFFERS BY TIBRINA HOBSON/
WIREIMAGE/GETTY
E/GETTY IMAGES; ET
BY B.MCBROOM/UNIVERSAL
OOM/UNIVERSAL
STUDIOS/ZUMA/NEWSCOM;
UMA/NEWSCOM;
GOONIES BY
Y AMBLIN
ENTERTAINMENT/ZUMA/
MENT/ZUMA/
NEWSCOM
From left: Sadie Sink,
Caleb McLaughlin (front),
Noah Schnapp,
Gaten Matarazzo,
Millie Bobby Brown
and Finn Wolfhard
By Samuel R. Murrian
Photography by
Ari Michelson
dentical twin brothers Matt and Ross
Duffer, the creators of the smash Netflix sci-fi horror series Stranger Things,
grew up in North Carolina on a steady
diet of pop culture—especially the stuff
that was supposed to be off-limits.
Like scary movies.
“My babysitter in preschool told me the
story of Freddy Krueger” from A Nightmare on
Elm Street, says Matt. “I was 4 years old! We
knew we weren’t supposed to be watching
horror movies. That made the appeal of them
so strong. It’s like forbidden fruit. You just
want to taste it.”
“We fell in love,”
says Ross.
The Duffers, now
33, have funneled
much of their childhood love of horror
into their hit TV
series, the spooky
Stranger Things, which
is less A Nightmare on
Elm Street and more
It. All nine episodes
of the second season
will stream on Netflix
beginning Oct. 27.
(You can catch up on
season one anytime
on Netflix.)
From top: Ross (left) and Matt
The first season
Duffer drew inspiration for Stranger was set in 1983—a
Things from movies like E.T. the
year before the DufExtra-Terrestrial and The Goonies.
fers were born—and
centered around a
group of kids, the search for their vanished
friend and the appearance of a psychokinetic
girl. There was a monster, interdimensional
paranormal forces and twisted laboratory
experiments.
Part of the fun of the first season was
meeting the young cast. Noah Schnapp, 13,
plays Will Byers, whose disappearance spurred
his friends Mike (Finn Wolfhard, 14), Lucas
(Caleb McLaughlin, 16) and Dustin (Gaten
Matarazzo, 15) into action. They aligned with
a mysterious girl named Eleven (Millie Bobby
Brown, 13) and confronted an alternative
dimension, a dark, cold, forbidding place called
the “Upside Down.”
Winona Ryder (Will’s mom), Matthew
Modine (a research scientist) and David
Harbour (their small town’s chief of police)
received raves for their performances as the
adults alongside the young actors. The entire
cast won Outstanding Performance by an
Ensemble in a Drama Series at this year’s
Screen Actors Guild Awards.
In season two, the ensemble is joined by
Paul Reiser and Sean Astin. Sadie Sink, 15
(who played Annie on Broadway and appeared
as one of the siblings in the movie The Glass
Castle), will come aboard as tomboy Max, and
Dacre Montgomery, 22 (from the movie Power
Rangers), will portray her older stepbrother.
SHADES OF SPIELBERG
Sharp-eyed fans have enjoyed finding nods
in the show to many of the Duffers’ movie
idols and influences—Steven Spielberg’s E.T.
and Stephen King’s It, bits of DNA from The
Goonies and Stand by Me, even shades of Ridley
Scott’s Alien. The tone of the show, often
pitch-black but laced with wicked humor,
echoes director Wes Craven’s Scream, while the
retro look of the show (and the music) recalls
John Carpenter’s Halloween or The Thing.
And the Duffers—like many folks—have
always loved to be scared.
“Fear is one of the strongest emotions,”
says Matt. “It’s an incredible adrenaline rush.”
Movies and TV shows, he says, are especially
safe ways to experience fright without any
serious consequences. “Part of your brain
knows, ‘T