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Los Angeles Times April 14 2017

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© 2017 WST
D
latimes.com
FRIDAY, APRIL 14, 2017
‘Mother of
all bombs’
a powerful
message
The Afghan strike,
along with the airfield
attack in Syria, shows
a more robust military
strategy under Trump.
By W.J. Hennigan
Photographs by
Mel Melcon Los Angeles Times
EL MERCADO mall, above, sits next to a Boyle Heights lot where a developer plans to build homeless housing.
The mall’s owners appealed the project’s environmental report, stalling the proposal as it awaits a hearing.
Homeless housing’s
next big roadblock
Eastside project shows local support is hard to win
By Doug Smith
A vacant lot between two
venerable Eastside landmarks — Evergreen Cemetery to the west and the El
Mercado mall to the east —
is the focus of a dispute that
portends difficulties for the
city’s plans to spur the construction of 1,000 units of
housing each year for the
chronically homeless.
A nonprofit developer
has an option to build 49 affordable-housing units on
the property, with half of
them dedicated to chronically homeless people who
have been diagnosed as
mentally ill.
It’s exactly the kind of
THE PLAN calls for 49 units of affordable housing,
with half dedicated to chronically homeless people.
project the city intends to
support with the $1.2-billion
homeless housing bond that
voters approved in November. But it’s been stuck for
nearly a year in the committee headed by one of the
most vocal supporters of
that bond, Councilman Jose
Huizar.
The Los Angeles City
Planning Department approved the plan last year.
That decision would have
been the last hurdle for the
developer, A Community of
Friends, after nearly three
years spent meeting with
government and neighborhood groups to come up with
a plan that had widespread
support.
[See Housing, A10]
WASHINGTON — The
U.S. military dropped the
most powerful nonnuclear
bomb in its arsenal Thursday on a cave-and-tunnel
complex that it said was
used by Islamic State fighters in eastern Afghanistan, a
stark reminder of a U.S. war
now in its 16th grinding year.
The behemoth bomb, officially called the Massive
Ordnance Air Blast, or MOAB, nicknamed the “mother
of all bombs,” is the most
powerful bomb the U.S. military has used since dropping
the atomic bomb on Nagasaki, Japan, in August 1945
at the end of World War II. It
had never been used in combat before.
Its use came less than
a week after President
Trump, who has put current
or retired military officials in
senior positions throughout
his administration, ordered
a retaliatory military strike
in Syria.
Taken together, the two
moves suggest an increased
willingness to use overt force
by contrast with President
Obama, who relied heavily
on smaller-scale, covert
drone strikes.
But like the Syria strike,
use of the monster munition
in Afghanistan is more symbolic than tactical, because
it is unlikely to change the
course of America’s longest
war.
Trump
praised
the
bombing as a “very, very successful mission.” He indicated that he had given the
COACHELLA
RINGS IN A
LATIN BEAT
Spanish-language and Latino
acts are set to play a bigger part
By Randall Roberts
Since it emerged out of the alternative rock scene in
1999, the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival has featured many acts spanning hip-hop, folk, EDM, pop, heavy
metal and classic rock.
Yet one style of music has long been underrepresented
on the grounds of the posh Empire Polo Club in Indio:
Latin music. That changes this year.
Coachella’s 2017 roster includes the highest volume of
Latino and Spanish-language bands in its 18-year history.
Given Southern California’s demographics, some might
say this is a long time in coming, especially when one takes
into account that the actual city of Coachella is more than
96% Latino or Hispanic.
“I thought we existed outside of what Coachella had to
offer,” said Daniel Gomez of Inland Empire band
Quitapenas. “But things are changing. The gatekeepers
are looking more like us.”
With President Trump pledging to build a wall along
the southern border and Latino
[See Coachella, A11]
Ed Jones AFP/Getty Images
NORTH KOREANS wait for the arrival of leader Kim Jong Un at the opening of
Ryomyong Street. Its high-rise buildings reportedly were built in less than a year.
Living the high life in –
North Korea’s capital?
Pyongyang shows off street to foreign media
By Jonathan Kaiman
Gina Ferazzi Los Angeles Times
THEE COMMONS (David Pacheco, from left, Jose
Rojas and Rene Pacheco) are Coachella-bound.
PYONGYANG,
North
Korea — The North Koreans
streamed in for hours —
black-suited officials, women in colorful dresses, grimfaced military men — until
they were a heaving mass in
central Pyongyang, packed
so tightly that the air above
them shimmered from rising
heat.
The occasion on Thursday was a ribbon-cutting
ceremony for Ryomyong
Street, a residential high-
rise project that, according
to state media, was personally overseen by the country’s supreme leader, Kim
Jong Un. The crowd, tens of
thousands strong, waited
for hours — and when Kim
arrived, it roared. He stood
on a red-carpeted stage,
framed by the street’s pastel-colored edifices of tile
and glass.
“The completion of this
street is more powerful than
100 nuclear warheads,”
Prime Minister Pak Pong Ju
said in a speech.
Kim said nothing. But his
intended message was clear:
North Korea still possesses
economic power, despite
international sanctions over
its nuclear program and the
rising threat of military conflict with the United States.
Several dozen foreign
journalists have arrived in
North Korea — perhaps the
world’s most isolated and restrictive country — as part of
a
government-sponsored
tour to mark the 105th birthday of Kim Il Sung, the nation’s founder and the current leader’s grandfather,
[See North Korea, A4]
Pentagon a free hand as part
of his vow to step up the war
on Islamic State.
“We have given them total authorization, and that’s
what they’re doing and
frankly that’s why they’ve
been so successful lately,” he
told reporters at the White
House.
“If you look at what’s happened over the last eight
weeks and compare that
really to what’s happened
over the past eight years,
you’ll see there’s a tremendous difference, tremendous difference,” he said.
Trump also brushed
aside questions of whether
the use of the bomb was intended to send a message to
[See Bomb, A5]
Trump
foreign
policy
switch
The president has
backpedaled on his
isolationist promises.
By Tracy Wilkinson
and Brian Bennett
WASHINGTON
—
Scarcely 12 weeks into his
presidency, Donald Trump
has backed off or reversed
many of his most provocative campaign promises on
foreign policy, embracing
mainstream positions that
have alarmed ardent supporters but have reassured
U.S allies.
The president remains
an unpredictable and impulsive leader on the world
stage, diplomats say — one
called him a “nuclear whirling dervish” — and he could
swiftly pivot back to some of
the unconventional proposals he offered in the 2016
campaign.
And although other politicians might be pummeled
for so many high-profile flipflops, Trump seemingly has
inoculated himself so far by
boasting that his “flexibility”
as an outsider makes him a
good negotiator.
Thus far, at least, Trump
has yet to “tear up” the landmark Iran nuclear disarmament deal, as he had once
promised, or to reverse President Obama’s historic
opening to Cuba, as he
vowed.
He has not moved the
U.S. Embassy in Israel from
Tel Aviv to the disputed city
of Jerusalem, as he had
promised, after Arab allies
warned of the turmoil it
would cause.
He affirmed the “one
[See Trump, A9]
Outbreak of
lethal bacteria
Ten infants in the UC
Irvine Medical Center’s neonatal intensive care unit were
infected. BUSINESS, B1
Weather
Mostly sunny.
L.A. Basin: 72/53 B8
Printed with soy inks on
partially recycled paper.
7
85944 00200
5
A2
F R I DAY, A P R I L 14 , 2 017
L ATI M E S . CO M
BACK STORY
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DOLORES WESTFALL plans her next move in 2015 after working and camping at a theme park in upstate
New York for several months. “I want to live life as much as I can, before I don’t have any,” she once said.
End of an inspiring journey
Dolores Westfall’s ashes at rest in desert after ‘retirement’ on the road
By Steve Padilla
The desert isn’t for everyone — too hot, too bleak
— but Dolores Westfall
loved it. When my time
comes, she once told her
sister during a desert jaunt,
spread my ashes here. Her
sister promised she would.
The vow was kept earlier
this month when Mary Ann
Hoye took the ashes to a
remote valley near the Nevada-California state line
for the last stop on Westfall’s
long and difficult, but also
inspiring, life’s journey.
Westfall, a former bank
secretary, museum curator
and interior design consultant, had found herself reaching retirement age in the
same predicament many
Americans face these days:
unable to make do on her
$190-a-month pension and
$1,200 Social Security check.
So she set out on an
adventure born partly of
choice, partly because there
really was none. She spent
her 70s traversing the country in search of temporary
jobs, living and traveling in
an RV she called “Big Foot.”
Over seven years, Westfall piloted Big Foot to 33
states to work all manner of
temporary, low-paying jobs
— Amazon warehouse clerk,
saleslady, resort receptionist, cavern tour guide.
“I want to live life as
much as I can, before I don’t
have any,” she said.
Her story, chronicled by
former Times staff writer
John M. Glionna and photographer Francine Orr, felt
achingly familiar at a time
when many are pushing
back their own retirements
well past the age of 65.
As “Too poor to retire,
too young to die” pointed
out, nearly one-third of U.S.
heads of households ages 55
and older have no pension
or retirement savings and a
median annual income of
about $19,000.”
Westfall’s story, which
appeared on Jan. 29, 2016,
moved readers in a way few
others have.
Part of the response was
due to Westfall herself,
whose quick humor and
cheerful determination
almost always eclipsed her
predicament.
“Westfall — 5 feet 1 tall,
with a graceful dancer’s
body she honed as a tapdancing teenager — is as
stubborn as she is highspirited,” Glionna wrote.
A man in Houston set up
a GoFundMe account for
Westfall, and donations
exceeded $20,000. Thousands more came in personal checks. One reader, disappointed she couldn’t aid
Westfall in person, helped a
homeless person in her own
hometown.
An email from a reader in
Georgia was typical: “If she
wants to come stay awhile
and see if she likes Atlanta, I
am offering free food, a free
place to park Big Foot and I
will pay for Bigfoot repairs. I
have a wide array of friends
who will also help.”
The article had caught
up with Westfall in the
spring of 2015 in upstate
New York, where at age 79
she ran a kiddie ride at the
Darien Lake theme park.
She earned $9 an hour, and
the job would only last into
September.
WESTFALL, left, celebrates with teenage co-workers in September 2015, on the
last day of their summer job at the Darien Lake theme park in upstate New York.
“BIG FOOT” the RV was Westfall’s only home for years. Times readers touched
by her story, “Too poor to retire, too young to die,” helped her out financially.
Money was a neverending worry. “I could just
cry,” she wrote in her journal
after a cop handed her a
$300 speeding ticket. “I
won’t have earned $300 in all
of May. If I can get it lowered
to $150, it will still be more
than my entire grocery
budget. Don’t know how I’m
going to manage it.”
But she did. She persuaded a judge to reduce
the fine to $150 and, as ever,
looked for more bargains, or
clocked more work hours,
sometimes 12 a day.
When an abusive mother
at the amusement park
screamed at her over a
perceived slight — “Just
because you’re a miserable
old lady with your effing
$7-an-hour job! You don’t
have a life!” — Westfall
shrugged it off.
By late summer Westfall
knew she needed dental
work, but she also learned
that she could take a guided
tour of buildings in the area
designed by her favorite
architect, Frank Lloyd
Wright. Each cost $100.
She picked Frank Lloyd
Wright.
“I believe doing something fun, no matter how
frivolous it might seem, is
food for the soul,” she said.
“You need to feed yourself
some pleasure once in a
while to keep feeling alive.
Otherwise, it’s just drudgery.”
Westfall did not solicit
donations, and was stunned
by the reaction to, as she
put it, “a story I couldn’t
imagine anyone would want
to read.” It took her weeks to
answer all the letters and
emails. For the first time in
years, she could shop for
groceries without anxiety,
though she continued to log
each purchase to the penny.
Last fall, Westfall had
planned to start driving
from New York to Florida,
where a job was waiting. But
just before Thanksgiving,
not long after her 80th birthday, she suffered a mild
heart attack. Her sister, who
hadn’t seen Westfall since
she’d hit the road in Big
Foot, flew from Berkeley to
be with her.
Hoye noticed that Westfall had begun slurring her
words.
Hoye had trouble directing emergency workers to
Big Foot’s location in the
countryside, but finally the
ambulance arrived and
rushed Westfall to the hospital. She’d had a stroke.
Upon her release, the
sisters hatched a plan to
drive Big Foot to California,
but doctors would have
none of that. A nurse let
Westfall park the aging RV
at her place while Westfall
flew with Hoye to Berkeley
to recover.
But on the flight to California, Westfall suddenly felt
severe pain in the abdomen.
Another ambulance, this
time waiting at the San
Francisco airport. Another
hospital, this time with a
grim diagnosis: Stage 4
metastatic pancreatic cancer.
Journalists are supposed
to keep a professional distance from their subjects,
but to Glionna and Orr,
Westfall wasn’t just a source
for a story. They had kept in
touch long after the story
ran. Orr visited Westfall in
Berkeley, and was there at
the moment in late December when Hoye told her
dying sister that it was “OK
to let go,” that “it will stop
hurting soon.” Two days
later, Westfall died.
This month it was finally
time to spread her ashes.
Orr and Glionna joined
Hoye and her husband,
David, his daughter and her
boyfriend in the desert, in a
remote place where Westfall
had taken solitary journeys
as a much younger woman.
Hoye had brought a
small bowl decorated with a
heart and the word “love,”
and, one by one, the mourners scooped up ashes and
gently poured them on the
desert sand and rock. Then
Glionna took the bowl and
flung ashes high into the air,
shouting, “Dolores!”
The others soon did the
same, again and again.
“Dolores! Dolores!” The
ashes seemed to hang in the
air ever so briefly, then the
light wind caught them and
they were gone.
steve.padilla@latimes.com
L AT I ME S . CO M
F R IDAY , A P R IL 14 , 2 017
A3
THE WORLD
Backlash grows over pope’s ‘Love’
year, when Iraqi militias
were legalized by parliament, he said, the coalition
considered their fighters civilian combatants, meaning
strikes that killed them were
not considered friendly fire,
even though they were fighting
alongside
coalition
forces. After the Sunni fighters were killed south of Mosul in October, the strike was
initially considered “nonproblematic” until Airwars
pressed the coalition to investigate. Eventually, the coalition confirmed the fighters, who were in the village of
Haj Ali, had been friendly.
“On a number of occasions, the coalition [members] were convinced they
were bombing Daesh forces,
and they were friendly,”
Woods said, using an Arabic
acronym for Islamic State.
“How many more have happened? We don’t know.”
Scrocca said that “tribal
forces are not considered civilians and would not be
part of our civilian casualty
tracking, assessment and
reporting process. We have
been training and working
with vetted tribal forces for
some time, not just since the
law was passed.”
“This is terrible for morale of friendly forces on the
ground,” Woods said of the
airstrikes. He credited the
coalition with reporting the
latest incident quickly. But
he also noted that of the
33 strikes with reported
friendly fire casualties that
have not been confirmed by
the coalition, at least 13 merit further investigation.
Francis invited Kasper to
address a consistory of cardinals, where the German
prelate re-pitched his ideas
about granting Communion
to people who divorce and
remarry.
Conservative cardinals
were quick to react. Five of
them published a booklength explanation in 2014
about why the Communion
ban could not be lifted.
Among them were American Cardinal Raymond
Burke and two Germans,
Mueller and Walter Brandmueller.
Undeterred, Francis held
two synods in 2014 and 2015
that discussed the issue.
“The German-language discussion group at the second
synod, including Mueller
and Kasper, had the most eloquent debating,” said Andrea Tornielli, a Vatican expert at the website Vatican
Insider.
George Pell, a conservative Australian cardinal, told
France’s Le Figaro newspaper that the synod debate
was just the latest episode in
a long-running theological
battle between Kasper and
Ratzinger/Benedict.
After the synods, in April
2016, Francis produced
“Amoris Laetitia,” in which
he wrote, “It is possible that
in an objective situation of
sin,” a person can be helped
to live in God’s grace, and in
certain cases, “this can include the help of the sacraments.”
Translation: In some
cases, a sinner — say, someone who was divorced and
remarried — can receive
Communion, the central
sacrament of Catholicism.
This time, four cardinals,
including Burke and two
Germans,
Brandmueller
and Joachim Meisner, wrote
to Francis in September asking whether “Amoris Laetitia” broke with existing doctrine.
When they received no response, they went public
with the letter in November.
Conservatives chimed in
to lend support. Archbishop
Charles Chaput of Philadelphia said last month that he
wanted Francis to answer
the questions in the letter.
“How can it be true that
people can receive Communion when they’re living
in an adulterous union today? How is that possible,
when the church says it’s not
possible?” he asked the independent Catholic website
Crux.
Crux editor John Allen
said American Catholics
were divided, with some
bishops — such as Chaput —
insisting that the doctrine
was unchanged, while others, including the archbishops of Chicago and Washington, saying Communion for
divorced Catholics can be
acceptable in some circumstances.
“There is no great ferment among rank-and-file
Catholics, but the insidebaseball crowd is borderline
obsessed, strongly divided
in the same way as Europe,”
he said. “Liberals see it as a
long-overdue gesture of pastoral generosity, while conservatives see it as symptomatic of Francis’ lack of
clarity on doctrine — and
they are going at it hammer
and tongs.”
In Africa, where the
church is battling a long tradition of polygamy, Cardinal
Wilfrid Napier, the archbishop of Durban, South Africa,
tweeted, “If Westerners in irregular situations can receive Communion, are we to
tell our polygamists and
other ‘misfits’ that they too
are allowed?”
But in February, the German bishops’ conference
backed the concept of caseby-case flexibility, stating,
“Catholics who have been remarried under civil law after
a divorce are invited to go to
the church, participate in
their lives and mature as living members of the church.”
On the same day,
Mueller’s interview appeared in Il Timone, showing yet again how the country where the debate started
remains split on the question.
“We are called to help
people, little by little, have a
full relationship with God,”
Mueller said, before adding,
“But we can’t give discounts.”
molly.hennessy-fiske
@latimes.com
Kington is a special
correspondent.
Conservative
opposition to Francis
spurs talk of a schism
in Catholic Church.
By Tom Kington
ROME — Of all the recent attacks launched by
conservatives against Pope
Francis, one stood out more
than most.
It came from a German
cardinal who is one of the
most powerful men in the
Vatican. And it underlined a
growing backlash in the
church to some of Francis’
more progressive ideas — a
backlash led largely by German and American bishops
who fear the pope may be
overturning centuries of
doctrine on divorce, among
other matters.
The cardinal, Gerhard
Mueller, the pope’s own doctrinal chief, made it clear in
an interview in February
that he firmly opposed Francis’ tinkering with the
church’s ban on divorced
and civilly remarried Catholics taking Communion.
Francis has implied that
the ban could be relaxed.
But Mueller told Il Timone,
an Italian Catholic publication: “No power in heaven or
on earth, neither an angel,
nor the pope, nor a council,
nor a law of the bishops, has
the faculty to change it.”
As Francis enters his
fourth year in office, his conservative opponents have
chosen to stand and fight
over his 2016 apostolic exhortation titled “Amoris Laetitia,” or “The Joy of Love,” in
which he suggested bishops
can use discretion in granting Communion to Catholics who divorce, then remarry in a civil ceremony.
Francis’ guidance was
seen by many as contradicting the ruling, which dates to
the early days of the Roman
Catholic Church, that couples are living in sin if they remarry, because their first
marriage is still valid in the
eyes of the church.
Francis’ opening was
part of his mercy-beforedoctrine drive, which welcomes outcasts to the
church rather than use
dogma to keep people out.
But for conservative Catholics, it was another reason to
feel aggrieved, after Francis
appeared to suggest in 2015
that Lutherans could re-
Photographs by
Alessandra Tarantino Associated Press
IN HIS 2016 apostolic exhortation titled “Amoris Laetitia,” or “The Joy of Love,” Pope Francis suggested that
bishops can use discretion in granting Communion to Catholics who divorce, then remarry in a civil ceremony.
CARDINAL Gerhard Mueller, the pope’s doctrinal
chief, is opposed to easing the Communion ban. The
debate over the issue started in Germany years ago.
ceive Catholic Communion,
and, when asked about gay
people in 2013, said, “Who am
I to judge?”
It was enough to start
talk of a schism in the
church. In February, anonymous
conservatives
in
Rome responded by putting
up posters attacking the
pope, while rumors spread
of prelates plotting to make
him resign.
Mueller’s senior role as
the the head of the Vatican’s
Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith gave his
criticism extra weight. But
his nationality also provides
a key to understanding the
roots of the row — one that
has been raging for years
and started not in the Vatican, but in Germany, long
before Francis was pope.
“With ‘Amoris Laetitia,’
Pope Francis simply took
sides in a battle which German bishops have been
fighting for years,” said Julius Mueller-Meiningen, a
Vatican expert who covers
the Holy See for Christ &
Welt, the religious supplement of the German weekly
Die Zeit.
The battle got underway
in 1993 when three German
bishops — Walter Kasper,
Karl Lehmann and Oskar
Saier — had a letter read out
in all the churches of their dioceses stating it was time to
talk about the rule on people
who remarry after divorcing.
Arguing
that
there
should be wiggle room “in
complex, individual cases,”
they used the kind of language Francis would employ
almost a quarter of a century
later.
Back then, there was another conservative German
heading the Congregation
for the Doctrine of the Faith
— Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger, later to become Pope
Benedict XVI. He shot back
with a strongly worded letter
to his fellow Germans,
telling them to stick to the
rules.
“If the divorced are remarried civilly, they find
themselves in a situation
that objectively contravenes
God’s law,” he wrote.
“Consequently,” he added, “they cannot receive
Holy Communion as long as
this situation persists.”
Kasper and Lehmann
continued the debate in an
informal group of prelates,
nicknamed the St. Gallen
group after the village in
Switzerland where they met.
Among their discussions:
Who would be the next
pope?
Mueller-Meiningen said
he was told that, before the
2005 conclave to elect the
successor to Pope John Paul
II, the cardinals talked
about
Cardinal
Jorge
Bergoglio of Buenos Aires as
a possibility.
But the group’s plans to
elect a reformer like Bergoglio were thwarted when
Ratzinger was picked instead.
“After the election of
Ratzinger, the group met for
the last time in January
2006, then broke up,” said
Mueller-Meiningen.
But
then Benedict unexpectedly
resigned in 2013. He cited
health reasons, though rumors swirled at the time that
he was also worn down by
bitter power struggles behind the scenes at the Vatican. In any event, with his
departure, the German cardinals “had a second
chance,” Mueller-Meiningen
said.
Again the group supported the candidacy of
Bergoglio, and this time
their man won. Cardinal
Bergoglio became Pope
Francis.
A year after his election,
Wrong coordinates in Syria strike
U.S. says Islamic State
was intended target of
the coalition attack
that killed 18 allies.
By Molly
Hennessy-Fiske
IRBIL, Iraq — The U.S.
military says a misdirected
airstrike this week killed 18
friendly fighters battling Islamic State militants alongside the international coalition in northern Syria.
U.S. Central Command
said Thursday that coalition
aircraft were given the
wrong coordinates by the
Kurdish-dominated Syrian
Democratic Forces for a
strike intended to target
militants south of their
stronghold in Tabqa.
“The coalition’s deepest
condolences go out to the
members of the SDF and
their families. The coalition
is in close contact with our
SDF partners who have expressed a strong desire to remain focused on the fight
against ISIS despite this
tragic incident,” Central
Command said in a statement, using an acronym for
Islamic State. “The coalition
is assessing the cause of the
incident and will implement
appropriate safeguards to
prevent similar incidents in
the future.”
The Kurdish fighters,
with air and ground support
from the U.S.-led coalition,
had surrounded Tabqa,
which is on a dammed section of the Euphrates River
just west of Raqqah, Islamic
State’s de facto capital in
Hawar News Agency
MEMBERS of the Syrian Democratic Forces carry the coffins of comrades in Tal
Abyad. The friendly fire deaths were attributed to misdirected coalition aircraft.
Syria. But the strike Tuesday hit their position, killing
18 of them. Several nations
have contributed air power
to the coalition, and it was
not immediately clear which
was behind the strike.
It also was unclear how
many such friendly fire
strikes have occurred since
the campaign began against
Islamic State in Iraq and
Syria in 2014.
The coalition releases
monthly reports of civilian
casualties from airstrikes,
both those confirmed and
under investigation. But
friendly fire strikes are
tracked internally, said U.S.
Army Col. Joe Scrocca, a
Baghdad-based spokesman
for the coalition.
“The coalition takes each
of these incidents very seriously, but we do not keep cumulative data on them like
we do civilian casualties because they happen so infrequently,” he said.
The
London-based
monitoring group Airwars,
which works with the coalition to track airstrike casualties, has found 37 reported
friendly fire strikes in Iraq
and Syria since 2014.
Four had been confirmed
by the coalition, including
the one in Tabqa, according
to Airwars director Chris
Wood. The others are:
• A strike on Dec. 18, 2015,
in Fallujah that killed at
least nine Iraqi soldiers and
injured 32 more.
• A strike on Sept. 17, 2016,
in Al Tharda, Syria, that
killed at least 15 friendly Syrian fighters.
• A strike on Oct. 5, 2016,
south of Mosul that killed 18
friendly Sunni Muslim tribal
fighters.
“It’s very difficult to know
how many more friendly fire
events there have been since
the coalition does not disclose this information,”
Woods said.
Scrocca said he was “not
aware of those incidents; we
do not keep cumulative data
on them, so I cannot readily
verify their validity.”
Woods said it’s difficult to
track total casualties from
the strikes, and their estimates vary widely.
More have been reported
in Iraq — where there have
been 224 to 419 suspected
friendly fire casualties from
coalition strikes — than in
Syria, where there have been
35 to 86, he said. Woods said
part of the reason the estimates vary so much is that
it’s unclear whom the coalition considers combatants.
From 2014 until late last
A4
F R I DAY , A P R I L 14 , 2 017
L ATI M E S . CO M
A showcase street in Pyongyang
[North Korea, from A1]
who died in 1994.
The trip is tightly controlled: Every journalist is
assigned a government
minder and is not permitted
to conduct independent interviews or leave the hotel
alone. So it is virtually impossible to corroborate the
portrait being painted by
North Korean officials.
Yet experts say the government’s boasts of economic growth check out. Kim,
they say, tacitly approves of
simple commerce — and this
alone is beginning to transform the staunch communist state.
In Pyongyang’s city center, signs of new wealth are
everywhere. Gleaming new
buildings
flank
freshly
paved thoroughfares, some
teeming with traffic. Men
wear suits and ties; women
carry designer handbags.
Streetside shops sell bananas, apples and peaches,
probably imported from
China.
“It’s very simple — you
know, capitalism works,”
said Andrei Lankov, a North
Korea expert at Kookmin
University in Seoul. “What
[Kim] did is, essentially, he
began to implement something very similar to what
China did in the early 1980s.
“He’s doing it much more
carefully than the Chinese
did it — much more carefully,” Lankov said. “But he is
doing it. And it works.”
Yet Kim is as repressive
as his forebears, Lankov
added, and has taken an
even harder line on foreign
influence. He has fortified
the Chinese border — once a
major crossing point for foreign goods — and cracked
down on private entrepreneurs distributing South
Korean entertainment.
“I’d call his policy ‘reform
without openness,’ ” Lankov
said. “It takes from China
the economic component.
But when it comes to policies, he does what he can to
maintain his father and
grandfather’s system of
maintaining absolute control.
“Is it possible to have
economic growth under
such a system? I’m inclined
to say yes. Is it possible to
have really fast growth? I’d
say no, but only time will
tell.”
Kim’s nuclear ambitions
have raised the specter of
Photographs by
troops in Pyongyang, the capital. The government held a ribbon-cutting ceremony for Ryomyong Street, a residential high-rise project.
military conflict with the
United States. Analysts expect the North Korean
leader to conduct a nuclear
or missile test to mark his
grandfather’s birthday on
Saturday, the country’s
most important holiday.
President Trump has suggested that the U.S. could attack North Korea in retaliation; and North Korea, in
turn, has said that it could
respond with a nuclear
strike on the United States.
Yet Kim appeared calm
at Thursday’s event, his posture straight, his hands
clasped behind his back.
The ceremony lasted about
20 minutes. After Pak concluded his speech, a military
band began playing a communist
anthem;
Kim
FOR THE RECORD
Charter school study: In
the April 11 California section, an article about a study
of charter schools referred to
a group that conducted earlier, related research with
the American Civil Liberties
Union as Public Counsel. It
is Public Advocates.
If you believe that we have
made an error, or you have
questions about The Times’
Ed Jones AFP/Getty Images
PORTRAITS of North Korea’s late leaders, founder Kim Il Sung, left, and his son and successor, Kim Jong Il, provide a backdrop for
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practices, you may contact
Deirdre Edgar, readers’
representative, by email at
readers.representative
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How to contact us
stepped into his black Mercedes limousine; and the applause abruptly stopped,
plunging the square into a
minute-long silence. Then
the crowd dispersed.
Preparations for the
event were shrouded in secrecy, underscoring the importance of the project to
North Korea’s government.
Minders roused the foreign
journalists at 4:30 a.m. for an
unspecified “major event”
and instructed them to leave
phones, computers and water at the hotel; they claimed
to have no further information. Kim’s appearance was
a surprise.
After the ceremony, participants — none of whom
would give their names to a
foreign reporter — said they
were impressed by the speed
of Ryomyong Street’s construction. The street has
about two dozen buildings,
all built in less than a year,
North Korean officials said.
“The reason was that
Supreme Leader Kim Jong
Un is very kind to our people
and loves the people very
much,” said one, a woman
wearing a pin bearing Kim Il
Sung’s portrait.
“It means other countries can’t copy our construction methods,” said another, a man in a black suit.
North Korea is still far
from achieving economic
self-sufficiency. Satellite images on Google Maps show
that behind the prim residential buildings lining
Pyongyang’s main streets lie
RYOMYONG STREET has about two dozen buildings, officials said. Its opening
came days before the 105th birthday of the nation’s founder.
huge warrens of traditional
homes, invisible to foreign
guests. And outside the
city — a metropolis of about
3 million people in a largely
agrarian country of about
25 million — development
has come slowly, if at all.
“Once you leave Pyongyang, you see more,” said
Robert Kelly, a professor of
political science at Pusan
National University in Seoul.
“You see that the rest of the
country looks like Mozambique. The roads fall apart.
You go to places without toilets. It’s really bad — Pyongyang is like an isolated little
city-state surrounded by a
rural piedmont.”
One day before a Times
reporter flew to Pyongyang,
a North Korean official who
helped arrange the trip sent
an email.
“I am writing to kindly request you to bring in a few
pieces of printer cartridges
to be donated to the Institute of American Study who
will assist and take care of
your trip,” it said, then listed
two specific types of cartridges. The Institute of
American Study is run by
North Korea’s Foreign Ministry.
One newspaper reporter
who was invited on a similar
trip in 2016 said a North Korean official asked him to do-
nate several specific pieces
of hockey gear. (Sanctions
block the sale of some sporting goods to North Korea.)
The minder assigned to
The Times accepted a Chinese knockoff of an HP cartridge, but looked confused.
He appeared to know nothing about the Foreign Ministry’s printers.
Nevertheless, he carried
the cartridge throughout
the evening and eventually
appeared to hand it off, presumably to its intended recipient.
jonathan.kaiman
@latimes.com
Twitter: @JRKaiman
(800) LA TIMES
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A Tribune Publishing Company Newspaper Daily Founded Dec. 4, 1881
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Printed with soy-based ink on recycled newsprint from wood byproducts.
Israel warily debates Syria strategy
Calls grow for more
humanitarian
involvement, while
others stress caution.
By Joshua Mitnick
TEL AVIV — Israel has
spent most of the Syrian civil
war watching from the sidelines rather than becoming
mired in a sectarian conflict
in which neither of the sides
looked particularly appealing as an ally.
Last week’s sarin gas attack, apparently by the Syrian army, has intensified a
long-running debate about
whether the government
should be doing more to alleviate humanitarian suffering just beyond its northern
border and act militarily to
weaken President Bashar
Assad.
Despite a state of war
that exists between the
neighbors, a growing number of Israelis are calling on
Prime Minister Benjamin
Netanyahu’s government to
do more to assist Syrian civilians, arguing that Jewish
history of displacement imparts a moral obligation on
Israel to help wounded Syrian civilians.
At a security Cabinet
meeting on Sunday, ministers mulled over proposals
to accept Syrian children injured in the gas attack — beyond a 4-year-old policy to
take in Syrians from rebel
areas near the border for
temporary medical treatment — but made no final
decision. A similar proposal
that was considered in the
wake of the siege of Aleppo
has yet to be implemented
“As Israelis and Jews, the
use of gas takes us back” in
time, said Intelligence Minister Yisrael Katz, alluding
to the Holocaust, during the
Cabinet meeting. “Our obligation as Jews and Israelis is
to offer aid to the victims of
the gas attack. There are
many children and the
elderly…. We must not stand
idly by.”
The angst points to a tug
of war between two schools
of thought on how to grapple
with Syria, a dilemma that
former national security advisor Giora Eiland described
in an interview with Israel
Radio as a “struggle between the Jewish heart and
mind.”
The dominant approach
reflects a realpolitik recognition that Israel, even though
it could topple Assad,
shouldn’t take sides in the
civil war because it has little
ability to shape a new Syria
and is viewed as a pariah by
most of the Arab world.
Although the fall of
Assad would be a strategic
game changer for Israel because of the Syria’s role as a
key link in the alliance between Iran and Hezbollah,
the Shiite Lebanese military
organization, there is fear of
a messy entanglement in
Syria like Israel’s ill-fated intervention in Lebanon’s civil
war in the 1980s. Wary of Islamic State and Al Qaedalinked rebels, some in Israel
even see Assad as a devilyou-know to potential chaos
to Israel’s north.
As a result, Israel has limited its intervention in Syria
to strikes aimed at blocking
delivery of so called gamechanging weapons systems
to Hezbollah, preventing
Shiite militants from establishing a presence in southern Syria near the border
with the Israeli-controlled
Golan Heights, and deterring groups from cross-border attacks.
At the same time it has
treated thousands of Syrians in its hospitals and
sends food, clothes and
blankets to pro-rebel villages along the border.
“Israel has been very
clear that it doesn’t want to
enter the mix in Syria, but it
will safeguard its vital inter-
ests,” said Dore Gold, a former director general of the
Israeli Foreign Ministry
under Netanyahu. Intervention “might create a more
difficult situation. Israel has
been very careful and responsible about what it
does.”
Israel’s biggest concern
about the outcome of the
civil war is to ensure that
Syria doesn’t become a satellite of Iran, with Tehran-allied forces stationed near
the Golan Heights.
Russia’s success in turning the tide of the war and
the humanitarian crisis during the siege of Aleppo have
strengthened the advocates
who would like to see Israel
come off the fence against
the Syrian government and
abandon its policy of neutrality.
“The position that it’s
better to see Assad go has
become more mainstream,”
said Joel Parker, a researcher on Syria at the
Moshe Dayan Center Middle
Eastern and African Studies
at Tel Aviv University.
“Everybody agrees that it’s
better to get rid of him. Even
though that he’s the devil
you know, it’s clearer that he
is the devil.”
Mitnick is a special
correspondent.
L AT I ME S . CO M
S
F R I DAY, A P R I L 14 , 2 017
A5
‘Mother of all bombs’ deployed
[Bomb, from A1]
North Korea, which has
been the target of administration saber rattling for
weeks.
“I don’t know if this sends
a message — it doesn’t make
any difference if it does or
not. North Korea is a problem; the problem will be taken care of,” he said.
Although the Pentagon’s
formal rules of engagement
have not changed, military
commanders appear to have
taken greater liberties in recent weeks — and made
more mistakes.
A series of misdirected
U.S. airstrikes in Iraq and
Syria and a botched ground
raid in Yemen have led to a
noticeable increase in reported civilian casualties.
Earlier Thursday, the U.S.
military announced that an
airstrike this week had accidentally killed 18 rebel fighters battling Islamic State in
northern Syria in the worst
friendly-fire incident of that
conflict.
The military said the
massive bomb — 30 feet long
and 21,600 pounds — was
dropped from the rear door
of an MC-130 cargo plane at
7:32 p.m. Thursday as part of
a U.S.-backed offensive on
an Islamic State stronghold
in Achin district in the eastern province of Nangarhar.
Although huge by the standards of conventional weapons, the bomb is still only a
fraction of the strength of a
nuclear weapon.
The
militants
have
gained strength in the area,
which is close to Pakistan,
and have been locked in a
pounding ground battle
with Afghan security forces
backed by U.S. special operations advisors.
Army Staff Sgt. Mark R.
De Alencar, a 37-year-old
Green Beret from Maryland,
was killed on Saturday after
coming under fire in eastern
Nangarhar. He was the first
American service member
killed in combat this year in
Afghanistan, and the 1,833rd
since the U.S.-led invasion in
late 2001.
The giant bomb initially
falls with a parachute, but a
GPS guidance system then
guides the bomb to its tar-
U.S. Air Force
A MASSIVE ORDNANCE AIR BLAST bomb. One was used for the first time by the U.S military on a tar-
get in Afghanistan. It is the most powerful bomb the U.S. military has dropped since Nagasaki, Japan, in 1945.
U.S. Air Force
THIS IMAGE shows the mushroom cloud created when the MOAB bomb was
detonated at a test site at Eglin Air Force Base in Florida in 2003.
get.
The munition detonates
before it hits the ground,
sending a lethal shock wave
more than a mile and a half
away.
The explosion was in-
tended to send pulverizing
pressure through the rocky
labyrinth of tunnels, where
Islamic State fighters were
able to move without being
detected by American spy
planes, U.S. officials said.
“This is the right munition to reduce these obstacles and maintain the momentum of our offensive,”
said Gen. John W. Nicholson
Jr., commander of U.S.
forces in Afghanistan.
The bomb was moved to
Afghanistan before Trump
took office, officials said, and
Nicholson did not need specific presidential approval to
use it, although the White
House was briefed.
The Pentagon has 8,400
troops in Afghanistan to
train and advise Afghan
forces; most rarely participate in direct combat.
White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer said U.S.
commanders “took all precautions necessary to prevent civilian casualties and
collateral damage as a result
of the operation.”
Speaking by phone from
Achin, Sher Nabi, a commander with the Afghan Local Police, said the bomb
landed about half a mile outside the town of Shogal, near
the border with Pakistan.
Nabi, who commands a
60-man unit of the government militia, said Afghan security forces have carried
out operations in the area
for several days against suspected Islamic State supporters.
Nabi said the bomb killed
“many militants” and destroyed their weapons.
There were no immediate reports of civilian casualties.
The massive bomb in
some ways is a shift from recent Pentagon weapons systems, which use drones and
missiles capable of hitting
targets through an open
window.
Retired Air Force Lt.
Gen. David Deptula, now
dean of the Mitchell Institute for Aerospace Studies
in Arlington, Va., said the
bomb was meant to obliterate a wide area and intimidate the enemy.
“With a blast radius of a
mile, this weapon wasn’t designed for an urban area,” he
said. “It’s going to have physical effects on the enemy, of
course, but it is also going to
create psychological effects.”
John Pike, director of
GlobalSecurity.org, a military policy research website,
said the bomb is a “gee-whiz
weapon,” not a tactical one.
“You use a bomb like this
to send a message,” he said.
“It demonstrates that the
U.S., despite 15 years of
bloody war, is here to stay.”
The bomb was developed
in 2002 to “put pressure on
then-Iraqi dictator Saddam
Hussein to cease and desist
or the United States would
not only have the means but
use them against the unpopular tyrant,” the Air Force
said in a 2008 news release.
It was tested at Eglin Air
Force Base in Florida but
was not used in Iraq. On
March 11, 2003, a test produced a mushroom cloud
visible from 20 miles away,
the release said.
Another U.S. munition,
officially called the Massive
Ordnance Penetrator, or
MOP, is designed to penetrate hardened bunkers.
At 30,000 pounds, it is
even heavier than the MOAB but carries less explosive
power.
william.hennigan
@latimes.com
Twitter: @wjhenn
Special correspondent
Sultan Faizy in Kabul,
Afghanistan, contributed to
this report.
A8
F R I DAY, A P R I L 14 , 2 017
S
L AT I ME S . CO M
THE NATION
Scandal roils Seattle mayor’s race
Three men allege Ed
Murray had sex with
them when they were
minors 3 decades ago.
By Rick Anderson
Ed Murray was supposed
to cruise to an election victory this fall for a second
term as Seattle mayor.
Instead, allegations that
he had sex with underage
boys three decades ago are
threatening to end his long
political career.
The upheaval began last
week when one man filed a
civil lawsuit against the
mayor and the Seattle
Times published similar allegations from two other
men, upending the race for
mayor and setting off what
the paper called “the biggest
political scandal in Seattle in
generations.”
Murray, 61, the city’s first
openly gay mayor, has been a
vocal proponent of same-sex
marriage, fighting homelessness, raising the minimum wage and battling the
Trump administration’s efforts to force cities to cooperate with federal authorities to arrest immigrants in
the country illegally.
The allegations date to
the 1980s, when Murray
worked
with
troubled
youths. The Seattle Times
spoke with two accusers in
2008, but did not publish
their accounts until last
week, when another man, a
46-year-old identified only
as D.H., filed the lawsuit.
The suit claims that
starting in 1986, when D.H.
was a 15-year-old crack addict, and continuing for five
years, Murray routinely paid
him $10 to $20 for sex acts.
Sex with a minor is statutory
rape, though the statute of
limitations has long expired.
In an editorial, the newspaper called on Murray to
not seek reelection.
“Regardless of whether
the allegations are true, he
cannot lead under this
cloud,” it said.
The lawyer for D.H. said
his client had remained
silent for so long because he
Elaine Thompson Associated Press
SEATTLE MAYOR Ed Murray, left, his husband, Michael Shiosaki, and his attorney, Robert Sulkin, prepare to make a statement to the
media. “Regardless of whether the allegations are true, he cannot lead under this cloud,” the Seattle Times editorialized about Murray.
didn’t want his father to
know. But the father’s recent
death freed him to speak as
long as his name was not
publicly revealed, said the
lawyer, Lincoln Beauregard.
In a note to readers, the
Times’ managing editor explained that the newspaper
had decided in 2008 that it
had too little information to
publish the allegations of the
two other accusers. Given
the similarities between
those accounts and the allegations made by D.H., the
paper overturned that decision, the note explained.
One of the men, Jeff
Simpson, 49, told the paper
that in the early 1980s he
lived in a Portland home for
troubled teens, where Murray worked at the time. He
said he was 13 the first time
that Murray raped him. The
other accuser, Lloyd Anderson, 51, said he was also a resident of the home and told a
similar story.
Simpson said he reported Murray to a Portland
social worker and a police
detective — an account the
paper said was supported by
a record from May 1984
showing that the Multnomah County district attorney considered, then rejected, filing third-degree
sodomy charges against
Murray.
Murray soon left Portland and moved to Seattle,
where he became active in
local politics. A Democrat,
he went on to serve in the
Washington state House
and Senate before being
elected mayor in 2013.
In a media briefing last
week, Murray said the allegations were “just not true”
and that “I will continue to
be mayor to this city and I
will continue to run for reelection.”
“Things have never come
easy to me in life, but I have
never backed down and I will
not back down now,” he said.
Murray took no questions and left the room after
a hug from his husband,
Michael Shiosaki, 56, a city
parks planner who has been
his partner for more than 25
years.
The scandal took a salacious turn this week when
the mayor’s lawyer, Robert
Sulkin, held a news conference to announce that a doctor had examined Murray’s
genitals and found no trace
of a mole that the lawsuit
said would prove that D.H.
had seen him without
clothes.
“This is the heart of the
party wing of the Republican Party cudgeled Barack
Obama’s fledgling presidency in congressional hearings over Fast and Furious.
The furor resulted in the resignation of the head of the
ATF and underlined one of
the signature failures of the
Obama administration. The
ATF lost track of 1,400 of the
2,000 firearms that were being monitored.
The government of Mexico announced Osorio-Arellanes’ arrest Thursday, proclaiming it as evidence of the
country’s commitment to
working with American authorities.
The arrest comes during
a period of strained relations
between the two countries,
prompted by allegations by
President Trump and conservative politicians that
Mexican migration is a major source of crime in the
U.S., a contention disputed
by social science and criminal justice statistics.
As for the rip crew’s remnants, in 2015, Ivan SotoBarraza and Jesus Leonel
Sanchez-Meza were tried
and convicted in Tucson of
first-degree
murder
in
connection with Terry’s
death.
Manuel
Osorio-Arellanes, who was shot and apprehended the night of the
confrontation, is serving a
30-year
sentence
after
pleading guilty to first-degree murder, as is Rosario
Rafael Burboa-Alvarez. It is
unclear what, if any, relation
there is between Manuel Osorio-Arellanes and Heraclio
Osorio-Arellanes.
The U.S. government is
still offering a $250,000 reward for information leading
to the arrest of another alleged member of the rip
crew, Jesus Rosario FavelaAstorga.
allegations, and they’re
false,” Sulkin said. The accuser “has absolutely no
credibility and the case
should be dropped.”
In response, Beauregard
said he may seek a second,
independent examination.
In liberal Seattle, the fact
that the mayor is gay seems
to have played little role in
the public reaction to the
scandal. Some commentators, however, have pointed
out that the law firm where
Beauregard works was
founded by John Connelly,
who opposes same-sex marriage and with his wife contributed $50,000 to a failed
2016 initiative to stop transgender people from using
the public bathrooms of
their choice.
Beauregard told the Seattle newspaper the Stranger that he disagreed with
Connelly’s politics and described himself as an African
American civil rights attorney and longtime Democrat.
“I would go to the mat to
fight for gay civil rights,” he
said. “We have represented
many, many gay clients. The
idea that this is anti-gay is ridiculous.”
Gay
City,
Seattle’s
LGBTQ center, said that it
“is not in a position to comment on the specifics of any
particular case.”
The City Council appeared befuddled by the allegations, with President
Bruce Harrell reading a 295word statement this week
that did not directly mention the mayor. “My council
colleagues and I have no intention of commenting on
matters of pending or potential litigation,” it said.
Kshama Sawant, a socialist on the council, issued
her own statement Wednesday. “While I cannot speak to
the veracity of the claims, allegations of rape and abuse
should always be taken seriously and investigated with
care and diligence,” she said.
“Our society, plagued by inequality and enormous imbalances of both power and
wealth, is a painful place for
sexual-violence survivors.”
To some, it sounded like
the start of a mayoral campaign.
Murray, whose Twitter
account describes him as a
champion of civil rights, is
the best-known among eight
candidates who have indicated they’ll run for mayor in
the July 1 primary election
for mayor. He’s also the leading fundraiser, having raised
$300,000.
Praising Murray as a
“relatively successful mayor,” the Seattle Times editorial said that stepping aside
would “clear the way for another qualified, pragmatic
leader to come forward.”
“What is best for the city,
Mr. Mayor?” it asked.
nigel.duara@latimes.com
Twitter: @nigelduara
Anderson is a special
correspondent.
Mexico holds man in border killing
He had been at large
since U.S. agent’s 2010
death involving ‘Fast
and Furious’ guns.
By Nigel Duara
PHOENIX — A member
of a drug-robbery ring suspected in the 2010 shooting
death of a Border Patrol
agent in Arizona has been
arrested deep in Mexico,
leaving just one member of
the original “rip crew” still at
large in a case that highlighted the failings of a guntracking operation that let
firearms fall into the hands
of criminals in Mexico.
The suspect, Heraclio
“Laco”
Osorio-Arellanes,
was apprehended Wednesday in an area known as the
“Golden Triangle,” the confluence of three Mexican
states where drug cartels
control vast stretches of territory. He was identified by
the Mexican marines who
arrested him only as “Heraclio N.”
“At the request of the authorities in the U.S.,” the
Mexican navy said in a statement, “naval personnel arrested Heraclio N. on the
border of Sinaloa and Chihuahua.”
The U.S. Justice Department confirmed later Thursday that the man in custody
was Osorio-Arellanes. He
had been named in an extradition order issued in December 2011, more than a
year after the death of Border Patrol Agent Brian
Terry. The U.S. government
had offered a $250,000 reward for information leading
to his capture.
Atty. Gen. Jeff Sessions
said in a news release that
the capture should send a
message to fugitives. “We
will hunt you down, we
will find you and we will
Customs and Border Protection
BRIAN TERRY, a U.S. Border Patrol agent, was
killed at age 40 near the border in Arizona in an
encounter with a six-man “rip crew” from Mexico.
bring you to justice,” he said.
Osorio-Arellanes was being held Thursday on suspicion of murder, theft and illegal use of a weapon. A previous suspect in Terry’s
death was held two years before extradition to the
United States.
Robert Heyer, Terry’s
cousin and a spokesman for
the Phoenix-based Brian
Terry Foundation, said the
U.S. attorney’s office in San
Diego called family members at 7:30 a.m. Wednesday
to inform them of the
arrest.
“This is great news,”
Heyer said. “The last two
they apprehended have
been fugitives in Mexico on
the loose. That Mexican authorities are still willing to
pursue justice despite the
political climate is really important.”
Terry and three other
Border Patrol agents were
on duty in a section of Peck
Canyon near Rio Rico, Ariz.,
on Dec. 14, 2010, when they
encountered
a
heavily
armed six-man team that
had sneaked across the border and was reportedly
headed to rob marijuana
dealers. Their illegal operation was known as a rip crew.
According to court testimony from Border Patrol
agents at the scene, Agent
Gabriel J. Fragoza saw the
rip crew’s “long rifles and
backpacks.”
They were, he said, “looking for something, and ready
to shoot.” Agent Timothy
Keller said he saw one of the
men with a hand on the grip
of his rifle, the other on the
barrel.
According to court papers, one of the agents
shouted “Police!” in English
and Spanish, and fired nonlethal beanbag rounds. The
men responded with gunfire.
One of the crew was
wounded with a shot to the
torso. Terry, 40, was struck
by a single bullet and called
out that he had been hit.
“I’m paralyzed,” Terry said.
According
to
Agent
William Castano, “Agent
Terry soon lost consciousness and died at the scene.”
The other Mexicans fled
back across the border.
The agents and Terry’s
family have to relive the
events of that night each
time another member of the
rip crew is tried in the U.S.,
Heyer said. The agents’ testimony is the basis for the
convictions, along with
physical evidence and the information obtained from the
imprisoned members of the
robbery ring.
“It’s always difficult to
hear that testimony,” Heyer
said.
While Donald Trump was
campaigning for president
last year, he told the Terry
family he would “open the
books” on Terry’s death and
the “Fast and Furious” operation, Heyer said.
On April 3, Heyer said,
the family spoke to Dana
Boente of the Justice Department,
who
briefly
served as acting attorney
general after Trump fired
Sally Yates.
“We told him we wanted
the pursuit of accountability
in the Department of Justice” and the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and
Explosives, Heyer said of the
40-minute phone call. “We
told him that we believed the
[Fast and Furious] whistleblowers are still being retaliated against.”
The Naco, Ariz., Border
Patrol station was renamed
after Terry in 2012.
Two guns found at the
scene were eventually traced
to a member of a gun-smuggling ring that was being
monitored in the Justice Department-sanctioned guntracking operation known
as Fast and Furious.
The aim of the operation
was to let guns cross into
Mexico to monitor how and
where they were used. U.S.
authorities have been criticized for letting informants
walk away from Phoenixarea gun shops with weapons rather than immediately
arresting them.
The scandal captured
Washington’s attention for a
time, as the insurgent tea
L AT I ME S . CO M
WST
A9
F R I DAY, A P R I L 14 , 2 017
New grasp
of ‘realities
of the job’
[Trump, from A1]
China” policy that is critical
to Beijing after initially
questioning it, and said this
week he would not declare
China a currency manipulator, as he had often pledged.
The
Atlantic
North
Treaty Organization is “no
longer obsolete,” he said at a
news conference Wednesday
with the secretary-general of
the 28-nation military alliance, a direct U-turn from
his stated position shortly
before he took office.
His decision to launch
cruise missiles into Syria in
response to a poison gas attack put him squarely in the
internationalist camp that
Presidents Clinton and
George W. Bush once occupied, far from the neo-isolationist “America first” doctrine that seemed to suggest
intervening only when U.S
interests
were
directly
threatened.
Bush, in a rare public
comment about the current
occupant of the White
House, told NPR on Thursday that the “realities of the
job” often reverse a candidate’s isolationist views.
To be sure, not everything is reverting to traditional policy.
The 1994 North American
Free Trade Agreement with
Mexico and Canada remains
intact. But Trump still
wants to renegotiate it to get
what he says would be better
terms for U.S. companies
and consumers, and he appears determined to build a
wall along parts of the
Southwest border.
The administration has
not withdrawn from the historic Paris accord on climate
change, which sets targets
for emissions that cause
global warming, as Trump
had suggested he might.
But he has signed executive orders to void Obama-
era limits for coal-burning
plants and other environmental
regulations
intended to help the United
States, one of the world’s
biggest emitters of greenhouse gases, meet its targets.
He has squabbled with
the leaders of Mexico and
Australia, two of America’s
closest allies, and held awkward meetings with German
Chancellor Angela Merkel,
head of Europe’s largest
economy.
And human rights and
democratic reform, pillars of
U.S. foreign policy since the
Cold War, have moved to a
back burner as Trump has
lavished praise on Egyptian
President Abdel Fattah Sisi
and other autocrats.
Trump’s lauding last year
for Russian President Vladimir Putin has come to
naught, just as Obama’s
early efforts to reset relations with Moscow went nowhere.
Relations “may be at an
all-time low,” Trump acknowledged Wednesday after the White House accused
Moscow of trying to cover up
Syria’s role in the April 4 poison gas attack, and Russia
accused the Trump administration of committing a
war crime by attacking Syria.
The White House insists
Trump is not abandoning
his convictions but rather is
adapting to new circumstances. His critics argue
that Trump never really had
convictions and that he
merely takes the position of
the latest cable news show
he saw — or the last person
to whom he spoke.
After Trump told visiting
Chinese President Xi Jinping that he believed Beijing
could force North Korea to
abandon its nuclear and
missile testing programs,
Shawn Thew European Pressphoto Agency
NATO is “no longer obsolete,” said President Trump at a news conference this week with Jens Stoltenberg,
secretary-general of the alliance. The remark was a U-turn from his stated position before he took office.
for example, Xi changed
Trump’s mind by recounting
the fraught history of China
and Korea.
“After listening for10 minutes, I realized it’s not so
easy,” Trump told the Wall
Street Journal this week. “I
felt pretty strongly that they
had a tremendous power”
over North Korea. “But it’s
not what you would think.”
White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer sought to
explain the president’s policy reversals by saying others were “evolving toward”
Trump’s positions, not the
other way around.
“The president’s tough
talk on a variety of issues
was to get results for the
American people,” Spicer
said.
Richard Haass, president of the Council on Foreign Relations and a former
senior State Department official, said Trump’s foreign
policy shifts have been welcomed abroad and in the
U.S. foreign policy establishment.
But “discomfort and uncertainty” continue to unnerve leaders and diplomats
because it is unclear
whether Trump’s shifts are
permanent, he said.
“And the mere fact that a
candidate and then a president could embrace such
radical ideas will leave a re-
sidue,” Haass added.
James Jay Carafano, a
fellow at the conservative
Heritage Foundation and
key advisor to the Trump
team, said it was a mistake
to take most of Trump’s
campaign promises seriously, at least on foreign policy.
“There are no U-turns
here, no 180-degree” flipflops, he said. “There was never an actual plan to go soft
on Russia or to pull away
from NATO.”
Those notions, he said,
were campaign rhetoric
aimed at motivating his
base or ginning up news coverage. In extensive meetings
with Trump’s staff, he said,
policy was much more measured, deliberate and mainstream.
Carafano pointed to Japanese
Prime
Minister
Shinzo Abe, the first foreign
leader to meet with Trump
at the president’s Mar-aLago club in Florida, as the
“poster child” for how to deal
with the administration: Ignore everything Trump has
said and walk into the meetings with a fresh slate.
Some of Trump’s shifts
may owe to internal realignments within the White
House.
Trump’s decision to fire
Michael Flynn as national
security advisor and replace
him with H.R. McMaster, a
respected figure in national
security circles, seems to be
pushing policy closer to the
mainstream.
McMaster, in turn, has
brought in officials such as
Fiona Hill, a highly regarded
hard-liner on Russia.
And if Trump’s chief
strategist, self-professed nationalist Stephen K. Bannon, is fading in influence, as
has been widely reported,
that too could create more
room for mainstream opin-
ion.
But those looking from
outside remain nervous.
“Will these shifts endure?” Haass said. “Or does
this indicate that populism,
nationalism and ‘America
first-ism’ are now running in
the
American
political
bloodstream?”
tracy.wilkinson
@latimes.com
Twitter: @TracyKWilkinson
brian.bennett@latimes.com
Twitter: @ByBrianBennett
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A10
F R I DAY, A P R I L 14 , 2 017
L ATI M E S . CO M
Project stalled by
neighbors’ appeal
Mel Melcon Los Angeles Times
THE HOUSING project proposed for a Metro-owned vacant lot, above, faced
upheaval after Metro built a power substation that took more space than planned.
Ce
sa
rE
.C
1st
St.
Floral Dr.
ha
ve
zA
ve
.
EVERGREEN
CEMETERY
Vacant lot
Electrical substation
El Mercado mall
1st St.
St.
ren
Indiana St.
aS
t.
4th
Lo
ing it only affordable housing?”
Huizar said he never
liked the project because he
thought the location needed
more retail businesses.
“We don’t want to create
more dead space,” Huizar, a
Metro board member, told
the hearing. “We want to create more retail space for this
location. And it has been significantly reduced.”
Initially conceived as 43
housing units with 26,000
square feet of ground-floor
retail space, the plan was
changed to 53 units and only
5,000 square feet of retail after Metro built a power substation on the lot that took
more space than anticipated.
“I try to stay calm,”
Huizar said, his voice cracking with emotion as he castigated Metro’s staff for
changing the plan without
consulting him or the community.
“I keep getting misled,”
he said. “If I keep getting
misled, I can imagine what
the community has to put up
with. This is unacceptable.”
Gloria Molina, then a
member of the L.A. County
Board of Supervisors, tried
to assuage him, describing
her experience with a similar
project that had gained
community acceptance.
“I can assure you once
this is in place, you’re going
to be very proud of it,”
Molina said. “You should
meet with them. You should
work with them.”
Huizar cast the only vote
against the project.
Over the next three years,
Gallo attended more meetings and made additional
changes to allay opposition,
among them agreeing to reserve half the units for veterans.
In July 2015, the Boyle
Heights
Neighborhood
Council endorsed the final
plan — 49 housing units and
10,000 square feet of retail —
on a 15-1 vote.
“They tried to engage as
many folks as possible,” said
ee
nA
ve.
lash will be a new roadblock.
“This happens everywhere,” Gallo said. “People
support it in concept. They
think we’re doing an important thing. And then when it
comes to being in your
neighborhood, it becomes
getting over that hurdle. Despite the rhetoric that’s out
there, the political will is
most in need to get these
projects done.”
“What elected people
tend to do is reflect the
wishes of their constituencies,” said Mike Alvidrez,
chief executive of Skid Row
Housing Trust, a large nonprofit developer.
What’s needed, Alvidrez
said, is for those elected officials to take the lead in convincing communities that
projects like the one proposed near El Mercado
would make neighborhoods
better, not worse.
“Now that we’re faced
with the prospect of doing
this on a large scale, we need
that political support to affirm that is true,” he said.
Huizar did not respond
to emailed questions from
The Times, and neither Silverstein nor Tony Rosado
returned calls.
Huizar and both Rosados, however, spoke out
against the project when it
was before the L.A. County
Metropolitan Transportation Authority board nearly
four years ago. Metro was
considering an exclusive negotiating agreement with A
Community of Friends for
use of the land, which had
been a staging area during
construction of the Eastside’s Gold Line extension.
The Rosados objected to
the plan to house mentally ill
people there.
Many of the 30,000 people
who visit El Mercado every
week are children, Pedro
Rosado said.
“Our children will be at
high risk with mentally ill
people only 10 feet away,” he
told Metro board members
at a public hearing. “Why are
you people hiding it and call-
Ev
erg
r
[Housing, from A1]
But one prominent opponent remained: the lot’s
next-door neighbor. The
family that owns El Mercado
— known for Mexican crafts
and food and a popular
nightclub — appealed the
project’s environmental report, saying the project was
too dense, would adversely
affect schools and libraries,
and lacked adequate parking. Since then the project
has been stalled, waiting for
a hearing on the appeal.
After family patriarch
Pedro Rosado died in 2015,
his son Tony Rosado took up
the fight. He is being represented by attorney Robert
Silverstein, a veteran of legal
challenges over Hollywood
development.
Huizar chairs the City
Council’s planning committee, which could recommend
either that the full council
reject the appeal and allow
the project to proceed or require A Community of
Friends to do more environmental analysis, up to a
costly environmental impact report.
Dora Leong Gallo, chief
executive of A Community of
Friends, found Huizar’s failure to schedule the hearing
ironic considering his support for Proposition HHH in
the fall.
Huizar stumped for the
bond measure so enthusiastically that council President Herb Wesson dubbed
him one of the Three H’s,
along with himself and
Councilman
Marqueece
Harris-Dawson.
Gallo said the stalemate
reflects the challenges of
building housing for the
chronically homeless.
The construction of supportive housing in Los Angeles is currently limited to
about 300 units a year by
competition for scarce subsidies. Proposition HHH will
provide funds to greatly increase the pace, but leaders
of the mostly nonprofit
development
community
worry that constituent back-
Boyle Heights
60
500 FEET
Sources: Mapzen, OpenStreetMap
An g e l i c a Q u i n te r o Los Angeles Times
Mynor Godoy, president of
the Boyle Heights council,
who was head of its planning
committee at the time.
In response to community requests, Godoy said, the
developer made modifications to the lighting and
landscaping and agreed to
include day care in the retail
space.
The
architect
changed the building’s profile to interact better with
the street, Godoy said.
Gallo said she also eliminated all windows facing El
Mercado after the owner’s
representative expressed
concern that an apartment
next door might bring complaints about noise from the
popular nightclub.
In March 2016, the L.A.
City Planning Department
granted the required approvals for height, street setback and parking.
But the green light
turned red when lobbyist
Harvey Englander filed an
appeal on behalf of the Rosados. It challenged an administrative finding that allowed the project to avoid
the burden of a full environmental impact report.
Asked why Huizar had
not scheduled a hearing after nearly a year, Huizar
spokesman Rick Coca said
in an email that the councilman was waiting for the
parties to negotiate.
Gallo said she offered to
discuss changes to the project with the Rosados’ lawyer, but he has not responded or returned her calls.
Gallo said she would be
prepared to do more environmental work if she knew
what was required.
“Schedule the darn thing
so we can have that conversation,” she said. “Why isn’t
it being scheduled?”
Huizar’s office said in an
email April 7 that it would
schedule the issue in May or
June.
Meanwhile, time is running out, Gallo said. Metro
has twice extended the
deadline for conclusion of a
development
agreement.
The deadline is now June 30.
After that, Metro would
be free to look for a new developer.
doug.smith@latimes.com
The first annual Los Angeles Times
Night Market will be a bustling outdoor
street food market in Grand Park.
NIGHT
MARKET
MAY 10––14
Tickets on sale at
lafoodbowl.com
GRAND
PARK
L AT I ME S . CO M
S
F R I DAY , A P R I L 14 , 2 017
A11
Latin music takes Coachella stage
[Coachella, from A1]
communities being shaken
by an uptick in Immigration
and Customs Enforcement
raids, artists say that building bridges between the
English-speaking Coachella
crowd and Latino communities presents real-world opportunities.
Jorge Avila of the Los Angeles-based Qvole Collective, a booking and artist
management company focused on what it calls “the
black/brown avant garde,”
describes the climate as “the
perfect storm of circumstances.”
“There’s an urgency for
us to come together,” he
said. “Our place here is literally being threatened. People are getting deported.”
The shift in direction at
Coachella caught many by
surprise — even U.S. immigration agents.
Last month members of
Argentine guitar band Las
Ligas Menores (The Minor
Leagues) learned that their
work visas had been denied.
U.S. immigration officials
had never heard of the Spanish-language quintet and required documentation of its
popularity.
It wasn’t enough that the
band presented a signed
contract or that the band’s
name was on the Coachella
festival poster. “VISA 911,”
read a desperate email from
keyboardist Nina Carrara to
a reporter on the day the
band received the bad news.
“They asked us to present evidence such as newspaper clippings, YouTube
videos, awards (we never got
any...), old contracts, letters
of recommendation of acclaimed artists. And we did,
but apparently they need
more,” Carrara explained.
The band filed an appeal
and, 10 days before the start
of the festival, the visas were
approved. ( As part of the
appeal process, The Times
supplied a letter confirming
that it had interviewed
Las Ligas Menores about
the band’s Coachella booking.)
One of the gatekeepers
responsible for giving the
band its chance at the festival is 25-year-old promoter
Rene Contreras, who is also
making his Coachella debut.
He was in an economics
class at Cal Poly Pomona,
when he was contacted by
Goldenvoice, a division of
Gina Ferazzi Los Angeles Times
BOYLE HEIGHTS cumbia-punk band Thee Commons — with cofounders David Pacheco, left, and his drummer-brother Rene, along with
Jose Rojas — have their last garage rehearsal before heading to Coachella, where they’ll perform on the Sonora stage Saturday.
AEG, to help anchor a new
Coachella stage dubbed the
Sonora.
“It all started with a text
from him, while I was sitting
in class,” Contreras wrote
via email from the Coachella
grounds on Wednesday, referring to festival architect
Paul Tollett.
Tollett described his idea
for the Sonora stage, recalled Contreras, “and told
me I had full creative control
over it. It personally took me
about two weeks to process
everything that was happening.”
Not
that
Contreras
lacked the experience. The
first-generation
Mexican
American founded the annual Viva! Pomona music
festival in 2011. It has since
grown into a must-see event
that celebrates the blurredline bilingualism of Southern
California’s
underground music scene.
Contreras’ musical epi-
phany occurred when he and
some friends had roadtripped a few years ago to Tijuana for the All My Friends
Music Festival.
“When I got there, I was
amazed on how much we all
had in common with the
crowd that lived across the
border and on how we were
so unalike but loved similar
things,” he said. “Here I discovered newer bands and
was exposed to a new culture
of
progressive
creative
ideas.”
Among those booked for
Coachella are Boyle Heights
cumbia-punk band Thee
Commons; Argentine expat
Tall Juan; Colombian rock
group Diamante Electrico;
Mexico City punk band Los
Blenders; and Providence,
R.I., band Downtown Boys,
a self-described “bi bilingual
political dance sax punk
party.”
Add in the ascendant Los
Angeles band Chicano Bat-
man, which will perform at
Coachella for a second time,
the returning Venezuelan
American singer-songwriter
Devendra Banhart and the
Spanish band Hinds, among
others, and there’s a clear
Latin bent among the more
than 100 acts that will perform at the festival, which
launches Friday and repeats
again next week.
“It’s just a good, positive
indicator that we’re an economic force to be reckoned
with, and now they understand that, to a certain extent,” said David Pacheco,
cofounder of Thee Commons.
He calls the political climate and increased awareness of deportations “an unintended spotlight. Obviously there’s a bad side, but
on the plus side we now have
more attention to say something and do something
meaningful.”
Quitapenas’ David Quin-
tero said, “Our parents are
from Mexico, and we’re first
generation, so we grew up
around a lot of Mexican folk
music. But since we’re from
Southern Cali, we’re into a
lot of different kinds of music.”
Although they listened to
a lot of English-language
music, they opted to sing in
their native tongue, Gomez
said, as “a way for us to be
creative in a different way,
and try and say something
that maybe we hadn’t heard
growing up.”
For the Boyle Heights
band Thee Commons, which
will close out the Sonora
stage on Saturday, their direction was set after discovering the influential 2007 collection of Peruvian guitar
music “Roots of Chicha:
Psychedelic Cumbias from
Peru, Vol. 1,” said David
Pacheco, who founded the
band with his drummerbrother Rene. It was their fa-
ther who suggested they
might like classic Mexican
cumbia as well.
Because of the music’s
foundations, singing in
Spanish was a given but not
a requirement, David said.
“It just naturally flows just to
sing in Spanish. We have
some songs in English as
well. It’s just whatever feels
right.”
Carrara of Las Ligas
Menores says that many Argentine bands face a similar
dilemma.
“There are many bands
in South America that think
that to be popular you have
to sing in English, because
it’s what the masses think,”
she says. “But for us it is
really important to sing in
our native language. It’s who
we are.”
randall.roberts
@latimes.com
Twitter: randall.roberts
@latimes.com
N.Y. judge, first
black woman on
state’s top court,
is found dead
Body is discovered
in the Hudson River.
Suicide is suspected.
By Barbara Demick
Brennan Linsley Associated Press
“GIVEN THE UNCERTAINTY in Washington, this is not the time to be trying to carve off new turf and
expand markets and make dramatic statements about marijuana,” said Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper.
No ‘Amsterdam-style’ pot clubs
Colorado lawmakers,
fearing a federal
crackdown, decide
against regulating
bring-your-own sites.
associated press
DENVER — Colorado
lawmakers have backed off
plans to regulate marijuana
clubs, saying the state would
invite a federal crackdown
by approving Amsterdamstyle pot clubs.
The state House voted
Thursday to amend a bill
that would have set rules for
how private pot clubs could
work.
It was a dramatic reversal. Bring-your-own pot
clubs had bipartisan support in the Legislature, and
the measure already had
cleared the Republican Senate.
But lawmakers bowed to
Democratic Gov. John Hickenlooper, who repeatedly
warned lawmakers that he
would veto a club measure if
it allowed indoor pot smoking.
The
governor
also
warned that clubs, and a
separate proposal to allow
marijuana delivery, might
invite intervention from the
U.S. Justice Department.
“Given the uncertainty in
Washington, this is not the
time to be trying to carve off
new turf and expand markets and make dramatic
statements about marijuana,” Hickenlooper told the
Denver Post last month.
Sponsors of the club bill
said that they had little
choice but to back off, leaving Colorado with its current
spotty club landscape.
Colorado already has
about 30 private pot clubs,
according to legislative analysts, but they operate under
a patchwork of local regulations and sometimes are
raided by law enforcement.
Clubs in Colorado frequently operate in a similar
manner to pot clubs in states
where marijuana isn’t legal,
with small groups meeting
up to smoke in a secret location that members sometimes call “Dave’s House,” a
reference to an old Cheech
and Chong skit.
The House amendment
passed Thursday effectively
removes club regulations,
and the remaining bits of the
bill are relatively minor. The
bill could face yet more
changes before a final vote.
Lawmakers who bemoaned the club bill’s demise cited U.S. Atty. Gen.
Jeff Sessions, who has
hinted that states violating
federal drug law wouldn’t be
tolerated.
“I’d like to see [a club bill]
that goes much further, and
that does a lot more, but in a
year with Jeff Sessions, a
small first step is better than
no step at all,” Democratic
Rep. Jonathan Singer said.
Not everyone agreed with
the change, saying Colorado
is wimping out by backing
off.
“It only makes sense to al-
low people to have a place
where they can [smoke marijuana] where it’s controlled
and confined,” said Republican Sen. Tim Neville, who
sponsored a separate club
bill that failed because it
would have allowed clubs to
sell the marijuana people
would smoke, similar to a
bar selling alcohol.
“We have legalized marijuana. Where do we want
people to use it if not at
home? On the street?”
The Colorado bill would
have made it the first state to
regulate clubs statewide.
Alaska pot regulators decided this month to delay action on a measure to allow
on-site marijuana consumption at pot dispensaries, or
“tasting rooms.”
Ballot measures approved by voters last year in
California, Maine and the
city of Denver would allow either on-site pot consumption or so-called social-use
clubs, but regulations for
how those clubs would work
haven’t been settled.
NEW YORK — The death
of a respected New York
state judge whose body was
found floating in the Hudson River on Wednesday is
being investigated as a possible suicide.
The body of Sheila Abdus-Salaam, 65, the first African American woman to
serve on the New York State
Court of Appeals and a
prominent figure in legal circles, was found clothed in
the river near 132nd Street,
about one mile from her
home in Harlem.
Police said there were no
obvious signs of trauma or
foul play.
The New York Daily News
quoted an unnamed police
officer saying suicide was
suspected, but authorities
would not confirm that.
“The medical examiner
will determine the cause of
death, and the investigation
is ongoing,” a police spokesman said in a statement.
Abdus-Salaam was appointed to the state’s highest court in 2013, becoming
the first African American
woman and first Muslim to
serve in the position.
She was known to champion the rights of same-sex
parents in child custody and
visitation cases.
“She was a pioneer.
Through her writings, her
wisdom and her unshakable
Mike Groll Associated Press
THE GOVERNOR said
Sheila Abdus-Salaam, 65,
was a “force for good.”
moral compass, she was a
force for good whose legacy
will be felt for years to come,”
New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said in a statement.
Born Sheila Turner, Abdus-Salaam used the surname of her first husband.
She was born in Washington, D.C., to a family with
seven children. Her official
biography posted on the
court’s website said she became interested in law as a
child watching TV shows like
“Perry Mason.”
By high school, she had
developed a fascination with
the civil rights movement.
She graduated from
Barnard College and received her law degree from
Columbia University. She
started her legal career as a
staff attorney for legal services in Brooklyn.
She married her third
husband, an Episcopal
priest, last summer.
barbara.demick
@latimes.com
A12
F R I DAY, A P R I L 14 , 2 017
L ATI M E S . C O M /O P I N I O N
OPINION
EDITORIALS
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
LETTERS
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Trump takes on a U.N. agency
It was foolhardy for the new
administration to stop funding
the U.N. Population Fund.
A
cross the globe, women and
girls trapped by poverty and war
struggle to get healthcare when
they are pregnant and contraceptives when they don’t want to
become pregnant. Many face violence in refugee camps, endure female genital mutilation, risk being married off as children or lack
things as basic as sanitary pads. The United
Nations Population Fund, which subsists on
the voluntary contributions of U.N. member
nations, has been in existence for nearly 50
years to tackle these and other problems.
Yet the U.S. decided recently to pull all of
its funding for the agency — a foolhardy and
unnecessary move. The State Department
invoked the Kemp-Kasten Amendment of
1985, which bars U.S. aid to any organization
that the president determines supports or
participates in coercive abortion or involuntary sterilization. The funding got pulled because the U.N. agency works in China — one
of 150 countries where it operates — which
has a coercive family planning program. The
U.S. rightly denounces China’s forced “family
planning” practices as violations of human
rights. And if the Population Fund were
somehow facilitating that policy, it might deserve to have its funding yanked. But it is not.
Not only does the Population Fund decry
such practices, it has called on China to dismantle its coercive family planning program.
(In fact, the agency deserves some credit for
moving China away from its one-child policy
to its two-child policy. Still bad, but less restrictive.) Besides, none of the money the
U.S. gives to the U.N. fund is allowed to be
spent in China, for exactly this reason. Nor is
any money from any contributor spent on
elective abortions anywhere.
So in order to make an empty, symbolic
statement about China, the U.S. is pulling
money that goes to efforts like this: maintaining the only maternity hospital in the Za’atari
refugee camp in Jordan, where more than
7,100 babies have been delivered since 2013.
In the immediate future, the Population
Fund will keep the maternity hospital open
with emergency contingency funding, but it
will have to scramble to cover staff salaries.
The U.S. funding also supports reproductive healthcare (excluding abortion), genderbased violence prevention and counseling,
and prevention and management of sexually
transmitted infections in that camp and
other sites in Jordan.
In Syria, U.S. funds go to mobile clinics,
training of staff, and essential medicines and
healthcare supplies in areas where existing
health facilities have been damaged and resources are already strained by an influx of
internally displaced people. Funds also support 42 health facilities and 32 mobile teams
in 10 Syrian governorates.
In Sudan, without U.S. dollars, Population Fund officials say they will have to cancel
obstetric fistula repairs for women whose
bodies have been injured during childbirth.
The Population Fund’s 2016 budget was
$842 million. The U.S. — not the largest
donor — contributed just over $69 million.
The Population Fund hopes to make up
about half of that with other donations. The
agency spends less than $2 million in China.
What’s happening is part of an ongoing
battle in which the agency has been used as a
political football. Since 1985, Republican administrations have invoked Kemp-Kasten to
withdraw funding — or part of it — and then
Democratic administrations have read the
law differently and restored the funding.
House members and Senators have written letters to the secretary of State urging
him to reverse his department’s decision. He
should do so as soon as possible.
Just a few months ago, the Trump administration took an even more disturbing step:
It re-established the so-called global gag rule
— prohibiting U.S. aid to any organization
doing healthcare work outside the U.S. if that
organization also provides abortions or offers abortion counseling.
There are plenty of ways for the U.S. to
limit how American aid dollars are spent —
without slashing all funding from organizations working in desperately poor, underserved and conflict-torn areas of the world.
A vaccination law that works
T
he controversial 2015 law doing away with an exemption that
had allowed public school students to skip vaccinations based
on their “personal beliefs” appears to have worked. California state officials reported this week that 95.6% of kindergartners are fully vaccinated. That’s the highest rate recorded at least since 1998, when a
now-debunked study purported to show a
link between vaccinations and autism.
Overall, immunization rates in the state
rose slightly more than 5 percentage points
in the two years since the bitterly fought SB
277 was passed. Los Angeles and other
Southern California counties that had rates
below the 95% level considered optimal for
preventing an outbreak of measles are now
safely above it.
This data is cause for celebration, albeit a
measured one. Eighteen percent of schools in
the state still have immunization rates lower
than 95%. Also, the vaccination rates are only
for entering kindergartners. Older kids who
were previously exempted weren’t required
by SB 277 to update their shots. There will be
gaps in the collective immunity levels until
those students either meet the 7th grade immunization requirements or move on.
These are problems that should solve
themselves over time, but the data showed a
possible complication: a slight uptick in the
number of students obtaining medical exemptions from the vaccinations, which are
still allowed. These kids really may qualify for
medical exemptions, but if the trend continues, it could point to unscrupulous doctors
trying to make a buck with medical exemption mills. If so, they must be stopped before
they undercut the good work of SB 277.
peace officers,” she was
stating the truth. If these
employees are impacted,
shouldn’t the public know?
The voting public needs
to understand this because
it will impact their health,
safety and services when
recruitment falls off and
public servants go elsewhere.
Michael H. Miller
Los Angeles
::
Irfan Khan Los Angeles Times
A MOURNER pays his respects at a memorial for
the victims of the San Bernardino school shooting.
Gun control: Do it
Re “Growing inured to violence,” editorial, April 12
My heart and deepest sympathies go out to the family
of the 8-year-old child killed in San Bernardino through
no fault of his own, and to the other child injured as the
result of the same incident.
How many more children have to be unwitting victims
because as a nation we will not seriously address gun
control? Has gun violence become so common that we
have lost sight of the need to do something about it?
Gun control is not about eradicating the 2nd
Amendment; it is about establishing guidelines for
owning these weapons and outlawing those kinds that
are good for only one thing: killing a lot of people.
As is displayed on a daily basis, ignoring an issue will
not make it go away. We either deal with the problem or
the problem will continue to deal with us.
Doris K. Reed
Los Angeles
Your editorial advocating keeping guns out of the
hands of domestic abusers
should be a call to action.
Last week, our national
coalition, Prosecutors
Against Gun Violence,
stood in Manhattan with
lawmakers from diverse
states to support pending
bills to do just that. Our
organization previously
joined with the Coalition
for Risk-based Firearms
Policy to produce a template for how changes in
state statutes and law
enforcement protocols
could save lives across the
nation by removing abusers’ firearms at an early
stage.
In Los Angeles, my
office has taken aggressive
action to enforce strong
laws already on the books
and work with our community partners to inform the
public about how to use
these laws to protect themselves and their families.
These enhanced protocols
are the result of teamwork
between the Los Angeles
Police Department and my
office to ensure that every
safeguard is afforded to
victims of domestic violence.
Mike Feuer
Los Angeles
The writer is city attorney of Los Angeles.
::
This election makes no sense
C
an we finally stop electing the
members of the state Board of
Equalization?
The Times’ editorial board has
argued for years that the fivemember board, which administers more
than 30 state taxes and fees, ought to be disbanded and either reconstituted entirely
with appointees or subsumed into the Franchise Tax Board. The quasi-judicial Board of
Equalization, the nation’s only elected tax
commission, is little more than a well-paid
landing place for politicians on their way up
(or down). It’s problematic to have tax disputes decided by politicians, especially when
they raise campaign money from people
whose cases may come before the board. And
it’s unfair and unrealistic to ask voters to
make informed decisions about whom to
elect to such obscure posts.
As if we needed one, now there’s another
reason. According to a recent audit, elected
board members may be misusing the agency’s staff and funds to serve their own political interests. That was one of the findings of
the state Department of Finance after it examined the agency, which handles $60 billion
in sales, property and other tax revenue every year. The audit was launched after another inquiry found the board had misallocated
$47.8 million in sales tax revenue.
According to the audit, board members
spent millions on “educational and outreach”
materials that seemed more like self-promotion, and commandeered administrative
staff to work on pet projects. In one example,
113 Board of Equalization office workers were
directed to do parking and registration duties for a “Connecting Women to Power” conference put on by a board member. Also, the
administration still couldn’t adequately explain what happened to that $47.8 million.
Given the behind-the-scenes nature of
the board’s work, it’s not surprising that its
four elected members may struggle to connect with voters across their gigantic and
oddly shaped districts. Still, tax auditors
pulling parking duty?
Elected board member Jerome Horton
decried the audit findings as an incomplete
picture and based on hearsay. But the sole
member of the board who wasn’t directly
elected to it — State Controller Betty Yee, an
ex officio member who spent 10 years as an
elected member — says there’s “prevalent
misuse of resources.” She wants the Legislature to strip the board of its administrative
duties so it can focus on hearing tax appeals.
That won’t remove all the potential conflicts of interests or reduce the burden on
voters, however. When the audit goes before a
state Senate budget subcommittee for a
hearing next week, all the options for reform
should be part of the discussion.
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
AND
PUBLISHER
Davan Maharaj
News
MANAGING EDITORS
Marc Duvoisin, Lawrence Ingrassia
DEPUTY MANAGING EDITORS
Colin Crawford, Megan Garvey, Scott Kraft
ASSISTANT MANAGING EDITORS
Christina Bellantoni, Matt Doig, Shelby Grad,
Mary McNamara, Kim Murphy, Michael Whitley
FOUNDED DECEMBER 4, 1881
Opinion
Nicholas Goldberg EDITOR OF THE EDITORIAL PAGES
Juliet Lapidos OP-ED AND SUNDAY OPINION EDITOR
Re “Chaos in a classroom:
‘He just shot everywhere,’ ”
April 11
This article says, “As
details emerged, it was
clear the shooting was
domestic violence, not
terrorism.”
But how clear was that,
really? The personal targeting doesn’t change the
fact that it was part of a
violent ideology intended
to intimidate women into
submission.
The killing of about
1,000 women every year in
this country by their estranged husbands or exboyfriends — and almost
never the other way around
— reflects an insistence
that women don’t have the
right to choose their mates
or have a life of their own. I
call that terrifying.
Robert Watson
Los Angeles
Gorsuch takes
a stolen seat
Re “It’s now Justice Gorsuch,” April 11
Isn’t it ironic that Senate Majority Leader Mitch
McConnell (R-Ky.) single
handedly decided who
should serve on the
Supreme Court by blocking Merrick Garland from
being considered after he
was nominated in 2016 by
President Obama and then
invoking the nuclear option to confirm Neil Gorsuch, all in an effort to
replace the strict constructionist Antonin Scalia with
another strict constructionist, Gorsuch?
One would think that a
strict constructionist
would find McConnell’s
actions questionable, as
McConnell essentially
dissolved the separation of
power between the three
branches of our government.
Dave Hoen
Santa Ana
::
With an offhand, nineword exclamation — “I got
it done in the first 100
days!” — President Trump
displayed rank narcissism.
To exult over Gorsuch’s
taking of the vacant
Supreme Court seat as a
significant presidential
accomplishment is beyond
laughable.
When November’s
election gave Trump the
presidency and the Republicans a continued Senate
majority, Gorsuch’s confirmation was a done deal.
The only surprise is that it
didn’t happen sooner.
If Trump is to take any
credit, it’s that he managed
to avoid impeachment
before Gorsuch was confirmed.
Nancy A. Stone
Santa Monica
Democrats’ grip
on ballot jargon
Re “The last word in reform efforts?” April 10
It is a virtual certainty
that California Atty. Gen.
Xavier Becerra will continue the tradition of his
Democratic Party predecessors by manipulating
ballot language to kill any
significant public union
pension reform.
That tradition is a
subtle tactic of unionbacked Democratic officials. It also feeds the party’s hubris in this state that
one-party rule will never
run out of other people’s
money to spend.
It will be an amusing
albeit painful sight someday to watch that Democratic Party’s special interests cannibalize each other
for table scraps while the
firemen, policemen, teachers and nurses enjoy their
excessive spoils in low-tax
states.
Kip Dellinger
Santa Monica
::
Your article elevates a
phony issue about the
ballot summary of pension-reform measures as
somehow the decisive
factor on these efforts.
The attorney general,
who writes the summaries,
knows that the language
must be impartial. If his
summary is biased or
erroneous, there is a process for judicial review.
When former Atty. Gen.
Kamala Harris wrote that
a pension-reform measure
“eliminates constitutional
protections for vested
pension and retiree healthcare benefits for current
public employees, including teachers, nurses, and
As a former labor lawyer, I understand that
unions did their job in
negotiating extraordinarily
generous pension benefits
for the employees they
represented. And I don’t
blame unions for state and
local officials who likely
didn’t even understand the
lunacy of these benefit
amounts or else, even
worse, chose to kick the
can down the road.
But to attempt to prevent reform by referring
not to pension benefits
already earned, but to the
formula that would perpetuate the continued earning
of benefits at these same
rates in the future as
“vested,” is legally wrong
and intellectually dishonest. In benefits law, vested
means already earned,
nothing more.
It’s especially disappointing when this linguistic lie is told by Democrats,
the party that is supposed
to care about regular people. After all, the money
that goes to perpetuating
these benefits isn’t available for schools, healthcare, child care and other
social programs that people need.
Michael Weinbaum
San Clemente
$1 million to be
an American
Re “Trump ally’s idea for
wall: Charge wealthy foreigners,” April 10
What a great idea by
Rep. Dana Rohrabacher
(R-Huntington Beach):
Instead of issuing 50,000
immigrant visas by lottery,
sell them to wealthy foreigners for $1 million each
and use the revenue to
build President Trump’s
border wall.
But I have an even
better idea for comprehensive immigration reform:
Get rid of the visa categories based on family relationships and employees
in high-demand fields
altogether. Sell immigrant
visas for $5 million each
and citizenship certificates
for $20 million. There
would be plenty of takers.
During his campaign,
Trump stressed the importance of ensuring that
immigrants to the U.S.
share our values. Since love
of money, more than family
ties or expertise, seems to
be the highest American
value, granting U.S. residence and citizenship to
the very rich will truly
make American greater
than ever.
Laurie Jacobs
San Clemente
::
Rohrabacher has a
great idea. All we have to
do is change the plaque on
the Statue of Liberty: “Give
us your money! We don’t
need your tired, and we
especially do not need your
poor.”
Craig Arnold
Long Beach
Polio vaccine or
grilled cheese?
On April 12, 1955, it was
announced that Jonas
Salk’s vaccination against
polio worked. It was, simply, very good news.
This April 12, when
America so needs a hero,
when we so need pride in
accomplishments and
science, how was he remembered? Barely at all.
It was, however, proclaimed National Grilled
Cheese Sandwich Day.
Kurt Sipolski
Palm Desert
HOW TO WRITE TO US
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L AT I ME S . CO M / O PI N I O N
F R I DAY, A P R I L 14 , 2 017
A13
OP-ED
Don’t play the money card in Syria
By Steven Dixon
and Rami Nakhla
O
n the morning of April
4, Syrian President
Bashar Assad’s government carried out a
chemical attack on the
town of Khan Sheikhoun in the rebel-held province of Idlib. At least 70
residents were killed and hundreds
more were injured as the chemical,
almost certainly sarin, left its victims writhing in agony and gasping
for air.
Also on April 4, world leaders
gathered in Brussels for the second
day of an annual conference on Syria, now in its fifth year and convened
by the European Union, where
scores of countries pledge billions in
relief for victims of the conflict.
Previously, the pledges made at
the donor conference were earmarked almost exclusively for humanitarian aid. This year, however,
for the first time, the topic of reconstruction was on the agenda. Reconstruction assistance is distinct
from humanitarian aid in that it
would be funneled toward efforts to
stabilize Syria — toward rebuilding
infrastructure and economic development, for instance. It is also distinct in that it would mean dealing
directly with Assad.
Although discussions at the
donor conference are loose — each
country is free to spend its funds as
it chooses, and nothing agreed to at
the meeting is binding — the shift in
debate toward reconstruction,
seemingly subtle, has profound implications.
Louai Beshara AFP/Getty Images
ALLOTTING relief funds for reconstruction is on the table.
The official position held thus
far by most of the E.U. donor countries is that no reconstruction assistance should be offered until a
genuine political transition is under
way. The prospect of reconstruction assistance now, before any
meaningful progress has been
made, signals that the international community is preparing a
new strategy in a bid to resolve the
conflict in Syria: the so-called money card.
Put simply, the strategy is to use
reconstruction funds as an incentive to push Assad toward transition. The West has been largely impotent in its efforts to bring a halt to
the conflict in Syria. Cease-fires
have been routinely broken, and
peace talks have reached their sixth
round without the Assad regime
Republicans learn
to love Medicaid
RONALD BROWNSTEIN
P
resident Trump on
Wednesday signaled his
determination to mount
another drive to repeal
the Affordable Care Act,
but he faces a surprising obstacle:
widespread Republican resistance to cutting Medicaid. That
hesitation, following decades of
GOP efforts to retrench the program, powerfully demonstrates
how the party’s growing reliance
on economically strained and
older white voters is disrupting its
ideological compass.
Created in 1965, Medicaid is a
state-federal partnership that for
most of its history provided
healthcare primarily for lowincome children, seniors and
disabled adults. Both Ronald
Reagan and George W. Bush
proposed shrinking Medicaid by
transforming it from an openended entitlement to a limited
block grant for states, which
would cap federal contributions.
In 1995, during the Newt Gingrich
era, the Republican-controlled
House and Senate, despite some
resistance from GOP moderates,sent such a bill to President
Clinton, who vetoed it.
With the ACA, President
Obama significantly expanded
Medicaid by allowing states to
extend eligibility to more lowincome uninsured adults; about
11 million of the 20 million people
who gained coverage under Obamacare did so through Medicaid.
After the GOP regained the
House majority in 2010, it repeatedly passed legislation to undo
the expansion and sharply reduce
the underlying program itself. But
those proposals were blocked
either by the Senate or by Obama.
Following those well-worn
tracks, this year’s House GOP
health bill proposed to eliminate
the ACA’s Medicaid expansion
and to limit federal payments to
states for the underlying program.
The combined effect would have
slashed federal Medicaid spending by $880 billion over the next
decade and eliminated coverage
for 14 million people, the Congressional Budget Office calculated.
As Trump noted in his Wednesday interview with Fox Business
Network, Republicans are counting on those spending reductions
to help fund the tax cuts up next
on their priority list.
But the proposed Medicaid
cutbacks provoked unanticipated
resistance from centrist House
Republicans, particularly from
states that had expanded eligibility under the ACA. Republican
senators from West Virginia,
Alaska, Arkansas, Ohio and Nevada — all expansion states —
also questioned the cuts. GOP
governors from those last three
states, plus Michigan, added
warnings. None of this guarantees
that Republicans won’t eventually
coalesce around a plan to repeal
Obamacare and squeeze Medicaid. But clearly the program’s
politics have grown more complicated for the party.
One new wrinkle is that the
ACA’s Medicaid expansion pro-
vides clear benefits to providers as
well as patients. In states that
expanded Medicaid, hospitals are
providing much less uncompensated care, which means fewer
costs shifted to paying customers.
Rural hospitals have particularly
benefited “because people there
have less income and less access
to other forms of coverage,” noted
Edwin Park, vice president for
health policy at the left-leaning
Center on Budget and Policy
Priorities.
Working-age adults also report
much higher levels of financial
and medical well-being in expansion states. A 2016 study by the
Commonwealth Fund, a nonpartisan health-research organization, found that far fewer adults
reported not seeking attention for
a health problem — or problems
paying their medical bills — in
New York and California, which
expanded Medicaid, than in
Texas or Florida, which did not.
Even more important than the
Medicaid expansion’s benefits
may be who is collecting them.
Obamacare brought into the
program millions of low-income
working adults, many of them
older but not old enough for Medicare. As Medicaid’s reach expanded up the income ladder, the
GOP electoral coalition extended
down the ladder. Where the two
lines cross, Republicans found the
drive to shrink Medicaid suddenly
threatened their own voters.
Amid growing concern about
the opioid epidemic, for instance,
the Foundation for a Healthy
Kentucky recently reported that
Medicaid provided substanceabuse treatment for about seven
times more Kentuckians in 2016
than in 2014.
In Ohio, an extensive 2016 state
report concluded the Medicaid
expansion had helped reduce the
state’s share of uninsured working-age adults to its lowest level
ever. The study found that 71% of
those covered in the expansion
were white, 56% were male, and
58% held a high school degree or
less. Half were 45 or older, far
more than in the traditional Medicaid population. Many of the
expansion’s coverage gains came
in rural and blue-collar southeast
Ohio counties, where Trump won
at least two-thirds of the vote; in
1996 Clinton carried many of the
same counties.
Before the ACA expansion,
Medicaid served few working
adults. That made it easy for
critics to disparage it as a welfare
program for poor families often
portrayed as non-white. Now
Medicaid not only serves more
working-class adults, but also
provides a lifeline to those mostly
white, lower-income, rural and
small-town communities beset by
rising health challenges and contracting economic opportunity.
Long an emblem to conservatives
of profligate big government,
Medicaid now symbolizes how an
evolving Republican Party is
struggling to align its ideology
with its voters’ material interests.
Ronald Brownstein is a senior
editor at the Atlantic.
and the opposition ever even entering the same room. Neither a
United Nations Security Council
resolution nor a referral to the international court are forthcoming.
And, in Russia, Assad enjoys the
support of a powerful ally.
The offer of reconstruction now,
the argument goes, could act as a
point of leverage over Assad: If you
stop the atrocities, maintain ceasefires, give access to humanitarian
agencies and commit to transition,
then we will pay.
But the logic is flawed. Although
the money card is framed as an altruistic means of relieving the suffering of the Syrian people, it glosses over the fact that Assad’s hold
on power is the primary reason that
Syrians are suffering in the first
place. Offering assistance to Assad
while cutting the opposition out of
the picture would only legitimize
the regime and entrench Assad’s
position.
Proponents also champion the
money card as a pragmatic strategy
— distasteful perhaps, but necessary for the greater good. But even
by this measure, the logic is still
flawed. Financial assistance will
only create a perverse incentive
structure and exacerbate problems.
If reconstruction aid is given to
the regime in exchange for humanitarian access or a cease-fire, what
happens if — or, rather, when —
Assad senses an opportunity to
strike at the opposition and decides
to renege on the deal? Funding may
be withheld until a cease-fire is renegotiated, but the cycle could continue ad infinitum. By offering reconstruction assistance to the regime, the international community
would be giving leverage to Assad
as much as gaining it.
Consider a second scenario, in
which the regime maintains a
cease-fire but obstructs humanitarian access. While the international community could threaten to
withhold assistance if access is not
granted, Assad could threaten to
break the cease-fire if the aid is not
granted.
As this month’s chemical attacks demonstrate, such scenarios
are not farfetched. After all, the regime claimed to have dismantled its
chemical arsenal after killing hundreds in a similar attack back in
2013. If promises are broken when
reconstruction aid is flowing, the
international community would
find itself complicit, however tangentially, in what would have otherwise been the independent actions
of a dictator.
The ultimate goal of the money
card would be to coax Assad into
good faith and perhaps into eventual political transition. For it to work,
however, the promise of reconstruction must hold real value to him.
Assad’s actions demonstrate that
this isn’t the case.
How much value can reconstruction have to a person who has
demonstrated such a willingness to
savagely deconstruct?
A person who has gone to such
extremes to hold on to power — a
person who has unleashed chemical attacks, called airstrikes on
schools and dropped barrel bombs
on hospitals — will not relinquish
power gently.
Economic assistance to the
Assad regime would also have
disastrous repercussions beyond
Syria. By linking adherence to international law with a financial reward, the international community
would be sending a clear signal to
other states around the world that
human rights violations can become a bargaining chip.
There can be no reconstruction
in Syria without a stable transition,
and there can be no transition without justice. The money card is a losing hand.
Steven Joe Dixon is the Syria
program officer and Rami Nakhla
is the Syria project coordinator at
No Peace Without Justice.
DAVID HORSEY
David Horsey Los Angeles Times
The quest for an early primary
By Bill Whalen
P
lucked from California’s
political recycling bin:
proposals by Democrats
in Sacramento to move
the Golden State’s presidential primary election from June
to the third week in March, and
perhaps even earlier, in 2020. It’s
not a groundbreaking concept.
California held “early” primaries in
the four presidential elections
from 1996 through 2008. Judged on
participation and ability to push
forward a victorious candidate,
they produced mixed results.
The state’s February 2008 primary, for example, saw 57.7% of registered voters turn out, with Hillary
Clinton — not the ultimate winner,
Barack Obama — taking the
Democratic prize. Last year’s June
presidential primary at least
matched the final national slates;
it drew 10% less of the electorate.
The politicians pushing for the
primary date change say the state
must right the wrong of its voice
being “silenced” because it weighs
in so late in picking presidential
candidates. One bill includes the
option for whoever is governor to
move the date even earlier than
March, to compensate as other
states jockey for position. (In 2008,
despite California’s February primary date, six states pushed
ahead and the West Coast colossus
got buried in a “Super Tuesday”
avalanche of 22 other states.)
It’s not as if California lacks for
influence in national politics. Right
now, the state seems poised and
panting to sue the Trump administration — on numerous fronts —
with a fervor that suggests Gloria
Allred is calling the shots in Sacramento. And after next year’s elections, the California political Ateam will include Sen. Kamala
Harris and, as governor, either
Gavin Newsom, Antonio Villaraigosa or John Chiang. That lineup
seems likely to produce at least two
mediagenic candidates to wave
California’s Democratic flag in future presidential contests.
None of that means Golden
State Dems will pass up the opportunity to add to their clout with a
primary switch. However, it’s not
so clear the national party, which
also has a say in when primaries
get scheduled, should go along.
Do Democrats really
want to see this state’s
agenda front and
center in 2020?
Any Democratic presidential
candidate coming to these parts in
the early days of a 2020 campaign
theoretically would have to sign on
to a made-in-California agenda of
higher gasoline taxes, legalized
marijuana, earlier prison parole,
stricter gun control and something
akin to universal healthcare — not
to mention the idea of the entire
state as a sanctuary for immigrants who are in the country illegally.
Such policies make for political
success in California — guns, grass
and bigger government have propelled Newsom to the front of 2018’s
gubernatorial pack, early polling
suggests. But in the more socially
conservative pockets of Michigan,
Ohio, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin? Ask Hillary Clinton how that
works out.
One other consideration for national Democrats: California’s ability to pull off a clean, swift election.
Last year, what with the state’s
liberal mail-in ballot rules, it took
more than a month for California’s
secretary of state to certify all the
county results in the June primary.
And that election didn’t include
another way the state wants to encourage voters, same-day registration, which will be in play in
2020. Calling a winner on future primary nights in California? Sounds
like a job for Warren Beatty. Embarrassing.
I could be wrong and moving
California to a slot near the front of
the primary line could pay off for
state and national pols. Certainly,
if the goal is bringing more reporters here and bigger paydays for local fundraisers, consultants and
campaign worker-bees, then the
earlier the better.
But the early-primary proponents also posit that voting long
before June will invigorate the electorate. I’d suggest that if that’s the
benchmark, history indicates the
primary’s date isn’t a crucial factor.
Using registered-voter turnout
as the metric, the most successful
California primary in recent times
would be the contest held in June
1980. As in 1988, 2000, 2008 and 2016,
it was a non-incumbent presidential election — that is, the sitting president in each case was
termed out. What made the 1980
primary different for Golden State
voters was that not one but two
Californians were ballot choices:
Jerry Brown on the Democratic
side, and Ronald Reagan for the
GOP.
Perhaps what Californians
crave most isn’t more time in the
presidential election spotlight but
more candidates of their own to
vote for.
Bill Whalen, a research
fellow at Stanford University’s
Hoover Institution, was chief
speechwriter for Gov. Pete
Wilson.
A14
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CALIFORNIA
B
F R I D A Y , A P R I L 1 4 , 2 0 1 7 :: L A T I M E S . C O M / C A L I F O R N I A
Rift opens
over effort
to revise
pot laws
L AW ENFORCEME NT
Lawmakers and police
chiefs say Brown’s
streamlining proposal
benefits marijuana
industry over public.
By Patrick McGreevy
Photographs by
Mark Boster Los Angeles Times
A DMV OFFICER writes a citation for a disabled-parking violation during an enforcement operation this
week. Investigators stopped 280 people and found that 42 were using their placards fraudulently.
Fines — and media glare
— for parking scofflaws
With TV cameras rolling, DMV nabs placard abusers
By Benjamin Oreskes
Dressed in heavy boots and plainclothes, the Department of Motor Vehicles investigators lay in wait,
ready to strike.
They skulked behind concrete slabs in the parking
lot of the Glendale Galleria shopping center. Their
quarry: customers suspected of illegally parking in
spots reserved for the disabled.
“Hello, ma’am. I’m a DMV officer of the peace. We’re
doing a compliance check,” one investigator said as he
flashed his badge at a woman who had parked a white
Mercedes in one of the spots.
She was asked to produce her license, the placard
and her registration.
But the placard didn’t belong to her.
The woman insisted it belonged to her husband.
But since it wasn’t hers, she was cited — and you
could say she was apoplectic.
The TV camera crews that descended on the scene
only made her more livid.
With tears welling in her eyes, she tried to walk away
[See Disabled, B8]
from the officers as she ex-
DISGUISED as a shopper, an undercover officer lingers at
a disabled parking spot at the Glendale Galleria.
SACRAMENTO — A
proposal by the Brown administration to revise marijuana laws in California is
drawing backlash from lawmakers and police chiefs
who say it would repeal rules
approved by the Legislature
two years ago and benefit
the pot industry over the
public.
Gov. Jerry Brown wants
to merge medical marijuana
regulations approved by the
Legislature in 2015 with
standards set by Proposition 64, an initiative approved in November by California voters that legalizes
the sale of cannabis for recreational use.
The proposal, to be acted
on in a budget trailer bill,
may not win the necessary
two-thirds vote of the Legislature in its current form,
some key lawmakers say. If
the rift results in a prolonged
legislative stalemate, it
could delay use of Brown’s
proposal in some state licensing that is required to
begin in January, activists
worry.
Law enforcement officials and legislators object
that the administration proposal jettisons some provisions of the 2015 regulatory
scheme, including a requirement that pot shops get permits from the cities in which
they are located before the
state will issue a license.
The Legislature’s bipartisan approval of regulations in 2015 was “one of the
most significant accom[See Cannabis, B7]
O’Farrell
donor
faces a
penalty
The man used several
companies to give to
council campaign.
By Emily Alpert Reyes
A Los Angeles real estate
investor faces a $17,000 fine
after writing checks through
more than a dozen companies to help elect City Councilman Mitch O’Farrell, violating city rules that limit
campaign donations.
The proposed fine from
the Los Angeles City Ethics
Commission comes more
than a year and a half after
The Times highlighted the
donations as an example of
how hard it is to tell who is
behind campaign contributions from businesses.
Four years ago, Leeor
Maciborski wrote checks to
the O’Farrell campaign from
limited liability companies
tied to apartment buildings
in East Hollywood and Los
Feliz, city investigators
found. Maciborski, who was
responsible for maintaining
the buildings, was authorized to unilaterally make expenditures of up to $1,000
from the companies.
The donations ran afoul
of campaign finance restrictions. Under city rules, each
[See Fine, B5]
Gary Coronado Los Angeles Times
SKI RUN BOULEVARD in South Lake Tahoe is covered with snow in January. Sierra Nevada pre-
cipitation is significant because the range supplies large amounts of water to the rest of the state.
LIQUID ASSETS? OH, YES
Sierra Nevada sees wettest winter in nearly a century
By Sarah Parvini
A series of late-season storms
has vaulted this winter into the history books, making it the wettest for
California’s northern Sierra Nevada
in nearly a century of record-keeping, according to the California Department of Water Resources.
As of Thursday, an astonishing
89.7 inches of precipitation across a
zone of eight stations in the northern Sierra has been recorded since
October. That surpasses the record
88.5 inches in the 1982-83 rainy season.
Sierra Nevada precipitation is
significant because the mountain
range supplies large amounts of water to the rest of the state.
“When we receive a record
amount of rainfall in the north, that
translates to everybody who benefits from water down the state,”
said Doug Carlson, spokesman for
the California Department of Water
Resources.
Carlson noted that California is
only six months into the water year,
and although the state doesn’t normally see much rainfall in the latter
part of the year, rain and snow in the
months ahead could break other records.
The San Joaquin index, which
covers a zone of five stations, could
also set a record this year. That region is tracking close to the 1982-83
record year.
Experts and state water officials
say California is seeing more of
these intense weather swings as
temperatures warm, making wet
[See Record, B5]
Rich Pedroncelli AP
ASSEMBLYMAN Ken
Cooley was among the
authors of the 2015 bill.
State
audit
clears
charter
group
Alliance CollegeReady Public Schools
didn’t use public funds
to fight teachers’ bid
to join union, it says.
By Anna M. Phillips
A state audit released
Thursday of Alliance College-Ready Public Schools
has cleared the charter
school network of any financial wrongdoing in its efforts
to fight unionization.
Alliance operates 28 middle and high school charters
in Los Angeles. Charter
schools are publicly funded
but privately managed. Alliance teachers, as in most
charters, are not represented by a union.
But two years ago, 67 Alliance teachers began advocating to join United Teachers Los Angeles, a move that
the charter network fiercely
opposed.
As the unionization battle dragged on, it became increasingly contentious.
UTLA officials accused
Alliance of intimidating
teachers and filed several
complaints with California’s
Public Employment Relations Board, alleging that
the network had violated
state laws that allow teachers to organize without fear
of reprisal.
The union also said that
the network was using taxpayer dollars to pay for lawyers and public relations
consultants to defend itself
against the unionizing effort.
But the state audit requested by California’s Joint
Legislative Audit Committee found no evidence of misspending or fraud.
Alliance did spend nearly
$1 million to fend off unionization, the audit found. But
none of that money was taken out of the schools’
budgets, diverted from
classrooms or drawn from
[See Charters, B7]
Chairman of
Steelers dies
Dan Rooney helped
settle two NFL
strikes and led
Pittsburgh to six
Super Bowl rings.
OBITUARIES, B6
B2
F R I DAY , A P R I L 14 , 2 017
L ATI M E S . CO M
SCIENCE FILE
New rules urged for PSA test
Panel recommends
men 55 to 69 weigh
pros and cons before
doing screening.
MELISSA HEALY
For men between the
ages of 55 and 69, getting
screened for prostate cancer is a mixed bag of possible down-the-road benefits and just as possible
immediate harms.
That means there’s no
one-size-fits-all answer to
the fraught question of
whether to get screened for
the most common type of
cancer in men, according to
new advice from a task force
of preventive health experts. After weighing all the
pros and cons with their
doctors, the panel concluded Tuesday that some
men may reasonably decide
to take the test and others
may just as reasonably opt
to skip it.
For decades, prostate
cancer screening was a
routine part of healthcare
for men of a certain age. A
simple blood test would
allow doctors to measure
levels of a protein called
prostate-specific antigen, or
PSA. If those levels were
deemed too high, it was
considered a possible sign of
cancer.
Over time, doctors began
to realize that the PSA test
wasn’t always a reliable
indicator of cancer. They
also saw that follow-up tests
and treatments often
caused serious problems.
The U.S. Preventive
Services Task Force set out
to determine whether the
benefits of the PSA test
could justify these risks.
After examining the latest
crop of studies published up
through October 2016, the
task force concluded that
the answer would depend
on whether a man placed a
higher priority on avoiding
prostate cancer or on avoiding unnecessary medical
procedures that could affect
his quality of life.
RapidEye Getty Images/iStockphoto
A PSA test is ordered to screen for prostate cancer. In a draft recommendation,
experts say the test’s benefits for men ages 55 to 69 are balanced by the harms.
In its report, the task
force advised doctors not to
make the PSA test part of
their standard exam for
men ages 55 to 69. Instead,
they should discuss the
uncertainties about the test
and order it only if their
patients still want it, the
panel said.
That’s a departure from
guidance issued in 2012,
when the task force recommended against using the
PSA test in men of all ages.
The new report still
advises against PSA testing
for men ages 70 and older. In
this age group, the panel
said, the evidence is clear:
Looking for prostate cancer
and treating the tumors
that are found would do
more to erode quality of life
than to extend it.
The task force was unable to come up with clear
recommendations for the
screening of African American men, who are more
likely than white men to get
prostate cancer and to die
as a result.
Nor did the panel offer
advice to men with a family
history of the disease, who
are about 30% more likely to
be diagnosed than men with
no first-degree relatives who
had it.
Prostate cancer affects
101.6 out of every 100,000 men
in the United States, according to the Centers for
Disease Control and Prevention. In 2013, the most
recent year for which statistics are available, 176,000
men were diagnosed with
the disease and 28,000 died
of it.
But screening for
prostate cancer is fraught
with uncertainty, and even a
diagnosis usually raises
more questions than it
answers. Prostate cancer
commonly takes hold in
men who don’t suffer symptoms or ill health as a result:
Among men in their 50s who
died of other causes, autopsies revealed that more than
1 in 5 had prostate cancer.
Among men who died in
their 70s, more than a third
had prostate cancer. Doctors often say that men are
more likely to die with
prostate cancer than of it.
Even upon diagnosis, the
difference between an aggressive prostate cancer
that could kill and one that
might languish harmlessly
for decades is often unclear
to physicians. And aggressive treatment, which includes removal of the
prostate gland or radiation
treatment, impairs sexual
functioning in more than
half of men and frequently
results in incontinence.
Not surprising, an increasing proportion of men
— especially younger men
and the roughly threequarters judged to have
“low-grade” tumors — are
choosing “watchful
monitoring” over immediate treatment.
Studies that followed
men assigned to different
treatment groups, including
watchful monitoring, suggest that 20% to 50% of men
diagnosed with prostate
cancer through screening
might never have become ill.
If as many as half of
prostate cancer diagnoses
are cases of over-diagnosis,
that makes the question of
who should be screened —
as well as how often and at
what level of sensitivity — a
consequential one.
“Unfortunately, no strategy completely eliminates
over-diagnosis,” the task
force wrote in its report.
Some clinical research
suggests strongly that more
prostate cancer deaths
could be averted if physicians used PSA thresholds
that were lower than those
widely used in the United
States to diagnose prostate
cancer. But preventing a
small number of premature
deaths would come at the
expense of putting many,
many more men through an
unnecessary medical ordeal.
The panel’s roundup of
rigorous clinical trial results
suggests that over 10 to 15
years of regular screening
with a PSA exam, a group of
1,000 men ages 55 to 69 years
might lose one or two to
prostate cancer. It may also
prevent as many as three
cases of prostate cancer
that spread to other organs.
However, in that same
group, 235 men will be recommended for a biopsy,
which can cause infection,
bleeding and pain. Of the 100
men who are ultimately
diagnosed with prostate
cancer, 80 will opt for
surgery or radiation treatment, and 60 of them will
suffer incontinence or impotence, the panel found.
If men in this age group
choose to be screened,
performing a PSA test every
two to four years “appears
to provide a good trade-off
between a reduction in
over-diagnosis and a small
reduction in mortality benefit,” the task force said.
For men older than 70,
prostate cancer screening
didn’t offer any benefit, the
panel said. For these men,
hunting for prostate cancer
risked pain, worry and
expense without saving lives
or even warding off metastasis.
The task force’s draft
recommendation comes six
months after it issued its
findings in preliminary
form. That initial report
drew some controversy,
including from screening
advocates who urged that
the panel’s report reflect
stronger confidence in the
lifesaving benefits of the
PSA test.
Some of those critics
asserted that screening
should be credited for a
decline in U.S. deaths due to
prostate cancer mortality
over the last two decades.
The task force responded that this trend started
before the effects of widespread screening could have
been detected. It added that
many other factors, including better treatment, probably contributed to the
decrease in prostate cancer
deaths.
The draft recommendation will be open for public
comment until May 8. When
the panel’s final recommendation is issued, it will
figure in insurers’ decisions
about whether to cover the
cost of PSA testing.
Although screening for
cancers of the breast, cervix,
lung, colon and rectum
must be fully covered by
health plans, the panel’s
recommendations against
routine PSA testing means
that insurers may require
co-payments to cover some
of the cost.
melissa.healy@latimes.com
L AT I ME S . CO M
F R IDAY , A P RI L 14 , 2 017
B3
CITY & STATE
Woman held
in moon rock
sting can sue
Appeals court sides
with 75-year-old who
was detained for
having lunar material.
By Maura Dolan
A 75-year-old woman
who tried to sell a paperweight containing a speck of
moon rock may try to hold a
federal agent liable for detaining her for two hours in a
public parking lot in urinesoaked pants, a federal appeals court decided unanimously Thursday.
The U.S. 9th Circuit
Court of Appeals said Joann
Davis, the widow of an engineer who worked with
NASA, was entitled to show
that her detention was “unreasonably prolonged and
unnecessarily degrading.”
The federal agent “organized a sting operation involving six armed officers to forcibly seize a Lucite paperweight containing a moon
rock the size of a rice grain
from an elderly grandmother,” Chief 9th Circuit Judge
Sidney R. Thomas wrote for
a three-judge panel.
Davis’ late husband,
Robert, was a brilliant engineer who managed North
American Rockwell’s Apollo
project, the court said.
During that time, he was
given two Lucite paperweights — one containing a
fragment of lunar material,
the other a piece of the
Apollo 11 heat shield — as
gifts.
The family believed they
came from astronaut Neil
Armstrong, but the 9th Circuit said the source was unconfirmed.
After Robert’s death in
1986, Joann experienced financial troubles. Her son
was severely ill and had to
have more than 20 operations. He has since died.
Her youngest daughter
also died, and Joann took responsibility for her grandchildren.
She decided to try to sell
the paperweights and contacted auction houses without success.
She
finally
emailed
NASA for help in finding a
buyer for what she called
“rare Apollo 11 space artifacts.” She explained how
her late husband had received them.
Norman Conley, a special
agent and criminal investigator for NASA’s Office of Inspector General, was as-
signed
to
investigate
whether Davis really possessed a moon rock.
He had someone pose as
a broker and call Davis. During several conversations, all
but one recorded, Davis explained how she obtained
the moon rock and insisted
she wanted to do everything
legally. She also mentioned
that she hoped to sell her
late husband’s firearms.
At no point was she informed that all lunar material is the property of the federal government and that
possession was a crime, the
court said.
After obtaining a warrant
to search Davis and seize the
moon rock, Conley arranged
a meeting with her in 2011at a
Denny’s restaurant in Lake
Elsinore.
Davis, who was then 75,
went to the restaurant with
her husband, Paul Cilley,
who was about 70, the court
said. They had married in
1991.
Davis thought she was
going to sell the paperweight
and placed it on the table,
the court said. Instead, the
law enforcement officers
went into action.
One grabbed the paperweight from Davis’ hand.
Another clutched Cilley by
the back of his neck and held
his arm behind his back in a
bent-over position, the court
said.
They took Davis and Cilley outside, and she said
they ignored her when she
said she needed a restroom.
Conley has admitted he
knew that Davis had urinated in her pants, the court
said.
A federal prosecutor later
declined to press charges,
and Davis sued.
Conley contended that as
a government agent he was
clearly immune from liability. A federal judge disagreed,
and Conley appealed to the
9th Circuit.
In rejecting Conley’s appeal, the 9th Circuit said
Davis had presented enough
evidence to show that her
constitutional right to be
free of unreasonable seizure
may have been violated.
“Conley had no law enforcement interest in detaining Davis for two hours while
she stood wearing urinesoaked pants in a restaurant’s parking lot during the
lunch rush,” Thomas wrote.
Davis’ lawsuit may now
proceed.
maura.dolan@latimes.com
Twitter: @mauradolan
Gina Ferazzi Los Angeles Times
ELLIE PAEZ places homemade “stars of hope” along the fence at North Park Elementary School in San Ber-
nardino the day after special-needs teacher Karen Smith, 53, and student Jonathan Martinez, 8, were killed.
‘We can’t let what
happened conquer us’
Educators at school
where teacher and
pupil were slain ask to
be allowed to return.
By Veronica Rocha
Looking to heal from this
week’s deadly shooting inside a San Bernardino classroom, North Park Elementary educators have asked
district officials to be allowed to return to campus
and carry on with the school
year.
Teacher Joyella Beuler
told San Bernardino City
Unified School District
members at a special meeting Wednesday night they
had a plan to move students
who used the classroom
where the shooting occurred
to another space on campus.
She also asked that locks be
placed on classroom doors
throughout the school,
which is closed this week.
“It is important that our
entire school community be
able to heal together our
school,” said Beuler, who
stood alongside a group of
educators from North Park.
“We can’t let what happened
conquer us. We need to con-
Irfan Khan Los Angeles Times
MARK MORALES visits a memorial for the shoot-
ing victims. Nolan Brandy, 9, remains hospitalized.
quer it and we will. We believe that Karen would want
us to carry on at North Park
and she is forever with us.”
Beuler’s pleas came days
after she and fellow educators scrambled to get their
students to safety Monday
when a gunman entered the
North Park classroom and
opened fire on special-education instructor Karen
Smith.
The gunman was Smith’s
estranged husband, Cedric
Anderson. An employee at
the school saw Anderson
and recognized him as
Smith’s husband. She asked
him to sign in and allowed
him to walk unescorted to
Smith’s classroom.
Once inside, he fired 10
shots, stopping once to
reload, and then shot himself.
Smith, 53, was killed. Two
students were struck by
gunfire. Jonathan Martinez,
an 8-year-old boy with
Williams syndrome, was airlifted to a nearby hospital
and died before entering
surgery. Nolan Brandy, 9,
was wounded and remains
hospitalized.
District Supt. Dale Marsden said he met with Nolan
on Wednesday and “touched
his cheeks and saw a beautiful smile.” He said Nolan
could be released from the
hospital this weekend.
“He’s doing great,” Marsden said. “We are so grateful
to see he and his family in
very, very good spirits.”
Marsden said he received
a call from U.S. Secretary of
Education Betsy DeVos this
week, saying “they stand
ready to provide support.”
District officials planned
to meet with North Park students and their parents on
Thursday to talk about the
idea of returning to school
Monday. Parents of students
who were taught by Smith
had also expressed a desire
for their children to come together and talk about how
they are coping, he said.
“We will go through these
things the rest of our lives,”
Marsden said. “None of us
will be the same.”
veronica.rocha
@latimes.com
Treatment of passenger
the talk of Little Saigon
Doctor dragged off
United flight was
known in community
as a musician.
By Anh Do
Minh Phu Le’s cousin
called her about the news
shaking up Little Saigon:
The man who’d been
dragged off a United Airlines
flight, seen in a viral video,
was someone they all knew.
“I can’t believe it’s him,”
Le recalled saying after
viewing the footage, over
and over, of Dr. David Dao.
“And I can’t believe they’re
treating him like that, bloodied and confused. I was so
angry.”
Dao is a familiar presence
in Orange County’s Vietnamese cultural district,
where he frequently performs traditional music, as
well as his own compositions, at community concerts.
Talk of his online image
— ashen and injured — has
dominated discussions this
week at bakeries where immigrants sipped iced coffee
and in hair salons in between
cuts and perms.
Dao, 69, had been heading home to Kentucky after
celebrating at a reunion of
medical school friends in
California. During a stop in
Chicago, officials forcibly removed him from his seat after he refused to leave the
sold-out United flight.
Dung Nguyen, a leader in
Kentucky’s
Vietnamese
community, said he was
stunned when he recognized
Dao as the central figure in
the viral video.
“I just heard about what
happened and when I played
it, I saw his face so scared
and hurt. It made me very
upset because he is a passenger — he bought a ticket
properly. He was already
seated and to be pulled out
like that, nobody deserves
that.”
Nguyen said he texted
Dao to see how he was doing.
Dao responded that he remained in the hospital in
Chicago, “so I left him
alone,” Nguyen said.
“He needs rest and time
to recover. But everyone I’ve
emailed with and everyone
in the community that I’ve
talked to finds this treatment
unacceptable.
It
doesn’t matter if you’re Chi-
nese, Vietnamese, American
or whatever. Nobody deserves to be treated this
way.”
Nguyen described Dao as
a “thoughtful and reliable”
community volunteer, eager
to help at Tet festivals and
offering to teach traditional
Vietnamese music for free to
teenagers, schooling them in
the arts of his homeland.
Dao, who came to the
United States in 1970, plays
several instruments and has
performed throughout the
United States with wellknown Vietnamese entertainers.
Expatriates this week
have been clicking on
YouTube videos featuring
his work and posting them
online in a show of solidarity.
On Facebook, Vietnamese
Americans have highlighted
his community work and his
support of a Kentucky group
that helps the homeless,
saying his past “shouldn’t
matter” when it comes to the
“tragedy”
committed
against him by United officials.
That past? Dao was convicted in 2004 of illegally prescribing painkillers to a patient in exchange for sex. He
surrendered his medical li-
Joshua Lott AFP/Getty Images
DEMONSTRATORS at O’Hare Airport in Chicago protest this week against
United Airlines’ treatment of a Vietnamese American doctor on a flight.
cense in 2005. Regulators
cleared Dao to return to
medical practice in 2015.
“It’s
unconscionable,
what [United Airlines] did.
And the outrage is international,” said author and essayist Andrew Lam of San
Francisco. “Not only Vietnamese Americans are angry, Asian Americans are furious, and that reaction has
rolled across the Pacific because all of us can see ourselves in that situation. We
can be a sitting duck, with no
resource when you’re just
caught in the power game.”
Yet in a community
where hundreds of thousands of dollars can be
raised quickly — demonstrated by past fundraisers
for flooding victims in central Vietnam — there’s been
no rush in Little Saigon to
help Dao, with many believing he will end up with millions from suing United.
“I don’t worry about his
income at this point,” said
Tammy Hong as she waited
for her turn at the My Ngoc
beauty salon in Westminster. “He’s totally doing the
right thing in hiring the big
lawyers.”
But, she said, “you wonder if they picked on him because of his age or because
he’s Asian. Did they think
he’s a quiet minority who
won’t resist?”
anh.do@latimes.com
B4
F R I DAY, A P R I L 14 , 2 017
L ATI M E S . CO M
ATF flags
arms dealing
by officers
Agency warns of trend
in unlicensed resale of
restricted weapons by
law enforcement.
By Greg Moran
and Lyndsay Winkley
SAN DIEGO — The head
of the ATF’s office in Los Angeles has sent a memo to
Southern California police
chiefs and sheriffs saying the
agency has found law enforcement officers buying
and reselling guns in what
could be a violation of federal firearms laws.
The memo from Eric
Harden, special agent in
charge of the federal Bureau
of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives’ Los
Angeles field division, describes the finding as an
“emerging problem” and expresses concern about “the
growing trend of law enforcement officials engaging
in the business of unlicensed
firearms dealing.”
He did not say how many
officers the agency has
found purchasing and reselling weapons, but the
March 31 memo says some
officers had bought more
than 100 firearms. Some of
the guns have been recovered at crime scenes.
But Harden states that
the goal is “to educate, not
investigate, to ensure law enforcement officials comply
with federal law in order to
avoid unnecessary public
embarrassment to themselves and your department/
agency.”
His memo focuses on the
purchase and resale of “off
roster” firearms. Those are
guns that are not on an approved list of weapons that
can be sold to the public.
The California law establishing the roster has an exemption that allows sworn
peace officers to purchase
such weapons, and an additional one that allows officers to resell the guns under
certain conditions. But if officers are buying and reselling weapons for profit as
a business, they need a federal firearms license, or FFL.
The lack of a license is the
conduct that ATF has uncovered and is the subject of
the memo.
That amounts to a violation of federal law, the memo
says. In addition, if a gun is
bought with the intent to sell
it or on behalf of someone
else and that was not disclosed on federal transaction records — known as a
“straw purchase” — that
also breaks federal law.
Selling without a license
can carry a maximum sentence of five years in prison.
Lying on the federal form
carries a maximum 10-year
penalty.
It is unclear when the
ATF discovered the problems, or what specifically
prompted the memo.
Ginger Colbrun, spokeswoman for the ATF Los Angeles office, said the agency
noticed that some firearms
recovered at crime scenes
were found to have been purchased within the last three
years.
That “time to crime”
measure developed by the
ATF shows the time frame
from when a gun is sold by a
licensed dealer to when it is
recovered by police during a
criminal investigation. The
national average is 10 years.
A shorter time period can indicate the gun was the product of a straw purchase —
bought in order to be sold
quickly.
After spotting the trend
in routine trace reports, the
agency looked closer, Colbrun said. “After further investigation, ATF noticed
some law enforcement officers had been making significant purchases of firearms,” she said.
She declined to be more
specific, saying there were
ongoing investigations.
Colbrun said the memo,
addressed to “Dear Law Enforcement Partner,” didn’t
indicate that officers who
might be breaking federal
gun laws were getting special treatment.
“There is no extra consideration,” she said. “We believe the most effective way
to stop the behavior is to educate law enforcement in
what the laws are.”
The California Police
Chiefs Assn., which represents chiefs and sheriffs
across the state, emailed the
memo to its members this
week. It was then forwarded
to local agencies.
Federal prosecutions of
state law enforcement officers for selling off-roster
weapons are rare. The most
recent occurred in Sacramento County, when former
Sheriff ’s Deputy Ryan McGowan was found guilty in
June 2015 of selling guns illegally and falsifying federal
records to do it.
Prosecutors said he sold
25 guns at an inflated price
between 2008 and 2011. McGowan also worked with a licensed gun shop to further
circumvent federal law.
One buyer converted two
guns to assault weapons and
later got into a six-hour
standoff with a SWAT team.
He was sentenced in June to
18 months in prison.
greg.moran
@sduniontribune.com
lyndsay.winkley
@sduniontribune.com
Moran and Winkley write
for the San Diego
Union-Tribune.
‘Heiress’ gets
prison sentence
Sparkle Soojian
receives three years
for involvement in
2015 choking death.
By Andy Nguyen
The self-proclaimed heiress to an Armenian crackerbread company was sentenced to three years in prison last week for her involvement in a man’s 2015 choking
death.
Sparkle Soojian, who
claimed on her website to be
the heiress to the Ak Mak
cracker-bread
company,
pleaded guilty to involuntary manslaughter in the
death of John Michael KingSmith, 31.
Soojian’s then-boyfriend,
Jared
Kasiewicz,
has
pleaded guilty to voluntary
manslaughter; his sentencing is scheduled for June.
King-Smith was the exboyfriend of Soojian’s roommate and had shown up unannounced at their Glendale apartment on the night
of Sept. 10, 2015, according to
court testimony.
An altercation broke out,
and
Soojian
texted
Kasiewicz to come over.
When the former Marine
arrived at the apartment, he
tackled King-Smith and
placed him in a chokehold,
according to court testimony.
Video recorded during
the incident reportedly
shows Kasiewicz choking
King-Smith and asking people nearby for rope to tie him
up. He then bound KingSmith’s wrists to his feet.
Kasiewicz washed off the
blood he had gotten on himself during the scuffle, then
told several people in the
apartment he “wasn’t here”
and left, according to court
testimony.
Soojian then called police
to report a break-in had occurred and said that neighbors tied up King-Smith.
When officers arrived,
they found King-Smith in a
state of medical distress. He
was taken to a hospital,
where he was pronounced
dead.
According to the Los Angeles County coroner’s office, King-Smith died of asphyxia and a compressed
neck.
andy.nguyen
@latimes.com
Nguyen writes for Times
Community News.
Photographs by
Irfan Khan Los Angeles Times
Fire burns
2 homes;
5 injured
Five people were injured, two critically, and
a family pet was killed
when flames swept
through two homes in
the 16500 block of Las
Casas Place in Pacific
Palisades early Thursday, according to the Los
Angeles Fire Department. The blaze apparently broke out at 2:14
a.m. in grass between
the residences, the department said.
Schools win grants to replicate
Two L.A. Unified
campuses will receive
$750,000 to re-create
themselves elsewhere.
By Howard Blume
A private effort to reshape public education in
Los Angeles took its next
step Thursday with the announcement that two public
schools
would
receive
$750,000 grants to re-create
themselves in other locations.
Public Service Community School and King/Drew
Magnet High School of Medicine and Science, both located south of downtown
L.A., got the money from
Great Public Schools Now, a
nonprofit group that says it
wants to replicate successful
schools of any kind.
Although the group is
closely associated with efforts to expand the number
of charter schools in L.A., it
has made a point of also
sharing funding under its
control with programs of the
Los Angeles Unified School
District.
“We believe this strategy
of dramatically expanding
schools is a smart way of ensuring that all students will
have access to the best that
schools have to offer,” Myrna
Castrejón, executive director of Great Public Schools
Now, said in a statement.
Union leaders and charter school critics remain
skeptical of Great Public
Schools Now, which is less
than two years old. They’ve
called its aid to L.A. Unified a
form of tokenism compared
with relatively vast sums
that well-heeled backers of
the group have provided in
years past to charter operators. These critics have
said they expect Great Public Schools Now to continue
that pattern.
Alex Caputo-Pearl, president of United Teachers Los
Angeles, the local teachers
union, said of the grants,
“This is the same old bait
and switch.”
Great Public Schools
Now, he said, is one component of a broader effort to
move more of the public education system into private
control, including for-profit
entities.
Charters are privately
operated public schools that
are free from some restrictions that govern traditional
campuses. Most are nonunion.
The new district schools
would retain union representation.
“This is a new opportunity for our district, and when
these funds became available, it was always our goal
to seek them,” said Chris
Downing, superintendent of
L.A. Unified’s 148 Local District South schools. “We feel
confident we’re going to do a
good job with it.”
Downing oversaw both
successful proposals — it
isn’t clear that there were
any other submissions —
with teams made up of his
central-office staff and the
principals of each school. Up
to this point, teachers have
not played a crucial role, although faculty at Public
Service provided some feedback “about what makes
their school a quality
school,” Downing said.
The teachers talked
about Public Service’s instructional focus and its ongoing teacher training,
Downing added.
A portion of the funding
could go to training or to free
teachers and administra-
tors from some of their normal duties during the planning phase. The schools are
expected to open in fall 2018.
Both Public Service and
King/Drew opened on new
campuses, which is not likely
to be the case with their
clones. No decision has been
made on locations, other
than that they’ll be in South
Los Angeles.
The schools currently
enroll a combined 2,000 students; the goal is to serve
1,000 more. Both schools
have low-income, minority
populations
and
have
achieved higher test scores
than some surrounding
campuses.
“These schools are two
great examples of success at
L.A. Unified,” said district
Supt. Michelle King. “We are
happy to serve more students and give them the
quality education they deserve.”
If King could win these
additional students back
from charter schools, other
school districts or private
schools, she’d be achieving
one of her major goals: reversing years of declining
enrollment. If, instead, the
students are pulled from
other district programs,
possibly weakening their viability — not so much.
The grant submissions —
about 30 pages long — were
reviewed by a selection committee, which also conducted interviews.
Its members were Derrick Chau, senior executive
director of instruction for
L.A. Unified, who was chosen by King; Elmer Roldan,
director of education policy
for United Way of Greater
L.A. and a former senior
staff member for school
board member Monica Garcia; Dan Nieman, corporate
citizenship manager at Northrop Grumman, who was
once a senior staff member
of former school board
member Marlene Canter;
Maria Casillas, a Great Public Schools Now board member and former L.A. Unified
senior administrator who
became a charter school
backer; and education consultants Becca Bunn and
Jamie Prijatel.
Earlier
grant-winners
have included: Teach For
America, a two-year teaching program; Heart of Los
Angeles, an enrichment program for students; Equitas
Academy Charter Schools,
for a building project; and
several charter schools hoping to build on efforts to retain successful teachers.
howard.blume
@latimes.com
Dillon Deaton Los Angeles Times
MYRNA CASTREJÓN , center, leads Great Public Schools Now, which will give
grants to two L.A. public schools. It has also raised the ire of charter school critics.
L AT I M E S. C O M
F R I DAY , A P R I L 14 , 2 017
B5
Investor’s donations
violated city rules
[Fine, from B1]
donor can give only a limited
amount to each candidate
running — $700 per election
at the time.
But investigators found
that several sets of the companies had a majority of the
same
members,
which
means they were considered
to be the same donors under
city rules.
All in all, the limited liability company donations
exceeded city restrictions by
$3,000, city investigators
found. Maciborski was held
responsible for the violations because he controlled
the campaign contributions
from the companies, according to a city summary of the
investigation.
The Times initially drew
attention to the donations
because state filings showed
that the LLCs were headed
by the same person, raising
questions about whether
some or all of the campaign
contributions came from the
same donors.
Campaign finance experts said it was impossible
to tell, however, without access to internal records that
were not publicly available.
Many business entities —
particularly small, privately
held limited liability companies — don’t have to publicly
report who owns them. That
can make it hard to tell who
is giving the money and
whether campaign rules are
being followed.
When a reporter first inquired about the campaign
contributions,
O’Farrell
spokesman Tony Arranaga
said the councilman had not
been aware of any relationship between the companies. City investigators were
able to determine the ties
between the business entities after Maciborski handed over operating agreements.
To make it clearer where
political donations are coming from, the Ethics Commission
has
weighed
whether to demand more information from businesses
and other groups that give
to local campaigns. But so
far, no changes have been
made.
Councilman David Ryu
suggested banning such
donations entirely, but that
idea failed to gain traction.
Campaign consultants argued that barring donations
from business entities would
simply spur them to fund independent
committees,
which can accept donations
of any size.
Maciborski did not respond to requests for comment Thursday. In the past,
the real estate investor has
been involved with the Hollywood Chamber of Commerce and neighborhood
groups in Los Feliz and Hollywood, which includes
areas represented by O’Farrell.
Maciborski told investigators that he had signed
the company checks to
O’Farrell four years ago because he thought the thencandidate’s “pro-growth”
platform and stance on rent
control lined up with the interests of the limited liability
companies, according to the
city.
Maciborski also contributed, in his own name, to
O’Farrell’s officeholder account that fall. Emails show
that he was in touch with
O’Farrell after he was first
elected: That fall, Maciborski repeatedly reached
out to schedule meetings
with the councilman over
breakfast or lunch.
He also asked the councilman to write him letters of
recommendation for university programs, including
an MBA program at London
Business School, and an
O’Farrell staffer was tasked
with the job.
Arranaga, the O’Farrell
spokesman, said he didn’t
want to speculate on what
Maciborski was referring to
regarding the councilman’s
position on rent control. In
an email, Arranaga said that
O’Farrell had committed to
address the housing crisis by
preserving rent-stabilized
units. He did not respond to
additional questions about
Maciborski and their meet-
ings.
Last month, Maciborski
signed a proposed agreement to pay a $17,000 fine for
the violations, which is half
of the maximum possible
penalty. City investigators
said they suggested the
lower fine because Maciborski had cooperated with
the city probe.
The Ethics Commission
is slated to vote on the proposed fine for Maciborski on
Tuesday.
The commission will also
vote on a proposed $22,500
fine for Jimmy Blackman, a
registered lobbyist who used
to work at City Hall, for
breaking “revolving door”
rules that restrict how and
when former city officials
can try to sway city decisions.
Blackman worked for
Antonio Villaraigosa when
the politician served as
councilman and later as
mayor, and then became
chief of staff to then-Councilman Dennis Zine. After he
stopped working for the city
in 2013, Blackman formed a
lobbying firm that started
representing the firefighters
union.
Under city rules, highranking officials like Blackman are barred from lobbying city officials for one year
immediately after leaving
their city job. But less than a
year after his departure,
Blackman repeatedly reached out to city officials to tell
them where the union stood
on budget proposals, a city
investigation found.
Like Maciborski, Blackman could have faced a
much higher penalty, but
city investigators suggested
imposing half of the maximum fine because he had
been cooperative.
“In an effort to advocate
for Los Angeles City Firefighters and the communities they serve, I made a mistake and I take full responsibility for the oversight,”
Blackman said in an email
Thursday.
emily.alpert@latimes.com
Twitter: @LATimesEmily
Gary Coronado Los Angeles Times
A SKIER at heavily blanketed Northstar California Resort in Truckee. Two years
ago, the lack of snow left locals in many parts of the Sierra Nevada anxious.
This wet winter is one
for the history books
[Record, from B1]
years wetter and dry years
drier.
“California
is
North
America’s most variable climate,” said Jeffrey Mount, a
water expert at the Public
Policy Institute of California.
“The year-to-year differences in precipitation are unmatched.”
Still, Mount said, this is a
“benign extreme wet year.”
“What’s happening here
is great for Southern California. This relieves pressure
on and creates an opportunity for Southern California
to store more of their water
and groundwater,” he said.
“It’s really nice to take some
pressure off of everybody, including the environment.”
Two years ago, the lack of
snow left locals in many
parts of the Sierra anxious.
The drought hurt ski resorts and changed the landscape of the mountains. In
some areas, trees died at an
alarming rate. In others, the
typically
snow-capped
peaks were bare and dry.
This winter, many residents say they’ve never seen
so much snow.
“There’s just been too
many road closures, too
many power outages, and
just too much snow and nowhere to put it,” said Janet
Tuttle, who with her husband owns Donner Ski
Ranch, one of the oldest ski
resorts in the state. She had
a better season financially in
How to Raise
a Reader
• tips and advice for parents • book recommendations
• local resources guide
Available in Spanish and English
View the guide online and order your free copy at
latimes.com/readingby9
the very ordinary weather of
last year.
The
intense
winter
prompted Gov. Jerry Brown
last week to finally declare
the drought over in all counties except Fresno, Kings,
Tulare
and
Tuolumne,
where diminished groundwater levels mean there is
still a need for emergency
drinking water.
But right now, the aboveground water supply is
much improved for most
parts of the state.
sarah.parvini
@latimes.com
Twitter: @sarahparvini
Times staff writer
Rong-Gong Lin II
contributed to this report.
B6
F R I DAY, A P R I L 14 , 2 017
S
L AT I ME S . CO M
OBITUARIES
DA N ROONEY, 1932 - 2017
Owner turned Steelers into a dynasty
By Sam Farmer
H
is NFL franchise was
dominant in the fall,
but Pittsburgh Steelers Chairman Dan
Rooney was a man for
all seasons.
He helped settle two players’
strikes, came up with a rule that
promoted diversity in the coaching
and executive ranks, collected six
Super Bowl rings along the way
and served as United States ambassador to Ireland in his late 70s.
The modest and unassuming
Rooney, among the most beloved
owners in sports, died Thursday at
84.
“Few men have contributed as
much to the National Football
League as Dan Rooney,” Commissioner Roger Goodell said in a
statement. “A member of the Pro
Football Hall of Fame, he was one
of the finest men in the history of
our game and it was a privilege to
work alongside him for so many
years.”
Rooney, who took over the team
in the 1960s from his father, Art
Rooney Sr., took a stumbling franchise to staggering heights in the
1970s, with four championships in
six years. He played a pivotal role in
assembling the team’s legendary
1974 draft class, which included future Hall of Famers Lynn Swann,
John Stallworth, Jack Lambert
and Mike Webster.
He was instrumental in resolving players’ strikes in 1982 and ’87,
Gene J. Puskar Associated Press
‘HE KNOWS WHAT WORKS’
Dan Rooney, one of the most beloved owners in sports, took a stumbling Steelers franchise to
staggering heights in the 1970s and was pivotal in resolving two players’ strikes in the 1980s.
and in 2003 he helped establish
what would become known as the
“Rooney Rule,” which requires
teams to interview minority candidates for head coaching and senior
football-operation positions.
When it came to loyalty to their
coaches, the Steelers practiced
what they preached. Whereas
other teams impatiently burn
through head coaches, the Steelers
have had three since 1969 — Chuck
Noll, Bill Cowher and Mike Tomlin.
“Most owners call me or GMs,
and they say, ‘What are you thinking?’ or ‘Give me some advice,’ ”
former NFL coach Tony Dungy, a
onetime Steelers player and a
member of the Pro Football Hall of
Fame, told The Times in January.
“I say, ‘Call Dan Rooney and ask
him how he does it. He’s hired three
coaches in 50 years, they’ve all gone
to Super Bowls. He’s never had to
fire a coach. He’s got a formula. He
knows what works for him.’ ”
Born July 20, 1932, Rooney
played quarterback for North
Catholic High School in Pittsburgh
and would have earned first-team
all-Catholic League honors but for
another young talent, Johnny
Unitas, a future Hall of Famer who
briefly played for the Steelers.
Rooney made the second team.
After
graduating
from
Duquesne University in 1955,
Rooney began working for his father and was named president of
the Steelers in 1975. He held that
position until 2003, when he assumed the chairman role and his
son, Art Rooney II, took over as
president.
In 2009, Rooney was appointed
U.S. ambassador to Ireland by
President Obama and served until
his resignation in 2012. Four years
later, the Jackie Robinson Foundation presented Rooney its Lifetime
Achievement Award.
“Dan Rooney epitomized what
has made not just the Steelers, but
the NFL and competitive sports,
so adored,” said Larry Paul, a Los
Angeles resident whose family
owns the largest non-Rooney share
of the Steelers. “His deep drive for
the betterment of our team, our
game and our country knew no limits. His contributions to the game
of football and the Steelers will provide an enduring legacy that will
transcend time.”
Rooney is survived by Patricia,
his wife of 65 years, as well as seven
children, 20 grandchildren, five
great-grandchildren and four
brothers.
sam.farmer@latimes.com
The Associated Press contributed
to this report.
T ED DY GET TY GASTON, 1913 - 2017
Wrote revealing memoir
about her marriage to Getty
By Steve Marble
H
Chris Pizzello Invision/AP
‘HILARIOUS AND UNFORGETTABLE’
Charlie Murphy, shown in 2012, was perhaps best known for his
appearances on Dave Chappelle’s Comedy Central show.
CHARL IE MURPHY
Eddie Murphy’s
brother made own
mark in comedy
associated press
C
harlie Murphy, older
brother of Eddie Murphy and a comic performer in his own right
who turned encounters
with Rick James and Prince into
standout sketches on “Chappelle’s Show,” has died. He was 57.
Murphy died Wednesday in
New York of leukemia, his representative, Domenick Nati, said.
He was perhaps best known for
his appearances on Dave Chappelle’s Comedy Central show. In
the recurring segment “Charlie
Murphy’s True Hollywood Stories,” Murphy would recount how
his brother’s fame brought him
into the orbit of the biggest stars.
His versions of the experiences,
played out by him, Chappelle and
others, became enduring hits.
In one sketch, James is shown
as an impulsive big-mouth who
keeps spouting, “I’m Rick James,
[expletive]!” and trades punches
with Murphy.
In another, Prince is mocked
for his frilly shirt but then shows
his slick moves on the basketball
court. The music legend then
serves everyone pancakes.
“Who the … could make up”
those events, Murphy asked at the
end of the sketch.
He collaborated with his
brother in writing the films “Nor-
bit” and “Vampire in Brooklyn,”
both of which starred Eddie Murphy.
He voiced a role in the animated TV series “The Boondocks” and also appeared in the
comedy series “Black Jesus.”
Fellow celebrities mourned his
death.
Comedian Chris Rock tweeted,
“We just lost one of the funniest
most real brothers of all time.”
Former Lakers great Magic Johnson tweeted that “I haven’t seen
anything as funny as Charlie Murphy & Dave Chappelle’s skits on
the Chappelle’s Show!” and
“Hamilton” playwright Lin-Manuel Miranda tweeted that Murphy’s “storytelling was hilarious
and unforgettable.”
D.L. Hughley, who toured with
Murphy and other comedians recently, tweeted: “After every gig,
he rushed home to be with his
kids. He died with gigs on the
books.”
Murphy’s feature films include
“Our Family Wedding,” “King’s
Ransom” and “CB4.”
He is credited with appearances on episodes of the Starz TV
drama series “Power” to run later
this year.
“He joined ‘Power’ for our upcoming season, and his talent
shines in every scene,” the channel
said in a statement.
news.obits@latimes.com
e was one of America’s
richest men; she was a
crimson-haired dinner club singer in New
York who aspired to
be in opera.
Together, J. Paul Getty and
Teddy Lynch forged a complex
and intermittently stormy relationship that survived a world war
and long stretches of separation
and imprisonment, but was ultimately undone by the cruelest of
events: the death of a child.
Decades after Getty died,
Teddy Getty Gaston retraced
their marriage in the 2013 memoir
“Alone Together: My Life With J.
Paul Getty,” a story of glamour
and pain in early 20th century
America that pulled back some of
the mystique from one of America’s best-known billionaires.
Gaston, who continued to live
near the couple’s onetime Pacific
Palisades villa that eventually became part of the J. Paul Getty Museum, died April 8 at the age of 103.
Gaston, her daughter said, remained mentally agile until her
death and — her fondness for opera still in full bloom — listened to
the entirety of “Madame Butterfly” a week before she died.
Born Sept. 13, 1913, in Chicago,
Gaston grew up in Greenwich,
Conn., before going off to New York
to work as a singer. Her first job
singing at a dinner club paid $25 a
week plus a free meal — decent
enough, she felt, for the Depression era.
When Getty met Gaston —
then Teddy Lynch — she was singing at a New York nightclub. Getty
told her she had a nice voice. They
danced. They became a couple,
there to be seen at the Stork Club
or the Russian Tea Room, drifting
through the night with Bette
Davis and Henry Fonda.
When Gaston decided to take
opera singing lessons, Getty
agreed to foot the bill if she paid
him 10% of her future singing earnings. In a 2013 interview with The
Times, she said the financial arrangement was actually her idea.
But with Getty’s lasting image as a
penny-pincher, some wondered.
When the two later married in
Rome in 1939, Getty had her sign a
prenuptial agreement, commonplace in Hollywood now but almost unheard of then.
Gaston studied opera in England and Italy, staying on even
when Getty returned to the United
States and the drumbeat of war
grew louder in Europe. As tensions
abroad began to build, Gaston extended her visa by signing on as a
correspondent for the New York
Herald Tribune. She was eventually accused by Italy’s ruling National Fascist Party of being a spy
Al Seib Los Angeles Times
A STORY OF GLAMOUR AND PAIN
Teddy Getty Gaston’s 2013 memoir of life with J. Paul Getty
pulled back some of the mystique from the oil tycoon.
and was jailed, freed only when her
employer vouched that she was a
journalist.
When she returned to the
United States in 1942, Getty had
moved to Oklahoma to run an aircraft business, his contribution to
the war effort. Though it may have
been an act of patriotism on Getty’s part, she preferred their beach
house in Santa Monica.
By 1951, Getty had largely
planted himself abroad, negotiating oils pacts in the Middle East
and pushing his fortunes skyward.
On the home front, their son
Timmy was undergoing surgery
after surgery for treatment of a
brain tumor. In her memoir, Gaston said Getty rarely saw his son
and complained about the mounting medical bills.
When Timmy died at the age of
12, Gaston was with him at a New
York hospital. Getty was in Europe. And when the boy was buried at the family’s villa, Getty did
not attend the services.
“Oh, my God, he was so far
away,” she said in the 2013 interview. “It was horrible to go through
it alone.”
The couple separated and then
divorced. For Getty, who’d already
been married four times, it would
be his last marriage. And his longest. He died in 1976, then one of the
richest men in America.
Gaston later married a longtime friend, William Gaston. Together they had a daughter, Gigi,
an L.A. filmmaker.
Gaston had a career of her own,
too. In addition to the memoir, she
co-wrote “The Mark of an Eagle,” a
1990 novel that tells the tale of a
priest-turned-fortune hunter, and
had an uncredited role singing opera in Billy Wilder’s film “The Lost
Weekend.”
Though the stories of Getty’s
tightfisted nature were nearly legendary — he had reportedly refused to pay a ransom demand for
a grandson, even after the kidnappers severed the boy’s ear and
mailed it to the oil tycoon — Gaston’s daughter said he had an emotional and sentimental side that
was overlooked.
Gaston and Getty, she said,
had a complicated relationship
that she likened to Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton, whose
high-drama on-again, off-again relationship seemed to set the gold
standard for tortured courtships.
Still, Gigi Gaston said that since
she was a child, she remembers
her mother faithfully putting flowers on Getty’s grave.
In her memoir, Gaston seemed
to recognize that her husband was
a deeply nuanced character, brilliant yet difficult, a man who loved
his family but ultimately left them
behind to chase power and wealth.
In a 2013 review, the New York
Times said Gaston’s book was “the
kindest, most understanding
memoir of a narcissist you’ll ever
read.”
Late in life, Gigi Gaston, said
her mother reflected on who had
been the love of her life. J. Paul? the
daughter asked. “I sure hope so,”
her mother replied.
Gaston is survived by her
daughter.
steve.marble@latimes.com
Twitter: @stephenmarble
L AT I ME S . CO M
F R I DAY, A P R I L 14 , 2 017
B7
A rift over state’s marijuana laws
[Cannabis, from B1]
plishments” of that legislative session, Assemblyman
Ken Cooley (D-Rancho Cordova) said in a letter last
week to Nancy McFadden,
the governor’s top aide.
“To undo that work now
in favor of a pork-barrel proposition run by the industry
is antithetical to good governance,” wrote Cooley, a coauthor of the 2015 law. “If the
governor intends to move
forward with this proposal, I
will vigorously oppose the
trailer bill and urge my colleagues to do so as well.”
The proposal also faces
opposition from Ken Corney, president of the California Police Chiefs Assn.
“It’s shocking,” said Corney, who is Ventura’s police
chief. “It’s a giveaway to the
commercial marijuana industry which will not be
good for California.”
The language proposed
for the budget trailer bill by
the state Bureau of Cannabis Control would, if adopted
by the Legislature, become
the framework the agency
would use to draft regulations.
“The first priority of the
administration in implementing the new regulatory
system that will govern the
cannabis industry in California is to protect public and
consumer safety,” says a report by the bureau.
State law requires any
change in Proposition 64’s
execution to be approved by
a two-thirds vote of the Legislature and be consistent
with the intent of the initiative.
The Brown administration concluded that having
different rules for medical
Rich Pedroncelli Associated Press
GOV. JERRY BROWN wants to merge medical marijuana rules passed by the
Legislature in 2015 with standards set by Proposition 64, approved in November.
and recreational marijuana
would result in waste and
confusion from using parallel systems.
The rules proposed by
the administration include
eliminating a requirement
that those who grow and sell
pot use a third-party distributor and not distribute it
themselves. The provision
was sought to provide accountability and prevent
monopolistic businesses.
The 2015 legislation requires licenses for cultivation, manufacturing, retail,
distribution and testing of
medical pot. But medical
marijuana businesses are allowed under the law to get licenses in only two of those
categories — and they can’t
be a distributor and a seller.
Proposition
64
and
Brown’s proposal would al-
low one corporation to get licenses in all of the categories
at once, except testing.
“Allowing for a business
to hold multiple licenses including a distribution license will make it easier for
businesses to enter the market, encourage innovation,
and strengthen compliance
with state law,” according to
the 79-page Brown administration report.
Supporters of the legislation’s
restrictions
say
Brown’s proposal could create a conglomerate with a
competitive advantage.
“We think that having an
independent
distributor
prevents a vertically integrated industry that is susceptible to monopoly control,” said Barry Broad, a
lobbyist for the Teamsters
union, which is seeking a role
in the burgeoning industry.
But industry leaders said
requiring an independent
distributor would increase
the costs of cannabis for consumers, who might choose
the black market as a result.
“We believe that open distribution is the best way to
ensure that small and medium-sized businesses have
access to the market and
consumers,” said Lynne Lyman, California state director of the Drug Policy Alliance, which co-wrote Proposition 64.
Cooley said the industry
is behind provisions of Proposition 64 that allow businesses to dominate multiple
levels of the industry, from
cultivation to distribution to
sales.
“It is so outrageous to
take what was one of the no-
table accomplishments of
2015 and shunt everything
into the framework of the
self-interested,
moneyed
backers of Proposition 64,”
Cooley said.
Another point of contention involves a requirement in the 2015 law that every medical marijuana sales
and farming business get a
permit from the state, which
would issue a license only if
the business first obtained a
permit from its city or
county. That provision was
meant to guarantee that pot
shops would not violate city
ordinances because cities
would have the power to
shut them down by revoking
a permit.
The
administration’s
proposal outlines a mandate
for a state permitting process, but permits would not
be required from local agencies. “With 58 counties and
482 cities, it is unrealistic to
expect the licensing entities
to verify that each applicant
is in compliance with any local law or regulation,” said
the report from the Brown
administration.
The Brown proposal
would allow applicants for
state licenses to voluntarily
submit a local permit if one
is available, arguing some
cities will decide to issue permits. In cases where a city
does not issue permits, the
applicant for a state license
must abide by local ordinances and submit an environmental impact report to the
state.
“The Bureau [of Cannabis Control] will have to contact someone at the local jurisdiction to ensure that the
potential licensee is in compliance” with local planning
rules, said bureau spokesman Alex Traverso.
If a city bans marijuana
farms or shops, the state
would not issue a license, Lyman said.
But she said an alternative was needed where cities
have not banned pot businesses but also do not have a
license procedure.
“Otherwise we feared we
would have large swaths of
the population and the state
without access,” she said.
Assemblyman
Rob
Bonta (D-Oakland), who cowrote the 2015 marijuana law
with Cooley, said he sees the
proposals
drafted
by
Brown’s bureau as a place to
start negotiations. Asked if
he could support the Brown
budget trailer bill, Bonta
said: “Not in its current
form. It has to change.”
Assemblyman
Tom
Lackey of Palmdale, one of
several Republicans who
voted to support the 2015
law, shares the same concerns.
“There will certainly need
to be some improvements
before it is something I can
support,” Lackey said. “Law
enforcement and local governments have some serious
concerns about the proposed changes by Gov.
Brown’s administration.”
Lyman said she has
heard that some lawmakers
may try to obstruct the
Brown proposals. But she
said her side has a strong argument in the fact that Proposition 64 should be deferred to, because it was approved by 57% of the voters
in the state.
patrick.mcgreevy
@latimes.com
Alliance didn’t obituary notices
misuse funds,
state audit says
Place a paid Notice: latimes.com/placeobituary
Search obituary notice archives: legacy.com/obituaries/latimes
Dickman, Joseph “Jerry”
Shelley, ethel Goldie
Mount Sinai Memorial Parks
Hollywood Hills - 800-600-0076
www.mountsinaiparks.org
[Charters, from B1]
public funds.
Instead, the charter network relied on private contributions. According to the
audit, it raised about $1.7
million from private donors
and received $2 million in
pro bono legal work.
As of June 2016, Alliance
had spent about $915,000 —
including $426,000 on consulting fees, $107,000 on legal
costs, and $31,000 for fliers
and letters to parents and
teachers — in fighting unionization.
“We feel vindicated that
we are good stewards of the
public dollar and that our focus has been, continues to
be, and will always be on running great schools,” Alliance
spokeswoman
Catherine
Suitor said. “We’re really
happy to put this behind us.”
State auditors did find
that Alliance didn’t fully
comply with federal regulations before it shared parent
and alumni contact information with third parties.
One of those groups, the California Charter Schools
Assn., used that information
in its own public relations
campaign against unionization.
On that score, Alliance
officials agreed to implement the audit’s recommendations.
UTLA President Alex
Caputo-Pearl said Thursday
that the audit showed
Alliance and the California
Charter
Schools
Assn.
had “cynically abused the
parental information they
have.”
“Alliance may be saying
this shows that public money hasn’t been used, but the
larger issue is that a publicly
funded school operator …
has spent millions of dollars
against their own teachers
that should have gone into
class-size
reduction
or
school supplies,” CaputoPearl said.
Although the audit closes
one chapter in the union’s
fight to represent charter
school teachers, the complaints it lodged with the
Public Employment Relations Board remain unresolved.
In late 2015, a Los Angeles
County Superior Court
judge issued a preliminary
injunction prohibiting Alliance administrators from
interfering with efforts to
unionize its teachers — an
order that remains in effect.
To date, UTLA has not
persuaded a majority of Alliance’s more than 600 teach-
ers to join its ranks. CaputoPearl said that more than
200 Alliance teachers support unionization, but he
would not give an exact figure.
Union organizers are allowed to be on campuses after school hours.
“They’re literally on our
campuses every day,” Suitor
said, describing ongoing
unionization efforts. “The
audit, in my mind, was part
of that campaign. UTLA
wants to find a smoking gun,
and there is none.”
anna.phillips@latimes.com
Twitter: @annamphillips
Lottery results
Tonight’s Mega Millions
Estimated jackpot: $30 million
Sales close at 7:45 p.m.
For Wednesday, April 12, 2017
SuperLotto Plus
Mega number is bold
9-14-17-23-29—Mega 5
Jackpot: $28 million
Winners per category:
5 + Mega
5
4 + Mega
4
3 + Mega
3
2 + Mega
1 + Mega
Mega only
No. of
winners
—
2
19
383
659
15,833
8,423
38,453
55,711
Amount
of prize(s)
—
$19,926
$1,048
$86
$45
$9
$9
$1
$1
Fields, Bill
July 2, 1930 - April 4, 2017
Billy Fields was born in New York
City on July 2, 1930. He was successful
as a singer at an early age winning
Chance of a Lifetime an impressive
four times. He served in the United
States Marines as a drill sergeant
during the Korean War and formed
the first entertainment division for the
Marines. Once home, Billy resumed
his career headlining all around New
York City including at the famed
Latin Quarter. He then beat out Steve
Lawrence to replace Eddie Fisher at
Grossingers in the Catskill Mountains.
He recorded multiple records for MGM.
Billy transitioned into promotion,
producing the Rolling Stones’ first
concert in the USA at Carnegie Hall.
He then assisted Sid Bernstein with
producing the Beatles on their historic
first trip to the U.S. at Shea Stadium.
Fields moved on to managing
singers, touring with Elvis as Colonel
Parker’s assistant and went on to
manage Neil Diamond, Whitney
Houston, Frankie Valli and the Four
Seasons, among others. At The Bitter
End he nurtured the talents of Joan
Rivers, Dick Cavett, and Woody Allen,
to name a few.
He is survived by his wife Madelyn,
son Bill Cook, grandson Sam, nephew
Steven, niece Conni and many lifelong
friends.
Germansky, Larry
Mount Sinai Memorial Parks Hollywood Hills 800-600-0076
www.mountsinaiparks.org
Powerball number is bold
5 + P-ball
5
4 + P-ball
4
3 + P-ball
3
2 + P-ball
1 + P-ball
P-ball only
No. of
winners
—
—
—
33
51
1,606
1,306
11,004
26,800
Amount
of prize(s)
—
—
—
$365
$246
$8
$10
$5
$4
Winning jackpot ticket(s) sold in other
states: None
For Thursday, April 13, 2017
Fantasy Five: 2-11-16-23-27
Daily Four: 8-4-4-4
Daily Three (midday): 5-5-7
Daily Three (evening): 1-4-2
Daily Derby:
(3) Hot Shot
(8) Gorgeous George
(7) Eureka
Race time: 1:44.24
Results on the Internet:
www.latimes.com/lottery
General information:
(800) 568-8379
(Results not available at this number)
LincoLn, Janette
RoyeR, Virginia DiTullio
Janette was born in Brazil and
brought her love and energy to all. She
was well known for her love of cooking
and entertaining and made friends
with everyone she met. She will be
dearly missed by many. She is survived
by her children, Patrick, Christopher,
and Nicole, and her husband, David.
Her service will be Monday, April 17,
10 am at St. Mel Church in Woodland
Hills, with a reception to follow.
Education: Occidental College, cum
laude, Glendale College, Glendale
public schools
Virginia’s life was all about the
music. She grew up accompanying
her father, Joseph DiTullio’s cello
students. When her sister, Louise
DiTullio began playing the flute,
Virginia added the flute literature into
her repertoire. Before long the three of
them became the DiTullio trio, playing
many broadcasts from the Los Angeles
County Museum of Arts. The group was
popular and played countless concerts
throughout Southern California,
including the Brand Library series,
California Institute of Technology, and
Community Concerts.
Virginia was a member of the
National Association of Recording
Arts and Sciences and recorded two
albums with her sister, Louise. She
was an accomplished accompanist and
collaborated with many of Los Angeles’
top musicians. She was pianist and
harpsichordist for the Glendale
Chamber Orchestra. In her later life
she gave piano lessons to many of the
area’s young people and adults.
She was an active member of the
Glendale Committee for the L.A.
Philharmonic, serving for many
years as their Membership Chair. As a
member, she loved to work with the
3rd grade children of Glendale when
the Music Mobile van was brought
to the elementary schools. She also
served as a docent at the Pasadena
Showcase House of Design.
A terrific cook and hostess, Ginny’s
parties and receptions were always a
hit. She was loved by all and will be
missed.
Virginia is survived by a son, Ronald
Royer, daughter, Yvonne Green,
grandchildren Joseph Green, Nicole
Green and James Royer, sisters Louise
DiTullio Dillon and Christine DiTullio
Reiter, daughter-in-law, Kaye Royer
and son-in-law Mark Green who
was with her throughout her final
illness. Her husband of over 60 years,
Richard N. Royer, predeceased her on
September 30, 2015.
Service to be held Saturday, April
15, 1:00 PM at Wee Kirk o’the Heather,
Forest Lawn Glendale.
In lieu of flowers the family
requests donations be made to the
Memorial Music Scholarship Fund
MTAC Glendale Branch (Joseph and
Laura DiTullio String Scholarship) MTA.
Mail to Glendale Branch Treasurer,
Lori Richardson, 3233 Sparr Blvd,
Glendale, CA 91208. Check payable to
MTAC Glendale Branch MMSF. This is
a 501c3 non-profit organization, tax
information will be provided.
If preferred, contributions can
also be made to the Leukemia and
Lymphoma Society.
January 2, 1948 - April 10, 2017
Powerball
8-14-61-63-68—Powerball 24
Jackpot: $60 million
California winners per category:
Mount Sinai Memorial Parks Hollywood Hills 800-600-0076
www.mountsinaiparks.org
Kunze, Steven R.
April 14, 1968 - March 16, 2017
Steven Ronald Kunze was born on
April 14, 1968 to Ron and M’Liz Kunze
in Encino, California, and passed away
at his home March 16th, 2017. Steve
grew up in Northridge, California, and
attended CSUN, graduating in 1992.
He had a long career as a regional sales
director, most recently working at Ryan
Herco. Steve was a constant jokester
and loved to be funny and loved to
laugh. He was the life of the party and
made friends wherever he went. Steve
loved all sports, reading the paper, and
pop culture. He became a die-hard
University of Alabama fan when his
oldest daughter Kalyn started college
there in 2015 and was so excited for his
youngest daughter Ashley to join her
sister in Alabama this fall. Steve was
beyond proud of his girls. Steven is
survived by his parents, Ron and M’Liz
Kunze, his mother and father-in-law,
Steve and Nancy Webber, his wife,
Tifani Kunze, his precious daughters,
Kalyn and Ashley Kunze, his sister Kris
Quirk, and his brother-in-law, Brian
Webber. We will miss his smiling face
every single day.
To place an obituary ad
please go online to:
latimes.com/placeobituary
Pollock, Shirley
March 17, 1922 - April 11, 2017
Shirley Rita London Pollock, beloved
wife, mother, and grandmother passed
away peacefully April 11, 2017, having
just celebrated her 95th birthday.
She was born on March 17, 1922 in
Philadelphia, PA, the daughter of Dora
Sley and Louis London, sister of the late
Eleanor Gibbel and Edward London.
She was married to her beloved Martin
Peanut Pollock for 67 years, until his
death in 2008. She is survived by
daughters Terri Ann Pollock, Nancy
Pollock, Barbara Ruskin and son-inlaw, Jeremy Ruskin; grandchildren:
Sasha Pollock, Sandha Khin, Hannah
Khin, Jesse Ruskin and Tobin Belzer,
Matt Ruskin and Hannah FeldnerShaw. She adored her close family
members, Robby and Chuck Robinson,
Betsy Sley Grossman, Denise and
Barclay Livker, the Shassian clan and
many others. She was predeceased
by her dear son-in-law Ronald Khin,
sister-in-law Gertrude London Rifkin,
and brother-in-law Henry Gibbel. We
are grateful to Silvia Galdamez, her
loving caregiver of 21 years, and to
Julya Bonilla, for their devotion to our
family. Shirley was the first woman
president of Overbrook High School,
graduating in 1939. Shirley and Martin
raised their family in Philadelphia and
owned and operated Camp Sholom,
in Collegeville, PA, a summer camp
that became a community of lifelong
friends and fans of Shirley. Shirley led
Girl Scout troops, ran the gift shop at
Main Line Reform Temple, and read
books for the blind. They moved to Los
Angeles in 1977, where Shirley became
a leader of the Brandeis University
National Committee, holding local
and national leadership positions and
receiving the first Eris Fields Lifetime
Achievement Award in 2010. In 2016
she was elected to the Brandeis
Board of Fellows for her significant
volunteer contributions to Brandeis
University, and was hooded among
family and friends in December. She
was chair of the leadership presidium
and editor of the chapter Bulletin until
her death. Donations may be made
in honor of Shirley London Pollock,
to Los Angeles Chapter Scholarship
Fund, Brandeis National Committee.
Brandeis University, 415 South Street,
Waltham, MA 02453. Services will be
held Sunday, April 16, at 11:30 a.m.
Mount Sinai Hollywood Hills Memorial
Park, 5950 Forest Lawn Drive, LA
90068. Family and friends are invited
home following the service.
Pollock, Shirley
Mount Sinai Memorial Parks Hollywood Hills 800-600-0076
www.mountsinaiparks.org
or call
1-800-234-4444
latimes.com/placeobituary
Swackenberg, Victoria
wolfskill
December 13, 1934 - April 8, 2017
Yoshida, George
July 13, 1929 - March 22, 2017
George passed away in Camarillo,
CA, from complications of a stroke.
Born in Oakland, CA, to Nobuji and
Tame Yoshida, second to the youngest
of 6 children. He was a nursery owner
in Carson, CA, before moving to
Camarillo, CA, in 1980.
Survived by his wife of 53 years
Hatsuye Yoshida, son Gene Nobuo and
daughter Marcia Emi. Also, survived
by siblings, Chiyo Uyemura, Michi
(Kaz) Ando, Kiyoshi (Judy) Yoshida
and numerous nieces and nephews.
Predeceased by parents Nobuji and
Tame Yoshida, and siblings Hideo
Yoshida and Yuki (Chiai) Asaka, and
brother-in-law Isamu Uyemura.
A Celebration of Life will be held at
a later date.
latimes.com/placeobituary
June 10, 1917 - April 8, 2017
Spatz, Norman Charles
Survived by his loving sons, Russell
(Digna) Spatz, Buddy (Kay) Shushman,
and Gary (Jill) Spatz. Beloved
grandchildren: Andrew (Rebecca)
Singer, Raquel (Robert) Banos,
Vanessa (Armando) Benitez, Alexandra
Spatz, Katherine Molly Spatz, Stacy
(Bryan) Davis and Sheryl Shushan, and
adoring great grandchildren, Isabella,
Natalia, Lyla Ann, Zachary, Gabriel,
Andrea, Anna, and Leah. Services will
be held at 9:30am Friday, April 14,
2017, Mount Sinai Memorial Parks and
Mortuaries.
Mount Sinai Memorial Parks Hollywood Hills 800-600-0076
www.mountsinaiparks.org
Wittenberg, Phyllis edith
July 9, 1929 - April 7, 2017
“Phinchy,” beloved mother, sister,
and aunt, died on April 7th, 2017,
after a long battle with Alzheimer’s.
The youngest of a large family in
Perth Amboy, NJ, she was among
the first group of local girls to be Bat
Mitzvahed. After marrying Sidney
Friedman in 1950 and having her
only child, Karen, she followed her
older siblings to L.A. and never looked
back. Widowed at 29, she passed up
four proposals before marrying Ted
Wittenberg in 1962 and eventually
getting the job she treasured as
the office manager for a thriving
psychological practice. Phinchy loved
to travel, whether taking road trips in
their camper van to several national
parks, being pampered on a cruise,
or travelling with her daughter who
moved to Houston. Widowed again,
she kept busy hot air ballooning,
frolicking in Big Bear snow, playing
Mahjongg (brilliantly), and her
favorite pastime, eating out. She
loved the arts, with season tickets to
several iconic L.A. venues. Interested in
politics she was a passionate defender
of human rights. In 1995 her daughter
moved back to L.A. and lived with her.
In her later years Phinchy was looked
after and loved by caregivers, Loraine
and Diane. She was an exemplary
mother, filled with hugs, kisses, love,
kindness, laughter and compassion.
Now, finally, she can rest in peace.
Place an Obituary Online
go to
latimes.com/placeobituary
Victoria Wolfskill Swackenberg, 99,
of Los Angeles, passed away on April 8,
2017, in Culver City.
She was born in Los Angeles on June
10, 1917, to Victoria Juarez Wolfskill
and Martin Wolfskill. She was a fifthgeneration Angeleno and descendent
of the Lugo, Estudillo, Pedrorena, and
Wolfskill early California families. Her
forebears include the California settler
William Wolfskill.
Victoria graduated from Compton
Junior College, where she enjoyed
performing in theatrical productions
with the Pasadena Community
Playhouse Association.
In 1943, she married Vincent Phalen
Swackenberg, and they moved to San
Diego for several years. On returning
to Los Angeles, they settled in Burbank
and Toluca Lake, where Victoria was
active in the Red Cross as a Grey Lady
and in her church. In 1972, Victoria and
Vincent moved to Hancock Park, close
to where she was born and her many
friends.
Always proud of her heritage
and city, she championed all things
Californian and Angeleno. She loved
California Chardonnay, never missed
the concert series at the Los Angeles
Philharmonic, and was a 44-year
active member of the Ebell of Los
Angeles, where she held a variety of
leadership positions, chaired several
benefits and events, enjoyed directing
and acting in plays, and started a
California history series. She was also
a longtime member of Sisters Servants
of Mary Guild, Costume Council of
LACMA, Christ the King of LA Parish,
and Nichibei Fujinkai, the JapaneseAmerican friendship society.
Known for her beautiful and widebrimmed hats, Victoria loved planning,
hosting, and attending parties.
She hosted her annual March Hare
Costume Party and June Bug Birthday
Party in her home for decades, and was
generous in feting the achievements
of others. For 10 years, she enjoyed
traveling on the tall ship, Sea Cloud,
trips that were always bookended
by bon voyage and welcome-home
parties.
Predeceased by her husband
Vincent, she is survived by her
daughter, Victoria Anne Umans,
grandson Andrew Umans (Elizabeth),
great-grandchildren Clara and Zachary,
and several nieces and nephews. Sister
Elena Thornton and brother Frank
Burke also predeceased her.
Services will be held Tuesday, April
18th, 11am at Calvary Cemetery.
In lieu of flowers, please send
donations to Sisters Servants of
Mary, 2131 W. 27th St., LA 90018 or
Marycrest Manor, 10664 St. James Dr.,
Culver City 90230.
Share a
memory
To sign a guest book please go to
latimes.com/guestbooks
B8
F R I DAY, A P R I L 14 , 2 017
L ATI M E S . CO M
Today in Southern California
Today in North America
5-day forecasts
Pressure:
Sunny and mild: High pressure will promote a dry northerly flow and a warmng trend today. Gusty
winds will develop through the I-5 corridor and in portions of the Antelope and Santa Clarita valleys.
Afternoon highs will be mild. Saturday will be sunny and warmer with light winds. Another system
approaching the West Coast on Sunday may bring light afternoon rain north of Point Conception.
High/low temperatures are average forecasts for entire zone.
Today
Saturday
Sunday
Monday
Tuesday
L.A. Basin
72/53
Mostly sunny
Mostly sunny
Partly sunny
Mostly cloudy
Partly sunny
Valleys
73/50
Air quality
Sunny and breezy
Mostly sunny 78/51
Clouds, sun 75/51
Mostly cloudy 73/56
Clouds, sun 69/51
76/53
74/55
73/58
68/55
Los Angeles Basin: Mostly
sunny with a mild
afternoon. Clear tonight.
Sunny and mild Saturday.
Valleys/canyons: Mostly
sunny and mild. Clear and
chilly tonight. Sunny and
warmer Saturday.
Orange County: Some
morning clouds, then
Beaches
68/52
Mostly sunny
Mostly sunny
Clouds, sun
Mostly cloudy
Clouds, sun
mostly sunny and mild.
Clear and cool tonight.
Sunny and warmer
Saturday.
Ventura/Santa Barbara:
Mostly sunny with gusty
north winds. Clear and
chilly tonight. Sunny and
mild Saturday.
San Diego County: Morning
Good
Moderate
Mountains
56/30
69/52
68/53
70/58
66/53
Sunny and cool
Mostly sunny 64/33
Partly sunny 62/33
Partly sunny 58/34
Partly sunny 58/32
clouds, then partly sunny.
Mostly clear tonight. Sunny
and mild Saturday.
Local mountains: Sunny
and breezy to windy. Clear
and chilly tonight. Sunny
and warmer Saturday.
High desert: Sunny, breezy
and cool. Clear and chilly
tonight. Sunny and warmer
Unhealthful for:
Sensitive people
Temps
Deserts
87/59
Sunny
Mostly sunny
Partly sunny
Some sun
Partly sunny
L
–0
H
Low
▲
Warm Front
Cold Front
0s 10s 20s 30s 40s 50s 60s 70s 80s 90s 100+
93/62
95/63
91/62
90/61
Morro Bay
Santa Barbara
Ventura
Zuma Beach
Marina del Rey
Hermosa Beach
Cabrillo Beach
Hunt’n. Beach
Newport Beach
Dana Point
San Clemente
Oceanside
Solana Beach
Mission Beach
Avalon
4p
4p
4p
4p
4p
4p
4p
4p
4p
4p
4p
4p
4p
4p
4p
Rain T-storm Snow Ice
Chicago
68/61
Las Vegas
77/57
Los Angeles
72/53
Not Available
Santa Clarita
Hesperia
72/48
Santa Paula
LOS ANGELES CO.
69/37
Ojai
71/46
Santa
Simi Valley
Barbara
69/45
Chatsworth
SAN BERNARDINO CO.
Burbank Monrovia
72/48
71/45
72/49
Camarillo
Ventura
74/50
66/52
72/46
67/49
Yucca Valley
Pomona/
UCLA
72/49
Fairplex
Oxnard
San
Bernardino
LA
Downtown
Westlake
Ontario
71/53
67/49
73/49
Woodland
74/47
72/53
Village
74/48
Hills
Whittier
S. Santa Barbara Co.
71/47
Chino
75/48
Height
Period
Direction
Santa Monica Hills
Riverside
74/44
RIVERSIDE CO.
Fullerton
72/51
1-2’
11 sec W
68/52
72/39
74/52
Torrance
Santa Ana
Ventura Co.
69/51
ORANGE CO.
Palm
Hemet
Long
Height
Period
Direction
69/54
Springs
73/44
Irvine
Beach Newport
3-6’
11 sec W
69/52
87/59
72/53 Beach
Mission Viejo
Los Angeles Co.
66/54
Temecula
Height
Period
Direction
69/48
Laguna
71/43
2-4’
11 sec W
Beach
San
65/51
Clemente
Orange Co.
Surf and sea
67/48
SAN DIEGO CO.
Height
Period
Direction
POINT CONCEPTION TO MEXICO
Oceanside
3-5’
15 sec SW
Inner waters: West-to-northwest winds
70/44
at 10-15 knots. Wind waves 1-6 feet with
San Diego Co.
west swells 3-5 feet.
Ramona
Escondido
Height
Period
Direction
70/40
68/45
Surf zone: The potential for strong rip
3-5’
14 sec W
currents is high at beaches in Ventura,
Poway
Orange and San Diego counties, and
69/50
moderate elsewhere.
Tides
UV index
L.A. Outer Harbor, in feet.
Minutes to burn for
San Diego
Today 12:15p 3.5 Hi 6:00a 0.2 Lo sensitive people
Station
Time Wind
Waves Temp
68/55
Las Vegas, 25
Trough
Seattle
51/42
New York
64/46
Denver
77/40
Miami
82/73
Houston
81/64
South Coast Air Quality Management District forecasts air quality
SANTA
BARBARA CO.
Jet Stream
Anchorage
47/32
Saturday.
Low desert: Sunny and
warm. Clear tonight. Sunny
with a hot afternoon
Saturday.
San Francisco Bay Area:
Partly sunny and cool. Clear
to partly cloudy tonight.
Partly sunny and milder.
All
High
◗
Unsettled Plains: Warm, moist air spreading north will fuel
scattered showers and thunderstorms in the nation’s midsection.
Showers and mountain snow will continue in the Northwest. The
Northeast will be dry while the Southwest is cool with gusty winds.
VENTURA CO.
NNW7
W6
SW6
W6
W6
WSW6
WSW6
SW4
SW4
SW4
SW4
SW4
WSW4
WSW4
WNW4
9/13
2/11
5/11
4/14
4/11
4/11
4/11
4/15
4/15
3/15
3/15
3/15
3/15
3/15
1/11
55/63
57/69
58/67
56/66
59/65
62/65
56/66
57/65
59/65
59/65
58/66
59/64
60/66
57/66
61/64
Wind speed in knots; wave heights in feet/intervals in seconds;
temperatures for sea/air
Sat.
11:33p 4.9 Hi
1:08p 3.2 Hi
------ Hi
Almanac
Thursday
Today Saturday
Hi Lo Prcp. Hi Lo Hi Lo
Anaheim
Avalon/Catalina
Bakersfield
Barstow
Beaumont
Big Bear Lake
Bishop
Burbank
Camarillo
Chatsworth
Chino
Dana Point
Death Valley
Del Mar
Escondido
Eureka
Fallbrook
Fillmore
Fresno
Fullerton
Hemet
Hesperia
Huntington Beach
Idyllwild
Irvine
L.A. D’ntown/USC
L.A. Int’l. Airport
74
67
74
76
64
53
71
68
69
68
73
67
87
68
75
54
73
69
67
75
68
71
70
59
70
71
69
56
51
56
52
48
35
48
54
53
53
49
55
72
58
57
44
55
52
50
56
51
51
51
36
56
56
54
--Tr
------------.45
--1.96
---------
71
63
68
76
69
56
68
74
72
72
74
66
85
64
68
55
68
72
67
74
73
69
65
62
69
72
68
50
54
43
46
42
30
35
50
46
49
44
50
66
53
45
39
45
48
43
52
44
37
54
38
52
53
52
76
67
76
85
79
64
74
77
71
77
82
69
89
67
74
57
74
77
73
78
82
79
68
72
72
76
70
52
57
50
54
45
33
38
53
49
51
47
52
70
53
47
44
46
49
50
53
47
48
55
44
53
53
54
Los Angeles, 25
Phoenix, 25
San Francisco, 30
Thursday Downtown readings
Temperature
Los Angeles Fullerton
Ventura
High/low
71/56
75/56
62/54
High/low a year ago
73/57
73/59
68/55
Normal high/low for date 73/53
73/52
68/48
Record high/date
99/1888 99/2008 93/2008
Record low/date
41/1883 47/2010 41/1983
Precipitation
24-hour total (as of 4 p.m.) 0.00
0.00
0.00
Season total (since Oct. 1) 18.67
16.39
18.83
Last season (Oct. 1 to date) 6.83
5.20
8.43
Season norm (Oct. 1 to date) 13.86
12.70
15.55
Humidity (high/low)
90/48
89/45 100/64
California cities
City
5:17p 1.8 Lo
6:43a 0.4 Lo
5:42p 2.2 Lo
City
Thursday
Today Saturday
Hi Lo Prcp. Hi Lo Hi Lo
Laguna Beach
Lancaster
Long Beach
Mammoth Lakes
Mission Viejo
Monrovia
Monterey
Mt. Wilson
Needles
Newport Beach
Northridge
Oakland
Oceanside
Ojai
Ontario
Oxnard
Palm Springs
Pasadena
Paso Robles
Pomona/Fairplex
Poway
Redding
Rialto
Riverside
70
68
71
48
71
71
59
46
93
72
69
62
75
68
71
65
85
68
65
72
75
57
68
73
57
49
55
38
52
55
53
38
68
58
51
55
50
49
54
52
60
54
49
53
55
44
55
54
---.58
--.23
----.09
-.02
-Tr
--.13
--.38
---
65
68
72
51
69
66
60
60
84
66
75
66
70
69
74
67
87
72
71
73
69
63
73
72
51
40
53
23
48
52
45
41
59
54
50
46
44
45
48
49
59
51
35
49
50
42
47
39
Forecasts provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. ©2017
69
81
74
58
74
73
63
65
91
69
80
68
74
74
83
68
93
78
78
81
73
69
82
82
53
47
54
33
50
51
48
43
62
55
51
50
47
47
50
51
62
53
41
48
51
45
49
43
Sun and moon
Today’s rise/set
Last Quarter
April 19
Los Angeles County
Sun 6:23a/7:24p
Moon 10:42p/8:44a
New Moon
April 26
Orange County
Sun 6:22a/7:22p
Moon 10:40p/8:43a
First Quarter
May 2
Ventura County
Sun 6:27a/7:28p
Moon 10:46p/8:47a
Full Moon
May 10
City
Thursday
Today Saturday
Hi Lo Prcp. Hi Lo Hi Lo
Sacramento
San Bernardino
San Clemente Pier
San Diego
San Francisco
San Gabriel
San Jose
San Luis Obispo
Santa Ana
Santa Barbara
Santa Clarita
Santa Monica Pier
Santa Paula
Santa Rosa
Simi Valley
Tahoe Valley
Temecula
Thousand Oaks
Torrance
UCLA
Van Nuys
Ventura
Whittier Hills
Woodland Hills
Wrightwood
Yorba Linda
Yosemite Valley
62
69
59
74
59
xx
64
65
71
69
69
67
71
60
66
45
70
64
71
66
69
62
72
67
54
73
46
48
56
53
61
53
xx
52
55
57
49
48
53
51
47
52
30
53
51
53
53
52
54
52
48
48
53
38
.29
---.07
xx
.33
.09
-.02
---.45
-.99
----------.13
64
74
67
68
62
74
65
71
69
71
72
68
71
65
72
44
71
70
69
71
76
67
72
75
58
72
53
42
47
48
55
46
52
44
50
54
45
48
52
46
38
48
21
43
47
51
53
48
49
51
48
37
49
30
69
83
71
70
65
79
70
75
73
67
80
69
74
67
77
54
78
73
70
73
80
68
77
80
70
78
60
48
48
50
56
49
53
48
47
55
49
50
52
48
42
49
31
45
49
51
53
51
50
52
50
42
50
34
U.S. cities
High 96 in Eloy, Ariz.
Low 12 in Champion, Mich.
City
Thursday
Hi Lo Prcp.
Today
Hi Lo Sky
Albuquerque
Amarillo
Anchorage
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Brownsville
Buffalo
Burlington, Vt.
Casper
Charleston, S.C.
Charleston, W.Va.
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Colo. Springs
Columbia, S.C.
Columbus
Concord, N.H.
Dallas/Ft.Worth
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
Duluth
El Paso
Eugene
Fairbanks
Fargo
Flagstaff
Grand Junction
Grand Rapids
Green Bay
Hartford
Helena
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jacksonville, Fla.
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Louisville
Medford
Memphis
Miami
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York
Oklahoma City
Omaha
Orlando
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, Maine
Portland, Ore.
Providence
Pueblo
Raleigh
Rapid City
Reno
Richmond
St. Louis
Salt Lake City
San Antonio
San Juan, P.R.
Santa Fe
Seattle
77
77
49
82
57
84
69
80
88
63
59
87
53
58
79
82
78
83
60
76
56
73
83
69
57
83
79
79
53
59
86
53
46
68
65
81
49
55
62
63
84
82
77
79
79
80
83
83
53
86
82
49
55
86
83
65
74
80
84
66
94
59
57
53
60
78
80
76
56
75
84
80
80
84
76
54
80
79
47
82
57
81
67
58
87
48
56
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62
58
64
81
82
81
68
81
66
77
83
77
62
82
77
71
63
53
88
53
48
69
62
76
65
57
65
53
83
81
77
81
74
77
82
85
55
86
82
54
65
87
81
64
78
73
84
67
88
68
57
53
61
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79
67
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80
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82
76
51
47
53
25
61
52
64
52
39
56
45
46
68
32
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54
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48
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62
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31
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27
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42
35
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49
54
55
65
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48
37
60
72
41
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49
53
49
61
49
66
43
37
42
44
45
55
37
39
61
54
57
66
75
36
43
---------.07
-.02
------.16
--------.06
.04
--.01
----.04
.13
-.01
.08
---Tr
---.04
-Tr
.25
.05
---.55
------.01
----.04
Tr
--Tr
.12
-.33
47
55
32
61
46
60
49
38
63
31
42
70
46
38
30
61
56
59
61
60
54
44
59
58
31
63
40
61
50
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34
25
45
27
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53
52
37
32
70
64
61
60
64
57
59
64
35
63
73
51
58
63
64
46
61
61
64
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36
39
41
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64
35
64
73
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Taken at 3 p.m. Thursday
Spokane
Springfield, Mo.
Tallahassee
Tampa
Tucson
Tulsa
Washington, D.C.
Wichita
Yuma
World
Acapulco
Amsterdam
Athens
Baghdad
Bangkok
Barbados
Beijing
Berlin
Buenos Aires
Cabo San Lucas
Cairo
Calgary
Cancun
Copenhagen
Dublin
Edinburgh
Frankfurt
Geneva
Havana
Ho Chi Minh City
Hong Kong
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kabul
Kingston
London
Madrid
Manila
Mecca
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Mumbai
New Delhi
Oslo
Paris
Rio de Janeiro
Rome
Seoul
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei
Tehran
Tokyo
Toronto
Vancouver
Vienna
Winnipeg
Zurich
53
80
84
87
93
80
71
72
90
42
55
52
67
58
59
56
58
63
.24
----Tr
-.03
--
50
77
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85
89
81
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60
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---.02
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---
87
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Hz
Hz
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Pc
Pc
Su
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Pc
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Pc
Key: Su sunny; Pc partly cloudy; Cy cloudy; Fg
foggy; Prcp precipitation; Dr drizzle; Hz;hazy
Sh showers; Ts thunderstorms; R rain; Sn snow;
Sf snow flurries; I ice; Rs rain/snow; W windy;
Tr trace. Notes: National extremes are for NWS
stations; excludes Alaska and Hawaii.
Missing data indicated by “xx”.
DMV cracks down on placard abuse
[Disabled, from B1]
claimed, “Am I being arrested?”
Soon her husband and
daughter arrived. They
hurled expletives at the
DMV investigators and then
at the scrum of media.
“You portray our president as bad,” the daughter
said as she tried to shield her
face with a handbag before
declaring the whole lot, well,
jerks (but with another
word).
The DMV — which has
200 sworn peace officers
across the state — dispatched investigators to the
shopping center Tuesday to
nab people improperly using
disabled parking spots.
In the last three years,
the state agency has conducted 270 of these enforcement operations and handed out about 2,000 citations.
The number of citations
issued has increased each
year, according to data provided by the DMV.
DMV
Commander
Randy Vera said it’s not uncommon for people who are
caught to say that the disabled placard belongs to a
spouse. But the person to
whom the placard has been
issued must be in the car
when it’s parked in one of
these spots.
Vera said the problem is
worse in areas where there
aren’t many parking spaces
and a lot of demand.
Last year, lawmakers
tried and failed to pass legislation toughening up regulation of the disability placards.
Mark Boster Los Angeles Times
A FAMILY is cited for using an out-of-state disabled parking placard. California does not recognize placards
issued by other states and requires out-of-state visitors to obtain a travel placard to use disabled parking.
“The most frequent violators we get are those who
are utilizing parking placards of a friend or a family
member or a placard they
found,” Vera said.
Sometimes people will
buy them online, he added.
The citations can lead to
fines that range from $250 to
$1,000.
On this day, the investigators stopped 280 people
and found that 42 of them
were using placards fraudulently.
Offenders received misdemeanor citations.
DMV officers recently
conducted similar operations in Sacramento.
Several years ago, the department launched Operation Blue Zone, intending to
root out drivers who improperly apply for disability
parking placards. DMV investigators were on the look-
out for people whose applications bore the same medical diagnoses, handwriting
and doctor’s signatures.
Last year, two lawmakers
asked for an audit of the
DMV’s application procedures.
The results of that investigation are expected soon,
according to the state auditor’s office.
Democratic Assemblyman Mike Gatto introduced
legislation with Republican
Assemblyman Eric Linder
that would have forced people to turn in placards after
family members who had
gotten them died. The legislation did not pass, and both
lawmakers have since left
the Assembly.
In the case of the Glendale operation, even those
who were not cited because
they had parked legally were
often
annoyed
to
be
stopped.
One driver asked for the
officers’ badge numbers and
accused them of harassment.
Another, perturbed at
being photographed, put on
her designer sunglasses,
tousled her hair and used
her Louis Vuitton bag as a
shield.
But she was in the clear.
Other shoppers took it in
stride.
After handing over her
placard and identification,
one woman who declined to
give her name said: “I’m glad
you guys are doing this because most people just get
these placards from anywhere.”
Hanna Shweyk said she
often ferries around her octogenarian mother in their
minivan. On days like this
one, when the parking lots
are crowded with spring
break shoppers, she’s lucky
to find a parking spot for the
disabled.
When all of these spots
are taken, she’s forced to
drop her mother off in front
of the store and go hunting
for parking. That means her
mother is left alone, she said.
“Then I see people with
no placards. I think this will
teach them a lesson not to
park here,” Shweyk said to a
battery of cameras.
She turned away from the
reporters and began to head
to the shops, but stopped to
ask with a smile: “Am I going
to be on the nightly news?”
benjamin.oreskes
@latimes.com
Twitter: @boreskes
BuSINESS
C
F R I D A Y , A P R I L 1 4 , 2 0 1 7 :: L A T I M E S . C O M / B U S I N E S S
DOW 20,453.25 ▼ 138.61 S&P 500 2,328.95 ▼ 15.98
NASDAQ 5,805.15 ▼ 31.01
GOLD $1,285.90 ▲ 10.60
OIL $53.18 ▲ 0.07
EURO $1.0612 ▲ .0014
U.S. T-NOTE (10-yr.) 2.24% — Unch.
10 infants
infected at
UC Irvine
hospital
An MRSA outbreak
that occurred over
eight months is just
now becoming public.
By Melody Petersen
Photographs by
Mel Melcon Los Angeles Times
CLOCKWISE, T.J. Bjorklund and Jae Yun of the University of Illinois and Li-Yun Kwan and Zhisheng Xue
of the University of Maryland compete in the Big Ten Network e-sports championship March 28 in L.A.
E-SPORTS’ OLD
COLLEGE TRY
Over the course of eight
months, a lethal bacteria infected 10 already critically ill
infants in UC Irvine Medical
Center’s neonatal intensive
care unit — an outbreak that
the public is only finding out
about now.
None of the infants has
died, hospital officials said.
Yet UCI doctors have not
found the source of the infections, which continued even
after 220 employees used antiseptic soap and ointment
to eliminate bacteria on
their skin and in their noses.
Orange County health officials have known about the
continuing
hospital-acquired infections since the
middle of December, when
lab tests confirmed that five
infants had been infected by
the same strain of a superbug.
That month, two more
babies were sickened. Another tested positive in late
February, and two more in
March.
County officials said they
did not notify the public
about the outbreak because
they had no evidence that infants being treated at UCI’s
neonatal unit were at higher
risk than infants admitted
elsewhere.
UCI officials say they did
not believe that it was necessary to notify families preparing to have labor and deliveries at the hospital of the
ongoing outbreak. They said
they had isolated the infected patients in one of the
hospital’s two intensive care
units for infants. New patients are now only accepted
into the other unit, they said.
The 10 babies tested positive for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus,
or MRSA. The superbug is
especially dangerous for
premature infants. One
study found that 26% of infants infected with MRSA
while in the ICU died.
The last positive test for
MRSA in one of the newborns at UCI was on March
26, hospital officials said.
That baby has since tested
negative and none of the infants has an active infection,
the hospital said.
Hospital officials confirmed the outbreak after
questions from The Times.
The newspaper learned of
the outbreak from Marian
Hollingsworth, who filed a
complaint about it with the
[See Infants, C7]
Will competitive gaming rival the appeal of football and basketball
or register a blip like rugby? One start-up aims to whip up interest
By Paresh Dave
Duran
Parsi
headed
to
Pepperdine’s law school three years
ago with a mission: By the end, he’d either practice law or commit to his
fledgling e-sports business.
With graduation near, Parsi might
need to grant himself an extension.
Collegiate Star League, the 30-person
e-sports operation run from his Studio City apartment, has essentially
become the NCAA for video games.
The company organized tournaments that 30,000 college students in
the U.S. and Canada participated in
this school year. Sponsorship sales
tripled from last school year, and
enough cash remained for Parsi, 29, to
live off his business instead of student
loans.
But amateur e-sports trails the
professional level in fervor. Parsi
doesn’t know whether the college
sports matches he organizes will rival
the profits and appeal of college
basketball and football or grow into
niche money-suckers such as rugby
and field hockey. The company that
makes the leading game “League of
Legends” expects to land in between,
matching the small, but loud fandoms
of college baseball.
“College e-sports is a buzzword
right now, but there’s a big misconception about how big college esports is,” Parsi said. “We have a lot of
players, but the audience is far behind.”
Large audiences deliver broadcasting and advertising deals that
turn March Madness and bowl games
into business bonanzas. But eight
livestreams this year of Big Ten Conference e-sports matches drew zero
revenue for the league and a combined 2.1million viewers, or less than a
single postseason college basketball
game can draw with its rich history
and bracket-induced popularity.
Parsi’s firm — the top organizer of
college e-sports by participants — remains unprofitable.
The venture started in college
when UC San Diego roommates
pointed Parsi to the tech club’s tournament for the intragalactic alien battle game “StarCraft.” Parsi, figuring
an easy gold, fell to bronze and exited
surprised that 60 people showed. Inspired by classmates’ skills, he arranged a team and launched it into
competition against other California
universities.
By the time he earned a master’s
degree in international relations from
George Washington University, Parsi’s little league [See E-sports, C7]
Attorneys describe injuries of
dragged-off United passenger
By Hugo Martin
The man who was
dragged off a United Airlines
flight suffered a broken nose
and concussion and lost two
front teeth, according to lawyers who are preparing a
lawsuit against the Chicago
carrier.
The passenger, Dr. David
Dao, was discharged from a
hospital Wednesday night
but still will undergo reconstructive surgery to repair
the injuries he received after
being yanked from a plane
that was scheduled to fly
from Chicago to Louisville,
Ky., on Sunday night.
Dao’s attorney, Tom
Demetrio, blamed a “culture
of disrespect and rudeness”
at United, adding that Dao
escaped Vietnam by boat in
1975. Sunday’s experience
“was more horrifying than
leaving Vietnam,” he said.
Dao’s daughter said her
Why it makes
sense to sell
too many seats
Overbooking leads to
more than 40,000 fliers
being involuntarily removed each year. For
carriers, there’s a logic to
maxing out flights. C3
Joshua Lott AFP/Getty Images
CRYSTAL DAO PEPPER, right, with attorney
Stephen Golan, said her family was “horrified” by the
incident involving her father, Dr. David Dao.
father and her four siblings
are shaken by the incident
and were “completely horrified and shocked” by the video.
“What happened to my
dad should not have happened to any human being
under any circumstance,”
Crystal Dao Pepper said.
United Airlines issued yet
another apology Thursday
in response to the comments
by Demetrio and Dao’s
daughter. The company also
vowed to review its policies
and employee training to
avoid such an ugly scene in
the future.
“This horrible situation
has provided a harsh learning experience from which
we will take immediate, concrete action,” the airline
said. “We have committed to
our customers and our employees that we are going to
fix what’s broken so this never happens again.”
Worldwide furor was
sparked by video and pho[See Dao, C6]
Michael Owen Baker For The Times
ARLENE HOWARD, who runs a PR firm in Brent-
wood, was billed thousands for bogus calls to Cuba.
Who pays the
bill if your phone
line gets hacked?
The fine print in Spectrum’s terms of
service says customer is responsible
DAVID LAZARUS
Arlene Howard’s phone
bill said she
made a bunch
of calls to
Cuba, which
she didn’t.
Her service
provider,
Charter Communications, acknowledged
that her office line must
have been hacked.
But it still demanded
that she pay thousands of
dollars to cover the cost of
the bogus calls.
To which all customers of
Charter’s Spectrum service
should rightly respond: Say
what?!
You probably didn’t
know this — I didn’t — but
buried deep within the fine
print of Spectrum’s terms of
service for business and
residential landlines is a
provision that the customer,
not the company, is responsible for any fraudulent use
of the phone service.
I found similar provisions tucked away in
AT&T’s and Frontier Communications’ terms.
You get hacked, you pay.
And that, of course, is
nuts. It’s not your handset,
after all, that’s being
hacked. In most cases, it’s
the telecom company’s
network. Why should the
customer be left holding the
bag for a corporate security
lapse?
“It’s frustrating,” said
Christine Mailloux, staff
attorney with the Utility
Reform Network, a San
Francisco advocacy group.
“The companies will come
up with a mumbo-jumbo,
gobbledygook explanation
for how it’s the customer’s
responsibility. But it’s hard
to see how these contracts
are defensible.”
Howard owns a small PR
firm in Brentwood. She
relies on Spectrum — formerly Time Warner Cable —
for her office’s phones, Internet connections and TV
[See Lazarus, C6]
C2
F R I DAY , A P R I L 14 , 2 017
WS T
L AT I M E S. C O M /B U S I NE S S
BUSINESS BEAT
Scandal hits Wells Fargo results L.A.’S
COSTLY
HOUSING
IS A BIG
ISSUE FOR
STAFFING
Its first-quarter profit
is flat and revenue
declines as customers
remain on guard.
By James Rufus Koren
Wells Fargo & Co. reported first-quarter earnings Thursday that show the
scandal over unauthorized
customer accounts is eating
into its bottom line.
The San Francisco bank
said its net income totaled
$5.5 billion, showing no
growth from last year’s first
quarter — though the results topped the modest expectations of Wall Street.
Wells Fargo Chief Executive Timothy Sloan acknowledged to analysts that the
scandal involving sham
checking, savings and credit
card accounts has hurt the
bank’s business. But he was
optimistic that the hit
wouldn’t last long.
“Of course it’s having an
impact on performance at
the moment,” Sloan said
during a conference call.
“What we’ve been able to
demonstrate historically ...
is that we can work through
those challenges.”
While profit was flat for
the quarter ended March 31,
revenue actually declined. It
amounted to $22 billion,
down $200 million from last
year’s first quarter and lower
than the $22.3 billion expected by analysts, according to data provider Factset.
The bank’s book of outstanding loans shrank, with
loan balances at the end of
the first quarter down $9.2
billion compared with the
end of last year. That decline, executives said, was
driven in part by a drop in
consumer credit card balances, which fell by nearly
$2 billion.
Some of that is seasonal,
as consumers pay off bills after the holidays. But the
bank also blamed some of
the decline on the fact that
new credit card account
openings have fallen sharply
since the accounts scandal,
which first came to light in a
2013 Los Angeles Times
investigation and drew national attention after a $185million settlement with
regulators in September.
Credit card applications
have nosedived since the
settlement sparked congressional
investigations
and forced out prior CEO
John Stumpf. In March, customers applied for about
200,000 credit cards, a decline of 42% from 12 months
earlier. That’s actually an
improvement from February, when credit card applications fell 55% compared
with the same month a year
Region’s affordability
crisis makes it harder
for companies to
attract and retain
workers, a survey says.
By Tracey Lien
Chuck Burton Associated Press
A MAN USES a Wells Fargo ATM in Charlotte, N.C. Wells CEO Timothy Sloan acknowledged to analysts
that the scandal involving sham checking, savings and credit card accounts has hurt the bank’s business.
earlier.
Wells Fargo saw declines
in other types of consumer
lending too. It originated
fewer auto loans and home
mortgages, though different
factors probably are at play.
Rising interest rates have
made mortgage refinancing
less attractive and Wells
Fargo has joined other lenders in tightening credit
standards on auto loans, a
move that would lead to
fewer loans being made.
It’s not clear whether or
how much the accounts
scandal might be hurting
those businesses, but Cathy
Seifert, an analyst at CFRA
Research, said she suspects
that there’s been at least
some effect — or that there
will be in the months and
years ahead.
“My sense is this will continue to have an impact on
their ability to grow those
various consumer businesses going forward,” she
said. “I think that’s definitely
something to be looking for
in the next quarter.”
Along with cutting into
loans, the scandal has also
cost the bank in legal fees
and other expenses. Wells
Fargo reported that its
spending on outside professional services due to the
sham accounts and related
issues was about $80 million
in the quarter.
That went to pay for,
among other things, an
investigation released Monday on how the bank’s onerous sales goals led to the creation of as many as 2.1 mil-
Honest Rates.
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Purchase or Refinance
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Freddie Yeawary
Personal Mortgage Consultant
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www.SouthlandCU.org
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subject to change without notice. The loan and accompanying interest
rates, points, and APRs may differ and be adjusted based on your
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amount, and loan purpose. Rates are subject to increase or decrease
at the end of the fixed rate period, may adjust annually, and are based on an index plus a margin. The
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eligibility. All new accounts will be verified through ChexSystems and are subject to credit approval. Real
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lion unauthorized accounts.
The bank is paying for other
internal inquiries too, including one looking into
claims that Wells Fargo
workers had applied for Prudential insurance policies on
customers’ behalf without
authorization, according to
the report.
Wells Fargo Chief Financial Officer John Shrewsberry said during the conference call that he expects the
bank to continue spending
$70 million to $80 million per
quarter on issues related to
the accounts scandal for
some time.
“There are a couple outside firms doing major reviews,” he said. “Some of
those [costs] will be around
for several quarters.”
Shrewsberry and Sloan
also discussed the bank’s effort to cut its operating costs
by about $2 billion annually
over the next few years.
That initiative includes
cutting 400 branches nationwide by the end of next year,
mirroring an industry trend
as more customers get comfortable with mobile and online banking. Wells Fargo
said it already has closed
nearly 40 branches in the
first quarter.
Despite higher costs,
lower loan balances and
lower-than-expected revenue, the bank’s net income
reached $1 a share, beating
analysts’ expectations of 96
cents.
JPMorgan Chase and
Citigroup also reported
earnings Thursday. Both
beat expectations and re-
ported first-quarter profits
that were 17% higher than
the same quarter last year.
JPMorgan’s net income rose
$6.4 billion, while Citi’s
climbed to $4.1 billion.
Unlike Wells Fargo, JPMorgan and Citigroup saw
modest loan growth in the
quarter. They were also
boosted by strong results
from their investment banking divisions, a business in
which Wells Fargo is a
smaller player.
Wells Fargo shares closed
Thursday at $51.35, down
$1.77 or 3.3%. The other big
banks also declined but less
so, with JPMorgan shares
falling 1.2% and Citigroup
losing 0.8%.
james.koren@latimes.com
Twitter: @jrkoren
Reality TV writers
stage walkout in N.Y.
It’s part of a Writers
Guild of America bid
to unionize more
unscripted shows.
By David Ng
Writers for several popular reality TV shows — including “Pawn Stars,” “Tiny
House Nation” and “Forged
in Fire” — walked off the job
Wednesday in New York as
part of an effort by the Writers Guild of America, East to
unionize more unscripted
shows.
The one-day walkout,
which drew an estimated 200
writers, occurred during the
lunch hour over multiple locations in New York. The
scribes were from several reality TV production companies, including Peacock Productions, Leftfield Pictures
and Sharp Entertainment.
Peacock, which is a division of NBCUniversal, produces such shows as
“Caught on Camera With
Nick Cannon” and “Disappeared.” Leftfield is behind
the popular series “Pawn
Stars” and the new “American Grit.”
Reality TV writers “rarely
have access to healthcare
and are often placed in dangerous situations in the
field,” said Jess Beck, a writer-producer who helped organize the walkout. She said
writers often work long
hours without overtime pay
and full weekends without
compensation.
“Now it’s time for the
companies to do their part
and come to the bargaining
table with the intent of working out fair contracts and
giving basic rights to those
of us who are earning their
profits.”
Representatives of Peacock, Leftfield Pictures and
Sharp Entertainment were
not immediately available
for comment.
The walkout comes during a sensitive time as the
Dimitrios Kambouris Getty Images
LOWELL PETERSON, head of the Writers Guild of
America, East, says itinerant reality TV writers often
have difficulty gaining traction in negotiations.
possibility of a larger, industrywide writers strike appears increasingly likely.
The East and West Coast
branches of the Writers
Guild are deep in negotiations with the major studios
and broadcasters over a new
contract and have until May
1 to reach an agreement on a
number of issues, including
compensation from streaming and health and pension
benefits.
Talks in Los Angeles
broke off in late March after
the two sides failed to make
headway and resumed Monday. The WGA is scheduled
to hold a strike-authorization vote among its members this month.
Wednesday’s walkout in
New York was separate from
the larger negotiations but
the timing of the one-day
event could put more pressure on studios as the union
seeks to increase its visibility
and leverage.
“This lunchtime action
gave writer-producers from
a variety of companies the
opportunity to talk about
what they need on the job
and how we can work together to build power in this
part of the industry,” Lowell
Peterson, executive director
of the Writers Guild of
America, East, said in a
statement.
He said reality TV writers
often have difficulty gaining
traction in negotiations
when they “move from company to company, from project to project.”
The WGA has long
sought to unionize reality
shows, to varying degrees of
success. In 2006, writers for
“America’s Next Top Model”
went on strike after they said
the show’s producers rejected their request to join
the Writers Guild of America, West.
In recent months, the
East Coast branch of the
guild has targeted Leftfield,
saying the company has
failed to sign a union contract despite more than a
year at the bargaining table.
Writers and producers voted
in 2015 to join the guild.
Leftfield has stated that
its pay levels are well above
the minimum compensation
levels that the guild has negotiated with other production companies, and that it
provides a range of benefits.
david.ng@latimes.com
NEW YORK — With yearround sunshine, golden
beaches and some of the
country’s best tacos and
burritos, you might think
Los Angeles wouldn’t have a
problem attracting and retaining workers.
But like many metropolitan areas burdened with
high housing costs, the region’s affordability crisis is
deterring workers from
putting down roots, according to the results of a survey
released this week by USC
and the Los Angeles Business Council.
“Though we have yet to
see a critical mass of businesses priced out of the region, this is an area of concern,” Raphael Bostic, a professor of public policy at
USC who led the research,
said in a statement.
High housing costs,
Bostic said, are leading to
employers having to develop
special hiring packages, subsidize employee transportation or offer relocation costs,
which puts a strain on companies’ bottom lines and
makes it harder to compete
with markets where housing
costs aren’t as high.
“There’s ample evidence
to show that the time is now
to implement strategies to
reduce housing costs,” he
said.
The survey team reached
out to nearly 50 of Los Angeles’ largest employers and
received responses from 15
of them.
Nearly 60% of those surveyed said the region’s high
cost of living was affecting
employee retention, and
64% of the companies said
they had to factor in cost of
living when negotiating hiring packages for high-level
employees.
Southern
California
home prices have been rising
steadily for nearly five years,
a result of a rebounding
economy, low mortgage
rates and few homes on the
market. According to real estate firm CoreLogic, the median price of a Los Angeles
County home in February
was $525,000, up 7.9% from a
year earlier.
The survey also found
that when employees can’t
afford housing near their
jobs, they have to endure
long, taxing commutes,
which can hurt employee
satisfaction and productivity.
Nearly every employer
surveyed said more than
25% of their employees
spent more than 45 minutes
commuting to or from work.
“It’s concerning that high
housing costs could lead to
Los Angeles losing its competitive edge in recruiting
top talent,” said Mary Leslie,
president of the Los Angeles
Business Council. “This survey underscores the need to
think outside the box and
tackle our city’s high cost of
living problem.”
Still, one city’s loss is another’s gain. Cities such as
Seattle, where the cost of
housing is nearly half that of
San Francisco’s, have bolstered their workforces by
snapping up employees who
are leaving pricier regions. A
recent report from LinkedIn
found that San Francisco
has been the top source of
new workers moving to Seattle in the last 12 months, followed by moves to New York
and Chicago.
tracey.lien@latimes.com
Twitter: @traceylien
Times staff writer Andrew
Khouri contributed to this
report.
L AT I ME S . CO M / B U S I NE S S
S
F R I DAY, A P R I L 14 , 2 017
C3
Tesla plan puts
clean-truck race
into high gear
By James F. Peltz
Tesla Inc. plans to unveil an electric cargo truck in September, Chief Executive Elon Musk said Thursday, heating up the race to get a zero-emissions semi-truck on the
road.
“Tesla Semi truck unveil set for September,” Musk
said on Twitter. “Team has done an amazing job. Seriously next level.” He did not provide any details, including
when the truck would be available for purchase.
The truck would add to the ambitious production
schedule underway at the Palo Alto automaker, which
also is gearing up to build its widely anticipated Model 3
mid-market sedan.
Musk previously had indicated that the truck was
coming and that it probably would have some autonomous-driving features.
Musk also tweeted Thursday that Tesla expects to unveil a pickup truck in 18 to 24 months.
In outlining the company’s “master plan” last July,
Musk said heavy-duty trucks were among the other types
of electric vehicles needed in the marketplace and that
Tesla expected to unveil its truck this year.
“We believe the Tesla Semi will deliver a substantial reduction in the cost of cargo transport, while increasing
safety and making it really fun to operate,” he said then.
Others also are working on bringing a zero-emissions
cargo truck to market, such as Mercedes-Benz and its Urban eTruck, and Nikola Motor Co.’s hydrogen fuel cell
truck, which the company showcased in December.
Tesla’s stock closed Thursday at $304 a share, up $7.16.
james.peltz@latimes.com
Trump rolls out
changes to ACA
your delay. Above, travelers check in at a United Airlines counter at O’Hare International Airport in Chicago.
The logic behind airlines
selling too many seats
Overbooking leads to more than 40,000 fliers involuntarily removed
annually. For carriers, the math makes sense to try to max out flights.
By Hugo Martin
associated press
The Trump administration released limited fixes
Thursday for shaky health insurance markets, even as it
reaffirmed its goal of dismantling the Obama-era healthcare law that created them.
Republicans contend that the Affordable Care Act —
also called the ACA or Obamacare — is beyond repair, but
their “repeal and replace” slogan hasn’t been easy to put
into practice, nor politically popular. So the administration is taking steps to keep the existing system going even
as it pursues its ambition of a total remake.
Many of the changes announced Thursday follow recommendations from insurers, which wanted the government to address shortcomings with HealthCare.gov markets. They include:
8 A shortened sign-up window of 45 days, starting with
coverage for 2018. That’s about half as long as the current
open-enrollment season. Some insurers say a tighter
sign-up schedule will allow for more focused marketing.
Critics say uninsured people may be left out.
8 Curbs on “special enrollment periods” that allow
consumers to sign up outside the normal openenrollment window. Insurers say these have been too easily granted, allowing some people to sign up only when
they need costly treatment.
8 Allowing an insurer to collect past debt for unpaid
premiums from the previous 12 months before applying a
consumer’s payments to a new policy.
8 Giving insurers more flexibility to design low-premium plans that can be tailored to young adults.
“While these steps will help stabilize the individual and
small-group markets, they are not a long-term cure for
the problems that the Affordable Care Act has created,”
Seema Verma, the Trump administration official responsible for the markets, said in a statement.
CNN
JEFFREY LORD, left, described President
Trump as “the Martin Luther King of healthcare.”
Pundit’s Trump
remark criticized
By Stephen Battaglio
CNN political commentator Jeffrey Lord is under fire
on social media for describing President Trump as “the
Martin Luther King of healthcare.”
Lord made the remark Thursday on CNN’s “New Day”
during a discussion on a report that Trump is threatening
to cut subsidies to the poor under the Affordable Care Act
as a way to get Democrats to negotiate with him on
healthcare reform.
“Think of Donald Trump as the Martin Luther King of
healthcare,” Lord told CNN anchor Alisyn Camerota.
“When I was a kid, President Kennedy did not want to introduce the civil rights bill because he said it wasn’t popular and he didn’t have the votes for it.”
“Dr. King kept putting people in the streets in harm’s
way to put the pressure on so the bill would be introduced,” Lord added.
Using the civil rights leader to make a point about the
president’s proposed hardball tactic outraged Democratic activist Symone Sanders, the other panelist in the
discussion. “ Let’s not equate Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
— humanitarian and Nobel Peace Prize winner — to the
vagina-grabbing president, Donald Trump,” she said.
Lord’s remarks were met with immediate scorn on
Twitter, where the exchange was a trending topic.
“Embarrassing: why does CNN allow this. There are
thoughtful credible [Republicans] who can talk about the
health care debate,” tweeted TV journalist Soledad O’Brien, who once worked as an anchor at the network.
CNN did not respond to a request for comment.
stephen.battaglio@latimes.com
Joshua Lott AFP/Getty Images
IF YOU get booted from your seat, the airline can offer you nothing to $1,350, depending on the duration of
T
he now infamous incident in which a passenger was yanked
from a sold-out United
Airlines plane has the
Chicago-based carrier
reviewing how it deals
with flights that don’t have enough
seats for everyone who wants to board.
Overbooking is a regular practice in
the airline industry and it results in
more than 40,000 passengers involuntarily removed annually from seats
they purchased. Why do most airlines
routinely sell more tickets than available seats for flights? And why does
federal law allow it?
Airlines know some people won’t
show up.
Historical flight data tells airlines
that on any particular flight, a percentage of passengers won’t show up to fill
their seat, maybe because they overslept, got caught in traffic or simply forgot.
That percentage varies based on
many factors, including whether those
passengers are flying for a vacation or a
business trip. If the passengers who
don’t show up bought refundable tickets, the airline loses the revenue from
those empty seats.
Airlines overbook with the
help of secret formulas
To avoid flying with empty seats,
airlines sell more seats than are available. Federal law allows this practice
but doesn’t dictate the exact percentage of seats an airline can sell twice for
the same flight.
Instead, airlines calculate how
many seats to oversell based on proprietary algorithms that try to guess how
many passengers are likely to miss the
flight. The goal is to come up with a
number that fills the plane as close to
full capacity without having to boot
passengers off — either voluntarily or
involuntarily.
The algorithm must take into consideration what airlines must spend to
compensate passengers who are
bumped from a flight. Airlines don’t
want the compensation costs to exceed how much more they make for
double-selling a seat.
Not that many passengers
are denied boarding
In 2016, the 12 biggest U.S.-based
airlines denied boarding to 475,000
passengers, including about 41,000 who
were removed from flights involuntarily last year.
That’s a rate of about 6 passengers
who are involuntarily bumped from
flights for every 100,000 fliers, according to the U.S. Transportation Department. That rate dropped from about
7 fliers for every 100,000 passengers in
2015.
ExpressJet Airlines, a subsidiary of
SkyWest Airlines, had the highest rate
of passengers removed involuntarily
last year — 1.5 fliers for every 100,000
passengers. JetBlue Airways says it
doesn’t overbook but must still bump
passengers when flights are canceled
for various reasons.
What you get for giving up
your seat
When an airline has overbooked a
flight and needs to remove paying
passengers, federal law says the carrier
must first ask for volunteers to give up
their seats to take a later flight. An
airline has no limit on how much compensation it can offer passengers to
voluntarily give up a seat.
If an airline can’t get enough passengers to voluntarily give up their
seats, the carriers can select passengers to remove involuntarily. Federal law does not dictate how an airline
chooses. Many carriers first target
passengers who paid the least for a
ticket or who booked at the last minute.
What if you don’t want to
give up your seat?
If an airline picks a passenger to be
removed involuntarily from an overbooked flight, federal law says the
carrier doesn’t have to offer any compensation as long as the airline gets
the flier to the final destination within
an hour of the arrival time of the overbooked flight.
If an airline gets a booted passenger
on a flight that arrives between one
and four hours later than the arrival
time of the overbooked flight, federal
law says the carrier must pay 200% of
the original fare, with a cap of $675.
If the airline gets the booted passenger to the final destination later
than four hours after the original arrival time, the carrier must pay 400% of
the original fare, with a maximum of
$1,350. The airlines can offer such compensation in the form of cash, travel
vouchers or a combination of
the two.
Are there better ways of
dealing with overbooked
flights?
Industry experts suggest that there
are several options for reducing the
number of passengers who are booted
involuntarily.
8 Airlines can stop overselling altogether or alter the algorithm to cut
back on the number of seats that are
oversold.
8 Carriers should try to resolve
overbooking problems in the terminal,
before passengers get on the plane. It
is harder to get passengers to give up
their spots once they are seated.
8 Airlines should give gate agents
authority to offer as much in compensation as needed to get passengers to
give up their seats voluntarily to avoid
hurt feelings or an ugly onboard scene.
8 Airlines should send texts to
passengers on an overbooked flight,
asking for bids on how much they will
take to give up their seats.
8 Carriers should make the airline
policy for overbooking more transparent so that passengers know how likely
they are to be booted and what they
can expect if it happens. Most airline
policies on overbooking are buried
deep in a carrier’s website.
8 Airlines that have an oversold
flight can book seats for their extra
passengers on rival carriers. Airlines
have negotiated fares for such situations.
hugo.martin@latimes.com
Spectrum auction buoys KOCE
The flagship PBS
station for Southern
California will get a
$49-million windfall.
By Stephen Battaglio
KOCE, the flagship PBS
station for Southern California, will see a $49-million
windfall from the auction of
the public airwaves to companies with wireless networks.
The Federal Communications Commission’s auction raised $19.8 billion from
bidders that included TMobile, Dish Network and
Comcast, the FCC announced Thursday.
About $10 billion of that
amount went to TV station
license holders who gave up
all or part of their broadcast
frequencies that eventually
can be used to service wireless providers. About $7 billion will go to reduce the federal deficit.
A total of 175 stations will
sell their spectrum back to
the government. Of those
stations, 133 will continue to
serve their markets by
broadcasting on another
channel through a sharing
arrangement. Thirty other
winners successfully moved
to other frequencies. About
12 stations will leave the air
completely, none of which
are in the Los Angeles market.
The auction proceeds
were also a boon to San Bernardino public TV station
KVCR, which previously announced that it’s receiving
$157 million from the auction. The station is owned by
San Bernardino Community College.
In both cases, the stations are selling their broadcast spectrum while retaining the ability to still serve
their viewing audiences that
watch them through overthe-air broadcast television.
KVCR is moving from its
spot on the UHF band to a
new frequency. KOCE has
entered a channel-sharing
agreement with Los Angeles
station KSCI.
Viewers who watch the
over-the-air signal will have
to use the re-scan function
on their TV sets to get the
stations on their new frequencies after the transition
occurs over the next few
years. Cable and satellite
subscribers will not know
the difference.
"There will be no impact
on the viewer,” said Andrew
Russell, president and chief
executive of PBS SoCal.
The auction proceeds are
meaningful for public broadcasters who are facing significant federal funding cuts
proposed by the Trump administration.
Russell said the one-time
proceeds will be used to invest in new programming,
initiatives in broadband
services and establishing an
endowment fund to provide
ongoing income. But the station will still need the federal
stipends it receives every
year for its operating costs,
he said.
The auction proceeds
were “on the low side” of
what the station expected to
receive, Russell said.
That was the consensus
of most of the auction participants as demand for spectrum from wireless carriers
was not as robust as expected. Many stations expected much higher revenue
from the auction.
Some small, lower-power
stations that weren’t eligible
to participate in the auction
may go off the air, especially
if they have to spend millions
to move to another channel
on the radio-wave spectrum.
Maxwell Agha and his
wife, Michelle Diaz Agha,
have invested millions into
their San Diego station
KSDY-TV, which broadcasts
Spanish-language
news and local programming. They’ve asked the
FCC to change the station’s
status so that it would be eligible to receive funds from
the auction.
“It’s up to them to grant
us relief, otherwise there is
no guarantee we’re going to
survive this,” Maxwell Agha
said.
stephen.battaglio
@latimes.com
Twitter: @SteveBattaglio
F R I DAY, A P R I L 14 , 2 017
SALES EVENTS
WS T
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Announcements
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The transferor is CBS
Broadcasting Inc. and
the assignor is CBS Radio East Inc. The officers,
directors, and other attributable parties to the
transferor and the assignor are: CBS Radio Inc.,
CBS Westinghouse Holding Company, Inc., CBS
Corporation,
National
Amusements, Inc., Adam
Townsend, Alissa Makower, Andrew Siegel, Anne
Kelly, Anne Lucey, Anne O’
Grady, Anthony Ambrosio, Anthony Bongiorno,
Armando Nunez, Arnold
Kopelson, Bruce Gordon,
Bruce Taub, Bryon Rubin,
Charles Gifford, Craig
Brill, Darin Bassin, David
Andelman, David Berson,
David Hillman, David Pill,
David Rhodes, Deanna
O’Toole, Deborah Barak,
Dorothy Alke, Doug Morris, Eric Sobczak, Gary
Countryman, Gary Silver,
George Schweitzer, Gil
Schwartz, Glenn Geller,
Harry Isaacs, James Morrison, Javier Avitia, Jeff
Fager, Jo Ann Ross, John
Bagwell, Jonathan Anschell, Joseph Califano,
Jr., Joseph Ianniello, Julie
Behuniak, Kenneth Koen,
Kenneth Silver, Kimberly
Pittman, Laura Franco,
Laura Kreda, Lawrence
Liding, Lawrence Tu,
Leonard Goldberg, Leslie
Moonves, Linda Griego,
Lura Burton, Mallory
Levitt, Mark Engstrom,
Mary Diaz-Albertini, Matthew Morgeson, Michael
Klausman, Michael Koczko, Michele Scaringella,
Mindy Greene, Nicole
Paolini-Subramanya, Paul
Franklin, Peter Dunn,
Ray Hopkins, Rebecca
Borden, Richard Jones,
Robert Ross, Roni Mueller, Sandra Williams, Sean
McManus, Shari Redstone, Sumner Redstone,
Susanna Lowy, Trupti Patel, William Cohen, Andre
Fernandez, Jo Ann Haller,
Matthew Siegel, Stacey
Benson, Steven Grosso,
Scott Herman.
The transferees are the
shareholders of Entercom
Communications
Corp. The proposed officers, directors, and other
attributable parties to
Entercom Communications Corp. are: David
Field, Joseph Field, Leslie
Moonves, Joseph Ianniello, Stephen Fisher,
Andrew Sutor, Eugene
Levin, Michael Dash, Louise Kramer.
Elliot Evers is the sole
member of TDC Communications, LLC, which is
the trustee of The Entercom Divestiture Trust.
A copy of the applications
and related materials are
available at fcc.gov.
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Legal Notices
Legal Notices
KAMP-FM, KNX, KRTH
& KTWV
On March 20, 2017, an
application was filed
with the Federal Communications Commission
requesting consent to
the transfer of control of
the broadcast licenses of
KAMP-FM, Los Angeles,
CA, 97.1 MHz, KNX, Los
Angeles, CA, 1070 kHz,
KRTH, Los Angeles, CA,
101.1 MHz and KTWV, Los
Angeles, CA, 94.7 MHz,
in connection with the
merger of CBS Radio Inc.
and Entercom Communications Corp.
Department of Justice
Antitrust Division
Take notice that the
United States has filed a
proposed Final Judgment
in a civil antitrust case in
the United States District
Court for the Central District of California (Western
Division), United States
of America v. DIRECTV
Group Holdings, LLC, and
AT&T, Inc., Civil Action No.
2:16-cv-08150-MWF-E.
On November 2, 2016, the
United States filed a Complaint against DIRECTV
and its corporate successor, AT&T, alleging that DIRECTV was the ringleader
of a series of unlawful
information exchanges
between DIRECTV and
three of its competitors
– Cox Communications
Inc., Charter Communications Inc. and AT&T (before it acquired DIRECTV)
– during the companies’
negotiations to carry the
SportsNet LA “Dodgers
Channel,” in violation of
Section 1 of the Sherman
Act, 15 U.S.C. § 1. The proposed Final Judgment,
filed on March 23, 2017,
requires the Defendants
to stop illegally sharing
competitively-sensitive
information with their
rivals, to monitor certain
communications
their
programming executives
have with their rivals, and
to implement antitrust
training and compliance
programs. A Competitive
Impact Statement filed
by the United States describes the Complaint,
the proposed Final Judgment, the industry, and
the remedies available to
private litigants who may
have been injured by the
alleged violation.
$50,000
REWARD NOTICE
The City of Los Angeles
offers a reward payable at
the discretion of the City
Council to one or more
persons in the sum or
sums up to an aggregate
maximum total sum of
$50,000 for information
leading to the identification and apprehension of
the person or persons responsible for THE SHOOTING DEATH OF ELOISE
ELIZARRARAZ, in the City
of Los Angeles. On Saturday, January 7, 2017, 34year old Eloise Elizarraraz
was found shot to death
in her car near the intersection of Harding Avenue and Tripoli Avenue in
Sylmar. The night before
her death, a witness overheard a heated argument
between Ms. Elizarraraz
and her ex-boyfriend,
Jose Rodriguez, from
whom she had recently
separated. The detectives investigating this
crime have identified Mr.
Rodriguez as a suspect in
this crime, but have not
been able to locate him.
Detectives are continuing
to investigate this matter, and believe a reward
may compel members of
the public to provide information on the person
responsible for this crime.
The person or persons
responsible for this crime
represent an ongoing
threat to the safety of the
people of Los Angeles.
Unless withdrawn or paid
by City Council action,
this offer of reward shall
terminate on, and have
no effect after, OCTOBER
14, 2017.
The provisions of payment and all other considerations shall be governed by Chapter 12 of
Division 19 of the LAAC
Code, as amended by
Ordinance Nos. 158157
and 166666. This offer
shall be given upon the
condition that all claimants provide continued
cooperation within the
criminal justice system
relative to this case and is
not available to public officers or employees of the
City, their families, persons in law enforcement
or persons whose misconduct prompted this
reward. If you have any
information
regarding
this case, please call the
Los Angeles Police Department at 1-877-LAWFULL, 24 hours.
C. F. No. 17-0010-s15
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NOTIFICATION OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA GAS COMPANY’S REQUEST
TO INCREASE RATES FOR THE FORECASTED PIPELINE SAFETY
ENHANCEMENT PLAN IMPLEMENTATION
Legal Notices
$50,000
REWARD NOTICE
The City of Los Angeles
offers a reward payable at
the discretion of the City
Council to one or more
persons in the sum or
sums up to an aggregate
maximum total sum of
$50,000 for information
leading to the identification and apprehension of
the person or persons responsible for the SHOOTING DEATH OF DEONTRA
LAJOHN GANT, JR., in the
City of Los Angeles. On
Saturday, June 20, 2015,
at approximately 12:20
a.m., 35-year old Deontra LaJohn Gant, Jr. was
walking west on Vernon
Avenue in the Vermont
Square
neighborhood
of Los Angeles, when a
light-colored sedan traveling east on Vernon Avenue stopped adjacent
to him. Three black men
then exited the vehicle
and ran towards Mr. Gant.
One of the men then
went back to the car, but
the other two chased Mr.
Gant and fired multiple
rounds from a handgun,
fatally wounding him.
To date, the detectives
investigating this crime
have not been able to
identify the suspects, and
hope that a monetary reward compels members
of the public to provide
information on this crime.
The person or persons
responsible for this crime
represent an ongoing
threat to the safety of the
people of Los Angeles.
Unless withdrawn or paid
by City Council action,
this offer of reward shall
terminate on, and have
no effect after, OCTOBER
14, 2017.
The provisions of payment and all other considerations shall be governed by Chapter 12 of
Division 19 of the LAAC
Code, as amended by
Ordinance Nos. 158157
and 166666. This offer
shall be given upon the
condition that all claimants provide continued
cooperation within the
criminal justice system
relative to this case and is
not available to public officers or employees of the
City, their families, persons in law enforcement
or persons whose misconduct prompted this
reward. If you have any
information
regarding
this case, please call the
Los Angeles Police Department at 1-877-LAWFULL, 24 hours.
C. F. No. 16-0010-s7
Legal Notices
NORTHERN AZ NORTHERN
AZ WILDERNESS RANCH
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Blend of evergreen woodlands & grassy meadows
with sweeping views across
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garden soil & maintained
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descriptions/
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chart/area info 1st United
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KCBS-FM
On March 20, 2017, an
application was filed
with the Federal Communications Commission
requesting consent to
the transfer of control of
the broadcast license of
KCBS-FM, Los Angeles,
CA, 93.1 MHz, in connection with the merger of
CBS Radio Inc. and Entercom Communications
Corp.
An application
was also filed to assign
the license of KCBS-FM to
The Entercom Divestiture
Trust.
Services For Seniors
APPLICATION A.17-03-021
On March 30, 2017, Southern California Gas Company (SoCalGas ) and San
Diego Gas & Electric Company® (SDG&E®) jointly filed with the California Public
Utilities Commission (CPUC), their application requesting the CPUC approve a rate
increase for the implementation of the Pipeline Safety Enhancement Plan (PSEP).
This application will cover forecasted costs associated with implementing the PSEP.
SoCalGas is requesting an increase of $44.58 million, starting in 2019, to cover these
costs. If approved, the increase would be charged to customers over a 12-month
period, or until the costs are recovered.
®
The CPUC opened Rulemaking (R.)11-02-019 to adopt new safety and reliability
regulations for natural gas transmission and distribution pipelines, and to orderly and
cost effectively replace or pressure test all natural gas transmission pipelines, for
which reliable records were not available. SoCalGas and SDG&E initiated its PSEP
work and began recording costs in their regulatory accounts, as directed by the CPUC
in Decision (D.)12-04-021, D.14-06-007, and D.16-08-003. The CPUC determined in
D.14-06-007 what costs should not be charged to customers and those costs have
been excluded from this application. D.16-08-003 ordered SoCalGas and SDG&E to
file a forecasted application as soon as possible to justify charging customers for costs
associated with certain projects. This application complies with that direction.
The SoCalGas revenue increase requested in this application applies to gas
distribution and transmission service, using a methodology which was previously
approved by the CPUC. This application requests recovery of certain forecasted
safety plan costs, which include the replacing, reduction of pipeline pressure, and
abandoning of natural gas pipelines. Additionally, this application will seek to recover
project management costs that support SoCalGas and SDG&E’s safety enhancement
plan. Recovery of costs incurred for additional safety related work will be requested
in future applications.
ESTIMATED IMPACT OF THIS REQUEST ON GAS RATES
SoCalGas has estimated the impact of the requested $44.58 million1 increase in
gas revenues under the proposed rates as shown in the tables below. The actual
distribution of the increase to each customer class depends on how the CPUC
ultimately decides all issues in the application.
Illustrative Proposed Class Average Rate Increase Per Customer Class:
Customer Class
Residential
Commercial
Natural Gas Vehicles
Large Industrial (distribution level service)
Large Industrial (transmission level service)
Backbone Transmission Service
System Total
¢/Therm
0.12 ¢/Therm
0.08 ¢/Therm
0.05 ¢/Therm
0.06 ¢/Therm
0.04 ¢/Therm
4.31 ¢/Therm
0.48 ¢/Therm
% increase
0.2%
0.3%
0.3%
0.8%
1.8%
13.4%
1.8%
If the CPUC approves SoCalGas’ request for a gas rate increase and the rate
allocation method, the bill for a typical bundled residential customer, using 35 therms
per month, would increase $0.19, or 0.5 percent, from $41.16 to $41.35. Individual
customer bills may differ. SoCalGas is requesting rates become effective in 2019.
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION
You may request additional information or obtain a copy of the application and related
exhibits by writing to: Brian Hoff, Southern California Gas Company, 555 W. Fifth
St., GT14D6, Los Angeles, CA 90013-1011. SoCalGas’ application and attachments
may also be inspected at the CPUC’s Central Files Office, 505 Van Ness Ave., San
Francisco, CA 94102.
Copies of this Application will be available for viewing and printing on the SoCalGas
web site at: socalgas.com/regulatory/cpuc.shtml.
Copies of this insert will be available for viewing and printing on the SoCalGas web
site at socalgas.com/regulatory/.
CPUC PROCESS
This application will be assigned to an Administrative Law Judge (Judge) who will
determine how to receive evidence and other related documents, necessary for the
CPUC to establish a record upon which to base its decision. Evidentiary Hearings
(EHs) may be held where parties of record will present their testimony and may be
subject to cross-examination by other parties. These EHs are open to the public, but
only those who are parties of record can participate.
After considering all proposals and evidence presented during the formal hearing
process, the assigned Judge will issue a proposed decision which may adopt
SoCalGas’ proposal, modify it or deny it. Any CPUC Commissioner may sponsor
an alternate decision. The proposed decision, and any alternate decisions, will be
discussed and voted upon at a scheduled CPUC Voting Meeting.
The Office of Ratepayer Advocates (ORA) may review this application. ORA is the
independent consumer advocate within the CPUC with a legislative mandate to
represent investor-owned utility customers to obtain the lowest possible rate for
service consistent with reliable and safe service levels. ORA has a multi-disciplinary
staff with expertise in economics, finance, accounting and engineering. For more
information about ORA, please call (415) 703-1584, e-mail ora@cpuc.ca.gov or visit
ORA’s web site at www.ora.ca.gov.
Other Countries
Costa Rica 40 ac, 3 hses,
irrig. & creekwater, fruits,
nuts & teakwood. Caretaker
& maid on site. Private, near
nature reserve. $500,000.
928-310-8075
Legal Notices
NOTICE OF PUBLIC
HEARING
The Los Angeles County Regional
Planning Commission will
conduct a public hearing to
consider the project described
below. You will have an
opportunity to testify, or you can
submit written comments to the
planner below or at the public
hearing. If the final decision on
this proposal is challenged in
court, testimony may be limited
to issues raised before or at the
public hearing.
Hearing Date and Time:
Wednesday May 17, 2017, at 9:00
a.m.
Hearing Location: 320
West Temple Street, Hall of
Records, Rm. 150, Los Angeles, CA
90012
Project& Permit(s): SEA
Program Update – SEA Ordinance
(Project No. 2017-003723, Permit
No. RPPL2017006228)
Project
Location:
Countywide within Significant
Ecological Areas (SEAs)
CEQA
Categorical
Exemption: Class 8 - Actions
by Regulatory Agencies for
Protection of the Environment
Project
Description:
General Plan Implementation
Program C/NR-2 SEA Ordinance.
Changes to the SEA Ordinance
(Los Angeles County Zoning Code
Section 22.56.215) which
regulate permitting, design
standards, and the review process
for development within SEAs.
For more information regarding
this
application,
contact
Alejandrina Baldwin, Los
Angeles County Department of
Regional Planning (DRP), 320 W.
Temple St., Los Angeles, CA
90012. Telephone: (213) 9746461, Fax: (213) 626-0434, Email:
abaldwin@planning.lacounty.gov
. Case materials are available
online
at
http://planning.lacounty.gov/sea
/meetings or at the Hacienda
Heights Library (Steinmetz Park,
1545 S. Stimson Ave, Hacienda
Heights, CA 91745 and Lancaster
Regional Library (601 W.
Lancaster Blvd., Lancaster, CA
93534). All correspondence
received by DRP shall be
considered a public record.
If you need reasonable
accommodations or auxiliary aids,
contact the Americans with
Disabilities Act (ADA) Coordinator
at (213) 974-6488 (Voice) or (213)
617-2292 (TDD) with at least 3
business days' notice. Si
necesita
más
información por favor
llame al (213) 9746466.
4/14/17
From
brokers
to buyers.
In one
place.
The transferor is CBS
Broadcasting Inc. The
officers, directors, and
other attributable parties to the transferor are:
CBS Westinghouse Holding Company, Inc., CBS
Corporation,
National
Amusements, Inc., Adam
Townsend, Alissa Makower, Andrew Siegel, Anne
Kelly, Anne Lucey, Anne O’
Grady, Anthony Ambrosio, Anthony Bongiorno,
Armando Nunez, Arnold
Kopelson, Bruce Gordon,
Bruce Taub, Bryon Rubin,
Charles Gifford, Craig
Brill, Darin Bassin, David
Andelman, David Berson,
David Hillman, David Pill,
David Rhodes, Deanna
O’Toole, Deborah Barak,
Dorothy Alke, Doug Morris, Eric Sobczak, Gary
Countryman, Gary Silver,
George Schweitzer, Gil
Schwartz, Glenn Geller,
Harry Isaacs, James Morrison, Javier Avitia, Jeff
Fager, Jo Ann Ross, John
Bagwell, Jonathan Anschell, Joseph Califano,
Jr., Joseph Ianniello, Julie
Behuniak, Kenneth Koen,
Kenneth Silver, Kimberly
Pittman, Laura Franco,
Laura Kreda, Lawrence
Liding, Lawrence Tu,
Leonard Goldberg, Leslie
Moonves, Linda Griego,
Lura Burton, Mallory
Levitt, Mark Engstrom,
Mary Diaz-Albertini, Matthew Morgeson, Michael
Klausman, Michael Koczko, Michele Scaringella,
Mindy Greene, Nicole
Paolini-Subramanya, Paul
Franklin, Peter Dunn,
Ray Hopkins, Rebecca
Borden, Richard Jones,
Robert Ross, Roni Mueller,
Sandra Williams, Sean McManus, Shari Redstone,
Sumner Redstone, Susanna Lowy, Trupti Patel,
William Cohen.
The transferees are the
shareholders of Entercom
Communications
Corp. The proposed officers, directors, and other
attributable parties to
Entercom Communications Corp. are: David
Field, Joseph Field, Leslie
Moonves, Joseph Ianniello, Stephen Fisher,
Andrew Sutor, Eugene
Levin, Michael Dash, Louise Kramer.
Legal Notices
Legal Notices
STATE OF CONNECTICUT
SUPERIOR COURT
JUVENILE MATTERS
ORDER OF NOTICE
JD-JM-61EL Rev. 12-04
C.G.S. 45a-716(c), 46b-129(a),52-52
Notice to: Erica Williams, mother of child born on
12/8/2014 of parts unknown.
A petition/motion has been filed seeking:
The petition, whereby the court’s decision can affect
your paternal rights, if any, regarding minor child(ren)
will be heard on 4/27/2017 at 10:00 am at 60 Housatonic Avenue Bridgeport CT 06604
Therefore, ORDERED, that notice of the hearing of
this petition be given by publishing this Order of Notice once, immediately upon receipt, in the Los Angeles Times
a newspaper having a circulation in California
RIGHT TO COUNSEL: Upon proof of inability to pay
for a lawyer, the court will provide one for you at court
expense. Any such request should be made immediately at the court office where your hearing is to be
held.
/s/ Hon. James Ginnocchio, Judge 3/13/2017.
4/14/2017
HOW TO PLACE AN AD
Self-service 24/7:
latimes.com/placead
Contact us by phone 24/7:
800-234-4444
If you would like to follow this proceeding, or any other issue before the CPUC, you
may use the CPUC’s free subscription service. Sign up at: http://subscribecpuc.cpuc.
ca.gov/.
ADVERTISING POLICIES
For Los Angeles Times advertising terms
and conditions go to:
http://www.tronc.com/ad-io-terms/
If you would like to learn how you can participate in the proceeding, have informal
comments, or if you have questions about the CPUC processes, you may access the
CPUC’s Public Advisor Office (PAO) webpage at http://www.cpuc.ca.gov/pao/. You
may also contact the PAO as follows:
E-mail:
Phone:
TTY:
CPUC Public Advisor’s Office
505 Van Ness Ave.
San Francisco, CA 94102
public.advisor@cpuc.ca.gov
1-866-849-8390 (toll-free) or 1-415-703-2074
1-866-836-7825 (toll-free) or 1-415-703-5282
LA Times
Please reference SoCalGas Application No.17-03-021 in any communications you
have with the Commission regarding this matter. All public comments will become part
of the public correspondence file for this proceeding and made available for review for
the assigned Judge, the Commissioners, and appropriate CPUC staff.
1
Total SoCalGas PSEP Revenue is approximately $45.14 million, without Franchise Fees and Uncollectibles,
which includes SDG&E PSEP costs of approximately $0.56 million to cover the integration of Local
Transmission PSEP costs between SoCalGas and SDG&E. The SoCalGas PSEP Revenue includes $7.4
million to cover 2017 and 2018 costs.
Real Estate
Classified
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CNS-2996852#
To advertise your pets, log on to
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Dogs
CITATION BY PUBLICATION - TRC 109 & 114
TO Defendant: Gerald M.
Parker
GREETINGS:
NOTICE TO DEFENDANT:
“You have been sued. You
may employ an attorney.
If you or your attorney do
not file a written answer
with the clerk who issued
this citation by 10:00 am
on the Monday next following the expiration of
42 days after the date
this citation was issued, a
default judgment may be
taken against you.”
You are hearby commanded to appear by
filing a written answer
to the Counter-Plaintiff’s
Alfred C. Glassell, III’s
Claim Regarding The
Interpled Property and
Cabo Blanco Company’s
Claim Regarding The
Interpled Property at or
before 10:00 o’clock A.M.
on the Monday next after
the expiration of 42 days
after the date of issuance of this citation the
same being Monday, May
22nd, 2017 before the
Honorable Terry D. Bailey, County Court at Law
Court, of Panola County,
at the Courthouse in said
County in Panola, Texas.
Said Counter-Plaintiff’s
Alfred C. Glassell, III’s
Claim Regarding The
Interpled Property and
Cabo Blanco Company’s
Claim regarding The Interpled Property was filed
in said court on the 28th
day of March, 2017, in the
above entitled cause.
A Brief statement of the
nature of this suit is as follows, to-wit: SEE CAUSE
2015-244 as is on file in
the Office of the District
Clerk, Carthage, Panola
County, Texas.
Issued and given under
my hand and seal of said
Court at Panola County,
Texas this 3rd day of April,
2017.
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
MISUN
©2017 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
All Rights Reserved.
LCHIFN
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SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILITY BENEFITS. Unable
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THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
WOSNY
Dogs
Interested persons may
address comments to
Scott A. Scheele, Chief,
Telecommunications and
Media Section, Antitrust
Division, Department of
Justice, 450 Fifth Street
NW, Suite 7000, Washington, DC 20530 (telephone:
202-514-5621) within 60
days of the date of this
notice. Such comments,
including the name of the
submitter, and responses
thereto, will be posted
on the Antitrust Division’s
website, filed with the
Court, and, under certain
circumstances, published
in the Federal Register.
A copy of the application
and related materials are
available at fcc.gov.
STAY INFORMED
Write:
Copies of the Complaint,
proposed Final Judgment, and Competitive
Impact Statement are
available for inspection
on the Antitrust Division’s
website at http://www.
justice.gov/atr and at
the Office of the Clerk of
the United States District
Court for the Central District of California (Western Division).
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C4
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suggested by the above cartoon.
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Yesterday’s
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Jumbles: BLAZE
RAINY
SMOGGY
SHOULD
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Legal Notices
Legal Notices
SummonS
CITACIon JuDICIAL
Case number (numero del Caso): BC589008
NOTICE TO DEFENDANT:
(AVISO AL DEMANDADO):
Ik Hyun Kim, an individual; and Does 1 through 20,
inclusive;
YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF:
(LO ESTA DEMANDANDO EL DEMANDANTE):
Douglas Huffman, an individual; Gloria Huffman, an
individual;
NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide
against you without your being heard unless you
respond within 30 days. Read the information below.
You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons
and legal papers are served on you to file a written
response at this court and have a copy served on the
plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you.
Your written response must be in proper legal form if
you want the court to hear your case. There may be
a court form that you can use for your response. You
can find these court forms and more information at
the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.
courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county law library, or
the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you
do not file your response on time, you may lose the
case by default, and your wages, money, and property
may be taken without further warning from the court.
There are other legal requirements. You may
want to call an attorney right away. If you do not
know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney
referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you
may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit
legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit
groups at the California Legal Services Web Site (www.
lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online
Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or
by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived
fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award
of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The court’s lien must
be paid before the court will dismiss the case.
іAVISO! Lo han demandado. Si no responde
dentro de 30 dias, la corte puede decider en su
contra sin escuchar su version. Lea la informacion a
continuacion.
Tiene 30 DIAS DE CALENDARIO despues de que
le entreguen esta citacion y papeles legales para
presenter una respuesta por escrito en esta corte y
hacer que se entregue una copia al demandante. Una
carta o una llamada telefonica no lo protegen. Su
respuesta por escrito tiene que estar en formato legal
correcto si desea que procesen su caso en la corte. Es
posible que haya un formulario que usted pueda usar
para su respuesta. Puede encontrar estos formularios
de la corte y mas informacion en el Centro de Ayuda
de las Cortes de California (www.sucorte.ca.gov), en
la biblioteca de leyes de su condado o en la corte
que le quede mas cerca. Si no puede pagar la cuota
de presentacion, pida al secretario de la corte que le
de un formulario de exencion de pago de cuotas. Si
no presenta su respuesta a tiempo, puede perder el
caso por incumplimiento y la corte le podra quitar su
sueldo, dinero y bienes sin mas advertencia.
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Business Names
Business Names
Fictitious Business Name Statement NO.: 2017 061056
The following person is doing business as:
Fictitious Business Name(s) PFIS INSURANCE
SERVICES 1000 N. Central Ave Ste. 400, Glendale, CA
91202. Registered Owner (S): PACFED INSURANCE
SERVICES, INC 1000 N. Central Ave Ste. 400, Glendale,
CA 91202. Business is conducted by: a Corporation.
The registrant commenced to transact business under
the fictitious business name or names listed above on
N/A . I declare that all information in this statement
is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as
true information which he or she knows to be false
is guilty of a crime) REGISTRANT/CORP/LLC NAME:
PACFED INSURANCE SERVICES, INC. Signature: James
E. Garrison. This statement was filed with the County
Clerk of Los Angeles County on March 10, 2017.
NOTICE- in accordance with subdivision (a)of section
17920 A Fictitious Name Statement generally expires
at the end of five years from the date on which it
was filed in the office of the County Clerk except, as
provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it
expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth
in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other
than a change in the residence address of a registered
owner. A new fictitious business name statement
must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this
statement does not of itself authorize the use in this
state of fictitious business name in violation of the
rights of another under federal state or common law
(see section 14411 et seq. Business and Professions
code). Dean C. Logan, Los Angeles County Clerk. BY:
N/A , Deputy. Published 3/21, 3/28, 4/4, 4/11/2017 .
Fictitious Business Name Statement NO.: 2017 071771
The following person is doing business as:
Fictitious Business Name(s) Movin’ Paws 1115
South Wooster Street, #101, Los Angeles, CA 90035.
Registered Owner (S): Christine Torreele 1115 South
Wooster Street, #101, Los Angeles, CA 90035. Business
is conducted by: an Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious
business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare
that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information
which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime)
REGISTRANT/CORP/LLC NAME: Christine Torreele.
Signature: Christine Torreele. This statement was
filed with the County Clerk of LA County County on
March 22, 2017. NOTICE- in accordance with subdivision (a)of section 17920 A Fictitious Name Statement
generally expires at the end of five years from the
date on which it was filed in the office of the County
Clerk except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section
17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the
facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section
17913 other than a change in the residence address
of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name
statement must be filed before the expiration. The
filing of this statement does not of itself authorize
the use in this state of fictitious business name in
violation of the rights of another under federal state or
common law (see section 14411 et seq. Business and
Professions code). Dean C. Logan, LA County County
Clerk. BY: Juanita Carpenter, Deputy. Published 3/24,
3/31, 4/7, 4/14/2017.
Legal Notices
Legal Notices
SUMMONS
(CITACION JUDICIAL)
CASE NUMBER (Número del Caso): BC639401
NOTICE TO DEFENDANT:
(AVISO AL DEMANDADO):
CARL BERNARD, an individual; CHARLES M. INOKON, an individual; JESSE
WILLARD HATHORN, aka JESSE WILLARD HATHORN JR., aka JESSE W.
HATHORN, aka JESSE HATHORN, aka JESSE W. HATHORNE, aka JESSE
HATHORNE, aka JESSE W. HAWTHORNE, aka JESSE HAWTHORNE, an
individual; RICHARD A. SCHULENBERG, an individual; PAULA A. JOHNSON,
an individual; LEGACY HOLDINGS INTERNATIONAL, INC, a Nevada
corporation; ENTERPRISE INSURANCE SERVICES, a California limited
liability company; and DOES 1 through 20, inclusive
YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF:
(LO ESTÁ DEMANDANDO EL DEMANDANTE):
The name and address of the court is: (El nombre y
WAYNE F. WANDELL, an individual,
direccion de la corte es):
Stanley Mosk Courthouse
NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without
111 North Hill Street
your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the
Los Angeles, CA 90012
information below.
The name, address, and telephone number of
plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff without an at- You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are
torney, is: (El nombre, la direccion y el numero served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy
de telefono del abogado del demandante, o del served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your
demandante que no tiene abogado, es):
written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to
Ryan Sargent, Esq., The Sargent Firm
hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your
2424 Vista Way, Suite 206
response. You can find these court forms and more information at the
Oceanside, CA 92054
California
Courts
Online
Self-Help
Center
760.780.1684
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county law library, or the
courthouse
nearest
you.
If
you
cannot
pay
the
filing
fee,
ask
the
court
Date: (Fecha) July 22, 2015
clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you
may lose the case by default, and your wages, money, and property may
Sherri R. Carter Clerk
(Secretario)
be taken without further warning from the court.
Judi Lara Deputy
(Adjunto)
There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney
right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an
SUMMONS (Family Law)
attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be
Case No. PD03342
eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program.
Notice to Respondent:
You can located these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services
Aviso al demandado:
Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online SelfELENA VASILIEVA
Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local
court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for
You have been sued. Read the information below.
waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000
Petitioner’s name is:
or more in a civil case. The court’s lien must be paid before the court will
Lo han demandado. Lea la informacion a continuacion.
dismiss the case.
Nombre del demandante:
BEN ORENSTEIN
You have 30 calendar days after this Summons and Petition are served on
you to file a Response (form FL-120) at the court and have a copy served
on the petitioner. A letter or phone call will not protect you.
If you do not file your Response on time, the court may make orders
affecting your marriage or domestic partnership, your property, and
custody of your children. You may be ordered to pay support and
attorney fees and costs.
For legal advice, contact a lawyer immediately. Get help finding a lawyer
at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center
(www.courts.ca.gov/selfhelp), at the California Legal Services website
(www.lawhelpca.org), or by contacting your local county bar association.
Tiene 30 dias de calendario despues de haber recibido la entrega legal de
esta Citacion y Peticion para presentar una Respuesta (formulario FL120) ante la corte y efectuar la entrega legal de una copia al
demandante. Una carta o llamada telefónica o una audiencia de la corte
no basta para protegerlo.
Si no presenta su Respuesta a tiempo, la corte puede dar órdenes que
afecten su matrimonio o pareja de hecho, sus bienes y la custodia de sus
hijos. La corte tambien le puede ordenar que pague mantuencion, y
honorarios y costos legales.
Para asesoramiento legal, pongase en contacto de inmediato con un
abogao. Puede obtener información para encontrar un abogado en el
Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California (www.sucorte.ca.gov) en el
sitio web de los Servicios Legales de California (www.lawhelpca.org) o
poniéndose en contacto con el colegio de abogados de su condado.
¡AVISO! Lo han demandado. Si no responde dentro de 30 días, la corte
puede decidir en su contra sin escuchar su version. Lea la información a
continuación.
Tiene 30 DÍAS DE CALENDARIO después de que le entreguen esta citación
y papeles legales para presenter una respuesta por escrito en esta corte y
hacer que se entregue una copia al demandante. Una carta o una
llamada telefónica no lo prolegen. Su respuesta por escrito tiene que
estar en formato legal correcto si desea que procesen su caso en la corte.
Es posible que haya un formulario que usted pueda usar para su
respuesta. Puedo encontrar estos formularios de la corte y más
información en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California
(www.sucorte.ca.gov), en la biblioteca de leyes de su condado o en la
corte que le quede más cerca. Si no puede pagar la cuota de
presentación, pida al secretario de la corte que le dé un formulario de
extención de pago de cuotas. Si no presenta su respuesta a tiempo,
puede perder el caso por incumplimiento y la corte le podrá quitar su
sueldo, dinero y hiener sin más advertencia.
Hay otros requisites legales. Es recommendable que llame a un abogado
inmediatamente. Si no conoce a un abogado, puede llamar a un servicio
de remission a abogados. Si no puede pagar a un abogado, es posible que
cumpla con los requisites para obtener servicios legales gratuitos de un
programa de servicios legales sin lines de lucro. Puede encontrar estos
grupos sin lines de lucro en el sitio web de California Legal Services,
(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de
California, (www.sucorte.ca.gov) o poniéndose en contacto con la corte
o el colegio de abogados locales. AVISO: Por ley, la corte tiene derecho a
reclamar las cuotas y los costos extentos por imponer un gravamen sobre
cualquier recuperación de $10,000 ó más de valor recibida mediante un
acuerdo o una concesión de arbitraje en un caso de derecho civil. Tiene
que pagar el gravamen de la corte antes de que la corte pueda desechar
el caso.
NOTICE—RESTRAINING ORDERS ARE ON PAGE 2:
These restraining orders are effective against both spouses or domestic
partners until the petition is dismissed, a judgment is entered, or the
court makes further orders. They are enforceable anywhere in California
by any law enforcement officer who has received or seen a copy of them. The name and address of the court is:
(El nombre y dirección de la corte es):
Stanley Mosk Courthouse
AVISO – LAS ÓRDENES DE RESTRICCIÓN SE
111 North Hill Street
ENCUENTRAN EN LA PÁGINA 2: Las órdenes de restricción
Los Angeles, CA 90012
están en vigencia en cuanto a ambos cónyuges o miembros de la pareja
de hecho hasta que se despida la petición, se emita un fallo o la corte dé
The name, address, and telephone number of the plaintiff’s attorney, or
otras órdenes. Cualquier agencia del orden público que haya recibido o
plaintiff without an attorney, is:
visto una copia de estas órdenes puede hacerias acatar en cualquier lugar
(El nombre, la dirección y el número del abogado del demandante, o del
de California.
demandante que no tiene abodgado, es):
FEE WAIVER: If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the clerk for a fee
R. Lance Belsome
waiver form. The court may order you to pay back all or part of the fees
1055 West Seventh Street, Suite 2800
and costs that the court waived for you or the other party.
Los Angeles, CA 90017
(213) 489-7775
EXENCIÓN DE CUOTAS: Si no puede pagar la cuota de
Date: November 2, 2016
presentación, pida el secretario un formulario de exención de cuotas. La
Sherri R. Carter, Clerk
corte puede ordenar que usted pague, ya sea en parte o por completo, las
By: /s/ Cristina Grijaiva, Deputy
cuotas y costos de la corte previamente exentos a petición de usted o de
la otra parte.
STATEMENT OF DAMAGES AND NOTICE RE PUNITIVE DAMAGES
TO DEFENDANT CARL BERNARD [Code Civ. Proc. §§ 425.11 and 425.115]
The name and address of the court are (El nombre y dirección de la corte
Case No.: BC 639401 (Assigned for all purposes to the Honorable Gregory
son):
Keosian, Dept. 61)
NOTICE TO DEFENDANT CARL BERNARD:
9425 Penfield Ave. Chatsworth, CA, 91311
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED THAT:
Plaintiff WAYNE F. WANDELL will seek economic and non-economic
The name, address, and telephone number of the petitioner’s attorney,
damages against you when he seeks a judgment in the above-captioned,
or the petitioner without an attorney, are (El nombre, dirección y número
as follows:
de teléfono del abogado del demandante, o del demandante si no tiene
Economic Damages: $1,475,000
abogado, son):
Non-Economic Damages (Emotional Distress): $300,000
YOU ARE HEREBY FURTHER NOTIFIED THAT:
Daniel J DeSario, Esq. (SBN 105589)
In addition to the above-described economic and non-economic
DANIEL J DESARIO & ASSOCIATES
damages, Plaintiff WAYNE F. WANDELL reserves the right to seek an
8484 Wilshire Blvd., Suite 660 Beverly Hills, CA 90211
award of punitive and/or treble damages in the amount of Five Million,
Tel. 323-655-6538
Three Hundred Twenty-Five Thousand Dollars ($5,325,000) against you
Fax 310-861-0762
when he seeks a judgment in the above-captioned action against you.
Dated: March 9, 2017
Date: AUG 30, 2016
R. Lance Belsome
By: Sherri R. Carter, Deputy
Attorney for Plaintiff WAYNE F. WANDELL
Published in the Los Angeles Times
Published in the Los Angeles Times
4/7, 4/14, 4/21, 4/28/2017
3/23, 3/30, 4/6, 4/13/2017
Legal Notices
Legal Notices
Legal Notices
F R I DAY, A P R I L 14 , 2 017
Legal Notices
C5
Legal Notices
中文 1-800-843-8343 | 한국어 1-800-628-3061 | Tiếng Việt 1-800-327-3031 | Khmer / ភាសាខ្មែរ 1-800-843-1309
Para recibir una copia de esta notificación en español, escriba a: Southern California Edison Company, P.O. Box 800, 2244 Walnut
Grove Avenue, Rosemead, CA 91770, Atención: Comunicaciones Corporativas. Para más detalles en Español, llame al 1-800441-2233 Todos los días 8:00-20:00.
SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA EDISON COMPANY
NOTICE OF APPLICATION FILING REQUESTING TO INCREASE ELECTRIC RATES FOR ALISO CANYON UTILITY
OWNED ENERGY STORAGE, A. 17-03-020
SUMMARY
On March 30, 2017, Southern California Edison Company (SCE) filed an application with the California Public Utilities Commission
(CPUC) requesting approval to increase rates for the recovery of costs associated with the Aliso Canyon Utility Owned Storage
(UOS), A.17-03-020. This application seeks to recover costs associated with several SCE-owned energy storage projects that are
designed to help maintain electric reliability in the Los Angeles Basin. The CPUC directed SCE to develop these new projects to help
alleviate the energy impact during the time of limited operation at Aliso Canyon. If the CPUC approves this application, SCE’s annual
revenue requirement would increase on average by $12.402 million, resulting in an estimated 0.1% system average rate increase
compared to current rates.
ABOUT THE APPLICATION
SCE is requesting to recover costs associated with obtaining contracts, site assessment, and construction of four SCE-owned
energy storage projects. The CPUC authorized SCE to pursue energy storage projects to help reduce reliability concerns from
the suspension on gas injections at the Aliso Canyon Storage Facility. On May 26, 2016, the CPUC issued Resolution E-4791
(the Resolution) requiring SCE to create energy storage projects on an expedited basis to help alleviate outage risk within SCE’s
service territory. The Resolution found that turnkey projects located at SCE-owned or controlled sites would increase the likelihood
of resources being timely developed. The Resolution also required the projects to be in service by December 31, 2016 to reduce
the risk of winter power outages. In compliance with the resolution, SCE obtained two Tesla battery systems adjacent to SCE’s Mira
Loma substation in Ontario, California, and two General Electric energy storage systems integrated into SCE’s existing Gas Turbine
Peaker Generating Stations in Norwalk, California and Rancho Cucamonga, California. These storage projects offer online storage
of electricity which can be discharged into the electrical grid as needed, reducing the likelihood of service interruptions. On December
30, 2016, the projects became fully operational and able to charge and discharge to support grid operations.
SCE is seeking to recover $70 million in capital and operating and maintenance costs for this project which would increase system
average rates approximately 0.1% compared to current rates. If approved, an average non-CARE residential customer using 550
kWh per month could see a monthly bill increase of $0.10, from a current monthly bill of $107.30 to $107.40. The following table
compares SCE’s current bundled average rates, by customer group, to proposed bundled average rates if SCE’s cost recovery
proposal in this application is approved by the CPUC:
Revenue and Rate Increase by Customer Group
Residential
Lighting - Small and Medium Power
Large Power
Agricultural and Pumping
Street and Area Lighting
Standby
Total
Current
Revenues
($000)
4,917,589
4,419,380
1,977,952
412,602
132,948
275,239
12,135,710
Revenue
Increase
($000)1
4,852
4,429
2,413
328
65
314
12,402
Proposed
Revenue
($000)1
4,922,441
4,423,809
1,980,365
412,931
133,013
275,553
12,148,112
% Increase
over Current
0.10%
0.10%
0.12%
0.08%
0.05%
0.11%
0.10%
Current
Rates
(¢/kWh)
17.76
16.84
11.91
12.71
18.05
9.61
15.83
Rate
Increase
(¢/kWh)
0.02
0.02
0.01
0.01
0.01
0.01
0.02
Proposed
%
Rates
Increase
(¢/kWh)
17.78
0.10%
16.86
0.09%
11.93
0.10%
12.72
0.08%
18.06
0.05%
9.62
0.10%
15.84
0.10%
1
$12.402 million is the average of the annual revenues over the 2017 – 2020 time period as shown in Tables X-16 and X-17 in SCE’s supporting testimony (SCE-01)
served concurrently with SCE’s application A.17-03-020.
** Actual changes in rates will be determined by the CPUC
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION ABOUT SCE’S APPLICATION
You may review a copy of SCE’s application and related exhibits at SCE’s corporate headquarters (2244 Walnut Grove Avenue,
Rosemead, CA 91770).
Customers with Internet access may view and download SCE’s application and related exhibits on SCE’s website at http://on.sce.
com/2p1JBfw, or by visiting www.sce.com/applications, typing “A.17-03-020” into the Search box, and clicking “Go.” If you have
technical issues accessing the documents through the website, please e-mail case.admin@sce.com for assistance (be sure to
reference proceeding A.17-03-020 in your e-mail).
To request a hard copy of SCE’s application and related exhibits, or to obtain more information about this application from SCE,
please write to:
Southern California Edison Company
A.17-03-020 – SCE’s Aliso Canyon UOS Application
P.O. Box 800
Rosemead, CA 91770
Attention: David Balandran
In addition, a copy of this application may be reviewed at the CPUC’s Central Files Office, located in San Francisco, CA, by
appointment. For more information, please contact the CPUC at aljcentralfilesid@cpuc.ca.gov or (415) 703-2045.
CPUC PROCESS
This application will be assigned to an Administrative Law Judge (Judge) who will determine how to receive evidence and other
related documents necessary for the CPUC to establish a record upon which to base its decision. Evidentiary Hearings (EHs) may
be held where parties of record will present their testimony and may be subject to cross-examination by other parties. These EHs
are open to the public, but only those who are parties of record can participate.
After considering all proposals and evidence presented during the formal hearing process, the assigned Judge will issue a proposed
decision which may adopt SCE’s application as proposed, modify it, or deny it. Any CPUC Commissioner may sponsor an alternate
decision. The proposed decision, and any alternate decisions, will be discussed and voted upon at a scheduled CPUC Voting
Meeting.
The Office of Ratepayer Advocates (ORA) may review this application on behalf of SCE’s ratepayers. ORA is the independent
consumer advocate within the CPUC with a legislative mandate to represent investor-owned utility customers to obtain the
lowest possible rate for service consistent with reliable and safe service levels. ORA has a multi-disciplinary staff with expertise
in economics, finance, accounting, and engineering. For more information about ORA, please call (415) 703-1584, e-mail
ora@cpuc.ca.gov or visit ORA’s website at www.ora.ca.gov/.
STAY INFORMED
If you would like to follow this proceeding, or any other issue before the CPUC, you may use the CPUC’s free subscription service.
Sign up at: http://subscribecpuc.cpuc.ca.gov/.
If you would like to learn how you can participate in this proceeding, provide public comments, or if you have questions about any
CPUC processes, you may access the CPUC’s Public Advisor’s Office (PAO) webpage at www.cpuc.ca.gov/pao/. You may also
contact the PAO as follows:
Phone:
1-866-849-8390 (toll-free) or 1-415-703-2074
TTY
1-866-836-7825 (toll-free) or 1-415-703-5282
Or write to: CPUC
Public Advisor’s Office
505 Van Ness Avenue
San Francisco, CA 94102
Email:
public.advisor@cpuc.ca.gov
Please reference application number A.17-03-020 in any communications with the CPUC regarding this matter. All public comments
will become part of the public correspondence file for this proceeding and made available for review by the assigned Judge, the
Commissioners, and appropriate CPUC staff.
CNS-2996942#
GOLDEN STATE WATER COMPANY
Si tiene alguna pregunta con respecto a este aviso o no entiende el contenido o para obtener una copia en español, llame a nuestro
número 1-800-999-4033.
NOTICE OF REQUESTED RATE INCREASE FOR COST OF CAPITAL FOR
GOLDEN STATE WATER COMPANY’S
APPLICATION NO. 17-04-002
SUMMARY
On April 3, 2017, Golden State Water Company (GSWC) filed Application No. 17-04-002 with the California Public Utilities Commission
(CPUC) requesting an increase in rates to establish its authorized cost of capital and rate of return for utility operations for 2018, 2019 and
2020. GSWC’s application requests an increase in the rate of return of 0.77% from the current percentage of 8.34% to 9.11% for 2018,
2019 and 2020.
Overall, the proposed changes to the cost of capital will increase GSWC’s currently authorized revenues by $12.1 million (4.0%). If
approved, GSWC’s request will increase rates beginning on January 1, 2018.
GSWC is required to file a cost of capital application every three years. The authorized cost of capital determines the amount of money
GSWC is allowed to recuperate in rates as a return on the money it has invested. This request is subject to adjustment per the Water Cost
of Capital Mechanism, which allows for automatic annual adjustments to the return on equity and embedded cost of debt in the cost of
capital. GSWC’s proposed cost of capital request is summarized in the following table:
Year
2018- 2020
Cost Factor
Long
g Term Debt
Common Eq
quityy
Cost
6.60%
11.00%
Capital Structure (Weight)
43.0%
57.0%
Weight Cost
2.84%
6.27%
9.11%
CUSTOMER IMPACT
The increase in annual revenues will vary by ratemaking area. The following table shows the proposed increase in 2018 for each of the
ratemaking areas served by GSWC.
Arden Cordova
Bayy Point
Clearlake
Los Osos
Ojjai
Santa Maria
Simi Valleyy
Amount ($000))
Reg
gion 1
Reg
gion 2
Reg
gion 3
Total
Increase
%
$379.8
$189.2
$101.1
$242.3
$353.2
$563.8
$200.0
3.1%
3.4%
4.6%
5.7%
5.9%
4.3%
1.6%
$5,,601.1
$4,,438.5
$12,,069.0
4.4%
3.8%
4.0%
The impact on customer bills will vary by ratemaking area. The following table shows the effect on an average customer’s bill, based on
the usage and the respective service areas shown in the table. The impact on any particular customer’s bill will depend on the customer’s
actual usage level and meter size.
District
Reg
gion 1
Arden Cordova (Residential Metered))
Arden Cordova (Flat))
Arden Cordova (Non-Residential Metered))
Bayy Point (Residential))
Bayy Point (Non-Residential))
Clearlake (Residential))
Clearlake (Non-Residential))
Los Osos (Residential))
Los Osos (Non-Residential))
Ojjai (Residential))
Ojjai (Non-Residential))
Santa Maria (Residential))
Santa Maria (Non-Residential))
Simi Valleyy (Residential))
Simi Valleyy (Non-Residential))
Reg
gion 2 (Residential))
Reg
gion 2 (Non-Residential))
Reg
gion 3 (Residential))
Reg
gion 3 (Non-Residential))
Average Usage
(Ccf))
14
111
7
71
5
12
6
27
13
42
15
53
11
59
10
39
11
61
Current Authorized Rates*
Proposed
Rates**
$32.77
$68.80
$260.40
$56.41
$423.57
$85.89
$149.81
$81.96
$293.62
$114.85
$289.68
$59.49
$166.63
$57.13
$359.34
$54.65
$171.26
$54.91
$249.15
$33.80
$71.00
$268.56
$58.33
$437.97
$89.86
$157.38
$86.65
$310.42
$121.59
$306.70
$62.01
$173.69
$58.01
$364.92
$57.08
$178.85
$57.04
$258.82
Bill
Increase
$
%
$1.03
3.1%
$2.20
3.2%
$8.16
3.1%
$1.92
3.4%
$14.40
3.4%
$3.97
4.6%
$7.57
5.1%
$4.69
5.7%
$16.80
5.7%
$6.74
5.9%
$17.02
5.9%
$2.52
4.2%
$7.06
4.2%
$0.88
1.5%
$5.58
1.6%
$2.43
4.4%
$7.59
4.4%
$2.13
3.9%
$9.67
3.9%
* GSWC filed Tier 1 Advice Letters (1679-W – 1690-W) on March 6, 2017, to implement 2017 rates. These advice letters are pending review with an effective date of April 20, 2017.
** The rates proposed for 2018 will continue through a 3 year rate cycle, 2018-2020.
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION AND TO OBTAIN A COPY OF THE APPLICATION
A copy of GSWC’s Application No. 17-04-002, and related exhibits, may be reviewed online at www.gswater.com. The application may
also be reviewed at the CPUC’s Central Files Office by appointment. For more information, contact aljcentralfilesid@cpuc.ca.gov or 1-415703-2045.
If you need additional information, you may visit www.gswater.com or call GSWC’s 24-hour Customer Service Center; toll free,
at 1-800-999-4033, TTY 1-877-933-9533.
CPUC PROCESS
This application will be assigned to an Administrative Law Judge (Judge) who will determine how to receive evidence and other related documents,
necessary for the CPUC to establish a record upon which to base its decision. Evidentiary Hearings (EHs) may be held where utilities, consumer
advocacy groups, and other entities which have been given official status as parties, will present their testimony and may be subject to crossexamination by other parties. These EHs are open to the public, but only those who are parties may participate. The hearings and documents
submitted in the proceeding become part of the formal record. The Judge relies upon the formal record when writing a proposed decision to present
to the Commissioners for their consideration.
After considering all proposals and all evidence presented during the formal hearing process, the assigned Judge will issue a proposed
decision, determining whether to adopt GSWC’s request, modify it, or deny it. Any CPUC Commissioner may sponsor an alternate decision.
The proposed decision, and any alternate decisions, will be discussed and voted upon at a scheduled Commission Voting Meeting.
STAY INFORMED
If you would like to follow this proceeding, or any other issue before the CPUC, you may use the CPUC’s free subscription service. Sign
up at: http://subscribecpuc.cpuc.ca.gov/.
If you would like to learn how you can participate in the proceeding, have informal comments, or have questions about the CPUC processes, you may
access the CPUC’s Public Advisor’s Office (PAO) webpage at http://consumers.cpuc.ca.gov/pao/. You may also contact the PAO as follows:
Write:
CPUC Public Advisor’s Office
505 Van Ness Avenue
San Francisco, CA 94102
Email: public.advisor@cpuc.ca.gov
Phone: 1-866-849-8390 (toll-free) or 1-415-703-2074
1-866-836-7825 (toll-free) or TTY 1-415-703-5282
Please reference GSWC’s Cost of Capital Application No. 17-04-002 in any communications you have with the CPUC regarding this
matter. All public comments will become part of the public correspondence file for this proceeding and made available for review to the
assigned Judge, the Commissioners, and appropriate CPUC staff.
CNS-2998282#
C6
F R I DAY, A P R I L 14 , 2 017
L ATI M E S . C O M /B U S I NE S S
Lawyers
detail
United
flier’s
injuries
[Dao, from C1]
tos, captured on other passengers’ cellphones, of airport police dragging a limp
Dao off the crowded plane to
make room for company
personnel.
The outcry put pressure
on United Airlines Chief
Executive Oscar Munoz to
apologize more than once.
He appeared on television
Wednesday after issuing
statements on the incident
Monday and Tuesday.
“Like you, I continue to
be disturbed by what happened on this flight, and I
deeply apologize to the customer forcibly removed and
to all the customers aboard,”
Munoz said. “No one should
ever be mistreated this way.”
Demetrio, a prominent
personal injury lawyer, filed
a petition Wednesday for a
court order to preserve evidence of the incident. A
hearing on the request is
scheduled
for
Monday
morning.
The flight was fully
booked, but United sought
to clear four seats to make
room for four United employees who needed to be in
Joshua Lott AFP/Getty Images
ATTORNEY Thomas Demetrio, who is representing Dr. David Dao, at a news conference with lawyer Stephen Golan and Dao’s daughter.
Louisville the next day. After
asking for volunteers and offering as much as $800 and a
hotel stay, United picked
four passengers to be removed. Dao was among
those picked, but he refused
to leave.
Dao and his wife were returning from a vacation in
California and had boarded
the connecting flight to head
home to Elizabethtown, Ky.
Demetrio described Dao
as being respectful during
the incident. “He was not a
trouble passenger, not a nut
job,” the attorney said. “He
just wanted to go home.”
The three airport police
officers have been put on administrative leave as the city
reviews the incident.
The attorney also said
neither he nor Dao’s family
have received a direct apology from Munoz — contradicting the airline chief, who
said he reached out to the
family to offer his apology.
Demetrio declined to discuss what kind of damages
Dao might seek in a lawsuit,
saying he doesn’t know the
extent of the physical, emotional or psychological damage the man suffered. But,
he said, the airline did not
have the right to use “unnecessary force and violence” to
remove a passenger who is
not a threat.
“Common carriers have
the highest duty of care to
provide protection and safe-
ty to its fare-paying passengers,” he said, adding
that the Chicago airport police who dragged Dao from
the plane share in responsibility for the incident.
The lawyer also spoke out
against airlines that overbook flights, as well as what
he said was a culture of disrespect and bullying. Dao is
going to “stand up for passengers going forward,” he
said.
Demetrio had a hand in
winning several large settlements over the years, including a $1-billion class action
settlement of concussion litigation against the NFL and
NHL and a $75-million
award for 10 victims of a 2002
scaffold collapse at a Chicago high-rise that killed
three and injured seven.
hugo.martin@latimes.com
Twitter: @hugomartin
The Chicago Tribune
contributed to this report.
Spectrum bills customer for bogus calls
[Lazarus, from C1]
service. Her typical bill runs
about $1,200 a month.
In January she received a
bill that included nearly
$6,400 in charges for international calls. Howard
contacted Spectrum to ask
what was going on.
“They said it was for all
the calls I made to Cuba,”
she told me. “I told them I
didn’t make any calls to
Cuba.”
Spectrum looked into
things and acknowledged
that Howard’s phones must
have been hacked. Yet,
because the company is so
big-hearted, a service rep
said, Spectrum would hold
Howard responsible for only
half the charges, or about
$3,000.
“What do you mean
half?” Howard replied. “I
was hacked. This is your
responsibility.”
This is where Spectrum
pointed her to the service
contract for business customers. It says that “the
customer is solely responsible for prevention of unauthorized, unlawful or
fraudulent use of or access
to services.”
The fine print of the
MARKET ROUNDUP
Stocks sink for
third day in a row
associated press
Investors were in a selling
mood Thursday at the end of
a mostly subdued week of
trading, sending U.S. stocks
lower for the third day in a
row.
Energy stocks led the
broad decline, which gathered momentum in the final
hour of trading before the
long Easter holiday weekend. The slide marked the
lowest close for the stock
market since Feb. 13 and
came on a day when several
major banks reported quarterly results, kicking off the
company earnings season.
Traders also weighed the
potential for rising geopolitical tensions after news that
the United States attacked
an Islamic State tunnel complex in eastern Afghanistan
with the largest non-nuclear
weapon the U.S. military has
ever used in combat.
“Investors have plenty of
reasons to be cautious,” said
Erik Davidson, chief investment officer at Wells Fargo
Private Bank.
Bond prices edged up.
The yield on the benchmark
U.S. 10-year Treasury note
fell to 2.23% from 2.24%.
Gold, which investors
often buy in times of global
uncertainty, climbed $10.40
to $1,288.50 an ounce.
Oil prices went up as traders shrugged off an International Energy Agency report that said demand
growth for oil will slow for a
second consecutive year this
year. Benchmark U.S. crude
rose 7 cents to $53.18 a barrel.
Brent crude, used to price
international oils, rose 3
cents to $55.89 a barrel.
Even so, energy stocks
fell sharply. Chesapeake En-
ergy was the biggest decliner
in the Standard & Poor’s 500
index, dropping 4.2% to
$5.89.
Wells Fargo sank 3.3% to
$51.35 after Warren Buffett’s
Berkshire Hathaway sold
some of its stock in the lender to avoid being designated
a bank holding company.
Wells also reported flat
quarterly earnings.
Pier 1 Imports slumped
9.1% to $6.59 after the home
decor retailer reported disappointing sales.
U.S. Steel fell 5.9% to
$29.42 as investors weighed
the effect of a wastewater
spill at one of the company’s
steel plants in northern Indiana. Federal officials were
waiting for the results of
tests aimed at determining
whether a potentially carcinogenic chemical entered
Lake Michigan during the
Tuesday spill.
Trovagene leaped 21.3%
to $1.04 after the San Diego
developer of diagnostic
technology announced a
new board member.
The dollar continued to
weaken the day after President Trump said in an interview with the Wall Street
Journal that the dollar was
“getting too strong” and that
he won’t declare China a currency manipulator. The dollar slid to 109.16 yen from
109.71 yen late Wednesday.
The euro rose to $1.0612 from
$1.0598.
Wholesale gasoline fell 1
cent to $1.73 a gallon. Heating oil stayed at $1.65 a gallon. Natural gas rose 4 cents
to $3.23 per 1,000 cubic feet.
Silver rose 21 cents to
$18.51 an ounce. Copper rose
3 cents to $2.57 a pound.
U.S. markets will be
closed Friday for the Good
Friday holiday.
contract for residential
customers is even more
explicit. It says that the
customer is “responsible for
any fraudulent or unauthorized use of the voice service
that occurs through the
subscriber’s account regardless of who is responsible for such usage.”
It also says that “the
subscriber shall be solely
responsible for payment of
all applicable charges ...
even where calls are originated by fraudulent means
either from the subscriber’s
premises or from remote
locations.”
Think about that. A
hacker in Russia could run
up crazy charges on your
phone, and it’s your responsibility to pay the bill.
AT&T and Frontier
aren’t much better. Their
contracts specify that customers are responsible for
all fraudulent charges that
accrue prior to a hack being
reported to the companies
— which in most cases
would be all charges, because you wouldn’t know
you’ve been hacked until
your bill arrived weeks later.
It looks like wireless
customers are generally
Dow: six months
Thursday: 20,453.25
Down 138.61
21500
21000
20500
20000
19500
19000
18500
18000
17500
O
N
D
J
F
Major stock indexes
Index
Close
Dow industrials
M
Daily
change
A
Daily % YTD %
change change
20,453.25
-138.61
-0.67
+3.49
S&P 500
2,328.95
-15.98
-0.68
+4.03
Nasdaq composite
5,805.15
-31.01
-0.53
+7.84
S&P 400
1,681.04
-18.86
-1.11
+1.23
Russell 2000
1,345.24
-13.96
-1.03
-0.88
EuroStoxx 50
3,146.65
-16.49
-0.52
+4.52
Nikkei (Japan)
18,426.84
-125.77
-0.68
-3.60
Hang Seng (Hong Kong)
24,261.66
-51.84
-0.21
+10.28
6 month
change
1 year
change
Interest rates
Treasuries
Yield
Weekly
change
T-bill: 1 year
1.01
-0.02
+0.36
T-note: 5 year
1.76
-0.10
+0.50
+0.49
+0.51
T-note: 10 years
2.24
-0.10
+0.49
+0.45
T-bond: 30 years
2.90
-0.09
+0.42
+0.30
1 year
ago
Bank & mortgage rates
Rate
Week
ago
6 months
ago
6 Month CD
0.38
0.38
0.38
0.34
1 Year CD
0.61
0.62
0.61
0.57
2 Year CD
0.78
0.77
0.77
0.76
30 Year Fixed
3.86
3.93
4.10
3.49
15 Year Fixed
3.05
3.13
3.25
2.69
30 Year Jumbo
4.51
4.62
4.81
4.38
Close
in $
Weekly
change
spared such manhandling.
AT&T’s wireless contract,
for instance, says that
“you’re not liable for charges
you did not authorize.”
Howard shared with me
her correspondence with
Spectrum. She hit a brick
wall in trying to make the
company back down from
its customer-unfriendly
position. Her lawyer also got
nowhere.
Worse, Spectrum played
hardball by twice cutting off
her service and demanding
payments. Last week, Howard shelled out $1,250 to get
her service restored — for
calls she didn’t make.
“What choice did I have?”
she told me. “I have a business to run.”
The company gave Howard until Monday to cough
up at least another $700 of
the more than $3,000 it says
is outstanding. If she
doesn’t, it’ll shut her down
again.
Spectrum’s stance is
that it was Howard’s internal phone system, not
Spectrum’s network, that
was hacked, so none of this
is the company’s fault.
That’s a bold position
considering that it’s impossible to access Howard’s
phone system without
getting at it via Spectrum’s
line. Nor could the fraudulent calls to Cuba have been
made without Spectrum
serving as a conduit.
“After thoroughly investigating this issue, it is clear
Ms. Howard’s business
phone system, which was
purchased through a third
party, was compromised —
not our voice service to her
firm,” Spectrum spokesman
Dennis Johnson said in a
statement. “We have helped
her secure her private business phones and provided a
credit to her account.”
It’s unclear what he
meant by that. Howard said
no Spectrum technician has
visited her office. That
suggests Spectrum made
any fixes remotely, which
indicates some responsibility for network security.
The credit Johnson
referred to was for some
extra taxes that Spectrum
acknowledged months ago
it had erroneously tacked on
to the fraudulent charges.
Johnson declined to
elaborate on his statement.
But the company apparently was nervous enough
about my asking questions
that it informed Howard it
would reduce her outstanding bill by $500.
A telecom industry insider, requesting anonymity
in return for telling the
truth, told me that most
phone companies insert
these noxious you-pay-forfraud provisions in their
contracts to prevent customers from willy-nilly
challenging all charges on
their bill.
However, this person
said, most companies won’t
hesitate to write off fraudulent calls if it’s clear that the
customer didn’t make them.
Debra Tortorelli, an
AT&T spokeswoman, acknowledged that “if we
determine that fraud has
occurred on a customer’s
account, we quickly reverse
unauthorized charges.”
Javier Mendoza, a Frontier
spokesman, similarly told
me that cases of fraud are
reviewed “on a case-by-case
basis.”
That’s good — and Charter should adopt a similar
policy. However, if a phone
company is flexible about
such matters, it should say
as much in its contract,
rather than reserving the
right to stick customers
with bogus bills.
And if Spectrum is confident that its customer
didn’t make thousands of
dollars worth of international calls, which it apparently is in Howard’s case,
the stand-up thing is to
swallow the charges (the
true cost of which undoubtedly is much less than what
was billed).
Spectrum’s parent,
Charter, pocketed $3.5 billion in profit last year. You
now have to wonder how
much of that came from
strong-arming customers.
Send your tips or feedback
to david.lazarus
@latimes.com.
Commodities
Commodity: Unit
Delivery
date
1 year
change
Oil: Barrel
May 17
53.18
+1.48
+11.68
Gold Ounce
Apr 17
1,285.90
+35.60
+60.90
Silver Ounce
Apr 17
18.49
+0.26
+2.32
Source: The Associated Press (Bank and mortgage rate figures from Bankrate.com)
Online updates
For current market coverage plus stock prices and
company data, go to latimes.com/business
Jeff Roberson Associated Press
SPECTRUM’S PARENT, Charter Communications,
pocketed $3.5 billion in profit last year.
L AT I ME S . CO M / B U S IN E S S
WST
F R I DAY, A P R I L 14 , 2 017
C7
Infants infected at UCI hospital
[Infants, from C1]
state.
Hollingsworth, who sits
on a state advisory committee on hospital-acquired infections, said it appeared
that UCI and government
health officials were trying
to quietly handle the
outbreak internally.
She learned of the outbreak, she said, from a friend
who works in the UCI hospital complex.
Hollingsworth said she
believes that the hospital
should have informed pregnant women being admitted
to deliver their infants.
“You never know if your
baby will end up in the
NICU,” Hollingswroth said,
using the shorthand term
for the neonatal intensive
care unit. “I would have
wanted to know.”
UCI officials say they
have worked aggressively to
try to prevent more infections, using measures that
“meet or exceed best industry practices.”
“Our rapid response
came the minute we saw the
strains were the same,” said
Susan Huang, UCI’s medical
director of epidemiology
and infection prevention.
Huang said that since
last month, UCI has been
disclosing the outbreak in a
letter to parents of all infants
in intensive care.
Before that time, she
said, staff had been instructed to disclose the
MRSA infections to parents
as their babies were being
tested or treated for the infections.
Huang said the hospital
has not been testing patients in other areas of the
medical center for the
MRSA strain.
The UCI case is not an
isolated one. For decades,
hospitals have struggled to
contain lethal pathogens
from spreading in the intensive care units treating premature babies.
The fragile patients are
especially vulnerable to infections because of their
serious conditions, which
often require catheters and
ventilators to keep them
alive. Their immune systems
are still developing.
Besides being potentially
deadly, the infections can
harm the infants’ brain development and growth in
early childhood.
The outbreaks are also
costly. A 2010 study found
that a MRSA infection extended the infant’s hospital
stay by 40 days on average at
an additional cost of
$160,000.
The federal Centers for
Disease Control and Prevention does not track the number of outbreaks or deaths
from infections in the neonatal units.
Lisa McGiffert, who directs the safe patient project
at Consumers Union, said
some outbreaks have been
uncovered by media reports
or when doctors write about
them in medical journals.
The public does not learn
about an untold number of
others, she said.
In January, New Jersey
health officials confirmed
that an outbreak of MRSA
had occurred in a neonatal
unit of a Camden hospital
after a nurse detailed the
infections in a lawsuit. The
nurse said in her lawsuit that
she had been fired for reporting the hospital’s mis-
handling of the outbreak.
“A lot of these outbreaks
disappear,” McGiffert said.
Experts say the outbreaks can be prevented by
proper infection control procedures, including some
that can be costly to the hospital’s bottom line. For example, studies have found
that infection rates decrease
when more nurses are available to care for the infants or
when the unit is moved to a
larger space.
In 2013, the CDC said it
had written guidelines for
hospitals in preventing outbreaks in the neonatal units.
The agency said then it was
preparing to publish the
proposed guidelines in the
Federal Register. But that
did not happen.
The agency restarted the
project last year and is now
working on a new proposed
guideline.
Martha Sharan, a CDC
spokeswoman, said Thursday that the proposed
guidelines were not published in 2013 so the agency
could “carefully evaluate
new and relevant scientific
articles” on the subject.
In California, state officials who license hospitals
are expected to quickly respond to complaints when
patients may be in danger.
A state inspector did not
visit the UCI Medical Center
to investigate the outbreak
until March 20, after Hollingsworth’s complaint.
UCI said it had sent a letter to the state describing
the infants’ infections in
early January.
By then, seven of the10 infants had been sickened.
In a letter to Hollingsworth, state officials said
their investigation completed on April 3 found that
the hospital had not broken
any federal or state laws.
Hollingsworth
questioned that finding. “If UCI
had done everything correctly,” she said, “there
would not have been so
many babies infected.”
State
officials
said
Thursday that they never received UCI’s letter and that
the hospital did not call to
follow up.
John Murray, a UCI
spokesman, said four employees also tested positive
for being colonized with the
same strain of MRSA in January. After the use of the
antiseptic soap, those employees have now tested negative, he said.
The hospital is continuing to clean all equipment
and surfaces throughout the
unit, he said. Staff and family members must also wear
gowns and gloves while visiting the babies and take
other precautions such as
placing cellphones in plastic
bags.
“Our goal is to ensure the
safety of our patients and
eradicate the presence of
any drug-resistant bacteria
in our neonatal intensive
care unit,” Murray said.
McGiffert at Consumers
Union said the group believes that all outbreaks
should be made public so patients can take precautions.
The public disclosure would
also cause hospitals to work
harder to prevent infections,
she said.
“Patients have a right to
know,” she said.
melody.petersen
@latimes.com
Digital
sports
rise to
college
level
[E-sports, from C1]
had ballooned into a nationwide spectacle. Collegiate
Star League started featuring several games in addition to “StarCraft.” Landing
the perennial contract to
run the technology and logistics behind Riot Games’
university competition for
“League
of
Legends”
boosted the company’s
credibility.
The league introduced
multiple divisions of play,
separating schools by skill
level, with separate champions crowned in each game
for each division. Prizes escalated from mice and keyboards in 2012 to $200,000
this year. Because NCAA
rules don’t apply to e-sports,
cash prizes are fair game.
But prizes might be phased
out as more schools offer
scholarships, bringing esports in line with the norms
of traditional college athletics.
Keeping pace with player
interest required Parsi to acquire sponsors and more
employees. He got the capital by selling majority ownership of Collegiate Star
League
in
2015
to
WorldGaming. The division
of Canadian movie theater
chain Cineplex Inc. has high
expectations for diversifying
its revenue.
“We want to be the de
facto provider for collegiate
e-sports,” said Wim Stocks,
WorldGaming’s chief executive.
But
Collegiate
Star
League is hobbled. Much
like college baseball, many
top players turn pro before
attending college. That contributes to reduced popularity because fans aren’t
tuning in to track up-andcomers. Some players return to college as part of “retirement,” but Parsi expects
a ban on such crossover in
the interest of fairness.
“Star personalities is the
No. 1 issue we face,” Parsi
said.
No stars, no fans. No fans,
no sponsors.
Parsi is eyeing international competitions, hoping
a global audience is sizable
enough to pique advertisers.
“League of Legends” creator
Riot Games is pursuing licensing and broadcasting
partnerships with U.S. collegiate conferences, such as
the Big Ten and Pac-12, in
hopes that emphasizing regional rivalries such as USCUCLA draws fans.
Promotion
from
gamemakers or streaming
services improves viewership. But turning to developers could backfire for
Parsi if they spot efficiencies
in internally operating the
entire league.
For instance, Valve, the
cantankerous maker of
popular
“Dota”
and
Photographs by
Mel Melcon Los Angeles Times
MEMBERS of the University of Maryland “League of Legends” team celebrate their victory over the University of Illinois last month.
JANICE DAVERN, right, and other family members cheer on her grandson T.J.
Bjorklund, a member of the University of Illinois “League of Legends” team.
“Counter-Strike”
games,
hasn’t raised concerns with
Collegiate Star League using them in leagues. But a
sudden turnabout is possible. Case in point: Blizzard
Entertainment, which owns
collegiate events arm Tespa,
stopped Parsi from hosting
a league for “Hearthstone”
this school year, he said.
Parsi insists emerging
games continually will fill
gaps. The harder part, he
says, is convincing school
administrators to get on
board.
Robert Morris University
in downtown Chicago was
the trailblazer. The school
has 65 gamers on schoolfunded athletic scholarships
that cover up to 70% of college costs, said Kurt
Melcher, who’s gone from
women’s soccer coach to
executive director of esports.
Schools’ support leads to
perks such as priority registration, so players’ classes
don’t conflict with practices.
They can get a dedicated
space to gather — no more
getting kicked out of the library for playing games.
Parsi imagines schools absorbing his major expense:
flying players in for championships.
UC
Irvine
students
scrounged up $250,000 from
computer makers and other
companies to turn a billiards
lounge into a gaming enclave
near the campus center. A
dozen gaming stations are
reserved for the school’s aca-
demic-scholarship “League
of Legends” players. About
50 computers are playable
for $4 an hour, with students
crowding in on weekdays
and teenagers and their
moms popping by on weekends.
Riot Games prefers esports teams fall under athletics departments, which
enables them to tap existing
fundraising, marketing and
compliance officials. They
already have know-how for
everything from monitoring
players academic and behavioral performance to fostering hype through rallies
and online trash-talking.
“’League of Legends’ is a
sport, and it needs all these
structures around of it,” said
Michael Sherman, Riot
Games’ college e-sports
lead.
School and conference
officials say e-sports give a
slice of students something
bigger to care about than academics. They also bring
more programming to conference TV channels.
But many aren’t yet
ready to invest in e-sports.
Scholarships don’t yet pay
off, whether from ticket sales
or attracting applicants.
Constant
operational
changes from game developers leave administrators
and students feeling raw.
“Not having information
about what you’re investing
into is the worst thing you
can do,” said Jesse Wang, UC
Irvine’s e-sports coordinator.
Among players’ latest
criticism is the uncertain
rules for rare circumstances
when a college player is
drafted mid-season by a pro
team. Other frustrations include the lack of opportuni-
ties to sell merchandise and
tickets.
In recent months, companies have promised increased predictability. For
instance, Riot Games has
sent a clear message that it
will be the one to establish esports rules for its games
that Parsi and anyone else it
works with would have to
abide by.
Riot is open to official
sanctioning from the NCAA,
which already works with
outside organizations to
oversee sports such as
shooting and rowing. Collegiate Star League would
welcome an NCAA partnership, if it’s in the best interest
of players, Parsi said.
Treating e-sports like
traditional college sports
would add significant regulation. But following NCAA
rules governing gender balance in competition and
compensation, for instance,
would ultimately benefit esports, organizers say.
“In an ideal world, the
competition wouldn’t be
about winning money, but
the competition would be
the reward itself,” Parsi said.
By rough estimates,
about 20 in 1,000 college students participate in traditional college athletics, while
2 in 1,000 compete in video
games.
As law school graduation
looms, Parsi expects he’ll
find enough reason to believe those figures will inch
closer and Collegiate Star
League will thrive. He might
even splurge this summer to
get formal offices in Los Angeles.
“I’m not saying for sure
it’s going to be NCAA
basketball and not collegiate rugby,” he said of esports. “There’s signs that
we can become ‘like basketball,’ and that’s encouraging.”
paresh.dave@latimes.com
Twitter: @peard33
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F R I D A Y , A P R I L 1 4 , 2 0 1 7 :: L A T I M E S . C O M / S P O R T S
Pelinka
looks
to the
stars
DODGERS
CAN’T
GET THE
BIG HIT
NBA PLAYOFFS | CLIPPERS VS. UTAH
GAME 1: SATURDAY AT STAPLES CENTER, 7:30 P.M. TV: E SPN, PRIME
They fall to Cubs to
finish a series in which
they stranded runners
time and again.
GM believes Lakers
can lure top free
agents. ‘You can feel
the current shifting.’
CHICAGO 4
DODGERS 0
By Tania Ganguli
and Lindsey Thiry
That it takes a few AllStar players to win a championship in the NBA is no secret.
That the Lakers aspire to
win a title as soon as possible
is no secret either. It’s why
owner Jeanie Buss turned
over the team’s front office
nearly two months ago.
So how quickly can general manager Rob Pelinka
and president of basketball
operations Magic Johnson
turn the Lakers’ roster into
one that can compete for a
championship?
It’s complicated.
“I anticipate that there
are many stars that understand how unique this Los
Angeles Laker platform is. I
am fully convinced we will
have one or more than one
come,” Pelinka said. “To put
a timetable on it, I can’t do
that.”
Pelinka spoke on Thursday amid exit interviews.
He, Johnson and Lakers
coach Luke Walton met with
each player to discuss their
expectations for
them.
They’ll expect most players
to take some time off to refresh after the season, then
return to Los Angeles for offseason workouts.
The Lakers haven’t determined which players on
their roster now are part of
their future. The front office’s evaluation isn’t over
yet.
“Guys that aren’t committed to excellence won’t be
here,” Pelinka said.
In the coming months,
the Lakers will explore trade
possibilities and study their
[See Lakers, D7]
By Andy McCullough
Wally Skalij Los Angeles Times
DeANDRE JORDAN walks off the court in Houston after the Clippers lost Game 7 of a second-
round playoff series against the Rockets in 2015, completing an epic collapse after leading, 3-1.
PLAYOFF
PAYOFF?
Clippers are hoping to write a new chapter in
their history, which is full of postseason failures
By Broderick Turner
Danny Moloshok Associated Press
ROB PELINKA says
the Lakers are unique.
D
On the one hand, Clippers players admit they feel
the weight of past playoff failures — to a degree.
On the other hand, coach Doc Rivers suggests that
it’s a narrative perpetuated by the media.
Wherever one stands on the issue, there are basic
truths that cannot be ignored.
It’s a fact that the Clippers have never advanced beyond the second round of the playoffs.
And it’s inevitable that the media and naysayers will
remind them of that reality whenever the playoffs roll
around.
So playing the Utah Jazz in a first-round series that
begins with Game 1 at Staples Center on Saturday
night presents the Clippers with yet another opportu-
nity to scale the championship mountain.
“It increases that desire, that fire to win a championship,” Blake Griffin said Thursday before practice.
“But I think we’re all fans of the game of basketball and
have watched a lot of great teams and a lot of great players struggle to get to that point. It’s my seventh season.
We haven’t won a championship yet, but [I] also know
that it doesn’t come that easily.
“Sometimes you have to keep fighting for it. It’s not
something that we’re like, ‘Oh, poor us,’ like we’re
cursed and we’ve been through all this stuff.
“But no, sometimes you have to put in the time and
you have to go through some trials and tribulations before you get to where you want.”
The Clippers have had to endure self-inflicted trials
and tribulations in the playoffs and also have been de[See Clippers, D7]
railed by injuries.
CHICAGO — The numbers do not inspire confidence. They do not foretell
doom, but they do dampen
the thought of a rematch between these two clubs at this
park in October. In dropping
two of three to the Cubs, including a 4-0 loss Thursday
at Wrigley Field, the Dodgers operated at an obscene
rate of offensive inefficiency.
The coming weeks will tell if
the output this week was an
anomaly or a harbinger.
On 24 occasions during
these 27 innings, a Dodger
came to bat with a runner in
scoring position. Only once
did a Dodger supply a hit.
The team stranded 26 runners and managed only four
runs in all. The Cubs combine elite defense with a diverse, stingy pitching staff.
The Dodgers (5-5) could not
solve the puzzle during
these three games and could
not handle the stress of highleverage
opportunities
Thursday.
“We missed the big hit all
day,” shortstop Corey Seager said.
Manager Dave Roberts
noted how his players often
swung at pitches outside the
strike zone Thursday. The
affliction is common for
teams mired in a slump. The
tendency to “do too much,” a
dreaded phrase for hitters,
creeps up as innings pass
without offense, Roberts explained.
Roberts and several of
his players saw little reason
to draw conclusions from
the first three series of the
season. But one stubborn
pattern from 2016 has
carried into 2017: Four of the
Dodgers’ five losses this season have come when they’ve
faced a left-handed starting
pitcher. The grumbling
about the Dodgers’ futility
against these foes will continue “until we prove other[See Dodgers, D3]
TEXAS 8, ANGELS 3
No good spin
for this rotation
Angels still tied for first
place despite starters’
majors-worst ERA. D3
NHL PLAYOFFS | GAME 1: DUCKS 3, CALGARY 2
DUCKS LEAD SERIE S, 1-0 | GAME 2: SATURDAY AT HONDA CENTER, 7:30 TV: FS WE ST, NBCSN
Home ice
serves Ducks
well again
Getzlaf leads
by example
against Flames
HELENE ELLIOTT
In a few concise sentences,
Ryan Getzlaf summed up
the Ducks’ past four seasons
of playoff misery and explained why he believes they
are well equipped to avoid
repeating those unhappy
endings.
“To me, the biggest thing with our group
has always been staying level-headed, staying in the moment, staying in the game,” the
Ducks’ captain said after their morning
skate Thursday, and although he didn’t
mention it, he often was among those who
lost their poise at bad times.
“A lot of times early in the year I thought
our group got distracted from whether it be
a bad call, a big hit, a goal against. Those
kinds of things. We didn’t respond that
well,” he added. “The second half of the
season, we made it a focal point to make
sure we stayed calm
[See Elliott, D5]
They beat the Flames for 28th
straight time at Honda Center
By Curtis Zupke
Wally Skalij Los Angeles Times
JOSH MANSON of the Ducks and Matthew Tkachuk of the Flames are left out
of position during a play in the second period.
Make it 28-love and counting.
Ducks coach Randy Carlyle likened holding home-ice advantage to holding serve in
tennis. It’s been well documented that the
Ducks have held it for more than a decade
against the Calgary Flames, and it didn’t
change in Game 1 of their first-round playoff
series Thursday.
Rickard Rakell and Jakob Silfverberg
erased a one-goal deficit with second-period
goals in a 3-2 win at pumped-up Honda Center.
Ryan Getzlaf delivered a captain-esque
game with a goal and an assist and the Ducks
got a huge penalty kill late to to squash any
thoughts of history extinguishing. They have
won 28 straight
[See Ducks, D5]
D2
F R I DAY, A P R I L 14 , 2 017
L ATI M E S . C O M/ SP O RTS
PRO CALENDAR
DODGERS
ANGELS
FRI.
14
SAT.
15
SUN.
16
MON.
17
ARIZONA
7
SNLA
ARIZONA
6
SNLA
ARIZONA
1
SNLA, Ch. 5
TUE.
18
ARIZONA COLORADO
7
7
SNLA
SNLA, Ch. 5
at Kansas at Kansas at Kansas
at Houston at Houston
City
City
City
5
5
5:15
4:15
11:15 a.m.
FSW
FSW
FSW
FSW
FSW
UTAH
7:30**
Prime, ESPN
CLIPPERS
CALGARY
7:30*
NBCSN, FSW
DUCKS
UTAH
7:30**
Prime, TNT
at Calgary
7*
NBCSN, Prime
at Orlando
Noon
Channel 11
GALAXY
Shade denotes home game
*Stanley Cup playoffs. **NBA playoffs.
Michael Owen Baker For The Times
DODGERS MANAGER Dave Roberts has learned to adjust to situations, including making pitching changes.
TODAY ON THE AIR
TIME
BASEBALL
11:15 a.m.
4 p.m.
5:15 p.m.
EVENT
ON THE AIR
Pittsburgh at Chicago Cubs
St. Louis at New York Yankees
Angels at Kansas City
7 p.m.
Arizona at Dodgers
TV: MLB
TV: MLB
TV: FS West
R: 830, 1330
TV: SNLA
R: 570, 1020
COLLEGE BASEBALL
4 p.m.
Oregon State at Washington
5 p.m.
Oklahoma State at Kansas
7 p.m.
UCLA at Stanford
COLLEGE FOOTBALL SPRING GAMES
4:30 p.m. Kentucky
COLLEGE GYMNASTICS, NCAA CHAMPIONSHIP
10 a.m.
Women, first semifinal (UCLA included)
5 p.m.
Women, second semifinal
COLLEGE SOFTBALL
3 p.m.
Wisconsin at Purdue
COLLEGE TENNIS
2:30 p.m. Arizona at USC
GOLF
9:30 a.m. PGA Champions, Mitsubishi Electric Classic
Noon
PGA, RBC Heritage
4 p.m.
LPGA, Lotte Championship
3:30 a.m. Ladies European Tour, Lalla Meryem Cup
(Sat.)
6:30 a.m. European PGA, Trophee Hassan II
(Sat.)
HOCKEY, STANLEY CUP PLAYOFFS
4 p.m.
New York Rangers at Montreal
4 p.m.
Columbus at Pittsburgh
5 p.m.
St. Louis at Minnesota
7:30 p.m. San Jose at Edmonton
SOCCER
11:30 a.m. France, Angers vs. Paris Saint-Germain
11:30 a.m. Scotland, Kilmarnock vs. Midlothian
11:30 a.m. Spain, Athletic vs. Las Palmas
4 p.m.
MLS, Philadelphia vs. New York City
8 p.m.
MLS, San Jose vs. Dallas
3:30 a.m. Italy, Inter Milan vs. AC Milan
(Sat.)
4:30 a.m. England, Tottenham vs. Bournemouth
(Sat.)
6:30 a.m. Germany, Dortmund vs. Frankfurt
(Sat.)
6:30 a.m. Germany, Hoffenheim vs. Monchengladbach
(Sat.)
6:30 a.m. Germany, Leipzig vs. Freiburg
(Sat.)
6:45 a.m. England, Crystal Palace vs. Leicester City
(Sat.)
TENNIS
10 a.m.
ATP, U.S. Clay Court Championship, quarterfinals
4 a.m.
ATP, Grand Prix Hassan II, semifinals, doubles
(Sat.)
final
TV: Pac-12
TV: FS1
TV: Pac-12LA
TV: SEC
TV: ESPN2
TV: ESPNU
TV: BigTen
TV: Pac-12LA
TV: Golf
TV: Golf
TV: Golf
TV: Golf
TV: Golf
TV: USA
TV: NHL
TV: NBCSN
TV: NBCSN
TV: beIN1
TV: FSP
TV: beIN2
TV: ESPN, ESPND
TV: KFTR, UniMas
TV: beIN Net
TV: NBCSN
TV: FS1, GolTV
TV: FS2
TV: FSP, FOXD
TV: NBCSN
TV: Tennis
TV: Tennis
Roberts reflects on life
and mixing things up
DYLAN HERNANDEZ
CHICAGO — As blearyeyed players marched into
Wrigley Field’s cramped
visiting locker room Thursday morning, they were
welcomed to work by a
cheerful voice from inside
the manager’s office.
The voice belonged to
Dave Roberts, the highly
energetic and highly caffeinated manager of the Dodgers.
Yasiel Puig stuck his
head into Roberts’ office.
Roberts told Puig about how
MLB Network had mentioned the outfielder’s foundation. “I like it,” Roberts
told him.
Watching Roberts interact with his players this
week, you never would have
imagined he was in mourning. You never would have
guessed he was less than
month removed from the
death of his father, Waymon.
“I think about him a lot,”
Roberts said.
Two days earlier, the
Dodgers didn’t have a game
to play. The 44-year-old
Roberts was alone in his
luxury hotel room and
started thinking about his
father.
“I just wanted to hear his
voice,” Roberts said. “I
didn’t even know if my sister
turned off his phone or not,
but I just called his number.”
When Roberts shared the
story, a silence fell over the
office. He placed the tip of
his index finger on his lips
and stared into the space in
front of him.
He wasn’t down for long.
He couldn’t be. The game
was calling.
And the game requires
the full commitment of a
manager’s intellectual and
emotional resources, as
Roberts learned last year in
his successful maiden season with the Dodgers.
As a player, he was conditioned to visualize positive
outcomes. That was still his
mentality at the start of last
season. So, if he went into a
particular game, he counted
on the starting pitcher
lasting six innings. His task
was to figure out who would
serve as the seventh- and
eighth-inning links to closer
Kenley Jansen.
The state of the Dodgers
rotation forced him to rewire
his brain. Injuries and substandard performances
meant Roberts couldn’t
take anything for granted. It
wasn’t uncommon for him to
be making his first change in
the fourth or fifth inning.
“I think I’ve learned
quickly as a manager that
you can’t just expect good
things to happen,” he said.
“You always have to caution
for the worst case. I’m very
cognizant of various exit
strategies.”
And that was how he
learned to use his bullpen.
No relievers had designated
roles outside of Jansen.
Anyone in the bullpen could
come in at any time.
The idea wasn’t new in
baseball. How successfully
the idea was implemented
was.
Players have routines.
Disrupt their routines and
you threaten their performances.
“I think it’s the consistency of conversations with
me and our players, about
eliminating noise, being
accountable and not making
excuses because that’s an
excuse,” Roberts said. “It’s
challenging guys to back up
what they say. If they’re here
for the team and to be unselfish, then the out in the
fifth inning is just as big as
the out in the ninth inning.”
The Dodgers bullpen
topped the major leagues
last season in innings
pitched and earned-run
average. The pitchers in the
group have changed this
season, but the results
haven’t. Through 10 games,
Dodgers relievers have
posted a combined 1.34
ERA.
The team dropped its
series finale against the
Chicago Cubs, 4-0, but the
bullpen contributed another
31⁄3 scoreless innings.
Roberts said that is in
part because he has learned
to better utilize the data
provided to him by the front
office, which he studies
before every game.
Was Roberts a good
student?
“When I wanted to be,” he
said.
Roberts has a degree
from UCLA, but it’s in history. The school will give one
of those to pretty much
anyone. I know. My degree
from UCLA is also in history.
Roberts laughed.
“You’re right,” he said. “I
wasn’t econ at UCLA.”
As important as his
aptitude is the confidence
he gained last year in the
playoffs, particularly in what
was his managerial magnum
opus in Game 5 of a National
League division series
against the Washington
Nationals.
Roberts’ starting pitcher
in that game, Rich Hill,
failed to complete the third
inning.
Joe Blanton recorded the
final out of the third inning
and pitched the fourth. Julio
Urias pitched the fifth and
the sixth. Jansen entered
the game in the seventh
inning and pitched 21⁄3 innings. Clayton Kershaw, who
started the previous day,
registered the last two outs.
The Dodgers won, 4-3,
and advanced to the NL
Championship Series,
where they fell to the Cubs.
When the season ended,
Roberts was named the
league’s manager of the year.
He shared those triumphs with his father, a
former Marine and disciplinarian. He won’t have his
father alongside him for his
future victories.
Roberts reflected on how
their relationship evolved
over the years.
“He was completely
different than when he
raised me,” Roberts said.
“He softened. He just became a fan.”
Roberts nodded and
forced a smile.
dylan.hernandez@latimes.com
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L AT I ME S . CO M / S P O RT S
F R I DAY, A P R I L 14 , 2 017
D3
BASEBALL
DODGERS REPORT
Kershaw finally
to face Greinke
By Andy McCullough
CHICAGO — Clayton Kershaw
shared a clubhouse with Zack
Greinke for three seasons. The two
became close friends as the Dodgers strung together a trio of National League West championships.
Kershaw felt disappointed
when his team allowed Greinke to
depart after the 2015 season for a
six-year, $206.5-million contract
with Arizona.
Never before has Kershaw faced
Greinke as an opponent. That will
change Friday evening at Dodger
Stadium, when the Diamondbacks
arrive for a four-game series. Kershaw admitted he did not relish the
opportunity to face his friend.
“I don’t really look forward to
it,” Kershaw said. “You almost just
try to block it out. It’s not fun to
pitch to people that you know. I’m
not good at separating that. I think
I’m just going to have to really focus
and think about it like he’s another
guy, and then, the next day I can
talk to him.”
The duo went 104-34 during
their three seasons together.
Greinke finished second in National League Cy Young award voting in 2015, while Kershaw finished
third. Kershaw won the award in
2013 and 2014.
Last season featured challenges for both men. Kershaw suffered a herniated disk in his back
and missed nearly three months.
Greinke saw his fastball velocity diminish, dealt with shoulder issues
and finished the season with a 4.37
earned-run average.
Greinke, for his part, sounded
more eager for the matchup.
“I’ve been wanting to face him
just to see how nasty he is,” Greinke
told reporters in Arizona. “I like
seeing when someone is just so
good and you can see how it’s really
tough to hit.”
Hill handles
bullpen session
Rich Hill (blister) completed a
35-pitch bullpen session at Dodger
Stadium to test his readiness for
returning from the 10-day disabled
list. The Dodgers shut down Hill
for a start to avoid aggravating the
blister on his left middle finger.
If Hill is cleared to pitch, he
would start Sunday against Arizona.
in the eighth inning. It went for a two-base error, but no runs scored in the inning.
Short hops
Quality isn’t there
from Angels’ starters
andy.mccullough@latimes.com
Twitter: @McCulloughTimes
Their rotation has the
highest ERA in the majors
after Nolasco is hit hard in
loss to the Rangers.
Pedro Baez (right wrist bruise)
is expected to rejoin the team this
weekend, manager Dave Roberts
said. Roberts would not say who in
the bullpen will lose a roster spot to
make room for Baez, but he indicated Ross Stripling was not at
risk. The team could option Josh
Fields.
Jeff Haynes Associated Press
DODGERS CATCHER Yasmani Grandal tags out Kyle Schwar-
ber at the plate in the fifth inning, when the Cubs scored twice.
Ryu again is unable
to finish five innings
[Dodgers, from D1]
wise,” Roberts said.
On Thursday, the team fell to a
member of their 2016 roster. Brett
Anderson and Hyun-Jin Ryu combined for16 innings last season. Anderson blew out his back in spring
training, developed a blister upon
his return in August and injured
himself fielding a bunt. Ryu stumbled in his rehabilitation from
labrum surgery in 2015 and pitched
only once.
Yet both men broke camp in
2017 as rotation members for championship contenders. Anderson
took a $3.5-million deal with the
Cubs and won the fifth spot during
spring training. Ryu never wavered
in his readiness for the start of the
season, and exceeded the expectations of his Dodgers employers.
After his debut last week, Ryu
(0-2, 5.79 ERA) chastised himself
for failing to complete five innings.
He saw no need to celebrate his return from the abyss. Ryu had
missed nearly two full seasons because of his torn labrum, but he
still held himself to the standard he
set in 2013 and 2014. He felt a similar
frustration after allowing four runs
in 42⁄3 innings Thursday.
“As a starting pitcher, I feel like
five innings is the minimum you
need to pitch,” Ryu said. “And for
two games straight, I wasn’t able
to.”
Ryu reached 89 mph on his fastball with a 2-1 pitch to first baseman Anthony Rizzo in the first inning. The ball was headed toward
the outer edge of the plate, but
Rizzo still clobbered it. His solo homer gave the Cubs an early lead.
The Dodgers had less luck with
their fly-ball placement. Seager
will curse the name of Cubs center
fielder Albert Almora Jr. Almora
leaped at the wall to bring down a
drive by Seager in the first inning.
Two innings later, Almora robbed
Seager once more.
With a runner at second, Anderson tried to handcuff Seager with a
curveball down the middle. Seager
was not fooled. He unleashed a
drive that forced Almora to sprint
Sean M. Haffey Getty Images
ANGELS RIGHT FIELDER Cameron Maybin drops a ball hit by the Rangers’ Robinson Chirinos
toward the bricks in center. Anderson crouched and waited. The ball
landed in the heel of Almora’s
glove. Anderson pumped his fists.
Wrigley Field erupted.
“Every time you barrel up a ball,
you’re hoping for the best,” Seager
said. “It happens, though.”
Another eruption occurred in
the bottom of the fourth, when
shortstop
Addison
Russell
launched a solo homer onto Waveland Avenue beyond the left-field
bleachers.
Down two runs, the Dodgers
stoked their best opportunity in
the top of the fifth, when Ryu led off
with a walk, Seager singled to left
and Justin Turner walked to load
the bases with two outs.
Up came Yasiel Puig. He passed
on a curveball at the knees, but
chased a chest-high fastball. “That
changed that sequence right
there,” Roberts said, allowing Anderson to keep Puig off balance.
Anderson sneaked a second strike
on a fastball down the middle. Puig
swung late at an inside fastball,
managing only a harmless popup
to first base.
“That was a big at-bat in the
game,” Roberts said.
The Dodgers would not advance a runner to third base again.
And the Cubs broke through for
two runs off Ryu in the bottom of
the inning. The Chicago bullpen
held the line after Anderson departed following the fifth.
Anderson “did not have his best
stuff,” Roberts said. But still he
kept the Dodgers off the board. After three games at Wrigley Field,
the club did not exit the friendly
confines boasting about a rematch
in October. The group understood
the work necessary to reach that
stage again.
“It’s a long season,” Turner said.
“A lot of stuff happens. We can’t
worry about anyone else. We’ve got
to make sure we take care of our
business, and make sure we get
there first.”
andy.mccullough@latimes.com
Twitter: @McCulloughTimes
As Royals mourn Ventura,
Angels remember Adenhart
TEXAS 8, ANGELS 3
By Bill Shaikin
By Bill Shaikin
The Angels will face a team in
mourning this weekend. Sadly,
they can relate.
The Kansas City Royals held
their home opener this week, a traditionally joyous occasion that this
year carried a somber tone.
The ceremonial first pitch was
thrown out by the mother of Yordano Ventura, the Kansas City
pitcher killed in a car accident in
the Dominican Republic in January.
Eight years ago, the Angels navigated a season without Nick
Adenhart, the pitcher killed in a
car accident after his first start of
the year. If the Angels’ experience
is any indication, the Royals could
find themselves grieving for some
time.
“It was tough,” manager Mike
Scioscia said. “It’s still difficult,
when you think about a family that
has all their holiday dinners and
there’s an empty chair. That’s
who’s really affected the most.
“We lost a friend and we lost a
player, and you feel like he’s your
son when these guys are on the
team. It took some time. It took a
lot of time.”
Even in their time of mourning,
the 2009 Angels won the American
League West by 10 games and ad-
Mike Trout is still here. The offense is pretty productive, notwithstanding the Angels’ 8-3 loss
Thursday to the Texas Rangers at
Angel Stadium. There is no shame
in getting shut out by Yu Darvish
for seven innings.
But the Angels this year will go
as far as their starting pitching can
take them, and the early results are
not encouraging.
The Angels’ starters have a 6.00
earned-run average — the highest
in the major leagues, as of Thursday afternoon. Throw out the one
scoreless start from ace Garrett
Richards, who is on the disabled
list with no timetable for his return,
and the Angels’ starters have a 6.60
ERA.
“You’re not going to finish well if
that’s going to be the rule of how
they’re going to pitch,” manager
Mike Scioscia said.
The individual numbers: Jesse
Chavez 5.40, Ricky Nolasco 5.40,
Matt Shoemaker 7.71, Tyler Skaggs
8.71. First up to replace Richards:
JC Ramirez, a reliever with a career
ERA of 5.14.
The Angels are so strapped for
fresh bullpen arms that they called
up Daniel Wright from triple-A Salt
Lake on Wednesday, let him throw
the final four innings Thursday,
then sent him back to Salt Lake.
Ten games do not a season
make. The Angels have won six,
leaving them tied with the Houston
Astros atop the American League
West. Nothing is doomed.
“These guys are going to pitch
better,” Scioscia said. “We know
that. They’re going to pitch deeper
into games, and they’re going to
give us the quality starts we’re
looking for.”
The Angels have one quality
start this season, ranking last in
the major leagues. Nolasco threw it
last week.
“No excuses,” Nolasco said, “but
it’s April 10, 11, something like that?
We’re confident in the ability of
each of the five guys getting the
ball. We’ll get there.”
Nolasco has pitched 162⁄3 innings this season and given up five
home runs. No pitcher in the
league has given up more.
On Thursday, he pitched five innings and gave up five runs on eight
hits, including a leadoff home run
to Carlos Gomez in the first inning
and a two-run shot by Nomar
Mazara in the third inning.
The Rangers scored once off
Nolasco in the first inning, twice in
the second and twice more in the
third.
“That’s on me,” Nolasco said. “I
put us in a really tough position
against a really good pitcher.”
Darvish worked seven innings,
giving up five hits and two walks,
with 10 strikeouts.
The Angels were down to their
Ventura
Adenhart
vanced to the league championship series.
“That group of guys was a special team in ’09,” Scioscia said.
“They embraced Nick’s family.
They embraced honoring Nick in a
lot of different ways, from bringing
his jersey with us on the road to going out when we clinched to where
his number was on the wall and
taking a team picture. Those were
special moments.
“During the season, it wasn’t a
topic of conversation. Everyone
dealt with pain in their own way.
Occasionally, his name would
come up. We would ask about the
family, and we would talk. It took a
long time.
“They somehow got their focus
back on winning and playing baseball, and we were able to get into
the ALCS that year, but not without a lot of heartache. It just takes
time.”
bill.shaikin@latimes.com
Twitter: @BillShaikin
last out when they finally scored,
on a three-run homer by Danny Espinosa. Of his eight hits this season, three are home runs, all in the
ninth inning.
Espinosa played last year for
the Washington Nationals, where
Max Scherzer, Stephen Strasburg
and Tanner Roark head the rotation.
“Not every team has three of
those guys,” Espinosa said. “But
we have some very good pitchers. …
We have the pitching. Sometimes it
doesn’t work out. But it’s not the
fact that we don’t believe in our
pitching. I think we have a lot of
trust and belief in our pitching.”
bill.shaikin@latimes.com
Twitter: @BillShaikin
ANGELS REPORT
Ramirez gets a shot as starter
By Bill Shaikin
The Angels do not plan to activate ace Garrett Richards from
the 10-day disabled list when he is
eligible Sunday. Richards has not
yet been cleared to resume throwing, and reliever JC Ramirez will
replace him in the rotation Friday.
Manager Mike Scioscia said a
“best-case scenario” would involve
Ramirez pitching well and earning
another turn five days later.
Richards has not played catch
since he was diagnosed last week
with what the team called a
strained biceps. He has not
pitched in eight days and could require more time to rebuild arm
strength and/or complete a minor
league rehabilitation assignment,
depending on when the Angels’
medical staff clears him to resume
throwing.
“They’ll let us know when he’s
ready to pick up a ball,” Scioscia
said. “The longer he’s out, obviously, there would be more rehab
involved.”
The Angels’ playoff chances imploded last season when injuries
forced the team to field a patchwork rotation that included veterans such as Tim Lincecum and
David Huff. Richards is the key to
the Angels’ rotation.
Richards, 28, was limited to six
starts last season because of a torn
elbow ligament. He successfully rehabilitated the elbow with injections of stem cells and platelet-rich
plasma, avoiding the need to
undergo reconstructive surgery
and sit out a season. Although the
biceps strain forced him to leave
his first start this season, the elbow
appeared sound in a subsequent
MRI examination.
Ramirez, 28, will make his first
start since 2011, when he was in double-A with the Philadelphia
Phillies. Since then, he bounced
through four other organizations
before the Angels claimed him on
waivers last June.
When he signed his first pro
contract, as a 16-year-old from
Nicaragua, he said he envisioned
himself as a starting pitcher in the
major leagues. He had all but
abandoned that goal along the
way, but the Angels directed him to
work as a starter in winter ball and
tried him as a starter in spring
training.
Now, he gets his chance to do
what he imagined himself doing a
dozen years ago.
“Dream come true,” he said.
Scioscia said that the Angels
would monitor how the bullpen responds without what he called the
“multi-inning power arm” of Ramirez. The Angels’ bullpen has
worked more innings than all but
one American League team.
“We’ll pay attention to where
this goes in the next couple weeks,”
Scioscia said. “If he lights it up as a
starter and helps us win games,
great. We have to keep our finger on
the pulse of our whole pitching
staff.”
bill.shaikin@latimes.com
Twitter: @BillShaikin
D4
F R I DAY, A P R I L 14 , 2 017
L ATI M E S . C O M/ SP O RTS
BASEBALL
CUBS
DODGERS
NL STANDINGS
West
W
L
Pct.
Arizona
7
3
.700
Colorado
7
4
DODGERS
5
5
GB
L10
—
7-3
.636
1
⁄2
6-4
.500
2
5-5
2
5-5
San Diego
5
5
.500
San Francisco
4
7
.364 31⁄2
Central
L
W
Pct.
4-6
GB
L10
Cincinnati
7
3
.700
Chicago
6
3
.667
1
⁄2
6-3
Milwaukee
5
5
.500
2
5-5
Pittsburgh
3
6
.333 31⁄2
3-6
St. Louis
3
6
.333 31⁄2
East
W
L
Pct.
—
7-3
3-6
GB
L10
—
7-3
New York
7
3
.700
Washington
5
4
.556 11⁄2
5-4
Miami
4
5
.444 21⁄2
4-5
Philadelphia
3
6
.333 31⁄2
3-6
Atlanta
2
6
.250
2-6
4
Thursday’s results
at Chicago 4, DODGERS 0
at Boston 4, Pittsburgh 3
Milwaukee 5, at Cincinnati 1
New York 9, at Miami 8, 16 innings
Colorado 3, at San Francisco 1
AL STANDINGS
West
W
L
Pct.
GB
L10
6-4
ANGELS
6
4
.600
—
Houston
6
4
.600
—
Oakland
5
5
.500
Texas
4
5
.444 11⁄2
4-5
Seattle
2
8
.200
2-8
Central
W
4
GB
L10
3
.667
—
6-3
Minnesota
6
3
.667
—
Chicago
4
4
.500 11⁄2
4-4
Cleveland
4
5
.444
2
4-5
Kansas City
3
6
.333
3
3-6
GB
L10
L
Pct.
Dodgers
Forsythe 2b
Seager ss
Turner 3b
Puig rf
Van Slyke 1b
b-Toles lf
Grandal c
Thpsn cf
c-Gnzlz 1b
Herndz lf
d-Pedrsn cf
Ryu p
e-Utley
f-Barnes
Totals
AB
4
4
2
3
2
2
4
2
2
2
2
1
1
1
32
R
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
H
0
1
1
1
0
0
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
6
BI
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Avg.
.229
.282
.355
.265
.154
.240
.185
.000
.276
.222
.250
.000
.059
.200
Dodgers
Chicago
5-5
2-4
0-0
Streak
Lost 2 This month
Home
4-2 Road
Division
6-4 Interleague
Next: Tonight at Kansas City, 5:15 p.m. PDT
TV/Radio: FS West/830, 1330
Chicago
AB R H BI Avg.
Schwarber lf 3 0 1 1 .212
Szczur lf
0 0 0 0 .000
Bryant 3b
3 0 0 0 .229
Rizzo 1b
4 1 2 2 .243
Russell ss
4 1 1 1 .256
Contreras c 4 0 1 0 .286
Almora cf
3 0 1 0 .500
Heyward rf
4 0 1 0 .290
Baez 2b
2 1 1 0 .211
Anderson p 1 0 0 0 .000
a-Jay
0 1 0 0 .333
Edwards p
1 0 0 0 .000
Uehara p
0 0 0 0 --Davis p
0 0 0 0 --Totals
29 4 8 4
000 000 000 —0
100 120 00x —4
6
8
0
0
a-pinch hit for Anderson in the 5th. b-grounded out for Van Slyke
in the 6th. c-flied out for Thompson in the 6th. d-singled for
Hernandez in the 7th. e-lined out for Dayton in the 7th. f-struck out
for Hatcher in the 9th.
Walks—Dodgers 4: Turner 2, Puig 1, Ryu 1. Chicago 4: Schwarber
1, Bryant 1, Almora 1, Baez 1. Strikeouts—Dodgers 5: Forsythe 1,
Seager 1, Van Slyke 1, Grandal 1, Barnes 1. Chicago 9: Schwarber 2,
Bryant 2, Contreras 2, Heyward 2, Edwards 1. LOB—Dodgers 9,
Chicago 6. 2B—Grandal (1), Hernandez (2), Contreras (2).
HR—Rizzo (1), off Ryu; Russell (1), off Ryu. RBIs—Schwarber (5),
Rizzo 2 (3), Russell (5). DP—Dodgers 1 (Forsythe, Seager, Gonzalez);
Chicago 1 (Baez, Rizzo).
Dodgers
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Ryu L, 0-2 .................42⁄3 6 4 4 2 5
77 5.79
Fields .........................2⁄3 1 0 0 0 0
15 0.00
Dayton........................2⁄3 0 0 0 1 1
9 0.00
Hatcher .......................2 1 0 0 1 3
33 1.29
Chicago
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Anderson W, 1-0...........5 3 0 0 4 2
90 0.84
Edwards ......................2 1 0 0 0 1
20 0.00
Uehara........................1 1 0 0 0 1
13 0.00
Davis ..........................1 1 0 0 0 1
13 0.00
HBP—Ryu (Jay).
U—Paul Nauert, Dan Iassogna, Sam Holbrook, Greg Gibson.
T—3:01. Tickets sold—38,379 (41,072).
Texas
Gomez cf
Choo dh
Mazara rf
Napoli 1b
Rua 1b
Odor 2b
Andrus ss
Gallo 3b
Chirinos c
Profar lf
Totals
AB
5
5
5
4
0
5
4
3
4
2
37
R
1
1
1
0
0
0
2
1
2
0
8
H
1
2
1
0
0
1
2
1
2
1
11
BI
1
1
2
0
0
0
0
0
3
1
8
Avg.
.139
.258
.368
.171
.154
.250
.353
.207
.400
.143
Texas
Angels
BREWERS
REDS
8
3
6-4
2-2
0-0
Angels
AB R H BI Avg.
Escobar 3b 4 0 0 0 .366
Calhoun rf
3 0 1 0 .316
Revere cf
1 0 0 0 .214
Trout cf
2 0 2 0 .333
Cron 1b
1 0 0 0 .304
Pujols dh
4 1 1 0 .200
Simmons ss 3 0 1 0 .343
Pnington ss 0 0 0 0 .333
Maybin lf-rf 3 1 0 0 .231
Marte 1b-lf 4 0 0 0 .250
Espinosa 2b 4 1 2 3 .229
Perez c
4 0 0 0 .100
Totals
33 3 7 3
122 003 000 —8
000 000 003 —3
11
7
0
3
5
1
Baltimore
6
2
.750
5
4
.556 11⁄2
—
5-4
New York
5
4
.556 11⁄2
5-4
Tampa Bay
5
5
.500
2
5-5
Toronto
1
8
.111 5 ⁄2
1-8
Milwaukee AB R H BI Avg. Cincinnati
Villar 2b
4 0 0 1 .163 Hamilton cf
Thames 1b 3 2 2 2 .360 Peraza 2b-ss
Aguilar 1b 0 0 0 0 .400 Votto 1b
Braun lf
3 1 1 2 .226 Duvall lf
Shaw 3b
4 0 0 0 .211 Suarez 3b
Santana rf 4 0 2 0 .267 Schebler rf
Broxton cf 4 0 1 0 .208 Cozart ss
Pina c
4 1 1 0 .389 Astin p
Arcia ss
4 1 3 0 .231 Barnhart c
Nelson p
2 0 0 0 .000 Arroyo p
Torres p
0 0 0 0 --- Storen p
a-Franklin
1 0 0 0 .200 Alcantara 2b
Hughes p
0 0 0 0 --- Totals
Totals
33 5 10 5
New York
Grndrsn cf
Lagares cf
Cabrera ss
Cespdes lf
Flores 1b
Bruce rf
Walker 2b
T.Rivera 3b
Duda 1b
f-deGrom
d’Arnaud c
Gsellman p
Edgin p
a-Reyes
Montero p
Blevins p
c-Cnfrto cf
Reed p
R.Rivera 1b
Totals
Milwaukee
Cincinnati
AB
4
4
3
4
4
3
3
0
3
1
0
1
30
R
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
H
1
1
0
0
0
0
3
0
0
0
0
0
5
004 010 000 —5
100 000 000 —1
BI
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
Avg.
.300
.293
.158
.316
.375
.161
.481
--.296
.000
--.000
10
5
0
0
Walks—Texas 3: Gallo 1, Profar 2. Angels 3: Trout 1, Pennington 1,
Maybin 1.
Strikeouts—Texas 7: Gomez 1, Choo 1, Mazara 2, Napoli 1, Gallo
1, Profar 1. Angels 11: Escobar 2, Calhoun 2, Pujols 1, Maybin 1,
Marte 2, Espinosa 1, Perez 2.
E—Simmons (2), Maybin (1), Perez (2). LOB—Texas 6, Angels 6.
2B—Andrus (4), Chirinos (1). HR—Gomez (3), off Nolasco; Mazara
(3), off Nolasco; Espinosa (3), off Hauschild. RBIs—Gomez (4),
Choo (2), Mazara 2 (11), Chirinos 3 (6), Profar (2), Espinosa 3 (12).
SB—Andrus (1), Gallo (2), Trout (1), Maybin (1). CS—Andrus (1).
Runners left in scoring position—Texas 2 (Gomez, Napoli);
Angels 5 (Calhoun, Pujols, Simmons 2, Perez). RISP—Texas 4 for 11;
Angels 1 for 10.
Runners moved up—Pujols, Escobar. GIDP—Choo, Maybin.
DP—Texas 1 (Odor, Andrus, Napoli); Angels 1 (Espinosa,
Pennington, Cron).
Texas
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Darvish W, 1-1 .............7 5 0 0 2 10
103 2.33
Hauschild ....................2 2 3 3 1 1
33 12.00
Angels
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Nolasco L, 0-2 .............5 8 5 5 0 7
97 5.40
Wright.........................4 3 3 3 3 0
65 6.75
a-grounded out for Torres in the 9th.
Walks—Milwaukee 1: Braun 1.
Strikeouts—Milwaukee 5: Villar 2, Pina 1, Nelson 2. Cincinnati 6:
Hamilton 1, Duvall 3, Suarez 1, Alcantara 1.
LOB—Milwaukee 4, Cincinnati 4. 2B—Santana (3). HR—Braun
(3), off Arroyo; Thames (2), off Arroyo. RBIs—Villar (7), Thames 2
(5), Braun 2 (6), Votto (5). SB—Hamilton (5), Peraza (5).
CS—Broxton (1), Arcia (1). SF—Votto. S—Nelson, Arroyo.
Runners left in scoring position—Milwaukee 2 (Santana, Pina);
Cincinnati 2 (Hamilton, Votto). RISP—Milwaukee 1 for 6; Cincinnati 0
for 3.
Runners moved up—Villar, Shaw, Peraza. GIDP—Shaw.
DP—Cincinnati 1 (Peraza, Alcantara, Votto).
Milwaukee
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Nelson W, 1-0 ..............7 5 1 1 0 5
101 1.38
Torres..........................1 0 0 0 0 1
10 1.23
Hughes .......................1 0 0 0 0 0
10 0.00
Cincinnati
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Arroyo L, 0-2 ................6 7 5 5 0 2
80 9.90
Storen.........................1 1 0 0 0 2
11 1.80
Astin...........................2 2 0 0 1 1
28 0.00
WP—Darvish, Nolasco, Wright.
U—Paul Emmel, Brian O’Nora, Scott Barry, Stu Scheurwater.
T—3:14. Tickets sold—30,255 (43,250).
HBP—Astin (Thames).
U—Brian Gorman, D.J. Reyburn, Mike DiMuro, Tripp Gibson.
T—02:25. Tickets sold—13,573 (42,319).
1
ERA
TIME
2.31
7 p.m.
3.46
SNLA
6.55 11:15 a.m.
6.00
MLB
4.50
1 p.m.
3.21
0.69
4 p.m.
1.80
9.00
4 p.m.
2.53
8.10 4:30 p.m.
0.00
8.44 7:15 p.m.
4.50
AMERICAN LEAGUE >>>
W-L
2-0
1-0
0-0
0-0
0-0
0-1
1-0
1-0
0-0
0-1
1-0
2-0
1-1
0-1
ERA
5.40
2.08
0.00
1.29
4.26
6.35
2.45
4.38
0.00
10.80
0.64
2.08
2.38
4.09
TIME
5:15 p.m.
FS West
4 p.m.
W-L
1-0
0-1
ERA
1.50
11.74
TIME
4 p.m.
MLB
4 p.m.
4 p.m.
5 p.m.
7 p.m.
7 p.m.
INTERLEAGUE >>>
MATCHUP
STL/Wacha (R)
NY (AL)/ Tanaka (R)
LEADERS
NATIONAL LEAGUE >>>
Player
G
AB
R
H
Avg.
Murphy Was .......................9
40
7
18 .450
Myers SD .........................10
40
10
16 .400
Realmuto Mia.....................8
30
7
12 .400
Ozuna Mia .........................9
36
6
14 .389
Zimmerman Was .................9
34
6
13 .382
Freese Pit ..........................8
21
3
8 .381
Suarez Cin .......................10
32
7
12 .375
Wieters Was .......................9
27
4
10 .370
Nunez SF .........................10
39
4
14 .359
Kendrick Phi.......................8
31
4
11 .355
Turner DODGERS.................9
31
3
11 .355
Home Runs
Cespedes, New York ........................................................... 6
Ozuna, Miami .................................................................... 4
Bruce, New York................................................................. 4
Reynolds, Colorado ............................................................ 4
Runs Batted In
Ozuna, Miami .................................................................. 16
Reynolds, Colorado........................................................... 11
Pitching
Garrett, Cincinnati ........................................................... 2-0
Arrieta, Chicago .............................................................. 2-0
WPeralta, Milwaukee.........................................................2-0
McCarthy, DODGERS ........................................................ 2-0
Cueto, San Francisco ....................................................... 2-0
Dunn, Colorado............................................................... 2-0
Harvey, New York ............................................................. 2-0
Robles, New York .............................................................2-0
Roark, Washington........................................................... 2-0
AMERICAN LEAGUE >>>
H
1
0
1
2
2
3
1
0
0
0
4
0
0
1
0
0
1
0
0
16
New York
Miami
BI
1
0
0
2
1
0
0
0
0
0
4
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
9
Avg.
.212
.000
.304
.275
.200
.300
.195
.000
.250
.000
.333
.000
--.079
----.417
--.273
Miami
Gordon 2b
Ellis c
Yelich cf
Stanton rf
Bour 1b
Ozuna lf
Dietrich 3b
Phelps p
Ziegler p
d-Moore
e-Realmuto
Wittgren p
Rojas ss-3b
Chen p
Urena p
b-Suzuki
Riddle ss
Totals
AB
8
6
5
6
7
6
3
0
0
1
1
1
7
1
2
1
2
57
R
1
2
2
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
8
H
3
1
1
1
1
2
1
0
0
0
0
0
3
0
0
0
0
13
042 010 010 000 000 1 —9
400 040 000 000 000 0 —8
BI
0
0
1
1
1
4
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
8
Avg.
.293
.100
.244
.270
.129
.389
.261
.000
--.333
.400
.000
.286
.250
.000
.167
.111
16
13
0
0
a-singled for Edgin in the 6th. b-struck out for Barraclough in the
7th. c-doubled, advanced to 3rd for Blevins in the 8th. d-grounded
out for Ziegler in the 9th. e-flied out for Tazawa in the 12th. f-struck
out for Smoker in the 15th.
Walks—New York 3: Cespedes 2, d’Arnaud 1. Miami 9: Ellis 1,
Yelich 3, Stanton 1, Bour 1, Ozuna 2, Dietrich 1. Strikeouts—New
York 11: Granderson 2, Cabrera 1, Cespedes 2, Flores 1, T.Rivera 2,
deGrom 1, R.Rivera 2. Miami 16: Ellis 3, Yelich 3, Stanton 2, Bour 1,
Dietrich 1, Wittgren 1, Rojas 2, Chen 1, Suzuki 1, Riddle 1. LOB—New
York 9, Miami 13. 2B—Conforto (1), Bour (2). 3B—d’Arnaud (1).
HR—Cespedes (5), off Chen; Flores (2), off Chen; Cespedes (6), off
Urena; d’Arnaud (2), off Conley; Ozuna (4), off Gsellman.
RBIs—Granderson (3), Cespedes 2 (10), Flores (3), d’Arnaud 4 (9),
Conforto (4), Yelich (4), Stanton (7), Bour (3), Ozuna 4 (16), Dietrich
(4). SF—Stanton. S—Gsellman, Ellis, Riddle. Runners left in scoring
position—New York 3 (Granderson, Cabrera, Conforto); Miami 5
(Ellis, Yelich, Bour, Suzuki 2). RISP—New York 4 for 11; Miami 4 for
13. Runners moved up—Duda. GIDP—Flores. DP—Miami 1 (Riddle,
Gordon, Bour).
New York
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Gsellman ..................42⁄3 5 8 8 3 5
97 9.28
Edgin..........................1⁄3 2 0 0 1 0
6 4.15
Montero ....................11⁄3 3 0 0 1 2
34 6.00
Blevins .......................2⁄3 0 0 0 1 1
9 0.00
Salas..........................2 1 0 0 1 1
22 0.00
Reed ..........................2 0 0 0 0 0
16 1.29
Smoker .......................3 1 0 0 1 5
38 3.38
Robles W, 2-0 ..............2 1 0 0 1 2
34 3.86
Miami
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Chen ..........................3 7 6 6 0 3
56 7.00
Urena .........................3 3 1 1 0 2
36 2.25
Barraclough H, 2 ..........1 1 0 0 0 1
21 1.80
Phelps BS, 2-2 .............1 2 1 1 0 1
23 6.00
Ziegler.........................1 0 0 0 1 0
12 1.50
McGowan ....................2 1 0 0 2 0
26 0.00
Tazawa ........................1 0 0 0 0 0
15 6.75
Wittgren ......................3 0 0 0 0 3
45 2.70
Conley L, 1-1 ...............1 2 1 1 0 1
19 3.00
Inherited runners-scored—Edgin 2-2, Blevins 2-0.
WP—Barraclough 2.
U—Angel Hernandez, Lance Barksdale, John Tumpane, Ted
Barrett. T—5:38. Tickets sold—23,192 (36,742).
Trevor Story hit a two-run homer in the
fourth inning, and five Colorado pitchers combined on a five-hitter. Madison
Bumgarner, who struck out eight in six
innings, took the loss.
TODAY’S GAMES
NATIONAL LEAGUE >>>
MATCHUP
Angels/Ramirez (R)
KC/Duffy (L)
BAL/Miley (L)
TOR/Sanchez (R)
DET/Norris (L)
CLE/Bauer (R)
TB/Archer (R)
BOS/Porcello (R)
CHI/Covey (R)
MIN/Mejia (L)
HOU/Keuchel (L)
OAK/Graveman (R)
TEX/Perez (L)
SEA/Hernandez (R)
R
0
0
0
2
2
1
1
0
0
0
3
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
9
COLORADO
3
SAN FRANCISCO 1
Paul Sancya Associated Press
W-L
1-0
1-1
0-1
1-0
1-0
1-0
1-0
1-0
0-0
1-1
1-1
0-0
1-1
2-0
AB
5
3
8
6
7
7
7
2
4
1
6
1
0
1
0
0
2
0
2
62
6-2
Thursday’s results
Texas 8, at ANGELS 3
Minnesota 11, at Detroit 5
at Boston 4, Pittsburgh 3
Chicago 10, at Cleveland 4
at New York 3, Tampa Bay 2
Baltimore 2, at Toronto 1
at Kansas City 3, Oakland 1
MATCHUP
ARI/Greinke (R)
Dodgers/Kershaw (L)
PIT/Cole (R)
CHI/Hendricks (R)
PHI/Nola (R)
WAS/Strasburg (R)
NY/Syndergaard (R)
MIA/Conley (L)
MIL/Milone (L)
CIN/Feldman (R)
SD/Chacin (R)
ATL/Teheran (R)
COL/Anderson (L)
SF/Cueto (R)
9
8
Travis d’Arnaud hit a 16th-inning home
run to lift New York. He also had a
three-run triple, and Yoenis Cespedes
homered twice. Miami’s Marcell Ozuna
hit a grand slam in the first inning.
6-3
Boston
NEW YORK
MIAMI
Ryan Braun and Eric Thames homered,
Jimmy Nelson allowed a run in seven
innings in his second strong start in a
row, and Milwaukee ended Cincinnati’s four-game winning streak.
5-5
6
W
Pct.
Streak
Lost 1 This month
Home
3-1 Road
Division
4-3 Interleague
Next: Tonight vs. Arizona, Dodger Stadium, 7
TV/Radio: SportsNet LA/570, 1020
TEXAS
ANGELS
6-4
1
Detroit
East
L
4
0
Player
G
AB
R
H
Avg.
AGarcia ChW ......................8
31
6
14 .452
Castillo Bal ........................7
26
3
10 .385
Headley NYY.......................9
32
9
12 .375
Mazara Tex .........................9
38
9
14 .368
Escobar ANGELS ...............10
41
9
15 .366
Andrus Tex .........................9
34
8
12 .353
Cain KC.............................9
29
3
10 .345
Simmons ANGELS .............10
35
5
12 .343
SCastro NYY .......................9
36
4
12 .333
CDavis Bal .........................8
30
5
10 .333
Trout ANGELS ...................10
36
6
12 .333
Home Runs
Springer, Houston............................................................... 5
KDavis, Oakland ................................................................ 4
Lindor, Cleveland................................................................ 4
Perez, Kansas City .............................................................. 4
Runs Batted In
Espinosa, ANGELS............................................................ 12
Mazara, Texas .................................................................. 11
Sano, Minnesota.............................................................. 11
Pitching
Givens, Baltimore.............................................................2-0
Barnes, Boston ............................................................... 2-0
Vargas, Kansas City ......................................................... 2-0
Hughes, Minnesota.......................................................... 2-0
ESantana, Minnesota....................................................... 2-0
J.Ramirez, ANGELS .......................................................... 2-0
Bailey, ANGELS ............................................................... 2-0
Triggs, Oakland ............................................................... 2-0
Graveman, Oakland ......................................................... 2-0
Peacock, Houston ........................................................... 2-0
Givens, Baltimore ............................................................ 2-0
T H E F O RC E I S S T RO NG W I T H T H I S O N E
Detroit Tigers shortstop Jose Iglesias stretches for the throw from second baseman Andrew
Romine and gets the out as Minnesota’s Max Kepler slides into the bag. The Twins took a 3-2
lead in the inning and went on to an 11-5 victory at Comerica Park.
RED SOX
PIRATES
4
3
WHITE SOX
INDIANS
10
4
YANKEES
RAYS
3
2
Tim Anderson homered on the game's
first pitch, Matt Davidson added a
three-run shot in a five-run first and
Chicago sent the defending AL champions to their fifth loss in six games.
Aaron Hicks hit two home runs, the
second a two-run go-ahead drive in the
seventh inning, and New York completed a three-game sweep to move
above .500 with its fourth win in a row.
Pittsburgh AB R H BI Avg. Boston
AB
Mercer ss
4 1 1 0 .206 Pedroia 2b
3
Marte cf
3 0 0 0 .270 Bnntndi cf
4
MCtchn rf
4 1 1 2 .250 Betts rf
3
Polanco lf
4 1 2 0 .273 Ramirez dh 4
Freese dh
1 0 1 0 .381 Moreland 1b 3
Harrison 3b 4 0 0 0 .259 Bogaerts ss 4
Bell 1b
3 0 0 0 .143 Herndz 3b
4
Jaso 1b
1 0 0 0 .000 Vazquez c
3
Gosselin 2b 3 0 0 0 .000 Holt lf
3
a-Frazier
1 0 1 0 .269 Young lf
0
Stewart c
3 0 1 0 .333 Totals
31
b-Cervelli
1 0 0 0 .185
Totals
32 3 7 2
Chicago AB R H BI Avg. Cleveland
Adrsn ss 6 2 1 1 .167 Santana 1b
Cabra lf
4 2 2 0 .258 Lindor ss
Abreu 1b 4 2 2 1 .250 Brantley lf
Asche dh 5 1 1 1 .100 Ecrncn dh
AGrcia rf 4 1 3 3 .452 Ramirez 2b
Dvdsn 3b 5 1 1 3 .333 Chsnhll cf
Snchz 2b 5 1 1 0 .222 Diaz 3b
Narvz c
4 0 2 1 .167 Almonte rf
LGrca cf 5 0 2 0 .250 Gomes c
Totals
42 10 15 10
Totals
Tampa Bay
Dickerson dh
Kiermaier cf
Longoria 3b
Miller 2b
Souza Jr. rf
Morrison 1b
Robertson ss
Smith lf
Bourjos lf
Sucre c
Totals
Pittsburgh
Boston
H
0
1
1
1
1
2
1
0
0
0
7
200 001 000 —3
010 000 03x —4
BI
0
0
0
2
0
1
1
0
0
0
4
Avg.
.278
.235
.174
.300
.324
.333
.263
.625
.091
.286
Chicago
Cleveland
7
7
1
1
a-singled for Gosselin in the 9th. b-flied out for Stewart in the 9th.
Walks—Pittsburgh 5: Mercer 1, Marte 1, Freese 3. Boston 3:
Pedroia 1, Betts 1, Moreland 1 Strikeouts—Pittsburgh 10: Mercer 1,
Marte 2, McCutchen 2, Polanco 1, Harrison 2, Bell 1, Stewart 1.
Boston 7: Pedroia 1, Benintendi 1, Ramirez 1, Moreland 1, Hernandez
1, Vazquez 1, Holt 1. E—Gosselin (1), Vazquez (1). LOB—Pittsburgh 7,
Boston 6. 2B—Polanco (2), Stewart (1), Ramirez (2), Moreland (8),
Hernandez (1). HR—McCutchen (1), off Rodriguez.
RBIs—McCutchen 2 (3), Ramirez 2 (2), Bogaerts (3), Hernandez
(2). SB—Polanco (3). CS—Marte (2), Frazier (2). RISP—Pittsburgh 1
for 7; Boston 3 for 7. Runners moved up—Vazquez.
Pittsburgh
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Kuhl .........................61⁄3 5 1 1 0 6
92 2.38
Rivero H, 3 ..................2⁄3 0 0 0 0 0
8 1.50
Hudson H, 3 ................1⁄3 0 2 1 1 0
14 5.40
Nicasio L, 0-2 ..............2⁄3 2 1 1 2 1
19 3.86
Boston
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Rodriguez ..................51⁄3 4 3 2 4 8
107 5.23
Hembree ...................12⁄3 2 0 0 0 2
23 3.60
Barnes W, 2-0 ..............1 0 0 0 1 0
13 0.00
Kimbrel S, 3-3..............1 1 0 0 0 0
16 2.25
Inherited runners-scored—Rivero 1-0, Nicasio 2-4, Hembree
2-1.
U—Gabe Morales, Gary Cederstrom, Eric Cooper, Adrian Johnson.
T—3:15. Tickets sold—32,400 (37,499).
ORIOLES
BLUE JAYS
AB
5
4
5
3
4
5
3
4
4
37
R
0
1
1
0
1
0
0
0
1
4
H
0
1
2
0
3
1
2
2
1
12
520 000 030 —10
100 020 010 — 4
BI
0
0
1
0
1
1
0
0
1
4
Avg.
.205
.324
.241
.156
.250
.200
.242
.313
.091
15
12
0
0
Walks—Chicago 4: Cabrera 1, Abreu 1, A.Garcia 1, Narvaez 1.
Cleveland 4: Lindor 1, Encarnacion 2, Diaz 1. Strikeouts—Chicago 7:
Anderson 1, Abreu 1, Davidson 3, Sanchez 1, L.Garcia 1. Cleveland 9:
Santana 3, Lindor 2, Brantley 2, Encarnacion 1, Gomes 1.
LOB—Chicago 9, Cleveland 11. 2B—Cabrera (4), Sanchez (1),
L.Garcia (2), Brantley (2), Chisenhall (1). HR—Anderson (1), off
Tomlin; Davidson (2), off Tomlin; Brantley (1), off Gonzalez; Gomes
(1), off Jennings. RBIs—Anderson (2), Abreu (4), Asche (1), A.Garcia
3 (8), Davidson 3 (8), Narvaez (1), Brantley (6), Ramirez (6),
Chisenhall (1), Gomes (1). SF—Ramirez. DP—Chicago 1 (Sanchez,
Anderson, Abreu).
Chicago
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Gonzalez ...................42⁄3 8 3 3 4 5
101 4.22
Swarzak W, 1-0 ..........12⁄3 1 0 0 0 0
25 0.00
Jennings....................12⁄3 2 1 1 0 2
29 2.45
Kahnle ........................1 1 0 0 0 2
17 2.45
Cleveland
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Tomlin L, 0-2 .............12⁄3 8 7 7 1 0
42 18.47
Armstrong .................21⁄3 1 0 0 2 5
49 8.44
Logan .........................1 0 0 0 0 0
13 3.38
McAllister ....................2 2 2 2 1 2
25 3.38
Otero ..........................1 3 1 1 0 0
15 6.23
Martinez ......................1 1 0 0 0 0
12 0.00
McAllister pitched to 3 batters in the 8th.
Inherited runners-scored—Swarzak 2-0, Armstrong 1-0, Otero
2-0. PB—Narvaez (2), Gomes (1).
U—Tim Timmons, James Hoye, Will Little, Jeff Kellogg. T—3:32.
Tickets sold—15,060 (38,000).
2
1
ROYALS
OAKLAND
AB
4
4
4
4
4
3
4
1
3
2
33
R
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
1
0
2
H
2
0
1
0
0
1
0
1
1
1
7
BI
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
2
Avg.
.324
.237
.222
.143
.306
.323
.235
.273
.200
.333
Tampa Bay
New York
New York
AB R H BI Avg.
Ellsbury cf
3 1 0 0 .290
Hicks lf
3 2 2 3 .313
Holliday dh 3 0 0 0 .276
Castro 2b
3 0 1 0 .333
Headley 3b 4 0 1 0 .375
Bird 1b
4 0 0 0 .050
Judge rf
3 0 0 0 .276
Romine c
3 0 2 0 .250
Torreyes ss
3 0 1 0 .250
Totals
29 3 7 3
010 010 000 —2
100 000 20x —3
7
7
0
0
Walks—Tampa Bay 2: Morrison 1, Sucre 1. New York 5: Ellsbury 1,
Hicks 1, Holliday 1, Castro 1, Judge 1.
Strikeouts—Tampa Bay 15: Kiermaier 3, Longoria 2, Miller 3,
Souza Jr. 3, Morrison 1, Robertson 3. New York 7: Ellsbury 1, Castro 1,
Headley 1, Bird 3, Judge 1.
LOB—Tampa Bay 6, New York 7. 2B—Castro (1), Romine (1).
HR—Bourjos (1), off Severino; Hicks (1), off Andriese; Hicks (2), off
Cedeno. RBIs—Sucre (4), Bourjos (2), Hicks 3 (5).
Runners left in scoring position—Tampa Bay 1 (Miller); New York
5 (Castro 2, Judge, Torreyes 2). RISP—Tampa Bay 1 for 4; New York 0
for 8.
Runners moved up—Torreyes, Ellsbury. GIDP—Hicks.
DP—Tampa Bay 1 (Miller, Robertson, Morrison).
Tampa Bay
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Andriese......................6 5 1 1 3 5
99 4.50
Ramirez H, 2................1⁄3 1 1 1 0 0
4 4.76
Cedeno L, 1-1..............1⁄3 1 1 1 0 0
4 9.00
Hunter ........................1⁄3 0 0 0 0 0
6 0.00
Farquhar......................1 0 0 0 2 2
20 1.59
New York
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Severino W, 1-0............7 5 2 2 1 11
104 4.50
Betances H, 1 ..............1 1 0 0 1 2
22 2.70
Chapman S, 2-2 ...........1 1 0 0 0 2
20 0.00
Inherited runners-scored—Cedeno 1-0. WP—Andriese,
Farquhar.
U—Todd Tichenor, Adam Hamari, Bill Miller, Kerwin Danley.
T—2:59. Tickets sold—34,772 (49,642).
3
1
TWINS
TIGERS
11
5
Closer Zach Britton escaped a nervy
ninth inning for his fourth save and
Baltimore handed Toronto its sixth
consecutive loss, part of a franchiseworst 1-8 start for the Blue Jays.
Jason Vargas carried a shutout into the
eighth inning and Kansas City finally
broke through against Oakland, avoiding a sweep and ending an eight-game
losing streak against the Athletics.
Max Kepler, Miguel Sano and Robbie
Grossman hit home runs for Minnesota, which took advantage of an
uncharacteristically wild outing by
Tigers starter Jordan Zimmermann.
Baltimore
Gentry lf
Jones cf
Machado 3b
Trumbo rf
S.Smith rf
Davis 1b
Castillo c
Mancini dh
Schoop 2b
Hardy ss
Totals
Oakland
AB R H BI Avg.
Semien ss
4 0 0 0 .152
R.Davis cf
3 1 1 1 .216
Lowrie dh
4 0 2 0 .286
K.Davis lf
4 0 0 0 .316
Healy 1b
4 0 1 0 .200
Plouffe 3b
4 0 1 0 .188
Canha rf
3 0 0 0 .067
Vogt c
3 0 0 0 .258
Rosales 2b 3 0 1 0 .429
Totals
32 1 6 1
Kansas City AB R H BI Avg.
Gordon lf
4 1 1 0 .189
Mstakas 3b 3 1 1 0 .294
Cain cf
3 1 2 1 .345
Hosmer 1b
3 0 0 0 .171
Perez c
4 0 1 1 .286
Moss dh
3 0 0 1 .043
Orlando rf
4 0 1 0 .143
Escobar ss
4 0 2 0 .219
Mondesi 2b 3 0 0 0 .148
Totals
31 3 8 3
Oakland
Kansas City
000 000 001 —1
201 000 00x —3
Minn.
Dozier 2b
Sntna 2b
Grsmn dh
Mauer 1b
Sano 3b
Kepler rf
Plnco ss
Gimnz c
Rosrio lf
Buxton cf
Totals
Baltimore
Toronto
AB
4
4
3
4
0
4
4
2
3
3
31
R
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
1
0
2
H
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
2
1
5
BI
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
2
Avg.
.000
.250
.179
.219
.278
.333
.385
.294
.231
.192
Toronto
Carrera lf
Bautista rf
Dnldsn dh
1-S’mcha dh
Morales 1b
Tulowitzki ss
Martin c
Pillar cf
Barney 3b
a-Smoak
Goins 3b
b-Pearce
Travis 2b
Totals
AB
4
4
3
1
2
4
3
4
2
1
0
1
3
32
R
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
000 020 000 —2
000 001 000 —1
H
0
1
1
0
0
2
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
6
BI
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
Avg.
.188
.152
.310
.167
.235
.212
.042
.242
.375
.208
.000
.174
.088
5
6
0
0
a-grounded out for Barney in the 7th. b-lined out for Goins in the
9th. 1-ran for Donaldson in the 6th.
Walks—Baltimore 2: Machado 1, Mancini 1. Toronto 3: Morales 2,
Martin 1. Strikeouts—Baltimore 15: Gentry 3, Jones 1, Machado 1,
Trumbo 1, Davis 4, Castillo 2, Mancini 1, Schoop 1, Hardy 1. Toronto
6: Carrera 1, 1-Saltalamacchia 1, Tulowitzki 1, Martin 1, Pillar 2.
LOB—Baltimore 4, Toronto 7. 2B—Schoop 2 (2), Bautista (2),
Donaldson (2), Pillar (1). RBIs—Schoop (4), Hardy (2), Donaldson
(4). Runners left in scoring position—Baltimore 1 (Gentry); Toronto
4 (Carrera, Martin, Pearce 2). RISP—Baltimore 2 for 4; Toronto 1 for
8. DP—Baltimore 1 (Hardy, Schoop, Davis).
Baltimore
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Gausman W, 1-0 ..........6 5 1 1 2 3
97 3.94
O’Day H, 1...................1 0 0 0 0 1
11 12.27
Brach H, 4...................1 0 0 0 0 2
15 0.00
Britton S, 4-4 ...............1 1 0 0 1 0
18 0.00
Toronto
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Liriano L, 0-1 .............62⁄3 5 2 2 2 10
91 9.00
Biagini ......................11⁄3 0 0 0 0 2
17 1.17
J.Smith........................1 0 0 0 0 3
12 1.80
Inherited runners-scored—Biagini 1-0. WP—Britton.
U—Lance Barrett, Dale Scott, Jim Reynolds, Brian Knight.
T—2:45. Tickets sold—32,957 (49,282).
6
8
2
1
Walks—Oakland 1: R.Davis 1. Kansas City 3: Moustakas 1, Cain 1,
Hosmer 1.
Strikeouts—Oakland 8: Semien 1, R.Davis 1, K.Davis 1, Healy 2,
Plouffe 1, Canha 1, Vogt 1. Kansas City 8: Gordon 2, Hosmer 1, Perez
1, Moss 1, Orlando 2, Mondesi 1.
E—Hahn (1), Canha (2), Escobar (1). LOB—Oakland 5, Kansas
City 9. 2B—Lowrie (3), Rosales (1). HR—R.Davis (1), off Herrera.
RBIs—R.Davis (6), Cain (3), Perez (5), Moss (2). SB—Cain (4),
Mondesi (4). SF—Moss. S—Mondesi.
Runners left in scoring position—Oakland 2 (Lowrie, Plouffe);
Kansas City 4 (Moustakas, Cain, Orlando, Mondesi). RISP—Oakland
0 for 5; Kansas City 2 for 10. GIDP—K.Davis, Plouffe, Perez.
DP—Oakland 1 (Plouffe, Rosales, Healy); Kansas City 2 (Escobar,
Mondesi, Hosmer), (Vargas, Mondesi, Hosmer).
Oakland
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Hahn L, 0-1 .................6 6 3 3 2 7
98 3.75
Coulombe....................1 0 0 0 1 0
22 4.50
Madson.......................1 2 0 0 0 1
13 0.00
Kansas City
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
2
Vargas W, 2-0 ............7 ⁄3 4 0 0 1 8
98 0.66
Soria H, 1 ...................1⁄3 0 0 0 0 0
5 0.00
Herrera S, 1-2 ..............1 2 1 1 0 0
27 6.00
Inherited runners-scored—Soria 1-0.
U—Mark Wegner, Clint Fagan, Chris Guccione, Dana DeMuth.
T—2:39. Tickets sold—22,160 (37,903).
Minnesota
Detroit
AB
5
0
3
5
2
4
5
3
5
5
37
R
1
0
3
1
2
2
1
0
0
1
11
H
2
0
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
11
BI
0
0
2
1
3
3
0
1
1
0
11
Avg.
.243
.100
.286
.214
.310
.258
.267
.333
.156
.088
Detroit
Rmine 2b
Cstlans 3b
Cabrera 1b
Machado 2b
Martinez dh
a-Avila dh
Upton lf
Mahtook lf
Collins rf
McCann c
Jones cf
Iglesias ss
Totals
AB
5
5
2
1
3
1
3
1
3
4
3
4
35
R
0
0
2
0
0
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
5
002 135 000 —11
110 002 001 — 5
H
0
0
1
0
0
1
1
0
1
0
2
3
9
AB
4
3
3
4
4
4
4
4
1
2
1
34
R
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
3
Colorado
San Francisco
Boston’s Xander Bogaerts singled in
the go-ahead run in the eighth inning,
shortly after Hanley Ramirez tied the
score with a two-run double. Andrew
McCutchen homered for Pittsburgh.
R
1
1
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
4
Colorado
Blackmon cf
LeMahieu 2b
Arenado 3b
Gonzalez rf
Reynolds 1b
Story ss
Cardullo lf
Garneau c
Gray p
Rusin p
c-Adames
Totals
BI
0
0
1
0
0
0
2
0
0
0
0
2
5
Avg.
.375
.222
.133
.000
.207
.600
.182
.071
.350
.167
.238
.179
11
9
0
0
a-singled for Martinez in the 8th.
Walks—Minnesota 8: Grossman 2, Sano 3, Kepler 1, Gimenez 2.
Detroit 3: Cabrera 1, Collins 1, Jones 1. Strikeouts—Minnesota 5:
Dozier 1, Sano 1, Gimenez 1, Buxton 2. Detroit 11: Romine 1,
Castellanos 1, Machado 1, Martinez 2, Upton 1, Collins 1, McCann 2,
Jones 1, Iglesias 1. LOB—Minnesota 7, Detroit 6. 2B—Kepler (2),
Iglesias (2). 3B—Jones (1). HR—Grossman (1), off Zimmermann;
Kepler (1), off Sanchez; Sano (3), off Sanchez; Cabrera (1), off
Hughes; Upton (1), off Hughes. RBIs—Grossman 2 (3), Mauer (5),
Sano 3 (11), Kepler 3 (4), Gimenez (2), Rosario (3), Cabrera (1),
Upton 2 (3), Iglesias 2 (4). SB—Dozier (4), Buxton (1). CS—Jones
(1). DP—Minnesota 1 (Gimenez, Dozier).
Minnesota
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Hughes W, 2-0 ...........52⁄3 5 4 4 3 5
97 3.86
Haley S, 1-1 ..............31⁄3 4 1 1 0 6
70 4.50
Detroit
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Zimmermann L, 1-1 ....42⁄3 4 5 5 5 3
99 5.06
Sanchez....................11⁄3 7 6 6 2 1
35 10.50
Greene........................2 0 0 0 1 0
29 2.70
Jimenez.......................1 0 0 0 0 1
13 0.00
Inherited runners-scored—Haley 1-0, Sanchez 2-2.
WP—Zimmermann, Sanchez.
U—Jerry Meals, Ron Kulpa, Ed Hickox, Chris Conroy. T—3:31.
Tickets sold—22,573 (41,681).
H
0
2
1
1
1
1
0
0
0
1
0
7
BI
0
0
0
0
1
2
0
0
0
0
0
3
Avg.
.233
.211
.308
.205
.306
.143
.000
.167
.000
.500
.000
San Fran.
Span cf
Panik 2b
Belt 1b
Pence rf
Gillaspie 3b
Nunez ss
Parker lf
Federowicz c
a-Crawford
Bumgarner p
b-Hundley c
Totals
AB
4
3
4
4
3
3
3
1
1
2
1
29
R
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
000 201 000 —3
000 000 100 —1
H
1
1
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
5
BI
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
Avg.
.259
.344
.190
.302
.300
.359
.150
.000
.306
.286
.294
7
5
0
0
a-grounded out for Federowicz in the 8th. b-struck out for Ramirez
in the 8th. c-lined out for Dunn in the 9th.
Walks—Colorado 2: LeMahieu 1, Arenado 1. San Francisco 3:
Panik 1, Gillaspie 1, Federowicz 1. Strikeouts—Colorado 10:
Blackmon 1, Gonzalez 1, Reynolds 1, Story 2, Cardullo 1, Garneau 3,
Gray 1. San Francisco 5: Pence 2, Parker 2, Hundley 1.
LOB—Colorado 6, San Francisco 5. HR—Story (1), off Bumgarner.
RBIs—Reynolds (11), Story 2 (2), Nunez (3). SB—LeMahieu (1).
SF—Nunez. Runners left in scoring position—Colorado 3 (Arenado,
Reynolds, Cardullo). RISP—Colorado 1 for 7; San Francisco 0 for 1.
Runners moved up—Gonzalez, Nunez. GIDP—Panik, Nunez.
DP—Colorado 2 (Arenado, LeMahieu, Reynolds), (LeMahieu, Story,
Reynolds).
Colorado
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Gray ...........................3 1 0 0 2 1
34 4.38
Rusin W, 1-0..............31⁄3 2 1 1 0 2
37 1.69
Ottavino H, 5 .............11⁄3 0 0 0 0 2
19 1.50
Dunn H, 3 ...................1⁄3 0 0 0 0 0
3 0.00
Holland S, 6-6..............1 2 0 0 1 0
19 0.00
San Francisco
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Bumgarner L, 0-2..........6 6 3 3 1 8
101 3.43
Ramirez.......................2 1 0 0 1 1
37 5.06
Blach..........................1 0 0 0 0 1
8 9.00
Gray pitched to 1 batter in the 4th.
Inherited runners-scored—Rusin 1-0, Ottavino 2-1.
U—Jordan Baker, Mike Everitt, Bill Welke, Bruce Dreckman.
T—2:50. Tickets sold—41,915 (41,915).
NOTES
Kaprielian to
have surgery,
out until 2018
associated press
James Kaprielian, the New
York Yankees’ top pitching
prospect, will have Tommy John
surgery next week and be sidelined
until 2018.
The team said Dr. Neal ElAttrache will operate Tuesday on the
23-year-old right-hander out of
UCLA, who was taken with the16th
overall pick in the 2015 amateur
draft.
Kaprielian’s 2016 season was cut
short in April after his third start
at Class-A Tampa because of a
strained right flexor tendon. He returned to pitch in the Arizona Fall
League and went 2-3 with a 4.33
ERA in seven starts, striking out 26
in 27 innings.
He was limited to one major
league spring-training appearance, striking out three in two
scoreless innings against Toronto
on March 16, then was assigned to
Class-A Tampa again for the start
of this season.
The team said he felt right elbow pain on April 6 and put him on
a minor league disabled list. He
then had scans and was examined
by team physician Dr. Christopher
Ahmad.
Etc.
Cleveland Indians second baseman Jason Kipnis, who is on the10day disabled list with a sore right
shoulder, bruised his left hand
when he was hit by a pitch in a minor league game. Indians manager
Terry Francona said X-rays were
negative and it’s hoped Kipnis can
continue his rehabilitation assignment Saturday. ... The Chicago
White Sox placed catcher Geovany
Soto on the 10-day DL because of
an inflamed right elbow.
L AT I M E S . CO M / S P ORTS
S
FR IDAY , A P RI L 14 , 2 017
D5
STANLEY CUP PLAYOFFS
ROUNDUP
NHL PLAYOFF SCHEDULE
FIRST ROUND
WESTERN CONFERENCE
1 Chicago vs. 4 Nashville
EASTERN CONFERENCE
1 Washington vs. 4 Toronto
Gm 1
Gm 2
Gm 3
Gm 4
Gm 5
Gm 6
Gm 7
Gm 1
Gm 2
Gm 3
Gm 4
Gm 5
Gm 6
Gm 7
Predators lead series, 1-0
Nashville 1, Chicago 0
Saturday at Chicago, 5
Monday at Nashville, 6:30
Thurs. at Nashville, TBD
April 22 at Chicago, TBD*
April 24 at Nashville, TBD*
April 26 at Chicago, TBD*
Capitals lead series, 1-0
Wash. 3, Toronto 2 (OT)
Saturday at Washington, 4
Monday at Toronto, 4
Wednesday at Toronto, 4
April 21 at Wash., TBD*
April 23 at Toronto, TBD*
April 25 at Wash., TBD*
2 Minnesota vs. 3 St. Louis
Blues lead series, 1-0
2 Pittsburgh vs. 3 Columbus
Penguins lead series, 1-0
Gm 1
Gm 2
Gm 3
Gm 4
Gm 5
Gm 6
Gm 7
Gm 1
Gm 2
Gm 3
Gm 4
Gm 5
Gm 6
Gm 7
St. Louis 2, Minn. 1 (OT)
Today at Minnesota, 5
Sunday at St. Louis, noon
Wed. at St. Louis, 6:30
April 22 at Minn., TBD*
April 24 at St. Louis, TBD*
April 26 at Minn., TBD*
Pittsburgh 3, Columbus 1
Today at Pittsburgh, 4
Sunday at Columbus, 3
Tuesday at Columbus, 4:30
Thurs. at Pitt., TBD*
April 23 at Columbus, TBD*
April 25 at Pitt., TBD*
1 DUCKS vs. 4 Calgary
Ducks lead series, 1-0
1 Montreal vs. 4 N.Y. Rangers
Rangers lead series, 1-0
Gm 1
Gm 2
Gm 3
Gm 4
Gm 5
Gm 6
Gm 7
Gm 1
Gm 2
Gm 3
Gm 4
Gm 5
Gm 6
Gm 7
DUCKS 3, Calgary 2
Saturday at DUCKS, 7:30
Monday at Calgary, 7
Wednesday at Calgary, 7
April 21 at DUCKS, TBD*
April 23 at Calgary, TBD*
April 25 at DUCKS, TBD*
New York 2, Montreal 0
Today at Montreal, 4
Sunday at New York, 4
Tuesday at New York, 4
Thurs. at Montreal, TBD*
April 22 at New York, TBD*
April 24 at Montreal, TBD*
2 Edmonton vs. 3 San Jose
Sharks lead series, 1-0
2 Ottawa vs. 3 Boston
Bruins lead series, 1-0
Gm 1
Gm 2
Gm 3
Gm 4
Gm 5
Gm 6
Gm 7
Gm 1
Gm 2
Gm 3
Gm 4
Gm 5
Gm 6
Gm 7
San Jose 3, Edmon. 2 (OT)
Today at Edmonton, 7:30
Sunday at San Jose, 7
Tuesday at San Jose, 7
Thurs. at Edmon., TBD*
April 22 at San Jose, TBD*
April 24 at Edmonton, TBD*
* Games 5-7 if necessary
Boston 2, Ottawa 1
Saturday at Ottawa, noon
Monday at Boston, 4
Wednesday at Boston, 4:30
April 21 at Ottawa, TBD*
April 23 at Boston, TBD*
April 25 at Ottawa, TBD*
All times PDT, p.m.
Capitals rally for OT victory
associated press
SUMMARIES
Toronto native Tom Wilson scored his first NHL
playoff goal 5:15 into overtime and the Washington
Capitals survived a scare to
beat the Maple Leafs 3-2 on
Thursday night in Game 1 of
their first-round series.
The top-seeded Capitals
came back from a two-goal
deficit to take the early lead
in the series and at least momentarily stop the panic
about a slip-up. Justin
Williams scored twice in
regulation, and Washington
showed it could handle the
adversity of falling behind.
Braden Holtby was up to
the task in goal, stopping 35
of the 37 shots he faced. Toronto counterpart Frederik
Andersen was arguably the
best player on the ice with 41
saves before being beaten by
Wilson with an absurd shot
on the winner.
Mitch Marner and Jake
Gardiner scored in the first
period for Toronto, back in
the playoffs for the first time
since 2013.
Game 2 is Saturday night
in Washington.
The Maple Leafs lost
when leading by multiple
goals again after doing so an
Predators 1, Blackhawks 0
Nashville..................................1
Chicago ...................................0
0
0
0 — 1
0 — 0
FIRST PERIOD: 1. Nsh., Arvidsson 1 (Forsberg, Johansen),
7:52. Penalty—Hartman, CHI, (interference), 9:48.
SECOND PERIOD: Scoring—None. Penalty—Johansen,
NSH, (delay of game), 0:09.
THIRD PERIOD: Scoring—None. Penalty—Arvidsson,
NSH, (tripping), 11:52.
SHOTS ON GOAL: Nsh. 11-4-5—20. Chi. 6-12-11—29.
Power-play conversions—Nsh. 0 of 1. Chi. 0 of 2.
GOALIES: Nsh., Rinne 1-0-0 (29 shots-29 saves). Chi.,
Crawford 0-1-0 (20-19). Att—22,075 (19,717). T—2:27.
Capitals 3, Maple Leafs 2, OT
Toronto.............................2
Washington .......................1
Molly Riley Associated Press
TOM WILSON (43) of the Capitals celebrates his
0
1
0
0
0 — 2
1 — 3
FIRST PERIOD: 1. Tor., Marner 1 (Van riemsdyk, Bozak),
1:35. 2. Tor., Gardiner 1, 9:44. 3. Was., Williams 1 (Oshie,
Shattenkirk), 12:24 (pp). Penalties—Eller, WSH, (cross
checking), 4:34. Boyle, TOR, (interference), 10:22. Hyman,
TOR, (tripping), 10:52.
SECOND PERIOD: 4. Was., Williams 2 (Kuznetsov, Niskanen), 16:00. Penalties—Martin, TOR, (cross checking),
17:34.
THIRD PERIOD: Scoring—None. Penalties—None.
OVERTIME: 5. Was., Wilson 1, 5:15. Penalties—None.
SHOTS ON GOAL: Tor. 15-13-7-2—37. Was. 12-13-13-6—
44. Power-play conversions—Tor. 0 of 1. Was. 1 of 3.
GOALIES: Tor., Andersen 0-0-1 (44 shots-41 saves).
Was., Holtby 1-0-0 (37-35). Att—18,506 (18,506). T—3:2.
overtime goal with Jay Beagle and Daniel Winnik.
NHL-high eight times during the regular season.
Nashville 1, at Chicago 0:
Pekka Rinne made 29 saves,
Viktor Arvidsson scored in
the first period and the
Predators beat the Blackhawks in Game 1 of their
first-round playoff series.
Rinne’s second career
postseason shutout sent
Nashville to only its second
playoff win in Chicago in seven tries. The Predators did
not have a 1-0 victory during
the regular season.
Game 2 is Saturday night
at the United Center.
Corey Crawford had 19
saves for Chicago, which got
center Artem Anisimov
back from a leg injury that
sidelined him for the last
part of the season, but struggled to find many good looks
against the Predators.
Ducks maintain
their composure
Photographs by
Wally Skalij Los Angeles Times
EVEN WITH a broken stick flying his way, Ducks goalie John Gibson is able to maintain his concentration.
Ducks score twice on the power play
[Ducks, from D1]
home games against Calgary, dating to the 2006 playoffs.
That was put in Calgary’s
face with the “You can’t win
here!” chants, and Getzlaf
had the exclamation point
with a hit on Flames captain
Mark Giordano toward the
end.
“We’re going to have earn
everything. That’s a great
hockey team over there,”
Getzlaf. “We’re going to have
to continue to get better in
certain areas, but we found a
way to win tonight.”
Silfverberg’s wrist shot
from the left circle with 2
minutes 13 seconds to go in
the second period was the
game-winning goal and the
Ducks’ second power-play
goal of the game.
Rakell’s goal only tied it,
2-2, but it effectively swayed
the game back toward the
Ducks. Calgary made an illtimed line change that allowed Kevin Bieksa to spring
Getzlaf with a 150-foot pass
to lead a partial three-onnone. Rakell put in Getzlaf ’s
rebound, and it was back on
for the Ducks.
Calgary was up, 2-1, on a
whip-around pass by Kris
Versteeg that Sam Bennett
flicked
home
midway
through the second period,
and for a brief window it
looked like the streak could
see its demise.
The building took on
twice as much energy as a
regular-season game, with a
we got one win tonight and
we’re ready to move on to the
next one.”
Said Bieksa: “I thought
we looked comfortable from
start to finish. There was a
little period there in the second where they had some
momentum in [our] end, but
I thought we got through
that pretty well, and we were
in control.”
There was some question
as to how Ducks goalie John
Gibson would respond, back
under the postseason lights.
The 23-year-old got better as
the game went on. He finished with 30 saves and
helped kill off a two-man advantage by Calgary in the final minutes.
“I don't think it was my
best [game] tonight, but I
got better as the game went
on,” Gibson said. “The guys
helped me out in front.”
sports@latimes.com
DUCKS 3, FLAMES 2
COREY PERRY of the Ducks tries to deflect a shot
Calgary....................................1
DUCKS ....................................1
sea of orange towels waving
on the Ducks, who hung 16
numbered banners to represent the 16 wins needed to
win the Stanley Cup.
Calgary tamed some of
that enthusiasm with a
power-play goal in a specialteams heavy opening period
that ended in a 1-1 tie. Sean
Monahan redirected Versteeg’s shot after a keep-in
FIRST PERIOD: 1. DUCKS, Getzlaf 1 (Theodore, Silfverberg),
0:52 (pp). 2. Cal., Monahan 1 (Brodie, Versteeg), 8:43 (pp).
Penalties—Hamilton, CGY, (tripping), 0:47. Kase, DUCKS,
(slashing), 8:08. Bennett, CGY, (holding), 13:02. Engelland,
CGY, (tripping), 14:42. Silfverberg, DUCKS, (hooking), 17:13.
SECOND PERIOD: 3. Cal., Bennett 1 (Versteeg, Hamilton),
9:46. 4. DUCKS, Rakell 1 (Bieksa, Getzlaf), 13:53. 5. DUCKS,
Silfverberg 1 (Theodore, Eaves), 17:47 (pp).
Penalties—Hamilton, CGY, (tripping), 14:18. Bouma, CGY,
(interference), 16:21.
THIRD PERIOD: Scoring—None. Penalties—Versteeg, CGY,
(slashing), 7:49. Hamilton, CGY, (cross checking), 14:11.
Kesler, DUCKS, (interference), 16:53. Shaw, DUCKS, (high
sticking), 17:40. Kesler, DUCKS, (delay of game), 19:59.
SHOTS ON GOAL: Cal. 9-11-12—32. DUCKS 17-13-11—41.
Power-play conversions—Cal. 1 of 5. DUCKS 2 of 7.
GOALIES: Cal., Elliott 0-1-0 (41 shots-38 saves). DUCKS,
Gibson 1-0-0 (32-30). Att—17,174 (17,174). T—2:45.
past Flames goalie Brian Elliott in the first period.
by TJ Brodie.
The Ducks and their fans
were buzzing from a powerplay goal by Getzlaf 52 seconds into the game. His slap
shot from the left side went
in off Flames defenseman
Deryk Engelland.
“We talk about home ice
and battling for it. It’s only
home ice if you use it,” Getzlaf said. “Other than that,
1
2
0 — 2
0 — 3
[Elliott, from D1]
and played the way we
wanted to. I thought we did a
good job doing that.”
That composure fueled
an 11-0-3 surge that carried
them to their fifth straight
Pacific Division title. On
Thursday, Getzlaf — the
team’s captain — made sure
their success carried over
into the first game of their
opening-round playoff series
against the Calgary Flames.
Getzlaf scored the Ducks’
first goal, set up the second
with a shot that was rebounded by teammate
Rickard Rakell, and kept the
puck in the zone on the
power play that led to Jakob
Silfverberg’s winner in the
Ducks’ 3-2 victory over the
Flames. If that weren’t
enough, he leveled Calgary
defenseman Mark Giordano
with a hard but clean shoulder hit in the third period,
luring Calgary’s Dougie
Hamilton into a foolish retaliation penalty.
Getzlaf said Giordano
“was just the guy that had
the puck,” but the crowd at
Honda Center counted it as
avenging a knee-on-knee hit
Giordano had inflicted
against Ducks defenseman
Cam Fowler on April 4 to
knock Fowler out of the
lineup for perhaps as long as
six weeks.
The Ducks generally were
composed Thursday night,
at least until the final minutes, and Getzlaf was equally
soft-spoken and matter-offact about the playoff victory.
“I thought it was good.
We’re going to have to be
better,” said Getzlaf, who
also won 12 of 20 faceoffs. “I
thought we were a little
sloppy in some areas. Because they’re going to be
better. We know that group
over there.
“We’re going to have to
earn everything. That’s a
great hockey team over
there. We’re going to have to
continue to get better at
certain areas. We found a
way to win tonight.”
They found it because
Getzlaf showed them the
way. “He’s a leader for a
reason,” Ducks goaltender
John Gibson said. “He leads
and we follow.”
Getzlaf has three goals
and 12 points in 13 career
playoff games against the
Flames, whose home arena,
the Scotiabank Saddledome,
features a banner with Getzlaf ’s name and likeness
hanging from its rafters.
That banner was raised in
tribute to his stellar junior
hockey career with the Calgary Hitmen, but he probably won’t get any further
respectful treatment there
following his performance
against the Flames on
Thursday.
Getzlaf, whose preference
for passing over shooting has
vexed many coaches, took
the shot from the left point
that became the Ducks’ first
goal Thursday, during a
power play, 52 seconds into
the game. After the Flames
pulled even on a first-period
KEYS TO GAME 1
1
The Ducks won the
special-teams game.
They cashed in on two
power plays, including the
go-ahead score by Jakob
Silfverberg. Calgary went
one for two and committed
seven minor penalties.
2
The captain set the
tone. Ryan Getzlaf
sparked the Ducks with the
game’s first goal 52 seconds
in and assisted on the gametying score. He has 101
points in 105 playoff games.
3
John Gibson was good
late. The Ducks goalie
kicked out a lot of big rebounds in the first two
periods but got sharper. He
made a short-handed stop
on Mikael Backlund with 11
minutes remaining and got
the Ducks through two
penalty kills late.
— Curtis Zupke
power-play goal by Sean
Monahan and took a 2-1 lead
on Sam Bennett’s finish of a
fine pass from a spinning
Kris Versteeg, Getzlaf helped
the Ducks pull even at 13:53 of
the second period, with the
help of a terrible line change
by the Flames. Getzlaf took a
stretch pass from Kevin
Bieksa and took a shot that
was stopped by Calgary
goaltender Brian Elliott, but
Rakell was there for the
rebound.
Getzlaf wasn’t credited
with an assist on Silfverberg’s go-ahead goal but he
still played a key role because
the Flames, undoubtedly
remembering his shot on the
Ducks’ first goal, overplayed
him. That left Silfverberg free
to make a clever redirection
in front of the net.
They held on despite
some mistakes, despite the
long and frequent rebounds
that Gibson left, and despite
two late penalties. But they
held on to take a 1-0 lead in
the series and buck the trend
this spring toward home
teams losing their series
opener, which has happened
in five of eight games so far.
“We talked about home
ice and battling for it. It’s
only home ice if you use it,”
Getzlaf said, sensibly.
“We got tested tonight
that’s for sure. We did a good
job of staying focused and
working through it, as opposed to working against it.”
So many times in the past
they beat themselves with
undisciplined play and a lack
of poise. Getzlaf on Thursday
kept them level-headed, in
the moment, in the game. It’s
a recipe they must continue
to follow. They must continue to follow him, too, as long
as he leads as impressively as
he did Thursday.
helene.elliott@latimes.com
Twitter: @helenenothelen
D6
F R I DAY, A P R I L 14 , 2 017
L ATI M E S .C O M / SP O RTS
Plum is the first
pick in WNBA
NCAA scoring leader is
chosen by San Antonio.
Sparks select Wiese, a
standout shooter.
wire reports
NEW YORK — Chosen by the
San Antonio Stars, Kelsey Plum
went first in the WNBA draft
Thursday, and the Sparks selected
three-point specialist Sydney
Wiese with the 11th pick.
Plum, a Washington Huskies
guard, finished her college career
with an NCAA-record 3,527 points.
The Stars had the worst record last
season and held the top pick for the
first time in franchise history.
“I’ve been dreaming about it for
so long,” Plum said. “I’m really excited and grateful for the opportunity and will make the most of it.”
The 6-0 Wiese, the Pac-12 Conference career record holder with
373 three-point baskets, averaged
15.2 points, 4.9 rebounds and 4.5 assists as a senior.
The Sparks used their other
pick — the 11th selection in the
third round — to take 6-5 Saicha
Grant-Allen, who averaged 9.9
points and 8.6 rebounds last season for Dayton.
Los Angeles had the rights to
Connecticut’s No. 4 pick in the first
round, but used them to acquire
Odyssey Sims, a 5-8 fourth-year
guard from Dallas, in February.
That move was necessitated by the
loss of Kristi Toliver, the top outside shooting threat on last year’s
league championship team, who
signed with Washington.
The Sparks also gave up their
second-round pick in the trade,
but reacquired their No. 11 pick,
which they used to select Wiese.
Sims, who averaged 14.0 points
last season, has career averages of
15.5 points and 4.0 assists and was
the No. 2 pick of the 2014 draft.
Meanwhile, Chicago drafted
Alaina Coates with the second
pick. The South Carolina star, the
first of three Gamecocks selected
in the first round, injured an ankle
in the Southeastern Conference
tournament and didn’t play in the
team’s run to the national title.
Dallas took Kentucky forward
Evelyn Akhator with the third pick,
and the Wings came back with
South Carolina’s Allisha Gray with
the fourth choice.
Gray decided to forgo her senior
year of eligibility and enter the
draft a day after the Gamecocks
won the title. Kaela Davis was taken by the Wings at No. 10, meaning
the two Gamecocks will be together in Dallas.
“It’s great to have the connection and familiarity in an unknown
situation,” Davis said of playing
with Gray.
Northwestern’s Nia Coffey went
fifth to San Antonio, with Maryland’s Shatori Walker-Kimbrough
picked sixth by the Washington
Mystics.
Atlanta took Brittney Sykes of
Syracuse seventh. Brionna Jones
of Maryland went to Connecticut
with the eighth pick. Chicago used
its second pick in the first round to
select Michigan State’s Tori
Jankoska at No. 9. That made for
four Big Ten Conference players
drafted in the first nine picks.
Alexis Jones of Baylor closed
out the first round, heading to Minnesota.
The draft was held in an event
space in New York with WNBA
President Lisa Borders announcing the picks from a DJ booth, creating a party atmosphere.
The league will start its 21st season May 13, with training camps
opening April 23.
Johnson aims for
the top of the heap
Elaine Thompson Associated Press
SAN ANTONIO-BOUND
Kelsey Plum had a record
3,527 points in college.
WNBA draft:
First round
Kelsey Plum
Washington, guard
2. CHICAGO
Alaina Coates
South Carolina, center
3. DALLAS
Evelyn Akhator
Kentucky, forward/center
4. DALLAS
Allisha Gray
South Carolina, guard
5. SAN ANTONIO
Nia Coffey
Northwestern, forward
6. WASHINGTON
Shatori Walker-Kimbrough
Maryland, guard
7. ATLANTA
Brittney Sykes
Syracuse, guard
8. CONNECTICUT
Brionna Jones
Maryland, center
9. CHICAGO
Tori Jankoska
Michigan State, guard
10. DALLAS
Kaela Davis
South Carolina, guard
11. SPARKS
Sydney Wiese
Oregon State, guard
12. MINNESOTA
Cauley (63) has lead
by two at the Heritage
staff and wire reports
the last four seasons with the New
York Giants.
Bud Cauley took advantage of
pristine, windless conditions at Harbour Town Golf Links with birdies on
four of final five holes for an eightunder 63 and a two-shot lead Thursday after the opening round of the
RBC Heritage at Hilton Head Island,
S.C.
Cauley hadn’t made many waves at
Harbour Town his first three visits
with two missed cuts and only one
round in the 60s. This time, though,
with mild, 70-degree conditions, practically no wind and abundant sunshine, Cauley made eight birdies in a
bogey-free round, including three
straight to finish with a flourish.
Cauley was two in front of Luke
Donald, Graham DeLaet and Sam
Saunders, the grandson of the late
Arnold Palmer. Russell Henley continued his recent run of top-flight golf
with a 66 to join a group that included
former U.S. Open winner Webb Simpson and Ian Poulter.
Kicked off the bus by the Florida
Panthers in November, Gerard Gallant has packed his bags for Las Vegas
to take over as the first coach of the
NHL expansion Golden Knights. Gallant joins the Golden Knights some
five months after being unceremoniously fired by the Panthers immediately following a 3-2 loss to the Hurricanes at Carolina. Gallant’s luggage
was removed from the team bus outside the arena and he eventually had
to take a taxi while the Panthers left
him behind to continue their road trip
to Chicago.
Ariya Jutanugarn of Thailand and
South Koreans In-Kyung Kim and
Su-Yeung Jang shared a one-stroke
late in the second round of the LPGA
Lotte Championship in Kapolei,
Hawaii. Jutanugarn had a bogey-free
six-under 66, and Kim shot 64 and
Jang was four under through 16 holes
to reach nine under .
UCLA assistant basketball coach
Ed Schilling has accepted a job as a
member of new Indiana coach Archie
Miller’s staff, the Hoosiers announced, after having worked under
Steve Alford the previous four seasons since Alford’s arrival in Westwood.
— Ben Bolch
Dustin Johnson, the world’s No. 1
player, said he’ll return to the PGA
Tour at the Wells Fargo Championship in Wilmington, N.C., May 4-7.
Johnson was among the favorites to
win the Masters last week. But a fall at
his rental home hurt his back the day
before the year’s first major began.
North Carolina forward Justin
Jackson is hiring an agent and entering the NBA draft, the school announced. The Atlantic Coast Conference player of the year is projected as a
first-round pick, with some mock
drafts putting the 6-8, 210-pound player at the edge of the lottery.
ETC.
Sock leads a U.S.
parade in Houston
Top-seeded Jack Sock outlasted
Germany’s Tommy Haas 6-4, 3-6, 6-3
to lead five Americans into the U.S.
Men’s Clay Court Championship
quarterfinals. Second-seeded John
Isner, third-seeded Sam Querrey,
fourth-seeded Steve Johnson and unseeded Ernesto Escobedo joined
their U.S. compatriot in the final eight
at River Oaks in Houston.
Isner topped Argentina’s Leonardo Mayer 6-7 (5), 7-6 (3), 6-3. The
2013 winner will face Escobedo, a 4-6,
6-4, 6-4 winner over Brazil’s Thiago
Monteiro.
Dan Rooney, Pittsburgh Steelers
chairman who helped turn the Steelers into a premier NFL franchise and
whose name is attached to the NFL’s
landmark initiative in minority hiring,
died Thursday at 84. Obituary, B6.
The Indianapolis Colts agreed to
terms with free-agent defensive tackle
Johnathan Hankins. on a three-year
contract worth up to $30 million. The
6-foot-2, 320-pound Hankins spent
By Lance Pugmire
1. SAN ANTONIO
THE DAY IN SPORTS
Josh Scobee signed a one-day ceremonial contract with the Jacksonville Jaguars and formally retired
with the team that drafted him in
2004. Scobee, 34, called it quits after a
dozen NFL seasons, including the
first 11 in Jacksonville, and walked
away as the franchise’s all-time leading scorer.
Arizona guard Allonzo Trier will
return for his junior season, bolstering
what was already going to be a strong
team. Trier, who considered leaving
for the NBA after his freshman season, and was suspended the first 19
games of 2016-17 for testing positive for
performance-enhancing drugs. Trier
ended up being the team’s leading
scorer at 17.2 points a game and was
the most valuable player of the Pac-12
tournament.
A win Saturday, flyweight
belt-holder says, would
make him UFC’s all-time
greatest champion.
Alexis Jones
Baylor, guard
Demetrious Johnson might have
considered himself too blunt to remain an analyst on Fox’s UFC
broadcasts, but the longtime flyweight champion doesn’t mind
sharing his opinion about what winning his Saturday night fight on the
network might mean.
If Johnson (25-2) can successfully defend his belt
against San Diegotrained Wilson Reis
in the main event of
the card at Kansas
City, Mo., which
starts at 5 p.m. PDT,
he’ll match former
middleweight champion Anderson Sil- Johnson
va’s record run of 10 consecutive title
defenses.
“Every champion in the UFC
would love to accomplish this.…
[Winning] signifies that I’m the best
champion the UFC has ever had,”
Johnson said.
That point may be up for debate
given Conor McGregor’s recent unprecedented wearing of two belts at
once and the legacy that includes
Silva, Randy Couture, B.J. Penn and
Chuck Liddell, but Johnson doesn’t
mind being too bold.
Did he feel restricted in his criticism, perhaps wanting to identify
inadequacies in others who can’t
match his knowledge, reflexes and
tactics?
He said after trying to serve as a
studio analyst on Fox, “I kind of put
it on the back burner. You can’t be
yourself. I like to very honest. I like to
talk about fights straight up.”
GOLF
$6.5-MILLION RBC HERITAGE
At Hilton Head, S.C.—Par 71
Harbour Town Golf Links—7,099 yards
18-Hole Leaders
Bud Cauley ..........................32-31—63
Luke Donald .........................33-32—65
Graham DeLaet.....................34-31—65
Sam Saunders ......................33-32—65
Shane Lowry.........................33-33—66
Russell Henley ......................33-33—66
Danny Lee............................34-32—66
Ian Poulter ...........................33-33—66
Ben Crane............................35-31—66
Webb Simpson......................32-34—66
Jason Bohn ..........................33-34—67
Anirban Lahiri .......................35-32—67
J.J. Spaun ............................35-32—67
Grayson Murray .....................33-34—67
Cameron Smith.....................35-32—67
Harold Varner III ....................36-31—67
Francesco Molinari ................33-34—67
Hideto Tanihara.....................35-32—67
Martin Kaymer ......................33-35—68
Matt Kuchar .........................35-33—68
Jason Kokrak ........................34-34—68
Ollie Schniederjans................35-33—68
Andrew Johnston ...................34-34—68
Rafael Campos .....................34-34—68
Ryan Palmer .........................32-36—68
Spencer Levin .......................34-34—68
Brian Gay.............................34-34—68
William McGirt ......................36-32—68
Hunter Mahan.......................35-33—68
Pat Perez..............................33-35—68
Jason Dufner ........................34-34—68
Jim Furyk .............................34-34—68
Marc Leishman .....................33-35—68
Branden Grace......................35-33—68
Steve Marino ........................36-33—69
Wesley Bryan ........................34-35—69
Rod Pampling .......................34-35—69
K.J. Choi ..............................34-35—69
Billy Hurley III .......................33-36—69
Brian Stuard.........................34-35—69
Chad Campbell .....................37-32—69
Whee Kim ............................35-34—69
Sung Kang ...........................35-34—69
Mark Anderson......................37-32—69
Martin Laird..........................34-35—69
Tyrrell Hatton ........................35-34—69
Nick Taylor............................35-34—69
Brandt Snedeker ...................35-34—69
Jonas Blixt............................31-38—69
Carl Pettersson .....................36-33—69
Shawn Stefani ......................35-34—69
Tommy Gainey ......................35-34—69
Kyle Reifers ..........................34-36—70
Yuta Ikeda............................34-36—70
Patrick Cantlay ......................36-34—70
John Huh .............................37-33—70
Charles Howell III...................34-36—70
Stewart Cink.........................36-34—70
Kevin Na..............................35-35—70
Billy Horschel........................36-34—70
Ernie Els ..............................34-36—70
Tyrone Van Aswegen ...............33-37—70
Ryo Ishikawa ........................37-33—70
Johnson Wagner ....................36-34—70
Zac Blair ..............................35-35—70
Chris Kirk .............................35-35—70
Russell Knox.........................34-36—70
Vijay Singh ...........................36-34—70
David Hearn .........................35-35—70
Mark Hubbard.......................35-35—70
Camilo Villegas .....................36-34—70
Roberto Castro......................36-35—71
Michael Kim .........................35-36—71
Andrew Loupe.......................35-36—71
Bill Haas..............................37-34—71
D.A. Points ...........................35-36—71
Troy Merritt ...........................33-38—71
Steven Bowditch....................36-35—71
Danny Willett ........................37-34—71
Brian Harman .......................36-35—71
Kyle Stanley .........................34-37—71
C.T. Pan ...............................34-37—71
Alex Cejka............................35-36—71
Ben Martin ...........................33-38—71
Peter Malnati ........................34-37—71
Vaughn Taylor........................37-34—71
Adam Hadwin .......................37-34—71
Aaron Baddeley.....................35-36—71
Blayne Barber .......................37-34—71
Ryan Blaum..........................36-35—71
Freddie Jacobson ..................35-37—72
Kelly Kraft ............................36-36—72
Greg Chalmers ......................38-34—72
Graeme McDowell .................36-36—72
James Hahn .........................38-34—72
Kevin Kisner .........................36-36—72
Lucas Glover.........................36-36—72
Boo Weekley.........................38-34—72
Brett Stegmaier.....................35-37—72
Robert Garrigus.....................37-35—72
Scott Brown..........................32-40—72
Derek Fathauer .....................37-35—72
Dominic Bozzelli....................37-35—72
Patton Kizzire ........................36-36—72
When asked if could be completely honest on television, Johnson said only, “Yeah, but.…”
Nevertheless, in light of his
struggle to draw a massive audience
on pay-per-view broadcasts with his
immense talents, Johnson returns
to Fox after beating “The Ultimate
Fighter” winner Tim Elliott by
unanimous decision in December.
“It’s good to do both” network
and pay-per-view, Johnson said. “Of
course, I care [about self-branding].
To get millions of viewers on the network is great.
“Maybe the next time, I bring
more attention to my pay-per-view.”
Johnson said that he’s content to
let his talent speak for itself without
taking on an MMA educational role
on television.
“I do what I do and let it lie,” he
said. “I’m not here to do … sessions
to explain what is great about mixed
martial arts. I do that with my fighting. People can either acknowledge
that when they see it or they can be
naive.”
Johnson, 30, will mark his youngest child’s second birthday on fight
night when he meets the 32-year-old
Reis (22-6), the No. 3-ranked flyweight.
“It’s just another fight and every
fight is difficult,” said Johnson, who
has been lured to move up to bantamweight, where former champion
Dominick Cruz, who has defeated
Johnson, resides along with former
champion T.J. Dillashaw and current unbeaten champion Cody Garbrandt.
“I think about it,” Johnson said.
“Maybe in like three years I’ll get
tired of cutting all this damn
weight.”
That may be longer than what
most MMA fans would like.
But, with Johnson, you know
you’re getting the truth.
lance.pugmire@latimes.com
Twitter: @latimespugmire
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$2-MILLION LOTTE CHAMPIONSHIP
At Kapolei, Hawaii—Par 72
Ko Olina Golf Club—6,397 yards
18-Hole Leaders
Mi Hyang Lee........................34-32—66
Paula Creamer ......................32-34—66
Alena Sharp .........................33-34—67
Su-Yeon Jang........................33-34—67
Beth Allen ............................34-33—67
Eun-Hee Ji............................34-33—67
Lizette Salas.........................35-32—67
a-Hye Jin Choi.......................35-33—68
Amy Anderson ......................35-33—68
Mina Harigae ........................34-34—68
So Yeon Ryu .........................32-36—68
Katherine Kirk .......................34-34—68
Nicole Broch Larsen...............33-35—68
Wichanee Meechai ................34-34—68
Becky Morgan.......................37-31—68
Stacy Lewis ..........................32-36—68
Kris Tamulis ..........................33-36—69
Ashleigh Buhai......................37-32—69
Ai Miyazato...........................34-35—69
Inbee Park............................35-34—69
Amy Yang.............................35-34—69
Ariya Jutanugarn....................35-34—69
Bronte Law...........................35-34—69
Tiffany Joh............................32-37—69
Cydney Clanton.....................34-35—69
Sandra Changkija ..................35-34—69
Pannarat Thanapolboonyaras...36-33—69
Danielle Kang .......................34-35—69
Katie Burnett ........................34-35—69
Simin Feng...........................36-33—69
Gaby Lopez ..........................35-35—70
Peiyun Chien ........................36-34—70
Jodi Ewart Shadoff.................34-36—70
Mo Martin ............................36-34—70
Amelia Lewis ........................35-35—70
Jackie Stoelting.....................36-34—70
Marissa L Steen ....................36-34—70
Angela Stanford ....................35-35—70
Austin Ernst..........................34-36—70
Sung Hyun Park ....................35-35—70
In Gee Chun .........................34-36—70
Brooke M. Henderson.............36-34—70
Joanna Klatten......................36-34—70
Hae Rym Kim........................36-34—70
Nontaya Srisawang ................35-35—70
Annie Park ...........................38-33—71
Sakura Yokomine...................36-35—71
Ryann O’Toole .......................35-36—71
Carlota Ciganda ....................34-37—71
Kim Kaufman........................36-35—71
Jenny Shin............................34-37—71
In-Kyung Kim ........................35-36—71
Cristie Kerr ...........................37-34—71
Haru Nomura........................36-35—71
Mariah Stackhouse................34-37—71
Emily Tubert..........................34-37—71
Aditi Ashok...........................32-39—71
Belen Mozo ..........................37-34—71
Therese O’Hara .....................35-36—71
Lindy Duncan........................36-35—71
Christina Kim........................36-35—71
Jennifer Song........................37-34—71
Hyo Joo Kim .........................36-35—71
Michelle Wie.........................37-34—71
Kelly Tan ..............................36-35—71
Min Lee ...............................37-34—71
Demi Runas .........................36-35—71
Ally McDonald ......................35-37—72
Brooke Pancake ....................38-34—72
Marina Alex ..........................36-36—72
Caroline Hedwall ...................36-36—72
Ayako Uehara .......................34-38—72
Jaye Marie Green...................35-37—72
Cheyenne Woods...................36-36—72
Sandra Gal...........................36-36—72
Mi Jung Hur..........................38-34—72
Chella Choi ..........................35-37—72
Laura Gonzalez Escallon .........36-36—72
Laetitia Beck ........................35-37—72
Nasa Hataoka.......................36-36—72
Kelly W Shon ........................35-37—72
Others included:
Lydia Ko ..............................38-35—73
Morgan Pressel .....................38-35—73
Vicky Hurst...........................35-38—73
Brittany Lang ........................37-38—75
Brittany Lincicome .................38-37—75
a--amateur
PGA EUROPEAN TOUR
$2.65-MILLION TROPHEE HASSAN II
At Rabat, Morocco—Par 73
Royal Golf Dar Es Salam—7,615 yards
18-Hole Leaders
Gary Stal, France ..................36-34—70
Gregory Havret, France ...........35-35—70
James Morrison, England........36-34—70
Lucas Bjerregaard, Denmark....35-35—70
Clement Sordet, France ..........35-36—71
Max Orrin, England ................36-35—71
Gregory Bourdy, France...........35-36—71
Alexander Levy, France ...........36-35—71
Dylan Frittelli, South Africa ......35-36—71
Jaco van Zyl, South Africa .......34-37—71
Trevor Fisher, South Africa .......35-36—71
Pelle Edberg, Sweden ............36-36—71
Edoardo Molinari, Italy ...........34-37—71
Daniel Im, U.S.......................37-37—74
Erik Compton, U.S..................37-38—75
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Silvio Berlusconi’s 31-year reign at COLLEGE
AC Milan is over. Italy’s most success- VOLLEYBALL
MEN
ful soccer club was sold by the former All-MPSF
COLLEGE
Italian prime minister to a Chinese- FirstT.J.Team
DeFalco, So., outside hitter, Long Beach
led consortium after several delays St. Josh Tuaniga, So., setter, Long Beach St. Jake BASEBALL
Langlois, Sr., outside hitter, BYU. Stijn van PAC-12
over the past few months.
Tilburg, So., opposite, Hawaii. Jame Amitz, Jr., UCLA 2, Stanford 0
Berlusconi’s holding company, outside hitter, UCLA. Michael Saeta, Sr., setter, BIG WEST
Irvine. Kyle Ensing, So., opposite, Long Hawaii 4, UC Riverside 2
Fininvest, released a statement UC
Beach St. Tamir Hershko, Sr., outside hitter, UC Cal Poly 4, UC Davis 1
Thursday announcing that it had Irvine. Mitch Stahl, Sr., middle blocker, UCLA. Lu- UC Santa Barbara 11, UC Irvine 3
Yoder, Sr., outside hitter, USC. David Wiec- Long Beach St. 6, Cal St. Northridge 2
completed the transfer of its 99.93% cas
zorek, So. outside hitter, Pepperdine. Jennings WEST COAST
stake in Milan to Rossoneri Sport Franciskovic, Sr., setter, Hawaii.
Loyola Marymount 12, St. Mary’s 3
Pepperdine 11, BYU 7
Luxembourg — formerly known as PRO SOCCER
PAC-WEST
Sino-Europe Sports. The group is led MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER
Cal Baptist 6, Azusa Pacific 1
Schedule
by Chinese businessman Yonghong Today’s
NONCONFERENCE
N.Y. City FC at Philadelphia, 4 p.m.
USC 13, Cal St. Fullerton 9
Li.
Seattle at Vancouver, 7 p.m.
FC Dallas at San Jose, 8 p.m.
The deal, which values Milan at 740
SOCCER
Saturday’s Schedule
million euros (about $800 million), reINTERNATIONAL
GALAXY at Orlando City, 11:30 a.m.
Europa League
Atlanta
United
FC
at
Montreal,
10
a.m.
quires the investors to spend 350 milQuarterfinals, First Leg
New England at Chicago, 2 p.m.
lion euros ($372 million) over three
Ajax (Netherlands) 2, Schalke (Germany) 0
D.C. United at New York, 4:30 p.m.
Anderlecht (Belgium) 1, Manchester United
Toronto FC at Columbus, 5 p.m.
years on improvements. The new
(England) 1
Minnesota United at Houston, 5:30 p.m.
Celta Vigo (Spain) 3, Genk (Belgium) 2
owners’ first match will be Saturday
Real Salt Lake at Colorado, 6 p.m.
Lyon (France) 2, Besiktas (Turkey) 1
Sporting Kansas City at Portland, 7:30 p.m.
against Chinese-owned Inter Milan.
$600,345 U.S. CLAY COURT
CHAMPIONSHIPS
At Houston
Surface: Clay-Outdoor
SINGLES (second round)—John Isner (2), d.
Leonardo Mayer, Argentina, 6-7 (5), 7-6 (3), 6-3;
Fernando Verdasco (5), Spain, d. Nicolas Kicker,
Argentina, 7-6 (4), 6-1; Steve Johnson (4), d.
Dustin Brown, Germany, 7-6 (12), 6-4; Ernesto
Escobedo d. Thiago Monteiro, Brazil, 4-6, 6-4,
6-4; Sam Querrey (3),d. Horacio Zeballos, Argentina, 6-4, 6-4; Thomaz Bellucci (8), Brazil, d.
Maximo Gonzalez, Argentina, 2-6, 7-6 (5), 6-2;
Jack Sock (1), d. Tommy Haas, Germany, 6-4,
3-6, 6-3; Feliciano Lopez (6), Spain, d. Chung
Hyeon, South Korea, 4-6, 6-2, 6-1.
$572,000 GRAND PRIX HASSAN II
At Marrakech, Morocco
Surface: Clay-Outdoor
SINGLES (second round)—Benoit Paire (6),
France, d. Radu Albot, Moldova, 6-2, 6-2; Jiri
Vesely, Czech Republic, d. Mischa Zverev (4),
Germany, 6-4, 6-4; Tommy Robredo, Spain, d.
Grigor Dimitrov (1), Bulgaria, 6-4, 1-6, 6-1; Paolo
Lorenzi (5), Italy, d. Gianluigi Quinzi, Italy, 7-6
(5), 2-6, 6-4; Jan-Lennard Struff, Germany, d.
Amine Ahouda, Morocco, 6-3, 6-4; Philipp
Kohlschreiber (3), Germany, d. Jeremy Chardy,
France, 6-0, 2-6, 6-3.
DOUBLES (quarterfinals)—Raven Klaasen,
South Africa, and Rajeev Ram (1), d. Guillermo
Duran-Andres Molteni, Argentina, 7-5, 6-4;
Dominic Inglot, Britain-Mate Pavic, Croatia, d.
Rohan Bopanna, India-Marcin Matkowski (3),
Poland, 6-2, 6-4.
$226,750 CLARO OPEN COLSANITAS
At Bogota, Colombia
Surface: Clay-Outdoor
SINGLES (second round)—Kiki Bertens (1),
Netherlands, d. Cindy Burger, Netherlands, 6-2,
7-5.
(Quarterfinals)—Lara Arruabarrena (4),
Spain, d. Aleksandra Krunic, Serbia, 7-5, 5-7,
6-2; Sara Sorribes Tormo, Spain, d. Magda
Linette (5), Poland, 6-4, 4-6, 7-6 (5); Francesca
Schiavone, Italy, d. Kiki Bertens (1), Netherlands,
6-1, 6-4; Johanna Larsson (3), Sweden, d. Sara
Errani, Italy, 7-5, 6-4.
DOUBLES
(quarterfinals)—Irina
Khromacheva, Russia-Nina Stojanovic, Serbia, d.
Natela Dzalamidze, Russia-Tatjana Maria (2),
Germany, 6-4, 6-3; Beatriz Haddad Maia, BrazilNadia Podoroska, Argentina, d. Maria Irigoyen,
Argentina-Paula Kania (3), Poland, 6-3, 6-4;
Catalina Pella, Argentina-Daniela Seguel, Chile,
d. Aleksandra Krunic, Serbia-Katerina Siniakova
(1), Czech Republic, 6-2, 2-6, 10-7; Veronica
Cepeda Royg, Paraguay-Magda Linette, Poland,
d. Lara Arruabarrena, Spain-Mariana DuqueMarino (4), Colombia, 6-3, 6-3.
$226,750 LADIES OPEN BIEL BIENNE
At Biel, Switzerland
Surface: Hard-Indoor
SINGLES (second round)—Marketa Vondrousova, Czech Republic, d. Annika Beck, Germany, 6-1, 6-3; Barbora Strycova (1), Czech Republic, d. Carina Witthoeft, Germany, 6-2, 7-6
(6); Camila Giorgi, Italy, d. Carla Suarez Navarro
(2), Spain, 2-6, 7-6 (5), 6-2; Aliaksandra Sasnovich, Belarus, d. Viktorija Golubic, Switzerland, 6-1, 6-4.
DOUBLES (quarterfinals)—Hsieh Su-wei, Taiwan-Monica Niculescu (2), Romania, d. Lenka
Kuncikova, Czech Republic-Cornelia Lister, Sweden, 6-2, 6-2; Timea Bacsinszky-Martina Hingis,
Switzerland, d. Lina Gjorcheska, MacedoniaAnastasiya Komardina, Russia, 6-4, 6-0.
THE ODDS
Baseball
National League
Favorite
at DODGERS -228
at Chicago
-178
New York
-141
at Washington -202
at Atlanta
-150
at CincinnatI -130
at S. Francisco -145
American League
Favorite
at Kansas City -144
at Cleveland -137
at Toronto
-149
at Boston
-140
at Minnesota -136
Houston
-139
at Seattle
-147
Interleague
Favorite
at N.Y. Yankees -142
Underdog
Arizona
Pittsburgh
at Miami
Philadelphia
San Diego
Milwaukee
Colorado
+208
+166
+131
+182
+140
+120
+135
Underdog
ANGELS
Detroit
Baltimore
Tampa Bay
Chicago
at Oakland
Texas
+134
+127
+139
+130
+126
+129
+137
Underdog
St. Louis
+132
NBA Playoffs
Favorite
at CLIPPERS
at Cleveland
at Toronto
at San Antonio
at Washington
at Golden State
at Boston
at Houston
Line (O/U)
51⁄2 (200)
81⁄2 (2121⁄2)
7 (2011⁄2)
81⁄2 (191)
41⁄2 (211)
131⁄2 (223)
71⁄2 (2061⁄2)
7 (228)
Underdog
Utah
Indiana
Milwaukee
Memphis
Atlanta
Portland
Chicago
Oklahoma City
Stanley Cup Playoffs
Favorite
Underdog
at Montreal
-145 N.Y. Rangers
+135
at Pittsburgh -160 Columbus
+150
at Minnesota -195 St. Louis
+180
at Edmonton -146 San Jose
+136
Boston
-117 at Ottawa
+107
Updates at Pregame.com
—Associated Press
BASEBALL
Atlanta—Called up pitcher Jason Hursh from
Gwinnett (IL).
Baltimore—Designated pitcher Oliver Drake
for assignment; purchased the contract of
pitcher Stefan Crichton from Norfolk (IL).
Boston—Optioned pitcher Ben Taylor to Pawtucket (IL); activated pitcher Robbie Ross Jr. from
the 10-day disabled list.
Chicago White Sox—Put catcher Geovany
Soto on the 10-day disabled list, retroactive to
April 12; purchased the contract of catcher Kevan
Smith from Charlotte (IL).
Cleveland—Optioned outfielder Tyler Naquin
to Columbus (IL); activated outfielder Lonnie
Chisenhall from the 10-day disabled list.
Kansas City—Called up pitcher Jake Junis
from Omaha (PCL).
Miami—Sent third baseman Martin Prado to
Jupiter (FSL) for a rehab assignment.
Milwaukee—Sent pitcher Matt Garza and
catcher Andrew Susac to Colorado Springs (PCL)
for rehab assignments.
N.Y. Mets—Optioned pitcher Paul Sewald to
Las Vegas (PCL); activated outfielder Juan Lagares from the 10-day disabled list.
Philadelphia—Optioned pitcher Adam
Morgan to Lehigh Valley (IL); called up pitcher
Luis Garcia from Lehigh Valley.
PRO BASKETBALL
Orlando—Fired general manager Rob
Hennigan.
PRO FOOTBALL
Houston—Released center Tony Bergstrom;
waived linebacker Gerald Rivers.
Indianapolis—Agreed to terms with defensive
end Johnathan Hankins.
N.Y. Jets—Signed center Wesley Johnson.
HOCKEY
Chicago—Called up goaltenderJeff Glass from
Rockford (AHL).
Dallas—Hired Ken Hitchcock as coach.
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
California—Announced that freshman guard
Charlie Moore will transfer.
Georgia—Announced that junior forward
Yante Maten will enter the NBA draft.
Gonzaga—Announced that sophomore guard
Bryan Alberts will transfer.
N.C. State—Announced that sophomore
guard Maverick Rowan had left the team.
Tusculum—Hired Nick Pasqua as coach.
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
N.C. State—Announced that freshman wide
receiver Thaddeus Moss will transfer.
Oklahoma—Announced that graduate wide
receiver Jeff Badet had transferred from Kentucky.
PRO
BASKETBALL
NBA LEADERS
By Associated Press
Final Regular Season
Scoring
..................
G
Wstbrook ..
81
Harden .....
81
Thomas ....
76
Davis .........
75
DeRozan ..
74
Lillard ........
75
Cousins ....
72
James .......
74
Leonard ....
74
Curry .........
79
Irving .........
72
Towns .......
82
Durant .......
62
Assists
......................
Harden ........
Wall ..............
Westbrook ...
Paul ..............
Rubio ...........
James ..........
Teague ........
Holiday ........
Green ..........
Lowry ...........
FG Percentage
.................
Jordan .....
Gobert .....
Capela .....
Howard ....
Gortat ......
Jokic, .......
Adams .....
Whitesde .
Vlciunas ..
James ......
Rebounds
...................
Whiteside ..
Drummnd ..
Jordan .......
Gobert .......
Howard ......
Towns ........
Davis ..........
Love ...........
Cousins .....
Westbrook
G
81
78
81
61
75
74
82
67
76
60
FG
412
413
362
388
390
494
374
542
391
736
OFF
293
345
298
314
296
296
172
148
152
137
PTS
2,558
2,356
2,199
2,099
2,020
2,024
1,942
1,954
1,888
1,999
1,816
2,061
1,555
AVG.
31.6
29.1
28.9
28.0
27.3
27.0
27.0
26.4
25.5
25.3
25.2
25.1
25.1
AST
907
831
840
563
682
646
639
488
533
417
AVG.
11.2
10.7
10.4
9.2
9.1
8.7
7.8
7.3
7.0
7.0
FGA
577
625
563
613
674
854
655
973
702
1344
PCT
.714
.661
.643
.633
.579
.578
.571
.557
.557
.548
DEF
795
770
817
721
644
711
712
518
642
727
AVG.
14.1
13.8
13.8
12.8
12.7
12.3
11.8
11.1
11.0
10.7
MINOR LEAGUE
BASEBALL
CALIFORNIA LEAGUE
Thursday’s Results
Visalia 5, Inland Empire 4
San Jose 8, Stockton 2
Rancho Cucamonga 6, Lake Elsinore 3
Modesto 8, Lancaster 0
PACIFIC COAST LEAGUE
Thursday’s Results
Iowa 5, New Orleans 2
Oklahoma City 8, Nashville 1
Omaha 3, Round Rock 0
Colorado Springs 8, Memphis 2
Salt Lake 4, Sacramento 3
El Paso 1-0, Tacoma 0-5
Fresno 12, Las Vegas 4
Albuquerque at Reno, rain
L AT I ME S . CO M / S P O RT S
F R IDAY , A P RI L 14 , 2 017
D7
NBA
AROUND THE LEAGUE
NBA PLAYOFF SCHEDULE
FIRST ROUND
WESTERN CONFERENCE
EASTERN CONFERENCE
1 Golden State vs. 8 Portland
Best-of-seven series
1 Boston vs. 8 Chicago
Best-of-seven series
Gm 1
Gm 2
Gm 3
Gm 4
Gm 5
Gm 6
Gm 7
Gm 1
Gm 2
Gm 3
Gm 4
Gm 5
Gm 6
Gm 7
Sun. at Golden State, 12:30
Wed. at Golden State, 7:30
April 22 at Portland, 7:30
April 24 at Portland, 7:30
April 26 at Gold. St., TBD*
April 28 at Portland, TBD*
April 30 at Gold. St., TBD*
Sunday at Boston, 3:30
Tuesday at Boston, 5
April 21 at Chicago, 4
April 23 at Chicago, 6:30
April 26 at Boston, TBD*
April 28 at Chicago, TBD*
April 30 at Boston, TBD*
2 San Antonio vs. 7 Memphis
Best-of-seven series
2 Cleveland vs. 7 Indiana
Best-of-seven series
Gm 1
Gm 2
Gm 3
Gm 4
Gm 5
Gm 6
Gm 7
Gm 1
Gm 2
Gm 3
Gm 4
Gm 5
Gm 6
Gm 7
Sat. at San Antonio, 5
Mon. at San Antonio, 6:30
Thurs. at Memphis, 6:30
April 22 at Memphis, 5
April 25 at San Ant., TBD*
April 27 at Memphis, TBD*
April 29 at San Ant., TBD*
Sat. at Cleveland, noon
Mon. at Cleveland, 4
Thurs. at Indiana, 4
April 23 at Indiana, 10 a.m.
April 25 at Cleveland, TBD*
April 27 at Indiana, TBD*
April 29 at Cleveland, TBD*
3 Houston vs. 6 Oklahoma City
Best-of-seven series
3 Toronto vs. 6 Milwaukee
Best-of-seven series
Gm 1
Gm 2
Gm 3
Gm 4
Gm 5
Gm 6
Gm 7
Gm 1
Gm 2
Gm 3
Gm 4
Gm 5
Gm 6
Gm 7
Sunday at Houston, 6
Wednesday at Houston, 5
April 21 at Okla. City, 6:30
April 23 at Okla. City, 12:30
April 25 at Houston, TBD*
April 27 at Okla. City, TBD*
April 29 at Houston, TBD*
Saturday at Toronto, 2:30
Tuesday at Toronto, 4
Thurs. at Milwaukee, 5
April 22 at Milwaukee, noon
April 24 at Toronto, 4*
April 27 at Milw., TBD*
April 29 at Toronto, TBD*
4 CLIPPERS vs. 5 Utah
Best-of-seven series
4 Washington vs. 5 Atlanta
Best-of-seven series
Gm 1
Gm 2
Gm 3
Gm 4
Gm 5
Gm 6
Gm 7
Gm 1
Gm 2
Gm 3
Gm 4
Gm 5
Gm 6
Gm 7
Saturday at Clippers, 7:30
Tuesday at Clippers, 7:30
April 21 at Utah, 7
April 23 at Utah, 6
April 25 at Clippers, TBD*
April 28 at Utah, TBD*
April 30 at Clippers, TBD*
* Games 5-7 if necessary
Sun. at Washington, 10 a.m.
Wed. at Washington, 4
April 22 at Atlanta, 2:30
April 24 at Atlanta, 5
April 26 at Wash., TBD*
April 28 at Atlanta, TBD*
April 30 at Wash., TBD*
All times PDT, p.m. except noted
Magic fire GM after five years
wire reports
The Orlando Magic fired
general manager Rob Hennigan, saying Thursday it was
time to go in a different direction after missing the postseason for five seasons.
“We appreciate Rob’s efforts to rebuild the team, but
feel we have not made any discernible improvement over
the last few years specifically,”
Magic CEO Alex Martins
said Thursday in a statement.
“It’s time for different leadership in basketball operations.
We certainly wish Rob and his
family well.”
Magic assistant general
manager Matt Lloyd was
named the interim GM while
the team searches for Hennigan’s replacement. Orlando
also fired assistant GM Scott
Perry.
“Matt brings solid experience and his appointment as
general manager on an interim basis will allow us to seamlessly continue our preparations for the upcoming draft,”
Martins said.
At 30, Hennigan was the
youngest general manager in
the NBA when he was hired by
the Magic in June 2012.
But the Magic never won
Stephen M. Dowell AP
ROB HENNIGAN was
only 30 when he was
named general manager.
enough under Hennigan’s direction, missing the postseason all five years of his tenure
and posting a 132-278 (.322)
record — the second-worst in
the NBA over the five seasons.
The Magic finished this season 29-53 after entering the
year with expectations of
breaking through to the postseason under first-year coach
Frank Vogel.
Hennigan has made several moves that didn’t pan
out. The most recent was
trading Victor Oladipo to
Oklahoma City for veteran
power forward Serge Ibaka
last June. Hennigan also
signed center Bismack Biyombo during free agency, as
the team looked to go big in its
frontcourt during a small-ball
era.
ended 2016-17 with a 31-51 mark
after winning their finale
Wednesday against the 76ers.
Overall, the Knicks are 80-166
with Jackson in charge.
Jackson staying
with Knicks
Memphis Grizzlies guard
Tony Allen is out indefinitely
with a strained calf muscle in
his right leg as his team gets
ready for its Western Conference playoff series with the
San Antonio Spurs.
The Grizzlies announced
Thursday that Allen “will be
continually reevaluated while
beginning rehab immediately.”
Allen was injured Wednesday as the Grizzlies closed the
regular season with a 100-93
loss to the Dallas Mavericks.
The 35-year-old Allen averaged 9.1 points, 5.5 rebounds
and 1.4 assists in 71 games this
season.
The New York Knicks and
Phil Jackson picked up their
options on the final two years
of his contract, according to a
report by ESPN.com. Knicks
owner James Dolan said in
February he would honor
Jackson’s five-year deal, and it
appears he’s keeping his word
despite the Knicks’ having
missed the playoffs in all three
years with Jackson as president.
The Knicks wouldn’t comment on or confirm the report.
Jackson and the Knicks
each had an option to part
ways after the third full season of his contract. Jackson
had the clause put in when it
appeared there would be a
work stoppage this summer,
but the NBA and players
union reached a deal on a new
collective bargaining agreement.
The Knicks have lost at
least 50 games all three seasons under Jackson. They
Grizzlies’ Allen out
Attendance mark
The NBA broke its attendance record by drawing nearly
22 million fans this season.
The league said Thursday
the total exceeded 21.9 million,
topping last season’s mark by
more than 25,000. The average
attendance of 17,884 was also a
record. The 723 sellouts tied
the mark set in 2015-16.
Maybe this year
will be different
Wally Skalij Los Angeles Times
FALLING SHORT IN YEARS PAST “increases that desire ... to win a championship,” Blake Griffin says.
[Clippers, from D1]
They have relived the
memory of blowing a sevenpoint lead in less than 50 seconds against the Oklahoma
City Thunder in Game 5 of
the second round in 2014, a
series the Clippers lost in six
games.
They have owned up to
blowing a 3-1lead against the
Houston Rockets in the second round in 2015, losing the
last three games of the series.
They have come to grips
with the fact that Griffin
(left quadriceps tendon)
and Chris Paul (broken right
hand) both were sidelined in
Game 4 of a first-round series against the Portland
Trail Blazers in 2016, leading
to the Clippers’ losing the series in six games.
Still, in Rivers’ eyes, there
the media goes again in
bringing up the past and
asking how the Clippers can
overcome their recent misfortunes.
“I think it weighs on you
guys,” Rivers said, referring
to reporters. “Really. I don’t
think it weighs on us at all. I
said that yesterday. I don’t
think I’ve ever gone into the
playoffs thinking about
what we didn’t do last year.”
Do the players share his
feelings?
“Yeah, but it doesn’t
mean that they don’t want to
win,” Rivers said. “Guys,
like, everybody doesn’t win
each year. You’ve got to keep
going after it. And that’s my
point. I can name 29 teams
from last year that feel like
from their not success — if
that’s what we’re going to
call it — probably want to
win it this year. I’m sure
some probably feel it more
than others, I guess, but I
don’t think it’s as heavy as
you guys think it is.”
Well, maybe all those disappointments can give the
Clippers a stronger mental
edge this time around.
“You would hope so,” J.J.
Redick said. “I do think you
can draw on past experiences, good and bad, and use
them both as motivation
and as a learning tool. I think
for us our theme in every
game in this series has got to
be: finish. We’ve got to finish
every game and that’s got to
be the focus.
“Going back to last year,
the year before, the year before that, if we had done a
better job of finishing in the
playoffs, I think we would
have had a different overall
result. That’s got to be our
theme against Utah.”
Etc.
The Clippers said there
was no timetable for Austin
Rivers to return after the reserve point guard sat out the
last six games of the regular
season because of a left
hamstring injury.
broderick.turner@latimes.com
Twitter: @BA_Turner
Walton: Ingram would benefit from working with Kobe
[Lakers, from D1]
options in the draft. The Lakers will
keep their lottery pick only if it is in
the top three, and they have a 47%
chance of that happening. Pelinka
said the Lakers have plans to return
the team to prominence no matter
what happens with that pick.
Part of that will involve potential
free agents. Though this summer’s
crop of free agents isn’t expected to
be very deep, next summer’s could
be. And though top free agents have
shunned the Lakers for the last few
years, Pelinka thinks that is changing.
“Whereas in past years it was,
‘Gosh, I don’t even know if we’re going to get meetings with certain players,’ you can just feel a current shifting now towards us,” Pelinka said.
“There’s an excitement of, ‘Gosh
that’s a huge destination,’ whether
it’s people … saying they want to be
drafted here now or whether it’s just
rumblings you hear about players
that want to come to L.A., you can
feel the current shifting our way.”
Ingram and Kobe?
During Brandon Ingram’s exit interview Thursday, Johnson and
Pelinka suggested he spend time
with Kobe Bryant this offseason to
learn from Bryant’s expertise.
“Just saying what I should look
for in this organization, how I should
be in this organization,” Ingram said.
“They definitely thought Kobe
should be one of the people I should
talk to just about how he felt at 19
years old, 20 years old, being in this
organization.”
Before the All-Star break, Bryant
and Ingram communicated about
possibly getting together.
“Kobe has been receptive to working with lots of players in the offseason,” Pelinka said. “He benefited
so much because he was aggressively
reaching out to the greats [in his own
career].”
Walton hopes that when Ingram
and Bryant meet, the benefit for Ingram will be both mental and physical. Walton hopes they can work together in a gym so Bryant can show
Ingram some of the drills he spent
countless hours perfecting.
“I can coach Brandon, [but]
Brandon’s a much better basketball
player than I was,” Walton said.
“There’s certain players that need
guidance from certain players. … He
can learn a lot from someone like Kobe that’s been through it and has a
certain kind of skill at a level that’s
much higher than me or anyone on
our staff had.”
Bryant has been around the organization some lately. He attended
Pelinka's introductory news conference and also spoke at Shaquille
O’Neal’s statue ceremony at Staples
Center.
“The Lakers are my family,” Bryant said, when asked last month if
those appearances were a sign he’ll
be more involved with the team. “I’ll
always be available for Jeanie and
the whole organization. They know
I’m only a phone call away.”
The end for Metta?
Metta World Peace isn’t likely to
return to the Lakers next season.
“Magic said he’s probably not going to bring me back,” World Peace
said Thursday at the team’s training
facility in El Segundo after a brief
meeting with members of the front
office. “They really appreciated a lot
of the things that I brought to the table this year with the rookies. And
just working hard every day.”
The decision to inform World
Peace that he would not be on the
team next season was made swiftly
to ensure that he would have a
chance to work out for other organizations.
World Peace has said he wants to
play for 20 years. So far he’s played 18
pro seasons — 17 in the NBA and one
overseas. Six of those seasons were
spent with the Lakers, where he
helped them win their most recent
championship in 2010.
The Lakers considered adding
World Peace to their staff in some capacity before the 2016-17 season, but
World Peace wanted to keep playing.
Walton has long thought World
Peace would make a good coach.
“We’d love to have him back,” Walton said. “Come back and talk to us
and see how we can have you be
around and continue to help these
young guys.”
Said Pelinka: “Everyone loves his
work ethic. Everyone loves his commitment to being the best version of
himself. … He was a leader all season
long.”
tania.ganguli@latimes.com
lindsey.thiry@latimes.com
Twitter: @taniaganguli
Twitter: @LindseyThiry
David Zalubowski Associated Press
METTA WORLD PEACE has probably played his last game
with the Lakers, but he might come back as a coach someday.
D8
FRIDAY, APRIL 14, 2017
LOS ANGELES TIMES
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F R I D A Y , A P R I L 1 4 , 2 0 1 7 :: L A T I M E S . C O M / C A L E N D A R
AT T HE M OV I E S
ADVERTISEMENT
HHHH!
– TIME OUT NEW YORK
ANNE
JASON
HATHAWAY
A FILM BY NACHO
SUDEIKIS
VIGALONDO
COACHELLA
FESTIVAL
Movie
music
for rap
’n’ rock
crowd
Hans Zimmer will
leave the composing
room to front his
70-plus-piece band.
MIKAEL WOOD
POP MUSIC CRITIC
Robert Gauthier Los Angeles Times
“FAWCETT represents the search for meaning we all have — that terrible and wonderful ... quest,” Charlie Hunnam says of “Z” role.
ON A JOURNEY
Charlie Hunnam
searches for meaning
in his life and his work
By Steven Zeitchik
Most actors who dine in Hollywood restaurants don’t talk to beret-clad strangers.
And they’re especially not likely to be taking
in disquisitions from one of those strangers on
wine. Yet there is Charlie Hunnam — yes, grittyas-dirt Jax from the FX biker series “Sons of Anarchy” — at Greenblatt’s, the Westside’s promised land of whitefish and latkes, eagerly receiving oenophilic wisdom from an older man in colorful headgear.
“I came back from being outside doing this,”
the British actor said a moment later, pointing
to a vaping implement, “and he was drinking
wine right in the middle of the day. So I asked
him some questions,” Hunnam added with a
wouldn’t-you-do-the-same? shrug. “He knew a
lot — it was really interesting.”
Hunnam has long headed his own way. Since
he started getting leading film roles in the early
2000s — in “Nicholas Nickleby” and as a snarling
ringleader in the 2005 soccer-fan drama “Green
Street Hooligans” — the actor, 37, has shown a
maverick streak. A working-class Brit who as a
kid devoured American films and literature. A
heartthrob-in-waiting who eschews heartthrob
roles. A Hollywood creature who openly criticizes the Hollywood machine.
Hunnam is perhaps best known for the role
he didn’t play, the Christian Grey part in the
erotic drama “Fifty Shades of Grey.” It was the
type of 11th-hour exit one rarely sees — a genuinely unexpected bucking of the Hollywood
handbook that encapsulates his independence.
But starting Friday, Hunnam’s fame could
take on a new dimension: He’ll be on the big
screen (really big, given the film’s 35 mm format) as the doomed British explorer Percy
Fawcett in James Gray’s jungle-adventure “The
Lost City of Z.” And next month, he’ll appear as
the lead in Guy Ritchie’s “King Arthur: Legend
of the Sword,” a stylish big-budget take on the
5th and 6th century English legend.
The two will show more of the under-theradar-actor to the world, or at least the same aspects to more of the world. At a time of glib
soundbites and Twitter fronting, Hunnam offers a refreshingly different kind of personality, a
candid and considered soul seemingly trapped
in a Hollywood-actor [See Hunnam, E12]
MORE REVIEWS
KENNETH TURAN
‘Norman: The Moderate
Rise and Tragic Fall of
a New York Fixer’ PAGE E4
‘Heal the Living’ PAGE E6
‘Truman’ PAGE E9
JUSTIN CHANG
‘Graduation’ PAGE E8
‘The Lost City of Z’ PAGE E12
ADDITIONAL REVIEWS
‘Tommy’s Honour’ PAGE E5
‘My Entire High School
Sinking Into the Sea’ PAGE E7
‘A Woman, a Part’ and other
films.
PAGES E8-9, 11
CANNES FILM FESTIVAL
Independent streak runs
through the competition
By Steven Zeitchik
A range of unconventional American players
— from Sofia Coppola to the Safdie brothers,
Noah Baumbach to Netflix — will populate this
year’s Cannes Film Festival competition lineup.
Organizers announced the selections Thursday morning in Paris, where in addition to some
European and Asian favorites came the names
of movies by American directors who’ve rarely
been in competition at Cannes — or to the festival at all.
Cannes, particularly in its competition lineup, is widely seen as a temperature read on the
state of prestige film. Judging by the slate announced Thursday, the heat is moving decidedly, even startlingly, toward U.S. auteurs and
digital upstarts — while studios and their directors, until even recent years a steady Cannes
presence, have gone cold.
Among the more indie elements at this year’s
festival are Baumbach and his “The Meyerowitz
Stories,” a story of adult siblings starring Adam
Sandler and Ben Stiller; Coppola and her “The
Beguiled,” based on the same novel as Clint
Eastwood’s outre 1971 film; and Benny and Josh
Safdie and their caper “Good Time.” All three
movies will play in competition.
Ditto Todd Haynes’ “Wonderstruck.” With
his time-spanning adaptation of Brian
Selznick's children’s book, the “Carol” director
will make his return to the Croisette after his
2015 appearance — which was his first in17 years.
Making an even rarer showing on the
Croisette is the offbeat
[See Cannes, E10]
Goodbye, Elvis;
hello, Georgia
Elvis impersonator
dons a wig and a dress
to pay rent, and “The
Legend of Georgia
McBride” is born. E14
Cheesy old
films, look out
“Mystery Science
Theater 3000” is back,
this time on Netflix,
with all new quips but
the same old fun. E16
Francois Guillot AFP/Getty Images
DIRECTOR Sofia Coppola will premiere
“The Beguiled” at the festival in May.
“POSITIVELY SUBVERSIVE AND JUST SO COOL.”
ANNE
JASON
HATHAWAY
SUDEIKIS
A FILM BY NACHO
VIGALONDO
ALL SHE COULD DO WAS SAVE THE WORLD
#SheIsColossal @SheIsColossal
NOW PLAYING
Hans Zimmer’s natural
habitat is a dark, windowless room.
As one of Hollywood’s
most successful film composers — with scores for dozens of movies stretching
from “The Dark Knight” to
“The Lion King” — the 59year-old
Oscar
winner
spends untold hours in
screening rooms and recording studios, including his
own private space tucked
into a larger complex on a
quiet industrial street in
Santa Monica.
Filled with polished
woodwork and red velvet
furniture, it has proved to be
an inspiring spot for the man
whose music combines lush
orchestral
arrangements
with unconventional electronic textures.
But that didn’t keep Zimmer’s friends from pushing
him to try a change of scenery.
“This whole thing started
with Johnny Marr and Pharrell Williams sitting me down
and going, ‘You’ve got to get
out of here and look your audience in the eye,’” the composer said the other day, referring to the Smiths guitarist (whom Zimmer drafted
to play on “Inception”) and
the
hip-hop
producer
turned pop star (with whom
Zimmer worked on “Hidden
Figures”).
“And they’re right,” he
added. “At some point you
have to see if any of the stuff
you’ve been doing while hiding behind a screen actually
resonates with people.”
That’s what Zimmer is
doing this week by launching
the North American leg of
his first concert tour, scheduled to stop Friday night at
the Microsoft Theater before moving on to a performance Sunday at the Coachella Valley Music and Arts
Festival in Indio. (The tour,
[See Festival, E15]
TV grid .................... E17
Comics ............... E18-19
E2
F R I DAY, A P R I L 14 , 2 017
L ATI M E S . C O M /CA L E N DA R
LIOR
ASHKENAZI
MICHAEL
SHEEN
RICHARD
GERE
CHARLOTTE
GAINSBOURG
HANK
AZARIA
DAN
STEVENS
STEVE
BUSCEMI
JOSH
CHARLES
“A
SPELLBINDER.
ONE OF RICHARD GERE’S BEST PERFORMANCES EVER.”
-Peter Travers, ROLLING STONE
‘Survivor’
sets the bar
at a new level
As expected, the fur
flies after the network
airs one contestant’s
outing of another.
By Christie D’Zurilla
“RICHARD GERE’S PERFORMANCE
IS AMAZINGLY FUNNY.
IT’S GOT A LOT TO SAY ABOUT THE WORLD THAT WE
LIVE IN AND HOW IT WORKS, BUT IT SAYS IT IN THIS
VERY SLY AND DECEPTIVELY LIGHTHEARTED WAY.”
-A.O. Scott, THE NEW YORK TIMES
“SMART, MORDANT, WONDERFULLY WITTY.”
-John Powers, VOGUE
“RICHLY ENTERTAINING.”
-Pete Hammond, DEADLINE
On Wednesday night’s
episode of “Survivor: Game
Changers,” a contestant
outed a fellow cast member
as transgender, sparking
widespread attention that
has rippled well beyond the
show’s audience.
On the episode on the
CBS reality show contestant
Zeke Smith was revealed to
be transgender by fellow
contestant Jeff Varner.
“There is deception here.
Deception on levels ... these
guys don’t even understand
... ,” Varner told host Jeff
Probst and the six other survivors at the show’s tribal
council, which concludes
each episode with someone
being voted off the island.
“Zeke, why haven’t you told
anyone you’re transgender?”
Varner exposed Smith,
he said, because the secret
“reveals the ability to deceive.”
The rest of the group was
shocked by Varner’s insensitivity. “You should be
ashamed of yourself ... for
what you’re willing to do to
get yourself further in a
game for a million dollars,”
said Ozzy Lusth, Smith’s
ally.
“Is it starting to hit you,
the gravity, that you didn’t
just tell six people, you told
millions of people?” Probst
asked Varner as the latter
appeared to regret what he’d
done. Varner said he
thought
“everyone”
in
Smith’s real-life circles knew.
“I thought he was just deceiving these people. It never dawned on me that no
one knew. ... I’m just devastated.”
The episode was filmed
several months ago. Knowing it was likely to stir strong
opinions — and wide viewership — the network, Smith
and the gay rights group
GLAAD worked between
the taping and the airing on
a response to the episode.
Smith, who has represented himself as a gay man
for two seasons on the show,
said he didn’t say anything
else at the time of the taping
because “I didn’t want to be
the trans ‘Survivor’ player. I
wanted to be Zeke the ‘Survivor’ player.”
In a Hollywood Reporter
guest essay published immediately after the show
aired on the West Coast,
Smith relived the moments
after Varner’s question.
“ In ‘Survivor,’ much is
permissible which is typically objectionable, but
there are limits, as there
should be on a familyfriendly reality show....”
Varner tweeted Wednesday night: “ Zeke is a wonderful man and I will forever
be amazed and inspired by
his forgiveness and compassion.”
cdz@latimes.com
Jeffrey Neira CBS
WORDS by Jeff Varner, left, sink in with contestants
Sarah Lacina, Zeke Smith and Debbie Wanner.
QUICK TAKES
‘Friends’ on off-Broadway
TELLURIDE
FILM FESTIVAL
MIAMI
FROM THE
WRITER-DIRECTOR
OF “FOOTNOTE”
FILM FESTIVAL
TORONTO
INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL
NORMAN
The Moderate Rise and Tragic Fall of a Ne w York Fixer
IN ASSOCIATION
WITH THE SOLUTION ENTERTAINMENT GROUP
A
SONY
PI
C
TURES
CLASSI
C
S
RELEASE
TADMOR
PRESENTS A COLD IRON PICTURES AND BLACKBIRD PRODUCTION A MOVIE PLUS PRODUCTION
A FILM
BY JOSEPH CEDAR RICHARD GERE “NORMAN: THE MODERATE RISE AND TRAGIC FALL OF A NEW YORK FIXER” LIOR ASHKENAZI HANK AZARIA STEVE BUSCEMI CHARLOTTE GAINSBOURG
CASTING
MUSIC
MUSIC
COSTUME
PRODUCTION
MICHAEL SHEEN DAN STEVENS
BY LAURA ROSENTHAL PRODUCER HAL WILLNER BY JUN MIYAKE DESIGNER MICHELLE MATLAND DESIGNERS KALINA IVANOV ARAD SAWAT
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A US-ISRAELI CO-PRODUCTION © 2016 OPPENHEIMER STRATEGIES LLC
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STARTS TODAY
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VIEW THE TRAILER AT WWW.NORMAN-MOVIE.COM
Forget that mythical “Friends” reunion that’s never
going to happen — “Friends! The Musical!” is on track for an
off-Broadway run.
The unauthorized parody’s song titles should resonate
with fans of the long-running NBC sitcom. Courtesy of the
musical’s co-writers, Bob and Tobly McSmith, the
soundtrack includes: “The Only Coffee Shop in New York
City,” “45 Grove Street — How Can We Afford This Place”
and “How You Doing, Ladies?”
Tobly McSmith said a “Friends” parody “was the next
logical step” in a sequence of almost-homages that has
included sendups of “Full House,” “Saved by the Bell” and
“Beverly Hills, 90210.”
It’s time to “lovingly lampoon” a show he and others grew
up with, McSmith said, adding that fans want to see it
exaggerated with commentary on the sillier story lines and
those things that never quite made sense.
Auditions will be held next month in New York City, and
the show should open in September or October at the Triad
Theatre. Paul Stancato will direct.
— Christie D’Zurilla
At 85, Lynn will ‘Deadpool 2’
unveil new work snags Josh Brolin
Country music pioneer
Loretta Lynn turns 85 on
Friday, and she’s marking
the occasion with two soldout performances this weekend at the historic Ryman
Auditorium in Nashville and
word that she’ll release a
new studio album in August.
“Wouldn’t It Be Great” is
the latest product of nearly a
decade’s worth of recording
at the Cash Cabin Studio
with co-producers John
Carter Cash and Lynn’s
daughter, Patsy Lynn Russell.
The new album, due Aug.
18, highlights Lynn’s songwriting with three new compositions interspersed with
new interpretations of several of her signature songs
both new and old.
“I think you try to do better with every record you put
out,” Lynn said in a statement. “It’s just everyday living. I think you’ve got to tell
your stories.”
— Randy Lewis
Josh Brolin has joined
the cast of “Deadpool 2” to
play Nathan Summers, the
villain known as Cable, who
will next take on Ryan Reynolds’ foul-mouthed mercenary.
In the comics, Cable was
the son of Scott Summers
(Cyclops) and Madelyne
Pryor (a clone of Jean Grey).
The
cybernetically
enhanced mutant had various
dealings with Deadpool as
friend and foe.
His many powers include
time travel, superhuman
strength, telekinesis and
teleportation, or “bodysliding.”
News of Brolin’s casting
was met with surprise from
comic book and film fans,
who also know the Oscarnominated actor as Thanos
from Marvel’s Cinematic
Universe.
“Deadpool 2” is expected
to arrive in theaters next
year.
— Nardine Saad
LOS ANGELES TIMES
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F R I DAY, A P R I L 14 , 2 017
S
L AT I M E S. C O M /CA L E N DA R
AT THE MOVIES
LATIMES.COM/MOVIES
He’s making connections
REVIEW
Richard Gere powers ‘Norman’ as a would-be fixer who’s in way over his head
KENNETH TURAN
FILM CRITIC
Subtle, unsettling, slyly
amusing, “Norman: The
Moderate Rise and Tragic
Fall of a New York Fixer”
takes some getting used to
because it’s the kind of film
we’re not used to seeing.
Starring an unexpectedly
persuasive Richard Gere
and the first English-language film from top Israeli
filmmaker Joseph Cedar,
this delicate, novelistic character study is what more
American
independent
films would be like if more
were made by thoughtful
grown-ups who gravitated
toward nuance and complexity.
The gifted Cedar, a writer-director whose last two
works,
“Beaufort”
and
“Footnote,” were Oscar
nominated, never makes the
same film twice. Here he’s
come up with an entirely involving drama about means
and ends, illusion and delusion and the price having
your dreams come true can
extract, all of it centering on
a man named Norman.
Norman’s last name, Oppenheimer, is Cedar’s acknowledged tribute to Joseph Suss Oppenheimer, an
influential and ill-fated 18th
century “court Jew” who was
a banker and behind-thescenes mover and shaker for
a powerful German duke.
Impeccably played by
Gere, who has completely
immersed himself in a very
unlikely role, this Oppenheimer starts out without even
a thimbleful of money or influence. A pusher, a hustler,
an eternal searcher for the
exploitable angle, Norman
has nothing to go on but his
drive.
In a wise but unorthodox
move, Cedar doesn’t try to
explain or psychoanalyze
Norman, doesn’t provide his
back story or reveal his secrets, doesn’t even tell us
where Norman lives or
whether his claims of family
beyond his nephew Philip
(the
protean
Michael
Sheen) are true or not. It
simply presents his actions
in their confounding singlemindedness.
Always dressed in the
same camel-hair topcoat
and gray flat cap over a serviceable black suit, a bag
slung across his body and
phone earplugs at the ready,
Norman is a one-man army.
Constantly walking and
Seacia Pavao Sony Pictures Classics
MICHAEL SHEEN , from left, and Lior Ashkenazi provide solid support for Richard Gere’s hustling New Yorker in the drama “Norman.”
‘Norman: The
Moderate Rise
and Tragic
Fall of a New
York Fixer’
Not rated
Running time: 1 hour, 58
minutes
Playing: Arclight,
Hollywood; Landmark,
West Los Angeles
talking on the streets of
Manhattan, unless he’s taking a herring-and-crackers
break at a synagogue run by
trusting Rabbi Blumenthal
(an
unexpected
Steve
Buscemi), Norman is fighting to promote himself at all
costs. Told he’s like “a
drowning man trying to
wave at an ocean liner,” he
insists “but I’m a good swimmer.”
When “Norman” opens,
the details of the project he
is seen promoting are not
clear, but there’s never any
doubt of the ferocity with
which he’s pushing it.
Searching for a way to
connect with powerful financier Arthur Taub (Josh
Charles), Norman buttonholes people wherever he
finds them, exaggerating
and insinuating, trafficking
in half-truths, evasions, prevarications and even outright lies.
Absolutely impervious to
rejection, unfazed by blows
that would stun a bull elephant, Norman keeps going
not only because that’s who
he is but also because he
truly believes his middle-
man talents are providing a
service by connecting those
whom only he can help.
Norman’s search for potential Taub leverage leads
him to the visiting Micha Eshel, Israel’s obscure but ambitious deputy minister of
Industry, Trade and Labor
beautifully played by Lior
Ashkenazi (the younger Talmudic scholar in Cedar’s
brilliant “Footnote.”)
Inveigling his way into
conversation with Eshel in
front of a high-end Manhattan shoe boutique run by the
ethereal Jacques (a wonderful cameo by Isaach De
Bankole), Norman ends up
spending $1,192, tax included, buying the Israeli
what he calls “the most expensive pair of shoes in New
York.” It’s a purchase that
will change his life.
For, three years and nu-
merous favors later, a miracle happens. Obscure no
more, Eshel becomes prime
minister and anoints Norman his “unofficial ambassador to New York Jewry,”
leading to some sublime
scenes illustrating with cinematic elan what it feels like
to have doors previously
closed swinging open.
Those open doors, as it
turns out, don’t only offer
opportunity, they let in a
host of problems Norman
never had before, as people
expect more from him and it
becomes trickier than ever
for him to deliver.
In addition to Gere and
the other stars, Cedar has
made excellent use of fine
actors like Charlotte Gainsbourg, Dan Stevens, Hank
Azaria and Harris Yulin in
supporting roles and in general dazzles us with his great
command of his complex
story.
As “Norman” hurtles
toward its daring and unexpected conclusion, one of the
subversive things the film
does is encourage us,
against all expectation, to
see things from the point of
view of its often irritating
protagonist.
Maybe, just maybe, Norman’s ability to create an intricate filigree of favors and
obligation makes him not a
man on the make but an unintentional saint, engaged in
the sacred task of tikkun
olam, the repair of a broken
world. It’s something you’ll
have to think about, and providing that kind of substance is what Joseph
Cedar’s films are always
about.
Movie recommendations
from critics Kenneth Turan, Justin Chang and
other reviewers.
intoxicating, this documentary on the tragic story of
jazz trumpeter Lee Morgan
has a creative soul, and
that makes all the difference. Whether you care
about jazz or not, the poetry of the filmmaking by
Kasper Collin and the
poignance of the story will
win you over. (Kenneth
Turan) NR.
The Women’s
Balcony
kenneth.turan@latimes.com
CRITIC’S CHOICE
After the Storm
A sublimely simple family
drama from the Japanese
writer-director Hirokazu
Kore-eda, a filmmaker
assured enough to hide his
mastery in plain sight.
Nothing is overemphasized, and nothing escapes
his attention. (Justin
Chang) NR.
Frantz
HBO
HBO’S RESTORED version of writer-director Marcel Ophüls’ 1976 documentary
“The Memory of Justice” includes original footage of the Nuremberg Trials.
‘Memory of Justice’ returns
Critically lauded but little seen during its original 1976 release, “The Memory of Justice,”
Marcel Ophüls’ powerful documentary about individual versus collective responsibility for
war crimes, is about to get a new lease on life. Considered by the director (also known for “The
Sorrow and the Pity”) to be “the best work I ever did,” “Justice” debuts on HBO2 on April 24,
Holocaust Remembrance Day. Unavailable for decades and the product of a 10-year restoration process, this version also improves on the original release by replacing English voiceover with subtitles for its French and German interviewees. Drawing parallels between the
precedent set at the post-World War II Nuremberg Trials with later actions committed by the
French in Algeria and the U.S. in Vietnam, “Justice” is as relevant today as when it came out, if
not more so.
— Kenneth Turan
Beautifully shot in blackand-white with the occasional burst of color, writerdirector François Ozon’s
layered post-WWI drama
puts a feminist spin on
Ernst Lubitsch’s 1932 antiwar film, “Broken Lullaby.”
(Justin Chang) PG-13.
I Am Not Your
Negro
As directed by the gifted
Raoul Peck, this documentary on James Baldwin uses
the entire spectrum of
movie effects, not only
spoken language but also
sound, music, editing and
all manner of visuals, to
create a cinematic essay
that is powerful and painfully relevant. (Kenneth
Turan) NR.
I Called Him
Morgan
Artistic, obsessive and
La La Land
Starring a well-paired Ryan
Gosling and Emma Stone,
writer-director Damien
Chazelle’s tuneful tribute to
classic movie musicals is
often stronger in concept
than execution, but it’s
lovely and transporting all
the same. (Justin Chang)
PG-13.
Personal Shopper
Kristen Stewart gives her
most accomplished screen
performance to date in
Olivier Assayas’ shivery
paranormal thriller — a
haunted-house movie, a
murder mystery and, in
many ways, Assayas’ most
surprising film yet about
the anxieties of modern life.
(Justin Chang) R.
Their Finest
Genial and engaging with a
fine sense of humor, this
story of making movies in
World War II Britain stars
Gemma Arterton and a
marvelous Bill Nighy and
makes blending the comic
with the serious look simpler than it actually is.
(Kenneth Turan) R.
An Israeli box-office
hit about a Jerusalem
clash of religious cultures,
this is an unapologetically
warmhearted comedic
drama, a fine example of
commercial filmmaking
grounded in a persuasive
knowledge of human behavior. (Kenneth Turan)
NR.
Your Name.
The highest-grossing
anime of all time and
winner of the Los Angeles
Film Critics Assn.’s
animated feature prize,
Makoto Shinkai’s thrillingly
beautiful film juggles
an out-of-body farce, a
time-traveling romance
and a terrifying epic of
survival. (Justin Chang)
PG.
‘Spark’ to get
a late review
The animated adventure
“Spark: A Space Tail,” featuring the voices of Patrick
Stewart, Susan Sarandon
and Jessica Biel, opened Friday in general release but
was not screened for critics.
The review will appear as
soon as possible in Calendar
and online at latimes.com/
moviereviews.
L AT I ME S . CO M / CA L EN DA R
F R IDAY , A P R IL 14 , 2 017
E5
AT THE MOVIES
“ONE OF THE YEAR’S
BEST MOVIES.”
“THE KIND OF GRAND ADVENTURE
EPIC FEW PEOPLE KNOW HOW
TO MAKE ANYMORE.”
“POWERFUL.
A VISIONARY FILM.”
Neil Davidson Roadside Attractions
TOMMY (Jack Lowden) watches his shot in “Tom-
my’s Honour,” a tale of father-and-son golf legends.
REVIEW
True masters
on and off
the course
Father-and-son golf
greats rise above class
in the affecting film
‘Tommy’s Honour.’
By Kevin Crust
Anyone who watched
Sergio García’s thrilling sudden-death victory in last
weekend’s Masters knows
that golf can be dramatic.
That tradition goes back 150
years to the time of Old Tom
Morris, who won the Open
Championship
(what
Americans call the British
Open) in 1861, 1862, 1864 and
1867, before passing the mantle to his son, Young Tom or
Tommy Morris, also a fourtime winner.
The Morrises and their
flinty, but ultimately tender,
relationship are the subject
of the handsomely produced
drama “Tommy’s Honour,”
directed by Jason Connery
and based on a book by Kevin Cook, who also wrote the
screenplay with his wife,
Pamela Marin.
Though ostensibly set on
various links throughout
Britain, this faithful and
often moving film addresses
much more than golf heroics, commenting on issues of
tradition, class and family,
especially the bonds between father and son.
Golf has changed a lot
since the Morrises first teed
their shots from small,
handcrafted hills of dirt, and
they contributed mightily to
that modernization. Old
Tom, the longtime greenskeeper at Scotland’s Royal
and Ancient Golf Club of St.
Andrews, helped organize
the first Open, hand-crafted
balls and clubs in his shop
and designed dozens of
courses, rapidly evolving a
sport that had already been
played for four centuries.
Young Tommy was a true innovator on the links, creating shots and strategies
that would affect the game
for decades.
In the movie, Tommy is
played with antsy rebellion
by Jack Lowden, who bears a
strong resemblance to Dennis Christopher, star of the
1979 cycling film “Breaking
Away,” another sports drama rooted in class with a
strong father-son dynamic.
Learning the game from Old
Tom, played by Peter Mullan, Tommy surpasses his
dad by the time he is a teen.
Nothing but pride, and
perhaps a lament of aging,
passes over Old Tom’s face
as he watches his son’s progress. The conflict between
the two men largely emerges
from Tommy’s rejection of
his father’s working-class
model of maintaining the
course and attending to the
club members’ needs with
lessons and equipment. In
other words, knowing his
place.
In the 19th century, amateurism was idealized, with
professional athletes viewed
as something like prized
thoroughbreds, though with
less social standing. Club
members, real “gentlemen,”
staked professional golfers’
matches, gambling large
sums of money and then
paying the golfers a small cut
of the winnings. Tommy
Morris challenged the status
quo, successfully demanding a larger share.
Tommy chafes at the idea
of the already rich men profiting from his talent. A bit of
a dandy, he sees how the upper class lives and wants a
piece of the action, standing
up to the club’s pompous
chief, Alexander Boothby
(cheekily played by Sam
Neill), while earning the disapproval of Old Tom.
The elder Morris initially
sees little need for change in
a society that allows him to
provide for his family, yet remain in debt. But through
his love for Tommy, he bestows a begrudging acceptance. The veteran Mullan,
best known for his work with
Ken Loach and Danny
Boyle, can do more with a
narrowing of the eyes than
most actors can with a soliloquy, and his ruddy features
and stoic demeanor anchor
the film, grounding it in social realism whenever it
tends toward romanticism
and sentimentality.
The younger Morris also
bucks convention when he
falls for Meg Drinnen
(“Guardians of the Galaxy’s” Ophelia Lovibond), a
maid 10 years his senior. The
film pins much of its story on
their romance, a match met
with judgment from the
community and strong displeasure from Tommy’s
mother, Nancy (Therese
Bradley). Fortunately, there
is plenty of chemistry between Lowden and the winsome Lovibond, and their
scenes of courtship both
lighten the tone and earn our
emotional investment.
Connery and his crew, including director of photography Gary Shaw, production designer James Lapsley
and
costume
designer
Rhonda Russell, richly
evoke the harsh beauty of
Scotland, while warmly recreating the style and manners of the period. There’s a
certain “Chariots of Fire”like reverence for all things
golf and Scottish, but the
woolly courses, a far cry from
the manicured fairways of
today, and comparatively
crude implements used by
the players, provide an
earthy balance.
However, the greatest
strength of “Tommy’s Honour” turns out to be its primary weakness as well. It’s
surprisingly affecting, but
there’s a tendency to telegraph pivotal emotional moments that in a way lessens
their effect. It’s a tribute to
the film’s overall craft, and
especially its cast, that it’s as
much a winner as it is.
calendar@latimes.com
‘Tommy’s
Honour’
Rating: PG, for thematic
elements, some suggestive
material, language and
smoking
Running time: 1 hour, 52
minutes
Playing: In limited release
AMAZONSTUDIOS PRESENTS IN ASSOCIATIONWITH MICAENTERTAINMENT AND NORTHERNIRELANDSCREEN
A PLANBENTERTAINMENT KEEPYOURHEAD MADRIVERPICTURES PRODUCTION IN ASSOCIATIONWITH SIERRAPICTURES A JAMESGRAY FILM
CHARLIE HUNNAM
ROBERTPATTINCOSTUME
SON SIENNAMILLER “THELOSTCI
TYOFZ” TOMHOLLAND ANGUSMACFADYEN
IANMcDIARMID
CASTING
MUSIC
MUSIC
FRANCONERO BY KATERINGSELL DESIGNER
SONIA GRANDE SUPERVISORS GEORGEDRAKOULI
AS RANDALLPOSTEREXECUTIVEBY CHRISTOPHERSPELMAN
PRODUCTION
DIRECTOROF
EDITORS JOHNAXELRAD,ACE LEEHAUGEN DESIGNER JEAN-VINCENTPUZOS PHOTOGRAPHY DARIUSKHONDJI, ASC,AFC PRODUCERS BRADPITT MARCBUTAN
PRODUCED
BASEDON
BY DEDEGARDNER p.g.a. JEREMYKLEINER p.g.a. ANTHONYKATAGAS p.g.a. JAMESGRAY p.g.a. DALEARMIN JOHNSON THEBOOKBY DAVID GRANN
WRITTENFORTHESCREEN
ANDDIRECTEDBY JAMESGRAY
www.LostCityofZ.com
VIOLENCE, DISTURBING
IMAGES, BRIEF STRONG
LANGUAGE AND
SOME NUDITY.
© 2016 LCOZ HOLDINGS LLC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
HOLLYWOOD
ARCLIGHT CINEMAS
at Sunset & Vine (323) 464-4226 arclightcinemas.com
Fri: 10:05, 11:15, 1:10, 3:10, 5:25, 7:15, 8:15, 10:15, 11:45 Sat: 10:05, 11:00, 1:10, 3:10, 5:25, 7:00, 8:15, 10:15,
11:45 Sun: 10:05, 11:15, 1:10, 3:10, 5:25, 7:15, 8:15, 10:15 Mon: 11:10, 12:15, 1:45, 3:20, 5:15, 7:00, 8:00, 9:30,
10:45, 11:30 Tue: 10:50, 11:15, 1:30, 3:15, 5:00, 7:15, 8:15, 10:15 Wed: 11:30, 1:20, 2:30, 5:30, 8:15, 10:00
WEST LOS ANGELES
THE LANDMARK
at W. Pico & Westwood (310) 470-0492 landmarktheatres.com
Fri & Sun: 10:00, 11:30, 1:05, 3:00, 4:10, 5:40, 7:15, 8:40, 10:15 Sat: 10:00, 11:30, 1:05, 3:00, 4:10,
5:40, 7:30, 8:40, 10:25 Mon: 11:30, 1:05, 2:35, 4:10, 7:15, 10:15 Tue: 11:30, 1:05, 2:35, 4:10,
5:40, 7:15, 8:45, 10:15 Wed & Thur: 11:30, 1:05, 2:35, 4:10, 7:15, 10:15
Q&A TOMORROW with Screenwriter and Director JAMES GRAY
at The Landmark following the 4:10PM show and at ArcLight Hollywood following the 7:00PM show
E6
F R I DAY, A P R I L 14 , 2 017
L ATI M E S . C O M /CA L E N DA R
AT THE MOVIES
REVIEW
Drama makes a heartfelt connection
‘Heal the Living’
offers a poignant,
surprising story that
resonates with life.
KENNETH TURAN
FILM CRITIC
Unusual in its story, unexpected in its structure,
made with an unerring instinct for emotional connection, “Heal the Living” wallops us without ever overplaying its hand.
Co-written and directed
by France’s Katell Quillevere, “Heal the Living” reveals a gift for joining skillful
visual filmmaking with moving, affecting storytelling, all
in the service of a story that
unfolds in surprising ways.
“Heal the Living” is an
ensemble film, despite having Tahar Rahim and
Emmanuelle Seigner, two of
France’s top actors in key
roles, as it follows not an individual but an actual human heart. Involved in this
story, adapted by the director and Gilles Taurand from
a successful novel, is the
teenage boy the heart came
from, the mature woman it
might be going to, and the
two teams of doctors trying
to make that transition
work.
Though there are some
heartbreaking flashbacks,
these people are introduced
sequentially, as their time in
the narrative arrives, which
adds an energy to the proceedings. The one thing that
unites the boy and the woman, the film’s heartening
through line, are those doctors, brought to vivid life not
as saints but like everyone
else in “Heal the Living,”
people striving to be at their
best for the challenges life inevitably throws at them.
Seen first is 17-year-old
Simon (Gabin Verdet), introduced in the port city of
Le Havre taking a clandestine early morning departure from the room of his
high school sweetheart, Ju-
Cohen Media Group
SIMON (GABIN VERDET), left, is injured in an accident, and physician Thomas (Tahar Rahim) is called in to assist in “Heal the Living.”
‘Heal the
Living’
Not rated
Running time: 1 hour, 44
minutes
Playing: Laemmle’s
Monica, Santa Monica
liette (Galatea Bellugi). Devoted to cycling and in general yearning for activity, Simon is not so much a daredevil as an exulter in
physicality, in the joy of being alive.
Meeting up with two
friends, he hops into a van
for a ride to some early
“A BEAUTIFUL
TRIBUTE TO
THE GAME.
morning surfing. Beautifully
shot (as the whole film is) by
Tom Harari, the surfing has
the potential for danger inherent in the sport, but the
problem for Simon comes
not in the water but on the
drive back.
Presented to us in an unusual visual way, Simon’s accident puts him in a local
hospital, unconscious with
severe brain damage and no
chance of recovery.
Enter now the hospital’s
staff, primarily senior surgeon Pierre (Boult Lanners), rumpled, all business
yet caring, and, later, medical specialist Thomas, the
physician who deals with potential organ donations,
played with a convincing
FROM THE DIRECTOR OF
‘4 MONTHS, 3 WEEKS AND 2 DAYS’
“
MAKE SURE TO SEE THIS MOST
AUTHENTIC CINEMATIC ACHIEVEMENT.”
– Jim Nantz, Legendary Sportscaster and the Voice of Golf
World Golf Hall of Fame member
BASED ON THE DRAMATIC TRUE
STORY OF OLD TOM MORRIS
AND YOUNG TOM MORRIS
first, they go home to think
about it, understanding
that the clock is ticking on
how long their son’s body
will remain viable for saving
other lives.
Brought into the mix
next is Claire (French Canadian actress Anne Dorval),
a difficult Parisian whose
weak heart is getting
weaker. We meet the people
important to her, including
her two sons, a concert pianist (Alice Taglioni) she has
been close to, and the medical team she will work with if
the transplant is to happen.
Laying out “Heal the Living’s” plot this way makes
its filmmaking style feel
more straight ahead than it
is. In reality, Quillevere is
“An out of this world triumph!
A must-see!”
- Scott Mantz, Access Hollywood
NO GIANT LEAP
IS MADE
ALONE
SUPERB.
guided by the logic of emotion as much as any narrative thread, giving this, her
third feature, a remarkable
sense of immediacy, always
alive to the expressive potential of each scene.
The best illustration of
this is the exquisitely crafted
flashback scene of the moments when Simon and Juliette became a couple. Its
appearance in the film feels
random, but it is not. It is
perfectly placed to create
maximum expressive resonance. Working like this is
second nature to Quillevere,
and it’s why “Heal the Living” is such a success.
kenneth.turan
@latimes.com
“CRITIC’S PICK!
THE NEXT BEST THING
TO DANCING ON AIR.”
– NEW YORK TIMES
VINCE
GIORDANO
THERE’S A FUTURE IN THE PAST
A MASTERLY, COMPLEX MOVIE.”
“I HOPE
EVERYBODY
EMBRACES
THIS FILM,
BECAUSE IT IS A POIGNANT STORY
THAT IS SO BEAUTIFULLY DEPICTED.”
– Ben Crenshaw, Two-time Masters Champion,
sensitivity by Rahim, who
shot to French stardom with
Jacques Audiard’s very different “Un Prophete.”
Added at this point are
Simon’s estranged and distraught parents, first his
mother, Marianne (an impressive Seigner), and then
father, Vincent (French rapper Kool Shen), who holds
himself responsible because
he introduced his son to
surfing.
Unwilling to believe that
their son, hooked up to
machines and looking still
alive, is, in fact, brain dead,
the parents are confronted
by Pierre, who says simply,
“It’s the truth, and you have
to hear it.” Unwilling to even
consider organ donation at
MISSION
CONTROL
THE UNSUNG HEROES OF APOLLO
– Peter Bradshaw, THE GUARDIAN
A GRIPPING THRILLER.
A MUST-SEE.”
“
STARTS
TODAY
BEVERLY HILLS
Laemmle’s&Music
A FILM BY DAVE DAVIDSON
AMBERHall
EDWARDS
(310) 478-3836 laemmle.com
Daily: 12:20, 2:40, 5:10, 7:40, 10:00
Vince Giordano & Filmmakers In Person
Tonight after the 7:40pm show and
Tomorrow after the 2:40pm & 7:40pm shows.
Watch the trailer and learn more: www.firstrunfeatures.com
– Peter Travers, ROLLING STONE
★★★★
“
MESMERIZING.
”
– Ann Hornaday, THE WASHINGTON POST
CAPTIVATING. MARVELOUS.
“
A PITCH-PERFECT MORALITY PLAY.”
– Jordan Hoffman, VANITY FAIR
★★★★
“
EXTRAORDINARILY POIGNANT AND INSIGHTFUL.”
STARTS TODAY
SANTA MONICA
Laemmle’s Monica Film Center
(310) 478-3836 laemmle.com
Fri & Mon-Thur: 1:50, 4:30,
7:10, 9:55 Sat & Sun: 10:30AM,
1:50, 4:30, 7:10, 9:55
PASADENA
Laemmle’s
Playhouse 7
(626) 844-6500
Sat & Sun:
11:00AM
Q&A with NASA Engineer TERRY WATSON
Tomorrow at the Monica after the 7:10pm
show, moderated by Scott Mantz.
REAL
JOURNALISM
REAL
IMPACT
Introducing the
free Hot Property
newsletter.
– Geoffrey Macnab, THE INDEPENDENT
A THOROUGHGOING
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L AT I ME S . CO M / CA L EN DA R
F R I DAY , A P R I L 14 , 2 017
E7
AT THE MOVIES
REVIEW
There’s got to be a morning after ...
‘Poseidon Adventure’
meets ‘Breakfast Club’
in this delightfully
absurd ‘School.’
By Robert Abele
However you feel about
the ubiquity of high school
turmoil as a movie genre, it’s
safe to say there’s nothing
like animator Dash Shaw’s
“My Entire High School
Sinking Into the Sea,” a colorful, hand-drawn calamity
comedy that is equal parts
John Hughes, Wes Anderson
and Irwin Allen.
Shaw, whose work encompasses graphic novels
(“New School,” “Cosplayers”) and the cartoon arts
(the video “Seraph” for
Sigur Rós), brings to bear a
delightfully absurd sensibility and a keenly funny understanding of youthful alienation and ambition neurosis.
You’d be surprised how
much the two fit together in
Shaw’s succession of evermore fantastical disaster
scenarios: the cafeteria powwow about imminent flooding death that devolves into
petty cliquishness, friends
arguing about whether yoga
is exercise while averting
near-demise, a tough-asnails lunch lady turning into
an unexpected (to the
scared kids, that is, not to
herself) action hero.
The collage at work in
Shaw’s debut feature is both
figurative and, considering
the layering of drawing,
painting and photographic
image, literal.
The same goes for the
fault lines that run through
cliff-side Tides High School:
They define the students’
group-segregated lives yet
also exist as a reality underneath the building.
Shaw’s self-named antihero Dash (the voice of Jason Schwartzman) and bespectacled Assaf (Reggie
Watts) are outcast best buds
who fancy themselves muckrakers for their school paper,
GKids
DON’T YOU forget about them — Assaf, left, and Dash are outcast best buds in the film “My Entire High School Sinking Into the Sea.”
‘My Entire
High School
Sinking Into
the Sea’
Rating: PG-13, for some
images of peril, sexual
references and drug
material
Running Time: 1 hour, 17
minutes
Playing: Nuart, L.A.
which is edited by the third
member of their misfit trio,
bookish Verti (Maya Rudolph). When Dash’s oversensitivity threatens to
break up the gang, he turns
on his friends, but in bitter
exile also discovers the
BASED ON
scoop of his sophomore life:
a top-down scandal exposing the building as not being
up to the earthquake safety
code.
Nobody believes Dash,
because he’s a serial exaggerator. But he’s proved
right the hard way when the
mildest of subterranean
shocks sends the school sliding into the Pacific. The only
true escape — from sharks,
drowning or students still
harboring lingering school
resentments — means finding one’s way to the roof, and
making unlikely friends, including Lunch Lady Lorraine (Susan Sarandon) and
a snobby joiner named Mary
(Lena Dunham in the Molly
Ringwald role).
As externalized visions of
high school hellishness go,
Shaw’s doesn’t always trans-
late into the most cohesively
entertaining of mash-ups,
but his techniques are attention-grabbers.
Sometimes, it’s as if
Lynda Barry were a cutoutmad Fauvist. Sometimes,
it’s the trippiest “ScoobyDoo” episode you’ve ever
seen. The strangely mixed
sound design for the deadpan
dialogue
simultaneously recalls Robert Altman and Judd Apatow.
Most of the time, characters are crudely rendered in
simple lines, but one wistful
recollection of a camp summer features detailed illustrations that feel like something out of Highlights magazine (until the jokey closeup
of
urine-stained
underwear breaks that
spell).
But even at its most art-
installation-like — when
your attention might be
tempted to wander as Shaw
wrestles with focusing on
story or visuals — it percolates with the imagination of
a passionate few artists,
rather than narcotizes in the
manner of industrialized
animation, and that’s a
beautiful thing.
Sleeping sharks get ZZZs
above their heads. A character’s color — it often changes
— usually feels connected to
the intensity of what he or
she is feeling. And sometimes there’s a photograph
of a cotton swab.
Better still, Shaw’s adventure story, with its
shades of “The Poseidon Adventure,” allows for pockets
of feeling that, though conceived as semi-winking
homages to those “Break-
fast Club”-like moments of
class-divide understanding,
still carry a measure of sincerity.
For a movie that impishly
likes cutting to animated
lungs during its crisis-ofbreath moments and gets
edgy kicks out of depicting
its high body count, it’s
the film’s secretly beating
heart — the awareness
that surviving high school
brings — that underlies its
creativity.
It makes Shaw’s frequent
flights of head-scratching
comic fancy even feel emotionally appropriate. Because, at a certain point, in
the words of that other
comic book movie, you’ll believe a poetically waxing
lunch lady can fly.
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HEARTWARMING
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E8
F R I DAY , A P R I L 14 , 2 017
L ATI M E S . C O M /CA L E N DA R
AT THE MOVIES: REVIEWS
Sundance Selects
MARIA DRAGUS portrays Eliza and Adrian Titieni plays her desperate father, Romeo, in the suspenseful new film from Romanian writer-director Cristian Mungiu.
‘GRADUATION’
Sins of a well-meaning father
With daughter’s future at stake, anything goes in Cristian Mungiu’s tense drama
JUSTIN CHANG
FILM CRITIC
“Graduation,” a film of
gripping moral suspense
from Romanian writer-director Cristian Mungiu,
opens with a rock being
hurled through the window
of a middle-aged doctor
named Romeo (Adrian Titieni). It is the first of several
attacks that take place over
the course of the movie, including a second act of vandalism and an attempted
sexual assault. Mungiu’s
purpose here is not to identify the guilty (which would
take a while), but rather to
establish an atmosphere of
ambiguous unease.
Bleak, naturalistic and
flawlessly acted, “Graduation” distills the mood and
moral decay of a place whose
gray skies and nondescript
housing blocks feel like permanent reminders of its
dark history.
Unlike Mungiu’s 2007
masterpiece, “4 Months, 3
Weeks and 2 Days,” which
unfolded in the final days of
Nicolae Ceausescu’s Communist dictatorship, the
new film is set in the present,
but the past continues to
cast a long shadow. A sense
of desperation, mostly venal
but sometimes violent,
seems to hover in the very air
these men and women
breathe.
And while Romeo is a
mild-mannered, outwardly
respectable contributor to
society, his own sins — far
more than those committed
against him and his family —
are what seem to interest the
movie most. “I have this feeling someone’s following me,”
he says, and that someone
might as well be the filmmaker himself, whose hyperalert camera stays fixed on
the good (and sometimes
not-so-good) doctor as he
navigates a labyrinth of personal and professional corruption.
The drama is set in motion when his teenage
daughter, Eliza (Maria Dragus), fends off a would-be
rapist on her way to school
one morning — a senseless
attack that disturbs Romeo
for reasons beyond the initial shock and lingering
trauma. Eliza is about to
take the final exams that
could secure her a scholarship to Cambridge, and
the attack comes as an illtimed blow to her academic
future, rattling her nerves,
shattering her wrist and
forcing her to wear a heavy
cast that, the exam proctors
worry, might be concealing a
cheat sheet.
Their suspicions turn out
to be thoroughly justified,
not because Eliza is a cheater but because just about everyone else is.
Over the course of two
sharply plotted, grimly absorbing hours, “Graduation”
becomes a steady accrual of
petty vices, under-the-table
exchanges and quiet betrayals. Some of these have been
happening for a while, like
Romeo’s affair with a single
mother, Sandra (Malina
Manovici) — a detail foreshadowed here by his chilly
estrangement from his longsuffering wife, Magda (Lia
Bugnar).
The love that Romeo and
Magda might have once felt
for each other — perhaps before they returned to Romania from exile in 1991, hoping
for a better life post-Communism — has long since
‘Graduation’
Rating: R, for some
language
Running time: 2 hours, 8
minutes
Playing: Laemmle’s Royal
Theatre, Los Angeles
been displaced entirely onto
their daughter, along with
what remains of their hopes
and dreams. That Eliza
might escape this dreadful
place is all that matters to
Romeo, even if it means calling in favors with an old
friend at the police station
(Vlad Ivanov), a tight-lipped
exam board official (Gelu
Colceag) and an ailing politician (Petre Ciubotaru) who
might benefit from his professional attention.
Romeo, like some of his
conspirators, tries to reassure himself that these
machinations are necessary,
a last-minute deviation from
an otherwise strict ethical
code that he prides himself
on upholding. But “Graduation” gives the lie to such
self-serving reassurances.
No less than “4 Months, 3
Weeks and 2 Days,” which
similarly used a compressed
time frame to shed light on a
condition of long-term malaise, this is a movie about
the moral cost of survival —
the negotiations and compromises that each character must continually make
with others, and with his or
her own conscience.
Mungiu, who shared the
directing prize at last year’s
Cannes Film Festival (with
Olivier Assayas for “Personal Shopper”), is a master of
concentration. Working for
the first time with the cinematographer Tudor Vladimir Panduru, the director
invests his characters’ mundane conversations with a
hushed, almost conspiratorial intensity.
At its best, Mungiu’s style
achieves the clarity of the
confessional: His characters
may deflect and dissemble,
but the camera, with its
restless following movements and unblinking long
takes, gives them no room to
hide.
At times Titieni, with his
fine-grained
Everyman
schlumpiness, brings to
mind Olivier Gourmet, the
great Belgian actor often
cast in the restless, relentlessly compassionate films
of Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne (who happen to be
credited among “Graduation’s” co-producers). But
Romeo’s failings are held in
check, and to some extent
corrected, by Eliza, a sensitive child who finds herself
caught between obedience,
disillusionment and her own
desire for freedom — including the freedom to continue
seeing her boyfriend, Marius
(Rares Andrici), whom
Romeo can’t abide.
Art-house
audiences
may recall the gifted Dragus
as one of the young children
in “The White Ribbon,”
Michael Haneke’s 2009 portrait of a pre-World War I
town in the grip of an eerily
pervasive evil. There is
something of Haneke’s
steely observation in “Graduation,” but there is also a
warmer, more hopeful vision
of humanity — a grace born
of the film’s toughness and
clarity of vision.
justin.chang@latimes.com
Twitter: @JustinCChang
Tom Betterton Factory 25
Strand Releasing
Lionsgate
JOHN ORTIZ , Maggie Siff, center, and Cara Sey-
THE FILMMAKERS don’t shy away from showing
the tough moments of teens like Ginger Leigh Ryan.
problematic seatmate on a dangerous flight.
‘A WOMAN, A PART’
‘ALL THIS PANIC’
‘ALTITUDE’
mour play long-lost friends who are reconnecting.
DENISE RICHARDS plays an FBI agent with a
Incredible acting An achingly real A no-frills flight
in indie drama
portrait of youth with no suspense
As a title, “A Woman, A
Part” both reveals and obfuscates the themes of the
film, written and directed by
Elisabeth Subrin.
Maggie Siff stars as
Anna, a TV actress on the
verge of a breakthrough or a
breakdown; a woman who is
very unhappy with that specific part.
Ready to throw in the
towel on her acting career,
she beats a hasty retreat out
of L.A., returning to her old
apartment in New York and
reconnecting with her longlost friends and theater collaborators, Isaac (John Ortiz) and Kate (Cara Seymour).
The film itself is not just
about one woman and one
part, but about three people,
grappling with their pasts,
presents and futures, and
provides three fantastic
parts for three incredible actors.
There is also a part for
Anna in Isaac’s new play
that is uncomfortably familiar and it reopens old
wounds, reveals intentions
and blows the lid off long-repressed confrontations.
The film is an astute
character study that is analytical but never unemotional.
Subrin has a background
in experimental shorts and
video art, and moments of
surreality pepper “A Woman, A Part” but never eclipse
the thrust of the characters’
journey. Siff is wonderful,
but Ortiz and Seymour
nearly steal the movie out
from under her.
For Subrin, it’s not just a
promising entry into the
world of narrative filmmaking but already a fine
achievement.
— Katie Walsh
“A Woman, A Part.” Not
rated. Running time: 1 hour,
38 minutes. Playing: Laemmle Monica Film Center,
Santa Monica.
Director Jenny Gage
weaves a gorgeous, lyrical
piece of nonfiction cinema
out of intimate confessions
and urban landscapes in the
documentary
“All
This
Panic.” The film is a tone poem, a watercolor portrait, a
snapshot of youth following
the lives of a group of
teenage girls growing up in
Brooklyn.
Aesthetically, the film
looks and feels like a narrative indie movie, but the girls
on screen are all too real,
squabbling with their siblings, navigating the tricky
transitions into sex, drugs
and drinking, all while clawing out a personal identity
for themselves.
In the high-stakes world
of teenagers, the stakes are
elevated when those teens
have all of New York City at
their feet. The girls seem impossibly young, and at
times, impossibly wise beyond their years, wrestling
with family issues, mental
health, money, sexuality,
death and hardest of all, life
itself.
Gage and cinematographer Tom Betterton
were granted incredible access to the lives of these girls
and respect that trust. They
never shy away from the
tough or unflattering moments, and capture many
vulnerable and soul-bearing
moments. The dreams and
insecurities and struggles of
these girls are specific, and
so universal. “All This Panic”
is a deeply felt tribute to
youth but also to growing
up; it’s a time capsule of a
fleeting, fragile moment
when angst is mixed with
beauty
and
everything
seems ripe with potential.
— Katie Walsh
“All This Panic.” Not rated.
Running time:1hour,19 minutes. Playing: Arena Cinelounge Las Palmas, Hollywood; Arena Cinelounge,
Santa Monica.
The best thing that can
be said about director Alex
Merkin’s low-budget, highflying action picture “Altitude” is that it doesn’t take
itself too seriously. Then
again, any movie with Denise Richards playing an FBI
agent stuck on a plane between feuding master criminals was never going to be a
masterpiece — even with a
better script and expensive
special effects.
Richards’ none-too-convincing Agent Gretchen
Blair discovers early in her
flight that her seatmate
Terry (Kirk Barker) is trying
to escape from his partners
in crime with a suitcase filled
with millions of dollars.
When the crew of the jet
starts disappearing, she figures out that Terry’s exfriends (played by Dolph
Lundgren and Greer Grammer) are on board, with a
plan to get their money back.
“Altitude” doesn’t pack
much plot into its short run-
ning time; instead Merkin
and screenwriter Jesse Mittelstadt pile up jokes about
the annoyances of air travel,
wedged between clumsily
staged shootouts and punch
outs.
The cast is game and the
pace blessedly zippy, but
everything about this film
feels too fake to generate any
real suspense.
Granted, it’s not easy to
set a thriller on an airplane.
Done well, films like “Red
Eye” and “Flightplan” combine mystery and melodrama with the sweaty anxiety of being suspended
30,000 feet in the air.
“Altitude” is more like
watching a dangerous game
of cat-and-mouse in a
cramped hallway.
— Noel Murray
“Altitude.” Rating: R, for
language and some violence.
Running time: 1 hour, 28
minutes. Playing: Laemmle
NoHo 7, North Hollywood.
L AT I ME S . CO M / CA L EN DA R
F R I DAY, A P R I L 14 , 2 017
E9
AT THE MOVIES: REVIEWS
Fine balance of life, death
‘TRUMAN’
How a terminally ill man handles his end becomes an exercise in affirmation
KENNETH TURAN
FILM CRITIC
It sounds paradoxical
but, if done right, films about
a life ending can be the most
life-affirming films you’ll see.
“Truman,” a great success in
its native Spain, is definitely
done right.
Essentially a two-hander
about a terminally ill man
and his lifelong best friend,
“Truman” swept the 2016
Goyas, Spain’s equivalent to
the Academy Awards, winning best film, screenplay
and director as well as actor
and supporting actor for its
pair of veteran stars.
That would be Ricardo
Darin, Argentina’s biggest
attraction, best known in
this country for “The Secret
in Their Eyes,” and Javier
Camara, who has appeared
in several Pedro Almodovar
films, including “Talk to
Her” and “Bad Education.”
Darin and Camara, who
also shared the best actor
prize at Spain’s prestigious
San Sebastian festival, were
director Cesc Gay’s first
choices, and it’s not hard to
see why.
Both accomplished performers for whom not pushing too hard is second nature, they are ideal for this
feelingly done, honest and
very human story about
what is wanted from life as
death approaches, a satisfying film that is moving in
both expected and unexpected ways.
Though it’s set in Madrid,
“Truman” begins not there
but on an early morning in
Canada, where Tomas (Camara) is saying goodbye to
his wife and young children
before taking off for Spain,
where he is paying a visit to
best friend Julian (Darin).
The visit is a surprise, but
the underlying reason for it
is not. Julian has found out
that the lung cancer he
thought had been contained
has in fact dangerously metastasized.
More than that, tipped
off by Julian’s attractive
cousin
Paula
(Dolores
Fonzi), Tomas knows that
Julian, sick of hospitals and
medical regimens, has decided not to have the cancer
treated
anymore.
“I’m
done,” he tells his friend, and
it’s clear he means it.
FilmRise
DOLORES FONZI, left, and Javier Cámara, right, in “Truman,” about lifelong friends, a beloved dog and a dying man arranging his exit.
‘Truman’
Not rated
Running time: 1 hour, 48
minutes
Playing: Laemmle’s Royal,
West Los Angeles;
Playhouse 7, Pasadena
In a lesser scenario, “Truman” would be taken up by
Tomas trying to change
Julian’s mind, but here
Tomas quickly realizes that
his friend cannot be dissuaded by him or anyone
else.
Instead, Tomas spends
the four days he has of his
trip in Madrid accompanying Julian as his friend tries
to tie up the loose ends in his
life and arrange things
ahead of time so that his
death is not a burden to the
survivors.
Though the two men
could not be closer, they are
far from identical, which
leads
to
considerable
amount of amusing bicker-
ing between the two.
Tomas, a scientist back
home in Canada, is a planner
and worrier, while Julian, an
actor who is still working on
stage, is dramatic and emotional, someone who enjoys
nothing better than making
a scene — like the one he creates when he berates colleagues who are avoiding
him because of his illness.
The darkly amusing
situations the men navigate
together include shopping
for a casket and dealing with
the producer of the play
Gunpowder & Sky
KS Pictures
Julian is in. But much of
their time is taken up with
the character that gives the
film its name.
Truman, however, is not
a person but a dog, a large
and elderly bull mastiff with
a mind of its own that Julian,
with his son at university in
Amsterdam, considers to be
his second child.
Completely consumed
with Truman’s well-being,
Julian has a comical conversation with a vet about how
the dog will react to his
death and even takes meet-
ings with a series of potential
adoptive families who would
inherit the dog when he dies.
Julian believes that “the
only thing that matters in
life is relationships,” but because this bromide is harder
to put into practice than he
anticipates, it’s a pleasure to
watch these believable individuals as they try. “Each
person dies as best they
can,” the actor says, and
those indeed prove to be
words to live by.
kenneth.turan@latimes.com
Jacob Hutchings Vision Films / Swen / Eammon Films
NEW YORKERS (Nelsan Ellis, Melanie Lynskey)
MATTHEW WEBB , left, joins Keith Sutliff and
Brandon Pearson in a mission to exact revenge.
and Victoria Justice will put one over on the cool kids.
‘LITTLE BOXES’
‘THE MASON BROTHERS’
‘THE OUTCASTS’
Many a nostril flares in
“The Mason Brothers,” a
talky, drawn-out crime
thriller that’s big on posturing but comes up empty in
the delivery of convincing
dramatic goods.
After their baby brother,
Orion (Michael Whelan), is
killed during a downtown
L.A. heist, bank-robbing siblings Ren (the film’s writer
and director, Keith Sutliff)
and
hot-headed
Jesse
(Brandon Pearson), along
with fellow accomplice Gage
(Matthew Webb), have good
reason to believe they were
set up, eliciting the services
of a bounty hunter (Tim
Park) to track down the culprits.
Those in the market for a
good-old-fashioned, adrenaline-soaked vengeance yarn
will have to look elsewhere —
in lieu of any actual action or,
at the very least, a sense of
mounting tension, the disgruntled Mason boys occupy most of the film’s point-
A teen comedy for the
Tumblr generation, “The
Outcasts” groups students
according to what they like,
including canceled sci-fi
show “Firefly,” the value of pi
and, surprisingly, “The 48
Laws of Power.” The script
from Dominique Ferrari and
Suzanne Wrubel gets enjoyably specific when delving
into its characters’ quirks,
though some of the references seem dated.
High school seniors Jodi
(Victoria
Justice)
and
Mindy (Eden Sher) are the
unpopular students of the title, with their respective affection for Tina Fey and the
periodic table making them
targets of the cool kids. After
unsuccessfully trying for a
truce with the bullies, Jodi
and Mindy realize that if all
of the outcasts band together, they will outnumber
the high school royalty. With
the help of a Girl Scout
(Katie Chang), a would-be
leader (Ashley Rickards), a
move to suburbs with their son (Armani Jackson).
ASHLEY RICKARDS , left, Eden Sher, Avan Jogia
Multiracial story Too much talk
Repeat of popular
with a light touch and too few thrills plot is still fun
In “Little Boxes,” a citydwelling family finds itself
transplanted to suburbia, illequipped to handle the culture shock.
Melanie Lynskey and
Nelsan Ellis play Gina and
Mack, a married couple —
she’s a photographer, he’s a
writer — and parents to the
quietly nerdy Clark (Armani
Jackson).
Their multicultural life in
Brooklyn is lovingly sketched out in an opening sequence.
Though it looks Utopian,
Gina, desiring stability and
health insurance, has taken
a job at a college in a small
town in Washington state.
Soon the family members
find themselves in their huge
new house, waiting on their
moving truck, getting to
know their new neighbors
and colleagues.
Written by Annie J. Howell and directed by Rob Meyer, “Little Boxes” is almost
anthropological in its dis-
section of the cultural quirks
of suburban life.
There is an unsettling
fixation on race that pervades every new interaction with the interracial
family.
While Mack is profiled by
his new neighbors, Clark’s
new classmates are fascinated by the diversity he
brings to their lily-white
burg. The racial discourse is
never pushed far enough to
be humorous or biting — just
awkward.
Lynskey, Ellis and Jackson are charming enough to
buoy this lightly dramatic
tale, but with a laid-back energy the stakes are never
quite high enough. “Little
Boxes” offers tame social
commentary in a pleasant
package.
— Katie Walsh
“Little Boxes.” Not rated.
Running time: 1 hour, 24
minutes. Playing: Laemmle
Music Hall, Beverly Hills.
lessly prolonged sequences
sitting around offering stiff
readings of stiffer dialogue
pertaining to plotting their
next move.
By the time they get
around to exacting some
sort of retribution, the stagy
execution of their preferred
methods of torture will likely
elicit more laughter than
shivers.
In his first feature effort,
Sutliff, who also takes a production design and shared
casting credit, may have
been aiming for classic Hollywood noir, but this lifeless
serving of soggy pulp packs
all the gritty authenticity of a
gummy vitamin.
— Michael
Rechtshaffen
“The Mason Brothers.”
Rating: R, for pervasive language and some violence.
Running time: 1 hour, 54
minutes. Playing: Downtown Independent, Los Angeles.
feminist (Jazmyn Richardson) and nerds of various
stripes, the best friends fight
back.
Frequently fun and generally harmless, “The Outcasts” doesn’t bring anything new to the teen comedy, but that’s the nice thing
about the sub-genre. Given
their age, its target audience
may not realize that the cinematic battle between popular and unpopular students
has been going on since before they were born. This
movie won’t endure like
“Mean Girls,” “Clueless” or
“The Breakfast Club,” but it
likely won’t cause too many
eye rolls either.
— Kimber Myers
“The Outcasts.” Rating:
PG-13, for for crude and suggestive content, language
and some teen partying.
Running time: 1 hour, 35
minutes. Playing: Laemmle
NoHo 7, North Hollywood;
also on VOD.
E10
F R I DAY, A P R I L 14 , 2 017
L AT I M E S . C O M / CA L E N DA R
AT THE MOVIES
Indie directors to arrive in force
[Cannes, from E1]
hyphenate John Cameron
Mitchell, with his “How to
Talk to Girls at Parties”
playing out of competition.
The sci-fi romance, starring
Elle Fanning and Alex
Sharp, is based on a Neil
Gaiman short story.
And newcomer Netflix
will bring two movies to competition for the first time
ever: “Meyerowitz” and
Bong Joon-ho’s “Okja,” the
South Korean director’s
story of a girl and her
mythic-creature friend that
marks the director’s followup to 2013’s “Snowpiercer.”
The distributor is debuting movies in Cannes after
dominating such recent festivals as Sundance but remaining at arm’s length
from the French confab.
“Netflix celebrates its
first Cannes selection of
original movies … marking a
milestone for its ever-growing slate of exclusive and diverse content,” it said in a release shortly after the announcement.
Upstarts ruled the day
around the world too. Sure, a
number of international
darlings will be back to a festival known for rewarding its
own: the Turkish-German
director Fatih Akin (“In the
Fade”), “The Artist” helmer
Michel Hazanavicius (“Redoubtable,” about a young
Jean-Luc Godard, quelle
scandal) and Arnaud Desplechin
(“Ishmael’s
Ghosts,” which will open the
festival).
Perhaps most prominently for some film fans is a
new Yorgos Lanthimos
work. The director of the
Cannes hits “Dogtooth” and
“The Lobster” brings a new
movie, “The Killing of a Sacred Deer” — like “Lobster,”
it’s in English, has an animal
theme and stars Colin Farrell.
But as a rule the festival
is short on diehards. Michael
Haneke, who will bring the
European refugee drama
“Happy End” to Cannes, is
the only director of the 19 announced in competition to
have won the Palme d’Or.
Instead there are a number of foreign-born competition first-timers, like Bong
Joon-ho, who previously was
in Un Certain Regard (and
even that was eight years
ago).
Among actors, it will be
hard to top for anyone to top
the year that Nicole Kidman
is having. After an Oscar
nomination in February for
her work in “Lion,” acclaim
this spring for her turn in
HBO’s “Big Little Lies” and
even the social phenomenon
of the Kidman World Cup,
she will now follow it with the
Cannes hat trick: parts in
“The Beguiled,” “Sacred
Deer” and “How to Talk to
Girls at Parties.”
But the announcement
particularly marks a next
phase for the American independent movement, with
Ben Rothstein Focus Features
NICOLE KIDMAN, bottom right, is in “The Beguiled,” one of three films she appears in at Cannes this year.
Sofia Coppola, bottom middle, directs “Beguiled,” based on the same novel as Clint Eastwood’s 1971 film.
Baumbach and the Safdies
stepping into the Cannes
competition limelight for
the first time.
The Safdies, the indie
filmmakers behind such
quirkfests as “Daddy Longlegs” and “The Pleasure of
Being Robbed,” take perhaps the biggest notch up
with
“Time,”
starring
Robert
Pattinson
and
Barkhad Abdi; many of their
festival appearances have
been of the more niche sort.
For Coppola, meanwhile,
the “Beguiled” premiere
(the film is an adaptation of
Thomas Cullinan’s book “A
Painted Devil”) marks an
upgrade after her “The Bling
Ring” opened the lower-profile Un Certain Regard four
years ago. Coppola will have
her first film in competition
since her “Marie Antoinette”
divided audiences all the
way back in 2006.
That same year, Mitchell
scandalized audiences with
his explicit “Shortbus,” out
of competition. Eleven years
later he’ll come back.
And add to that another
American auteur in David
Lynch—whose
episodes
from his “Twin Peaks”
Showtime reboot will be
screened—and Taylor Sheridan’s directorial debut
“Wind River” in Un Certain
Regard, and Cannes has a
very U.S. indie feel.
On the other end of the
spectrum comes the conspicuous absence of big
American studio directors:
Steven Spielberg, Clint
Eastwood, Woody Allen,
Steven Soderbergh. So prevalent in the past — indeed,
last year saw studio mainstays Spielberg, Jodie Foster
and Shane Black all premiere movies out of competition — their ranks thus far
will not be represented at
Cannes at all.
In some cases that’s a
function of timing, as
Cannes-friendly movies may
simply not be ready. And
some seeming changes at
festivals as much circumstantial as fundamental.
But directors such as Soderbergh and Allen, who actually have new works at or
near completion, are notable absences.
Soderbergh’s
“Logan
Lucky,” a Southern heist
comedy starring Adam
Driver
and
Channing
Tatum, might have been expected to nab a slot in
Cannes, especially since it
marks the director’s return
to feature film helming after
a much-ballyhooed retirement — not to mention that
Soderbergh is a Palme d’Or
winner who had debuted
several
films
on
the
Croisette. But the August
release is now likely to skip
the festival circuit entirely.
Allen, a Cannes regular (his
“Café Society” opened the
fest last year), won’t bring
his “Wonder Wheel,” a story
of 1950s Coney Island to the
festival ahead of its Amazon
release likely later this year.
In fact, major studios —
from Warner Bros. to Fox to
Universal to Pixar — will, as
of now, all sit Cannes out.
That might not seem like
major news in this franchisehappy era, but it’s in fact
rare; usually a “Mad Max” or
“Inside Out” makes its way
on to the lineup, as a studio
looks to ride good reviews to
a big international release.
The movies that might
have most expected to do
that this year are Christopher Nolan’s “Dunkirk” or
Alexander Payne’s “Downsizing.” But the Warner
Bros. war film and Paramount economy-themed
dramedy, respectively, are
not headed to Cannes.
It’s a very different story
for U.S. upstart firms. Netflix is far from the only newgeneration distributor with
multiple competition entrants. The New York-based
A24, fresh off its best picture
win for “Moonlight” — and
rapidly becoming Netflix’s
HBO-esque foil on the film
side — has “Deer” and
“Good Time.”
And Amazon, which had
multiple
selections
at
Cannes last year, returns
with films such as “Wonderstruck” and “You Were Never Really Here,” Lynne
Ramsay’s movie based on
the Jonathan Ames novel
that stars Joaquin Phoenix.
The movie marks the Scottish auteur’s first effort since
“We Need to Talk About Kevin,” which was a sensation at
Cannes six years ago. (One
Netflix title that won’t be
there, incidentally: “War
Machine,” the David Michod-directed tale inspired
by Stanley McChrystal starring Brad Pitt as the polarizing general.)
Even virtual reality, a development Cannes has been
slow to embrace, is seeing an
uptick: Mexican American
director Alejandro Inarritu
will be among those debuting a new piece on the
Croisette, when “Carne Y
Arena (Virtually Present,
Physically Invisible)”, a
story of refugees and immigrants, premieres in the official selection.
Whether these changes
are a function of Cannes enthusiasm for a new kind of
work, big-conglomerate reluctance to head to the
Croisette or a combination
of the two is tough to parse.
But whatever the reason, it
will give this year’s festival a
decidedly different flavor,
one that at least in some
ways is in keeping with the
Next Big Thing-minded
Sundance than the studioand repeat-heavyweight essence of past gatherings.
Cannes kicks off May 17,
entering one of the most
charged environments in a
generation, coming just
weeks after a French election that could usher in a
new era. It’s fitting that this
year’s Cannes does something of the same.
steve.zeitchik@latimes.com
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L AT I ME S . CO M / CA L EN DA R
E11
F R I DAY, A P R I L 14 , 2 017
AT THE MOVIES
CAPSULE REVIEWS
Inside
David
Lynch’s
mind
How David Lynch’s early
days as a boundaries-free
artist led to the making of
his groundbreaking debut
feature, 1977’s “Eraserhead,”
is tracked with deliberate introspection in the wellcrafted
documentary
“David Lynch: The Art Life.”
Anyone looking for a fun,
revealing, movie-career survey á la 2016’s “De Palma” will
be disappointed. “The Art
Life” is fairly sober stuff and
as elliptical as Lynch’s signature output.
The documentary’s directors, Jon Nguyen, Rick
Barnes and Olivia Neergaard-Holm, who collaborated on 2007’s “Lynch,” reconstruct the auteur’s story
using clips from three years’
worth of recorded interviews
with Lynch, archival family
photos and footage, and
shots of Lynch thinking,
smoking, hanging with toddler daughter Lula, and creating unexamined, headscratching art around his
Hollywood Hills home.
En route, Lynch recollects his relatively happy,
itinerant childhood; youthful creative leanings, friendship with mentor-painter
Bushnell Keeler, time at the
Pennsylvania Academy of
Fine Arts, marriage to first
wife Peggy (with whom he
had a daughter, future filmmaker Jennifer), first short
films, and the American
Film Institute grant that
helped fund “Eraserhead,” a
movie that took five years to
finish but paved the way
for Lynch’s celebrated career.
No one else weighs in on
Lynch here — it’s all him, all
the time. And, although
chatty, he’s not the warmest
or most engaging presence.
Still, Lynch devotees should
dig this respectful, offbeat
portrait.
— Gary Goldstein
“David Lynch: The Art
Life.” Not rated. Running
time: 1 hour, 28 minutes.
Playing: The Cinefamily at
the Silent Movie Theatre,
Los Angeles.
Apollo’s heroes
on the ground
“Mission Control: The
Unsung Heroes of Apollo” is
a well-crafted, revealing
British documentary reuniting the surviving team members entrusted with safely
taking astronauts to the
moon and back.
Although these hidden
Janus Films
THE FILMMAKER in a scene in “David Lynch: The Art Life,” which uses clips from three years’ worth of recorded interviews of him.
sung Heroes of Apollo.” Not
rated. Running time: 1 hour,
40
minutes.
Playing:
Laemmle Monica Film Center, Santa Monica; Laemmle
Playhouse 7, Pasadena; also
on VOD.
It’s hard keeping
old jazz alive
Charlie Gross
“VINCE GIORDANO: There’s a Future in the Past”
spotlights the bandleader and music archivist.
figures are exclusively male
and almost entirely white,
there’s still much to find uplifting.
In exchange for their
$6,770 starting salaries,
those who first “manned”
the consuls would often
work 35 hours straight
under extreme pressure, especially when they had to address the “Houston, we’ve
had a problem” distress call
from the Apollo 13 crew.
Filmmaker David Fairhead, who edited 2016’s “The
Last Man on the Moon,” profiling the late Gene Cernan,
creates a vivid atmosphere
(chain-smoking
seemed
part of the job description)
combining a remarkable
amount of archival footage
with audio recordings and
computer simulations.
But it’s those insightful
interviews with the likes of
Cernan and Jim Lovell, and,
especially Chris Kraft, acknowledged as the creator of
Mission Control, and Gene
Kranz (played by Ed Harris
in Ron Howard’s “Apollo
13”), who still favors military
crew cuts, that effectively hit
home.
There’s something undeniably moving about seeing
the reunified flight directors
and controllers, most now in
their 80s and 90s, seated at
their original command
posts, reflecting on their
shared triumphs and tragedies while acknowledging
the toll all those stress-filled
hours would often take on
their family life.
— Michael
Rechtshaffen
“Mission Control: The Un-
Unless you’re a jazz aficionado or a denizen of New
York’s classier nightclubs
and society functions, you
may not be familiar with the
work of Vince Giordano —
even though the bandleader
and music archivist has
been one of the most in-demand early 20th century
Americana revivalists for
decades.
Dave Davidson and Amber Edwards’ documentary
“Vince Giordano: There’s a
Future in the Past” is a fine
introduction to a musician
so respected that filmmakers like Woody Allen and
Martin Scorsese have called
on him to help re-create the
sounds of the ’20s and ’30s in
their period pictures.
Always, Giordano strives
to transport audiences of
today into another world.
Davidson and Edwards
reveal what it takes to be a
working musician, making a
living in the 2010s with songs
nearly a century old.
From the outside, Giordano looks successful.
But he still sweats find-
ing regular gigs for his big
band, and he’s still schlepping instruments and an extensive collection of vintage
sheet music around the
country.
Giordano’s combo is
road-tested, bringing vitality and showmanship to
moldy oldies. “There’s a Future in the Past” is equally
balanced between its smoking-hot live performances,
interviews and day-in-thelife footage.
There’s less in the film
about why it matters to keep
RARE DEPTHS OF PERSONAL AND SENSUAL DETAIL.”
CRITICS PICK
“MESMERIZING.”
“Vince Giordano: There’s a
Future in the Past.” Not
rated. Running time: 1 hour,
30
minutes.
Playing:
Laemmle Music Hall, Beverly Hills.
“THIS IS HOW YOU MAKE
A FEMINIST FILM
ABOUT HOLLYWOOD.” –INDIEWIRE
MAGGIE SIFF CARA SEYMOUR JOHN ORTIZ
A WOMAN,
A PART
and SUSAN
MAYA
LENA REGGIE
SARANDON
JASON
AM WATTS RUDOLPH
SCHWARTZMAN DUNH
“AN INSTANT CULT”
CLASSIC!
“A GREAT
DISASTER
a film by
ELISABETH
SUBRIN
#AWOMANAPART
WWW.AWOMANAPART.COM
E
—FILMMAKER MAGAZIN
”
COMEDY!
— NERDIST
@
STARTS TODAY
SANTA MONICA
Laemmle’s Monica Film Center
(310) 478-3836 laemmle.com
Fri & Mon-Thur: 1:40, 4:20, 7:20,
10:00 Sat & Sun: 11:00AM, 1:40,
4:20, 7:20, 10:00
PASADENA
Laemmle’s
Playhouse 7
(626) 844-6500
Sat & Sun:
11:00AM
A FILM BY
DASH SHAW
Q&As with filmmaker ELISABETH SUBRIN
& actress MAGGIE SIFF Today & Tomorrow
at the Monica at the 7:20 shows.
Joined Today by actor LUCAS NEAR-VERBRUGGHE
with actress GABY HOFFMAN moderating
& Tomorrow by actor JOHN ORTIZ.
latimes.com
“SUPERB. SUBLIMELY COMPASSIONATE.
history alive, instead of creating something new. But by
showing the exhausting diligence that goes into moments of pure transcendent
joy onstage, this documentary should make new fans
for Giordano’s living museum.
— Noel Murray
EXCLUSIVE ENGAGEMENT
STARTS TODAY
LANDMARK THEATRES
NUART THEATRE
11272 SANTA MONICA BLVD. (310) 473-8530
LOS ANGELES • 1:00, 3:10, 5:20, 7:30, 9:40PM
16BR1801
“POSITIVELY SUBVERSIVE
AND JUST SO COOL.”
– NEW YORK MAGAZINE
“HATHAWAY IS HILARIOUS!”
– THE VILLAGE VOICE
“A GROUNDBREAKER,
SERIOUSLY UNMISSABLE.”
– ROLLING STONE
“EXQUISITE.
A REMARKABLE
SENSE OF IMMEDIACY.”
“HHHH!
A WONDERFUL
BLACK
COMEDY.”
– TIME OUT NEW YORK
“AN EXCELLENT CAST
THAT INCLUDES TAHAR RAHIM,
EMMANUELLE SEIGNER
AND ANNE DORVAL.”
ANNE
JASON
HATHAWAY
SUDEIKIS
OFFICIAL SELECTION
RENDEZ-VOUS
WITH FRENCH CINEMA
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TORONTO
INT’L FILM FESTIVAL
ALL SHE COULD DO WAS SAVE THE WORLD
COHEN MEDIA GROUP PRESENTS
HEAL THE LIVING
BASED ON THE BEST-SELLING NOVEL
EXCLUSIVE ENGAGEMENT STARTS TODAY
LAEMMLE MONICA FILM CENTER 1332 2ND STREET, SANTA MONICA 310-478-3836 4:40PM 7:30PM 10:00PM
VIGALONDO
#SheIsColossal @SheIsColossal
HOLLYWOOD
ArcLight Cinemas At Sunset & Vine (323) 464-4226 arclightcinemas.com
Fri: 10:05, 12:25, 2:15, 4:45, 6:00, 8:30, 11:15, 12:10 Sat: 10:05, 12:35, 2:00, 4:30, 6:00, 8:30, 11:15, 12:10 Sun: 10:05, 12:25, 2:15, 4:45, 6:00,
8:30, 11:15 Mon: 10:40, 12:10, 2:15, 4:30, 6:00, 8:30, 10:10 Tue: 10:35, 12:35, 2:15, 4:45, 6:00, 8:25, 11:15 Wed: 10:40, 1:50, 3:25, 5:50, 7:30, 10:40
SANTA MONICA
ArcLight Cinemas At Santa Monica Place arclightcinemas.com
Fri & Sat: 10:45, 1:15, 3:05, 5:35, 8:00, 9:50, 11:55 Sun: 10:45, 1:15, 3:05, 5:35, 8:00, 9:50
Mon-Wed: 11:00, 1:10, 3:05, 5:30, 8:00, 9:50
BURBANK
AMC Town Center 8
amctheatres.com
IRVINE
Edwards University Town Center 6
(844) 462-7342 #143
LAGUNA NIGUEL
Regency Directors Cut Cinema
at Rancho Niguel (949) 831-0446
LONG BEACH
UA Long Beach 6
(844) 462-7342 #509
LOS FELIZ
Vintage Cinemas
Los Feliz 3 (323) 664-2169
Daily: 1:30, 4:15, 7:00, 9:45
NORTH HOLLYWOOD
Laemmle’s NoHo 7
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WEST LOS ANGELES
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ArcLight Cinemas At The Sherman Oaks Galleria (818) 501-0753
Fri-Sun: 10:45, 1:00, 2:55, 5:25, 8:10, 10:25 Mon & Wed: 11:10, 1:00, 2:55,
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E12
F R I DAY, A P R I L 14 , 2 017
S
L AT I M ES . C O M / CA L E NDAR
AT THE MOVIES
REVIEW
The magic of a mystery unsolved
‘The Lost City of Z’
charts a hauntingly
beautiful journey
down the Amazon.
JUSTIN CHANG
FILM CRITIC
In May 1925, the legendary British explorer, surveyor and archaeologist Lt. Col.
Percy Fawcett vanished,
along with his son Jack and
their friend Raleigh Rimmell, while searching for the
ruins of an ancient South
American civilization. It was
Fawcett’s eighth expedition
to the Amazon, and it’s the
third one we see dramatized
in “The Lost City of Z,”
James Gray’s rich, meditative and deeply transporting
portrait of a man who found
himself compelled to enter
the jungle again and again,
even if it meant leaving behind his family and defying
the expectations of those
who sent him.
“A man’s reach should exceed his grasp,” Fawcett
notes, and so, perhaps,
should the reach of any filmmaker trying to get a handle
on this particular mystery.
And Gray, a shrewd and
soulful Hollywood classicist,
has duly allowed Fawcett’s
obsession to fuel his own. In
hacking his way through the
tangled narrative undergrowth of David Grann’s
nonfiction bestseller, and
transforming the Amazon’s
legendary “green hell” into a
heavenly celluloid vision, the
director evinces the kind of
faith in the power of cinema
that once led masters like
Francis Ford Coppola and
Werner Herzog into their
own storied episodes of
downriver madness.
Among other things, that
faith has compelled Gray to
leave his native New York, an
urban jungle that he has
spent most of his career colonizing, starting with his
1994 Brighton Beach-set
crime
thriller,
“Little
Odessa,” and culminating in
his epic Ellis Island melodrama, “The Immigrant”
(2013). If that film’s ambitious period re-creation and
elegiac sense of tragedy
pointed the way toward
“The Lost City of Z,” it’s still
remarkable how boldly Gray
approaches two new and
equally distant early 20th
century
frontiers
here,
stretching from the upper
echelons of British society to
the uncharted reaches of the
South American wilderness.
Fawcett, for his part,
seems to have felt much
more at home in the latter.
Aidan Monaghan Amazon Studios / Bleeker Street
CHARLIE HUNNAM , center, plays Lt. Col. Percy Fawcett, an explorer who vanished into the jungle in 1925.
‘The Lost City
of Z’
Rating: PG-13, for violence,
disturbing images, brief
strong language and some
nudity
Running time: 2 hours, 20
minutes
Playing: Arclight Cinemas,
Hollywood, and the
Landmark Theatre, West
Los Angeles
He is played by Charlie Hunnam (“Sons of Anarchy”),
who, despite his handsome
blond features and athletic
build, projects little in the
way of a golden boy’s arrogance. When we first meet
Fawcett in 1905, he is an undecorated British army major stationed in Cork, Ireland, eager to distinguish
himself and erase the damaging legacy of his father’s
dissolute ways.
An assignment from the
Royal Geographical Society
of London — a two-year
mapmaking
expedition
along the much-disputed
border of Bolivia and Brazil
— does not quite promise
the glorious destiny he has
in mind. But across the Atlantic, into the jungle and
down the Amazon he goes,
leaving behind his pregnant
wife, Nina (Sienna Miller),
and their young son, Jack,
and plunging into a world
where deadly diseases,
sharp-toothed
predators
and wary tribespeople lie in
wait for him and his comrades, Henry Costin (Robert
Pattinson) and Arthur Manley (Edward Ashley).
But the jungle’s natural
wonders and horrors are not
what seem to interest Gray
most. Notwithstanding a
snake, a panther and a
bloodthirsty school of piranhas, the director has largely
cut back on Grann’s endlessly detailed panoply of
creepy-crawlies without in
any way derailing the viewer’s sense of wonderment.
Shooting on 35-mm. film (as
he did with “The Immigrant”), cinematographer
Darius Khondji duly honors
the intoxicating beauty of
this humid emerald forest in
luminously textured images
that seem to beckon us as
surely as they must have
beckoned Fawcett.
Amid
the
gathering
mists, the dense foliage and
the immersive soundscape,
which occasionally merges
with the restrained swells of
Christopher
Spelman’s
score, you might glean the
flickering specters of great
movies past. A jaw-droppingly surreal interlude in
which Fawcett stumbles on
an opera house in a clearing
nods to “Fitzcarraldo,” while
a sudden ambush signaled
by a deadly rain of arrows is
scarcely Gray’s sole invocation of “Apocalypse Now.”
It is here too that Fawcett
uncovers his first clues —
hand-sculpted
artifacts,
whispers among the indigenous people he encounters
— that this jungle may hold
the remnants of a lost civilization. This fabled El Dorado looms ever larger in
Fawcett’s imagination when
he returns to London and
tries to persuade his fellow
society members of a city
that may predate Western
civilization — an idea that
Gray dramatizes, in a raucous sequence, as an affront
to the cultural arrogance of
the British Empire.
The discoveries that fascinate Gray are not strictly
anthropological, and his
sense of the world as a teeming jungle, cruel and indifferent to human survival, does
not begin and end with the
Amazon. He shows us the
hypocrisy of a civilization in
which human beings can be
subjected to rigid yet arbitrary class divisions one
minute, then tossed into the
bloody equalizer of World
War I the next — as we see
when Fawcett, Costin and
Manley find themselves
caught in the 1916 Battle of
the Somme, whose brutality
Grey evokes with extraordinary vividness and restraint.
In the face of these atrocities, it makes a strange kind
of sense that Fawcett might
feel more at home in the
company of a cannibal tribe
he encounters on a 1912 expedition back to the Amazon. “We must attempt to engage,” he tells his fellow explorers, none more quietly
loyal than Costin, whom the
thickly bearded Pattinson
plays with wry, witty understatement. Costin stands in
stark contrast to the cowardly James Murray (a supremely loathsome Angus
Macfadyen), a fellow society
traveler who will prove to be
a thorn in Fawcett’s side
even after they return home.
For all its lush, goldenhued classicism, which
might seem to invite the
temptations of nostalgia,
“The Lost City of Z” attacks
the era’s colonialist attitudes with a critical and
bracingly modern spirit.
Fawcett doesn’t approach
the “savages” as a white savior; he shows them the same
respect (perhaps more) that
he accords his peers, reserving his contempt for the rubber industry that’s decimated their region.
If this Fawcett is a model
of enlightenment in many
ways, he remains a man of
his moment in others. Some
of the most gripping moments reveal the personal
toll of his long absences from
home, including one scene in
which Nina — Miller in one of
her sharpest performances
— gives angry voice to the realization that her own independent spirit has no outlet
in this patriarchal world.
Fawcett’s complicated relationship with Jack (played
as a teen by Tom Holland) is
no less beautifully realized,
and their initial estrangement finds moving reconciliation in the vast adventure
that awaits and unites them.
Hunnam was cast as
Fawcett after Brad Pitt (one
of the film’s executive producers) and Benedict Cumberbatch bowed out, and
that inevitable sense of having something to prove can
only have helped; this is easily his finest and most disciplined film performance. His
Fawcett might have benefited from a touch more
madness, a more consuming
sense of obsession, but you
feel it blazing within him
nonetheless,
inseparable
from the keen intelligence
and tremendous physical
fortitude that made him
such an exemplary explorer.
“The Lost City of Z” is the
kind of picture whose classicism, a term often confused
with conventionality, feels
increasingly like a radical
statement
of
intent.
Fawcett’s journeys into the
Amazon, each drawing him
a little further into his heart
of darkness, provide a
steady rhythm and clean
three-act structure, but its
hauntingly
lyrical
final
scenes deliver the very opposite of closure. The movie
may frustrate your desire for
straight-up thrills and clear
answers, but its irresolution
is masterful — sincere, generous and entirely appropriate to the searching story.
Fawcett has become a
near-mythic avatar of obsessive wanderlust; his travels
inspired great writers including Arthur Conan Doyle
and Evelyn Waugh, and he is
purported to be a chief inspiration for Indiana Jones. In
the decades following his
disappearance,
explorerdisciples attempted to retrace his steps, and many
paid with their own lives.
Gray offers up his own poetic
speculation, but doesn’t pretend to know any of the answers. His movie is a reminder that the world’s
most beautiful mysteries endure precisely because they
remain unsolved.
justin.chang@latimes.com
An epic search for meaning in life, work
[Hunnam, from E1]
body.
In “Lost City,” he plays
the real-life Fawcett with a
thoughtful, at times sullen,
seriousness. The former artillery soldier made repeated trips to the Amazon
in search of a community he
believed was the remnants
of El Dorado, eventually disappearing there with his son
in 1925.
As Hunnam conjures him
from David Grann’s nonfiction bestseller, Fawcett was
not the swashbuckling adventurer at the start of his
quest, nor the stark-raving
mad Kurtzian figure as it
went on — instead, he was
beset by the kind of quiet
preoccupation that destroys
and nourishes in equal measure.
“For me, Fawcett represents the search for meaning
we all have — that terrible
and wonderful and ordained
quest,” Hunnam said. “He
wasn’t finding any answers
in society; he found life
wholly unsatisfying. So it
was this voice asking questions: ‘What are we doing,
and what is this desperate
dark hole and how do I fill it?
Most of us fill it with total
nonsense — with consumerism. And he thought this
quest would help quiet that
voice.”
Hunnam tends to answer
questions with a pause, followed by a rush of words, an
attempt to get across a truth
unbothered by spin, as
though by simply speaking
quickly and eloquently he
could ward off the dreaded
curse of the talking point.
He also evinces a dark
view glinted — slightly —
with humor.
“I don’t pay much attention to what’s going on in the
world. I really don’t. I suppose where it comes from is a
deep sense of pessimism,” he
says. “All the challenges
we’re facing — the lack of water, overpopulation, climate
change, social media.”
He waited the quickest
poker-faced second to let the
quip land, then continued,
more gloomily: “I feel like
we’re rapidly galloping
toward an apocalypse —
we’ve passed critical mass. I
know it’s a morbid viewpoint. But I’m not melancholy. It’s just Trump or
Brexit or whatever it is —
what difference does it
make? It’s hard to get invested in any of it.” Several
times in the interview, he described feeling “existential
and lost” at various life
points.
Hunnam, who now lives
in L.A., spent his early childhood in Newcastle, then
moved with his mother and
brothers to the rural Lake
District. His parents divorced when he was young,
and he maintained a worshipful attitude toward his
father, a feared figure who
had amassed a fortune in the
at-times shady scrap-metal
business.
Though no longer alive,
the elder Hunnam looms
large in the actor’s psyche —
“a colossus who was incredibly well-respected and
feared” in a place where
popularity was measured by
how much and how hard you
fought. It was in part why
young Charlie got into a lot
of scraps as a teenager, even
though he was interested in
Robert Gauthier Los Angeles Times
DIRECTOR James Gray, left, chats with Charlie
Hunnam, star of jungle-adventure “Lost City of Z.”
films more than fists.
The hardscrabble place
also informed him in more
overt ways.
“I was very conscious as a
young man that people weren’t bringing forth the force
of their lives — they weren’t
bringing the desire of all they
wanted to be. And it really
struck and stayed with me.”
That class struggle also
plays into Fawcett’s narrative: Coming from humble
beginnings, the explorer
fought against a gentry suspicious of lower-class outsiders.
“On my more confident
days, I would draw parallels
between his life and mine —
what he was running from
and toward, and the determination and indomitability
year after year. It struck me
as a tragedy — one could put
in all that sacrifice and discipline and hope only to be
awarded with failure.
“Although I’ve enjoyed
success in my career, I’ve
also had to endure an enormous amount of failure too.
Fawcett felt at home in the
jungle because he didn’t feel
at home anywhere else, the
same way I only feel really at
home on set. And when I got
this role, I saw the parallels
and also renewed hope — I
realized it’s the best opportunity I ever got.”
Gray cast Hunnam after
early attempts to place Brad
Pitt and Benedict Cumberbatch in the film faltered.
The director saw in Hunnam
similarities to his out-toprove-something character.
“I couldn’t help feeling his
life and Fawcett’s overlap,”
Gray said. “You don’t keep
saying, ‘This is a wonderful
chance,’ as Charlie did, unless you think you haven’t
had enough of them.”
Hunnam has indeed
turned down as much as he’s
accepted, and he even questions some of the movies he’s
been in — perfectly respectable ones with top-flight directors, like Guillermo del
Toro’s “Pacific Rim.” “It
wasn’t something interesting creatively,” he said of
the part. “I look back and
can’t justify it. I shouldn’t
have really been there.” He
opted not to come back for
the sequel.
Of his withdrawal from
“Fifty Shades,” he cites a desire to, well, go his own way.
“I had a slight worry that my
aspiration for the role would
be too much of an uphill
struggle, that it should have
existed more within the context of the book,” he said of
the project, on which author
E.L. James wielded much influence. “I realized I was trying to reinvent Christian
Grey a bit too much. So I
stepped aside.”
He’s also willing to question what the film publicity
machine is for, in a way that
goes beyond just the general
reluctance at salesmanship
many actors cop to. He
waves aside the idea, for instance, that “Lost City” was
difficult to shoot. “There’s
this sense out [there] that
this was hardship. The idea
for this came about after
‘The Revenant’; everyone
wanted to tell that narrative.
I think it’s a P.R. move. It
wasn’t actually that hard.”
He said this attitude
comes from a childhood
founded on authenticity.
“When I read ‘Catcher in the
Rye’ as a kid, I was influenced by that idea of not wanting to be phony.” He gestured outside to a larger,
wealth- and consumptionminded industry. “You wonder what kind of evisceration Holden Caulfield would
have for all this.”
Is there fallout from this
career exactitude? Hunnam
admits that some people
have navigated “these [twin
poles of art and commerce]
more elegantly, Fassbender
and Ryan Gosling and a million other examples.”
Gray said these traits
should only help him. “Charlie is someone who’s tried to
clear his system of noise, and
that’s a good thing.” Then
again, the director has at
times in his career himself
traded commercial success
for artistic integrity.
Taylor Sheridan, the actor-turned-filmmaker who
worked with Hunnam for
years on “Anarchy,” said:
“Charlie is kind of a throwback — an egoless artist who
just cares about the acting.”
Hunnam appreciated the
thought. “I wouldn’t compare my career to [that of]
Daniel Day-Lewis — I have
no illusions of grandeur —
but I have always enjoyed
how he approaches it: It’s all
about the work, and when
he’s not working, he disappears into obscurity.”
Hunnam has been writing too — historical scripts
like “Vlad,” about Vlad the
Impaler — and Sheridan expects him behind the camera before too long.
For now, salvation may lie
in the right part. “Arthur,”
for instance, which Hunnam
said doesn’t feel like a “Pacific Rim” redux.
“The journey of that movie is someone who has to deal
with internal demons at the
same time as he does external challenges; he has to
keep searching for meaning.” He stopped as he realized the connection. “It always comes down to meaning, doesn’t it?”
steve.zeitchik@latimes.com
LOS ANGELES TIMES
CALENDAR
FRIDAY, APRIL 14, 2017
E13
SUPERB NEW SEASON…
SWIFTER, NASTIER AND SPIKIER THAN ANY OTHER COMEDY
A+…TV’S BEST COMEDY GETS EVEN BETTER
OUTRAGEOUS, BRASH, VERY FUNNY
ENTHRALLING …JULIA LOUIS-DREYFUS
CONTINUES TO SLAY
UNFAILINGLY GREAT WRITING
TV’S BEST POLITICAL SATIRE
BRILLIANT…’VEEP’ IS BACK TO
MAKE AMERICA HILARIOUS AGAIN
HYSTERICAL AS EVER
★★★★★
E M M Y AW A R D W I N N E R
®
SUNDAY AT
10:30 PM
OR STREAM IT ON
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JULIA LOUIS - DREYFUS
E14
F R I DAY, A P R I L 14 , 2 017
L ATI M E S . C O M /CA L E N DA R
THEATER
ANDREW BURNAP’S Casey finds his fortune can
be a drag when he substitutes his Elvis character.
THEATER REVIEW
A boy turns
into a man
... in drag
Pull off the wig and
falsies, and ‘Georgia
McBride’ finds its
endearing center.
CHARLES McNULTY
THEATER CRITIC
Casey, a struggling Elvis
impersonator at a dive
called Cleo’s in the Florida
Panhandle, is a handsome,
sweet-natured goof-off. His
act isn’t exactly packing
them in — Elvis might as well
be George Washington to
audiences today. But why
should a guy fret over money
when he has charm, washboard abs and a knack for
gyrating his hips to “Blue
Suede Shoes”?
When Casey’s wife, Jo,
yells at him for bouncing the
rent check for a Papa John’s
pizza, he can’t understand
why she’s so upset. There are
still a few slices left and, besides, he just bought a new
flashy
jumpsuit
that’s
bound to breathe new life
into professional prospects.
Casey
(charmingly
played by Andrew Burnap)
has a lot of maturing to do in
“The Legend of Georgia McBride,” a flamboyantly fun if
formulaic
comedy
by
Matthew Lopez. The play,
which opened Wednesday at
the Geffen Playhouse under
the direction of Mike Donahue, tightens the noose on
Casey’s life in the quick and
dirty manner that guarantees he’s heading for humorous extremes.
While arguing about the
rent check, Jo (a radiantly
gritty Nija Okoro) announces that she’s pregnant. Jason (Larry Powell),
the couple’s landlord, tells
Casey he’s going to have to
move out if he can’t come up
with the money. And Eddie
(Nick Searcy), Casey’s boss
at Cleo’s, is ready to cut Elvis
loose.
But just when it seems
that all hope is lost for Casey,
some unexpected career
counseling appears before
him in the shape of a drag
queen named Miss Tracy
Mills (the fabulous Matt McGrath). Eddie’s cousin,
Tracy arrives at the bar with
her finger-snapping sidekick Miss Rexy (Powell doing double duty) in desperate search of a new gig.
Before you know it, Cleo’s
is transformed into a drag
hot spot. After Rexy goes
AWOL (in a sloppily executed bit of comic convenience), Tracy teaches Casey
the tricks of the cross-dressing trade. The jumpsuit is
eventually cut up into a
country-western diva’s costume, and Elvis dies so that
Georgia McBride can be
born.
But how can a straight
dude explain to his wife that
the cash he’s hauling home is
coming from a new line of
work that involves full makeup and falsies? The plot
points leading to Casey’s crisis couldn’t be more predictably arranged. “The Legend of Georgia McBride”
makes an outrageous set-up
seem completely familiar.
Photographs from Geffen Playhouse
ELVIS didn’t work out for Andrew Burnap’s Casey, left, but Matt McGrath’s Miss Tracy Mills has some ideas.
‘The Legend
of Georgia
McBride’
Where: Geffen Playhouse,
10886 Le Conte Ave., L.A.
When: 8 p.m.
Tuesdays-Fridays, 3 and 8
p.m. Saturdays, 2 and 7
p.m. Sundays; ends May 14
Running time: 1 hour, 40
minutes
Tickets: $32-$90 (subject
to change)
Info: (310) 208-5454,
www.geffenplayhouse.org
It’s still enjoyable, but don’t
expect many surprises.
Lopez, author of the
much-produced play “The
Whipping Man,” has a style
that combines bold ideas
with commercial execution.
“Georgia McBride” seems
like a laboratory experiment
in which the musicals “Priscilla Queen of the Desert”
and “The Full Monty” are
melded into a mainstream
campy comedy with just
enough LGBTQ consciousness to keep the PC police at
bay. (Rexy delivers a speech
to Casey on what it really
means to be a drag queen
that seems like it might have
been edited out of a Harvey
Fierstein drama for being
too preachy.)
The drag performances
are lively though not spectacular examples of the
form. McGrath shines in a
Broadway revue number,
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Times for 04/14/17 only
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charles.mcnulty@
latimes.com
Twitter: @charlesmcnulty
Beverly Hills
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MONICA
dience into patrons at
Cleo’s. And choreography be
damned, what red-blooded
American
theatergoer
doesn’t get a hoot out of seeing a man swan about onstage in a dress?
But what’s most memorable about “The Legend of
Georgia McBride” is the tenderness between Burnap’s
Casey and Okoro’s Jo — the
silly method he has for rubbing her feet, the hurt and
disappointment they show
after a fight. Casey may still
be a boy but he’s a lovable
one. And as he grows into a
man by discovering himself
as a woman onstage, he becomes even more endearing.
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but Burnap fails to show why
Georgia McBride catches
fire the way she does. Perhaps no artistry could make
the farfetched situation believable, but Casey’s lipsyncing and sexpot dance
moves cry out for more of
Tracy’s coaching. The blare
of the music at times substitutes for the missing verve.
The extravagant costumes, designed with insouciant flair by E.B. Brooks,
are jocular treats. And the
ingenious set, constructed
by Donyale Werle in a way
that collapses home, dressing room and barroom into
one another, makes efficiency seem like stage poetry.
The direct address greetings of Searcy’s Eddie instantly turns the Geffen au-
Culture Monster
All the arts, all the time
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FOR 4/14/2017 ONLY
latimes.com/CultureMonster
L AT I ME S . CO M / CA L EN DA R
F R I DAY, A P R I L 14 , 2 017
E15
POP MUSIC
Oscar-winner may have guest(s)
[Festival, from E1]
which the German-born musician took through Europe
last year, will return to Los
Angeles on Aug. 11 for an encore at the Shrine Auditorium.)
At Coachella, where the
bill is dominated by singers
and rappers such as Lady
Gaga and Kendrick Lamar,
Zimmer’s instrumental music will no doubt be an oddity. But the composer insists
that the show he’s put together is far from the buttoned-up
occasion
one
might expect.
“The reason I didn’t do
this for the longest time is
that I’ve always had a problem with the way we present
orchestral music,” he said,
reclined on a sofa with a cup
of coffee. “Why would you
spend an evening of your
precious time with a man
with his back to you and a
bunch of people in suits
reading the paper?”
Instead, he’s promising a
more rock-informed experience, with Zimmer acting
not as conductor but as a
frontman leading a group of
more than 70 musicians
through freewheeling renditions of some of his favorite
themes.
One of those musicians is
Marr’s 25-year-old son, Nile,
who also plays in the British
indie trio Man Made and
says the Zimmer outfit is
“basically the biggest band
you’ve ever seen playing the
most epic music you’ve ever
heard.”
The band approach isn’t
entirely new for Zimmer.
Before he moved into
composing for movies, he
played briefly as a member
of the Buggles, Trevor
Horn’s late-’70s new-wave
group that scored a hit with
“Video Killed the Radio
Star.”
“But after that the record
company just wanted us to
do the same thing again and
again and again,” he said.
“So you suddenly realize in
rock and roll you’re very easily typecast.”
Film music, in contrast,
Mark Boster Los Angeles Times
“THE ONLY way I can treat this is like I’m having a dinner party with a few friends, “ said Hans Zimmer, 59.
offered limitless variation. “I
wrote ‘Driving Miss Daisy’
and ‘Black Rain’ in the same
month, and they couldn’t be
any more different.”
Zimmer, who plays keyboard, guitar and banjo in
the show, intends to show off
FOOD BOWL
the stylistic breadth of his
work on tour. But he won’t
show images from the movies themselves — they se-
duce an audience into ignoring the players onstage, he
says. Nor does he plan to deliver any kind of canned
commentary.
“Scripted, I’m terrible,”
he said. “Can’t do it. Long
time ago, Jeffrey Katzenberg
asked me to take part in a
presentation about animation at Lincoln Center. And
his main press person, I
overheard her say, ‘Don’t
script Hans — he’s like a
plank of wood.’
“The only way I can treat
this is like I’m having a dinner party with a few friends.
Sometimes I ramble on and
lose my way, and sometimes
somebody in the band says,
‘Come on, let’s play some
music.’”
Is his head sufficiently
full of anecdotes that he can
conjure stories at the mention of a title?
“Go ahead,” he said.
“Name one.”
“Rain Man.”
“My first movie in Hollywood,” he shot back. “I’d
come to Los Angeles not
knowing anybody, not knowing my way around. So I
wrote the whole score in
Barry [Levinson]’s office.”
Another
windowless
room.
“It’s my fate.”
In statements about the
tour, Zimmer’s handlers
have said he will be joined on
stage by special guests — an
especially
tantalizing
prospect at Coachella, with
its densely packed roster.
Yet the composer initially
played down that idea at his
studio, saying he’d been
“completely and utterly consumed” by an upcoming
movie and hadn’t arranged
any specific cameos.
Then he kept talking.
“Look, Kendrick and I are
playing the same night,”
he said. “I haven’t talked
to him about it, but we’ve
done things together. And I
think there might be a
chance I can persuade Pharrell
to come and do something.
“Maybe I’ll phone somebody.”
mikael.wood@
latimes.com
Twitter: @mikaelwood
PRESENTS
‘Cooking is a call to act’
- Massimo Bottura
A FORUM
Featuring:
Massimo Bottura
Mario Batali, Roy Choi,
Dominique Crenn, Mary Sue Milliken
Followed by a screening of ‘Theater of Life’
Friday, May 5, 8 pm
The Theatre at the Ace Hotel
A Place
for the Young
at Heart
Introducing Agave by The New Home Company, a
new neighborhood of spacious single-story flats for
buyers 55 & older in the heart of Brea’s master-planned
May 5–––––8 pm
community of La Floresta. The homes at Agave
showcase single-level floorplans, “lock-and-leave”
living, semi-private elevators and other amenities
designed for the young at heart to thrive.
Pre-Sales Commence Summer 2017.
Register Online Today at:
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E16
F R I DAY, A P R I L 14 , 2 017
L ATI M E S . C O M /CA L E N DA R
TELEVISION
WEEKEND PICKS
REVIEW
‘MST3K’ still piles
on scrappy silliness
The cult TV series
returns with all-new
quips and same old
delightful fun.
ROBERT LLOYD
TELEVISION CRITIC
Narendra Dangiya
DANCE
‘Four Visions’ of India
The Aratani World Series continues with “Dance India: Four
Visions,” a survey of classical dance forms. Performers include
Rahul Acharya, above, Shakti Dance Company, Vijayalakshmi,
California Gharana with the Leela Dance Collective. Aratani
Theatre, 244 S. San Pedro St., L.A. $15-$35; student discounts
available. 7 p.m. Saturday. www.festivalofsacredmusic.org
MUSIC & DANCE
MUSIC
A ‘Vision’ of
Earth, space
‘Wicked’ stars on area stages
THEATER
Center holds
Block Party
Encore, encore: Center
Theatre Group brings
back three recent local
productions for its inaugural Block Party series.
Up first, “Failure: A Love
Story,” a remount of
Coeurage Theatre Company’s 2015 staging of
Philip Dawkins’ romantic
drama about three sisters
in 1920s Chicago — and an
L.A. Times Critics’
Choice. Kirk Douglas
Theatre, 9820 Washington
Blvd., Culver City. $25-$70.
6:30 p.m. Sunday. www
.centertheatregroup.org
Carolyn Cole Los Angeles Times
MUSIC
THEATER
See ’em,
believe ’em
‘Animaniacs’
at La Mirada
Man your battle stations!
Coheed and Cambria, the
veteran New York-based
band known for its mix of
prog rock, heavy metal
and science-fiction
themes, hits the stage in
Tinseltown. Hollywood
Palladium, 6215 Sunset
Blvd., Hollywood. $35,
$69. 7 p.m. Saturday.
www.livenation.com
Voice actors Rob Paulsen,
Tress MacNeille and Jess
Harnell, late of the beloved
animated series “Animaniacs,” reunite to perform songs from the show
as part of “Animaniacs
Live!” La Mirada Theatre,
14900 La Mirada Blvd., La
Mirada. $15-$50. 7 p.m.
Saturday. www.lamirada
theatre.com
GET A GREAT DEAL!
America’s most complete
TV listings magazine
Darren Michaels Satellite of Love
JONAH RAY is the new host on the Satellite of Love
in the revived “Mystery Science Theater 3000.”
‘Mystery
Science
Theater 3000:
The Return’
Where: Netflix
When: Anytime, starting
Friday
TV’s Frank.”
Like the hosts before
him, Jonah is a remarkably
chill and cheery prisoner,
clearly in no danger of losing
his mind, addressing viewers, genially participating in
“invention exchanges” with
his captors, passing the time
with robot friends Crow
(Hampton Yount), Tom
Servo (Baron Vaughn) and
Gypsy (Rebecca Hanson).
(The voice cast is all new,
and Hanson is the first woman to play Gypsy; “I’ve upgraded her language center,” Jonah says. “I wanted to
give her a Midwest accent –
you know, those women have
music in their voices.”)
Of the 14 new episodes
(joining a selection of 20
original-run episodes already on Netflix), the two
available for preview were
built around screenings of
“Reptilicus,” a 1961 Dutch
impression of a Godzilla
movie, and “Cry Wilderness,” a 1987 Bigfoot-themed
nature adventure for kids.
The deceptively ingenious
structure of the show offers a
double experience, of both a
terrible movie one might enjoy for its own sad sake and a
running comical commentary on the film provided by
Jonah, Crow and Tom, seen
in silhouette against the
screen; we watch with and
behind them.
Connoisseurs may quibble. The commentary, which
is scripted, can seem marginally less spontaneous
than in episodes of old,
though I would guess this is
mainly a matter of practice.
And not every hit lands —
the new writing crew, led by
former “The Daily Show
With Jon Stewart” head
writer Elliott Kalan, also includes “Community” creator Dan Harmon and that
show’s star, Joel McHale —
and many references will go
right past younger viewers,
but with hundreds of quips
in the course of an episode,
enough do. And the sketches
that frame and interrupt the
showing are all delightful.
Although a rather detailed mythology emerged
over the series’ decade-long
run, the only consistency
that matters is the show’s relationship to its material
and its audience, and, allowing for changes in cast, writing staff and technology, this
is fundamentally the same
“MST3K” you might have
loved, been baffled by or
completely ignored for all
those many years, all those
many years ago.
Notwithstanding
the
relative celebrity of its new
players, the cultural weight
of its new home and a status
grown legendary with time,
it lives up, or down to, its
original low-res model. It is
still a scrappy, silly thing,
probably best experienced
late at night, with friends,
and following the show’s one
specific instruction: “Turn
down your lights (where applicable).”
robert.lloyd@latimes.com
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Prepare to “ooh” and
“aah” with “Bella Gaia —
A Poetic Vision of Earth
From Space.” Directorcomposer Kenji Williams,
choreographer Irina
Akulenko and others join
forces for this work incorporating music, dance
and visuals including
satellite imagery supplied
by NASA. Caltech, Beckman Auditorium, 332 S.
Michigan Ave., Pasadena.
$10-$45. 8 p.m. Saturday.
www.events.caltech.edu
It’s a “Wicked” weekend indeed when that hit musical’s
original costars perform in separate shows on local stages.
First, Idina Menzel helps kick-start a new season at the
Greek. The next night, Kristin Chenoweth (below) holds
court at the Cerritos Center. The Greek Theatre, 2700 N.
Vermont Ave., L.A. $40-$190. 8 p.m. Friday. www.lagreek
theatre.com. Cerritos Center for the Performing Arts, 12700
Center Court Drive, Cerritos. $75-$110. 8 p.m. Saturday.
www.cerritoscenter.com
Born in the far reaches of
local television, formed in
the soup of primordial basic
cable and canceled for the
second time in 1999, “Mystery Science Theater 3000”
came back to life Friday, resurrected into the 21st century world of big-time
streaming media.
Formerly of KTMA in
Minneapolis, Comedy Central (beginning when it was
still Comedy Channel) and
the Sci-Fi Channel (later
Syfy), it resides now on Netflix, fueled by the collective
energy of a dedicated fan
base that pledged nearly
$6 million in a Kickstarter
campaign to produce new
episodes.
Put simply, “MST3K”
translates the private experience of watching and
mocking terrible old movies
with your friends into public
comedy. It comes from a lost
tradition of hosted TV creature features and late-night
movies dredged from the
bottom of a station’s library.
It’s also a puppet show,
largely; kid stuff, with a
nerdy, grown-up spin.
Jonah Ray (also currently of Seeso’s “Hidden
America With Jonah Ray”)
is the series’ third host, after
creator (and still captain)
Joel Hodgson and successor
Mike Nelson. As Jonah Heston (as in Charlton, one assumes), he is, like his predecessors, the subject of an experiment: Trapped in the
“not-too-distant future” on a
spaceship called the Satellite of Love, he is forced to
watch bad movies — actual
bad movies, shown in their
entirety, that we watch with
him — until his captors discover the one that drives him
mad. In some vague way,
this knowledge will allow
them to rule the world.
Felicia Day plays Kinga
Forrester, daughter and
granddaughter of the series’
earlier antagonists, self-described “third-generation
super villain and the inevitable master of all profitmaking media.” Her more
focused plan for universal
domination is, essentially, to
get rich off the series you’re
watching: “I’m going to blow
up this brand and sell it to
Disney for a billion dollars.”
Patton Oswalt plays her
classically dim right hand,
Max, also descended from
an earlier character, known
as TV’s Frank. (Max prefers
to be known as “TV’s Son of
L AT I ME S . CO M / CA L EN DA R
F R IDAY , A P RI L 14 , 2 017
T V HIGH LI GHTS
Friday Prime-Time TV
SERIES
Bob Massi Is the Property
Man Jumping from Fox
News Channel to Fox
Business, this real estate
series launches its third
season with an examination of issues facing the
housing industry, especially in those markets affected by the housing crisis. 5:30 and 9:30 p.m.
MacGyver Seeking revenge,
Murdoc (guest star David
Dastmalchian) orchestrates a plan meant to kill
MacGyver (Lucas Till)
and everyone else at the
Phoenix Foundation as
the action series ends its
first season. 8 p.m. CBS
The Toy Box California kids
introduce
articulated,
ballet-themed dolls and a
backpack that becomes a
piñata. Eric Stonestreet
hosts. 8 p.m. ABC
Rosewood Rosewood, Villa
and TMI (Morris Chestnut, Jaina Lee Ortiz and
Anna Konkle) help a
small-town’s
sheriff
(guest star Diandra Lyle)
investigate the murder of
the community’s former
mayor. 8 p.m. Fox
Hawaii Five-0 McGarrett
(Alex O’Loughlin) thinks
about his grandfather’s
involvement in the attack
on Pearl Harbor as he
probes the murder of a
survivor of the USS Arizona. Hal Holbrook guest
stars. 9 p.m. CBS
Reign Mary and Darnley
(Adelaide Kane, Will
Kemp) marry in a lavish
ceremony. 9 p.m. KTLA
Shark Tank Two California
inventors pitch their bicycle braking system, while
three inventors from Seattle suggest a method to
give business patrons free
parking. Also the Sharks
follow up with Al “Bubba”
Baker and his de-boned
rib steaks. 9 p.m. ABC
Great Performances at the
Met Diana Damrau stars
in Bartlett Sher’s production of Gounod’s opera
“Romeo and Juliet.” 9 p.m.
KOCE
Blue Bloods Danny and
Baez (Donnie Wahlberg,
Marisa Ramirez) suspect
a teenager’s apparent suicide was actually a murder. Mark Linn-Baker and
Tammy Blanchard guest
star and Tom Selleck also
stars. 10 p.m. CBS
Craig Blankenhorn CBS
A TEEN’S suspected
suicide may have been
murder on “Blue Bloods,”
with Donnie Wahlberg.
Animals The edgy animated
comedy breaks from its
usual format for a live-action episode set inside the
headquarters of an evil
conglomerate where Dr.
Labcoat (RuPaul) prepares to roll out a new
drug. 11:31 p.m. HBO
MOVIES
The Man Who Knew Infinity Dev Patel stars as the
brilliant East Indian
mathematician Srinivasa
Ramanujan, who in 1913
travels to England and
Trinity College, Cambridge, to work with professor G.H. Hardy (Jeremy Irons). Toby Jones,
Stephen Fry and Kevin
McNally also star in this
2015 British biographical
drama written and directed
by
Matthew
Brown. 8 p.m. Showtime
Hop The Easter Bunny-tobe (Russell Brand) decides to go AWOL and
pursue a Hollywood career in this 2011 comedy
that combines computer
animation and live action.
James Marsden, Kaley
Cuoco, Hank Azaria and
Elizabeth Perkins also
star. 9 p.m. Disney
How to Train Your Dragon
(2010) 8 a.m. TOON
Toy Story 2 (1999) 8:25 a.m.
and 11:20 a.m. Disney
Anomalisa (2015) 3 p.m.
EPIX
The LEGO Movie (2014) 3
p.m. Cartoon
TALK SHOWS
CBS This Morning Barry
Gibb. (N) 7 a.m. KCBS
Today Mike Lupica; Easter
entertaining:
Martha
Stewart; Hank Azaria.
(N) 7 a.m. KNBC
KTLA Morning News (N) 7
a.m. KTLA
Good Morning America
Ernie
Johnson;
Josh
Groban; the cast of “The
Great Comet.” (N) 7 a.m.
KABC
Good Day L.A. (N) 7 a.m.
KTTV
Live With Kelly Carrie Ann
Inaba (“Dancing With the
Stars”). (N) 9 a.m. KABC
The View Singer Jackie Evancho and her sister, Juliet Evancho, discuss
transgender rights. (N) 10
a.m. KABC
The Wendy Williams Show
Daymond John (“Shark
Tank”). (N) 11 a.m. KTTV
The Talk Ariel Winter; Aldis
Hodge. (N) 1 p.m. KCBS
The Dr. Oz Show Scientology: Leah Remini. 1 p.m.
KTTV
The Doctors A woman sues
a restaurant because she
fell off its donkey statue;
pain as a murder defense;
yogurt. (N) 2 p.m. KCBS
Steve Harvey Caroline and
Albert Manzo (“Manzo’d
With Children”). (N) 2
p.m. KNBC
Harry Tyrese (“The Fate of
the Furious”); five ways to
de-clutter. (N) 2 p.m.
KTTV; midnight KCOP
Dr. Phil A man has become
obsessed in his quest for
enlightenment. (N) 3 p.m.
KCBS
The Ellen DeGeneres Show
Rob Lowe and sons
Matthew and John Owen
(“The Lowe Files”); Maddie Ziegler (“Leap!”). (N)
3 p.m. KNBC
The Real Income tax advice;
fashionable Easter hats;
lipstick. (N) 3 p.m. KTTV
Charlie Rose: The Week (N)
7:30 p.m. KOCE
Washington Week President
Trump’s foreign policy
shifts; U.S. missile strikes
in Syria; use of MOAB in
Afghanistan:
Robert
Costa, the Washington
Post; Peter Baker, the
New York Times; Vivian
Salama, AP; Michael
Crowley, Politico; Molly
Ball, the Atlantic. (N) 8
p.m. KOCE
Charlie Rose (N) 11 p.m.
KVCR; 12:30 a.m. KOCE; 1
a.m. KLCS
Tavis Smiley Folk singer
Arlo Guthrie. (N) midnight KOCE
Nightline (N) 12:37 a.m.
KABC
8 pm
CBS
8:30
MacGyver (TV14) (Season
finale) Murdoc plans revenge
against MacGyver. (N) Å
NBC First Dates (TVPG) A man
shows up after clearly having
had a few drinks. (N)
KTLA The Originals (TV14) Dark
magic puts Klaus and Marcel
on a collision course. (N) Å
ABC The Toy Box (TVPG) A ballerina doll; a piñata in a backpack. (N) Å
KCAL News (N)
9 pm
9:30
Sports News Movies (N) New Å Closed Captioning
Hawaii Five-0 (TV14) One of
the last survivors of the USS
Arizona is murdered. (N) Å
Dateline NBC (TVPG) A young
mom is found dead on the
side of a road. (N) Å
Reign (TV14) Mary and Darnley marry; James makes a
discovery. (N) Å
Shark Tank (TVPG) Pitches
include a smartphone security app. (N) Å
News (N)
10 pm
10:30
News (N)
20/20 (TVPG) Å
News (N)
and Baez investigate a teen’s
alleged suicide. (N) Å
Dateline NBC (TVPG) A detec- News (N) Å
tive comes face to face with
a serial killer. (N) Å
News (N)
News (N)
News (N)
News (N)
Sports Central Mike & Molly
TMZ (TVPG)
FOX
Rosewood (TV14) The murder You the Jury (TV14) Racism
MyNt
American Ninja Warrior Å
American Ninja Warrior Å
Seinfeld Å
Seinfeld Å
King of Queens
Antiques Roadshow (TVG) Å Financial Solutions For You (TVG) Å
Charlie Rose Å
The Thin Man Goes Home ›› (1944) Å
Sudden Fear ››› (1952) Joan Crawford. (9:45) Å
Viernes Santo: Viernes de
Vino el Amor (TV14) (N)
La Piloto (TV14) (N)
Noticias (N)
Washington
LAaRT
Great Performances at the Met (TVPG) Diana Damrau stars in Bartlett
Week (N) Å
Sher’s production of Gounod’s opera “Romeo and Juliet.” (N) Å
Law & Order: CI (TV14) Å
Law & Order: CI (TV14) Å
Family Guy Å Family Guy Å Seinfeld Å
Sun Studio Leo Bluegrass The Austin City Limits The Avett
Front and Center (TVPG)
Business
KVCR
KCET
UNI
KOCE
KDOC
KLCS
of a small town mayor. (N)
online. (N) Å
Bud Welch.
Cox Family.
Brothers; Nickel Creek.
Southside Johnny. Å
(TVG) (N) Å
Live PD (TV14) (N) Å
Live PD (TV14) Riding along with law enforcement. (N) Å
AMC Lethal Weapon 3 ››› (1992) Mel Gibson. (7:30) (R) Å
Lethal Weapon 4 ›› (1998) Mel Gibson. (R)
ANP Tanked (TVPG)
Tanked: Sea-Lebrity Edition (TVPG) (N)
Tanked Å
BBC
BET
Bravo
CMT
CNN
Com
Disc
Disn
E!
ESPN
Food
FNC
Free
FX
Hall
HGTV
Hist
IFC
Life
MSN
MTV
NGC
Nick
OWN
Spike
Sund
Syfy
TBS
TCM
TLC
TNT
Toon
Travel
Tru
TV L
USA
VH1
WGN
Cine
Encr
HBO
Show
Doctor Who (TVPG) Å
Doctor Who (TVPG) Å
Doctor Who (TVPG) Å
Doctor Who Å
Dr. Dolittle (6) Space Jam ›› (1996) Michael Jordan, Wayne Knight. (PG)
Rebel (TV14)
Housewives
Selena ››› (1997) Jennifer Lopez. Mexican-American singer skyrockets to fame. (PG) Å
Varsity Blues ›› (1999) (7) (R) Å
Varsity Blues ›› (1999) James Van Der Beek. (R) Å
CNN Tonight: Don Lemon (N) Anderson Cooper (TVPG) Å Anderson Cooper (TVPG) Å Unseen Enemy
We’re the Millers ›› (2013) (6:55) (R) Å
We’re the Millers ›› (2013) Jennifer Aniston. (R) Å
Gold Rush: Parker’s Trail (N)
Gold Rush (TVPG) Parker falls into freezing water. (N) Å
Gold Rush Å
Stuck in Middle Andi Mack (N) Hop ›› (2011) James Marsden. (PG) Å
Tangled Å
Stuck in Middle
Couples Retreat ›› (2009) Vince Vaughn, Jason Bateman. (PG-13) Å
Kardashian
E! News (N)
SportsCenter (TVPG) (7:30) SportsCenter (TVPG) (N) Å SportsCenter (TVPG) (N) Å SportsCenter
Diner, Drive-In Diner, Drive-In Diner, Drive-In Diner, Drive-In Diner, Drive-In Diner, Drive-In Diner, Drive-In
Factor Friday Å
Tucker Carlson Tonight Å
Hannity Å
First 100 Days
The Hunger Games: Catching Fire ››› (2013) Jennifer Lawrence. (7:30) (PG-13) Å
The 700 Club
Guardians of the Galaxy ››› (2014) Chris Pratt, Zoe Saldana. (PG-13) Å X-Men: Days of Future Past
Improvement Improvement The Middle Å The Middle Å The Middle Å The Middle Å Golden Girls Å
Dream Home Dream Home Dream Home Dream Home House Hunters Hunters Int.
House Hunters
American Pickers (TVPG) Å American Pickers (TVPG) Å American Pickers (10:03) Å Pickers
Bad Boys ›› (1995) Martin Lawrence, Will Smith. (R) Å
Crank ›› (2006) (10:45) (R)
Bring It! (TVPG) (N) Å
Bring It! (TVPG) (N) Å
The Pop Game (TVPG) (10:13) Bring It! (11:11)
All In With Chris Hayes Å
The Rachel Maddow Show Å The Last Word Å
Lockup: Raw
Ridiculousness Ridiculousness Ridiculousness Ridiculousness Ridiculousness Ridiculousness Ridiculousness
Naked Science Naked Science Origins of Humankind
Explorer (TVG) Å
Origins
Henry Danger (TVG) Å
Ice Age: Dawn of the Dinosaurs ›› (2009) Ray Romano. (PG) Friends Å
20/20 on ID (TV14) Å
48 Hours: Hard Evidence Å
48 Hours: Hard Evidence
20/20 on ID Å
Cops (TVPG) Cops (TVPG) Bellator MMA Live (TV14) (N) Å
Bellator Å
Law & Order (TV14) Å
Law & Order (TV14) Å
Law & Order (TVPG) Å
Law & Order Å
Fast & Furious ›› (2009) (7) John Wick ››› (2014) Keanu Reeves. (R) Å
The Magicians
Horrible Bosses 2 ›› (2014) Jason Bateman, Charlie Day. (R) Å
The Bounty Hunter › (2010)
Magnificent Obsession ››› (1954) (7:30)
All That Heaven Allows ››› (1955) Jane Wyman. (9:45) Å
American Gypsy Wedding Å
American Gypsy Wedding Å
American Gypsy Wedding Å
Gypsy Å
The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies ›› (2014) Ian McKellen. (PG-13) Å
The Island
King of the Hill King of the Hill American Dad American Dad Bob’s Burgers Bob’s Burgers Family Guy Å
Expedition Unknown (TVPG) Expedition Unknown (TVPG) Expedition Unknown (TVPG) Expedition Å
Carbonaro Å Carbonaro Å Carbonaro Å Carbonaro Å Carbonaro Å Carbonaro Å Carbonaro Å
MASH (TVPG) Raymond Å
Raymond Å
Raymond Å
Raymond Å
Raymond Å
King of Queens
Law & Order: SVU (TV14) Å Law & Order: SVU (TV14) Å Team Ninja Warrior (TVPG) Å Team Ninja Å
RuPaul’s Drag Race (TV14) (N) RuPaul’s Drag Race (TV14)
National Security ›› (2003) (PG-13) Å
U.S. Marshals ›› (1998) Tommy Lee Jones, Wesley Snipes. (PG-13) Å
How I Met Å
Black Mass ››› (2015) Johnny Depp. (R) Å
Marauders (2016) Bruce Willis. (10:05) (R) Å
The White Queen (TV14) Å
National Treasure: Book of Secrets ›› (2007) (9:06) (PG) Å Face/Off
Criminal ›› (2016) Kevin Costner, Gal Gadot. (R) Å
Real Time: Bill Maher (TVMA) VICE (TV14)
The Man Who Knew Infinity ›› (2015) Dev Patel. Mathemati- Boxing Dmitry Bivol vs. Samuel Clarkson.
cian Srinivasa Ramanujan finds a mentor in 1913. Å
(N) Å
Deep Impact (1998) (6:56) Å Outlander (TVMA) Å
The Fifth Element (1997) (9:57) (PG-13) Å
TMC Love Actually ››› (2003) Hugh Grant, Laura Linney. (R) Å Carol (2015) Cate Blanchett. (10:15) (R) Å
Starz
Cooking demos by
Nguyen Tran
Marcela Valladolid
Food trucks
Green Truck, Inc. • HoLee Chow • India Jones Chow Truck • Oaxaca On Wheels • Palazzolo Truck
Belly Bombz • Boba Truck • Cousins Maine Lobster • Gourmet Genie • The Greasy Wiener
Jogasaki Burrito • Truck Recess Inc. • White Rabbit • Harold & Belle's
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Jessica Koslow
11 pm
Blue Bloods (TVPG) Danny
WHERE CHEFS DISH
AND FOOD TRUCKS RULE
Ayesha Curry
E17
E18
F R I DAY, A P R I L 14 , 2 017
L ATI M E S . C O M /CA L E N DA R
COMICS
BRIDGE
SUDOKU
By Frank Stewart
This week I’ve dealt with
preventing your partner
from making a mistake.
Cover the West/South
cards and defend as East.
Against four hearts, West
leads a club: queen, ace,
king. What do you lead at the
second trick?
In real life East shifted to
his singleton seven of diamonds. South played the
eight, and West had to guess.
If the seven was a singleton,
West had to win and return a
diamond. But if East had led
from a doubleton, West
needed to play the 10, preserving communication so
the defense could get two
diamonds later. (West had to
assume that East had a major-suit ace.)
Inevitably, West went
KENKEN
Every box will contain a number; numbers depend on the size of the grid. For a 6x6
puzzle, use Nos. 1-6. Do not repeat a number in any row or column. The numbers in each
heavily outlined set of squares must combine to produce the target number found in the
top left corner of the cage using the mathematical operation indicated. A number can be
repeated within a cage as long as it is not in the same row or column.
4/14/17
HOROSCOPE
By Holiday Mathis
Aries (March 21-April 19):
The social swirl favors you,
though in a temperate kind
of way. Go home when you’re
tired.
Taurus (April 20-May
20): Your purpose will converge with a bit of randomness that you can’t help but
pay attention to.
Gemini (May 21-June 21):
Don’t start with what others
want from you or who they
want you to be. Start with
what interests and excites
you.
Cancer (June 22-July 22):
People will have to come to a
decision together. Calm
communication will be key.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22): Relationships’ ease will have
more to do with what’s going
on outside the relationship.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22):
Be careful not to let your perfectionism keep you from expanding opportunities.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23):
You find it pretty easy to
make rational decisions, unless you are 1) hungry, 2)
tired or 3) emotionally involved. Hungry and tired are
easy to remedy. Good luck
getting your feelings out of it,
though!
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 21):
Bottom line, the group will
be better for your expertise,
instinct and involvement.
Sagittarius (Nov. 22Dec. 21): Surrender if you feel
it’s time to stop resisting
where life wants to take you.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan.
19): You will look for what
you find and, bonus, what
you beckon for will come to
you.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb.
18): You can only give what
you’ve got. Actually, you
could borrow to give, but
that would be a horrible idea
today. In fact, make sure you
don’t give all you’ve got.
Hold back half. You’re going
to need a lot more tomorrow.
Pisces (Feb. 19-March
20): You’ll wake up and avoid
some rather overblown expectations that are being
promoted by parts of our
culture in the realm of relationships. You recognize
that this hype is toxic to your
pursuit of love.
Today’s birthday (April
14): You have a talent for
putting people together who
fit well, and you’ll create scenarios that could never have
happened without you.
You’ll be made an offer that
seems so crazy to you but
also quite right. Physical
strength and mental stamina will be required for the
marathon-like situation in
June. You’ll be proud and
richer for the run. Leo and
Libra adore you. Your lucky
numbers are: 7, 4, 30, 19 and
45.
Holiday Mathis writes her
column for Creators
Syndicate Inc. The
horoscope should be read
for entertainment. Previous
forecasts are at
latimes.com/horoscope.
wrong. When dummy’s king
won, South drew trumps,
forced out the ace of spades
and threw three diamonds
on dummy’s spades. He lost
one diamond but made
game.
East saves his partner by
cashing the ace of spades at
Trick Two. When he leads a
diamond next, West will
have no choice but to play
East for a singleton.
Question: You hold: ♠ A 9
7 3 ♥10 7 ♦ 7 ♣ A10 8 6 4 3. Your
partner opens one heart,
you respond one spade, he
rebids two hearts. Now
what?
Answer: To pass and accept a plus score would be
beyond reproach. Nevertheless, partner’s rebid
promises a six-card or longer suit, and you have two
aces and a possible ruffing
value in diamonds. If you’re
vulnerable, I would admire a
raise to three hearts.
South dealer
Both sides vulnerable
NORTH
♠ K Q J 10 2
♥KJ62
♦K42
♣Q
WEST
EAST
♠65
♠A973
♥53
♥ 10 7
♦ A J 10 5
♦7
♣J9752
♣ A 10 8 6 4 3
SOUTH
♠84
♥AQ984
♦Q9863
♣K
SOUTH WEST
NORTH EAST
Pass
Pass
1♠
Pass
2♥
Pass
3♥
Pass
4♥
All Pass
Opening lead — ♣ 5
2017, Tribune Media
Services
ASK AMY
‘You owe us — forever’
Dear Amy: I was adopted
within my family when I was
a little girl. My grandparents
on my father’s side forced
my father’s sister to adopt
me. She raised me, and
though we were never close
when I was a kid, in recent
years, we’ve developed a better relationship.
I am stuck trying to make
my aunt/“mom” and grandmother happy. Every time I
need to make a major decision and it’s not what they
envision for me, they guilttrip me, mentioning how
they saved me from the life I
could’ve had.
I was divorced a few years
ago and was a single mom,
and not once did I ask for financial help from them.
However, when I cannot afford an extravagant gift for
them, I never hear the end of
it. According to my grandmother, how much I spend
shows how much respect I
have for them.
I’ve been dating a wonderful man for the last two
years, and we’re ready to be
married. I’ve tried to ask for
my family’s blessing, but
they do not like him because
he’s not the same ethnicity
as I am.
I am so hurt. This man
treats me and my son the
way we should be treated.
But my family is forcing me
to choose between pursuing
a new life or them. How can I
move on with my life, knowing that I am rejecting the
family that saved me?
Torn Between
Family and Love
hospital and am going to
school to be a nurse.
There is this guy whose
pictures keep showing up on
the popular page of my Instagram feed.
I was looking through his
page, and it says that he is a
single dad who lives in my
area. He is very good looking
and looks like a very involved
dad. I would like to talk to
him and see what could happen. I just don’t know how to
start a conversation with
him without looking desperate. Can you help?
B
Dear Torn: Repeat after
me: I do not owe my family
unending gratitude.
I can understand why
you feel obligated to your
family for giving you so
much, but good parents
don’t ask to be paid back for
the task of raising you, they
expect good children —
which you are — to pay that
kindness forward by raising
good children themselves —
which you are doing.
You do not owe your family for your upbringing, and
for them to constantly remind you that they rescued
you so long ago is unkind
and manipulative.
You have done your job
and grown up into a compassionate, self-sufficient person. You have found a person who loves and appreciates you.
Start planning for the
wonderful life you and your
husband will build together
for your son. You may have
to carry on in that life without your family, at least for a
time.
Dear B: First, this: Understand that it would be very
easy for this guy to create a
completely fictitious persona on Instagram. Proceed
with common sense and
caution.
I’m afraid there is no
magical conversation starter to chat with a crush. This
is a matter of simply being
bold enough to make the
first move. I think the best
solution for you is the simplest, and that is to be honest and authentic: Reach
out, introduce yourself, and
say, “It looks like you and I
have a lot in common.” Don’t
worry if this encounter
doesn’t go perfectly.
Dear Amy: I am a 30-yearold single mom. I work in a
Send questions to askamy@
amydickinson.com.
FAMILY CIRCUS By Bil Keane
DENNIS THE MENACE By Hank Ketcham
ARGYLE SWEATER By Scott Hilburn
MARMADUKE By Brad & Paul Anderson
BLISS By Harry Bliss
BALLARD STREET By Jerry Van Amerongen
CROSSWORD
Edited By Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
By Mark McClain
ACROSS
1 Tablet input
5 Stick (on)
10 Groovy
13 “The Quiet Man”
co-star
15 Take in, maybe
16 Mauna __
17 Insensitive zealot?
19 Wine bottle figs.
20 Asian capital
21 Where Gauguin painted
“Woman With a Flower”
23 Lays to rest
26 Eye parts
27 Gung-ho
28 Concurrent with
29 Poetic praise
30 Like Mandarin Chinese,
linguistically
32 ’80s-90s slugger Fielder
35 Popular wine region
37 Summer Triangle
twinkler
39 All there
40 View
42 Get rid of
5 Part of UTEP
44 Rotation meas.
6 Fronton game word
45 Downgrade, maybe
7 Kind of deviation: Abbr.
47 Tot’s indigestion area
8 Wobble
49 Grows periodically
9 Unpredictable
51 Sad, on the Seine
10 Golf course equipment
52 Sweater wool
of the future?
53 Rodeo critter
11 Big artery
55 Item under a top
12 Rationale
56 Reprobate’s regular
14
Genesis mount
expense?
18 Like wild horses
61 Funny pair?
22 Duncan of baking fame
62 Like Mexico’s Pyramid
23 Shackles
of the Magician
24 Clay-court legend
63 Part of UTEP
25 What many golfers
64 Whiskey option
regularly engage in?
65 Rested
26 Yardstick
66 Casual refusal ... and,
28 Reel, for one
another way, a hint
31 Fledgling launching
to this puzzle’s four
spots
longest answers
33 Feedback
34 “I wanna try!”
DOWN
36 End of __
1 Bashful comrade?
38 Frying preparation
2 “I thought so!”
41 Self-evident actualities
3 1860s White House boy
4 Tell, memorably
43 Least spoiled
© 2017 Tribune Content Agency
46 Ham’s accessory
48 “The Queen” (2006) star
49 Color in
“America the Beautiful”
50 Like many bar jokes
53 Blow a fuse
54 Canvas shelter
57 Actress Carrie who was
married to Dick Cavett
58 Skeletal opening?
59 Toddler’s downtime
60 Japanese market letters
ANSWER TO
PREVIOUS PUZZLE
4/14/17
L AT I ME S . CO M / CA L EN DA R
F R IDAY , A P R IL 14 , 2 017
COMICS
DOONESBURY By Garry Trudeau
Doonesbury is on vacation. This is a reprint.
DILBERT By Scott Adams
LA CUCARACHA By Lalo Alcaraz
BABY BLUES By Jerry Scott & Rick Kirkman
CANDORVILLE By Darrin Bell
CRANKSHAFT By Tom Batiuk & Chuck Ayers
HALF FULL By Maria Scrivan
PEARLS BEFORE SWINE By Stephan Pastis
NON SEQUITUR By Wiley
LIO By Mark Tatulli
JUMP START By Robb Armstrong
9 CHICKWEED LANE By Brooke McEldowney
BLONDIE By Dean Young & John Marshall
GET FUZZY By Darby Conley
ZITS By Jerry Scott & Jim Borgman
BIZARRO By Dan Piraro
TUNDRA By Chad Carpenter
DRABBLE By Kevin Fagan
PRICKLY CITY By Scott Stantis
MUTTS By Patrick McDonnell
FRAZZ By Jef Mallett
PEANUTS By Charles M. Schulz
E19
E20
FRIDAY, APRIL 14, 2017
LOS ANGELES TIMES
MASTERPIECE
…
A
THE BEST SHOW ON TELEVISION ”
“
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★★★★★
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HBO NOW® is only accessible through participating partners in the US and certain US territories. Certain restrictions apply. ® & ©2017 Home Box Office, Inc. All rights reserved.
LOS ANGELES TIMES
SGIE FRIDAY, APRIL 14, 2017
G1
THANK YOU FOR MAKING US THE
1
#
CHECK OUT OUR GIANT
INVENTORY
ON
O
NR
ROTOLO.COM
OTOLO.COM
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NEW 2017 CHEVROLET CRUZE SEDAN LS AUTOMATIC
YOU SAVE
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$
INCLUDING REBATES
MSRP.............................................. $20,540
ROTOLO DISCOUNT ............................ $3,041
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FACTORY REBATE ............................... $1,500
DOWN PAYMENT ASSIST** ................. $1,000
SELECT MODEL BONUS TAG*............... $1,000
NET COST
NEW 2017 CHEVROLET MALIBU LS
MSRP................................................ $24,240
ROTOLO DISC....................................... $2,741
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FACTORY REBATE .................................$2,500
SELECT MODEL BONUS TAG*................. $1,000
DOWN PAYMENT ASSIST** ................... $1,000
NET COST
YOU SAVE
7,241
$
INCLUDING REBATES
13,999
16,999
$
1 AT THIS NET COST
(173680X/226774)
**Must finance thru GM Financial
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NEW 2017 CHEVROLET EQUINOX LS
$
$
YOU SAVE
8,781
INCLUDING RE
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REBA
MSRP... ............................................$27,780
ROTOLO DISCOUNT ............................ $4,531
SALE PRICE ...................................... $23,249
FACTORY REBATE ............................... $2,250
SELECT MODEL BONUS TAG*............... $2,000
1 AT THIS
S NET COST
(173482/250293)
**Must finance thru GM Financial
Finan cial
NEW 2017 CHEVROLET TRAVERSE LS
MSRP................................................$32,320
ROTOLO DISCOUNT .............................. $4,571
SALE PRICE .........................................$27,749
FACTORY REBATE ................................. $2,750
SELECT MODEL BONUS TAG*.................$2,000
YOU SAVE
9,321
$
INCLUDING REBATES
NET COST
NET COST
22 ,999
18,999
$
$
1 AT THI
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1 AT THIS
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(172872T/288435)
NEW 2017 CHEVROLET SILVERADO 1500 LT DBL CAB
5.3 L, V8, MYLINK COLOR TOUCH AUDIO, TRAILER EQUIPMENT PKG, REMOTE START
ALL STAR EDITION!
NET COST
MS
MSRP...
............................................$41,890
ROTOLO DISCOUNT ............................ $6,391
RO
SALE PRICE ...................................... $35,499
SA
FACTORY REBATE ............................... $2,500
FA
SELECT
SE
MODEL BONUS TAG*............... $2,000
30,999
YOU SAVE
$
10,891
$
INCLUDING REBATES
1 AT THIS NET COST
(172058T/192128)
NEW 2017 CHEVROLET BOLT EV LT
219
MO *
PLUS
TAX
$
LEASE FOR
ONLY
1 AT THIS PAYMENT (172599/141753)
*Plus tax. 36 months closed-end lease on approved Tier 1 credit thru GM Financial. Tier A-2 or A-3 may be slightly higher. Total drive-offs includes $3,500 customer cash or
trade equity and $3,200 factory rebate. Total due at signing $6,700. $.25 per mile in excess of 10K miles per year.
OUR EXCEPTIONAL PRE-OWNED VEHICLES!!
MANAGER’S SPECIALS MANAGER’S SPECIALS MANAGER’S SPECIALS
’16 CHEVY SONIC LT HB
’16 CHEVY CRUZE LTD LS SDN
Gray, 4Cyl, Auto, A/C, P/W, P/L, MP3 CD,
XM, Bluetooth, Alloys, Only 5K Miles
White, 4Cyl, Manual, A/C, P/W, P/L, MP3 CD,
Bluetooth, Onstar, Only 15K Miles (GM CERTIFIED)
13
,988
1 AT THIS PRICE (14584Y/117142)
12,988
1 AT THIS PRICE (172364A/126810)
$
$
8,988
1 AT THIS
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’14 HYUNDAI TUCSON GLS SPORT UTIL
SILVER, 4 CYL, AUTO A/C,
P/W, P/L, MP3 CD, LOW MILES
(172001A/902210)
14,988
$
1 AT THIS
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’15 NISSAN NV200 SV CARG0 VAN
WHITE, 4 CYL, AUTO A/C,
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15,988
$
1 AT THIS
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’14 CHEVY CRUZE DIESEL SDN
10,988
$
1 AT THIS
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’15 KIA OPTIMA LX SDN
BURG, 4 CYL, AUTO A/C, P/W, P/L,
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14,988
$
1 AT THIS
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’15 HONDA ACCORD SPORT SDN
GRAY, AUTO A/C, P/W, P/L, MP3
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18,988
$
1 AT THIS
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WHITE, AUTO A/C, P/W, P/L,
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(172710A/476352)
12,988
$
1 AT THIS
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’15 HONDA CIVIC LX SDN
BLACK, 4 CYL, AUTO A/C,
P/W, P/L, MP3 CD, LOW MILES
(172011A/560344)
14,988
$
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’15 KIA FORTE LX SDN
SILVER, AUTO A/C, P/W,
P/L, MP3 CD
(172712A/378242)
12,988
$
1 AT THIS
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’14 HONDA ACCORD LX SEDAN
SILVER, 4 CYL, AUTO, A/C,
P/W, P/L, CD, LOW MILES
(172491A/290956)
14,988
$
1 AT THIS
PRICE
’16 CHEVY CRUZE LS SDN
’14 KIA OPTIMA LX SDN
GRAY, 4 CYL, AUTO A/C,
P/W, P/L, MP3 CD
(172492A/311129)
13,988
$
1 AT THIS
PRICE
’15 NISSAN ALTIMA 2.5 S SDN
4 CYL, AUTO, A/C, P/W, P/L,
MP3 CD (170132A/354508)
14,988
$
1 AT THIS
PRICE
SILVER, 4 CYL, AUTO, P/W,
P/L, A/C, BACK UP CAMERA,
BLUETOOTH, LOW MILES
(14571Y/303741)
14,988
$
1 AT THIS
PRICE
’14 CHEVY VOLT SDN
4 CYL/ELECT, BLACK, AUTO A/C,
P/W, P/L, MP3 CD, ALLOYS, LOW
MILES (161382A/160682)
15,988
$
1 AT THIS
PRICE
’15 CHEVY TRAVERSE LT SPORT UTIL ’15 CHEVY TRAVERSE LS SPORT UTIL ’15 FORD EDGE SEL AWD SPORT UTIL ’15 CHEVY COLORADO CREW CAB Z71
WHITE, V6, AUTO A/C, 2 LT,
P/SEAT, XM, BLUETOOTH,
ONSTAR, ALLOYS, LOW MILES
(170693A/271588)
21,988
$
1 AT THIS
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WHITE, V6, AUTO A/C, P/W, P/L, REAR
A/C, 3RD ROW SEAT, XM, ONSTAR,
ONLY 22K MILES (14572Y/136010)
21,998
$
1 AT THIS
PRICE
BLACK, V6, AUTO A/C, P/W, P/L MP3
CD, P/SEAT, ALLOYS, ONLY 11K MILES
(172701A/897586)
24,988
$
1 AT THIS
PRICE
GRAY, V6, AUTO A/C, P/W, P/L,
NAVIGATION, BACK UP CAMERA,
TOW, ALLOYS, ONLY 13K MILES (GM
CERTIFIED) (170404A/252856)
28,988
$
1 AT THIS
PRICE
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866-275-8450
Fontana, 210 Freeway, Exit Sierra
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Open Daily 8:30am-10pm • Sunday 9-10pm
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’14 CHEVY CRUZE LT SDN
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15
,999
1 AT THIS PRICE (172307A/108039)
7
,988
1 AT THIS PRICE (172256A/710193)
14
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’15 CHEVY SPARK LS HB
Black, 4Cyl, Turbo, Auto, P/W, P/L, Mylink, XM,
Alloys, Only 7K Miles
BLUE, 4 CYL, A/C, P/W, P/L, ONSTAR, ALLOYS,
LOW MILES
Silver, 4Cyl, Auto, A/C, MP3 CD, XM,
Onstar, Alloys
WHITE, 4 CYL, A/C, P/W,
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’17 CHEVY CRUZE LT SDN
’15 CHEVY SPARK LS HB
’16 CHEVY MALIBU LTD LT SDN
Free Shuttle • Appointments Welcome,
Call 909-822-1111
All advertised prices exclude government fees and taxes, any finance charges, any dealer documentation/preparation charges, any electronic filing
charges and any emission testing charge. GM Factory Rebates in lieu of special finance offers. *Select Model Bonus Tag available for select models.
All vehicle images are for illustration purposes only. OnStar and XM require subscription from GM after 90 days*. Southern California residency
restrictions apply. Ad prices good 4/14/17 thru 4/15/17.
www.rotolochevy.com • www.rotolochevy.com • www.rotolochevy.com • www.rotolochevy.com • www.rotolochevy.com • www.rotolochevy.com • www.rotolochevy.com • www.rotolochevy.com • www.rotolochevy.com • www.rotolochevy.com • www.rotolochevy.com • www.rotolochevy.com • www.rotolochevy.com • www.rotolochevy.com
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G2
FRIDAY, APRIL 14, 2017 SGIE
LOS ANGELES TIMES
back by popular demand
Zero down leases!
leave your wallet at home!
absolutely $0 cash out of pocket!
EXPERIENCE
THE NEW BUICK
new 2017 buick encore
ZERO CASH
OUT OF POCKET!
Lease
for Only
169
$
1 AT THIS OFFER
per mo
+ TAX
ULTRA LOW MILEAGE LEASE FOR WELL QUALIFIED LESSEES
WITH A NON-GM LEASE (99 OR NEWER MODEL)
24 MO cLOSED END LEASE. $1,075 GM FINANcIAL
REbATE pLUS $1,500 INcREMENTAL cASH, $1,500
cOMpETITIvE LEASE REbATE*, MUST HAvE A NONGM vEHIcLE LEASE TO QUALIFy. RESIDUAL $16,952.
MILEAGE cHARGE OF 25¢/MILE OvER 20,000 MILES
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new 2017 gmc acadia
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cLOSED END LEASE. $1,500 SELEcT bONUS cASH pLUS $400
INcREMENTAL cASH, $1,500 cOMpETITIvE LEASE REbATE*,
MUST HAvE A NON-GM vEHIcLE LEASE TO QUALIFy. RESIDUAL
$24,363. MILEAGE cHARGE OF 25¢/MILE OvER 20,000 MILES
(238250, 238710, 241212)
family owned and operated for 100 years
626-966-4461
shop from home: reynolds1915.com
345 N. CITRUS,
WEST COVINA
*On approved credit. All prices plus government fees and taxes, any finance charges, any dealer document processing charge, any electronic filing charge,
and any emission testing charge, subject to prior sale. Ad expires close of business day of publication.
LOS ANGELES TIMES
SGIE FRIDAY, APRIL 14, 2017
CHECK OUT THESE AMAZING DEALS
2016 buick VERANO MSRP ....................................................$24,800
$8,850 NET SAVINGS FROM MSRP
Net
Cost
15,950
$
2 AT THIS NET COST
REYNOLDS DISCOUNT .............................$4,350
SALE PRICE ............................................$20,450
FACTORY REBATE........................................$500
COMPETITIvE LEASE REBATE.....................$1,500
(MUST HAvE A NON-GM vEHICLE LEASE TO qUALIFY)
BONUS CASH..........................................$2,000
CTT REBATE ................................................$500
114325, 117522
PRIOR COURTESY LOANER
2017 buick REGAL
$5,985 NET SAVINGS FROM MSRP
Net
Cost
23,950
$
1 AT THIS NET COST
MSRP .....................................................$29,935
REYNOLDS DISCOUNT ..............................$3,985
SALE PRICE .............................................$25,950
COMPETITIvE LEASE REBATE......................$1,500
(MUST HAvE A NON-GM vEHICLE LEASE TO qUALIFY)
BONUS CASH..............................................$500
120019
PRIOR COURTESY LOANER
NEW 2017 buick ENVisiON
$9,245 NET SAVINGS FROM MSRP
Net
Cost
27,735
$
1 AT THIS NET COST
124713
MSRP .............................................. $36,980
REYNOLDS DISCOUNT ....................... $4,918
SALE PRICE ...................................... $32,062
STAND ALONE REBATE....................... $4,327
NEW 2016 buick cAscAdA
$9,435 NET SAVINGS FROM MSRP
Net
Cost
27,950
$
1 AT THIS NET COST
MSRP ...................................................... $37,385
REYNOLDS DISCOUNT ............................... $7,935
SALE PRICE .............................................. $29,450
COMPETITIvE LEASE REBATE....................... $1,500
(MUST HAvE A NON-GM vEHICLE LEASE TO qUALIFY)
084046
GREAT SAVINGS ON TRUCKS AND SUVS!
NEW 2017 GMC SIERRA 1500 REG CAB
$8,580 NET SAVINGS FROM MSRP
$
MSRP ........................................................................................ $30,325
REYNOLDS DISCOUNT ................................................................. $3,375
SALE PRICE ................................................................................ $26,950
SELECT BONUS CASH ........................................................................... $2,000
DOWN PAYMENT ASSIST ...................................................................... $1,000
Net Cost
22,950
Must fiNANcE thRu GM fiNANciAL
FACTORY REBATE............................................................................ $500
COMPETITIvE LEASE REBATE..................................................................... $500
(Must hAVE A NON-GM VEhicLE LEAsE tO QuALifY)
1 AT THIS NET COST
248060
NEW 2017 GMC ACADIA SLE
$7,008 SAVINGS FROM MSRP
$
Net Cost
MSRP ........................................................................................ $33,375
REYNOLDS DISCOUNT ................................................................. $3,074
SALE PRICE ................................................................................ $30,301
STAND ALONE REBATE................................................................. $3,934
26,367
3 AT THIS NET COST
238250, 238710, 241212
NEW 2017 GMC SIERRA 1500 DOUBLE CAB ELEVATION
$9,370 NET SAVINGS FROM MSRP
$
MSRP ........................................................................................ $36,320
REYNOLDS DISCOUNT ................................................................. $4,370
SALE PRICE ................................................................................ $31,950
DOWN PAYMENT ASSIST ..................................................................... $1,000
Net Cost
26,950
Must fiNANcE thRu GM fiNANciAL
FACTORY REBATE............................................................................ $500
COMPETITIvE LEASE REBATE.................................................................. $1,000
(Must hAVE A NON-GM VEhicLE LEAsE tO QuALifY)
INCREMENTAL CASH ......................................................................... $500
SELECT BONUS CASH ................................................................. $2,000
1 AT THIS NET COST
156312
NEW 2016 GMC SIERRA 2500 CREW CAB HD
$11,015 NET SAVINGS FROM MSRP
$
MSRP ........................................................................................ $38,515
REYNOLDS DISCOUNT ................................................................. $4,515
SALE PRICE ................................................................................ $34,000
FACTORY REBATE......................................................................... $2,000
COMPETITIvE LEASE REBATE..................................................................... $500
Net Cost
27,500
(Must hAVE A NON-GM VEhicLE LEAsE tO QuALifY)
SELECT BONUS CASH ................................................................. $4,000
1 AT THIS NET COST
227785
Family owned and operated For 100 years
Famil
626-966-4461
shop from home: reynolds1915.com
*On approved credit. All prices plus government fees and taxes, any finance charges, any dealer document processing charge,
any electronic filing charge, and any emission testing charge. Subject to prior sale. Ad expires close of business day of publication.
345 N. citrus,west coviNa
G3
G4
FRIDAY, APRIL 14, 2017 SGIE
LOS ANGELES TIMES
Champion
CELEBRATE WITH MASSIVE SAVINGS!!! Fri.- sun.
0 72
% FOR
MO.
On approved credit
on select models
PLUS
in lieu of Factory
Rebates. $13.99 per
$1000 Financed.
APR
FINANCING
(ADDITIONAL REBATES)
ON SELECT MODELS
1000
$
1000
$
0
DOWN
On Approved Credit
500
$
2000
$
CHRYSLER CAPITAL BONUS CASH
**CONQUEST LEASE BONUS CASH
†
PLUS
0
PAYMENTS
FOR 90 DAYS
On Approved Credit
****
****MILITARY
BONUS CASH
***CHRYSLER
***
CHRYSLER 200 TRADE IN BONUS CASH
NEW 2017 RAM 1500 QUAD CAB
MSRP..................................$35,080
CHAMPION DISCOUNT ........ $5,750
SALE PRICE ........................ $29,330
FACTORY REBATE................. $5,250
11,000 OFF MSRP
“WORK OR PLAY IN STYLE”
$
NEW 2016 DODGE DART
6,082S
NET SAVING
AUTO, POWER WINDOWS /LOCKS,
A/C, CRUISE & MUCH MORE
MSRP.......................................$21,080
CHAMPION DISCOUNT............$3,582
SALE PRICE........................ $17,498
FACTORY REBATE ................$2,500
$
NET SAVING
POWER WINDOWS/LOCKS, BLUETOOTH, CRUISE & MUCH MORE
7 PASSENGERS
MSRP.......................................$25,580
CHAMPION DISCOUNT............$3,466
SALE PRICE ............................ $22,114
FACTORY REBATE .................... $5,116
NET SAVING
AUTO, POWER WINDOWS/LOCKS, AM/FM,
CRUISE, TILT & MUCH MORE
MSRP...................................... $26,400
CHAMPION DISCOUNT............ $3,122
SALE PRICE............................ $23,278
FACTORY REBATE ................$5,280
NET SAVINGS
AUTO, POWER WINDOWS/DOORS/LOCKS, & MUCH MORE
MSRP.......................................$30,215
CHAMPION DISCOUNT...........$11,217
SALE PRICE........................$18,998
“NOTHING REGULAR ABOUT THIS”
NET SAVING
SALE PRICE.............................$23,248
FACTORY REBATE......................$2,250
$
NET SAVIN
8 SPEED, AUTO, POWER WINDOWS/LOCKS, AM/FM,
ABS, KEYLESS ENTRY, CRUISE, TILT & MORE
4,292S
NET SAVING
MSRP..................................... $31,290
CHAMPION DISCOUNT............$2,292
SALE PRICE............................$28,998
FACTORY REBATE ....................$2,000
SALES
HOURS
8:30am to 10pm
7 Days a
Week
NEW 2017 JEEP PATRIOT
AUTO, BLUETOOTH, CRUISE CONTROL
AND MUCH MORE
7 592S
$ ,
NET SAVING
NET COST TO YOU
17,998
$
5,972S
NET SAVING
718050/718026
18,998
$
AUTO, BLUETOOTH, CRUISE CONTROL,
POWER
POWE WINDOWS/LOCKS & MUCH MORE
9,092S
$
NET SAVING
6,092S
NET SAVING
10,92G7S
NET SAVIN
8 SPEED, AUTOMATIC, TRANSMISSION, AM/FM, KEYLESS ENTRY,
CRUISE, TILT, POWER WINDOWS/LOCKS & MUCH MORE
26,998
$
NET SAVING
19,998
$
5 AT THIS PRICE
AUTO, POWER WINDOWS/DOORS/LOCKS,
CRUISE, TILT & MUCH MORE
NET COST TO YOU
21,998
$
5 AT THIS PRICE
NEW 2017 RAM 1500 CREW CAB
AUTO POWER WINDOWS, AM/FM/A/C,
AUTO,
BLUETOOTH & MUCH MORE
ABS, CRUISE,
C
HH521754, HH511871
3,787S
NET COST TO YOU
NEW 2017 DODGE CHALLENGER SXT
2 AT THIS PRICE
NET COST TO YOU
MSRP $24,970
MSRP...................................... $36,925
CHAMPION DISCOUNT............ $6,177
SALE PRICE.............................$30,748
FACTORY REBATE .....................$4,750
$
18,998
$
ALL AT THIS
MSRP..................................... $28,090
CHAMPION DISCOUNT............$3,342
SALE PRICE ............................$24,748
FACTORY REBATE .....................$2,750
$
NET COST TO YOU
NEW 2017 DODGE CHARGER SE
WITH MSRP OF $26,090
22,998
5 AT THIS PRICE
POWER WINDOWS/LOCKS, AUTO, CRUISE CONTROL
BLUETOOTH & MUCH MORE
5 AT THIS PRICE
$
16,998
$
MSRP...................................... $29,090
CHAMPION DISCOUNT............ $3,274
SALE PRICE..............................$25,816
FACTORY REBATE......................$5,818
$
NET COST TO YOU
NEW 2017 JEEP RENEGADE LATITUDE
WITH MSRP OF $30,215
NET COST TO YOU
WITH MSRP OF $22,260
NEW 2017 JEEP CHEROKEE
ALL IN STOCK
20998
ALL IN STOCK
MSRP.......................................$24,970
CHAMPION DISCOUNT............$2,972
SALE PRICE.............................$21,998
FACTORY REBATE .....................$3,000
2 AT THIS PRICE
NET COST TO YOU
15,998
MSRP...................................... $24,590
CHAMPION DISCOUNT............$3,592
SALE PRICE............................ $20,998
FACTORY REBATE .....................$4,000
$
NET COST TO YOU
$
MSRP ..................................... $22,260
CHAMPION DISCOUNT............ $3,012
SALE PRICE ............................$19,248
FACTORY REBATE .................... $3,250
718644/718571/718663
NEW 2017 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE LAREDO
AUTO, POWER WINDOWS/LOCKS, UCONNECT,
REAR CAMERA, CRUISE & MORE
NET SAVING
ALL IN STOCK WITH MSRP OF $35,080
3 AT THIS PRICE
NEW 2017 CHRYSLER 300
MSRP...................................... $33,435
CHAMPION DISCOUNT...............$3,750
SALE PRICE............................ $29,685
FACTORY REBATE .....................$6,687
$
16,998
$
NEW 2017 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN
NET COST TO YOU
AUTO, POWER WINDOWS/LOCKS, CRUISE,
PASSENGER SEATING AND MUCH MORE
7 PASSEN
$
MSRP.......................................$26,090
,
CHAMPION DISCOUNT...............$2,842
5,092S
10,43G7S
NET COST TO YOU
NEW 2016 RAM REGULAR CAB
11,217
$
6,262S
$
5 AT THIS PRICE
NEW 2017 CHRYSLER 200 LIMITED
8,402S
$
14,998
$
NEW 2017 DODGE JOURNEY
8,582S
$
NET COST TO YOU
$
24,080
NET COST TO YOU
NET COST TO YOU
25,998
$
5 AT THIS PRICE
NEW 2017 DODGE DURANGO
POWER WINDOWS/LOCKS, BLUETOOTH, KEYLESS GO & MUCH MORE
7 PASSENGERS
5 AT THIS PRICE
MSRP ......................................$31,785
CHAMPION DISCOUNT............$2,287
SALE PRICE ........................... $29,498
FACTORY REBATE ....................$1,500
Champion
800•547•1084
9655 E. FIRESTONE BOULEVARD • DOWNEY 90241
WWW.GOCHAMPIONDODGE.COM
NET COST TO YOU
27,998
$
5 AT THIS PRICE
HABLAMOS ESPAÑOL
Alladvertisedpricesexcludegovernmentfeesandtaxes,anyfinance
charges,anydealerdocumentprocessingcharge,anyelectronicfiling
chargeandanyemission testingcharge.Anydealeradd-onsoptional.
Vehicles and colors in ad are for illustration only. *Residence in Indio,
KernCounty,LosAngeles,OrangeCounty,Riverside,SanBernardino,San
LuisObispo,SantaBarbara,Ventura.Seedealerfordetails.**Mustshow
proofofnon-ChryslerJeeporDodgevehicleleasetoreceivebonuscash.
****Must show proof of active military ID to receive Bonus Cash.
†Must Finance thru Chrysler Capital to receive Bonus Cash. ***Must
trade in any vehicle to qualify. Ad expires close of business day of
publication 4/16/17.
LAA4896854-1
AUTO, POWER DOORS/LOCKS AND MUCH MORE
Hemi
LOS ANGELES TIMES
SGIE FRIDAY, APRIL 14, 2017
G5
FAMILY OWNED AND
OPERATED SINCE 1968
$PRING SAVINGS
$AVINGS EVENT
SPRING
100’s
of Vehicles
In Stock
AT NO COST!
$
NEW 2017 CHEVROLET
CORVETTE
8,411
CORVETTE
TOTAL SAVINGS
Stingray Coupe
49,759
$
H620/104170
NET
COST
52,154
$
$
NEW 2017 CHEVROLET
SPARK LS Automatic
1,611
TOTAL SAVINGS
MSRP......................................................
MSRP
...................................................... $14,975
SALE PRICE ..........................................$13,864
..........................................
CHEVY BONUS CASH...............................
CASH ...............................$500
13,364
$
1 AT THIS OFFER
MALIBU LT Automatic
16,889
9,111
TOTAL SAVINGS
*MUST FINANCE THRU GM FINANCIAL.
1 AT THIS OFFER
CAMARO 1LT Turbo
6,911
1 AT THIS OFFER
H3040/110971
7,111
$
TOTAL SAVINGS
**MUST CURRENTLY LEASE NON-GM VEHICLE.
*MUST FINANCE THRU GM FINANCIAL
1 AT THIS OFFER
H2680/553949
$
8,911
TOTAL SAVINGS
1 AT THIS OFFER
BOLT EV L/T
TOTAL SAVINGS
MSRP.....................................................
MSRP
..................................................... $39,295
1 AT THIS OFFER
SILVERADO 1500 LT Crew Cab
H413-0/187887
3,111
**MUST CURRENTLY LEASE NON-GM VEHICLE.
NEW 2017 CHEVROLET
NET
COST
$
32,776
$
H2930/177059
$
10,199
TOTAL SAVINGS
5.3L V8
6-speed auto
ALL STAR
EDITION
1 AT THIS OFFER
2XH770/159502
7,911
$
NEW 2017 CHEVROLET
SUBURBAN LS
TOTAL SAVINGS
MSRP........................................................
MSRP
........................................................ $51,110
CREST CHEVY DISC ...............................
...............................$5,411
SALE PRICE .........................................$45,699
.........................................
DOWN PAYMENT ASSIST* ................. $1,000
CHEVY BONUS CASH............................
CASH ............................$1,500
CREST CHEVY DISCOUNT .....................
.....................$3,111
$3,111
36,184
27,834
$
MSRP ..................................................... $42,975
MSRP.....................................................
CREST DISCOUNT...................................
DISCOUNT ...................................$5,911
$5,911
SALE PRICE ..........................................$37,064
..........................................$37,064
16% OFF....................................................
OFF ....................................................$4,288
$4,288
NEW 2017 CHEVROLET
$
13,289
$
All Star Edition
MSRP .....................................................$36,340
MSRP.....................................................
$36,340
CREST DISCOUNT..................................
DISCOUNT .................................. $3,911
SALE PRICE ......................................... $32,429
SELECT MARKET BONUS...................
BONUS ................... $1,000
CHEVY CONQUEST PROGRAM..........
PROGRAM ..........$2,000
NET
COST
63,999
$
SILVERADO 1500 DBL Cab
NET
COST
TOTAL SAVINGS
29,429
NET
COST
NEW 2017 CHEVROLET
H1760/157013
$
$
MSRP......................................................
MSRP
......................................................$70,910
$70,910
CREST CHEVY DISCOUNT...................
DISCOUNT ................... $4,911
SALE PRICE.........................................
PRICE .........................................$65,999
$65,999
CORVETTE LOYALTY...........................
LOYALTY ...........................$2,000
$2,000
MSRP ......................................................$36,745
MSRP......................................................
$36,745
CREST CHEVY DISCOUNT ....................
....................$5,411
$5,411
SALE PRICE ..........................................
..........................................$31,334
$31,334
GM COMPETITIVE LEASE**
LEASE**................
................$1,500
$1,500
CHEVY BONUS CASH............................
CASH ............................$1,500
$1,500
$500
GM INCREMENTAL CONSUMER CASH......
CASH......$500
NEW 2017 CHEVROLET
NET
COST
H300/101862
8-speed,
paddle shift
Automatic,
Performance Data
and Video w/
Navigation,
2LT Pkg.
CRUZE LS Automatic
H3460/771637
MSRP ..................................................... $26,000
MSRP.....................................................
CREST DISCOUNT....................................
DISCOUNT ....................................$4,111
SALE PRICE ..........................................$21,889
..........................................
GM LEASE PROGRAM ...........................$1,500
...........................
CHEVY BONUS CASH............................
CASH ............................$1,500
DOWN PAYMENT ASSISTANCE* ...... $1,000
SELECT MARKET BONUS CASH.......
CASH ....... $1,000
$
Stingray Coupe
NEW 2017 CHEVROLET
NET
COST
$
NEW 2017 CHEVROLET
NET
COST
CORVETTE
6,911
TOTAL SAVINGS
MSRP ..................................................... $20,400
MSRP.....................................................
CREST CHEVY DISCOUNT .....................
.....................$3,111
SALE PRICE ...........................................$17,289
...........................................
DOWN PAY ASSIST* ............................ $1,000
CHEVY BONUS CASH............................
CASH ............................$1,500
CHEVY COMPETITIVE LEASE CASH**......
CASH** ......$1,500
CREST CHEVY DISCOUNT ......................
......................$1,111
NET
COST
1 AT THIS OFFER
$
NEW 2017 CHEVROLET
8-speed,
paddle shift,
Bluetooth Streaming,
Apple Carplay/
Android/ Google
capability.
MSRP .....................................................$60,565
MSRP.....................................................
$60,565
CREST CHEVY DISCOUNT....................
DISCOUNT ....................$6,411
$6,411
SALE PRICE
PRICE..........................................
..........................................$54,154
$54,154
CORVETTE LOYALTY...........................
LOYALTY ...........................$2,000
$2,000
1 AT THIS OFFER
8,411
TOTAL SAVINGS
Stingray Coupe
MSRP ...................................................... $58,170
MSRP......................................................
CREST CHEVY DISCOUNT....................
DISCOUNT ....................$4,411
$4,411
SALE PRICE..........................................
PRICE ..........................................$53,759
$53,759
CORVETTE LOYALTY...........................
LOYALTY ...........................$2,000
$2,000
CONSUMER CASH.................................
CASH.................................$2,000
$2,000
NET
COST
$
NEW 2017 CHEVROLET
1 AT THIS OFFER
NET
COST
H3520/129624
43,199
$
*MUST FINANCE THRU GM FINANCIAL.
1 AT THIS OFFER
H3890/233750
Corner of 21st & 1st St, San Bernardino
Freeway Close to Anywhere in the Inland Empire
210
215
259
CHEVROLET
888.239.4825
Lifetime Warranty Details of Coverage. Engine: Cylinder block and head and all internal parts, intake manifold, timing gears and gaskets, timing chain / belt and cover, flywheel, valve covers, oil pan, oil pump, engine mounts,
turbocharger housing and all internal parts, supercharger housing and all internal parts, engine control computer, water pump, fuel pump, seals and gaskets. Transmission and Transaxle: Case and all internal parts,
torque converter, clutch cover, transmission mounts, transfer case and all internal parts, engine control computer, seals and gaskets. Front wheel drive system: Final drive housing and all internal parts, axle shafts, drive
shafts, constant velocity joints, front hub and bearings, seals and gaskets. Rear wheel drive system: Axle housing and all internal parts, propeller shaft, u-joints, axle shaft, drive shaft, bearings, supports, seals and gaskets.
✓ Service your vehicle at any licensed repair shop ✓ Only factory recommended maintenance required. ** Residency restriction apply. All vehicle subject to prior sale. All advertised prices exclude government
fees and taxes, any finance charges, any dealer documentation preparation charge any electronic filing charges and any emission testing charge. Special financing in Lieu of rebates. Select Market Bonus
Cash - Residency restrictions apply. Down Payment Assit, must finance thru GM Financial. *Corvette Owner Loyalty Cash eligible to current Corvette owners towards the purchase/lease at 12/13 Corvette.
Sale ends close of business on publication day.
LAA4892979-1
www.crestchevrolet.com
G6
FRIDAY, APRIL 14, 2017 SGIE
LOS ANGELES TIMES
CHOOSE
EVERYTHING
MUST GO!
FROM OVER
1600
Auto Center - Family Owned and Operated Since 1975
VEHICLES
IN ONE GIANT
OPEN EASTER
SUNDAY
LOCATION!
CALIFORNIA’S #1 VOLUME GM DEALER!
H
O
S
W
L
I
E
R
R
P
S
A
AVING
S
S!!
F
O
CALIFORNIA’S BIGGEST AND BEST SELECTION - NEVER UNDERSOLD!!
MARK CHRISTOPHER CHEVY
NEW 2017 CHEVY SILVERADO 1500 LS PICKUP
4.3L V6 ECOTEC 3, 6-SPEED AUTOMATIC
SAVE
$8,045
MSRP .......................................................... $31,040
MARK CHRIS. DISC. ............................
............................$4,224
$4,224
SALE PRICE ............................................
............................................$26,816
$26,816
SELECT MODEL BONUS TAG** ......$3,821
$3,821
NEW 2017 CHEVY COLORADO CREW SHORTBOX NEW 2017 CHEVY SILVERADO LT DOUBLE CAB
3.6L DI DOHC V6, 8-SPEED AUTOMATIC, MYLINK 7” COLOR TOUCH AUDIO,
TOW HAUL MODE, REMOTE KEY LESS ENTRY, CRUISE CONTROL, THEFT
DETERRANT SYSTEM, TRAILER PKG., CAST ALUMINIUM WHEELS
MSRP ..........................................................
..........................................................$30,320
$30,320
MARK CHRIS. DISC. ............................
............................$4,333
$4,333
SALE PRICE ............................................
............................................$25,987
$25,987
SELECT MODEL BONUS TAG** .....
.....$1,617
$1,617
$
NET COST
22 ,995
$
2 AT THIS OFFER (245283, 246493)
24 , 370 $29 ,995
1 AT THIS OFFER (257201)
LEASE FOR ONLY
24 MONTHS!
109
MSRP $22,530
ALL STAR
EDITION!
$0
Down
LEASE
LEAS
ASE FO
ASE
FOR
R ONLY
ON
135
$
MO
PLUS
TAX*
5 AT THIS OFFER
*$0 down, plus tax, plus DMV. 24 months closed-end
nd lease on approved credit
thru GM Financial. Includes $1,950 rebates, $1,000 Bonus Tag and $1,500
Competitive Lease Cash (must have ‘99 or newer non-GM lease in household.)
$.25 per mile in excess of 12k miles per year. Total due at signing $743.
MO
PLUS
TAX*
4 AT THIS OFFER
(171960, 168119, 168579, 146944)
MSRP $26,165
*$0 down, plus tax, plus DMV. 36 months closed-end lease on approved credit
thru GM Financial. Includes $1,000 Select Model Bonus Tag**, $1,950 rebates
and $1,500 Competitive Lease Cash (must have ‘99 or newer non-GM lease in
household.) $.25 per mile in excess of 12k miles per year. Total due at signing $869.
NEW 2017 CHEVY VOLT PREMIER
5.3L V8 ECOTEC 3, 6-SPEED AUTOMATIC,
TRAILER PKG., REAR CAMERA, REMOTE START,
RUNNING BOARDS, 8” COLOR TOUCH MYLINK
AUDIO, TOO MUCH TO LIST!!
$
31 ,995
$
SAVE
,
11,285
ALL STAR
EDITION!
1 AT THIS OFFER (321214)
NEW 2017 CHEVY EQUINOX LT
2.4L DOHC, 4CYL WL /VVT, 6-SPEED
AUTOMATIC, 17” ALUMINUM
WHEELS, COLOR TOUCH
6-SPEAKER AUDIO, APPLE/ANDROID
STREAMING, REAR
R CAMERA
$0
Down
LEASE FOR ONLY
24 MONTHS!
169
$
MO
PLUS
TAX*
1 AT THIS OFFER (579473)
MSRP $27,855
*$0 down
down, plus tax,
tax plus DMV. 24 months
mon closed-end lease on approved credit
thru GM Financial. Includes $1,600 rebates, $1,500 Select Model Bonus Tag**
and $1,500 Competitive Lease Cash (must have ‘99 or newer non-GM lease in
household.) $.25 per mile in excess of 12k miles per year. Total due at signing $896.
NEW 2017 CHEVY TAHOE LS
CHEVY MYLINK AUDIO W/NAVIGATION, ADAPTIVE CRUISE
CONTROL W/FULL SPEED FRONT AUTOMATIC BREAKING,
SIDE BLIND/REAR CROSS TRAFFIC/FORWARD COLLISION
ALERTS, INTELLIBEAM HEAD LAMPS
MSRP ..........................................................
..........................................................$43,280
$43,280
MARK CHRIS. DISC. ............................
............................$6,960
$6,960
SALE PRICE ...........................................
...........................................$36,320
$36,320
SELECT MODEL
DEL BONUS TAG**
TAG ....$4,325
$4,325
NET COST
NEW 2017 CHEVY MALIBU LT
7” COLOR TOUCH 6-SPEAKER AUDIO,
APPLE/ANDROID STREAMING, 17”
ALUMINUM WHEELS, REAR CAMERA,
POWER SEAT, TEEN DRIVER
$0
Down
$
SAVE
$
11,525
5.3L ECOTEC V8, 6-SPEED AUTO, TRAILER PKG, FOG LAMPS, REMOTE
START, REAR CAMERA, REAR DEFROSTER, 110-V POWER OUTLET
NET COST
1 AT THIS OFFER ( 215292)
NEW 2017 CHEVY CRUZE LT AUTOMATIC
1.4L TURBO, 6-SPEED AUTO,
MYLINK 7” COLOR TOUCH AUDIO,
BLUETOOTH/APPLE/ANDROID
STREAMING, CRUISE CONTROL,
16” ALUM. WHEELS, TEEN DRIVER
MSRP............................................................
MSRP
............................................................$41,520
$41,520
MARK CHRIS DISC................................
DISC ................................$7,386
$7,386
SALE PRICE .............................................
.............................................$34,134
$34,134
SELECT MODEL BONUS TAG**.....$4,139
$4,
SAVE
$5,950
NET COST
NEW 2017 CHEVY SILVERADO 1500 LT CREW CAB
5.3L V8 ECOTEC, 6-SPEED AUTO, TRAILER PKG., FOG LAMPS, REMOTE
START, REAR CAMERA, REAR DEFROSTER, 110-V POWER OUTLET
NEW 2017 CHEVY BOLT EV LT
$0
Down
$0
Down
ALL NEW!
ALL ELECTRIC!!
DC FAST CHARGING PROVISIONS
LEASE FOR ONLY
399
$
LEASE FOR ONLY
299
$
MSRP $41,590
MO*
PLUS
TAX*
1 AT THIS OFFER (180241)
*$995 down plus tax, plus DMV. 36 months closed-end
nd Lease on approved credit thru GM
Financial. Includes $6,275 rebate and $500 Competitive Lease Cash (must have ‘99 or new nonGM Lease in household). $.255 per
p mile in excess of 12K miles per year. Total due at signing $2,393.
MSRP $49,185
MO
PLUS
TAX*
2 AT THIS
T OFFER (230425, 235115)
*$0 down, plus tax, plus DMV. 36 months closed-end lease on approved credit thru GM Financial. Includes $2,500
Select Model Bonus Tag**, $1,500 Competitive Lease Cash (must have ‘99 or newer non-GM lease in household.)
and $750 Select Market rebate. $.25 per mile in excess of 12k miles per year. Total due at signing $1,323.
LEASE FOR ONLY
289
$
MO
PLUS
TAX*
2 AT THIS OFFER (145979,, 146433)
MSRP $38,330
*$0 down
down, plus tax,
tax plus DMV. 36 months closed-e
closed-end lease on approved credit thru
GM Financial. Includes $3,500 rebate. $.25 per mile in excess of 12k miles
per year. Total due at signing $997.
MARK CHRISTOPHER BUICK
NEW 2017 BUICK ENCORE
1.4L TURB
TURBO, 6 SPEED AUTOMATIC, REMOTE START, INTELLILINK COLOR TOUCH AUDIO W/BLUETOOTH
ST
STREAMING, APPLE CARPLAY/ANDROID CAPABILITY, 18” ALUM. WHEELS, REAR CAMERA
MSRP................................................$25,745
MARK CHRIS DISC .............................$3,696
SALE PRICE...................................... $22,049
SELECT BONUS TAG** ...................... $3,304
18,745
$
NET
COST
Save over
25%!!
5 AT THIS OFFER.
LEASE FOR ONLY
24 MONTHS!
129
$
MO*
PLUS
TAX
5 AT THIS OFFER.
MSRP $25,745
*$0 down plus tax, plus DMV. 24 months closed-end lease on approved credit thru GM financial.
Includes $2,575 rebate, $1,500 Select Model Bonus Tag and $1,500 competitive lease cash*.
$.25 per mile in excess of 12k miles per year. Total due at signing $797.
MARK CHRISTOPHER GMC
$0 DOWN! $0 DUE! $0 DRIVE-OFFS! $0 SECURITY DEPOSIT!
7 PASSENGER SEATING WITH 3RD ROW SEAT!
LEASE FOR ONLY
24
4 MONTHS!
MONT
$
MSRP
$
33,535
*$0
NEW 2017 GMC TERRAIN SLE
2.4L 6 SPEED AUTOMATIC, REAR CAMERA, COLOR TOUCH AUDIO, REMOTE START,
18” WHEELS $0 DOWN $0 DUE $0 DRIVE - OFFS $0 SECURITY DEPOSIT
LEASE FOR ONLY
24 MONTHS!
269 159
/MO* PLUS TAX
4G LTE
WI-FI
MSRP
M
SR P 2
28,830
8 830
$
1 AT THIS OFFER (253863) 2 AT THIS OFFER (256928, 264786)
Total due at signing. 24 months closed-end lease on approved credit through
GM Financial. Includes $400 rebate, $1,500 Competitive Lease Cash (must have ‘99 or
newer non-GM lease in household). $.25 per mile in excess of 12K miles per year.
*$0
LEASE FOR ONLY
24 MONTHS!
$
$
/MO* PLUS TAX
NEW 2017 GMCCANYONCREWSHORTBOX
Total due at signing. 24 months closed-end lease on approved credit thru GM financial.
Includes $3,200 rebate, $1,500 Select Model Bonus Tag and $1,500 *Buick/GMC Lease loyalty/
conquest cash, $.25 per mile in excess of 12k miles per year.
219
MSRP $28,035
/MO* PLUS TAX
2 AT THIS OFFER (167785, 171256)
*$0
Total due at signing. 24 months closed-end lease on approved credit through
GM Financial. Includes $1,500 Competitive lease cash (must have ‘99 or newer non-GM
lease in household). $.25 per mile in excess of 12K miles per year.
www.markchristopher.com
22131
1 Convention Center Way
Ontario, CA 91764
855-611-5212
LAA4892930-1
NEW 2017 GMC ACADIA SLE
CONVENIENTLY LOCATED
RIGHT ON THE 10 FWY. IN ONTARIO
All vehicles subject to prior sale. All advertised prices exclude government fees and taxes, any finance charges, any dealer documentation preparation charge, any electronic filing charges. **Select Model Bonus Tag available for select models. ***Conquest cash must own ‘99 or newer
non-GM in household. *Must have Buick/GMC or Non-GM Lease in household. **Must own .99 or newer Chevy in household. *Residency restriction apply. End of lease term disposition fees: Chevy $395; GMC/Buick $495; Cadillac $595. Sale ends close of business on publication date.
April 14, 2017
LA
Closed Sunday,
April 16th in
Observance
of our
Easter
Holiday
Y,
!
IN NDA
Y
RR MO H
HU DS 17T
EN RIL M!
LE AP T 9P
SA
A
BEAT
CLOCK
the
FREE 50ASHLEYGIFTCARD
$
DAY1
‡
GIVEN TO THE FIRST 25 CUSTOMERS
FRIDAY - APRIL 14TH, SATURDAY APRIL 15TH AND MONDAY - APRIL 17TH!
SHOPEARLY36HOURSONLY!
Friday, April 14
Saturday, April 15
DAY2
9am to 9pm!
9am to 9pm!
33off
DAY3
Monday, April 17
9am to 9pm!
Use your Ashley Advantage™ credit card from 3/21/2017 to 4/17/2017 on purchases and get your choice of Special Financing offers.
%
our
entire
inventory!
‡
PLUS
months
NO INTEREST *
NO DOWN PAYMENT
NO MINIMUM PURCHASE
On purchases with your Ashley Advantage™ credit card from 3/21/2017 to 4/17/2017. Equal monthly payments required for 33 months.
Ashley HomeStore does not require a down payment, however, sales tax and delivery charges are due at time of purchase. *See back page for details.
OR
72 months
NO INTEREST* • NO DOWN PAYMENT • NO MINIMUM PURCHASE
ON OUR EVERYDAY LOW PRICES
On purchases with your Ashley Advantage™ credit card from 3/21/2017 to 4/17/2017. Equal monthly
payments required for 72 months. Ashley Furniture does not require a down payment, however, sales tax
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24001 El Toro Rd
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MONTCLAIR
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ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT
• tips and advice for parents • book recommendations •
• local resources guide •
bilingual guide
LOS ANGELES TIMES | www.latimes.com •
How to Raise
a Reader
• FRIDAY, APRIL 14, 2017
T1
ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT
Dear Parents, Teachers, and Educators,
Table of Contents
Few things can enrich a life as much as a great story does. Here in Los Angeles, our stories
are as varied as the people who write, illustrate, and read them. Stories tell us who we are,
show us what’s possible, and make us human.
3
Fall in Love with Reading
4
Books for Babies
& Preschoolers
How to Raise a Reader
6
Books for 1st- & 2nd-Graders
Our Favorite Learn-to-Read Apps
8
Books for 3rd- & 4th-Graders
Encouraging Reluctant Readers
10
Reading Milestones
11
7 Ways to Use Media and
Tech to Raise Bilingual Kids
12
Local Resources Guide
But, here in one of the storytelling capitals of the world, too few children and students
have the literacy skills needed to experience the benefits of reading. According to the 2016
California Assessment of Student Performance and Progress, 44 percent of third-grade
students in the Los Angeles Unified School District did not meet the English language
arts and literacy standards needed for likely success in future coursework.
Third grade, or around age 9, is an important milestone for evaluating children’s reading
comprehension. Reports show that children who read competently by the end of the
third grade are more likely to graduate high school and go on to higher education. A solid
foundation in reading opens doors to academic fulfillment, personal enrichment, and
opportunities throughout one’s lifetime.
Los Angeles Times Reading by 9 helps parents and educators prepare children for a brighter
future through an annual Parent Reading Guide. This year’s guide was developed in
partnership with Common Sense Media, an independent nonprofit organization dedicated
to helping kids thrive in a world of media and technology. The guide is available for free, in
English and Spanish, and provides tips and ideas for incorporating reading and stories into
daily life, recommended books and reading apps, important milestones, literacy resources,
and more.
LOS ANGELES TIMES | www.latimes.com • • FRIDAY, APRIL 14, 2017
T2
The guide is distributed to parents, teachers, and educators throughout California with
the help of community-based organizations and schools. It’s also available as a PDF at
latimes.com/Readingby9.
It’s our hope that the guide will serve as a valuable resource for parents and educators —
and that more children and students will be able to engage with reading and stories and
lead more successful and fulfilling lives.
Thank you for reading,
Davan Maharaj
Editor-in-Chief and Publisher
Los Angeles Times
This supplement did not involve the editorial or reporting staffs
of the Los Angeles Times.
To order additional copies or download a digital version of the
2017 Parent Reading Guide, please visit latimes.com/readingby9.
The guide is free of charge to parents, educators, and organizations working with children and families. To contact us with
comments and questions or to receive more information, please
email public.affairs@latimes.com.
Los Angeles Times Public Affairs manages philanthropy,
community engagement, and corporate social responsibility at
the nation’s largest metropolitan daily news organization. We
broaden perspectives, empower storytellers, and inspire our
community to question and transform the world around them.
For more information, visit latimes.com/readingby9.
Common Sense is the nation’s leading independent nonprofit
organization dedicated to empowering kids to thrive in a world
of media and technology. Families, educators, and policymakers
turn to Common Sense for unbiased information and trusted
advice to help them learn how to harness the positive power of
media and technology for all kids.
For more information, visit commonsense.org or contact our
Los Angeles office at 310-689-7537.
Holly Goldberg Sloan
The first book I read all by myself was
Caps for Sale by Esphyr Slobodkina,
and still, to this day, I can recite “You
monkeys, you! You give me back my
caps!” with outrageous pride and delight.
ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT
Fall in Love
with Reading
— Julie Berry
Author of The Passion of Dolssa
There is one thing that is guaranteed to make your child’s life
better: reading.
Read to your kids.
While I was growing up in the former USSR, we
didn’t have any picture books worth reading, but
my older brother read aloud to me all the fighting
scenes from The Three Musketeers and Treasure
Island instead. By the time I was 10, I was writing
and illustrating my own books about pirates and
musketeers with the thinnest plot possible but
meticulously detailed fighting sequences.
Read with your kids.
Listen to your kids read to you.
It’s really that simple.
Stories are how we make sense of the world. They preserve
our past. They explain our present. They show us our future.
We learn best and most easily when we use more than one of
our senses. A child touches the pages of a book. A child hears
the sounds of the words. A child’s mind is forming. Ideas and
concepts are taking shape.
We checked out books and brought them home. Those books
filled us up. I remember my grandmother reading to me.
I remember reading books with my cousins. My aunts and
uncles. My older and younger brothers.
Author of Breaking Stalin's Nose
The heart of my 6-year-old self fluttered at
every adventure I read in Virginia Hamilton's
The People Could Fly. That book would forever
transform my ability to believe beyond
my circumstances.
— Angelica Witherspoon-Cassanova
Author of Clip-Clop Chronicles
Books are bridges. And they allow travel in two directions.
The Los Angeles Times Festival of Books is the largest event
of its kind in the United States. It celebrates the power of
words and pictures.
Be a reader.
Build a better world.
Author of the beloved novel Counting by 7s, Holly is a
four-decade resident of LA whose latest novel, Short,
is about a girl who grows into herself while playing a
Munchkin in a production of The Wizard of Oz.
— Naomi Shihab Nye
Author of The Turtle of Oman
• FRIDAY, APRIL 14, 2017
Make a future reader.
Favorite Poems Old and New, a big lovely fat
book I still own, edited by Helen Ferris (and in
print for decades), showed me as a very young
reader how many different voices, styles, subjects,
line lengths, possibilities there were in poetry and
opened up my whole horizon till now. Exposure
can be everything!
LOS ANGELES TIMES | www.latimes.com •
The hopes and dreams we have for our children begin when
we open the first pages of a picture book and teach the colors
of the rainbow and the sounds that animals make.
— Eugene Yelchin
T3
ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT
Tender story of
Nana showing
grandson city
beauty via bus.
books for
LOS ANGELES TIMES | www.latimes.com • • FRIDAY, APRIL 14, 2017
T4
Babies &
Preschoolers
For additional book
recommendations,
visit:
Last Stop on
Market Street
Matt de la Peña
age 3+
commonsense.org/book-lists
How to Raise a Reader
Regan McMahon
Common Sense Media
Kids become lifelong readers for all kinds
of reasons. But parents can influence kids’
appreciation of books by sharing their
own love of literature and modeling reader
behavior. Try these tips to turn your kids
into bookworms.
ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT
Classic
all-ages
masterpiece
has a wild
imagination.
Corduroy
Don Freeman
age 2+
Sweet, heartwarming picture-book classic.
Where the Wild
Things Are
Maurice Sendak
age 2+
One Fish, Two Fish,
Red Fish, Blue Fish
Ezra Jack Keats
Dr. Seuss
age 2+
age 3+
age 2+
Classic captures a kid’s delight in freshly
fallen snow.
Infectious rhymes great for early reading
or read-aloud.
Read aloud. Keep it up well past babyhood; kids
will enjoy it longer than you think.
Funny is fine. Some parents worry about letting
kids read edgy humor books about kids getting
into trouble. Talk to your kids about the content,
but keep in mind that humor is a great pathway
to book loving.
Make reading a family value. Actions speak
louder than words. Take your kids to the
library regularly, and hunt for low-cost books
at used bookstores. And be sure to set aside
time for reading only — turning off the TV,
computer, and cell phone. Warning: It could
be habit-forming!
Savor the series. A great series will keep kids
hungry for the next installment.
Count on the classics. Try introducing your kids to
books you loved as a kid, and see which ones click. Comics are OK. Graphic novels are among the
hottest trends in children’s books, and they can
Find books about the things your kids love.
really get kids hooked on reading.
Librarians, booksellers, and web searches can help.
• FRIDAY, APRIL 14, 2017
Charming bedtime book is magic
for truck lovers.
LOS ANGELES TIMES | www.latimes.com •
Goodnight, Goodnight,
Construction Site Sherri Duskey Rinker
The Snowy
Day
T5
ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT
Funny,
poignant tale
of cynical girl,
superpowered
squirrel.
Flora & Ulysses:
The Illuminated
Adventures
books for
LOS ANGELES TIMES | www.latimes.com • • FRIDAY, APRIL 14, 2017
T6
1st- & 2ndGraders
For additional book
recommendations,
visit:
commonsense.org/book-lists
Kate DiCamillo
age 8+
Charlotte’s
Web
Harry Potter and the
Sorcerer’s Stone
E.B. White
J.K. Rowling
age 7+
Gentle, much-loved barnyard classic delights
all ages.
Our Favorite
Learn-to-Read Apps
Christine Elgersma
Common Sense Media
age 8+
Magical start of the fantastic boy-wizard series.
Apps with the most learning potential help
kids learn how to learn — and make them
want to come back for more. The ones that
really supply a foundation for lifelong learning encourage questions, foster curiosity,
and support critical thinking. They teach by
engaging kids, building concepts and deep
understanding, providing feedback about
performance (and adjusting difficulty
Annie Barrows
Classic
morality
tale is wildly
entertaining.
age 6+
Friendship tale a sure hit with kids starting
chapter books.
ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT
Ivy + Bean
Secret Coders
Gene Luen Yang
age 8+
Fun, funny graphic novel promotes
programming.
Jennifer Torres
Roald Dahl
age 8+
age 6+
Warm, funny tale of family, tacos, and
middle school.
Homer
Swap Tales: Leon
age 4+
Our favorite apps for building kids’ reading skills cover
everything from letter recognition, phonics, and sight
words to vocabulary building and comprehension. So
whether you’re on the go or on the couch, start here to
make learning to read fun and engaging.
Sight Words
These are some of our top picks.
iOS | Android
iOS
age 6+
iOS | Android
Crack the Books
age 5+
age 7+
iOS
• FRIDAY, APRIL 14, 2017
accordingly), and providing opportunities to strengthen
learning beyond the play session.
LOS ANGELES TIMES | www.latimes.com •
Charlie and
the Chocolate
Factory
Stef Soto,
Taco Queen
T7
ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT
Inspiring
memoir of
teen Nobel
laureate
shot by
Taliban.
books for
LOS ANGELES TIMES | www.latimes.com • • FRIDAY, APRIL 14, 2017
T8
3rd- & 4thGraders
I Am Malala:
How One Girl
Stood Up for
Education and
Changed the
World
For additional book
recommendations,
visit:
Malala Yousafzai
age 10+
commonsense.org/book-lists
Encouraging
Reluctant Readers
Caroline Knorr
Common Sense Media
Kids may express reluctance toward reading
for a variety of reasons. As with anything
they’d rather not do, forcing them, comparing
them to other kids, and punishing them won’t
work. What will? Try these ideas.
Encourage reading for fun. Sometimes adults
focus so much on getting kids to read that they
forget about the fun. But kids who are having
fun will read.
Madeleine L’Engle
Cliff-hanging orphan
adventure wrapped
in black humor.
age 9+
ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT
A Wrinkle in Time
Classic sci-fi story still inspires and gets
kids thinking.
The Bad Beginning:
A Series of
Unfortunate Events,
Book 1
As Brave as You
Jason Reynolds
age 10+
Lemony Snicket
age 9+
Poignant summer adventure brims with
family love and hope.
The Crossover
Jacqueline Woodson
Kwame Alexander
age 10+
age 9+
The Lightning Thief:
Percy Jackson and the
Olympians, Book 1
Rick Riordan
age 9+
Soaring, poignant novel in verse hits all
the right spots.
Greek myths meet fast-paced adventure
in boy-demigod tale.
Go graphic. Many high-quality graphic novels
draw in readers through illustrations, short-form
text, and engrossing stories.
Find characters who reflect your kid’s experience.
Look for books with characters and situations
that mirror your kid’s experience. Whatever
helps kids identify with the story will keep them
more engaged.
entertaining and educational. Use them
alongside traditional reading.
Seek out sports. For kids who’d rather be
physically active than read a book, consider
books about teams or by athletes.
Let them follow their interests. You may not love
Captain Underpants, but if that’s what your kid
wants to read, put aside your judgment for the
greater good.
Look for different reading opportunities. Reading
is valuable no matter what the format: Pokémon
cards, product labels, recipes.
Get techy. Ebooks and storybook apps that
offer multimedia along with the story can be
Fact-check. With their amazing stats,
incredible images, short-form text, and startanywhere formats, books of facts can entice
kids who’d rather not tackle longer stories.
Take turns. With a book your kid has chosen,
take turns reading a page (or two). Ask
questions along the way.
• FRIDAY, APRIL 14, 2017
Captivating poems depict coming-of-age
in tumultuous 1960s.
LOS ANGELES TIMES | www.latimes.com •
Brown Girl Dreaming
T9
ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT
Reading
Milestones
By: KidsHealth® from Nemours
This is a general outline of the milestones on the
road to reading and the ages at which most kids
reach them. Keep in mind that kids develop at
different paces and spend varying amounts of
time at each stage. If you have concerns, talk to
your child’s doctor, teacher, or reading specialist
at school. Early intervention is key in helping kids
who are struggling to read.
Infancy
UP TO AGE 1
Kids usually begin to:
LOS ANGELES TIMES | www.latimes.com • • FRIDAY, APRIL 14, 2017
T10
•
•
•
•
•
imitate sounds they hear in language.
respond when spoken to.
look at pictures.
reach for books and turn the pages with help.
respond to stories and pictures by vocalizing
and patting the pictures.
Toddlers
AGE 1–3
Kids usually begin to:
• answer questions about and identify objects
in books — such as “Where’s the cow?” or
“What does the cow say?”
• name familiar pictures.
• use pointing to identify named objects.
• pretend to read books.
• finish sentences in books they know well.
• scribble on paper.
• know names of books and identify them by
the picture on the cover.
• turn pages of board books.
• have a favorite book and request it to be
read often.
Early Preschool
First and Second Grades
AGE 3
Kids usually begin to:
AGE 6–7
Kids usually begin to:
•
•
•
•
•
explore books independently.
listen to longer books that are read aloud.
retell a familiar story.
recite the alphabet.
begin to sing the alphabet with prompting
and cues.
• make continuous symbols that resemble writing.
• imitate the action of reading a book aloud.
Late Preschool
AGE 4
Kids usually begin to:
• recognize familiar signs and labels, especially
on signs and containers.
• make up rhymes or silly phrases.
• recognize and write some of the letters of
the alphabet.
• read and write their names.
• name letters or sounds that begin words.
• match some letters to their sounds.
• use familiar letters to try writing words.
Kindergarten
AGE 5
Kids usually begin to:
• understand rhyming and play rhyming games.
• match some spoken and written words.
• understand that print is read from left to right,
top to bottom.
• write some letters and numbers.
• recognize some familiar words.
• predict what will happen next in a story.
• retell stories that have been read to them.
© 1995-2017. The Nemours Foundation/KidsHealth®. Reprinted with permission.
• read familiar stories.
• sound out or decode unfamiliar words.
• use pictures and context to figure out
unfamiliar words.
• use some common punctuation and
capitalization in writing.
• self-correct when they make a mistake while
reading aloud.
• show comprehension of a story through drawings.
Second and Third Grades
AGE 7–8
Kids usually begin to:
• read longer books independently.
• read aloud with proper emphasis and expression.
• use context and pictures to help identify
unfamiliar words.
• understand the concept of paragraphs and
begin to apply it in writing.
• correctly use punctuation.
• correctly spell simple words.
• write notes like phone messages and emails.
• enjoy games like word searches.
• use new words, phrases, or figures of speech
that they’ve heard.
• revise their own writing.
Fourth Through Eighth Grades
AGE 9–13
Kids usually begin to:
• explore and understand different kinds of
texts like biographies, poetry, and fiction.
• understand and explore expository, narrative,
and persuasive texts.
• read to extract specific information, such as
from a science book.
• identify parts of speech and devices like
similes and metaphors.
• correctly identify major elements of stories
like time, place, plot, problem, and resolution.
• read and write on a specific topic for fun and
understand what style is needed.
• analyze texts for meaning.
ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT
7 Ways to Use
Media and
Tech to Raise
Bilingual Kids
Maria O. Alvarez
Common Sense Media
From watching Spanish-language TV shows to
downloading bilingual apps, these ideas ease
the sometimes challenging task of raising your
kids to speak two languages.
Whether you speak Spanish or just want your
kids to learn it, raising bilingual kids is a big commitment. But even though it can be challenging,
it’s definitely worth the effort. Many studies confirm the multiple benefits of bilingualism.
4
Reading is a great way to increase
vocabulary and learn grammar. Start
with bilingual books or ones with Spanish
words. Read them to your kids if you can, or find
people you trust to read to them in Spanish. For
little kids whose mother tongue is Spanish, these
activities are especially important. Research shows
that developing their literacy skills in Spanish first
facilitates the learning process of reading, writing,
and speaking in English.
2
5
6
3
7
Spanish TV shows teach vocabulary,
intonation, and culture. Watching these
shows also helps kids develop their
listening abilities.
Download apps that can support your kids’
growing Spanish vocabulary. Some apps
let you select the primary language.
Watch documentaries in Spanish that
cover history, culture, and life in Spanishspeaking countries. If you’ve been to the
places depicted in the movie or experienced the
traditions, share your own stories or memories.
Explore digital storytelling tools to create
memories. You can have your kids practice
their Spanish by writing the titles and
sharing what they’ve created. Plus, you can share
them with friends or relatives who live in other
states or countries.
• FRIDAY, APRIL 14, 2017
When learning a second language, it’s important
to hear, read, and speak it as often as possible.
If you can, visit a Spanish-speaking country to
immerse your whole family in the language and
culture. Here are some tips to support you and
your kids as you navigate the experience of
living between two languages and cultures.
1
Choose audio in Spanish when you’re
watching a movie. If your kids are
usually immersed in an English-speaking
environment, they might have trouble following
along — but keep trying. Listening to the language
will really help them develop their ear for Spanish.
LOS ANGELES TIMES | www.latimes.com •
Aside from the learning value, Spanish fluency
will open doors for kids. Spanish is the third-most
spoken language in the world, and according to
Pew Research, it’s the most-spoken non-English
language — even among non-Hispanics — in the
United States. Thanks to the internet and other
factors, the world has become increasingly more
interconnected, and knowing more than one
language makes you more competitive in a global
economy. If you’re interested in having your kids
become bilingual, check out our recommended
apps list to help kids learn another language.
You also can visit our Latino landing page for
more information in Spanish.
Use media and devices whenever you can
to support the Spanish-learning process.
Join your kids when possible. That way the
message will be more clear: This is a family goal,
and we can do it together!
T11
ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT
Local
Resources Guide
key:
Within 1/2 mile
of public transit
Literacy program
for children
Multiple
locations
Parent training/
education available
Referral services
provided
Many organizations in the Los Angeles area provide multilingual literacy resources and programming for children and families at little or no cost.
Age 0-5
Crystal Stairs
511 Goldleaf Circle, Suite 150
Los Angeles, CA 90056
323-299-8998
www.crystalstairs.org
El Nido
10200 Sepulveda Blvd., Suite 350
Mission Hills, CA 91345
South Central LAMP
Proyecto Pastoral
892 E. 48th St.
Los Angeles, CA 90011
135 N. Mission Rd.
Los Angeles, CA 90033
323-234-1471
www.southcentrallamp.org
323-881-0081
www.proyectopastoral.org
Westside Children’s Center
12120 Wagner St.
Culver City, CA 90230
310-846-4100
www.westsidechildren.org
www.elnidofamilycenters.org
El Centrito Family Learning Centers
LOS ANGELES TIMES | www.latimes.com • • FRIDAY, APRIL 14, 2017
T12
450 South K Street, Room 112
Oxnard, CA 93032
805-483-8685
Hands Together
Age 6-8
Mother’s Club
980 N. Fair Oaks
Pasadena, CA 91103
3727 W 6th. St., #300
Los Angeles, CA 90020
213-365-7400
www.kyccla.org
All Ages
Los Angeles Public Library
826LA
213-228-7000
www.lapl.org/branches
12515 Venice Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90066
310-915-0200
www.826la.org
Los Angeles Unified Preschool
Abriendo Puertas/Opening Doors
888 S. Figueroa St., #800
Los Angeles, CA 90017
1000 N. Alameda St., #240
Los Angeles, CA 90012
213-416-1200
www.laup.net
213-346-3216
www.ap-od.org
Mar Vista Family Center Preschool
CSUN LA Times Literacy Center
5075 S. Slauson Ave.
Culver City, CA 90230
18111 Nordhoff Street
Northridge, CA 91330
310-390-9607
www.marvistafc.org
818-677-7394
www.csun.edu
201 Civic Center Drive East
Santa Ana, CA 92701
714-479-0294
www.handstogether-sa.org
Koreatown Youth and
Community Center
72 branches throughout the city
Mexican American
Opportunity Foundation
Multiple locations in
Los Angeles County
www.maof.org
Pathways
3325 Wilshire Blvd., Suite 1100
Los Angeles, CA 90010
213-427-2701
www.pathwaysla.org
Check online or call to make
sure the services listed are
still provided.
626-792-2687
www.mothersclub.org
Options for Learning
885 S. Village Oaks Drive
Covina, CA 91724
626-967-7848
www.optionsforlearning.org
Don’t have a computer or internet access at home?
The Los Angeles Public Library can help. Library cardholders can reserve computers at their local
branch, and free Wi-Fi is available for visitors. Call the central branch at 213-228-7000 or visit
lapl.org/branches for more information and to locate the branch nearest you.
LOS ANGELES TIMES | www.latimes.com • • FRIDAY, APRIL 14, 2017
T13
Guía de
recursos locales
leyenda:
Dentro de 1/2 milla del
transporte público
Programa de
alfabetización para niños
Múltiples
ubicaciones
Se ofrece entrenamiento/
educación para padres
Muchas organizaciones en el área de Los Ángeles proporcionan recursos de alfabetización multilingües y programación para niños y familias a un costo bajo o gratis.
De 0 a 5 años
Crystal Stairs
511 Goldleaf Circle, Suite 150
Los Angeles, CA 90056
323-299-8998
www.crystalstairs.org
El Nido
10200 Sepulveda Blvd., Suite 350
Mission Hills, CA 91345
South Central LAMP
Proyecto Pastoral
892 E. 48th St.
Los Angeles, CA 90011
135 N. Mission Rd.
Los Angeles, CA 90033
323-234-1471
www.southcentrallamp.org
323-881-0081
www.proyectopastoral.org
Westside Children’s Center
12120 Wagner St.
Culver City, CA 90230
310-846-4100
www.westsidechildren.org
www.elnidofamilycenters.org
El Centrito Family Learning Centers
450 South K Street, Room 112
Oxnard, CA 93032
805-483-8685
Hands Together
De 6 a 8 años
714-479-0294
www.handstogether-sa.org
Mother’s Club
980 N. Fair Oaks
Pasadena, CA 91103
626-792-2687
www.mothersclub.org
Options for Learning
885 S. Village Oaks Drive
Covina, CA 91724
626-967-7848
www.optionsforlearning.org
Koreatown Youth and
Community Center
3727 W 6th. St., #300
Los Angeles, CA 90020
213-365-7400
www.kyccla.org
Todas las edades
Los Angeles Public Library
826LA
213-228-7000
www.lapl.org/branches
12515 Venice Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90066
310-915-0200
www.826la.org
Los Angeles Unified Preschool
Abriendo Puertas/Opening Doors
888 S. Figueroa St., #800
Los Angeles, CA 90017
1000 N. Alameda St., #240
Los Angeles, CA 90012
213-416-1200
www.laup.net
213-346-3216
www.ap-od.org
Mar Vista Family Center Preschool
CSUN LA Times Literacy Center
5075 S. Slauson Ave.
Culver City, CA 90230
18111 Nordhoff Street
Northridge, CA 91330
310-390-9607
www.marvistafc.org
818-677-7394
www.csun.edu
201 Civic Center Drive East
Santa Ana, CA 92701
ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT
Se ofrecen servicios
de remisión
72 branches throughout the city
Mexican American
Opportunity Foundation
Multiple locations in
Los Angeles County
www.maof.org
Pathways
3325 Wilshire Blvd., Suite 1100
Los Angeles, CA 90010
213-427-2701
www.pathwaysla.org
Revisa en línea o llama para
asegurarte de que éstos
servicios todavía se prestan.
¿No tienes acceso a una computadora o internet en casa?
La biblioteca pública de Los Ángeles te puede ayudar. Las personas que tienen el carnet de la
biblioteca pueden reservar computadoras en su biblioteca local, en donde se ofrece Wi-Fi gratis
para los visitantes. Llama a la central al 213-228-7000 o visita lapl.org/branches para obtener
más información y encontrar la biblioteca más cercana a ti.
• FRIDAY, APRIL 14, 2017
T14
LOS ANGELES TIMES | www.latimes.com •
7 consejos para
criar niños bilingües
usando los medios
y la tecnología
Maria O Alvarez
Common Sense Media
Desde ver tele en español hasta descargar apps
bilingües, estas ideas te pueden ayudar a sortear
los retos de criar a un niño bilingüe.
Además de que el español les permite tener muchas
más oportunidades tanto en la escuela como en el
trabajo, hablar el idioma facilita la interacción familiar
y la conexión emocional sobre todo con las personas
mayores en la familia. También es importante mencionar que el español es el tercer idioma más hablado
en el mundo. De acuerdo con el Pew Research Center,
el español es el idioma más hablado después del
inglés en los Estados Unidos, aún entre personas que
no son hispanas. Gracias al internet y otros factores,
el mundo se está convirtiendo cada vez más en un
mundo interconectado y saber más de un idioma
definitivamente te da una gran ventaja en la economia global actual. Si estás buscando recursos para
apoyar la crianza de tus hijos bilingües, revisa esta
lista de apps recomendadas para ayudar a tus hijos
a aprender otro idioma.
Cuando estás aprendiendo otro idioma, es importante
que lo leas, escuches y hables tan frecuentemente
como sea posible. Si puedes, visita algún país donde
se hable español para que toda tu familia se sumerja
en el idioma y la cultura. Estos consejos te pueden
ayudar a sortear la experiencia de vivir entre dos
idiomas y dos culturas, usando la tecnología a tu favor.
1
2
Usen la tecnología y los aparatos juntos,
siempre que sea posible para apoyar el
aprendizaje de tus hijos. De esa forma el
mensaje estará más claro: esta es una meta
de la familia y lo podemos hacer juntos.
4
Selecciona el audio en español cuando vean
una película. Si tus hijos están sumergidos
en un ambiente donde se habla inglés la
mayor parte del tiempo, puede que se les dificulte
seguir viendo la película, pero no te rindas y sigue
intentándolo. Ver películas en español les puede
ayudar muchísimo a desarrollar el oído.
La lectura es una excelente forma de
desarrollar el vocabulario y aprender la
gramática. Comienza con libros bilingües
o libros con palabras en español. También puedes
leerles cuentos a tus hijos o buscar adultos de
confianza que puedan leer bien en español. Para los
niños pequeños cuya lengua madre es el español,
estas actividades son especialmente importantes.
Existen investigaciones que demuestran que
desarrollar la capacidad de lectura en español
primero facilita el aprendizaje de la lectura,
escritura y conversación en inglés.
5
6
La televisión en español puede ayudarles
con su vocabulario, entonación y los expone
a la cultura. Ver estos programas les puede
ayudar a desarrollar sus habilidades para escuchar
y entender el español.
7
3
Descarga aplicaciones que sirvan de apoyo
para el creciente vocabulario de tus hijos
en español. Algunas apps te permiten
seleccionar el idioma principal.
Vean documentales sobre historia, cultura
y la vida en países donde se hable español.
Si has visitado lugares o experimentando las
tradiciones que vean en los documentales, cuéntale
a tus hijos tu experiencia y da inicio a una buena
plática. Compartir tu propia historia y recuerdos
es parte de la crianza de niños bilingües.
Explora herramientas digitales para que
creen sus propios recuerdos. Puedes
hacer que tus hijos practiquen su español
escribiendo los títulos, narrando en español y luego
compartiendo sus reflexiones. Luego, es fácil que lo
reenvíes a familiares, por mensaje de texto o correo
electrónico, en otros estados o países.
ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT
Para muchas familias latinas hablar español es
una prioridad, pero todos sabemos que criar niños
bilingües es un gran compromiso. Lo cierto es que
aunque pueda ser un reto, definitivamente vale la
pena. Muchos estudios confirman los múltiples
beneficios del bilingüismo.
LOS ANGELES TIMES | www.latimes.com •
• FRIDAY, APRIL 14, 2017
T15
Logros
de lectura
Por: KidsHealth® from Nemours
Esta es una descripción general de los logros de
desarrollo en el área de lectura y las edades en la
que la mayoría de los niños los alcanzan. Ten en
cuenta que los niños se desarrollan a distintas
velocidades y pasan cantidades variables de tiempo
en cada etapa. Si tienes preocupaciones, habla con
el médico, maestro o especialista de lectura de tu
hijo en la escuela. La intervención temprana es clave
para ayudar a los niños con dificultades para leer.
Infancia
HASTA 1 AÑO
Los niños usualmente comienzan a:
•
•
•
•
•
imitar los sonidos que oyen en el lenguaje.
responder cuando se les habla.
ver imágenes.
sujetar libros y hojear las páginas con ayuda.
responder a historias e imágenes al vocalizar
y dar palmadas en las imágenes.
Niños pequeños
ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT
DE 1 A 3 AÑOS
Los niños usualmente comienzan a:
• responder preguntas de objetos e identificarlos
en libros, tales como: “¿Dónde está la vaca?”
O “¿Cómo hace la vaca?”
• nombrar imágenes familiares.
• usar señales con el dedo para identificar
objetos nombrados.
• pretender leer libros.
• terminar oraciones de los libros que conocen bien.
• hacer garabatos en papel.
• conocer los nombres de libros e identificarlos
por la imagen en la portada.
• hojear las páginas de libros de cartón.
• tener un libro favorito y pedir que se lo lean seguido.
Principio de preescolar
Primero y segundo grado
3 AÑOS
Los niños usualmente comienzan a:
6 Y 7 AÑOS
Los niños usualmente comienzan a:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
explorar libros por su cuenta.
escuchar libros más largos leídos en voz alta.
contar historias familiares.
recitar el alfabeto.
cantar el alfabeto con indicaciones y pistas.
hacer símbolos continuos parecidos a la escritura.
imitar la acción de leer un libro en voz alta.
Fin de preescolar
• leer historias familiares.
• deletrear o decodificar palabras desconocidas.
• usar imágenes y contexto para descubrir
las palabras desconocidas.
• usar las mayúsculas y puntuación común
en la escritura.
• corregirse cuando cometen un error al leer
en voz alta.
• mostrar comprensión de una historia por
medio de dibujos.
4 AÑOS
Los niños usualmente comienzan a:
Segundo y tercer grado
• reconocer señales y etiquetas familiares,
especialmente en señalamientos y contenedores.
• crear rimas o frases absurdas.
• reconocer y escribir algunas de las letras
del alfabeto.
• leer y escribir sus nombres.
• nombrar letras o sonidos que comienzan
con palabras.
• corresponder algunas letras con sus sonidos.
• usar letras familiares para intentar
escribir palabras.
Kínder
5 AÑOS
Los niños usualmente comienzan a:
• entender las rimas y jugar juegos de rimas.
• corresponder algunas palabras habladas y escritas.
• entender que la letra se lee de izquierda
a derecha y de arriba a abajo.
• escribir algunas letras y números.
• reconocer algunas palabras familiares.
• predecir qué sucederá en una historia.
• contar historias que se les han leído.
© 1995-2017. The Nemours Foundation/KidsHealth®. Reimpreso con permiso.
7 Y 8 AÑOS
Los niños usualmente comienzan a:
• leer libros más largos por su cuenta.
• leer en voz alta con expresión y énfasis apropiados.
• usar el contexto y las imágenes para ayudar
a identificar las palabras desconocidas.
• entender el concepto de párrafos y comenzar
a aplicarlo en la escritura.
• usar la puntuación de forma correcta.
• deletrear de forma correcta palabras simples.
• escribir notas, como en mensajes de texto
y correos electrónicos.
• disfrutar juegos como búsquedas de palabras.
• usar nuevas palabras, frases o figuras de
lenguaje que han oído.
• revisar su propia escritura.
De cuarto a octavo grado
DE 9 A 13 AÑOS
Los niños usualmente comienzan a:
• explorar y entender los distintos tipos de
textos, como las biografías, la poesía y la ficción.
• entender y explorar los textos expositivos,
narrativos y persuasivos.
• leer para extraer información específica,
tal como en un libro de ciencia.
• identificar las partes del habla y elementos
como símiles y metáforas.
• identificar de forma correcta los elementos
principales de historias, como tiempo, lugar,
trama, problema y resolución.
• leer y escribir sobre temas específicos por
diversión, y entender qué estilo corresponde.
• analizar textos para obtener el significado.
Aventura de suspenso
de un huérfano que está
llena de humor negro.
Madeleine L’Engle
age 9+
LOS ANGELES TIMES | www.latimes.com •
Historia clásica de ciencia ficción que inspira y
hace pensar a los niños.
Un mal principio
(Una serie de
catastróficas
desdichas nº 1)
As Brave as You
Jason Reynolds
age 10+
Lemony Snicket
age 9+
Aventura conmovedora de verano con mucho
amor familiar y esperanza.
Brown Girl Dreaming
The Crossover
Jacqueline Woodson
Kwame Alexander
age 10+
age 9+
• FRIDAY, APRIL 14, 2017
T16
Una arruga en el
tiempo
Percy Jackson y los
dioses del Olimpo: El
ladrón del rayo
Rick Riordan
Poemas encantadores que representan el paso de la
niñez a la adultez en la década tumultuosa de 1960.
Novela en verso, majestuosa y conmovedora.
Cuento de un niño semidiós combinado con mitos
griegos y aventuras rápidas.
Elige algo gráfico. Hay muchas novelas gráficas de
alta calidad que atraen a los lectores por medio
de ilustraciones, texto en formato corto e historias
fascinantes.
Busca libros de deportes. Para los niños que prefieren
hacer actividades físicas en vez de leer un libro,
considera los libros de equipos o los que están
escritos por atletas.
Deja que sigan sus intereses. Es posible que a ti no te
guste Captain Underpants, pero si eso es lo que tu hijo
quiere leer, deja tu prejuicio a un lado por el bien de él.
Encuentra personajes que reflejen las experiencias
de tu hijo. Busca libros con personajes y situaciones
que se asemejen a las experiencias de tu hijo; lo que
sea que ayude a los niños a identificarse con la historia
los mantendrá más interesados.
Busca oportunidades de lectura distintas. La lectura
es importante sin importar el formato que tenga:
Tarjetas de Pokémon, etiquetas de productos, recetas.
Elige lo tecnológico. Los libros electrónicos y apps
de libros de cuentos que ofrecen multimedia junto
con la historia pueden ser entretenidos y educativos.
Úsalos junto con la lectura tradicional.
Selecciona un libro de datos. Gracias a las
estadísticas impresionantes, imágenes increíbles,
texto de formato corto y formatos para empezar
en cualquier página, los libros de datos pueden
atraer a los niños que prefieren no leer las historias
más largas.
Tomen turnos. Después de que tu hijo elija un libro,
tomen turnos para leer una página (o dos). Realiza
preguntas durante la lectura.
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age 9+
LOS ANGELES TIMES | www.latimes.com •
• FRIDAY, APRIL 14, 2017
T17
Autobiografía
inspiradora
de una
adolescente
galardonada
con el premio
Nobel, quien
fue baleada
por los
talibanes.
libros para
tercero y
cuarto
grado
Yo soy Malala:
la joven que
defendió el
derecho a la
educación y fue
tiroteada por
los talibanes
Para más
recomendaciones
visita:
ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT
commonsense.org/latino
Muchos de estos libros están disponibles tanto
en inglés como en español (los que tienen títulos
en inglés solo están disponibles en inglés).
Malala Yousafzai
age 10+
Cómo estimular a los
lectores renuentes
Caroline Knorr
Common Sense Media
Es posible que los niños se rehúsen a leer por
una variedad de razones. Al igual que con
cualquier cosa que preferirían no hacer, forzarlos,
compararlos con otros niños y castigarlos no
funcionará. ¿Qué funciona? Intenta las ideas
a continuación.
Aliéntalos a leer por diversión. A veces los adultos
se enfocan tanto en hacer que sus hijos lean que se
olvidan de la diversión. Sin embargo, los niños leen
cuando se divierten.
Cuento
clásico sobre
moralidad
que es
increíblemente
entretenido.
age 6+
Cuento de amistad que tiene éxito con niños
que comienzan a leer libros de capítulos.
Secret Coders
Gene Luen Yang
age 8+
Novela gráfica divertida y chistosa que
promueve la programación.
LOS ANGELES TIMES | www.latimes.com •
Annie Barrows
• FRIDAY, APRIL 14, 2017
T18
Eva y Beba
Charlie y la
fábrica de
chocolate
Stef Soto,
Taco Queen
Jennifer Torres
Roald Dahl
age 8+
age 6+
Historia cálida y chistosa sobre la familia,
los tacos y la secundaria.
Nuestras apps favoritas para desarrollar las habilidades de lectura de los
niños cubren todo, desde el reconocimiento de letras, fonética y palabras
visuales, hasta el desarrollo y comprensión del vocabulario. Así que, ya
sea que estés fuera de casa o en el sillón, comienza aquí para hacer que
el aprendizaje sea divertido y atractivo.
A continuación presentamos algunas de nuestras selecciones principales.
Homer
Swap Tales: Leon
age 4+
iOS
age 6+
iOS | Android
Sight Words
Crack the Books
age 5+
iOS | Android
age 7+
iOS
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la dificultad según corresponda) y al proporcionar oportunidades para
fortalecer el aprendizaje más allá de la sesión de juego.
T19
LOS ANGELES TIMES | www.latimes.com •
• FRIDAY, APRIL 14, 2017
Cuento chistoso
y conmovedor de
una niña cínica
y una ardilla con
superpoderes.
libros para
primero y
segundo
grado
Para más
recomendaciones
visita:
commonsense.org/latino
ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT
Flora y Ulises:
las aventuras
iluminadas
Muchos de estos libros están disponibles tanto
en inglés como en español (los que tienen títulos
en inglés solo están disponibles en inglés).
Kate DiCamillo
age 8+
La telaraña de
Carlota
Harry Potter y la piedra
filosofal
E.B. White
J.K. Rowling
age 7+
Clásico ameno sobre animales de granja que
deleita a todas las edades.
Nuestras apps favoritas
para aprender a leer
Christine Elgersma
Common Sense Media
age 8+
El mágico comienzo de la serie fantástica
del niño mago.
Las apps con el mayor potencial de aprendizaje
le ayudan a los niños a entender cómo aprender
y hacer que regresen por más. Las apps que
realmente brindan una base para un aprendizaje
de por vida alientan las preguntas, fomentan la
curiosidad y apoyan el pensamiento crítico. Estas
brindan lecciones al hacer que los niños participen,
al desarrollar conceptos y comprensión profunda,
al brindar comentarios del rendimiento (y ajustar
T20
LOS ANGELES TIMES | www.latimes.com •
Corduroy
• FRIDAY, APRIL 14, 2017
Imaginativa
obra maestra
clásica para
todas las
edades.
Don Freeman
age 2+
Libro clásico de imágenes dulce y
reconfortante.
Donde viven los
monstruos
Maurice Sendak
age 2+
Felices sueños, camiones grandes
y pequeños Sherri Duskey Rinker
Un día de
nieve
Un pez, dos peces,
pez rojo, pez azul
Ezra Jack Keats
Dr. Seuss
age 2+
age 3+
Libro encantador para antes de ir a dormir
para los fanáticos de los camiones.
Clásico que captura el encanto de un niño por
la nieve recién caída.
Rimas contagiosas y excelentes para la lectura
temprana o para leer en voz alta.
que les puede gustar a pesar de la edad.
Lo chistoso está bien. Algunos padres se preocupan
por permitirle a los niños leer libros de humor atrevido
de niños que se meten en problemas. Habla con tus
hijos del contenido, pero ten en cuenta que el humor
es una buena forma de que se enamoren de los libros.
Convierte la lectura en un valor familiar. Las
acciones hablan más fuerte que las palabras. Lleva
a tus hijos a la biblioteca con frecuencia y busca
libros económicos en tiendas de libros usados.
También asegúrate de programar horas solo
para la lectura, en donde apaguen la televisión,
computadoras y teléfonos. Advertencia: ¡Esto
podría hacer que leer se convierta en un hábito!
Aprovecha las series. Una excelente serie hará que
los niños estén pendientes de la próxima entrega.
Cuenta con los clásicos. Intenta mostrarle a tus
hijos libros que te encantaban de niño y ve cuáles
les gustan.
Encuentra libros de las cosas que le encantan a
tus hijos. Los bibliotecarios, vendedores de libros
y búsquedas web pueden ayudar.
Los cómics están bien. Las novelas gráficas son algunas
de las tendencias más populares de libros para niños, y
realmente pueden enganchar a los niños con la lectura.
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age 2+
LOS ANGELES TIMES | www.latimes.com •
• FRIDAY, APRIL 14, 2017
T21
Historia tierna
de la abuela
“Nana” que le
enseña a su nieto
la belleza de la
ciudad en un
autobús.
libros para
bebes
y niños
pequeños
Última parada
de la calle
Market
Matt de la Peña
age 3+
Para más
recomendaciones
visita:
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commonsense.org/latino
Muchos de estos libros están disponibles tanto
en inglés como en español (los que tienen títulos
en inglés solo están disponibles en inglés).
Cómo criar
a un buen lector
Regan McMahon
Common Sense Media
Los niños se convierten en lectores de por vida
por muchas razones. Sin embargo, los padres
pueden influir en la apreciación de los niños por
los libros al compartir su propio amor por la
literatura y al dar el ejemplo. Intenta usar los
consejos a continuación para convertir a tus
hijos en lectores ávidos.
Lee en voz alta. Sigue leyendo en voz alta aun
después de la infancia; te sorprenderás de lo mucho
— Julie Berry
Autor de The Passion of Dolssa
Hay algo que garantiza que la vida de tus hijos sea mejor: la lectura.
Léeles a tus hijos.
Lee con tus hijos.
Escucha a tus hijos cuando te leen.
Cuando era niña en la antigua Unión Soviética,
no habían libros de imágenes que valieran la pena
leer, pero en vez de eso mi hermano mayor me leía
en voz alta todas las imágenes de peleas de The
Three Musketeers y Treasure Island. Cuando tenía
diez años, escribía e ilustraba mis propios libros
de piratas y mosqueteros con las tramas más
sencillas posibles pero con secuencias de peleas
detalladas de forma meticulosa.
En realidad es así de simple.
Las historias son la forma en la que le damos sentido al mundo.
Preservan nuestro pasado. Explican nuestro presente. Nos muestran el futuro.
Aprendemos mejor y con más facilidad cuando usamos más de
uno de nuestros sentidos. Un niño toca las páginas de un libro.
Un niño escucha los sonidos de las palabras. La mente de un niño
está en formación. Las ideas y conceptos van tomando forma.
Las esperanzas y sueños que tenemos para nuestros hijos
comienzan cuando abrimos las primeras páginas de un libro de
imágenes y les enseñamos los colores del arco iris y los sonidos
que hacen los animales.
Cuando yo era niña, íbamos a la biblioteca cada sábado en la mañana. No teníamos dinero para llenar las repisas de libros, así que
los rentábamos para llevarlos a casa. Esos libros nos llenaban de
alegría. Recuerdo a mi abuela cuando me leía. Recuerdo leer libros
con mis primos. Mis tías y tíos. Mis hermanos mayores y menores.
LOS ANGELES TIMES | www.latimes.com •
Holly Goldberg Sloan
El primer libro que leí por mi cuenta
fue Caps for Sale de Esphyr Slobodkina,
y hasta el día de hoy, puedo recitar
la parte de “¡Van a ver changos!”
¡Devuélvanme mis gorras!”, con
un gran orgullo y deleite.
• FRIDAY, APRIL 14, 2017
T22
Enamórate
de la lectura
— Eugene Yelchin
Autor de Breaking Stalin's Nose
El corazón de mi hijo de seis años se aceleraba
con cada aventura que le leía de The People
Could Fly. Ese libro transformó para siempre
mi capacidad de creer más allá de mis
circunstancias.
— Angelica Witherspoon-Cassanova
Autor de Clip-Clop Chronicle
El Festival del Libro de The Los Angeles Times es el evento más
grande de este tipo en los Estados Unidos. Celebra el poder de las
palabras e imágenes.
Sé un buen lector.
Inspira a un futuro lector.
Construye un mundo mejor.
Holly es autora de la aclamada novela Counting by 7s,
es residente de Los Ángeles desde hace cuatro décadas
y su novela más reciente titulada Short, se trata de una
niña que llega a un proceso de autodescubrimiento
mientras interpreta un papel de una chiquilla en una
producción del Mago de Oz.
Favorite Poems Old and New, es un libro
encantador y grande de poemas que aún poseo,
editado por Helen Ferris (e impreso durante
décadas), que me mostró como lectora joven la
cantidad tan variada de voces, estilos, temas,
longitudes de líneas y posibilidades que hay en la
poesía y que ha ampliado mi perspectiva hasta el
presente. ¡La exposición puede cambiar todo!
— Naomi Shihab Nye
Autor de The Turtle of Oman
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Los libros son puentes. Y permiten viajar en dos direcciones.
LOS ANGELES TIMES | www.latimes.com •
• FRIDAY, APRIL 14, 2017
T23
Estimados padres, maestros y educadores,
Tabla de contenido
Hay pocas cosas que pueden enriquecer tanto una vida como una excelente historia. Aquí
en Los Ángeles, nuestras historias son tan variadas como las personas que las escriben,
ilustran y leen. Las historias nos dicen quiénes somos, nos muestran qué es posible y nos
hacen humanos.
3
Enamórate de la lectura
4
Libros para bebés y niños
de preescolar
Cómo criar a un buen lector
6
Libros para niños de 1.º y 2.º grado
Nuestras apps favoritas para
aprender a leer
8
Libros para niños de 3.º y 4.º grado
Cómo estimular a los lectores
renuentes
10
Logros de lectura
11
7 maneras de usar los medios
de comunicación y la tecnología
para criar a niños bilingües
12
Guía de recursos locales
Sin embargo, si bien esta es una de las capitales de narración del mundo, hay muy pocos
niños y estudiantes que tienen las habilidades de alfabetización necesarias para obtener
los beneficios de la lectura. De acuerdo con la evaluación de rendimiento y progreso de
estudiantes de California del 2016, el 44 por ciento de los estudiantes de tercer grado en
el distrito escolar unificado de Los Ángeles no cumplieron con los estándares de literatura
en inglés y alfabetización que son necesarios para aumentar la probabilidad de tener éxito
en los estudios futuros.
El tercer grado o alrededor de los 9 años, es un momento importante para evaluar los
logros de desarrollo de comprensión de lectura. Los reportes indican que los niños que leen
de forma competente para el final de tercer grado tienen más probabilidades de graduarse
y continuar con la educación superior. Tener una base sólida de lectura abre puertas para
lograr el éxito académico, el enriquecimiento personal y tener oportunidades durante toda
la vida.
El programa de Los Angeles Times “Reading by 9” le ayuda a los padres y educadores a
preparar a los niños para un futuro más brillante por medio de una guía anual de lectura
para padres. La guía de este año se desarrolló en asociación con Common Sense Media,
una organización sin fines de lucro independiente dedicada a ayudar a que los niños prosperen en un mundo de medios de comunicación y tecnología. La guía está disponible gratis
en inglés y español, y ofrece consejos e ideas para incorporar la lectura y las historias en la
vida cotidiana, recomendaciones de libros y apps de lectura, logros importantes, recursos
de alfabetización y más.
La guía se distribuye a padres, maestros y educadores en todo California con la ayuda de
organizaciones y escuelas basadas en la comunidad. También está disponible en formato
PDF en latimes.com/Readingby9.
Nuestro deseo es que esta guía sirva como un recurso útil para padres y educadores, que
más niños y estudiantes puedan interesarse por la lectura y las historias y que tengan vidas
más exitosas y plenas.
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Gracias por leer,
Davan Maharaj
Jefe de redacción y editor
Los Angeles Times
Para solicitar copias adicionales o descargar una versión digital de
la Guía de lectura para padres del 2017, visita
latimes.com/readingby9.
La guía es gratuita para padres, educadores y organizaciones que
trabajan con niños y familias. Si tienes comentarios, preguntas o
si deseas obtener más información, envía un correo electrónico a
public.affairs@latimes.com. Este suplemento no incluye al personal de edición o reportajes de Los Angeles Times.
El departamento de Asuntos Públicos administra la filantropía,
participación comunitaria y responsabilidad social corporativa
en la organización de noticias diarias metropolitana más grande
del país. Nosotros ampliamos las perspectivas, empoderamos a
los narradores e inspiramos a nuestra comunidad a cuestionar
y transformar el mundo que los rodea. Para obtener más información, visita latimes.com/readingby9.
Common Sense se dedica a ayudar a los niños a prosperar en la
era digital. Empoderamos a los padres, educadores y ciudadanos
al brindarles información imparcial y orientación para ayudarlos
a usar el poder de los medios de comunicación y la tecnología
como una fuerza positiva en la vida de todos los niños. Para más
información visita commonsense.org.
LOS ANGELES TIMES | www.latimes.com •
• FRIDAY, APRIL 14, 2017
T24
Cómo criar a un
buen lector
• consejos para padres • recomendaciones de libros •
• guía de recursos locales •
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