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2019-01-02 The Herald Scotland

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A NA LYSI S , I NSIG H T, OPI N ION
January dreams
Career detox
Ever wanted to work on
a deserted island? Well,
now?s your chance Page 8
www.heraldscotland.com
236TH YEAR NO. 288
Late trains,
bad service
... yet still
ScotRail?s
fares go up
Who Scots clubs are chasing
in the transfer window Sport
PRICE �50 SUBSCRIPTION PRICE FROM �13
WEDNESDAY JANUARY 2, 2019
Clean room
for surgical
instruments
was riddled
with mould
The Dook of Love
CAROLINE WILSON
A UNIT that cleans surgical instru-
On day increase takes effect, call for
price freeze after year of rail chaos
TOM GORDON
SCOTRAIL is being urged to reverse
the annual fare increase which bites
today to avoid adding to the misery of
passengers already enduring its
dismal service.
Despite new lows in train punctuality and reliability, peak fares in Scotland are being hiked by 3.2 per cent in
line with inflation, with the rise in
off-peak ticket capped at 2.2%.
The rise means the annual cost of a
Glasgow-Edinburgh season ticket
goes up �8 to �84, and an extra
� on a Glasgow-Stirling season
ticket, taking it to �228.
ScotRail also ends its popular Kids
Go Free scheme today, now charging
�for under-16s.
Opposition parties and the TSSA
rail union have called for fares to be
frozen.
Abellio, the Dutch-owned operator
of the ScotRail franchise, is being
threatened with the removal of its
contract if it continues to miss targets.
SNP ministers issued a ?remedial
plan notice? on Christmas Eve
because of cancelled services serving
Dunblane, Bathgate, Edinburgh, Fife
and the Borders.
ScotRail was given eight weeks to
submit a ?robust? plan to fix the
problems. If the rail firm fails to
comply with the resulting ?remedial
agreement?, it would be deemed an
Event of Default, which would entitle
the Scottish Government to terminate its contract.
Recent weeks have seen a surge in
problems at ScotRail, with staff shortages caused by training sessions for a
new winter timetable and delays in
the arrival of new rolling stock.
The first week of the new timetable
saw around 80 trains cancelled each
day.
Transport Secretary Michael
Matheson ordered Alex Hynes, the
managing director of ScotRail Alliance, and Dominic Booth, MD of
Abellio, to end the chaos.
Nicola Sturgeon called the service
?unacceptable? and said Holyrood
needed the power to nationalise the
railways north of the Border.
Less than half of trains arrived on
time at Glasgow Central or Edinburgh Waverley last year.
However, many of the problems on
the network are due to Network Rail,
which runs the track and other infrastructure, and is ultimately owned by
the UK Government.
Opposition parties said the Scottish Government, which awards the
franchise and determines the fare
caps, needed to work with Abellio to
Continued on Page 5
NEW Year?s Day dippers shook off their
hangovers by braving the icy waters of
the Firth of Forth yesterday for the
annual Loony Dook fundraiser.
The event drew hundreds of
spectators to the shore at South
Queensferry, near Edinburgh, to see
hardy participants from more than 20
countries take the plunge.
A swimmer dressed as Donald Trump
stole the spotlight, with others opting for
kilts, T-shirts or traditional beachwear
for the sell-out event. A total of �from
every ticket bought is donated to the
RNLI. The winner of the fancy dress
competition receives �0 to donate to
a charity of their choice.
Full story: Page 3
ments for all of Glasgow?s hospitals
was riddled with mould and bacteria,
and important safety checks had been
missed.
More than 1,000 operations were
cancelled, including cancer surgery,
and NHS work had to be farmed out
to the private sector after inspectors
ordered an immediate suspension at
Cowlairs Decontamination Unit in
Springburn on November 13.
NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde
said issues with the fabric of the building were responsible for the closure,
which lasted almost two weeks, but
did not give any further details.
However, information obtained by
the Evening Times, The Herald?s sister
paper, has revealed inspectors
uncovered a ?significant issue? with
bacterial and mould contamination in
the clean room ? where instruments
are despatched to hospitals.
Inspectors from independent assessors at Lloyd?s Register Business
Assurance were also critical that environmental checks scheduled to take
place in October had not been carried
out and no results were available for a
test on November 8, leaving inspectors unclear if they had been carried
out.
The inspectors said: ?There was a
significant issue relating to bacterial
and mould contamination in the clean
room.
?The October scheduled environmental monitoring was not performed
as scheduled and was stated to have
been performed on November 8 ? no
results were available for review.
?Although a deep clean was
performed, mould continues to be an
issue.?
Professor Hugh Pennington, a leading bacteriologist, said the issue
had put instruments at risk of contamination. He said: ?Clean rooms should
be impeccably clean, that goes
Continued on Page 3
Praise for police as man is detained over knife attack at railway station
Could this be
the year when
everything
goes wrong?
Page 13
containing the threat during the incident, at around 9pm on Monday at
Manchester Victoria Station.
Earlier, GMP Assistant Chief
Constable Russ Jackson had said the
suspect lived in the Cheetham Hill
area of the city and counter-terrorism
officers were at his address.
He said a couple aged in their 50s
suffered multiple stab wounds in the
?random? attack.
The suspect was heard to shout
?Allah? and ?Long live the Caliphate?
during the incident at the station,
which is next to Manchester Arena
where suicide bomber Salman Abedi
NEWS
BUSINESS
Why being pregnant
was the worst nine
months of my life
Why a Brexit
deal would be
major boost
for UK banks
PAGE 2
killed 22 people on May 22, 2017.
Mr Jackson said: ?There is wide reporting about what the attacker allegedly
said during the incident and because
of this we want to be clear,
we are treating this as a terrorism
Continued on Page 4
Page 20
943735
IAIN MACWHIRTER
the involvement of other people in this
attack, but confirming this remains a
main priority for the investigation.
The search of the address in
Cheetham Hill continues.?
Prime Minister Theresa May joined
British Transport Police in commending the emergency services for
770965
after a ?frenzied? New Year?s Eve
stabbing which left three people hurt
has been detained under the Mental
Health Act.
Greater Manchester Police (GMP)
said the 25 year-old, who is being held
on suspicion of attempted murder, has
been assessed by specialist medical
staff. Police are searching his home.
A spokesman said: ?The counter-terrorism investigation remains
ongoing. There is nothing to suggest
9
THE terror suspect who was arrested
01
MARTHA VAUGHAN
*
2 NEWS
CONTENTS
Wednesday January 2, 2019
A NA LYSI S , I NSIG H T, OPI N ION
SCOTLAND DIGEST
Depression made me secretly hope I?d lose my baby
SARAH WARD
A mother has told how crippling
That was the
year in politics
Pages 6-7
pre-natal depression convinced her
she was going to be a terrible mum and even made her wish she?d have a
miscarriage.
Former TV news anchor Hayley
Matthews, 38, fell pregnant with her
second son after four years of trying
with partner Kenny Maddison, 37.
But instead of feeling delighted,
she was struck with depression, and
became utterly convinced she would
be an unfit mother who was not
capable of having a baby.
Her feelings became so strong she
secretly hoped she?d miscarry,
looked into having an abortion and
didn?t tell anyone she was pregnant
for six months, apart from her
partner.
With the help of counselling she
got through the pregnancy ? which
she called the ?worst nine months of
my life?.
Mother-of-two Hayley, a former
STV presenter, gave birth to baby
Oryn last month, and is on the mend.
She?s bravely speaking out to
remind women they ?can?t be
everything to everyone? ? and that
there?s no such thing as the ?perfect
mum?.
Hayley, from Edinburgh, said: ?I?d
had a quick search on the internet
about abortions and the procedure.
?I was sitting there crying and
thinking ?I can?t do that but I don?t
think I?m strong enough to have a
baby?. It was six months before I told
anyone ? I couldn?t face saying the
words.
?I didn?t tell many people I was
pregnant as I knew I?d made a
terrible decision and would make a
terrible mum. I used to tell myself ?I
asked for this?.
?I thought if I had a miscarriage it
might be the best thing.
?It was horrible, I knew deep
down, but it felt like someone had
taken over my head.
?It was a slow process before I felt
better about it. These first few weeks
have been amazing and I?m over the
moon.
?Part of me feels guilty about how
bad I felt at the start, and at the time
there was part of me that hoped
?Mother Nature? would end the
pregnancy for me. I just can?t get my
head around it because I felt like a
completely different person. I look at
him and think ?I?m so glad I didn?t do
anything stupid?.?
Live at Five presenter Hayley left
her job in 2017 to spend more time
with her son Harris, now six, after
feeling years of ?guilt? at missing out
due to her work.
剟 Hayley with baby Oryn. She now
says being a new mum is amazing.
Grandparents? treats contribute to childhood obesity
VICTORIA WELDON
GRANDPARENTS who shower chil-
Sea disaster
remembered
Page 11
剟 Government plans to halve
childhood obesity by 2030.
The year in
your pictures
Page 15
PLUS
剟 Opinion
Page 13
剟 Letters
Pages 14 & 15
剟 Television
Pages 16 & 17
dren with sweets and treats are to be
targeted in the fight against childhood
obesity.
Experts claim that youngsters who
are looked after by grandparents are
often given chocolate and sweets and
are less likely to be taken outside to
play.
The research, which looked at families in Edinburgh and Birmingham,
also found that they tend to be more
lenient with children and use screens
or TV for entertainment.
The study recommended that
nant women and young children by
midwives and health visitors.
?We could ask them to bring grandparents to appointments. We could
ask women what their intentions are
for childcare so we can find those who
are going to be using grandparents. At
the moment, women are not asked
this.?
Almost one quarter of Scots children are overweight or obese by the
time they start primary school, while
only three-quarters of them get an
hour of physical activity each day.
Age Scotland chief executive Brian
Sloan said a ?common sense?
approach was needed.
He said: ?Grandparents should
respect parents? dietary requests for
their children but there should also be
discussions to understand where and
when a grandparent can spoil their
grandchildren ? whether through
experiences or food.
?Each family dynamic is different.
The choice to include grandparents in
health appointments should be an
option, not a requirement, for
parents.?
The Scottish Government said its
plans to halve childhood obesity by
2030 include ?providing information
and advice for parents and carers ?
which can include grandparents ? and
training for frontline staff in services
that work with them?.
Being forced to apply to stay in UK angers Europeans
MAX MCLEAN
A TEACHER and a former Member
of Parliament have told of their anger
and disappointment at having to
?apply? to remain in the United
Kingdom after Brexit.
The Home Office announced on
December 27 that EU citizens and
their families would have to apply to
the EU Settlement Scheme if they
want to continue living in the UK
after December 31, 2020.
The scheme will be fully open by
March 30, 2019, with an application
costing � for those aged 16 and
over and �.50 for under 16s. The
Home Office?s video received more
than 7,000 replies from Twitter users,
many of them angry.
?We were told during the
campaign that our rights would
remain the same,? Christian Allard, a
councillor for Aberdeen City
Council, said.
?As soon as the Government
decided that we would have to apply
to stay here, then I said I won?t apply.
I?m sorry, I?m not applying to remain
in my own home. I came here in good
faith, I know my rights ? I?m here by
right.?
Mr Allard moved to Scotland in
the 1980s from France, and served as
a Member of the Scottish Parliament
for the North East of Scotland from
2013 to 2016.
?The crucial point is ?application?,?
he said. ?If you apply for something it
means that you could be rejected.
?We don?t know yet if Brexit is
going to be delayed, so I would ask
people not to rush into paying for
something which we don?t know
what the outcome will be.
?I?m very careful to say that the
stance I?m taking is personal.?
Others however aren?t as confident
about protesting against the scheme.
Barbara Henderson, 47, is a drama
teacher and children?s author who
moved to Scotland from Germany in
1991 to study English at university.
?My next step will have to be to
comply with the settlement scheme,?
she said.
?I?ve been in this country for 27
years. I?ve not been unemployed, I?ve
not claimed benefits, I have paid into
the system from day one of
graduating ? in fact, I established a
book festival in my town.
?Suddenly it separates me from my
family and my community and that?s
what riles me. It?s somehow
presented as, ?Aren?t you lucky, we?re
going to let you stay?.?
剟 Christian Allard, a French-born
politician, must apply to remain.
Top Rangers executives see their pay packages rise
剟 Family announcements
Page 18
MARTIN WILLIAMS
THE salary packages of Rangers? two
EUROMILLIONS
THE National Lottery
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Selection: 10 UK millionaires
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grandparents could accompany
expectant mothers to health visitor
checks or midwife appointments to
become better informed about making
health choices for youngsters.
Study leader Dr Bai Li, of the Institute of Applied Health Research at the
University of Birmingham, said: ?In
the UK, a quarter of working parents
are relying on grandparents.
?We found some parents felt they
could not criticise because they rely
on the free care.
?We suggest grandparents who are
going to be caring for children under
the age of five are given a brief intervention. We can exploit the existing
system of health checks given to preg-
剟 Rangers managing director
Stewart Robertson.
executive directors has risen by nearly
�,000 over a year as the club saw
soaring losses of �.3 million.
The directors? nine per cent rise
came amid losses for the year ending
June 30, 2018, that were double those
of the previous campaign.
It comes on top of the previous
year?s salary lift of more than �,000.
Losses for that 12 months also
doubled.
Managing director Stewart Robertson was the biggest beneficiary. His
earnings came to a total of �1,000 in
the last year, including a �,000
bonus, meaning his pay package rose
by �,000. His pay package increased
by �,000 the previous year.
Finance director Andrew Dickson?s
total pay package was �3,000 .
This was made up of a �5,000
basic salary with a �,000 bonus and
�,000 in pension contributions,
with �000 benefits in kind.
Overall, his pay package rose
�000 and follows a �,000 salary
rise the previous year.
The club?s board has revealed for
the first time a further �9,000 has
been given to an unspecified number
of ?key management personnel? in
the last financial year. This includes
�8,000 by way of salary and �,000
in bonuses. The board describes beneficiaries as employees who ?have been
or are part of the management group...
and have had substantial influence in
impor t ant decision-making
processes.?
Details of the remuneration come
after Rangers chairman Dave King?s
family trust agreed to cover a funding
shortfall over the next two years.
The Rangers International Football
Club plc board has previously said
that the latest forecasts indicate at
least �6m is required for the rest of
the season 2018/19, with a further
� needed for 2019/20.
They have received undertakings
from investors ?confirming that they
will provide financial support as it is
required?.
The final amount required is
dependent on future football performance, European football participation and player trading amongst other
factors.
The independent auditor from
Campbell Dallas accepts a failure to
secure the additional funds would
result ?in the existence of a material
uncertainty which may cast significant doubt as to the group?s ability to
continue as a going concern?.
There has been widespread criticism over the salaries paid to directors
and staff under previous ownership
COMMENT AT HERALDSCOTLAND.COM
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Wednesday January 2, 2019
NEWS
A NA LYSI S , I NSIG H T, OPI N ION
3
Luther is back with more everyday tales of death and destruction
Luther
BBC1
****
Doctor Who
BBC1
***
BY ALISON ROWAT
A SUSPECT sprints into a dock-
yard, pursued by a Volvo driven
by a demon lawman. He catches
the culprit and slams him against
the wall. ?Can you breathe??
snarls the urban sheriff. ?Shame
that.? Job done, he heads home,
only to be abducted on his doorstep by a gang of thugs. Welcome
to just another day in the life of
Luther.
With an opening scene calling
to mind Line of Duty in its blistering pace, Idris Elba, playing
DCI John Luther, and show creator, Neil Cross, signalled they
were in no mood to mess around
in this, the fifth series about the
London detective who adds an
extra helping of mayhem to the
maverick cop mix.
Gang boss George Cornelius
(Patrick Malahide in one of his
juiciest roles since Minder) had
ordered the snatching of Luther.
Cornelius?s son was being held
captive, and dad wanted to know
if Luther was involved because
he and the DCI had ?history?
together. Previously, it was
Cornelius who had been chained
to a radiator by Luther, because
Luther is that kind of cop.
Besides Cornelius?s missing
son, London crime figures were
being boosted by a serial killer
who liked to torture and mutilate his victims. Luther had seen
剟 Jodie Whittaker dashes
about as the Doctor.
worse, unlike ambitious new
start DS Catherine Halliday
(Wunmi Mosaku, excellent in
Kiri and same here).
Cross introduced regular characters at a steady pace and soon
it was like the old team had never
been away. But where was the
lady of the hour, the one we were
all waiting for? Alice Morgan
(Ruth Wilson), the killer who
struck up such a close relationship with Luther the pair were
going to run off together, was
officially dead, off the case. But
in the worst kept secret since the
colour of the sky, we knew she
was coming back, but when and
why? By the end of the first
instalment, this four parter,
continuing tonight, looked set to
be the Luther that really lets rip.
Bring it on.
This time last year, Doctor
Who fans had been given a sneak
peek at the first woman Time
Lord, played by Jodie Whittaker.
Having made her debut proper in
October, Whittaker spearheaded
another move, replacing the
traditional Christmas Day
special with a Ne?er Day one.
This, too, promised the return of
a familiar character, this one
?the most dangerous creature in
the universe? according to The
Doctor. And it wasn?t even
Donald Trump. Clue: this one
did not do stairs.
After a complicated preamble
about some warmongering creature cut into three and buried in
different parts of the world, the
action switched to the present
day where an ancient burial site
was being excavated.
Before you could say, ?This is
slightly more exciting than Time
Team?, a squid-like creature,
later identified as a Dalek without its casing, had escaped and
was declaring its intention to
destroy humanity. They never
change, do they?
Fans had been promised an
all-action Doctor Who. More
money had been spent, but there
was still a lot of time spent talking in the TARDIS, and the
Dalek advance party looked as
naff and tin-can like as ever, especially when flying. The most
impressive thing on screen was
Whittaker, throwing herself into
the epic daftness with the energy
of several doctors.
Love won the day, with Ryan?s
estranged father turning up and
making peace with his son, and
The Doctor gathering her little
family around her for new adventures. Asked where they were
going next, she replied, ?Everywhere!? It is going to take more
than a Dalek to dislodge Whittaker from this gig.
剟 Water skiers in fancy dress were out on Loch Lomond yesterday, as were many revellers fundraising at South Queensferry?s Loony Dook, pictured above centre and right
Ne?erday dip in the freezing sea?
They said it would never catch on
MARTIN WILLIAMS
SENIOR NEWS REPORTER
THOUSANDS of New Year?s Day
thrillseekers shook off the Hogmanay
cobwebs across Scotland by braving
the icy waters of the sea.
A host of January 1 plunges were
held for charity at locations including
the Borders, Wemyss Bay, Loch
Lomond and the Highlands, as
revellers washed away festive
hangovers by walking or running into
the water.
Hundreds of spectators gathered to
watch the biggest of the bunch, with
more than 1000 brave souls in
swimming costumes and fancy dress
taking the plunge at South
Queensferry during the annual Loony
Dook fundraiser.
The Dook dates back to 1986 when
three locals jokingly suggested it as a
hangover cure for the Hogmanay
festivities. Today, Dookers from 23
countries around the world take part.
A warming bowl of porridge was on
offer as an incentive for taking the
freezing dip.
Among those taking part were Ed
Bartlam and Charlie Wood, the
directors of Underbelly, which
organises Edinburgh?s Hogmanay
celebrations.
The pair said: ?Last night we
It?s terrific how much
energy and
excitement the Loony
Dook generates
welcomed 75,000 people to Edinburgh
for the best New Year party ever at the
epic 25th anniversary Edinburgh?s
Hogmanay.
?What better way to clear those
foggy heads from the night before than
a swift dip in freezing cold water?
?Today, New Year?s Day, we joined
over 1,000 participants from 21
countries on the shores of South
Queensferry to brave the waters of the
Firth of Forth for the much-loved
Loony Dook.
?We loved being ?Dookers?
welcoming the New Year. It?s terrific
how much energy and excitement the
Loony Dook generates and the
fantastic fancy dress costumes people
make and the money generated for
charity.?
Organisers said Tony Pirouet, who
came in a home-made costume as a
man on a toilet, won the fancy dress
prize ? a �0 donation to his chosen
charity of East Fife and Scooniehill
Riding for the Disabled.
Hundreds more took the plunge in
North Berwick, with Royal National
Lifeboat Institution volunteers on
standby.
Further north in Kirkcaldy, the
Langtoun Loony Dook on January 1
attracted scores more hardy
individuals, for a cause very close to
organiser Jimmy Bonner?s heart.
Half the money raised by the event
will go to the Marfan Trust which
剟 Susan Boyle will tour
and make a new record.
Susan Boyle?s
comeback
tour plans
SUSAN Boyle is set to
make a comeback this year
? a decade after she first
shot to fame on Britain?s
Got Talent,
The Scottish singer,
nicknamed Subo, will take
part in a champion of
champions version of the
show in the US in a move
organised by judge Simon
Cowell.
She is also preparing to
record a new album and
perform live on Britain?s
Got Talent.
Ms Boyle will star on
America?s Got Talent: The
Champions, which starts
on January 7.
Judge Mel B let slip that
she is already through to
the semi-finals of the show,
which pits past contestants
against each other.
A source close to the
57-year-old singer said:
?This is a big year for
Susan and she is very much
stepping back into the
limelight with her AGT
champions appearance
being just the start.
?The anniversary of her
audition which made
headlines around the
world is the perfect time to
launch a career comeback,
and Simon and Susan are
both very excited about the
year ahead.?
Ms Boyle, from
Blackburn, West Lothian,
had stepped away from the
spotlight in recent times
but said she was looking
forward to returning to the
stage.
She said: ?I couldn?t
walk away from a second
chance to prove myself. I?m
really looking forward to
singing ? this time, with
something to prove.?
Also taking part in AGT:
The Champions, are singer
Paul Potts, dancing dog act
Ashleigh Butler and Sully,
illusionist Darcey Oake,
magician Issy Simpson and
recent BGT winner,
comedian Lee Ridley.
Clean room for
surgical tools
full of mould
Continued from Page 1
剟 Some of the 1100 participants and revellers at the annual Loony Dook on New Year?s Day at South Queensferry which has been running since 1986.
A special reason to celebrate for
some of year?s first parents
剟 Valerie and Grant McLean with their new
baby boy, who came three weeks early.
supports people with Marfan
Syndrome, a genetic disorder affecting
the body?s connective tissue. Mr
Bonner has lost seven members of his
family to the syndrome, including his
brother and mother.
The dook was held in memory of
Ryan Bonner, Jimmy?s nephew, who
lost his life due to heart complications
caused by Marfan Syndrome in
February. He was just 34 years old.
The dooks came after people from
around the world welcomed in the new
A PROUD mother of one of
Scotland?s first babies of 2019
has said her new year will be
starting with a well-earned nap.
Valerie McLean, 30, gave
birth to a baby boy just minutes
after the bells at Queen
Elizabeth University Hospital in
Glasgow.
The baby came two weeks
earlier than planned, and
Valerie and her husband Grant,
37, have yet to choose his
name.
He weighed 8lb 1oz.
The couple abandoned their
Hogmanay party plans and
rushed to hospital at around
11.30pm.
He was born at 12.21am.
year at a colourful street party in
Edinburgh.
Around 75,000 party-goers gathered
in the centre of the capital, in the
shadow of the city?s castle, to see in
2019 at one of the world?s largest street
parties.
The jubilant crowd counted down
the 10 seconds to midnight before a
fireworks display lit up the sky above
the famous landmark, with the
soundtrack provided by German band
Meute.
Mrs McLean, a consultant
from Glasgow, said she was
?thrilled and knackered? after
becoming a mother.
She said: ?We?ll be here
possibly today and tomorrow
and then we?ll get home and
settle into our life as a family.
?It?s all still a bit surreal to be
honest. Especially since it was
so early, it wasn?t due for
another two weeks.
?I need a nap now, that?s for
sure.?
In Edinburgh, parents
Deirdre and Graeme Kelly
yesterday celebrated the birth
of their daughter Isla, born at
midnight to the sound of the
city?s firework display.
剟 Deirdre and Graeme Kelly with baby Isla,
who was born seconds after the bells.
A mass rendition of Auld Lang Syne
then rang out around the city as the
fireworks fell silent.
The events in Princes Street were the
main focus of the city?s Hogmanay
party, which ran for several hours over
December 31 and January 1.
Organisers of the celebration also
said this year?s events were aimed at
marking the ties between Scotland and
Europe as the UK prepares to leave the
EU.
Revellers enjoyed music across three
COMMENT AT HERALDSCOTLAND.COM
stages including the Waverley stage
and Judge Jules and the Mac Twins
leading the DJ stage in Castle Street.
Elephant Sessions enthralled the
crowd in South St David Street.
Franz Ferdinand, supported by
Metronomy and Free Love, headlined
the Concert in the Gardens.
Meanwhile Love Letters to Europe
from writers in Scotland were last
night being projected onto six
buildings across Edinburgh as part of
the city?s Hogmanay celebrations.
without saying. I assume
that the clean room is at
the end of the process of
instrument preparation.
The environmental
problems therefore carry a
theoretical risk that
outgoing instruments
could be contaminated.
?I also regard the
non-performance of
scheduled environmental
monitoring as an
important issue, as was
poor record keeping.?
Inspectors said the
building was in a ?poor
state of repair? with paint
and plaster flaking from
ceilings in the washroom
and the clean room.
The unit was cleared for
safety on November 22 and
production recommenced
four days later ? however,
not before more than 1,000
operations were cancelled,
including some ?urgent?
cancer operations, hip or
knee replacements and all
scheduled tonsillectomies.
NHS Greater Glasgow
and Clyde said ?the
majority? of patients who
had operations postponed
had been given alternative
dates.
A spokeswoman for
NHSGGC said: ?Cowlairs
is back in full operation
after some issues raised by
inspectors were fully
addressed.
?The vast majority of
patients who had
procedures postponed
have now been re-booked
with early appointments
and the few remaining will
be re-booked within the
next two weeks.?
Glasgow?s hospitals use
millions of instruments
every year, from single
surgical instruments to
complex theatre sets.
4 NEWS
BULLETIN
Wednesday January 2, 2019
A NA LYSI S , I NSIG H T, OPI N ION
NEWS DIGEST
Demand for doubling of fines for anti-social behaviour
TOM GORDON
ON-THE-SPOT fines for some antisocial behaviour should be doubled
to �0 to let police officers dispense
?swift justice? to the worst offenders,
the Scottish Tories have said.
The party said the current �
fixed penalty notice (FPN) for
offences such as vandalism and
breach of the peace could let
troublemakers off the hook.
Under Holyrood?s 2004 AntiSocial Behaviour Act, police officers
have the power to impose FPNs for
10 offences, including public
drunkenness and malicious damage.
剟 Conservative MP
Johnny Mercer.
Soldiers are
confined to
barracks ?not
fit for animals?
SOLDIERS are living in
barracks which are not fit
for animals, a Tory MP has
claimed after a leaked
report revealed concerns
about fire safety.
Defence Safety
Authority inspectors found
that cash cuts had led to an
?unacceptable
degradation? of barracks,
the document obtained by
the Sun said.
The Ministry of Defence
(MoD) said all its buildings
met fire regulations and �billion was being invested
on modernising sites
across the country.
But Tory MP Johnny
Mercer, a former Army
officer and a member of the
Commons Defence
Committee, told the
newspaper: ?Animals
would not be housed in
such dangerous conditions.
?It is disgraceful how
ministers talk up our
armed forces at every
opportunity, and yet, away
from the spotlight, ask our
most loyal public servants
to endure totally
unacceptable and lethal
living environments.?
DSA director-general
Lieutenant Generak
Richard Felton ordered the
report after blazes at Aliwal
barracks in Tidworth,
Wiltshire, and Thiepval
Barracks in Lisburn,
Northern Ireland.
A Ministry of Defence
spokesman said: ?All
occupied buildings owned
by the MoD meet national
fire regulations and we
regularly inspect our sites
to ensure they meet safety
standards.
?We are making
improvements to fire safety
across our sites.?
剟 Double the fine for fixed penalty
offences say Tories.
The Tories say the single fine is too
crude and want a two-tier system in
which a �0 FPN could be imposed
for the more serious offences.
The Scottish Government last
night said it would consider the idea.
The latest figures show a steep fall
in the use of anti-social behaviour
FPNs, which are most commonly
used for breach of the peace. Officers
issued 55,562 in 2013/14 but 42,956
in 2014/15, then 29,368 in 2015/16
and just 15,363 in 2016/17.
Tory MSP Liam Kerr said giving
the police the discretion to impose
higher FPNs would allow more
flexibility in dealing with offences,
and act as a greater deterrent.
Continued from Page One
investigation. However it?s really important to stress we are retaining an open
mind in relation to the motivation for this
attack.?
A man and a woman who were
attacked suffered very serious injuries but
they are not life-threatening, he said.
A British Transport Police officer was
also injured as officers on patrol bravely
and immediately confronted the attacker
with Tasers and pepper spray.
GMP Chief Constable Ian Hopkins
said: ?I know that the events of last night
will have affected many people and
caused concern.
?That the incident happened so close to
the scene of the terrorist attack on May
22, 2017, makes it even more dreadful.?
Mr Jackson said police have recovered
two knives, but do not yet know if both
were used in the attack.
Sam Clack, a BBC producer, was on a
platform at Manchester Victoria waiting
for a tram home when he witnessed the
attack.
The 38-year-old said: ?I just heard this
most blood-curdling scream and looked
down the platform.
?What it looked like was a guy in his
60s with a woman of similar age and
another guy all dressed in black.
?It looked like they were having a fight
but she was screaming in this blood-curdling way.
?I saw police in high-vis come towards
him.
?He came towards me. I looked down
and saw he had a kitchen knife with a
black handle with a good 12-inch blade.
?It was just fear, pure fear.?
Mr Clack said police used a Taser and
pepper spray before ?six or seven? officers
jumped on the man and held him down.
He said he heard the suspect saying:
?As long as you keep bombing other countries this sort of s*** is going to keep
happening.?
Mr Clack said it looked like both the
man in his 60s and the woman with him
had been stabbed, but both were
conscious and were walked to a waiting
ambulance.
A WOMAN of 60 has died
in a road accident on Lewis
on Hogmanay.
The pedestrian was hit
by a car at Swainbost in
Ness on the north of the
island at around 5.24pm.
Following the accident,
Police Scotland officers
said that she had died from
her injuries.
Officers also confirmed
that an investigation into
the circumstances
surrounding the incident
was under way.
The road had to be
closed and diversions put
in place in the wake of the
incident, police added.
?Any person who
witnessed the accident or
has any information which
will assist the investigation
is asked to contact Police
Scotland,? said a
spokesman.
剟 Officers restrain
a man after three
people were
stabbed.
Corbyn put on spot
over People?s Vote
Life imitates art
TOM GORDON
POLITICAL EDITOR
JEREMY Corbyn is under intense pressure to
MYSTERY surrounds the
Lewis woman
killed by car
justice to low-level offenders who
might otherwise be let off the hook.
?It would be up to police when to
impose this stiffer penalty..?
A government spokesperson said:
?While fixed penalty notices are an
important tool in tackling anti-social
behaviour, they form part of a wider
range of powers which allow police
and local authorities to exercise
discretion and judgement when
using the options available to them.
?We are committed to ensuring
these agencies have the powers and
resources needed. Were they to
indicate further measures or changes
might assist them, clearly we would
consider any such proposal.?
Police keep ?open mind? over attack motive
Mystery over
man?s death
death of a man who was
discovered with fatal
injuries in Dundee in the
early hours of New Year?s
Day.
Police are appealing for
witnesses following an
incident in the Nethergate
area of the city at about
1.15am yesterday.
Emergency services were
called to reports of a
disturbance involving
several people near the
shopping centre, which left
one man in a lifethreatening condition.
The man was taken to
Ninewells Hospital where
he died from his injuries.
Following the
unexplained death,
detectives are appealing for
witnesses who may have
seen an altercation to come
forward.
He said a two-tier system exists
elsewhere in the UK, and claimed
there was police interest in mirroring
the approach north of the border.
Around 1000 anti-social
behaviour reports are received by
Police Scotland every day.
Mr Kerr said: ?Doubling the fine
for the more serious anti-social
behaviour offences would be
relatively easy. It means we can get
tougher on the troublemakers who
vandalise communities and
intimidate their neighbours.
?This isn?t about allowing
dangerous criminals to dodge court.
Increased fines mean more crime
could be punished, delivering swift
THE home of the Kelpies has been transformed
into a spectacle of pyrotechnics, interactive light
installations, puppetry and sculpture for a New
Year event.
And Ewa Ludew is clearly a fan as she stands
in front of the Virgo sculpture at the annual Fire &
Light: Cosmic Fortunes at the Helix in Falkirk.
The illuminated outdoor experience features
newly commissioned installations depicting the
signs of the zodiac.
Created by five Scottish artists, each sign has
been made to show its unique characteristics as
it sits among the elements of air, earth, fire and
water.
back a People?s Vote after a new poll showed
massive support for it among Labour members,
and their deep fear of a no-deal Brexit.
Despite their leader?s resistance to the idea,
the survey found Labour members supported
another referendum on the EU by a margin of
almost three to one, with 72 per cent in favour.
It also found a majority of Labour voters
want Mr Corbyn to ?fully support? the idea.
The survey of more than 1000 members was
carried out by YouGov for the Economic and
Social Research Council-funded Party
Members Project.
It found Labour members were among the
most alarmed at the prospect of no deal.
While just 35% of the electorate as a whole
believed warnings of short-term food and
medicine shortages, the figure was 58% for
Labour voters and 82% for Labour members.
Similarly, while 45% of all voters thought a
No Deal Brexit would cause medium to longterm economic damage, it was 65% for Labour
voters and 89% for party members.
A life-long Eurosceptic, Mr Corbyn has said
his priority is to get a general election if Theresa
May?s Brexit deal collapses, with a People?s
Vote as a possible fall-back option if he doesn?t.
However, he has blown hot and cold on the
subject, and last month said Labour would
press ahead with Brexit if it won a snap
election, and was unclear if he would back
Remain if it came to a People?s Vote.
The poll found almost a quarter of Labour
members thought their leader supported Brexit.
Some 29% of members surveyed said they
opposed the party?s stance on Brexit, and 56%
of those said it had caused them to consider
quitting, equivalent to around 88,000 members.
If there was a People?s Vote with a three-way
question, almost 90% of Labour members said
they would back Remain, 3% would back Mrs
May?s deal and 5% would back no deal.
Professor Tim Bale, of Queen Mary
University London, said: ?Our survey suggests
Labour?s membership is overwhelmingly in
favour of the UK remaining in the EU and
badly wants a referendum to achieve that end.
?Labour?s grassroots clearly hate Brexit and,
although many of them still love Corbyn, he
might not be able to rely for much longer on
their support for him trumping their opposition
to leaving the EU. Our research is bound to
increase pressure on him to get off the fence.?
Sedgefield Labour MP Phil Wilson said:
?The leadership has too often hidden behind
myths that Labour is evenly divided on this
issue when the clear evidence from this and
other polls shows it is the leadership which is
increasingly out of step with its supporters.
?I urge Jeremy to seize this chance to change
the course of history, before it?s too late.?
Meanwhile, Mrs May has used her New Year
message to address her own divided party.
The Prime Minister urged MPs to back her
Brexit withdrawal deal when it comes to a key
Commons vote in around a fortnight, saying
they had an ?important decision to make?.
She said that if she secured backing for her
deal - which many Tory MPs oppose because in
case the Irish backstop keeps the UK tied to the
EU - the country could ?turn a corner?.
In his New Year message, Mr Corbyn said
Brexit was a ?complete mess?, and accused Mrs
May of letting down both Remain and Leave
voters by trying to impose ?a bad deal?.
DUP leader Arlene Foster, whose 10 MPs are
seen as critical to the Commons vote, said the
PM would need to get significant changes from
the EU before the DUP would back her plan.
Tory Brexiter MP Jacob Rees-Mogg said:
?The two greatest risks to the union are
splitting Northern Ireland from Great Britain,
and a second referendum, which would
legitimise the calls for a second independence
vote in Scotland.?
Police Scotland spending � a year on hire vehicles
TOM GORDON
POLICE Scotland is spending almost
�million a year on vehicle hire to
cope with special events because
there is no spare capacity in its own
fleet.
New figures obtained by the
Scottish LibDems under freedom of
information show the number of hire
vehicles rose sharply from 6,609 in
2015/16 to 10,833 in 2017/18.
The cost was around �5,000 in
2015/16 and �0,000 last year.
Hires are also up in almost every
month so far in 2018/19, with the
most recorded in May 2018, when
1,372 were needed to meet demand.
The growing use of hires coincides
with complaints from rank and file
officers that the force?s 3,500-vehicle
fleet is increasingly clapped out.
The fleet clocks up almost 70m
miles a year, with cars and vans only
replaced after doing 150,000 miles.
The force cut its vehicle
procurement budget by �9m in
2018/19 to �9m, meaning only
around 280, or 8 per cent, of vehicles,
will be replaced this year.
LibDem MSP Liam McArthur said
the force was struggling financially.
He said: ?Clearly there are times
when Police Scotland will have
specific operational demands that
necessitate additional vehicles, but it
is the SNP Government?s
responsibility to ensure that they can
afford the kit they need.
?There has been a 64% increase in
hire vehicles. The public would not
want to see a police force dependent
on short term solutions in place of
long term thinking.?
Deputy Chief Constable Fiona
Taylor said almost all of the force?s
vehicles were ?in constant use?.
She said: ?When operational
demands require us to hire
additional vehicles to respond to
events such as VIP visits and sporting
events, we only do so for as long as is
necessary. In many cases, the hire
costs are met by other organisations
or re-charged to event hosts.
?It is almost always cheaper for us
to hire vehicles for a short term to
meet an operational need than to buy
additional vehicles or pay mileage for
the use of private vehicles.?
A spokesperson for Justice
Secretary Humza Yousaf said: ?How
and when to use hire cars is an
operational matter for Police
Scotland. All vehicles are fit for
purpose and the fleet is maintained
to a very high standard.?
剟 The force do not have spare
vehicles so must hire when needed.
NHS spends hundreds of millions in private sector
TOM GORDON
HEALTH boards spent more than
剟 Labour?s Monica Lennon called
for more NHS staff.
�0 million of taxpayers? money
sending patients to private hospitals
and surgeries in the last three years.
Scottish Labour, which obtained
the figures through freedom of information, said the true cost was likely to
be higher as not all boards were
included and claimed private firms
were using the NHS as a ?cash cow?.
Moreover, the spending did not
include private agency staff, which
would push the estimated total private
sector spend between 2015/16 and
2017/18 above �0m.
The detailed figures covered 12 of
Scotland?s 14 territorial health boards,
except Lothian and Highland.
They showed almost �1m was
spent on private hospitals and surgeries since 2015/16, some �m of it by
NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde.
Labour said it showed the pressure
the health service was under to meet
demand, although the spending
declined across the three years.
Labour MSP Monica Lennon said:
?Health boards are already feeling the
pressure because SNP ministers have
failed to provide our hospitals with
the right number of doctors and
nurses, so they have to turn to expensive private providers to hit targets.
?The NHS is our most-valued
public service. Taxpayers don?t want
the health service used as a cash cow
for private companies.
?The only way to cut this private
spending is to ensure our health
service has the staff it needs, with the
time to deliver the care patients
deserve.
?We need real change in health and
social care and an NHS that is fit for
the future.?
A Scottish Government spokeswoman said: ?We are absolutely
committed to a publicly owned and
operated NHS and for the people of
Scotland to continue to have free,
timely access to health services.
COMMENT AT HERALDSCOTLAND.COM
?Over the last three years Scottish
Government spending on health has
approached � billion.
?The use of the independent sector
by the NHS to address short-term
capacity issues represents around 0.5
per cent of this investment, which
compares to 7.3% in NHS England.
?For context, over this same period,
our NHS has had to pay around
�75bn because of Private Finance
Initiative and Public Private Partnership contracts.?
The Scottish Government has previously said that total private sector
spend, including private agency staff,
by NHS boards was �.5m in
2015/16 and �m in 2016/17.
Wednesday January 2, 2019
NEWS 5
A NA LYSI S , I NSIG H T, OPI N ION
Spacecraft makes rendezvous with tiny object four billion miles away
MARCIA DUNN
NASA?S New Horizons spacecraft
has survived humanity?s most
distant exploration of another
world.
Ten hours after the middle-of-thenight encounter four billion miles
away, flight controllers in Laurel,
Maryland, yesterday received word
from the spacecraft that it had
successfully completed its latest
mission. Cheers erupted at Johns
Hopkins University?s Applied Physics Laboratory, home to mission
control.
An anxious crowd in a nearby
auditorium watching events joined
in the loud celebration.
New Horizons zoomed past the
small celestial object known as
Ultima Thule three-and-a-half years
after its spectacular brush with
Pluto.
Scientists say it will take nearly
two years for New Horizons to
beam back all its observations of
Ultima Thule, a full billion miles
beyond Pluto.
At that distance, it takes six hours
for the radio signals to reach Earth.
Based on rudimentary pictures
snapped just hundreds of thousands of miles before the 12:33am
close approach, Ultima Thule is
decidedly elongated in shape ?
measuring about 22 miles by nine
miles.
Scientists say there are two possibilities for this: Ultima Thule is
either one object with t wo
Six hours
for radio
signals to
reach
Earth
connected lobes, sort of like a spinning bowling pin or peanut still in
the shell, or two objects orbiting
surprisingly close to one another.
A single body is more likely, they
noted. An answer should be forthcoming today, once new and better
pictures arrive.
But the best colour close-ups will
not be available until later in January and February.
The icy rock has been in a deepfreeze preservation state since the
formation of our solar system 4.5
billion years ago. Scientists hope to
learn about those origins through
New Horizons? observations deep
inside the so-called Kuiper Belt, or
frozen Twilight Zone, on the fringes
of the solar system.
New Horizons will continue to
zoom farther away. The hope is that
the mission will be extended yet
again and another target will be
found. Ultima Thule is the first
destination to be reached that was
not even known until after the
spacecraft?s launch in 2006.
Cancelled trains and late services
make fare hike a hard sell to Scots
As passengers face increased
ticket prices from this morning
MARTIN WILLIAMS looks at
how ScotRail Abellio
is performing as it
looks to boost
standards on
Scotland?s railways
IT was billed as the improvement plan to
usher in faster trips and build the ?best
railway Scotland has ever had?.
But Dutch transport firm Abellio?s
control of the ScotRail franchise has come
under fire from all directions as disruption
went on for a 23rd day on Hogmanay
following the introduction of a new winter
timetable.
The new timetable, timed to coincide
with the introduction of faster and more
environmentally friendly trains, was set up
after railway consultant Nick Donovan
carried out an independent review of the
performance of Abellio ScotRail and
Network Rail, which is in charge of track
infrastructure.
This resulted in a series of accepted
recommendations, primarily to improve
train reliability and end skip-stopping ? the
practice of missing a stop when a service is
running late ? except as a last resort.
The train operator had said its new
electric and high-speed trains, including
the environmentally friendly Hitachi Class
385 stock, would allow shorter journey
times and provide more seats and services.
But passengers have bombarded
ScotRail with complaints since the
timetable launched. An estimated average
of 80 services were cancelled per day in the
first week-and-a-half of the new winter
timetable.
Most of the disruption that has hit
railways since the timetable launch has
been due to staff shortages. ScotRail say
this is partly because training on the new
trains had not been done in time to be
ready for the timetable launch.
The company also said the problems
were due to the late arrival of the Hitachi
385s and high-speed InterCity trains.
Further blame has been placed on the
RMT union?s industrial action over a pay
dispute that lasted several weeks but was
resolved nearly four weeks ago.
Dozens of services were cancelled and
the number of carriages cut on scores more
over Hogmanay. Staffing issues were again
given as the main cause.
And that was after ScotRail had been
told by the Scottish Government to come
up with a plan to improve services or face
having its contract axed.
Ministers issued a Remedial Plan Notice
on Christmas Eve citing cancellations in
November and December as having
breached required performance targets.
They have the power to issue a notice if
they think an operator has contravened or
is likely to contravene any term in the
franchise agreement.
It means an improvement plan must be
delivered within eight weeks, outlining
how ScotRail will resolve the problems. If
any remedial agreement is unsuccessful, it
could result in the termination of the
franchise agreement.
ScotRail had declared in advance of the
new timetable that the flagship Edinburghto-Glasgow rail link would see the fastest
剟 Commuters
struggle to find
seats on the
Queen Street to
Waverley service,
above; much is
riding on the new
Hitachi Class 385
rolling stock, left
Pictures:
Robert Perry
journey time cut to 42 minutes after an
�8 million upgrade.
But a Herald analysis of the changes
showed that this amounts to just one train
out of 173 from Queen Street to Waverley
achieving this journey time.
The 2pm train on the first working day
of the new timetable was scheduled to take
42 minutes, with the same journey just six
minutes slower under the old timetable.
We also found that just 18 of 173 trains
are scheduled to make the daily journey
from Glasgow to Scotland?s capital within
50 minutes and none run during the rush
hour.
Before the new timetable chaos,
ScotRail had already been flooded with
complaints about cancelled services and
longer journey times in some areas.
It led to MSP Mark Ruskell, who
represents mid-Scotland and Fife, seeking
urgent talks with Transport Secretary
Michael Matheson over a timetable he
described as ?a major cause for concern?.
In October, East Dunbartonshire
Council was investigating ways to improve
Milngavie?s ?lacklustre? rail service in the
wake of Donovan?s improvement plan
which called for urgent action to put in
measures for ?right-time departures?.
Herald analysis shows that the
percentage of on-time services which arrive
within 59 seconds of their booked arrival
time at Milngavie Station has improved
slightly ? from 25.6% in the April 30-May
27 period last year to 27.7% now ? but it
remains one of the worst rates in Scotland.
The improvement plan also wanted
urgent measures to ?ensure confidence? in
on-time departures at Whifflet,
Lanarkshire. The Herald?s analysis shows
a small improvement in on-time services
over the same period, up from 48.2% in
2017 to 57.3%.
Rail fares increase by under-fire firm
prompts calls to nationalise service
Continued from Page 1
freeze prices. Labour MSP Colin
Smyth said: ?This rail fare rise is
a rip-off. Commuters are now
being forced to pay more for
train services which are plagued
by delays, cancellations and
overcrowding.?
Green MSP John Finnie MSP
said: ?It?s wrong to ask rail
passengers to pay a significantly
increased fare for a poor service
as too often we suffer delayed,
cancelled and overcrowded
trains. Public ownership of this
public service can?t come soon
enough.?
Scottish LibDem MSP Alex
Cole-Hamilton said: ?Few
passengers would think that
ScotRail?s recent performance
should now be rewarded with
another ticket price hike.?
Manuel Cortes, general
secretary of the TSSA, said:
?Freezing fares for passengers
would help the hard-pressed
commuter but it?s only one part
of what it takes to run a railway.
We need trains that turn up, run
on time, have enough seats... We
need staff in ticket offices and on
the platforms.
?Abellio, who run ScotRail,
COMMENT AT HERALDSCOTLAND.COM
BULLETIN
should be stripped of the
franchise which month on month
only excels now in setting new
record lows.?
Both ScotRail and Abellio
declined to comment, however, a
spokesperson for Transport
Scotland said: ?Calls for a fares
freeze underestimate the impact
of these on the public purse.
?The average fares increases
in Scotland [2.8%] are lower than
England and Wales [3.1%].
ScotRail fares, on average per
passenger-kilometre, are around
20% lower than those on rail
services across Great Britain.
?Two-thirds of the cost of
running the railway is already
met through Scottish
Government subsidy, with the
remainder through rail
passenger revenues. Any
change to rail fares could
therefore have a significant
impact on the taxpayer.
?Many delays are due to
infrastructure issues which are
the responsibility of Network
Rail, which remains the
responsibility of the UK
Government. Devolution of
Network Rail?s activities would
allow us to take further action to
improve services.?
剟 The winner is hugged
by Paul Hollywood.
Special Bake
Off won by
Carter-Bailey
GREAT British Bake Off
finalist Steven CarterBailey fended off former
winner Candice Brown to
claim star baker in the
show?s New Year special.
Carter-Bailey, who
competed in 2017, returned
to the Bake Off tent,
triumphing in all three
challenges and earning the
first Hollywood hug for a
complex showstopper.
Brown, who won the
seventh series of the show
in 2016, was the first
winner to return to the
tent.
She crafted a series of
successful bakes but could
not compete with CarterBailey, whose designs were
deemed ?unbelievable? by
judge Paul Hollywood.
Following his win,
Carter-Bailey said: ?That
felt really, really good. It
was a challenge to walk
back into that tent. To do it
and win is an immense
feeling. What a start to
2019. It couldn?t be better.?
Holding his Bake Off
trophy, he added: ?I?m
going to walk away and
start 2019 with three new
friends, and a new plate.?
Brown admitted defeat,
saying: ?I?ve learnt that
Steven is unstoppable
when it comes to fondant,
and I have learnt that I still
love The Great British
Bake Off.?
She added: ?I came here
as a winner, and of course
it would have been nice to
do that double but it was
really good fun. It was
great to be back.?
Tamal Ray, a 2015
finalist, also returned with
Kate Henry, from 2014.
Dr Hook front
man dies at 81
DR Hook & The Medicine
Show singer Ray Sawyer
has died aged 81.
The musician was
famous for the black eye
patch he wore after he lost
his eye in a car accident.
The 1970s band, from
Alabama and which was
later known as just Dr
Hook, was best known for
the song When You?re In
Love With A Beautiful
Woman.
Artists International
Management said: ?It?s
with a heavy heart that we
have to say goodbye to one
of the iconic performers of
the 1970s who literally had
his smiling face on the
cover of Rolling Stone.
?He lived the rock and
roll life right up to the age
of 81, and he was proud of
it. Rest peacefully Ray...
you will be sadly missed.?
The company also
shared a post from
Sawyer?s wife Linda, which
said: ?We thank you all for
your continued support
and prayers. Ray loved you
all.?
6 A YEAR IN POLITICS
Wednesday January 2, 2019
A NA LYSI S , I NSIG H T, OPI N ION
剟 Jackson Carlaw has deputised for Ruth Davidson as Tory leader during her maternity leave.
剟 Labour MSP James Kelly successfully launched a bill to scrap the Offensive Behaviour at Football Act.
Leonard looks for fresh
ALISTAIR
GRANT
剟 Scottish Labour leader Richard Leonard has not had an easy year and at times has struggled at First Minister?s Questions. Picture: Colin Mearns
剟 Labour?s public services spokeswoman Jackie Baillie in the Parliament building in Edinburgh..
AS a tumultuous 2018 finally
spluttered to an end, both of
Scotland?s main unionist
parties were led by politicians
most people would struggle to
recognise, let alone name.
For the Scottish Tories, this is
less of a problem. Interim
leader Jackson Carlaw freely
admits he is simply keeping
Ruth Davidson?s seat warm
until she returns from
maternity leave.
Scottish Labour leader
Richard Leonard has more
reason to worry. And as he
looks ahead to a new year, he
must be hoping it offers
something of a fresh start, too.
Mr Leonard laid out his
socialist vision early in 2018,
promising to roll back the
privatisation of public services
in his first major speech as
leader.
But in late January, a racism
row erupted in his party amid
claims a top councillor told
Scottish Labour MSP Anas
Sarwar that Scotland wouldn?t
vote for a ?brown, Muslim
P**i?.
Weeks later, Scottish Labour
MP Hugh Gaffney was forced
to apologise after using racist
and homophobic language
during a Burns Supper speech.
And the following month,
Labour councillor Jim
Dempster admitted making an
Islamophobic comment about
then SNP transport minister
Humza Yousaf. It was a
damaging run of stories.
Elsewhere, avoidable
blunders marred Scottish
Labour?s conference in Dundee
in March.
There were red faces all
round when the name of Keir
Hardie ? Labour?s revered
Scottish founder ? was
misspelled during a conference
awards ceremony.
And UK leader Jeremy
Corbyn later sparked an
almighty row after insisting his
party?s Brexit vision must
include barriers to prevent
employers ?being able to
import cheap agency labour?.
Luckily, Mr Leonard?s own
speech went down well, and
Labour?s internal divisions over
Brexit never quite erupted into
the open.
There were victories to come,
too. Notably, Scottish Labour
MSP James Kelly successfully
spearheaded a drive to scrap a
controversial law aimed at
cracking down on sectarian
behaviour at football. The
Offensive Behaviour at
Football and Threatening
Communications Act had come
under heavy criticism since its
introduction.
Its repeal marked the first
time an entire Act has been
scrapped ? with no legislation
to replace it ? since the Scottish
Parliament was reconvened in
1999.
Mr Leonard also had some
success at First Minister?s
Questions by cutting through
the spin and focusing on real
people let down by a struggling
NHS.
But all too often he would
emerge from a bruising
exchange with Nicola Sturgeon
looking crushed.
Meanwhile, Labour?s Brexit
position continued to confuse
and the antisemitism scandal
engulfing the UK party refused
to die down.
In September, party bosses
were accused of betraying
former Scottish leader Kezia
Dugdale after cutting funding
to her defence of a �,000
defamation claim.
A month later came a
reshuffle that rapidly
descended into farce.
Seeking to refresh his front
bench, Mr Leonard sacked two
of his party?s biggest names:
health spokesman Anas Sarwar
and economy spokeswoman
Jackie Baillie. Mr Sarwar
apparently learned of the move
from Twitter.
At a Scottish Parliamentary
Journalists? Association lunch
in early December, one hack
asked Mr Leonard if he would
consider following in Ms
Dugdale?s footsteps and
entering I?m a Celebrity...Get
Me Out of Here! to bag some
much-needed exposure.
?As I understand it, that?s
invitation only,? he joked.
Of course, one politician
who needed no such help
grabbing the limelight was
Scottish Tory leader Ruth
Davidson.
By early February, the bullish
MSP was appearing in the
glossy pages of Vogue. Days
剟 There was a heated row over a councillor?s description of Scottish Labour leadership candidate Anas Sarwar.
COMMENT AT HERALDSCOTLAND.COM
Wednesday January 2, 2019
A NA LYSI S , I NSIG H T, OPI N ION
剟 Labour withdrew its financial backing for Kezia Dugdale in a defamation case with Wings Over Scotland.
A YEAR IN POLITICS 7
剟 Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn leaves Possilpark Parish Church in Glasgow after meeting asylum seekers.
start after a torrid year
剟 Scottish Tory leader Ruth Davidson gave birth to a baby boy, Fin, announcing she and her partner Jen Wilson were ?delighted? by the infant?s safe arrival at Edinburgh Royal Infirmary.
later, Channel 4 announced she
would join Made In Chelsea?s
Jamie Laing and comedian Tim
Minchin in The Great Celebrity
Bake Off.
Ms Davidson was then
named one of 2018?s most
influential people by Time
magazine, and at the end of
May, Vogue included her in its
inaugural guide to Britain?s 25
most influential and
aspirational female figures.
The Scottish Tory leader,
however, was about to take an
unexpected break from the
public eye.
In April, the 39-year-old
announced she was pregnant
with her first child after
undergoing IVF.
She and her partner Jen
Wilson were delighted, and
little Finn Paul Davidson was
born in October, weighing 10lb
1.5oz.
As she left on maternity
leave, her deputy Jackson
Carlaw was asked to keep the
Tory show on the road.
Ms Davidson?s absence
coincided with one of the most
dramatic political periods in
living memory.
Brexit tore through the UK?s
political system like a tornado.
The old rules were chucked out
the window. Confusion
reigned.
Lacking the bite of his boss,
Mr Jackson nevertheless largely
held his own at FMQs.
But Brexit and the endless
Tory psychodrama gripping
Westminster loomed on the
horizon, and his party seemed
increasingly embarrassed by
the antics down south.
Fears over a Westminster
?power grab? initially led to a
rare moment of agreement
between the SNP and the
Tories.
But the consensus wasn?t to
last, and the Tories eventually
became the only party to vote
against a Holyrood motion
refusing consent to the UK
Government?s EU
(Withdrawal) Bill.
The party later slammed the
Scottish Government?s
alternative Brexit Bill, which
剟 Ross Thomson got himself in hot water by insulting fellow Tories.
has since become entangled in
legal wrangling.
There was no shortage of
empty posturing as the months
wore on.
Both Ms Davidson and
Scottish Secretary David
Mundell hinted they would
There was no
shortage of empty
posturing as the
months wore on
resign if any Brexit deal
introduced different
arrangements for Northern
Ireland. But as other ministers
quit over this very issue, the
pair stayed put.
It all gave the SNP plenty of
ammunition. They accused the
Scottish Tories of selling out
fishermen over Brexit and
gleefully pointed to the chaos
engulfing Westminster, where
party infighting made matters
worse.
In October, staunch Brexiter
Ross Thomson, the Tory MP for
Aberdeen South, suggested his
Scottish colleagues were
?a***holes? for opposing Boris
Johnson.
It came after it emerged
剟 Tory MSP Michelle Ballantyne justified child benefit limit on poor.
COMMENT AT HERALDSCOTLAND.COM
senior Scottish Tories had
apparently launched a bid ?
dubbed ?Operation A***? ? to
stop the former Foreign
Secretary succeeding Theresa
May as Prime Minister.
Ms Davidson and Mr
Mundell are known to have
little time for the Brexiter wing
of the Tory Party.
Not all the year?s rows were
centred on Brexit. Michelle
Ballantyne, the Scottish Tories?
welfare spokeswoman, caused
outrage in October when she
said the two-child cap on
benefits was ?fair? because
poor people cannot have as
many children as they like.
As a new year dawns, Ms
Davidson?s absence from the
Brexit debate will be keenly felt
by many in her party.
To much of the public, after
all, she is the Scottish Tories.
Towards the end of last
summer she opened up about
her past mental health struggles
and ruled out ever launching a
bid to become Prime Minister.
It was a blow to many centrist
Tories UK-wide.
By the time she returns in the
spring, Brexit will be upon us.
There seems little doubt she?ll
play a major part in whatever
comes next.
And Mr Leonard?
Well, there?s always the
reality TV jungle. Perhaps Ms
Dugdale can help him wangle
an invite.
8 NEWS
Wednesday January 2, 2019
A NA LYSI S , I NSIG H T, OPI N ION
Long ago left to nature, Handa?s
wildlife now brings humans back
Deserted in the potato famine,
the island now welcomes a new
generation keen to help its
world-famous seabird
colonies as volunteer
rangers in the
summer, discovers
MIKE MERRITT
IT is famed as the home of one of Britain?s
most important seabird colonies ? and its
most remote and expensive public toilet.
Now Handa Island off the west coast of
Sutherland is to host dozens of volunteers
who are being recruited to help look after
the thousands of guillemots, kittiwakes and
fulmars which gather there.
The island is owned by Scourie Estate
and managed as a reserve in partnership
with the Scottish Wildlife Trust.
Handa has had no full-time inhabitants
since 1848, when it was deserted during the
potato famine. But today it attracts many
tens of thousands of birds during the
summer.
The island is also home to smaller populations of important seabirds like Arctic
skuas and puffins. Mammals including
dolphins, whales and seals are often seen
from its coast.
In a major expansion of conservation
work, the Trust is appointing five long-term
volunteers to undertake a range of tasks, on
placements ranging from eight to 22 weeks,
including surveys of breeding birds and
helping visitors to safely explore the island.
And around 50 short-term volunteers are
needed to spend a week welcoming visitors
who arrive on the ferry.
The volunteers will be supervised by
Linnea Hindriks, the newly appointed
Handa Island Ranger for the 2019 season.
Linnea, from Germany, who was a longterm volunteer on the island in 2017, said:
?I absolutely loved my time on Handa as a
volunteer.
?I started off as an assistant ranger for
just the spring but I ended up staying for the
whole season.
?I can?t wait to go back this year as the
ranger and I?m looking forward to working
with lots of enthusiastic volunteers to help
protect this amazing place and its special
wildlife.
?Working on Handa requires both physical and mental strength. But for someone
who is up for a challenge, and who is happy
to spend a week in simple and shared
accommodation, it will be an unforgettable
experience.?
Sven Rasmussen, reserve manager, said:
?Handa is an incredibly special wild place.
Our volunteers work full-time but outside
of this they have the unique chance to
spend long summer evenings exploring the
island, listening to the roar of seabirds on
the busy cliffs, or sharing their experiences
with other volunteers in the island bothy.
?I?m delighted that Linnea is joining our
剟 One of the tasks of
Scottish Wildlife Trust
volunteers on Handa
Island is to count the
numbers of seabirds in
its cliff-face colonies,
above.
Guillemots are among
the islands teeming
wildlife, left.
Pictures: Danni Thompson
(SWT) & Steven Gardner
team in 2019. It shows that volunteering
with the Trust gives people the skills and
experience that helps them find future
work in conservation.?
Last year?s rangers, Craig Nisbet and
Francesca Clair, lived and worked on the
island from March to September.
Normally uninhabited Handa is also
home to Britain?s remotest and most expensive public toilet.
More than 7000 visitors flock to the
remote isle every summer ? and in growing
Handa is an
incredibly
special wild
place
numbers because it is on the booming
North Coast 500 tourist route ? and so,
seven years ago, Handa had a �,000
comfort stop installed to keep up with the
boom.
The Handa eco loo is turf-roofed and
made of steel.
It took a five-man team six days to build
it on an island so difficult to reach it took
several attempts by landing craft to get the
materials for it on shore.
Positioned on a hill overlooking a beach,
the foundations are seven feet deep to stop
it being blown into the Atlantic by the galeforce winds that regularly blow, while the
only prying eyes are from the seals and
otters who live nearby.
Following completion in 2012, intrepid
birdwatchers to one of Scotland?s most
spectacular wildlife reserves have a toilet
with great views: from its confines they can
see iconic mountains including Suilven,
Foinaven and Ben Mor Coigach, as well as
seals and otters on the beach.
On the island?s busiest days there can be
up to 150 visitors, though in the 19th
century Handa was recorded as having a
population of just 65 people.
However, the islanders had a parliament,
similar to that of St Kilda, which met daily
and a female-centric society where the
oldest widow on the island was considered
its queen.
But, despite a healthy diet of oats, fish
and seabirds, the remaining islanders
decided to abandon their homes for the
mainland 171 years ago as a result of the
potato famine.
Applications for volunteering on Handa
Island open today and close at 9am on
February 11.
For more information about volunteering with the Scottish Wildlife Trust on
Handa Island and elsewhere visit www.
scottishwildlifetrust.org.uk/volunteer
When it comes to climate, Glasgow University team knows the drill
JACK MCGREGOR
A DRILL originally developed to
break through Martian rocks is
set to be deployed to Antarctica,
on a mission which could boost
understanding of the Earth?s
changing climate.
A team of Glasgow University
engineers is heading to a British
Antarctic Survey (BAS) research
station named Skytrain Ice Rise
tomorrow with a sophisticated
drill they originally developed
for use on future unmanned
Martian rover missions.
Current technology requires
considerable downward force in
order to drive the drill bit
through rock, a considerable
challenge in lower-gravity envi-
ronments such as the surface of
Mars. The new drill overcomes
that issue, allowing the whole
system to be made much smaller.
That, in turn, makes it ideal
for sending down the long,
narrow boreholes drilled in
Antarctica, where it aims to
collect a sample of rock from the
very bottom of the ice sheet.
The team has worked with
BAS on several occasions to test
the space drill systems in the
cold, dry and rocky Antarctic,
one of just a handful of places on
Earth whose landscape is similar
to that which might be found on
Mars.
On this visit, the aim is to test
the effectiveness of the drill technology for a new, more terrestrial purpose.
Dr Patrick Harkness of the
University of Glasgow leads the
team which developed the drill.
He said: ?We?re hoping to get a
sample of bedrock out from
underneath the ice sheet and
return it to the UK for analysis.
When we do that we?ll be able to
determine how long it?s been
since that rock last saw the sun
and that information will allow
us to recreate the advance and
withdrawal of the ice sheets,
which gives us much greater
information about the coming
and going of ice ages.
?That could allow us to validate our climate models with
much greater confidence and
make better decisions about
environmental matters here on
Earth.?
It?s time to
talk about
mental
health
MENTAL health campaign-
ers are encouraging more
people to reach out to those
they believe are struggling
ahead of a dedicated Time
to Talk day next month.
Research by See Me,
which works to end mental
health discrimination,
suggests only a quarter of
young people would tell
someone if they are finding
it difficult to cope.
It says employers and
those working in the education and health sectors can
help by ensuring those who
are struggling are treated
fairly.
See Me?s survey of 1,455
young people found less
than half (40%) would be
willing to speak to their
manager about their mental
health.
More than two-thirds
(69%) said they had
witnessed others being
treated differently or
unfairly because of mental
health issues.
Ahead of a national Time
to Talk day on February 7,
campaigners highlighted
the case of Jenn Barnes
from Glasgow, who said
sharing her struggles with
her parents and friends had
helped her when she felt she
could not cope.
M s B a r ne s , w ho s e
brother Calum took his
own life in 2017, said: ?I
kept everything bottled up
for so long that I was at
breaking point.
?It ended up with me
having an episode in a shop
where I broke down on the
floor in tears. I was then
taken to hospital. I told my
mum and dad what I had
been feeling and they got
my friends involved.
?If I hadn?t spoken to
them I might not be here,
things were really bad.?
The 31-year-old said she
hopes anyone in a similar
situation is able to find help.
Woman falls
80 feet on
holiday island
A YOUNG British woman
was in a grave condition
yesterday after falling more
than 80 feet while climbing
at a sanctuary on the holiday island of Majorca.
The 25-year-old, who has
not been named, fell from
the Cura sanctuary on the
Randa Mountain 16 miles
east of Palma, the island
c apit al, arou nd 3am
yesterday.
She was rescued by
璮irefighters and taken to
the Son Espases hospital
with a severe head injury
and multiple fractures after
her boyfriend used his
mobile phone to raise the
alarm.
It was not reported
whether there were any
other people at the scene at
the time.
If an ad
is wrong,
the ASA
is here to
put it right.
ASA.org.uk
Advertising Standards Authority
Wednesday January 2, 2019
剟 Snowboarder David White takes the stairs at Glasgow Concert hall,
Buchanan Street, after heavy snowfall in February. Picture: Colin Mearns
A NA LYSI S , I NSIG H T, OPI N ION
剟 Oliver Keenan, whose Halloween turn as Pennywise the Dancing Clown
went viral in an online video, with brother Flynn, 10. Picture: Kirsty Anderson
THE YEAR IN PICTURES 9
剟 Kaytlin Scott with her work Familial Semantics at Glasgow School of
Art degree show 2018 in the Tontine Building. Picture: Colin Mearns
Picture perfect: The Herald?s images of 2018
剟 Artist Tim
Vincent-Smith at
Inverleith House
in Edinburgh?s
Royal Botanic
Gardens, which
was used as part
of the Edinburgh
International
Science Festival.
The Pianodrome
Live project created
a 360-degree arena
made from 50
pianos.
Picture: Gordon Terris
剟 Milliner William Chambers at the launch of a collection inspired by
Charles Rennie Mackintosh at the Lighthouse, Glasgow. Pic: Jamie Simpson
剟 Hutchesons
restaurant in
Glasgow provided
an unusual setting
for a fashion
shoot by Kirsty
Anderson.
Picture: Kirsty
Anderson
剟 Chinese New Year of the Dog celebrations took place in George Square,
Glasgow. Picture: Jamie Simpson
COMMENT AT HERALDSCOTLAND.COM
10 ARTS
BULLETIN
Wednesday January 2, 2019
A NA LYSI S , I NSIG H T, OPI N ION
ARTS
Kopranos and co ring in new year with showtunes of the future
Franz Ferdinand,
Metronomy, Free Love
Concert in the Gardens
Edinburgh?s Hogmanay
Neil Cooper
Killing Eve?s Villanelle
played by Jodie Comer.
BBC slips in
sneak preview
THE BBC rang in 2019 by
sharing a sneak peek at
forthcoming new series of
programmes including
Killing Eve, Poldark and
Call The Midwife.
The one-minute teaser
trailer was unveiled on
social media, captioned: ?If
you thought 2018 was
good, wait until you see
what we?ve got in store for
2019.?
Jodie Comer is seen
laughing as the evil
Villanelle from Killing Eve,
while there are also
glimpses of duelling in
Poldark and the midwives
at Nonnatus House.
Other returning shows
highlighted include Luther,
Peaky Blinders and Line
Of Duty.
The clip also offers a first
glimpse of Tcheky Karyo in
the upcoming spin-off of
The Missing.
****
THE spirit of Glasgow club-night
Optimo hung over the capital on a
grand scale to see out 2018 with a
very hip spring in its step. While
Optimo DJs prepared to man the
decks alongside Chicago House
queen The Black Madonna at Leith
Theatre, Edinburgh?s Hogmanay kickstarted official celebrations with a
mainstage triple bill headlined by
Franz Ferdinand, one of the first of a
post-millennium art-pop new wave to
infiltrate the mainstream.
Their success arrived shortly after
the band?s first scheduled
Edinburgh?s Hogmanay appearance,
in 2003/04, was cancelled due to
high winds. Fifteen years on, the
same slot is taken by Free Love, the
Glasgow-based duo of Suzi Rodden
and Lewis Cook formerly known as
Happy Meals. The euphoric storm of
hippified techno whipped up by a
barefoot Rodden and a beret-clad
Cook on analogue electronic kit
flanked by psychic signs and symbols
suggested biblical weather wouldn?t
be a problem.
Rodden revels in conjuring
electronic zaps into the air in between
singing in French or else breaking out
into Lindsay Kemp-style dance
routines. She also has fun with
flowers in a way that probably hasn?t
been seen since early Smiths gigs.
Joseph Mount?s five-piece
Metronomy line-up follow with a
propulsive show of squelchy
dancefloor prog, with wiggy
keyboards and high-pitched vocal
lines underpinned by a percussive
pulse that makes for a delicious
experience.
Franz Ferdinand enter with the sort
of showbiz swagger that comes with
14 months on the road and their name
blazing behind them in an old school
dance hall style. With guitarist Dino
Bardot and multi-instrumentalist
whizz-kid Julian Corrie now fully
integrated into the fold by way of last
year?s Always Ascending album,
vocalist Alex Kapranos and co sound
triumphal on pretty much everything
they do.
On the opening Do You Want To,
Kapranos customises the
Alex
Kapranos,
left, is a
willing
showman who
delighted in
camping it up
in the capital
fronting dico
rockers Franz
Ferdinand.
?transmission party? line for a
Hogmanay party reference as he casts
himself as a wilfully cheesy MC. He
high-kicks it up on The Dark of the
Matinee, and teases with libidinous
intent on No You Girls. At times he
sounds pre-pop, even as bassist Bob
Hardy and drummer Paul Thomson
bounce out irresistible disco rhythms
behind. This is offset by the glorious
three guitar strut of Michael, only to be
compounded by a game take on Auld
Lang Syne following the fireworks.
Take Me Out?s anthemic yearning is
punctuated by what look like
co-ordinated jumps, while the Germanlanguage outro on Darts of Pleasure
makes for an all too fitting song for
Europe. Corrie poses just as well as
Kapranos, his piano line on Lazy Boy
ushering in one of what sounds like
several 21st-century show-tunes for
musicals to come.
Edging towards the finale, Kapranos
drops to one knee and goes into full
Las Vegas showman routine. A closing
This Fire is extended to epic level,
ending with a coup de theatre full of as
much knowing grandiosity as the
ensemble bow that follows.
Multi-instrumentalist puts together a group to cement links he has made with Dutch avant-garde players
Fifield whistles up magic new
band for Celtic Connections
ROB ADAMS
Penny Bendall was to get
young people into crafts.
A crafty idea
for children
A CERAMICS conservator
is searching for youngsters
with hidden artistic talents
which could lead to
unexpected careers.
Penny Bendall, who 12
years ago rebuilt three
Chinese porcelain vases
damaged by a visitor to the
Fitzwilliam Museum in
Cambridge, fears the
potential of children who
have natural craft skills is
not being recognised.
She has set up a charity
which runs workshops for
teenagers who enjoy
working with their hands.
The Creative Dimension
Trust offers courses in
skills including engraving,
wall painting and gilding. It
allows youngsters to work
with leading specialists and
aims to give them an
insight into career
possibilities.
EastEnders is to reflect
London?s diversity.
Gay bar for
Albert Square
A GAY bar is to open on
Albert Square to reflect the
diversity of London, the
new executive producer of
EastEnders has said.
Kate Oates recently
joined the show from
Coronation Street and she
said she has big plans to
champion diversity.
In a video posted on the
EastEnders Twitter page,
she said: ?I am really
interested in bringing some
more LGBTQ characters
in, and maybe we will have
a new precinct for them as
well.
?We are looking at
opening a gay bar on the
square which will be a
super-cool precinct where
gay and straight characters
can all just hang out and
loads of stories can cross
and should just be
something really exciting.?
F
RASER Fifield is untangling the
web of lines that has brought
LoLanders, a band that makes
its debut at Celtic Connections,
together. The late artist and writer Pete
Frame became the go-to guy for rock
family trees that traced every
connection leading up to the birth ?
and what came after their lifespan ? of
bands both famous and not so well
known, and his assiduousness would
have been useful here.
Fifield and his nominal co-leader, the
Dutch viola player Oene van Geel, have
worked together before, as have van
Geel and LoLanders guitarist, Graeme
Stephen, and Fifield and Stephen have
history as a duo and in Fifield?s on-andoff trio with various drummers. Then
there?s van Geel?s duo with LoLanders?
bass guitarist Mark Haanstra and other
situations that have involved one or
other of the above with Glasgow-based
tablas player Hardeep Deerhe and
Dutch percussionist Udo Demandt.
?What?s most exciting for me, and I
think for all the other musicians too, is
that we?ve never all played together
before and we won?t know what
LoLanders sounds like until the first
day of rehearsals,? says Fifield, who
prefers to be thought of as the catalyst
who caused the sextet to form rather
than a bandleader. ?We have six very
experienced musicians who?ll all have
an input and although the composers
among us will all be bringing new
pieces to rehearsals, there?s no
pre-thought direction for us to follow.
We really will see what happens.?
LoLanders is the latest project in the
Going Dutch programme that has been
bringing musicians from the
Netherlands to the UK and Ireland
over the past eighteen months or so.
The difference here, though, is that,
rather than a one-way visit, plans are in
hand for LoLanders to play concerts in
the Netherlands, including a gig at
Amsterdam?s long-established
Bimhuis, as well as the upcoming
Celtic Connections gig and further UK
appearances in the summer.
?It?s actually quite unusual to know
before we play the first concert that
there will be others six months or so
down the line,? says Fifield, a multiinstrumentalist whose versatility has
taken him across the world, touring
internationally with Indian percussion
master Zakir Hussain and recording in
Buenos Aires with leading
contemporary exponents of tango
music as well as featuring with
musicians from closer to home
including Capercaillie and Aly Bain.
?Lots of bands have come together
for an initial project that has turned
into a one-off, never to be heard from
again, so knowing that we have a
possibility of developing a LoLanders
repertoire and identity makes this all
the more interesting.?
The idea behind LoLanders was that
Fifield and Oene van Geel should each
invite two musicians they enjoyed
working with to create the sextet.
Fifield and van Geel first met in 2012
when they were selected for the
London-based organisation Serious?s
first international Take Five, an
Sax player and piper Fraser Fifield will be mostly sticking to playing low whistle in his sextet LoLanders with the Dutch viola player Oene van Geel.
initiative aimed at giving composerperformers aged twenty-five to thirtyfive with a background in jazz and
improvising music the opportunity to
take time out to develop their craft,
build their careers and get their music
out into the world.
?We got on really well from the start
and understood each other musically,?
says Fifield. The fact that their first
instruments ? Fifield plays bagpipes
and saxophone but for some time has
majored on the low whistle ? aren?t
immediately associated with jazz
probably helped with the bonding
process. Following on from the Take
Five retreat van Geel invited Fifield
over to Amsterdam to work with his
trio Nordanians, a group that marries
international influences with jazz and
raga approaches, on concerts marking
his receipt of the prestigious Boy Edgar
award, which over the past 50 years
and more has acknowledged musicians
who have made a significant
contribution to the Dutch music scene.
?Playing with the Nordanians was
really liberating,? says Fifield, who
made quite an impression on Dutch
promoters and festival organisers at
that time. ?Up to then I?d come
through the experience of learning the
pipes but not feeling completely at ease
because of my Scots-English
background and then coming at the
saxophone from a slightly odd
perspective and not having the full
grounding in jazz. With the
Nordanians I played whistle more or
less exclusively and I felt, here?s a
Knowing that
we have a
possibility of
developing a
LoLanders
repertoire and
identity makes
this all the
more
interesting
situation where I can be completely
myself. I feel I?ve progressed as a player
since then and developed a technique
where I can play chromatically. The
low whistle especially is a very versatile
instrument and I?ve worked really hard
to try and chip away at its perceived
limitations. I?ll probably have the pipes
and saxophone with me for LoLanders
but playing the low whistle is where I
feel I?ll make the most natural
contribution.?
It was shortly after Fifield?s
experience with the Nordanians that
he put his long-time associate Stephen
in touch with Oene van Geel. The
guitarist was working on music that
featured himself with a string quartet
who would have to be fairly elastic in
their approach. And it turned out that
van Geel had just such a group, Zapp4.
Van Geel takes up the story: ?Fraser
told me about Graeme and I thought, if
Graeme has the same sense of
adventure and the same expression in
his playing as Fraser does, then this
could be really interesting. So Graeme
and I set up a Skype call. I loved
Graeme?s ideas, especially his
compositions for silent movie
soundtracks, which have become a
specialism of his. In fact, one of my
compositions ? a double cello concerto
? was quite heavily influenced by
Graeme?s writing and Distances, the
suite we recorded and toured with
Graeme and Zapp4 turned out really
well. After we?d recorded that, in 2015,
Stephen composed a soundtrack for
the 1927 classic film Metropolis for
COMMENT AT HERALDSCOTLAND.COM
himself, Zapp4 and the drummer/
percussionist Tom Bancroft, which we
premiered at the Edinburgh Fringe in
2016. We later took that to the
Xintiandi Festival in Shanghai, China.
So we have quite a history together
now and I?m really looking forward to
working with him in LoLanders.?
For Fifield, it?s the strength of
personalities that all of the musicians
bring to LoLanders that gives him
confidence this untried combination
will produce something interesting.
?As it happens we have a
combination of melody and harmony
instruments with quite a strong
emphasis on rhythm, between guitar,
bass guitar and two percussionists, so
we have the three main elements
covered. I have no idea of what it might
sound like but I?ve every faith in the
musicians concerned and I?m
confident that what they produce
together will be of good quality.?
LoLanders is just one entry in
Fifield?s diary during Celtic
Connections. On January 19, the day
his Dutch colleagues arrive to begin
rehearsing for LoLanders, he is part of
the band performing the score for the
computer-animated fantasy adventure
film, Brave, in Glasgow Royal Concert
Hall. He also features with
Aberdeenshire ballad singer Frieda
Morrison and Gaelic singer (and
Outlander favourite) Gillebride
MacMillan later in the month.
Lolanders appear at Glasgow Royal
Concert Hall on Tuesday, January 22.
Wednesday January 2, 2019
NEWS
A NA LYSI S , I NSIG H T, OPI N ION
11
One hundred
years of grief:
victims of the
Iolaire wreck
remembered
First Minister among hundreds who gathered
on Lewis to mark the centenary of the island?s
darkest hour at a poignant memorial
service, reports VICTORIA WELDON
IT was one of the worst maritime disas-
ters in British waters and a tragedy that
shook every family on Lewis.
The Iolaire disaster saw more than 200
men lose their lives just a mile from home
as the ship sank after running onto rocks
off Stornoway on New Year?s Day 1919.
The death of the sailors ? who were
returning home from the First World War
? left a lasting impact on the close-knit
community and now, 100 years on,
hundreds have gathered to mark the anniversary of the catastrophe.
Descendants of those who lost their
lives were joined by Prince Charles and
Nicola Sturgeon at a commemorative
service in Stornoway, where wreaths
were laid at the town?s HMY Iolaire
Memorial.
One of those attending, Kathreen
Hunter, lost her grandfather Norman
MacLeod in the disaster. He was just 36
when he perished just a few yards
offshore.
The former fisherman of Arnol, Lewis,
left behind a wife and two young sons.
Mrs Hunter?s father John MacLeod
would never talk about losing his parent
before his first birthday, often shrugging
questions off by saying he could not
remember.
However, he did pen a poem in Gaelic
? The War Widow ? describing how his
mother would every year wash the
uniform his father was dressed in when
he was found on the shore.
The 62-year-old retired teacher of Inverness said: ?It was just so raw and too sore
for him to speak about.
?The hardship they went through, the
very little support ? no counselling.?
HMY Iolaire left the port of the Kyle of
Lochalsh on the mainland late on the
evening of Hogmanay 1918.
At around 2.30am on New Year?s Day
she began to struggle in high winds and
crashed into rocks known as The Beasts
of Holm just a mile from the safety of
Stornoway harbour.
A total of 201 servicemen lost their
lives and around a third of the bodies
were never recovered from the sea. Only
82 survived.
Sharon Smith?s great-uncle Malcolm
Thomson died in the disaster aged 27, but
he was never supposed to be on the
doomed ship.
The able seaman was due to head back
on an earlier sailing, but had bumped into
two friends from the island?s small
community of Swainbost.
Having not seen each other for four
years, he decided to return home with
them on the HMY Iolaire.
Ms Smith said: ?They were coming
home at the end of the First World War,
they were coming home in time for New
Year celebrations.
?For them to lose their lives so close to
home, in such tragic circumstances, had
a tremendous affect on the island.
?It was almost like a blanket of grief
had covered the island.?
But the 44-year-old nurse believes the
community has been able to build something positive out of the tragedy.
She added: ?It?s brought people closer
together, made us appreciate our family
and look into our family history. I feel
closer to him now; he?s part of my family.?
Binge drinking linked to social media
addiction in major new research study
MARK WAGHORN
BINGE drinking at
university is causing
students to get hooked
on Snapchat, Instagram
and Facebook, according to new research.
And they are more
likely to post inappropriate comments on social
media after a wild night
out ? putting their future
at risk, suggests the
study.
Undergraduates who
abu s e a lc ohol a r e
f r e quent ly plac i ng
messages while intoxicated ? and showing
signs of ?social media
addiction?.
They may later regret
combining the two - as
the consequences can
affect them for a lifetime,
warn psychologists.
The study of US
students follows a survey
of their British counterparts earlier this year
that found one in five get
?drunk on purpose?
about once a week.
Lead author Professor
Natalie Ceballos, of
Texas State University,
San Marcos , s aid:
剟 Snapchat is one of the favoured sites.
?During these times
when young students are
feeling disinhibited by
alcohol, they may be
even more likely than
usual to post inappropriate material without
considering the future
impact.
?In some cases, these
sorts of mistakes have
even influenced college
admission and later job
applications.?
What is more, friends
who view their remarks
Retiring lifeboat crew
?served 279 years?
EIGHT members of a
Shetland lifeboat crew
have finally ?jumped
ship? after almost a
staggering 280 years
service between them.
Many of the retiring
crew of RNLI Aith have
been serving since they
were young boys.
In total the volunteers
have logged 279 years
with the lifeboat service.
Some of them have
served in various roles
within the RNLI, and
all have given many
hours of their time, and
saved many lives in the
process.
A farewell
presentation was held
in the local Rankin
Lounge in Aith, where
Lifeboat operations
manager Alexander
Simpson thanked the
volunteers for their
?amazing? efforts over
the years.
Mr Simpson said:
?The number of years
these men have given to
the lifeboat was
amazing, and it was
certainly much
appreciated by the
RNLI, and everyone in
the Aith community.?
Operating for over 80
years, Aith is the most
northerly lifeboat
station on Shetland?s
Atlantic coast.
may then be more likely
to perceive heavy drinking as exciting and fun,
said her team.
Snapchat and Instagram are the most popular sites among students,
followed by Facebook
and Twitter. But binge
drinkers use Snapchat
and Facebook most, they
found.
Prof Ceballos said
students who had binged
on alcohol were more
likely to have posted on
social media while
drinking or intoxicated
than those who never
had.
They also showed
greater ?intensit y?
toward social media ?
more emotional investment that allowed it to
become part of their
identities.
This suggested there
was a trend toward
being more addicted to
social media. They also
used more social media
platforms than
non-binge drinkers.
Prof Ceballos said:
?These findings suggest
that, in terms of common
brain reward mechanisms, perhaps when
students get a positive
response on social
media, this might be
?rewarding? to them in a
way that is similar to
other addictive behaviours, and then over time
they get ?hooked?.
But the study,
published in the Journal
of Studies on Alcohol
and Drugs, also found
social media may help
prevent over indulgence
with appropriate
messages.
Shops lose Harry
Potter legal battle
STUART MACDONALD
A CHAIN of Scottish
tourist shops has lost a
legal battle with entertainment giants Warner
Bros over Harry Potter
merchandise.
Edinburgh-based
Gold Brothers wanted to
trademark ?World of
Wizardry? for shops selling goods inspired by the
Potter books.
They applied to the
UK Intellectual Property Office (IPO) to
register the name to sell
?confectionery, games,
clothing, clothing accessories and toys?.
However, lawyers for
the film studio sent
letters to the company
asking them to stop passing off their products as
licensed merchandise.
Warner Bros lodged a
challenge to the trademark application with
the IPO and the matter
was to be decided at a
legal hearing.
However, Gold Brothers director Lully Gold
failed to file evidence in
time so the movie giants
succeeded in having the
trademark
bid
abandoned.
Mr Gold was ordered
to pay them �0 in legal
costs.
COMMENT AT HERALDSCOTLAND.COM
剟 Nicola Sturgeon,
above, lays a wreath
at a centenary
service on Lewis also
attended by Prince
Charles, top, to
remember the tragedy
of the Iolaire, right,
which sank with the
loss of hundreds of
lives. Sharon Smith?s
great-uncle Malcolm
Thomson, left, was
among those lost.
Another relative, Ruairidh Moir, 29, is
the same age his great-great uncle
Kenneth Campbell was when he perished
at sea.
He was one of seven brothers who
fought in the war ? two of them were
killed ? and fought from 1914 to 1918.
Mr Moir said his great-great grandmother received a letter from the king
saying she could pick one of her children
to be removed from duty.
She decided not to make that decision
and they remained in the fight.
He said: ?It?s just beyond comprehension, that?s why it?s important ? for their
sake and our sake ? that we don?t let it go
unnoticed. 200 men out of a fragile island
community ? if they had made it, what
would the island have been now??
Following the commemorative service,
the First Minister said: ?Today in Stornoway we rightly look back 100 years and
remember those lost on the Iolaire ? a
tragedy that involved so many, so close to
shore and, for most of the men, so close to
home.
?We reflect on those who perished and
how survivors, family, friends and the
wider communities on Lewis, Harris and
Berneray must have felt.
?The legacy of the Iolaire will never be
forgotten.?
12 INTERNATIONAL
BULLETIN
Wednesday January 2, 2019
A NA LYSI S , I NSIG H T, OPI N ION
WORLD DIGEST
Unesco founding member US quits over Israel rows
PARIS
THE United States and Israel offi-
剟 Firefighters at the car
attack site in Tokyo.
Eight injured
as driver rams
into crowd
of revellers
cially left the UN?s educational,
scientific and cultural agency
(Unesco) at the stroke of midnight,
the culmination of a process triggered more than a year ago amid
concerns that the organisation
fosters anti-Israel bias.
The withdrawal is mainly procedural yet serves a new blow to
Unesco, co-founded by the US after
the Second World War to foster
peace.
Donald Trump?s administration
filed its notice to withdraw in October 2017 and Israeli Prime Minister
Benjamin Netanyahu followed suit.
The Paris-based organisation has
been denounced by its critics as a
crucible for anti-Israel bias:
condemned for criticising Israel?s
occupation of East Jerusalem,
naming ancient Jewish sites as Palestinian heritage sites, and granting
full membership to Palestine in
2011.
The US has demanded ?fundamental reform? in the agency that is
best known for its World Heritage
programme to protect cultural sites
and traditions. Unesco also works to
improve education for girls, promote
understanding of the Holocaust?s
horrors, and to defend media
freedom.
The withdrawals will not greatly
affect Unesco financially, since it has
been dealing with a reduction in
funding since 2011 when both Israel
and the US stopped paying dues
after Palestine was voted in as a
member state.
Since then officials estimate that
the US ? which accounted for
around 22 per cent of the total
budget ? has accrued $600 million in
unpaid dues, one of the reasons for
President Trump?s decision to quit.
Israel owes an estimated $10m.
Unesco director-general Audrey
Azoulay took up her post just after
Mr Trump announced the pullout.
Ms Azoulay, who has Jewish and
Moroccan heritage, has presided
over the launch of a Holocaust
education website and the UN?s first
educational guidelines on fighting
anti-Semitism - initiatives that might
be seen as responding to US and
Israeli concerns.
Officials say that many of the
reasons the US cited for withdrawal
do not apply anymore, noting that,
since then, all 12 texts on the Middle
East passed at Unesco have been
consensual among Israel and Arab
member states.
Earlier, the US told Unesco officials that the US intends to stay
engaged at Unesco as a non-member
?observer state? on ?non-politicised?
issues, including the protection of
World Heritage sites.
剟 President Donald Trump baulked at
paying the US?s $600m unpaid dues.
A CAR has slammed into
pedestrians on a street
where people had gathered
for New Year?s festivities in
downtown Tokyo, injuring
at least eight people.
Police arrested a man in
his 20s on suspicion of
attempted murder.
The street had been
closed to traffic for
revellers when the incident
occurred yesterday
morning.
In video footage a small
van with its entire front
end can be seen smashed
and officers and
ambulance workers
rushing to the scene.
The incident occurred
early on Tuesday on
Takeshita Dori, a street
well known to tourists that
runs past the Meiji Shrine
in Harajuku.
Every New Year?s Eve,
the train line that includes
Harajuku station runs all
night for people welcoming
the new year with a shrine
visit.
Elsewhere, in western
Germany, at least four
people were injured when
a man intentionally drove
into a crowd of people in
what appears to have been
an attack directed at
immigrants.
Muenster police said the
50-year-old driver of a
Mercedes rammed into a
crowd in the centre of
Bottrop minutes into the
new year.
Two more attempts by
the driver to run down
other people failed.
Police said those hit by
the car included Syrian
and Afghan citizens, and
some were seriously
injured.
The driver fled towards
the nearby city of Essen
before being stopped and
arrested by police.
The driver made antiforeigner comments during
his arrest and police said
there are indications he is
mentally ill.
Baby pulled alive from flats rubble
MAGNITOGORSK
RESCUERS have pulled a baby
剟 Former Pakistan prime
minister Nawaz Sharif.
Sharif appeals
against seven
year sentence
剟 Rescuers lift the 10-month-old child from the rubble of the collapsed block in Magnitogorsk. Seven people are dead and many others are missing.
More talks but do not push us too far, Kim tells Trump
PAKISTAN?S former prime
minister Nawaz Sharif has
appealed against a prison
sentence handed down by
an Islamabad anticorruption tribunal last
week.
Sharif?s lawyer, Khawaja
Haris, said he is seeking
the suspension of the
December 24 ruling which
sentenced the country?s
three-time premier to seven
years in prison for failing
to disclose how his family
set up the Al-Azizia steel
mills in Saudi Arabia.
Mr Haris filed the appeal
yesterday.
Sharif, who was removed
from power in 2017 over
corruption allegations, is
being held in a prison in his
home city, Lahore, as
authorities proceed with
several trials against him.
He has denied any
wrongdoing.
Sharif and his family
were exiled to Saudi Arabia
by Pervez Musharraf who
seized power in 1999 to
become a military dictator.
They returned in 2007.
PYONGYANG
NORTH Korean leader Kim Jong-un
has warned Washington not to test
Pyongyang?s patience with sanctions
and pressure.
Mr Kim was speaking during his
televised New Year?s speech where
he said he is ready to meet with US
president Donald Trump at any time
to produce an outcome ?welcomed
by the international community?.
However, he said the North will be
forced to take a different path if the
United States ?continues to break its
promises and misjudges the patience
of our people by unilaterally
demanding certain things and
pushes ahead with sanctions and
pressure?.
Mr Kim also said the US should
continue to halt its joint military
exercises with ally South Korea and
not deploy strategic military assets to
the South.
Washington and Pyongyang are
trying to arrange a second summit
between Mr Trump and Mr Kim,
who met in Singapore on June 12
?If the United States takes sincere
剟 Kim Jong
Un had a stark
message for
the world when
he delivered his
speech to North
Korea
measures and corresponding action
to our leading and pre-emptive
efforts, then (US-North Korea)
relations will advance at a fast and
excellent pace through the process of
implementing (such) definite and
groundbreaking measures,? said Mr
Kim, who delivered the speech
sitting on a leather chair, wearing a
black suit and gray-blue tie.
?It is the unwavering position of
our party and the republic?s
government and my firm will that
the two countries as declared in the
June 12 joint statement ... take steps
to establish a permanent and stable
peace regime and push toward the
complete denuclearisation of the
Korean Peninsula,? he said.
?Therefore, we have already
declared domestically and
internationally and took various
actions showing our commitment
that we will no further create or test
nuclear weapons and will not use or
spread them.?
Mr Kim?s speech was closely
watched as North Korean leaders
traditionally use New Year?s
statements to reflect on the past year
and issue major policy goals for the
year ahead.
He used his New Year?s speech a
year ago to start a newfound
diplomatic approach with Seoul and
Washington, which led to his
meetings with South Korean
president Moon Jae-in and Mr
Trump.
Mr Kim also met three times with
Chinese President Xi Jinping, which
boosted his leverage by
reintroducing Beijing ? Pyongyang?s
main ally ? as a major player in the
diplomatic process to resolve the
nuclear stand-off.
But nuclear talks between
Washington and Pyongyang have
stalled in recent months as they
struggle with the sequencing of
North Korea?s disarmament and the
removal of US-led sanctions against
the North.
COMMENT AT HERALDSCOTLAND.COM
boy alive from the rubble of a
Russian apartment building
which collapsed, killing at least
seven people and leaving
dozens missing.
The rescue came about 35
hours after a section of the
10-storey building in the city of
Magnitogorsk collapsed in an
explosion believed to have
been triggered by a natural gas
leak.
They found the baby after
hearing his cries amid the
debris.
However, the 10-month-old
was seriously injured and his
recovery prospects were
unclear.
?The child was saved
because it was in a crib and
wrapped warmly,? regional
governor Boris Dubrovsky was
quoted as saying by the
Interfax news agency.
The regional emergency
ministry said earlier yesterday
that 37 residents of the
building have still not been
accounted for.
The rescue operation was
temporarily halted while
workers tried to remove or
stabilise other sections of the
building which were also in
danger of collapse.
Hopes of finding survivors
were fading because of the
harsh cold, with temperatures
dropping overnight to around
minus 18C (0F).
Seven bodies have so far
been recovered and five
injured survivors taken to
hospital.
Magnitogorsk, an industrial
city with the world?s largest
steel mill, has a population of
400,000 and is 870 miles southeast of Moscow.
Fairground ride
traps eight
overnight
RENNES
FRENCH firefighters had to
rescue eight New Year revellers
who were trapped high in the air
on a broken fairground ride for
more than eight hours overnight.
The three adults and five
teenagers ? the youngest aged 13 ?
were stuck about 170ft (52m)
above the ground in the city of
Rennes in western France.
Witnesses quoted by local
newspaper Ouest-France said the
pendulum ride broke down at
around 8.30pm on New Year?s
Eve, causing noise and sparks and
leaving one of the two passenger
sections suspended at the highest
point.
Firefighters used a helicopter to
reach the trapped group and
provide them with harnesses so
they could be winched down on to
a rescue ladder.
They had all safely reached the
ground by yesterday morning.
OPINION 13
A NA LYSI S , I NSIG H T, OPI N ION
Wednesday January 2, 2019
KEN SMITH
THE DIARY
Making a point
WELL, did you watch the World
Darts Championship final yesterday
on the telly? It does seem a little
strange that such a mundane game
has gripped the attention of so many
people. As Irish bookmakers Paddy
Power commented with a truism
after the dramatic semi-final game
between Michael Smith and Nathan
Aspinall: ?It?s matches like this that
inspire you to go down the pub and
throw a few darts yourself. Then your
first three darts total up to seven and
you can?t hit a double to save your
life, so f*** it, stick to five-a-side.?
Took off
剟 There is nothing like a trade war to precipitate a recession, and the mother of all trade wars has broken out between the United States and China.
Steven Camley is away
Beware: 2019 may be the year
everything goes wrong at once
IAIN
MACWHIRTER
A
NYONE with a pension linked
to the stock market will be
entering 2019 feeling somewhat
chastened after the worst
December since 2002. US shares have
been down nearly 20 per cent.
These ?corrections?, as economists
like to call them, often act as storm
warnings for recessions ahead, and
everyone?s trying to predict when the
next one will break. You may not have
recovered from the last economic
recession ? most of us haven?t since
earnings have been stagnant ? but the
truth is that the next one is overdue.
Recessions come in roughly 10-year
cycles ? 1990, 2000, 2008 ? and are linked
to natural fluctuations in the business
cycle. But they are usually triggered by
specific events. In 2000, it was the dot.
com bust when thousands of dodgy
internet ventures went under. In 2008 it
was banks behaving badly by marketing
collateralised debt obligations and other
toxic financial derivatives. That required
�1 trillion in bailout money, loaned by
us taxpayers, to prevent a collapse of the
global financial system.
However, you can?t step in the same
river twice, and we can be sure the next
recession won?t be like the last. This time
it looks more likely to be governments
behaving badly, since the banks have
been reined in a little since the funny
money noughties. There is nothing like a
trade war to precipitate a recession, and
the mother of all trade wars has broken
out between the world?s two biggest
economies: the United States and China.
The tendency is to blame Donald
Trump alone for this mutually assured
destruction of trade, but China has been
behaving badly too. Its average tariffs are
much higher than America?s, and it has
been engaging in well-documented
industrial espionage and intellectual
property violations, as well as
maintaining an undervalued currency
for many years. China is a communist
dictatorship and doesn?t play by Western
market rules.
However, China?s defenders say that if
the US chooses to open factories in
China to make its computers and mobile
phones, exploiting cheap labour, it can
hardly expect the host country not to
benefit from technology transfers. China
was one of the most impoverished
countries on the planet only three
decades ago. It is only now trying to
build a consumer society, through
increased wages and a more diversified
economy, which should be good for
world trade.
But Mr Trump has clocked that China
is likely to overtake the US in the not too
distant future and in his strong-arm
fashion is trying to alter the terms of
trade while America still has muscle.
Hence his slapping 10 per cent tariffs on
$200 billion of Chinese imports last year.
China immediately retaliated in kind by
slapping tariffs on US goods, like Harley
Davidson motorcycles and beer.
The utter
chaos of
the UK,
and loose
talk of a
No-Deal
Brexit,
makes a
collapse in
confidence
in the
economy a
dead cert
It makes much more sense to deal
with these issues through international
forums like the World Trade
Organisation. But Mr Trump isn?t into
sensible solutions and is now
threatening to place 25 per cent tariffs
on a further �0bn, and then $500bn of
Chinese goods in 2019. This could
destabilise the entire global economy.
The China economy is slowing fast, just
as most of the rest of the industrialised
countries have also entered a downturn.
There?s been signs of a Christmas
thaw in relations between Mr Trump
and President Xi Jinping, but the trade
war may only be beginning. And of
course the Potus has also been targeting
the EU, placing 25 per cent tariffs on
steel imports from Europe. (How Brexit
Britain could be expected to suddenly
enter this global melee, and extract
concessionary trade deals from all these
warring giants, is one of the more
bizarre Eurosceptic fantasies).
The European Union is already
experiencing the effects of the global
trade war, and growth in the bloc is
expected to falter further in 2019, even
before Brexit is taken into account.
There are other pressures. Brussels has
been in a stand-off with Spain over its
expansionist budget, and President
Macron has not settled accounts with
the gilet jaunes, who are expected to
renew their nationwide demonstrations
in the New Year. The rise of populism in
Europe has no direct impact on trade
and investment, but Emmanuel
Macron?s Winter of Discontent could
upset one of the largest Eurozone
economies just as Germany too is
feeling the freeze in its export industries.
Which brings us to Brexit, where a lot
of German car exports are at stake if
there is serious trade disruption in
March, when the UK is scheduled to
leave the EU. Forget Project Fear, the
effects of Brexit have already been
evident in the slowdown in inward
investment to Britain and the
non-recovery of growth. The UK
economy is caught in the doldrums of
low wages and low productivity.
Structural changes in the digital
economy have caused havoc on the high
streets ? as the collapse of HMV
reminded us before Christmas.
The utter chaos of the British
Government, and loose talk of a
No-Deal Brexit, makes a collapse in
confidence in the UK economy a dead
cert in 2019. These apparently
psychological factors are important. The
world?s fifth-largest economy has taken
leave of its senses, is cutting ties with its
biggest trading partners and is sending
legions of skilled European workers
scuttling back home. Countries aren?t
supposed to do things like this. It is an
act of economic irrationality that will
reverberate across Europe and the
northern hemisphere.
All these factors taken together sound
very much like a SparkNotes summary
of the causes of the 2019-20 economic
recession. There?s just too much stuff
going on for it not to have profound
economic consequences.
Both the big UK parties are
fundamentally split, lacking in effective
leadership, and without any sense of
where the country is going. Social media
has turned the public sphere crazy, with
Twitter wars infecting politics and
destroying rational debate. Of course,
an economic recession isn?t inevitable
and we shouldn?t talk ourselves into
one. But it will take great care and a lot
of cool heads to prevent 2019 being the
year that everything went wrong at once.
Today?s feminist activists are wrong to exclude men
ROSEMARY
GORING
T
he #MeToo movement,
arguably last year?s most
potent political force, shows
no sign of losing vigour. It?s a
remarkable testament to the pent-up
frustration and anger of womankind
that what was initially seen, when it
began in October 2017, as a frivolous
or fleeting craze, has put down roots
and become a force to be reckoned
with.
Anne Widdicombe might have
dismissed it as trivial and whingeing
? and some #MeTooers undoubtedly
deserve that label ? but the culture
of sexual harassment and abuse it
calls out is far from unimportant.
Equally crucial are other issues that
have vexed women for decades, if
not centuries, among them equality
of pay, professional respect and
opportunity.
So far, so reasonable. Yet, when I
heard Mary Robinson, former
President of Ireland, talking last
week about Mothers of Invention, a
podcast she has set up that focusses
exclusively on women?s efforts to
address climate change, my heart
did a double skip: one for delight,
two for despair. Delight that women
are getting involved directly in trying
to help reduce our carbon footprint,
without a doubt the most urgent of
the world?s ails, but despair at
Robinson?s smug assumption that
?it?s women who change behaviour,
in the family and the community?.
Let?s put aside for a moment the
fact that, as Robinson reveals in her
recent book, Climate Justice, her
own awareness of environmental
calamity dawned on her like a
Damascene conversion
astonishingly late in the day.
What sets my teeth on edge is the
sanctimonious way in which women
are increasingly frequently being
portrayed ? mostly by other women.
It?s as if there is a collective halo that
needs constant polishing, lest it lose
its lustre. Indeed, it seems you
cannot these days be a female in a
position of influence or authority
without feeling the urge ? or the
pressure ? to add a stone to the cairn
of women?s rights, entitlements and
endeavours.
Don?t misunderstand me. I am an
old-style feminist, and decry utterly
the unfair, oppressive and
sometimes iniquitous treatment of
women in our and other societies.
Men have an awful lot to answer for,
today and in the past. But I get
decidedly uneasy at the perceptual
divide that appears to be widening
between the sexes. Climate change,
said Robinson, is ?man-made?, and
she enjoys using the term, even
though admitting it embraces men
and women. But apart from this
deliberate provocation, is she really
correct in assuming that women
change attitudes more widely than
men?
Maybe it depends on what sort of
country you?re living in. When I
look around the UK, I don?t
recognise that stark distinction.
Plenty of men seem to be trying to
bring about green change, ethical
enlightenment, societal
improvement, better childcare and
education, and are working towards
this alongside women. Sometimes,
for heaven?s sake, they are even
taking the lead.
Meanwhile, children in
two-parent families are open to
influences from both parents. While
women still tend to spend more time
with their young, this does not
necessarily equate to a more lasting
influence on their behaviour or
outlook. The other day my
husband?s granddaughter rushed to
interrupt her mother who was on
the phone to announce that
Liverpool had just scored a fourth
goal against Newcastle ? whose
influence was that?
We are going through a phase
where almost every interview with a
woman politician or banker,
entrepreneur or artist, includes the
obligatory question about #MeToo,
in the same way that every American
is asked their opinion of Trump.
And while it obviously takes women
at the top to help bring about change
for those lower down the ladder ? or
in the community at large ? it is
surely not a sacred obligation placed
upon each of them. To assume that
is to be sexist and discriminatory.
It?s certainly not an expectation
placed upon men.
Yet to listen to some women?s
To listen to some women?s outrage, you?d think
there?s a contract, signed at birth, that insists
women pay especial attention to female issues
COMMENT AT HERALDSCOTLAND.COM
outrage, you?d think there?s a
contract, signed at birth, that insists
women pay especial attention to
female issues even if there are things
that interest them more. Florence
Nightingale and Elsie Inglis
personally helped save hundreds of
lives, and their influence rippled
down the decades to the benefit of
all, women as much as men. Yet
their initial impulse was not to
improve things for their own kind,
but to help wounded soldiers and
the sick and dying. In other words,
to improve the conditions of
humanity as a whole, not one
gender or the other.
Of course splinter groups and
special interest parties can make
things change ? just look at Dr
Inglis?s formidable all-women
hospitals. There is a galvanising
power and collective spirit in female
solidarity that nobody can deny. So
let?s hear it for women tackling
climate change. And for men too.
In these unsettling and perilous
times we surely need to remember
that we are all just people. Our
identity is not primarily male or
female, trans, intersex, other, or
whatever label fits. We are simply
and essentially human, with all the
complexities of personality, type,
and biases that entails. Since we?re
in it all together, that?s also how we
should sort things out.
WELL, OK, if we are going to
mention the darts, we should of
course mention our favourite darts
joke. It?s the one about the Glasgow
toper in the pub who told his pals:
?The wife asked what I was doing on
the computer and I said I was looking
for cheap flights.? He then added:
?She got all excited, which is strange,
as she?s never shown any interest in
darts before.?
What a shower
DID you survive the New Year? A
few folk have been reminiscing about
their behaviour at this time of year,
and Kimmy confuses: ?I once went
to a party on New Year?s Eve and
had too much vodka, so I went
upstairs and by mistake puked on all
the coats on the bed. It was then I
realised of course that I wasn?t in the
bathroom. So I took all the coats, put
them in the bath and turned on the
shower to clean them.? Any other
New Year confessions?
Sparks fly
IT was great seeing the torch-lit
profession through Edinburgh?s city
centre the other night with thousands
of visitors from around the world. It
reminds us of Pete Irvine, when he
organised Edinburgh?s Hogmanay
celebrations, having a French act
using fire which led to sparks
blowing on to the crowd. City
officials overreacted and called out
the fire brigade. The French company
said they had been ?artistically
raped? and vowed never to perform
in Scotland again. When a
newspaper reported the occasion as a
?flaming hell? six people demanded
compensation for burned jackets.
?And guess what?? Pete told us.
?They were mainly Prada jackets.?
剟 John Sim in Dumbarton passes
on a great pun from a shop at
Glasgow?s Barras.
Ladled it on
ANDY Kesson passes on:
?Overheard in the Chicago Institute
of Art, where a small child, reading
the description of a painting asked,
?Grandma, what?s a brothel??
Grandma, after an enormous pause,
explained, ?it?s the place where they
make soup?.?
Coming clean
HOGMANAY was of course the time
when lots of folk in Scotland have a
good clean of their house to welcome
in the New Year. As Glasgow
councillor Mhairi Hunter confessed
on Monday: ?So today I have to clean
the house. My New Year resolution
should probably be to do it more
often so I don?t have so much to do at
Hogmanay.?
Got it covered
MARRIED life, continued. Kent
Graham muses: ?How can my wife?s
hands not open a jar of pickles in the
day, but become superhuman vicegrips at night when I want some
covers??
A skoosh
AMY Kinnaird in Ayrshire tells us: ?I
overheard this gem in a Glasgow cafe
last week at lunchtime, ?Do you want
ice-cream or skooshy cream with
your apple tart?? The question did
not raise an eyebrow.?
Of course it shouldn?t, Amy. A word
that makes perfect sense to locals but
would leave any visitor to the city
struggling. Any other examples?
Paints a picture
SAYS Robin Irvine in Milngavie: ?I
bought my mother-in-law a mobile
phone. Under the picture of the
phone that tells you what all the bits
are for, is the warning,
?Note! All illustrations are for
illustrative purposes only?. I would
never have guessed.?
Contact The Diary on 0141 302 7055
or thediary@theherald.co.uk.
14 OPINION
Wednesday January 2, 2019
A NA LYSI S , I NSIG H T, OPI N ION
Those were the days...
1965: ?Croquet is not malicious but of course the aim is to win?
Founded on Monday
J a n ua r y 27, 17 8 3
RUSSELL LEADBETTER
Selections from
The Herald Picture Store
THE HERALD IS COMMITTED TO PROVIDING FAIR
AND IMPARTIAL COVERAGE OF SCOTLAND?S AFFAIRS
AND DOES NOT ENDORSE ANY POLITICAL PARTY
THE rain fell without cease on Pollok
House in Glasgow, and on the three
croquet courts laid out there.
Ascetic faces, wrote the un-named
Glasgow Herald journalist who
compiled the ?From All Quarters??
column, peered grimly from under
sodden anoraks. A handful of
spectators were seeking shelter
beneath a tree. Rain drops splashed
into the cup of coffee being cradled
by Mrs Rosemary Hall, secretary of
the day?s visitors, Edinburgh
Croquet Club. A literary gent looked
rather fetching in his panama hat.
The occasion was a return match
between Glasgow Croquet Club,
which had opened on the Pollok
Estate in 1959, and Edinburgh.
(Photographed here is Glasgow?s
president, Dr J. Alexander.)
?You mustn?t get the impression,?
Mrs Hall told our writer, ?that it is just
a game for the old.?
Croquet ?demands a good eye
and the ability to plan ahead. We
want to attract more young players.
It?s a slow game, of course. But so is
golf, and plenty of young people
play that. And its great merit is that
young and old can play in equal
terms.?
Accuracy, the Herald writer
observed, was vital, the hoop being
only so much wider than the ball.
Planning ensured that the other balls
lay where the player could use them
to his or her own advantage.
?People sometimes say that it is a
malicious game?, someone said.
?But it?s not. After all, the aim in
every sport is to win.?
Edinburgh ran out winners, by two
games to one.
Let us have
less shouting,
more listening
T
WO wishes for 2019. Our first is a quieter world.
That is to say (sotto voce), we would like less
shouting ? and more listening. The year past
featured a worrying polarisation of views,
doubtless encouraged by the internet, and by a vehemence
of expression lacking any respect.
A small point: it is possible to have more than one
rational point of view about Europe, Scottish
independence, Islam, the NHS, the railways, gender,
possession football and the current state of pop music. To
air such views, it should not be necessary to retreat to
?safe spaces?. The whole of society should be a safe space,
in which good arguments win clearly and fairly, while the
bad are heard and defeated.
Related to our first wish, our second is to make bullying
unacceptable in all spheres of life, from the school
playground through youth culture to ?grown up? politics
and the workplace. Bullying, like poverty, has always been
with us, but that only serves to remind us of the need to
challenge it continually.
Doubtless, 2019 will throw up contentious issues that
test our desire to conduct dialogue decently. Brexit, more
than anything, will encourage confrontation. Scottish
independence has, thankfully, been promoted largely in a
civilised manner, but both sides have their hotheads.
Across the Atlantic, President Trump putting another
brick in his wall will prompt his opponents to perform
virtuous public tantrums in lieu of a strategy. Someone
needs to have a quiet word with the Democrats about
effective opposition ? while inviting our own Labour
Party to cock an ear too.
Amidst arguments over ideology, technology will
continue making quiet progress. More cars will go electric
and some will drive themselves, reducing road rage. Test
flights for landing communities on Mars will continue,
with potential colonists trained in how to get along.
If they can live together without shouting and bullying,
that will indeed be one giant leap for humankind.
Why Westminster will never truly
represent the will of the people
LETTERS
SEVEN DAYS OF HERALD VOICES
Monday
Marianne Taylor
and Mark Smith
Friday
Andrew McKie
and Catriona Stewart
Tuesday
Neil Mackay and
Margaret Taylor
Saturday
Kevin McKenna,
Tom Gordon, Ken Smith,
Alison Rowat, Keith Bruce
and Fidelma Cook
Wednesday
Iain Macwhirter and
Rosemary Goring
Thursday
Alison Rowat and
Brian Beacom
Sunday
Iain Macwhirter, Vicky Allan,
Rab McNeil, David Pratt,
Ron McKay and
Susan Swarbrick
Clarifications and corrections
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the Editor at complaints@
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SEVERAL of your correspondents
(Letters, December 28) reprove Dr
Gerald Edwards for not knowing that
the 2016 Brexit referendum was only
advisory, not binding on the UK
Parliament (Letters, December 27).
True, but this puts legal correctness
above practical politics, since in
practice no Parliament can overrule
the will of the voters expressed in a
referendum that Brexit should
happen. Hence the need for a second
referendum to reverse this decision in
principle and cancel the Article 50
request.
What the UK Parliament can
decide is what form Brexit should
take, which was not decided or even
asked in the referendum.
But here we run into the major
defect of the UK Parliament. It is
elected by first past the post, which
almost certainly produces a
government with only minority
support from the voters (and on
occasion not even the largest
minority). This defect is compounded
by the Westminster principles that
this minority has the right to impose
its will on the majority (if the
government can at least win a
confidence vote); and that the
government need only consult its
own party and can ignore the views
of other parties, devolved
parliaments, and voters. For Brexit,
these defects have been compounded
by a divided Conservative Party and a
Prime Minister who seeks to impose
a particular form of Brexit without
consulting anyone if she can help it.
So we have a Brexit treaty which
Parliament would reject (if the PM
allowed it to vote). Meanwhile, for
the Official Opposition, Jeremy
Corbyn has moved from wishing he
could ignore Brexit altogether, to
using it to bring about a General
Election, which would be won by a
party with only minority support.
n Have your say:
The Editor, The Herald, 200 Renfield Street,
Glasgow G2 3QB; e-mail: letters@theherald.co.uk
Contrast the Scottish Parliament,
with an electoral system specifically
designed to prevent a single party
having a majority of seats without a
majority of the votes (though this
failed in 2007.) The Scottish
Government has to be either a
coalition; or if a minority one-party
government has to accept the need to
consult on policies with other parties.
If it tries to ignore Parliament, a
parliamentary defeat will provide a
sharp reminder of its place (as has
happened to the SNP government).
On the other hand, the Scottish
Parliament has reached consensus
(Tories excepted) on legislation to
protect Scottish Brexit interests.
Alastair Wallace,
19 Lixmount Avenue,
Trinity, Edinburgh.
IT is with some interest and much
puzzlement that I read William
Scott?s letter (December 31) The final
paragraph was particularly
interesting. Mr Scott commented that
we must leave with honour and
control the manner of leaving and not
be bullied by the EU. Mr Scott further
suggests that the EU apparently will
come begging for a relationship after
we have left.
Everyone is entitled to an opinion
and Brexit has been well documented
as divisive and appears to have split
the UK in many different directions.
However, watching the negotiations
play out has been like watching a
Brian Rix farce without the laughs.
Honour? Control? It?s very difficult
to cite examples of that type of
behaviour in the negotiations to date.
Resignations and a vote if no
confidence have been the highlights
so far. I am deeply saddened by the
whole Brexit process and look to the
future with much trepidation.
Anne-Marie Colgan,
10 Castle Wynd, Bothwell.
LIAM Fox says he is concerned that
Theresa May and her Government
are running the risk of losing the
bond they have with the people of the
UK as the zero hour approaches for a
crucial vote in Parliament. The
turnout in the 2017 Election was 68.7
per cent and the Conservative Party
won 42.4 per cent of the popular vote,
taking 48.9 per cent of parliamentary
seats. Therefore Mrs May was
supported by less than 30 per cent of
the total electorate.
Knowing the love affair between
Government statisticians and their
supporters Dr Fox must already be
aware of that fact. The reality is that
there is no such bond between the
present Government and the people
of the UK and it is not possible to lose
what has not existed. Any claim to a
bond, no matter how imaginary, has
long been compromised by Mrs May
personally and by her ministers in
their attitude to the people?s wish for
a withdrawal from the EU voted for
democratically in 2016.
No doubt there will be plenty of
parliamentary and political
acrobatics still to come before March
29. What is certain is that the wishes
of the ?people? will as usual not be
canvassed.
J Hamilton,
G/2,1 Jackson Place,
Bearsden.
What that is meant to ?deter? and
what the ?presence? is meant to be or
do, he does not add, or perhaps he
really does not know. Does the world
have the role in mind it expects the
UK to play? Empire2 perhaps? A few
more bases nearer global hotspots?
Aircraft carriers for hire?
We have become accustomed to
MPs at Westminster fantasising
about punching above our weight and
other skewed attributes about the UK
globally, but the latest blethers from
Mr Williamson are disturbing.
Such blimpish uttering was
thought to have been consigned to
the midden long ago, but here it is
billowing up like a damp Rule
Britannia.
Does anybody take him seriously
any more? Is this Cabinet thinking?
Does the PM sanction such loose
chatter?
I expect he will be released from
his tenure at the MoD in the next
reshuffle.
John Edgar,
1a Langmuir Quadrant,
Kilmaurs.
DEFENCE Secretary Gavin
Williamson has morphed into a
deluded fantasist. He stated: ?We can
actually play the role in the world
stage that the world expects us to play
... this is our biggest moment as a
nation since the end of the Second
World War.?
He went on to imagine that the UK
can ?get as much of our resources
forward-based, actually creating a
deterrent but also taking a British
presence?.
WE joined a club and we knew the
rules. All clubs have committees
which allow discussion on those rules
to makes changes to same and surely
Britain was not the only country
unhappy with their lot. So what do
we do? We throw the dummy out of
the pram without checking on the
consequences rather than trying to
make changes from within first. We
then expect to be able to negotiate to
become an associate member with
cherry-picked benefits but none of the
costs, a bit like being an associate
member of the local golf club, having
use of the clubhouse, the right to play
the first nine holes, and all free.
We have come this far so why not
just go for broke, have a General
Election, a referendum on the EU
and wrap it all up with a referendum
on an independent Scotland too.
George Dale,
21 Oakwood Drive,
Beith.
50 YEARS AGO
Mr William Ross, Secretary of State
for Scotland, last night described
Scotland?s Hogmanay road casualty
toll of six deaths and 94 injured as
?horrifying.?
He said: ?It would seem that all
the Christmas advice and appeals
for care are receiving scant
attention.
?We know that not all accidents
can be avoided, but a great many of
them can. It is the duty of each and
every one of us to see that we at
least are not responsible for causing
injury, either through carelessness
or callousness.?
100 YEARS AGO
In the early hours of yesterday
morning, just outside the harbour of
Stornoway and within a few yards of
the shore, over 200 Lewismen lost
their lives under the most distressing
circumstances. Some 500 soldiers
and sailors were coming to the
island on New Year leave. The
numbers were beyond the capacity
of the mail steamer Sheila, and some
260 naval ratings were being
conveyed from Kyle of Lochalsh to
Stornoway on board H.M. yacht
Iolaire.
For some reason the vessel ran
ashore near Holm Head.
FROM OUR ARCHIVES
5 YEARS AGO
?Gonnae no dae that? and ?haud yer
wheesht? have topped a poll of
Scotland?s favourite sayings. A study
of 579 Scots shows a resounding
95% are proud of their heritage and
love using phrases with traditional
roots, such as ?it?s a dreich day? and
?lang may yer lum reek?. Other
popular everyday sayings include
?keep the heid?, ?noo jist haud on?
and ?pure dead brilliant?. When
referring to someone tall and thin,
Scots may describe them as a
?skinny malinky long legs?, while a
drunk person might be described as
?oot yer face?.
10 YEARS AGO
Scottish teachers were yesterday
ringing in the New Year with a
warning over the noise levels
associated with school bells. A
teaching union said an increasingly
common practice of installing one
large bell for the whole school, rather
than a series of smaller bells, was
risking the hearing of staff and
pupils. And the Scottish Secondary
Teachers? Association (SSTA), which
represents 9000 secondary
teachers north of the border, is
appealing for an end to the practice
? particularly with the building of
new schools.
25 YEARS AGO
Fears are growing across Northern
Ireland that the coming weeks will
bring more IRA and loyalist violence.
The pre-Christmas optimism for
peace has now disintegrated after a
wave of IRA fire bomb attacks and a
clear message from Sinn Fein
rejecting the Downing Street
declaration. Soundings that have
been taken within Sinn Fein to date
indicate a very negative reaction to
the declaration signed by Prime
Ministers John Major and Albert
Reynolds, pictured, in December.
Security forces now expect further
violence.
COMMENT AT HERALDSCOTLAND.COM
Wednesday January 2, 2019
Trans protests
are non-violent
Picture of the year
AGENDA
Why we
need a bold
target on
fuel poverty
STUART Waiton (?Names may hurt
you ... but you need to get used to it?,
The Herald, December 31) claims
that trans people, who in 2018 saw
their identities and rights attacked in
some of the media in an
unprecedented way, have responded
by disrupting events, ?sometimes
violently?. Perhaps he would like to
back up this assertion with evidence
of any violent disruption by trans
people in Scotland? There is none
that we are aware of.
Some people participated in noisy
protests outside a couple of events in
Scotland held by a campaign that
opposes trans equality. Noisy
protest is not everyone?s chosen
campaign tactic, but it?s a fairly
common one across a wide range of
issues. And many other trans people
and their families and friends have
continued to stand up for their rights
through dialogue and debate. There
has been a lot of misinformation
spread on this subject recently, and
the false claim that trans people in
Scotland are prone to violence is yet
more of the same.
Tim Hopkins,
Equality Network,
30 Bernard Street, Edinburgh.
ASHLEY
CAMPBELL
Policy and Practice Manager,
CIH Scotland
I
N October the National Records of
Scotland published its annual
statistics showing how many
additional deaths occurred across
Scotland last winter. While these
statistics always make for bleak
reading, this year?s publication was
particularly shocking with 4,800
winter deaths registered ? an 18 year
high.
Changes to benefits, stagnant
wages and insecure employment in
recent years have left many people
struggling to afford the basics. We are
now all familiar with the term
?eating or heating?, a sad reality for
too many people. Despite a Scottish
Government target to eradicate fuel
poverty by 2016, 24.9 per cent of
households in Scotland are still living
in fuel poverty.
Cold, damp homes are not only
bad for people?s health, they put
people?s lives at risk.
That is why CIH Scotland, along
with other housing, conservation and
third sector organisations established
the Existing Homes Alliance
Scotland (ExHAS) to campaign for
more investment in our homes. To
improve energy efficiency, reduce
carbon emissions and make sure that
people get the right advice and
information about energy use. We
want to make sure that every person
in Scotland is living in a home that is
energy efficient and that they can
afford to heat.
Encouragingly, the Scottish
Government is working on a Fuel
Poverty Bill which will introduce a
new definition for fuel poverty, set a
new target for reducing it and require
the Government to develop a strategy
showing how it will meet the new
target.
Introducing a statutory target will
help to drive the action needed to
make a real difference. But the
current Bill is simply not ambitious
enough.
The Bill proposes a new target,
that no more than five per cent of
households in Scotland are living in
fuel poverty by 2040. This would
Light relief
I MAY be in a minority, but I would
certainly welcome abandoning
changing the clocks back every
October (?Time running out on plan
to stop clocks going back?, The
Herald, December 28). As someone
who suffers greatly from seasonal
affective disorder (SAD), I begin to
dread that date from early
September, as it ushers in for me five
months of struggling with the early
darkness. I am sure that living with a
more natural, gradual decrease of
light would be more bearable.
It also puzzles me why we change
the clocks back eight weeks before
the winter solstice, but have to wait
13 before they go forward. Light
levels must be fairly equal eight
weeks either way, so why the added
wait for mood-boosting light?
I believe that more accidents to
pedestrians, especially children,
happen during dark afternoons than
mornings. Permanent summer time
could decrease these, while perhaps
also lessening seasonal depression
through allowing us to become
accustomed to gradual change as we
are surely naturally designed to do.
P Davidson,
Gartcows Road, Falkirk.
Save Skara Brae
I READ your article on Skara Brae
(?Orkney?s neolithic monuments
threatened by global warming?, The
Herald, December 28) and
wondered if anyone has spoken to
the experts in Netherlands about
reclamation of the bay to save this
priceless place.
I visited last year and couldn?t
believe some major project was not
under way to raise funds across the
world and start work immediately ?
there is no time to lose. Surely there
must be someone out there who
knows how to build a dyke, albeit a
giant one. We owe it to the Neolithic
people and our future population.
We want the new
definition to take
the real cost of living
in remote rural
Scotland into account
Denise W Brown,
14 Clerkland Road, Stewarton.
A free spirit
IT was refreshing to note the
exhilaration divulged by Thelma
Edwards following her recent
domestic frustrations (Letters,
December 29). Following her brief
commune with nature normal
service appears to have been
restored. Recently, in the solitude of
my own garden I experienced a
similar uplift. This was occasioned
by the sight of snowdrops, daffodils
and rhubarb crowns having surfaced,
coupled with a squirrel scurrying by
and a female fox foraging.
The voluminous silence was only
broken by the twitter of a robin who
viewed my intrusive presence with
distrust. Truly,the best things in life
are free.
Allan C Steele,
22 Forres Avenue, Giffnock.
OPINION 15
A NA LYSI S , I NSIG H T, OPI N ION
剟 Throughout 2018, we have published a Picture of the Day submitted by Herald readers. Here are three of our favourites: (from top) the
emblematic tree at Milarrochy Bay, Loch Lomond, taken by Tom Clark; an accommodating Highland cow with the Cuillins in the background
snapped at Hartfield House hostel by Frank Urban; a dramatic Fife sunrise contributed by Kim Bennett.
We welcome submissions for Picture of the Day. Email picoftheday@theherald.co.uk
ON THIS DAY
17AD: Ovid (Publius Ovidius
Naso), the celebrated poet, died in
Rome - as did the historian Livy,
who wrote a 142-book history of
the city.
1492: The Spanish army
recaptured Granada from the
Moors.
1757: Clive of India captured
Calcutta after it had been seized by
the Nawab of Bengal. The latter
imprisoned 146 British prisoners in
the notorious ?black hole?. Only 23
survived.
1932: The Japanese set up the
republic of Manchukuo after
occupying Manchuria.
1946: King Zog was deposed as
ruler of Albania.
1947: Cupro-nickel coins were
issued by the British Mint to replace
silver.
1952: Pope Pius XII declared
that television was a threat to family
life.
1971: Sixty-six people were
crushed to death when a barrier
collapsed at Ibrox Park.
1974: Tex Ritter, American singing
cowboy of stage and screen, died.
He sang the title song for the classic
western High Noon.
1987: The publishers of Enid
Blyton?s Noddy books bowed to
pressure groups and agreed to
expunge all alleged racism from
them.
2011: Oscar-nominated actor Pete
Postlethwaite, pictured, died after a
long fight with cancer.
BIRTHDAYS
David Bailey, photographer, 81;
David Graveney, leading figure in
English cricket, 66; Tia Carrere
actress, 52; James Marshall, actor,
52; Cuba Gooding Jr, actor, 51;
Christy Turlington, pictured,
model, 50; Lucy Davis, actress, 46;
Kate Bosworth, American actress,
36.
COMMENT AT HERALDSCOTLAND.COM
mean that even if the Scottish
Government met its target, 138,000
households could still be living in
fuel poverty more than 20 years from
now. This is not acceptable.
The new definition of fuel poverty
proposed is based on the Minimum
Income Standard published by the
Joseph Rowntree Foundation each
year which tracks what goods and
services members of the public think
people need to be able to afford a
good standard of living. We welcome
this approach. However, it doesn?t
take the higher costs of rural living
into account.
Research has shown that the cost
of living in remote rural Scotland is
up to 35 per cent higher than other
parts of the UK. This puts people at a
much higher risk of fuel poverty and
this must be addressed in the new
fuel poverty definition.
We think that the bill needs to do
more than just set a target. It should
set out the energy efficiency
measures and resources that are
needed to meet the new target. A
much more robust system for
monitoring and reporting on
progress is also needed to ensure we
remain on track.
We are supporting ExHAS in
calling for a more ambitious target ?
for no one to be living in fuel poverty
as far as reasonably practicable by
2032. We want the new definition to
take the real cost of living in remote
rural Scotland into account and to be
underpinned with the resources
needed to achieve real changes. We
missed the target to eradicate fuel
poverty by 2016 and without
increased investment and
accountability, it is almost
inevitable that we will miss the new
target too.
Yes, our proposed target is
ambitious but it is not impossible.
With the backing of MSPs across
Parliament, we can end fuel poverty
in Scotland for good.
Agenda is a column for
outside contributors.
Contact: agenda@theherald.co.uk
16 TELEVISION
Wednesday January 2, 2019
RADIO LISTINGS
TELEVISION 17
Wednesday January 2, 2019
www.scottishgardener.co.uk
www.scottishwalks.com
www.scottishcyclingmag.co.uk
Whether you enjoy pottering in the garden, walking through Scotland?s beautiful landscapes, cycling through the countryside we have it covered.
Register for your free digital edition to our portfolio of magazines at the individual websites listed above.
18 OBITUARIES
Wednesday January 2, 2019
A NA LYSI S , I NSIG H T, OPI N ION
Haldane Duncan
Scottish TV director and producer
known for his work on soap operas
Born: July 25, 1940;
Died: December 26, 2018
HALDANE Duncan, who has died
aged 78, was one of the most prolific
television directors and producers
working for Scottish Television during
the 1980s and 90s. He was one of the
few television directors to have
directed every major soap opera in the
UK: Emmerdale, Coronation Street,
Crossroads, The Bill, EastEnders,
Hollyoaks, Brookside and Take the
High Road
Born Charles George Haldane
Duncan in Edinburgh in 1940, his
father died when he was nine years
old to be brought up alone by his now
single mother. Becoming fatherless at
a young age he was able to attend
George Heriot?s school in Edinburgh
as a Foundationer which meant his
mother did not have to pay the usual
fees. At Heriot?s he made close friendships many of which lasted until the
end of his life.
He spent his early years in insurance but an interest in theatre led him
in 1964 to study stage management at
the Glasgow College of Dramatic Art
(now the Royal Conservatoire of
Scotland). This subsequently led to
work at the Edinburgh Traverse theatre under artistic director Jim Haynes
and then the Lyceum where he
worked under director Tom Fleming
and with the then young actor Brian
Cox.
In the late 1960s he joined the BBC
in London where he worked on Top of
the Pops and the Dusty Springfield
show, working with the likes of Mel
Torme, Woody Allen and Tom Jones.
After attending a director?s training
course at the BBC he moved back to
Scotland where he subsequently
joined Scottish Television.
At the time STV was known as the
station with the licence to print
money and this meant that the station
broadcast a wide range of programming. Duncan produced and directed
a diverse range or programmes including Glenn Michael?s Cavalcade,
Scotsport, the Corries and other Folk,
Reporting Scotland, a live concert by
the rock band Gillan, a religious documentary filmed over several weeks in
Greece a, a number of studio operas
and a documentary about the travelling community in Scotland. This
does not include the numerous political and news programmes he worked
on with the then young political
editor and aspiring MP, Gordon
Brown.
However, it is drama that he was
ultimately drawn to. His time at
Scottish Television saw him produce
and direct several early series of
Taggart and the popular television
adaptation of the Steamie. He continued to work on children?s drama
including Waiting for Elvis, a drama
about Elvis Presley?s only visit to the
UK, written by Alex Norton.
Duncan was renowned for giving
many young actors their first start in
television including David Tennant,
Peter Mullan, Alan Cumming and a
young Alan Rickman who he cast as
Bonnie Prince Charlie in a schools
drama in the late 1970s. He also
produced and directed a number of
Hogmanay shows where he was keen
to move away from the traditional
ceilidh type format by introducing a
dramatic narrative. This included the
1990 Hogmanay show which centred
around an elderly woman alone at
home where her neighbours brought
the new year celebrations to her. The
concept was based on thoughts of his
own mother who often spent new year
alone after he had moved out.
After leaving STV in the early
1990s, Duncan spent the next 15 years
as a freelance director. After several
stints working on The Bill he went on
to direct all of the main soaps in the
UK. He spent some time working in
Germany on the German version of
The Bill, die Wache. It was a challenging experience as a non-German
speaker directing actors and working
from scripts in German.
In the final years of his career, his
work was mainly on Emmerdale
where, as always, his reputation as a
director who could turn around
episodes quickly ensured a steady
stream of work.
Speaking about Duncan, Taggart
star Alex Norton said he was sad to
hear that his old friend and collaborator had died.
?I worked with Hal many times
over the years,? he said, ?starting by
duetting with Allan Tall in My
Painting Box - Hal?s directorial debut
when he was a floor manager at BBC
Scotland back in the sixties. He raised
my profile considerably when he cast
me as the butcher in Knife Edge, one
of the original Taggart episodes, and
kick-started my writing career when
he commissioned my first TV play,
Waiting for Elvis (we won a gold
medal at the New York Film and
Television Awards). Hal played a big
part in my life and I?ll miss him
terribly.?
Haldane Duncan is survived by his
wife, t wo children and five
grandchildren.
Janet Anderson
Contact
Deacon of the Church of Scotland
Born: September 1, 1948;
Died: November 20, 2018
JANET Anderson, who has died
aged 70, was a deacon of the Church
of Scotland who has left behind her
so many changed people and places
throughout Scotland.
Janet went to train at St. Colm?s
College in Edinburgh and thereafter journeyed to Rostrevor in
County Down, Northern Ireland, to
the newly established centre for
Christian renewal and reconciliation to be part of the community
there. These were formative times
for her.
In 1979, she was commissioned
as a deaconess in the Church of
Scotland, serving at first in
Hillhouse parish in Hamilton,
before moving in 1982 to Ruchazie
in north Glasgow where she would
To place your notice in Family Announcements
Monday - Friday 9.00am -5.00pm
stay until 2004. In those twenty
two years she spent herself tirelessly for the community and
collected around her a wide circle
of friends. She was truly ecumenical in her outlook and practice, and
could see through to the things that
united. There, in that challenging
part of the city, she put all her
efforts into helping the less fortunate and bringing people together.
She was instrumental in establishing the Ruchazie, Garthamlock
and Craigend Credit Union which
she chaired for many years. She
worked tirelessly for the Union,
giving people the confidence to
keep it going themselves, making it
a real force for upward social mobility. Under her guidance, it moved
out of the church to have its own
shop front. Those who would never
had got access to financial services
were now being helped to become
financially independent and many
were set free from the tyranny of
poverty and loan sharks. Janet was
also involved in beginning and
developing the Ruchazie Housing
Association, bringing health and
comfort to those previously living
in damp and draughty conditions.
Janet?s life of service was marked
by her complete lack of self glory.
She declined the bestowal of an
M.B.E for her services. And it was
this very humility, combined with
her desire to serve others, that
made her life speak so powerfully,
including her complete independence of mind and fearlessness to
say it as she saw it.
After Ruchazie, she had spells
working at Arisaig, Mallaig and the
Small Isles, and then in the Parish
of Reay, Strathy & Halladale in
Caithness, from where she retired
back to the family home in
Breakish, south Skye.In retirement
she carried on in the same vein of
faithful service, actively involved in
the Presbytery of Lochcarron/Skye
and also serving as an NHS chaplain in Broadford Hospital. There
are many families on the island
who could tell their own stories of
how Janet helped them and their
loved ones through difficult times.
When she received news of her
own ill health, she carried on life as
we knew she would, stepping in to
trying days with her usual honesty
and courage.
In Janet?s passing many have lost
a great companion and devoted
friend. But to those same people
her life still speaks and provides an
example of practical, persistent
love.
She was unmarried and is
survived by a brother and two
sisters.
FAMILY ANNOUNCEMENTS
Telephone 0141-302 6000
or by e-mail at announcements@heraldandtimes.co.uk
? Deaths
DUNLOP ? HUGH. McLACHLAN ?
JAMES (JIMMY).
Peacefully at Royal
Peacefully at home
Alexandra Hospital,
Paisley, on Saturday in Ballantare on
Thursday 27th
22nd December
December 2018.
2018, Hugh Black
Much loved
Dunlop of South
husband of Elsie
Biggart, Lugton, in
McKeand. Service
his 93rd year, dearly
in St Colmon Parish
loved husband of
Church, Colmonell,
Aileen, loving dad
on Monday 7th
to Irene and Iain, a
January at 12
respected fathernoon, thereafter to
in-law of Ewen and
Colmonell Cemetery
Aileen and a proud
at 1pm, to which
and adored papa
all friends are
to Lynne, Katrina,
respectfulluy invited.
Anne, Isla and Evie.
Family flowers only.
A celebration of
Retiral collection in
Hugh?s life will take
aid of charity.
place at Dunlop
Kirk, on Friday
TAYLOR ? ANNIE.
4th January at
Peacefully at
11am, followed by
McClymont House,
interment in the
Lanark, on Saturday
churchyard. All
22nd December
family and friends
2018. Annie Aitken
respectfully invited.
(nee Barr), aged 95
Family flowers only
please but donations years, beloved wife
of the late Thomas
in lieu, if desired,
Taylor, dearly loved
to The Ayrshire
mum to Henry,
Hospice.
Isobel, Jean and
HAINEY ? ISOBEL. the late Andrew
and Tommy, a dear
Peacefully at home
mother-in-law,
in Colmonell, on
gran and greatThursday 27th
gran to the family.
December 2018,
Funeral service at
Isobel McBride,
Cairngryffe Parish
dear wife of the late
Church, Carmichael,
Wullie Hainey and a
on Thursday 3rd
much loved mother,
January 2019, at
mother-in-law, gran
11am, thereafter to
and great-gran.
Service in St Colmon Bedlay Cemetery,
Moodiesburn,
Church, Colmonell,
at 1.15pm
on Wednesday
approximately, to
9th January at
which all friends are
1pm, thereafter to
Colmonell Cemetery respectfully invited.
at 2pm, to which
all friends are
respectfully invited. ? Scripture Text
Retiral collection in
aid of charity.
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Show me
your ways, a
LORD, teach me
your paths; guide
me in your truth
and teach me,
for you are God
my Saviour, and
my hope is in
you all day long.
Psalm 25:4-6
To place your Notice in the
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19
Wednesday January 2, 2019
RECIPE OF THE DAY
Cullen Skink Croquettes
with Dill Mayonnaise
INGREDIENTS
2 smoked haddock fillets, skins
removed
400g celeriac
3 spring onions
1tbsp wholegrain mustard
100g chives, chopped
100g dill, chopped
500ml milk, plus a little for the egg
mix
1 lemon, juice only
2 eggs, beaten
100g mayonnaise
250g panko breadcrumbs
250g plain flour
Oil, for frying
Salt and pepper
By Ross McDevitt, Head Chef at
Boozy Cow Dundee
Boozy Cow have recently launched
their latest menu for 2019 featuring
new additions, including these cullen
skink croquettes served with a dill
mayonnaise, which have been
particularly popular.
Boozy Cow is the go-to restaurant
for juicy burgers and loaded waffles
smothered in chilli con carne and
gooey cheese. Find Boozy Cowon
Roseangle in Dundee, or visit the
Edinburgh restaurant on Fredrick
Street. For more information, visit:
www.boozycow.com
METHOD
1 Poach the haddock fillets in the milk
Makes 8 to 12 croquettes
until the flesh is opaque, this will take
around 10 minutes. Drain the haddock
and set aside to cool.
2 Peel and chop the celeriac into small
chunks and place in boiling water and
cook until it is soft. Drain and set aside
to cool.
3 Chop the spring onions finely and
place in a mixing bowl. Add the juice
of the lemon to the spring onions and
then flake the haddock into the mix,
ensuring there are no bones in the
mix.
4 Mash the celeriac until smooth and
add to the bowl. Add half of the
chopped dill, chives and wholegrain
mustard and gently mix. Season to
taste.
5 Form the mix into croquettes, about
two inches by oneinch. Once shaped,
croquettes to come to room
temperature and then pan or deep-fry
them until they are golden brown.
Finish cooking them in the oven for
around 8 minutes, making sure they
are piping hot in the middle.
9 To serve, mix together the remaining
chopped chives, dill and wholegrain
mustard with the mayonnaise for a
dipping sauce.
freeze the croquettes, as this will make
it much easier to coat in breadcrumbs.
6 Once firm, get three mixing bowls
and place the flour in one, the eggs in
another and panko breadcrumbs in
the last bowl. Add a splash of milk and
seasoning to the eggs and whisk
together.
7 Place the first croquette into the flour
and coat and then shake off any
excess. Next, dip the floured croquette
into the egg mix and make sure the
whole croquette is coated evenly.
Again, shake off any excess. Finally
dip the croquette into the panko
breadcrumbs and coat completely.
Repeat this process until all of the
croquettes are fully coated.
8 Next, cook the croquettes. Preheat
the oven to180癈. Allow the
In association with Taste
Communications, Scotland?s food
and drink communications company
www.tastecommunications.co.uk
answers below
TEASERS
Name the Celebrity
Starting from 1, fill in the grid in a clockwise direction
with four-letter words. The last letter of each word
becomes the first letter of the next word. If you have
correctly filled in the grid there should be a sevenletter key word reading across from 8.
? and just for fun. Give your grey matter an extra workout.
Can you think of seven things that this person is known for?
3
4
16
6
5
9. Deceased
10. Information
11. Yes votes
12. Male deer
13. Grasp
14. Hand part
15. Take care of
16. Child?s toy
Coarse file
Hairstyle
Miserly
Naming word
Invalid
Raise
Cash register
Praise, glorify
KEYWORD CLUE: A girl?s name
Wednesday 2nd January 2019
PUZZLES
News Quiz
Sports Quiz
1. How many Tory MPs voted against
Theresa May in the recent vote of no
confidence?
2. For how many years had David
Dimbleby hosted Question Time before
leaving in December?
3. Which honour did Love Actually star
Keira Knightley, pictured, collect at
Buckingham Palace in December?
4. A project to rebuild the set of which
BBC programme is expected to cost
� million more than planned?
1. Stuart Broad plays cricket for which
county?
2. Who is France?s top ranked male
tennis player?
3. Jenson Button began his Formula
One career with which team?
4. What is the name of Ottawa?s
NHL team?
5. How much is the outer bull worth on
a dartsboard?
Codebreaker
Fill in the grids so that every row, every column and
every 3x3 box contains the digits 1-9. There?s no maths
involved ? solve the puzzle using reasoning and logic.
Codebreaker is a crossword with no clues. The number
on each square corresponds to a letter. Fill in all the
instances of the two given letters, and then use your
skill to crack the code and work out the rest. Cross each
letter of the alphabet off as you go.
EASY
ANSWERS
answers tomorrow
Double Crossword
Sudoku
6. An actress, I was born
in Corpus Christi, Texas in
1975. I starred in the TV show
Desperate Housewives. I took
part in Masterchef US in 2013.
Word Spiral: 1 Rasp; 2 Perm; 3 Mean; 4 Noun; 5 Null; 6 Lift; 7 Till;
7
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
3. An actor, I was born in 1889.
My parents were music hall
entertainers and I made my
first stage appearance at the
age of five. I was best known
for my performance in the film
The Gold Rush.
12
8 Laud; 9 Dead; 10 Data; 11 Ayes; 12 Stag; 13 Grip; 14 Palm; 15 Mind;
13
5. A TV presenter, I was born
in Edmonton, Middlesex in
1928. One of my catchphrases
was ?Didn?t they do well!?
I presented The Generation
Game and, more recently,
Strictly Come Dancing.
16 Doll. Keyword Solution: Lillian.
11
Who Am I?: 1. Mia Farrow; 2. Dame Kelly Holmes; 3. Charlie
8
2. A sportswoman, I was
born in 1970 in Pembury in
Kent. I qualified as a Class 1
PT instructor while I was in
the British Army?s Adjutant
General?s Corps. At the Athens
Olympics I won gold medals
for both the 1500m and 800m.
Chaplin; 4. Kirsty Young; 5. Sir Bruce Forsyth; 6. Eva Longoria.
15
News Quiz: 1. 117; 2. 25 years; 3. An OBE; 4. EastEnders.
10
14
Cheryl Fernandez-Versini
9
4. A broadcaster, I was born in
East Kilbride in 1968. I was one
of the first British newsreaders
to read the news standing up.
I presented Desert Island Discs
before having a break to be
treated for fibromyalgia.
Sports Quiz: 1. Nottinghamshire; 2. Richard Gasquet; 3. Williams;
2
Can you name the well-known personalities from the
clues they give?
1. An actress, I was born in Los
Angeles, California in 1945.
I am the daughter of actress
Maureen O?Sullivan. My films
include Rosemary?s Baby and
The Purple Rose of Cairo.
4. Senators; 5. 25 points.
1
Who Am I?
CRYPTIC CLUES
Down
Across
4. Jack and Mark take no
1. Object in favour of trial (7)
part (7)
2. The agents are fellow-
8. Responds to broken
performers (7)
crates (6)
3. Royal Navy stew scattered
9. Tales about harbours (7)
about (6)
10. Gives the little bird a name
5. Rather be off having a rest (8)
or names (6)
11. Doing a key job in the
6. Walks in a military
office? (6)
manner? (6)
12. One leaving the string
7. Resolute under canvas? (6)
tangled, showing
13. Pat?s logo placed upright on
toughness (8)
the pitch (8)
18. Service I care for? (3,5)
14. King eaten by shellfish
20. Petals come out in soft
colour (6)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ
1
2
3
4
5
14
15
16
17
18
R
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
O
Across: 1 Laughing gas; 9 Oak; 10 Axminster; 11 Ducks;
13 Sirloin; 14 Norway; 16 Speeds; 18 Prevail; 19 Resit;
20 Out-and-out; 21 Pie; 22 British Rail.
Down: 2 Ark; 3 Grass; 4 Inmost; 5 Gin trap; 6 Authoress;
7 Wooden spoon; 8 Trendsetter; 12 Carpenter; 15 Against;
17 Floods; 19 Rotor; 21 Phi.
Give yourself ten minutes to find as many words as
possible using the letters in the wheel. Each word must
use the hub letter and at least three others, and letters
may be used only once. You cannot use plurals, foreign
words or proper nouns. There is at least one nine-letter
word to be found.
I
R
9-er
2
R
O E
A
Z
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
Word Ladder
Kakuro
Using the clues provided, fill in each step
of the ladder with a new word, changing
one letter at a time.
Fill in the white squares with
the numbers 1 to 9. Each
horizontal block of squares
must add up to the number in
the shaded square to its left,
and each vertical block must
add up to the number in the
shaded square above it. No
number may be used more
than once in any one block.
SOUR
Decant
Mail
YESTERDAY?S SOLUTION:
CRUCIFIED cider, cred, cried, crucified, crude, cued, cure, cured,
curie, deific, dice, dicer, dicier, dire, ecru, feud, fire, fired, fried,
iced, icier, rice, riced, ride, rife, rude, rued.
Nearly all
Flagpole
32567
968338
94185
gives a European city;
gives a European port;
gives a European port.
YESTERDAY?S SOLUTION:
PLATFORMS
19. A stream in the garden? (6)
24. Tearing around the rock (7)
Down
1. Stunted (7)
2. Corrosive (7)
3. Stripe (6)
5. Official statement (8)
6. Sarcastic (6)
7. Shines (6)
13. Indebted (8)
14. Tumbler (7)
15. Pacify (7)
16. Repudiate (6)
17. Beneficial (6)
19. Profoundly (6)
Across: 1 Evangelists; 9 Low; 10 Intricate; 11 Space; 13 Nearest;
14 Fathom; 16 Pellet; 18 Sincere; 19 April; 20 Editorial; 21 Tie;
22 Destitution.
Down: 2 Vow; 3 Naive; 4 Extend; 5 Imitate; 6 Traveller; 7 Close-fisted;
8 Teetotaller; 12 Attentive; 15 Open out; 17 Resist; 19 Allot; 21 Too.
Sulk
Each number from 1 to 9 represents a different letter.
Solve the clues and insert the letters in the appropriate
squares to discover a word which uses all nine letters.
1
M L
breath (6)
17. Taken the wrong way (6)
dismay and roar! (6)
YESTERDAY?S QUICK SOLUTION:
YESTERDAY?S SOLUTIONS:
How you rate:
20, average
30, good
40, very good
50 or more, excellent.
16. Swimmer getting out of
superficial (7)
23. Clanger will bring cry of
Across
4. Shorten (7)
8. Cunning (6)
9. Let (7)
10. Invisible (6)
11. Puzzle (6)
12. A missile (8)
18. Encumbrance (8)
20. Failure (6)
21. Distant (6)
22. Impart (7)
23. Acquits (6)
24. Hint (7)
Word Wheel
Hard
15. Novel place to move to (3,4)
22. Everyone in display which is
QUICK CLUES
YESTERDAY?S SOLUTION:
1=U, 2=L, 3=Q, 4=D, 5=X, 6=K, 7=Y, 8=N, 9=A, 10=S,
11=P, 12=R, 13=F, 14=O, 15=G, 16=H, 17=E, 18=W,
19=T, 20=V, 21=C, 22=B, 23=I, 24=J, 25=M, 26=Z
Easy
makes you crease (7)
21. Bent on getting new hat (6)
YESTERDAY?S CRYPTIC SOLUTION:
HARD
Name the Celebrity:
Word Spiral
MASH
YESTERDAY?S SOLUTION:
Lamp, Lame, Lane, Lone, Lose, Lost, Post.
YESTERDAY?S
SOLUTION:
9 8
2 6 3
7 5
2 1
7 9 6
3 1
3 1 4
9 7 8
4 5
1 8
2 6
4 2
9 3 7
1 3
6 8
5 7
5 6
4 1 3
6 5 9
2
9 4
5 1
8 6
7 8
4 3 5
2 9
13
12
15
33
9
10
14
11
7
23
11
12
13
11
5
13
21
6
12
16
33
8
11
9
12
11
7
10
29
22
24
13
15
11
19
16
13
26
25
7
BUSINESS
Wednesday January 2, 2019
A NA LYSI S , I NSIG H T, OPI N ION
CONTACT
Business Editor:
Ian McConnell
Tel: 0141 302 7142
Deputy Business Editor:
Scott Wright
Tel: 0141 302 7138
Brexit deal could see bank
shares rise after tough year
SCOTT WRIGHT
DEPUTY BUSINESS EDITOR
THE share price of two of the
BUSINESS
For the most comprehensive
coverage of Scottish business
EVERY FRIDAY
Ian McConnell
Called to
Account
EVERY SATURDAY
Margaret Taylor
Personal
Finance
UK?s biggest banks have the
potential to rally significantly
should a breakthrough be
achieved in the Brexit impasse,
analysts have declared.
Brexit uncertainty weighed
heavily on shares in both Royal
Bank of Scotland and Lloyds
Banking Group in 2018, with
each tumbling by around 25 per
cent. Across the UK?s top four
banks, Royal, Lloyds, Barclays
and HSBC, shares dropped by
around 15% to 20% over the
course of 2018.
Edinburgh-based Royal Bank
and Lloyds, owner of Bank of
Scotland, saw stocks flag despite
reporting healthy profits. Royal
has also paid its first dividend
since before the financial crisis,
when it was bailed out by taxpayers at a cost of �.5 billion.
The bank underlined the
Brexit effect as it unveiled its
third quarter results in October.
It made a �0 million provision
against bad debts escalating in
the event of a disorderly Brexit,
which came shortly after chief
executive Ross McEwan had
warned a no-deal Brexit could tip
the UK economy into recession,
More recently, Royal Bank
began the process to allow it to
move up to �bn of assets
managed by its investment banking operation to a subsidiary in
the Netherlands should the UK
leave the EU without a deal.
And last month it unveiled a
move to upgrade its branch in
Frankfurt into a hub which
would ultimately ensure it
continues to benefit from passporting rights after Brexit, meaning that it could still offer
financial services across the EU.
But it was not just the big four
banks which saw their share
price come under pressure in
2018. Shares in ?challenger?
CYBG, owner of Clydesdale
Bank, were also down heavily
over the year, having tumbled by
around 50% since August.
Michael Hewson, chief market
analyst at CMC Markets, said
剟 RBS underlined the Brexit effect when it made a �0m provision against bad debts escalating in the event of a disorderly exit.
BUSINESS
For the most
got two pictures. You?ve got a
picture whereby Lloyds, RBS
and Barclays have actually done
well, in terms of the business. But
in terms of the share price performance they have been rubbish.?
Summing up the situation,
Laith Khalaf, senior analyst at
Hargreaves Lansdown, said the
share price of Lloyds is currently
below its level in 2011, when the
current chief executive Antonio
Horta-Osorio took over. He said:
?At that time it was making a
loss. Last year it made a profit of
�n, but the price is still lower
today. That tells you it is really
being held back.
?If there was an orderly Brexit
outcome, I think that tells you
there is some upside in the banking sector.?
Royal Bank
had all but ?given
comprehensive
up? the 20% gain its shares made
coverage
Scottish
in 2017,
when itofwas
the best
bank performer
on the market.
business
And he said the main reason is
the uncertain political climate,
observing that a hard Brexit
could lead to a spike in bad loans,
falling house prices and more
muted consumer spending.
?You would be forgiven for
thinking the banks had a bad
year for profitability, but they
haven?t,? Mr Hewson said. ?The
big question is, why are they
down? And they are down
because there are concerns about
what the future holds, whether it
be a bad Brexit, a Corbyn
Government or a further cut in
interest rates.?
Mr Hewson added: ?You?ve
EVERY
EVERY
FRIDAY
SATURDAY
Ian McConnell Margaret Taylor
Called to
Personal
Account
Finance
Mr Khalaf also flagged the
danger to banks such as Royal
and Lloyds if economic growth
slows in light of a no-deal Brexit,
particularly if it leads to
increased losses on bad loans
and more uncertainty for interest
rates.
But he added: ?Equally, if we
do get some resolution that looks
like we are heading for an orderly
Brexit that is not going to harm
the economy, there could be
considerable upside for the banking sector.?
Highlighting the progress that
both Lloyds and RBS are making
some 10 years on from the financial crisis, Mr Khalaf added: ?If
Brexit wasn?t happening, we?d be
having a very different conversation about banks.?
Building on the theme, Mr
Hewson contends the major
banks could well ?rally very
strongly? if there is progress on
Brexit.
He said: ?If we do get a deal, I
can foresee a scenario where
they rally very strongly, Lloyds
especially.
?In terms of where it [Lloyds]
is valued, it is cheap as chips.
That doesn?t mean it can?t get
cheaper, and obviously it will
depend an awful lot on the
outcome of this Brexit farrago.?
However, with Theresa May
showing no signs of building
enoug h s upp or t for her
Withdrawal Agreement as the
Brexit date of March 29
approaches, he said a hard Brexit
is looking ?more likely?.
Corbyn win could have implications for state-owned bank
SCOTT
WRIGHT
to a General Election, analysts
say the prospect of victory for
socialist Jeremy Corbyn in the
event the UK goes to the polls
will be a further concern for
top brass
Foratthestate-backed
most
Royal. Indeed, it could well be
comprehensive
that the
prospect of a CorbyncoverageGovernment
of Scottish is
led Labour
already be
deterring investors
business
from buying shares in the
Edinburgh-based institution.
Labour has previously said
it would launch a consultation
into breaking up the bank into
smaller local players if it
BUSINESS
WE have just emerged from a
year in which, thanks to Brexit,
politics collided with business
in a perhaps unprecedented
scale. But at Royal Bank of
Scotland the political worry is
not confined to Brexit.
As speculation persists that
the Brexit impasse could lead
EVERY Ian McConnell
FRIDAY Called to Account
comes to power, while there
has also been a suggestion
that a Labour Government
could go the whole hog and
fully nationalise the institution.
Royal Bank remains 62.4
per cent owned by UK
taxpayers ? a legacy of its
�.5 billion bailout during the
financial crisis of 2008 and
2009 ? and current
Chancellor Philip Hammond
remains committed to selling
off the Government?s shares.
He re-started the process of
selling off the public?s stake in
June, when a tranche of
shares equating to around
7.7% of the bank were sold to
institutional investors ? at a
loss to the taxpayer.
Michael Hewson at CMC
Markets, said: ?[Shadow
Chancellor] John McDonnell
has made no bones about the
fact he would like to change
RBS?s mandate.
?That is a risk if there is an
election and Labour manage
to get hold of the reins of that.
I certainly think of the two
banks, Lloyds is probably the
better bet than RBS, which
has the tail risk of being taken
over completely, or coming
under the influence of political
pressure in terms of its
lending practices.?
Mr Hewson?s comments
were echoed by Laith Khalaf
at Hargreaves Lansdown, who
said the uncertainty over what
a Labour Government would
do with RBS is an ?additional
worry? for the bank.
It looks like being an
another eventful year for the
one-time banking titan.
The Herald crosswords
ACROSS
1 Fairy godmother ultimately
enveloped in rancour (6)
4 Strike-breaking poet's
weapon kept here (8)
9 Freezing point (6)
10 Fashionable posture
adopted, for example (8)
12 Reportedly dodged under
pipe (4)
13 Equal terms will define
change (5)
14 Most of gunge is thin (4)
17 Sharp press go mad, seeing
bugs (12)
20 Log of charges for
entry? (9,3)
23 Many schemes must ignore
parking (4)
24 Suspicious about European
being tired (5)
25 Ban Doctor Who at last (4)
28 Enormous deficit in fossil
fuel (8)
29 Outwardly deplore role and
leave (6)
30 Doctor duly ends abruptly (8)
31 Destructive type left after
museum (6)
DOWN
Wednesday, 2nd January, 2019
1 Terrible hiding in case of serious
parties (8)
2 Reversible cam? (8)
3 Charge applied to two
students? (4)
5 Modern argument against casual
worker (12)
6 An object of ridicule however
thoughtful initially (4)
7 Records of non-u plants? (6)
8 Doctor on new team fantasised (6)
11 Does one merely observe bug
here? (3,2,3,4)
15 Large vehicle getting award for
performance (5)
16 Shed tears about working for a
mate (5)
18 How people may write about
getting autonomy? (8)
19 Lacking principles - must
welcome time for God, for
example (8)
21 Son has no trousers (6)
22 Designated fashion centre of
Cadiz (6)
No. 14,744 by JM 26 One's levy halved for land
offshore (4)
27 Cases of free tea or cheese (4)
l Published by Newsquest (Herald & Times) Ltd, registered in Scotland with registered number SC011138 and registered office at 200 Renfield Street, Glasgow G2 3QB. Printed at 125 Fullerton Drive, Glasgow G32 8FG
by Puzzler Media YESTERDAY?S SOLUTIONS
ACROSS
1
8
9
10
13
16
17
18
19
20
21
24
27
28
29
Gave a weak excuse to (6,3)
Soya bean product (4)
Caribbean drum group (5,4)
Exchange for money (4)
Ornithologist's interest (5)
___ Radcliffe, marathon
runner (5)
Pays attention to (5)
Water-cut channel in
rock (5)
Rental agreement (5)
Sizeable (5)
Roadside parking
place (3-2)
Parched and dry like a
desert (4)
Straw model (4,5)
Make a noise like an
engine (4)
Romantic fling (9)
DOWN
2 Quaker ___, brand of breakfast cereal (4)
3 Horn noise (4)
4 Emirates state (5)
5 Exacted a money penalty (5)
6 Give up hope (4,5)
7
11
12
13
14
15
22
23
25
26
Issued (9)
Dishwasher or fridge, eg (9)
Cheekily bold (9)
Traditional Jewish roll (5)
Race during which a baton is passed (5)
Self-consciously (5)
Hawaiian greeting (5)
Unimaginative, trite (5)
Roman garment (4)
Smart ___, know-all (4)
erate across Europe and the
northern hemisphere.
All these factors taken together sound
very much like a SparkNotes summary
of the causes of the 2019-20 economic
recession. There?s just too much stuff
going on for it not to have profound
economic consequences.
Both the big UK parties are
fundamentally split, lacking in effective
leadership, and without any sense of
where the country is going. Social media
has turned the public sphere crazy, with
Twitter wars infecting politics and
destroying rational debate. Of course,
an economic recession isn?t inevitable
and we shouldn?t talk ourselves into
one. But it will take great care and a lot
of cool heads to prevent 2019 being the
year that everything went wrong at once.
Today?s feminist activists are wrong to exclude men
ROSEMARY
GORING
T
he #MeToo movement,
arguably last year?s most
potent political force, shows
no sign of losing vigour. It?s a
remarkable testament to the pent-up
frustration and anger of womankind
that what was initially seen, when it
began in October 2017, as a frivolous
or fleeting craze, has put down roots
and become a force to be reckoned
with.
Anne Widdicombe might have
dismissed it as trivial and whingeing
? and some #MeTooers undoubtedly
deserve that label ? but the culture
of sexual harassment and abuse it
calls out is far from unimportant.
Equally crucial are other issues that
have vexed women for decades, if
not centuries, among them equality
of pay, professional respect and
opportunity.
So far, so reasonable. Yet, when I
heard Mary Robinson, former
President of Ireland, talking last
week about Mothers of Invention, a
podcast she has set up that focusses
exclusively on women?s efforts to
address climate change, my heart
did a double skip: one for delight,
two for despair. Delight that women
are getting involved directly in trying
to help reduce our carbon footprint,
without a doubt the most urgent of
the world?s ails, but despair at
Robinson?s smug assumption that
?it?s women who change behaviour,
in the family and the community?.
Let?s put aside for a moment the
fact that, as Robinson reveals in her
recent book, Climate Justice, her
own awareness of environmental
calamity dawned on her like a
Damascene conversion
astonishingly late in the day.
What sets my teeth on edge is the
sanctimonious way in which women
are increasingly frequently being
portrayed ? mostly by other women.
It?s as if there is a collective halo that
needs constant polishing, lest it lose
its lustre. Indeed, it seems you
cannot these days be a female in a
position of influence or authority
without feeling the urge ? or the
pressure ? to add a stone to the cairn
of women?s rights, entitlements and
endeavours.
Don?t misunderstand me. I am an
old-style feminist, and decry utterly
the unfair, oppressive and
sometimes iniquitous treatment of
women in our and other societies.
Men have an awful lot to answer for,
today and in the past. But I get
decidedly uneasy at the perceptual
divide that appears to be widening
between the sexes. Climate change,
said Robinson, is ?man-made?, and
she enjoys using the term, even
though admitting it embraces men
and women. But apart from this
deliberate provocation, is she really
correct in assuming that women
change attitudes more widely than
men?
Maybe it depends on what sort of
country you?re living in. When I
look around the UK, I don?t
recognise that stark distinction.
Plenty of men seem to be trying to
bring about green change, ethical
enlightenment, societal
improvement, better childcare and
education, and are working towards
this alongside women. Sometimes,
for heaven?s sake, they are even
taking the lead.
Meanwhile, children in
two-parent families are open to
influences from both parents. While
women still tend to spend more time
with their young, this does not
necessarily equate to a more lasting
influence on their behaviour or
outlook. The other day my
husband?s granddaughter rushed to
interrupt her mother who was on
the phone to announce that
Liverpool had just scored a fourth
goal against Newcastle ? whose
influence was that?
We are going through a phase
where almost every interview with a
woman politician or banker,
entrepreneur or artist, includes the
obligatory question about #MeToo,
in the same way that every American
is asked their opinion of Trump.
And while it obviously takes women
at the top to help bring about change
for those lower down the ladder ? or
in the community at large ? it is
surely not a sacred obligation placed
upon each of them. To assume that
is to be sexist and discriminatory.
It?s certainly not an expectation
placed upon men.
Yet to listen to some women?s
To listen to some women?s outrage, you?d think
there?s a contract, signed at birth, that insists
women pay especial attention to female issues
COMMENT AT HERALDSCOTLAND.COM
outrage, you?d think there?s a
contract, signed at birth, that insists
women pay especial attention to
female issues even if there are things
that interest them more. Florence
Nightingale and Elsie Inglis
personally helped save hundreds of
lives, and their influence rippled
down the decades to the benefit of
all, women as much as men. Yet
their initial impulse was not to
improve things for their own kind,
but to help wounded soldiers and
the sick and dying. In other words,
to improve the conditions of
humanity as a whole, not one
gender or the other.
Of course splinter groups and
special interest parties can make
things change ? just look at Dr
Inglis?s formidable all-women
hospitals. There is a galvanising
power and collective spirit in female
solidarity that nobody can deny. So
let?s hear it for women tackling
climate change. And for men too.
In these unsettling and perilous
times we surely need to remember
that we are all just people. Our
identity is not primarily male or
female, trans, intersex, other, or
whatever label fits. We are simply
and essentially human, with all the
complexities of personality, type,
and biases that entails. Since we?re
in it all together, that?s also how we
should sort things out.
WELL, OK, if we are going to
mention the darts, we should of
course mention our favourite darts
joke. It?s the one about the Glasgow
toper in the pub who told his pals:
?The wife asked what I was doing on
the computer and I said I was looking
for cheap flights.? He then added:
?She got all excited, which is strange,
as she?s never shown any interest in
darts before.?
What a shower
DID you survive the New Year? A
few folk have been reminiscing about
their behaviour at this time of year,
and Kimmy confuses: ?I once went
to a party on New Year?s Eve and
had too much vodka, so I went
upstairs and by mistake puked on all
the coats on the bed. It was then I
realised of course that I wasn?t in the
bathroom. So I took all the coats, put
them in the bath and turned on the
shower to clean them.? Any other
New Year confessions?
Sparks fly
IT was great seeing the torch-lit
profession through Edinburgh?s city
centre the other night with thousands
of visitors from around the world. It
reminds us of Pete Irvine, when he
organised Edinburgh?s Hogmanay
celebrations, having a French act
using fire which led to sparks
blowing on to the crowd. City
officials overreacted and called out
the fire brigade. The French company
said they had been ?artistically
raped? and vowed never to perform
in Scotland again. When a
newspaper reported the occasion as a
?flaming hell? six people demanded
compensation for burned jackets.
?And guess what?? Pete told us.
?They were mainly Prada jackets.?
剟 John Sim in Dumbarton passes
on a great pun from a shop at
Glasgow?s Barras.
Ladled it on
ANDY Kesson passes on:
?Overheard in the Chicago Institute
of Art, where a small child, reading
the description of a painting asked,
?Grandma, what?s a brothel??
Grandma, after an enormous pause,
explained, ?it?s the place where they
make soup?.?
Coming clean
HOGMANAY was of course the time
when lots of folk in Scotland have a
good clean of their house to welcome
in the New Year. As Glasgow
councillor Mhairi Hunter confessed
on Monday: ?So today I have to clean
the house. My New Year resolution
should probably be to do it more
often so I don?t have so much to do at
Hogmanay.?
Got it covered
MARRIED life, continued. Kent
Graham muses: ?How can my wife?s
hands not open a jar of pickles in the
day, but become superhuman vicegrips at night when I want some
covers??
A skoosh
AMY Kinnaird in Ayrshire tells us: ?I
overheard this gem in a Glasgow cafe
last week at lunchtime, ?Do you want
ice-cream or skooshy cream with
your apple tart?? The question did
not raise an eyebrow.?
Of course it shouldn?t, Amy. A word
that makes perfect sense to locals but
would leave any visitor to the city
struggling. Any other examples?
Paints a picture
SAYS Robin Irvine in Milngavie: ?I
bought my mother-in-law a mobile
phone. Under the picture of the
phone that tells you what all the bits
are for, is the warning,
?Note! All illustrations are for
illustrative purposes only?. I would
never have guessed.?
Contact The Diary on 0141 302 7055
or thediary@theherald.co.uk.
14 OPINION
Wednesday January 2, 2019
A NA LYSI S , I NSIG H T, OPI N ION
Those were the days...
1965: ?Croquet is not malicious but of course the aim is to win?
Founded on Monday
J a n ua r y 27, 17 8 3
RUSSELL LEADBETTER
Selections from
The Herald Picture Store
THE HERALD IS COMMITTED TO PROVIDING FAIR
AND IMPARTIAL COVERAGE OF SCOTLAND?S AFFAIRS
AND DOES NOT ENDORSE ANY POLITICAL PARTY
THE rain fell without cease on Pollok
House in Glasgow, and on the three
croquet courts laid out there.
Ascetic faces, wrote the un-named
Glasgow Herald journalist who
compiled the ?From All Quarters??
column, peered grimly from under
sodden anoraks. A handful of
spectators were seeking shelter
beneath a tree. Rain drops splashed
into the cup of coffee being cradled
by Mrs Rosemary Hall, secretary of
the day?s visitors, Edinburgh
Croquet Club. A literary gent looked
rather fetching in his panama hat.
The occasion was a return match
between Glasgow Croquet Club,
which had opened on the Pollok
Estate in 1959, and Edinburgh.
(Photographed here is Glasgow?s
president, Dr J. Alexander.)
?You mustn?t get the impression,?
Mrs Hall told our writer, ?that it is just
a game for the old.?
Croquet ?demands a good eye
and the ability to plan ahead. We
want to attract more young players.
It?s a slow game, of course. But so is
golf, and plenty of young people
play that. And its great merit is that
young and old can play in equal
terms.?
Accuracy, the Herald writer
observed, was vital, the hoop being
only so much wider than the ball.
Planning ensured that the other balls
lay where the player could use them
to his or her own advantage.
?People sometimes say that it is a
malicious game?, someone said.
?But it?s not. After all, the aim in
every sport is to win.?
Edinburgh ran out winners, by two
games to one.
Let us have
less shouting,
more listening
T
WO wishes for 2019. Our first is a quieter world.
That is to say (sotto voce), we would like less
shouting ? and more listening. The year past
featured a worrying polarisation of views,
doubtless encouraged by the internet, and by a vehemence
of expression lacking any respect.
A small point: it is possible to have more than one
rational point of view about Europe, Scottish
independence, Islam, the NHS, the railways, gender,
possession football and the current state of pop music. To
air such views, it should not be necessary to retreat to
?safe spaces?. The whole of society should be a safe space,
in which good arguments win clearly and fairly, while the
bad are heard and defeated.
Related to our first wish, our second is to make bullying
unacceptable in all spheres of life, from the school
playground through youth culture to ?grown up? politics
and the workplace. Bullying, like poverty, has always been
with us, but that only serves to remind us of the need to
challenge it continually.
Doubtless, 2019 will throw up contentious issues that
test our desire to conduct dialogue decently. Brexit, more
than anything, will encourage confrontation. Scottish
independence has, thankfully, been promoted largely in a
civilised manner, but both sides have their hotheads.
Across the Atlantic, President Trump putting another
brick in his wall will prompt his opponents to perform
virtuous public tantrums in lieu of a strategy. Someone
needs to have a quiet word with the Democrats about
effective opposition ? while inviting our own Labour
Party to cock an ear too.
Amidst arguments over ideology, technology will
continue making quiet progress. More cars will go electric
and some will drive themselves, reducing road rage. Test
flights for landing communities on Mars will continue,
with potential colonists trained in how to get along.
If they can live together without shouting and bullying,
that will indeed be one giant leap for humankind.
Why Westminster will never truly
represent the will of the people
LETTERS
SEVEN DAYS OF HERALD VOICES
Monday
Marianne Taylor
and Mark Smith
Friday
Andrew McKie
and Catriona Stewart
Tuesday
Neil Mackay and
Margaret Taylor
Saturday
Kevin McKenna,
Tom Gordon, Ken Smith,
Alison Rowat, Keith Bruce
and Fidelma Cook
Wednesday
Iain Macwhirter and
Rosemary Goring
Thursday
Alison Rowat and
Brian Beacom
Sunday
Iain Macwhirter, Vicky Allan,
Rab McNeil, David Pratt,
Ron McKay and
Susan Swarbrick
Clarifications and corrections
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SEVERAL of your correspondents
(Letters, December 28) reprove Dr
Gerald Edwards for not knowing that
the 2016 Brexit referendum was only
advisory, not binding on the UK
Parliament (Letters, December 27).
True, but this puts legal correctness
above practical politics, since in
practice no Parliament can overrule
the will of the voters expressed in a
referendum that Brexit should
happen. Hence the need for a second
referendum to reverse this decision in
principle and cancel the Article 50
request.
What the UK Parliament can
decide is what form Brexit should
take, which was not decided or even
asked in the referendum.
But here we run into the major
defect of the UK Parliament. It is
elected by first past the post, which
almost certainly produces a
government with only minority
support from the voters (and on
occasion not even the largest
minority). This defect is compounded
by the Westminster principles that
this minority has the right to impose
its will on the majority (if the
gove
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