close

Вход

Забыли?

вход по аккаунту

?

Tucson Lifestyle Home & Garden - January 2019

код для вставкиСкачать
w w w.L I N DA R O B I N S O N D ES I G N.c o m
LINDA ROBINSON
D ES I G N ASSO C I AT ES L LC
MASTER OF THE SOUTHWEST
INTERIOR
•
REMODEL
•
N E W C O N ST R U CT I O N D ES I G N
Dinner Without
Reservations.
available at
2260 W Ina Rd. Tucson | 520.544.8600
(NW Corner of La Cholla Blvd. & Ina Rd.)
Mon-Sat 10-6 Sun 11-5
Ask about our complimentary in-home design service
| thomasvilleaz.com
Wow on all accounts
Comfort, quality and style.
There is simply no other recliner like a Stressless recliner. Made in Norway since 1971, each and every chair
is crafted to offer the very best in comfort, quality and style. All of us at Copenhagen are proud to have been
part of the Stressless story since the very beginning. Come see the entire collection and let us help you find
your true comfort zone. Stressless and Copenhagen... for the way we live, today and tomorrow.
TUCSON 3660 E. Fort Lowell 520-795-0316
PHOENIX 1701 E. Camelback 602-266-8060
SCOTTSDALE 15804 N. Scottsdale Rd. 480-367-6401
TEMPE 2346 E. Southern (at 101) 480-838-3080
www.CopenhagenLiving.com
contemporary
furniture and accessories
contents
january 2019
Features
16 Retro Ranch Remodeled
By Romi Carrell Wittman
A local couple found a mid-century ranch
house that — with the help of a pair of skilled
renovators — has become their dream home.
22 Not So Plain Geometry
By Romi Carrell Wittman
Landscape architect Elizabeth PrzygodaMontgomery helped create cohesive, midcentury-styled entertaining spaces from a
double-width yard.
16
14
26
26 A Full Range: Kitchens
Before & After
We present the results of five dramatic local
kitchen renovations.
Departments
12 14 32 34 36 38 Garden Calendar
A monthly guide to gardening in Tucson.
Local Craftsmen: Very Heavy Metal
AAMA Metal Arts & Design’s founders excel
in creating Southwest-inspired art pieces.
From My Kitchen to Yours: Soup-er
Side Dish!
Lynne Jackson has taken a traditional gazpacho recipe and re-worked it into an easy but
delicious meal.
22
Regional Artisan: Signs of Success
Artist Ashley White turned her talents to
sign-making, creating her business, Modern
Aquarian Signs.
Letters to the Editor
Events & More
What’s going on in Tucson on the home
and garden scene.
About the cover: This mid-century ranch home was
re-worked to achieve maximum function while still
keeping its stylistic roots. Photography by Matt Vacca.
6
Tucson Lifestyle HOME & GARDEN / JANUARY 2019
Tu c s o n L i f e s t y l e . c o m
It’s comfortable here!
New Collections at Baker’s
Baker’s—a must-see home furnishing destination
that ignites inspiration and creativity, boasting
new products and collections that will set
your home apart.
Shown:
39
YEARS
FLEXSTEEL
OMNIA
B R A D I N G TO N -Y O U N G
HOOKER
S I M P LY A M I S H
AND MORE
BakersHomeFurnishings .com
Where Tucson shops for quality home furnishings
2303 E. Grant Rd. (West of Tucson Blvd.)
520.326.4808
Mon - Sat: 9:30 - 5:30
letter from the editor
Modern Times
Editor Debby Larsen at a photo shoot at the home of
Lynne Jackson. Photo by Thomas Veneklasen.
The calendar says it’s 2019, but all over Tucson, homeowners are turning back the
clock 50 or so years to revel in the style that we know as mid-century modern. And
why not? With its elegant geometry, sense of space, and forward-looking feel, there
is at once a nostalgic, and yet timeless, quality to it.
For our cover story on page 16 we visited a mid-century ranch home that received
an extensive and beautiful remodel that has kept the bones of the structure intact,
but also fleshed out the vision of modernism. Even if your place is territorial,
Spanish colonial, or some other Southwestern style, we think you’ll find plenty to
inspire a makeover at your casa.
We haven’t overlooked the exterior spaces, either. There are certain elements to
hardscape and plantings that help to define the modern style, too. Our feature on
page 22 presents a backyard that received a redesign that provides a nod to the past
while being thoroughly updated and functional.
Kitchens are often the first room that becomes antiquated, and in order to help
you figure out some options for new cabinets, fixtures, etc., we have compiled a
pictorial, starting on page 26.
Whether or not you are contemplating redoing a home or garden space, like
many of us you are probably finding ways to dress up your monthly menus. We sat
down with Lynne Jackson to find out about a classic side dish that she has elaborated into an easy and tasty main dish.
Elsewhere in this issue, you can learn about a young woman who hand-letters
signs for local businesses (page 34) and discover what to do to keep your garden
looking its best (page 12).
Debby Larsen, Editor
8
Tucson Lifestyle HOME & GARDEN / JANUARY 2019
Tu c s o n L i f e s t y l e . c o m
The Garden Gate
®
Landscape Design Center
Landscape Design-Installation
Landscape Design, Pool Design, Landscape Installation
ROC164986
TGG_DesignCenter_2pgSprd_12-4-17_PRINT.indd 1
12/4/17 4:23 PM
Where great landscapes begin
520.574.7585
8620 N Oracle Road
thegardengateaz.com
Open Mon-Fri 9 am to 5 pm | Sat 8 am to 4 pm | Closed Sunday
Kitchens, Fire Features, Patios and Hardscape
ROC226071
TGG_DesignCenter_2pgSprd_12-4-17_PRINT.indd 2
12/4/17 4:23 PM
garden calendar
January
A quiet time for Tucson gardens.
Co
ia “
Te a C ”
up
at
er
Le
t tu
ce
as
Ki
ng
Tu
t”
W
s“
l
oc
p
Cy
er
u
PLANT
FERTILIZE
Sow seeds of beets, bok choy, carrots,
lettuce, radishes, spinach and Swiss
chard.
Start seeds of peppers, eggplant and
tomatoes indoors.
PROTECT
Fertilize bearded iris toward the end of
the month, then water thoroughly.
Fertilize citrus in January or February.
Use one-third of the total nitrogen
requirement. Scatter granular fertilizer
along the canopy and water deeply.
Do not feed dormant Bermuda grass.
Cover frost-tender plants with burlap,
sheets or frost cloth.
HARVEST
PRUNE
Continue citrus harvest of grapefruits,
mandarins, tangelos, lemons, kumquats, navels and blood oranges.
Prune roses by removing dead and
crossing canes. Leave five or six
canes, cutting them to 18 inches.
Dab ends with wood glue to discourage insects.
Trim non-native deciduous shade
trees. Wait to prune native trees and
shrubs after they bloom.
Prune citrus only to remove dead
wood, crossed branches, suckers rising from below the graft point
and vertical sprouts from the top of
the tree.
WATER
If winter rains are sparse, water trees
and shrubs every two or three weeks.
Do not water succulents if forecast
calls for a freeze.
Water fall-planted wildflower seeds if
there is little rainfall.
TRANSPLANT
C yp
Pennywort
er u
s“
C
eo
l
12
pa
tr a
”
Tucson Lifestyle HOME & GARDEN / JANUARY 2019
Set out transplants of sweet alyssum, candy tuft, baby’s breath,
daisy, bacopa, bachelor’s
button, pansy, calendula,
snapdragon, wallflower, nasturtium, ornamental kale, Iceland
poppy and stock.
Set out winter vegetables such as
Brussel sprouts,
cabbage, kale,
Chinese cabbage and
cauliflower.
TIP OF THE MONTH
Ponds and water gardens enhance
your landscape by adding the
sound of water and the sight of an
array of lush plants.
Place your garden where it will
receive at least five hours of sunlight daily. Shading the water itself
is important to provide relief for fish
and inhibit algae growth. Plants in
water gardens thrive despite our
summers as their roots are in water.
Floating plants are essential and
should cover 60 percent of the
water surface. They take up nutrients from the water and provide
shade. They can be very prolific,
and even invasive. For example,
Arizona has labeled water hyacinths as an invasive species.
Oxygenator plants add oxygen to
the water and take up nutrients.
They should be planted in containers at the bottom of the pond. Water
should be circulated once per hour.
Water lilies provide color (in a wide
variety of shades) and spread out
on the surface.
Marginal plants also take up nutrients and add visual impact. Plant
in containers along the shallow
edges of the bog area. They purify
the water by removing heavy metals, and benefit the environment
by attracting bees, butterflies and
dragonflies. HG
Tu c s o n L i f e s t y l e . c o m
PARTY OF SIX...
YOUR
TABLE
IS READY
KENZO COLLECTION
Family Owned
Since 1979
Nationwide Shipping
& Delivery
TODAYSPATIO.COM
PHOENIX
SAN DIEGO
SCOTTSDALE
TUCSON
100% Satisfaction
Guaranteed
Complimentary
Design Services
(866)9-TODAYS
PARADISE VALLEY
GLENDALE
GILBERT
local craftsmen
Very Heavy Metal
Ambrosio Adams Metal Arts & Design is a collaborative duo of designers who produce three-dimensional metal art by Pamela
Ambrosio and Joan Adams. The welders share a mutual love for art and
saw a need for outdoor metal sculptures.
Their work includes traditional Southwestern-inspired designs, as well
as more contemporary motifs. Mixed-media art pieces include salvaged
and recycled metal in addition to traditional stain, paint, glass, mosaics and
stone items.
Each piece is sealed to prevent fading and rusting. Large garden art statues
are stabilized to withstand the outdoor elements. HG
Pamela Ambrosio (left) and Joan Adams (right) in their
metal studio. Portrait by Thomas Veneklasen.
Source:
AAMA Metal Arts & Design
5122 Fort Yuma Trail
(520) 352-9823 or (520) 306-7744
www.AamaMetalArts.com
14
Tucson Lifestyle HOME & GARDEN / JANUARY 2019
Their art also can be found at:
Petroglyphs, 228 S. Park Ave.
Harlow Gardens, 5620 E. Pima St.
Tu c s o n L i f e s t y l e . c o m
NEW YEAR - FRESH START!
NEW YEAR’S SAVINGS UP TO 75% ON SELECT CLEARANCE MERCHANDISE*
*While supplies last. Some floor samples sold as-is.
Located Inside Sam Levitz Northwest
3750 W. Orange Grove Rd.
520.512.5777 • galleryatlevitz.com
Weekdays 10-9
Saturday 10-7 • Sunday 11-6
Retro Ranch Remodeled
This 1961 gem received a much-needed makeover
that retained its bones but updated the style.
BY ROMI CARRELL WITTMAN | PHOTOGRAPHY BY MATT VACA
16
Tucson Lifestyle HOME & GARDEN / JANUARY 2019
Tu c s o n L i f e s t y l e . c o m
H
ow do you know when you’ve
found The One?
For one couple, it was all
about the feeling they got upon
entering a stylish mid-century in
the eastside Windsor Park neighborhood.
Tucson couple Billy and Helena had
been on the hunt for a home for several
months, but they’d had no luck in finding
something that suited their growing family. It didn’t help that it was 2007, the very
height of the housing boom, when nothing stayed on the market for long. They
originally wanted something in midtown,
but were priced out of the market. They
never considered looking on the eastside
until their Realtor suggested it.
Turns out their Realtor was onto something.
“I just knew,” says Billy about discovering the three-bedroom, 1900-square-foot
home. “I walked in and saw the wall of
windows and that was it. It was an emotional response.”
Built in 1961, this classic mid-century
ranch featured sleek, angular lines, large
expanses of windows from which to see
the Catalina and Rincon Mountains, little to
no exterior ornamentation and the liberal
use of glass, concrete and wood throughout. Unlike the mid-century residences
you might find in Palm Springs, with their
turquoise, orange and green accents,
the home’s palette is subdued, creating a
sophisticated and timeless appeal.
Although the couple loved the house
and the friendly neighborhood, there were
some aspects they decidedly didn’t love.
First, there was the entryway, which at
one point had been an outdoor porch. A
previous owner had enclosed it to make a
living room, but it was completely at odds
with the home’s design style.
Soon after moving in, the couple
attacked that problem first, hiring an architect to streamline the house, while maintaining the overall square footage. The
next item on the to-do list was the kitchen,
but, being a much bigger undertaking, the
couple put it off until 2016.
They knew they needed expert help
for the job, so they contacted Kathryn
Prideaux of Prideaux Design and David
Papanikolas of Alta Constructors after seeing ads for their respective businesses during Tucson Modernism Week. The couple
had no idea that Prideaux and Papanikolas
frequently work together.
LEFT Floating shelves hold the homeowners’
collections. The entire space lends itself to the
mid-century modern aesthetic.
Tu c s o n L i f e s t y l e . c o m
Tucson Lifestyle HOME & GARDEN / JANUARY 2019
17
The kitchen had been updated over the years and the end result
was a cramped, dated U-shape with builder-grade, alder cabinets
and green granite countertops. Aside from the problems with
functionality, there was a potentially more significant issue with
the stove, a commercial-grade restaurant range.
“People raved about it because it was a professional six-burner
range,” Helena says. “But restaurant ranges aren’t usually found
in home kitchens. It had no insulation around it and I worried it
would burn the surrounding cabinets.”
Another issue was the overwhelming smell of natural gas. “The
pilot lights on a commercial stove … you could smell gas all the
time,” Billy says.
The couple came up with their new kitchen wish list and provided that, along with their budget, to Prideaux and Papanikolas.
18
Tucson Lifestyle HOME & GARDEN / JANUARY 2019
“I gave them an idea of what was involved with each wish list
item,” Papanikolas says. After three or so visits, the couple decided
on a design, then decamped to a friend’s home in Oro Valley for
the duration of the four-month-long renovation.
“We donated a bunch of our stuff and used it as an opportunity
to declutter,” Helena says.
Fortunately for the design team, the home was in pretty good
shape from a systems perspective. There was little required in
terms of correcting bad wiring, plumbing or other issues. That
meant the bulk of the budget could be devoted to the remodel
itself, which included the construction of a huge kitchen island, a
wall of northeast-facing windows and new cabinetry.
The island, which runs nearly the length of the whole kitchen,
draws the eye first. With its white quartz countertop, ample
Tu c s o n L i f e s t y l e . c o m
ABOVE Deep, full-height wood
cabinets provide storage while
maintaining a clean look. The flooring is large-format gray porcelain
tile with narrow grout lines.
RIGHT The dining area looks into
the living room.
Tu c s o n L i f e s t y l e . c o m
Tucson Lifestyle HOME & GARDEN / JANUARY 2019
19
TOP A spacious center island prep area and wall of windows
provide an open feeling.
LEFT Rift-cut white oak cabinets supply warmth and contrast to
the bright white quartz countertops. Handmade Heath tile on the
backsplash pulls in a natural desert color palette.
storage and built-in seating, it makes a gorgeous statement while
remaining accessible, inviting and imminently usable.
In addition to the island, J-Swiss & Company custom cabinets
(made of straight-grain white oak) were installed, providing both
functionality and a form consistent with the home’s style. An
understated, hand-made Heath Tile backsplash perfectly complements the white quartz.
The north wall of the kitchen was converted into windows,
bathing the space in natural light and amplifying its size. It’s easy
to imagine both large parties as well as more intimate gatherings
congregating here. To anchor the design, the homeowners selected a 24-inch gray porcelain tile, which was installed throughout
the home.
When it came to selecting furnishings, Prideaux directed the
couple to newly constructed pieces with a retro feel. “They didn’t
have time to hunt for the perfect pieces,” she says, “and vintage
pieces often need to be refurbished.”
Prideaux looked toward modern furniture brands like Blu Dot,
Room and Board, West Elm and even Ikea to furnish the space.
The result is a clean, stylish home that’s not only attractive, but also
livable for the couple and their children.
“We really like it, but not necessarily because it’s mid-century
modern,” Billy says. “We just like the home overall.” HG
Sources:
Prideaux Design, www.prideaux-design.com
Alta Constructors, Inc., www.altaconstructorsinc.com
20
Tucson Lifestyle HOME & GARDEN / JANUARY 2019
Tu c s o n L i f e s t y l e . c o m
Black pendant lights over the
kitchen island add a punch of
contrast to the white painted
tongue and groove ceiling.
Tu c s o n L i f e s t y l e . c o m
Tucson Lifestyle HOME & GARDEN / JANUARY 2019
21
Not-So-Plain
Geometry
A 1950s-era home got a backyard
update that emphasizes clean lines
and maximum function.
BY ROMI CARRELL WITTMAN
PHOTOGRAPHY BY PUSPA LOHMEYER
W
hile living in the Catalina Foothills, Linda McKenzie and
her husband John Haas craved the intimacy and connection of a traditional urban neighborhood.
“We didn’t know our neighbors,” Linda says. “We were missing
the neighborhood feeling we had when we lived in Salt Lake City.”
They also wanted to be closer to amenities and the heart of the
city. They were immediately drawn to the Tom Gist-designed
home not far from downtown.
You probably know the names Joesler, Merriweather and
Brown. They’re some of the architects who made names for themselves in Tucson in the post-WWII building boom. Not as well
known, but no less influential, was Tom Gist.
A homebuilder with no formal architectural training, Gist
moved to Tucson from Chicago after the war. By the 1950s, he’d
developed a distinctive design style: elongated floor plans, large
walls of windows with views of the surrounding mountains, burnt
adobe construction and plenty of interior woodwork. He built
more than 170 homes during his career.
ABOVE Outdoor spaces are
delineated with integrated
colored concrete. Upholstered
teak chairs, a bold graphic outdoor rug and concrete bench
complete the look.
LEFT Wire mid-century
modern chairs from Hot Cool
Vintage are paired with “bullet”
planter reproductions.
22
Tucson Lifestyle HOME & GARDEN / JANUARY 2019
Tu c s o n L i f e s t y l e . c o m
We’ve really enjoyed the outdoor dining
area, barbecue and bar. John barbecues
almost every night and he enjoys the
practicality of it.
Tu c s o n L i f e s t y l e . c o m
Tucson Lifestyle HOME & GARDEN / JANUARY 2019
23
Butterfly canvas chairs
flank a retro-style “Mod
Fire” feature by Boxhill.
Linda loved the location of the home as
well as its double lot. Though the interior
needed some TLC, she knew it was the
right fit. After completing an extensive
remodeling project that included new
north-side floor-to-ceiling windows, it
became obvious that the backyard also
needed some loving attention. Linda and
John were determined to make the view as
beautiful as the home’s interior.
“It felt unfinished,” she says. “The hardscape was kind of weird and the whole
thing seemed unfinished and choppy.”
A wall blocked access to the property’s
guesthouse.
They asked a trusted friend for landscape
architect recommendations and Elizabeth
Przygoda-Montgomery, owner of Boxhill
Design, was among the suggestions. After
interviewing each candidate, they knew
Montgomery was the right choice.
LEFT The barbecue was custom designed by
Boxhill, and constructed by Hazelbaker-Rush of
HARU with powder-coated steel and eco-wood
from Originate Natural Building Materials.
24
Tucson Lifestyle HOME & GARDEN / JANUARY 2019
Tu c s o n L i f e s t y l e . c o m
“I just loved her vision. She seemed to
get what we wanted even though we didn’t
really describe it that well,” she says. “We
didn’t want the typical Tuscan style you
often see. We wanted something more open
and modern. And John, who is a three-day-aweek golfer, wanted a putting green.”
But they didn’t want the usual kidneyshaped putting green or the existing (but
unsalvageable) swimming pool. They
desired something more geometric with
clean lines, something that PrzygodaMontgomery understood immediately.
“After we hired her, she came to the first
meeting with ideas for color palettes and layouts. We were struck by how she’d captured
it. We were both like, ‘yes!’”
Przygoda-Montgomery embarked on
what she describes as a “New Modern”
design. “They wanted a modern take on midcentury design,” she explains. “It’s mid-century but functional and more comfortable.”
Her design opened up the yard, taking full
advantage of its double width. The pool was
filled in and an entertaining space was created. A custom barbecue and bar serves as a
gathering space for as many as six people.
“There are little vignettes throughout the
yard,” Przygoda-Montgomery says. “There is
a clean plant palette with lots of repetition.”
The perimeter walls were painted a charcoal hue and interior walls were painted
black to add a sense of scale to the space.
Mexican feather grass, bottle tree, milkweed,
and citrus plants pop against the neutral
hardscape. John’s putting green serves as a
bright centerpiece of the yard. A modernist
water feature with uplighting and color contrast also provides a pleasant focal point.
“A lot of times you see these weird
amoeba-shaped grassy areas,” PrzygodaMontgomery says. “Instead, we did a geometric golfing piece that fits the design.”
The couple loves the results. “We’ve really
enjoyed the outdoor dining area, barbecue
and bar. I love looking at it,” Linda says.
“John barbecues almost every night and he
enjoys the practicality of it. The yard is versatile and can accommodate many people
or just two. It’s a nice space for talking and
entertaining or just looking at the stars while
having a glass of wine. It’s very quiet. You’d
never know you were near downtown.” HG
LEFT Drought-tolerant
Candelilla plants add a
sculptural element against
the wall painted in “Iron Ore”
by Sherwin-Williams.
BELOW A pond-less spillway water feature is integrated into a low painted
patio wall
Sources:
Landscape Design: Boxhill Design,
www.boxhilldesign.com
Landscape Installation: Turf Tek, LLC.,
www.turftekllc.com
Co-Stylist: Francine Vacca Smith, Hot Cool
Vintage, www.etsy.com
Barbecue Construction: Hazelbaker-Rush,
HA/RU, www.ha-ru.co
Tu c s o n L i f e s t y l e . c o m
Tucson Lifestyle HOME & GARDEN / JANUARY 2019
25
A Full Range:
Kitchens Before & After
From new
appliances, to
updated cabinetry,
to custom islands
and countertops,
these kitchen
makeovers
have all the right
ingredients.
Before
The homeowners found their kitchen to be uninspiring, as well
as lacking in functionality for their cooking and entertaining needs.
Before
The kitchen sported cherry-stained cabinets, glass mosaic backsplash
and granite countertop, along with basic pendant lighting.
After
DESIGNER: MICHELLE CARNES, ASID
DESIGN FIRM: DORADO DESIGNS
WWW.DORADODESIGNS.COM
PHOTOGRAPHY: STEVEN MECKLER
26
Tucson Lifestyle HOME & GARDEN / JANUARY 2019
The kitchen’s footprint was changed, with the island shape redesigned
to offer more storage and better traffic flow. Revised elements include
a new pantry layout and built-in appliances. Slate-gray painted
cabinets and white marble-look quartz countertops add a fresh look.
The hood was replaced with an inset version covered in drywall layered
with oxidized copper, which added a bright punch of turquoise.
Brass cage pendant lights were added above the island.
Tu c s o n L i f e s t y l e . c o m
The homeowner recently purchased this abode, and a kitchen remodel
was at the top of their wish list. The result was a fresh new look with a
modern white and gray color scheme.
Before
Before
The kitchen’s style was reminiscent of the late 1990s. The overall layout
worked, but the homeowner disliked the look of the perimeter cabinets.
The island was oddly shaped and lacked function. Dark knotty alder cabinets,
travertine floors and backsplash, granite countertops appeared dated.
After
The island and peninsula cabinets, pantry door and the stove hood were
replaced. The layout of the island was changed to include seating. The
pantry cabinet was converted into a coffee bar. The perimeter cabinets were
retained, but updated with custom doors and drawer fronts to match the
new cabinets. The ceiling was redone with shiplap. Subway tile was installed,
spanning from the new quartz countertop to the ceiling. A white hood with
stainless steel trim became a focal point for the kitchen, along with the
adjacent floating shelves. Dramatic chandelier pendants were added above
the island, and the recessed can lights were updated with LEDs.
Tu c s o n L i f e s t y l e . c o m
DESIGNERS: MELISSA ELKINS AND MATT YANEY
DESIGN FIRM: SOUTHWEST KITCHEN & BATH
WWW.SOUTHWESTKITCHEN.COM
PHOTOGRAPHY: KC CREATIVE DESIGN PHOTOGRAPHY
Tucson Lifestyle HOME & GARDEN / JANUARY 2019
27
Before
The homeowner wanted a redesign to result in a lighter and more modern
look through the use of materials such as quartz, marble and granite.
Before
The home was built in the late 1980s with raised panel oak cabinets, Corian
counters and dark blue mosaic tile backsplashes. The existing island, which
was too large and bulky for the scale of the space, was the biggest challenge.
Outdated appliances and light fixtures needed to be replaced.
After
DESIGNER: PATRICIA MOONEY, ASID
DESIGN FIRM: DESIGNLINES, INC.
WWW.DESIGNLINESAZ.COM
PHOTOGRAPHY: ROBIN STANCLIFF
28
Tucson Lifestyle HOME & GARDEN / JANUARY 2019
The first order of business was to redesign and replace the kitchen island and
incorporate a free-form raised granite bar counter. A full slab of marble was
installed above the cooktop for a dramatic accent. The original doors and drawer
fronts were replaced with Shaker-style versions in maple that were painted white.
Polished chrome hardware finished off the look.
Tu c s o n L i f e s t y l e . c o m
Before
The previous kitchen was dark, dated and too
cramped for the needs of a growing family.
Before
The home was built in the late 1980s. The kitchen had
dark, heavily grained cabinets. The lower soffits made the
room feel closed in. The small-scale ceramic floor tiles and
dated appliances needed replacing.
After
Two partial walls that separated the kitchen and family
room were removed. The basic layout was reconfigured
and the refrigerator relocated to an opposite wall. The
soffits above the cabinets were taken out, and an archway
closed off and replaced with a door. Larger windows,
cherry cabinets and sleek stainless appliances were
added. The limestone subway tile backsplash creates
a contrast with the wood tones. Wood-look flooring differentiates the kitchen from the family room. New lighting
was installed, including under-cabinet LEDs, low-profile
fixtures and recessed LED lighting in the ceiling.
Tu c s o n L i f e s t y l e . c o m
DESIGNERS: BOB HARVEY AND LAURA NATALE
DESIGN FIRM: CANYON CABINETRY & DESIGN
WWW.CANYONCABINETRY.COM
PHOTOGRAPHY: ROBIN MCMASTERS
Tucson Lifestyle HOME & GARDEN / JANUARY 2019
29
This ’90s-era Southwest-style home’s kitchen required re-working
to increase its functionality.
Before
The custom, energy-efficient mud adobe home features exposed brick
on the inside. The kitchen had a utilitarian feel, with a stainless steel
backsplash. The interior finishes included honey-colored shaker cabinets and outdated appliances. The original L-shape design only allowed
for a tiny island and pantry. The layout did not work well for entertaining.
After
The old kitchen was completely gutted. The sink and stove locations
were reversed to create a better flow. The pantry wall was removed to
open up the space, and an island was constructed using five mesquite
pieces. A new hutch was made of mahogany, and stained to match
the mesquite countertop. A porcelain tile backsplash complements
the adobe walls. Rustic golden alder cabinetry enhances the
ranch-style concept. HG
DESIGNER: EDITH VILLALOBOS-ZAMORA, ALLIED ASID
DESIGN FIRM: EMV DESIGN BUILD
WWW.EMVDESIGNBUILD.COM
PHOTOGRAPHY: ROBIN STANCLIFF
30
Tucson Lifestyle HOME & GARDEN / JANUARY 2019
Tu c s o n L i f e s t y l e . c o m
Custom metal works including:
n
Custom Metal Gates
n
Fences
n
Planters
n
Trellises
n
Art & More
For more design ideas visit our
website or come see us at The Garden Gate.
520.664.9234 | 8620 N. Oracle Rd.
Located inside The Garden Gate | ROC 273009
www.johansenfence.com
from my kitchen to yours
Chunky Shrimp “Gazpacho”
Soup-er Side Dish!
PHOTOGRAPHY BY THOMAS VENEKLASEN
This terrific-tasting make-ahead dish is perfect
as an appetizer or even a main course.
Lynne Jackson has created this quick and refreshing dish, which has
become a favorite with her family and friends. Lynne is appreciated as much
for her entertaining skills — she adds great attention to detail in her varied
tablescapes — as for her creative culinary delights.
Chunky Shrimp “Gazpacho”
1 container of Trader Giotto’s Fresh
Bruschetta, 14.5 oz.
1/2 cup jicama, diced
1/2 cup red onion, diced
1/2 cup yellow or orange bell pepper,
diced
1/2 cup cilantro, chopped
Juice of 1 lime
Tabasco sauce, several dashes
1/2 tsp. garlic salt
1/4 or 1/2 tsp. ground cumin
1 medium avocado, cut into
small pieces
3/4 lb. medium shrimp, cooked
and peeled (about 4 cups), cut
into small pieces
Lynne Jackson
Directions
Combine ingredients (except avocado) and refrigerate for a
few hours or overnight.
Before serving, add avocado.
Possible garnishes: chopped chives, croutons, tortilla strips
and crumbled Mexican white cheese.
Serve with warm flour tortillas.
Serves 4 as a main dish or 8 as an appetizer.
Lynne’sTip: Bruschetta from Trader Joe’s and cooked shrimp
from Costco cut prep time in half.
32
Tucson Lifestyle HOME & GARDEN / JANUARY 2019
Tu c s o n L i f e s t y l e . c o m
Int
h
eHe
a
r
t
o
f
Th
eCi
t
y
Si
n
c
e1
9
5
0
m
o
r
f
s
g
n
i
t
e
e
r
G
h rm
cS
i
t
s
O Hi
Ice House by
Josias Joesler
Built 1938
Tucson Warehouse
& Transfer Building
Designed by Curlett & Son
Built 1918
eA
n
n
i
vs y
1
00Y
!
regional artisan
Signs of Success
PHOTOS SUBMITTED BY ARTIST
A
Photo by Thomas Veneklasen
rtist Ashley White creates custom hand-painted signs,
menus and murals for a wide range of clients at commercial and residential venues. In 2013, she followed
her passion for sign painting and created the business Modern
Aquarian Signs.
White’s approach to sign making is both artistic and intellectual. Not only must it be aesthetically pleasing, but also
perform its function, such as selling a product or providing
direction. Each of her works is tailored specifically to her clients’ needs.
A self-taught artist, White has studied traditional sign painting techniques and letterforms. She continually develops her
style and experiments with new materials and techniques.
Her work can be seen at more than 50 restaurants, offices,
businesses, and public spaces in Tucson, as well as in other
parts of the country. She observes, “What I love about my work
is that I’m always learning!”
Ashley White
Modern Aquarian Signs
(520) 222-9613
www.modernaquarian.com
CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT Sign located at Ten55 Brewing & Sausage
House; portrait of artist Ashley White at Belle Starr Salon; art nouveauinspired piece located at Tucson Hop Shop, Metal Arts Village (photo by
Thomas Veneklasen); sign located at Casa Marana Craft Beer + Wine.
34
Tucson Lifestyle HOME & GARDEN / JANUARY 2019
Tu c s o n L i f e s t y l e . c o m
n Epoxy-Urethane Coatings
n Concrete Staining & Sealing
n Concrete Overlay
n Diamond Grinding and Polishing
n Custom Tile Installations
n Pool Areas & Deck Resurfacing
n Outdoor Kitchens and BBQs
REMODELING:
Commercial or Residential —
complete interior or exterior
remodeling services
n Garages, Driveways & Patios
n Interior Flooring
n Kitchen and Bathroom Remodel
n Commercial Projects and Renovations
Billy Monroe
520.444.7666
Brett Monroe
520.603.7789
brett@monroe-remodeling.com
• Licensed #280803 • Bonded • Insured
www.monroe-remodeling.com
letters to the editor
experience with Guy Fieri and the Food
Network show Diners Drive-ins and
Dives.
We hope that our fellow Tucsonans will
stop in to try our unique, authentic and
world-famous cuisine.
Digging the Seen
A Bowl of Cherries
I was honored to appear in the feature
story “Cheery and Cherry” in Tucson
Lifestyle Home & Garden (November
2018). The idea of combining the different
aspects of my story (home, art practice,
and design business) came to fruition after
Editor Debby Larsen visited my home. She
was an expert at combining the disparate
parts of my life into an articulate, creative,
colorful whole, all while working hand in
hand with me and photographer Robin
Stancliff.
We want to thank everyone at Tucson
Lifestyle Home & Garden for our feature
(“As Seen on TV!” December 2018). We
really appreciated the opportunity to
spotlight our delicious dish, as well as our
Sherrie Posternak
Tucson, AZ
Fatima E. Campos, Owner
Luis Campos, GM
Inca’s Peruvian Cuisine
Tucson, AZ
Corrections
In “Zest of Show” (November 2018)
the water schedule was inadvertently
reversed. The text should read: Water slow
and deep twice a week during the summer and once a week during the rest of the
year.
* * *
In the article Local Craftsman: “Into the
Woods” (December 2018), the phone
number for Southwest Furniture & Design
was incorrectly listed. It should be (520)
461-1341.
Tr anscend
the Ordinary
520.792.0056 | WWW.RINGSOFWOOD.NET
36
Tucson Lifestyle HOME & GARDEN / JANUARY 2019
Tu c s o n L i f e s t y l e . c o m
Tu c s o n L i f e s t y l e . c o m
Tucson Lifestyle HOME & GARDEN / JANUARY 2019
37
events & more
Your guide to what’s happening on the home and garden
front this month. Event listings run without charge on
a space-available basis as a service to our readers.
Because of possible last-minute changes, readers
should confirm event details by calling the
telephone numbers in the listings.
January
ART & SPECIAL EXHIBITS
Tucson Museum of Art
Event:
Fashion Fête, Feb. 1, 6-9 p.m. A night of art and culture
benefiting Tucson Museum of Art, including bites, a bubble
bar, wine bar and Scotch bar on the patio. Puspa Lohmeyer
is featured, as well as a presentation of her fashion and
beauty collection. Complimentary beauty bar by Red Door
Spa and raffle packages. Tickets $75.
Exhibits:
Blue Tears: Installation by Patricia Carr Morgan, Jan.
29-April 21
Carlos Estévez: Entelechy. Works from 1992 to 2018,
Jan. 26-May 5
30 Americans: The Rubell Family Collection, through
Jan. 13
Watercolors from the Art of the American West
Collection, ongoing
Arthur Lazar Photographs, ongoing
The Museum’s collection includes exhibits of American
Art, Art of the American West, Contemporary Art, Folk Art of
the Americas, Pre-Columbian and Spanish Colonial, Latin
American Art and Modern Art.
Museum Hours: Tues-Sun. 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; closed Mon.
Located at 140 N. Main Ave. Contact 624-2333, or visit
www.TucsonMuseumofArt.org for further details and other
events. Admission to the museum is $12 for adults, $10
for seniors, $7 for students 12-17; free for active military
and veterans with ID, and children 12 and under.
Arizona State Museum
One World, Many Voices, through March 2
The Resiliency of Hopi Agriculture: 2000 Years of
Planting, through June 29
Hopi Katsina Dolls: Enduring Meaning and Stylistic
Change, through June 20
Life Along the River: Ancestral Hopi at Homol’ovi,
through June 29
Woven Through Time: American Treasures of Native
Basketry and Fiber Art, ongoing
Paths of Life: American Indians of the Southwest,
ongoing
The Pottery Project, ongoing
Museum Hours: Mon.-Sat. 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Closed Sun.
and federal and state holidays. Adult admission $5; free
for students and youth under 17. Arizona State Museum
located on the University of Arizona campus, 1013 E.
University Blvd. Call (520) 621-6302 for general information or visit www.statemuseum.arizona.edu for information on exhibits, lectures and special events.
The University of Arizona Museum of Art
Exhibits:
Encountering Death: Our Responses and
Reconciliations, through Jan. 6
Renaissance Prints from the Permanent Collection,
through Feb. 17
Mapping Q, through Jan. 13
What Is The Color, When Black Is Burned? The Gold
War, Part I, through Mar. 24
6 & 6, through Mar. 31
Botanical Relations, Jan. 26-Mar. 24
38
Tucson Lifestyle HOME & GARDEN / JANUARY 2019
Grand Canyon – View from the head of Bright Angel Trail. Don’t miss EFFIE! Plein Air Pioneer, Jan.
11-Apr. 28. See Tucson Desert Art Museum listing for details.
The Altarpiece of Ciudad Rodrigo, ongoing
Museum Hours: Tues.-Fri. 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Sat. 9 a.m.-5
p.m.; Sun. 12-5 p.m. Closed Mon. and University holidays.
Located on the campus of the University of Arizona, 1031
N. Olive Rd. Visit www.artmuseum.arizona.edu for more
information on exhibits, hours, events and education.
Admission: adults, $8; $6.50 seniors 65+ and groups
of 10 or more; museum members, students, children,
military, and UA faculty and staff, free. (520) 621-7567;
www.artmuseum.arizona.edu
Tucson Desert Art Museum
Special Event:
An Artful Evening with Gabriel Ayala, Jan. 19, 6:308:30 pm. Join this creative Yaqui virtuoso guitarist at the
Museum for an evening of original music, rich life stories
and artwork, $15 in advance and $20 at the door.
Exhibits:
EFFIE! Plein Air Pioneer, Jan. 11-Apr. 28. This retrospective exhibition will illuminate the career of Effie
Anderson Smith (1869-1955), known as “The Dean Of
Arizona Women Painters,” through historical paintings and
artifacts from the entirety of her career culled from private
and public collections.
Opening Reception and Proclamation by Cochise
County for Effie’s 150th birthday Jan. 12, 2-4 p.m.
Included with daily museum admission and free for
members.
Desert Hollywood: Celebrity Landscapes in Cinema,
through May 31. Our Southwestern landscapes are the
stars in many genres of film. This abridged exhibition
continues our celebration of the desert scenery that is cast
in key roles in blockbuster movies.
La Textura de la Tierra: Modern Landscapes by Don
West and Lou Heiser, Jan. 18-Feb. 24.
The Museum’s permanent collection features a premier
collection of Native American textiles, classical and modern paintings and photography, as well as artifacts. 7000
E. Tanque Verde Rd. (520) 202-3888. www.tucsondart.org
Metal Arts Village
Open Studios Under the Full Moon, Jan. 19, 5-8 p.m.
Visit the numerous artists’ studios, enjoy food, beverages,
entertainment and demonstrations. Check the website for
classes. Metal Arts Village, 3230 N. Dodge Blvd., 9759792, www.metalartsvillage.com
GARDENING & PLANTS
Tucson Botanical Gardens
Events:
Luminous, through Jan. 6, a series of illuminated sculptures based on the flora and fauna of the Sonoran Desert.
Butterfly Magic, through May, in the Orchid Pavilion.
Classes:
The Wisdom of Trees: Rooted in Science, Thursdays,
1/31, 2/7, 3/7, 4/4 and 5/2, 6-7 p.m., free
To complement the Out of the Woods botanical art exhibit,
the College of Science, Laboratory of Tree Ring Research
brings a special forest-themed Science Café. Engage with
UA researchers, ask questions and deepen your understanding of the world around you.
Growing Spring Transplants, Sat., Jan. 12, 9:30 a.m.12 p.m. $35; $28 members
Sustainable Landscape Design, Wed., Jan. 30, 9
a.m.-4 p.m. With guidance from Dan Dorsey of the
Sonoran Permaculture Guild, you will create a long-term
plan for your sustainable home and landscape. $80; $64
members
Trees of Southern Arizona, Fri., Jan. 18, 10 a.m.-12
p.m. Join Jeff Babson of Sky Island Tours for a look at our
local trees. $20; $16 members
General admission: $15 adults; $13 Student/Senior/
Military; $8 for those 4-17; 3 and under are free. Hours:
8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. daily; Thurs. and Fri. evenings, 4:308 p.m. Register ahead for most classes online: members
get 20% off price of classes — call for details. Class
size is limited and prices per class vary. All events held at
the TBG, 2150 N. Alvernon Way. Call 326-9686, ext. 35
or visit www.tucsonbotanical.org for details on special
events, classes, ticket prices, etc.
Tohono Chul
Exhibits:
Featured Artist: William Lesch, through Feb. 6,
Welcome Gallery
Copper State, through Feb. 6, Main Gallery
For all classes and workshops, call 742-6455 x 0 to
register. Pre-registration is required. Tours, classes and
exhibits vary by season. All proceeds benefit the park.
Open daily 8-5; closed on national holidays. Adult admission $10; seniors $8; student and active military $5;
children $3. Located at 7366 N. Paseo del Norte. Visit
Tu c s o n L i f e s t y l e . c o m
www.tohonochul.org for more information and fees.
Yume Japanese Gardens of Tucson
Check their website for upcoming classes and events.
Covering three quarters of an acre in central Tucson, Yume
Japanese Gardens comprises five traditional visions of
landscape. As a cultural meeting point, Yume maintains
a museum with permanent and temporary exhibits of
Japanese art and handcrafts, an art gallery and a gift shop.
Open daily except Mondays, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. General
Admission: $9 Adults; $8 Seniors; $7 Students & Military
with ID; $5 Children 3-15; Free, children 2 and under.
2130 N. Alvernon, (520) 303-3945. www.yumegardens.
org
Pima County Cooperative Extension
Master Gardeners
Seminars:
Preparing Raised Beds for Vegetables, Jan. 12, 9 a.m.
Roses, Jan. 26, 9 a.m.
Check website for other Seminar information.
Held in the Meat Lab Auditorium, across the street from
the Extension Office, northwest side of Campbell Avenue
and Roger Road, entrance off Roger Road.
Tours of the Demonstration Gardens: every
Wednesday and Saturday of each month, except in
January, near major holidays or in bad weather. Tours run
9-10:30 a.m., 4210 N. Campbell Ave. Groups of 8 or more
should call ahead. Meet near the door to the plant clinic.
https://extension.arizona.edu/pima-master-gardeners
Rose Society of Tucson
Monthly Meetings: 1st Tues. of every month (except
July & Aug.) at Tucson Botanical Gardens at 6:30 p.m.
Contact: Liz Strong, lizzie441@comcast.net, or visit www.
Rosesocietyoftucson.org.
Southern Arizona Koi Association, Inc.
Monthly Meetings: 4th Sunday of each month at various
members’ ponds. For more information, visit www.sakoia.
org or call 390-0879.
Tucson Area Iris Society
Monthly Meeting, Sat., Jan. 12, 1-4:30 p.m., MurphyWilmot Branch Library, (small room), 530 N. Wilmot Rd.,
594-5420. Greg Starr, nurseryman and author of Cool
Plants for Hot Gardens presents his pictorial journey to
Madagascar. More information: irisgrowinaz@gmail.com
Tucson Cactus & Succulent Society
General Meeting: First Thursday of each month at 7 p.m.,
at Sky Islands Public High School, 6000 E. 14th St. www.
tucsoncactus.org
Tucson Garden Club
Monthly Meeting: Held the third Wednesday of the month
Oct.-April in the Atria Community Room, 10 a.m., 5549
E. Pima Way. Focuses on flower design and education in
horticulture. 886-7937. tucsongardenclub.com
Tucson Orchid Society
Monthly Meeting: 3rd Wed. of the month (except Dec.), 7
p.m. Tucson Gem and Mineral Society Building, 3727 E.
Blacklidge Rd. 749-1142. Tucsonorchidsociety.com
Tucson Organic Gardeners
Monthly Meeting: 3rd Tues. of every month — Sept.-April
at St. Mark’s Presbyterian Church, Geneva Room, 3809 E.
2nd St. For more information and event times, call 6709158 or visit tucsonorganicgardeners.org HG
To submit your home and garden event or workshop,
contact Anne Kellogg at anne@tucsonlifestyle.com.
Tu c s o n L i f e s t y l e . c o m
Tucson Lifestyle HOME & GARDEN / JANUARY 2019
39
MARKETPLACE
Home & Garden
INSPIRED BY YOUR LIFE
be inspired at
520.531.9187
www.southwestkitchen.com
7780 N. Oracle #150
Tucson, AZ 85704
Authorized dealer of Medallion® Cabinetry
MESQUITE INTERIORS
custom mesquite furniture
Stunning in any setting.
artisan.
heirloom.
handcrafted
handcrafted.
Discover our story. Browse our gallery of fine
mesquite furniture at mesquite-interiors.com
6831 E. Camino Principal
520.850.9777
SAT & SUN 11-4, OR BY APPOINTMENT
Tu c s o n L i f e s t y l e . c o m
Tucson Lifestyle HOME & GARDEN / JANUARY 2019
41
Home & Garden
MARKETPLACE
PLUMB HAPPY
COMPLETE PLUMBING SERVICE
REMODEL SALE
Skilled Journeymen Plumbers,
Not Salesmen Paid By Commission
Service, Repair or Replacement
Water Conditioning and Water Heating Specialist
Best Warranties in Market –
We Stand Behind Our Work!
MAKING ROOM FOR OUR
NEW LOOK
SAVINGS UP TO 50% OFF
THRU 1-31-2019
Ventana Village
Showroom
6872 E. Sunrise Dr.
Suite 100
520-825-2297
We are a BBB
Accredited Business
and have an A rating
Dove Mountain
Showroom
12120 Dove Mt. Blvd.
Suites 102-122
520-561-5880
(520) 792-4036
www.plumbhappyaz.com
ROC 164793
on
OF
K5
RESOLVE
Dri
FL
nk
20
%
IST
ing
to Give Your Family
Healthy Water
No solicitors please
P
Wa RIC
ter
E
Sys
tem
*
• Pure, healthy drinking water
• The only biologically
safe water on the market
certified to remove 99.99%
of bacteria, viruses and cysts
• Water-powered patented
technology
• Whole-house solutions
remove chlorine plus protect
fixtures and appliances
When water tastes better, you
and your family will drink more!
kineticotucson.com
520.293.6687
By MWPS, Exclusive Authorized Independent Dealer
CHRIS &
AMANDA’S
TREE SERVICE
Licensed & Insured
Certified Arborist
ROC 320536
treerem
o v a ls e r
v ic
.c o m 5
etucson
2 0 .5 9 1
Tree problems, solved!
Our local, family owned & operated business provides
expert tree care, maintenance, and removal services.
ANY TREE SERVICE!
Cannot be combined with other offers.
Expires 1/31/19
Limited Time Offer
42
Tucson Lifestyle HOME & GARDEN / JANUARY 2019
Tu c s o n L i f e s t y l e . c o m
.9 2 6 5
MARKETPLACE
Home & Garden
modern | historic | rustic | classic
2301 E Speedway Blvd
Tucson, AZ 85719-4730
(520) 319-1777
SUNDREA
DES IGN/BUIL D L LC
s
DeGrazia Little Gallery
Solo show runs Jan 13-25.
Opening party Sunday from 12pm-3pm.
Landscape Design & Construction
520-529-1635 SundreaDesignBuild.com
ROC# 304598
Tu c s o n L i f e s t y l e . c o m
Tucson Lifestyle HOME & GARDEN / JANUARY 2019
43
Home & Garden
MARKETPLACE
Blinds and Shades For
Our Desert Lifestyle
TUCSON CACTUS & KOI
n Top-down
Bottom-up Shades
2-inch Faux & Wood Blinds
n Honeycomb Shades
Call Now!
n Woven Wood Shades
520.299.0899
n Duette & Silhoutte Shades
n Interior Roller & Screen Shades
n
CACTUS • DESERT PLANTS
POTTERY • KOI FISH AND
WATER GARDENS
520.617.4478
7810 N. Oracle Rd., Oro Valley
tucsoncactuscompany.com
DANTE’S Window Coverings
40 Years of Professional Advice & Service
AZ Licensed Contractor |s ROC110194 ROC052955
Making the Old
West New Again!
The Leader in Residential and Commercial Painting
Free Estimates
3-5 Year
Warranties
520.404.8556
info@contentsdesigngroup.com
contentsdesigngroup.com
44
Tucson Lifestyle HOME & GARDEN / JANUARY 2019
EN
ROC #135755
L
C IA
Painting
ID
Fine Furnishings • Window Treatments • Color Consulting
R ES
Lourdes Rozean • Jim Bopp
Bella Zwicker • Sara Smith
TIA
ER
The interior design talent continues...
Stetson
L • CO M
M
Call Today!
(520) 322-0684
www.stetsonpainting.com
Serving all of Tucson and Surrounding Areas
Tu c s o n L i f e s t y l e . c o m
MARKETPLACE
Home & Garden
Fall and Winter
Art & Painting Classes
For adults and children at any level.
Cost: beginning at $10 an hour per person
Materials will be provided at a set price or
bring your own materials
Open Weekdays and Sat. 10 am-6pm
Enroll now via email: Sandra.arce.art@gmail.com
Or call: 520-345-5311
520-808-0018
Kids’ Art Party
Come celebrate your birthday with your friends!
1918 E. Prince Rd.
Exp
and
ed
VILLAGE
Loc
atio
na
tG
ree
nT
hin
gs
at
An extraordinary collection of handmade furniture, lighting,
Talavera pottery, antiques, fine art, home accessories & gifts.
Plus, 13 acres of amazing plants, trees, annuals and more.
Open Daily • 3384 E. River Rd. • 520-299-9471
greenthingsaz.com • zocalovillage.com
Tu c s o n L i f e s t y l e . c o m
Tucson Lifestyle HOME & GARDEN / JANUARY 2019
45
SCOTT GUERIN
Heating & Cooling
15-16
Beaut
nction
u
F
&
l
if u
al
EST 2008
Limited Warranty:
Parts – 10 Years (Registration Required)
SEER
SPLIT SYSTEM
1 STAGE COMPRESSOR
2 – TON $4,500.00
3 – TON $4,750.00
4 – TON $5,200.00
5 – TON $5,450.00
AC Replacement Cost Only
All Prices Include Labor & Equipment
AIR CONDITIONER • GAS FURNACE • HEAT PUMP
(520) 648-2504
Special Financing Available OAC • FREE ESTIMATES
Check • Cash
ROC. 252995 • Bonded • Insured
909 W. Hadley St. • Tucson, AZ 85705
www.scottguerinheatingandcooling.com
One-stop design and
construction company that
fully executes your vision
from start to finish.
Interior Design & General Contracting
Cox Communications 2017
Latina Entrepreneur of the Year
(520) 481-9893
www.emvdesignbuild.com
edith@emvdesignbuild
Licensed, Bonded, Insured ROC300098/ROC300099
You never know what
you’re going to find!
Tucson’s
leading upscale
resale shop
filled with
quality
furnishings,
mid-century
modern, antiques
& collectibles.
Always buying
furniture
5454 E. Pima St.
(Pima & Craycroft)
(520)
795-5210
Mon.-Sat. 10-6
Sunday 11-4
Robin Stancliff
Home & Garden
MARKETPLACE
3402 E. Grant Rd.
((520) 321-4621
www.FB.com/Tomsfinefurniture
Wed.-Sat.11-5:30
Sunday 11-4
fine furniture and collectibles
tomsfurniture@comcast.net
46
Tucson Lifestyle HOME & GARDEN / JANUARY 2019
Tu c s o n L i f e s t y l e . c o m
Документ
Категория
Журналы и газеты
Просмотров
0
Размер файла
32 826 Кб
Теги
Tucson Lifestyle Home & Garden
1/--страниц
Пожаловаться на содержимое документа