close

Вход

Забыли?

вход по аккаунту

?

2019-01-02 Los Angeles Times

код для вставкиСкачать
$2.75 DESIGNATED AREAS HIGHER
© 2019
latimes.com
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2019
MEETING
SET ON
BORDER
SECURITY
Top congressional
leaders are invited to
the White House for
a briefing that could
affect the shutdown.
By Jennifer Haberkorn
and Sarah D. Wire
WASHINGTON — The
Trump administration has
invited top congressional
leaders to a briefing on border security Wednesday, the
first time the lawmakers will
have been to the White
House since before a partial
government shutdown began Dec. 22.
It is unclear whether the
meeting will involve actual
negotiations on how to reopen portions of the federal
government that have been
closed in a dispute over
President Trump’s request
for $5 billion for a wall along
the southern U.S. border.
There has been little negotiation between the administration and Congress over
the Christmas and New
Year’s holidays.
The top eight congressional leaders, representing
both parties from each
chamber of Congress, will
get a briefing from Homeland Security Department
officials on border security,
according to congressional
aides.
The briefing comes a
day before the start of the
new Congress — in which
political control of the
House will flip from Republicans to Democrats. Democratic leaders have promised a vote Thursday to reopen the government; their
plan does not include money
for a wall.
Trump has said he will
not support legislation that
doesn’t include money for a
wall. Last month, however,
the administration sent
mixed signals on what the
president would sign, leading the Senate to unanimously support a bill with
no wall funds.
The Democratic plan
calls for the House to pass
two funding bills. One would
reopen all the closed agencies except Homeland Security for the rest of the fiscal
year that ends in September.
The other would fund
Homeland Security until
Feb. 8, allowing the department to operate normally
while negotiations continue.
The Democrats’ plan is
similar to what the Senate
passed unanimously in midDecember in an attempt to
avoid the shutdown.
But the bills may not
move further unless the
White House reverses its position on the wall money.
[See Shutdown, A8]
Mark Boster For The Times
FIREWORKS BLAST from the American Legion float, “Still Serving America,” on Orange Grove Boulevard during the 130th Rose Parade.
CAMARADERIE AT Suing
to retain
THE ROSE PARADE the right
For event’s die-hard fans, the overnight campout is part of the fun
By Suhauna Hussain,
Melissa Gomez,
Alexa Diaz
and Howard Blume
Paul Soucey loves the
Rose Parade so much that, a
decade ago, he married his
wife on the spot on Pasadena’s Colorado Boulevard
where they camp each year
with friends near the start of
the parade route.
Soucey, 72, who said the
event holds his most cherished memories, has been
attending the parade for
35 years. On Tuesday, he
stood at his campsite — a
cozy place on the grass with
cots and a checkerboard,
lawn chairs and a grill — with
a group of friends who call
themselves the Rose Parade
Renegades.
“The best part of camping is the camaraderie,” said
Soucey, of Buena Park. “People always ask us why we
brave the cold. It’s because
when we see the parade, it’s
an explosion of color and
beautiful music that you just
can’t get by watching the
TV.”
His friend Jaime Herrera
of Pasadena added: “Here,
you can actually smell the
roses and see the happiness
on the band’s faces who are
playing for us.”
Kent Nishimura Los Angeles Times
DANCERS WITH the Banda Municipal de Acosta
from Costa Rica perform during the Pasadena parade.
Luis Sinco Los Angeles Times
OHIO STATE gives coach Urban Meyer a florid fare-
well in Rose Bowl win over Washington. SPORTS, D1
Ticket holders in space jam
They paid $100,000 for an Xcor flight. Now they want it back.
NASA craft
survives flyby
New Horizons gathers
data about Ultima
Thule, an icy relic
beyond the orbit of
Neptune. Close-ups
are coming. NATION, A9
National parks
hit by shutdown
By Samantha Masunaga
The first sign of trouble
was
the
ever-extended
launch date.
One customer of space
tourism firm Xcor Aerospace Inc. thought his flight
would come in 2011. Nael
Hamameh expected 2015 to
be the year he would finally
achieve his childhood dream
of going to space, having
paid Xcor $100,000 for a
ticket.
But 2015 came and went.
After hearing no word of
progress, Hamameh asked
for a refund. Xcor told him it
would try to find someone
else to buy his ticket by the
end of 2017, but at the least,
he would receive $35,000.
Then, it all came crashing
down in November 2017,
when Xcor filed for Chapter
7 bankruptcy.
[See Space, A9]
For many, the Rose Parade has become a cheerful
annual respite from the divisive politics that grip the
nation. On Tuesday, the
130th parade kicked off
amid an ongoing partial federal government shutdown
prompted by disagreements
over funding a wall along the
country’s southern border.
But even the shutdown
wasn’t enough to stop a
group of U.S. Forest Service
pack mules from marching
in the parade, toting Smokey Bear, who is celebrating
his 75th birthday this year.
While Smokey was created to spread the message
of forest fire prevention, he
couldn’t prevent a small fire
that broke out Tuesday on
one of the last floats in the
parade.
A portion of the Chinese
American Heritage Foundation’s 95-foot float — which
depicted the moment when
two locomotives met faceto-face at the 1869 completion of the Transcontinental
Railroad — caught fire near
where the parade began on
Orange Grove Boulevard
and sent smoke pouring into
the crowd.
Those aboard were able
to extinguish the flames
quickly before evacuating,
said Pamela Knapp, chair of
[See Parade, A6]
A stretch of the main
road through Sequoia
and Kings Canyon is
closed because officials
can’t ensure visitor
safety. CALIFORNIA, B1
New laws will
benefit workers
For minimum-wage
earners, port truckers,
farmworkers, nursing
mothers and others,
2019 offers reasons to
celebrate. BUSINESS, C1
Weather
Sunny and cool.
L.A. Basin: 62/42. B6
Gabriel Bouys AFP / Getty Images
XCOR AEROSPACE’S Lynx was supposed to take tourists to the edge of space.
After the company’s 2017 bankruptcy, ticket holders are still fighting for a refund.
to live in
America
Immigrants abused
as children by their
parents fight denial of
special status by the
Trump administration.
By Andrea Castillo
When Alex thinks about
her childhood in Guerrero,
Mexico, she remembers the
abuse.
There was the time her
mother threatened to burn
her hands on the stove because she had cried after being hit. And the time her
mother didn’t get her medical treatment after she
caught her finger in a steel
gate. Or the many times she
had to beg neighbors for food
because her mother punished her by not feeding her.
Now a 22-year-old Cal
State Fullerton student
studying animation, Alex
moved to San Diego at age 7
to live with her paternal
grandmother. For decades,
young immigrants like her
have benefited from a legal
classification called Special
Immigrant Juvenile Status,
which allows them to live in
the United States and embark on a path to U.S. citizenship.
Nationwide, SIJS is available to immigrants under
age 21 who have been
abused, abandoned or neglected by one or both parents if a state court finds
that it’s against their best interest to be returned to their
parents or go back to their
home country. Implemented
by Congress as part of the
Immigration Act of 1990,
the protections increasingly
have been used in recent
years by minors who arrived
unaccompanied at the Mexican border.
But since the beginning
[See Immigrants, A12]
Migrants trying
riskier routes
More people are crossing
through the desert as
the established paths of
illegal entry into the U.S.
tighten. NATION, A5
Tear gas again
used at border
U.S. agents also employ
smoke bombs and pepper
spray on frustrated asylum seekers who rushed
the fence. CALIFORNIA, B1
A2
W E D N E S DAY , JA N UA RY 2, 2019
LAT IMES. C OM
ON THE GROUND IN SEATTLE
with Mike Seely
Holding SuperSonic grudge
Starbucks owner weighs a run for president. It’s a hard sell in his city.
L
ate in the morning
in the Seattle
neighborhood of
Georgetown,
James Harper is
fetching lunch from a Mexican restaurant called Lorena’s Kitchen. An aircraft
bound for Boeing Field
obscures the gleaming sun,
flying so low that it feels as
though it might land in
Harper’s salsa.
Harper stops to contemplate whether he could
throw his support behind a
potential run for the White
House by Howard Schultz,
owner of Starbucks, a Seattle institution. But Schultz
also is the former owner of
the Seattle SuperSonics,
and for many Seattle residents that’s a problem, at
least when it comes to giving him their vote.
“I’m a Sonics fan, so it
just won’t happen,” Harper
concludes.
Across the Duwamish
River in the neighborhood
of South Park, a middleaged man with a formidable
beard nurses a beer at Loretta’s, a bar and eatery. He
echoes Harper, albeit more
bluntly and with a two-word
phrase unprintable here.
In 2006, Schultz sold the
Sonics to an ownership
group led by Oklahoma City
energy baron Clay Bennett.
At the time, Schultz said he
was frustrated by local
politicians’ refusal to fork
over millions of dollars in
public money for arena
improvements.
Soon after the sale, Bennett moved the NBA team
to the Sooner State and
rechristened them the
Thunder. Schultz completed this transaction 12
years ago, but in Seattle,
where bitter Sonics fans still
abound, it might as well
have been yesterday.
How a Schultz presidential candidacy, presumably taking flight with a bid
for the Democratic nomination, would play nationally
is an open question. He
recently hired John McCain’s former right-hand
man, Steve Schmidt, as an
advisor, which isn’t a move
someone makes unless he
has a major office in his
sights.
But his bungled stewardship of what was, at the
time, the only major men’s
professional sports franchise in Seattle to have won
a league championship in
the modern era, hangs like
an albatross around the
New York native’s neck in
his adopted hometown (the
Seahawks have since won
the Super Bowl and, if not
for the worst goal-line call in
NFL history, would have
won one more).
“There’s still a hangover
from the Sonics,” says Seattle-based public affairs
consultant Ron Dotzauer.
“He promised us the team
would stay in Seattle, and
he lied. I don’t think he
could finish in the top three
in a mayor’s race in Seattle.”
“He sold Seattle down
Jason Redmond AFP/Getty Images
COFFEE MAGNATE Howard Schultz is still criti-
cized for selling the Seattle SuperSonics in 2006.
the river, knowing full well
what Bennett was going to
do,” adds Dotzauer, refusing
to believe Schultz’s claim
that he thought Bennett
would try to keep the team
in Seattle. (Schultz, through
a spokesperson, declined to
be interviewed for this
story.)
And Schultz’s challenges
with Seattle voters don’t
end with the Sonics.
“I don’t think that he has
enough chops in terms of
advocacy and work on the
ground,” says Karen Besserman, executive director of
Emerge Washington, an
organization that recruits
and trains Democratic
women to run for office.
“He’d be a fresh face because he’s outside the political norm, but I think Seattle
as a city understands the
need for experience. Starbucks is a mixed blessing:
People either love it or hate
it.”
Indeed. Think of the
famous “Onion” headline:
“New Starbucks Opens in
Rest Room of Existing
Starbucks.” That made it
into print 20 years ago. It’s a
testament to the ubiquity of
a cafe culture that’s only
gotten more ubiquitous.
Besserman says Schultz
hasn’t been a major force in
local politics. “He hasn’t
shown up as an active player
in the Democratic Party or
policy fights that haven’t
directly affected him,” she
says.
“More generally, Seattle
is a very strongly progressive city that includes a
significant amount of people on the left who are suspicious of business,” says
political consultant
Sandeep Kaushik. “I think
any billionaire businessman
would have a tough time in
Seattle.” (As of Dec. 28,
Schultz ranked 280th on the
Forbes 400, with a net worth
of $3.2 billion.)
Spotting Schultz at a
public event in Seattle is like
a true-life version of
“Where’s Waldo?” He often
crops up in other cities
laying the groundwork for
his next professional chapter, or is presumably ensconced in his stately residence in Madison Park,
which is among the nicest
areas in Seattle — along
with Denny-Blaine. The
Schultz family left the latter
neighborhood after a private driveway they built
through a public park didn’t
go over too well with their
neighbors.
The office housing Jason
Reid’s and Adam Brown’s
film production companies
sits hard by a set of railroad
tracks in SoDo, a heavily
industrial neighborhood
south of downtown Seattle.
Starbucks’ world headquarters is located a mere
half a mile to the northwest,
a fact that takes on a darkly
comic texture once you
learn of the pair’s opinion of
Schultz.
“He backstabbed the city
of Seattle,” says Reid, who,
with Brown among his
collaborators, produced a
feature-length documentary, “Sonicsgate,” about the
team’s departure. “He could
have shown a little patience
and waited for the Steve
Ballmers of the world [to
bid for the team].” (Ballmer,
a former Microsoft chief
executive, bought the Los
Angeles Clippers in 2014.)
“It was really just a
tantrum,” Brown says of
Schultz’s decision to sell the
team to the group from
Oklahoma City, a metropolis that had been openly
pining for an NBA franchise
after temporarily hosting
New Orleans’ team in the
aftermath of Hurricane
Katrina. “The state Legislature wouldn’t kiss the ring,
and Schultz likes being the
king. His ego didn’t want
another local businessman
to succeed where he’d
failed.”
Brown goes so far as to
call Schultz “the Democratic version of [President]
Trump,” listing having a
“cult following” and being
“ego-driven” among their
supposed shared qualities.
There are similarities, to be
sure: Both men were raised
in New York (Trump in an
affluent Queens neighborhood, Schultz in public
housing in Brooklyn), both
are polarizing figures in the
cities they now call home,
both are wealthy businessmen, and should Schultz
choose to run, he would
have exactly the same
amount of experience in
public office as Trump had
when he successfully ran:
zero.
But Kaushik thinks it’s
unfair to compare the two,
noting: “Schultz, in his life
and work, has shown a
genuine belief in the importance of public service and
the responsibilities that
come with it in a way that
Donald Trump absolutely
has not. Whether it’s trying
to foster dialogues around
race or engaging with other
significant civic issues, I
think Howard Schultz has
demonstrated a seriousness
of purpose and good intent.”
As with Starbucks’ hamhanded #RaceTogether
campaign, where the company was roundly mocked
for encouraging customers
to have discussions with
baristas about racial relations while their java percolated, Schultz’s good intentions occasionally misfire.
Yet in contrast to the discomfort he exhibits when
asked to discuss the Sonics
debacle, he’s refreshingly
self-critical when reflecting
on his strategic missteps
outside the sporting realm.
He also boasts a rags-toriches background that any
candidate would love to
share.
Though several of the
people who offered their
opinions on Schultz considered both his lack of political experience and role in
the Sonics debacle to be
problematic, some weren’t
bothered. Dressed in hospital scrubs as she unlocked
her car door after picking
something up in Georgetown, Meghan Moore said
she’d be open to supporting
Schultz over other Democratic presidential contenders because “he’s a successful businessman.”
And back at Loretta’s,
third-grade teacher Dave
Darling said he’d vote for
Schultz based on how he’s
dealt “with social justice
issues.”
Darling, who has a series
of beads braided into his
goatee, now feels his decision to vote for Trump in
2016 “was wrong,” and singles out Schultz’s response
to one of Starbucks’ biggest
blunders: When a store
manager in Philadelphia
called the cops on two black
men who were waiting for a
friend this year, Schultz
closed the company’s U.S.
locations for several hours
so employees could undergo
diversity training.
“I think he’d be able to
collaborate rather than
build a wall between Democrats and Republicans,”
Darling says. “That’s a big
selling point for me.”
But what about the
Sonics? That may not be an
issue in, say, New Hampshire or Iowa, but the team’s
departure remains a sore
spot here.
“Seattle isn’t going to
forgive or forget,” says
Dotzauer, the public affairs
consultant. “He’s going to
carry this to his grave.”
Seely is a special
correspondent.
1,000 WORDS: SIRNARESMI, Indonesia
3KRWR/$7LPHV
7+(32:(567+$7%(
'(/,9(5('
Sign up for the free
Los Angeles Times Politics newsletter.
Analysis and breaking news from our
award-winning journalists in
Sacramento and Washington.
QHZVOHWWHUVODWLPHVFRP
Associated Press
DEADLY LANDSLIDE
Soldiers, police and residents fanned out across a damaged Indonesian village on Tuesday, searching in the
mud for possible victims of a landslide caused by torrential rain that killed at least nine people and left 34
others missing. Tons of mud that rolled from the surrounding hills late Monday buried 30 houses in
Sirnaresmi in West Java’s Sukabumi district. Sixty people who were displaced have fled to a temporary
shelter, said a national disaster mitigation agency spokesman. Seasonal rains and high tides in recent days
have caused dozens of landslides and widespread flooding across much of Indonesia.
WEDNESDAY , JANUARY 2, 2019
L AT I ME S . CO M
A3
THE WORLD
Brazil inaugurates far-right president
Jair Bolsonaro’s
ascension to power
marks an abrupt
ideological shift.
By Tracy Wilkinson
With a high-level U.S. delegation in attendance, former army captain Jair Bolsonaro was sworn in Tuesday as president of Brazil, a
post he won in a landslide
election victory despite
bombastic statements.
Bolsonaro, who has expressed admiration for military dictatorships and insulted women, people of color and the gay community,
took office in an elaborate
swearing-in ceremony in the
Brazilian capital, Brasilia,
and promised to immediately shake up his nation’s
status quo.
The unlikely ascent to
power of Bolsonaro — an
avowed fan of President
Trump — marks a hard shift
to the right in Latin America’s largest country, which
has been ruled by leftist or
centrist governments since
the end of military rule more
than three decades ago.
Trump made a congratulatory phone call to Bolsonaro soon after his election in October, and he was
quick on the mark again
Tuesday.
Minutes
after
Bolsonaro’s
inauguration,
Trump tweeted his good
wishes: “Congratulations to
President @JairBolsonaro
who just made a great inauguration speech — the
U.S.A. is with you!”
Bolsonaro stuck to many
of the same far-right positions, pledging to fight the
teaching in schools of what
he calls “the ideology of gender” and to end violence by
shielding all police from
prosecution for use of excessive force.
He also vowed to “constantly ask God for guidance” as he governs and to
confront leftist militancy,
stamping out what he calls
cultural Marxism that he
contends
has
spread
through Brazil because of its
leftist governments.
“This is the beginning of
Brazil’s liberation from socialism, political correctness
and a bloated state,” Bolsonaro said.
“We have the great challenge of taking on the effects
of an economic crisis, of facing the distortion of human
Carl de Souza AFP/Getty Images
JAIR BOLSONARO and his wife, Michelle, ride in a convoy to his swearing-in ceremony in the capital, Brasilia. Bolsonaro, who has ex-
pressed admiration for military dictatorships and insulted women and minority groups, promised “Brazil’s liberation from socialism.”
rights and the breakdown of
the family,” he said.
Like a growing club of
world leaders, Bolsonaro —
who survived a stabbing
during the campaign — rode
a wave of popular discontent
to victory, making populist
promises along the way and
vowing to upend Brazilian
politics. Brazil has suffered
from rampant corruption
scandals; the nation’s first
female president was impeached on corruption
charges, and her predecessor is in jail on a corruption conviction.
Bolsonaro, who served in
Congress for years, faces an
economy reeling from its
worst recession in history.
While generally favoring
free-market policies, he will
also probably be forced to
accommodate
demands
from Brazil’s biggest industries, many state-run.
Delegations from numerous countries attended the
ceremony Tuesday, including one from the U.S. led by
Secretary of State Michael
R. Pompeo. Members of the
Trump administration say
they have confidence Bol-
sonaro will not derail
Brazil’s democracy, as many
Brazilians,
outside
observers and human rights
activists fear.
Bolsonaro
disinvited
three presidents — all leftists — to whom his predecessors had sent invitations:
Nicolas Maduro of Venezuela, Miguel Diaz-Canel of
Cuba and Nicaragua’s Daniel Ortega.
The three countries are
on the Trump administration’s blacklist for what it describes as corruption and
egregious human rights
abuses.
A Brazil led by a far-right
president has been cited by
senior administration officials as the kind of government they can partner with.
Bolsonaro has already announced plans to work more
closely with the United
States, especially to counter
Venezuela.
Two of the attendees who
perhaps traveled the farthest to reach Brasilia on
Tuesday are also right-wing
politicians: Israeli Prime
Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Hungarian Prime
Evaristo Sa AFP/Getty Images
OUTGOING President Michel Temer presents Bol-
sonaro with the presidential sash at Planalto Palace.
Minister Viktor Orban.
Netanyahu has formed a
warm relationship with Bolsonaro, in part because he
has vowed to move the Brazilian Embassy in Israel to
Jerusalem.
Netanyahu praised Bolsonaro as a “good friend.” He
and Pompeo met on the
sidelines of the inauguration
to discuss security, including
Trump’s abrupt order to
withdraw U.S. troops from
Syria.
Pompeo,
appearing
alongside Netanyahu before
the inauguration, told reporters he had assured the
Israeli leader that “nothing
will change” in U.S. efforts to
keep Israel safe.
“The decision the president made on Syria in no
way changes anything that
this administration is working on alongside Israel,”
Pompeo said, noting that
the fights against the militant group Islamic State
and Iranian “aggression”
continue.
“Our commitment to
Middle East stability and
the protection of Israel continues in the same way it did
before that decision was
made,” Pompeo said.
A swift withdrawal of
U.S. forces from Syria is expected to bolster Iran, as
well as Russia and Syrian
President Bashar Assad,
whose removal was an original goal of the U.S.-backed
insurgency. And it could
leave Israel more vulnerable
to attack.
Later, both Pompeo and
Netanyahu met with Honduran President Juan Orlando Hernandez. The three
agreed to boost trilateral
economic and political relations, and Hernandez promised to put a new Honduran
Embassy in Israel in
Jerusalem, according to a
statement from the U.S.
State Department.
After the inauguration,
Pompeo and Bolsonaro
shook hands and hugged.
tracy.wilkinson
@latimes.com
Family seeks help to free hunger striker in Egypt
Relatives want U.S.
secretary of State to
press for the release of
seriously ill American.
By Salma Islam
CAIRO — The family of
an American citizen on a
hunger strike in an Egyptian
prison is urging Secretary of
State Michael R. Pompeo to
use his upcoming Cairo trip
to press for the man’s release
before it’s too late.
Moustafa Kassem, a 53year-old auto parts dealer
from Long Island, N.Y., has
been consuming only liquids
since he was sentenced
Sept. 8 — in a mass trial with
more than 700 defendants —
to 15 years in prison over a
protest he says he had nothing to do with.
The Egyptian American
dual citizen, who has been in
prison since showing his U.S.
passport during a security
crackdown in 2013, has decided that “either he goes
out free or he goes out in a
box,” said his brother-in-law,
Mustafa Ahmed.
Vice President Mike
Pence and former Secretary
of State Rex Tillerson had
raised Kassem’s case with
Egyptian President Abdel
Fattah Sisi before the sentencing. With the clock now
ticking on Kassem’s health,
his family and legal team are
urgently looking to Pompeo
to push harder for Kassem’s
freedom when he visits
Egypt this month.
“He has been losing
weight and now his hair is
falling out from the lack of
MOUSTAFA KASSEM is imprisoned in Egypt over
a 2013 protest he says he had nothing to do with.
nutrition,” said Kassem’s
U.S.-based lawyer, Praveen
Madhiraju. “Even the prison
doctors say that he has
passed the point where his
hunger strike will seriously
affect his health.”
Kassem’s sister in New
York said his family attempted to talk him out of
the strike. “We tried to persuade him to eat, but he refused,” said Eman Kassem.
He’s determined that if authorities “are not going to release him, then he’s going to
stay like that until, God forbid, he just dies,” she said.
Ahmed alleges that prison officials are endangering
Kassem, who has Type 2 diabetes, by allowing him only
fruit juices and not vegetable juices in an attempt to
pressure him to end the
hunger strike.
Kassem was arrested
Aug. 14, 2013, after security
forces broke up a protesters
camp in Rabaa al Adawiya
Square. The protesters were
supporting the country’s
first democratically elected
president,
the
Muslim
Brotherhood’s Mohamed
Morsi, who had been overthrown by the army six
weeks earlier with popular
support.
Human Rights Watch es-
timated that at least 817 people were killed when security
forces raided the camp.
Kassem maintained that
he was never part of the protest. He had been in Egypt to
visit family and had gone to a
shopping mall two miles
from the square to change
currency before flying back
to the U.S., said his brotherin-law, who was with him at
the time. When the men returned to their car more
than an hour later, they
found that the chaos had
spread.
When the pair were asked
for identification, Kassem
handed over his U.S. passport; army officers then beat
him and arrested him, according to Ahmed.
Kassem
was
tried
alongside hundreds, predominantly supporters of
the now-banned Muslim
Brotherhood, in a high-profile case that Amnesty International called “a grotesque
parody of justice.” Seventyfive of the 739 defendants, including senior leaders of the
group, were given the death
penalty.
Kassem’s legal team is
continuing its efforts to get
him released, said his lawyer
Madhiraju.
“His appeal is pending,
but that could take months
if not years to work its
way through the legal system. Moustafa probably
does not have that long.
We’ve also sent a communication through the U.N. special procedures to try and
get additional outside attention on his case,” Madhiraju
said, referring to the United
Nations’ system employing
human rights experts.
Kassem applied more
than a year ago to renounce
his Egyptian citizenship, on
the advice of his legal team
and the State Department,
but his request has yet to be
granted, his brother-in-law
said.
Another
Egyptian
American prisoner, Mohamed Soltan, was deported to the U.S. in 2015 after renouncing his Egyptian
citizenship; a presidential
decree, issued the year before, allows for foreign nationals accused of or convicted of crimes to be deported.
The U.S. government has
increased its engagement
with Egypt over Kassem in
recent months but hasn’t
used the leverage it has at its
disposal, said Madhiraju.
The day before Kassem
was sentenced, the State
Department notified Congress that Pompeo had
signed a national security
waiver to release $1.2 billion
in military aid to Egypt. The
department said that it had
“serious concerns about the
human rights situation in
Egypt” but that cooperation
with the country was crucial
to U.S. national security.
President Trump hosted
Sisi in the White House in
2017, saying the leader had
done a “fantastic job”; in
April, Trump congratulated
Sisi on winning a landslide
election that many critics
considered a sham.
“My sense is that under
the Trump administration
the U.S. government has
consistently
raised
Kassem’s case but that the
administration is unwilling
to threaten the overall bilat-
eral relationship if Kassem is
not released,” said Andrew
Miller, deputy director for
policy at the Project on Middle East Democracy and former director for Egypt military issues at the National
Security Council from 2014 to
2017.
“With Kassem now on
hunger strike,” he said, “his
case has become more urgent and will hopefully attract more attention from
both the administration and
Congress.”
Miller said he expected
Pompeo to use his Cairo visit
to directly raise Kassem’s
plight with Sisi. “It is important for the administration
to continue broaching his
status with the Egyptian
government because a failure to do so would signal
that the U.S. government is
not actually that interested
in his fate,” he said.
In response to questions
about whether Pompeo
would bring up Kassem’s
case in his Cairo visit, a State
Department representative
said: “We are deeply concerned.... He’s a U.S. citizen.
His case has been raised repeatedly with the Egyptian
government.”
Kassem is aware of Pompeo’s upcoming trip, his sister said, and despite his deteriorating health, the father
of two retains hope of being
freed.
But, Eman Kassem said,
“he’s in a very dangerous situation.”
Islam is a special
correspondent. Times staff
writer Tracy Wilkinson in
Washington contributed to
this report.
A4
W E D N E S DAY, JA N UA RY 2, 2019
LAT IMES. C OM
Detainee was
in Moscow
for wedding,
family says
American is being
wrongly held on spy
charges, relatives say.
U.S. expects Russia to
grant access to him.
By Matt Pearce
Russian Emergency Situations Ministry
WORKERS extricate a baby boy from a collapsed section of an apartment building in Magnitogorsk, Russia.
“The child was saved because it was in a crib and wrapped warmly,” a regional official was quoted as saying.
Infant rescued in Russia
Seriously injured boy
is found 35 hours after
a deadly apartment
building collapse.
associated press
MOSCOW — Russian
rescuers Tuesday pulled an
infant boy alive from the rubble of an apartment building
about 35 hours after a collapse that killed at least seven people and left dozens
missing.
They found the baby after hearing cries amid the
debris. A section of the 10story building in the southern Ural Mountain city of
Magnitogorsk
collapsed
Monday after an explosion
believed to have been triggered by a natural gas leak.
The child, who officials
Maxim Shmakov Associated Press
RESCUE EFFORTS were halted as workers tried to
stabilize building sections in danger of collapsing.
initially said was a girl, was
seriously injured and his recovery prospects were unclear.
The boy’s mother survived the collapse and went
to a hospital to identify him,
the state news agency Tass
reported, citing the regional
emergencies ministry. The
child will be flown to Moscow
for further treatment, Tass
said.
The regional emergency
ministry said earlier Tuesday that 37 residents of the
building had not been accounted for. Hopes of finding
survivors were dimmed by
the harsh cold: Temperatures overnight were around
0 degrees Fahrenheit.
“The child was saved because it was in a crib and
wrapped warmly,” the region’s
governor,
Boris
Dubrovsky, was quoted as
saying by the Interfax news
agency.
Rescue crews temporarily halted their search while
workers tried to stabilize
sections of the building in
danger of collapse.
Five people were hospitalized after the building collapse in the city about 870
miles southeast of Moscow,
the emergencies ministry
said.
Car attacks in Germany, Japan
Vehicles plow into
New Year’s crowds,
injuring 13. Both
drivers are arrested.
associated press
In attacks early Tuesday
in Germany and Japan, drivers plowed vehicles into pedestrians, injuring at least
five in the small western
German town of Bottrop
and eight in Tokyo.
In Bottrop, the 50-yearold driver of a silver Mercedes, a German man, was
arrested after his car
slammed into a crowd. Po-
lice said those hit included
Syrian and Afghan citizens,
and some were seriously injured.
The driver then sped off
toward the nearby city of Essen, where he tried and
failed to hit people waiting at
a bus stop, police said. He
was arrested on suspicion of
attempted homicide.
The driver, whose name
wasn’t released, made antiforeigner comments during
his arrest, and there were indications he suffered from
mental illness, police said.
“The man had the clear
intention to kill foreigners,”
Herbert Reul, the top security official in North RhineWestphalia
state,
was
Cosmetic Eyelid
Rejuvenation
For
Tired Eyes
quoted as saying by the German news agency DPA.
In Tokyo early Tuesday, a
minivan slammed into pedestrians on a street where
people had gathered for New
Year’s festivities in downtown Tokyo, injuring eight,
police said.
The
van’s
driver,
Kazuhiro Kusakabe, 21, was
arrested and being questioned on suspicion that he
intentionally tried to kill
people, the Tokyo Metropolitan Police Department said.
NHK TV video showed a
small van with its entire
front end smashed and officers and medical personnel
rushing to the scene.
How to contact us
Home Delivery and
Membership Program
For questions about delivery,
billing and vacation holds, or
for information about our
Membership program, please
contact us at (213) 283-2274 or
membershipservices@
latimes.com. You can also
manage your account at
myaccount.latimes.com.
Want to write a letter to be
published in the paper and
online? E-mail
letters@latimes.com.
For submission guidelines,
see latimes.com/letters.
Warren C. Stout, MD
U.S. News and World Report
Top Doctor
Readers’ Representative
One of the rare fellowship-trained Oculofacial Plastic Surgeons
in the U.S., Dr. Stout’s expertise is the eye area. He is renowned
for his personal approach and for creating a natural and refreshed
appearance for his patients, both women and men. He has performed
thousands of cosmetic eyelid procedures and has taught at the
University level for over 20 years.
If you believe we have
made an error, or you have
questions about our
journalistic standards
and practices, our readers’
representative can be
reached at
readers.representative
@latimes.com, (877) 554-4000
or online at
latimes.com/readersrep.
Advertising
For print and online
55 y.o. Female
advertising information, go to
latimes.com/mediakit or call
(213) 237-6176.
Reprint Requests
For the rights to use articles,
photos, graphics and page
reproductions, e-mail
reprint@latimes.com or call
(213) 237-4565.
Times In Education
To get The Times, and our
newspaper-based teaching
materials, delivered to
your classroom at no cost,
contact us at latimes.com/tie
or call (213) 237-2915.
The Newsroom
Have a story tip or
suggestion? Go to a
newsroom directory at
latimes.com/staff or
latimes.com/newstips or call
(213) 237-7001.
Media Relations
For outside media requests
and inquiries, e-mail
commsdept@latimes.com.
Search archives, merchandise
and front pages at
latimes.com/store.
Founded Dec. 4, 1881
Vol. CXXXVIII No. 30
LOS ANGELES TIMES (ISSN 0458-3035)
After
49 y.o. Male
After
Call today to schedule your consultation
Pasadena Towers • 800 E. Colorado Blvd., Suite 260 Pasadena
626-449-6494
www.stoutlaser.com
LAA5039735-1
is published by the Los Angeles Times,
2300 E. Imperial Highway, El Segundo, CA
90245. Periodicals postage is paid at Los
Angeles, CA, and additional cities.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to
the above address.
Home Delivery Subscription Rates (all rates
include applicable CA sales taxes and apply
to most areas)
Print + unlimited digital rates: Seven-day
$16/week, $832 annually. Thursday–Sunday
$11.50/week, $598 annually. Thursday &
Sunday $6.05/week, $314.60 annually.
Saturday & Sunday $5/week, $260 annually.
Sunday $5/week, $260 annually.
Monday–Saturday $13.80/week, $717.60
annually (also includes Sundays, except 4/1,
5/27, 9/2, and 10/28). Monday–Friday
$12.50/week, $650 annually.
Print-only rates: Seven-day $1,048.32
CRITICS of Russia have seized on the arrest of Paul
Whelan as a possible Cold War-style tit-for-tat.
L.A. Times Store
After
51 y.o. Female
matt.pearce@latimes.com
Special correspondent
Sabra Ayres in Paris
contributed to this report.
(800) LA TIMES
Letters to the Editor
Droopy Upper Eyelids
Under Eye Bags
A ninth person was injured after Kusakabe got out
of the van and punched him,
police said. His condition
was not immediately known.
A large tank filled with
kerosene was found in the
car, police said. The suspect
appeared to have planned to
set his car on fire, Japanese
news reports said. Police declined to comment on the reports, and said the incident
remained under investigation.
The crash occurred on
Takeshita Street, a road well
known to tourists and pop
culture and fashion fans,
which runs by Meiji Shrine in
the Harajuku district of
Tokyo’s Shibuya ward.
Paul Whelan, the U.S. citizen detained in Russia on
espionage charges, is a former Marine who had traveled to Moscow for a fellow
Marine’s wedding, the man’s
family said Tuesday, alleging that he is being wrongly
held.
“We are deeply concerned
for his safety and well-being,” Whelan’s family said in
a statement provided to the
media by his twin brother,
David. “His innocence is undoubted, and we trust that
his rights will be respected.”
Whelan’s family said it
had contacted the U.S. State
Department and other federal officials for help after
learning of his Friday arrest
from news reports Monday,
and the family expected U.S.
officials to visit Whelan, who
works in Michigan, within
three days.
Trump administration
officials have remained relatively quiet about Whelan’s
detention, amid concerns
about possible Russian retaliation for the ongoing U.S.
investigation into Russian
interference in the 2016 election.
A State Department
spokesperson, declining to
be identified, said in a statement to The Times that
Russia’s Foreign Ministry
had formally notified U.S.
officials of Whelan’s arrest
and that the U.S. expected
Russian authorities to provide access to Whelan in detention.
“Due to privacy considerations, we have no additional information to provide at this time,” the
spokesperson wrote in an
email.
David Whelan did not respond to requests for an interview.
Critics of Russia have
seized on the arrest as a possible Cold War-style tit-fortat emerging at a tenuous
time for the Trump administration, which faces the ongoing Russia investigation
by special counsel Robert S.
Mueller III as well as a House
of Representatives about to
transition to Democratic
control.
While President Trump
has struck a friendly tone
with Russian President
Vladimir Putin, U.S. investigators working for Mueller
have secured federal indictments against more than a
dozen Russians for alleged
election interference to aid
Trump’s 2016 campaign.
One Russian citizen in the
U.S., Maria Butina, has
pleaded guilty to working as
an unregistered foreign
agent on behalf of the Russian government while infiltrating conservative groups
such as the National Rifle
Assn.
Whelan’s arrest “looks increasingly like a hostage situation,” tweeted British financier and Putin critic Bill
Browder, whose attorney,
Sergei Magnitsky, died
under suspicious circumstances in Russian custody.
(In July, Putin offered to assist Mueller’s investigation if
Russian officials, in return,
were allowed to investigate
Browder.) “All foreign travelers to Russia should beware that anything could
happen. The US government should intervene decisively in this case.”
According to details first
reported by the Daily Beast,
Whelan works as a director
of global security and investigations for BorgWarner, an
automotive
components
manufacturer in Michigan.
He reportedly previously
worked as a police officer
and sheriff ’s deputy in Michigan and took military leave
to serve in the Iraq war in
2003.
Whelan appeared to have
a fondness for Russia and
for Trump, according to
a social media profile under
his name on VKontakte, a
service popular in Russia.
On the day of Trump’s inauguration in 2017, he posted:
“GOD SAVE PRESIDENT
TRUMP!!”
Whelan visited Russia for
the first time more than a
decade ago, according to an
archived version of a personal website that has since
been removed.
“Having grown up during
the Cold War, it was a dream
of mine to visit Russia and
meet some of the sneaky
Russians who had kept the
western world at bay for
so long !!” the website said,
adding that Whelan befriended several Russians
on his trip, including a man
named
“Maxim”
who
worked for the Russian
army.
“We have stayed in touch
with one another and have
shared many interesting
stories and experiences,”
the website said. “The Russian people were very polite
and kind to a stranger who
didn’t speak the language
and spent a lot of time wandering around the Metro
without a clue as to where he
was going!!”
annually. Thursday–Sunday $619.32
annually. Thursday & Sunday $333.32
annually. Saturday & Sunday $333.32
annually. Sunday $275 annually.
Monday–Saturday $858 annually (also
includes Sundays, except 4/1, 5/27, 9/2, and
10/28). Monday–Friday $715 annually.
Pricing for all subscriptions includes the
Thanksgiving 11/22 issue.
All subscriptions may include up to four
premium issues per year. For each Premium
issue, your account balance will be charged
an additional fee up to $4.49, in the billing
period when the section publishes. This will
result in shortening the length of your billing
period. Premium issues currently
scheduled: NFL 2018 Football Preview
9/2/18, 2018 Holiday Gift Guide 11/4/18 and
Jonathan Gold’s 101 Best Restaurants
12/9/18. Dates are subject to change
without notice.
Printed with soy-based ink on recycled newsprint from wood byproducts.
FOR THE RECORD
If you believe that we have
made an error, or you have
questions about The Times’
journalistic standards and practices, you may contact the readers’ representative by email
at readers.representative@
latimes.com, by phone at
(877) 554-4000 or by mail at
2300 E. Imperial Highway,
El Segundo, CA 90245. The
readers’ representative office
is
online
at
latimes.com/readersrep.
facebook.com/latimes
L AT I ME S . CO M
WEDNESDAY , JANUARY 2, 2019
A5
THE NATION
Migrant families shift to riskier routes
They are crossing
in the desert as the
established paths of
illegal entry tighten.
By Molly
Hennessy-Fiske
EL PASO — Increasing
numbers of Guatemalan
families trying to enter the
U.S. illegally are avoiding
the most popular routes in
favor of more dangerous, remote desert crossings like
those used by two children
who died in December in
Border Patrol custody, officials say.
Most people trying to
sneak into the country still
use long-established routes
in Texas’ Rio Grande Valley.
But recently released government figures show a
growing number of families
crossing along the 268-mile
stretch of border known as
the El Paso sector, which includes western Texas and all
of New Mexico.
In November, the Border
Patrol in that sector caught
11,617 people traveling in families — nearly 20 times the total during November 2017
and just over a fifth of all migrants apprehended on the
southern border. The majority of those families were
from Guatemala.
Kevin McAleenan, the
U.S. Customs and Border
Protection commissioner,
told reporters Monday that
the increase in migrant families was creating an “unprecedented crisis.”
From Dec. 22 to Dec. 30
along the entire border with
Mexico, the Border Patrol
has referred 451 migrants —
including
259
children,
about half of them under age
5 — to medical providers.
“Many were ill before they
departed their homes,”
McAleenan said, citing cases
of flu, pneumonia, tubercu-
Moises Castillo Associated Press
A CASKET holds the body of Jakelin Caal Maquin at a Guatemala City airport. Jakelin, 7, died in El Paso on
Dec. 8, two days after she crossed the U.S. border in New Mexico and was taken into Border Patrol custody.
losis and parasites.
Six children and 11 adults
have been hospitalized.
Officials did not say how
many of the medical referrals were in the El Paso sector.
The area has been a focal
point in the debate over
illegal immigration since
7-year-old Jakelin Caal
Maquin died at an El Paso
hospital on Dec. 8, two days
after crossing in New Mexico
and being taken into Border
Patrol custody with her father, who remains at a shelter awaiting results of an autopsy.
He has said through his
lawyers that he cared for his
daughter during their journey and that she was not ill
before they got to the U.S.
Two weeks later, on Dec.
24, 8-year-old Felipe Gomez
Alonzo died in New Mexico
after being apprehended at
the border with his father
and spending six days
among at least four crowded
holding facilities. An autopsy showed he had the flu.
McAleenan said the two
cases were the only deaths of
children in Border Patrol
custody in more than a decade.
Teams from the U.S.
Coast Guard and Centers
for Disease Control and Prevention were sent to the border this week to assist in
medical screenings and recommend measures to limit
illnesses in Border Patrol
holding areas in El Paso.
Immigrant rights advocates blamed the new, more
dangerous crossing patterns largely on stepped-up
enforcement in more frequently traveled areas and
efforts by the Trump administration to discourage people from entering at official
border crossings to seek asylum.
“When you start interfering with a migration pattern,
you better be prepared
to deal with the consequences,” said Ruben Garcia, director of Annunciation
House, which has been sheltering migrants in El Paso
and coordinating shelters in
New Mexico.
McAleenan rejected that
explanation. He said smugglers were steering families
into “new and remote areas”
to avoid paying crossing fees
to the cartels that control
more popular routes.
The bus ride from Guatemala takes just a few days,
leaving migrants feeling
fresh for the trek through
the desert and “providing
greater confidence for parents to bring younger children,” he said.
Guadalupe Correa-Cabrera, a professor of policy
and government at George
Mason University, said her
research showed that cartel
control of the Rio Grande
Valley was indeed driving up
the price of crossing there.
“Kids are dying because
now the families are trying to
make it through other
points,” she said.
And more migrants are
traveling with children because smugglers are telling
them families have a better
chance of receiving asylum,
Correa-Cabrera said: “They
are promising the families if
you bring the children with
you, you have a ticket to the
United States.”
At an El Paso shelter on
Monday, Roberto Ramirez
Diaz, 32, said he brought his
17-year-old son, Darinel,
north from the highlands of
western Guatemala last
month because a smuggler
had told them it would be
easier to cross as a family.
Darinel explained that
the price of crossing was also
less for a family than for a
single adult — $4,600 compared with $8,000 — because
families could be left at the
border to claim asylum
whereas individuals must be
guided deeper into the country.
They said smugglers sent
some migrants through the
desert, but that they wound
up crossing from Juarez to El
Paso, then turning themselves over to the Border Patrol. They were released five
days later.
They planned to take a
bus to Immokalee, Fla.,
where Ramirez’s brother
makes $80 a day as a farmworker — 20 times what they
made working the fields in
Guatemala — and has an
apartment they can share
while they wait for their immigration court proceedings.
They have arranged to
work with him to pay off
their debt to the smuggler.
Once they do, they plan
to send for the rest of their
family: Ramirez’s wife and 6year-old daughter.
molly.hennessy-fiske
@latimes.com
Twitter: @mollyhf
going on now
WESTSIDE PAVILLION
FURNITURE
STORE CLOSING
AREA RUG
CLEARANCE
75
%
orig*
prices
This store is closing!
Find incredible markdowns &
savings on hand-knotted Oriental rugs,
hand-crafted rugs & machine-woven
reproductions. Choose from a wide
variety of designs & colors in sizes
ranging from 2’x3’ to 10’x14’. Bring your
fabric swatches, measurements & home
decorating ideas. Best of all, you can
take your rug home today! Don’t miss
this opportunity to find a great
rug at big savings!
In this Fine Rug Gallery:
Macy’s
Westside Pavilion Furniture
10800 West Pico Blvd
Los Angeles, CA 90064
*ORIG. PRICES ARE OFFERING PRICES & SAVINGS MAY NOT BE BASED ON ACTUAL SALES. SOME ORIG. PRICES NOT IN EFFECT DURING THE PAST 90 DAYS. SALE ENDS 1/27/19.
*Intermediate price reductions may have been taken. Floor stock only. All sales final. Clearance items will not go up in price. Styles shown are representative of the group.
Quantities limited. Delivery not available. Prices & merchandise may differ on macys.com
A6
W E D N E S DAY , JA N UA RY 2, 2019
LAT IMES. C OM
Campfires,
and a float
fire, at a
chilly Rose
Parade
[Parade, from A1]
the parade’s float entries committee. Spectators, believing the parade to be over, began
spilling onto the parade route. A band tried
navigating around the stranded float and ran
into the crowd milling about.
Eventually, the float was towed away. It was
followed in the parade lineup by the horsedrawn Gold Rush Fire Brigade, which marched
right through the smoke.
With a theme of “The Melody of Life,” the parade featured grand marshal Chaka Khan and
101st Rose Queen Louise Deser Siskel, an aspiring future scientist in glasses who has proudly
spoken about being Jewish and bisexual.
The event included 40 floats, 21 marching
bands and 18 equestrian units, and served as a
prelude to the Rose Bowl, this year pitting the
Washington Huskies and Ohio State Buckeyes.
The parade has become an international
showcase of cultural and geographic diversity.
A high school band from Flower Mound, Texas,
marched, as did Na Koa Ali‘i, Hawaii’s all-state
marching band from Kaneohe. They were
joined by the All-Izumo Honor Green Band
from Japan and the Banda Escolar from
Guayanilla, Puerto Rico.
A first-time parade entry came from the
restaurant chain Chipotle, which hopes for a
goodwill boost five months after more than
600 people came down with food poisoning after eating at an Ohio location. The “Cultivate a
Better World” float, which featured a giant red
tractor, was crafted with ingredients served in
Chipotle restaurants, including about
200 pounds of chili flakes to cover the tractor,
ground onion seeds for the tires, and cumin,
cloves, oregano and bay leaves covering the
cart.
As it often is on New Year’s Day, the weather
in Pasadena was clear and bright, with sunshine that followed a chilly night for campers
along the 5.5-mile route. Temperatures dipped
into the high 30s — not a record cold, but a chill
made worse by gusty overnight winds.
With campers stoking fire pits to keep
warm, firefighters patrolled for windblown embers.
As the clock ticked down the final seconds of
2018, the crowd began to chant: “Five, four,
three, two … Happy New Year!”
Jacob Botello, of Santa Monica, and his
mother, Mary, let off party poppers that filled
the air with confetti, and police cars drove
down Colorado Boulevard blaring their sirens
to mark the occasion.
Bundled up in layers, the Botellos passed
the time by playing dominoes and sharing family stories. The family has had some deaths recently, and the new year gave him hope for new
beginnings, he said.
“It’s a nice experience,” he said of the festive
parade atmosphere.
Justin Caballes rang in the new year with a
group of friends huddled around a fire barrel
near the intersection of Colorado Boulevard
and Bonnie Avenue. Caballes, who grew up in
Pasadena, started his tradition of camping out
for the parade five years ago for a girl he liked.
She had sent a mass text message saying that if
she didn’t get enough people to stay out all
night with her, she wouldn’t get to go.
Caballes was ill-prepared for the cold that
first year, and he didn’t even really get to talk to
the girl he liked. In many ways, it was a bust.
But he had so much fun that he’s attended every year since.
Revelers hurled corn tortillas topped with
shaving cream at passing cars. Over the years,
police officers have become more lenient about
the act, said Stephanie Gonzalez, 29, who has
been coming to the parade with her extended
family for the last two decades.
At one point, her cousin, Samuel Gonzalez,
11, walked up to his mother, Kami, with his red
sweater stained with shaving cream. He had
pelted a car with a tortilla, but the passengers
shot back.
“They got me!” he said. “They got me with a
tortilla.”
Crowds cooed over a group of small horses
decked out in Rose Parade decor. Victoria Nodiff-Netanel, president of a Calabasas-based
nonprofit called Mini Therapy Horses, said
they had helped people after recent crises, including the mass shooting at the Borderline
Bar and Grill in Thousand Oaks and the
Woolsey fire.
“It’s “Li’l Sebastian!” cried out one woman
upon spotting them, referencing the beloved
mini horse in the television series “Parks and
Recreation.”
For Armando Hurtado, of La Mirada, the
parade was about watching his daughter perform in the Pasadena City College Honor Band
and communing with those around him.
“People don’t see race here,” he said. “Everyone is here for one purpose, to bring in the new
year.”
He added: “You don’t see people coming together a lot. This is one event where that happens.”
Tamya Roberts, of Los Angeles, who
camped with her family near the front of the parade route, prepared full meals for her husband
and two kids: chicken soup, carne asada burritos and rice for dinner and hash browns, eggs
and sausage for breakfast. They started coming 15 years ago.
“We made it a yearly tradition to come out
and celebrate,” she said. “They can’t go to the
club, and I’m too old to go to the club. So this is
just a good family atmosphere.”
suhauna.hussain@latimes.com
melissa.gomez@latimes.com
alexa.diaz@latimes.com
howard.blume@latimes.com
Times staff writers Hailey Branson-Potts, Phi
Do, Dorany Pineda, Leila Miller, Matthew
Ormseth and Sam-Omar Hall contributed to
this report.
Kent Nishimura Los Angeles Times
CHINA AIRLINES’ colorful entry, “Rhythm of Taiwan,” won the parade’s interna-
tional trophy for the most outstanding float from outside the United States.
A SMALL FIRE disabled the Chinese A
Spectators who thought the delay meant
“TASTE THE MAGIC,” the parade entry from Stella Rosa Wines, won the Grand Marshal award for most outstanding creative co
Kent Nishim
NICK SCHWARTZ and Anthony Woods bounce on a trampoline on the Carnival Cruise Line float, titled “Come Sail Away.”
L AT I ME S . COM
WEDNESDAY , JANUARY 2, 2019
Mark Boster For The Times
American Heritage Foundation’s float, requiring tow trucks to move it out of the way.
the parade was over flooded the route and became entangled with a marching band.
A7
Mark Boster For The Times
SPECTATORS huddle around a fire pit to keep warm as they pass the time before
the parade. Temperatures dropped into the 30s at night with a strong wind.
Mark Boster For The Times
oncept and float design. The Sweepstakes award, for most beautiful entry, went to the UPS Store Inc. for its float “Books Keep Us on Our Toes.”
mura Los Angeles Times
Dania Maxwell Los Angeles Times
RED-AND-YELLOW parasols shade participants as they walk the 5.5-mile parade route. The 2019 Rose Parade featured 40 floats and 21 marching bands.
A8
W E D N E S DAY , JA N UA RY 2, 2019
LAT IMES. C OM
Leaders to meet on border security
[Shutdown, from A1]
Senate Majority Leader
Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.)
has said he will not bring up
a spending bill for Senate
consideration unless it has
Trump’s support.
Incoming House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-San
Francisco) said in a letter to
colleagues Tuesday that the
votes would make clear Republicans are responsible
for the shutdown.
“We are giving the Republicans the opportunity
to take yes for an answer,”
Pelosi wrote. “Senate Republicans have already supported this legislation, and
if they reject it now, they will
be fully complicit in chaos
and destruction of the president’s third shutdown of his
term.”
The Democrats’ stopgap
funding for the Homeland
Security Department would
not provide money for the
wall, but would extend the
department’s authority to
spend $1.3 billion approved
in the last budget for border
security. Under that authorization, no money can be
spent for a wall, but it can be
used to upgrade existing
border fencing.
Democrats say that dividing the money into two
bills would allow the reopening of the vast majority of
government agencies for
which funds aren’t in dispute while Congress and
Trump continue to debate
their disagreements over
immigration
and
the
border. But that approach
would also greatly limit
Trump’s leverage in negotiations.
A long list of government
agencies and departments
closed after midnight Dec.
21 when Congress and
Trump could not agree on a
spending package.
The effect on the public
has been limited, although
officials have had to close
campgrounds at Joshua
Tree and Yosemite national
parks and elsewhere because of a lack of operating
toilet facilities.
With the Christmas and
New Year’s holidays at a
close, however, the effect of
the shutdown will start becoming more visible if it
Zach Gibson Getty Images
THE 116TH United States Congress begins Thursday with no clear resolution for the partial government shutdown that began Dec. 22.
Democrats propose dividing the spending in question into two separate bills so most of the shuttered agencies can resume operations.
‘We are giving
the Republicans
the opportunity
to take yes for
an answer.’
— Rep. Nancy Pelosi,
on a temporary compromise
stretches on. Some home
sales may be delayed, for example, and the Internal
Revenue Service has curtailed services for taxpayers.
About 800,000 government workers won’t get paid
during the shutdown, with
just over half of them required to work anyway because their jobs are deemed
essential for public safety.
The rest are on furlough.
Many government workers who get paid on a twoweek cycle will begin missing paychecks next week. In
addition, a large number of
employees at companies
that do contract work for
the government have lost
their jobs or had hours cut
back because of the shutdown.
The president initially
said he would take responsibility for the shutdown, but
has since tried to lay the
blame on Democrats for not
agreeing to fund the wall. In
his presidential campaign,
Trump repeatedly said the
wall would be paid for by
Mexico.
Senate
appropriators
had previously agreed on
$1.6 billion for border security funding for the current
year — the amount the administration initially asked
for. Under the Senatepassed measure, the money
could be used to upgrade existing fencing, but not for a
new wall.
Trump has more recently demanded $5 billion.
The House under Republican control approved a bill
providing that money, but
Senate Republican leaders
conceded they could not
muster the votes to pass
that amount.
The agencies closed in
the shutdown include the
departments of Homeland
Security, State, Agriculture,
Commerce, Housing and
Urban Development, Interior, Justice and Transportation, as well as independent
agencies including NASA,
the Food and Drug Administration and the Environmental Protection Agency.
jennifer.haberkorn
@latimes.com
sarah.wire@latimes.com
Stop dropping by to work.
Start dropping by to visit.
At Elmcroft, our residents and their
loved ones get to focus on what’s really
important – each other.
Explore Venice from our community!
Wednesday, January 16 at 4:00 PM
Call 818.254.8014 or visit
elmcroft.com/mountview today to
learn more.
A Senior Living Community
2640 Honolulu Avenue | Montrose, CA
©2019 Eclipse Senior Living
License# 197607164
W E D N E S DAY , JA N UA RY 2 , 2 019
L AT I M E S . C O M
A9
Xcor ticket holders now in space jam
[Space, from A1]
The story of Xcor and its
ticket holders — 282 of them,
as of the most recent count
— is a cautionary tale for the
space tourism age.
In purchasing tickets for
a brief bout of weightlessness at the fringes of space,
would-be astronauts are
placing the ultimate speculative bet.
None of the space vehicles developed by the two
major players, Virgin Galactic and Blue Origin, are fully
operational yet. But some
tourism firms have collected
money
upfront;
Virgin
Galactic’s price is as much
as $250,000.
In the case of Xcor, the
bet came up snake eyes. Its
aspiring astronauts have
been left grounded, wondering whether they’ll get a portion of their ticket price
back.
Steve Jones, 43, applied
to be a creditor in Xcor’s
bankruptcy case but has
since learned he would not
receive any funds. The ticket
holder hired a lawyer, David
Keesling, about a year and a
half ago.
Keesling said in an interview in November that there
is “some slim” chance that
funds could be recovered,
but the number of entities
involved in the case complicates the process.
“Is there a possibility?
Sure,” Keesling said. “Is
there a probability? I can’t
tell you today that it is; I
can’t tell you that it’s not. It’s
easy to file a lawsuit. It’s not
necessarily easy to collect.”
Jones, a commercial pilot
who lives in Tulsa, Okla.,
said scraping together the
money for the Xcor ticket
was a sacrifice. “I live in an
apartment. I don’t drive the
newest car,” he said. “That’s
a lot of money. You’re talking
kids’ college or buying a
house.”
Hamameh, 37, said news
of Xcor’s bankruptcy was
disheartening. “I was very
disappointed, but not because of the money,” said
Hamameh, the chief executive of a French internet
start-up. “Because of the
dream that will never come
true.”
A fun 90 seconds
When Xcor unveiled its
plans for the two-seat Lynx
space plane in 2008 at a press
conference in Beverly Hills,
company officials estimated
flight tests would begin in
2010.
They said the vehicle
could eventually fly tourists
to space up to four times a
day. Flights would reach an
altitude of about 38 miles
above the Earth — below the
height that the U.S. military
and Federal Aviation Administration consider to be
the edge of space, but high
enough that passengers
would feel 90 seconds of
weightlessness.
The Mojave-based company was founded by Jeff
Greason, Aleta Jackson,
Doug Jones and Dan DeLong, who had worked together at a now-defunct reusable rocket company.
That company had planned
to send a 63-foot-tall,
thumb-shaped vehicle to
space that would return to
Earth via a giant propeller.
Xcor eventually raised at
least $19.2 million, according
to Crunchbase, a platform
that tracks fundraising.
Customers who wanted to
be among the first 100 people
to ride the Lynx paid
$100,000 upfront, while others who chose to wait could
pay in installments.
By 2011, NASA lent the
firm a measure of credibility
when it announced its intent
to hire Xcor to carry experiments into space. At the
time, the company was seen
as the main competitor to
British billionaire Richard
Branson’s Virgin Galactic,
which had also set up shop
at the Mojave Air and Space
Port.
The companies took very
different approaches to the
challenge of reaching space.
Virgin Galactic uses a twinfuselage carrier aircraft to
hoist a space plane known as
SpaceShipTwo up to a high
altitude; it releases the
smaller craft, which ignites
its own rocket motor to blast
into space. Last month, the
company reached space
with its SpaceShipTwo vehicle for the first time on a test
flight.
Using another vehicle or
booster to propel a crew
craft to space is considered a
“much more traditional approach,” said Sonya McMullen, assistant professor
of aeronautics at EmbryRiddle Aeronautical University. But Xcor would have
the Lynx climb all the way up
under its own power.
“They really took the
hard
technological
approach to the same problem,” McMullen said.
Good on paper
As development proceeded on the Lynx, the
company wooed potential
customers.
A major draw for Cyril
Bennis, 70, was the private
flight, with just him and a pilot. Virgin Galactic’s space
plane can seat eight people,
including the two pilots.
Bennis has wanted to go
to space since meeting
NASA
astronaut
John
Glenn as a child in Ireland.
He did some training on his
own, including experiencing
G-forces at the commercial
National Aerospace Training and Research Center
outside Philadelphia to
make sure he could handle
the trip. Then in 2008, he
paid the $100,000 ticket
price.
“The vision Xcor had at
that time, obviously on paper, looked very good,” said
Bennis, a retired resident of
Stratford-upon-Avon in the
U.K., who served as that
city’s mayor and worked in
the hotel business. “It had
good, established people
around it.”
Bennis and other wouldbe space tourists trekked to
Mojave several times to visit
the company’s Lynx production facility, view prototypes
and chat with staff. On one
particular trip, the group
underwent jet fighter training, which Bennis described
as “a great thrill.”
“We were never any
wiser,” he said. “There was
never any doubt in our
minds … any inkling that
there was a problem within
the company.”
But behind the scenes,
Xcor was finding it had
underestimated the complexity of the Lynx’s development and the funding
needed to pull it off.
“I think we had a really
good ship,” recalled Dale
Amon, a former senior engineer at Xcor responsible for
working on the electronics,
data and software in the
Lynx’s cockpit. But “things
always take longer and cost
more than you expect, so you
have to keep fundraising until you’re done.”
Greason, Xcor’s CEO,
was replaced in 2015 by Jay
Gibson, a former Beechcraft
Corp. executive who had
previously served as assistant secretary of the U.S. Air
Force. A year later, the company shelved Lynx development and turned its focus
to a contract to build an upper-stage rocket engine for
United Launch Alliance, a
joint venture of Boeing Co.
and Lockheed Martin Corp.
that launches national security satellites for the U.S.
government. That was the
company’s most promising
near-term source of revenue.
That same year, Xcor laid off
about half of its 50- to 60-person workforce, including
Amon.
In January 2017, Xcor executives sent a letter to ticket
holders, pledging the delay
“in no way diminishes our
will and actions to finish
building the Lynx and start
the flight test phase.”
“For now, we are unable
to share a reasonable time
frame for your anticipated
space flight,” wrote Gibson
and Tom Burbage, president of the board of directors.
This rankled Hamameh,
the French internet entrepreneur. He purchased his
Xcor ticket using a significant amount of funds reaped
from the sale of his social
media marketing agency.
Even before the January letter, he was pushing the company for a refund.
“I said, ‘Guys, it has been
one year late; you are making
no
progress,’ ”
Hamameh said.
No white knight
Xcor was counting on
funds from the United
Launch Alliance contract,
but that ran out abruptly.
Without mentioning ULA by
name, Gibson told a Senate
committee hearing in 2017
that Xcor had thought it had
a funding commitment from
the prime contractor on a
propulsion project through
the year and beyond. But
Xcor was told the contract
was terminated with less
than 30 days’ notice, Gibson
said during his confirmation
hearing to be deputy chief
management officer of the
Defense Department.
Gibson left Xcor in June
2017, less than two weeks after his nomination was announced. Xcor board member Michael Blum was
named acting chief executive. Gibson was later pro-
Steve Jones
Gabriel Bouys AFP / Getty Images
STEVE JONES sacri-
JEFF GREASON, a
ficed to scrape together
money for a ticket for
Xcor’s Lynx space plane.
co-founder of Xcor Aerospace, was replaced as
company CEO in 2015.
moted to chief management
officer at the Pentagon but
resigned in November.
The Wall Street Journal
reported prior to Gibson’s
resignation that he was
forced out for a “lack of
performance.” An attempt
to reach him through
LinkedIn was unsuccessful.
In July 2017, Blum sent an
email to the aspiring space
tourists, saying in the “coming weeks and months, we
hope to share the news of
new partners and capital
sources to support our business.”
But on his third or fourth
day on the job, Blum said, he
was forced to terminate all
remaining employees. The
company had run out of
money and was unable to
make payroll because of the
loss of the ULA contract. An
early Xcor customer himself,
Blum insists a customer liai-
son representative was in
touch with him regularly
throughout 2016 and into the
next year, making the January 2017 letter a disappointment but “no surprise.”
“I had held out hope that
a white knight could be
found, even in a distressed
sale of the company,” he said
in a LinkedIn message in October. “This did not materialize.”
Dreams grounded
News of the bankruptcy
devastated Sabine Daniels
Vandersluys, 39, an Amsterdam resident who won an
Xcor ticket through a contest sponsored by a shopping rewards program.
To prepare for her trip,
she had been strapped into a
motion-training simulator
in the Netherlands for about
three minutes to experience
the type of G-forces she
would encounter in space. A
subsequent medical check
proclaimed her good to go.
She thought she would fly by
2014.
“This was a prize of a million lifetime opportunities,”
she said. “I work part time,
and I thought, well, if I do go
to space … I was trying to
maybe give lectures in
schools or try to do something with it.”
After the bankruptcy filing, some Xcor customers
asked what had happened to
the $35,000 that was part of
their deposits but supposed
to be kept separate in an escrow account and refunded
in the event of an incident
like the bankruptcy. A number were unsuccessful in
connecting with or getting
answers from Intertrust
Group, the organization
they said oversaw those escrow accounts.
A spokesman for Intertrust Group, a corporate
management group based in
the Netherlands, said in an
email that “when there is an
escrow agreement in place,
Intertrust will execute according to what’s been defined in that escrow agreement.” The spokesman said
he could not provide any further detail.
U.S. Chapter 7 bankruptcy trustee Jeffrey Vetter
referred questions about the
Xcor customers’ escrow accounts to the Justice Department.
A Justice Department
spokeswoman said in a No-
vember email that information about the escrow accounts was “not of the public
record in this pending matter.”
Ticket holder Milan
Karki, 41, did receive $34,500
from the escrow account. He
reached out to Intertrust in
May and received the funds
in September, after Intertrust said there was an
escrow account with his
name. He purchased his
ticket in 2013.
“I had lost hope,” said the
New York resident and management consultant. He’s
using the funds to buy property for his parents in their
homeland of Nepal.
Bennis plans to go to Amsterdam to meet Intertrust
officials face to face and get
answers on behalf of the
group.
“It was felt the plug was
pulled, and we were left to
our own devices,” he said.
Bennis and Jones have
not given up hope of achieving spaceflight. Each talks
about trying to get a spot on
a future Blue Origin suborbital flight.
“I think the technology
that has come forward, and
[with the] extraordinary
amount of talented people
who are working behind the
scenes, there’s got to be a future in suborbital space,”
Bennis said. “I want it to
come in my lifetime.”
samantha.masunaga
@latimes.com
Twitter: @smasunaga
Bill Ingalls NASA
ALAN STERN, center rear, cheers with children in Laurel, Md., at the moment the New Horizons craft made
its closest approach to Ultima Thule. The group was at Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory.
NASA craft survives a flyby
of the most distant world yet
After a nail-biter,
scientists await
close-up images
of Ultima Thule.
By Deborah Netburn
It’s official.
Four billion miles from
Earth, NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft sped past a
small, cold Kuiper Belt object known as Ultima Thule
on Monday night, successfully collecting data on the
most distant world ever visited by humankind.
The flyby occurred at 9:33
PST New Year’s Eve, exactly
as planned, but mission
leaders didn’t receive word
that the spacecraft had survived the encounter until
7:30 a.m. Tuesday.
“Thousands of operations on the spacecraft had
to work correctly to get this
data, and now we know they
did,” said Alan Stern, the
principal investigator for the
mission. “I don’t know about
you, but I’m really liking this
2019 thing so far.”
This is the second time
that New Horizons has successfully flown past an object in the outer reaches of
the solar system. In July 2015,
the spacecraft sped past
Pluto, giving humanity its
first up-close look at the
dwarf planet and revealing
its diverse geography.
The Pluto flyby was New
Horizons’ primary mission,
but Alice Bowman, the operations manager, said she
was more nervous while
waiting for confirmation
that the Ultima Thule flyby
NASA
A COMPOSITE of two images taken by New Hori-
zons, left, and an artist’s impression of Ultima Thule.
had gone off without a hitch.
“I think it had to do with
the timing,” she said. “We
celebrated this flyby at
night, when it happened, but
before we had gotten the signal back.”
The team had to wait
overnight for the spacecraft
to send the message that all
its instruments were healthy
and that its servers were
filled with science data.
The nail-biting delay was
stressful but inevitable.
New Horizons was not in
contact with Earth during
the flyby to ensure all its energy was directed toward
collecting data, mission
planners said.
And when the spacecraft
finally did send the all-clear
message to Earth, it took the
signal 61⁄2 hours moving at
the speed of light to traverse
the vast ocean of space between it and us.
When it was finally received by radio telescopes in
Madrid,
Bowman
was
elated.
“We did it again,” she
said. “Fantastic.”
Ultima Thule is deep
within the Kuiper Belt, a
doughnut-shaped region of
space beyond the orbit of
Neptune that is dotted with
hundreds of thousands of icy
objects.
The small world, about 20
miles in diameter, is part of a
group of objects that populate an area of the Kuiper
Belt known as the cold classical belt. Scientists believe
those worlds have remained
in a stable, circular orbit
around the sun for 4.5 billion
years, frozen in time at the
far reaches of the solar system.
For that reason, Ultima
Thule could represent the
most pristine example yet of
the original disk of gas and
dust out of which the planets
formed.
The first close-up images
of the icy relic were expected
to come down to Earth on
Monday evening, mission
planners said. They will be
shared with the public beginning Wednesday.
“Signals are coming back
from across the solar system
as we speak,” Stern said.
“Overnight the science team
will analyze the first highresolution images and we’ll
share them with you tomorrow.”
In the meantime, the science team shared a newly released image taken by New
Horizons from a distance of
about 500,000 miles from Ultima Thule. It is pixelated
and blurry, but it clearly
shows that the object is
made up of two circular
lobes stuck together or perhaps two smaller objects
that are orbiting each other.
“It’s a pixelated blob, but
it’s a better pixelated blob
than we had before,” said
Hal Weaver, New Horizons
project scientist. “Ultima
Thule is finally beginning to
reveal its secrets.”
By stringing a few of
these images together, the
scientists were also able to
determine that the oblong
Ultima Thule is rotating like
a propeller from the perspective of the spacecraft.
This explains why the
amount of light it reflects
does not change over time.
The same side of the object
is always facing New Horizons.
But aside from these few
revelations, New Horizons’
science team leaders refused
to make predictions about
what the first high-resolution images might show.
Nobody
knows
yet
whether this world is active
or dormant, if its surface will
be smooth or pockmarked
by craters.
It might have moons or
rings.
“It will all be revealed by
tomorrow or the next day,”
Weaver said. “Ultima Thule
will be turned into a real
world.”
deborah.netburn
@latimes.com
A10
W E D N E S DAY , JA N UA RY 2 , 2 019
L AT I M E S . C O M / O P I N I O N
OPINION
EDITORIALS
LETTERS
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Rethink the Mira Loma jail
The proposed women’s detention
center in Lancaster is a product of
outdated, male-oriented planning.
he criminal justice system
was built for men — men’s bodies, men’s psyches, men’s problems. But the fastest-growing
contingent of jail and prison inmates is women. They are housed in institutions not built with them in mind and are
guarded by officers untrained to meet their
needs and challenges. They are more likely
than men to suffer from mental illness or
drug addiction, and far more likely to have
been victims of sexual or physical abuse.
More than half of incarcerated women have
children, and one study after another demonstrates that they will do better during and
after their time in jail with frequent visits
from their kids — yet women’s jails are often
built in remote locations, so the trip to visit
them is too long and too costly.
Women inmates simply need different
quarters, designed for different needs and
different programs, than men.
The concept should be obvious to the Los
Angeles County Board of Supervisors,
which spent years studying juvenile probation programs before demolishing and rebuilding Campus Kilpatrick, a former barracks-style probation camp that now is tailor-made for rehabilitation, mentoring,
counseling and treatment of juvenile offenders. The board wisely saw that it needed the
programming and the building design to be
complementary. The same logic holds true
for adult female jail inmates.
This particular board is uniquely qualified to grasp the special needs of women, including inmates. Four of the five supervisors
are women — a historic development following 164 years of exclusively male or majority
male boards. Two years ago, almost immediately after the new female majority was
seated, the board launched a Women and
Girls Initiative to finally deal with the inequities that undermine the lives of the county’s female residents of all ages, in all circumstances — including, presumably, in jail.
Now the promise to focus on women
faces its first real test. Early in the new year,
the board is set to consider a contract to
build a new women’s jail on the site of the
Mira Loma Detention Center in Lancaster.
Oddly, it’s a product of more male-oriented
criminal justice thinking.
Mira Loma is the kind of place you’d put a
jail a quarter-century ago — and in fact
T
that’s when the adjacent state prison
opened. The operating principle of California prison construction during the incarceration boom of the 1980s to early 2000s was
to lock up offenders in the desert, far away
from the rest of us.
But it’s an outmoded approach to a women’s jail, where 65% of inmates haven’t even
been convicted of anything, where young
mothers need visits from their kids during
an especially stressful time, and where inmates who have been abused or terrorized
by their male partners and who have turned
to drugs for escape need regular face time
with qualified clinicians and counselors on
site— not video images broadcast from
downtown L.A. because the commute is too
onerous.
A car trip from Long Beach or Pomona to
Mira Loma takes up to two hours each way,
and a trip by public transit? Forget it. You
simply can’t get there and back in the same
day.
The Mira Loma plan, if “plan” is the right
word, calls for a jail in the wrong place, with
buildings designed and constructed with
too little regard for their use. The county
seems determined to move forward chiefly
because it won a state grant several years
ago to pay for the project, and it doesn’t
want to lose the money. But authorizing
construction would be like buying a shoe
only because someone else offered to pay for
it. What’s the point, if you have to cut off a
toe to make it fit? You fit the shoe to the foot,
not the other way around. You fit the building — and the location — to the programming need.
A comprehensive women’s criminal justice plan would obviously takes into consideration the need to punish crimes appropriately, but should also include an aggressive
effort to divert young women from jail and
into treatment — or shelters where they
could seek refuge from their abusers —
within an easy commute from their homes.
It would include a study of the effect on the
female inmate population of SB 10, the bail
reform law set to take effect later this year. It
would include regular transit connections or
free shuttles for service providers and families.
The Board of Supervisors must not make
a mockery of its commitment to better the
lives of women and girls. It should reconsider the location of its new jail. And if it
won’t do that, it should at least not approve
construction until it hires consultants to
think through a plan for programs. It would
be foolish to build new buildings before figuring out how big they need to be and what
they need to include.
The undervalued trees of L.A.
hile bird lovers, environmentalists and poets
have long put a high value
on trees, the hard-nosed
number crunchers in government have not. Trees have often been
treated as merely aesthetic enhancements.
Nice, but not essential. That’s one reason
why tree maintenance is among the first
government services cut during a recession.
That limited view is changing, and there
is increasing recognition that trees are more
than just pretty things. With climate
change, big trees will be increasingly useful
to remove pollution from the air, collect water during rainstorms and create shade that
cools nearby property.
But for all the benefits that trees provide
Los Angeles, city officials still do not hold
the urban forest in the same regard as other
public infrastructure, like streets and storm
drains. That’s one of the key findings from a
recent report commissioned by City Plants,
a nonprofit that works with city departments to plant and care for public trees.
While outside experts have appraised
the value of Los Angeles’ trees (including
privately owned ones) at $12 billion, city officials have never attached such an economic
value to the local urban forest. The city
doesn’t quantify the value of the trees themselves, nor the energy and water savings
generated by mature specimens. As a result,
the city hasn’t made it a priority to invest
and maintain trees as public assets.
The City Plants report says Los Angeles
should be spending three times as much on
its urban forest. The city spends about $25
million now, but the budget would have to be
closer to $80 million to match comparable
cities with robust urban forests, such as
New York City and Melbourne, Australia.
The reality is that there are always far
more infrastructure needs than there are
dollars. Still, it’s clear that L.A. needs to invest more in its urban forest. It’s especially
important now because trees are both more
essential than ever and more at risk.
Climate change is expected to make Los
W
Angeles a hotter, drier city, and having more
big, healthy trees could lessen the impact. A
mature urban forest and dense tree canopy
can provide relief on the hottest days —
shaded surfaces can be 20 to 45 degrees
cooler than those in direct sun — and reduce
air conditioning demand, which helps ease
the strain on the city’s electrical grid.
Tree roots also capture and store rainwater, which helps the city make better use
of its water supply at a time of more extreme
weather conditions and wider swings between periods of drought and flooding.
But many mature trees in the city have
been weakened by drought, a problem exacerbated when water-conscious residents
stopped irrigating their plants. Invasive
pests are a major threat too, spreading disease that could infest an estimated 38% of
the 71 million trees across the Southern California region and cause a massive die-off.
Then there’s the damage caused by the
city itself. Los Angeles has committed to
spending $1.4 billion over the next 30 years to
fix the city’s busted sidewalks, many of
which were damaged by tree roots. While
the sidewalk repairs are essential, the process often fells mature trees.
In response to the City Plants report, the
Board of Public Works has called for a “Tree
Summit” to gather advocates and experts to
recommend policies to protect the urban
forest. The city’s Recreation and Parks Department is compiling an inventory of trees
in the city parks, which is vital to tracking
the loss of trees to disease and drought and
to ensure adequate replacement. The city
needs to come up with $3 million more to
complete an inventory of trees planted
along the streets.
The Bureau of Street Services has begun
discussions on how to quantify the costs
and value of trees, which will help inform
stronger policies to protect mature trees
and encourage the planting of new ones.
Yes, trees are lovely. But to survive and
flourish, Los Angeles needs to treat its urban forest like a true piece of public infrastructure.
EXECUTIVE CHAIRMAN Dr. Patrick Soon-Shiong
EXECUTIVE EDITOR Norman Pearlstine
MANAGING EDITOR
Scott Kraft
SENIOR DEPUTY MANAGING EDITOR
Kimi Yoshino
DEPUTY MANAGING EDITORS
Sewell Chan, Colin Crawford, Julia Turner
ASSISTANT MANAGING EDITORS
FOUNDED DECEMBER 4, 1881
Len De Groot, Shelby Grad, Loree Matsui,
Angel Rodriguez, Michael Whitley
Opinion
Nicholas Goldberg EDITOR OF THE EDITORIAL PAGES
Sue Horton OP-ED AND SUNDAY OPINION EDITOR
Al Seib Los Angeles Times
LAUSD SUPT. Austin Beutner’s district reorgani-
zation plan would create 32 school networks.
Empower principals?
Re “Reorganizing L.A. Unified,” editorial, Dec. 27
Any teacher will tell you that good schools have good
principals and mediocre schools have indifferent
principals. Always overlooked in improving the schools is
the major role that principals play.
Giving more purchasing power to the schools is an
invitation to fraud. L.A. Unified controls more than 900
schools and often makes poor decisions like the iPad
giveaway. But a district-wide template is necessary to
keep purchasing orders from going to hastily formed
companies run by somebody’s brother-in-law.
Supt. Austin Beutner’s desire to decentralize L.A.
Unified is the antithesis of today’s best-run companies.
Steve Jobs, Elon Musk, Bill Gates, Jeff Bezos and Mark
Zuckerberg are examples of hands-on executives who
made their companies excel and dominate.
Would Apple be Apple if Jobs had divided the
company into 32 fiefdoms?
Bob Munson
Newbury Park
Lawmakers,
lawyers, Trump
Re “Professionals sold out;
we got President Trump,”
Opinion, Dec. 30
Virginia Heffernan’s
column on the doctors,
lawyers and other professionals over many years
who have made major
ethical compromises in
service to Donald Trump
was sobering. I am a lawyer, so I am familiar with
professional ethical tenets.
President Trump’s
enablers are shameless.
Their willingness to abandon their integrity so they
can curry favor with
Trump is inexcusable. Our
current national nightmare may end sooner than
the remaining two years of
this administration thanks
to the professional integrity of Justice Department
special counsel Robert S.
Mueller III.
The Trump tragedy
also includes some Republican legislators. These
people are indeed professionals — after all, serving
as a lawmaker requires
knowledge of the law. All of
these enablers must face
their own reckoning.
Steven A. Ludsin
East Hampton, N.Y.
::
I do not understand
how Heffernan can conclude that Trump’s grandfather, Friedrich Trump,
was guilty of “moral cowardice” for having fled
mandatory military service
in the German Imperial
Army when he was 16 years
old in 1885.
I hold no brief for either
Trump, but Heffernan
could have just as easily
concluded that it took
moral courage for
Friedrich to escape (not
“slunk off ”) to North
America instead of serving.
My grandfather was
conscripted into the Imperial Russian Army at the
turn of the 20th century. I
think it took great moral
courage on his part to
come to America, bring his
young wife and family over
as soon as possible and
begin a new life here. He
died in Pittsburgh of the
Spanish flu in 1919 working
for his family’s future, not
on a forsaken battlefield
where he was destined to
become cannon fodder. His
thriving family lives on.
Heffernan does not say
why she believes
Friedrich’s act was moral
cowardice. Can we then
conclude that she believed
it was the moral duty of
good Germans to serve the
kaiser’s imperial ambitions? Can we extrapolate
from this her opinions on
the Vietnam War protesters?
Michael P. King
Beverly Hills
::
Heffernan concludes,
“When our current national nightmare is over, if
it ever is, everyone — from
doctors and lawyers to PR
firms and lobbyists — who
enabled the bad guys must
face their own reckoning.”
Why wait? Hold the
enablers of Trump accountable now. The path to
Trump’s reckoning is
through theirs.
Brian Masson
Harbor City
Why the Airbnb
law won’t work
Re “Don’t dilute the Airbnb
rules,” Opinion, Dec. 27
Regulation of home
rentals and of scooters and
of street vendors all demonstrate the dysfunction of
our city government and
the futility of trying to
control a marketplace —
and not just because each
of these efforts takes years
to reach fruition.
These regulation efforts
are an utter waste of time
simply because there is
never going to be sufficient
enforcement of any of these
regulations to stop people
from doing what sufficient
demand makes personally
profitable.
The City Council should
stick to changing holiday
names and plastic straw
bans and issuing thank you
certificates, all things that
get done quickly and don’t
interfere too significantly
with our daily lives.
Jeffrey C. Briggs
Hollywood
::
I am shocked that city
leaders would even contemplate the idea of allowing tenants in rent-controlled units to “home
share” by listing their
dwellings on Airbnb.
This is ridiculous. You
cannot have it both ways.
Accepting a governmentsubsidized apartment and
making money off it seems
to derail the purpose of
rent control itself — to
house people who are the
most needy, not to create
an enterprise that undermines the system.
Our city leaders need to
wake up. And, by the way,
while they’re at it, they
should stop accepting
political donations from
short-term home rental
companies.
Peter David Harris
Los Angeles
How driving
an EV pays off
Re “Going electric in California,” letters, Dec. 30
There needs to be a
balance in viewing electric
cars and their use in
Southern California or
anywhere else. I’ve built
and owned electric vehicles
for the last eight years, and
they have proved to be the
best and most economical
transportation I have ever
experienced.
First off, you have to
research how and where
you are going to charge the
vehicle. It has to be convenient since you will charge
often, and seeking a public
site is impractical for daily
use. It costs around $1,600
for a charger and installation at home, so figure that
into the purchase price of
your car.
Why go to all this hassle
and expense? Because
there is no other vehicle
with a lower carbon footprint or the ability to convert the sun’s energy directly into vehicle power.
Only an electric car can get
its energy directly from the
sun. The path for all other
fuels requires extraction,
processing, transportation
and storage, thus adding to
their inefficiencies and
pollution contributions.
It is time we get serious
about stopping climate
change, cleaning up our
environment and stopping
the burning of fossil fuels.
Philip Chipman
Costa Mesa
The writer is an aerospace engineer and an
electric vehicle advisor at
UC Irvine.
::
Having recently purchased a Chevrolet Bolt
electric vehicle, I can tell
your readers that a Tesla is
not the only option for
drivers who want more
distance between charges.
The Bolt is rated at more
than 200 miles on a full
charge.
Also, I’m finding plenty
of charging stations in the
area, some of which are free
to use. As businesses install more and more of
these, it will become even
easier to add some mileage
while shopping, lunching
or just sitting and reading
the Los Angeles Times.
Steven Besneatte
Placentia
Trump lying is
still a big deal
Re “Trump makes false
claim,” Dec. 28
How numb have we
become to the lies of President Trump?
He travels to Iraq and
stands before our troops,
and lies to their faces about
how he got them a 10% pay
raise. His comments were
not misstatements; rather,
they were part of a completely fabricated story
that he had concocted.
This deserved to be a
front-page story and yet it
appeared on Page A7.
If I had written the
headline, it would have
read, “Commander in chief
lies to our troops.”
Larry Macedo
West hills
::
What a waste of headline space.
Saying “Trump makes
false claim” is like saying
“The sun rises.” How about
something a little more
informative, like, “Trump
lies to troops”?
Claude Goldenberg
Seal Beach
No right to DUI
Re “Utah adopts nation’s
toughest DUI law,” Dec. 29
I can’t stop shaking my
head after reading that
there are actually people in
this country who feel they
have a right to indulge in
behavior that may kill me,
a family member or other
innocent persons, and that
any regulation of that
behavior is considered
tyrannical.
Since when did living in
a country of laws become
oppressive? And why do
some people consider it
their right to engage in
behavior — in this case,
drinking and driving —
that could kill or injure
others?
If you want to drink and
then crash and injure
yourself or worse, fine, but
do not endanger anyone
else.
Mike Aguilar
Costa Mesa
HOW TO WRITE TO US
Please send letters to
letters@latimes.com. For
submission guidelines, see
latimes.com/letters or call
1-800-LA TIMES, ext. 74511.
W E D N E S DAY , JA N UA RY 2 , 2 019
L AT I M E S . C O M / O P I N I O N
A11
OP-ED
HERE’S HOPING
When workers rumble, tech will change
By Margaret O’Mara
This article is one in a series about
reasons for optimism in 2019.
‘N
ot OK, Google.”
These three words
— chanted and
splashed on signs
during
November’s worldwide walkout of an estimated 20,000 Google employees —
summed up the newly combative
mood emerging from the campuses
of Silicon Valley. In November, the
tech industry’s most cherished assets — its employees — mobilized
with speed and scale to question
their companies’ controversial defense contracts, protest inequities
in pay and promotion, and demand
better protections for the contractors and part-timers who make up
a significant chunk of tech’s workforce.
The pushback presents yet another headache for tech executives,
challenging some of the business
fundamentals that have made the
industry so successful and profitable. Considered in the context of
Silicon Valley’s longer history, however, this new worker activism is a
promising and exciting development — and it might end up being one of the best things to happen
in the tech world in 2019.
Even before the arrival of the
silicon chips that gave the valley its
name, the region’s iconic companies consciously styled themselves
as a new breed, one that treated
employees well in a distinctive California-casual environment.
Hewlett-Packard, founded in
1939 by two engineers who had
spent little time in corporate America and had little enthusiasm for
emulating it, set the tone from the
start. Everyone wore shirtsleeves,
enjoyed alfresco lunches at the employee cafeteria and played games
of horseshoes out back when they
needed a break. Co-founder Bill
Hewlett called it “management by
wandering.” When HP went public
in the late 1950s, the entire whitecollar workforce — from founders to
secretaries — got a chunk of ownership in the company.
As electronics and computer industries mushroomed up around
Silicon Valley in successive decades, other companies invoked
“the HP way” as their model. It became a land of open-space offices,
jogging paths and raucous company happy hours.
There was plenty that was problematic about this culture. By the
1980s, employees might have had
Ferraris in their driveways, but 80and 90-hour workweeks were common. One early Microsoft employee
cheerfully referred to the company
as “a velvet sweatshop.” The growing number of women in the industry quickly learned that success depended on their willingness to pull
long hours and fit into a culture
that was a strange mix of high
school computer lab and frat
house.
The industry professed to be a
meritocracy but placed a premium
on recruiting people from a handful
of top schools or, better yet, hired
those referred by current employees. In the dot-com boom of the
1990s, Sun Microsystems filled 60%
of its jobs through referral; Netscape hung a sign in its headquarters asking, “Who is the best
person you’ve ever worked with?
How can we hire him/her?” While
the rest of corporate America diversified, tech’s culture become more
homogeneous. Yet the considerable financial upside — not to men-
tion the genuine satisfaction
gained from working on worldtransforming products — curbed
employee dissent.
Today, techies still work hard
and play hard. The pay and perks of
full-time employment have become
richer than ever. At the same time,
contract and temp work proliferates, both as a way for companies to
keep costs lean and as a path for
employees to step away from the
punishing pace. (Not surprisingly, a
number of white-collar contractors
are mothers of small children.)
The surge of worker activism
came partly as a result of these
long-building disparities. But it
also is a sign that the technology industry is growing up.
“Management by wandering,”
pingpong tables, and hiring by referral may have worked well when
technology was somewhat off to the
side of American capitalism. Now,
however, these companies and their
products are the main event, driving the global economy in ways
unimagined in the days of Hewlett
and Packard. And the problematic
things about current Silicon Valley
culture — the lack of diversity, the
tolerance of bad behavior, the
dramatic inequities within its workforce — are limiting tech companies’ ability to continue their remarkable track record of innovation.
Talent is the most precious commodity in Silicon Valley. “Our employees,” Google founders Sergey
Brin and Larry Page told investors
back in 2004, “are everything.” The
climbing walls and free snacks —
those aren’t PR gimmicks; they’re
signals of a job market that remains
fiercely competitive.
Here are grounds for optimism.
Tech can’t afford to have its talented white-collar workers walk
out permanently. Lawmakers in
Washington may make noise about
regulation and antitrust enforcement. Customers may delete their
accounts. But, in 2019, sustained
worker activism could have the
most power of them all to alter the
trajectory of where tech could go
next.
Margaret O’Mara is a professor
of history at the University of
Washington. Her next book, “The
Code: Silicon Valley and the
Remaking of America,” will be
published in July.
Moving to the
other side —
the news side
GUSTAVO ARELLANO
A
Los Angeles Times
GRASSLANDS that could be developed under the proposed Centennial project at Tejon Ranch.
A troubled deal
A conservation agreement
isn’t enough protection
for Tejon Ranch.
By Ileene Anderson
A
s I turned a corner, the
animal was suddenly
right there in all its furious glory, hissing a
warning and baring its
teeth. It was the first badger I’d ever
seen, and I beat a hasty retreat. But
after that close encounter at Tejon
Ranch 30 years ago, I watched from
a distance, fascinated by this fearless little beast.
That’s the kind of experience
you often have at Tejon, one of
Southern California’s most spectacular landscapes. Its vast boundaries extend from the San Joaquin
Valley shrub lands to Sierra foothills to the Mojave Desert — an ecologically extraordinary mix of
Joshua trees, pines and oaks that
yield to desert grasslands and stunning wildflower fields. To step onto
Tejon (“badger” in Spanish) is to
travel back to a time when much of
the state was wilderness.
This 270,000-acre property,
about an hour and half north of Los
Angeles, is privately owned, but
taxpayers have spent millions to
safeguard wild places at Tejon, and
the land is supposed to be protected by a conservation agreement.
Yet this national treasure is not
nearly protected enough. The Los
Angeles County Board of Supervisors recently approved the 5,800acre Centennial development on
the ranch — 19,000 homes and 8.4
million square feet of commercial
space that would destroy crucial
wildlife habitat. A second similar
development, called Grapevine, in
the Kern County portion of the
ranch, is the subject of a recent lawsuit.
The conservation agreement allows harmful grazing, oil drilling
and mining on portions of the preserved land. And now, the already
limited public access to this breathtaking place, where condors soar
above fields of wildflowers, has been
further curbed by the ranch owners.
The current problems at Tejon
are rooted in negotiations a decade
ago between the ranch owners, who
were planning to develop the property, and environmental groups,
who were likely to oppose those
plans.
Tejon offered a deal: It would set
aside 90% of the ranch for conservation and fund a conservancy, run by
the company and environmental
groups, to oversee that land. In return, the organizations would refrain from publicly opposing the developments.
To support the conservancy
concept, the state’s Wildlife Conservation Board paid $15.8 million to
Tejon for “conservation easements”
— agreements restricting damaging activities — on 62,000 acres of
land within the conservancy.
Several environmental groups
agreed to the deal: Audubon California, the Endangered Habitats
League, the Natural Resources Defense Council, the Planning and
Conservation League and the Sierra Club. Others, including the Center for Biological Diversity, where I
am a biologist, refused. Ten years
later, the center has all the more
reason to think it made a wise
choice.
In our estimation, half the land
the ranch owners offered for conservation wasn’t buildable anyway,
and environmental pressures to
protect rare and endangered
species would have required the
other half to be preserved. In other
words, much of the same land could
have been protected without environmental groups signing away
their freedom to protest environmentally
problematic
developments.
There were other problems with
the agreement as well. The preserved land continues to be owned
by Tejon Ranch rather than a conservancy or a public entity, and the
company can dictate who comes on
the land — and who can’t.
Earlier this year, the company
banned botanist Nick Jensen and
his organization, the California Native Plant Society, from the ranch,
along with other groups associated
with the society. As a company vice
president said to the Los Angeles
Times, the group was banned “because of its public opposition to the
Centennial development” — apparently a reference to a letter Jensen
cosigned about the project’s environmental impacts.
Jensen was even banned from
the areas covered by the state’s con-
servation easement, which is supported with public dollars.
That’s a serious blow. Tejon is
a living laboratory for biological
diversity, including a new buckwheat species discovered on the
ranch. All scientists with a legitimate reason to be on the land
should have access.
Even as the Tejon Ranch Company punishes its critics, there are
growing financial concerns about
the flawed conservation agreement.
The nonprofit conservancy currently runs on loans from the company. The money to repay those
loans and fund future operations is
supposed to come mostly from fees
from three Tejon development projects but none have yet broken
ground. Despite the green light
from the L.A. County supervisors,
Centennial needs additional approvals and may face environmental lawsuits.
Unlike the groups that entered
the agreement, my organization is
able to oppose problematic aspects
of the developments in court. Earlier this month, in response to a lawsuit filed the center, a judge found
the environmental review for
Tejon’s Grapevine inadequate. The
judge ordered Kern County to rescind approvals for the development.
What’s the solution? For decades, my organization’s vision for a
majority of the ranch’s iconic
wilderness has been a publicly accessible park. Indeed, the conservation agreement even specifies “a
commitment to working together
with the Conservancy to establish a
California state park,” but that
hasn’t materialized.
State and local officials should
be stepping up to ensure the preservation of this land, as well as reasonable and fair public access to it.
They shouldn’t be allowing sprawling development in areas that are of
tremendous environmental value.
Future generations deserve the
opportunity to be enchanted by
Tejon Ranch. They should hear the
wind whistling through pine needles, enjoy the rich smell of leaves
under a massive mother oak’s lush
canopy, and meet a cantankerous
badger in the grasslands.
Ileene Anderson is a senior
scientist at the Center for
Biological Diversity.
year ago, I debuted my weekly column in these
pages with a proclamation: Anyone who quits California because they find the going rough here are
“cowards who want all of the easy and none of the
hard.”
It drew exactly the reaction I wanted. Anger. Praise. Letters to
the editor. More importantly, it attracted an engaged readership
interested in a conversation about the direction of the Golden
State.
That became my template. I’d pick a topic I hoped would resonate with the entire state that particular week, and then tried to
write about it in such a way that it might tell the rest of the country
something about us Californians too. It’s not easy to try to entertain, inform and infuriate readers simultaneously — and that
challenge has been one of the most rewarding experiences of my
career.
I always mentally returned to that first dispatch. I did so again
after an analysis by Bloomberg last month that found that an
average of 128 people moved out of Los Angeles every day in 2017. So
let me reiterate: Quitters are cowards.
And now, you can count me as one of them … kinda. I’m leaving
this post as Opinion columnist covering California for The Times — to
become a features reporter covering
California for The Times.
I didn’t want to give up this columna. But the jefes at this fine fish
wrap believe in maintaining a wall
between the news and opinion pages.
(How have I not convinced them that
walls are inherently evil?)
To write a weekly column, period,
is a goal for many reporters — and
I’m grateful to have had the chance.
To have done it in the pages of the Los Angeles Times, a newspaper
I’ve read my entire life, has been an honor. To have had a platform
to celebrate the state and attack those who insult? That’s been this
lifelong Californian’s fantasy come true.
So why am I stepping away?
The answer is simple: While I have a big mouth, I am a reporter
at heart. I yearned to return to my roots, which is to say I want to
be buried in FOIAs at 4 a.m.
On the Metro staff, I’ll still be covering all of California. Instead
of commenting on stories, my full-time job is now to go find them.
I’m excited to join this staff (benefits, I’ve missed you so…), but
particularly as part of a hiring spree by Times owner Dr. Patrick
Soon-Shiong that seeks to bolster this paper so it can be the journalistic enterprise California deserves.
During my year of punditry, I came to appreciate that those of
us who remain in California love it more than life itself. That applies to liberals and conservatives, to young and old, to residents
from Yolo to Imperial counties. We put up with a state perpetually
on the edge of ruin because we expect things to get better — and
they always do, thanks to those of us who stick it out.
We could do more with that love. The Trump-supporting octogenarian in Rancho Santa Fe is as invested here as a DACA recipient in Oakland. We can teach one another how to become better
Californians — if we allow ourselves to listen.
I’m also proud to have written this columna as a Mexican
American. Too often, Hispanic-surnamed reporters get pigeonholed into covering only Latino issues. From the start, my bosses
wanted me to cover all of California, not just the caliente parts.
That mandate made me grow as a writer, and I’d urge editors
across the country to follow their example and let Latinos be columnists, instead of only Latino columnists.
I could babble on, but I’ve got gracias to give. A special thanks
to Bob Sipchen, Cherry Gee and Matt Welch, all former Times
opinion editors who gave me my first op-ed writing opportunities
12 years ago. Also thanks to The Times’ editorial page editor Nick
Goldberg and former Op-Ed page editor Juliet Lapidos for giving
me the chance to do this on a weekly basis.
And especially to my jefa de jefas, Robin Rauzi, who was the
best type of editor: Someone who knows your talents and because
of that never lets you slide. Who made my column better every
week. Who was as effusive with her critiques as she was with her
wit and praise.
I’m moving on, but with my commitment to California even
stronger. This isn’t adios, but an ay te watcho. I’ll be seeing y’all
around, because this Californian ain’t a quitter.
I am leaving
this post
to become
a features
reporter for
The Times.
gustavo.arellano@latimes.com
A12
W E D N E S DAY , JA N UA RY 2 , 2 019
L AT I M E S . C O M
Suit says special status illegally denied
[Immigrants, from A1]
of 2018, the Trump administration has been rejecting
special status applications
from immigrants who are
over 18, despite court orders
finding that they were mistreated.
In response, Alex, who is
using an alias out of fear of
retaliation, and three other
young immigrants living in
California have sued the administration, saying their
applications were unlawfully
denied. “I think they’re just
trying to find loopholes, honestly, to not let people have
what was once provided to
them,” Alex said. “The small
possibility that we have to
become U.S. citizens … is
getting smaller and smaller.
I feel like that’s their goal: to
make it almost impossible
for one to be legally in the
U.S.”
The administration has
said that it is adhering to
laws in a majority of states
that set adulthood at age 18.
Critics contend that the
shift is further evidence that
the federal government is
trying to create as many obstacles as possible for immigrants in need of humanitar-
ian protections.
According to lawyers
bringing the case against
the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, several
hundred young people in
California could be affected
by the denials this year.
In October, Judge Nathanael Cousins of the U.S.
District Court of Northern
California issued an order
that bans the government
from deporting or placing
into deportation proceedings any SIJS applicants in
the state who are over 18
while the lawsuit proceeds.
The four plaintiffs in the
case experienced similar circumstances of abuse or neglect. One is a 19-year-old
New Zealand citizen who
was abandoned by both parents at 4 months old and
raised by her aunts. Her application was denied in April
by Citizenship and Immigration Services. Another is
a 19-year-old from Honduras
who was abandoned by his
parents shortly after birth
and raised by a cousin. His
application has been pending for more than a year, despite the requirement under
law that SIJS petitions be
decided within six months.
“I think this is part of the
administration’s attack on
immigrants,” said attorney
Sara Van Hofwegen of Public
Counsel, a pro bono public
interest law firm in Los Angeles. “Very little immigration law has changed in the
last two years, but we’re seeing a dramatic change
across all forms of relief.”
The case follows a classaction lawsuit in the same
court
challenging
the
Trump administration’s decision to end temporary protected status for hundreds of
thousands of immigrants
from several countries.
Michael Bars, a Citizenship and Immigration
Services spokesman, said
the agency could not comment on pending litigation.
The SIJS lawsuit hinges
in part on states’ differing
definitions of the age of
adulthood.
To obtain special status,
applicants first need a ruling
from a juvenile court in their
state finding that they were
mistreated
and
either
declaring them a dependent
of the court or appointing
them a guardian. Afterward,
purposes of establishing
guardianship.
In late 2015, the California
Legislature passed a law allowing courts to appoint
guardians for people between 18 and 20 years old for
the purpose of applying for
SIJS. In approving the bill,
the Legislature wrote that it
was “particularly necessary
in light of the vulnerability of
this class of unaccompanied
youth, and their need for a
custodial relationship with a
responsible adult as they adjust to a new cultural context, language, and education system, and recover
from the trauma of abuse,
neglect, or abandonment.”
Under the Trump administration, the citizenship
and immigration agency has
stopped accepting applications from people who were
over 18 but under 21, saying
they were not juveniles. It’s a
departure from the way applications were routinely
processed since the law was
enacted in 1990 and expanded in 2008.
More than 70,000 people
have applied for the protections since 2010, according to
Citizenship and Immigra-
‘I think this is part
of the administration’s attack
on immigrants.
Very little
immigration law
has changed ...
but we’re seeing
a dramatic change
across all forms
of relief.’
— Sara Van
Hofwegen,
attorney with Public Counsel
the applicant submits the
judge’s order with the petition to Citizenship and Immigration Services.
In most states, where 18year-olds are considered
adults, courts can issue the
orders required for SIJS applications only through age
17. But California and a few
other states define children
as being under age 21 for the
Homicides in Chicago fall for third year
But the number of
killings is still higher
than the combined
total in L.A. and N.Y.
associated press
Joshua Lott Getty Images
POLICE investigate a shooting in Chicago. The city reported 561 homicides between Jan. 1 and Dec. 31, 2018.
The police chief says “a reasonable goal” would be to one day get the annual number of homicides below 300.
ed
Trustce
n
si
1992
IN
NS
“NO OO O O Problem!”
• NO MOVING OUT - Non-Tenting Termite
Treatments* - NO PROBLEM
• Stay in your home while we safely
treat your home - NO PROBLEM
• Free 2 Year Warranty on
all services - NO PROBLEM
SPE C T
• 25+ years of GREAT service
rvice
M
and pricing - NO PROBLEEM
• Free Inspection and Estimate
timate so you
have all the information
on you need
to make the right decisions for your
home - NO PROBLEM
CALL 310-256-2220 TODAY
TO SCHEDULE A FREE TERMITE INSPECTION
ADDITIONAL KILTER® OFFERS:
TERMITES “NO
O PROBLE
PROBLEM”
RODENT REMOVAL & PREVENTION
SCHEDULE A FREE
TERMITE INSPECTION
AND RECEIVE
CALL TODAY TO SCHEDULE A
FREE RODENT INSPECTION
AND RECEIVE
$200 OFF
$100 OFF
FF
ANY KILGUARD SERVICE
Must present coupon at time of inspection. New customers
ustomers
usto
mers
only. Some restrictions may apply. Expires 7/31/18.
RMIT
E
TERMITES are
TE
RODENT CONTROL
OL
+ FREE 2 YEAR WARRANTY
Must present coupon at time of inspection. New customers
only. Some restrictions may apply. Expires 7/31/18.
95
QUARTERLY
PEST CONTROL
Must present coupon at time of inspection. New customers
only. Size restrictions may apply. Expires 7/31/18.
www.kiltertermiteandpestcontrol.com
R
TP
F
FREE
Home Inspection
310-256-2220
*Fumigation estimates available upon request
drafted by the city and the
Illinois attorney general to
reform Chicago police under
federal court supervision.
The Chicago Police Department and the mayor
have been criticized since
the 2014 slaying of black teenager Laquan McDonald by a
white police officer. McDonald was shot 16 times by Officer Jason Van Dyke, who was
convicted of second-degree
murder in October.
A video, which showed
the teen holding a knife and
walking away from officers,
prompted an investigation
of the Chicago Police Department by the Justice Department, which found
widespread abuses.
Other officers are accused of trying to coordinate
false reports to protect Van
Dyke.
Emanuel and police
brass began implementing
reforms well before the consent decree was presented to
U.S. District Judge Robert
Dow for approval.
The draft plan stems
from a lawsuit filed by Illinois Atty. Gen. Lisa Madigan, one that was not opposed by Emanuel.
You Don’t Need a Hero...
...Just a Great Plumber
#1 Te
r
Comp mite
an
in L A y
PESTS “NO PROBLEM”
$
The number of shootings
fell 14% in 2018 compared
with the same period last
year, and the numbers are
down 32% since 2016, when
there were more than 3,500
shootings. Through Dec. 31,
2018, there were 2,391 shootings in Chicago.
More than 9,500 illegal
guns were seized in 2018, the
most in five years, a police
statement on the data said.
Closer cooperation between
local and federal law enforcement has also led to an
increase in federal gun prosecutions in recent years, police said.
Overall, crime citywide
was down 10% in 2018 compared with the year before.
Robberies and carjackings
were both down 19%, and car
thefts decreased 11%, the department figures show.
The addition of more
than
200
license-plate
reader systems in squad
cars, bringing the total number to 240, has aided police in
locating stolen vehicles, the
department said.
The release of the crime
data comes as a judge continues to weigh whether to
approve a 200-page plan
We’ll Beat Most
Competitors
Coupons
Military
and Senior
Citizens
Discount
Teachers & 1st
Responders
Now Hiring
Technicians
& Plumbing
Apprentices
Family Owned and Operated for 50+ years
LIC# 7670477
CLEAR ANY DRAIN
$
FREE
65 150
sewer camera inspection
with any drain service.
Through proper access point with coupon. Not valid with other offers offer.
$
Through proper access point with coupon.
Not valid with other offers.
Clean Mainline from Roof
Through proper access point with coupon.
Not valid with other offers offer.
Serving Orange County and LA. County
714-635-7473
626-813-4325
www.mrrooter1.com
LAA6031713-1
including Englewood and
West Garfield Park, have
been plagued for years by
gun and gang-related violence.
Victims of gun violence in
2018 included 12-year-old
She’nyah O’Flynn of Covert,
Mich., who was spending
time with her father in Chicago over the summer. Police said she probably wasn’t
an intended victim when she
was shot while getting out of
a car in West Garfield Park.
Police have said most
killings in Chicago are connected to street gangs, with
members vying for control
of territory or simply retaliating for perceived slights
by gang rivals, which are
typically
communicated
through social media.
IO
killings in Chicago was
higher than the combined
total in the country’s two
other largest cities. As of
about mid-December, New
York reported 278 homicides
and Los Angeles 243.
President Trump has
often singled out Chicago’s
high homicide rate, tweeting
in 2017: “If Chicago doesn’t fix
the horrible ‘carnage’ ... I will
send in the Feds!”
Chicago Mayor Rahm
Emanuel
has
accused
Trump of oversimplifying
the problem and its potential solutions.
Although homicide numbers dropped in many districts in Chicago in 2018, they
went up in several neighborhoods on the city’s south
and west sides. Those areas,
F R EE
CHICAGO — Preliminary numbers indicated
that homicides in Chicago
fell by about 100 last year
compared with 2017, though
the total again eclipsed the
number of homicides in Los
Angeles and New York combined, according to data released Tuesday.
Police in Chicago, the nation’s third-largest city, reported that 561 homicides
were committed between
Jan. 1 and Dec. 31, 2018. That
compares to 660 homicides
in 2017 and more than 770 in
2016, which marked a 19-year
high that put a national
spotlight on Chicago’s persistently dire rates of gun violence.
Chicago police credited
the decreases in part to the
addition of more than 1,000
officers in recent years. Police also cited the creation of
high-tech nerve centers in 20
of 22 police districts, where
officers rely on gunshot-detection technology and predictive analytics that help
quickly get police to areas
where violence is most likely
to erupt.
“Are we where we want to
be? Of course not,” Police
Supt. Eddie Johnson said.
But he added, “I do think we
are taking steps in the right
direction.”
Official numbers for 2018
are expected to be released
in several weeks, according
to the department.
Johnson has previously
said “a reasonable goal”
would be to one day get the
annual number of homicides
below 300.
Although the decrease in
2018 is significant, the homicide total is a repeat of 2016
and 2017, when the number of
tion Services figures. Applications grew significantly after a 2015 influx of unaccompanied children at the border. The agency received
nearly 17,000 applications
from October 2017 — the
start of the last fiscal year —
to June, the last month for
which data is available.
A spokesman for Citizenship and Immigration
Services told Politico in
April that the agency had rejected hundreds of applicants based on guidance issued in February but never
announced publicly.
Compounding the issue,
lawyers say, is that it’s increasingly taking longer for
applicants to get a response.
The number of pending
applications has more than
tripled since 2016. In 2017,
close to 19,000 applications
were pending. As of June,
more than 30,000 applications remained unresolved.
Plaintiffs’ lawyers say
that SIJS applicants are at
further risk of deportation
based on another policy
change that Citizenship and
Immigration Services implemented in July, which directs its officers to begin removal proceedings against
anyone who is denied an immigration benefit.
“These children brought
themselves to the attention
of the U.S. government, relying on the language of the
law,” said attorney Mary
Tanagho Ross of Public
Counsel. “The government
is saying, ‘We can ad-hoc reinterpret the law and change
our minds and punish you
for it.’ It’s really a bait-andswitch.”
The
administration’s
clamp-down is squeezing
immigrants like Jay, a 22year-old from Mexico who is
another plaintiff in the lawsuit. She was brought to the
United States at age 7, and
suffered years of physical
abuse by her father. She fled
in 2014, and a former computer science teacher in San
Jose took her in. Last year,
the teacher was appointed
as her legal guardian.
Forced to drop out of
community college in 2016 after being diagnosed with
thyroid cancer, Jay said her
life now consists of doctor’s
appointments and lab tests.
She suffers anxiety and depression from the trauma
she endured as a child.
In July, Jay received a letter stating that Citizenship
and Immigration Services
planned to deny her special
status application.
She has temporary protection from deportation
under Deferred Action for
Childhood Arrivals, which
the Trump administration
announced it would end last
year. In response to lawsuits,
two U.S. district courts
halted the program’s termination and required Citizenship and Immigration
Services to continue accepting renewal applications
from DACA recipients while
the lawsuits move forward.
“I had all the hope that
this was going to be the last
process that I would need to
go through,” Jay said. “It’s
completely unfair. There’s a
lot of us that left our country
when we were kids. That’s
not a home that we know.”
At the October court
hearing, Department of Justice attorney Ari Nazarov argued that 18-year-olds are
adults under California law,
despite the 2015 law extending their status as minors for
SIJS applications. He acknowledged that applicants
— especially the plaintiffs —
run the risk of being referred
to Immigration and Customs Enforcement and
placed in deportation proceedings. But he said they
aren’t at immediate risk of
deportation.
“If removal proceedings
even were to happen right
now, it would take years before they’re resolved,” he
said, noting that they have
the right to appeal. He also
argued that SIJS doesn’t
automatically grant recipients legal status because
they have to later apply to
become legal residents.
“All it is is just a classification,” he said. “So there’s no
irreparable harm here.”
Alex disagrees. The possibility of being deported
makes her worry about a lot
of things: being separated
from her grandmother, her
friends and her boyfriend,
not being able to finish college or fulfill her dream of becoming a cartoon animator.
Most frightening of all is
the thought of being tracked
down by her family in Mexico
and enduring more abuse.
“I’m terrified to go back,”
she said. “My life is here.”
andrea.castillo
@latimes.com
B
CALIFORNIA
W E D N E S D A Y , J A N U A R Y 2 , 2 0 1 9 :: L A T I M E S . C O M / C A L I F O R N I A
Agents fire
tear gas as
migrants
rush border
Central Americans
frustrated by weeks of
waiting had planned a
peaceful approach,
but some threw rocks.
By Wendy Fry
Carolyn Cole Los Angeles Times
FEDERAL PROSECUTORS don’t yet know whether PG&E played a role in last year’s Camp fire and
whether there was a probation violation. But there’s evidence the utility violated state law in 11 fires in 2017.
PG&E ties to ’17 fires
may violate probation
U.S. attorney’s office
cites evidence that
the utility violated
state law in 11 blazes.
By Alene
Tchekmedyian
Wally Skalij Los Angeles Times
MALIBU RESIDENT Brett Hammond flees the Woolsey fire’s advance Nov. 9.
“We weren’t ready,” said one councilman, looking to prepare for the next blaze.
Studying the Woolsey fire
Malibu and L.A. County each plan to examine their
response to the blaze that destroyed 1,600 structures
By Matt Hamilton
The city of Malibu and
the county of Los Angeles
will begin examining the response to and recovery from
the Woolsey fire, the fastmoving and most destructive wildfire in recent Southern California history.
Citing the “new era of
threat from wildfires,” the
Los Angeles County Board
of Supervisors voted unanimously last month to convene a panel to review the
cause of the Woolsey fire, the
deployment of firefighters,
evacuation procedures and
the communication among
first responders and municipalities.
The fire broke out Nov. 8
and quickly spread to more
than 96,000 acres, killing
three people and destroying
more than 1,600 structures
before it was contained on
Thanksgiving Day.
Officials have said thousands of homes were saved,
but residents in the flames’
path have criticized firefighters and authorities for a
slow response, a paucity of
firefighting resources and
conflicting evacuation infor[See Woolsey fire, B4]
Federal prosecutors said
Pacific Gas and Electric Co.
may have violated the terms
of its probation in a 2010
criminal case for its role in
igniting deadly wildfires
that ravaged Northern California’s wine country last
year.
In a court filing Monday,
the U.S. attorney’s office
said state investigators
found evidence that the utility violated state law in 11
fires — including the Atlas
fire that killed six people —
that broke out in October
2017.
“These facts, specifically
if PG&E started a wildfire by
reckless operation or maintenance of its power lines,
may serve as a basis for” the
judge to find that the utility
violated probation, federal
prosecutors said.
They added that they
don’t have enough information on the utility’s potential
role in last year’s Camp fire
in Butte County — the deadliest wildfire on record in
state history — to determine
whether it amounted to a
probation violation.
The embattled utility acknowledged in a separate
court filing that it could face
additional legal trouble if
found responsible for igniting the blazes. It’s already
[See PG&E, B4]
Youth football backers go on offensive
After helping halt
efforts to bar tackling,
the sport’s enthusiasts
favor a new proposal.
By Melody Gutierrez
California youth football
supporters who defended
their sport against a proposal last year that would have
barred tackling have taken a
new approach: going on the
offensive.
Under a bill supported by
a coalition of youth football
groups, California, beginning in 2021, would limit children to two 60-minute practices of full contact, while
barring tackling in the
sport’s offseason.
The proposal introduced
last month by Assemblyman
Jim Cooper (D-Elk Grove)
[See Youth football, B4]
SAN DIEGO — A group
of about 150 migrants attempted to breach a San Diego border fence on New
Year’s Eve, and some began
throwing rocks at responding U.S. border agents, who
deployed pepper spray and
tear gas on the crowd, authorities said.
U.S. Customs and Border
Protection said the group
was attempting to climb
over and under the San Diego border fence. When
agents and officers responded, about 45 migrants
turned back to Mexico, according to the agency.
But some migrants began throwing rocks over the
fence at agents and officers,
according to the agency.
“Several
teenagers,
wrapped in heavy jackets,
blankets and rubber mats,
were put over the concertina
wire. Border Patrol agents
witnessed members of the
group attempt to lift tod-
Guillermo Arias AFP / Getty Images
CENTRAL AMERICAN migrants run away from
tear gas after trying to cross into San Diego.
U.S. shutdown
hits Sequoia,
Kings Canyon
A big section of the
parks’ main road is
closed, as well as some
privately run facilities.
By Howard Blume
and Matthew Ormseth
Officials have announced
they are closing sections of
Sequoia and Kings Canyon
National Parks because of
the partial shutdown of the
federal government.
The
announcement,
made late Monday, follows a
similar closure announced
for Joshua Tree National
Park.
In both cases, park officials said the government
shutdown has prevented
them from maintaining conditions that are safe for park
visitors.
In Sequoia and Kings
Canyon, about 250 miles
Space figure
finally steps into
the spotlight
Kevin Chang Daily Pilot
UNDER A BILL backed by youth football groups, full-contact practices would be
limited for California children, and tackling would be banned during the offseason.
dler-sized children up and
over the concertina wire and
[have] difficulty accomplishing the task in a safe
manner,” a news release
from U.S. authorities states.
The release does not say
what time the incident occurred, and a follow-up
question was not immediately answered.
The Customs and Border
Protection release said
agents and officers deployed
smoke, pepper spray and CS
gas, a kind of tear gas, to address the rock throwers, who
they said were assaulting
border agents and risking
the safety of migrants who
had already made it onto the
U.S. side.
The gases caused people
to stop throwing rocks and
flee, CBP said.
The agency apprehended
25 people, including two minors, the release said.
“I don’t like that type of
violence of people throwing
rocks,” said Silvio Sierra of
Honduras, one of the migrants who approached the
border and turned back
amid the gas. “We don’t like
that type of violence of
throwing rocks. The majority of people came in peace.
Our intent was to walk up
peacefully.”
Regarding the tear gas,
[See Migrants, B5]
Shelby Jacobs’ contributions to the Apollo
and shuttle programs
were overlooked amid
racial bias. B2
north of Los Angeles, furloughed park employees
have been unable to maintain the safety of roads and
certain walking paths in
winter conditions. In Joshua
Tree, 130 miles east of Los
Angeles, workers have been
unable to empty vault toilets, which are near capacity.
Sequoia and Kings Canyon officials said that as of 6
p.m. Monday they had
closed Generals Highway at
Hospital Rock. The closure
extends through Giant Forest and Lodgepole through
to Lost Grove.
“Trash receptacles are
overflowing, resulting in litter dispersal throughout the
area and a threat to wildlife,”
the park service said in a
news release. “Vehicular
congestion, motor vehicle
accidents, and icy roadways
have led to up to three-hour
delays on the Generals
Highway.”
[See Closure, B6]
Shutdown adds
to court backlog
Immigration hearings
for many will have to be
rescheduled when
federal government
funding is restored. B3
Lottery ......................... B4
B2
W E D N E S DAY , JA N UA RY 2 , 2 019
L AT I M E S . C O M
PROFILE
Unsung space figure gets spotlight
Shelby Jacobs, 83,
whose contributions
were veiled by bias,
is now a role model.
PAM KRAGEN
OCEANSIDE, Calif. —
Shelby Jacobs, 83, is responsible for one of the most
iconic video images of
NASA’s race to put a man on
the moon in the 1960s.
It’s the oft-seen, slowmotion color footage of a
ringlike section of the Saturn V rocket separating
from the Apollo 6 spacecraft
and spinning slowly away
toward Earth, 200,000 feet
below.
Yet for all of his 40 years
working his way up to the
executive level on the Apollo
and space shuttle programs, Jacobs, who is black,
faced near-constant discrimination from his white
colleagues and was never
paid as well as other engineers doing the same work.
To avoid rocking the
boat, Jacobs kept a low
profile in his working life.
But in recent years, he has
stepped into the spotlight to
serve as a role model for
minorities and women who
face workplace discrimination.
His triumph against
extreme odds is being celebrated at an exhibit at the
Columbia Memorial Space
Center in Downey. “Achieving the Impossible: The Life
and Dreams of Shelby
Jacobs” will run through the
spring.
Jacobs said he’s honored
by the recognition, but what
he’s most excited about is a
daylong program at the
museum on Feb. 16 to celebrate Black History Month.
Jacobs never had any black
role models in his field of
work, so he’d like to serve as
an example of what can be
achieved in spite of the
challenges of prejudice,
white privilege and the low
expectations that minorities still face.
“That’s the story of my
Pam Kragen San Diego Union-Tribune
SHELBY JACOBS, 83, is featured in an exhibit at Downey’s Columbia Memorial
Space Center about his achievements in the Apollo and space shuttle programs.
life. I’ve never been apprehensive about doing something that had not been
done before,” he said during
a recent interview at his
home. “I never presumed to
limit myself to my own
limitations.”
Jacobs grew up the son of
a preacher in the tiny black
community of Val Verde,
just north of Santa Clarita.
To help his family make
ends meet, he picked watermelons, cantaloupes and
potatoes as a boy and bused
restaurant tables as a teen.
Blacks made up just 1% of
his class at William S. Hart
High School in Newhall, but
he stood out in many other
ways: Jacobs was a threesport varsity athlete and
senior class president.
He assumed that after
high school the best job he
could get was as a restaurant cook. Then he took an
aptitude test that showed a
high proficiency for math
and science. When he
earned a scholarship to
UCLA, where he planned to
study mechanical engineering, his high school principal
took him aside to warn
Jacobs that he should expect many doors to be
closed to him because of his
race.
“I didn’t translate his
comments negatively,”
Jacobs said. “He was letting
me know the playing field
was not level, and I appreciated his honesty.”
In 1953, Jacobs enrolled
at UCLA and three years
later was hired at Rocketdyne, a Canoga Park space
program contractor that
built rockets used in the
Mercury, Atlas, Jupiter and
Thor programs. At the time,
just eight of Rocketdyne’s
5,000 engineers were black.
Jacobs hadn’t intended
to become a pioneer, but he
learned ways to cope. He
didn’t hang out with his few
black colleagues because he
thought that would be a
“springboard to failure.”
Instead, he assimilated as
best he could with his white
co-workers. When they
would make racial comments, he didn’t get angry.
He simply challenged their
assumptions.
After President Kennedy
announced the Apollo program in 1961, Jacobs transferred to Rockwell in Downey, where he spent the rest
of his career.
Jacobs’ specialty was
designing engine components, hydraulics, pneumatics and propulsion systems.
In 1965, he was assigned to
design a camera system
that could film the rocket
separations for the unmanned Apollo 6.
After three years of testing and perfecting, the
cameras recorded the famous footage just seconds
after the launch on April 4,
1968. Jacobs said the video
proved the viability of the
Saturn V rocket separation
process. It was also the first
time video had captured the
curvature of Earth from
space.
But the mission’s success
was overshadowed by another event that day: the
assassination of Martin
Luther King Jr.
It was a troubling fullcircle moment for Jacobs.
Inspired by King’s marches
for voting rights in 1965,
Jacobs spent two weeks in
Georgia that summer canvassing neighborhoods to
register black voters. The
racial divide there was so
extreme, he and other California volunteers were
warned to avoid sharing a
cup or an ice cream cone
with their white fellow volunteers.
For the last 15 years of his
career, Jacobs worked on
the space shuttle program,
where he was project manager of the external tank
disconnect systems. He rose
to the executive level of vice
president, which was known
as “mahogany row” for its
luxurious wood desks.
He said his rise to the top
was so shocking to some of
his white colleagues that
workers would frequently
come to his office just to
gawk at a black man behind
the desk. He got there, he
said, through a mix of being
blessed with a head for
math and science and a
strong work ethic.
“I didn’t always stay
inside the lines of what was
expected of me,” he said. “I
was an envelope-pusher.”
He retired in 1996 and
moved with his then-wife,
Diane, and their daughter,
Shelley, to Oceanside. Diane
died in 2011, and in 2014, he
married Elizabeth Portilla,
79. They split their time
between homes in Oceanside and Encinitas.
Jacobs started garnering
attention for his work 10
years ago, when he was
named a NASA “unsung
hero.” But it wasn’t until he
and his wife saw the movie
“Hidden Figures” in 2016
that he decided to begin
promoting the need to hire
and adequately compensate
women and minorities.
Jacobs said the women
depicted in the movie, who
made important achievements working for NASA in
the early 1960s, had the
temperamental suitability
to face the slings and arrows
of prejudice and not react
angrily.
Since 2016, the Jacobses
have traveled the country
visiting space museums,
where he has encouraged
their administrators to
highlight the hidden figures
of the aerospace industry.
He has been a featured
speaker for the past two
years at the Columbia Memorial Space Center.
In 2019, NASA will celebrate the 50th anniversary
of Apollo 11, the space capsule that first landed men
on the moon. Jacobs has
already been contacted for
several video and newspaper interviews as well as
by an author who would like
to write his biography.
In each interview, Jacobs
said he tries to deliver the
same message.
“It’s important to be a
pioneer, but I want people to
understand that while we
appreciate the progress,
things need to be done to
address the inequality.
That’s something that was
there when I started, and
it’s still happening today
right up to the very top level
of our government.”
pam.kragen
@sduniontribune.com
Kragen writes for the San
Diego Union-Tribune.
C E L E B R AT E T H E N E W Y E A R W I T H T H E
TO U R N A M E N T O F R OS E S ®
T H A N K YO U TO O U R S P O N S O R S
Presenting Sponsors
Presenting Sponsor
of the Rose Parade® and
Rose Parade Opening Spectacular
Presenting Sponsor
of the Rose Bowl Game®
Oicial Sponsors
Oicial Fitness Partner
of the Rose Parade
Oicial Sponsor of the
Tournament of Roses
Oicial Floral Company and
Sponsor of the Rose Parade
Float Awards
Oicial Ticket Exchange,
VIP Hospitality and
Corporate Travel Partner
Oicial Rose of the
Rose Bowl Game
Oicial Vehicle of
the Rose Parade
Oicial Tire of the Rose Parade
and Presenting Sponsor of
Decorating Places
Oicial Grandstand Seating
and Ticketing Company
Presenting Sponsor of
the Rose Parade Grand Finale
and Equestfest
Event Sponsors
Presenting Sponsor of
Coronation
Oicial Host of Team Visit
Presenting Sponsor of
the VIP Tailgate
Presenting Sponsor of
Empowerment Day
Presenting Sponsor of
the President’s Ball
Oicial Host of the
Annual Beef Bowl
Supporting Sponsors
Product Suppliers
Community Partners
Royal Court Sponsors
Presenting Sponsor of Bandfest,
Provider of Rose Parade
Drumheads
W E D N E S DAY , JA N UA RY 2 , 2 019
L AT I M E S . C O M
B3
CITY & STATE
Plea is
entered
in theft
of yacht
Costa Mesa man, 24,
pleads not guilty in
incident before
Newport boat parade.
By Julia Sclafani
A Costa Mesa man has
pleaded not guilty to stealing a yacht in Newport Harbor on the last day of the
Newport Beach Christmas
Boat Parade.
Theodore Liko Wilson,
24, entered not guilty pleas
last week to felony burglary,
felony unlawful taking of a
vehicle and felony vandalism as well as six misdemeanor counts related to
driving under the influence,
resisting arrest and operating a vessel under the influence.
At 3:45 p.m. Dec. 23 — less
than three hours before the
harbor boat parade was
scheduled to begin — Newport Beach police and the
Orange County Sheriff ’s Department Harbor Patrol responded to calls of a “boat
traveling erratically” in the
harbor near the 2300 block of
Newport Boulevard, sheriff ’s spokeswoman Carrie
Braun said.
Harbor Patrol personnel
were told that the 70-foot
yacht, named Gambler, had
been stolen, the Sheriff ’s Department said.
The person driving the
boat “was unresponsive to
commands and attempted
to accelerate and steer the
boat away,” the department
said.
A Newport Beach police
officer and a sheriff ’s deputy
boarded the moving boat
and gained control of it
within minutes, authorities
said.
The deputy suffered minor injuries, including cuts
and scrapes, while trying to
breach the cabin, Braun
said.
Wilson was arrested and
booked into Orange County
Jail.
“Obviously this was a significant
hazard,”
said
Braun, noting the number of
vessels in the harbor at the
time. “There was a lot of concern for life and safety of all
individuals in the harbor.”
Justin Aveni, 36, of Fontana was at Woody’s Wharf
on Newport Boulevard
hours before the boat parade, which he and his
friends planned to watch,
when he noticed that the
large yacht appeared to lose
power as it was leaving its
dock, then regained it.
“You could see on the left
side of the boat ropes and
buoys were still hanging out
of the boat,” Aveni said.
“Usually on boats like
that there are people pulling
up buoys,” he said, adding
that the yacht appeared to
have no crew onboard.
Then the owner of the
yacht, a custom 1989 Nordlund, showed up at Woody’s
Wharf and said, “That’s my
boat. Can somebody take
me to it?” Aveni said.
“Let’s get this dude a
ride,” Aveni said he told a
friend who had a boat
docked nearby.
The Gambler “started
accelerating rapidly forward
and then in reverse,” Aveni
said.
At one point, the yacht
sped toward an electric boat
while its passengers were
“screaming while trying to
get away,” Aveni said. The
yacht stopped about 30 feet
short of colliding with the
small boat, he said.
Aveni and his friends piloted their boat toward the
Gambler until a Harbor Patrol vessel tried to stop
them. “We have the owner of
the boat — that boat was
stolen,” Aveni said they told
a Harbor Patrol deputy.
“That’s when everyone
realized there was problem,”
Aveni said.
The yacht was damaged,
though the extent was unknown. The owner could not
be reached for comment.
Wilson’s next scheduled
court appearance is Friday.
Sclafani writes for Times
Community News.
Genaro Molina Los Angeles Times
WHILE immigration court cases for people in detention centers go ahead as scheduled, those for people who aren’t detained will be re-
scheduled once the U.S. shutdown ends. Above, Anna Francisco Pasqual and her children after their release from detention in Texas.
Immigration court is strained
A backlog of cases grows as the partial U.S. government shutdown continues
By Kate Morrissey
SAN DIEGO — The government shutdown over
President Trump’s request
for border wall funding is
probably increasing the immigration court backlog.
While cases for people in
detention centers are going
ahead as scheduled, those
for people on the nondetained docket will get new
dates once the government
is funded again. That means
many hearings are being
postponed in a system already clogged by more than
800,000 pending cases, according to the latest data
from the Transactional Records Access Clearinghouse
at Syracuse University.
San Diego’s nondetained
docket has more than 4,000
cases pending.
Although case loads during the shutdown have been
lighter because of the holidays, many more cases will
be affected if the closure continues into next week, Houston attorney Ruby Powers
said.
“That’s when it’s going to
get really bad,” Powers said.
Because attorneys don’t
know when the shutdown
will end or how cases will be
prioritized for rescheduling,
there’s a lot of uncertainty
for clients with upcoming
court dates, Powers said.
Some of the hearings that
will need to be rescheduled
are from the “master calendar.” Those hearings are
used to provide people in
proceedings with information, for paperwork submissions and to schedule other
hearings, known as “merits
hearings,” which are more
like trials.
Although it can be frustrating to have either rescheduled, because the existing backlog will probably
push the new dates months
or years into the future, rescheduling merits hearings
can be especially difficult for
clients, Powers said.
“They’ve been waiting.
They’re so stressed out.
Their whole life depends on
this hearing date,” Powers
said. “They want to get it
over with so they can try to
move on with their lives, and
you can just feel that stress
and uncertainty.”
If hearing dates get
pushed years into the future,
it can affect a person’s eligibility to stay in the U.S. Evidence can grow old, or country conditions can change.
Fingerprints pulled as part
of a background check
might need to be rerun.
Sometimes the person is
asking for permission to stay
through a program that allows people to remain in the
country if their absence will
cause extreme hardship to a
child who is a U.S. citizen. If
that child turns 18 before the
case finishes, the immigrant
will probably lose the ability
to stay.
Immigration courts will
send notices of the date
changes to those whose
cases are affected, according
to a statement from the Executive Office for Immigration Review.
kate.morrissey
@sduniontribune.com
Morrissey writes for the San
Diego Union-Tribune.
Motherless toddler separated from dad
Border officials take
boy into custody
when father seeks
asylum after an attack
that killed his wife.
By Kate Morrissey
SAN DIEGO — After he
lost his green card following
a felony conviction and was
deported to Mexico, Sergio
Angel
Martinez
Lopez
thought he would never
come back to the U.S.
That changed this summer after his wife was killed
in a spray of bullets in a
drive-by shooting, according
to news reports. Martinez
decided to flee with their son
Sergio, not quite 2.
When he asked for asylum in October at the San
Ysidro Port of Entry, border
officials told him that he
would have to be separated
from the younger Sergio but
assured Martinez that his
son would soon be united
with Martinez’s mother in
Jacksonville, Fla.
More than two months
later, the toddler is still in the
federal government’s custody in Texas, Martinez said.
Locked inside Otay Mesa
Detention Center, Martinez,
32, said he feels like he’s still
being punished for the life he
lived when he was younger, a
lifestyle he said he left behind in the United States.
“If they’d focused on why
I came to ask for asylum, I
don’t think they’d have the
heart to separate me and the
baby,” he said.
Martinez originally came
to the U.S. from Tijuana with
his family when he was in elementary school, moving to
Jacksonville.
By his late teens, he was
getting into trouble, with
criminal charges related to
SERGIO Angel Martinez Lopez with his son. They
have been separated for more than two months.
drugs and alcohol. Then police found a gun in the car he
was driving, according to immigration officials, court records and Martinez himself.
Martinez maintains that
the gun was his friend’s, but
it didn’t matter. He served a
prison sentence and was
transferred to immigration
custody and deported in
September 2014.
He returned to his hometown of Tijuana and got a job
at a call center. There he met
Glenda Siboney Gaona Zamora and fell in love.
Martinez was living with
Gaona and two children —
one was hers from a previous
relationship — in Sanchez
Taboada, one of Tijuana’s
most violent neighborhoods, when they became
targets of threats because of
an incident that began outside their home between police and a driver, Martinez
said.
The incident escalated
when police entered the
home, searching for a gun
that wasn’t there. Police
eventually told the family to
move for their own safety.
The couple hid in a hotel
until they found a new place
in El Refugio, a neighborhood in eastern Tijuana.
Martinez thought it was
far enough away, but less
than two weeks later, someone sprayed bullets at the
family car while his wife was
driving. Somehow, Martinez
and the two children
emerged unscathed, but
Gaona was badly hurt.
He managed to get her to
a hospital, where she died
that afternoon.
Martinez went into hiding again, frequently switching hotels if he felt someone
was watching him. He received a message with a
photo of his bullet-riddled
car warning him about what
would come next.
He decided to apply for
asylum and waited in the sixweek line at the San Ysidro
Port of Entry to ask the U.S.
for protection.
“I would’ve never went if I
had known they would take
my baby away,” Martinez
said.
When asked why Martinez was separated from his
child, Immigration and Customs Enforcement said its
officers weren’t involved and
deferred to Customs and
Border Protection, which
did not respond to a request
for comment because of the
ongoing government shutdown.
Though a San Diego fed-
eral judge has ordered the
Trump administration to reunify families, court rulings
so far have made exceptions
for parents with serious
criminal histories.
Immigration
officials
have separated parents
from their children if the parents have enough of a criminal history that officials do
not believe they can release
them. Under a court ruling,
children may not be held indefinitely in immigration
custody. They must be released within 20 days.
With news of two children
dying in immigration custody in recent weeks, Martinez is especially concerned. He calls every day to
the facility in Texas that is
housing his son to ask
whether his mother’s application to sponsor the boy
has been processed.
He’s had one video call
with his son since they were
separated, though he’s requested several more.
Martinez’s normally talkative and playful toddler
didn’t say much as he looked
at his father on the screen.
“I could see in his face
that he was mad at me,”
Martinez said. “Me and him
were really close even when
his mom was alive.”
His son spent his second
birthday in custody.
Unaccompanied
children, and those who are
separated from their parents at the border, end up in
custody of the Office of Refugee Resettlement until social workers can find and approve family members living
in the U.S. to sponsor them.
The average amount of
time a child spends in custody has almost doubled in
the last two years, growing
from 34 days two years ago to
60 days more recently, according to data from the Department of Health and Human Services.
Advocates have attributed at least some of this lag
to a change in policy last year
requiring all adults living in
the potential sponsor’s
home to submit fingerprints
that may be shared with
ICE, the agency responsible
for deportations.
The
Department
of
Health and Human Services
ended that policy in mid-December, acknowledging that
it had affected how long children stayed in custody.
Martinez’s
mother,
Maria Niskanen, is saving
money to be able to take care
of the younger Sergio when
he is finally released.
Martinez’s
younger
brother, Anthony Niskanen,
25, said he helped her with
the paperwork and said the
entire household completed
the fingerprinting process
weeks ago. They don’t know
how much longer it will take.
He has listened to his
mother’s weekly video chats
with the younger Sergio.
“I can tell that the baby is
confused. He lost his mom,
and now he lost his dad,”
Niskanen said. “I think
they’re taking care of him. I
just don’t think he’s happy.”
For Martinez, the hardest part is not knowing what
will happen next. He passed
an interview with an asylum
officer, the first step in the
process to be able to stay in
the U.S., but he hasn’t found
an attorney to help him with
the immigration court case.
What he wants more than
anything is to be back with
his son. He left two children
behind in Jacksonville when
he was deported.
“I already missed out on
two kids’ lives,” Martinez
said. “I can’t miss out on
three of them.”
kate.morrissey
@sduniontribune.com
Morrissey writes for the San
Diego Union-Tribune.
B4
W E D N E S DAY , JA N UA RY 2 , 2 019
L AT I M E S . C O M
Youth
football
devotees
back bill
[Youth football, from B1]
models the limitations on restrictions already in place
for high school football in
California, which caps fullcontact practices to 90 minutes twice a week.
The restrictions come
amid growing concern from
medical professionals who
say repetitive collisions from
hitting and blocking can
cause long-term brain damage.
“We want to improve the
safety standards for youth
tackle football across the
state,” said Joe Rafter, president of Southern Marin
Youth Football in the San
Francisco Bay Area, who is
working with Cooper’s office
on the bill. “It’s the right
thing to do.”
But Rafter said their efforts would also block any
new attempts by lawmakers
to bar youth tackle football.
A bill to set a minimum age
of 12 to play organized tackle
football died in April, but the
authors of the legislation,
AB 2108, promised to try
again in 2019.
Assembly members Kevin McCarty (D-Sacramento)
and
Lorena
Gonzalez
Fletcher (D-San Diego)
cited research showing
youths who began playing
tackle football before age 12
developed cognitive, behavioral and mood problems
earlier than those who began full-contact sports later.
McCarty’s office said he
plans to introduce another
bill banning tackling in
youth football.
“I played organized football as a child, and I love the
sport to this day,” McCarty
said after the bill was pulled
from the Arts, Entertainment, Sports, Tourism and
Internet Media Committee
in April when it became apparent it did not have the
votes to pass. “But love for
football doesn’t mean that
we should ignore science.”
Cooper said he wants to
ensure that kids can still
play tackle football, but in a
safer environment. Banning
tackling outright goes too
far, he said.
“Americans love football,
and kids love playing football,” Cooper said. “However, we must ensure our children are safe while participating in contact sports.”
melody.gutierrez
@latimes.com
Twitter: @MelodyGutierrez
Gary Coronado Los Angeles Times
T HE COLD HUMANS AND THE SEA
Beachgoers brave the winter water in San Pedro for the Cabrillo Beach Polar Bear Plunge. The New Year’s Day swim celebrates the
crowning of the group’s king and queen. The Cabrillo Beach Polar Bears club is dedicated to fitness and community service.
Role in fires may violate probation
[PG&E, from B1]
facing heavy scrutiny and a
slew of lawsuits.
“If it were determined
that a wildfire had been
started by reckless operation or maintenance of
PG&E power lines, that
would, if the specific circumstances gave rise to a violation of federal, state or local
statutes, implicate the requirements” of its probation, the company’s lawyers
said in the filing.
They pointed out the utility’s ongoing cooperation
with state investigations
probing its role in wildfires,
and said that out of the 315
wildfires reported by the
California Department of
Forestry and Fire Protection
in 2017 in the utility’s service
area, 40 of them were allegedly linked to PG&E equipment.
The utility has not admitted any wrongdoing in the
Camp fire, which started the
morning of Nov. 8 and within
hours overtook three mountain communities and displaced up to 50,000 people in
Butte County. Eighty-six
people were killed.
While the cause of the
A message to our readers
Because of an unforeseen technical issue, we are unable
to list obituaries in today’s edition. You can view
today’s listings at legacy.com. If you have any questions
or need assistance placing an obituary, please call (800)
234-4444.
AMERICA’S
FAVORITE TV
BOOK
Now at the BEST p
price available!
ubscribe &
Su
SA
S VE 80%
F THE $3.99 COVER PRICE!
OFF
Carolyn Cole Los Angeles Times
WHILE THE CAUSE of the Camp fire is still under investigation, state investi-
gators have identified two potential ignition points near PG&E equipment.
Camp fire is still under investigation, state investigators are probing whether
problems on a transmission
line ignited the blaze and
have identified two potential
ignition points near PG&E
equipment. The company
has said it found bullet-riddled equipment and felled
branches on power lines
elsewhere within the fire’s
massive footprint.
The company’s lawyers
noted in their filing that a
utility worker was one of the
first to alert authorities to
the blaze.
The filings came at the request of U.S. District Judge
William Alsup, who is over-
seeing the utility’s probation
in a criminal case stemming
from the deadly San Bruno
gas pipeline blast, which
killed eight people in 2010.
PG&E was found guilty
of several crimes in that
case, including obstructing
a National Transportation
Safety Board probe, and
sentenced to five years’ probation. It was also ordered to
pay a $3-million fine. Under
the terms of its probation,
the utility was not supposed
to commit any other crimes.
Alsup also asked California Atty. Gen. Xavier Becerra’s office to weigh in on potential criminal charges the
utility could face in connection with any wildfire since
its sentencing.
Becerra’s office said last
week that the utility could be
charged with a range of
crimes, including murder or
involuntary manslaughter, if
authorities determine that
recent wildfires ignited as a
result of the reckless operation or maintenance of
power lines.
alene.tchekmedyian
@latimes.com
Twitter: @AleneTchek
Looking to prepare for the next blaze
[Woolsey fire, from B1]
mation.
“It’s clear that a comprehensive review of the county’s response and recovery
procedures will be valuable
to ensure that we are increasingly better prepared
for the heightened fire risk
we now face, as well as to answer questions raised by my
constituents,” said Supervisor Sheila Kuehl, whose district includes several communities in the Santa Monica Mountains directly affected by the blaze.
The county’s committee
will be made up of law enforcement, state and local
firefighting agencies, and
representatives from cities
including Malibu, Calabasas
and Agoura Hills. The committee will work with the
county’s chief executive officer, who will also hire an outside consultant to study the
overall Woolsey fire response.
The supervisors will receive progress reports every
90 days detailing strengths
and weaknesses of the disaster response and recommendations for handling future catastrophes.
In Malibu, where about
440 homes were destroyed in
the fire, the City Council
unanimously voted last
month to create its own special committee to begin looking at the city’s response to
the fire as well as ways to improve evacuations and prepare for future events.
“It was a disaster, on every level. It was a total disas-
ter. All of our systems
weren’t up for this because
we weren’t ready,” Councilman Mikke Pierson said at
the meeting. “I’m much
more interested in how we
get ready and how we improve.”
The scope and structure
of Malibu’s special committee was unclear, but the City
Council designated two
members — Skylar Peak and
Rick Mullen — to lead the
group. Mullen said the pair
could propose specific subgroups with narrower tasks,
such as reviewing evacuation plans. Evacuations for
Malibu’s eastern end, which
was mostly untouched in the
Woolsey fire, were a priority.
The City Council is expected to finalize the special
committee at its Jan. 14
meeting. Meanwhile, Malibu
will create a website where
residents can submit suggestions for disaster response and recovery.
“The entire City Council
and I are absolutely committed to helping the residents
of Malibu rebuild and get
back on their feet as quickly
and safely as possible,” Mayor Jefferson Wagner said in a
statement.
“Like so many of you, my
house burned down, so I am
going through this together
with you. Part of the healing
process includes understanding what happened
and why it happened, and
making improvements for
the future, which is why the
formation of a disaster committee is so important.”
matt.hamilton
@latimes.com
Lottery results
EACH WEEK ENJOY
TV
WATCHING
MADE
EASY
Tonight’s SuperLotto Plus
Jackpot: $36 million
Sales close at 7:45 p.m.
Tonight’s Powerball Jackpot:
$53 million
Sales close at 7 p.m.
Local cable conversion chart for every
cable & satellite provider in your area
For Tuesday, Jan. 1, 2019
The most insight on what to watch from
America’s top TV critics
34-44-57-62-70—Mega 14
Jackpot: $425 million
Your weekly go-to guide on Movies and
Streaming
Sudoku, Trivia, Word Search and Crossword
fun
PREFERRED DISCOUNT
LA Times readers can get 13 issues for only $10.49
– the lowest newspaper price available!
SUBSCRIBE TODAY
Toll-free: 1-877-580-3163
Online: tvweekly.com
Mega Millions
Mega number is bold
Fantasy Five: 11-14-16-34-38
Daily Four: 3-4-5-8
Daily Three (midday): 9-3-1
Daily Three (evening): 9-8-3
Daily Derby:
(10) Solid Gold
(1) Gold Rush
(6) Whirl Win
Race time: 1:48.63
Results on the internet:
www.latimes.com/lottery
General information:
(800) 568-8379
THE RUINS of a home remain at Point Dume in Malibu after the Woolsey fire. A
(Results not available at this number)
city panel will focus on “understanding what happened and why it happened.”
Katie Falkenberg Los Angeles Times
W E D N E S DAY , JA N UA RY 2 , 2 019
L AT I M E S . C O M
B5
Migrants met with tear gas at border
[Migrants, from B1]
he said, “It was very strong.
It was everywhere. People
were crying. Women and
children, too. The gas was
everywhere.”
Several migrants from
the group that rushed the
border said they had grown
frustrated by weeks of waiting at El Barretal shelter
with conflicting and shifting
information about how the
U.S. immigration process is
supposed to work. They said
the majority in the group
planned to peacefully approach U.S. immigration authorities at the border and
“throw themselves at their
mercy.”
Such a rush of the border
had been discussed for days.
“The thing about it is, you
don’t want to be illegal but
you are already illegal,” Sierra said. “So they tell you to
take a number. You ask for a
number and wait in line for
an opportunity. But there’s
so many people in line, you
aren’t getting through. If you
walk up and ask for asylum,
they say you are in the wrong
place. You tell me: What are
we supposed to do?”
Jose Alexander of El Salvador said he headed to the
border with his 4-year-old
son and witnessed the tear
gas firing. He said he didn’t
see anyone throwing rocks, a
sentiment echoed by many
migrants Tuesday.
“My son is still scared,”
Alexander said. “We were a
little farther back in the
group. As soon as I heard the
first shot, I scooped him up
and ran back. He was really
scared.”
Authorities also used
tear gas Nov. 25 during a similar rush on the border. Although some women and
children said they were affected by the gas, officials
said it was targeted only at
rock-throwers in that instance as well. President
Trump at the time said it
was “a very minor form of the
tear gas itself ” that he assured was “very safe.”
The migrants from Guatemala, Honduras and El
Salvador seek asylum from
violence and other unrest in
their native countries. They
set out on foot in October,
eventually using buses and
Guillermo Arias AFP/Getty Images
U.S. BORDER Patrol officers deploy near a border fence to deter Central American migrants from crossing from Tijuana to San Diego. As
night fell on New Year’s Eve, the migrants tried to cross but retreated after officers used smoke, tear gas and pepper spray.
other means to arrive in Tijuana, where they have been
awaiting U.S. processing.
Their presence has been
portrayed as an invasion by
Trump and as a humanrights crisis by others. They
have been routed from one
shelter to another, and many
have decided to return to
their homelands or stay in
Mexico, where new President Andrés Manuel López
Obrador is more welcoming
than Trump.
U.S. authorities are not
the only ones who have used
tear gas on the Central
‘There’s so many people in line, you aren’t getting through.
If you walk up and ask for asylum, they say you are in the
wrong place. You tell me: What are we supposed to do?’
— Silvio Sierra of Honduras
America migrants. Two people tossed tear gas canisters
into the El Barretal shelter
as migrants were settling
into bed on Dec. 18.
Juan Carlos Caballero
Jones said he participated in
Tuesday’s rush on the bor-
der. He said he made it past
the border fence and hid in
the brush as agents searched nearby.
“When they passed me, I
moved another inch or so,
and then I stayed still,” he
said. “They walked right
past me but didn’t find me.”
Eventually,
Caballero
was discovered by the lights
from a helicopter, he said: “I
was just starting to think I
was free.”
He said he was the only
one caught in the spotlight
of the helicopter and was unsure whether the agents
would use some type of force
to stop him.
“I was so nervous my
whole body was shaking,” he
said. He said agents on the
ground returned, took him
into custody and walked him
back into Mexico.
“I was so close,” he said
with a sigh. “But I am going
to try again on another day.”
wendy.fry
@sduniontribune.com
Fry writes for the San Diego
Union-Tribune.
DEPART
ON AN ADVENTURE
OF A LIFETIME
RETURN
WITH A GREATER
UNDERSTANDING
Let our reporters, editors and photographers take you on a journey of discovery.
855-890-5298
(Monday-Friday, 7 a.m. – 5 p.m. PT)
LATexpeditions.com/explore
B6
W E D N E S DAY , JA N UA RY 2 , 2 019
L AT I M E S . C O M
Today in North America
Less windy: The strong upper-level system that supported the cold Santa Ana winds during the last 36
hours is moving to the east. High pressure over the Great Basin will gradually weaken today and
tonight, resulting in weaker offshore gradients and a gradual warming trend. Skies will be clear today
and temperatures will remain below normal. Nights will be cold, especially in wind-sheltered areas.
Icy: Freezing rain will glaze parts of central and northern Texas,
and heavy rain will spread from eastern Texas across the Deep
South. Snow will continue in parts of the Southwest, and light snow
will fall over the Great Lakes region.
5-day forecasts
Pressure:
L
Low
H
High
◗
Today in Southern California
▲
Warm Front
Cold Front
Jet Stream
Trough
High/low temperatures are average forecasts for entire zone.
Temps
Today
L.A. Basin
62/42
Valleys
61/40
Beaches
63/43
Mountains
37/19
Deserts
62/37
Thursday
Friday
Saturday
Sunday
Sunny
Sunny
Sunny
P.M. showers
Rain possible
Sunny
Sunny
Sunny
Rain
Rain possible
Sunny
Sunny
Sunny
Showers
Mostly cloudy
Windy, not as cold
Not as cold
45/20
Sunny
51/22
Cooler
42/26
Showers
39/24
Sunny
Sunny
Sunny
Clouds, sun
Showers
65/45
66/46
62/48
61/47
Los Angeles Basin: Sunny
and breezy. Clear and chilly
tonight. Sunny and warmer
Thursday.
Valleys/canyons: Sunny
and breezy. Clear and chilly
tonight. Sunny and warmer
Thursday.
Orange County: Sunny and
windy. Clear and breezy
Air quality
65/40
66/41
59/43
57/41
tonight. Mostly sunny with
lighter winds Thursday.
Ventura/Santa Barbara:
Sun and cool. Clear and
chilly tonight with freezing
temperatures inland. Mostly
sunny Thursday.
San Diego County: Sunny
and cool. Clear and chilly
tonight. Sunny Thursday.
Good
Moderate
66/43
66/46
63/49
60/48
Local mountains: Sunny
and cool with winds 20-30
mph, gusting to 55 mph.
Clear, breezy and cold
tonight. Sunny and breezy
Thursday.
High desert: Sunny and
breezy. Clear and cold
tonight. Sunny and cool on
Thursday.
Unhealthful for:
Sensitive people
–0
0s 10s 20s 30s 40s 50s 60s 70s 80s 90s 100+
Anchorage
36/13
65/40
68/42
63/48
62/45
Low desert: Sunny with
gusty winds. Clear and cold
tonight. Sunny and warmer
Thursday.
San Francisco Bay Area: .
Sunny and cool. Clear and
chilly tonight. Partly cloudy
Thursday.
Seattle
46/44
Denver
44/19
Chicago
33/23
New York
38/33
Las Vegas
49/31
Los Angeles
62/42
All
Rain T-storm Snow Ice
Houston
51/47
Miami
82/73
Not Available
South Coast Air Quality Management District forecasts air quality
SANTA
BARBARA CO.
Santa Clarita
Hesperia
60/38
Santa Paula
LOS ANGELES CO.
50/24
Ojai
63/36
Santa
Simi Valley
Barbara
61/35
Chatsworth
SAN BERNARDINO CO.
Burbank
62/39
Monrovia
61/35
61/40
Camarillo
Ventura
62/38
57/41
66/40
62/44
Yucca Valley
Pomona/
UCLA
50/28
Oxnard
San Bernardino
LA Downtown Fairplex
Westlake
Ontario
64/42
63/42
62/36
Woodland
60/36
62/42
Village
61/36
Hills
Whittier
Santa Barbara Co.
63/39
Chino
65/39
Height
Period
Direction
Santa Monica Hills
Riverside
64/32
RIVERSIDE CO.
Fullerton
63/40
1-3’
15 sec WNW
63/43
58/27
64/39
Torrance
Santa Ana
Ventura Co.
62/40
ORANGE CO.
Palm
Hemet
Long
Height
Period
Direction
63/41
Springs
58/28
Irvine
Beach Newport
2-4’
15 sec WNW
63/39
62/37
63/41 Beach
Mission Viejo
Los Angeles Co.
61/41
Temecula
Height
Period
Direction
63/40
Laguna
59/28
2-4’
15 sec WNW
Beach
San
61/41
Clemente
Orange Co.
Surf and sea
59/38
SAN DIEGO CO.
Height
Period
Direction
POINT CONCEPTION TO MEXICO
Oceanside
1-3’
14 sec S
Inner waters: Winds northeast,
61/25
becoming southwest at 15-20 knots.
San Diego Co.
Wind waves 1-4 feet with a west swell of
Ramona
Escondido
Height
Period
Direction
1-2 feet.
59/28
61/32
2-3’
14 sec WNW
Surf zone: The potential for strong rip
Poway
currents is moderate at beaches in
62/36
Ventura and L.A. counties, and low
Tides
UV index
elsewhere.
L.A. Outer Harbor, in feet.
Minutes to burn for
San Diego
Today 6:29a 6.0 Hi 12:01a 1.8 Lo sensitive people
Station
Time Wind
Waves Temp
62/41
Las Vegas, 45
Morro Bay
Santa Barbara
Ventura
Zuma Beach
Marina del Rey
Hermosa Beach
Cabrillo Beach
Hunt’n. Beach
Newport Beach
Dana Point
San Clemente
Oceanside
Solana Beach
Mission Beach
Avalon
4p
4p
4p
4p
4p
4p
4p
4p
4p
4p
4p
4p
4p
4p
4p
VENTURA CO.
NW10
VAR5
WNW10
N15
WSW10
WSW10
WNW10
WNW10
WNW10
WNW10
WNW10
VAR5
VAR5
VAR5
WNW10
3/15
1/15
1/15
4/15
1/15
1/15
1/15
1/15
1/15
1/15
1/15
1/14
1/14
2/14
1/15
56/56
60/58
59/59
59/60
59/59
60/60
61/59
62/59
62/57
62/55
62/54
61/57
61/57
60/58
60/56
Wind speed in knots; wave heights in feet/intervals in seconds;
temperatures for sea/air
Thu.
8:00p 3.7 Hi 1:39p -0.4 Lo
7:04a 6.1 Hi 12:42a 2.0 Lo
8:43p 3.7 Hi 2:17p -0.6 Lo
Los Angeles, 45
Phoenix, 45
San Francisco, 60
Almanac
Tuesday downtown readings
Temperature
Los Angeles Fullerton
Ventura
High/low
62/38
62/45
62/46
High/low a year ago
71/47
71/45
70/49
Normal high/low for date 68/47
68/44
66/44
Record high/date
84/1898 84/2012 79/1996
Record low/date
35/1884 36/2015 32/1965
Precipitation
24-hour total (as of 4 p.m.) 0.00
0.00
0.00
Season total (since Oct. 1)
4.26
3.96
3.04
Last season (Oct. 1 to date) 0.12
0.08
0.06
Season norm (Oct. 1 to date) 4.14
4.03
4.81
Humidity (high/low)
54/12
20/10
42/11
Sun and moon
Today’s rise/set
New Moon
Jan. 5
Los Angeles County
Sun 6:59a/4:55p
Moon 3:53a/2:38p
First Quarter
Jan. 13
Orange County
Sun 6:57a/4:55p
Moon 3:51a/2:37p
Full Moon
Jan. 20
Ventura County
Sun 7:03a/4:59p
Moon 3:58a/2:42p
Last Quarter
Jan. 27
California cities
City
Tuesday
Today Thursday
Hi Lo Prcp. Hi Lo Hi Lo
Anaheim
Avalon/Catalina
Bakersfield
Barstow
Beaumont
Big Bear Lake
Bishop
Burbank
Camarillo
Chatsworth
Chino
Dana Point
Death Valley
Del Mar
Escondido
Eureka
Fallbrook
Fillmore
Fresno
Fullerton
Hemet
Hesperia
Huntington Beach
Idyllwild
Irvine
L.A. D’ntown/USC
L.A. Int’l. Airport
62
60
51
48
47
27
43
58
63
56
57
59
61
60
57
54
56
61
50
62
53
42
63
34
61
62
62
49
53
31
29
31
15
18
40
49
47
44
46
45
45
43
29
41
47
33
45
33
29
49
20
51
38
41
--------------.02
-----.01
--.01
----
64
54
54
51
55
37
54
62
66
61
64
59
60
61
61
55
60
62
54
64
58
50
63
44
63
62
63
38
45
33
27
29
19
24
38
40
40
32
39
36
40
32
41
30
37
31
39
28
24
40
29
39
42
44
67
57
59
57
60
45
60
66
67
65
69
61
63
64
65
59
64
66
57
67
63
56
64
49
65
65
64
39
48
36
30
33
20
26
40
40
40
35
41
37
42
35
46
32
38
36
41
33
26
44
34
41
45
46
City
Tuesday
Today Thursday
Hi Lo Prcp. Hi Lo Hi Lo
Laguna Beach
Lancaster
Long Beach
Mammoth Lakes
Mission Viejo
Monrovia
Monterey
Mt. Wilson
Needles
Newport Beach
Northridge
Oakland
Oceanside
Ojai
Ontario
Oxnard
Palm Springs
Pasadena
Paso Robles
Pomona/Fairplex
Poway
Redding
Rialto
Riverside
xx
47
62
35
58
60
59
43
50
63
55
56
60
60
55
62
58
61
55
59
57
58
53
55
xx
22
46
7
42
40
35
23
39
49
45
43
33
28
43
47
45
39
25
34
47
42
42
44
xx
-------------------.38
----
61
50
63
44
63
57
58
50
54
61
64
57
61
61
61
63
62
61
56
62
62
58
60
58
41
20
41
21
40
41
38
27
34
41
40
36
25
35
36
42
37
41
25
36
36
33
38
27
Forecasts provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. ©2019
62
56
66
50
65
61
59
55
59
63
67
56
64
64
66
63
65
65
60
67
65
54
65
65
43
23
43
18
41
43
42
32
36
44
42
39
30
38
40
43
40
44
29
39
39
35
39
30
City
Tuesday
Today Thursday
Hi Lo Prcp. Hi Lo Hi Lo
Sacramento
San Bernardino
San Clemente Pier
San Diego
San Francisco
San Gabriel
San Jose
San Luis Obispo
Santa Ana
Santa Barbara
Santa Clarita
Santa Monica Pier
Santa Paula
Santa Rosa
Simi Valley
Tahoe Valley
Temecula
Thousand Oaks
Torrance
UCLA
Van Nuys
Ventura
Whittier Hills
Woodland Hills
Wrightwood
Yorba Linda
Yosemite Valley
55
54
61
61
55
xx
55
61
61
58
52
65
61
61
55
34
55
55
60
59
58
62
60
55
28
59
43
37
45
50
45
44
xx
37
33
50
29
43
44
40
40
45
11
35
43
38
43
47
46
34
45
17
48
21
---.23
------------------------
54
60
59
62
55
62
59
62
63
61
60
63
63
56
62
42
59
63
62
64
64
62
63
65
42
63
52
30
36
38
41
40
40
36
34
41
35
38
43
36
31
39
20
28
39
40
42
39
44
40
39
27
37
31
55
65
62
64
55
67
59
63
65
62
65
66
66
55
66
48
64
66
64
67
68
63
66
68
48
66
54
33
39
40
44
42
43
38
37
45
40
38
43
36
32
38
22
32
39
43
43
40
45
42
41
31
37
33
U.S. cities
High 88 in Immokalee, Fla.
Low –39 in Daniel, Wyo.
City
Tuesday
Hi Lo Prcp.
Today
Hi Lo Sky
Albuquerque
Amarillo
Anchorage
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Brownsville
Buffalo
Burlington, Vt.
Casper
Charleston, S.C.
Charleston, W.Va.
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Colo. Springs
Columbia, S.C.
Columbus
Concord, N.H.
Dallas/Ft.Worth
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
Duluth
El Paso
Eugene
Fairbanks
Fargo
Flagstaff
Grand Junction
Grand Rapids
Green Bay
Hartford
Helena
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jacksonville, Fla.
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Louisville
Medford
Memphis
Miami
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York
Oklahoma City
Omaha
Orlando
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, Maine
Portland, Ore.
Providence
Pueblo
Raleigh
Rapid City
Reno
Richmond
St. Louis
Salt Lake City
San Antonio
San Juan, P.R.
Santa Fe
Seattle
34 19
20 13
40 34
66 60
62 48
46 33
61 45
19 -5
62 56
30 14
59 37
74 50
38 36
44 35
10 -11
78 61
55 49
71 64
30 28
43 42
40 38
10 1
75 66
43 40
47 32
39 36
12 -5
16 10
37 34
9 -12
49 29
41 26
34 10
-1 -19
20 -3
23 10
33 30
21 15
56 37
17 -6
83 74
65 40
40 38
83 57
19 17
46 35
47 36
47 45
38 27
50 42
82 71
27 25
10 0
51 50
66 64
58 44
24 22
13 5
83 62
61 44
51 38
44 40
50 33
42 29
58 39
12 -1
71 63
15 -4
36 16
67 52
36 35
22 6
52 38
82 75
28 12
44 33
32
40
36
61
44
44
45
34
56
33
34
61
33
22
26
70
51
59
33
44
40
41
65
43
30
39
44
32
35
13
39
47
25
24
28
28
33
26
35
35
84
51
39
78
36
49
42
46
46
45
82
31
21
48
71
38
36
36
81
43
54
41
30
44
36
42
55
40
43
52
38
26
45
81
30
46
.06
.01
.04
.31
.15
-.10
Tr
.06
-.59
-.27
.38
.02
-.11
.01
.09
-.03
.01
.03
-.69
-.02
Tr
.09
-----.02
-.02
.04
.78
.01
.02
-Tr
-.02
--.02
---.05
.02
-.40
.69
-.03
-.49
.05
.11
.97
-.92
.07
.05
Tr
-Tr
Tr
--.04
Tr
--
12
21
13
51
37
38
39
31
46
21
29
49
29
17
19
60
37
50
23
29
30
18
56
30
16
34
19
21
28
11
27
37
-2
17
5
6
26
15
24
28
73
47
25
61
22
31
35
33
29
37
73
22
16
37
60
33
26
20
64
36
32
30
19
40
26
8
47
24
23
44
25
16
40
74
5
44
Sn
Cy
Sn
R
Pc
R
Cy
Su
R
Pc
Su
Dr
Pc
Pc
Su
Sh
Cy
Cy
Cy
Cy
Cy
Pc
Cy
Cy
Su
R
Su
Su
Sf
Pc
Sn
Pc
Sn
Pc
Su
Pc
Sf
Sn
Su
Pc
Su
R
Cy
Fg
Pc
Su
R
Cy
Su
R
Su
Sn
Su
R
Cy
Pc
Cy
Su
Fg
Pc
Su
Cy
Su
Pc
Su
Pc
Cy
Pc
Su
Cy
Cy
Pc
R
Sh
Sn
R
Taken at 3 p.m. Tuesday
Spokane
Springfield, Mo.
Tallahassee
Tampa
Tucson
Tulsa
Washington, D.C.
Wichita
Yuma
30
30
81
80
48
33
64
22
54
23
28
65
64
33
25
47
17
39
Tr
Tr
--.34
-.02
.01
--
33
36
77
81
44
36
48
40
56
29
21
61
67
28
22
42
19
32
Pc
Cy
Fg
Pc
Sn
Cy
Cy
Pc
Su
94 73
48 46
48 46
65 41
84 70
84 77
35 12
46 41
90 68
72 51
64 50
41 9
84 77
45 42
49 45
45 40
45 42
43 34
84 66
82 72
60 55
50 41
55 41
69 59
39 26
88 75
51 42
59 27
86 73
88 71
74 44
34 27
28 22
90 68
72 45
41 35
46 44
91 77
58 44
31 11
37 34
91 72
66 60
50 41
50 36
34 33
41 36
46 34
-2 -18
41 36
-.83
.20
----.16
.12
---.06
.09
.04
-.16
--.02
.05
--.54
.19
---.17
--.34
.13
---.04
.04
--.48
-.14
--.04
-.09
-.07
87
45
52
59
88
84
33
37
87
75
64
44
83
38
44
37
41
40
85
82
59
46
54
77
48
88
42
54
85
91
74
13
31
89
72
31
43
91
58
33
31
85
65
50
50
29
42
39
17
37
74
39
43
48
71
77
13
27
59
56
52
30
74
33
35
27
27
28
66
76
56
40
40
56
21
76
33
27
74
70
45
7
29
68
45
26
32
80
33
15
23
71
63
41
38
26
40
26
15
23
Su
Cy
Pc
Cy
Hz
Su
Pc
Pc
Ts
Pc
Pc
Cy
Pc
Su
Cy
Su
Su
Pc
Su
Cy
R
Cy
Su
Ts
Su
Su
Pc
Su
Su
Su
Pc
Su
Sn
Hz
Hz
Su
Pc
Pc
Pc
Su
Pc
Su
R
Pc
Pc
Pc
R
Sf
Cy
Sf
World
Acapulco
Amsterdam
Athens
Baghdad
Bangkok
Barbados
Beijing
Berlin
Buenos Aires
Cabo San Lucas
Cairo
Calgary
Cancun
Copenhagen
Dublin
Edinburgh
Frankfurt
Geneva
Havana
Ho Chi Minh City
Hong Kong
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kabul
Kingston
London
Madrid
Manila
Mecca
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Mumbai
New Delhi
Oslo
Paris
Rio de Janeiro
Rome
Seoul
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei City
Tehran
Tokyo
Toronto
Vancouver
Vienna
Winnipeg
Zurich
Key: Su sunny; Pc partly cloudy; Cy cloudy; Fg
foggy; Prcp precipitation; Dr drizzle; Hz;hazy
Sh showers; Ts thunderstorms; R rain; Sn snow;
Sf snow flurries; I ice; Rs rain/snow; W windy;
Tr trace. Notes: National extremes are for NWS
stations; excludes Alaska and Hawaii.
Missing data indicated by “xx”.
Sequoia, Kings Canyon hit by U.S. shutdown
[Closure, from B1]
Popular walking paths
have also become more hazardous: “The Grant Tree
Trail, normally minimally
maintained by sanding, has
become
extraordinarily
slick. The ice and snow has
become compressed and
glazed due to heavy traffic,
causing multiple falls and at
least one injury.”
Officials emphasized the
importance of checking current road and weather conditions by calling (559) 5653341.
The park service said
some privately operated facilities in these areas would
also have to close.
“It is likely these closures
will remain in effect for the
duration of the government
shutdown,” the agency said
in the release.
To be sure, areas of the
parks would be closed anyway because of winter
weather conditions. Cedar
Grove Lodge and Bearpaw
High Sierra Camp fall into
this category, as does the
mountain road linking the
two parks.
The lodges that would
normally remain open have
tried to remain so. Their employees are not directly affected by the government
shutdown because they
work for a private company.
But visitor centers are
closed and roadside facilities are not being maintained.
At the privately run Wuksachi Lodge, a manager of
the off-site reservation center said that the park service
was allowing guests to stay
at the lodge through Tues-
Brian Melley Associated Press
SEQUOIA and Kings Canyon National Parks officials said they closed Generals Highway at Hospital Rock on
Monday because they couldn’t ensure safe conditions for visitors. Above, skiers in Sequoia in March 2016.
day night, but on Wednesday the lodge would close. In
the meantime, guests were
not allowed to hike on
nearby trails.
As of Tuesday night,
John Muir Lodge and some
of the Grant Grove cabins in
Kings Canyon were to remain open. The status of all
facilities would be reviewed
on a day-to-day basis, said
the manager, who requested
anonymity because the person was not authorized to
speak on behalf of the park
or the private operator.
The partial shutdown is
the result of a standoff between President Trump and
Congress over the federal
budget.
The bad political weather
in Washington has wreaked
havoc in the economy surrounding the parks, said
Nicky French, owner of the
Buckaroo Diner and the Ol’
Buckaroo food truck in
nearby Three Rivers.
She called the situation
“chaos.”
“All of the services that go
into maintaining public land
are not being done,” French
said.
Some tourists who were
unaware of the shutdown
have tried driving into the
park on icy roads and
quickly turned around. Others are canceling Airbnb reservations and other accommodations.
“The town has lost thousands and thousands of dollars,” French said. “It’s a very
small economy, and it’s an
economy that relies on tourism.”
To the south, in Joshua
Tree, campgrounds will
close at noon Wednesday.
Officials say they are basing
the closure on health and
safety concerns. The park’s
vault toilets are near capacity. Also, park visitor centers,
flush toilets, water-filling
stations and dump stations
are all closed because of the
shutdown.
Some rangers remained
to patrol the 1,235-squaremile park, a popular winter
destination for hikers and
rock climbers, but park officials said Monday that human waste in public areas,
off-road driving and other
infractions were becoming a
problem as the government
shutdown drags on.
howard.blume
@latimes.com
C
BuSINESS
W E D N E S D A Y , J A N U A R Y 2 , 2 0 1 9 :: L A T I M E S . C O M / B U S I N E S S
Stock
experts
bullish
despite
’18 whiff
After a big miss on last
year’s close, strategists
forecast 19% gain in ’19.
By Lu Wang
When you predict the
same thing will happen to
the stock market year after
year, eventually you’re going
to be wrong.
That’s what happened in
2018 to Wall Street strategists, whose perennial optimism about U.S. equities got
bushwhacked by the worst
fourth quarter in a decade.
In January, the group predicted
theStandard
&
Poor’s 500 index would end
2018 at 2,893, on average,
translating to an 8% gain. Instead, the benchmark index
dropped 6% to finish just
above 2,500. The almost 400point gap is the biggest since
the 2008 financial crisis.
Big misses when stocks
fall are a predictable outcome for strategists, who
since the start of the century
have never forecast a down
year in U.S. equities. Although obviously nothing to
brag about, it also bespeaks
a propensity to tailor the
outlook around what usually
happens — that is, stocks going up.
“It’s not a particularly
courageous prediction because when people are saying the market is going to be
up 8%, they’re basically saying it’s going to be an average
year,” said Eric Kuby, chief
investment officer who helps
oversee $1.4 billion at North
Star Investment Management in Chicago. “Looking
back at 2018, it’s anything
but average. It’s a very disappointing year.”
[See Stocks, C4]
Wells’
mortgage
mistake
still hurts
‘They destroyed me,’
Michaela Christian,
who was denied loan
aid and had to sell her
home, says of bank.
By Renae Merle
Mario Tama Getty Images
A NEW law orders the state to compile a list of trucking firms that fail to comply with orders on unpaid wages. Above, the Port of L.A.
Workers can celebrate in 2019
New laws mean gains in pay, transparency regarding sexual harassment
and improved working conditions. Employers say changes will be costly.
By Margot Roosevelt
For
minimum-wage
earners, port truckers, farm
laborers, sexual harassment
victims, nursing mothers,
high-powered female executives and workers injured on
the job, 2019 offers reason to
celebrate.
A score of new state laws
took effect on Jan. 1, expanding the rights of many employees while placing fresh
restrictions on businesses.
For workers, “2018 was a
stellar year” for protections
passed into law, said Steve
Smith, a spokesman for the
California Labor Federation, the umbrella group for
more than 1,200 unions and a
powerful force in state politics. “California continues to
be on the leading edge of delivering economic justice to
working people.”
The business community
is markedly less exuberant.
“We have some major
new laws to contend with
that will impact the costs for
Gary Coronado Los Angeles Times
BEGINNING this year, workers will be paid time and a half after 9.5 hours a day
or 55 hours a week at farms, ranches and dairies with 26 or more employees.
California businesses,” said
Rob Lapsley, president of
the California Business
Roundtable, which represents senior executives at
the state’s largest companies.
The new statutes will
spur litigation, he predicted.
“We are in a climate where
employers are getting sued
on so many fronts. That is
one of the biggest concerns
and I don’t think it is going to
change.”
The California Chamber
of Commerce nonetheless
boasted of fending off all 29
bills on its annual “Job Killers” list — legislation it
claimed would “decimate
economic and job growth.”
Its biggest win: Gov. Jerry
Brown’s September veto of
Assembly Bill 3080, a measure to curb businesses’ ability to force workers into private arbitration, preventing
them from filing lawsuits
over sexual harassment,
wage theft, discrimination
and other complaints.
[See Laws, C4]
Altria deal portends e-cig health disaster
MICHAEL HILTZIK
Michaela Christian lost a
long battle with Wells Fargo
in 2013 to save her Las Vegas
home, a defeat she says
changed the course of her
life. When the bank refused
to modify her mortgage,
Christian moved in with a
friend and scrambled to rebuild her life.
Five years later, Wells
Fargo admits it made a mistake. Christian, 46, qualified
for the kind of mortgage help
that may have saved her
home after all.
It is a mistake the giant
bank admits it made nearly
900 times over several years,
pushing hundreds of distressed homeowners into
foreclosure.
Christian said that when
she learned of Wells Fargo’s
error, “I was sick to my stomach.”
“They destroyed me and
destroyed my everything.”
[See Wells Fargo, C5]
Markets closed
U.S. stock markets
were closed Tuesday
for New Year’s Day.
Francois Guillot AFP/Getty Images
JUUL founders Adam Bowen, left, and James Monsees became billionaires when Altria, the nation’s largest
tobacco company, agreed to pay $12.8 billion for a 35% stake in their San Francisco-based e-cigarette company.
Ever since
their retail
introduction
about a dozen
years ago,
e-cigarettes
have been at
the center of a
debate over
their impact
on public health.
We now can safely say the
debate is over. E-cigs and
the vaping they foster are a
public health disaster in the
making. We can draw this
conclusion not from any
scientific study but from a
single financial transaction:
Altria, the nation’s largest
tobacco company, just
agreed to pay $12.8 billion
for a 35% stake in San Francisco-based Juul, the leading e-cigarette marketer.
The deal valued Juul at $38
billion and made its founders, Adam Bowen and
James Monsees, billionaires.
Altria largely invests in
markets with a capacity for
addiction, abuse or dependency. Its products include
cigarettes (Marlboro, for
[See Hiltzik, C3]
C2
W E D N E S DAY , JA N UA RY 2 , 2 019
L AT I M E S . C O M / B U S I N E S S
Your next Toyota could be a robot
Automaker is striving
to build an AI servant,
partner, companion.
By Kevin Buckland
Toyota Motor Corp. has
sold enough cars to put one
outside every Japanese
home. Now it wants to put
robots inside.
Well known for its automated assembly lines, Toyota sees a not-so-far-off future
in which robots transcend
the factory and become
commonplace in homes,
helping with chores — and
even offering companionship — in an aging society
where a quarter of the population is over 65 and millions
of seniors live alone.
Machines have become
much smarter in the last
decade or so. Yet every attempt to build one that can
do simple things like load a
washing machine or carry
groceries encounters the
same basic, physical problem: The stronger a robot
gets, the heavier and more
dangerous it becomes.
What Toyota has going
for it are $29 billion in cash
reserves, a new artificial intelligence research center
and a respected inventor,
Gill Pratt, heading the effort.
“This is a company with
so many resources that you
can never ignore them,” said
Morten Paulsen, a Tokyobased analyst at CLSA
Japan Securities Co., who
has covered the robotics industry for decades.
Toyota has been experimenting with robots since at
least 2004, when it unveiled a
trumpet-playing humanoid
with artificial lips, lungs and
movable fingers that could
accompany a human orchestra.
Since then research has
become more practical. Toyota’s latest android, the THR3, is a kind of avatar that
can be manipulated remotely via wearable controls, with goggles that enable users to see through the
machine’s camera-eyes.
The device could someday serve as arms and legs
for the bedridden, or as a
surrogate for relief workers
in disaster zones.
In 2015 the automaker
spent a billion dollars to
open its artificial-intelligence-focused Toyota Research Institute in Silicon
Valley. In 2017 it set up a $100million fund to invest in
start-ups and new robotics
technology. In 2018 it restructured its Partner Robot division to speed decision-making and shorten
development time.
“There’s internal pressure all of a sudden to move
faster,” senior manager
Keisuke Suga said at a recent industry forum near the
automaker’s Toyota City
headquarters.
The road to robots has
had its setbacks. In 2011, Toyota demonstrated a machine for lifting patients in and
out of bed, but engineers
had tested it only on healthy
volunteers. Once they realized that the frail required a
more delicate touch, the
product was shelved.
Another device, a personal scooter that resembled a
Segway, looked promising in
trials but was kept off the
streets by regulatory holdups.
Outside of factories and
Toru Yamanaka AFP/Getty Images
A T-HR3 ROBOT developed by Toyota holds a ball and mirrors the movements of its operator, left, who uses a wearable control system.
warehouses,
unfulfilled
promise has been the main
story for robots. For example, Boston Dynamics, a ballyhooed firm started by engineers from MIT, has spent
more than 12 years developing four-legged automatons but still hasn’t proved
they can be commercialized.
Most of the $2.1 billion
spent by consumers in 2017
on household robots was for
automated vacuum cleaners
and lawnmowers.
Toyota says the need for
elder care will change that.
The automaker illustrates
the point with a chart showing Japan’s inverted age pyramid in the year 2050, when
one-third fewer workers will
have to support twice as
many old people as today.
(Some 22% of the world’s
population will be older than
60 by then, according to the
World Health Organization.)
Toyota’s Human Support Robot, or HSR, is the
machine the automaker sees
as closest to making the leap
from lab to living room. The
robot equivalent of a Corolla
— all function and no frills —
the HSR is basically a retractable arm on wheels
with a video screen on top
and two large camera eyes
that give it the rudiments of
a face.
It weighs as much as half
a dozen bowling balls but
can lift a payload of only
about 2½ pounds. Still,
loaded with the right software, the machine can do
some interesting things.
In a 2018 demo by one of
Toyota’s partners, an AI
start-up called Preferred
Networks Inc., the robot was
able to learn where books,
pens and other items belonged on a shelf, and it
could clean a room that
looked like it had been
turned upside down by a 3year-old.
Kazuhiro Nogi AFP/Getty Images
A BASKETBALL-PLAYING robot named Cue prepares to shoot the ball during a halftime show rehearsal
for a match last year in Japan. Cue, also developed by Toyota, is said to be able to shoot free throws perfectly.
Using its sensor eyes and
pincer, the machine arranged slippers neatly on
the floor next to each other,
with both feet pointing in the
same direction.
Asked when its home
helpers will be available to
consumers, Toyota wouldn’t
say. But advisor Masanori
Sugiyama, a former top
manager in the robot program, says the HSR could be
ready for hospitals and rest
homes in two or three years
to do simple tasks such as tidying up or delivering meals.
For machines with more
profound skills, the wait will
be longer. “They need to be
able to understand what
people are thinking and
have empathy,” Sugiyama
said. “The idea is for the robot to be a friend.”
Buckland writes for
Bloomberg.
ADVERTISEMENT
Deposit & Loan Guide
Institution
Community
Commerce Bank
Int Chking Money
Acct
Mkt Acct
Min
Min
NA
NA
NA
NA
LA Times
3 mo
CD
Min
6 mo
CD
Min
1.41
2.02
12 mo
CD
Min
18 mo
CD
Min
24 mo
CD
Min
36 mo
CD
Min
60 mo
CD
Min
2.63
NA
3.04
3.14
3.30
10,000 10,000 10,000
NA
10,000 10,000 10,000
Member FDIC, Penalty for Early W/D, APY’s accurate as of 12-26-18
Synchrony Bank
NA
1.20
NA
NA
2.65
2.75
2.80
2.85
3.10
NA
0
NA
NA
2,000
2,000
2,000
2,000
2,000
0.65
0.80
2.38
1.31
1.46
1.46
1.92
100 50,000 2,500
2,500
2,500
2,500
2,500
2,500
2,500
Tustin Community Bank
909-450-2050
www.ccombank.com
800-869-3813
www.synchronybank.com
Great Rates + Safety = Peace of Mind. Member FDIC.
0.05 0.40
Phone / Website
714-730-5662
www.tustincmtybank.com
Savings Update
How much higher will the Fed raise rates?
For U.S. savers, what a difference three years can make.
Back in December 2015, the Federal Reserve hiked interest rates for the irst time since the Great Recession in
2008, inally taking an upward step out of a seven-year
valley of near-zero rates.
There is never a reliable crystal ball for this question, as
the Fed’s rate-setting committee holds sole responsibility
for that decision, and privately meets to determine a verdict
every 6-8 weeks. But with each new decision, they submit
a written projection for the future, and currently, they’re signaling that we may see two more bumps in 2019.
Fast forward to this December, and the Fed has now made
eight additional increases, announcing the latest one last This information matters particularly to CD savers, since
week. The Federal Funds Target Rate now sits 2.25 per- they lock into a rate for the future. As a result, opening
centage points above its 2015 level.
a new CD right before a rate hike is announced can be
disappointing. On the other hand, savings and money marThis matters to cash savers because savings, money mar- ket funds can spontaneously beneit from any number of
ket and certiicate of deposit rates are correlated with the increases, but at the expense of lower-than-CD rates.
Fed’s rate. While any single rate bump might not move the
needle across the entire banking industry, this three-year The Fed’s forecast last week of two more hikes in 2019
period of nine hikes has driven up rates throughout the de- is a slight downgrade from its previous prediction of three
posit accounts market.
increases next year. But still it suggests that the rising tide
cash savers have been enjoying may still have some swell
But is the Fed inished, or will it hike rates higher still? in it.
Rate Criteria: Rates effective as of 12/26/18 and may change without notice. RateSeeker, LLC. does not guarantee the accuracy of the information appearing above
or the availability of rates in this table. Banks, Thrifts and credit unions pay to advertise in this guide. NA means rates are not available or not offered at the time rates
were surveyed. All institutions are FDIC or NCUA insured. Yields represent annual percentage yield (APY) paid by participating institutions. Rates may change after
the account is opened. Fees may reduce the earnings on the account. A penalty may be imposed for early withdrawal. To appear in this table, call 773-320-8492.
Rising prices make the
rich richer, study finds
Wealthy stockholders
gain at the expense of
everyone else.
By Christopher
Ingraham
In 2016, U.S. companies’
pursuit of bigger profits
through higher prices transferred 3 percentage points of
national income from the
pockets of low-income and
middle-class families to the
wealthy, according to new
research on market concentration and inequality.
The study, forthcoming
in the Oxford Review of
Economic Policy, examines
how growing corporate
power, particularly in industries
dominated
by
shrinking numbers of huge
companies,
effectively
“transfer[s] resources from
low-income families to highincome families.”
In the latter part of the
20th century, the share of
U.S. households owning
some form of stock rose dramatically, from 32% in 1989 to
52% in 2001. That shift was
driven largely by a decline in
defined-benefit
pension
plans and the rise of the
401(k) retirement account.
As a result, the traditional
line between shareholders
and consumers has become
blurrier than ever. That has
led a number of economists
to declare that what’s good
for shareholders is also, by
definition, good for the middle class.
“In a world where individuals or households can be
both consumers and shareholders, the impact of market power on inequality depends in part on the relative
distribution of consumption
and corporate equity ownership across individuals or
households,” according to
the team of researchers behind the new study, which includes a member of the Australian parliament with a
doctorate in economics.
At the risk of oversimplifying, take the example of a
family with a diabetic member who must pay for insulin
on a regular basis. The family also happens to own stock
in the three powerful pharmaceutical companies that
manufacture insulin in the
United States.
Those companies have
drastically increased the
prices of insulin in recent
years, in part because of
their dominance of the domestic
insulin
market.
Those price increases have
resulted in higher profits for
company executives and
their shareholders.
Whether those price increases ultimately harm or
benefit the family depends
on two factors: how much
they spend on insulin and
how big a stake in the insulin
companies
they
own
through the stock market.
To answer this, the researchers use data from the
federal Survey of Consumer
Finances and the Consumer
Expenditure Survey to calculate the distribution of
corporate
equity
(e.g.,
stocks and business equity)
and of total consumer expenditures. They find that
corporate equity is much
more unequally distributed
than expenditures.
The top 20% of U.S.
households own nearly 90%
of the country’s total equity,
according to their calculations. But those households
account for a hair under 40%
of total consumer spending.
Looking at things from the
perspective of the poor and
middle class, the bottom
80% of the country owns just
10% of the equity but spends
60% of the money.
On net, that means it’s
nearly impossible for the
typical U.S. family to make
up for higher prices via the
performance of their stock
portfolio. When prices rise,
low- and middle-class families pay. Wealthy families
profit.
The researchers take this
analysis a step further by
calculating exactly how
much household income is
transferred from the poor
and middle class to the
wealthy solely because of
powerful companies’ profitmaximizing price increases.
They find that monopolistic
pricing takes a bite out of every income group’s share of
national income, with the
notable exception of the top
20%, whose incomes rise. In
effect, companies are using
their market power to extract wealth from poor and
middle-class
households
and deposit it in the pockets
of the wealthy, to the tune of
about 3% of national household income in 2016.
The implication of these
findings is that antitrust enforcement has the potential
to be a tool in the fight
against rising inequality by
reducing the ability of large
companies to set high prices
that primarily benefit the
wealthy. Conversely, the
findings suggest that a recent lapse in that enforcement is contributing to the
growing gap between the
rich and poor.
Ingraham writes for the
Washington Post.
W E D N E S DAY , JA N UA RY 2 , 2 019
L AT I M E S . C O M / B U S I N E S S
C3
Netflix’s hiring
binge continues
with new CFO
Spencer Neumann
was fired this week
by video game
maker Activision for
undisclosed reasons.
By David Ng
Wild Bunch TV
“THE OIL FUND” explores the clash between high finance’s opulence and Norway’s culture of moderation.
Sitcom seeks comedy gold
at Norwegian wealth fund
By Mikael Holter
It’s like “The Office,” but
with a $1-trillion problem.
That’s how director Harald Zwart describes his new
sitcom that takes place at
Norway’s wealth fund. “The
Oil Fund” revels in the clash
between the opulence of
high finance and the Nordic
country’s culture of moderation and strict bureaucracy,
but also brings in the debate
of how to responsibly invest
wealth amassed from decades of oil and gas production.
“When you’re familiar
with Norway’s political correctness, our social democratic principles, a country
where people leave work at
4 p.m. to pick up their kids at
kindergarten, you understand that this has the potential to be very funny,”
Zwart said by phone from
Los Angeles. The show premiered online this past
weekend and will be shown
on Discovery Inc.’s TVNorge
in January.
Set up in the 1990s, the
wealth fund invests oil income abroad to avoid stoking inflation at home. Now at
$1 trillion, it owns about 1.4%
of global stocks, large holdings of bonds and properties
across the globe.
The nation of 5.3 million
punches above its weight in
international markets. At
the same time, its investments are tightly regulated
and it follows strict ethics
and transparency rules, representing a unique experiment in national wealth
management.
The show co-created by
Zwart, the Hollywood-based
director of movies such as
“The Karate Kid,” and Tom
Gulbrandsen, explores this
contrast.
Comedy is found in socalled fat-finger trades causing billion-dollar errors and
what to do with a crate of
cash from a Chinese casino.
The fund is briefly put under
administration by a woolsweater-clad representative
from the independent Ethics Council, before she’s paid
off with a job, becoming the
day-to-day nemesis of the
fund’s star investment manager. They do deals with a
Russian oligarch and taunt
Swedish businessmen with
piles of cash.
While over the top, the
schisms can be seen as a
parable for Norway as a
whole, according to Zwart.
“Norway projects an image of being very aware of the
environment,” he said. “But
at the same time, we’re the
ones making the most money from the most polluting
product. So we have a dilemma there.”
Daily newspapers Dagbladet and Stavanger Aftenblad gave the show a score of
4 out of 6 in reviews over the
weekend, while the more
highbrow weekly, Morgenbladet, thought of it as a little too shallow.
The series comes as the
fund faces a series of milestone decisions. Norway’s
politicians, who have already instructed the fund to
dump most of its coal holdings, will soon choose
whether to also divest oil
and gas stocks.
Zwart declined to weigh
in on those issues but said he
had great faith his country
would have a healthy debate. A big lesson from working on the show over the last
two years is that Norway has
clout, he said.
“You think of the oil fund
as just a bunch of Norwegians and some money that
we have lying around,” he
said. “But I’ve learned along
the way how important we
are on a global scale.”
Zwart’s team met with
Norges Bank Investment
Management and got a tour
of the offices of the central
bank unit that manages the
fund in Oslo. But his team
based its research mostly on
conversations with contacts
elsewhere in the finance industry, the director said.
The sitcom’s characters
are almost exclusively Norwegian, but the fund itself
has 34 nationalities on its
staff and offices in London,
New York, Shanghai, Singapore and Tokyo. Its top management is all Norwegian.
NBIM welcomed the series and said it hopes it will
generate more interest in
the fund from the general
public. As for some of the
high
jinks,
spokesman
Thomas Sevang said, “Viewers are probably able to tell
the difference between TV
entertainment and reality.”
Zwart screened three episodes for the fund’s staff —
including Chief Executive
Yngve Slyngstad — a couple
of months ago.
Slyngstad’s verdict: “It
was very funny,” he said, before quickly running off, according to Zwart.
Netflix is making a big
hire from the video game
world, bringing aboard
Spencer Neumann as its
new chief financial officer,
according to a person familiar with the situation.
Neumann
recently
served as CFO of Activision
Blizzard Inc., where he oversaw the gaming giant’s financial reporting and accounting.
He will succeed Netflix’s
outgoing CFO, David Wells,
who announced his departure in August after a more
than decade-long tenure
working at the streaming entertainment company.
Netflix hasn’t made a formal announcement about
Neumann.
He arrives under something of a cloud after Activision announced that it was
terminating his employment Monday for issues unrelated to financial reporting and disclosure.
In an SEC filing, the
Santa Monica company said
that Neumann had been
placed on leave but didn’t
elaborate on the reason for
his dismissal.
Netflix has been aggressively hiring executive talent
from the entertainment industry, prompting the competition to take countermeasures; 21st Century Fox
is battling Netflix in court,
alleging the streaming company poached some of its
executives by inducing them
to break their employment
contracts.
As the new CFO of Netflix, Neumann will help to
oversee a vast global operation that spends billions of
dollars a year on streaming
content.
For 2018, the Los Gatos,
Calif.,
company
was
expected to spend as much
as $15 billion on original
and licensed movies and
TV shows, outpacing competitors such as HBO and
Amazon.
Netflix has been funding
its growth plans largely
through debt. For the recent
third quarter, the company
reported that its long-term
debt rose to $8.34 billion
from $4.89 billion a year earlier.
Netflix shares broke the
$400 mark for the first time
in June but finished 2018 at
$267.66. That was a gain of
about 36% for the year.
david.ng@latimes.com
Twitter: @DavidNgLAT
AFP/Getty Images
NETFLIX has been aggressively hiring executive
Holter writes for
Bloomberg.
talent from the entertainment industry. Above, the
streaming giant’s headquarters in Los Gatos, Calif.
Altria’s stake in Juul intensifies the vaping safety debate
[Hiltzik, from C1]
instance), smokeless tobacco, and wine and beer. It
doesn’t invest in products
with an eye toward their
medical benefits. So now,
e-cigarettes.
In acquiring its Juul
stake, Altria, which is the
U.S.-based remnant of the
old Philip Morris international tobacco empire, is
coming together with a
company that seems to
have taken lessons from its
playbook about how to
market an addictive product. One technique is to
minimize its dangers; Juul
says that its “mission” is to
help adult smokers kick the
habit, and that it’s appalled
that kids are using its devices to introduce themselves
to nicotine.
In a similar vein, Altria
says its investment fit with
its mission to “achieve tobacco harm reduction.”
Altria’s investment may
only intensify the debate
among medical experts
about the safety of vaping. A
quick primer: E-cigarettes
use a heating element to
vaporize a nicotine compound for ingestion. They
give users the desired nicotine kick without also delivering health-sapping and
cancer-causing components
of cigarette smoke, such as
tar. But it’s nicotine that’s
the addictive substance in
tobacco.
Some experts consider
e-cigarettes like Juul’s products to be promising devices
for weaning smokers off
tobacco. The degree to
which smokers actually
tend to give up cigarettes
and make the transition to
vaping is uncertain — some
vapers continue smoking,
too. Still, there seems little
question that vaping is
better for them than smoking — if they give up cigarettes.
The question is whether
Charles Bertram Lexington Herald-Leader
MANAGER Nick Gregory, 26, vapes at Botany Bay in
Lexington, Ky., which sells e-cigarettes and more.
vaping is better than using
nothing, and there medical
opinion seems heavily tilted
toward answering no.
Not long after e-cigs
started on their path of
popularity, public health
officials were warning that
the devices threatened to
“renormalize” smoking after
decades of largely successful
efforts to make the habit
socially unacceptable.
What raises hackles
among public health officials is that vaping absolutely has taken off among
schoolchildren. It’s easy to
conceal the activity, in part
because e-cigarettes like
Juul’s resemble the pen
drives that plug into laptop
computers, albeit elongated
into the size of a pack of
chewing gum. They don’t
emit the acrid stench of
cigarettes that used to
infuse the bathrooms of
many a high school in the
old days.
Vaping has now acquired
the cool image among teens
that used to attach to ciga-
rettes. The conclusion that
the vaping and tobacco
industries, having joined
forces, are creating a new
generation of nicotineaddicted customers is inescapable.
According to a survey
released last month by the
University of Michigan, the
percentage of 12th-graders
who reported vaping nicotine in the previous 30 days
rose to 21% in 2018 from 11%
in 2017 — an increase that
was “the largest ever recorded in the past 43 years for
any adolescent substance
use outcome in the U.S.”
The survey’s results indicate that in 2018, 1 in 5 high
school seniors vaped nicotine in the 30 days before
being surveyed.
The figures are shocking.
In 2001, some 29.5% of high
school seniors reported
having smoked cigarettes in
the previous 30 days. In 2018,
that figure fell to 7.6%, but
20.9% reported having
vaped nicotine, for a total of
28.5% combined vaping and
smoking — almost back up
to the level of cigarettes
alone in 2001.
As Kevin Drum of
Mother Jones observes, the
survey’s results indicate
that “in just a few years,
vaping has wiped out two
decades of work getting
teens to quit (or never start)
cigarette smoking.”
Public health officials
have reacted to the surge in
teen vaping by reconsidering the government’s previously tolerant approach to
the practice. Last month,
U.S. Surgeon General
Jerome Adams issued an
advisory calling e-cigarette
use an “epidemic” among
young people and calling for
increased vigilance and
education about its dangers.
“E-cigarette aerosol is
not harmless,” he stated.
“Nicotine exposure during
adolescence can harm the
developing brain — which
continues to develop until
about age 25. Nicotine exposure during adolescence can
impact learning, memory,
and attention. Using nicotine in adolescence can also
increase risk for future
addiction to other drugs.”
Food and Drug Administration Commissioner Scott
Gottlieb also has taken a
firmer stand on vaping.
Acknowledging that he
initially saw e-cigarettes as
useful for smoking cessation, he indicated in a Nov. 15
statement that their risks
were threatening to outweigh their benefits.
“Any policy accommodation to advance the innovations that could present an
alternative to smoking,” he
said, “cannot, and will not,
come at the expense of
addicting a generation of
children to nicotine through
these same delivery vehicles. This simply will not
happen. I will take whatever
steps I must to prevent
this.”
Gottlieb said that he’s
considering accelerating the
deadline for e-cigarette
manufacturers to comply
with FDA permitting rules
for some of their products,
which originally was set as
far off as August 2022. The
FDA also stepped up enforcement of regulations
barring the sales of nicotine
products to children and
called on the industry to
voluntarily end its marketing of flavored nicotine
pods, which appeal especially to underage users.
“I’ve been warning the
e-cigarette industry for
more than a year that they
needed to do much more to
stem the youth trends,”
Gottlieb said in September.
“In my view, they treated
these issues like a public
relations challenge rather
than seriously considering
their legal obligations, the
public health mandate, and
the existential threat to
these products. And the
risks mounted. Well, I’m
here to tell them that this
prior approach is over.”
Both he and Adams
specifically mentioned Juul
in their warnings — an
indication of the drawbacks
of dominating an industry.
Juul likes to depict itself
as a proactive warrior
against youth vaping. It
says its mission is to eradicate cigarette smoking by
giving smokers a safer alternative. “We don’t want
anyone who doesn’t smoke,
or already use nicotine, to
use JUUL products,” CEO
Kevin Burns said Nov. 13.
“We certainly don’t want
youth using the product. It
is bad for public health,
and it is bad for our mission.”
As of that day, Burns
said, Juul would stop accepting retailers’ orders for
mango-, cucumber-, fruitand creme-flavored pods,
and would tighten the ageverification procedures for
sales from its website, where
they still would be available.
The company also said it
would shut down its Facebook and Instagram accounts, because social
media has been a prime tool
for reaching young customers.
Burns didn’t make it all
that clear, however, that
Juul was under the gun from
Gottlieb, who on Sept. 12
had given the company,
along with other marketers,
60 days to give the FDA
“robust plans on how they’ll
convincingly address the
widespread use of their
products by minors,” with
the explicit threat that the
agency would come after the
firms with enforcement
proceedings if they failed.
Is it conceivable that
Juul and the other e-cigarette makers were blindsided by their products’
popularity with impressionable youngsters? The company asks to be praised for
never selling “flavors like
Gummy Bear or Cotton
Candy, which are clearly
targeted to kids.” But fruit
and creme flavors aren’t
exactly adult tastes.
The public health disaster of “electronic nicotine
delivery systems,” as e-cigs
are technically designated,
is already upon us. The
industry skated for a few
years, while regulators
convinced themselves that
the products were really for
adults trying to quit smoking. Altria’s $12.8-billion
investment in Juul exposes
the lie at the heart of this
claim. But it may be too
late.
Keep up to date with
Michael Hiltzik. Follow
@hiltzikm on Twitter, see
his Facebook page, or email
michael.hiltzik
@latimes.com.
C4
W E D N E S DAY , JA N UA RY 2 , 2 019
L AT I M E S . C O M / B U S I N E S S
Justin Sullivan Getty Images
FAST-FOOD workers demand $15 an hour at a February protest in Oakland. This year, the state pay floor rises to $12 an hour for employers with 25 or more workers.
New laws will benefit workers in 2019
[Laws, from C1]
Brown cited recent U.S.
Supreme Court decisions affirming mandatory arbitration policies, saying the California bill “plainly violates
federal law” — a stance disputed by proponents.
“We know many of these
job-killing proposals will return next session,” said
chamber President and
CEO Allan Zaremberg. “But
legislators need to understand that California employers have reached their
limit with respect to new
laws and regulations that increase costs through threat
of litigation.”
New workplace measures
include:
Minimum wages
On Jan. 1, the legal statewide pay floor rises from $11
an hour to $12 for employers
with 25 or more workers. For
smaller employers it increases from $10.50 to $11.
The increase is the latest
phase of a 2016 law to gradually boost California’s minimum wage to $15 an hour by
2023.
A score of California jurisdictions have raised local
minimum wages higher than
the state level, including the
city and county of Los Angeles, Santa Monica, Pasadena
and Malibu, where the rates
reached $12 an hour for
smaller employers and
$13.25 for larger employers as
of July.
Although many large California employers, including
Disneyland Resort
and
Amazon, are boosting pay to
at least $15 an hour in the
face of a tight labor market,
this year’s statutory jump is
likely to affect hundreds of
thousands across the economy.
Some 2.3 million Californians earned less than $12 an
hour in 2017, the latest num-
bers available from the U.S.
Bureau of Labor Statistics.
California is tied with
Louisiana and Florida for
having the highest poverty
rate of the 50 states, with
nearly a fifth of families unable to meet basic needs given the high cost of living.
Sexual harassment
Businesses have shielded
repeat offenders in harassment and assault incidents
by insisting that accusers
sign nondisclosure agreements before collecting settlements. Activists in the
#MeToo movement blame
the practice for enabling accused abusers such as Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein.
A new law, Senate Bill 820
, forbids companies from requiring secrecy, although a
victim can still choose to
keep his or her identity private.
“Transparency is important because we see examples of serial harassers and
their employers settling
one claim after another,”
said UC Berkeley law professor Catherine Fisk. But
she added that the bill
“might result in smaller settlements or make it harder
to settle cases because companies pay for confidentiality to avoid reputational
costs.”
Equally significant, Fisk
suggested, is a new law, Senate Bill 1300, reversing what’s
been called the “one free
grope” standard. A federal
appellate court in 2000 had
interpreted California law as
requiring sexual harassment to be “severe or pervasive,” deeming a single incident not to be illegal.
The new statute eliminates the single-incident exception, ending what its author, state Sen. HannahBeth Jackson (D-Santa Bar-
bara), called “a free pass on
unlawful behavior.”
It also forbids employers
to require workers, as a condition of employment or in
exchange for a raise, to sign
“nondisparagement agreements.”
Those agreements, often
slipped into hiring documents, forbid workers from
publicly disclosing or filing a
claim over labor violations
such as sexual harassment
or discrimination.
Another new law, Senate
Bill 224, applies sexual harassment protections not
just to bosses and co-workers but also to investors,
elected officials, lobbyists,
directors and producers.
The law is in part a response to reports by female
entrepreneurs in Silicon Valley detailing lewd remarks
and unwanted sexual advances by male venture capitalists.
It is also aimed at Hollywood. “This bill expands the
law to someone who is a
‘gatekeeper’ to a job, even if
they are not the direct employer,” Sacramento labor
lawyer Barry Broad said.
“This is a big issue in the entertainment industry.”
Finally, Senate Bill 1343
requires any employer of five
or more workers to train
them in dealing with sexual
harassment. Before, only supervisors at firms with 50 or
more workers had to be
trained. Employees who witness sexual harassment
often don’t know what to do
about it, so they stay silent,
advocates said.
Port truckers
Some 25,000 truck drivers haul goods from the
ports of Los Angeles and
Long Beach to nearby warehouses and rail yards for
shipping to U.S. retailers
and manufacturers. Since
2011, nearly 1,000 drivers have
filed complaints against
trucking companies for
workplace violations. But
some $40 million in judgments and fines assessed by
courts and by the California
labor commissioner in the
last four years remain unpaid, according to labor
groups.
A new law, Senate Bill
1402, orders the commissioner to compile a list of
trucking firms that fail to
comply with orders on unpaid wages, damages and
worker compensation liability. When retailers or manufacturers hire a listed company to transport freight,
they would be jointly liable
for future violations.
The Harbor Trucking
Assn., which represents
about 100 companies, opposed the law, calling it overregulation and a ploy by the
Teamsters union to organize
drivers. But its impact was
softened by giving shippers
a 90-day window to cancel
contracts with listed trucking firms before liability
kicks in.
“This is a brand new approach to enforcement,”
said labor lawyer Broad. “If
I’m Target or Walmart and I
hire Joe’s trucking company,
which refuses to change its
behavior, then I’ll be liable.
Trucking companies will see
business drop if they don’t
clean up their act.”
Women on boards
A groundbreaking corporate governance law, Senate
Bill 826, requires publicly
traded companies headquartered in California to
have at least one woman on
their boards of directors by
the end of 2019.
By the end of 2021, boards
with five directors would
have to include two women.
And boards with six or more
directors would need to include three women.
Noncompliant companies could be fined as much
as $100,000.
Several European countries have similar laws, but
California is the first U.S.
state to mandate gender diversity. The new law was opposed by 30 business groups
including the California
Chamber, which called it unconstitutional gender-based
discrimination.
“This makes us different
from other states,” said the
Business Roundtable’s Lapsley. “If companies have
trouble complying, they may
get sued. They may move to
other states.”
Many of those affected
are smaller firms, but several big companies such as
Skechers USA, the Manhattan Beach shoe retailer, and
Stamps.com, the El Segundo postage and software
provider, have all-male
boards.
Companies often name
directors “from a small list of
people whom the board already knows and trusts and
that small list often does not
include women,” said Betsy
Berkheimer-Credaire, CEO
of the advocacy group 2020
Women on Boards.
Of the 445 California
companies traded on the
Russell 3000 index, 105 have
no female directors, she added, yet “research shows that
public companies perform
better, are more profitable
and productive when women serve on their boards.”
Farmworkers’ pay
Picking crops may be one
of the most arduous of tasks,
but until now, farmworkers
could earn overtime pay
only if they worked more
than 10 hours a day or 60
hours a week — compared
with the standard of eight
hours a day and 40 hours a
week for other workers.
Senate Bill 1066, passed
in 2016, gives agricultural
employees time-and-a-half
pay beginning this year after
9.5 hours a day or 55 hours a
week at farms, ranches and
dairies with 26 or more employees.
By 2025, all agricultural
operations would have to
pay overtime after eight
hours a day and 40 hours a
week.
Injured workers
In the wake of a relaxation of federal rules on reporting workplace injuries
initiated by the Trump administration, Assembly Bill
2334 tightens state reporting laws. Cal/OSHA, the
state’s division of occupational health and safety, will
now have five years, rather
than just six months, to issue citations to employers
who fail to accurately record
injuries or deaths.
“This ensures that employers will not be able to
sweep things under the rug,”
said the Labor Federation’s
Smith. “For instance, the
hazards associated with
smoke inhalation at a wildfire site might not have been
known before because of the
six-month timeline.”
Nursing mothers
Pediatricians
recommend that babies be fed
breast milk until the age of 6
months, but working mothers in California were often
given no space outside of a
bathroom to pump milk. A
new law, Assembly Bill 1976,
requires employers to set
aside a private lactation
space apart from a bathroom.
margot.roosevelt
@latimes.com
Twitter: @margotroosevelt
Strategists remain bullish despite big miss in ’18
[Stocks, from C1]
Blame a fourth-quarter
sell-off that ruined a year
that before October had
gone pretty much according
to plan. At a record 2,930.75
in September, the S&P 500’s
year-to-date gain stood at almost 10%.
Then
the
market
plunged, sending the benchmark to the brink of a bear
market as fears of a recession crept up amid intensified U.S.-China trade tensions and a fourth interest
rate increase by the Federal
Reserve. Strategists, who
had rushed to raise their
forecasts amid one of the
best starts of a year ever, saw
their bullish calls steamrolled.
The closest that any of
the strategists followed by
Bloomberg came to the 2018
close was 140 points.
“If we had this conversa-
Spencer Platt Getty Images
STOCK strategists predicted the S&P 500 would end
2018 with an 8% gain. Instead, the index dropped 6%.
tion at the end of the third
quarter, they would have
gotten an A” on the report
card, said Tom Wirth, director of wealth management
for Chemung Canal Trust,
which manages $1.9 billion in
Elmira, N.Y. “The market
wants to go higher over the
long term, always. It’s just it
has periods that it doesn’t,
and predicting when that’s
going to be is the most difficult thing to do.”
At least four strategists
have reduced their projections for this year, including
Barry Bannister at Stifel
Nicolaus, Jonathan Golub at
Credit Suisse, Noah Weisberger at Sanford C. Bernstein, and Chris Harvey at
Wells Fargo.
Still, even after the downward revisions, their overall
bullish stance remains intact. All of the 22 strategists
tracked by Bloomberg see
higher prices over the next 12
months. At 2,975, the average estimate points to a 19%
gain from Monday, a prediction that’s more optimistic
at this time of year than any
since at least 1998.
True, the steepness of the
trajectory partly reflects
how far stocks just fell. After
all, the mean forecast is only
40 points away from the alltime high.
At the same time, the
prediction is consistent with
their propensity to lean bullish — during the last two
decades, strategists have
uniformly seen gains in the
S&P 500, with the average
annual forecast coming in at
9%.
Most of the strategists
view
the
three-month
plunge that had erased more
than $7 trillion from equity
values at its worst point as
overdone. Although the
earnings machine that has
powered the bull market
toward its 10th anniversary
is poised to decelerate, there
are few signs of a collapse.
With the tax cuts largely reflected, profit growth will
slow to half the pace seen in
2018 over the next two years.
But at an average of 10%, it’s
pretty much in line with the
historical rate since 1998.
“We see increasingly negative sentiment setting the
stage for upward surprises
in 2019,” John Stoltzfus, chief
investment strategist at Oppenheimer & Co., wrote in a
note to clients Monday, initiating a year-end target of
2,960 for the S&P 500. “We
believe the U.S. economy remains on solid footing despite risks and uncertainties
derived from trade concerns.”
Wang writes for Bloomberg.
W E D N E S DAY , JA N UA RY 2 , 2 019
L AT I M E S . C O M / B U S I N E S S
C5
Wells admits error,
but damage is done
[Wells Fargo, from C1]
Wells Fargo’s admission
is part of a cascade of lapses
that increased scrutiny of
the San Francisco bank,
with some Democrats in
Congress calling for the
ouster of its chief executive,
Tim Sloan. Over the last two
years, the bank paid more
than $1 billion in fines after
admitting it opened millions
of bogus accounts customers didn’t want and then
found itself in more trouble
after improperly repossessing thousands of cars.
The bank has repeatedly
apologized for its missteps
but is struggling to repair its
image. Customers who lost
their homes are being offered compensation or can
enter mediation, company
officials say.
Wells Fargo says an internal review found the bank
denied help to hundreds of
homeowners
after
fees
charged by foreclosure attorneys were improperly
used when the bank determined whom to offer mortgage help. The computer error began in 2010 and was not
corrected until last April, the
bank said.
Overall, 870 homeowners
were denied help for which
they qualified, including 545
who lost their homes to foreclosure. Wells Fargo says it
has reached most of the customers affected and set
aside $8 million — an average of $9,195 — to compensate them, though industry
analysts say that number is
likely to increase.
The revelation echoes
the complaints of thousands
of borrowers in the years after the financial crisis that
banks were stingy about offering help with borrowers’
exploding loans.
“Wells Fargo failed to
maintain its systems, failed
to find problems when they
occurred and then masked
the problem for years,” said
Alys Cohen, staff attorney
for the National Consumer
Law Center.
Christian bought her
home in 1998, when she was
just 24. At the time, the
three-bedroom home was on
the outskirts of a growing
Las Vegas. There weren’t a
lot of stores nearby, but
Christian said she loved the
neighborhood. “In the 15
years we were there, everything was perfect,” she said.
But in 2011, Christian lost
her job as a bartender as the
economy continued to sputter after the global financial
crisis. Then she was in a car
accident that left her with a
fractured pelvis and crushed
tibia. “I wasn’t even able to
walk for seven months. I
couldn’t work.”
One of her first calls for
help, she said, was to Wells
Fargo. Christian asked the
bank to defer her more than
$1,000 monthly mortgage
payment or lower the 7% interest rate to the prevailing
rate at the time, about 4%.
That would have lowered her
payments to about $500 a
month, Christian said.
“They said, ‘Have a nice
day’ and denied it,” she said.
A few months later,
Christian said, Wells Fargo
began foreclosure proceedings against her. With her father’s help, she found a job
that allowed her to maneuver with a cane, and spent
months searching for help,
she said. Christian said she
even offered Wells Fargo
$4,000 to make up for some
missed payments.
Ultimately,
Christian
said, she faced what she considered an unfathomable
choice: sell her home or lose
it in foreclosure.
“It was the last thing I
wanted,” she said. “I didn’t
want to uproot my son. He
had grown up there.”
After a quick sale of the
home, Christian temporarily moved in with a friend and
then into an apartment.
“I was in a daze,” Christian said through tears. “I
thought, 100%, I was going to
be able to save my home. I
had my finances in order. I
could not for the life of me
figure out why they wouldn’t
refinance.”
The answer came in Sep-
tember when Christian received a letter and a $15,000
check from Wells Fargo, admitting its mistake.
“We want to make things
right,” the letter states. “We
realize that our decision impacted you at a time you
were facing a hardship.”
Wells Fargo’s letter didn’t
explain how it determined
Christian was due only
$15,000. She sold the home
for $135,000 in 2013; Redfin
now estimates it is worth
about $250,000. And Christian estimates she had
about $30,000 in equity after
making mortgage payments
for more than a decade. And
that, she said, doesn’t include the $20,000 pool she
had installed.
“You can’t put a price on
what we lost. The scars will
be there forever. I will never
get over it,” said Christian,
now part of a class-action
lawsuit against the bank. “I
still miss my neighbors.”
Wells Fargo has declined
to discuss what, if any, formula it has used to determine how much each customer is owed. The compensation offered each home-
Joe Buglewicz For the Washington Post
“I WAS SICK to my stomach,” Michaela Christian said of how she felt when
Wells Fargo last year admitted it had mistakenly refused to modify her mortgage.
owner
is
based
on
“individual circumstances,”
said Tom Goyda, a bank
spokesman.
Wells Fargo worked extensively with Christian and
“completed multiple reviews
in an effort to find an option
that would allow her to keep
the home,” Goyda said. Unfortunately, he said, the
bank was unsuccessful.
Merle writes for the
Washington Post.
DEPART
ON AN ADVENTURE
OF A LIFETIME
RETURN
WITH A GREATER
UNDERSTANDING
Let our reporters, editors and photographers take you on a journey of discovery.
855-890-5298
(Monday-Friday, 7 a.m. – 5 p.m. PT)
LATexpeditions.com/explore
C6
W E D N E S DAY , JA N UA RY 2 , 2 019
L AT I M E S . C O M / B U S I N E S S
NEAR OR FAR.
DOMESTIC OR INTERNATIONAL.
NEW OR FAMILIAR.
You never know where it will take you.
The Los Angeles Times travel
section covers it all – every Sunday.
Check out these popular reads:
Your Weekend
Looking for a quick escape?
We’ll tell you where to go, eat, sleep
and what to see.
Before You Go
Based on our writers’ irst-hand
expert opinions, these are the things
you should know when preparing
for your trip.
The Concierge
Get the most out of your
vacation with traveler tips, deals,
and travel suggestions.
Know before you go: latimes.com/Travel
D
SPORTS
W E D N E S D A Y , J A N U A R Y 2 , 2 0 1 9 :: L A T I M E S . C O M / S P O R T S
RO S E B OW L
:: N O .
6 O H I O S TAT E 2 8 , N O . 9 WA S H I N GT O N 2 3
Too
much
star
power
Embiid leads the
76ers, whose talent
overcomes the
Clippers’ scrappiness.
PHILADELPHIA 119
CLIPPERS 113
By Andrew Greif
Photographs by
Robert Gauthier Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON QUARTERBACK Jake Browning gets a pass off as he scrambles from Buckeyes defensive tackle Dre’Mont Jones
late in the second half of Tuesday’s Rose Bowl game. The Huskies scored 20 consecutive points in the fourth quarter but fell short.
A rosy departure
Ohio State’s Meyer
leaves coaching
with a legacy that
doesn’t smell right
Buckeyes have all
the fun as Petersen
blames himself for
Huskies’ poor start
BILL PLASCHKE
By J. Brady McCollough
Decked out in glossy
scarlet, the Ohio
State football team
danced through the
Pasadena afternoon
like dozens of overstuffed roses.
Yet, in the middle
of it all, stalking and
scowling, there was
a thorn.
It was Buckeyes legendary
coach Urban Meyer, who awkwardly stole the show while seemingly ending a career as prickly as
it was pretty.
While his players were celebrating a 28-23 victory over Washington in the 105th Rose Bowl, the
focus was clearly on the farewell
for Meyer, who last month claimed
he was retiring.
As the game ended, Meyer
repeatedly pumped his arms. He
threw his headsets into the air. He
hugged his wife, Shelley. He
bathed in the falling red and white
confetti.
He acknowledged the Ohio
State marching band. He faced the
fans and formed an “O” and an “H”
with his arms. Those fans chanted,
“Ur-ban, Ur-ban.” And, of course,
two of his scarlet giants dumped a
bucket of Gatorade across his
back that left him shivering in the
early-evening mist.
[See Plaschke, D6]
OHIO STATE’S URBAN MEYER , after his final game as
Buckeyes coach, hoists the Rose Bowl trophy.
TUESDAY’S OTHER BOWL RESULTS ++++++++++
OUTBACK
CITRUS
IOWA
MISSISSIPPI STATE
27
22
FIESTA
KENTUCKY
PENN STATE
27
24
SUGAR
LOUISIANA STATE
CENTRAL FLORIDA
40
32
TEXAS
GEORGIA
28
21
8 BOWL GAMES ROUNDUP, D5
In 2011, during Urban Meyer’s
year away from coaching, he spent
much of his free time in pursuit of
learning and any edge he could put
to use when the right job came
along. That job, of course, was Ohio
State. But, before he would return
to his native Ohio as the Buckeyes’
head coach, he took a trip up to
Boise, Idaho, to observe Chris
Petersen’s Boise State program up
close.
What Petersen had accomplished at Boise was nothing short
of remarkable, and it needed
deeper understanding. Meyer remembered well the Broncos’ signature win over Oklahoma in the 2007
Fiesta Bowl, mainly because he
would never forget his wife, Shelley,
pointing out to Meyer that his Florida Gators did not run enough exotic trick plays like Petersen’s
Broncos used to baffle the Sooners. Meyer was in the middle of a
sleepless night preparing for that
year’s national championship
game, and he did not want to hear
it.
On Tuesday afternoon, 12 years
later, Meyer and Petersen, the two
active coaches with the best career
winning percentage, matched wits
for the first time in the Rose Bowl,
and it was Meyer’s Buckeyes who
were having all of the fun — for
[See Rose Bowl, D6]
N F L W I L D - CA R D ROU N D :: C H A R G E R S AT B A LT I M O R E
SUNDAY, 10 A.M. PST | TV: CHANNEL 2
Chargers seek to avoid rush-hour sequel
Slowing down Ravens’
creative defensive
front schemes is key
to giving Rivers time.
By Mike DiGiovanna
Russell Okung compared
the “pick-stunt,” a tactic favored by the Baltimore
Ravens defense, to a pickand-roll play in basketball,
where a linebacker sets a
screen on an offensive lineman while a defensive tackle
or edge rusher rolls around
the pick and barrels toward
the quarterback.
A
pick-and-steamroll
play would be a more accurate description, seeing as
how the Ravens flattened
Okung and his offensive line
mates in a 22-10 thrashing on
the Chargers’ home field
Sean M. Haffey Getty Images
IN A SCENE repeated often, Chargers quarterback Philip Rivers is under pres-
sure from the Ravens during their Week 16 game. Rivers was sacked four times.
Dec. 22.
The Chargers averaged
33 points and 370 total yards
during a four-game win
streak over Arizona, Pittsburgh, Cincinnati and Kansas City from Nov. 25 to Dec.
13, but they were reduced to
a band of smothered brothers by the Ravens, who rank
first in the NFL in yards
(292.9) and second in points
(17.9) allowed per game.
The
Ravens
sacked
quarterback Philip Rivers
four times for a loss of 34
yards while they harassed
and hurried him into a season-low 51.7 passer rating, as
Rivers completed 23 of 37
passes for 181 yards with no
touchdowns and two interceptions. Baltimore held the
Chargers to season lows in
points and yards (198).
For the Chargers to have
any chance of beating the
[See Chargers, D2]
By now, it’s no secret: The
Clippers’ grand plans for
2019 include pursuing the
kind of stars — plural — required to compete for championships in the NBA.
If there were any doubt
about the reasoning behind
those
ambitions,
their
matchup on the new year’s
first night was yet another
reminder of the advantages
afforded teams with multiple superstars.
Behind the return of center Joel Embiid, who finished with 28 points and 19
rebounds after missing his
last game with a sore left
knee, Philadelphia defeated
the Clippers 119-113 at Staples
Center.
“Give Philly credit, I
thought they were the instigator the whole game,”
coach Doc Rivers said.
Embiid was masterful
from the start and clutch at
the end.
With two minutes to play
in the fourth quarter, the 7footer made jump shots on
consecutive possessions to
help stave off a furious Clippers comeback. After the
Clippers’ Montrezl Harrell
missed both his free throw
[See Clippers, D4]
UCLA
will tout
clout in
search
Bruins might finally be
positioned to land
a high-profile coach.
Watson gets support.
By Ben Bolch
If the hiring of Chip Kelly
is any indication, UCLA may
not be operating under the
same old constraints as it
begins the search for its next
basketball coach.
Gripes about not being
able to pay enough or offer
top-level facilities might no
longer apply.
The Bruins are paying
Kelly an average of $4.66 million per season to coach
their football team. His office features a picturesque
view of campus inside the
gleaming Wasserman Football Center, a $75-million facility that serves as the hub
of cutting-edge sports science, strength and nutrition
programs.
That means whoever fills
the basketball coaching vacancy that was created this
week when UCLA fired
Steve Alford might be in line
to double the $2.6 million
that Alford pocketed per
[See UCLA, D3]
VEGAS 2, KINGS 0
Campbell
returns in loss
Kings goalie makes 46
saves but Vegas’
Marc-Andre Fleury
gets the shutout. D3
D2
W E D N E S DAY , JA N UA RY 2 , 2 019
L AT I M E S . C O M / S P O RT S
PRO CALENDAR
WED.
2
THU.
3
FRI.
4
SAT.
5
SUN.
6
NEXT: JAN. 12 VS. TBD, 5:15 P.M., CH. 11*
With a bye, Rams will do
their scouting from couch
RAMS
at
Baltimore*
10 a.m.
Channel 2
CHARGERS
LAKERS
OKLAHOMA
CITY
7:30
SpecSN, ESPN
NEW YORK
7:30
SpecSN
at
Minnesota
12:30
SpecSN
at Phoenix
6
Prime
ORLANDO
12:30
Prime
CLIPPERS
EDMONTON
7
FSW
TAMPA BAY
7:30
FSW
KINGS
VEGAS
7
FSW
EDMONTON
5
Prime
DUCKS
Shade denotes home game; *NFL playoffs
TODAY ON THE AIR
TIME
EVENT
BASKETBALL
5 p.m.
Minnesota at Boston
7:30 p.m. Oklahoma City at Lakers
ON THE AIR
TV: ESPN
TV: ESPN,
SpecSN R: 710
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
3:30 p.m. Tulane at Cincinnati
3:30 p.m. Nebraska at Maryland
3:30 p.m. Seton Hall at Xavier
4 p.m.
Harvard at North Carolina
4 p.m.
Georgetown at Butler
4 p.m.
Temple at Central Florida
4 p.m.
Texas Tech at West Virginia
4:30 p.m. Women, Texas Tech at Oklahoma
5:30 p.m. Connecticut at South Florida
5:30 p.m. Northwestern at Michigan State
5:30 p.m. DePaul at Villanova
6 p.m.
Oklahoma at Kansas
6 p.m.
Iowa State at Oklahoma State
6 p.m.
Texas at Kansas State
7:30 p.m. Colorado State at Nevada Las Vegas
8 p.m.
Utah State at Nevada
COLLEGE VOLLEYBALL
7 p.m.
Princeton at UCLA
HOCKEY
1 p.m.
IIHF World Junior Championship, Sweden vs.
Switzerland
4 p.m.
Pittsburgh at New York
5 p.m.
IIHF World Junior Championship, U.S. vs. Czech
Republic
6:30 p.m. San Jose at Colorado
7:30 p.m. IIHF World Junior Championship, Russia vs. Slovakia
HORSE RACING
2:30 p.m. Racing Coast to Coast featuring Turf Paradise
5 p.m.
Race Night featuring Delta Downs
SOCCER
11:45 a.m. England, Chelsea vs. Southampton
12:15 p.m. Portugal, Portimonense vs. Benfica
TENNIS
3 p.m.
Center Court, Hopman Cup, U.S. vs. Britain, Session 9
TV: CBSSN
TV: Big Ten
TV: FS1
TV: ESPN2
TV: FSW
TV: ESPNews
TV: ESPNU
TV: Prime
TV: CBSSN
TV: Big Ten
TV: FS1
TV: ESPN2
TV: ESPNews
TV: ESPNU
TV: CBSSN
TV: ESPNU
TV: Pac-12
TV: NHL
TV: NBCSN
TV: NHL
TV: NBCSN
TV: NHL
TV: TVG
TV: TVG
TV: NBCSN
TV: GOLTV
TV: Tennis
Players say they don’t
care who’s next.
Possible foes pose
different challenges.
By Gary Klein
They lost to the Chicago
Bears, defeated the Seattle
Seahawks
twice
and
watched from afar as the
Dallas Cowboys won the
NFC East.
The Rams will face one of
those teams in an NFC divisional-round playoff game
Jan. 12 at the Coliseum.
Coach Sean McVay and his
players, for the most part, do
not have a preference.
“You know it’s going to be
a great challenge regardless
… whether you played a team
or not,” McVay said. “Because you say, ‘Well, you’ve
got some familiarity with
them.’ Well, they have familiarity with you.
“I think it goes both
ways.”
The Rams, seeded second in the NFC behind the
New Orleans Saints, earned
a bye through the wild-card
round. So they will prepare
on some level for all three
possible opponents while
awaiting the results of this
weekend’s games.
The fourth-seeded Dallas Cowboys play host to the
fifth-seeded Seattle Seahawks on Saturday at AT&T
Stadium, and the thirdseeded Chicago Bears play
host to the sixth-seeded
Philadelphia Eagles on Sunday at Soldier Field. The
Rams will play the highestseeded team remaining.
“It don’t matter,” who the
Rams play, defensive tackle
Aaron Donald said. “We just
going to be ready for whoever it is.”
Offensive lineman Andrew Whitworth is taking a
wait-and-see approach.
“Just watch the games,
see how they unfold and prepare from there,” he said.
The Bears, Cowboys and
Seahawks present different
types of matchups for a
Rams team that finished
13-3 and went unbeaten in
the NFC West.
The Bears, under firstyear coach Matt Nagy, finished 12-4 and won the NFC
North with one of the NFL’s
best defenses.
Wally Skalij Los Angeles Times
AARON DONALD scrambles for a loose ball with Seahawks quarterback Russell
Wilson during the Rams’ 36-31 Week 10 win. The Rams swept Seattle this season.
Coordinator Vic Fangio
oversees a unit that includes
star linebacker Khalil Mack,
cornerback Kyle Fuller and
safety Eddie Jackson. The
Bears gave up a league-low
17.7 points a game and forced
a league-high 36 takeaways.
The Bears intercepted
four passes and also scored
on a safety in a 15-6 victory
over the Rams in Week 14 at
Soldier Field.
“We lost to the Bears, so,
you know, you want to play
them again and kind of redeem and get back what you
didn’t get the first time,” defensive lineman Ethan Westbrooks said.
The Rams would welcome the prospect of again
facing a Bears offense featuring second-year quarterback Mitch Trubisky, rather
than dealing with offenses
led by the Cowboys’ Dak
Prescott or the Seahawks’
Russell Wilson.
Prescott passed for 22
touchdowns, with eight interceptions, for a team that
won seven of its last eight
games and finished 10-6.
Prescott also rushed for six
touchdowns while leading
an offense that features NFL
rushing champion Ezekiel
Elliott and receiver Amari
Cooper.
The Cowboys gave up
only 20.2 points a game,
which ranks sixth in the
NFL.
Though they did not play
the Cowboys this season, the
Rams are familiar with
coach Jason Garrett and
many of his players because
they defeated the Cowboys
35-30 last season at AT&T
Stadium.
The Seahawks, of course,
are a known commodity.
The Rams defeated them
33-31 in Week 5 at CenturyLink Field in Seattle, and
36-31in Week 10 at the Coliseum.
After losing to the Rams
for the second time, the Seahawks won six of seven
games to finish the season
with a 10-6 record under
coach Pete Carroll.
Wilson passed for 35
touchdowns, with only seven
interceptions, for an offense
that also featured running
back Chris Carson and led
the league in rushing. Linebacker Bobby Wagner enjoyed another standout season for a defense that gave
up 21.7 points a game.
Last season, the Rams
advanced to the playoffs for
the first time since 2004. But
they came out flat and committed two special teams
turnovers in a 26-13 wild-card
loss to the Atlanta Falcons.
Young players on that
team
learned
valuable
lessons.
“Having that experience
last year definitely gives us a
little taste of what to expect
and [urgency] to capitalize
on the things we didn’t last
year,” tight end Gerald Everett said.
The one-and-done, losergoes-home nature of the
playoffs “definitely gets the
adrenaline flowing a lot
more,” linebacker Samson
Ebukam said.
“It’s completely different
— a whole new season,” he
said. “You better be ready, or
you’re going to get kicked
out.”
gary.klein@latimes.com
Chargers need to slow down Ravens’ pass rush
[Chargers, from D1]
Ravens in Sunday’s AFC
wild-card playoff game at
M&T Bank Stadium, their
offensive line must do a
much better job of picking
up Baltimore’s stunts and
blitzes to give Rivers a
cleaner pocket from which
to operate.
“Those
guys
gameplanned us the right way and
exploited some things that
we struggled with throughout the game,” said Okung,
the Chargers’ veteran left
tackle. “They figured out a
way to get the best of us.”
They did not fool the
Chargers or catch them offguard. Okung, right tackle
Sam Tevi, right guard
Michael Schofield, center
Mike Pouncey and left guard
Dan Feeney all said they
were prepared for Baltimore’s blitzes and stunts.
But the Ravens did an excellent job of disguising
blitzes and spreading stunts
across the line, and they funneled much of their pressure
toward the middle, preventing Rivers from stepping up
in the pocket and leaving the
immobile
37-year-old
quarterback with no escape
routes.
“Their defense is known
for pick-stunts and stuff like
that, and they were very
good at running them,”
Feeney said. “We had an idea
they were going to do it to us
— we just didn’t execute the
way we wanted to on some
pass protections. We were
fundamentally
unsound
across the board on many
plays.”
A second-and-16 play
from the Chargers’ 19-yard
line late in the third quarter
provides an example of the
havoc Baltimore’s ravenous
defense can create.
Ravens linebacker Patrick Onwuasor, who had
nine tackles, two sacks and a
forced fumble that night,
lined up in the A gap, between
Pouncey
and
Schofield. Defensive end
Brent Urban took a threepoint stance in the B gap be-
tween Schofield and Tevi.
Outside linebacker Za’Darius Smith was on the edge.
Rivers took the snap in
shotgun formation with running back Melvin Gordon to
his right. While Schofield engaged Urban, Onwuasor
gave Schofield a two-handed
shove in the left hip, throwing Schofield off-balance,
the pick part of the pickstunt.
“They’re always trying to
pop your hip into the air,”
said Nick Hardwick, the
Chargers’ center from 2004
to 2014. “If they can elevate
your hip, then your foot
comes off the ground, and
you can’t fight back with
pressure.”
After shoving Schofield,
Onwuasor
continued
toward the backfield. While
Gordon tried to pick up Onwuasor, the 6-foot-7, 300pound Urban circled behind
Onwuasor and Schofield
and bore down on Gordon,
who was suddenly overwhelmed by two Ravens.
The
6-4,
272-pound
Smith, meanwhile, beat Tevi
on the edge, and Smith and
Urban converged on Rivers
for a seven-yard sack, crushing Gordon amid a pile of humanity. Schofield, meanwhile, was rendered almost
moot on the play.
“At times, we were trying
to block half a body, or half a
man,” Okung said. “It leaves
you exposed, and a [defender] is more open to making a
big play.”
If there is a benefit to a
playoff rematch with the
Ravens two weeks after sustaining such a beating, it’s
that the Chargers linemen
know what to expect.
“The good news is they’ve
seen it once and they know
what to look for, and there
are only so many different
variations the Ravens can
run,”
Hardwick
said.
“They’ll take a bunch of reps
in practice in preparation for
[those stunts and blitzes]
and other variations off of
that.
“They won’t see the same
Marcio Jose Sanchez Associated Press
RAVENS cornerback Brandon Carr picks off Philip
Rivers in Baltimore’s dominant 22-10 Week 16 win.
NFL PLAYOFFS
Times Pacific
WILD-CARD ROUND
Saturday
AFC: No. 6 Indianapolis at No. 3 Houston .....1:30 p.m. (Ch. 7, ESPN)
NFC: No. 5 Seattle at No. 4 Dallas ..........................5:15 p.m. (Ch. 11)
Sunday
AFC: No. 5 CHARGERS at No. 4 Baltimore ...................10 a.m. (Ch. 2)
NFC: No. 6 Philadelphia at No. 3 Chicago ................1:30 p.m. (Ch. 4)
DIVISIONAL ROUND
Jan. 12
Lowest AFC seed at No. 1 Kansas City .....................1:30 p.m. (Ch. 4)
Highest NFC seed at No. 2 RAMS............................5:15 p.m. (Ch. 11)
Jan. 13
Highest AFC seed at No. 2 New England......................10 a.m. (Ch. 2)
Lowest NFC seed at No. 1 New Orleans...................1:30 p.m. (Ch. 11)
CONFERENCE CHAMPIONSHIPS
Jan. 20
NFC .................................................................................Noon (Ch. 11)
AFC ...........................................................................3:30 p.m. (Ch. 2)
SUPER BOWL
Feb. 3 at Mercedes-Benz Stadium, Atlanta
AFC champion vs. NFC champion .............................3:30 p.m. (Ch. 2)
look from the Ravens, but it
will be something similar or
something disguised differently that ends up the same.
Or it’s going to look the same
and they’ll invert the rush,
where the A gap guy will penetrate first and the defensive
end will wrap. You’ll have
worked on all those varia-
tions.”
Pre-snap
recognition
and anticipation and postsnap reaction will be key for
the Chargers.
“You have to see it beforehand, and that takes a lot of
film study,” Okung said.
“And when it happens, you
have to be ready for it and be
able to play off of it the right
way, and that’s not easy.”
Feeney said the Chargers
must be cleaner with their
switches, so one lineman is
not left blocking half a player
while a teammate is left with
two defenders.
The Chargers could also
mix up pass protections,
with the entire line sometimes dropping back in unison and linemen picking up
the closest rushers instead
of trying to switch assignments at the point of attack.
“The Chargers line at
times sits firm into the line of
scrimmage, which is great
for Philip Rivers because he
has a nice firm pocket,”
Hardwick said. “But when
you’re getting a lot of pickstunts, sometimes it’s better
to just level back onto the
same plane. That way your
guard and tackle’s shoulderpad depth is synced up and
there are no seams.”
Another way to counter
Baltimore’s stunts and
blitzes seems counterintuitive. While the Chargers
often kept Gordon and
Justin Jackson in the backfield to help protect Rivers in
the Dec. 22 game, Hardwick
said the Chargers might be
better off targeting their
running backs in the pass
game.
“One thing you can most
certainly do is empty the
backfield pre-snap or clear
out the running back on the
snap and not force him to
block,” Hardwick said. “You
try to create a mismatch in
space that way.”
Rivers turned two such
“hot reads” on Raiders’
blitzes into touchdowns this
season, throwing quickly
into the left flat to Austin
Ekeler for a 44-yard scoring
strike against Oakland on
Oct. 7 and to Gordon for a 66yard scoring play at Oakland on Nov. 11.
“A blitzing linebacker
usually eliminates the running back as an outlet receiver and forces him to
block,” Hardwick said. “But
if you send the running back
out, you’re going to force a
defensive end or edge rusher
to peel off to whatever side
the back releases to and create a little mismatch in
space. If you can convert
some of those and burn
them quickly, then they get
kind of hesitant.”
An effective running
game would ease some pressure on Rivers and the line,
but that won’t be easy. The
Ravens rank fourth in the
NFL in rushing defense, giving up an average of 82.9
yards a game, and they held
the Chargers to 51 yards in 16
carries, an average of 3.2
yards, in the Dec. 22 game.
The Ravens also neutralized Rivers’ ability to anticipate blitzes and get rid of the
ball quickly by using tight
press coverage against the
Chargers’ slot receivers and
wide receivers when they
brought pressure.
Led by Pro Bowl safety
Eric Weddle, the former
Charger, and Pro Bowl linebacker C.J. Mosley, the
Ravens are as tough in the
secondary as they are in the
trenches.
This Ravens defense
might not be quite as stingy
as the Ray Lewis-led, Super
Bowl-winning 2000 unit,
which held opponents to 10.3
points a game in the regular
season and 5.75 in four playoff games, but it will present
a formidable obstacle for the
Chargers on Sunday.
“I thought across the
board, not just in the box,
they were physical,” Hardwick said of the Ravens defense in the Dec. 22 game.
“They made you earn every
single ounce of air that you
were breathing in. From the
receivers to the tight ends to
the running backs, they
made you earn every inch
you were gaining.
“To me, that was really
impressive, how combative
of a defensive unit they are.
And
that’s
essentially
Ravens football.”
mike.digiovanna@latimes.com
Twitter: @MikeDiGiovanna
W E D N E S DAY , JA N UA RY 2 , 2 019
L AT I M E S . C O M / S P O RT S
Kings can’t wake offense
as Vegas pitches shutout
Campbell turns away
46 shots, but Golden
Knights’ Fleury denies
all 17 he faces.
VEGAS 2, KINGS 0
By Curtis Zupke
LAS VEGAS — Judging
by how the Kings went over
to greet Jack Campbell at the
horn, one would have
thought it was a victory.
They tapped helmets
with their beloved teammate
in what looked like congratulations, but it was essentially
apologies for not giving
Campbell’s game any justice
Tuesday.
The Kings trudged back
to their dressing room with a
2-0 loss to the Vegas Golden
Knights in which Campbell’s
career-high 46 saves was
their only lifeline in a New
Year’s Day downer.
“Unreal,” Jake Muzzin
said. “He gave us a chance to
be in that game. He played
his heart out. Hell of an effort
by ‘Soup’ [Campbell]. We’ve
got to be better for him.”
In his first game back
from knee surgery, Campbell’s only missed puck was a
power-play shot by Brandon
Pirri 3 minutes, 43 seconds
into the third period, and
that glanced off Campbell’s
outstretched glove. He was
still game to stop 19 other
shots in the third period before Vegas wrapped it with
Alex Tuch’s empty-net goal.
To think, Campbell felt off
early in his first game since
Nov. 10.
“I felt kind of brutal, actually,” Campbell said. “In the
first period, I was kind of excited, nervous, but in a good
way. But I haven’t felt that
excited in a while. It took me
20 minutes to get kind of settled in. After that, I found my
John Locher Associated Press
TEAMMATES mob Vegas center Brandon Pirri,
second from left, after his goal in the third period.
game.”
That hasn’t been difficult
for Campbell at T-Mobile
Arena and its booming
sound system and party atmosphere. He got his first
NHL win here last season in
a 41-save effort that represented a career revival.
“I think it’s just a great
building,” Campbell said.
“The fans are amazing. They
have a really good team over
there. You’ve got to be on
your A-game to play well
against those guys. Credit to
them, they always come out
and play well and the fans always show up. It’s a fun
building to play in. More fun
to win here. Next time, hopefully.”
Fortunately for the Kings,
that won’t be until the regular-season finale. In what
could have jokingly been
billed as the Hangover Bowl,
Campbell looked like the
only Kings player who didn’t
play the night before. The
Kings arrived at their hotel
in Las Vegas less than a minute before midnight on New
Year’s Eve and caught the
fireworks show just after
they stepped off the bus following a win in Colorado. It
couldn’t have translated
worse to Tuesday.
“You could just look at
them, the group was tired,”
coach Willie Desjardins said.
“That’s the bottom line. We
were just tired.”
The Kings were outshot
48-17 and did not put a shot
on goal in the second period
until almost the 18-minute
mark. Tyler Toffoli was
stopped by goalie Marc-Andre Fleury on a breakaway
early in the third period in
probably their best chance.
It
was
the
fourth
matchup between the teams
in a 24-day span.
“Like playoffs again,”
Muzzin said. “I’ve seen
enough of them for a while.”
Pirri’s goal had some controversy because replays
showed Ryan Reaves might
have played the puck with a
broken stick. But the Kings
didn’t challenge it and it
hardly mattered in the big
picture.
The Kings hit the halfway
mark of the season last in
the Pacific Division and nine
points out of a playoff spot.
They had talked about gaining confidence and playing
better in their own zone and,
despite the loss, Desjardins
wasn’t going to let one game
erase a late first-half uptick.
“We’ve had some pretty
good games,” Desjardins
said. “The past 10 games, it’s
not like they’ve been bad.
This is a tough night. It’s a
tough building to come into.
We didn’t have our legs. You
always have to be honest.
Tonight, we just didn’t have
our legs.”
curtis.zupke@latimes.com
Twitter: @curtiszupke
GOLDEN KNIGHTS 2, KINGS 0
KINGS .....................................0
Vegas ......................................0
0
0
0 — 0
2 — 2
FIRST PERIOD: Scoring—None. Penalties—None.
SECOND PERIOD: Scoring—None. Pen.—Stastny,
VGK, (interference), 0:57. Kempe, KINGS, (interference), 13:46. Holden, VGK, (holding), 16:32.
THIRD PERIOD: 1. Vegas, Pirri 6 (Eakin, Schmidt),
3:43 (pp). 2. Vegas, Tuch 14 (Pirri, Engelland), 19:27.
Penalties—Forbort, KINGS, (high-sticking), 1:43.
Doughty, KINGS, (tripping), 17:17.
SHOTS ON GOAL: KINGS 8-4-5—17. Vegas 9-18-21—
48. Power-play conversions—KINGS 0 of 2. Vegas 0 of 3.
GOALIES: KINGS, Campbell 5-8-0 (47 shots-46
saves). Vegas, Fleury 23-10-4 (17-17). Att—18,319
(17,367). T—2:22.
D3
NHL STANDINGS
EASTERN CONFERENCE
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Pacific
Calgary
Vegas
San Jose
DUCKS
Vancouver
Edmonton
Arizona
KINGS
Central
Winnipeg
Nashville
Colorado
Dallas
Minnesota
Chicago
St. Louis
W
24
24
21
19
19
18
17
16
W
25
24
19
20
18
15
15
L
12
15
13
15
19
18
20
22
L
12
15
13
16
17
21
18
OL
4
4
7
7
4
3
2
3
OL
2
2
8
4
3
6
4
Pts
52
52
49
45
42
39
36
35
Pts
52
50
46
44
39
36
34
GF
141
130
140
102
124
111
100
92
GF
134
124
134
108
110
121
102
GA
112
115
129
120
133
126
112
121
GA
111
104
123
106
108
153
123
Note: Overtime or shootout losses worth one point.
Metropolitan
Washington
Columbus
Pittsburgh
NY Islanders
NY Rangers
Carolina
New Jersey
Philadelphia
Atlantic
Tampa Bay
Toronto
Boston
Buffalo
Montreal
Florida
Detroit
Ottawa
W
24
23
21
21
17
16
15
15
W
31
26
22
21
21
17
15
15
L
11
13
12
13
14
17
16
19
L
7
11
14
13
14
15
19
21
OL
3
3
6
4
7
5
7
5
OL
2
2
4
6
5
6
7
4
Pts
51
49
48
46
41
37
37
35
Pts
64
54
48
48
47
40
37
34
GF
138
129
133
114
111
94
113
111
GF
168
144
114
115
128
124
115
126
GA
112
119
115
102
123
109
127
140
GA
117
109
105
115
128
134
140
159
Gregory Shamus Getty Images
THE BRUINS’ Sean Kuraly, left, scores on the back-
hand as the Blackhawks’ Gustav Forsling defends.
RESULTS
AT VEGAS 2
KINGS 0
BOSTON 4
VS. CHICAGO 2
AT NASHVILLE 4
PHILADELPHIA 0
The Kings’ Jack Campbell made 46 saves in his return
from injury but Marc-Andre Fleury got the shutout.
David Pastrnak had a goal and an assist, and Boston won
the 11th Winter Classic at Notre Dame Stadium.
Viktor Arvidsson scored twice and backup goalie Juuse
Saros stopped 32 shots for his sixth career shutout.
For complete NHL summaries, go to latimes.com/sports/scores
TODAY’S GAMES
Pittsburgh at N.Y. Rangers, 4 p.m.
Vancouver at Ottawa, 4 p.m.
Edmonton at Arizona, 6:30 p.m.
Calgary at Detroit, 4 p.m.
New Jersey at Dallas, 5:30 p.m.
San Jose at Colorado, 6:30 p.m.
THURSDAY’S GAMES
Tampa Bay at KINGS, 7:30 p.m.
Carolina at Philadelphia, 4 p.m.
Calgary at Boston, 4 p.m.
Vancouver at Montreal, 4:30 p.m.
Minnesota at Toronto, 11 a.m.
Florida at Buffalo, 4 p.m.
Chicago at N.Y. Islanders, 4:30 p.m.
Washington at St. Louis, 5 p.m.
FRIDAY’S GAMES
Vegas at DUCKS, 7 p.m.
Nashville at Detroit, 4:30 p.m.
Washington at Dallas, 5 p.m.
NY Rangers at Colorado, 6 p.m.
Winnipeg at Pittsburgh, 4 p.m.
Columbus at Carolina, 4:30 p.m.
New Jersey at Arizona, 6 p.m.
Names surface in coach search
Kevin Hagen Associated Press
ST. JOHN’S forward Marvin Clark II blocks a shot
by Marquette forward Theo John in the first half.
TOP 25 ROUNDUP
St. John’s crushes
No. 16 Marquette
associated press
Top 25 scores
Shamorie Ponds scored
20 of his 26 points in the first
half, dominating a highly anticipated matchup between
two of the nation’s top
guards, and St. John’s rebounded impressively from
its first loss of the season by
routing No. 16 Marquette 8969 on Tuesday in New York.
Marvin Clark II had 22
points and Mustapha Heron
added all 16 of his after halftime for the Red Storm (13-1,
1-1 Big East), who stopped
Marquette’s
eight-game
winning streak.
With
leading
scorer
Markus Howard held to
eight points on two-for-15
shooting, the Golden Eagles
(11-3, 0-1) got blown out in
their conference opener.
Howard entered averaging
25.1 points, best in the Big
East and ranked fifth in the
country.
The
anticipated
matchup between Howard
and Ponds was no contest
from the start. Ponds came
out sizzling and scored eight
points in the first 2:37. Meanwhile, the 5-foot-11 Howard
went 1 for 10 in the first half
and never got going. He
No. 9 Florida State
Winthrop
87
76
No. 10 Virginia Tech
Notre Dame
81
66
St. John’s
No. 16 Marquette
89
69
picked up four fouls and
played only 26 minutes.
at No. 10 Virginia Tech 81,
Notre Dame 66: Ty Outlaw
hit three three-pointers in a
22-9 second-half run and the
Hokies (12-1) beat the Fighting Irish (10-4). Kerry Blackshear Jr. led the way with 21
points, Nickeil AlexanderWalker and Ahmed Hill
scored 17 apiece and Outlaw
finished with 14 for the Hokies. T.J. Gibbs scored 19
points to lead Notre Dame.
at No. 9 Florida State 87,
Winthrop 76: Terance Mann
scored 22 points and Phil
Cofer added 14, helping the
Seminoles (12-1) hold off the
Eagles (8-5) for their seventh straight victory. The
Eagles had their four-game
winning streak stopped.
[UCLA, from D1]
season. The new coach will
also hold practices inside
the $35-million Mo Ostin
Basketball Center, a barely
year-old facility that is
among the best on the West
Coast, before making his debut inside the recently renovated Pauley Pavilion.
It might be enough to finally lure a brand-name
coach, thanks to a recent
surge in donor funds as well
as the record $280-million
Under Armour deal that the
school signed in 2016.
“I do think the funding
and the money will be there
in order to get the hire that
can get this program back
on track,” Sean Farnham,
the former UCLA forward
who’s now an ESPN college
basketball analyst, said
Tuesday during a telephone
interview. Farnham cautioned that it might not be
enough to land someone like
the Oklahoma City Thunder’s Billy Donovan, who
makes an average of $6 million per season in an area of
the country where that money goes much further than it
would in Los Angeles.
Farnham said one issue
UCLA’s search committee
may have to address with
prospective candidates is
the policy of usually taking
commercial flights instead
of charters. The team was recently marooned at the Cincinnati airport for 21⁄2 hours
because of a flight delay on
its way to Chicago.
“Kentucky’s not sitting in
an airport for 21⁄2 hours,
ever,” Farnham said. “And if
that’s who UCLA wants to
compete against, then you
have to be on a level playing
field.”
While Bruins fans openly
daydreamed on message
boards about prospective
candidates such as Donovan, Virginia’s Tony Bennett
and North Carolina State’s
Kevin Keatts, a groundswell
of support among recent
UCLA basketball alumni
continued to build for another name.
“The no-brainer is Earl
Watson,” Ryan Hollins, the
onetime UCLA center who is
now an NBA analyst, said of
the former Bruins point
guard who coached the
Phoenix Suns for parts of
three seasons. “The guy
bleeds blue and gold, and
he’s one of the best basketball minds that I’ve ever
been around.”
Former Bruins Matt
Barnes and Josiah Johnson
Matt York Associated Press
EARL WATSON , then interim coach of the Phoenix Suns in 2016, has the support
of several alumni to be the next head coach of the UCLA men’s basketball team.
tweeted their support of
Watson’s candidacy, citing
his ability to connect with
younger players and bring
the school’s alumni back to
Pauley Pavilion.
Darrick Martin, the former UCLA point guard who
was openly critical of Alford
shortly before he was fired,
said he would like to see Watson get a shot but that whoever gets the job should be
someone with California ties
who understands the dynamics of UCLA basketball
and is willing to embrace the
expectations of a program
that has won a record 11 national championships.
Martin said the new
coach should become instantly identifiable with
UCLA in the same way that
Roy Williams is with North
Carolina
or
Mike
Krzyzewski is with Duke.
“Certain coaches just fit
in certain areas,” Martin
said. “Also, in L.A., with all
the other teams here, in order for UCLA to regain its allure the style of play has to be
exciting — not a Big Ten
[Conference-style]
50-49
game.”
Just like it did in acquiring Kelly, UCLA has assembled a search committee
that involves more than athletic department officials.
The Bruins enlisted Hall of
Fame quarterback Troy Aikman and mega donor Casey
Wasserman with their football search and have engaged Golden State Warriors general manager Bob
Myers, a former UCLA player, in the hunt for their next
basketball coach. Wasserman will not participate in
the new search to prevent a
conflict of interest because
SOUTHLAND
MEN
at San Diego State 65, Cal State Northridge 60: Jeremy
Hemsley made a go-ahead three-pointer with 1:57 left for the
Aztecs (8-5), who staged a furious rally in the final 15 minutes
after trailing by 19 points to beat the Matadors (6-9).
at Washington 84, Cal State Fullerton 76: Jaylen Nowell
scored 20 points and had six assists, and Noah Dickerson
added 16 points and hauled in 12 rebounds for the Huskies
(9-4), who trailed 42-34 at halftime against the Titans (4-10).
MEN TODAY
Bethesda at UC Santa Barbara ........................................... 7 p.m.
he represents former Chicago Bulls coach Fred
Hoiberg, a potential candidate.
Longtime ESPN college
basketball analyst Jay Bilas
was not bullish on UCLA’s
chances to land a top coach
given its recent results. The
Bruins were rebuffed by
Brad Stevens and Shaka
Smart before hiring Alford
in 2013.
“I think after Ben Howland was dismissed, there
was an incorrect belief that
there would be a line at the
door and there was not,” Bilas said, “and so I think
UCLA has to be creative and
look for a long-term solution
rather than someone who
may have the biggest name
or come from what they consider to be a comparable job.
“I just don’t believe that’s
going to happen, and I don’t
believe that’s been in the
cards for a number of years
now.”
Asked if adding Myers to
the search committee could
enhance the results, Bilas
praised the executive as one
of the brightest minds in
basketball before adding, “If
you have somebody in
charge who knows what
they’re doing, I don’t know if
they need to form committees like that.”
ben.bolch@latimes.com
Twitter: @latbbolch
D4
W E D N E S DAY , JA N UA RY 2 , 2 019
L AT I M E S . C O M / S P O RT S
NBA
Their bond goes beyond video link
Lakers’ Stephenson and
Thunder’s George won’t put
friendship on hold when the
teams meet Wednesday.
By Tania Ganguli
Lance Stephenson and Paul
George came into the NBA together
and though their careers have put
thousands of miles between them
over the years, their friendship persists.
It is often expressed in the form of
“NBA 2K” video games. George creates a player, Stephenson creates a
player (whose name is obviously his
moniker of Born Ready) and they
take on internet opponents together.
“We ain’t lose a game yet,”
Stephenson said.
If last summer had gone a little differently, they might have been actual
teammates not just virtual teammates. And many thought it would
happen.
The Lakers will face the Oklahoma City Thunder on Wednesday
for the first time since George
shunned the Lakers in free agency.
George, who was cheered like a member of the home team each time he
played against the Lakers at Staples
Center last season, will undoubtedly
be booed. He’ll come to Los Angeles
this season with one of the league’s
best teams, being talked about for
MVP consideration.
There won’t be a marquee
matchup between two of last summer’s top free agents though. LeBron
James won’t play and could miss another week because of the groin injury he suffered Dec. 25. James did
some shooting on New Year’s Day
when the Lakers met for a light practice. Coach Luke Walton said it was
the first time he’d seen James shoot
since the injury.
James was one star linked last
season to the Lakers. George was the
other.
In George’s case, that linkage happened by design. In 2017, he told the
Indiana Pacers, the team that
drafted George and Stephenson in
2010, that he planned to leave in free
agency during summer 2018 to sign
with the Lakers. The Pacers responded by trading him to Oklahoma City.
The Thunder had a season-long
audition for George and he appreciated their willingness to give up
promising young guard Victor
Oladipo for him. They worked
throughout the season to show him
how much they valued him, though
Russell Westbrook grew angry any
time that dynamic arose.
“Sales pitch is gonna be when we
win a championship,” Westbrook
said. “Beat that pitch.”
Instead, the Thunder made an in-
glorious first-round exit, losing in six
games to the Utah Jazz.
But that didn’t turn George away.
He loved playing with Westbrook and
responded positively to general manager Sam Presti’s retention efforts.
Although George was talked about as
being a Los Angeles native, he actually grew up in Palmdale, a less urban
place that had more in common with
Oklahoma City than Los Angeles.
Before free agency opened,
George committed long term to the
Thunder. Many people within the
Lakers organization were devastated. Some, including owner Jeanie
Buss, wondered if this was going to be
a repeat of seasons when free agents
flirted with the Lakers but ultimately
the storied franchise came up empty.
Less than 24 hours later, James
agreed to become a Laker.
“You prep yourself, you do your
work and then whatever’s gonna happen is gonna happen,” Walton said.
“You don’t get too emotionally attached to it. We went after players, LeBron decided to come, Paul didn’t.
That’s our team now. We’re very
happy we have LeBron James.”
While the Thunder spent last season trying to figure out how to integrate their rebuilt team, they have
spent this season reaping the benefits.
“They have a really good defensive
team,” Walton said. “They got length
and size and versatility. They have
been doing it for a while now. … You
can tell they buy into that end of the
court.”
A lot of that is because of George,
who is averaging 26.4 points and 8.2
rebounds, and has been arguably the
Thunder’s best player.
“I think he improved a lot and I
think he’s getting better every year,”
Stephenson said.
Stephenson and Walton declined
to say much about whether they were
surprised George didn’t sign with the
Lakers. For Stephenson, their friendship won’t pause because they are
playing against each other this week.
“We gonna talk,” Stephenson said.
“We gonna talk trash for sure, man. I
remember in practice with the Pacers, we’d always go at each other and
push each other to be better. And I
feel like that made us better.”
TONIGHT
VS. OKLAHOMA CITY
When: 7:30.
On air: TV: Spectrum SportsNet,
ESPN; Radio: 710, 1330.
Update: The Thunder split games on
consecutive nights, home and away,
against the Dallas Mavericks over the
holiday weekend and are third in the
Western Conference, one game behind Golden State and Denver. Westbrook is averaging 21.0 points, 10.7 rebounds and 10.1 assists.
tania.ganguli@latimes.com
STANDINGS
Standings have been arranged to reflect how the teams will be determined for the playoffs. Teams are ranked 1-15 by record. Division
standing no longer has any bearing on the rankings. The top eight
teams in each conference make the playoffs, and the top-seeded
team would play the eighth-seeded team, the seventh team would
play the second, etc. Head-to-head competition is the first of several
tiebreakers, followed by conference record. (Western Conference
divisions: S-Southwest; P-Pacific; N-Northwest; Eastern Conference
divisions: A-Atlantic; C-Central; S-Southeast).
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Team
1. Denver
2. Golden State
3. Oklahoma City
4. Houston
5. Portland
6. CLIPPERS
6. LAKERS
8. San Antonio
W
24
25
23
21
22
21
21
21
L
11
13
13
15
16
16
16
17
PCT
.686
.658
.639
.583
.579
.568
.568
.553
GB L10
7-3
1
⁄2 6-4
11⁄2 6-4
31⁄2 9-1
31⁄2 7-3
4
4-6
4
4-6
41⁄2 7-3
Rk.
N1
P1
N2
S1
N3
P2
P3
S2
9. Sacramento
10. Memphis
11. Utah
12. Dallas
13. Minnesota
14. New Orleans
15. Phoenix
19
18
18
17
17
17
9
18
18
20
19
20
21
29
.514 11⁄2
.500 2
.474 3
.472 3
.459 31⁄2
.447 4
.237 12
4-6
3-7
5-5
2-8
4-6
3-7
5-5
P4
S3
N4
S4
N5
S5
P5
L10
8-2
6-4
8-2
5-5
5-5
5-5
6-4
3-7
Rk.
C1
A1
C2
A2
A3
S1
S2
C3
W
26
28
25
24
21
18
17
16
L
10
11
12
14
15
18
18
19
PCT GB
1
⁄2
.722
.718
.676 2
.632 31⁄2
.583 51⁄2
.500 81⁄2
.486 9
.457 10
8. Brooklyn
9. Orlando
10. Washington
11. Atlanta
12. Chicago
13. New York
14. Cleveland
17
16
14
11
10
9
8
21
20
23
25
27
29
29
.447
.444
.378
.306
.270
.237
.216
Line
51⁄2
6
5
21⁄2
1
OFF
6
OFF
OFF
Underdog
at LAKERS
at Cleveland
Atlanta
Dallas
New Orleans
Minnesota
Detroit
Orlando
Philadelphia
MILWAUKEE 121
DETROIT 98
Brook Lopez had 25 points, Giannis Antetokounmpo threw down
a spectacular one-handed dunk
and the host Milwaukee Bucks
cruised past the Detroit Pistons on
Tuesday 121-98.
Antetokounmpo had just 15
points, but his slam over Jon Leuer
was the highlight of the night. Antetokounmpo blew past Andre
Drummond, jumped and reached
his arm over a leaping Leuer for the
slam during the first quarter.
at Toronto 122, Utah 116: Kawhi
Leonard scored a career-high 45
points, while Pascal Siakam had a
career-best 28 points with 10 rebounds for the Raptors.
Portland 113, at Sacramento 108
(OT): Damian Lillard shook off a
sluggish night shooting to score
five of his 25 points in overtime, and
the Trail Blazers rallied after blowing a 14-point halftime lead.
at Denver 115, New York 108: Nikola
Jokic had 19 points, 14 rebounds
and 15 assists, including a late nolook pass to wrap things up, as the
Nuggets won their ninth straight
home victory.
Philadelphia 119, at Clippers 113
— associated press
Bucks 121, Pistons 98
DETROIT
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Bullock.......26 2-8 0-1 1-4 3 2 6
Griffin.........33 9-20 7-7 4-9 4 5 29
Drummond .30 6-12 3-5 2-7 1 2 15
B.Brown......28 0-7 0-0 3-8 3 4 0
Jackson......22 8-10 1-1 0-0 3 2 19
Leuer .........25 3-5 0-0 3-9 2 4 6
Kennard .....20 3-10 0-0 1-3 2 1 8
Thomas ......19 3-6 5-7 0-1 0 2 13
Calderon.....16 0-5 0-0 0-2 1 2 0
Galloway.....10 0-7 0-0 0-0 3 2 0
Robinson III ..7 1-2 0-0 0-0 1 0 2
Totals
35-92 16-21 14-43 23 26 98
Shooting: Field goals, 38.0%; free throws, 76.2%
Three-point goals: 12-33 (Griffin 4-9, Thomas 2-2,
Jackson 2-3, Kennard 2-4, Bullock 2-5, B.Brown 0-1, Leuer
0-1, Calderon 0-4, Galloway 0-4). Team Rebounds: 9.
Team Turnovers: 14 (19 PTS). Blocked Shots: 2 (Griffin,
Leuer). Turnovers: 14 (Griffin 6, Jackson 3, Bullock 2,
Calderon, Drummond, Leuer). Steals: 7 (Drummond 2,
Robinson III 2, Bullock, Griffin, Thomas). Technical Fouls:
coach Pistons (Defensive three second), 3:49 first.
Nuggets 115, Knicks 108
NEW YORK
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Knox ..........38 7-16 2-3 0-4 1 0 18
Vonleh........34 2-8 1-1 6-14 3 5 5
Kornet........26 6-9 3-3 0-6 1 3 19
Hardaway Jr.37 7-12 1-1 0-2 2 2 16
Mudiay .......31 7-20 0-2 2-3 9 3 15
Kanter........20 6-11 5-6 7-12 2 3 17
Trier ...........19 3-9 0-0 0-2 2 1 7
Ntilikina......18 4-6 0-0 0-0 5 2 10
Dotson .......13 0-2 1-2 0-0 3 2 1
Totals
42-93 13-18 15-43 28 21 108
Shooting: Field goals, 45.2%; free throws,
72.2%
Three-point goals: 11-27 (Kornet 4-7, Ntilikina
2-3, Knox 2-7, Trier 1-1, Mudiay 1-2, Hardaway Jr.
1-4, Dotson 0-1, Vonleh 0-2). Team Rebounds: 4.
Team Turnovers: 8 (9 PTS). Blocked Shots: 3 (Kornet, Mudiay, Vonleh). Turnovers: 8 (Mudiay 4, Hardaway Jr. 3, Vonleh). Steals: 4 (Mudiay 2, Knox, Ntilikina). Technical Fouls: None.
⁄2 7-3 A4
⁄2 4-6 S3
3
3-7 S4
51⁄2 5-5 S5
7
4-6 C4
81⁄2 1-9 A5
9
2-8 C5
Antetokounmpo’s
dunk sparks Bucks
A—19,800. T—2:19. O—Tony Brothers, Mark
Lindsay, Scott Twardoski
A—17,534. T—2:09. O—Karl Lane, Evan Scott, Eric Lew-
1
RESULTS
TORONTO
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Leonard......35 16-22 13-17 0-6 1 2 45
Siakam ......32 9-15 7-7 1-10 1 3 28
Ibaka .........29 3-10 1-4 0-8 3 4 8
Green.........30 1-4 0-0 2-4 1 4 2
VanVleet .....32 3-5 1-2 0-4 5 1 8
Powell ........22 6-11 0-0 0-3 1 4 14
Wright ........18 4-8 0-1 0-0 0 1 8
Monroe ......18 2-5 3-4 2-6 2 1 7
Anunoby .....17 1-2 0-0 0-2 3 1 2
Miles ...........2 0-0 0-0 0-2 1 0 0
Totals
45-82 25-35 5-45 18 21 122
Shooting: Field goals, 54.9%; free throws,
71.4%
Three-point goals: 7-20 (Siakam 3-4, Powell
2-4, VanVleet 1-2, Ibaka 1-3, Green 0-2, Wright
0-2, Leonard 0-3). Team Rebounds: 10. Team Turnovers: 9 (9 PTS). Blocked Shots: 6 (Monroe 2, Powell 2, Green, Ibaka). Turnovers: 9 (Leonard 2, VanVleet 2, Wright 2, Green, Monroe, Siakam). Steals:
4 (Wright 2, Anunoby, Ibaka). Technical Fouls:
coach Raptors (Defensive three second), 3:35
first.
Utah
24 29 32 31— 116
Toronto
26 25 44 27— 122
is
1
Time
7:30 p.m.
4 p.m.
4 p.m.
4 p.m.
4:30 p.m.
5 p.m.
5 p.m.
5 p.m.
6 p.m.
UTAH
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Favors ........27 8-12 5-8 6-9 0 4 21
Ingles.........34 0-5 2-3 0-6 6 5 2
Gobert .......32 6-7 4-5 3-9 2 3 16
Mitchell ......35 7-23 3-3 1-4 3 2 19
Rubio.........31 6-17 2-3 0-4 8 5 14
Crowder......26 9-15 7-7 0-6 0 3 30
Exum .........18 4-11 0-0 1-3 3 2 8
Korver ........18 1-4 0-0 0-1 0 1 3
Sefolosha .....9 1-3 0-0 1-1 0 1 3
O’Neale........7 0-0 0-0 0-0 1 1 0
Totals
42-97 23-29 12-43 23 27 116
Shooting: Field goals, 43.3%; free throws,
79.3%
Three-point goals: 9-32 (Crowder 5-7, Mitchell
2-8, Sefolosha 1-2, Korver 1-4, Favors 0-2, Rubio
0-4, Ingles 0-5). Team Rebounds: 10. Team Turnovers: 4 (5 PTS). Blocked Shots: 4 (Favors 2, Exum,
Rubio). Turnovers: 4 (Rubio 2, Crowder, Ingles).
Steals: 6 (Gobert 2, Ingles 2, Mitchell, O’Neale).
Technical Fouls: None.
MILWAUKEE
TODAY’S GAMES
Favorite
Oklahoma City
Miami
at Washington
at Charlotte
at Brooklyn
at Boston
at Memphis
at Chicago
at Phoenix
Raptors 122, Jazz 116
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Antetknmpo 26 6-11 3-5 0-8 7 5 15
Middleton ...28 9-14 3-4 3-5 2 2 22
Lopez.........30 7-13 4-5 0-3 0 0 25
Bledsoe......29 7-14 4-4 0-4 6 1 18
Brogdon .....25 6-7 0-0 0-4 5 1 13
Hill ............19 3-4 2-5 0-3 4 4 8
Snell..........17 4-5 0-0 0-2 0 0 9
Maker ........17 1-2 1-3 1-5 1 4 3
Wilson........17 0-2 0-0 1-5 1 1 0
S.Brown......15 2-3 0-0 0-2 1 1 4
Connaughton.4 2-3 0-0 0-0 0 0 4
J.Smith.........4 0-1 0-0 0-2 0 0 0
DiVincenzo....3 0-0 0-0 0-0 1 0 0
Totals
47-79 17-26 5-43 28 19 121
Shooting: Field goals, 59.5%; free throws, 65.4%
Three-point goals: 10-27 (Lopez 7-12, Brogdon 1-2,
Snell 1-2, Middleton 1-4, Antetokounmpo 0-1, S.Brown 0-1,
Hill 0-1, Maker 0-1, Wilson 0-1, Bledsoe 0-2). Team Rebounds: 8. Team Turnovers: 13 (17 PTS). Blocked Shots: 6
(Antetokounmpo 3, Lopez 2, DiVincenzo). Turnovers: 13
(Middleton 4, Antetokounmpo 3, Brogdon, DiVincenzo,
Hill, Lopez, Maker, Snell). Steals: 7 (S.Brown 3, Antetokounmpo, Bledsoe, Hill, Maker). Technical Fouls: coach
Bucks (Defensive three second), 3:03 second
Detroit
27 25 21 25— 98
Milwaukee
35 33 24 29— 121
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Team
1. Milwaukee
2. Toronto
2. Indiana
3. Philadelphia
4. Boston
5. Charlotte
6. Miami
7. Detroit
BOX SCORES
DENVER
Alex Gallardo Associated Press
THE 76ERS’ BEN SIMMONS , left, vies for the ball with the Clippers’ Tobias Harris during Tuesday
night’s game. Simmons had 14 points and nine rebounds to help the 76ers to a 119-113 victory.
76ers’ stars too much for L.A.
[Clippers, from D1]
attempts with 58 seconds remaining,
his team trailing by five, Philadelphia’s other young star, Ben Simmons, dribbled upcourt, sized up his
defender and drove to his left before
scoring a floater for a seven-point lead
with 39 seconds left.
Fans who’d stood during the previous minute as the Clippers (21-16)
mounted a comeback turned in their
seats said goodbye to those around
them and left. Those who stayed saw
Simmons apply the night’s coda with
a thunderous two-handed dunk in the
final seconds.
Simmons had 14 points and Jimmy
Butler, the star shooting guard the
76ers (24-14) traded for earlier this
season in their bid to play their way
into June, had 16 points and six rebounds before he was ejected in the
fourth quarter after grabbing the
neck of Avery Bradley while the two
jostled for rebounding position.
Though there is no doubt the Clippers hope to one day be in the position
similar to the 76ers’, able to pit multiple stars against opposing defenses,
Tuesday was another reminder of why
the franchise enjoys its current roster,
as well.
The Clippers trailed by as many as
24 points but a 10-0 fourth-quarter run
pulled them within 114-109 with 1:26
left. They showed literal fight along
the way while outscoring the 76ers by
12 in the second half.
Embiid and Clippers guard Patrick Beverley were each assessed
technical fouls after getting in each
other’s face during the fourth quarter,
and their scuffle was followed by Butler and Bradley’s shoving match,
which resulted in dual ejections and
technicals.
It was the Clippers’ self-described
persona in a nutshell: Unwilling to
76ERS 119, CLIPPERS 113
PHILADELPHIA
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Butler........................................29 5-13 5-6 2-6 4 2 16
Chandler ...................................26 3-6 0-0 2-4 2 4 7
Embiid ......................................35 9-19 8-12 4-19 3 5 28
Redick ......................................34 5-11 4-4 0-0 2 1 18
Simmons...................................32 6-13 2-6 1-9 8 3 14
McConnell .................................28 4-6 3-4 1-2 3 4 11
Bolden ......................................15 4-4 0-0 5-6 0 1 9
Shamet .....................................13 1-2 0-0 0-2 0 4 3
Muscala ....................................12 4-7 0-0 2-5 2 2 10
Korkmaz ....................................11 1-6 1-1 0-2 1 2 3
Totals
42-87 23-33 17-55 25 28 119
Shooting: Field goals, 48.3%; free throws, 69.7%
Three-point goals: 12-26 (Redick 4-8, Embiid 2-4, Muscala 2-5,
Bolden 1-1, Chandler 1-1, Shamet 1-2, Butler 1-3, Korkmaz 0-2). Team
Rebounds: 10. Team Turnovers: 20 (18 PTS). Blocked Shots: 7 (Embiid 3,
Bolden, Butler, McConnell, Simmons). Turnovers: 20 (Embiid 5, Simmons
4, McConnell 3, Butler 2, Redick 2, Bolden, Chandler, Korkmaz, Muscala).
Steals: 7 (McConnell 4, Chandler, Embiid, Simmons). Technical Fouls:
Embiid, 9:32 fourth
CLIPPERS
Min
Gallinari ....................................34
Harris........................................24
Gortat .......................................22
Bradley .....................................29
Gilgeous-Alexander......................20
Beverley ....................................33
Williams ....................................30
Harrell.......................................20
Scott ........................................10
Wallace.......................................5
Marjanovic...................................4
Thornwell.....................................4
FG-A
7-15
7-15
1-4
3-7
4-7
1-3
8-19
9-14
1-4
1-2
0-1
0-0
FT-A OR-T
5-6 2-7
6-6 1-6
4-4 2-7
0-0 0-0
0-0 1-2
2-4 1-3
5-9 0-4
2-5 3-10
0-0 1-1
0-0 0-0
0-0 1-1
0-0 0-0
A
3
0
2
1
5
1
3
2
0
0
1
0
P
2
4
2
2
5
6
1
4
0
0
2
1
T
21
21
6
6
8
5
22
20
2
2
0
0
**TEMPTAG**
42-91 24-34 12-41 18 29 113
Totals
Shooting: Field goals, 46.2%; free throws, 70.6%
Three-point goals: 5-25 (Gallinari 2-6, Beverley 1-2, Harris 1-4,
Williams 1-8, Bradley 0-1, Gilgeous-Alexander 0-1, Scott 0-3). Team Rebounds: 8. Team Turnovers: 13 (12 PTS). Blocked Shots: 0. Turnovers: 13
(Williams 3, Gallinari 2, Gilgeous-Alexander 2, Gortat 2, Marjanovic 2,
Harris, Scott). Steals: 12 (Harris 3, Williams 3, Gilgeous-Alexander 2, Gortat 2, Gallinari, Thornwell). Technical Fouls: Beverley, 9:32 fourth
Philadelphia
41 35 25 18— 119
CLIPPERS
28 30 30 25— 113
But we just kept on digging ourselves
a hole.
“... It’s proof that it’s there but it
feels like right now we’re in a defensive
rut.”
Embiid swished a three-pointer on
Philadelphia’s first possession and
swished the basket for a 3-0 lead and
the 76ers never trailed again. The
76ers finished with more offensive rebounds in the first quarter than the
Clippers had total rebounds.
Philadelphia scored 76 points in
the first two quarters, the 10th-most
points scored in a first half across the
entire league this season, to lead by 18.
One game after the 76ers scored 95
points in a blowout loss without Embiid in Portland, they had that many
with three minutes to spare in Tuesday’s third quarter.
Few, if any, NBA centers possess
the physical gifts and technical skills
of Embiid, and his success against the
Clippers in November suggested they
would struggle to contain him Tuesday. But the matchup underscored
the trouble they have had against opposing centers. Both Boban Marjanovic and Marcin Gortat allowed
opponents to shoot 65% in the restricted area in December.
“We have to be better at that position,” Rivers said.
Etc.
back down against teams with higherwattage stars.
Ultimately, star power overcame
scrappiness. The hole Los Angeles
created for itself during a disastrous
first half was too much to overcome.
Lou Williams scored 22, Tobias
Harris and Danilo Gallinari each
scored 21 and Harrell had 20 points.
“We’re making runs,” Rivers said.
“I thought we fought pretty hard in
the fourth quarter. We didn’t give in.
Center Johnathan Motley was
transferred Tuesday back to the
team’s G League affiliate in Ontario.
He’d spent two days with the team in
early December and was called up
again from the Agua Caliente Clippers
on Dec. 26. Players on two-way contracts are allowed to spent up to 45
days with the NBA team.
andrew.greif@latimes.com
Twitter: @andrewgreif
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Hrnangmz .. 19 2-4 2-2 1-2 0 1 8
Jokic ......... 34 8-16 2-3 6-14 15 3 19
Plumlee ..... 23 4-5 0-0 1-7 2 4 8
Craig ......... 24 5-10 1-2 2-4 1 0 13
Murray....... 32 4-12 0-0 1-3 5 1 8
Beasley ..... 29 8-15 2-2 0-6 5 0 23
Morris ....... 22 2-8 0-0 1-3 4 1 5
Millsap ...... 22 6-13 4-10 2-9 2 5 16
Harris ........ 19 1-5 4-4 1-2 2 3 6
Lyles ........... 9 4-7 0-0 1-3 0 1 9
Totals
44-95 15-23 16-53 36 19 115
Shooting: Field goals, 46.3%; free throws,
65.2%
Three-point goals: 12-34 (Beasley 5-9, Hernangomez 2-4, Craig 2-5, Jokic 1-2, Lyles 1-3, Morris
1-4, Murray 0-3, Millsap 0-4). Team Rebounds: 15.
Team Turnovers: 8 (9 PTS). Blocked Shots: 6 (Jokic
3, Craig, Lyles, Murray). Turnovers: 8 (Jokic 5, Hernangomez, Morris, Murray). Steals: 7 (Millsap 2,
Plumlee 2, Beasley, Jokic, Murray). Technical Fouls:
None.
New York
32 24 28 24— 108
Denver
28 27 27 33— 115
A—19,520. T—2:14. O—Ed Malloy, Tre Maddox,
Tyler Ford
Trail Blazers 113, Kings 108, OT
PORTLAND
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Aminu ........37 4-9 2-2 1-8 2 3 13
Harkless .....33 5-10 0-0 1-9 0 4 11
Nurkic ........37 5-10 14-16 5-23 7 4 24
Lillard ........41 8-21 8-8 1-6 6 0 25
McCollum ...38 8-19 0-2 0-1 2 3 16
Curry .........21 6-9 2-2 0-1 1 1 18
Leonard......15 0-2 0-0 1-3 1 1 0
Collins........15 2-7 0-0 1-4 1 1 4
Turner.........14 1-1 0-0 0-1 1 0 2
Stauskas ......9 0-2 0-0 0-0 1 2 0
Totals
39-90 26-30 10-56 22 19 113
Shooting: Field goals, 43.3%; free throws,
86.7%
Three-point goals: 9-32 (Curry 4-6, Aminu 3-5,
Harkless 1-2, Lillard 1-9, Stauskas 0-2, Collins
0-3, McCollum 0-5). Team Rebounds: 7. Team
Turnovers: 18 (27 PTS). Blocked Shots: 10 (Nurkic
5, Aminu 2, Harkless 2, McCollum). Turnovers: 18
(Lillard 5, Nurkic 4, Leonard 2, Aminu, Collins,
Curry, Harkless, McCollum, Stauskas, Turner).
Steals: 11 (Nurkic 5, Curry 3, Harkless 2, Lillard).
SACRAMENTO
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Bjelica....... 35 4-12 5-7 5-16 2 6 14
Shumpert... 24 4-11 0-0 0-1 3 1 9
Cauley-Stein 32 2-14 1-2 5-11 3 1 5
Fox ........... 37 6-19 1-1 0-2 2 4 13
Hield ......... 39 11-23 0-0 2-5 4 4 27
Bogdanovic 35 7-19 2-2 0-5 5 3 19
Jackson ..... 23 2-6 0-0 1-3 2 2 5
Ferrell........ 14 4-4 0-0 0-0 2 0 8
Giles III...... 13 3-5 0-0 1-7 0 0 6
Koufos......... 7 1-2 0-0 0-3 1 2 2
Totals
44-115 9-12 14-53 24 23 108
Shooting: Field goals, 38.3%; free throws,
75.0%
Three-point goals: 11-33 (Hield 5-8, Bogdanovic 3-11, Jackson 1-4, Shumpert 1-4, Bjelica
1-5, Fox 0-1). Team Rebounds: 13. Team Turnovers:
13 (12 PTS). Blocked Shots: 4 (Bjelica, Giles III,
Hield, Shumpert). Turnovers: 13 (Bogdanovic 4,
Bjelica 2, Fox 2, Hield 2, Giles III, Jackson, Koufos).
Steals: 13 (Bogdanovic 3, Shumpert 3, Fox 2,
Jackson 2, Cauley-Stein, Ferrell, Giles III).
Portland
26 38 19 20 10— 113
Sacramento
25 25 27 26
5— 108
A—17,583. T—2:21. O—Brent Barnaky, Mitchell
Ervin, John Goble
W E D N E S DAY , JA N UA RY 2 , 2 019
L AT I M E S . C O M / S P O RT S
D5
THE DAY IN SPORTS
Federer tops Williams at Hopman Cup
wire reports
Roger Federer won the bragging rights over fellow tennis great
Serena Williams as they faced
each other on the court for the first
time on Tuesday, with Federer
spearheading Switzerland’s 4-2,
4-3 (3) victory over the United
States in a mixed doubles decider
at the Hopman Cup in Perth, Australia.
“I was nervous returning
[Williams’ serve]. People talk
about her serve so much and I see
why it is such a wonderful serve because you just can’t read it,” Federer said. “It was great fun. You see
how determined and focused she
is, and I love that about her.”
Federer and playing partner
Belinda
Bencic
overcame
Williams and Frances Tiafoe in the
Fast4 format as Switzerland beat
the U.S. 2-1.
Federer and Williams shared a
good-natured interview afterward
and then engaged in a selfie.
“It was so fun. This is super cool
COLLEGE
BASKETBALL
1. Duke (35) .......
2. Michigan (9) ...
3. Tenn. (12) .......
4. Virginia (4) ......
5. Kansas (4) ......
6. Nevada ...........
7. Gonzaga .........
8. Michigan St. ...
9. Florida St. .......
10. Va. Tech .......
11. Texas Tech ...
12. Auburn ..........
13. Kentucky ......
14. Ohio St. ........
15. N. Carolina ...
16. Marquette .....
17. Miss. St. .......
18. N.C. State ....
19. Houston ........
20. Buffalo ..........
21. Indiana .........
22. Wisconsin ....
23. Oklahoma ....
24. Nebraska .....
25. Iowa ..............
Record
11-1
13-0
11-1
11-0
11-1
13-0
12-2
11-2
11-1
11-1
11-1
11-2
10-2
12-1
9-3
11-2
12-1
12-1
13-0
12-1
11-2
10-3
11-1
11-2
11-2
Andy Murray, 31, returned to
competitive tennis for the first
time since September and went on
a late roll to take the last four
games in a 6-3, 6-4 win over Australian wild-card entry James Duckworth at the Brisbane (Australia)
International. In first-round women’s matches, Johanna Konta
ousted
third-seeded
Sloane
Stephens 6-4, 6-3 to set up a second-round meeting with Ajla
Tomljanovic, who beat Katerina
Siniakova 1-6, 6-3, 6-0.
Fifth-ranked Juan Martin del
Potro said he will miss the Australian Open as he continues his recovery from a knee injury.
In Pune, India, Ivo Karlovic, 39,
beat an opponent more than two
decades younger than him with a
6-4, 7-5 win over Felix Auger-Aliassime, 18, in the first round of the
Maharashtra Open.
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
Sooners, Riley agree
to extend contract
Oklahoma and Lincoln Riley
agreed to a contract extension,
which should quell speculation
about the second-year coach being
lured away by an NFL team.
Oklahoma said that contract
terms were being finalized and
would be subject to approval by the
board of regents late this month.
North Carolina State wide receiver Jakobi Meyers is skipping
his final season to declare for the
NFL draft. The school announced
the redshirt junior’s decision less
than 24 hours after the Wolfpack
lost to Texas A&M in the Gator
Bowl.
A prosecutor said two Louisiana State football players — sophomore running back Clyde Edwards-Helaire or freshman linebacker Jared Small — appeared to
have responded with justifiable
force when they fatally shot an 18year-old man who was allegedly
trying to rob them at gunpoint.
East Baton Rouge Parish Dist.
Atty. Hillar Moore said that the investigation is in the preliminary
stages
ETC.
Browns’ interim
is first to interview
Gregg Williams had his interview with the Browns, who were
impressed by his leadership as
coach in the second half this season.
Williams went 5-3 as Cleveland’s
interim coach after taking over
when Hue Jackson was fired on
Oct. 29. The 60-year-old Williams is
the first candidate to meet with
general manager John Dorsey.
The Detroit Lions did not renew
offensive coordinator Jim Bob
Cooter’s contract. ... The Seattle
Seahawks placed safety Delano
Hill on injured reserve after he suffered a non-displaced fracture in
his hip in the regular-season finale.
... Nick Foles will start for Philadelphia in Sunday’s wild-card game
against the Bears. Coach Doug
Pederson said Foles is “feeling
good” after suffering a chest injury.
... The Oakland Raiders signed
quarterback Nathan Peterman to
a reserve future contract.
The 2020 Winter Classic will be
held at the Cotton Bowl in Texas.
The Dallas Stars will host the
NHL’s annual outdoor game on
New Year’s Day. But Commissioner Gary Bettman said the
league hasn’t decided on the opponent.
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
SOUTHLAND
San Diego St. 65, Cal St. Northridge 60
Washington 84, Cal St. Fullerton 76
EAST
St. John’s 89, Marquette 69
SOUTH
Florida St. 87, Winthrop 76
Radford 80, Mars Hill 51
Virginia Tech 81, Notre Dame 66
WOMEN
EAST
George Washington 51, Memphis 38
THE AP TOP 25 POLL
(Through Dec. 30)
No. School ............
that we get to do it at such a pinnacle point of our careers,” Williams
said. “I was so excited, and literally
it was the match of my career.”
Defending champion Switzerland will qualify for Saturday’s final
if it beats Greece on Thursday in
Group B. The United States, which
lost to Greece on Monday, can’t advance.
Pts
1,530
1,478
1,469
1,428
1,378
1,317
1,200
1,146
1,063
934
893
820
799
769
744
595
572
424
368
353
330
250
244
204
182
Tuesday’s Results
Rose Bowl
At Pasadena
Ohio State 28, Washington 23
Outback Bowl
At Tampa, Fla.
Iowa 27, Mississippi State 22
Citrus Bowl
At Orlando, Fla.
Kentucky 27, Penn State 24
Fiesta Bowl
At Glendale, Ariz.
LSU 40, Central Florida 32
Sugar Bowl
At New Orleans
Texas 28, Georgia 21
LSU 40, UCF 32
Texas 28, Georgia 21
Texas..........................10 10 0 8—28
Georgia ........................0 7 0 14—21
First Quarter
TEX—Ehlinger 2 run (Dicker kick), 10:35
TEX—FG Dicker 37, 6:05
Second Quarter
TEX—Ehlinger 9 run (Dicker kick), 14:53
UGA—Herrien 17 pass from Fromm (Blankenship kick), 9:03
TEX—FG Dicker 30, 4:37
Fourth Quarter
TEX—Ehlinger 1 run (C.Johnson pass from
Ehlinger), 11:49
UGA—Hardman 3 pass from Fromm (Blankenship kick), 10:25
UGA—Swift 5 pass from Fromm (Blankenship
kick), :14
A—71,449.
THE ODDS
TENNIS
College Basketball
$1.5-MILLION BRISBANE INTERNATIONAL
At Brisbane, Australia
Surface: Hard-Outdoor
MEN’S SINGLES (first round)—Denis Kudla d.
Taylor Fritz, 7-6 (5), 6-7 (2), 6-4; Andy Murray,
Britain, d. James Duckworth, Australia, 6-3, 6-4;
Jeremy Chardy, France, d. Jan-Lennard Struff,
Germany, 4-6, 6-3, 6-4; Nick Kyrgios (8), Australia, d. Ryan Harrison, 7-6 (5), 5-7, 7-6 (5);
Jo-Wilfried Tsonga, France, d. Thanasi Kokkinakis, Australia, 7-6 (6), 6-4; Jordan Thompson,
Australia, d. Alex Bolt, Australia, 6-3, 6-0; Alex
de Minaur (7), Australia, d. Alexei Popyrin, Australia, 6-2, 6-2.
WOMEN’S SINGLES (first round)—Johanna
Konta, Britain, d. Sloane Stephens (3), 6-4, 6-3;
Ajla Tomljanovic, Australia, df. Katerina Siniakova, Czech Republic, 1-6, 6-3, 6-0; Anastasija
Sevastova (8), Latvia, d. Daria Gavrilova, Australia, 6-3, 6-3; Petra Kvitova (4), Czech Republic, d.
Danielle Collins, 6-7 (6), 7-6 (6), 6-3; Aliaksandra Sasnovich, Belarus, d. Anastasia Potapova,
Russia, 6-4, 7-5.
(Second round)—Naomi Osaka (2), Japan, d.
Destanee Aiava, Australia, 6-3, 6-2; Lesia
Tsurenko, Ukraine, d. Kimberly Birrell, Australia,
6-4, 6-3.
$1.195-MILLION EXXONMOBIL OPEN
At Doha, Qatar
Surface: Hard-Outdoor
SINGLES (first round)—Ricardas Berankis,
Lithuania, d. David Goffin (6), Belgium, 3-6, 6-4,
7-6 (4); Guido Pella, Argentina, d. Cem Ilkel, Turkey, 7-6 (1), 6-3; Marco Cecchinato (4), Italy, d.
Sergiy Stakhovsky, Ukraine, 6-4, 6-2; Stan
Wawrinka, Switzerland, d. Karen Khachanov (3),
Russia, 7-6 (7), 6-4; Guillermo Garcia-Lopez,
Spain, d. Mubarak Shannan Zayid, Qatar, 6-1,
6-3; Dusan Lajovic, Serbia, d. Adrian Mannarino,
France, 6-3, 7-6 (5); Novak Djokovic (1), Serbia,
d. Damir Dzumhur, Bosnia-Herzegovina, 6-1,
6-2; Marton Fucsovics, Hungary, d. Marius Copil,
Romania, 6-3, 6-2; Pierre-Hugues Herbert,
France, d. Dominic Thiem (2), Austria, 6-3, 7-5.
Favorite
at Villanova
at Michigan St.
at Loyola Chi.
at Kansas
at Nevada
Line
121⁄2
131⁄2
7
10
10
Underdog
Depaul
Northwestern
Indiana St.
Oklahoma
Utah St.
Pro Football Playoffs
Saturday’s NFL Wild-Card Games
Favorite
Line (O/U)
Underdog
at Houston
2 (471⁄2)
Indianapolis
at Dallas
1 (431⁄2)
Seattle
Sunday’s NFL Wild-Card Games
Favorite
Line (O/U)
Underdog
at Baltimore
21⁄2 (411⁄2)
CHARGERS
at Chicago
6 (41)
Philadelphia
Updates at Pregame.com
—Associated Press
TRANSACTIONS
PRO FOOTBALL
Chicago—Signed quarterback Tyler Bray to
the practice squad; released offensive lineman
Willie Beavers from the practice squad.
Cincinnati—Signed kickerf Tristan Vizcaino to
a reserve/future contract.
Detroit—Signed quarterback Connor Cook to
a reserve/future contract; announced that the
contract of offensive coordinator Jim Bob Cooter
will not be renewed.
HOCKEY
Arizona—Assigned goaltender Calvin Pickard
to Tucson (AHL) for conditioning.
Carolina—Called up forward Saku Maenalanen from Charlotte (AHL); assigned forward
Janne Kuokkanen to Charlotte.
New Jersey—Put forward Taylor Hall on injured
reserve, retroactive to Dec. 23; called up defenseman Egor Yakovlev and forward Blake
Pietila from Binghamton (AHL).
LSU............................10 14 10 6—40
Central Florida ............14 7 3 8—32
First Quarter
LSU—FG Tracy 24, 12:38
UCF—McCrae 25 run (Wright kick), 10:56
UCF—B.Moore 93 interception return (Wright
kick), 6:39
LSU—Jefferson 22 pass from Burrow (Tracy
kick), 1:27
Second Quarter
LSU—Dillon 49 pass from Burrow (Tracy kick),
12:59
LSU—Jefferson 33 pass from Burrow (Tracy
kick), 7:11
UCF—G.Davis 32 pass from Mack (Wright
kick), :04
Third Quarter
LSU—Chase 32 pass from Burrow (Tracy kick),
12:38
LSU—FG Tracy 28, 5:18
UCF—FG Wright 37, 3:01
Fourth Quarter
LSU—FG Tracy 28, 5:18
LSU—FG Tracy 26, 4:12
UCF—McGowan 2 run (O.Anderson pass from
Mack), 2:24
Attendance—57,246.
Kentucky 27, Penn St. 24
Kentucky.....................10 0 17 0—27
Penn St. .......................0 7 0 17—24
First Quarter
KEN—FG Butler 28, 12:23
KEN—Bowden 58 punt return (Butler kick),
:45
Second Quarter
PSU—Bowers 1 pass from McSorley (Pinegar
kick), 13:56
Third Quarter
KEN—Snell 2 run (Butler kick), 12:38
KEN—FG Butler 28, 12:23
KEN—Snell 12 run (Butler kick), 1:35
Fourth Quarter
PSU—McSorley 1 run (Pinegar kick), 13:37
PSU—Freiermuth 18 pass from McSorley
(Pinegar kick), 9:00
PSU—FG Pinegar 32, 4:12
Attendance—59,167.
Iowa 27, Mississippi St. 22
Mississippi St. ...............6 0 13 3—22
Iowa.............................0 17 7 3—27
First Quarter
MSST—FG Christmann 44, 6:37
MSST—FG Christmann 42, :45
Second Quarter
IOW—FG Recinos 44, 10:02
IOW—Easley 75 pass from Stanley (Recinos
kick), 7:55
IOW—Smith-Marsette 15 pass from Stanley
(Recinos kick), 6:18
Third Quarter
MSST—Hill 1 pass from Fitzgerald (pass
failed), 11:26
MSST—Fitzgerald 33 run (Christmann kick),
11:08
IOW—Easley 8 pass from Stanley (Recinos
kick), 1:55
Fourth Quarter
MSST—FG Christmann 20, 12:04
IOW—FG Recinos 40, 5:51
Attendance—40,518.
NOTES
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
Stanford—Announced that junior tight end
Kaden Smith will enter the NFL draft.
Norm Hall Getty Images
CENTRAL FLORIDA quarterback Darriel Mack Jr. is tackled by Louisiana State linebacker
Jacob Phillips in the fourth quarter of the Fiesta Bowl. Louisiana State won 40-32.
BOWLS ROUNDUP
Louisiana State ends
Central Florida’s streak
associated press
BOWL SCHEDULE
SANTA ANITA RESULTS
Copyright 2019 by Equibase Co. Sixth day of a 61-day meet.
1048 FIRST RACE. 1 mile turf. Starter allowance. 4-year-olds and
up. Claiming price $50,000. Purse $33,000.
P# Horse
Jockey
Win
Place
Show
1 Rumpus Cat
Prat
7.20
4.40
3.20
7 Tigerbeach
Franco
12.20
6.60
6 East Rand
Van Dyke
3.20
8 Also Ran: Jimmy Chila, Acclimate, Hard Fought, Blitzkrieg, Fortune of War (GB).
8 Time: 23.27, 46.99, 1.10.78, 1.22.53, 1.34.36. Clear & Firm. Trainer: Richard
Baltas. Owner: Slam Dunk Racing.
8 Scratched: none.
8 Exotics: $2 Roulette (RED) paid $5.00, $1 Exacta (1-7) paid $37.90, 10-Cent
Superfecta (1-7-6-5) paid $81.93, $1 Super High Five (1-7-6-5-4) paid $5,154.10,
50-Cent Trifecta (1-7-6) paid $121.65.
1049 SECOND RACE. 6 furlongs. Claiming. Fillies and mares.
4-year-olds and up. Claiming prices $25,000-$22,500. Purse
$25,000.
P# Horse
Jockey
Win
Place
Show
7 Smitten Kitten
Pereira
8.40
3.80
2.80
1 Kindred
Gutierrez
3.00
2.40
2 Dannie Joe
Figueroa
2.80
8 Also Ran: Winsinfashion, Jeweled, Greater Glory, Proper Drink.
8 Time: 22.60, 45.80, 58.35, 1.11.75. Clear & Fast. Trainer: William Spawr. Owner:
Allen Racing LLC, Acker, Tom, Lindo, Jon, Mehringer, Dandi G., Rogers, Alexander J. and
Yee, Glenn.
8 Scratched: none.
8 Exotics: $2 Roulette (BLACK) paid $3.80, $2 Daily Double (1-7) paid $27.80, $1
Exacta (7-1) paid $11.60, 10-Cent Superfecta (7-1-2-3) paid $17.42, $1 Super High Five
(7-1-2-3-5) paid $328.80, 50-Cent Trifecta (7-1-2) paid $23.30.
1050 THIRD RACE. 1 mile. Claiming. Fillies and mares. 4-year-olds
and up. Claiming prices $16,000-$14,000. Purse $22,000.
P# Horse
Jockey
Win
Place
Show
5 Road Test
Roman
13.20
5.80
3.20
4 Bunny Yogurt
Pereira
4.40
3.20
1 Carrie’s Success
Franco
3.00
8 Also Ran: Swallows Inn Gal, Midnight Lilly, Lea’s Reward, Magicalchic.
8 Time: 24.32, 48.71, 1.13.76, 1.26.62, 1.39.72. Clear & Fast. Trainer: Jack Carava.
Owner: Chris Curtis.
8 Scratched: none.
8 Exotics: $2 Roulette (BLACK) paid $2.80, $2 Daily Double (7-5) paid $62.00, $1
Exacta (5-4) paid $26.80, 10-Cent Superfecta (5-4-1-6) paid $41.35, $1 Super High
Five (5-4-1-6-3) paid $1,529.90, 50-Cent Trifecta (5-4-1) paid $50.60, 50-Cent Pick
Three (1-7-5) paid $81.95.
1051 FOURTH RACE. 6 furlongs. Maiden special weight. 4-year-olds
and up. Purse $55,000.
P# Horse
Jockey
Win
Place
Show
7 Red Envelope
Van Dyke
5.80
3.20
2.80
2 Dubnation
Figueroa
3.20
2.60
1 Coil To Strike
Fuentes
5.00
8 Also Ran: Bouncing Around, Sidepocket Action, Sea’s Journey, Goldie’s Hills.
8 Time: 22.42, 45.65, 58.09, 1.10.90. Clear & Fast. Trainer: Dan L. Hendricks. Owner:
Sheehy LLC.
8 Scratched: none.
8 Exotics: $2 Roulette (BLACK) paid $5.60, $2 Daily Double (5-7) paid $47.60, $1
Exacta (7-2) paid $8.00, 10-Cent Superfecta (7-2-1-4) paid $20.28, $1 Super High Five
(7-2-1-4-5) paid $1,014.00, 50-Cent Trifecta (7-2-1) paid $29.00, 50-Cent Pick Three
(7-5-7) paid $54.45.
1052 FIFTH RACE. 1 mile turf. Maiden claiming. 3-year-olds.
Claiming prices $50,000-$40,000. Purse $32,000.
P# Horse
Jockey
Win
Place
Show
8 Tikkun Olam
Prat
28.20
13.60
7.40
6 Montana Moon
Fuentes
17.20
7.40
9 You Must Chill
Gutierrez
3.40
8 Also Ran: Surprise Fashion, Red Clem, Silent Musketier, Blame It On Kitty, Indy
Jones, Diamond Blitz, Zorich, Hard to Come Home, Sir Andover.
8 Time: 21.95, 45.72, 1.10.04, 1.23.14, 1.36.28. Clear & Firm. Trainer: J. Eric Kruljac.
Owner: Lewkowitz, Frank, Lewkowitz, Karen, Ticket To Ride, LLC and Kruljac, Eric J..
8 Scratched: Sea of Liberty, Dyf.
8 Exotics: $2 Roulette (BLACK) paid $4.40, $2 Daily Double (7-8) paid $88.40, $1
Exacta (8-6) paid $226.10, 10-Cent Superfecta (8-6-9-11) paid $572.52, 50-Cent
Trifecta (8-6-9) paid $726.05, $1 X-5 Super High Five (8-6-9-11-5) , X-5 Super High
Five Carryover $3,363, 50-Cent Pick Three (5-7-8) paid $121.25, 50-Cent Pick Four
(7-5-7-8) 4 correct paid $518.35, 50-Cent Pick Five (1-7-5-7-8) 5 correct paid
$2,968.05.
1053 SIXTH RACE. 1 mile. Claiming. 4 year-olds and up. Claiming
prices $40,000-$35,000. Purse $38,000.
P# Horse
Jockey
Win
Place
Show
1 Sheer Flattery
Figueroa
8.80
4.20
3.00
4 Arch Prince
Quinonez
5.20
3.20
3 Ike Walker
Rosario
3.00
8 Also Ran: Avanti Bello, Upper Room, Very Very Stella.
8 Time: 23.91, 47.68, 1.12.04, 1.24.42, 1.37.00. Clear & Fast. Trainer: Steve Knapp.
Owner: Knapp, Steve R. and Vanderdussen, Robert John.
8 Scratched: none.
8 Exotics: $2 Roulette (GREEN) paid $6.20, $2 Daily Double (8-1) paid $111.00, $1
Exacta (1-4) paid $19.10, 10-Cent Superfecta (1-4-3-6) paid $22.76, 50-Cent Trifecta
(1-4-3) paid $39.30, 50-Cent Pick Three (7-8-1) paid $107.35.
1054 SEVENTH RACE. 61⁄2 furlongs. Allowance optional claiming.
4-year-olds and up. Claiming price $62,500. Purse $59,000.
P# Horse
Jockey
Win
Place
Show
6 Red Lightning
Fuentes
50.60
20.00
6.20
5 Captain Scotty
Prat
5.60
3.60
1 Solid Wager
Van Dyke
2.20
8 Also Ran: Threefiveindia, Microrithms, Apalachee Bay, Lord Simba.
8 Time: 21.61, 43.83, 1.08.62, 1.15.29. Clear & Fast. Trainer: William E. Morey.
Owner: Cuyathy LLC.
8 Scratched: none.
8 Exotics: $2 Roulette (GREEN) paid $16.00, $2 Daily Double (1-6) paid $165.80, $1
Exacta (6-5) paid $157.90, 10-Cent Superfecta (6-5-1-3) paid $131.90, $1 Super High
Five (6-5-1-3-4) paid $3,867.60, 50-Cent Trifecta (6-5-1) paid $192.80, 50-Cent Pick
Three (8-1-6) paid $663.50.
1055 EIGHTH RACE. About 61⁄2 furlongs turf. Joe Hernandez Stakes.
4-year-olds and up. Purse $100,000.
P# Horse
Jockey
Win
Place
Show
8 Caribou Club
Talamo
8.60
3.60
2.40
3 Stormy Liberal
Van Dyke
2.40
2.10
7 Conquest Tsunami
Rosario
2.80
8 Also Ran: Cistron, Law Abidin Citizen, Calculator, Pubilius Syrus, Afleet Ascent.
8 Time: 20.92, 42.10, 1.05.37, 1.11.66. Clear & Firm. Trainer: Thomas F. Proctor.
Owner: Glen Hill Farm.
8 Scratched: none.
8 Exotics: $2 Roulette (RED) paid $3.00, $2 Daily Double (6-8) paid $166.60, $1
Exacta (8-3) paid $9.90, 10-Cent Superfecta (8-3-7-1) paid $17.37, $1 Super High Five
(8-3-7-1-5) paid $577.20, 50-Cent Trifecta (8-3-7) paid $15.45, 50-Cent Pick Three
(1-6-8) paid $263.45.
1056 NINTH RACE. 6 furlongs. Claiming. Fillies and mares.
4-year-olds and up. Claiming price $8,000. Purse $18,000.
P# Horse
Jockey
Win
Place
Show
8 Lucky Student
Van Dyke
4.60
3.20
2.60
1 Eskenforadrink
Cruz
9.80
6.00
2 Hero for Hire
Maldonado
4.00
8 Also Ran: Princess Kendra, Lovely Linda, Forthenineteen, Tiger Mom, Ciao Luna,
Sought More Pep.
8 Time: 21.96, 45.45, 58.35, 1.11.64. Clear & Fast. Trainer: Jerry Hollendorfer. Owner:
Hollendorfer, LLC, Team Green LLC and Todaro, George.
8 Scratched: none.
8 Exotics: $2 Roulette (RED) paid $3.40, $2 Daily Double (8-8) paid $22.60, $1
Exacta (8-1) paid $28.10, 10-Cent Superfecta (8-1-2-4) paid $35.86, $1 Super High
Five (8-1-2-4-9) paid $3,631.00, 50-Cent Trifecta (8-1-2) paid $70.25, 50-Cent Pick
Three (6-8-8) paid $195.70.
** _##TABLE##_1_0_ ** 1057 TENTH RACE. About 61⁄2 furlongs
turf. Allowance optional claiming. 3-year-olds. Claiming price
$50,000. Purse $57,000.
P# Horse
Jockey
Win
Place
Show
4 Irish Heatwave
Espinoza
16.40
8.00
6.40
1 Listing
Gutierrez
7.80
5.80
2 Teacher’s Treasure
Payeras
6.20
8 Also Ran: Takeo Squared, Sayin Grace, Feeling Strong, Grab the Munny, Offshore
Affair, Principe Carlo, Just Hit Play, Scouted, Eighty Proof.
8 Time: 21.67, 44.21, 1.07.09, 1.13.12. Clear & Firm. Trainer: J. Keith Desormeaux.
Owner: Calumet Farm.
8 Scratched: Clem Labine, Whooping Jay.
8 Exotics: $2 Roulette (BLACK) paid $4.80, $2 Daily Double (8-4) paid $47.20, $1
Exacta (4-1) paid $61.10, 10-Cent Superfecta (4-1-2-8) paid $163.91, $1 Super High
Five (4-1-2-8-3) , Super High Five Carryover $9,713, 50-Cent Trifecta (4-1-2) paid
$191.15, 50-Cent Pick Three (8-8-4) paid $54.15, 50-Cent Pick Four (6-8-8-4) 255
tickets with 4 correct paid $2,042.55, 50-Cent Pick Five (1-6-8-8-4) 43 tickets with 5
correct paid $9,612.30, 20-Cent Pick Six Jackpot (8-1-6-8-8-4) 7 tickets with 6 correct
paid $24,441.62, Pick Six Jackpot Carryover $396,370.
ATTENDANCE/MUTUEL HANDLE
On-track attendance-12,689. Mutuel handle-$1,527,144
Inter-track attendance-N/A. Mutuel handle-$2,087,475
Joe Burrow shook off a hard
hit early in the game to throw for
394 yards and four touchdowns,
helping No. 11 Louisiana State
end No. 8 Central Florida’s winning streak at 25 games with a 4032 victory in the Fiesta Bowl on
Tuesday at Glendale, Ariz.
Lousiana State (10-3) started
its first Fiesta Bowl without several key players on defense and
fell into an early 11-point hole.
The Tigers rallied behind
Burrow and a defensive front
that made life difficult for
quarterback Darriel Mack Jr.
Burrow was slow getting up
after being blindsided by 313pound defensive lineman Joey
Connors on an interception return for a touchdown in the first
quarter. The junior quarterback
returned to the game and picked
apart the Knights’ secondary,
completing 21 of 34 of passes, including two touchdowns to
Justin Jefferson.
Louisiana State sacked Mack
five times and made him rush numerous throws, holding the nation’s third-best offense to 250
yards, 295 below its average.
Taj McGowan scored on a
two-yard run and the Knights
(12-1) converted a two-point conversion to pull to within 40-32.
Central Florida’s last-ditch attempt ended on a tipped interception.
Citrus
Benny Snell Jr. ran for 144
yards and two touchdowns to become Kentucky’s career rushing
leader and help the 14th-ranked
Wildcats (10-3) wrap up their
best season in more than four
decades with a 27-24 victory over
No. 12 Penn State (9-4) at Orlando, Fla.
Snell overtook Sonny Collins’
career rushing record on a 12yard touchdown run that made it
27-7 late in the third quarter.
Collins rushed for 3,835 yards
from 1972 to 1975.
BOWL
WHEN (PST), TV
FAVORITE
CFP Championship: Clemson vs. Alabama
Monday, 5 p.m., ESPN
Alabama by 9
Odds through Tuesday
Results
Celebration: N. Carolina A&T 24, Alcorn St. 22
Las Vegas: Fresno State 31, Arizona State 20
Cure: Tulane 41, Louisiana Lafayette 24
Camellia: Georgia Southern 23, E. Michigan 21
New Mexico: Utah State 52, North Texas 13
New Orleans: Appal. St. 45, Middle Tenn. 13
Boca Raton: Ala. Birmingham 37, N. Illinois 13
Frisco: Ohio 27, San Diego State 0
Gasparilla: Marshall 38, South Florida 20
Bahamas: Florida International 35, Toledo 32
Idaho Potato: BYU 49, Western Michigan 18
Birmingham: Wake Forest 37, Memphis 34
Armed Forces: Army 70, Houston 14
Dollar General: Troy 42, Buffalo 32
Hawaii: Louisiana Tech 31, Hawaii 14
First Responder: Bos. Coll. vs. Boise St., cncl.
Quick Lane: Minnesota 34, Georgia Tech 10
Cheez-It: Texas Christian 10, California 7 (OT)
Independence: Duke 56, Temple 27
Pinstripe: Wisconsin 35, Miami 3
Texas: Baylor 45, Vanderbilt 38
Music City: Auburn 63, Purdue 14
Camping World: Syracuse 34, W. Virginia 18
Alamo: Washington State 28, Iowa State 26
Peach: Florida 41, Michigan 15
Belk: Virginia 28, South Carolina 0
Arizona: Nevada 16, Arkansas State 13 (OT)
Cotton: Clemson 30, Notre Dame 3
Orange: Alabama 45, Oklahoma 34
Military: Cincinnati 35, Virginia Tech 31
Sun: Stanford 14, Pittsburgh 13
Redbox: Oregon 7, Michigan State 6
Liberty: Oklahoma State 38, Missouri 33
Holiday: Northwestern 31, Utah 20
Gator: Texas A&M 52, North Carolina State 13
Rose: Ohio State 28, Washington 23
Fiesta: Louisiana State 40, Central Florida 32
Citrus: Kentucky 27, Penn State 24
Outback: Iowa 27, Mississippi State 22
Sugar: Texas 28, Georgia 21
Snell, a junior, has declared
for the NFL draft.
Trace McSorley threw for 246
yards and two touchdowns, and
the Nittany Lions’ career leader
in passing and victories also had
a team-high 75 yards in 19 carries.
Outback
Safety Jake Gervase made an
interception in the end zone to
help preserve a late lead and
Iowa beat No. 18 Mississippi
State 27-22 at Tampa, Fla.
Gervase also batted down an
errant fourth-down pass to end
the Bulldogs’ final drive at the
Iowa 32 with 25 seconds left. Two
earlier Mississippi State (8-5)
threats in the fourth quarter led
to only three points.
The Hawkeyes (9-4) had only
199 yards, with 75 coming on a
touchdown pass from Nathan
Stanley to Nick Easley, but they
converted three takeaways into
17 points.
Stanley threw for 214 yards
and three scores.
Sugar
Sam Ehlinger ran for three
touchdowns, the Texas defense
largely held Georgia in check and
the No. 15 Longhorns (10-4)
earned their first 10-victory season since 2009 by beating the No.
5 Bulldogs 28-21 in New Orleans.
The sophomore quarterback
finished with 64 yards in 21
carries and threw for 169 yards.
Jake Fromm completed 20 of
34 passes for 212 yards, three
touchdowns and one interception for the Bulldogs (11-3), who
scored a touchdown with 14 seconds left to pull within 28-21, but
Texas recovered the ensuing onside kick.
Texas jumped to a 17-0 lead by
early in the second quarter,
largely because of Georgia’s mistakes on special teams and offense.
D6
W E D N E S DAY , JA N UA RY 2 , 2 019
L AT I M E S . C O M / S P O RT S
ROSE BOWL: OHIO STATE 28, WASHINGTON 23
Meyer’s coaching
legacy is checkered
Gina Ferazzi Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON’S Hunter Bryant makes a one-handed grab in front of Ohio State’s Jordan Fuller.
Huskies’ rally falls short
[Rose Bowl, from D1]
most of the day, anyway.
Big Ten Conference champion Ohio State jumped all
over Pac-12 Conference champion Washington early and
held on for a 28-23 victory in
the 105th Rose Bowl game, a
contest that further humbled
the down-and-out “Conference of Champions” and
raised the question: What
happened to the Petersen
that had Shelley Meyer
hounding her husband about
letting loose more often?
“Very frustrating when you
start the first half like we
started,” Petersen said. “I had
no idea why. It’s on me. It’s not
these kids. They practiced
hard. They’re ready to play.
But we really didn’t play with
that edge and that chip that
we normally play with.”
Petersen’s Huskies have
been the class of a weakened
Pac-12 the last three years, but
particularly in the two years
since making the league’s last
College Football Playoff appearance, they’ve lost much of
their bite.
Total it up, and Washington went 0-3 in three straight
marquee bowl games against
Alabama, Penn State and
Ohio State.
“I think it means we’re
close to being where we want
to be,” Petersen said, “but
we’re not there. You’re playing
the best of the best. When you
play the three teams we just
got done playing the last three
years, there’s very little margin for error, and you have to
play your best football. We’ll
keep battling, keep learning.
Keep figuring out how to raise
the bar.”
Washington had a shot to
keep this game tight late in
the second quarter. Trailing
14-3, the Huskies faced fourth
and nine from the Ohio State
37. Petersen kept the offense
on the field, and senior
quarterback Jake Browning
lined up in the shotgun. The
large Buckeyes crowd in Pasadena, which appeared to outnumber the Washington contingent, anticipated a big play
and began to build a din. But
Browning would soon take a
few steps back, and, instead of
trying for the first down, took
the snap and executed a pristine pooch punt to the Ohio
season 10-4, a blueprint for
how to take the next step — it’s
the same one Alabama and
Clemson have followed to
Monday’s CFP championship
game: Find a talented
quarterback, cater your offensive system to his strengths,
spread the field and let your
skill players win one-on-one
battles in space.
“We need to look at our offense really closely, no question,” Petersen said.
In this high-flying era of
college football, the Huskies
seem to be neutered. But, for
now, they are the best the
Pac-12 has to offer.
It’s a quarterback’s game.
And it’s no coincidence that,
the last time the Pac-12 played
for a national championship,
Oregon’s Marcus Mariota was
the headliner as a Heisman
Trophy winner.
Alabama has Tua Tagovailoa back for another season.
Clemson
has
Trevor
Lawrence for two more years.
Who can the Pac-12 count on
to bring it back to life on the
national stage?
There is hope. In the North
division, Washington will
hand over its offense to Georgia transfer Jacob Eason, a
former five-star recruit; Oregon quarterback Justin Herbert decided to return for his
senior season, despite his
billing as a top-10 pick in the
NFL draft; and Stanford
quarterback KJ Costello has
the ability to elevate the Cardinal.
In the South, Kliff Kingsbury brings his “Air Raid”
scheme to USC, where young
and hungry JT Daniels awaits
his instruction.
Tuesday was Haskins’ day.
He completed 25 of 37 passes
for 251 yards and three touchdowns. And while Meyer got
the best of Petersen in his final
game as Ohio State’s head
coach, Haskins made Meyer’s
job much easier than Petersen’s.
“We will get that fixed,”
Petersen said of his offense.
“We’ll have a plan. We will.
We’ll study the hell out of the
tape. And, you know, pare
things down so we’re more
precise at what we’re doing. It
all comes down to execution.”
Luis Sinco Los Angeles Times
OHIO STATE’S Jeffrey Okudah (1) breaks up a pass
intended for Washington wide receiver Aaron Fuller.
State three.
For Petersen’s Washington program, that amounted
to trickery, and it was a move
steeped in conservatism and
playing not to lose. What was
Petersen afraid of? Browning
is a four-year starter, and,
though his production has regressed, he is capable of completing a 10-yard pass in a
tough situation.
But Petersen elected to
trust his top-five defense and
play field position. Only, the
Buckeyes’ top-five offense, led
by star quarterback Dwayne
Haskins and a mean running
back in Mike Weber, easily reversed the field before punting the ball back to Washington. The Huskies punted
again because Browning
could not connect with wideopen Aaron Fuller on third
and five, and, a minute later,
Ohio State busted the game
open 21-3 on Haskins’ third
touchdown pass of the first
half and 50th of the season.
“That was a big, huge key
to the game for those guys to
score right there,” Petersen
said.
The Buckeyes, who finished 13-1 and sent Meyer into
his second retirement from
coaching as a Rose Bowl
champion, painted an ugly
picture for fans of Washington
and all Pac-12 programs.
Talent-wise, Ohio State
probably belonged in the College Football Playoff, but this
was still a team that was humiliated by Purdue 49-20 and
needed overtime to escape
Maryland 52-51. This was the
worst Buckeyes defense in
many years, and Washington
couldn’t crack them for a
touchdown until early in the
fourth quarter.
The Huskies converted a
fourth and goal from the two
on a creative trick play, which
called for running back Myles
Gaskin, lined up as a Wildcat
quarterback, to fake a handoff
and throw a jump pass over
the top of the Ohio State defense to Washington tight end
Drew Sample.
It was exactly the type of
play that Petersen became
known for at Boise State, but
Tuesday, it was too little, too
late. The Huskies fought valiantly from there, ending the
game on a 20-0 run, but their
onside kick attempt was recovered by the Buckeyes with
42 seconds left.
For the first three quarters, Ohio State gave Washington, which finished the
brady.mccollough@latimes.com
[Plaschke, from D1]
But surely he wasn’t the
only one who felt a chill.
One had to ask, how much
of this legacy was worth
celebrating?
Urban Meyer has been a
great leader of football players, but he has not been a
great leader of men.
His football achievements
are astounding, but his enabling and empowering of
miscreant athletes has been
embarrassing.
Meyer is one of only two
modern-era coaches to win
national FBS titles at two
schools, hoisting the trophy
twice at Florida and once at
Ohio State. With a 190-32
record, he has won more
games in his 17 years than any
other FBS coach in a similar
span in NCAA history. He
went an astounding 86-9 in
seven years at Ohio State and
beat Michigan every season.
But at what price?
In his six years at Florida,
he oversaw several sketchy
teams whose players were
arrested for all sorts of alleged crimes, including domestic abuse. In dealing with
numerous off-the-field issues
there, while protecting players instead of holding them
accountable, Meyer twisted
the truth so much that he
became known as Urban
Liar. Those players included
the late Aaron Hernandez,
who later played for the New
England Patriots before
being convicted of murder
and ultimately killing himself
in his cell.
At Ohio State, his coverup culture surfaced last fall
when he was suspended for
three games for continuing to
employ receivers coach Zach
Smith in the wake of multiple
accusations of domestic
violence by his former wife,
Courtney. Throughout the
university’s investigative
process, which focused on
Meyer’s refusal to fire Smith
even though he knew of the
allegations, Meyers lied and
whined and essentially
played the part of the victim
instead of owning up to his
mishandling of the situation.
It wasn’t a pretty sight. He
came across as arrogant and
insensitive. With every attempt to defend himself, he
continued to bury himself.
Meyer announced his
retirement in December
because of what he said were
lingering health issues and
fallout over the three-game
suspension. The health
issues included stress headaches, but the suspicion is
that this “retirement’’ is all
about that suspension.
Many think that Meyer,
who is only 54, will take a year
off and return to coaching
somewhere else. After all, he
announced his retirement
twice before and always
returned.
This time, many wonder
whether he isn’t quitting
simply to spite the Ohio State
officials who benched him
against the wishes of a large
portion of the fan base.
He seemed to address this
during a strange postgame
news conference Tuesday in
which he seemed devoid of
any emotion. His answers
were devoid of any misty
memories or tearful farewells.
He was awfully stoic for
someone who was in the
process of riding off into the
sunset.
“Oh, sure, sure, a lot of joy
along the way,” he said.
“That’s something I have to
learn to have, more joy.”
The only time he seemed
to show his feelings was when
asked about his gestures to
the band and the fans. He
sounded a lot like a guy who
was calling out those who
didn’t support him.
“When adversity strikes …
people scatter,” he said. “The
band didn’t scatter. The band
was there. Buckeye Nation
was there. We saw that, all
throughout the adversity
that we went through.”
Just wondering, but, the
adversity that they went
through? The adversity of
coaching a football team that
continually employs an
assistant who is allegedly
hitting his wife? That adversity?
What about Courtney
Smith? How about her adversity? How about the adversity of any number of victims
of alleged crimes committed
by some of his former players?
At least in one corner of
this country, Meyer’s football
success far outweighs his
personal failings. There were
actually fans who publicly
protested his suspension last
fall and, Tuesday, thousands
of fans continued to roar
their approval.
After the game, I ran into
John Chubb, a friendly Columbus businessman who
wears an all-white Ohio State
outfit topped by a cowboy hat
and calls himself “the Buckeye Guy.”
And the Buckeye Guy
loves his guy.
“Things come up all over
the place, in my personal life,
surely with your personal life,
with everybody,” Chubb said.
“It’s all about how you handle
those things, and Urban
Meyer has been a good steward, a great guy, he came in
and promised a national
championship and he delivered and I’m forever grateful.”
My colleague Sam Farmer
ran into another guy, Matt
Walter, a Buckeyes fan holding a sign reading “Thanks
Urban.”
“Some of the off-the-field
stuff, it’s going to be a small
footnote, but that’s not going
to be his legacy,” Walter told
Farmer. “His legacy is, he was
given a program that was
really good and he made it
really great.”
Meyer’s work will continue to be on display in Columbus in his first postretirement gig, and this is not a
joke. Meyer will be co-teaching a class on character and
leadership at Ohio State’s
Fisher College of Business.
“I do believe I’m done,”
Meyer said Tuesday.
Here’s guessing he will
work a couple of semesters
and head back to the sidelines for the 2020 season.
USC, don’t even think
about it.
bill.plaschke@latimes.com
Twitter: @BillPlaschke
Ohio St. 28, Washington 23
Washington.............................3 0 0 20—23
Ohio St. .................................7 14 7 0—28
First Quarter
OSU—Campbell 12 pass from Haskins (Haubeil kick), 9:04
WAS—FG Henry 38, 1:19
Second Quarter
OSU—Dixon 19 pass from Haskins (Haubeil kick), 12:23
OSU—Berry 1 pass from Haskins (Haubeil kick), :14
Third Quarter
OSU—Dobbins 3 run (Haubeil kick), 8:23
Fourth Quarter
WAS—Sample 2 pass from Gaskin (Henry kick), 12:17
WAS—Gaskin 1 run (Henry kick), 6:42
WAS—Gaskin 2 run (pass failed), :42
STATISTICS
TEAM
WAS
OSU
First downs ...................................27
22
Rushes-yards ..........................36-129
32-113
Passing.......................................315
251
Comp-Att-Int..........................36-55-0
25-37-0
Return Yards..................................28
0
Punts-Avg..............................7-35.71
8-41.75
Fumbles-Lost................................0-0
0-0
Penalties-Yards ...........................6-46
9-53
Time of Possession ....................35:02
24:58
Individual Leaders
RUSHING: Washington, Gaskin 24-121, McGrew 1-7, Ahmed
5-4, Pleasant 1-0, (Team) 1-(minus 1), J.Browning 4-(minus 2).
Ohio St., Weber 15-96, Dobbins 7-24, McCall 2-12, (Team) 2(minus 5), Haskins 6-(minus 14).
PASSING: Washington, Gaskin 1-1-0-2, J.Browning 35-54-0313. Ohio St., Haskins 25-37-0-251.
RECEIVING: Washington, Baccellia 12-109, A.Fuller 7-80,
H.Bryant 4-51, Ahmed 3-22, T.Jones 3-22, Gaskin 3-(minus 1),
Sample 2-1, Otton 1-16, Chin 1-15. Ohio St., Campbell 11-71, Hill
3-54, Dobbins 3-15, Victor 2-34, Dixon 2-27, McLaurin 1-32,
Farrell 1-9, Weber 1-8, Berry 1-1.
MISSED FIELD GOALS—None.
SoCal Auto Dealer Marketplace
New and used car dealer specials
Visit
latimes.com/DealerSpecials
to view current new and used car specials from reputable
auto dealerships throughout Southern California.
your
dealership
here call today
(213) 237-6089
Ford
Honda
Volkswagen
Colley Ford Auto Center
Honda World
New Century VW
Family owned & operated
1945 Auto Centre Dr
833-926-5539
www.colleyford.net
#1 Volume Dealer in O.C.
13600 Beach Blvd., Westminster
(714) 890-8900 (562) 598-3366
www.ochondaworld.com
Das Auto
1220 So.Brand Blvd., Glendale
(800) 813-8998
your
dealership
here call today
(213) 237-6089
E
CALENDAR
W E D N E S D A Y , J A N U A R Y 2 , 2 0 1 9 :: L A T I M E S . C O M / C A L E N D A R
Michael Nagle For The Times
AT A WORKSHOP on consensual intimacy, Claire Warden, center right, and Fay Simpson choreograph a hug. Intimacy coordination is used for film, TV and stage.
Touching moments
Coordinators work on-set to make sexy scenes safe for actors
BY ASHLEY LEE >>> For actors, filming sex scenes can be a
job requirement — and an uncomfortable one. When Sarah
Scott was shooting an intimate scene for a television pilot, her
costar placed her hand on his groin, she said, and later called
her into his dressing room and masturbated in front of her.
Samara Weaving is reportedly leaving Showtime’s “SMILF”
in part because of concerns about how the showrunner handled a closed-set request during the filming of a sexual interlude.
Both the costar and the showrunner have denied these allegations, which helps demonstrate how complicated it can
be to orchestrate the performance of sex on set. But a new role
has emerged to help directors, showrunners and performers
navigate such scenes: the intimacy coordinator.
HBO announced in October that it would hire intimacy
coordinators for all of its productions, and since then, interest in the fledgling profession has spiked. To find out how, exactly, these individuals effect change on set, The Times re-
cently spoke with five of them about their newly in-demand
trade. These intimacy coordinators (who work on film and
television sets) and choreographers (who work with stage
performers) are all founders and members of Intimacy Directors International, an organization established in 2016.
Tonia Sina is the creator of the “Intimacy for the Stage”
method, the pioneering piece of pedagogy on which the role is
largely based. Alicia Rodis is HBO’s resident intimacy coordinator, working on shows such as “The Deuce,” “Crashing”
and the upcoming “Watchmen.” Claire Warden is a Broadway mainstay who just choreographed New York Theater
Workshop’s “Slave Play.” Adam Noble is a University of
Houston professor who created “Extreme Stage Physicality,”
a method equipping student actors to practice consent. And
Jessica Steinrock leads consent workshops for improv comedy troupes, including Comedy Sportz Chicago.
The Times conducted separate phone interviews with
each person and has condensed and ed- [See Intimacy, E4]
‘Life imitating
art, or art
imitating life’
The film ‘Capernaum’
blurs the line between
fiction and reality, just
as its director wanted.
By John Anderson
NEW YORK — Getting
into the United Nations
building in Manhattan is like
getting into three airports,
but once you’re inside, the
place is abuzz. The 70th anniversary of the Universal
Declaration
of
Human
Rights is being recognized
all month. On this mid-December day, the Dutch are
partying on Floor 2. And inside the Trusteeship Council Chambers, the film “Capernaum” is being praised
as a “wake-up call to the international community.”
“It could have been shot
in many cities around the
world,” says the French
ambassador, François Delattre.
The
performers
“aren’t even acting,” says the
Lebanese
ambassador,
Amal Mudallali.
“They aren’t acting,”
Lebanese director Nadine
Labaki says later outside the
makeshift screening room,
with its horseshoe configuration, guests and delegates.
“An actor comes to the set
being prepared, knowing his
lines, prepared to be a different person, to be in someone
else’s shoes. These people
weren’t acting: The situations are so similar to what
they’ve lived in their real
lives, they didn’t feel they
were becoming someone
else.”
At the center of “Capernaum” is Zain (Zain Al
Rafeea), a 12-year-old Beirut
street kid who looks like he’s
6 and becomes responsible
for a baby when the child’s
undocumented mother is arrested. The film won the jury
prize at the Cannes Film
Festival this year before
claiming awards at dozens of
other international festivals.
It recently scored a Golden
Globe nomination for foreign language film and made
[See ‘Capernaum,’ E2]
Harry
Potter
teaches
at USC
Hogwarts in L.A.: A
course burrows into
the screenplays to see
the art of adaptation.
By Tracy Brown
After stuttering through
a string of mostly incomprehensible words, Ronald
Weasley suddenly drops
down on one knee and asks
Fleur Delacour to the Yule
Ball. She thinks he’s joking.
The audience chuckles.
This crowd includes a Lucius Malfoy, a Severus
Snape, a couple of Luna
Lovegoods and at least three
Bellatrix Lestranges. Or
rather, students dressed as
those “Harry Potter” characters, as well as a couple
hundred of their USC classmates, many of whom
showed up to their screenwriting class in cosplay.
During the fall semester,
these USC students were
able to dive into the cinematic building blocks of
J.K. Rowling’s Wizarding
World through a course
called “The Harry Potter
Franchise: Adaptation, Ethics, Genre and the Magic of
Story.”
On stage, their classmates wrap up the performance of the brief scene, which
was based on an event that
was merely mentioned in
passing in 2005’s “Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire,”
the fourth film in the series
adapted from Rowling’s
popular fantasy books.
This particular script,
written by one of the students as a midterm assignment, was one of a handful
[See Potter, E2]
Like something
out of a dream
The artist Rosa Loy
questions everything.
Indeed, her work, at
Kohn, will have you
questioning reality. E3
Jay L. Clendenin Los Angeles Times
“THEY AREN’T acting,” says director Nadine Labaki, of the “Capernaum” cast.
TV grid ...................... E5
Comics ................... E6-7
E2
W E D N E S DAY , JA N UA RY 2 , 2 019
L AT I M E S . C O M / CA L E N DA R
Harry Potter teaches a USC film class
[Potter, from E1]
chosen to be performed by
students in class that evening.
“We’re taking a look at
the nature of adaptation,”
the course’s professor, Janet
Batchler, told The Times.
“We’re diving into the movies in a way to help people
understand ‘Why did the
filmmakers
make
the
choices that they made?’ ”
Offered as an iteration of
the “Screenwriters and
Their Work” series from
USC’s School of Cinematic
Arts for the first time,
Batchler’s recently wrapped
class was designed to examine the storytelling of the
“Harry
Potter”
series
through its specific filmmaking perspective.
The premise of the course
alone attracted “Harry Potter” fans of all stripes — from
those who originally fell in
love with the books to ones
who saw the movies first —
and from all across campus.
“Harry Potter,” of course,
is no stranger to academia,
especially as the subject of
literature courses. Dating
back to at least 2003, the
Wizarding World has also
been the focus of science
seminars,
childdevelopment classes, education
studies courses and even law
classes
at
universities
around the world.
But Batchler believes her
course might be the first in
the U.S. to focus specifically
on the films.
“I love that it’s a screenwriting class and not just a
cinema and media studies
class,” said Melanie Holpert,
who studies communications and history. “The
things that we’ve learned in
this class are so universal,
Gary Coronado Los Angeles Times
DRESSED in a Hogwarts house robe, Jessie Valdez attends a Harry Potter cinema course taught at USC.
not just in regards to ‘Harry
Potter,’ but to becoming a
good writer and understanding storytelling as a
whole.”
As if the promise of earning college credit for studying “Harry Potter” weren’t
enough, Batchler further
won over her students by
handing out a sorting quiz
on the first day of class.
In the “Harry Potter” series, every student attending
Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry is sorted
into one of four Houses
based on the traits favored
by each of the school’s
founders: Gryffindor, Hufflepuff, Ravenclaw and
Slytherin. Of course in the
Wizarding World there is no
quiz. They use a magical hat.
“[Students] can get
house points for making a
very cogent point in class,
which encourages people to
speak up and raise their
hands and contribute something,” Batchler, herself a
Ravenclaw, said of the sorting process in her class.
Some of Batchler’s students, though, already knew
their house affiliation from
taking the quiz at Pottermore, the official online
portal for all things “Harry
Potter.”
And sorting in the real
world is just as serious for
fans who have had seven
books and eight films to influence their opinions of the
houses. Though there were
exceptions, many of the
“Harry Potter” series’ heroes
were in Gryffindor, while a
majority of those affiliated
with Slytherin were villains.
“I created six email accounts for Pottermore because I’d been trying to get
into Gryffindor,” said Nisha
Malhotra, a senior and now
proud Hufflepuff.
“Hufflepuff is the best
house because Helga Hufflepuff, the founder of that
house, basically said, ‘Here’s
a novel idea: Maybe we
should treat all the students
equally,’ ” she added.
The house points system
helped foster a sense of community in the class that was
already bound by a shared
love for the series.
“What I love the most
about this course is there are
[nearly] 300 people, and the
students are from everywhere on this campus,” said
Vincent Powell, a Gryffindor
student in USC’s MFA program.
“Architecture students
and art students and dance
students … we have all these
different paths, but there is
something that unites us
with the story of Harry Potter, which is the basis of the
class. The universalism of
‘Harry Potter.’ ”
In addition to examining
the eight film installments,
discussion topics for the
course ranged from storytelling techniques to the ethical implications of choices
the filmmakers made in
their adaptations, as well as
the participatory culture of
“Harry Potter” fandom.
As Batchler explained in
class, fandom involves the
various acts of interacting
with a text (such as books
and movies), from discussing its meanings and
significance to creating supplemental art or stories
rooted in that world.
Which means the course
itself is a pretty meta “Harry
Potter” fandom experience.
Even the class’ midterm
assignment was an example
of fan-created content —
students were tasked with
adapting a scene from any of
the “Potter” books that was
omitted from the films.
“[‘Harry Potter’] is more
than just a story,” said
Matthew Maceda, a USC
sophomore and Hufflepuff.
“It’s being a part of your
house and going to the
theme parks and all that.
There’s an entire culture
that lets you be immersed in
that world.”
Beyond the inspiring
story of a young wizard destined to take down a magical
villain who is trying to conquer the world, the “Harry
Potter” series has remained
popular because fans have
been able to engage with different aspects of Rowling’s
world: supplemental books
and essays by the author,
stage plays, games and the
Wizarding World theme
parks.
Just as “Harry Potter” inspired some to create fan art
and fan fiction, the series inspired others to pursue their
own creative endeavors.
Jennifer Frazin, an MFA
student and Ravenclaw, said
she wrote her USC admissions essay about how
“Harry Potter” inspired her
to become a writer.
“I grew up with those
books,”
said
Frazin.
“They’re the reason that I
write.
“I really can’t think of any
other series like ‘Harry Potter’ where you love it so
much that you feel a need to
share it with the world.”
Now that’s magic.
tracy.brown@latimes.com
Twitter: @tracycbrown
Jouyssance
early music ensemble
An Angelic
Twelfth Night
Saturday, January 5, 2019 at 8:00 p.m.
St. Paul the Apostle Catholic Church
10750 Ohio Avenue, Westwood
Sunday, January 6, 2019 at 4 p.m.
St. Luke’s Episcopal Church
112 S. California Ave. Monrovia
facebook.com/latimes
Info: 213.533.9922
www.jouyssance.org
“A RARE OPPORTUNITY TO CATCH THIS
AMAZING COMPANY IN L.A.”
– Stage and Cinema
A new collaboration between the acclaimed Chicago companies
HUBBARD STREET
DANCE CHICAGO
& Third Coast Percussion
JANUARY 10-12, 2019
CONNECT WITH US
310.746.4000
TheWallis.org/Hubbard
Fares Sokhon Sony Pictures Classics
BOLUWATIFE TREASURE Bankole, left, and Zain Al Rafeea in “Capernaum.”
Art imitating life, as
well as life imitating art
[‘Capernaum,’ from E1]
the shortlist of nine contenders for a 2019 Academy
Award nomination.
It has also been associated with the U.N. from the
start, Labaki said; the
screening was a natural extension of that and perhaps
another way of furthering its
agenda — about child neglect, child labor, child marriage, the child refugee crisis
and child poverty in general.
“I’ve been collaborating
with the UNHCR [the
United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees]
from the start, and they
helped Zain get to Norway,”
she said. “He’s there now,
with his parents, overlooking the sea. It’s like a fairy
tale.” Both UNHCR and
UNICEF have been helping
other kids in the film too, she
said. “Maybe it can change
something. Maybe I’m too
naive.”
Her husband and the
film’s producer, Khaled
Mouzanar, concurred.
“The symbolism of this
film being shown in the U.N.
is big: It is as if each of these
voiceless people in this film
were given the chance to
make a speech at the U.N.,”
he said. “This was our main
aim. But we feel sometimes
as if people are expecting solutions or proposals from us
towards all these matters.
We shouldn’t expect solutions from artists; we should
only expect inspiration.”
“Capernaum” is Labaki’s
third feature, following
2007’s “Caramel” and 2011’s
“Where Do We Go Now?”
With its non-actors, naturalism and spontaneity, her latest has been compared to
the work of postwar neorealists such as De Sica and
Rossellini. It also bears comparison to the early docu-fiction of Abbas Kiarostami,
the lines ever blurred be-
tween the “real” and the not.
A key narrative device in
“Capernaum” — one might
almost call it a MacGuffin —
is Zain’s announcement in a
Beirut courtroom that he
wants to sue his abusive,
neglectful parents. Their
crime: having allowed him to
be born.
It’s the one angle to the
story, Labaki said, that is
wholly manufactured. Much
of the rest, she said, “was life
imitating art, or art imitating life, I don’t know which.
“Two days after we shot
the scene in which Rahil,
the baby’s mother, gets arrested, the actress got arrested in real life,” Labaki
said of Yordanos Shiferaw,
who, like her character, is
Ethiopian. “She got arrested
in exactly the same situation
— she didn’t have any papers. When we were shooting, she was illegal.”
The baby in the film,
Boluwatife Treasure Bankole, who is playing a boy,
was in a similar situation to
her character’s. “Her parents were arrested,” said
Labaki, who also plays
Zain’s lawyer in the courtroom scenes. “So just like in
the film, Treasure was without her mother.”
Labaki said that while
the film had a script, she also
wanted to tap into her cast’s
reality.
“The scene where Zain’s
mother, Souad, is confronting me [as the lawyer]
in court, I looked at her
[Kawthar Al Haddad] and
said: ‘Now you forget everything. This is your chance.’
— the judge was a real judge
— ‘And you have to say
everything you feel towards
[my character], the society
judging, the society that despises you.’ She has a child
who’s 18 and one that’s 9;
none of them are registered.
Her voice is never heard.
She’s had to give her children water and sugar [to
eat] because she had nothing else.”
Labaki agreed with the
French ambassador, that
the film might have been
shot in many cities around
the world. But “the problem
is magnified in Lebanon,”
she said, “mostly because
Lebanon has a million and a
half refugees and is a very
small country. At this point,
almost half the population is
Syrian — almost — so you
really feel it everywhere
around you. You have direct
contact every day.”
Labaki was, indeed, driving home one night when she
saw, on the median, a child
and a mother; the mother
was begging, the child was
trying to sleep but couldn’t
because there was nowhere
to lie down. It was the spark
for what she called “a homemade film.”
“It’s organic, homemade.
We worked without anyone
knowing anything, edited for
two years. Had 500 hours of
rushes; the first version was
12 hours. No producer would
allow this to happen.”
Luckily, her husband was
the producer.
Labaki is right now one of
the more prominent female
directors in the world. She
doesn’t say so, but it may be
that only a woman could
have made “Capernaum,”
tapping into the realities of a
refugee mother and deflecting the resentments that
might have followed.
“It was a blessed experience,” she says. “You’d think
some people would maybe say, ‘Why are you filming us?’ But it was the contrary. We were in a bubble,
where everyone was collaborating and no one was an actor.”
calendar@latimes.com
W E D N E S DAY , JA N UA RY 2 , 2 019
L AT I M E S . C O M / CA L E N DA R
E3
CULTURE MONSTER
latimes.com/culturemonster
5 DAYS
OUT
Highlights of the week
ahead in arts, music and
performance
THEATER
DANCE
THEATER
THEATER
ART
“Free Los Tres”
Casa 0101 Theater, L.A.
8 p.m. Fri.-Sat., 5 p.m. Sun.
Ends Jan. 27
$20-$25
Dance at the Odyssey
festival
Odyssey Theatre, L.A.
8 p.m. Sat., 2 p.m. Sun.
Other dates through Feb. 10
$25 per show
“Culture Clash (Still)
in America”
South Coast Repertory
Costa Mesa | 7:45 p.m. Tue.Fri., 2 and 7:45 p.m. Sat.-Sun.
Ends Jan. 20 | $63-$86
“Desert Rats”
Los Angeles Theatre Centre
8 p.m. Sat., 4 p.m. Sun.
Ends Jan. 20
$24-$48
“The Renaissance Nude”
Getty Museum, Brentwood
Ends Jan. 27
Free; parking $15
ART REVIEWS
Images from Kohn Gallery
“KLAR,” painted by Rosa Loy in 2017, is one of several paintings in her solo show in Hollywood. Below: Women pick apples in Loy’s 2018 “Beeren Auf Dem Kopf.”
Women in dreamland
Sisters? Friends? Lovers?
Rosa Loy’s female figures
make us wonder what’s
real, memory or reverie.
By David Pagel
Propaganda and art are often
thought of as opposites, the former
rehashing clichés to serve the powers that be, and the latter inspiring
individuals to believe they are in
the presence of something special
— a unique human expression, unlike anything else in the world.
At Kohn Gallery, the 19 pictures
that Rosa Loy has painted during
the last five years reveal that both
ideas are silly — and that art and
propaganda have more in common
than is usually assumed.
Born in 1958 in a small town in
what was East Germany, Loy
trained to paint as a Social Realist:
an artist-citizen whose readily accessible works depict everyday
folks enjoying their labors — industrial and agrarian — as they toiled
for the greater good.
But, being an artist, Loy questioned everything, including her
education. She paid attention to
the arts in Western Europe and in
the United States. When the Berlin
Wall came down in 1989, the dia-
logue between East and West
kicked into high gear.
Pretty quickly, Loy’s paintings
came to combine the best of both.
“So Near and Yet So Far,” her second solo show in Los Angeles, consists of pictures equally at home in
a children’s storybook, on the walls
of a museum or in the journal of a
sharp-eyed woman.
The shape-shifting ambidexterity of Loy’s paintings is a testament to her capacity to understand reality as a multilayered mixture of facts and feelings, sensations and sentiments, outlooks
and insights, selves and others.
Past and present likewise commingle in Loy’s subtle paintings.
Each seems to spring from a particularly vivid reverie. Each could
be a self-portrait.
But unlike most types of portraiture, Loy’s stylized — even
quasi-anonymous — figures are
never isolated, autonomous or
painted as if they stand alone in the
world, unique to themselves and
heads and shoulders above others.
On the contrary, they are down to
earth and approachable. All are depicted in relationships — to another woman or often to two, three or
more.
Sometimes Loy’s figures look
like sisters. Maybe twins. Or perhaps the same woman at different
times in her life. Or the same wom-
‘So Near
and Yet
So Far’
Where: Kohn Gallery,
1227 N. Highland Ave., L.A.
When: Through Jan. 9;
closed Sundays and Mondays
Info: (323) 461-3311,
kohngallery.com
an, in the same moment, when she
happens to be of two minds about
something.
Relationships between mothers and daughters come to mind.
So do relationships between and
among best friends, former selves,
future selves, best selves, worst
selves and all their selves in between.
Throughout “So Near and Yet
So Far,” the reality of the visible
world exists alongside — or right
on top of — the reality of memory,
the reality of the imagination and
the reality of fantasy.
Hopes and dreams jostle regrets and sorrows, together creating a bittersweet realm of great
complexity, resonance and richness.
calendar@latimes.com
His ‘Marble’ is transporting
The deceptively modest
exhibition will loop you
into mesmerizing worlds.
By David Pagel
Marc Selwyn Fine Art
LEE MULLICAN creates the sublime out of the simple. Here is
a detail from a work of his in “The Marble Drawings: 1966-1970.”
“Lee Mullican: The Marble
Drawings, 1966-1970” is a gem of an
exhibition that is not to be missed.
At Marc Selwyn Fine Art, 15 works
on paper catch Mullican (1919-98)
at the top of his game, transforming the simplest of marks into abstract compositions that are flatout sublime.
Each piece starts simply. Using
acrylic or oil paint, Mullican has
covered each plain sheet of paper
with a single color — most often the
supersaturated black of outer
space, but sometimes deep ocean
blue, blazing orange, smoky brown,
lovely lavender or dappled gray,
which he appears to have applied
with the tips of his fingers.
Keeping things simple, Mullican then used the dulled end of a
pastel crayon to press circles on his
painted sheets of paper, some-
times filling in every square inch.
The circumference of the crayons
determined the sizes of the circles;
the largest are a little smaller than
a dime, the smallest not much bigger than the head of a pin.
Finally, Mullican added one or
two highlights to many of his circles, creating concentric rings.
From up close, they resemble tiny
targets. From a few steps back, the
glistening highlights make your
eyes see spheres, which look like
marbles, giving the series its name.
Once you see marbles, there’s
no going back. Mullican’s drawings
suddenly seem to be upended tabletops jampacked with marbles
— each defying gravity to become a
sun in its own solar system.
The colors are pure Mullican: a
ravishing combination of stunning
primaries, plus the organic and the
outlandish. Fun counts for Mullican. So does excess. And imaginative transport that verges on the
hallucinatory.
“Angel Wave” takes you beneath
the sea’s surface to coral reefs
abuzz with electricity. A pair of untitled horizontal drawings makes
you feel as if you’re beholding a
‘Lee Mullican:
The Marble
Drawings,
1966-1970’
Where: Marc Selwyn Fine Art,
9953 S. Santa Monica Blvd.,
Beverly Hills
When: Through Feb. 2; closed
Sundays and Mondays
Info: (310) 277-9953,
marcselwynfineart.com
night sky so star-studded that the
real thing pales in comparison.
Crop circles and LED signage
on the fritz also pop into consciousness. Reptiles, rodents and birds
sometimes appear, only to dissolve
into their surroundings. The longer
you look, the less certain you are
about what’s in front of your eyes.
Losing your bearings — if not your
marbles — never looked better, nor
more stimulating.
calendar@latimes.com
E4
W E D N E S DAY , JA N UA RY 2 , 2 019
L AT I M E S . C O M / CA L E N DA R
Photographs by
Darrell Hoemann
JESSICA STEINROCK , right, specializes in teaching consensual intimacy in the field of improv comedy. Such expertise is increasingly sought out on stages and sets.
The goal: Make sexy scenes feel safe
[Intimacy, from E1]
ited the conversations.
So what is your job, exactly?
Noble: If you’re making a
show with fights, there’s no
question: You call a fight
director. But when it comes
to material that’s sexually
charged, there are too many
times when we’re just leaving actors to their own devices.
Rodis: There’s this black
hole where sex scenes have
lived for so long. Sometimes
directors really get in there,
but otherwise it’s, “Figure it
out yourself, go for it.” So as
an intimacy coordinator, I
coordinate. I facilitate the
uncomfortable conversations around all the potential land mines, all of the
things that could get miscommunicated or misconstrued, or just not talked
about.
How did you come to specialize in this?
Sina: While studying
stage combat, I was asked to
rehearse an intimate scene
outside of rehearsal, and it
became inappropriate
immediately. I thought, “I’m
not going to do this to my
actors, I’m a choreographer,
I have the ability to change
this.” I focused my master’s
thesis on creating a technique to choreograph sex
without victimizing anybody, while at the same time
improving the quality of
what we were seeing onstage. That was published
in 2006.
Rodis: As a fight director
and stunt coordinator, I was
constantly being brought in
to direct sexual-assault
scenes because I’m a woman. I couldn’t believe there
was no specialty for handling these roles.
Warden: There were a number of actors I taught who
were dealing with some kind
of trauma, but there were no
techniques on how to safely
navigate that when they tell
these deeply powerful and
personal stories. I spent
time working with psychologists and therapists so I can
help them to do that. Almost two years ago, a friend
sent me an article about
Tonia [Sina], and then I met
with her and Alicia [Rodis],
who trained me.
Steinrock: I’ve done improv
comedy for nine years, and
I’ve had a lot of messy experiences; my friends and I
would cry on each other’s
shoulders over things that
were said to us or done to us
in scenes. I’m getting my
PhD now, and I came to
Tonia with my research
about consent in improv.
That was three years ago.
Noble: One day a student
said to me, “I’d like a new
scene partner. I think he
tried to rape me.” They
hadn’t been able to find a
place to rehearse on campus, so they went back to his
dorm to rehearse “A Streetcar Named Desire,” and
that final scene is basically a
rape scene. She allowed me
to mediate a conversation,
and in that particular case,
it was a misunderstanding.
TONIA SINA , center, developed early guidelines for safely negotating intimacy.
He was trying to do the
scene, she had gotten triggered and she just ran. But
that event was a wake-up
call. So I created a methodology to protect students
who want to do this work.
What are the steps of your
work?
Noble: It begins with
some questions. Yes, it can
be something as simple as a
kiss or a touch, but what
story is that event supposed
to tell? Is it true to the characters? How is the audience
supposed to feel?
Sina: I meet with the
director to get an idea of
their vision for the scene.
Sometimes, directors hire
us because they don’t want
anything to do with it, which
is totally fine, for whatever
reason. Not everybody
wants to do this work, and
not everybody is past their
own trauma to be able to
choreograph sex in someone else.
Rodis: I read the scripts
and notate where there are
potential moments of intimacy. A stunt coordinator
makes sure [actors] don’t
actually punch someone in
the face. They cheat it with
an angle or padding. It’s the
exact same thing with inti-
TM
landmarktheatres.com/los-angeles
Info Line
ROYAL
10850 W. Pico at Westwood • West L.A.
3 Hours Free Parking. Additional 2 Hours $3 with Validation.
Showtimes and Information: (310) 470-0492
THE LANDMARK LOUNGE HAPPY HOUR • Daily 4:00pm–6:30pm &
9:00pm–10:30pm • Enjoy Happy Hour specials on select glasses of beer and wine!
▼●■ (PG)
STAN & OLLIE
THE FAVOURITE
●■ (R)
(12:30, 2:55, 5:20) 7:45, 10:05
(11:10, 1:55, 4:40) 7:30, 10:10
ON THE
BASIS OF SEX
6:30
▼●■ (PG-13)
(11:45, 1:30, 2:30, 4:15, 5:15) 7:00,
8:00, 9:40
●■
VICE (R)
West L.A.
(12:00, 3:00) 8:40
(11:00, 1:35, 4:20) 7:10, 9:55
●■ (R)
Santa Monica
BEN IS BACK (R)
NoHo 7
MARY QUEEN OF SCOTS E 1:30 PM
4:30 PM 7:30 PM 10:15 PM
HOLMES & WATSON C 12:40 PM
3:00 PM 5:20 PM 7:40 PM 10:00 PM
SHOPLIFTERS E 1:20 PM 4:10 PM
THE FAVOURITE E 1:30 PM 4:20 PM
7:10 PM 10:10 PM
PLAYHOUSE
AT ETERNITY’S GATE C
1:10 PM 7:30 PM
WELCOME
TO MARWEN
(1:40, 4:35) 7:25, 10:15
(11:00) 9:10
(11:40, 2:20, 5:00) 7:40, 10:15
4:15 PM 7:20 PM 10:15 PM
4:30 PM 7:30 PM 10:15 PM
THE RIDER E 4:40 PM 10:00 PM
THE FAVOURITE E 1:00 PM 4:00 PM
7:00 PM 10:00 PM
207 N. Maryland Ave
SHOPLIFTERS E 4:30 PM
●
ROMA E 1:00 PM 4:00 PM
ROMA (R)
7:10 PM 10:10 PM
(2:00, 5:00) 8:00
BARGAIN IN ( )
1045 Broxton Ave • Westwood • (310) 208-3250
BIRD BOX (R)
(2:00) 9:30
●
GREEN BOOK C 1:00 PM 4:00 PM
7:00 PM 10:00 PM
Glendale
TRAVEL
CLAREMONT
WELCOME TO MARWEN C 1:30 PM
4:30 PM 7:30 PM 10:15 PM
MARY QUEEN OF SCOTS E 1:20 PM
4:20 PM 7:20 PM 10:10 PM
11272 Santa Monica Blvd • West L.A. • (310) 473-8530
MARY QUEEN OF SCOTS E 1:30 PM
MARY QUEEN OF SCOTS E 1:20 PM
4:20 PM 7:20 PM 10:15 PM
THE FAVOURITE E 1:00 PM 4:00 PM
7:00 PM 10:00 PM
3:45 PM 6:30 PM
THE MULE E 1:50 PM 4:40 PM
7:30 PM 10:15 PM
VICE E 1:00 PM 4:00 PM
7:10 PM 10:10 PM
MARY QUEEN OF SCOTS E 1:20 PM
CAPERNAUM E 1:00 PM
MARY POPPINS RETURNS B 12:45 PM
3:50 PM 7:00 PM 10:15 PM
BOY ERASED E 1:00 PM 7:10 PM
GLENDALE
CAPERNAUM E 1:30 PM 4:20 PM
VOX LUX E 4:30 PM 7:20 PM 10:00 PM
MORTAL ENGINES C 1:20 PM
THE WIFE E 1:50 PM 7:20 PM
WELCOME TO MARWEN C 1:40 PM
ZERO I SP; 9:30 PM
VICE E 12:30 PM 3:40 PM
7:00 PM 10:10 PM
GREEN BOOK C 1:00 PM 4:00 PM
7:00 PM 10:00 PM
7:20 PM 10:15 PM
VOX LUX E 9:55 PM
No. Hollywood
7:10 PM 10:10 PM
7:10 PM 10:00 PM
Pasadena
Encino
VICE E 1:10 PM 4:10 PM
5240 Lankershim Blvd.
CAPERNAUM E 1:00 PM 4:00 PM
7:00 PM 10:10 PM
(1:50, 4:10)
▼●■ (PG-13)
17200 Ventura Blvd.
Beverly Hills
GREEN BOOK C 7:30 PM
BEN IS BACK E 1:50 PM 7:30 PM
▼●■ (PG) MARY
POPPINS RETURNS
TOWN CENTER
8556 Wilshire Blvd.
THE HOUSE THAT JACK BUILT E
3:50 PM 9:50 PM
7:30 PM 10:15 PM
(11:05, 1:45, 4:30) 7:15, 9:55
AHRYA FINE ARTS
VOX LUX E 4:00 PM 10:10 PM
4:30 PM 7:20 PM 10:10 PM
●■
www.LAEMMLE.com
COLD WAR E 1:00 PM 3:10 PM 5:20 PM
VICE E 1:10 PM 4:10 PM
MARY QUEEN
OF SCOTS
●■ (R)
1332 Second Street
TAFRAID
NO
OF SUBTITLES
7:30 PM 10:00 PM
(11:20, 2:00, 4:40) 7:20, 9:55
(1:05, 4:05) 7:05, 10:00
IF BEALE
STREET COULD
TALK
MONICA
11523 Santa Monica Blvd.
673 E. Colorado Blvd.
6:00
▼●■
THE MULE (R)
310.478 .3836
macy coordination. “She is
topless and performing oral
sex on the male character.”
OK, cool. Then I work with
the actors so that they don’t
actually have to do that.
Sina: Then I talk with
the actors about what
they’re comfortable with
doing. I tell them, “I’m not
here to make you do what
you don’t want to do. I’m
here to make sure that you
are consenting every step of
the way. I’m here to respect
your boundaries, and to
make sure everybody else
respects your boundaries.”
Steinrock: Improvisers
don’t choreograph the same
way we can in scripted theater, but there are boundarysetting conversations that
can happen before we go
onstage and ways to ask for
consent within the scene.
Noble: If the director
says, “I want him to grab her
by the boobs because I want
the moment to be shocking,” I can say, “OK, she’s
not comfortable being
grabbed by the breasts, but
we can show this character
going too far another way.
She’s totally willing for him
to grab her butt. So let’s just
tell the story that you’re
looking for in a different way
where everybody wins.”
Sina: Then, I adjust. I
add breath, I add angles, I
add the sleight of hand that
makes it look magical. We
continue and we make it
repeatable.
Noble: If the actor’s
doing a move in a show
every night and they’re not
comfortable with it anymore, they can always remove consent. We can make
accommodations, but they
have to be free to communicate that.
Rodis: There’s a good
amount of pre-production
work. I liaison with costumes to make sure that we
have robes and intimate
barriers ready. Cinematographers and lighting designers are involved too.
There are times when I’ll
ask to reposition, either to
make it more believable or
because that actor did not
sign off on showing that
body part.
[See Intimacy, E5]
450 W. 2nd Street
Claremont
VICE E 1:00 PM 4:10 PM
7:20 PM 10:15 PM
9036 Wilshire Blvd.
Beverly Hills
JOURNALIST
AQUAMAN C 1:10 PM 4:10 PM
7:10 PM 10:10 PM
A PRIVATE WAR E 1:30 PM 4:20 PM
MARY POPPINS RETURNS B 1:20 PM
4:20 PM 7:20 PM 10:10 PM
AT ETERNITY’S GATE C
1:40 PM 7:30 PM
MORTAL ENGINES C 9:55 PM
ROMA E 4:20 PM 10:00 PM
SPIDER-MAN: INTO THE SPIDER-VERSE B
1:40 PM 4:30 PM 7:20 PM 10:00 PM
GIRL E 1:10 PM 4:10 PM
7:00 PM 9:50 PM
MARY QUEEN OF SCOTS E 1:00 PM
4:00 PM 7:00 PM
CLOSED CAPTION
WITH A
MUSIC HALL
7:10 PM 9:50 PM
THE WIFE E 1:00 PM 7:00 PM
THE RIDER E 4:00 PM
FOR 1/2/2019 ONLY
NON-STANDARD PRICING
Let our reporters,
editors and
photographers
take you on a
journey of
discovery.
Home is where the gold-plated bathtub is.
FREE SOLO (PG-13)
Saturdays in the L.A. Times
(4:45) 7:15
Landmark strongly supports
a NO TEXTING AND
NO CELL PHONE policy.
Subscribe FilmClub.LandmarkTheatres.com
LandmarkTheatres.com/GiÂCards
( ) at Discount
= No Passes
= The Screening Lounge
● Closed Captioning ◗ Open Captioning ■ Descriptive Video Service
VALID WEDNESDAY~ JANUARY V ONLY
© 2019 Landmark Theatres
latimes.com/hotproperty
LATexpeditions.com/explore
W E D N E S DAY , JA N UA RY 2 , 2 019
L AT I M E S . C O M / CA L E N DA R
E5
On hand
to negotiate
intimacy
[Intimacy, from E4]
Warden: Closure is the
most important part. It tells
actors that they’re not
performing sex for real, that
this is the character’s sex
life. That’s such a crucial
differentiation to make
because in the past actors
have been asked to just try
it, do it, kiss, and then
they’re just choreographing
themselves with no guidance. They’re kissing each
other the way they would
kiss somebody and not the
way the character would.
What are some nonnegotiable rules of making
intimate scenes?
Rodis: At least 24 hours’
notice of nudity. It’s the
same if you’re a stunt performer on a TV show: a
stunt coordinator calls you
the night before, making
sure you know exactly
what’s happening, like, “It
was going to be a 15-foot fall,
but it’s looking like 17 now.”
Sina: Ask for consent in
rehearsal. If the director
says, “Grab her boob,” the
actor can turn to the actress
and say, “Is it OK?” That
one extra step takes two
seconds! And she has the
ability to say yes or no, or
something in between: “I
don’t want you to touch me
there, but you can touch me
in these places.” It’s helping
actors have a language so
that’s it not, “I’m just gonna
say yes to everything because I’m an actor and I
can’t say no.”
Steinrock: You can
telegraph your movements
by going for the hug 80% and
leaving that extra 20% for
the other person to come in.
There’s a huge stigma for
saying “no” in improv, which
is based purely on this idea
of “yes, and.” But truly, “yes,
and” is about the acceptance and agreement of
ideas; a “no” can be using
your suggestion in a different direction. When we treat
“yes” and “no” as changes in
direction, we can still get
fast, energized comedy
without violating anyone’s
boundaries.
Warden: Stick to the
choreography. Once a show
is open, the stage manager
has the notation of what the
physicality is in their book,
so if anything strays from
the choreography, they
address it that day. “I saw
tonight that this hand was
here, that’s not where it’s
supposed to be” or “this
lasted longer than it’s supposed to.”
Noble: Use proper
nomenclature instead of
calling it somebody’s “junk”
or grab her “tits” and all of
these sketchy, derogatory
words. These are body
parts, they have names.
Sina: I was choreographing a doctor’s exam
with a man, and someone
kept saying to the actor,
“You ready for anal rape
scene?” [The actor] came to
me and said, “This makes
me uncomfortable that he
calls it that.” Yeah, of course
it does!
Your job is partly keeping
people safe, but also keeping scenes sexy. What’s
your intimacy pet peeve?
Rodis: When it doesn’t
look like they’re actually
doing the act. Most people
haven’t been in a sword fight
before, so they might not
know when they’re watching “Pirates of the Caribbean” that that’s not necessarily how it’d go. But most
people have had sexual
experiences before, and it’s
a lot easier to call bull … on
that.
Sina: What really drives
me crazy is when there’s no
actual intimacy in the scene.
Darrell Hoemann
INTIMACY coordination specialists, from left, Claire Warden, Alicia Rodis and Tonia Sina share ideas.
person. The audience can
feel that.
Christian Rodriguez
ADAM NOBLE , center, helps performers prepare to navigate an intimate scene.
That’s an acting technique
that we don’t teach actors.
They have classes in stage
combat, dance, all these
other things, but they don’t
have classes on how to look
somebody in the eye for a
while.
Warden: I long for a
wider variety of storytelling.
It’s very much the same
thing again and again: objectification of the female
this very narrow perfection
we keep seeing.”
Steinrock: In improv, it’s
hand position. It’s very
small, but when people only
lightly put their arms
around each other, or their
fingers are full of tension as
if they’re ready to spring
away from their partner at
any moment, that tells a
story of you don’t actually
want to be touching this
ashley.lee@latimes.com
Wednesday Prime-Time TV
TV HI G HLI GHTS
SERIES
Gordon Ramsay’s 24 Hours
to Hell and Back Chef
Gordon Ramsay returns
for a new season of this unscripted series that sends
him on the road to help
eateries that are on the
brink. Up first, a classic
Cajun-inspired New Orleans restaurant. 8 p.m. Fox
Grown-ish
Zoey
(Yara
Shahidi) and her friends
begin their sophomore
year of college as this spinoff of the sitcom “blackish” returns with two new
episodes. Trevor Jackson,
Francia Raisa and Emily
Artook costar. 8 and 8:30
p.m. Freeform
The Masked Singer Six disguised celebrity vocalists
compete while wearing
elaborate
head-to-toe
costumes
(peacock,
hippo, monster, unicorn,
deer and lion) in the premiere of this unscripted
singing competition. 9
p.m. Fox
NOVA The new episode
“Pluto and Beyond” documents the progress of the
New
Horizons
space
probe as it prepares to fly
by an object known as
MU69 on Jan. 1, 2019. 9 p.m.
KOCE and KPBS
Project Runway All Stars
Alyssa Milano returns to
host the seventh and final
season of this fashion
competition series. Anne
Fulenwider mentors the
contestants, whose work
is judged by Isaac Mizrahi
and Georgina Chapman
with guest judge Debra
Messing. 9 p.m. Lifetime
SEAL Team Bravo Team
partners with the British
Special Air Service on a
mission to rescue passengers on a hijacked plane.
David Boreanaz stars;
Luke Mably guest stars. 9
p.m. CBS
Criminal
Minds
Rossi
(David Mantegna) and
the team travel to Portland, Ore., to investigate
an abduction that may be
linked to the murder of a
local couple who were
found slain in their home a
week
earlier.
Elias
Toufexis and Mike Faiola
guest star. Paget Brewster, A.J. Cook and Aisha
Tyler also star. 10 p.m.
CBS
American Masters The new
episode “James Watson”
explores the life and ca-
body, a lot of noise and
enjoyment from the female
body, a lot of broody silence
from the male body, and
rather dull power dynamics
and conventional sex. If we
see more sexual gratification for women, more vulnerability in men, more
“Ow! That was my elbow,
that was my thigh,” we can
go, “They have sex just like I
do! I don’t have to aspire to
How has your work
changed since the #MeToo
era began?
Warden: It’s changed
enormously. The knowledge
that all of this has happened
in our industry is present in
the room. I say, “I’ll take
care of that fear and trauma
while you get on with your
work, and we’ll do this together.” Almost every actor
I’ve worked with is grateful
to have someone in charge
of that. Some directors are
resistant at first, normally
because of a misunderstanding or a lack of understanding of why I’m there.
We’ll start the work and
every time, they’re like,
“That was really good! Can
you also look at this scene?
And I also have this next
project ... .” And then those
who are just worried that
we’re taking away their
privilege of abuse and
power. They’re not very
happy, but tough …, really.
This change for you is going
to be painful. I’m here to
help educate you and support you through that, but
you don’t get to do that
anymore.
CBS
8:30
The Big
Bang Theory
Young Sheldon SEAL Team (TV14) A mission Criminal Minds (TV14) An
(TVPG) Å
(TVPG) A
new dog. Å
Chicago Med (TV14) Å
All American (TV14) Å
ABC The Goldbergs American
(TVPG) Å
Housewife Å
KCAL News (N) Å
FOX Gordon Ramsay’s 24 Hours to
Hell and Back (TV14) (Season
NBC
KTLA
9 pm
9:30
(N) New Å Closed Captioning
8 pm
to rescue passengers on a
hijacked plane. (N) Å
10 pm
10:30
Sports
News
abduction may be linked to aMovies
double murder. (N) Å
Chicago Fire (TV14) Å
Chicago P.D. (TV14) Å
News (N) Å
All American (TV14) Å
News (N) Å Sports (10:45) News (N) Å
Modern Family Single Parents Match Game (TV14) Å
News (N) Å
(TVPG) Å
News (N) Å
(TVPG) Å
The Masked Singer (TVPG)
News (N) Å
News (N) Å
Sports Central 2 Broke Girls
The Big Bang
Theory (TV14)
(Premiere) The first six unpremiere) A Cajun-inspired dercover celebrity singers
New Orleans restaurant. (N) perform. (N) Å
MyNt Dateline (TVPG) Å
Dateline (TVPG) Å
Seinfeld Å
Seinfeld Å
KVCR Dick Cheney: A Heartbeat Away (TVG) Å
Bluegrass Å Amanpour and Company (N) Å
KCET Migrant Kitchen Tending Nature Fine Cut Å
Vera (TVPG) Å
UNI
KOCE
Michael Becker Fox
NICK CANNON hosts the new vocalist-in-disguise
competition “The Masked Singer,” airing on Fox.
reer of the American
molecular biologist best
known as one of the codiscoverers of the structure of the DNA molecule.
10 p.m. KOCE and KPBS
American Beauty Star
Fourteen hair and makeup experts vie for the title
of American Beauty Star
as this unscripted competition returns with new
host Ashley Graham,
mentor Sir John and
judges Christie Brinkley,
Yu Tsai and Leah Wyar.
10:03 p.m. Lifetime
SPECIALS
Mysteries at the Museum:
The Hindenburg Don
Wildman investigates the
horrific crash of the commercial airship Hindenburg in 1937. 9 p.m. Travel
MOVIES
The Death of Stalin (2017) 11
a.m. Showtime
Monster’s Ball (2001) 12:30
p.m. EPIX
Popstar: Never Stop Never
Stopping (2016) 2 p.m.
FXX
Avatar (2009) 2:45 p.m.
Cinemax
Gremlins 2: The New Batch
(1990) 3 p.m. IFC
On the Waterfront (1954) 5
p.m. TCM
Precious (2009) 6:10 p.m.
EPIX
A Streetcar Named Desire
(1951) 7 p.m. TCM
Good Morning America
Former football player
Colton Underwood; Yara
Shahidi. (N) 7 a.m. KABC
Good Day L.A. Sparks
Coach Derek Fisher; Emily Loftiss; Diane Warren.
(N) 7 a.m. KTTV
Live With Kelly and Ryan
Kerry Washington; John
Stamos; Coyote Peterson.
(N) 9 a.m. KABC
The View (N) 10 a.m. KABC
The Dr. Oz Show A high-fat,
high-protein, low-carbohydrate eating plan; turning the body into a fatburning machine. 10 a.m.
KCOP
The Doctors Man sues pharmacy for revealing prescription; appetite-crushing lollipops; stopping
split ends. 11 a.m. KCOP
The Talk Nick Cannon. (N) 1
p.m. KCBS
The Ellen DeGeneres Show
Heidi Klum (“America’s
Got Talent: The Champions”). (N) 3 p.m. KNBC
The Dr. Oz Show What
meals to eat and when to
eat them for best weight
loss. (N) 3 p.m. KTTV
Amanpour and Company
(N) 10 p.m. KVCR; 11:30
p.m. KOCE; 1 a.m. KLCS
Nightline (N) 12:37 a.m.
KABC
SPORTS
TALK SHOWS
NHL Hockey Pittsburgh
Penguins at New York
Rangers, 4 p.m. NBCSP;
San Jose Sharks at Colorado Avalanche, 6:30
p.m. NBCSP
CBS This Morning (N) 7
a.m. KCBS
Today (N) 7 a.m. KNBC
KTLA Morning News (N) 7
a.m. KTLA
NBA Basketball Minnesota
Timberwolves at Boston
Celtics, 5 p.m. ESPN;
Oklahoma City Thunder
at Los Angeles Lakers,
7:30 p.m. ESPN and SPST
Jesús
Mi marido tiene más familia
Nature (TVPG) Scientific re- NOVA (TVG) (Season pre-
search offers a new look into miere) The most distant
the life of red foxes. Å
flyby in history. (N) Å
KDOC Dateline (TVPG) Å
The Goldbergs The Goldbergs
KLCS Victoria (TVPG) Å
A&E
AMC
ANP
BBC
BET
Bravo
CMT
CNN
Com
Disc
Disn
E!
ESPN
Food
FNC
Free
FX
Hall
HGTV
Hist
IFC
Life
MTV
NGC
Nick
OWN
Para
Sund
Syfy
TBS
TCM
TLC
TNT
Toon
Travel
Tru
TV L
USA
VH1
WGN
Cine
Encr
EPIX
HBO
Show
Starz
TMC
Å
King of Queens
Blackademics
Shetland
Noticias
Amar a muerte (TV14)
American Masters (TVPG) The life of Nobel
Prize-winning biologist James Watson,
co-discoverer of DNA’s structure. (N) Å
Family Guy Å Family Guy Å Seinfeld Å
Victoria (TVPG) Å
Live PD: Patrol Live PD: Patrol Live PD: Patrol Live PD: Patrol Live PD: Patrol Live PD: Patrol Live PD: Patrol
Twister ››› (1996) Helen Hunt, Bill Paxton. (PG-13) Å
Double Jeopardy (10:35) Å
North Woods Law: Uncuffed (TV14) (N) Å
North Woods Law (TVPG) Å North Woods
The Green Mile ››› (1999) Tom Hanks. A prisoner possesses a miraculous healing power. (R) Å
I Can Do Bad … (6:28)
White Chicks ›› (2004) Shawn Wayans, Marlon Wayans. (9:03) (PG-13)
Real Housewives of New Jesey Real Housewives of New Jesey Real Housewives of New Jesey What Happens
Last-Standing Last-Standing Mermaids ››› (1990) Cher, Winona Ryder. (PG-13) Å
CNN Tonight: Don Lemon (N) Anderson Cooper (TVPG) Å Anderson Cooper (TVPG) Å CNN Tonight
South Park Å South Park Å South Park Å South Park Å South Park (TVMA) Black Friday Trilogy. Å
Moonshiners (TV14) (N) Å
Moonshiners (TV14) (N) Å
Homestead Rescue (N) Å
Homestead Å
Raven’s Home Raven’s Home Bunk’d (TVG) Bizaardvark
Bunk’d (TVG) Bunk’d (TVG) Raven’s Home
Botched (TV14) Å
Botched (TV14) (N) Å
Botched (TV14) Å
Botched Å
Basketball Oklahoma City Thunder at Lakers. (7:30) (N)
SportsCenter (N) Å
SportsCenter
Guy’s Grocery Games (TVG)
Guy’s Grocery Games (TVG)
Guy’s Grocery Games (TVG)
Guy’s Games
Fox News at Night (N) Å
Tucker Carlson Tonight Å
Hannity Å
Ingraham Å
Grown-ish (N) Grown-ish (N) Life-Size 2: A Christmas Eve (2018) Tyra Banks. Å
The 700 Club
Thor: The Dark World ›› (2013) Chris Hemsworth. (PG-13) Å
Thor: The Dark World ››
Love on Ice (2017) Julie Berman, Andrew W. Walker. Å
Love at First Dance (2018) Niall Matter. Å
Property Brothers (TVPG) Å Property Brothers (TVPG) (N) House Hunters House Hunters Property Bros.
Vikings (TV14) Å
Vikings (TV14) (N) Å
Oak Island: Drilling Down
The Curse of
Road House ›› (1989) Patrick Swayze, Kelly Lynch. (R) Å
Road House (1989) (10:45)
Project Runway All Stars
Project Runway All Stars (Sea- American Beauty Star (TV14) All Stars
(TVPG) Å
MSN
11 pm
News (N) Å
son premiere) (TVPG) (N) Å (Season premiere) (N) Å
(TVPG) Å
11th Hour Å
The Rachel Maddow Show Å The Last Word Å
11th Hour Å
Catfish: The TV Show (TVPG) Catfish: The TV Show (N)
True Life Now (TV14)
Lindsay Lohan
Locked Up Abroad: Breakout
Locked Up Abroad (TV14) (N) Locked Up Abroad (TV14)
Locked Up
SpongeBob Å SpongeBob Å SpongeBob Å SpongeBob Å The Office Å The Office Å Friends (TV14)
Four Weddings (TVPG) Å
Four Weddings (TVPG) Å
Four Weddings
Friends Å
Friends Å
I, Robot ›› (2004) Will Smith, Bridget Moynahan. (PG-13) Å
Criminal Minds (TV14) Å
Criminal Minds (TV14) Å
Criminal Minds (TV14) Å
Criminal Minds
Movie (6:15) I Am Number Four ›› (2011) Alex Pettyfer, Timothy Olyphant. (PG-13) Å Ender’s Game
Big Bang Å
Big Bang Å
Big Bang Å
Big Bang Å
Big Bang Å
Full Frontal (TVMA) Å
A Streetcar Named Desire (7) Viva Zapata! ›››› (1952) Marlon Brando, Jean Peters. (9:15) Å
My 600-Lb. Life (TVPG) (N) Å
Family by the Ton (TV14) (N) My 600-Lb
The Intern ›› (2015) Robert De Niro, Anne Hathaway. (PG-13) Å
Blended › (2014) (PG-13) Å
Samurai Jack American Dad American Dad Bob’s Burgers Bob’s Burgers Family Guy Å Family Guy Å
Mysteries at the Museum
Mysteries at the Museum: The Beyond the Unknown (TVG)
Monsters and
(TVPG) An ape-like beast
Hindenburg Disaster (TVPG) (Premiere) A secret of the
Mysteries in
Wild West. (N) Å
that roams the desert. (N) Å The 1937 crash. (N) Å
America Å
Jokers Å
Jokers Å
Jokers Å
Jokers Å
Jokers Å
Jokers Å
I’m Sorry Å
Everybody Loves Raymond Å Raymond Å
Raymond Å
2 1/2 Men Å 2 1/2 Men Å King of Queens
Law & Order: SVU (TV14) Å Law & Order: SVU (TV14) Å Law & Order: SVU (TV14) Å Modern Family
Love & Hip Hop Miami (N) Å Black Ink Crew: Chicago (N) Å Love & Hip Hop Miami Å
Ink: Chicago
Last-Standing Last-Standing Last-Standing Married ... With Married ... With Married ... With How I Met Å
The Usual Suspects ››› (1995) Stephen Baldwin. (R) Å
Out of Sight ››› (1998) (9:50) (R) Å
Alien/Predator: Requiem (7:24) Jeepers Creepers ›› (2001) (R)
Saw ›› (2004) (10:34) (R)
Fences ››› (2016) Denzel Washington, Viola Davis. (PG-13) Å
Revolutionary Road (10:20)
Never Been Kissed ›› (1999) Drew Barrymore. (PG-13) Å Pete Holmes: Dirty Clean Å
Fifty Shades…
Maid in Manhattan ›› (2002) Jennifer Lopez. (PG-13) Å
The Back-up Plan › (2010) (PG-13) Å
Along Came a Spider (7:14)
Country Strong ›› (2010) Gwyneth Paltrow. (PG-13) Å
Shock and Awe
Marshall ››› (2017) Chadwick Boseman. (PG-13) Å
Madea’s Family Reunion (2006) (PG-13) Å
E6
W E D N E S DAY , JA N UA RY 2 , 2 019
L AT I M E S . C O M / CA L E N DA R
COMICS
BRIDGE
SUDOKU
By Frank Stewart
You can improve your
play through reading and
study, but knowing that a
technique exists is not
enough.
You need the presence of
mind to recognize and apply
it at the table.
Against four spades,
West led the king of diamonds. When East signaled
with the four, West shifted to
a trump. South took the
A-K, then led the A-K and a
third club. East won and led
a diamond, and West took
the jack and ace for down
one.
This is a textbook deal.
How should South play?
South can win West’s
trump shift with the ace and
lead his seven to dummy’s
jack. He next leads the king
KENKEN
Every box will contain a number; numbers depend on the size of the grid. For a 6x6
puzzle, use Nos. 1-6. Do not repeat a number in any row or column. The numbers in each
heavily outlined set of squares must combine to produce the target number found in the
top left corner of the cage using the mathematical operation indicated. A number can be
repeated within a cage as long as it is not in the same row or column.
of hearts and discards a
club: a loser on a loser.
If West takes the ace and
errs by leading another
heart, South ruffs, cashes
the K-A of clubs and ruffs a
club.
He can return to dummy
by leading his deuce of
trumps to the four and discard diamonds on the good
clubs.
Question: You hold: ♠ 9 5
♥ A J 8 7 3 ♦ A K J 5 ♣ J 7. Your
partner opens one club, you
bid one heart, he rebids two
clubs and you try two diamonds. Partner next bids
two spades. What do you
say?
Answer: Partner doesn’t
have four cards in spades; he
didn’t bid one spade over
your one-heart response.
Your two diamonds was
forcing, so he had to bid
something at his third turn.
He may have a hand such as
A 3 2, 2, Q 7 6, A K 10 9 5 4. Bid
three clubs, which he should
treat as forcing.
West dealer
Both sides vulnerable
NORTH
♠J43
♥K4
♦832
♣A9632
WEST
EAST
♠95
♠8
♥AJ873
♥ Q 10 9 6 5 2
♦AKJ5
♦ 10 9 4
♣J7
♣ Q 10 8
SOUTH
♠ A K Q 10 7 6 2
♥ None
♦Q76
♣K54
WEST
NORTH EAST
SOUTH
1♥
Pass
4♥
4♠
All Pass
Opening lead — ♦ K
2019, Tribune Media
Services
ASK AMY
Half sibling? Dad is angry
1/2/19
HOROSCOPE
By Holiday Mathis
Aries (March 21-April 19):
You might copy someone
you admire, but it’s a temporary thing to help you understand your own identity.
Taurus (April 20-May
20): You’ve been known to
communicate
something
much more important than
what you’re talking about.
Gemini (May 21-June 21):
You will spend hours toiling
to “make yourself remarkable by some talent or another,” all the while knowing
that this is icing on the cake.
Cancer (June 22-July 22):
If you’re facing familiar territory with all that’s needed to
succeed, progress is certain.
But if you don’t know what’s
ahead, you might just be in
for some greatness.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22): It is
possible that when your efforts are counted in the future, it will be by an entirely
different system of measurement than is used today.
Your best bet will be to tend
to the intangible aspects.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22):
Ultimately, everything gets
easier when you understand
it better. But understanding
comes in layers. You’ll get to
a place where it all kicks in.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23):
Too much health is unhealthy. Too much rest and
leisure is exhausting. In all
things, balance!
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 21):
Whether you enjoy politics,
you will be dealing in political systems today, or at the
least in power dynamics.
Sagittarius (Nov. 22Dec. 21): The tendency to
blame yourself for things
that aren’t your fault or credit yourself for things that
aren’t your doing is universally human. Eliminate
blame and credit entirely.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan.
19): Because you are walking
around with your heart wide
open, your encounters will
tend toward extraordinary.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb.
18): Watching a child grow is
a remarkable and layered
experience that connects
you with your own evolution
and with humanity at large.
Pisces (Feb. 19-March
20): The acceptable effort
will be minimal. Show up
and smile. Much more than
that will be too much.
Today’s birthday (Jan.
2): The fulfillment of wishes
comes at a price, and it’s not
the price you thought it
would be. See, you’ve always
been willing to put in the
work, but what you didn’t realize is that feeling like you
deserve it may be the hardest work of all. Love yourself.
Credit yourself. Heal and
change the beliefs that have
kept you from feeling
worthy. Libra and Scorpio
adore you. Your lucky numbers are: 4, 25, 2, 28 and 18.
Holiday Mathis writes her
column for Creators
Syndicate Inc. The
horoscope should be read
for entertainment.
Dear Amy: I am one of the
many who have found a half
sibling through DNA testing. The birth mother never
told my father that she was
pregnant, and the child was
put up for adoption over 50
years ago.
I told my dad about this,
and he reacted by getting angry and stopping the conversation by telling me to not
have contact with the new
half sibling. I gave it a few
months and gently brought
it up again, only to be shut
down right away. He does
not wish to discuss it. I was
going to ask him to tell my
sibling that we have a newly
discovered half sibling out
there, but I know that is out
of the question.
I am excited about my
new relative and would like
to meet and get to know
them. I wish my dad would
be open to discussing this.
Before moving forward, I
would like to tell my other
sibling about our new halfsibling. I worry that I am going behind my dad’s back
and that he’ll be furious that
I have shared his secret.
I am feeling anxious
about having to keep this a
secret. How do I tell my sibling that we have a half sibling if our father is not open
to discussing this?
Reluctant Secret
Holder
Dear Reluctant: Your father had no knowledge of
this child he fathered, so the
existence of your half sibling
has not been a long-held secret. Don’t hold this as a secret now.
Your father’s response to
this is completely understandable. He feels betrayed
and, of course, he is unhappy
about it. He does not want to
face the imponderable complications of this possible relationship. He assumes it
will upend your family, but, if
anecdotal evidence I’ve collected on DNA discoveries is
accurate, the toughest part
of the experience is the anticipation. Your father will
not give you permission to
pursue this. Understand it
and forgive him for his own
reaction.
I suggest you take this in
discreet stages. Keep your
own expectations modest.
After you make some initial
contact with your half sibling, tell your father that you
are going to inform your
other sibling. Reassure your
father every step of the way,
and if he refuses to discuss it,
proceed on your own.
Dear Amy: I believe my
husband is cheating on me. I
went through his phone
once and he had another
girl’s naked picture on it.
He is also on a dating
website talking to other
girls.
Amy, he works long hours
and comes home exhausted.
He is a delivery driver,
and I believe he may be delivering more than just packages.
He hardly looks at me or
talks to me anymore, and
our sex life has been devastating. What should I do?
Wronged Wife
Dear Wife: Instincts are
powerful. But you also seem
to have ample evidence of
your husband’s extracurricular activities. If your husband is having sex with random people, you should get
tested for STDs.
Surely the holiday season
was an especially busy time
for your package-toting
Casanova. Now it’s your
turn. You should schedule a
special delivery: Hand him
an ultimatum.
You two need to talk, urgently, about your relationship. And then you have a
tough decision to make.
Marriages can recover from
infidelity — or suspected infidelity. But you can’t recover without communication and trust.
Send questions to Amy
Dickinson by email to
askamy@amydickinson
.com.
FAMILY CIRCUS By Bil Keane
DENNIS THE MENACE By Hank Ketcham
ARGYLE SWEATER By Scott Hilburn
MARMADUKE By Brad & Paul Anderson
BLISS By Harry Bliss
BALLARD STREET By Jerry Van Amerongen
CROSSWORD
Edited By Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
By Robin Stears
ACROSS
1 Fictional archaeologist
Croft
5 Prep for fight night
9 Furry critters who
helped disable the
shield generator on
Endor
14 Major work
15 La Scala song
16 “Mack the Knife” singer
17 *Jewelry alloy
19 Pull together
20 Frenzy
21 Plumeria garlands
23 CIA relative
24 “__ recall ... ”
25 *Genre that may be featured in the Eurovision
Song Contest
29 Serenade
31 “Good comeback”
32 Palm starch
33 Julia Louis-Dreyfus
comedy
37 London insurance pioneer
38 *Sleight-of-hand scam
41 Dispatch boat
44 Apple desktop
45 Former Virginia senator
Charles
49 Sesame paste
51 Daffy, for one
53 *Food brand whose
products include
Caribbean curry paste
and Jamaican jerk seasoning
57 Lyft approx.
58 Strike caller
59 H.G. Wells race
60 Actor Pratt or Pine
62 Flower girl, perhaps
65 1978 novelty song with
the line “Eat them up!
Yum!” ... and what both
parts of the answers to
starred clues can be
67 Come next
68 “Dies __”
69 Exactly, with “to”
70 Baby carrier?
71 Sleek swimmers
72 Gerritsen who created
Rizzoli and Isles
DOWN
1 Catholic service with
minimal ceremony
2 Loss of speech
3 Making a mess of
4 Bubbly city
5 Mattress problem
6 Orwellian worker
7 Didn’t feel well
8 Diameter halves
9 College URL ending
10 Pallid
11 Venezuelan river
12 Tacky
13 Moved furtively
18 NCAA’s Big __
22 Mach 1 flier
26 Made on a loom
27 Ian who plays Bilbo
Baggins
28 Things used for good
measure?
30 Scuttlebutt
34 Nutmeg State Ivy
Leaguer
35 Shade tree
36 Vardon Trophy org.
39 Hägar the Horrible’s
daughter
40 Civil rights gp.
41 Brings into harmony
42 Critter, in dialect
43 “Fingers crossed!”
© 2019 Tribune Content Agency
46 Perform surgery
47 Happens to, quaintly
48 Copper-zinc alloys
50 Party host’s bagful
52 Snowfall measure
54 2004 Jude Law title role
55 Orléans’ river
56 Rope fiber
61 __ index
63 Mongrel
64 Startled cry
66 “__ Just Not That Into
You”: 2009 film
ANSWER TO
PREVIOUS PUZZLE
1/2/19
L AT I M E S . C O M / CA L E N DA R
W E D N E S DAY , JA N UA RY 2 , 2 019
COMICS
DOONESBURY By Garry Trudeau
Doonesbury is on vacation. This is a reprint.
DILBERT By Scott Adams
LA CUCARACHA By Lalo Alcaraz
BABY BLUES By Jerry Scott & Rick Kirkman
CANDORVILLE By Darrin Bell
CRANKSHAFT By Tom Batiuk & Chuck Ayers
HALF FULL By Maria Scrivan
PEARLS BEFORE SWINE By Stephan Pastis
NON SEQUITUR By Wiley
LIO By Mark Tatulli
JUMP START By Robb Armstrong
9 CHICKWEED LANE By Brooke McEldowney
BLONDIE By Dean Young & John Marshall
GET FUZZY By Darby Conley
ZITS By Jerry Scott & Jim Borgman
BIZARRO By Wayno and Piraro
TUNDRA By Chad Carpenter
DRABBLE By Kevin Fagan
PRICKLY CITY By Scott Stantis
MUTTS By Patrick McDonnell
FRAZZ By Jef Mallett
PEANUTS By Charles M. Schulz
E7
E8
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2019
LOS ANGELES TIMES
Insight is always on the itinerary.
Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow:
Experience Japan’s Architecture
Through the Eyes of a Design Expert
Journalist-led L.A. Times Expeditions take you deeper into your destination.
HIGHLIGHTS
· Take in old and new
Tokyo in the company of
an expert as you learn
about iconic buildings
including the Nakagin
Capsule Tower, 21_21
Design Sight and Tod’s
Omotesando Building.
·
Explore the littlevisited islands of
Naoshima and
Teshima, known for
their contemporary art
collections and design.
· Savorthemanylavors
of Japan, from sushi to
Kobe beef, and take
in the bustling, worldfamousTsukijiish
market.
·
Experience the
highlights of traditional
Japanese architecture
throughout the country,
including Himeji’s
White Heron Castle
(considered one of the
most beautiful in Japan)
andtheiconicloating
torii gate at Itsukushima
Shrine.
ART & DESIGN
The Architecture of Japan
From Ancient to Contemporary, Featuring the Islands of Naoshima and Teshima
Itinerary 11 Days
Departs May 13, 2019
Travelers: 25
The architecture of Japan is a fascinating marriage of old and new, of ancient tradition and futuristic vision. See
the design wonders of this alluring land on this expedition of a lifetime. Among the iconic structures you’ll see:
Nakagin Capsule Tower, 21_21 Design Sight, Tod’s Omotesando Building, the Itsukushima Shrine, the White Heron
Castle and the temples of Kyoto. Led by Los Angeles Times culture writer Carolina Miranda, this 11-day journey will also
feature some of Japan’s best cuisine, including Kobe beef and the most authentic sushi experiences in the world.
CRUISES & TRAINS
ART & DESIGN
HISTORY & POLITICS
Swiss Mountains and
Italian Lakes
Cuban Chrome
Egyptian Perspectives:
Ancient to Present
A Journey by Rail
Itinerary 10 Days
Departs July 1, 2019
Departs Aug. 12, 2019
Travelers: 25
Awe-inspiring peaks and the romance
of traveling by rail come together in a
brilliantly curated journey of Switzerland and
northern Italy. Join L.A. Times columnist Chris
Erskine for 10 spectacular days riding the rails
Itinerary 6 Days
Departs Nov. 6, 2019
Travelers: 25
From
Ernest
Hemingway’s
1955
Itinerary 11 Days
Departs Nov. 11, 2019
Travelers: 25
Chrysler to Cuba’s famed 1905 (yes,
The Great Pyramid of Giza ranks high
’05) Cadillac, Cuba’s antique cars survive
on most travelers’ bucket lists. But
through the industriousness and passion of
Egypt offers so much more: the ancient temples
the Cuban people. Meet members of A Lo
of Abu Simbel. Luxor. The rescued Philae
Cubano Car Club of “Cuban Chrome” TV
Temple honoring Isis. Los Angeles Times
series fame on a tour led by Times automotive
managing editor Scott Kraft, an Egyptologist
writer Charles Fleming.
guide and guest speakers give you a view of
and taking in sights you’ll never forget.
BOOK NOW | 855.890.5298 (7 a.m.-5 p.m. PT M-F)
View all our expeditions at LATexpeditions.com
Egyptyouwon’tindanywhereelse.
PS2
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2019
LOS ANGELES TIMES
LOS ANGELES TIMES
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2019
PS3
PS4
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2019
3
LOS ANGELES TIMES
GOLDEN GLOBE® NOMINATIONS
INCLUDING
BEST TELEVISION LIMITED SERIES
so ENTHRALLING”
“
THE ATLANTIC
“
BEAUTIFUL WRITING...
laser-sharp editing ”
VOX
“
MESMERIZING...
meticulously constructed
”
“
THE NEW YORK TIMES
DAZZLING...
shrewdly constructed and coolly elegant ”
VARIETY
“
BRILLIANTLY DIRECTED
by Jean-Marc Vallée ”
THE BOSTON GLOBE
“Patricia
“ Amy Adams
OUTSTANDING”
Clarkson is simply
GREAT AT EVERY TURN
is
SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE
”
CHICAGO SUN-TIMES
“
HYPNOTICALLY
compelling ”
MASHABLE
THE A.V. CLUB
“
EXQUISITE ”
INDIEWIRE
“ PHENOMENAL
PERFORMANCES
by Amy Adams and Patricia Clarkson”
LOS ANGELES TIMES
“
FASCINATING...
haunting and riveting ”
THE HOLLYWOOD REPORTER
“
AMAZING ”
ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY
LOS ANGELES TIMES
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2019
FOR YOUR CONSIDERATION
3 GOLDEN GLOBE
®
AWARDS
NOMINATIONS
BEST TELEVISION
LIMITED SERIES
OR TV MOVIE
Best Performance by an Actress
in a Limited Series or Motion
Picture Made for Television
AMY ADAMS
Best Performance by an Actress
in a Supporting Role in a Series,
Limited Series or Motion Picture
Made for Television
PATRICIA CLARKSON
2 SAG AWARDS
®
NOMINATIONS
Outstanding Performance by a
Female Actor in a Television Movie
or Limited Series
AMY ADAMS
Outstanding Performance by a
Female Actor in a Television Movie
or Limited Series
PATRICIA CLARKSON
4 CRITICS’
CHOICE AWARDS
NOMINATIONS
BEST LIMITED
SERIES
Best Actress in a Limited Series or
Movie Made for Television
AMY ADAMS
Best Supporting Actress in a Limited
Series or Movie Made forTelevision
PATRICIA CLARKSON
ELIZABETH PERKINS
WGA AWARDS
NOMINATION
Long Form Adapted—Television
ARIELLA BLEJER, SCOTT BROWN,
VINCE CALANDRA, GILLIAN FLYNN,
DAWN KAMOCHE, ALEX METCALF,
MARTI NOXON
©2019 Home Box Ofice, Inc. All rights reserved. HBO® and related channels and service marks are the property of Home Box Ofice, Inc.
PS1
Документ
Категория
Журналы и газеты
Просмотров
1
Размер файла
38 065 Кб
Теги
Los Angeles Times
1/--страниц
Пожаловаться на содержимое документа