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2019-01-01 Woolworths Taste

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January/February 2019
R39.500 incl. VAT
Other countries
c
R34.35 excl. VAT
taste.co.za @WWTaste
What
to eat in
2019
The new
marshmallow
Corn ribs
Cauliflower
“buffalo wings”
Abi’s lazyy
Caprese
p
salaad
(page 6)
H OW T O E AT W E L L , S P E N D L E S S & M A K E T I M E F O R FA M I LY
Tacos every day!
Five inspired new combos
24-hour brunch
18 game-changing breakfasts
Siba’s secret
Quick, multitasking recipes
A D V E R T I S I N G
P R O M O T I O N
BRING HOME THE BACON
A good way to bring your budget back on track in the new year is to look for food that’s gentle
on the pocket. South African pork is one of the most affordable options out there and incredibly
versatile, too. A leg of pork roasted slowly in the oven can go a long way towards a variety of
meals – pull the pork and use it to make lasagne, or the filling for spicy tacos, or add it to your
next stir-fry. Roast some over the weekend and enjoy the benefits all week long. Talk about
a good return on your investment. tastyhealthymodernmeat.co.za
PHOTOGRAPH JAN RAS PRODUCTION JACQUELINE BURGESS
Serving suggestion
Mix 2 T paprika, 1 T garlic flakes, 1 T brown sugar, 1 T hot English
mustard powder, 3 T sea salt and rub all over a pork leg. Cover
and chill for an hour or overnight. Place the pork in a deep roasting
tray with 1½ cups apple cider vingear, 3 T Dijon mustard, ½ cup
tomato sauce, ½ cup Muscovado sugar, 1 t cayenne pepper and
1 t salt. Cover tightly with foil and place in a preheated oven at
160°C. Roast for 6 hours, or until the meat falls off the bone. Using
two forks, pull the pork apart and serve in toasted tacos with your
toppings of choice, such as charred corn, black beans, hummus,
yoghurt and avocado.
fairtrade • handmade • eco friendly • recycled • locally produced in eSwatini
P.O Box 45, Motshane, eSwatini
T / F: +268 – 244 24053 | 244 24142 | 244 24151 | 244 24588
Fax from SA only: 086 5305 452
www.ngwenyaglass.co.sz
| ngwenya@ngwenyaglass.co.sz
Ngwenya Glass Boutique, Watershed V&A Waterfront, Cape Town T: +27 21 418 0654
JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2019
CONTENTS
O FEATURES O
10 FOODS YOU
WILL EAT THIS YEAR
BREAKFAST CLUB
Meet the ingredients and
Jumpstart your mornings
flavours of 2019, a year when
with Abigail Donnelly’s jammy
you’ll be tempted to try the
likes of violet, green mango,
eggs, fruit and muesli bowls,
or Parmesan-and-bacon egg
muffins – breakfasts so good,
they shouldn’t be skipped. 18
katsu and nigella seeds (not
at the same time!) 74
BACK TO REALITY
TACO ’BOUT
A REVOLUTION
Siba Mtongana has her backto-work and school survival
Do a post-holiday fridge
clearout and stretch your
strategy all worked out. Feel
free to use her smart meal
budget with Hannah Lewry’s
five speedy new recipes.
ideas to breeze through
your annual rush. 80
Because buffalo wing-style
SPIRIT GUIDES
cauli tacos are a thing. 66
Where to go for drinks this
year? We reveal three great
South African cocktail bars
to add to your must-try list
in 2019. 86
PHOTOGRAPH MYBURGH DU PLESSIS PRODUCTION ABIGAIL DONNELLY FOOD ASSISTANT KELETSO MOTAU
STATE OF THE TART
Phillippa Cheiftz’s best-ever
tarts come in all sizes, perfect
for savoury veggie bites or
showstopping desserts. (Don't
miss the cheat’s secret to the
brinjal-and-tomato tart.) 94
PIT STOP
It’s going to be a long plum
season and we’ve got all the
inspiration you need to make
the most of Woolies’ delicious
new varieties, from a sticky
upside-down cake, to a cheesy
prosciutto-and-plum pizza.
100
SEA, SAND
& STRUDEL
Hit the long road to Namibia
and fill up on surprisingly
affordable food and drink, from
oysters at just R11 a pop to the
apple pie you’re going to want
as padkos. 106
O TABLE TALK O
O PREP TALK O
O COLUMNS O
27 Trends in food
115 Make your own yoghurt
52 TASTES THAT BIND
photography
at home
32 Store secrets: what’s in
119 Eat in for less: Hannah
our food director's basket?
Lewry's clever recipes for
food best served cold
Sam Woulidge shares
her delicious trick to
a quick sit-down weekday
family breakfast
34 3 ways with:
54 TASTES LIKE MORE
What's the vegetable of
the year? It’s affordable, it’s
green, and Food24 editor
Tessa Purdon says she'll be
eating a lot of it in 2019
peanut butter
36 What I know now:
O REGULARS O
Clare Smyth
8 Editor’s letter
38 Bubbling under:
10 The writer of our winning
Katlego Mlambo
letter wins Bosman wines
and a R500 Woolies gift card
40 Anatomy of a dish: the
orange-and-Campari cake
at Saint, Johannesburg
page 74
12 What really happens in
42 Set a romantic Valentine's
the TASTE kitchen? Our new
YouTube channel reveals all
Day table
14 Subscribe to TASTE and
46 Drinks trends from
BLACCFEST X Langa
you could win Prosecco from
Bottega worth R1 500
50 The TASTE case: six wines
16 Win a seven-night stay
to pour this summer
at Sun City worth R32 000
56 Scene Stealer:
128 Final tidbit: Jeremy
Stellenbosch
Loops’ spicy laksa broth
page 66
page 80
page 18
Tried. Tested. Guaranteed for life.
E D I TO R 'S LET TER
OKAY, so “the new easy” isn’t technically
new. Not for everyone anyway. People
have obviously been eating baked beans on
toast since time immemorial, but if you
love food and feeding people, canned beans
won’t cut it as a midweek family dinner.
And in that case, “the new easy” might
be a proper revelation. It was for me.
There are no beans on toast in this
issue, but there are a lot of recipes that
taste like they took a lot more time and
effort than they actually did. The point?
So you can spend more time at the table
and less in the kitchen.
Of course, one person’s “easy” is
another person’s terrifying MasterChef
challenge. Accomplished cooks always
say annoying things like, “Oh, my twicebaked Alaska berry bombe? It’s really
so easy!” In the very first episode of
TASTETube, Abi demos how to make her
signature pavlova. After explaining that
the meringue bit has only two ingredients,
Abi tells Siba, our resident celebrity chef
(everyone needs one): “After that, you
really can’t go wrong”. Yeah, right.
When I first made Abi’s pavlova
I overwhipped the meringue and had
A simple dish doesn’t necessarily mean
you can whack it out in 30 minutes after
work using the contents of your fridge
while feeding children and trying to have
an adult conversation (FYI it’s not possible
to do any of these simultaneously. I have
tried). When the hours are stacked against
you, what you really need is something
quick and easy. Since becoming a mom,
recipes I would previously have scorned
as too “basic” are now like gifts from
a magical place where time stands still
and filled lunchboxes grow on trees.
Example: my mother introduced me to
Nigella Lawson’s one-dish Indian-spiced
chicken and potato bake. Life-changing!
I now make it once a week and because
it involves several spices, fresh coriander
and quick-pickled red onions, I still feel
as though I’m actually cooking even
though it only takes 15 minutes to prep.
I also make it in bulk because it’s perfectly
acceptable (and delicious) as a work
lunch the next day. And, who knows,
a turmeric-tinted drumstick may well
find its way into Holly’s lunchbox
when she starts school. And why not?
If “planned” overs are good enough
“Accomplished cooks always say annoying
things like, ‘Oh my twice-baked Alaska
berry bombe? It’s really so easy’”
to take it out too early so I wound up
with a deflated pool-cushion pavlova
with traces of uncooked egg white.
Simple doesn’t always mean easy, nerds.
Watch the video and follow the recipe –
closely. It’s been 20 years in the making.
This is the trouble with the notion
of “simple food”. It is misunderstood.
for Siba Mtongana’s kids, they are good
enough for mine. Incidentally, Siba has
her own tandoori-style version of Nigella’s
chicken-tray bake (p 85). She is SA’s
Nigella, after all.
For me, embracing easy recipes
required a real mental shift. I’ve always
been an impulsive cook, but now I have
Start strong this year, by watching
Siba Mtongana demo her gamechanging, kid-approved recipes at
taste.co.za/TASTETube this month.
8 TASTE JAN/FEB 2019
to plan ahead, which has had the effect
of reducing my daily shopping habit, both
saving me money and giving me more
precious time with my daughter. That’s
a shift worth making.
I’ve also always kept my family out
of the kitchen. There have been incidents
with overcooked broccoli and porridgelike rice. Their repertoires subsequently
extend to omelettes and ready-meals.
I realise that when my stepson moves out
and has to subsist entirely on hot cross
buns it will be my fault. So I’ve decided
that 2019 will be the year they cook.
Sometimes. When I’m really too tired.
Which is where taco night comes in
(p 66). Ideal midweek assembly food.
Abi’s resolution for 2019 is to make
time for proper breakfasts (p 18). This is
one of mine, too. Because, while I totally
relate to Sam Woulidge’s shouty, chaotic
breakfasts, I do believe that being able to
share a meal with others is one of life’s
great joys. And we don’t do it enough.
So if, by the end of this decade, we
have helped you to spend less time in the
kitchen and more time with the people
you love, wouldn’t that be wonderful?
Follow mee on Instagram
@
@KateWi
lsonZA
PORTRAIT MYBURGH DU PLESSIS
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16779/2018
THE TEAM SAYS:
SUBSCRIPTIONS & DISTRIBUTION
Subscriptions hotline: 087 405 2005
What’s your January survival strategy?
“I stay in the shade!
And we do lots of
seafood braais with
snoek and yellowtail
with garlic, apricot
jam and butter. Sweet,
sticky and so good!”
– Alistair Fester
EDITORINCHIEF Kate Wilson
kate.wilson@newmedia.co.za
FOOD DIRECTOR Abigail Donnelly
FOOD EDITOR Hannah Lewry
GROUP MANAGING EDITOR Liesl Nicholson
liesl.nicholson@newmedia.co.za
SENIOR CONTENT EDITOR Michelle Coburn
michelle.coburn@newmedia.co.za
SENIOR COPY EDITOR Lynda Ingham-Brown
ASSOCIATE EDITOR Katharine Pope
COMMERCIAL PROJECTS EDITOR Jeanne Calitz
MULTIMEDIA FOOD STYLIST Jacqueline Burgess
ONLINE EDITOR Amy Ebedes
HEAD OF CREATIVE Mark Serra
ART DIRECTOR Alistair Fester
JUNIOR DESIGNER Rugshaana Abrahams
WINE CONSULTANT Allan Mullins
CONSULTING DIETICIAN Mariza van Zyl
“I cook more in the
evenings for the next
day, which helps
me save time and
money, and hopefully
repent for my holiday
overindulgence!”
– Hannah Lewry
“My husband makes
a great dish using
overripe tomatoes.
He cooks them down
with garlic, thyme and
red wine vinegar and
we eat it spooned over
rice, or polenta cooked
with a little stock
and Parmesan.”
– Katharine Pope
WOOLWORTHS EDITORIAL BOARD
Head of Brand Communications: Elizka Ferreira
Editorial Lead: Raphaella Frame-Tolmie
Brand Manager Foods: Hieba Solomon
ADVERTISING & MARKETING
Head of Advertising and Sales: Jeanine Boshoff
+27 21 417 1104 jeanine.boshoff@newmedia.co.za
Key Account Manager: Yvette Samaai
+27 21 417 1156 yvette.samaai@newmedia.co.za
Key Account Manager: Tharien Nel
+27 21 417 5168 tharien.nel@newmedia.co.za
Advertising Co-ordinator: Julian Petersen +27 021 417 1220
“We make an endof-the-month dinner
with chilli, grated
scraps of Parmesan,
black pepper and
chopped parsley mixed
into pasta – usually a
mix of all the quarter
packets collected
during the month.”
– Abigail Donnelly
“My picky eaters get
stock-standard sarmies,
with the occasional
treat. For myself, I pack
leftovers. So if you see
me eating lasagne
three days in a row,
you know what we had
for Sunday lunch!”
– Liesl Nicholson
“We’ve started making
big batches of Greek
meatballs over the
weekend –we just pop
them into lunchboxes
with a salad during the
week.” – Jeanne Calitz
PUBLISHING TEAM
Group Account Director: Kelly Cloete
Account Manager: Cecilia du Plessis
Production Manager: Shirley Quinlan
ABC Manager: Roxanne Holman 021 417 1218
EXECUTIVE TEAM
Managing Director: Aileen Lamb
Commercial Director: Maria Tiganis
Content Director: Andrew Nunneley
Chief Financial Officer: Mark Oaten
Chief Executive Officer: Bridget McCarney
Executive Director: John Psillos
Non-Executive Director: Irna van Zyl
Repro by: New Media Publishing
Printed by: Novus Print Solutions
Published on behalf of Woolworths
by New Media Publishing Pty Ltd,
New Media House,
19 Bree Street, Cape Town, 8001.
PO Box 440, Green Point, Cape Town, 8051.
Telephone: +27 (021) 417-1111
info@newmedia.co.za
newmedia.co.za
29 170
July–Sept 2018
FEEDBACK Email taste@newmediapub.co.za, tweet @WWTaste, or visit facebook.com/wwTASTE.
WINNING LETTER
One of the joys of subscribing to TASTE
is that after reading the current issue
(which I usually do by the middle of the
month) I dig out one of the back issues
and page through a lot of the recipes
that I’ve either forgotten or didn’t take
my fancy at the time. One of these
was in the June 2018 issue, Phillippa
Cheifitz’s Middle Eastern orange cake
with spiced syrup on page 90. This easyto-make cake is absolutely delicious. I’ve
made it three times and totally wowed
my guests. Thank you, TASTE. – Roy Haines
THE WRITER OF THIS MONTH’S
WINNING LETTER WILL RECEIVE
three bottles of Bosman Family
Vineyards’ very popular Bosman Adama
red blend and three bottles of Bosman
Woolworths Chenin Blanc, presented
in a beautiful Bosman Wine Club case,
worth R690, plus a R500 Woolies gift
card. Cheers, Roy!
36 TASTE JAN/FEB 2019
Winners of Ethical
Company of the Year
at the 2016 Drinks
B
Business Green Awards
in the UK, Bosman
Family Vineyards are
leaders in the ethical
production of wine.
V
Visit their 260-year-old
cellar in Wellington,
the vine-grafting
capital of South Africa,
fo
for an amazing tasting
experience, or taste
their wines at their
recently opened
B
Bosman Framehouse,
ssurrounded by fynbos
and the cool-climate
vvineyards of the Upper
H
Hemel-en-Aarde valley.
bosmanwines.com;
bo
osmanhermanus.com
BEHIND THE
SCENES AT TASTE
Photographer Sadiqah Assur-Ismail
makes magic with our office blinds
for the shot on page 27.
* Woolworths products featured are subject
to availability and may not be available at all
stores. All prices include VAT and were correct
at the time of going to press. Offers available
while stocks last. Not all products and
ingredients featured are available from
Woolworths. While all precautions have been
taken to ensure the accuracy of information,
neither the publisher and editor, nor New
Media Publishing, can be held liable for any
inaccuracies, injuries or damages that may arise.
COMING UP ON TASTETUBE
SIBA’S FAMILY-FOOD HACKS
FAST FOOD
WHO IS THE LAZY MAKOTI?
This mama of four knows a breakfast shortcut
when she sees one. Siba Mtongana also shares
her recipes for speedy meals with “planned
overs” that’ll get you through January.
Got 60 seconds to spare?
Be productive: learn how to make an
easy, but showstopping summer dish
you’ve never tried before.
Not you, if you catch cookbook author
and TASTE contributor Mogau Seshoene
cooking her ultimate date-night dinners
this February.
DON'T MISS AN EPISODE
Find our YouTube channel
at youtube.com/user/
Tastemagazine and hit the big red
subscribe button to watch TASTE
cooks and special guests
in action every week.
STAY CONNECTED!
Are you signed up for our free weekly
ns,
newsletter? Get weekly supper suggestion
droolworthy videos and exclusive online
competitions delivered to your inbox.
Sign up at taste.co.za now.
ASK QUESTIONS AND SHARE YOUR ADVICE AT TASTE.CO.ZA/COMMUNITY-QUESTIONS.
12 TASTE JAN/FEB 2019
PHOTOGRAPHS SADIQAH ASSUR-ISMAIL
What happens in the TASTE kitchen, stays in the TASTE kitchen … unless you’re watching TASTETube
SUBS CR I BE R’ S OFFER
SUBSCRIBE & WIN
Pop the Prosecco! Subscribe to TASTE for just R30 an issue and
you could win one of three gift hampers from Bottega, containing
the Bottega Metallics Collection, worth R1 500
Prosecco is booming aroun
nd
the world. Join the party
with the Bottega Metallicss
Collection – the perfect
bubbly for a summer
celebration.
Fish or poultry on the menu?
Pop the gold-plated bottlee:
Bottega Prosecco Gold. This
Italian Prosecco boasts a
fine bubble, floral and fruitty
aromas and scents of Goldeen
Delicious apples, Williamss
pears, and lily of the
valley flowers.
The Bottega White Gold
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elegant way to start a meaal
and pairs beautifully with
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Ready for pud? Crack open
the rose-gold metallic bottle:
Bottega Il Vino Dell’Amoree
Petalo Pink Manzoni Moscato
rosé. It’s characterised by
a fruity, off-dry taste and haas
a fresh, intense and delicatte
nose with hints of rose,
raspberry and spice.
AN EASY, NEW WAY
TO GET YOUR ISSUE
Want to get the subscriber’s discount, but don’t
want to wait for the post? TASTE subscribers
can now choose to collect their magazine
from Woolworths Food or selected stores in
main centres. Simply email subs@magsathome.
co.za or call 087 405 2005 to click and collect
your issue. You must be a Woolworths
cardholder. Find out more at taste.co.za.
Three easy ways to subscribe
1. Call 087 405 2005
2. SMS "Subs Tast" to 40573 (R1 per SMS)
3. EMAIL subs@magsathome.co.za.
4. For digital subscriptions, visit
magsathome.co.za, zinio.com or magzter.com.
*Offer limited to SA; ends 24 February 2019. Please allow time for processing and delivery. Please call 021 045 1809 for international subscription rates.
14 TASTE JAN/FEB 2019
COM PE TI TI ON
WIN!
A seven-night stay at Sun Vacation
Club at Sun City, worth R32 000
Sun Vacation Club is a collection of luxury, self-catering apartments at Sun City available for a 10-year membership.
The free-standing units feature a fully equipped kitchen and dining area that flows into a lounge and patio with
a built-in braai. The apartments sleep four adults in two bedrooms and can accommodate two children under 12
on sleeper couches. These luxury units are currently undergoing an extensive refurbishment.
Right on your doorstep you’ll find an outdoor gym, children’s play area, outdoor putt-putt, two restaurants,
a convenience and liquor store, as well as swimming pools and slides. Also enjoy free access to the Valley
of Waves during your stay, and explore the restaurants and entertainment options elsewhere in Sun City.
For more information about Sun Vacation Club, contact 011 780 7800 or email sales.svc@suninternational.com.
THE PRIZE: One lucky winner will win seven nights’ accommodation in a two-bedroom, two-bathroom unit in the Aviary,
which sleeps four adults and two children under 12 on sleeper couches. The prize cannot be used over peak periods,
government school holidays, long weekends, or The Nedbank Golf Challenge week. The prize is for accommodation only and
does not include travel, meals or any other expenses while at the resort. The prize is non-transferable, cannot be exchanged
for cash and is valid for six months from date of issue. TO ENTER, visit taste.co.za. QUESTION: At which resort
is the Sun Vacation Club located?
A D V E R T I S I N G
P R O M O T I O N
PUTTIN’ ON
THE BLITZ
Serving suggestions
PHOTOGRAPH JAN RAS PRODUCTION JACQUELINE BURGESS
Decant 1 can coconut milk into ice trays and freeze. Place the
frozen cubes into the blender with ¼ cup tahini and 1⁄3 cup
maple syrup. Blend for 1 minute until creamy.
OMELETTE FIVE WAYS
Creamy corn, bacon
and mushroom
Spinach-and-red pepper
egg-white omelette
Spicy paneer
Cherry tomatoes
and Grana Padano
Easy salmon and
broccoli
18 TASTE JAN/FEB 2019
FOO D R ESO LUTI O N S
Give your noble intentions for the most important meal of the day
a boost with Abigail Donnelly’s sweet and savoury recipes, from
anchovy toast to summer fruit bowls. Perfect for weekend mornings
– with clever make-ahead inspo for the rest of the week
Breakfast
club
ANCHOVY ON TOAST
WITH FRESH TOMATO
AND PARSLEY BUTTER
R17 PER SERVING
TASTE JAN/FEB 2019 19
FOO D R ESO LUTI ON S
OMELETTE FIVE WAYS
Adapt this recipe using the five options below.
CARB-CONSCIOUS, MEAT-FREE,
WHEAT- AND GLUTEN-FREE
Serves 1
EASY
GREAT VALUE
Preparation: 15 minutes
Cooking: 5 minutes
Easy salmon and broccoli
medium free-range eggs 2–3
butter 3 T, cubed
CARB-CONSCIOUS, WHEAT- AND
GLUTEN-FREE
While the omelette is cooking, blanch
a few stems Tenderstem broccoli in salted
boiling water for 2–3 minutes. Place inside
the omelette with 60 g oak-smoked salmon
flakes, then bake for 5 minutes.
1 Whisk the eggs. 2 In a medium non-stick
pan, melt the butter over a low heat, then
increase the heat to medium-high and
pour in the egg. 3 Gently push the edges of
the omelette in using a spatula so that the
uncooked egg runs onto the hot surface of
the pan. Cook for 7 minutes, then add the
toppings. When the omelette looks 70%
cooked, fold and remove from the pan.
If you’re using an ovenproof pan, bake the
omelette in the oven at 180°C for 2 minutes.
CARB-CONSCIOUS, WHEAT- AND
GLUTEN-FREE, DAIRY-FREE
Creamy corn, bacon and mushroom
Before you whisk the eggs, reduce ½ cup
cream in a medium saucepan. Pan-fry
4 rashers bacon until almost crispy, add
125 g chopped button mushrooms and
cook until tender. Add 2 cobs sweetcorn
kernels to the cream and cook for a further
3 minutes. Serve the omelette with the
creamy corn, bacon and mushrooms.
CARB-CONSCIOUS, WHEAT- AND
GLUTEN-FREE
Spinach-and-red pepper egg-white
omelette
For this omelette you can use 4 egg whites.
Whisk until medium peaks form, then cook
in a nonstick pan. Heat 1 t olive oil in a
separate pan over a high heat, add 1 thinly
sliced red pepper and cook for 5 minutes.
Add 100 g baby spinach and pan-fry for a
further 10 minutes. Finish off in the oven
for 10 minutes at 180°C, then top with the
spinach and red pepper and season.
CARB-CONSCIOUS, FAT-CONSCIOUS,
DAIRY-FREE, MEAT-FREE, WHEAT- AND
GLUTEN-FREE
“My big resolution
is to make more
time for a proper
breakfast, especially
on busy weekdays”
– Abigail Donnelly
FRIED EGGS IN BROWN
BUTTER WITH LABNEH
AND CORN “RIBS”
Serves 4
EASY
GREAT VALUE
Preparation: 15 minutes
Cooking: 20 minutes
butter 3 T
free-range eggs 4
sunflower oil, for deep-frying
sweetcorn 2 cobs
Woolworths labneh 2 x 150 g tubs
red chilli 1, finely chopped
Maldon salt, to taste
dukkah 1 t
dill, chopped, to garnish
1 Melt the butter in a large pan and fry the
eggs until cooked to your liking. 2 Heat the
Cherry tomatoes and Grana Padano
Pan-fry the cut side of 150 g halved cherry
tomatoes over a high heat in olive oil and
season to taste. Serve on the omelette
with freshly grated Grana Padano.
CARB-CONSCIOUS, MEAT-FREE,
WHEAT- AND GLUTEN-FREE
ANCHOVY ON TOAST
WITH FRESH TOMATO
AND PARSLEY BUTTER
“I love summer’s crop of tomatoes and
there’s nothing better than combining
them on a slice of toast with smoky, salty,
creamy ingredients.”
oil in a deep saucepan. Carefully cut the
corn from the cobs using a sharp knife so
you have 4 strips from each cob, making
sure you keep the core attached. 3 Deepfry until golden brown and curled. Drain
on kitchen paper. 4 Smear the labneh onto
four plates, top with an egg and chopped
chilli. Serve with the corn ribs and drizzle
over the butter from the pan. Season and
sprinkle over the dukkah and dill.
CARB-CONSCIOUS, MEAT-FREE,
WHEAT- AND GLUTEN-FREE
CINNAMON, APPLE AND
VANILLA OAT BOWL
Serves 2 to 4
EASY
GREAT VALUE
Preparation: 15 minutes
Cooking: 5 minutes
Serves 4
EASY
GREAT VALUE
Preparation: 15 minutes
Cooking: 15 minutes
unsalted butter 4 T
Italian parsley 10 g
Woolworths ancient grain brown
bread 4 slices
smooth cottage cheese 4 T
anchovies 30 g
Rosa tomatoes 100 g, halved
rolled oats 150 g
coconut milk 1 litre
ground cinnamon 1 t
ground nutmeg ¼ t
sea salt 1 t
vanilla pod 1, seeded
Muscovado sugar 4 T
green apple 1, cut into matchsticks
1 Using a hand blender, blend the butter
Spicy paneer
Cut 200 g paneer into bite-sized pieces,
then pan-fry over a medium heat in olive
oil and 1 T red curry paste. Season with salt
and serve in the omelette.
20 TASTE JAN/FEB 2019
and parsley. Allow to stand at room
temperature until serving. 2 Toast the
bread, then top with cream cheese,
anchovies, tomatoes and parsley butter.
CARB-CONSCIOUS
1 In a medium saucepan, combine the oats,
coconut milk, cinnamon, nutmeg, salt and
vanilla seeds. Cook for 10–12 minutes or
until the oats are tender. 2 Sprinkle with
the sugar and top with the apple.
FOOD R ES OLUT I ON S
FRIED EGGS IN BROWN BUTTER WITH LABNEH AND CORN “RIBS”
R40 PER SERVING
TASTE JAN/FEB 2019 21
HOW TO MAKE
ALMOND MILK
If you want to give the
cartons a skip
and try making your
own, simply soak
200 g almonds in water
overnight. Drain, then
rinse under cold water
for 2 minutes. Place in
a blender with 4 cups
fresh water and blend
until thick and opaque.
Strain through muslin
cloth and sweeten to
taste with honey or
maple syrup. You can
store the almond milk
in an airtight container
in the fridge for up
to three days.
CINNAMON, APPLE AND
VANILLA OAT BOWL
R20 PER SERVING
SUMMER FRUIT AND
YOGHURT BOWL
R16 PER SERVING
BANANA-AND-ALMOND
MUESLI BOWL
R22 PER SERVING
22 TASTE JAN/FEB 2019
FOOD R ES OLUT I ON S
PULL-APART
CARAMEL BREAD
R7 PER SERVING
COCOA-HAZELNUT
BREAKFAST BOWL
R30 PER SERVING
Cook’s note: Use coconut sugar if you
prefer it to Muscovado.
DAIRY-FREE, MEAT-FREE
BANANA-AND-ALMOND
MUESLI BOWL
“Mix up a big batch of the granola, seed and
nut mix for the week. Add milk, banana, peanut
butter and honey and you’re good to go.”
EXTRA SOURCE FOOD52.COM
Serves 4
EASY
GREAT VALUE
Preparation: 20 minutes
Woolworths baked crunchy granola
350 g
chia seeds 3 T
pumpkin seeds 3 T
coconut flakes 50 g
raw almonds 50 g, toasted
almond milk 2 cups (see recipe opposite)
bananas 2, halved lengthways
seasonal honey 4 T
peanut butter 4 T
1 Combine the granola, chia seeds, pumpkin
seeds, coconut flakes and almonds. 2 Serve
with the almond milk, banana, honey and
“Breakfast bowls
are an easy way to
get a good helping
of seeds, nuts and
seasonal fruit”
– Abigail Donnelly
then blend slightly to break down the fruit.
2 Mix the granola into the yoghurt-and-fruit
mixture. 3 Drizzle with the honey to serve.
Cook’s note: This recipe can also be made
using Woolworths’ Carb Clever granola and
without honey.
DAIRY-FREE, MEAT-FREE
PULL-APART
CARAMEL BREAD
a spoonful of peanut butter.
DAIRY-FREE, MEAT-FREE
SUMMER FRUIT AND
YOGHURT BOWL
Serves 4
EASY
GREAT VALUE
Preparation: 20 minutes
Woolworths frozen summer fruits 1½ cups
Woolworths double-cream plain
yoghurt 2 cups
Woolworths strawberry-and-macadamia
granola 100 g
seasonal honey 4 T
1 Combine the frozen fruit and yoghurt,
“Perfect for lazy Sunday mornings with a pot
of coffee. Try to save some (in an airtight
container) to give you a good start to Monday.”
Serves 6 to 8
A LITTLE EFFORT
GREAT VALUE
Preparation: 45 minutes, plus rising time
Cooking: 25 minutes
For the dough:
yeast 10 g
warm water ¼ cup
milk 1¼ cups, warmed
butter 80 g, melted
sugar 50 g
free-range eggs 2
sea salt 1 t
flour 600 g
TASTE JAN/FEB 2019 23
EGGS-PERT ADVICE
Get the most out of your eggs with these
handy tips
TEST THEIR FRESHNESS The
best way to check is to place the
eggs in a bowl of cold water. The
higher they float, the older they
are (a fresh egg will sink to the
bottom). When boiled, fresh
eggs will have their yolk perfectly
in the middle.
INGREDIENT
SWAP
Replace the filling
ingredients of these
versatile muffins with
any of your favourites:
chorizo instead of
bacon, and peppers,
spinach or mushrooms
as veggie alternatives.
Smoked mozzarella
is also a great swap
for Parmesan.
PARMESAN-ANDBACON EGG MUFFINS
R11 PER SERVING
For the caramel:
butter 170 g
sugar 250 g
ground cinnamon 1 T
brown sugar 150 g
vanilla pod 1, seeded
1 To make the dough, dissolve the yeast
in the warm water and allow to stand for
2 minutes. 2 Add the milk, butter, sugar,
eggs, salt and 360 g flour. Mix in a stand
mixer using the dough hook at a high speed
for 2–3 minutes. Gradually add
the remaining flour until a firm dough
starts to form, then mix at a low speed
for 3–6 minutes until the dough becomes
smooth. Place the dough in a well-oiled
bowl, cover and allow to rise until doubled
in size. 3 Preheat the oven to 180°C. 4 To
make the caramel, melt 100 g butter in
a pan. In a separate bowl, mix the sugar
and cinnamon, then set aside. 5 Melt the
remaining butter, then whisk in the brown
sugar and vanilla until combined. 6 Grease
24 TASTE JAN/FEB 2019
an 23 cm baking dish with nonstick spray
– you can either make one large bread
or 2 medium ones. 7 Punch down the
dough very gently and cut into 4 even
pieces. Shape each piece into rounds of
approximately 3 cm each. 8 Dip each piece
of dough in the melted butter, then roll
generously in the cinnamon and sugar.
Arrange in the baking dish. Pour the butterand-sugar mixture over the dough and
bake for 30–35 minutes. Remove from the
oven and rest for 15 minutes before serving.
Cook’s note: Make the dough the day
before and allow it to prove in the fridge
overnight so that it’s ready to bake first
thing in the morning. This dough doesn’t
go through a second stage of rising so you
need to bake it in a dish that has enough
space for it to rise. Cover the dough you
aren’t working with using a damp cloth
to ensure that it doesn’t dry out. While the
bread is baking, cover it with a lid or foil
if it starts turning too brown on top.
MEAT-FREE
GET CRACKING Instead of
cracking your eggs on the edge of
a dish or pan, gently tap them on
a flat surface, such as a counter or
chopping board. This stops pieces
of shell from being pushed into
the egg. Then simply insert your
thumbnails into the indentation
and break open the egg.
GIVE THEM A HAND To
separate eggs, rather than juggling
yolks and whites between two
halved shells, crack each egg into
one of your hands and let the
white run through your fingers
into a bowl, then place the yolk
in a second bowl.
BE PATIENT WITH THOSE
OMELETTES Let the beaten egg
cover the base of the pan and
cook for several minutes until
the mixture has almost cooked
through. Then add the fillings
before the all-important fold: run
a spatula around the edges of the
omelette to loosen it, then slide
the spatula under the centre and
flip it over the other half before
to cooking it for a few more
minutes in the pan or oven.
START BOILED EGGS IN HOT
WATER Opinions differ, but
the TASTE team’s verdict is that
cooking room-temperature eggs
in boiling water and dropping
them into iced water after the
desired cooking time makes it
much easier to peel off the shells
than starting them in cold water.
FOOD R ES OLUT I ON S
COCOA-HAZELNUT
BREAKFAST BOWL
Serves 4
EASY
GREAT VALUE
Preparation: 15 minutes
Cooking: 15 minutes
rolled oats 150 g
cocoa powder 4 T
hazelnuts 50 g
quinoa 3 T
ground cinnamon 1 t
ground nutmeg ¼ t
sea salt 1 t
coconut sugar 4 T
coconut milk 1 litre
1 In a food processor, combine the oats,
cocoa, hazelnuts, quinoa, cinnamon,
nutmeg, sea salt and sugar. Blend until
very fine. 2 Combine the oat mixture
with the coconut milk in a medium-sized
saucepan and cook for 5 minutes.
Cook’s note: Serve with a nut butter or
toasted coconut flakes. The nuts in this
recipe can be substituted with any other
grain, or omitted completely. You could also
leave out the cocoa powder and cook the
oat mixture with a vanilla pod instead.
DAIRY-FREE, MEAT-FREE
PARMESAN-AND-BACON
EGG MUFFINS
“Eat these savoury muffins hot from the oven
or store them for a week of breakfast on the go,
or as fillers for lunchboxes for the whole family.”
Makes 12
A LITTLE EFFORT
GREAT VALUE
Preparation: 15 minutes
Cooking: 35 minutes
sea salt ½ t
plain yoghurt ½ cup
olive oil 2 T
free-range egg 1
THE PERFECT JAMMY EGGS
Serves 1
EASY
GREAT VALUE
Cooking: 5 minutes
1 Preheat the oven to 180°C. To make the
filling, heat the butter in a large pan, add
the spring onions and fry for 5 minutes.
Add the bacon and fry for a further
10 minutes, then add the asparagus and
cook until tender. 2 To make the muffin
batter, place all the dry ingredients into
a large bowl and whisk to combine. Mix
the wet ingredients in a separate bowl.
3 Pour the wet ingredients into the dry
ingredients and mix. 4 Fold in the filling
ingredients, except the egg yolks. 5 Grease
a 12-hole muffin pan and spoon 2 T batter
into each muffin mould, making a small
indentation in each for the egg yolk to
settle in. Add an egg yolk to each mould,
cover with the remaining batter and bake
for 15–20 minutes or until golden brown.
medium free-range eggs 2–3
sea salt and freshly ground black
pepper, to taste
1 Bring a saucepan of water to the boil,
then reduce the heat to simmer. Using a
spoon, gently place the room-temperature
eggs in the simmering water. Cook for
exactly 5 minutes, then place the eggs
in an ice bath for 1 minute. 2 Remove
from the ice and allow to come to room
temperature. Once at room temperature
they will be easy to peel. Serve with
sea salt and pepper.
CARB-CONSCIOUS, FAT-CONSCIOUS,
DAIRY-FREE, MEAT-FREE, WHEAT- AND
GLUTEN-FREE
THE PERFECT JAMMY EGS
AN EGG-ZACT
SCIENCE
R5 PER SERVING
When you’re planning
boiled eggs, remember
to remove them
from the fridge an
hour in advance to
let them reach room
temperature. What
happens when you
don’t? The cold shells
will crack when you
place the eggs in
simmering water
and you’ll lose some
of the egg white.
For the filling:
butter 2 T
spring onions 3, finely chopped
bacon 125 g, cubed
asparagus 100 g, cut into 2 cm pieces
Parmesan 160 g, grated
free-range egg yolks 12
For the muffin batter:
flour 150 g
baking powder 1 t
bicarbonate of soda ¼ t
buttermilk ½ cup
TASTE JAN/FEB 2019 25
P R O M O T I O N
PHOTOGRAPH TOBY MURPHY PRODUCTION JACQUELINE BURGESS FOOD ASSISTANT SAXON KINNEAR
A D V E R T I S I N G
Woolworths’ new Yogi Baa dairy snack bars are the ideal additions to any lunchbox and make
a great on-the-go snack. Think of them as a mini “cheesecake” snack: creamy yoghurt cheese meets
milk chocolate in a snack bar that will go down a treat with kids and adults alike – and keep the
hunger pangs at bay until lunch or dinner time rolls around. woolworths.co.za
WHAT TO EAT, KNOW,
DO AND BUY NOW
PHOTOGRAPH SADIQAH ASSUR-ISMAIL
PRODUCTION HANNAH LEWRY FOOD ASSISTANT KATE FERREIRA
EDITED BY KATHARINE POPE
PHOTO
OPP
The days of boot polish and shaving foam
are long gone, so what’s driving the latest
trends in food photography? And how
can you replicate them yourself? We asked
the experts to spill their top tips.
TASTE JAN/FEB 2019 27
TA B L E TALK
TREND
Smoke & filters
Photographers and food stylists the world over are taking
their cues from past eras, fashion, art and, occasionally, real life
in their food photography
Left and above: Photographer Gabriel Cabrera
takes inspiration from seventies cookbooks.
Fun photography
“I think 2019 will definitely see a shift
towards brighter, colourful and quirky
photography,” says Vancouver-based
stylist and photographer Gabriel Cabrera
(@artfuldesperado). In his work, he takes
colour and contrast to another level. And
what’s going to be passé? “Kitchen twine,
rustic scissors, ribbons, and other romantic
elements are definitely going out.” Food
stylist Maggie Ruggiero (@maggie_ruggiero),
who has done work for Gather Journal,
Bon Appetit, Starbucks and The New York
Times, agrees. “Perhaps the trend of quiet
comfort/perfect-imperfect (crumbs, drips)
has run its course,” she says. In 2019, she
also predicts brighter, more colourful and
quirky work. “I like to think the trend will
be a little more ‘come out and play’.”
That filtered look
One reason for this shift could be
Instagram, where vibrant images with
high saturation get the most traction.
That trend seems to be influencing
photographers IRL (“in real life”). As
The National notes, “even traditional
photo libraries like Getty Images are
now releasing ‘Insta-style’ filtered images
from fashion weeks and awards shows.”
28 TASTE JAN/FEB 2019
TA BL E TAL K
Go retro
In addition to the wealth of inspired,
sustainable tips, we love the James
Beard Foundation’s new book,
Waste Not, for its brave, seventies
look shot by photographers Theo
Vamvounakis (@theovamvounakis) and
Keirnan Monaghan (@hippopigemous).
The award-winning pair, who’ve also
done work for Vogue, Vanity Fair and
Wired, among others, are masters
at creating an illustrated look with
an almost grainy texture.
Surreal scenes
PHOTOGRAPHS GABRIEL CABRERA, ELSA YOUNG, © WASTENOT BY THE JAMES BEARD FOUNDATION,
RIZZOLI NEW YORK, 2018, KEIRNAN MONAGHAN AND THEO VAMVOUNAKIS
Gabriel Cabrera predicts more surreal pairings in 2019 – “Stuff
that doesn’t necessarily make sense together”, and clients
requesting solid, bold colours as backgrounds, instead of natural
materials such as wood or concrete. Think sculptural images of
balancing butternuts, fruit hanging in mid-air, or cakes left lying
on a surface, un-iced, and partially covered by a newspaper, as
in the image below – also from Waste Not, which wouldn’t
be out of place in a Surrealist art exhibition.
“Kitchen twine, rustic scissors,
ribbons, and other romantic
elements are definitely out”
– Gabriel Cabrera
Shadow puppets
Forget the props: shadows are the hottest stars of current food
photography. Look out for sharp shadows and bold highlights,
as in the above shot by TASTE contributor Elsa Young.
TASTE JAN/FEB 2019 29
TA B L E TALK
• Paintbrushes: to paint vegetable
oil onto meat.
• Burn Shield emergency dressings:
they can make all the difference in a crisis.
The cooking:
“You have to be delicate and careful when
you’re cooking the food for a shoot,
so that it looks beautiful. Everything
must be cooked with love. Being a food
assistant is great because you learn how
to fix recipes when they don’t work.”
– Kate Ferreira, food assistant
The props:
“Always choose props and backgrounds
that will enhance the food, not fight with it.
Look for plates that allow the colour of your
dish to pop. Neutrals are always best
when you’re starting out. Avoid using
shiny plates, especially if you’re shooting
using your smartphone.” – Brita du Plessis
of Check!MyChina, a prop shop for professional
food stylists in Cape Town
TAKE YOUR
BEST SHOT
Serious contender or Insta
wannabe? These are our tips
for taking better food photos
“Always start with the simplest layout
possible and add garnishes and other
elements with each shot. It’s much easier
to add than to take away, especially when
things are prone to melting or mixing.”
– Hannah Lewry, TASTE food editor
In your tool box:
The styling:
“Be brave and natural. If you want to get
into the industry, find a photographer’s
assistant – someone else starting out –
and play with affordable dishes like toasted
cheese, so that you can learn and build
up a portfolio. And always have a bowl
of iced water next to you to refresh the
dish. I never put dry herbs on a plate,
always dip them first.” – Abigail Donnelly,
TASTE food director
“Always shoot in natural light and with
the freshest, most deliciously vibrant
produce you can find.” – Jacqueline Burgess,
TASTE multimedia food stylist
30 TASTE JAN/FEB 2019
• Prestik and toothpicks: to keep
round objects in place.
• A spray bottle filled with water:
to keep ingredients fresh and beautiful.
• A blowtorch: to make chocolate
glossy and char the edges of veggies.
• Metal skewers: to make griddle
marks on meat.
• Surgical gloves: to avoid leaving
fingerprints on chocolate.
• Eucalyptus oil: to remove stickers
from packaging.
• Pins: to prevent chicken skin from
shrinking when cooking – just make
sure you count how many you use
and remove them all before serving!
• Syringe: to add or remove liquid.
TASTE photographer Jan Ras shares his tips
for taking better phone photos:
• Wipe the camera lens (that blurry look
is probably a fingerprint).
• Hold the phone as steady as possible.
• Never use the zoom – rather get closer.
• Sit next to a window to get the best
light. At night, or in bad light, don’t use
your phone’s flash. Rather ask a friend to
shine their cellphone’s torch onto the plate
from behind. Use a napkin to diffuse the
light if it’s too harsh.
• Try different angles and ways of framing
a subject. For example, try cropping off
one side of a plate, centring it, or shooting
it from above.
• Switch on the HDR setting if your
phone has one. HDR stands for “high
dynamic range’ and will allow you to work
with a greater range of light and dark (for
example, if you want both the food and
the view outside to be visible in a shot.)
• Looking for a new phone? Take test
shots in store and compare the results.
If you’re splashing out, look for a phone
with multiple lenses, which will allow
you to play with depth of field (when the
background goes out of focus). Some new
top-of-the-range models also have very
effective night mode functions – great
for shooting dinners.
PHOTOGRAPH JAN RAS AND JAKUB VANEK
The photograph:
A D V E R T I S I N G
P R O M O T I O N
PHOTOGRAPH TOBY MURPHY PRODUCTION JACQUELINE BURGESS FOOD ASSISTANT SAXON KINNEAR
GREEN SHOOTS
“Let there be
seasons,” said the
poet Anne Sexton,
“so that our tongues
will be rich in
asparagus and
limes.” We couldn’t
agree more and,
happily, asparagus
is now in season.
It’s perfect for any
occasion, from a
light snack to an
indulgent breakfast,
such as asparagus
wrapped in Parma
ham and served with
soft-boiled eggs and
toast. Sound good?
Get your hands
on some delicious,
locally grown
asparagus
at Woolworths.
woolworths.co.za
Serving suggestions
Wrap asparagus spears in
prosciutto and drizzle with
olive oil. Roast for 5 minutes.
and serve with boiled eggs,
Parmesan shavings and
toasted baguette. For a
vegetarian option, replace
the prosciutto with
roasted tomatoes.
TA B L E TALK
STORE SECRETS FROM...
the food director
Want to know what Abigail Donnelly
will be eating this summer? We took
a peek inside her shopping basket
Spinach,
sweetcorn and
butterbean
burger patties
Make a burger
and pile it high
with vegan mayo,
rocket, sundried
tomatoes and
sweet potato
crisps.
Strained yoghurt
Spoon it into half
a ripe mango and top
with raw granola.
Woolies
coffee capsules
These are my
favourite –
especially when
used to make
an affogato
with Woolies’
cookies-andcream ice cream.
Jalapeño atchar
I love this on cheese
sandwiches made
with white bread.
32 TASTE JAN/FEB 2019
PHOTOGRAPHS SADIQAH ASSUR-ISMAIL
PRODUCTION HANNAH LEWRY FOOD ASSISTANT KATE FERREIRA
Frozen crumbed prawns
Serve with chopped mango,
chilli, coriander, fresh coconut
chunks, mixed with lime juice
and coconut milk.
TA B L E TALK
3 WAYS WITH
peanut
butter
Think beyond toast and
use the ubiquitous spread
to create a hearty plant-based
dinner, an easy hummus
or a wheat-free treat
1
Butternut with Thai peanut
sauce and coriander rice
Quarter 1 x 1 kg butternut lengthways.
Steam until tender, about 15–20 minutes.
Season lightly. To make the Thai peanut
sauce, simmer ½ cup smooth peanut
butter, 1 cup coconut milk, 1 T Thai curry
paste, 1 T fresh lime juice, and 1 t brown
sugar in a saucepan for a few minutes,
whisking until smooth. Season with salt.
To make the coriander rice, soak 200 g
jasmine rice for 20 minutes. Drain and
turn into a small saucepan and add
1½ cups water. Bring to a bubble, then
cover tightly and reduce the heat. Simmer
for 10 minutes. Turn off the heat and allow
to stand for 5 minutes. Fluff up with a
fork and mix in 3–4 T chopped coriander.
Serve the steamed butternut with the Thai
peanut sauce and coriander rice. Sprinkle
with chopped peanuts. Serves 2 to 3.
34 TASTE JAN/FEB 2019
3
Peanut butter-anddate biscuits
Preheat the oven to 180°C. In a large bowl,
mix 6 T Woolies organic peanut butter,
1 T coconut oil, 1 t vanilla paste or extract,
1 t ground ginger, 8 pitted, chopped dates,
and 120 g almond flour. Roll the dough
into 12 equal-sized balls and use a cookie
cutter to press out any shape of your liking.
Place on a greased baking tray and bake for
10 minutes. Allow to cool before serving.
Makes 12.
Garlicky hummus with
peanut butter
Blend 1 x 400 g can drained chickpeas,
1 T peanut butter, ¼ cup olive oil, 1 clove
garlic, the juice of ½ lemon and salt and
pepper until smooth. Drizzle with olive
oil and serve with Woolworths vegetable
chips. Serves 4.
PHOTOGRAPHS SADIQAH ASSUR-ISMAIL, TOBY MURPHY AND DIRK PIETERS
PRODUCTION ABIGAIL DONNELLY AND HANNAH LEWRY
2
TA B L E TALK
WHAT I KNOW NOW
Clare Smyth
Her London restaurant, Core, was awarded two Michelin stars
(in its first year), she was named Best Female Chef of 2018 and,
ahem, catered the royal wedding. Ishay Govender-Ypma met
an icon in the making
the weather and what I feel like eating
right now. Our coleslaw dish, for example,
was inspired by the incredibly hot summer.
The biggest thing awards give you
is confidence. It’s nice to be recognised
for the work that we’re doing. But with
every award comes more pressure.
The biggest award is always Michelin
and the more stars you have, the higher
your diners’ expectations.
Respect and professionalism are
essential in my kitchen. Respect is
about respect for the produce, each other,
the profession and respect for our guests.
Everyone has their own personality but
how you talk to each other is important.
Clare in action on
the pass at Core.
Learning to accept criticism comes
with experience and maturity. You
have to listen to the percentage. And if
there is a higher percentage of people
saying: “I don’t like that”, you have to listen
to that, but you can’t please everyone.
I’m against bullying in any form;
I hate it. I won’t tolerate it. I always
encourage people in my kitchen to
step up and call it out, so that we can
deal with it.
I loved the animals, used to ride horses
and was generally quite a tomboy. My
mum cooked for the farmworkers – simple,
very wholesome food, fresh from the farm.
And we ate every part of the animal.
It would cook slowly in the pot and
only be ready the next day.
I was always in a hurry. I started
working in restaurants at the age of 12
during the school holidays and on weekends.
I finished college when I was only 17, so
I wasn’t even old enough to get a job.
One of my signature dishes is
a potato-and-roe dish, which is about
my roots and about humble ingredients.
I ate potatoes every day growing up.
36 TASTE JAN/FEB 2019
British food is a mix of influences
from everywhere. For me, it’s really
about the produce and we have some of
the best – game and fish, shellfish. While
my cooking is French-influenced, I try to
make it as British as possible with some
nods to our own culture and familiar
classics that people identify with because
of a sense of nostalgia – like carrot cake,
which eliminated the need for sugar –
a scarce ingredient during the war.
I’m a very happy workaholic. I feel
I do have a balanced life because I love
what I do and there’s nowhere else I’d
rather be than at the restaurant. Eating out
and socialising are also important to me.
I get inspiration from nature,
from art, my environment, people, smells,
When setting up Core I did every
single thing myself, from arranging
the bank loans, the investments,
to designing the space. I didn’t take
on another member of staff until four
months before we opened.
I love the hospitality industry.
You don’t hear the government talking
about the industry, but I think we should
champion it more. It’s an industry
that needs people; you can’t do it
on a computer.
@corebyclaresmyth, @chefclaresmyth,
@IshayGovender
PHOTOGRAPH CORE
I grew up on a farm
in Northern Ireland.
I train my staff not just to work
for me, but to get an education.
We invest a lot of time in both training
and cross-training the team, so that it
sets them up for the future.
PHOTOGRAPH TOB
BY MURPHY PRODUCTION JACQUELINE BURGESS FOOD ASSISTANT SAXON KINNEAR
A D V E R T I S I N G
P R O M O T I O N
Few things say summer like biting into a ripe, red, luscious tomato. Woolworths has one for
every palate and occasion. Deep red Rosa and juicy Bella tomatoes have a sweet flavour
making them great for salads, while the mini Rosa is perfect for snacking. And don’t forget
the colourful mixed exotic tomatoes – roast them, marinate them, or enjoy them as they
are. Grown exclusively for Woolworths, they’ll bring a world of flavour to your kitchen.
woolworths.co.za
TA B L E TALK
BUBBLING UNDER
Katlego Mlambo
He had his own TV show at the age of 25, but this young gun is determined to earn his stripes in restaurant
kitchens, too. We caught up with the senior sous chef at hip new Cape Town spot The Commissary
My Silwood lecturers always said
I had potential, but I liked partying
and girls too much. As soon as I got
a Friday off – party, party! They used
to make me work extra shifts just to
prevent me from having off days. When
I graduated, I got a small certificate –
I was a bit cheesed off because other
people won KitchenAids and Le Creuset
prizes – and I got this certificate. But the
certificate said “most likely to succeed
in industry”.
Katlego Mlambo
When I was growing
up, my granny and my
mom were the cooks.
I still say that my granny is the best cook
in the world. She made these crazy
chicken livers – with a lot of chilli – spicy
and so moreish. I’m blessed to have
eaten in one- and two-star restaurants
in America and London, but my granny’s
overcooked veggies are still the best.
38 TASTE JAN/FEB 2019
Originally I wanted to be a dentist.
But I took a gap year after school.
I worked as a waiter in restaurants
in the UK and I saw what a good meal
can do. Then it became two gap years.
Then I wanted to study cheffing.
My mate told me that Cape Town
has a dope food scene, and that Silwood
is the best college. And then I ended
up studying there.
When I came back from the USA,
I worked at The Saxon Hotel in
Joburg for a year. But it was hotel
food – which is great, but I wanted
to change the world.
I met Chef Luke Dale Roberts in the
fridge at The Saxon. He told me to
email him. He gave me the opportunity
to open The Pop Luck Club in Joburg. It
was an amazing seven months. After it
closed. Luke said to me, “I worked with
you back in the day while you were still
naughty, but now you’ve proven yourself,
PHOTOGRAPH JAN RAS INTERVIEW KATHARINE POPE
PJ Vadas [of Vadas Smokehouse
& Bakery] has always had my
back. He’s my mentor. I worked at The
Roundhouse with him and he’s the
reason I went overseas. These guys from
Vermont called me on a Sunday – I was
hungover – they asked me if I knew
where Vermont was and I said no. It’s in
the middle of nowhere; there’s no Uber;
no public transport. The nearest barber
shop was over an hour away. I did a lot
of skiing. Black man on the slopes – it was
quite a sight. And while I was there,
I travelled to New York, Miami, Chicago.
I had a deep-dish pizza and went to
Alinea. Eleven Madison Park blew my
mind – I cried. Once because of the apple
snow course with maple taffy, and
the second time when the bill came.
TA BL E TAL K
are you keen to come back to Cape
Town?” I said “Of course!” Chef Luke
is one of the best chefs in the world!
I worked at The Pot Luck Club, then
The Shortmarket Club, and now
The Commissary is happening.
At The Commissary, we’re serving
cool food with aggressive, intense
flavours. It’s streetfood that went
to private school. To put a dish on the
menu at The Test Kitchen it goes through
so much nipping and tucking, but with The
Commissary we have a space to try things.
My favourite dish is one from The
Shortmarket Club, developed
by Wesley [Randles – head chef
of The Shortmarket Club, who
started The Commissary with
Simon Widdison]. Wesley’s from
Durban, so it’s octopus, with atchar, and
Durban spice – and we’ve taken that
dish and put it on a bun to make a slider.
You’ve got crunchiness, the tanginess of
the atchar … We also have Korean-fried
chicken wings. They have this tapioca
batter that looks pretty weird, but it’s
really, really delicious.
“One day, God willing,
when I have my own
restaurant, my vision
is to take African
cuisine up a level”
I’ve been very blessed – I had
two seasons of my TV show,
Kasi-licious nominated for a
SAFTA. I had to have elocution lessons,
learn to look at cameras, not to drop
F-bombs. The TV dream is still there, but
it made me realise I love being in the
kitchen. I don’t want people to think I’m
this kid who went to private school and
just got given this. I want to earn my
stripes. So I’ve tried to work in the
best restaurants. But Kasi-licious was
so dope because it was food made in
the township with a cheffy spin on it.
One day, God willing, when I have
my own restaurant, my vision is
to take African cuisine up a level.
On Kasi-licious, I did a sheep’s head
terrine, so I’d like to do that one day.
The one thing I’d like to change
is chefs ruling with an iron fist.
I was a naughty kid, but I’ve also seen
kids being broken. Now, when I see
people get up to mischief, I’m like, “Guys,
I used to be that kid. Friday, you’re sick,
really?” It’s weird shouting at guys to be
on time. But I believe you bring out the
best in people by being nice to them.
The best part of my job is when
you see someone cut into their
meal and you see that nod.
It makes me breathless, man.
The Commissary, 88 Shortmarket St, Cape Town
TA B L E TALK
ANATOMY OF A DISH
Saint’s orangeand-Campari cake
David Higgs’ and Gary Kyriacou’s Italian-inspired
restaurant Saint has had Sandton swooning over
its dramatic décor, Neapolitan-style pizzas and
stellar pastas since opening last year. Our hot tip?
Save space for this knockout cake, too
The gelato is
handmade in
small batches
with Campari and
churned really
slowly to a smooth
texture. The recipe
has to be very
carefully balanced
so that the Campari
doesn’t freeze. As
a finishing touch,
crushed, lightly
toasted pistachio
nuts are sprinkled
over the plate.
The dessert is
inspired by a cake
that designer Irene
Kyriacou used to
bake for family
occasions. The
recipe has been
tweaked slightly
and spiked with
Campari.
Saint, corner Rivonia Road
and Maude Street, Sandton,
Johannesburg, @saint_jhb
40
Sommelier
Wikus Human
recommends a
glass of dry rosé
bubbles to pair with
the cake. Keep it
local with Le Lude
or splash out with
French BillecartSalmon Brut Rosé.
PHOTOGRAPH ELSA YOUNG
According to
head pastry chef
Rene Tissong, the
secret is to pour
the syrup (Campari,
sugar and orange
juice) over the cake
as soon as it comes
out of the oven.
Instead of
traditional flour,
the recipe calls for
a mix of semolina
flour and ground
almonds.
TA B L E TALK
Hearts and flowers
With the month of love on our doorstep, wedding florist extraordinaire Heike Hayward shares
her ideas for a memorable Valentine’s table that’s both dramatic and deeply personal
Pick a theme
“I love indigenous flowers,
especially Cape fynbos,” she
says. “But locally, people
sometimes perceive them
Pretty in pink: carry the theme
as a bit ‘old school’ because
forward with handmade pink pillar
candles (R79.95) and Himalayan salt.
of the way we’re used to
arranging them.” For this
table setting, she combined
them with “super modern” flowers in rich
knows
colours. “I really enjoy the challenge of
a thing or two about romance, after all,
combining unexpected elements. Here
her floral design business, Fleur le Cordeur
you’ve got the ‘old-school’ elements of
is one of South Africa’s most sought after
wedding florists. Case in point: when
the proteas and the fynbos, combined
we interviewed her for this month’s table
with the orchid, which is modern and bold,
feature, she was working on no fewer than
and then you’ve got lots of roses to bring
it all together.”
six weddings – in a single week.
Yet, amid the craziness of summer
wedding season, Heike still gets excited
Master the basics
Consider your colour scheme and the
at the prospect of setting a romantic table
physical components of the table. “For
for Valentine’s Day – which is what she’s
this setting, you could group lots of small
done for TASTE this month, using an array
to medium vases together, or push the
of gorgeous blooms from Woolworths.
Heike Hayward
36 TASTE JAN/FEB 2019
flowers directly into green oasis foam.
As long as the flowers are in water, they
should keep for a few days in a cool room.”
In terms of colours, Heike is all for mixing
things up. “For this setting I was really keen
on using black accents in the crockery.
Valentine’s Day can often come across as
quite cheesy – but a few black elements
can immediately elevate your table.”
Aim for abundance
Heike believes that working with what
you love always yields the best results.
She loves food, so she likes to “load the
table with food, and flowers, of course”.
“I like to present the food as part of the
arrangement," she says of her actual menu,
“something like informal platters of tapas.
Throw in a nice bottle of wine, some
candlelight and your loved one, and
you’ve got everything you need for an
inviting table, and a romantic night.”
Heike Hayward, @fleurlecordeur. Look out for Heike’s
gift shop, Fleur le Cordeur, which will open in De Wet
Square in Stellenbosch in January.
GET THE LOOK
For the florals, combine a variety of
Woolworths orchids (from R149.99)
with seasonal fynbos. The roses are:
Rose & Snap bouquet (R120), speciality
roses in Sorbet Avalanche and Ace Pink
(from R109.99 for 10 stems). The crockery
includes Country Road’s Tapas dinner
plates (in faded pink, pale grey or matt
black, R448.99 for 4) and Country Road’s
Tapas side plates (in faded pink, pale grey
or matt black, R399 for 4). The cutlery is
Country Road’s Nolan Graphite 16-piece
cutlery set (R1 399). The glasses are David
Jones’ Premium Collection Ella whisky
tumbler (R180) and Studio.W crystal wine
glass (R250 for 4). Napery: Holestitch
cotton tablecloth in white (R499.99) and
cotton chambray napkins (R140 for 6).
PHOTOGRAPHS TASHA SECCOMBE TEXT JEANNE CALITZ
“People like to go out
on Valentine’s Day, I know,
but why would you want to
go to a restaurant when you
can set a beautiful table
in your own home? With
all the delicious food and
produce available today,
I find it so rewarding to set
your own table – it also feels
like a much more authentic
experience as opposed to
the commercial exercise
that Valentine’s Day can
sometimes be. This way,
you can use the event to
reinforce the relationship
between you and your
partner – and that’s
worth celebrating.”
So, how should you set
your Valentine’s Day table
for optimal romance?
Heike has a few pointers.
TASTE JAN/FEB 2018 36
A D V E R T I S I N G
P R O M O T I O N
WOK & ROLL
For a fresh, delicious meal that’s ready in minutes, it’s hard to beat Woolworths’ wok-ready
products. Consisting of a variety of chopped veggies, noodles and fragrant sauces,
they’re the busy cook’s secret weapon. Simply pick your veggies (such as the crisp and
crunchy mix of Tenderstem broccoli and red cabbage) and flash fry. Cook some noodles
(why not try low-carb cauliflower noodles?), douse in a Thai coconut sauce and dig in.
Feeling adventurous? Combine the veggies and noodles, wrap them in rice paper rolls
and dip into the ready-made sauce. It’s that easy. woolworths.co.za
Serving suggestion
PHOTOGRAPH JAN RAS PRODUCTION JACQUELINE BURGESS FOOD ASSISTANT SAXON KINNEAR
Prepare Woolworths Easy
to Wok noodles and julienne
stir-fry vegetables according
to package instructions. Wrap
in Asian rice paper rolls and serve
with prawns and the readymade
Thai coconut stir-fry sauce, mixed
with a little coconut milk or cream
to make a dipping sauce. Garnish
with toasted sesame seeds and
pink peppercorns.
TA B L E TALK
Best in glass
So, what should you be drinking in 2019? We joined the Black Cellar Club (BLACC) sommeliers
at their first ever wine and spirits festival, held in Langa, to find out
WEEKEND SPECIAL
Makers, lovers
and purveyors
of fine wines
and spirits
celebrated the
best at BLACC
Fest X Langa.
THE VENUE: Guga S’Thebe Arts
and Culture Centre, Washington
Street, Langa, Cape Town.
THE HOSTS: The Black Cellar Club.
Founded two years ago, BLACC
sees sommeliers and wine stewards
working to bring local wines and
spirits to the greater population
of African people.
THE EVENT: BLACC’s inaugural
premium wine and spirits festival,
BLACC Fest X Langa, 10–11
November 2018.
THE FOOD: Streetfood by Langaborn chef Ntlalo Jordan of Jordan’s
Way of Cooking, and Stanton
Hendricks and Ryan Brand
of Boulevard 82.
THE WINE: Top reds, whites
and bubblies from big names
including Jordan and Steenberg,
to newcomers Mosi and Kumusha.
The hotel somm says …
WHAT’S NEXT? Keep an eye on
@BLACCSA on Facebook for dates
for the Jozi festival in May.
PEARL OLIVER: BLACC chairperson and sommelier at The One & Only
The 2019 wine to watch is rosé all the way. Wine lovers are embracing it and winemakers
have been putting a lot of effort into producing these styles. It’s so versatile, it can take you
right through dinner.
The wine in my glass this summer is Chenin Blanc. The oaked versions are on the rise.
Try the cool-climate Five Generations by Cederberg Wines.
My cocktail of the year stars brandy. I like the KWV 10-year-old served with lime juice,
basil, lemongrass and Fitch & Leedes ginger ale.
Keep an eye on orange wine (white wine made by leaving the juice in contact with the
grape skins and seeds, creating an amber hue). This style should be drunk more in SA
so that more wine drinkers understand it. My favourite is the Intellego Elementis 2017
from the Swartland. @prospearl
46 TASTE JAN/FEB 2019
“Gin isn’t going away
– there’s nothing
like a well-made
G&T. Also fill your
glass with a Chenin
Blanc/Roussanne
blend this summer”
– Nondumiso Pikashe,
Ses’fikile Wines
founder
PHOTOGRAPHS JAN RAS PRODUCTION LIESL NICHOLSON INTERVIEWS MICHELLE COBURN
THE MUSIC: DJ Fosta, DJ Sebs
and the Abavuki Marimba Band.
TAB LE TA LK
The independent
somm says …
ATHULE KAMANGA:
BLACC senior member
The trend of the year is a greater interest
among local wine drinkers in how to pair
food and wine. I don’t mean high-end
pairings, but more what you’re going to
drink with supper at home – like samp and
beans with a rich beef stew. I’d recommend
a full-bodied wine to carry the heaviness
of the food. Try a Pinotage or Shiraz.
It’s Chardonnay all the way for me this
year. But rosé is in there too. I really
like the Simonsvlei Shiraz Rosé.
My cocktail of the summer is gin with
Fitch & Leedes pink tonic, strawberry
liqueur, a cinnamon stick, fresh mint
and crushed ice. @athulekamanga
Above: DJ Fosta had everyone moving to his beats. Below, from left: Audrey Lumba poured countless glasses
of Graham Beck bubbly; Pearl Oliver and bartender Matthew Ntsele with Pearl's brandy cocktail of the year.
SHOULD YOU MIX
YOUR DRINKS?
Internationally, mixologists say wine and spirit
mash-ups are going to be big this year (think gin
and sparkling wine, or rum with Prosecco). We asked
the pros on these pages and the verdict is clear
“I’ve never been a big fan, but I do
find an Aperol Spritz forgivable as an
apéritif. I believe everyone should
drink what makes them happy, as long
as we all drink local!” – Pearl Oliver
The winepreneur says …
“No thanks. I’m all for innovation
but I think you have to respect the art
and discipline of wine and mixology.
Mixing the two will alter the flavour
notes.” – Athule Kamanga
NOMHLE ZONDANI: founder/director, The Wine Shaq pop-up wine bar, Langa
This summer, try a wine slushie. Wine, fruit and crushed ice is a combination that’s
already a hit, but this is the year to give it a try if you haven’t already.
I’ll keep topping up my glass with Chardonnay this year. My favourite right now
is the Aslina by Ntsiki Biyela.
I predict more interest in organic, biodynamic and natural wines as wine lovers focus
more on health and environmental concerns.
A big trend now is bourbon barrel-aged wines. Barrels that once held whisky
or bourbon are being refurbished and used to age wine, and the barrels are charred
for aroma and flavour. @thewineshaq
“There will always be the next new
thing to try, including wine sold in tins,
but these things don’t last. You can’t
go wrong with a great bottle of wine
made by an expert, enjoyed as it was
intended.” – Joseph Dhafana
“There’s no room for this. Let me
have my gin and let me enjoy my
wine. Even if it’s one after the other.
Just not together!” – Aubrey Ngcungama
TASTE JAN/FEB 2019 47
TA B L E TALK
WHAT TO DRINK
WITH STREETFOOD
Flavour-packed streetfood, such as burgers,
chicken wings and nachos, deserves to be
enjoyed with a glass of something good
while you’re licking your fingers. Here
are some ideas from the pros
SPICY CHICKEN WINGS +
GEWÜRZTRAMINER
“The residual sugar in the wine
will complement the spices
used on the wings beautifully.”
– Pearl Oliver
PORK BURGER +
CHARDONNAY OR
SEMILLON
“A citrusy, wooded, cool-climate
Chardonnay or Semillon will cut
through the richness of the pork
and complement the guacamole,
too.” – Athule Kamanga
PREGO ROLL + ALBARIÑO
“Garlic is one of the toughest
ingredients to match as it can be
overwhelming and kill the wine
completely. I like the Newton
Johnson Albariño, which has fresh
lime that will tame the garlic.”
– Joseph Dhafana
Clockwise from above: Cheeseburgers and pork burgers kept the crowd happy; a chilled glass of Chenin Blanc
went down a treat on a warm Saturday afternoon; the Boulevard 82 team served streetfood hits.
The restaurant
somm says …
JOSEPH DHAFANA: La Colombe
sommelier and Mosi winemaker
“What to drink with
creamy mac ’n’ cheese?
Chardonnay or a Brut
bubbly gets my vote”
– Athule Kamanga,
independent somm
My advice of the year? Don’t judge a
wine by the flashy label on the bottle. They
are getting brighter and bolder but often
say nothing about what’s inside. Always
try before you buy. Go to wine tastings so
that you know exactly what you’re getting.
Then buy a few bottles of the same wine.
When you can, always start lunch
with a negroni. Its tart bitterness wakes
up the palate before your meal.
Syrah should be in your glass right now.
Try the Mullineux Granite Syrah and Eben
Sadie’s Cinsaut with grapes from bush
vines in Riebeek-Kasteel.
Do give orange wine a try, but be prepared
to let it to grow on you. It’s a very personal
thing. I like it with food but it can be harsh
on the palate, as the tannins are high.
48 TASTE JAN/FEB 2019
MAC ‘N’ CHEESE +
CHENIN BLANC
“This is a perfect duo. The
fruitiness and acidity of the
Chenin Blanc will work well
with the creaminess of the
cheese sauce.” – Nondumiso Pikashe
BUNNY CHOW + RIESLING
“The spices and heat of the food
will certainly meet their match
with the bold fruit of this fine
grape.” – Aubrey Ngcungama
NACHOS + CHARDONNAY
“The raw tomato in the salsa
adds acid to the food. Break it
down with a citrusy Chardonnay,
which also works well with the
guacamole and sour cream
– Chardonnay always loves
creaminess.” – Athule Kamanga
TAB LE TA LK
The wine
aficionado says…
AUBREY NGCUNGAMA:
BLACC co-founder
The coming of age of so
much of our population
means youngsters are going
to be asking questions about
what goes into their wine.
Green revolution incoming!
The varietal to drink this
summer is Sauvignon Blanc,
of course. Groote Post will
never fail.
Gin is still very much in,
but rum is growing – expect
to see and drink more of it in
2019 than you did last year.
Wine is my first love but
a perfect dry gin martini will
always put a smile on my face.
Above from left: BLACC Fest X Langa offered plenty of Insta moments; Langa-born chef Ntlalo Jordan with his famous
pork burger, perfect with a glass of Chardonnay or Semillon.
FOREVA STRAWS ARE FOREVER
Inspired by the late Eva Johnson, ForEVA
Straws are the first plastic-alternative
straws in South Africa to be commercially
available. ForEVA stainless steel drinking
straws are high-quality grade, eco-friendly,
reusable and dishwasher-safe. Available in
various colours and sizes (including funky
unicorn, rose gold, black, champagne gold
and silver), the stylish straws add a finishing
touch to cocktails or any other drink.
ForEVA Straws are sold in sets of 2 or 4, and
each set includes a cleaning brush and a
storage bag. Perfect for everyday usage,
they make for an incredible corporate gift.
ForEVA Straws are available in over 70 stores
nationwide and 6 stores internationally. Visit
www.forevastraws.co.za for a list of retailers
near you.
TA B L E TALK
In his new series, Allan Mullins curates a case of six wines that’ll ease you out
of the holidays and back to reality (with the promise of a cork to pop on 14 Feb)
DMZ Chenin
Blanc 2017
1
Perfect for: Celebrating
January’s pay day
It’s been a long, lean month.
So when your phone pings
to announce your first salary
of 2019 has landed, you’ll
want to celebrate with an
exciting wine. This one from
De Morgenzon has a vibrancy
that exhilarates the nose
and the palate – lightly floral
flavours of yellow apple,
honeydew melon and apricot,
with a complex, supple body
that balances luscious fruit
and crisp acidity.
Ken Forrester
Grenache 2016
2
Perfect for: Laid-back
Sunday nights
Get into the right headspace
for the week with a bottle
that’s bright and uplifting, as
well as pleasing and delicious.
The Ken Forrester Grenache
inspires with its inviting fruitfilled bouquet of strawberries,
raspberries and pomegranates
– sprightly and succulent with
a mouthwatering freshness.
Neil Ellis No
Sulphur Added
Sauvignon Blanc
3
Perfect for: Weekend
picnics
Whether you’ve gathered
with friends around tables
laden with alfresco fare or
are romantically à deux with
your checked blanket and
wicker basket, always include
50 TASTE JAN/FEB 2019
a wine like this: uplifting as
a summer breeze, with wafts
of gooseberry and fynbos,
and the juiciness of melon,
granadilla and white peach.
mulberry, a hint of mint and an
enticing spiciness. A laid-back
mouthful to inspire you.
Villiera Brut Rosé
Non-Vintage MCC
5
4
Villiera
Merlot 2015
Perfect for: Popping
on Valentine’s Day
Perfect for: The last day
of your summer holiday
When you’re thinking back
on good times shared, and
also looking ahead to what
the year holds, you need
a bottle to suit your mood.
This wine is velvety soft,
rounded and smooth. There’s
ripe fruit with blackcurrant and
Two essential prerequisites
for a potion to sweep your
Valentine off their feet: it must
be bubbly and it must be pink.
This MCC is a seductive salmon
pink with a frothing mousse,
enticing strawberry and
raspberry flavours, a beguiling
light spiciness, and a final
explosion of cascading bubbles.
Perfect for: Long brunches
You’ve worked hard to
prepare a variety of dishes
for your guests – fresh fillets
of fish, bubbling sausages
and creamy scrambled eggs –
so you’ll want a versatile wine
to match. This one has apple,
lemon and a zingy lift from
the Chardonnay, while the
Pinot Noir adds richer, darker
red fruit, with body and
texture. Perfect for dishes
ranging from light to rich.
Cape Wine
Master Allan
Mullins has
selected wines
for Woolies for
almost 30 years.
Buy these handpicked wines in
stores or at woolworths.co.za.
PHOTOGRAPH SADIQAH ASSUR-ISMAIL PRODUCTION HANNAH LEWRY
The Taste case
Spier Chardonnay
Pinot Noir 2018
6
TAST E S TH AT BI ND
Toast mastered
Weekends are made for laid-back family breakfasts, but with a little extra effort (and mayo)
SAM WOULIDGE has found a way to orchestrate a sit-down breakfast on school days, too
52 TASTE JAN/FEB 2019
without the fuss and the ham. Grated
cheese, eggs and a dollop of mayonnaise (I
grew up in the seventies after all) slathered
on slices of bread and popped under the
grill for a few minutes until it’s all puffed up
and warm and soft inside. Kind of like you
feel when you eat it.
Other than the mayonnaise, puffy
cheese ticks all the boxes that should be
ticked to ensure that a small boy has had
a sensible breakfast. But, more importantly,
it’s a treat. A nutritious (and yes, calorific)
treat, but the fact that I’ve gone to the
trouble of making puffy cheese feeds
the hearts of those I love.
Together we sit in the courtyard,
enjoying the early morning sun, drinking
from a fresh pot of hot tea and eating
warm toasted cheese before we take on
the day. Making provision for an additional
20 minutes in the morning for breakfast
is all that is required to centre ourselves
by focussing on one another. Eating puffy
cheese toasties together in the morning
is the culinary equivalent of the group
hug that Seb loves so much.
My in-laws came to stay recently.
They are familiar with our early morning
weekday shouting shenanigans, but on
that particular Tuesday I decided to get
up a bit earlier and make puffy cheese
toasties so that we could all eat together
before everyone went their separate ways.
“Aunty Phumla!” Seb shouted when our
helper and friend arrived for work. While
making her some coffee and putting the
bread in the toaster, and mixing the
grated cheese and egg, I noticed
Phumla laughing at me. “What?” I asked
defensively. “Vroeg opstaan. Kos maak.
Goeie makoti.” (Wake up early. Make food.
Good daughter-in-law.) She teased me
affectionately, referencing her own Xhosa
cultural traditions and the effort a new
bride goes to in order to impress her
in-laws. I laughed. Puffy cheese toasties
and laughter. And family and a friend.
That was a very good Tuesday morning. W
confessionsofahungrywoman.com; @samwoulidge
“Eating
puffy
cheese
toasties
together
in the
morning
is the
culinary equivalent
of the group hug that
Seb loves so much”
PUFFY CHEESE
TOASTIES
This is just the way my ma made
them. Double up if you’re eight
for breakfast.
Serves 4
EASY
GREAT VALUE
Preparation: 15 minutes
Cooking: 10 minutes
grated cheese 240 g
(I used a mix of Emmentaler
and mature Cheddar)
Hellmann’s mayonnaise 3 T
free-range egg 1
baking powder 1 t
bread 4 slices (I like low-GI seed
wholewheat brown bread)
butter, for spreading on
your toast
1 Turn the oven’s grill to high.
Mix the cheese, mayonnaise, egg
and baking powder well using
a fork. 2 Toast the bread in a
toaster, then butter. 3 Place a big
tablespoon of the cheesy mixture
onto each piece of toast and
spread evenly. Place under the
grill and bake until golden brown
and puffy. Eat immediately.
CARB-CONSCIOUS,
MEAT-FREE
PHOTOGRAPH TOBY MURPHY PRODUCTION HANNAH LEWRY PORTRAIT MICHAEL LE GRANGE
O
ur weekend breakfasts are leisurely,
decadent affairs. Food market
splurges that last way past lunchtime,
or freshly baked bacon-and-cheese
croissants from Jason Bakery, or warm
almond croissants and creamy flat whites
and hot chocolate from Giovanni’s after
a cold swim at Clifton. As a family of
three, these breakfast indulgences are
our weekly reminder of how lucky we are.
We are grateful for the life we have and
the lives we share.
Weekday breakfasts, on the other hand,
are rushed, often shouty experiences.
Try as we might, we never manage to sit
down at a table together and calmly
prepare ourselves for the day ahead.
There are occasional warm, fuzzy family
moments when we drink tea in bed
in the morning for a few minutes before
the hysteria kicks in. But mostly the hysteria
just kicks in.
When it comes to breakfast, I’m content
with coffee. Or a green juice if I’m feeling
particularly virtuous. If I can’t eat sugary
carbs as I do on weekends, I’d rather go
without. Jacques eats a wonderful homemade granola that he makes on Sunday
nights. In an ideal world, Seb would join his
father in eating double-thick yoghurt,
crunchy granola and a swish of honey.
But no. We don’t live in an ideal world.
And our son has taken a dislike to the
texture of granola. Texture? No one warned
me about this. Seb likes soft things for
breakfast. He eats scrambled eggs with
Parmesan shavings; sweet, softened milky
Weet-Bix; soggy, sugary Rice Krispies.
The last two fill me with guilt…
So, on good days – those days when
we have all managed to wake up a bit
earlier than usual and the school lunchbox
is packed with healthy treats and Jacques
and I can do more than gulp down our
coffees and grunt at one another – I make
puffy cheese toasties. Just the way my
mother did. With shortcuts and affection.
Puffy cheese is similar to Welsh rarebit
I suppose, or a croque monsieur, but
TAST E S LI KE M OR E
The new king in town
Move over, kale! Cabbage is poised to claim its rightful space on your plate, says Tessa
Purdon. It’s versatile, affordable, delicious – so many reasons to rise to Insta fame in 2019
54 TASTE JAN/FEB 2019
“Why has it
taken some
of us so long
to embrace
that funny
ball of leaves
– frumpiness and all?”
last year that he believes cabbage is the
most underrated vegetable, and when the
celebrated chef of a former world number
one restaurant gives it that much credit –
it’s time to sit up and listen.
Much like the move towards using
cheaper cuts of meat, local chefs
are now giving humble, everyday
vegetables pride of place on their menus.
They’re showcasing their versatility
and deliciousness with sophisticated
presentations and punchy flavours, or
treating them to techniques including
braising, charring, pickling and fermenting.
“Kimchi makes the world a better place,”
says Glen Williams, head chef at Foxcroft
restaurant in Cape Town, while Ivor Jones
of Chefs Warehouse Beau Constantia says
he likes to make sauerkraut and fry it
with chilli, mustard seeds and curry leaves.
“It’s super spicy and sour and so good,”
he emphasises.
One of my favourite quick and fuss-free
ways to eat cabbage in summer is to finely
slice a Woolies baby cabbage, dress it with
a zingy tahini vinaigrette, then sprinkle
over some crispy bacon bits. That’s it!
Simple, but so satisfying.
Most supermarkets stock standard
white and red cabbage. But take a walk
through your local fresh produce market
on a Saturday and you’ll find more of
the exotic varieties. The colours are a
beautiful burst of bright greens and
purples that allow your imagination to run
wild with edible possibilities. Watch out
world, cabbage is the new it-girl among
veggies and she’s gaining appeal. W
Tessa Purdon is the editor of Food24; @tessapurdon
PHOTOGRAPH TOBY MURPHY TEXT TESSA PURDON
PORTRAIT STEPHANIE NORMAN
J
ust saying the word “cabbage” can
make a person’s spine tingle. Dismal
associations come flooding in. That
dreaded cabbage soup diet of the 80s,
the pungent smell of a boarding school
dining hall, even the whiff of a really bad…
No, cabbage isn’t altogether sexy, but
it’s about to be, trust me!
It’s no real surprise that food trends
(or movements) are often driven by what’s
happening in the greater zeitgeist. Think of
issues surrounding climate change, food
insecurity, social constructs and new
methods of agriculture. Not to mention the
massive shift toward plant-based eating.
In a nutshell, what are we all after? Food
that’s affordable but also nutritious.
Cabbage is both of these things, as well
as being one of the few
vegetables that are salt tolerant.
I discovered this at the S/Zout
experiential waterless dinner
presented by Studio. H in Cape
Town last year – an event that
showcased the future of food
if sea water were to be used
for agriculture. So while you
might normally give cabbage
a wide berth in the shops,
you really need to embrace
it because it’s about to be
something we’re going
to be cooking with – a lot.
Many of the world’s cultures
already cook extensively with
this cruciferous veggie and
have for centuries – think
of Polish golumpki (boiled
cabbage leaves wrapped
around a meat filling with
onions and rice) or Korean
kimchi, which has had a lot
of time in the spotlight lately
thanks to the fermented
food trend. And we can’t
talk about cabbage without
including that British classic,
bubble and squeak.
So why has it taken some
of us so long to embrace that funny ball
of leaves – frumpiness and all? Could it be
that home cooks just don’t know what to
do with it? Much like kale before it became
Insta-famous. And although cabbage hasn’t
gone mainstream (yet) as cauliflower has,
there are countless South Africans who’ve
been making magic with it in the kitchen
for years, as Hope Malau points out in his
cookbook, Johanne 14. “A head of cabbage
can be cooked in so many different ways;
it is inexpensive and goes with anything
or nothing at all. You can eat it raw, boil
it or fry it, combine it with any other
vegetable and it will give you a wholesome
meal every time.”
René Redzepi of Noma fame told the
Bon Appetit team in a podcast interview
You Never Have to Leave
oneandonlycapetown.com
+27 21 431 5800 | reservations@oneandonlycapetown.com
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S C EN E STEALER
Stellenbosch on foot
Sure, wine farm restaurants have the best views, but when it comes to cool food spots,
Stellenbosch’s city centre has got it going on. Spend a weekend in town and take
a walking safari to find the town’s hottest restaurants and bars
56 TASTE JAN/FEB 2019
PHOTOGRAPHS JAN RAS TEXT KATHARINE POPE
SCEN E STEA LER
1
For crazy croissants:
SCHOON MANUFACTORY AND CROISSANT HATCH
Stellenbosch locals shed a tear when, after seven successful years,
Fritz Schoon’s glorious bakery left Stellenbosch for Somerset West.
Now, the bakery is back in the Eikestad with two new locations:
an industrial-chic “Manufactory” café in Bird Street, and a cute hatch
in the De Wet Centre courtyard. At the Manufactory, start the day
with soft scrambled eggs from Usana Farm, Ryan Boon bacon and country
loaf toast – and watch while the staff wrestle huge batches of sourdough,
dark rye and baguettes in the kitchen. The hatch – decorated in gorgeous
floral wallpaper – focuses on croissants, baked goods and coffee – a signature
Schoon blend courtesy of Conti Coffee. Don’t leave without trying one of
the baked treats: think wonderfully almondy apple friands, strawberry-andyoghurt cronuts and ricotta-and-honey croissants. Schoon Manufactory Café, 91 Bird
Street, La Colline; Schoon Croissant and Coffee Bar, De Wet Centre, corner Church and Bird Streets
2
For a single-malt
whisky: HANK’S
Named for famous
barfly and author Henry
Charles Bukowski – whose
nickname was Hank – this fairly new
whisky bar is a great spot for storytelling
and slow sipping. Located directly above
veteran drinking spot De Akker Pub,
the moody, sophisticated space was
designed by Story Design Collective,
who recreated the atmosphere of
a hunting lodge with pressed ceilings,
leather banquettes and old hunting
paintings (which frequently feature the character from the logo –
a cheeky fox, which always escapes the hunter). There’s an impressive
range of Irish and Scotch whiskies to try, as well as a couple of options
from Taiwan, Japan, America and SA. Or sip on a perfectly poured
whisky sour with a light egg white froth, or a Paloma – the Mexican
cocktail that’s more authentic than a margarita. Catch live acoustic
blues and folk on Tuesdays, and jazz on Thursdays.
1st floor, De Akker building, 90 Dorp Street (entrance on Herte Street)
3
For a glorious harvest table:
GREENGATE DELI
Pile up a plate of fresh salads
and meat from the harvest table
at this relaxed café. Sandwiches
and pies (try the venison one)
are another great lunch option. Sweltering
Stellenbosch summer days call for milkshakes
made with Italian ice cream or vegan
blueberry-and-banana “nice cream”. Owner
Ingrid du Toit is passionate about vegan
cooking – so look out for other specials
including vegan carrot cake, vegan chocolate
and coconut cake and vegan tagines.
De Wet Square, corner Church and Bird Streets
TASTE JAN/FEB 2019 57
S C EN E STEALER
4
For farm-fresh food whenever you like:
BOSCHENDAL AT OUDE BANK
Located in the former home of Schoon (see page 57
for their new location), this all-day spot is now also
offering dinners from Wednesday to Saturday. Think
farm pizza made with local, stoneground flour; organic
yellow maize-battered hake and chips with charred onion dip, and
farm-fresh salads – all developed by Boschendal’s star chef Christiaan
Campbell. In the afternoon, pop in for a platter and a cocktail – try
The Stopwatch Gang with whisky, pomegranate juice, citrus stock,
stopwatch syrup, orange and pomegranate bitters and ginger ale.
7 Church Street
5
For a slap-up lunch:
JARDINE RESTAURANT
George Jardine is the
master of turning comfort
food into fine-dining plates,
like the braised Williston lamb shoulder
“pie”, honeyed parsnip, grilled lamb kidney
and roasted garlic (top). At his Andringa
Street space (no. 9 on the 2019 Eat
Out Top 10), he serves a surprisingly
affordable two- or three-course menu
(if you calculate based on cost per units
of deliciousness). 1 Andringa Street
58 TASTE JAN/FEB 2019
A D V E R T I S I N G
P R O M O T I O N
PHOTOGRAPH TOBY MURPHY PRODUCTION JACQUELINE BURGESS FOOD ASSISTANT SAXON KINNEAR
BATTER UP
Looking for a something that’ll be on the table
with minimal fuss? Woolworths’ sustainably
sourced hake or calamari goujons fit the bill
perfectly. They’re quick to cook and easy
to serve – simply add tangy tartare sauce
and a squeeze of lemon juice and you’re
good to go. They’re also perfect in snacksized portions – which makes them a great
lunchbox option for everyone.
woolworths.co.za
S C EN E STEALER
6
For a salmon bagel:
ALL THINGS GOOD
Come lunchtime, this Ryneveld
Street spot is buzzing.
Students and tourists alike flock here for
an affordable, doughnut-shaped lunch.
Think bagels loaded with salmon, cream
cheese, cucumber, capers and dill; or
salami, Brie, olive tapenade and onion
jam. It’s also a great spot for vegans: at
the time of writing, there were four vegan
bagel options – including a mushroom,
sundried tomato, hummus and basil
bagel – and a choice of almond, soya or
coconut milk for your coffee. And for pud,
there are vegan peanut butter tarts and
vegan cheesecake. While you’re there,
pop into Meraki next door – run by the
same owners – for fantastic gluten-free
ricotta-and-almond cake. Also check out
the fairly new Meraki Downtown
at 84 Dorp Street – the spot formerly
occupied by Melissa’s. 36 Ryneveld St
7
For a giant burger: DE VRIJE BURGER
“Chefs need to start reclaiming everyday
food,” award-winning chef Bertus Basson
tells us over burgers, which he orders
from this, his diminutive burger joint on
Plein Street, at least once a week to “check
standards”. We think the hand-cut potato
chips, the juicy patties, and the free softserve with sprinkles that come with it
could also have something to do with his
habit. Also visit Bertus’s stellar new finedining spot, Eike, and his superb tapasand-wine bar, Spek & Bone, both
on Dorp Street. 61 Plein Street
60 TASTE JAN/FEB 2019
8
For oysters, bubbly and market-style shopping:
DE WARENMARKT
This double-volume, market-style space makes a great
relaxed spot to meet for lunch. On sweltering summer days,
a platter of dressed Saldanha Bay oysters from the Kaapse
Vonkel Cap Classique Oyster Bar will go down a treat with a glass of
something from the Legends wine list, which celebrates the Stellenbosch
terroir. Finish with a Jackson Pollock crêpe with Nutella and banana from
the For the Love of Yummyness stall. While you’re there, stock up on
Rozendal vinegars, Banhoek chilli oil from the deli, and some Oak Valley
glazed pork rashers, free-range, bone-in sirloin and certified Karoo lamb
from the Ryan Boon Speciality Butcher counter. 20 Ryneveld Street
OGILVY SA 12791/E
PROTECT YOUR
CLOTHING FROM
DISCOLOURING
WITH SKIP PERFECT CARE
S C EN E STEALER
9
For steak aux
champignons:
THE FATBUTCHER
Dry-aged Chalmar
beef is the game
changer at this
stylish steakhouse set in historic
Collins House. It’s been around since
2016 and has built a reputation
for perfectly seared steaks. Feast
on a steak aux champignons: fillet
steak, foraged mushrooms, Dijon
mustard, sherry, white truffle oil,
kataifi and fresh black truffle. On
balmy evenings, nab a spot outside
in the lovely courtyard and sip on
something cold from the extensive
gin list. 1 Van Riebeeck Street
10
For a fresh lime mojito:
BALBOA BALCONY BAR
Situated on the first floor, with a balcony looking
out through the oak trees, Balboa makes a
wonderful place for a relaxed drink on a hot
afternoon. It’s named for boxing legend Rocky Balboa, but this is not
the sort of place that regularly sees fist fights – an age limit of 23 means
that most patrons can hold their liquor. Sip on a mojito made with
fresh limes, and don’t miss the espresso tequila shot, made with freshly
brewed coffee and Kahlua. Soak up the booze with a generous burger
with a home-made patty, cheese sauce, and three kinds of fries.
First floor, 18A Andringa Street
62 TASTE JAN/FEB 2019
PHOTOGRAPH MYBURGH DU PLESSIS PRODUCTION HANNAH LEWRY FOOD ASSISTANT KATE FERREIRA
A
A D V E R T I S I N G
P R O M O T I O N
Kids will love the playful range of fruity snack bites from Woolworths – they finally have an
excuse to play with their food! Choose between fruity ABCs (alphabet-shaped pineappleand-carrot bites), fruity 123s (number-shaped strawberry-and-beetroot bites), raw mini
strawberry date bites, and mini fruity rulers (fruit bites shaped like small rulers in mango
and butternut or mixed berry and beetroot flavours). And it’s not just fun and games –
these snacks are portion controlled, a source of fibre and contain no added preservatives,
colorants or flavourants. Your quest for the perfect lunchbox item or between-meal snack
has just become so much easier. woolworths.co.za
A D V E R T I S I N G
P R O M O T I O N
TAKE
A LEAF
Remember when iceberg lettuce was all
there was? These days, we’re spoilt for
choice with a wide range, each with their
own unique flavour and texture. Woolworths’
selection of solo lettuce leaves allows you
to experiment and mix and match in endless
combinations. It’s the perfect opportunity
to play with your food. Butter lettuce, for
example, loves croutons, coconut chips
and a creamy basil dressing – and some
red leaves for colour. Crunchita (exclusive
to Woolies) gets on well with crispy onion
sprinkles, a balsamic vinaigrette, and
watercress for a touch of pepperiness.
Sustainably grown by local farmers, all the
leaves are hand selected for your table.
woolworths.co.za
PHOTOGRAPH TOBY MURPHY PRODUCTION JACQUELINE BURGESS FOOD ASSISTANT SAXON KINNEAR
Opposite,
clockwise
from bottom
left: Romaine,
butter lettuce,
watercress, rocket,
Crunchita and red
leaf lettuce. This
page: Crunchita
is served with
green tomatoes,
cucumber and
crispy onion
sprinkles.
TACO T UESDAY
SPICY PORK TACOS WITH
WATERMELON, CORIANDER
SALSA VERDE AND PEANUTS
Ready-cooked prawns
or panfried salmon are
a great swap for pork.
66 TASTE JAN/FEB 2019
TACO TUES DAY
Taco ’bout
a revolution
FOOD ASSISTANT KATE FERREIRA
Lift the spicy flavours of
the chicken with chopped
fresh mango.
CRUNCHY CHICKEN TACOS
WITH BLUE CHEESE
DRESSING
Fry ’em, toast ’em, char ’em, bake ’em – whichever way you like ’em, there’s
something for everyone on taco Tuesday. In fact, we have a brand new
combo for every day of the week. Pass the guacamole
TASTE JAN/FEB 2019 67
TACO T UESDAY
This is the ultimate
DIY taco recipe. Let
your friends and
family put them
together the
way they like.
SPICY STEAK KEBAB TACOS
WITH PICKLED PINEAPPLE
68 TASTE JAN/FEB 2019
TACO TUES DAY
CROWD-PLEASING
CRISPY FISH TACOS
The secret to this
recipe is the airy,
light, crispy batter.
It’ll have you going
back for thirds and
even fourths!
TASTE JAN/FEB 2019 69
TACO T UESDAY
SPICE, SPICE BABY!
Make these your go-to spices and sauces
for maximum flavour
CHIPOTLE
SEASONING
A Mexican-inspired
seasoning starring
slow-smoked, dried
jjalapeño chillies. R19.99
ENCHILADA
SPICE MIX Bell peppers,
garlic, paprika, chilli and
cinnamon are flavourboosting ingredients
here. R14.99
FAJITA SPICE MIX
Bland stands no chance
with this blend of sea
salt, cumin, cayenne
pepper, paprika, garlic,
red bell peppers,
oregano and smoked paprika. R14.99
HOT PERI-PERI
SAUCE Paprika and
bird’s-eye chilli –
because there’s no
such thing as too
hot, right? R26.99
SPICY PORK TACOS WITH
WATERMELON, CORIANDER
SALSA VERDE AND
PEANUTS
“If you’re a taco novice, this is the recipe for you.
But be prepared to fall in love with taco Tuesday!
You can thank us later.”
Serves 4
EASY
Preparation: 40 minutes
Cooking: 20 minutes
Woolworths mini wraps 8
olive oil, for frying
pork fillet 500 g
Woolworths enchilada spice 25 g
plain yoghurt, for serving
Woolworths prepared watermelon
1 x 250 g tub
70 TASTE JAN/FEB 2019
cucumber 1, sliced julienne, for serving
salted peanuts, roasted and crushed,
for serving
spring onion, sliced, to garnish
chilli, sliced, to garnish
For the coriander salsa verde, blend:
coriander 70 g
spring onions 5–6 (white part only)
green chillies 2, chopped
mint 10 g
garlic 2 cloves, chopped
olive oil ¼ cup
lime 1, zested and juiced
white wine vinegar 1 T
salt, to taste
1 Preheat the oven to 180°C. Fry the wraps
in a little olive oil until toasted. 2 Cut the
pork fillet into 2 or 3 equal pieces. Roll each
piece in the enchilada spice to coat. 3 Heat
2 T olive oil in a pan and pan-fry the pork
for 30 seconds on each side so the spice
doesn’t burn but the meat is sealed. Place
on a baking tray, pour over any excess
pan juices and roast for 5–10 minutes,
or until cooked to your liking. Allow to rest
before slicing. 4 Serve hot on the tacos,
topped with the yoghurt, watermelon,
cucumber, crushed peanuts and coriander
salsa verde. Garnish with spring onion
and sliced chilli.
WINE: Thelema Merlot 2016
CHICKEN TACOS WITH
BLUE CHEESE DRESSING
“I’m a total sucker for crunchy chicken anything.
This combo of blue cheese dressing and sweettart mango is one that I’ll be eating all summer.”
Serves 4
EASY
Preparation: 25 minutes
Cooking: 20 minutes
Woolworths spicy crumbed mini chicken
breast fillets 1 x 500 g pack
sea salt and freshly ground black
pepper, to taste
Woolworths Slimmer’s Choice wraps
4, chargrilled, for serving
Woolworths prepared mango
1 x 250 g tub, for serving
spring onion curls, for serving
red onion, sliced, for serving
celery curls, for serving
chillies 2, sliced, for serving
For the blue cheese dressing, mix:
good-quality mayonnaise 2 T
plain full-cream yoghurt ¼ cup
Woolworths Danablu blue cheese
100 g, crumbled
white wine or apple cider vinegar 2 t
garlic 1 clove, crushed
sea salt and freshly ground black
pepper, to taste
1 Preheat the oven to 180°C. Bake the
chicken according to package instructions.
2 Serve the chicken with the chargrilled
wraps, mango, spring onion, red onion,
celery, chillies and blue cheese dressing.
WINE: Creation Roussanne Viognier 2018
“Tacos are my
secret weapon in
the kitchen. They're
great for a fridge
cleanout and for
feeding a crowd”
SPICY STEAK KEBAB TACOS
WITH PICKLED PINEAPPLE
“These taco-style wraps are packed with
delicious fresh flavours – there’s no excuse
not to throw them together for a satisfying
midweek supper.”
Serves 4
EASY
Preparation: 25 minutes
Cooking: 5 minutes
Woolworths free-range rump or sirloin
steak 700 g, cubed
olive oil 3 T
Woolworths chilli con carne spice 25 g
jalapeños 2
Woolworths black beans 1 x 400 g can,
drained and rinsed
coconut milk 1 cup
lime 1, zested and juiced
Woolworths ancient grain wraps 4
fresh coconut, grated, to garnish
fresh mint, to garnish
For the pickled pineapple, toss:
pineapple, 1 peeled and thinly sliced
chillies 1–2, sliced
apple cider vinegar 1 T
sea salt and freshly ground black
TACO TUES DAY
Bake the cauliflower until
crispy and tender, then toss
in Napa Jack BBQ sauce while
hot to make a new veggie
take on Buffalo wings.
pepper, to taste
1 Toss the steak in the olive oil and chilli
con carne spice, then thread onto skewers.
Reserve the pan juices. 2 Chargrill on
a smoking-hot griddle pan, with the
jalapeños, for 1 minute on each side or
until cooked to your liking. Set aside to
rest. 3 Toss the black beans in the pan
juices. Slice the jalapeños and mix with the
coconut milk, lime zest and juice to make
a dressing. 4 Chargrill the wraps and serve
with the steak, black beans and pickled
pineapple. Drizzle over the dressing and
garnish with the coconut and mint.
DAIRY-FREE, WHEAT- AND GLUTEN-FREE
WINE: Hartenberg Shiraz 2016
CROWD-PLEASING
CRISPY FISH TACOS
“If you’ve ever wondered how to perfect the
ultimate fish taco, your search has come to
an end. This has to be one of my favourites.”
Serves 4
EASY
Preparation: 10 minutes
Cooking: 10 minutes
corn taco shells 6–8
fresh hake 1 x 400 g fillet, cut into strips
canola oil, for frying
microherbs, for serving
Woolworths exotic tomatoes,
sliced, for serving
sweetcorn 2 cobs, chargrilled
limes, halved, for serving
For the avocado-and-sour cream drizzle:
avocado 1, cubed
lime 1, zested and juiced
sour cream ½ cup
sea salt, to taste
For the tempura-style batter:
rice flour 150 g
self-raising flour 120 g
cold soda water 2 cups
smoked paprika 2 T
cayenne pepper 1 T
ground cumin 1 T
sea salt and freshly ground black
pepper, to taste
1 Preheat the oven to 180°C. Bake the taco
shells according to package instructions.
2 To make the avocado-and-sour cream
BUFFALO WING-STYLE CAULIFLOWER TACOS
drizzle, place all the ingredients into a
blender and process until smooth. Loosen
with a little water if necessary. 3 To make
the batter, whisk all the ingredients
together just before cooking the fish
to make sure it stays as light and airy as
possible. Dip the fish into the batter and
fry in the hot oil until puffed up, crispy and
golden. Drain on kitchen paper. 4 Serve
immediately in the taco shells with the
microherbs, tomatoes, chargrilled corn
and avocado-and-sour cream drizzle.
BUFFALO WING-STYLE
CAULIFLOWER TACOS
DAIRY-FREE
WINE: Creation Sauvignon Blanc
Semillon 2018
flour 120 g
almond milk 1 cup
Woolworths fajita spice 1 x 50 g box
“This is a great, flavour-packed veggie option.
These spicy cauli nuggets are the new veggie
buffalo wing! Delicious with the creamy, zesty
guacamole and pink pickled onions.”
Serves 4
EASY
Preparation: 30 minutes
Cooking: 40 minutes
TASTE JAN/FEB 2019 71
TACO T UESDAY
THAT’S A WRAP
Keep these versatile wraps on stand-by for snacks
and mealtimes in your house. Assemble, eat, repeat!
ANCIENT GRAIN
WRAPS Made with
teff flour, quinoa and
chia seeds, they’re
great filled with avo,
lettuce, chicken,
tomato and carrots. R55.99
CORN TACO
SHELLS Fill them
with beef or fish
and your favourite
combo of veggies
and cheese. R45.99
MULTISEED
WRAPS Chicken
breast fillets, sour
cream, salsa and
lettuce. Simple and
moreish. R55.99
panko crumbs 100–150 g
Woolworths cauliflower florets 700 g
smoked paprika 1–2 T
canola oil 1–2 cups, for frying
Woolworths Napa Jack BBQ sauce,
for serving
sea salt and freshly ground black
pepper, to taste
ripe avocados 2, halved and chargrilled
Woolworths multiseed wraps 4, toasted
fresh coriander, for serving
For the pickled onions:
red wine vinegar 1 cup
caster sugar 1 T
lime ½, juiced
peppercorns 1 t
red onions 2, cut into wedges
radishes 10, sliced
For the guacamole:
avocados 2, stoned and chopped
coriander 15 g, chopped
72 TASTE JAN/FEB 2019
STONEGROUND
FLOUR BURRITOS
Spread them with
sauce and wrap
around roasted
vegetables or fresh
salad and your choice of protein. R55.99
“Suspend corn tacos
from your oven’s
racks to ensure they
bake evenly”
lemons 2, juiced
garlic 1 clove, crushed
green chilli 1, sliced
sea salt and freshly ground black
pepper, to taste
1 Whisk the flour, almond milk, ¼ cup
water, half the fajita spice and a good
pinch of salt. Combine the remaining
fajita spice with the panko crumbs. 2 Dip
the cauliflower into the batter to coat,
shaking off any excess, then roll in the
spiced panko crumbs. Fry in batches in
the oil until golden and crunchy. Drain
WHITE FLOUR
WRAPS Grated
cheese, tuna, sour
cream and salsa –
yes, please!
R52.99
on kitchen paper. 3 To make the pickled
onions, bring the red wine vinegar, caster
sugar, lime juice and peppercorns to the
boil. Remove from the heat, add the onions
and radishes and allow to stand until cool.
4 Blend all the guacamole ingredients
and serve with the toasted wraps, grilled
avocado, crunchy cauliflower, BBQ sauce,
pickled onions and fresh coriander.
HEALTH-CONSCIOUS, DAIRY-FREE
WINE: Woolworths Bellevue
Pinotage 2017
A D V E R T I S I N G
P R O M O T I O N
FRESH START
Have you been thinking
of eating more plantbased food? If so,
look no further than
Woolworths’ delicious
plant-based meals:
they offer loads of
variety and ready-made
convenience. From
a delicious mushroomand-lentil burger or
a mushroom Kiev for
a weeknight dinner, to
a butternut-and-spinach
phyllo parcel (with
turmeric chilli cauli
florets on the side) for a
quick lunch, and a few
butternut-and-bean
sausages for a lazy
weekend braai, you’re
bound to find a tasty
plant-based meal for
every occasion.
woolworths.co.za
PHOTOGRAPH JAN RAS PRODUCTION JACQUELINE BURGESS
Serving suggestion
For the ultimate plant-based
platter, set out a range of
plant-based meals and add
Mediterranean meze in the
form of hummus, roasted
brinjal, tomatoes and
peppers and mini pitas.
Look out for this
icon in store to find
what you need for
your plant-based
lifestyle.
2019 TRENDS
TEN
FOODS YOU
WILL EAT
THIS YEAR
PHOTOGRAPHS MYBURGH DU PLESSIS PRODUCTION ABIGAIL DONNELLY
FOOD ASSISTANT KELETSO MOTAU
74 TASTE JAN/FEB 2019
MOCHI
2019 TRENDS
Always ahead of the trends, these are the ten ingredients Abigail Donnelly
predicts will be all over restaurant menus, in food blogs and the most
inspiring recipes in 2019. May we introduce the “new” chicken mayonnaise
sandwich, nut butter, sesame seeds, marshmallows and more
GREEN MANGO WITH
A WARM DRESSING
1 Mochi At its most basic, this pillowy Japanese dessert is made using
sweet glutinous rice flour, water and baking powder, sweetened with sugar and
coconut milk, then baked in the oven. It’s often coloured with matcha or other
edible dyes and wrapped around a sweet centre, such as red bean paste, to form
bite-sized treats much like gourmet marshmallows. Our favourite right now is
rose-water and vanilla mochi (opposite). Cape Town restaurant Tjing Tjing Momiji
is already in on the trend – try their kumquat mochi and be hooked.
2 Green mango Unripe mangoes, firmer and more tart than their
ripe counterparts, are widely used in Thai and Indian cooking (in India, dried green
mango is turned into powdered amchoor, which is used as a seasoning). Serve thinly
sliced and drizzled with a punchy dressing as a side dish with Thai curries.
Serving suggestion? Try a warm dressing of lime, turmeric, fish sauce, palm sugar
and another 2019 favourite – ghee – a form of clarified butter that has a high smoking
point, contains no lactose, doesn’t have to be refrigerated and is available at Woolies.
TASTE JAN/FEB 2019 75
2019 TRENDS
3 Old-world tomatoes
If you’re one of the urban South Africans who
eats 12 kg of tomatoes per year, you really should
be branching out from the standard varieties.
Come on, now. The global trend towards eating
“heirloom” varieties of vegetables and fruit
(produce that is naturally pollinated from seeds
handed down by generations) is catching on
locally. The benefits? Varied flavours, textures
shapes and colours that are all at their best eaten
raw, obvs. Serving suggestion? Nothing says
summer like Abi’s mixed platter of ripe Woolies
tomatoes with white-flesh nectarines, fior di latte
mozzarella torn into chunks and simply dressed
with extra vrigin olive oil, red wine vinegar,
chopped Italian parsley, lime zest and smoked
Maldon salt. We love it so much it made the cover.
4 Nigella seeds
Stand aside sesame! These tiny black seeds have
a slightly bitter flavour with some of the pungency
of onion, which will enhance sweeter veggies such
as carrots. Serving suggestion? Sprinkle over
tomatoes or egg and cheese dishes, or use the
seeds to make sweet-savoury shards to decorate
cakes and desserts. Pair Nigella seeds with ruby
chocolate, the on-trend new variety made from
ruby cocoa beans introduced last year by cocoa
company Barry Callebaut (find it at My Sugar
in Cape Town and Chocoloza in Joburg).
ABI’S LAZY CAPRESE SALAD
BAKED CHICKEN
BONE BROTH WITH
APPLE CIDER VINEGAR
NIGELLA SEED AND
RUBY CHOCOLATE
SHARDS
76 TASTE JAN/FEB 2019
EXTRA SOURCES BONAPPETIT.COM, TELEGRAPH.CO.UK, THEKITCHN.COM,
EATOUT.CO.ZA, NYTIMES.COM, NDA.AGRIC.ZA, APNEWS.COM
5 Tempeh
Like tofu, tempeh is made
from soya beans, but consists
of whole beans (rather than an
extract of the ground beans)
fermented to form a dense
block that’s firm in texture
and earthy in flavour. If you’re
a plant-based believer, add
it to your pantry arsenal,
pronto. Serving suggestion?
Try it marinated and fried in
gochujang, the spicy Korean
fermented red chilli paste,
then dipped into an addictive
vegan seaweed aïoli.
6 Bone broth
It’s not new, but bone broth
made headlines in the last
decade thanks to the paleo
diet and continues to inspire
converts. How is it different to
stock? Bone broth needs long,
slow cooking to extract gelatin
i l ffrom th
andd minerals
the bbones.
You can help the process along
by roasting the bones first with
a good-quality apple cider
vinegar (unfiltered), which is
also having a moment thanks
to the ongoing popularity of
fermented foods. Two trends
for the price of one.
KOREAN TEMPEH
WITH SEAWEED
AQUAFABA AÏOLI
TASTE JAN/FEB 2019 77
2019 TRENDS
7 Katsu
This is the 2019 version
of the chicken mayo
sandwich: chicken
breasts in a crust
of crushed cornflakes,
served on white
bread with Japanese
mayo. Our version
is inspired by katsu,
a fried chicken cutlet
made with panko
crumbs that originated
in Tokyo. Similar to a
schnitzel, it’s classic
Japanese comfort food
that’s now popular
around the world.
Add sriracha mayo for
a DIY fast-food winner.
KATSU CORNFLAKE
CHICKEN SANDWICH
78 TASTE JAN/FEB 2019
2019 TRENDS
8 Shave ice
9 Violet
Dairy-free, vegan and with no added
sugar, this Japanese-derived dessert
trend, which is made by shaving, not
crushing, a block of ice until very fine
so that it absorbs flavoured syrups,
is being called the new granita.
In Japan, kakigori is a traditional
summer dessert of shave ice made with
a fruit-flavoured syrup and sometimes
mochi, condensed milk or adzuki
beans. With flavours ranging from
coconut and raspberry to granadilla
and pineapple it makes a refreshing
dessert or – yes! – a frozen cocktail.
You’ll see this purple-blue flower
cropping up liberally on restaurant
menus this year. Internationally,
chefs are pairing violet mustard with
duck, as well as using it in cocktails.
At Coobs in Parkhurst, Jesse Chinn uses
candied violets in a drink called The
Aviator. Their subtle flavour makes
these flowers great for garnishing
salads and making violet sugar (layer
the flowers in a jar of caster sugar
to infuse). Serving suggestion?
The delicate sweetness of violets
is a perfect match for the tang of
strained yoghurts like labneh.
See page 115 for more on how to
make your own yoghurt or look out
for Woolies’ new strained yoghurts,
including labneh.
VIOLET LABNEH
RASPBERRYGRANADILLA SHAVE
ICE SNOW CONE
10 Date paste
Nothing lends natural sweetness to smoothies, bakes or
breakfast oats like fresh dates. Maximise their toffee-like
flavour by making a smooth paste (a.k.a. the new nut butter)
to use as a frosting for cakes or in vegan brownies. Serving
suggestion? Complement the sweetness of date paste with
a sprinkling of popped red and white quinoa – simply dry fry
these seeds in a hot pan to bring out their nutty flavour.
VEGAN DATE
BUTTER AND
POPPED QUINOA
01
36
6
FOO D R ESO LUTI ON S
Start your year right with
Siba Mtongana’s favourite
breakfasts and dinners thatt
double as lunchbox fillers.
Her ecipes will ease you
back into work and the
school run with plenty
of family time in between
COCONUT-ANDPEANUT BUTTER
MIELIE MEAL
80 TASTE JAN/FEB
/
2019
HAM-AND-CHEESE
OMELETTE ROLL
PHOTOGRAPHS
TOBY MURPHY
PRODUCTION
BRITA DU PLESSIS
FOOD ASSISTANT
ANDREA MASKEW
TASTE JAN/FEB 2019 81
FOO D R ESO LUTI ON S
3. Eat breakfast yourself
It’s the mother thing – the energy really
goes to the children and I grab whatever
I can. I make home-made goji berry
muesli on Sundays and I take some
to work in a jar with yoghurt. Or I’ll
make a smoothie and put it in a flask.
4. For dinner, get creative
with your empty fridge
The most amazing recipes come when
I’m busiest and I’ve got nothing in the
fridge. I use those moments to draw out
my creativity. Once, I just had green
beans, mushrooms and ginger. I sautéed
the mushrooms with garlic, ginger and
soya sauce, added the green beans and
cooked them for 7 minutes. It’s now
a staple side dish at home. I serve it with
marinated roast chicken and couscous.
5. Meal prep like a mom
I G O BACK TO WO R K .
IT’ S A CR A Z Y TI M E !
H E R E ’ S H OW I S U RVIVE
TH E F I R ST F E W WE E K S .
1. Start planning early
I give myself a big head start. In
November I’d already bought the school
uniforms and books! In the last week
of the holidays I wake the kids at the
normal time for school, so they’re not
crying and complaining when it’s time
to get up when term starts. I have to get
three little people out of bed, so I give
myself time – otherwise it’s painful!
2. Don’t fight over breakfast
What’s my breakfast plan? It’s more like
what’s their breakfast plan! I just try
to make it as healthy as possible. They
hate cereal and want cooked porridge.
I always advocate for oats, but they will
tell me “Enough oats now! We want
82 TASTE JAN/FEB 2019
What really works well is my take on
lasagne, which is an entire meal in one.
There are layers of mince, creamed
spinach and butternut. I find that the
kids really love it because the veg is not
on the side – we sneak it in! I make it
on the weekend, cut it into portions
and freeze them. I also make Bolognese
and pump it up with veggies. Puréed
butternut or greens work well.
6. Keep your pantry stocked
I always have garlic and ginger, and
I love canned food. I’m never without
a supply of beans – red kidney beans for
salads, baked beans and cannellini beans,
and a selection of canned fish – lots of
tuna, salmon and pilchards. I still make
my mother’s recipe for fish cakes using
pilchards. And then of course tomato
paste, canned tomatoes, pasta, rice and
grains. You can make a meal from the
pantry, even when there’s nothing in
the fridge.
7. Invest in lunchbox fillers
My children love peanut butter but for
safety reasons for kids with nut allergies,
their school doesn’t allow them to bring
anything containing nuts – not even
macadamia or Brazil nuts. So we do
cheese spread on sandwiches, fish or
chicken goujons, or I use leftover Woolies
rotisserie chicken. I know I could make
it, but I just don’t have the time! It’s so
convenient – I use it for lunchboxes, or
when the kids come back from school
they’ll have chicken with some carrots
or cucumber. For veggies, I give them
cherry tomatoes, carrot sticks – my son
Lonwabo likes thicker ones so he can
crunch on them. I don’t bother with what
I know they won’t eat because it goes to
waste. But we have lots of conversations
around vegetables and why they’re good
for them. @sibamtongana
Head to our YouTube channel to see Siba demo
her kids’ favourite porridge, and see more of her
back-to-reality recipes come alive.
FAMILY BREAKFASTS
COCONUT-AND-PEANUT
BUTTER MIELIE MEAL
“I like this as a tasty and filling breakfast
for grown-ups and children.”
Serves 4
EASY
GREAT VALUE
Preparation: 10 minutes
Cooking: 30 minutes
water 1.5 litres, plus 1 cup
salt a pinch
coconut milk 1 x 400 ml can
Woolworths super maize meal 170 g
For the topping:
peanut butter 4 T
coconut oil 4 T
coconut flakes 4 T
pumpkin seeds 4 T
honey 4 t (or to taste), for drizzling
1 Bring 1.5 litres water, the salt and coconut
milk to the boil. Mix 1 cup cold water with
INTERVIEW KATHARINE POPE
papa” – maize meal porridge – that’s
their favourite. I try different ways of
cooking it – in coconut milk or cream,
I sometimes add turmeric – they love
that because it’s yellow. They also love it
with peanut butter and they like coconut
oil instead of butter. I do whatever I can
to extend their palates. At home we also
have Tasty Wheat and Maltabella – which
is made from sorghum and is grainier,
so that’s not their favourite.
the maize meal to make a paste – this
prevents lumps from forming while cooking.
2 Add the maize meal mixture to the boiling
water, whisking continually. Alternate with
a wooden spoon to make sure you reach
the edges of the saucepan. 3 Bring to a
boil, then simmer for 25–30 minutes, half
covered, stirring occasionally until thickened
and cooked. It should be a pouring
consistency. 4 Remove from the heat and
pour into bowls. Top with the coconut oil,
peanut butter, coconut flakes, pumpkin
seeds and honey. Serve immediately.
Cook's note: Follow the instructions on
the pack to make a stiff pap.
DAIRY-FREE, MEAT-FREE, WHEAT- AND
GLUTEN-FREE
“The most amazing
recipes come when
I’m busiest and
I’ve got nothing
in the fridge”
HAM-AND-CHEESE
OMELETTE ROLL
“These delicious egg rolls are great at room
temperature, so you can also pack them
into lunchboxes if you like.”
Serves 4
EASY
GREAT VALUE
Preparation: 15 minutes
Cooking: 10 minutes
flour 2 T, plus 1 t
milk 1 cup
extra-large free-range eggs 6
cream 4 T (optional)
salt ¼ t
fresh parsley 4 T, leaves picked
microherbs, to garnish
For the filling:
cream cheese 150 g, at room temperature
ham 250 g
For the dressing, mix:
sweet chilli sauce ½ cup
soya sauce 2 T
water 3 T
1 Preheat the oven to 180°C. Line a baking
tray with greased baking paper, making
FISH CAKES
sure that it overlaps on the shorter sides.
2 In a large jug, whisk the flour and milk
together. Add the eggs, cream, salt and
whisk until well combined. Pour into the
prepared tray and scatter over the parsley.
3 Bake for about 10 minutes or until just
set. Remove from the oven and invert
onto a sheet of baking paper placed on
a flat surface. 4 Peel off the baking paper
from the base and discard. Spread with
the cream cheese and top with the ham,
making sure the omelette is covered.
5 Gently roll up and discard the paper.
Cut into slices and serve warm or chilled.
Serve with the dressing.
LUNCHBOX INSPIRATION
FISH CAKES
“These budget-friendly fish cakes star
butternut and canned tuna – a pantry
staple in my house. Everyone at home loves
them, from Brian to the littlies, so they’re
great for lunchboxes for the whole family.”
Serves 4 to 6
EASY
GREAT VALUE
Preparation: 15 minutes
Cooking: 15 minutes
canola oil 2 T, plus extra for frying
small red onion 1, finely chopped
garlic 2 cloves, finely chopped
spring onion 1, roughly chopped
butter chicken curry spice or mild
curry powder 1 t, heaped
butternut 375 g peeled, cooked and
mashed (it should be dry, not too wet)
flour 60 g, plus extra for dusting
tuna in brine 4 x 170 g cans, drained
sea salt and freshly ground black
TASTE JAN/FEB 2019 83
EASY FAMILY DINNERS
BROCCOLI PESTO PASTA
“A great way to get kids to eat more broccoli
and spinach! It’s a fast recipe that’s a
weekday stand-by for us.”
Serves 4
EASY
GREAT VALUE
Preparation: 15 minutes
Cooking: 15 minutes
BROCCOLI
PESTO PASTA
pepper, to taste
dried breadcrumbs 120 g
smoked BBQ sauce 1 T
Woolworths tartare sauce, for serving
seasonal fruit (red or black grapes,
banana or watermelon) on skewers,
for serving 1 Heat the oil in a large pan and sauté
the onion for 4 minutes until soft and
translucent. Add the garlic and spring
onion and cook for 1 minute. Add the curry
powder and stir for 30 seconds, taking care
not to burn the spice. 2 Add the mashed
butternut and stir until combined. Add
the flour, a heaped spoonful at a time, and
stir well. Stir in the drained tuna until well
combined. Season with salt and pepper.
3 Switch off the heat and allow the mixture
to cool slightly. In a tray or plate, mix the
extra flour and breadcrumbs. Heat a nonstick pan with enough oil for shallow frying.
Shape 2 T of the mixture into a ball using
your hands. Repeat with the remaining
mixture. 4 Dust the fish cakes in the
84 TASTE JAN/FEB 2019
breadcrumb-and-flour mixture, flattening
them slightly to form mini fish cakes.
Fry for 1½ minutes on one side and
1 minute on the other. 5 Gently remove
from the pan and drain on a wire rack
lined with kitchen paper. Allow to cool
completely before packing into an airtight
container to refrigerate or pack for lunch.
Serve with the BBQ and tartare sauces.
HEALTH-CONSCIOUS
WINE: Mount Vernon Unwooded
Chardonnay 2018
PACK THEM TO GO
I usually serve one fish cake for the
kids and 2–3 for Brian and myself
along with grapes and blueberries on
a stick, plus apples dipped in peanut
butter. The children are kept happy at
school with extras like carrots (the raw
veg they enjoy the most) and mini
cheese blocks.
orecchiette pasta 300 g
salt, to taste
lemon peel, to garnish
basil leaves, to garnish
For the broccoli pesto:
butter 1 T
broccoli 1 x 250 g head, cut into florets
(chop and use the stems)
baby spinach leaves 100 g, washed
and dried
salt a pinch
pepper a pinch
almonds 40 g
olive oil ¼ cup, plus 2 T
tahini 2 t
Parmesan 2 T grated
lemon ½, juiced
chilli flakes a large pinch
garlic 1 clove, crushed
For the salad:
Tenderstem broccoli tips 500 g
fresh shelled garden peas 125 g
green Nocarella olives
125 g, halved and pitted
red onion 1, very thinly sliced
1 Place the pasta in a large saucepan of
boiling salted water and cook until al dente.
2 To make the pesto, place the butter, 1 cup
water, broccoli, spinach and seasoning in
a saucepan and cook for 5 minutes with the
lid on. 3 Transfer the vegetables to a food
processor and blend. 4 Add the almonds,
olive oil, tahini, Parmesan, lemon juice, chilli
flakes and garlic and blend. 5 Check the
consistency and add some pasta cooking
water if necessary. 6 Drain the pasta and
return to the saucepan. Add the pesto
and stir through. Tip into a bowl and
allow to cool. 7 To make the salad, blanch
the broccoli and peas, then drain and cool.
8 When the pasta and vegetables are cool,
FOOD R ES OLUT I ON S
add the broccoli, peas, olives and red onion
and mix through. 9 Tip into a serving bowl
and garnish with lemon peel and basil.
HEALTH-CONSCIOUS
WINE: Pecan Stream Chenin Blanc 2018
“The kids really
love it because the
veg is not on the side
– we sneak it in!”
TANDOORI CHICKEN
SHEET PAN
“Marinate the chicken on Sunday night and
you’ve got dinner ready to get going on
Monday when you walk through the door.
I use the darker meat of the chicken (legs
and thighs) on the bone, as it has more
flavour and tends to be juicier than white
meat (breasts) and filleted portions.”
Serves 6
EASY
GREAT VALUE
Preparation: 15 minutes, plus 4–8 hours
marinating time (ideally overnight)
Cooking: 40 minutes
free-range skinless chicken legs 6
free-range skinless chicken thighs 6
garlic 4 cloves, crushed
fresh ginger 1 t finely grated
sea salt and freshly ground black
pepper, to taste
tandoori paste 30 g
tandoori spice blend 1 T
double-cream plain yoghurt 300 g
(or thick plain yoghurt)
garlic 2 bulbs, top part cut off
green beans 200 g, trimmed
sugar snap peas 125 g, trimmed
olive oil 2 T, plus extra for drizzling
Woolworths mashed potato, for serving
1 Score each chicken piece with 3 deep
incisions and place in a large, flat dish.
Rub the chicken with the garlic, ginger,
salt and pepper. Mix the tandoori paste
and spice with the yoghurt and pour over
the chicken, making sure it penetrates the
incisions. Marinate for 4 hours or ideally
overnight. 2 Preheat the oven to 200°C and
lightly grease a baking tray with oil. Place
a griddle pan over a high heat. 3 Cook the
TANDOORI CHICKEN SHEET PAN
chicken in the hot pan for 2 minutes on
each side, until it has griddle lines. Transfer
to the baking tray, add the garlic bulbs and
pour over some of the leftover marinade.
Roast for 25 minutes, or until cooked
through. 4 Meanwhile, heat a clean griddle
pan until very hot. Toss the beans and sugar
snap peas in olive oil and season lightly. Grill
for 1 minute on each side, or until they have
char lines. Set aside. Once the chicken is
cooked, arrange the grilled greens around
the chicken. Roast for 5 minutes and serve
with the mashed potato.
Cook’s note: For even better results, braai
the chicken instead of pan-grilling it for an
intense smoky flavour synonymous with
tandoori (which is traditionally made in
a clay oven), then finish it off in the oven
to make sure it’s cooked through.
FAT-CONSCIOUS, WHEAT- AND
GLUTEN-FREE
WINE: Hartenberg Riesling 2018
TASTE JAN/FEB 2019 85
TOP SA BA R S
I IT
I
86 TASTE JAN/FEB 2019
Oppsite: Justin
Shaw, head
barman at Cause
Effect Cocktail
Kitchen in Cape
Town. This page:
The Smokin’ Mama
mural overlooks
the courtyard at
The Chairman
in Durban.
PHOTOGRAPHS
CLINTON FRIEDMAN,
DAWIE VERWEY
AND JAN RAS
TEXT ANDY DAVIS,
JONO HALL AND
AMI KAPILEVICH
TASTE JAN/FEB 2019 87
TOP SA BA R S
THE CHAIRMAN
DURBAN
A bad cocktail is like a saccharine-sweet
slap on the palate and a hard kick in the
wallet. Not good by anyone’s standard.
Very bad in fact. But a fine cocktail
can take you to heaven with a sip;
a sensory avalanche of deliciousness,
wonder and pleasure, that gets you
on faster than two shakes of cayenne
pepper in your undies.
Basically, cocktails are about
stimulation!
So, you’re in Durban, you’re wearing
the atmosphere like a wet mink
and you’re in need of fresh, sublime
refreshment with a strong alcohol
kicker. Head down to the Point,
the skinny built-up peninsula that
protects the harbour from the ravages
of the Indian Ocean. This was once
a less salubrious neighbourhood full
of vice; a playground for sailors on
shore leave, drug dealers, miscreants,
pimps and prostitutes. Alas, there was
also a downside.
In the past few decades, the Point
has seesawed between crumminess
and respectability. Today the Point
Waterfront Precinct (as it’s called in
This spread, clockwise from above: Cigars are a popular theme at The Chairman, this is one of their vestibules;
a line of perches at the main bar; the Juicy Fruit cocktail being poured properly; mixologist Mandla Gumede’s tools
and liquid inspiration; Mandla Gumede; the Surrender Your Booty cocktail.
gaudy city brochures) still doesn’t look
like much, but it’s well secured by a grid
of CCTV cameras and security guards in
service of a growing tide of international
investments and developments, which
means it’s actually a lot safer than
the average Durban suburb. While
other businesses may struggle to get a
foothold, there is one establishment that
has thrived. The Chairman. And you,
mopping your brow swaddled in that
Durban mink … you need a drink.
The Chairman is plush, the way you
wish your home was. Beautiful furniture,
vintage and antique; thoughtful décor;
Persian rugs; African objets d’art. Classy.
Uptown. Nestled between a derelict
building (the old Seaman’s Institute)
on the one side and a pile of rubble with
a façade on the other. The Chairman
is basically a longstanding metaphor
for Durban’s sense of optimism. A vision
of what could be if we, as a city, ever
got our act together. And yes, they
do damn fine cocktails.
88 TASTE JAN/FEB 2019
Ask the immaculately turned
out tenderpreneur and the gaggle of
dandies to make a little space at the
bar and step up. Ask Mandla Gumede,
The Chairman’s resident mixologist,
(basically a professional bartender
who specialises in cocktails) for a
recommendation. If he doesn’t make
you something based on your desires,
off the cuff, you can order off the menu.
Mandla’s been in the game for 17 years
and knows his way around a cocktail
“The Chairman
is a longstanding
metaphor for
Durban’s sense
of optimism.
A vision of what
could be if we,
as a city, ever got
our act together”
TOP SA BA R S
shaker, muddler and jigger – not to
mention that he has an appreciation
of flavour profiles, alcohol bases,
ingredients and garnish.
We kicked off with The Chairman’s
special, a drink known as Surrender
Your Booty (I did not, alas; perhaps
I needed another). The drink: generous
dashes of Bombay Gin, Martini Bianco
and Cointreau with strong ginger,
pineapple and lemongrass. Like
a tropical twist on a martini.
Strong muti. Not a bad way to start.
Next up, I smashed a Juicy Fruit.
A simple concoction of Belvedere vodka,
lime and soda water on a bed of fresh
granadilla pulp. Delicious and fresh and
packs a punch. I drank it in about three
big sips. Glorious exuberance. That mink
is now discarded, lying in a wet puddle
on the floor, and you’re ready to shimmy
and rumble!
I topped the first round with a drink
called a Chuck Berry’s Mojo. Grapefruit
and lime juice with lots of Ciroc vodka
on ice and finished with fresh layered
strawberries. Sharp, sweet and strong,
with some chewy bits. Like a fruit salad
for Charles Bukowski.
Because Durban is a cosmopolitan
place with a large population of
teetotallers, The Chairman naturally
offers a selection of what they call
mocktails – you guessed it, alcohol-free
cocktails. I selected the Ginger Magic,
because it was at the top of the list and
I was rolling pretty fast and loose after
the first three drinks. Cranberry juice
with fresh limes and ginger and topped
up with tonic water to give it a grownup flavour. It was surprisingly delicious
and quite refreshing. I know because
I drank it. The basic problem with a
mocktail in Durban is that you invariably
drink it too fast, I mean it’s hot, you’re
thirsty and what’s holding you back?
Thankfully, on that thought, the
Uber came to save us. – Andy Davis
146 Mahatma Gandhi Road, Point, Durban;
thechairmanlive.com
TASTE JAN/FEB 2019 89
TOP SA BA R S
Clockwise from above: Alex Fahrenheim is on the bartending
team; the Jambo cocktail stars Mount Gay Barbados rum,
toasted almond, nutmeg and naartjie; tools of the trade.
SIN + TAX
JOHANNNESBURG
It’s not without a sheepish grin that
Julian Short talks almost evangelically
about how he wants to play a role
in making cocktails more accessible.
The sheepishness is because, as he’s
saying the words it’s hard to ignore
the fact that we’re tucked into a (sexily
dim) corner of Sin + Tax, his bar that’s
hidden behind an anonymous black
door With no sign. Down an alley.
Next to a parking lot. With a strict
admittance policy.
So much for accessible. Insert
cry-laughing emoji face.
And yet, somewhat disarmingly,
he totally sells it. Because he completely
and utterly means it. For all that
Sin + Tax potentially has the trappings
of it, pretension plays absolutely no part
in the tiny, exposed brick, glass and
leather nook that is a gemstone in the
dust of Joburg’s nascent cocktail scene.
Wait. “Scene” doesn’t feel like the
right word. Any given night here is
90 TASTE JAN/FEB 2019
a Choice Assorted biscuit box of Joburg’s
most eclectic, all gathering in the grip of
a city’s thirsty summer – and that really
shouldn’t be reduced to a “scene”. It also
feels like, although Julian is instinctively
savvy about the role of social-media
hashtags and Instagram posts (Sin + Tax
and its drinks are gorgeous), he’s
definitely not a slave to them. “A good
bartender can give you the history of
a city, a good bar is how you can define
a city.” And by this metric Sin + Tax
and Joburg are spiritual twins, easy to
overlook, yet welcoming and beautiful
if you stop and make the effort.
Truthfully, the “secret”, hidden
quality of Sin + Tax is actually Julian’s
sincere homage to the Prohibition
Era speakeasies he loves so madly. It is
meant to hide his gently dark bubble
and provide cover for the discerningly
thirsty. Because, once you’re inside, it
really is one of the most friendly, warmhearted places in which to have a drink.
After all, this is where David Beckham
was able to hang out anonymously for
“This is where
David Beckham
was able to hang
out anonymously
for a night on one
of the generously
stuffed leather
Churchill sofas”
a whole night on one of the generously
stuffed leather Churchill sofas. It’s where
South Africa’s rock-star restauranteurs
gather after service (they get a 15%
discount at the bar), and captains of
industry, journalists, bankers, Fridaynight revellers, T-shirts and ties all settle
into their corners and gratefully accept
their golden haze in a glass.
Thankfully, there is zero place on
Julian’s menu for children’s TV-showesque rainbows of sugary syrup designed
to hide meagre quantities of alcohol;
or single measures of over-engineered
science experiment served in a bespoke
TOP SA BA R S
replica of Picasso’s first tobacco pipe
made from locally sourced, hand-reared
organic millet fibres.
There’s definitely a playful quality
to the drink design and presentation
– this isn’t an uncomfortable, austere
church where a smile or a laugh during
the sermon, sorry, The Making of the
Cocktail, earns you a stern rebuke and
a lengthy roster of Hail Marys.
Julian’s drinks are, without exception,
layered and addictive – splashed, shaken,
shivered, strained clutches of flavours,
much like the notes of a perfume, all
dancing around the tent pole of the
alcohol at its base, creating something
you want to drink in deeply and greedily.
Springtime is Forever is the name
of his summer menu (another sheepish
grin), “because in Joburg, spring
basically lasts for about two days in
September and I just want to stretch
it out for as long as I can.” The menu
features a big emphasis on garden
produce and fresh, clean flavours –
rhubarb, apple, peach.
But this isn’t a man to hand you a fruit
juice in a fancy glass. The bar’s signature
drink is The No. 9 – a beverage that
rakish chef David Higgs liked so much,
he threatened to boycott Sin + Tax if it
was ever taken off the menu; a threat he
followed through on when Julian did
indeed remove it for a short while.
The No. 9 is a masterpiece of insanely
drinkable complexity. And watching
Julian make it is like watching one of
those inflatable bendy men that flail
and twirl on the side of the highway
– a blur of snapping wrists and sharp
movements. Nothing is measured and
there isn’t a single pause for breath or
thought, yet out of this precise chaos
comes a short glass with a picture of
Frida Kahlo attached to the rim and a
deep red drink poured over ice. The first
taste reveals flavours that are astounding
and unexpected. Vinegars (yes, you
read that correctly), smoky tequila and
pomegranate open up a wormhole
straight to shaded Mexican streets and
the deep flavours of hot southernhemisphere days. And that’s what a truly
great cocktail can do. Hidden behind
a door. With no sign. In an alley.
Next to a parking lot. – Jono Hall
Clockwise from above left: The Lapu Tuak features The Botanist gin, coconut water, butterfly pea flower
and salted litchi; the Pinotage Boulevardier is made using Woodford Reserve Bourbon, Campari and
Antica Formula vermouth, aged in a Pinotage barrel; award-winning mixologist Julian Short.
4 Bolton Road, Parkwood, Randburg; sintaxbar.com
TASTE JAN/FEB 2019 91
CAUSE EFFECT
COCKTAIL KITCHEN
CAPE TOWN
“Call me Awehwolf,” grins the barman,
sliding over a Toast pale ale. Toast beer
is made using surplus bread from bakeries
and restaurants in Cape Town. So you’re
not just drinking, you’re saving the world.
It’s a taste of things to come.
Awehwolf ’s real name is Justin Shaw.
He’s the head barman around here,
and from the moment we set off on his
Zambezi-rapids stream of consciousness,
I can’t imagine him anywhere else.
He is like an impish bar spirit that was
brewed in the vials and beakers lining
the mirrored display behind him.
In fact, these glass vessels are filled
with various tinctures, from cinnamon
92 TASTE JAN/FEB 2019
and slangbos to mushrooms and hay.
And next to the tinctures are jars of
drying or rare ingredients such as wildeels
(African wormwood) and saffron
and baobab and love root.
Most of these are foraged by the
“sackmen” (hessian sack-wearing
naturalists who sell herbs and roots at the
Cape Town train station) and sangomas,
or collected from Sea Point Nursery
and the Oranjezicht City Farm.
When we meet Justin he is designing
his seasonal cocktail menu. The term
“season” here does not refer to the weather
but to the availability of ingredients
and the intuition of his suppliers.
This summer will see the third iteration
of the cocktail menu in 11 months.
“Many local bars follow international
Clockwise from top left: Cause Effect is part hipster
watering hole, part alcoholic apothecary; Scratch the
Surfaace: a virgin cocktail containing the crust of a
roasted and desiccated coconut with moringa, stevia,
buchu, and kombucha; the Cape Sugarbird cocktail.
TOP SA BA R S
trends but we want to evoke Cape Town
and what makes it unique,” says Justin.
So the drinks at Cause Effect are based
on fynbos, which weaves together Cape
Town’s three primary natural domains:
ocean, mountain and vineyard.
It’s from the vineyard that the
“The Membrane
cocktail is served
with a sugared rice
disc ‘lid’ and you
need two qualities
to drink it: courage
and patience”
cocktails receive their base ingredient:
brandy, strictly pot-stilled and aged for a
minimum of three years. “Cape brandy
is now recognised as a world leader, and
we have an amazing brandy culture,”
says Justin, referring to the South African
braai staple, brandy and Coke, “but
the two aren’t one and the same, so
we have to reinterpret the story and
re-educate without sounding preachy.
That’s a challenge.”
It’s an ambitious mission but if the
cocktails here are anything to go by,
perhaps not as quixotic as it sounds.
The idea is to give patrons the cocktail
equivalent of a three-course meal. Start
your evening with a classic Campari
spritz imbued with umeshu (a Japanese
plum wine) or cold-brewed coffee and
vermouth. It’s a low-alcohol, effervescent
Clockwise from above left: Jars of dried rarities and tinctures give the mixologists something to play with
when concocting new creations; Justin Shaw with the Cross of Lorraine cocktail, made with Dusse cognac,
moringa, eucalyptus cordial and Caperitif.
apéritif to drink while you peruse the
menu. For mains, it’s all about the
experiential cocktails that bring your
drink to life. These are all unique concept
concoctions, dreamed up from scratch
by Justin and his merry mixologists.
“They might have names that you can’t
pronounce but not because we’re hoitytoity,” says Justin, “but because you
might not have heard of something like
Artemisia before.”
Here’s where you’ll spot the Cape
Sugarbird cocktail, named after the bird
responsible for pollinating South Africa’s
national flower, the Protea, which last
evolved so long ago that bees alone can’t
do the trick. The brandy used is the Oude
Molen XO – aged for 10 years – and it’s
draped with fynbos honey, dusted in
hibiscus powder, dappled with a pinch
of pollen and injected with pear purée
(locally sourced, of course). It’s served
in a bespoke blown glass sugarbird
that’s placed on a nest of hay.
The Membrane cocktail is served
topped with a sugared rice disc ‘lid’
and Justin says you need two qualities
to drink it: courage and patience.
“Courage, because you don’t know
what’s lurking under the membrane,
and patience because it takes up to five
minutes for the membrane to dissolve.”
Feeling adventurous? Try the threetiered cocktails, the Beetroot Brandy, the
Green Cube made of mint and cucumber,
the sour martini with a hot chutney
foam, the emulsified avocado, or the tall
moringa and eucalyptus drink that shoots
out streams of Christmas spice.
And that’s before you get to the dessert
cocktails, including a hot-and-cold spiced
piña colada, which is set alight at the
table and poured over ice cream. Not
to mention the strawberry butter-scone
martini made with butter-washed vodka
served with scones on the side.
“When you see someone look at
a cocktail or presentation that they’ve
never seen before, and there’s confusion,
delight, or a ‘this-is-absurd’ moment,
it’s like watching a kid play,” says
Awehwolf. “That’s good for us.”
Spoken like a figment of someone’s
imagination. – Ami Kapilevich
2A Park Road, MLT House, Gardens; facebook.com/
CauseEffect.Bar
TASTE JAN/FEB 2019 93
BE ST EVER : TA RTS
MAKE A
CHEAT’S CRUST
using crushed savoury
crackers and butter –
it’s fast, and perfect
for when it seems too
hot to deal with pastry.
But a proper shortcrust
pastry, or even phyllo,
will also be great when
you’re in the mood.
94 TASTE JAN/FEB 2019
BRINJAL-AND-TOMATO
TART WITH ROCKET
R21 PER SERVING
BE ST EVER : TA RTS
i -
eet or sa
r
r , ot or col
o
l
–
t
illi
large or ite size
tz
v
free for
t t rt t
or perfect
b t
or
r
State of the
TART
PHOTOGRAPHS TOBY MURPHY PRODUCTION BRITA DU PLESSIS
RECIPES PHILLIPPA CHEIFITZ FOOD ASSISTANT ANDREA MASKEW
TASTE JAN/FEB 2019 95
BE ST EVER : TA RTS
rocket, for serving
olive oil, for drizzling
1 To make the crust, mix the crackers
and butter well. Press into a 23 cm loosebottomed tart tin, covering the base
evenly. Chill while preparing the filling.
2 To make the filling, gently cook the
brinjals in the olive oil for about 10 minutes,
until softened. If necessary, add a little
more oil. Stir in the tomatoes, garlic and
oregano. Gently simmer, uncovered, for
about 15 minutes, until the tomatoes have
reduced and the brinjals are very tender.
Season lightly. Discard the fresh oregano
sprigs. Allow to cool, then spoon into
the prepared tart shell. 3 Mix the eggs,
cream and feta. Add a twist or two of
pepper; it shouldn’t need salt. Pour
over the vegetables and bake at 180°C
for 25 minutes, or until just set and pale
golden. 4 Serve topped with rocket,
lightly dressed with olive oil.
HEALTH-CONSCIOUS
WINE: Sophie Te’blanche Rosé 2018
FREE-FORM PEACH TART
SERVE THIS
SEASONAL
FRUIT TART
FREE-FORM PEACH TART
R20 PER SERVING
BRINJAL-AND-TOMATO
TART WITH ROCKET
Serves 6 to 8
EASY
GREAT VALUE
Preparation: 30 minutes, plus
10–15 minutes’ cooling time
Cooking: 50 minutes
For the crust:
savoury crackers 200 g, crushed
butter 125 g, melted
96 TASTE JAN/FEB 2019
while it’s still warm
– or even at room
temperature – with
a scoop of the best
vanilla ice cream.
(Woolies’ Extremely
Creamy Madagascan
vanilla dairy ice
cream made with
Madagascan vanilla
gets our vote.)
Serves 6 to 8
EASY
GREAT VALUE
Preparation: 25 minutes, plus 1 hour’s
chilling time
Cooking: 30 minutes
For the pastry:
butter 200 g
sour cream ¾ cup
flour 240 g
For the filling:
large, firm cling peaches 1 kg, sliced
unsalted butter 30 g, melted
sugar 2 T
For the filling:
Woolworths medium exotic brinjals
2 (about 450 g), peeled and finely diced
olive oil ¼ cup
peeled and diced Italian tomatoes
1 x 400 g can
garlic 1 clove, crushed
oregano a few fresh sprigs (or ½ t dried)
sea salt and freshly ground black
pepper, to taste
large free-range eggs 2, beaten
cream ¼ cup
feta 125 g, crumbled
vanilla ice cream, for serving
1 To make the pastry, cream the butter and
sour cream, then mix in the flour to make
a soft dough. Wrap in clingwrap and chill
for 1 hour, or until firm enough to roll. Roll
out between 2 sheets of baking paper to
form a 30 cm round. Return to the fridge
while preparing the filling. 2 To assemble,
place the circle of pastry on a baking tray.
Remove the top sheet of baking paper.
3 Leaving a wide border – about 5 cm –
ALMOND-ANDRASPBERRY TART
R34 PER SERVING
TRIPLE THE
ALMOND
FLAVOUR
with a base of Amaretti
biscuit crumbs (the
easiest crust ever),
Amaretto liqueur in the
topping and a garnish
of flaked almonds.
TASTE JAN/FEB 2019 97
BE ST EVER : TA RTS
For the topping:
raspberries 320 g
Amaretto liqueur 2 T
thick sour cream 2 cups
sugar 50 g
flaked almonds 30–40 g, toasted,
to garnish
mint leaves, to garnish
edible flowers, to garnish
1 Preheat the oven to 160°C. Grease a
28 cm springform cake tin and line the
base with baking paper. Grease the paper
very well. Mix the butter and Amaretti
biscuits and press into the tin. 2 Pour
the filling over the base and bake for 35
minutes, or until set. Allow to cool. 3 To
make the topping, mix the raspberries with
the liqueur, reserving a few raspberries
to garnish. Mix the sour cream and sugar
by hand and spoon over the raspberries.
Spread onto the topping and bake at 100°C
for 10 minutes. Allow to cool, then cover
and chill for 24 hours. 4 To serve, sprinkle
with the toasted almonds and garnish with
the reserved raspberries, mint and flowers.
WINE: Graham Beck Bliss MCC NV
LIGHT LUNCH,
SORTED
ROASTED SWEET PEPPER,
RICOTTA AND PARMESAN TARTS
with these cheesy tarts
packed with flavour
thanks to deliciously
sweet roasted peppers,
garlic, and basil. Great
straight from the
oven, or make them
in advance to serve
at room temperature
– because this is your
year of no rushing!
R40 PER SERVING
arrange the peaches on the pastry. Brush
with melted butter and sprinkle with sugar.
Fold the border of pastry over the peaches.
4 Bake at 190°C for 30 minutes, or until
golden brown. Serve with vanilla ice cream.
GREAT VALUE
Preparation: 30 minutes, plus 24 hours’
chilling time
Cooking: 45 minutes
HEALTH-CONSCIOUS
WINE: Woolworths Spier Peachy
Chenin Blanc 2018
For the base:
butter 15–20 g, melted
Amaretti biscuits 100 g, crushed
ALMOND-ANDRASPBERRY TART
Serves 10 to 12
EASY
98 TASTE JAN/FEB 2019
For the filling, beat:
free-range eggs 5
sugar 240 g
cream cheese 750 g (at room temperature)
Amaretto liqueur 2 T
ROASTED SWEET PEPPER,
RICOTTA AND PARMESAN
TARTS
Makes 5
EASY
GREAT VALUE
Preparation: 40 minutes
Cooking: 45 minutes
For the pastry, process:
flour 150 g
butter 150 g, cut into pieces
Parmesan 120 g, grated
tricolore peppers 6 (450 g), halved,
cored and seeded
basil leaves 10–15
salt, to taste
olive oil 5–8 t
Parmesan 25 g, grated, to garnish
basil leaves 10–12, to garnish
For the filling, mix:
large free-range eggs 2, lightly beaten
ricotta 250 g
garlic 1 clove, crushed
sea salt and freshly ground black
pepper, to taste
BE ST EVER : TA RTS
1 Pat the dough evenly into 5 x 10 cm
1 To make the pastry, process the flour, salt
greased loose-bottomed tart tins. Prick
using a fork and freeze while preheating
the oven to 190°C. Bake for 5–8 minutes,
or until pale golden. Allow to cool.
2 Place the peppers, skin-side down,
on a baking tray lined with baking paper.
Add a basil leaf or two to each one.
Season with salt and moisten with a little
olive oil. Roast at 190°C for 15–20 minutes,
or until soft. Remove from the oven and
allow to cool. Peel, taking care not to lose
the olive oil and basil. 3 Spoon the filling
into the cooled tart shells and smooth
the tops using a small spatula. Top with
the peppers, cut side down. Bake at
190°C for 15 minutes, or until the filling
is set. Allow to cool for 5 minutes, then
remove from the tins. Top with grated
Parmesan and basil.
and butter until crumbly. Whisk the oil, egg
yolk, iced water and brandy. Add to the flour
mixture and process until it forms a ball of
dough. 2 Roll out the pastry thinly between 2
sheets of baking paper. Chill while preparing
the filling. 3 To make the filling, heat the
butter and oil in a pan. Stir in the shallots and
a little salt. Cook gently for 5–8 minutes until
soft, but still pale. Add the mushrooms and
cook, stirring often, for 5 minutes, or until just
cooked. Stir in the flour. 4 Remove from the
heat and stir in the milk. Return to the heat
and cook, stirring, until thickened. Remove
MEAT-FREE
WINE: Secateurs Chenin Blanc 2018
MUSHROOM TARTLETS
from the heat, beat the egg and cream and
mix with the mushrooms. Add the lemon
zest and herbs. Season to taste and cool.
5 Preheat the oven to 200°C. Remove the
pastry from the fridge and roll out. Stamp out
18 rounds to fit small patty pan tins. Grease
the pans, place a round of pastry into each
cavity and fill with the mushrooms. Bake for
15 minutes. Serve garnished with dill.
Cook’s note: You can use a small muffin
pan instead of patty pans.
MEAT-FREE
WINE: Woolworths Ken Forrester
Grenache 2017
SERVE THESE
TARTLETS
as a light meal or as
snacks with a glass
of wine – an earthy
Pinot Noir or Grenache
is a good match.
Serves 6 to 8
EASY
GREAT VALUE
Preparation: 30 minutes
Cooking: 30 minutes
For the pastry:
cake flour 180 g
salt a pinch
chilled butter 100 g, cut into small pieces
olive oil 1 T
free-range egg yolk 1
iced water 1 T
brandy 1 T (or 1 T iced water)
MUSHROOM TARTLETS
R15 PER SERVING
For the filling:
butter 1 T
olive oil 1 T
shallots 150 g (or 1 medium onion),
peeled and finely chopped
sea salt, to taste
shiitake mushrooms 300 g trimmed,
cleaned and finely chopped
flour 1 T
milk ½ cup
large free-range egg 1
cream ½ cup
lemon 1, zested
dill or chives 2 T finely chopped,
plus extra to garnish
sea salt and freshly ground black
pepper, to taste
TASTE JAN/FEB 2019 99
Honey Punch
Cherry plum (Sweet Pixzee)
Flavour Blast
Cherry plum (Sweet Pixie)
PHOTOGRAPHS JAN RAS PRODUCTION AND RECIPES HANNAH LEWRY
FOOD ASSISTANT CHAD JANUARY TEXT ANNETTE KLINGER
Midnight Gold
100 TASTE JAN/FEB 2019
SEASON A L FR UI T
PLUM, GOAT’S CHEESE
AND HAZELNUT SALAD
Pit stop
Who knew the humble plum was one of the most difficult fruit to cultivate?
It takes a special kind of farmer to invest the time and precision required
to keep your pudding (pizza, salad or cake) full of properly good plums.
Jacques du Toit of Boschendal is that guy
TASTE JAN/FEB 2019 101
S EASON A L FR UI T
Beautiful
blossoms signal
the bounty to
come in one
of the plum
orchards tended
by Jacques du Toit,
Boschendal’s GM
of Agriculture.
ONE CRISP
MORNING
LAST AUTUMN,
Boschendal’s GM of agriculture, Jacques
du Toit, could be spotted hobbling
between two rows of plum trees. His
knee, fresh from surgery, was taking strain
as his farmer’s shoes sank into the soft,
mulch-covered soil. Walking alongside
him was Jannie Marais, South Africa’s
representative for Woolies’ exclusive plum
supplier The Custom Plum Company – a
joint venture between UK-based produce
supplier Mack, and local fruit-growing
company, Fruits Unlimited.
Each tree offered a merciful pit stop
as the two paused to inspect branch upon
branch of plump, dewy fruit. These aren’t
the kind of plums we grew up with, that’s
for sure. They’re larger, for one, but also
much sweeter; their flesh faintly redolent
of spring blossoms. Their evocative name
– Flavour Fall – is a nod to their autumnal
harvest time.
102 TASTE JAN/FEB 2019
As any fruit farmer will tell you, plums
require a particular level of precision (and
a fair amount of pampering) to cultivate;
doubly so if they’re destined for premium
supermarkets, both here and abroad.
“The margin for error is extremely
small and the risk is very high,” explains
Jacques. An untimely bout of hail or fierce
gust of wind, for example, can relegate an
otherwise perfect specimen to the bottom
of the pile. And while bruised apples or
pears can still be salvaged for their juice,
the same can’t be said for plums. The
stress crescendos during harvest time,
when a plum picked in the wrong way
(the trick is to cradle it in your hand and
pull downwards, gently but firmly) or
dropped into a fruit picker’s basket from
too great a height, can be disastrous.
Consider then, for a second, the
anxiety of being forced – on doctor’s
orders – to sit out the first two weeks of
a harvest you’ve spent the better part of
11 months working towards. “I ended up
having to shout orders at everybody
over the walkie-talkie,” Jacques
remembers with a wry smile.
To put things into context, Jacques
has been a farmer for 20 years and has
never had a December holiday; he’s been
married for ten years and still hasn’t
gone on honeymoon. He’s as hands-on
as they come. Which is why, when he
should have still been at home recovering,
there he was, back at his post, limp
notwithstanding. The harvest was
still in full swing, after all.
AS IS THE CASE WITH many large
industries, somewhere along the line,
the fruit-farming business evolved into a
rather competitive fruit-branding business.
Trademarked names and registered patents
have become signifiers for specific textures
and flavour profiles. Take the diminutive
Sweet Pixie, colloquially known as the
cherry plum, which will be making its
exclusive debut on Woolies’ shelves early
this year. Dainty and sweet with just a
hint of satisfying tartness, this interspecific
UPSIDE-DOWN STICKY PLUM CAKE
hybrid between a plum and cherry was
created in 2008 by a Californian fruit
breeding company, Zaiger’s Inc. Genetics –
a winner among literally tens of thousands
of varieties that they carefully crossbred in
that year alone.
Just let that sink in. It takes at least ten
years between identifying a successful
variety in California and being able
to buy it off the shelf here. As with
all interspecific plums imported by
The Custom Plum Company from
Zaiger’s, the cherry plum budwood
“Jacques has been
a farmer for 20 years
and has never had
a December holiday;
he’s been married
for ten years and
still hasn’t gone
on honeymoon”
(young branches prepared for grafting
onto the rootstock of another plant) had
to spend two years in quarantine before
the newly grafted trees spent over five
years growing in The Custom Plum
Company’s test trial blocks. Here, the
fruit was routinely tested for taste, shelf
life and storage. Only once the plums
were deemed commercially viable –
and delicious, of course – were they
planted at Boschendal in 2016. And even
then it wasn’t exactly smooth sailing,
according to Jacques. “Every step was
an unbelievable challenge because this
product is so unique and new. No one
else in South Africa has farmed it. I had
to learn how the trees grew, how the fruit
grew, what they liked and didn’t like …
It challenged my 20 years of farming
experience a lot.”
But Jacques maintains the blood and
sweat involved in cultivating plums –
especially tricky newcomers like the
cherry plum – is worth it. “Plums are
very labour intensive, but this suits
Boschendal’s vision around job creation.
For grapes, you need one fruit picker for
every five hectares, but with plums you
need a picker per hectare. So, for every
hectare of plums we’ve planted, we’ve
created a permanent job.” At over 140
hectares, it all adds up.
Below, from left: Jacques, Jannie Marais, SA’s rep for exclusive Woolies plum supplier The Custom Plum Company
and Cleo Jacobs, technical manager at Fruits Unlimited, inspect the orchard; Flavour Fall plums headed to Woolies.
THE MORNING’S NIPPY AIR has made
way for unseasonable mugginess by the
time Jacques and Jannie are seated in
an air-conditioned boardroom at the
headquarters of Fruits Unlimited in
Paarl. Joining them is Fruits Unlimited’s
GM, Hans Muylaert-Gelein, for what
is a weekly date in all three of their
diaries: a taste evaluation of the range
of plums currently “in development”
by The Custom Plum Company. These
evaluations see the men devour sliver
after sliver of plum in search of that holy
grail of high acidity and high sugar.
The conference table is covered with
cardboard trays filled with what must
be hundreds of plums and each of the
men is armed with a penknife and plate.
TASTE JAN/FEB 2019 103
S EASON A L FR UI T
For the dressing, mix:
garlic 1 clove, chopped
wholegrain mustard 1 t
Dijon mustard 1 t
red wine vinegar 1 T
lemon juice a squeeze
canola or olive oil ¼ cup
honey 1 T
sea salt and freshly ground black
pepper, to taste
Toss all the salad ingredients and drizzle
over the dressing.
HEALTH-CONSCIOUS, MEAT-FREE,
WHEAT- AND GLUTEN-FREE
WINE: Boschendal Elgin Series
Sauvignon Blanc 2017
UPSIDE-DOWN STICKY
PLUM CAKE
Jannie and Jacques check the fruit
daily just before the harvest.
“What you are looking for is aroma,” says
Jannie, bringing a slice towards his mouth
with his blade. “Something that suggests
something else. Dimensions.”
The scope is impressive. There’s an
inky-skinned varietal called Ruby Kat
that fills your nose with rose flavours; the
Scarlet Punch with flesh that’s an intense
beetroot-red and incredibly juicy; the
Emerald Gem, a plum-apricot cross that
has olive-green skin and tastes vaguely
of pear. Talking isn’t high on the agenda.
The sign of a plum candidate is when
the men eat all the way to the stone;
the sign of an unsuccessful one is the swift
rejection of the half-eaten fruit. “There’s
an enormous investment that goes into
research and development each year,” says
Hans. “Sometimes it comes
down to one winner paying for it all.”
Speaking of which, a tray of cherry
plums is passed around. They’re on the
verge of being ready for harvest, so
Jacques, Jannie and Hans are tasting them
almost daily. True to their trademarked
name, the fruit is diminutive and
delicate; its red-and-orange mottled
skin giving way to sunshine golden flesh
that’s crunchy, but not at the expense
of juiciness. The men chew in silence.
There’s a pause before Hans asserts:
104 TASTE JAN/FEB 2019
“They’re close, but not quite there yet.”
In a couple of days they will be, though.
If experience has taught them anything,
it’s that this isn’t a rush job. W
“The sign of a plum
candidate is when
the men eat all the
way to the stone;
the sign of an
unsuccessful one
is a half-eaten fruit ”
PLUM, GOAT’S CHEESE
AND HAZELNUT SALAD
Serves 4
EASY
GREAT VALUE
Preparation: 15 minutes
Woolworths sweet and tangy salad
1 x 140 g bag
plums 8–12 halved, quartered and sliced
chevin 200 g, sliced
hazelnuts 50 g, roasted and chopped
pea shoots, to garnish
Serves 8 to 10
A LITTLE EFFORT
GREAT VALUE
Preparation: 30 minutes,
plus cooling time
Cooking: 1 hour
Honey Punch plums 8–10
caster sugar 150 g, plus extra
for sprinkling
free-range eggs 3
vanilla extract 1 t
flour 240 g
baking powder 1½ t
butter 150 g, melted
white chocolate 200 g, chopped
fresh thyme 5 g
milk ½ cup
honey, for drizzling
mascarpone or plain yoghurt,
for serving
1 Preheat the oven to 180°C. Halve
and quarter the plums and remove
the stones. Arrange in a greased 24 cm
springform cake tin. Sprinkle with 1–2 T
caster sugar. 2 Beat the eggs, vanilla and
remaining sugar until pale and fluffy. Fold
in the flour and baking powder, then
whisk in the melted butter, chocolate,
thyme and milk. 3 Pour the mixture over
the plums and bake for 1 hour, or until a
skewer comes out clean. Allow to cool for
20 minutes, then turn out onto a serving
plate. Drizzle with honey and serve with
mascarpone or plain yoghurt.
MEAT-FREE
SEASON A L FR UI T
SWEET PICKINGS
The cherry plum is just one of the interspecific
varieties grown at Boschendal that you can grab
off Woolies’ shelves. The best part? Plum season
lasts from November to April.
RUBY DAWN
This early variety rings in plum
season with a tropical taste and
fine, crisp texture. Available from
mid-December.
MIDNIGHT GOLD
A bite into this inky-skinned beaut
reveals brilliant golden flesh with
honey-like notes. Available from
late January.
TAURED
The blush-coloured flesh offers
a distinctive aroma and great
sweet-tart balance. Available
from early January.
MIDNIGHT STAR
This purple-skinned plum has
yellow flesh that’s sweet with
a firm but melting texture.
Available late December.
FALL FIESTA
Vividly orange, these plums are
deliciously juicy with a touch of
tartness to offset the sweetness.
Available from late February.
FLAVOUR FALL
Mottled purple skin enrobes bright
yellow flesh that’s sweet and juicy.
Available from March to May.
AUTUMN TREAT
This is the last plum of the season
and rewards fans with its crunchy,
sweet flesh. Available from May
to June.
WINE: Boschendal Vin d’Or Noble
Late Harvest 2015
GORGONZOLA, PLUM AND PROSCIUTTO PIZZA
Serves 4 to 6
A LITTLE EFFORT
GREAT VALUE
Preparation: 2 hours
GORGONZOLA, PLUM AND PROSCIUTTO PIZZA
Cooking: 25 minutes
yeast 2 x 7 g sachets
sugar 1 T
lukewarm water 2½ cups
flour 720 g
olive oil, for drizzling
sea salt and freshly ground black
pepper, to taste
honey 1 T
butter 1 T
ripe Flavour Fall plums 8, halved
Gorgonzola 150 g
proscuitto 70 g
chilli oil, for serving
microherbs, to garnish
1 Mix the yeast and sugar with the water,
then set aside for a few minutes. 2 Turn the
flour out onto a clean surface or place in a
large bowl. Make a well in the middle and
pour in the yeast mixture. Using a fork or
blunt knife, slowly stir the liquid into the
flour to make a dough. 3 Knead well for
10 minutes, or until smooth and springy.
Cover and set aside until doubled in size.
Tear off balls of dough, arrange on a baking
tray and leave to rise again until ready to
bake. Preheat the oven to 200°C. 4 Roll out
each piece of dough into a thin oval pizza
base, drizzle with olive oil and season. Bake
for 10 minutes until just light golden. 5 Melt
the honey and butter in a pan, then add
the plums cut side down and caramelise
while the pizza bakes. 6 Remove the
pizza bases from the oven, tear over the
Gorgonzola and prosciutto and add the
slightly caramelised plums. Return to the
oven and bake until cooked through, about
10 minutes. Serve warm drizzled with chilli
oil and garnished with microherbs.
WINE: Boschendal 1685 Shiraz 2017
TASTE JAN/FEB 2019 105
PHOTOGRAPHS MELANIE VAN ZYL AND GETTY IMAGES TEXT MELANIE VAN ZYL
T RAV EL
For a country almost entirely covered in sand and rock, Namibia has
an unexpectedly delicious side. So make 2019 the year you finally take
that road trip and gorge yourself on affordable oysters, local game,
German pastries and great local beer
Slowtown
Coffee Roasters
roasts green
coffee beans to
perfection in
Swakopmund.
TASTE JAN/FEB 2019 107
T R AVEL
Sunrise views over the edge
of the Namib Desert from the
Dune Star Camp.
NAMIBIA has always been
defined by the Namib, which translates
as “vast place”, a name given to this
coastal desert by the indigenous Nama
people. It has also been called the Land
God Made in Anger and a “sh*thole
country” by a certain US president.
It’s never been ranked high as a food
destination though, which is strange
when you know what I know about
the culinary delights on offer.
Let’s start in the coastal town of
Lüderitz. A white Hollywood-style sign
on the hillside welcomes me to this odd
little outpost, which I’ve chosen for two
reasons. Number one is the deserted,
much photographed, diamond-mining
town of Kolmanskop. Standing here at
dawn, early rays sparkling off the sand,
it’s easy to see how Namibia earned
its name. What used to be a bustling,
wealthy town has been reclaimed by
the desert. I wander the sandy ruins and
wonder how a ghost town comes to be –
what made everyone disappear?
The Ghost Town Tour only starts
at 9.30 am so I order a cup of coffee
topped with a sweet foam spray of cream,
108 TASTE JAN/FEB 2019
“It’s easy to forget
you’re in the
desert when you’re
devouring platters
of oysters with
a good South African
Chardonnay”
and a freshly baked lemon meringue
pie in what used to be Kolmanskop’s
Champagne Bar. This is breakfast,
ghost-town style.
Later, on the tour, I learn that the first
diamond was discovered here in 1908
and exploitation of these glittering dunes
started immediately. The first miners
built the impressive village, sandwiched
between the sea and the sand, replicating
the architectural style of a traditional
German town. There was a ballroom,
school, bowling alley, casino and even
an ice factory. Back then, in the middle
of the desert, you could find the southern
hemisphere’s first X-ray station, ice and
Champagne. And the last two go perfectly
with the second reason for visiting.
From ghosts to gourmet … modernday Lüderitz is the place to get your
fix of Namibia’s non-indigenous but
delectable oysters. Oyster farming started
in the town almost 30 years ago and the
molluscs are now one of Namibia’s biggest
exports. Luckily, not all of them leave
the country. You can also enjoy them
direct from the source (a.k.a. the local
Seaflower factory) at the humble Diaz
Coffee Shop. Here, in a small back room
lined with a wall of wine bottles, chairs
fashioned from old orange buoys and
tables made from disused kreef traps,
you can indulge your oyster fantasies
at an affordable R11 a pop. Each shell
holds a perfect morsel along with a little
clear liquor, the official name for oyster
juice. I easily swallow 10, seasoned
with just a dash of Tabasco.
The menu also offers a variety of
cooked oysters, loaded with butter and
garlic or chilli, plus some incredible
calamari. A plate of tender, perfectly
grilled rings seasoned with lemon and
black pepper and served with chips
will set you back a mere R25.
GETTING THERE
FLIGHTS & VISAS Fly to Windhoek
or Walvis Bay (flights are cheapest
from Cape Town). I travelled with
Air Namibia and South African
Airways. South African passportholders do not require a holiday visa.
GETTING AROUND Hire a car with
clearance or a 4 x 4 if you can afford
it. Although Namibia’s gravel roads
are good, they are famous for
causing punctures in inadequate
tyres. If you do hire, definitely take
the tyre and windscreen insurance.
EXCHANGE RATE The Namibian dollar
is the official currency, but the value
is always the same as South African
rands, which are widely accepted too.
It’s easy to forget you’re in the desert
when you’re devouring platters of oysters
with a good South African Chardonnay,
but back on the road towards Aus the
harsh landscape quickly restores reality.
White sand blows across the tar and in
the distance I can see a small herd of the
Namib Desert horses that call this severe
wilderness home. Like the German
expats of Kolmanskop once did, they
have somehow carved out a home in the
desert, surviving on next to nothing.
Next up is the iconic
Sossusvlei. First, I take a drive
Clockwise from top left: Fishing nets and fresh seafood can be found at Diaz Coffee Shop; generous dollops of lemon
curd topped with ghostly meringue at the Ghost Town Tavern; bright seating at Swakopmund’s Fish Deli; Slowtown
Coffee Roasters looks out over Swakopmund's iconic lighthouse; pair your coffee with Slowtown's fresh pastries.
to Dune 45, so named because it is
45 km and 45 minutes from the gate
that marks the entrance to the NamibNaukluft National Park. Unlike the
road to Lüderitz, the sand that shapes the
enormous dunes here is grapefruit-skin
orange, changing tone as the sun sets
to better resemble the flesh of the fruit.
I trudge up the spine of a dune where
I’m rewarded with a jaw-dropping
panorama of the world’s oldest desert.
Camping in the National Park at
Sesriem is basic and the food menu offers
typical toasties and other unimaginative
pub grub, but the town’s only fuel station
serves up a surprise. After fixing a slow
puncture (these gravel roads appear tame,
but often strike a leak into even the
hardiest 4x4 tyres) I gaze through the
glass at the display counter, settling on
a springbok sausage roll. The pastry is
TASTE JAN/FEB 2019 109
T R AVEL
WHERE TO EAT AND DRINK
Soak up the stars from the comfort
of your bed at the Dune Star Camp.
LÜDERITZ
Diaz Coffee Shop A true hidden gem.
Home to affordable seafood such
as fresh oysters and calamari cooked
to perfection, it’s open every day
for breakfast, lunch and dinner.
Find them on Facebook.
Ghost Town Tavern Before or after the
Kolmanskop Ghost Tour, be sure to
take a seat in what used to be the
Champagne Bar in the town’s old
casino hall for coffee and home-made
cake. Tours range from R90 to R230
per person. kolmanskuppe.com
SESRIEM + SURROUNDS
Neuras Wine Estate Explore the
desert vineyards on a wine tour and
tasting, which includes a cheese platter.
R340 per person. neuraswines.com
Sossus Oasis Service Station
An unassuming fuel stop, there are
mouthwatering German sandwiches,
springbok sausage rolls and more at
the deli counter. sossus-oasis.com
fluffy and the contents perfectly spiced.
This is no factory pie.
Sadly, after spending the morning at
Deadvlei and climbing the wall of sand
that surrounds Sossusvlei, I find that
I don’t have time for my planned detour
to the nearby desert winery, Neuras Wine
Estate. Disappointed to be missing out on
“As is the case in
any Namibian lodge
worth its salt, oryx
steak is on the menu.
Tender and pink,
it is delicious with
the local brew”
an unusual wine tasting – they are known
for their Shiraz and a Merlot, Shiraz and
Petit Verdot blend – I console myself with
another sausage roll to go. As you do.
Luckily, there’s a sensational star suite
awaiting me at the Dune Star Camp
to ease my distress. This eco-friendly,
off-the-grid experience comes at a great
rate for South Africans, and each of the
110 TASTE JAN/FEB 2019
nine units at the intimate satellite camp
features a double bed on wheels, so you
can roll it out onto the deck for a night
under the stars.
But first things first. Dinner. As is the
case in any Namibian lodge worth its
salt, oryx steak is on the menu. Tender
and pink in the middle, it reminds me
of ostrich and is delicious with the local
brew, a cold glass of Tafel lager – a meal
that reminds me a lot of home.
Coffee is brought to my suite early the
next morning so that I can experience
the luxury of watching the dawn from
beneath the covers, the rising sun
gradually spreading its rays across the
sands. In this sprawling landscape, it really
does feel as if time has slowed down.
But my journey continues to the
settlement of Solitaire, where I find
Namibia’s busiest bakery. Fragrant with
the smell of home-baked goods made
fresh every day, McGregor’s Bakery is
located beside an old trading store and
fuel station, littered with rusted classic
cars, decades of character and, more often
than not, a parking lot full of 4x4 vehicles.
The drawcard? Moose’s apple pie.
A Scottish adventurer who found his
McGregor’s Bakery The one pitstop you cannot miss. Pick up a tray of
Namibia’s famous apple pie and hold
an impromptu photoshoot among
the classic cars. solitairenamibia.com
SWAKOPMUND
The Delight It’s worth staying
here for the sumptuous breakfast
buffet alone because it includes
Champagne and fresh oysters. The
hotel is perfectly situated for easy
access to the waterfront, shopping
strolls and the beach. store.gondwanacollection.com
Strand Hotel Most of the
restaurants at the waterfront
belong to this hotel. The Brewer
and Butcher is a particularly good
pub-style restaurant and home
to great Namibian craft beer.
strandhotelswakopmund.com
The Fish Deli A favourite with locals,
there’s everything from fresh oysters
and calamari to takeaway brötchen,
sausages of every flavour, pickled fish
and more. Find them on Facebook.
Slowtown Coffee Roasters Sip
artisanal Namibian coffee and watch
Swakopmund go by. slowtowncoffee.com
T RAV EL
Clockwise from top left: Spend sunset admiring boats in the quiet Lüderitz waterfront; don't let the polystyrene fool you, this is Namibia’s best apple pie; a cheerful breakfast
nook at Swakopmund’s bright hotel, The Delight; red curry calamari stir-fry at the Fish Deli; when the desert overwhelms, order iced coffee instead of a flat white.
way to Namibia, Percy Cross McGregor
(known as Moose), baked this treat for
travellers for over 20 years. Although he’s
no longer with us, Moose’s famous apple
pie recipe lives on and continues to pull
crowds. Now there’s also berry pie, an
array of sweet pastries and wood-fired
pizza (if you’ve got time to spare).
McGregor’s Bakery is the halfway
point on my road trip and the single
heavenly slice of apfelstrudel reminds
me what I’ve learnt so far. Namibia
was colonised by Germany after 1884
and despite the relatively short period
of occupation, 30 years was all it took
to leave a lasting impression – beer and
strudel are just the beginning.
In Swakopmund, it’s easy
to see the Bavarian influence.
The streets are lined with half-timbered
German architecture and Lonely Planet
likens this seaside oasis to holiday towns
along Germany’s North Sea and Baltic
coasts. It’s undeniably quaint and
delightfully pedestrian friendly after
having spent so much time in the car.
I walk to Slowtown Coffee Roasters
at the bottom of Daniel Tjongarero
Avenue, which operates with a 100%
Namibian team. Chic and trendy, there’s
iced coffee, pasteis de nata, cheesecake
and more on the chalkboard menu,
plus wonderful views of the lighthouse.
From the promenade, Swakopmund
feels like a beachside paradise, but the
surrounding sands of the Namib-Naukluft
National Park mean it’s still undeniably
a desert destination.
For dinner, it’s an easy stroll to one
of the reputable eateries overlooking the
sea. There are three restaurants from
which to choose (seafood, pub-style grub
and wholesome farm deli), but I opt for
The Fish Deli after reading about it in
international travel magazine AFAR.
Feeling a little oystered out, I choose
something more unusual from the menu
– a red curry calamari stir-fry.
Generously portioned and beautifully
presented, my plate is the perfect
representation of what this restaurant
is all about: everything is locally sourced,
with bright and appealing colours and
flavours that are refreshingly international
yet still unmistakeably Namibian.
My last meal also proves there are
many unexpected pockets of deliciousness
to be found in this country, even “in the
middle of nowhere”. W
Melanie van Zyl is a Joburg-based freelance travel
photojournalist; melanievanzyl.com.
TASTE JAN/FEB 2019 111
A D V E R T I S I N G
P R O M O T I O N
DELI-CIOUS!
Whether your goal is packing lunch for school or work, there’s no beating the addition of
a meaty snack to keep the hunger pangs at bay. Woolworths’ range of deli meats is ideal
and contain no MSG. Take your pick from tasty viennas, biltong snack sticks, salami bites
and sliced meat such as smoked ham or pastrami, then combine them with fresh fruit and
veggies, a square of cheese, nuts and a creamy spread like hummus. And if you really want
to lift your meal-prep game, a small batch of home-made meatballs, made using extra
lean, free-range beef mince, will go a long way towards making lunchtimes easy and tasty.
woolworths.co.za
PHOTOGRAPH TOBY MURPHY PRODUCTION JACQUELINE BURGESS
FOOD ASSISTANT SAXON KINNEAR
Serving suggestion
Mix 500 g free-range beef
mince with 1 finely
chopped red onion,
3 minced garlic cloves,
10 g chopped Italian
parsley, 1 free-range egg,
2 T breadcrumbs,
1 t smoked paprika and
1 t ground cumin. Season
and roll into bite-sized
balls. Fry until cooked
through and serve with
Dijon mustard, tzatziki,
green olives and capers.
A D V E R T I S I N G
P R O M O T I O N
RAW POWER
Servingg sugg
ggestions
gestions
Enjoy the raw cacao instant porridge
with almond milk or coconut milk and
a sprinkle of toasted coconut chips.
Serve any of the raw granolas with a
yoghurt of your choice, as well as
sliced peaches, ruby grapefruit and
pomegranate rubies.
Look out for this
icon in store to find
what you need for
your plant-based
lifestyle.
PHOTOGRAPH TOBY MURPHY PRODUCTION JACQUELINE BURGESS FOOD ASSISTANT SAXON KINNEAR
Now that the silly season is over, it’s
only natural to start thinking about
healthier options. If you’re planning
on making some changes to your
lifestyle, Woolworths’ range of raw
granolas and porridges is worth
a try. Whether you choose the
instant porridges (in cacao
or vanilla and almond), or
a deliciously crunchy bowl
of granola – in trendy flavours
such as goji berry and beetroot –
you’re getting a breakfast that’s
not only gluten-free, but also
sweetened with dates rather
than refined sugar. Throw in
an alternative milk (or make a
smoothie) and you’ve also got the
perfect vegan or plant-forward
breakfast. Available at selected stores.
woolworths.co.za
TIPS AND TECHNIQUES
FOR THE MASTER COOK
EDITED BY LYNDA INGHAM-BROWN
Prep
Talk
DA I RY Q U E E N
PHOTOGRAPHS SADIQAH ASSUR-ISMAIL PRODUCTION HANNAH LEWRY
Here’s a revelation: you can make your own
yoghurt at home. And you don’t need anything
fancy, just yoghurt (or yoghurt cultures) and
milk. It’s that easy. Why would you do this, we
hear you ask. Because it does wonders for your
gut health (and it’ll look great on Instagram).
Turn the page to see how it’s done.
115
P R E P TALK
HOME-MADE YOGHURT
Use full-cream or
Greek-style yoghurt
instead of cream with
roasted fruit such
as strawberries. Its
tanginess offsets the
sweetness perfectly
milk 8 cups (full-cream or 2% are best,
but skim can also be used)
plain yoghurt containing active
cultures ½ cup
1 Pour the milk into a heavy-based
saucepan (cast-iron works best) and place
over medium to medium-high heat. Warm
the milk to just below boiling, about 93°C.
Use a candy thermometer to measure the
temperature. Stir the milk gently as it heats
to make sure the bottom doesn’t catch
and the milk doesn’t boil over. This step is
necessary to change the protein structure
in the milk so it sets as a solid instead of
separating. 2 Let the milk cool until it is
just warm to the touch, about 44°C. Stir
occasionally to prevent a skin from forming.
3 Place about 1 cup warm milk into a bowl.
Add the yoghurt and whisk until smooth
and dissolved in the milk. 4 Whisking
gently, pour the thinned yoghurt into the
warm milk. This inoculates the milk with
the yoghurt culture. 5 Cover the saucepan
and place in the oven with the oven light
on or wrap the pot in towels to keep
the milk warm as it sets (ideally around
44°C). You can also make the yoghurt in
a dehydrator or using a yoghurt maker.
6 Let the yoghurt set for at least 4 hours or
overnight – the exact time will depend on
the cultures used, the temperature of the
yoghurt, and your preference. The longer
yoghurt sits, the thicker and more tart it
becomes. If this is your first time making
You’ll have seen the word “probiotics”
on yoghurt packaging, which refers
to the beneficial bacteria that are used
to ferment milk to make yoghurt.
Your gut already has thousands of types
of bacteria, which aid digestion. The
good bacteria stave off disease-causing
bacteria and those present in yoghurt
and other fermented foods help to
maintain this delicate balance. The
bacteria used to make yoghurt are most
commonly Streptococcus thermophilus
and Lactobacillus bulgaricus. They
feed off the lactose (sugar) in milk
and release lactic acid, which gives
yoghurt its characteristic tang.
116 TASTE JAN/FEB 2019
EXTRA SOURCE THEKITCHN.COM
LACTO-WHO?
PRE P TA LK
it, start checking it after 4 hours and stop
when it reaches a flavour and consistency
you like. Avoid stirring the yoghurt until it
has fully set. 7 Once the yoghurt has set
to your liking, remove it from the oven. If
you see any watery whey on the surface of
the yoghurt, you can drain it off or whisk it
back into the yoghurt before transferring
to containers. Whisking also gives the
yoghurt a more consistent creamy texture.
Transfer into storage containers, cover and
refrigerate. Home-made yoghurt will keep
for about 2 weeks in the fridge.
Cook’s note: Save ½ cup of yoghurt to
use to culture your next batch. If after a
few batches it starts to taste a bit strange
or you notice that it’s not culturing quite
as quickly, another unwelcome bacteria
may have appeared in your yoghurt, or the
strain is becoming weak. As long as the
latest batch still tastes okay you can eat it,
but go back to using commercially made
yoghurt in your next batch.
A D V E R T I S I N G
Culture club
You’ll find yoghurt in many different
guises around the world – and it’s not
just eaten with granola
Greek-style (or strained) yoghurt
has been strained to remove the
whey, resulting in a thicker consistency
with a distinctive sour taste. It has a
high fat content and is often used in
cooking as it can withstand higher
temperatures without curdling. It’s
also delicious drizzled with honey,
or with Hannah’s potato skins and
blistered tomatoes on page 123.
Hangop (literally “hang up”)
is a Dutch strained yoghurt eaten
as a dessert. It can also be made
with buttermilk.
P R O M O T I O N
Labneh medium-fat soft cheese,
R21.99 for 150 g.
Labneh is slightly thicker than
strained yoghurt and is usually eaten
like hummus, spread on a plate and
drizzled with olive oil. It’s also often
paired as a dip with za’atar. It can also
be dried and shaped into balls, rolled
in herbs and stored in olive oil. Labneh
becomes more sour as it ages. Here’s
a little inside info: you’ll find it in the
fridge at Woolies, too.
CLEAN SWEEP
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Available at the following retailers:
Fo r sa le s e nq u i r i es co n t a c t us on 0 11 402 006 2 o r email in fo @e co - con ce pt s.co.za
E AT I N FOR L ESS
WHAT’S FOR
DINNER?
One of the perks of summer is that supper
is often best served cold. Like our cool Asian
noodle salad, for instance, or a room-temp
Malay chicken tagliatelle with jalapeño atchar.
Add a few affordable, ready-made extras
and dinner will be chilled
PHOTOGRAPHS TOBY MURPHY
RECIPES AND PRODUCTION HANNAH LEWRY
FOOD ASSISTANT KATE FERREIRA
EAT I N FO R L ESS
Jalapeño atchar Malay chicken with tagliatelle
Cook 500 g Woolworths dried tagliatelle in salted boiling water until al dente,
then drain. Melt 100 g butter until foamy and just brown, add ½ x 200 g jar
Woolworths jalapeño atchar to the butter and toss through 2 x 140 g
punnets Woolworths Simply Add sliced butter-basted, oven-roasted
sliced chicken breast. Fold through the pasta. Serve at room
temperature with torn coriander and season to taste. Serves 4
WINE: Woolworths Paul Cluver Riesling 2018
ADD A DESSERT
Keep it cool with mini
almond vanilla ice cream
solos enrobed in a crisp
milk chocolate coating with
roasted almond pieces.
120 TASTE JAN/FEB 2019
EAT I N FO R LE SS
ADD A MEATY
MAIN AND
DESSERT
Marinated charred vegetables with butter beans
Chargrill 450 g Woolworths tricolore peppers over a gas flame or on the braai until mostly
blackened and charred all over. Slice 2 brinjals and grill until just catching and al dente.
Place the peppers and brinjals in a bowl, cover with clingwrap and allow to steam for
10 minutes. Meanwhile, make the dressing. Combine ¼ cup canola oil, 3 T white wine
vinegar, 1 clove chopped garlic, the juice of ½ lemon, 1 T honey, 1 t ground cumin and
season to taste. Peel the peppers and remove the seeds. Pour over the dressing and
massage lightly. Marinate for 1 hour, then serve with fresh mint and 1 x 400 g can drained
and rinsed butter beans. Serves 4 CARB-CONSCIOUS, HEALTH-CONSCIOUS, DAIRY-FREE,
MEAT-FREE, WHEAT- AND GLUTEN-FREE
Cook Woolies’ free-range mature
thick-cut sirloin steak to your
liking, slice and serve at room
temperature with the charred
veg. Then surrender to caramel
swirl hidden centre cupcakes,
finished with caramel and a swirl
of white chocolate mousse.
• WINE: Paul Cluver Chardonnay 2018
TASTE JAN/FEB 2019 121
ADD A DESSERT
Cold Asian salad with noodles, cucumber,
avocado and mango
Cook 2 nests rice noodles in boiling water until tender, then drain and cool. Blanch 170 g asparagus
and slice. Toss the noodles, asparagus, ½ diced cucumber, ½ sliced cucumber and 2 sliced celery stalks
with leaves. To make the dressing, combine 3 T rice wine vinegar, 1 clove chopped garlic, 1 sliced red
chilli, 1 x 4 cm piece peeled and grated fresh ginger, ¼ cup canola oil, 1 t caster sugar, the juice of
½ lemon and ½ t fish sauce. Drizzle over the salad and top with 2 sliced avocados and 1 diced ripe
mango. Sprinkle over 30 g roasted cashews. Serves 4 HEALTH-CONSCIOUS, DAIRY-FREE, MEAT-
•
FREE, WHEAT- AND GLUTEN-FREE WINE: Woolworths Cape Point Sauvignon Blanc 2018
122 TASTE JAN/FEB 2019
Buy four of Woolies’
decadent plant-based
chocolate coconut crème
desserts, made with coconut
milk and sustainably
sourced UTZ Certified cocoa.
They’re delicious topped
with fresh seasonal berries.
EAT IN FO R L E SS
Potato skins with cold blistered tomatoes, yoghurt and chilli chickpeas
Preheat the grill. Place 350 g vine tomatoes on a baking tray with 1 x 400 g can drained chickpeas and grill until the tomatoes are
blistered and soft and the chickpeas are crunchy and begin to pop, 5–10 minutes. Gently fry 3 cloves sliced garlic in ¼ cup canola
oil. Remove from the heat and add 1–2 t smoked paprika and the tomatoes. Set aside to marinate. Stir 1–2 T paprika oil into the
chickpeas to coat. Preheat the oven to 190°C. Peel 1 kg Woolworths medium everyday potatoes using a small, sharp knife
so that you have fairly thick peels. Place in water to prevent them from
browning whilepeeling. Drain the peels and pat dry well.
Toss in 2 T olive oil and sea salt to taste, then bake
until crispy and golden, about 20–30 minutes.
Serve with a dollop of Woolworths plain yoghurt,
the paprika tomatoes and crunchy chickpeas.
Garnish with Italian parsley.
Cook’s note: Roast the peeled potatoes
or use to make mash. Serves 4
MEAT-FREE, WHEAT- AND GLUTEN-FREE
WINE: Delaire Graff Cabernet
Franc Rosé 2018
ADD A QUICHE
AND DESSERT
Woolies spinach-and-feta quiche
is delicious served warm or cold.
Finish off with bowls of soft-scoop
chocolate, vanilla or strawberry
ice cream for dessert.
TASTE JAN/FEB 2019 123
EAT I N FOR L ESS
ADD FISH AND
A DESSERT
Woolies’ pickled hake fillets in a
mild curry sauce with onions and
bay leaves should always be in your
fridge as a summer standby. End
the meal with slices of cinnamondusted milk tart and coffee.
Turkish-inspired
eggs with crispy
chorizo and pita toast
Chop 1 x 35 g punnet sliced Woolworths
chorizo and pan-fry in 1 T olive oil until
crispy. Chargrill 12 Woolworths mini pita
breads until toasted. Boil 6 free-range eggs
to your preference, cool and peel. Spread
150 g Woolworths feta-and-herb dip onto
the base of a large shallow bowl, top with
2 sliced spring onions, the halved eggs and
crispy chorizo. Drizzle with the spicy oil
from the pan. Serves 4
WINE: Jordan The Real McCoy
Riesling 2018
124 TASTE JAN/FEB 2019
INDEX
STARTERS AND LIGHT MEALS
Anchovy on toast with fresh tomato
and parsley butter
20
Banana-and-almond muesli bowl
23
Brinjal-and-tomato tart with rocket
96
Cinnamon, apple and
vanilla oat bowl
20
Cocoa-hazelnut breakfast bowl
25
Coconut-and-peanut butter
mielie meal
82
Fish cakes
83
Fried eggs in brown butter with labneh
and corn “ribs”
20
Ham-and-cheese omelette roll
83
Marinated charred vegetables with butter
beans
121
Mushroom tartlets
99
Omelette five ways
20
Parmesan-and-bacon egg muffins
25
Plum, goat’s cheese and
hazelnut salad
104
Potato skins with cold blistered tomatoes,
yoghurt and chilli chickpeas
123
Puffy cheese toasties
52
Roasted sweet pepper, ricotta and
Parmesan tarts
98
Summer fruit-and-yoghurt bowl
23
The perfect jammy eggs
25
Turkish-inspired eggs with crispy
chorizo and pita toast
124
Gorgonzola, plum and
prosciutto pizza
Jalapeño atchar Malay chicken
with tagliatelle
Spicy pork tacos with watermelon,
coriander salsa verde and peanuts
Spicy steak kebab tacos with
pickled pineapple
Tandoori chicken sheet pan
MAIN MEALS
Broccoli pesto pasta
84
Buffalo wing-style
cauliflower tacos
71
Butternut with Thai peanut
sauce and coriander rice
34
Chicken tacos with blue
cheese dressing
70
Cold Asian salad with noodles, cucumber,
avocado and mango
122
Crowd-pleasing crispy fish tacos
71
DESSERTS AND BAKING
Almond-and-raspberry tart
Free-form peach tart
Peanut butter-and-date biscuits
Pull-apart caramel bread
Upside down sticky plum cake
105
120
70
70
85
98
96
34
23
104
SIDE SERVINGS
Garlicky hummus with peanut butter 34
Home-made yoghurt
116
CONVERSION CHART
250 ml = 1 cup
190 ml = ¾ cup
125 ml = ½ cup
85 ml = ¹⁄ cup
65 ml = ¼ cup
5 ml = 1 teaspoon
15 ml = 1 tablespoon
30 ml = 2 tablespoons
45 ml = 3 tablespoons
60 ml = 4 tablespoons
COMPETITION TERMS AND CONDITIONS
The winners will be the first correct entries drawn after the closing date. In the event of the judges not being able to get hold of the selected
winner on contact details supplied, an alternative winner will be selected. The judges’decision is final and no correspondence will be entered
into. The prize is not transferable and may not be converted into cash. Employees of Woolworths, New Media and the prize sponsor company,
their families, agencies or any other parties associated with the competition may not enter. All details correct at time of going to print. Note that
some expenses may not be included in the prize. Visit taste.co.za for prize-specific information and terms and conditions. Entry is limited to South
African residents over the age of 18 Unless otherwise specified, the closing date for all giveaways and competitions in this issue is 24 February
2019. Terms and conditions apply, see above..
* Woolworths products featured are subject to availability and may not be available at all stores. All prices include VAT and were correct at the time of going to press.
Offers available while stocks last. Not all products and ingredients featured are available from Woolworths. While all precautions have been taken to ensure the accuracy
of information, neither the publisher and editor, nor New Media, can be held liable for any inaccuracies, injuries or damages that may arise.
126 TASTE JAN/FEB 2019
F I N AL TI D B I T
Jeremy Loops, singer & songwriter
SPICY FRAGRANT
LAKSA NOODLE BROTH
Everyone in my family loves chilli. At the age of three,
I was eating atchar with my parents. Both of them are
great cooks, so whether it’s my dad’s famous peri-peri
prawns or my mom’s spicy spaghetti pomodoro,
there are always fresh ingredients with big flavours.
My broth recipe varies. I go by taste and what’s available
to me, but it should always have a combination of fresh
chilli, garlic, ginger, lemongrass, soya sauce, fish sauce, basil,
coriander, spring onions, vegetable stock and, for a heartier
laksa-style broth, I add tomato paste and coconut milk.
AND THE MUSIC?
Nature is my inspiration. I’ve just come back from a two-week
holiday in Sri Lanka, where we stayed in the jungle. I returned
feeling supercharged and really inspired. And I felt so at home
in a country where everyone eats spicy food for every meal
of the day!
In 2019, I’ll be touring Europe through January until the
middle of Feb. It’s our biggest ever European headline tour,
culminating with a show at Roundhouse in London, which
is an epic 3 300-seater venue. I’m very excited about it!
@jeremyloops
Find our Jeremy-inspired recipe for laksa broth at taste.co.za.
PHOTOGRAPH SADIQAH ASSUR-ISMAIL PORTRAIT BEN BROWN PRODUCTION HANNAH LEWRY
FOOD ASSISTANT KATE FERREIRA INTERVIEW KATHARINE POPE
What’s your
signature dish?
A tasty meal,
great company
and a world of
entertainment
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