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Los Angeles Times November 24 2017

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$2.75 DESIGNATED AREAS HIGHER
latimes.com
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2017
© 2017 WST
Fire policies
sidestep key
factor: wind
Experts urge stronger
steps, such as barring
homes in gusty areas,
turning off power lines
during Santa Anas.
By Bettina Boxall
Kent Nishimura Los Angeles Times
MALIBU UNITED Methodist Church hosts a dinner for the homeless last week. The meals are set to end
after city officials suggested they were attracting more homeless people and increasing the risk of crime.
In Malibu, uneasiness
over aiding homeless
Church is pressured to end twice-weekly dinners
By Gale Holland
Being homeless in Malibu is different.
Chris Smith watches ducks land on
the lagoon at sunset from his beach
encampment, known to locals as Margaritaville.
Nancy Rosenquist told the City
Council of huddling behind a dumpster and listening to Lady Gaga record
a song in an adjacent building.
Residents have long been generous
to those who live in the city’s 21 miles of
canyons, beaches and glittering shopping centers.
For 17 years, religious groups fed
homeless people, and the city and pri-
vate donors put up hundreds of thousands of dollars for social workers to
find them housing and services.
But Malibu United Methodist
Church — facing pressure from the
city — in recent weeks took a U-turn,
deciding twice-weekly dinners for
homeless people would stop after
Thanksgiving. The cutoff came after
city officials summoned organizers
and suggested they were attracting
more homeless people and making
the problem worse.
The issue boiled over on conservative and Christian online forums,
where Malibu residents were castigated as liberal hypocrites. Lurid
death threats poured in to City Hall.
At an emotional public hearing last
week, Mayor Skylar Peak denied ordering the meals to end, but he also
apologized for “miscommunication.”
“I just think we need to treat people
like our brother and don’t look where
they came from,” Kay Gabbard, one of
the meal organizers, said later.
Peak said the city wanted to work
with volunteers on a solution.
“I will stand by the fact that everyone up here is compassionate about
everyone in the community,” he said.
Malibu, population 13,000, has
roughly 180 homeless residents but no
shelter or housing for poor people.
As homelessness began to grow, a
group called the Community Assistance and Resource Team began hand[See Malibu, A8]
Flynn under
new scrutiny
for Turkey ties
Mueller broadens
inquiry into dealings
of Trump’s ex-national
security advisor.
Activists
object to
rentals’
status
change
By Chris Megerian
WASHINGTON — In the
lucrative world of Washington consulting, businesses
often burnish their reputations by adding boldface
names to their boards.
So after Michael Flynn
was fired as head of the Defense Intelligence Agency in
2014 for what the Obama administration said was mismanagement, he asked former CIA Director R. James
Woolsey to serve as an advisor for his new company, the
Flynn Intel Group.
The position involved little work, according to a
source with knowledge of
the relationship, until a fateful encounter at the JW Mar-
By Emily Alpert Reyes
Flanked by cameras, the
activists marched into the
glossy lobby of the downtown building and demanded to speak to the general manager.
The Olive Street building, they argued, had been
approved by the city as condominiums and then turned
into an “illegal hotel.” The
website for Level Furnished
Living advertises luxury
suites that rent for hundreds
of dollars a night. After a
string of people recounted
their housing woes, they
handed over a letter for company executives.
“They need to know that
they’re operating illegally,”
said Susan Hunter, an L.A.
Tenants Union activist clad
in a red shirt urging “Universal Rent Control Now.”
But the company that
owns the downtown tower
says it has every right to rent
out its rooms to travelers,
thanks to a little-known provision in city law. Earlier this
year, the building department gave Onni Group permission to use part of the
building as a “transient occupancy residential structure.”
The term was first introduced to city codes decades
ago, meant to cover “extended stay hotels” that provided rooms with kitchens,
unlike hotels or motels.
Building owners in commercial or high-density residential zones also can get city
[See Housing, A12]
After last month’s deadly
Northern California wildfires, atmospheric scientist
Cliff Mass scanned old
weather forecasts, searching for clues.
In two high-resolution
weather models for Oct. 8,
he found ample warning of
the crucial ingredient for the
firestorm that swept across
parts of eight counties,
claiming 43 lives and incinerating more than 8,000 buildings.
“I said, ‘Oh my God, look
at the winds,’ ” recalled
Mass, a University of Washington atmospheric sciences professor who writes a
popular
weather
blog.
“What if people were paying
attention to this? What
could they have done?”
The causes of the October conflagrations are under
investigation.
But for a number of the
fires, the prime suspects are
sparking power lines and
electrical
equipment
downed by winds that
gusted to more than 70 mph.
“It was a wind event, a
sudden onset and pretty
sudden die-down,” Mass
said. “So if you shut the
power down for nine hours …
it could have been a whole
different world.”
For years the state’s primary way of dealing with its
endemic wildfire threat has
been to mandate vegetation
clearance around homes in
high fire-hazard zones and
require the use of fire-resistant building materials in
new construction.
But as California puts
more people and houses on
one of the planet’s most
flammable landscapes and
the grim list of deadly wildfires grows longer, some experts say it’s time to take
stronger steps.
Among them: Ban development in wind corridors
where wild lands repeatedly
burn; bury utility lines in the
backcountry; preemptively
shut down power lines and
close public lands during ex[See Wildfires, A9]
riott Essex House, a luxury
hotel in Midtown Manhattan, on Sept. 19, 2016, about
seven weeks before the presidential election.
The meeting — which involved Flynn, Woolsey and
Turkey’s minister of foreign
affairs, Mevlut Cavusoglu —
is among those special counsel Robert S. Mueller III is
investigating as he seeks to
determine whether President Trump’s current or former aides helped Russian
meddling in the presidential
election or engaged in other
misconduct.
The Essex House group
discussed forcibly removing
Fethullah Gulen, a dissident
Turkish cleric who lives in
exile in Pennsylvania, and
sending him back to Turkey,
according to Woolsey. He later described the idea to the
Wall Street Journal as “a covert step in the dead of night
to whisk this guy away.”
Flynn was a senior advis[See Flynn, A7]
Chris Kraul For The Times
FRIENDS OF THE coca farmers killed in a clash last month with anti-narcotics
police pray at the site in Tandil, Colombia, where the shootings took place.
When a community ‘is
completely narcoticized’
As reform efforts fail, Colombian farmers see no
other way forward than to continue growing coca
By Chris Kraul
TANDIL, Colombia —
The anti-narcotics police arrived here in the heart of Colombia’s cocaine industry
last month to destroy the
coca crop. The community
was determined to save it.
Roughly 1,000 farmers,
some armed with clubs, surrounded the hilltop camp
that police had set up in a
jungle clearing and began
closing in on the officers.
The police started shooting. When they were done,
seven farmers were dead
and 21 were wounded.
“Several friends and
neighbors died on the
ground waiting for medical
assistance,” said Luis Gaitan, 32, who protected himself by hiding behind a tree
stump.
In the end, the police
crackdown appeared to
have little result.
Gaitan and others soon
returned to growing coca,
the raw material of cocaine.
The remote municipality of
Tumaco, where Tandil is located, produces 16% of Colombian coca — more than
anywhere else in the country.
If Colombia ever had a
chance to choke off its cocaine industry, this last year
might have been it. The U.S.backed government ended a
five-decade civil war with
the Revolutionary Armed
Forces of Colombia, better
known as the FARC, which
fueled its rebellion largely
with drug proceeds. The
peace agreement promised
new economic opportunities
for the poor villages where
coca production has long
been the major source of employment and cash payments to persuade coca farmers — known as cocaleros
— to grow legal crops in[See Colombia, A4]
Gina Ferazzi Los Angeles Times
BA R GA IN H U NTING
Shoppers outside an L.A. Best Buy are among
those seeking Black Friday deals. CALIFORNIA, B1
Thanksgiving
roast in L.A.
Downtown reached 92
degrees, breaking the
record for the hottest
Thanksgiving since
1877. CALIFORNIA, B3
Weather
Partly sunny, warm.
L.A. Basin: 85/62. B6
A2
F R I DAY , N OV E M BER 24, 2017
LAT IMES. C OM
BACK STORY
Brendan Smialowski AFP/Getty Images
PRESIDENT TRUMP has repeatedly criticized NFL players for kneeling during the national anthem to
protest police brutality. His remarks have broadened to condemn other athletes; some see a racial undertone.
Trump’s attacks on athletes
High-profile protests have drawn Twitter rants from the president
By Kurtis Lee
President Trump has berated them on Twitter and
at rallies as disrespectful ingrates who deserve punishment.
Athletes and their surrogates, similar to some political foes and celebrities, have
upset him. As is his nature,
the president has responded
in ways that have generated
intense publicity, often via
tweets.
In recent months, Trump
has called on the NFL to suspend or fire players who
have not stood during the
national anthem, a position
many players have embraced to draw attention to
police brutality against African Americans. Nearly 70%
of the athletes in the league
are black.
After an NBA star said he
would not attend a White
House ceremony, Trump
said the player’s entire team
was no longer invited. And,
after Trump said he helped
secure the release of three
college basketball players
who were in Chinese custody
after shoplifting, he criticized the reaction of one
player’s father who he said
did not seem grateful
enough.
Here’s a recap of some of
the tense moments involving Trump and athletics.
What happened with the
Oakland Raiders’ Marshawn Lynch in Mexico?
On Sunday, the Oakland
Raiders battled the New
England Patriots in Mexico
City.
Before the game, Lynch,
a running back for the
Raiders, stood for Mexico’s
national anthem, but sat
during “The Star-Spangled
Banner.” When Trump saw
pictures of the pregame
moment, he tweeted in
disgust.
“Marshawn Lynch of the
NFL’s Oakland Raiders
stands for the Mexican
Anthem and sits down to
boos for our National Anthem. Great disrespect!”
the president wrote Monday. “Next time NFL should
suspend him for remainder
of season. Attendance and
ratings way down.”
Neither the Raiders, who
lost the game 33-8, nor
Lynch had responded to
Trump’s tweet as of Thursday.
How often has Trump
criticized the NFL protests?
He repeatedly criticized
NFL players and executives
on Twitter this fall and
complained about the
league during a rally in
Alabama in September.
“Wouldn’t you love to see
one of these NFL owners,
when somebody disrespects
our flag, they say get that
son of a bitch off the field
right now — he’s fired!
Fired!” Trump roared at the
rally. “That’s a total disrespect of our heritage. That’s
a total disrespect of everything that we stand for,
OK?”
Between Sept. 23 and
Oct. 23, nearly 12% of
Trump’s tweets directly
addressed the NFL or referred to respect for the
national anthem, according
to an analysis by Business
Christian Petersen Getty Images
THE RAIDERS’ Marshawn Lynch incited the presi-
dent’s ire at a recent NFL game in Mexico City.
AFP/Getty Images
LaVAR BALL has been accused of not expressing
gratitude for his son’s release from China.
Insider. The only thing he
tweeted about more during
that time frame was Puerto
Rico, which was hammered
by Hurricane Maria.
In October, Vice President Mike Pence abruptly
left a game between the San
Francisco 49ers and Indianapolis Colts after players
took a knee during the
national anthem.
How has the NFL responded?
So far, officials haven’t
required players to stand for
the national anthem. But
last month, NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell issued
a memo noting he would like
to see players “honor our
flag and our country, and
our fans expect that of us.”
He added, “We also care
deeply about our players
and respect their opinions
and concerns about critical
social issues.”
And yet, Colin Kaepernick, the former 49ers
quarterback who began the
protests last season, remains out of the league and
unsigned, drawing concerns
from some who believe he’s
being barred from the NFL
for starting the movement.
When it comes to professional athletes, is the president’s criticism limited to
the NFL?
No. Trump has also
scolded NBA players.
In September, days after
Golden State Warriors
guard Stephen Curry suggested he would not attend
a traditional White House
champions visit, Trump
opted to not invite the entire
team.
“Going to the White
House is considered a great
honor for a championship
team. Stephen Curry is
hesitating, therefore invitation is withdrawn!” he
tweeted.
In response, the Warriors
issued a statement, saying,
among other things, “We
believe there is nothing
more American than our
citizens having the right to
express themselves freely on
matters important to
them.”
Cleveland Cavaliers star
LeBron James pushed back
even harder at Trump.
“U bum @StephenCurry30 already said he
ain’t going! So therefore
ain’t no invite. Going to
White House was a great
honor until you showed up!”
James tweeted.
More recently, Trump
complained that the father
of one of the three UCLA
basketball players arrested
in China for shoplifting had
downplayed his role in winning the players’ release.
The president suggested
that perhaps he shouldn’t
have spoken with China’s
president about the matter.
“Now that the three
basketball players are out of
China and saved from years
in jail, LaVar Ball, the father
of LiAngelo, is unaccepting
of what I did for his son and
that shoplifting is no big
deal. I should have left them
in jail!” he tweeted.
Are there racial undertones to Trump’s criticism?
Marc Morial, president of
the National Urban League,
said it’s important to remember that the athletes —
many of whom are black —
are protesting racism and
racially motivated police
brutality.
“It’s a missed opportunity to focus on the method,
rather than the purpose of
the protest,” he said. “The
sad fact is a significant
contingent of the president’s most ardent supporters are motivated by racial
hostility, and whether it’s
his intention or not, the
president’s attacks do reinforce their resentment.”
“Protesting injustice,”
Morial said, “has been a
tradition for black athletes
from Jackie Robinson to
Muhammad Ali to Colin
Kaepernick and LeBron
James. It’s their right as
Americans and it’s distressing to see the commander in
chief vilifying anyone for
exercising the constitutional rights that he is
sworn to uphold.”
Derrick Johnson, president of the National Assn.
for the Advancement of
Colored People, said the
president “continues to
operate like a bully.” “The
optics speak loudly,” he
said.
Trump has said his
criticism of NFL players
who do not stand during the
national anthem has nothing to do with race.
“I never said anything
about race,” he said in September on Air Force One.
“This has nothing to do with
race or anything else.”
kurtis.lee@latimes.com
S
L AT I ME S . CO M
FRIDAY , NOVEMB ER 24, 2017
A3
THE WORLD
Missing submarine suffered blast
Argentina’s disclosure
a week later angers
the families of crew,
whose fate is unclear.
By Andres
D’Alessandro
and Chris Kraul
BUENOS AIRES — An
international flotilla of ships
and several high-tech aircraft searching for a missing
Argentine submarine focused on an area in the
southern Atlantic Ocean on
Thursday after authorities
confirmed acoustical evidence of an explosion coming from the lost vessel with
44 crew members aboard.
The Argentine navy confirmed Thursday that its
missing submarine, the San
Juan, experienced an explosion Nov. 15, three hours after Capt. Pedro Fernandez
called to report a power system failure. The data also
pinpointed the site of the explosion as close to the point
of last contact.
But
Argentine
navy
spokesman Capt. Enrique
Balbi had no information on
the fate of the crew members. Nor has the submarine
been located.
“There was an anomalous event [which was] unusual, short, violent and
nonnuclear, consistent with
an explosion,” Balbi said at a
news conference in Buenos
Aires, the capital.
The ship had a seven-day
supply of oxygen, which may
have run out Wednesday.
Also complicating a rescue
are the ocean depths ranging from 600 to 9,000 feet.
The blast occurred in waters 240 miles east of the
Valdes Peninsula in Argentina’s Chubut province. The
explosion was detected less
than 40 miles from where
Fernandez, the submarine’s
captain, last communicated
with onshore authorities
and mentioned problems
with the ship’s battery system.
Balbi explained the delay
in the announcement by
saying that only on Wednesday did his government receive confirmation of the
blast from the U.S. Navy,
which received and analyzed
the data collected from its
Eitan Abramovich AFP/Getty Images
RELATIVES of the 44 crew members aboard the Argentine submarine missing since Nov. 15 arrive at the navy base in Mar del Plata.
THE VESSEL’S disappearance precipitated a search-and-rescue operation involving ships and aircraft. The U.S. is among the nations providing assistance.
sonar technology. Separate
confirmation came Thursday from an Austrian-based
agency that monitors for violations of the global ban on
nuclear testing.
Family members, who
said they were told the news
shortly before the Thursday
morning news conference,
said they were enraged by
the Argentine navy’s handling of the information.
“Now there is no hope. We
are furious. They are shameless,” said Itati Leguizamon,
wife of the submarine’s
radar specialist German Oscar Suarez, speaking of navy
officials. She spoke to reporters at the entrance of
the Mar del Plata naval station, about 250 miles south
of Buenos Aires. “They lied
to us. How are they not going
to know [before now] that
there was an explosion.”
Maria Rosa Belcastro,
mother of crew member Lt.
Fernando Vicente Villareal,
told TN news cable channel
that since hearing of the explosion, she has lost all hope
of seeing her 38-year-old son,
who is married and has a 3year-old daughter. “I believe
my son will not be returning.”
Both the U.S. and Austrian reports placed the location of the explosion in
roughly the same area.
The U.S. Navy has dispatched two submarinehunting aircraft, as well as
specialized manned and unmanned underwater vehicles capable of cutting into
the submarine and extracting the crew.
Special correspondents
D’Alessandro and Kraul
reported from Buenos Aires
and Bogota, Colombia,
respectively.
They may be Italy’s
toughest film critics
Murderers, robbers
and drug dealers make
up the jury at Rome’s
newest movie festival.
By Tom Kington
ROME — When the deliberations were over, jury
members at Rome’s newest
film festival were confident
they had picked the right
winner.
“Let’s just say we know an
intense story when we see
one, because we have lived
some pretty intense stories
of our own,” said Luigi Zannini.
Zannini was one of 20 inmates, including murderers,
armed robbers and drug
dealers, making up the jury
last month at Rebibbia prison’s debut film festival, part
of a flourishing and often
surprising cultural program
at the Rome prison.
Not content with showing five new Italian films at
the prison’s theater, festival
organizer Ilaria Spada — a
well-known actress — invited directors and actors in
for
question-and-answer
sessions after the screenings, where about 80 prisoners watched the films intently alongside the jurors.
The aim, Spada said, was
to help rehabilitate some of
Rebibbia’s meanest offenders.
“By sitting down and
watching these films together, we are all on the
same level — the prisoners
feel less separated from society and the director and ac-
tors drop their prejudices,”
she said.
That did not stop the
Q&A session from getting
lively after the screening of
one film, “The Girl of the
World,” in which the protagonist forces his girlfriend to
become a drug dealer while
he is in jail.
“Tempers rose as inmates told the director the
film was unrealistic,” said
Clementina Montezemolo, a
psychologist who helped
plan the festival. “They said
prisoners have a code under
which you never harm women.”
Another film, “Everything You Want,” about an
elderly poet mentoring a
mixed-up boy, provoked a
“long and emotional” debate, said director Francesco Bruni.
“One inmate described
how he helped a depressed
Romanian cellmate find his
feet and to leave jail a
changed man,” he said. “The
film touched something in
them and the debate was
one of the most emotional
moments of my career.”
The jury loved “No Country for the Young,” the fictional story of young Italians
fleeing jobless Italy to start a
new life in Cuba, and frequently applauded director
Giovanni Veronesi during
the questions.
When the director asked
the prisoners if he had used
enough fake blood in a fight
scene, one inmate serving a
sentence for murder called
out, “It was just the right
amount.”
A bespectacled juror,
also in for homicide, said he
was impressed by the score.
“Tell us about working with
this composer who provided
such a majestic soundtrack,” he asked.
Such sophisticated questions are not out of place at
Rebibbia, where the entrance area is filled with display cases containing ancient Roman artifacts found
by inmates who are allowed
out on archaeological digs.
A docudrama film that
followed the jail’s theater
group as it rehearsed Shakespeare’s “Julius Caesar” won
the Berlin Film Festival in
2012.
On Oct. 30, a performance of “Hamlet” by the
group, which includes mafia
bosses in its lineup, was
streamed live in theaters
around Italy.
The group’s producer,
Fabio Cavalli, shot a short
film at Rebibbia in October
in which he recreated the
last scene from “The Blues
Brothers,” in which inmates
dance to “Jailhouse Rock.”
Many in Cavalli’s theater
group have gone on to become professional actors
when they leave Rebibbia.
After taking a break from
acting to organize the film
festival at the jail, Spada
said she was heading in the
opposite direction.
“In my next film I would
like to play a prisoner,” she
said.
On the night of the festival’s
award
ceremony,
Spada kissed directors and
actors as they arrived and
mixed easily with tattooed
inmates taking their seats,
including a gray-haired man
from southern Italy who
Jacopo Marchini Suma Events
WINNING DIRECTOR Giovanni Veronesi, center right, with journalist Laura
Delli Colli, left, and members of the jury at the film festival at a prison in Rome.
killed three lawyers he suspected of defrauding him.
As guards hovered by the
exits, two government ministers who had come to show
their
approval
gave
speeches and a group of inmates performed a spirited
cover version of David Bowie’s “Heroes,” before the
prizes were announced.
(“We could steal time, just
for one day / We can be heroes, forever and ever.”)
“No Country for the
Young” took the top prize at
the festival, which is called
“Altri Sguardi,” or “Other
Glances.” It narrowly beat
“Everything You Want” after
what jurors described as “a
tough debate.”
“My films always do well
with prisoners,” said director Veronesi, smiling after he
collected his statuette onstage.
“I have screened my work
at jails up and down Italy
and found that prisoners
ask all the questions journalists do not, for example
about minor characters,” he
said.
“I did have one screening
where no one asked questions, but they were mafia
bosses kept in isolation —
they didn’t care about the
film, it was just a chance to
get out of their cells,” he said.
Following a request from
the jury, the evening climaxed with a screening of a
favorite recent film, “They
Call Me Jeeg” — a funny and
slick Italian hit from 2015 in
which a small-time crook in
Rome acquires superpowers
and battles an evil drug
dealer.
Director
Gabriele
Mainetti arrived to take
questions after the screening and said he had last visited the jail 20 years ago to
perform as an actor in a play
for inmates.
“The audience would
shout out reactions during
the play, telling you where
you did well and where you
exaggerated,” he recalled.
“It taught me that you cannot be anything less than
honest with prisoners.”
After cake and sandwiches were served to mark
the end of the festival, jurors
loaded up their paper plates
as guards began to take
them back to their cells.
“When you are in jail you
understand what is really
important in life,” said Davide, 32, a former stick-up
man who declined to give his
last name, saying he wanted
to protect his anonymity.
“People on the outside play
with their phones, while you
are alone in a cell with your
brain turning.
“Because you see so little,
when you watch a film you
focus on everything that is
going on.”
Kington is a special
correspondent.
A4
F R I DAY , N OV E M BER 24, 2017
LAT IMES. C OM
Anti-coca efforts fail in Colombia
[Colombia, from A1]
stead.
But as the Oct. 5 clash in
Tandil illustrates, things
have not gone as planned.
Coca cultivation last year
nationwide expanded to
361,000 acres, according to
the United Nations. An area
about the size of Los Angeles, that’s triple the 2013 total
and the most acres since
2000,
when
the
U.S.
launched a multibillion-dollar aid program called Plan
Colombia to combat drugs
and terrorism.
The U.S. gets 92% of its
cocaine from Colombia,
which
exported
record
quantities in 2016, according
to the U.S. government.
“As coca cultivation and
cocaine production in Colombia increase, the United
States will likely see continued increases in cocaine-related deaths, new [users],
seizures and positive workplace tests,” the U.S. Drug
Enforcement Administration said in a report last
month forecasting even
more coca cultivation and
bigger shipments this year.
The boom is partly due to
the 2015 elimination of aerial
spraying with glyphosate, an
herbicide that killed coca
plants but raised health concerns.
At the same time, promises during peace negotiations to pay coca farmers to
switch crops backfired and
spurred a rush to plant coca
in time to cash in. The government in turn has been
slow and uneven in making
those payments largely because of budget problems.
More worrisome for the
government is that criminal
enterprises have been expanding their drug operations by rushing to fill the
power vacuum left in the villages once controlled by the
FARC. Mafias routinely issue death threats to coca
farmers, warning them to
not accept alternative development assistance.
“You look behind the
drug problem and you find
the problem of security,”
said Bo Mathiasen, who
heads Colombia operations
at the United Nations Office
on Drugs and Crime. “It is
practically impossible to
think you can have a sustainable change in an area where
organized crime controls the
farmers.”
That reality has been
playing out in Tumaco.
Situated on the Pacific
coast near the border with
Ecuador, the municipality is
ideal territory for cultivating
and trafficking drugs. The
thick jungle, lack of roads
and lattice of ocean inlets
lined by mangroves make it
difficult for authorities to
patrol here for arrivals of the
chemicals used to process
coca or departures of cocaine shipments headed
north.
“The municipality is 70%
dependent on illegal drugs,”
Mathiasen said. “That’s
farming,
manufacturing,
transportation
and,
of
Carlos Ortega El Tiempo
SPECIAL TEAMS of police remove coca plants in Tumaco, Colombia, near the Ecuadorean border in July. Last month, coca farmers tried
to stop a similar eradication in Tandil, leading to a clash with anti-narcotics police that left seven farmers dead and 21 wounded.
Chris Kraul For The Times
JOANA MOPAN, widow of one of the farmers, says
she doesn’t know how she and her son will manage.
course, the export of cocaine. In other words, it is
completely narcoticized.”
Tumaco is also desperately poor. Most residents of
the township lack sewage or
drinking water systems. An
ongoing plague has killed
vast expanses of African
palm that was the only legitimate income for many farmers, and the small fishing
industry based here continues to suffer from a June 2015
oil spill that occurred when
FARC guerrillas bombed a
pipeline, dumping 10,000
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A Tribune Publishing Company Newspaper Daily Founded Dec. 4, 1881
Vol. CXXXVI No. 356
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barrels of crude into the
Nulpe River.
For many, coca farming
has long been the most reliable way to earn a living.
Most of the cocaleros in
Tumaco are from other
parts of Colombia. They
started arriving a decade
ago, when the FARC evicted
black
and
indigenous
groups from land that had
been deeded to them under a
1993 law aimed at reducing
social inequities. The rebels
offered new “colonists” easy
credit, security and the
chance to make more money
than they ever dreamed possible. A 10-acre farm might
yield its operator enough
coca to generate sales of up
to $2,000 a month to customers who would then process
it for export.
“Coca was our way out of
poverty, the only means we
have to feed our families, pay
for our children’s education,” said Elier Martinez,
president of the local coca
farmers collective. “People
who have come to grow coca
are here because they’re
looking for a better life.”
The peace deal reached
in November 2016 promised
to quash coca production.
Coca farmers in areas formerly held by the rebels were
to receive compensation of
about $400 a month for two
years of coca-free farming
followed by a single payment
of up to $3,000 to help sustain a new crop or business.
But the promise of that
program has yet to materialize for many cocaleros.
A decline in the price of
oil and coal exports has left
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Chris Kraul For The Times
ELIAS, who did not want to give his last name, uses his motorized canoe to trans-
port passengers to a river port near Tandil, a hard-to-reach coca-growing area.
the government with a
budget shortfall — and
struggling to meet its commitment to the farmers. A
member of the government’s
peace negotiating team who
spoke on condition of anonymity said that last year
the Finance Ministry, citing
a lack of funds, rejected a
plan to pay farmers a total of
$600 million immediately
upon implementation of the
accord.
Roughly 23,000 families of
the 150,000 thought to be
growing coca are now receiving payments, according to
Rafael Pardo, an advisor to
President Juan Manuel Santos. Some farmers, however,
are not eligible for the program because their plots are
larger than 15 acres and
therefore classified as industrial or — as was the case for
Gaitan and the 1,000 farmers
in his community in and
around Tandil — they don’t
have clear title to the land.
Gaitan, who moved here
in 2012 and earns about
$1,000 a month from his 4acre farm, said that without
crop substitution payments,
there is no way he could afford to give up growing coca.
He said he and his wife and
three children would starve.
“Coca generates work
and it is sustainable,” he
said. “They try to paint us as
mafiosos, but we are just the
bees that make the honey.
Others who are more important eat the honey we produce.”
The FARC has demobilized, but there is no shortage of other armed groups to
take over the coca production the rebels once controlled.
Ten drug trafficking organizations are active in Tumaco, according to a recent
study by Colombia’s attorney general. In addition to
the National Liberation
Army, a leftist rebel group,
they include the Zetas and
Sinaloa cartels of Mexico.
“We know the Mexican
cartels are there,” said Mathiasen, the U.N. official.
“They send envoys to organize the supply chain from the
source, which makes sense.
You would do the same if you
were exporting bananas or
oranges; it’s just a different
business.”
The area continues to at-
tract young men like 22year-old Leonardo, who
asked that his last name not
be used for fear of retribution by drug traffickers. He
arrived in Tandil last year to
work as a raspachin, or
scraper, as coca harvesters
are known. He said he can
make $30 a day, or three
times what coffee harvesters
earn back home in Caldas
province. He said he will
soon have enough money to
buy his mother a small
house.
The U.S. government,
which has spent $10 billion
on aid to Colombia since
2000, has been frustrated
that cocaine cultivation is
going up, not down.
Santos set a goal that
250,000 acres of coca —
roughly two-thirds the national total as of last December — would be eradicated
this year. Since January, special teams of police have
fanned out across cocagrowing regions of Colombia, including Tumaco, to
pull up coca plants.
That has led to serious
tensions between the authorities and coca growers
— and occasional violence.
At least four cocaleros have
been killed this year in 20
clashes with police. In April,
farmers just outside Tumaco overpowered 50 police
officers, held 12 of them
hostage for a day and seized
some weapons. U.N. mediators negotiated a peaceful
ending to the standoff.
But the incident helped
set the stage for the killings
last month in Tandil.
“We realized the government wasn’t going to give us
anything, and that the police
were continuing with eradication, that there would be
no agreement,” said Martinez, the leader of the collective there. “So frustration
was building.”
Local farmers say they
had not threatened the police before officers began firing. The police have said
that they started shooting
only after they had been
fired upon with cylinder
bombs, which resemble
huge mortar shells. But police suffered no casualties
and offered no evidence of
bomb craters.
Police helicopters arrived
about an hour after the
shootings to take the
wounded to hospitals.
Days later, Gaitan and
several other coca farmers
gathered in the jungle clearing where most of the victims were shot to bow their
heads and say a brief prayer.
Since the killings, tensions have remained high.
“No one from the government has been around to
apologize or talk about compensation,” said Joana
Mopan, the widow of one of
the shooting victims, 31year-old Diego Escobar. “I
don’t know how my 13-yearold son and I are going to
manage.”
Eight days after the
shootings, Jose Jair Cortes,
a coca farmer and Tumaco
community leader who advocated voluntary coca
eradication, was assassinated. Many farmers suspect that mafias opposed to
the government’s alternative crops plan ordered the
killing as a warning.
The government says it’s
trying to improve conditions
in Tumaco to win back the
trust of the farmers. The
president held an emergency security council meeting in Tumaco in mid-October and announced a campaign to bring more police
and troops to the area and to
step up social programs.
Santos said he recognized
that the township’s “necessities are immense.”
“The government has not
abandoned Tumaco. To the
contrary,” he said in a
speech. “The national, departmental and local governments have to work more
as a team to stimulate participation and accelerate the
substitution of illicit crops.”
Leticia Riascos, a community leader in the city of
Tumaco, said most coca farmers chose their work by necessity and would happily
change “if they had a real option.”
“They don’t want to leave
this coca business to their
children and grandchildren,
don’t want to hand down the
problem to future generations,” Riascos said. “We
want to be good people and
work for the good of the community.”
Kraul is a special
correspondent.
LOS ANGELES TIMES
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2017
A5
A6
FR I DAY , N OV E M BER 24, 2017
S
LAT IMES. C OM
THE NATION
Driverless shuttle? They’re all in
Despite an accident,
hundreds of riders
have been willing to
take a gamble on a
robot vehicle in Vegas.
By David Montero
LAS VEGAS — The
small, blue shuttle drove defensively. Slowly. Piloted entirely by computer, it followed the rules of the road
like a student driver trying
to impress an instructor.
It approached the traffic
signal, where it was set to
turn right. On the corner, a
pedestrian attempted to
wave it on through before realizing there was no driver to
heed his directive. The stalemate — politeness verses
programming — was broken
only when the light turned
green and the shuttle could
lawfully proceed.
Ben Johnson, the human
attendant on board the Keolis shuttle, looked at the seven passengers. They were
looking right back at him.
“It’s very cautious,” Johnson said.
That might be because
buried in the gigabytes of the
shuttle’s memory are the
events of Nov. 8. It was supposed to be the celebrated
debut of America’s first public driverless shuttle to carry
passengers. Race car driver
Danica Patrick was there for
its launch. So was magician
Penn Jillette.
Instead, it became the
day of a fender bender for
the ages between man and
machine.
Early reports blamed us,
not them. A very human
truck driver backed into it,
leaving a trace of cosmetic
damage on the shuttle, no
injuries to passengers but
plenty of questions about robots sharing the road with
Erik Verduzco Las Vegas Review-Journal
A DRIVERLESS shuttle has been offering free rides in a half-mile loop in down-
town Las Vegas since Nov. 8, averaging about 150 passengers a day, its backers say.
people. The Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department cited the driver for unsafe backing, and the National Transportation Safety Board launched an
investigation into the incident Nov. 10.
But if there’s a place to
take a chance on something
— to rebound from a loss
with a quick win — Las Vegas
might be that place. In this
home to 10x odds on craps,
longshot bets on the horses
and insurance on blackjack,
there have been plenty of
brave souls willing to take a
chance on the driverless
shuttle in the more than two
weeks since the collision.
John Moreno, spokes-
man for AAA Northern California, Nevada and Utah,
said the shuttle has averaged 150 riders a day as it
runs primarily from about 10
a.m. to 6 p.m. six days a
week. AAA is one of the shuttle’s sponsors, along with the
city of Las Vegas and the Regional Transportation Commission of Southern Nevada.
It has had no incidents
since that first day.
Ricardo Lemus, 38, was
in town from Chino Hills for
a few days during Thanksgiving week with his family
and conceded the prospect
of getting on a shuttle without a driver was a little
“scary.”
But it was also free — a
win in his book. He boldly
stepped
aboard
and
strapped himself into the
shuttle, which currently
carries a maximum of eight
people.
His wife pointed out the
signs showing how to break
the glass in the case of an
emergency. He noted the fire
extinguisher. Resting on a
ledge was the Xbox controller that Johnson could use to
override the computer, if
needed.
“How fast can this go?”
Lemus asked after the shuttle left its station at Container Park and slowly passed people walking along the
sidewalk.
Johnson told him it could
go 35 mph, but it wasn’t going to approach anything
near that. On the half-mile
loop that took them past a
motel that looked like it had
endured one too many hangovers, it cruised at a very unDanica Patrick-like speed of
12 mph.
The shuttle gingerly maneuvered to its only stop in
front of the restaurant 7th &
Carson. Nobody got off.
Johnson hit a button and the
shuttle eased its way back
onto the street, but then
jerked to a stop as an 18wheeler crossed the doubleyellow divider and tried to
position itself to back into an
ally — prompting the obvious question: Do computers
have flashbacks?
“Strong brakes,” Lemus
said.
Johnson grabbed the
Xbox controller and manually took over — though to
the casual observer, it
looked
as
though
he
might’ve been just calling an
audible after seeing a surprise blitz package from the
defense on the “Madden
NFL” video game. He carefully checked for oncoming
traffic and then steered
around the truck before
turning over the controls
back to the machine.
Moreno said it’s unclear
how far the nation is from
fully autonomous shuttles
on the roads, and current
laws require a driverless vehicle to have a human attendant on board. Moreno
said it reminded him of the
early days of elevators.
“People were very skeptical of this thing that could
rapidly transport you up 20
flights of stairs in seconds,”
Moreno said. “There was an
elevator operator who would
push the floor for you, but he
was mostly there to ease
people’s concerns. Now you
don’t really see elevator operators much anymore.”
Christopher
Barker,
spokesman for Keolis, said
that the computer-driven
shuttles are operating on an
expanded basis in Europe
and that the accident was a
learning process for everyone. He said that as the
truck backed up, the shuttle
was hemmed in by a car behind it and that the computer “performed as designed.”
He said that insurance
companies in the United
States are studying how to
draft policies (the shuttle is
insured)
and
that
programmers included the
accident scenario into the
computer’s databanks.
There are other scenarios, he said, in which it still is
necessary to have a person
on board — including if a
traffic light goes out and police are directing traffic
through the intersections.
Currently, the shuttle’s computer is synced with the traffic signals along its short
route.
As the shuttle made its
way down Fremont Street,
past the El Cortez Hotel &
Casino, people on the sidewalks stopped to look. A cartoon bubble on the back window read “Look Ma, no
driver.” Lemus and his family laughed as it stopped
back at Container Park,
where a line of about 10 people were awaiting their turn
to ride.
“Welcome to the future,”
Johnson said as they got
off and the next group
boarded.
Lemur said he’d ride it
again. He said he felt safe —
though it was still strange
not seeing a driver at the
wheel. His family started to
head for the casinos to play
some roulette and, with no
hesitation, he quickly joined
them.
david.montero
@latimes.com
Twitter: @davemontero
FRIDAY , NOVEMB ER 24, 2017
L AT I ME S . CO M
A7
No punishment for Baltimore cop
Commissioner won’t
put the last officer in
the Freddie Gray case
before a trial board.
By Justin Fenton
BALTIMORE — Baltimore Police Commissioner
Kevin
Davis
dismissed
all administrative charges
against the last officer facing
discipline in the Freddie
Gray case, meaning all six
officers who were accused in
the arrest and death of the
25-year-old two years ago
will keep their jobs.
Police spokesman T.J.
Smith said Sgt. Alicia White,
who faced charges that
could have resulted in termination, would face no further administrative actions.
Two other officers have been
acquitted of administrative
charges by police trial
boards.
Davis “feels proceeding
with this administrative
hearing would not be in good
faith, and has dismissed the
charges,”
Smith
said
Wednesday.
The dismissal of the
charges brought a quiet end
to efforts to hold police officers accountable in a case
that has gripped the city
since Gray’s death in 2015.
State’s Atty. Marilyn J.
Mosby brought criminal
charges against six officers
but won no convictions. Federal authorities declined to
bring charges.
The Police Department
then brought administrative charges against five
officers. Two pleaded guilty,
accepted discipline and
are back at work. Two were
cleared by trial boards,
and White will not face a
board.
White’s attorney, Tony
Garcia, said White was
grateful for the decision.
“She has always maintained her innocence from
the very beginning,” Garcia
said. “I think that whenever
someone dies, they wish
they could do the whole
thing over so it didn’t happen. But she doesn’t feel she
did something wrong.”
William H. “Billy” Murphy Jr., an attorney for
Gray’s family, declined to
comment.
“This
final
decision
places Baltimore at a moral
crossroads,” said Sherrilyn
Ifill, president of the NAACP
Legal Defense and Educational Fund.
“A young man entered
the custody of police and
Amy Davis Baltimore Sun
SGT. ALICIA WHITE was the last of six police officers who could have been
fired over the 2015 death of Freddie Gray, a case that led to protests and rioting.
within an hour his spine was
broken, his voice box
crushed,” she said. “Our city
has been defined by this.
Now Baltimore must decide
how to go forward. Balti-
more must commit itself to
whatever changes to policing, to internal police discipline, to our legal system are
needed to ensure that this
cannot happen with impuni-
ty ever again.”
Gray was arrested in
West Baltimore on April 12,
2015. He suffered a broken
neck in the back of a police
van and died a week later.
His death inspired massive protests against police
brutality; on the day he was
buried, the city erupted in riots, arson and looting.
The city paid a $6.4-million judgment to Gray’s family.
White was one of the six
officers who were criminally
charged by Mosby in 2015.
She faced manslaughter
charges that could have
brought 25 years in prison.
Three of the officers were
acquitted by a judge, and
the charges against White
and two others were
dropped.
The Baltimore Police Department referred the internal investigation to an outside agency, which recommended charges against five
of those officers.
Two accepted minor discipline. White and two others, Officer Caesar Goodson,
the van driver, and Lt. Brian
Rice, faced possible termination and decided to fight
the cases.
The only pending matter
in the Gray case is a federal
lawsuit brought by some of
the officers against Mosby
for malicious prosecution
and defamation.
Fenton is a Baltimore Sun
staff writer.
Flynn inquiry finds
strong ties to Turkey
[Flynn, from A1]
or to Trump’s presidential
campaign at the time. His
company also was being
paid $530,000 to dig up and
disseminate incriminating
information about Gulen,
payments Flynn didn’t disclose until four months after
the election.
Shortly after Trump won
the election, he named
Flynn as his national security advisor, a position of immense power in the White
House.
The retired three-star
Army general had led a distinguished career in military
intelligence in Iraq and Afghanistan, but most Americans knew him only for his
angry denunciation of Hillary Clinton at last year’s Republican National Convention, where he led the crowd
in chants of “Lock her up!”
But in December, during
the presidential transition,
Flynn reportedly had a second meeting with Turkish
government officials at the
21 Club, an upscale New York
restaurant. They again discussed a Turkish proposal to
forcibly remove Gulen and
deliver him to Turkey, but
this time in exchange for up
to $15 million, the Wall Street
Journal
reported
this
month.
NBC News separately
reported that Mueller also
is examining reports that
Flynn was offered millions to
help free Reza Zarrab, a
wealthy gold trader close
to Turkey’s ruling family.
Zarrab was arrested in Miami in March 2016 on charges
of conspiring to evade U.S.
sanctions against Iran, money laundering and bank
fraud. He was denied bail
and remains in custody.
In response to the
news reports, Robert Kelner, Flynn’s lawyer, said in a
statement that he was
breaking his usual silence
to denounce “allegations
about General Flynn, ranging from kidnapping to bribery, that are so outrageous
and prejudicial that we are
making an exception to our
usual rule: they are false.”
Flynn was forced to
resign as national security
advisor in February, after
only 24 days in the job, for
misleading Vice President
Mike Pence and other White
House officials about his
meetings
with
Sergey
Kislyak, the then-Russian
ambassador in Washington.
But Flynn’s ties to Turkey
— and the conversations
about Gulen — could be
more problematic. It is a felony to fail to register as a foreign agent, and potentially a
far more serious crime to
agree to secretly act on another government’s behalf
after being named to a senior White House post, or not
to report a possible bribe.
Neglecting to register as
a foreign agent is rarely prosecuted, but Mueller clearly is
willing to do so. Trump’s former campaign manager,
Paul Manafort, and a top
deputy were charged last
month with failing to register — as well as conspiracy
and money laundering — despite having filed retroactive
paperwork in June. They
have pleaded not guilty.
If Flynn is charged, his
ruptured business relationship with Woolsey, who has
spoken to Mueller’s investigators, could be an important part of the case.
Their falling-out accelerated when Flynn filed a
belated federal report in
March disclosing his work
as a foreign agent on behalf
of Inovo BV, a Netherlandsbased company run by
Ekim Alptekin, a Turkish
businessman.
Inovo paid $530,000 to
the Flynn Intel Group to dig
up and disseminate incriminating information about
Gulen, work that “could be
construed to have principally benefitted [sic] the Republic of Turkey,” the report
said.
Flynn said in the report
that he shared with Inovo an
advance draft of an op-ed
published by the Hill on election day in which he described Gulen as “an Islamic
mullah.”
“Gulen’s vast global network has all the right markings to fit the description of
a dangerous sleeper terror
network,” Flynn wrote in the
op-ed, which drew on research his company had collected under its contract
with Inovo. “From Turkey’s
point of view, Washington is
harboring Turkey’s Osama
bin Laden.”
The disclosure report
also said Flynn’s company
would create an “investigative laboratory” that would
include a “former Director of
United States Central Intelligence Agency,” an apparent reference to Woolsey,
who headed the spy agency
from 1993 to 1995.
Woolsey left the Trump
transition team in January
and tried to distance himself
from Flynn after the report
was filed. He told reporters
that the Essex House meeting included talk of circum-
Andrew Harnik Associated Press
MICHAEL FLYNN’S dealings with Turkey and talk of forcibly returning a Turk-
ish dissident could be more problematic than the Russia ties that led to his ouster.
venting the normal extradition process to get Gulen out
of the country and back to
Turkey.
Turkish President Recep
Tayyip Erdogan has accused
Gulen, a former political ally
who fled to the U.S. in 1999, of
stirring dissent in the
increasingly authoritarian
country. Gulen, who heads a
global network of schools
and social groups, denies
trying to destabilize Turkey.
Erdogan’s pursuit of
Gulen intensified after a
failed military coup attempt
in July 2016. A harsh government crackdown led to the
arrests or firings of thousands of judges, prosecutors, police, journalists
and others allegedly aligned
with Gulen’s movement. The
country remains under
emergency rule.
Erdogan’s government
has repeatedly demanded
Gulen’s extradition and submitted documents it describes as evidence of his
misdeeds. A Justice Department spokeswoman, Nicole
Navas Oxman, said the department was working with
Turkish authorities but had
made no decision.
“We will review any new
materials the Turkish government may provide and
will make any decisions
about extradition on the basis of the facts and relevant
U.S. law,” Oxman said.
The dispute has led to a
deterioration in relations
between Washington and
Ankara that began under
President Obama and has
worsened under Trump.
“Fethullah Gulen is their
most-wanted man and he’s
living in the Poconos,” said
Amanda Sloat, a former
State Department official
who now is a senior fellow at
the nonpartisan Brookings
Institution in Washington.
Erdogan’s visit to the
White House in May ended
in fiasco when his security
personnel beat up peaceful
protesters outside the Turkish ambassador’s residence,
injuring 11 people. The State
Department said it com-
plained to Ankara in “the
strongest possible terms.”
Rep. Eric Swalwell (DDublin), a former Alameda
County deputy district attorney and member of the
House Intelligence Committee, said Mueller’s investigators appear to be following
the “plain sight doctrine” in
Flynn’s case by extending
their inquiry beyond his contacts with Russian officials.
“If you go into the house
with a warrant to seize guns
and in plain sight you see a
drug operation going on, you
don’t have to look the other
way,” Swalwell said. “You
can also follow that trail.”
Woolsey declined to
speak for this article. Kelner,
Flynn’s lawyer, and Peter
Carr, a spokesman for
Mueller, also declined to
comment.
chris.megerian
@latimes.com
Twitter: @chrismegerian
Times staff writers David S.
Cloud and Joseph Tanfani
contributed to this report.
A8
F R I DAY , N OV E M BER 24, 2017
WST
LAT IMES. C OM
Malibu grapples with homelessness
[Malibu, from A1]
ing out clothes and toiletries
and arranging homeless
service days with the county.
Last year, some of the
members broke off and
raised $460,000 to hire fulltime social workers from the
People Concern, a Southern
California nonprofit social
services agency.
In just over a year, the social workers got 24 of Malibu’s homeless people off the
streets, including 11 placed in
permanent housing.
Meanwhile,
Malibu
United Methodist Church
and Standing on Stone, a
Christian group, had been
hosting twice-weekly homeless dinners on Wednesdays
and Thursdays for three
years. The church is in a residential neighborhood, near
the high school.
After the Metro’s Expo
Line opened to Santa Monica last year, neighbors began
complaining of mentally ill
and rough-looking characters camping at the beach
and hanging out near
schools.
“A homeless person was
taking a shower in the girls
locker room in middle school
— that wasn’t real good,”
said Gary Peterson, a retired
developer and hotelier who
quit the church’s board of
trustees over the meal issue.
“Providing dinner is a nice
thing to do and a good thing,
but it’s the location.”
The L.A. County Sheriff ’s
Department reported a
surge in homeless nuisance
calls and scattered crimes,
although not necessarily
committed by transients;
one woman woke to find a
naked man standing over
her bed.
Some homeless people
believed residents were reacting against an influx of
African Americans from
Santa Monica and downtown Los Angeles. Malibu is
90% white.
“People don’t want to see
homeless people around,”
said Tyrone Valiant, 70, as he
waited outside the Malibu library for a bus. “Now they’re
cutting off the food.”
At one of the final dinners
last week, 50 people from
several Southern California
communities lined up on a
Luis Sinco Los Angeles Times
TWICE-WEEKLY meals for the homeless at Malibu United Methodist Church, above, are set to end amid city
pressure. The group that hosts them had already been forced to move three other times because of complaints.
Kent Nishimura Los Angeles Times
brick patio festooned with
lights to sample a cornucopia of home-cooked food:
hors
d’oeuvre
platters,
grilled chicken, ham, salads,
fruit, mac and cheese, lasagna, mashed potatoes and
an entire dessert table.
“This is very sad for us;
we’ve been enjoying these
friends for more than three
years,” said the Rev. Sandy
Liddell, the church’s pastor.
At the council meeting,
Mayor Pro Tem Rick Mullen
suggested volunteers put together box lunches for the
social workers to hand out
instead of dinners.
“It’s not about the
meals,” said Shifra Wylder of
Standing on Stone, which
has fed Malibu’s homeless
people for 17 years.
Over the years, her group
has helped hundreds of
homeless people move into
apartments,
return
to
school or reunite with their
families, she told the council.
John Maceri, the People
Concern’s executive director, later said he disagreed
that the meals contributed
to Malibu’s homeless problem. But he recognized that
neighbors see people coming into their community
and are genuinely upset.
“What makes it all the
sadder is it’s pitting neighbor against neighbor,” he
said.
Liddell pledged to find a
new place for the feedings,
but that could be tough.
Standing on Stone has been
forced to move three other
times because of complaints, Wylder said.
“There’s no place in Malibu to go,” she said.
Several homeless people
said they sympathized with
the city’s dilemma. Back at
Margaritaville, Chris Smith
said he was recovering from
a traumatic eviction and
“the meals are definitely
helping.”
“But the taxpayers don’t
want to take a chance on
crime, and I kinda agree
with them,” he said.
“Some homeless people
are good and some are bad,”
he added, before jumping on
his bike and heading to the
church.
CHRIS SMITH , whose camp near Zuma Beach is known to locals as Margaritaville, said the church’s meals
were a help. “But the taxpayers don’t want to take a chance on crime, and I kinda agree with them,” he said.
gholland@latimes.com
FRIDAY , NOVEMB ER 24, 2017
L AT I ME S . CO M
A9
Weighing the wind in fire policy
[Wildfires, from A1]
treme wind events to prevent ignitions — the vast
majority of which are caused
by people or equipment.
“In Southern California,
every single year the conditions are there for a severe
wildfire,” said Alexandra
Syphard, senior research
scientist with the nonprofit
Conservation Biology Institute. “You have Santa Ana
wind conditions every year.
You have summer drought
every year, high temperatures.
“What it takes is an ignition to happen at the same
time,” she added. “And since
ignitions are caused by humans, that is something
under our control.”
Whether they’re called
the Santa Anas, diablos or
sundowners,
withering
winds from the east invariably drive California’s most
horrific wildfires. They blast
down mountainsides and
fan sparks into unstoppable
infernos.
Thanks to advances in
weather modeling, these hot
breaths of nature are more
predictable than ever.
“There are certain corridors where the winds tend to
travel,” said Alex Hall, a
UCLA professor of atmospheric sciences who has
helped map Santa Ana wind
corridors in Southern California. “We also have the
ability to predict event by
event where the winds are
going to be the strongest.”
But the growing sophistication of wind mapping
and forecasting isn’t reflected in the state’s wildfire
policies.
“I often hear people say
that if we construct our
buildings correctly and put
enough defensible space
around it, then we don’t
need to worry about where
you put the houses,”
Syphard said.
“But they don’t necessarily fireproof your house. You
can see that by some of the
houses that burned in recent
years,” added Syphard,
whose research has linked
wildfire losses to the location and spatial arrangement of houses.
In recent years, the state
has made some moves to
factor wildfire into land-use
planning. Under a 2012 law,
cities and counties are supposed to consider wildfire
risk and consult with the
California Department of
Forestry and Fire Protection
when they update their general plans and approve subdivisions.
Yet there appears little
inclination to place especially fire-prone areas off
limits to development.
“We have to consider
property rights,” said Mitch
Glaser, an assistant administrator in the L.A. County
Department of Regional
Planning.
The county has required
fire-related changes in the
layout and size of subdivisions and zoned the backcountry to avoid isolated,
large-scale housing projects,
Glaser said. But he didn’t
know of any development
application that was denied
because of wildfire risk.
The building continues
even in areas where it is virtually guaranteed that a
wind-whipped fire will roar
through sooner or later.
Take the five-mansion
compound that U2 guitarist
the Edge plans to erect on a
rugged coastal hillside in
Malibu, an oft-scorched corridor for Santa Ana winds.
“The placement of homes
on a ridgeline documented
to have burned at least six
times between 1942 and 2010
makes it almost certain the
ridgeline will burn again in
the near future,” the National Park Service warned
in comments to the California Coastal Commission,
which approved the project
in 2015 after years of
controversy over its impact
on coastal views and envi-
Photographs by
Brian van der Brug Los Angeles Times
DOWNED POLES and lines block a street in Santa Rosa’s Hidden Valley, where most of the homes were destroyed by the fire in October.
ronmentally sensitive habitat.
A few highly flammable
parts of the world are taking
tougher stands. National
planning regulations in
France now require communities in the country’s fireprone south to bar development in certain high firehazard zones.
“It’s not terribly popular.
But they do have the ability
to make that happen,” said
Susan Kocher, a natural resources advisor with the UC
Cooperative Extension who
spent a sabbatical in France
and recently published a research paper on the topic.
In California, land-use
planning is primarily a local
responsibility.
“Local municipalities are
so concerned about their tax
base and private property
rights and making money
that they’re not addressing
the real risks,” said Richard
Halsey, director of the California Chaparral Institute.
Development should be
barred in some areas, or if it’s
allowed, residents should be
required to “sign a waiver —
we don’t want fire protection,” Halsey argued. “I
don’t know if politically
that’s ever going to happen.”
Bill Stewart, co-director
of UC Berkeley’s Center for
Fire Research and Outreach, says it’s time to stop
installing
above-ground
power lines to serve rural
residences.
“We’re going to have to go
underground or not have
power lines and have people
on pure solar and batteries …
because they get knocked
down,” he said.
San Diego Gas & Electric
Co. took another tack after
the utility was hit with fines
and huge settlement costs in
the wake of devastating 2007
wildfires caused by its sparking electrical equipment.
The company spent
$1.7 million to install 170
weather observation stations on backcountry poles,
creating what it calls one of
the
country’s
densest
weather
monitoring
networks.
Every 10 minutes, the stations transmit data to the
utility on wind speed and direction, temperature and
humidity.
When the Santa Anas
start blowing, the company’s three meteorologists
monitor the network around
the clock. Utility crews and
contract firefighters are dispatched in advance to areas
where the strongest winds
are forecast.
Since
the
program
started, SDG&E says, it has
turned off power to portions
of its distribution system 16
times for public safety reasons.
The shut-offs have affected a relatively small
number of customers, a total
of 1,000, who received telephone alerts of impending
outages.
The network has yielded
a wealth of new information
about regional wind patterns.
“A lot of what people
knew was anecdotal,” said
SDG&E senior meteorologist Steve Vanderburg. “But
once you actually install the
weather stations and start
looking at what’s going on,
you see that there’s a big difference between reality and
anecdotal information.”
It turns out the county’s
strongest winds don’t blow
through passes and canyons, as previously thought.
The monitoring has also
documented
remarkable
variability in wind strength
across relatively short distances.
In one Santa Ana event,
Vanderburg said, gusts of 91
mph were measured at the
utility’s Sill Hill weather station while a mile to the south
they were half that.
No other utility in the
state has a similar monitoring system.
After the 2007 fires,
SDG&E also worked with
the U.S. Forest Service and
UCLA scientists to develop
the Santa Ana Wildfire
Threat Index, which is publicly available online.
Launched in 2014 and
managed by federal agencies, the index uses weather
data and information on
vegetation moisture levels to
rank upcoming Santa Ana
events according to the potential for a large fire.
On Oct. 24, when one of
the strongest Santa Ana
events in years hit Southern
California, the index rated
the wildfire threat in Los Angeles and Ventura counties
as “high,” one step below the
top ranking of “extreme.”
“We want to tell people
this is a day when you may
have to evacuate your
home,” said Forest Service
meteorologist Tom Rolinski, who helped devise the
index.
They didn’t have to.
There were no major fires —
this time.
bettina.boxall
@latimes.com
Twitter: @boxall
SPARKING power lines and downed electrical equipment may have contributed
to the firestorm that swept across parts of eight counties, claiming 43 lives.
A10
F R I DAY , N OV E M BER 24, 2017
LAT IMES. C OM/ OPINION
OPINION
EDITORIALS
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
LETTERS
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The pension blame game
W
hen a city, school district
or other local government
agency gets into financial
trouble and pulls out of
the California Public Employees’ Retirement System because it can’t
make its required contribution to the pension fund, that bodes ill for the benefits it
has promised its retirees.
At best, current employees will see their
future retirement benefits frozen at what
they’ve already accrued. And if their employer fails to pay the termination fee CalPERS demands from agencies that pull out,
it means workers past and present will see
their promised retirement checks slashed.
There’s a debate now in Sacramento over
who should have to tell employees when a
local government or agency is pulling out of
the pension fund. The CalPERS board
wants the employer to make the notification
because, after all, it was the employer — not
CalPERS — that made the promises to employees that proved unsustainable.
But this argument misses the bigger
point. It’s a little like arguing over who gets
to tell the ship’s captain about the gigantic
iceberg ahead instead of taking action to
avoid it. Knowing whom to blame certainly
won’t help retirees of the city of Loyalton
and the East San Gabriel Valley Human
Services District, who got letters from CalPERS in August telling them their checks
were going to be eviscerated — a reduction
caused by their employer’s failure to pay its
CalPERS termination fee.
The CalPERS board voted last week to
seek legislation next year that would require
a local agency to notify current employees
and retirees within seven days when the
agency moves to terminate its contact with
the $343-billion fund.
It would be infinitely preferable if there
were no bad pension news to be delivered.
But as yet there hasn’t been the necessary
political will to allow a financially strapped
city, for example, to make adjustments to its
benefits, such as reducing or ending automatic cost-of-living hikes or reducing the
benefits for years of work not yet performed,
so it could afford to continue to pay both retired cops and those still on the beat.
Pension commitments should be sacrosanct; governments or agencies should not
be able to abandon their retirees just because the local economy hits a rough patch
or a new governing board is elected with a
different set of priorities. And under California law and court rulings, public employee
pensions were long seen as precious close to
untouchable. Once workers were hired,
their pension benefits could not be reduced
in value — they could only be improved.
The promised benefits, however, often
demanded a bigger-than-expected annual
financial contribution from agencies, as
costs proved to be greater than expected
and pension fund investment returns
smaller. As shortfalls emerged, larger cities
and agencies had several cost-cutting options they could pursue with employee
unions, including layoffs, pay freezes and
less generous pension plans for new hires.
But smaller cities and agencies didn’t have
as much flexibility, and soon found themselves choosing between making the pension contributions CalPERS required and
providing core services.
Troubled cities or agencies can’t withdraw from CalPERS and expect the fund to
fulfill the pension promises they made; they
have to pay the retirement fund the full projected cost to CalPERS of their employees’
pensions. If they don’t — and the agencies
withdrawing from CalPERS rarely can afford to — CalPERS won’t dun other cities or
agencies to make up the difference. Instead,
the fund will cut the workers’ pension benefits to match the amount their employer
previously contributed.
Recent bankruptcy court rulings have
raised an alternative that' seems no better
for workers: Insolvent cities may be able to
break their CalPERS contracts by declaring
bankruptcy, potentially treating employees
and retirees like creditors who have to settle
for less than what they’re owed. No city has
tested that possibility yet, however.
Will a cascade of retirees seeing their retirement checks slashed change the political calculation for meaningful reform? We
may soon find out. Retirees of Trinity
County Waterworks District No. 1 will be
getting their checks trimmed next, and
those of the Niland Sanitary District near
the Salton Sea will follow.
So, yes, California legislators should
change the law to require notification when
any of the roughly 3,000 cities, school districts, fire service districts and other public
agencies in CalPERS decide that they can’t
afford to continue their CalPERS contract.
Then they should change the law to make
that requirement moot.
Don’t blast marine mammals
F
or decades, environmental activists in California have battled to
keep the oil and gas industries
from turning the state’s coastline
into a West Coast version of the
Gulf of Mexico oil fields. Their allies in Congress and, occasionally, the White House
have helped their cause by placing (temporary) constraints on oil and gas leases, enacting the Marine Mammal Protection Act,
and designating national marine monuments that protect swaths of ocean water
from any kind of drilling. These are all sensible, smart restrictions designed to allow
the oceans and the animal and plant life
within them to thrive — while safeguarding
the vulnerable coastline from the sort of
spill that dumped 21,000 gallons of crude oil
into the waters near Santa Barbara in 1969.
So it’s disturbing to see a bill in the
House of Representatives that would upend
many of these protections and functions as
little more than a wish list for the oil industry. HR 4239, the SECURE American Energy Act, would strip the president’s ability to
designate a national marine monument
that’s off-limits to drilling, remove crucial
protections for marine mammals, ease
regulations on exploratory drilling in the
Arctic region, and mandate the sale of offshore wind leases off the coast of California
within a year of the bill’s passage.
Written mainly by lawmakers from Gulf
Coast states, this toxic bill has made it
through the House Committee on Natural
Resources and may reach the House floor as
soon as next week. It should be voted down,
but in this House, it probably won’t be.
One of the most egregious aspects of the
bill is that it strips away crucial safeguards
in the Marine Mammal Protection Act for
whales, dolphins and other ocean dwellers
that are profoundly affected by the noise of
seismic equipment used for oil and gas exploration. Underwater sonic discharges can,
at their worst, damage the hearing of animals so badly that they lose their ability to
navigate, which is essential to their survival,
numerous experts say. The repeated air gun
blasts into the water also disrupt feeding
and reproduction. The Marine Mammal
Protection Act makes it illegal to harm or
kill a marine mammal without a permit,
even if done inadvertently. Those permits
are issued when companies can show that
their work will impact only small numbers of
animals. The law also requires energy companies to use methods that have the “least
practicable impact” on marine mammals.
The new bill would remove those protections, while also exempting permitted activities from having to comply with the Endangered Species Act’s protections for endangered or threatened marine mammals.
That’s nuts.
In another troubling provision, the bill
would bar the president from designating a
national marine monument to protect marine areas of national interest and significance from oil and gas drilling. Any future
designation would instead require an act of
Congress.
A third problem is the bill’s requirement
that the federal government sell wind leases
off the California coast within a year of enactment. While wind farms can be a good
source of renewable energy, they are just
starting to be sited in the ocean — with none
yet off the coast of California. Wind farms
should not be arbitrarily rushed into existence, as this bill would do.
In fact, the California Coastal Commission — which has authority under the federal Coastal Zone Management Act to
weigh in on offshore activities — is already
part of a multi-agency task force, led by the
federal Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, working to identify the best locations
for offshore wind farms. These offshore arrays of wind turbines are tethered by cables
to the ocean floor and then connected to
power stations onshore. To find environmentally suitable locations, the task force
considers such factors as the wind farms’ effects on bird migration and ocean life, their
appearance, and the impact of the onshore
facilities on the surrounding areas.
Even if this bill became law and a wind
lease were quickly sold, there’s no guarantee
that the project would ever be built. The
Coastal Commission could find that it
would have an adverse effect on sea birds
and migrating whales, for example, and
refuse to issue permits for the onshore component of the wind farm. The developers
would probably then take the commission
to court. So much for fast-tracking wind
leases.
There’s so little good in this bill, lawmakers need to deep-six it. The environmentally
unfriendly House isn’t likely to do so, but the
Senate can and should.
CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER
AND
PUBLISHER
Ross Levinsohn
News
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
Lewis D’Vorkin
INTERIM EXECUTIVE EDITOR
Jim Kirk
MANAGING EDITOR
Lawrence Ingrassia
DEPUTY MANAGING EDITORS
Colin Crawford, Scott Kraft
ASSISTANT MANAGING EDITORS
FOUNDED DECEMBER 4, 1881
Christina Bellantoni, Shelby Grad,
Mary McNamara, Kim Murphy, Michael Whitley
Opinion
Nicholas Goldberg EDITOR OF THE EDITORIAL PAGES
Juliet Lapidos OP-ED AND SUNDAY OPINION EDITOR
Bryan R. Smith AFP/Getty Images
PRESIDENT TRUMP’S supporters say his elec-
tion precipitated a turnaround in the U.S. economy.
Get specific
Re “Trump rides strong economy,” Nov. 21
President Trump was swept into office on the support
of people who wanted him to be their champion and
provide the leadership necessary to make our
government more responsive to them. They want the
president to build an even stronger and more vibrant
America.
Regarding Trump’s role in helping to strengthen the
economy, I would like to know what kind of decisions
were made before the president was inaugurated that set
the stage for today’s good economic growth. How much
of the job growth resulted from momentum prior to the
Trump presidency?
I’d like to know what aspects of today’s economic
growth can be specifically and solely attributed to
Trump. It’s really tiring to keep hearing about all the
successes with virtually no specifics to back up the
rhetoric.
Sid Pelston
Beverly Hills
Trump came into office
riding on a powerful economy thanks to all the years
of President Obama
pulling it out of the depths
of a recession.
The run-up of the stock
market is largely due to
past and promised deregulation. Nobody loves deregulation like the financial, commodities and
pharmaceutical industries
do.
Cathy Tennican
Los Angeles
No deterrent
necessary
Re “The nuclear code
football,” editorial, Nov. 19
It is perplexing that The
Times Editorial Board
favors a policy that could
kill millions of people.
Any use of nuclear
weapons would have unacceptable humanitarian
consequences. You “shudder” to think about this,
but promote the president’s ability to threaten
first use of nuclear weapons anyway. The International Committee of the
Red Cross has categorically stated that no effective humanitarian response would be possible
in the event of a nuclear
detonation.
Nuclear deterrence is a
concept created in the
minds of men and followed
by those who gamble our
collective future. This idea
does not “defend the nation,” but rather puts the
nation — and indeed all
nations — at risk of catastrophic annihilation.
Deterrence will only
work up until the moment
that it fails. Once it fails, we
will only have a moment to
regret not taking action
when we had the chance.
Rick Wayman
Santa Barbara
The writer is director of
programs for the Nuclear
Age Peace Foundation.
::
The Times’ argument
against limiting the president’s authority to launch a
nuclear first strike is based
on the assumption that the
president may have to act
in a very short time to use
nuclear weapons to protect
the U.S. against foreign
aggression.
This argument is based
entirely on assessments of
foreign powers’ military
capabilities that have been
greatly inflated to justify
the procurement of a massive arsenal of weapons.
Removing the president’s first-strike nuclear
option does not limit his
authority to deploy nuclear
weapons defensively. The
U.S. has operational detection systems fully capable
of giving adequate warning
of a nuclear attack for us to
retaliate in kind. At the
same time, the U.S. has
more than sufficient conventional forces to defend
against any kind of nonnuclear attack.
The only reason for
allowing the president to
keep the first strike nuclear
option is to intimidate,
terrorize and force other
nations to comply with U.S.
foreign policies. This is not
morally justifiable and the
president should not have
this authority.
W.R. Knight
McLean, Va.
::
Current U.S. policy
defines the sole purpose of
our nuclear weapons as
being to deter a nuclear
attack. This is in effect a
“no first use” policy, and it
is completely appropriate
in an age of smart bombs
and cyber weaponry. It is
difficult to imagine any
scenario where a first
nuclear strike by the U.S.
would be appropriate.
The legislation you
oppose retains the president’s ability to respond to
a nuclear attack without
congressional approval, so
deterrence is retained.
Regardless of which
administration is in power,
there is concern that the
executive branch has
gained too much power in
authorizing the use of
military force. The proposed legislation seems
like a good idea at any time.
Ed Salisbury
Santa Monica
Kaepernick’s
right not to vote
Re “GQ got it wrong on
Kaepernick,” column, Nov.
20
George Skelton got
outside his expertise when
he wrote about former San
Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick.
Please don’t start the
nonsense that it is our duty
to vote, especially for black
citizens, when every statistical measure for this
so-called duty shows that
African Americans have
been excluded from participation throughout our
entire history.
Gerrymandering is the
best example of this. State
legislatures have no compunction to exclude blacks
and even members of the
party not in power. Blacks
have good reason not to
pay the trashy homage of
voting because in school
we are taught it is some
holy, magical duty.
We all vote for different
reasons, and if I want to
protest by not voting,
please remember it is a
constitutionally protected
right as much as the socalled duty to vote.
Ralph Mitchell
Monterey Park
::
I beg Skelton to dive
into articles on voting and
kneeling during the national anthem written by
people who are not part of
the dominant culture.
Such writings actually
exist.
Sam Fulwood III suggests that voting might be
the last thing on a young
person’s mind when he or
she is “poor, ignored, or
vilified.” Ta-Nehisi Coates
reminds us that any manner of youthful protest
against America’s power
structure “isn’t the real
problem.” Angela Davis
suggests that refusing to
stand during a nationalistic song glorifying the
bombs and rockets of war
may help us to “imagine
possible futures.”
It’s easy for Skelton to
say that people should
respect “core foundations
of America and the Constitution,” especially when
those principles were
established by and for
people who looked just like
him.
Angi Neff
Santa Monica
::
Bravo to Skelton.
Contrast Kaepernick’s
public protests with the
quiet act by Dodgers first
baseman Adrian Gonzalez
in 2016, who reportedly
refused to stay with the
rest of the team at a Trump
hotel in Chicago.
Bob Wieting
Simi Valley
::
Skelton thinks football
game viewers should not
have to be forced to watch
political activities.
Recently, I went to a
performance at the Music
Center in downtown Los
Angeles, and before then, I
saw a movie at a theater. I
didn’t have to stand at
attention and hear the
national anthem at any of
these events, and neither
did anyone else.
When I go to be entertained by highly paid professional athletes, why do
they and I have to prove
our patriotism? Only in
sports has this become an
issue because of Kaepernick’s kneeling protest of
this charade, which we
have because the leagues
and sports teams want to
escape antitrust laws by
presenting themselves as
quintessentially American.
Why the heck should
any business owner have
the right to insist that we
participate in their political statements on the
field?
Robert Von Bargen
Santa Monica
Singling out
Venice Beach
Re “Hep A on the beaches,”
Opinion, Nov. 20
Los Angeles faces two
real crises: the largest
homeless population in the
nation and a hepatitis A
outbreak. To deal with it,
Conor Friedersdorf calls
for opening up public restrooms in one community —
Venice.
As I would have informed him had he called
me instead of citing a 2year-old quote, he is missing the big picture.
Camping is banned in
almost all of Los Angeles’
parks, including on
beaches. No camping
should lead to no campers,
thus no need for restrooms
late at night.
If the city will not honor
the camping ban in all its
parks, then it should open
all of them to camping and
keep the restrooms open
all day and night. This
would include, for example,
camping in the park next
to City Hall, with 24-hour
access to ground-floor
restrooms.
I doubt The Times
would welcome the return
of an Occupy L.A.-style
encampment across the
street from its downtown
headquarters any more
than the residents of
Venice want a return to the
noxious behaviors that
inevitably occur with opening up the restrooms along
Venice Beach at night.
Mark Ryavec
Venice
The writer is president
of the Venice Stakeholders
Assn.
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1-800-LA TIMES, ext. 74511.
A9A
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2017 WST
LOS ANGELES TIMES
FRIDAY , NOVEMB ER 24, 2017
L AT I ME S . CO M/ OP I N IO N
A11
OP-ED
Don’t let The AT&T merger makes sense
the FCC
gut net
neutrality
It’s the Justice Dept.’s
objections that are out of
touch with the law and the
economics of Hollywood.
By Victoria J. Buchholz
and Todd G. Buchholz
By Jessica Rosenworcel
R
ight now, you can go
online and connect with
friends, watch videos
and read the news.
There’s a good chance
you are reading this online right
now.
We do much more on the internet than consume content, however. Increasingly, it is also where we
create. We use online platforms
and digital services to develop,
share and spread ideas around the
corner and around the globe.
This is the open internet experience we all know, and it’s a big
part of why America’s internet
economy is the envy of the world.
But this week, the leadership at
the Federal Communications
Commission put forth a plan to
gut the foundation of this openness. They have proposed to end
net neutrality, and they are trying
to force a vote on their plan on
Dec. 14.
It’s a lousy idea. And it deserves
a heated response from the millions of Americans who work and
create online every day.
Net neutrality is the right to go
where you want and do what you
want on the internet without your
broadband provider getting in the
way. It means your broadband
provider can’t block websites,
throttle services or charge you
premiums if you want to reach
certain online content.
Proponents of wiping out these
rules think that by allowing broadband providers more control and
the ability to charge for premium
access, it will spur investment.
This is a dubious proposition.
Wiping out net neutrality
would have big consequences.
Without it, your broadband provider could carve internet access
into fast and slow lanes, favoring
the traffic of online platforms that
have made special payments and
consigning all others to a bumpy
road. Your provider would have
the power to choose which voices
online to amplify and which to
censor. The move could affect
everything online, including the
connections we make and the
communities we create.
This is not the internet experience we know today. Americans
should prevent the plan from
becoming the law of the land.
There is something not right
about a few unelected FCC officials making such vast determinations about the future of the internet. I’m not alone in thinking this.
More than 22 million people have
filed comments with the agency.
They overwhelmingly want the
FCC to preserve and protect net
neutrality.
At the same time, there are real
questions about who filed some of
the net neutrality comments with
the FCC. There are credible allegations that many of the comments
were submitted by bots and others
using the names of deceased people. What’s more, some 50,000
recent consumer complaints
appear to have gone missing.
As he announced this week,
New York Atty. Gen. Eric Schneiderman has been investigating
these apparently fake comments
for six months. The Government
Accountability Office is also looking into how a denial-of-service
attack may have prevented people
from getting their thoughts into
the official record.
In short, this is a mess. If the
idea behind the plan is bad, the
process for commenting on it has
been even worse.
Before my fellow FCC members
vote to dismantle net neutrality,
they need to get out from behind
their desks and computers and
speak to the public directly. The
FCC needs to hold hearings
around the country to get a better
sense of how the public feels about
the proposal.
When they do this, they will
likely find that, outside of a cadre
of high-paid lobbyists and lawyers
in Washington, there isn’t a constituency that likes this proposal.
In fact, the FCC will probably
discover that they have angered
the public and caused them to
question just whom the agency
works for.
I think the FCC needs to work
for the public, and therefore that
this proposal needs to be slowed
down and eventually stopped. In
the time before the agency votes,
anyone who agrees should do
something old-fashioned: Make a
ruckus.
Reach out to the rest of the
FCC now. Tell them they can’t take
away internet openness without a
fight.
Jessica Rosenworcel is a
member of the Federal
Communications Commission.
D
epartment of Justice
officials
announced
Monday that they
were swooping in to
protect
Americans
from economic predators by fighting for our right to watch “Game of
Thrones.” The prosecutors’ target
is AT&T’s proposed merger with
Time Warner. But like “Game of
Thrones,” the government’s lawsuit is set in a world of ancient fantasies, rather than current law
and the real economics of Hollywood.
The department argues that if
AT&T consummates its $85-billion purchase of Time Warner, the
combined firm would “use its control of Time Warner’s popular programming as a weapon to harm
competition … [which would] result in fewer innovative offerings
and higher bills for American families.”
The argument is remarkably
out of touch. Old Hollywood players and entrants like Hulu, Amazon and Netflix are erecting studios, signing up talent and work-
ing at a furious pace to create new
programs for consumers. By invading the traditional entertainment market, they have upended
its power structure as they chase
after the eyeballs of fickle viewers.
We imagine more than a few dinosaur cable and studio executives have rushed to the emergency room at Cedars-Sinai complaining of chest pains and “cordcutting.”
Consider: In 1970, the NBC
“Bob Hope Christmas Special” attracted nearly two-thirds of television viewers, and his jokes were
stale even then. When the president of the United States gave a
speech, you could not escape it —
every channel showed his face because only a handful of channels
existed. In 1983, 77% of televisions
tuned in to a single show — the last
episode of “MASH.” These days a
big hit like “The Big Bang Theory,”
grabs 11% of the audience.
We are living in a “Golden Age
of Television” precisely because of
the explosion of talent, platforms
and venues for consuming entertainment. The number of scripted
series has jumped more than 40%
since 2010. Some consumers complain of too many choices; channel
surfing is difficult with 500 to
choose from. And this Golden Age
must compete with non-television
offerings. The “League of Legends” video game championships
attracted 43 million streaming
viewers last year. That’s why, for
all the critical acclaim “Game of
Thrones” garners, cable companies earn only about $7 a month
per subscriber when they offer
HBO, which distributes it.
In this climate, is it likely that
AT&T would be able to jack up the
price of viewing Time Warner
shows? If the programming were
so singularly valuable Time Warner would have already raised
prices to maximize profits. Merger
economics teaches us that monopolists curb their output in order to boost prices. For example,
when an airline dominates a city, it
can cut back the number of available seats or flights in and out. But
why would AT&T want lower ratings for television programming?
Would fewer viewers allow it to
raise prices?
In an era of fragmented and
fickle audiences, talent, not the
name of the cable company, is
what commands a premium. Brilliant writers and showrunners like
Shonda Rhimes, Greg Berlanti
and Tina Fey have more choices
than ever, as Rhimes’s recent “totally open road” deal (her words)
with Netflix suggests. Compare
this to the era when Jack Warner
called writers “schmucks with
Underwoods.” Actors have more
choices, too. Remember the iconic
1943 MGM photo of 65 famous contract players, including Jimmy
Stewart, Katharine Hepburn and
Gene Kelly. MGM claimed to have
“more stars than the heavens,”
but those stars had little power to
sign new deals with new studios.
The government’s case against
the AT&T merger is so weak we
wonder whether officials made an
innocent mistake. Are the deal’s
critics mixing up Time Warner Cable (already sold to Charter Communications in 2016) with Time
Warner programs? Had AT&T
bought the cable company, it
would have been a “horizontal
merger,” a marriage of direct competitors that decreased competition and could have pushed up
consumer prices. But AT&T actually wants to buy programs, which
would be a “vertical merger.” For
the last 30 years, the government
has approved such mergers (including Comcast’s purchase of
NBC), and a wide-ranging Journal
of Economic Literature study of
merged businesses — from motels
to soft drink companies to shoemakers — concluded that vertical
combinations seldom injure consumers.
The Justice Department’s suit
makes no sense in today’s world.
Its antitrust attorneys should
step out of the past and leave the
fantasies to television.
Victoria J. Buchholz is a
corporate and intellectual
property attorney in Los Angeles.
Todd G. Buchholz is a former
director of economic policy at the
White House and the author of
“The Price of Prosperity: Why
Rich Nations Fail and How to
Renew Them” (HarperCollins,
2016).
Darren Hauck Getty Images
HOLIDAY shopping means frenzied schedules for clerks — who can be called in or sent home at a moment’s notice.
No rest for retail workers
W
By Steven Greenhouse
hen you go
shopping this
holiday season,
you’ll no doubt
come
across
smiling cashiers and perky sales
clerks. But behind the holiday
cheer, many retail workers have
very un-merry tales to tell about
the craziness of their work schedules.
I’ve heard many tales of woe
over the last five years — of unpredictable,
ever-changing,
stress-inducing work schedules
— as I’ve researched labor conditions in retail and elsewhere in
the service sector.
Whether at big-box stores, department stores or specialty
stores, many workers complain
that their managers have ramped
up the scheduling chaos as retail
competition has grown ever fiercer, partly because Amazon is
eroding the sales of brick-andmortar retail.
A man who worked at a Zara in
Manhattan when I interviewed
him in 2015, Brandon Wagner,
sometimes had to work until 11
p.m., getting home around midnight, and then be back at the
store at 8 next morning. That
meant he’d get just five or six
hours of sleep.
Mirella Casares, a Victoria’s
Secret worker in Florida, told the
New York Times earlier this year
that her weekly hours swung
wildly, from a low of 15 hours a
week to a high of 39, making it
hard to plan her life or her budget.
Frequent last-minute scheduling
changes made it difficult to find
care for her 2-year-old and 6-yearold.
An aspiring actor, Desmond
Anthony, told me that the Express in Manhattan where he
used to work would often schedule him for two days of work, plus
two or three on-call days. That
meant he had to call his boss first
thing in the morning and be
ready to rush in if the store
needed him. If he wasn’t needed,
he went unpaid, even though his
on-call status made it impossible
for him to schedule auditions or
make other plans.
The stories pile up. One Milwaukee worker, Mary Coleman,
said she once made the hour-long
bus commute to her job at a
Popeye’s only to be told that she
shouldn’t clock in. Business was
slow and they didn’t need her
that day, her boss said. (She
wasn’t paid.)
Another retail worker told me
she didn’t learn her work schedule for the next week until Saturday, two days before her workweek began. A Wal-Mart worker
in Orlando, Fla., said she was inexplicably assigned zero hours
one week, sandwiched between
20-hour and 25-hour weeks.
Much of this herky-jerky
scheduling grows out of new
money-saving
management
practices.
Thanks to advances in software, many stores and restaurants now monitor their sales
minute by minute, hewing to a
strict employees-to-sales ratio.
When sales jump or dip, a store
might suddenly call in unscheduled workers or tell scheduled
workers to go home.
Although this helps businesses hold down costs and serve
customers better, it creates havoc
for many workers.
Scheduling
chaos as retail
competition
grows fierce.
A 2014 study led by Susan
Lambert, a professor of organizational theory at the University of
Chicago, found that 41% of earlycareer workers received one week
or less advance notice of their
work schedule.
This unpredictability makes it
difficult to schedule child care or
doctor’s appointments or to juggle college classes while holding a
job.
UCLA researchers recently
surveyed 800 retail employees in
the L.A. area and found that evervarying work hours create chaos
in many workers’ lives, problems
compounded by the city’s size
and transportation woes.
Some workers complained to
the researchers, who are finalizing their study, that they could
barely make ends meet because
of their part-time hours and because their unpredictable schedules made it difficult to hold a second job.
Just as low wages in the fastfood industry spawned the Fight
for 15, the volatility of retail schedules has given birth to the Fair
Workweek movement.
This fast-growing initiative
has persuaded city councils in
Emeryville, Calif.; San Francisco;
New York and Seattle as well as
Oregon’s state Legislature to
adopt laws that bring more predictability — and sanity — to
scheduling. Fair Workweek may
target L.A. next year.
These laws have various wrinkles. They generally apply to retail and restaurant workers and
require two weeks’ notice of work
schedules. And they usually call
for a good-faith estimate of
weekly hours upon hiring, and
give workers the right to decline
to work when there is less than 10
or 11 hours between shifts.
All the laws require predictability pay — often one hour of
pay for a scheduling change ordered by the employer, and four
hours of pay for canceling shifts
with less than 24 hours’ notice.
(Such pay is not required if shifts
change because of utility failures,
severe weather, acts of God or the
recommendation of civil authorities.)
Industry lobbyists have vigorously battled these laws, saying
they would limit retailers’ flexibility, burden them with new mandates and needlessly raise costs.
But the retailers have brought
these laws upon themselves.
They have made workers’ hours
and pay — and lives — swing so
wildly that many workers feel like
yo-yos.
Fair workweek laws merely restore some much-needed balance and stability, in both hours
and income, for the workers who
serve us day after day.
Steven Greenhouse, a former
labor and workplace reporter for
the New York Times, is writing a
book about the history and
future of labor unions and
worker advocacy in the United
States.
LOS ANGELES TIMES
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Activists decry loss of housing
[Housing, from A1]
permission to convert apartment buildings for “transient occupancy” and rent
them out for short stays.
The claims made by the
hotel workers union and
other housing activists, who
have called on the city to investigate whether Onni is
breaking the law, are “completely inaccurate and misleading,” said Mark Spector,
senior development manager of the Onni Group,
which also owns the building
that houses The Times.
Spector said the company was serving an “underserved market” through the
rentals. “Downtown Los Angeles has an unmet demand
for the business traveler or
families that are staying for a
medium-length period of
time but want the amenities
of home,” Spector said in an
email.
The obscure provision,
which has drawn little attention in the past, has alarmed
some tenant activists who
argue that it could exacerbate the housing crisis. They
fear that as Mayor Eric
Garcetti and other politicians clamor for more apartments, real estate developers could capitalize on the
push for housing, then start
using those units for nightto-night guests.
And they are especially
alarmed that Onni did not
have to undergo a public
hearing to change how its
downtown building was
used, a fact that planning
officials attribute to its zoning.
The Olive Street building
is “a classic example of gaming the system to maximize
profits,” said Larry Gross,
executive director of the Coalition for Economic Survival, which advocates for
renters. “And they’re doing it
on the back of L.A. residents
who need housing.”
Planning officials are unsure how many buildings
have gotten the unusual label, but the Olive Street
building is not alone.
At the Metropolitan, a
glassy tower across from the
Hollywood offices of Netflix
and Sunset Bronson Studios, travelers wheel luggage
Luis Sinco Los Angeles Times
CALLING IT AN “illegal hotel,” activists protest last week at Level Furnished Living, a downtown L.A. condo
building that also rents to travelers. Advocates worry that such buildings could worsen the housing crisis.
into the lobby and punch
codes into keypads to get
into their rooms.
The storied building on a
palm-tree-studded stretch
of Sunset Boulevard is advertised online as an
“apartel” with furnished
rooms that offer showstopping views.
It is also home to a dwindling number of tenants,
some of whom have complained about a revolving
door of temporary visitors.
More than a decade ago, Los
Angeles officials agreed to
allow hotel rooms at the
Metropolitan to be converted into apartments, saying it would help provide
housing.
This year, the city approved a dual use for the
building, allowing the 52
units to be rented either as
apartments or for shorter
“transient
occupancy”
stays.
Jerry Neuman, a representative for the Metropolitan project, argued that it
would provide needed units
for both long-term and
short-term residents, serving the unique needs of Hollywood.
“It doesn’t take away
from housing stock — it allows transient use as well,”
Neuman said, adding that
the entertainment industry
often brings in workers who
need somewhere to stay for a
short period. “And when
those units are no longer
necessary for transient occupancy, they are readily
available as apartments.”
Hunter challenged the
decision, arguing it would
displace renters and improperly create a new “hybrid” use that could be exploited by other developers
in the future.
To get city approval,
“they’ll say, ‘We’re in desperate need because of this
housing crisis,’ ” Hunter
said. “And then they’ll turn
around and make it a hotel.”
The Central Los Angeles
Area Planning Commission,
whose members are appointed by Garcetti, denied
her appeal but imposed a
long list of requirements on
the project, including 24hour security and a manager
on site.
It also stated that existing renters with active
leases, including month-tomonth leases, could not be
displaced or evicted without
just cause.
But the company does
not have to renew leases
when they expire, as long as
it gives people a mandated
amount of time to relocate.
Recently, some renters got a
warning that their tenancy
would be terminated within
60 or 90 days, depending on
whether they sought an extension. One of the affected
tenants said he had lived in
the building for five years.
“Isn’t this displacing tenants?” Hunter said.
Renters later got a second notice that they would
get an additional four
months to relocate after the
termination date — and
could move to other floors in
the Metropolitan that will
not house temporary guests.
Neuman, who did not know
how many legal notices had
been issued, said they had
gone to tenants whose leases
had expired.
He rejected the idea that
tenants were being displaced by short-term rentals, pointing out that at a
building like the Metropolitan that does not fall under
rent-stabilization rules, “a
landlord can decide not to
renew a lease at any time.”
“This project has followed every rule in the
book,” he said.
Other renters say they
fear they could be next.
“People go to the manager and he says, ‘Oh, are
you still living here?’ ” said
Chris Dusendschon, who
has lived at the Metropolitan for eight years. “My
greatest hope is to just stay
in my home.”
Los Angeles soon could
impose new restrictions on
the little-known phenomenon: Under a draft ordinance that would legalize
and regulate renting out
homes for short stays, the
city would prohibit residential buildings from being
converted into “transient
occupancy residential structures” in order to protect
housing.
As it stands, the draft
rules do not explicitly prevent apartment buildings
from obtaining a dual use
designation for short- and
long-term stays, but the
planning department is examining that issue as the
regulations are hammered
out, its spokesman, Yeghig
Keshishian, said.
emily.alpert@latimes.com
Twitter: @AlpertReyes
CALIFORNIA
B
F R I D A Y , N O V E M B E R 2 4 , 2 0 1 7 :: L A T I M E S . C O M / C A L I F O R N I A
Auditor
suggests
regents
punish
UC aides
She urges reform after
finding Napolitano
staffers interfered with
state’s analysis.
By Teresa Watanabe
California State Auditor
Elaine Howle wants University of California regents
to consider disciplining university employees who repeatedly interfered with a
state audit, tried to hide
their actions, misled investigators and withheld requested information until
threatened with court action, according to a private
report by her office obtained
by The Times.
Howle’s office began investigating UC interference
in a state audit on the performance of UC President
Janet Napolitano’s office after a whistleblower complaint early this year. Like a
separate inquiry commissioned by regents whose results were released last
week, Howle’s investigation
determined that Napolitano
had approved a plan instructing the UC system’s 10
campuses to submit responses to confidential
questionnaires about her office for review by her aides
before sending them on to
the state auditor.
Both
investigations
found that Napolitano’s
aides asked campuses to
tone down or delete criticisms. But neither found
sufficient evidence that Napolitano knew her aides
planned to do this. Napolitano told investigators
that had she known, she
would not have approved
their plan.
Both reports primarily
blamed Napolitano’s chief of
staff, Seth Grossman, and
deputy chief of staff, Bernie
Jones, for the interference.
Howle’s report cited additional evidence of wrongdoing by Jones, including at
least two intentional failures
to provide requested documents to the auditor and an
inappropriate effort to identify the whistleblower.
These actions impeded
her audit “by impairing
[her] office’s statutory right
to access records, failing to
provide the requested documents in a timely manner,
failing to provide unaltered
records, and contributing to
inefficiency and waste,”
Howle wrote in an Oct. 26
letter to George Kieffer,
chairman of the UC Board of
Regents.
The Times obtained copies of the letter and the report after the state auditor
sent them to legislative
leaders of both parties.
Howle declined to comment.
Her report outlined several recommendations to
avoid future interference, in[See Audit, B6]
Francine Orr Los Angeles Times
OLA PEARL TANNER, 79, hugs her great-granddaughter Alani Hayes, 11, on Thursday in South L.A. Tanner is the center of her
family — and not just on Thanksgiving. She’s the person her family turns to for help: for advice, a shoulder to cry on and a place to live.
A PLATE AND A PLACE
At Thanksgiving and in
hard times, 79-year-old
is family’s foundation
By Michael Livingston
Gina Ferazzi Los Angeles Times
A CUSTOMER makes his getaway from Toys R Us with two shopping carts full of goods
after the store in Los Angeles opened to shoppers on the evening of Thanksgiving.
‘The joy of coming to buy’
Some brave the cool nights and
packed stores for the Thanksgiving
deals. Others just love to shop.
By Michael Livingston,
Alejandra Reyes-Velarde
and Danielle Parenteau-Decker
Jay Pujalte, 45, spent three nights in a tent
outside the Atwater Village Best Buy. With a rug
for comfort and his wife and daughter for company, Pujalte was willing to wait to find a deal —
and an experience — that couldn’t be had online.
Over the years, e-commerce and ever-earlier
sales have eroded Black Friday’s prominence as
the main barometer of the holiday shopping season. But Thanksgiving night shopping still holds
mystique for consumers.
A recent PwC consumer survey found that
58% of shoppers planned to go out and browse
for bargains after eating their turkey. Last year,
only 40% of shoppers said they would shop on
Thanksgiving night.
Some choose to shop in bricks-and-mortar
stores to be able to see and touch what they are
buying. Some, as Pujalte said, want to capture
“the shopping spirit.”
Camping outside before Thanksgiving sales
has become tradition for his Highland, Calif.,
family, who have sat outside together in hopes of
a worthwhile bargain for four of the last five
years. Last year, Pujalte missed out because of
his work as a truck driver.
They line up well before knowing what the
sales will be. Usually, the store’s employees
“don’t release the [details] until” 3:30 p.m. or so,
[See Shopping, B2]
only 90 minutes be-
Ola Pearl Tanner grabbed a Tupperware
container filled with chopped red, green and yellow bell peppers and tossed them in the pot of
turkey necks.
Since 6 a.m. Wednesday, Tanner had cooked
turkey, prime rib, green beans and turkey wings.
The turkey necks, greens, seafood dressing
and desserts — sweet potato pies, a chocolate
pie, a chocolate cake, a devil’s food cake and banana pudding — were next on her list.
Marshell Mitchell, one of Tanner’s granddaughters, entered the kitchen when the
seafood dressing — made with shrimp, oysters,
crab, chicken sausage and more — was mentioned.
“I heard you say seafood dressing,” Mitchell
said. “I’m going to have to take a plate with me to
work.”
The scene at Tanner’s modest South Los Angeles house — family coming together for food,
traditions and camaraderie — was repeated
across Southern California on Thursday. The
painstaking preparation of a sacred Thanksgiving menu. The family filling the house and
crowding the kitchen. Catching up on the year
that was.
Tanner is the center of her family — and not
just on Thanksgiving Day. She’s the person her
extended family turns to for help: for advice, a
shoulder to cry on and a place to live.
Mitchell is one of the relatives — four grandchildren, a daughter and a son-in-law — staying
at Tanner’s house these days while they look for
a permanent home.
“She’s always been like that,” said Tanner’s
nephew, Stanley Richard. “Ever since I’ve known
her, people have been staying with her. She
doesn’t turn people away.”
Tanner’s children would bring friends going
through hard times to her house for a meal and a
place to sleep — a room, the couch, whatever was
available.
“If you’re down on your luck, you can come by
Sister Tanner’s house,” Richard said.
For Tanner, 79, this is just the way she was
raised.
She moved to California from Hazlehurst,
Miss., in 1961, part of a ma[See Tanner, B4]
Actor’s sexual assault accusers speak out
Two women each say
he forced himself on
them after late nights
spent at his home.
By Alene
Tchekmedyian
Chris Delmas AFP/Getty Images
ED WESTWICK in two Twitter posts adamantly
denied the sexual assault allegations against him.
For both women, the encounter began the same.
They were each invited to
“Gossip Girl” star Ed Westwick’s home by a mutual
friend. When their Uber
driver dropped them off,
they drank and hung out at
the house for hours. Eventually, they each went to a
spare bedroom to sleep.
Then, the women both alleged in separate interviews
with The Times, the British
actor forced himself on
them.
The women said the incidents happened months
apart, three years ago. At the
time, the women were each
dating someone, friends of
Westwick.
A third woman, who
asked that her name not be
published, told The Times
that Westwick grabbed and
slapped her backside at FYF
Fest near downtown Los Angeles that same year.
“You don’t know what
you’re missing,” she said he
told her, after she declined to
buy him a drink.
Another, Rachel Eck,
told BuzzFeed News that
Westwick groped her that
same year at the Sunset
Marquis in West Hollywood,
where she showed up to
hang out with her exboyfriend.
A publicist for Westwick
did not respond to the allegations after multiple emails
and phone calls from a reporter. But in two Twitter
posts, Westwick adamantly
denied the allegations.
“I do not know this woman,” he wrote after the first
woman, Kristina Cohen,
came forward. “I have never
forced myself in any manner,
on any woman. I certainly
have never committed rape.”
Two days later, he said
he’s cooperating with authorities “so that they can
clear my name as soon as
possible.”
“It is disheartening and
sad to me that as a result of
two unverified … social media claims, there are some in
this environment who could
ever conclude I have had
anything to do with such vile
and horrific conduct,” he
wrote. “I have absolutely
not.”
In light of the allegations,
the BBC announced that it
was suspending the debut of
“Ordeal by Innocence,” a
new television series starring Westwick, “until these
[See Westwick, B5]
B2
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BORDER WATCH
Stronger drugs fuel U.S. epidemic
Marijuana
Mexican ‘superlabs’
increase the purity,
potency of narcotics.
KRISTINA DAVIS
Ten years ago, the average gram of meth available
in the U.S. was 39% pure.
Today, it is being sold in a
nearly pure state, manufactured in Mexican “superlabs” and smuggled across
the border to feed an epidemic of addiction.
The drug is being peddled alongside fentanyl, a
synthetic opioid 50 times
stronger than heroin, and
carfentanil, an elephant
tranquilizer that can kill a
human with just a speck or
two.
The purity and potency
of illegal — and in some
cases legal — drugs seem to
have reached new levels. It is
a trend that is particularly
alarming to authorities as it
unfolds against the backdrop of an emerging opioid
crisis that has taken an
unprecedented number of
lives and touches all walks of
life.
Drug poisoning deaths
are the leading cause of
injury death in the U.S.,
surpassing car crashes,
suicide, homicide and guns.
Just how much stronger
can drugs get?
That could depend on
how the opioid crisis pans
out, as there are indications
that the craving for prescription highs and the
introduction of fentanyl into
the illegal market have
changed appetites.
“I’ve got to believe that
the higher potency is to
compete with the higher
potency of other drugs
available on the market,”
said Rosalie Liccardo Pacula, director of the Santa
Monica-based Bing Center
for Health Economics and a
drug policy expert with the
RAND Corp.
That shift has hit many
users by surprise, as fentanyl is increasingly being
cut into traditional drugs of
abuse like heroin and meth.
“People are not choosing
these substances,” Pacula
said. “[Fentanyl and carfentanil] have infiltrated our
supply chain and pose a
serious public health risk
because users aren’t aware.”
With the stakes higher
than ever, Amy Roderick,
spokeswoman for the U.S.
Drug Enforcement Administration in San Diego,
hopes the public is taking
notice.
“Hopefully people are
educating themselves and
realize it’s safer to stay away.
It is devastating when
someone in your family is
Lottery results
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3 + Mega
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No. of
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2
9
311
481
13,507
7,176
36,139
56,871
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—
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96
2,287
2,008
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Ron Rogers McClatchy-Tribune
OFFICIALS RAID a cross-border drug tunnel in San Diego in 2011. In the U.S. illegal market, most of the
fentanyl — a prescription painkiller — is either being made in Mexican cartel labs or being sent from China.
addicted to these drugs,”
she said. “We can’t lay our
heads down and have society be the walking dead.”
Here’s a look at drug
purity levels over time and
the current marketplace:
Methamphetamine
When U.S. laws restricted the sale of precursor chemicals needed to
make methamphetamine,
its production moved from
domestic home labs to
massive labs in Mexico run
by cartels. But consumption
of the drug has kept a strong
foothold in the nation and
Southern California.
The drug is being sold in
nearly pure form these days.
Purity in 2016 was around
93% to 96% with prices low
and stable, indicating an
oversupply, according to the
DEA’s 2017 National Drug
Threat Assessment. A
93%-pure gram was going
for $58 in 2016.
To counteract the falling
prices, organizations are
trying to market more to the
East Coast and hook new
users, authorities said. The
Mexican labs are also coming up with new methods to
make the drug so they don’t
have to rely on getting precursor chemicals from
China, a supply chain that is
being heavily scrutinized,
the DEA reported.
Survey and treatment
data show that demand for
meth may be increasing. In
San Diego County, deaths,
reported usage and reported availability all rose
over the last five years,
according to the Methamphetamine Strike Force 2016
Report Card, put out by the
Justice Department.
Fentanyl
Fentanyl, a prescription
drug that has been around
for decades, has been used
as a painkiller and anesthetic in clinical settings.
Most of the fentanyl in
the U.S. illegal market is
either being made in Mexican cartel labs or is being
mailed in much smaller
quantities from China. It is
not complicated to cut
fentanyl into other drugs or
make into pills, which can be
especially deadly to users in
the hands of an amateur
mixologist. It is cheaper and
easier to make than heroin,
which is produced from
poppy crops, and it is often
deceptively marketed on the
street as heroin or oxycodone pills to opioid addicts.
The fentanyl being
seized coming across the
U.S.-Mexico border in San
Diego is typically 4% to 6%
pure, already diluted considerably by the cartels, said
Roderick. The smaller
quantities being mailed
from China are much purer,
often 90% or higher, according to the DEA.
A wholesale kilogram of
fentanyl in San Diego
County goes for about
$31,000, Roderick said.
Prices increase farther from
the border.
“We’re seeing more fentanyl than any other DEA
lab in the country due to the
fact we are at the border,”
Roderick said.
Heroin
Heroin in San Diego
County comes exclusively
from Mexico, and with
boosts in farming production there, the country is
now the primary source of
heroin for the U.S.
Lab tests show Mexican
powder heroin is extremely
pure, especially on the East
Coast, more than the typical
40% to 50% dilution in that
market, the DEA reported.
In San Diego, in 2015
heroin was testing 35% pure,
continuing an upward trend
over the last few years.
Mexican black tar heroin, which has traditionally
been the heroin of choice in
San Diego, has also been
increasingly replaced by
refined white or brown
powder heroin — another
result of the opioid epidemic.
“Prescription drug users
don’t want black tar heroin,” Roderick said. “That
looks nasty; they want
something nice and pretty.”
A designer drug marketed as “China White,” a
name that used to mean
heroin, now means fentanyl
or perhaps an even stronger
fentanyl derivative.
“The illicit fentanyl and
heroin markets are so intertwined it is difficult to gauge
how much heroin market
share fentanyl has gained,”
the DEA stated in its 2017
assessment.
Cocaine
Cocaine appears to be
coming back into fashion
after its 1970s and ’80s heyday.
“Cocaine is really coming
back with a bang,” Roderick
said. “I expect purity to go
up and prices to start back
up.”
Opioid addicts have been
drawn to the drug recently,
she said, and “speedballing”
— mixing heroin and cocaine to balance the stimulant and depressant effects
of the drugs — is becoming
more popular again.
Coca production has
been increasing in Colombia
in recent years with the end
to aerial fumigation and a
financial incentive program
promising to pay farmers for
their illicit crops if they turn
to legal ones.
While the average purity
of a gram of cocaine in the
U.S. has remained relatively
stable in the last several
years — around 45% to 49%
— it increased to 56% last
year. The price has dropped
since then, to $165 per gram.
“Since 2007, average
annual cocaine purity in the
United States has had a
relatively strong relationship with Colombian cocaine production, although
the relationship between
cocaine production and
domestic prices is weak,”
the DEA reports.
“This may mean other
factors, including competition within drug markets
and changes in the user
population, have more
influence on domestic
prices than previously recognized,” it said.
This isn’t your parents’
pot. Marijuana has gotten
increasingly stronger over
the decades as the demand
for designer crops has
grown, the drug is decriminalized around the country
and innovation flourishes.
It’s a phenomenon
tracked in part by the University of Mississippi’s
Potency Monitoring Program, which tests law enforcement seizures from
around the nation.
Mexico is the primary
foreign source for marijuana, although marijuana is
being grown increasingly in
the U.S. as it is legalized in
many states. While Mexican
marijuana is thought to be
lower grade, law enforcement reporting indicates
cartels are increasing the
quality to stay competitive,
according to the DEA.
Traditional marijuana,
the leafy kind, averaged a
THC potency of 11% in 2015
— three times the amount in
1995, according to the
seizure data. (Potency is the
dosage needed to affect a
person, versus purity, which
is the amount of drug in a
sample.) The highest level of
THC — the component that
creates a high — tested was
37%.
Concentrated marijuana, known as hash oil, is
incredibly more potent, with
a national average of 56%
purity in 2015, according to
the university’s seizure
data. Concentrated marijuana is found in vaporizers,
edibles, tablets and lotions,
and is how many new or
experimental users might
experience legalized recreational marijuana.
Some hash oil seizures
tested above 90% potency,
the university reported.
The legal market shows
even higher typical potency
levels — 20% in traditional
marijuana and 60% in concentrate being common in
Washington state, according to a 2017 study by RAND.
Potential users in states
where marijuana is legal
need to remember that this
isn’t the same weed they
smoked in college, experts
say.
“The purity is so much
higher and you run the risk
of ending up hurting yourself,” Roderick said.
Pacula at RAND is part
of a group of experts working to identify standard
doses of marijuana that can
be recommended in its
various forms — an area of
research lacking in the U.S.
because marijuana is illegal
under federal law.
kristina.davis
@sduniontribune.com
Davis writes for the San
Diego Union Tribune.
The thrill and agony of shopping
[Shopping, from B1]
fore doors open.
On Thursday, two Best
Buy workers — accompanied by a security guard —
passed out pamphlets highlighting deals to those waiting in a line that numbered
more than 200.
Though crowds still line
up on Thanksgiving afternoon, they’re not the only
ones seeking savings on
Thursday. Adobe predicts
that e-commerce sales on
Thanksgiving will total $2.8
billion, an increase of 15%
compared with last year.
Black Friday online sales
are projected at $5 billion, a
16.4% increase from last
year’s Black Friday.
Analysts and industry
trackers expect increased
holiday sales this year because of higher consumer
confidence and employment
gains.
The National Retail Federation trade association
forecast a jump in retail
sales in November and December of 3.6% to 4%, or
$678.75 billion to $682 billion,
up from $655.8 billion last
year.
“I think we’re going to see
a healthy weekend,” said
Paula
Rosenblum,
cofounder at Retail Systems
Research.
San Fernando resident
Irma Mosqueda, 52, was
pleased with the price of the
TV she purchased at the
Kohl’s in Sun Valley — at
$299 it was $100 less than the
list price — and she had a $60
voucher. But savings weren’t
her main motivation.
Photographs by
Gina Ferazzi Los Angeles Times
A SHOPPER, left, checks out the deals while people continue to wait outside Best
Buy 30 minutes after the Atwater store opened at 5 p.m. on Thanksgiving Day.
PEOPLE POUR in after the doors open. Industry
trackers expect increased holiday sales this year.
In her eighth year of
Thanksgiving
weekend
shopping, she says, “It’s
more for the custom than it
is for necessity.
“It’s for the joy of coming
to buy.”
Joanne Leibowitz, on the
other hand, set out with a
target in mind.
Leibowitz, her husband,
Grant, and their 1-year-old
daughter waited about six
hours outside the Atwater
Best Buy to snag two Apple
MacBooks. Leibowitz, a 32year-old makeup artist from
Silver Lake who is nearly six
months pregnant, spent
much of that time in a lawn
chair, moving when the line
did.
The wait — and their decision to eat Thanksgiving
dinner earlier in the week —
was worth it, as they found
the laptop deal they were
seeking.
Others, however, came
away empty-handed.
Katrina Lopez, 31, waited
outside the Toys R Us in
Burbank for two hours, determined to buy Fingerlings
— robotic monkey toys that
attach to the finger.
Among the holiday season’s hottest gifts, Fingerlings were out of stock at the
other stores and websites
Lopez checked.
So the Valley Village
woman spent the last week
calling various Toys R Us locations at 9 a.m. each day to
ask about the plaything. She
was told the Burbank retailer would have them
Thursday.
Minutes before the store
opened, however, a sales associate walked out and said
it would not stock the monkeys until Sunday, eliciting
groans from the crowd.
“I am so mad right now,”
she said.
Lopez plans to be back in
line at 8 a.m. Sunday.
michael.livingston
@latimes.com
alejandra.reyes-velarde
@latimes.com
danielle.parenteau-decker
@latimes.com
Times staff writer
Samantha Masunaga
contributed to this report.
FRIDAY , NOVEMB ER 24, 2017
L AT I ME S . CO M
B3
CITY & STATE
Racial
bias suit
targets
police
force
Five Asian officers
in San Gabriel allege
discrimination and a
hostile work culture.
By Alene
Tchekmedyian
Photographs by Marc
Martin Los Angeles Times
RUNNERS take part in the Turkey Trot Los Angeles on Thursday morning downtown, where the temperature hit a high of 92 degrees.
A record-setting Thanksgiving
Downtown, it’s the
hottest Turkey Day
since weather service
archives began in 1877.
By Hailey
Branson-Potts
and Jack Dolan
A Thanksgiving heat
wave
stretched
across
Southern California on
Thursday, with downtown
Los Angeles hitting 92 degrees. That made this year’s
Thanksgiving the hottest
since record-keeping began
in 1877, the National Weather
Service said.
The holiday heat wave
set records across the
Southland, pushing the
mercury into the 90s from
the beaches to the inland
valleys.
The thermometer hit 91
at LAX, shattering the previous record of 84 set in 1990,
THE HOT and dry conditions this holiday week stem from an upper-level ridge
of high pressure causing desert air to flow toward the coast, a meteorologist said.
according to the National
Weather Service. Long
Beach Airport also hit 91, a
new record there.
Temperatures climbed
to 93 at Hollywood Burbank
Airport in Burbank, 94 at
UCLA and 95 in Woodland
Hills — all records.
In Orange County, a
weather service thermometer in Newport Beach
showed 89 degrees at 1 p.m.,
far surpassing the previous
record of 81 set in 2002.
It was the second day of
record temperatures in the
region. On Wednesday,
downtown L.A. hit 92 degrees, LAX 92, Long Beach
96, UCLA 95, Woodland Hills
93 and Oxnard 97.
Temperatures will begin
to fall Friday.
The hot and dry conditions stem from an upperlevel ridge of high pressure
hovering over the area,
which is causing desert air
from the northeast to flow
toward the Southern California coast, said Joe Sirard,
a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in
Oxnard.
Luckily for firefighters,
who will be on high alert
with the soaring temperatures, strong winds that
typically trigger red flag
warnings are not expected,
he said.
hailey.branson
@latimes.com
jack.dolan@latimes.com
Jealous boyfriend
suspected in killing
20-year-old is accused
of driving his pickup
truck into girlfriend’s
co-worker at 7-Eleven.
By Corina Knoll
A 20-year-old man is suspected of killing his girlfriend’s co-worker by chasing him in a truck and plowing into him at a 7-Eleven in
Fontana, authorities said
Thursday.
John Nieto was jealous of
Cristian
DominguezAguilar, 18, who occasionally
received a ride home from
Elisabeth Mancilla, 20, Fontana Police Sgt. Kevin
Goltara said in a statement.
Nieto surmised that
Dominguez-Aguilar
and
Mancilla were having a relationship, a suspicion that
police believe was untrue,
the statement said.
About 7:15 p.m. Wednesday, Nieto was waiting when
Mancilla dropped off Dominguez-Aguilar at a 7-Eleven
in the 1770 block of Foothill
Boulevard, Goltara said.
Driving a white Chevy Silverado, Nieto took off after
Dominguez-Aguilar,
who
fled on foot, police said.
When his first attempt at
running down the victim
failed, Nieto tried again, this
time striking the young man
and ramming the convenience store, Goltara said.
Mancilla witnessed the
incident and did not call police or try to help Dominguez-Aguilar, Goltara said.
Instead, she picked up Ni-
Jill Marie Holslin
“¡LLEGALE!” was projected briefly onto a border wall prototype in San Diego
last weekend. The Spanish word looks like “illegal” but means “come in.”
Fontana Police Department
JOHN NIETO chased
Border wall seen in critical light
the 18-year-old victim in
his truck, police say.
eto, whose truck was disabled, and dropped him off at
his San Bernardino residence, police said. She then
drove to her own home in Rialto.
Dominguez-Aguilar,
a
Fontana resident, was taken
to a hospital, where he died.
Authorities found the
couple Thursday morning at
Mancilla’s home. Nieto was
arrested on suspicion of
murder, and Mancilla was
arrested on suspicion of accessory to murder, Goltara
said. The two, who have a
child together, were booked
at West Valley Detention
Center in Rancho Cucamonga.
Anyone with additional
information about this incident is asked to call Fontana
Det. Jason Coillot at (909)
350-7700.
corina.knoll@latimes.com
Twitter: @corinaknoll
Activists cast images
on prototypes in San
Diego to mock them.
By Kate Morrissey
SAN DIEGO — A collaboration of artists and activists lighted up the Trump
administration’s border wall
prototypes last weekend
with a ladder and other images critiquing the barriers.
The first political activism that the prototypes have
seen, the project was part
art, part performance and
part action, said Jill Marie
Holslin, one of the artists.
Using
three
trucks
parked on the Mexican side
of the border, the crew — including members of Overpass Light Brigade San Diego, People Over Profits San
Diego and a group of UC San
Diego graduate students led
by Andrew Sturm — on Sat-
urday night projected images onto the walls using a
theater light.
“You can think of it as
power games, but you can
also think of it as the long
tradition of the clown and
clowning around, using humor to deflate the power of
an over-leaning government,” Holslin said. “That’s
something that has been a
tradition in politics for centuries.”
She designed the ladder
image.
“The ladder is this simple, simple thing. You can
buy a ladder for $50 and you
can climb over a wall that
they spent $500,000 to
build,” Holslin said. “It’s this
simple technology that defeats every effort of the government to create this massive image of impermeability
and absolute power.”
Another image used a
play on words: “¡Llegale!” It
means “Come in!” in Spanish but looks like the word
“illegal.”
Though the projections
lasted about 25 minutes —
the length of time the light’s
battery lasted — the images
taken by the group have
since drawn reaction online.
Holslin said she received
thousands of messages in response to the images she
posted on Facebook. After
internet trolls began to attack her, she said, she
changed the settings so that
they were no longer public.
“What I’ve seen in my
comments is people are
overwhelmingly moved and
in agreement with the sentiment of the messages,” Holslin said. “American values
are welcoming immigrants,
welcoming refugees and not
crying to create this stonewall face of pushing people
away.”
kate.morrissey
@sduntiontribune.com
Morrissey writes for the San
Diego Union-Tribune.
Five Asian American police officers are suing the San
Gabriel Police Department,
alleging they were subjected
to widespread discrimination and a hostile work
culture in which managers
used racial slurs and refused
to hire or promote Asian officers.
The officers allege that
they were passed over for
promotions, some up to
three times, and coveted assignments in favor of nonAsian colleagues with less
training and experience.
In recent years, their lawsuit says, education requirements were relaxed to promote non-Asian officers,
and at least one employee
promoted instead of them
was under investigation by
another police agency.
The officers also say they
were frequently subjected to
harassment, with colleagues
mocking Asian accents
when speaking to them, using slurs and making comments based on hateful stereotypes.
For
example,
when
there’s a car crash in the city,
the plaintiffs frequently endure comments from other
officers about “their people”
being poor drivers, says the
lawsuit, which was filed this
week.
City spokesman Jonathan Fu said San Gabriel officials are reviewing the lawsuit but declined to comment further.
The lawsuit identifies a
captain and three lieutenants who “regularly participate in this harassing behavior.” Managers teased one
plaintiff, Nhat Huynh, with
comments about how a dog
was afraid of being eaten because Huynh was Vietnamese, the suit alleges.
The behavior, the lawsuit
alleges, was dehumanizing
and humiliating toward
Asian people and emboldened trainees to make similar comments. The officers
are suing for racial discrimination and harassment, as
well as retaliation and failure to prevent and remedy
discrimination, harassment
and retaliation.
One of the plaintiffs,
Sunny Kim, says the harassment was so incessant that
he left the agency.
Kim, who is Korean
American and speaks fluent
Korean, says in the suit that
he was denied a promotion
in 2014 and 2016. In October
2016, he complained to management after a fellow officer
used the N-word, according
to the lawsuit. He later met
with the chief of police, who
told him the officer would be
confronted but later threatened to fire Kim if he told
anyone else about the incident, the lawsuit alleges.
Months later, Kim applied for a K-9 handler position and the selection panel
called him “the most intelligent candidate,” the lawsuit
says. But during a later interview for the position, the
chief questioned Kim about
how he handled the complaint, saying he should have
confronted the officer instead of making a report or
asked to work a different
shift, according to the complaint.
Kim left the department
last month.
The lawsuit says only seven of the agency’s roughly 50
officers are of Asian descent
in a city where more than
60% of residents are Asian
and the last time an Asian
American officer was hired
was in 2007.
The officers are seeking
unspecified economic and
special damages.
alene.tchekmedyian
@latimes.com
B4
F R I DAY , N OV EM BE R 24, 2017
S
LAT IMES. C OM
Her generosity spans generations
[Tanner, from B1]
jor migration of African
Americans to Southern California at that time.
Tanner says her parents
“raised my siblings to be
kind to people.”
She has lived in Willowbrook since 1964 and worked
for 30 years in local schools,
first as a cook’s assistant,
then a teacher’s assistant
and finally a teacher.
She lived on the other
side of the alley — before the
home she now owns was
even built.
“I watched them bring it
in on trucks,” she said. She
told her late husband, Harold Tanner Jr., “I want one of
those houses so bad” for
them and their six kids.
She eventually got her
wish, and the home is now
the center of her muchgrown family.
From those six children,
she now has more than
30 grandchildren and nearly
50 great-grandchildren.
For Thanksgiving, four
generations of the Tanner
family pile into the small
house. Others could not
make it but made a point of
reaching out.
“What up, Gran!” Ashton
Tanner said Wednesday on
the cellphone’s speaker.
Ashton, 29, is Tanner’s
great-nephew who is an officer in the Durham Police
Department in North Carolina.
He was on his way to New
York but had to wish her the
best.
“I owe her everything,”
said Ashton, who stayed
with Tanner after graduating from Kent State University in 2012 until he joined
the Army in 2014.
He said Tanner offered
important support and
compassion when he needed
it.
“Most people don’t even
want to shake someone’s
hand, let alone give them a
place to stay,” Ashton said.
“Home is not a place. Home,
for me, is the people you’re
with.”
Before ending the call,
Ashton told Tanner how
much he loved her and that
he would see her soon.
Richard, another one of
Ola Tanner’s nephews, is the
Photographs by
Francine Orr Los Angeles Times
OLA PEARL TANNER, 79, adds a plate of food to her dining room spread for her multi-generational family on Thanksgiving Day.
pastor of the family’s church,
Beacon
Light
Baptist
Church, on Avalon Boulevard. He attended church
regularly as a teenager before he “went down the
wrong pathway,” Richard
said.
“I started selling drugs,
hanging out, doing stuff contrary” to what the church
taught, Richard said. He
didn’t attend church often
after
graduating
high
school, but his aunt was his
own beacon guiding him
home.
She “always did encourage me, not judge me, but encourage me,” Richard said.
After he was wounded in a
drive-by shooting, Tanner
was there to take him in.
“I knew I had somewhere
to come. My auntie was
HAROLD Tanner III with his mother, Ola, who has
lived in L.A.’s Willowbrook neighborhood since 1964.
there, with open arms,”
Richard said.
Richard became a pastor
in July 1988 and served at
Mount Pilgrim Baptist
Church in Compton until
2005, when he became pastor at Beacon.
Tanner said it’s “surreal”
to see her nephew “build this
church up with young people. He’s so invested in this
church,” where she is the
president of the usher
board.
Richard’s investment is
shown in the newly installed
60-inch television screens in
the church.
“If you don’t have your
Bible, look at the screen,”
Richard said during one
Sunday service. “I couldn’t
wait to say that.”
On Thursday afternoon
relatives picked their spot
on the couch or grabbed a
chair to watch the Cowboys
play the Chargers or converse until dinner was
served.
The grandchildren and
great-grandchildren were
assigned to fill cups with
soda and juice, and to arrange the cookie plate.
“Make it look nice,” Tanner
said.
With the last dish on the
table, and Tanner having
changed into a red-andblack outfit, she directed the
crowd to head to the dinner
table.
“Move all around,” she
said.
michael.livingston
@latimes.com
Twitter: @MikeLive06
FRIDAY , NOVEMB ER 24, 2017
L AT I ME S . CO M
B5
British actor’s accusers speak out
[Westwick, from B1]
matters are resolved.”
Los
Angeles
police
opened an investigation after Cohen filed a report this
month at the LAPD’s Hollywood station. The agency’s
sex crimes unit of the Robbery-Homicide
Division
took over the case.
In interviews with The
Times, both Cohen and Aurelie Cao, who goes by the
stage name Aurelie Wynn,
offered detailed accounts of
encounters with Westwick in
2014.
For Cohen, the alleged incident happened sometime
after Valentine’s Day. She
said she went to a house
party with Kaine Harling, an
Australian producer she was
dating, and her best friend,
Blaise Godbe Lipman. She
and Harling left the party
and went back to her place,
where they stayed up
through the night talking.
Early that morning,
Westwick called Harling and
invited the producer over to
his house, which Cohen said
was somewhere in the Hollywood Hills off Mulholland
Drive.
Harling called an Uber
and the pair went to Westwick’s home. The three of
them spent the morning in
Westwick’s bedroom, she
said, drinking and smoking
marijuana, playing dress-up
with his hats, speaking in
different accents, playing
rap music and writing.
Cohen said other people
were in the home, including
Westwick’s then-roommate.
At some point, possibly in
the afternoon, the energy in
the bedroom changed, she
said. Westwick suggested
they have a threesome.
Cohen said she told Harling she felt weird and
wanted to leave. Harling told
her he didn’t want to leave so
abruptly or make things
awkward, she said.
The three of them moved
to the kitchen.
Cohen said she was tired
and Westwick suggested she
sleep in his guest room. Harling walked her to the spare
room, where he told her he
Jordan Strauss Invision/Associated Press
ED WESTWICK is accused of sexual assault by two women who described him forcing himself on them in separate incidents in 2014.
was going to “watch the
game” for 20 minutes with
the boys. Then, she recalled
him telling her, they could
leave.
Cohen quickly fell asleep.
When she woke up, she
said, the sheets were thrown
off her and Westwick was
sticking his fingers inside of
her. She said she tried to
fight him off and told him to
stop.
She said he grabbed her
head and told her he wanted
to have sex with her, and
asked if she wanted to have
sex with him.
“Why would I?” she
asked.
“Money,” she said he
replied.
Then, she alleged, he coerced her into having sex.
Eventually, she said, Harling came to the room and
asked her if she wanted to
leave. She remembers feeling paralyzed and terrified.
“I wish I had had enough
courage to just run out of the
room and make a scene,” Cohen said. “But I didn’t. I said,
‘No.’ ”
Cohen said Westwick
walked Harling to the door
and said, “She’s gonna be my
wife for a little bit.” The actor
then shut and locked the
door.
Harling could not be reached for comment. In a
strange twist, Buzzfeed
News reported, Harling is
also the ex-boyfriend who
called Eck, the woman who
said in an interview with the
news site that Westwick
groped her, to the Sunset
Marquis hotel in March 2014.
After Harling left, Cohen
Public toilets fit for San Francisco
Painted Lady Pit Stop
resembles city’s iconic
Victorian houses.
By Hailey
Branson-Potts
You can’t move into San
Francisco’s newest Victorian houses, but you can use
the bathrooms.
The San Francisco Public Works department this
week debuted a new public
loo on wheels — the Painted
Lady Pit Stop — that resembles in miniature the city’s
iconic ornate Victorian
homes, with a shingled roof,
decorative windows and exterior walls painted yellow,
purple and pale green.
The colorful double-unit
lavatory is the newest addition to the city’s Pit Stop
public toilet program, which
operates a fleet of portable
potties throughout the city
to discourage people from
using sidewalks and doorways as toilets, according to
San Francisco Public Works.
The Painted Lady toilet
will be rotated among existing Pit Stop sites, temporarily replacing the standard
toilet trailers.
“We are testing innovative designs that are inviting
and encourage people to use
them,” Public Works Director Mohammed Nuru said in
a statement. “We will continue to do everything we can to
improve your experience on
San Francisco Public Works
PUBLIC WORKS officials hope the city’s newest portable toilets will be “inviting
and encourage people to use them.” The Pit Stop program launched in 2014.
San Francisco’s streets. At
the end of the day, the Pit
Stop brings relief and dignity to people in need of a
bathroom and improve
neighborhood livability.”
The Painted Lady is a solar-powered toilet designed
and manufactured as part of
a collaboration between the
Public Works department
and the San Francisco business Tiny Potties, owned by
Nick Bovis.
“By creating a real house
bathroom and bringing it to
people who don’t have a
home, you can bring them a
little dignity,” Bovis said in a
statement.
Like all the Pit Stops, the
Painted Lady offers needle
disposal boxes and free dog
waste bags. Each user is allowed five minutes inside.
The Pit Stop program,
which began in 2014 with
three locations in the Tenderloin, employs former
state prisoners. The loos are
staffed through a partnership with Hunters Point
Family, a nonprofit that
helps people with barriers to
employment find jobs.
The program includes a
fleet of portable toilets and
semi-permanent JCDecaux
public restrooms. It also
staffs one park bathroom in
the South of Market neighborhood.
Costa Mesa currently is
considering a similar portable toilet program.
hailey.branson
@latimes.com
Suspects killed in crash during police pursuit
Their car crossed into
oncoming traffic while
fleeing O.C. deputies.
By Corina Knoll
Two male suspects were
killed Thursday afternoon
when a pursuit involving Orange County sheriff ’s deputies ended in a collision at
Imperial Highway and Big
Sky Lane in Anaheim, authorities said.
Deputies
responded
about 12:40 p.m. to a report
of suspicious activity in the
19000 block of Ridgeview
Road in Villa Park, said
Jaimee Blashaw, a spokeswoman for the Sheriff ’s Department.
The deputies made contact with the suspects, who
fled in a gray Ford Focus,
Blashaw and Anaheim Police Sgt. Daron Wyatt said.
During the four-minute
pursuit, one of the suspects
threw out a pillowcase that
contained laptops and jewelry, Blashaw said.
As the suspects’ vehicle
headed north on Imperial
Highway, it crossed into the
southbound lanes and collided head-on with a Kia
SUV, Wyatt said.
The driver of the Ford
was pronounced dead at the
scene. A male in the rear passenger seat was taken to a
hospital, where he died. A female in the front passenger
seat
suffered
non-lifethreatening injuries.
Wyatt said the female
driver of the Kia was taken to
a hospital with minor injuries.
The names and ages of
the suspects were not given.
No deputies were injured,
Blashaw said.
The danger of police pursuits has received renewed
attention in recent years.
The Los Angeles County civil grand jury in recent
months released a report
emphasizing the importance of training for law enforcement in reducing the
likelihood of crashes during
pursuits.
A Times data analysis
showed that 1 in 10 car
chases initiated by the Los
Angeles Police Department
from 2006 to 2014 resulted in
injuries to bystanders.
corina.knoll@latimes.com
Twitter: @corinaknoll
Times staff writer James
Queally contributed to this
report.
said that in a daze, she had
dinner with Westwick. She
said he served dry steak and
soggy onion rings.
“At that point I felt like I’d
completely lost my voice,”
she said.
They watched the movie
“About Time” and had sex.
That time, Cohen said, she
didn’t fight it. She ended up
spending the night.
“I wish I did just run out
of the room,” Cohen said. “In
the moment I was just
scared; I was actually scared
that he could’ve killed me.”
When she woke up in the
morning, Cohen asked Westwick to call her an Uber and
he did. He kissed her goodbye and she left, directing
the Uber driver to Godbe
Lipman’s home, where her
car was parked.
Cohen provided a photograph she took that morning
of what she said was Westwick’s bedroom.
Godbe Lipman, 28, said
in an interview that Cohen
told him the same story that
February morning in 2014.
Reflecting on it now, Godbe
Lipman thinks the whole situation was a setup.
Cao’s story was similar. A
friend invited her to a Glendower Avenue mansion she
said Westwick was renting in
August 2014. By the time she
got there, she said, the party
was over. She was invited
again the next night, when,
she said, Westwick sent an
Uber to her Santa Monica
home to pick her up.
At the time, Cao, 30, said
she was dating Mark Salling,
an actor on the television
show “Glee” who was caught
in 2015 with a trove of child
pornography. He agreed last
month to plead guilty to possessing child porn.
Cao said she and her
friend spent the night drinking and talking with Westwick and his roommate on
the patio until the sun
started to come up. They decided to grab a few hours’
sleep, she said, before events
that day. Westwick guided
her to a master bedroom
filled with children’s belongings, including a crib and a
playpen.
Cao said he sat on the bed
and asked her if she wanted
to hook up. She said no.
“OK, then,” she recalled
him saying. She said he then
pushed her face-down onto
the bed, snapped off her onepiece bathing suit and penetrated her from behind as
she told him to stop.
“I was in shock,” she said.
She remembers thinking, “I
can’t believe this is happening.”
Westwick fell asleep, Cao
said, and she tried to snap a
photo of him to prove she
was there, but the room was
too dark. She did film two
videos — which she provided
to The Times — as she tried
to find her way out of the
home that morning.
Cao decided to speak out
after hearing Cohen’s story
and seeing people online trying to discredit her. Cao first
described her account in a
Facebook post.
“I wouldn’t have done it
otherwise,” Cao said. Her
friend, Eleni Feleke, confirmed to The Times that
Cao told her about the incident in 2014, a week or so after it allegedly happened.
Cao said she considered
going to the police at the
time, but friends discouraged her, telling her that the
experience was common in
Hollywood and that people
would criticize her and say
she was out for fame. The alleged incident, she said, deterred her from pursuing an
acting career.
Cohen and Cao met for
the first time one recent
afternoon at the LAPD’s
Hollywood station, where
Cao filed a sexual assault report. Cohen said she showed
up to provide moral support.
When Cao walked in, the
two women embraced.
“Oh my God, I’m like
nervous,” Cao told Cohen. “I
think it’ll be relieving. I did
my part. After that, it’s out of
my hands.”
Cohen handed her a
fuzzy red blanket she had
brought to keep Cao warm
for when she spoke to police.
“I’m here to hold you,”
Cohen said.
alene.tchekmedyian
@latimes.com
B6
FR I DAY , N OV EM BE R 24, 2017
LAT IMES. C OM
UC regents look at tighter audit rules
Rich Pedroncelli Associated Press
STATE AUDITOR Elaine Howle’s inquiry found
interference in an audit of the UC president’s office.
[Audit, from B1]
cluding disciplining the UC
employees involved, requiring training and education
about whistleblowers and
the inappropriateness of retaliation, and revising reporting so that university
auditors report directly to
regents, not to the UC president’s office.
In an interview Wednesday, Kieffer said the regents
would be “working collaboratively” with Howle to implement her suggested reforms. The regents also plan
to discuss their own, more
detailed recommendations
at their next meeting, in January.
Their proposals include a
ban on obstructing, interfering or coordinating requests
for information in responding to state audits. They also
suggest having the general
counsel, chief investment officer and top audit officers
report solely to them on audits and investigations involving the president’s office.
Napolitano apologized
for her actions last week after the regents released the
findings of their inquiry,
which was conducted by former state Justice Carlos
Moreno and law firm Hueston Hennigan. The regents
unanimously agreed to retain her as president but disagreed on how to discipline
her and others involved.
A majority of regents
voted to reprimand Napolitano and said Grossman
and Jones would have been
subject to serious discipline
had they not resigned earlier this month.
Eric Risberg Associated Press
UC REGENT Monica Lozano, right, questions the auditor as UC President Janet Napolitano listens at a Board
of Regents meeting in May. Napolitano has apologized for her aides’ improper conduct during the audit.
A vocal minority, however, said more serious action
was needed. Lt. Gov. Gavin
Newsom, an ex-officio regent, told The Times
through a spokesman that a
mere reprimand of Napolitano was “insignificant.”
Regent John A. Pérez said a
broader range of actions
should be debated, including
possible
measures
against Grossman and
Jones.
Kieffer said Grossman
and Jones received no severance packages or residual
UC benefits.
“They got zero,” he said.
“There is, frankly, nothing
more we could do to them.”
He said he would be
working with Howle in coordination with Napolitano to
determine whether to take
any other actions against
UC employees for inappro-
priate behavior during the
audit.
teresa.watanabe
@latimes.com
Twitter: @teresawatanabe
Times staff writer Patrick
McGreevy contributed to
this report.
BuSINESS
C
F R I D A Y , N O V E M B E R 2 4 , 2 0 1 7 :: L A T I M E S . C O M / B U S I N E S S
Tie-up
might
hurt
tech
Qualcomm has been
an innovation leader.
That could change if
Broadcom buys it.
By Mike Freeman
Peter Morning Associated Press
STORMS HAVE enabled several ski resorts to open before this weekend. Above, snow is cleared at Mammoth Mountain last week.
Skiing in state gets pricier
The average cost of a daily adult lift ticket is up 7% from last season
By Hugo Martin
The snow is falling but lift ticket
prices are rising at many California
ski resorts.
November storms have already
dumped heaps of snow in the Sierra
Nevada, including around Lake
Tahoe, allowing a few resorts to
open.
But enjoying that snow will cost
winter sports enthusiasts more.
The price of a season pass that
offers unlimited access to California’s four resorts owned by Mammoth Resorts — Mammoth Mountain, June Mountain, Big Bear and
Snow Summit — increased nearly
24% this month to $1,049 for adults.
At Squaw Valley and Alpine
Meadows, passes for unlimited skiing at the two resorts for the season
rose Wednesday to $999 from $899
last year, an 11% increase.
And to try to ease crowding on
weekends, Squaw Valley and Alpine
Meadows blocked out Saturdays
and Sundays for skiers who buy the
“bronze pass,” one of the least expensive annual passes.
The average price of a one-day
adult lift ticket in California has increased about 7% this season compared with last season, according to
an analysis by Liftopia, a website
that sells lift tickets and passes for
ski resorts throughout North
America.
Despite the higher prices and
new restrictions, last year’s extended ski season caused by record
snowfall may have increased interest in skiing and snowboarding in
California.
“Most people here are getting
buzzed and excited for the 2017-2018
season,” said Claire Saddington, a
longtime skier and snowboarder
with the Wailers Ski, Snowboard
and Social Club of Los Angeles.
Crowds have been big at the resorts, and some ski trips planned
for this winter are already sold out,
according to skiers and resort operators.
“As of now, the forecast looks
great for us,” said Lauren Burke, a
spokeswoman
for
Mammoth
Mountain, which opened Nov. 9,
three months after closing last
year’s extended season.
The Conejo Ski and Sports Club
of Newbury Park has sold out all 56
seats on its January bus trip to the
Mammoth Mountain resort, said
Gary Huettinger, a vice president
for the club based in Westlake Village. The bus trips for February and
March are filling up fast, he said.
“People are complaining about
prices going up,” Huettinger said.
“But what are you going to do?”
The Thanksgiving weekend is
considered the official start of the
ski season, but five California resorts — Boreal Mountain, Heavenly
Mountain, Mammoth Mountain,
Squaw Valley and Alpine Meadow
— have already opened.
“It’s a really good sign that resorts are getting open on schedule,”
said Michael L. Reitzell, president
[See Lift tickets, C3]
For well over a decade,
Qualcomm has been the research and development engine driving advances in cellular wireless. By making big
bets on technologies years
ahead of time, it created inventions that now enable
streaming video, street-bystreet directions, photo
sharing, longer battery life
and a host of other features
found on nearly every smartphone on the planet.
If Broadcom succeeds
with its bold $103-billion
takeover bid to acquire
Qualcomm, would it continue the practice of pursuing
long-term research on the
next big innovation that
pushes the mobile technologies forward?
An increasing number of
analysts don’t think so. It is
not the way Broadcom Chief
Executive Hock Tan has run
his companies over the
years.
“He optimizes everything
around efficiencies,” said
Jim McGregor, principal analyst with Tirias Research.
“He is an investor. The philosophy he is taking is: We
don’t invest in research and
development. We buy it.”
Broadcom’s effort to acquire Qualcomm — which
could be headed for a hostile
proxy fight for control of
Qualcomm’s board of directors — would attempt to
meld it to very different business models and cultures
around innovation, analysts
say.
“You have the risk takers,
and then you have the ones
that let the market play out
and then go in,” McGregor
[See Qualcomm, C5]
FCC didn’t wait Casinos shifting to a younger vibe
till Black Friday
for telecom’s gift
Gambling revenue is
up, and facilities spend
heavily to lure next
generation of bettors.
DAVID LAZARUS
It’s Black
Friday, but
the Trump
administration
already has
handed out
gifts to the
telecom
industry.
The Republican-controlled Federal Communications Commission this
week took the wraps off its
rollback of net neutrality
rules, which it will finalize
next month and give internet service providers more
control over what you see
online.
The FCC also passed a
new rule on robocalls, which
sounds like a good thing for
consumers but probably
isn’t.
Net neutrality is the sort
of high-tech, policy-wonk
issue that may cause people’s eyes to glaze over, but
it’s really important for
internet users.
At its heart, net neutrality is about guaranteeing a
level playing field for all
online services and content
providers. It ensures that
broadband providers such
as phone and cable companies can’t give preferential
treatment to anyone — their
own streaming-video serv-
ice, say, over Netflix or Amazon Prime Video.
The Obama administration saw such favoritism
as a big enough threat that
it passed regulations in 2015
prohibiting internet service
companies from interfering
with the content flowing
over their networks.
Now President Trump’s
appointee as FCC chairman, Ajit Pai, is proposing
to gut those rules, which he
said have “depressed investment in building and expanding broadband networks and deterred innovation.”
His stance on net neutrality is expected to be
backed by the commission’s
Republican majority at a
Dec. 14 meeting.
Pai said this week that it
was a mistake for the
Obama administration to
impose “heavy-handed,
utility-style regulations
upon the internet.” He uses
that phrase a lot — “heavyhanded” — as if the government has no business telling
huge telecom companies
what to do.
This, just days after the
Justice Department sued
AT&T over that company’s
planned takeover of Time
Warner, arguing that the
deal would be bad for consumers.
[See Lazarus, C3]
By Hugo Martin
The San Manuel Casino
has traded in its bingo cards
for something more electric.
Bingo, once the primary
revenue source for the San
Manuel Band of Mission Indians in San Bernardino
County, has been phased out
at the casino, near Highland.
What had been the nation’s
second-largest bingo hall is
now filled with hundreds of
new slot machines, card tables and a loud rock ’n’ rollthemed restaurant.
The revamp and expansion is part the casino’s effort to dominate the gambling scene in Southern California by adopting a younger, more energetic vibe. The
tribe said it plans to spend
an additional $550 million to
build a 500-room hotel adjacent to the casino.
“We are not here to be
also-rans,” said Loren Gill,
the casino’s general manager. “We are here to be the
best.”
But the competition will
be tough. Other casinos
around the region have already invested heavily in upgrades to take advantage of
surging consumer confidence, which has brought in
a steady stream of gamblers
willing to lay down big bets.
Irfan Khan Los Angeles Times
SAN MANUEL Casino has added hundreds of slot machines to draw young gam-
blers. “We are out of the bingo business,” said general manger Loren Gill, above.
The Bicycle Casino in
Bell Gardens unveiled a new
99-room hotel last year.
The Pechanga Band of
Luiseno Indians plans next
month to open a $285-million project that will add a
568-room hotel wing, plus a
two-story spa and other
amenities to its casino in Temecula.
The Pala Casino in northern San Diego County has
completed a $5.7-million renovation that included a new
wine cave and an outdoor
patio lounge.
The investments make
sense. Gambling revenue at
Indian casinos in California
grew 8% in 2015, compared
with 4.6% growth in 2014, according to a report by Alan
Meister, a gambling-industry expert with the consulting film Nathan Associates.
California leads the nation with 63 tribes that run
gambling operations. Revenue from those operations in
2015 — a record $7.9 billion —
represent the sixth consecutive year of growth since the
economic meltdown, according Meister’s report.
“The strong growth in re-
cent years has encouraged
further development of existing gaming facilities,”
Meister said in a statement.
“As some casinos expand
and renovate, competitors
may need to look to do the
same in order to maintain
market share and grow.”
Since October 2016, the
San Manuel tribe has added
900 slot machines, 16 card tables, a daiquiri and juice bar
and a Mexican restaurant
designed
by
comedian
George Lopez, plus overhauls of its steak restaurant,
[See Casinos, C3]
C2
F R I DAY , N OV E M BER 24, 2017
WST
LAT IMES. C OM/ B USINESS
Tech gifts
reach new
levels, and
so do prices
Companies step up
features in the latest
models, but just one
could drain a person’s
entire holiday budget.
By Hayley Tsukayama
You may notice something different about the
prices of the tech products
that companies are pushing
the hardest this year:
They’re four digits.
Technology companies,
which make the bulk of their
money during the holiday
season, are starting to diversify more and move upscale.
Which means there are more
Lamborghinis and Ferraris
of tech sitting in the spots
that used to be occupied by
Lexuses. (Splashy tech gifts,
after all, are never that
cheap.)
Take mobile phones released this fall, for instance:
Apple’s newest premium
phone, the iPhone X, is $999
— far more than the $649
that used to net you the latest iPhone. Samsung’s Galaxy Note 8 starts at $950, up
from $850 from last year.
The same is true of
marquee products from
Google. Its new Pixelbook
laptop, the latest member of
its generally cheap Chromebook line, is selling for $999.
(You can get a Chromebook
for about $300, on average.)
And Microsoft’s Surface
Book 2, which has a detachable 13-inch screen that
makes a tablet out of your
laptop, remains $1,500 to
start — unless you’re
tempted to buy the new
$2,499 15-inch model.
Compare those prices
against the average amount
that U.S. adults plan to
spend on tech gifts this year:
$478, according to the Consumer Technology Assn., an
industry lobbying group.
Even among the biggest potential spenders (in this
case, adults ages 35 to 44),
the average is just $674.
While an average may not
represent what everyone’s
willing to spend, it is notable
that the price of just one gift
can be more than double
that budget.
So, what’s with the price
increase of top-tier products? For one, companies
have put more into their devices. In Apple’s case, the
iPhone X brings facial-recognition technology and a
nearly all-screen front to the
iPhone for the first time. The
Galaxy Note 8 packs in new
multitasking features that
bring you closer than ever to
a handheld computer. The
Pixelbook has a flexible
hinge that lets you flip its
keyboard behind the screen,
making it a more versatile
laptop option. And the Surface Book 2, in addition to offering that model with two
extra inches, is more powerful than ever and edges
toward a portable desktop.
This brings us to another
reason for the price hike:
This new and experimental
technology is expensive to
build. Take the iPhone’s new
OLED screen, or the facialrecognition sensor. That
hasn’t been around long
enough for the company to
produce cheaply.
Is it all worth it? Based on
my time with them, these
products are well made and
live up to their top-of-theline status.
But they do have imperfections that may make
many balk at spending a
grand. Apple’s Face ID,
while impressive, doesn’t
work 100% of the time. The
Surface Book 2 has a bit of a
wobble problem with its display. These are the kinds of
things that early adopters
might be happy to take in
stride, but not everyone else
would be.
There’s also the fact that,
with their higher prices,
these mobile devices are
competing with desktops
that can simply offer more
bang for their buck in productivity. And there’s a
greater chance for buyer’s
remorse when you’re spending a desktop’s worth of
money on a smartphone
that — no matter its sophistication or cost — will always
have an on-screen keyboard
prone to typos. Or, as is the
case with the Pixelbook, a
laptop that still runs what
are essentially mobile apps.
So this is a year to shop
around more than ever and
think about how badly you
want the newest features,
and whether you can wait for
some of them to trickle down
a tier. You may, for example,
decide it’s better to pick up
an iPhone 8 or iPhone 7 with
extra
storage
capacity
rather than an iPhone X
with a fancy feature you may
not use. Or, of course, you
may still find that dropping
$1,000 on a single item still
makes sense for you.
Tsukayama writes for the
Washington Post.
Josh Edelson AFP/Getty Images
Jeff Chiu Associated Press
AT TOP, Apple’s Philip Schiller talks about the iPhone X, which costs hundreds more than its predecessor, at
a media event in Cupertino, Calif. Above, a Google Pixelbook computer retails for about the same price: $999.
MARKET ROUNDUP
China slump weighs on global stocks
associated press
European stock markets
were weighed down Thursday by the earlier slump
in China’s main stock market to its lowest level since
September. Trading levels
were relatively modest,
though, with U.S. markets
closed for the Thanksgiving
holiday.
In Europe, Britain’s
FTSE 100 fell 0.1% to 7,410,
while
Germany’s
DAX
slipped 0.2% to 12,995. France’s CAC 40 outperformed
its counterparts, trading up
0.6% at 5,384.
Chinese
stocks
fell
sharply on reports that the
government is moving to
rein in online lending firms.
Investors also pulled back
after Hong Kong’s Hang
Seng index hit a 10-year high
Wednesday to take profits.
The Shanghai Composite index sank 2.3% to 3,351.92,
its lowest level since September, while the Hang
Seng
slumped 1%
to
29,707.94.
“Sentiment in China was
dented by Beijing halting
approvals for all new online
lending companies to curb a
credit bubble,” analyst Mike
van Dulken of Accendo Markets said.
Other Asian markets finished generally flat. South
Korea’s Kospi finished 0.1%
lower at 2,537.15, and Australia’s S&P/ASX 200 finished unchanged at 5,986.20.
Stocks in Singapore and
other
Southeast
Asian
countries were mixed. Japan
was closed for a holiday.
The 19-country Eurozone
is set for its best quarterly
performance since early 2011,
according to a closely
watched survey Thursday,
the latest sign that a robust
economy has gained further
momentum heading into the
year’s end.
Financial
information
company IHS Markit said its
purchasing managers’ index
— a broad gauge of business
activity across the manufacturing and services sectors
— rose to 57.5 points in November from 56 the previous
month. Anything above 50
indicates an expansion, and
the index now stands at
its highest level since April
2011.
Minutes of the Federal
Open Market Committee’s
last meeting that ended Nov.
1 showed that most officials
generally think it soon will be
time for another increase in
the Federal Reserve’s key interest rate. A few Fed leaders
think rates should stay
where they are until there is
more evidence inflation is
rising, showing concerns
that the U.S. inflation rate is
falling short of expectations
despite the jobless rate falling to the lowest level in
nearly 17 years. But the minutes did not change expectations of a December rate
hike, analysts said.
The price of oil retreated
after a jump on reports that
key oil producers might extend the cuts in production
they made at the start of this
year. U.S. crude fell 20 cents
to $57.82 a barrel on the New
York Mercantile Exchange
while Brent crude, used to
price international oils, lost
31 cents to $63.01 a barrel in
London.
The euro rose 0.2% to
$1.1844, and the dollar was
unchanged at 111.21 yen.
FRIDAY , NOVEMB ER 24, 2017
L AT I ME S . CO M/ B U S IN ES S
C3
Ski season starts with a price jump
[Lift tickets, from C1]
of the California Ski Industry Assn., a trade group for
California and Nevada resorts.
Mammoth Mountain had
only two lifts running on
opening day but soon had
enough snow to operate 12 of
its 28 lifts.
Squaw Valley and Alpine
Meadows operated three of
42 lifts on the day each
opened — Nov. 17 and Nov. 18,
respectively — but now are
running at least 11 lifts combined.
“It was definitely high energy for sure, which was exciting,”
Squaw
Valley
spokeswoman Liesl Hepburn said.
Those hardest hit by
higher lift prices will be skiers who wait till the last minute to buy passes or get lift
tickets the day they arrive at
the slopes, said Evan Reece,
Liftopia’s chief executive.
Veteran skiers, on the
other hand, typically avoid
some of the pain of the
higher prices by buying annual passes at a discount
several months in advance
or by ordering day tickets
online at a lower rate, he
said.
Resorts offer discounts
for early ticket buyers to get
skiers to make a commitment, which increases revenue and helps the businesses gauge the upcoming
crowd sizes, Reece added.
“The ski industry, as a
whole, wants to [encourage]
people to buy tickets before
they arrive,” Reece said.
The state’s ski resorts are
coming off a 2016-17 winter
that recorded one of the largest snowpacks in California
history, so big that the central Sierra Nevada snow accumulation was larger than
the previous four years combined, according to NASA
data.
The snow was so plentiful
that Mammoth Mountain,
the state’s most popular ski
Gary Coronado Los Angeles Times
BUYING passes or lift tickets in advance can save you money. Those hardest hit by higher lift prices will be skiers who wait till the last
minute to buy passes or get lift tickets the day they arrive at the slopes. Above, skiers at Squaw Valley take advantage of snow last June.
resort, operated until Aug. 6,
making it the resort’s second-longest season. Squaw
Valley, the California resort
northwest of Lake Tahoe,
raised the possibility of staying open year-round. It
ended its season July 15,
marking the resort’s longest
ever.
Skiers are hopeful for a
good snow year but don’t ex-
pect this season to match
the snowfall of last winter.
“This could be a pretty
decent season this year, but
who knows?” said Huettinger of the Conejo Ski and
Sports Club.
He said he hopes that the
conditions this year at Mammoth Mountain will at least
be better than they were two
years ago, when the state
was in the last year of a punishing drought.
“Two years ago we went
up to Mammoth and played
volleyball near the base of
the mountain,” Huettinger
said.
Weather forecasters say
early data suggest this winter could be influenced by
weak La Niña conditions —
the same weather condi-
tions that last year brought
warmer temperatures and
less precipitation to the
southern part of the country
and lower temperatures and
higher precipitation to the
north.
Skiers prefer that storms
dump snow just before a
weekend or holiday break.
“If it snows especially
hard on Tuesday, Wednes-
day and Thursday, it makes
it easier to ski on Friday, Saturday and Sunday and get
back home on Monday,” said
Kris Flaig, president of the
Long Beach Ski Club, which
has scheduled monthly trips
to Mammoth Mountain
from December through
March.
hugo.martin@latimes.com
FCC gives gift
to telecom firms
Irfan Khan Los Angeles Times
SAN MANUEL Casino, once the nation’s second-largest bingo hall, has phased out the game in favor of slot
machines. It’s also expanded its rock ’n’ roll-themed restaurant in its push for a younger, livelier atmosphere.
Southland casinos spending big
to attract new wave of gamblers
[Casinos, from C1]
retail outlet and an Asianthemed gambling room.
The most noticeable
change has been the expansion of its Rock & Brews
restaurant, a raucous rock
’n’
roll-themed
eatery
founded by, among others,
Gene Simmons and Paul
Stanley, members of the
rock band Kiss. It serves bar
food among rock images and
giant television screens on
the wall, blaring concert
footage and music videos.
Like most of the other casinos that have invested in
upgrades and expansions,
the San Manuel Casino is
making a play for younger
gamblers with a more lively
atmosphere, Gill said. That
meant eliminating more geriatric games.
“We are out of the bingo
business,” he said.
The San Manuel Indians
jumped into gambling in
1986 with a 50,000-squarefoot bingo hall, the nation’s
second-largest bingo operation. Over the years, slot
machines and card tables
have taken over bigger
shares of the casino.
In place of the last 25,000
square feet of bingo-devoted
space, in addition to the expansion of the Rock & Brews
restaurant, the casino added a merchandise shop, a
new bar and the final 400 of
the 900 new slot machines.
Gill said the bingo parlor
could not match the surging
demand for the slot games,
hot wings, barbecue chicken
and jalapeño poppers. The
casino has been drawing a
maximum of about 1 million
visitors a month since the
upgrades were completed,
but Gill declined to say how
much numbers have increased in the last year.
Hoping to take advantage of the growth, the tribe
plans to spend about
$550 million on a hotel with
500 rooms, a spa, pool and
five new restaurants. Gill
said he hopes to break
ground next year, with the
opening scheduled for 2020.
The expansion is expected to employ 1,400 construction workers and add
about 1,200 full-time jobs,
bringing the casino’s staff to
about 5,000 employees.
On a recent Tuesday, the
casino was alive with the
sounds of slot machines
ringing and gamblers shuffling between games.
Monica and Albert Amador of Fontana sat at one of
the casino bars, eating
French fries and playing video poker. The couple said
they visit the casino about
once a week to eat.
“The food is amazing,”
Monica Amador said.
The couple live only a few
minutes’ drive from the casino, but once the tribe completes its hotel they said they
might book a room or try the
new restaurants.
“That’s another reason to
come,” she said.
But not everyone is
happy about the changes at
the casino.
Josie Alarcon, a retiree
from San Bernardino, said
she she misses the bingo,
which she played almost
daily in the past. Now she
gets her fix at the bingo halls
at the Pechanga Casino or
the Morongo Casino in
Cabazon, she said.
Asked about the changes
at the San Manuel casino,
she shrugged and said: “It’s
OK, but it’s not the same.”
hugo.martin@latimes.com
Twitter: @hugomartin
[Lazarus, from C1]
Under the FCC’s plan,
Pai said, “the federal government will stop micromanaging the internet” and
will “simply require internet
service providers to be
transparent about their
practices so that consumers
can buy the service plan
that’s best for them.”
Because, as you know,
there are so many different
broadband providers competing for your business.
(Sarcasm alert.)
Democratic Commissioner Mignon Clyburn
called Pai’s rule change,
revealed the day before
Thanksgiving, “a cornucopia full of rotten fruit, stale
grains and wilted flowers
topped off with a plate full of
burnt turkey.”
She said the so-called
Restoring Internet Freedom Order “would dismantle net neutrality as we know
it by giving the green light to
our nation’s largest broadband providers to engage in
anti-consumer practices,
including blocking, slowing
down traffic, and paid prioritization of online applications and services.”
Take a look around and
you’ll see why Team Trump
has this all wrong.
Cable giant Comcast
owns NBCUniversal’s movies and TV shows, and in
September it launched a
streaming-video service
called Xfinity Instant TV
that features a variety of
cable channels.
Under current rules,
Comcast couldn’t provide
more reliable access to its
own service or slow down
rival streaming signals from
the likes of Sling TV. There
are no broadband fast lanes.
After Pai’s rule change
takes effect, however, there
would be nothing to stop
Comcast from fiddling with
your feed, making the
prospect of broadband fast
lanes — and deliberate
traffic jams — very much a
reality.
Comcast could demand
that companies like Netflix
pay extra for more reliable
signals. It could also charge
its own subscribers more for
fast-lane access to content.
The telecom industry
welcomed Pai’s rule change
— although it made no
commitment to actually
invest in better networks.
Cinnamon Rogers, vice
president of government
affairs for the Telecommunications Industry Assn., said
ditching net neutrality “will
improve the business case
for deploying next-generation wireline and wireless
broadband to meet growing
consumer demand for connectivity.”
Improve the business
case? There’s a call to arms
for you.
Harold Feld, senior vice
president of the advocacy
group Public Knowledge,
said the repeal of net neutrality will leave internet
users “completely unprotected by the FCC.”
He said the change has
“more to do with gouging
consumers and crushing
competition than with
providing new services.”
As for robocalls, consumers might think at first that
the FCC finally has their
back.
The commission gave its
explicit blessing to phone
companies blocking robocalls before they can reach
customers’ landlines or
mobile phones. This is important because the companies argued in the past that
federal rules prevented
them from blocking calls.
“Robocalls and telemarketing calls are consistently
the top source of consumer
complaints received by the
FCC,” the commission said,
estimating that U.S. consumers receive about 2.4
billion robocalls every
month.
Here’s the catch: Along
with giving phone companies the go-ahead to block
calls, the FCC told them
they can pass along to customers any costs incurred in
stopping robocalls.
In other words, it’s virtually guaranteed that if your
phone company cracks
down on robocalls, you’ll see
yet another fee on your bill.
Or robocall filtering will be
offered as an add-on service,
like call waiting.
So the problem is being
addressed.
But, like better broadband access, it’ll cost you.
David Lazarus’ column runs
Tuesdays and Fridays. He
also can be seen daily on
KTLA-TV Channel 5 and
followed on Twitter
@Davidlaz. Send your tips
or feedback to david.lazarus
@latimes.com.
C4
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2017
LOS ANGELES TIMES
L AT I ME S . CO M/ B U S IN ES S
Broadcom
could halt
Qualcomm
innovation
[Qualcomm, from C1]
said. “It’s a more conservative approach. I’m not saying it’s bad. It just doesn’t
help with innovation. It
doesn’t drive the market.”
Making that marriage
work without destroying
what makes Qualcomm
valuable could be difficult. It
would be like attempting to
build a clock with two completely different sets of parts
— one geared toward turning the hands clockwise and
the other designed to spin
the hands in the opposite direction, said Olivier Blanchard, senior analyst at Futurum, a technology strategy and research firm.
“Qualcomm invests in
stuff that doesn’t have to be
profitable for a while,” Blanchard said. “They’re not going quarter by quarter. They
have a bigger strategy.
“Whereas Broadcom is
super good at cutting costs
and being a financially driven company. That is great
for investors quarter to
quarter but doesn’t necessarily have the focus to want
to build things for the long
term.”
Although the companies
may not be a perfect cultural
or business model match,
they certainly make a compelling pair financially.
After cost cutting and assuming completion of Qualcomm’s $38-billion pending
acquisition of Dutch chip
maker NXP Semiconductors, the combined companies would create a juggernaut with $51 billion in revenue and a $22-billion annual
operating profit — trailing
only Intel and Samsung in
the semiconductor industry.
The conglomerate would
own a leading market position in nearly every high-value chip inside smartphones.
This month, Broadcom
offered $70 a share for Qualcomm in cash and stock,
representing a 28% premium in its share price.
Qualcomm’s shares were
trading at low levels because
of its fierce legal battle with
Apple and global antitrust
regulators over patent fees.
Qualcomm executives have
preached patience — noting
that it has favorably resolved patent licensing battles with Nokia and others
before.
With its stock price down
18% over the last year, patience from hedge funds,
mutual funds and other institutional investors that
make up 78% of Qualcomm’s
investor base may be wearing thin.
Broadcom’s takeover offer is far from a done deal,
however. There’s considerable risk that global regulators would block the sale.
Qualcomm rejected Broadcom’s offer as dramatically
undervaluing the company.
But Broadcom’s bid is serious. It could pursue a
proxy battle to win board
seats to push the deal
through. It also could boost
the per-share offering price
into the high $70s to low $80s,
RBC Capital Markets analyst Amit Daryanani said in
a research note.
Such a move would force
Qualcomm’s shareholders
to decide “can Qualcomm’s
management, which has
overseen severe underperformance and been unable
to resolve key disputes, turn
the ship; or should shareholders put faith in Hock
Tan and take the exit?” Daryanani wrote. “We think
status quo isn’t a feasible option anymore, especially if
Broadcom were to raise the
offer” heading into a proxy
battle.
Tan has been very successful at growing his
core
company,
Avago
Technologies, through acquisitions. His largest was
Irvine-based
Broadcom,
which Avago bought for $37
billion in 2016 and took the
Broadcom name. The company is strong in Wi-Fi/Bluetooth, broadband infrastructure and data center
networking chips. Tan has
been a master at absorbing
the companies he acquires
— delivering strong financial
performance. Broadcom’s
stock has surged nearly 61%
over the last 12 months.
Tan contends Broadcom
is a technology company
that invests in research and
development. He views the
firm as a portfolio of marketleading product lines, which
he calls sustainable franchises.
“We identify the strong
businesses in the companies
we acquire, and in the case of
Qualcomm, undoubtedly it’s
their roots,” Tan said. “Their
roots trace back to cellular
wireless. That is what attracts and excites me about
the company. It is the leader
— engineering, technology
and market leader — in cellular wireless. We see that as
a very sustainable franchise.”
When Avago bought
Broadcom, it began to sell off
product lines it didn’t see as
sustainable
franchises.
They included its Internet of
Things business and wireless infrastructure backhaul
division, among others.
“Let’s say Broadcom acquired Qualcomm tomorrow — putting aside regulatory hurdles and all that,”
said Blanchard of Futurum.
“I think Broadcom would
have a tendency to get rid of
all the business units and
projects that aren’t going to
be very quickly profitable.”
Qualcomm, on the other
hand, invests in technologies that are years from producing a return on investment. It has been working on
5G, which aims to deliver fiber-optic-like speeds to
mobile devices, for a decade,
even though 5G technology
isn’t expected to start generating a return on investment
until 2019.
“While start-ups are good
innovators, you still need
companies that have the
staying power, the investment capabilities and everything else to build a market,
build an ecosystem,” said
McGregor of Tirias Research. “That is why you
need companies that are
risk takers and have that investment capability like a
Google, an Intel, a Qualcomm, etc.”
Although Broadcom has
amassed an impressive
technology portfolio, its lack
of cellular chips is a big hole
in its product lineup, said
Geoff Blaber of industry research firm CCS Insight.
“It is clear Broadcom
needs Qualcomm far more
than Qualcomm would benefit from the tie-up,” Blaber
said. “The gap in Broadcom’s portfolio will become a
mounting problem” as more
far-flung gadgets are equipped with high-speed cellular
connectivity and computing
power.
For its part, Qualcomm
sees future growth potential
with the upcoming rollout of
ultra-fast 5G networks — in
which it is believed to have a
technology lead — and the
expansion of cellular technologies into cars, healthcare devices, the Internet of
Things gadgets and other industries.
The company has been
expanding
smartphone
products to include radio
frequency chips used near
antennas. Moreover, the
purchase of NXP, which
makes automotive and security chips, would help ease
Qualcomm’s reliance on the
slowing smartphone market. During its 2017 fiscal
year that ended in September, the company took in $3
billion of its $22.3 billion in
revenue from nonsmartphone customers. That is a
25% increase from the previous year.
In addition, its chip-making unit — which pulls in
most of the company’s revenue — has boosted profit
margins for six straight
quarters. Its patent licensing business, which accounts for most of its profit,
struggled as Apple and another smartphone maker
stopped paying royalties for
using Qualcomm’s patented
cellular technologies.
“It’s not like Qualcomm is
bad at making money,”
Blanchard
said.
“They
understood how to monetize
3G. They understood how to
build and monetize 4G. Now
they are doing it with 5G and
already
working
on
technology beyond that.
They are a long-bet company.”
mike.freeman
@sduniontribune.com
WST
FRIDAY , NOVEMB ER 24, 2017
C5
C6
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2017 WST
LOS ANGELES TIMES
D
SPORTS
F R I D A Y , N O V E M B E R 2 4 , 2 0 1 7 :: L A T I M E S . C O M / S P O R T S
N F L W E E K 12 :: CHA R G ERS 28 , DALLAS 6
Mora
is on
their
minds
Many UCLA seniors
are disappointed the
fired coach won’t get
to send them off.
By Ben Bolch
A year ago, Jim Mora
stood inside the Rose Bowl
and shared a tender moment with each of his seniors
before they bounded onto
their home field one last
time.
The UCLA coach held
quarterback Mike Fafaul’s
head in his hands while conveying his appreciation. He
embraced linebacker Cameron Judge in a tight hug. He
placed his hand atop defensive end Takkarist McKinley’s head and playfully
nudged him toward the field.
On Friday night, the Bruins seniors will receive acknowledgment from everyone except the man who
brought them to UCLA.
They will share hugs,
handshakes and smiles with
parents, teammates and interim coach Jedd Fisch.
Then they will try to beat
California as a tribute to the
coach who was fired only five
days before their final home
game.
“He’s one of the reasons
why I came 1,800 miles away,
from Louisiana, to be a part
of this organization,” Bruins
senior linebacker Kenny
Young said of Mora. “He is a
real mentor. He’s a great guy,
a great guy at the end of the
day. And I wish I could’ve
shook his hand and hugged
him for my last game, but,
you know, things happen.”
Several players said they
had not seen Mora since he
[See UCLA, D6]
Mark J. Terrill Associated Press
JEDD FISCH , UCLA’s
interim coach, will lead
the team against Cal.
TONIGHT’S GAME
UCLA (5-6) vs.
California (5-6)
AT THE ROSE BOWL
TV: FS1, 7:30
Tom Pennington Getty Images
PHILIP RIVERS WAS AS SHARP as a knife during his first Thanksgiving game of his 14-year NFL career, carving up the Cowboys
for 434 yards and three touchdowns as the Chargers improved their playoff chances. “Does it get any better?” Rivers said.
PASSING GRAVY
There’s no
bringing
Allen down
Rivers has one of the best
games of his career on a
national stage in a solid
effort by the Chargers.
By Dan Woike
ARLINGTON, Texas — There
was a little Decatur, Ala., on the
field with Philip Rivers on Thursday.
That was the town where he
grew up, fantasizing of playing in
the NFL; where he obsessed over
football with his father and grandfather, and where he doctored photos to include his face on the cover
of Sports Illustrated.
It was one of the first things on
his mind after he led his team to a
28-6 victory over the Dallas Cowboys.
“I think it’s moments and games
like this, where I go, ‘This is what I
dreamed of as a kid,’ ” Rivers said in
the locker room. “ ‘You’re going to
play the Dallas Cowboys on
Thanksgiving at 35 years old. What
in the world? Does it get any better?’ I think a little of that lets you
just go, ‘Ahhhhhh.’ ”
The primal scream from Rivers
came after his team dominated the
Cowboys in front of a national audience, the score not fully representing the margin between the teams.
He had just played one of the best games of his career, throwing for
434 yards and three touchdowns
with only six incompletions in 33 attempts.
It’s the fifth time he has thrown
for more than 425 yards in a game,
and the first time his team won
when he’s put up those numbers.
[See Chargers, D4]
By Mike DiGiovanna
Michael Ainsworth Associated Press
KEENAN ALLEN CAUGHT 11 passes for 172 yards, including a
dazzling 42-yard touchdown that pretty much iced the victory.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Vikings keep rolling, Redskins win ugly
Minnesota wins its seventh in a row, beating Detroit 30-23;
Washington wins a struggle with the New York Giants 20-10. D3
ARLINGTON, Texas — One by
one they fell to the AT&T Stadium
turf Thursday, five Dallas Cowboys
defenders in all, tumbling to the
ground as if they were pins and
Chargers receiver Keenan Allen
was a human bowling ball.
Four of the five got a hand on
Allen — one grabbed a shoulder,
one an ankle, one a rib cage, one a
thigh. Another grasped at air as
Allen juked his way down the left
sideline for a 42-yard fourth-quarter touchdown that sealed the
Chargers’ 28-6 Thanksgiving Day
victory over the Cowboys.
Allen’s shake-and-bake catchand-run highlighted another huge
day. This time he caught 11 passes
from Philip Rivers for a career-best
172 yards and a touchdown to help
the Chargers win for the fifth time
in seven games and vault themselves into a crowded AFC playoff
picture.
“I used to be a running back,”
Allen said with a chuckle, when
asked where he got those kinds of
moves. “I can’t wait to get on the
plane and watch the replay. Once
you cross the goal line, it was like,
‘Whew, I made it!’ It felt great.”
Through nine games this season, Allen — who suffered a season[See Receivers, D5]
GOOD TIMES
FOR MANSON
HIGH SCHOOLS
Dorsey’s leader
in sacrifices
Tight end Isaiah
Smalls might be the
Dons’ best player, but
he’s concentrating on
blocking now. D2
He’s become a big part of Ducks
defense, and his mother is healthy
By Mike Coppinger
Josh Manson didn’t
really want to leave Saskatchewan, but he had no
choice.
Summer was coming to
an end and it was time to
head back to Southern California for training camp
ahead of the 2016-17 NHL season.
Leaving his mother, Lana
Manson, behind in Canada
would be far more difficult
this time.
While Josh was at North-
eastern, she was diagnosed
with Stage 1 melanoma.
Now, the cancer had advanced to Stage 4 and,
worse,
it
metastasized
throughout Lana’s body: her
lungs, pelvis, bones and
brain.
He knew this could be the
last time he saw her. The
doctors told them in September there was a threemonth window for the medicine to work.
But the baby-faced Manson had a blossoming NHL
career to attend to and, be[See Manson, D7]
NFL
Joyner’s job is
not a breeze
Rams defensive back
could be called upon
for double duty
against the highscoring Saints. D3
NBA
Keeping their
eyes on the ball
Turnovers have been
hurting the Lakers,
while assists helped
the Clippers end their
losing streak. D9
Alex Gallardo Associated Press
DUCKS DEFENSEMAN Josh Manson recently received a four-year contract
extension worth $4.1 million annually. He leads the team in plus-minus rating.
Motor racing .......... D7
Day in Sports ......... D8
D2
S
F R I DAY , N OV EM BE R 24, 2017
PRO CALENDAR
FRI.
24
SAT.
25
SUN.
26
MON.
27
TUE.
28
NEW
ORLEANS
1:15
Channel 2
RAMS
NEXT: DEC. 3 VS. CLEVELAND, 1 , CHANNEL 2
CHARGERS
at
CLIPPERS
7:30
SpecSN,
Prime
LAKERS
at
Sacramento
7
Prime
CLIPPERS
LAKERS
7:30
SpecSN,
Prime
at Arizona DUCKS
6
7:30
FSW
FSW, Ch. 13
at Detroit
4:30
FSW
KINGS
WINNIPEG at KINGS
1
7:30
Prime
FSW, Ch. 13
at Chicago
5:30
FSW
DUCKS
Shade denotes home game
TODAY ON THE AIR
TIME
EVENT
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
8 a.m.
AdvoCare Invitational, Missouri vs. St. John’s
9 a.m.
Battle 4 Atlantis, final, Northern Iowa vs.
Villanova
10:30 a.m. Wooden Legacy, Saint Mary’s vs. Washington
State
11:30 a.m. Battle 4 Atlantis, third place, North Carolina
State vs. Tennessee
Noon
Seattle at Washington
Noon
PK80, consolation, Portland State vs. Butler
12:30 p.m. PK80, semifinal, North Carolina vs. Arkansas
1 p.m.
North Texas at Georgia Tech
2 p.m.
AdvoCare Invitational, semifinal, Central Florida
vs. West Virginia
2:30 p.m. PK80, semifinal, Duke vs. Texas
2:30 p.m. Las Vegas invitational, Xavier vs. Arizona State
4 p.m.
Wooden Legacy, semifinal
4 p.m.
Emerald Coast Classic, New Mexico vs. Texas
Christian
4 p.m.
Winthrop at Auburn
4:30 p.m. NIT Season Tip-Off, third place, Virginia vs.
Rhode Island
5 p.m.
Las Vegas Invitational, third place, George
Washington vs. Kansas State
5 p.m.
Eastern Washington at Utah
6 p.m.
Pepperdine at Texas A&M
6 p.m.
Wisconsin Milwaukee at Wisconsin
6 p.m.
PK80 tournament
6:30 p.m. PK80 tournament
6:30 p.m. Emerald Coast Classic, Maryland vs. St.
Bonaventure
6:45 p.m. NIT Season Tip-Off, Vanderbilt vs. Seton Hall
8 p.m.
PK80 tournament
9 p.m.
PK80 tournament
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
8:30 a.m. Western Michigan at Toledo
9 a.m.
Miami at Pittsburgh
9 a.m.
Baylor at Texas Christian
9 a.m.
Northern Illinois at Central Michigan
9 a.m.
Navy at Houston
11:30 a.m. Missouri at Arkansas
12:30 p.m. South Florida at Central Florida
12:30 p.m. New Mexico at San Diego State
1 p.m.
Iowa at Nebraska
1:30 p.m. Eastern Michigan at Indiana
4 p.m.
Western Kentucky at Florida International
5 p.m.
Virginia Tech at Virginia
5 p.m.
Texas Tech at Texas
7:30 p.m. California at UCLA
COLLEGE VOLLEYBALL
8 p.m.
Women, Washington State at Washington
GOLF
5 p.m.
PGA, Emirates Australian Open
HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL
7:30 p.m. Centennial (Corona) at St. John Bosco
HOCKEY
10 a.m.
Pittsburgh at Boston
1 p.m.
Winnipeg at Ducks
2 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Washington
6 p.m.
Kings at Arizona
HORSE RACING
Noon
Trackside Live, featuring Del Mar
PRO BASKETBALL
5 p.m.
Charlotte at Cleveland
7:30 p.m. Chicago at Golden State
SOCCER
11:15 a.m. Germany, Hannover vs. Stuttgart
11:30 a.m. Spain, Celta Vigo vs. Leganes
Noon
England, West Ham vs. Leicester City
6:30 a.m. Germany, Dortmund vs. Schalke
(Sat.)
TENNIS
Noon
WTA, Hawaii Open
ON THE AIR
TV: ESPNews
TV: ESPN2
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TV: ESPN2
TV: Pac-12
TV: ESPNU
TV: ESPN
TV: FS West
TV: ESPN2
TV: ESPN
TV: 11
TV: ESPN2
TV: CBS Sports
TV: SEC
TV: ESPNU
TV: FS1
TV: Pac-12
TV: SEC
TV: Big Ten
TV: ESPN2
TV: ESPNU
TV: CBS Sports
TV: ESPNews
TV: ESPN2
TV: ESPN
TV: ESPNU
TV: 7
TV: FS1
TV: CBS Sports
TV: ESPN
TV: 2
TV: 7
TV: CBS Sports
TV: FS1
TV: Big Ten
TV: beIN1
TV: ESPN
TV: 11
TV: FS1 R: 570
TV: Pac-12
TV: Golf
TV: Prime
TV: 4
TV: Prime R: 830
TV: NHL
TV: FS West R:
790
TV: TVG
TV: NBA
TV: NBA
TV: FS2, UDN
TV: beIN Net
TV: NBCSN, UNVSO
TV: FS1, UDN
TV: Tennis
WEEKEND SOCCER ON TV
In three of Europe’s top five leagues, the leading goal scorer
plays for the team that is also leading the table. This weekend’s
schedule features three games in which a league’s top two scorers will face off — and not surprisingly, each game will affect positions near the top of the standings as well.
EPL: Less than a third of the way into the season, defending
champion Chelsea is already nine points shy of league-leading
Manchester City. But the third-place Blues take a four-game
winning streak — and a 270-minute scoreless streak — on the
road Saturday against fifth-place Liverpool, winner of three
straight (Ch. 4, 9:30 a.m. PST). The game also will match the
league’s leading goal scorers in Liverpool’s Mohamed Salah,
who has scored nine times, and Chelsea’s Alvaro Morata, whose
eight goals are tied for second.
Bundesliga: A month ago, Borussia Dortmund sat atop the
league. But four losses during a five-game winless slide has sent
the team tumbling four spots. But if it can arrest that fall against
red-hot Schalke on Saturday (FS1, Univision Deportes, 6:30 a.m.
PST), the team could jump as high as second.
Ligue 1: Little has gone wrong this season for unbeaten Paris
Saint-Germain, which leads Europe’s major club teams in goals
(43) and goal-differential (plus-34). PSG hasn’t really been
tested, though, since just two of first its 13 games have come
against teams currently in the league’s top four. That changes
Sunday when PSG goes to Monaco to face the only team within
eight points of the leaders (BeIN Sports, 11:45 a.m. PST). The
game also will showcase the league’s top scorers in PGS’s Edinson Cavani (15 goals) and Monaco’s Radamel Falcao (13).
La Liga: Another Sunday matchup of scoring leaders sends
Barcelona and Lionel Messi, who tops La Liga with 12 goals, to
Valencia to meet Simone Zaza, who enters the weekend second
in the league with nine tallies (BeIN Sports en Espanol, 11:30
PST). A loss by either side would tarnish unbeaten records 12
games into the schedule.
— Kevin Baxter
LAT IMES. C OM/ SP ORT S
He leads way, before
and during the game
ERIC SONDHEIMER
ON HIGH SCHOOLS
Each time the Dorsey
Dons have run onto the
football field this season,
6-foot-4, 215-pound tight end
Isaiah Smalls has proudly
carried the school flag with
his right hand, waving it
while teammates follow.
Standard-bearers have
been important in history.
Armies fought under, and
protected, their flag. If the
standard-bearer ever fell,
another solider picked the
flag up. Football is no different.
“Carrying the flag means
a lot,” Smalls said. “I want to
show everybody we’re here.
We’re going to show our
enthusiasm and be ready to
play. I want other teams to
know I’m going to be here for
all four quarters.”
Dorsey (6-6) was supposed to be the prime challenger to Narbonne in City
Section football this season.
A 1-6 start put an end to
that. Now the Dons have
regrouped, gone on a fivegame winning streak and
are playing at South Gate on
Friday in a Division I semifinal.
Smalls, an Oregon State
commit who’s probably the
best player on the Dons, is
an example of what you
expect out of a leader. He
has sacrificed for the good of
the team.
In the last two games,
he’s caught one pass. The
team needed him to focus on
blocking, so he did.
“He blocked his butt off,”
coach Charles Mincy said.
“It’s a benefit to have someone who’s versatile and we
can move around. Any time
you have deficiencies, he
helps us. Like every receiver
dude, he wants to catch
passes.”
Said Smalls: “I’m frustrated I don’t get the ball but
take it out on the guy I have
to block.”
Smalls played quarterback when an injury
knocked out starter Mekhi
Ellis. He almost rallied the
team to a win against Culver
City and battled to the bitter
Eric Sondheimer Los Angeles Times
ISAIAH SMALLS, a tight end who has played
quarterback when needed, carries the flag for Dorsey.
end in a 33-14 loss to rival
Crenshaw. You could sense
the lessons he was learning
and the examples he was
setting: Never stopping the
fight until the last second
has expired.
“He’s the elder statesman, so to speak,” Mincy
said. “He’s the most mature
guy we got. We have to lean
on him for a lot.”
Smalls has stayed at
Dorsey for four years. That’s
important at a time when
players move around for
what they perceive as better
opportunities. Sometimes
staying is the best opportunity. Smalls’ father died
several years ago. It’s been
him, his mother, his sister
and his teammates working
together through ups and
downs.
“It’s just a family and
never stops,” he said.
Showing loyalty, trusting
your coach, believing in
yourself — those are great
concepts to embrace on
Thanksgiving weekend.
Early signing date
There’s a new early signing date for high school
football seniors: Dec. 20-22.
It’s a good idea for everybody. Players certain about
their college choice can end
the recruiting process
rather than wait until the
next signing period in February. Coaches, tired of the
games being played,
whether someone is truly
committed while they’re
taking other visits, find out
the truth.
Of course, if a coach gets
fired after signing day, that
could be a problem. Because
this is all new, let’s hope
schools will release players
following a coaching change
as common sense dictates.
And if any players have
concerns, they can always
ask to sign a financial aid
contract instead of a letter of
intent. That binds the
school but not the athlete.
eric.sondheimer@latimes.com
Twitter: @latsondheimer
TONIGHT’S
FOOTBALL
SEMIFINALS
SOUTHERN SECTION DIVISION 1
Corona Centennial (10-1) vs.
Bellflower St. John Bosco
(11-1) at Cerritos College,
7:30 (FS West): This is the
fifth consecutive year these
teams have played in a semifinal or final. Each school
has won twice. The big question all week has been
whether standout Centennial quarterback Tanner McKee will play. He has thrown
on the sideline, but it will be
up to the team trainer and
doctor to make a final decision. He was taken out of last
week’s game after hitting his
head during a tackle. With or
without him, the Huskies
have been running the ball
well. St. John Bosco’s sophomore quarterback, D.J. Uiagalelei, has been sensational
in two playoff victories. The
pick: St. John Bosco.
Santa Ana Mater Dei (12-0)
at Mission Viejo (12-0), 7:
Mater Dei’s offense is so
good that even good defenses can’t slow the Monarchs. That’s the challenge
for Mission Viejo. The Monarchs’ passing game, aided
by a dominant offensive line,
scores
touchdowns
in
bunches. Mission Viejo will
try to take time off the clock
running the ball with Akili
Arnold. The pick: Mater Dei.
CITY SECTION OPEN DIVISION
Fairfax (9-2) at Harbor City
Narbonne (8-3), 7: Fairfax
Coach Shane Cox will need
to pull out every trick and
strategy in the book to topple the Gauchos. He has a
defense that has played well
all season. But top-seeded
Narbonne has running back
Jamar Jefferson, quarterback Jalen Chatman and a
big offensive line. The pick:
Narbonne.
Carson (8-3) at Crenshaw
(9-2), 7: Crenshaw has been
quietly preparing for a showdown with Narbonne. A win
here should make it a reality.
The Cougars have received
strong line play and have
plenty of playmakers, led by
quarterback Isaiah Johnson
and sophomore defensive
back-receiver Jared Greenfield. Carson has been making steady progress under
first-year coach Arnold Ale.
The pick: Crenshaw.
— Eric Sondheimer
COLLEGE BASKETBALL ROUNDUP
No. 2 Arizona falls again in Bahamas
associated press
Top 25 scores
Ben Emelogu scored 20
points and Southern Methodist upset No. 2 Arizona 6660 in Thursday night’s consolation round at the Battle
4 Atlantis, handing the Wildcats their second consecutive loss to an unranked opponent in the Bahamas.
The Mustangs (5-1) blew
an 11-point lead in the second
half but responded with a
10-2 run to go ahead for good.
SMU won despite shooting
31%, though the Mustangs
scored 19 points off 20 Arizona turnovers.
Allonzo Trier scored 22
points for the Wildcats (3-2).
Steve Dykes Getty Images
No. 1 Duke 99, Portland
State 81: Trevon Duval
scored 22 points and the
Blue Devils pulled away
from surprisingly tenacious
Portland State to open the
Phil Knight Invitational (or
PK80) in Portland, Ore.
Marvin Bagley III added
18 points, and Grayson Allen
had 14 points and nine assists. Duke (6-0) trailed by as
many as eight points, but
took
control
midway
through the second half
when Wendell Carter Jr.’s
dunk put the Blue Devils in
front 67-62. They would go on
to lead by as many as 21
points.
It was Mike Krzyzewski’s
200th victory as coach of a
No. 1-ranked team. He’s 20029 when the Blue Devils sit
atop the poll.
No. 4. Michigan State 73,
DePaul 51: Matt McQuaid
had 20 points to lead four
Spartans in double figures
in scoring in PK80.
No. 5 Villanova 85, Tennessee 76: Jalen Brunson
scored 25 points to help the
Wildcats rally from 15 down
in the Battle 4 Atlantis semifinals. Villanova (5-0) trailed
44-29 before a 23-2 run.
No. 7 Florida 108, Stanford 87: Egor Koulechov had
26 points, including five
three-pointers, and the Gators romped in PK80.
No. 9 North Carolina 102,
DUKE’S Trevon Duval, who led the Blue Devils with
22 points, drives in a victory over Portland State.
SOUTHLAND
MEN
Missouri 95, Long Beach State 58: Jordan Geist scored 16
points, freshman Jontay Porter had a season-best 15 and the
Tigers (4-1) routed the 49ers (2-3) in the opening round of the
Advocare Invitational.
Rider 90, UC Irvine 82: Frederick Scott scored 22 points and
grabbed nine rebounds, Jordan Allen added 19 points, and
the Broncs (4-1) pulled away early to beat the Anteaters (2-4)
in the consolation round of the Las Vegas International.
Georgia 64, Cal State Fullerton 57: Turtle Jackson scored 14
of his career-high 16 points in the second half, rallying the
Bulldogs (4-0) past the Titans (1-3) in the opening round of
the Wooden Legacy.
TODAY
MEN
Long Beach State at Oregon State ....................................10 a.m.
(Advocare Invitational at Orlando)
UC Irvine vs. Northern Arizona ...........................................11 a.m.
(Continental Tire Invitational at Las Vegas)
Pepperdine at Texas A&M .................................................... 6 p.m.
(Progressive Legends Classic)
CS Fullerton vs. San Diego St. or Sacramento St..... 6:30 p.m.
(Wooden Legacy at Fullerton)
Prairie View A&M at UC Santa Barbara .......................... 7 p.m.
WOMEN
No. 5 UCLA vs. Kansas State ............................................1:15 p.m.
(South Point Shootout at Las Vegas)
USC vs. Purdue .......................................................................... 5 p.m.
(Rainbow Wahine Showdown at Honolulu)
Portland 78: Luke Maye
scored 20 points and
grabbed 10 rebounds, Joel
Berry II added 18 points and
the Tar Heels (4-0) had five
players in double figures in
the PK80.
No. 15 Xavier 83, George
Washington 64: Trevon
Bluiett scored 20 points to
help the Musketeers advance in the Las Vegas Invitational. Xavier (5-0) finished the game making 33 of
No. 1 Duke
Portland State
99
81
Southern Methodist
No. 2 Arizona
66
60
No. 4 Michigan State
DePaul
73
51
No. 5 Villanova
Tennessee
85
76
No. 7 Florida
Stanford
108
87
No. 9 North Carolina
Portland
102
78
No. 15 Xavier
George Washington
83
64
No. 17 Gonzaga
Ohio State
Late
Western Kentucky
No. 18 Purdue
77
73
Rhode Island
No. 20 Seton Hall
75
74
No. 21 St. Mary’s
Harvard
89
71
No. 23 West Virginia
Marist
84
78
57 from the floor, including
five of 13 from three-point
range.
Western Kentucky 77,
No. 18 Purdue 73: Darius
Thompson scored 12 points
and made two clinching free
throws with 5.1 seconds left
to help the Hilltoppers to the
upset in the consolation
round at the Battle 4 Atlantis.
Rhode Island 75, No. 20
Seton Hall 74: Jared Terrell
made a running layup with
5.2 seconds left to give the
Rams the win in the Preseason NIT in New York.
Terrell finished with 32
points for the Rams (3-1).
No. 21 St. Mary’s 89, Harvard 71: Jock Landale scored
26 points and the Gaels took
a 26-point halftime lead and
won in the opening game of
the Wooden Legacy at Cal
State Fullerton. Emmett
Naar just missed a triple
double, finishing with 11
points, a career-high nine rebounds and nine assists for
the Gaels (5-0).
FRIDAY , NOVEMB ER 24, 2017
L AT I ME S . CO M/ S P O RT S
D3
NFL
RAMS REPORT
Joyner could move
around against Saints
By Gary Klein
Kirthmon F. Dozier Detroit Free Press
LIONS QUARTERBACK Matthew Stafford is sacked by Vikings defensive end
Everson Griffen in the second quarter. Griffen had two of the Vikings’ three sacks.
Keenum, Vikings
in charge in division
Quarterback stays hot
and Minnesota takes a
three-game lead in the
NFC North.
MINNESOTA 30
DETROIT 23
associated press
DETROIT
—
Case
Keenum stood in the pocket
to take a hit, dipped his right
shoulder to slip out of a sack
and shuffled his feet in the
pocket to give his receivers
more time to get open.
Looking like a savvy winner instead of a journeyman,
he picked apart Detroit’s defense with his arm and made
plays with his legs to help the
Minnesota Vikings beat the
Lions 30-23 Thursday.
Keenum threw for two
touchdowns and ran for a
score in the first half to give
the Vikings (9-2) a doubledigit lead and they went on
to win a seventh straight
game.
They took a huge step
toward winning the NFC
North by taking a threegame lead over the secondplace Lions (6-5).
Keenum, undrafted out
of Houston in 2012, is 7-2 this
season after going 9-15 with
the Houston Texas and
the St. Louis/Los Angeles
Rams.
Vikings 30, Lions 23
Minnesota ............................13 7 7 3—30
Detroit ...................................0 10 6 7—23
First Quarter
Min—Rudolph 1 pass from Keenum (kick blocked),
5:29.
Min—Keenum 9 run (Forbath kick), 3:55.
Second Quarter
Det—FG Prater 32, 10:15.
Min—Rudolph 22 pass from Keenum (Forbath kick),
:37.
Det—M.Jones 6 pass from Stafford (Prater kick), :10.
Third Quarter
Min—Murray 2 run (Forbath kick), 12:52.
Det—FG Prater 32, 7:08.
Det—FG Prater 50, 1:03.
Fourth Quarter
Det—M.Jones 43 pass from Stafford (Prater kick),
14:16.
Min—FG Forbath 36, 3:42.
Attendance—66,613.
STATISTICS
Min
Det
First downs ...................................28
17
Total Net Yards .............................408
289
Rushes-yards ..........................41-136
15-53
Passing.......................................272
236
Punt Returns ..............................2-14
2-30
Kickoff Returns ...........................2-46
1-35
Interceptions Ret. ........................1-21
0-0
Comp-Att-Int..........................21-30-0
20-35-1
Sacked-Yards Lost .......................2-10
3-14
Punts .....................................4-42.8
4-45.0
Fumbles-Lost................................0-0
2-1
Penalties-Yards ...........................9-74
8-54
Time of Possession ....................34:57
25:03
Individual Leaders
RUSHING: Minnesota, Murray 20-84, McKinnon 1323, Keenum 7-20, S.Diggs 1-9. Detroit, Riddick 5-20,
Abdullah 6-14, Tate 2-13, Zenner 1-6, Stafford 1-0.
PASSING: Minnesota, Keenum 21-30-0-282. Detroit, Stafford 20-35-1-250.
RECEIVING: Minnesota, Thielen 8-89, S.Diggs 5-66,
Rudolph 4-63, Wright 2-25, McKinnon 1-31, Floyd 1-8.
Detroit, M.Jones 6-109, Ebron 4-34, Tate 4-7, Abdullah
3-29, Golladay 2-61, Riddick 1-10.
FIELD GOALS MISSED: None.
“I want to be great and I
have confidence in myself
that I can be great,” he said.
The Vikings signed him
to be a backup and he has
made the most of his opportunities with Sam Bradford
injured and Teddy Bridgewater recovering from a
knee injury.
Keenum completed 21 of
30 passes for 282 yards with
both touchdowns going to
Kyle Rudolph, giving the Vikings a 20-3 lead late in the
second quarter.
“Case is amazing because he does so many small
things to pick up first downs
and keep drives alive,”
Rudolph said. “Every time
he finds a way to convert another third down, it means
we’ve got three more plays to
attack the defense. With the
number of big-play guys
we’ve got now, we can do a lot
of damage with those three
plays.”
Detroit made mistakes in
every phase of the game
and Minnesota took advantage. Keenum’s one-yard
pass to Rudolph was made
easier because the Lions
had just 10 defenders on the
field.
Keenum’s nine-yard TD
run came after Matthew
Stafford was charged with a
fumble while trying to hand
off to Ameer Abdullah.
Stafford completed 20 of
35 passes for 250 yards and
two scores.
Instead of winning to pull
within a game of Minnesota
and having a potential tiebreaker, the Lions’ loss
hurts their chances of making a second straight postseason appearance.
“Don't count us out just
yet,” Detroit coach Jim Caldwell said. “We've got a lot of
football yet to play.”
Cousins does just enough
to get Redskins a victory
Two second-half
touchdown passes
make the difference
against lowly Giants.
WASHINGTON 20
NEW YORK GIANTS 10
associated press
LANDOVER, Md. — In
one embarrassing fourthquarter sequence that drew
boos from the home crowd,
Kirk Cousins and the Washington Redskins went from
planning to punt on fourthand-one to calling timeout
and deciding to go for it, to
drawing a delay-of-game
penalty and, in the end,
punting anyway.
Which, naturally, elicited
more jeers.
By the end, Cousins was
hearing cheers because he
threw
two
second-half
touchdowns passes, helping
the Redskins defeat the New
York Giants 20-10 on Thursday in a game between two
injury-depleted teams that
did not look ready for prime
time.
“There were several plays
that I would chalk up to the
fact that they were sloppy
because it was a short week.
We just didn’t have the reps
that we needed to,” said
Redskins 20, Giants 10
N.Y. Giants..............................0 3 7 0—10
Washington.............................0 3 7 10—20
Second Quarter
NYG—FG Rosas 30, 4:00.
Was—FG Rose 28, :13.
Third Quarter
Was—Crowder 15 pass from Cousins (Rose kick),
6:32.
NYG—Jenkins 53 interception return (Rosas kick),
2:52
Fourth Quarter
Was—Doctson 14 pass from Cousins (Rose kick),
3:31.
Was—FG Rose 33, 1:49.
Attendance—73,210.
STATISTICS
NYG
Wash
First downs .....................................7
17
Total Net Yards .............................170
323
Rushes-yards ............................24-84
31-122
Passing ........................................86
201
Punt Returns ................................2-8
4-20
Kickoff Returns ...........................2-39
2-38
Interceptions Ret. ........................1-53
1-1
Comp-Att-Int..........................13-27-1
19-31-1
Sacked-Yards Lost .......................4-27
6-41
Punts .....................................9-41.2
7-44.0
Fumbles-Lost................................1-0
0-0
Penalties-Yards ...........................6-79
8-55
Time of Possession ....................25:23
34:37
Individual Leaders
RUSHING: N.Y. Giants, Gallman 9-37, Darkwa 11-30,
Vereen 3-18, Manning 1-(minus 1). Washington, Perine
24-100, Marshall 4-18, Cousins 3-4.
PASSING: N.Y. Giants, Manning 13-27-1-113. Washington, Cousins 19-31-1-242.
RECEIVING: N.Y. Giants, Lewis 3-26, Engram 3-18,
King 2-36, Gallman 2-6, Ellison 1-9, Vereen 1-9, Darkwa
1-9. Washington, Crowder 7-141, Perine 3-30, Paul 316, Doctson 2-28, Harris 2-12, Marshall 1-12, Grant 1-3.
PUNT RETURNS—N.Y. Giants, Raymond
Cousins, who completed 19
for 31 for 242 yards.
The two NFC East rivals
combined for more punts
(nine) than points (six) in
the first half, which ended
3-3 on a pair of short field
goals — from 30 yards by
New York’s Aldrick Rosas,
and 28 by Washington’s Nick
Rose. The big play on Washington’s lone scoring “drive”
of the half? A 37-yard flag for
pass interference on New
York’s Ross Cockrell; the entire possession covered 38
yards.
But Cousins, for whom
every game is seemingly a
referendum on whether
Washington (5-6) should
sign him to a long-term deal,
connected with Jamison
Crowder on a 15-yard pass in
the third quarter that broke
the 3-3 tie, and with Josh
Doctson on a 14-yarder with
31⁄2 minutes remaining in the
game.
On the Crowder play,
Cousins was flushed out of
the pocket and bought time
by moving to his right before
throwing into the end zone,
where his receiver was
“pretty wide open,” according to the quarterback. On
the one to Doctson, Cousins
looked for another receiver
but eventually came back to
last year’s first-round draft
pick, saying, “He got separation and made a great
catch.”
In between, cornerback
Janoris Jenkins intercepted
Cousins’ pass and returned
the ball 53 yards to make it
10-10.
That one play involved
more yardage than Eli Manning and the Giants (2-9)
generated in the second half.
“Not very good,” New
York coach Ben McAdoo
summed up.
It might be a busier-thanusual Sunday for Rams safety Lamarcus Joyner.
With
cornerbacks
Kayvon Webster and Nickell Robey-Coleman trying
to work through injuries,
Joyner might be called upon
for double duty when the
Rams play the high-scoring
New Orleans Saints at the
Coliseum.
Joyner starts at free safety but also could be deployed
as a slot corner against an offense led by future Hall of
Fame quarterback Drew
Brees.
Joyner said Thursday
that he was comfortable at
either spot. But Brees
makes any defense uncomfortable.
“You just have to take advantage of the few mistakes
he’s going to make,” Joyner
said.
Webster, who starts opposite Trumaine Johnson,
went into concussion protocol during last week’s defeat
by the Minnesota Vikings.
Robey-Coleman suffered a
thigh injury.
Webster was limited in
practice
Thursday
but
coach Sean McVay said the
corner might play against
the Saints.
“He’s on track to be available for us, so as long as we
don’t have any setbacks, the
anticipation is to be able to
have him,” McVay said.
Robey-Coleman,
who
plays as the third cornerback in obvious passing
situations, has not practiced
this week.
The Rams’ secondary
depth improved with Troy
Hill’s return this week from a
hamstring injury. The Rams
also
promoted
Kevin
Peterson from the practice
squad.
Second-year pro Blake
Countess can play cornerback and safety, but Joyner
is the most versatile member of the secondary.
He played cornerback his
first three NFL seasons before switching to safety this
season.
“He’s a tremendous player wherever we play him; it’s
just where we need to play
him in this game,” defensive
coordinator Wade Phillips
said. “So we’ve worked some
things out there.
“You may see him at
both.”
The Rams will need a
strong performance from
the secondary — and the entire defense — against a
Saints offense that ranks
first in the NFL. The Saints
also are second in passing
and third in rushing and
scoring.
Phillips described Brees
as “an all-time great” who
employs “Peyton Manningtype preparation.”
Phillips was on the San
Diego Chargers staff in 2004
and 2005 when Brees was the
team’s quarterback.
The Chargers had finished 4-12 in 2003 but went
12-4 in 2004.
“I know what he can do,”
Phillips said.
So does Joyner, who was
on the field last year when
Brees and the Saints routed
the Rams 49-21 at the Mercedes-Benz Superdome.
“The biggest thing is, you
have to be expecting adversity at any given time in the
game just because of the
playmaker Drew Brees is,”
Joyner said.
Along with neutralizing
Brees, the Rams must control a rushing attack that
features running backs
Mark Ingram and Alvin Kamara and has averaged 144
yards rushing per game.
The Rams gave up 177
yards rushing last week
against the Vikings. The
Rams rank 28th in the
league against the run.
Phillips said the Rams
have been “up and down”
against the run, but he
pointed to their Week 7 performance against the Arizona Cardinals. A week after
Adrian Peterson rushed for
134 yards against the Tampa
Bay Buccaneers, the Rams
limited him to 21.
Turn the tables?
In the Saints’ rout of the
Rams last season, Saints
coach Sean Payton went out
of his way to embarrass former Rams defensive coordinator Gregg Williams.
Payton and Williams
coached together with the
Saints from 2009 to 2011.
They won a Super Bowl together but also received suspensions in the aftermath of
the infamous Bountygate
scandal.
“All I remember was I
wasn’t playing in the fourth
quarter because we were
getting beat so bad, so that’s
not a good thing,” Rams running back Todd Gurley said.
Gurley said he did not begrudge the Saints for running a trick play that resulted in a touchdown to cap
the victory.
“It’s football,” Gurley
said. “If you don’t want nobody to score, then stop
them.
“That’s always been my
philosophy is, ‘Let’s run the
score up.’ I feel like that now.
“We’ve got a high-powered offense it’s like, ‘Hey,
we’ve been getting our tails
kicked the last 10 years, so
let’s do the opposite now.’ ”
Etc.
Defensive lineman Aaron
Donald did not practice because of illness. Linebackers
Mark Barron (hand) and
Bryce Hager (shoulder),
running backs Lance Dunbar (knee) and Malcolm
Brown (knee) also did not
participate. … The Rams resigned tight end Johnny
Mundt to the practice
squad. Mundt had been on
the roster for two games
while Derek Carrier was
sidelined because of a hamstring injury.
gary.klein@latimes.com
Twitter: @latimesklein
D4
F R I DAY , N OV E M BER 24, 2017
LAT IMES. C OM/ SP ORT S
NFL WEEK 12: CHARGERS 28, COWBOYS 6
SUMMARY
CHARGERS ..............0 3
Dallas.....................0 0
13 12 — 28
0 6 — 6
Second quarter
CHARGERS — Field goal Novak 22,
1:56. Drive: 14 plays, 66 yards, 6:59.
Key plays: Ekeler 3 run on 3rd-and-2,
Rivers 11 pass to Allen, Rivers 2 pass to
Allen on 3rd-and-3, A.Brown 4-yard
defensive pass-interference penalty on
4th-and-1, Rivers 22 pass to Henry on
3rd-and-4, Rivers 5 pass to Ekeler on
3rd-and-9. CHARGERS 3, Dallas 0.
Not quite on their last legs
Chargers win despite
injury to Novak and
punter’s struggles
with backup duty.
By Mike DiGiovanna
Third quarter
CHARGERS — Henry 3 pass from Rivers
(kick failed), 8:59. Drive: 10 plays, 77
yards, 6:01. Key plays: Gordon 11 run,
Rivers 38 pass to Ekeler on 3rd-and-2,
Rivers 10 pass to Allen on 3rd-and-4.
CHARGERS 9, Dallas 0.
CHARGERS — Ty.Williams 27 pass from
Rivers (Kaser kick), 1:46. Drive: 8 plays,
92 yards, 3:59. Key plays: Rivers 16
pass to Gordon, Rivers 31 pass to
Ty.Williams, Rivers 13 pass to Allen.
CHARGERS 16, Dallas 0.
Fourth quarter
Dallas — R.Smith 2 run (pass failed),
12:48. Drive: 9 plays, 81 yards, 3:58.
Key plays: L.Collins 10-yard offensive
holding penalty, Prescott 13 pass to
Morris, R.Smith 3 run on 3rd-and-2,
Tr.Williams 36-yard defensive passinterference penalty, Prescott 18 pass to
Bryant on 3rd-and-6. CHARGERS 16,
Dallas 6.
CHARGERS — Allen 42 pass from Rivers
(kick failed), 9:58. Drive: 6 plays, 75
yards, 2:50. Key play: Rivers 14 pass to
Allen. CHARGERS 22, Dallas 6.
CHARGERS — King 90 interception
return (kick failed), 7:41. CHARGERS
28, Dallas 6.
TEAM STATISTICS
LAC
DAL
FIRST DOWNS ........................25
Rushing ..................................4
Passing.................................17
Penalty ...................................4
THIRD DOWN EFF ................9-14
FOURTH DOWN EFF................0-1
TOTAL NET YARDS .................515
Total Plays.............................66
Avg Gain ..............................7.8
NET YARDS RUSHING ..............81
Rushes .................................33
Avg per rush .........................2.5
NET YARDS PASSING .............434
Sacked-Yds lost ....................0-0
Gross-Yds passing ................434
Completed-Att...................27-33
Had Intercepted .......................0
Yards-Pass Play ...................13.2
KICKOFFS-EndZone-TB.........6-4-2
PUNTS-Avg. .......................0-0.0
Punts blocked..........................0
FGs-PATs blocked ..................0-0
TOTAL RETURN YARDAGE ........106
Punt Returns ........................0-0
Kickoff Returns....................1-16
Interceptions ......................2-90
PENALTIES-Yds....................5-56
FUMBLES-Lost ......................1-0
TIME OF POSSESSION ........36:05
14
4
8
2
6-11
0-0
247
49
5.0
79
20
4.0
168
2-11
179
20-27
2
5.8
2-1-1
5-41.6
0
0-0
102
0-0
4-102
0-0
7-60
1-0
23:55
INDIVIDUAL LEADERS
RUSHING: CHARGERS, Gordon 21-65,
Ekeler 6-15, Benjamin 1-6, Rivers
5-(minus 5). DALLAS, Smith 9-41,
Morris 9-36, Williams 1-6, Switzer
1-(minus 4).
PASSING: CHARGERS, Rivers 27-33-0434. DALLAS, Prescott 20-27-2-179.
RECEIVING: CHARGERS, Allen 11-172,
Henry 5-76, Ekeler 3-55, Benjamin
3-50, Gordon 3-23, Williams 2-58.
DALLAS, Witten 7-44, Williams 4-54,
Bryant 3-37, Beasley 2-19, Smith 2-7,
Morris 1-13, Butler 1-5.
PUNT RETURNS: CHARGERS, None.
DALLAS, None.
KICKOFF RETURNS: CHARGERS, King
1-16. DALLAS, Switzer 4-102.
TACKLES-ASSISTS-SACKS: CHARGERS,
Addae 5-2-0, Perryman 4-3-0, Bosa
4-0-0, Phillips 3-4-0, Williams 3-1-0,
King 3-0-0, Hayward 3-0-0, Boston
2-2-0, Liuget 1-1-1, Palepoi 1-1-1,
Ingram 1-1-0, Jenkins 1-0-0, Mebane
0-1-0, Philon 0-1-0, Pullard 0-1-0.
DALLAS, Smith 7-1-0, Hitchens 6-1-0,
Scandrick 5-1-0, Jones 5-0-0, Heath
5-0-0, Durant 4-1-0, Woods 4-0-0,
Brown 3-0-0, Lewis 2-0-0, Neal 2-0-0,
Lawrence 1-4-0, Wilson 1-1-0, Ash
1-0-0, Collins 0-2-0, Mayowa 0-1-0,
Awuzie 0-1-0, Crawford 0-1-0.
INTERCEPTIONS: CHARGERS, King 1-90,
Hayward 1-0. DALLAS, None.
FIELD GOALS MISSED: CHARGERS,
Novak 35.
Officials — Referee Jerome Boger, Ump
Richard Hall, HL Jerry Bergman, LJ Mike
Carr, FJ Eugene Hall, SJ Walt Coleman
IV, BJ Tony Steratore, Replay John
McGrath.
Attendance — 93,012.
CHARGERS IN
SPOTLIGHT
OFFENSE
Chargers wide receiver
Keenan Allen followed up a
dominant performance
against the Buffalo Bills by
shredding the Dallas secondary on Thanksgiving
Day. Allen got 14 targets,
catching 11 of them for a
career-best 172 yards and
highlighted by a jaw-dropping 42-yard touchdown,
during which he slithered
around half of the Cowboys
defense to ice the game. He
needs 73 yards receiving for
the second 1,000-yard season of his career.
DEFENSE
The Chargers’ secondary,
particularly the cornerbacks, have been great all
season, but lately rookie
Desmond King has found
himself more involved in the
unit’s big plays. With a 90yard interception return for
a touchdown in the fourth
quarter, King became the
only defensive back in the
NFL with more than one
sack and a pick-six.
— Dan Woike
ARLINGTON, Texas —
Chargers kicker Nick Novak
was in the locker room getting pain-killing injections in
his lower back and hip flexor
in the first quarter of Thursday’s game when he heard
the television announcers
reference a video that was
quickly spreading on social
media.
Novak’s
emergency
backup, punter Drew Kaser
— who hadn’t attempted a
field goal in high school, college or the NFL — was practicing kicks on the sideline
when one of his attempts appeared to miss the net a few
feet in front of him at AT&T
Stadium.
“It actually didn’t miss
the net at all,” Kaser claimed
afterward. “There was a hole
in the net, and it went
through the hole. We ended
up fixing it with tape. I gotta
make sure that gets corrected, because I don’t want
that bad publicity there.”
Kaser could laugh about
the incident because the
Chargers beat the Dallas
Cowboys 28-6 in a bizarre
game in which he did not
punt, attempted three extra
points, making one and
missing two, and kicked off
four times, two going to the
end zone for touchbacks.
But it was no laughing
matter for coach Anthony
Lynn, who, instead of attempting a field goal on a
fourth-and-13 from the Cowboys 16 early in the second
quarter, opted to go for it,
with Philip Rivers’ 12-yard
pass to Austin Ekeler leaving
the Chargers one yard short.
“I was told [Kaser] was
good from the 25, and then
someone told me he was
practicing his kicks and he
missed the whole damned
net,” Lynn said. “So I decided to go for it.”
Novak practiced this
Michael Ainsworth Associated Press
CHARGERS KICKER Nick Novak said it “didn’t feel good at all” when he missed this field goal attempt from
35 yards in the first quarter. Holder Kellen Clemens and the Cowboys Anthony Brown watch it go wide.
week despite being listed on
the injury report, but he said
his back got sore during
warmups, and it “didn’t feel
good at all” when he pushed
a 35-yard field-goal attempt
wide right with 8:58 left in
the first quarter.
Novak returned from the
locker room and spent much
of the second quarter
stretching and kicking balls
into the net. He kicked a 22yard field goal about two
minutes before halftime for a
3-0 lead.
But when Novak’s extrapoint attempt after Hunter
Henry’s three-yard touchdown catch sailed wide left
with 6:01 left in the third, Novak knew he couldn’t continue.
“I tried to grind through
it, but it just kept getting
worse,” said Novak, who will
undergo an MRI test Friday.
“They decided to go with
Drew the rest of the game,
and he did a great job.”
With the kickoffs? Yes,
Kaser did a commendable
job there. Kaser even nailed
his first extra point after
Tyrell Williams’ 27-yard
touchdown catch gave the
Chargers a 16-0 lead in the
third quarter. But Kaser
pushed both of his extrapoint attempts wide right in
the fourth.
“I’ve never had a game in
which I had no punts, and
my reward for that is getting
to kick and kick off, so it was
a very interesting day,”
Kaser said. “Having not
kicked in eight years, I
thought I was decent.
“My first extra-point kick
came out solid, it was a good
kick, and the next two I
pushed a little, but I thought
the kickoffs got gradually
better. I tried to help the
team as best I could.”
Novak, a 10-year veteran
who kicked for the Chargers
from 2011 to 2013, was resigned in early October to replace struggling rookie
Younghoe Koo.
The Chargers will have
nine days before their next
game to determine whether
they will have to make another change at kicker.
“I’m optimistic that I’ll
feel better by our next game
— I’m not worried about
that,” Novak said. “I will do
everything I can to get healthy. Thankfully, we have a little break.”
Lynn said he considered
going for two-point conversions, but the Chargers’
cushion — and their ability
to reach the end zone instead of having to settle for
field goals in the second half
— allowed him to stick with
Kaser.
“We were prepared to go
for it on fourth down the
whole game,” said receiver
Keenan Allen, who caught 11
passes for 172 yards and a
touchdown, “but that ... was
gonna hurt us.”
It would have been even
more painful if Kaser was
hurt and the Chargers had
to go to their third-string
kicker.
“I was probably next in
line — I kicked in high
school,” Allen said. “But I’m
a toe guy, so I’m liable to
miss unless I could kick off a
tee.”
mike.digiovanna@latimes.com
Twitter: @MikeDiGiovanna
Rivers puts Chargers in wild-card chase
[Chargers, from D1]
Rivers threw for 219 yards
in the first half, but the Chargers led only 3-0. After his
first touchdown in the third
quarter, a throw to Hunter
Henry into a tight window in
the end zone, Rivers shuffled
his feet as if he was Muhammad Ali — though on the
doorstep of 36 years old, he
floats more like a buffalo
than a butterfly.
On the next drive, he
found
receiver
Tyrell
Williams on the Dallas sideline for a 27-yard score,
throwing the ball to the perfect spot for the connection
to be made.
On his third touchdown,
Rivers hit Keenan Allen, who
skirted around five tacklers
on the way to a 42-yard
score.
It was a Thanksgiving
carving that Rivers won’t
forget. “It was special,” he
admitted.
Allen was electric for the
second week in a row, catching 11 passes for a career-best 172 yards. Henry caught
five passes for 76 yards and
four other receivers caught
passes for at least 16 yards.
“I just think we got into a
groove,” Allen said. “We got
into a rhythm and we just
beat their defense. We ran
better plays.”
The Chargers didn’t just
beat the Dallas defense.
They made life pretty miserable for the Cowboys’ offense too.
The Cowboys had their
biggest play of the game, a
34-yard Dak Prescott scoring run, negated by a fairly
obviously holding penalty on
tackle Tyron Smith, the former USC star. The run,
which came with the Chargers leading 9-0, was erased
and, thanks to Joey Bosa,
Prescott tossed a pass out of
bounds and Dallas was
Larry W. Smith EPA/Shutterstock
TYRELL WILLIAMS catches a pass from Philip Rivers between two Cowboys
defensive backs and goes into the end zone to give the Chargers a 16-0 lead.
forced to punt.
The Chargers’ defense
would intercept two passes
by Prescott, with Desmond
King nabbing the first pick of
his career and returning it 90
yards for a touchdown.
Casey Hayward grabbed his
third interception in the last
two games as boos filled
AT&T Stadium.
“They’re scoring with the
football now on defense, and
they’re taking the ball away,”
Chargers coach Anthony
Lynn said. “The turnovers
have made a big difference.”
The defense was solid
from the opening kick. The
offense, though, ran into
some early problems.
Kicker Nick Novak, who
had been on the team’s injury report during the short
week of practice, missed his
first field goal and injured
his back. Without a kicker
available, the Chargers
couldn’t settle for field goals
… nor could they get in the
end zone using four downs.
Novak gritted his teeth
and made a 22-yard field
goal on the team’s third trip
into the red zone in the first
half, giving the Chargers a
3-0 lead at the break.
“It’s frustrating to feel
like you’re dominating the
game and you’re up by
three,” Lynn said. “We just
stuck with the plan.”
Rivers and the Chargers
marched down the field and
scored on the first drive of
the second half, and from
there they were off.
With the win, the Chargers (5-6) have staked a serious claim at the final wildcard spot in the AFC, looking like the class of a group of
contenders that includes
Baltimore, Cincinnati, Buffalo, Miami, Houston, Oakland and the New York Jets.
The Cowboys (5-6) lost their
third in a row.
“It was an all-around
team win — one we needed
to keep us in the mix,” Rivers
said. “We’ve still got a ways
to go.”
And Rivers wants to be
there for every part of a football journey that’s not quite
over.
After reminiscing about
his boyhood dreams, he
shifted gears to acknowledge some adult insecurities. With his football team
losing games, with his interceptions on the rise, he’d
heard the whispers that
maybe his tank was running
out of gas.
Thursday, he said, was
partly about that as well.
“I’d argue with some
who’ve said I haven’t played
as well the last couple of
years. In some ways, I
haven’t. In some ways I have.
That might add to it too,”
Rivers said with a grin. “This
was a little bit of, ‘Not so fast.
… Hold on. Don’t try to run
me off yet.’ ”
There’s still more dreaming to do.
dan.woike@latimes.com
Twitter: @DanWoikeSports
BY THE NUMBERS
3
0
3
434
Losses in a row for Cowboys,
who were without running back
Ezekiel Elliott in all three because of suspension. Dallas has
lost all three by at least 20 points.
Punts for the Chargers, which
should have made for an easy day
for Drew Kaser, but the punter
spent the afternoon filling in for
injured kicker Nick Novak.
Touchdowns scored by the
Chargers’ defense over the last
two games, including Desmond
King’s 90-yard interception
return against the Cowboys.
Passing yards for the Chargers’
Philip Rivers, the ninth time he
has thrown for more than 400 in
his career. It’s also the 51st time
he has thrown for three scores.
L AT I ME S . CO M/ S P O RT S
FRIDAY , NOVEMB ER 24, 2017
D5
NFL WEEK 12: CHARGERS 28, COWBOYS 6
CHARGERS REPORT
Defense shows it has the ‘it’ factor
By Dan Woike
ARLINGTON, Texas —
The word is “swagger,” but
Chargers defensive tackle
Damion Square isn’t fond of
it.
There are better ways to
describe the “it” the Chargers defense is playing with,
the display that was clear as
could be in the team’s 28-6
win Thursday against the
Cowboys.
It’s confidence. It’s attitude. It’s ferocity. It’s speed.
It’s control. It’s command.
Whatever — it’s swagger.
“We’re showin’ out, baby,”
Square said. “We know the
guys we’ve got. We know the
personnel. We’ve got some
special guys.”
Thursday, the Dallas
Cowboys gained only 258
yards and scored one touchdown — as many as the
Chargers defense scored.
Rookie Desmond King,
known for his ball-hawking
in college at Iowa, grabbed
his first interception. And,
just as he did as a Hawkeye,
he took that first pick back
for a touchdown.
“It was amazing. First, it
started with the interception like, ‘Wow, I’ve got
the ball in my hands.’ And
then when you go to the end
zone and cross that line,
you’re on national TV.
Everybody in the world is
watching,” King said. “And
you have your teammates
with you — it’s just a great
feeling to have.”
Cornerback Casey Hayward had the other pick, his
third in the last two games.
The Chargers have won
five of their last seven games,
a stretch where they’ve taken 17 of the 19 turnovers
they’ve forced this season.
“We have a chance to
show the world. Everybody
is watching this game,” Hayward said. “People were
watching the Lions game,
but more people are tuned
into the Cowboys game.
“This is America’s Team,
and that’s what we came to
do — hit them in the mouth.”
All of their success can be
tracked to the team’s sudden ability to stop the run.
The Chargers were solid
again, holding Dallas to only
79 yards.
The
improvement
against the ground attack
came with familiarity to defensive coordinator Gus
Bradley’s defensive principles, schemes and assign-
Wesley Hitt Getty Images
THE CHARGERS’ Jahleel Addae hits Dallas Cowboys’ Brice Butler after Butler makes a catch during the second half Thursday.
ments. And it came with
some tough talk among the
players.
“The energy [we have],
we’re not scared to confront
each other,” Square said.
“Every great defense I’ve
ever been on, guys aren’t
scared of that. It’s not pointing fingers necessarily, but
it’s understanding the areas
where we’ve got to get tight.”
That started with getting
better on the ground. From
there it bled into forcing
turnovers and then, finally,
turning those turnovers into
points.
King’s interception return Thursday was the
Chargers’ third defensive
touchdown of the season —
all in the last two games.
“You see it. We’re picking
up on truly knowing where
we should be and what we
need to do and how it should
look,” safety Tre Boston
said.
“If you’re not an expert at
what you’re doing in this defense, yeah, you can get
gashed. But when you have
the right pieces of the defense, the right guys — you
can see it — you build more
and more as the season
goes.”
Williams injured
If there was bad news
coming out of the lopsided
win at Dallas, it had to do
with rookie wide receiver
Mike Williams, who left the
game with a knee injury. He
was seen leaving the stadium using crutches with a
large brace on his right leg.
Williams had to be carted
away during the Chargers’
opening drive, limping off
the field after running a
route on the only snap he
played. He had been listed
on the team’s injury report
this week with a knee injury,
but Chargers coach Anthony Lynn said he wasn’t
sure that was pertinent.
“I know it was something
with his knee, but I’m not
sure what it is yet,” Lynn
said. “I’m not sure this has
anything to do with the injury he had in practice. It
was just sore in practice, but
this was completely different.”
Williams, the Chargers’
2017 first-round pick and No.
7 overall selection, missed
almost the entire offseason
and first five weeks of the
season as he recovered from
a back injury. In six games
this year, he has nine catches
for 84 yards.
Etc.
Right tackle Joe Barksdale returned to the lineup
after missing the last four
games because of a foot injury. … Linebacker Hayes
Pullard, who missed the
Chargers’ last two games, returned from a neck injury
and defensive end Chris McCain played after sitting out
last week with a hamstring
injury. … Quarterback Philip
Rivers was quick to credit
the Chargers’ offensive line,
which held Dallas and the
NFL’s top pass rusher, DeMarcus Lawrence, without
a sack. … After not raising
his fist during the national
anthem the last two games
because of the NFL’s program with the military,
“Salute to Service,” tackle
Russell Okung again raised
a fist during the anthem to
protest racial inequalities
and police brutality.
dan.woike@latimes.com
Twitter: @DanWoikeSports
Allen: ‘We have
a lot of threats’
[Receivers, from D1]
ending knee injury in the
first week of 2016 — had 44
catches for 596 yards and
one touchdown. In two
games over the last five days,
Allen has 23 catches for 331
yards and three touchdowns.
“That’s crazy,” Allen said
of his two-game output. “I
just have a lot of confidence,
and our offense is making
things happen. [Offensive
coordinator Ken Whisenhunt] and Phil are calling
the right plays, the line is doing a great job, Phil is throwing the ball great, and the receivers are doing a good job
of finishing routes.”
Rivers got excellent protection this week — he was
sacked once in the last two
games — and he has done a
better job of getting the ball
to his playmakers in space.
Several of Allen’s big
plays came after short passes, most of his yards coming
after the catch. Tight end
Hunter Henry, who disappeared from the playbook
far too often this season,
caught five passes for 76
yards and a touchdown.
Henry, on a third-andfour from the Cowboys 29yard line, caught a short
pass over the middle and
turned it into a 22-yard gain
to set up a Chargers field
goal and a 3-0 lead just before halftime.
Midway through the
third quarter, Henry slipped
a double-team in the middle
of the end zone and caught a
three-yard scoring pass
from Rivers, who had initially looked toward Austin
Ekeler in the left corner.
“He’s a big guy, a big
threat in the red zone, for
sure,” Allen said of Henry,
whose score gave them a 9-0
lead. “He has good hands
and runs good routes. It’s
great to get him involved. …
We’re just getting it to our
dogs, going out there and executing it and making it happen. Today, when we got out
there, it was like we were going to score every time.”
Rivers also found speedster Travis Benjamin for a
46-yard completion in the
first quarter; Tyrell Williams
caught two passes for 58
yards, and a 27-yard touchdown on a go route for a 16-0
lead. Running backs Melvin
Gordon and Ekeler combined for six catches for 78
yards. The Chargers had
eight pass plays of 20 yards
or more.
“We have a lot of threats,”
Allen said. “It’s hard to double somebody. It’s hard to
match up with somebody.
Travis and Tyrell are burning downfield, Hunter and I
Michael Ainsworth Associated Press
HUNTER HENRY CELEBRATES after his three-yard touchdown catch gave the Chargers a 9-0 lead early
in the second half. Henry and Keenan Allen (13) were the big targets for Philip Rivers in his 434-yard game.
going intermediate, so pick
your poison, which one do
you want to guard?”
Allen’s touchdown came
less than three minutes after
Dallas had scored to trim the
Chargers’ lead to 16-6 early in
the fourth.
Running a corner route
out of the left slot, Allen
caught the pass over his left
shoulder at about the 32yard line and broke the
tackle of Dallas cornerback
Orlando Scandrick at the 28.
Allen cut back inside between free safety Byron
Jones and nickel back Xavier Wood at the 10-yard line —
both defenders made contact with Allen but were unable to bring him down —
and avoided cornerback Anthony Brown’s thigh tackle
at the five-yard line before
reaching the end zone.
That gave the Chargers a
22-6 lead with 9:58 to play.
“I’ve had plays like that in
high school, but never in the
NFL,” Allen said. “It was a
great play call, and Phil
threw a great ball. I knew the
safety was coming, and once
I broke out and felt him, I
knew I had to get up the field
fast. After that, it was just
making guys miss and getting to the end zone.”
Gordon was on the sideline for Allen’s touchdown, a
play that impressed but did
not awe him.
“That’s what he does —
it’s not like you’re shocked,”
172
4
Interceptions for Chargers’
Casey Hayward this season,
grabbing one against Dallas and
three in last two games. He led
the NFL with seven last season.
2
Thanksgiving Day games for the
Chargers, the previous a 21-17
AFL win over Houston in 1969.
The 48 years is longest team gap
between Thanksgiving games.
mike.digiovanna@latimes.com
Twitter: @MikeDiGiovanna
NEXT UP
BY THE NUMBERS
Career-high yards receiving
for Chargers’ Keenan Allen, who
had 11 catches. He has 23 catches
for 331 yards and three scores
over the last two games.
Gordon said. “He’s a tough
guy to tackle, and he’s very
shifty. He can’t really be
stopped. I don’t think he’s
been stopped all year.
“We have so many weapons. They have to cover him,
then we have Travis, Tyrell,
Hunter … when I get the running game going and the offensive line is clicking, we
can be really dangerous.”
1992
Year the Chargers became
the only team to start 0-4 and
still qualify for the playoffs.
This year’s Chargers
also started the season 0-4.
CHARGERS (5-6)
VS. CLEVELAND (0-10)
Sunday, Dec. 3, 1 p.m.
TV: Channel 2. Radio: 640.
D6
F R I DAY , N OV E M BER 24, 2017
LAT IMES. C OM/ SP ORT S
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
WEEKEND VIEWERS GUIDE
Need some help deciding which college football games to
watch? Look no further. Each Friday, Times contributor
Chuck Schilken handicaps what’s worth watching, and
skipping, on the weekend’s menu of games:
THIS MORNING
8:30 a.m.: Western Michigan at Toledo, ESPNU.
9 a.m.: No. 2 Miami at Pittsburgh, Channel 7; Baylor at
No. 12 Texas Christian, FS1; Northern Illinois at Central
Michigan, CBS Sports Network (CBSSN); Navy at Houston, ESPN.
11:30 a.m.: Missouri at Arkansas, Channel 2.
THIS AFTERNOON
South Florida (9-1) at
No. 15 Central Florida (10-0)
12:30 p.m., Channel 7
Standing between Central Florida and its first undefeated
regular season is American Athletic Conference rival South
Florida, whose only loss this season was by four points to
Houston. The winner is AAC East champ and gets “War on
I-4” bragging rights.
Iowa (6-5) at
Nebraska (4-7)
1 p.m., FS1
Mike Riley could be coaching his last game with Nebraska.
The Cornhuskers haven’t won fewer than five games in a
season since 1961.
12:30 p.m.: New Mexico at San Diego State, CBSSN.
THIS EVENING
California (5-6) at
UCLA (5-6)
7:30 p.m., FS1
In men’s water polo, these are the top seeds for the upcoming NCAA championship tournament; in football, both
teams need a win to become bowl eligible. Attention UCLA
and Jedd Fisch: Cal is 2-0 against interim head coaches this
season.
5 p.m.: No. 25 Virginia Tech at Virginia, ESPN; Texas Tech
at Texas, Channel 11.
SATURDAY MORNING
No. 9 Ohio State (9-2) at
Michigan (8-3)
9 a.m., Channel 11
Ohio State can keep its slim College Football Playoff hopes
alive with a big win here. Third-year Michigan coach Jim
Harbaugh seeks his first win in “The Game” and probably
will have to rely on third-string quarterback John O’Korn.
Bowl eligibility
at stake vs. Cal
[UCLA, from D1]
bid farewell during an emotional meeting on campus
Sunday. Defeating Cal, they
said, would help send off
their former coach on a far
more upbeat note.
The Bruins, 5-6 overall
and 3-5 in the Pac-12 Conference, could also parlay a victory over the Golden Bears
(5-6, 2-6) into what would be
their fifth bowl game appearance in Mora’s six seasons. Cal also has a possible
bowl berth at stake.
Even amid a season that
cost Mora his job, UCLA has
not lost on its home field, going 5-0. The Bruins are trying
to go undefeated at the Rose
Bowl for the first time since
2005.
UCLA’s senior appreciation nights have come with
unhappy endings in recent
years. The Bruins have lost
their final home game in
each of the last five seasons,
their last victory coming
over Colorado in November
2011 under Rick Neuheisel.
As they prepared for
their last trip to the Rose
Bowl earlier this week, players shared some of their favorite Mora memories. Safety Adarius Pickett recalled
the coach being there to
shake his hand during his
graduation ceremony after
he fulfilled his degree requirements in only three
years.
Center
Scott
Quessenberry
described
how Mora helped transform
him from an 18-year-old kid
into a 23-year-old man.
Quarterback
Josh
Rosen, a junior who also
might be playing in his last
home game before entering
the NFL draft, spoke of former walk-ons embracing the
same mottos in their professional careers that they had
learned under Mora while
playing for the Bruins.
“Be the same guy every
day, set the standard and reset it every day, play against
your own championship
standard,” Rosen said, tick-
ing off the mantras. “I mean,
it goes on and on. … You go
on Instagram and scroll
through my feed and there’s
‘We love you coach, we’ll miss
you’ every third photo.”
Mora’s absence could be
most acutely felt among
UCLA’s defensive players.
Young said Mora had become more heavily involved
in all aspects of the team’s
struggling defense in recent
weeks, leading to some significant improvement. The
Bruins held USC to only 3.7
yards a carry last week, and
the 153 yards rushing UCLA
gave up was a season low.
Defensive coordinator
Tom Bradley said Mora was
constantly offering assistance, even calling late at
night.
“ ‘Hey, coach, can I do
this [for] you, can I help you
with this?’ ” Bradley said, recalling Mora’s message.
“Things that you’ll never forget and I will always have
great admiration and respect for the way he treated
each and every one of us as
people.”
Despite his team going
10-17 since late in the 2015 season, Mora remained buoyant through his final hours
with the Bruins. In what
would be his last remarks as
the team’s coach after
UCLA’s 28-23 loss to USC on
Saturday, he spoke of ending
a disappointing season on a
positive note.
“Right now, if we can pull
this thing together and come
back with great energy next
week, which I expect us to
do, and we can go out and we
can defend our home field
again and we can get to a
bowl,” Mora said, “I think it
will mean a lot for these
young men given the circumstance of this situation
and that’s what we’re going
to try to do.”
It could mean more than
he imagined.
ben.bolch@latimes.com
Twitter: @latbbolch
MATCHUPS:
UCLA (5-6, 3-5) vs.
California (5-6, 2-6)
Tonight, 7:30, Rose Bowl. TV: FS1. Radio: 570
Justin Wilcox said, “but
that’s one long run too
many.”
By Ben Bolch
Marquee matchup
UCLA quarterback Josh
Rosen vs. the Cal secondary.
Rosen will be playing in
what’s expected to be his
final home game before
declaring for the NFL draft.
He’d also like to have a good
showing as a tribute to
recently fired coach Jim
Mora while helping the
Bruins secure the victory
they need to become eligible
for a bowl. Rosen has passed
for 3,515 yards this season
and needs 226 to surpass
Brett Hundley for a school
single-season record. Cal’s
pass defense has allowed
254.3 yards per game, ranking 10th in the Pac-12 Conference.
Getting offensive
8 UCLA (466 ypg/34.1
ppg): Bruins interim coach
Jedd Fisch will continue
calling plays for an offense
that is averaging 6.4 yards
per play, not far off the
modern school record of
6.81 yards per play set in
1998.
8 Cal (377.8 ypg/27.8 ppg):
Tailback Patrick Laird is
averaging six yards per
carry and needs 51 yards to
reach 1,000 for the season.
Quarterback Ross Bowers
has been spotty, completing
58.8% of his passes with 12
interceptions and 17 touchdowns.
Getting defensive
8 UCLA (491.5 ypg/37.6
ppg): The Bruins’ beleaguered run defense, which
has surrendered a schoolrecord 3,176 yards rushing, is
coming off its best performance of the season. UCLA
held USC to 153 yards rushing and 3.7 yards per carry.
8 Cal (427 ypg/28.3 ppg):
The Bears held Stanford
tailback Bryce Love mostly
in check last week with the
exception of a 57-yard touchdown run. “Other than the
one long run we played him
pretty well,” Cal coach
Something special
UCLA might want to fully
devote a coach to special
teams as part of the expanded 10-man staff allowed
next season. There have
been repeated breakdowns,
including a miscommunication against USC that led to
a punt being returned for a
touchdown. … Cal kicker
Matt Anderson has made 16
of 22 field-goal attempts, 13
of which have been good
from at least 40 yards.
Of note
UCLA is trying to go
unbeaten at the Rose Bowl
for the first time since 2005,
when the Bruins wiped out a
12-point deficit in the fourth
quarter during a 47-40 victory over the Bears. … The
winning team in this series
has scored at least 30 points
in each of the last 13 meetings.
Local ties
The Bears have 43 players from Southern California, including many
starters: left tackle Patrick
Mekari (Westlake Village),
center Addison Ooms (Laguna Niguel), fullback Malik
McMorris (Santa Ana), nose
guard Tony Mekari (Westlake Village), linebacker
Raymond Davison III (Los
Angeles), cornerback Camryn Bynum (Corona), cornerback Elijah Hicks (La
Mirada), safety Quentin
Tartabull (Mission Hills),
safety Jaylinn Hawkins
(Buena Park), punter Dylan
Klumph (Malibu) and long
snapper Alonso Vera (Carson). … Four UCLA starters
are from Northern California: safety Adarius Pickett (Richmond), tackle
Kolton Miller (Roseville),
defensive tackle Boss Tagaloa (Pittsburgh) and long
snapper Johnny Den
Bleyker (Fremont).
ben.bolch@latimes.com
Twitter: @latbbolch
9 a.m.: No. 7 Georgia at Georgia Tech, Channel 7; Kansas at
No. 19 Oklahoma State, FS1; East Carolina at No. 20 Memphis, ESPNU; Florida State at Florida, ESPN; Louisville at
Kentucky, SEC Network (SEC); Indiana at Purdue, ESPN2;
Connecticut at Cincinnati, ESPNews; Tulane at Southern
Methodist, CBSSN.
9:15 a.m.: Boston College at Syracuse, KDOC.
9:30 a.m.: Duke at Wake Forest, Prime.
SATURDAY AFTERNOON
No. 1 Alabama (11-0) at
No. 6 Auburn (9-2)
12:30 p.m., Channel 2
This Iron Bowl has massive playoff implications. The winner plays Georgia for the Southeastern Conference title,
meaning Auburn could earn an additional chance to impress the CFP committee.
No. 23 Boise State (9-2) at
Fresno State (8-3)
12:30 p.m., CBSSN
These rivals will play for the Milk Can trophy this week and
then for the Mountain West championship next week.
Fresno State has the conference’s best defense; it will try to
slow the Broncos’ dual quarterback attack of Brett Rypien
and Montell Cozart.
12:30 p.m.: No. 5 Wisconsin at Minnesota, Channel 7; No. 10
Penn State at Maryland, Big Ten Network (Big Ten); North
Carolina at North Carolina State, ESPNU; Iowa State at
Kansas State, ESPN2.
12:45 p.m.: West Virginia at No. 4 Oklahoma, ESPN.
1 p.m.: No. 16 Michigan State at Rutgers, Channel 11; No. 22
Northwestern at Illinois, FS1; Vanderbilt at Tennessee,
SEC; Temple at Tulsa, ESPNews.
1:30 p.m.: Arizona at Arizona State, Pac-12 Networks.
2 p.m.: Southern at Grambling State, NBC Sports Network.
4 p.m.: Oregon at Oregon State, ESPN2.
4:30 p.m.: No. 3 Clemson at No. 24 South Carolina, ESPN;
Texas A&M at No. 18 Louisiana State, SEC; Texas San Antonio at Louisiana Tech, ESPNU.
NICK FITZGERALD of Mississippi State tries to elude the rush. A leg injury knocked him out of the game.
SATURDAY EVENING
associated press
No. 8 Notre Dame (9-2) at
No. 21 Stanford (8-3)
5 p.m., Channel 7
A huge late-season game against Notre Dame could give
Stanford’s Bryce Love a boost in the Heisman Trophy race.
Notre Dame is playing for a spot in a New Year’s Six bowl
game. Stanford fans will have one eye on the Washington
State-Washington game.
No. 13 Wash. State (9-2) at
No. 17 Washington (9-2)
5 p.m., Channel 11
Washington has won the Apple Cup four years in a row, but a
Washington State win gives the Cougars the Pac-12 North
title. Otherwise, Stanford faces USC in the conference
championship game.
6 p.m.: Brigham Young at Hawaii, CBSSN.
7 p.m.: Colorado at Utah, FS1.
7:15 p.m.: Utah State at Air Force, ESPN2.
charles.schilken@latimes.com
Twitter: @chewkiii
Butch Dill Getty Images
Mississippi wins the Egg Bowl again
MISSISSIPPI 31
NO. 14 MISS. STATE 28
STARKVILLE, Miss. —
Jordan Ta’amu threw for 247
yards and two touchdowns,
Jordan Wilkins ran for two
scores and Mississippi upset
No. 14 Mississippi State 31-28
on Thursday night.
Ole Miss, 6-6 overall and
3-5 in the Southeastern Conference, held off a late Mississippi State rally to win the
Egg Bowl for the fourth time
in six seasons. The Rebels
had a 10-6 lead at halftime
and broke it open in the second half with touchdown
passes of 77 yards to A.J.
Brown and 63 yards to D.K.
Metcalf.
“I’m just so happy for our
players and our fans,” Ole
Miss interim coach Matt
Luke said. “This means so
much to them. It hasn’t been
always easy this year. We’ve
been on some better teams
with better records, but
they’ll always remember this
year and how they fought
through adversity.”
Brown, the SEC’s leader
in yards receiving, had six
catches for 167 yards. Wilkins
had 110 yards rushing.
Mississippi State (8-4,
4-4) was a two-touchdown
favorite but had to play most
of the game without starting
quarterback Nick Fitzgerald. He was carted off the
field in the first quarter with
a right leg injury.
Fitzgerald came into the
game with 968 yards rushing
this season, which was the
most for a quarterback in
the SEC. Without him, the
Bulldogs turned to freshman Keytaon Thompson,
but the offense wasn’t nearly
as effective until the fourth
quarter.
The Bulldogs trailed 31-13
with 8:23 remaining, but
scored two touchdowns to
pull to 31-28 with 1:05 left. Ole
Miss recovered an onside
kick to seal the victory.
“We just ran out of time
there at the end,” Mississippi State coach Dan
Mullen said.
The Times’ picks
Each week, the Los Angeles Times’ contingent of college
football experts — it’s how they refer to themselves —
will make choices on a variety of games. Warning: If they
could accurately predict results, they wouldn’t be reporters or editors. Their picks:
Angel
Rodriguez
David
Wharton
Mike
Hiserman
Ben
Bolch
Zach
Helfand
California
UCLA
UCLA
28-24
UCLA
42-35
UCLA
35-31
UCLA
35-24
UCLA
42-31
S. Florida
C. Florida
C. Florida
31-14
C. Florida
38-30
C. Florida
35-24
C. Florida C. Florida
35-17
35-24
Alabama
Auburn
Auburn
21-17
Alabama
24-20
Alabama
31-22
Alabama
38-28
Alabama
31-21
Louisville
Kentucky
Louisville
42-28
Louisville
35-28
Kentucky
31-30
Louisville
42-27
Louisville
41-30
Florida St.
Florida
Florida St. Florida St. Florida St.
21-17
24-17
24-20
Florida
28-27
Florida St.
24-21
Kansas St. Kansas St.
Iowa St.
24-21
21-17
Kansas St.
Iowa St.
31-28
Iowa St.
30-14
Iowa St.
27-26
NDame
Stanford
NDame
28-10
NDame
27-14
NDame
31-21
NDame
35-28
NDame
35-28
Wash. St.
Wash.
Wash.
38-21
Wash.
35-34
Wash.
34-30
Wash.
28-24
Wash.
24-21
Ohio St.
Michigan
Ohio St.
17-14
Ohio St.
30-21
Ohio St.
38-21
Ohio St.
35-24
Ohio St.
24-14
Boise St.
Fresno St.
Fresno St.
28-24
Boise St.
28-24
Boise St.
34-28
Fresno St.
30-20
Boise St.
28-21
Last week
4-6
7-3
8-2
7-3
5-5
71-49
82-38
73-47
75-45
67-53
PROGNOSTICATING RECORDS
Season
FRIDAY , NOVEMB ER 24, 2017
L AT I ME S . CO M/ S P O RT S
D7
KINGS REPORT
Tired of losing? Iafallo
might simply be tired
By Curtis Zupke
Harry How Getty Images
JOSH MANSON , left, was all smiles after his first goal of the season against Bos-
ton on Nov. 15. Corey Perry was more matter of fact in his reaction.
Manson’s offense is improving
[Manson, from D1]
sides, his mother wouldn’t
have let him stay anyway.
“All of a sudden the future
is that your time is short and
you don’t know what’s going
to happen,” he recounted.
“Everything’s unexpected.
You don’t know what kind of
time you’re going to get with
her.
“All of a sudden I’m leaving, and it’s like, ‘Wow, I better
make the most of the time
that I now have.’ That was the
hardest thing to wrap my
head around for sure.”
Josh told his mother it was
weighing on his mind, and she
put him at ease when she said:
“I’ll see you when you play Calgary.”
So off Josh went and, as he
prepared for his first full season in the NHL, he received
some great news on his 25th
birthday: The medicine
worked and the cancer was in
remission.
Lana underwent interferon injections for one year in an
attempt to eradicate the disease. Josh called it “a heck of a
drug. It takes a toll on your
body. Watching her go
through that was miserable.”
All is well now, and last
week Lana visited Southern
California and the pair played
her favorite sport — golf (she
plays twice a week now that
she’s healthy).
When Josh’s dad, Dave
Manson, played in the NHL,
Lana played hockey mom as
Josh grew into the top-four
defenseman he is today for the
Ducks.
She took Josh to practices
and games, operated the establishment the family owned
Extreme Pita, and also took
his two sisters to soccer activities (both played college soccer). Josh’s brother, Ben,
plays junior-level hockey.
“What crosses your mind:
None of the kids were married
yet, you think of the things
you’re going to miss,” Lana
said.
But she didn’t, and she was
in attendance Nov. 15 at
Honda Center when Josh
scored his first goal of thisseason.
The 6-foot-3, 213-pounder
added two more goals in the
last three games, and suddenly, the man with a reputation as a stay-at-home defenseman is flashing offensive
skills.
“Seeing how he improved
in a couple of years is amazing,” said defenseman Francois Beauchemin, who played
with Manson in 2015, and then
returned this season after two
campaigns in Colorado.
“He’s becoming one of the
best all-around defensemen
in the league. We all know how
good he is in his own zone, but
MANSON poses with his father, Dave, a former enforcer in the NHL for 18 seasons, and mother Lana,
who overcame Stage 4 melanoma last year.
he can skate as well and he can
move the puck pretty good.”
Manson’s physical play
surely reminds people of his
father Dave, who had a penchant for scraps during his 18
seasons in the NHL. His 2,792
penalty minutes rank No. 13
all-time.
Dave called eight different
cities home during his NHL
career, and Josh was around
for some of it — Dave retired
when Josh was 10 — so he
learned to acclimate to new
surroundings quickly.
“He’s making his own
name,” said Dave, who is
proud of how his son invested
in his future, with five consecutive summers in skating
school. “He grew up in a
hockey family. He is his own
player. He’s established. He’s
his own man.”
Said Josh: “He’s always
there to rely on. I can lean on
him. He understands the
game so well. More than anything, he understands the
mind-set and what it takes to
stay and play in the NHL.”
He’ll be around for a while
after the Ducks rewarded his
ever-improving play last
month with a four-year contract extension worth $4.1 million annually.
Josh leads the Ducks with
a plus-11 rating, and his 11
points are tied for fourth on
the team.
A nifty backhand deke
fooled Florida’s Roberto Luongo on a breakaway goal
Sunday, and Josh buried another Wednesday through the
five-hole of Vegas’ Maxime Lagace.
“Manson is a young player
that we believe in and he’s
that type of no-nonsense player,” said coach Randy Carlyle.
“You watch the way he prepares himself and the way he
practices day in, day out,
that’s the way he plays.”
Josh was battling for a college scholarship when he
switched from forward to defense, and that changed
everything. He was drafted by
the Ducks in 2011 (sixth
round) and is locked up
through 2022.
He owns his father’s
toughness and his mother’s
positive attitude. And as a
self-described late bloomer,
he’s just getting started.
“I’m starting to figure out
the kind of player I can be and
grow into that player,” he said.
“Guys, they don’t see it coming. You jump in the rush,
they’re not really keying on
you.”
Soon enough, the NHL will
realize just how good Manson
is. They’ll have no choice.
TODAY
VS. WINNIPEG
When: 1.
On the air: TV: Prime Ticket;
Radio: 830.
Update: The Ducks held a full
practice on Thanksgiving, the
morning after perhaps their
worst performance of the season, a 4-2 defeat to the Vegas
Golden Knights with 49 shots
allowed (they had just 19). …
The Jets (13-5-3) are second in
the Western Conference with
29 points. Goaltender Connor
Hellebuyck has been a revelation, with .925 save percentage. Star winger Patrick
Laine’s 11 goals are tied for 10th
in the NHL. … This is the
Ducks’ last home game before
a six-game trip.
sports@latimes.com
WEDNESDAY’S LATE SUMMARY
GOLDEN KNIGHTS 4, DUCKS 2
Vegas ......................................0
DUCKS ....................................1
1
1
3 — 4
0 — 2
FIRST PERIOD—1. DUCKS, Manson 3 (Montour), 9:16.
Penalties—Carrier, VGK, major (fighting), 3:25; Liambas,
DUCKS, major (fighting), 3:25.
SECOND PERIOD—2. DUCKS, Grant 5 (Fowler, Lindholm), 5:59
(pp). 3, Vegas, Marchessault 6 (Perron, Theodore), 19:07 (pp).
Penalties—McNabb, VGK, (interference), 5:18; Liambas,
DUCKS, (tripping), 11:44; Perron, VGK, (hooking), 12:47; Vatanen,
DUCKS, (interference), 18:06; Haula, VGK, (hooking), 19:49.
THIRD PERIOD—4. Vegas, Miller 3 (Neal, Perron), 2:21. 5.
Vegas, Neal 11 (Marchessault, Karlsson), 11:18. 6. Vegas, Karlsson 10 (Smith, Marchessault), 18:00. Penalties—Liambas,
DUCKS, (holding stick), 4:02; Marchessault, VGK, (slashing),
12:01.
SHOTS ON GOAL—Vegas 20-12-17—49. Ducks 7-5-7—19.
Power-play opportunities—Vegas 1 of 3; Ducks 1 of 4. Goalies—Vegas, Lagace 5-5-1 (19 shots-17 saves). Ducks Gibson 7-7-1
(49-45).
A—17,174 (17,174). T—2:35.
One glance at Alex Iafallo
suggested he was in the middle of a grueling playoff series
in late spring.
He sported a cut near his
eye, courtesy of an errant stick
from Winnipeg Jets defensemen Dustin Byfuglien. An
ice pack was on his back. But
this was only late November,
on a rare off-day during a
packed schedule for the
Kings.
At this time last year,
Iafallo was on a three-week
holiday break from his college
team, Minnesota Duluth. He
played 42 games total, or
about half of an NHL regular
season. Iafallo already has
played 22 games, a sharp contrast for a rookie who didn’t
play junior hockey.
“It’s definitely new,” Iafallo
said. “College is a short 40
games. … You don’t practice a
lot. Obviously, in college you
practice every day for an hour
and a half. [These] games
take a toll on you. But I’m
starting to learn to prepare
and how important rest is and
getting healthy.”
The Kings’ recent stretch
of five games in eight days was
the first true stamina test for
Iafallo and other Kings rookies. The Kings monitor fatigue
through strength and conditioning coach Matt Price, but
they can’t control a relentless
NHL schedule that inevitably
digs in to players such as
Iafallo, 24.
“I do think it caught up
with him a little bit at the end
of last week,” Kings coach
John Stevens said.
Stevens also said that
Iafallo was probably his best
forward in a 2-1 loss to Winnipeg on Wednesday at Staples Center. Iafallo drew a
penalty, shoved Josh Morrissey to the ice near the boards
and played nearly 16 minutes
even though he’s no longer on
the power play. Stevens said
Iafallo has adjusted well to
what he says is not entirely a
physical test.
“I think in the National
Hockey League, it’s much
more difficult to manage your
rest, get your downtime … You
don’t have three, four, five-day
stretches very often where
you can just relax and not
worry about playing at a really
high level,” Stevens said. “To
me, it’s a huge challenge mentally at this level.”
Iafallo said veterans Jeff
Carter and Kyle Clifford
have given him tips on managing an NHL season. Iafallo will
get reminded of his college career Friday against the Arizona Coyotes and fellow rookie
Clayton Keller. In March,
Iafallo and Minnesota Duluth
defeated Keller and Boston
University in overtime of the
NCAA West Regional final to
earn a trip to the Frozen Four.
“I’m excited to see him,”
Iafallo said.
No panic
Stevens wasn’t ringing the
alarm even though his team
has lost six of seven games
and fallen out of first place in
the Pacific Division. They
gave up goals in the final minute of the opening two periods
against Winnipeg, got one
back by Tyler Toffoli but
couldn’t tie it despite three
power plays in the third period. Stevens said their check-
Harry How Getty Images
ROOKIE Alex Iafallo is facing a number of challenges
as he adjusts from college hockey to the NHL.
NHL STANDINGS
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Pacific
Vegas
KINGS
Calgary
Vancouver
San Jose
DUCKS
Edmonton
Arizona
Central
St. Louis
Winnipeg
Nashville
Colorado
Chicago
Minnesota
Dallas
W
13
12
12
11
11
10
8
5
W
16
13
13
11
10
10
11
L
6
8
8
8
8
8
12
16
L
5
5
6
8
8
8
10
OL
1
2
1
3
1
3
2
3
OL
1
3
2
1
3
3
1
Pts
27
26
25
25
23
23
18
13
Pts
33
29
28
23
23
23
23
GF
72
65
62
61
50
60
59
59
GF
78
69
68
69
63
64
61
GA
60
52
64
61
45
60
74
89
GA
58
57
62
65
56
59
65
Note: Overtime or shootout losses worth one point.
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Metropolitan
Columbus
New Jersey
N.Y. Islanders
Washington
Pittsburgh
N.Y. Rangers
Carolina
Philadelphia
Atlantic
Tampa Bay
Toronto
Detroit
Boston
Ottawa
Montreal
Florida
Buffalo
W
14
12
12
12
11
11
9
8
W
16
14
10
9
8
8
8
5
L
7
5
7
10
9
9
7
9
L
3
8
9
7
6
12
11
13
OL
1
4
2
1
3
2
4
5
OL
2
1
3
4
6
3
2
4
Pts
29
28
26
25
25
24
22
21
Pts
34
29
23
22
22
19
18
14
GF
63
69
77
67
61
72
58
61
GF
83
81
65
54
64
54
63
52
GA
53
66
69
72
80
68
59
65
GA
54
69
64
59
67
80
73
79
THURSDAY’S RESULTS
No games scheudled
TODAY’S GAMES
KINGS at Arizona, 6 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Boston, 10 a.m.
Colorado at Minnesota, 1 p.m.
San Jose at Vegas, 3 p.m.
Ottawa at Columbus, 4 p.m.
Edmonton at Buffalo, 4 p.m.
Nashville at St. Louis, 5 p.m.
Winnipeg at DUCKS, 1 p.m.
N.Y. Islanders at Philadelphia, 1 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Washington, 2 p.m.
Vancouver at New Jersey, 4 p.m.
Detroit at N.Y. Rangers, 4 p.m.
Toronto at Carolina, 4:30 p.m.
Calgary at Dallas, 6 p.m.
SATURDAY’S GAMES
DUCKS at KINGS, 7:30 p.m.
Buffalo at Montreal, 4 p.m.
Washington at Toronto, 4 p.m.
New Jersey at Detroit, 4 p.m.
Minnesota at St. Louis, 5 p.m.
Winnipeg at San Jose, 7 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Pittsburgh, 4 p.m.
Chicago at Florida, 4 p.m.
NY Islanders at Ottawa, 4 p.m.
Vegas at Arizona, 5 p.m.
Calgary at Colorado, 7 p.m.
ing was much better and their
approach is still upbeat.
“I think our guys know
that there’s good things happening here, but we can play
better than we’re playing,”
Stevens said. “Don’t accept
what’s going on. Influence
what’s going on.”
Coyotes-Jets franchise history to score 10 goals in the
team’s first 15 games. He coleads rookies with 11 goals. Arizona recalled goalie Marek
Langhamer on an emergency
basis following an injury to
Antti Raanta. Coyotes forward Mario Kempe, the older
brother of the Kings’ Adrian
Kempe, has been scratched
the past three games. The two
played against each other in
the preseason.
Mitchell trade
The Kings acquired veteran center Torrey Mitchell
from the Montreal Canadiens
for a fifth-round conditional
draft pick in 2018. It will become a fourth-round pick if
the Kings make the playoffs.
The move follows the Nov.
14 acquisition of Jussi Jokinen to stabilize the Kings
depth forward group. Mitchell, 32, has no points in 11
games this season, mostly as a
fourth-line
forward.
He
scored eight goals in 78 games
with Montreal last season.
TONIGHT
AT ARIZONA
When: 6 p.m. PST
On the air: TV: FS West; Radio: 790
Update: Keller joined Teemu
Selanne as the only rookies in
curtis.zupke@latimes.com
Twitter: @curtiszupke
WEDNESDAY’S LATE SUMMARY
JETS 2, KINGS 1
Winnipeg .................................1
KINGS .....................................0
1
0
0 — 2
1 — 1
FIRST PERIOD—1. Winnipeg, Lowry 3 (Copp, Mason),
19:52. Penalties—Trouba, WPG, (holding), 7:06; Pearson, KINGS, (hooking), 12:24.
SECOND PERIOD—2. Winnipeg, Laine 11 (Perreault,
Ehlers), 19:01 (pp). Penalties—Chiarot, WPG,
(interference), 9:01; Kempe, KINGS, (holding), 12:57;
Brown, KINGS, (slashing), 17:54.
THIRD PERIOD—3. KINGS, Toffoli 10 (Kopitar, Fantenberg), 5:26 (pp). Penalties—Tanev, WPG, (high sticking), 4:09; Little, WPG, (tripping), 8:31; Wheeler, WPG,
(high-sticking), 12:20; Kopitar, KINGS, (hooking),
19:30.
SHOTS ON GOAL—Winnipeg 9-10-8—27. KINGS 1116-12—39.
Power-play opportunities—Winnipeg 1 of 4; KINGS1
of 5.
Goalies—Winnipeg, Mason 1-3-1 (39 shots-38
saves). KINGS, Quick 9-7-1 (27-25).
T—2:37. A—NA.
NASCAR must reboot after losing its brightest stars
GEORGE DIAZ
ON MOTOR RACING
Martin Truex Jr. and his
race team woke up a bit
groggy Monday morning,
feeling the effects of a nightlong celebration at the Furniture Row Racing motorcoach
parked inside HomesteadMiami Speedway.
“Beer, pizza, hot dogs and
plenty of laughs,” said David
Ferroni, Truex’s public relations man who ducked out
early at 1 a.m. while the party
was still going strong.
The inevitable hangover
of Truex and his fabulous
story of resilience spills over
to the rest of the NASCAR
Nation. The 2018 season will
bring a new day, one filled
with great uncertainty.
Truex will still be around,
but the sport will lose its
signature star in Dale Earnhardt Jr., voted the most
popular driver in the sport 14
consecutive seasons. It will
lose a past Cup champion in
Matt Kenseth. And say adios
to Danica Patrick, the polarizing driver who never found
speed to race at the front but
moved the needle in so many
ways when it came to cyber
clicks and social engagement.
Change is always inevitable, and sometimes it is
good. And NASCAR no
doubt is spinning this in a
perky way, touting the talents
of young hopefuls Chase
Elliott, Kyle Larson, Ryan
Blaney, Bubba Wallace,
Daniel Suarez and others.
NASCAR does indeed
have enough rising drivers to
fill its tank when it comes to
competitive racing. The
concern is whether any of
these drivers will become
transcendent stars.
The sport was lucky to
have two generations of
Earnhardts. But now all
those fans of the No. 3 and
the 88 need to fill a void and
root for somebody else. Maybe it’s Elliott, who has the
solid family pedigree as well.
Or Alex Bowman, who takes
over Earnhardt’s ride at
Hendrick Motorsports.
But whoever it is will have
to engage the NASCAR
Nation as well as Casual Fan
and not just win races.
“Bill Elliott was the most
Gaston De Cardenas Associated Press
NASCAR’S most popular driver Dale Earnhardt Jr. is
retiring, leaving a void in the sport.
popular guy too, and he
moved on and the sport got
going,” said three-time Cup
champion Tony Stewart, who
retired after the 2016 season.
“Brian France [NASCAR
chairman and chief executive] once reminded me,
when I was summoned down
to his office in Daytona, that
the sport was around long
before I was around and it
will be around long after I am
gone. One person retiring is
not going to ruin the sport.”
But there are other issues
in play for a sport with changing demographics and sponsorships that are drying up.
Much like other industries,
the problem is that traditional older customers have
become disenchanted or
disenfranchised, and the
younger generation is not
making up the gap.
“There are things out of
our control: how millennials
and other fans of ours are
consuming not only our sport
but all the sports,” France
said during a media session
at Homestead during the
championship weekend.
“That’s obviously a challenge
for everybody. Attention
times, the platforms they
want to view and consume,
they’re changing. TV always
will be critically important,
but other things now will give
us a great opportunity, and
we’re positioned well there.”
NASCAR has a deal with
NBC that runs through 2024,
a financial safety net during
tough times when track
attendance and ratings have
been down. Despite France’s
insistence that ratings
haven’t flat-lined, the ratings
for Sunday’s championship
finale was 2.7, down from 3.3
in 2016, and down 4.4 from
2105. That’s a 40% decline in
just two years.
Sportsmediawatch.com
reported that excluding
rainouts, 25 of the first 34
races this season have set
all-time or decade-plus lows
in ratings and viewership.
The keys to any potential
uptick begins on the track,
and Patrick has left the
arena.
It was a rough Sunday for
her as she made her last start
as a Cup regular. Patrick’s
car got into the wall on Lap
139, bringing fire and smoke
and an end to her day. It was
the 11th time she did not
finish a race this season.
“I hit the wall in [turns] 3
and 4 and got some fender
rub on the tire and it blew the
tire,” she said. “I went a couple of laps and there was
smoke in the car, but they
thought it was all right, but it
wasn’t.”
Patrick announced earlier
in the week that she would
race in the 2018 Daytona 500
and Indianapolis 500.
“What I’m not looking
forward to is I have to go sit in
my bus and wait for everyone
to get done with the race
before I can go home,” she
said, laughing. “That sucks,
but I think that what’s coming ahead is bright for me and
for the way it feels, so I’m
excited.”
sports@latimes.com
D8
F R I DAY , N OV EM BE R 24, 2017
LAT IMES. C OM/ SP ORT S
THE DAY IN SPORTS
Day is one stroke back in Australian Open
staff and wire reports
Jason Day and Jordan Spieth
went in opposite directions Friday
at the Australian Open in Sydney.
Day had four consecutive birdies on the back nine, including a 30footer, for a three-under 68 that left
him a stroke out of the secondround lead. Australian Lucas Herbert, who shot 66, is in front with a
nine-under total of 133 on the Australian course.
First-round leader Cameron
Davis, who shot 72 Friday, is another stroke behind in third.
Defending champion Spieth
earlier failed to take advantage of
ideal morning scoring conditions
and had a 71 to fall eight strokes behind Herbert.
Spieth, who hasn’t played since
the Presidents Cup in late September, has won the Australian Open
two out of the last three years and
finished second the other time.
Day, who had seven birdies and
four bogeys, is aiming to win his
first Australian Open title in his
first competitive appearance on
home soil since 2013.
ETC.
More fallout for
Russian Olympians
The two Russians who had their
medals from the Sochi Games
stripped because of doping have
been barred from competing in
World Cup races, at least temporarily.
It’s the latest sanction against
Aleksandr Tretiakov and Elena
Nikitina, who had their medals —
gold for Tretiakov, bronze for
Nikitina — taken away Wednesday
after it was determined they were
part of Russia’s state-sponsored
doping program at the 2014
Olympics. They have already been
banned from future Olympics, and
now may have no place to slide.
The International Bobsled and
Skeleton Federation handed down
the suspensions Thursday, effective immediately. Tretiakov and
Nikitina were planning to compete
in World Cup races at Whistler,
Canada, this weekend.
In all, four Russians have been
suspended by the IBSF. Along with
Tretiakov and Nikitina, Mariia
Orlova and Olga Potylitsyna —
who have been racing on the lessertier Intercontinental Cup Circuit
this season — were also banned,
just as they were by the IOC. All
four are expected to appeal, and
the IBSF said they will be entitled
to a hearing if that happens.
Rain and temperatures above
freezing canceled training for the
men’s World Cup skiing stop at
Lake Louise, Canada.
It was the second straight day
The top five teams in the poll remained unchanged with defending
World Cup champion Germany
leading Brazil, Portugal, Argentina
and Belgium.
— Kevin Baxter
training was called off. The men are
scheduled to race a downhill Saturday followed by a super-G Sunday at the resort west of Calgary.
Nine teams that didn’t qualify
for the 32-team field for next summer’s World Cup will have to be
content with spots in the top 32 in
the latest FIFA world rankings.
The U.S., which failed to make
the cut in soccer’s quadrennial
championship for the first time
since 1986 on the final day of qualifying, is one of those countries. The
Americans are listed 24th in the
monthly FIFA rankings, up three
spots from October.
The rankings are determined
by a points system in which teams
are rewarded based on the results
of FIFA-recognized international
matches over the last four years.
More recent results and more significant matches are more heavily
weighted to help reflect the current
competitive state of a team.
Andre Silva scored in each half
to help AC Milan beat Austria Vienna 5-1 and book a spot in the
knockout stage of the Europa
League.
Arsenal clinched the top spot in
Group H despite a 1-0 loss at Cologne, the London club’s first defeat of
their campaign. Arsenal already
had a place in the knockout stage.
Lyon routed Apollon 4-0 and Atalanta hammered Everton 5-1 in
Goodison Park in Group E.
Former AC Milan and Real
Madrid striker Robinho was sentenced to nine years in prison by a
court in Milan, Italy, on charges of
sexual assault, Italian news agency
ANSA reported.
PRO FOOTBALL
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
MEN
AP TOP 25
No. 1 Duke 99, Portland State 81
SMU 66, No. 2 Arizona 60
No. 4 Michigan State 73, DePaul 51
No. 5 Villanova 85, Tennessee 76
No. 7 Florida 108, Stanford 87
No. 9 North Carolina 102, Portland 78
No. 15 Xavier 83, George Washington 64
No. 17 Gonzaga vs. Ohio State, late
Western Kentucky 77, No. 18 Purdue 73
Rhode Island 75, No. 20 Seton Hall 74
No. 21 Saint Mary's 89, Harvard 71
No. 23 West Virginia 84, Marist 78
SOUTHLAND
Rider 90, UC Irvine 82
WEST
Arizona St. 92, Kansas St. 90
Hampton 76, N. Arizona 66
St. John’s 82, Oregon St. 77
Alaska-Anchorage 78, Santa Clara 73
UConn 71, Oregon 63
Washington St. 75, Saint Joseph’s 71
Xavier 83, George Washington 64
EAST
Nicholls 76, Presbyterian 64
UMBC 84, Chicago St. 73
SOUTH
N. Iowa 64, NC State 60
W. Kentucky 77, Purdue 73
MIDWEST
UCF 68, Nebraska 59
SOUTHWEST
Arkansas 92, Oklahoma 83
Charleston (WV) 59, Sam Houston St. 49
Texas 61, Butler 48
WOMEN
AP TOP 25
No. 7 Mississippi St. 65, No. 24 Arizona St. 57
No. 8 Baylor 100, Missouri State 58
No. 9 Ohio State 100, Memphis 69
No. 11 West Virginia 75, Butler 68
No. 12 Tennessee 101, No. 20 Marquette 99
No. 14 Stanford 79, Kent State 54
WEST
Alaska-Anchorage 59, Tulsa 53
EAST
Binghamton 68, Md.-Eastern Shore 51
Syracuse 77, Wisconsin 74
Vanderbilt 69, George Washington 59
SOUTH
Buffalo 82, Nebraska 72
Clemson 72, Detroit 44
Florida 90, Savannah St. 40
Florida Gulf Coast 89, DePaul 84
Georgia Tech 69, Penn 55
Iowa 77, Charlotte 64
NC State 68, Alabama 49
North Texas 50, Coastal Carolina 34
Providence 56, Stetson 45
Virginia Tech 79, Drexel 67
Wright St. 85, Richmond 69
MIDWEST
Green Bay 61, Columbia 43
Indiana St. 57, Montana 45
Oklahoma St. 76, South Dakota 68
COLLEGE
FOOTBALL
AP TOP 25
Mississippi 31, No. 16 Mississippi State 28
SOUTH
Alabama State 37, Edward Waters 3
TODAY’S GAMES
EAST
Miami at Pittsburgh, 9 a.m.
Ohio at Buffalo, 10 a.m.
SOUTH
South Florida at UCF, 12:30 p.m.
Texas State at Troy, 1 p.m.
Western Kentucky at FIU, 4 p.m.
Virginia Tech at Virginia, 5 p.m.
MIDWEST
Western Michigan at Toledo, 8:30 a.m.
Northern Illinois at Central Michigan, 9 a.m.
Iowa at Nebraska, 1 p.m.
SOUTHWEST
Navy at Houston, 9 a.m.
Baylor at TCU, 9 a.m.
Missouri at Arkansas, 11:30 a.m.
Texas Tech at Texas, 5 p.m.
FAR WEST
New Mexico at San Diego St., 12:30 p.m.
California at UCLA , 7:30 p.m.
FCS PLAYOFFS
First round, Saturday
Furman at Elon, 10 a.m.
Lehigh at Stony Brook, 11 a.m.
CCSU at New Hampshire, 11 a.m.
Samford at Kennesaw State, 11 a.m.
South Dakota at Nicholls, 1 p.m.
Western Illinois at Weber State, 1 p.m.
Monmouth (NJ) at Northern Iowa, 2 p.m.
San Diego at Northern Arizona, 5 p.m.
DIVISION II PLAYOFFS
Second round, Saturday
West Chester at Indiana (Pa.), 9 a.m.
Harding at Ashland, 9 a.m.
West Florida at West Georgia, 10 a.m.
Findlay at Assumption, 10 a.m.
Delta St. at West Alabama, 10 a.m.
Midwestern State at Minn. St.-Mankato, 10 a.m.
Ferris State at Fort Hays State 11 a.m.
Texas A&M at Central Washington, noon
DIVISION III PLAYOFFS
Second round, Saturday
Case Western at Mount Union, 9 a.m.
Frostburg St. at Washington & Jefferson, 9 a.m.
Husson at Delaware Valley, 9 a.m.
Wesley at Brockport , 9 a.m.
Trine at Wartburg, 10 a.m.
North Central at Wisconsin-Oshkosh, 10 a.m.
Linfield at Mary Hardin-Baylor, 10 a.m.
Berry at St. Thomas, 10 a.m.
NAIA PLAYOFFS
Quarterfinals, Saturday
Northwestern (Iowa)at St. Francis (Ind.), 9 a.m.
Saint Xavier at Morningside (Iowa), 10 a.m.
Georgetown (Ky.) at Reinhardt, 10:30 a.m.
Southern Oregon at Lindsey Wilson, 11 a.m.
THIS DAY IN
SPORTS
1904 — Fullback Sam McAllester is thrown for
a touchdown to give Tennessee a 7-0 victory over
Alabama. McAllester, wearing a wide leather belt
with handles sewn on the side, is repeatedly
thrown by two teammates over the line of scrimmage, including the only touchdown of the game.
1949 — The Syracuse Nationals edge the Anderson Packers 125-123 in five overtimes.
1957 — Cleveland Brown rookie Jim Brown
rushes for 232 yards and scores four touchdowns in a 45-31 victory over the Los Angeles
Rams.
1960 — Wilt Chamberlain of the Philadelphia
Warriors sets an NBA record with 55 rebounds in
a 132-129 loss to the Boston Celtics.
1977 — Miami's Bob Griese throws for six
touchdowns in a 55-14 Thanksgiving Day victory
over the Detroit Lions.
1996 — Karrie Webb, capping a sensational
rookie year, wins the season-ending LPGA Tour
Championship to become the first player in tour
history to earn more than $1 million in a season.
2000 — LaDainian Tomlinson caps the fourthbest rushing season with 174 yards and a touchdown in Texas Christian's 62-7 victory over
Southern Methodist. . He finishes the season
with 2,158 yards.
2002 — Dominant to the very end, Annika
Sorenstam finishes off the best LPGA Tour season in 38 years with a four-under 68 to win the
season-ending ADT Championship, her 11th victory of the year.
2009 — Roger Federer rallies to beat Andy
Murray 3-6, 6-3, 6-1 at the ATP World Tour Finals,
ensuring he'll have the year-end No. 1 ranking for
the fifth time.
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
LATE WEDNESDAY BOX SCORE
No. 10 USC 88, LEHIGH 63
West
L.A. Rams
Seattle
Arizona
San Francisco
North
Minnesota
Detroit
Green Bay
Chicago
South
New Orleans
Carolina
Atlanta
Tampa Bay
East
Philadelphia
Dallas
Washington
N.Y. Giants
LEHIGH
FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Andree ........ 2-7 0-0 0-0 0 1 6
Karnik ......... 3-8 1-2 5-9 0 4 7
Leufroy ........ 1-12 1-2 0-3 2 2 3
Ross ........... 9-13 4-5 2-5 2 3 24
Tejada ......... 8-17 0-0 2-4 2 1 19
Cohen ......... 1-4 0-0 1-2 2 1 2
Bennett ....... 0-4 0-0 0-1 1 3 0
Wilson......... 0-1 0-0 0-1 0 1 0
Porter.......... 1-4 0-0 1-4 1 1 2
Totals
25-70 6-9 11-29 10 17 63
Shooting: Field goals, 35.7%; free throws,
66.7%. Three-point goals: 7-28 (Tejada 3-8,
Ross 2-3, Andree 2-7, Bennett 0-1, Cohen 0-2,
Leufroy 0-7). Team Rebounds: 6. Team Turnovers:
10 (10 pts). Blocked Shots: 0. Steals: 5 (Bennett
2). Technical Fouls: None.
USC
FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Boatwright ..- 7-16 2-2 8-11 3 0 19
Metu........... 6-9 3-7 3-9 3 1 15
Mathews...... 7-10 0-0 1-7 2 0 18
McLaughlin .. 2-7 0-0 0-4 7 0 5
Stewart ....... 5-10 0-0 1-1 0 2 13
Thornton...... 0-0 2-2 0-2 4 2 2
Uyaelunmo... 1-1 0-0 1-2 0 0 2
Aaron.......... 1-7 1-2 0-2 1 0 4
Rakocevic .... 3-4 0-1 1-4 1 3 6
O’Bannon .... 0-4 2-2 1-1 0 0 2
Usher.......... 0-0 0-0 1-3 3 1 0
Henderson ... 1-2 0-0 0-1 0 1 2
Totals
33-70 10-16 17-47 24 10 88
Shooting: Field goals, 47.1%; free throws,
62.5%. Three-point goals: 12-26 (Mathews 4-6,
Stewart 3-6, Boatwright 3-7, McLaughlin 1-2,
Aaron 1-4, Henderson 0-1). Team Rebounds: 4.
Team Turnovers: 10 (10 pts). Blocked Shots: 2
(Metu 2). Turnovers: 10. Steals: 6 (McLaughlin ).
Technical Fouls: Usher, 6:22 first.
Halftime: USC 44, Lehigh 34.
SOCCER
INTERNATIONAL
(home team listed first)
MEXICO
Liga MX
Cruz Azul 0, Club America 0
Atlas v Monterrey
MLS
Conference championships
(home-and-home)
Eastern Conference
Tuesday: Toronto 0, Columbus 0
Nov. 29: Columbus at Toronto, 4:30 p.m.
Western Conference
Tuesday: Seattle 2, Houston 0
Nov. 30: Houston at Seattle, 7:30 p.m.
MLS Cup
Saturday, Dec. 9: at higher seed, 1 p.m.
ODDS
College Football
Today
Favorite
at TCU
at TOLEDO
Virginia Tech
N Illinois
Ohio U
Missouri
at S.D. STATE
at HOUSTON
Miami
Iowa
at TROY
at UCF
W Kentucky
at TEXAS
at UCLA
Saturday
at CINCINNATI
Boston College
Michigan St
at PURDUE
Ohio State
at NC STATE
at WAKE FOR.
Appalachian St
at TENNESSEE
at KANSAS ST
Louisville
Georgia
Penn St
Northwestern
North Texas
FAU
at AIR FORCE
at MARSHALL
at NEVADA
at WASHING.
Wyoming
at UTAH
Arkansas St
at MIDDLE TEN.
Wisconsin
Notre Dame
Clemson
at LSU
Boise St
at SMU
at OKLA. STATE
Arizona
at OKLAHOMA
at OREGON
at N.M STATE
at LALAFAYETTE
Temple
at LA. TECH
at MEMPHIS
at UAB
Alabama
Florida St
BYU
Line (O/U)
Underdog
Baylor
241⁄2 (51)
131⁄2 (621⁄2)
W. Michigan
at VIRGINIA
7 (491⁄2)
3 (54)
at C. MICHIGAN
at BUFFALO
5 (601⁄2)
9 (70)
at ARKANSAS
1
20 (47 ⁄2)
New Mexico
Navy
41⁄2 (55)
1
13 (51 ⁄2) at PITTSBURGH
1
at NEBRASKA
3 ⁄2 (51)
241⁄2 (491⁄2)
Texas State
1
South Florida
9 ⁄2 (63)
1
at FIU
2 ⁄2 (55)
10 (55)
Texas Tech
1
6 ⁄2 (64)
California
51⁄2 (561⁄2)
UCONN
at SYRACUSE
31⁄2 (58)
1
at RUTGERS
13 ⁄2 (40)
21⁄2 (51)
Indiana
1
at MICHIGAN
11 ⁄2 (50)
16 (56)
North Carolina
Duke
111⁄2 (581⁄2)
7 (52)
at GEORGIA ST
1
Vanderbilt
1 (45 ⁄2)
3 (491⁄2)
Iowa St
10 (68)
at KENTUCKY
11 (51)
at GA. TECH
22 (58)
at MARYLAND
1
at ILLINOIS
16 ⁄2 (46)
at RICE
10 (631⁄2)
1
at CHARLOTTE
21 ⁄2 (64)
1
1 ⁄2 (57)
Utah St
Southern Miss
21⁄2 (471⁄2)
3 (67)
UNLV
Washington St
101⁄2 (48)
1
1
20 ⁄2 (48 ⁄2) at SAN JOSE ST
Colorado
101⁄2 (56)
8 (69)
at LA-MONROE
1
1
Old Dominion
11 ⁄2 (47 ⁄2)
17 (43)
at MINNESOTA
1
2 (56 ⁄2)
at STANFORD
131⁄2 (461⁄2) at S. CAROLINA
1
Texas A&M
9 ⁄2 (51)
7 (481⁄2)
at FRESNO ST
1
Tulane
8 (67 ⁄2)
41 (70)
Kansas
1
1
2 ⁄2 (74 ⁄2) at ARIZONA ST
West Virginia
23 (671⁄2)
Oregon St
25 (621⁄2)
10 (56)
Idaho
6 (57)
Georgia
Southern
3 (59)
at TULSA
UTSA
2 (501⁄2)
28 (79)
East Carolina
20 (47)
UTEP
at AUBURN
41⁄2 (471⁄2)
5 (44)
at FLORIDA
3 (481⁄2)
at HAWAII
NFL
Sunday
Favorite
Line (O/U)
Underdog
at CINCINNATI
71⁄2 (38)
Cleveland
Chicago
at PHILADEL.
131⁄2 (44)
at NEW ENGL.
16 (47)
Miami
Buffalo
at KAN. CITY
91⁄2 (47)
at ATLANTA
10 (48)
Tampa Bay
Carolina
41⁄2 (40)
at NY JETS
at INDIANAPLS
Tennessee
31⁄2 (46)
at SAN FRAN
Seattle
61⁄2 (441⁄2)
New Orleans
at LA RAMS
21⁄2 (531⁄2)
Jacksonville
5 (38)
at ARIZONA
Denver
at OAKLAND
4 (431⁄2)
at PITTSBURGH 14 (431⁄2)
Green Bay
Monday
Favorite
Line (O/U)
Underdog
at BALTIMORE
7 (38)
Houston
Updated odds available at Pregame.com
W
7
6
4
1
W
9
6
5
3
W
8
7
6
4
W
9
5
5
2
L
3
4
6
9
L
2
5
5
7
L
2
3
4
6
L
1
6
6
9
T
0
0
0
0
T
0
0
0
0
T
0
0
0
0
T
0
0
0
0
Pct. PF PA
.700 303 186
.600 242 199
.400 176 254
.100 174 260
Pct. PF PA
.818 271 195
.545 294 264
.500 204 230
.300 174 221
Pct. PF PA
.800 302 196
.700 213 180
.600 231 210
.400 203 228
Pct. PF PA
.900 320 188
.455 248 270
.455 258 276
.182 172 267
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
Mark Tenally Associated Press
EA SY P ICKI NGS
Washington Redskins cornerback Kendall Fuller intercepts a pass intended for New
York Giants wide receiver Travis Rudolph during the second half Thursday night.
HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL
GOLF
SOUTHERN SECTION PLAYOFFS
DIVISION 1
Semifinals, today, 7:30 p.m.
No. 1 Mater Dei (12-0) at Mission Viejo (12-0)
No. 2 Corona Centennial (10-1) vs. No. 3 St.
John Bosco (10-2) at Cerritos College
DIVISION 2
Semifinals, today, 7:30 p.m.
No. 1 Upland (12-0) at No. 4 Oaks Christian
(10-2)
No. 2 Heritage (11-1) at No. 3 Valencia (11-1)
DIVISION 3
Semifinals, today, 7:30 p.m. unless noted
No. 1 Charter Oak (12-0) at No. 4 Rancho
Verde (10-2), 7 p.m.
El Toro (8-4) at St. Francis (11-1)
DIVISION 4
Semifinals, today, 7:30 p.m. unless noted
Downey (10-2) at No. 1 Capistrano Valley
(12-0)
Murrieta Mesa (9-3) at No. 2 Cajon (11-1), 7
p.m.
DIVISION 5
Semifinals, today, 7 p.m.
Paloma Valley (10-2) vs. No. 1 Paraclete
(11-1) at Palmdale
Moorpark (10-2) at No. 2 Paramount (11-1)
DIVISION 6
Semifinals, today, 7:30 p.m.
No. 1 Bishop Diego (11-1) vs. Saugus (6-6) at
College of Canyons
No. 2 Golden Valley (7-5) at Mira Costa (5-6)
DIVISION 7
Semifinals, today, 7 p.m.
Burbank (10-2) at Don Lugo (10-2)
No. 3 St. Margaret's (10-2) at No. 2 El Modena (10-2)
DIVISION 8
Semifinals, today, 7:30 p.m. unless noted
No. 1 Rio Mesa (12-0) at No. 4 Antelope Valley (10-2), 7 p.m.
No. 3 Grace Brethren (10-2) at No. 2 Silve-
$1.25-MILLION AUSTRALIAN OPEN
At Sydney — Par 71 (35-36)
The Australian Golf Club — 7,239 yards
First-Round Leaders
Cameron Davis, Australia ........30-33—63
Taylor Macdonald, Australia .....32-33—65
Jason Day, Australia ...............33-33—66
Nick Cullen, Australia .............31-35—66
Alex Edge, Australia ...............33-33—66
Stephen Leaney, Australia .......34-33—67
Ben Campbell, New Zealand ...34-33—67
Anthony Quayle, Australia........37-30—67
Lucas Herbert, Australia..........35-32—67
Steven Jeffress, Australia ........33-35—68
Jason Norris, Australia............36-32—68
Jonas Blixt, Sweden ...............35-33—68
Jamie Arnold, Australia...........33-35—68
Rod Pampling, Australia .........35-33—68
a-Dylan Perry, Australia...........35-33—68
Andrew Martin, Australia.........34-34—68
Matthew Guyatt, Australia .......34-34—68
Austin Bautista, Australia ........34-34—68
Kramer Hickok, U.S. ...............36-33—69
Jordan Spieth, U.S. ................35-35—70
Brett Jones, U.S.....................37-36—73
Mike Miller, U.S. ....................36-39—75
Zac Blair, U.S. .......................38-37—75
a-Charles Reiter, U.S. .............35-40—75
Mike Weir, Canada.................39-38—77
$2-MILLION HONG KONG OPEN
At Hong Kong — Par 70 (34-36)
Hong Kong Golf Club — 6,703 yards
First-Round Leaders
SSP Chawrasia, India .............33-32—65
Shubhankar Sharma, India .....33-33—66
Matthew Fitzpatrick, England ...32-34—66
Thomas Detry, England...........34-33—67
Keith Horne, South Africa........31-36—67
Angelo Que, Philippines..........32-35—67
Micah Lauren Shin, U.S. .........32-35—67
Jamie Donaldson, Wales......... 31-36—67
Poom Saksansin, Thailand ......32-35—67
Marcus Kinhult, Sweden .........35-32—67
rado (11-1)
DIVISION 9
Semifinals, today, 7 p.m.
No. 1 Aquinas (12-0) vs. Cypress (9-3) at
Western
No. 2 Ridgecrest Burroughs (10-2) vs. No. 3
Mayfair (11-1) at Bellflower
DIVISION 10
Semifinals, today, 7:30 p.m. unless noted
Quartz Hill (11-1) at No. 1 Apple Valley (12-0),
7 p.m.
Valley View (9-3) at No. 2 Dos Pueblos (11-1)
DIVISION 11
Semifinals, today, 7:30 p.m. unless noted
No. 4 Covina (10-2) at No. 1 Culver City (11-1)
Rancho Mirage (9-3) vs. Katella (11-1) at
Glover Stadium (Anaheim), 7 p.m.
DIVISION 12
Semifinals, today, 7:30 p.m. unless noted
Santa Maria (8-4) at No. 4 South El Monte
(11-1)
No. 2 Santa Ana (11-1) vs. No. 3 Big Bear
(10-1) at Big Bear Middle School,
1:30 p.m. Friday
DIVISION 13
Semifinals, today, 7:30 p.m. unless noted
Santa Clara (10-2) vs. No. 4 Orange (10-2) at
El Modena, Saturday, 7 p.m.
No. 3 Westminster La Quinta (11-1) at Silver
Valley (8-3)
Notes: Semifinals, Nov. 24. Championships,
Dec. 1-2.
SOUTHERN SECTION
8-MAN
DIVISION 1
Championship, Saturday, 1 p.m.
No. 3 Mojave (9-2) at No. 1 Faith Baptist
(9-0)
DIVISION 2
Championship, Saturday, 6 p.m.
Laguna Blanca (8-2) at No. 2 Lancaster Baptist (7-3)
Li Haotong, China..................34-34—68
Terry Pilkadaris, Australia ........32-36—68
Justin Rose, England..............34-34—68
Wade Ormsby, Australia ..........31-37—68
Julian Suri, U.S......................33-35—68
Tommy Fleetwood, England .....34-34—68
Thongchai Jaidee, Thailand .....33-35—68
Danny Chia, Malaysia.............32-36—68
Others include:
Sergio Garcia, Spain ..............33-36—69
Sean Crocker, U.S..................33-36—69
Rafa Cabrera Bello, Spain.......35-34—69
Harold Varner III, U.S. .............35-34—69
Paul Peterson, U.S. ................35-35—70
Chase Koepka, U.S. ...............35-36—71
Daniel Im, U.S.......................36-36—72
Sam Chien, U.S.....................35-37—72
Casey O’Toole, U.S. ................35-38—73
Johannes Veerman, U.S. .........33-41—74
Anthony Kang, U.S. ................37-37—74
David Lipsky, U.S. ..................36-39—75
TRANSACTIONS
FOOTBALL
Chicago — Placed LB Leonard Floyd on injured reserve.
San Francisco — Claimed DL Cassius Marsh
off waivers from New England.
HOCKEY
Arizona — Recalled G Marek Langhamer from
Tucson (AHL).
Dallas— Reassigned G Mike McKenna and LW
Curtis McKenzie to Texas (AHL). Recalled D Julius
Honka from Texas.
St. Louis — Recalled F Sammy Blais from San
Antonio (AHL).
COLLEGE
Kent State — Fired football coach Paul
Haynes.
Minnesota — Agreed to terms with football
coach P.J. Fleck on a one-year contract extension
through the 2022 season.
West
Kansas City
L.A. Chargers
Oakland
Denver
North
Pittsburgh
Baltimore
Cincinnati
Cleveland
South
Jacksonville
Tennessee
Houston
Indianapolis
East
New England
Buffalo
Miami
N.Y. Jets
W L
6 4
5 6
4 6
3 7
W L
8 2
5 5
4 6
0 10
W L
7 3
6 4
4 6
3 7
W L
8 2
5 5
4 6
4 6
T
0
0
0
0
T
0
0
0
0
T
0
0
0
0
T
0
0
0
0
Pct. PF PA
.600 262 220
.455 249 202
.400 204 247
.300 183 259
Pct. PF PA
.800 227 165
.500 213 171
.400 169 199
.000 150 259
Pct. PF PA
.700 245 141
.600 222 253
.400 267 262
.300 179 280
Pct. PF PA
.800 290 203
.500 208 250
.400 157 254
.400 201 222
Thursday’s results
Minnesota 30, Detroit 23
L.A. Chargers 28, Dallas 6
Washington 20, N.Y. Giants 10
Sunday’s games
Tennessee at Indianapolis, 10 a.m.
Carolina at N.Y. Jets, 10 a.m.
Cleveland at Cincinnati, 10 a.m.
Tampa Bay at Atlanta, 10 a.m.
Miami at New England, 10 a.m.
Buffalo at Kansas City, 10 a.m.
Chicago at Philadelphia, 10 a.m.
Seattle at San Francisco, 1:05 p.m.
Jacksonville at Arizona, 1:25 p.m.
Denver at Oakland, 1:25 p.m.
New Orleans at L.A. Rams, 1:25 p.m.
Green Bay at Pittsburgh, 5:30 p.m.
Monday’s game
Houston at Baltimore, 5:30 p.m.
FIGHT SCHEDULE
Nov. 24
At Nakhon Ratchasima, Thailand, Chayaphon
Moonsri vs. Tatsuya Fukuhara, 12, for Moonsri's
WBC minimumweight title.
Nov. 25
At the Theatre at Madison Square Garden,
New York (HBO), Sergey Kovalev vs. Vyacheslav
Shabranskyy, 12, light heavyweights; Sullivan
Barrera vs. Felix Valera, 10, light heavyweights;
Jason Sosa vs. Yuriorkis Gamboa, 10 rounds,
junior lightweights; Yuriorkis Gamboa vs. Jason
Sosa, 10, super featherweights.
Dec. 2
At Madison Square Garden, New York (HBO),
Miguel Cotto vs. Sadam Ali, 12, for Cotto's WBO
World junior middleweight title; Rey Vargas vs.
Oscar Negrete, 12s, for Vargas' WBC junior
featherweight title.
Dec. 9
At The Theater at Madison Square Garden,
New York (ESPN), Vasyl Lomachenko vs. Guillermo Rigondeaux, 12, for Lomachenko's WBO
World super featherweight title.
At Mandalay Bay Hotel & Casino, Las Vegas
(HBO), Orlando Salido vs. Miguel Roman, 10,
junior lightweights; Tevin Farmer vs. Kenichi
Ogawa, 12, for vacant IBF junior lightweight title;
Francisco Vargas vs. Stephen Smith, 10, junior
lightweights.
DEL MAR RESULTS
Copyright 2017 by Equibase Co. 13th of a 16-day meet.
9109 FIRST RACE. 13⁄8 mile turf. Allowance optional
claiming. Fillies and mares. 3-year-olds and up.
Claiming price $40,000. Purse $53,000.
P# Horse
Jockey
Win Place Show
1 Scandal
Smith
8.40
3.80
3.00
6 Bombilate
Stevens
2.80
2.20
8 Hacktivism
Nakatani
4.80
8 Also Ran: Causeforcommotion, Shazara, Antonina (PER), November Tale (IRE), Wishful Winking.
8 Time: 24.42, 49.32, 1.15.41, 1.40.52, 2.04.30, 2.16.47. Clear &
Firm. Trainer: Richard E. Mandella. Owner: Ramona S. Bass, LLC, Claiborne Farm and Dilschneider, Adele B..
8 Scratched: You’re A Goat (GB).
8 Exotics: $1 Exacta (1-6) paid $12.70, $2 Quinella (1-6) paid $8.80,
$1 Superfecta (1-6-8-9) paid $436.60, 50-Cent Trifecta (1-6-8) paid
$52.25.
9110 SECOND RACE. 61⁄2 furlongs. Maiden claiming.
Fillies. 2-year-olds. Claiming prices $50,000-$40,000.
Purse $28,000.
P# Horse
Jockey
Win Place Show
5 Krissys Manicure
Bejarano
8.00
4.40
3.00
4 My Rose of Savanna Frey
17.40
6.80
2 Line Drive
Prat
3.20
8 Also Ran: Sauce On Side, Condi, Pure Sugar, Silversonic.
8 Time: 22.09, 45.70, 1.11.25, 1.18.11. Clear & Fast. Trainer: Richard
Baltas. Owner: J K Racing Stable LLC and Chandler, Bruce.
8 Exotics: $2 Daily Double (1-5) paid $42.60, $1 Exacta (5-4) paid
$72.80, $2 Quinella (4-5) paid $75.20, $1 Superfecta (5-4-2-7) paid
$1,387.90, 50-Cent Trifecta (5-4-2) paid $211.50.
9111 THIRD RACE. 1 mile turf. Allowance optional
claiming. 3-year-olds and up. Claiming price $62,500.
Purse $55,000.
4
Shivermetimbers
6
Peace
**OSET**
**OSET**
**OSET**
**OSET**
**OSET**
**OSET**
Smith ** _##TABLE##_1_3_
** _##TABLE##_1_3_
** _##TABLE##_1_3_
**
** SEVENTH
** RACE. 6 furlongs. Starter optional
9115
8.80
3.80
2.80
claiming. 2-year-olds. Claiming price $50,000. Purse
Prat
$28,000.
** _##TABLE##_1_3_
** _##TABLE##_1_3_
**
**
3.80
2.80
P# Horse
Jockey
Win Place Show
8
He’s Stylish
Baze
1
Psycho
Roman
16.60
8.40
6.40
** _##TABLE##_1_3_ **Dar
7 Treasure Hunter
Pereira
16.40 10.80
2.40
5 Royal Trump
Maldonado
5.60
8 Also Ran: Point Guard, Orbit Rain, Majestic Eagle, Longden (GB),
8 Also Ran: Royal Bar, Neighborhood Bully, Not Yet, Bob’s All In,
End of Spirits, Danny O.
Warrior’s
Lullaby.
8 Time: 22.78, 47.05, 1.11.74, 1.24.19, 1.36.94. Clear & Fast. Trainer:
Jerry Hollendorfer. Owner: Mark DeDomenico LLC and West Point 8 Time: 22.29, 45.35, 57.67, 1.11.17. Clear & Fast. Trainer: Steven
Miyadi. Owner: Amber Sandoval.
Thoroughbreds.
8 Exotics: $2 Daily Double (6-4) paid $19.20, $1 Exacta (4-6) paid 8 Scratched: Midnight Run.
$17.10, $2 Quinella (4-6) paid $17.60, $1 Superfecta (4-6-8-9) paid 8 Exotics: $2 Daily Double (13-1) paid $231.20, $1 Exacta (1-7) paid
9112 FOURTH RACE. 6 furlongs. Maiden claiming.
$200.60, 50-Cent Trifecta (4-6-8) paid $21.40, $1 Pick Three (2-6-4) $147.30, $2 Quinella (1-7) paid $139.80, $1 Superfecta (1-7-5-8) paid
3-year-olds and up. Claiming price $50,000. Purse
paid $46.00, 50-Cent Pick Five (1-5-2-6/7-4) 5 correct paid $541.10. $3,609.80, 50-Cent Trifecta (1-7-5) paid $321.80, $1 Pick Three (4$28,000.
13-1) paid $266.30.
9114 SIXTH RACE. 13⁄8 mile turf. Red Carpet H. Stakes.
P# Horse
Jockey
Win Place Show
911 -EIGHTH RACE. 1 mile turf. Maiden special weight.
Fillies and mares. 3-year-olds and up. Purse $100,000.
6 Catfish Hunter
Maldonado
3.40
2.60
2.20
Fillies and mares. 3-year-olds and up. Purse $52,000.
4 Quick Finish
Van Dyke
4.00
3.00
P# Horse
Jockey
Win Place Show
P# Horse
Jockey
Win Place Show
3 Thankful Every Day Roman
3.60
13 How Unusual
Nakatani
21.80
7.60
5.00
12 Lori’s Attitude
Baze
16.20
6.60
4.40
7 Responsibleforlove Talamo
3.20
3.20
8 Also Ran: Black Storm, Insubordination, Dream On Brother, Scien9
Achira
Stevens
3.40
2.60
1 Laseen
Pereira
6.40
tifically.
6 Halo Ahead
Bejarano
3.20
8 Time: 21.64, 44.70, 56.99, 1.09.89. Clear & Fast. Trainer: Steven 8 Also Ran: La Manta Gris, Evo Campo (IRE), Kiss Me Now (BRZ),
Miyadi. Owner: Nicholas B. Alexander.
Earring, Dynamic Mizzes K, Victress, Birdie Gold, Domestic Vintage, Do 8 Also Ran: Red Shelby, Chalky (IRE), Night Bloom, Delectable, Golden
Kitten,
Prieta,
Deccan
Queen,
Blossom
Trail
Miss,
Queen
of
Troy.
8 Scratched: Sea’s Journey.
the Dance.
8 Exotics: $2 Daily Double (2-6) paid $19.00, $1 Exacta (6-4) paid 8 Time: 23.69, 48.39, 1.13.57, 1.38.59, 2.03.05, 2.14.92. Clear & 8 Time: 22.97, 47.61, 1.12.26, 1.24.18, 1.36.47. Clear & Firm. Trainer:
$6.60, $2 Quinella (4-6) paid $9.80, $1 Superfecta (6-4-3-2) paid Firm. Trainer: Michael Pender. Owner: Pender Racing LLC, Fetkin, Bob, Carla Gaines. Owner: Golden Pegasus Racing, Inc..
8 Scratched: Lovely Raquel, Morning Dance.
$155.30, 50-Cent Trifecta (6-4-3) paid $12.50, $1 Pick Three (5-2-6) Sill, Hunter and St. Hilaire, Christopher.
8 Exotics: $2 Pick Six Jackpot (2-6/7-4-13-1-12) , Pick Six Jackpot
paid $41.80.
8 Scratched: Galileo’s Song (IRE), Lottie.
Carryover
$10,521, $2 Daily Double (1-12) paid $206.40, $1 Exacta
8 Exotics: $2 Daily Double (4-13) paid $97.40, $1 Exacta (13-7) paid
9113 FIFTH RACE. 1 mile. Maiden special weight.
$39.50, $2 Quinella (7-13) paid $26.40, $1 Superfecta (13-7-1-5) paid (12-9) paid $26.80, $2 Quinella (9-12) paid $21.00, $1 Superfecta
2-year-olds. Purse $52,000.
(12-9-6-7)
paid $745.90, $1 Super High Five (12-9-6-7-3) paid
$1,736.10, 50-Cent Trifecta (13-7-1) paid $129.05, $1 Pick Three (6-4$982.40, 50-Cent Trifecta (12-9-6) paid $43.80, $1 Pick Three (13-1P#
Horse
Jockey ** _##TABLE##_1_3_
** _##TABLE##_1_3_
** _##TABLE##_1_3_
** 13)**paid $103.80.
**
12) paid $720.90, 50-Cent Pick Four (4-13-1-12) 4 correct paid
Win
Place Show
$2,060.20, $2 Pick Six (2-6/7-4-13-1-12) 5 out of 6 paid $822.60, Pick
P# Horse
Jockey
Win Place Show
2 Caribou Club
Van Dyke
7.80
3.80
3.00
1 Holiday Stone
Prat
6.00
4.00
4 Kencumin (FR)
Bejarano
4.00
8 Also Ran: Twentytwentyvision, A Red Tie Day, Troublewithatee, Gio’s
Calling.
8 Time: 24.12, 48.74, 1.12.19, 1.23.80, 1.35.20. Clear & Firm. Trainer:
Thomas F. Proctor. Owner: Glen Hill Farm.
8 Scratched: Feldini.
8 Exotics: $2 Daily Double (5-2) paid $43.60, $1 Exacta (2-1) paid
$22.40, $2 Quinella (1-2) paid $22.80, $1 Superfecta (2-1-4-7) paid
$542.80, 50-Cent Trifecta (2-1-4) paid $50.75, $1 Pick Three (1-5-2)
paid $101.10.
**OSET**
**OSET**
**OSET**
DEL MAR ENTRIES
14th day of a 16-day thoroughbred meet.
8061
9015
9117 FIRST RACE. (12:30 p.m.) 1 mile turf. Maiden
special weight. 2-year-olds. Purse $52,000.
9119 THIRD RACE. 5 furlongs turf. Allowance optional
claiming. 2-year-olds. Claiming price $80,000. Purse
$53,000.
PR
Horse (PP)
Jockey,Wt
Odds
8141 Falcone,5
K Desormeaux,120
7-2
8104 Fengari,11
F Prat,120
9-2
....
Cosa Nostra (IRE),3 R Bejarano,120
6-1
8142 Erotic,9
G Stevens,120
6-1
8162 Midnight Soot,6
S Gonzalez,120
6-1
9009 Channel Crossing,10 T Baze,120
10-1
8104 Rockaway (IRE),8
K Frey,120
10-1
....
Toro De Toro,12
J Talamo,120
10-1
8157 Calexman,2
E Maldonado,120
12-1
9051 El Asesino,1
B Blanc,120
15-1
....
Elevate,7
C Nakatani,120
20-1
....
Lauderdale,4
D Van Dyke,120
30-1
9118 SECOND RACE. 6 furlongs. Claiming. Fillies.
3-year-olds. Claiming prices $20,000-$18,000. Purse
$24,000.
PR
8163
8041
....
8159
8034
9058
Horse (PP)
Velvet Jones,6
Pomp And Party,1
Yalisha,8
Besides The Point,3
Just Be Held,2
Dangerously Close,4
Jockey,Wt
F Prat,120
S Elliott,120
K Desormeaux,120
B Pena,118
T Baze,120
E Maldonado,120
Odds
5-2
3-1
4-1
5-1
6-1
8-1
PR
9030
(8059)
(8165)
(7081)
....
8095
8070
6286
8070
6127
....
9021
Bitzka,5
Love Recipe,7
Horse (PP)
Count Alexander,4
Factorofwon,8
Texas Wedge,7
Colonel Cash,2
Smmer Shamal (FR),3
Candy Crew,6
Cono,5
Sir Valentine,1
Trusting Friend,9
Schulace,10
My Sweet Emma,12
Show It N Moe It,11
K Frey,120
A Solis,120
Jockey,Wt
C Nakatani,120
T Baze,120
F Prat,120
E Maldonado,120
E Roman,117
M Pedroza,120
G Stevens,120
R Bejarano,120
K Frey,120
D Van Dyke,120
T Conner,117
J Talamo,117
12-1
20-1
Odds
3-1
4-1
5-1
8-1
8-1
12-1
12-1
12-1
12-1
15-1
20-1
20-1
9120 FOURTH RACE. 1 mile. Maiden special weight.
3-year-olds and up. Purse $52,000.
PR
8043
8149
9006
8043
6092
Horse (PP)
Captivate,5
Zipman,4
Momma’s Baby Boy,1
California Street,3
Hollywood Strike,7
Jockey,Wt
F Prat,122
R Bejarano,122
M Smith,122
D Van Dyke,122
V Espinoza,124
Odds
5-2
3-1
7-2
4-1
5-1
9006
....
Lighthouse Point,2
K Desormeaux,122 12-1
Moneigh Moprblems,6 S Elliott,122
12-1
9121 FIFTH RACE. 1 mile turf. Maiden special weight.
2-year-olds. Purse $52,000.
PR
9051
8104
8142
....
9009
8104
8142
8141
....
8141
Horse (PP)
Beer Tap,1
Eskimo Roses,4
Jungle Warfare,3
River Boyne (IRE),2
Arch Anthem,6
Bartlett Hall,5
Holy Ghost,8
Blended Citizen,10
Convexity,9
Pointed,7
Jockey,Wt
E Roman,X115
E Maldonado,120
M Smith,120
F Prat,120
T Baze,120
V Espinoza,120
K Desormeaux,120
T Pereira,120
D Van Dyke,120
Mt Garcia,120
Odds
9-2
5-1
5-1
6-1
8-1
12-1
12-1
20-1
20-1
20-1
9122 SIXTH RACE. 6 furlongs. Allowance optional
claiming. 3-year-olds and up. Claiming price $40,000.
Purse $53,000.
PR
Horse (PP)
Jockey,Wt
Odds
....
Spectre Bond,1
E Roman,X116
3-1
....
Clear The Mine,7
R Bejarano,124
9-2
6318 Red Lightning,6
K Desormeaux,119
5-1
1092 Sword Fighter,4
F Prat,119
6-1
(8144) Desert Law,8
S Elliott,122
8-1
(9042) Iron Rob,9
T Pereira,124
8-1
(8131) Street Vision,2
G Stevens,121
8-1
8131 Papa Turf,3
J Talamo,124
12-1
8036 Stone Hands,5
D Van Dyke,119
15-1
....
Borden County,10 T Baze,119
20-1
9123 SEVENTH RACE. 11⁄2 mile turf. Hollywood Turf Cup.
3-year-olds and up. Purse $200,000.
PR
Horse (PP)
Jockey,Wt
6205 Flamboyant (FR),3 B Blanc,124
8027 Chicago Style,1
D Van Dyke,120
(4466) Lottie,2
R Bejarano,117
....
Manitoulin,6
M Smith,120
9016 Tequila Joe,4
F Prat,120
8027 Inordinate,7
C Nakatani,122
8091 Prince Of Arabia,5 T Pereira,120
9124 EIGHTH RACE. 7 furlongs. Maiden claiming.
3-year-olds and up. Claiming price $20,000. Purse
$17,000.
Odds
3-1
7-2
6-1
6-1
6-1
12-1
20-1
PR
9017
8133
9048
3212
9017
9017
1089
8160
8037
9075
Odds
3-1
7-2
9-2
5-1
5-1
12-1
15-1
20-1
30-1
30-1
Horse (PP)
Bardstown,4
Inhibition,10
Super Duper Cooper,8
Is Trevor Clever,2
Psychedelicat,1
Downside Up,7
Jay Makes Us Laugh,5
Air Force Cadet,9
Drum Roll Please,3
Unnamed Source,6
Jockey,Wt
K Desormeaux,124
S Gonzalez,124
T Baze,122
S Elliott,124
D Van Dyke,122
E Maldonado,122
E Roman,X117
I Puglisi,124
A Jimenez,124
B Pena,122
FRIDAY , NOVEMB ER 24, 2017
L AT I ME S . CO M/ S P O RT S
D9
NBA
LAKERS REPORT
STANDINGS
Standings have been arranged to reflect how the teams will be
determined for the playoffs. Teams are ranked 1-15 by record. Division standing no longer has any bearing on the rankings. The top
eight teams in each conference make the playoffs, and the topseeded team would play the eighth-seeded team, the seventh team
would play the second, etc. Head-to-head competition is the first of
several tiebreakers, followed by conference record. (Western Conference divisions: S-Southwest; P-Pacific; N-Northwest; Eastern Conference divisions: A-Atlantic; C-Central; S-Southeast).
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Team
1. Houston
2. Golden State
3. Minnesota
3. San Antonio
5. Denver
5. New Orleans
5. Portland
8. Oklahoma City
9. LAKERS
9. Utah
11. Memphis
12. Phoenix
13. CLIPPERS
14. Sacramento
15. Dallas
W
14
13
11
11
10
10
10
8
L
4
5
7
7
8
8
8
9
PCT
.778
.722
.611
.611
.556
.556
.556
.471
GB L10
9-1
1
8-2
3
6-4
3
7-3
4
6-4
4
7-3
4
6-4
51⁄2 4-6
Rk.
S1
P1
N1
S2
N3
S3
N2
N4
8
8
7
7
6
5
4
11
11
10
12
11
13
15
.421
.421
.412
.368
.353
.278
.211
1
1
1
2
2
31⁄2
5
4-6
3-7
2-8
3-7
1-9
4-6
3-7
P2
N5
S4
P3
P4
P5
S5
Rk.
A1
C1
A2
C2
A3
A4
C3
S1
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Team
1. Boston
2. Detroit
2. Toronto
4. Cleveland
5. New York
5. Philadelphia
7. Indiana
7. Washington
W
16
11
11
11
10
10
10
10
L
3
6
6
7
7
7
8
8
PCT
.842
.647
.647
.611
.588
.588
.556
.556
GB L10
9-1
4
6-4
4
7-3
41⁄2 8-2
5
7-3
5
7-3
51⁄2 5-5
51⁄2 6-4
9. Milwaukee
10. Charlotte
10. Miami
12. Orlando
13. Brooklyn
14. Chicago
15. Atlanta
9
8
8
8
6
3
3
8
9
9
10
11
13
15
.529
.471
.471
.444
.353
.188
.167
1
⁄2
11⁄2
11⁄2
2
31⁄2
6
7
5-5
4-6
5-5
2-8
3-7
2-8
2-8
C4
S2
S3
S4
A5
C5
S5
TODAY’S GAMES
Favorite
Line Underdog
Portland
31⁄2 at Brooklyn
New York
2 at Atlanta
at Boston
81⁄2 Orlando
at Oklahoma City 8 Detroit
at Minnesota
4 Miami
Toronto
11⁄2 at Indiana
at Cleveland
OFF Charlotte
at Denver
6 Memphis
New Orleans
6 at Phoenix
at Golden State
19 Chicago
Time
9 a.m.
4:30 p.m.
4:30 p.m.
5 p.m
5 p.m.
5 p.m.
5 p.m.
6 p.m.
6 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
Walton: Turnovers should decrease
whether it’s Thanksgiving or it’s a
random Friday, I like getting together with my brother and nieces
and nephews and breaking bread
with one another.”
Just like his 20-year-old point
guard, Walton doesn’t attempt to
cook. “I know my limitations,” Walton said. “Top Ramen soup, peanut
butter and jelly sandwiches and cereal. These are my specialties.”
By Tania Ganguli
When the Lakers staff mapped
out what it wanted from the team
this year, they knew some of it would
come with a cost.
The fast pace, all the running, it
would pair with mistakes at first.
Now the Lakers are hoping to
turn to the next stage of that development.
“We got to the season, we said
what can we be really good at?” Lakers coach Luke Walton said. “What
are our strengths? And our youth
and our ability to get out and run and
having a point guard like Zo [Lonzo
Ball], transition basketball is what
we wanted to do. We know there’s going to be turnovers. I think our guys
are good enough that those numbers
should start coming down now.”
The Lakers are the second-worst
team in the NBA when it comes to
ball security. They commit 17.3 turnovers per game, and only the Philadelphia 76ers commit more.
They don’t have one player who is
among league leaders. Rather, the
Lakers make these mistakes as a
whole. Ball, Julius Randle, Brandon Ingram and Kyle Kuzma lead
the team in turnovers.
“Just make the right play,” Ball
said. “Make the simple play. I think
we’re trying to go for home runs
when we could make a pass and get a
layup.”
That sentiment is something
Walton has discussed with the players. There isn’t often time to work on
transition offense during a season
packed with games, but the Lakers
will get a chance to do so this weekend.
They have a rare four-day break
between games — no games on
Thanksgiving, Friday, Saturday or
Sunday. Walton plans to spend some
time Saturday working on their transition game.
tania.ganguli@latimes.com
Twitter: @taniaganguli
WEDNESDAY’S LATE BOX
KINGS 113, LAKERS 102
LAKERS
Kyusung Gong Associated Press
LAKERS FORWARD Larry Nance Jr., right, could return to the
team next week. Nance broke his hand Nov. 2 in Portland.
Nance is close
Larry Nance Jr. could return to
the team by next week. The Lakers
play the Clippers in a road game at
Staples Center on Monday and the
Golden State Warriors at home on
Wednesday.
Nance broke his hand Nov. 2 in
Portland. His injury is technically a
fracture to his second metacarpal —
the bone that begins in his left hand
and extends into his index finger.
The recovery time was expected to
be between four and six weeks.
When Nance suffered the injury,
he was the starting power forward.
In his absence Walton has started
the rookie Kuzma. He will use the
practices when Nance is able to return to determine who the starter
will be once Nance is healthy.
Thanksgiving plans
Ball’s family home was to be filled
with people Thursday. Ball said
Wednesday he expected 30 to 40 people to attend the family celebration
with his father, grandfather and
grandmother responsible for the
cooking.
His role?
“I just eat,” Ball said. “Have a
good time. I can’t cook at all.”
Each year he eagerly awaits his
grandmother’s peach cobbler.
Brook Lopez left his team in Sacramento to be with family in Northern California after Wednesday
night’s game.
Kuzma’s mother came into town
to celebrate Thanksgiving with her
son.
And the Walton clan planned to
spend the day at Walton’s brother’s
house.
It’s a rare time when they’ll be
able to spend a holiday with family
instead of the team.
“We’re used to not having holidays off, it’s no big deal,” Walton said.
“I love playing on Christmas, but
CLIPPERS REPORT
ATLANTA — Lou Williams
made the Clippers’ first threepointer of the game off a pass from
center DeAndre Jordan. Austin
Rivers made the next three-pointer in the first quarter off a pass
from Williams. Wesley Johnson
added another three-pointer later
in the quarter off a pass from Rivers.
That was the theme for the Clippers during their 116-103 victory
over the Atlanta Hawks on
Wednesday night — pass the ball to
the open man, move bodies to open
spaces and knock down threepointers in the process.
The Clippers shot 50% on 30 attempts from three-point range.
“We played with a lot of energy,”
Johnson said. “I think that was the
main thing. Really, we were just
moving the ball.”
The Clippers had 30 assists on
44 field goals.
It was clear they were willing to
share the basketball.
SACRAMENTO
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Labissiere ..........................19 2-7 0-0 4-8 0 1 4
Temple ..............................29 3-8 0-0 0-3 0 4 7
Randolph...........................30 10-16 0-0 0-7 7 3 22
Fox ...................................23 5-11 1-2 1-4 3 2 13
Hill ...................................22 0-2 0-0 0-3 1 1 0
Cauley-Stein.......................28 10-14 6-8 0-6 1 0 26
Bogdanovic ........................26 6-9 0-0 0-1 7 3 14
Mason...............................26 4-7 1-1 2-5 7 2 11
Hield.................................14 4-7 1-1 0-1 0 1 10
Carter .................................9 1-2 0-2 0-1 0 2 2
Koufos ................................7 2-2 0-0 3-5 0 1 4
Jackson ...............................1 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0 0
Richardson...........................1 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0 0
Totals
47-85 9-14 10-44 26 20 113
Shooting: Field goals, 55.3%; free throws, 64.3%
Three-point goals: 10-21 (Fox 2-2, Mason 2-2, Bogdanovic 2-3, Randolph
2-5, Hield 1-3, Temple 1-3, Carter 0-1, Cauley-Stein 0-1, Hill 0-1). Team Rebounds: 7. Team Turnovers: 17 (12 PTS). Blocked Shots: 4 (Carter, Koufos,
Labissiere, Temple). Turnovers: 17 (Fox 5, Bogdanovic 3, Cauley-Stein 2, Mason
2, Randolph 2, Carter, Koufos, Labissiere). Steals: 9 (Randolph 3, Bogdanovic
2, Cauley-Stein 2, Fox, Hield). Technical Fouls: None.
LAKERS
19 22 26 35— 102
Sacramento
31 23 22 37— 113
A—17,583. T—2:11. O—Scott Twardoski, Ron Garretson, Leon Wood
WEDNESDAY’S LATE BOX
Ball movement helped lead to victory
By Broderick Turner
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Ingram...............................32 4-7 4-6 1-6 6 2 12
Kuzma...............................35 7-17 0-0 0-2 0 4 17
Lopez ................................17 2-6 0-0 0-1 0 5 4
Ball...................................37 4-8 0-2 0-7 11 2 11
Caldwell-Pope.....................35 7-12 2-2 0-1 3 1 20
Randle ..............................29 6-9 2-3 2-8 2 2 14
Clarkson ............................25 6-15 1-2 1-2 3 2 15
Hart ..................................10 1-1 0-0 0-3 1 0 3
Brewer.................................8 2-3 0-0 0-0 1 0 6
Bogut..................................5 0-0 0-0 0-2 0 1 0
Zubac .................................1 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0 0
Ennis ..................................1 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0 0
Totals
39-78 9-15 4-32 27 19 102
Shooting: Field goals, 50.0%; free throws, 60.0%
Three-point goals: 15-29 (Caldwell-Pope 4-6, Ball 3-5, Kuzma 3-7, Brewer
2-2, Clarkson 2-6, Hart 1-1, Lopez 0-2). Team Rebounds: 5. Team Turnovers: 17
(23 PTS). Blocked Shots: 4 (Bogut, Ingram, Lopez, Randle). Turnovers: 17 (Ball
4, Randle 4, Caldwell-Pope 3, Clarkson 2, Kuzma 2, Bogut, Lopez). Steals: 8
(Randle 2, Ball, Brewer, Caldwell-Pope, Clarkson, Hart, Kuzma). Technical
Fouls: None.
“We got good shots,” Rivers
said. “Guys had the open looks.
Look at the shots Wes got. ... He
shot wide-open looks. He’s a great
shooter. Like, when we move the
ball like that and you get good looking shots, it leads to better percentages.”
Johnson was on target with his
three-point launches.
He made his first six attempts,
missing his seventh and final
three-pointer in the fourth quarter.
“It was just how the plays were
drawn up,” Johnson said. “I was
just trying to get the spacing down
right. Anybody can be in those
spots, in the corner. It’s just how
the spacing is drawn up. I’m there.”
The Clippers made all those
shots under the weight of knowing
they had lost Patrick Beverley for
the season.
He underwent an arthroscopic
lateral meniscus repair and a microfracture procedure Wednesday
on his right knee.
“It’s tough. You hate to lose anybody, especially like that,” Johnson
said. “Thoughts and prayers go out
to him. I sent him a text earlier. I
think everybody will. I hate to see
him go down, but we have to have
the next man step up. I know he
was going to be encouraging for
whoever steps up. Pat was in good
spirits so we’re going to try to keep
him uplifted.”
Hard-playing Dekker
The Clippers can always count
on Sam Dekker to play his hardest
in limited minutes. That was the
case again against the Hawks.
Dekker played just 11 minutes 1
second, but he contributed six
points, two steals and one rebound. “One thing I can control is
playing hard and my activity level,”
Dekker said. “In whatever minutes
I get, whether it’s 20 minutes or
four minutes, I’m going to play as
hard as I can. I’m getting a lot more
comfortable with our system, and
that helps too. I’ve just got to keep
the activity and good things will
happen.”
CLIPPERS
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Griffin................................37 9-19 5-8 2-10 10 3 26
W.Johnson..........................35 8-10 2-2 0-1 1 2 24
Jordan...............................37 6-6 2-2 2-16 2 2 14
Rivers................................36 7-12 1-4 0-2 5 1 18
L.Williams ..........................37 7-15 3-3 1-1 8 0 20
Evans ................................19 2-3 0-0 0-1 2 4 4
Dekker ..............................11 3-6 0-0 1-1 1 0 6
Reed.................................10 1-2 0-0 0-1 0 1 2
C.Williams ...........................8 1-2 0-0 0-0 1 1 2
Thornwell .............................7 0-1 0-0 0-0 0 1 0
Totals
44-76 13-19 6-33 30 15 116
Shooting: Field goals, 57.9%; free throws, 68.4%
Three-point goals: 15-30 (W.Johnson 6-7, Rivers 3-5, L.Williams
3-6, Griffin 3-8, Evans 0-1, Thornwell 0-1, Dekker 0-2). Team Rebounds: 8. Team Turnovers: 15 (21 PTS). Blocked Shots: 4 (Jordan 2,
Rivers, W.Johnson). Turnovers: 15 (Griffin 6, L.Williams 6, C.Williams,
Evans, Jordan). Steals: 7 (Dekker 2, Rivers 2, Griffin, L.Williams,
W.Johnson). Technical Fouls: None.
ATLANTA
Daniel Shirey Associated Press
LOU WILLIAMS made three
broderick.turner@latimes.com
Twitter: @BA_Turner
CLIPPERS 116, HAWKS 103
of the Clippers’ 15 three-point
baskets against the Hawks.
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Collins...............................37 7-9 0-0 3-10 3 4 14
Prince ...............................20 1-7 0-0 0-1 3 2 2
Dedmon ............................28 6-8 2-4 3-6 1 4 17
Bazemore ..........................28 5-9 0-0 1-5 0 2 14
Schroder............................32 8-21 2-2 1-3 7 0 19
Belinelli .............................26 7-11 5-5 0-3 2 3 20
Cavanaugh .........................16 4-5 0-0 0-0 0 2 8
Magette.............................15 1-4 2-2 1-4 5 0 4
Delaney .............................14 0-4 2-2 0-2 2 2 2
Bembry .............................13 1-4 0-0 0-1 2 0 3
Ilyasova ...............................5 0-1 0-0 0-1 1 1 0
Totals
40-83 13-15 9-36 26 20 103
Shooting: Field goals, 48.2%; free throws, 86.7%
Three-point goals: 10-29 (Bazemore 4-6, Dedmon 3-4, Bembry
1-2, Schroder 1-4, Belinelli 1-5, Cavanaugh 0-1, Magette 0-1, Delaney 0-3, Prince 0-3). Team Rebounds: 6. Team Turnovers: 15 (16
PTS). Blocked Shots: 2 (Bembry, Dedmon). Turnovers: 15 (Bazemore
4, Bembry 2, Collins 2, Prince 2, Schroder 2, Belinelli, Dedmon,
Delaney). Steals: 10 (Collins 4, Belinelli 2, Prince 2, Bazemore,
Schroder). Technical Fouls: coach Hawks (Defensive three second),
8:08 first.
CLIPPERS
29 33 26 28— 116
Atlanta
30 33 21 19— 103
A—12,675. T—2:05. O—Brent Barnaky, JB DeRosa, Sean Wright
D10
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2017
LOS ANGELES TIMES
E
CALENDAR
F R I D A Y , N O V E M B E R 2 4 , 2 0 1 7 :: L A T I M E S . C O M / C A L E N D A R
AT T H E M OV I E S
TELEVISION
REVIEW
‘Gotta’
tries
but
can’t
keep up
Feeling dated, the
reboot lacks the
power of Spike Lee’s
breakthrough film.
LORRAINE ALI
TELEVISION CRITIC
Netflix’s reboot of Spike
Lee’s 1986 breakthrough
film, “She’s Gotta Have It,”
occupies an odd space of being both timely and dated.
It arrives as women’s issues and bigotry are front
and center in the media and
entertainment but also
draws from an era when ideas about sexual harassment,
gender roles and systemic
racism were less explored on
screen.
The 10-episode series,
premiering Thursday, follows the same basic story of
Lee’s film: Aspiring Brooklyn artist Nola Darling is on a
quest to define herself, her
sexuality and her womanhood in the face of societal
sexism, racism and the
smothering demands of her
three lovers.
But just as Brooklyn, and
more specifically her neighborhood of Fort Greene, has
drastically changed in the
30-plus years since Lee first
ruffled feathers with his indie release so has film and
TV’s representation of women.
Lee, 60, who directed the
entire series and wrote the
first and last episodes, now
must compete with contemporary productions that his
early work helped inspire.
Namely, Issa Rae’s “Insecure.” Her HBO masterpiece (starring and co-created and written by Rae)
captures the humor, pain
and complexity of four black
women facing the uncertainty of their 30s in the rapidly changing environs of
Los Angeles and postTrump America.
The Netflix comedy/
drama, however, is too busy
[See ‘Gotta,’ E13]
David Lee Netf lix
DEWANDA WISE plays
determined Brooklyn
artist Nola Darling.
Get in the
holiday spirit
Some L.A.-area
theaters are
spreading Christmas
cheer earlier than
others. E10
Lenny Bruce
play canceled
The late comic is at
the center of a storm
after a university
canceled a show based
on his work. E11
Disco’s queen
is back again
A musical about the
life of late pop singer
Donna Summer is on
stage at the La Jolla
Playhouse. E12
Horoscope .............. E14
TV grid .................... E16
Sony Pictures Classics
TIMOTHÉE Chalamet portrays a precocious 17-year-old whose summer encounter with a young man gives him a new sense of self.
REVIEW
SUN-KISSED LOVE
Sudden attraction sets off a push-pull of feelings in the superb
‘Call Me by Your Name.’ The filmmaking is idyllically ideal.
JUSTIN CHANG
FILM CRITIC
“Call Me by Your Name,” Luca Guadagnino’s
gloriously al fresco new movie, sets the scene in
its opening moments: “summer 1983, somewhere
in northern Italy.” It’s a fittingly lazy description
of a time and place that could hardly be more
idyllic.
Men and women blissfully while away the
hours, riding their bicycles by day and dancing
well into the night. They read and play, swim and
sunbathe, pausing to drink fresh-squeezed apricot juice and savor the sight of each other’s bodies.
To describe this as one of the year’s most
pleasurable movies, in short, may be less a matter of critical insight than of simple observation.
Pleasure isn’t just Guadagnino’s intended effect;
it is one of his defining obsessions and guiding artistic principles. He has become one of world cinema’s great sensualists, a filmmaker whose sunkissed surfaces and woozy rhythms produce an
atmosphere of sweet, heady intoxication.
His two previous films, “I Am Love” (2010) and
“A Bigger Splash” (2016), both also set in his native Italy, were about the delightful if sometimes
MORE INSIDE
KENNETH TURAN
‘1945’ PAGE E4
Parable explores guilt and nature of evil.
JUSTIN CHANG
‘On the Beach at Night Alone’
PAGE E2
The drama about an affair is fascinating.
‘Thelma’ PAGE E6
Supernatural thriller looks at religion.
ADDITIONAL REVIEWS
‘A Gray State’ PAGE E6
ALSO
‘Cuba and the Cameraman’
and other films. PAGE E7
lethal consequences of pursuing desire without a
safety net. “Call Me by Your Name” rings a less fatalistic but equally ardent variation on the same
theme.
Adapted from André Aciman’s 2007 novel, a
well-regarded addition to the pantheon of gay
coming-of-age stories, the movie weaves a captivating chronicle of first love around Elio Perlman
(a superb Timothée Chalamet), a smart, sensitive teenager with dark curls and suggestive eyes
perched atop a reedy frame.
Like most of Guadagnino’s characters, Elio
enjoys a life of enviable privilege. He and his
warm, erudite parents (Michael Stuhlbarg and
Amira Casar) are Jewish intellectuals who have
turned their countryside manse into the most
inviting of scholarly retreats. The house is a cozy
warren of books and manuscripts, where English, French and Italian are spoken interchangeably and conversations can drift from German
philosophy to Gallic literature. Elio is precocious,
to say the least, but at 17 he finds himself in desperate need of a more practical education, one
that an on-and-off French girlfriend (Esther
Garrel) can provide only up to a point.
Enter Oliver (Armie Hammer), a twentysomething American grad student who is revising a manuscript on
[See ‘Call Me,’ E8]
A role tailor-made for Denzel
Writer-director Dan Gilroy created
‘Roman J. Israel, Esq.’ for Washington,
and together they toiled to get it right
By Mark Olsen
Filmmaker Dan Gilroy was standing on the
corner of 9th and Broadway in downtown Los
Angeles on a recent sunny afternoon, looking
north at the canyon of marquees and buildings
stretching out in front of him.
This particular strip of Broadway provided
the location for a key climactic sequence in
Gilroy’s latest movie, “Roman J. Israel, Esq.,” a
character study and legal drama starring Denzel
Washington. Gilroy recalled how he and his cinematographer Robert Elswit walked the street
many times in preparation for shooting, getting
the timing right for the pace of the dialogue.
“It’s funny, I never really came down here during the day. It’s very different,” Gilroy said. “We
only location scouted at night.”
Taking in the pedestrians, construction and
bustling traffic around him, he added, “But you
get the sense of being in an urban landscape
here.”
In the film, Washington plays the title role, a
veteran activist attorney [See ‘Roman,’ E9]
Robert Gauthier Los Angeles Times
“I HAD NEVER met Denzel before, never talked to Denzel before,” said filmmaker Dan
Gilroy, at left with Washington in Beverly Hills. “There was nobody else I’d want.”
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Photographs from Cinema Guild
KIM MIN-HEE in South Korean writer-director
Hong Sang-soo’s “On the Beach at Night Alone.”
REVIEW
A personal
scandal is
turned wildly
on its head
Filmmaker Hong
Sang-soo delivers
a fascinating work
parsing fact, fiction.
JUSTIN CHANG
FILM CRITIC
Near the end of “On the
Beach at Night Alone,” a
prickly, fascinating new film
from the South Korean writer-director Hong Sang-soo,
a well-liquored character
notes, “Personal stories are
boring.” Her statement
could be read two ways, either as a late attempt to preempt criticism of this intensely personal story, or as
a wry assurance that the
story isn’t personal at all.
Maybe there’s a third way
too, which is that it doesn’t
mean anything in particular.
People do blurt out the
weirdest things in Hong’s
movies, especially given all
the soju he plies them with.
Still, we may as well consider the evidence for Option A. The story follows a
young
actress
named
Young-hee (Kim Min-hee)
who is reeling from the scandalous aftermath of her affair with a married film director. Probably not coincidentally, Kim and Hong confirmed
tabloid
rumors
earlier this year by acknowledging their own off-screen
relationship, which began
while Hong was still married.
“On the Beach at Night
Alone,” which screens this
week at the Downtown Independent courtesy of Acropolis Cinema, can thus be seen
as a confession, a deflection
or, like so much of this filmmaker’s work, a teasing acknowledgment of the blurry
distinction between truth
and fiction. But while Hong
may greet his audience’s curiosity with a certain sphinxlike detachment, his investment in the story itself feels
entirely sincere, largely devoid of his usual structural
trickery and deeply attuned
to his characters’ pain.
We
first
encounter
Young-hee in frigid Hamburg, Germany, where she
walks the streets and parks
with an older friend, Jeeyoung (Seo Young-hwa). Occasionally one of them will
quietly allude to the affair, an
illicit romance that Younghee still hasn’t fully given up
on. Kim’s performance,
which won an acting prize at
this year’s Berlin International Film Festival, is remarkable in its ability to register intense sorrow and
thoughtfulness beyond the
parameters of dialogue.
Young-hee’s loneliness is remarkably eloquent, and it
finds an atmospheric echo in
the chilly, muddy terrain of a
beach they visit with some
local friends.
A quiet, mysterious rupture occurs at around the 25minute mark, and on the
other side of it Young-hee is
back home in Gangneung, a
city on the eastern coast of
South Korea. Surrounded
once more by familiar faces
and a lingering whiff of rumor, Young-hee casts off her
melancholy and emerges
from her shell in spectacularly
Hongian
fashion,
through a series of seemingly endless dinners and
drinking sessions, filmed in
long takes punctuated by
the occasional, quizzical
zoom of the camera.
Hong is a tirelessly prolific filmmaker; this is one of
three new movies he’s directed this year, the others
being “The Day After” and
“Claire’s Camera.” As his
least-receptive critics have
pointed out, his work might
well benefit if there were less
of it to go around. Yet there is
pleasure and even meaning
in Hong’s productivity. Few
other directors have shown
such ruthless consistency in
charting the layers of awkwardness and misunderstanding that exist between
the sexes, and few others
have made these familiar insights feel like such a renewable source of comic and
melodramatic confusion.
“On the Beach at Night
Alone” isn’t as accomplished
as Hong’s 2015 collaboration
with Kim, the masterfully bifurcated “Right Now, Wrong
Then.” But it’s more than
worth seeing for Kim’s exposed nerve endings alone,
and also for the way in which
Hong’s typically playful sensibility seems to tilt at times
into a surreal, menacing
strangeness.
Whichever beach Younghee winds up on, she is followed by a figure whose
identity remains a mystery
to the end. Still, it can’t help
but suggest a metaphorical
interpretation, and perhaps
even a rebuke to those inclined to study the frame for
answers. Maybe it’s personal
after all.
justin.chang@latimes.com
Twitter: @JustinCChang
‘On the Beach
at Night
Alone’
In Korean and English, with
English subtitles
Not rated
Running time: 1 hour, 41
minutes
Playing: Downtown
Independent, Friday, 8
p.m.
MIN-HEE, center, who captured an acting prize this
year at the Berlin International Film Festival, in a
scene with the cast from the absorbing drama.
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LATIMES.COM/MOVIES
Szilagyi Lenke
THE ARRIVAL of Hermann Sámuel (Iván Angelusz, left) and his son (Marcell Nagy) creates a major disturbance in a community full of secrets in postwar Hungary.
The consequences of evil
REVIEW
‘1945’ is a lean, quietly furious parable about guilt in a small Hungarian town
KENNETH TURAN
FILM CRITIC
The premise is simple but
compelling: Two strangers
get off a train in a small town,
and nothing is ever the same
again.
It could be the premise
for a classic western set in
Tombstone or Dodge, but
the town is in rural Hungary,
the two men are Orthodox
Jews and the year, as the title
indicates, is “1945.”
A Hungarian feature
coming just a few years after
that country won the foreign
language Oscar for the
Auschwitz-themed “Son of
Saul,” “1945” is a very different but equally compelling
film. Strongly directed by
Ferenc Török from a script
he co-wrote with Gábor T.
Szántó, this is a lean, unadorned parable about guilt
and the nature and consequences of evil.
Photographed in luminous, high-contrast blackand-white by Elemér Ragályi and driven by Tibor
Szemzö’s unnerving score,
“1945” is a quietly furious film
that puts a particular time
and place under a microscope, revealing hidden fault
lines and differences that
had been papered over.
Taking place over several
hours on a single hot August
afternoon, just a few months
past V-E Day, “1945” presents a world that is trying
to get back to normal even as
it senses that normal will
be harder to achieve than
it hopes.
István Szentes (Péter
Rudolf), the town notary
and owner of a prosperous
pharmacy, is introduced
shaving for what he hopes
will be a wonderful day. His
unassuming son Árpád
(Bence Tasnádi) is set to
marry a local beauty,
Kisrózsi (Dóra Sztarenki),
and if he can keep his substance-abusing wife, Anna
(Ezter Nagy-Kálózy), under
control, István is looking
forward to a respite from
his troubles, which he has a
lot of.
For though the war is
over, victorious Russian
troops show no signs of leaving. Some returning Hungarian soldiers, like the mus-
cular malcontent Jansci
(Tamás Szabó Kimmel), formerly engaged to Kisrózsi,
are happy about that, while
others in the town worry
what that will mean.
But then the train, belching black smoke like some
malignant presence, arrives,
and those two serious, unsmiling Jews, father Hermann Sámuel (Iván Angelusz) and his son walk out
onto the platform, creating a
major disturbance in the
field by their very presence.
Arriving with a large,
mysterious trunk, they arrange to have it taken into
town by cart but insist on
walking alongside it, leaving
plenty of time for the worried
stationmaster to speed into
town and spread the news.
‘1945’
In Hungarian with English
subtitles
Not rated
Running time: 1 hour, 31
minutes
Playing: Laemmle Royal,
West L.A.; Laemmle Town
Center 5, Encino; Laemmle
Playhouse 7, Pasadena
Like characters in some
kind of slow-motion horror
film, the townspeople share
the terrifying word: “Jews
have arrived,” “Jews are in
the village” or the blunt
“They’re back.” Questions of
what happened during the
war, what was done to make
everyone feel this way, are
artfully raised and gradually
answered.
One of the factors that
makes “1945” especially involving is that the arrival of
the Jews is so disturbing
that it stirs up conflicts, tensions and animosities that
have little to do with the
newcomers or what happened during the just-concluded war.
Simple, powerful, made
with conviction and skill,
“1945” proceeds as inexorably as Sámuel and his son on
their long walk into town. It’s
a potent messenger about a
time that is gone but whose
issues and difficulties are
not even close to being past.
kenneth.turan@latimes.com
OUR MOVIE PICKS
Movie recommendations
from critics Kenneth Turan
and Justin Chang.
Battle of the Sexes
This enjoyable and entertaining film, with the gifted
and innately likable actors
Emma Stone and Steve
Carell as Billie Jean King
and Bobby Riggs, respectively, is most involving
when it deals not with
sports or society but with
the personal struggles both
players, especially King,
were going through in the
run-up to their 1973 tennis
match. (Kenneth Turan)
PG-13.
Blade Runner 2049
Gkids
“THE BREADWINNER,” about a girl forced to take a stand against the Taliban,
is not animated business as usual, and that makes it special, our film critic writes.
A luminous sense of self
Animator Nora Twomey was a key player in two of the best animated films of recent
years, “The Secret of Kells” and “Song of the Sea,” and now, with “The Breadwinner,” she
has an exceptional feature of her own.
Though it’s set in dusty Kabul, Afghanistan, and not emerald Ireland, “The Breadwinner”
shares with its predecessors a vivid sense of a very specific culture as well as a gift for
strikingly beautiful visuals.
Kabul may not sound like a likely site for luminous images, but Twomey and her team
show us a city of captivating sandstone-hued houses where colorful flowers and teeming
markets come to bright and convincing life.
But beauty aside, this is an unexpectedly tough-minded story of an 11-year-old girl
forced to take a stand against the harsh excesses of life under the Taliban. It’s not animated business as usual, and that makes it special. In selected theaters.
— Kenneth Turan
You can quibble with aspects of it, but as shaped by
Denis Villeneuve and his
masterful creative team,
this high-end sequel puts
you firmly and unassailably
in another world of its own
devising, and that is no
small thing. (Kenneth Turan) R.
The Breadwinner
In its power and its beauty,
this story of a young girl’s
struggles in Taliban-controlled Afghanistan reminds
us that animation can be
every bit as much of a medium for adults as it is for
children. (Kenneth Turan)
PG-13.
A Fantastic Woman
Chilean writer-director
Sebastián Lelio’s follow-up
to “Gloria” is a compassionate and captivating portrait
of a young transgender
woman (a superb Daniela
Vega) dealing with hostility
and intolerance in the wake
of her lover’s death. (Justin
Chang) R.
best. (Kenneth Turan) NR.
The Florida Project
Carey Mulligan, Jason
Mitchell, Mary J. Blige and
Rob Morgan are part of a
superb ensemble in writerdirector Dee Rees’ sweeping
epic of World War II-era
Mississippi, the rare film
that grants its white and
black characters the same
moral and dramatic weight.
(Justin Chang) R.
Absorbing us in the day-today rhythms of life at a
dumpy Florida motel complex, home to a wildly spirited 6-year-old girl named
Moonee (the startling
Brooklynn Prince), Sean
Baker (“Tangerine”) goes to
a place few of us know and
emerges with a masterpiece
of empathy and imagination. (Justin Chang) R.
Mudbound
Novitiate
As warm as it is smart, and
it is very smart, this portrait
of a high school senior year
marks actor-screenwriter
Greta Gerwig’s superb
debut as a solo director and
yet another astonishing
performance by star Saoirse
Ronan. (Kenneth Turan) R.
A hit at Sundance and
already nominated for a
Gotham breakthrough
director award, this drama
about the emotional content of nuns’ lives in the
mid-1960s sure-handedly
takes us inside the world of
belief with care, concern
and a piercing, discerning
eye. (Kenneth Turan) R.
Last Flag Flying
The Square
Bryan Cranston, Laurence
Fishburne and Steve Carell
give richly felt performances
as Vietnam veterans reuniting 30 years later in Richard
Linklater’s warm, ribald
and elegiac quasi-sequel to
Hal Ashby’s 1973 classic,
“The Last Detail.” (Justin
Chang) R.
A museum curator ( Claes
Bang) undergoes a crisis of
conscience in Swedish
writer-director Ruben
Östlund’s virtuoso satire of
the modern-art world,
which won the Palme d’Or
at the 2017 Cannes Film
Festival. (Justin Chang) R.
Lady Bird
The Meyerowitz
Stories (New and
Selected)
Funny, moving and psychologically complex, this is
writer-director Noah Baumbach’s latest foray into the
intricate paradoxes of dysfunctional family dynamics,
and, starring Dustin Hoffman, Adam Sandler and
Ben Stiller, it ranks with his
Three Billboards
Outside Ebbing,
Missouri
Uncommon writer-director
Martin McDonagh and a
splendid cast toplined by
Frances McDormand,
Woody Harrelson and Sam
Rockwell present a savage
film, even a dangerous one,
the blackest take-no-prisoners farce in quite some
time. (Kenneth Turan) R.
LOS ANGELES TIMES
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AT THE MOVIES: REVIEWS
‘THELMA’
The quiet before the storm
Joachim Trier’s supernatural thriller takes unsettling look at religion, sexuality
JUSTIN CHANG
FILM CRITIC
“Thelma” begins in a remote stretch of wintry
wilderness, where a man and
his young daughter step gingerly across a frozen lake
and into the woods nearby.
The father has a rifle, presumably with the intention
of shooting a fawn that pops
into view. But after taking
careful aim, he suddenly
swings the weapon in an unexpected direction. The
screen cuts to black before
we see what happens next,
but a powerful sense of unease takes hold. Who is the
hunter in this picture, and
who is the prey?
The answer isn’t entirely
clear even a decade or so
later, when we catch up with
Thelma (an excellent Eili
Harboe), a freshman biology
student at a university in Oslo. Even for a first-year who
finds herself adrift in a big
city, Thelma seems unusually lonely. Her extreme isolation is driven home by an
early shot that slowly picks
her out in a crowded plaza
with a slow, creeping zoom
that recalls “The Conversation.” That isn’t the only
1970s American classic looming large over this movie,
which at times plays like
“Carrie” in Scandinavian
deep freeze.
A muted and moody
supernatural chiller, “Thelma” marks a first foray into
quasi-horror territory for
Norwegian director Joachim
Trier, who scripted the film
with his usual writing partner, Eskil Vogt. After 2015’s
“Louder Than Bombs,” a
sensitive if unpersuasive
drama about an American
family reeling from tragedy,
Trier has returned to native
soil, geographically at least,
where he made his dazzling
debut feature, “Reprise”
(2006), and its wrenching follow-up, “Oslo, August 31st”
(2011). What all these films
share, apart from a love of
formal innovation, is an
acute sensitivity to the experiences of young people, and
of the sorrow and disillusionment that seem to be
their natural inheritance in
any time or place.
Thelma, at least initially,
seems to possess a narrower
emotional register than
Orchard
EILI HARBOE plays the title character, a college student raised in a strict Christian family. Call it a “Carrie” in Scandinavian deep freeze.
most. She lives out of a suitcase in a sparsely furnished
apartment. Her parents
(Henrik Rafaelsen and Ellen
Dorrit Petersen) are strict
fundamentalist Christians
who call her every day, peppering her with gentle but
insistent questions about
her schedule, her diet and
the company she keeps.
One afternoon, she’s
studying in the library when
she suffers a violent seizure
and collapses, a reaction
that might well have something to do with the birds
flying in ominously Hitchcockian formations outside
the window. Or maybe it has
something to do with the
fact that when it happens,
she’s sitting next to a lovely
student named Anja (Norwegian American musician
Kaya Wilkins), who, after
the incident, befriends Thelma and gradually brings her
out of her shell.
The two young women
begin hanging out together
and in large groups, where
Thelma’s forthright Christian beliefs come in for some
genial mockery. In due time,
she lets her guard down,
drinking her first beer and
smoking her first cigarette,
and drawing Anja toward
her with a power that seems
almost otherworldly. In one
of the film’s most striking set
pieces, she attends a dance
performance where Anja’s
hand
casually
brushes
against her leg, triggering a
reaction that might make
you fear for the architectural
stability of the concert hall.
By the time the two lock
lips, triggering a surreal blur
of flashbacks and serpentine imagery, it’s clear that
something deeply unsettling
has been unleashed.
That
something,
of
Not rated
In Norwegian, with English
subtitles
Running time: 1 hour, 56
minutes
Playing: Laemmle’s
Playhouse 7, Pasadena;
Laemmle’s Monica Film
Center, Santa Monica
course, might simply be a
young woman’s late-blooming sexual independence; if
the hormonal metaphors
are awfully hard to miss, the
allusions to movies like
“Black Swan,” “The Exorcist” and “The Fury” are obvious enough to trip over.
“Thelma” is tense, thoughtful and beautifully composed, and it contains at
least two sequences, both of
A&E IndieFilms / First Run Features
Keri Anderson IFC Films
BERNADETTE (Rosemarie DeWitt) spends a little
‘Thelma’
them flashbacks, that tap
into a vividly primal sense of
terror. It also contains moments that suggest an upscale European spin on a
standard-issue schlock horror movie, the kind where
big revelations come courtesy of a few creepy Google
searches and a trip to the
mental hospital.
In these moments, you almost wish that Trier, rather
than holding back, had simply gone for broke. There is
impressive nuance to this vision, to be sure; even Thelma’s parents, who might
have tilted into authoritarian caricature, are basically
the nicest, most loving religious extremists you’ve ever
met. But there is also a certain slackness and hesitation, an unwillingness to go
for obvious payoffs, that
suggests a filmmaker more
in command of his craft than
THE DOCUMENTARY explores the deaths of David
of what he wants to say.
Harboe’s performance is
a compelling slow thaw, her
unassuming mask of a face
gradually flushing with color
and feeling. That the film
seems less interested in harnessing the full extent of her
telekinetic abilities than in
shaking her loose from her
emotional repression is
somehow more admirable
than satisfying. You could
read “Thelma” as a saga of
Sapphic liberation, a fiery
critique of religious patriarchy or perhaps yet another superhero’s traumatic origin story; it’s graceful and
ambiguous enough to support each of these readings.
But the more possibilities
the movie seems to entertain, the more its cumulative
power seems to dissipate.
justin.chang@latimes.com
Twitter: @JustinCChang
Dark Sky Films
JASON RITTER , left, with Jaime King, shines as the
time with kindly hotel manager Sam (Jon Bernthal).
Crowley, on the set of his feature film, and his family.
selfish husband of a stay-at-home mom who snaps.
‘SWEET VIRGINIA’
‘A GRAY STATE’
‘BITCH’
A slow-baked,
More a ‘whydunit’ Dark comedy
arty Alaskan noir than a ‘whodunit’ satirizes suburbia
The arty thriller “Sweet
Virginia” is less a “neo-noir”
than a “meta-noir,” dropping desperate characters
into a twisty plot that eventually becomes a comment
on the entire genre.
Directed by Jamie M.
Dagg from a screenplay by
Benjamin and Paul China,
“Sweet Virginia” stars Christopher Abbott as a contract
killer named Elwood, who
finds his way to a motel in
Alaska managed by a kindly
ex-rodeo star named Sam
(Jon Bernthal). There, he
waits with mounting irritation for money he’s owed
from his latest victim’s widow, Lila (Imogen Poots). It’s
immediately obvious that
Elwood’s not much of a professional but instead kills indiscriminately because he’s
psychologically damaged.
After opening with an explosion of violence, “Sweet
Virginia” settles down into a
slow-moving mood piece,
concerned primarily with
the sad daily lives of a handful of stock characters. It’s as
though they are aware
they’re clichés and are determined to make sure the audience knows there’s more
to them than meets the eye.
Dagg (who previously
made the very good “River”)
tries too hard to give the material a highbrow frame. The
movie is dimly lighted and
hushed to a fault.
But the China brothers’
script is strong, and Dagg
elicits terrific performances
from Abbott, Bernthal and
Poots. The cast and creators
dig underneath flat pulp
conventions and find the
real pain and emotional instability at their roots.
— Noel Murray
“Sweet Virginia.” Rated: R,
for violence, some strong
sexuality, language and drug
use. Running time: 1 hour, 33
minutes. Playing: Arena
Cinelounge Sunset, Hollywood.
Unfolding like a more intricately plotted episode of
“48 Hours,” Erik Nelson’s “A
Gray State” is a unsettling
look at a 2015 murder case.
On introduction, David
Crowley would appear to be
well on his way — a charismatic, driven Iraq war veteran-turned-filmmaker with
a Muslim wife and a 4-yearold daughter. He became an
internet sensation after his
concept trailer for a dystopian feature about American
society under authoritarian
control went viral.
He would attract a rabid
alt-media following, but
while developing the movie
version of “Gray State,” he
began exhibiting increasingly antisocial behavior
that concerned friends and
family, leading to the discovery of the bodies of Crowley,
his wife and daughter in
their Minnesota home.
Police ruled the execution-style deaths a murdersuicide, although the revela-
tion that the words “Allahu
akbar” were scrawled on a
wall in Crowley’s wife’s blood
became catnip for conspiracy theorists contending it
was a government hit job.
Less of a whodunit than a
“whydunit,” the film executive produced by Werner
Herzog is accurately described by Nelson as “a psychological-horror-thriller
masquerading as a documentary,” to which “cautionary tale” should be added.
Whether or not Crowley
may have suffered from undiagnosed PTSD, “A Gray
State” disturbingly traverses the blurred boundary between reality and performance all too inherent in today’s social media-fed climate of cultural narcissism.
— Michael
Rechtshaffen
“A Gray State.” Not rated.
Running time: 1 hour, 33
minutes. Playing: Laemmle
Music Hall, Beverly Hills.
Writer, director and star
Marianna Palka skewers
suburban life with the riotous, unsettling “Bitch,” the
tale of a stay-at-home mom
who drops out when the
pressure proves too much.
Palka plays Jill, mother of
four, married to harried
workaholic philanderer Bill
(Jason Ritter). As he ignores
her cries for help, caught up
with his own concerns at
work, Jill creeps closer to the
edge. After another missed
family dinner, she cracks.
Haunted by the barking of a
neighborhood
German
shepherd, her broken psyche adopts the persona of a
growling, rabid dog, cowering in the basement.
“Bitch” expresses its
deep anxiety through Jeffrey
Alan Jones’ sound design
and Morgan Z. Whirledge’s
score. Plucked strings, erratic drums, scratching percussion and always the tapping of long nails and constant barking reflect Jill’s
mental state.
The film showcases Ritter’s performance. The crisis
forces Bill to snap out of his
misogynist corporate programming, as he’s suddenly
tasked with taking care of
his children and wife. Their
American Dream becomes a
nightmare, if it wasn’t already.
As the family descends
into chaos, Bill breaks down
and hits rock bottom, where
he has to figure out how to
make himself whole again.
“Bitch” takes a provocative
and surreal premise, rooted
in social commentary, and
follows it to its plausible end.
For a film that’s incredibly
angry and blackly comic, it
finally, and surprisingly,
makes a case for compassion and understanding.
— Katie Walsh
“Bitch.” Not rated. Running
time: 1 hour 33 minutes.
Playing: Laemmle Music
Hall, Beverly Hills; on VOD.
FRIDAY , NOVEMB ER 24, 2017
L AT I ME S . CO M/ CA L E N DA R
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AT THE MOVIES
Rita Moreno
shines, film can’t
CAPSULE REVIEWS
Forging
a bond
with Cuba
When self-taught New
York documentarian Jon
Alpert first traveled to Cuba
in the 1970s, his state-of-theart video equipment was so
heavy that he and his wife
and filmmaking partner,
Keiko Tsuno, pushed it
through Havana in a baby
carriage.
Over the next 40 years of
visits, the hardware grew
lighter and Alpert’s connection to the island nation
deepened. As the dynamic
“Cuba and the Cameraman”
reveals, it’s a bond built on
exuberance and curiosity.
Initially drawn by the ideals of the Cuban Revolution,
Alpert never loses sight of
them as the first blush of romance gives way to a cleareyed chronicle of the regime’s failures and struggles. His encounters with
working-class city dwellers
and peasant farmers take
him off the prescribed tourist path and are bursting
with life. In different ways, so
too are his interactions with
the charismatic Fidel Castro, striking in their informality.
But it’s the salt-of-theearth Borregos, a trio of farmer brothers and their sister, who give the film its
most involving through-line,
and its heart. They’re in
their 60s when Alpert first
meets them, happily working the soil. Thirty-odd years
later, having weathered
tough times, they remain as
committed to the land as
ever. When one brother faces
medical challenges, Alpert
steps in where the country’s
underfunded — but still free
to patients — healthcare
system can’t.
Alpert sums up his involvement in Cuba as “making friends” — no small thing
given the fraught U.S.-Cuba
political divide. As a decades-long, ground-level portrait of the country, his vibrant film is unprecedented.
— Sheri Linden
“Cuba and the Cameraman.” Not rated. Running
time: 1 hour, 54 minutes.
Playing: Laemmle Monica
Film Center, Santa Monica;
streaming on Netflix.
It’s atmospheric,
but the clichés ...
A night in coastal Portugal sees an itinerant American laborer (Anton Yelchin,
in one of his last roles) and a
restless French archaeology
grad student (Lucie Lucas)
meet for talk, sex and emotional fragmentation in
Gabe Klinger’s “Porto.”
But unlike a more conventionally
approached
rom-com or swoony romance about the night that
changed everything, this serious-as-a-heart-attack
two-hander mixes up time
frames and film formats
(8mm, 16mm, 35mm) to suggest an experience being remembered and played out at
the same time by its participants.
Yelchin’s Jake and Lucas’
Mati first lock eyes at a dig,
then at a train station and finally at a restaurant, where
the first overture is made.
But his vibe is uncomfortably creepy, hers inexplicably accommodating, and
there seems to be a concerted effort on Klinger’s
part to leave unexplored
Jake’s violent stalker tendencies (briefly depicted in
the flash-forwards) so as to
more rapturously memorialize the eroticism of strangers coupling. The film is less
a tale of equals, with
Yelchin’s possessive mien
fairly dominating Lucas’
looser, in-the-moment portrayal.
That’s not to say that cinematographer
Wyatt
Garfield’s way with grainy,
intimate celluloid in an ancient city isn’t entrancingly
atmospheric — the best
thing about Klinger’s time/
memory/dream aesthetic is
how it looks: the visual
equivalent of an audiophile’s
nostalgia for vinyl. But the
time jumping feels precious,
and the screenplay — written by Klinger and Larry
Gross — falls too easily into
clichés about rough men
and troubled women to ever
achieve something truly resonant about the highs and
fallouts of chance encounters.
— Robert Abele
Nagamitsu Endo Netf lix
JON ALPERT, center, travels to Cuba in 2009 in “Cuba and the Cameraman.”
“Porto.” In English, French
and Portuguese with English subtitles. Not rated.
Running time: 1 hour, 16 minutes. Playing: Landmark
NuArt, West L.A.
Living through
Clapton’s pain
Rock fans everywhere
know that Eric Clapton
honed his blues guitar chops
so finely in the 1960s that
fans dubbed him “God” and
persevered through multiple addictions, tragic personal loss and the awkward
experience of falling in love
with his best friend’s wife.
Yet outside of Clapton’s
own 2007 memoir, his story’s
never been told as well as it is
in director Lili Fini Zanuck’s
documentary “Eric Clapton:
Life in 12 Bars.” Zanuck had
access to an astonishingly
thorough archive of photos,
films and audio and illustrates Clapton’s darkest
days with shocking immediacy.
A loner by nature, Clapton was drawn early on to
the idea of a single musician
with a guitar, exorcising personal demons — of which he
had many. Zanuck traces
much of the tension in Clapton’s life to difficulties relating to peers more interested
in fame. To dull his disappointment, he numbed
himself with drugs and alcohol.
“Life in 12 Bars” rushes
too quickly through the latter days of Clapton’s career,
before ending on a upbeat
note that — while undeniably moving — feels forced.
But it’s hard to overstate
how powerful it is to hear
Clapton on tape in the
early ’70s, telling an interviewer that the most important thing in his life is heroin,
or to see his drunken midconcert arguments with audiences.
Unlike most rock docs,
“Life in 12 Bars” isn’t a look
back from a distance. It’s like
living through one man’s
pain.
— Noel Murray
“Eric Clapton: Life in 12
Bars.” Not rated. Running
time: 2 hours, 14 minutes.
Playing: Monica Film Center, Santa Monica.
The Trocks
glory in tutus
Can men be considered
“ballerinas”? They can —
and are — especially when
they’re members of the gender-bending, all-male comic
ballet company, Les Ballets
Trockadero de Monte Carlo,
a.k.a. “The Trocks,” which is
enjoyably profiled in the
documentary “Rebels on
Pointe.”
The
internationally
popular, 43-year-old group,
founded in the wake of the
Stonewall riots and the start
of the modern day gay-rights
movement, doesn’t consider
itself a gay dance troupe per
se. But, as artistic director
Tory Dobrin notes here,
since all its members are gay
and perform in drag, there’s
a pretty specific “sensibility”
at work.
The ethnically diverse
company’s chief calling card
is its irreverent take on a
largely traditional art form:
adding facial and physical
humor to superb classical
dance technique.
The result is a delightful,
embracing cultural experience, one that the film’s director, Bobbi Jo Hart,
warmly captures in all its offbeat glory as she follows the
group from its New York
base to performances in
Canada, Japan, Scotland
and elsewhere.
The movie also benefits
from its intriguing peeks
into the personal, home and
family lives of several openbook troupe members.
Chats with Dobrin (who offers strong historical context, including how the
AIDS crisis impacted the
Trocks), dance critics and
American Ballet Theatre
principal dancer James
Whiteside round out this
intimate portrait.
— Gary Goldstein
“Rebels on Pointe.” Not
rated. Running time: 1 hour,
30
minutes.
Playing:
Laemmle Music Hall, Beverly Hills.
Other than the buoyant
presence of Oscar winner
Rita Moreno, “Remember
Me” is a charmless but
harmless comedy about two
cousins and their aging
grandmother.
The EGOT-winner improves every scene in which
she appears, but her absence makes moments built
around other actors that
much worse.
Public radio journalist
Vincent
(writer-director
Steve Goldbloom) drops
by his grandparents’ home
for a short visit, but the
unexpected death of his
grandfather (Ray Reinhardt) leaves him and his aspiring actor cousin Barry
(Joel Kelley Dauten) scrambling.
Unsure of what to do with
their grandmother Nanna
(Moreno), who they know
will be crushed by the loss of
her husband, they set off on
a road trip to drop her off at
an assisted living facility
without her knowledge, but
Nanna turns out to be more
of a handful than they expect.
Moreno still exudes the
remarkable energy that has
been a hallmark of her career. “Remember Me” receives its few laughs when
she gets to be delightfully
profane, while many of the
jokes from Vincent and
would-be comedian Barry
land with thuds.
As a screenwriter and director, Goldbloom is green
but well-intentioned, with
later moments redeeming
some early ugliness. It’s unclear whether he or his characters didn’t quite think
through their choices, but
the result is on-screen bumbling that isn’t funny for the
audience.
— Kimber Myers
“Remember
Me.”
Not
rated. Running time: 1 hour,
23
minutes.
Playing:
Laemmle Music Hall, Beverly Hills.
E8
F R I DAY , N OV EM BE R 24, 2017
LAT IMES. C OM/ CALENDAR
AT THE MOVIES
Sony Pictures Classics
A FATHER played by Michael Stuhlbarg, left, helps his son, portrayed by Timothée Chalamet, center, understand his feelings for Armie Hammer’s grad student.
Of hearts
and bodies
[‘Call Me,’ from E1]
Heraclitus when he becomes
the Perlmans’ latest six-week
summer houseguest. From
the day Oliver pulls up in a
cab and moves into Elio’s
bedroom, he seems almost
too beautiful to be true, a towering blond Adonis in polo
shirts and high-top sneakers.
(Not since he played the Winklevoss twins in “The Social
Network” has Hammer used
his 6-foot-5 physique to such
witty, self-effacing effect.) As
the two begin spending odd
afternoons together, playing
volleyball with friends and
hanging out alone poolside,
the film’s already warm temperature
spikes
several
notches.
With his striking good
looks and brash all-American
confidence (“Later!” is his
preferred farewell), Oliver
charms his older hosts — especially Mr. Perlman, a Hellenic scholar — but stirs in
Elio a strange mix of intense
dislike and equally intense
desire. The genius of “Call Me
by Your Name” is that it refuses to distinguish between
these two impulses.
In Aciman’s novel, Elio,
narrating in the first person,
is forever lusting after Oliver
while also trying to guess how
much he knows and whether
their desires might possibly
be in alignment; the ambiguity becomes an unbearable
source of shame, anxiety and
even animosity.
Working from a supremely
intelligent script by James
Ivory, no stranger to teasing
out repressed longing in upscale settings, Guadagnino
has no interest in rushing Elio
and Oliver toward a premature consummation. (The
drawn-out waiting game is
the whole point of the movie.)
And while the director
lacks Aciman’s access to
Elio’s innermost thoughts, he
and cinematographer Sayombhu Mukdeeprom, shooting on exquisite 35-millimeter
film, turn the camera into a
remarkably subjective instrument. The stop-and-go narrative rhythms suggest a
teenager’s wayward attention
span. The snippets of Ravel
we hear on the soundtrack
might be playing out in Elio’s
own musically gifted mind.
(The gorgeous new Sufjan
Stevens songs we hear are of a
more
mysterious
provenance.)
A brilliant
formalist,
Guadagnino is especially fluent in the mechanics of Hitchcockian suspense and Antonionian languor, and in “Call
Me by Your Name” he once
again proves himself a veritable deconstructionist of desire. He channels the mystery
of attraction into a kind of
tactile, moment-by-moment
suspense, turning key images
— a hand on a bare shoulder,
a pair of swim trunks hung up
to dry, a piece of stone fruit
put to unexpectedly creative
use — into focal points of carnal anxiety. Crucially, however, the movie’s emotional and
psychological acuity is more
than a matter of sterling technique.
Chalamet, who has an
amusing supporting role in
the current “Lady Bird,” is a
sensational talent, and Elio,
whose cocky sense of mischief
has the curious effect of making him seem all the more unguarded, is one of the year’s
most fully formed screen
characters. He broods and
blushes, schemes and fumbles, and seems both enrap-
tured and terrified by the
power of his physicality.
The young actor finds a
splendid match in Hammer,
who plays Oliver like a bunch
of unusually dreamy Russian
nesting dolls: He’s something
of a rival at first, a specimen of
superior worldliness and
masculinity, before opening
up to reveal a trusted confidant and finally a generous,
affectionate equal.
For all its simmering
erotic intensity, “Call Me by
Your Name” isn’t a particularly explicit movie, especially
when compared with other
recent explorations of young
gay desire like “God’s Own
Country” and “Beach Rats,”
or a more distant landmark
like “Blue Is the Warmest Color.” Indeed, since its well received premiere at this year’s
Sundance Film Festival,
Guadagnino’s movie has
drawn criticism in some
quarters for its visual discretion, which has struck even
some admirers as a curious
failure of nerve.
The detractors have a
point, insofar as first love
doesn’t come with a no-nudity clause. But if the film is a bit
eager to safeguard its characters’ privacy, it remains an uncommonly enveloping and affecting experience, a romance that swoops you up
and then gently sets you
down. What stays with you is
not just its visual beauty but
also its melancholy wisdom,
its understanding of the
fickle, fleeting nature of what
it’s showing us. It knows that
the agony of unmet physical
desire, once relieved, can
soon give way to a deeper
emotional ache, which is why
Elio and Oliver’s relationship
sometimes feels as though it
were ending even as it’s just
beginning.
Guadagnino’s storytelling
is overpoweringly intimate
but never narcissistic. He directs our gaze both inward
and outward, toward the
treasures and mysteries buried within this Italian paradise, and also toward the unseen, unspoken forces that
have threatened bonds like
Elio and Oliver’s for millennia. Nearly every relic we see
— a decorative reminder of
the Fascist era, a Greek sculpture dredged up from the
Mediterranean — speaks in
some way to the vulnerability
of their love and the tyranny
of time.
It falls to Stuhlbarg’s
deeply moving performance
as Elio’s father, an authority
on the ancient world and a
man ahead of his moment, to
make sense of this eternal conundrum. “Our hearts and
our bodies are given to us only
once,” he says, and “Call Me
by Your Name” embraces
that truth with thrilling, devastating abandon.
justin.chang@latimes.com
Twitter: @JustinCChang
‘Call Me by
Your Name’
In English, French and
Italian with English
subtitles
Rated: R, for sexual
content, nudity and some
language
Running time: 2 hours, 12
minutes
Playing: ArcLight Cinemas,
Hollywood; Landmark,
West Los Angeles
L AT I ME S . CO M/ CA L E N DA R
FRIDAY , NOVEMB ER 24, 2017
E9
AT THE MOVIES
A collaboration from start to finish
[‘Roman,’ from E1]
who is forced to grapple with
new challenges when his
long-time law partner suddenly dies.
Rather than dealing with
his own ethics and idealism
in the abstract from the isolation of the back room of an
office, he is confronted by realities of the modern legal
system, contemporary ideas
of activism and the temptation of money. Carmen Ejogo
plays a younger legal activist
and Colin Farrell a highpriced private practice attorney. (Imagine those two
as the angel and devil on
your shoulder.)
“Roman J. Israel, Esq.” is
Gilroy’s second movie as
writer-director. A longtime
screenwriter, his directing
debut was the 2014 film
“Nightcrawler,”
which
starred Jake Gyllenhaal as a
freelance news videographer
who roamed the dark streets
of Los Angeles. “Nightcrawler” earned Gilroy an Oscar
nomination for original
screenplay and a sense that
for his next film he could
capitalize on its acclaim and
success to do what he
wanted.
And what he wanted was
to write a script for Denzel
Washington.
“I had never met Denzel
before, never talked to Denzel before,” said Gilroy. “I decided early on if Denzel was
not going to do it, I was not
going to do it. It was too tailor-made for him. There was
nobody else I’d want.”
Birth of a character
Gilroy sent Washington
the script, and once the actor
had read it, they met for a
long lunch in New York as
Washington was preparing
to direct and star in the
adaptation
of
August
Wilson’s “Fences,” which
earned Viola Davis the supporting actress Oscar and
nominations for best picture, adapted screenplay
and actor for Washington.
After a handshake, Gilroy
and Washington set off on a
close collaboration on the
character.
Glen Wilson Columbia Pictures
CARMEN EJOGO and Denzel Washington in a scene from the crime drama “Roman J. Israel, Esq.”
“I like Roman,” Washington said, sitting recently with
Gilroy for an interview in an
L.A. hotel room. The character’s eccentric look, with outdated clothes, hair and glasses, a heavy briefcase and a
pair of headphones wherever he goes — even the music
he listens to — were all products of their collaboration.
Noting that he purposefully wore shoes two sizes too
big to change the way he
walked, Washington said
with a smile, “I’m a slob anyway, so I embraced that, my
inner slob. He was right up
my alley.
‘You don’t get parts like
this, they’re further and
fewer between,” said Washington. Pressed as to what
exactly he responded to in
the character, he added, “I
don’t know, I don’t analyze it
too much. I just do it.”
Gilroy added, “I wrote the
character, but Denzel very
much authored the character.”
In preparation, Washington did research on people
on the autism spectrum with
Asperger’s syndrome. It was
a way of considering the
character’s remarkable legal
knowledge and capacity as
well as his hesitancy with social interactions.
Nevertheless,
despite
their open collaboration,
Gilroy said Washington was
often ahead of him in regard
to the character, his motivations and behavior.
“His process is a still mystery to me. He keeps his own
counsel,” Gilroy said of
Washington. “There are
many things he wants to talk
about, but talking about the
intricacies of creation is not
something he’ll go into great
detail on. It’s very private to
him. I think it’s his way of
protecting the creation of a
real moment.”
Two views of L.A.
Almost as important to
the film as Washington’s acting is Gilroy’s depiction of
Los Angeles.
For
“Nightcrawler,”
Gilroy had purposefully
avoided downtown, preferring instead to feature the
various other landscapes
Los Angeles has to offer, presenting the city as if part of a
nature documentary with
Gyllenhaal a coyote on the
prowl. For “Roman J. Israel,
Esq.,” he wanted to present
yet another view of the city.
“This film, Denzel’s character works in the heart of
the criminal justice system;
he is a criminal justice attorney in downtown Los Angeles,” Gilroy said. “He lives
here, he works here, he
moves around here. So we
were going to shoot the majority of the film in downtown, and we embraced it.”
Although the construction site seen happening
right next to Roman’s old
downtown apartment building had to be done via visual
effects, it was while scouting
locations that Gilroy realized the intense amount of
major
work
happening
throughout the city. So all
through the movie, cranes
and construction can be
seen in the background.
“It really worked to our
advantage because you got
the sense that not only was
Denzel’s character going
through a transformation,
but the city was going
through a transformation,”
Gilroy said. “There is a new
era now coming to pass. And
that’s part of the film. Denzel’s character is out of touch
with his time. It became a
physical manifestation for
us to see this massive urban
project going on down here,
this change.”
Having finished shooting
only in mid-summer, the film
premiered as a late addition
to the Toronto International
Film Festival in September.
After a lukewarm response,
Gilroy, his editor (and
brother) John Gilroy plus
Washington
immediately
went back into the editing
room. They ultimately cut 13
minutes from the film and
moved a key scene between
Washington and Farrell further up in the movie.
“The film wasn’t finished,” Washington said of
showing the movie at the festival. “It told us what we
needed to know. And that
was a necessary part of the
process.”
“The most people we
showed it to before Toronto
was, I think, 27 people. And
that was wrong of me to
think it was utterly representative,” said Gilroy. “Denzel’s right, the film was not
finished. And I needed to be
hit upside the head by a
crowd that I looked at as one
I could relate to.”
Just as the character of
Roman Israel in the movie itself is forced to take a stock of
who he is and how he wants
to respond to the world, so
too did Gilroy and Washington find themselves confronted by a new, unexpected reality.
“I say it all the time, a film
will tell you what it doesn’t
want,” said Washington. “It’s
one thing to say it; it’s another thing to really do something.”
mark.olsen@latimes.com
Twitter: @IndieFocus
E10
F R I DAY , N OV E M BER 24, 2017
LAT IMES. C OM/ CALENDAR
THEATER
Roger Nygard
LIZ DAVIES, seated, Linda Miller, Joe Keyes and Maile Flanagan in the play “Bob’s Holiday Office Party.”
THE 99-SEAT BEAT
Spirited holiday theater
By Margaret Gray
Thanksgiving is over, already! Toss out those turkey bones
and swap those decorative pumpkins for mistletoe. Holiday
shows usually preempt L.A.’s regular theater schedule in
December, but for those who can’t wait, here are four that
open sooner. Two look promising for family outings: “A
Christmas Carol” at Glendale Centre Theatre and the Jane
Austen reboot “Miss Bennet: Christmas at Pemberley” in
Santa Barbara. The others — “Feliz NaviDivas” by the cult
drag troupe Chico’s Angels in Silver Lake, and a return of
the L.A. favorite “Bob’s Holiday Office Party” in Atwater.
52nd ‘Carol’ at
Glendale Centre
The essentials: It just
wouldn’t be Christmas
without “A Christmas Carol,” Charles Dickens’ harrowing and heartwarming
story of holiday redemption.
Many local theater companies offer their versions,
each with a devoted following (see Costa Mesa’s South
Coast Repertory and Pasadena’s A Noise Within, for
two). But the longest-running tradition in the area
can be found at Glendale
Centre Theatre, which is
preparing to launch its 52nd
annual show.
Why this? More than 50
years — that’s a long time in
Los Angeles, where, as Delia
Ephron once joked, “by the
time you’re 35, you’re older
than most of the buildings.”
After so many years, the
company’s directors —
related to the original
founders — have a pretty
solid understanding of what
works best on its elegant,
intimate, in-the-round
stage. Lively performances
and vivid special effects
ensure that veterans and
first-timers alike will enjoy
this hoary but never gratuitous lesson in the value of
generosity.
Details: Glendale Centre
Theatre, 324 N. Orange St. 8
p.m. Fridays, 3 and 8 p.m.
Saturdays; ends Dec. 24.
$22-$32. (818) 244-8481,
www.glendalecentre
theatre.com.
‘Miss Bennet’
at the New Vic
The essentials: Say
you’re really, really tired of
“A Christmas Carol” but are
still in the market for a
family show. As reported
last month in the New
Yorker, playwrights Lauren
Gunderson and Margot
Melcon came up with their
Jane Austen reboot — a
sequel to “Pride and Prejudice” — in response to the
question “What does American theater need?” A new
holiday play, they decided:
something “clever, heartwarming, and familyfriendly.” Their story “Miss
Bennet: Christmas at Pemberley,” rehabilitates Mary,
the nerdiest, least marriageable Bennet sister, as a
romantic heroine in her own
right.
Why this? Gunderson
may not yet be a household
name, but according to the
New Yorker, she’s the most
produced playwright in
America right now. “Miss
Bennet” was a success in its
rolling world premier in 2016,
praised by the Washington
Post as “a gift for Jane
Austen fans” and by the
Chicago Tribune as “droll
and quite delicious.” This
production, by Santa Barbara’s Ensemble Theatre
Company, is directed by
Andrew Barnicle (former
artistic director of Laguna
Playhouse) and stars the
talented, prolific Paige
Lindsey White as everybody’s favorite Bennet
sister, Lizzie.
Details: The New Vic, 33
W. Victoria St., Santa Barbara. Opens Thursday. 8
p.m. Thursdays-Saturdays,
2 and 7 p.m. Sundays; ends
Dec. 17. $20-$25. (805) 9807529, www.etcsb.org.
‘Feliz NaviDivas’
at Cavern Club
The essentials: Chico’s
Angels are Latina drag
queens — Kay Sedia, Frieda
Laye and Chita Parol (the
alter egos of Oscar Quintero, Danny Casillas and
Ray Garcia), who parody
the 1970s TV series “Charlie’s Angels” in their variety
act at a Silver Lake restaurant (as well as in their
webisodes). The live series
has had five installments,
each a full-length musical by
co-creators Sedia/Quintero
and Kurt Koehler in which
an unseen boss dispatches
the three sassy, fabulous
models/undercover detectives to solve another mystery.
Why this? The Angels
combine 1970s nostalgia,
over-the-top outfits, playful
ribaldry and Three Stoogesstyle pratfalls with tight, if
absurd, plotting. Of their
previous show “Love Boat
Chicas,” the L.A. Weekly
wrote, “It’s like an Agatha
Christie novel, only with
drag queens.” Margaritas
are encouraged.
Details: Cavern Club
Celebrity Theater in Casita
del Campo Restaurant, 1920
Hyperion Ave., L.A. Limited
engagement: 2, 8 and 10 p.m.
Saturday; 3, 6 and 7:30 p.m.
Sunday; 7:30 p.m. Monday
and Tuesday. $25-$35.
www.chicosangels.com.
‘Office Party’ at
Atwater Village
The essentials: It
started as a one-night-only
improv piece in 1995, a
kitschy send-up of a disastrous holiday party in a
small-town Iowa insurance
office — and it never really
went away. For 22 years,
“Bob’s Holiday Office Party”
has returned to L.A. as
faithfully as Santa Claus
himself, delighting fans 16
and up with what L.A.
Times reviewer Philip Brandes described in 2000 as its
“shameless lowbrow antics.”
The show may have moved
venues, but co-creators Rob
Elk and Joe Keyes are still
starring in it, alongside a full
cast of returning party
guests.
Why this? A holiday
office party can be the stuff
of nightmares —if it’s your
office. It’s much more cathartic, and less careerdamaging, to watch fictional characters drink too
much, make terrible choices
and achieve dubious epiphanies under the mistletoe.
Bob faces the same schlocky
decor and odious townspeople year after year, but the
fast-paced, ad-libbed lines
are a little different each
time. There are some
Christmas traditions that
don’t get sung about in the
carols. Don’t those deserve
to be celebrated too?
Details: Atwater Village
Theatre, 3269 Casitas Ave.,
L.A. Opens Thursday. 8 p.m.
Thursdays-Saturdays, 7
p.m. Sundays; ends Dec. 18.
$25-$35. (800) 838-3006,
www.bobsofficeparty.com.
FRIDAY , NOVEMB ER 24, 2017
L AT I ME S . CO M/ CA L E N DA R
THEATER
Lenny Bruce is back,
but not for one college
A playwright can’t get
his work on the comic
onstage at Brandeis,
his alma mater.
By Rick Kogan
Lenny Bruce, the controversial comic who was hammered and hounded during
most of his career by those
who think certain words
should be kept from our ears
and who also enjoy standing
guard over our collective morality, has been dead since
1966.
But he now sits firmly at
the center of a free-speech
controversy that has erupted
after Brandeis University in
Massachusetts canceled the
production of a play based on
his work.
“Buyer Beware” is by
Michael Weller, a 1965 Brandeis graduate and the writer
of such successful plays as
“Moonchildren” and the
screenplays for such movies
as “Hair” and “Ragtime.” He
is also a faculty member of
the School of Drama at the
New School in New York City
and is scheduled to receive
Brandeis’ Creative Arts
Award on Jan. 23.
He was informed of this
honor last year. It carries
with it the expectation of an
educational effort by the recipient and it was suggested
by the university’s theater
department that Weller
might explore freedom of
speech issues by doing what
he does best, writing a play.
He spent time interviewing dozens of students
and teachers and diving deep
into the recently acquired
Lenny Bruce Collection,
housed in Brandeis University’s special collections. It is a
gathering of personal photographs, papers and recordings that came to the university via Bruce’s daughter,
Kitty Bruce, thanks to a financial gift from the Hugh
M. Hefner Foundation.
Titling his play after a
boxed set of Bruce’s recorded comedy titled “Let the
Buyer Beware,” a first draft
was ready in June, with plans
to mount a production this
fall.
Smooth sailing
Sam Weisman, a respected theater and film director and teacher, and a 1973
Brandeis graduate, began
working with Weller. “He
stayed at my house when he
was here,” says Weisman,
who lives near the Brandeis
campus; Weller lives in New
York City. “He wrote a first
draft, made some revisions.
Set, costume and lighting designers were hired. A set was
designed, a model built.
Floor surfaces were chosen,
and furniture discussed. Our
composer started playing
with musical ideas, blending
Lenny’s voice with hip-hop
beats and hooks. We were excited about casting the show
once summer break was
over. We were moving ahead
with what I considered an
important new play.”
“Buyer Beware” is set on
the Brandeis campus in the
near future and focuses on a
white university student
character named Ron who,
having listened to many of
Bruce’s recordings, plans to
perform a comedy routine
based on that material, most
notably one that features the
N-word. University officials
in the play, worried that this
performance coincides with
a campus visit by a wealthy
alum and donor, attempt to
stop the show, even threatening the young man with academic probation. A black
student character, overhearing Ron’s recitation of
Bruce’s material, gets angry
and posts on social media,
drawing attention from
Black Lives Matter, which
calls for a protest. At the climax of the play, Ron performs, students protest and
that wealthy donor offers to
pay Ron’s tuition.
Things were proceeding
nicely until life started to
mirror art.
By mid-August, copies of
the script had made their
way into the hands of some
faculty members, administrators and students. Outrage was sparked and protests ensued, in the form of
emails to university President Ron Liebowitz and
Facebook posts. Some of the
John Lindsay AP
THE LATE COMEDIAN Lenny Bruce, seen here on April 8, 1963, in New York
after being refused entry to Great Britain, is still a controversial figure.
complaints: The play “positions a white man as the
brave protagonist and a
black man as the overreacting, violent antagonist”; “It is
an overtly racist play and will
be harmful to the student
population if staged”; and
the portrayal of its black
characters “is ridiculous and
vicious.”
It remains unclear how
many calls and emails were
part of this campaign or how
many people were involved
or how many actually read
the play. One alumnus
named Ayelet Schrek told
the university’s student
newspaper, the Brandeis
Hoot, “I trust the people who
told me about (the play). I
don’t need to read the actual
language to know what it is
about. ” Current student and
theater major Andrew Child
told the Hoot, “The issue we
all have with it is that (Weller) is an older, straight gendered, able-bodied and white
man. It isn’t his place to be
stirring the pot.”
The Hoot has done its best to cover this complicated
and often messy story.
On Nov. 6 the university,
after what it said were meetings with Weller, issued this
statement: “It was the playwright’s sense, in his own
words, ‘that rehearsals of the
play, and growing sentiment
among some students in the
theater department, might
not be conducive to the creative atmosphere desired for
a premiere presentation of a
new work.’”
To some this appeared to
be an attempt by the university to spin things in its favor: It wasn’t our decision to
cancel the play. The playwright made us do it.
But Weller has disputed
the university’s version of
events. Ever reluctant to give
interviews before a play of his
has gone into production,
Weller did talk briefly to the
Hoot and also to a local radio
station, which quotes him
(he was not on air) as having
said the university’s handling of the decision not to
produce the play is “dangerous and corrosive,” adding
that: “Since I delivered the
play, I haven’t heard from the
theater department. … I
wanted to give it to the
school. I’m personally heartbroken.”
He was not alone in his
disappointment.
Strong support
On Nov. 8, the Dramatists
Guild of America and the
Dramatists Legal Defense
Fund condemned the university’s decision. Its statement said, in part: “By capitulating, the University has
compromised core principles of academic freedom
and abdicated its educational responsibility to offer
students a wide range of
viewpoints regardless of how
controversial they may be.”
It went on: “To be clear, no
school has an obligation to
produce a play. But neither
does anyone have a constitutional right to go through life
unoffended. To the contrary,
it is a university’s duty to expose its students to a range
of views that challenge and
discomfort them.”
Earlier last week, the
Foundation for Individual
Rights in Education (FIRE),
a Philadelphia-based nonprofit organization focused
on “civil liberties in academia
in the U.S.,” wrote an open
letter to President Liebowitz
asking him, among many
things, “What material, exactly, did the university consider too ‘challenging’ for its
students and faculty? And
why, when an agreement
could not be reached with
Weller to find a more ‘appropriate’ setting for the play,
did the university decide not
to stage the production as intended, and instead defaulted to functionally censoring the ‘challenging’ material instead of openly engaging with it?”
Getting defensive
Last Tuesday, Liebowitz
responded to FIRE, defending the school’s position, arguing that the play had been
“postponed” until spring and
that it was Weller who chose
to have it produced elsewhere.
Still, this all strikes some
as a preemptive strike, ignoring how drastically a play can
change from the page to the
stage. And since “Buyer Beware” had not been cast and
there had been no rehearsals, there was no opportunity
for Weller to hear any suggestions or make alterations
or revisions.
This is a lot of fuss over a
guy who’s been dead for half
a century. Indeed, to many
people Lenny Bruce is now
more myth than man. But
it is hard to argue that he
has influenced generations
of comics and Chicago was
an important part of his career.
This is where in 1958 he
made his first national impact, playing a place called
Cloister Inn. Then came bigtime club engagements; a
few comedy albums and
movie roles; drug busts; a series of arrests and a trial on
obscenity charges (he was
convicted); a virtual blacklist
that kept him off U.S. stages;
increasing drug use; and unstable behavior. And then he
was dead.
Chicago movie and theatrical producer Jason Brett
has known and worked with
Weller for decades. He has
closely watched the playwright’s career and this recent contretemps and says,
““What offends me is the hypocrisy of all this. This is a
university founded in the
name of a champion of free
speech (Supreme Court Justice Louis Brandeis) and the
purpose of any university is
to teach cultural literacy,
turn young learners into
critical thinkers. Now a small
group of student dramaturges are so offended by the
words of Lenny Bruce that
they succeeded in killing him
for a second time. It is
shameful.”
But all is not lost. Lenny
Bruce is “alive and well” in
Los Angeles.
He has been on stage
since June at Theatre 68 in
the world premiere of a oneman show written by and
starring Ronnie Marmo and
directed by Chicago’s Joe
Mantegna.
“I Am Not a Comedian …
I’m Lenny Bruce” has been a
hit, both critically and at the
box office, recently being extended through the end of
this year.
Philip Brandes writing in
The Times wrote that it cuts
“through historical haze to
invoke Bruce’s troubled, anarchic spirit and make a
compelling case for his enduring relevance.”
He concludes the rave review with this: “Not just a comedian, Lenny Bruce was
too much the pioneering outcast to get the recognition he
deserved in his lifetime.
Nevertheless, his unique
brand of introspective commentary broke through the
limitations of punchlinedriven stand-up and paved
the way for his successors. …
This engaging and illuminating portrait allows subsequent generations to understand who Lenny Bruce was,
and, more important, why he
mattered.”
Kogan is a reporter for the
Chicago Tribune.
calendar@latimes.com
E11
E12
F R I DAY , N OV EM BE R 24, 2017
LAT IMES. C OM/ CALENDAR
THEATER
The Queen
of Disco
reigns again
La Jolla Playhouse’s
Donna Summer
musical looks at late
singer’s life and career.
By James Herbert
Donna Summer ruled
disco — and, for a time
nearly four decades ago, the
pop-music universe.
Not everyone, of course,
was wild about the danceminded style that Summer
helped turn into a defining
cultural phenomenon of the
1970s.
But even the most diehard disco foe has to acknowledge the huge influence Summer exerted on the
larger pop landscape as a
singer and, in part, a songwriter — helping usher in
electronic music with such
hits as “I Feel Love,” and
crossing over into rock and
R&B with the chart-topping
likes of “Bad Girls” and “Hot
Stuff.”
And five years after her
death from lung cancer at
age 63, Summer’s legacy —
as both an artist and a
source of inspiration —
seems as strong as ever.
The lasting force of her
work is helping La Jolla Playhouse’s new musical about
the groundbreaking pop
icon break some ground of
its own, says LaChanze, the
Tony Award winner who is
one of three actresses
playing the late Queen of
Disco in the world-premiere
show “Summer: The Donna
Summer Musical.”
“While I’m very excited
that this is a role for a woman, I’m more excited that
this is a role for a black woman,” says the single-named
Broadway star. “Because
that to me is more of a rarity
than roles for women in general.
“I mean, you rarely see a
musical being told about the
life of a black woman. If you
can think of another off the
top of your head, I’ll give you
a quarter.
“So it’s exciting for me
that this is about an African
American icon.”
She’s an icon whose
songs — some two dozen of
which appear in the show —
boomed from jukeboxes,
pulsed from radios and
shook the floorboards of
dance clubs around the
world in Summer’s heyday
from the late ’70s to early
’80s.
Summer scored a dozen
Top 10 hits from 1976 to 1982
and won five Grammys over
the course of her career.
To help turn her songs
and story into a work of live
theater, writers Colman Domingo and Robert Cary
turned to director Des
McAnuff, the former Playhouse artistic chief who has
a bit of experience with
shepherding shows about
pop-music icons to the
stage.
McAnuff, a two-time
Tony winner (for the Playhouse-bred “The Who’s
Tommy” and “Big River”),
scored a huge Broadway hit
with another La Jolla-originated show, “Jersey Boys.”
The musical about the Four
Seasons spent more than 11
years on Broadway before
closing last January.
Now McAnuff guides a
show that roves over Summer’s life while using her final concert as a focal point.
Joining LaChanze in his
cast are the Broadway-seasoned Ariana DeBose and
the
relative
newcomer
Storm Lever, seen recently
at the Playhouse in “Freaky
Friday.”
Finding “Donnas” with
voices to match the show’s
namesake was paramount
to McAnuff, because to him
Summer’s singing was what
set her apart.
“I would say more than
anything else that her voice
distinguishes her from others,” says McAnuff, who
shares a writing credit on
the show. “She had this angelic singing voice, with an
extraordinary range.
And “as we say in the
piece, there was a purity in
her voice that made her the
perfect instrument for that
time,” when synthesized
sound was becoming more
prominent in music.
“There is a purity to the
synthesizer, of course. It can
pierce your very bones when
it’s used right. And her voice
has a kind of purity that
really is unusual.”
Summer’s music informed the art and lives of
the three lead actresses in
different ways, but like
McAnuff, they say they’ve
learned a lot about their subject in the course of working
on the show.
“I knew of her growing up,
and I knew of her songs,”
says DeBose. “And I knew
she looked like me. But I
didn’t understand the scope
of what she actually accomplished until I started doing
the research to audition for
this piece.
“To my surprise, she was
incredibly theatrical in the
way she approached music.
It’s really all about storytelling for her. She’s really
rooted in character. And
Photographs by
K.C. Alfred San Diego Union-Tribune
LA CHANZE, left, Storm Lever and Ariana DeBose each play the titular character in the world-premiere
musical “Summer: The Donna Summer Story,” which is being performed at the La Jolla Playhouse.
‘Summer:
The Donna
Summer
Musical’
SUMMER was “theatrical in the way she approached
music,” says DeBose, left, with LaChanze and Lever.
that makes her exciting for
me to play.
“I think you stumble upon your heroes when you
need them. So she may not
have started out as a hero for
me, but she has morphed
into that.”
To Lever, Summer “was
so iconic because not only
did she have the voice, but
she owned the genre in a way
nobody else could. She wrote
hit song after hit song.
“Everyone wanted to escape at that time. Everyone
wanted to dance. It didn’t
matter if you were black,
purple, gay, straight.”
McAnuff and the actors
When: 7:30 p.m. TuesdayWednesday; 8 p.m.
Thursday-Friday; 2 and 8
p.m. Saturday; 2 and 7
p.m. Sunday. Through
Dec. 24.
Where: La Jolla
Playhouse’s Mandell Weiss
Theatre, 2910 La Jolla
Village Drive,
Playhouse/UC San Diego
Theatre District
Tickets: $58 and up
Info: (858) 550-1010,
lajollaplayhouse.org
emphasize that the show
doesn’t shy from the less
rosy parts of Summer’s story
— including the controversy
she stepped into in the 1980s
by making comments ap-
pearing to disparage the gay
community. (Summer later
apologized, although she
also maintained she was
misunderstood.)
And the director says his
aim is to bring Summer and
her music back into the cultural conversation as a matter of much more than nostalgia.
“What I’m hoping for with
this is that it isn’t just a kind
of retro thing,” McAnuff
says.
“I think this is a really
great, universal story about
an artist who had her triumphs and her struggles,
and had her conflicts. I hope
this will really appeal to a
very broad audience.
“My hunch is that this
won’t just be for people who
remember the disco scene,
but will hopefully find a new
audience.”
Herbert is a San Diego
Union-Tribune reporter.
calendar@latimes.com
FRIDAY , NOVEMB ER 24, 2017
L AT I ME S . CO M/ CA L E N DA R
E13
TELEVISION
PRIME-TIME TV RATINGS
Football is a
win for NBC
Sunday and Thursday
night games help the
network draw a big
weekly viewership.
By City News Service
The most-watched “Sunday Night Football” game
since the season opener and
a third-place finish by
“Thursday Night Football”
helped NBC to its mostwatched week of the 8-weekold prime-time television
season. The Philadelphia
Eagles’ 37-9 victory over the
Dallas Cowboys averaged
21.06 million viewers, the
most for a “Sunday Night
Football” game since the
Cowboys’ 19-3 victory over
the New York Giants in the
Sept. 10 season opener.
Sunday’s
telecast
marked the fourth time this
season that a “Sunday Night
Football” game has averaged more than 20 million
viewers. The only other programs to have averaged
more than 20 million viewers
this season were Games 6
and 7 of Fox’s coverage of the
World Series.
NBC averaged 8.79 million viewers for its primetime programming between
Nov. 13 and Sunday for its
second consecutive weekly
victory, according to liveplus-same-day figures released Tuesday by Nielsen.
CBS was second for the
fourth consecutive week after winning each of the season’s first four weeks, averaging 7.83 million viewers.
ABC was third for the
sixth time during the 2017-18
season, averaging 5.55 million viewers. Fox finished
fourth among the broadcast
networks for the 37th time in
40 weeks, averaging 2.72 million viewers for its 16 hours of
programming.
ABC’s coverage of the
American Music Awards on
Sunday was 18th for the
week, averaging 9.15 million
viewers, an 11.8% increase
over last year’s record low of
8.18 million.
The American Music
Awards has aired annually
since 1974. It averaged a
record 48.16 million viewers
in 1985 when it aired in January and there was less competition for viewers and
fewer leisure-time options.
NBC football programming accounted for four of
its five programs to average
more than 10 million viewers.
The other was the drama
“This Is Us,” 11th for the
week, averaging 10.05 million
viewers.
ESPN was the mostwatched cable network, averaging 2.68 million viewers.
Here are the combined rankings for national prime-time
network and cable television last week (Nov. 13-19), as compiled by Nielsen. They are based on the average number of
people who watched a program from start to finish during
its scheduled telecast or on a playback device the same day.
Nielsen estimates there are 289 million potential viewers in
the U.S. ages 2 and older. Viewership is listed in millions.
Program
1 NFL Football:
Eagles at
Cowboys
2 NFL Pre-Game
(Sun.)
3 NFL Football:
Titans at Steelers
4 The Big Bang
Theory
5 NCIS
Net- Viewwork
ers
NBC 21.06
NBC
15.31
NBC 13.52
CBS 13.44
CBS 13.09
--------------------------------------6 Young Sheldon
7 60 Minutes
8 Football Night in
America (Part 3)
9 Bull
10 The Good Doctor
CBS
CBS
NBC
11.83
11.47
11.40
CBS 10.36
ABC 10.15
--------------------------------------11 This Is Us
12 The Voice (Tue.)
13 Dancing With the
Stars
14 NCIS: New
Orleans
15 The Voice (Mon.)
NBC 10.05
NBC 9.98
ABC 9.90
CBS
NBC
9.70
9.60
--------------------------------------16 Blue Bloods
17 Hawaii Five-0
18 American Music
Awards
19 Survivor
20 NFL Football:
Dolphins at
Panthers
CBS
CBS
ABC
9.25
9.17
9.15
CBS
ESPN
8.85
8.81
NBC
8.41
CBS
AMC
NBC
ABC
8.40
7.84
7.71
7.53
--------------------------------------26 Football Night in
America (Part 2)
27 Seal Team
28 MacGyver
29 NCIS: Los
Angeles (Sun.)
30 Chicago PD
NBC
7.51
CBS
CBS
CBS
7.24
7.17
6.95
NBC
6.39
--------------------------------------31 Life in Pieces
32 S.W.A.T.
33 NFL coverage
(Thu.)
34 Kevin Can Wait
35 Empire
CBS
CBS
NBC
6.38
6.26
6.23
CBS
FOX
6.15
6.05
--------------------------------------36 Wisdom of the
Crowd
37 Modern Family
38 The Blacklist
39 Madam Secretary
40 The Middle
CBS
6.03
ABC
NBC
CBS
ABC
5.94
5.89
5.86
5.71
--------------------------------------41
42
43
44
45
Criminal Minds
The Goldbergs
Man With a Plan
The Brave
Scandal
CBS
ABC
CBS
NBC
ABC
5.64
5.63
5.38
5.02
4.97
--------------------------------------46 Superior Donuts
47 American
Housewife
48 Scorpion
49 48 Hours (10
p.m.)
50 Speechless
CBS
ABC
4.92
4.89
CBS
CBS
4.75
4.50
ABC
4.41
--------------------------------------51 9JKL
CBS
52 Dateline
NBC
53 Law & Order True
NBC
Crime: The
Menendez
Murders
54 Movie: “Coming Hallmark
Home for
Christmas”
55 Designated
ABC
Survivor
4.33
4.31
4.16
63 Star
64 How to Get Away
With Murder
65 Lucifer
FOX
3.58
--------------------------------------66 NCIS: Los
CBS
Angeles (Sat.)
67 Blindspot
NBC
68 48 Hours (9 p.m.)
CBS
69 The Orville
FOX
70 Hannity (Wed.)
Fox News
3.44
3.37
3.33
3.32
3.31
--------------------------------------71
72
73
74
75
Hannity (Thu.)
WWE (8 p.m.)
Hell’s Kitchen
Gold Rush
Hannity (Tue.)
Fox News
USA
FOX
Discover
Fox News
3.29
3.27
3.21
3.17
3.09
--------------------------------------76 The Toy Box
77 WWE (9 p.m.)
78 The Rachel
Maddow Show
(Wed.)
College
Basketball: Duke
at Michigan St.
The Rachel
Maddow Show
(Mon.)
ABC
USA
MSNBC
3.08
3.07
3.02
ESPN
3.02
MSNBC
3.02
College Football:
ABC
UCLA at USC
57 20/20
ABC
58 Fresh Off the Boat
ABC
59 Movie: “A Gift to Hallmark
Remember”
60 black-ish
ABC
4.11
4.05
TNT
3.01
FOX
History
3.00
2.98
NFL
2.96
MSNBC
2.88
--------------------------------------Tucker Carlson
Tonight (Wed.)
Tucker Carlson
Tonight (Mon.)
88 Tucker Carlson
Tonight (Thu.)
Hannity (Mon.)
90 College Football
Coverage (Sat.)
Fox News
2.88
Fox News
2.88
Fox News
2.86
Fox News
ABC
2.86
2.84
--------------------------------------91 WWE (10 p.m.)
92 Hannity (Fri.)
93 College
Basketball:
Kentucky at
Kansas
94 The Simpsons
SNL Prime
USA
Fox News
ESPN
2.77
2.72
2.70
FOX
NBC
2.67
2.67
--------------------------------------96 Latin Grammy
UNI
Awards 2017
MSNBC
97 The Rachel
Maddow Show
(Thu.)
98 Gotham
FOX
Kevin (Probably)
ABC
Saves the World
100 Tucker Carlson
Fox News
Tonight (Fri.)
3.86
3.86
3.83
2.66
2.64
2.62
2.62
2.60
--------------------------------------Tucker Carlson
Tonight (Tue.)
102 The Ingraham
Angle (Wed.)
103 The Ingraham
Angle (Thu.)
104 Movie: “Sleigh
Bells Ring”
The Flash
Fox News
2.60
Fox News
2.53
Fox News
2.51
Hallmark
2.46
CW
2.46
--------------------------------------ABC
2.45
Network averages
Here is the number of viewers (in millions) that
each network averaged per hour of prime time,
for last week and for the season.
4.05
4.00
3.89
3.88
--------------------------------------FOX
ESPN
81 NBA Basketball:
Golden State
Warriors at
Celtics
82 The Gifted
83 The Curse of Oak
Island
84 NFL Football:
Titans at Steelers
85 The Rachel
Maddow Show
(Tue.)
106 The Mayor
---------------------------------------
Lethal Weapon
62 College Football
Playoff: Top 25
Net- Viewwork
ers
FOX
3.74
ABC
3.72
---------------------------------------
--------------------------------------21 NFL Pre-Game
(Thu.)
22 Mom
23 The Walking Dead
24 The Voice (Wed.)
25 Grey’s Anatomy
Program
Network
NBC
Last
week
8.79
Season
to date
8.88
-------------------------------------7.83
9.99
-------------------------------------ABC
5.55
6.63
-------------------------------------Fox
2.72
6.47
-------------------------------------UNI
1.68
1.53
-------------------------------------CW
1.33
1.72
-------------------------------------CBS
David Lee Netf lix
ADMIRERS , including one portrayed by Lyriq Bent, left, try to woo DeWanda Wise’s Nola Darling.
Series struggles in new era
[‘Gotta,’ from E1]
updating an old story for a
new generation to pay attention to what’s happening on
that other platform and
coast.
The opening sequence of
each 30-minute episode is a
moving and powerful montage of photos from Brooklyn
way back when (pre-1990?),
and now. Those few seconds
convey the gentrification
and changing face of Brooklyn so succinctly that each
installment starts with a
strong underpinning of local
history and culture.
But the first four episodes
reviewed here struggle to
stay current, though they all
have
hashtagged
titles
(#LuvIzLuv, #DaJumpOff,
etc.) and interludes that indicate
Nola
(DeWanda
Wise) is a new woman in a
new era.
Understatement has never been Lee’s style. His searing commentary on race and
stereotypes riled critics and
Hollywood, cracking open
the door for black filmmakers in the ’80s, ’90s and beyond. But for this series
about a woman’s journey
toward empowerment, his
hammer-away
approach
backfires for a few reasons,
the first of which is that Lee
is not a she.
Nola expresses that she
wants to dress and act according to how she feels but
complains to her therapist
that “the male gaze” inhibits
her sense of freedom. It’s a
valid point most women can
relate to. But the worst offender here is the camera,
David Lee Netflix
“SHE’S GOTTA Have It” subjects DeWanda Wise’s
character to the male gaze she feels restrained by.
‘She’s Gotta
Have It’
Where: Netflix
When: Any time, starting
Thursday
Rated: TV-MA (may be
unsuitable for children
under the age of 17)
which ogles at Nola throughout — in bed with lovers,
lounging around alone in
high-end lingerie or on a
date in the black dress she
bought as an expression of
freedom but that men (and
the camera) see as something they want to peel off
her.
If the idea was to illustrate the everyday exploitation of women’s sexuality, it
does just that, but likely
from an unintended angle.
The second issue is
scenes meant to be satirical
jabs at piggish male behavior are so focused on the
men, they diminish Nola’s
plight. For instance, she’s
cat-called on the streets by
male caricatures so comical
and cartoonish that their
presence overshadows her
feelings of anger and degradation. It becomes more
about them than her.
Lastly, dated references
spoken by millennial characters make it difficult to stay
firmly planted in their world:
Is there anyone in their 20s
who’d refer to a cinephile
friend as an “Ebert”? Or
when Nola’s friends complain about the rising cost of
living in the neighborhood,
one culprit is the “A-Rab”
bodega that sells overpriced
milk. Arabs hardly represent
a new wave of interlopers
along DeKalb Avenue, making even the stereotypes
here throwbacks to an earlier era.
The series is co-created
and executive produced by
Lee’s spouse, Tonya Lewis
Lee, and the majority of the
episodes were written by
women, such as Radha
Blank and Lee's sister, Joie
Lee, who also plays Nola's
mother. Despite their input,
Nola feels like a projection
from the male perspective
rather than a character created and informed by women.
Her suitors still bear the
names of their predecessors
from the film. Narcissist
Greer
Childs,
married
banker Jamie Overstreet
and the B-Boy originally
played by Lee, sneakerwearing Mars Blackmon, are
now played, respectively, by
Cleo Anthony, Lyriq Bent
and “Hamilton’s” Anthony
Ramos. All provide comic relief as they play convincingly
smitten characters who
stumble and fumble around
Wise’s gorgeous and determined Nola.
But given how many
other great scripted series
have emerged in the past five
years alone with strong female leads — “Jane the Virgin,” “Chewing Gum,” “The
Handmaid’s
Tale”
and
“black-ish” — “She’s Gotta
Have It” is best remembered
as the film that kicked it all
off rather than a series struggling to keep up.
lorraine.ali@latimes.com
Twitter: @lorraineali
E14
F R I DAY , N OV E M BER 24, 2017
LAT IMES. C OM/ CALENDAR
COMICS
BRIDGE
By Frank Stewart
Many good bridge books
appeared recently, including
“Battling the Best,” Sartaj
Hans’ penetrating and
award-winning account of a
major tournament, and
“The Abbot’s Return to
Earth,” rib-tickling humor
by David Bird.
“Judgment at Bridge 2”
by Mike Lawrence has solid,
practical advice on bidding.
(In this convention-happy
world, I was gratified to read
a book that lists conventions
players should avoid.)
Lawrence notes that
when your partner preempts and the next player
doubles, your bid in a new
suit should be lead-directing. If today’s East raises to
three hearts at his first turn,
West will lead a heart — di-
sastrously — against the
eventual four spades.
But East’s three clubs
shows heart tolerance and
club strength, so West leads
the jack of clubs. The defense takes three clubs, and
when East leads a fourth
club, they also get a trump.
Go to Baronbarclay.com
for everything in print, instructional software and
other bridge-related items.
Question: You hold: ♠ A
Q 9 7 4 ♥ Q 7 ♦ K 5 3 ♣ 8 4 2.
Your partner opens one
heart, you respond one
spade and he rebids two
hearts. What do you say?
Answer: Partner’s two
hearts promise six or more
hearts. He would never be
compelled to rebid a fivecard suit here. He could instead bid 1NT or bid two of a
minor suit or support the
spades. You have enough
strength to invite game, but
your club weakness warns
against bidding 2NT. Raise
to three hearts.
West dealer
N-S vulnerable
NORTH
♠K65
♥A2
♦AJ98
♣K653
WEST
EAST
♠J3
♠ 10 8 2
♥KJ9654
♥ 10 8 3
♦742
♦ Q 10 6
♣J7
♣ A Q 10 9
SOUTH
♠AQ974
♥Q7
♦K53
♣842
WEST
NORTH EAST
SOUTH
2♥
Dbl
3♣
4♠
All Pass
Opening lead — Choose it
Tribune Media Services
ASK AMY
She hasn’t met his mom
HOROSCOPE
By Holiday Mathis
Aries (March 21-April 19):
If people are on Team You,
you’re going to feel much
more comfortable and free
around them.
Taurus (April 20-May
20): There’s a small and
tempting lie hanging over
you. Maybe it seems like the
kinder choice, but if you can
avoid it, do.
Gemini (May 21-June 21):
If improvement (rather than
perfection) is the goal, eventually you’ll hit the heights.
Cancer (June 22-July 22):
For the sake of being orderly,
you may have to cut something out. The remaining
part should be much easier
to manage.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22):
The simplicity of your approach will be disarming to
those dealing with massive
complexities.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22):
Strongly consider putting
your thoughts into written
form, especially in a letter to
someone you appreciate.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23):
If you can keep to the topics
and activities that contribute to your health, this is no
small thing. Reward it.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 21):
Give other members of your
family a chance to contribute. Don’t wear yourself out.
Sagittarius (Nov. 22Dec. 21): Tonight, you’re
open-minded. You may even
be willing to travel beyond
reality as you know it.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan.
19): Do you have people
around you who believe in
you even more than you believe in yourself? Because
that’s a gift. Treasure them.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb.
18): Today’s luck springs
from appreciating where
you come from, partly because you’re now experienced enough to understand the pressures and
freedoms of adulthood and
the difficulties involved in
raising another human.
Pisces (Feb. 19-March
20): In the wizarding world,
you say your spell, wave your
wand, and it’s done. In the
physical world, there’s so
much more breath and flesh
to involve in it. Maybe that’s
better. Work will feel good to
you today.
Today’s birthday (Nov.
24): It’s not that you want a
total change, but a few key
refinements on your wish list
will be granted in the next
three months, and this will
up your entire game. January is the start of a new level
of self-love and acceptance.
March brings a change of
scenery, and June is all
about building up your loved
ones. Gemini and Capricorn
adore you. Your lucky numbers are: 44, 5, 16, 21 and 37.
Holiday Mathis writes her
column for Creators
Syndicate Inc. The
horoscope should be read
for entertainment. Previous
forecasts are at
latimes.com/horoscope.
Dear Amy: My boyfriend
and I have been dating for a
year, but I haven’t met his
mom yet.
We’re both in our mid-20s
and currently live near our
parents.
This is a tough situation
because his mother suffers
from an undiagnosable condition that has left her
homebound and unable to
perform many of what we
consider normal daily duties.
My boyfriend has told me
many times that when he
has approached the topic
with her, she has been very
interested in him bringing
me by the house.
One time we even had set
plans to do so, and then she
backed out a couple of days
before.
I’ve spent a lot of time
over this year being somewhat offended. I just can’t
help it.
I realize that she is going
through something that I
can’t ever truly understand
and that she is self-conscious about the reality of
it.
I also realize that there
are some underlying mental
health issues that have been
created because of her inability to leave her home or
interact with others.
I hate feeling this way because I understand that she
is really struggling, but our
relationship has gotten very
serious, and I worry that I
won’t even meet her until
our wedding day, if it gets
that far.
Do you have any advice
that could help me in this situation?
Longing to Meet Mom
Dear Longing: You and I
are both guessing about this
woman’s condition, but I
doubt it is “undiagnosable.”
It is undiagnosed, however,
or at least you haven’t been
told her diagnosis.
I also assume that her
mental health issues are not
a result of her isolation, but
possibly the cause of it.
She might be agoraphobic, a hoarder, alcoholic, depressed or have any number
of other health issues affecting her ability to meet you.
Whatever her malady,
you are making a mistake to
take this personally. She was
this way before you came
along, and she may not improve without treatment.
You might have some
success if you contact her via
social media, email or postal
mail. Don’t pile on the guilt
(this will only make things
harder for her), but keep
things light and let her know
that you are very happy in
your relationship with her
wonderful son.
Dear Amy: I like to travel.
When I travel, I fly first/business class.
If I decide to travel with
someone, I like to sit with my
travel companion so I have
someone to talk to and plan
things with. That’s why
you have the companion,
right?
If he/she doesn’t want to
travel first/business class,
should I offer to upgrade the
person’s class so we can sit
together and enjoy the “getting there and back” portion
of the trip together?
Or do we just sit separately?
What’s the protocol?
Tom
Dear Tom: I’m not sure
this is a protocol question,
but more of a friendship
question. If you and a friend
agree to travel together and
you have the coin to afford
first-class travel, you should
travel the way you want to.
It would be most gracious for you to offer to upgrade your companion’s seat
so you can clink your Champagne glasses together, but
it is not required. Some people prefer a “cone of silence”
when they fly, even if it is in
coach.
Send questions for Amy
Dickinson to askamy@
amydickinson.com.
L AT I ME S . CO M/ CA L E N DA R
FRIDAY , NOVEMB ER 24, 2017
COMICS
E15
E16
F R I DAY , N OV E M BER 24, 2017
LAT IMES. C OM/ CALENDAR
TV HIGHLIGHTS
SERIES
TALK SHOWS
Great Performances “White
Christmas” and other
classic tunes are featured
in “Irving Berlin’s Holiday
Inn — the Broadway Musical,” a stage adaptation
of the hit 1942 film that
starred Bing Crosby and
Fred Astaire. 8:30 p.m.
KOCE
CBS This Morning (N)
7 a.m. KCBS
Today Black Friday; Sherri
Papini, the Redding woman who was abducted
while jogging in 2016. (N)
7 a.m. KNBC
KTLA Morning News (N)
7 a.m. KTLA
Good Morning America
Tom Cullen (“Downton
Abbey”); Black Friday
bargains; Xscape performs. (N) 7 a.m. KABC
Good Day LA Journalist
Chris Wallace; football
preview with Jackie Slater
and Vince Ferragamo. (N)
7 a.m. KTTV
Dr. Phil Parents accuse a
son-in-law
of
verbal
abuse, lies, and trying to
turn
their
daughter
against them. (N) 9 a.m.
KCBS
Megyn
Kelly
Today
Thanksgiving leftovers.
(N) 9 a.m. KNBC
The Wendy Williams Show
Whoopi Goldberg. (N)
11 a.m. KTTV
Steve Milo Ventimiglia; Toni
Braxton. 2 p.m. KNBC
Rachael Ray Tim Tebow.
2 p.m. KCOP
The Ellen DeGeneres Show
Eric Stonestreet (“Modern Family”); Whitney
Cummings; Kelsea Ballerini performs. 3 p.m.
KNBC
Washington Week A review
of the Trump presidency
so far; a look ahead to 2018.
(N) 7 and 8 p.m. KOCE
Tavis Smiley Chef Roy Choi;
gardener Ron Finley; author Sam Polk. 11 p.m.
KOCE
The Tonight Show Starring
Jimmy Fallon 11:34 p.m.
KNBC
The Late Show With
Stephen Colbert Morgan
Freeman. 11:35 p.m. KCBS
Jimmy Kimmel Live Jon
Stewart; Woody Harrelson; Tony Bennett performs. 11:35 p.m. KABC
The Late Late Show With
James
Corden
Jeff
Bridges; David Boreanaz;
Liam Gallagher performs.
12:37 a.m. KCBS
Late Night With Seth Meyers Mark Wahlberg; filmmaker Martin McDonagh;
Walk the Moon performs.
12:37 a.m. KNBC
Nightline (N) 12:37 a.m.
KABC
Tracey Ullman’s Show The
comedian appears as German Chancellor Angela
Merkel and Maggie Smith
in the series’ second season finale. 11 p.m. HBO
SPECIALS
Frosty the Snowman In this
animated classic, Jimmy
Durante narrates the tale
of the snowman who came
to life one day. Followed by
the 1992 sequel “Frosty
Returns,” featuring the
voices of John Goodman
and Jonathan Winters.
8 and 8:30 p.m. CBS
Dr. Seuss’ How the Grinch
Stole Christmas! This
1966 adaptation of the Dr.
Seuss children’s book has
long been an annual holiday viewing tradition.
Legendary
animator
Chuck Jones directed the
story, Boris Karloff narrates and Thurl Ravenscroft sings the green
meanie’s classic theme
song. 8 p.m. NBC
iHeartRadio Music Festival Night 2 Lorde, Miley
Cyrus, Big Sean and DJ
Khaled are among the artists performing in the
back half of this two-part
concert special filmed in
Las Vegas and hosted by
Ryan Seacrest. 8 p.m.
KTLA
Santa Claus Is Comin’ to
Town A mailman voiced
by Fred Astaire explains
Santa’s origins in this
stop-motion
animated
1970 special. 8 p.m. ABC
DreamWorks Trolls Holiday Anna Kendrick and
Justin Timberlake reprise
their voice roles in this
sort-of sequel to the animated 2016 musical comedy. 8:30 p.m. NBC
Grammys Greatest Stories: A 60th Anniversary
Special Six decades’
worth of Grammy Awards
history is condensed into
this new two-hour special.
Paul McCartney, Aretha
Franklin, Bruce Springsteen, Lady Gaga, Sting,
Warner Bros.
THE HOLIDAY TALE
“Dr. Seuss’ How the
Grinch Stole Christmas!”
is back on NBC.
Celine Dion, Elton John,
Mary J. Blige, Keith Urban
and Bruno Mars are
among the many stars featured. John Legend and
Carrie Underwood host. 9
p.m. CBS
MOVIES
Hey Arnold!: The Jungle
Movie The kids from the
hit animated series that
went off the air in 2002 are
back in this new fulllength adventure tale.
7 p.m. Nickelodeon
Testament of Youth Alicia
Vikander and “Game of
Thrones’” Kit Harington
star in this fact-based 2014
drama about two young
Brits whose budding romance is tested by the
horrors of World War I.
8 p.m. KCET
Finding
Santa
Jodie
Sweetin (“Full House”)
plays a woman desperately seeking a replacement St. Nick for her New
England town’s Christmas parade in this new
holiday romance. Eric
Winter also stars. 8 p.m.
Hallmark Channel
The Karate Kid (1984)
11 a.m. AMC
Jaws (1975) 11 a.m. Showtime
Magnificent
Obsession
(1954) Noon TCM
Get Shorty (1995) 1:05 p.m.
Epix
My Fair Lady (1964) 2 p.m.
TCM
The Score (2001) 2:05 p.m.
TMC
United 93 (2006) 3 p.m.
Showtime
Raging Bull (1980) 3:45 p.m.
Cinemax
The Dirty Dozen (1967)
5 p.m. TCM
The Punisher (2004) 5:15
p.m. IFC
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