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Professional Photographer January 2019

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PROFESSIONAL PHOTOGRAPHER • JANUARY 2019
P.24 FEAR LESS
Leverage the scare
P.34
CORD FREE
Location lighting
P.45 CLEAR CUT
2019 Diamond Photographers
PROFESSIONAL PHOTOGRAPHERS OF AMERICA INC.
SMOOTH SAILING AHEAD
©VICENS FORNS
VOL. 146 • NO. 2480
FLUID
JANUARY 2019
Going Beyond the Camera
Why we are your printing partner in success
At WHCC, we’re committed to helping your business thrive. We understand the importance of selling your clients on the value
of investing in photographic art. That’s why we provide a wide selection of innovative products and helpful resources that go
beyond the camera, so you can inspire your clients, sell more, and grow your business.
See all of our latest product ideas + resources at whcc.com/partner
CONTENTS | JANUARY 2019
ppmag.com
©KIMBERLY J. SMITH
©JORDAN MATTER
4
16
PPM AG.COM
45 Clear cut
2019 Diamond
Photographers
By Amanda Arnold
On ppmag.com
DEPARTMENTS
SPECIAL FEATURE
IN EVERY ISSUE
8
14
18
74
74
Editor’s note
Giveaway
On the cover
President’s message
Perspective
82 Final frame
FOREGROUND
11 Hypothetical feast
12 Groundbreaking PPA research
14 Lifting up teens
16 Tiny dancers
SUCCESS
23 Infographic: Cultural currency
24 Befriending fear
By Eric Minton
THE GOODS
29 The horizon looks bright:
Zeiss ZX1 camera
30 First look: Fujifilm GFX 50R
By Don Chick
34 Pro review:
Interfit Badger Unleashed TTL/HSS
By Betsy Finn
38 Pro Review: Sigma 105mm
F1.4 DG HSM Art lens
By Ellis Vener
From the Imaging USA experts
FIND THIS AND MORE ON OUR HOME PAGE
Put business first
ppmag.com/business-first
Work a wedding like an all-star
ppmag.com/all-star-wedding
Gallery: Diamond Photographers of 2019
ppmag.com/2019-diamonds
Opportunities in disruption
ppmag.com/disruption
Cinematic lighting creates realism
ppmag.com/lighting-for-sales
Questions lead to sales
ppmag.com/questions-to-sales
5 tips for boudoir sessions
ppmag.com/boudoir-tips
In-person sales ignited the
Marinos’ business
ppmag.com/marinos
High-end lighting for school
photographers
ppmag.com/school-lighting
Enter to win a Tiffen Steadicam
Air 15 monopod
ppmag.com/win
Professional Photographer (ISSN 1528-5286) is published monthly for $27 per year (U.S. rate) by PPA Publications and Events, Inc., 229 Peachtree Street, NE, Ste. 2300, Atlanta, GA 30303-1608.
Periodicals postage paid at Atlanta, Ga., and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Professional Photographer magazine, P.O. Box 7126, St. Paul, MN 55107.
PROFE S SION A L PHOTOGR A PHER | JANUARY 2019
5
PROFESSIONAL PHOTOGRAPHERS OF AMERICA
229 PEACHTREE STREET NE, SUITE 2300
ATLANTA, GA 30303-1608
404.522.8600 • PPA.COM
Professional Photographer is the official journal
of Professional Photographers of America
Director of Publications
Jane Gaboury
jgaboury@ppa.com
Senior Editor
Joan Sherwood
jsherwood@ppa.com
Associate Editor
Amanda Arnold
aarnold@ppa.com
Art Director/
Production Manager
Debbie Todd
dtodd@ppa.com
Editor-at-Large
Jeff Kent
jkent@ppa.com
Contributing Editors
Don Chick & Ellis Vener
Director of Sales
& Strategic Alliances
Wayne Jones
(404) 522-8600, x248
wjones@ppa.com
East Regional Sales Manager
Marina Anderson
(937) 902-8217
manderson@ppa.com
EDITORIAL OFFICES
Professional Photographer
229 Peachtree Street NE
Suite 2300
Atlanta, GA 30303-1608 U.S.A.
(404) 522-8600
SUBSCRIPTIONS
Professional Photographer
P.O. Box 7126
St. Paul, MN 55107
(800) 742-7468
subscriptions@ppa.com
TO RENEW OR SUBSCRIBE
ppmag.com/subscribe
(800) 742-7468
PPA MEMBER SERVICES
Professional Photographers
of America
(800) 786-6277
csc@ppa.com, ppa.com
Periodicals postage paid in Atlanta,
Ga., and additional mailing offices.
POSTMASTER
Send address changes to
Professional Photographer
P.O. Box 7126
St. Paul, MN 55107
West Regional Sales Manager
Brian Sisco
(404) 522-8600, x230
bsisco@ppa.com
Advertising Services Manager
Leanne Bradley
lbradley@ppa.com
Advertising Services Coordinator
Curistan Neal
cneal@ppa.com
PPA BOARD OF DIRECTORS
PPA STAFF
President
*Stephen Thetford
M.Photog.Cr., CPP
sthetford@ppa.com
Chief Executive Officer
David Trust, CAE
trustd@ppa.com
Vice President
*Audrey L. Wancket
M.Photog.Cr., CPP
awancket@ppa.com
Treasurer
*Gregory Daniel
M.Photog.Cr., CPP, F-ASP
gdaniel@ppa.com
Chief Financial Officer
Chief Operating Officer
Scott Kurkian, CAE
skurkian@ppa.com
Director of Certification
Julia Boyd, CAE
jboyd@ppa.com
Director of Events
Fiona Corbett, CMP
fcorbett@ppa.com
Chairman of the Board
*Rob Behm
M.Photog.Hon.M.Photog.Cr., CPP Director of Publications
Jane Gaboury
rbehm@ppa.com
jgaboury@ppa.com
Directors
Director of Membership
Mary Fisk-Taylor
Kristen Hartman, CAE
M.Photog.Cr., CPP, ABI, API
khartman@ppa.com
mfisktaylor@ppa.com
Barbara Bovat
Cr.Photog.
bbovat@ppa.com
Jeffrey Dachowski
M.Photog.Cr., CPP
jdachowski@ppa.com
Clark Marten
M.Photog.Cr., CPP
cmarten@ppa.com
Director of Sales and
Strategic Alliances
Wayne Jones
wjones@ppa.com
Director of Education
Angela Kurkian
M.Photog.Cr., CPP
akurkian@ppa.com
Steve Kozak
M.Photog.Cr., CPP
skozak@ppa.com
Director of Information
Technology
and Administration
Scott Morgan
smorgan@ppa.com
Kira Derryberry
M.Photog.Cr., CPP
kderryberry@ppa.com
Director of Human Resources
Wilda Oken
woken@ppa.com
Mark Campbell
M.Photog.Cr., CPP, API
mcampbell@ppa.com
Director of Marketing and
Communications
Carla Plouin
cplouin@ppa.com
Allison English Watkins
M.Photog.Cr., CPP
awatkins@ppa.com
Industry Advisor
Michael Hanline
mhanline@ppa.com
Executive Assistant
Carol Espinal
cespinal@ppa.com
*Executive Committee
of the Board
Professional Photographer, official journal of the Professional Photographers of America Inc., is the oldest exclusively professional photographic publication in the
Western Hemisphere (founded 1907 by Charles Abel, Hon.M.Photog.), incorporating Abel’s Photographic Weekly, St. Louis & Canadian Photographer, The
Commercial Photographer, The National Photographer, Professional Photographer, and Professional Photographer Storytellers.
Opinions expressed by Professional Photographer or any of its authors do not necessarily reflect positions of Professional Photographers of America, Inc.
Acceptance of advertising does not carry with it endorsement by the publisher.
Copyright 2019, PPA Publications & Events, Inc. Printed in U.S.A.
6
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© 2018 FUJIFILM
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and its affiliates.
All rights©
reserved.
DON’T LOOK NOW
EDITOR’S NOTE
LEADING LINES
WATCH WHERE YOU’RE GOING
If you’re a motorcycle driver or a bicycle rider, you’re well aware of the phenomenon known as target fixation: Look intently at something and that’s where
you’re going to go. You notice, say, a pothole straight ahead in the road, and
you say to yourself, Avoid the pothole. Just as you’re congratulating yourself
for having seen the pothole—
CLUNK—you’ve driven right
It’s never too soon (or too late)
through it. Because although
to have a great year.
you told yourself to avoid it,
you stared at it and so you
steered toward it. This is why,
when I ride my bike on the greenway, I no longer call out to the tots on their bikes
“On your left” as I get ready to pass them. When I did, they invariably looked left
toward the sound of my voice, steered directly into my path, and came close to
launching us both into the air.
Target fixation happens when we’re driving our cars, too. It’s not as pronounced because a car’s steering is less sensitive to fine body movements, but
it’s cited as the reason so many police cars that are pulled off on the shoulder of
the road are hit by motorists. Those flashing blue lights are like a magnet for our
eyes. BOOM!
How does one avoid target fixation? Don’t look where don’t want to go. If you’re
driving any kind of vehicle and see an obstruction, look at it with your peripheral
vision only and concentrate your focus beyond the problem at hand.
Come to think of it, that’s sound advice for entrepreneurs as well: Don’t look
where you don’t want to go. If your goal is to have a profitable, sustainable, and
personally satisfying business, don’t fixate on all the potential problems you’re
inevitably going to encounter. Direct your gaze and your energy toward your true
destination.
You’re going to read and hear a lot about “the gap” from PPA in the coming
months. Bridging the gap between photographers and consumers is an issue that
we very much believe has the potential to help photographer entrepreneurs more
than any other benefit PPA could provide. Bridging the gap means uncovering
data you can use to understand consumer expectations (however irrational or
unwarranted you believe them to be). It means understanding your market space.
It means valuing your time. It means keeping a positive, can-do attitude. It means
identifying your strengths and weaknesses. It means keeping your focus forward,
and not looking where you don’t want to go.
It’s never too soon (or too late) to have a great year. Hope to see you at Imaging
USA in Atlanta this month, where we’ve got an amazing slate of gap speakers
along with our reliably spectacular programming on photographic techniques
and business topics. We’ve even booked two very special gap-related keynote
speakers for you. They’re going to blow you away with ideas you can use right
away in 2019. If you can’t make it to Atlanta, no worries; we’ve got tons of gap
education coming down the pipeline for you via print and online. •
u
©EDDIE TAPP
COMING NEXT MONTH
High-flying weddings
Jay Philbrick keeps us on the edge of our seats
©JAY PHILBRICK
Entrepreneur
Business owners have to get comfortable with risk
Game changer
The new Canon R system rewrites the rules
STAY IN TOUCH
editors@ppa.com
twitter.com/ppmagazine
facebook.com/ppmagazine
pinterest.com/ppmagazine
Jane Gaboury
instagram.com/professionalphotographer_mag
8
Director of Publications
PPM AG.COM
Your photography
& business online
learning center is here!
You’ll find hundreds of programs for
photographers, by photographers
to help you earn more, do more
& Be More!
PPA.com/EDU
FOREGROUND
by Amanda Arnold
HYPOTHETICAL FEAST
SERIES ENVISIONS ARTISTS’ MEALS
Oysters and beef for breakfast? That was
Walt Whitman’s way, discovered photographer Michelle Gerard while conducting
research for her series “The Artist Diet,”
a personal project that reimagines the eating habits of renowned creatives throughout history.
To come up with this composition, “I studied any photo I could find of Whitman, his
home, and his desk,” she says. “While it
was unrealistic to get entirely periodappropriate items, I did ensure a few key
props such as the pewter plates, amber
inkwell, and the desktop itself were a fairly close match to Whitman’s personal items.
I also found some high-res images with
Whitman’s own writing to add to the photo.”
The photo was made with a Canon EOS 5D
Mark IV camera and a Canon EF 50mm
f/1.2L USM lens, and was illuminated by
sunlight filtered through a glass block window.
©MICHELLE GERARD
PROFE S SION A L PHOTOGR A PHER | JANUARY 2019
11
GROUNDBREAKING PPA RESEARCH
FOREGROUND
TOP OF MIND
STUDY WILL HELP YOU ORIENT YOUR BUSINESS TO CONSUMER NEEDS
the ever-changing expectations of clients
and how to address consumer needs. It addresses such topics as the importance of establishing a professional vision, valuing your
time, overcoming the fear of failure, and the
importance of taking responsibility for business growth regardless of outside forces.
Research from the new study will be unveiled at Imaging USA by PPA CFO Scott
Kurkian, and the full report and analysis will
be available to members in the weeks following. The study, which surveyed over 1,000
consumers by gender, race, age group, and
geographic region, is the first in a number
of studies to come from PPA over the next
couple of years. “Consumer research is our
biggest initiative right now,” says Kurkian.
New PPA research will allow members to start bridging the gap between themselves and consumers by
better understanding how purchasing decisions are made and what’s important to buyers.
u
What’s more important to consumers—
the quality of your photos or how easy you
are to work with? How soon do they expect
to receive images after a session? Are they
searching Google for a local photographer,
or are they asking friends and family for recommendations?
Until now, the answers to these questions
were anyone’s guess. But PPA’s new Consumer Photography Buyers Study, conducted
for the association by a third party, will finally provide reliable data revealing consumer
perceptions of and expectations for professional photography.
“One of the things that is lacking anywhere
in this industry is an actual understanding
about what consumers think about professional photography,” says PPA CEO David
Trust. With consumers’ true perceptions and
desires shrouded in mystery, it’s been difficult-
12
for photographers to bridge the gap between
what their business offers and what consumers expect. “This gap is the single biggest
threat to professional photography,” he notes.
Consumers continue to spend discretionary household income in every category. “So
why not on photography?” Trust asks. “It is
PPA’s job to help photographers, to prepare
them, to give them the armor and the arrows
in their quiver to get out there and compete.”
The new research data, along with PPA’s
gap education via Imaging USA, other
events, videos, and Professional Photographer, will teach photographers how to orient
their business toward contemporary consumer demands.
Distinct from the traditional business education long offered by PPA, new gap content
provided by the association focuses on educating photographer entrepreneurs about
TESTING OUR METTLE
“Some of this is going to be tough love, bitter medicine to take,” warns Kurkian of the
study’s results, “because we are asking in
very straightforward terms what consumers
think about professional photography.”
For example, preliminary data shows
more consumers select photographers based
on how easy they are to work with than by
the quality of their photographs or the depth
of their photographic knowledge, which will
no doubt disappoint some seasoned pros.
“There is a disconnect between most
professional photographers and their consumers, and we are going to find out things
about consumers—why they purchase and
what they want to purchase—that will require some humility on our part and adjusting our business models,” Trust says.
But having concrete consumer data to
analyze will bring photographers closer
to their market. “I think the success of any
business depends on its ability to step back
from the emotional part of the business and
look at what the consumer is trying to tell
us,” says Kurkian. “The businesses that do
that, that actually listen to their consumer,
are the businesses that have financial success. And the ones that don’t are typically the
ones that struggle or even fail. That is why
we are doing this research.” •
PPM AG.COM
LIFTING UP TEENS
FOREGROUND
TOP OF MIND
ANTI-BULLYING BILLBOARDS GET ATTENTION
IMAGES ©CARA JONAS
u Seniors portrait photographer Cara Jonas
wanted to use her skills to benefit her community. So when she noted that teen clients
and their parents commonly mentioned bullying as a concern, she launched into action
with an anti-bullying campaign incorporating teen ambassadors and billboards. She
produced the project in conjunction with
October’s World Day of Bullying Prevention.
THE AMBASSADORS: Jonas approached
clients, schools, friends, and colleagues to
find ideal teens to represent anti-bullying.
Thanks to the popularity of this year’s campaign among teens in her community, next
year she plans to have interested students
apply with a written recommendation from
a school counselor.
THE BILLBOARDS: When she approached
the billboard company for the campaign,
they suggested four digital billboards, which
meant Jonas could make individual portraits
of each ambassador and have those portraits
rotate throughout each day. Next year she’s
aiming for 12 digital billboard locations to
accommodate even more teen ambassadors.
MOVIE REVEAL: During her sessions, Jonas took video of the ambassadors talking
about their passion for the campaign, which
she then used to create a reveal movie incorporating both still photography and humorous outtakes. A local movie theater donated their space for a showing of the film to
the ambassadors, friends, and family. “They
were all stars for the day,” Jonas says. “We
had about 100 people.”
RAMPING UP: The campaign’s popularity
with students, parents, and school counselors has inspired Jonas to enhance the program. She’s planning for anti-bullying speaker events and bullying-free social events for
teens. She’s even applying for nonprofit status
for the program. “I went into this thinking
this is a great community thing and a marketing outreach program for the studio,” she
says. But it’s so much more than that. “I am
rewarded every day in my heart and soul.” •
JANUARY GIVEAWAY:
TIFFEN STEADICAM AIR 15 MONOPOD
u The Tiffen Steadicam Air 15 makes working with a monopod easy and versatile. Designed to hold
up 15 pounds of gear, the Steadicam Air 15 features 100 percent gas lift and spring-activated
height adjustment that you can employ with a foot pedal. It enables full 360-degree
rotation and extends to 62.5 inches. A $399 value
tiffen.com
WIN A TIFFEN STEADICAM AIR 15 MONOPOD
ENTER TODAY: PPMAG.COM/WIN
14
PPM AG.COM
Nikon is a registered trademark of Nikon Corporation. ©2018 Nikon Inc.
* For compatibility details with the new optional adapter, please visit nikonusa.com/mirrorless
M I R R O R L E S S
R E I N V E N T E D
Finally, a full-frame mirrorless camera with the optical excellence you’ve come
to expect from Nikon. With precision optics, reliability and intuitive design,
the new Z 7 is the first mirrorless that feels and acts like a Nikon camera.
Its revolutionary new mount lets in more light than ever before, opening
the door to groundbreaking new lens designs and boundless imaging
possibilities. Take spectacular stills and 4K UHD video with the new NIKKOR
Z lenses, or use approximately 360 NIKKOR® lenses with the new adapter.*
Behold a future full of creative possibility with mirrorless, reinvented by Nikon.
4 5 . 7 M P | 6 4 –2 5 , 6 0 0 I S O | 49 3 P D A F S YS T E M | U P TO 9 F P S |
4K UHD FULL-FRAME VIDEO | QUAD VGA ELECTRONIC VIEWFINDER
N I KO N U S A .CO M /M I R RO R L E S S
TINY DANCERS
FOREGROUND
TOP OF MIND
PHOTOBOOK TELLS CHILDHOOD’S MANY STORIES
IMAGES ©JORDAN MATTER
u After his 2012 New York Times best-
selling book “Dancers Among Us” struck
a chord, Jordan Matter knew he wanted
a follow-up. But it wasn’t until his young
daughter hit an arabesque while shoveling snow that he had his theme: dancing
through childhood.
“Born to Dance” (Workman Publishing)
is about more than clean lines and perfected form, though. “It gave me the opportunity to show the depth of childhood and document as many childhood experiences as
possible,” he says. Each photo of a child
dancer tells a relatable, often poignant
story about the struggles and joys of grow16
ing up. “It’s not just about ice cream and
sleepovers. It’s also about bullying and
trying to fit in, first crushes and first loves,
[growing] from children to adolescents.”
One of the first realizations Matter
had when he began making the series
is that children are never alone, so they
shouldn’t be alone in his images. That
changed up his compositions for the better, he says.
“Ninety-nine percent of the time they
were off-the-cuff,” he says. For example,
for one composition he envisioned his
subject performing an arabesque while
scrambling eggs. But when that com-
position felt blah,
he enlisted his son
to dirty the kitchen
with flour and Nutella handprints, his
chocolate-splattered
daughter to perch on the counter, and the
dancer to perform her arabesque atop a
pot on the floor.
“The point is, we moved from clean
kitchen to complete destruction and chaos, but it’s one of those photos that gets
a lot of laughs,” he says. “Every kid has
done that and every parent has cleaned
it up.” •
PPM AG.COM
M I R R O R L E S S
R E I N V E N T E D
ONE
HUNDREDS
ADAPTER,
OF
POSSIBILITIES
The new full-frame Z Series features a
revolutionary new adapter that lets you
shoot with approximately 360 F-mount
NIKKOR® lenses* while maintaining all of
their sharpness and image quality. This
innovative adapter also allows seamless
AF/AE control with more than 90 F-mount
NIKKOR lenses. In addition, the Z Series
provides in-camera Vibration Reduction,
even
when
attaching
non-VR
lenses.
Behold a future of creative possibility with
mirrorless, reinvented by Nikon.
PROFE S SION A L PHOTOGR A PHER | JANUARY 2019
* For compatibility details with the new optional
adapter, please visit nikonusa.com/mirrorless
Nikon is a registered trademark of Nikon Corporation.
©2018 Nikon Inc.
MERITED
IMAGES FROM THE PPA LOAN COLLECTION
LOAN COLLECTION / ©VICENS FORNS
ON THE COVER
boat inspired Vicens Forns’ “Sea of Tulle.” “I saw this abandoned boat in Point Reyes
[California] and something about its rusty parts and old wood tilted to its side attracted
me,” he says. “I envisioned the boat in the background and the bride in the front, with her
veils flowing on both sides as if they were waves of the sea, and the ship was sailing rough
waters.” Vicens Forns Photography, based on Napa, California, specializes in wedding, engagement, post-wedding, and portrait photography. vicensforns.com
LIGHTING DIAGRAM
u
The
MAIN LIGHT
Profoto B2
250 Air TTL
• CAMERA & LENS: Canon EOS-1D X Mark II, Canon EF 11-24mm f/4L USM lens
• EXPOSURE: 1/250 second at f/11, ISO 100
• LIGHTING: He used a Profoto B2 250 Air TTL positioned to the subject’s right.
• POST-CAPTURE: The image was edited in Adobe Lightroom and Adobe Photoshop
using Nik Collection Color Efex Pro filters.
ABOUT THE LOAN COLLECTION
The current Loan Collection comprises more than 600 photographs chosen by jurors of PPA’s International Photographic Competition. The compositions are considered the best of the best in contemporary professional photography, having been awarded the Loan
Collection distinction based on their success in meeting the 12 elements of a merited image. ppmag.com/12-elements
18
PPM AG.COM
The time has come to face a new reality:
There is a gap between photographers and
consumers. PPA is here to help you bridge it!
The photography industry has changed. Now, more than
ever, there’s a gap between photographers and consumers,
and it’s steadily growing as the market changes and
technology evolves.
These days, photographers are working harder for less.
They’re not realizing their true value. But you can put a stop
to this, and you don’t have to go it alone. PPA is here to help
you move forward in business with a set of marketing tools
available with your PPA membership. These tools are
designed to help photographers bridge the gap and grow
their business with confidence.
3 Marketing resources for all
working photographers:
1. Marketing Toolbox & Advertising Campaign
Too often, working photographers get so busy they forget
that marketing is a very important key to bridging the gap
with their consumers. PPA developed resources to raise
your studio’s visibility and credibility while making sales and
marketing easier with customizable promotional templates
and a listing on FindAPhotographer.com (See the list on
opposite page). Additionally, PPA invests in print and online
advertising to help spread the word about the value of
hiring professional photographers so more consumers
can understand it’s worth paying for quality
photography services.
PPA.com/MarketingTools
2. The PRINT Movement
It’s a well-known fact: Photographers who are Print
Artists make a lot more money than shoot-and-burn
photographers. That’s why working photographers
need to learn how to price and sell prints and upsell the
benefits of offering professionally-printed works.
And the PRINT Movement is here for that! This
“movement” is an awareness campaign that promotes
the value and importance of printing photographs in
our world today while teaching photographers how
to bridge that gap. It’s backed by dozens of industry
partners and helps professional photographers prosper.
Join the Movement (it’s free!) and get access to tools
that help photographers show customers the value of
print products.
PrintMovement.org
3. Videos & Webinars to help you ‘Bridge the Gap’
You might be wondering where to find ‘Bridging the
Gap’-related video content to learn faster. Good news:
you’ll find them on PPA’s Online Learning Center! There,
you’ll find the best-suited photography education with
business, technique and inspiration-video content,
developed specifically for working photographers.
PPA members have free 24/7 access to well over 1,100
video tutorials and webinars that can be streamed live
by anyone FOR FREE! Bookmark PPA’s Online Learning
Center and sign-up for the free upcoming webinars!
PPA.com/EDU
• A DV E R T I S E M E N T •
“
I integrated PPA’s tools into my marketing,
and I can honestly tell you it works. They have
brochures, side-by-side examples, and videos for
different types of photography. Check it out!
Michell Santelik
Santelik Studio
Be More Visible!
Find-A-Photographer
”
• MEMBER SINCE 2005 •
YOU can start using PPA’s sales and marketing tools right now to start
bridging the gap in your community and spread the word about the quality of
your photography.
Not every studio can afford a big marketing campaign, but your PPA
membership lets you tap into lots of marketing resources. From helping with
your sales process and justifying costs to showcasing the quality of your work
and positioning your expertise, PPA is here to help:
8 Marketing Tools From PPA Used By
Successful Photographers
These resources work for all photography specialties, but PPA has nichespecific tools for six specialties: Weddings, Families, Newborns, High
School Seniors, Pets and CPPs. Below are some easy-to-use marketing
tools that have proven to help photographers build up their brands in
their local markets:
1. Fully Customizable Sales & Print-Product Brochures: Describe and
display your skills & style in a way that clients will understand.
2. Shareable Videos: Let these emotion-charged videos sell the “why
hiring a pro matters” for you.
3. Dedicated Landing Web Pages: What’s better than a third-party
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5. Consumer Tips: This compilation of tips and FAQs will empower
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6. Photo-Style Quizzes: A fun way for people to find out their preferred
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7. Side-by-Side Comparisons: One of the best ways to show the
difference between professional versus amateur work.
8. Weekly Articles: Find tips and ideas on sales and marketing for your
studio alongside educational resources for consumers.
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SUCCESS
STRONGER BUSINESS, BETTER LIFE
CULTURAL CURRENCY
Sometimes you want to punch up your images with pop culture appeal. Stock image purveyor Shutterstock has identified trends
that speak to modern consumers. Find inspiration in the colors, patterns and themes of these modern styles.
MA
J O R T R END
NEW MINIMALISM
MA
J O R T R END
FANTASY
MA
J O R T R END
SPACE
Bold, vibrant colors and fluid lines
Mythical beasts, magical
landscapes, and the fantasy genre
Sci-fi and science fact
TR END
TR END
TR END
CACTUS
NATURAL LUXURY
DIGITAL CRAFTS
An obsession with desert culture
The ripples of agate and
swirls of marble
Old art forms recreated for
digital consumption
TR END
TR END
TR END
ANCIENT GEOMETRICS
PUNCHY PASTELS
A GLOBAL MARCH
Sweet candy colors
The future is female
Intricate patterns with origins
in diverse cultures
Source: Shutterstock 2018 Creative Trends
PROFE S SION A L PHOTOGR A PHER | JANUARY 2019
23
SUCCESS
BRIDGING THE GAP
BEFRIENDING FEAR
HARNESS WHAT SCARES YOU
Judi Holler
by Eric Minton
u He sounds like a slouch. He hangs around
Judi Holler’s home and, well, everywhere she
goes, for that matter. Cares for her and keeps
her safe but wants her under his thumb,
demanding that she vacuum or do laundry
when she should be working. And check out
his name: Fear. She should dump the guy,
right? No way. Working with fear has become
integral to Holler’s professional success.
We’re not talking about an actual physical
dude, of course. Fear is the metaphysical psychosis that occupies a portion of everyone’s
persona. Holler has created such an interac-
24
tive relationship with this distracting physiological abstraction that she’s made fear
corporeal in her imagination. “Yeah, it’s a
person, I talk to him,” she says. “The thing for
everybody to understand about making fear
my homeboy is that you turn fear into your
friend. You make space for fear, you make it
part of your life party, and you stop wasting
your precious energy trying to get rid of it.
You’ll never be able to outrun your fears.”
Holler learned to capitalize on her fears
during her time studying improv theater at
Second City in Chicago, which boosted her
into a career as a fear researcher and keynote speaker. She’s given herself the job title
chief fear boss, and she’ll be addressing the
audience at Imaging USA this month as a keynote speaker. Our interview had me in stitches; it also had me shifting my own approach
to business as a creative entrepreneur.
“A lot of business owners allow fear to
make decisions instead of making decisions
for themselves,” she says. “I prefer to be the
boss of my life, not fear. Fear, I thank you for
keeping me safe and appreciate what you do
to keep me alive, but I’m the boss.”
PPM AG.COM
RUNNING TOWARD FEAR
Holler’s experience with creative entrepreneurs (being one herself), her expertise in
identifying fear’s role, and her training in
embracing fear can gird photographers to
tackle one of their most challenging obstacles to business growth (whether they recognize it as such or not). She brings to the
table her own life lessons—“I had to work
that brave muscle,” she says of her career
moves—and she brings to the stage the personality of a Second City alum.
“A lot of business owners allow
fear to make decisions instead
of making decisions for
themselves. I prefer to be the
boss of my life, not fear. Fear,
I thank you for keeping me safe
and appreciate what you do to
keep me alive, but I’m the boss.”
The oldest of four siblings, Holler had a
lower middle-class upbringing in St. Louis
and became the only person in her immediate family to earn a college degree, a bachelor’s in communications. As Holler tended bar while seeking a job in her field, her
boss’s wife invited her to a Meeting Professionals International chapter meeting. “I was
like Bambi,” Holler says of the experience,
but she noted a woman who “looked amazing” standing alone. Though intimidated,
Holler ran what she calls her first “fear experiment” by introducing herself. Two days
later, the woman called her for an interview,
and Holler was on a career ladder in corporate sales and marketing. At 30 she moved to
Chicago and began taking classes at Second
City. A successful audition for The Second
City Conservatory led to five years studying
and performing improv with the theater and
forming an improv group with other students, calling themselves Control Alt Delete.
Holler sounds fearless, right? But she insists that nobody is fearless. “People say,
‘I don’t get afraid.’ Sure you do. To say
you have no fear is to say you are an alien.”
Second City opened her eyes to real fear.
PROFE S SION A L PHOTOGR A PHER | JANUARY 2019
SUCCESS
BRIDGING THE GAP
FEAR IS AN ASSET
“The more I did the scary thing on stage at
Second City five, six, seven nights a week,
the more I had the guts to start doing the
scary thing on the stage of my life five, six,
seven days a week. I was managing my fear
totally differently. Instead of running from it
I was inviting it into my life party, making
space for it. My improv training helped me
realize that my fear is a clear asset for the
business I’m running as CEO of me.” She
began blogging on this topic in 2013, which led
to speaking engagements, which led to another
leap of fear in 2016: leaving her corporate
job to become a full-time speaker and writer
on fear, personal branding, and balance.
Yes, she still gets stage fright. “I get scared
every time I speak in front of an audience,”
she says. “I like that. I don’t want that to ever
change. It means I respect the audience and
what I do matters.”
She explains that fear uses disguises to
manipulate people:
• IMPOSTER SYNDROME: “A collection of
feelings of inadequacy that persists despite evidence of success,” Holler says. Examples are
chronic self-doubt and a sense of “intellectual fraudulence” that could be exposed at any
time, despite your resume and experience.
• PERFECTIONISM: “There’s so much danger in always getting ready,” she says. “Perfectionism is a dangerous place, and fear
loves it.”
• PROCRASTINATION: “Procrastination is
fear’s best friend,” she says. “When you see
someone you love constantly putting something off, find out what they’re afraid of.
There’s something there, there’s a reason
they’re not doing it. Address the fear, and
then put it in place.” Procrastination’s sidekick is blame, finding fault elsewhere and
self-portraying as a victim. Holler calls such
people energy vampires, “and that’s a choice,
too. What is it you’re afraid of?”
Holler cites Steven Pressfield’s book “The
War of Art,” which she calls “mandatory
reading for all human beings, but certainly for creatives,” as she spins off a litany of
what Pressfield calls “the resistance”: fear of
letting our family down, fear of poverty, fear
of groveling, fear of looking ridiculous, fear
of death, and, of course, fear of failure. However, as Pressfield writes, “The real fear, the
26
Judy Holler has become renowned for her presentations on how people can benefit by leveraging their fears.
master fear, the mother of all fears that’s so
close to us that even when we say it we don’t
believe it, is the fear that we’ll succeed.”
TRUST YOURSELF
Holler draws parallels between the crafts of
improv and photography. As with improv,
photographers master technical skills that
better prepare them not only to adjust to unexpected situations during a photography
session but to remain in control of those situations as they develop. They can apply this same
focus in their entrepreneurial dimension.
Another parallel is in Holler’s definition
of improv: two or more people collaborating
in an environment of uncertainty with the
common goal of creating a solution. “We do
that every day,” Holler says. “You don’t wake
up with a script. Mental preparation for me
is more important than the technical craft.
Trusting yourself, trusting your team, trusting your creative abilities so you can make a
decision, balance P&L [profit and loss], and
hire people, and trusting who you hire. And
then trusting the process. How you manage
yourself and your energy on stage is the
same as managing your business.”
Trusting in one’s individuality is the most
important fear a creative should harness.
Holler loves rap music, “old-school, ’90s hiphop,” and when she started out as an entrepreneur, she was afraid customers would
find out. “I feared that people would not hire
me and take me seriously,” she says. Then
she started using that fear as a springboard,
fusing hip-hop into her work.
“What I found was, No. 1, I started having
a lot more fun. I was starting to create things
that were firing me up.” And two, “I started
attracting customers and clients that were
my people, that love the same things I do. We
have to find ways to infuse the things we love
into our work. There are a million speakers
out there just like there are a million photographers, and they have to remember that no
one has their lens and no one is them.” •
judiholler.com
Eric Minton is a writer and editor in
Washington, D.C.
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THE GOODS
PRODUCTS, TECHNOLOGY & TECHNIQUE
THE HORIZON LOOKS BRIGHT
Zeiss intends its ZX1 to become a seamless extension of your creative mind, from shooting to editing to sharing.
Start with the ergonomics of the body and a high-performance 35mm Zeiss Distagon lens. Add a quiet
leaf shutter in a mirrorless system and a full-frame 37.4-megapixel CMOS sensor.
Zeiss promises you won’t get mired in complex menus with its intuitive navigation system
that appears on a 4.3-inch display. Adobe Photoshop Lightroom CC is integrated into the camera, allowing you to process and edit raw files from anywhere.
You can even share directly from the camera and back up images to cloud storage via Wi-Fi.
And there’s a built-in 512GB SSD for generous storage capacity. The Zeiss ZX1 will be released
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zeiss.com/zx1
IMAGES COURTESY ZEISS
PROFE S SION A L PHOTOGR A PHER | JANUARY 2019
29
GRAND VIEW
THE GOODS
FIRST LOOK
FUJIFILM GFX 50R
by Don Chick, M.Photog.Cr., CPP
I recently had the opportunity to have hands-on experience with
a pre-production model of the Fujifi lm GFX 50R 51.4-megapixel
medium-format rangefi nder-style camera. Along with the body I
received three Fujinon lenses: a GF23mmF4 R LM WR (approximately equivalent to an 18mm in 35mm format), a GF32-64mmF4
R LM WR (a 25-50mm equivalent) and a GF110mmF2 LM WR (an
85mm equivalent). These all range between $2,300 and $2,800 at
full retail price.
Because this was a pre-production model, I’m reporting on
my general user experience with the design and functions. I had
great fun working with this camera and was impressed with the
results. One of my favorite features is the size of the viewfi nder. I
remember the days when I was accustomed to looking through medium-format fi lm cameras and then switched
over to 35mm digital cameras—the reduction of viewing area was significant. This
new Fujifi lm GFX 50R is a delight to look
through, taking me back to that roomy
viewfi nder experience.
In my fi rst foray out with the camera
I paid attention to the scenes and the un-
u
IMAGES ©DON CHICK
This dramatic, high-contrast scene was photographed using the Fujinon GF110mmF2 lens and converted to black-and-white with Topaz Labs B&W Effects.
30
PPM AG.COM
folding light along my drive. I loved a simple image of fall foliage (below) and the soft quality and dreaminess of the bokeh
that the GF110mmF2 lens produced. Having worked with 10and 25-megapixel cameras for many years, the resolution of the
50-megapixel capture amazed me. When I zoomed in I could still
see detail in the veins of the leaves in a tiny portion of the image
(inset below).
Along with the resolution capability, the Fujifilm GFX 50R can
handle a strongly backlit scene. On close examination of an image
of a dew-soaked tree and the rising sun (page 32) I was amazed to
see essentially no color fringing. I was able to get a dramatic image with strong visual impact and no chromatic aberration. And
because the camera is mirrorless, looking through the viewfinder means you’re looking at an electronic monitor, not through the
optics of the lens. This will save your eyes if you accidentally point
your lens too close to the sun.
The autofocus feature was accurate, quick, and responsive. I
prefer using the single-point focus option because it trains on the
exact spot I want instead of having the camera assume which portion of the frame is most important to me.
For this photograph, the camera was tripod-mounted and set at 1/25 second
at f/4, ISO 250. Inset: With its 50-megapixel resolution, the GFX can reveal
detail in the veins of the leaves in this .0045 portion of the full image.
PROFE S SION A L PHOTOGR A PHER | JANUARY 2019
THE GOODS
FIRST LOOK
The standard ISO range is 100 to 12,800 with an extended range
of 50 to 102,400. Yes, ISO 102,400 has a lot of noise; however, it will
allow you to get images you would not otherwise be able to obtain.
The LCD monitor on the back of the camera moves in two directions, up or down, which is helpful when you’re photographing in
landscape orientation holding the camera overhead or down low.
In a portrait orientation you won’t have the same advantage.
While I enjoyed capturing images with the camera handheld
and tripod mounted, I did take issue with the ergonomic design.
I have large hands and found it difficult to hold onto the camera
(3.5 pounds with the 23mm lens) for extended lengths of time.
I think it would feel better with more grip in the front.
There are quite a few buttons on the back and many menu options for the various settings, so users will want to set aside time
to practice and get familiar with everything. You really don’t want
to get in the field and be expected to produce images only to find
yourself hunting for a particular setting.
At $4,500 for the body, this is a serious financial commitment,
but if you plan to make large prints it offers a serious advantage in
image capture size as well as image quality. •
This dew-soaked tree is strongly backlit from the rising sun. When I zoomed in on areas of the file in Photoshop, there was no chromatic aberration.
32
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THE GOODS
PRO REVIEW
INTERFIT BADGER UNLEASHED TTL/HSS
by Betsy Finn, M.Photog.Cr.
IMAGES ©BETSY FINN
34
I’m always on the lookout for products that
offer an innovative solution to common
problems. For instance, we all want studio
quality light when we’re on location, but
no one wants the hassle of cords and extra weight. I take a studio strobe and external battery pack with me on all location
sessions, so when I heard about the Badger Unleashed TTL/HSS 250Ws wireless
strobe, I was intrigued.
Before my first trial run, I fully charged
the batteries, which takes 90 minutes. I put
the batteries into the Badger Unleashed
units, turned them on to make sure they
worked, and tested them with a client a few
hours later. If you know how to use studio
lights, you won’t have much of a learning
curve, at least with the lights on manual
mode. I completed two studio sessions on
one charge with plenty of battery power left
to spare. (The specs claim 430 full-power
flashes per charge).
The lights have a 9-stop power range,
and the power can be adjusted from 250
watt-seconds (Ws) down to 1Ws in 1/10-stop
increments. The maximum sync speed in
HSS mode is 1/8,000 second (normal sync
mode maxes out at 1/250 second), and the
recycle time is 1.5 seconds at full power.
That’s a little slower than my corded studio
lights but reasonable for a battery-powered
flash. The Badger Unleashed has a 15-watt
daylight-balanced LED modeling light that
you can use as a continuous light source.
It maxes out at 1,250 lumens and can be
adjusted proportionally to your flash power
settings.
The Badger Unleashed uses a Bowens
S-Type mount for modifiers. There’s also
an umbrella receiver if you prefer. I didn’t
have any compatible light modifiers, so Interfit sent along two soft boxes for the review. It was reasonably easy to attach the
modifiers, even given my unfamiliarity
with the S-Type mount.
In keeping with a cord-free goal, the Badger Unleashed is compatible with all Interfit TTL and manual remotes. So, if you’re
new to the Interfit product family, make
sure to budget accordingly. TTL remotes
are available for Canon, Nikon, and Sony,
and a manual mode remote is available for
other brands. The flash unit can be used
u
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For this location portrait I used the Badger Unleashed in manual mode at full power, modified with
a 48-inch octabox.
with a PC-Sync cord, but that defeats the
purpose of being cordless, right? It’s worth
noting that when Interfit’s second-generation remotes are released later this year,
the Badger Unleashed will be able to function in stroboscopic mode—that’s up to 90
flashes at 99Hz, according to the manual.
My fi rst few trial runs with the Badger
Unleashed were done in manual mode, and
PROFE S SION A L PHOTOGR A PHER | JANUARY 2019
I had no problems whatsoever. The images
were well exposed except for the few times
I took a second picture before the flash had
recycled.
When I was ready to give the TTL and
HSS a shot, I switched modes on the Badger
Unleashed. Being able to use high-speed
sync was amazing. I fully enjoyed capturing images of my clients playing on a swing
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Images © Danny Dong
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This portrait was lit using the Badger Unleashed
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set with a faster shutter speed than regular
studio strobes could handle. After my clients left, I kept going, having fun creating
a series of test shots to see what the Badger Unleashed could do. During this phase
I discovered that you can shoot in manual
mode with or without HSS, and the same is
possible in TTL mode as well.
Overall it was a pleasure to use the Badger Unleashed lights, and I was a little
sad to send them back. It was refreshing
to use a lightweight, portable flash setup
that could deliver consistent, professional
results. The learning curve on these lights
is negligible, and the charge time is fantastic. I had no issues creating quality images
on the fly whether I used the Badger Unleashed in TTL or manual mode.
The Badger Unleashed flash unit is
only 5x5x7 inches and includes a drop-in
lithium-ion battery that charges in less
than two hours, has high-speed sync and
TTL capabilities, and weighs less than 4
pounds. The Interfit Badger Unleashed
TTL/HSS retails for $349.99. Spare batteries are available for $59.99, and remotes
range from $79.99 to $99.99. •
Betsy Finn, is a portrait artist in Michigan.
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COURTESY SIGMA
THE GOODS
PRO REVIEW
Photographed at f/2, this images shows the sharp light pole silhouetted
against a dreamy bokeh sky. This is due to a complex asymmetric optical
design, which contributes to the heft and size of the lens.
FOR THE LOVE OF BOKEH
SIGMA 105MM F1.4 DG HSM ART LENS
by Ellis Vener
The Sigma Photo 105mm F1.4 DG HSM Art
lens is part of the company’s Global Vision
line of Art, Sport, and Contemporary lenses.
It is a solidly constructed, large-aperture,
large-bodied (for its focal length) autofocus
lens designed for full-format (24x36mm)
cameras. And like the other Sigma Art lenses, it delivers superb optical performance
at a reasonable price. One thing about Sigma’s Art series lenses is that they make you
feel as if the people who make them truly
u
PROS
CONS
• Large maximum aperture
• Weight
• Extremely sharp
• Size
• Excellent correction for optical
abberations and vignetting
• Autofocus speed
• Available in a variety of lens mounts
• Tripod mount with Arca-Swiss quickrelease foot and 1/4-20 tripod thread
• Competitive price
38
love producing great lenses.
Even for a large-aperture short telephoto, this is one big, heavy lens. It boasts a
4.6-inch diameter and a 5.2-inch length,
and weighs in at 53.72 ounces without the
included removable rotating tripod mount
(61.83 ounces with mount). Much appreciated is Sigma’s tripod mount foot that incorporates an Arca-Swiss quick-release
plate. Despite the weight and the lack of
an internal optical stabilization system,
it’s easily hand-holdable when used with a
Canon EOS 5DS.
Sigma calls this lens Bokeh Master. True to
the nickname, it renders out-of-focus areas
as pleasingly soft-edged shapes. What impresses me more is how gently the lens produces transitions from crisp focus to out-offocus areas in front of and behind the plane
of focus. This is especially evident with portraits. This is how the lens earns its nickname. Performance at f/1.4 is great and improves as you stop down to about f/9. Below
f/9 there is slight but progressive falloff in
acuity, but unless you spend your days photographing resolution targets and brick walls
and then pixel-peep to see the differences between frames made at different apertures,
you’d have to look really hard to see the falloff in sharpness. Likewise, the lens flare and
glare suppression as well as micro-contrast
transitions are worthy of superlatives.
Getting light to behave that way requires
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around 17 large-diameter elements arranged in 12 groups, the lens is optimized to
maximize acuity, minimize optical aberrations, and geometric distortions and to
minimize falloff in illumination, contrast,
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to f/16 and consists of nine overlapping
curved blades. The lens takes 105mm filters.
The one downside of the lens is that autofocus is not particularly swift. It’s not slow,
but this isn’t a lens I’d choose for swift and
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The gentle transition from crisp focus to areas out
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erratically moving subjects. Otherwise
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speeds at lower ISOs and low light work.
The street price for the 105mm F1.4 DG
HSM Art lens was $1,599 for Canon EF,
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move to compete with Sony in the fullframe mirrorless camera market, we’re
very likely at the final peak of lenses designed for the venerable single lens reflex
camera type. Digital SLRs are far from
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MOLIGHT
MICHAEL MOWBRAY, M.PHOTOG.CR., MOLIGHT OWNER,
PRESIDENT OF MJM GLOBAL INTERPRISES INC.
Q: WHAT IS MOLIGHT AND WHAT MAKES IT DIFFERENT?
A: MoLight is a leading independent reseller of innovative
Godox flashes and my own propriety line of modifiers. I
started MoLight almost four years ago when I saw a gap in
the marketplace for a retailer that could provide high-end
service and affordable lighting products. You can purchase
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Q: YOU MENTIONED SERVICE AND SUPPORT. TELL US MORE ABOUT THAT.
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On that note, I am also big on education. I enjoy teaching,
and interacting with customers who have questions or chal-
42
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makes me different from big box retailers: in-depth knowledge and rapid, responsive, personalized service. And with
all of that I’m still active as a professional photographer.
Q: GODOX HAS GOTTEN VERY POPULAR IN THE PAST FEW YEARS.
WHY IS THAT?
A: Value. Godox and MoLight together provide a tremendous
amount of value for the investment. Innovation and ease
of use is right up there as well. Godox keeps introducing
fantastic new flashes that take the market by storm. For
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is only $299. The AD200 has interchangeable Fresnel and
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It offers high-speed sync, TTL and manual settings, and an
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integrated radio receiver that allows you to remotely change
the settings and trigger the flash. In fact, all of the flashes I
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and they all work together. That is innovation and value.
Q: DO YOU OFFER ANYTHING BESIDES GODOX FLASHES?
A: Yes! I’ve worked with several suppliers to create a lineup
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PROFE S SION A L PHOTOGR A PHER | JANUARY 2019
size from a 22-inch square to a 48-inch octabox to a 1x5foot stripbox … all with grids included.
Q: WHAT DOES THE FUTURE HOLD FOR MOLIGHT?
A: Growth and innovation. I’m always looking to bring in new
products that will help photographers create and shape light
easily and affordably.
43
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2019 DIAMOND PHOTOGRAPHERS
» Whether it’s the stunning realism of a Roman cityscape or the remarkable
surrealism of an amber-eyed orchid, this year’s Diamond Photographer images show that imagination, technique, and tenacity offer astounding photographic results. The following Diamond-level creations represent the best of
the best from PPA’s International Photographic Competition.
Participants are named Diamond Photographers when all four of the images
they enter into competition earn a spot in the coveted Loan Collection. The
competition has two categories: Photographic Open and Artist.
Photographic Open images are judged against PPA’s 12 Elements of a Merit Image benchmark, which considers impact, technical excellence, creativity, style, composition, presentation, color balance, center of interest, lighting,
subject matter, technique, and storytelling.
Artist images are judged not just by the finished work but also by the complexity of the process used to achieve the final outcome.
This year, 15 competition entrants earned Diamond Photographer status,
with three of them earning the Diamond distinction in both the Photographic
Open and Artist categories.
BY AMANDA ARNOLD
45
Photographic Open
©AMY FEICK
All Roads Lead to Rome
Amy Feick, M.Photog.Cr., CPP, captured “All Roads Lead to Rome” while traveling with her mother, cousin, and grandmother, who was born in Italy. “We
only had one day in Rome, so we tried to get in as many sites as we could,” she
says. “My cousin suggested we go to the top of Castel Sant’Angelo for sunset.
It was busy, but I was able to squeeze to the edge. I didn’t have a tripod so I had
to handhold the camera and just hope everything lined up. That spectacular
view of Rome was one of my favorite memories.” Twin Shutterbug Studios is
based in Port Huron, Michigan, and specializes in senior, child, newborn, and
fine art photography. twinshutterbugstudios.com
CAMERA & LENS: Nikon D610, AF-S Nikkor 70-200mm f/2.8G ED VR II lens
EXPOSURE: 1/160 second at f/3.5, ISO 1250
LIGHTING: Natural light
POST-CAPTURE: The image is a panoramic composite of 18 individual images.
Adobe Lightroom was used for basic exposure and lens correction, and Adobe
Photoshop CC’s Photomerge was used to create the composite. Additional
processing was done using Nik Color Efex Pro.
46
On Our Way!
Michael Anthony created “On Our Way!,” (right) while making a Profoto promotional video at Vasquez Rocks in Agua Dulce, California. “When we put them
on the motorcycle and stood them up, we saw that we were able to create a
sense of motion by getting some air under the gown,” he says. “So we had our
assistant throw the gown a few times until the motion was perfect.” Michael
Anthony Photography is based in Los Angeles, California, and specializes wedding and boudoir photography. michaelanthonyphotography.com
CAMERA & LENS: Sony a7R III, Sigma 135mm F1.8 DG HSM Art lens
for Canon with Mount Converter MC-11
EXPOSURE: 1/250 second at f/10, ISO 50
LIGHTING: To the right was a Profoto B1X with a 3-foot soft box, to the left
behind the subjects was a B1X with zoom reflector, and 90 degrees
to the right was an A1 to add a rim light to the motorcycle.
POST-CAPTURE: Post-processing was outsourced to a team that used Adobe
Photoshop to dodge and burn using curves and unsharp mask,
and blended tones in the skin using frequency separation.
PPM AG.COM
This is the larger category in PPA’s IPC, representing the more traditional competition in which jurors assess images by the
final result. Jurors guide their decisions with PPA’s long-standing benchmarks for image quality: 12 Elements of a Merit Image.
These are impact, technical excellence, creativity, style, composition, presentation, color balance, center of interest, lighting, subject matter, technique, and storytelling. Merits earned in the Open category go toward the PPA master of photography degree.
©MICHAEL ANTHONY
©BEN SHIRK
Make a Wish
The daughter of Ben Shirk, M.Photog.M.Artist.Cr., wanted to be a subject in one of his imaginative works like her brothers had. “We talked about ideas, and she wanted to look like a
princess,” he says. A big part of Shirk’s inspiration for “Make a Wish” was the scene from “Fantasia” in which Mickey Mouse conjures a tidal wave. Shirk initially imagined the image depicting
a small child striking fear into an adult in response to not getting what she wanted. But as he
worked on the image, “The original fear I had planned turned into an awestruck moment.”
Shirk Photography is based in Wilton, Iowa, and specializes in sports teams and high school
seniors photography. shirkphotography.com
LIGHTING DIAGRAM
MAIN LIGHT
Paul C. Buff Einstein
24" beauty dish
above on boom arm
CAMERA & LENS: Canon EOS-1D X, Canon EF 24-70mm f/2.8L II USM lens
EXPOSURE: 1/80 second at f/6.3, ISO 250
LIGHTING: Using Paul C. Buff Einsteins, he had a 24-inch beauty dish on a boom arm directly
above the subject as a main light, and a reflector placed camera left to soften the shadows.
POST-CAPTURE: In his studio, he set up the scene by blowing up hundreds of balloons, hanging
chicken wire from the 16-foot ceiling, and then spending a full day attaching the balloons to the
wire. He photographed the scene and elements at different angles, and in Adobe Photoshop CC
combined the best elements and options. Then he photographed the subjects on green screen.
FOUR EYES
Erich Caparas created “Four Eyes,” (right) in Guagua, Pampanga, Philippines, for a senior portrait. “Native
Americans gazed to the stars for enlightenment and wisdom,” he says. “I was inspired to create her image
looking beyond the cosmos, eager to learn from the benevolent beings amidst the heavenly body filled with
stars.” Erich 3D Photography is based in Riverview, Florida, and specializes in creative portraiture. erich3d.com
CAMERA & LENS: Nikon D810, AF Nikkor 28-105mm f/3.5-4.5D lens
EXPOSURE: 1/60 second at f/11, ISO 160
LIGHTING: Using Phottix brand lights, the main used a white beauty dish with a
honeycomb grid and was placed in front of and above the model at a distance of 5 feet,
and the two accent lights were modified with strip boxes with grids, wrapped with blue
gels and placed 45 degrees behind and above the model.
POST-CAPTURE: In Photoshop CC 2018, he used the proprietary frequency
separation and channel masking techniques.
48
FILL
reflector
LIGHTING DIAGRAM
ACCENT
Phottix flash strip boxes
with grids and blue gels
MAIN LIGHT
Phottix flash
white beauty dish
honeycomb grid
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©ERICH CAPARAS
©KRISTI SUTTON ELIAS
LIGHTING DIAGRAM
Venus the Goddess
“Venus the Goddess,” was staged in a conference room while Kristi Sutton Elias, M.Photog.M.Artist.Cr.,
taught a fine art workshop at Imaging USA 2018 in Nashville, Tennessee. “I wanted to create a dramatic,
whimsical portrait that mirrored the Renaissance,” Elias says. Kristi Sutton Elias Photography is based in
Long Beach, California, and specializes in fine art portrait photography. kristielias.com
FILL LIGHT
Elinchrom strobe
soft box
50
MAIN LIGHT
Elinchrom strobe
strip box
CAMERA & LENS: Hasselblad H6D, Hasselblad HC 50mm f/3.5 II lens
EXPOSURE: 1/125 second at f/8, ISO 800
LIGHTING: The main light was an Elinchrom strobe with a strip box camera left and the fill was another
Elinchrom strobe powered down and modified by a soft box, camera right.
POST-CAPTURE: Using Adobe Photoshop and Nik Collection software, she used multiple images to
increase the fullness of the dress and composite in a new background. She then blended and painted
the image. Nik was used to create the tones.
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DIVINE
One of the favorite properties of
Mario Muñoz, Jr., M.Photog.Cr.,
to photograph is the Boca Raton
Resort and Club “It offers such
incredible architectural backdrops
with such gorgeous natural light,”
he says. For “Divine,” he used
a staircase that was filled with
beautiful light coming in from the
right. “Utilizing the veil and the
soft light, we were able to create
this image which showcases
and complements the most
important part of the photo, and
that is the bride,” he says.
Muñoz Photography is based in
Fort Lauderdale, Florida, and specializes in wedding, event, family
portrait, and seniors photography.
munozphotography.com
CAMERA & LENS: Canon EOS 5D
Mark IV, Canon EF 11-24mm
f/4L USM lens
EXPOSURE: 1/320 second at f/4.5,
ISO 1600
LIGHTING: Available light
POST-CAPTURE: In Adobe
Lightroom and Photoshop CC,
he applied slight desaturation
and vignetting, and darkened the
windows to minimize distractions
and pull focus toward the bride.
©MARIO MUÑOZ
52
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©DOUG BENNETT
Cold Sierra Morning
Doug Bennett, M.Photog.Cr., had always wanted to make an early morning
image of the Eastern Sierra Mountains after a fresh snowstorm. “I had
hoped for a colorful alpine glow morning, but that didn’t happen,” he says.
What did happen was the opportunity for a great black-and-white rendering. “It was very cold that February 2017 morning and I really related to the
blowing snow at the top of the Sierra peaks.” Bennett Photography is based
in Colorado Springs, Colorado, and specializes in landscape photography.
bennettphotography.net
CAMERA & LENS: Nikon D800E, AF-S Nikkor 24-70mm f/2.8G ED lens
EXPOSURE: 1/15 second at f/16, ISO 100
LIGHTING: Natural light
POST-CAPTURE: Adobe Camera Raw was used for file conversion, and the blackand-white conversion was done in Nikon Capture NX2 and Nik Color Efex Pro.
54
YAUPON HOLLY
“Yaupon Holly,” (right) was made during a “lighthouse run,” according to
Mona Sadler, M.Photog.M.Artist.Cr., CPP. “A group of photographers would get
together in October or November and go see how many lighthouses we could
visit in one weekend,” she explains. She was wandering around looking at the
fall leaves when she came across the holly and made the image. Coastal
Portraits is based in New Bern, North Carolina, and specializes in pet, people,
and special event photography. coastalportraitsnc.com
CAMERA & LENS: Canon EOS 5D, Canon EF 70-200mm f/2.8L IS USM lens
EXPOSURE: 1/40 second at f/5, ISO 200
LIGHTING: Natural light
POST-CAPTURE: The image was painted in Corel Painter IX then converted to
black-and-white with Nik Silver Efex Pro 2. It was photographed vertically
and flipped horizontally in post. After converting it to black-and-white,
Sadler removed the background and painted in a dark background
“that is visible enough just to see something is there.” She then darkened
the image to give it more drama and intrigue.
PPM AG.COM
©MONA SADLER
PROFE S SION A L PHOTOGR A PHER | JANUARY 2019
55
Songbirds
“Songbirds” was inspired when Kimberly
J. Smith, M.Photog.M.Artist.Cr., CPP found
a small bird cage. “I had to do something
with it,” she says. So she came up with a
story: A little girl is supposed to be reading
a book but wants the freedom to do what
she likes instead. “She wants to be free
like the bird,” Smith explains. “They are
singing together because they feel the
connection, the freedom they long for.”
She photographed the bird at a zoo during
a school field trip with her son and brought
in a client to pose as the girl. CK Fine
Portraits is based in Muskogee, Oklahoma,
and specializes in child, seniors, and fine
art photography. ckfineportraits.com and
kimberlysmithartist.com
CAMERA & LENS: Canon EOS 5D Mark IV,
Canon EF 100mm f/2.0 USM lens
EXPOSURE: 1/125 second at f/2.8, ISO 640
LIGHTING: For the model, she used natural window light to the subject’s right and
a 40x72-inch silver Aurora reflector to her
left. There were also larger windows up
high on the wall in front of the subject.
POST-CAPTURE: The image was retouched
and digitally painted in Photoshop CC. She
changed the subject’s dress length, added
sleeves and a bow to her dress, and then
added the bird. The bird cage door was
closed in the photograph, but she made it
appear open it in Photoshop.
©KIMBERLY J. SMITH
56
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artist
Artist category Loans are those that have been altered substantially in postproduction through digital enhancements, traditional techniques, or a combination of the two. One of the biggest differences between this category and the
Photographic Open is that jurors take into account technique and the degree of
difficulty of the post-capture work. Photographers often submit guide images
or diagrams that illustrate the step-by-step process applied to each image.
Merits earned in this category are applied toward the PPA master artist degree.
©MARK SWEENEY
Mister Belvedere
“Mister Belvedere” grew out of the preparations Mark Sweeney, M.Photog.Cr., was making for an educational program for the Professional Photographers Society
of New York State. He wanted to demonstrate what could be done with simple items, and an aristocratic character à la Monopoly’s Rich Uncle Pennybags came
to mind. To make the image, Sweeney photographed the inside of an empty soup can, and with Photoshop warping and liquefying at play, an interesting shape
appeared. He duplicated and flipped the warped layer to keep the face symmetrical. Next, he added the original can for the nose area and twice again for the eyes.
A photo of a pinecone was warped and twirled in Photoshop to create the mustache. Photographing vintage accessories allowed him to add the overcoat, jabot, and
bowler hat. He placed drop shadows under the bowler and used shading to create dimension. He dropped in a sky for the background and adjusted the hue. Final
tweaks included the monocle with reflection, a cord made from an iPhone charging cable, and the three birds for depth and humor. Mark Sweeney Photography is
based in Clifton Park, New York, and specializes in wedding and corporate event photography. sweeneyphotography.com
58
PPM AG.COM
©MONA SADLER
ANGRY BIRD
A rough line sketch was the start of “Angry Bird” by Mona Sadler, M.Photog.M.Artist.Cr., CPP. Over a two-year period, Sadler added and subtracted feathers
and features in Photoshop, using the colors of a peacock as her foundation. To lend the image a feeling of motion, she added flack and doubled up the feathers
via cloning. She used a black brushing technique to make the bird appear as if it were emerging out of the brush with a bad attitude. “When I completed the
eyes, the name was obvious,” she says. Coastal Portraits is based in New Bern, North Carolina, and specializes in pet, people, and small event photography.
coastalportraitsnc.com
PROFE S SION A L PHOTOGR A PHER | JANUARY 2019
59
FINDERS, KEEPERS
Sandra Pearce, M.Photog.MEI.Cr., CPP, made a photo of the “Finders, Keepers” subject several years ago at a public event and had always wanted to paint her.
She photographed the antique train while visiting Savannah, Georgia, and the puppies “just seemed to go along with her since she was just about to drop the two
she was clutching,” Pearce explains. Using Adobe Photoshop and Nik Filters, she extracted all the images in Photoshop, placed them where they looked best,
and then painted. “I finally got the painting I had envisioned. Children and puppies—what else makes us smile so easily?” Sandra Pearce Photography is based in
Okeechobee, Florida, and specializes in portrait and family photography. sandrapearcephotography.net
©SANDRA PEARCE
60
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62
Masterpiece
Cristie Reddehase,
M.Photog.M.Artist.Cr., had
always loved the photograph
she made of Kylemore Abbey
in Ireland, but thanks to heavy
fog on the day she made it, the
image was rather flat. The history
of the castle was what inspired
“Masterpiece.” “Kylemore was
built in 1868 as a private home,”
she says. “I imagined this scene
could be a typical day in the life of
the mistress of the house during
that time period.” Working first
in Adobe Photoshop CC 2018, she
arranged the background image
by moving the castle, created a
wider dirt path, and added some
trees to frame the subject. Next,
she extracted the subject, placed
her in the scene, and added
the appropriate highlights and
shadows. In Corel Painter 2018,
Reddehase painted the dress
and hairstyle free hand. While
painting the rest of the image, she
added red flowers in the foliage
for color harmony. Silver Image
Photography is based in Spring,
Texas, and specializes in seniors,
family, child, executive headshot,
and beauty portrait photography.
silver-image-photo.com
PROFE S SION A L PHOTOGR A PHER | JANUARY 2019
63
Turbocharged
An antique car aficionado, Karen Walker, M.Photog.M.Artist.Cr., CPP, captured a photograph of a 1923 Ford at a classic car show. “I was drawn to this particular
vehicle because of its clean lines and vibrant color,” she says. “I enjoy finding ways to transform an image into something completely different than the original
capture. The challenge here was to use just one photo to create a new image that was visually interesting at first glance but was also complex in its many details.”
Using Adobe Photoshop CS5, she extracted the car from the background and moved it to a new empty document. Then she copied the layer and used free transform
to slightly move and turn the layer. Repeating this process over and over again in different ways, she made new shapes that were recombined into unique elements.
She also added adjustment layers and layer effects along the way. Warp and liquefy were used to tweak some of the shapes. Karen Walker Studio is based in Boyne
City, Michigan, and specializes in family, seniors, pet, and business portrait photography as well as photo restoration and retouching. karenwalkerstudio.com
©KAREN WALKER
64
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©KIMBERLY J. SMITH
Hangin’ With My Peeps
Kimberly J. Smith, M.Photog.M.Artist.Cr., CPP, had several different photos of birds and wanted to combine them in a way that honored their personalities. “I
remembered watching a short animated film with my kids when they were little and it made me smile,” she says. “So I searched through our vacation snapshots
and found the perfect bird to fit the story and added him in.” The work was composited from eight images and digitally painted in Adobe Photoshop CC. She drew
the power lines in Photoshop, printed the image on Lexjet Sunset Velvet Rag paper on a Canon printer, and added more details by hand with colored pencils.
“The image makes me smile every time I look at it and I hope it makes others smile as well.” CK Fine Portraits is based in Muskogee, Oklahoma, and specializes
in child, seniors, and fine art photography. ckfineportraits.com and kimberlysmithartist.com
66
PPM AG.COM
The Catch
Ben Shirk, M.Photog.M.Artist.Cr., made “The Catch” for a high school senior who wanted a portrait that included his bass fishing boat. It rained so much the week of the
session that all area lakes and rivers were at flood stage. So instead of heading out on the water, Shirk had the subject park his boat and trailer in the alley behind Shirk’s
studio. Using Godox SB600 II lights—a 36-inch octabox on the main light and a 6-inch can with warming gel on a backlight—he made photographs of the teen in the boat.
He added water in post-production using Adobe Photoshop CC and Adobe Lightroom Classic CC. “I keep a folder of stock images I have photographed in my travels,”
says Shirk. “I used bits and pieces of rivers, lakes, and oceans that I have traveled to to create the scene in Photoshop.” Shirk Photography is based in Wilton, Iowa,
and specializes in sports teams and high school seniors photography. shirkphotography.com
©BEN SHIRK
68
69
©CHRIS VANDER VELDE
I Shih Tzu Not
The unexpected loss of a client’s dog was the impetus for Chris Vander Velde, M.Photog.M.Artist., to create “I Shih Tzu Not.” “I was commissioned to create
painted portraits of her three remaining dogs,” Vander Velde explains. “This dog, Jasper, a bold and sassy Shih Tzu when in his own surroundings, experiences severe
anxiety when he leaves his home.” The only solution was to have the owner use her cell phone to capture photos of him at home for Vander Velde to use. “I chose the
image I felt would best showcase his characteristics and personality and began painting.” The painting was done in Adobe Photoshop with a variety of brushes, textures,
and blend modes. Canyon Bluff Studios LLC is based in Green Bay, Wisconsin, and specializes in portrait, nature, and landscape photography. canyonbluffstudios.com
On ppmag.com
All the Diamond Photographers’ images
ppmag.com/2019-diamonds
70
PPM AG.COM
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PERSPECTIVE
THROUGH THE LENS OF PPA
PPA ARCHIVES
PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE
CARPE DIEM
by Stephen Thetford, M.Photog.Cr., CPP
u At PPA headquarters hangs a photograph
of the professional photographers who
came together in 1869 for the association’s
first convention. It was staged five months
after the National Photographic Association,
as PPA was first known, was formed. The image shows 150 or so individuals of varying
ages and demeanors. I find a common determination expressed on their faces. Recently,
I found myself standing before the image and
staring into the faces of our predecessors. At
that moment I could not help but think of
a memorable scene from one of my favorite
movies of the 1980s, “Dead Poets Society.”
The movie is set in the late 1950s at a prestigious preparatory school in New England.
The scene is early in the movie where English teacher John Keating (Robin Williams)
takes his class of high school senior boys to
a lobby lined with display cases containing
the trophies and photographs of former students. Keating encourages his students to
74
consider what the former—now dead—students might say to this new generation who
have their lives still before them. The conclusion was “Carpe diem,” Latin for “Seize the
day.” Keating goes on to suggest additional
lines from relevant poetry such as “Gather ye
rose buds while ye may.” Keating’s message:
Take hold of life purposefully and fully when
opportunities are available to you.
This same message is for each of us: Seize
the day. Before us is a brand new year and
the opportunity to infuse fresh enthusiasm
into our careers and businesses. Imaging
USA takes place this month in Atlanta, and
it gives each of us the opportunity to participate in the greatest photographic education,
networking, exhibits, and trade show on the
planet. Our staff and volunteers have prepared a timely array of programming that
can, if we seize the opportunity, make a difference in our businesses and our families.
We owe it to ourselves to invest in our fu-
ture, but that future is not guaranteed. The
market for professional photographers is
changing at a phenomenal pace. Technology
is only one of the drivers. One of the biggest
threats to our future is the gap between photographers and consumers. Consequently, a
significant portion of educational programing at Imaging USA this year will focus on
understanding how to close this gap and
address the desires and expectations of consumers. Understanding the gap is significant, but the real need is to close the gap.
And closing that gap isn’t the responsibility
of consumers. To be successful in the future
photographers must learn what it is that motivates consumers to purchase and how they
purchase. This is the kind of information
that is waiting for you at Imaging USA.
Regardless of where you are in your career, Imaging USA will provide more ideas,
information, and inspiration than you’ll be
able to absorb. But don’t be overwhelmed.
Take what you need from the programming
to serve your needs and know that when
you’re ready for more, PPA is always here.
After you return home from Imaging USA,
review what you learned, what got you excited, and implement those things into your
business this year by making a strategic
plan for the changes. I talked with a member several years ago who used a deliberate
process to implement what she’d learned at
the convention. She blocked time out of her
day, took her notes to a secluded location,
and methodically went through them to determine what would be most beneficial to
her business in the coming year. Realizing
that trying to do too much would result in
nothing being completed, she selected three
or four things that would be priorities, and
she put the rest of the ideas away to consider
only when the priorities were accomplished.
Our future success depends on our willingness to invest in it and work at it. As John
Hagee is quoted as saying, “The only time
that success comes before work is in the dictionary.” What we learn at Imaging USA will
help us to efficiently and effectively make
2019 a banner year both as artists and business owners. I am confident that the members depicted in the 1869 convention photo
would express to us that the time is now, so
let’s seize the day! See you at Imaging USA. •
PPM AG.COM
IPC RULES GET REFRESHED
BETTER TIMELINES, MORE SPECIALTY FOCUS
©BOORAY PERRY
u Having reviewed the results of the 2018
competitions, PPA’s International Photographic
Competition Committee has improved the process for 2019. The biggest change: condensing district competitions and expanding IPC.
• District competitions have been moved
later in the year. This will allow entrants to
get the benefit of an initial round of judging
before sending images to PPA for district and
IPC judging. All district competitions are now
taking place on the same day, and each district
(Northcentral, West, Northeast, Southeast, and
Southwest) will now follow the same schedule.
• Specialized judging will help to focus the
competition. Judging will be done by category by specialized jurors.
• The same subject model can be entered
into more than one category, but the image
and concept must be distinctly different.
• Creative Open is a new category that’s
specifically for images that include elements
not created by the image maker. •
ppa.com/be-more/competitions
DISTRICTS TIMELINE
Registration: April 8-May 8
Late registration (additional fee required): May 9-May 22
Judging: June 2-7
IPC TIMELINE
Registration: June 14-July 18
Late registration (additional fee required): July 19-Aug. 1
Judging: Aug. 18-23
2019 AFFILIATE SCHOOLS
MARCH 10-14
Georgia School of Professional Photography
North Georgia Tech
Clarkesville, Georgia and Helen, Georgia
gppa.com
MAY 19-23
Great Lakes Institute of Photography
Boyne Highlands
Harbor Springs, Michigan
glip.org
APRIL 7-11
New England Institute of
Professional Photography
Devens Common Conference Center
Devens, Massachusetts
ppane.com
JUNE 8-12
East Coast School Photographic Workshops
Holiday Inn Downtown
Raleigh, North Carolina
eastcoastschool.com
APRIL 28-MAY 3
Texas School of Professional Photography
Renaissance Hotel and Conference Center
Addison, Texas
texasschool.org
JUNE 8-11
Florida Photography Workshops
Daytona State College
Daytona Beach, Florida
floridaphotographyworkshops.org
MAY 5-10
Mid-Atlantic Regional School of
Professional Photography
The Grand Hotel
Cape May, New Jersey
marsschool.com
JUNE 17-20
Winona School of Professional
Photography
Fort Harrison State Park Inn
Indianapolis, Indiana
winonaphotoschool.org
PROFE S SION A L PHOTOGR A PHER | JANUARY 2019
JULY 28-AUG. 2
Professional Photographers’ Society of
New York State Photo Imaging Workshop
Hobart and William Smith College
Seneca Lake, New York
ppsnysworkshop.com
SEPT. 22-25
Lamarr Williamson School of South Carolina
Columbia Convention Center
Columbia, South Carolina
lamarrschool.com
More on PPA Affiliates
ppa.com/about/ppa-affiliates
75
PROGRESS IN PRINT
PERSPECTIVE
THROUGH THE LENS OF PPA
YOUR MEMBER MAGAZINE THROUGH THE YEARS
MAGAZINE CO VER PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY EDDIE TAPP
PPM AG.COM
76
u PPA’s flagship publication has gone by several names and appeared in assorted
design formats, but for more than a century, it’s been keeping members inspired.
PROFE S SION A L PHOTOGR A PHER | JANUARY 2019
77
LABS
PROFE S SION A L PHOTOGR A PHER | JANUARY 2019
79
THE SHOP
Advertise in
THE SHOP section of
PROFESSIONAL PHOTOGRAPHER
Ad size: 3.625" x 4.33"
For information, contact your advertising representative:
MARINA ANDERSON
East Regional
Sales Manager
937-902-8217
manderson@ppa.com
BRIAN SISCO
West Regional
Sales Manager
404-522-8600, x230
bsisco@ppa.com
80
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THE SHOP
PROFE S SION A L PHOTOGR A PHER | JANUARY 2019
81
FINAL FRAME
IRRESISTIBLE RESOLUTION
©BEN SHIRK
PPM AG.COM
82
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BE MORE Cooected
Join Your Local
Affliate
PPA Affliate members are a creative community of photographers helping
photographers. These non-proft groups nurture and provide the support
and tools to help you grow.
As an Affliate member YOU will:
• Meet & connect with peers & mentors
• Attend in-person workshops throughout the year with some of the
best instructors in the industry
• Sharpen your skills by competing in your local image competitions
• Close the gap toward earning a PPA Degree by attending
PPA Education Workshops
• Get recognized; build credibility & set yourself apart
• Get involved & give back to your photographic
community
• And much more!
There’s never been a better time to Be More Connected!
Find a PPA Affliate near you.
PPA.com/Affliates
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