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Microwave joining of materials

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M icrowave joining of materials
Yiin, Tzu-Yuan, Ph.D .
The Pennsylvania State University, 1992
UMI
300 N. Zeeb Rd.
Ann Arbor, MI 48106
The Pennsylvania State University
The Graduate School
Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics
M ICROW AVE JO IN IN G O F M A TER IA LS
A Thesis in
Engineering Science and Mechanics
by
Tzu-Yuan Yiin
Submitted in Partial Fulfillment
of the Requirements
for the Degree of
Doctor of Philosophy
December 1992
We approve the thesis of Tzu-Yuan Yiin.
Date of Signature
Vhsundara V. Varadan
Distinguished Alumni Professor of Engineering
Science and Mechanics and Electrical Engineering
Thesis Advisor
Chair of Committee
l/lj/Vu/
Vijcfy K Varadan
Distinguished Alumni Professor of Engineering
Science and Mechanics and Electrical Engineering
f .
yL
Jgsepl/C. Conway, Jr. /
'
Professor of Engineering Mechanics
Bernhard R. Tittmann
Kunkle Professor of Engineering Science
and Mechanics
10 1 16 I 7 2Sridhar Komameni
Professor of Clay Mineralogy
_____
IchardlfrM cN itt'
Professor of Engineering Mechanics
Head of the Department of Engineering
Science and Mechanics
A B ST R A C T
This thesis studies and characterizes the joining of similar and dissimilar materials
using microwave energy; 2.45 GHz microwave frequency single-mode and multi-mode
cavities were designed to join the materials. Loss tangents of soda-lime-silicate glass and
sintered a silicon carbide (SA-SiC) were measured as a function of temperature, using
HP8510B Network Analyzer at microwave frequencies. Loss tangent increased rapidly
with temperature, indicating the possibility of using the microwave energy to heat and join
the materials.
Joining of dissimilar ceramics (composite/reaction bonded silicon carbide (Si-SiC),
glass-ceramic/Si-SiC, and Al/sintered a silicon carbide (SA-SiC)) with and without applied
pressure were achieved and required only several minutes. Scanning Electronic Microscopy
(SEM) showed uniform joint interfaces. Similar ceramics joining with interlayers (SiSiC/glass/Si-SiC, Si-SiC/Al/Si-SiC, and SA-SiC/Al/SA-SiC) were also joined with
microwave power. The Si-SiC/glass/Si-SiC interface had no bubbles (CO 2 and CO)
produced at the interface, which is the main problem for conventionally joining ceramics
with glass as an interlayer.
Reaction bonded Silicon Carbide (Si-SiC) joined to itself with Aluminum as an
interlayer was perform ed in a multi-mode cavity. Destructive and non-destructive
evaluations on the joined specimens showed that the joined specimens reached the quality
of the original SiC.
Joining of sintered a Silicon Carbide (SA-SiC) to Aluminum was also achieved in
this study. Due to the high thermal conductivity of SA-SiC the joining was done in a very
short time (1 minute). Sintered a silicon carbide (SA-SiC) was also joined to itself with A1
as the interlayer. A uniform joint was obtained; however, only 43% of original SA-SiC
strength was reached.
Electron microprobe examination on the interface showed the image of A1 diffusion
paths at the interlayer (Si-SiC/Al/Si-SiC) and the chemical reaction between SA-SiC and A1
(SA-SiC/Al/SA-SiC). A state-of-the-art technology, Scanning Acoustic M icroscopy
(SAM), was used to examine the joined interface beneath the surface. Since the detection
was beneath the surface, more reliable information about the joints was obtained. For the
specimens, Si-SiC/glass/Si-SiC, Si-SiC/Al/Si-SiC, SA-SiC/Al, and SA-SiC/Al/SA-SiC,
near the surface of the joints the interfaces were very uniform, no defects were detected by
SAM; therefore, a sound joint was achieved with microwave heating.
Three- and four-point bend tests were performed to find the fracture strength of the
joints. From the fracture flaw observation of three point bending test, the Si-SiC/Al/Si-SiC
had very high joined strength (219.4 MPa), and the joined specimens were broken away
from the joined interface. W ith the two-parameter Weibull approach, the joined SiSiC/Al/Si-SiC reached the same parameters as the original material.
Characterization of material properties was also performed on sintered Barium
Strontium Titanate (BST) as an example and is discussed in Appendix A. Mechanical and
thermal properties of BST were evaluated by different test methods based on the American
Standard Test Methods (ASTM). The coverage of the test methods serves to give some
insight into the determination of property information in order to provide comment on the
quality of ceramics.
V
TABLE OF CONTENTS
LIST OF T A B L E S .......................................................................................................
L IS T
OF
Page
ix
FIG U R E S..............................................................................................
x
A C K N O W L E D G E M E N T S.....................................................................................
xiii
Chapter 1
IN T R O D U C T IO N ..................................................................
1
1.1
Scope o f T h esis....................................................................
1
1.2
E ngineering C eram ics...........................................................
1
1.3
Im portance o f Jo in in g ..........................................................
5
1.4
Ceramic-Ceramic and Ceramic-Metal Joining......................
5
1.5
Mechanisms and Parameters of Interface.............................
13
1.6
Literature Review of Silicon Carbide Joining with
C onventional H eating..........................................................
13
MICROWAVE HEATING..........................................................
18
2.1
M icro w av e s..............................................................................
18
2.2
M icrow ave-M aterial Interactions........................................
19
2.2.1
Electrical Phenomena of Dielectric Materials
19
2.2.2
Polarization o f M aterials.......................................
21
2.2.3
Complex Dielectric C onstant.................................
24
2.2.4
Power Dissipated in M aterials..............................
26
2.2.5
Thermal Runaway of M aterials............................
27
2.3
Loss Tangent Measurement of M aterials.............................
28
2.4
Applications of Microwave Joining....................................
31
Chapter 2
2.4.1
2.4.2
Multi-Mode Microwave Cavity Joining
by Meek and B lake................................................
Single-Mode Cavity Joining by Palaith et al
31
32
vi
2,4.3 Single-Mode Microwave Cavity (6 GHz) Joining
by Fukushim a et al.................................................
35
Advantages of M icrowave H eating...................................
38
MICROWAVE JOINING OF M ATERIA LS..........................
41
Joining of Low Loss Tangent Materials (First T ype)............
41
Use of High Loss Tangent Materials as Interlayers
(Second T y p e)...........................................................................
43
Joining of High Loss Tangent Materials (Third T ype)...........
44
Experim ental P rocedure......................................................
45
3.4.1
Materials Characterization for Microwave Joining....
45
3.4.2 Sam ple P rep aratio n .................................................
48
3.4.3
M icrowave Joining System s..................................
51
3.4.3.1 Multi-Mode Cavity.......................................
51
3.4.3.2 Single-Mode Cavity.......................................
53
EVALUATION OF JOINED SPECIM ENS........................
56
Optical Microscopy.....................................................................
56
Scanning Electron Microscopy.................................................
56
Electron M icroprobe A nalysis...........................................
57
Proof T e stin g ............................................................................
57
4.4.1
Three-Point Bending T est............................................
58
4.4.2
Four-Point Bending T est..............................................
59
4.4.3 Two-Parameter W eibull A pproach..........................
60
Ultrasonic Non-Destructive Method
(Scanning Acoustic M icroscopy).......................................
62
RESULTS AND D ISC U SSIO N ........................................
64
Optical Micrographs of Microwave Joined Specimens........
64
vii
5.2
Scanning Electron Microscope and Electron Microprobe
A n a ly s is .............................................................................
69
5.2.1
S i-SiC /A l/S i-SiC ....................................................
69
5.2.2
SA -SiC /A I/SA -SiC ...................................................
70
5.3
Three Point Bending Test R esu lts..........................................
71
5.4
Four Point Bending Test R esu lts..........................................
72
5.5
Statistical Analysis of Fracture Strength of Si-SiC and
S A -S iC .......................................................................................
76
Scanning Acoustic Microscopy...................................................
79
C O N C L U S IO N S .......................................................................
84
5.6
Chapter 6
R E F E R E N C E S ...........................................
87
AppendixSPECIFICATIONS FOR ENGINEERING CERAMICS
USING BARIUM STRONTIUM TITANATE (BST) AS AN
E X A M P L E .............................................................................................
91
A.1
G rain
A.2
Dynamic Elastic Modulus Measurements...........................
A.3
A.4
S iz e ................................................................................
91
93
A.2.1 O bjective and Background.....................................
93
A.2.2 Velocity of Ultrasonic Wave P u lses..........................
93
Water Absorption, Bulk Density, Apparent Porosity and
Apparent Specific Gravity of Ceramic...............................
97
A.3.1 S ig n ific a n c e .................................................................
97
A.3.2 Procedure and R esults............................................
97
Hardness Test o f C eram ic.....................................................
99
A.4,1 W hat Is H ardness ? .................................................
99
A.4.2 R ockw ell H ard n ess..................................................
99
A.4.3 General Description and Test Procedure for
R ockw ell H ard n ess..................................................
100
A.4.4 Remarks of the Rockwell Hardness T est....................
101
A.4.5 Vickers Hardness N um ber (HV)............................
101
viii
A.5
A .6
A.7
A .8
A.9
A.4.6 Conversion of Vickers Hardness to Rockwell
H a rd n e s s......................................................................
103
Flexural Strength Test of C eram ic......................................
104
A.5.1 O b je c tiv e .....................................................................
104
A.5.2 D e sc rip tio n ..................................................................
104
A .5.3 R e s u lts ..........................................................................
108
Therm al Shock R esistance.................................................
109
A.6.1 O b je c tiv e .....................................................................
109
A.6.2 B ac k g ro u n d .................................................................
109
A . 6 .3 Procedure and R esults............................................
Ill
Thermal Conductivity Measurement of Ceramic.................
112
A.7.1 Objective and Background.....................................
112
A.7.2 Procedure and A pparatus........................................
113
A .7.3 R e s u lts ..........................................................................
115
T herm al E x p an sio n ...............................................................
115
A.8.1 Objective and Background.....................................
115
A .8.2 Procedure and R esults............................................
116
Summary......................................................................................
118
ix
LIST OF TABLES
Table
Page
1.1
Typical C eram ic P ro p erties.......................................................................
4
1.2
Examples of Ceramic Joining Classified by T ype..........................................
10
1.3
Silicon Carbide Joined with Different Ceramic Powders.........................
16
1.4
Comparison o f Silicon Carbide Joining M ethods...................................
17
2.1
Summary of M icrowave Joining of Ceram ics.........................................
37
3.1
M aterials C h aracteristics............................................................................
47
3.2
Dim ensions of M icrowave Joining M aterials..........................................
50
5.1
Summary of Materials Joined with Multi-Mode Microwave Cavity.
65
5.2
Comparison of Original and Joined Si-SiC Mechanical Properties
77
5.3
Joined SA -SiC M echanical Properties....................................................
78
A. 1
Measured Elastic Constants of 7 BST Specimens and the A verage
96
A.2
Water Absorption, Bulk Density, Apparent Porosity and Apparent
Specific Gravity of BST Averaged for 10 Specimens .............................
98
A.3
Vickers Hardness o f 7 BST Specim ens..................................................
103
A.4
Vickers Hardness Conversion to the Rockwell and
R ockw ell Superficial H ardness...............................................................
104
A.5
Weibull Approach of BST..................................................................................
109
A .6
Results of BST Subjected to Thermal Shock Water Q uenching................
112
A.7
Thermal Properties Results of BST..................................................................
115
A .8
Mechanical and Thermal Properties of BST....................................................
118
X
LIST O F FIG U R ES
Figure
1.1
Page
Conventional heating for joining ceramic.
The direction of heat flow is from the surface to the interior......................
6
1.2
Conventional heating cycle for joining ceramic to metal..........................
7
1.3
Compliant joint design (edge brazing joining)........................................
12
1.4
Com pression joint design (ceram ic-m etal)...............................................
12
2.1
Schematic behavior of charge buildup and current flow in
(a) an ideal dielectric and (b) a real dielectric material............................
21
Schematic representation of polarization by dipole chains
and bound ch arg es.....................................................................................
22
2.3
Schematic representation of different mechanisms of polarization
23
2.4
Frequency dependence of polarizability of dielectric materials
2.5
Loss tangent as a function of temperature for (a) glass (b) S iC ................
29
2.6
Schematic diagram and flow chart of Meek and Blake’s [1988]microwave
jo in in g ..............................................................................................................
33
2.7
Palaith
34
2.8
Fukushima
et al. [1988] single-mode set-up..........................................
36
3.1
First type of microwave joining
(arrows indicate the directions of heat flow).........................................
42
Second type of microwave joining
(arrows indicate the directions of heat flow ).........................................
44
Third type of microwave joining
(A rrow s indicate the heat flow ).............................................................
46
Three groups of microwave joining (a) rectangular block ceramic
joined to rectangular block ceramic with or without interlayer
(b) silicon carbide tube joined to silicon carbide tube with interlayer
(c) silicon carbide tube joined to metal tube without interlayer....................
49
M ulti-mode cavity for microwave
54
2.2
3.2
3.3
3.4
3.5
........
et al. [1988] single mode set-up................................................
joining.............................................
24
xi
3.6
Schematic diagram of standing waves (TE iq j ) in a waveguide cavity
where a and b are the broad and narrow sides of the waveguide
cross-section and dc is along the z direction and represents
the length of the cavity.....................................................................................
53
3.7
Schematic diagram of single-mode cavity........................................................
54
3.8
Temperature profile of SiC placed in microwave cavities:
(a) Single-m ode (b) M ulti-m ode.............................................................
55
Three types of fracture paths (A) high strength joints (B) medium strength
jo in ts, and (C) low strength jo in ts.........................................................
58
4.2
Schematic diagram of the four point test.................................................
59
4.3
Schematic of Weibull strength distribution plot........................................
61
4.4
Reflection and transmission of sound waves.
(a) Transmission and reflection of sound waves at an interface
(b) Reflection of sound waves at a defect.............................................
62
4.5
Scanning A coustic M icroscope (SAM )...................................................
63
5.1
Optical micrographs of polished (A) Composite / Si-SiC and
(B) Glass-ceramic / Si-SiC interfaces showing uniform joining.
A rrow s indicate the joined interfaces....................................................
66
Optical micrographs of polished (C)Si-SiC/glass / Si-SiC and
(D) Si-SiC/Al / Si-SiC interfaces showing uniform joining.
A rrows indicate the joined interfaces....................................................
67
Optical micrographs of polished (E) SA-SiC/Al/S A-SiC and
(F) SA-SiC/Al interfaces showing uniform joining.
A rrow s indicate the joined interfaces....................................................
68
Photographs of Si-SiC/Al/Si-SiC interface on the same position by
(a) SEM (dark phases shows the SiC grains), (b) electron microprobe
image of Al on the interface (Al diffused into the Si but not the SiC
grains). Arrow indicates the joined interface.........................................
69
Photographs of SA-SiC/Al/SA-SiC interface on the same position by
(a) SEM (b) electron microprobe image of Al on the interface (A layer of
AI4 C 3 compound). Arrow indicates the joined interface........................
70
Fracture paths of three-point bend test of Si-SiC.
A rrow s indicate the joined interface......................................................
71
Schematic diagram of SiC four-point bending test
(a) Si-SiC (b) S A -S iC .............................................................................
73
4.1
5.1
5.1
5.2
5.3
5.4
5.5
xii
5.6
Fracture path o f four-point bending fractured Si-SiC specimen
74
5.7
Fracture path of four-point bending fractured SA-SiC specimen
75
5.8
Weibull plots of four-point bend strength of original and joined Si-SiC
frac tu re stre n g th s........................................................................................
77
Weibull plots of four-point bend strength of joined SA-SiC fracture
s tre n g th s ...........................................................................................................
78
(A) Scanning Acoustic Micrograph of the Si-SiC/glass/Si-SiC joined
interface. Arrows indicate the joined interface.......................................
80
(B) Scanning Acoustic Micrograph of the Si-SiC/Al/Si-SiC joined
interface. Arrows indicate the joined interface.......................................
81
(C) Scanning Acoustic Micrograph of the SA-SiC/Al/SA-SiC joined
interface. Arrows indicate the joined interface.......................................
82
(D) Scanning Acoustic Micrograph of the SA-SiC/Al joined interface.
A rrow s indicate the joined interface.......................................................
83
A. 1
Scanning Electron Micrograph showing grain size of BST...........................
92
A.2
Ultrasonic velocity measurement system with direct contact
o f transducer on specim en.......................................................................
95
A.3
Schematic diagram of Rockwell Hardness and test steps.........................
100
A.4
Schematic diagram of the Vickers hardness test........................................
102
A.5
Schematic diagram of the four point test................................................
105
A .6
Schematic diagram of biaxial flexure test...............................................
106
A.7
Weibull approach for the four point bending of BST.......................................
108
A .8
Schematic diagram of apparatus for
thermal shock resistance parameter...............................................................
Ill
Schematic diagram for thermal diffusivity measurement.........................
113
A. 10 Temperature curves measured on BST for
therm al conductivity m easurem ent.........................................................
114
A. 11 Thermal expansion behavior of BST as function of temperature
117
5.9
5.10
5.10
5.10
5.10
A.9
ACKNOW LEDGEM ENTS
I wish to express my sincere gratitude to my advisor, Professor Vasundara V.
Varadan, for giving me the chance to work in the Center for the Engineering of Electronic
and Acoustic Materials.
I also extend my appreciation to my doctoral committee members ~ Professors
Vijay K. Varadan, Joseph C. Conway, Bernhard R. Tittmann, and Sridhar Komameni for their advice and comments. My thanks go to Dr. Fathi Selmi for teaching me in the
laboratory and supplying the Barium Strontium Titanate (BST) specimens and also to Mr.
Richard Hollinger for the thesis correction. I extend additional thanks to my parents and my
w ife’s whole family for their continued support and encouragement.
Finally, I would like to thank my wife, Chin-Fen, for all her patience and
understanding during this period.
1
Chapter 1
IN T R O D U C T IO N
1.1 Scope of Thesis
The scope of this study is to characterize the microwave joining technique and apply
it to join similar and dissimilar materials. Conventional joining methods are reviewed in this
chapter. Procedures for conventional heating and joining and the associated difficulties are
evaluated. Due to the absorption of electromagnetic energy by materials, ceramics can be
heated internally and possibly joined together. Microwave interaction with materials and the
microwave heating technique will be reviewed specialized about joining. A bibliographical
review of conventional and microwave joining and the state of the art equipment for
joining materials will be discussed in Chapter 2 and Chapter 3. The dielectric loss tangent
as a function o f temperature will also be discussed. Heat flow during microwave joining
due to the different material types will be classified in Chapter 3. Single-mode and multimode cavities designed in the lab have been used to join engineering ceramics. Joined
specimen characterization has been performed with optical microscope, scanning electron
microscope (SEM), electron microprobe analysis, and scanning acoustic microscope. Fourpoint and three-point bending tests are used to check the joined fracture strengths. Statistic
evaluation of the fracture strengths is performed by the two parameter Weibull approach.
1.2 Engineering Ceramics
Ceramics are useful materials for many engineering and structural applications. It is
well known that ceramics and metals exhibit wide differences, but in general, ceramics are
stronger, more corrosion resistant, and less thermally expansive or conductive than metals.
Ceramics have been used as thermal insulators, abrasion resistors, and widely used as tile,
2
bricks and earthenware. In these usages, only some of the desirable properties of ceramics
have been applied. Conventional ceramics are made from the original raw mineral. The raw
mineral contains too many impurities which make the processing of high quality ceramics
difficult and time consuming.
To avoid those defects, some ceramics are prepared using extensive and careful
processing that produces materials with properties well suited for the most demanding
applications. Such ceramics are named "Engineering Ceramics" to denote their superior
and highly reproducible properties necessary for com plex device and structural
applications.
The technology of formulating engineering ceram ics has been developed
tremendously in the last decade in response to the requirements o f industry. M ost
engineering ceramics are fabricated by consolidation of a compact of pure, finely divided
oxide or nonoxide powders in a furnace at high temperature, except for room temperature
chemically bonded cement and concrete. The materials that are involved in the engineering
ceramics are crystalline ceramics produced by synthetic processing. These include
extremely pure, ultrafine particles of alumina, titanates, carbides, borides, feldspar, and
other minerals and chemicals that are carefully processed to the desired forms and shapes.
The starting powder is very important in the control of microstructure and the resulting
physical properties. This dictates that the controlling variables for the nucleation and
growth of ceramic powders are very important. New ceramic processing techniques have
also been developed, resulting in a new generation of high performance engineering
ceramics. These processes include hot isostatic pressing, sol-gel process, microwave
sintering, etc.
The most important advantage sought in many of these developments is resistance
to increased operating temperatures. Engineering ceramics can provide strength and
corrosion resistance at high temperature. Operating at high temperature can have high
thermodynamic efficiency in energy conversion devices and also efficiencies associated
with decreased needs for cooling. A further advantage of engineering ceramics is the
greater acceleration allowed by decreased mass. In addition to the technical advantages of
3
engineering ceramics, the potential low cost is particularly attractive. Low cost is possible
because of the abundance of raw materials, especially silicon carbide, alumina, and silicon
nitride. Table 1.1 shows some typical ceramic properties [Ceramic Source, 1991].
Those applications of engineering ceramics include heat exchangers, automotive
engine components such as turbocharger rotors and roller cam followers, power generation
components, cutting tools, biomedical implants, and processing equipm ent used for
fabricating a variety of polymer, metal and ceramic parts [Cranmer, 1991]. These
applications rely on combinations of properties which can be summarized as:
• Retention of mechanical properties at high temperature
• Low coefficient of friction
• Low coefficient of expansion
• Corrosion resistance
• Thermal insulation
• Electrical insulation
* Low density
4
Table 1.1 Typical Ceramic Properties.
Property
Range of Values
Specific Examples
Vickers Hardness
5 - 44 GPa
glass
AI2 O3
SiC
Failure Strength
7 0 -1 2 0 0 MPa
70
SiC
200-800
0.75
2.7-4.2
5-7
0.75-18MPa m 1/2
glass
AI2 O3
SiC
Thermal Expansion
20-100 (x 10-7 /°CT)
glass
0.2-2000 W/m°K
30
glass
M 2 O3
Fracture Toughness
K IC
Thermal Conductivity
5
20
200-1000
70 -1 0 0 (x l0 '4)
AI2 O3
70-90(xl0‘4)
SiC
3 7 (x l0 '4)
glass
AI2 O3
SiC
2-10
50
500
Dielectric Constant
at 1 MHz
glass
AI2 O3
SiC
2-5
9
40
Dielectric Loss
at 1 MHz
glass
l-5 0 0 (x l0 '4)
AI2 O 3
2x1 O' 4
SiC
500 xlO ' 4
5
1,3 Importance of Joining
Although ceramics can be processed to obtain some useful properties, it is difficult
and expensive to make large or complex shapes from conventional processing. The
potential use of engineering ceramics is limited by their lack of formability and their brittle
nature. The poor formability leads to significant difficulties in manufacturing structural
components at reasonable costs and the brittle nature makes it difficult to accurately predict
their service lifetimes. Also, use of ceramics for many structural and electronic applications
requires that they be connected to other materials at some point. For example, it is popular
to make use o f the high temperature properties of ceramics in conjunction with the
formability and toughness of metals by combining the two in the form of joints to form
more complex parts. The most reliable method for these applications is to join simple pieces
together. Each simple piece can be made easily and also tested before joining to eliminate
possible flaws. Joining ceramics to each other or to m etals involves considerable
difficulties due to the differences in their physical and chemical natures. Many processing
techniques have been developed to tackle this problem and this has resulted in a wide
variety of joining methods. Whatever method is used, the formation o f successful joints
depends on the achievement of intimate contact between the workpieces, the conversion of
these contacting surfaces into an atomically bonded surfaces, and the ability of this interface
to accommodate thermal expansion mismatch stresses generated either during cooling after
fabrication or by temperature changes in operating conditions.
1A £sramic--Ceramig -and.Ceramic-Metal Joining
For conventional joining the pieces to be joined are first heated to the desired
temperature with heating elements surrounding the pieces. The heat is generated by the
heating elements first and then radiates to the surfaces o f the ceramics or metals. The heat
can conduct into the interior, By the thermal conductivity of the ceramics or metals. Figure
1.1 shows the schematic diagram of a conventional heating system. Since the thermal
6
conductivities of ceramics and metals are quite different, a very complex heating cycle is
needed. Figure 1.2 is a typical heating process for joining a ceramic and a metal. There are
four different steps of heating. The first step (a) is to heat at a very low heating rate which
will make the joining pieces have very small temperature gradients. Step (b) is to let the
joining pieces reach uniform temperatures throughout. Once the pieces have uniform
temperatures, a high heating rate is applied (c) to obtain the desired joining temperature,
and then the temperature is held (d) to produce reaction or diffusion. The heating rate cycle
is not only time consuming but also costly.
Joining techniques which are being actively considered for high strength
applications can all be classified as reaction bonding and diffusion joining. This covers the
class of joints in which the materials involved react during the process of joint formation,
either chemically by forming reaction products at the interfaces, or physically by diffusion.
Joining pieces
Heating element
D rectionofheat
Figure 1.1 Conventional heating for joining ceramic. The direction of heat flow is from
the surface to the interior.
7
1200
Temperature (°C)
1000
Reaction or diffusion
3°C/min
800
600
400
200
4
6
Time (Hour)
Figure 1.2 Conventional heating cycle for joining ceramic to metal.
8
For example, fusion welding, which involves localized melting o f the materials to
be joined, can produce joints having high strength and good refractoriness. It is limited in
that the materials to be joined should have a good match for their thermal expansion
coefficients and melting points. Also, the joint formation requires very high localized
fabrication temperatures. Rice [1970] showed that some ceramics, like silicon carbide,
cannot be joined by fusion, even when using electron beam methods (high local heating),
because of the high melting temperature of silicon carbide (2815.5°C).
Diffusion bonding is similar to fusion welding, with sim ilar properties and
limitations, though it relies more on diffusion at the interface rather than actual melting of
the materials involved [Akselsen, 1992], Consequently, it requires lower temperatures to
form the joint compared to fusion welding but requires longer fabrication times and high
pressure during the joining process which limits the ability to join complex shapes. The
temperatures required are of the order of 1500°C and the pressure is around 15 MPa and
higher which are quite high compared to brazed joints.
The brazing joining method involves putting a thin active metal between the two
ceramic pieces on ceramic and metal pieces to be joined. There are many methods to make
the interlayer metals [Mizuhara et al., 1989]: (1) a sheet of active metal (2) a mixture sheet
of active metal with joining metal or ceramic (3) commercially available brazing alloy
(copper-silver-titanium). This process has several advantages which include: obviating the
need for wettable ceramics, lower fabrication temperatures (thus decreasing thermal
contraction mismatch) and the reduced rate of degrading chemical interactions. The joints
are also compliant because of the ductile interlayer. However, the process has significant
disadvantages such as long fabrication times and application temperatures limited by the
low-melting soft interlayers. Also, the process requires application of pressure which in
turn limits the geometries of the possible joints and requires complicated jigs and fixtures.
Glazing involves formation o f joints using glass interlayers. This technology has
been commercialized and is primarily used to provide hermetic sealing for arc enclosures or
other similar applications. The brittleness of the glass phase, stringent requirements for
thermal expansion matching and consequently the complications involved in designing
9
these joints puts them at a significant disadvantage [Zdaniewski et al., 1987].
Another common conventional joining method is the moly-manganese process (MoMn brazing). It is a two-step process: metallizing the ceramic and then joining to ceramic
or metal [Mizuhara et al.,1989]. The metallization process is coating a thin layer of metal on
the ceramic surface, which is performed at high temperature. It is a very time-consuming
and expensive process.
It seems that reaction bonding and diffusion joining have excellent potential for
ceramic-ceramic and ceramic-metal joining because they can supply good strength.
However, one must also note that a severe stress concentration sometimes accompanies
joining. The problems of grain growth and formation of pores, in addition to thermal
expansion mismatch, then become serious. Especially for the ceramic-metal joining, high
thermal stress can be created at the joint because of the thermal expansion mismatch around
the interfaces. Therefore, the thermal stress problems must be overcome to obtain reliable
joints.
The best way to achieve a joint and also overcome the thermal expansion mismatch
is by engineering design. Different designs have been developed for different applications.
There are two popular designs discussed as follows: (1) Compliant joint design (Figure
1.3): the thermal expansion mismatch problem is reduced by the concentric distortion of
the metal cylinder. Also the ductile metal interlayer will deform plastically to distribute the
thermal stress on the surface of the ceramic. (2) Compression joint design (Figure 1.4): In
this design, the thermal expansion difference between metal and ceramic is used as an
advantage to join them. For example, by putting a ceramic part into a metal part at high
temperature and then cooling down to room temperature, the outside metal will shrink more
than the inner ceramic for a metal having higher thermal expansion coefficient. This will
produce a compressive force from the metal to the ceramic to produce a high joint strength.
Overall, the conventional methods for joining ceramic-ceramic and ceramic-metal
can be summarized as in Table 1.2.
10
Table 1.2 Examples of Ceramic Joining Classified by Type [Loehman, 1990].
CERAMIC-CERAMIC JOINING
No Filler Material
Name
Description
Fusion welding
Interfacial fusion using localized heat
source
Diffusion bonding
Direct contact with heat and pressure
With Filler Material
Glazing
Inter-facial composition melts, wets,
with non-metallic liquid and then bonds
(bonding with molten glass is common)
Mo-Mn brazing
Metallized ceramic with Mo-Mn and
then metal braze
Active metal brazing
Molten alloy containing a reactive
metal wets, reacts and bonds to
ceramic
11
Table 1. 2 (continued).
CERAMIC-METAL JOINING
No Filler Material
Name
Description
Glass-metal bonding
Molten glass wets metal and reacts
when cool
Diffusion bonding
Direct contact under heat and pressure
With Filler Material
Reactive, non-metallic
Reactive composition wets and reacts
liquid bonding while molten and then
joined when cool
Mo-Mn brazing
then metal braze
Metallized with Mo-Mn process and
Active metal brazing
Molten alloy containing a reactive
metal wets, reacts and bonds
12
Metal
c=i
I
=
Ductile metal interlayer
|
Ceramic cylinder
Figure 1.3 Compliant joint design (edge brazing joining).
Ceramic
6
87
511529
Metal
Figure 1.4 Compression joint design (ceramic-metal).
13
1.5 Mechanisms and Parameters of Interface rSchwartz.19921
The mechanism of joined interfaces has been investigated for many years. These
studies have scrutinized the chemistry of the interfacial reactions and how it affects the
bond strength of the joint. The most common approach is the sessile drop techniques. Such
experiments provide the means of studying wetting and spreading of a liquid on a rigid
solid and changes in the surface and interfacial energies. The technique also provides a
convenient method of studying the reactions that occur at the interface by characterizing
cross-sections obtained by cutting a frozen sessile drop assembly perpendicularly to the
interface.
1.6 Literature Review of Silicon Carbide Joining with Conventional Heating
Silicon carbide is a widely used ceramic characterized by high hardness and good
strength retention at high temperatures. It has good oxidation resistance due to a protective
SiC>2 surface layer. Its thermal shock resistance is considered good for a ceramic due to its
relatively low thermal expansion and high thermal conductivity. Silicon carbide exists in a
cubic form termed beta silicon carbide and in noncubic forms, which are collectively termed
alpha silicon carbide. The alpha form is more stable at high temperature [Srinivasan et al.,
1989; Coppola et al.,1982].
Silicon carbide can retain high strength and rigidity to about 1600°C. This coupled
with high thermal shock resistance and high thermal conductivity has made it become the
candidate material for many high technology applications. The joining of silicon carbides
has attracted a lot of researchers. The following are some important examples from the
literature covering 1980 through the present.
Iseki et al. [1980] joined two blocks of sintered silicon carbide with silicon carbide
powder as the interlayer by holding the joining specimens at 1650 °C for 30 minutes in Ar
atmosphere with a pressure of 100 MPa. The interlayer silicon carbide powder was
prepared by heating a mixture of SiC>2 and carbon black with metallic aluminum. Al played
14
a significant role at the interface. In Iseki’s later paper [Iseki et al., 1984], it was proved
that Al has a chemical reaction with silicon carbide. The joined strength was around 83%
of the original silicon carbide strength.
Iseki et al. [1981] later joined two pieces of sintered silicon carbide with
Germanium (Ge) metal powder as the interlayer. The joining was done in a graphite
susceptor with induction heating in vacuum holding the specimens at 1180°C for 10
minutes. The Ge was detected to have diffusion into and reaction with the Si phase in
silicon carbide. The joined strength was around 50 % of the original silicon carbide
strength.
Yajima et al. [1981] reported the use of polymers of borodiphenylsiloxane (PB)h
mixed with silicon carbide powder as the interlayer to join reaction bonded silicon carbide.
The joining specimens were heated at 1500°C for one hour in N2 atmosphere. The (PB)^
heated up to 1500°C in N 2 produces silicon carbide and graphite. The maximum joint
strength was around 54 % of the original strength.
Iseki et al. [1984] used 0.5 mm thick aluminum (Al) metal as an interlayer to join
reaction bonded silicon carbide and sintered silicon carbide. The joining temperature was
1000°C in vacuum for an hour by induction heating. There was no reaction layer at the
reaction bonded silicon carbide and Al interface. In this joint, aluminum and free silicon in
the silicon carbide formed a continuous liquid phase at high temperature, allowing the Al to
penetrate into the silicon carbide. However, cracks were formed because of the thermal
expansion mismatch between Al and silicon carbide. There was a reaction at the interface of
sintered silicon carbide and Al. It has been reported by Clinton [Iseki et al., 1984] that
silicon carbide reacts with Al at 800°C to produce AI4 C 3 . The AI4 C 3 phase was formed at
the SA-SiC/Al interface. It is proved later by Yano et al. [1992] that the origin of this
difference between reaction bonded silicon carbide and sintered silicon carbide is due to the
free silicon in the reaction bonded silicon carbide. Since there are some cracks at the
reaction bonded silicon a carbide and Al interface due to the thermal expansion mismatch.
The strength is only half of the strength of joined sintered silicon carbide. Interface
15
examination of Sintered a silicon carbide (SA-SiC) /Al/Sintered a silicon carbide (SA-SiC)
using high resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) was investigated by Yano
et al. [1992]. A reaction layer (AI4 C 3 ) was produced during the high temperature (1000°C)
joining processing. The misfit between the silicon carbide and AI4 C 3 lattice was
accommodated by interfacial dislocations and the atomic arrangement of the transition
phase. The strength o f the SA-SiC/Al/SA-SiC joint is attributable to the transition layers
between both the SA-SiC/Al4 C 3 and the AI4 C 3/AI interfaces, which shows a relatively
high coherency of atomic configuration.
Moore [1985] has also joined commercial sintered silicon carbide (SA-SiC) by three
different methods: hot pressing, diffusion welding and brazing with different ceramic
submicron powders as the interlayer. For hot press joining, two silicon carbide blocks were
put in a graphite susceptor inside an induction heating furnace with an A r atmosphere.
Holding at 1950°C for 3 hours with 13.8 MPa applied pressure, joining was completed
with gross plastic deformation. Grain growth across the joining interface gave evidence of
a good joint. For the diffusion and brazing joining, six different powders were used as the
interlayers. Hot isostatic pressing (HIP) was applied under the conditions of 1950°C and
138 MPa argon pressure applied for two hours. A diffusion joint was achieved and the
results are summarized in Table 1.3. It can be learned from this paper that a homogeneous
joint can be made by the use of an improved method involving application of a uniform,
ultra-thin interlayer which will react completely with the silicon carbide base material, or the
use of an interlayer consisting of a mixture of the interlayer powder with submicron silicon
carbide powder.
16
Table 1.3 Silicon Carbide Joined with Different Ceramic Powders.
Interlayer
voids at the interface
cracks at the interface
A1B
No
Yes
b 4c 3
Yes
Yes
ZtB 2
Yes
No
SiB 4
No
No
AI4 C 3
Yes
No
MoSi2
No
No
Boadi et al. [1987] have reported a successfully joined silicon carbide with an AgCu-Ti alloy foil interlayer. The use of foils was thought much simpler and easier to handle
and to control interlayer thickness. The interlayer was prepared carefully by using an
ultrasonic vibrator and dipping in acid solution to minimize oxidation or contamination of
the surfaces. The sandwich specimens (SA-SiC/foil/SA-SiC) were placed in a graphite
susceptor and heated in vacuum using an induction heating furnace. Joining temperature
was held at 850 to 950°C for 30 minutes. The holding time and temperature decide the joint
quality. An original joined silicon carbide strength was achieved by holding at 950°C 30
minutes.
Table 1.4 summarizes the joining silicon carbide using the conventional methods.
As we can see from the results, the joining time is very long; also the temperature and
pressure are very high which consume energy and require high cost facilities.
From this review it appears that the best method for conventionally joining
"Engineering Ceramics,” like silicon carbide, is to use active metal brazing to produce a
reaction interlayer which can give high bond strength.
Table 1.4 Compression o f Silicon Carbide Joining Methods.
IN T E R ­
LAYER
J O IN IN G
M ETHOD
M A X IM U M
TEM P.
(°C )
H O L D IN G
T IM E
( h r .)
A P P L IE D
PRESSU RE
(M P a )
FRA CTU RE
STRENGTH
( % O R IG IN A L )
100
83
1/6
Vacuum
50
1500
1
Vacuum
54
Brazing
1000
1
Vacuum
50
Hot-Pressure
W elding
1950
3
13.8
A1B, % Q ,
ZrB 2
powder
Diffusion
1950
2
138
SiB 4 A h Q
M o S i2
powder
Brazing
1950
2
Ag-Cu-Ti
alloy
Brazing
950
0.5
SiC
powder
Diffusion
1650
0.5
Ge
Diffusion
1180
(PB ^
polymer
Diffusion
Al
No
138
Vacuum
?
?
?
100
18
Chapter 2
MICROWAVE H EA TIN G
Microwaves are electromagnetic waves which are frequently used as heating
sources. Many types of devices have been developed to produce microwaves; in the United
States, a magnetron operating at 2.45 GHz is the most popular for industrial applications.
There are several potential benefits of using microwave energy to join materials because
microwave power causes the material to heat itself. This leads to a rapid and uniform
temperature rise, ensuring high thermal efficiency.
2,1 Microwaves
The microwave frequency portion of the electromagnetic spectrum has been
traditionally used for the transmission and reception of information in communication and
radar. Microwaves were first used for heating in the 1940's following the invention of the
magnetron during the World War II. Engineers and scientists were then presented with a
unique challenge of putting such a device for generating microwaves to peaceful and
profitable use [Metaxas, 1983]. In the broadest sense, the electromagnetic spectrum covers
the range of frequencies from dc to visible light to X-rays and above. The microwave
portion of the spectrum lies in the frequency band between 300 MHz to 300 GHz with
wavelengths of 1 m to 1 mm. The other characteristics of electromagnetic waves, besides
frequency and wavelength, are magnitude, phase, and the ability to propagate, i.e., transfer
energy from one point to another. It is the exploitation of these properties that allows the
heating of materials and the determination of their electrical characteristics.
With the advent of low cost microwave sources and consumer items has also come
a resurgence of interest in using the energy and properties of these frequencies for other
important applications [Bruce, 1988]. There are important reasons for using microwave
19
heating over conventional processing methods for certain applications. In the microwave
process, heat is generated internally within the ceramic instead of originating from outside
heating sources. As a result of this internal and volumetric heating, the direction of heat
flow and thermal gradients are the reverse of the conventional heating process [Sutton,
1989].
2,2 Microwave-Material Interactions
Materials are composed of arrangements of atoms as ions or molecules, each made
of positively and negatively charged particles having various configurations in empty space
and varying states of relative motion. What is of primary interest here is the interaction of
electromagnetic waves with materials. Because of the polarization properties of a material,
the wavelength of the electromagnetic wave becomes shorter and the magnitude of the
electric field is attenuated in the material. This attenuation of the field results in the
conversion of electromagnetic energy into thermal energy within the material, i.e., heating.
The origin o f the heating lies in the ability of the electric field to polarize the charges in the
material and the inability of this polarization to follow extremely rapid reversals o f the
electric field. Therefore, the polarization lags the applied electric Held ensuring that the
resulting current has a component in phase with the applied electric field resulting in the
dissipation of power within the insulting material.
2.2.1 Electrical Phenomena of Dielectric Materials
First of all, the electrical properties of a dielectric material can be discussed in
relation to the capacitor. A capacitor consists of two conductors separated by air or
dielectric material. It is used to store or release an electrical charge Q. The charge on a
capacitor is
Q = CV
(2 . 1)
20
where V is the applied voltage and C is the capacitance. The voltage is proportional to the
amount of stored charge, and the current passing through the capacitor is
V=qyc= J l d t / C
( 2 .2 )
I = C ( dV / dt)
(2.3)
V = V0 exp (jcot)
(2.4)
Ic =j(oCV
(2.5)
with a sinusoidal voltage
a charging current results
which is 90° advanced in phase in relation to the applied voltage. However, there is an
inertia to charge movement that shows up as a relaxation time for charge transport in a real
dielectric material as shown in Figure 2 . 1. In equations (2.4 & 2.5), j equals
V-l,
and to
equals 2 jrf, where f is the frequency in cycles per second.
The capacitance C contains both a geometrical and a material factor. For a large plate
capacitor of area A and thickness d the geometrical capacitance in vacuum is given by
Co = A£()/d
( 2 .6 )
where £q is the permittivity of free space (Eq = 8.86 x 1 0 " ^ F/m). If a ceramic material of
dielectric constant £ is inserted between the capacitor plates,
21
c =c0(e / £o) =Cq£
(2.7)
where £ ’ is the relative dielectric constant
Charge
Voltage
Current
I
Q
Time-
Time-
Time(a)
I
Q
Time-
Time
Time—►
(b)
Figure 2.1 Schematic behavior of charge buildup and current flow in (a) an ideal dielectric
and (b) a real dielectric material.
2.2.2 Polarization of Materials
A dielectric material reacts to an electric field differently from free space because it
contains charge carriers that can be displaced, and charge displacements within the
»
dielectric can be neutralized a part of the applied field. Since V = Q / C and C = Cq £ ,
V = Q /(C o £ )
(2-8)
22
That is, only a fraction of the total charge, the free charge, sets up an electric field; the
remainder, the bound charge, polarizes and neutralizes part of the electric field. Figure 2.2
shows the total electric flux density D as the sum of the electric field E and polarization
field P:
D =£q E + P = EE
(2.9)
where the polarization is the surface charge density of the bound charge, equal to the dipole
moment per unit volume of material:
(2 . 10)
P = N |X
N is the number of dipoles per unit volume and |i is the average dipole moment. Thus
polarization can equivalently designate either the bound charge density or the dipole
moment per unit volume.
EE
©
Dipole
ffl
®
EB
- \-
F—) Free charge
|—i—i
|—h | Bound charge
Figure 2.2 Schematic representation of polarization by dipole chains and bound charges.
23
O f all dipoles or induced dipoles in the material, there are various possible
mechanisms for polarization in a dielectric material [Von Hippel, 1954]:
(a) Electronic polarization: space charges arising from localized electrical
conduction, or the shift of the negative electron cloud in relation to the positive
atom nucleus in an electric field (Figure 2.3(a)).
(b) ionic polarization (atomic polarization): the displacement of positive and
negative ions in relation to one another (Figure 2.3(b)),
(c) orientational polarization: occurring in materials possessing permanent electric
dipoles randomly oriented in the absence of an external field, but undergoing an
orientation toward the applied electric field (Figure 2.3(c)).
No field
Field applied
*4
E
(a) Electronic polarization
(b) Ionic polarization
(c) Orientational polarization
Figure 2.3 Schematic representation of different mechanisms of polarization.
24
The polarizability of a dielectric material is dependent on frequency as shown in
Figure 2.4. The electronic polarization process will rapidly follow alternative fields in the
visible part ( E H z ) of the spectrum. Ionic polarization process is able to follow an applied
high frequency field and contribute to the dielectric constant at frequencies to the infrared
region (THz) of the spectrum. Orientation polarization has relaxation times corresponding
at GHz frequencies.
.o
dipolar
electronic
6
8
12
14
16
Frequency
Figure 2.4 Frequency dependence of polarizability of dielectric materials.
2.2.3 Complex Dielectric Constant
Maxwell modified Ampere’s law for static fields by including a displacement
current density term caused by the rate of change of the total electric flux and derived the
following expression for the total current density in a material [Johnk, 1975]
V x ( B / p ) = J c + 3 (e E ) / 3t
( 2 . 11)
25
It states that the total current density (curl of B/(i) at any point in a region is the sum
o f the electric current density J c (= oE) and the displacement current density 9( e E )/9t at
that point. B is the magnetic flux density, ji is the permeability and o is the conductivity of
the material. As for sinusoidal electric field variations, E = Eg e -i®1 , equation (2.11)
attains the following form for the total current density:
J = (J Eq + jco£ Eq
(2.12)
Re-arranging equation (2.12) yields
J = j (0 Eg (£’ -jO / lOEfl) Eq
(2.13)
However, in free space, where a = 0, Maxwell’s circuital law given by (2.13) becomes
J = J g) £ q £ ’ Eq
(2.14)
Comparison of equations (2.13) and (2.14), we can get an effective dielectric constant of
the material where conduction effects dominate:
£*c = £ ’ -j(j / w£g = E’ - j £”c
(2.15)
It is shown that, in order to satisfy Maxwell circuital law in a real dielectric material,
the dielectric constant must attain a complex form to account for any loss mechanisms. By
26
analogy any other form of loss, such as polarization, we can define an effective loss factor
£”e f f as
£”e f f = e ”+ a / ( o e O
(2.16)
The complex dielectric constant can then be given by
e* = e’-je”eff
(2.17)
The ratio o f the effective loss factor to that of the dielectric constant
tan 8 = £”ef f / £ ’
(2.18)
is called the loss tangent of material.
2.2.4 Power Dissipated in Materials
Microwave heating involves the conversion o f electromagnetic energy into
h eat Energy is transported through dielectric material by means of electromagnetic waves.
The power flow through a closed surface can be calculated from the integration of the
Poynting vector [Johnk, 1976]
P = E x H (W/m2)
(2.19)
Therefore the power dissipated in a dielectric material can be calculated by the integration
of equation (2,19) over volume V:
Jv V- ( E x H ) d V = J s’ ( E x H)- d S ’
(2.20)
27
using the divergence theorem:
V • (E x H ) = (V x E> H - ( V x H > E
(2.21)
By definition the average power is
Pav = - 0/2) I s ’
Real <E x H > dS ’
(2.22)
The average power absorbed per unit volume P(W/m^), provides the following basis for
heating:
Pav = <oe0 e"(.ff | E0 R
(2.23)
where E q (V/m) is the magnitude of the internal field [Metaxas et al., 1983]. Equation
(2.23) shows that the power absorbed varies linearly with the frequency, the dielectric loss
factor, and varies with the square of the electric field.
2.2,5 Thermal Runaway of Materials
As was mentioned earlier, the principle of microwave heating is based on the fact
that the dielectric loss tangent of the materials increases rapidly with temperature. In
general, the rate of rise of temperature of a dielectric material, dT/dt, is proportional to its
heat input,
w £q
e"eff I E q P , but heat is conducted away from the material at a rate
proportional to a t v 2 t , where a t is the theimal diffusivity. Tan 8 initially will rise slowly
with increasing temperature, and then some critical point (Tcrjt) is reached. At temperatures
above Tcrjt, tan 5 rises very rapidly, which causes a condition of thermal runaway in a
28
microwave heated material. As tan 8
begins to increase rapidly, the material begins to
absorb microwave energy more efficiently, which also raises the temperature. This causes
tan 5 to rise even faster. The net result is an exponential increase (runaway) in temperature.
Thermal runaway is an important aspect of microwave heating. It can cause undesirable hot
spots within a material; it can also be used to heat materials at rapid rates.
2.3 Loss Tangent Measurement of Materials
To investigate the thermal runaway phenomena of glass and silicon carbide, the loss
tangent was measured as a function of temperature in the frequency range of 8 to 13 GHz.
A 15 cm square plate was placed vertically inside a resistively heated furnace. The furnace
has two microwave transparent but thermally insulating windows allowing the microwave
beam from two spot focusing antennas to pass through the furnace and heated sample. The
antennas are connected to a HP 8510B vector network analyzer, TRL calibration and time
dom ain gating are used to reduce system errors [Hollinger et al., 1991; Varadan et
al.,1991b]. The complex transmission coefficient is measured from which the dielectric
constant and loss tangent are computed. Figure 2.5 shows the rapid increase o f the
dielectric loss tangent of soda-lime-glass and silicon carbide at microwave frequencies. For
the soda-lime-glass, the high loss tangent above 300°C is due to the sodium ionic
conduction. This agrees with Meek and Blake's prediction [1986] and also explains how a
material with a low loss tangent at room temperature can be easily joined using microwave
power. The loss tangent of silicon carbide also increases with temperature. Therefore,
ceramics with both low and high loss tangents at room temperature can be heated up with
microwave power to high temperature.
29
0. 15-
0. 05-
o.oo.
0
100
200
300
400
500
600
temperature ( °C )
(a) Glass
Figure 2.5 Loss tangent as a function of temperature for (a) glass (b) SiC
30
loss tangent
Q 8 -T -
Q2- -
Q0- i i i i j i i i i 1 i i i i [ i i r 'r ri i i i I
is
SO
75
160
E5
ISO
temperature (°C )
(b) SiC
Figure 2.5 (Cont.)
r i >r l
175
ZD
31
2.4 Applications of Microwave Joining
In the 1980's, microwave energy has been successfully used to join similar
ceramics with or without an adhesive ceramic as summarized in Table 2.1. Microwave
heating has the potential for uniform, rapid heating since the energy is absorbed directly
inside the heated object, rather than being conducted in from the outside. The possibility
for this kind o f joining is to heat up the low dielectric loss ceramic to its thermal runaway
temperature region. As the ceramic reaches this region, the loss tangent will increase
exponentially with temperature. Because the energy absorbed by ceramic is proportional to
the loss tangent, it can be heated up to very high temperatures and joined in a short time if
the thermal runaway temperature is reached.
2.4.1 Multi-Mode Microwave Cavity Joining bv Meek and Blake H9861
Meek and Blake [1986] first bonded two plates of AI2 O 3 and A ^C ^-to-K ovar by
microwave heating using a mixture of glass sealing powders applied as a thin layer between
the plates. The process is shown in Figure 2.6. The powders contained a microwave
coupling material (watch oil) which is dependent upon the frequency, power and duration
of the microwave energy to be absorbed so the interlayer could be selectively heated and
rapidly fused. The joining specimens were placed in a conventional home-type (700W)
microwave oven with fibrous alumina insulation which provides good thermal insulation
while being “invisible” to microwave energy to be absorbed by the coupling agent. At full
power, the microwave energy is coupled to the organic material of the coupling agent and
to easily polarizable lead atoms present in the glass sealing material. As the watch oil
slowly rises in temperature, it causes the glass to also rise in temperature by convective heat
transfer from the microwave heated organic oil coupling agent. Eventually, the oil-glass
combination reaches the decomposition temperature (about 320°C) at which point glass
liquid phase occurs thus initiating microwave coupling directly to the glass sealing material.
Also at this temperature, higher frequency relaxation mechanisms predominate which
32
couple to the microwave radiation. The glass sealing material then reaches the temperatures
of 700°C to 800°C which causes chemical reaction at the interface and bonding is achieved
in 100 minutes. By using the x-ray analysis, it was discussed that the reaction o f the glass
sealing material forms a chemically different seal than that which would be formed by
conventional heating because it is formed by diffusion rather than by wetting of the
reactants. Also, the microwave process proves to be 8 times faster than conventional
joining processes and uses about 5 % of the energy.
2.4.2 Single-Mode Cavity Joining
A single-mode cavity as shown in Figure 2.7 can resonate with the desired
electromagnetic wave pattern (TE jq ^) in a rectangular cavity composed of a variable iris
combined with a movable end wall to compensate for the shift in the cavity resonant
frequency resulting from changes in the properties of the materials. The power is supplied
by a 2.45 GHz magnetron. The microwaves are directed through standard waveguides to a
microwave reflection bridge composed of a ferrite circulator, which sends any power
reflected from the cavity to a voltage sampling probe and power head for measurement.
High energy concentration on the joining area results in high efficiency for microwave
heating and joining.
The single-mode cavity was first used to join A ljO j-glass-A ^C ^ in place of
Meek’s multi-mode microwave oven [1986]. By placing the samples to be joined in a
region of high electric Held, joints equivalent to Meek’s A ^O j-g lass-A ljO j [1986] were
made with much less power (75W) and in much less time (10 minutes) [Palaith et
al.,1988].
Mullite was joined by the same single-mode cavity with microwave heating of the
ends of two rods butted together. The ceramic samples protrude through the broad walls of
the cavity at its geometrical center. Pressure is applied to the ends protruding outside the
cavity with a strain gauge measuring the pressure. Two Mullite rods were joined together
without any sintering aids at 1300°C in about 5 minutes [Palaith et al.,1988].
33
CERAMIC
SEALING
MATERIAL
COUPLING
AGENT
1
COMBINED
INSULATIVE
SURROUNDING
TEMPERATURE
AND TIME
CONTROLS
W MICROWAVE
FINISHED
PRODUCT
Figure 2. 6 Schematic diagram and flow chart of Meek and Blake’s [1988] microwave
joining.
Compressor
Acoustic probe
Magnetron
Circuta,<,r
i
.C avity
probe
circulator
Pow er heads
Power meters
Voltage
sampling probe
Vacuum
system
Strip chart reader
IR pyrometer
Figure 2.7 Palaith et al. [1988] single mode set-up.
co
-p*
35
From the characterization of the joined specimens, some useful features of
microwave joining of ceramics can be noted [Palaith et al.,1988]:
(a) Power consumption is minimal (100-300 watts) and time required is very short;
(b) Microscopic homogeneity is retained in the vicinity of the joint interface on the
scale of one micron;
(c) Tlie joined specimens exhibit greater strength than the as-received material;
(d) Test specimens do not fail at or near the joint, and the joint region is harder and
tougher than the balance of the specimen.
2.4.3 Single-Mode Microwave Cavity (6 GHzi Joining
Fukushima et al. [1988] used a computer-controlled single mode rectangular cavity,
shown in Figure 2.8, to self-join rods of A I 2 O 3 and Si 3 N 4 . The heating source is a
microwave oscillator with a klystron capable of amplifying the microwave power up to 3
kW. The cavity was designed to resonate the T E j q 3 mode when microwave power is
applied. A directional coupler was used for detecting the reflected power from the cavity;
also a Pt-Rh type thermocouple was used to calibrate the temperature. An adjustable iris
and plunger were used to tune the cavity to resonate with the joining specimens inside
during the process. By using the computer controlled technique, the heating rate of the
specimen could be set to a constant which produced a sound joint.
Alumina rods of 92% and 96% purity could be directly bonded without any
sintering aids. Maximum joint strengths, which were equal to the strength of the original
materials, were achieved at temperatures of 1750°C and above in 3 minutes. The bending
strength of joined 92% alumina rods was 420 MPa, which was retained at temperatures of
up to 800°C. The joining of high purity AI2 O 3 or Si3 N 4 rods required a thin layer of a
lower purity sheet placed in the joint prior to microwave heating. The silicon nitride
specimens required a nitrogen atmosphere for strong joints to occur. From the microscopic
observation, there was little difference in microstructure before and after joining. The
sintering aids in grain boundary phases were preferentially heated and melted or diffused.
Pyrometer
Microwave
oscillator
Sample
Waveguide
Attenuator
Klystron
0
Plunger
Directional
coupler
Pulse motor
Reflection
Ins control
Controller
Plunger control
nanpmmre
omputer
Figure 2.8 Fukushima et al. [1988] single-mode set-up.
Table 2.1 Summary o f M icrowave Joining o f Ceramics.
M A X IM U M P R O C E S S IN G
TEM P.
T IM E
(m in.)
(° C )
A P P L IE D
FRA CTU RE
P R E S SU R E STREN G TH
(M P a )
(% O R IG IN A L )
M A T E R IA L
IN T E R ­ JO IN IN G
LA Y ER M ETHOD
Alumina
(96%)
G lass
Diffusion
1450
100
No
Alumina
(92%)
No
Diffusion
1850
3
0 .6
100
Diffusion
1720
3
1.8
90
No
Diffusion
1300
3
1.2
100
No
Diffusion
1850
20
10
SN501
Diffusion
1720
6
6 .2
74
No
Diffusion
1300
9
iqq
Alumina
(99%)
Silicon
Nitride
(SN501)
Silicon
Nitride
(SN220)
Silicon
Nitride
(SN220)
Mullite
Alumina
4~5
?
20
38
2.5 Advantages of Microwave Heating
There are several potential benefits of using microwave energy to join materials, all
of which derive from the fact that the electromagnetic field penetrates the material and heats
internally. This leads to a rapid temperature rise, since one does not have to wait for the
heat to be conducted from the surface to the interior. It is quite clear that high quality joined
specimens of both oxide and non-oxide ceramics can be made in very short times using
modest microwave power and compression, with very little surface preparation. The
increased hardness and the scanning electron microscope (SEM) studies in the joint region
of the materials showing the microscopic homogeneity of the joint interface suggest a
joining mechanism: melting and diffusion of grain boundary phases.
The following characteristics and advantages of the microwave heating process
bode well for its eventual adoption in future research [Sutton, 1989]:
(a) Direct coupling (absorbing) of microwave creates volumetric heating
• Potential to heat large sections uniformly
• Reversed thermal gradients: surface cooler than interior
• Process materials at lower surface temperatures
• Rapid removal of water, binders, and gases without rupture or cracking.
• Internal stresses reduced by lower thermal gradients
• Heat in clean (pure) environment; air, controlled atmospheres, vacuum, or
pressure
• Control partial pressure of reactive gases for selective oxidadon/reduction
of certain phases
• Improvement of product quality, uniformity, and yields
• Instantaneous response to microwave power changes
• Lower thermal mass; precise and automated temperature control
39
(b) Dielectric losses (and heating) accelerate very rapidly with increasing
temperature above Tcrjt
• Ability to heat "transparent" materials above Tcrjt
• Very rapid processing (2 to 50 times faster than conventional)
• Densify materials rapidly with minimum grain growth
(accelerated sintering)
• Reduce process costs (time, energy, and labor)
• Ability to heat ceramics well above 2000°C
(in air, vacuum, or controlled atmospheres)
(c) Microwaves are polarized and coherent; location of maximum electric and
magnetic fields can be controlled
• Capability of high energy concentration in short times and in selected
regions
• Frequency and power level optimization for given material, size, and
shape
• Potential for process automation, flexibility, efficiency, and energy savings
• Precise heating of selected region, i e.,brazing or sealing of joints, fiber
drawing and plasma generation
• Acceleration of sintering and diffusion due to high electric fields; thus
densificadon at lower temperatures
(d) Differential microwave coupling of phases, additives, and constituents
leads to selective heating
• Synthesis of new materials and microstructures
• Heating of selected zones (brazing and sealing)
• Enhanced coupling of microwave transparent materials
• Use of fugitive coupling materials for preheating of otherwise transparent
materials
40
• Use of microwave coupling materials as shapes or containers to heat the
more transparent materials
• Superior control over state of oxidation through selective heating of
phases and control over oxygen partial pressure
41
Chapter 3
M ICROW AVE JO IN IN G O F M A TER IA LS
The use of microwave heating for joining ceramics can, generally, be divided into
three types depending on the properties o f materials. Low loss tangent materials, like
alumina, cannot absorb microwave energy very well at room temperature. Also, the thermal
runaway effect does not dominate until high temperatures. This kind of material can be
bonded together without an interlayer and is the first type of microwave joining. In the
second type of microwave joining high loss tangent materials, which are easily susceptible
to the thermal runaway effect are joined, or a conducting polymer composite is used as an
interlayer, to absorb the microwave energy and heat up fast. This is a localized heating
process at the interlayer. The third type is joining high loss tangent materials, like silicon
carbide, with a low melting temperature material as the interlayer. This type o f joining
applies to the microwave heating of high loss tangent ceramics with a reactive interlayer.
This solves the most difficult problem encountered in conventional joining, namely, thermal
expansion mismatch at the joining interface. What is emphasized here again is that, in all
three types, the ceramics are heated from the interior, not from the outer surface as with
conventional heating.
3.1 Joining of Low Loss Tangent Materials (First Type!
The first type involves the joining of two similar, low room temperature loss
tangent ceramics together as shown in Figure 3.1. In this type, the ceramic samples are
heated to a high temperature (~1600°C) when they are joined together. The joining process
is like melting the joining interfaces. The fracture strength of the joint can be as high as the
original ceramic fracture strength according to published results [Palaith, 1989 &
Fukushima, 1989]. The big problem with this method is the difficulty to reach and then
42
control the thermal runaway effect because of the steep slope of loss tangent vs.
temperature. Another problem is heating the ceramics with microwaves from room
temperature to the thermal runaway region. Because of the low loss tangent this may take
several minutes. As we know, the thermal runaway region may induce thermal microcracks
inside the material and should be avoided.
This method can be improved by surrounding the materials to be joined with a high
loss tangent material, like silicon carbide. The SiC will heat up fast and then radiate the heat
to the joining pieces. The joining pieces can then reach the thermal runaway temperature
easily and join.
Direction of
heat
Working region
Temperature
Force
Figure 3.1 First type of microwave joining (arrows indicate the directions of heat flow).
43
12_U se o f High Loss Tangent Materials as Interlavers (Second Type)
The second type of microwave joining is to join two, low room temperature loss
tangent ceramics by using a high-room-temperature loss tangent ceramic as an interlayer
which can reach the thermal runaway region easily with microwave heating as shown in
Figure 3.2. The microwave energy is absorbed easily by the interlayer and the heat is
conducted to the ceramic. With the localized heating on the interlayer, the thickness of
interlayer is not easy to optimize. If a thinner interlayer is used, it can not absorb heat
rapidly, w hile thicker interlayer will induce the same problem as the first type
(microcracks). Therefore the joined strength never reaches the original strength.
To solve the problem of this type, a high loss tangent, with low melting point
material, like soda-lime-silicate glass, can be used as the interlayer. The loss tangent of
soda-lime-silicate glass starts to increase exponentially around 300°C, and the glass
becomes soft around 500°C.
The localized heating idea with microwave heating has been successfully applied to
join thermoplastics [Varadan et al.,1991a]. There are two kinds of interlayers used for
joining thermoplastics. The first kind of interlayer is a conductive polymer composite. The
conductive polymer composite will heat up fast and melt, the thermoplastic around the
interfaces will also melt when heated by the conducting polymer. At that moment, if
pressure is applied, the melting interlayer mixed with melting thermoplastics will be
squeezed out of the interface. After cooling down, the thermoplastics are joined without
any interlayer remaining. Another kind of interlayer is using a high microwave coupling
liquid sprayed on the interfaces. The coupling liquid heats up the interfaces, reaches its
boiling temperature and then evaporates out. Since the boiling temperature of many
solvents is only around 100°C, the application can only be applied to low melting point
material joining, like thermoplastics. With careful design of the joining parameters (time,
pressure, power), there will not be much thermal expansion mismatch due to the interlayer.
44
Base material
f
1
.5
o
c
Interlayer
t/3
Working region
of interlayer
Base material
Temperature
Force
Figure 3.2 Second type of microwave joining (arrows indicate the directions of heat flow).
3.3 Joining of High Loss Tangent Materials (Third Type")
The third type is to join high loss tangent ceramics together at a lower temperature
(~1200°C). Some ceramics, like silicon carbide, have a high loss tangent even at room
temperature and a high thermal conductivity. Therefore, they are very easy to heat with
microwave power to high temperatures without damaging the samples. This is because the
high thermal conductivity of the ceramics conducts the heat to the surfaces where it can
escape and thus eliminates the temperature gradient. These properties o f ceramics can be
used to join them together with active metal as an adhesive. A1 metal has a low thermal
expansion coefficient and has been chosen as a candidate material to join engineering
ceramics because of its low melting temperature and possible chemical reaction with
ceramics in a conventional furnace [Iseki et al., 1984]. In the microwave heating, although
metals cannot absorb microwave energy due to their high conductivity, the heat generated
from the ceramics could heat up the metal by conduction. We can call this type a “ Selective
Heating” method. It can also be applied to join two totally different materials, such as
45
ceramic to metal, with microwave heating.
As mentioned earlier, the loss tangent of silicon carbide has a tendency to increase
with temperature (thermal runaway effect). It can be heated up internally to over 1000°C in
a very short time as shown in Figure 2.2 (b) and has been widely used as a susceptor to
preheat microwave sintering specimens [Yu et al.,1991; Janney et al.,1992]. Putting SiC
with metal together in the microwave field, the metal part will reflect the electromagnetic
waves and is not heated by the microwave field, only the SiC heats up. If the metal is in
contact with the SiC, the heat will conduct to it, and only the joining area on the metal is
heated up to make the bond. As mentioned in Chapter 1, the conventional joining method
has difficulty in making the temperatures of the joining pieces uniform, especially for
joining ceramic to metal which has a much higher thermal conductivity. Slowing down the
heating rate can reduce the temperature difference, but high cost plus a complex heating
cycle will come with it. This type of microwave joining can easily solve the conventional
joining problems. This avoids the problem on thermal expansion mismatch because the
bulk metal is not heated in the short time needed. Figure 3.3 shows the schematic diagram
and the directions of heat flow to metal with microwave power.
3.4 Experimental Procedure
3.4.1 Materials Characterization for Microwave Joining
The compositions of the materials used for microwave joining are shown in Table
3.1. The aluminum used as the adhesive contains 98.5 vol. % Al, 0.5 vol.% Fe and 1.0
vol.% Si. The surface roughness o f Al foil for interlayer was around 1 fim and the
thickness was 16 |xm before joining. To minimize the oxidation on the Al surface and avoid
contamination on all the surfaces, the Al was used immediately after cleaning in the
ultrasonic cleaner.
46
Force
Force
i
♦
SiC
Direction
of heat
SiC
Force
T
Force
Figure 3.3 Third type of microwave joining (Arrows indicate the heat flow).
47
Table 3.1 Materials Characteristics.
Aluminum:
98.5 vol.% Al, 0.5 vol.% Fe, 1.0 vol.% Si
Composites:
20 % carbon fiber reinforced glass matrix composite
Glass:
Soda-Lime-Silicate microscope slide glass
Glass-ceramic:
LAS (L i20A l203-Si02)
Si-SiC:
Siliconized silicon carbide
Bi-modal SiC grains with 11 vol.% free silicon metal
surrounded (Norton Co.,)
SA-SiC:
Hexoloy® alpha sintered silicon carbide
Submicron SiC powders mixed with 0.1-5 wt.%
boron and 0.1-2 wt. % carbon (Carborundum Co.,)
Commercial soda-lime-silicate glass and LAS (Li2 O-Al2 O 3 -Si0 2 ) glass-ceramic
were used in the study. The glass-ceramic process, discovered by Stookey and Armistead
[McMillan, 1964], is a technique by which many small crystals are grown in a glass in
order to transform the glass article to a fine-grained, fully dense polycrystalline ceramic.
Such ceramics generally have mechanical properties that are superior to the glasses from
which they were formed and they are much more stable at high temperatures. The
advantage of ceramics formed by this process is that they contain no porosity as is normally
encountered in conventionally processed polycrystalline ceramics. The process consists of
melting a glass and forming the desired shape, which is followed by crystallization using a
multi-temperature heat treatment.
Carbon fiber reinforced glass matrix composite is made by mixing 20% carbon
fiber with silicate glass as the matrix. The materials were combined in a twin screw
extruder. In this process, the glass matrix is first melted, then specific weight fraction of the
fiber and the glass matrix are mixed in the extruder. During the extrusion process, the two
materials are thoroughly mixed together and pushed towards a circular die. In the die, the
material cools and hardens into a small diameter cylinder. The cylinder is then chopped into
48
small pellets. The composite pellets are then melted for injection molding. During injection
molding, the melted material is injected into a mold with high pressure. The high pressure
helps to restrict the volume of voids in the final product. The composite then cools and
solidifies in the mold [Lubin, 1982],
Commercial, reaction bonded silicon carbide (Si-SiC) samples were made by
Norton Co., Worcester, Mass. The Si-SiC exhibits a bi-modal microstructure o f SiC
grains, the small grains range from 2 to 5 Jim and large grains range 100 to 150 pm. The
Si-SiC is manufactured by a slip casting process. The raw materials are milled and prepared
into slurry for slip casting. The slip is then cast into molds and removed for drying. The
green components undergoes the siliconization process where they are fired at temperatures
exceeding 1600°C to facilitate both the densification of the SiC and the infiltration of the
polycrystalline silicon metal. This material contains 11% by volume free silicon, and the
bulk density was 3.1 g/cm^. Si-SiC appears to contain no porosity, indicating a perfect
bonding and infiltration between the silicon and the SiC grains.
The sintered alpha silicon carbide (SA-SiC) is made by an extrusion process by
Carborundum. Hexoloy® alpha silicon carbide is produced by pressureless sintering the
ultra-pure submicron powder derived from the original Acheson process. The powder is
mixed with boron (~0.1-5.0 % by weight) and carbon (~0.1-2.0 % by weight) sintering
aids, then formed into complex shapes by a variety o f methods and consolidated by
sintering at a temperature above 2000°C. The material has a uniform microstructure with 25 pm sized grains and contains approximately 2-3 % porosity.
3.4.2 Sample Preparation
The dimension of the materials to be joined are summarized as shown in Figure 3.4
and Table 3.2. They can be divided into three groups: (a) rectangular block ceramic joined
to rectangular block ceramic with or without interlayer (b) silicon carbide tube joined to
49
silicon carbide tube with interlayer (c) silicon carbide tube joined to metal tube without
interlayer. All the joining interfaces were ground first with a 15 Jim grit diamond wheel
and then polished down to 1 Jim with diamond pastes. The surfaces were prepared parallel
to each other to avoid any mismatch between them. To minimize the oxidation on the metals
and avoid contam ination on all the surfaces, the samples thus prepared were used
immediately after cleaning in the ultrasonic cleaner.
After microwave joining, the specimens were cut perpendicular to the joined
interfaces with 320 grit diamond saw and gradually polished to 0.25 mm with diamond
pastes. After ultrasonic cleaning, the specimens were put in a desiccator and made ready for
the non-destructive evaluation.
Tf"H
^
j
Ceramic
p
Ceramic
Zeramir
Interlayer
Ceramic
(a)
I
■
Ceramic
(b)
Metal (Al)
(c)
Figure 3.4 Three groups of microwave joining (a) rectangular block ceramic joined to
rectangular block ceramic with or without interlayer (b) silicon carbide tube
joined to silicon carbide tube with interlayer (c) silicon carbide tube joined to
metal tube without interlayer.
50
Table 3.2 Dimensions of Microwave Joining Materials.
A
B
C
t
(mm) (mm) (mm) (mm)
Joining
material
Group
Si-SiC
(a)
30
20
6
SA-SiC
(a)
35
25
6
SA-SiC
(b)
SA-SiC
(c)
Composite
(a)
10
2
10
Glass-ceramic (a)
10
2
10
Aluminum
(interlayer)
(a)
30
Aluminum
(interlayer)
(b)
Aluminum
(0
Glass
(a)
D1
(mm)
45
D2
El
(mm) (mm)
E2
40
12
6
0.016
0.016
45
40
20
30
6
0.15
E3
(mm) (mir
12
9
51
3.4,3 Microwave Joining Systems
3,4.3.1 Multi-Mode Cavity
A multi-mode microwave power supply was used first for this application to find
the best technique for microwave joining. The multi-mode cavity used for joining samples
was a Kenmore 700 watt house-hold microwave oven as shown in Figure 3.5. The oven
contains a pulse power supply magnetron and a 12”x l 2 ” cavity. The rotating plate and
plastic parts in the cavity were removed. One small hole drilled from the top of the cavity is
designed to put a quartz tube and thermocouple into the cavity. A microwave leakage
detector was turned on whenever power was on to make sure the system was safe. The
oven was placed on two multi-jacks which can be adjusted to apply pressure on the
specimens. The pressure was added by increasing the height of the multi-jacks. The force
on the specimens was read on the weight scale below the multijacks. The temperature was
recorded by putting a thermocouple on the joining interface during heating.
Although the multi-mode microwave oven has non-uniform wave patterns in the
cavity, SiC has a high dielectric loss factor at room temperature and behaves like a sink to
absorb almost all the energy from the magnetron. Also, the samples are small compared to
the wavelength, so the field variations in the sample are small. For the low loss tangent
materials joining, the specimens can be surrounded by the SiC bars or put into a SiC
cylinder. The loss tangent of SiC increases with temperature (thermal runaway effect), and
the heat radiates to the joining specimens, once the thermal runaway region of the low loss
tangent specimens have been reached, then the specimens could heat up and join.
Force
_L
.cavity
c sramii:
Magnetron
(power supply)
c sramii:
Weight Scale
Figure 3.5 Multi-mode cavity for microwave joining.
53
3.4.3,2 Single-Mode Cavity
In preparation for single-mode cavity microwave joining, the specimens were
placed inside the center of a single mode copper cavity with microwave power supplied as
shown in Figure 3.7. The power was coupled to the cavity through a variable iris and tuned
to resonate at 2.45 GHz by an adjustable short. The electromagnetic wave pattern in the
rectangular cavity is TE jq j mode as shown schematically in Figure 3.6. Pressure was
applied to the specimen from outside the cavity through tubes on the broad sides of the
cavity. These tubes are designed to provide access to the cavity and are designed to have a
cut off frequency much higher than 2.45 GHz so there is no microwave leakage. The
whole process was conducted in air atmosphere during heating. When joining was done,
the power was turned off and the samples were cooled down to room temperature.
The heating history of SiC recorded on the joining interface by a pyrometer when
SiC was placed in single-mode cavity and by a thermocouple when placed in a multi-mode
cavity is shown in Figure 3.8.
b
x
Figure 3.6 Schematic diagram of standing waves (TE 1Q3 ) in a waveguide cavity where a
and b are the broad and narrow sides of the waveguide cross-section and dc is
along the z direction and represents the length of the cavity.
POWER
SOURCE
CONTROL
UN IT
FORCE
■
CAVITY
APPLICATOR
MAGNETRON
HEAD
0TO 3K W
2.45 G H Z
WAVEGUIDE
COUPLER
PYROMETER
71
VARIABLE
O
CERAMIC
SAMPLE
FORCE
Figure 3.7 Schematic diagram of single-mode cavity.
ADJUSTABLE
WAVEGUIDE
SHORT
55
Temperature (°C)
1200 -
800(a) Single-mode
(b) Multi-mode
400-
0
180
360
540
720
900
Time(Seconds)
Figure 3.8 Temperature profile of SiC placed in microwave cavities:
(a) Single-mode (b) Multi-mode.
56
Chapter 4
EVALUATION O F JO IN E D SP E C IM E N S
This chapter is concerned with the testing, characterization, and non-destructive
evaluation of the microwave joined specimens. The purpose of the testing is to provide a
basis to evaluate the joined specimen properties.
4.1 Optical Microscopy
Optical Microscopy is a primary analytical technique used to examine microstructure
with reflected light from the specimen surface. Optical microscopy is often well suited to
the characterization of grain structure, porosity, and identifying flaws and defects in
material surfaces [Bloss,1961].
4.2 Scanning Electron Microscopy
For the surface examination of the joined interfaces, scanning electron microscopy
(SEM) and electron microprobe techniques were performed. The SEM has a Robinson
backscatter detector and can image surface features in the pm range. In this instrument the
electron beam is brought to a fine focus on a very small region of the specimen and the
scattered electrons are collected on the fixed detector, the signal of which is fed to a
cathode-ray tube (CRT). The beam is swept across the surface of the specimen and the
CRT, which is synchronized with the beam, and traces an image of the specimen [Reimer,
1972].
57
4.3 Electron Microprobe analysis
Electron microprobe analysis provides the means o f determining the chemical
composition o f very small volumes at the joined interface. The name derives from the
essential feature of a fine electron beam which is directed at the point to be analyzed.The xrays generated by the incident beam are characteristic of the elements, and the intensity of
these x-rays is an approximately linear funcdon of concentration. The electron microprobe
consists of an electrooptical system which features an electron beam that is focused onto an
area about 1 |im in diameter on the surface of the specimen, a detection system which
measures the intensity of the characteristic radiation of the elements to be determined.
Scanning the beam over the specimen allows the distribution of chosen elements on the
surface of the specimen to be displayed as an enlarged image on the screen o f a CRT. If the
electron beam is swept across the surface while the x-ray detector is set to record a
wavelength characteristic of a particular element, a plot can be obtained on an oscilloscope;
brightness in the oscilloscope image corresponds to points in the specimen where the
elem ent is found in abundance. In addition, the slowing of the electrons produces a
continuous spectrum which constitutes a background upon which the characteristic lines are
superimposed [Mckinley, 1972].
4.4 Proof Testing
Joint strength measurements are needed to monitor the development of a joining
process. Conventional testing methods can be classified into tensile, bend and shear tests.
The strength is calculated by dividing the fracture load by the area of the joined surface.
The tensile and shear tests may not produce pure tensile or shear at the joint because of the
hold-down forces or thermal contraction in different material configurations, both of which
can affect the joined strength. Furthermore, it is very difficult and expensive to machine
specimens and grip then without causing damage. For those reasons, strengths of joined
58
specimens are often determined by bend tests. In bend tests, the stress is not uniform but
one considers the strength in terms o f the maximum tensile stress being applied. This
maximum stress occurs in some region along one of the outer surfaces of the specimen. In
this way, fracture is generally biased to flaws at or near the outer surface. Three and four
point bend tests are two common methods to determine the joint strengths.
4.4.1 Three Point Bending Test
Most of the three-point bending test fracture specimens can be classified into three
types according to fracture paths as shown in Figure 4.1 which can approximately tell the
joined strength [Suganuma et al., 1986]. The first type of fracture path consists of a ductile
fracture plane within the interlayer (metal) and a brittle fracture plane within the ceramic.
Figure 4.1(A) shows this type fracture path. The joint strength o f this type could have at
least 80 % of the original ceramic strength. Type B and Type C are similar to each other but
the strength o f type B is higher than that of type C. Differing from type A, the fracture
paths of both types are limited within a narrow region near the interface.
Ceramic
Ceramic
(A)
(B)
(C)
Figure 4.1 Three types of fracture paths (A) high strength joints (B) medium strength
joints, and (C) low strength joints.
59
4.4.2 Four Point Bending Test
Up to now there are no national or international standards specifying loading
conditions, shapes and dimensions of the specimens, but symmetrical specimens of
rectangular cross sections are usually preferred. Using elastic beam theory [Beer &
Johnston,1976], the flexural joined strength of sandwich specimens of rectangular cross
section as shown in Figure 4.2 can be determined from the fracture load F and the
specimen dimensions from the equation:
Gf = 3FD/B2W
(4.1)
Where Gf (MPa) is fracture strength, F (N) is the fracture load, W (mm.) and B (mm.) are
the width and height of the specimen, and D (mm.) is the difference between inner span
and outer span. This formula which is used often assumes the material to be elastic (the
load-displacement behavior needs to be linear).
F
Joined interface
Figure 4.2 Schematic diagram of the four point test.
60
4.4.3 Two Parameter Weibull Approach
The strength distribution of ceramics can often have a large standard deviation and
thus it is often important to know the form of this distribution. An empirical distribution
that has become very popular is the two parameter Weibull distribution and is based on a
specimen at its weakest link. This distribution can be written in the form
ln(l/(l-F))=K V ( Gf/o 0 )m
(4.2)
where m is the Weibull modulus, Oq is die characteristic strength, Of is the fracture strength
o f specimen, V is the factor of volumetric flaws, K is a geometry factor, and F is the failure
probability which can be determined by different ranking procedures based on the fracture
stress. The failure probability is determined by
F = (n -0 .5 )/N
(4 .3 )
where n is the rank number o f the specimen from lowest to highest stress and N is the total
number of specimens tested. By calculating F and measuring the maximum stress at
fracture (i.e., a,^), the Weibull modulus can be determined from the slope of a best fit
linear regression o f a lnln (1/1-F) vs. In o m plot as seen in Figure 4.3. One can also
determine the characteristic strength ( oq) by setting the failure probability (F) equal to
63.2% .
K is a factor that depends on the loading geometry in the strength test. For the case
of uniform tension, the entire volume of the specimen is loaded in tension; thus, K = l. If a
specimen is loaded in any other manner besides uniform tension, K will be less than unity.
Oq is a normalizing constant called the characteristic strength which represents the strength
61
where the cumulative failure distribution equals zero. This always occurs at a probability of
failure equal to 63.2%. The parameter m is generally called the W eibull modulus which
represents the degree of variability in the flaw population. Values of m for ceramics are
generally in the range 5 to 20. The width of the strength distribution decreases as m
increases. As we see from equation (4.2), the strength of a specimen failing at a particular
failure probability depends of the loading and the specimen size. The equation assumes
failure can occur from anywhere in the body (volumetric flaws). If failure occurs only from
surface flaws, V in equation (4.2) is replaced by A, an area term.
- - .999
-
.632
|
ce
©
L.
&©
U
3
•M
3
fc
- ■ .007
LN (Maximum Strength)
12
Figure 4.3 Schematic of Weibull strength distribution plot.
4.5 Ultrasonic Non-Destructive Method (Scanning Acoustic Microscopy)
W hen the properties of a material are sensitive to overall structural features,
measurements of sound velocity or ultrasonic attenuation can be used for NDE. The
ultrasonic detection and characterization of individual interior defects, such as voids,
cracks, and inclusions in the size range of 20 to 100 pm, in ceramics usually require the
use of high frequency, high resolution techniques. These techniques are generally referred
to as acoustic microscopy. Most conventional ultrasonic NDE is based on the transmission
or back-reflection of ultrasonic waves to generate an acoustic image of a defect or second
phase, with the contrast depending on the acoustic mismatch between the different media
(Figure 4.4).
Reflected ^
Incident
^
~ ~
Transmitted
*
medium 1
medium 2
(a)
medium 1
\ ]
X
medium 2
►
I
defect
back wall
(b)
Figure 4.4 Reflection and transmission of sound waves, (a) Transmission and reflection of
sound waves at an interface (b) reflection of sound waves at a defect.
63
The need to detect defects on or near the surface has attracted methods based on the
recently developed acoustic microscope in which the images are formed by the interaction
of sound waves with the specimen. Acoustic Microscopy is the general term applied to high
resolution, high frequency ultrasonic inspection techniques which produce images of
features beneath the surface of a specimen. Because ultrasonic energy requires continuity of
materials to propagate, internal defects such as voids, inclusions, delamination and cracks
interfere with the transmission and (or) reflection of ultrasonic signals. The image contrast
results from the differences in the elastic properties o f the various constituents in the
specimen and can thus yield quite different information from the conventional optical
microscope [Gilmore et al., 1987].
In the scanning acoustic microscope (Figure 4.5) the ultrasonic beam is focused on
the surface by refraction through the coupling media and either the lens or specimen can be
scanned to build up an image from the reflection of longitudinal waves back into the
coupling media. Contrast is brought about through variations in the reflection coefficients
across the sample. This method is receiving increasing attention in the NDE field and
shows great promise because it has advantage over optical microscope o f penetrating
slightly into the material.
Imaging system
High-frequency
pulse
Transducer
Coupling med
(water)
Specimen
Figure 4.5 Scanning Acoustic Microscope (SAM)
64
Chapter 5
R E SU L T S AND D ISC U SSIO N
Microwave power was successfully applied to join materials as discussed in chapter
3. Joined silicon carbide joining specimens were then chosen for the destructive and non­
destructive evaluations to check the joined specimens qualities. Optical and Scanning
Electron Microscopy (SEM) were performed to check the uniformity of interfaces on the
surfaces. Chemical reaction and element diffusion along the interfaces were detected by the
electron microprobe technique which could image the elements at the joined interface.
Fracture strength and fracture flaws along the joined interfaces were also tested by four
point and three point bend tests. Statistical analysis of joined SA-SiC and joined Si-SiC
fracture strengths were performed with the two parameter Weibull approach. Scanning
Acoustic Microscopy (SAM) examination beneath the joined interface can provided a more
complete evaluation of the microwave joined silicon carbides.
5.1 Optical Micrographs of Microwave Joined Specimens
Table 5.1 summarizes the joining conditions for silicon carbide joined to itself and
other materials. Figure 5.1 (A) to Figure 5.1 (F) are the typical optical micrographs taken at
the joined interfaces. Uniform interfaces without any cracks were observed for these
specimens.
65
Table 5.1 Summary of Materials Joined with Multi-Mode Microwave Cavity.
MATERIAL
INTER­
LAYER
PROCESSING
TIME (Min.)
APPLIED
PRESSURE
(MPa)
APPLIED
POWER
(Watt)
Composite/Si-SiC
No
10
0.034
450
Glass-ceramic/Si-SiC
No
20
2.0
450
Si-SiC/Si-SiC
Glass
2
1.0
450
Si-SiC/Si-SiC
A1
5
1.2
450
SA-SiC/SA-SiC
A1
10
1.24
700
SA-SiC/Al
No
1
No
700
(B)
Figure 5.1 Optical micrographs of polished (A) Composite / Si-SiC and
(B) Glass-ceramic / Si-SiC interfaces showing uniform joining.
Arrows indicate the joined interfaces.
(D)
Figure 5.1 Optical micrographs of polished (C) Si-SiC/glass / Si-SiC and
(D) Si-SiC/Al /Si-SiC interfaces showing uniform joining.
Arrows indicate the joined interfaces.
68
(F)
Figure 5.1 Optical micrographs of polished (E) S A-SiC/Al / SA-SiC and
(F) SA-SiC/Al interfaces showing uniform joining.
Arrows indicate the joined interfaces.
69
5.2 Scanning Electron Microscope and Electron Microprobe Analysis
5,2.1 Si-SiC/Al/Si-SiC
Figure 5.2 shows the SEM and electron microprobe photographs of Si-SiC/Al/SiSiC. From the variation of A 1 composition across Si-SiC/Al/Si-SiC detected by electron
microprobe, no reaction layer between silicon carbide grain and aluminum could be
detected. While aluminum and the free silicon phase in Si-SiC formed a continuous liquid
phase at high temperature, in addition to the microwave heating enhanced diffusion, A1
penetrates (diffuses) into the Si phase deeply but not into SiC grains. No cracks were
formed at the interface, which could be attributed to the short heating dme.
(a)
(b)
Figure 5.2 Photographs of Si-SiC/Al/Si-SiC interface on the same position by (a) SEM
(dark phases shows the SiC grains), (b) electron microprobe image of A 1 at
the interface (A1 diffused into the Si but not the SiC grains).
Arrow indicate the joined interface.
70
5.2.2 SA-SiC/Al/SA-SiC
Figure 5.3 shows the SEM and electron microprobe photographs of SA-SiC/Al/SASiC interface. Since the SA-SiC contains only SiC, no silicon phase as in Si-SiC, a layer of
chemical reaction product A ^ C j ^ j (3SiC(g) + 4A 1^ -» Al^Cj^g^ +3Si(sp was formed at
the interface. Although the joint appears good, the weak fracture strength (152 MPa) and
high tendency to absorb water of the AI4 C 3 layer [Iseki et al., 1983] at room temperature
make the SA-SiC/Al/SA-SiC joint strength very low (195 MPa). This has been shown by
the four point bending test, only 50% o f original strength was reached by joined SASiC/Al/SA-SiC.
(a)
(b)
Figure 5.3 Photographs of SA-SiC/Al/SA-SiC interface on the same position by (a)
SEM (b) electron microprobe image of Al at the interface (A layer of
AI4 C 3 compound). Arrow indicates the joined interface
71
5,3 Three Point Bending Test Results
Joined Si-SiC's specimens were indented on the interfaces for three-point bend test
to estimate strength from the direction of the fracture paths. The typical three-point bending
Si-SiC fracture specimen shows in Figure 5.4 that the joint has the same fracture path as
type (A) of Figure 4.1, the fracture path still flowed into the base material which indicates
at least 80 % of the original strength.
2 0 0 >’
200
Figure 5.4 Fracture path for the three-point bend test of Si-SiC. Arrows indicate the
joined interface.
72
5.4 Four Point Bending Test Results
Original Si-SiC's without microwave joining and joined Si-SiC's were cut into
rectangular bars of dimension 1.5 x 2.0 x 30 mm 3 as shown in Figure 5.5 (a) for the fourpoint bending tests. For SA-SiC’s joined, the original and sandwich joined specimens
were cut into 5 x 5 x 50 mm^ bars for the four point bending tests as shown in Figure 5.5
(b). All the tensile surfaces for testing were polished down to 1 |im and edges were
beveled to remove any surface crack flaws caused by machining of the testing bars. Ten
original Si-SiC and SA-SiC bars and 10 joined Si-SiC and SA-SiC bars were fractured
separately, using an Instron test machine in air atmosphere at a cross head speed of 0.5
mm/min.
Typical fracture path of the Si-SiC four-point bend test is shown in Figure 5.6. For
the four point-bend tests, all the joined specimens fractured away from the interface but
still in the inner span. The Si-SiC/Al/Si-SiC interface has a deep diffusion o f Al into the Si
phase to make continuously mixed phases; however, the SA-SiC contains a chemical
reaction layer of A ^ C j ^ at the interface, and as was pointed out earlier the compound
AI4 C 3 has a tendency to be corroded by water and weak fracture strength (152 MPa) at
room temperature [Iseki et al., 1983]. The fracture path o f the SA-SiC was along the
AI4 C 3 layer as shown in Figure 5.7, the joined strength compared to the original material
strength is quite different.
73
1.5 mm
Si-SiC
Si-SiC
1.5 mm
25 mm
(a) Si-SiC
4.5 mm
SA-SiC
SA-SiC
4.0 mm
13 mm
39 mm
(b) SA-SiC
Figure 5.5 Schematic diagram of SiC four-point bending test (a) Si-SiC (b) SA-SiC.
74
200 ^im
Figure 5.6 Fracture path of four-point bending fracture Si-SiC specimen.
Figure 5.7 Fracture path of four-point bending fracture SA-SiC specimen.
76
Microwave heating enhanced the chemical reaction between Al and SA-SiC and the
resulting compound AI4 C 3 layer has weaken the joined strength. Suitable interlayers which
can react with SA-SiC and produce a strong compound should be chosen to solve the
problem.
5.5 Statistical Analysis of the Fracture Strength of Si-SiC and SA-SiC
The two parameter Weibull modulus plot was used for statistically analyzing the
fracture strengths of joined Si-SiC's and SA-SiC’s. Results from the two parameter
Weibull statistical approach are shown in Figure 5.8 and Tabe 5.2 for Si-SiC's. The joined
specimen reached 100% of original Si-SiC strength due to the deep diffusion of Al metal.
This data proves that the interface has a higher strength than the Si-SiC. The average
fracture strength o f SA-SiC’s is 194.4 MPa which is only 50% of original SA-SiC strength
as shown in Figure 5.9 and Table 5.3. This is due to the chemical reaction between Al and
SiC; a weak layer containing AI4 C 3 was formed at the interface.
77
Fracture Strength (MPa)
200.3
- i.
»
244.7
270.4
original
joined
£
Ln Strength (MPa)
Figure 5.8 Weibull plots of four-point bend strength of original and joined Si-SiC
fracture strengths.
Table 5.2 Comparison of Original and Joined Si-SiC Mechanical Properties.
Specimen
Configuration
Average
Weibull
Strength (MPa) Modulus (m)
Standard
Deviation
Characteristic
Strength (Oq)
Original
215.4
15.1
17
2 2 2 .2
Joined
219.4
14.2
18
225.6
78
Fracture Strength (MPa)
164
r
200.3
244.7
El
Joined SA-SiC
El
□
IQ □
□
i
-
2
□
'
-3-
IS
□
4.9
5.1
5.3
5.5
5.7
Ln Strength (MPa)
Figure 5.9 Weibull plots of four-point bend strength of joined SA-SiC fracture
strengths.
Table 5.3 Joined SA-SiC Mechanical Properties
Specimen
Configuration
Weibull
Average
Strength (MPa) Modulus (m)
Standard
Deviation
Characteristic
Strength ( o q )
Joined
194.4
46
213
5.1
79
5.6 Scanning Acoustic Microscopy
Due to the specimen preparation, damage always happens on the surface. So,
Scanning Acoustic Microscopy (SAM) was used to examine the microwave joints beneath
the surface. A high frequency transducer (400 MHz) was applied. Figure 5.10 shows the
joined interface beneath the surface. The colors on the micrographs tell the relative
amplitude of reflected waves; for example, if black is shown on the image micrograph, it
tells that a defect exists. Also the resolving power of the transducer is 2.5 |Lim, any defects
or cracks larger than 2.5 (im can be detected and shown on the image micrograph. There
were no defects or cracks detected in the microwave joints; sound joints beneath the
surface were achieved with microwave heating.
80
Figure 5.10 (A) Scanning Acoustic Micrograph of the Si-SiC/glass/Si-SiC joined interface.
Arrows indicate the joined interface.
Figure 5.10 (B) Scanning Acoustic Micrograph of the Si-SiC/Al/Si-SiC joined interface.
Arrows indicate the joined interface.
82
Figure 5.10 (C) Scanning Acoustic Micrograph of the SA-SiC/Al/SA-SiC joined interface.
Arrows indicate the joined interface.
Figure 5,10 (D) Scanning Acoustic Micrograph of the SA-SiC/Al joined interface.
Areows indicate the joined interface.
84
Chapter 6
C O N C L U S IO N S
The main objective of this investigation was to apply microwave heating to join
materials. 2.45 GHz microwave frequency single-mode and multi-mode cavities were
designed to join the materials. Measurements of the loss tangents of soda-lime-silicate glass
and sintered a silicon carbide (SA-SiC) were performed with HP8510B Network Analyzer
to prove the loss tangent of ceramics can increase rapidly with temperature above some
temperatures - thermal runaway effect, which is the key for microwave heating.
Three types o f microwave heating to join materials have been proposed. Combined
with the idea for conventional joining of silicon carbide, the third type of microwave
joining has been pointed out as the best way to join silicon carbide.
Dissimilar material joints (Composite/Si-SiC, Glass-ceramic/Si-SiC, and Al/SASiC) with or without applied pressure have been achieved in minutes. Optical micrographs
and SEM show uniform joining interfaces.
Similar ceramics joining with interlayers (Si-SiC/glass/Si-SiC, Si-SiC/Al/Si-SiC,
and SA-SiC/Al/SA-SiC) were also joined with microwave power. The Si-SiC/glass/Si-SiC
interface has no bubbles (CO 2 , CO) produced at the interface which cannot be achieved by
conventional heating with glass as interlayer. Optical micrograph also shows the sound
joint.
Reaction bonded silicon carbide (Si-SiC) joined to itself with aluminum as an
interlayer was done in a multi-mode cavity. Three and four point bending tests were
performed to test the fracture behavior of the joints. From the fracture flaw observation of
three point bending test, the Si-SiC/Al/Si-SiC has very high joint strength. Also the four
point bending fracture test shown that the Si-SiC/Al/Si-SiC fracture specimens were broken
away from the joined interface; interface strength equal to the original base material is
85
proved. With the two parameter Weibull approach, the joined Si-SiC/Al/Si-SiC has reached
the same parameters as the original material. High joined strength is due to the diffusion of
Al metal into the Si phase of Si-SiC. Electron microprobe analysis has proved this
phenomenon at the joined interface.
Sintered a silicon carbide (SA-SiC) was also joined to itself with Al as the
interlayer. Although a uniform joint was made, the chemical reaction between Al and SiC
produced an AI4 C 3 compound which is much weaker than the SA-SiC, and only 43% of
original SA-SiC strength was reached. Electron microprobe examination on the interface
has shown the image of chemical reaction layer between SA-SiC and Al.
Sintered a silicon carbide (SA-SiC) joined to Al metal was also achieved in this
study. Due to the high thermal conductivity of SA-SiC, the joining can be done in a very
short time.
The most modem technology, Scanning Acoustic Microscope (SAM), was used to
examine the joined interface beneath the surface. Since the detection is beneath the surface,
more confident conclusions about the joints can be made. Si-SiC/glass/Si-SiC, SiSiC/Al/Si-SiC, SA-SiC/Al, and SA-SiC/Al/SA-SiC near the surface of the joints have very
uniform interfaces, no defects can be detected by SAM, a sound joint is achieved with
microwave heating.
The main conclusions of the investigation can be summarized as follows:
• The problems with conventional heating to join material can be solved with
microwave heating.
• Ceramics can be heated up in a short time with minimal microwave power
supplied.
• High loss tangent ceramics, such as silicon carbide, have high heating rates
when placed in a microwave cavity.
86
* Microwave joining of silicon carbide to itself or other materials can be
achieved.
• The Si-SiC/Al/Si-SiC joint has reached the original Si-SiC strength due to
the “microwave enhanced diffusion” effect.
•The SA-SiC/Al/SA-SiC joint strength is only 43% of original SA-SiC strength
due to the “microwave enhanced chemical reaction” which produces a weak
layer compound.
87
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Polymer Engineering and Science. Mid-April. Vol.31. No.7 (1991a).
Varadan, V.V., Hollinger, R.D., Ghodgaonkar, D.K., and Varadan, V.K., “ Free-Space,
Broadband M easurem ents of High-Temperature, Complex Dielectric Properties at
Microwave Frequencies.” IEEE Trans. Instrumen. Meas. Vol. 40, No. 5 (1991b).
Yajima, S., Okamura, K., Shishido, T., Hasegawa, Y., Matsuzawa, T.,"Joining of
SiC to SiC using Polyborosiloxane," pp. 253, J. Am. Ceram. Soc.. Vol. 60, No 2(1981)
Yiin, T. Y„ Varadan, V.V., Varadan, V. K. and Conway, J. C., “ Microwave Joining of
Si-SiC/Al/Si-SiC." Ceramic Transactions. Vol. 21, pp 507-514 (1991).
Wolfenden, A., Harmouche, M. R., “Dynamic Young’s Modulus Measurements in
Metallic Materials: Results of an Interlaboratory Testing Program.” Journal of Testing and
Evaluation. JTEVA. Vol. 17, No. 1, Jan. (1989), pp. 2-13.
Yu, X. D., Varadan, V. V. and Varadan, V. K., “Application of Microwave Processing to
Simultaneous Sintering and Joining of Ceramics,” Ceramic Transactions. Vol. 21, pp 497506 (1991).
Zdaniewski, W.A., Conway, J.C., and Kirchner, H.P., “Effect of Joint Thickness and
Residual Stresses on the Properties of Ceramic Adhesive Joints,” J. Am. Ceram. Soc. ,
70[2], pp. 104-118 (1987).
91
Appendix
S P E C IF IC A T IO N S F O R E N G IN E E R IN G C E R A M IC S U SIN G
B A RIU M ST R O N T IU M TITA N ATE (BST) AS AN E X A M PL E
Knowledge of accurate values for the properties of ceramics becomes indispensable
for their utilization in engineering design. The designer often needs to know or be warned
that the quoted values are valid over specified ranges o f temperature, pressure, mechanical
stress (including cycling), and chemical environment. Mechanical and thermal properties of
Barium Strontium Titanate (BST) were evaluated by different test methods as a specific
example. We tried to apply or develop reliable tests which sim ulate the working
environmental conditions of the actual component where strength predictions are to be
made. This can be an almost impossible task since com ponents used in industrial
applications often experience very complex states which cannot be accurately simulated in
laboratory experiments. Therefore, American Standard Test M ethods (ASTM ) are
performed to provide a data base by which to assess the strength of Barium Strontium
Titanate under known conditions. The coverage of the test methods and results in this
chapter serves to give some insight into the determination of property information in order
to provide comment on the quality of Barium Strontium Titanate (BST).
A .l Grain Size fASTM El 121
The sintered ceramic specimen surface was first ground to 50 pm surface
roughness and followed by automatic polishing down to 0.5 |im surface roughness using
SiC sand papers or diamond pastes. After the polishing treatments, the specimen was flat,
smooth, and free from physical imperfections. In order to fully reveal the microstructure of
the specimen, a further treatment of thermal etching was required. The bonding of atoms,
92
ions, or molecules is weaker at exposed positions such as grain boundaries and
imperfections; therefore etching first initiates at these locations yielding a delineation of the
microstructure. Thermal etching was performed at 50°C below the ceramic sintering
temperature for 10 minutes. After cooling down to room temperature, ceramic specimen
was ultrasonically cleaned in acetone and gold coated to prevent charging during the surface
examination. The gold coating was done by sputtering in a low vacuum chamber. The SEM
examination has a Robinson backscatter detector and can imagine the surface up to |am
range. Figure A .l shows the typical SEM picture of BST which has grain size around 7.4
[im.
Figure A .l Scanning Electron Micrograph showing the grain size of BST.
93
A.2 Dynamic Elastic Modulus Measurements fASTM-C7691
A.2.1 Objective and Background
The objective is to measure the Young’s elastic modulus (E), shear modulus (|i),
Bulk modulus (B) and Poisson’s ratio (v) of ceramic using the ultrasonic method [ASTMC769]. In engineering and science the elastic modulus is of fundamental and technological
importance. It has applications in areas such as load-deflection, buckling, thermoelastic
stresses, fracture mechanics, creep, interatomic potentials, lattice defects, thermodynamic
equations o f state, free energy and thermal expansion.
When a stress (force/aiea) is applied to a material, it gives rise to a strain (change in
volume or shape). The strain is actually caused by stretching of the atomic bonds in the
solid and in some materials the atoms may move relative to each other. For solids, there is
usually some range of stresses over which the deformation of the materials is elastic, i.e.
the deformation is reversible. In a linear elastic material the stress (a) is proportional to the
strain ( e), g =E e, where E is the elastic constant known as Young’s modulus. The
properties of a material under applied shear and pressure are described by the shear
modulus (|i) and the bulk modulus (B). The Poisson’s ratio (v) is defined as the negative
ratio of the transverse strain to axial strain [Kingery et al., 1976]. For an isotropic material,
we only need two elastic constants to describe their behavior. The magnitude of the elastic
constants depends on the strength and density of the atomic bonds in a material.
A.2.2 Velocity of Ultrasonic Wave Pulses
For ultrasonic wavelengths less than the dimensions of the specimens, two normal
modes of wave propagation in isotropic media prevail. They are the longitudinal and shear
94
modes, with respective velocities
and Vs. Longitudinal waves, sometimes referred to as
com pressional waves, alternately compress and dilate the material lattice (generate
compressive and tensile strains) as they pass by. The resulting particle motion o f the
material is parallel to the direction of wave propagation. Shear waves, on the other hand,
generate particle displacements perpendicular to the propagation direction, causing the
material lattice to shear as the waves pass by. The wave speed V in the specimen is
determined by measuring the transit time t of an ultrasonic pulse over a known path L in the
specimen, and by calculating V=L/t. The ultrasonic velocity measurements are made at a
frequency of 5 MHz for longitudinal and 10 MHz for transverse waves, with higher
frequency being used for shorter path length. All measurements are made at a room
tem perature of 21°C [W olfenden et al., 1989], Figure A.2 illustrates the principal
components used for a majority of the measurements. A pulser/receiver unit transmits a
very short spike voltage to a traducer, generating a broad-band ultrasonic wave of short
duration. The transducer converts the excitation into a mechanical oscillation or sound wave
which is coupled into the specimen to propagate at the sound velocity. The coupling is
significantly enhanced by using a thin layer (much less than an ultrasonic wavelength) of
liquid. Commercially available transducers have a casing that houses a piezoelectric element
and often an impedance matching circuit, which are designed for convenient electrical
attachment to the pulser/receiver via coaxial cable and standard connectors. After entering
the specim en, the ultrasonic pulse echoes back and forth between the faces o f the
specimens, while constantly decaying in amplitude due to scattering, absorption, and
boundary interface losses. Each time the wave pulse is incident at the traducer/specimen
interface, a portion of the elastic wave energy is converted into a electrical signal by the
transducer. The received signal is then amplified and displayed on an oscilloscope so that
the transit time measurements can be made. Electronic techniques exist to automate the
measurements with direct computer control. The accuracy of these measurements depends
on the dimensions of the specimen (path length, end-face parallelism, etc.), the particular
ultrasonic coupling technique, and the signal-to-noise ratio. Typically, the accuracy for
these transit time measurements is ± 0.1 % or better. The densities of the specimens for this
95
study were determined by the Archimedes method, by which the density of the specimen is
measured relative to that of distilled water.
From these two wave speeds and the density p, all the elastic parameters of the
material can be calculated:
Young's modulus = p Vs2 (3V ^ 2 - 4 Vs2) / (
-
Vs2 )
(A. 1)
Bulk modulus = p ( V L2 -(4/3) Vs2)
(A.2)
Shear modulus= p Vs2
(A.3)
Poisson'sratio= (V L 2 -2V S2 ) / ( 2V L 2 -2V S2 )
(A.4)
where
= Longitudinal wave speed in the specimen and Vs = Shear wave speed in the
specimen. The elastic constants of seven BST specimens were determined as shown in
Table A .l.
PULSER/RECEVER
SCOPE
TRANSIT
TIME
TESTING SAMPLE
Figure A.2 Ultrasonic velocity measurement system with direct contact of transducer
on specimen.
Table A .l Measured Elastic Constants of 7 BST Specimens and the Average.
Density
vs
Vl
Young
Bulk
Shear
(g/cm3)
(m/s)
(m/s)
(GPa)
(GPa)
(GPa)
5.14
4342
7076
232.14
128.13
96.89
0 .2 0
5.20
4796
7534
277.06
135.55
119.49
0.16
5.01
3808
6527
180.57
116.64
72.69
0.24
5.08
3966
6599
194.59
114.76
79.92
0 .2 2
5.10
3947
6818
198.27
131.11
79.44
0.25
5.13
3769
6529
182.25
121.59
72.89
0.25
5.16
3700
6068
170.11
95.81
70.64
0 .2 0
Poisson
BST Elastic Constant Averages With Standard Deviation
Density
gm/cm3
5.12±0.06
Elastic modulus
GPa
185.2±37.4
Shear modulus
GPa
75.1±17.8
Bulk modulus
GPa
116.0±17.8
Poission’s ratio
0.23±0.03
97
A.3 Water Absorption. Bulk Density. Apparent Porosity and Apparent Specific Gravity
of Ceramic TASTM-C201
A.3.1 Significance
Measurement of density, porosity, and specific gravity is a tool for determining the
degree of maturation of ceramic. These properties are widely used in the evaluation and
comparison of product quality and as part of the criteria for selection, or for determining
structural properties that may be required for a given application. The test method is a
standard method suitable for use in quality control, research and development, establishing
criteria for and evaluating compliance with specifications, and providing data for design
purposes.
A.3,2 Procedure and Results
First of all, 10 ceramic specimens are dried to constant weight by heating them to
105~110°C in a oven, followed by cooling in a desiccator. Then the dry mass (D) is
determined with a weight scale balance. The next step is to place the specimens in a pan of
distilled water and boil for 5 hours, making sure the specimens are covered with water at all
times and not in contact with the heated bottom of the container. After the boiling period,
the test specimens are cooled to room temperature while still completely covered with water
for a minimum o f 24 hours. For determining the suspended weight (S), the specimens are
placed in a wire loop that is suspended from one arm o f the balance. The balance is
previously counter-balanced with the wire in place and immersed in water to the same depth
as is used when the specimens are in place. After determining the suspended weight, each
specimen is lightly blotted with a cotton cloths to remove all drops of water from the
surface and then the saturated weight (W) is determined.
The average results of water absorption, bulk density, apparent porosity and
apparent specific gravity of BST were calculated for ten BST specimens based on the
98
definitions and the formula as shown in Table A.2.
Table A.2 Water Absorption, Bulk Density, Apparent Porosity and Apparent Specific
Gravity of BST Averaged for 10 Specimens.
Name
Unit
Formula
Result
Dry Weight (D)
g
D
0.7455
Suspended Weight (S)
g
S
0.6083
Saturated Weight (W)
g
W
0.7469
Exterior Volume (V)
cm ^
w-s
0.14
\folume of open pores
cm-*
W-D
1.4x10-3
\blum e of impervious portion
cm-*
D-S
0.14
Apparent Porosity (P)
%
(W-D)xl00/V
1 .0 1 ± 0 .0 2
Water Absorption (A)
%
(W-D)x 100/D
0.18±0.01
Bulk density (B)
g/cm^
D/V
5.38±0.06
D / (D-S)
5.43±0.05
Apparent Specific Gravity CD
Theoretical Density
g/cm^
5.6
99
A,4 Hardness Test of Ceramic TASTM-E18& ASTM-E1401
A.4.1 W hat is Hardness ?
Hardness is defined in the conventional sense as a means o f specifying the
resistance of a material to deformation, scratching, and erosion. Hardness tests are based
on indenting the sample with a hard indenter, which may be spherical, conical, or
pyramidal. Common techniques for measuring hardness in ceramics are known as Vickers
(HV), Rockwell superficial (HR), and Knoop (HK).
A A 2 Rockwell Hardness
A) Rockwell Hardness Test: An Indentation hardness test using a verified machine
to force a hard steel ball indenter under specified conditions into the surface of the material
under test in two operations, and to measure the difference in depth of the indentation under
the specified conditions of preliminary and total test forces (minor and major loads,
respectively).
B) Rockwell Hardness Number, HR: A number derived from the net increase in
the depth of indentation as the force on an indenter is increased from a specified preliminary
test force to a specified total test force and then returned to the preliminary test force.
For example
64 HRC = Rockwell Hardness Number of 64 on Rockwell C Scale.
81 HR30N = Rockwell Superficial Hardness Number of 81 on Rockwell 30N
Scale.
A.4.3 General Description and Test Procedure for Rockwell Hardness
Figure A. 3 shows how the Rockwell Hardness was investigated and the steps to
make the indentation.
Po
Po + PI
Po
I t j
: 300
::0
A
B
i
±
T
: iQQ.
1
Scale
Scale
A=Depth of penetration under test force before application of additional load.
B=Increase in depth of penetration under additional load.
C=Permanent increase in depth of penetration under preliminary test force after
removal of additional force.
HR=Rockwell hardness number = 100 - C.
Figure A. 3 Schematic diagram of Rockwell Hardness and test steps.
101
A.4.4 Remarks of the Rockwell Hardness Test
• There is no Rockwell hardness value designated by a number alone, because
it is necessary to indicate which indenter and force have been employed in
making the test
• The difference in depth is normally measured by an electronic device or by a
dial indicator,
• The hardness value, the higher the number, the harder the material.
A.4.5 Vickers Hardness Number (HV1
An indentation hardness test which forces a square-based pyramidal diamond
indenter having specified face angles (136°) into the surface of the material under test and
the the diagonals of the resulting impression after removal of the load are measured as
shown in Figure A.4
The V ickers Hardness number is obtained by dividing the applied load in
kilograms-force by the surface area of the indentation in square millimetres computed from
the mean o f the measured diagonals of the indentation. Formula used to compute Vickers
hardness are given below:
HV = P / As = 2 P sin (a/2) / d 2 = 1.8544 P / d 2
(A.5)
where P is the applied force in Kgf, A s is the surface area of indentation in mm., a is the
face angle of indenter (136°), and d is the mean diagonal length in mm.
102
I
I—(?)
<x=136 0 between
opposite faces
Testing specimen
Number
Symbol
1
a
Angle at the vertex of the pyramidal indenter
(136°)
2
P
Test load in kilograms-force
3
d
Arithmetic mean of the two diagonals d j and d 2
Designation
Figure A.4 Schematic diagram of the Vickers hardness test.
103
A.4.6 Conversion of Vickers Hardness to Rockwell Hardness
Sometimes it is impossible to test the material under the conditions specified, so
standard Hardness Conversion Tables (ASTM E140) can be applied to solve this problem.
ASTM-E140 gives the relationships between Vickers Hardness, Rockwell Hardness,
Rockwell Superficial Hardness and Knoop Hardness; many of those conversion values
were obtained from computer-generated curves o f actual test data, ceramic was first
indented by Vickers Hardness set-up and the results are shown in Table A.3. By using the
conversion table, the Vickers Hardness can be converted to the Rockwell Hardness as we
want and is shown in Table A.4.
Table A.3 Vickers Hardness of 7 BST specimens.
Specimen
d(mm)
P(Kgf)
HV
A
0.153
5
396
B
0.158
5
371
C
0.154
5
391
D
0.154
5
391
E
0.150
5
412
F
0.158
5
371
G
0.148
5
423
Average =392±19
1 04
Table A.4 Vickers Hardness Conversion to the Rockwell and Rockwell Superficial
Hardness.
Vickers
392
Rockwell Superficial
Rockwell
A scale D scale
C scale
(60Kgf) (lOOKgf) (90Kgf)
15N
30N
45N
70.4
80.4
59.5
43.1
55.4
40
A.5 Flexural Strength Test of Ceramic 1ASTM-F3941.
A.5,1 Objective
The objective here is to determine the flexural strength and fracture toughness of
ceramic using four point bending and biaxial flexure strength (modulus o f rupture)
methods.
A.5.2 Description
In bend tests, the stress is not uniform but one considers the strength in terms of
the maximum tensile stress being applied. This maximum stress occurs in some region
along one o f the outer surfaces of the specimen. In this way, fracture is generally biased to
flaws at or near the outer surface. Up to now there are no national or international standards
specifying loading conditions, shapes and dimensions of the specimens, but symmetrical
specimens o f rectangular cross sections are usually preferred as shown in Figure A.5. By
using elastic beam theory, the flexural strength of ceramic specimens of rectangular cross
section can be determined from the fracture load F and the specimen dimensions from the
equation [Beer & Johnston, 1981]:
105
o bf = 3FD/B2W
(A.6 )
This formula used often assumes the material to be elastic (the load-displacement
behavior needs to be linear).
F
B
_L
Figure A.5 Schematic diagram of the four point test
The strength of the ceramic was also measured by another method, biaxial flexure
method, using a mechanical testing machine. In this test, the center of the ceramic is
m arked as the intersection of three lines drawn from diametrically opposite points
approximately 60° to each other, ceramic pellets were placed on three small steel balls
which form an equilateral triangle on the circular bottom fixture as shown in Figure A.6 .
The circle that circumscribed these three steel balls has a diameter of about 1 inch. A steel
hemispherical ball was placed with its flat surface on the top of the other fixture, and
through a piston on the other side of the fixture, the sample is fractured into two or three
parts in the biaxial flexure mode. The biaxial flexure strength is calculated using the
equations given below:
a f = -3P / 4 P d 2 (X-Y)
(A.7)
106
X = (1+u) ln(B/C )2 + [(1-tj)/2] (B/C )2
<A -8)
Y=(l+t))[l+ln(A/C)2] + (1 -d) (A/C )2
<A '9>
where d is the Poisson's ratio, B is the radius o f the loaded area, A is the radius of the
support circle, C is the radius o f the sample, P is the applied load at failure, and d is the
thickness of the sample at the point of failure.
P
Steel balls
BST
2B
» i |4
_ L
BST
T
Figure A .6 Schematic diagram of biaxial flexure test.
1 07
Fracture toughness is a measure of the energy consumed during differential
extension of flaws or cracks determined at the critical stress. This is expressed by different
numbers depending on the test method of loading a crack tip. K jq is the m ost common
number for fracture toughness and it represents the critical fracture toughness in mode I
loading, which is tensile loading. Fracture toughness can be regarded as a material
constant. It is a function of the stress and the critical flaw size [Marshall et al., 1974]. In
this study, fracture toughness was measured by fractography observation. The four point
bend fracture surface was examined with optical stereomicroscope to find the surface
failure origin length. Fracture toughness then can be calculated using the formula
KIC = Y o Y V c
(A. 10)
where Y is the surface crack factor (=1.24), trY is the fracture strength from four point
bend test, and C is the surface failure origin length.
The strength distribution of ceramics can often have a large standard deviation and
thus it is often important to know the form of this distribution. An empirical distribution
that has become very popular is the two parameter Weibull distribution and is based on a
specimen at its weakest link. This distribution can be written in the form
ln(l/(l-F))=K V ( <yf/a 0 )m
(A. 11)
where F is the failure probability, K is a factor that depends on the loading geometry in the
strength test and CTq and m are constants that determine the magnitude and width of the
strength distribution respectively. The parameter m is generally called the Weibull modulus
and <Jq is a normalizing stress. The width of the strength distribution decreases as m
increases. As we see from the equation, the strength of a specimen failing at a particular
108
failure probability depends on the loading and the specimen size. The equation assumes
failure can occur from anywhere in the body (volumetric flaws). If failure occurs only from
surface flaws, V in equation is replaced by A, an area term.
A.5.3 Results
The two parameter Weibull modulus plot was used for statistically analyzing the
four-point bending fracture strengths of ceram ic. Results from the two parameter Weibull
statistical approach are shown in Figure A.7 and Table A.5. The fracture toughness of
BST is 1.28 MPaVm.
Fracture Strength (MPa)
100
120
2
1
0
£i
-1
a
□
Q
-4
4.0
4.2
4.4
4.6
4.8
5.0
Ln (Failure Stress) MPa
Figure A.7 Weibull approach for the four point bending test of BST.
109
Table A.5 Weibull Approach of BST
Average
strength (MPa)
Biaxial flexure
Average
Standard
strength (MPa) deviation
Four point bend
Weibull
modulus
(m)
Characteristic
strength
122
105
33
10
8.5
W
A .6 Thermal Shock Resistance 1ASTM-C5541.
A.6.1 Objective
The purpose of this test is to determine the thermal shock resistance parameter, R,
of ceramic to the sudden exposure to extreme changes in temperature. These conditions
may be encountered in equipment operated intermittently in low temperature areas. Effects
of thermal shock include cracking and delamination of substrates or wafers, opening of
terminal seals and case seams, and changes in electrical characteristics due to moisture
effects or to mechanical displacement of conductors or insulating materials.
A.6.2 Background
When ceramic materials are subjected to a rapid change in temperature, there is
often a variation in temperature through the body. The temperature variation leads to
thermal stresses, as one part of the body 'wants' to be a different size and shape than some
other part and substantial stresses develop in the material. Resistance to weakening or
fracture under these conditions is called thermal shock resistance.
Generally, ceramics have relatively poor thermal shock resistance due to their low
strength, high thermal expansion and low thermal conductivities. Nonetheless, ceramics
1 10
are often used under conditions where their thermal shock resistance is critical. An analysis
of the stresses caused by thermal gradients yields the relation [Kingery e ta l., 1976]:
a = E a (Ta-T)/(l-v)
(A. 12)
where o = stress at the surface, E = elastic modulus, a = thermal expansion coefficient, v
= Poisson's ratio, Ta = 'average' temperature of the sample, and T = surface temperature.
For a water quench, the rate of surface heat transfer can be fast enough that Ta
remains at approximately the initial sample temperature and T at the surface is the
temperature o f the bath. As the AT of the quench increases, eventually o will reach Gf and
the sample fails, thus defining a critical ATC, the maximum temperature difference in the
body under steady-state heat flow conditions or the maximum allowable temperature
difference the body can be subjected to in a convective environment (applicable under
severe heat transfer conditions). Rearranging the equation gives
g
= E a AT/(l-v)
(A. 13)
which for the fracture condition becomes
ATC = Gf (l-v)/E a
(A. 14)
The right hand side is often denoted by R, which is a thermal shock resistance
parameter. It is clear that good thermal shock resistance to avoid fracture initiation is
associated with high values of fracture stress and thermal conductivity, and low values of
111
Young’s modulus of elasticity and the coefficient of thermal expansion.
A.6.3 Procedure and Results
Temperature-controlled baths containing water were used for the temperature
treatment. Ten ceramic specimens were first immersed in bath A at high temperatures as
shown in Figure A .8 for a minimum 5 minutes. Immediately after the preconditioning time,
the specimens were transferred to B which had water kept at the temperature of 0°C. The
specimens remained at the low temperature for a minimum of 5 minutes and then were
transferred to C which had the same condition as A for at least of 5 minutes; this was so
called one cycle. The transfer time from high temperature to low temperature (A to B) and
from low temperature to high temperature (B to C) was less than 10 seconds. If there were
no specimens broken after 15 complete cycles, the high temperature bath was increased
5°C. If 2 specimens broke during the specific temperature cycle, the temperature difference
in this cycle was considered as the thermal shock resistance parameter (ATC). The results
are shown in Table A.6 . The ATC of BST is equal to 95 °C.
B
Oven
Thermometer
Test specimen
• for one cycle: A (5 mins) => B (5 mins) =* C (5 mins)
• A and C have the same condition.
• B was kept at 0 °C.
Figure A .8 Schematic diagram of apparatus for thermal shock resistance parameter.
112
Table A .6 Results of BST Subjected to Thermal Shock Water Quenching.
A T(°Q
TEST SPECIMENS
FRACTURE SPECIMENS
70
10
0
75
10
0
80
10
0
85
10
0
90
10
0
95
10
2
ATC = 95 °C
A.7 Thermal Conductivity Measurement of Ceramic 1ASTM-C4Q81.
A.7.1 Objective and Background
The objective is to determine the temperature dependence of thermal conductivity of
ceramic. Thermal conductivity is defined as the proportionality constant k, which relates the
amount of heat (dQ) flowing during a time interval dt across an area A under a steady state
thermal gradient dT/dx [Kingery et ah,1976].
dQ/dt = -kA (dT/dx)
(A. 15)
However, many ceramics have unsteady-state thermal conditions (heating and
cooling) in actual application. Under these conditions, temperatures at any point within the
material change with time and can be described by
113
dT/dt = D (d2 T/dx2)
(A. 16)
where t = time, T = temperature, x = distance and D = thermal diffusivity. Thermal
diffusivity (D) is related to thermal conductivity (k) as follows:
D = k/pCp
(A. 17)
where p = density and C p = specific heat. Therefore, thermal conductivity can be indirectly
determined from thermal diffusivity measured under transient heating conditions.
A.7.2 Procedure and Apparatus fHimsworth. 19571
A long bar of ceramic was placed in contact with in an alumina substrate. The
apparatus consists of a one-revolution per twenty minutes motor, a microswitch, a relay,
and a hot-plate. The motor turns a cam which is cut to open or close the microswitch every
ten minutes; this microswitch in turn controls the relay which turns the hot-plate on and off.
The alternate heating and cooling of the hot-plate generates a thermal wave in the ceramic
which causes the temperature at any given point in the material to vaiy with time as shown
in Figure A.9.
TEMPERATURE READOUT
#2
TIMER
COMPUTER
Figure A.9 Schematic diagram for thermal diffusivity measurement.
114
The temperature was measured by thermocouples at two suitable distances on the
ceramic and read every 100 seconds. It was found that the temperature curves vary
periodically as shown in Figure A. 10, giving an approximate sine curve. The curve for the
point more remote from the heated end has a smaller amplitude than the other. From the
amplitude and phase shift of the two curves the thermal diffusivity can be calculated by
Fourier analysis [Billington, 1949]:
D=L2/2 [I/LNCAj A ^)] [1/time lag]
(A. 18)
where D is the thermal diffusivity of ceram ic, L is the distance between thermocouples, A j
and A 2 are the amplitudes of first and second curves, time lag is the time by which second
curve lags behind first.
200
190 *
160 -
Point #1 on B.S.T.
Point #2 on B.S.T.
ODD
■■
150 '
140 130
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
Time interval (minutes)
Figure A. 10 Temperature curves measured on BST for thermal conductivity measurement.
115
A.7.3 Results
The density was measured by Archimedes principle. Specific heat of ceramic was
obtained from Touloukian [1967]. Table A.7 shows the results of thermal diffusivity and
thermal conductivity measurement of ten BST specimens.
Table A.7 Thermal Properties Results of BST.
Property
Units
Results
Density
gm/cm^
5 .4 ± 0 .1
Specific heat
Ws/g°K
0.512
Thermal diffusivity
m^/s (x 10 *^)
75.3±15
Thermal conductivity
cal-cm/cm^-°C-sec
0.075±0.005
A .8 Thermal Expansion TASTM-C3721.
A.8.1 Objective and Background
The objective is to measure the thermal expansion coefficient of ceramic with
Harrop dilatometer analyzer. Ceramic undergoes a reversible change in dimensions when
heated. The magnitude and temperature range over which such changes occur determine the
thermal expansion coefficient (a ). Generally, materials increase in volume with increased
amplitude about their mean lattice positions.
One method for representing thermal expansion is via a linear thermal expansion
coefficient (aj) which relates the instantaneous change in dimension to the temperature
116
interval:
otj = dl /I dT
(A. 19)
where 1 is a linear dimension.
It is important to recognize that the thermal expansion coefficient can vary markedly
over a given application temperature range. Many ceramics exhibit more than one phase,
and the difference in the thermal expansion behavior between phase transitions must be
accounted for to understand the thermal expansion behavior. Several other features that can
affect the thermal expansion behavior are the presence of microstresses. One important
consequence of microstresses is the formation of microcracks in the body, which in turn
can result in significant hysteresis in the thermal expansion behavior during a
heating/cooling cycle [Hayden et al., 1965].
A.8,2 Procedure and Results
Thermal expansion was measured with Harrop dilatometer analyzer at a heating
rate o f 3°C/min. over the temperature range of 1150°C. A linearly variable differential
transformer and data acquisition processor were used to record the incremental length
change as a function of temperature as shown in Figure A. 11. Due to the BST phase
transition around 1000°C and probably microstresses effects, the thermal expansion
coefficient of heating is 7.65 ppm/°C, while the thermal expansion coefficient o f cooling is
10.37 ppm/°C.
BST
1.5
p h
/^ < ^
Percent
Tine
«= 7. 653p
€05
(nin)
Expansion
_
s=10JS7ppli/*C
-1
0
250
500
250
1000
1250
Tenperature (°C)
Figure A .l 1 Thermal expansion behavior o f BST as function o f temperature.
1500
118
A.9 Summary
Table A.8 is the summary of the mechanical and thermal property testing results of
the BST.
Table A.8 Mechanical and Thermal Properties of BST.
PROPERTY
UNITS
TEST
METHODS
RESULTS
GRAIN SIZE
pm
SEM
7.4
THEORETICAL
DENSITY
g/cm3
BULK DENSITY
g/cm3
5.6
ASTM-C623
5.4±0.06
ELASTIC MODULUS GPa
ASTM-C623
185±37.4
SHEAR MODULUS
GPa
ASTM-C623
75±17.8
BULK MODULUS
GPa
ASTM-C623
116± 18
POIS SON’S RATIO
ASTM-C623
0.23±0.03
WATER
ABSORPTION
ASTM-C20
0.18±0.01
POROSITY
ASTM-C20
1.01 ±0.02
119
PROPERTY
UNITS
SPECIFIC
GRAVITY
TEST
METHODS
RESULTS
ASTM-C20
5.4310.05
HARDNESS
Rockwell
(15N scale)
ASTM-E18
ASTM-E140
80.4±4
FLEXURAL
STRENGTH
MPa
(21 °C)
ASTM-F394
122±8.5
FRACTURE
TOUGHNESS
MPaVm
ASTM-F394
1.2810.05
THERMAL SHOCK
*C
ASTM-C554
92
THERMAL
CONDUCTIVITY
cal-cm/cm2-°C-Sec
ASTM-C408
0.07510.005
SPECIFIC HEAT
Ws/g°K
THERMAL
DIFFUSIVITY
m2/s (x 10'8)
ASTM-C408
75.33115
EXPANSION
COEFFICIENT
ppm/°C
ASTM-C372
7.6
0.512
VITA
Tzu-Yuan Yiin was bom in Kaohsiung, Taiwan, R.O.C., on November 3, 1961.
He received his B.S. in Naval Architecture Engineering from the National Taiwan
University in June 1985. After graduation, he served in the Chinese Navy for two years.
In the fall of 1988 he entered the Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics at The
Pennsylvania State University for Ph.D. study. In January 1989, he joined the Center for
the Electronic and Acoustic Materials as a research assistant.
He is a member of American Ceramic Society and American Welding Society.
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