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Los Angeles Times April 13 2017

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© 2017 WST
latimes.com
THURSDAY, APRIL 13, 2017
U.S., Russia
still at odds
after visit
by Tillerson
By Tracy Wilkinson,
Mansur Mirovalev
and David Lauter
Glen Johnson Planet Pix
U.S. SECRETARY OF STATE Rex Tillerson, center, and Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov, right,
appeared unhappy with each other but said they saw ways to salvage relations between the nuclear powers.
Police manuals under
scrutiny on immigration
By James Queally
Like many law enforcement agencies across California, Culver City police say officers don’t enforce federal
immigration law. The City Council
declared the town a so-called sanctuary city last month, promising to protect the public safety of all city residents, regardless of immigration
status.
But the Police Department’s manual seems to suggest something different, offering officers guidance on
how to stop people suspected of illegally entering the U.S., a misdemeanor under federal law.
Culver City’s policy says “a lack of
English proficiency may be considered” as a possible criterion for police
to suspect that someone entered the
country illegally, though it goes on to
say that “it should not be the sole factor in establishing reasonable suspicion.”
The department is one of at least
11 in California that uses blanket po-
A mixed message
on enforcement?
Culver City police and at least
10 other agencies in California
follow the same manual for law
enforcement agencies.
POLICE GUIDELINE
“While a lack of English proficiency
may be considered, it should not be
the sole factor in establishing
reasonable suspicion. When
practicable, reasonable effort
should be made to accommodate
persons with limited English
proficiency.”
ACLU RESPONSE
“Using English proficiency as a
factor to justify a police detention is
discriminatory and violates state
and federal law,” says Adrienna
Wong, staff attorney at the ACLU of
Southern California.
A climate change
trailblazer taking
two steps back
British Columbia now
favors fossil fuels after
freezing its carbon tax.
By William Yardley
VANCOUVER, Canada
— British Columbia promotes itself as “Super,
Natural,” and for many years
it was praised for walking
that talk.
Nearly a decade ago,
the province enacted North
America’s first tax on carbon emissions, putting it
on the cutting edge of
government efforts to fight
climate change. The economy grew even as emissions declined. Climate activists around the world admired the move, but so did
conservatives like former
Secretary of State George P.
Shultz, who sought market-
driven solutions.
Now, however, Canada’s
West Coast is striving
toward a very different kind
of cutting edge: British Columbia is positioning itself to
become a global leader in exporting fossil fuels, with
plans to nearly triple crude
oil exports through a controversial new pipeline and
vastly expand production of
liquefied natural gas to be
sold in Asia.
And although the revenue-neutral carbon tax is
still in place, the province’s
current political leadership
has halted the annual rate
increases built into the original plan. Emissions, meanwhile, are rising again.
“They definitely have
horses on either side of the
wagon,” Tarika Powell, who
studies fossil fuel exports for
Sightline Institute, a Seattle
think tank, said of the
[See Canada, A5]
lice manuals from Lexipol, an Irvine
company that drafts policies for law
enforcement agencies.
Civil rights activists are now raising concerns about the manuals, saying they encourage immigration enforcement at a time when many local
police agencies are trying to build
trust with immigrant communities
fearful over President Trump’s calls
for more deportations. The American Civil Liberties Union of Southern
California sent a five-page letter to
Lexipol on Wednesday morning calling on the company to modify the policy.
“By suggesting that officers may
systematically consider characteristics widely shared by Californians to
arrive at reasonable suspicion of a
crime, the policy encourages profiling
and illegal detentions, and runs afoul
of the Fourth Amendment,” the letter
reads.
Adrienna Wong, an ACLU staff attorney, said her office began researching the issue after receiving re[See Police, A10]
MOSCOW — President
Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin tried to
tap the brakes Wednesday
on what appeared a free fall
in relations between Washington and Moscow, but daylong talks between their top
diplomats failed to bridge
disputes over last week’s
poison gas attack in Syria
and other key issues.
Although the Kremlin
this week said Putin would
not greet U.S. Secretary of
State Rex Tillerson on his
first official trip to Moscow,
the Russian leader met the
U.S. envoy for more than two
hours in what appeared a
determined effort to repair
the growing breach.
Little concrete appeared
to emerge from the meeting,
although Foreign Minister
Sergei Lavrov said later that
“we understand each other
better” and that he saw
“many prospects for cooperation,” including a possible resumption of arms
control talks.
Lavrov said Moscow
would put “back in force” a
telephone hotline used to
keep U.S. and Russian warplanes from colliding or accidentally firing at one another in the crowded skies over
Syria. Russian officials said
last week they would suspend the hotline.
The high-level meetings
in Moscow came as Trump
continued a week of flipflops in which he has jettisoned large chunks of the
foreign policy — and significant pieces of economic policy — that he espoused as he
ran for the presidency.
Trump, who repeatedly
praised Putin during last
year’s campaign, said at a
White House news confer[See U.S.-Russia, A4]
Chicken’s back, kids
After LAUSD food standards pushed poultry
suppliers away, new vendors step up to plate
By Howard Blume
Mel Melcon Los Angeles Times
ANITA GONZALES prepares oven-roasted drum-
sticks for Belvedere Elementary students last month.
For more than a year, one
of the foods Los Angeles students like best has been all
but absent from school
menus.
Last month, high school
students, with two entree
choices at lunch, were offered an oven-baked drumstick on the 24th — but that
was it for chicken.
Los Angeles Unified
School District had been
budgeting up to $20 million
on chicken a year. Then its
school board set new standards for how suppliers
should treat their poultry,
their workers and the environment. Contract talks
with Tyson Foods and Pilgrim’s Pride, the nation’s
largest two suppliers, fell
apart in 2015.
This month, the Board of
Education finally cleared
[See Chicken, A8]
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Alexei Nikolsky Pool Photo
RUSSIAN PRESIDENT
Vladimir Putin met with
the secretary of State
despite Kremlin statements that he would not.
Disdain
in Syria
for U.S.
after
airstrike
Damascenes express
support for Assad as
he digs in his heels.
By Patrick J.
McDonnell
DAMASCUS, Syria —
From his shop window, looking out on the storied
Umayyad mosque and the
remains of a 2,000-year-old
Roman bath complex, Joseph Havera was contemplating what he considered a
nightmare scenario: A U.S.led assault on the Syrian
capital, stronghold of President Bashar Assad.
“Why would the United
States attack Syria? I don’t
understand it,” Havera, an
august merchant of textiles,
antiquities and other Syrian
handicrafts, said Wednesday from his musty secondfloor aerie, up a series of narrow stairways that wind
past sundry craftsmen’s
workshops.
“I knew this Trump liked
women,” Havera added.
“But it seems he likes bombs
too.”
In the wake of a U.S. missile strike on a Syrian air
base last week, word of
Washington’s newly aggressive posture toward Assad’s
government has rippled
through the cobbled alleys
of the Old City, where serpentine lanes run past Roman-era colonnades, spice
emporiums and storefronts
crammed with Damascussteel daggers and intricately
inlaid wooden boxes.
The prospect of a wider
U.S. intervention has unnerved many in this bastion
[See Syria, A4]
A2
T H U R S DAY , A P R I L 13, 2 017
S
L AT I ME S . CO M
Who controls what in Syria
Secretary of State Rex Tillerson used a trip to Moscow this week to press Russia to withdraw support
for the Syrian government after a deadly poison gas attack that the U.S. blames on President Bashar
Assad. With the help of Russian air power, Assad’s government has made significant territorial gains,
driving rebel forces from strongholds they controlled for years. Here’s a look at who is involved in
Syria’s multifaceted civil war and the areas of the country they now hold, according to research from
the Institute for the Study of War.
TURKEY
Government
forces
besieged
Aleppo
ppo
The Syrian
government
Air bases under
government control
Government
forces
isolated
Idlib
Khan Sheikhoun
Site of April 4 chemical attack
LEBANON
Dair Alzour
Government
forces besieged
SYRIA
Homs
Shayrat air base
Site of April 7 U.S. airstrike
Damascus
Assad’s government has
regained control of major
cities such as Aleppo and
Homs, which saw some of
the fiercest fighting of the
war. A U.S. missile strike on
Shayrat, an air base in
government-controlled
territory, was the first time
Washington intentionally
targeted pro-Assad forces.
U.S. officials say Shayrat
was used to launch the
chemical attack on the
rebel-held town of Khan
Sheikhoun.
IRAQ
ISRAEL
50 MILES
JORDAN
TURKEY
Russia and Iran
Aleppo
Government areas
with Hezbollah
presence
Idlib
Dair Alzour
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SYRIA
Homs
Known Iranian (or
proxy) positions
LEBANON
Damascus
Known Russian
positions
Russian air defense
missile ranges
IRAQ
Russia has established
positions and provided
critical air support to the
Syrian government. Russian
officials say their campaign
is aimed at the militant
group Islamic State, but
according to the U.S., the
strikes have focused on
other opposition groups,
some of them backed by
Washington. Iran and its
proxies, such as the
Lebanese Shiite Muslim
militia Hezbollah, have also
sided with Assad and set up
positions throughout the
country.
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Kurdish militias
An alliance of ethnic Kurdish
and Arab militias known as
the Syrian Democratic
Forces controls much of
northern Syria. The alliance
is dominated by a Kurdish
group called the People’s
Protection Units, or YPG,
and is receiving military
support from the U.S. to
fight Islamic State.
Aleppo
Idlib
Air bases under
Kurdish control
SYRIA
Homs
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LEBANON
Damascus
IRAQ
ISRAEL
50 MILES
JORDAN
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TURKEY
888.535.5770
Opposition
groups and
Turkey
Area under both Turkish
and opposition control
Idlib
Air bases under
opposition control
Khan Sheikhoun
Site of April 4 chemical attack
SYRIA
Homs
LEBANON
Damascus
IRAQ
ISRAEL
50 MILES
JORDAN
HAS A
BEGINNING,
A MIDDLE
…AND A
WEEKEND
TURKEY
Islamic State, which carved
out a sprawling territory in
Syria and Iraq, has been
losing ground in both
countries. But it retains
control of its self-declared
capital, Raqqah, and the
Euphrates River leading to
Iraq.
Raqqah
Air base under
Islamic State control
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Islamic State
Aleppo
Idlib
SYRIA
Homs
Sunni Arab-dominated rebel
groups, including more
moderate factions such as
the Free Syrian Army and
Islamist radicals once
affiliated with Al Qaeda, hold
territory in the west of Syria.
The U.S., Turkey and
Sunni-led Persian Gulf
nations have backed some
of these groups. Turkey has
a presence in the north
alongside opposition groups
it supports. Although the
country is an ally of the
U.S., it opposes U.S. support
for the YPG because of the
group’s alleged ties to
Kurdish militants in Turkey.
LEBANON
Damascus
IRAQ
ISRAEL
JORDAN
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Source: Institute for the Study of War
50 MILES
Note: Territories as of April 3, military
positions as of March 21.
A l e x a n dr a Z a v i s and T h o m a s S u h L a u de r Los Angeles Times
L AT I ME S . CO M
S
T H UR S DAY, A P R I L 13 , 2 017
A3
THE WORLD
Trump makes an offer to China
If Beijing helps rein in
North Korea, the U.S.
is willing to back off
on trade issues.
By Barbara Demick
NEW YORK — President
Trump is willing to make
concessions on his signature
issue of trade in return for
Chinese help reining in
North Korea, he told reporters on Wednesday.
The stark about-face in
priorities comes at a time
when North Korea might be
preparing to conduct its
sixth nuclear test. A U.S. aircraft carrier, the Carl Vinson, is heading toward the
region and is being joined by
Japanese warships.
The urgency of the situation was reflected in
Trump’s comments to White
House reporters Wednesday
when he recounted recent
conversations with his Chinese counterpart.
“The way you’re going to
make a good trade deal is to
help us with North Korea,
otherwise we’re just going to
go it alone,” Trump said he
told Chinese President Xi
Jinping.
“I think [Xi] means well
and wants to help. We’ll see
whether he does,” added
Trump, speaking during a
news conference with NATO
Secretary-General
Jens
Stoltenberg.
Trump spoke Wednesday morning by telephone to
the Chinese president, following up on their summit
last week at the Mar-a-Lago
resort in Florida.
Nervous that the United
States might engage in military action, Beijing looked
poised to take tougher measures against Pyongyang.
Chinese media have hinted
the government could withhold fuel oil shipments to
North Korea or enforce already
tough
sanctions
against a country that conducts almost all of its trade
across its 850-mile border
with China.
Beijing was unnerved by
the unilateral U.S. airstrikes
last week against Syria, punishing President Bashar
Assad’s government for its
poison gas attacks on civilians, analysts said. The
airstrikes were ordered
hastily while Xi was visiting
Trump in Florida.
“There is widespread
concern in Beijing about a
U.S. preemptive strike on
North Korea,” said Yun Sun,
a specialist at the Washing-
Ahn Young-joon Associated Press
PEOPLE at a Seoul rail station watch a TV news program showing a file image of the Carl Vinson aircraft
carrier. The U.S. ship is heading toward the region and is being joined by Japanese warships.
Alex Brandon Associated Press
PRESIDENT Trump and his Chinese counterpart, Xi Jinping, in Florida last
week. “I think [Xi] means well and wants to help” with North Korea, Trump said.
ton-based Stimson Center
who was visiting Beijing last
week. “They saw how assertive and unilateral the
U.S. action was on Syria, and
they know that Trump is serious about North Korea.”
Chinese state media first
reported on the telephone
call between Trump and Xi,
and according to Sun, the
subtle wording of the re-
ports indicated heightened
Chinese concern about
North Korea’s nuclear program.
“China usually emphasizes stability over denuclearization, but this time it
was different,” she said.
The Global Times, a
state-run Chinese newspaper, also warned in an
editorial Wednesday that
Beijing would support stiffer
action against its historical
ally.
“More and more Chinese
support the view that the
government should enhance
sanctions over Pyongyang’s
nuclear activities,” the Global Times wrote. “If the North
makes another provocative
move this month, the Chinese society will be willing to
see the [U.N. Security Council] adopt severe restrictive
measures that have never
been seen before, such as restricting oil imports to the
North.”
North Korea often schedules its weapons tests to coincide with symbolic national events. There are
fears that it might conduct
another nuclear test —
which would be its sixth —
this week to mark the 105th
anniversary of the birth of its
founder, Kim Il Sung. A delegation of about 200 foreign
journalists visiting Pyongyang has been told it should
prepare for a “big and important event” on Thursday.
Since Mao Tse-tung sent
troops across the Yalu River
in 1950, China has been the
main protector of the renegade North Korean government. But it has periodically
signaled its displeasure by
withholding for brief periods
shipments of fuel oil on
which energy-starved North
Korea is dependent.
Relations have ebbed
since 2011 when the thirdgeneration leader, Kim Jong
Un, succeeded his father,
Kim Jong Il. The new leader,
still in his early 30s, has
doubled down on his country’s development of nuclear
weapons and missiles. In
blustery speeches, he has
warned that his country
might soon be ready to test
an intercontinental ballistic
missile capable of reaching
the United States.
All that is worrisome to
the Chinese Communist
Party, which fears a North
Korean collapse that could
send refugees rushing into
China and could bring a reunited, U.S.-dominated Korea to its borders.
With its secretive nature,
China seldom acknowledges
when it is punishing North
Korea, but there are clues.
For example, Beijing has
blocked delivery of North
Korea’s principal export of
coal. On April 7, a dozen
freight ships that were
headed to the North Korean
port of Nampo were ordered
to turn around.
The Chinese government
offered up an implausible explanation that the North
Korean quota for coal imports had been exceeded.
But many analysts believe it
was a response to the constant cajoling and threats
emanating from Trump.
Trump has not specified
exactly what concessions he
has offered China in return
for help with North Korea,
but frequent reversals have
become familiar in the
Trump administration. In
comments
published
Wednesday in the Wall
Street Journal, Trump said
he had decided not to label
China as a currency manipulator, despite promises to do
so during last year’s presidential campaign.
In his news conference
with Stoltenberg, he also
backed away from his earlier
criticism of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization
as obsolete.
With
North
Korea,
Trump had earlier suggested he would be willing to
meet directly with Kim Jong
Un, and back-channel talks
were scheduled this year.
But that fell apart after Kim
was implicated in the dramatic assassination of his half
brother Kim Jong Nam, who
was poisoned with VX gas in
Malaysia.
“I can’t figure out the
Trump
administration
strategy. They are trying to
feel their way to a policy,”
said Joel Wit, a senior fellow
at the U.S.-Korea Institute
at Johns Hopkins University. “They seem to think
now they can find some common ground with China.”
barbara.demick
@latimes.com
Twitter: @BarbaraDemick
Times staff writer Laura
King in Washington
contributed to this report.
Defiant ex-president to run again in Iran
Ahmadinejad enters
the race despite long
odds and the supreme
leader’s advice.
By Ramin Mostaghim
and Shashank Bengali
TEHRAN — Defying
Iran’s supreme leader, the
confrontational
former
President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad filed papers
Wednesday to contest next
month’s elections, a longshot bid to regain his post
that stunned even veteran
political observers.
Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei had
advised Ahmadinejad in
September not to run again
and the former president
said he agreed, even calling a
news conference last week to
announce he was backing
his former vice president,
Hamid Baghaei, for the
presidency.
Asked why he changed
his mind, Ahmadinejad said,
“The supreme leader advised me; he didn’t order
me,” according to the Iranian Students News Agency.
It was a typically brash
move for a wily populist and
archconservative who confounded Western countries
during his eight years as
president, when he was
prone to aggressive and
sometimes demonstrably
false statements, such as denying the Holocaust and
stating there were no gay
people in Iran.
His candidacy must be
approved by the conservative Guardian Council,
which oversees elections
and is close to Khamenei.
Even many hard-liners believe the council will disqualify Ahmadinejad and
Baghaei, who was briefly
jailed on corruption charges.
The council is expected
to finalize the list of candidates in about two weeks.
In one sign of official discontent with his move, several pro-Ahmadinejad websites were blocked beginning Wednesday morning.
Ahmadinejad perhaps
sees an opening in the May19
election because conservatives have not rallied around
a credible challenger to his
successor, President Hassan Rouhani, a relative moderate who has championed
better ties with the West. Ahmadinejad was barred from
seeking a third consecutive
four-year term but is now eligible again.
Conservatives
believe
Rouhani is vulnerable because the economy remains
weak despite the deal he
made to curb Iran’s nuclear
program in exchange for a
lifting of most international
sanctions.
While in office from 2005
to 2013, Ahmadinejad instituted a program of cash
transfers that was popular
with working-class Iranians.
But the policy also fueled hyperinflation that experts say
left Iran’s economy weaker
in the long run.
Photographs by
Ebrahim Noroozi Associated Press
FORMER IRANIAN President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, left, and ally Hamid
Baghaei hug in Tehran after registering for the presidential election.
“THE SUPREME LEADER advised me; he didn’t
order me” not to run, Ahmadinejad said.
Ahmadinejad’s
popularity faded further as his
combative persona and support for the nuclear program
alienated the West and led to
the harshest sanctions ever
imposed on a country.
He also clashed with the
supreme leader over top political appointments, and his
disputed 2009 reelection
prompted the largest protests in Iran in a generation.
The ensuing crackdown
saw thousands detained
and dozens of dissidents arrested, the memory of which
Khamenei was likely referring to when he said an unnamed candidate — widely
understood to be Ahmadinejad — should not run
again because it would “polarize” the country.
Khamenei’s office did not
issue any immediate reaction to Ahmadinejad’s attempt to run.
“Whatever was former
President Ahmadinejad’s
motivation in defying the
supreme leader’s advice, it
will be a detrimental blow to
his political career,” Khosrou Dehghan, an analyst
close to Iran’s reformist
camp, posted on Telegram, a
social media app.
Some analysts believe
the conservative favored by
the clerical and military establishment is Ebrahim
Raisi, a former judge best
known for ordering thousands of political prisoners
to be put to death in the
1980s.
“The ruling theocracy is
busy grooming Ebrahim
Raisi,” said Hojjat Kalashi, a
secular analyst, adding that
Raisi could later emerge —
even if he does not win the
election — as a possible successor to the Khamenei.
“I think Ahmadinejad
can’t mobilize crowds,”
Kalashi said. “He will be disqualified and, to some degree, silenced.”
shashank.bengali
@latimes.com
Twitter: @SBengali
Special correspondent
Mostaghim reported from
Tehran and Times staff
writer Bengali from New
Delhi.
A4
T H U R S DAY , A PRI L 13 , 2 017
L AT I M ES . C OM
Tense Moscow
meetings yield
little consensus
over Syria
Louai Beshara AFP/Getty Images
SYRIANS mass outside the U.N. office in Damascus to protest the “unjust American aggression.” “The Iraqi
scenario will not be repeated in Syria,” read one banner, referring to the 2003 U.S.-led invasion of Iraq.
In Damascus, U.S. airstrike
elicits defiance and disdain
[Syria, from A1]
of support for Assad, whom
Trump referred to on
Wednesday as “an evil person” and “an animal.”
Assad’s response has
been to defiantly dig in. This
week, demonstrators massed outside the United Nations office in Damascus,
protesting
the
“unjust
American
aggression”
against Syria. “The Iraqi
scenario will not be repeated
in Syria,” read one banner,
referring to the 2003 U.S.-led
invasion of Iraq that followed accusations — unfounded, as it turned out —
that Saddam Hussein’s government was harboring
weapons of mass destruction.
After more than six grueling years of war, this ancient capital has regained a
sense of equilibrium, despite
the daily soundtrack of notso-distant mortar strikes —
hollow thuds that hardly
draw notice anymore in a
sprawling metropolis that is
home to more than 5 million
people.
Life has resumed a sense
of normality, a notion that
may stun those who have followed news reports of Syria’s
civil war but haven’t been
to Damascus lately. Traffic
clogs the streets and shoppers browse the souks, taking time for an Arabic coffee
or an ice cream from the celebrated Bakdash ice cream
parlor in the Hamidiya souk.
Residents have become
accustomed to the checkpoints, concrete blast barriers and robust army presence in the streets. The
heavy security has generally
been successful in reducing
the car bomb attacks that
racked the capital in the
Liliana Nieto del Rio For The Times
“WHY would the United States attack Syria? I don’t understand it,” said Joseph
Havera, who sells textiles, antiquities and other Syrian handicrafts in Damascus.
early months of the war and
drove people from the
streets. Now, the Old City is
alive at night again. Bars are
hopping in Bab Touma, a
largely Christian district.
Many Damascenes have
even allowed themselves to
contemplate an end to the
shattering conflict.
But the U.S. attack last
week has added an unsettling new element that complicates any forecast for a
resolution. Washington has
long provided arms and
training to anti-Assad rebels, but never overtly intervened against his government — until last week.
The Trump administration called the strike a retaliation for a Syrian government chemical attack on a
rebel-held town in northwestern Idlib province.
Damascus and its main al-
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lies, Russia and Iran, have
denied that the government
was responsible, suggesting
the poison gas was inadvertently released during an
airstrike on a munitions depot, or planted by the opposition to draw the U.S. into
the war.
To many here, especially
Christians, other minorities
and secular Sunni Muslims,
the Assad government —
widely reviled in the West —
has become a bulwark
against an insurgency that
has come to be largely dominated by hard-core Islamists. Government supporters may not like Assad, but
they see his leadership as a
barrier against an array of
hard-line opposition fighters whom many consider
just as threatening as Islamic State, the ultra-radical
group that until now has
been the main target of U.S.
military might in Syria.
Although Assad’s forces
have tight control of the
capital, armed opposition
factions still hold suburbs
just a few miles from the city.
Everyone is aware that the
current sense of stability
could be transitory.
“Our spirit isn’t very high
right now,” said Ghina Allain, 20, who was strolling
through the ancient Souk alSilah with her sister, Hannah, 18. “What does Trump
know about our country?
Who is he to do this?”
Of course, there are many
Syrians who have long called
for a U.S.-led military effort
to oust Assad’s autocratic
government. Various opposition groups applauded
the Trump administration
strike, saying it was long
overdue. But no one would
express such sentiments
publicly
on
Damascus’
closely patrolled streets.
Instead, most expressed
disdain for the United
States.
“We know that the Americans are working with the
Saudis and with Daesh,”
said Mahal Ghanem, a
snack seller in the Old City,
using an Arabic acronym for
Islamic State. The U.S. and
Saudi Arabia, he said, have
long been arming anti-
Assad forces, though Washington and Riyadh deny aiding Islamic State.
“This is nothing new,” he
said. “They will be defeated.”
Early on in the conflict,
the government concentrated its forces on consolidating control of the capital,
maintaining its base of support on the Mediterranean
coast and recapturing the
cities of Homs and Aleppo.
That strategy has resulted in a huge loss of life
among
pro-government
forces but has thus far
proved successful — thanks
in large part to aid from Russia, Iran and Hezbollah, the
Lebanese Shiite Muslim
group closely tied to Iran.
Government supporters are
unapologetic about the outside aid.
“Yes, Russia helped save
our Syria, and we are grateful,” said Nidal Mahmoud,
47, a clerk from Homs who
was sipping coffee on an Old
City street. “What would we
have done without them?
Syria would have been lost.”
The Old City, one of the
historic jewels of the Middle
East, has remained intact
even as the ancient centers
of Aleppo and Homs were
destroyed in the fighting. It
remains a place where people can come and put the
war aside.
“Many of our customers
have lost loved ones in the
war, they have suffered a
great loss,” noted Ahmad
Hussein Abd, manager of
the landmark Nawfara coffee and tea house, where
clouds of smoke from water
pipes drift over the patio.
“But here they can have
some peace, some time to be
quiet and be happy. Here, we
don’t talk politics.”
There seems, in general, a
reluctance to pass judgment. This is, after all, a conflict that has yet to be settled
conclusively.
“In the end, God will always save Syria,” said Yusuf
Kanavid, a rug salesman sitting on a chair outside his
shop. “Syria will always survive. God is with us.”
patrick.mcdonnell
@latimes.com
FOR THE RECORD
If you believe that we have
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[U.S.-Russia, from A1]
ence that it would be “a fantastic thing if we got along
with Putin and if we got
along with Russia.”
“Right now we’re not getting along with Russia at
all,” Trump added. “We may
be at an all-time low in terms
of relationship with Russia.
This has built for a long period of time. But we’re going
to see what happens.”
Putin also warned of
worsening ties in a TV interview in Moscow.
“You can say that the level of trust on a working level,
especially on the military
side, has not improved but
most likely worsened” since
last week’s U.S. airstrike in
Syria, Putin said, according
to a transcript released by
the Kremlin.
In a day of fast-moving diplomacy, Russia vetoed a
U.S.-backed motion at the
United Nations Security
Council that would have required Syrian President
Bashar Assad’s government
to cooperate with U.N. investigators looking into the
April 4 nerve gas attack on
Khan Sheikhoun, a rebelheld village in Syria.
Visible shifts in Trump’s
foreign policy began April 6
with his decision to launch
59 cruise missiles at a Syrian
military airfield, an airstrike
that countered Trump’s position that the U.S. should
not intervene overseas except to directly defend its interests.
Trump’s explanation for
why he ordered the strike —
the painful images of children killed by a nerve gas attack that the U.S. blamed on
Syrian government forces —
had more in common with liberal internationalism than
with his “America first” slogans.
At the same news conference, Trump declared that
NATO, which he had repeatedly disparaged before he
took office, was “no longer
obsolete.” For 70 years,
“the NATO alliance has
been the bulwark of international peace and security,”
he said.
He praised China, which
he had consistently criticized during his campaign.
And in an interview with the
Wall Street Journal, he confirmed that his administration would not label China a
“currency manipulator” —
something he had pledged
to do “on Day One.”
On the domestic policy
side, he said in the interview
that he would support continued operation of the Export-Import Bank, which he
had opposed, and would
consider reappointing Janet
L. Yellen as chairwoman of
the Federal Reserve when
her term expires next year.
In Moscow, testy public
statements confirmed that
U.S.-Russian relations remain at a discordant level. In
their news conference, Tillerson and Lavrov spoke in
unusually blunt terms and
publicly sparred over Syria
and Ukraine.
They shook hands for the
cameras as they met but did
not smile and appeared unhappy with each other.
“There is a low level of
trust” between Washington
and
Moscow,
Tillerson
warned. “The world’s two
foremost nuclear powers
cannot have this kind of relationship.”
“We need to attempt to
put an end to this steady
degradation, which is doing
nothing to restore the trust
between our two countries
or to make progress on the
issues of greatest importance to both of us,” he added.
Both diplomats said they
saw ways to stop the slide.
Lavrov said the two governments had agreed to appoint special envoys to conduct what he called “a pragmatic conversation about
the irritants, so to speak,
that have piled up in our relationship under the Obama
administration.”
The Obama administration imposed economic
sanctions on Moscow in
2014 after it annexed the Crimean peninsula and intervened militarily in eastern
Ukraine. President Obama
approved additional sanctions in December after U.S.
intelligence agencies concluded that Russia had used
hacking and other tactics to
interfere in the 2016 presi-
‘There is a low
level of trust. The
world’s two
foremost nuclear
powers cannot
have this kind of
relationship.’
— Rex Tillerson,
secretary of State,
on relations with Russia
dential race.
“I for one would like to say
that I do not think that Russia and the U.S. have so great
a distance that it cannot be
bridged on many issues of
the international agenda,
both
with
Syria
and
Ukraine,” Lavrov said. “It’s
not impossible.”
Tillerson said they did
not discuss easing sanctions, noting that anger in
Congress over Russian meddling in last year’s election
“is serious enough to attract
additional sanctions.”
Lavrov quickly responded, saying the U.S. envoy
“did not threaten me with
sanctions; didn’t threaten
me with anything, actually.”
They argued over U.S.
charges that Assad’s forces
carried out the chemical
weapons attack last week
that killed more than 80 people and injured hundreds
more. Russian military
forces support Assad in the
multi-sided Syrian civil war,
and Lavrov insisted he had
seen “no confirmation” that
Syrian forces had used nerve
gas.
Lavrov instead took Tillerson to task for what he
called the “illegitimate” U.S.
cruise missile attack that
followed, and the U.S. opposition to Assad’s continued
rule.
The Russian diplomat
said the U.S. has a long history of toppling dictators, including Serbia’s Slobodan
Milosevic, Iraq’s Saddam
Hussein, Libya’s Moammar
Kadafi and others in wars
that he called a “blatant violation of international law.”
Earlier, as he stepped
into a long session with
Lavrov, Tillerson said he
hoped to find “areas of common interest — even where
our tactical approaches may
be different — and further
clarify areas of sharp difference.”
Lavrov said Moscow
wanted to understand the
Trump’s administration’s
“real intentions.”
It is customary for new
U.S. secretaries of State to
meet with Russian presidents on their first trips to
Moscow, a tradition that
goes back to before World
War II.
So the Kremlin statement Monday that Putin
would not receive Tillerson
had seemed another sign of
the nosedive in relations —
especially since Putin had
personally bestowed one of
Russia’s highest honors, the
Order of Friendship, on Tillerson just four years ago,
when he was chief executive
of Exxon Mobil.
Putin, in the TV interview, lashed out at U.S. allies
in the North Atlantic Treaty
Organization for their unanimous support for the U.S.
retaliatory strike in Syria.
“Everyone is nodding,
like bobbing-head dolls,
without analyzing anything
that is happening,” Putin
said. “Where is the proof the
Syrian military used chemical weapons? None. And
there is a violation of international law. That’s an obvious fact.”
Trump had studiously
avoided criticizing Putin,
but finally addressed the
matter in an interview with
Fox Business Network.
“Frankly, Putin is backing a person that’s truly an
evil person,” Trump said, referring to Assad. “I think it’s
very bad for Russia. I think
it’s very bad for mankind.”
tracy.wilkinson
@latimes.com
Twitter: @TracyKWilkinson
david.lauter@latimes.com
Twitter: @DavidLauter
Times staff writers
Wilkinson and Lauter
reported from Washington.
Special correspondent
Mirovalev reported from
Moscow.
L AT I ME S . CO M
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Karwai Tang WireImage
PREMIER Christy Clark of British Columbia froze the Canadian province’s trail-
blazing carbon emissions tax in 2012 and has championed liquefied natural gas.
In British Columbia,
fossil fuels regain favor
[Canada, from A1]
British Columbia government. “And they are going in
opposite directions.”
In a province that has
been influential in shaping
environmental policy in
Canada and beyond, the
question is which horse will
prevail — and one clue to the
answer is expected to come
next month, when Premier
Christy Clark faces reelection.
Clark, who took office in
2011, leads the conservative
but incongruously named
BC Liberal Party. Her predecessor, Gordon Campbell,
was also a member of that
party, yet while Campbell
pushed the carbon tax to approval in 2008 and still takes
pride in it, Clark has shown
little interest in climate leadership.
She instead has championed liquefied natural gas,
which involves cooling natural gas into a dense liquid to
make it easier and cheaper
to ship.
If all 19 of the current
LNG proposals in the province were built, according to
Powell’s research, British
Columbia would become the
world’s largest LNG exporter many times over, dwarfing
the current leaders, Qatar
and Australia. Emissions
from LNG terminals and refineries could drastically increase the level of greenhouse gas emissions within
the province — and much of
those emissions would be
exempt from the carbon tax,
according to analyses of
Clark’s plans.
It was Clark who froze the
carbon tax in 2012 and has
refused to raise it since
then, essentially ignoring
the advice of a special
task force she created to
make recommendations. Although Clark does highlight
the province’s leadership on
the carbon tax, she has cited
concerns among some business groups and others that
increasing it would hurt the
economy.
Her closest challenger
next month, John Horgan of
the New Democratic Party,
has said he supports raising
the carbon tax because “it’s
the right thing to do,” and he
has lashed out at Clark for
accepting millions in campaign donations from fossil
fuel companies and other industry groups.
Yet a New Democratic
Party strategy document
obtained and leaked by the
BC Liberals made it clear
that even Horgan’s party is
wary of being cast as supporting tax increases, regardless of the benefits. It
also expressed concerns
that the province’s Green
Party would peel away votes
if it took no action.
“The BC Liberals will call
it a tax increase — and
they’ll holler from the
rooftops in rural B.C.,” the
leaked document said.
“We must holler back
with: ‘Our plan puts more
money in the pocket for a
majority of B.C. families.
Hers doesn’t. Our plan actually accomplishes the goals
of a carbon tax — reducing
carbon
pollution.
Hers
doesn’t. Our plan creates
good jobs that last in a more
sustainable economy with
more opportunities for the
future. Hers doesn’t.’ ”
The political sensitivity
over the carbon tax within
the province is striking given
its influence outside it.
In December, Canadian
Prime
Minister
Justin
Trudeau established his national climate plan, which
requires all provinces and
territories to put in place either a tax or a cap-and-trade
plan by 2022.
Instead of using the mo-
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Sources: OpenStreetMap, Mapzen
P a ul Dugin s k i Los Angeles Times
ment to boast of British Columbia’s early leadership on
pricing carbon, Clark made
a show of insisting before she
agreed to it that the province
would lead no further, that it
would not increase its tax
without other provinces
making firm commitments
to meet the 2022 goal.
Clark also did not put up
a fight when Trudeau made
what was widely viewed as a
counterintuitive bargain to
get the industry support he
needed for his national plan:
His administration approved two major pipelines
that would transport crude
from the vast tar sands in Alberta, next door to British
Columbia. The larger of the
two pipelines, called Trans
Mountain, is the one that
would nearly triple oil exports from British Columbia.
Like the proposed LNG
projects, the Trans Mountain pipeline is intended to
help Canadian fossil fuels reach markets in Asia, as well
as the West Coast of the
United States. It would
transport nearly 900,000
barrels a day, creating as
much as a sevenfold increase
in the number of ships navigating Vancouver’s spectacular but fragile waterfront.
The ships would gather
in front of the sunsets in
English Bay, pass close to
Stanley Park, travel under
the graceful Lions Gate
Bridge and ply the shallow
and narrow Burrard Inlet on
their way inland to the town
of Burnaby, the terminus of
the pipeline and the site of
what would be a greatly expanded tank farm near the
entrance to Simon Fraser
University.
“There’s a lot of opportunity for bad things to happen
in a confined area,” said Derek Corrigan, the mayor of
Burnaby, which is fighting
the pipeline along with the
city of Vancouver, many
First Nations and environmental groups.
Vessel traffic also could
be much worse if many of the
LNG projects are built.
Yet whether they will be is
unclear. The price of natural
gas has plummeted, leaving
the viability of the British
Columbia projects uncertain. The Trans Mountain
pipeline also faces challenges.
Last month, Kinder Morgan, the American company
planning the pipeline, increased its estimate of the
project’s cost to $5.5 billion,
substantially more than its
initial $3.7-billion estimate.
Still, it said, now that it has
federal and provincial approval in hand, construction
will begin this fall and the
pipeline is expected to be operational late in 2019.
Eugene Kung, a lawyer at
an advocacy firm here, West
Coast Environmental Law,
noted that another proposed pipeline in a more rural part of the province,
known as the Northern
Gateway pipeline, had received government approvals and made similar pronouncements before it was
ultimately rejected in a
court challenge from First
Nations and later by
Trudeau.
The Trans Mountain
pipeline, reaching its terminus in one of the West
Coast’s most environmentally minded cities, is expected to face far more opposition than the Northern
Gateway if construction actually starts, Kung said. He
said more than 100 First Nations are along the pipeline’s
route from Edmonton, and
only about a third have signaled they will not oppose it.
“A third of a pipeline,”
Kung said, “is a pretty terrible pipeline.”
Campbell, the former
premier, who recently returned to Canada after serving as its high commissioner
to the United Kingdom, said
that he supports developing
“an array” of energy sources,
including LNG, but that he
opposes exemptions to the
carbon tax.
“That changes the way
people think about energy,”
he said.
The former premier said
he regrets not putting the
carbon tax on a mandatory
10-year schedule of increases, one that could have
endured through the leadership of Clark.
“They still say that they
take pride in having a revenue-neutral carbon tax,”
Campbell said. “If you do,
then what are the next steps
you take?
“The journey’s not done,”
he said. “We started it with
some good, strong policies
that I would have liked to see
carry on. But it’s up to the
current elected leaders.
“There are leaders and
there are followers. Right
now, British Columbia has a
policy that’s leading, but
they haven’t really done
much to advance it.”
william.yardley
@latimes.com
Twitter: @yardleyLAT
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A6
T H U R S DAY, A P RI L 13, 2 017
L ATI M E S . CO M
Brazil’s corruption scandal grows
‘It makes you
smile to think that
what they’ve
done could all
catch up to them
now.’
Brazilians celebrate
as more politicians,
including 8 Cabinet
members, are named.
By Jill Langlois
SAO PAULO, Brazil —
Fernanda Santini, an elementary school teacher in
Sao Paulo, seemed to sum
up the feelings of many Brazilians when a Supreme
Court justice this week released a list of politicians being investigated on corruption allegations.
Rumors of who was on
the list had circulated for
some time, and when it finally came out, scores of officials were named, including
eight Cabinet ministers.
“It’s about time they were
all named,” Santini said
with satisfaction Wednesday. “It’s not like we all didn’t
know who would — or at
least should — be investigated, but it makes you smile
to think that what they’ve
done could all catch up to
them now.”
Residents of Sao Paulo
celebrated the release of the
list Tuesday by banging on
pots and pans, an act that
has become symbolic in
Brazil of protesting against
political corruption since
the arrest and jailing of
many government leaders in
the seemingly never-ending
fallout from the investigation code-named “Lava
Jato,” or Car Wash.
Satirical Brazilian website Sensacionalista even
published a list of 15 politicians on the list who had previously attended anti-corruption protests.
The official list, the subject of leaks and much
speculation, was made public when Justice Luiz Edson
Fachin removed the seal on
plea-bargain
testimony
from executives of the construction company Odebrecht, whose former chief
executive, Marcelo Odebrecht, is serving a 19-year
prison sentence for his involvement in paying millions
of dollars in bribes as part of
a graft scheme.
— Fernanda Santini,
elementary school teacher
Silvia Izquierdo Associated Press
DEMONSTRATORS march on Copacabana Beach in Rio de Janeiro last month to protest government cor-
ruption and support the three-year investigation that has grown to include dozens of top politicians.
Federal prosecutors will
open new inquiries into eight
ministers
in
President
Michel Temer’s Cabinet, as
well as 24 senators and 39
lawmakers in the lower
house of Congress.
Among those on the
“Fachin list,” as it is being
called, are Temer’s chief of
staff, Eliseu Padilha, and
Foreign Minister Aloysio
Nunes Ferreira. Members of
Congress have been implicated too, including the
president of the lower house,
Rodrigo Maia, as well as
former Senate President
Renan Calheiros and his
replacement, Eunicio Oliveira.
Temer’s name was also
mentioned in evidence and
transcriptions related to investigations into some of his
top allies, according to
Fachin’s ruling. The president, however, has temporary immunity, which prevents a sitting president
from being investigated for
acts that occurred outside
his current mandate.
Brazilians are becoming
accustomed to seeing presidents in legal hot water.
Temer’s predecessor, Dilma
Rousseff, was impeached
last
fall
for
breaking
budgetary rules by shifting
around funds to cover shortterm deficits. She wasn’t accused of corruption, nor was
she a target of Lava Jato, but
her predecessor, Luiz Inacio
Lula da Silva, was. He faces
corruption charges in connection with alleged bribes
from Oderbrecht.
While some see the list’s
release as a victory, other
Brazilians say it’s likely just
another step in a long, long
road.
“Just because they’re on
that list doesn’t mean anything will actually happen to
them,” said Jairo Peres, a
street vendor in Sao Paulo.
“It’s good that they have the
shame of being investigated,
but they’ll find a way to stay
right where they are, spending all our money.”
Once federal prosecutors
wrap up their investigations
into each politician on the
list, their findings will be
brought
back
to
the
Supreme Court, which will
decide whether the officials
will be charged with crimes
such as corruption and money laundering.
Despite the fact that
nearly a third of his Cabinet
and a third of the Senate are
named on the Fachin list,
Temer said the accusations
would not slow down the
work of the federal government.
“We absolutely cannot
paralyze legislative activity,”
he said Thursday. “We have
to continue with government [work], and legislative
and judicial activity.”
The new inquiries have
come at a delicate time for
Temer, who is trying to obtain approval of controversial pension overhaul proposals that the government
considers its only way out of
severe pension system debt
and, in turn, would provide a
return to confidence in the
country’s economy. Last
year alone, Brazil registered
a pension deficit of $67 billion in the 12 months
through November.
Brazilians, however, are
not pleased with the plan to
set a minimum retirement
age of 65 after the country
has gone so many years
without setting a bar at all.
“I’ve been working since I
was 14 years old, and now
they tell me I’ll have to wait
until I’m 65 to retire and get
my measly pension? It’s absurd,” said Antonia Ferreira,
who works at a clothing
store in Sao Paulo. “Maybe if
[politicians] stopped lining
their pockets with our money, we wouldn’t be in this situation in the first place.
They should start paying us
taxes. Or maybe I’ll just run
for office next year.”
Langlois is a special
correspondent.
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L AT I ME S . CO M
T H U R S DAY, A P R I L 13 , 2 017
A7
THE NATION
Drive, park, gamble — and pay
Last year, some Vegas
casinos did away with
free parking. Now the
prices are going up.
By David Montero
LAS VEGAS — The good
old days of widespread free
parking at casinos ended in
2016. Now, with some properties raising those initial fees
beginning Wednesday, it’s
enough to make visitors
yearn for the halcyon days of
last year when parking was
just cheaper.
MGM Resorts International is again leading the
charge — just as it did less
than a year ago when it was
the first to announce the
elimination of free parking
on most of its Las Vegas
Strip properties. Others followed suit, leaving just a few
holdouts offering free parking.
The removal of free parking was seen as yet another
blow to the image Las Vegas
had cultivated over decades:
free booze, cheap food and
low-cost rooms in exchange
for big profits at the casino.
But since the evolution of
the Strip in recent years emphasized high-end clubs,
restaurants and live entertainment, and broadened
the visitor profile to include
non-gamblers,
revenue
sources have expanded as
well — with parking fees being the latest and most controversial.
It’s a dizzying array of
parking rate increases centered on a tiered time schedule and a casino’s location.
Here’s the easiest one to remember: The first hour remains free at all MGM properties.
For self-parking at MGM
Grand, Mandalay Bay, the
Mirage, Delano and New
York, New York, instead of
F
ET
E
R N
E
V
E
Steve Marcus Las Vegas Sun
FREE PARKING is harder to find at popular Las Vegas casinos. The ones that do provide it, however, plan
to advertise the fact. Some casinos continue to offer free parking to Las Vegas residents.
getting up to four subsequent hours at $7, only the
first two will be charged at
that rate. Stay two hours
longer, the fee jumps to a $10
flat rate. Beyond that, the
flat rate climbs an extra two
bucks to $12.
Prices for self-parking
are also jumping at Aria,
Bellagio and Vdara under
the same tiered system.
Those rates are now $7, $12
and then $15.
Valet parking prices are
up as well.
It had been $13 and $18 at
eight of the properties including MGM Grand, but
they now range between $15
and $25. The top rates are
again at Aria, Bellagio and
Vdara.
Monte Carlo, Excalibur
and Luxor remain the
cheapest MGM properties
charging for parking, beginning at $5 and capping at $10
for a full day.
Among the casinos on
the Las Vegas Strip still allowing free self-parking are
the Cosmopolitan, Stratosphere, Wynn, Treasure Island, Venetian and Palazzo.
Circus Circus, owned by
MGM Resorts, will continue
to offer free unlimited selfparking but is charging for
valet parking.
Yvette Monet, spokeswoman for MGM International, said the increase was
“based on market analyses
we have conducted since we
implemented the program.”
Treasure Island is so adamant about not charging for
parking, a spokeswoman
said, that the casino is in the
process of adding free parking to its advertising campaigns. Both the Venetian
and Palazzo — owned by Las
Vegas Sands Corp. — also
said they didn’t have plans
to charge for parking.
The Cosmopolitan will
begin charging for parking
on May 16.
Caesars Entertainment,
which owns seven properties on the Strip, recently began charging at the Linq,
Bally’s, Paris, Flamingo and
Caesars Palace. Next week,
it will add the Cromwell and
Harrah’s to the pay-to-park
list.
Unlike MGM, however,
Caesars properties continue
to offer free parking for locals. MGM eliminated that
perk at the end of last year.
Also, most of the properties offer a membership program that allows customers
to avoid parking fees by attaining status levels based
on points earned at the ca-
sinos. MGM, for example, offers its guests free parking if
they apply for a branded
MasterCard.
Anthony Lucas, professor of casino management at
the University of Nevada,
Las Vegas, said the parking
fee hike was probably already built in as a strategy to
avoid hitting people too hard
with the initial introduction
of it last year.
“I would say it’s a scheduled rate hike,” Lucas said.
“We’ll roll it out cheap and
raise it in a year. They map
out the cash flows year to
year to year until they get to
where they want to be. Or at
least monitor to see how it’s
going.”
But the increase comes
on the heels of two other
price hikes for visitors to Las
Vegas.
Last month, resort fees
went up at some properties
by as much as $3, and a room
tax increase of .088% approved by the Nevada Legislature also kicked in to help
fund a new stadium for the
soon-to-be
Las
Vegas
Raiders.
The parking fees on the
Strip have given places like
downtown and other offStrip properties a marketing wedge issue to work with,
however.
David Strow, spokesman
for Boyd Gaming, said it was
using a “Don’t Get Stripped”
marketing campaign to try
and siphon customers to
places like Main Street Station and the California Hotel
and Casino — along with offStrip properties such as the
Orleans.
Parking at the Orleans is
free, and the two downtown
properties offer validated
parking when customers either gamble, stay or dine at
the casinos.
david.montero
@latimes.com
Twitter: @davemontero
University of Southern California
Sol Price School of Public Policy
Presents
The Dennis F. and Brooks Holt
Distinguished Lecture
Featuring
The Washington Post Publisher and CEO
Founding CEO and President of POLITICO
Frederick J. Ryan, Jr.
Journalism, Accountability, Power
The Confluence of Media & Public Policy
USC Price School is pleased to welcome Frederick J. Ryan, Jr.
to the USC campus for an evening of discussion and inquiry
on this timely topic that is front and center in each of our daily
lives. Ryan will address the function of journalism in American
democracy and how it can play a pivotal role in holding elected
leaders accountable to the public.
Wednesday, April 19, 2017 | 6:00 PM | USC Bovard Auditorium
Limited Seating—Reservation Required | Industry Professionals, Students, Faculty & the Public
Visit PriceEvents.org to
register for this FREE EVENT!
A8
T H U R S DAY , A P R I L 13 , 2 017
WS T
L AT I ME S . CO M
Poultry returns to LAUSD menu
[Chicken, from A1]
the way for a chicken comeback, approving contracts
with three new vendors — including powerhouse Perdue
Farms — that more closely
meet its criteria. As soon as
May, students should see the
return of chicken frankfurters, patties and tenders.
Food advocates say the
nation’s
second-largest
school system led the way
with standards for food suppliers.
“The district has done a
good job, and they have the
commitment,” said Clare
Fox, executive director of the
Los Angeles Food Policy
Council, which advises and
evaluates local institutions
on food purchases.
Still, some observers
question such attention to
wings and thighs in a school
system struggling with below-average test scores and
a potential budget crisis.
Accounts of just what
caused the standoff differ.
L.A. Unified’s negotiator
said a major sticking point
was the district’s insistence
on a right to audit company
operations. A Tyson spokesman recalled a disagreement over price.
The two versions are not
entirely at odds, given that
stricter requirements can
drive up the price of a product. Pilgrim’s Pride said it
simply decided to pursue
other business opportunities.
After negotiations collapsed, turkey showed up
more frequently on district
menus. In the interim, distributor Gold Star Foods,
which does not raise its own
chickens, was able to provide only a limited supply.
The origins of the chicken
crisis date to 2010, when
Tyson was the finalist for the
primary, five-year chicken
contract. When the contract
came before the Board of
Education, school board
member Steve Zimmer said
he’d heard that Tyson had a
poor reputation. As Zimmer
recalls it, a senior staffer
then assured him that the
company’s problems were in
the past. Zimmer immediately searched the Internet,
found evidence of ongoing
Mel Melcon Los Angeles Times
CHICKEN IS a lunchtime favorite of L.A. Unified students, but they haven’t had
much of it in more than a year after negotiations with vendors hit a dead end.
‘Every big issue
you see
connected to the
food system is
manifested, is
most dramatic, in
the chicken
industry.’
— Alexa Delwiche,
executive director of the
Berkeley-based Center for
Good Food Purchasing, which
helps large institutions improve
food procurement practices
concerns, including worker
safety, and turned his laptop
screen around to let people
see what he’d found.
He got the vote delayed
and also won over two colleagues on the seven-member board. But a four-vote
majority approved the contract.
“It was fairly heartbreaking for me,” Zimmer said.
The rest of the Board of
Education had come around
by 2012, when L.A. Unified
may have been the nation’s
first school system to adopt
rules to evaluate food suppliers in five areas: the nutritional quality of their products, animal welfare, environmental impact, help to
the local economy and treatment of the workforce.
Early on, the district had
success, such as expanding
the use of locally grown produce. But the 2015 chicken
contract was seen as a watershed. Activists and some
prosecutors had targeted
Big Poultry, with its massive
farms and slaughterhouses,
accusing companies of polluting the environment, exposing workers to danger
and treating chickens in a
needlessly inhumane manner.
“Every big issue you see
connected to the food system is manifested, is most
dramatic, in the chicken industry,” said Alexa Delwiche, executive director of
the Berkeley-based Center
for Good Food Purchasing,
which helps large institutions monitor and improve
food procurement practices.
In recent years, consumers, distributors and institutions have exerted increasing pressure on suppliers to
move away from feeding
chickens with meal made
from meat byproducts and
from pumping them with antibiotics. Scientists have
said the use of antibiotics in
farming could hasten the
evolution of disease-resistant bacteria.
In 2016, fast-food giant
McDonald’s announced that
it would no longer use chickens that received any antibiotic used to treat people.
L.A. Unified, meanwhile,
helped build a consortium of
the nation’s six largest
school systems to strengthen their clout with food providers. And last year, San
Francisco and Oakland Unified passed their own versions of L.A.’s good-food policy.
The school system has a
long history of activism. It
supported divestment from
apartheid South Africa,
used school construction
bonds to pay for a local jobtraining program, and led
the pack on paying a $15-anhour minimum wage and
providing health benefits to
part-time workers and their
families.
As with some other
stands, the poultry principles come with a price — the
potential to make chicken as
much as two-thirds more expensive, according to an estimate last year by a senior
manager in food services.
“While examining the nutritional health of food products is worthwhile,” said
Lance Izumi, an education
specialist at the conservative, San Francisco-based
Pacific Research Institute,
“one wonders why the school
board is spending so much
time promoting a social-activist agenda in its cafeterias
rather than focusing on improving the poor achievement of so many district students.”
Criticism on this front recently entered the school
board campaign in a negative mailer illustrated with
photos of chicken nuggets
that targeted Zimmer.
But on this issue, Zimmer and Nick Melvoin, his
opponent in a May runoff
election, virtually finish each
other’s sentences.
“When companies like
Tyson Foods are cited repeatedly for [Occupational
Safety and Health Administration] violations, poor
working conditions and failure to meet sustainability
standards, they must be
held accountable and new
providers must be sought,”
said Melvoin when he answered questions posed by
the nonprofit Los Angeles
Food Policy Council. “The
only way to do that is
through oversight — which
is the responsibility of the
LAUSD board, and what I’m
running to promote.”
Zimmer said his job takes
in the whole district, not just
academics.
“This is not ever what I
thought I would spend a
minute on,” Zimmer said.
“But we have a major responsibility in managing a
$7.6-billion operating budget
and the impact of those
funds on what will be, for
some students, their only
full meal of the day. And also
on the impact of these dollars on the lives of the people
who work in these industries.”
In March, to begin to
bring chicken back, the district approved up to $50 million in contracts over five
years with Perdue, Goodman Food Products and
Somma Food Group, and
additional spending is likely.
The incoming chicken,
per district rules, has to be
antibiotic-free. Perdue, as it
happens, now proclaims all
its chickens free from hormones, steroids and antibiotics. All chickens, Perdue
says, also enjoy “a 100% vegetarian diet” — and drink
oregano-spiked water as an
antioxidant.
As for Tyson and Pilgrim’s Pride, they may try to
get back in.
“Many of our products
meet L.A. Unified’s Good
Food Purchasing Policy
standards,” said Pilgrim’s
spokesman
Cameron
Bruett. “We believe there will
be opportunities to do business with each other again in
the future.”
Tyson also has products
that meet the district’s
standards,
said
Tyson
spokesman Gary Mickelson:
“We’re proud of our company and strive to operate
responsibly in all aspects of
our business.”
The district has yet to apply its full standards to beef
and pork, although that’s
the plan. Even with chicken,
the new suppliers don’t
score well across all parameters, Zimmer said.
And the hunt continues
for a good breakfast biscuit
with chicken.
Still, the patties and tenders should please hungry
students.
“We do a lot of taste
tests,” said L.A. Unified
Food Services Director Joseph K. Vaughn. “It became
very apparent to us that the
kids want breaded chicken
product.”
howard.blume
@latimes.com
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Metro’s Best
What can you learn
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Oodles.
Metro’s bus operators have a tough job; they give directions,
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Ask questions. Take a tour. Ask more questions.
Try the food. Ask even more questions. You get the idea.
It’s casual, it’s complimentary and you’re invited.
The Village at Sherman Oaks Senior Living
Community’s next Lunch and Learn is on Wednesday,
April 19th from 11:30am-1:30pm.
Please call 818.646.6011 to RSVP.
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LOS ANGELES TIMES
PAID ADVERTISEMENT
THURSDAY, APRIL 13, 2017
A9
A10
T H U R S DAY, A P R I L 13 , 2 017
WS T
L AT I ME S . CO M
Police manuals draw
scrutiny of ACLU
[Police, from A1]
ports that some police agencies in the Inland Empire
were turning over suspects
to immigration enforcement
agents without receiving
warrants or detainer requests from federal authorities. ACLU officials said
they identified nearly a dozen agencies using the Lexipol policy by submitting
public records requests to
various departments for
their policies.
In addition to Culver City,
police in Azusa, Blythe, Brisbane, Fontana, Fremont, Irwindale, Laguna Beach,
Murrieta, Rialto and Walnut
Creek in California all purchased the policy, according
to the ACLU.
Police officials in Blythe,
Brisbane, Culver City, Fremont, Rialto and Walnut
Creek told The Times that
they do not actively engage
in immigration enforcement. Rialto’s police chief
said this week that he
would consider revising the
policy.
Police in Azusa, Fontana,
Irwindale, Laguna Beach
and Murrieta did not respond to requests for comment.
Ken Wallentine, a senior
legal advisor with Lexipol,
said the group’s policies are
guidelines for local police
chiefs, who should consider
their local demographics
and circumstances before
turning those policies into
practice.
He said the addition of a
“lack of English proficiency”
as a criterion for a stop
might carry more weight in,
say, Minnesota than Southern California. Lexipol’s policy, he noted, urges police
not to use difficulty speaking
English as the sole reason to
validate a stop. Officers
should combine that factor
with another, such as the
possession of fraudulent immigration documents, in deciding whether there is
enough evidence to make an
arrest, he said.
“It just depends on the individual
circumstances.
ACTION
RELAXATION
‘If they’re not
enforcing it, that’s
good, but they
shouldn’t have
this policy on the
books to begin
with.’
— Jennie
Pasquarella,
American Civil Liberties Union
That’s why we say lack of
English proficiency is only
one factor. The very fact that
we emphasize that in policy
is a pretty loud pronouncement of caution,” said Wallentine, who is also a special
agent for the Utah attorney
general’s office.
A Lexipol spokeswoman
would not say how many
law enforcement departments in California use the
company’s policies. Nationwide, roughly 3,000 police
agencies have purchased
some form of policy from
Lexipol, according to Wallentine.
The
ACLU’s
report
comes at a time when law enforcement officials in California and around the country are growing concerned
that increased immigration
enforcement will deter people who are in the country illegally from cooperating
with local police, reporting
crimes or stepping forward
to serve as witnesses at trial.
Prosecutors in several
states have said that ICE’s
practice of making arrests in
courthouses will have a
“chilling effect” on crime reporting. Last month, Los
Angeles police said the number of sexual assaults and
domestic violence incidents
reported by Latinos had
plummeted in the city since
the beginning of the year.
Jennie Pasquarella, the
director of the ACLU’s Immigrants’ Rights Project in
Southern California, said
continued use of Lexipol’s
policy would only deepen the
divide between police and
the immigrant community.
“It worries me that all
these agencies have these
policies on the books,” she
said. “If they’re not enforcing
it, that’s good, but they
shouldn’t have this policy on
the books to begin with.”
The
Lexipol
policy
adopted by Culver City police and other departments
tells officers that “all individuals, regardless of their immigration status, must feel
secure that contacting or being addressed by members
of law enforcement will not
automatically lead to immigration inquiry and/or deportation.” It then explains
that officers “may detain an
individual when there are
facts supporting a reasonable suspicion that the individual entered in the United
States in violation of a federal criminal law.”
Culver City Police Lt.
Troy Dunlap, who heads the
department’s community
relations bureau, said the
immigration policy was part
of a comprehensive package
of policies developed by Lexipol that his agency adopted.
The department has steadfastly refused to take part in
immigration enforcement,
he said.
“I would say the purpose
of us stopping someone
would not be for immigration enforcement. The only
time immigration would
come into play is if they came
to our jail and they were
booked,” he said. “Specifically stopping someone and
asking about immigration
status is not our practice.”
The city’s mayor, Jim
Clarke, said the department
has not engaged in immigration enforcement in decades, but said he would consider the removal of the immigration enforcement policy from the department’s
manual.
Rialto Police Chief Randy
De Anda said he was concerned about the possibility
that crime victims might decide against contacting police, even though his agency
does not engage in immigration enforcement.
“I think it’s a concern
across the state for a lot of
police chiefs and sheriffs,” he
said. “Hopefully, moving forward, we’re able to put those
communities at ease, because obviously we cannot
do our jobs to the fullest if we
don’t have the cooperation
of witnesses or victims.”
Other departments have
modified their policies to remove sections the ACLU
had criticized. A Fremont
police spokesman said the
department had deleted the
section that allowed officers
to consider a “lack of English
proficiency” as a criterion for
stopping a person suspected
of illegal entry.
In the Bay Area city of
Brisbane, police said they do
not stop people to question
their immigration status,
but Cmdr. Robert Meisner
defended the decision to
nonetheless employ Lexipol’s policy.
“The policy is to give
guidance to officers on
where we stand and what
they’re allowed and should
be doing or not doing,” he
said. “But we’re sensitive to
the issues. … We need to
maintain trust in the community.”
Meisner said all the municipal police departments
in San Mateo County have
incorporated general policies developed by Lexipol
into their own rules, and
ACLU officials said they are
concerned that the policy on
immigration enforcement
could be employed by many
more agencies in California.
Pasquarella said ACLU officials in Minnesota have also
been wrestling with similar
police policies provided by
Lexipol.
“It’s not a good idea to
have local law enforcement
engaged in the work of immigration enforcement, both
because it’s not their job and
it undermines community
trust in police,” Wong said.
“Calling on local law enforcement to engage in immigration enforcement results …
in racial profiling and disparate scrutiny placed on communities of color.”
james.queally@latimes.com
Twitter:
@JamesQueallyLAT
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L AT I ME S . CO M
T H U R S DAY , A P R I L 13, 2 017
Same-sex marriage
faces new resistance
Three North Carolina
lawmakers, citing the
Bible, support a state
ban. Experts say bill’s
chances aren’t good.
By Kurtis Lee
The U.S. Supreme Court
went a long way toward settling the legal debate over
same-sex marriage with a
2015 ruling that it was a fundamental right.
North Carolina apparently didn’t get the memo.
This week, three conservative Republican state legislators there introduced a
bill to ban people of the same
sex from marrying one another in North Carolina.
Titled the “Uphold Historical Marriage Act,” the
bill argues that the Supreme
Court ruling “exceeds the
authority of the court relative to the decree of
Almighty God” and that individual states should be allowed to make their own
marriage laws.
It goes on to quote Genesis: “A man shall leave his father and his mother and
hold fast to his wife, and they
shall become one flesh.”
Opponents of the legislation castigated it as an unnecessary step that will
stoke division in a state still
reeling from the fallout of a
controversial bill regulating
which bathrooms transgender people can use.
Democratic Gov. Roy
Cooper criticized the bill on
Twitter, labeling it “wrong”
for North Carolina. “We need
more LGBT protections, not
fewer,” he wrote.
North Carolina House
Speaker Tim Moore, a Republican, released a statement Wednesday saying the
bill would not receive a hearing this session.
“There are strong constitutional concerns with this
legislation given that the
U.S. Supreme Court has
firmly ruled on the issue,
therefore House Bill 780 will
be referred to the House
Rules Committee and will
not be heard,” it said.
Legal experts said the
legislation didn’t stand a
chance.
“A city, town, state legislature can pass any law they
like, but it has to be constitutional,” said Karen O’Connor, a professor at American
University who specializes in
public policy and the
Supreme Court. “This currently would not meet that
bar.”
Under the Constitution,
federal law is the “supreme
law of the land,” she said.
Stephen Griffin, a professor of constitutional law at
Tulane University, said the
effort by North Carolina lawmakers was similar to tactics used in the 1950s and
1960s.
“This is reminiscent of
the civil rights era, when
Southern legislatures tried
to defy the Supreme Court
over the abolition of segregation,” he said.
In 1957, three years after
the Supreme Court’s Brown
vs. Board of Education ruling deemed separate public
schools for blacks and
whites to be unconstitutional, President Eisenhower had to send federal
troops to Little Rock, Ark.,
to help desegregate Central
High School.
North Carolina isn’t the
only place where legislators
have sought to challenge the
Supreme Court’s 5-4 decision on same-sex marriage.
Arkansas lawmakers floated
a proposal last month to ban
it, but gave up after strong
resistance.
Nationwide, polls show
support for same-sex marriage has increased in recent
years. Even before the 2015
Supreme Court ruling, more
than two dozen states allowed it.
Evangelical Christians
have held out in opposition,
with a 2016 poll by the Pew
Research Center finding
that 68% opposed it, while
27% were in support.
Rep. Larry Pittman, an
evangelical from Concord,
N.C., who is among the three
sponsors of the same-sex
marriage legislation introduced this week, could not
be reached for comment.
The message on his voice
mail said, “Let Jesus be Lord
of your life today.”
The effort comes less
than a month after North
Carolina repealed House
Bill 2, which banned transgender people from using
the public bathrooms of
their choice.
The 2016 bill led to a backlash from corporations,
sports leagues and artists,
who boycotted holding
events in the state. Officials
in Charlotte, the state’s biggest city, estimated nearly
$100 million was lost when
the NBA moved its 2017 AllStar Game to New Orleans.
“North Carolina is not
giving up on its discrimination against LGBTQ people,” said Cathryn Oakley,
senior legislative counsel at
the Human Rights Campaign, a national group that
advocates equal rights for
the LGBTQ community.
“Simply put: It’s outrageous.”
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A12
T H U R S DAY, A P R I L 13 , 2 017
L ATI M E S . C O M /O P I N I O N
OPINION
EDITORIALS
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
LETTERS
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Protect privacy at the border
I
n a recent op-ed for the Los Angeles
Times, naturalized U.S. citizen Lubana
Adi detailed how Customs and Border
Protection agents seized and searched
her phone without a warrant when she
returned from visiting her family in Turkey.
“Does the 4th Amendment apply to Muslim
citizens at LAX?” she asked.
The sad truth is that its core protections
don’t seem to apply to any U.S. citizen at the
border, where customs agents are as free to
pore through hard drives as they are to scrutinize roller bags and backpacks. This socalled border exception to the 4th Amendment has a long history. The very first Congress called for warrantless searches at the
border to ensure the proper collection of duties; since then, the rationalization expanded to include the need to block contraband, such as illegal drugs and child pornography.
As laptops and smartphones proliferated, though, border agents began using the
exception to seek something other than
smuggled goods or contraband — they’re
looking for evidence that the device’s owner
is up to no good. Such searches multiplied in
the last two years of the Obama administration, rising from 4,700 in 2015 to almost 24,000
in 2016, the Associated Press reported. The
Trump administration has multiplied them
again, with searches on pace to hit 60,000 this
year.
Searches conducted without even a reasonable suspicion of unlawful activity aren’t
just inefficient; they’re also an affront to
Americans’ constitutional right to privacy.
Adi and her fellow citizens are having the
sensitive personal information on their digital devices hoovered up by federal agents —
apparently because of where they traveled or
their ethnicity, and at other times purportedly because of randomly applied scrutiny.
Some even are having their devices searched
before they leave.
Smartphones and laptops aren’t like luggage — they are repositories of medical and
financial data, communications with loved
ones, and in many cases retain a detailed
digital history of one’s movements. The
breadth and sensitivity of that information is
what makes these devices different from the
sorts of personal possessions that law enforcement officers can legally examine without a warrant, a unanimous Supreme Court
ruled three years ago. That ruling applied to
people whom police officers have arrested,
which invites the question why Americans at
the border should have fewer rights than
those in a holding cell.
Sens. Ron Wyden (D-Ore.), Rand Paul
(R-Ky.) and a bipartisan group of House
members think the answer is: “They
shouldn’t.” They’ve introduced legislation in
the House and Senate to bar border agents
from searching a U.S. citizen’s or lawful permanent resident’s digital devices without a
warrant. It also would prohibit an increasingly common tactic of delaying or refusing
entry to citizens and lawful residents unless
they “volunteered” their device passwords
and social media accounts.
The measure would allow warrantless
searches for emergency situations involving
imminent threats, national security or organized crime, as long as there are grounds
to obtain a warrant after the fact. It’s a reasonable exception that underlines the point
of the bill, which is to stop baseless searches
of U.S. citizens — a step that’s long overdue.
Truth in judicial labeling
I
t’s a lamentable fact of political life
that winning an election for superior
court judge in California often depends
on what job description the candidate
chooses to put on the ballot.
The “ballot designation” goes right under
the candidate’s name, allowing each contender three little words to squeeze in as
much attention-grabbing and persuasive information as the law may permit. So in many
cases a deputy district attorney can call himself or herself a “violent crimes prosecutor,”
or perhaps a “gang crime prosecutor” in
hopes that voters will be impressed by such
tough-on-crime credentials.
The political gold standard may be “child
molestation prosecutor.” If you can get away
with that one you’re a pretty good bet to land
a spot in a run-off or win the race outright.
That’s a sorry comment on how voters decide among judicial candidates. Sorrier still
is the fact that so many candidates for a job
in which truth is paramount push the truth
and the law to the limit, and sometimes beyond, by using ballot designations that obscure rather than clarify their actual occupations. If you prosecuted mostly petty theft
cases but assisted in one misdemeanor
spousal assault case last year, for example,
should you be allowed to call yourself a “domestic violence prosecutor”? If you’re an in-
surance lawyer but also teach a law class for
an hour once each week, can you be a “law
professor”? If you run a restaurant but you
also have a law license and defended a cousin
accused of prostitution last year, can you call
yourself a “sex trafficking lawyer”? Perhaps
— if the registrar-recorder is in a good mood
and none of your opponents challenge you in
court.
For too many judicial candidates, ballot
designations have become an invitation to
deceive. Sen. Benjamin Allen (D-Santa
Monica), has a worthy bill that would help
end such gamesmanship by more strictly
limiting what candidates can call themselves. A candidate couldn’t use designations
like “lawyer” or “attorney” unless they spent
at least half their time in that profession in
the previous year. A government lawyer
would be limited to using the actual job title,
such as “deputy district attorney.”
Of course, if the real point is to give voters
useful as well as accurate information, perhaps it would be better to scrap ballot designations altogether and instead offer links to
State Bar discipline records, performance reviews, Yelp-like client comments or video of
candidate forums.
But let’s not get carried away, and let’s not
get ahead of ourselves. SB 235 is a smart step
forward. It deserves support.
It’s about time, Alabama
A
labama’s embattled Gov.
Robert Bentley stepped down
Monday after pleading guilty to
two misdemeanors following a
salacious sex scandal. That set
off an enormous media extravaganza that
overshadowed the other big political news
out of Alabama this week: Bentley’s successor, Gov. Kay Ivey, signed a law Tuesday
ending the state’s atrocious practice of allowing judges to override a jury’s recommendation of a life sentence and instead
send convicted killers to death row.
The death penalty is anachronistic and
barbaric; society would be better off without
it. It is meted out disproportionately
against people of color and the poor. It
hinges on the arbitrary whims of local prosecutors, who decide whether murders should
be charged as capital offenses. Ourcomes
are affected by bad policing, prosecutorial
misconduct and lying witnesses.
But despite all that, states that continue
to put people to death need to ensure that
they do so as fairly as possible and without
violating the Constitution.
Alabama hasn’t met those standards.
The Supreme Court ruled in its 2002 Ring
vs. Arizona decision that under the 6th
Amendment guarantee to a jury trial, the
“findings of fact” that can lead to an execution must be made by a jury, not a judge.
The court reinforced that standard in its
2015 Hurst vs. Florida decision, ruling that
Florida’s system of having juries issue advisory recommendations was insufficient because the final decision was left to a judge.
Florida subsequently revised its rules; the
Delaware Supreme Court also voided its
similar system. But Alabama’s judicial override system sputtered on. The outrageous
practice is compounded by politics. The
Equal Justice Initiative, a civil rights and
criminal justice advocacy group, has
reported that judicial overrides increase
during judicial election years, suggesting
that some death sentences may have been
imposed not because the defendants were
the “worst of the worst,” but because judges
running for reelection sought to portray
themselves as tough on crime. That would
be a cynical abuse of judicial authority.
So in the “better late than never” spirit,
it’s good that Alabama has finally ended the
practice. But hold the full applause. The
new law doesn’t change Alabama’s rule allowing a death sentence to be handed down
on the basis of 10 out of 12 juror votes (rather
than a unanimous 12, which is what is required for conviction). Also, the new law is
not retroactive, which means people sent to
Alabama’s death row by judges overruling
juries still face execution. Since Alabama
isn’t about to end the death penalty, it
should take those two additional steps to
make its system as fair and just as possible.
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
AND
PUBLISHER
Davan Maharaj
News
MANAGING EDITORS
Marc Duvoisin, Lawrence Ingrassia
DEPUTY MANAGING EDITORS
Colin Crawford, Megan Garvey, Scott Kraft
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FOUNDED DECEMBER 4, 1881
Opinion
Nicholas Goldberg EDITOR OF THE EDITORIAL PAGES
Juliet Lapidos OP-ED AND SUNDAY OPINION EDITOR
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“SOMEONE AS despicable as Hitler” did not use
chemical weapons, said Sean Spicer on Tuesday.
Spicer said what?
Re “Spicer regrets comparing Hitler, Assad,” April 12
Stupidity usually does not require a response.
However, I suggest the following for White House
spokesman Sean Spicer, who wrongly said that Adolf
Hitler did not use chemical weapons:
8 A mandatory visit to Auschwitz.
8 A mandatory visit to the holocaust museum in
Washington.
8 Lessons in using his brain before opening his mouth.
8 Instruction in the German “master plan” for the
annihilation of all Jews.
Then, after completing the above, he must sincerely
apologize to all Holocaust survivors, after which he
should be fired for incompetence. As a Holocaust
survivor and very proud American, I demand nothing
less.
Marianne Bobick
Long Beac
Please inform Spicer
that he is in error about
Hitler not gassing his “own
people.”
Under the Aktion T4
program started in 1939 by
Hitler, the gnadentod
(“good death”) program
was instituted for patients
whose lives were deemed
not worth living. By the
end of 1941, nearly 100,000
patients were collected in
secret and taken to psychiatric institutes across
Germany to be gassed to
death.
The only crime of these
people was that they were
elderly, crippled or mentally disabled. Perhaps
Spicer forgot about them.
Craig Carr
West Hills
::
Spicer has to go. The
White House has to realize
that Spicer lacks general
knowledge of history,
which is unacceptable for
its most high-profile
spokesman.
“Holocaust centers?”
Hitler did not gas his own
people? Weren’t the people
of Germany (including
Jews) under Hitler’s leadership, similar to how the
people of Syria attacked
with chemical weapons
were under Bashar Assad’s
control?
Chemical bombs are the
same as chemical gas
chambers.
Steve Shaevel
Woodland Hills
Silencing is not
a valid protest
Re “Shutting down campus speech,” editorial,
April 11
Protesting is a right
guaranteed by the 1st
Amendment. Preventing
someone from speaking is
not protected.
Those protesters who
tried to prevent conservative author Heather Mac
Donald from speaking at
Claremont-McKenna
College should be ashamed
of themselves. Our nation
is made better by vigorous
political debates.
I recall when American
Nazi George Lincoln Rockwell spoke at UCLA in 1967.
Those of us who were disgusted by his political
views did not prevent him
from speaking. Instead,
when Rockwell took the
stage at Royce Hall, we
silently stood up and
turned our backs to him.
We did not shout him
down, we did not rush the
stage, and we did not prevent him from expressing
his views.
If one is confident in his
or her beliefs, then there is
no reason to prevent a
person with opposing
views from expressing
them. But those who lack
confidence in their beliefs
will seek to prevent a person with opposing views
from speaking.
Andrew C. Sigal
Valley Village
The recent student
action at ClaremontMcKenna reaffirms why
some students are called
sophomores. Trying to
prevent disturbing opinions by disruption is as
ineffective as J.D.
Salinger’s character Holden Caulfield’s effort to
eliminate graffiti by erasing it from the walls.
I would urge students to
move beyond the sophomoric to realize a university’s gift to society is to
provide a protected place
where the free exchange of
all ideas is encouraged.
That indefatigable voice of
democratic liberalism,
John Stuart Mill, understood the necessity of this
principle when he told us
society is “no more justified
in silencing that one person, than he, if he had the
power, would be justified in
silencing mankind.”
In 1970, then-Gov. Ronald Reagan closed 28 public college campuses in
California to prevent protests over the Kent State
killings. A few of us, recalling another Millsean notion — that truth emerges
stronger by collision with
error — fought to keep the
schools open; I would
implore that we do the
same today.
A. Lee Brown Jr.
Lake San Marcos, Calif.
Good riddance
to the filibuster
Re “Goodbye, U.S. Senate,”
Opinion, April 9
Abbe R. Gluck claims
that the loss of the filibuster is a “tragic loss for our
democracy.” In fact, getting rid of the Senate filibuster will allow us to
regain some of the democratic principles of our
government.
Democracy requires
that the majority legislates
and governs, and the Senate is the most undemocratic part of our government. It is possible for 41
senators representing a
small minority of the U.S.
population to effectively
shut down the government
by preventing cloture.
The Affordable Care
Act was not an example of
bipartisan cooperation.
Even though Sen. Olympia
Snowe (R-Maine) voted
against cloture in the Senate, she had voted for the
bill to go forward in the
Finance Committee and
was vilified by her Republican colleagues. She went
on to retire from the Senate because of the hostility
of her fellow Republicans.
This is hardly a democratic
process.
It is time to discard the
filibuster in the Senate. Let
the party in power legislate
and govern.
Terrence R. Dunn
Bakersfield
::
I disagree with Gluck
for three reasons.
First, I believe the fili-
buster is unconstitutional.
The Constitution carefully
specifies when a supermajority is required. The
filibuster is not one of
them.
Second, the Senate is
already, structurally and
undemocratically, tilted in
favor of the minority. Each
state, regardless of population, is allotted two senators. So Wyoming, population 585,000, has as many
senators as California,
population 39 million. The
filibuster exacerbates this
imbalance.
Third, for most of its
history, the filibuster was
used sparingly and rarely
did harm. Then came Sen.
Mitch McConnell (R-Ky),
the current majority leader
who, as the minority
leader, shattered the longstanding norm by applying
the filibuster indiscriminately, making a sham of
the rule. His abuse established a destructive new
norm.
The filibuster as had its
ugly day. Now it must go.
Bill Blum
Studio City
Skid row vote
skewed by Web?
Re “At a crossroads, skid
row loses bid for own council,” April 8
As a member of the
Echo Park Neighborhood
Council, I am concerned
about the results of the
vote to consider a separate
neighborhood council for
skid row.
The tally of votes cast
by paper ballot was 183-19
in favor of establishing a
council, in which residents
could have a degree of
self-determination and
autonomy in the decisionmaking about their own
community.
But by using online
voting, the opposite result
was reached, with a tally of
807-581 against the creation
of a separate skid row
neighborhood council.
Does it occur to anyone
that homeless people may
not have Web access or
even the knowledge or
training to use the internet?
I would guess that
downtown’s more well-off
stakeholders who have
easy access to the Internet,
including wealthy developers, accounted for many
of those 807 votes. It’s just
wrong to disenfranchise
people based on their
internet access.
Cheryl Ortega
Los Angeles
Small egos of
big-game hunters
Re “Why men aspire to kill
big game,” April 10
Years ago I was asked
by the wife of a man of
great means to meet at her
home to discuss Christmas
decor. The door opened to
reveal a grand entry —
grand in size but pitiful in
its wall display of the heads
of gorgeous wild animals as
well as a zebra head and
skin on the floor.
I was sickened, but she
was the hunter’s wife and
not responsible for her
spouse’s hobby.
I will never comprehend
killing of beautiful wildlife,
especially to cover one’s
walls. Despite the wealth
they have achieved, I believe the men who do this
look in the mirror and see a
physically or socially inadequate being.
The irony is that guides
are paid to find the targets,
and the entire process is a
pinball machine.
Diane Stanfield
Santa Monica
::
I’ll tell you why men
aspire to kill big game.
They do it because they
have no sense of the value
of other life on this planet.
They are men who are very
impressed with themselves
and who need to kill something to feel important.
Gerald Orcholski
Pasadena
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L AT I ME S . CO M / O PI N I O N
T H U R S DAY, A P R I L 13 , 2 017
A13
OP-ED
Check NATO’s march — and Russian ire
By Michael E. O’Hanlon
P
resident Trump’s relationship with Russian
President Vladimir Putin
may turn out to be too
close for comfort, but
Trump’s instincts about U.S.-Russia ties are at least partly right. The
U.S. simply can’t afford poor relations with the planet’s other nuclear
superpower.
Security in Syria depends on it,
for one. The even bigger issue, however, is security in Europe, where
tensions between Russia and the
North Atlantic Treaty Organization have been acute for three years.
Some maintain that Putin cultivates an adversarial relationship
with the outside world to strengthen his popularity at home and thus
his hold on power, and also to provide him with an excuse to suppress
dissent. This may be true, but he
also appears to bear a genuine
grudge against the U.S. for its postCold War assertiveness near his territory. For two decades, and especially over the last 10 years, Putin
and other Russian officials have
complained that NATO’s eastward
march threatens Russia’s security.
Granted, NATO has gone out of
its way to consult and work with
Russia since the Cold War ended.
The alliance has also avoided
putting major combat forces in new
member states that are situated
near Russia’s borders.
Still, one can understand why
Russians would find it overbearing
and triumphalist that NATO
moved 1,000 miles east while taking
in a dozen new members, most of
which were previously part of the
Warsaw Pact or the Soviet Union.
The U.S. also supported democratic forces that gave rise to revolutions in Ukraine, Georgia and Kyrgyzstan, and, as Moscow sees it, we
attacked other countries, including
Serbia, Iraq and Libya, without a legal basis for doing so and often with
poor results. Meanwhile, NATO expansion continues. Last month, the
U.S. Senate ratified the Balkan nation of Montenegro’s accession to
the alliance, and Trump on Tuesday signed off on the move.
In Putin’s eyes, we are an out-ofcontrol hyper-power that must be
opposed. His view is warped, but it
seems to be sincere.
The whole situation is counterproductive, and nowhere more so
than in Ukraine and Georgia. President George W. Bush persuaded
NATO to publicly offer eventual
membership to the two countries —
both former Soviet republics, both
adjacent to Russia — but there was
no timetable established and no interim guarantee of security in the
John Thys AFP/Getty Images
NATO has moved 1,000 miles east while taking in new members.
meantime. They are thus fully exposed to Russian aggression. Exacerbating matters, NATO has a longstanding policy of not accepting
new members until they resolve any
territorial disputes with neighbors.
Though a sensible idea in the abstract, the policy gives Putin an incentive to stoke trouble with
Ukraine and Georgia, because any
ongoing disputes invalidate their
near-term eligibility for NATO
membership.
Trump should at least try to deescalate tensions. He could do so
with a broad agreement among
NATO states, Moscow and the neutral countries of Europe. In such an
agreement, NATO could vow to not
expand further. In return, Russia
would commit to leave the neutral
countries alone, withdraw military
forces from their territories, allow
them to join whatever diplomatic
and economic groups they want (including the European Union), and
stop arming and abetting separatists in places such as the Donbas region of Ukraine and northern Georgia. Once Putin met these conditions, the U.S. could lift its sanctions against Russia.
Trump’s two predecessors also
wanted to improve U.S.-Russia relations, of course.
Bush tried until disputes over
Iraq and NATO soured the atmosphere; Russia then invaded Georgia in the summer of 2008.
President Obama talked of a “reset” with Moscow before his hopes
were dashed by Russia’s aggression
against Ukraine and military intervention in Syria, and by Putin’s suppression of dissent and democracy
at home.
Putin continues to make diplomacy difficult. He is now adamantly opposing Trump’s limited
and careful reprisal against the Syrian government’s apparent use of
chemical weapons. And as investigations into Russian interference in
the U.S. presidential election heat
up, much of Trump’s top national
security team is reverting to antiRussia rhetoric.
If we continue down this path, a
U.S.-Russia war could erupt over a
contested area in Europe. To reduce the risk, we need to develop an
alternative to further expansion of
NATO, one that promotes the security and prosperity of the neutral
countries in Eastern Europe.
Michael E. O’Hanlon is a senior
fellow in foreign policy at the
Brookings Institution.
Hate flying? Let
Richard Branson
kill United Airlines
By Matt Welch
M
Ben Curtis Associated Press
AS CHOCOLATE prices drop, the suffering of the farmers who grow cocoa increases.
Before you eat that
chocolate bunny ...
By Simran Sethi
J
ust after Valentine’s Day,
prices for cocoa plummeted.
Days later, media outlets
erupted in a collective hurrah. “Your chocolate is getting cheaper,” headlines proclaimed. “Easter will be sweet.”
What wasn’t factored into the celebration is the deep suffering of the
subsistence farmers who grow cacao, the seeds of a pod-shaped fruit
that, once harvested, become the
cocoa traded on the commodities
market and destined for the chocolate eggs and bunnies that fill most
Easter baskets.
Cacao’s origins trace to the
rainforests of the upper Amazon,
and the seeds are believed to have
been transformed into a drink in
Mesoamerica at least as early as
400 BC. Once used as medicine,
currency and a stand-in for human
blood during rituals, today cacao
— cocoa — is dried, fermented and
roasted to become the foundation
of the $100-billion chocolate industry. The trees grow in a tropical
band 20 degrees north and south of
the equator, with 70% of production based in West Africa and centered in Ivory Coast.
Despite the success of the chocolate (and confection) industries,
90% of cocoa farmers operate at
the margins. A recent study by the
French Development Agency and
Barry Callebaut (the world’s largest cocoa manufacturer) determined that farmers in Ivory Coast
earn roughly 91 cents a day. Imagine what it means for those farmers
when the price they receive for the
fruits of their labor drops — as it
has recently — by 33%.
This decline in commodity cocoa prices over the past year is the
result of several factors, including
predictions that consumers in
China and India would develop an
insatiable appetite for chocolate.
Consumption has increased in
these countries but not at forecasted levels. And globally, demand has remained largely un-
Sean Gallup Getty Images
changed. But farmers haven’t been
able to slow production: They had
already planted more trees in anticipation of increased demand
and that, coupled with good
weather in most of Ivory Coast’s
cocoa-growing regions, bolstered
the harvest and has resulted in a
bumper crop and oversupply.
Because there is no global
agreement ensuring farmers a
base price for cocoa, the farmers
are vulnerable to every market
shift. However, local governments
can and do set parameters for the
crop. In 2016, the Ivorian regulator
Conseil du Cafe-Cacao set a minimum price of 1,100 Central African
francs per kilogram, roughly 81
cents per pound, and also helped
farmers contract with exporters to
buy the early 2017 crop. But that
was last July, when the market
price of cocoa was significantly
higher; many exporters have since
defaulted on their commitments.
Although officials say they’ve
resold the defaulted contracts, last
week Ivory Coast’s minimum price
guaranteed to farmers was cut by
almost 40%.
Adding to this challenge are reports that the new crop will be
abundant. (It is a perverse fact of
economics that high yields contribute to an increased supply that
results in lower prices for farmers.)
And with new plantings continu-
ing to mature (it takes three to five
years for a new tree to produce cocoa), the glut is expected to grow
larger in years to come.
If farmers can’t earn a living
from cocoa, they will grow other
crops or seek out different employment. If the shift is widespread, it
may decrease the diversity of cocoa, affect the development of the
crop and ultimately make cocoa
harder to get and more expensive
for chocolate lovers and chocolate
makers.
For consumers, the solution is a
tasty one: Eat more chocolate. But
not just any chocolate. At no other
moment in history has information
on farmers, cocoa prices and the
chocolate industry been so readily
available — investigate and choose
wisely.
To support cocoa farmers, look
for chocolate that contains more
cocoa. (In the United States, a
candy bar has to contain only 10%
cocoa to be legally identified as
chocolate.)
Pay attention to the story on
the label. Certifications indicate a
range of social, economic and environmental initiatives to sustain cocoa production. Origin designations seek to highlight different flavors found in the regions where cocoa is grown.
If you put your money where
your mouth is and buy craft, or specialty, chocolate, you’re underwriting makers who may be trading directly with farmers. Craft chocolate costs more than what’s massproduced because its makers are
committed to raising the profile of
quality cocoa, and they pay a premium for the crop.
Go ahead, bite into that chocolate Easter bunny. But consider
the people whose labor supplied
the raw material that makes it
taste so good.
Simran Sethi is the author of
“Bread, Wine, Chocolate: The
Slow Loss of Foods We Love”
and the creator of the chocolate
podcast “The Slow Melt.”
ost semi-frequent
travelers
have
their own private
no-fly
list—that
one airline whose
aggressive incompetence and
casual cruelty leads them to say
“never again.” Even before introducing the term “re-accommodate” into the National Registry
of
Corporate
Euphemisms,
United has been that no-go airline
for me, the result of a long series of
outrages beginning with the nearruination of George Gershwin’s
“Rhapsody in Blue.”
And yet, after grim Expedia
searches, I continue to sporadically fly those unfriendly skies, because unlike evil rental car companies (cough *AVIS* cough), air
carriers have colluded with government to shield themselves
from the consumer-friendly gales
of competition. Protectionist legislators have basically made it impossible for us to quit United.
Perhaps you’ve seen that
graphic making the rounds,
showing how mergers over the
last decade have consolidated the
largest 11 domestic airlines into a
profitable, customer-abusing Big
Five? The accompanying BuzzFeed headline is a true enough
conclusion: “Airlines Treat You
Badly Because They Can.” But
like a lot of the how-we-got-here
coverage this week, it misses one
elephant in the room.
Foreign companies and individuals — think Richard Branson
and Virgin Atlantic Airways — are
forbidden by U.S. law from owning
more than 25% of a domestic airline. That’s why Virgin America
could be sold last year to Alaska
Airlines over the express wishes of
Virgin’s famous founder: He just
didn’t have enough votes.
The differently headquartered
are banned outright from servicing routes between two American
cities, a practice with the sinistersounding name of cabotage. And
carriers from Singapore to the
Gulf States are not only barred
from competition, but subject to
sneering taunts by American legacies from behind the protectionist firewall, such as when United
CEO Oscar Munoz this March
said that companies including
the well-regarded Emirates “aren’t real airlines.”
What on Earth justifies such
pre-Trump xenophobic mercantilism in our increasingly globalized world? According to North
America’s Air Line Pilots Assn.:
“These regulations ensure the national security of our country and
the integrity of our airline industry.” Or translated into honestese, “These regulations ensure
the job security of unionized U.S.
nationals and the continued existence of poorly run U.S. airlines.”
The nexus between neglected
infrastructure and national security is one of the most reliably insane areas of public policy. Recall
the coast-to-coast freakout in
2006 when Dubai Ports World attempted to buy management
rights to a half-dozen major U.S.
ports. Or, for those of us with longer memories, the shameful panic
here in L.A. a quarter century ago
when the county awarded a subway-car contract to a company
from (shudder) Japan.
In fact, one of the biggest worries among free-market economists about President Trump’s
gestating $1-trillion infrastructure bill is that it will contain “buy
American, hire American” provisions that would discourage
needed investments from foreign
companies and financial institutions.
The irony of America’s lagging
air travel quality—including the
abject lousiness of its airports,
which President Trump is absolutely correct about—is that we
once led the world in airline innovation. When the domestic industry was deregulated in the
mid-1970s, thanks to then-Sen.
Ted Kennedy, future Supreme
Court Justice Stephen Breyer, liberal economist Alfred Kahn, and
President Carter (yes, you read all
that right), our trading partners
scrambled to become more like
us. Then they surpassed us.
Protectionist
legislators have
basically made it
impossible for us
to quit United. We
should let foreign
companies compete.
It took a couple of decades, but
eventually the European Union
dismantled subsidies for national
carriers, privatized a number of
airports (something unheard of
here), and let literally hundreds of
low-cost airlines run riot. It even
allowed some foreign-airline cabotage, on a case-by-case basis.
The result is those annoying Instagram pics from friends who
live in London, showing off that
people in Europe fly everywhere
for dirt cheap.
Yes, airlines on the continent
come and go faster than New York
restaurants. But that’s precisely
the point: With real competition
comes real failure, hopefully followed by bankruptcy and even
liquidation, instead of Americanstyle too-big-to-fail bailouts. How
many customers must United
pummel before they can Gershwin us no more?
As Marc Scribner of the Competitive Enterprise Institute put
it this week: “If American consumers wish to enjoy improved
service quality in air travel, they
should demand that Congress repeal 90 years of anti-competitive
federal law. Less regulation of air
travel, not more, is the solution.”
This will be a lonely sentiment
in a week when headline-chasers
from Republican New Jersey Gov.
Chris Christie to Democratic
Maryland Sen. Chris Van Hollen
elbow each other out with interventionist solutions. But if we
really want to punish United Airlines — and Lord, how I’ve
dreamed of this day — then letting Richard Branson and his cohort come and compete on
American soil will do more to extract justice than a hundred regulators ever could.
Matt Welch is editor at large
of Reason magazine and a
contributing writer to Opinion.
A14
T H U R S DAY, A P R I L 13 , 2 017
L ATI M E S . CO M
Smog rule trapped in EPA limbo
The agency’s request
for a court delay has
activists worried that
the tougher emissions
standard is doomed.
By Alene
Tchekmedyian
When the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
adopted a stricter smog limit in 2015, forcing states to reduce emissions, many people were disappointed.
At the time, the agency
reduced the ground-level
ozone standard to 70 parts
per billion, down from the 75ppb standard adopted in
2008 under the George W.
Bush administration.
Industry groups and
some states criticized the
standard as too strict, argu-
ing it would hinder economic
growth, while public health
advocates and environmentalists, who had called for
a 60-ppb standard, argued
the rule wasn’t protective
enough.
Groups from both sides
sued the EPA, which was set
this month to defend the
2015 rule in court.
But now, at the request of
the EPA, the case is on hold
— and environmentalists
fear the Trump administration will ditch the cleaner
standard.
A federal appeals court
panel this week agreed to
suspend the case to give the
EPA time to review, and possibly reconsider, the standard.
“In light of President
Trump’s pro-growth agenda, EPA continues to carefully review the broad implications of the 2015 ozone
standard and ensure that we
are supporting American
jobs and protecting human
health and the environment,” EPA spokeswoman
Liz Bowman said via email.
Environmental
and
health groups filed court papers opposing the delay.
They worried that the move
may signal plans by the EPA
to weaken the standard or
delay its implementation.
“What’s at stake here is
clean air,” said Seth Johnson, an attorney with Earthjustice, which filed court papers opposing the agency’s
request. “The Environmental Protection Agency is supposed to make sure that the
air gets cleaned up, and if
they do put a pause on implementing the standard,
the air is going to stay dirtier
for longer.”
Ozone is formed when
pollution from cars, trucks,
power plants and refineries
cooks in the heat and sun-
Don’t lose sleep
over Dry Mouth
light. Exposure can trigger
asthma attacks and other
breathing problems. Johnson said any delay could lead
to unnecessary deaths.
The new rule was expected to have the largest effect in California, which has
some of the worst air quality
in the nation and has in the
past failed to meet smog
standards. On 132 days last
year, the ozone level in much
of the greater Los Angeles
area failed to meet the
standard. Most of the violations occurred during summer months.
“L.A. has the worst ozone
pollution in the country,”
said Adrian Martinez, another Earthjustice attorney.
“We need the federal government
setting
stringent
standards so California can
protect us from dangerous
smog.”
It’s not yet clear what
changes, if any, the agency
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agency will move forward
with those findings.
“It’s unlikely the agency
will put time and effort into
implementing a standard
it’s still questioning,” Rubin
said.
Dave Clegern, a spokesman for the California Air
Resources Board, called the
agency’s review “unnecessary” and said loosening the
standard would be a mistake.
“We signed off on those
standards too. We believe
they are based in sound science and they are necessary
for public health,” Clegern
said. “They already have
done all the science involved
in this…. Whatever review
they run, if they’re running it
scientifically, they will get
the same results as they
have now.”
alene.tchekmedyian
@latimes.com
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plans to make, but experts
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standard won’t get more
strict.
At the head of the agency
now is Scott Pruitt, the former Oklahoma attorney
general, who was part of a
group that sued the EPA
over the smog standard, arguing it was too restrictive.
“It definitely calls the
possibility of loosening the
requirement, which would
allow there to be a higher level of ozone” than the current
rule allows, said Jim Rubin,
an environmental attorney.
The appeals court ordered the EPA to file status
reports every 90 days on the
agency’s review of the 2015
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The agency was scheduled in October to issue findings on which regions failed
to meet the standard, Rubin
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CALIFORNIA
B
T H U R S D A Y , A P R I L 1 3 , 2 0 1 7 :: L A T I M E S . C O M / C A L I F O R N I A
Vaccination
rate up after
exemptions
tightened
SA N B ER NA R D I N O S C H O O L S H OO TI NG
The percentage of
kindergartners with all
required shots rose to
95.6% last fall. ‘This is
one year, one step,’
lawmaker cautions.
By Soumya
Karlamangla
and Rong-Gong Lin II
The vaccination rate for
California’s kindergartners
soared this fall from the previous year, fueled by a state
law that made it significantly tougher for parents to
exempt schoolchildren from
shots.
It was the highest vaccination rate among kindergartners since at least 1998,
and comes after a measles
outbreak that began at Disneyland in 2014 focused new
attention on the issue.
New
data
released
Wednesday show that the
percentage of California’s
kindergartners as of last fall
with all required vaccinations rose from 92.8% to
95.6%.
More
kindergartners
were also getting the measles vaccination: 97.3% of
California’s kindergartners
reported receiving both
measles shots, up from
94.5% a year ago and 92.6% in
the fall of 2014, just before the
Disneyland measles outbreak.
Gina Ferazzi Los Angeles Times
THE DAY AFTER Jonathan Martinez, 8, and teacher Karen Smith were shot and killed in their class-
room at North Park Elementary School on Monday, people gather at the school for a candlelight vigil.
BOY RECALLED
AS ‘FULL OF LIFE’
Before he was killed in his classroom, Jonathan Martinez
battled a rare disorder with his contagious enthusiasm
By Melissa Etehad
Many who knew Jonathan Martinez remembered him for an infectious smile that belied a difficult life.
The 8-year-old was born with
Williams syndrome, a rare genetic
condition that can result in learning
difficulties and medical problems
such as heart and kidney ailments.
He had undergone heart surgery.
Seeing Jonathan overcome these
challenges makes his sudden, violent
death inside his special education
classroom in San Bernardino all the
more difficult to bear, friends say.
Diane Abrams, who worked in the
special-needs class where Jonathan
was a student, said she remembers
him as “full of life.”
“He was so special to teach…. He
was curious to learn and wanted to do
his very best. He was such a loving little guy. He’d sit with his hands folded
at his desk and look at me and say,
San Bernardino City Unified via AP
JONATHAN was known
for his wide smile and outgoing friendliness. “I will
think of him as a very best
friend,” said a classmate.
Vaccination rates for
whooping
cough,
also
known as pertussis, posted
similar numbers.
Experts say the conditions for measles outbreaks
are enhanced if the vaccination rate is less than 95%.
Lawmakers who authored the vaccination law,
known as SB 277, cheered
the results.
“It is gratifying to see that
in the course of just one
school year, more children —
and the public at large — are
now more fully protected
from preventable diseases,”
Sen. Ben Allen (D-Santa
Monica) said in a statement.
“Great news,” tweeted
state Sen. Richard Pan (DSacramento), a pediatrician.
Pan said in an interview
Wednesday that he was encouraged by this year’s vaccination rates, especially because they are higher than
the minimum needed to
keep a single measles case
from spreading rapidly in
California.
“Measles certainly hasn’t
gone away,” he said, pointing
to outbreaks in Europe and
one in L.A. County earlier
this year. “We need to be sure
to have our immunization
levels high enough. The fact
that this class, and the state
overall, has now achieved
this level is one further step
to restore the community
immunity we had before.”
But Pan noted that the
[See Vaccination, B4]
California’s kindergarten
vaccination rates
Measles
‘Ms. Abrams, am I being an all-star?’ ”
she recalled.
Jonathan’s week began the way it
does for most children: He was
dropped off at school Monday morning after having spent the weekend
playing with friends and family, according to neighbors.
But then a gunman walked into
the boy’s classroom at North Park Elementary School in San Bernardino.
About10:27 a.m., the gunman fired
10 shots from a Smith & Wesson revolver. One of the bullets fatally
struck Jonathan as he stood near his
teacher, Karen Smith, who was also
shot dead.
The gunman was Smith’s estranged husband, Cedric Anderson.
An employee at the school had
seen Anderson arrive and recognized
him as Smith’s husband. Following
normal protocol, she asked him to
sign in and allowed him to walk unescorted to Smith’s classroom.
[See Jonathan, B4]
Pertussis/whooping cough
98% fully immunized
96
94
92
’98
’00
’02
’04
’06
’08
’10
’12
’14
’16
Source: California Department of Public Health
L e n D e G r o o t Los Angeles Times
CAPITOL JOURNAL
California wants
a louder voice in
presidential races
the primary up to March
Cop punches alleged jaywalker Moving
is good way for state to be heard
Sacramento officer’s
department calls his
actions ‘disturbing.’ A
probe is launched.
By Veronica Rocha
A criminal investigation
has been launched into the
“disturbing” actions of a
Sacramento police officer
who was captured on video
punching a man accused of
jaywalking, authorities said.
The officer, whose name
hasn’t been released, was
placed on leave as authorities opened an administrative investigation into his actions.
On Tuesday, the Police
Department released dashcam video from the officer’s
patrol cruiser showing the
confrontation. (A witness’
cellphone video of the incident sparked public outrage
when it was circulated on so-
cial media recently.)
“The actions of the involved Sacramento police
officer are disturbing and do
not appear to be reasonable
based upon the circumstances,” the Police Department said in a statement.
“The Sacramento Police Department holds itself to the
highest professional standard and the actions that
were observed are not indicative of the dedicated women and men who work for the
Department.”
Police said the officer
tried to stop the man just after 5 p.m. Monday as he
crossed a street illegally near
the intersection of Cypress
Street and Grand Avenue in
North Sacramento. The
man, who later identified
himself to reporters as
Nandi Cain Jr., put his hands
up and walked away.
As he walked off, the officer and Cain began arguing
in the street, police said.
[See Video, B6]
GEORGE SKELTON
in sacramento
KTLA
A VIDEO SHOWS a Sacramento officer repeatedly
punching a man accused of jaywalking after the man
challenged the officer’s reasons for stopping him.
California
voters had
virtually no
voice in who
was nominated for
president last
year. That’s
plain wrong.
And hopefully it can be
made right for 2020.
Yes, that’s an eon away,
although for millions of
voters in this deep-blue
state, the next presidential
election probably can’t
come soon enough.
Regardless, the system
needs to be fixed long before
the next White House wannabes surface and inevitably politicize what should
be a rational decision about
California’s role in the nominating process.
Just ask yourself: Were
you really happy about the
nominations of Donald
Trump and Hillary Clinton?
Millions were not, I suspect.
But Trump and Clinton
had the Republican and
Democratic nominations
practically sewed up —
thanks to some pampered
pipsqueak states — before
Californians were heard
from in the June primary.
They probably would
have been nominated anyway. Trump and Clinton
won in California’s June
primary and may well have
been the victors even if we’d
voted in March.
But that’s not the point.
The point is that our views
didn’t matter. By the time
we got to the party, no one
cared. Everyone was leaving
for the conventions.
It’s a sorry system of
democracy that disregards
the opinions of nearly 11% of
the nation’s electorate.
It’s our own fault, however, for scheduling such a late
primary when the political
[See Skelton, B5]
B2
T H U R S DAY , A PRI L 13 , 2 017
L AT I M ES . C OM
SURROUNDINGS
Syrian refugee, 17, is feared drowned
TERI FIGUEROA
SAN DIEGO — Mohammed al Mustafa and his
family escaped the terror
and destruction of war-torn
Aleppo, Syria, and they
settled several weeks ago in
the suburb of El Cajon,
ready to start a new life.
But now his parents and
four sisters are mourning
the 17-year-old, who is believed to have drowned
Sunday after being caught
in a rip current off Mission
Beach. His body hasn’t been
recovered.
“He didn’t have a childhood because of the war in
Syria,” his father, Husan al
Mustafa, said through a
translator. The family came
to America hoping there
would be “a better future for
him in the United States.”
In San Diego, Mohammed was just getting accustomed to his new surroundings, buoyed in part by the
region’s close Syrian community.
He had pleaded with his
parents to let him go on the
beach outing with four
buddies. Promising to keep
in close contact, he later
spoke via FaceTime with his
father from the beach,
where the teens ate pizza
and drank soda on the
shore.
“He was a good boy,”
family friend Lisa Attardo
said Tuesday. “He knew his
parents were worried.”
At some point, the group
ventured into the water.
It was Mohammed’s first
time at a beach, his father
said. He was last seen wading knee- or waist-deep in
the waves.
Fire officials said it appears the boy and another
teen were pulled into the
strong rip current about 6
p.m. Lifeguards spotted the
other teen struggling and
pulled him to the beach, but
they never saw Mohammed.
Once on shore, the group
told lifeguards their friend
was missing.
Lifeguards, with help
from a police helicopter,
searched the area until it
San Diego Union-Tribune
MOHAMMED AL MUSTAFA was on his first-ever beach trip when he was
caught in a rip current at San Diego’s Mission Beach. His body hasn’t been found.
George Ourfalian AFP/Getty Images
THE TEENAGER and his family fled to Turkey from Aleppo, Syria, above, in
2014. They recently joined a growing community of Syrian refugees in San Diego.
got too dark but couldn’t
locate the teen. Authorities
believe he was submerged
by the current.
“It was pulling really
strong, and it gets very deep
very quick,” San Diego
lifeguard Capt. James Gartland said.
On Tuesday, search
efforts resumed, with maritime agencies using boats
equipped with sonar to
scour the bottom of the
ocean. A helicopter also flew
over the area in search of the
boy’s body, with no success.
No further searches were
planned.
The family held out hope
that Mohammed might
have returned to shore and
wandered away, perhaps
disoriented, but that hope
was fading.
The teen’s mother is
“inconsolable,” said Attardo, who attends St.
Thomas More Catholic
Church in Oceanside, which
for weeks has been helping
the family get settled in
their new home.
San Diego County has a
growing community of
Syrian refugees fleeing the
civil war that has raged in
their country since 2011.
Since 2014, about 1,140
Syrian refugees have arrived
in the region. Many have
settled in El Cajon or the
City Heights neighborhood
of San Diego.
Like many others, Husan
al Mustafa and his family
fled Syria as the violence
grew.
“It was really dangerous
to live in Aleppo,” he said
through an interpreter. The
family witnessed bombings
and violence and had
friends and neighbors who
were killed, he said.
Al Mustafa, an accountant, said he and his family
escaped in mid-2014 to Turkey, where they were able to
rent a home. About a year
later, they registered there
as refugees.
He said the family
wanted to leave Turkey
“because of Mohammed. …
He was really young, but he
could not study there.”
After roughly 18 months
of intense vetting, they were
allowed to come to the U.S.,
sponsored by the Catholic
Charities Diocese of San
Diego. The family arrived
Jan. 24.
At St. Thomas More,
Father Mike Ratajczak and
Sister Maureen Brown
invited parishioners to help
the family. The congregation has donated cash,
household supplies, and a
sewing machine and fabric
for Mohammed’s mother,
who is a seamstress.
One parishioner offered
a van for the family to use,
and another volunteered to
help Mohammed’s older
sister with her goal of entering college in the fall.
Attardo and her husband led the push to gather
donations and have visited
with the family often. She
said they are hardworking
and generous, always smiling.
“Their house is full of
laughter,” Attardo said. “A
lot of love in this family. A lot
of love.”
Their father, who like the
rest of the family is still
learning English, is eager to
find a job and become selfsufficient, Brown said.
She said that when Rata-
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jczak has asked Al Mustafa
what was needed, he replied
that they could either give
him a fish or teach him to be
a fisherman — and he
wanted to be a fisherman.
On Sunday, the Attardos
had driven down to El Cajon
to visit and hand off donations. They spent a few
hours there and watched as
the father spoke via FaceTime to Mohammed at the
beach.
teri.figueroa
@sduniontribune.com
Figueroa writes for the San
Diego Union-Tribune.
Lottery results
For Tuesday, April 11, 2017
Mega Millions
Mega number is bold
19-34-35-38-49—Mega 8
Jackpot: $25 million
California winners per category:
5 + Mega
5
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4
3 + Mega
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4
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Winning jackpot ticket(s) sold in other
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SuperLotto Plus
Mega number is bold
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Jackpot: $28 million
Powerball
Powerball number is bold
8-14-61-63-68—Powerball 24
Jackpot: $60 million
Fantasy Five: 7-12-27-36-39
Daily Four: 8-4-6-5
Daily Three (midday): 0-6-2
Daily Three (evening): 1-4-6
Daily Derby:
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Race time: 1:45.41
Results on the Internet:
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General information:
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(Results not available at this number)
L AT I ME S . CO M
T H U R S DAY, A P R I L 13 , 2 017
CITY & STATE
More Californians are
completing high school,
but are they prepared?
B3
Graduation rates released
California graduation rates by high need groups
2015-16
Migrant education
Low income
English learners
Special education
Foster youth
2014-15
82%
79
72
66
51
81%
78
69
65
50
Four-year high school graduation rates are rising
California
100%
By Sonali Kohli
Los Angeles Unified
School District’s high school
graduation rate jumped almost 5 percentage points
within a single year, the largest increase in recent history, according to new state
data.
The district hit a 77%
graduation rate in 2015-16, up
from 72.2% the year before,
according to the California
Department of Education.
Last year the district estimated that 75% of the class
of 2016 graduated on time,
which already was an alltime high. The state’s calculation may be higher because it is able to track down
more students who started
in the system but transferred out and may have
been counted by the district
as dropouts.
The state graduation
rate was 83.2% last school
year, up less than a percentage point. L.A. is inching
closer to it.
“This data shows we are
closing opportunity gaps
and preparing more L.A.
Unified students for college
and careers, but we still have
work to do,” L.A. Unified
Supt. Michelle King said in a
statement. “I expect these
numbers to keep rising until
we reach our goal of 100 percent graduation.”
But high school graduation rates don’t tell the whole
story, especially with school
districts relying on an array
of “credit recovery” methods
to let students quickly bring
80
60
40
20
0
SAN DIEGO — Former
San Diego Mayor Roger
Hedgecock and his wife are
suing the city over a 2015 fall
she took on a damaged sidewalk that allegedly ruptured
her silicone breast implants
and eventually required replacement surgery.
Although the Hedgecocks aren’t seeking a specific amount, the lawsuit they
filed in October said the
damages suffered “are well
in excess of $25,000.”
The suit contends the
city was negligent and careless in not repairing a 2.5inch concrete lip in a public
sidewalk caused by a tree.
The incident took place in
Pacific Beach.
A spokesman for City
Atty. Mara Elliott said
Wednesday that the city expected the case to go to trial
later this year. Lawyers in
the case are scheduled to
meet Friday to discuss potential trial dates.
Trials are unusual in
sidewalk cases, which the
city typically has settled out
SAN DIEGO — A player
for a professional soccer club
in Tijuana has been arrested
at the border and accused of
trying to smuggle methamphetamine into the United
States.
Daniel Gomez, a defender with Club Tijuana
Xoloitzcuintles de Caliente’s
reserve team, was arrested
April 5 and charged with importing a controlled substance. According to a complaint filed in U.S. District
Court in the Southern District of California in San Diego, he tried to bring in
nearly 48 pounds of packaged meth.
After a hearing Tuesday,
a judge ordered Gomez to re-
2011
2012
2013
2014
2015
2016
Los Angeles Unified
California
Filipino
Asian
White
Pacific Islander
Latino
Native American
Black
Harrison Hill Los Angeles Times
THE GRADUATION rate in L.A. Unified rose to 77% in 2015-16 from 72.2% the
94%
93
88
82
80
74
73
up their grades in classes
they’ve failed.
The state should also release the percentage of students who needed remedial
help in college and highlight
those truly successful districts from which more students are graduating without needing remedial college
classes, said UCLA education
professor
Pedro
Noguera.
“While we all should be
happy to see graduation
rates rising, we also know
that it’s not necessarily because kids are better-prepared,” Noguera said. “The
rates of kids being placed in
remedial courses is still very
high.”
In fall 2016, just 62% of
California State University
freshmen were considered
college-ready in both English and math.
“Diplomas should mean
that a student has every opportunity to either go to college or find a rewarding career,” said Ryan Smith, executive director of Education
Trust-West, a nonprofit that
advocates for high achievement for all state students.
“With the rise of credit recovery, with some questionable
rigor standards, we need to
make sure we’re doing everything possible to provide a
quality education for all students.”
Disparities in graduation
of court in recent years.
According to the lawsuit,
Cynthia Hedgecock suffered
“serious personal injuries”
when she tripped over the
raised portion of sidewalk,
“flew forward and came
crashing to the ground” on
July 31, 2015.
Two weeks later, she
went to a local medical clinic
“with persistent chest pain
and breast deformities” and
learned in September 2015
that both of her silicone implants had ruptured and
that silicone had been leaking into her bloodstream,
the suit says.
That November, she had
both implants removed and
replaced in what the suit described as “a grueling procedure.” She then needed
weeks to recover, during
which she used pain medication and sleeping aids and
required her husband’s constant assistance, according
to the suit, which was first
reported by the San Diego
Reader.
Roger Hedgecock is a coplaintiff because he suffered
“the loss of support, service,
love, companionship, soci-
ety, affection, relations and
solace from his wife.”
He had to stay home and
help his wife every day with
her recovery, prompting him
to seek compensation for his
“own loss of income and the
loss of consortium with his
wife,” the suit said.
Damaged city sidewalks
have been a controversial
topic this spring, with San
Diego paying nearly $5 million to a bicyclist launched
28 feet by a raised sidewalk.
After the council approved that settlement
March 7, Councilman David
Alvarez renewed his push for
a new policy shifting the responsibility of repairing
sidewalks almost entirely to
the city. The existing policy,
which makes adjacent property owners responsible for
repairs in all but a small
number of circumstances,
has resulted in too many
damaged sidewalks and
large injury payouts, Alvarez
said.
main detained because he
was a flight risk, according
to court records and the U.S.
attorney’s office.
Gomez’s attorney and
the team known as Xolos did
not return requests for comment.
A U.S. citizen, Gomez
was arrested after he tried to
enter the U.S. from Mexico
at the Otay Mesa border
crossing, telling a Customs
and Border Protection officer that he was traveling to
the U.S. to work.
The officer searched
Gomez’s car and noticed
that the spare tire in its
trunk had hard spots and
wasn’t the usual weight,
court records say. An officer
cut the spare open and
found 23 packages made of
plastic wrap, carbon paper,
‘This data shows
we are closing
opportunity gaps
and preparing
more L.A. Unified
students for
college and
careers, but we
still have work to
do.’
— Michelle King,
L.A. Unified superintendent
90%
87
77
84
77
66
73
Source: California Department of Education
Graphics reporting by S o n a l i K o h l i
year before. Above, the district’s continuation high school graduation in June 2016.
Los Angeles Times
rates by race narrowed
slightly statewide for 2015-16,
state numbers show.
Black, Latino and Native
American students continue to lag behind in the state
and in Los Angeles.
School districts such as
Oakland, San Francisco and
L.A. have increased their focus on helping black students graduate, which may
have helped, Smith said.
“We still have work to do
to ensure that all black,
brown and low-income students and students with disabilities succeed,” Smith
said.
High-needs
students
who get more funding from
the state — English lan-
guage learners, those from
low-income families, and
foster youths — still perform
worse than the state as a
whole. Only half of the
state’s foster youths graduated on time in 2016.
An Education TrustWest analysis found that
California
schools
hire
roughly one social worker for
every 12,870 students.
Fewer than 500 social
workers now work in California schools, Smith said. “We
should be investing in more
social workers to support
foster youth.”
sonali.kohli
@latimes.com
Twitter: @Sonali_Kohli
CAITLYN JENNER
speaks out, live and in person
david.garrick
@sduniontribune.com
Garrick writes for the San
Diego Union-Tribune.
Soccer player faces charge
By Joshua Stewart
2010
2015-16 high school graduation rates by race
Ex-mayor sues San Diego
over wife’s implant rupture
By David Garrick
Los Angeles Unified
cardboard and packing
tape. A probe found a substance that later tested positive for meth. Another
search turned up 11 more
packages in the car’s panels.
Agents from the Department of Homeland Security
interviewed Gomez. He told
them he owned the car but
had traded it away three
months ago to an unnamed
person, and traded again to
get it back about a month
ago, court records say.
He told the agents that
he “did not know anything
about the drugs in the vehicle,” according to records.
He was then arrested and
charged with importing a
controlled substance.
joshua.stewart
@sduniontribune.com
Tuesday, May 2, 7:30 p.m.
The Theatre at Ace Hotel | Tickets start at $20
Join us for a special evening as Caitlyn Jenner and co-author
Buzz Bissinger sit down with the LA Times’ Patt Morrison. They’ll
discuss Jenner’s new book, “The Secrets of My Life,” her past,
her transition, life in the public eye during these politically
charged times and much more.
Get tickets: latimes.com/IdeasExchange
B4
T H U R S DAY, A P R I L 13 , 2 017
L AT I M E S . C OM
Vaccination rate jumps
[Vaccination, from B1]
law affects only very young
children — and there is still a
percentage of schoolchildren who have not been vaccinated because of the previously lax law. “This is one
year, one step. We halted the
bleeding,” he said.
The law requires that
children entering kindergarten and 7th grade have all
their vaccinations, so elementary school children already older than kindergarten age will be required to be
immunized eventually. But
there are thousands of Californians who’ve already
crossed 7th grade or graduated from high school without ever having received a
vaccine.
The UC system has said it
will require vaccines for all
new enrollees, but most
young adults won’t encounter another vaccination
checkpoint once they leave
high school.
“That’s why it’s going to
take years to restore community immunity,” Pan said.
“So I’m really happy about
this year, but this is not a
declaration that we’re done
and it’s over with. This
shows progress.”
More than the statewide
averages, he said, he’s worried about counties with low
vaccination rates.
Eight of the state’s 58
counties had vaccination
rates below 90%, according
to the new data. Viruses circulate in neighborhoods and
communities, so regions
with low vaccination rates
are at risk, Pan said. “We
need to shrink those pockets.”
State data also show that
the percentage of kindergartners receiving a permanent medical exemption
from vaccines has risen from
0.2% to 0.5%. Pan said he suspects the increase is primarily because children who had
always qualified for medical
exemptions had been using
personal belief exemptions
because they were easier to
obtain.
He said the state has to
monitor whether doctors
are providing fraudulent
medical exemptions, but he
thinks it’s most likely that
the increase is due to legiti-
Mel Melcon Los Angeles Times
DR. MONICA ASNANI, right, says goodbye to Kristian Richard, being held by
his mother, Natasha, after the child was given an MMR vaccine in 2015.
mate medical exemptions.
Kindergartners entering
home-based private school
or an independent study
program that does not provide classroom-based instruction can avoid the
state-required vaccinations.
The data show that 0.5% of
California’s kindergartners
were reported as lacking
vaccinations under this category.
State health officials said
other reasons for the improvement of vaccination
rates included audits of
schools to ensure they were
complying with immunization law. Officials have said
that schools often did not
follow up on kindergartners
admitted on the condition
they would eventually receive all their immunizations.
The California vaccine
law passed in 2015 was one of
the most far-reaching inoculation laws in the nation. It
bars parents from using religious or personal beliefs as a
reason to excuse their children from enrolling in kindergarten without receiving
all state-required immunizations. California joined
just two other states — Mississippi and West Virginia —
in making such a requirement as a condition for
‘I’m really happy
about this year,
but this is not a
declaration that
we’re done and it’s
over with.’
— state Sen.
Richard Pan,
a pediatrician
school enrollment.
The law drew hundreds of
protesters to the state Capitol, where they argued that
parents should have the
right to make decisions
about their children’s health
without interfering with
their ability to attend a public or private school.
But most lawmakers and
Gov. Jerry Brown said the
public health was too important to allow unvaccinated
children who don’t have an
allergy or other medical excuse to go to school.
“The science is clear that
vaccines dramatically protect children against a number of infectious and dangerous diseases,” Brown said at
the time.
The decline in vaccina-
tions came amid growing
public concern about the
safety of vaccines and
whether
they
caused
autism, a fear that stemmed
from a report in a British scientific journal published in
1998. The article was retracted and declared to be a
“deliberate fraud.” Numerous studies have since provided overwhelming evidence that vaccines are safe.
But the damage was
done. By 2013, California’s
kindergarten measles vaccination rate hit a low of 92.3%.
A year later, the measles outbreak struck at Disneyland
and grew to become California’s worst since 1991, ultimately infecting more than
150 people and spreading to
other states.
Opponents filed a lawsuit
last summer claiming that
the law violated California
children’s right to an education under the state’s Constitution. A judge denied
their request for an injunction that would have
blocked the law’s roll-out,
and the plaintiffs later withdrew their case.
soumya.karlamangla
@latimes.com
Twitter: @skarlamangla
ron.lin@latimes.com
Twitter:@ronlin
Friends, family
left stunned by
boy’s death
[Jonathan, from B1]
Once inside, Anderson
began shooting, stopping
once to reload, then shot
himself.
Jonathan was airlifted to
a nearby hospital but died
before entering surgery. A
9-year-old boy, identified
as Nolan Brandy, was also
shot and is in stable condition.
Classmates were left
stunned.
Jeffrey Imbriani, 7, told
the Associated Press he was
still trying to process the
death of his friend and soccer buddy.
“I know him because one
day he just walked up to me
and said, ‘Can we be
friends?’ and I said, ‘Yeah,’
and we’ve been friends ever
since,” he said. “I will think of
him as a very best friend.”
Grief counselors met
with the boy’s parents and
family members Tuesday
morning. Throughout the
day, their frontyard was
lined with cars as friends
and neighbors came to give
their condolences.
People who have Williams syndrome often endure
medical and cognitive setbacks, but the disorder can
also inspire empathy in
those who suffer from it.
Many people with Williams
syndrome,
particularly
young children, are known
for their friendliness, said
Terry Monkaba, executive
director of the Williams Syndrome Assn.
“Everyone who smiles at
them is their friend,” Monkaba said. “They tend to notice the little things that
make you feel good, like a
new dress. They are often
considered the mayor of
their elementary school.”
Some scientists believe
the friendliness of those with
Williams syndrome is a coping mechanism to diminish
their anxieties.
The disorder is caused by
missing genes, including one
that plays a role in forming
the protein elastin, leading
to cell overgrowth and problems around arteries and
vessels.
People with Williams syndrome can have mild to severe learning disabilities,
but children with the disorder are not usually in special-education programs,
Monkaba said.
“Today, more and more
children with Williams are
included in regular classrooms, with some accommodations,” she said.
About 25,000 people
nationwide have the disorder.
Though she didn’t know
Jonathan personally, a
death is something that people in the Williams syndrome
community feel personally,
Monkaba said.
Jonathan’s death, “because it was so senseless and
so tragic, it just makes it that
much harder,” she said.
Jonathan’s cousin set up
a GoFundMe page to help
the family cover funeral
costs and raised more than
$118,000 in one day.
Mary Wilson, who lived
across the street from the
boy’s family, said he was
well-behaved and beloved.
“He never left the frontyard when he played outside,” she said.
Bobby and Janet Lopez
walked hand in hand to the
Martinez home Tuesday
afternoon with a white
bouquet of flowers. They
have lived in the neighborhood for 50 years and have
been neighbors of the
Martinez family for more
than 10.
Trying to hide his tears,
Bobby Lopez said he wanted
to show his neighbors support.
“We could feel their
pain, and we know we can’t
take it away, but we are
here to share our love,” he
said.
melissa.etehad
@latimes.com
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L AT I ME S . CO M
T H UR S DAY, A P R I L 13 , 2 017
B5
OBITUARIES
DOROTHY MENGE RING
Mom was perfect foil for Letterman
associated press
D
avid Letterman’s
mother, Dorothy
Mengering, a Midwestern homemaker who became an unlikely
celebrity in her 70s as she
baked mystery pies and covered the Olympics for her
son’s late-night show, has
died. She was 95.
Letterman’s
publicist
Tom Keaney confirmed
Mengering’s death Tuesday.
Letterman had been on
the air for years, and had
made ironic celebrities out
of dozens of nobodies, before
he thought to bring on his
mom.
But the moment he did,
she became a hit, with a
cheerful “Hi, David!” in her
Indiana accent starting every appearance.
The two had great on-air
Michael Conroy Associated Press
ON-AIR CHEMISTRY
Dorothy Mengering shares a laugh with her son,
David Letterman, in 2007. Her homespun sincerity made her a hit with audiences.
chemistry, her homespun
sincerity proving the perfect
foil for her son’s urban acerbity.
Her first appearances
came via satellite from her
Carmel, Ind., kitchen for a
segment called “Guess
Mom’s Pies,” which became
a Thanksgiving tradition.
Letterman would make a
huge production of the bit
before finally declaring, usually correctly, “chocolate
chiffon!” or “rhubarb!” When
he was wrong, she would
take on a comforting tone
like he was a boy who had
lost a Little League game.
She soon started making annual Mother’s Day appearances too.
But she really became a
star when the show took her
out of the kitchen.
Mengering was a correspondent for Letterman’s
CBS show at the 1994 Winter
State wades into primary politics
[Skelton, from B1]
parties inexplicably allow
the nominating circus to
begin while people are still
taking out their Christmas
trees.
This is not a new story, of
course. California has been
fretting about being ignored
for decades.
It has been roughly half a
century since California
primaries were very compelling.
In 1964, Arizona Sen.
Barry Goldwater moved the
California GOP to the right
by beating New York Gov.
Nelson Rockefeller and
clinching the Republican
presidential nomination.
In 1972, anti-Vietnam
War candidate Sen. George
McGovern of South Dakota
bagged the Democratic
nomination by beating
former Vice President Hubert Humphrey in California.
Afterward, the parties
got “reform” happy and
junked California’s winnertake-all primaries, devaluing their importance. Convention delegates were
parceled out more evenly.
So there was less incentive
for candidates to wage
highly expensive, all-out
campaigns here.
Plus, other states moved
up their primaries to gain
clout, rendering California’s
June contest a “who cares?”
blob.
For four presidential
elections starting in 1996, we
tried early primaries in an
effort to be a player, not
merely a spectator in the
nosebleed seats. Results
were mixed. Usually the
nominations were still all
but decided before we
voted. In 2008, California did
toss Hillary Clinton a life
raft that kept her campaign
afloat for three more
months.
In 2012, we went back to
the June primary and national irrelevance except as
an ATM machine loaded
with mega-rich campaign
donors.
Now there’s a proposed
‘A state as large
and diverse
as California
should not be
an afterthought’
in presidential
politics.
— Alex Padilla,
California secretary of state
new twist to the early primary idea. In three previous
stabs at influence, the presidential and state primaries
for legislative and congressional seats were combined
in March. Then the state
contests were returned to
June in the non-presidential
years.
In 2008, however, separate primaries were held for
president in February and
state offices in June.
Secretary of State Alex
Padilla wants to move all
primaries permanently to
the third Tuesday in March,
right after the spoiled voters
of Iowa and New Hampshire
go first.
If other states got antsy
and moved their primaries
ahead of California’s, the
governor could push ours up
further.
Holding all primaries in
March rather than flipping
back to June in non-presidential years would eliminate voter confusion,
Padilla contends. It also
would increase voter turnout. And combining the
presidential and state primaries, rather than splitting
them, would save about $100
million.
“A state as large and
diverse as California should
not be an afterthought” in
presidential politics, Padilla
says. “The concerns of California voters should be
heard a lot more by the
candidates.”
The legislation, SB 568
by state Sen. Ricardo Lara
(D-Bell Gardens), is scheduled for its first vote in the
Senate elections committee
Tuesday.
“It’s good for both
parties and good for the
state,” says Republican
consultant Rob Stutzman.
“This should be one of those
nonpartisan issues. At some
point, the White House
should have to think about
California a little differently.”
Democratic strategist
Bill Carrick says, “I’m for
doing it to see if we can get
some relevance.” But he
cautions: “What I’ve learned
from being in on reforms is
that there are a lot of unin-
tended consequences that
pinch you in the rear.”
Regardless, we should
take the risk. It’s time to
stop being shoved around
by the weenie states and
allow Californians to vote
when it matters.
But there are some questionable trade-offs:
Legislators and members of Congress would be
running in primaries before
they even completed twothirds of their terms.
Incumbents would benefit from early primaries
because there’d be less time
for their challengers to raise
money and get known.
Candidates — including
for governor and other
statewide offices — would
have to start running full
throttle around Halloween,
stretching out the campaign season way beyond
public tolerance.
California really should
pop for the extra money and
hold a separate March
presidential primary and
keep the state contests in
June.
On the plus side for a
California governor or U.S.
senator, it would give them
an early boost in reaching
for the presidency.
If Gov. Jerry Brown had
only been so fortunate all
those times he ran … he still
would have lost.
george.skelton
@latimes.com
Twitter: @LATimesSkelton
obituarY
notices
Place a paid Notice: latimes.com/placeobituary
Search obituary notice archives: legacy.com/obituaries/latimes
Olympics in Lillehammer,
Norway, a role she reprised
for the next two Winter
Games, wearing bulky snow
gear that made her tiny body
almost invisible, and oozing
pure sincerity even in the absurd bits Letterman’s writers had her perform.
“After Lillehammer, I
couldn’t believe how it all
took off,” Mengering told the
New York Times in 1996. “I
think it’s about the idea of
Mom and of a family.”
Mengering lived all her
life in Indiana. She married
Place a paid Notice: latimes.com/placeobituary
Search obituary notice archives: legacy.com/obituaries/latimes
Fowler, Mary Ann
Mary Ann Fowler, 97, resident of
Orange County, passed away on March
8, 2017.
Mary Ann is survived by her son and
daughter-in-law James and Cynthia
Dean; and also by her niece Lauria A.
Carey, along with other relatives.
No memorial service will be held.
9%
Angelina Vardanian
May 24, 1932 - April 4, 2017
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Angelina, our sweet angel, was born in
Los Angeles to Michel & Nellie
Ambarcumian. She lived a full life and
passed away from Alzheimer’s disease.
She graduated from Garfield High School with
honors and attended East Los Angeles College.
Angie was married on April 23, 1955 to the
love of her life, Albert Vardanian. They shared
and enjoyed a wonderful life filled with love and
happiness for 62 years. They raised two loving and
devoted daughters, Linda Hagelis and Michelle
Vardanian. She owned and operated a successful
fashion boutique for several years in Tarzana until
her retirement.
Angie was a very special woman. She lived her
life to the fullest, and was loved and admired by
everyone who knew her. She had a big heart and
did not hesitate to help those in need. Angie and
Albert have visited many parts of the US, including
Hawaii and travelled to Mexico and Canada several
times throughout their life together. She always
enjoyed the various local cultures and dining at fine
ethnic restaurants. Her love for music and dancing
will continue as she dances with the angels in
heaven. Angie will be remembered and cherished
forever in our hearts.
Memorial services: Saturday, April 15th,
12:00pm, at Forest Lawn Hollywood Hills,
Church of the Hills. Private family reception to
follow. A memorial donation can be made to The
Alzheimer’s Association. http://act.alz.org/goto/
AngelinaVardanian
http://www.tributes.com/obituary/show/AngelinaVardanian-104654041
Mackay, Robin
March 27, 1931 - April 6, 2017
Hagan, Liz D.
April 17, 1958 - April 7, 2017
Elizabeth (Liz) Dorothy Hagan died
peacefully in Glendale, CA, due to
complications from breast cancer.
Born in Minneapolis, MN, to
parents Betty (Henslee) Hagan and
Jack Hagan. She attended Wayne HS,
Ft. Wayne, IN, class of 1976; Indiana
University–Purdue University, BS in
business, class of 1999.
A resident of Bakersfield, CA, Liz
recently celebrated her 10-year
anniversary at Vulcan Materials
Corporation, a career which brought
great joy to Liz and her business
associates. She will be remembered
by her many friends and co-workers
in Fort Wayne, IN, Minneapolis, MN,
Macon, GA, and Los Angeles, CA.
Liz is survived by her brothers and
sisters, Pat Hagan, Chris Hagan Nagel,
Ed Hagan, Lucy Hagan, and Molly
Hagan; nieces and nephews Molly
(Nagel) Hunt, Colleen Hagan, John
Hagan, and Patrick Hagan (godson);
and partner Sharon Dinges. Preceded
in death by her parents Betty and Jack
Hagan; and brother Joe Hagan.
In keeping to the spirit of how Liz
lived her full and generous life, please
consider making a charitable donation
to the organization of your choice and
passion.
HasHioka, o.D., Dr.
Henry k.
DR. HENRY K. HASHIOKA, O.D., age
98 passed away on April 3, 2017. He is
survived by his wife, May S. Hashioka;
sons, David and Stanley Hashioka;
daughter, Barbara Hashioka; he is also
survived by many nieces, nephews and
other relatives.
Celebration of life service will be
held on Wednesday, April 19, 2:30
p.m. at Fukui Mortuary “Chapel in
the Garden”, 707 E. Temple St. in Los
Angeles.
www.fukuimortuary.com
213-626-0441
In Memoriam
LARRY – JERRY – GARY –
STUART – BOB
SAVE US A SEAT AT THE BAR
Lloyd - Diane - Irwin – Sandy –
Shelly - Carol
TO
ANNUAL RETURN
ON YOUR MONEY
news.obits@latimes.com
obituarY
notices
May the road rise to meet you –
May the wind be always at your
back –
The sun shine warm upon your face
–
The rain fall soft upon your fields –
And may God hold you in the palm
of his hand
“UNTIL WE MEET AGAIN”
6%
Letterman’s father, florist
Harry Letterman, in 1942.
He died in 1973, and she married structural engineer
Hans P. Mengering, who
died in 2013.
After she became famous, she put out a cookbook, 1996’s “Home Cookin’
With Dave’s Mom,” that included recipes such as
“Dave’s Fried Baloney Sandwich” and the secrets behind
many of the pies she had
baked for the show.
To place
an obituary ad
please go
online to:
latimes.com/placeobituary
or call
1-800-234-4444
Robin Mackay died on Thursday,
April 6, 2017 in Los Angeles, California
at the age of 86. Husband, father,
grandfather, great-grandfather, and
friend to many, Robin lived his life fully
and well.
He was born on March 27, 1931
in Montreal, Canada to Agret and
Florence Mackay. He lived in Montreal
until he graduated from McGill
University with a bachelor’s degree
in math and economics, in 1951. He
married the love of his life, Valerie
Wilde, at the McGill Chapel in 1954,
almost 63 years ago. Robin and Val
moved to the United States in 1956
with two small girls, Heather and
Wendy, when he got a job at Boeing
in Seattle. Their son Trevor arrived four
years later. Robin was proud to become
a United States citizen in 1964 and
spent 24 years in various positions at
Garrett AirResearch (now Honeywell),
including Director of Industrial Market
Development.
Robin was a prolific inventor who
developed new concepts, applications
and markets for advanced gas turbines
including the first all gas turbine
cogeneration system and the first
microturbine. He was a respected
member of the SAE, the Society of
Automotive Engineers International,
and presented numerous papers at the
SAE, ASME, AEE and other technical
organizations. He had eleven patents
and two pending. In 1988, he and
his partner Jim Noe co-founded what
became Capstone Turbine Corporation,
the world’s leading producer of
low-emission microturbine systems.
These light, small and quick-starting
turbines provide ‘instant-on’ backup
power and are used around the world,
including successfully powering much
of Catalina Island and the Reagan
Library. Currently there are many
thousands of these generators in use
around the world, with almost zero
maintenance. In 2004, Robin founded
Agile Turbine Technology, LLC to
continue his development of advanced
gas turbines.
Robin was an enthusiast: he not
only loved gas turbines but was a
true gadget connoisseur. He loved
performance cars, dating back to his
rally competition days at McGill in
Montreal to his favorite new toy, his
beloved red Tesla. Robin also loved
boats, from his summers sailing at
Lac Tremblant in Algonquin Park,
Canada to his years of sailing and
power boating in California. Robin was
well known in the Southern California
boating community, where he served
as Commodore of the Redondo Beach
Power Squadron, and Power Boat
Fleet Captain of the King Harbor Yacht
Club. He and Val cruised the coast
of California and the Mediterranean
with friends and family, including
many happy memories at the Fourth
of July Yacht Club on Catalina Island.
More recently, Robin and Val enjoyed
cruising and travelling the world, in
Asia, South America and Europe.
After many years in Palos Verdes,
he and Val moved to Manhattan
Beach, where he loved his daily walks
along the strand. An accomplished
photographer, he loved taking
pictures of his travels and especially
the beautiful sunsets over the ocean.
Robin was an avid skier all his life. He
and Val invited family and friends to
their house in Mammoth Lakes. He was
delighted to receive his free Mammoth
ski pass when he turned 80, and put it
to good use. He was extremely healthy
and fit and enjoyed skiing during this
year’s record snowfall. He was active
in the local community in Mammoth,
as a member of the Rotary Club. Every
summer, he and Val hosted the Felici
Trio, a world-class chamber music
group, during the annual Mammoth
chamber music festival. He loved
classical music of all kinds, and enjoyed
opera and local theater at both
Mammoth and in Manhattan Beach.
Robin is survived by his wife Valerie,
his brother Mac, his three children
Heather, Wendy and Trevor, his five
grandchildren, and his two, soon-tobe three, great-grandchildren.
Services will be held at King Harbor
Yacht Club at noon on Friday, April 14,
2017. Please share memories and send
messages to the family at the Rice
Mortuary website: www.LAfuneral.
com. In lieu of flowers, please send
donations to the charities listed on the
website.
Walit, Caryle Sandra
Mount Sinai Memorial Parks Simi Valley 800-600-0076
www.mountsinaiparks.org
latimes.com/placeobituary
B6
T H U R S DAY , A P R I L 13 , 2 017
L ATI M E S . CO M
Today in North America
Today in Southern California
Southern Plains storms: Storms in the Plains may produce heavy
rain and gusty winds. Showers will dampen the Midwest and Great
Lakes regions. The Northeast will be cool and dry, while the Pacific
Northwest is chilly with showers and mountain snow.
5-day forecasts
Pressure:
High/low temperatures are average forecasts for entire zone.
Today
Friday
Saturday
Sunday
Monday
L.A. Basin
70/52
Partly cloudy
Mostly sunny
Mostly sunny
Partly sunny
Mostly cloudy
Valleys
67/47
72/52
76/53
74/55
73/59
Los Angeles Basin:
Morning clouds and a
chance of isolated showers,
then partly sunny and
breezy. Clear to partly
cloudy and cool tonight.
Valleys/canyons: Partly
sunny, breezy and cool.
Clear to partly cloudy
tonight.
Air quality
Partly cloudy
Mostly sunny
Mostly sunny
Clouds, sun
Mostly cloudy
Beaches
65/53
Partly cloudy
Mostly sunny
Mostly sunny
Clouds, sun
Mostly cloudy
72/49
78/50
76/52
72/56
Orange County: Partial
clearing, breezy and cool.
Partly cloudy tonight.
Ventura/Santa Barbara:
Clouds and a chance of
isolated showers, then
partly sunny this afternoon.
Clear to partly cloudy
tonight.
San Diego County: Partly
Good
Moderate
Mountains
55/24
68/52
70/51
69/54
68/59
Cooler
Mostly sunny
Mostly sunny
Partly sunny
Some sun
cloudy, breezy and cool.
Partly cloudy early tonight,
then mostly cloudy late.
Local mountains: Partly
cloudy and windy. Showers
possible on north-facing
slopes. Some clouds
tonight.
High desert: Partly sunny,
windy and cooler. Mostly
Unhealthful for:
Sensitive people
Temps
Deserts
85/56
Partly sunny
Mostly sunny
Mostly sunny
Partly sunny
Clouds, sun
57/28
63/31
61/33
61/38
L
–0
Low
H
▲
Warm Front
Cold Front
0s 10s 20s 30s 40s 50s 60s 70s 80s 90s 100+
Jet Stream
Trough
Rain T-storm Snow Ice
Anchorage
47/29
86/59
93/63
94/66
92/66
clear and cool tonight.
Low desert: Mostly sunny,
breezy and cooler. Clear
and cool tonight.
San Francisco Bay Area:
Variably cloudy, breezy and
cool with a chance of
showers. Partly cloudy and
cool tonight.
All
High
◗
Clouds, then sun: A cold front moving through the area this morning will bring clouds and a chance of
isolated showers. The clouds will give way to partial sun with a cool, breezy afternoon. The high
deserts and mountains will be windy. Dry weather will continue Friday and Saturday with mostly
sunny and warmer conditions.
Seattle
54/42
Las Vegas
80/54
Los Angeles
70/52
Not Available
New York
62/46
Chicago
55/47
Denver
78/46
Houston
81/62
Miami
81/69
South Coast Air Quality Management District forecasts air quality
SANTA
BARBARA CO.
Santa Clarita
Hesperia
68/46
Santa Paula
LOS ANGELES CO.
67/40
Ojai
68/46
Santa
Simi Valley
Barbara
67/46
Chatsworth
SAN BERNARDINO CO.
Burbank Monrovia
67/47
66/49
67/47
Camarillo
Ventura
69/51
62/47
66/46
65/50
Yucca Valley
Pomona/
UCLA
72/45
Fairplex
Oxnard
San
Bernardino
LA
Downtown
Westlake
Ontario
67/54
65/49
69/49
Woodland
69/47
70/52
Village
70/47
Hills
Whittier
Santa Barbara Co.
66/45
Chino
69/45
Height
Period
Direction
Santa Monica Hills
Riverside
71/47
RIVERSIDE CO.
Fullerton
69/51
2-4’
12 sec SW
65/53
69/38
71/53
Torrance
Santa Ana
Ventura Co.
67/49
ORANGE CO.
Palm
Hemet
Long
Height
Period
Direction
69/54
Springs
70/44
Irvine
Beach Newport
3-5’
12 sec SW
68/53
85/56
69/54 Beach
Mission Viejo
Los Angeles Co.
66/55
Temecula
Height
Period
Direction
68/50
Laguna
69/46
3-5’
12 sec W
Beach
San
65/52
Clemente
Orange Co.
Surf and sea
67/51
SAN DIEGO CO.
Height
Period
Direction
POINT CONCEPTION TO MEXICO
Oceanside
2-4’
15 sec SSW
Inner waters: West winds at 12-25
69/47
knots. Wind waves 2-5 feet with mixed
San Diego Co.
west and south swells of 2-feet.
Ramona
Escondido
Height
Period
Direction
68/43
69/49
Surf zone: The potential for strong rip
2-4’
13 sec WSW
currents is high at beaches in L.A. and
Poway
Ventura counties, and moderate
70/53
elsewhere.
Tides
UV index
L.A. Outer Harbor, in feet.
Minutes to burn for
San Diego
Today 11:32a 3.9 Hi 5:22a 0.0 Lo sensitive people
Station
Time Wind
Waves Temp
70/57
Las Vegas, 25
Morro Bay
Santa Barbara
Ventura
Zuma Beach
Marina del Rey
Hermosa Beach
Cabrillo Beach
Hunt’n. Beach
Newport Beach
Dana Point
San Clemente
Oceanside
Solana Beach
Mission Beach
Avalon
4p
4p
4p
4p
4p
4p
4p
4p
4p
4p
4p
4p
4p
4p
4p
VENTURA CO.
W7
W7
W8
W7
WSW6
W7
W7
W6
W6
WNW6
WNW6
WNW6
WNW6
NW6
WNW7
5/16
2/12
4/12
3/12
3/12
4/12
4/12
4/15
4/15
3/15
3/15
3/15
3/15
3/15
0/12
54/60
57/66
58/65
54/64
58/63
62/65
58/65
56/64
59/63
60/64
60/66
61/64
60/65
57/64
61/61
Wind speed in knots; wave heights in feet/intervals in seconds;
temperatures for sea/air
California cities
City
Wed.
Today
Hi Lo Prcp. Hi Lo
Friday
Hi Lo
Anaheim
Avalon/Catalina
Bakersfield
Barstow
Beaumont
Big Bear Lake
Bishop
Burbank
Camarillo
Chatsworth
Chino
Dana Point
Death Valley
Del Mar
Escondido
Eureka
Fallbrook
Fillmore
Fresno
Fullerton
Hemet
Hesperia
Huntington Beach
Idyllwild
Irvine
L.A. D’ntown/USC
L.A. Int’l. Airport
76
71
83
87
75
63
76
74
73
76
78
65
96
62
78
56
75
74
79
76
77
73
68
65
71
75
68
71
61
68
76
69
57
67
74
71
71
73
66
84
65
68
54
68
72
67
73
72
69
66
63
67
72
69
53
48
52
51
43
32
33
52
48
50
45
48
69
53
50
47
47
47
53
53
48
45
51
37
53
56
53
---------------.65
------------
70
59
72
76
66
55
63
69
66
67
71
66
89
66
69
53
68
69
66
71
70
67
65
58
68
70
66
51
49
46
46
41
24
31
51
46
47
47
52
65
54
49
41
48
47
44
53
44
40
54
33
53
52
54
50
53
44
47
42
28
37
51
46
48
45
51
63
52
45
39
45
47
44
52
44
38
55
39
52
52
53
Fri.
11:06p 5.1 Hi
12:15p 3.5 Hi
11:33p 4.9 Hi
4:53p 1.4 Lo
6:00a 0.2 Lo
5:17p 1.8 Lo
Almanac
Los Angeles, 30
Phoenix, 25
San Francisco, 30
Wednesday Downtown readings
Temperature
Los Angeles Fullerton
Ventura
High/low
75/56
76/53
69/52
High/low a year ago
75/56
73/56
68/54
Normal high/low for date 72/53
72/52
68/48
Record high/date
97/1888 98/2008 93/2008
Record low/date
42/1887 46/1999 36/1967
Precipitation
24-hour total (as of 4 p.m.) 0.00
0.00
0.00
Season total (since Oct. 1) 18.67
16.39
18.83
Last season (Oct. 1 to date) 6.83
5.20
8.43
Season norm (Oct. 1 to date) 13.84
12.68
15.53
Humidity (high/low)
83/39
80/36
82/59
City
Wed.
Today
Hi Lo Prcp. Hi Lo
Friday
Hi Lo
Laguna Beach
Lancaster
Long Beach
Mammoth Lakes
Mission Viejo
Monrovia
Monterey
Mt. Wilson
Needles
Newport Beach
Northridge
Oakland
Oceanside
Ojai
Ontario
Oxnard
Palm Springs
Pasadena
Paso Robles
Pomona/Fairplex
Poway
Redding
Rialto
Riverside
69
76
73
xx
76
77
65
63
93
65
77
67
71
74
78
70
92
74
70
79
78
59
76
80
65
68
72
51
68
66
59
60
85
66
73
64
70
69
74
68
86
72
70
72
69
63
73
72
53
44
53
xx
48
52
55
45
59
55
49
56
47
41
51
50
60
52
46
48
45
52
52
47
---xx
--.06
----.23
------Tr
--.02
---
65
66
69
44
68
62
60
53
92
66
69
62
69
67
70
65
85
68
66
69
70
56
68
69
52
40
54
19
50
47
47
37
57
55
46
47
47
46
47
49
56
50
39
49
53
37
47
38
Forecasts provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. ©2017
52
38
53
23
48
49
44
40
58
54
48
46
45
45
47
50
59
50
35
47
49
42
46
39
Sun and moon
Today’s rise/set
Last Quarter
April 19
Los Angeles County
Sun 6:25a/7:23p
Moon 9:49p/8:06a
New Moon
April 26
Orange County
Sun 6:24a/7:22p
Moon 9:47p/8:05a
First Quarter
May 2
Ventura County
Sun 6:28a/7:27p
Moon 9:53p/8:10a
Full Moon
May 10
City
Wed.
Today
Hi Lo Prcp. Hi Lo
Friday
Hi Lo
Sacramento
San Bernardino
San Clemente Pier
San Diego
San Francisco
San Gabriel
San Jose
San Luis Obispo
Santa Ana
Santa Barbara
Santa Clarita
Santa Monica Pier
Santa Paula
Santa Rosa
Simi Valley
Tahoe Valley
Temecula
Thousand Oaks
Torrance
UCLA
Van Nuys
Ventura
Whittier Hills
Woodland Hills
Wrightwood
Yorba Linda
Yosemite Valley
66
77
59
71
64
73
68
70
72
70
77
67
75
59
71
52
78
75
71
69
76
69
74
78
66
78
68
64
74
67
68
61
74
64
71
68
71
72
68
70
65
71
45
71
70
69
71
76
67
72
74
59
71
54
49
51
49
56
54
51
57
50
55
47
40
53
45
51
47
42
46
50
53
53
52
52
50
46
41
50
38
.04
---.16
-Tr
Tr
-----.08
-Tr
------------
62
69
67
70
61
69
62
63
69
66
68
65
68
60
67
38
69
67
67
67
70
65
69
69
55
70
45
40
47
51
57
47
52
45
46
54
49
46
53
46
37
47
19
46
47
49
54
50
50
51
45
32
50
24
42
45
48
56
46
51
44
48
54
46
47
52
46
37
47
19
43
47
49
52
49
49
50
47
36
48
28
U.S. cities
High 96 in Death Valley, Calif.
Low 12 in Embarrass, Minn.
City
Wednesday
Hi Lo Prcp.
Today
Hi Lo Sky
Albuquerque
Amarillo
Anchorage
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Brownsville
Buffalo
Burlington, Vt.
Casper
Charleston, S.C.
Charleston, W.Va.
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Colo. Springs
Columbia, S.C.
Columbus
Concord, N.H.
Dallas/Ft.Worth
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
Duluth
El Paso
Eugene
Fairbanks
Fargo
Flagstaff
Grand Junction
Grand Rapids
Green Bay
Hartford
Helena
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jacksonville, Fla.
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Louisville
Medford
Memphis
Miami
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York
Oklahoma City
Omaha
Orlando
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, Maine
Portland, Ore.
Providence
Pueblo
Raleigh
Rapid City
Reno
Richmond
St. Louis
Salt Lake City
San Antonio
San Juan, P.R.
Santa Fe
Seattle
78
69
48
80
77
79
76
61
83
72
60
83
46
58
66
81
73
81
59
69
58
73
84
67
67
77
74
71
61
60
90
59
52
67
67
75
58
54
67
61
84
80
67
79
76
87
77
73
62
81
84
53
57
79
82
76
75
73
85
77
92
65
60
60
70
81
83
63
65
81
73
74
79
86
73
58
78
71
47
81
58
79
69
76
86
56
60
82
54
55
76
81
78
79
55
77
62
73
82
70
58
81
78
71
58
55
87
54
47
64
65
80
57
55
61
61
84
81
73
80
76
80
81
81
52
84
81
50
58
86
83
62
75
73
83
67
94
63
55
53
61
80
78
69
54
73
82
76
77
82
74
54
50
50
28
60
51
59
56
39
60
43
48
69
45
46
29
54
55
59
38
46
47
41
59
44
54
62
40
45
44
30
65
44
22
36
28
38
42
32
51
39
72
60
43
52
46
61
51
50
49
55
70
36
40
54
64
58
53
46
62
57
62
48
48
47
46
37
57
38
48
58
45
45
61
75
49
46
-----Tr
.01
Tr
.04
-.03
.08
Tr
.06
--.41
-------.13
Tr
-.01
---.28
-----.03
.09
Tr
.11
.19
------Tr
.01
.08
-.09
.11
.03
.02
-.06
----.24
.54
----Tr
---Tr
.57
-.57
50
53
29
60
45
59
48
45
63
39
42
69
36
35
41
58
50
56
47
52
49
45
57
53
34
61
46
56
47
37
61
40
23
48
33
48
45
37
38
36
71
62
54
57
62
54
60
55
37
63
69
42
46
57
62
46
61
58
61
48
63
49
36
41
41
45
52
48
30
48
63
39
61
69
40
42
Su
Ts
Su
Pc
Pc
Pc
Pc
Pc
Pc
Ts
Su
Pc
Pc
Pc
Su
Pc
Pc
Su
R
Pc
Cy
Pc
Pc
Pc
Pc
Pc
Su
Cy
Cy
Pc
Su
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Su
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Su
Cy
R
Su
Sh
Cy
Pc
Sh
Pc
Cy
W
Pc
Su
Sh
Pc
Pc
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Cy
Su
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Cy
Pc
Pc
Su
Pc
Pc
Sh
Su
Su
Su
Pc
R
Su
Pc
W
Pc
Sh
Su
Sh
Taken at 3 p.m. Wednesday
Spokane
Springfield, Mo.
Tallahassee
Tampa
Tucson
Tulsa
Washington, D.C.
Wichita
Yuma
World
Acapulco
Amsterdam
Athens
Baghdad
Bangkok
Barbados
Beijing
Berlin
Buenos Aires
Cabo San Lucas
Cairo
Calgary
Cancun
Copenhagen
Dublin
Edinburgh
Frankfurt
Geneva
Havana
Ho Chi Minh City
Hong Kong
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kabul
Kingston
London
Madrid
Manila
Mecca
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Mumbai
New Delhi
Oslo
Paris
Rio de Janeiro
Rome
Seoul
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei
Tehran
Tokyo
Toronto
Vancouver
Vienna
Winnipeg
Zurich
54
76
85
86
91
80
79
76
92
46
45
54
66
55
50
65
47
62
.06
-----.01
Tr
--
53
78
86
86
93
80
70
73
90
35
60
56
64
58
62
52
61
59
Ts
Cy
Pc
Pc
Su
Cy
Pc
Cy
Pc
92
52
72
91
97
88
77
57
64
90
84
45
82
52
57
55
66
72
84
96
70
61
81
70
79
88
63
83
95
106
76
50
45
94
102
49
66
86
68
61
44
71
69
71
69
46
55
61
59
66
73
48
45
65
82
79
44
43
43
63
64
30
64
43
46
48
36
39
59
81
69
48
63
54
47
77
45
45
81
79
51
39
39
82
68
32
39
75
46
43
27
62
64
61
48
41
46
34
32
36
-.78
-.01
-.04
-.38
--.04
.03
.10
.44
.05
.12
.05
---.62
-.04
.08
--.14
---Tr
.03
.02
--.57
-.40
--.07
.21
.06
.25
.10
.02
.10
.01
---
88
52
73
99
97
88
71
54
68
85
77
41
86
52
52
53
60
68
82
95
73
62
71
69
76
88
58
83
94
109
77
55
45
96
104
43
61
82
68
67
41
71
73
77
59
55
53
60
61
63
74
45
56
74
78
81
46
40
49
65
59
30
72
41
45
41
39
41
65
78
68
46
52
53
46
73
42
50
77
74
52
32
39
81
74
34
46
73
51
50
25
58
66
61
47
39
42
45
46
40
Pc
Cy
Pc
Cy
Pc
Sh
Pc
Sh
Pc
Su
Su
Cy
Pc
Sh
Cy
Cy
Cy
Su
Sh
Pc
Cy
Su
Ts
Cy
Pc
Pc
Pc
Pc
Su
Su
Pc
Su
R
Hz
Hz
Sh
Cy
R
Su
Su
Pc
Su
Cy
Pc
Su
Pc
Sh
Pc
Pc
Sh
Key: Su sunny; Pc partly cloudy; Cy cloudy; Fg
foggy; Prcp precipitation; Dr drizzle; Hz;hazy
Sh showers; Ts thunderstorms; R rain; Sn snow;
Sf snow flurries; I ice; Rs rain/snow; W windy;
Tr trace. Notes: National extremes are for NWS
stations; excludes Alaska and Hawaii.
Missing data indicated by “xx”.
Officer in beating: ‘You were... jaywalking’
[Video, from B1]
Cain questioned the officer’s
reasons for stopping him.
In the dash-cam video,
the officer tells Cain, “You
are jaywalking back here.”
Cain responds by telling
the officer he looked both
ways.
“Stop right now before I
take you to the ground,” the
officer says. “If you do not
stop right now, I will take you
to the ground.”
Cain, 24, responds with,
“You pulled me over for
nothing.”
The officer then orders
Cain to get down on the
ground.
“I don’t have nothing,”
Cain says, and then removes
his jacket. “I don’t have
nothing.”
As the officer continues
to tell Cain to get on the
ground, Cain says, “If you’re
a real man, you can take your
gun away and you can fight
me like a real man.”
At that point, the video
shows the officer charging
toward Cain.
The officer then throws
Cain to the ground and begins punching him in the
face repeatedly.
“Give me your ... hand,”
the officer yells. “I’ll break
your ... arm.”
The video shows the officer on top of Cain, punching
him at least a dozen times as
another squad car pulls up
to the scene and a second officer jumps out to help.
“Why could you just not
comply?” the first officer
says as he breathes heavily.
“You were ... jaywalking.
The exchange continues,
punctuated with expletives,
but much of it is inaudible as
yet another cruiser pulls up
with its siren on and more officers run to the fight.
“You’re going to hear
from my lawyer,” Cain yells.
Cain tells the officer that
he doesn’t trust him because
police officers have fatally
shot many other people.
“What’s your probable cause
for pulling me over?” he asks
the officer.
“You look pretty alive to
me, man,” one officer says.
“I am alive,” Cain says.
“I’m better than alive. My
soul is alive. You can’t kill
my pride. You can’t kill my
soul or nothing. You don’t
know who you are [dealing]
with.”
As the officers handcuff
Cain and lead him to the first
officer’s cruiser, the man
says he had just gotten off
from work and was having a
rough week. He said his girlfriend had kicked him out of
their home.
“I am tired,” Cain said.
“Leave me alone. Are you
going to buy me more housing? Are you going to get me
a better job? No, you are
not.”
The witness’ cellphone
video of the confrontation
shows Cain facing the officer
and quickly slipping off his
jacket.
Naomi Montaie, who recorded the interaction as it
unfolded in front of her,
screams at Cain, “Nephew,
just listen.”
Seconds later, the officer
approaches Cain, grabs his
neck and takes him down to
the ground. The video shows
the officer as he sits on Cain
and hits him in the face.
Montaie yells, “Why you
beating him like that?”
As Cain lies on his side,
the officer appears to be
twisting and pulling one of
his arms.
Moments later, the second officer arrives and grabs
Cain’s other arm as they
place handcuffs on him.
Meanwhile,
Montaie,
who is Cain’s neighbor, continues to record the arrest,
saying, “Oh, Jesus, I’ve seen
this, Lord.”
“Oh my God, why did you
down,” he told the station.
After Cain was detained,
a police supervisor reviewed
the officer’s dash-cam video
and launched an investigation, according to the Police
Department.
“The preliminary investigation led the supervisor to
believe that there were significant policy concerns and
immediately notified his
chain of command,” police
said.
Police arrested Cain on
suspicion of resisting arrest
‘It didn’t have to happen. Why did the
officer have to stop this guy for
jaywalking and why did the officer feel
this guy posed a threat to himself and
to the public?’
— Laurie Levenson,
Loyola University law professor
take him down like that?”
she asks.
Cain later told KTXL-TV
that the officer demanded
he take his hands out of his
pocket and show him a
weapon. He said the officer
had his hand on his gun.
“So I took off my jacket to
let him know, ‘I don’t have
anything,’ ” he told the news
station.
Cain said he was nervous
because the officer had his
hand on his weapon. When
the officer took him down to
the ground, Cain said, he did
not resist.
“I am not going to give
this man any reason to kill
me, basically to gun me
as well as for a misdemeanor
warrant
from
Fresno
County, police said.
While sitting in the back
of the police cruiser, Cain is
heard on the police video
saying, “You can take the
gun and you can shoot me in
my head right now because I
am tired of living.”
The video shows Cain
growing agitated and kicking the police cruiser.
An officer then appears
to enter the cruiser and grab
Cain from behind.
“All right, all right, stop. I
can’t breathe,” he says.
“You need to take a deep
breath, dude,” the officer
says.
“Change your attitude
and calm down. You understand? We are going to let
you go in a sec. We are going
to give you a minute to calm
down. Right now, you are
threatening our safety.”
Cain questions how he
could threaten the officers’
safety since he is in handcuffs.
“I am angry,” he says.
“You guys are harassing me.
You provoked me.”
Later, police determined
“there were insufficient
grounds for making a criminal complaint against the
pedestrian,” police said.
Police released Cain from
custody and dropped any
pending charges against
him.
However, he must still
appear in court for the
Fresno County warrant, police said.
Once the criminal investigation into the officer’s actions is completed, detectives will submit all reports
and evidence to the Sacramento County district attorney, who will decide if
charges will be filed.
On Wednesday, Sgt.
Bryce Heinlein said that although police released Cain
from custody, they also
planned to investigate his
actions and present any evidence to prosecutors.
Meanwhile, the Police
Department plans to review
its training procedures. The
officer involved in the altercation has worked with the
department for two years,
police said.
“The videos of this incident portray actions and behavior that we would con-
sider unacceptable conduct
by a Sacramento police officer,” the department said.
Loyola University law
professor Laurie Levenson
said the videos show a man
who was just tired of being
hassled by the police.
“It’s just sort of set up to
go wrong,” she said.
Officers are often provoked and react when a subject refuses to comply with
their commands, Levenson
said.
In this case, she said, she
wonders why the officer
didn’t use other tactics.
“It didn’t have to happen,” she said. “Why did the
officer have to stop this guy
for jaywalking and why did
the officer feel this guy posed
a threat to himself and to the
public?”
The Police Department
will have to approach the investigation from several different angles, including the
public’s perception of the arrest and the officer’s reason
for making the arrest,
Levenson said.
She said the public will
probably see an officer
pounding on a man for jaywalking, while the officer
could argue that he was in a
one-on-one conflict without
backup and had to protect
himself.
“You get a sense from the
video that people in that
community are tired of being
hassled by the police,”
Levenson said. “That is the
underlying problem.”
veronica.rocha
@latimes.com
Twitter:
@VeronicaRochaLA
BuSINESS
C
T H U R S D A Y , A P R I L 1 3 , 2 0 1 7 :: L A T I M E S . C O M / B U S I N E S S
DOW 20,591.86 ▼ 59.44
S&P 500 2,344.93 ▼ 8.85
NASDAQ 5,836.16 ▼ 30.61
GOLD $1,275.30 ▲ 4.10
OIL $53.11 ▼ 0.29
EURO $1.0598 ▼ .0010
U.S. T-NOTE (10-yr.) 2.24% ▼ 0.08
Mammoth
Resorts deal
adds to a run
of mergers
C OM PA NY T OW N
Colorado partnership
will buy the operator
of ski areas including
Snow Summit.
By Hugo Martin
Photographs by
Katie Falkenberg Los Angeles Times
KAI RYSSDAL, host and senior editor of the public radio show “Marketplace,” prepares to record an
episode of his “Make Me Smart” podcast at “Marketplace’s” downtown Los Angeles offices.
When being the most
popular isn’t enough
Mammoth Resorts, the
company that runs four of
California’s most popular
ski resorts, has agreed to be
acquired by a Colorado partnership, further consolidating control of the nation’s ski
slopes into the hands of a few
major developers.
The partnership of Colorado-based Aspen Skiing
Co. and KSL Capital Partners, a private equity firm, is
buying Mammoth Resorts,
which operates Mammoth
Mountain and June Mountain in the Eastern Sierra,
and took over Bear Mountain and Snow Summit in
the San Bernardino Mountains in 2014.
The terms of the deal, to
be completed by fall, were
not disclosed.
The partnership, which
was formed this week, will
operate 12 resorts that attract about 7 million skiers a
year, with Mammoth Mountain as the biggest resort.
The Mammoth Resorts
properties in California
draw about 2 million visitors
a year to more than 4,000 skiable acres.
The deal creates a new
challenger to Vail Resorts
Inc., the publicly owned
company that operates10 resorts and three urban ski
areas in the U.S. and Australia.
The KSL-Aspen Skiing
partners vowed to keep focus at the California resorts
on the ski experience.
“We are the furthest
thing from a detached corporation,” said Mike Kaplan, chief executive of Aspen
Skiing, which owns four resorts and hospitality projects in Colorado. “We are
really passionate about the
ski industry, the mountain
environment and the mountain communities.”
[See Resorts, C6]
Public radio’s ‘Marketplace’ averages 14.6 million listeners a week,
and its audience is growing. Now it has ambitious plans to expand.
By Meg James
Weekday afternoons, millions of Americans — many
stuck in rush-hour traffic —
learn the business news of
the day from Kai Ryssdal, a
former Navy pilot and host
of the public radio show
“Marketplace.”
“I spend almost as much
time with Kai Ryssdal as I do
with my own husband,”
joked Sally Kilbridge of
Scottsdale,
Ariz.,
who
toughs out her more than
two-hour-a-day commute by
listening to public radio.
“Marketplace,” which is
produced in downtown Los
Angeles by American Public
Media, is the most popular
business program on radio
or TV in the U.S., with an average of 14.6 million listeners
a week. In the last year, the
28-year-old program has
seen its audience grow 16%
— benefiting from Americans’ increased appetite for
news.
Hoping to capitalize on
its success, “Marketplace”
has launched an ambitious
plan to remain a vital source
for economic information as
consumers’ listening habits
change, putting a strain the
traditional broadcast model.
“We cannot rest on the
idea that listeners are always going to come to us,”
Deborah Clark, senior vice
‘We cannot rest on the idea
that listeners are always
going to come to us....
People are not just looking
toward the radio for the
content.’
— D EBORAH C LARK ,
senior vice president and general manager
of “Marketplace’s” portfolio of programs
president and general manager of “Marketplace’s”
portfolio of programs, said
in a recent interview.
“They’ve been a captive audience. We’re on the radio
and they know how to find us
there — but now people are
not just looking toward the
radio for the content.”
Consumers have more
choices, including in their
cars. New vehicles are equipped with screens and technology that enable drivers to
use voice-activated Internet-connected devices —
opening the floodgates of
content available to commuters who spend hours in
their cars and raising the level of competition for “Marketplace.”
At the same time, consumers are adding to their
homes smart speakers, such
as Amazon’s Echo, that connect with Internet radio.
Tech-savvy and younger audiences are more in tune
with podcasts and personalized music playlists than
old-school radio.
Another threat exists in
Washington:
President
Trump last month recommended eliminating government funding for public TV
and radio. “Marketplace”
doesn’t directly receive any
federal money. But if Congress goes along with
Trump’s plan, local stations
would face deep cuts and
[See ‘Marketplace,’ C6]
Gina Ferazzi Los Angeles Times
THE CONSOLIDATION trend is evident around
Lake Tahoe and elsewhere. Above, Snow Summit.
Online ad firms
fight piracy, fraud
By Paresh Dave
A technology company
wanted its ads in front of
people reading online about
data storage. Instead, tens
of thousands of dollars
worth of ads landed on websites that belonged in the Internet’s trash can.
United vows to
change its ways
By Samantha Masunaga
and Tracey Lien
United Airlines said it will
no longer call on law enforcement to remove paid and
seated passengers who have
not agreed to give up their
places on sold-out flights,
one of several moves the airline announced Wednesday
to try to quell a week of consumer outrage.
The Chicago airline’s
chief
executive,
Oscar
Munoz, told ABC News’
“Good Morning America” on
Wednesday that he felt
“shame” when he watched
the video of a passenger, Dr.
David Dao, being dragged
off a sold-out United flight
bound for Louisville, Ky., on
Sunday by Chicago airport
police.
United has said it needed
to bump four passengers to
make room for airline employees who needed to travel
to Louisville. The airline reportedly offered $400 and a
hotel stay, and then $800 to
passengers to induce them
to give up their seats. When
there were no volunteers,
United selected Dao and
other passengers to get off
the plane.
Dao refused, prompting
airport police to pull him
[See United Airlines, C4]
Joshua Lott AFP/Getty Images
UNITED AIRLINES will no longer ask law enforcement to remove fliers from
sold-out flights. Above, the United terminal at O’Hare International Airport.
There was clouddatarecoverywebhost.info, where
the firm’s ad appeared on a
page that featured a viral
YouTube video of a woman
whacking an attacker to the
ground with a dog. And
cloudmortgageloan.com,
where it ran next to a plagiarized
Pittsburgh
PostGazette article about health
screenings for metal workers. Aside from their URLs,
the websites had nothing to
do with online storage.
In the tangled ecosystem
that is online advertising,
such nefarious websites collectively reap billions of dollars annually bilking advertisers. Many large companies wouldn’t want their ads
financing distributors of
misleading news, deceptive
or counterfeit products, pirated movies and TV shows,
or extremist groups. But
that’s exactly what happens
every day.
Media companies and
their advertisers are shortchanged $8 billion a year because of scams, or more than
the estimated combined revenue of Lionsgate, Paramount Pictures and MGM
Studios.
Advertisers think they’re
getting the desired views
and clicks. But companies
taking closer looks are finding unwelcome results. Websites where ads appear are
visited by robots — comput[See Online ads, C5]
C2
T H U R S DAY , A PRI L 13 , 2 017
L AT I ME S . C O M/ B U S I N ES S
BUSINESS BEAT
Tech firms seek
to preserve net
neutrality rules
They oppose a Trump
administration plan to
water down Obama’s
Internet regulations.
By Brian Fung
Jim Watson AFP/Getty Images
PRESIDENT TRUMP, with Chinese President Xi Jinping on Friday, says he believes China hasn’t been ma-
nipulating its currency for months and that labeling it a manipulator might jeopardize talks on North Korea.
Trump backs off currency
manipulator label for China
President also says
dollar ‘is getting too
strong’ and he might
keep Fed chief Yellen.
associated press
Backing away from a
campaign pledge, President
Trump said Wednesday that
his administration won’t label China a currency manipulator in a report due this
week, though he does think
the U.S. dollar “is getting too
strong.”
Trump also said in an interview at the White House
with the Wall Street Journal
that he would prefer that the
Federal Reserve keep interest rates relatively low. And
he reversed another campaign stance by saying he
supports the U.S. Export
Import Bank.
The president left open
the possibility of re-nominating Janet L. Yellen for a
second four-year term as
Fed chair. That would mark
another shift from his campaign position that he would
probably replace Yellen
when her term as chair ends
Melanie Maxwell AP
ASKED whether Fed
Chair Janet Yellen would
be “toast” when her term
ends, Trump said no.
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in February.
In the interview, Trump
said, “I do like a low-interest
rate policy, I must be honest
with you.”
The decision not to label
China a currency manipulator represents one of the
sharpest
reversals
of
Trump’s brief presidency.
Trump began to bash China
in the 2015 speech that began
his campaign, saying Beijing
kept its currency artificially
low to give its manufacturers
an unfair advantage in global trade.
A weaker Chinese currency, relative to the dollar
for example, makes Chinese
goods more affordable for
American consumers and
U.S. goods more expensive
in China.
As a candidate, Trump
pledged to instruct his
Treasury secretary to label
China a currency manipulator immediately after he
took office.
But in Wednesday’s published interview with the
Journal, Trump said he had
changed his mind because
he now believes — as many
experts have consistently
maintained — that China
hasn’t been manipulating its
currency for months, and because labeling Beijing a manipulator might jeopardize
his talks with the Chinese on
confronting the threat of
North Korea.
“They’re not currency
manipulators,” Trump said.
On the dollar’s overall
value against major trading
partners, Trump said: “I
think our dollar is getting
too strong, and partially
that’s my fault because people have confidence in me.
But that’s hurting — that
will hurt ultimately.”
The dollar began rising in
value in mid-2014, a trend
that has exerted a drag on
U.S. exports.
Trump was highly critical
of Yellen during the fall campaign, accusing her of keeping borrowing rates low to
help Democrats.
But asked during the
Journal interview whether
Yellen would be “toast”
when her term ends next
year, Trump said no.
“I like her, I respect her,”
Trump said, noting that the
two have met since he took
office for an Oval Office discussion.
The president said he
planned to fill two vacancies
on the Export Import
Bank’s board, which has
been effectively paralyzed
with three open seats on its
five-member board. Exporters say the bank acts as an
important financing mechanism for overseas deals.
The Republican base has
opposed the bank, considering it “crony capitalism” for
big corporations. Trump
took a similar stance during
his campaign.
“It turns out that, first of
all, lots of small companies
are really helped, the vendor
companies,” Trump told the
Journal. “But also, maybe
more important, other
countries give [assistance].
When other countries give it
we lose a tremendous
amount of business.”
Tech companies are
pushing the Federal Communications Commission
not to water down its rules
on net neutrality, teeing up a
confrontation between Silicon Valley and Washington
as the nation’s top telecom
regulator mulls over a plan
to undo the Obama administration’s regulations for Internet providers.
In a meeting with FCC
Chairman Ajit Pai on Tuesday, the Internet Assn. —
which represents companies such as Google, Amazon and Netflix — said it
maintains “vigorous support” for the agency’s net
neutrality policy, which
moved to regulate broadband companies, such as
Comcast and Charter, like
their predecessors in the legacy telephone business.
Those rules ban the
blocking or slowing of websites, and also prohibited Internet service providers
from charging websites special fees for displaying them
on consumers’ devices.
“Existing net neutrality
rules should be enforced and
kept intact,” the Internet
Assn. wrote in a follow-up
transparency filing.
Pai has been consulting
with industry groups on a
proposal to repeal the FCC’s
rules, seeking voluntary
promises by Internet providers not to block or slow
sites rather than imposing
preemptive regulations to
ensure that they comply. Beyond cutting off a source of
potential revenue, broadband industry advocates
say, the rules have slowed
the pace at which providers
build out their networks and
upgrade speeds.
Should Pai move forward
with his plan, it would trigger a months-long process to
solicit public feedback. If the
last go-round on net neutrality is any indication, there
could be a high-profile campaign by both sides to shape
the outcome. But with a 2-1
Republican majority at the
FCC, and GOP control of
Congress and the White
House, Pai’s path to rolling
back the FCC’s net neutral-
Nicholas Kamm AFP/Getty Images
FCC CHIEF Ajit Pai
seeks voluntary promises
by Internet providers not
to block or slow sites.
ity rules seems clear for now.
The FCC’s regulations
were pushed through in 2015
by a Democratic majority.
They took the dramatic step
of classifying Internet providers as “common carriers”
under the agency’s congressional charter, giving the
FCC greater authority to impose bans on carriers’ business practices. Although the
industry sued to have the
rules overturned, a federal
appeals court later upheld
the regulations. Broadband
providers have asked the
court to rehear the case, but
such a step may no longer be
necessary if Pai successfully
rewrites the rules to suit the
industry, experts say.
Some policymakers have
pushed for legislation from
Congress that could settle
the debate once and for all.
But Democrats are unwilling to come to the negotiating table unless they receive
assurances that the bill
would allow the FCC to continue writing rules for Internet providers in the future.
Republican opposition to
the net neutrality rules revolves around this issue:
Conservatives fear that the
agency could use its powers
to directly regulate the price
of broadband or suppress investment in high-speed networks, analysts have said.
Pai’s effort to roll back
the FCC’s treatment of Internet providers as common
carriers comes amid a
broader swipe at the previous FCC’s tech policies. He
has taken steps to prevent
smaller Internet providers
from selling low-cost broadband to the poor, as well as to
reverse a proposal that
would have lifted a ban on inflight cellphone use.
Fung writes for the
Washington Post.
Wal-Mart cuts cost
of online-only items
picked up at stores
associated press
Starting next week, WalMart Stores Inc. will offer
discounts on thousands of
online-only items when customers elect to have them
shipped to one of the company’s stores for pickup.
The move is part of the
retailer’s efforts to better
compete with online leader
Amazon.com.
Initially, the Wal-Mart
discount will be available on
about 10,000 items. But the
Bentonville, Ark., retailer
says it will then expand the
price cuts to more than1million items by the end of June.
Among the offers starting April 19: An infant car
seat that was priced at
$148.05 will have an additional discount of $7.40. A
Lego Great Vehicles Ferry
priced at $23.99 will have an
additional pickup discount
of $2.55.
Wal-Mart is able offer the
discounts by delivering the
products directly to its 4,700
stores, saving on costs by
avoiding shipping to individual shoppers’ homes.
The offer builds on WalMart’s move in late January
that replaced a pilot program offering free shipping
but that came with an annual fee of $49, with one with a
lower free-shipping threshold, faster delivery and no
membership fee.
The retailer said it will reduce free shipping time to
two days on 2 million of its
most popular items, including essentials such as diapers and pet food as well as
hot toys and electronics.
Wal-Mart’s average shipping
time has been three to five
days. Also, at the time, it reduced the spending necessary for free shipping to $35
from $50.
These moves are being
spearheaded by Walmart
.comChief Executive Mark
Lore, who joined the company when Wal-Mart bought
Jet.com, which he founded,
last year.
It’s also another illustration of how Wal-Mart is trying to figure out a way to
compete with Amazon and
its dominant Prime plan.
Amazon’s membership program costs $99 a year, but includes services such as
streaming music and video
that create fierce loyalty.
Amazon Prime members
buy frequently and spend
more money, analysts say.
“We’re creating price
transparency to empower
customers to shop smarter
and choose what’s best for
them,” Lore wrote in a company blog post.
L AT I ME S . CO M / B U S IN E S S
T HU R S DAY, A P R I L 13 , 2 017
C3
COMPANY TOWN
Sylvester Stallone sues Warner Bros.
The actor says studio
covered up profit
from the 1993 movie
‘Demolition Man.’
By David Ng
Sylvester Stallone has
made a fortune on films like
the “Rocky” and “Rambo”
franchises, and more recently on the three “The Expendables” movies. But it is
a mostly forgotten action
flick from the 1990s that is at
the center of a new drama
pitting the Oscar-nominated star against a major
Hollywood studio.
Stallone is suing Warner
Bros. over the 1993 sciencefiction movie “Demolition
Man,” claiming that the studio covered up how much
money the film made and
bilked his production company out of its fair share of
grosses.
In a complaint filed
Wednesday in Los Angeles
Superior Court, Stallone al-
Alberto E. Rodriguez
SYLVESTER Stallone’s
production company is
called Rogue Marble.
leges that Burbank-based
Warner Bros. spent years sitting on money owed to Stallone’s company, Rogue Marble. The studio initially said
the movie was $66.9 million
in the hole, but later sent
him a check for more than
$2 million, according to the
lawsuit.
Stallone claims that his
company is entitled to 15% of
the movie’s grosses, which
he said have exceeded $125
million. The actor is alleging
that the studio has engaged
in fraud and is seeking dam-
ages and interest. Stallone is
also looking to put “an end to
this practice for all talent
who expect to be paid by
Warner Bros. for the fruits of
their labor.”
The suit offers a glimpse
into the opaque world of
Hollywood
accounting,
where talent and corporate
management often spar
over who is owed what and
when.
Lawsuits brought by creative talent over profit participation are common. Recent suits include actor
Al Seib Los Angeles Times
CREW MEMBERS work on the steps of Los Angeles City Hall as the film “Ocean’s Eight” shoots scenes on the Spring Street steps
March 6. The film features female thieves who try to pull off the heist of the century at New York’s annual Met Gala.
On-location movie shoots plunge
L.A. feature film production falls 36.3% in first quarter despite bigger state tax credits
By David Ng
The number of on-location movie shoots in the Los Angeles area
plummeted in the first quarter of
the year despite generous California tax incentives designed to lure
more big-budget film productions
from out of state.
On-location feature film production dropped 36.3% from the same
quarter last year, down to 729 shoot
days from 1,145 days, according to a
new report from FilmL.A., the nonprofit organization that oversees
permitting in the area.
Overall, on-location production
in L.A. declined 2.1% from the same
quarter last year as TV shoots held
steady thanks to a rise in Webbased productions.
FilmL.A. said possible causes for
the drop in feature film activity include the local unavailability of
soundstages — TV production occupies much of the area’s facilities
— as well as an overall decline in the
total number of movies being made
here because of competition from
other locales. States such as Louisiana, New York and Georgia —
where a movie based on the quintes-
Mariah Tauger For The Times
THE L.A. AREA faces competition from other locales, which
continue to draw filmmakers with generous film incentives.
sentially Californian TV series
“Baywatch” was filmed — continued to draw filmmakers with generous film incentives.
“Feature production levels are
proving highly cyclical and difficult
to evaluate on a quarter-by-quarter
basis,” Paul Audley, president of
FilmL.A., said in a statement
Wednesday.
The organization noted that in
early 2017, there were eight movies
shooting in the L.A. area that received state tax credits, versus five
such projects in 2016. Among the
movies that filmed locally in the
quarter was Walt Disney Pictures’
“A Wrinkle in Time.” The fantasy
film was approved last year for an
$18-million tax credit, the largest
production incentive ever under a
program that was expanded in 2015
to bring more movie and TV production back to the state.
California awards $330 million
annually in film and TV tax credits
that allow producers to recoup as
much as 25% of certain production
costs, such as set construction and
crew member salaries.
Movie production in L.A. surged
last year, climbing 12% to 4,865
shoot days in 2016 from 4,344 shoot
days in 2015. A lot of the gain happened in the fourth quarter, which
saw on-location feature film activity
jump nearly 23% from the same period in 2015.
For the most recent quarter,
FilmL.A. said on-location TV production declined slightly by 0.6%,
with pilot production dropping
15.5% and Web-based TV production climbing 33.7%. The Web-based
shows aren’t the series seen on Netflix or Amazon, but are typically
short-form online content produced by companies like Buzzfeed
and other Internet firms.
On-location commercial production was also down for the first
quarter, dropping 2.6% from the
same period last year.
david.ng@latimes.com
Fox’s O’Reilly takes vacation amid outcry
By Samantha Masunaga
Fox News host Bill O’Reilly said he will take a previously planned vacation as
he faces mounting pressure
over multiple sexual harassment allegations.
O’Reilly announced his
plans during his Tuesday
night broadcast of “The
O’Reilly Factor” on the Fox
News Channel, saying he
typically takes a vacation
around this time of the year.
“I grab some vacation because it’s spring and Easter
time,” he said. “Last fall, I
booked a trip that should be
terrific.”
O’Reilly wouldn’t say
where he was headed, only
that he would have a “full report” when he returned.
This month, the New
York Times reported that
O’Reilly and Fox News paid
about $13 million over the
years to settle several claims
of sexual harassment and
other inappropriate behavior toward women at the
company.
Since then, dozens of
sponsors have withdrawn
their ads from the program.
The National Organization
for Women and other advocacy groups have called for
O’Reilly’s dismissal.
O’Reilly has acknowledged the settlements made
from 2002 to 2014 but denied
the merits of all the sexual
harassment claims against
him. He has said the payouts
were made to spare his children from negative publicity
that would be caused by any
prolonged legal battles.
On Monday, network parent company 21st Century
Fox said it was launching an
investigation into a claim by
Los Angeles radio personality Wendy Walsh that she
was denied the chance to become a Fox News contributor after rebuffing O’Reilly’s sexual advances.
Walsh spoke to the Los Angeles Times this week about
why she went public with her
claim against O’Reilly.
After O’Reilly announced
his vacation, New York Magazine reported that there’s a
split inside the Murdoch
family, which runs 21st Century Fox, over whether O’Reilly should remain with
the network. 21st Century
Fox declined to comment on
that report. Fox News confirmed that this was a
planned vacation and that
O’Reilly is due back April 24.
samantha.masunaga
@latimes.com
Patricia Schlein Star Max/GC Images
FOX NEWS host Bill O’Reilly, shown in October, said
during his Tuesday night broadcast that he will take a
previously planned vacation. He wouldn’t say where.
Harry Shearer suing over
the movie “This Is Spinal
Tap,” Kevin Costner over
“Robin Hood: Prince of
Thieves” and Richard Dreyfuss over “What About
Bob?”
In the Wednesday complaint, Stallone alleges that
Warner Bros. has continuously received revenue
from “Demolition Man” but
failed to send Rogue Marble
a profit participation statement since late 1997.
Rogue Marble, represented by the Beverly Hills
law firm of Johnson & Johnson, has spent that last three
years haggling with Warner
Bros. over money from the
movie, according to the suit.
It said in early 2015, Stallone’s company received a
letter stating that no money
was owed to it because
“Demolition Man” had a
$66.9-million deficit.
After inquiring further,
Rogue Marble said it received a profit participation
statement and a check for
$2.8 million. But the statement was “one page and did
not contain any detail for the
figures presented, nor did it
contain any detail covering
the reporting period since
the last statement.”
Warner Bros. declined to
comment.
“Demoliltion
Man”
opened in October 1993 and
grossed $58.1 million in
ticket sales in the U.S. and
Canada. The movie has also
generated revenue from
overseas theatrical releases,
home video releases and TV
and cable broadcasts.
In the futuristic movie,
Stallone plays an L.A. cop
who is cryogenically frozen
along with a criminal (Wesley Snipes). The two are revived years later, resuming
their rivalry and taking care
of unfinished business.
Stallone has worked with
Warner Bros. on numerous
projects, including the 2015
movie “Creed,” for which the
actor received an Oscar
nomination for reprising his
role as Rocky Balboa.
david.ng@latimes.com
Melania
Trump
awarded
damages
The first lady sued the
Daily Mail newspaper
for reporting rumors
about her past.
associated press
LONDON — First Lady
Melania Trump has accepted an apology and damages from the publisher of
the Daily Mail newspaper for
reporting rumors about her
time as a model, the two
parties in the lawsuit said
Wednesday.
Trump sued the Daily
Mail in Britain and Mail Online in the United States over
an August article, which ran
under the headline “Racy
photos and troubling questions about his wife’s past
that could derail Trump.”
The first lady’s attorneys
argued that the report damaged her ability to build businesses based on her status
as a well-known figure and
“successful businesswoman.”
In a joint statement, the
parties said the Mail retracted its false statements
that Trump “provided services beyond simply modeling” and agreed to pay
damages and costs. The
amount was not specified.
As part of the settlement,
the Mail published an apology, saying, “We accept that
these allegations about Mrs.
Trump are not true and we
retract and withdraw them.”
Catrin Evans, lawyer for
the Mail’s publisher, told a
hearing at London’s High
Court that the company
wanted “to set the record
straight, and to apologize to
the claimant for any distress
and embarrassment that
the articles may have caused
her.”
C4
T H U R S DAY, A P R I L 13 , 2 017
S
L AT I M E S. C O M /B U S I NE S S
Give up seat to United’s CEO?
Among tales from passengers is one in which attendant tried to shame first-class fliers
DAVID LAZARUS
Far be it from
me to tell
United Airlines how it
should run its
business.
But judging from the
hundreds of
emails, tweets
and social media posts I’ve
gotten in response to my
column on a first-class
passenger being threatened
with handcuffs — this is
separate from the doctordragging incident — I feel
comfortable in suggesting
that this company needs to
make some changes, and
fast.
This first story I’ll share
isn’t such a big deal in the
grand scheme of things. But
it’s perhaps illustrative of
the corporate mindset at
United, which seems to
place customer satisfaction
well below the interests of
employees and shareholders, which isn’t very smart
over the long haul.
It also involves the head
of the company, Oscar
Munoz. And a United
spokeswoman admitted to
me Wednesday that it really
happened.
Steven Ginsberg — he
prefers to be called “Sonny”
— is a Chicago lawyer who
vacationed last Christmas
in Aspen, Colo. He told me
that when he and his family
were flying home on United,
the weather was pretty
fierce. The small plane sat
for nearly an hour on the
runway before returning to
the gate.
At that point, a family of
five that had occupied most
of the six first-class seats
got off the aircraft. Ginsberg
didn’t know it at the time,
but he found out later that
this was Munoz, his wife and
three of his four kids.
The flight crew promptly
upgraded the first-class
standby passengers to the
suddenly available firstclass seats. Eventually, the
plane left the gate again for
another takeoff attempt.
However, it turned around
and once more returned to
the gate.
United spokeswoman
Megan McCarthy says this
Mark Von Holden AP Images for United Airlines
UNITED CEO Oscar Munoz and his family reportedly gave up their first-class seats on a flight but later re-
boarded after others had been seated. After recognizing the unfairness, the family took empty seats elsewhere.
Valerie Fearns
GEOFF FEARNS was threatened with being hand-
cuffed if he didn’t hand over his first-class seat.
was solely due to the
weather. Ginsberg, who was
on the plane, isn’t so sure.
At the gate, he told me, a
flight attendant announced
to the five people who’d
been bumped up to first
class two hours earlier that
they’d have to return to
Economy Plus. “She said
the family that had gotten
off earlier had decided to get
back on,” Ginsberg said.
This being Aspen, none
of the people now enjoying
first-class accommodations
were willing to move. Ginsberg said he was told by one
of the now-first-class passengers that a crew member
had confided that Munoz
and his family had disembarked to try and get a flight
out of a different airport, the
one near Vail.
When that didn’t work
out, the passenger told
Ginsberg, the United chief
executive hurried back to
the Aspen airport.
“The gate attendant
repeatedly tried to shame
the standby folks into vacating the first-class seats,
shaking her head and making comments about how
they should show respect,”
Ginsberg said.
“The standby folks stood
their ground. They knew it
was Munoz, were bothered
by them being the cause of
an extra delay and did not
feel they should be moved
up and then back.”
McCarthy said Munoz
was unaware of all this. She
said that when he and his
family reboarded the aircraft, he recognized the
unfairness of asking people
to move and, on his own,
decided to take the empty
seats in Economy Plus.
Ginsberg’s take is that
the flight crew was “bending
over backward to make the
CEO happy.”
If so, it would reflect
what seems to be yet another case of misplaced priorities. In the case of David
Dao, the doctor who was
forcibly dragged Sunday
from an overbooked United
flight, his seat was wanted
by the airline for one of its
own employees, who needed
to get elsewhere for a work
shift.
Then I wrote about Geoff
Fearns, an Irvine investment manager who was
threatened with being
handcuffed if he didn’t hand
United
seeks
to quell
outrage
[United Airlines, from C1]
screaming from his seat.
Also on Wednesday, the
Chicago Department of Aviation put two more officers
who were involved in the
onboard fracas on administrative leave, joining an officer who was suspended earlier. The passenger, Dao,
took steps that could be a
prelude to a lawsuit, and
President Trump weighed in
on the controversy.
During his interview,
Munoz apologized to Dao,
his family, passengers on the
plane, United customers
and employees, pledging
that this “will never happen
again on a United Airlines
flight.”
“That is not who our family at United is,” Munoz said.
Later Wednesday, United
said all customers on that
flight are receiving compensation for their ticket costs.
Such moves are the right
first steps, branding experts
said. But they believe that
the airline will have to do a
lot more to regain the trust
of customers.
“They have so destroyed
the connection and trust
they’ve built up over the
years,” said Eric Schiffer,
chief executive of Reputation Management Consultants in Irvine. “And it wasn’t
just the beat-down of a customer that everyone could
project themselves being —
it was the response afterwards, which was so cold
and done with such a lack of
empathy. It made people believe they just don’t care.”
After the videos and photos of Dao’s removal from
the plane generated public
outrage, Munoz initially said
in a letter to employees that
the 69-year-old physician
from Elizabethtown, Ky.,
over his full-fare, first-class
seat on a flight from Hawaii
to Los Angeles to another
first-class passenger
deemed a “higher priority”
by United.
I’ve received many, many
recollections of indignities
large and small suffered by
United passengers. The
unifying thread to all of
them is a seeming disregard
on the airline’s part to how
its customers are treated or
and whether the passengers
would ever use the carrier
again.
Micky Levy, for example,
said she was flying from
New Jersey’s Newark Liberty International Airport to
Los Angeles International
Airport last month.
“As soon as I sat down, I
noticed my seat smelled like
it was soaked with urine,”
she recalled. “The floor was
also moist. I complained to
the flight attendants, who
were very rude.”
After her seatmates also
complained, Levy said, a
United employee placed
extra cushions atop the
existing ones. The smell,
however, remained intense.
Levy said a flight attendant refused to upgrade her
to an empty seat in business
class but instead responded
that “I could go to the lavatories, get some water and
soap, and wash my seat if I
was really bothered by the
unsanitary smell.”
Rita Nethersole related
her experience of last summer flying United from
Hong Kong to her home in
Massachusetts. She said
she suffers from claustrophobia and can have panic
attacks on long, crowded
flights. So she specifically
booked an aisle seat and
confirmed that she still had
the seat reservation 24
hours before her flight.
But when she checked in,
she was given a boarding
pass for a middle seat. “I
questioned it and was
brusquely told that my seat
was changed,” Nethersole
said. “I begged for a change
and was still denied. I told
them I was afraid I might
have a panic attack but got
nowhere.”
She ended spending
hours standing in the galley,
heavily medicated, trying
desperately to keep from
freaking out.
“I did everything I was
supposed to and still wound
up with a seat that was
unacceptable,” Nethersole
said. “No one attempted to
help me. No one should have
had to go through this.”
On the other hand,
Michael Barletta told me
about his experience a year
ago when United was
“warm, compassionate and
exceptionally empathetic”
after his 26-year-old daughter, Camille, a United flight
attendant, died after being
hit by a speeding car.
United arranged for her
body to be flown to Chicago
for a memorial service.
Munoz also became
personally involved, arranging transportation and
hotel accommodations for
Camille’s former colleagues
to attend the service. He
called the family to convey
his condolences.
That’s classy behavior.
Now what about all the
rest of us who aren’t airline
employees?
David Lazarus‘ column runs
Tuesdays and Fridays. Send
your tips to david.lazarus
@latimes.com.
Major stock indexes
Index
Dow industrials
Close
Daily
change
Daily %
change
YTD %
change
+4.20
20,591.86
-59.44
-0.29
S&P 500
2,344.93
-8.85
-0.38
+4.74
Nasdaq composite
5,836.16
-30.61
-0.52
+8.42
S&P 400
1,699.90
-19.95
-1.16
+2.37
Russell 2000
1,359.20
-17.75
-1.29
+0.15
EuroStoxx 50
3,163.14
+3.43
+0.11
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18,552.61
24,313.50
-195.26
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+10.51
Nikkei (Japan)
Hang Seng (Hong Kong)
Source: AP
MARKET ROUNDUP
Stocks post losses
as bond yields slip
Julio Cortez Associated Press
UNITED AIRLINES said all customers on the flight from which a man was
dragged are receiving compensation. Above, a United jetliner in Newark, N.J.
was a “belligerent” customer
who “refused to comply”
with requests to give up his
seat.
Munoz apologized to Dao
in subsequent statements,
calling the incident a “truly
horrific event.” In Wednesday’s interview, Munoz said
his initial words “fell short of
truly expressing what we
were feeling.”
Munoz said the airline
will conduct a “deep and
thorough” review of many of
its policies related to this, including the incentives offered to give up seats once
people are aboard an aircraft. If no one chooses to
leave the plane, despite the
compensation
offered,
Munoz said United will not
use a law enforcement official to take a passenger off.
“To remove a booked,
paid, seated passenger, we
can’t do that,” he said.
This change could spread
to other airlines, analysts
said.
“It just seems like something that is rare enough
where there’s a lot of upside
to be able to promise passengers that this is not going
to happen to you and it’s not
costly to do,” said Seth Kaplan, managing partner of
Airline Weekly. “There’s just
no downside to doing this.”
In 2016, airlines posted an
involuntary bumping rate of
62 per 1 million passengers,
down from 73 per1million fliers the year before, according to a recent report from
the Bureau of Transportation Statistics. The bureau
said the 2016 figure represents the lowest annual rate
since 1995.
Delta and American airlines did not respond to requests for comment on
whether their policies would
change.
Although United has denied reports that the Chicago flight was overbooked,
the incident has resulted in
increased scrutiny of this
common airline practice.
Jan Brueckner, professor
of economics at UC Irvine,
said overbooking can actually benefit consumers. If an
airline flies with empty
seats, it forgoes revenue.
“Eliminating empty seats
is a good idea because it
keeps fares down,” he said.
“People don’t like it because
it’s crowded, but still, they
care more about the price
than anything.”
Rather than changing
policies on overbooking, airlines should adjust their
compensation policies to get
more volunteers to take a
later flight, he said. Federal
rules cap the compensation
that airlines can pay for involuntary bumping at $1,350.
President Trump also
brought up this point in a
Wednesday interview with
the Wall Street Journal. He
said airlines shouldn’t be
prevented from overselling
flights, but should eliminate
the maximum value of compensation vouchers so passengers have more incentive
to give up their seats.
On Wednesday, Dao
asked a Chicago-area court
for an order requiring
United and Chicago to retain all recordings, video and
reports of the incident, as
well as the personnel files of
the aviation department officials who pulled him from
the flight, according to the
Chicago Tribune.
Thomas A. Demetrio and
Stephen L. Golan, attorneys
representing Dao, said they
plan to hold a news conference Thursday in Chicago.
In his interview with ABC
News, Munoz said he had
reached out to Dao and left a
message, but hasn’t yet been
able to connect with him.
When asked whether he
believed Dao was at fault,
Munoz hesitated before saying, “No, he can’t be. He was
a paying passenger sitting in
a seat in our aircraft, and no
one should be treated that
way, period.”
samantha.masunaga
@latimes.com
tracey.lien@latimes.com
associated press
Industrial and materials
companies led U.S. stocks
modestly lower Wednesday
on another day of subdued
trading ahead of the long
Easter holiday weekend.
The slide marked the second decline in a row for the
stock market, extending its
losses for the month.
Energy stocks also fell as
oil prices snapped a six-day
winning streak. Utilities,
phone companies and other
high-dividend stocks were
among the biggest gainers.
Bond prices rose, sending
yields lower.
The Standard & Poor’s
500 index slid 8.85 points, or
0.4%, to 2,344.93. The Dow
Jones industrial average fell
59.44 points, or 0.3%, to
20,591.86. The Nasdaq composite index lost 30.61 points,
or 0.5%, to 5,836.16.
Small-company stocks
did worse than the rest of the
market. The Russell 2000 index gave up 17.75 points, or
1.3%, to 1,359.20.
The yield on the benchmark U.S. 10-year note fell to
2.25% from 2.32% late Tuesday. That’s its lowest yield
since November.
“That’s indicative of people once more taking that
opinion of being risk-off, or
not willing to make a bet that
equity prices are going to be
up because of higher earnings to be reported here for
the first quarter,” said Terry
DuFrene, global investment
specialist at J.P. Morgan Private Bank.
Among the stocks that
helped pull the market lower
Tuesday was Tractor Supply, which sank 8.3%, shedding $5.86 to $64.61. The farm
equipment retailer said
sales of seasonal goods fell
during the first quarter.
Industrial-sector stocks
were the biggest decliners in
the S&P 500. Fastenal tumbled 8% after the maker of
industrial coatings and construction fasteners disclosed that its business was
hurt by higher freight expenses and inventory costs.
The stock lost $4.05 to $46.29.
Investors bid up shares in
Blackberry after arbitrators
awarded the smartphone
maker $814.9 million to resolve a dispute with Qualcomm over royalty overpayments. The stock gained
$1.23, or 16%, to $8.93.
Benchmark U.S. crude
snapped a six-day winning
streak, losing 29 cents to
close at $53.11 a barrel in New
York. Brent crude, the
standard for international
oil prices, fell 37 cents to
close at $55.86 a barrel in
London.
Gold rose $3.90 to
$1,278.10 an ounce.
In late trading, the dollar
weakened to 109.10 yen, down
from 109.69 yen late Tuesday.
The euro strengthened to
$1.0669 from $1.0608.
L AT I ME S . CO M / B U S IN E S S
T H UR S DAY, A P R I L 13 , 2 017
Firms fight
piracy, fraud
and fake news
[Online ads, from C1]
ers hacked to impersonate
real browsing behaviors.
Others traffic in content
people crave but upstanding
businesses wouldn’t want to
support, such as bootlegged
movies or terrorist propaganda.
“A lot of advertisers don’t
look that close because
there’s so many websites involved,” said Erik Mekkelson, who bought the ads for
the tech firm. “There’s hundreds, thousands of websites. And these are sneaking through.”
The setup is siphoning
potential revenue from legitimate media companies to
shady ones. And it’s enabling hucksters to profit in
fake newswriting and piracy
because of ad views.
Stopping money from
flowing to their operations
has become a new priority
for advertisers. Their results
are difficult to measure, but
early signs are encouraging.
With government regulators, Hollywood studios and
ad buyers growing privy to
the scale of online ad fraud,
the $200-billion online ad industry has begun taking
stock of itself.
Most online ads are purchased through automated
software that matches the
pricing and distribution
preferences of advertisers
with the purported audiences of websites and apps. The
transactions occur in milliseconds. Advertisers get
long computer-generated
lists of where their ads ran.
Website operators automatically receive a bank account deposit.
GroupM, the New York
City media agency that leads
the world in ad-buying,
started over the last couple
of years analyzing the Web
pages on which its clients’
ads appeared.
The findings were uncomfortable, said Jonathan
Hsia, who until recently was
managing partner and head
of digital investment at
GroupM’s Mindshare North
America.
“You’ll find a number
don’t pass the smell tests,”
he said. “Hundreds of thousands of impressions from a
site you’ve never heard of,
that’s
almost
certainly
fraud.”
On piracy video services,
some ads pitched offerings
from NBC, Paramount and
Lionsgate — the very companies whose content was
being stolen. Hsia and his
colleagues also realized that
some of the websites spread
malicious software that
could infect a computer,
turning it into one of the robots that mimic human Internet users.
That “is something we
don’t want to be a party to,”
Hsia said.
Mindshare adopted a
strict protocol: It refuses to
pay for spots not vetted by a
staffer
or
tracking
technology.
At the small ad-buying
agency Ace Rankings in San
Francisco,
Mekkelson’s
analysis found as much as
90% of the placements for his
tech-firm client were on bogus websites. The ads were
purchased through Google,
which allows almost any
website to carry ads.
Mekkelson complained
to Google about the placements and received some refunds. He also tried banning
some websites from carrying
his ads. But as he struck one
website, a new one would
arise. Soon, his client shifted
from such ads toward safer
and more expensive bets.
As Hsia found, it wasn’t a
hard sell because advertisers had more assurance they
were reaching people — not
robots.
Google
and
other
technology providers that
connect advertisers and
Cheryl A. Guerrero Los Angeles Times
FRANK ADDANTE is founder of Rubicon Project, which specializes in digital ad
placement. It tries to suss out the business model of websites applying to host ads.
websites have vowed to expand their review processes.
For example, Rubicon
Project tries to suss out the
business model of websites
applying to host ads. The
Playa Vista company tries to
answer basic questions:
Who owns the website’s content? Does the website have
rights to it? Is this something someone would read?
Is there a companion Facebook page that looks active?
Are there comments?
Eyeballing a website can
ward off piracy and robot
fraud.
“A terrible, low-quality
site is probably not going to
have very many humans
visiting,” said Mike Zaneis,
who helms Trustworthy Accountability Group, a crossindustry organization promoting online advertising
best practices.
Tech companies also examine less visible signs. Piracy websites tend to be
overseas, so a large amount
of U.S. visitors to an offshore
website would raise concerns. On the Web, information is mainly viewed in the
same country where it’s created.
When
visitor-tracking
firms such as SimilarWeb
and ComScore report an audience substantially different from the number of ad
views, reason for suspicion
increases. The discrepancy
suggests the website is using
robots to juice readership.
Offending websites get added to lists that automatically
keep some ads off them.
Ad networks can check
for fake readers by asking
them questions, similar to
how online forms sometimes
require people to solve a
math equation before submitting. An unusual response would suggest the
visitor is a robot. Ad network
OpenX also monitors the
speed of behind-the-scenes
prompts and commands on
the computer. Sloth-like
loading could signal robots
are sucking resources.
Approved websites are
subject to increased followup monitoring. It’s meant to
thwart bait-and-switch tactics in which disreputable
material is swapped in after
passing an initial screening.
Banned websites appear
to shut down as income disappears. Many that Mekkelson found last year with pilfered or nonsensical content, including cloudmortgageloan.com, no longer
exist.
But fraudsters and the
same-old content often reappear under new URLs. Ad
networks are attempting to
be proactive in stamping
them out. They recognize a
person who visits one piracy
website is likely to visit one
or two others, and they can
analyze the individual’s
browsing history to identify
previously unknown offenders.
A handful of ad networks
have subjected themselves
to audits in the last year to
prove they’re taking steps to
deter pirates and fraudsters.
Several ad agencies and advertisers such as Arby’s, Kellogg’s and Unilever have
committed to avoiding copyright-infringing websites.
“It’s no panacea, but it’s
going to put a lot of pressure
on criminal networks,”
Zaneis said.
His team is working with
auditor Ernst & Young,
which devised the $8-billion
losses estimate in 2015, to
quantify outcomes.
Banding together appears to have paid off by one
measure, though drawing a
direct link isn’t easy. In summer 2015, about 30% of the
ads on 1,200 big destinations
for illegal access to movies
and TV shows were from
high-spending advertisers.
By last fall, the percentage
had slipped into the single
digits, according to Santa
Monica ad tracking firm
Pathmatics.
The data suggest that the
C5
500 largest advertisers in
any given month, by Pathmatics estimates, have
nearly extricated themselves from a cadre of pirates.
But new frontiers, including smartphone apps and video, are sore spots. Pathmatics found that the
amount of big-name video
advertisers on piracy websites held steady last year.
In recent weeks, WalMart, AT&T and hundreds
of other advertisers curtailed YouTube spending
over concerns of supporting
racist and violent videos.
Though Wall Street analysts
didn’t expect the boycott to
result in a long-term financial hit for YouTube, the online video giant introduced
several new policies to restrict where ads appear —
including new layers of human review and minimum
viewership requirements.
The freedoms that make
the Internet welcoming to
anyone mean it may never
be clean enough to satisfy
every advertiser. Mekkelson
just hopes companies take a
strong stand on who gets
paid when they put ads online. Industry leaders warn
that universal compliance
and deterrence is far off.
MGID is among the ad
networks that maintain support for piracy operations
such as Thevideo.me. Ads
MGID supplies to the website tend to be the most lucrative type — salacious, irresistible links such as
“These Hot Russian &
Ukrainian Singles Want to
Meet Older Men.”
MGID, with offices in
Santa Monica, said this
week it would review the
website and that it bans any
publisher whose content is
illegal.
Even when banned, pirates have no shortage of
countermeasures.
Some
now load pop-ups to generate revenue. The new windows feature a different
“safe” website, perhaps
about dieting strategies, allowing it to host ads.
That’s the scheme by
which Amazon.com, BMW
and Wynn Las Vegas at least
one day supported Couchtuner.me, where people
binge on bootleg copies of
TV shows such as “The Real
Housewives”
and
“Big
Brother.”
paresh.dave@latimes.com
Twitter: @peard33
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C6
T H U R S DAY , A P R I L 13 , 2 017
WS T
L AT I M E S. C O M /B U S I NE S S
‘Marketplace’ has plans to expand
[‘Marketplace,’ from C1]
some might have to scale
back on programming, perhaps dropping Marketplace.
Cognizant of these challenges, “Marketplace” is expanding its staff, producing
more audio podcasts and
figuring out other ways to reach listeners and generate
more revenue. The plan is to
turn a show about business
into a self-sustaining business that can prosper in the
era of digital media.
“I want us to grow,” said
Ryssdal, the popular host of
the flagship afternoon program. “We need to be a go-to
source about things that are
happening in this economy.
We need to grow to a point
where
our
reputation
matches our ambitions.”
Key to “Marketplace’s”
strategy is cultivating listeners who are not devotees of
public radio. Finding new
sources of revenue also presents challenges because
public broadcasters are not
allowed to run overt commercial
messages,
and
“Marketplace’s” mission —
“raising the economic intelligence of the country” — puts
a priority on education, not
commerce.
“I’ve always admired
what ‘Marketplace’ does,”
said Ben Manilla, director of
audio at UC Berkeley’s
Graduate School of Journalism. “But the question is
how will the programming
be delivered, how will it be
paid for and how will people
find it in this vast sea of content?”
“Marketplace” has long
been an outlier. The show
launched in 1989 at Cal State
Long Beach’s KLON radio
station before being acquired in 1990 by USC, which
sold the operation a decade
later to Minnesota Public
Radio.
It now distributes the
four “Marketplace” programs — a morning report,
the flagship 30-minute afternoon show, the weekend report and “Marketplace
Tech” — through American
Public Media, the St. Paul,
Minn.-based parent company.
Together, the shows attract a larger audience than
leading cable business programs such as Fox News’
“Your World With Neil
Cavuto,” which draws nearly
2 million viewers an episode,
according to Nielsen.
“Marketplace’s” annual
revenue is about $18 million,
about two-thirds of which
comes from corporate sponsors. About a quarter of the
money comes from the carriage fees paid by radio stations that air its programming. More than 750 stations carry “Marketplace,”
including local stations
KPCC-FM (89.3) in Pasadena and KCRW-FM (89.9)
in Santa Monica.
The show has attracted
loyal fans, including Kilbridge, associate director of
the Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business
Journalism at Arizona State
University in Phoenix. In the
current polarized media environment, Kilbridge said
she appreciates “Marketplace’s” evenhanded treatment of the news and Ryssdal’s humor and conversational style.
“Kai dumbs it down without making me feel dumb,”
Katie Falkenberg Los Angeles Times
“THE ME that you hear on the air is pretty much
the me that you get in real life,” Kai Ryssdal says.
she said.
Workdays begin early at
“Marketplace’s” downtown
Los Angeles offices that
overlook a busy on-ramp to
the Harbor Freeway. Ryssdal, 53, and a small contingent of editors huddle in a
conference room, beginning
at 7:30 a.m., to discuss the
news of the day and prepare
the lineup for the show that
tapes at 2:30 p.m. Reporters
then have four hours to complete their assignments,
boiling down a complex subject into 90 seconds of audio.
Unlike many other radio
broadcasts, Ryssdal writes
his own script.
“The me that you hear on
the air is pretty much the me
that you get in real life,” said
Ryssdal, who spent eight
years in the military and four
years with the U.S. State Department,
including
in
China. He returned to the
U.S. in the late 1990s, and
while his wife attended graduate school, he worked at a
Borders bookstore in Palo
Alto and tried to figure out
what career to pursue.
At the age of 34, he became an intern at San Francisco public radio station
KQED-FM (88.5) — and
quickly got hooked.
He joined “Marketplace”
in 2001, moving his family to
Los Angeles and working the
overnight shift to anchor the
morning report, which is
now produced in New York
with David Brancaccio.
Ryssdal became the host of
the afternoon show nearly 12
years ago.
On this morning, he and
his Oakland-based colleague Molly Wood recorded
an episode of their recently
launched digital podcast,
“Make Me Smart With Kai
and Molly.”
“This is an opportunity
for us to go in spaces we
haven’t been,” he said in an
interview. “There’s a giant
universe of people out there
who don’t know what public
radio is, and they are [into]
podcasts.”
According to Edison Research, podcasts (digital audio broadcasts) have become one of the fastestgrowing media formats.
About 24% of the U.S. population listens to at least one
podcast a month, according
to an Edison survey this
year, compared with 12% in
2010. The audience skews
young; about twice as many
listeners ages 12 to 24 download these audio stories
compared with those over
55.
“The spoken word isn’t
old-fashioned
anymore,”
said Megan Lazovick, director of research for Edison
Research in New Jersey,
adding the rise in podcasts
correlates with the adoption
of smart phones. “Podcasts
are not going to replace radio, but it is really growing.
There is a podcast for everyone.”
“Marketplace” is well-positioned to capitalize on the
trend because it has expertise in audio storytelling and
high production values. The
team has produced podcasts for more than five
years and its podcasts now
reach an audience of 5 million. The group now markets
half a dozen podcasts, including “Code Breaker,” a
series with Tech Insider;
“The Uncertain Hour,” a
documentary series about
welfare reform; and Corner
Office, Ryssdal’s conversations with big-name chief
executives.
“Make Me Smart With
Kai and Molly” is more personality-driven and more
casual than the radio broadcasts. For example, a recent
episode was: “Avocado toast
is really a story about
NAFTA.”
“Marketplace” has tackled complex stories, such as
a current series called “The
Big Promise,” which explores Trump’s campaign
promises and why voters
embraced him. Ryssdal and
other reporters have been
focusing on the economy in
Erie, Pa., which went for
Trump in the last election.
Another current series, “Robot-Proof Jobs,” examines
how automation is displacing traditional jobs.
Three-quarters of “Marketplace’s” audience comes
from the radio broadcasts,
but Clark, the general manager, expects the mix to
change as audiences shift to
digital sources.
Changing viewer habits
prompted “Marketplace’s”
new business plan, not the
proposed cuts in Washington, Clark said.
Clark plans to add nearly
a dozen employees to
“Marketplace’s” staff of 85,
and she recently hired a
chief operating officer, public radio veteran Mark Crowley, to explore revenue opportunities, including live
events, “Marketplace” video
games and perhaps even
creating educational materials for school curriculum.
“This is about taking our
brand and building it in a
way that allows us to introduce our form of storytelling
to more people,” Clark said.
“This also is about putting
some more meat on the
bones and positioning for
the future.”
meg.james@latimes.com
Twitter: @MegJamesLAT
Partnership is
buying state ski
area operator
where Vail Resorts, operator
of Heavenly Mountain Resort, acquired the Northstar-at-Tahoe resort near
the lake’s North Shore in
2010.
The
following
year,
Squaw Valley USA and
Alpine Meadows, two of the
largest ski resorts at Lake
Tahoe, combined operations.
Only two days before announcing the latest deal for
Mammoth Resorts, KSL
and Aspen Skiing unveiled a
deal to take over Intrawest
Resorts Holdings, a Denverbased resort company that
operates six mountain resorts, with approximately
8,000 skiable acres and 1,100
acres of land for real estate
development. The deal was
valued at $1.5 billion.
The KSL-Aspen Skiing
partnership seems intent on
challenging the dominance
of Vail Resorts, one of the
world’s biggest ski resort operators. KSL’s two founder,
Michael S. Shannon, and
Eric C. Resnick, are both former Vail executives.
Vail, through its subsidiaries, operates 10 resorts
and three urban ski areas in
Colorado, Utah, California,
Nevada, Minnesota, Michigan and Wisconsin as well as
Australia.
Brian van der Brug Los Angeles Times
SOME OF the nation’s most popular ski areas are now in the control of a handful of large resort developers.
Terms of the deal for Mammoth Resorts were not disclosed. Above, Mammoth Mountain in December.
The story of Mammoth
Mountain — California’s
busiest ski resort — began
with Dave McCoy, who created the first rope tow in the
Mammoth area in 1937 by
lashing a rope to the axle of a
Model A Ford and charged
skiers 50 cents to get pulled
up the slopes.
Local control of the resort has been on the decline
since 1996 when Canadianbased resort operator Intrawest bought a major share in
the resort, followed in 2006
by Starwood Capital Group,
a private equity fund run by
real estate developer Barry
Sternlicht.
Mammoth
residents
seemed split on whether the
latest change in ownership
would be good for locals.
Some business owners hope
the new resort owners will
invest heavily in the mountain.
“I’m very excited,” said
Kevin Green, a real estate
developer who has lived full
time near the Mammoth resort for five years. “It’s great
for real estate. It’s going to
get more people to visit our
mountain.”
But Green said his girlfriend worries that lift tickets, lodging, food and other
necessities for locals will get
more expensive.
“There has to be a balance where people can build
a life for themselves here,” he
said.
hugo.martin@latimes.com
Twitter: @hugomartin
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
To advertise your pets, log on to
latimes.com/advertiser/category/pets
Dogs
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Don’t let the phone
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Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
ZEBAL
©2017 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
All Rights Reserved.
YINAR
GMOYSG
SLUDHO
Advertise with
LA Times Classified
LA Times Classified (800) 234-4444
Check out the new, free JUST JUMBLE app
[Resorts, from C1]
Rusty Gregory, chief executive of Mammoth Resorts,
said he expects the deal will
keep the same local management in place at Mammoth.
“They bought Mammoth
because of our personality,
not to change our personality,” he said.
The Colorado partners
also vowed to continue investing in the California resorts.
“We love to see our resorts continue to thrive and
prosper,” Kaplan said.
Although
a
dollar
amount for the Mammoth
Resorts purchase was not
disclosed,
Connecticutbased Starwood Capital
Group bought a controlling
interest in Mammoth Resorts in 2006, when it operated only Mammoth and
June Mountain, for $365 million. Mammoth Resorts
took over Bear Mountain
and Snow Summit in 2014 in
a $38-million deal.
The purchase of Mammoth Resorts follows a consolidation spree in the ski industry that has put some of
the nation’s most popular
mountains in the control of a
handful of large resort developers.
The trend has been evident around Lake Tahoe,
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
“
Yesterday’s
”
(Answers tomorrow)
Jumbles: FRAME
CIVIC
SEASON
QUAINT
Answer: The horned animals loved butting heads,
even with the — RAMIFICATIONS
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Legal Notices
Department of Justice
Antitrust Division
Take notice that the
United States has filed a
proposed Final Judgment
in a civil antitrust case in
the United States District
Court for the Central District of California (Western
Division), United States
of America v. DIRECTV
Group Holdings, LLC, and
AT&T, Inc., Civil Action No.
2:16-cv-08150-MWF-E.
On November 2, 2016, the
United States filed a Complaint against DIRECTV
and its corporate successor, AT&T, alleging that DIRECTV was the ringleader
of a series of unlawful
information exchanges
between DIRECTV and
three of its competitors
– Cox Communications
Inc., Charter Communications Inc. and AT&T (before it acquired DIRECTV)
– during the companies’
negotiations to carry the
SportsNet LA “Dodgers
Channel,” in violation of
Section 1 of the Sherman
Act, 15 U.S.C. § 1. The proposed Final Judgment,
filed on March 23, 2017,
requires the Defendants
to stop illegally sharing
competitively-sensitive
information with their
rivals, to monitor certain
communications
their
programming executives
have with their rivals, and
to implement antitrust
training and compliance
programs. A Competitive
Impact Statement filed
by the United States describes the Complaint,
the proposed Final Judgment, the industry, and
the remedies available to
private litigants who may
have been injured by the
alleged violation.
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Legal Notices
REQUEST FOR ORDER
Change
Spousal or Partner Support
Determination of Arrears
& Establish Payment Plan
Case Number: BD 475 585
Attorney: Brett R Wishart
Law Offices of Brett R.
Wishart
4 Venture, Suite 290
Irvine, CA 92618
Telephone No.: (949) 3961711
Fax No.: (949) 407-4869
Attorney for: Hubert P.
Frings
Notice of Hearing
To: Britt Madeleine Frings
(Respondent)
Date: 1/26/17
Time: 8:30
Dept.: 22
Room: 519
Superior Court of California, County of Los Angeles
111 North Hill Street
Los Angeles, California
90012-3117
CENTRAL DISTRICT
Filed Dec 01 2016
Sherri R, Carter, Executive
Officer/Clerk
By: F. Andrade, Deputy
Copies of the Complaint,
proposed Final Judgment, and Competitive
Impact Statement are
available for inspection
on the Antitrust Division’s
website at http://www.
justice.gov/atr and at
the Office of the Clerk of
the United States District
Court for the Central District of California (Western Division).
NOTICE OF CONTINUANCE OF HEARING
SUPERIOR COURT OF THE
STATE OF CALIFORNIA IN
AND FOR THE COUNTY
OF LOS ANGELES
Interested persons may
address comments to
Scott A. Scheele, Chief,
Telecommunications and
Media Section, Antitrust
Division, Department of
Justice, 450 Fifth Street
NW, Suite 7000, Washington, DC 20530 (telephone:
202-514-5621) within 60
days of the date of this
notice. Such comments,
including the name of the
submitter, and responses
thereto, will be posted
on the Antitrust Division’s
website, filed with the
Court, and, under certain
circumstances, published
in the Federal Register.
CASE
NUMBER:
BD
475585
Date of Hearing: 5/26/17
Time of Hearing: 8:30 am
Department: 22
Re the Marriage of:
Petitioner: Hubert P.
Frings
and
Respondent: B. Madeleine Frings
TO RESPONDENT B. MADELEINE FRINGS AND HER
ATTORNEYS OF RECORD,
PLEASE NOTE THAT:
The hearing of January
26, 2017 has been continued to May 26, 2017, at
8:30 a.m. in Department
22 of Los Angeles County
Superior Court located at
111 North Hill Street, Los
Angeles, California 90012.
Dated: 2/16/17
LAW OFFICES OF BRETT R,
WISHART
By: BRETT R. WISHART
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remain relevant in today’s
highly competitive market?
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nia Newspaper Publishers Case No. A-16-743754-C
Association new innovative Dept. No. XXX
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Real Estate Services
Legal Notices
DRAFT EIRS
It has been determined
that the following proposed projects have a
significant effect on the
environment and draft
Environmental
Impact
Reports (EIRs) have been
prepared.
NP-17-001-BE: Notice of
Preparation (NOP) of a
Draft Environmental Impact Report (EIR) for the
proposed Sixth Street
Park, Arts, River, and Connectivity Improvements
(PARC) Project. The City
of Los Angeles Bureau of
Engineering (LABOE) is
beginning the environmental review process for
the proposed Sixth Street
Park, Arts, River, and
Connectivity
Improvements (PARC) Project,
located in Los Angeles
beneath and adjacent to
the Sixth Street Viaduct,
between Mateo Street to
the west and the United
States Highway 101 to
the east. LABOE has prepared an Initial Study (IS)
and is requesting input
from public agencies,
stakeholders, and other
interested parties on the
scope and content of the
EIR. The NOP/IS is available online at http://eng.
lacity.org/techdocs/emg/
sixthstreet_parks_arts.
htm and at the following
public locations: Central Library, 630 West
5th Street, Los Angeles,
CA 90071; Little Tokyo
Library, 203 South Los
Angeles Street, Los Angeles, CA 90012; Robert
L Stevenson Library, 803
Spence Street, Los Angeles, CA 90023; Benjamin
Franklin Library, 2200 East
1st Street, Los Angeles,
CA 90033; BH Technology Center; 1600 East 4th
Street, Los Angeles, CA
90033; Boyle Heights City
Hall; 2130 East 1st Street
Suite 241, Los Angeles,
CA 90033. Comments are
due by Monday, May 15,
2017. Comments may
be submitted by email
to Jan.Green.Rebstock@
lacity.org (please include
Sixth Street PARC in the
subject line). Please also
include the name, telephone number, mailing address, and email
address of a person to
contact in case there are
questions regarding the
comments
submitted.
Comments may also be
submitted by mail to: Dr.
Jan Green Rebstock, City
of Los Angeles, Department of Public Works, Bureau of Engineering, Environmental Management
Group, 1149 S. Broadway,
6th Floor, Mail Stop 939,
Los Angeles, CA 90015.
You can also learn more
about the project at
www.sixthstreetviaduct.
org/parc.
Public Meeting: A public
scoping meeting will be
held to review the draft
conceptual designs of
the proposed Sixth Street
PARC Project and obtain
input on the scope and
content of the Draft EIR.
The meeting will be held
on May 3, 2017, 6:00 pm
– 8:00 pm at the Puente
Learning Center, 501
South Boyle Avenue, Los
Angeles, CA 90033. Public parking is available
onsite.
CITY OF LOS ANGELES ENVIRONMENTAL NOTICES
Notice is hereby given to the general public of the availability for public review and comment on the following
Environmental documents. Please call Darlene Navarrete to review file: (213)978-1332. Files are available for
REVIEW at: Los Angeles City Hall, 200 N. Spring St., Room 750, Los Angeles, CA 90012. Comments can be faxed
to: (213)978-1343, or emailed to darlene.navarrete@lacity.org. (*unless otherwise noted). CD indicates the
City Council District, sf indicates square feet and LAMC indicates Los Angeles Municipal Code. The publication is
intended to serve as our Notice of Intent to adopt the following Mitigated Negative Declaration (MND) or
Negative Declaration (ND)
MITIGATED NEGATIVE DECLARATION-NG-17-057-PL: ENV-2016-2858. 11331 W Osborne St; Sunland-TujungaLake View Terrace-Shadow Hills-East La Tuna Canyon. CD7. The project is the construction, use and
maintenance of a new 2,940 sf convenience store with an 8-pump gas station with 24-hour operations daily &
the dispensing of beer & wine for off-site consumption from 6:00 am to 2:00 am daily. The site is developed
with a 2,603 sf convenience store & 18 existing parking spaces. The proposed project will add 12 parking
spaces for a total of 30 parking spaces. REVIEW/COMMENT period ends: May 3, 2017
MITIGATED NEGATIVE DECLARATION-NG-17-058-PL: ENV-2016-4864. 842-846 S Grand Ave & 845 S Olive St;
Central City. CD14. The proposed project is the construction, use & maintenance of a new, 29-story mixed-use
development consisting of 205 dwelling units & 2,430 sf of ground floor commercial space with a total of 262
automobile parking spaces. The project requires: a Vesting Tentative Tract Map for a 9-lot subdivision,
including 1 master lot & 8 air space lots; Variances to permit: a) a minimum parking stall width of 8 feet in lieu
of the otherwise required 8 feet, 6 inches; b) a minimum parking stall length of 16 ft. in lieu of the otherwise
required 18 ft.; and c) a minimum drive aisle of 21 ft. in lieu of the otherwise required; a Floor Area Transfer of
less than 50,000 sf; and a Site Plan Review for a development project which creates 50 or more dwelling units.
REVIEW/COMMENT period ends: May 3, 2017
VS.
CASEYLEE MORAN, RENE VASQUEZ, KARISA HIRABAYASHI, NANCY HIRABAYASHI and DOES I through X,
inclusive. Defendants.
KARISA HIRABAYASHI and NANCY HIRABAYASHI;
Cross-Claimants
VS.
CASEYLEE MORAN and RENE VASQUEZ
Cross –Defendants
SUMMONS - CIVIL
NOTICE! YOU HAVE BEEN SUED. THE COURT MAY DECIDE AGAINST YOU WITHOUT YOUR BEING HEARD
UNLESS YOU RESPOND WITHIN 20 DAYS. READ THE
INFORMATION BELOW.
TO THE CROSS-DEFENDANT: A civil Cross-Claim has
been filed by the Defendant/Cross-Claimants Karisa
Hirabayashi and Nancy Hirabayashi against you for
the relief set forth in the Cross-Claim.
1. If you intend to defend this lawsuit, within 20 days
after this Summons is
served on you, exclusive of the day of service, you
must do the following:
(a)File with the Clerk of this Court, whose address is
shown below, a formal written response to the Complaint in accordance with the rules of the Court, with
the appropriate filing fee.
(b)Serve a copy of your response upon the attorney
whose name and address is shown below.
2. Unless you respond, your default will be entered
upon application of the Defendants/Cross-Claimants
and failure to so respond will result in a judgment
of default against you for the relief demanded in the
Cross-Claim, which could result in the taking of money
or property or other relief requested in the Complaint.
3.If you intend to seek the advice of an attorney in
this matter, you should do so promptly so that your
response may be filed on time.
4. The State of Nevada, its political subdivisions, agencies, officers, employees, board members, commission
members and legislators each have 45 days after service of this Summons within which to file an Answer or
other responsive pleading to the Cross- Claim
Dated: December 21, 2016
By: Shimaya Ladson, Deputy Clerk
Submitted by: Christopher M. Hanley, Esq.
Nevada Bar No. 11391
Attorneys for Defendants/Cross-Claimants
Attorneys for Defendants Karisa Hirabayashi
and Nancy Hirabayashi:
M. Caleb Meyer, Esq., Nevada Bar No. 13379
Christopher Hanley, Esq. Nevada Bar No. 11391
MESSNER REEVES LLP
5556 S. Fort Apache Road, Suite 100
Las Vegas, Nevada 89148
Telephone:(702) 363-5100
Facsimile: (702) 363-5101
E-mail: chanley@messner.com
E-mail: cmeyer@messner.com
3/20, 3/27, 4/3, 4/10, 4/17/2017
NOTICE OF AVAILABILITY OF A DRAFT
ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT/
ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT REPORT
FOR
BERTHS 226-236 [EVERPORT]
CONTAINER TERMINAL IMPROVEMENTS PROJECT
(SCH#2014101050)
Pursuant to the National Environmental Protection Act (NEPA) and
California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA), the U.S. Army Corps of
Engineers, Los Angeles District (Corps) and the City of Los Angeles Harbor
Department (LAHD) have prepared a joint Draft Environmental Impact
Statement/ Environmental Impact Report (Draft EIS/EIR) for Berths 226236 [Everport] Container Terminal Improvements Project (the proposed
Project).
The proposed Project consists of various improvements to the Everport
Container Terminal located on Terminal Island within the Port of Los
Angeles to expand the terminal's capacity and to accommodate larger
vessels. Improvements include dredging at Berths 226-232, the addition
of five new cranes, the raising of five existing cranes, the development of
23.5 additional acres of backlands, and an extension to the existing lease
by ten years for continued operations until 2038. The Draft EIS/EIR
identifies significant and unavoidable impacts associated with the
following environmental resource areas: air quality, biological resources,
cultural resources, greenhouse gas emissions, ground transportation and
noise. The project includes facilities and sites that are identified on the
State of California Hazardous Waste and Substances Site List (also known
as the Cortese List, compiled pursuant to California Government Code
65962.5).
Availability: The Draft EIS/EIR is available for review at: Port of Los
Angeles Environmental Management Division, 222 West 6th Street, Suite
900, San Pedro, CA 90731; Los Angeles City Library, Central Branch, 630
West 5th Street, Los Angeles CA 90071; Los Angeles City Library, San
Pedro Branch, 931 South Gaffey Street, San Pedro, CA 90731; Los Angeles
City Library, Wilmington Branch, 1300 North Avalon, Wilmington, CA
90744. The public notice is available online at the Corps website:
www.spl.usace.army.mil/regulatory/POLA.htm and the entire Draft
EIS/EIR is also available on the Port's web site:
http://www.portoflosangeles.org under the Environmental tab.
Public Meeting: The Corps and the Port will jointly conduct a public
meeting will be held on May 10, 2017, at 6:00 p.m. in the Board Room at
the Harbor Department Administration Building, 425 South Palos Verdes
Street, San Pedro, CA 90731
Written comments on the Draft EIS/EIR can be submitted through June 5,
2017, and should be mailed to both of the following addresses.
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Los Angeles District
Regulatory Division
ATTN: Theresa Stevens, Ph.D.
2151 Alessandro Drive, Suite 110
Ventura, California 93001
and
City of Los Angeles Harbor Department
Christopher Cannon, Director
Environmental Management Division
425 S. Palos Verdes Street
San Pedro, CA 90731
Comments
may
also
be
sent
via
email
to:
theresa.stevens@usace.army.mil and/or ceqacomments@portla.org..
Please remember to:
Send your comments in letter format as an attachment to the e-mail;
Include a valid mailing address in the comment letter; and
Use the project title as the e-mail's subject line.
For additional information, please contact the Corp's Public Affairs Office
at (213) 452-3920 or Tara Tisopulos, Project Manager at the Port of Los
Angeles at (310) 732-7713.
CN936421 BERTHS 226-236 Apr 13, 2017
T H U R S DAY , A P RI L 13 , 2 017
Legal Notices
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Case number (numero del Caso): BC600710
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Legal Notices
NOTICE OF ESCHEAT
TO THE CITY OF
LOS ANGELES
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN,
that for more than three
years there remained
unclaimed with the Department of Transportation of the City of Los
Angeles monies held in
the account known as the
“UNCLAIMED MONIES OF
TRANSPORTATION TRUST
FUND NO. 853” for security deposits received by
the Department between
July 1, 2010 through December 31, 2013.
AMOUNT: $132,264.47
A listing of these unclaimed refunds may be
viewed on the web at
http://www.lacity-parking.org/laopm/refund.
html.
Claims for return of monies held must be filed with
the City Clerk, Room 395
City Hall, 200 N. Spring
St., Los Angeles, CA 90012
BEFORE THURSDAY, JUNE
8, 2017.
THE AFORESAID MONIES
WILL BECOME THE PROPERTY OF THE CITY OF
LOS ANGELES ON JUNE
8, 2017.
DATED: March 23, 2017
CLAIRE BARTELS, CITY
TREASURER, OFFICE OF
FINANCE CITY OF LOS
ANGELES
PAINTER
EXP’D STAIN/FINISHER
FRANK BARRON TRUST; ALL PERSONS CLAIMING ANY
LEGAL OR EQUITABLE RIGHT, TITLE, ESTATE, LIEN, OR
INTEREST IN THE REAL PROPERTY DESCRIBED IN THIS
COMPLAINT, WHICH IS ADVERSE TO PLAINTIFF’S TITLE
OR CREATES ANY CLOUD ON PLAINTIFF’S TITLE, AND
DOES 1 THROUGH 100, INCLUSIVE.
YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF:
(LO ESTA DEMANDANDO EL DEMANDANTE):
RED, WHITE & BLUE PUBLIC LIVERY CORPORATION
NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide
San Diego ASAP $40-50K+ against you without your being heard unless you
MUST stain, MIX COLORS, respond within 30 days. Read the information below.
You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons
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SUMMONS
(CITACION JUDICIAL)
CASE NUMBER (Número del Caso): BC589123
NOTICE TO DEFENDANT:
(AVISO AL DEMANDADO):
Bernicec Sarmiento, an individual
YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF:
Ready Wholesale Electric and Lighting, Inc., a California corporation
NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without
your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the
information below.
You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are
served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy
served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your
written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to
hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your
response. You can find these court forms and more information at the
California
Courts
Online
Self-Help
Center
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county law library, or the
courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court
clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you
may lose the case by default, and your wages, money, and property may
be taken without further warning from the court.
There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney
right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an
attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be
eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program.
You can located these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services
Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online SelfHelp Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local
court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for
waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000
or more in a civil case. The court’s lien must be paid before the court will
dismiss the case.
¡AVISO! Lo han demandado. Si no responde dentro de 30 días, la corte
puede decidir en su contra sin escuchar su version. Lea la información a
continuación.
Tiene 30 DÍAS DE CALENDARIO después de que le entreguen esta citación
y papeles legales para presenter una respuesta por escrito en esta corte y
hacer que se entregue una copia al demandante. Una carta o una
llamada telefónica no lo prolegen. Su respuesta por escrito tiene que
estar en formato legal correcto si desea que procesen su caso en la corte.
Es posible que haya un formulario que usted pueda usar para su
respuesta. Puedo encontrar estos formularios de la corte y más
información en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California
(www.sucorte.ca.gov), en la biblioteca de leyes de su condado o en la
corte que le quede más cerca. Si no puede pagar la cuota de
presentación, pida al secretario de la corte que le dé un formulario de
extención de pago de cuotas. Si no presenta su respuesta a tiempo,
puede perder el caso por incumplimiento y la corte le podrá quitar su
sueldo, dinero y hiener sin más advertencia.
Hay otros requisites legales. Es recommendable que llame a un abogado
inmediatamente. Si no conoce a un abogado, puede llamar a un servicio
de remission a abogados. Si no puede pagar a un abogado, es posible que
cumpla con los requisites para obtener servicios legales gratuitos de un
programa de servicios legales sin lines de lucro. Puede encontrar estos
grupos sin lines de lucro en el sitio web de California Legal Services,
(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de
California, (www.sucorte.ca.gov) o poniéndose en contacto con la corte
o el colegio de abogados locales. AVISO: Por ley, la corte tiene derecho a
reclamar las cuotas y los costos extentos por imponer un gravamen sobre
cualquier recuperación de $10,000 ó más de valor recibida mediante un
acuerdo o una concesión de arbitraje en un caso de derecho civil. Tiene
que pagar el gravamen de la corte antes de que la corte pueda desechar
el caso.
response at this court and have a copy served on the
plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you.
Your written response must be in proper legal form if
you want the court to hear your case. There may be
a court form that you can use for your response. You
can find these court forms and more information at
the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.
courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county law library, or
the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you
do not file your response on time, you may lose the
case by default, and your wages, money, and property
may be taken without further warning from the court.
There are other legal requirements. You may
want to call an attorney right away. If you do not
know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney
referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you
may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit
legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit
groups at the California Legal Services Web Site (www.
lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online
Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or
by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived
fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award
of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The court’s lien must
be paid before the court will dismiss the case.
іAVISO! Lo han demandado. Si no responde
dentro de 30 dias, la corte puede decider en su
contra sin escuchar su version. Lea la informacion a
continuacion.
Tiene 30 DIAS DE CALENDARIO despues de que
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posible que haya un formulario que usted pueda usar
para su respuesta. Puede encontrar estos formularios
de la corte y mas informacion en el Centro de Ayuda
de las Cortes de California (www.sucorte.ca.gov), en
la biblioteca de leyes de su condado o en la corte
que le quede mas cerca. Si no puede pagar la cuota
de presentacion, pida al secretario de la corte que le
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The name and address of the court is: (El nombre y
direccion de la corte es):
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The name, address, and telephone number of
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Date: (Fecha) November 10, 2015
Sherri R. Carter Clerk
(Secretario)
Judi Lara Deputy
(Adjunto)
SummonS
CITACIon JuDICIAL
Case number (numero del Caso): BC639625
NOTICE TO DEFENDANT:
(AVISO AL DEMANDADO):
Ofelia Duron, an individuall Stephen Guereque, an
individual; Victor Marquez, a purported individual;
Liliana Llamas; apuported individual; Ana Noyla, a
purported individual; Maria Zapata, a purported
individual; Alex Posada, a purported individual. All
persons unknown claiming any legal or equitable
right, title, estate, lien, or interest in or to the property
described in this complaint adverse to Plaintiff’s title,
or any cloud on Plaintiffs’ title thereto, and DOES 1
through 20, Inclusive
YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF:
(LO ESTA DEMANDANDO EL DEMANDANTE):
Yun Liu and Cong Chen
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can find these court forms and more information at
the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.
courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county law library, or
the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you
do not file your response on time, you may lose the
case by default, and your wages, money, and property
may be taken without further warning from the court.
There are other legal requirements. You may
want to call an attorney right away. If you do not
know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney
referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you
may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit
legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit
groups at the California Legal Services Web Site (www.
lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online
The name and address of the court is:
Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or
(El nombre y dirección de la corte es):
by contacting your local court or county bar associaLos Angeles Superior Court
tion. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived
111 N Hill St
fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award
Los Angeles, CA 90012
of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The court’s lien must
be paid before the court will dismiss the case.
іAVISO! Lo han demandado. Si no responde
The name, address, and telephone number of the plaintiff’s attorney, or
dentro de 30 dias, la corte puede decider en su
plaintiff without an attorney, is:
contra
sin escuchar su version. Lea la informacion a
(El nombre, la dirección y el número del abogado del demandante, o del
continuacion.
demandante que no tiene abodgado, es):
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le entreguen esta citacion y papeles legales para
16601 Ventura Blvd., 4th Floor
presenter una respuesta por escrito en esta corte y
Encino, CA 91436
hacer que se entregue una copia al demandante. Una
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Notice of Case Management Conference set for May 11 at 8:30 AM, OSC respuesta por escrito tiene que estar en formato legal
re: publication and OSC re: default;
correcto si desea que procesen su caso en la corte. Es
posible que haya un formulario que usted pueda usar
Stanley Mosk Courthouse, Dept. 52
para su respuesta. Puede encontrar estos formularios
de la corte y mas informacion en el Centro de Ayuda
Date: July 24, 2015
de las Cortes de California (www.sucorte.ca.gov), en
Sherri R. Carter, Clerk
la biblioteca de leyes de su condado o en la corte
By: Paul So, Deputy
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SPORTS
T H U R S D A Y , A P R I L 1 3 , 2 0 1 7 :: L A T I M E S . C O M / S P O R T S
NBA PLAYOFFS: FIRST ROUND | CLIPPERS VS. UTAH
GAME 1: SATURDAY AT STAPLES CENTER, 7:30 P.M. TV: E SPN
UTLEY
CRASHES
CUBS’
PARTY
He barrels into home
to score after Chicago
gets its Series rings.
McCarthy is sharp.
DODGERS 2
CHICAGO 0
By Andy McCullough
Wally Skalij Los Angeles Times
CLIPPERS CENTER DeAndre Jordan, right, gets a lot of the ball, but he is still called for the foul against Sacramento’s Ben
McLemore during the fourth quarter at Staples Center. Jordan had 18 points and 17 rebounds in the regular-season finale.
RIVERS’ EDGE
Clippers finish regular
season with seventh win in
a row and earn home-court
advantage against Jazz.
Trying season comes to an end
Walton’s first year as coach
of the Lakers concludes
with loss to the Warriors
and 26-56 record.
CLIPPERS 115
SACRAMENTO 95
By Broderick Turner
Win, and the Clippers were going to host Games 1 and 2 of the
first-round Western Conference
playoff series against the Utah Jazz
at Staples Center.
Lose, and the Clippers were going to travel to Salt Lake City to
face the Jazz in front of their raucous crowd for the first two games
of the postseason series.
The Clippers answered the call,
winning their seventh consecutive
game with a 115-95 victory over the
Sacramento Kings on Wednesday
night at Staples Center.
With all five of the Clippers
starters scoring in double figures,
they now have the home-court advantage in the best-of-seven series
that starts with Game 1 Saturday
night at 7:30 at Staples. Game 2 is
here Tuesday night.
“I wanted to win the game,”
Clippers coach Doc Rivers said. “I
thought it was good for our guys to
win. But honestly, home court was
still more important. We got that,
so that was nice to get for us. That’s
a bonus.”
[See Clippers, D6]
GOLDEN STATE 109
LAKERS 94
By Tania Ganguli
Marcio Jose Sanchez Associated Press
BRANDON INGRAM of the Lakers drives to the basket
against Kevin Durant of the Warriors in the first half.
OAKLAND — There was some
poetry in the place this all ended.
Oracle Arena was where Lakers
coach Luke Walton first learned to
be a head coach, where he led the
defending NBA champions to a
39-4 start — what wound up being a
precursor to his dream job.
The first season of the Walton
era in Los Angeles closed with the
Lakers losing 109-94 to the Golden
State Warriors. But it didn’t feel
like the end for Walton.
“This wasn’t, coming in, ‘Hey
let’s go turn this thing around in
year one, competing for a title. …
We didn’t have the same goals as
Golden State had starting this
year, or Cleveland starting this
year,” he said. “Our goal from the
coaching standpoint was getting
better at passing, getting better at
playing defense, making reads on
[See Lakers, D7]
CHICAGO — The coaches of the Dodgers maintain a
highlight reel of the eldest
player on their roster. They
show it to his teammates as
an example to follow. They
hope to teach the others on
the club, professionals who
play the game at the highest
level, to mimic the effort, intensity and attention to detail of Chase Utley.
Utley does not like the attention. But his performance still offers lessons for
instruction, like in the ninth
inning of a 2-0 victory over
the Cubs on Wednesday,
when Utley scored from first
base after a dropped third
strike and a throwing error.
He barreled through the 6foot-3, 230-pound frame of
Chicago reliever Hector
Rondon to score the insurance run.
“He would run through a
brick wall,” shortstop Corey
Seager said. “And he basically did.”
From the 30,000-foot
view, the run meant little.
The Dodgers (5-4) already
led, thanks to a leadoff ho[See Dodgers, D3]
Sweet start
Brandon McCarthy has
fared well in his first two
outings of the season.
Opponent
IP
H
R
Padres
6
4
2
BB SO
1
4
Cubs
6
4
0
3
4
Angels
run out
of late
rallies
They can’t come back
this time from a deficit
as they did in the
previous two games.
TEXAS 8
ANGELS 3
By Pedro Moura
NHL PLAYOFFS: FIRST ROUND | DUCKS VS. CALGARY
GAME 1: TONIGHT AT HONDA CENTER, 7:30 TV: PRIME TICKET, NBCSN
Ducks counting on young defensemen
With Fowler injured,
Theodore, Montour
and others will try to
pick up the slack.
Don’t expect this
one to be pretty
By Curtis Zupke
Ducks and Flames talk
about discipline, but they
like to mix it up. D8
8 KEYS TO THE SERIES. D8
About 2,600 miles separate where Shea Theodore
and Brandon Montour grew
up, on opposite ends of Canada.
Theodore hails from
Aldergrove, about an hour
from Vancouver, while Montour is from Oshweken, near
Toronto.
They both became offense-minded defensemen
and, eventually, teammates
with the San Diego Gulls to
start this season. Hockey
journeys have a funny way of
meandering,
and
it’s
through their precocious
talent that both players
have landed in an important
place with the Ducks.
They be will looked at,
among other young defensemen, to help make up for the
loss of the injured Cam Fowler in a best-of-seven firstround playoff series against
the Calgary Flames that
starts Thursday at Honda
Center.
“He’s a good kid,” Montour said of Theodore. “Obviously, we’ve got him and a
couple of others as well. It’s
good to share the experience
[See Ducks, D8]
Wally Skalij Los Angeles Times
DEFENSEMAN SHEA THEODORE (53) of the Ducks, battling Trevor Lewis of
the Kings, saw his first playoff action last season.
It was unprecedented
and improbable, and now it’s
over. The Angels’ two-game
streak of impressive comeback victories ceased to exist Wednesday night, without so much as a hint at a revival. They fell 8-3 to Texas at
Angel Stadium, unable to rebound from a poor Jesse
Chavez start in his second
outing as an Angel.
“Jesse got into some bad
counts,” manager Mike
Scioscia said. “He just
wasn’t as effective as he was
in his other outing.”
Chavez began by throwing Carlos Gomez four consecutive fastballs, all outside, most a bit low. He cornered Shin-Soo Choo into a
1-and-2 count, and then induced
a
double-play
groundout on a changeup at
the outer edge. Nomar
Mazara popped out to end
the inning.
To begin the second,
Mike Napoli smashed a 411foot homer to right field. The
next
action
happened
quickly: Rougned Odor flied
out on the first pitch he saw,
Jonathan Lucroy flied out
on the second and Elvis An[See Angels, D2]
D2
T H U R S DAY, A P R I L 13 , 2 017
L ATI M E S . C O M/ SP O RTS
ANGELS REPORT
PRO CALENDAR
THU.
13
DODGERS
FRI.
14
at Chicago
ARIZONA
Cubs
7
11:15 a.m.
SNLA
SNLA
ANGELS
TEXAS
12:30
FSW
SUN.
16
MON.
17
ARIZONA
6
SNLA
ARIZONA
1
SNLA, Ch. 5
ARIZONA
7
SNLA
at Kansas at Kansas at Kansas
at Houston
City
City
City
5
5:15
4:15
11:15 a.m.
FSW
FSW
FSW
FSW
UTAH
7:30**
ESPN
CLIPPERS
DUCKS
SAT.
15
CALGARY
7:30*
Prime,
NBCSN
CALGARY
7:30*
NBCSN
at Calgary
7*
NBCSN
at Orlando
Noon
Channel 11
GALAXY
Shade denotes home game
*Stanley Cup playoffs. **NBA playoffs.
TODAY ON THE AIR
TIME
EVENT
BASEBALL
11 a.m.
Pittsburgh at Boston
11:15 a.m. Dodgers at Chicago Cubs
ON THE AIR
TV: MLB
TV: SNLA R: 570,
1020, 1540
TV: FS West
R: 830
TV: MLB
12:30 p.m. Texas at Angels
4 p.m.
Tampa Bay at New York Yankees
COLLEGE BASEBALL
4 p.m.
Auburn at Tennessee
5 p.m.
Seton Hall at Xavier
6 p.m.
UCLA at Stanford
6 p.m.
Florida at Vanderbilt
6 p.m.
Oregon State at Washington
COLLEGE SOFTBALL
2 p.m.
UCLA at Oregon State
3 p.m.
South Florida at Central Florida
4 p.m.
Washington at Oregon
GOLF
Noon
PGA, RBC Heritage
4 p.m.
LPGA, Lotte Championship
3:30 a.m. European PGA, Trophee Hassan II
(Fri.)
HOCKEY
4 p.m.
Toronto at Washington
5 p.m.
Nashville at Chicago
7:30 p.m. Calgary at Ducks
SOCCER
Noon
TV: SEC
TV: FS1
TV: Pac-12 L.A.
TV: ESPNU
TV: Pac-12
TV: Pac-12
TV: ESPNU
TV: Pac-12
TV: Golf
TV: Golf
TV: Golf
TV: USA
TV: NBCSN
TV: Prime, NBCSN
R: 830
Europa League, Anderlecht vs. Manchester
United
Europa League, Ajax vs. Schalke
Mexico, Toluca vs. Cruz Azul
England, Bristol City vs. Queens Park
Noon
6:45 p.m.
6:45 a.m.
(Fri.)
TENNIS
3 a.m. (Fri.) ATP, Grand Prix Hassan II
TV: FS1, ESPND
TV: FS2
TV: UDN
TV: beIN1
TV: Tennis
latimes.com/sports
SPORTS
Get more on your favorite teams
Go online after each Lakers, Clippers and
Ducks game for takes from The Times’ staff on
what we learned from each victory and loss
from your favorite home teams.
Film study a benefit to Espinosa
By Pedro Moura
Danny Espinosa entered Tuesday
with three hits in 25 plate appearances
this season, his first as an Angel. For his
fourth hit, he bunted his way aboard in
the second inning.
Then, as the Angels trailed in the
ninth inning, he saw a Sam Dyson sinker
headed toward the outside part of the
plate, waited, and hammered it for an opposite-field home run that sparked his
team’s rally. “That was probably the best
swing I’ve seen him take,” teammate
Mike Trout said.
Espinosa doubled his season hit total
on the night by shooting a single into
right in the 10th inning. The second baseman said he inched closer to the feeling
he’s been seeking.
“It’s one of those things where my timing has been hit and miss,” Espinosa said
before Wednesday’s game. “I’ve been
working on getting that timing. If I’m on
time, I don’t have to cheat. I just stuck to
my approach both those at-bats.”
He said film study has helped him
understand his mistakes.
“Sometimes you wonder, ‘Why I am a
tick late? I feel like I’m starting on time,’ ”
Espinosa said. “And then you watch the
video, and you say, ‘OK, I’m not on time.
I’m not getting started when I want to get
started.’ It might just be something like
that. Sometimes it’s just a feeling. I don’t
want to start my swing early. I just want
to get ready early. That, for me, helps.”
Bailey to the DL
The Angels placed right-hander Andrew Bailey on the 10-day disabled list.
Manager Mike Scioscia said he came to
the team Wednesday reporting discomfort and was diagnosed with inflammation in his right shoulder.
After a turbulent spring, Bailey appeared in three of the Angels’ first eight
games, and threw three perfect innings.
He was awarded the win twice, including
in Sunday’s comeback over Seattle.
Bailey, 32, underwent shoulder reconstruction surgery in 2013 and required two
years to return to the majors. When his
hometown Philadelphia Phillies released
him last summer, he signed a minor
league deal with the Angels and impressed while closing games in September. The Angels re-signed him for one
year and $1 million in November.
“We want to be very conservative with
Andrew,” Scioscia said. “He threw the
ball so well coming back at the end of last
year. We want to get him back there. So
we’re gonna let him settle in and hopefully get his shoulder where it needs to
be.”
In his stead, they recalled righthander Daniel Wright from triple-A Salt
Lake, where he had made one start and
gave up 10 runs in 31⁄3 innings.
Wright, 26, debuted in the majors last
season and logged a 6.13 earned-run average in nine appearances. Scioscia said he
likes the slider he updated during the
spring. Wright is one of several possibilities to start Saturday in Kansas City, in
the rotation vacancy created by Garrett
Richards’ absence.
Short hops
Richards said he has not resumed
throwing and the team does not have a
planned day for him to do so. He had said
he hoped to start throwing again Tuesday after exiting his first start of the season because of a biceps strain. Scioscia
said the Angels remain confident Richards is “moving in the right direction.” …
Right-hander Cam Bedrosian said his
excited fist pump after Trout’s homersaving catch in Tuesday’s 10th inning was
the most emotion he had ever displayed
on a major league mound.
pedro.moura@latimes.com
Angels can’t quite overcome early deficit
[Angels, from D1]
drus homered to left-center field, also
on the first pitch.
Chavez cruised through the third
and fourth innings, but issued a leadoff
walk to Lucroy in the fifth. Andrus
laced a ball that glanced off the glove of
leaping second baseman Danny Espinosa and Joey Gallo tripled down the
right-field line to drive in Lucroy and
Andrus.
While left-hander Jose Alvarez
warmed in the Angels bullpen, Jurickson Profar singled past C.J. Cron at
first base to drive in Gallo. Pitching
coach Charles Nagy visited the mound,
and when Gomez flied out to center
field, Scioscia pulled Chavez for Alvarez.
“Up until the last inning, it was fine,”
Chavez said. “The fifth inning kind of
unraveled a little too soon, before I
could even put a stop to it.”
The left-handed Choo blooped a
ball into left field and the Rangers had
runners at the corners. After a groundout pushed Choo to second, Scioscia
ordered an intentional walk of Napoli,
and Alvarez struck out Odor.
Blake Parker struck out two Rangers in a scoreless sixth inning. Yusmeiro Petit threw the next two innings,
yielding only a homer to Gomez in the
seventh. Mike Morin struggled through
the ninth to stretch Texas’ lead to five
runs for the Angels’ last hacks.
In the Angels’ first inning, Yunel
Escobar drove a baseball deep to right
field, where Mazara caught it. Kole Calhoun soon hit one where Mazara could
not reach, but Calhoun never advanced
past second, as Mike Trout and Albert
Pujols struck out.
Andrelton Simmons began the second by working a walk, after he and
Scioscia griped about a called strike on
a baseball that appeared low and outside. Television cameras caught Scioscia yelling to plate umpire Stu Scheurwater that he had to call the same pitch
a strike for the Angels.
Stephen Dunn Getty Images
MIKE NAPOLI of the Rangers hits a home run in the second inning as
Angels catcher Martin Maldonado and umpire Stu Scheurwater look on.
Ben Revere followed with a double
to left, and Cron and Espinosa each
launched sacrifice flies to tie the score
2-2. In the third, Trout homered, and
Pujols twice came within a few feet of
homering. First was a drive down the
left-field line that dove foul. Next was a
384-foot flyout to the warning track
caught by Gomez.
After Jeremy Jeffress retired
Escobar to begin the eighth, manager
Jeff Banister called in left-hander Alex
Claudio to face Calhoun, who promptly
stroked a single down the left-field line
— right where Texas’ third baseman
would have been, if not for the shift. Out
went Claudio and in came rookie righthander Jose Leclerc, who struck out
Trout on three pitches and induced a
harmless first-pitch popup from Pujols.
On Sunday and Tuesday, the Angels
became the first team in 26 years to win
consecutive games when trailing by five
or more runs in the seventh inning or
later. On Wednesday, they did not trail
by five until the ninth, and they could
not come back from that.
The streak is over. Now, they are a
6-3 team with an encouraging offense
and a worrisome starting rotation so
far incapable of lasting success.
The Angels’ starters are averaging
just greater than five innings per outing. Only one team’s starters have
pitched less on average: the New York
Yankees’.
“It’s important,” Scioscia said.
“There’s no doubt it’s important.”
pedro.moura@latimes.com
Twitter: @pedromoura
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L AT I ME S . CO M / S P O RT S
T H UR S DAY, A P R I L 13 , 2 017
D3
BASEBALL
Friedman looks to follow Cubs’ lead
Baseball operations boss of
the Dodgers aims to build a
World Series winner as
Epstein did in Chicago.
DYLAN HERNANDEZ
CHICAGO — Joe Maddon was
stumped.
How are Andrew Friedman and
Theo Epstein different?
Maddon knows them well. As
the manager of the Chicago Cubs,
he reports to Epstein, the team’s
president of baseball operations.
When Maddon managed the
Tampa Bay Rays, he worked
alongside Friedman, now Epstein’s counterpart on the Dodgers.
Maddon didn’t state the obvious, which was that the brainiac in
Chicago has World Series rings.
“I don’t know,” Maddon said.
He paused.
“Theo can play guitar,” Maddon said. “Andrew would run away
from that.”
The audience laughed.
“Theo likes to …” Maddon
started.
He reconsidered.
“Andrew likes to compete, too,”
he said. “Andrew likes to compete
on the golf course.”
Maddon shook his head.
“They really are similar, man,
I’m telling you,” he said.
More than you think.
A cursory look at the their
rosters points to a significant
chasm in philosophy, the Cubs
built around a group of players in
their mid-20s while the Dodgers
have more of a veteran-laden team
that counts Adrian Gonzalez and
Justin Turner as foundational
parts.
But that is a function of timing.
Epstein is entering his seventh
season with the Cubs, Friedman
only his third with the Dodgers.
Their franchises are on parallel
tracks, the Dodgers behind the
Cubs but nonetheless headed in
the same direction.
Epstein and Friedman were
hired to more or less do the same
thing, which was to rebuild their
franchises from top to bottom.
This meant not only increasing the
role sabermetrics played in decisions, but also revamping the
team’s player-development system.
“I’m certain that’s where Andrew is working from,” Maddon
said.
The ring ceremony offered an
idealized version of the Dodgers’
future. The Cubs won the World
Series last year and are positioned
to win several more championships, as their nucleus is made
up of the likes of 27-year-old first
baseman Anthony Rizzo, 25-yearold third baseman Kris Bryant,
24-year-old outfielder Kyle
Schwarber and 23-year-old shortstop Addison Russell.
Epstein won two World Series
with the Boston Red Sox. If he had
an advantage when taking over
the Cubs before the 2012 season, it
was that he inherited a team that
had finished in last place in each of
the last two seasons. Free of expectations to compete immediately, he was able to sacrifice the
present for the future.
The Cubs remained in last
place in each of Epstein’s first
three seasons, allowing them to
stockpile high draft picks. Epstein
didn’t want to gamble on pitchers,
who were more susceptible to
injuries. So he instead used his top
picks on position players. They
drafted Bryant with the second
overall pick in 2013 and Schwarber
with the fourth pick in 2014.
Russell was acquired as part of
a package in trade for established
pitchers Jeff Samardzija and
Jason Hammel.
Friedman never had the option
of trading front-line pitchers for
prospects. He inherited a team
that won back-to-back division
championships.
“We were at different points of
the success cycle,” Epstein said.
“They’ve done a really nice job of
winning while establishing something new at the same time.”
Friedman had more to work
with. The team’s former scouting
director, Logan White, already had
found players who were viewed as
stars in the making, including
Corey Seager, Julio Urias, Joc
Pederson and Cody Bellinger.
Still, the Dodgers looked to
add. Knowing their options in the
draft would be limited by where
they were picking, they focused on
the international market. In the
2015-16 signing period, the franchise invested about $90 million on
amateur players from Latin
America.
The star of that class, righthander Yadier Alvarez, is ranked
the No. 2 prospect in the Dodgers
farm system by Baseball America.
Outfielder Yusniel Diaz is No. 7.
Alvarez, Diaz and the other
prospects who were signed then
are still in the lower levels of the
minor leagues. If they develop as
the Dodgers project, the construction of the team’s future major
league rosters will probably resemble that of the present-day
Cubs.
However, the strength of the
Dodgers roster will spare them
from doing what the Cubs did in
2014, when they fielded a young
team that finished last in National
League Central.
“It’s always challenging to
introduce too many young players
all at the same time,” Friedman
said. “If you look back at the last
couple years, we’ve been able to
slowly integrate two to three guys
a year. That way it doesn’t put any
undue pressure on the young
player.”
At the same time, the relatively
low cost of homegrown players
would permit the Dodgers to
venture into the high end of the
free-agent market to round out
their roster, as the Cubs did when
they signed starting pitcher Jon
Lester to a six-year, $155-million
contract before the 2015 season.
In the hours leading up to the
Cubs ring ceremony, Friedman
acknowledged he has imagined
what it would be like if the Dodgers
win the World Series.
“It gives me goose bumps
thinking about the excitement
and the parade and how long our
fans have waited for us to bring a
championship back to L.A.,”
Friedman said.
He saw a preview on Wednesday night. Wrigley Field erupted
when Epstein was called to receive
his ring. The fans chanted Epstein’s name.
The fan base’s suspicions of
analytics, the wisecracks about
computers and calculators, the
fears that old traditions are being
abandoned, none of that exists
here.
The Cubs are World Series
champions. It could happen in Los
Angeles too.
dylan.hernandez@latimes.com
Twitter: @dylanohernandez
Turner
pinch-hits;
Gutierrez
goes on DL
By Andy McCullough
maintain his momentum after
Contreras dropped the third strike
and bounced a throw to first base.
Woodward identified three moments when the average player
would falter: before the pitch, when
runners rarely take a wide enough
lead on a full count with two outs.
At second base, when runners
often slow down to read the play
behind them. And at third base,
when runners brake in assumption
that the play will be made in front
of them.
“He never stopped,” Woodward
said.
The ball dribbled past the foul
line. Second baseman Ben Zobrist
scooped it up. He fired toward
Rondon, who could not secure the
throw. Utley collided with Rondon,
who tumbled over. Utley pulled his
38-year-old body out of the dirt and
jogged to his dugout.
Woodward planned to add the
moment to Utley’s reel. Utley declined to place much emphasis on
the play. His ability to make the
spectacular seem monotonous is
another of his gifts.
“I kept going,” Utley said. “And
it worked out.”
CHICAGO — Dodgers third
baseman Justin Turner grounded
into an eighth-inning double play
as a pinch-hitter Wednesday night
against the Chicago Cubs, returning to the field after experiencing
discomfort in a quadriceps.
Turner was hurt while running
to second base Monday night
against the Cubs and the Dodgers
weren’t sure when he would return.
“It feels a lot better today,”
Turner said before the game.
“Hopefully, with another day of
treatment, I’ll be ready to go tomorrow.”
He was ready a bit sooner.
The team was less fortunate
with backup outfielder Franklin
Gutierrez, who landed on the 10day disabled list because of a left
hamstring strain. The team recalled outfielder Trayce Thompson to take Gutierrez’s roster spot.
Roberts indicated Gutierrez’s
worst-case scenario would involve
a three-week layoff. Gutierrez was
hitting .231 in his first six games.
Roberts expects Gutierrez to avoid
baseball activities until the weekend, at the earliest.
“For us, to have the coverage, it
was a no-brainer to put him on the
10-day,” Roberts said.
Thompson was hitless in four
games with triple-A Oklahoma
City. The Dodgers did not put
much importance on such a small
sample of at-bats. The team appreciates Thompson’s ability to play
all three outfield positions, and he
is likely to start against left-handed pitchers.
Thompson hit 13 home runs last
season before a stress fracture in
his back forced him to the disabled
list in July. He did not play again.
As he rehabilitated, he experienced setbacks in November and
December, he said. The Dodgers
did not expect him to be ready to
compete in games in early April.
“Once I started to pick up my
activity in late January, right before spring training, it really expedited the process tremendously,” Thompson said. “By the
end of spring training, I felt like I
was normal. Obviously, I’m in a
good place now.
“I’m just happy to be back. No
pun intended.”
andy.mccullough@latimes.com
Twitter: @McCulloughTimes
andy.mccullough@latimes.com
Twitter: @McCulloughTimes
Matt Marton Associated Press
CHASE UTLEY scores from first base in the ninth after a dropped third strike and a throwing error. Cubs’ Hector Rondon is at left.
Dodgers lead from get-go on Toles’ HR
[Dodgers, from D1]
mer by Andrew Toles. Brandon
McCarthy silenced the Cubs
across six innings of four-hit baseball. Ross Stripling furthered his
case for high-leverage usage with a
quartet of strikeouts. And the Dodgers managed to escape the evening despite batting 0 for 7 with
runners in scoring position and
stranding nine runners.
Yet, up close, to the keen observers who populate the Dodgers’
coaching staff and front office, the
play by Utley caused eyes to glow
after the game. Third base coach
Chris Woodward suggested “less
than five” players in the majors
would have the wherewithal to
score on that play. How many of
that group are 38? “Probably zero,
other than him,” Seager said.
“That shows what he’s about,”
Manager Dave Roberts said.
“What we’re about.”
That is why the Dodgers resigned Utley this past winter, even
after acquiring Logan Forsythe as
their everyday second baseman.
The club still felt he could aid the
team in a part-time role. Utley accepted a reduced salary and reduced playing time to play near his
home in California.
Bringing back Utley repre-
sented the last piece of reunion
conducted by the front office over
the winter. The team brought back
21 members of the 25-man roster
which fell in the National League
Championship Series to the Cubs
last October. The Dodgers were reminded of their fate once again before Wednesday’s game.
On Monday, the Dodgers witnessed the raising of the 2016 championship banner. Two days later,
the Cubs doled out World Series
rings to the assembled members of
their roster. The victors unveiled
their spoils with joy. The crowd
cooed at the 108 diamonds glinting
in each ring.
“We don’t really focus on last
year too much,” Toles said. “We just
want to go out there and win for us.
It’s 2017. That’s last year. It’s over.
They can enjoy it, but we’re looking
forward to this year.”
The temperature dipped to 45
degrees at the first pitch, with a
hearty wind whipping off Lake
Michigan. Roberts watched wouldbe homers wilt in the air.
Toles found a trajectory to
break through. He turned on a low
fastball from Cubs starter John
Lackey, and “I hit it on a line, so the
wind had no factor,” he said. The
baseball cleared the right-field
bleachers. The Dodgers would not
require any more offense.
McCarthy (2-0, 1.50 ERA)
thrived on the dull satisfaction of
groundouts. The defense turned
three double plays. McCarthy also
benefited from the wind, which
knocked down a pair of well-struck
drives, one by first baseman Anthony Rizzo in the fifth and another by catcher Willson Contreras in
the sixth.
“The last time I pitched here, I
gave up a wind home run, the other
way,” McCarthy said. “I’ll take the
ones that go in my favor.”
When McCarthy exited, Roberts handed the ball to Stripling.
He struck out two batters in the
seventh. Roberts stuck with him
for the eighth. Stripling said he
“emptied the kitchen sink” against
outfielder Jon Jay, who stared at an
outside slider for a called third
strike. Luis Avilan fanned outfielder Kyle Schwarber to end the
inning.
Utley led off the ninth with a
walk. Two batters later, with two
outs and Toles at the plate, he prepared for aggression on the bases.
He set up well deep enough that he
could sprint at second base without rounding off his turn toward
third. The angle would allow him to
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▼
▼
D4
T H U R S DAY , A P R I L 13, 2 017
L ATI M E S .C O M / SP O RTS
BASEBALL
DODGERS
CUBS
2
0
Streak
Won 1 This month
Home
3-1 Road
Division
4-3 Interleague
Next: Today at Chicago Cubs, 11:15 a.m.
TV/Radio: SportsNet LA/570, 1020
5-4
2-3
0-0
NL STANDINGS
West
W
L
Pct.
GB
L10
—
7-3
Arizona
7
3
.700
Colorado
6
4
.600
DODGERS
5
4
.556 11⁄2
5-4
San Diego
5
5
.500
5-5
San Francisco
4
6
.400
Central
L
W
Pct.
1
6-4
2
3
4-6
GB
L10
Cincinnati
7
2
.778
Chicago
5
3
.625 11⁄2
5-3
Milwaukee
4
5
.444
4-5
Pittsburgh
3
5
.375 31⁄2
3-5
St. Louis
3
6
.333
3-6
East
W
L
Pct.
—
7-2
3
4
GB
L10
—
6-3
New York
6
3
.667
Washington
5
4
.556
1
5-4
Miami
4
4
.500 11⁄2
4-4
Philadelphia
3
6
.333
3
3-6
Atlanta
2
6
.250 31⁄2
2-6
Wednesday’s results
DODGERS 2, at Chicago 0
San Diego 6, at Colorado 0
St. Louis 6, at Washington 1
Cincinnati 9, at Pittsburgh 2
New York 5, at Philadelphia 4
Milwaukee 2, at Toronto 0
Atlanta 5, at Miami 4
at San Francisco 6, Arizona 2
AL STANDINGS
West
W
L
Pct.
GB
L10
—
6-3
ANGELS
6
3
.667
Houston
6
4
.600
1
⁄2
6-4
Oakland
5
4
.556
1
5-4
Texas
3
5
.375 21⁄2
3-5
Seattle
2
8
.200 41⁄2
Central
W
L
Pct.
2-8
GB
L10
Detroit
6
2
.750
Minnesota
5
3
.625
1
5-3
Cleveland
4
4
.500
2
4-4
Chicago
3
4
.429 21⁄2
3-4
Kansas City
2
6
.250
2-6
East
W
L
Pct.
—
6-2
4
GB
L10
Baltimore
5
2
.714
—
Tampa Bay
5
4
.556
1
5-4
Boston
4
4
.500 1 ⁄2
4-4
New York
4
4
.500 1 ⁄2
4-4
Toronto
1
7
.125 4 ⁄2
1-7
1
1
1
5-2
Wednesday’s results
Texas 8, at ANGELS 3
at New York 8, Tampa Bay 4
at Detroit 5, Minnesota 3
Chicago 2, at Cleveland 1
Milwaukee 2, at Toronto 0
Baltimore 12, at Boston 5
Oakland 8, at Kansas City 3
Houston 10, at Seattle 5
TODAY’S GAMES
TEXAS
ANGELS
Dodgers
AB R H BI Avg. Chicago
AB R H BI Avg.
Toles lf
5 1 2 1 .261 Schwarber lf 3 0 0 0 .200
Seager ss
5 0 1 0 .286 Bryant 3b
2 0 0 0 .250
Forsythe 3b 2 0 0 0 .258 Rizzo 1b
4 0 2 0 .212
Gonzalez 1b 4 0 1 0 .296 Zobrist 2b
4 0 1 0 .185
Grandal c
3 0 0 0 .174 Russell ss
4 0 0 0 .257
Pederson cf 2 0 0 0 .227 Heyward rf
3 0 1 0 .296
b-Turner
1 0 0 0 .345 Contreras c 3 0 1 0 .292
Hrndz cf
0 0 0 0 .143 Lackey p
1 0 0 0 .667
Utley 2b
3 1 0 0 .063 c-Almora cf 1 0 0 0 .556
Puig rf
4 0 1 0 .258 Jay cf
3 0 0 0 .333
McCarthy p 1 0 0 0 .333 Totals
28 0 5 0
a-Thompson 1 0 0 0 .000
d-Van Slyke 1 0 0 0 .182
Totals
32 2 5 1
Dodgers
Chicago
100 000 001 —2
000 000 000 —0
5
5
1
1
a-walked for McCarthy in the 7th. b-grounded out for Pederson in
the 8th. c-reached on error, advanced to 2nd for Montgomery in the
8th. d-struck out for Avilan in the 9th.
Walks—Dodgers 6: Forsythe 2, Grandal 1, Pederson 1, Utley 1,
McCarthy 1. Chicago 3: Schwarber 1, Bryant 2. Strikeouts—Dodgers
14: Toles 1, Seager 2, Gonzalez 2, Grandal 2, Pederson 1, Utley 2,
Puig 1, McCarthy 1, Thompson 1, Van Slyke 1. Chicago 9: Schwarber
3, Zobrist 1, Heyward 1, Contreras 1, Lackey 1, Jay 2. E—Gonzalez (1),
Contreras (2). LOB—Dodgers 9, Chicago 5. 2B—Seager (4).
HR—Toles (2), off Lackey. RBIs—Toles (4). SB—Heyward (1).
CS—Bryant (1). S—Lackey. GIDP—Turner, Rizzo, Zobrist, Russell.
DP—Dodgers 3 (Utley, Seager, Gonzalez), (Seager, Utley, Gonzalez),
(McCarthy, Seager, Gonzalez); Chicago 1 (Russell, Zobrist, Rizzo).
Dodgers
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
McCarthy W, 2-0...........6 4 0 0 3 4
91 1.50
Stripling H, 1 .............12⁄3 0 0 0 0 4
34 1.42
Avilan H, 2 ..................1⁄3 0 0 0 0 1
4 0.00
Jansen S, 2-2...............1 1 0 0 0 0
10 5.40
Chicago
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Lackey L, 1-1 ...............6 4 1 1 3 10
106 3.00
Montgomery.................2 1 0 0 2 1
34 3.60
Rondon.......................2⁄3 0 1 0 1 2
23 2.70
Grimm ........................1⁄3 0 0 0 0 1
8 4.91
Inherited runners-scored—Avilan 1-0, Grimm 1-0.
U—Greg Gibson, Paul Nauert, Dan Iassogna, Sam Holbrook.
T—3:20. Tickets sold—40,844 (41,072).
ASTROS
MARINERS
W-L
0-1
0-0
0-1
1-0
0-0
0-1
0-0
0-1
ERA
TIME
3.86 11:15 a.m.
1.59
SNLA
4.50
4 p.m.
1.50
1.50
4 p.m.
13.50
5.79 7:15 p.m.
3.00
AMERICAN LEAGUE >>>
MATCHUP
TEX/Darvish (R)
Angels/Nolasco (R)
MIN/Hughes (R)
DET/Zimmermann (R)
CHI/Gonzalez (R)
CLE/Tomlin (R)
TB/Andriese (R)
NY/Severino (R)
BAL/Gausman (R)
TOR/Liriano (L)
OAK/Hahn (R)
KC/Vargas (L)
W-L
0-1
0-1
1-0
1-0
1-0
0-1
0-0
0-0
0-0
0-0
0-0
1-0
ERA
TIME
3.65 12:30 p.m.
3.86
FS West
1.50
10 a.m.
1.50
3.00
3 p.m.
11.57
9.00
4 p.m.
7.20
MLB
5.40
4 p.m.
135.14
3.00 5:15 p.m.
1.50
INTERLEAGUE >>>
MATCHUP
PIT/Kuhl (R)
BOS/Rodriguez (L)
W-L
1-0
0-1
ERA
3.60
7.20
TIME
11 a.m.
LEADERS
NATIONAL LEAGUE >>>
Player
G
AB
R
H
Avg.
Murphy Was .......................9
40
7
18 .450
Suarez Cin .........................9
28
7
12 .429
Cozart Cin..........................7
24
2
10 .417
Realmuto Mia.....................7
29
7
12 .414
Myers SD .........................10
40
10
16 .400
Ozuna Mia .........................8
30
5
12 .400
Nunez SF ...........................9
36
4
14 .389
Zimmerman Was .................9
34
6
13 .382
Wieters Was .......................9
27
4
10 .370
Drury Ari............................8
28
4
10 .357
Home Runs
Cespedes, New York ........................................................... 4
Bruce, New York................................................................. 4
Reynolds, Colorado ............................................................ 4
Runs Batted In
Ozuna, Miami .................................................................. 12
Solarte, San Diego ........................................................... 10
Reynolds, Colorado........................................................... 10
Lamb, Arizona.................................................................. 10
Pitching
Garrett, Cincinnati ........................................................... 2-0
Arrieta, Chicago .............................................................. 2-0
WPeralta, Milwaukee........................................................ 2-0
McCarthy, DODGERS ........................................................ 2-0
Cueto, San Francisco ....................................................... 2-0
Dunn, Colorado............................................................... 2-0
Harvey, New York ............................................................. 2-0
Roark, Washington........................................................... 2-0
AMERICAN LEAGUE >>>
Player
G
AB
R
H
Avg.
Castillo Bal ........................6
22
2
9 .409
AGarcia ChW ......................7
27
5
11 .407
YEscobar ANGELS ...............9
37
9
15 .405
Mazara Tex .........................8
33
8
13 .394
Headley NYY.......................8
28
9
11 .393
CDavis Bal .........................7
26
5
10 .385
KDavis Oak ........................9
34
8
12 .353
Simmons ANGELS ...............9
32
5
11 .344
Souza Jr. TB .......................9
32
4
11 .344
Andrus Tex .........................8
30
6
10 .333
SCastro NYY .......................8
33
4
11 .333
Home Runs
Springer, Houston............................................................... 5
KDavis, Oakland ................................................................ 4
Lindor, Cleveland................................................................ 4
SPerez, Kansas City ............................................................ 4
Runs Batted In
Springer, Houston............................................................... 9
Gallo, Texas....................................................................... 9
Mazara, Texas .................................................................... 9
Trout, ANGELS ................................................................... 9
Tulowitzki, Toronto............................................................... 9
Odor, Texas ....................................................................... 8
Espinosa, ANGELS.............................................................. 8
Sano, Minnesota................................................................ 8
Lindor, Cleveland................................................................ 8
Torreyes, New York .............................................................. 8
Pitching
Givens, Baltimore............................................................ 2-0
ESantana, Minnesota....................................................... 2-0
J.Ramirez, ANGELS .......................................................... 2-0
Bailey, ANGELS ............................................................... 2-0
Triggs, Oakland ............................................................... 2-0
Graveman, Oakland ......................................................... 2-0
Peacock, Houston ........................................................... 2-0
Streak
Lost 1 This month
6-3
Home
4-1 Road
2-2
Division
6-3 Interleague
0-0
Next: Today vs. Texas, Angel Stadium, 12:30 p.m.
TV/Radio: FS West/830
Texas
Gomez cf
Choo dh
Mazara rf
Napoli 1b
Odor 2b
Lucroy c
Andrus ss
Gallo 3b
Profar lf
Totals
AB
4
5
4
4
5
4
4
3
4
37
R
1
0
1
2
0
1
2
1
0
8
H
1
1
1
2
1
1
2
1
1
11
BI
1
0
0
1
2
0
1
2
1
8
Avg.
.129
.231
.394
.194
.258
.250
.333
.192
.083
Texas
Angels
Angels
AB R H BI Avg.
Escobar 3b 4 0 0 0 .405
Calhoun rf
4 0 2 0 .314
Trout cf
4 1 1 1 .294
Pujols dh
4 0 0 0 .194
Simmons ss 3 1 1 0 .344
Revere lf
4 1 1 0 .231
Cron 1b
3 0 1 1 .318
Espinosa 2b 3 0 0 1 .214
Mldndo c
3 0 0 0 .208
Totals
32 3 6 3
020 030 102 —8
021 000 000 —3
11
6
1
0
Walks—Texas 5: Gomez 1, Mazara 1, Napoli 1, Lucroy 1, Gallo 1.
Angels 1: Simmons 1.
Strikeouts—Texas 8: Gomez 1, Choo 1, Mazara 1, Odor 1, Lucroy 1,
Gallo 1, Profar 2. Angels 7: Calhoun 1, Trout 2, Pujols 1, Espinosa 2,
Maldonado 1.
E—Odor (2). LOB—Texas 7, Angels 5. 2B—Calhoun 2 (3), Revere
(2). 3B—Odor (1), Gallo (1). HR—Napoli (2), off Chavez; Andrus (3),
off Chavez; Gomez (2), off Petit; Trout (3), off Griffin. RBIs—Gomez
(3), Napoli (4), Odor 2 (8), Andrus (3), Gallo 2 (9), Profar (1), Trout
(9), Cron (1), Espinosa (8). SF—Cron, Espinosa.
Runners left in scoring position—Texas 4 (Odor 2, Lucroy,
Profar); Angels 3 (Pujols 2, Espinosa). RISP—Texas 3 for 7; Angels 0
for 6.
Runners moved up—Mazara, Revere. GIDP—Choo.
DP—Angels 1 (Cron, Simmons).
Texas
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Griffin W, 1-0 ...............6 4 3 3 1 4
83 6.75
Jeffress H, 1 ..............11⁄3 0 0 0 0 1
15 6.75
Claudio .......................0 1 0 0 0 0
2 0.00
Leclerc S, 1-1 ............12⁄3 1 0 0 0 2
16 0.00
Angels
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Chavez L, 1-1.............41⁄3 5 5 5 2 3
67 5.40
Alvarez........................2⁄3 1 0 0 1 1
15 0.00
Parker .........................1 0 0 0 0 2
15 3.60
Petit ...........................2 2 1 1 2 2
34 1.50
Morin..........................1 3 2 2 0 0
23 7.36
Claudio pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.
Inherited runners-scored—Leclerc 1-0, Alvarez 1-0.
U—Stu Scheurwater, Paul Emmel, Brian O’Nora, Scott Barry.
T—2:59. Tickets sold—34,599 (43,250).
6
0
CARDINALS
NATIONALS
6
1
Zach Lee stepped in for Luis Perdomo
(disabled list) to earn his first major
league win, combining with four relievers on a three-hitter. Ryan Schimpf
homered in a four-run first inning.
Mike Leake worked seven shutout
innings, beating Max Scherzer, and
Stephen Piscotty homered and had
five RBIs. Scherzer, who yielded one
earned run, threw three wild pitches.
San Diego AB R H BI Avg. Colorado
Margot cf
5 1 1 0 .325 Blackmon cf
Myers 1b
3 2 2 1 .400 LeMahieu 2b
Solarte 2b
4 2 2 1 .324 Gonzalez rf
Renfroe rf
4 0 1 1 .250 Arenado 3b
Schimpf 3b 2 1 1 3 .160 Parra 1b
Blash lf
3 0 0 0 .000 Story ss
Hedges c
4 0 1 0 .037 Amarista lf
Aybar ss
3 0 0 0 .192 a-Adames
Lee p
3 0 0 0 .000 c-Wolters
b-Cordoba
1 0 0 0 .286 Garneau c
Totals
32 6 8 6
d-Reynolds
Freeland p
Cardullo lf
Totals
St. Louis
Fowler cf
Garcia ss
Crpntr 1b
Piscotty rf
Adams lf
Grichuk lf
Gyorko 3b
Wong 2b
Fryer c
Leake p
c-Martinez
Totals
San Diego
Colorado
AB
4
3
3
2
3
3
2
1
1
3
1
1
2
29
R
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
400 020 000 —6
000 000 000 —0
H
2
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
3
BI
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Avg.
.256
.171
.200
.306
.343
.129
.143
.000
.263
.214
.313
.333
.000
8
3
0
1
a-popped out for Lyles in the 7th. b-flied out for Buchter in the
9th. c-struck out for Oberg in the 9th. d-grounded out for Garneau in
the 9th.
Walks—San Diego 4: Myers 1, Schimpf 1, Blash 1, Aybar 1.
Colorado 6: LeMahieu 1, Gonzalez 1, Arenado 2, Parra 1, Story 1.
Strikeouts—San Diego 6: Schimpf 1, Blash 2, Hedges 2, Aybar 1.
Colorado 7: Blackmon 1, Arenado 1, Parra 1, Amarista 1, Wolters 1,
Garneau 1, Freeland 1. E—Story (2). LOB—San Diego 5, Colorado 8.
2B—Margot (4), Myers (4), Blackmon (1), Gonzalez (3).
HR—Schimpf (2), off Freeland. RBIs—Myers (9), Solarte (10),
Renfroe (5), Schimpf 3 (5). SF—Schimpf. DP—San Diego 1
(Schimpf, Solarte, Myers); Colorado 3 (Story, LeMahieu, Parra),
(Story, LeMahieu, Parra), (Story, Parra).
San Diego
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Lee W, 1-0 ................51⁄3 2 0 0 4 3
90 0.00
Torres .......................12⁄3 0 0 0 0 1
21 3.86
Buchter .......................1 1 0 0 0 2
17 3.86
Esch ...........................0 0 0 0 2 0
9 0.00
Maurer ........................1 0 0 0 0 1
9 4.50
Colorado
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Freeland L, 1-1 ..........42⁄3 8 6 6 3 2
72 5.91
Lyles ........................21⁄3 0 0 0 0 2
21 8.44
McGee ........................1 0 0 0 1 2
17 3.00
Oberg .........................1 0 0 0 0 0
10 1.80
Esch pitched to 2 batters in the 9th.
HBP—Lyles (Myers). T—2:49. Tickets sold—20,968 (50,398).
St. Louis
Washington
R
1
0
2
1
0
0
0
0
1
0
1
6
H
1
1
0
3
0
1
1
0
0
0
1
8
BI
0
0
1
5
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
6
Avg.
.171
.250
.192
.273
.143
.212
.227
.167
.143
.200
.500
Wash.
Eaton cf
Rendon 3b
Harper rf
Murphy 2b
Zimrmn 1b
Werth lf
Wieters c
Difo ss
Scherzer p
a-Taylor
b-Lind
Totals
AB
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
3
1
1
1
34
R
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
1
H
2
1
0
1
2
0
0
1
0
0
1
8
100 020 003 —6
000 000 010 —1
BI
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
Avg.
.333
.133
.344
.450
.382
.303
.370
.250
.250
.000
.500
8
8
0
2
a-struck out for Scherzer in the 6th. b-singled for Kelley in the 8th.
c-singled for Cecil in the 9th.
Walks—St. Louis 3: Garcia 1, Carpenter 2. Strikeouts—St. Louis
14: Fowler 2, Garcia 2, Carpenter 1, Adams 2, Gyorko 1, Wong 2,
Fryer 2, Leake 2. Washington 8: Harper 2, Zimmerman 1, Werth 2,
Wieters 1, Scherzer 1, Taylor 1. E—Rendon (2), Difo (2). LOB—St.
Louis 8, Washington 6. 2B—Piscotty (1), Eaton (4), Zimmerman (3).
HR—Piscotty (1), off Blanton. RBIs—Carpenter (2), Piscotty 5 (7),
Eaton (5). SB—Garcia (1), Gyorko (1). SF—Carpenter. RISP—St.
Louis 3 for 9; Washington 2 for 9.
St. Louis
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Leake W, 1-1 ...............7 4 0 0 0 7
104 0.60
Rosenthal H, 1.............1⁄3 3 1 1 0 1
13 6.75
Bowman H, 2...............1⁄3 0 0 0 0 0
5 0.00
Cecil H, 1....................1⁄3 0 0 0 0 0
7 13.50
Oh..............................1 1 0 0 0 0
12 9.64
Washington
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Scherzer L, 1-1.............6 4 3 1 2 10
104 2.13
Romero .......................1 1 0 0 0 1
8 8.10
Kelley .........................1 1 0 0 0 1
18 9.00
Glover.........................1⁄3 1 1 1 0 1
10 4.50
Solis ..........................1⁄3 0 1 1 1 1
10 10.80
Blanton.......................1⁄3 1 1 1 0 0
6 4.50
Inherited runners-scored—Bowman 2-0, Cecil 2-0, Solis 1-0,
Blanton 2-2. HBP—Scherzer (Fowler), Romero (Garcia).
WP—Scherzer 3.
U—Brian Knight, Lance Barrett, Dale Scott, Jim Reynolds.
T—3:14. Tickets sold—31,647 (41,418).
GIANTS
6
DIAMONDBACKS 2
Carlos Beltran drove in three runs,
Josh Reddick drove in two and Houston
erased a 5-0 deficit after three innings
to win two of the three games in the
series at Seattle.
San Francisco scored three runs in the
fifth inning, which included Denard
Span’s RBI single, and three in the
seventh, in which Jarrett Parker tripled
in two runs. Matt Cain earned the win.
Ender Inciarte homered twice, Tyler
Flowers hit a go-ahead single in the
ninth and Atlanta broke a five-game
losing streak, overcoming a pair of
two-run homers by Giancarlo Stanton.
Zack Wheeler got his first win in 21⁄2
years, Yoenis Cespedes and Asdrubal
Cabrera each drove in two runs and
New York swept Philadelphia, whose
Maikel Franco hit a grand slam.
Arizona
AB R H BI Avg. San Fran. AB R H BI Avg.
Pollock cf
5 1 1 0 .238 Span cf
5 1 2 1 .261
Peralta rf
4 0 2 1 .216 Belt 1b
3 1 0 0 .184
Gldsdt 1b
4 0 0 0 .270 Pence rf
5 0 1 1 .308
Lamb 3b
3 1 3 0 .342 Crawford ss 4 1 0 0 .314
Tomas lf
2 0 0 0 .323 Gillaspie 3b 4 0 1 1 .286
Drury 2b
4 0 1 1 .344 Hundley c
4 1 1 1 .313
Owings ss
4 0 1 0 .324 Panik 2b
3 1 1 0 .345
Mathis c
4 0 0 0 .238 Parker lf
3 0 2 2 .176
Miller p
2 0 0 0 .000 Cain p
2 1 1 0 .333
b-Hazelbkr
1 0 0 0 .750 a-Hill
1 0 0 0 .118
d-Herrmann 1 0 0 0 .300 c-Marrero
1 0 0 0 .056
Totals
34 2 8 2
Totals
35 6 9 6
Atlanta
AB R H BI Avg. Miami
AB R H BI Avg.
Inciarte cf
4 2 2 3 .189 Gordon 2b
5 1 1 0 .273
Swanson ss 4 0 1 0 .167 Realmuto c 3 0 0 0 .414
Freeman 1b 3 1 1 1 .333 Yelich cf
4 1 0 0 .250
Markakis rf
3 0 1 0 .300 Stanton rf
3 2 2 4 .290
Phillips 2b
3 1 0 0 .300 Ozuna lf
4 0 1 0 .400
Garcia 3b
4 0 0 0 .161 Moore 1b
4 0 1 0 .375
Flowers c
4 0 2 1 .333 Rojas 3b
4 0 0 0 .214
1-d’Arnaud 0 0 0 0 .250 Riddle ss
3 0 1 0 .143
Peterson lf
4 1 1 0 .286 c-Dietrich
1 0 0 0 .250
b-Bonifacio 1 0 0 0 .125 Koehler p
2 0 1 0 .250
Recker c
0 0 0 0 .000 a-Suzuki
1 0 0 0 .200
Totals
30 5 8 5
d-Bour
1 0 0 0 .125
Totals
35 4 7 4
New York
AB R H BI Avg. Philadelphia AB
Conforto cf
4 3 2 1 .400 Hrndz 2b
4
Cabrera ss
4 0 1 2 .342 Kendrick lf
4
Cespedes lf 2 0 1 2 .265 Herrera cf
3
Bruce rf
4 0 1 0 .273 Franco 3b
4
Walker 2b
3 0 1 0 .206 Saunders rf 3
Duda 1b
4 0 0 0 .286 Joseph 1b
2
Reyes 3b
4 0 0 0 .054 a-Nava
1
d’Arnaud c
3 1 0 0 .238 c-Blanco
1
Wheeler p
2 1 0 0 .000 Rupp c
3
Robles p
0 0 0 0 --- d-Knapp
1
Blevins p
0 0 0 0 --- Galvis ss
3
Salas p
0 0 0 0 --- Velasquez p 1
b-Grndrsn
0 0 0 0 .214 Stassi 1b
2
Totals
30 5 6 5
Totals
32
Houston
Springr cf
Rddick rf
Altuve 2b
Correa ss
Beltran dh
Brgmn 3b
McCann c
Gurriel 1b
Aoki lf
1-Mrsk cf
Totals
AB
6
3
3
5
5
4
3
5
4
1
39
R
1
3
3
1
0
0
0
0
1
1
10
H
1
2
3
2
2
2
0
2
2
0
16
BI
0
2
0
1
3
1
1
1
0
0
9
Avg.
.233
.333
.275
.282
.308
.243
.200
.242
.313
.200
Houston
Seattle
Seattle
AB R H BI Avg.
Dyson lf
4 1 0 0 .152
Haniger rf
5 0 1 0 .250
Cano 2b
4 1 1 1 .250
Cruz dh
4 0 1 0 .184
Seager 3b
4 1 1 1 .212
Motter ss
4 1 2 2 .357
Zunino c
4 0 1 0 .214
Freeman 1b 4 1 2 1 .500
Martin cf
4 0 0 0 .083
Totals
37 5 9 5
000 220 330 —10
212 000 000 — 5
16
9
1
0
1-ran for Aoki in the 8th.
Walks—Houston 6: Reddick 1, Altuve 2, Bregman 1, McCann 2.
Seattle 1: Dyson 1. Strikeouts—Houston 4: Correa 1, Beltran 1,
Bregman 1, McCann 1. Seattle 7: Haniger 2, Cruz 1, Motter 1, Zunino
1, Martin 2. E—Correa (1). LOB—Houston 9, Seattle 6. 2B—Beltran
(3), Bregman (2), Aoki (1), Motter (4). HR—Freeman (1), off Fiers;
Motter (1), off Fiers. RBIs—Reddick 2 (2), Correa (3), Beltran 3 (5),
Bregman (2), McCann (3), Gurriel (1), Cano (8), Seager (5), Motter 2
(2), Freeman (1). SB—Dyson (2), Haniger (2). SF—Reddick.
RISP—Houston 8 for 17; Seattle 1 for 8. Runners moved
up—Springer, Martin. GIDP—Springer, McCann. DP—Seattle 2
(Freeman, Seager, Gallardo), (Seager, Cano, Freeman).
Houston
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Fiers ...........................4 6 5 5 1 5
89 5.40
Sipp ...........................1 0 0 0 0 0
8 4.50
Peacock W, 2-0 ............2 1 0 0 0 2
27 0.00
Gregerson....................1 1 0 0 0 0
12 10.13
Gustave.......................1 1 0 0 0 0
11 7.36
Seattle
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Gallardo ......................5 7 4 4 4 2
89 6.30
Rzepczynski H, 2...........1 0 0 0 0 0
6 0.00
Altavilla L, 1-1..............1 4 3 3 1 0
23 5.40
Overton.......................1⁄3 2 3 3 1 0
13 20.25
Marshall....................12⁄3 3 0 0 0 2
17 0.00
Inherited runners-scored—Marshall 2-2. WP—Altavilla, Overton.
U—Bruce Dreckman, Jordan Baker, Mike Everitt, Bill Welke.
T—3:12. Tickets sold—14,479 (47,476).
REDS
PIRATES
Arizona
San Francisco
100 000 010 —2
000 030 30x —6
8
9
2
1
a-struck out for Gearrin in the 6th. b-struck out for Chafin in the
7th. c-grounded out for Kontos in the 7th. d-grounded out for Bradley
in the 9th.
Walks—Arizona 3: Lamb 1, Tomas 2. San Francisco 5: Belt 2,
Crawford 1, Panik 1, Parker 1. Strikeouts—Arizona 12: Pollock 2,
Peralta 1, Goldschmidt 1, Drury 1, Owings 3, Mathis 2, Miller 1,
Hazelbaker 1. San Francisco 7: Pence 2, Crawford 2, Parker 1, Cain 1,
Hill 1. E—Owings 2 (5), Span (1). LOB—Arizona 9, San Francisco 10.
2B—Lamb (3), Span (3), Hundley (3), Cain (1). 3B—Pollock (1),
Parker (1). RBIs—Peralta (4), Drury (6), Span (1), Pence (4),
Gillaspie (2), Hundley (2), Parker 2 (2). SB—Peralta (2), Lamb (1).
SF—Peralta.
Arizona
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Miller L, 1-1...............51⁄3 7 3 3 2 5
101 5.06
Chafin ........................2⁄3 0 0 0 0 0
6 2.45
Wilhelmsen ................. 2⁄3 2 3 3 2 0
31 9.00
Bradley .....................11⁄3 0 0 0 1 2
20 0.00
San Francisco
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Cain W, 1-0 .................5 5 1 1 3 6
92 4.82
Gearrin H, 1.................1 0 0 0 0 3
13 0.00
Kontos H, 1 .................1 1 0 0 0 1
19 7.36
Law ............................1 2 1 1 0 1
16 6.23
Strickland ....................1 0 0 0 0 1
8 0.00
Cain pitched to 2 batters in the 6th.
WP—Miller, Wilhelmsen. PB—Mathis (2).
U—CB Bucknor, Manny Gonzalez, Fieldin Culbreth, Mark Carlson.
T—3:21. Tickets sold—41,656 (41,915).
9
2
BREWERS
BLUE JAYS
BRAVES
MARLINS
AB
4
3
2
5
3
2
4
4
4
3
1
35
10
5
NATIONAL LEAGUE >>>
MATCHUP
Dodgers/Ryu (L)
CHI/Anderson (L)
NY/Gsellman (R)
MIA/Chen (L)
MIL/Nelson (R)
CIN/Arroyo (R)
COL/Gray (R)
SF/Bumgarner (L)
PADRES
ROCKIES
8
3
Atlanta
Miami
002 100 011 —5
002 020 000 —4
5
4
8
7
1
0
a-struck out for Koehler in the 6th. b-lined out for Ramirez in the
8th. c-flied out for Riddle in the 9th. d-struck out for Ramos in the
9th. 1-ran for Flowers in the 9th.
Walks—Atlanta 3: Freeman 1, Markakis 1, Phillips 1. Miami 2:
Realmuto 1, Stanton 1. Strikeouts—Atlanta 4: Freeman 2, Garcia 2.
Miami 9: Yelich 1, Ozuna 2, Moore 1, Rojas 1, Riddle 2, Suzuki 1, Bour
1. E—Swanson (2). LOB—Atlanta 3, Miami 6. 2B—Gordon (2).
HR—Inciarte (1), off Koehler; Freeman (3), off Koehler; Inciarte (2),
off Tazawa; Stanton (1), off Garcia; Stanton (2), off Garcia.
RBIs—Inciarte 3 (4), Freeman (3), Flowers (2), Stanton 4 (6).
CS—Swanson (1), Markakis (1). S—Garcia 2. DP—Atlanta 1 (Garcia,
Phillips, Freeman); Miami 2 (Riddle, Gordon, Moore), (Realmuto,
Riddle).
Atlanta
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Garcia.........................5 7 4 3 2 4
86 5.73
O’Flaherty....................1 0 0 0 0 2
11 4.91
Ramirez.......................1 0 0 0 0 0
11 3.38
Vizcaino W, 1-0 ............1 0 0 0 0 2
17 0.00
Johnson S, 1-2 .............1 0 0 0 0 1
11 2.25
Miami
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Koehler .......................6 5 3 3 2 1
71 3.27
Ziegler H, 2..................1 0 0 0 0 1
15 1.80
Tazawa BS, 1-1.............1 2 1 1 0 1
20 9.00
Ramos L, 0-1...............1 1 1 1 1 1
13 2.25
WP—Vizcaino, Ramos.
T—2:51. Tickets sold—16,808 (36,742).
2
0
ORIOLES
RED SOX
METS
PHILLIES
New York
Philadelphia
5
4
R
1
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
4
101 030 000 —5
000 004 000 —4
H
2
0
0
2
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
6
BI
0
0
0
4
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
4
Avg.
.308
.355
.313
.242
.200
.120
.571
.400
.125
.286
.219
.000
.182
6
6
0
0
a-pinch hit for Garcia in the 6th. b-struck out for Salas in the 9th.
c-pinch hit for Benoit in the 9th. d-grounded out for Rupp in the 9th.
Walks—New York 5: Conforto 1, Cespedes 1, Walker 1, Wheeler 1,
Granderson 1. Philadelphia 2: Herrera 1, Saunders 1.
Strikeouts—New York 13: Conforto 2, Cabrera 2, Cespedes 1, Duda
2, Reyes 2, d’Arnaud 3, Wheeler 1. Philadelphia 7: Hernandez 1,
Kendrick 1, Herrera 1, Saunders 1, Rupp 1, Velasquez 1, Stassi 1.
LOB—New York 5, Philadelphia 3. 2B—Cespedes (3), Joseph (1).
HR—Conforto (2), off Velasquez; Franco (2), off Robles.
RBIs—Conforto (3), Cabrera 2 (6), Cespedes 2 (8), Franco 4 (8).
CS—Cespedes (1). SF—Cespedes. DP—New York 1; Philadelphia 1.
New York
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Wheeler W, 1-1 ..........52⁄3 4 3 3 1 4
85 7.45
Robles H, 2 .................2⁄3 1 1 1 1 0
16 5.40
Blevins H, 2.................2⁄3 0 0 0 0 1
8 0.00
Salas H, 2 ...................1 0 0 0 0 1
10 0.00
Reed S, 3-3 .................1 1 0 0 0 1
17 1.80
Philadelphia
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Velasquez L, 0-2 ...........5 5 5 5 4 7
100 9.00
Garcia.........................1 0 0 0 0 1
8 0.00
Neshek .......................1 0 0 0 0 2
11 0.00
Neris ..........................1 1 0 0 0 1
16 0.00
Benoit.........................1 0 0 0 1 2
22 0.00
HBP—Velasquez (d’Arnaud).T—3:13. Tickets sold—28,272
(43,651).
12
5
ATHLETICS
ROYALS
8
3
Rookie Amir Garrett took a shutout into
the seventh inning and Jose Peraza,
Eugenio Suarez and Tucker Barnhart
had three hits apiece as Cincinnati
finished a three-game sweep.
Chase Anderson (1-0) and two relievers combined on a four-hitter, and
Jonathan Villar hit a solo home run to
help hand Toronto (1-7), which is off to
its worst start, its fifth loss in a row.
Trey Mancini hit two of Baltimore’s five
home runs. The Orioles tagged Steven
Wright (0-1) for six runs in the first
inning. The knuckleballer gave up eight
runs in 11⁄3 innings.
Andrew Triggs (2-0) gave up four hits
and struck out three batters in six
shutout innings, Jed Lowrie drove in
three runs and Oakland beat Kansas
City for the eighth time in a row.
Cincinnati
Hamilton cf
Peraza 2b
Votto 1b
Duvall lf
Suarez 3b
d-Kvlhn 3b
Schebler rf
Cozart ss
Barnhart c
Garrett p
b-Alcnara lf
Totals
Pittsburgh AB R H BI Avg.
Mercer ss
4 0 1 0 .200
Marte cf
4 0 0 0 .294
MCthn rf
4 1 2 0 .250
Freese 3b
3 1 2 2 .350
e-Hanson
1 0 0 0 .333
Cervelli c
4 0 1 0 .192
Bell 1b
4 0 0 0 .160
Harrison 2b 2 0 1 0 .304
Frazier lf
4 0 0 0 .240
Nova p
1 0 0 0 .000
a-Gosselin
1 0 0 0 .000
c-Jaso
1 0 0 0 .000
Totals
33 2 7 2
Milwaukee AB R H BI Avg.
Villar 2b
4 1 2 1 .179
Thames 1b
4 0 1 0 .318
Braun dh
4 0 0 0 .214
Shaw 3b
4 0 0 0 .235
Santana rf
4 1 2 0 .231
Niewnhs lf
4 0 0 0 .059
Broxton cf
4 0 1 1 .200
Bandy c
2 0 1 0 .300
Arcia ss
3 0 0 0 .136
Totals
33 2 7 2
Toronto
AB R H BI Avg.
Travis 2b
4 0 0 0 .097
Bautista rf
4 0 1 0 .138
Dnldsn dh
2 0 0 0 .308
1-S’mhia dh 0 0 0 0 .200
Morales 1b 4 0 0 0 .250
Tlwitzki ss
2 0 0 0 .172
Martin c
3 0 1 0 .048
Pearce lf
3 0 1 0 .182
Pillar cf
3 0 1 0 .241
Barney 3b
2 0 0 0 .333
a-Smoak
1 0 0 0 .217
Goins 3b
0 0 0 0 .000
Totals
28 0 4 0
Balti.
Smith rf-lf
Jones cf
Mcdo 3b
Davis 1b
Trmbo dh
Cstillo c
Mncini lf
Gentry rf
Schp 2b
Hardy ss
Flhrty ss
Totals
Oakland AB R H BI Avg. Kansas City AB R H BI Avg.
Semien ss 3 2 0 0 .172 Gordon rf
4 0 0 0 .182
Joyce rf
4 0 1 1 .185 Mstakas 3b 4 1 1 0 .290
Lowrie 2b
3 0 1 3 .290 Cain cf
4 0 3 1 .308
K.Davis lf
5 1 2 0 .353 Hosmer 1b
4 0 1 1 .188
Vogt c
5 1 2 0 .286 Perez c
3 0 1 0 .290
Healy dh
4 1 2 0 .194 Butera c
1 0 0 0 .000
Alonso 1b 5 0 1 1 .308 Moss lf
4 0 0 0 .050
Plouffe 3b 2 2 1 1 .179 Cuthbert dh 4 0 0 0 .182
R.Davis cf
4 1 2 2 .206 Escobar ss
4 0 1 0 .179
Totals
35 8 12 8
Mondesi 2b 3 2 1 1 .167
Totals
35 3 8 3
000 040 410 —9
000 000 200 —2
Milwaukee
Toronto
010 001 000 —2
000 000 000 —0
AB
5
5
4
4
4
1
5
4
5
3
1
41
R
1
1
1
1
1
0
0
1
2
1
0
9
H
1
3
1
1
3
1
1
1
3
0
0
15
BI
1
2
1
0
3
0
1
0
1
0
0
9
Avg.
.306
.297
.171
.353
.429
.200
.179
.417
.333
.000
.000
Cincinnati
Pittsburgh
15
7
0
1
a-popped out for Nova in the 6th. b-struck out for Wood in the 8th.
c-popped out for Hudson in the 8th. d-singled for Suarez in the 9th.
e-struck out for Freese in the 9th.
Walks—Cincinnati 3: Votto 1, Duvall 1, Cozart 1. Pittsburgh 1:
Harrison 1. Strikeouts—Cincinnati 5: Hamilton 1, Duvall 1, Cozart 1,
Garrett 1, Alcantara 1. Pittsburgh 10: Marte 3, Freese 1, Hanson 1,
Cervelli 1, Bell 1, Frazier 3. E—Freese (1). LOB—Cincinnati 8,
Pittsburgh 6. 2B—Peraza (2), Suarez (3), Schebler (2), Cozart (2),
Barnhart (2), Mercer (1), McCutchen (1), Cervelli (2). HR—Freese
(2), off Garrett. RBIs—Hamilton (3), Peraza 2 (3), Votto (4), Suarez 3
(8), Schebler (6), Barnhart (1), Freese 2 (3). SB—Peraza (4).
DP—Cincinnati 1 (Suarez, Peraza, Votto); Pittsburgh 2 (Cervelli,
Mercer, Harrison), (Mercer, Harrison, Bell).
Cincinnati
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Garrett W, 2-0............62⁄3 5 2 2 0 5
96 1.42
Wood .........................1⁄3 0 0 0 0 1
5 1.93
Stephenson .................2 2 0 0 1 4
29 7.36
Pittsburgh
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Nova L, 1-1..................6 8 4 3 0 1
82 2.25
Bastardo.....................2⁄3 2 4 4 2 1
29 20.25
Rivero.........................1⁄3 1 0 0 0 1
7 1.69
Hudson .......................1 3 1 1 0 2
31 3.86
Watson .......................1 1 0 0 1 0
10 0.00
HBP—Garrett (Harrison).
T—2:54. Tickets sold—12,327 (38,362).
WHITE SOX
INDIANS
1.
7
4
0
0
a-struck out for Barney in the 8th. 1-ran for Donaldson in the 9th.
Walks—Milwaukee 1: Bandy 1. Toronto 3: Donaldson 2, Tulowitzki
Strikeouts—Milwaukee 4: Thames 1, Santana 1, Nieuwenhuis 1,
Broxton 1. Toronto 8: Travis 2, Donaldson 1, Morales 2, Martin 2,
Smoak 1.
LOB—Milwaukee 5, Toronto 4. 2B—Thames (3), Santana (2),
Broxton (1), Martin (1). HR—Villar (3), off Stroman. RBIs—Villar (6),
Broxton (2).
Runners left in scoring position—Milwaukee 2 (Santana, Arcia);
Toronto 3 (Martin 2, Pearce). RISP_Milwaukee 1 for 7; Toronto 0 for
3.
Runners moved up—Nieuwenhuis, Shaw, Morales. GIDP—Travis,
Morales, Pillar.
DP—Milwaukee 3 (Arcia, Thames), (Arcia, Villar, Thames), (Feliz,
Arcia, Thames).
Milwaukee
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Anderson W, 1-0...........7 3 0 0 2 7
89 0.69
Knebel H, 2 .................1 1 0 0 0 1
10 0.00
Feliz S, 3-3 ..................1 0 0 0 1 0
12 2.45
Toronto
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Stroman L, 1-1.............9 7 2 2 1 4
100 1.76
PB—Martin (1).
U—Jerry Layne, Marvin Hudson, Dan Bellino, Mike Estabrook.
T—2:15. Tickets sold—29,919 (49,282).
2
1
YANKEES
RAYS
Baltimore
Boston
AB
4
5
5
5
5
5
3
1
4
4
0
41
R
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
0
1
0
0
12
H
0
2
1
3
2
3
2
0
2
2
0
17
BI
0
1
1
1
1
2
4
0
2
0
0
12
Avg.
.278
.286
.200
.385
.250
.409
.267
.000
.174
.174
.000
Boston
AB R H BI Avg.
Pedroia 2b 4 0 1 0 .303
Hrndz 2b
1 0 0 0 .267
Bnitndi cf
2 1 0 1 .233
Betts rf
5 0 0 0 .150
Rmirz dh
4 1 2 0 .313
Mrlnd 1b
3 0 1 0 .323
Bogrts ss
5 1 3 2 .294
Sndval 3b 5 1 1 2 .133
Young lf
4 1 2 0 .286
Leon c
4 0 1 0 .348
Totals
37 5 11 5
621 000 300 —12
001 310 000 — 5
17
11
1
1
Walks—Baltimore 1: Mancini 1. Boston 4: Benintendi 1, Ramirez
1, Moreland 2. Strikeouts—Baltimore 6: Jones 1, Trumbo 1, Castillo
1, Mancini 1, Schoop 2. Boston 5: Hernandez 1, Benintendi 1,
Moreland 1, Sandoval 1, Young 1. E—Jimenez (1), Pedroia (1).
LOB—Baltimore 4, Boston 11. 2B—Machado (2), Davis (2), Castillo
(2), Ramirez (1), Moreland (7), Young (2). HR—Mancini (1), off
Wright; Schoop (1), off Wright; Jones (2), off Wright; Davis (2), off
Wright; Mancini (2), off Taylor; Sandoval (2), off Jimenez.
RBIs—Jones (4), Machado (5), Davis (3), Trumbo (6), Castillo 2 (3),
Mancini 4 (5), Schoop 2 (3), Benintendi (6), Bogaerts 2 (2),
Sandoval 2 (7). SF—Benintendi. DP—Baltimore 1 (Hardy, Schoop,
Davis); Boston 3 (Sandoval, Bogaerts, Moreland), (Bogaerts,
Pedroia, Moreland), (Pedroia, Bogaerts, Moreland).
Baltimore
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Jimenez ....................41⁄3 8 5 5 2 1
104 10.38
Givens W, 2-0 ..............2 1 0 0 0 1
30 1.59
Hart .........................12⁄3 2 0 0 0 3
31 0.00
Nuno ..........................1 0 0 0 2 0
25 0.00
Boston
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Wright L, 0-1 .............11⁄3 8 8 8 0 1
34 13.50
Taylor........................32⁄3 3 1 1 1 3
66 1.69
Abad ..........................1 2 1 1 0 0
17 9.00
Kelly ...........................2 3 2 2 0 1
44 3.38
Scott ..........................1 1 0 0 0 1
14 0.00
HBP—Wright (Smith), Givens (Benintendi). WP—Wright, Jimenez.
PB—Castillo (1).
T—3:46. Tickets sold—32,211 (37,499).
8
4
TIGERS
TWINS
5
3
Derek Holland (1-1) held Cleveland
hitless until Francisco Lindor’s double
in the sixth inning and Matt Davidson
had a two-run single. Holland struck
out four and walked four in six innings.
Aaron Judge hit a home run for the
third consecutive game and had three
RBIs, and New York rebounded from a
3-0 deficit in the fifth inning to win its
third game in a row.
Andrew Romine hit a grand slam to
right field, the first of his career, and
Detroit scored five runs in the fourth
inning against Kyle Gibson (0-1) to
overcome a 3-0 deficit.
Chicago
AB R H BI Avg.
Saladino 2b 4 0 0 0 .238
Anderson ss 4 0 1 0 .200
Cabrera lf
4 0 1 0 .222
Abreu 1b
4 0 0 0 .214
Asche dh
2 1 0 0 .067
A.Garcia rf
4 1 1 0 .407
Davidson 3b 4 0 1 2 .385
Narvaez c
3 0 0 0 .000
L.Garcia cf
2 0 0 0 .143
Totals
31 2 4 2
Cleveland AB R H BI Avg.
Santana 1b 4 1 1 0 .235
Lindor ss
4 0 2 0 .333
Brantley lf
4 0 0 1 .208
Encrnacn dh 2 0 0 0 .172
Ramirez 2b 3 0 0 0 .179
Guyer rf
3 0 0 0 .167
a-Almonte
1 0 0 0 .250
Diaz 3b
3 0 0 0 .200
Perez c
4 0 0 0 .111
Jackson cf
2 0 0 0 .231
Totals
30 1 3 1
Minnesota AB R H BI Avg. Detroit
AB R H BI Avg.
Dozier 2b
4 1 1 1 .219 Kinsler 2b
3 0 0 0 .280
Kepler rf
3 1 1 0 .222 Cstellns 3b 4 1 1 0 .258
Sano dh
3 0 0 0 .296 Cabrera 1b 4 0 0 0 .107
Mauer 1b
4 0 1 2 .217 Martinez dh 3 1 0 0 .231
Polanco ss
3 0 0 0 .280 Upton lf
3 1 1 0 .158
Castro c
2 0 0 0 .316 Collins rf
4 1 2 1 .353
1-Buxton
0 0 0 0 .069 McCann c
3 0 0 0 .200
Escobar 3b 4 0 0 0 .286 Romine cf
3 1 2 4 .545
Rosario cf
3 1 1 0 .148 Iglesias ss
2 0 0 0 .083
29 5 6 5
Santana lf
3 0 0 0 .100 Totals
Totals
29 3 4 3
Chicago
Cleveland
020 000 000 —2
000 000 010 —1
Tampa Bay
Souza Jr. rf
Kiermaier cf
Longoria 3b
Weeks Jr. 1b
Morrison 1b
Dickerson dh
Norris c
Rbrtsn 2b
Beckham ss
Miller 2b
Bourjos lf
c-Smith lf
Totals
4
3
1
1
a-grounded out for Guyer in the 9th.
Walks—Chicago 2: Asche 2. Cleveland 4: Encarnacion 1, Ramirez
1, Diaz 1, Jackson 1.
Strikeouts—Chicago 13: Saladino 2, Anderson 2, Cabrera 1,
Abreu 2, Asche 1, A.Garcia 1, Davidson 3, Narvaez 1. Cleveland 9:
Brantley 1, Encarnacion 2, Guyer 1, Diaz 3, Perez 1, Jackson 1.
E—Narvaez (1), Salazar (1). LOB—Chicago 5, Cleveland 7.
2B—A.Garcia (1), Lindor 2 (3). RBIs—Davidson 2 (5), Brantley (5).
CS—L.Garcia (1).
Runners left in scoring position—Chicago 1 (A.Garcia);
Cleveland 3 (Ramirez, Guyer, Perez). RISP—Chicago 1 for 4;
Cleveland 0 for 9.
Runners moved up—Narvaez, Brantley.
DP—Cleveland 1 (Perez, Ramirez).
Chicago
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Holland W, 1-1 .............6 1 0 0 4 4
101 1.50
Swarzak H, 1................1 0 0 0 0 2
16 0.00
Jones H, 1 ...................1 2 1 1 0 1
26 6.23
Robertson S, 1-1 ..........1 0 0 0 0 2
12 0.00
Cleveland
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Salazar L, 0-1 ..............6 4 2 2 2 11
106 4.63
Logan .........................2⁄3 0 0 0 0 0
5 5.40
Otero........................11⁄3 0 0 0 0 1
16 5.40
McAllister ....................1 0 0 0 0 1
11 0.00
HBP—Salazar (L.Garcia). WP—Salazar.
U—Jeff Kellogg, Tim Timmons, James Hoye, Will Little. T—2:58.
Tickets sold—15,628 (38,000).
Tampa Bay
New York
AB
5
4
3
3
1
4
4
3
2
2
2
2
35
R
1
0
2
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
4
H
1
1
0
1
0
1
1
1
1
0
1
1
9
BI
0
0
0
2
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
3
Avg.
.344
.265
.219
.273
.321
.303
.200
.308
.154
.161
.143
.238
New York
Ellsbury cf
Hicks lf
Holliday dh
Carter 1b
Castro 2b
Headley 3b
Judge rf
Higashioka c
Kozma ss
Gardner
Torreyes ss
Totals
AB
5
3
4
4
4
4
3
4
1
1
1
34
R
0
0
0
1
1
2
2
1
0
0
1
8
200 010 010 —4
000 024 20x —8
H
1
0
0
1
2
2
2
0
0
0
0
8
BI
1
2
0
0
0
0
3
0
0
0
0
6
Avg.
.321
.231
.308
.176
.333
.393
.308
.000
.000
.258
.240
9
8
2
1
Walks—Tampa Bay 2: Longoria 1, Robertson 1. New York 5: Hicks
2, Holliday 1, Judge 1, Kozma 1. Strikeouts—Tampa Bay 11: Souza Jr.
2, Kiermaier 3, Longoria 2, Weeks Jr. 1, Morrison 1, Dickerson 1,
Miller 1. New York 1: Castro 1. E—Beckham (1), Cedeno (1), Castro
(1). LOB—Tampa Bay 7, New York 7. 2B—Souza Jr. (4), Dickerson
(3). HR—Weeks Jr. (1), off Montgomery; Judge (3), off Ramirez.
RBIs—Weeks Jr. 2 (2), Dickerson (5), Ellsbury (3), Hicks 2 (2), Judge
3 (7). SB—Ellsbury (2).
Tampa Bay
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Snell ........................42⁄3 2 2 0 3 1
83 3.18
Diaz L, 0-1 ..................2⁄3 3 3 2 1 0
21 3.60
Cedeno .......................0 1 1 0 0 0
10 0.00
Ramirez ....................12⁄3 2 2 2 0 0
26 3.38
Farquhar......................1 0 0 0 1 0
14 1.93
New York
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Montgomery ..............42⁄3 5 3 2 2 7
89 3.86
Mitchell W, 1-0...........11⁄3 0 0 0 0 0
14 0.00
Clippard H, 2 ...............1 0 0 0 0 2
15 2.08
Layne..........................1 2 1 1 0 1
21 5.40
Holder ........................1⁄3 2 0 0 0 0
11 0.00
Chapman S, 1-1...........2⁄3 0 0 0 0 1
9 0.00
Cedeno pitched to 2 batters in the 6th.
HBP—Montgomery (Kiermaier). WP—Diaz. PB—Higashioka (1).
T—3:33. Tickets sold—38,002 (49,642).
Minnesota
Detroit
102 000 000 —3
000 500 00x —5
4
6
0
0
1-ran for Castro in the 9th.
Walks—Minnesota 4: Sano 1, Polanco 1, Castro 2. Detroit 2:
Kinsler 1, Upton 1.
Strikeouts—Minnesota 9: Dozier 1, Kepler 2, Sano 1, Polanco 2,
Castro 1, Escobar 1, Santana 1. Detroit 4: Castellanos 1, Martinez 1,
Upton 1, Collins 1.
LOB—Minnesota 4, Detroit 4. 2B—Castellanos (2), Upton (1).
HR—Dozier (1), off Fulmer; Romine (1), off Gibson. RBIs—Dozier (2),
Mauer 2 (4), Collins (2), Romine 4 (4). S—Iglesias.
Runners left in scoring position—Minnesota 2 (Polanco,
Escobar); Detroit 2 (Cabrera, McCann). RISP—Minnesota 1 for 3;
Detroit 2 for 8.
Runners moved up—Cabrera. GIDP—Sano, Escobar.
DP—Detroit 2 (Kinsler, Iglesias, Cabrera), (Castellanos, Kinsler,
Cabrera).
Minnesota
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Gibson L, 0-1...............4 4 5 5 1 2
63 8.00
Duffey.........................3 2 0 0 1 0
29 0.00
Breslow .......................1 0 0 0 0 2
12 0.00
Detroit
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Fulmer W, 1-0 ..............6 4 3 3 1 7
110 2.25
Ryan H, 3 ....................1 0 0 0 1 0
11 2.45
Wilson S, 1-2 ...............2 0 0 0 2 2
35 4.50
HBP—Fulmer (Kepler), Gibson (Martinez).
U—Chris Conroy, Jerry Meals, Ron Kulpa, Ed Hickox. T—2:48.
Tickets sold—23,738 (41,681).
Oakland
Kansas City
001 214 000 —8
000 000 021 —3
12
8
1
0
Walks—Oakland 6: Semien 2, Joyce 1, Lowrie 1, Healy 1, Plouffe 1.
Kansas City 2: Gordon 1, Mondesi 1. Strikeouts—Oakland 5: Semien
1, Lowrie 1, K.Davis 2, Alonso 1. Kansas City 5: Moustakas 1, Cain 1,
Hosmer 1, Moss 1, Escobar 1. E—Triggs (1). LOB—Oakland 8, Kansas
City 7. 2B—Lowrie (3), Vogt (3), Healy (2), R.Davis (3), Moustakas
(1), Cain (1), Perez (1). HR—Mondesi (1), off Montas. RBIs—Joyce
(4), Lowrie 3 (5), Alonso (6), Plouffe (2), R.Davis 2 (5), Cain (2),
Hosmer (3), Mondesi (2). SB—Semien (4). SF—Lowrie, Plouffe.
Runners left in scoring position—Oakland 4 (Lowrie, Vogt 2,
R.Davis); Kansas City 3 (Moss 2, Escobar). RISP—Oakland 4 for 14;
Kansas City 2 for 11. DP—Oakland 1 (Lowrie, Semien, Alonso);
Kansas City 2 (Mondesi, Escobar, Hosmer), (Butera, Hosmer).
Oakland
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Triggs W, 2-0 ................6 4 0 0 1 3
90 0.00
Dull ............................1 0 0 0 0 1
13 9.00
Hendriks......................1 3 2 2 1 0
27 5.40
Montas .......................1 1 1 1 0 1
22 1.69
Kansas City
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Hammel L, 0-1...........42⁄3 7 4 4 2 4
94 6.52
Wood .........................2⁄3 1 2 2 1 0
16 20.25
Young .........................1⁄3 3 2 2 1 1
16 6.75
Alexander ..................21⁄3 0 0 0 0 0
18 0.00
Junis...........................1 1 0 0 2 0
16 0.00
Inherited runners-scored—Wood 1-0, Young 2-2, Alexander 2-0.
WP—Hammel 2.
U—Dana DeMuth, Mark Wegner, Clint Fagan, Chris Guccione.
T—3:07. Tickets sold—24,380 (37,903).
NOTES
Buchholz has
tear in forearm
Philadelphia Phillies righthander Clay Buchholz has a partial tear of the right flexor pronator
mass, the team announced
Wednesday.
The flexor pronator mass is the
collection of muscles on the anterior of the forearm.
Buchholz is 0-1 with a 12.27 ERA
in two starts.
Etc.
Former Dodgers first baseman
James Loney signed a minor
league contract with the Detroit
Tigers. ... Outfielder Melvin Upton
Jr. signed a minor league deal with
the San Francisco Giants. ... Infielder Stephen Drew was put on
the 10-day disabled list by the
Washington Nationals because of a
hamstring strain. The team recalled infielder Grant Green, a former USC standout, from triple A. ...
Right-hander Rookie Davis was
put on the 10-day DL by the Cincinnati Reds because of a bruised
right forearm.
— associated press
L AT I ME S . CO M / S P O RT S
T H U R S DAY, A P R I L 13 , 2 017
D5
THE DAY IN SPORTS
St. Louis sues NFL over Rams’ relocation
staff and wire reports
The Rams are preparing for
their second season in Los Angeles,
but the aftermath of their exit from
St. Louis continues.
On Wednesday, the city of St.
Louis sued the NFL and all of its
teams and owners, alleging the
league violated its relocation
guidelines.
The city, St. Louis County and
the St. Louis Regional Convention
and Sports Complex Authority
filed the lawsuit in St. Louis Circuit
Court. It seeks unspecified damages for breach of contract, unjust
enrichment and fraudulent misrepresentation.
“There is no legitimate basis for
this litigation,” the NFL said in a
statement. “While we understand
the disappointment of the St. Louis fans and the community, we
worked diligently with local and
state officials in a process that was
honest and fair at all times.”
A Rams spokesman said the
team does not comment on pendTRANSACTIONS
BASEBALL
Angels—Put pitcher Andrew Bailey on the 10day disabled list, retroactive to April 10; called up
pitcher Daniel Wright from Salt Lake (PCL).
Dodgers—Put outfielder Franklin Gutierrez on
the 10-day disabled list, retroactive to April 11;
called up outfielder Trayce Thompson from Oklahoma City (PCL).
Cincinnati—Put pitcher Rookie Davis on the
10-day disabled list; called up pitcher Barrett Astin Louisville (IL).
Detroit—Agreed to terms with first baseman
James Loney on a minor league contract.
Kansas City—Called up pitcher Scott
Alexander from Omaha (PCL); optioned outfielder Terrance Gore to Northwest Arkansas (TL).
N.Y. Yankees—Signed pitcher Jordan
Montgomery and added him to the 25-man roster; designated pitcher Johnny Barbato for assignment.
San Diego—Put pitcher Luis Perdomo on the
10-day disabled list, retroactive to April 9; called
up pitcher Jake Esch from San Antonio (TL).
San Francisco—Agreed tp terms with
outfielder Melvin Upton Jr. on a minor league
contract.
Seattle—Called up pitcher Evan Marshall
from Tacoma (PCL); sent outfielder Boog Powell
to Tacoma; assigned pitcher Casey Fien outright
to Tacoma.
Texas—Called up pitcher Nick Martinez from
Round Rock (PCL); optioned infielder-outfielder
Drew Robinson to Round Rock.
Washington—Put infielder Stephen Drew on
the 10-day disabled list; purchased the contract
of infielder Grant Green from Syracuse (IL).
PRO BASKETBALL
NBA—Fined Philadelphia guard Gerald Henderson $25,000 for throwing an elbow to the
head of Indiana forward Paul George; fined
George $25,000 for public criticism of officiating.
Cleveland—Waived center Larry Sanders;
signed guard-forward Dahntay Jones and center
Edy Tavares.
PRO FOOTBALL
Chargers—Signed tight end Jeff Cumberland
to a one-year contract.
Denver—Promoted Steve Antonopulos to director of sports medicine and Vince Garcia to
trainer.
New England—Signed defensive back
Brandon King.
HOCKEY
Kings—Hired Mike Futa as assistant general
manager.
Arizona—Signed forward Jens Looke to a contract.
Carolina—Fired goaltenders coach David
Marcoux.
N.Y. Islanders—Removed the interim status
for coach Doug Weight.
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Florida—Announced that freshman guard Eric
Hester will transfer.
Kansas—Announced that junior guard Svi
Mykhailiuk will enter the NBA draft.
Kentucky—Announced that sophomore Isaac
Humphries will enter the NBA draft.
Middle Tenn.—Announced that graduate
senior forward Nick King has transferred from Alabama.
Oregon—Announced that junior forward Dillon
Brooks will enter the NBA draft.
Presbyterian—Announced the resignation of
coach Gregg Nibert.
Tennessee State—Hired Jessica Kern as
women's coach.
Texas A&M—Announced that graduate guard
Duane Wilson had transferred from Marquette.
Wisconsin—Released redshirt junior guard
Jordan Hill so that he can transfer.
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
Middle Tenn.—Suspended defensive lineman
Justin Akins and linebacker Shalom Alvarez while
they're investigated for possible animal cruelty.
PRO SOCCER
MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER
WEST
W L T
Pts GF GA
Portland .........4 1 1
13 16 8
FC Dallas........3 0 1
10 6 2
Houston .........3 2 0
9 11 9
Sporting K.C....2 0 3
9 5 2
San Jose ........2 2 1
7 7 7
GALAXY ..........2 3 0
6 7 8
Seattle ...........1 1 3
6 7 6
R. Salt Lake ....1 3 2
5 6 8
Colorado ........1 2 1
4 4 6
Vancouver .......1 3 1
4 6 10
Minn. United ...1 4 1
4 10 22
EAST
W L T
Pts GF GA
Columbus .......3 2 1
10 9 7
Orlando City ....3 1 0
9 4 3
Atl. United FC ..2 1 2
8 13 5
Chicago..........2 1 2
8 6 7
New England ...2 2 1
7 9 6
N.Y. City FC .....2 2 1
7 8 5
New York ........2 3 1
7 5 9
D.C. United .....2 2 1
7 4 8
Toronto FC ......1 0 4
7 6 4
Montreal.........0 2 3
3 5 8
Philadelphia....0 3 2
2 5 9
Three points for a win, one for a tie.
Friday’s Schedule
N.Y. City FC at Philadelphia, 4 p.m.
Seattle at Vancouver, 7 p.m.
FC Dallas at San Jose, 8 p.m.
Saturday’s Schedule
GALAXY at Orlando City, 11:30 a.m.
Atlanta United FC at Montreal, 10 a.m.
New England at Chicago, 2 p.m.
D.C. United at New York, 4:30 p.m.
Toronto FC at Columbus, 5 p.m.
Minnesota United at Houston, 5:30 p.m.
Real Salt Lake at Colorado, 6 p.m.
Sporting Kansas City at Portland, 7:30 p.m.
THE ODDS
Baseball
National League
Favorite
Underdog
at Chicago
-133 DODGERS
+123
at Miami
-118 New York
+108
at Cincinnati -107 Milwaukee
-103
at S. Francisco -160 Colorado
+150
American League
Favorite
Underdog
Texas
-120 at ANGELS
+110
at Cleveland -195 Chicago
+180
at Detroit
-139 Minnesota
+129
at New York -125 Tampa Bay
+115
at Toronto
-113 Baltimore
+103
at Kansas City -124 Oakland
+114
Interleague
Favorite
Underdog
at Boston
-145 Pittsburgh
+135
Updates at Pregame.com
—Associated Press
MINOR LEAGUE
BASEBALL
PACIFIC COAST LEAGUE
Wednesday’s Results
Memphis 2, Colorado Springs 1
Oklahoma City 5, Nashville 0
Omaha 6, Round Rock 3
Iowa 18, New Orleans 5
Salt Lake 4, Sacramento 1
Albuquerque at Reno
Fresno at Las Vegas
El Paso at Tacoma, rain
CALIFORNIA LEAGUE
Wednesday’s Results
Visalia 2, Lake Elsinore 0, 10 innings
Lancaster 9, San Jose 7
Rancho Cucamonga 11, Inland Empire 2
Stockton 5, Modesto 2
ing litigation.
The lawsuit alleges that in the
years leading up to the Rams’ relocation request, “Rams officials decided to move the team and confidentially determined that they
would be interested in exploiting
any opportunity to do so.”
It also said that “Rams representatives acknowledged the
strong fan support in St. Louis and
knowingly made the following false
statements regarding the team’s
intent to engage in good faith negotiations and to stay in St. Louis.”
The lawsuit cites public or published statements made by Rams
owner Stan Kroenke, vice president of football operations Kevin
Demoff and NFL Commissioner
Roger Goodell.
— Gary Klein
The Chargers agreed to re-sign
veteran tight end Jeff Cumberland
to a one-year deal. Cumberland
missed all of last season after tearing his left Achilles’ tendon during
a preseason game last summer. He
will compete for time behind tight
ends Antonio Gates and Hunter
Henry.
Cumberland caught 86 passes
for more than 1,000 yards and 10
touchdowns during six seasons
with the New York Jets before joining the Chargers last year.
— Dan Woike
ETC.
Creamer, Lee
share Lotte lead
America’s Paula Creamer and
South Korea’s Mi Hyang Lee
shared a one-stroke lead after
shooting six-under 66 in the first
round of the LPGA’s Lotte Championship in Kapolei, Hawaii.
Americans Beth Allen and Lizette
Salas were in the group of five golfers at five under.
Oregon junior forward Dillon
Brooks says he is entering the NBA
draft. The Pac-12 Player of the Year
has hired an agent, which ends his
eligibility with the Ducks. Brooks
averaged 16.1 points per game this
season for Oregon, which went to
the Final Four. A clutch performer,
he scored game-winners against
Tennessee, UCLA and Cal this season. ... Kansas guard Svi Mykhailiuk is entering the NBA draft, but is
not hiring an agent and could decide by May 24 to withdraw his
name and return for his senior season. The 6-foot-8 Mykhailiuk
started 25 games last season, averaging 9.8 points and shooting 38.9%
from beyond the arc.
The Dallas Stars are bringing
back Stanley Cup-winning coach
Ken Hitchcock, hoping to turn
themselves back into a championship contender. Hitchcock is returning to Dallas and will be
named coach at a news conference
Thursday, a person with direct
knowledge of the situation confirmed to the Associated Press.
Hitchcock, 65, won the Cup with
Dallas in 1999, coaching there for
parts of seven seasons from1995-96
through 2001-02. He has since
coached the Philadelphia Flyers,
Columbus Blue Jackets and St.
Louis Blues. He was fired as Blues
coach in February and replaced by
Mike Yeo. Hitchcock replaces
Lindy Ruff, who was fired Monday.
German authorities arrested a
suspected
Islamic
extremist
Wednesday in their investigation
into a bomb attack on a German
soccer team Borussia Dortmund,
while the team — missing a defender wounded in the blasts — lost 3-2
to visiting Monaco in a hastily rescheduled Champions League
match. Amid heightened security,
the defeat for Borussia Dortmund
in Europe’s top club competition
came less than 24 hours after three
explosions shattered a window of
the team’s bus and rattled nerves
across the gritty city in western
Germany.
Dortmund coach Thomas
Tuchel said after the loss that he
felt European soccer’s governing
body, UEFA, had not taken the attack seriously enough as it swiftly
rescheduled the match.
TENNIS
$600,345 U.S. CLAY COURT
CHAMPIONSHIP
At Houston
Surface: Clay-Outdoor
SINGLES (first round)—Maximo Gonzalez, Argentina, d. Jared Donaldson, 6-4, 5-7, 6-3; Horacio Zeballos, Argentina, d. Rogerio Dutra Silva,
Brazil, 6-2, 7-5; Fernando Verdasco (5), Spain,
d. Kevin Anderson, South Africa, 7-6 (4), 7-6 (4);
Thiago Monteiro, Brazil, d. Donald Young (7),
6-3, 6-4; Leonardo Mayer, Argentina, d. Adam
Pavlasek, Czech Republic, 5-7, 6-2, 6-1; Thomaz
Bellucci (8), Brazil d. Frances Tiafoe, 7-5, 1-6,
6-2; Chung Hyeon, South Korea, d. Victor Estrella
Burgos, Dominican Republic, 6-4, 5-7, 6-4; Ernesto Escobedo d. Tennys Sandgren, 6-3, 6-3;
Feliciano Lopez (6), Spain, d. Bjorn Fratangelo,
7-5, 6-4.
$572,000 GRAND PRIX HASSAN II
At Marrakech, Morocco
Surface: Clay-Outdoor
SINGLES (first round)—Jeremy Chardy,
France, d. Malek Jaziri, Tunisia, 6-2, 4-6, 6-3;
Paolo Lorenzi (5), Italy, d. Guillermo GarciaLopez, Spain, 7-6 (4), 7-5; Jiri Vesely, Czech Republic, d. Luca Vanni, Italy, 6-2, 6-3; Benoit Paire
(6), France, d. Carlos Berlocq, Argentina, 6-7
(0), 6-3, 6-2.
(Second round)—Borna Coric, Croatia, d.
Reda Al Amrani, Morocco, 6-2, 3-6, 7-6 (5); Albert Ramos-Vinolas (2), Spain def. Laslo Djere,
Serbia, 6-7 (4), 6-1, 6-4.
DOUBLES (quarterfinals)—Marcel GranollersMarc Lopez (2), Spain, d. Jeremy Chardy-Fabrice
Martin, France, 5-7, 7-5, 10-8; Florin Mergea,
Romania-Aisam-ul-Haq Qureshi (4), Pakistan, d.
Nicolas Almagro, Spain-Carlos Berlocq, Argentina, walkover.
$226,750 CLARO OPEN
At Bogota, Colombia
Surface: Clay-Outdoor
SINGLES (second round)—Sara Sorribes
Tormo, Spain, d. Katerina Siniakova (2), Czech
Republic, 6-2, 6-3; Johanna Larsson (3), Sweden, d. Veronica Cepede Royg, Paraguay, 6-4,
6-4; Magda Linette (5), Poland, d. Elitsa Kostova, Bulgaria, 6-4, 6-4; Aleksandra Krunic, Serbia, d. Silvia Soler-Espinosa, Spain, 6-0, 7-5;
Sara Errani, Italy, d. Sachia Vickery, 6-2, 6-3;
Francesca Schiavone, Italy, d. Dalia Jakupovic,
Slovenia, 6-1, 6-2; Lara Arruabarrena (4), Spain,
d. Irina Khromacheva, Russia, 7-6 (3), 6-0.
$226,750 LADIES OPEN BIEL BIENNE
At Biel, Switzerland
Surface: Hard-Indoor
SINGLES (first round)—Carla Suarez Navarro
(2), Spain, d. Julia Boserup, 6-1, 6-2; Viktorija
Golubic, Switzerland, d. Laura Siegemund (5),
Germany, 6-2, 4-6, 7-6 (3).
(Second round)—Elise Mertens, Belgium, d.
Mona Barthel, Germany, 6-2, 6-4; Anett Kontaveit, Estonia, d. Evgeniya Rodina, Russia, 6-3,
6-2; Kristyna Pliskova, Czech Republic, d. Donna
Vekic, Croatia, 6-1, 6-2; Julia Goerges (7), Germany, d. Oceane Dodin, France, 6-4, 6-3.
DOUBLES (quarterfinals)—Xenia Knoll, Switzerland-Demi Schuurs (1), Netherlands, d. Annika
Beck, Germany-Renata Voracova, Czech Republic, 6-3, 1-6, 12-10.
GOLF
PGA STATISTICS
Through April 9
FedExCup Season Points
1. Dustin Johnson, 1,903.200. 2. Hideki Matsuyama, 1,821.834. 3. Justin Thomas,
1,793.293. 4. Jon Rahm, 1,361.433. 5. Adam
Hadwin, 1,160.167. 6. Jordan Spieth, 1,104.213.
7. Pat Perez, 1,093.145. 8. Rickie Fowler,
1,068.983. 9. Justin Rose, 980.167. 10. Brendan Steele, 959.855.
Scoring Average
1. Rory McIlroy, 68.868. 2. Rickie Fowler,
68.992. 3. Sergio Garcia, 69.376. 4. Jordan
Spieth, 69.425. 5. Justin Rose, 69.482. 6.
Justin Thomas, 69.497. 7. Dustin Johnson,
69.649. 8. Thomas Pieters, 69.669. 9. Jon
Rahm, 69.677. 10. Hideki Matsuyama, 69.717.
Driving Distance
1. Rory McIlroy, 318.8. 2. Dustin Johnson,
316.2. 3. Luke List, 312.4. 4. Andrew Loupe,
311.7. 5. Brandon Hagy, 310.8. 6. Brooks
Koepka, 309.2. 7. Grayson Murray, 309.0. 8 .
Smylie Kaufman and Aaron Wise, 307.6. 10. Trey
Mullinax, 306.7.
Driving Accuracy Percentage
1. Brian Stuard, 74.09%. 2. Francesco Molinari, 72.90%. 3. Steve Wheatcroft, 72.79%. 4.
Martin Kaymer, 72.14%. 5. Jim Furyk, 71.92%. 6.
William McGirt, 71.40%. 7. Roberto Castro,
71.16%. 8. Zac Blair, 70.76%. 9. Graeme McDowell, 70.48%. 10. Russell Knox, 70.44%.
Greens in Regulation Percentage
1. Dustin Johnson, 75.25%. 2. Henrik Norlander, 75.00%. 3. Martin Flores, 73.93%. 4. Jordan Spieth, 73.89%. 5. Kyle Stanley, 73.74%. 6.
Billy Horschel, 73.54%. 7. Lucas Glover,
73.47%. 8. Sergio Garcia, 73.15%. 9. Tony
Finau, 73.07%. 10. Greg Owen, 73.06%.
Total Driving
1. Sergio Garcia, 45. 2. Kyle Stanley, 59. 3.
Rickie Fowler, 69. 4. Francesco Molinari and
Bernd Wiesberger, 89. 6. Brendan Steele, 92. 7.
Keegan Bradley, 98. 8. Lucas Glover, 99. 9.
Bubba Watson, 101. 10. 2 tied with 107.
Birdie Average
1. Justin Thomas, 4.89. 2. Jordan Spieth,
4.80. 3. Anirban Lahiri, 4.61. 4. Dustin Johnson,
4.59. 5. Hideki Matsuyama, 4.53. 6. Rickie
Fowler, 4.47. 7. Jon Rahm, 4.45. 8. Rory McIlroy,
4.44. 9. Justin Rose, 4.41. 10. Luke List, 4.39.
Sand Save Percentage
1. Luke Donald, 77.08%. 2. Rickie Fowler,
74.00%. 3. Alex Noren, 71.43%. 4. Tim Wilkinson, 70.00%. 5. Jason Day, 68.97%. 6. Adam
Hadwin, 68.42%. 7. Gary Woodland, 67.35%. 8.
Zac Blair, 66.23%. 9. Seung-Yul Noh, 65.43%.
10. Shane Lowry, 64.00%.
All-Around Ranking
1. Rickie Fowler, 225. 2. Hideki Matsuyama,
271. 3. Sergio Garcia, 308. 4. Justin Rose, 319.
5. Francesco Molinari, 326. 6. Jon Rahm, 330.
7. Rory McIlroy, 337. 8. Adam Hadwin, 351. 9.
Jordan Spieth, 354. 10. Justin Thomas, 361.
PRO BOWLING
PRO BOWLERS ASSN.
PBA DOUBLES CHAMPIONSHIP
At Portland, Maine
40-game qualifiers
Top five advance to stepladder finals
1. Jesper Svensson, Sweden-Kyle Troup, Taylorsville, N.C., 9,353 pins. 2. E.J. Tackett, Huntington, Ind.-Marshall Kent, Yakima, Wash.,
9,332. 3. Bill O'Neill, Langhorne, Pa.-Jason Belmonte, Australia, 9,229. 4. Dick Allen, Columbia, S.C.-Zeke Bayt, Westerville, Ohio, 9,144. 5.
D.J. Archer, Friendswood, Texas-Shawn Maldonado, Houston, 9,141.
NONQUALIFERS: 6. Anthony Simonsen,
Austin, Texas-Connor Pickford, Plano, Texas,
9,115, $7,000. 7. Josh Blanchard, Mesa, Ariz.Andres Gomez, Colombia, 8,981, $7,000. 8.
Greg Ostrander, Freehold, N.J.-A.J. Johnson, Oswego, Ill., 8,841, $5,500.
SOCCER
INTERNATIONAL
(Home team listed first)
UEFA Champions League
Quarterfinals, first leg
Borussia Dortmund (Germany) 2, Monaco 3
Atletico Madrid (Spain) 1, Leicester (England) 0
Bayern Munich (Germany) 1, Real Madrid
(Spain) 2
COLLEGE
VOLLEYBALL
MEN
Mountain Pacific Sports Federation
Cal Baptist d. UC San Diego, 25-19, 25-19, 2519
Al Bello Getty Images
ANDRE WARD , left, hits Sergey Kovalev during a light-heavyweight bout in Las Vegas last November, when Ward
won by unanimous decision. Kovalev will get a chance for payback June 17, again in Vegas.
No more overtraining days
Kovalev says he ran out
of steam in loss to
Ward, aims to prepare
differently for rematch.
By Lance Pugmire
There are regrets — such as
judging — that Sergey Kovalev
wants to stop dwelling upon as
he moves toward his June 17 rematch against Andre Ward.
The lament that continues
to gnaw at Russia’s former
three-belt light-heavyweight
champion is one he plans to
keep foremost in his mind
while preparing for the second
meeting with Oakland’s Ward
at Mandalay Bay in Las Vegas.
Kovalev says he overtrained for the first fight.
“I don’t like what happened
with me after the fifth round. I
lost my power, my natural ability, my speed.… I tired,” Kovalev said Wednesday at Hollywood’s Roosevelt Hotel on the
third and final stop of the national tour to promote the
HBO pay-per-view bout.
“I didn’t feel him for the first
four rounds at all. In the first
minute of the fifth round, I felt
finished. My mistake. I will
train less than I did.”
Kovalev (30-1-1, 26 knockouts) will continue to keep his
camp at Big Bear under
trainer John David Jackson,
but said his progress will be
more closely monitored by an
assistant conditioning coach.
Ward (31-0, 15 KOs) rallied
from a second-round knockdown in the Nov. 19 bout and
piled up a slew of rounds in the
second half to win by 114-113
scorecards from all three
judges — John McKaie, Burt
Clements and Glenn Trowbridge.
Ward, who has said he expects to continue his success in
the rematch, told reporters
Wednesday that Kovalev and
his team are doing themselves
a disservice by pushing the
overtraining narrative and not
confronting the real problem of
how Ward outboxed him.
“He says he’s going to be
better and he says he’s training
less this fight?” Ward wondered.
“What they think is helping
him — giving him a pass — is
hurting him. Why didn’t you
finish me? … I smiled and got
up. … It spoke to a lot of people.”
Kovalev continues to take
issue somewhat with judges’
scoring in the first bout.
“Andre Ward took my belts
… not fair. He didn’t deserve it,”
Kovalev said. “Once it was announced by Michael Buffer,
when I heard 114-113, I thought
the judges would give the victory to my side. And I didn’t
think I won just because of the
knockdown. Just watch only
the 10th round. All the judges
gave that to Andre Ward. So
you understand what happened.”
That implication was given
voice by some who surmised
Ward, the most recent U.S.
Olympic men’s boxing gold
medalist, was favored by the
three American judges.
Kovalev promoter Kathy
Duva said she asked Ward’s
promoter, Roc Nation Sports,
to consider requesting that the
Nevada State Athletic Commission retain at least one
international judge for the rematch and says she was told
no.
The promoters and sanctioning bodies do not have the
final say in the judges’ selection, however. The Nevada
commission does.
“No one had concern with
those three judges before the
first fight.
“In fact, [Duva’s] Main
Events was very happy,” said
Bob Bennett, executive director of the commission. “I’m
willing to listen to the recommendations of the promoters
and sanctioning bodies, but
I’m more concerned with selecting the best judges possible
for the fight.
Kovalev’s ideal performance is to win by knockout, removing judges from the equation.
In Oakland on Tuesday, he
told Ward, “I will finish your
boxing career,” and on
Wednesday he glared at Ward
to tell him, “I will get my belts
back.”
lance.pugmire@latimes.com
Twitter: @latimespugmire
Rams exercise fifth-year option on Donald
Dominant defensive
tackle probably will get
a new contract from the
team before then.
By Gary Klein
In one of the most predictable moves of the offseason, the
Rams exercised their fifth-year
option on defensive tackle
Aaron Donald, the team announced Wednesday.
Donald, 25, has been one of
the NFL’s most dominant players since the Rams selected
him with the 13th pick in the
2014 draft. The 6-foot-1, 285-
pound Donald has amassed 28
sacks en route to three consecutive Pro Bowl selections.
Donald originally signed a
four-year, $10.1-million contract
that included a $5.7-million
signing bonus. The All-American from the University of
Pittsburgh is due to earn about
$3.2 million this season, according to spotrac.com
Under terms of the collective bargaining agreement,
teams have the option of adding a fifth year to first-round
rookie contracts after a player’s third season. The fifth year
is guaranteed for injury. For
players selected with the 11th
through 32nd picks, the fifthyear salary is the average of the
third through 25th highest salaries for a player’s position.
Last year, that figure was
just over $6.1 million for defensive tackles.
But Donald is probably in
line to receive a new contract
well before he gets to his fifth
season.
General
manager
Les
Snead all but said as much in
February during the scouting
combine in Indianapolis.
“Let’s be honest here,”
Snead said. “Aaron’s probably
sitting pretty right now.”
Asked about a possible extension for Donald, Snead
said: “It’s definitely coming.
The guy deserves a raise,
there’s no doubt. Whether he
gets a raise or not, he’s going to
show up, do the things he does.
But that’s coming.”
Donald flourished in his
first three seasons playing in a
4-3 defensive scheme. He said
this week that he was looking
forward to playing in new defensive coordinator Wade
Phillips’ 3-4 scheme.
“I’m comfortable wherever
he puts me,” Donald said.
“Like I always say, ‘rushing the
passer — it doesn’t matter if it’s
outside, inside, nose tackle, I
can do it.’ I did it before, so I’m
just comfortable wherever he
puts me.”
gary.klein@latimes.com
Twitter: @latimesklein
D6
T H U R S DAY, A P R I L 13 , 2 017
L ATI M E S .C O M / SP O RTS
NBA
BOX SCORES
STANDINGS
Standings have been arranged to reflect how the teams were determined for the playoffs. Teams were ranked 1-15 by record. Division
standing no longer had any bearing on the rankings. The top eight
teams in each conference made the playoffs, and the top-seeded
team will play the eighth-seeded team, the seventh team will play the
second, etc. Head-to-head competition was the first of several tiebreakers, followed by conference record. (Western Conference divisions: S-Southwest; P-Pacific; N-Northwest; Eastern Conference divisions: A-Atlantic; C-Central; S-Southeast).
W
67
61
55
51
51
47
43
41
L
15
21
27
31
31
35
39
41
PCT
.817
.744
.671
.622
.622
.573
.524
.500
GB L10
9-1
6
5-5
12
5-5
16
8-2
16
7-3
20
6-4
24
3-7
26
7-3
9. Denver
10. New Orleans
11. Dallas
12. Sacramento
13. Minnesota
14. LAKERS
15. Phoenix
40
34
33
32
31
26
24
42
48
49
50
51
56
58
.488 1
.415 7
.402 8
.390 9
.378 10
.317 15
.293 17
Rk.
P1
S1
S2
P2
N1
N2
S3
N3
5-5
4-6
2-8
5-5
3-7
5-5
2-8
N4
S4
S5
P3
N5
P4
P5
W
53
51
51
49
43
42
42
41
L
29
31
31
33
39
40
40
41
PCT
.646
.622
.622
.598
.524
.512
.512
.500
GB L10
7-3
2
4-6
2
8-2
4
5-5
10
6-4
11
5-5
11
6-4
12
7-3
Rk.
A1
C1
A2
S1
S2
C2
C3
C4
9. Miami
10. Detroit
11. Charlotte
12. New York
13. Orlando
14. Philadelphia
15. Brooklyn
41
37
36
31
29
28
20
41
45
46
51
53
54
62
.500
.451
.439
.378
.354
.341
.244
—
4
5
10
12
13
21
S3
C5
S4
A3
S5
A4
A5
6-4
3-7
4-6
4-6
3-7
1-9
5-5
x-clinched playoff spot y-division z-conference
END REGULAR SEASON
RESULTS
Bulls, Pacers clinch
last two East spots
The Chicago Bulls and Indiana
Pacers wrapped up the final two
playoff spots in the Eastern Conference on the final night of the
regular season Wednesday, leaving
the Miami Heat on the outside
looking in.
Jimmy Butler scored 25 points,
and the Bulls routed the depleted
Brooklyn Nets 112-73. Paul Zipser
added a career-high 21 points off
the bench as Chicago took advantage of a short-handed Brooklyn
lineup to secure its first playoff appearance under coach Fred
Hoiberg.
Paul George finished with 32
points and 11 rebounds in the Pacers’ 104-86 victory over Atlanta,
their fifth victory in a row earning
them the No. 7 seed in the East and
a first-round matchup with Cleveland.
Goran Dragic scored 28 points,
and Hassan Whiteside added 24
points and 18 rebounds as the Heat
defeated the Washington Wizards,
110-102, but fell a game short of the
playoffs after beginning the season
with an 11-30 record.
at Utah 101, San Antonio 97: The
Jazz won their ninth in a row at
home, but they couldn’t get homecourt edge from the Clippers.
at Boston 112, Milwaukee 94: Gerald Green scored 18 points, 10 of
them in a 25-2 fourth-quarter run,
and the Celtics claimed the No. 1
seed in the East.
at Houston 123, Minnesota 118:
James Harden had his 22nd tripledouble with 27 points, 10 rebounds
and 12 assists, making a final push
for most valuable player. Karl-Anthony Towns finished with 28
points and 21 rebounds for the
Timberwolves and became the
youngest player to average 25
points and 10 rebounds in a season.
Denver 111, at Oklahoma City 105:
Russell Westbrook got an MVP endorsement from Oscar Robertson
before playing only the first half
against the Nuggets. He finished
with averages of 31.6 points, 10.7 rebounds and 10.4 assists.
Toronto 98, at Cleveland 83: The
Raptors won for the first time in
four tries against the Cavaliers,
who rested LeBron James, Kyrie
Irving and Kevin Love.
New Orleans 103, at Portland 100:
The Pelicans hung on with stars
from both teams sitting.
Dallas 100, at Memphis 93: The
Mavericks ended a five-game losing streak despite leaving starters
Dirk Nowitzki, Harrison Barnes
and Wesley Matthews at home.
at New York 114, Philadelphia 113:
Carmelo Anthony scored 17 points
after deciding to play in what could
be his final game with the Knicks.
at Orlando 113, Detroit 109: Aaron
Gordon had 32 points and 12 rebounds and the Magic won the finale between non-playoff teams.
at Golden State 109, Lakers 94
at Clippers 115, Sacramento 95
— associated press
Celtics 112, Bucks 94
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Johnson.........20 0-5 0-0 0-1 0 2 0
Leuer ............19 0-5 2-2 1-5 1 0 2
Drummond ....24 4-9 1-3 4-14 2 3 9
Caldwell-Pope.28 6-18 5-6 0-4 0 3 20
Smith............34 8-20 3-4 1-4 10 1 20
Harris............29 3-11 0-4 3-6 2 1 7
Bullock..........29 6-9 0-0 0-2 3 0 17
Marjanovic .....20 6-12 2-2 6-11 0 2 14
Ellenson ........19 5-10 1-5 2-6 1 1 12
Hilliard ..........13 3-7 2-2 0-0 1 2 8
Totals
41-106 16-28 17-53 20 15 109
Shooting: Field goals, 38.7%; free throws, 57.1%
Three-point goals: 11-35 (Bullock 5-6, CaldwellPope 3-10, Ellenson 1-3, Harris 1-4, Smith 1-6, Leuer
0-1, Hilliard 0-2, Johnson 0-3). Team Rebounds: 13.
Team Turnovers: 8 (12 PTS). Blocked Shots: 3 (Marjanovic 3). Turnovers: 8 (Ellenson 3, Caldwell-Pope 2,
Hilliard 2, Smith). Steals: 6 (Bullock 2, CaldwellPope, Ellenson, Harris, Marjanovic). Technical Fouls:
None.
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Carroll...........16 1-5 0-0 0-6 1 0 2
Patterson.......14 1-1 0-0 0-1 0 0 3
Valanciunas ...15 6-10 0-0 3-7 1 1 13
Lowry............17 4-8 4-6 0-2 4 1 13
Powell ...........34 10-13 2-2 1-2 2 2 25
Siakam .........28 4-8 0-0 2-10 0 3 8
Wright ...........28 3-10 2-4 1-1 0 1 9
Poeltl ............22 3-3 1-2 2-5 2 5 7
VanVleet ........20 2-7 1-2 0-4 6 3 5
Caboclo.........17 5-11 0-0 2-4 1 1 11
Nogueira .......12 0-3 0-0 1-3 2 1 0
Joseph ............6 1-5 0-0 0-1 0 0 2
Tucker .............6 0-2 0-0 0-2 1 2 0
Totals
40-86 10-16 12-48 20 20 98
Shooting: Field goals, 46.5%; free throws, 62.5%
Three-point goals: 8-27 (Powell 3-5, Patterson
1-1, Valanciunas 1-1, Caboclo 1-3, Wright 1-3, Lowry
1-5, Siakam 0-1, Tucker 0-1, Nogueira 0-2, VanVleet
0-2, Carroll 0-3). Team Rebounds: 9. Team Turnovers:
8 (11 PTS). Blocked Shots: 2 (Caboclo, Poeltl). Turnovers: 8 (Lowry 4, Carroll, Siakam, Valanciunas,
Wright). Steals: 8 (Patterson 2, Wright 2, Lowry, Powell, Siakam, Valanciunas). Technical Fouls: None.
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Beasley..........34 7-17 1-1 1-5 2 2 15
Henson ..........13 4-6 0-0 1-3 1 1 8
Maker ............26 3-8 3-3 3-6 3 2 9
Brogdon.........23 5-10 0-0 2-5 3 0 11
Vaughn ..........40 6-15 0-1 2-3 4 4 14
Payton ...........32 1-4 1-2 0-7 5 3 3
Teletovic .........27 2-8 2-2 0-3 2 4 7
Hawes ...........17 5-7 3-3 0-5 2 3 15
Monroe ..........16 3-7 4-5 0-6 4 1 10
Terry................6 1-2 0-0 0-0 0 0 2
Totals
37-84 14-17 9-43 26 20 94
Shooting: Field goals, 44.0%; free throws, 82.4%
Three-point goals: 6-23 (Hawes 2-3, Vaughn 2-4, Brogdon
1-2, Teletovic 1-5, Maker 0-2, Monroe 0-2, Payton 0-2,
Beasley 0-3). Team Rebounds: 8. Team Turnovers: 17 (20
PTS). Blocked Shots: 9 (Maker 3, Beasley 2, Payton 2, Brogdon, Vaughn). Turnovers: 17 (Vaughn 5, Maker 3, Monroe 3,
Payton 3, Hawes 2, Beasley). Steals: 6 (Beasley 3, Vaughn 2,
Brogdon). Technical Fouls: None.
ORLANDO
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Team
1. y-Boston
2. y-Cleveland
3. x-Toronto
4. y-Washington
5. x-Atlanta
6. x-Milwaukee
7. x-Indiana
8. x-Chicago
Raptors 98, Cavaliers 83
DETROIT
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Team
1. z-Golden State
2. y-San Antonio
3. x-Houston
4. x-CLIPPERS
5. y-Utah
6. x-Oklahoma City
7. x-Memphis
8. x-Portland
Magic 113, Pistons 109
Wally Skalij Los Angeles Times
BLAKE GRIFFIN, who was close to a triple-double,
is fouled by Sacramento’s Ben McLemore.
Clippers to open
playoffs at home
[Clippers, from D1]
Around 8:15 Wednesday
night, the Jazz defeated the
San Antonio Spurs 101-97 in
Salt Lake City, putting all
the pressure on the Clippers
to earn their victory, the No.
4 seeding in the West and the
home-court advantage that
would come with it.
That
was
incentive
enough for the Clippers.
“You pay attention to
scores just like you play attention to scores all the
time,” said Blake Griffin,
who had 15 points, nine rebounds and eight assists.
“Once you play, once you
start the game, I don’t think
we said, ‘Oh, we’re going to
sit out the rest of the game.’ I
think it was good for us to
come out and play this game
and focus on ourselves and
work on the stuff we needed
to work on.”
But there was one small
thing the Clippers looked
forward to doing.
The Kings were the last
team to defeat the Clippers,
back on March 26, in Los Angeles, a stunning development because the Clippers had just defeated Utah
the day before.
That win over the Jazz on
March 25 had given the Clippers the regular-season series against Utah, 3-1, and
gave them the tiebreaker in
the event both teams finished with identical records.
And, well, both teams
did, at 51-31.
But the Clippers won 11 of
their last 13 games, taking
control of their own destiny
in the process.
They easily moved by the
Kings in the regular-season
finale.
J.J. Redick led the Clippers with 18 points, setting a
franchise record along the
way. He went three for seven
from three-point range, allowing him to establish a
season Clippers record for
three-pointers with 201.
DeAndre Jordan shared
game-high scoring honors
with Redick with 18 points,
making eight of 10 shots. Jordan also had 17 rebounds.
Chris Paul had 17 points
and nine rebounds and Luc
Mbah a Moute 14 points.
Willie Cauley-Stein had 19
points and 14 rebounds, and
Arron Afflalo added 18
points for the Kings.
“Maybe a few weeks ago,
our spirit just wasn’t the
same,” Paul said. “Our defensive intensity wasn’t
there. I think the past couple
of weeks we picked that
up. It’s nice to finish the season strong, but all that was
to build habits for the playoffs.”
broderick.turner@latimes.com
Twitter:@BA_Turner
CLIPPERS 115, KINGS 95
SACRAMENTO
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Labissiere..........32 3-7 1-2 0-3 1 3 7
Cauley-Stein ......35 9-18 1-1 2-14 6 2 19
Afflalo ...............34 8-11 2-2 0-2 6 0 18
Galloway............41 4-11 4-4 1-4 6 2 14
Hield ................37 7-15 0-1 2-6 4 3 16
McLemore .........31 6-13 2-4 1-7 1 5 15
Papagiannis .......27 3-6 0-0 1-1 3 3 6
Totals
40-81 10-14 7-37 27 18 95
Shooting: Field goals, 49.4%; free throws, 71.4%
Three-point goals: 5-11 (Galloway 2-2, Hield 2-4,
McLemore 1-3, Labissiere 0-1, Papagiannis 0-1). Team
Rebounds: 4. Team Turnovers: 10 (16 PTS). Blocked
Shots: 2 (Cauley-Stein, Papagiannis). Turnovers: 10 (Papagiannis 3, Cauley-Stein 2, Galloway 2, Hield 2,
Labissiere). Steals: 2 (Galloway, McLemore). Technical
Fouls: None.
CLIPPERS
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Griffin ...............33 6-14 3-3 2-9 8 2 15
Mbah a Mte .......32 6-8 0-3 0-3 0 1 14
Jordan...............36 8-10 2-4 7-17 2 3 18
Paul..................34 6-12 2-2 1-5 9 1 17
Redick ..............28 6-13 3-3 0-2 4 1 18
Crawford............23 4-7 4-4 0-0 3 0 13
Speights............17 3-8 0-0 1-4 1 4 7
Felton ...............16 2-5 0-0 0-1 2 2 4
Bass...................8 1-2 5-6 0-1 0 1 7
W.Johnson ...........5 1-2 0-0 0-1 0 0 2
Pierce .................1 0-2 0-0 0-0 0 0 0
Totals
43-83 19-25 11-43 29 15 115
Shooting: Field goals, 51.8%; free throws, 76.0%
Three-point goals: 10-28 (Paul 3-5, Redick 3-7,
Mbah a Moute 2-3, Crawford 1-2, Speights 1-5, W.Johnson 0-1, Pierce 0-2, Griffin 0-3). Team Rebounds: 7.
Team Turnovers: 6 (2 PTS). Blocked Shots: 6 (Jordan 4,
Mbah a Moute, Redick). Turnovers: 6 (Speights 3, Mbah
a Moute 2, Paul). Steals: 4 (Paul 2, Felton, Griffin). Technical Fouls: None.
Sacramento
23 24 26 22— 95
CLIPPERS
30 23 34 28— 115
A—19,060. T—2:03. O—Bill Spooner, Karl Lane, Scott
Wall
NBA PLAYOFF SCHEDULE
FIRST ROUND
WESTERN CONFERENCE
1 Golden State vs. 8 Portland
EASTERN CONFERENCE
1 Boston vs. 8 Chicago
Gm 1
Gm 2
Gm 3
Gm 4
Gm 5
Gm 6
Gm 7
Gm 1
Gm 2
Gm 3
Gm 4
Gm 5
Gm 6
Gm 7
Sun. at Golden State, 12:30
Wed. at Golden State, 7:30
April 22 at Portland, 7:30
April 24 at Portland, 7:30
April 26 at Gold. St., TBD*
April 28 at Portland, TBD*
April 30 at Gold. St., TBD*
Sunday at Boston, 3:30
Tuesday at Boston, 5
April 21 at Chicago, 4
April 23 at Chicago, 6:30
April 26 at Boston, TBD*
April 28 at Chicago, TBD*
April 30 at Boston, TBD*
2 San Antonio vs. 7 Memphis
2 Cleveland vs. 7 Indiana
Gm 1
Gm 2
Gm 3
Gm 4
Gm 5
Gm 6
Gm 7
Gm 1
Gm 2
Gm 3
Gm 4
Gm 5
Gm 6
Gm 7
Sat. at San Antonio, 5
Mon. at San Antonio, 6:30
April 20 at Memphis, 6:30
April 22 at Memphis, 5
April 25 at San Ant., TBD*
April 27 at Memphis, TBD*
April 29 at San Ant., TBD*
Sat. at Cleveland, noon
Mon. at Cleveland, 4
April 20 at Indiana, 4
April 23 at Indiana, 10 a.m.
April 25 at Cleveland, TBD*
April 27 at Indiana, TBD*
April 29 at Cleveland, TBD*
3 Houston vs. 6 Oklahoma City
3 Toronto vs. 6 Milwaukee
Gm 1
Gm 2
Gm 3
Gm 4
Gm 5
Gm 6
Gm 7
Gm 1
Gm 2
Gm 3
Gm 4
Gm 5
Gm 6
Gm 7
Sunday at Houston, 6
Wednesday at Houston, 5
April 21 at Okla. City, 6:30
April 23 at Okla. City, 12:30
April 25 at Houston, TBD*
April 27 at Okla. City, TBD*
April 29 at Houston, TBD*
Saturday at Toronto, 2:30
Tuesday at Toronto, 4
April 20 at Milwaukee, 5
April 22 at Milwaukee, noon
April 24 at Toronto, 4*
April 27 at Milw., TBD*
April 29 at Toronto, TBD*
4 CLIPPERS vs. 5 Utah
4 Washington vs. 5 Atlanta
Gm 1
Gm 2
Gm 3
Gm 4
Gm 5
Gm 6
Gm 7
Gm 1
Gm 2
Gm 3
Gm 4
Gm 5
Gm 6
Gm 7
Saturday at Clippers, 7:30
Tuesday at Clippers, 7:30
April 21 at Utah, 7
April 23 at Utah, 6
April 25 at Clippers, TBD*
April 28 at Utah, TBD*
April 30 at Clippers, TBD*
* Games 5-7 if necessary
Sun. at Washington, 10 a.m.
Wed. at Washington, 4
April 22 at Atlanta, 2:30
April 24 at Atlanta, 5
April 26 at Wash., TBD*
April 28 at Atlanta, TBD*
April 30 at Wash., TBD*
All times PDT, p.m. except noted
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Fournier.........27 4-11 2-2 0-3 2 1 12
Gordon..........34 11-20 7-7 2-12 0 2 32
Ross .............22 1-2 0-0 0-3 3 1 2
Vucevic..........27 8-15 0-0 1-11 1 4 18
Payton...........31 10-18 0-0 0-5 13 3 21
Hezonja.........23 3-7 0-0 1-11 1 2 8
Meeks...........18 3-7 3-4 0-0 1 2 12
Augustin ........16 0-1 0-0 0-2 4 1 0
Garino...........11 0-1 0-0 0-0 0 2 0
Grges-Hunt ......9 0-0 4-4 0-0 1 0 4
Zimmerman .....8 1-2 0-0 0-1 0 3 2
Biyombo..........8 1-3 0-0 2-3 1 1 2
Totals
42-87 16-17 6-51 27 22 113
Shooting: Field goals, 48.3%; free throws, 94.1%
Three-point goals: 13-25 (Meeks 3-5, Gordon
3-7, Vucevic 2-2, Hezonja 2-3, Fournier 2-4, Payton
1-1, Augustin 0-1, Garino 0-1, Ross 0-1). Team Rebounds: 6. Team Turnovers: 11 (16 PTS). Blocked
Shots: 6 (Gordon 2, Vucevic 2, Ross, Zimmerman).
Turnovers: 11 (Garino 2, Meeks 2, Augustin, Fournier,
Georges-Hunt, Hezonja, Payton, Ross, Zimmerman).
Steals: 7 (Hezonja 2, Ross 2, Vucevic 2, Gordon).
Technical Fouls: None.
Detroit
17 32 32 28— 109
Orlando
38 21 28 26— 113
A—19,458. T—2:09. O—Steven Anderson, Tony
Brown, James Capers
Knicks 114, 76ers 113
PHILADELPHIA
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Holmes ..........33 7-11 1-1 2-7 0 2 15
Poythress .......31 9-14 0-0 3-6 1 3 18
Anderson .......34 9-10 5-7 0-2 3 3 26
Lwawu-Cbrt.....23 5-10 3-4 0-2 3 5 14
McConnell ......18 2-6 0-2 0-3 8 1 4
Henderson......29 2-4 0-0 0-0 3 0 4
Stauskas........29 3-11 4-4 0-4 3 3 12
Splitter...........21 5-12 1-2 3-5 0 3 12
Long..............17 4-13 0-0 8-9 0 5 8
Totals
46-91 14-20 16-38 21 25 113
Shooting: Field goals, 50.5%; free throws, 70.0%
Three-point goals: 7-23 (Anderson 3-4, Stauskas
2-6, Luwawu-Cabarrot 1-3, Splitter 1-3, Holmes 0-2,
Long 0-2, Poythress 0-3). Team Rebounds: 12. Team
Turnovers: 13 (17 PTS). Blocked Shots: 1 (Anderson).
Turnovers: 13 (Luwawu-Cabarrot 3, Stauskas 3, Anderson 2, McConnell 2, Henderson, Long, Splitter).
Steals: 10 (Anderson 3, Henderson, Holmes, Long,
McConnell, Poythress, Splitter, Stauskas). Technical
Fouls: None.
NEW YORK
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Anthony.........23 7-15 3-3 1-2 1 2 17
N’dour...........24 2-5 1-2 1-1 0 0 5
Hernangmz ....18 1-2 5-6 3-10 3 0 7
Baker............29 3-6 1-2 0-1 4 1 8
Lee...............19 2-5 3-5 0-0 0 1 8
Plumlee.........26 7-10 0-2 4-11 0 5 14
Randle ..........25 5-8 1-1 1-3 0 3 12
Vujacic ..........20 2-9 1-2 1-1 6 2 7
Holiday..........20 6-10 6-7 1-5 1 1 20
Kuzminskas....18 4-6 2-2 3-4 0 1 11
O’Quinn.........13 2-4 0-0 2-4 2 2 5
Totals
41-80 23-32 17-42 17 18 114
Shooting: Field goals, 51.2%; free throws, 71.9%
Three-point goals: 9-22 (Holiday 2-5, Vujacic 2-5,
O’Quinn 1-1, Kuzminskas 1-2, Randle 1-2, Baker 1-3,
Lee 1-3, Anthony 0-1). Team Rebounds: 7. Team Turnovers: 20 (29 PTS). Blocked Shots: 5 (O’Quinn 2,
Holiday, N’dour, Plumlee). Turnovers: 20 (Randle 4,
Plumlee 3, Baker 2, Hernangomez 2, Holiday 2,
Kuzminskas 2, N’dour 2, Vujacic 2, Anthony). Steals:
6 (Holiday 2, Randle 2, Anthony, O’Quinn). Technical
Fouls: None.
Philadelphia
22 37 28 26— 113
New York
25 31 22 36— 114
A—19,812. T—2:11. O—Kane Fitzgerald, Gediminas Petraitis, Brent Barnaky
Mavericks 100, Grizzlies 93
DALLAS
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Brussino ........36 4-8 3-3 2-7 2 2 15
Finney-Smith...30 3-9 0-0 0-5 5 2 7
Noel ..............22 4-8 2-2 1-7 0 0 10
Powell............34 2-11 6-6 1-3 0 4 12
Ferrell ............28 2-9 2-3 0-1 5 3 7
Liggins ...........24 3-5 2-3 3-7 0 3 8
Harris ............19 6-12 3-4 0-2 8 0 15
Uthoff ............19 4-6 3-4 0-2 1 0 11
Hammons ......12 3-4 3-4 0-1 0 2 9
Mejri..............11 2-2 1-2 1-2 0 3 6
Totals
33-74 25-31 8-37 21 19 100
Shooting: Field goals, 44.6%; free throws, 80.6%
Three-point goals: 9-34 (Brussino 4-8, Powell
2-9, Mejri 1-1, Ferrell 1-4, Finney-Smith 1-5, Liggins
0-1, Uthoff 0-1, Harris 0-5). Team Rebounds: 9. Team
Turnovers: 12 (12 PTS). Blocked Shots: 4 (Hammons
2, Noel, Uthoff). Turnovers: 12 (Brussino 3, Ferrell 2,
Noel 2, Powell 2, Finney-Smith, Hammons, Harris).
Steals: 9 (Brussino 2, Liggins 2, Ferrell, FinneySmith, Harris, Noel, Powell). Technical Fouls: None.
MEMPHIS
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Green ............21 1-2 0-0 0-5 1 2 3
Gasol.............24 5-13 2-2 0-8 4 1 13
Allen ...............5 2-4 0-0 2-2 0 0 4
Carter ............22 1-4 2-2 0-2 4 2 5
Conley ...........17 5-9 3-4 0-2 2 0 15
Selden...........31 4-7 0-0 0-1 1 3 10
Harrison .........24 2-6 4-6 1-4 1 4 8
Daniels ..........24 1-9 0-0 1-2 2 3 3
Randolph .......19 7-13 1-1 1-5 2 2 15
Baldwin..........18 3-8 3-3 1-4 0 2 9
Wright............15 1-3 2-2 3-4 1 1 4
Davis...............8 0-1 0-0 2-3 0 3 0
Martin .............6 1-4 2-2 5-6 0 0 4
Totals
33-83 19-22 16-48 18 23 93
Shooting: Field goals, 39.8%; free throws, 86.4%
Three-point goals: 8-25 (Selden 2-3, Conley 2-5,
Gasol 1-2, Green 1-2, Carter 1-4, Daniels 1-4, Baldwin 0-1, Randolph 0-1, Harrison 0-3). Team Rebounds: 6. Team Turnovers: 14 (15 PTS). Blocked
Shots: 4 (Gasol 2, Harrison, Wright). Turnovers: 14
(Baldwin 4, Daniels 3, Gasol 2, Randolph 2, Carter,
Martin, Selden). Steals: 4 (Baldwin 2, Conley, Harrison). Technical Fouls: Defensive three second, 9:10
second
Dallas
22 24 24 30— 100
Memphis
27 28 19 19— 93
A—16,274. T—2:22. O—Mike Callahan, Mitchell
Ervin, Sean Corbin
Pacers 104, Hawks 86
ATLANTA
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Bembry..........31 3-6 0-0 2-7 3 3 7
Humphries......27 2-9 1-4 4-8 0 2 5
Ilyasova..........18 6-10 2-2 0-3 1 2 15
Prince............24 4-8 2-3 0-2 2 4 11
Calderon ........29 5-8 0-0 0-2 5 1 12
Delaney .........26 2-7 5-5 0-2 5 2 10
Sefolosha.......23 0-3 0-0 1-4 0 0 0
Kelly..............21 3-8 0-0 1-3 0 0 8
Muscala.........20 3-7 2-2 0-2 2 1 10
Dunleavy ........17 2-6 3-3 0-4 1 0 8
Totals
30-72 15-19 8-37 19 15 86
Shooting: Field goals, 41.7%; free throws, 78.9%
Three-point goals: 11-29 (Kelly 2-2, Calderon 2-4, Muscala 2-4, Bembry 1-2, Delaney 1-3, Ilyasova 1-3, Prince 1-3,
Dunleavy 1-4, Sefolosha 0-1, Humphries 0-3). Team Rebounds: 8. Team Turnovers: 18 (25 PTS). Blocked Shots: 4
(Humphries 2, Bembry, Muscala). Turnovers: 18 (Calderon
3, Delaney 3, Sefolosha 3, Bembry 2, Ilyasova 2, Muscala
2, Dunleavy, Kelly, Prince). Steals: 5 (Delaney 2, Bembry,
Ilyasova, Prince). Technical Fouls: None.
TORONTO
CLEVELAND
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Frye................7 2-4 0-0 0-1 0 0 5
Thompson......18 5-6 0-2 3-4 0 0 10
Shumpert ......29 3-8 5-6 1-3 3 1 11
Smith............24 1-9 0-0 0-2 4 2 3
Dero.Willms ...24 3-6 1-1 0-3 4 4 10
J.Jones ..........36 3-16 2-3 1-6 2 2 9
Derr.Willms ....27 3-8 2-2 0-4 3 0 10
Jefferson........25 1-4 4-5 0-6 2 1 7
Tavares..........24 3-4 0-1 4-10 1 3 6
D.Jones .........12 3-8 3-4 1-2 1 1 9
Korver ...........10 1-3 0-0 0-2 0 0 3
Totals
28-76 17-24 10-43 20 14 83
Shooting: Field goals, 36.8%; free throws, 70.8%
Three-point goals: 10-37 (Dero.Williams 3-4, Derr.Williams 2-3, Frye 1-2, Korver 1-2, Jefferson 1-3,
Smith 1-6, J.Jones 1-12, D.Jones 0-2, Shumpert 0-3).
Team Rebounds: 7. Team Turnovers: 15 (15 PTS).
Blocked Shots: 7 (Tavares 6, J.Jones). Turnovers: 15
(Dero.Williams 4, Shumpert 4, Tavares 2, D.Jones,
J.Jones, Jefferson, Smith, Thompson). Steals: 5
(Shumpert 2, Jefferson, Smith, Thompson). Technical
Fouls: None.
Toronto
26 27 22 23— 98
Cleveland
21 13 24 25— 83
A—20,562. T—1:59. O—Kevin Scott, Brian Forte,
Ken Mauer
MILWAUKEE
BOSTON
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Crowder .........30 6-12 1-2 0-5 2 1 16
Johnson .........19 6-7 2-3 2-5 1 4 16
Horford ..........21 5-8 2-2 0-6 2 0 12
Bradley ..........30 4-9 0-0 0-2 1 1 8
Thomas..........22 3-11 5-6 2-4 8 0 13
Smart ............27 1-3 2-2 2-5 8 4 5
Olynyk............23 3-9 0-0 0-4 6 5 8
Brown............22 5-10 0-1 2-4 1 0 10
Green ............21 6-15 4-4 1-6 1 2 18
Zeller .............10 2-4 1-2 1-2 0 0 5
Jerebko............4 0-2 0-2 1-2 0 0 0
Young ..............3 0-1 1-2 0-0 0 0 1
Rozier ..............3 0-0 0-0 0-1 1 0 0
Totals
41-91 18-26 11-46 31 17 112
Shooting: Field goals, 45.1%; free throws, 69.2%
Three-point goals: 12-37 (Crowder 3-7, Johnson 2-2,
Olynyk 2-3, Thomas 2-6, Green 2-8, Smart 1-2, Jerebko 0-1,
Young 0-1, Brown 0-2, Horford 0-2, Bradley 0-3). Team Rebounds: 11. Team Turnovers: 8 (10 PTS). Blocked Shots: 3
(Johnson, Smart, Thomas). Turnovers: 8 (Smart 2, Brown,
Crowder, Green, Horford, Olynyk, Thomas). Steals: 12 (Crowder 3, Horford 2, Smart 2, Bradley, Brown, Johnson, Rozier,
Thomas). Technical Fouls: team, 3:16 fourth.
Milwaukee
36 20 22 16— 94
Boston
25 32 23 32— 112
A—18,624. T—2:03. O—Tom Washington, Marat Kogut,
Mark Lindsay
Bulls 112, Nets 73
BROOKLYN
Heat 110, Wizards 102
WASHINGTON
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Oubre ............28 4-12 0-0 1-3 1 1 8
Porter ............14 4-8 3-3 1-6 0 2 11
Gortat............25 8-9 0-1 2-5 1 1 16
Jennings.........27 1-9 0-0 0-3 5 2 2
Satoransky .....30 1-7 0-0 1-4 5 2 2
Mac ..............34 6-11 5-6 0-4 0 1 18
Burke ............30 10-13 2-2 0-0 4 0 27
Bogdanovic.....19 3-8 0-0 1-1 1 1 7
Ochefu...........16 4-6 0-0 2-3 1 1 8
McCullough ......6 0-1 0-0 0-2 0 0 0
Smith ..............6 1-3 1-2 0-3 0 2 3
Totals
42-87 11-14 8-34 18 13 102
Shooting: Field goals, 48.3%; free throws, 78.6%
Three-point goals: 7-26 (Burke 5-7, Bogdanovic
1-2, Mac 1-4, McCullough 0-1, Oubre 0-2, Porter 0-2,
Satoransky 0-3, Jennings 0-5). Team Rebounds: 4.
Team Turnovers: 10 (11 PTS). Blocked Shots: 0. Turnovers: 10 (Burke 2, Mac 2, Satoransky 2, Smith 2,
Gortat, McCullough). Steals: 9 (Oubre 3, Satoransky
2, Burke, Jennings, McCullough, Ochefu). Technical
Fouls: Satoransky , 6:49 first.
MIAMI
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
J.Johnson.......36 5-11 2-2 1-8 8 3 12
Whiteside ......30 10-17 4-6 5-18 0 1 24
Dragic ...........36 11-21 4-4 2-4 5 2 28
McGruder ......20 1-2 0-0 2-2 2 0 2
Richardson ....37 6-12 0-0 0-2 1 2 15
Ellington ........30 3-10 0-0 0-7 1 0 9
T.Johnson.......18 2-4 0-0 1-3 2 1 4
Reed.............14 8-9 0-0 3-6 0 3 16
White............12 0-1 0-0 0-0 0 0 0
Haslem ...........1 0-1 0-0 0-1 0 1 0
Totals
46-88 10-12 14-51 19 13 110
Shooting: Field goals, 52.3%; free throws, 83.3%
Three-point goals: 8-24 (Richardson 3-6, Ellington 3-9, Dragic 2-4, Haslem 0-1, McGruder 0-1,
J.Johnson 0-3). Team Rebounds: 3. Team Turnovers:
17 (18 PTS). Blocked Shots: 4 (Whiteside 2, J.Johnson, Richardson). Turnovers: 17 (Dragic 7, T.Johnson
3, J.Johnson 2, McGruder 2, Reed, Richardson,
Whiteside). Steals: 2 (Dragic, White). Technical
Fouls: None.
Washington
27 23 27 25— 102
Miami
23 33 35 19— 110
A—19,963. T—1:59. O—Pat Fraher, Derrick Collins,
Derrick Stafford
Rockets 123, Timberwolves 118
MINNESOTA
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Towns............36 12-17 1-1 1-21 3 2 28
Wiggins .........30 7-17 5-7 0-2 3 2 21
Dieng............27 3-8 0-0 3-8 2 2 6
Dunn ............32 5-13 0-0 0-2 16 4 10
Rush.............24 3-3 0-0 1-2 2 0 8
Jones ............28 6-9 2-2 1-4 7 1 17
Muhammad ...21 9-18 3-5 1-2 1 1 22
Casspi...........19 2-4 0-0 2-3 2 2 4
Aldrich ..........15 1-2 0-0 1-4 0 1 2
Payne .............5 0-0 0-0 0-1 1 0 0
Totals
48-91 11-15 10-49 37 15 118
Shooting: Field goals, 52.7%; free throws, 73.3%
Three-point goals: 11-23 (Jones 3-4, Towns 3-4, Rush 2-2,
Wiggins 2-5, Muhammad 1-6, Dunn 0-2). Team Rebounds: 3.
Team Turnovers: 15 (23 PTS). Blocked Shots: 3 (Dunn 2,
Jones). Turnovers: 15 (Wiggins 4, Dieng 3, Dunn 3, Rush 2,
Aldrich, Jones, Muhammad). Steals: 7 (Jones 2, Muhammad
2, Dunn, Towns, Wiggins). Technical Fouls: Dunn, 8:54 first.
HOUSTON
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Anderson.......32 7-17 0-0 1-2 4 2 20
Ariza .............37 6-14 1-2 2-5 6 1 15
Capela ..........29 11-12 0-3 5-10 2 1 22
Beverley ........30 3-9 2-3 5-10 7 2 10
Harden..........34 8-13 6-8 1-10 12 3 27
Gordon..........26 4-12 0-0 1-3 2 3 11
L.Williams......24 1-11 4-4 0-5 4 0 7
Hilario ...........16 4-7 1-2 1-2 0 1 9
T.Williams ........2 1-2 0-0 0-0 0 0 2
Wiltjer .............1 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0 0
Brown .............1 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0 0
Taylor ..............1 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 1 0
Totals
45-97 14-22 16-47 37 14 123
Shooting: Field goals, 46.4%; free throws, 63.6%
Three-point goals: 19-56 (Anderson 6-15, Harden 5-10,
Gordon 3-10, Beverley 2-6, Ariza 2-8, L.Williams 1-7). Team
Rebounds: 8. Team Turnovers: 10 (15 PTS). Blocked Shots: 7
(Capela 3, Ariza, Gordon, Harden, Hilario). Turnovers: 10
(Harden 4, Capela 2, L.Williams 2, Beverley, Hilario). Steals:
11 (Harden 4, Beverley 3, Ariza, Capela, Hilario, L.Williams).
Technical Fouls: Beverley, 8:42 first.
Minnesota
32 28 21 37— 118
Houston
33 27 35 28— 123
A—18,055. T—1:56. O—Nick Buchert, Ed Malloy, Derek
Richardson
Pelicans 103, Trail Blazers 100
NEW ORLEANS
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Cunningham...18 4-5 0-0 1-5 0 0 10
Hill ...............30 4-8 4-6 0-3 0 0 13
Ajinca ...........25 5-12 1-1 1-7 0 3 11
Frazier...........27 1-8 3-4 1-2 8 2 6
Holiday..........15 4-11 0-0 1-3 5 0 8
Diallo............29 4-9 4-5 4-16 0 4 12
Crawford........22 6-12 0-0 0-1 4 0 15
Toupane ........20 4-4 0-0 0-1 0 4 8
Cook.............19 4-7 2-2 1-1 1 2 11
Motiejunas.....16 3-11 0-1 1-2 0 2 6
Moore ...........13 1-3 1-2 1-1 2 0 3
Totals
40-90 15-21 11-42 20 17 103
Shooting: Field goals, 44.4%; free throws, 71.4%
Three-point goals: 8-24 (Crawford 3-4, Cunningham 2-3, Cook 1-1, Hill 1-4, Frazier 1-5, Moore 0-1,
Holiday 0-2, Motiejunas 0-4). Team Rebounds: 5.
Team Turnovers: 11 (15 PTS). Blocked Shots: 3 (Cunningham, Diallo, Hill). Turnovers: 11 (Ajinca 3, Cook
2, Crawford 2, Diallo, Frazier, Hill, Holiday). Steals: 13
(Motiejunas 3, Cook 2, Ajinca, Crawford, Cunningham, Diallo, Frazier, Hill, Moore, Toupane). Technical
Fouls: None.
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Hamilton ........29 4-11 0-0
2-9 4 0 8
Dinwiddie .......31 1-5 2-2
1-4 2 4 5
Foye ..............19 1-10 0-0
0-1 2 1 2
Hollis-Jeffersn..30 2-7 2-2
2-8 1 2 6
LeVert ............24 5-13 0-0
0-5 2 1 10
Goodwin.........29 7-11 6-10 4-7 4 3 20
Whitehead......25 2-10 0-0
0-3 2 3 5
McDaniels ......25 5-13 4-4
0-6 0 0 15
Nicholson.......22 1-6 0-0
1-5 0 2 2
Totals
28-86 14-18 10-48 17 16 73
Shooting: Field goals, 32.6%; free throws, 77.8%
Three-point goals: 3-33 (Whitehead 1-4, Dinwiddie 1-5,
McDaniels 1-6, Nicholson 0-1, Goodwin 0-2, Hamilton 0-4,
LeVert 0-5, Foye 0-6). Team Rebounds: 6. Team Turnovers: 18
(33 PTS). Blocked Shots: 3 (Goodwin, Hollis-Jefferson,
McDaniels). Turnovers: 18 (Goodwin 5, Whitehead 3, HollisJefferson 2, LeVert 2, Nicholson 2, Dinwiddie, Foye, Hamilton, McDaniels). Steals: 8 (Foye 2, Nicholson 2, Dinwiddie,
Goodwin, Hamilton, LeVert). Technical Fouls: None.
CHICAGO
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Mirotic ..........22 3-12 1-2 4-9 2 4 9
R.Lopez .........23 2-4 5-6 2-8 1 2 9
Butler............34 8-19 8-9 1-6 4 1 25
Rondo...........19 4-9 0-0 4-6 5 3 10
Wade ............22 3-9 1-2 0-2 4 1 7
Zipser ...........28 8-13 0-0 0-6 2 3 21
Portis ............25 5-11 1-2 2-10 3 1 12
Grant ............22 2-7 0-0 0-6 2 0 5
Felicio ...........18 1-3 0-0 0-4 1 2 2
Lauvergne........5 1-1 0-0 1-4 2 0 2
Carter-Willms ...5 0-0 0-0 0-0 1 0 0
Valentine .........5 2-4 0-0 0-1 1 1 5
Morrow............4 2-3 0-0 0-0 0 0 5
Totals
41-95 16-21 14-62 28 18 112
Shooting: Field goals, 43.2%; free throws, 76.2%
Three-point goals: 14-30 (Zipser 5-7, Rondo 2-2, Mirotic
2-8, Morrow 1-1, Portis 1-2, Butler 1-3, Valentine 1-3, Grant
1-4). Team Rebounds: 5. Team Turnovers: 12 (10 PTS).
Blocked Shots: 4 (Butler 2, Mirotic, R.Lopez). Turnovers: 12
(Wade 6, Butler, Grant, Mirotic, Portis, R.Lopez, Rondo).
Steals: 15 (Butler 4, Mirotic 3, Grant 2, Portis 2, CarterWilliams, Felicio, Rondo, Valentine). Technical Fouls: None.
Brooklyn
13 19 24 17— 73
Chicago
27 23 25 37— 112
A—21,648. T—1:59. O—Eric Lewis, Tyler Ford, Dan Crawford
Nuggets 111, Thunder 105
DENVER
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Hernangmz ....34 4-17 0-0 0-7 1 3 9
Plumlee.........32 6-10 4-6 1-5 0 5 16
Jokic .............40 9-14 11-14 2-16 8 4 29
Beasley .........40 8-17 0-0 1-3 3 2 17
Murray ..........40 10-17 3-3 0-2 6 1 27
Miller ............28 0-3 0-0 1-8 4 0 0
Arthur ...........23 2-7 8-9 0-2 0 2 13
Totals
39-85 26-32 5-43 22 17 111
Shooting: Field goals, 45.9%; free throws, 81.3%
Three-point goals: 7-25 (Murray 4-5, Arthur 1-4, Beasley
1-4, Hernangomez 1-9, Miller 0-3). Team Rebounds: 14. Team
Turnovers: 15 (19 PTS). Blocked Shots: 8 (Jokic 5, Arthur,
Murray, Plumlee). Turnovers: 15 (Jokic 4, Murray 3, Plumlee
3, Beasley 2, Arthur, Hernangomez, Miller). Steals: 6 (Arthur
4, Beasley, Jokic). Technical Fouls: None.
OKLAHOMA CITY
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Gibson...........22 4-11 5-6 3-7 0 2 13
Singler ...........25 3-6 2-4 0-6 1 1 8
Adams...........13 4-7 0-0 2-4 0 2 8
Oladipo..........24 4-9 1-2 0-3 3 0 10
Westbrook ......18 2-10 0-0 0-5 8 2 5
Huestis ..........24 3-7 0-1 2-5 2 0 7
Kanter ...........19 6-8 0-0 2-5 1 2 12
Christon .........18 2-4 0-0 0-0 2 4 5
Abrines ..........18 4-11 0-0 3-6 1 1 11
Grant.............17 5-6 2-2 0-4 1 1 13
Cole ..............14 2-9 1-2 0-2 0 2 5
Sabonis .........14 1-8 0-0 0-2 0 6 2
Collison ...........8 3-5 0-0 2-2 1 1 6
Totals
43-101 11-17 14-51 20 24 105
Shooting: Field goals, 42.6%; free throws, 64.7%
Three-point goals: 8-25 (Abrines 3-6, Grant 1-1, Christon
1-2, Huestis 1-2, Oladipo 1-2, Westbrook 1-5, Collison 0-1,
Cole 0-2, Sabonis 0-2, Singler 0-2). Team Rebounds: 8. Team
Turnovers: 12 (19 PTS). Blocked Shots: 8 (Huestis 3, Gibson
2, Oladipo, Singler, Westbrook). Turnovers: 12 (Oladipo 3,
Westbrook 3, Kanter 2, Abrines, Adams, Gibson, Sabonis).
Steals: 10 (Adams 2, Cole 2, Sabonis 2, Grant, Kanter,
Oladipo, Singler). Technical Fouls: None.
Denver
25 31 30 25— 111
Oklahoma City
26 38 21 20— 105
A—18,203. T—2:17. O—Monty McCutchen, Matt Boland,
Josh Tiven
Jazz 101, Spurs 97
SAN ANTONIO
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Aldridge .........34 9-14 0-0 2-5 0 1 18
Leonard .........30 5-13 3-3 1-5 2 2 14
Dedmon.........14 1-4 0-2 5-8 0 1 2
Green ............19 1-6 0-0 2-4 2 1 2
Parker............24 5-8 4-4 0-1 2 2 14
Gasol.............22 6-13 0-0 3-7 0 3 13
Mills ..............18 3-5 0-0 0-2 5 1 8
Ginobili ..........17 1-3 2-2 0-2 2 1 5
Anderson .......15 3-7 1-1 0-2 2 3 8
Simmons........12 1-4 0-0 1-2 1 0 2
Lee ...............12 1-3 0-0 1-3 0 0 2
Bertans..........12 2-5 1-1 0-1 0 1 7
Murray .............5 1-1 0-0 0-0 0 1 2
Totals
39-86 11-13 15-42 16 17 97
Shooting: Field goals, 45.3%; free throws, 84.6%
Three-point goals: 8-21 (Mills 2-2, Bertans 2-5, Anderson
1-2, Gasol 1-2, Leonard 1-2, Ginobili 1-3, Aldridge 0-1, Parker
0-1, Simmons 0-1, Green 0-2). Team Rebounds: 5. Team Turnovers: 15 (20 PTS). Blocked Shots: 2 (Aldridge, Green). Turnovers: 15 (Dedmon 2, Ginobili 2, Lee 2, Parker 2, Simmons 2,
Aldridge, Bertans, Green, Leonard, Mills). Steals: 12 (Aldridge
3, Green 2, Anderson, Bertans, Gasol, Ginobili, Leonard, Mills,
Parker). Technical Fouls: Simmons, 10:16 second
UTAH
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
George ..........39 12-21 3-3 0-11 3 3 32
Turner ...........32 7-14 4-4 3-8 2 2 18
T.Young..........36 4-8 1-2 4-8 1 0 9
Ellis ..............23 0-4 0-0 0-0 1 2 0
Teague ..........32 6-9 6-8 0-0 7 1 19
Stephenson ...22 2-7 0-0 1-10 6 2 4
Miles ............20 3-8 0-0 0-2 1 1 9
Brooks ..........16 2-3 0-0 0-0 0 1 5
Seraphin .......15 3-8 2-2 0-2 0 2 8
Totals
39-82 16-19 8-41 21 14 104
Shooting: Field goals, 47.6%; free throws, 84.2%
Three-point goals: 10-24 (George 5-10, Miles 3-7,
Brooks 1-2, Teague 1-2, Ellis 0-1, Stephenson 0-1, Turner
0-1). Team Rebounds: 6. Team Turnovers: 10 (3 PTS).
Blocked Shots: 7 (Turner 6, Stephenson). Turnovers: 10
(Stephenson 3, Seraphin 2, T.Young 2, George, Teague,
Turner). Steals: 5 (T.Young 2, Ellis, George, Stephenson).
Technical Fouls: None.
Atlanta
15 28 25 18— 86
Indiana
22 28 34 20— 104
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Layman .........37 4-10 0-0 2-4 3 2 10
Leonard.........35 3-11 0-0 0-9 1 4 7
Vonleh...........38 5-8 2-3 9-19 1 1 12
Napier...........25 10-18 2-3 0-4 2 2 25
Turner ...........22 3-8 0-0 0-4 3 1 6
Connaughton..36 7-13 0-0 0-7 7 5 19
Harkless ........22 5-6 1-5 1-2 2 1 11
Quarterman ...22 4-11 0-2 2-4 3 2 10
Totals
41-85 5-13 14-53 22 18 100
Shooting: Field goals, 48.2%; free throws, 38.5%
Three-point goals: 13-30 (Connaughton 5-10, Napier 3-6, Layman 2-5, Quarterman 2-5, Leonard
1-4). Team Rebounds: 8. Team Turnovers: 23 (28
PTS). Blocked Shots: 2 (Leonard, Quarterman). Turnovers: 23 (Quarterman 7, Layman 4, Napier 4, Connaughton 3, Turner 3, Leonard, Vonleh). Steals: 4
(Harkless, Napier, Quarterman, Vonleh). Technical
Fouls: None.
New Orleans
22 31 25 25— 103
Portland
30 23 32 15— 100
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Hayward.........22 7-9 0-0 1-2 1 1 14
Ingles ............28 3-7 0-0 0-2 3 3 9
Diaw..............14 2-4 0-0 0-1 1 3 4
Gobert ...........28 5-9 3-5 1-9 0 2 13
Hill................21 4-7 4-5 1-2 5 1 13
Mack .............26 4-7 3-4 2-3 3 1 13
Hood .............22 4-13 0-0 1-4 2 2 10
Favors............20 4-8 0-0 0-5 3 0 8
Exum .............16 1-2 0-0 0-1 3 2 2
Johnson .........16 3-6 1-2 0-0 3 0 8
Lyles ...............8 0-2 1-2 0-3 0 1 1
Withey .............5 1-2 1-2 1-2 0 0 3
Burks...............5 1-1 0-0 0-2 0 0 3
Totals
39-77 13-20 7-36 24 16 101
Shooting: Field goals, 50.6%; free throws, 65.0%
Three-point goals: 10-26 (Ingles 3-6, Mack 2-3, Hood 2-8,
Burks 1-1, Hill 1-2, Johnson 1-3, Diaw 0-1, Exum 0-1, Hayward
0-1). Team Rebounds: 11. Team Turnovers: 16 (11 PTS).
Blocked Shots: 5 (Burks, Gobert, Hayward, Mack, Withey).
Turnovers: 16 (Favors 4, Gobert 3, Ingles 3, Hood 2, Exum,
Hayward, Lyles, Mack). Steals: 10 (Favors 3, Diaw, Exum, Hayward, Hill, Hood, Ingles, Mack). Technical Fouls: None.
San Antonio
23 23 26 25— 97
Utah
32 21 29 19— 101
A—17,923. T—2:15. O—Courtney Kirkland, Scott Foster,
Eric Dalen
A—19,521. T—2:17. O—David Guthrie, Marc Davis,
Bennie Adams
A—19,911. T—2:11. O—Rodney Mott, Tre Maddox, Bill Kennedy
INDIANA
PORTLAND
L AT I ME S . CO M / S P O RT S
T H U R S DAY, A P R I L 13 , 2 017
D7
BASKETBALL
Clippers aware of their playoff limitations
Inability to get past second
round weighs on them, but
now they must concentrate
on the Jazz, not the past.
By Broderick Turner
Wally Skalij Los Angeles Times
THE CLIPPERS’ Jamal Crawford, left, driving past Sacra-
mento’s Ben McLemore, knows about postseason pain.
The Clippers have their playoff
burdens to bear, their inability to
get past a certain threshold constantly weighing on them.
But having reached the playoffs
for the sixth consecutive season
brings the Clippers new hope that
they can get past the second round
for the first time in franchise history.
They will take the first step in
that direction when the Clippers
meet the Utah Jazz in the first
round Saturday night.
“You can’t do anything about
the past,” point guard Chris Paul
said. “OKC, Houston and now with
Portland and all the injuries, it is
what it is. It’s there. So now we just
have to play now.”
The Clippers have had their
share of pain from past playoff failures.
In the 2014 second-round playoff
series against Oklahoma City, the
Clippers collapsed in the final 49.2
seconds of Game 3, losing a sevenpoint lead in the most horrific fashion. And it was Paul who had the
meltdown of meltdowns in those final seconds, twice turning the ball
over and committing a foul while
Russell Westbrook shot a threepointer with 6.2 seconds left and
the Clippers holding a tenuous
three-point lead.
In the 2015 second-round playoff
series against Houston, the Clippers blew a 3-1 lead. They seemingly had wrapped up the series
when they took a 19-point lead in
the third quarter of Game 6 at Staples Center. But they caved yet
again, crumbling in that game and
the series.
In the 2016 first-round playoff
series against Portland, injuries
took the Clippers down after they
won the first two games. Paul (broken right hand) and Blake Griffin
(left quadriceps tendon) were injured in Game 4 of that series.
It has been a lot for the Clippers
endure over the past few years.
“At times, it hits you at different
moments,” top reserve Jamal
Crawford said. “At moments you’re
like, ‘This is frustrating to keep going out like this, to keep having
good regular seasons and keep going out like this, whether it be
through injury or self-inflicted.’
But then there’s times I say, ‘Hey,
you know what? We’re not that far
away, obviously. We’re one of the
better teams in the league.’ So I
think different days bring out different emotions.”
broderick.turner@latimes.com
Twitter: @BA_Turner
Versatile
forward
will join
UCLA
LAKERS REPORT
Ingram wants to
become a leader
By Tania Ganguli
OAKLAND — Brandon
Ingram hasn’t spent much
time measuring how he did
his rookie year. That’s because to him the rookie year is
just a small part of the picture. He’s thinking bigger and
looking into the distance.
He knows clearly what he
wants.
“Hopefully leading this
Lakers team,” Ingram said.
“You try to stay in the moment but you always have to
keep that in the back of your
head. How can I lead this
team one day? What do I want
to be? How can I be a leader
on this floor? How can we win
more games in the future?
That’s all going through my
head this offseason coming
up.”
Ingram is entering his first
real offseason as an NBA
player. A year ago he was preparing for the draft after a
year at Duke, knowing he’d
probably be the first or second overall pick. It didn’t
matter to him, he just wanted
to be drafted. The Lakers
drafted the skinny 6-foot-9
forward second overall.
Ingram went from coming
off the bench to starting only
in case of injuries, to becoming a full-time starter on Feb.
6 at Madison Square Garden,
when he scored 14 points with
seven rebounds. All the while
his playing time was among
the most for rookies.
He learned how to use his
length defensively and for effectively attacking the basket. He learned how to be
more aggressive and assert
himself. The 19-year-old
stayed patient, knowing his
body wasn’t yet what it would
be when he fully matured.
He heard what expectations others had for him, and
he wanted more.
Does he believe he showed
what his ceiling can be
through his play this year?
“Honestly, I don’t think I
have,” Ingram said. “I’ve gotten better each and every
game. I’ve gotten more comfortable, more confident, the
repetitions that I’ve done in
practice. I don’t think I have
[shown my ceiling]. I think I
can be a lot better, of course,
as my body transforms, I’ll be
even better adjusting to this
game. I think things will come
a lot easier for me.”
Shutting people up
Because of injuries, Luol
Deng was active during the
Lakers’ 82nd game of the season. But he knew that didn’t
mean he’d play. He hasn’t
played since Feb. 28.
“There’s a bitter taste in
my mouth,” Deng said. “I just
gotta come back with a chip
on my shoulder. This year
started to build a fire inside
me. I don’t tell people a lot of
times because I carry on not
being as competitive, but I’ve
got a lot of people to shut up
next year.”
The Lakers signed Deng
to a four-year deal worth $72
million this summer. That
signing was made by the Lakers’ previous front office of
Mitch
general manager
Kupchak and executive vice
president of basketball operations Jim Buss. The two
men have been replaced by
general
manager
Rob
Pelinka and president of
basketball operations Magic
Johnson.
Deng began the season as
the starting small forward.
Ingram replaced him in the
lineup in February. Deng still
saw minutes for most of the
month. He averaged 7.6
points and 5.2 rebounds per
game for the season. Deng averages 15 points per game for
his career.
“I feel like I worked very
hard coming into this season
and continued to work hard,”
Deng said. “It was just one of
those, just the way the team
was made up and having to
learn so much, I had a hard
time trying to be consistent in
the system.”
Not
playing,
merely
watching, is a new feeling for
Deng. “It’s a feeling that I
know a lot of people wouldn’t
want to be in,” Deng said.
“[Basketball is] something I
really love.”
tania.ganguli@latimes.com
Twitter: @taniaganguli
WARRIORS 109, LAKERS 94
LAKERS
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Ingram ..............29 5-16 1-2 1-5 5 2 11
Nance...............30 6-14 0-0 5-11 2 3 13
Randle ..............24 6-10 1-1 1-8 3 1 13
Clarkson............32 8-16 0-3 0-3 2 2 17
Ennis ................38 5-12 2-2 0-0 5 2 14
Nwaba ..............25 2-4 1-2 0-3 2 2 5
Brewer ..............18 4-8 0-0 0-2 2 4 8
Robinson...........18 2-5 0-0 2-4 1 1 4
Black ................13 2-2 2-2 2-3 0 3 6
World Peace.......10 1-6 1-2 0-1 1 2 3
Totals
41-93 8-14 11-40 23 22 94
Shooting: Field goals, 44.1%; free throws, 57.1%
Three-point goals: 4-17 (Ennis 2-6, Nance 1-3, Clarkson 1-6, World Peace 0-2). Team Rebounds: 8. Team
Turnovers: 18 (0 PTS). Blocked Shots: 3 (Nance 2, Ennis). Turnovers: 18 (Ingram 5, Ennis 4, Robinson 4,
Black, Brewer, Clarkson, Nwaba, Randle). Steals: 13
(Brewer 4, Ingram 3, Nance 3, World Peace 2, Clarkson). Technical Fouls: None.
GOLDEN STATE
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Durant ..............27 11-16 2-4 0-8 5 1 29
McAdoo ............27 3-6 2-2 2-5 1 2 8
Pachulia ............12 2-3 2-2 3-6 2 0 6
Curry ................28 6-17 3-4 0-5 8 1 20
Thompson..........25 4-12 3-4 1-2 2 0 12
McCaw..............28 5-12 2-2 2-4 1 1 13
Clark.................22 2-8 0-0 0-4 3 1 4
Jones................19 2-3 0-2 0-7 0 3 4
McGee ..............17 5-7 1-2 2-5 1 4 11
Livingston ..........17 0-3 0-0 1-4 2 0 0
West .................13 1-3 0-0 3-4 1 4 2
Totals
41-90 15-22 14-54 26 17 109
Shooting: Field goals, 45.6%; free throws, 68.2%
Three-point goals: 12-36 (Durant 5-7, Curry 5-14,
McCaw 1-5, Thompson 1-5, Pachulia 0-1, Clark 0-4).
Team Rebounds: 12. Team Turnovers: 20 (0 PTS).
Blocked Shots: 8 (Jones 2, McAdoo 2, Durant, McCaw,
McGee, Pachulia). Turnovers: 20 (Curry 5, West 5, Durant 3, Clark 2, Jones, Livingston, McAdoo, McCaw, McGee). Steals: 14 (McAdoo 4, Curry 2, Livingston 2,
Thompson 2, Clark, Durant, McGee, West). Technical
Fouls: Defensive three second, 9:29 first
LAKERS
28 22 20 24— 94
Golden State
43 21 29 16— 109
O—James Williams, Mark Ayotte, Ron Garretson
The 6-foot-8 Chris
Smith is a perfect fit
for Bruins’ game,
Steve Alford says.
By Ben Bolch
Walton stays optimistic on future
[Lakers, from D1]
the court, having the individual skill level of the young guys.
That’s where we’re at right
now and that’s going to continue into the summer.”
It was a season that tried
Walton and taught him patience in the face of losing.
“You have no choice,” Walton said. “You either go insane
or you learn to be patient
when you lose a lot.”
The Warriors (67-15) rested
Andre Iguodala and Draymond Green for a playoff run
that begins Sunday.
The Lakers (26-55) played
their regular rotation, except
for D’Angelo Russell, who was
still in Louisville, Ky., mourning the death of his grandmother.
All five Lakers starters
scored in double figures with
Jordan Clarkson leading with
17 points. Warriors forward
Kevin Durant led all scorers
with 29 points.
The Lakers led one time in
the game. With one minute
and 29 seconds elapsed in the
game, Clarkson hit a threepointer to give them a 3-2 lead.
By the end of the first quarter,
the Lakers were down by 15,
with the Warriors having
scored 43 points, including 15
from Kevin Durant and nine
from Stephen Curry.
At halftime, the Warriors
led 64-50, and Durant’s output
had reached 24 points.
So ended a season that
tried Walton.
He did not begin his career
as a head coach with much experience with losing.
Arizona was an NCAA
tournament mainstay, and
made the national championship game while Walton
was there. The Lakers only
had one losing season in Walton’s eight years playing for
the organization. They traded
him to Cleveland in March of
2012, and the Cavaliers struggled, but as soon as Walton
finished playing there he
joined a Warriors staff that
won the NBA championship.
He took this job knowing
he was entering a rebuilding
situation — knowing he would
have to bear some losing before wins returned to the storied franchise he considered
part of himself.
But things didn’t start
that way. The Lakers won 10
out of their first 20 games.
They beat the playoff-bound
Houston Rockets in their season opener. They beat the
Warriors at home, and beat
them badly,117-97. They stayed
competitive with the San Antonio Spurs.
They showed fight and
spirit and rewarded their
head coach’s almost unceasing positivity with visions of
perhaps sneaking their way
into the playoffs.
It was a heady time, and
one that perhaps meant a little too much, players and
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Twitter: @taniaganguli
Marcio Jose Sanchez Associated Press
LARRY NANCE JR. of the Lakers tries to keep Klay Thompson of the Warriors
Greinke VS
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coaches later admitted. December shocked them and
brought Walton to the brink of
a breaking point. He hardly
slept that entire month.
The Lakers went 2-14 in December and endured an eightgame losing streak. The last of
those eight games was in
Brooklyn, against a team that
would finish the season with
the worst record in the NBA.
“That was a dark time for
me,” Walton said.
In the locker room after
the game, Walton challenged
his players not to be soft. He
reached out to Warriors coach
Steve Kerr. He reached out to
his sports psychologist Mike
Gervais. He wrote in a journal.
It was one of two eightgame losing streaks the Lakers had this season. They also
had losing streaks of six, five
and four (multiple times).
That’s experience the firstyear coach might not have
liked, but knew served him.
When Wednesday’s game
ended, Walton lingered on the
court. He stopped for a smiling chat with Kerr. He hugged
other members of the Warriors’ staff, players and security
staff.
Then he walked into the
visiting locker room in an
arena where his vision for the
Lakers’ future can be seen
fully matured.
UCLA added what is
likely the final piece of its celebrated recruiting class
Wednesday when Chris
Smith signed a letter of intent, making him the sixth
newcomer headed to Westwood next season.
The 6-foot-8 forward
from Huntington (W.Va.)
Prep picked the Bruins over
a slew of other suitors who
pursued him once he reclassified into the class of 2017
earlier this year. He said he
could play and defend every
position from point guard to
power forward.
“He’s a versatile player
with great length who can
play on the wing and excel as
a power forward,” UCLA
coach Steve Alford said in a
statement released by the
school. “He has shown that
he can handle, pass and
shoot the ball, which fits perfectly to our style. Chris has
an opportunity to make an
impact from the start, and
we’re looking forward to
having him here this summer.”
Smith attended UCLA’s
comeback victory over Oregon in February and said he
was attracted to the Bruins’
up-tempo style.
“I told coach [Alford]
that I really liked how everybody touched the ball, everybody moved the ball and
they got up and down the
court,” Smith recently told
The Times, “and he said
nothing’s going to change.”
Josh Gershon, a national
recruiting analyst for Scout.com, said that Smith might
be a candidate to redshirt
next season as he continues
to develop, but that he holds
strong potential.
“He’s a kid with a lot of
upside and someone who’s a
smart take given what he
could be down the road,”
Gershon said.
UCLA’s freshman class,
ranked No. 2 nationally by
Scout.com, ESPN.com and
Rivals.com, also includes
point guard Jaylen Hands
and small forward Kris
Wilkes, who were both
McDonald’s All-Americans;
power forwards Cody Riley
and Jalen Hill; and shooting
guard LiAngelo Ball.
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T H U R S DAY, A P R I L 13 , 2 017
L ATI M E S . C O M/ S P O RT S
NHL
Don’t believe what
Ducks, Flames say
KINGS REPORT
Futa receives
promotion to
assistant GM
HELENE ELLIOTT
By Helene Elliott
Rob Blake, appointed general
manager of the Kings on Monday,
made his first major move Wednesday when he promoted Michael
Futa to assistant general manager.
Futa, highly regarded in the
hockey world for his work with the
Kings’ development system, had
been the vice president of hockey operations and director of player personnel under Dean Lombardi, who
was fired Monday along with coach
Darryl Sutter.
“Mike has made tremendous contributions to our hockey club over
the years and he will be one of several
people we are going to internally lean
on,” Blake said in a news release issued by the Kings. “He and his department have enjoyed success here
both with the NHL draft and the Ontario Hockey League in particular,
and we look forward to additional
success in the immediate future.”
Futa just finished his 10th season
with the Kings. He had been their director of amateur scouting but was
elevated to the vice presidency in order to get him to stay after other
teams inquired about his potential
availability for jobs in their organizations.
Futa previously was general manager of the Owen Sound Attack of the
junior-level OHL.
Determining
Futa’s
future
topped the list of Blake’s tasks, a list
that also includes identifying candidates to replace Sutter as coach. It’s
believed that Blake will meet with
John Stevens, who was the Kings’
associate head coach under Sutter,
before expanding the scope of his
search.
Iginla update
Future Hall of Fame forward
Jarome Iginla, who brought a dose
of competitiveness to the Kings’ lineup after they acquired him from Colorado just before the trading deadline, said he had so much fun in his
short stint with the team that he’d
like to continue his career after he
turns 40 on July 1. He said returning
to the Kings would be an option for
him, though he’s not sure if the new
management group headed by Blake
will want him back.
Iginla had six goals and nine
points in 19 games with the Kings,
who acquired him for a conditional
2018 fourth-round draft pick. He
ranks 34th on the all-time NHL scoring list with 1,300 points and is tied
for 15th with 625 goals. His contract
ended after the just-completed season.
Speaking on a conference call
with reporters, Iginla said he was not
100% sure he will play another season
but added that his confidence and
enjoyment increased during his time
with the Kings. He said he had been
50-50 about continuing his career
while he played for the struggling
Colorado Avalanche. “I thought
sometimes maybe it’s time,” he said
of hanging up his skates.
“But going to L.A., it was a really
good experience to be back and have
fun and play with the group there
and have a good opportunity to play
in meaningful.… I know we didn’t
make [the playoffs] but up until our
last four every game felt like a big
deal. It was a big deal with the standings and stuff. It was exciting and I
would like to keep playing.”
helene.elliott@latimes.com
Twitter: @helenenothelen
Rick Scuteri Associated Press
DUCKS DEFENSEMAN Brandon Montour will be making his
postseason debut tonight against the Flames.
Ducks maintain faith
in young defensemen
[Ducks, from D1]
with them.
“Coming up here and doing well
and having a chance to be in the lineup and being a part of this team is
pretty crazy, so I’m excited.”
The Ducks will first lean on Hampus Lindholm and Sami Vatanen, as
well as veteran Kevin Bieksa, to replace Fowler, a top-pair defenseman, power-play quarterback and
thoughtful leader.
But from there, the experience
drops. Montour, Theodore and Josh
Manson have played a combined
seven playoff games. The next postseason games for Montour and
Korbinian Holzer will be their first.
Ducks coach Randy Carlyle
asked his older players to reach out
to the younger ones to prep them for
the high-intensity atmosphere of the
playoffs, where one turnover could
be on an endless loop on highlight
shows.
“You just want to make sure you
manage their mind-set, make sure
their mind-set’s in the right place,”
Bieksa said. “You don’t want them
getting too jittery. Obviously, they
understand the importance of the
Stanley Cup playoffs and how everything’s magnified. You almost want
to do a better job of calming them
down and instilling confidence in
them. Let them go out there and
play their game.”
It’s a do-over for Theodore and
Manson. Theodore, 21, was thrust
into the playoffs last season after
playing in only 19 regular-season
games. His game has grown in fits
and spurts and he’s been usurped
some by Montour, 23.
But he’s progressed. Theodore
practiced on the first power-play
unit this week and Montour on the
second unit.
“It’s kind of an up-and-down season, but to get the call late down the
stretch, that’s something you want,”
Theodore said. “Going into playoffs,
[I’ve been] kind of showing them
NHL PLAYOFF SCHEDULE
FIRST ROUND
WESTERN CONFERENCE
1 Chicago vs. 4 Nashville
EASTERN CONFERENCE
1 Washington vs. 4 Toronto
Gm 1
Gm 2
Gm 3
Gm 4
Gm 5
Gm 6
Gm 7
Gm 1
Gm 2
Gm 3
Gm 4
Gm 5
Gm 6
Gm 7
Best-of-seven series
Today at Chicago, 5
Saturday at Chicago, 5
Monday at Nashville, 6:30
April 20 at Nashville, TBD
April 22 at Chicago, TBD*
April 24 at Nashville, TBD*
April 26 at Chicago, TBD*
Best-of-seven series
Today at Washington, 4
Saturday at Washington, 4
Monday at Toronto, 4
Wednesday at Toronto, 4
April 21 at Wash., TBD*
April 23 at Toronto, TBD*
April 25 at Wash., TBD*
2 Minnesota vs. 3 St. Louis
Blues lead series, 1-0
2 Pittsburgh vs. 3 Columbus
Penguins lead series, 1-0
Gm 1
Gm 2
Gm 3
Gm 4
Gm 5
Gm 6
Gm 7
Gm 1
Gm 2
Gm 3
Gm 4
Gm 5
Gm 6
Gm 7
St. Louis 2, Minn. 1 (OT)
Friday at Minnesota, 5
Sunday at St. Louis, noon
Wed. at St. Louis, 6:30
April 22 at Minn., TBD*
April 24 at St. Louis, TBD*
April 26 at Minn., TBD*
Pittsburgh 3, Columbus 1
Friday at Pittsburgh, 4
Sunday at Columbus, 3
Tuesday at Columbus, 4:30
April 20 at Pitt., TBD*
April 23 at Columbus, TBD*
April 25 at Pitt., TBD*
1 DUCKS vs. 4 Calgary
Best-of-seven series
1 Montreal vs. 4 N.Y. Rangers
Rangers lead series, 1-0
Gm 1
Gm 2
Gm 3
Gm 4
Gm 5
Gm 6
Gm 7
Gm 1
Gm 2
Gm 3
Gm 4
Gm 5
Gm 6
Gm 7
Today at DUCKS, 7:30
Saturday at DUCKS, 7:30
Monday at Calgary, 7
Wednesday at Calgary, 7
April 21 at DUCKS, TBD*
April 23 at Calgary, TBD*
April 25 at DUCKS, TBD*
New York 2, Montreal 0
Friday at Montreal, 4
Sunday at New York, 4
Tuesday at New York, 4
April 20 at Montreal, TBD*
April 22 at New York, TBD*
April 24 at Montreal, TBD*
2 Edmonton vs. 3 San Jose
Sharks lead series, 1-0
2 Ottawa vs. 3 Boston
Bruins lead series, 1-0
Gm 1
Gm 2
Gm 3
Gm 4
Gm 5
Gm 6
Gm 7
Gm 1
Gm 2
Gm 3
Gm 4
Gm 5
Gm 6
Gm 7
San Jose 3, Edmon. 2 (OT)
Friday at Edmonton, 7:30
Sunday at San Jose, 7
Tuesday at San Jose, 7
April 20 at Edmon., TBD*
April 22 at San Jose, TBD*
April 24 at Edmonton, TBD*
* Games 5-7 if necessary
Boston 2, Ottawa 1
Saturday at Ottawa, noon
Monday at Boston, 4
Wednesday at Boston, 4:30
April 21 at Ottawa, TBD*
April 23 at Boston, TBD*
April 25 at Ottawa, TBD*
All times PDT, p.m.
how I can play. They can trust you in
all situations. I feel like the last couple of games leading into the playoffs, I was playing more minutes
than I have previously, and that definitely adds to my confidence.”
Manson formed a partnership
with Lindholm this season as Carlyle has used them against physically big lines, but they were broken
up after Fowler injured his right
knee last week. Manson’s postseason was cut short by a shoulder injury in Game 1 last year, and he’s
ready for a retry.
“I’ve been looking forward to it all
year, hoping if we get back in I’d get a
second chance at it,” he said.
Lindholm welcomes the added
workload and doesn’t feel the pressure has changed. He believes the
Ducks are equipped to withstand
the loss of Fowler. They beat Calgary
last week without Lindholm and
Vatanen.
“Over the years here, both me
and Cam have been injured, in and
out, and other guys too,” Lindholm
said. “You sometimes have to get
some more responsibility. Some
other days someone else might step
it up for you. I don’t think things
change that way. Of course we want
Cam back as soon as possible, but
we’ve got a good group here.”
Carlyle reinforced that opinion.
A defenseman in his playing career,
Carlyle said it takes about 300 games
to get a true read on a defenseman.
Theodore, Montour, Manson and
Holzer aren’t there yet, but they’re
on their way.
“This isn’t climbing Mt. Everest,”
Carlyle said. “This is going out and
playing and doing what you do.
You’re here as a hockey player. Just
go out and play the game that you’re
capable of playing. Yeah, it’s going to
be tougher. But these kids have all
risen to the occasion, or they
wouldn’t be in the NHL.”
sports@latimes.com
Keys to the series
The Calgary Flames
were the most
penalized team in
the NHL this season with an average
of 11:39 in penalty
time per game. The
Ducks were the
second-most penalized team, at 11:23 per game. On
April 4, in the teams’ final regularseason matchup, their extracurricular activities added up to 106 penalty
minutes in the third period after a
knee-on-knee hit by Calgary
defenseman Mark Giordano
took Ducks defenseman Cam
Fowler out of the game and, unfortunately, out of the lineup for two to six
weeks.
Based on that, it’s reasonable to
conclude their first-round series will
not be mistaken for a tea party.
That’s why it was amusing
Wednesday to hear coaches and
players on both teams insist discipline is the touchstone of their
strategy, when it’s likely that decorum will go out the window within
minutes of Thursday’s opening
faceoff at Honda Center.
“I’ve said from the beginning our
discipline has to be upgraded. We’ve
had [a] penalty parade,” Ducks
coach Randy Carlyle said after his
team practiced. “Both coaching
staffs, they’re not going to want the
penalty parades to the box. Special
teams are always a factor in a series.
They can swing momentum positively and negatively in your direction for your hockey club.”
Calgary’s Glen Gulutzan said
essentially the same thing after his
team’s brisk practice.
“Special teams become really
important in the playoffs. The margins are so tight that a penalty here,
a bounce, chances are hard to come
by,” he said. “I think it’s going to be a
physical series, but I really think it’s
going to be a whistle-to-whistle
series, and that’s how we’re approaching it.”
Carlyle insisted the Ducks had
“turned the page” on what happened in their last regular-season
encounter, which included Ducks
defenseman Josh Manson fighting
Giordano to avenge the hit on Fowler. Giordano repeated Wednesday
his hit wasn’t intentional and added,
“Hopefully Cam’s OK,” but he’s
bound to become “Public Enemy
No. 1” in Anaheim.
“Just looking forward to moving
on,” said Giordano, who will appear
in his first playoff game since 2007,
a wait prolonged by the Flames’
years of struggles and his injury
problems.
He also said the Flames’ success
depends on avoiding the penaltyprone behavior they specialized in
during the season. The Flames’
speed could be a big asset, but it
won’t do them any good if they’re
marching to the penalty box and
unable to roll out their lines.
“We don’t want to get into that
game. We want to play hard, play
physical, play in between the whistles,” Giordano said. “We don’t want
anything to slow our game down, so
we’ve got to stay away from it. We’ve
got to be emotional, but there’s a
fine line in the playoffs where you’ve
got to use your emotions in the right
way.”
If there’s a “Public Enemy No. 2”
in Anaheim, it will be Flames rookie
forward Matthew Tkachuk. The son
of former NHL and U.S. national
team forward Keith Tkachuk, the
Keys to the first-round
best-of-seven playoff series
between the Ducks and the Calgary
Flames:
1. DISCIPLINE: The Flames and
Ducks are the two most penalized
teams in the NHL, and the Ducks
can’t get rattled by Calgary or the
officiating. “We’ve had [a] penalty
parade,” Ducks coach Randy
Carlyle said. “Those are things that
really worry us as a coaching staff.
They have to be curtailed.”
2. COLLECTIVE DEFENSE:
Without injured Cam Fowler, the
responsibility must be spread
throughout the defensive unit. That
means more minutes for Hampus
Lindholm and Sami Vatanen,
among others, against Calgary’s
up-tempo offense.
3. GET TO BRIAN ELLIOTT:
Calgary needs its goalie to steal
some games, and the Ducks need
to remove the belief that he can.
The numbers are on the Ducks’
side as Elliott is 1-7-3 with a 3.20
goals-against average lifetime
against the Ducks.
— Curtis Zupke
19-year-old has a knack for irritating
opponents with his abrasive style
and led the Flames with 105 penalty
minutes. He also has a knack for
scoring: He had 13 goals and 35
points in 76 games and might have
had more if not for a two-game
NHL-imposed suspension he
earned for elbowing Kings defenseman Drew Doughty in the face.
The word “restraint” doesn’t
seem to be part of Tkachuk’s vocabulary, but he has no intention of
toning down his game because it’s
the playoffs.
“I know that the way I’ve played
my whole life is the way I’m going to
play this series and moving forward
for the rest of my career,” he said. “I
don’t really worry too much about it,
if it’s going to work or if it’s not going
to work. I just hope that when it
comes down to me playing my game,
playing our team game, our team
playing our team’s game, hopefully
we’ll have success.”
Carlyle was Keith Tkachuk’s
teammate and assistant coach in
Winnipeg, and he joked about asking Keith to tighten the reins on
Matthew. Not that Carlyle expected
success there.
“If he’s as thick-headed as his
dad, I don’t think a phone call will do
any good,” said Carlyle, who noted
Keith Tkachuk was nicknamed
“Meat” for the talented but immature Nuke LaLoosh character in the
movie “Bull Durham.”
How the Ducks handle Tkachuk
probably will influence how the
series plays out.
“You’ve just got to stay mentally
strong. He does a job and he does it
effectively, as you’ve seen throughout the year with him,” said Manson,
the son of legendary NHL tough guy
Dave Manson. “You don’t let him get
under your skin. You focus on winning more than you focus on one
guy. I think this group will be fine.
We’ve dealt with a few of those kind
of players before.”
Dealing with it again might mean
exercising restraint instead of racking up penalty minutes, which would
be a novelty for both teams.
helene.elliott@latimes.com
Twitter: @helenenothelen
PLAYOFF ROUNDUP
Sharks get jump on Oilers in overtime
associated press
Melker Karlsson scored
at 3 minutes 22 seconds of
overtime and the San Jose
Sharks came back to beat
the host Edmonton Oilers
3-2 on Wednesday night in
Game 1 of their first-round
Western Conference playoff
series.
The Oilers took a 2-0
first-period lead only for the
veteran Sharks to come
back and tie the score with
just over 15 minutes to play
in the third period.
Milan Lucic and Oscar
Klefbom scored for Edmonton. Joel Ward and Paul
Martin scored for San Jose.
Oilers center Connor McDavid, the NHL’s leading
scorer in the regular season,
had one assist in his playoff
debut. It was the first playoff
game in the Oilers’ new
downtown arena and the
team’s first postseason
game in almost 11 years.
The Sharks played without star center Joe Thornton, who is day to day with a
left knee injury.
St. Louis 2, at Minnesota
1 (OT): Joel Edmundson
scored at 17:48 of overtime
and Jake Allen made a ca-
reer-high 51 saves for the
Blues in a Western Conference series. Zach Parise tied
the score with 22.7 seconds
left in regulation for the
Wild, whose dominance was
thwarted by a stellar performance from Allen.
N.Y. Rangers 2, at Montreal 0: Tanner Glass scored
in the first period and Henrik Lundqvist made 31 saves
for his 10th career playoff
shutout as the Rangers won
the opener of an Eastern
Conference series. Michael
Grabner added an emptynet goal with 1:10 left to play.
at Pittsburgh 3, Columbus 1: Marc-Andre Fleury
stopped 31 shots in a surprise start in place of injured
Matt Murray and the Penguins opened their Stanley
Cup title defense by beating
the Blue Jackets in an Eastern Conference series. Murray was a late scratch after
suffering a lower-body injury
during warmups.
Boston 2, at Ottawa 1:
Brad Marchand scored off
the rebound of Patrice Bergeron’s shot with 2:33 left to
break a 1-1 tie and the Bruins
won Game 1 in an Eastern
Conference series.
SUMMARIES
Bruins 2, Senators 1
Boston.....................................0
Ottawa.....................................0
0
1
2 — 2
0 — 1
FIRST PERIOD: Scoring—None. Penalties—Stone,
OTT, (tripping), 9:01. Marchand, BOS, (holding), 16:52.
Stone, OTT, (tripping), 17:08. Pageau, OTT, (delay of
game), 19:10.
SECOND PERIOD: 1. Ott., Ryan 1 (Karlsson), 10:28.
Penalties—Borowiecki, OTT, (tripping), 4:52. Pastrnak,
BOS, (tripping), 5:55.
THIRD PERIOD: 2. Bos., Vatrano 1 (Nash, Mcquaid),
4:55. 3. Bos., Marchand 1 (Pastrnak, Bergeron), 17:27.
Penalties—None.
SHOTS ON GOAL: Bos. 14-11—25. Ott. 9-12-6—27.
Power-play conversions—Bos. 0 of 4. Ott. 0 of 2.
GOALIES: Bos., Rask 1-0-0 (27 shots-26 saves). Ott.,
Anderson 0-1-0 (25-23). Att—18,702 (19,153).
T—2:31.
Rangers 2, Canadiens 0
N.Y. Rangers .............................1
Montreal ..................................0
0
0
1 — 2
0 — 0
FIRST PERIOD: 1. N.Y. Rangers, Glass 1, 9:50.
Penalties—Gallagher, MTL, (tripping), 4:15. Mcdonagh,
N.Y.R, (interference), 15:39. Smith, N.Y.R, (high sticking), 17:35.
SECOND PERIOD: Scoring—None. Penalties—Miller,
N.Y.R, (delay of game), 14:37. Galchenyuk, MTL, (delay
of game), 15:35. Gallagher, MTL, (holding), 16:29.
THIRD PERIOD: 2. N.Y. Rangers, Grabner 1 (Fast),
18:50. Penalties—Danault, MTL, (tripping), 14:20.
Markov, MTL, Misconduct (misconduct), 19:35. Zuccarello, N.Y.R, (roughing), 19:35. Gallagher, MTL,
(roughing), 19:35.
SHOTS ON GOAL: N.Y. Rangers 5-13-13—31. Mon.
16-9-6—31. Power-play conversions—N.Y. Rangers 0 of
4. Mon. 0 of 3.
GOALIES: N.Y. Rangers, Lundqvist 1-0-0 (31 shots-31
saves). Mon., Price 0-1-0 (30-29). Att—21,288
(21,273). T—2:30.
Penguins 3, Blue Jackets 1
Columbus ................................0
Pittsburgh ................................0
0
3
1 — 1
0 — 3
FIRST PERIOD: Scoring—None. Penalty—Maatta, PIT,
(hooking), 17:39.
SECOND PERIOD: 1. Pit., Rust 1 (Kessel, Malkin),
1:15. 2. Pit., Kessel 1 (Malkin, Schultz), 3:45 (pp). 3.
Pit., Bonino 1 (Maatta, Hornqvist), 16:25.
Penalties—Calvert, CBJ, (tripping), 2:58. Savard, CBJ,
(roughing), 16:48.
THIRD PERIOD: 4. Clm., Calvert 1 (Anderson), 12:41.
Penalties—Savard, CBJ, (interference), 5:46. Rowney,
PIT, (hooking), 10:04.
SHOTS ON GOAL: Clm. 16-4-12—32. Pit. 3-16-10—
29. Power-play conversions—Clm. 0 of 2. Pit. 1 of 3.
GOALIES: Clm., Bobrovsky 0-1-0 (29 shots-26
saves). Pit., Fleury 1-0-0 (32-31). Att—18,563
(18,387). T—2:37.
Sharks 3, Oilers 2, OT
San Jose...........................0
Edmonton.........................2
1
0
1
0
1 — 3
0 — 2
FIRST PERIOD: 1. Edm., Klefbom 1 (Eberle, Lucic),
6:44. 2. Edm., Lucic 1 (Mcdavid, Letestu), 17:07 (pp).
Penalties—Eberle, EDM, (tripping), 9:18. Kassian,
EDM, (high sticking), 13:24. Boedker, S.J., (interference), 16:29. Caggiula, EDM, (hooking), 19:45.
SECOND PERIOD: 3. S.J., Ward 1 (Vlasic, Donskoi),
1:43 (pp). Penalties—Burns, S.J., (tripping), 5:22.
Karlsson, S.J., (slashing), 7:51. Gryba, EDM, (elbowing),
12:32. Caggiula, EDM, (high sticking), 19:02.
THIRD PERIOD: 4. S.J., Martin 1 (Hertl), 5:22.
Penalties—Maroon, EDM, (holding stick), 4:51. Vlasic,
S.J., (roughing), 4:51. Lucic, EDM, (slashing), 11:13.
OVERTIME: 5. S.J., Karlsson 1 (Pavelski, Vlasic), 3:22.
Penalties—None.
SHOTS ON GOAL: S.J. 10-10-18-6—44. Edm. 10-4-32—19. Power-play conversions—S.J. 1 of 6. Edm. 1 of 3.
GOALIES: S.J., Jones 1-0-0 (19 shots-17 saves).
Edm., Talbot 0-0-1 (44-41). Att—18,347 (18,641).
T—2:39.
Blues 2, Wild 1, OT
St. Louis...........................0
Minnesota.........................0
1
0
0
1
1 — 2
0 — 1
FIRST PERIOD: Scoring—None. Penalties—Reaves,
STL, (interference), 5:39. Parise, MIN, (holding stick),
14:52.
SECOND PERIOD: 1. StL, Sobotka 1 (Steen), 6:21.
Penalties—Folin, MIN, (high sticking), 11:42. Suter,
MIN, (delay of game), 13:37.
THIRD PERIOD: 2. Min., Parise 1 (Granlund, Koivu),
19:37. Penalties—Berglund, STL, (tripping), 0:17.
OVERTIME: 3. StL, Edmundson 1 (Tarasenko,
Schwartz), 17:48. Penalties—Suter, MIN, (slashing),
5:57. Pietrangelo, STL, (slashing), 12:24.
SHOTS ON GOAL: StL 9-6-6-5—26. Min. 10-16-188—52. Power-play conversions—StL 0 of 4. Min. 0 of 3.
GOALIES: StL, Allen 1-0-0 (52 shots-51 saves). Min.,
Dubnyk 0-0-1 (26-24). Att—19,168 (18,064). T—-20:42.
E
CALENDAR
APRIL 22–23
T H U R S D A Y , A P R I L 1 3 , 2 0 1 7 :: L A T I M E S . C O M / C A L E N D A R
MUSIC REVIEW
A cool
start to
Iceland
music
festival
L.A. Phil’s Reykjavík
concerts begin with
music of the Earth and
singing in teacups.
MARK SWED
MUSIC CRITIC
Mel Melcon Los Angeles Times
VIN DIESEL could power “The Fate of the Furious” to an opening weekend that could top $400 million worldwide, analysts say.
Vin Diesel wants
to get even bigger
‘Fast’ anchor,
a global star,
talks Oscar
MOVIE REVIEW
Franchise is
just spinning
its wheels
How and why is it that
Reykjavík suddenly has
such musical prominence?
Perhaps the “why” will become clearer during the Los
Angeles
Philharmonic’s
Reykjavík Festival. Don’t
count on it, however. A dip of
the toes into Iceland’s puzzling culture, much of if
seemingly
inspired
by
weirdly awesome landscapes, is only a dip of the
toes.
There was, though, a
helpful explanation of the
“how” Tuesday night at the
L.A. Phil New Music Group’s
Green Umbrella program.
This concert served as a
kind of preview to the main
event: three orchestral concerts, Thursday through
Saturday, that will include a
host of Icelandic pieces (different each night) along with
the participation of the rock
band Sigur Rós.
On Tuesday, a pre-concert conversation between
Icelandic musicologist Árni
Heimir Ingólfsson and composer and conductor Daníel
Bjarnason brought up a few
of the unique aspects of this
remote Nordic island and
Europe’s least-populated
country. Ingólfsson noted
that a country the size of Indiana had a population of
about 330,000, similar to that
of
Anaheim.
Everyone
knows everyone. A lot of
them have the same, or very
similar, names.
Plus,
Ingólfsson
explained, in a country without
a long musical tradition,
[See L.A. Phil, E5]
By Jen Yamato
Vin Diesel is a tough guy tender
enough to remember the last time
he cried. Sitting in an exquisitely
upholstered chair of a Beverly Hills
hotel suite discussing his “dark”
turn in the latest “Fast & Furious”
film, he describes an emotional episode that transpired two days before, a familiar glint of mischief
flashing in his eyes.
Like many of Diesel’s largerthan-life stories, including those
on-screen as the star of the $3.9 billion “Fast and Furious” franchise,
this one involves family and new
frontiers for the global action hero
— as well as the goofy side he shares
with his 101 million fans on Facebook, or “Vinbook,” where he’s
known to post sentimental tributes
to his late friend and costar Paul
Walker along with videos of himself
belting out Katy Perry and Rihanna
karaoke jams.
And like just about all of the stories he shares as you spend time in
his orbit, the [See Vin Diesel, E4]
JUSTIN CHANG
FILM CRITIC
Matt Kennedy Universal Pictures
MICHELLE RODRIGUEZ returns as Letty in “The Fate of the
Furious,” the eighth installment in the 16-year-old blockbuster
franchise. F. Gary Gray (“Straight Outta Compton”) directs.
Barely five minutes have elapsed
in “The Fate of the Furious” before
Michelle Rodriguez mutters, “It’s
gonna be a bomb.” She is not talking about the movie (duh) but,
rather, about a 1953 Chevy Fleetline
whose hunkajunk engine Vin Diesel
has cleverly souped up — though it
might be more accurate to say he’s
turned it into a dynamite stick on
wheels — using little more than his
wits, his muscles and the tab of a
Coke can. You’ve got to admire that
last part: It’s a plot point, a product
placement and a well-timed Pepsi
dig rolled into one.
It’s no spoiler to report that the
Fleetline goes up in flames after a
hilariously overblown street race (it
would be a spoiler to report that it
doesn’t), shortly before flying
through the air and crashing into
the Gulf of Mexico off the coast of
Havana. “The Fate of the Furious”
is one of
[See Review, E4]
Christopher Berkey
For The Times
She’s a different
kind of country
Singing or playing the
fiddle, Lillie Mae is an
attention-getter. E3
Harsh realities
within Romania
Director Cristian
Mungiu’s film looks at
capitalism’s toll. E2
Comics ................... E6-7
TV grid ...................... E8
HAS A BEGINNING, A MIDDLE…AND A WEEKEND
Don’t miss a thing: Get a Festival Pass today.
With hundreds of authors, celebrities, musicians, artists, chefs and more, it’s never too early to start planning your Festival of Books weekend.
And while admission is free, a Festival Pass allows you to reserve tickets to indoor events before they become available to the general public.
#bookfest | latimes.com/festivalofbooks
E2
T H U R S DAY, A P R I L 13 , 2 017
L ATI M E S . C O M /CA L E N DA R
Secret deals, illicit favors Lear wins Guthrie prize
QUICK TAKES
Television producer, writer and social activist Norman
Lear will receive the Woody Guthrie Prize, which is awarded
annually to an artist who “best exemplifies the spirit and life
work of the Oklahoma singer, songwriter and folk music
provocateur.”
Lear will receive the award at a ceremony May 12 at the
Grammy Museum in Los Angeles, where he also will take
part in a question-answer session with Guthrie scholar and
museum executive director Robert Santelli.
The Woody Guthrie Prize is bestowed by the Woody
Guthrie Center based in Tulsa, Okla., and was created to
recognize artists who are “speaking for the less fortunate
through music, film, literature, dance or other art forms and
serving as a positive force for social change in America.”
Following previous recipients Pete Seeger, Mavis Staples
and Kris Kristofferson, Lear is the first nonmusician to be
chosen for the prize, established in 2014.
“Norman Lear’s work as a television writer and producer
broke barriers and challenged accepted social norms,” the
center’s executive director, Deana McCloud, said in a
statement. “An outspoken supporter of the 1st Amendment,
his work as a political activist follows in Woody’s footsteps
by promoting diversity and equality.”
— Randy Lewis
A Romanian director
tackles moral failings
of post-Communist
Europe in new film.
By Jeffrey Fleishman
Whispers of conspiracy
slink through the ragged
town by the railroad tracks.
In a land of secret deals
and illicit favors, where a
man’s conscience is bartered for and haggled over,
Romanian director Cristian
Mungiu’s new film, “Graduation,” is a tale of a generation that brought down a tyrant only to watch decades
of disillusionment and corruption seep into the lives of
its children.
Nearly 30 years after the
collapse of Communism,
much of Eastern Europe
runs on political chicanery
and pliable morality. Mungiu has placed these burdens on the once sturdy
shoulders of Dr. Romeo Aldea, who, to get his daughter
out of Romania and into a
British university, forsakes
the virtues that underpin his
pride. It is the diminishment
of a man by a thousand
nicks, a soul that rationalizes venial sins for the sake of
his only child.
“Is it possible to stay a
completely moral and ethical person in a country
which is not always moral? I
don’t think so,” said Mungiu,
whose film opens in Los Angeles on Friday. “The conclusion of [Aldea] is that the
only way you can avoid feeling guilt at some point is to
prevent your children from
stepping inside this chain of
complicity. Once you’ve
made that first major compromise, there’s no way out.”
Amid lulling arias and
stray dogs, “Graduation,”
like Mungiu’s “4 Months, 3
Weeks and 2 Days,” a story of
friendship and abortion that
won the Palme d’Or at
Cannes in 2007, is a meditation on a nation that went
from the repressive regime
of Nicolae Ceausescu to the
fleeting
ebullience
and
deeper cruelties of capitalism. The director’s realism examines the grand and
Stephanie Cornfield For The Times
“THE AIM of this kind of cinema is to help the audience learn more and consider
their own lives and compromises,” Cristian Mungiu says of his film “Graduation.”
the miniature, the swift and
the slow, so that life’s intimacies, from a poured drink to a
morning tryst, appear like
meticulous paintings.
Mungiu said his plots —
he rarely edits within a scene
— unfold “like a diary in a
very short period of one
character.” He added: “You
have to include the dead moments that you meet in life.
You have to live through all
of them.”
His acclaimed subtlety
and minimalism are similar
to that of fellow Romanian
director Cristi Puiu, whose
recent “Sieranevada” explored post-communist life
during a wake after a father’s
death in a cramped apartment. The filmmakers’ unflinching, patient styles neither condemn nor condone
but, instead, examine a
fortysomething generation
trying to reconcile the sins of
the past, the compromises
of the present and the uncertainty of the future. Heroes
and villains are not grand or
outsized; they are neighbors
and relatives trying to get by.
Throughout much of
Eastern Europe, especially
in the years immediately after the Berlin Wall fell, questions resounded over poli-
tics, religion, collaborators,
opportunists and recrimination. The aspiration was to
race toward the West. But
the consequences of that
change — and of the past
that forced it — have shaped
the work of many writers,
artists and directors looking
to make sense of a political
system that defined much of
the 20th century. The dilemma of shattered ideals is
evident in “Sieranevada”
when a communist loyalist
tells her granddaughter:
“I’m sorry, but history isn’t
made out of presumptions.”
“Graduation” is opening
in the U.S. after mass anticorruption rallies shook
Bucharest, the Romanian
capital. The country in recent years has made progress in attempting to stem
graft and fraud. But corruption persists, even as the
economy has grown and Romania has joined the European Union. That pervasive
heritage — on large and
petty scales — shapes the
hushed asides and knowing
winks that ripple through
Mun-giu’s film.
They torment Aldea
(Adrian Titieni), a doctor
desperate for his daughter,
Eliza (Maria-Victoria Dragus), to pass her final tests
to qualify for a scholarship to
study in Britain. Distant
from his wife, unable to meet
the emotional needs of his
lover, Aldea is determined
that Eliza will escape her
country’s legacy, even if that
means betraying what’s left
of his honor and integrity. He
seeks favors and colludes
with a police officer and a
politician to fix her exam
scores.
“This is the world we live
in,” Aldea says with the disenchantment of a man
about to forsake another
piece of himself. “Sometimes, we need to fight using
their weapons.” He tells his
daughter: “When you’re in
Kensington Gardens [in
London], with all those
squirrels chasing you, the
world here will seem so far
away, you’ll wonder if it was
RICHARD
LIOR
HANK STEVVE CHARLOTTE MICHAEL DAN
JOSH
GERE ASHKENAZI AZARIA BUSCEEMI GAINSBOURG SHEEN STEVENS CHARLES
“A SPELLBINDER THAT TAKES YOU PLACES YOU
DON’T SEE COMING AND FEATURES RICHARD GERE
IN ONE OF HIS BEST PERFORMANCES EVER.”
-Peter Travers, ROLLING STONE
TELLURIDE MIAMI
FILM FESTIVAL
FILM FESTIVAL
TORONTO
INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL
NORMAN
“FOOTNOTE”
FROM THE WRITER-DIRECTOR OF
F “F
TNOTE”
The Moderate Rise and Tragic Fall of a New York Fixer
WRITTEN AND DIRECTED BY JOSEPH CEDAR
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Fri-Sun: 11:00 • 12:15 • 1:40 • 3:00 • 4:25 • 6:00 • 7:10 • 8:40 • 9:50
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real.”
A parent’s yearning to
have his child succeed is universal. The odds against
that in countries such as Romania, to say nothing of Syria or South Sudan, are steeper, creating equivocations
that over time become so inured that they break the
spirit. Aldea, like many of
Mungiu’s generation, is a
man between two worlds,
tainted by the residue of dysfunction and too old to enjoy
whatever national revitalization the future may bring.
“The film tries to place a
mirror in front of the audience,” Mungiu said. “The
aim of this kind of cinema is
to help the audience learn
more and consider their own
lives and compromises.”
Even the communist bloc
architecture of Aldea’s town
casts uninspiring shadows.
Decency here is as muddied
as the landscape. Dogs
prowl. Rocks crash through
windows. His daughter is attacked and almost raped.
She too is at a precipice. Will
she become an iteration of
her father and scheme to get
ahead? Or will she find another way? The bonds of
their relationship are in flux
as Aldea darts around in a
panic that offers sparse repose, except for the arias
playing on his car radio.
“For people of my generation, it’s too late to expect a
dramatic change during the
span of your life. We’re never
going to become Germany
or Denmark,” Mungiu said.
“The problem is about our
children. What are you going
to tell your children now?
Are you going to encourage
them to stay and fight as you
did, hoping they can change
the things you couldn’t? Or
… will they fly wherever they
want and work wherever
they want?
“What’s the future of this
generation in this country
and in the world? Are they
going to be more moral than
us?”
jeffrey.fleishman
@latimes.com
‘Fear Factor’
returning to TV
MTV is bringing back
“Fear Factor” and has
tapped “Fate of the Furious”
star
Chris
“Ludacris”
Bridges as host and executive producer.
The network has ordered
a 12-episode reboot that will
premiere on May 30, and the
rapper-actor will fill in for
former host Joe Rogan as
part of an overall deal with
MTV.
“MTV is about celebrating youth culture, and with
the reinvented ‘Fear Factor,’
we are putting the power in
our audience’s hands to face
and overcome their biggest
fears,” Chris McCarthy,
president of MTV, VH1 and
Logo, said in a statement.
The original “Fear Factor” first aired on NBC in
2001 for six seasons and was
among the first syndicated
reality competition series. It
featured the wild and the
gruesome and developed a
reputation for being inhumane.
MTV’s iteration will shift
focus to more lighthearted
fare “custom-created for a
generation that is increasingly empowered, while also
more anxious than ever,” according to a statement.
Stunts will be inspired by
“urban legends, popular
scary movies and viral videos from today’s cultural zeitgeist,” MTV said.
Apparently, that means
personal cellphone rescues
and
challenges
called
“Roach-ella” and “Trap
Queen.”
Each one-hour episode
will enlist eight contestants
— paired into four teams of
two — as they face off for a
$50,000 cash prize.
— Nardine Saad
Law will join
cast of ‘Beasts’
Jude Law is ready for wizarding school.
Richard Shotwell Invision/AP
JUDE LAW will play a
young Albus Dumbledore
in the next “Beasts” film.
Warner Bros. has conjured up the actor to play a
young Albus Dumbledore in
the next installment of the
“Fantastic
Beasts
and
Where to Find Them” franchise. In the film, fan favorite
Dumbledore will be shown
before he became headmaster at Hogwarts, as he was
portrayed in the eight
“Harry Potter” films, initially played by Richard Harris before being replaced by
Michael Gambon.
Two-time Oscar nominee
Law is no stranger to Warner
Bros. franchises, having appeared as Dr. Watson in the
studio’s
two
“Sherlock
Holmes” films, as well as the
upcoming “King Arthur:
Legend of the Sword.”
“As fans ourselves, we are
thrilled to have Jude Law
joining
the
‘Fantastic
Beasts’ cast, playing a character so universally adored,”
Warner Bros. President
Toby Emmerich said in a
news release.
“Jude has been a member
of the Warner Bros. family
for years, and we’re excited
to embark on this new adventure with him,” he added.
The film is scheduled to
shoot this summer, with returning stars Eddie Redmayne, Katherine Waterston and Johnny Depp, director David Yates and producer J.K. Rowling.
The
as-yet-untitled
“Beasts” film will arrive in
theaters Nov. 16, 2018.
— Dave Lewis
VIEW THE TRAILER AT WWW.NORMAN-MOVIE.COM
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Now Featuring Reserved Luxury Seating
GIFTED C (11:30, 2:00, 4:30), 7:15, 9:40
THE ZOOKEEPER’S WIFE C (12:30, 4:00)
Bargain Showtimes in ( )
562-804-5615
EAST LOS ANGELES
Rancho Niguel Road
961 Broxton Avenue
13917 Pioneer Blvd.
FIST FIGHT E (12:30, 2:50), 5:15, 7:30, 10:15
THE GREAT WALL C (12:10, 3:00), 5:35, 8:00, 10:35
THE LEGO BATMAN MOVIE B (11:40, 2:20), 5:00,
7:40, 10:20
RINGS C (12:20), 5:20, 7:50, 10:30
A DOG’S PURPOSE B (11:20, 2:10, 4:50), 7:20
XXX: THE RETURN OF XANDER CAGE C
(3:30), 10:25
MONSTER TRUCKS B (2:40 PM)
SLEEPLESS E 10:10 PM
SING 3D B (11:30, 2:00, 4:40), 7:10, 10:00
ROGUE ONE: A STAR WARS STORY C (12:15), 6:50
MOANA B (12:25, 4:00), 7:00, 9:50
Goodrich & Whittier
323-726-8022
$6.00 All Day Tuesday (Not Applicable in 3D)
THE FATE OF THE FURIOUS C 8:00 PM
THE CASE FOR CHRIST B (2:05), 7:25
THE CASE FOR CHRIST (SPANISH SUBTITLES) B
(11:20, 4:45), 10:05
GOING IN STYLE C (12:15), 5:15
GOING IN STYLE (SPANISH SUBTITLES) C (2:45 PM)
SMURFS: THE LOST VILLAGE B (1:20, 3:45), 6:10, 8:35
SMURFS: THE LOST
VILLAGE (SPANISH SUBTITLES) B (12:20, 2:45),
5:10, 7:35, 10:00
THE BOSS BABY B (11:25, 2:00, 4:35), 7:10, 9:45
THE BOSS BABY (SPANISH SUBTITLES) B
(12:25, 3:00), 5:35, 8:10
GHOST IN THE SHELL C (12:40, 3:20), 6:00, 8:45
GHOST IN THE SHELL (SPANISH SUBTITLES) C
(11:40, 2:20), 5:00, 7:40, 10:20
CHIPS E (11:50, 4:55), 10:10
CHIPS (SPANISH SUBTITLES) E (2:25), 7:30
LIFE E (11:30, 4:50), 10:15
LIFE (SPANISH SUBTITLES) E (2:10), 7:35
POWER RANGERS C (3:40), 9:50
POWER RANGERS (SPANISH SUBTITLES) C
(12:40), 6:45
BEAUTY AND THE BEAST B (1:00, 4:00), 7:00, 10:00
BEAUTY AND THE BEAST (SPANISH SUBTITLES) B
(11:55, 2:55), 6:05, 9:05
KONG: SKULL ISLAND C (12:45), 6:30
KONG: SKULL ISLAND (SPANISH SUBTITLES) C
(3:40), 9:30
GRANADA HILLS 9
16830 Devonshire Street
818-363-3679
THE FATE OF THE FURIOUS C 7:00, 8:00, 9:30,
10:30, 11:15
THE CASE FOR CHRIST B (11:00, 1:40), 4:20, 7:15, 9:50
GOING IN STYLE C (11:50, 2:15), 4:50, 7:40, 10:10
SMURFS: THE LOST VILLAGE B (11:30, 2:00), 4:30,
7:00, 9:30
THE BOSS BABY B (11:40, 1:00, 2:10, 3:30), 4:40,
6:00, 7:10, 9:40
GHOST IN THE SHELL C (12:00, 2:40), 5:15
POWER RANGERS C (12:15, 3:50)
BEAUTY AND THE BEAST B (11:15, 12:30, 2:20,
3:40), 5:30, 7:20, 8:45, 10:15
PLANT 16
7876 Van Nuys Blvd.
6355 Bellingham Ave.
818-760-8400
$1.75 Sun. & Tue! (All 2D Movies, All Day!)
FIST FIGHT E 12:30, 2:50, 5:20, 7:40, 10:10
THE GREAT WALL C 12:00, 2:30, 5:10, 7:50
RINGS C 7:10, 9:40
A DOG’S PURPOSE B 11:50, 2:20, 4:50, 7:20
RESIDENT EVIL: THE FINAL CHAPTER E 10:30 PM
SPLIT C 9:50 PM
818-779-0323
“Locally Owned, Proudly Operated”
THE GREAT WALL C 2:20, 5:00, 7:40, 10:15
JOHN WICK: CHAPTER 2 E 12:30, 4:00, 7:30, 10:20
THE LEGO BATMAN MOVIE 3D B 11:30, 2:00,
4:40, 7:10, 9:45
A DOG’S PURPOSE B 11:40, 4:30
HIDDEN FIGURES B 10:05 PM
LION C 1:00, 4:00, 7:30, 10:20
LION C 12:00, 3:00, 7:20
SING B 11:30, 2:00, 4:30
LA LA LAND C 12:20, 3:40, 6:50, 9:55
ROGUE ONE: A STAR WARS STORY C 7:00, 10:00
MOANA B 11:40, 2:10, 4:40
SING B 11:50, 2:10
ROGUE ONE: A STAR WARS STORY C 10:10 PM
CONEJO VALLEY
REBECCA (1940) I 7:30 PM
SAN GABRIEL VALLEY
AGOURA HILLS STADIUM 8
29045 Agoura Road
818-707-9966
$6 Wednesday all day for all 2D films
(upcharge for DBOX & 3D)
Now Offering Reserved Seating
ACADEMY CINEMAS 6
1003 E. Colorado Blvd
626-229-9400
All Seats $2.00 before 6pm • $1.00 All Beef Hot Dogs
THE FATE OF THE FURIOUS - DOLBY ATMOS C
7:00, 10:00
THE SHACK C (12:30, 3:30), 7:10, 10:00
THE FATE OF THE
FURIOUS - DBOX SEATING - DOLBY ATMOS C
7:00, 10:00
THE GREAT WALL C (11:30, 4:50), 7:40, 10:15
THE FATE OF THE FURIOUS C 8:00, 9:00
THE CASE FOR CHRIST B (11:00, 1:30, 4:00), 6:40, 9:15
GIFTED C (11:10, 1:40, 4:10), 7:20, 9:45
THE FATE OF THE FURIOUS C 7:00, 7:30, 8:00,
8:30, 10:00, 10:30
THE FATE OF THE
FURIOUS - DBOX SEATING C 7:00, 10:00
THE CASE FOR CHRIST B (11:10, 1:45), 4:25, 7:05, 9:45
GIFTED C (11:55, 2:25), 4:50, 7:15, 9:55
GOING IN STYLE C (12:35, 2:55), 5:15, 7:35, 10:10
SMURFS: THE LOST VILLAGE B (11:00, 12:00,
1:00, 2:20, 3:45), 4:40, 5:45, 7:10, 8:35, 9:40
SMURFS: THE LOST VILLAGE IN 3D B (1:30), 6:15
THE BOSS BABY B (11:30, 12:30, 1:55, 3:00), 4:20,
5:20, 6:50, 7:40, 9:10, 10:05
GHOST IN THE SHELL C (11:50, 2:30, 3:15), 5:00,
7:30, 10:05
CHIPS E (2:35 PM)
LIFE E (12:05), 5:05
POWER RANGERS C (10:45, 1:40), 4:30, 7:25, 10:15
BEAUTY AND THE BEAST B (11:05, 12:50, 2:00),
4:00, 5:00, 7:00, 8:05, 9:55
KONG: SKULL ISLAND C (11:20, 2:05), 4:45
LOGAN E (12:15, 3:50)
GET OUT E (12:20, 2:50), 5:25, 7:55, 10:30
1440 Eastman Ave. at Telephone Rd. 805-658-6544
All Seats $3.50 • $1.50 Surcharge for 3D Movies
$1.00 All Day Tuesday - 3D Surcharge Applies
GOING IN STYLE C (11:30, 2:10, 4:30), 7:00, 9:20
SMURFS: THE LOST VILLAGE B (11:40, 2:00, 4:40), 6:50
THE BOSS BABY - DOLBY ATMOS B (12:00, 2:30, 4:50)
GHOST IN THE SHELL C (11:20, 1:50, 4:20)
BEAUTY AND THE BEAST B (12:30, 3:40), 6:30, 9:30
GET OUT E (12:10, 2:50), 5:20, 7:50, 10:20
WESTLAKE VILLAGE TWIN
FIST FIGHT E (3:10, 5:30), 7:50, 10:10
A DOG’S PURPOSE B (3:50 PM)
SPLIT C 10:20 PM
HIDDEN FIGURES B (12:00 PM)
LION C (12:40), 7:20
LA LA LAND C (12:20, 3:20), 7:00, 9:50
ROGUE ONE: A STAR WARS STORY C (2:20), 5:20,
8:15
MOANA B (11:40, 2:10)
FOOTHILL CINEMA 10
854 E. Alosta Ave. at Citrus
626-334-6007
All Seats $7.00 before 5pm
THE FATE OF THE FURIOUS C 7:00, 10:00
4711 Lakeview Canyon at Agoura Rd. 818-889-8061
THE CASE FOR CHRIST B (11:30, 2:10, 4:45), 7:20, 10:05
T2 TRAINSPOTTING E (12:45, 4:00)
GIFTED C (11:15, 1:45, 4:20), 7:15, 10:10
THE ZOOKEEPER’S WIFE C (12:30, 3:40), 7:00
GOING IN STYLE C (12:30, 2:50), 5:10, 7:30, 9:50
VENTURA COUNTY
PASEO CAMARILLO 3
390 N. Lantana at Daily
805-383-2267
SMURFS: THE LOST VILLAGE B (12:00, 2:30, 4:50),
7:10, 9:40
THE BOSS BABY B (11:20, 12:40, 2:00, 3:15, 4:30),
6:50, 9:30
GIFTED C (1:20, 4:30), 7:15
GHOST IN THE SHELL C (12:10, 2:40), 5:15, 7:45, 10:15
THE ZOOKEEPER’S WIFE C (12:40, 3:50), 7:00
POWER RANGERS C (11:00, 1:50, 4:40), 7:35, 10:25
FRANTZ C (1:00), 7:30
BEAUTY AND THE BEAST B (1:00, 4:00), 7:00, 10:00
THE LAST WORD E (4:10 PM)
KONG: SKULL ISLAND C (11:10, 2:20), 5:00, 7:50, 10:30
Showtimes for April 13
L AT I ME S . CO M / CA L EN DA R
T H U R S DAY, A P R I L 13 , 2 017
E3
POP & HISS
latimes.com/pophiss
5 NIGHTS
OUT
A curated calendar of live
music not to be missed.
THURSDAY
FRIDAY
SATURDAY
SUNDAY
MONDAY
Sohn
Fonda Theatre
6126 Hollywood Blvd.
$25.50
8 p.m.
Hans Zimmer
Microsoft Theater
777 Chick Hearn Court
$59.50-$250
8 p.m.
Anders Osborne
New Birth Brass Band
Teragram Ballroom
1234 7th St.
$22
8 p.m.
Natalie Merchant
Greek Theatre
2700 N. Vermont Ave.
$30-$366
6:30 p.m.
Tortoise
Teragram Ballroom
1234 7th St.
$25
7 p.m.
POP MUSIC REVIEW
Rapper invites
crowd to step
into his deep,
dark mind
Long Beach native
Vince Staples brings
his intense worldview
to an attentive
audience at the Fonda.
MIKAEL WOOD
POP MUSIC CRITIC
“L.A., y’all having a good
time tonight?” Vince Staples
asked, and it wasn’t clear
what answer he was searching for.
The 23-year-old rapper
from Long Beach had come
to the Fonda Theatre on
Tuesday night for the first of
two concerts to finish a
lengthy North American
tour. In a way, the run of
shows represents a victory
lap — one final celebration of
his acclaimed recent work
before he moves on to a new
studio album expected later
this year.
But Staples doesn’t
really do victory.
On his impressive, unflinching
2015
debut,
“Summertime ’06,” he presents a bleak portrait of his
hometown in the grip of
gang violence and police
brutality; even his songs
about sex — like “Lemme
Know,” with its image of a
broken condom — sound
drained of joy, as though
Staples recognizes that experience as just another
transaction likely to go
wrong.
And
success
hardly
brightened his worldview.
On last year’s “Prima
Donna” EP, he brags about
being paid $80,000 for
playing a single gig — then
tells us he “put it away for a
rainy day / You never know
when you gon’ catch a case.”
That gritty realism isn’t
unique to Staples of course.
But the thoroughness of his
vision is: In his music he never offers the promise of escape, as Snoop Dogg does, or
of transcendence, as Kendrick Lamar does.
Speaking this month to
NPR, Staples said he didn’t
create his breakout song
“Norf Norf ” — about a neighborhood where “folks need
Porsches, hos need abortions” — to “make people
happy.” In his reckoning, the
tune functions the way a
murder scene or a rape
scene functions in a film; it’s
meant to display “an element of trauma.”
So were we having a good
time Tuesday night? The
idea
seemed
perverse
(which didn’t stop hundreds
of party people from pumping their fists to “Norf
Norf ”).
Instead, Staples’ hourlong show felt like an invitation to step into his troubled
mind. Dressed in a dark
hoodie, he performed by
himself in front of three large
video
screens
flashing
scenes of police action in
“Hands Up” and bursting
lava in “Fire,” in which he
predicts he’s going to hell;
other songs were accompanied by pictures of skulls and
sea life in murky water.
The lighting scheme rendered Staples in silhouette,
leading your eye away from
him even as his crisp, intense
rapping held your attention
— a neat inversion of the
typical pop-star encounter.
Staples’ visual approach
wasn’t covering for a lack of
charisma. Even if you
couldn’t see his face, the way
he moved his body around
the stage told you this was a
guy who knows how to be
watched. (Knows too well,
perhaps: In his song “Dopeman” he vividly describes
being set up by the feds.)
But his goal was getting
you to move past that baselevel fascination — to look
with him, not at him.
Toward the end of the
concert, Staples relaxed his
stance ever so slightly to perform a pair of thumping
EDM collaborations —
“Smoke & Retribution,”
with Flume, and “Ghost,”
with Major Lazer and With
You — that finally allowed
the audience the pleasure it
was craving.
But then he came back
for an encore and did the title track from “Summertime
’06,” a haunting, slow-motion ballad in which he confesses his doubts about his
ability to forge a stable life
with a lover.
“This could be forever,
baby,” he sang, standing perfectly still behind a microphone stand. “This could be
forever, maybe.”
mikael.wood@latimes.com
Twitter: @mikaelwood
Brandon Espeleta
VINCE STAPLES’ Tuesday concert at the Fonda
Theatre was the first of a pair of shows in L.A.
Christopher Berkey For The Times
LILLIE MAE, relaxing at Layla’s Bluegrass Inn in Nashville, is putting her own touch on the genre.
HER SPIN
Country maverick Lillie Mae is stepping into
the spotlight with her dazzling singing and fiddling
By Randy Lewis
NASHVILLE — Two middle-aged
women eyed Lillie Mae as she strolled
into Rotier’s family restaurant in
Nashville, her head shaved on both
sides with a shock of short, dark hair
on top, nose ring and tattoos on both
arms easily visible.
“Well, aren’t you just darling?” one
of the observers said on her way to the
cashier to pay her bill.
Singer, songwriter and fiddler Lillie Mae smiled back and demurely
thanked the woman for the remark.
“That’s better than what I get a lot
of times,” she quietly told a visitor as
they sat down for a late lunch on a recent afternoon in one of her favorite
hangs.
Lillie Mae has dazzled increasingly
larger audiences over the last decade
with her elastic and colorful vocal
aplomb, her technical command of
the fiddle and her charismatic presence as a performer.
Those traits take center stage in
her biggest career step yet as Jack
White’s Third Man Records releases
the 26-year old musician’s new solo album, “Forever and Then Some,” on
Friday.
As part of a trip west to tape an appearance that will run on Thursday’s
episode of “Conan,” she’ll also play a
showcase that evening in L.A. at the
Monty Bar.
Lillie Mae doesn’t sound like most
of the carefully groomed nascent
stars roaming the streets of Nashville,
but that’s one of the things that
caught the attention of indie rock
kingpin White — who recruited her for
the all-female band that supported
him on his Lazaretto tour in 2014.
“What isn’t interesting about her?”
asked Stacy Vee, director of festival
talent for Goldenvoice who oversees
the talent bookings for the promoter’s Stagecoach Country Music Festival, which Lillie Mae played in 2008
with her family band, Jypsi.
“Seriously, the way she’s singing,
the way she presents her art, I haven’t
seen it performed like that. …It’s completely fresh, it sounds way older and
way newer, masculine and feminine at
the same time.”
Her album spans the melancholic
Americana breakup song “Over the
Hill and Through the Woods” to the
sprightly country two-step “Honky
Tonks and Taverns.” Elsewhere,
there’s the country-gospel lope of
“Wash Me Clean” and the folk bluegrass sway of the title track. The album closes with the haunting
mantra-like
minor-key
lament
“Dance to the Beat of My Own Drum.”
Lillie Mae’s voice comes out of the
Dolly Parton school of high, quavering emotionalism, bringing a tinge of
sadness even to her more optimistic
lyrics. One of the most distinctive facets of her singing is her ability to
swoop up to some notes, gracefully
fall off others and register hop with
the ease of a great yodeler.
The album features instrumental
and vocal contributions from several
members of her large family: her
brother, Frank, on guitar; older sister
Scarlet on mandolin; and younger sister McKenna Grace on vocals. For
years, they sang together as a family
band that also included another older
sister, Amber Dawn, who now lives in
Canada.
Nearly a decade ago, they were
making the rounds as Jypsi.
Lillie Mae was 16 at the time, and
she quickly rose from her role supporting to the band’s lead vocalist.
Jypsi persisted, mostly at Layla’s
Bluegrass Inn on Broadway along
Nashville’s central tourist thoroughfare. The band would play several
nights a week, four hours a night for
years, honing the siblings’chops
across a broad range of material from
country and bluegrass to rock, soul
and R&B.
That provided Lillie Mae with a
diverse range of tools in her musical
kit. As a songwriter, she leans toward
heartbreak, which she concedes
sometimes limits her opportunities
to flash her expertise on the fiddle.
“I just don’t write those kinds of
[uptempo bluegrass] songs,” she
said. “I wish I did.”
Now the big challenge is stepping
up yet again: from frontwoman in a
family band and featured support
player to a bona fide rock star to focal
point of her own show.
“It’s kind of scary, in a way. But I’m
really ready to just get out there and
play and play and play.”
randy.lewis@latimes.com
Lillie Mae
Where: Monty Bar,
1222 W 7th St.,
Los Angeles
When: 10 p.m. Thursday
Info: (213) 228-6000,
www.montybar.com
E4
T H U R S DAY, A P R I L 13 , 2 017
S
L AT I M E S. C O M /CA L E N DA R
Vin Diesel is franchise’s muscle
[Vin Diesel, from E1]
showman in Diesel can’t
help but draw out the
drama. Even if it means interrupting our chat about
“The Fate of the Furious,”
the eighth chapter of the
Universal Pictures franchise, which is already
hurtling toward a massive
opening weekend that analysts say could top $400 million worldwide.
So, about that time he
cried. Diesel pulls out his
phone and FaceTimes a
friend to help with the story.
Celebrity DJ Steve Aoki
picks up with a grin: “Vin!”
They describe a monster
track they recorded in Las
Vegas with Diesel on vocals,
a project few know about.
And when the megastar
played the track for Paloma
Jimenez, his girlfriend and
mother of his three children,
the next day, it brought
Diesel to tears.
Neither Aoki nor Diesel
will play the song or even reveal what it’s called. But,
raves Aoki from Mexico before the video chat cuts out,
“What Vin brought to the table, I’ve never experienced
before. I think it’s going to
blow
people’s
minds.”
Diesel’s eyes widen, overjoyed.
He turns to me, smiling
ear to ear. “You just got gold.
You. Just. Got. GOLD!” Later, he tells an assistant, “I’m
gonna get a Grammy before
I get an Oscar!”
At 49, Diesel is a unicorn
in Hollywood: A multicultural, multi-franchise star
(“Fast & Furious,” “xXx,”
“Riddick”) with international box office draw who,
thanks to a producing deal
that sprang from an eleventh-hour cameo tacked
onto the back of the third
“Fast” movie, also enjoys
nearly unrivaled creative
control over his own fate in
one of the biggest blockbuster properties in the world.
Born Mark Sinclair in
Northern California, Diesel
grew up a theater kid on
Manhattan’s Lower West
Side, a world away from flying sports cars out of skyscrapers in Dubai and outracing submarines in Iceland. His career began in
typical indie film fashion
when he wrote, directed and
starred in “Multi-Facial,” a
1995 short film about a multiracial actor struggling to
get hired in Hollywood.
Steven Spielberg saw the
film and cast Diesel in “Saving Private Ryan,” his first
bona fide studio acting gig.
Within a few years Diesel
was carrying back-to-back
hits in films that would eventually turn into full-fledged
action franchises: “Pitch
Black,” “The Fast and the
Furious” and “xXx.”
He shrugs remembering
how he walked away from
the first “Fast” sequel leav-
Universal Pictures
VIN DIESEL returns to the role of family-oriented Dom Toretto, who gets blackmailed by a cyberhacker in “The Fate of the Furious.”
ing millions on the table, dissatisfied with the direction
of his character. But “Tokyo
Drift” director Justin Lin
tempted him back for a cameo , and by 2009’s “Fast & Furious,” Diesel was back — as
star and producer.
Since then, Diesel has
helped the franchise evolve
from its bromantic Los Angeles-set street racing origins into a global blockbuster series whose fans keep
coming back for Toretto’s
brooding heroism, those fast
cars, a charismatic cast of
international costars, brain
meltingly bombastic set
pieces and one crucial central concept: “Family.”
Michelle Rodriguez, who
plays Diesel’s longtime love
and right hand wheelwoman
Letty Ortiz, has been a pivotal member of the franchise
since the first “Fast & Furious” movie. She credits
Diesel for championing the
“family” theme that became
emblematic for the series.
“It’s something that
came out of Vin’s mouth
when he didn’t like the line
that was there, and I love
how it caught wildfire,” she
says over the phone from
New York. “At the end of the
day the movie is all about
that. If you’ve got no heart to
keep together all the blowing
up and explosions, nobody
really cares.”
The “Fast & Furious”
movies, to date, have raced
to more than $3.9 billion at
the box office. Diesel is
proud that the franchise and
its post-racial heroes have
proved that diversity can sell
tickets both at home and
overseas, something he argued to studio execs long before #OscarsSoWhite.
But, he asks playfully, but
maybe kind of seriously too,
“When’s it going to be ‘Oscars So Vin?’”
“Fate,” directed by F.
Gary Gray, ostensibly gives
Diesel more of what his inner
artist craves: Intense character drama to mine as Dom
Toretto, happily honeymooning in Havana, is
blackmailed to the dark side
by a cyberhacker named Cipher (Charlize Theron, in
long blond dreadlocks).
She’s got leverage against
him he can’t ignore, directly
involving his — you guessed
it — family.
The pitch: “Dom goes
dark.”
And so Toretto betrays
his family, creating space for
returning stars Dwayne
Johnson
and
Jason
Statham. They’re joined by
veterans Rodriguez, Chris
“Ludacris” Bridges, Tyrese
Gibson, Kurt Russell and
Nathalie Emmanuel plus
newcomers Helen Mirren
and Scott Eastwood, who
muscle into the “Fast” family, setting up the next two
sequels in the process.
“I’ve been able to satisfy a
lot of my director urge by being a producer,” says Diesel,
who’s attached to a “Kojak”
movie he says Universal also
wants him to direct, although he’s loathe to tie
himself up for the length of
time it would take to helm as
well as star.
One of Diesel’s last directing credits is “Los Bandoleros,” a 2009 “Fast & Furious” short leading into the
events of the fourth film. He
says the “Fast” movies give
him space to stretch his filmmaker yearnings, to some
degree. “I’m the one that
dreams up all these stories,
I’m the one that hires the directors — I greenlight the
damn thing!” he exclaims.
“I’m the only on-set producer — for real,” he adds.
(Series
producer
Neal
Moritz, screenwriter Chris
Morgan and Michael Fottrell
are also producers on
“Fate.”) “I go to set on days
I’m not filming to put out
fires, to make sure this person doesn’t argue with this
person. I’m the person they
all come to.”
But not all fires on the
“Fate” set could be contained. He doesn’t deny rumors of an on-set beef with
Johnson, who publicly called
out his male costars toward
the end of the “Fate” shoot in
an expletive-filled Instagram post, reportedly aimed
at Diesel, that’s been viewed
over 4 million times.
“You can’t really feud
with me too much if I’m hiring you, right?” Diesel smiles
enigmatically. He confirms
that following Johnson’s
post, he paid a visit to Johnson’s trailer the next day to
squash the drama. “People
are all human. I think it was a
hard shoot. I’m a good
scapegoat, like if someone
messes up on scheduling.…”
Tyrese Gibson, who’s
been with the franchise
since his character Roman
Pearce revved around Miami with Walker’s Brian
O’Conner in the Diesel-less
“2 Fast 2 Furious,” downplays the beef.
“It is literally impossible
to think that you can have
any
work
environment
where you have to be around
people every day all day, and
it’s never going to come
down to egos and people trying to outdo and upstage
each other,” he says.
Rodriguez
concurs.
“There’s no family that’s never had a disagreement —
and if you have that kind of
family, I give kudos to you,
and I think you’re in some
“Stepford Wives”-type of
weird middle American suburb somewhere that’s full of
A.I., because in real life I’ve
never had a family that
didn’t have some type of conflict,” she said with a laugh.
(Johnson, who stood by his
post in an interview last fall
with The Times, was not
available to comment.)
“I think his post came out
of a frustration, and he’s human,” Diesel says of John-
Betrayal is at
heart of ‘Fate’
[Review, from E1]
the first Hollywood productions to shoot in Cuba since
the easing of diplomatic relations with the U.S. in 2014,
which means that, for all its
fun-in-the-sun frivolity, the
movie inevitably reflects
something about the political and economic moment
that produced it.
It is many other things
too: the eighth chapter in an
improbably successful 16year-old blockbuster franchise, a 2-hour, 15-minute
earplug commercial, an argument for the law of diminishing returns and the latest
proof, as if proof were
needed, that diversity sells.
Years
before
#OscarsSoWhite became the depressing industry catchphrase, the “Fast & Furious”
movies were the glorious
standard-bearer for multiplex multiculturalism, distinguished by an ever-shifting but fully integrated ensemble and a willingness to
tap directors of color like
John Singleton, Justin Lin
and James Wan.
The latest filmmaker to
join their ranks is F. Gary
Gray, who recently directed
“Straight Outta Compton”
but whose most salient credit is his terrifically entertaining 2003 remake of “The Italian Job.” He has imported a
few key elements from that
automotive heist caper,
though arguably too little of
its sleek, snazzy elegance
and too much Charlize
Theron (four words I never
thought I’d write).
With some clever crossbranding and better writing,
we could have ended up with
“The Fast and the Furiosa.”
Instead, we have Cipher
(Theron), a seductive cyberterrorist with blond dreadlocks, a red-bearded henchman (“Game of Thrones” actor Kristofer Hivju), and a
drearily familiar code of winner-takes-all nihilism.
Cipher must have some
mighty powerful leverage
over Diesel’s Dom Toretto,
who suddenly decides to
help her procure a stash of
nuclear weapons that could
trigger World War III, abandoning his new bride, Letty
(Rodriguez), and their affectionate gang of globe-trotting gearheads in the process. That isn’t at all like
Dom, who has made it clear
that his favorite “F” word
isn’t “fast” or “furious” but
“family.” Nor, come to think
of it, is it much like Diesel,
who has seldom shown the
inclination — or, frankly, the
talent — to cloak his character’s motives in mystery.
His costars, for their
part, are largely content to
stay in the safe and familiar
lanes plotted out for them in
Chris Morgan’s script. Those
bickering sidemen Roman
(Tyrese Gibson) and Tej
(Chris “Ludacris” Bridges)
spend most of their time
competing for the affections
of ace hacker Ramsey
(Nathalie Emmanuel, an-
Matt Kennedy Universal Pictures
THE CAST includes Tyrese Gibson, left, Chris “Ludacris” Bridges, Scott East-
wood, Dwayne Johnson, Nathalie Emmanuel and Michelle Rodriguez.
‘The Fate of
the Furious’
Rating: PG-13, for prolonged sequences of
violence and destruction,
suggestive content and
language
Running time: 2 hours, 15
minutes
Playing: In general release
other “Game of Thrones”
regular). Kurt Russell returns as a covert government operative, this time
with Scott Eastwood in tow
as his annoying protégé.
And hey look, there’s Helen
Mirren in a few “hey look,
there’s
Helen
Mirren”
scenes.
Naturally, Dwayne Johnson is back as Diplomatic
Security Service agent Luke
Hobbs, who reluctantly pulls
himself away from coaching
his daughter’s soccer team
to resume the thrill of the
chase. But not even a gratuitously bone-crunching prison-break sequence — pitting
him against his old nemesis
Deckard
Shaw
(Jason
Statham) and allowing for
some choice one-liners of the
“I will beat your ass like a
Cherokee drum” variety —
can quite offset the feeling
that the thrill is gone.
Ever since Dom and
Hobbs went mano a mano in
“Fast Five,” Diesel and Johnson have often seemed
locked in a private competition, as if to see who can imitate the world’s most expressive tree trunk. The two
stars share little screen time
here, and whether there’s
any truth to the rumors of a
behind-the-scenes
“Furious” feud, that disconnect —
the sense that the actors
might as well have been digitally inserted alongside each
other, for all the chemistry
they achieve — spreads
through the ensemble like a
bad case of rust.
You may well argue that
chemistry — and, for that
matter, acting — is beside
the point when it comes to
some of the more outlandishly incoherent set pieces in
“The Fate of the Furious,”
and you wouldn’t be entirely
wrong. At one point Cipher
turns virtually every car in
Manhattan into a self-driving weapon, and then, just
for kicks, sends about 50 of
them careening out of an upper-story parking structure,
in what may be the cinema’s
first scene of vehicular mass
suicide.
And even that feels like a
warmup act — or perhaps a
cool-down act — for the climactic showdown in freezing-cold Russia (actually
played by Iceland), where a
parade of speeding cars and
exploding trucks are upstaged by a wayward submarine. No spluttering Vladimir
Putin reaction shots are in
store, alas, though given the
son. “I protect all of my actors, and I protect him. I take
pride in having him in the
franchise. I take pride in how
his character goes.”
Diesel dismisses persistent media speculation over
their ongoing friction as
“clown stuff.” “I’m proud of
Dwayne. He’s my little
brother, and I’m going to
make sure he shines.”
He dials his signature
Diesel charm back up and
jokes that even Universal
uses him as a scapegoat —
like when he made the announcement last year on social media that “Fast 9” and
“Fast 10” were already dated
for release in April 2019 and
April 2021, respectively.
“I think they do that to
bind me to them. ‘Let’s just
say Vin did it!’” he roars,
mock-recoiling
at
the
thought of doing eight, nine,
or 10 more of these movies.
Hollywood
watchers
wouldn’t be shocked to see
the studio extend the profitable franchise’s planned
“Fast10” conclusion by sending Dom Toretto and his
team of turbocharged misfits into more adventures —
with Diesel, whose real life
and screen life families have
become so intertwined, at
the center of it all.
“When you’re the heart
and soul of a franchise,”
Diesel says, “you get blamed
for the good and the bad.”
jen.yamato@latimes.com
movie’s level of anythinggoes insanity (or is it indifference?), they would hardly
have felt out of place.
All this testifies, I suppose, to the ongoing durability of a franchise that
started out in 2001 as little
more than hot rods and
cheap thrills, before unexpectedly hitting its creative
and commercial stride a few
movies later. But after the
ultra-stylish detour of “The
Fast and the Furious: Tokyo
Drift,” the unfiltered actionmovie exhilaration of “Fast
Five” and the emotional
high of “Furious 7,” with its
moving elegy for the late
Paul Walker, the series
seems to have at last entered
its frustrating, decadent,
spinning-its-wheels phase.
The theme of “The Fate
of the Furious” — not to be
missed among all the hot
babes, fast cars, private
planes and big bangs — is
betrayal, and not just because Dom suddenly goes
rogue. The sudden recasting
of murderous bad guy
Deckard as a good guy may
be a necessary expedient
from a narrative point of
view, and it does yield a
pretty amusing homage to
John Woo’s classic “Hard
Boiled.”
But it is also likely to induce whiplash, and not the
good kind, for those fans
who have invested something of themselves in this
series, enjoying its utter lack
of pretension while taking its
emotional core seriously.
“The Fate of the Furious”
isn’t going to bomb, to be
sure. But it may be the first
movie to see all those hardearned sentiments about
family loyalty blow up in its
face.
justin.chang@latimes.com
Twitter: @JustinCChang
L AT I ME S . CO M / CA L EN DA R
WST
Photographs by
E5
T H UR S DAY, A P R I L 13 , 2 017
Wally Skalij Los Angeles Times
THE L.A. PHIL New Music Group’s Green Umbrella program begins a Reykjavik festival at Disney Hall.
Reykjavik Fest may be
everyone’s cup of tea
[L.A. Phil, from E1]
“people don’t box themselves in.” A symphony orchestra first played in Iceland in 1926. It’s a hip, new
and thus contemporary
scene.
All but one of Tuesday’s
composers was born after
1960, and they get around.
The island may breed and
attract outliers, but Iceland’s young composers
typically travel widely.
History and prehistoric
geology often infuse the music, as they did here.
Modern
electronic
technology is another feature; long, dark, frigid winters give Icelandic composers plenty of time indoors at
the computer.
The most memorable example on the program,
which was conducted by
Bjarnason and featured the
Schola Cantorum Reykjavík
chamber choir along with
the members of the L.A. Phil,
was Thuridur Jónsdóttir’s
“Cylinder 49,” commissioned by the L.A. Phil for
this concert and given its
world premiere.
Her inspiration was an
ancient Edison wax cylinder
of an ancient Icelandic chant
recorded in1920. On the original recording, the scratchy
background noise made by
the cylinder disc practically
drowns out the singing.
But like faded centuryago photographs, the distortions are what make the past
feel real, so it is the noise she
explores. A mixed chamber
ensemble makes mystifying
scraping sounds, including a
percussionist rubbing a
teacup with a spoon, and
some further haunting electronic drones.
Once she gets us to embrace the background as a
place of teeming musical
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SCHOLA CANTORUM chamber choir sings into teacups to elicit a sound from
the past while performing the premiere of Thuridur Jónsdóttir’s “Cylinder 49.”
richness, Jónsdóttir then
has the chorus sing the folk
song
through
teacups
placed over their mouths, recreating the distant effects
of hearing the long-gone
singers on the wax cylinder.
Another new piece, an
L.A. Phil co-commission and
given its U.S. premiere, was
“Quake” by Páll Ragnar
Pálsson.
His bio begins by noting
that he was a guitarist in the
Icelandic rock band Maus,
exemplifying the tightknit
character of the Reykjavík
musicians who easily blend
genres. Dressed in a cream
suit, he looked more like an
absent-minded Oxford don,
and he does, indeed, hold a
doctorate in music.
“Quake,” which is for
cello solo and large chamber
ensemble, is pretty much
what its title suggests, the
music of the ground not
being steady under your
feet. Nothing is settled,
everything is in trills and
tremolos and glissandi. The
solo cello, excellently played
by Saeunn Thorsteinsdóttir,
creaks and moans. But the
most effective musical quaking feels interior, evoking
the quaking you feel in those
first seconds when an earthquake begins, when you first
sense the Earth moving
but have no idea yet how
much.
The other two U.S. premieres were Bjarnason’s “Ek
Ken Die Nag,” for chorus and
five wind instruments, and
Atli Ingólfsson’s “Object of
Terror” for a large chamber
group. Turning to the other
end of the world, Bjarnason
sets an Afrikaans text (the
title translates as “I Know
the Night”) — moody night,
be it near Antarctica or the
Arctic — that connects us
all. “Object of Terror” is
more music of distorted surfaces. Ice breaks like bombs
burst.
Icelandic music is cool,
flowing, not made of dramatic structures, yet it is often a
call to attention.
And that is how the program began, with a snare
drum solo, “Prím,” by Áskell
Másson, who was born in
1953 and was the most senior
of the composers. It starts as
fanfare and then goes structurally awry. Here is yet another example of Icelandic
music’s quest for turning the
sound of the Earth into song,
and L.A. Phil principal percussionist Joseph Pereira
made a snare drum sing.
mark.swed@
latimes.com
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E6
T H U R S DAY , A P R I L 13, 2 017
L AT I M E S .C O M/ CA L E N DA R
COMICS
BRIDGE
SUDOKU
By Frank Stewart
Cy the Cynic is a fatalist
about how his partners perform.
“A fool and my money are
soon partners,” he says.
As today’s West in a money game, Cy led a low heart
— the unbid suit — against
four spades. East took the
ace and returned the 10. Declarer followed with the seven and eight, concealing his
five, and Cy won. He pondered — and shifted to a diamond.
Dummy’s king lost to
East’s ace, but South ruffed
the next diamond, drew
trumps and claimed.
Cy’s partner was miffed
since he could have ruffed a
third heart and cashed his
ace, but the result was his
fault. East knows from Cy’s
KENKEN
Every box will contain a number; numbers depend on the size of the grid. For a 6x6
puzzle, use Nos. 1-6. Do not repeat a number in any row or column. The numbers in each
heavily outlined set of squares must combine to produce the target number found in the
top left corner of the cage using the mathematical operation indicated. A number can be
repeated within a cage as long as it is not in the same row or column.
4/13/17
HOROSCOPE
By Holiday Mathis
Aries (March 21-April 19):
Bodily responses, such as
hunger, sleepiness and fear,
are not commanders of our
being, just suggestions from
the physical realm.
Taurus (April 20-May
20): What we resist persists.
Let go and the opposing
force might come forward,
but it won’t be able to grip
you.
Gemini (May 21-June 21):
If you seek to bypass the
problem, you’ll squander energy in the workaround.
Cancer (June 22-July 22):
You may feel compelled to
give more than is necessary,
though you won’t regret this.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22):
You will solve one of the
great mysteries of life —
“What are other people’s
motives?” or “What’s he
thinking?”
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22):
Accepting what you can’t
change is one way to go
about it, though you might
accidentally
find
that
through acceptance a transformation happens anyway.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23):
Should you spend, save or
give what you have? Whichever choice you make will
end in loss; it’s just a matter
of timing.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 21):
You haven’t forgotten about
the person who knocked
themselves out to help you.
Sagittarius (Nov. 22Dec. 21): Selfies don’t always
represent the prevailing narcissism of the age. Today’s
snaps will be about letting
others know you’re proud to
be together and you want to
share the memory in later
days.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan.
19): You may be worried
about whether your plans
have a solid foundation or
not. Don’t move until you
feel better about this.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb.
18): In fairy tales, uninvited
guests turn up at the party
anyway, resentful at the
slight and wielding spells of
vengeance. In real life, it’s
just hurt feelings.
Pisces (Feb. 19-March
20): Regardless of how cool,
or solid or useful a thing may
be, what’s popular now
could be out tomorrow.
Today’s birthday (April
13): It is not imperative that
you know what you’re doing
before you embark. If it were,
no one would venture, create, explore or love. Trust
yourself to figure it out as
you go. You’ll especially love
where you go in May. June is
for promises exchanged to
be kept all year. July brings
an investment opportunity.
Taurus and Virgo adore you.
Your lucky numbers are: 9, 4,
44, 49 and 15.
Holiday Mathis writes her
column for Creators
Syndicate Inc. The
horoscope should be read
for entertainment. Previous
forecasts are at
latimes.com/horoscope.
lead of the four that South
has at least three hearts, and
East knows that Cy has the
king: Cy wouldn’t lead low
from a worthless holding.
So East can see four defensive tricks. But to save Cy
from going wrong, East must
cash his ace of diamonds at
Trick Two, then return a
heart. Cy will have no option
but to lead a third heart.
Question: You hold: ♠ 7 5
3 ♥ A 10 ♦ A Q 10 3 ♣ 10 8 7 5.
Your partner opens one
spade. The next player passes. What do you say?
Answer: Despite the
weak trump support, this
hand is too strong to raise to
two spades. It has some 10s,
a queen of diamonds backed
by the ace, and a possible
ruffing value in hearts. In
standard methods, bid two
diamonds, planning to support spades next. If a two-di-
amond response would force
to game, respond 1NT, forcing.
South dealer
N-S vulnerable
NORTH
♠Q82
♥QJ3
♦K8652
♣K3
WEST
EAST
♠96
♠753
♥K9642
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♦ A Q 10 3
♣942
♣ 10 8 7 5
SOUTH
♠ A K J 10 4
♥875
♦7
♣AQJ6
SOUTH WEST
NORTH EAST
1♠
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2♦
Pass
3♣
Pass
3♠
Pass
4♠
All Pass
Opening lead — ♥ 4
Tribune Media Services
ASK AMY
Send those thank yous!
Dear Amy: Eleven years
ago, I married the most perfect person for me. We’ve
been blissfully married ever
since.
We had a very small wedding with just our closest
family and friends in attendance, or at least that was the
plan. We ended up with quite
a few tangential people
there.
Despite our invitations
saying “No gifts, please, people still brought gifts, a lot of
gifts. When we got home after the reception, we opened
everything and I immediately made a list so I could
get my thank-you notes written.
I got about a quarter of
them written. Everything
was in a box: the cards, envelopes, stamps, my list,
everything! And then, oops,
it got mistakenly tossed during a cleaning spree.
As a result, no one received a thank-you note
from me. I got in touch with
those I knew best and explained what happened, but
I couldn’t remember everyone or what they gave us and
I have felt awful about this
ever since. We had no saved
copies of the guest list, or
anything.
How can I get over this?
Help me find peace,
please.
Shamed and Grateful
Dear Shamed: You have
two choices here: Continue
to not get over it, or write
your notes!
If your wedding was as
small as you say, I’m sure you
can figure out who attended,
through photos and enlisting the help of your husband,
close friends, family and the
magic of Facebook.
Celebrate your next wedding anniversary by making
this right. You and your
spouse should take full responsibility for your inattention, and then let each guest
know by mail that you are
grateful for their presence in
your life and at your wedding
and that you are still “blissfully married.” Say, “If you
gave us a material gift that
has not been acknowledged,
please let us know so that we
may thank you properly for
it.” Send along a wedding
photo and a current photo.
Dear Amy: A couple of
weeks ago, my manager,
“Shelly,” quit. She was a fantastic boss, and in her free
time she was helping me
study to pass my certification exam. Even after she
quit, she promised she
would still study with me.
But the higher-ups are angry with her and have asked
me to stop studying with her.
I can understand why
they wouldn’t want a current
employee studying with a
former employee, especially
one who (apparently) left on
bad terms. Unfortunately,
my former boss now has my
study guides, which I borrowed from a colleague.
How do I politely ask for
my books back, while still
letting her know that I appreciate what she did for
me? How can I tell her that I
can no longer study with her
and still keep our relationship civil?
Worried
Dear Worried: Remember
that your company can’t dictate who you spend personal
time with. That being said,
some of this material may be
proprietary, and your bosses
presumably have a legitimate business reason to ask
you to limit your contact.
The borrowed study materials are the perfect reason
to reach out and arrange to
catch up and get them back.
Say, “As you know, I borrowed them from Frank, and I
will need to return them.”
Let her know that you’ve
made study arrangements
that work better with your
schedule, thank her sincerely and ask if she would
mind if you kept in touch.
Send questions for Amy
Dickinson to askamy@
amydickinson.com.
FAMILY CIRCUS By Bil Keane
DENNIS THE MENACE By Hank Ketcham
ARGYLE SWEATER By Scott Hilburn
MARMADUKE By Brad & Paul Anderson
BLISS By Harry Bliss
BALLARD STREET By Jerry Van Amerongen
CROSSWORD
Edited By Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
By Matt Skoczen
ACROSS
1 Jackson with a 1972
Lifetime Achievement
Grammy
8 Rx watchdog
11 Wing
14 Most sober
15 Curved part
16 Md. neighbor
17 Infomercial promise
19 Md. neighbor
20 Powerful 1970s
Pittsburgh defensive
line, familiarly
22 Didst whack
25 Spot checker?
26 One-named Deco
master
27 Swiss river
28 Loot
31 Storm warning
33 Pair
35 Algonquin Round Table
member, e.g.
37 Role for Dustin
38 “The Card Players”
artist
42 Amu __: Asian river
44 Verizon subsidiary
45 Undertaking
7 Perfectly, with “to”
48 Anka song with the
phrase “Kiss me mucho” 8 Leak source
9 Diminutive celeb
51 Soccer chant
sexologist
53 Loving murmur
10 Taiwanese PC maker
54 A giraffe has a long one
11 Pirate on the Queen
55 Org. concerned
Anne’s Revenge
with briefs
12 Descendants of a son
57 “Swing Shift” Oscar
of Jacob and Leah
nominee
13 Venezuelan cowboy
59 Sticker on store fruit
18 MDL ÷ X
63 Fill in (for)
21 Studio occupant
64 Hint in a specialty
crossword, and, literally, 22 Glum
23 Kentucky Derby time
what’s found in 17-, 20-,
24 Latin “pray for us”
38- and 59-Across
29 Barn __
68 Actor Wallach
30 Light source
69 Jeans name
32 Banquet dispenser
70 Like some lunch orders
34 Futon kin
71 “Amen!”
36 Sweet __
72 Inject
73 “Seems that way to me” 39 OPEC member
40 Madhouse
41 The lot
DOWN
42 Portrayer of
1 “Mrs. Miniver” studio
“McDreamy” on
2 2001 W.S. champs
“Grey’s Anatomy”
3 Guffaw sound
43 Typically
4 Stop at sea
46 Boozer
5 Hopkins role
6 Scotland’s Arran, e.g.
47 Colorful carp
© 2017 Tribune Content Agency
49 Revered
50 Was loyal to
52 Picks
56 High point of a
European trip?
58 Foil giant
60 Golden St.
campus
61 Yours, to Yves
62 Tie up
65 Not of the cloth
66 __ Nimitz
67 DDE’s command
ANSWER TO
PREVIOUS PUZZLE
4/13/17
L AT I ME S . CO M / CA L EN DA R
T H U R S DAY , A P R I L 13, 2 017
COMICS
DOONESBURY By Garry Trudeau
Doonesbury is on vacation. This is a reprint.
DILBERT By Scott Adams
LA CUCARACHA By Lalo Alcaraz
BABY BLUES By Jerry Scott & Rick Kirkman
CANDORVILLE By Darrin Bell
CRANKSHAFT By Tom Batiuk & Chuck Ayers
HALF FULL By Maria Scrivan
PEARLS BEFORE SWINE By Stephan Pastis
NON SEQUITUR By Wiley
LIO By Mark Tatulli
JUMP START By Robb Armstrong
9 CHICKWEED LANE By Brooke McEldowney
BLONDIE By Dean Young & John Marshall
GET FUZZY By Darby Conley
ZITS By Jerry Scott & Jim Borgman
BIZARRO By Dan Piraro
TUNDRA By Chad Carpenter
DRABBLE By Kevin Fagan
PRICKLY CITY By Scott Stantis
MUTTS By Patrick McDonnell
FRAZZ By Jef Mallett
PEANUTS By Charles M. Schulz
E7
E8
T H U R S DAY , A P RI L 13 , 2 017
L ATI M E S . C O M /CA L E N DA R
T V HIGHL IGHTS
Thursday Prime-Time TV
SERIES
TALK SHOWS
The Big Bang Theory Howard and Bernadette (Simon Helberg, Melissa
Rauch) struggle with leaving their baby in day care,
while Bert (Brian Posehn)
introduces his new girlfriend (April Bowlby). 8
p.m. CBS
Trial & Error Larry’s (John
Lithgow)
daughter
(Krysta Rodriguez) becomes a suspect in the
murder one month into
the trial and Josh (Nicholas D’Agosto) wants to put
her on the witness stand,
but Larry won’t allow it. 8
p.m. NBC
Supernatural Sam and
Dean (Jared Padalecki,
Jensen Ackles) investigate the case of a missing
person, and a witness says
the victim was attacked
by a man with the head of
a goat. 8 p.m. KTLA
Grey’s Anatomy Meredith
and Nathan (Ellen Pompeo, Martin Henderson)
wind up as seatmates on a
long flight. 8 p.m. ABC
MasterChef: Junior Edition
Chef Aarón Sánchez takes
a turn as a guest judge in
this new episode. 8 p.m.
Fox
The Great Indoors Jack
(Joel McHale) insults the
office’s technical wizard
(guest star Rory Scovel),
and soon pays a price. 8:30
p.m. CBS
Mom Inspired by her new
boyfriend (guest star Bret
Harrison) Christy (Anna
Faris) becomes obsessed
with living healthier, driving everyone else around
her crazy. 9 p.m. CBS
Riverdale Molly Ringwald
(“Pretty in Pink”), joins
the cast as Archie’s (KJ
Apa) mom, whom his dad
(Luke Perry) is ready to
divorce. 9 p.m. KTLA
Scandal
Olivia
(Kerry
Washington)
imagines
what might have happened if the presidential
election (the election
within the show) hadn’t
been rigged. Bellamy
Young, Jeff Perry, Tony
Goldwyn, Darby Stanchfield and Joshua Malina
also star. 9 p.m. ABC
The Amazing Race The
teams build and deliver
desks to a local school in
Zanzibar, Tanzania, in
this new episode. 10 p.m.
CBS
CBS This Morning Activist
Malala Yousafzai; Dan
Schulman, PayPal; Tim
Stevens; bull rider Jess
Lockwood. (N) 7 a.m.
KCBS
Today Danny DeVito; Tom
Colicchio; David Frei;
Enzo Febbraro. (N) 7 a.m.
KNBC
Good Morning America Adam Sandler; the cast of
“Scandal” celebrates 100
episodes; Geoff Stultz.
(N) 7 a.m. KABC
Good Day L.A. Ross Mathews; Bill Nye; Lisa
Tanker. (N) 7 a.m. KTTV
Live With Kelly Anna
Chlumsky
(“Veep”);
Carrie Ann Inaba. (N) 9
a.m. KABC
The View Martha Stewart;
model Tyson Beckford.
(N) 10 a.m. KABC
The Wendy Williams Show
Natalie Zea (“The Detour”). (N) 11 a.m. KTTV
The Talk Jimmy Smits. (N) 1
p.m. KCBS
The Doctors Krysta Rodriguez discusses breast
cancer; man says heartbreak caused his heart attack. (N) 2 p.m. KCBS
Steve Harvey Kim Gravel.
(N) 2 p.m. KNBC
Dr. Phil A 10-year-old girl
claims her mother’s fiancé
sexually abused her. (N) 3
p.m. KCBS
The Ellen DeGeneres Show
Chris Hardwick (“The
Wall”); Kunal Nayyar
(“The Big Bang Theory”);
“Pretty Little Liars” cast.
(N) 3 p.m. KNBC
The Real (N) 3 p.m. KTTV
To the Contrary With Bonnie Erbé Donald Trump’s
defense of Bill O’Reilly; review of presidency. (N)
5:30 p.m. KOCE
Tavis Smiley Author David
Armitage; Rhea Seehorn.
(N) 11 p.m. KOCE
Charlie Rose (N) 11 p.m.
KVCR; 11:30 p.m. KOCE; 1
a.m. KLCS
The Daily Show (N) 11 p.m.
Comedy Central
Conan Kunal Nayyar; Harland Williams. (N) 11 p.m.
TBS
Jimmy Kimmel Live Charlize Theron; Tony Goldwyn; Romeo Santos performs. (N) 11:35 p.m.
KABC
Nightline (N) 12:37 a.m.
KABC
Cate Cameron KTLA
MOLLY RINGWALD
joins the cast of the CW’s
“Riverdale” on KTLA.
The Blacklist: Redemption
Scottie
and
Howard
(Famke Janssen, Terry
O’Quinn) vie for control of
the organization, while
Tom (Ryan Eggold) is
caught in a dangerous
battle against Mr. Solomon (Edi Gathegi) in the
season finale. 10 p.m. NBC
The Catch Alice and Val
(Mireille
Enos,
Rose
Rollins) take a fresh look
at the cold case on which
they first were partnered.
10 p.m. ABC
Sun Records Sam (Chad
Michael Murray) struggles with the decision to
let Col. Tom Parker (Billy
Gardell) take over Elvis’
(Drake Milligan) career. 10
p.m. CMT
SPECIALS
Sacred Cod This sobering
new special chronicles the
collapse of the oldest fishery in the United States,
which has been driven to
the edge of commercial
extinction because of
overfishing and the impact of global warming on
ocean temperatures. 9
p.m. Discovery
MOVIES
Hook (1991) 8 a.m. OVA
Madagascar (2005) 10 a.m.
TOON
Dear White People (2014)
Noon BET
Harry Potter and the
Deathly Hallows: Part 1
(2010) 1:30 p.m. Freeform
How to Train Your Dragon
(2010) 2 p.m. TOON
Gone Girl (2014) 3 p.m. FXX
Harry Potter and the
Deathly Hallows: Part 2
(2011) 5 p.m. Freeform
Out of the Furnace (2013) 6
p.m. Showtime
CBS
Sports News Movies (N) New Å Closed Captioning
8 pm
8:30
9 pm
9:30
The Big
Bang Theory
Great Indoors
Mom Christy
Life in Pieces
(TVPG) Matt
and Colleen
baby-sit. (N)
NBC Trial & Error
Powerless
Chicago Med (TV14) Dr.
(TVPG) Sum- (TVPG) Emi- Halstead’s father is admitted
mer is a sus- ly’s first board to the hospital against his
pect. (N) Å meeting. (N) wishes. (N) Å
KTLA Supernatural (TV14) Sam and Riverdale (TV14) Archie hides
Dean investigate a missing his feelings about his parperson case. (N) Å
ents’ divorce. (N) Å
ABC Grey’s Anatomy (TV14) Mer- Scandal Olivia wonders what
edith and Nathan are seat- life would be if the election
mates on a flight. (N) Å
hadn’t been rigged. (N) Å
KCAL News (N)
News (N)
(TVPG) Day
care. (N) Å
FOX
(TV14) Jack adopts a
insults the IT healthy lifestyle. (N) Å
guy. (N) Å
MasterChef (TVPG) A ginger- Kicking & Screaming (TV14)
bread house. (N) Å
MyNt Bones (TV14) Å
KVCR
KCET
UNI
KOCE
KDOC
KLCS
A&E
AMC
ANP
BBC
BET
Bravo
CMT
CNN
Com
Disc
Disn
E!
ESPN
Food
FNC
Free
FX
Hall
HGTV
Hist
IFC
Life
MSN
MTV
NGC
Nick
OWN
Spike
Sund
Syfy
TBS
TCM
TLC
TNT
Toon
Travel
Tru
TV L
USA
VH1
WGN
Cine
Encr
HBO
Show
Starz
TMC
(N) Å
Bones (TV14) Å
10 pm
10:30
The Amazing Race (TVPG)
Teams build desks and deliver them to a school in Zanzibar, Tanzania. (N) Å
11 pm
News (N)
The Blacklist: Redemption
News (N)
(TV14) (Season finale) Scottie and Howard struggle for
control of Halcyon. (N) Å
News (N)
News (N)
The Catch (TV14) Alice and News (N)
Val re-examine their first
cold case. (N) Å
News (N)
Sports Central Mike & Molly
News (N)
TMZ (TVPG)
Å
Seinfeld Å
Seinfeld Å
King of Queens
Counting From Infinity (2015) The Great Transmission (2015) American Conscience (TVG) Å Charlie Rose Å
Doc Martin (TVPG) Å
Death in Paradise (TVPG) Å Agatha Raisin (TVPG) Å
Doc Martin Å
Jueves Santo: Fe y Tradición
Vino el Amor (TV14) (N)
La Piloto (TV14) (N)
Noticias (N)
Burt Bacharach Brit Floyd: The World’s Greatest Pink Floyd Show Red Rock Serenade (TVG) Å Tavis (N) Å
Law & Order: CI (TV14) Å
Law & Order: CI (TV14) Å
Family Guy Å Family Guy Å Seinfeld Å
Globe Trekker (TVG) Å
Travels: Darley Born to Explore Travelscope
Roadtrip Nation Business (N)
The First 48: Deadly Dealings 60 Days In (TV14) (N) Å
Nightwatch (TV14) (N)
The First 48 Å
Smokey and the Bandit ››› (1977) Burt Reynolds. (PG) Å Crocodile Dundee (1986) (10:15) (PG-13)
North Woods Law (TVPG) (N) North Woods Law (TV14) (N) North Woods Law (TV14) (N) North Woods
Doctor Who (TVPG) Å
Doctor Who (TVPG) Å
Doctor Who (TVPG) (10:45)
The Players Club ›› (1998) LisaRaye. A woman works as a stripper to pay her tuition. (R) Martin (TVPG)
Real Housewives: Beverly Hills Real Housewives: Atlanta
Housewives: Potomac (TV14) What Happens
Last Man
Last Man
Last Man
Last Man
Sun Records (TV14) Johnny Sun Records
Standing Å
Standing Å
Standing Å
Standing Å
starts his own band. (N) Å (TV14) Å
CNN Tonight: Don Lemon (N) Anderson Cooper (TVPG) Å Anderson Cooper (TVPG) Å CNN Tonight
South Park Å South Park Å Tosh.0 (TV14) Tosh.0 (TV14) Tosh.0 (TV14) South Park Å Daily Show (N)
Deadliest Catch: Captains
Sacred Cod (TVPG) (N) Å
Deadliest Catch (TVPG)
Stuck in Middle Good Luck
Liv & Maddie Liv & Maddie Andi Mack (TVG) Å
Jessie (TVG)
Little Fockers › (2010) Robert De Niro. (PG-13) Å
Total Divas (TV14) Å
E! News (N)
SportsCenter (TVPG) (N) Å SportsCenter (TVPG) (N) Å SportsCenter (TVPG) (N) Å SportsCenter
Chopped (TVG) Å
Chopped (TVG) Å
Beat Bobby (N) Beat Bobby Å Beat Bobby Å
The O’Reilly Factor Å
Tucker Carlson Tonight Å
Hannity Å
First 100 Days
The Hunger Games ››› (2012) Jennifer Lawrence, Josh Hutcherson. (PG-13) Å
The 700 Club
Ride Along ›› (2014) Ice Cube, Kevin Hart. (PG-13) Å
Ride Along ›› (2014) Ice Cube. (PG-13) Å
Last-Standing Last-Standing The Middle Å The Middle Å The Middle Å The Middle Å Golden Girls Å
Flip or Flop Å Flip or Flop Å Flip-Flop Vegas Flip or Flop Å House Hunters Hunters Int.
Flipping Å
Swamp People (TVPG) (N) Å Swamp People (TVPG) (N)
Forged in Fire (TVPG) (10:12) Swamp People
Final Destination 2 ›› (2003) Ali Larter, A. J. Cook. (R) Å Final Destination 3 ›› (2006) (R) Å
Sex and the City 2 ›› (2010) Sarah Jessica Parker, Kim Cattrall. (R) Å
Women: Dallas
11th Hour (N) Å
The Rachel Maddow Show Å The Last Word Å
11th Hour Å
Wild ’n Out Å Wild ’n Out Å Wild ’n Out (N) Squares Å
Squares Å
Squares Å
Squares Å
Killing Jesus (2015) Haaz Sleiman, Kelsey Grammer. The life and death of Jesus Christ. Å Killing Jesus
Rio ››› (2011) Anne Hathaway, Jesse Eisenberg. (G) Å Full House Å Full House Å Friends Å
20/20 on ID (TV14) Å
20/20 on OWN (TV14) Å
20/20 on ID (TV14) Å
20/20 on ID
Fast Five ›› (2011) Vin Diesel, Paul Walker. (7:30) (PG-13) Å
Fast Five ›› (2011) (PG-13)
Law & Order (TVPG) Å
Law & Order (TVPG) Å
Law & Order (TVPG) Å
Law & Order
Faster ›› (2010) (7) (R) Å Fast & Furious (2009) Vin Diesel, Paul Walker. (PG-13) Å
Wrecker Å
Seinfeld (TVG) Seinfeld Å
Big Bang Å
Big Bang Å
Big Bang Å
Big Bang Å
Conan (N) Å
Topper Takes a Trip (7) Å
Journey for Margaret ››› (1942) (8:45) Å Sister Kenny ››› (1946)
Casey Anthony: An American Murder Mystery (TV14) Casey Anthony is charged with murder. Casey Anthony
The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey ›› (2012) Ian McKellen, Martin Freeman. (PG-13) Å
King of the Hill King of the Hill American Dad American Dad Bob’s Burgers Bob’s Burgers Family Guy Å
Mysteries at the Museum Å
Mysteries at the Museum (N) Mysteries at the Museum Å
Mysteries Å
Jokers Å
Jokers Å
Jokers Å
Jokers Å
Jokers (N) Å Inside (N) Å Game Show Å
MASH (TVPG) (8:12) Å
Raymond Å
Raymond Å
Raymond Å
Raymond Å
King of Queens
Law & Order: SVU (TV14) Å Law & Order: SVU (TV14) Å Law & Order: SVU (TV14) Å Law & Order Å
Boyz N the Hood ››› (1991) (7) (R) Å
Baby Boy ››› (2001) Tyrese Gibson, Omar Gooding. (R)
Outsiders (TVMA) Å
Cops (TVPG) Cops (TVPG) Engagement Å Engagement Å How I Met Å
Lights Out (2016) Teresa Palmer. (PG-13)
The Purge: Election Year (2016) (9:25) (R) Å
The White Queen (TV14) Å
Dodgeball: A True Underdog Story ››› Å
The Cable Guy ›› (10:34)
War Dogs ›› (2016) Jonah Hill, Miles Teller. (R) Å
Unforgiven ›››› (1992) (R) Å
Homeland (TVMA) Å
Billions (TVMA) Å
Dark Net (N) Penn & Teller Gigolos Å
Jaws 2 ›› (1978) (PG) Å
Jarhead ››› (2005) Jake Gyllenhaal. (R) Å
I, Robot Å
Who’s Your Caddy? › (2007) (PG-13) Å
Good Luck Chuck › (2007) Dane Cook. (R) (9:35) Å
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LOS ANGELES TIMES
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BO441405
488
• Solid Brass Construction
• For Single Hole Configurations
NP2510-5103/15S
SAVE
30%
$761 Before Savings
— $233 in Instant Savings
$634 Before Savings
— $146 in Instant Savings
$
Nadya
Single Handle Faucet
528
$
After
Savings
Faucet only.
After
Savings
Faucet only.
on Built-in/Premium Appliances
NEW Appliance Outlet
24120 Garnier St. Torrance, CA 90505
32” Under-mount
Double Bowl Sink
• 16 Gauge Quality
• 9” Large Bowl Depth
EMSP-15LCR
$326 Before Savings
— $73 in Instant Savings
EVENTS
253
$
After
Savings
Sink only. Drain not included.
SAVE
22%
SAVE
Diamond™
1 1/2 Bowl Sink
• Heat Resistant up to 536°F
• Bowl Depths: 9-1/2’’ & 8’’
• Color: Biscotti
BO441282
$610 Before Savings
— $260 in Instant Savings
350
$
After
Savings
Sink only. Drain not included.
42%
• 9” Depth
• Three Faucet Holes with
One Accessory Hole to Right
KO3821-4-NA
$487 Before Savings
— $117 in Instant Savings
370
$
After
Savings
Sink only. Drain not included.
Pacific Sales & Samsung
invite you to become a Master Host
Come learn the tricks of the trade
of entertaining while learning about
Samsung's latest home appliances.
Valid 4/13/17 - 4/19/17
• 16 Gauge
• 2 Free Grids & Strainers
EMRD3319CC
22%
$562 Before Savings
— $127 in Instant Savings
435
$
After
Savings
Sink, 2 grids and strainers.
up to
on Sub-Zero, Wolf and Kohler Products.
Save up to $1,000 on Sub-Zero and Wolf products and up to $500 on
Kohler Products. See store for more details. Kohler product range of
possible discount $186-$506. Maximum savings of $506 based on
combined purchase of Kohler kitchen sink and Kohler faucet.
Visit pacificsales.com/sale for more deals.
1- 18 Month Financing - Subject to credit approval. Terms and conditions apply.
See store for details.
BEST BUY, the BEST BUY logo, the tag design, PACIFIC SALES KITCHEN & HOME, the PACIFIC SALES
KITCHEN & HOME logo, PACIFIC KITCHEN & HOME and the PACIFIC KITCHEN & HOME logo are
trademarks of BBY Solutions, Inc. © 2017 Best Buy. All rights reserved.
24%
SAVE
SAVE
$
1,500
At Pacific Sales Torrance
Saturday April 22, 2017
11am to 4pm
2- Free Delivery - Offer applies to standard delivery ($69.99) on appliance purchases $399
and up and kitchen & bath fixtures $1,000 and up, and to limited metro delivery area. Additional
parts extensive labor, haul-away of current appliance and installation charges are extra.
3/8” 10 MM Radius
Double Bowl Sink
It Takes the Best
to Make the Best.
ART OF ENTERTAINING
Limited to Stock on Hand. No Rainchecks. We reserve the right to limit quantities. Selection
may vary by store. Some products may not be displayed or physically available at any
of the stores, but may be available for purchase as a Special Order. Not responsible for
typographic, photographic or pricing errors in this ad.
SAVE
Vault
33” Single Bowl Sink
Non-commissioned
EXPERT Staff,
Here to Help.
FREE
18
MONTH Delivery
2
Financing
On Major Appliances and
Kitchen & Bath Fixtures
$599 & Up When You Use
Our Store Credit Card.
1
With All Major Appliance
Purchases Totaling $399
& Up and Kitchen & Bath
Fixtures $1,000 & Up.
PS3
PS4
THURSDAY, APRIL 13, 2017
LOS ANGELES TIMES
Everything you need for your Bathroom
SAVE
Chadwick
Widespread
Lavatory Faucet
Satin Nickel
53%
• Pop-Up Drain Included
• 1/4 Turn Ceramic Disk Cartridge
SE4320GL75VP
$434 Before Savings
— $234 in Instant Savings
200
$
• Tornado Flushing System
• ADA Compliant
TOMS604114CUFG-01
SAVE
26%
33%
Rectangle
Undercounter
Lavatory Sink
• 19” x 12 3/8”
• CeFiONtect Ceramic Glaze
TOLT542G-01
$319 Before Savings
— $99 in Instant Savings
$154 Before Savings
— $52 in Instant Savings
$226 Before Savings
— $76 in Instant Savings
102
$
After
Savings
Palermo
One Piece Toilet
• Soft-Close Seat and
Cover Included
• Chair-Height Bowl
ST6006128-01
257
$
150
$
After
Savings
Sink only.
SAVE
38%
$420 Before Savings
— $163 in Instant Savings
After
Savings
SAVE
Dantesca®
Undercounter
Lavatory Sink
• 19" x 15"
• CeFiONtect Ceramic Glaze
TOLT597G-01
220
$619 Before Savings
— $162 in Instant Savings
Toilet only.
31%
Faucet only.
Ultramax II
One Piece 1G Toilet
457
SAVE
• Pop-Up Drain Included
• Brass Vavle Bodies
NP8100/26
$
After
Savings
Faucet only.
$
Rydder
Widespread
Lavatory Faucet
SAVE
Multifunction
Showerhead
• Multi-Function Engine
with 5 Spray Mode
• Solid Brass Construction
NP2144/26
205
$
Showerhead only.
33%
After
Savings
Sink only.
31%
Moxie® Single-Function
Showerhead
with Wireless Speaker
SAVE
34%
• Includes Wireless Speaker and
Micro USB Charging Cable
• Soft Silicone Spray-Face is Easy to Clean
KO9245-E-CP
$149 Before Savings
— $52 in Instant Savings
$298 Before Savings
— $93 in Instant Savings
After
Savings
Toilet, soft close seat and cover only.
SAVE
97
$
After
Savings
After
Savings
Showerhead, speaker and USB cable included.
SAVE
57%
Ariana
Soaking Bath Tub
Right Hand
60”x30”x19”
• Integral Apron and Tile Flange
• No Need to Wet-Set
ARARIANA-R-WH
$1,294 Before Savings
— $744 in Instant Savings
550
$
After
Savings
Tub only.
Visit pacificsales.com/sale for more deals.
Non-commissioned
EXPERT Staff,
Here to Help.
FREE
18
MONTH Delivery
2
Financing
On Major Appliances and
Kitchen & Bath Fixtures
$599 & Up When You Use
Our Store Credit Card.
1
With All Major Appliance
Purchases Totaling $399
& Up and Kitchen & Bath
Fixtures $1,000 & Up.
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