close

Вход

Забыли?

вход по аккаунту

?

USA Today - January 02, 2019

код для вставкиСкачать
$2.00 ❚ THE NATION'S NEWS
WEDNESDAY
E2
10 new must-see
TV shows to chill
with this winter
01.02.19
“Black Monday” cashes in on comedy, a
new superhero series arrives, and singers are unmasked one by one. In Life
DON CHEADLE AND ANDREW RANNELLS BY SHOWTIME
NEWSLINE
POISONED CITIES DEADLY BORDER | PART 4 OF 4
DUMPING GROUNDS
IN NEWS
Trump wishes ‘haters’
a Happy New Year
President rejects Dems’ plan to end
shutdown without border wall money
Slew of new state
laws go into effect
From handwriting to a rising minimum
wage, a look at some notable changes
IN MONEY
Housing market will
be slower, steadier
2018 started off hot but softened
as buyers were put off by high prices
Dow’s 2018 decline
largest since 2008
Index suffers bruising 5.6 percent loss
despite 265-point New Year’s Eve rally
IN SPORTS
Coach firings show
lack of accountability
Jarrett Bell: NFL GMs keep jobs while
their fall guys search for new work
Tons of junk, much of it from the USA,
piled up to befoul air, water and lives
Which athletes will
break out in 2019?
Some emerging stars that could be
household names by the turn of 2020
Ian James
Palm Springs Desert Sun
USA TODAY NETWORK
IN LIFE
MEXICALI, Mexico – On the outskirts of this city, where cattle graze
and tractors roll across the farmland,
a sooty building belches out clouds of
smoke.
Twisted scraps of metal and the
smashed skeletons of cars sit in piles
next to the plant, where machinery
hums loudly, punctuated by the booming sounds of metal striking metal.
Across a narrow dirt road, Blanca
Ramírez lives in the same farmhouse
where she grew up. She remembers
when she was a kid, before the steel mill
was built, the land across the road was
an alfalfa field and the air was clean.
Now smoke pours out of the plant at
all hours, drifting over a row of houses
and across the fields.
VIVIAN ZINK/NBC
“We didn’t used to see
as much as we see now.
It’s terrible.”
Blanca Ramírez
“The pollution has gradually increased because we didn’t used to see
as much as we see now,” Ramírez said,
standing on the road beside the plant.
“It’s terrible.”
The Grupo Simec steel mill is a huge
recycling facility. It devours metal
scraps and the chassis of old cars,
which arrive on trucks from junkyards
where they’ve been stripped of parts.
The metal goes in dirty, covered with
paint and rust, and is melted down
See DUMPING, Page 3A
Griselda Núñez Ramos
is one of dozens of
“pepenadores,” or trash
pickers, who live and
work in a dump south
of Mexicali. ZOE MEYERS/
USA TODAY NETWORK
About this
project
“Poisoned Cities, Deadly
Border” is an investigative series begun by the
Palm Springs Desert
Sun in 2016 to examine
pollution on the border
and the effects on
people’s health. The
pollution is linked to
the rise of industry in
Mexicali, where maquiladoras manufacture
products for sale in
Mexico and the USA.
Dwayne Johnson
rocks ‘Titan Games’
NBC show features contests inspired
by former WWE star’s gym workouts
15 albums we can’t
wait to hear this year
2019 is already shaping up to be a
promising year in the world of music
QIJFAF-03005x(a)L
©COPYRIGHT 2019
USA TODAY,
A division of
Gannett Co., Inc.
HOME DELIVERY
1-800-872-0001, USATODAYSERVICE.COM
USA SNAPSHOTS©
More U.S. teens prefer to
communicate with their friends
via text than in person.
Texting
33% 35%
2012
2018
In person
erson
49% 32%
2012
2018
SOURCE commonsense.org survey of 1,141
teens ages 13 to 17
MIKE B. SMITH, VERONICA BRAVO/USA TODAY
STATE-BY-STATE 5B
Small businesses suffer
shutdown shudders
Federal workers sue
over work without pay
Koreas
draw closer
in ‘soccer
diplomacy’
John Fritze
Thomas Maresca
Sam Samhouri’s corner cafe in Oakland, California, sits on what might
normally be considered a prime piece
of real estate: directly across the street
from an 18-floor office building.
The problem for Samhouri is that
the campus that supplies most of his
customers is the Ronald V. Dellums
Federal Building. That means many of
his lunchtime regulars have been furloughed by the partial government
shutdown in its second week.
“There’s nobody there,” said Samhouri, whose City Cup cafe employs
three people.
As the shutdown entered the new
year, there were signs the lapse was
beginning to have an effect, not just on
the hundreds of thousands of federal
employees who have been furloughed
or forced to work without pay but also
on the businesses and industries that
rely on them.
Though the impact was obscured by
Christmas, when government offices
were already scheduled to be closed, it
may become more pronounced as
much of the nation returns to work
Wednesday. Some businesses are
waiting on government loan approvals. Others, near federal buildings or
national parks, are worried about
losing their customer base.
The shutdown began Dec. 22 when
President Donald Trump and congressional Democrats failed to reach an
agreement over White House de-
CHUNCHEON, South Korea – This
time last year, the situation on the
Korean Peninsula looked dire. North
Korea spent most of 2017 conducting
one provocative missile test after another and detonated its
most powerful nuclear
device, a hydrogen
bomb, in September.
On Twitter, President
Donald Trump threatened “fire and fury” and
taunted North Korean Kim Jong
leader Kim Jong Un, Un
calling him “little rocket
man.” Kim fired back, bashing Trump
as a “mentally deranged U.S. dotard.”
The war of words seemed like it might
spill over into a real war.
Through the darkness, a glimmer of
hope shone in an unlikely place: youth
soccer.
See SHUTDOWN, Page 6A
See SOCCER, Page 2A
USA TODAY
PERSONAL FINANCE 4B
Special to USA TODAY
Lawmakers are due back at the
Capitol on Thursday, but there has
been no sign of either side giving
way on the dispute over Trump’s
border wall. MANUEL BALCE CENETA/AP
MARKETPLACE TODAY 4D
PUZZLES 4D
TONIGHT ON TV 5D
WEATHER 4A
YOUR SAY 5A
NEWS
2A ❚ WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2019 ❚ USA TODAY
Soccer
Continued from Page 1A
North and South Korea had cut off all
official communication since 2016, but
the two Koreas still participated in the
Ari Sports Cup, an eight-team soccer
tournament for under-15s held in Kunming, China, in December 2017.
“Even though we had great tension
between the two Koreas, we still continued to have these youth soccer
games,” said Choi Moon-soon, the
governor of South Korea’s Gangwon
province, who accompanied a team to
the tournament.
Gangwon province hosted the
Pyeongchang Winter Olympics, and
Choi seized the opportunity to push for
sports diplomacy. South Korean President Moon Jae-in publicly expressed
his wishes for North Korea to join the
Olympics but had no way of officially
delivering the message.
In Kunming, Choi had a closed-door
meeting with a North Korean counterpart, Mun Ung, a vice minister-level official who heads North Korea’s April 25
Athletic Committee, a military-affiliated
sports club.
“I officially invited North Korea to
participate in the Olympics,” Choi said.
“Until last December, there had been no
channel open. But through this Ari
Sports Cup exchange, there was an
opening.”
Less than two weeks later, South Korea – and the world – had their answer.
In his New Year’s address, Kim announced that his country would participate in the Winter Games. Shortly afterward, the two sides had their first official sit-down in two years to hash out
the details.
The announcement “was so unexpected because there was so much tension then, unlike what is happening
right now,” Choi said.
In February, North and South Korean
athletes marched into the Olympic
opening ceremony under a unified Korean flag, kicking off what would be
dubbed the “Peace Olympics.” It was the
first step in a remarkable diplomatic
turnaround in 2018, highlighted by a
historic summit between Trump and
Kim in June.
The Ari Sports Cup was held for a
fifth time in October in Chuncheon, a
city in Choi’s home turf of Gangwon
province.
South Korean players celebrate their
win over North Korea at the East Asian
championship in Tokyo on Dec. 12,
2017. KAZUSHI KURIHARA/KYODO NEWS VIA AP
Eight teams from six countries participated, and a North Korean side of
under-15s took on a South Korean team
of players from the province.
The North Korean team won the
match 3-1, and though the competition
on the pitch was spirited, the mood
around the event was celebratory. Choi
and Mun sat next to each other in the
stands of a nearly full stadium that
shook with cheering fans and blaring
K-pop music.
Afterward, the two teams took a
joyful lap around the field together in
front of fans in a show of what Choi
called “soccer diplomacy.”
An organizer of the Ari Sports Cup,
Kim Kyung-sung, head of the North and
South Korean Sports Exchange Association, said such scenes had been the
hope all along.
“Sports exchange is the most effective way to ease tensions on the Korean
Peninsula,” he said.
The fact that the Ari Cup is a youth
sports exchange may have been a crucial factor in keeping that communication channel open, he said.
“With the young players, it is less
politically charged,” he said.
For the players, the game seemed all
about having fun and meeting their
neighbors from the other side of the
divided peninsula.
Li Il Song, a North Korean player, said
he didn’t feel much distance from players in the South.
“I hope we can go back and forth and
play more games and have a friendly relationship with each other,” he said.
Kim Ga-un, 15, a midfielder on the
South Korean team, said he hoped the
countries would be united soon but
North Korean forward Jong Il-gwan takes it to Japan at the East Asian Football
Federation championship in 2017 in Tokyo. South Korea tried to reach out to its
reclusive neighbor through their mutual love of soccer. KIMIMASA MAYAMA/EPA-EFE
mentioned one difference: the North’s
team was bigger and stronger.
“They’re very speedy and strong,” he
said. “It felt like we were playing against
third-year high schoolers.”
Players from the North Korean team
practice year-round and are among the
elite youth athletes in the country.
Schools from around Gangwon province came out to root for their classmates, and many students expressed
curiosity about the players from the
North.
“Win or lose, it’s not important,” said
Jeong Yu-seok, 16, a classmate of three
of the players on the Gangwon team.
“The match is special because it makes
our relationship better than before.”
Jeong said he had never met a North
Korean but hoped to get the chance: “I
want to know about their lives, their
lifestyle.”
The next Ari Sports Cup will be in
Wonsan, North Korea, in May, and Choi
hopes to extend the power of youth soccer even further.
“Ultimately, Korean issues need to be
solved internationally,” he said. “So we
are thinking of inviting the United
States to the games in Wonsan next May
because we believe this issue boils
down to the fact that there should be
good relations between North Korea
and the U.S.”
Corrections & Clarifications
USA TODAY is committed to accuracy.
To reach us, contact Standards Editor
Manny Garcia at 800-872-7073 or
e-mail accuracy@usatoday.com. Please
indicate whether you’re responding to
content online, on social media or in
the newspaper.
7950 Jones Branch Dr., McLean, Va. 22108, 703-854-3400
Published by Gannett, Volume 37, No. 75
(ISSN0734-7456)
SUBSCRIPTIONS 1-800-USA-0001
Monday – Friday, 8 a.m. – 7 p.m. ET
Regular U.S. subscription rates: $29 per month; $348 per
year. For customer service-related inquiries, please
contact Barb Smith, VP/Customer Service, PO BOX
650301, DALLAS TX 75265-0301, or fax 1-800-732-3631.
Advertising: All advertising published in USA TODAY is
subject to the current rate card; copies available from the
advertising department. USA TODAY may in its sole
discretion edit, classify, reject or cancel at any time any
advertising submitted.
Classified: 1-800-397-0070
National, Regional: 703-854-3400
Reprint permission, copies of articles, glossy reprints:
www.GannettReprints.com or call 212-221-9595
USA TODAY is a member of The Associated Press and
subscribes to other news services. Published daily except
Saturdays, Sundays and widely observed holidays.
Periodicals postage paid at McLean, Va., and at additional
mailing offices. USA TODAY, its logo and associated
graphics are registered trademarks. All rights reserved.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to USA TODAY,
8700-K Red Oak Blvd., Charlotte, NC 28217.
ADVERTISEMENT
Leading Acid Reflux Pill
Becomes an Anti-Aging
Phenomenon
Clinical studies show breakthrough acid reflux treatment also helps maintain vital health
and helps protect users from the serious conditions that accompany aging such as fatigue
and poor cardiovascular health
“ACCIDENTAL” ANTI-AGING BREAKTHROUGH: Originally developed for
digestive issues, AloeCure not only ends digestion nightmares... it revitalizes the
entire body. Some are calling it the greatest accidental discovery in decades.
One AloeCure Capsule Daily
• Helps End Digestion Nightmares
• Helps Calm Painful
Inflammation
• Soothes Stiff & Aching Joints
• Reduces appearance of Wrinkles
& Increases Elasticity
• Manages Cholesterol &
Oxidative Stress
• Supports Healthy Immune System
• Improves Sleep & Brain Function
THESE STATEMENTS HAVE NOT BEEN EVALUATED BY THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION. THIS PRODUCT IS NOT INTENDED TO DIAGNOSE, TREAT, CURE, OR PREVENT ANY DISEASE. ALL DOCTORS MENTIONED ARE
REMUNERATED FOR THEIR SERVICES. ALL CLINICAL STUDIES ON ALOECURE’S ACTIVE INGREDIENT WERE INDEPENDENTLY CONDUCTED AND WERE NOT SPONSORED BY THE AMERICAN GLOBAL HEALTH GROUP.
NEWS
USA TODAY ❚ WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2019 ❚ 3A
POISONED CITIES DEADLY BORDER
Dumping
Continued from Page 1A
along with iron ore and carbon coke,
then emerges clean as pieces of steel
rebar for construction, stacked in bundles on trailers.
Smelting separates impurities from
the molten iron and leaves behind
waste: heaps of grayish black slag,
which in other places have been found
to contain calcium, silicon, iron, chromium, manganese, lead, and other metals and pollutants.
Some of the slag is piled inside the
compound’s walls. Other mounds of
slag have been dumped outside the
walls, on the opposite side of the plant
from Ramírez’s home, forming a flattened heap beside a trash-strewn ditch
and a dry field.
Mexicali and surrounding areas
along the border have become a dumping ground for junk, from old appliances
to electronic waste to discarded tires,
some of which arrives from the United
States. There’s money to be made here
from some types of junk: Old cars can be
dismantled for reusable parts. Old iron
and copper can be resold or melted
down to make new material. And a
whole host of businesses, large and
small, legal and illegal, focus on taking
in discarded items and recycling anything of value.
The problem with Mexicali’s recycling businesses isn’t what gets recycled. It’s what goes up in the air and
what’s cast aside in the process.
All around Mexicali, vacant lots are
littered with trash ranging from household garbage to shattered pieces of old
computers. In backyards, heaps of
plastic and cardboard are collected by
unlicensed recyclers. Along the city’s
streets, blazing piles of tires and electrical cables send columns of black smoke
billowing into the air.
In the junkyards, rows of old cars
bake in the sun, leaking oil onto the
ground. The cars are cannibalized for
parts, and the battered remnants are
trucked to the steel mill southeast of the
city, where they’re dumped along with
pieces of old appliances, rusty iron
cables, and a mishmash of discarded
railings, gates, racks and barrels.
Elsewhere in Mexicali, where factories known as maquiladoras have proliferated to manufacture products for
export, many dumps, scrap yards and
recycling businesses have sprung up to
take in waste from both Mexico and the
United States. Though some of the businesses have licenses and say they’re
complying with environmental rules,
many others are operating illegally.
The top environmental official in the
state of Baja California has acknowledged that despite efforts to shut down
illegal dumps, many remain, and the
problem is still largely out of control.
The blight goes back years
Mexicali’s recycling businesses,
scrapyards and dumpsites create problems that go beyond aesthetics.
Circuit boards in discarded cellphones and electronics, for example,
contain toxic pollutants like arsenic,
cadmium, lead and mercury. Acid from
old car batteries can leak into the soil.
Whenever junk is filled with hazardous
chemicals, the toxins can leach into the
soil and pollute the groundwater as well
as water running in ditches.
For years, government officials on
both sides of the border have recognized
that the widespread unregulated dumping in Mexicali represents a potential
hazard.
In a 2012 report, consultants working
for the Border Environment Cooperation Commission studied how to improve the city’s deficient garbage collection system and made a list of suggestions. They said that Mexicali’s ditches
and drains are badly polluted “due to the
large volume of solid wastes” and that
polluted water from dumps is flowing
into the sewage-filled New River, which
crosses the border and continues past a
neighborhood in Calexico.
The report said that the trash
dumped along ditches and canals has
included discarded mattresses, household garbage and other debris and that
the “lack of control” adds to the pollution problems. The authors suggested,
among other things, cleaning up one of
the drains that feeds the New River.
The U.S. Environmental Protection
Agency and the California EPA have
since provided money for cleanups in
the city’s ditches and drains. The work
has involved pulling out tires, refrigerators, furniture and other debris.
Last year, Baja California’s Environmental Protection Department said it
A truck drives along the Pacífico Canal toward a dump in the Mexicali Valley. PHOTOS BY ZOE MEYERS/USA TODAY NETWORK
shut down 29 illegal dumpsites covering
a total of 250 acres.
“Right now, the problem we see most
often is illegal dumps,” said Thelma
Castañeda Custodia, the Baja California
agency’s secretary.
She said she doesn’t know how many
recyclers and junkyards are doing business illegally, but she guesses that for
every one that’s legal, three others may
be without permits.
Baja California’s Environmental Protection Department provided dozens of
inspection documents in response to a
request from the Palm Springs Desert
Sun. Those documents from 2016 and
2017 included 35 inspections that led to
fines, which ranged from the equivalent
of $750 to about $6,500. Twelve of
those cases involved waste disposal or
recycling businesses.
The agency has just four full-time
inspectors to enforce environmental
rules in Mexicali, and the documents
show they’re spending a significant
share of their time examining waste
businesses and recyclers.
One of the problems along the border,
Castañeda said, is the large quantity of
used goods that arrive on trucks from
the USA and come through customs as
secondhand items.
“That’s what has us, especially on the
border, stuck with a problem now of
accumulating tires and other types of
waste – electronics and other types of
waste that people simply don’t know
where they can dispose of it,” Castañeda
said.
From raw material, waste
Mexico’s government allows foreignowned maquiladoras to import raw materials and machinery tax-free as long
as they export the finished products.
While operating under that regime,
the companies need to track the raw
materials they bring across the border,
the finished products they export and
where they send their waste, said
Roberto Durazo, director of business
development for the Mexican company
IVEMSA. His firm assists foreign companies and provides “shelter” services,
acting as their legal representative in
the country.
“All the scrap, the company has to
keep very strict controls,” Durazo said.
“If they are bringing in metal and they
have some metal scrap, they cannot just
throw it somewhere.”
In general, the maquiladoras are supposed to export any hazardous waste
back to the country of origin, in many
cases to the United States. But León Felipe Ruiz González, operations director
for the consulting company Consorcio
Ambiental, said there are also “legal caveats” that allow for some hazardous
waste to be disposed of in Mexico.
He didn’t elaborate on those caveats.
However, government records show
some companies are disposing of hazardous waste in Mexico.
Documents from the federal Ministry
of Environment and Natural Resources
list companies that are authorized to
handle hazardous waste. In Mexicali,
they include 19 companies authorized to
transport hazardous waste, four approved recyclers of hazardous waste
and 11 companies that store hazardous
waste.
The documents show those companies receive things including leadtainted waste from electronics welding,
flammable solvents, pesticides, auto
waste including lead and acid, corrosive
substances, paint, contaminated soil,
asbestos, sludge left over from chromeplating, waste containing cyanide, leadtainted slag from furnaces and other
toxic chemicals.
When a company opens a factory in
Mexico, it’s required to prepare an environmental study and provide details
about the waste it will generate and how
it will dispose of the waste.
Durazo’s company has about two
dozen maquiladoras as clients, and he
said he doesn’t remember any of them
having problems with environmental
regulations or fines in recent years.
Clouds of chemicals
Behind their walls and guardhouses,
some of Mexicali’s factories have tanks
that hold industrial chemicals. Leaks
and spills have released plumes of
hazardous chemicals and sent people
fleeing.
One incident occurred in 1992, when
a leak at the Química Orgánica pesticide
plant in Mexicali released hydrochloric
acid into the air, prompting people to
flee the area. The plant later closed.
Other incidents at industrial plants
in Mexicali have included leaks of am-
Trash is often dumped alongside ditches in Mexicali.
monia and fires that sent toxic chemicals up in smoke.
The accidents have led to studies of
the dangers posed by industrial plants.
Judith Ley García, a researcher at the
Autonomous University of Baja California in Mexicali, has studied the risks to
help authorities and companies prepare
in the event of an emergency.
In one study, Ley and other researchers simulated leaks of ammonia from 18
companies that store substantial
amounts of the gas, which, if inhaled,
can be fatal.
Mapping danger zones around those
plants, they estimated that 14 percent of
Mexicali’s population is exposed to
risks from potential ammonia leaks,
and that’s considering just one of the
many toxic chemicals that are used in
factories along the border.
A lawsuit and a $21,000 fine
The Grupo Simec steel mill was one
of three companies named in a lawsuit
in 2014, when law professor Fidel Alfaro
Meléndrez and a group of more than 50
university law students sued Mexican
environmental authorities and accused
them of failing to control pollution.
In their complaint, they wrote that
the steel mill and two gas-fired power
plants “are polluting the air we breathe,
causing harm to the environment and
society in general, translating into respiratory illnesses and losses of human
lives.”
They lost the case last year. But
Alfaro Meléndrez said he’s considering
suing again to press for change.
A representative of Grupo Simec
didn’t respond to a request for an interview but said in an email that official information about the publicly traded
company is available online.
Grupo Simec says it “has made an ongoing commitment to environmental
protection and every year we make significant investments to maintain all the
equipment in operation at our production plants in good working order.” The
company says all its plants comply with
environmental regulations.
After the lawsuit was filed, government regulators cracked down. During
an inspection in September 2015, officials from the Federal Attorney for Environmental Protection, or PROFEPA, ordered the steel mill temporarily shut
down and fined the company 350,000
pesos, or about $21,000, for violations
including failing to properly equip the
plant to control emissions.
The agency said in a statement that
smoke was coming out “through doors,
walls and holes, without being captured
by any emission-control equipment.”
Just nine months later, the plant
caught fire. TV news footage of the blaze
in June 2016 showed thick smoke pouring out of the plant. The smoke spread
across Mexicali, covering the city.
The steel factory soon reopened.
Even when the plant is operating normally, Blanca Ramírez said, smoke
drifts through her yard. From her house,
she said she sometimes hears what
sound like explosions, “like a firecracker
inside something.”
Ramírez said she feels powerless.
“It’s hard not being able to do anything, not being able to control that
problem,” she said. “And I think this
doesn’t just affect us. It affects all of
Mexicali.”
NEWS
4A ❚ WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2019 ❚ USA TODAY
Write fancy, and hunt in
more colors – it’s the law
Pet principles
Kristin Lam
USA TODAY
Only those dogs, cats and rabbits
from shelters or rescue groups can be
sold at pet stores in California, beginning Tuesday. If pet store owners don’t
follow the law, including posting
where the pet came from on its cage,
they will pay up to a $500 fine.
New year, new laws.
A slew of state laws take effect at the
turn of the calendar – ranging from
minimum wage changes to pink hunting
gear to a mandatory cursive writing curriculum. One state will even begin paying people to relocate for remote work.
A few of the more notable changes:
Minimum wages will increase
President Donald Trump invited congressional leaders to the White House on
Wednesday for a briefing on border security and plans for a wall. EVAN VUCCI/AP
“HAPPY NEW YEAR TO EVERYONE,
INCLUDING THE HATERS AND THE
FAKE NEWS MEDIA!” Trump tweeted.
He wrote, “2019 WILL BE A FANTASTIC YEAR FOR THOSE NOT SUFFERING
FROM TRUMP DERANGEMENT SYNDROME. JUST CALM DOWN AND ENJOY THE RIDE, GREAT THINGS ARE
HAPPENING FOR OUR COUNTRY!”
Later in the day, Trump issued a more
sedate tweet: “Happy New Year!”
Trump taunted Pelosi, who is likely to
be elected House speaker for the new
Democratic majority.
“Border Security and the Wall ‘thing’
and Shutdown is not where Nancy Pelosi wanted to start her tenure as Speaker!” he tweeted. “Let’s make a deal?”
The Trump administration invited
congressional leaders to the White
House on Wednesday for a briefing on
border security, including plans for the
wall.
Pelosi and the Democrats said they
already have a plan and will pass it
when they take charge of the House of
Representatives after it convenes
Thursday. The proposal includes fullyear funding for shuttered departments
except for the Department of Homeland
Security, which handles immigration
and border security.
USA TODAY
WASHINGTON – With no end of a
partial shutdown in sight, President
Donald Trump rang in the new year
Tuesday by denouncing a new Democratic plan to reopen the government
because it lacks money for a wall along
the U.S.-Mexico border.
“The Democrats, much as I suspected, have allocated no money for a new
Wall. So imaginative!” Trump tweeted.
“The problem is, without a Wall there
can be no real Border Security - and
our Country must finally have a Strong
and Secure Southern Border!”
Democrats accused Trump of promoting the shutdown by insisting on
an expensive wall that would do little
or nothing to stop illegal crossings.
Trump “has given Democrats a
great opportunity to show how we will
govern responsibly & quickly pass our
plan to end the irresponsible #TrumpShutdown – just the first sign of things
to come in our new Democratic Majority committed to working #ForThePeople,” Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi tweeted in promoting her plan.
From the White House, Trump issued mocking greetings to his critics.
WEATHER
Following six other states and
Washington, D.C., Hawaii will allow
doctors to provide fatal prescription
medicine to terminally ill patients who
make several requests.
Two health care providers must
confirm a patient’s diagnosis and
decision-making ability.
At the start of the new year, 19 states
and 21 cities will increase their minimum wage, according to the National
Employment Law Project. About 17 million people from New York to California
will have received pay bumps, the project estimates, once additional minimum wage increases are phased in
throughout the year.
Happy New Year,
‘haters,’ from Trump
David Jackson
Medically assisted suicide
Kids must learn cursive
Ohio decided that cursive isn’t obsolete. A law will require students to
write legibly in cursive by the end of
fifth grade. The handwriting instructional materials must be part of school
curriculum by July 1.
Hunters may wear bright pink
Hunting enthusiasts in Illinois have a
new wardrobe choice.
In addition to bright orange, hunters
can wear bright pink beginning this year
to meet safety requirements during deer
seasons.
The bill passed unanimously in both
state chambers.
The new color option is supposed to
help hunters see each other and prevent
firearm accidents.
Previously, hunters were limited to
orange hats and upper outer garments
displaying a minimum of 400 square
inches of orange.
‘Sanctuary’ policies banned
Under a law prohibiting jurisdictions and law enforcement from
adopting “sanctuary” immigration
policies, officials may be forced to
work with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement.
No cities in Tennessee formally
hold a “sanctuary city” status, according to the Commercial Appeal, a member of the USA TODAY Network. One
county sheriff ’s office may have to reverse its policy on refusing to detain
people suspected of living in the country without documentation.
Move to Vermont, get paid
Remote workers who relocate to Vermont can apply for up to $10,000 from
the state government, starting Tuesday.
To promote economic growth, Vermont will cover expenses related to
moving and working from home or a coworking space, including computer
software and hardware. The state will
give up to $125,000 to qualified applicants in 2019 on a first-come, firstserved basis.
Legal smoking age raised
Joining six other states, Massachusetts will restrict the purchase of tobacco products to those 21 and older.
Young adults who turned 18 – the previous age requirement – before the
new year can still buy cigarettes.
Focus on what matters to you.
WEATHER ONLINE
USATODAY.COM
Download our free app and try My Topics.
TODAY’S HIGH TEMPERATURES
FRONT & CENTER
PRECIPITATION FORECAST
T-storms
With 102.4 inches
of rain, 2018 was
the wettest year
on record in
Wilmington,
North Carolina.
Olympia
46
43
Snow
Ice/mix
47
32
37
35
Fargo
Boise
Bend
Billings
33
45
31
40
Idaho Falls Jackson
Hole
15
54
Reno
43
26
25
42
55
St. George
Las Vegas
Fresno
Sioux Falls
28
North Platte
Palm Springs
40
35
62
61
27
San Diego
23
27
38
34
Cincinnati
44
39
46
35
Austin
33
44
Honolulu
San Antonio
83
45
Jackson
45
52
Houston
43
Richmond
50
50
Raleigh
56
Columbia
62
Charleston
68
76
79
HOTTEST:
88°
Immokalee, Fla.
81
Puerto Rico
Miami
San Juan
Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather Inc. ©2019
Below 10
10s
20s
82
81
Brownsville
Note: For contiguous
48 states through
3 p.m. ET yesterday
Tampa
72
61
30s
40s
50s
60s
70s
THURSDAY
EXTREMES
Savannah
74
Tallahassee
71
TODAY
43
48
Jacksonville
New
Orleans
51
SOURCE National Weather Service;
AccuWeather
43
Charleston
68
Mobile
Baton Rouge
63
Philadelphia
Washington Annapolis
Montgomery
Shreveport
Harrisburg
62
36
MidlandOdessa
38
Atlanta
57
41
35
New York
41
58
Little Rock Birmingham
Hartford
33
Charlotte
49
34
Albany
55
Nashville
45
Dallas/Ft. Worth
34
Hawaii
43
24
Boston
Pittsburgh
Columbus
Memphis
Tulsa
33
Lubbock
42
40
33
38
35 37
Oklahoma
City
30
Juneau
Lansing
Jefferson City St. Louis Louisville
Knoxville
Wichita
38
El Paso
Anchorage
Cleveland
33
21
33
Detroit
33 35
Kansas City Springfield
Indianapolis
33
Montpelier
Buffalo
36
52
Fairbanks
Chicago
Topeka
Albuquerque
Phoenix
61
Alaska
26
34
Santa Fe
Flagstaff
30
Augusta
Burlington
Grand
Milwaukee Rapids
32
Omaha
21
24
Madison
Des Moines
Cheyenne
Dodge City
Los Angeles
20
35
41
25
13
Pierre
Denver
Aspen
38
48
54
Marquette
22
40
Salt Lake City
Carson City
San Francisco
Casper
26
21
Elko
Duluth
Mpls-St. Paul
25
Rapid City
34
Burns
56
Sacramento
What’s the coldest month
of the year in the
Northern Hemisphere?
Bismarck
Miles City
Helena
45
Salem
On this date in 1997, Pueblo,
Colorado, soared to a January
record high of 81 degrees.
Bangor
Spokane
32
Portland
Eureka
Doyle Rice; Alejandro Gonzalez/
USA TODAY
@USATODAYWeather
Rain
Seattle
80s
90s
100s
COLDEST:
-39°
Daniel, Wyo.
FRIDAY
110+
TOP TRAVEL CITIES Air quality index (AQI)
BALTIMORE
ATLANTA
WED
THU
FRI
A little
rain
62/53
Showers
around
61/52
WED
Rain
62/42
THU
FRI
Incr.
clouds
48/40
FRI
WED
Mostly
sunny
82/73
WED
THU
Shower
82/71
THU
FRI
Mostly
sunny
85/70
FRI
f Fog
i Ice
r Rain
CHARLOTTE
Much
colder
34/29
A bit of
snow
43/30
Mostly
sunny
46/35
Mostly
sunny
22/15
Mostly
sunny
36/24
Mostly
sunny
39/29
FRI
TODAY
THU
40/29c
33/26pc
30/8sf
40/32pc
37/22c
63/38w
34/10sn
25/3s
43/37pc
66/57r
44/35r
55/32s
63/55c
34/30s
57/47r
32/23pc
33/22pc
33/29pc
24/19pc
28/15pc
68/59sh
50/37c
40/21s
39/28pc
40/27pc
30/10s
46/29pc
39/22sf
66/40s
15/4pc
33/9s
50/36pc
66/56sh
53/33c
58/35s
67/40r
41/32pc
57/53r
40/28s
36/28c
34/29pc
34/28pc
39/20s
71/60c
46/32pc
46/31w
CHICAGO
WED
THU
FRI
DALLAS/FT. WORTH
Mostly
cloudy
33/20
Mostly
sunny
38/26
NEW YORK
Rain at
times
36/32
Heavy
rain, ice
39/33
Plenty of
sun
52/32
WED
THU
Milder
44/30
FRI
AQI Good
AQI Good
AQI Good
ORLANDO
DENVER
WED
Clearing
37/28
THU
FRI
Mostly
sunny
58/29
FRI
Partly
sunny
43/29
FRI
Much
colder
38/33
WED
Fog
82/64
WED
Cooler
43/37
WED
THU
Rain
69/47
THU
Clearing
45/32
THU
Fog
83/66
THU
Clearing
48/31
THU
FRI
Cooler
58/44
FRI
Partly
sunny
47/41
FRI
T-storms
81/58
FRI
Partly
sunny
46/39
FRI
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Colorado Springs
Columbia, S.C.
Columbus, Ohio
Corpus Christi, Texas
Dayton, Ohio
Daytona Beach, Fla.
Des Moines, Iowa
Duluth, Minn.
Durham, N.C.
El Paso, Texas
Fairbanks, Alaska
Flagstaff, Ariz.
Fargo, N.D.
Fort Myers, Fla.
Fort Smith, Ark.
Fort Wayne, Ind.
Fresno, Calif.
Grand Rapids, Mich.
Green Bay, Wis.
Greensboro, N.C.
Greenville, S.C.
Harrisburg, Pa.
dr Drizzle
TODAY
44/30c
40/30c
39/15pc
62/55c
43/30c
52/44dr
42/28c
79/62f
32/19s
13/12pc
55/47c
39/24sn
23/0sn
27/3s
25/18pc
84/64f
38/31r
37/25c
54/31s
33/25sf
24/14sn
54/45c
56/49r
43/36pc
AQI Good
AQI Good
AQI Good
h Haze
THU
43/27pc
40/30pc
48/25s
63/54sh
41/27pc
60/37pc
40/25pc
80/64f
44/23s
33/24c
56/44r
46/25pc
4/-17pc
39/8s
35/25pc
83/67f
43/35r
39/26pc
58/34s
35/28s
31/26pc
56/46r
58/50r
47/28pc
pc Partly cloudy
s Sunny
Hartford, Conn.
Indianapolis
Islip, N.Y.
Jackson, Miss.
Jacksonville, Fla.
Jefferson City, Mo.
Kansas City
Key West, Fla.
Knoxville, Tenn.
Laredo, Texas
Lexington, Ky.
Lincoln, Neb.
Little Rock, Ark.
Long Beach, Calif.
Louisville, Ky.
Lubbock, Texas
Madison, Wis.
Manchester, N.H.
Memphis, Tenn.
Milwaukee
Mobile, Ala.
Modesto, Calif.
Montgomery, Ala.
Myrtle Beach, S.C.
sh Showers
TODAY
35/25s
38/25c
37/28pc
52/45r
79/60f
35/20pc
34/19pc
82/76s
55/46r
50/42dr
47/33c
36/15s
41/34r
62/41w
46/33c
34/26sn
26/12sn
32/24s
45/37r
30/18sn
71/62sh
54/29s
68/55r
61/55c
THU
42/26pc
41/25s
45/29pc
58/40r
80/63f
45/24pc
46/23pc
83/76s
52/45r
61/36pc
44/32pc
46/21s
45/37r
66/43s
46/32pc
40/24sn
36/23s
40/26sn
48/44r
36/26s
69/53c
55/34s
65/58sh
65/56r
Mostly
sunny
52/30
Sunny,
cool
56/35
Sunny
63/38
AQI Moderate
SALT LAKE CITY
WED
THU
FRI
Mostly
sunny
83/73
Partly
sunny
83/72
Partly
sunny
82/72
AQI Good
AQI Good
PHOENIX
WED
w Windy
HONOLULU
WED
THU
AQI Good
PHILADELPHIA
P.M.
flurries
35/27
WED
Sunny
49/28
Cloudy
72/62
sn Snow
DETROIT
Not as
cold
41/17
THU
WED
AQI Good
Akron, Ohio
Albany, N.Y.
Albuquerque
Allentown, Pa.
Amarillo, Texas
Anaheim, Calif.
Anchorage, Alaska
Aspen, Colo.
Atlantic City, N.J.
Augusta, Ga.
Austin, Texas
Bakersfield, Calif.
Baton Rouge, La.
Billings, Mont.
Birmingham, Ala.
Bismarck, N.D.
Boise, Idaho
Buffalo, N.Y.
Burlington, Vt.
Cedar Rapids, Iowa
Charleston, S.C.
Charleston, W.Va.
Cheyenne, Wyo.
A little
rain
59/50
Mild with
rain
58/44
THU
NEW ORLEANS
sf Snowflurries
U.S. CITIES
Cooler
58/49
WED
AQI Good
AQI Good
AQI Good
WED
Clearing
50/31
MPLS-ST. PAUL
MIAMI
BOSTON
THU
AQI Good
AQI Good
c Cloudy
Cooler
44/36
Partly
sunny
25/14
Partly
sunny
30/21
Partly
sunny
33/26
AQI Moderate
HOUSTON
Rain
51/44
WED
THU
Rain
ending
52/35
THU
FRI
Sunny
57/36
FRI
SAN FRANCISCO
WED
Plenty of
sun
61/41
WED
THU
Sunny
64/45
THU
FRI
Mostly
sunny
63/50
FRI
AQI Good
Mostly
sunny
48/30
Sunny,
cool
52/35
Sunny
56/38
Mostly
sunny
55/39
Mostly
sunny
55/41
Mostly
sunny
56/47
AQI Moderate
SEATTLE
WED
THU
FRI
LOS ANGELES
WED
Sunny
62/43
THU
Sunny
65/45
FRI
Sunny
66/47
AQI Moderate
AQI Good
AQI Good
SAN DIEGO
LAS VEGAS
WED
A little
rain
46/44
Rain,
breezy
53/45
Spotty
showers
51/39
AQI Moderate
WASHINGTON
WED
Cooler
48/41
THU
Clearing
52/36
FRI
P.M. rain
50/44
AQI Good
t Thunderstorms
Nags Head, N.C.
Nashville, Tenn.
Newark, N.J.
New Haven, Conn.
Norfolk, Va.
Oakland, Calif.
Oklahoma City
Omaha, Neb.
Palm Springs, Calif.
Pensacola, Fla.
Pierre, S.D.
Pittsburgh
Portland, Maine
Portland, Ore.
Providence, R.I.
Raleigh, N.C.
Rapid City, S.D.
Reno, Nev.
Richmond, Va.
Rochester, N.Y.
Sacramento, Calif.
San Antonio
San Jose, Calif.
Santa Fe, N.M.
TODAY
50/46c
49/38r
39/34pc
37/30pc
49/44c
57/35s
33/25c
35/17s
61/39s
72/63sh
35/21pc
41/30c
29/21s
45/42pc
36/27s
56/46c
40/23pc
43/23s
50/43c
34/27pc
54/30s
45/36r
58/33s
27/6sf
THU
51/44sh
48/43c
48/31pc
45/31pc
55/44r
56/38s
35/27sn
45/23s
64/42s
70/57sh
39/22s
40/26pc
37/25sn
53/46r
43/28sf
57/46r
46/26pc
50/31pc
55/40sh
37/29pc
55/33pc
55/35pc
58/39s
27/7s
Sarasota, Fla.
Savannah, Ga.
Scottsdale, Ariz.
Shreveport, La.
Sioux Falls, S.D.
South Bend, Ind.
Spokane, Wash.
Springfield, Mo.
Springfield, Ill.
St. Louis
St. Petersburg, Fla.
Syracuse, N.Y.
Tallahassee, Fla.
Tampa, Fla.
Toledo, Ohio
Topeka, Kan.
Tucson, Ariz.
Tupelo, Miss.
Tulsa, Okla.
Virginia Beach, Va.
Wichita, Kan.
Wilmington, Del.
Winston-Salem, N.C.
Worcester, Mass.
TODAY
82/64pc
74/60f
51/26s
45/39r
28/18s
33/20sf
32/29pc
36/22c
33/20pc
37/24c
80/65pc
31/24pc
76/61f
81/67pc
38/26c
36/18pc
44/25sn
49/42r
35/23c
49/44c
38/18pc
43/36pc
53/45c
32/24s
THU
81/66pc
74/60c
55/32s
48/35r
39/24s
38/24s
39/35r
45/29c
40/23s
44/27s
79/64pc
36/25pc
74/64c
81/67pc
39/27pc
48/22pc
54/32s
51/48r
39/28r
53/41r
45/23c
48/30pc
56/46r
38/26pc
WORLD CITIES
Beijing
Buenos Aires
Cancun, Mexico
Dubai, UAE
Frankfurt
Hong Kong
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
London
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Mumbai, India
Paris
Rio de Janeiro
Rome
Seoul
Singapore
Sydney
Toronto
Tokyo
TODAY
33/14pc
87/59t
83/74pc
79/62pc
41/26s
58/56r
45/39c
55/40s
76/57t
45/30pc
74/45pc
14/7s
31/28sn
88/69h
43/33pc
91/80pc
49/35pc
31/15s
88/78pc
85/71s
29/26pc
50/36pc
THU
36/17s
75/59pc
83/73pc
82/66pc
37/30c
63/63r
45/35r
51/40s
71/59t
41/28pc
73/47pc
24/22pc
30/26sn
89/70h
40/30pc
93/80s
47/30s
35/18s
89/78h
83/72h
35/30pc
50/37s
NEWS
USA TODAY ❚ WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2019 ❚ 5A
OPINION
TODAY'S DEBATE: WALL STREET
Our view: Trump administration
roils a volatile stock market
For much of the Trump administration’s first two years, Republicans
could take refuge in the stock market.
Sure, the administration was a mess
and deeply compromised. But markets
were rising. The economy was strong.
The corporate tax cuts and deregulation were working. Rather than focusing on all of that “noise” coming out of
Washington, these Republicans could
confine themselves to more pleasant
topics, such as the performance of their
portfolios and 401(k) accounts.
More recently, however, the stock
market hasn’t been such a good place to
hide. Even after a year-end rally, the
S&P 500 finished 2018 at 2,507 — down
more than 6 percent for the year and
14 percent from its high in early October, marking the S&P’s worst annual
performance since 2008.
When markets are volatile, a White
House should adopt the physicians’
credo: First, do no harm. Instead, the
Trump administration has undermined
confidence in markets. It started by
waging an ill-conceived and everevolving trade war. It then raised
doubts — through its ongoing shuffling
of personnel — about its overall competence and ability to handle international crises.
To make matters worse, this fall
President Donald Trump got into the
business of Fed bashing. Because he
can’t take blame for anything, Trump
began lighting into Federal Reserve
Chairman Jerome Powell when stocks
went down or interest rates went up.
The president has even mused in recent days about firing Powell, as he has
done with so many people in his administration.
That, of course, only spooked markets further. Investors see the Fed’s
freedom to make monetary policy
without political interference as one of
the pillars of the American economic
system.
Annual performance of
the S&P 500 stock index
+19.4%
+11.4%
+9.5%
2015
2014
-0.7%
2018
2016
2017
-6.2%
SOURCE Yahoo Finance
JEFF KOTERBA/OMAHA WORLD-HERALD/POLITICALCARTOONS.COM
KARL GELLES/USA TODAY
To cap off the year, Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin blundered his
way into an almost comical unforced
error. The former Goldman Sachs executive announced that he had talked to
leaders of the six largest banks and
wanted to reassure the public that
these financial institutions had plenty
of money to lend.
In so doing, Mnuchin essentially
raised the possibility of a liquidity crisis that no one was particularly concerned about. This bizarre incident was
blamed for contributing to a 653-point
drop in the Dow on Christmas Eve.
To be sure, markets frequently sell
off for reasons that have nothing to do
with presidents.
Stock prices of late have been particularly vulnerable to a correction, given
that they have been on an upward trajectory since early 2009, marking it the
longest bull market in American history. And volatility is fed by high-speed
automated trading.
But never before has a president
been so keen to take credit for rising
stock prices and so quick to blame others when they fall.
Opposing view: Hey, Fed,
the economy is slowing down
Juscelino F. Colares
President Donald Trump’s strong
economy has exhibited signs of slowing down, and the Federal Reserve
would be wrong not to take notice.
Fourth-quarter GDP forecasts now hover in the mid-to-high 2 percent range —
nothing like the 3-to-4 percent range
we’ve seen this year. Indeed, a number
of indicators point to a slowdown.
Although the president and the Republican-controlled Congress deserve
praise for tax cuts, keeping this country
in its second-longest postwar expansion and making it attractive to domestic and foreign investment, the investment spike they brought and the resultant economic stimulus they produced
have waned, as expected.
Central bank tightening has been
felt worldwide. The Fed began reducing
assets from its balance sheet late
spring 2016, thus gradually mopping up
liquidity from the market, even as it
embarked on interest rate hikes. Increasing public and private debt levels
have also led to tighter monetary policy
in Asia, Turkey and other emerging
markets. Europe, the other major cen-
ter of global growth, also saw the European Central Bank begin reversing
quantitative easing (i.e., central-bank
asset purchases). Thus, central bank
stimulus is down worldwide and credit
has tightened in foreign markets. A further deceleration of trade, caused not
only by increasing trade friction, won’t
help world growth forecasts either.
While deregulation and increased oil
production have propelled the United
States to the top of the world’s oil-producing nations, the expansionary effect of lower oil prices has been
countered, to a significant extent, by a
stronger dollar — thanks in no small
part to Fed rate hikes — making U.S. exports less competitive abroad. Lower
oil prices also have strongly contractionary effects in oil-producing states.
In sum, both for domestic and international reasons, a slowdown is likely.
In case Fed Chairman Jerome Powell
needs any reminding, it is better to err
on the side of a little more inflation and
end up with a soft landing.
Juscelino F. Colares is a professor of
law and finance at Case Western Reserve University.
Wall is Trump’s Alamo.
This won’t end well.
He staked his brand and
base on a risky promise
frontiersman Davy Crockett at the Alamo, Trump must fight to the death. Despite criminal investigations, convictions and guilty pleas swirling around
him, 89 percent of Republicans still approve of the president’s performance,
according to a recent Gallup poll. They
are sticking with him for now, but they
expect a wall. Failure, which seems inevitable, will be reputationally fatal.
In the corporate world, there is often
an event forcing stakeholders to realize
that their expectations will not be met.
For BP, it was the Deepwater Horizon
explosion and oil spill that killed 11 people in 2010. At GE, expensive acquisitions, poor performance and rising interest rates showed that management
couldn’t deliver. At Wells Fargo, it was,
well, one thing after another.
Failure to build the wall will have
similar implications for Trump. His
base will recognize he never had a plan
and when he said “Mexico will pay for
it, believe me,” he was conning them.
If the wall wasn’t funded with Republicans running Congress, how likely
is it with Democrats taking control of
the House? Even Republican senators
will eventually abandon him as pressure to reopen the government supersedes whatever pressure they feel from
a weakened president. Like Caesar of
Rome, his “friends” in the Senate may
be his ultimate undoing.
The gap between expectations and
reality is becoming hard for Trumpians
to deny. Ann Coulter has angrily turned
on Trump for his failure to meet the
clear and tangible expectation he himself set. Fox News pundits and Rush
Limbaugh see the gap. As the wall failure becomes more clear and is amplified by conservative media and social
media commentators, Trump’s reputation among even his ardent supporters
will crumble.
In May 2017, we used our algorithms
to predict that events eroding the president’s reputation would sink him to a
40 percent support level (roughly
where he is now) — and that this would
hold until his base’s expectations are
shattered, leaving him at 25 percent.
All indications are that we are headed
in this direction.
Like Humpty Dumpty, the wall will
be his (reputational) downfall.
Nir Kossovsky
President Donald Trump got to the
White House riding the support of voters for whom the most visible manifestation of “making America great again”
would be a wall on our southern border.
He made that symbol the single most
tangible part of his brand. But now that
his supporters expect it and his reputation depends on it, the wall is like his
Alamo. He has no choice but to stand
his ground and fight to the bitter end.
To Trump, the media’s opinions
don’t matter, the Democrats’ opinions
don’t matter and the opinions of more
moderate, pragmatic members of his
own party don’t matter. What he has
learned from history and experience is
that if broadening your base means disappointing your core audience, it can
lead to reputational disaster.
My firm is in the business of insuring
corporations against reputational crises and has analyzed thousands of scenarios. Reputation is based on the degree to which reality is in sync with expectations. Setting expectations without an adequate plan for meeting them
is a dangerous game. If, eventually, you
stumble, angry, disappointed stakeholders will make you pay a price.
Candidate Trump made the same
misjudgment as countless companies.
It wasn’t enough to cast himself as a
tough businessman who would make
better trade deals. It wasn’t enough to
posture as a skillful negotiator who
could get a fractious Congress moving.
It wasn’t enough to say he’d put “America first” and end our entanglements in
foreign wars. It wasn’t enough to promise he’d cut taxes and regulations.
Like BP’s brand promise of being
“beyond petroleum,” like GE’s “imagination at work” portrayal of solving the
world’s problems, like Wells Fargo
trumpeting its new ethical standards,
Trump linked his own brand inextricably with the wall. Like those companies, he hadn’t thoroughly thought
through what expectations he would
have to fulfill if elected, and how exactly he’d be able to deliver something he
had no unilateral power to deliver.
And now, like Col. James Bowie and
Nir Kossovsky is CEO of Steel City Re.
YOUR SAY
Is Warren the candidate Democrats have been waiting for? Some doubt it.
FACEBOOK
USA TODAY OPINION
As much as I would love for Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., to run for president and win, I don’t think she can. As
evidenced by the last election, America
will not vote for a woman, even though
she is the most qualified, intelligent and
experienced. Basically, the American
electorate seems to be ignorant, puritanical and small-minded. Maybe she
has a chance as vice president.
Richard Blue
She’d definitely be better than the
man currently in the White House.
Lynne LaPorte
jokes. She will never escape the DNA
test.
Jim Reid
This country doesn’t need someone
like Warren. She will only create another
set of rules, taxes and policies to make
us a weaker nation with no borders and
jobs flocking overseas.
Lou Creola
I sincerely hope Democrats can come
up with someone viable with a positive
message and constructive platform to
move America forward. Based on history, this person is not the one.
Open borders, higher taxes, abolishing ICE didn’t work in 2016.
Democrats are handing President
Donald Trump another four years.
John Wettstein
Warren has already made the worst
mistake in politics: The senator has allowed herself to become the brunt of
I like Warren, but she won’t get it.
Trump and Fox News are just itching to
get at her, and not over policy. They’ll
make it personal. Since Trump loves
name calling, the Democrats should get
together and pick a name for him.
Daniel Hamilton
WANT TO COMMENT? Have Your Say at
letters@usatoday.com, @usatodayopinion on
Twitter and facbook.com/usatodayopinion. Comments are edited for length and clarity. Content
submitted to USA TODAY may appear in print,
digital or other forms. For letters, include name,
address and phone number. Letters may be mailed
to 7950 Jones Branch Drive, McLean, VA, 22108.
“USA TODAY hopes to serve as a forum for better understanding and unity to help make the USA truly one nation.” – Allen H. Neuharth, Founder, Sept. 15, 1982
Gannett Company President
& Chief Executive Officer
ROBERT DICKEY
USA TODAY Publisher
President, USA TODAY NETWORK
MARIBEL PEREZ WADSWORTH
USA TODAY
Editor in Chief
NICOLE CARROLL
Executive Editor/News: Jeff Taylor
Executive Editor/Audience: Patty Michalski
Executive Editor & Vice President/Investigations: Chris Davis
Executive Editor/Local News: Amalie Nash
Editorial Page Editor: Bill Sternberg
Chief Revenue Officer: Kevin Gentzel
6A ❚ WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2019 ❚ USA TODAY
NEWS
Shutdown
Continued from Page 1A
mands for as much as $5 billion in additional funding for a border wall. Both
sides are dug in, and there has been little
indication that the impasse will be resolved quickly.
National parks remained open,
though some reduced their services.
Smithsonian museums in Washington
have accommodated visitors but are set
to close this week. Social Security checks
continued, and airport screeners remain
at work.
But for many, the effect has been
tangible.
Federal workers hit
“This time, it’s going to hurt a lot more
because of the time of year it is,” said
Justin Tarovisky, a corrections officer at
a federal prison in West Virginia and
executive vice president of the local
American Federation of Government
Employees union.
“We work in a tough environment,” The pain of a partial government shutdown may become more pronounced as people return from holiday breaks this
Tarovisky said. “Not only does it linger in month. Congress is set to come back to the Capitol on Thursday to renew the funding feud. WIN MCNAMEE/GETTY IMAGES
the back of your mind; it kind of drives
morale down a little bit.”
Though there is a heavy concentra- trip to Florida to remain in Washington
said Rickabaugh, whose company,
tion of federal workers in the Washing- during the impasse, there was little eviRick-N-Ball Restoration, fixes damage
ton region, the majority of federal em- dence negotiations to resolve the “I think one day of a shutdown
caused by water, mold, smoke and
ployees work outside the nation’s standoff were underway. Trump and is too much.”
other hazards. “It’s unfortunate that
capital. California, Texas, Florida and congressional Democrats continued to Ryan Baugh
the inability of politicians to come to an
Georgia, for instance, account for about trade partisan jabs, a sign that officials Office of Immigration Statistics
agreement (means) people like us ...
20 percent of the overall civilian work- were nowhere close to a deal to reopen
pay a price.”
force, according to data from the Office shuttered agencies.
Rickabaugh said he’s pushing forof Personnel Management.
House Democrats, who will take
ward with the business, relying on his
In the past, including the 16-day shut- control of that chamber Thursday, Small businesses waiting
own credit. He described the governdown in 2013, federal workers received readied a proposal to reopen the govment shutdown as a “speed bump that
back pay. That outcome is not guaran- ernment by providing full-year funding
When Andrew Rickabaugh and his we will overcome whether that loan
teed because it requires Congress and for most departments. The proposal brother-in-law decided to start a resto- comes through or not.”
the White House to work together to pass would fund the Department of Home- ration business last year in Huntsville,
Officials near federal park lands rea law mandating the back pay.
land Security through Feb. 8, giving Alabama, they reached out to the Small mained concerned about how an ex“I think one day of a shutdown is too both sides additional time to strike a Business Administration to guarantee tended shutdown might affect busimuch,” said Ryan Baugh, who works for deal on border security.
a loan to help them buy equipment.
nesses. In Florida, most federal wildlife
the Office of Immigration Statistics at
“This legislation reopens governThe process was going smoothly – refuges and parks were at least partialthe Department of Homeland Security ment services, ensures workers get the Rickabaugh said he expected approval ly open Monday. That meant fishing
and is an AFGE steward in the office. “As paychecks they’ve earned and restores around Christmas – until the shutdown and birding guides, as well as other serit goes on, the effects will be more certainty to the lives of the American hit.
vices, were open – for now.
strongly and widely felt.”
people,” House Democratic leader NanThe Small Business Administration
Everglades City Mayor Howie
Both Tarovisky and Baugh stressed cy Pelosi and Senate Democratic leader guaranteed more than $30 billion in Grimm said keeping those businesses
that they were speaking on behalf of the Chuck Schumer said in a joint state- loans to companies in the fiscal year running is crucial to his town.
union, not their agencies. The AFGE ment Monday.
that ended in 2017, but processing of
“If they would shut them down, that
sued the Trump administration Monday,
Trump rejected the proposal.
most loans was suspended when the would hurt for sure,” he said. “Hopefulclaiming it is illegal to require “essential”
“Democrats, come back from vaca- agency closed. Rickabaugh couldn’t ly, they can get things worked out, and
government employees to work without tion now and give us the votes neces- reach SBA officials in Alabama.
the country can go back to work.”
pay.
sary for Border Security, including the
“We’re having to do things a little difContributing: Bart Jansen, USA TOThough Trump delayed his annual Wall,” Trump tweeted Monday.
ferently than maybe we had planned,” DAY; Fort Myers News-Press
IN BRIEF
Strategic Command apologizes
for New Year’s Eve tweet bomb
The U.S. Strategic Command, responsible for managing the nation’s nuclear arsenal, apologized Monday for
tweeting that it was prepared to drop
something “much bigger” than the iconic ball that marks the new year in New
York City.
Hours before the ball drop, the command tweeted, “#TimesSquare tradition rings in the #NewYear by dropping
the big ball...if ever needed, we are
#ready to drop something much, much
bigger.” The tweet included video showing a bomber dropping two conventional Massive Ordnance Penetrator bombs
at a test range in the USA.
The command’s Twitter account has
more than 93,000 followers, and the
tweet was deleted after sparking controversy on social media. “Our previous
NYE tweet was in poor taste & does not
reflect our values,” the command tweeted. “We apologize. We are dedicated to
the security of America & allies.”
California fires may mean utility
PG&E violated criminal sentence
Federal prosecutors said a California
utility’s role in igniting wildfires in 2017
could allow a judge to find that it violated terms of its criminal conviction in a
deadly gas pipeline explosion.
In a court filing Monday, the U.S. attorney’s office in San Francisco cited investigations by state officials that
blamed Pacific Gas & Electric power
lines for some of the fires in October
2017. PG&E didn’t immediately return a
request for comment.
Prosecutors said a judge could use
those facts to determine that the utility
violated conditions of its probation in a
conviction stemming from an explosion
of one of its natural gas lines in 2010.
The blast in the San Francisco Bay Area
killed eight people.
North Dakota legislation seeks
to discourage pipeline tampering
A North Dakota legislator wants to
increase legal consequences for people
who tamper with pipelines and groups
that help them. A pipeline protest shut
down oil flow for several hours in 2016.
Sen. Janne Myrdal, R-Edinburg,
sponsored the bill, The Bismarck Tribune reported. It would increase maximum fines from $10,000 to $100,000 if
an organization is found to have conspired with individuals who tamper
with infrastructure.
NASA spacecraft opens new year
4 billion miles from Earth
NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft
survived the most distant exploration of
another world, a tiny, icy object 4 billion
miles away that’s shaped like a peanut
or bowling pin.
Flight controllers in Maryland received word from the spacecraft late
Tuesday morning. Cheers erupted at
Johns Hopkins University’s Applied
Physics Laboratory, home to Mission
Control, as mission operations manager
Alice Bowman declared, “We have a
healthy spacecraft.”
New Horizons zoomed past the small
celestial object known as Ultima Thule
3½ years after its spectacular brush
with Pluto. Scientists said it will take
nearly two years for New Horizons to
beam back all its observations of Ultima
Thule, a full billion miles beyond Pluto.
130th Rose Parade boasts floral
floats, singer Chaka Khan
Floral floats and marching bands
took to the streets under a sunny California sky as the 130th Rose Parade drew
hundreds of thousands of spectators on
New Year’s Day and millions more
watched on TV.
The extravaganza in Pasadena
kicked off with a performance by singer
Chaka Khan, the grand marshal of the
parade, and featured 40 floats.
Far-right Bolsonaro assumes top
job in Brazil, promises big changes
Jair Bolsonaro was sworn in as Brazil’s president Tuesday, taking the reins
of Latin America’s largest and most
populous nation with promises to overhaul myriad aspects of daily life and put
an end to business-as-usual governing.
Bolsonaro is the latest of several farright leaders around the globe who have
come to power by riding waves of anger
at the establishment and promising to
ditch the status quo.
From staff and wire reports
USA TODAY ❚ WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2019 ❚ SECTION B
IN MONEY
Be resolute about career resolutions
New Year’s is the perfect time to take stock. 2B
IN TECH
Tech-heavy 2019 just getting started
From 5G to 8K, consumers have much to digest. 3B
STATES
Around the nation
News from every state. 5B
Dow Jones’
decline
is biggest
since ’08
Final 3 months brought
volatility to Wall Street
Adam Shell
USA TODAY
Stocks closed out a bruising 2018
with gains on New Year’s Eve but it
wasn’t enough to help the market avoid
its biggest annual loss in 10 years.
The Dow Jones Industrial Average,
which rallied 265 points in the year’s final trading day, finished 2018 with a
loss of 5.6 percent, its worst decline
since a 33.8 percent drop in 2008. The
broad Standard & Poor’s 500 stock index fell 6.2 percent in 2018, its worst
performance in a decade.
Despite Monday’s rally, which was
sparked by signs of progress in trade
talks between the U.S. and China, the
S&P 500 still posted its biggest December decline since 1931 and narrowly
dodged its first bear market since 2009
on its way to its worst annual performance since the financial crisis.
In a tweet over the weekend, President Donald Trump said he spoke with
Chinese counterpart Xi Jinping about
the trade dispute between the world’s
two biggest economies and that “Big
progress was being made!” That news
was greeted positively by investors, as
slowing economic growth, due in part
to tariffs and trade-related uncertainty, has weighed heavily on stocks.
2018 morphed into a treacherous
year for investors, as the stock market
suffered two corrections – or drops of
10 percent or more from prior highs.
The benchmark stock gauge on Christmas Eve also came within two--tenths
of a percentage point of tumbling 20
percent from its peak on a closing basis
and into bear market territory.
“That sure felt like a bear,” said John
Lynch, chief investment strategist at
LPL Financial. That narrow miss kept
the bull market, which began in March
2009, intact.
Volatility returned to Wall Street
with a vengeance in the final three
months of the year, with stocks cratering under the weight of fears of recession, concern about the Federal Reserve hiking interest rates, trade war
uncertainties and signs of a global economic slowdown. After a 0.9 percent
gain on the year’s final trading day, the
S&P 500 finished 2018 14.5 percent below its Sept. 20 peak of 2,930.75.
The blue chip Dow ended the year 13
percent shy of its recent peak. The
Nasdaq composite finished 2018 down
3.9 percent and 18.2 percent below its
August all-time high. The small-company Russell 2000 index suffered the
biggest decline, tumbling 12.2 percent
and enters the new year 22.5 percent
from its peak, deep in bear territory.
USA SNAPSHOTS ©
Mortgage rates
Rate Week ago
30 yr. fixed
4.60%
4.59%
15 yr. fixed
3.77%
3.82%
5/1 ARM
4.00%
4.05%
7/1 ARM
4.10%
4.16%
30 yr. jumbo
4.44%
4.48%
30 yr. FHA
4.09%
4.12%
SOURCE: BANKRATE.COM
GETTY IMAGES
Housing market will be
slower, steadier in 2019
House hunters should watch
and understand these trends
Janna Herron
USA TODAY
the market – houses priced $250,000 and
higher – especially when it comes to newly
built houses, said Danielle Hale, chief economist of realtor.com. That’s good news for
move-up buyers, but not so much for the firsttime millennial buyer. “There’s still a mismatch
on the entry-level side,” she said.
Forget fevered bidding wars and snap homebuying decisions. Slower and steadier will Houses in all shapes and sizes
characterize next year’s housing market.
That follows a 2018 that started off hot but
If you’re a first-time buyer, you won’t be
softened into the fall as buyers – put off by high completely out of luck if you stay open-mindprices and few choices – sat out rather than ed. If a single-family home is out of the quespaid up.
tion, consider a mobile home or townhouse as a
Affordability issues will remain a top con- starter home, both of which are on the rise.
cern going into 2019, exacerbated by rising
The volume of shipments for manufactured
mortgage rates. But some of 2018’s more in- houses – also known as mobile homes – is extractable issues will begin to loosen up. The pected to finish above 100,000 this year, up
volume of for-sale homes is expected to rise from 93,000 in 2017, according to Robert Dietz,
and diversify, while the number of buyers is chief economist of the National Association of
forecast to shrink.
Home Builders. The trend is expect“For home sellers, they need to
ed to continue next year.
recognize those days of frenzied
These homes are also significantmarket are over. They must price The first few
ly cheaper than other home types.
competitively to sell their home,”
Not including land costs, the cost to
said Lawrence Yun, the chief econo- months of
buy a mobile home averages
mist at the National Association of 2019 will
$70,600, compared with $257,900
Realtors. “For buyers, there will be
for an existing single-family home
challenges when it comes to rising reveal exactly and $309,700 for a new home.
interest rates, but they don’t have to
You may also consider a townhow the new
make hurried decisions anymore.”
house, an attached single-family
Still, some cash-strapped first- tax changes
home located in a community of
time buyers will simply be priced
homes. Construction of townhomes
out, while a cohort of potential affect
also is experiencing year-over-year
move-up buyers will decide to stay homeowners.
growth and is outpacing the singlein their existing home, make renovafamily detached home market, Dietz
tions and enjoy their current low mortgage said.
rate. Price increases will moderate, and every“The market is being supported by millennione in the market will need to adjust.
als moving from renting to their first-home
purchase,” he said. “If you’re in a high-cost area
Finally, more homes to choose from
with wage and job growth, townhouses are appropriate for entry-level. And they still get that
One of the biggest complaints among buyers suburban feel with their own front door.”
in the last several years is that there weren’t
enough homes for sale. In fact, the supply of Affording a home remains hard
houses hit historic lows in the winter of 2017
and has yet to rebound substantially. That
Housing values are still expected to increase
fueled bidding wars, price increases and frus- next year, but not at the gang-buster pace seen
tration.
in recent years. NAR’s Yun forecasts modest
The supply crunch is expected to ease some price growth between 2 percent and 3 percent,
in 2019 with inventory rising 10 percent to down from close to 5 percent this year and over
15 percent, according to Yun. But the increase
will be skewed toward the mid-to-high end of See TRENDS, Page 2B
MONEY
2B ❚ WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2019 ❚ USA TODAY
Make resolutions to set yourself up for success
rewards.
Your HR department can also show
you how to contribute to your savings
each pay period. Direct deposit makes it
easy to designate set amounts of your
paycheck to different accounts, including savings, so you can easily set it, forget it and watch your savings grow.
Johnny C. Taylor
Columnist
USA TODAY
Johnny C. Taylor Jr., a human-resources expert, is tackling your questions as part of a series for USA TODAY.
Taylor is the president and CEO of the
Society for Human Resource Management, the world’s largest HR professional society.
The questions are submitted by readers, and Taylor’s answers below have
been edited for length and clarity.
The promise of a new year has many
employees taking stock of their accomplishments and careers.
For many, this will include setting
goals – land a new job, move to a new
city or take on new responsibilities in a
current role.
This time of reflection is particularly
important for younger professionals,
who may be wondering, “What’s next
for me? How can I move ahead? How
can I design a career?”
As 2019 dawns, I’d like to offer a few
resolutions for younger workers who are
considering the question, “What will set
me up for success at work in 2019 and
beyond?”
Put yourself out there
Consider joining a young professionals group or meeting up with like-minded peers. By connecting with others, you
can exchange ideas and learn about opportunities for career growth in your
community.
Learn something new
Take the opportunity to pick up new
skills. There are plenty of seminars,
continuing-education classes and lectures offered online and in your community to fill gaps in your knowledge.
Reach out to your alumni network to
see if your alma mater or local university
offers classes you can audit for a fee, or
take advantage of your employer’s tuition-assistance program and take
classes toward an advanced degree.
Refresh your online presence
It’s time to look over your online profiles to ensure they align with your professional aspirations. Review them with
a critical eye and remove anything that
you wouldn’t want your current or future employers to see.
Consider buying a personal domain
and creating a professional portfolio to
document your important experiences
and successes.
Give yourself a break
Taking time now to schedule a vacation for later in the year gives you something to look forward to. Taking time off
is important because it helps avoid
burnout. Healthy employees use their
in-office time more effectively and are
more productive.
Resolve to commit to your goal
Make resolutions that are plausible. GETTY IMAGES
Be an expert on your employer
Be patient
Familiarize yourself with your organization’s mission, vision and goals,
and you will become a stronger employee. Challenge yourself to learn more
about your company by exploring a new
product or service it offers. Meet colleagues from other departments, read
the annual report, attend an annual
meeting and follow news coverage of
your company.
Having aspirations is important. But
keep in mind that success doesn’t happen overnight. You will need to work at
it. Expose yourself to new people, places
and things to find it.
Don’t be afraid to fail
You’ve heard the saying “No pain, no
gain.” Be willing to take some risks in
your career. Without stretching yourself, you will never fully succeed.
GETTY IMAGES
Trends
Continued from Page 1B
5 percent in 2017.
At the same time, mortgage rates are
expected to hit 5.5 percent by the end of
2019. Both factors make it more expensive for buyers to purchase a home. Hale
estimates that the expected increase in
prices and interest rates translates to an
8 percent rise in the average monthly
mortgage payment.
Interest rate trap
Shrinking affordability will convince
some buyers – especially first-timers –
to sit out the market altogether next
year because they can’t make the numbers work. Homeowners considering
selling their home may also stay put because of rising mortgage rates – a socalled interest rate trap. Most outstanding mortgages have an interest rate of
4.5 percent or less, according to a report
this year from Black Knight, a data analytics firm.
“They have a nice low mortgage rate,
lower than the current rate, so there’s no
reason to move,” said Mark Fleming,
chief economist of First American Financial Corp.
Tax worries linger
The first few months of 2019 will reveal how the new tax changes affect
homeowners. One key rule is the new
cap on the mortgage interest deduction.
Before, homeowners could deduct
interest they paid on up to $1 million in
mortgage debt – including interest on
home equity loans and lines of credit –
reducing their taxable income.
Now, you can only deduct interest on
up to $750,000 in mortgage debt. Interest paid on home equity loans and lines
of credit is deductible only if the funds
were used to pay for home improvements or renovations.
The only taxpayers who will exceed
those limits are high-end homeowners
and buyers and those with multiple
homes with mortgages.
The bigger question mark is if and
how the $10,000 limit on state and local
taxes deduction – known as SALT – will
affect housing markets in high-tax
states such as New Jersey, New York,
Connecticut and California.
Buyers may be reluctant to purchase
homes in those states – or choose a
smaller house – if they calculate they
will pay too much in non-deductible
taxes. “These states may see softer
housing markets compared to the rest of
the country,” said Yun, if the SALT cap
hurts enough homeowners.
The bottom line
If you’re a seller: Price realistically
and be ready to cut the listing price or
offer other incentives to get a deal done.
“It’s still a seller’s market, but not like it
was,” Hale said. “Sellers need to be
mindful of competition, especially for
more expensive properties.”
If you’re a buyer: Don’t worry about
going slow when making decisions.
“There is less buyer competition and
more inventory,” Yun said. “Buyers can
take time to find the home that fits into
their budget.”
Become financially savvy
Connect with your human resources
department to learn more about how
you can take advantage of the benefits
offered by your company.
You can save money and prepare for
retirement (it’s never too early to start
saving) by taking advantage of benefits
such as commuter assistance, 401(k)
company match and health/wellness
Whether your goal for 2019 involves
learning something new, taking on a
new project or asking for a promotion,
do the work required to make it happen.
Ninety-two percent of people fail to
keep their New Year’s resolutions. Don’t
be one of them.
And if you’re a young HR professional, you are likely so busy doling out career advice for others that you forget
how important it is for you to tend to
your own professional advancement
and development.
From listening to the latest podcast
about managing a multi-generational
workforce to updating your HR knowledge by enrolling in a class on HR tech,
you should consider joining the Society
for Human Resource Management to
tap into resources specially designed by
your professional society to help you
achieve your 2019 career resolutions.
MONEY
USA TODAY ❚ WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2019 ❚ 3B
What’s next in
tech for 2019,
from 5G to AI
Faster networks, bendable phones, more choices for
cord-cutters – even a breakdown in our very own critical thinking, because we’re leaning too heavily on artiPersonal Tech
ficial intelligence? ❚ Consumers will have a lot of new
Edward C. Baig
tech to digest in the new year ahead, in what is shap-
USA TODAY
ing up to be a year of transition. This is some of what
to look forward to in consumer tech in 2019. ❚ We’ve been hearing
about the wicked fast next-generation of wireless for a few years now,
TV makers have been showing off 8K models for years but are only now starting
to sell them. But you’ll need bucks: Samsung has one for $14,999. AFP/GETTY IMAGES
and tests and early deployments of a relatively very small scale have
long begun in earnest. ❚ But 2019 is when the commercial rollout of
5G networks starts to become more real in a lot more places, in the
U.S. and overseas.
5G is coming
In this country, the first available
5G-capable smartphones are expected
to arrive by the spring, and you’ll also
see 5G hotspots and modems by then, if
not sooner. At a recent Qualcomm tech
summit in Maui, Samsung showed off
5G smartphone prototypes, while AT&T
and Verizon set up mini-5G test networks. Those two carriers, plus (pending government approval) a newlymerged T-Mobile and Sprint, all have
ambitious designs for 5G.
A quick explainer: 5G combines fast
speeds with low “latency” or network
responsiveness, which will be critical to
the technology’s long-time impact on
everything from self-driving cars to remote surgery.
You’ll be well into the next decade before 5G impacts such fields in a massive
way. In 2019, the 5G push will be centered around fixed wireless deployments, essentially a broadband substitute for the home, and yes, the early
stages of the fast phones you’ll start carrying around in your pocket.
Around the world, Deloitte expects
25 operators to have launched 5G service in at least part of their territory
(usually cities) in 2019, with about 1 million 5G-capable handsets to have
shipped by year-end. Put that in perspective: since Deloitte projects about
1.5 billion smartphones to be shipped
overall in 2019, the 5G share is tiny. But
hey, it’s a start.
Flexible-screen phones
Speaking of long-promised tech that
hasn’t, um, come into the fold just yet,
2019 also appears to be the year where
we finally see commercial phones with
flexible displays, a nascent market of
devices from Samsung, LG, Huawei,
Motorola and possibly others.
Once again, we’ve already gotten
hints of what’s possible.
This past October, a Fremont, California, startup known as Royole
launched the FlexPai in China, billed as
the “world’s first commercial foldable
smartphone with a flexible display.” The
device costs more than $1,300 and is being pitched initially to developers.
Though not exactly a product yet,
Samsung teased its own flexible phone
design at a recent developer conference,
during which Google announced that
Android would support foldable form
factors.
In 2019 when such form factors begin
to take shape, some important questions will need to be answered. Two of
the biggest: What is the ultimate consumer benefit, and just how much will
these new-fangled devices cost?
Samsung’s move “highlights the hard
reality that this design may be a solution
looking for a problem,” notes Wayne
Lam, principal analyst for mobile devices and networks at IHS Markit. Color
me a skeptic as well, until proven otherwise.
Cord cutting chews away at cable
Apple will launch a streaming on-demand TV rival to Netflix and Amazon
Prime. That’s what The Information
website wrote this past October, and I
have little reason to doubt that the report, which was pinned on unnamed
sources, is accurate.
Apple has been spending big, just like
Netflix and Amazon, on original content, leading further credence to the
company’s ambitions in the space. Look
for the Apple streaming service to
launch during the first half of the new
year, and be free to users of Apple de-
The first available 5G-capable
smartphones are expected to arrive by
the spring, with hot spots and modems
expected sooner. EPA-EFE
vices like the iPhone, iPad and Apple TV.
New services aren’t just coming out
of Cupertino. Disney recently announced that it will be launching its
Disney+ direct-to-consumer streaming
service late in the new year, built around
the company’s venerable namesake
studio, along with Pixar, Marvel, the
Star Wars franchise and also National
Geographic.
Also coming before the close of 2019
will be a streaming service from AT&T,
born out of the completion earlier this
year of the AT&T-Time Warner merger.
A new Google operating system?
Most consumers haven’t heard of
Google Fuschia, which is an experimental “open source” operating system that
Google has been rather quietly working
on for at least a couple of years. Google
apparently wants to keep it that way, at
least for the moment.
The promise of Fuschia, though, is
that it will fuse together variants of Google’s disparate Android and Chrome operating systems, to eventually replace
one or the other as the core software inside phones, tablets, computers and
connected smart home appliances. For
now, Fuschia-talk is reserved for the
geeks. The prediction here is that Google will give more visibility to Fuschia in
2019, even if it will presumably take
some time before consumers derive any
benefits from this still mysterious project.
Mixed bag for gaming consoles
Video game fans waiting for the next
Microsoft Xbox or Sony PlayStation
consoles may be waiting the entire year,
though details on each presumed new
console are likely to spill out over the
coming months. The next Xbox consoles – yes, there may be more than one
– reportedly carry the code-name Scarlet, but I don’t think you’ll be able to get
your hands on any new boxes until
2020. The same could be said for a PS5,
though I think there’s a better, albeit still
small, chance that Sony’s next-generation console could turn up late in 2019.
All may not be lost entirely when it
comes to new video game consoles next
year. Look for Nintendo to release an
updated Nintendo Switch perhaps as
soon as next summer, boasting an improved display and better specs than the
current model which was released in
2017. Rumors point to a refresh that is
just that, a more powerful version of the
existing console that still works with
current Switch games, rather than
something dramatically different.
8K TV: Don’t hold your breath
You only recently bought that stunning big-screen 4K TV that has become
the anchor of your home theater, and
you even got it (relatively) cheap. And
now consumer electronics manufacturers want to sell you, yikes, an even larger
television built around 8K TV technology, with four times the number of pixels than that TV on your wall. Heck, the
industry has to bolster profit margins
somehow.
TV makers have been showing off 8K
for years but are only now starting to sell
them. At the IFA conference in Berlin
last August, LG and Samsung showed
off mammoth 8K TVs. Samsung is selling its 85” Q900 QLED Smart 8K UHD
TV, for a cool $14,999.
Unless your last name is, I dunno,
Spielberg or Coogler, I don’t see you buying that TV or another 8K model from
another TV maker in 2019. So why mention 8K here? Because you’ll be hearing
a lot more about such TVs moving forward, starting at next months’ Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas. Rest
assured, as with 4K and HDTV, prices
will fall eventually.
Price is likely the biggest reason most
of you reading this won’t consider an 8K
TV anytime soon. Lack of stuff to watch
in 8K is another. At some point, video
game content will catch up to 8K and,
later, movies you can watch at home.
The 2020 Tokyo Olympics will also be
broadcast in 8K. And the truth is that 4K
TV you’re watching now still looks awfully good.
AI-driven rise in ‘mental obesity’
The influence of artificial intelligence
is, well, everywhere, and we consumers
are increasingly relying on chatty AIdriven digital assistants in our homes
and elsewhere.
Is that reliance getting to be a bit too
much?
A global online survey conducted by
Ericsson makes the very real suggestion
that by automating more of our day-today decisions, we are in danger of becoming mentally lazy.
Fifty-seven percent of survey respondents want a smartphone to know
when they’re getting ill before they
themselves detect any symptoms.
Another 43 percent of people would
like a virtual assistant to decide when
they should visit a doctor, dentist or
hairdresser.
Just over a third believe critical
thinking will disappear because of the
overuse of virtual assistants.
And 31 percent believe that we may
have to go to “mind gyms” to practice
thinking.
The way I see it, the next time I’m set
to write about what’s ahead for the new
year in tech, I just might have an AI assistant drum up those predictions.
ADVERTISEMENT
MONEY
4B ❚ WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2019 ❚ USA TODAY
PERSONAL FINANCE 
Kick mindless spending to the curb
Assisted awareness could
help with budget control
Susan Tompor
Detroit Free Press
USA TODAY NETWORK
What if mom always could be at your
side and make you think twice about
whether you really should spend an extra $50 on yet another night out with the
girls?
OK, who really wants to hear from
mom all the time? But what about your
bank? Could you give up mindless
spending if you got a nudge from your
banker?
As we move into the season of New
Year’s resolutions, expect to hear more
from banks and others about how to do
a better job at tracking your spending
and saving more money.
“You might not always love what
you’re hearing. But everybody needs a
coach, a mom or a friend,” said Andy
Harmening, senior executive vice president, consumer and business banking
director for Huntington Bank, which operates in eight states, primarily in the
Midwest.
Huntington is running ads now that
highlight a “Heads Up” alert where customers can set a monthly amount to
spend on shopping, groceries or restaurants, or whatever.
Then, during the month, the bank
sends a heads up via your mobile phone,
laptop or computer to keep you on track.
You might get a notice like: “You’ve
spent $300 of your $400 budget for groceries this month.”
❚ Can a drone stop you from spending? One of the Huntington TV ads uses
a clever “spending drone” that hovers
above a couple on a special date night in
a fancy restaurant.
The young man starts out trying to
order “oysters.” The drone says: “Over
budget.” He moves on to “lobster.” The
drone says: “Over budget.”
You get the picture. Soon, you’d expect the couple to run out the door, jump
in the car and head to a more budgetfriendly spot with a drive thru.
Stay tuned.
The bank can help consumers who
want to participate track spending by
category as the customer uses Huntington debit and credit cards.
The bank can help you get started by
setting up a few budget categories based
on your spending history. Beginning in
Huntington National Bank is offering a “digital messaging program” to help
customers hold back on purchases, manage their spending and build savings. It’s
less intrusive than the drone in the bank’s ad. HUNTINGTON NATIONAL BANK
early 2019, the Heads Up program will
integrate artificial intelligence tools to
provide customers with up to 40 key insights into their financial wellness as
they set goals.
❚ Talking about money around the
kitchen table: Harmening said the
“Heads Up” approach came out of focus
meetings where bankers literally sat
with customers in their homes around
the kitchen table asking what matters
the most to them. He said the “proverbial kitchen table” is the centerpiece of
where real conversations happen.
The bank created what it calls “The
Hub,” a new digital banking experience
that’s free to all its customers. The bank
is able to review spending trends for the
past 12 months and help people set a
budget. The bank’s philosophy is that
it’s not just big events that require some
planning and a heads up. Little everyday
moments need some financial planning,
too.
The game plan includes helping customers categorize their spending so
they can better understand how to
change some habits going forward. Customers also are able to set up a monthly
spending limit by category. So if you
only want to spend $100 a month on eating out, you’d do a better job tracking
that spending throughout the month.
A look-ahead calendar also provides
a financial view of the month to come,
so customers get a better handle on
when bills and deposits will hit their accounts and plan accordingly.
Such programs can help customers
review where they’re already spending
money. As a result, for example, customers may find it easier to spot recurring subscriptions to services they
didn’t even realize they were still paying
for but not using.
Customers said they wanted help
keeping their financial goals front and
center, according to Huntington.
“They said: ‘Make it easy. Be proactive. We might not always appreciate it.
But we need it,’ ” Harmening said.
❚ Watch out for big and small money drains: Most people can use some
help tracking the big money drains in
their life. Maybe it’s all that money
they’re spending buying lunch each day.
Or getting a coffee on the way to work.
Or splurging on a new video game or a
new sweater a few times a month.
Maybe you spend too much money
when you’re trying to impress a date. Or
you’re overtired and shopping online
late at night.
In the old days, people would talk
about using spending envelopes to set
aside cash that you can use on groceries
or rent. Or people would be encouraged
to write down how much they were
spending each day on incidentals.
Now we’re living in a digital world
where you are able to set up another sort
of system. For those already facing big
bills, tracking small expenditures really
can add up and help with a budget.
Take someone who is juggling college
loan payments. “What happens with
student lending is it creates pressure on
your cash flow,” Harmening said.
But if you’re able to suddenly save an
extra $100 or $200 a month, it makes it a
lot easier to pay that $300 student loan
bill each month.
Kicking mindless money habits is a
theme that we’ll likely hear more about
in the New Year.
After big spending moments – which
can include everything from Black Friday and Cyber Monday sales to holiday
gift giving and trips to visit family –
plenty of households start out 2019 in
the red. Even finding small ways to cut
back right now can help as many wait it
out before receiving a big tax refund in
February or March.
❚ Take something out of the cart
and put it back: Ally Bank announced
in late December that it put 48 of its customers to a test of sorts with four savings challenges to overcome “absentminded and needless spending habits.”
On average, the bank said, the customers found they could easily save $50
using just one of the strategies.
How did they do it? Some took a hard
look at what they were buying each
week and then focused on cutting out
one or two such purchases each week.
Some signed up for a “shopping cart
challenge” and agreed to review what’s
in the grocery cart before they check
out. Then they’d remove a few items
each trip, particularly if the goods
turned out to be more of a “want” than
an legitimate “need.”
Some eliminated spending money
each month on services that they
weren’t using each month – such as
streaming music, online video games
and the like. Others aimed to shop “responsibly” online. The idea was to leave
items in the online cart, wait a while and
then avoid making whatever purchases
that you can. Some found the best savings by reconsidering their online purchases by waiting a day or two.
Mindfulness is a buzzword for all
sorts of things. Being aware of your present self and surroundings can help cut
back on stress, improve sleep and, yes,
maybe even control your spending.
Social Security has built-in fail-safes, won’t run dry
Sean Williams
The Motley Fool
Social Security is unequivocally the
nation’s most important social program.
Each month, over 62 million Americans take home a benefit check, of
which 62 percent of aged beneficiaries
lean on to comprise at least half of their
income. Without Social Security, retired
workers, the elderly, and even the surviving spouses and/or children of deceased workers could see considerably
higher rates of poverty.
But for as much as Social Security
has done over a nearly eight-decade period, it hasn’t kept the program from
running into trouble. A number of ongoing demographic changes, compounded
with inaction from Congress, is sending
Social Security down a tumultuous
path. In fact, fear regarding Social Security’s long-term outlook has become so
apparent that a Pew Research Center
survey in 2014 found that 51 percent of
millennials didn’t expect the program to
be there when they eventually retire.
Social Security has problems,
but running out of cash isn’t one
The big question a lot of folks (especially millennials) are probably asking
about Social Security, given its many
problems, is this: When, exactly, will the
program run out of cash?
Believe it or not, the honest answer,
assuming no changes to the way Social
Security is funded, is never.
Without question, Social Security
has its problems. The worker-to-beneficiary ratio is expected to decline until
2035 as baby boomers leave the workforce and become eligible for a retirement benefit. There simply aren’t
enough new workers to step in for these
retiring boomers to buoy the worker-tobeneficiary ratio.
GETTY IMAGES
Retirees are also living substantially
longer than they were, say, five or six
decades ago. The average life expectancy has increased by nine years since
1960, and the percentage of Americans
making it to the eligible initial claiming
age of 62 has risen substantially, too.
Even income inequality has reared its
head and hurt Social Security. We’re
witnessing a greater percentage of
earned income being exempted from
Social Security’s payroll tax – $300 billion in 1983 versus $1.2 trillion in 2016 –
while also seeing the well-to-do live significantly longer than lower-income
folks whom the system was designed to
protect. Ultimately, it means a lot of Social Security income is winding up in the
hands of the wealthy.
Social Security’s excess cash
could soon disappear ...
But the biggest concern of all is the
inflection point the program has hit. According to the newest annual Trustees
report, Social Security will expend more
than it collects in revenue this year for
the first time since 1982. Though the
amount of estimated net cash outflow
($1.7 billion) is relatively small next to
the $2.89 trillion currently held in asset
reserves, this outflow is expected to increase rapidly beginning in 2020.
Where the misconception that Social
Security is running out of cash comes
into play is based on the Trustees’ latest
prediction that the program’s asset reserves will be exhausted by 2034.
Should this excess cash run out as forecast, an across-the-board cut to benefits of up to 21 percent may be needed to
sustain payouts through 2092, without
the need for any further cuts.
So, to be clear, Social Security’s excess cash may very well be depleted in
less than two decades. But this isn’t the
same as saying, “Social Security will run
out of cash.” Even if the program doesn’t
have a red cent in excess cash, it can still
continue divvying out a benefit check to
eligible recipients, thanks to its two
sources of recurring revenue.
... but its recurring sources of
revenue ensure it’ll never run out
Currently, Social Security has three
sources of funding.
Assuming Congress fails to act and
the Trust’s asset reserves are indeed depleted, then one of those sources – the
interest income earned on its excess
cash – will go away. Still, it leaves two
sources of recurring revenue that ensure payouts can continue.
The first is Social Security’s payroll
tax, a 12.4 percent tax on earned income
between $0.01 and $128,400, as of 2018.
As long as Americans keep working and
Congress doesn’t remove the payroll tax
as a source of revenue, the payroll tax
will remain the program’s heavy hitter,
so to speak.
In 2017, the payroll tax generated
$873.6 billion of the $996.6 billion the
program collected.
The second recurring source of revenue is the taxation of benefits. Signed
into law in 1983 and implemented in
1984, the taxation of benefits allows recipients earning above certain thresholds – adjusted gross income plus onehalf benefits above $25,000 for individuals and $32,000 for couples filing
jointly – to have a portion of their Social
Security benefits taxed at federal ordinary income-tax rates. In 2017, the taxation of benefits led to $37.9 billion being collected.
As long as these two sources of
revenue remain intact, there will always
be money for the Social Security Administration to disburse to eligible
beneficiaries.
The program simply can’t run out of
cash – ever.
This doesn’t mean payouts aren’t
subject to potential reductions over
time – but it does suggest that Social Security won’t go bankrupt.
The Motley Fool is a USA TODAY content partner offering financial news,
analysis and commentary designed to
help people take control of their financial lives. Its content is produced independently of USA TODAY.
MONEY
USA TODAY ❚ WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2019 ❚ 5B
News from across the USA
ALABAMA Anniston: Federal officials
are putting a fish whose habitat is
threatened by development in Southern states on the endangered species
list. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is adding the trispot darter fish
to the list. The fish can be found in
the Coosa River watershed.
HIGHLIGHT: MONTANA
state’s overall health ranking fell in
2018, though it did see an uptick in
infant health. The Oklahoman reports
the state ranked 47th in overall
health in 2018, down from 43rd in
2017, according to the America’s
Health Rankings annual report.
OREGON Salem: Marijuana could
ALASKA Anchorage: Winter tourism
take the next step toward joining
pinot noir, craft beer and hazelnuts
on Oregon’s list of famous exports,
under a proposal likely to go before
state lawmakers this year.
is growing in Alaska. The state
known as a popular summer destination has increasingly attracted visitors in the colder months for the past
decade. The Anchorage Daily News
reports visitor volume grew 33 percent for the fall and winter season in
the past 10 years.
PENNSYLVANIA Philadelphia: One of
the city’s classic diners is ending its
overnight shift, reflecting changes in
the way people eat and socialize. The
Penrose Diner went to a 6 a.m.-tomidnight schedule starting Monday.
ARIZONA Tucson: A team of Univer-
sity of Arizona researchers is getting
a $2 million military grant for its
work on bone regrowth technology.
The Arizona Daily Star reports the
five-year grant comes from the Department of Defense with the hope it
could benefit wounded soldiers.
ARKANSAS Little Rock: An unusual-
ly rainy year for most counties in the
state has left roadways marked with
potholes.
THOM BRIDGE/INDEPENDENT RECORD VIA AP
RHODE ISLAND Pawtucket: The city
Helena: The sharp scrape of steel on ice cut through a rare windless December
morning at the Silos on Canyon Ferry Reservoir as a quartet of skaters moved
briskly across the smooth, frozen surface, with Mount Baldy in the background.
“It’s so graceful, and the possibilities are endless,” Dale Livezey said, skating
backward. “When the ice is smooth like this, it’s the closest thing to flying on the
ground.” Several years ago he and some “wild ice” skating enthusiasts started an
online group to share their passion. About five years ago, it moved to Facebook
under the name “MT icebuds,” where it has grown into a sizable network.
CALIFORNIA Joshua Tree National
Park: The park’s gates have remained
open despite the partial federal government shutdown, and crowds of
visitors have been rolling in without
having to pay $30 per vehicle. Ranger
Dylan Moe says it’s a little disorderly,
but rangers haven’t seen any blatant
disregard for law and order.
COLORADO Denver: The Budweiser
Clydesdales were on hand this week
to welcome full-strength beer hitting
the shelves of the state’s grocery
stores. Eight of the famous mascot
horses visited the Colorado Capitol
on Monday afternoon to celebrate the
state’s largest liquor code changes
since prohibition.
CONNECTICUT New London: The
U.S. Coast Guard Academy’s ability to
serve cadets returning from winter
break will be affected by the forced
furlough of administrative staff and
other nonessential civilians as part of
the partial government shutdown,
the school says.
DELAWARE Wilmington: The Dela-
ware Children’s Museum once again
held its New Year’s Rockin’ Noon, a
New Year’s Eve countdown offered
during the day so young children can
participate. The event is so popular,
marketing manager Joe Valenti says,
that the museum decided for the first
time this year to reload the confetti
launchers and do another countdown
at 2 p.m. Monday.
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA Washing-
ton: The Metro system in the nation’s
capital is ringing in 2019 with some
weekend shutdowns, WUSA-TV reports. On Jan. 12-13, no trains will run
from Reagan National to L’Enfant
Plaza and Arlington Cemetery. And
Jan. 26-27, there will be no trains
south of Braddock Road.
FLORIDA Cape Coral: After about a
month of rehabilitation at the Clinic
for the Rehabilitation of Wildlife,
known as CROW, an adult male bald
eagle who was found injured in November flexed his recovered wing as
he took flight Sunday.
GEORGIA Atlanta: Former President
Jimmy Carter, former first lady Rosalynn Carter and dozens of members
of their family attended worship service at the church where Martin Luther King Jr. once preached. News
outlets report more than 40 members
of the Carter family joined the congregation for the last Sunday morning service of the year at the historic
Ebenezer Baptist Church.
HAWAII Wailuku: A steep trail to the
Kalaupapa leprosy settlement has
been closed indefinitely after a landslide took out a bridge along one of
the switchbacks.
IDAHO Lava Hot Springs: The hous-
ing market in southeastern Idaho is
booming. Nowhere is this more true
than in Lava Hot Springs, where
houses are being bought up before
they’re even listed, sometimes for
well above asking price.
ILLINOIS Urbana: As part of a new
initiative to showcase local art, more
than 30 pieces now hang in the public spaces of Busey Wealth Management’s corporate headquarters in
downtown Urbana.
INDIANA Lawrence: This Indianapo-
lis suburb is hoping to boost its profile and attract new visitors with a
cultural district promoting the arts
and the area’s military history. The
Indianapolis Business Journal reports that Lilly Endowment Inc.
awarded the city of Lawrence and
the nonprofit Arts for Lawrence
$5.85 million to build the Fort Harrison Cultural Campus.
IOWA Des Moines: The Varsity
Theatre – Des Moines’ beloved onescreen movie theater that opened
on Christmas Day in 1938 – hosted
its final screenings Sunday.
KANSAS Baldwin City: A minister
from a private Christian university
has been selected for a two-month
deployment as a chaplain at a research center in Antarctica. Baker
University campus minister Kevin
Hopkins was heading out Wednesday for the assignment at McMurdo
Station, The Lawrence JournalWorld reports.
KENTUCKY Louisville: Billions of
gallons of water soaked the city in
2018, making it the wettest year on
record in Louisville.
LOUISIANA Lake Charles: A boat-
ing club has organized a privatepublic partnership to put up channel markers along a bayou where
water often hides cypress stumps
and knees. Ben Garber of the Lake
Charles Sail and Power Squadron
says that because Contraband Bayou isn’t used for commerce, the
Coast Guard and Army Corps of
Engineers can’t install markers.
MAINE Somerville: Lights, camera,
MISSISSIPPI Olive Branch: A man
says he ordered his wife a $2,000
diamond bracelet for Christmas and
was shocked to see 48 of the bracelets when he opened the box.
WATN-TV reports Olive Branch
Alderman Dale Dickerson ordered
the bracelet from a company called
Jewelry Unlimited. Dickerson called
the company and sent the extras
back. The company sent a pair of
diamond earrings as a thank-you.
MISSOURI Springfield: A year after
Greene County began using trailers
to house inmates amid jail overcrowding, officials in other areas of
the country are eyeing the program.
But some legal experts argue the
program has raised major red flags.
is adopting traffic cameras to crack
down on speeding. Mayor Donald
Grebien says the effort aims to address problem speeding in school
zones, as police department resources are limited.
SOUTH CAROLINA Columbia: State
wildlife officials are recommending
people use their old, live Christmas
trees to help animals. The state Department of Natural Resources says
old trees can be used for erosion control or as cover for small animals like
quails and rabbits. The agency also
has a program that takes old trees
and sinks them in lakes to become
artificial reefs for fish.
SOUTH DAKOTA Sioux Falls: The two
most popular dog breeds in the city
in 2018 were the Labrador retriever
and the Shih Tzu.
TENNESSEE Franklin: After a suc-
cessful inaugural year, “BreakFEST” –
a pop-punk music festival starting on
a Sunday morning – will return to the
Factory on June 2. New Found Glory
will once again headline – guitarist
and Franklin resident Chad Gilbert is
the brains behind the event.
TEXAS Fort Worth: A 27-mile rail
using blockchain technology to create digital versions of its marriage
certificates. The initiative’s success
is causing the county to look at
ways it could use the technology
with other records.
system extending from downtown
Fort Worth to Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport is scheduled to
launch Saturday. TEXRail trains,
operated by the Trinity Metro transit
agency, will make nine stops along
the route, including in the suburbs of
North Richland Hills and Grapevine.
Trinity Metro, in an effort to jumpstart ridership, will not charge fares
in January. Come Feb. 1, a one-way
ticket will cost $2.50.
NEW HAMPSHIRE Hanover: Con-
UTAH Salt Lake City: A woman who
NEBRASKA Lincoln: Even as con-
struction continues on four new fire
stations, city officials are beginning
to plan for two more.
NEVADA Reno: Washoe County is
struction is getting underway on a
$200 million project to integrate
engineering, computer science and
entrepreneurship at Dartmouth
College.
NEW JERSEY Prospect Park: Most
helped kidnap Elizabeth Smart is
living several blocks from an elementary school following her release
from prison in September, according
to Utah’s sex-offender registry. Wanda Barzee, 73, is listed in the registry
as living in an apartment near Parkview Elementary School.
scat. That’s the premise of a potential new reality series featuring a
woman who is locally famous for
making creations out of moose
droppings. The Portland Press Herald reports Mary Winchenbach and
her wife, Deb Nicholls, are in discussions with TNT about bringing
their art to cable television.
people his age are just figuring out
how to handle their personal finances. Intashan Chowdhury has to
reconcile a $6.5 million municipal
budget. Chowdhury, 22, the borough’s new administrator, is believed to be one of the youngest
town managers in New Jersey history, if not the youngest, and the first
of Bengali descent.
MARYLAND Baltimore: Since 1950,
NEW MEXICO Albuquerque: The
VIRGINIA Charlottesville: Officials in
NEW YORK Bethel: Finding a place
WASHINGTON Yakima: A homeless
Baltimore has dropped from America’s sixth most populous city to the
country’s 30th largest. And there’s
no end in sight to the population
drain. Baltimore has led all U.S.
cities in population loss for the past
two years running.
MASSACHUSETTS Boston: Federal
fishing managers are holding the
line on the quota for an important
commercial species of crab. The
National Oceanic and Atmospheric
Administration says the quota for
Atlantic deep-sea red crab will be
about 3.9 million pounds, the same
as it has been since 2011.
MICHIGAN Lansing: Outgoing Gov.
Rick Snyder says he and wife Sue
plan to take an Upper Peninsula
“whirlwind waterfall” tour at some
point this year. He says he owes his
wife “some vacations” and “another
honeymoon period” after eight years
as governor. He left office Tuesday.
MINNESOTA St. Cloud: Nori Cafe &
Creamery hosted its grand opening
Saturday. Husband-and-wife duo
Muhsin Abdulkadir and Farhiya
Iman, both 29, manage the familyowned cafe. Iman said the idea
sparked when she and Abdulkadir
noticed St. Cloud’s changing demographics and saw a need for a
common meeting ground for people
of all backgrounds.
University of New Mexico is offering
a new course that’s generating a lot
of buzz on campus – a class on cannabis and communication.
to stay for the 50th anniversary
Woodstock concert in August may
not be a groovy experience. The
Times Herald-Record of Middletown
reports that many motels, bed and
breakfasts, and Airbnb rentals are
already sold out in Sullivan County.
NORTH CAROLINA Raleigh: The
fatal mauling of a zoo intern by a
lion that escaped from a locked pen
Sunday at the Conservators Center
near Burlington illustrates the need
for state regulators to crack down
on unaccredited exhibitors of dangerous animals, animal welfare
advocates say.
NORTH DAKOTA Bismarck: A state
lawmaker wants to charge owners
of electric and hybrid vehicles an
annual fee to help offset lost motor
fuel taxes that fund road work.
OHIO Toledo: A researcher at Ohio
State University has come up with a
new app that has tips on spotting
bed bugs and getting rid of them.
The app works on Android and iOS
devices and can be found by searching “bed bug field guide.”
OKLAHOMA Oklahoma City: The
VERMONT Montpelier: The state is
hoping to attract new residents and
boost its population and workforce
by paying folks to relocate. The state
is accepting applications for the program, which pays people who work
remotely for an out-of-state company
to move to Vermont.
this city that endured a deadly white
nationalist rally in 2017 say people
are cursing police officers, and it’s
thinning the department’s ranks.
encampment has returned to its former location after temporarily relocating. The Yakima Herald-Republic
reports the operators of Camp Hope
are required to move the encampment every six months so it can be
deemed a temporary camp as part of
a deal with the city.
WEST VIRGINIA Charleston: State
health officials say flu cases are on
the rise in West Virginia.
WISCONSIN Dodgeville: Residents in
a rural county are split over a plan to
build a solar farm that would include
more than 1 million solar panels. The
Wisconsin State Journal reports that
the Badger Hollow Solar Farm proposed by Invenergy would cover
2,700 acres in Iowa County and could
power more than 70,000 homes.
WYOMING Jackson: Officials will
allow a metal music festival to take
place again east of Grand Teton National Park. The Jackson Hole News
and Guide reports the Teton County
administrator granted a special event
permit for the Fire in the Mountains
festival scheduled for July 13-14 at
Heart Six Ranch in Moran.
From staff and wire reports
MONEY
6B ❚ WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2019 ❚ USA TODAY
REAL certainty
In an ever-changing world, it’s comforting to know that year in, year out, you can always
count on STIHL. It’s our New Year’s resolution to bring you a 2019 filled with even more
unmatched customer service and innovative new solutions to make your life easier.
That’s the legendary quality of Real STIHL.
/stihlusa
BATTERY POWER. MADE BY STIHL.
STNUSAT034
©2018 STIHL Available at participating dealers while supplies last.
STIHLusa.com
USA TODAY ❚ WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2019 ❚ SECTION C
IN SPORTS
2019 could be these athletes’ year
Duke freshman, soccer’s Pugh among notables 3C
College basketball and football
Coaching candidates for UCLA 3C; bowl scores 5C
NFL playoffs
Saints top power rankings; wild-card X factors 6C
ZION WILLIAMSON BY BRIAN SPURLOCK/USA TODAY SPORTS
SPORTSLINE
REID BY JAKE ROTH/USA TODAY SPORTS
FIRST WORD
I’ll watch it, but I’ll have a
knot in my stomach. I love
both guys. It’s a tough one to draw
in the first round.”
Chiefs coach Andy Reid to USA TODAY
on Sunday’s first-round NFL playoff
game between teams coached by a
couple of his former assistants, Matt
Nagy of the Bears and Doug Pederson
of the Eagles.
Mike McCarthy was fired Dec. 2 but could be hired by one of the seven other teams needing a coach. GEOFF BURKE/USA TODAY
NOTABLE NUMBERS
76,126
Fans, second-largest crowd ever for
an NHL game, according to the league,
at Notre Dame Stadium on Tuesday
for Boston’s 4-2 victory over Chicago
in the annual NHL Winter Classic.
25
Game winning streak ending
Tuesday for Central Florida in
the Fiesta Bowl. LSU, after falling behind 14-3, defeated the Knights 4032. It had been the longest winning
streak in major-college football. UCF
was playing in its second consecutive
New Year’s Six Bowl after beating
Auburn last season in the Peach Bowl.
Accountability is
at issue in firings
Decision-making GMs stay on as losses blamed on coaches
Jarrett Bell
Columnist
USA TODAY
LAST WORDS
I’m blessed to play with him. I
consider him one of my closer
friends.”
Steelers QB Ben Roethlisberger, denying reports that he was involved in a
dispute with teammate Antonio Brown
and called the attention on the receiver’s behavior “baffling.” “If there was a
blowout, I certainly didn’t see it,”
Roethlisberger told 93.7 The Fan in
Pittsburgh.
What a pleasure. What an
honor. It was nerve-racking,
too. I thought, ‘I’ve got to win this
point, but it is Serena Williams.’ ”
Tennis legend Roger Federer on playing tennis legend Serena Williams in a
mixed doubles match Tuesday in the
Hopman Cup in Australia. It was the
first meeting in their careers. Federer
and Belinda Benic of Switzerland defeated Williams and Frances Tiafoe.
Here’s what really stinks about another round of NFL coaches walking
the plank:
Steve Wilks is gone. Steve Keim
stays.
Vance Joseph is gone. John Elway
stays.
Todd Bowles is gone. Mike Maccagnan stays.
Dirk Koetter is gone. Jason Licht
stays.
See the pattern?
As fired coaches head into 2019 as
symbols of failed opportunities — and
please, let’s not forget about the tremendous ripple effect that includes
assistant coaches and their families —
it is more than merely striking that so
many general managers and other
power brokers with highbrow titles
will keep collecting their paychecks
while their fall guys search for new
work.
Some vacancies more
attractive than others
Mike Jones
Columnist
USA TODAY
The NFL’s annual coaching carousel got off to a fast and furious
start as six teams fired their head
coaches before most restaurants
stopped serving breakfast the day
after the regular season ended.
This latest wave of firings began
Sunday night as the Jets dismissed
Todd Bowles and the Buccaneers
axed Dirk Koetter. They joined the
Browns and Packers, who fired their
coaches in-season.
Then Monday morning, the list
of fired coaches expanded to include Marvin Lewis (Bengals),
Adam Gase (Dolphins), Vance Joseph (Broncos) and Steve Wilks
(Cardinals).
The Packers and Browns have a
bit of a head start on their counterparts in the market for head coaches. Now teams will begin moving
quickly to ensure they get a shot at
the top candidates.
Meanwhile, just as it’s important for team officials to find the ultimate fit for their teams, coaches
should be just as careful when considering offers. The top candidates
will have the luxury of being extremely selective. Bad fits can
doom a coaching opportunity. Of
the eight coaches fired this season,
See VACANCIES, Page 2C
See FIRINGS, Page 2C
From staff and wire reports
Players weigh in on size of
CFP field and transfer rule
USA SNAPSHOTS ©
NHL goals against
GP GA GAA
M. New, Jersey
5
6 1.59
C. Delia, CHI
3
5 1.67
P. Francouz, COL
1
1 2.07
L. Brossoit, WPG
10
21 2.11
R. N.Y., Islanders
18
37 2.21
SOURCE: AP
As of Dec. 31
Jori Epstein and Paul Myerberg
USA TODAY
It’s standard during the regular season for reporters to get weekly access
to a few coaches and players, typically
the coach and the team’s best players.
That made media days at the Orange
and Cotton Bowls an opportunity to
pepper the entire roster and coaching
staff from the four College Football
Playoff teams — Alabama, Clemson,
Notre Dame and Oklahoma — with a
series of questions related about the
status of the sport. Their responses:
WHAT’S ONE RULE YOU WOULD
CHANGE IN COLLEGE FOOTBALL?
“It’s football but also making sure
player safety is important. I do think
they could do a little bit better with the
targeting calls. They could be a little
more loose with those calls, but other
than that everything is fine.” — Alabama
defensive lineman Isaiah Buggs
“I mean, we definitely want to get
paid.” — Alabama linebacker Anfernee
Jennings
“Dress we have to wear, the uniform
stuff. Everything they say we can’t do I
feel like we should be able to do. From
the shirt being out to the knees being
out, I don’t get the reasoning behind it at
all. Whatever, man.” — Notre Dame linebacker Jonathan Jones
See SURVEY, Page 4C
If Alabama linebacker Anfernee
Jennings had his way, college players
would get paid.
MARVIN GENTRY/USA TODAY SPORTS
SPORTS
2C ❚ WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2019 ❚ USA TODAY
NFL
Firings
Continued from Page 1C
Sure, it’s a results-driven business.
Coaches, as they say, are hired to be
fired. But the devil is dancing in the details.
“I’m just as responsible, if not more
responsible,” Elway, the Broncos’ president of football operations and GM, said
Monday as he explained the move with
Joseph.
Yeah, right. For years, Joseph dutifully climbed the ladder of the coaching
ranks. After a few years of establishing
himself as an up-and-coming candidate, he finally got his big shot — and
lasted just two seasons before Elway
pulled the plug.
Simply put, Joseph wasn’t the only
reason the Broncos went 11-21 during his
tenure.
Now Elway begins the search for
what will be his fourth coach in six
years. His recruitment of Peyton Manning a few years ago netted a Super Bowl
crown. But his miscalculations on other
quarterback matters cannot be ignored:
He drafted the bust Paxton Lynch in the
first round. He gave a job to troubled
Chad Kelly, who was waived after his arrest on a trespassing charge. He refused
to take a second look at Colin Kaepernick, who was attractive enough of an
option for Elway before he sparked the
protest movement in the NFL but not afterward.
Elway deserves only so much credit
for publicly stating the obvious during a
news conference, then pledging to do
better. Being responsible sounds good,
but apparently it doesn’t mean being accountable to the point where it costs you
your job without ample time to get it
right or wrong.
That’s on NFL ownership to change.
Given the league calendar, teams often wait to make moves on GMs, personnel directors and scouts until after
the NFL draft. What a bad look. Coaches
are traditionally booted after Week 17,
while others can buy time and improve
perception by picking some hot new
prospects in the spring who may or may
not pan out. It’s an inherently weird residual of the NFL’s culture.
Still, at least Elway didn’t have the
worst optics on the so-called “Black
Monday,” which had a double meaning
when considering that five of the eight
minority coaches who began the season
at the helm are gone.
With Ozzie Newsome stepping down
Steve Wilks was on the job with the Cardinals for one season, let go after
finishing a league-worst 3-13. MARK J. REBILAS/USA TODAY SPORTS
from his role with the Ravens following
the playoffs, the league that has gone to
great lengths to promote a level playing
field for minority candidates in key
leadership positions will have just one
African-American GM.
Chris Grier was promoted by the Dolphins to oversee football operations in a
move that bucked multiple trends on
Monday as coach Adam Gase was fired
and executive vice president Mike Tannenbaum was reassigned. Yes, it proves
that despite the NFL calendar, it’s possible to make front office decisions, too,
when the season ends and still proceed
with the draft process.
But back to Wilks. Go ahead, have
some empathy for a man canned after
one year on the job in Arizona — which
would be sad whether he was AfricanAmerican (which he is), white, purple or
green. One-and-done, even with the 313 record now attached to Wilks’ resume, is ruthless.
When you fire a coach after one year
— which in recent years was also the
fate of Jim Tomsula, Hue Jackson, Mike
Mularkey, Chip Kelly and Rob Chudzin-
ski — it means you really didn’t believe
in your hire when you made it in the first
place.
Clearly, coaches are expected to
change the culture and get results
quickly. The second-year Los Angeles
coaches, Sean McVay and Anthony
Lynn, get points for that. But not every
coach brings the presence that, say, Bill
Parcells did.
I’m certainly not calling for last-place
finishers Jon Gruden (4-12) and Matt
Patricia (6-10) to get axed after one season with the Raiders and Lions, respectively — although it was reasonable to
expect some quick, Parcells-like magic
from Coach Chucky, given that 10-year,
$100 million contract. Both coaches
need more time with their rebuilding
jobs. But their cases, in comparison,
makes the Cardinals’ handling of Wilks
that much more tragic.
Even worse, when Cardinals President Michael Bidwill sat there Monday,
Keim was at his side. It wasn’t Wilks
who signed quarterback Sam Bradford
to a $20 million deal while they sought
to develop a long-term prospect (which
Vacancies
mitted to Jameis Winston, so the new
coach would have to be a fan of him and
commit to helping the former No. 1 overall pick live up to the expectations. Winston is physically gifted, but his decision-making and maturity have been issues. If a coach can connect with him
and address his inconsistency, one of
the franchise’s biggest problems will be
solved. From there, the Bucs need to improve the supporting cast around him,
especially on defense.
Continued from Page 1C
five of them held their positions for
three years or fewer. So although it’s
hard to turn down guaranteed money,
coaches need to think long and hard
about some of these jobs.
They must take into account the state
of the roster, the stability of the front office, the support from ownership and
how they see themselves fitting into the
overall picture. Taking a job merely for
the sake of becoming a head coach could
translate into a short stint.
Here’s a look at the current job openings and how they rank in terms of desirability.
1. Packers
In today’s NFL, coaches are expected
to produce quick turnarounds. That’s
why a roster with a stable quarterback
situation is most attractive. The Packers
are fortunate to still have future Hall of
Famer Aaron Rodgers in top form. The
chance to work with him will entice
many candidates.
Green Bay also has key pieces on defense, as well as a track record of organizational stability. The Packers generally
practice patience when it comes to roster building, which bodes well for a
new coach. The franchise historically is
hesitant to spend big in free agency,
but there’s currently about $44 million
in cap space available, according to
Overthecap.com. A smart coaching hire,
effective spending in free agency and a
strong draft class could quickly put
Green Bay back in the ranks of the
league’s contenders.
2. Browns
This is a young team led by a talented
and confident quarterback in Baker
Mayfield. Cleveland has rising standouts on defense as well, with Myles Garrett and Denzel Ward leading the way.
John Dorsey was aggressive in Year 1
of his roster construction, making
turned out to be Josh Rosen). And it was
Keim who had the five-game suspension this year after his guilty plea for extreme DUI.
It just looks like a twisted double
standard that Bidwill would stick it out
with Keim yet have such short patience
with Wilks. Bidwill, though, read the
same type of script that Elway used. He
declared that the fired coach was “a
good man.” Lamented the wins and
losses. Pledged to do better with the
next coaching search.
What, do they pass along these boilerplate statements on the dark
NFLntranet?
When Bidwill mentioned that the
Cardinals lacked the competitiveness
under Wilks that he’s looking for, he
sounded so silly. The Cardinals lost on
Sunday, but the Seahawks won on a
field goal as time expired. That’s competitiveness. Wilks’ team never quit on
him.
And it’s ironic that the Cardinals are
considering ousted Packers coach Mike
McCarthy for the job, according to reports. McCarthy would be good for Rosen. At the moment, though, it doesn’t
appear that the No. 10 overall selection
was a better pick by Keim than Lamar
Jackson, who was taken 32nd overall by
the Ravens and won the AFC North
crown.
Maybe the Cardinals didn’t rank
Jackson so high because, with all of that
running he did at Louisville, the Heisman Trophy winner didn’t look like the
prototypical NFL quarterback, even as
the game has increasingly evolved to
feature mobile passers. Newsome
seems to know better. Quarterbacks
come in different sizes, shapes and
hues. The bottom line is winning.
Wilks, by the way, took his team to
Green Bay and beat McCarthy’s team.
Apparently, that didn’t count much on
Bidwill’s scale of competitiveness. Now
McCarthy might wind up with Wilks’
old job.
The coach is gone. The GM stays.
That’s not the case everywhere. The
Vikings and Jaguars are keeping their
coach/GM combinations, although it’s
expected there will be other staff
changes, as is the case with the Falcons,
who fired all three of their coordinators
on offense, defense and special teams.
But the next time you hear representatives from some NFL team spout
that they’ve made some “organizational
decision” while explaining a key decision, just remember all of the coaches
who walked the plank without their
GMs at their side on Black Monday.
6. Dolphins
Whoever is the next coach for the Browns will have a quarterback, Baker
Mayfield (6), who is young, talented and confident. TOMMY GILLIGAN/USA TODAY SPORTS
trades for veterans while landing a
strong draft class. Look for more of the
same this offseason. Roughly $80 million in cap space will position Cleveland
for another active run in free agency. Because of the potential displayed by Mayfield and his teammates in the second
half of the season, the Browns’ job will
intrigue a number of top-level candidates. Dorsey has a strong relationship
with Mike McCarthy, and multiple reports say owner Jimmy Haslam is high
on Josh McDaniels.
3. Jets
Quarterback Sam Darnold and about
$106 million in cap space make this a
very attractive situation for potential
coaches. Darnold showed poise and talent as a rookie, and after years of futility, the Jets appear to have finally struck
gold at the most important position on
the field.
But the state of the front office makes
this a little less desirable a job compared
to Green Bay and Cleveland. General
manager Mike Maccagnan has made
some questionable moves, and some
around the league question whether or
not he gave Todd Bowles adequate support. He has managed to hang on to his
job for at least another season, however.
4. Broncos
John Elway hasn’t managed to get
this team out of rebuild mode following
Peyton Manning’s Super Bowl victory
and subsequent retirement. But Denver
does have talent on defense, particularly in its pass rush with Von Miller and
Bradley Chubb. The Broncos also have a
solid signal-caller in Case Keenum,
though he might be better suited as a
bridge to a true franchise quarterback.
And don’t forget Pro Bowl rookie running back Phillip Lindsay. Denver has
about $47 million in cap space to help
improve this roster.
5. Buccaneers
This could mark the drop-off in desirability from top jobs. Since reaching the
playoffs in 2007, Tampa Bay has had
four head coaches and only three winning seasons. The front office is com-
The Dolphins have unloaded a lot of
talent over the last couple of years, but
they don’t have a lot of cap space to
work with. Ryan Tannehill has been adequate as a starting quarterback, but
he’s had issues with durability and consistency, and the new coach would have
to help decide whether he’s the longterm answer.
7. Cardinals
The Cardinals have their quarterback
in Josh Rosen. They also have a talented
running back (David Johnson) to help
ease pressure on him. But this roster remains in need of a lot of work. Some
people around the league have questions about the quality of the Arizona
front office, and the decision to fire
Wilks after one year could give some
candidates pause about taking on this
project.
8. Bengals
On one hand, the Bengals could be attractive because ownership has demonstrated patience and loyalty with Marvin Lewis, who held that head coaching
job since 2003. Andy Dalton remains
under contract, so that’s another need
checked off. But the Bengals never have
displayed a true sense of urgency to win.
They don’t go all out when it comes to
free agency or spending, and they don’t
display a lot of innovation in their organizational approach. Transforming
this team from average to a legitimate
contender could prove challenging.
SPORTS
USA TODAY ❚ WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2019 ❚ 3C
These athletes loom as 2019 breakouts
NFL
From Staff Reports
USA TODAY
Baker Mayfield: He won the Heisman Trophy and was the No. 1 overall
draft pick, but there was no guarantee
Mayfield would transition to the NFL.
Mayfield is the latest in a small list of
quarterbacks who have flashed potential, despite being 6-1 or shorter. Drew
Brees (6 foot) of the Saints and Russell
Wilson (5-11) of the Seahawks are other
notable examples. But Mayfield played
in an era of college football known for its
reliance on concepts of the spread offense. After the Browns moved on from
former coach Hue Jackson, offensive
coordinator Freddie Kitchens and the
new regime dialed up a philosophy that
meshed well with Mayfield’s strengths.
Most notably, Kitchens stressed the
need to fire quick passes to limit the
sacks and pressure Mayfield faced. A revamped running game helped, but Mayfield’s confidence also grew. He delivered pinpoint throws in stride when
needed. After years of toiling at the position, the Browns look like they’ve finally drafted a legitimate franchise
quarterback. Now all they have to do is
put more weapons around him, foster
his development and get him to limit
turnovers.
— Scott Gleeson
2018 saw many athletes vault into national prominence. They included U.S.
Open winner Naomi Osaka and Angels
phenom Shohei Ohtani. Some breakout
stars even waited until championship
games to make their mark (Villanova’s
Donte DiVincenzo, now on the Bucks).
Here’s a look at emerging athletes
who appear poised to have breakout
performances in 2019.
College basketball
Zion Williamson: The 6-7, 285pound Duke forward has gotten the attention of the college basketball world
early in the 2018-19 season, and he’s
combined with a talented freshman
class to make the Blue Devils likely title
contenders ahead of the NCAA tournament. After his one-and-done college
career, Williamson could be the No. 1
pick in June’s NBA draft, and then the
hype will really begin, particularly if he
goes to a team that needs a major facelift (looking at you, Cleveland and Phoenix). Coach Mike Krzyzewski has called
Williamson one of the most unique athletes he’s ever coached — Team USA or
in Durham — and his ferocious dunks,
brute force and motor make him mustwatch. Warriors coach Steve Kerr started the LeBron James comparison, and
that only fueled expectations for this 18year-old.
— Scott Gleeson
NHL
College football
Trevor Lawrence: While first-year
quarterbacks stepping into starting
roles upon arriving on campus have become more common than ever, it’s fair
to call Lawrence’s debut with Clemson a
success on a unique scale. Before the Tigers dominated Notre Dame in the Cotton Bowl, the true freshman had tossed
24 touchdown passes against four interceptions while completing 65 percent of
his attempts. Against the Irish, he threw
for 327 yards and three TDs as Clemson
punched its ticket to the College Football Playoff title game.
Sold as the nation’s top-ranked
recruit in last year’s class, Lawrence piloted Clemson’s offense through another dominant regular season and to the
doorstep of another national championship. What does the future hold? Come
2019, Lawrence will join Alabama’s Tua
Tagovailoa as the best young passers in
the sport and have NFL scouts and general managers drooling over his place as
a once-a-decade sort of quarterback
talent. There’s simply no ceiling on
Lawrence’s potential. — Paul Myerberg
Women’s soccer
Mallory Pugh: In 2016, Pugh, who
was then 18, became the youngest player to score for the U.S. women’s national
team in an Olympics, with her goal in a
2-2 draw against Colombia. In 2018, the
forward tallied six goals and three assists despite missing several weeks
with a right knee sprain. Pugh went to
UCLA for one quarter before turning pro
and signing with the Washington Spirit
in 2017.
— Roxanna Scott
Duke freshman forward Zion Williamson is averaging 19.8 points and 9.4
rebounds. BRIAN SPURLOCK/USA TODAY SPORTS
Baseball
Vladimir Guerrero Jr.: On paper,
Guerrero was a boy playing against men
in 2018. In reality, it was Guerrero who
looked down on his foes. The Blue Jays’
prospect dominated several levels of the
minor leagues, culminating in a 30game stint at Class AAA, against players, on average, eight years older than
him. Whatever: Guerrero batted .336,
produced a .978 on-base plus slugging
percentage and showed he belonged in
the major leagues. Alas, baseball’s draconian service-time rules, and teams’
desires to manipulate them, kept Guerrero in the minor leagues. Not to worry:
On, say, April 26, Guerrero will make his
debut in Toronto, and baseball might
soon thereafter be heralding its next
emerging superstar.
The Hall of Fame bloodlines are just
the beginning. Guerrero’s father was inducted into Cooperstown last summer.
But imagine this: A Guerrero with lighttower power, eye-opening quick-twitch
muscles and elite plate discipline to
match. Since making his debut as a 17year-old, Guerrero has posted a .414 onbase percentage, while gradually adding pounds to his frame and home runs
to his game. By May, he’ll be where he
belongs, and baseball will be the richer
for it.
— Gabe Lacques
Basketball
Luka Dončić: The 19-year-old is
playing better than any other NBA rookie this season (19.6 points, 6.5 rebounds
and 5.0 assists per game). He has more
than met expectations after being taken
No. 3 in the draft after a highly touted
European career. The 6-7 Slovenian
guard has delivered highlight-reel passing and an array of step-back threepointers in crunchtime for the Mavericks. He’s injected energy into a franchise that had 24 wins last season.
What does the future hold? Donči搒s
rise in Dallas is eerily similar to Mavericks great Dirk Nowitzki’s when he entered the league in the late 1990s.
— Scott Gleeson
Jack Hughes: In NHL cities where
rebuilding is underway, fans understand the phrase “Lose for Hughes.”
Since the start of last season, there’s
been a buzz about Hughes becoming the
next American star. He’s 5-10, 170
pounds, but he’s expected to have an
enormous impact on a franchise when
he is chosen No. 1 in June’s draft. Scouts
say there’s no chance anyone will move
ahead of him. The boyish-looking
Hughes is too fast, too elusive, too clever
with and without the puck. The expectation is he will have an impact similar
to Blackhawks star Patrick Kane, a
smallish player who can put up numbers with the best in the game. Hughes
is playing with the U.S. National Team
Development Program, and he is dominating at his age level. He had 116 points
in 60 games last season. In last month’s
Five Nation Tournament, he tallied 16
points in four games. He could be in the
NHL in 2019-20.
— Kevin Allen
Olympics: Track and field
Noah Lyles: The 21-year-old American sprinter held the fastest time in the
200-meter dash in 2018 (blitzing a 19.65second time in July), as well as one of
the fastest 100-meter times (9.88 seconds in June). Lyles’ times were almost
identical to Olympic legend Usain Bolt’s
times at the same age. With the 200 his
specialty, Lyles’ consistently excellent
times in the event would have beaten
Bolt in the Rio Games in 2016. Lyles is
also the current 300-meter indoor world
recordholder with a time of 31.87 from
the 2017 U.S. Indoor Championships.
His decision to skip college (he had a full
ride to Florida) and compete at the pro
level only expedites his rise. In a postBolt era of Olympic sprinting, Lyles is
poised to ascend to the top for the 2020
Tokyo Games. That means 2019 figures
to be a key year.
— Nancy Armour and Scott Gleeson
UCLA might look at mid-majors for next coach
Scott Gleeson
USA TODAY
UCLA fired men’s basketball coach
Steve Alford on Monday following a tumultuous tenure that hit its breaking
point with two embarrassing non-conference losses.
While Murry Bartow will serve as interim head coach for the rest of 2018-19,
the search for the program’s next coach
has begun. Which coaches would jump
ship from their current programs to take
on the pressure and hype Alford never
lived up to in Westwood? Here’s a look
at five potential candidates:
Eric Musselman, Nevada. The 54year-old is everything the UCLA program needs. He’s up-and-coming, having catapulted a power mid-major program from the Mountain West into national relevancy thanks to last year’s
Sweet 16 finish and top-five ascension
this season. He has the coaching chops
(in the NBA and overseas) that prove he
can do more than recruit. Given that
he’s been able to lure top talent to Nevada, he probably wouldn’t struggle on the
recruiting trail with a storied program
such as UCLA. Best of all, the charis-
Eric Musselman took Mountain West’s
Nevada to last year’s Sweet 16.
CHRISTOPHER HANEWINCKEL/USA TODAY SPORTS
matic Musselman is media friendly and
could sway the hard-to-win-over donors and alumni.
Gregg Marshall, Wichita State.
While he is more apt to stay put now
that the once mid-major Shockers have
joined the American Athletic Conference, Marshall will likely be in high consideration given his track record in piloting Wichita State to extremely solid
NCAA tournament success (outside of
last year’s first round exit). When Marshall was coaching the Shockers to the
Final Four in 2013, he was being considered for the role that Alford eventually
won. Marshall’s proved himself even
more in the time since, leading WSU
team to a nearly undefeated season in
2014 and another Sweet 16 trip in 2016.
Marshall brings a grittiness to the table
and would instill a tenacious style of
play that would give the Bruins a backbone they’ve lacked for quite some time.
Fred Hoiberg, unemployed. The former Bulls’ coach will be at the top of the
leaderboard given he is not coaching
and had way better success at the college level while leading Iowa State to
deep NCAA tournament runs before
leaving for the NBA. College coaches
who don’t pan out in the NBA (ahem,
Rick Pitino) usually are quickly forgiven
when a desperate program (ahem,
UCLA) is in need, so if some of the
home-run hires or long shots don’t pan
out, Hoiberg might be out on the West
Coast by the spring.
Billy Donovan, Thunder. A long
shot, but there’s a chance the NBA life
has worn on Donovan and he misses the
college basketball world he dominated
while guiding Florida to back-to-back titles in the 2000s (and continued success after that). Warriors GM Bob Myers
is a top consultant in UCLA’s coaching
search, which could give athletics director Dan Guerrero a shot at this unlikely
hire.
Tony Bennett, Virginia. Another
long shot, but an interesting one. That’s
because a fan base that is craving a
high-octane offense would be graced
with a slow-tempo and ridiculously disciplined one should Bennett surprisingly leave the program he’s elevated to
elite status. Bennett’s Virginia teams
have led the nation in defense plenty
over the course of the last half decade.
And even if UCLA is looking for more
glitz and glamour, Alford was an offensive-centric coach, so perhaps a defensive-oriented coach who has shown
great class (right after a No. 16 over No. 1
seed upset, no less) would be the right
fit to mix it up and start meeting the
towering expectations in Westwood.
SPORTS
4C ❚ WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2019 ❚ USA TODAY
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
Alabama may need to turn it up a notch
Tide must be better than
it was against Sooners
Dan Wolken
Columnist
USA TODAY
No matter how many times we’ve
seen the rage of Alabama football coach
Nick Saban play out in viral video clips,
neither the shock value nor the humor
ever quite goes away. There he is, maybe
5 feet, 7 inches on a good day, so intimidating and so full of rage, commanding
both the attention and the fear of everyone in his orbit.
“We expect him to go off like that
when we do something undisciplined,”
Alabama defensive tackle Quinnen Williams said.
Even in the midst of Alabama’s comfortable 45-34 victory over Oklahoma in
the College Football Playoff semifinals,
Mount Saban experienced a few eruptions, sparing nobody around him. The
biggest casualty might have been his
headset, which was slammed to the
ground near the end of the second quarter after three consecutive procedure
penalties turned a likely touchdown
into a field goal.
But for Saban, these aren’t just random expressions of emotion. Everything he does is purposeful. The message was clear: If Alabama is going to
win its sixth national title under Saban,
last Saturday wasn’t good enough. And
not just because of what Alabama did or
didn’t do against Oklahoma but because
of whom it plays next.
By now, Alabama knows what it’s up
against Monday in Santa Clara, California. While the Crimson Tide are still the
gold standard of college football and the
favorite to win the championship game,
no opponent in the Saban era has
proved more worthy of Alabama’s attention and respect than Clemson, which it
will face for the fourth consecutive year
in the playoff.
“It’s a dynasty they have over there,”
Alabama offensive tackle Jonah Williams said. “It’s a great team with great
coaches, and that’ s a pretty solid recipe
for success in college football.”
That Williams applied the “D” word
to Clemson is notable, if only because
it’s how most people describe this era of
Alabama football, a dynasty without
equal.
In a sense, though, Williams is right.
Over the last four years, Clemson is 54-4
Alabama coach Nick Saban can get angry but he usually has a motive. JASON GETZ/USA TODAY SPORTS
with a national championship and two
of those losses to Alabama. In the same
span, Alabama is 55-3 with two titles
and a loss to Clemson. This quadrennial, as it were, tilts toward Alabama by
the thinnest of margins. If Clemson
wins Monday, you can call it a draw.
“It’s hard to beat a team that’s supremely talented and supremely wellcoached, and I think both us and Clemson are great examples of that,” Williams said. “We know it comes down to
execution for us, and that’s what you
want. You want a challenge, you want to
play the best, and we’re fortunate to get
an opportunity.”
Although the semifinal games were
not particularly compelling on their
own, they at least foreshadowed a reason to watch the championship game. If
anything, Clemson might have played
cleaner, more forceful football in a 30-3
win over Notre Dame than Alabama,
which got off to a sizzling 28-0 start but
flattened out a bit over the final three
quarters.
It never felt as if the Crimson Tide
were in any danger of losing to Oklahoma, even as the Sooners drew to within
11 late in the third quarter and again on
two occasions in the fourth. But Alabama did play a rather untidy game by
its lofty standards, committing nine
penalties for 86 yards and allowing
some deep opportunities in the passing
game.
The fact Oklahoma got traction at all
after such a disastrous start was not
typical for an Alabama team. Perhaps it
was simply a lack of focus after getting
such a big lead so quickly, or maybe
there are some vulnerabilities that
Oklahoma exposed and Clemson, with
its speed at receiver, might also be able
to exploit.
“I kept telling our players on the sidelines, we have to keep playing, we have
to keep grinding. We’ve got to play for 60
minutes,” Saban said. “I thought we had
one little lull in the game once we got
ahead 28-0 where we had a few penalties, stopped ourselves a couple times.
They took advantage of those opportunities and got themselves back in the
game. But it was no surprise to me at all
that they were able to make some plays
that got them back in the game.”
Even as Saban was playfully tossing
oranges out of the Orange Bowl Trophy
in the postgame celebration, his mind
was undoubtedly turning toward Clemson. Then again, it was probably there
long ago.
As much as football programs talk
about focusing on one game at a time, it
would only be natural for Alabama to
have been mentally preparing all along
for Clemson to be the last hurdle. Why
Survey
Continued from Page 1C
“I’d probably say the transfer rule. I
mean, a lot of people think it’s unfair
that coaches can leave and do whatever
they want, but if a player wants to leave
he has to go through this, sit out or appeal the NCAA decision.” — Oklahoma
defensive lineman Ronnie Perkins
“Targeting stuff has been controversial but I think the concept behind it is
good. The game needs some of it, but
some instances it’s been a little hazy.
We’ve had some this year called where I
was like I don’t know if that’s targeting;
some that weren’t called. I think it’s a
good rule; the game needs it. Maybe it
just needs time, only been in place for a
few years. Needs time to develop.” —
Clemson tight end Garrett Williams
HOW MANY TEAMS SHOULD BE
IN THE COLLEGE FOOTBALL PLAYOFF?
“Everyone makes it, 129. FCS starts in
the spring and once they win, they get
in. Winner of FCS and FBS play each
other. Oooh, other rule change: We
could do what the Premier League does
in soccer where we relegate teams.
North Dakota State’s up with us now
and we send someone else down.” —
anonymous
“I see pros with the eight-team playoff. I think it honestly gives you a better
chance to see what team is truly the
best. But at the same time, that’s a lot of
games. It takes a toll on the players. ...
But if you’re looking to find the best, the
eight-team playoff is the way to go.” —
Oklahoma tight end Grant Calcaterra
“As a fan I’d like to see it expand but
as a player, we’re already playing up to 15
games and I think it’d really deteriorate
from the actual playoff if it expands because a lot of people don’t play in these
bowl games since they’re trying to get
Heisman Trophy-winning quarterback Kyler Murray signed a baseball contract
last summer with the Athletics. JASEN VINLOVE/USA TODAY SPORTS
drafted, don’t want to get hurt. ... I think
four’s fine.” — Tanner Muse, Clemson
safety
“I like the eight-team. I think four just
makes more people talk, and eight
might just shut everybody up.” — Alabama wide receiver DeVonta Smith
WHAT’S THE STRANGEST THING
YOU WERE TOLD DURING YOUR
RECRUITMENT?
“Oh lord, I’ll keep it PG. The strangest
thing? ... I guess with all the baseball
thing I had, I’ve had a lot of stuff said to
me about what I could do. A couple people said I could pitch, a couple said I
could come out and hit every once in a
while for football and baseball. That I
could pitch if I wanted to — I’m like I
don’t know, are you trying to sell me
some crap?” — anonymous
“Everyone always brought up, ‘The
girls here love football players.’ And not
that it was weird. ... I mean, it definitely
excited me, but I’m kind of like, I’m 17,
I’m sitting with my mom. She doesn’t
necessarily want to hear that.” — Alabama tight end Hale Hentges
“I was told by one school that when I
came on my official visit, I would have a
host who was a football player but most
of the time I’d be accompanied by a
female athlete, also. For the whole
weekend. A female. He said he’d put us
in contact with a beautiful female athlete to accompany us for the whole
weekend.” — Perkins
HOW MANY TIMES HAVE YOU
BEEN DRUG-TESTED THIS SEASON?
Among the more than 15 players
asked, responses mostly ranged from 0
to 4 with an even disbursement.
OTHER THAN YOUR HOME FIELD,
would the Crimson Tide expect anything else?
“During the year you’re so focused
who you have on Saturday, but you kind
of do have it in the back of your mind,”
Williams said. “They pose a lot of challenges; they have athletes at every position, have a great defense, very well
coached, disciplined and it just comes
down to execution. We have to play our
best game, and we know they’re going to
bring their best, so it comes down to
who makes more plays.”
Though Alabama has the deeper pedigree, there seems to be very little actually separating Clemson from Alabama.
After they split two one-possession
games, last year’s matchup in the semifinals was the most lopsided of the
three, a 24-6 Crimson Tide victory. But
even in that game, Alabama led just 10-6
in the third quarter with Clemson driving when Kelly Bryant threw an interception to Da’Ron Payne that unlocked a
second-half avalanche.
Bryant is now gone, replaced by star
freshman Trevor Lawrence, whose talent and poise have made this Clemson
offense far more dangerous.
Even though we’ve seen it four years
in a row, it’s still a tantalizing matchup.
And if Alabama doesn’t play a cleaner
game than it did Saturday, Saban’s rage
could turn into disappointment.
WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE STADIUM
TO PLAY IN?
“I would say the Cotton Bowl.” — Calcaterra
“Definitely Kyle Field, at Texas A&M.
That’s so fun to play there. My fiancee,
all of her family went to Texas A&M, so
this past year it got a bit more significant
for me. But I love playing there. It’s so
loud.” — Hentges
“The most fun I’ve had in was Boston
College this year. I made a tackle on
their side, tackle for loss, and then I had
a beer thrown at me. I didn’t know you
could sell beer in a college stadium until
it was thrown at me there.” — Muse
SHOULD KYLER MURRAY PLAY
FOOTBALL OR BASEBALL?
“Baseball: More money, longer time,
more endorsements, more face time,
more guaranteed money. I don’t love
baseball but if he loves it, that’s the
practical choice.” — Notre Dame safety
Devon Studstill
“I feel like he should go like that man
Bo Jackson and do both. Go crazy. He
pretty cold at both. If he were to do just
one, I’d say baseball — not knocking
him because he’s a bad quarterback.
He’s going to be great whatever he does,
but if I personally was in that situation,
I’d go baseball.” — Jones
“From what I’ve heard, he’s a really
good baseball player. Obviously he’s a
really good football player. Being drafted in the first round of baseball speaks
for itself. I don’t know what to tell him.
I’d say baseball if he got drafted that
early.” — Clemson punter Will Spires
WHAT ADVICE DID YOU GET ON
THE NFL?
“Stay true to yourself, make your circle smaller and going out, knowing what
you want. Never lose love for the game,
always try to do your best.” — Notre
Dame running back Dexter Williams
“Take it serious. Be all in with it and
take it serious.” — Clemson defensive
back Trayvon Mullen
SPORTS
E2
USA TODAY ❚ WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2019 ❚ 5C
FOR THE RECORD
All times ET
NFL
PLAYOFF
Washington St. 28, Iowa St. 26
Florida 41, Michigan 15
Belk Bowl
Charlotte, N.C.
Indianapolis at Houston, 4:35 p.m. (ESPN)
Seattle at Dallas, 8:15 p.m. (FOX)
Virginia 28, South Carolina 0
Sunday’s Games
L.A. Chargers at Baltimore, 1:05 p.m. (CBS)
Philadelphia at Chicago, 4:40 p.m. (NBC)
Divisional Playoffs
Saturday, Jan. 12
Baltimore/Los Angeles Chargers/Indianapolis
or Tennessee at Kansas City, 4:35 p.m. (NBC)
Chicago/Dallas/Seattle at L.A. Rams, 8:15 p.m.
(FOX)
Sunday, Jan. 13
Houston/Baltimore/Los Angeles Chargers at
New England, 1:05 p.m. (CBS)
Dallas/Seattle/Philadelphia at New Orleans,
4:40 p.m. (FOX)
Cotton Bowl Classic
Arlington, Texas
CFP Semifinal, Clemson 30, Notre Dame 3
Orange Bowl
Miami Gardens, Fla.
CFP Semifinal, Alabama 45, Oklahoma 34
Monday’s Games
Military Bowl
Annapolis, Md.
Cincinnati 35, Virginia Tech 31
Toronto
Philadelphia
Boston
Brooklyn
New York
L
11
14
15
21
28
Pct GB
.711
—
.622 3½
.583
5
.447
10
.243 17½
Charlotte
Miami
Orlando
Washington
Atlanta
W
18
17
16
14
11
L
18
18
20
23
25
Pct
.500
.486
.444
.378
.306
GB
—
½
2
4½
7
Milwaukee
Indiana
Detroit
Chicago
Cleveland
W
25
25
16
10
8
L
10
12
18
27
29
Pct
.714
.676
.471
.270
.216
GB
—
1
8½
16
18
Houston
San Antonio
Memphis
Dallas
New Orleans
W
21
21
18
17
17
L
15
17
18
19
21
Pct
.583
.553
.500
.472
.447
GB
—
1
3
4
5
Denver
Oklahoma City
Portland
Utah
Minnesota
W
23
23
21
18
17
L
11
13
16
19
20
Pct
.676
.639
.568
.486
.459
GB
—
1
3½
6½
7½
Golden State
L.A. Clippers
L.A. Lakers
Sacramento
Phoenix
W
25
21
21
19
9
L
13
15
16
17
29
Pct
.658
.583
.568
.528
.237
GB
—
3
3½
5
16
Southeast Division
Central Division
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
Northwest Division
Pacific Division
Monday’s Games
Pts
51
49
48
46
41
37
37
35
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP
39
40
40
40
38
42
37
W
25
23
19
20
18
15
15
Pacific Division
GP
40
42
41
41
42
39
39
40
GF
138
129
133
114
111
94
113
111
GA
112
119
115
102
123
109
127
136
L OT Pts GF GA
12 2 52 134 111
15 2 48 120 104
13 8 46 134 123
16 4 44 108 106
17 3 39 110 108
21 6 36 121 153
18 4 34 102 123
W
24
23
21
19
19
18
17
16
L
12
15
13
15
19
18
20
21
Monday’s Games
OT
4
4
7
7
4
3
2
3
Pts
52
50
49
45
42
39
36
35
GF
141
128
140
102
124
111
100
92
GA
112
115
129
120
133
126
112
119
Nashville 6, Washington 3
New Jersey 4, Vancouver 0
Carolina 3, Philadelphia 1
Pittsburgh 3, Minnesota 2
N.Y. Islanders 3, Buffalo 1
N.Y. Rangers 2, St. Louis 1
Columbus 6, Ottawa 3
Florida 4, Detroit 3, SO
Tampa Bay 2, Anaheim 1, OT
Los Angeles 3, Colorado 2, OT
Montreal 3, Dallas 2, OT
Calgary 8, San Jose 5
Winnipeg 4, Edmonton 3
Tuesday’s Games
Boston 4, Chicago 2
Philadelphia at Nashville
Los Angeles at Vegas
Wednesday’s Games
Pittsburgh at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m.
Calgary at Detroit, 7 p.m.
Vancouver at Ottawa, 7 p.m.
New Jersey at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Edmonton at Arizona, 9:30 p.m.
San Jose at Colorado, 9:30 p.m.
Thursday’s Games
Minnesota at Toronto, 2 p.m.
Carolina at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Florida at Buffalo, 7 p.m.
Calgary at Boston, 7 p.m.
Chicago vs. N.Y. Islanders at Nassau Veterans
Memorial Coliseum, 7:30 p.m.
Vancouver at Montreal, 7:30 p.m.
Washington at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m.
Friday’s Games
Winnipeg at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m.
Nashville at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Columbus at Carolina, 7:30 p.m.
Washington at Dallas, 8 p.m.
New Jersey at Arizona, 9 p.m.
N.Y. Rangers at Colorado, 9 p.m.
Vegas at Anaheim, 10 p.m.
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
Bowl games
Friday’s Games
Music City Bowl
Nashville, Tenn.
Auburn 63, Purdue 14
Camping World Bowl
Orlando, Fla.
Syracuse 34, West Virginia 18
Citrus Bowl
Orlando, Fla.
Kentucky 27, Penn State 24
Fiesta Bowl
Glendale, Ariz.
Rose Bowl
Pasadena, Calif.
Ohio State 28, Washington 23
Sugar Bowl
New Orleans
Texas (9-4) vs. Georgia (11-2)
Monday’s Game
College Football Championship
Santa Clara, Calif.
Clemson vs. Alabama, 8 p.m. (ESPN)
Saturday, Jan. 19
East-West Shrine Classic
At St. Petersburg, Fla.
East vs. West, 3 p.m. (NFLN)
NFLPA Collegiate Bowl
At Pasadena, Calif.
14
7
10
3
6 — 40
8 — 32
RUSHING—LSU, Brossette 29-117, EdwardsHelaire 10-32, Burrow 9-24, Jefferson 1-(minus 5), (Team) 3-(minus 7). UCF, McCrae 1081, O.Anderson 3-23, Killins 3-17, Mar.Williams
1-6, McGowan 2-6, Mack 11-(minus 3).
PASSING—LSU, Burrow 21-34-1-394. UCF, Mar.Williams 1-1-0-23, Mack 11-30-1-97.
RECEIVING—LSU, Chase 6-93, Jefferson 4-87,
Sullivan 3-76, Edwards-Helaire 3-25, Dillon 286, Moreau 2-22, Brossette 1-5. UCF, G.Davis
3-59, M.Colubiale 3-20, Snelson 2-24, Killins
2-(minus 8), Mack 1-23, McCrae 1-2.
MISSED FIELD GOALS—None.
Kentucky 27, Penn St. 24
First Quarter
0
7
17
0
0 — 27
17 — 24
KEN—FG Butler 28, 12:23
KEN—Bowden 58 punt return (Butler kick), :45
Second Quarter
PSU—Bowers 1 pass from McSorley (Pinegar
kick), 13:56
Third Quarter
KEN—Snell 2 run (Butler kick), 12:38
KEN—FG Butler 28, 12:23
KEN—Snell 12 run (Butler kick), 1:35
PSU—McSorley 1 run (Pinegar kick), 13:37
PSU—Freiermuth 18 pass from McSorley (Pinegar kick), 9:00
PSU—FG Pinegar 32, 4:12
KEN
PSU
First downs
16
21
Rushes-yards
42-176 41-161
Passing
121
246
Comp-Att-Int
9-15-0 17-35-1
Return Yards
89
30
Punts-Avg.
9-44.66
5-37.6
Fumbles-Lost
1-0
1-1
Penalties-Yards
3-27
3-24
Time of Possession
30:42
29:18
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING—Kentucky, Snell 26-144, T.Wilson
10-29, Rose 4-9, Middleton 0-0, Bowden 1-0,
Richardson 1-(minus 6). Penn St., McSorley
19-75, Sanders 13-51, Slade 4-27, Hamler 1-11,
Jo.Brown 1-4, J.Thomas 1-0, (Team) 1-(minus
3), Clifford 1-(minus 4).
PASSING—Kentucky, T.Wilson 9-15-0-121.
Penn St., Clifford 0-2-0-0, McSorley 17-33-1246.
RECEIVING—Kentucky, Bowden 5-84, Richardson 2-12, Conrad 1-21, Bouvier 1-4. Penn St.,
Thompkins 4-74, Bowers 3-32, Freiermuth 238, Shorter 2-17, Ju.Johnson 2-13, Sanders 2-7,
Hamler 1-41, J.Dotson 1-24.
MISSED FIELD GOALS—Penn St., Pinegar 40,
Pinegar 36.
Iowa 27, Mississippi St. 22
First Quarter
6
0
0
17
13
7
3 — 22
3 — 27
MSST—FG Christmann 44, 6:37
MSST—FG Christmann 42, :45
Second Quarter
IOW—FG Recinos 44, 10:02
IOW—Easley 75 pass from Stanley (Recinos
kick), 7:55
IOW—Smith-Marsette 15 pass from Stanley
(Recinos kick), 6:18
Third Quarter
MSST—Hill 1 pass from Fitzgerald (pass
failed), 11:26
MSST—Fitzgerald 33 run (Christmann kick),
11:08
IOW—Easley 8 pass from Stanley (Recinos
kick), 1:55
Fourth Quarter
NC State
Texas A&M
First Quarter
3
7
10
14
0
14
0 — 13
17 — 52
TXAM—Mond 62 run (Small kick), 14:34
NCST—FG C.Dunn 43, 2:21
TXAM—Dodson 78 interception return (Small
kick), 11:18
TXAM—T.Williams 17 run (Small kick), 5:44
Fourth Quarter
TXAM—T.Williams 93 run (Small kick), 13:56
TXAM—FG Small 35, 6:17
TXAM—Gillaspia 13 run (LaCamera kick), :22
NCST TXAM
First downs
15
18
Rushes-yards
37-134 34-401
Passing
139
140
Comp-Att-Int
19-32-2 14-26-1
Return Yards
80
127
Punts-Avg.
6-44.0 3-41.33
Fumbles-Lost
1-0
0-0
Penalties-Yards
4-30
8-75
Time of Possession
32:57
27:03
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING—NC State, Gallaspy 14-79, Person
10-47, McKay 6-14, Fedd-Jackson 0-0, Rhem
1-(minus 2), Finley 6-(minus 4). Texas A&M,
T.Williams 19-236, Mond 5-85, Corbin 4-41,
Gillaspia 3-20, Etwi 3-19.
PASSING—NC State, Finley 19-32-2-139. Texas
A&M, Mond 14-26-1-140.
RECEIVING—NC State, Emezie 6-36, C.Riley 633, Meyers 3-19, Angeline 2-33, Gallaspy 1-12,
Thomas 1-6. Texas A&M, K.Rogers 6-44, Ausbon 4-25, Davis 2-39, Sternberger 1-28, Buckley 1-4.
MISSED FIELD GOALS—Texas A&M, Small 52.
Northwestern 31, Utah 20
Northwestern
Utah
First Quarter
0
14
3 28
6 0
0 — 31
0 — 20
UTH—J.Dixon 27 pass from Shelley (Gay kick),
5:48
UTH—J.Jackson 4 pass from Shelley (Gay
kick), 1:40
Second Quarter
NW—FG Kuhbander 21, 8:42
UTH—FG Gay 32, 3:52
UTH—FG Gay 20, :05
Third Quarter
NW—Lees 4 pass from Thorson (Kuhbander
kick), 13:13
NW—McGee 82 fumble return (Kuhbander
kick), 6:40
NW—Klock 20 pass from Thorson (Kuhbander
kick), 4:39
NW—Lees 8 run (Kuhbander kick), 1:40
NW
UTH
First downs
17
19
Rushes-yards
40-81
32-91
Passing
241
302
Comp-Att-Int
21-30-1 27-45-2
Return Yards
13
113
Punts-Avg.
7-38.28 5-46.2
Fumbles-Lost
1-0
4-4
Penalties-Yards
3-28
4-35
Time of Possession
31:46
28:14
MSST—FG Christmann 20, 12:04
IOW—FG Recinos 40, 5:51
A—40,518.
MSST
IOW
First downs
15
11
Rushes-yards
42-190 20-(min
Passing
152
214
Comp-Att-Int
14-32-2 21-31-1
Return Yards
42
154
RUSHING—Northwestern, Bowser 23-70, T.J.
Green 1-7, Roberts 1-7, Lees 2-6, Hanaoka 1-2,
Moten 2-1, Thorson 5-(minus 6), (Team) 5(minus 6). Utah, Shelley 12-39, Shyne 14-33,
Brumfield 3-19, T.J. Green 2-3, J.Dixon 1-(minus 3).
PASSING—Northwestern, Thorson 21-30-1241. Utah, Shelley 27-45-2-302.
RECEIVING—Northwestern, C.Green 7-46,
McGowan 4-45, Chiaokhiao-Bowman 2-64,
Nagel 2-21, Lees 2-10, Holman 1-24, Klock 120, Skowronek 1-6, Hanaoka 1-5. Utah, J.Dixon
9-114, Mariner 4-38, Br.Kuithe 4-36, Enis 3-34,
J.Jackson 3-33, B.Thompson 1-31, Field 1-7,
Nacua 1-5, T.J. Green 1-4.
MISSED FIELD GOALS—None.
Cincinnati 35, Virginia Tech 31
Cincinnati
Virginia Tech
First Quarter
7
7
7
7
son 41.
Stanford 14, Pittsburgh 13
Stanford
Pittsburgh
0
0
Second Quarter
7
10
0
3
7—
0—
14
13
PIT—FG Kessman 29, 14:14
STA—Scarlett 1 run (Toner kick), 7:39
PIT—D.Hall 6 run (Kessman kick), 2:32
Third Quarter
PIT—FG Kessman 28, 8:13
Fourth Quarter
STA—Scarlett fumble recovery in endzone
(Toner kick), 11:28
STA
PIT
First downs
12
18
Rushes-yards
34-103 42-208
Passing
105
136
Comp-Att-Int
6-17-0 11-28-0
Return Yards
21
33
Punts-Avg.
9-40.88 6-35.16
Fumbles-Lost
2-0
1-0
Penalties-Yards
6-41
6-39
Time of Possession
26:21
33:39
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING—Stanford, Scarlett 22-94, Maddox
4-23, M.Wilson 1-9, Hattis 0-0, (Team) 2-(minus 4), Costello 5-(minus 19). Pittsburgh,
D.Hall 16-123, A.Davis 6-27, Pickett 12-25, Ollison 5-23, Ffrench 1-6, Carter 2-4.
PASSING—Stanford, Costello 6-17-0-105.
Pittsburgh, Pickett 11-28-0-136.
RECEIVING—Stanford, Arcega-Whiteside 390, M.Wilson 2-6, Parkinson 1-9. Pittsburgh,
Ffrench 5-49, Mack 4-68, Araujo-Lopes 1-13,
D.Hall 1-6.
MISSED FIELD GOALS—Pittsburgh, Kessman
55.
Oklahoma St. 38, Missouri 33
Missouri
Oklahoma St.
First Quarter
3
7
13
7
3
21
14 — 33
3 — 38
OKS—Stoner 30 pass from Cornelius (Ammendola kick), 9:27
MIZ—FG McCann 24, 6:46
Second Quarter
MIZ—Gicinto 5 pass from Lock (McCann kick),
7:49
OKS—T.Johnson 7 pass from Cornelius (Ammendola kick), 5:31
MIZ—Blanton 16 pass from Lock (kick failed),
3:35
Third Quarter
OKS—Ty.Wallace 9 pass from Cornelius (Ammendola kick), 11:49
OKS—Hubbard 4 run (Ammendola kick), 10:21
MIZ—FG McCann 26, 4:20
OKS—T.Johnson 46 pass from Cornelius (Ammendola kick), 3:08
Fourth Quarter
MIZ—J.Johnson 86 pass from Lock (McCann
kick), 14:41
MIZ—Rountree 55 run (McCann kick), 11:50
OKS—FG Ammendola 27, 5:54
MIZ
OKS
First downs
27
27
Rushes-yards
42-264 35-169
Passing
373
333
Comp-Att-Int
23-38-0 27-45-2
Return Yards
41
0
Punts-Avg.
3-45.33 3-50.0
Fumbles-Lost
3-1
1-0
Penalties-Yards
6-65
7-76
Time of Possession
32:25
27:35
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
Fourth Quarter
Mississippi St.
Iowa
Monday’s Bowl Games
Texas A&M 52, NC State 13
Third Quarter
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
10
0
RUSHING—Mississippi St., Fitzgerald 20-103,
Hill 12-43, Ae.Williams 6-22, Gibson 1-12,
K.Thompson 3-10. Iowa, T.Young 3-7, KellyMartin 5-0, (Team) 1-(minus 1), Sargent 7-(minus 3), Stanley 4-(minus 18).
PASSING—Mississippi St., Fitzgerald 14-32-2152. Iowa, Stanley 21-31-1-214.
RECEIVING—Mississippi St., Ae.Williams 3-19,
Hill 3-12, Mitchell 2-42, De.Thomas 2-16, Ju.Johnson 2-5, S.Guidry 1-51, F.Green 1-7. Iowa,
Easley 8-104, Smith-Marsette 4-29, Hockenson 3-43, B.Smith 3-33, T.Young 2-1, Sargent
1-4.
MISSED FIELD GOALS—None.
NCST—C.Riley 9 pass from Finley (C.Dunn
kick), 14:56
NCST—FG C.Dunn 49, 10:45
TXAM—T.Williams 2 run (Small kick), 6:43
TXAM—K.Rogers 6 pass from Mond (Small
kick), :32
LSU—FG Tracy 28, 5:18
LSU—FG Tracy 26, 4:12
UCF—McGowan 2 run (O.Anderson pass from
Mack), 2:24
LSU
UCF
First downs
32
17
Rushes-yards
52-161 30-130
Passing
394
120
Comp-Att-Int
21-34-1 12-31-1
Return Yards
111
6
Punts-Avg.
3-36.0 6-49.33
Fumbles-Lost
1-1
1-1
Penalties-Yards
14-145 12-104
Time of Possession
44:31
15:29
Kentucky
Penn St.
7-33.14
1-1
0-0
26:26
Second Quarter
American vs. National, TBA (NFLN)
10
14
5-41.6
1-1
8-90
33:34
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
Fourth Quarter
L OT Pts GF GA
7 2 64 168 117
11 2 54 144 109
14 4 48 114 105
13 6 48 115 115
14 5 47 128 128
15 6 40 124 134
19 7 37 115 140
21 4 34 126 159
OT
3
3
6
4
7
5
7
5
Iowa 27, Mississippi State 22
LSU—Chase 32 pass from Burrow (Tracy kick),
12:38
LSU—FG Tracy 28, 5:18
UCF—FG Wright 37, 3:01
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
Metropolitan Division
Punts-Avg.
Fumbles-Lost
Penalties-Yards
Time of Possession
Third Quarter
NHL
L
11
13
12
13
14
17
16
18
Tuesday’s Games
Outback Bowl
Tampa, Fla.
LSU—Dillon 49 pass from Burrow (Tracy kick),
12:59
LSU—Jefferson 33 pass from Burrow (Tracy
kick), 7:11
UCF—G.Davis 32 pass from Mack (Wright
kick), :04
Utah at Cleveland, 7:30 p.m.
Brooklyn at Memphis, 8 p.m.
Dallas at Boston, 8 p.m.
Indiana at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Orlando at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Washington at Miami, 8 p.m.
Atlanta at Milwaukee, 8:30 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
New York at L.A. Lakers, 10:30 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Portland, 10:30 p.m.
COLLEGE MEN’S BASKETBALL: Nebraska at Maryland
(BTN, 6:30 p.m.); Tulane at Cincinnati (CBSSN, 6:30
p.m.); Seton Hall at Xavier (FS1, 6:30 p.m.); Temple at
Central Florida (ESPNEWS, 7 p.m.); Texas Tech at West
Virginia (ESPNU, 7 p.m.); Northwestern at Michigan
State (BTN, 8:30 p.m.); UConn at South Florida
(CBSSN, 8:30 p.m.); DePaul at Villanova (FS1, 8:30
p.m.); Iowa State at Oklahoma State (ESPNEWS, 9
p.m.); Texas at Kansas State (ESPNU, 9 p.m.); Colorado State at UNLV (CBSSN, 10:30 p.m.); Utah State at
Nevada (ESPN2, 11 p.m.)
Texas A&M 52, NC State 13
Second Quarter
Friday’s Games
W
24
23
21
21
17
16
15
15
Gator Bowl
Jacksonville, Fla.
LSU—FG Tracy 24, 12:38
UCF—McCrae 25 run (Wright kick), 10:56
UCF—B.Moore 93 interception return (Wright
kick), 6:39
LSU—Jefferson 22 pass from Burrow (Tracy
kick), 1:27
Toronto at San Antonio, 8 p.m.
Denver at Sacramento, 10 p.m.
Houston at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.
Wednesday’ Games
SOCCER: Premier League: Chelsea vs. Southampton
(NBCSN, 2:55 p.m.)
Northwestern 31, Utah 20
First Quarter
Thursday’s Games
GP
38
39
39
38
38
38
38
38
Holiday Bowl
San Diego
LSU
UCF
Atlanta at Washington, 7 p.m.
Dallas at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Miami at Cleveland, 7 p.m.
New Orleans at Brooklyn, 7:30 p.m.
Detroit at Memphis, 8 p.m.
Minnesota at Boston, 8 p.m.
Orlando at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Philadelphia at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
Oklahoma City at L.A. Lakers, 10:30 p.m.
Washington
Columbus
Pittsburgh
NY Islanders
NY Rangers
Carolina
New Jersey
Philadelphia
Oklahoma State 38, Missouri 33
Tuesday’s Bowl Games
LSU 40, UCF 32
Wednesday’s Games
Everton 0, Leicester 1
Arsenal 4, Fulham 1
Cardiff 0, Tottenham 3
NHL: Pittsburgh at NY Rangers (NBCSN, 7 p.m.); San
Jose at Colorado (NBCSN, 9:30 p.m.)
North vs. South, 2:30 p.m. (NFLN)
Utah at Toronto
Detroit at Milwaukee
New York at Denver
Portland at Sacramento
Philadelphia at L.A. Clippers
W
31
26
22
21
21
17
15
15
Liberty Bowl
Memphis, Tenn.
Saturday, Jan. 26
Senior Bowl
At Mobile, Ala.
Tuesday’s Games
GP
40
39
40
40
40
38
41
40
Oregon 7, Michigan State 6
LSU 40, UCF 32
Indiana 116, Atlanta 108
Charlotte 125, Orlando 100
Houston 113, Memphis 101
San Antonio 120, Boston 111
New Orleans 123, Minnesota 114
Oklahoma City 122, Dallas 102
Golden State 132, Phoenix 109
Tuesday’s Games
NBA: Minnesota at Boston (ESPN, 8 p.m.); Oklahoma
City at LA Lakers (ESPN, 10:30 p.m.)
Redbox Bowl
Santa Clara, Calif.
W
27
23
21
17
9
Calgary
Vegas
San Jose
Anaheim
Vancouver
Edmonton
Arizona
Los Angeles
Nevada 16, Arkansas State 13 (OT)
Stanford 14, Pittsburgh 13
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
Winnipeg
Nashville
Colorado
Dallas
Minnesota
Chicago
St. Louis
Arizona Bowl
Tucson, Ariz.
Sun Bowl
El Paso, Texas
NBA
Man United 4, Bournemouth 1
Times Eastern. Programs live unless noted.
Check local listings.
Saturday’s Games
Peach Bowl
Atlanta
Wild-card Playoffs
Saturday’s Games
Tampa Bay
Toronto
Boston
Buffalo
Montreal
Florida
Detroit
Ottawa
SPORTS ON TV
Alamo Bowl
San Antonio
7
10
14 — 35
7 — 31
VT—Kumah 21 pass from Willis (B.Johnson
kick), 10:22
CIN—McClellan 38 pass from Ridder (Jones
kick), 7:46
Second Quarter
CIN—Lewis fumble recovery in endzone
(Jones kick), 11:22
VT—S.Peoples 1 run (B.Johnson kick), 7:04
Third Quarter
VT—FG B.Johnson 28, 10:21
CIN—Warren 40 run (Jones kick), 9:16
VT—Cunningham 2 pass from Willis (B.Johnson kick), 1:52
Fourth Quarter
CIN—Moore 19 run (Jones kick), 12:44
VT—Willis 5 run (B.Johnson kick), 10:32
CIN—Warren 8 run (Jones kick), 1:29
A—32,832.
CIN
VT
First downs
23
24
Rushes-yards
36-256 45-224
Passing
206
219
Comp-Att-Int
15-32-1 20-31-1
Return Yards
6
142
Punts-Avg.
5-41.4 4-42.0
Fumbles-Lost
3-0
1-1
Penalties-Yards
13-96
10-92
Time of Possession
28:55
31:05
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING—Cincinnati, Warren 20-166, Moore
9-64, Ridder 1-9, T.Thomas 3-9, Lewis 0-8, McClellan 1-2, (Team) 2-(minus 2). Virginia Tech,
McClease 13-102, Holston 10-40, Willis 12-33,
S.Peoples 9-26, Turner 1-23.
PASSING—Cincinnati, Ridder 4-7-0-86, Moore
11-25-1-120. Virginia Tech, Willis 20-31-1-219.
RECEIVING—Cincinnati, Cloud 3-35, McClellan
2-47, Medaris 2-43, Ja.Jackson 1-22, Lewis 114, Geddis 1-12, Warren 1-10, Rollins 1-9,
Mbodj 1-6, Labelle 1-5, Deguara 1-3. Virginia
Tech, Hazelton 6-57, Keene 4-19, Kumah 3-45,
Cunningham 2-22, Turner 1-40, Holston 1-14,
McClease 1-8, Grimsley 1-8, P.Patterson 1-6.
MISSED FIELD GOALS—Virginia Tech, B.John-
RUSHING—Missouri, Rountree 27-204, Lock 630, Badie 9-30. Oklahoma St., Hubbard 18145, Cornelius 12-21, Hockett 1-5, L.Brown 2-3,
Keyes 0-0, (Team) 2-(minus 5).
PASSING—Missouri, Lock 23-38-0-373. Oklahoma St., Ty.Wallace 1-1-0-(minus 3), Cornelius 26-44-2-336.
RECEIVING—Missouri, J.Johnson 9-185, Blanton 4-35, Banister 3-37, E.Hall 2-72, Gicinto 230, J.Knox 1-6, Badie 1-5, Rountree 1-3. Oklahoma St., T.Johnson 7-141, Ty.Wallace 7-83,
Stoner 6-59, Hubbard 3-37, Wolf 3-16, Cornelius 1-(minus 3).
MISSED FIELD GOALS—Missouri, McCann 42.
Oregon 7, Michigan St. 6
Michigan St.
Oregon
Third Quarter
0
0
0
0
6
0
0—
7—
6
7
MSU—FG Coghlin 34, 9:57
MSU—FG Coghlin 34, 9:57
Fourth Quarter
ORE—Mitchell 28 pass from Herbert (Stack
kick), 11:19
MSU
ORE
First downs
19
11
Rushes-yards
46-159
27-37
Passing
172
166
Comp-Att-Int
22-40-1 19-33-0
Return Yards
62
54
Punts-Avg.
7-39.0 11-35.5
Fumbles-Lost
3-0
1-0
Penalties-Yards
5-35
2-15
Time of Possession
37:14
22:46
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING—Michigan St., L.Scott 24-84, Lewerke 16-63, Heyward 4-9, Nailor 1-3, Stewart
Jr. 1-0. Oregon, Verdell 14-43, Tra.Dye 6-18,
Maimone 1-(minus 7), Herbert 4-(minus 7),
(Team) 2-(minus 10).
PASSING—Michigan St., Lewerke 22-40-1-172.
Oregon, Herbert 19-33-0-166.
RECEIVING—Michigan St., Stewart Jr. 9-45,
White 6-64, L.Scott 3-0, Dotson 2-27, Nailor
1-26, Ma.Sokol 1-10. Oregon, Redd 7-65,
Mitchell 6-70, Breeland 2-26, Verdell 2-3,
Johnson III 1-10, Tra.Dye 1-(minus 8).
MISSED FIELD GOALS—Michigan St., Coghlin
50.
SOCCER
English Premier League
Liverpool
Tottenham
Man City
Chelsea
Arsenal
Man United
Leicester
Wolverhampton
Watford
Everton
West Ham
Bournemouth
Brighton
Crystal Palace
Newcastle
Cardiff
Southampton
Burnley
Fulham
Huddersfield
GP
20
21
20
20
21
20
21
20
20
21
20
20
20
20
20
21
20
20
21
20
W
17
16
15
13
12
10
9
8
8
7
8
8
7
5
4
5
3
4
3
2
Saturday’s Games
D
3
0
2
4
5
5
4
5
4
6
3
2
4
4
6
3
6
3
5
4
L
0
5
3
3
4
5
8
7
8
8
9
10
9
11
10
13
11
13
13
14
Leicester 0, Cardiff 1
Tottenham 1, Wolverhampton 3
Fulham 1, Huddersfield 0
Watford 1, Newcastle 1
Brighton 1, Everton 0
Liverpool 5, Arsenal 1
Sunday’s Games
Crystal Palace 0, Chelsea 1
Burnley 2, West Ham 0
Southampton 1, Man City 3
GF
48
46
54
38
46
41
25
23
27
31
27
28
22
17
15
19
21
19
19
12
GA Pts
8 54
21 48
16 47
16 43
31 41
32 35
23 31
23 29
28 28
31 27
30 27
37 26
27 25
26 19
27 18
41 18
38 15
41 15
47 14
35 10
Huddersfield vs. Burnley 1945 GMT
Chelsea vs. Southampton 1945 GMT
West Ham vs. Brighton 1945 GMT
Bournemouth vs. Watford 1945 GMT
Wolverhampton vs. Crystal Palace 1945 GMT
Newcastle vs. Man United 2000 GMT
Thursday’s Game
Man City vs. Liverpool 2000 GMT
TENNIS
ATP World Tour Qatar
ExxonMobil Open
Doha, Qatar
Surface: Hard; Purse: $1.195 million
Singles — First round: Ricardas Berankis, Lithuania, def. David Goffin (6), Belgium, 3-6, 6-4,
7-6 (4); Guido Pella, Argentina, def. Cem Ilkel,
Turkey, 7-6 (1), 6-3; Marco Cecchinato (4), Italy, def. Sergiy Stakhovsky, Ukraine, 6-4, 6-2;
Stan Wawrinka, Switzerland, def. Karen Khachanov (3), Russia, 7-6 (7), 6-4; Guillermo Garcia-Lopez, Spain, def. Mubarak Shannan Zayid, Qatar, 6-1, 6-3; Dusan Lajovic, Serbia, def.
Adrian Mannarino, France, 6-3, 7-6 (5); Novak
Djokovic (1), Serbia, def. Damir Dzumhur, Bosnia-Herzegovina, 6-1, 6-2; Marton Fucsovics,
Hungary, def. Marius Copil, Romania, 6-3, 6-2;
Pierre-Hugues Herbert, France, def. Dominic
Thiem (2), Austria, 6-3, 7-5.
Doubles — First round: Robin Haase and
Matwe Middelkoop, Netherlands, def. Dominic Inglot, Britain, and Franko Skugor (4), Croatia, 3-6, 6-3, 10-7; Maximo Gonzalez, Argentina, and Nicolas Jarry, Chile, def. Albert Ramos-Vinolas and Fernando Verdasco, Spain,
6-3, 6-4; Santiago Gonzalez, Mexico, and Aisam-ul-Haq Qureshi, Pakistan, def. Marco
Cecchinato and Andreas Seppi, Italy, 6-3, 6-2.
Brisbane International
Brisbane, Australia
Surface: Hard; Purse: Men, $501,345; Women,
$1 million
Men’s Singles — First round: Denis Kudla,
United States, def. Taylor Fritz, United States,
7-6 (5), 6-7 (2), 6-4; Andy Murray, Britain, def.
James Duckworth, Australia, 6-3, 6-4; Jeremy
Chardy, France, def. Jan-Lennard Struff, Germany, 4-6, 6-3, 6-4; Nick Kyrgios (8), Australia, def. Ryan Harrison, United States, 7-6
(5), 5-7, 7-6 (5); Jo-Wilfried Tsonga, France,
def. Thanasi Kokkinakis, Australia, 7-6 (6), 6-4;
Jordan Thompson, Australia, def. Alex Bolt,
Australia, 6-3, 6-0; Alex de Minaur (7), Australia, def. Alexei Popyrin, Australia, 6-2, 6-2.
Women’s Singles — First round: Johanna Konta, Britain, def. Sloane Stephens (3), United
States, 6-4, 6-3; Ajla Tomljanovic, Australia,
def. Katerina Siniakova, Czech Republic, 1-6,
6-3, 6-0; Anastasija Sevastova (8), Latvia, def.
Daria Gavrilova, Australia, 6-3, 6-3; Petra Kvitova (4), Czech Republic, def. Danielle Collins,
United States, 6-7 (6), 7-6 (6), 6-3; Aliaksandra Sasnovich, Belarus, def. Anastasia Potapova, Russia, 6-4, 7-5.
Women’s Singles — Second round: Naomi
Osaka (2), Japan, def. Destanee Aiava, Australia, 6-3, 6-2; Lesia Tsurenko, Ukraine, def.
Kimberly Birrell, Australia, 6-4, 6-3;
Men’s Doubles — First round: Kyle Edmund
and Neal Skupski, Britain, def. Henri Kontinen,
Finland, and John Peers (3), Australia, 7-6 (4),
6-2; John Millman and John-Patrick Smith,
Australia, def. Marcelo Demoliner, Brazil, and
Daniil Medvedev, Russia, 6-7 (3), 6-4, 10-4;
Robert Lindstedt, Sweden, and Milos Raonic,
Canada, def. Bob and Mike Bryan (1), United
States, 3-6, 6-4, 10-7.
Women’s Doubles — First round: Kristina Mladenovic, France, and Galina Voskoboeva, Kazakhstan, def. Kiki Bertens and Demi Schuurs,
Netherlands, 6-3, 7-5; Barbora Krejcikova and
Katerina Siniakova (1), Czech Republic, def.
Mihaela Buzarnescu, Romania, and Nadiia Kichenok, Ukraine, 6-4, 6-0; Lucie Hradecka,
Czech Republic, and Andreja Klepac, Slovenia,
def. Elise Mertens, Belgium, and Sam Stosur,
Australia, 6-4, 6-2; Anna-Lena Groenefeld,
Germany, and Vania King, United States, def.
Olga Danilovic, Serbia, and Anastasia Potapova, Russia, 7-6 (3), 7-6 (4).
WTA Shenzhen Open
Shenzhen, China
Surface: Hard; Purse: $750,000
Singles — First round: Kristyna Pliskova,
Czech Republic, def. Peng Shuai, China, 3-6,
7-6 (6), 3-3 retired; Monica Niculescu, Romania, def. Jelena Ostapenko (4), Latvia, 6-0,
6-2.
Singles — Second round: Vera Zvonareva,
Russia, def. Ivana Jorovic, Serbia, 7-5, 4-6,
6-4; Sorana Cirstea, Romania, def. Pauline
Parmentier, France, 6-2, 6-2; Alison Riske,
United States, def. Evgeniya Rodina, Russia,
4-6, 6-2, 6-3; Veronika Kudermetova, Russia,
def. Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova (8), Russia,
6-2, 1-6, 6-2.
Doubles — First round: Dalila Jakupovic, Slovenia, and Irina Khromacheva (3), Russia, def.
Jiang Xinyu and Tang Qianhui, China, 6-4, 2-6,
10-4; Nao Hibino, Japan, and Anhelina Kalinina, Ukraine, def. Tatjana Maria, Germany, and
Pauline Parmentier, France, 6-1, 7-5; Timea
Bacsinszky, Switzerland, and Vera Zvonareva,
Russia, def. Wang Xinyu and Xun Fang Ying,
China, 2-6, 7-5, 13-11.
WTA ASB Classic
Auckland, New Zealand
Surface: Hard; Purse: $226,750
Singles — First round: Sofia Kenin, United
States, def. Petra Martic (4), Croatia, 7-5, 2-6,
6-2; Kirsten Flipkens (7), Belgium, def. Sachia
Vickery, United States, 6-2, 6-2; Barbora Strycova (5), Czech Republic, def. Taylor Townsend, United States, 6-2, 6-7 (5), 6-3; Hsieh
Su-wei (3), Taiwan, def. Polona Hercog, Slovenia, 6-2, 6-3; Bibiane Schoofs, Netherlands,
def. Alison Van Uytvanck (8), Belgium, 3-4 retired; Julia Goerges (2), Germany, def. Johanna Larsson, Sweden, 6-0, 6-4; Mona Barthel,
Germany, def. Silvia Soler-Espinosa, Spain,
6-2, 7-6 (1); Venus Williams (6), United States,
def. Victoria Azarenka, Belarus, 6-3, 1-6, 6-3;
Amanda Anisimova, United States, def. Jana
Cepelova, Slovakia, 6-2, 3-0 retired; Bianca
Andreescu, Canada, def. Timea Babos, Hungary, 6-4, 7-6 (6).
Doubles — First round: Eugenie Bouchard,
Canada, and Sofia Kenin, United States, def.
Lesley Kerkhove, Netherlands, and Sabrina
Santamaria, United States, 2-6, 6-3, 10-6; Alexandra Panova, Russia, and Laura Siegemund, Germany, def. Raluca Olaru, Romania,
and Abigail Spears (1), United States, 6-3, 6-4;
Monique Adamczak and Jessica Moore, Australia, def. Kaitlyn Christian and Asia Muhammad (3), United States, 3-6, 6-3, 12-10.
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
AP Top 25 Fared
1. Duke (11-1) did not play. Next: vs. Clemson,
Saturday.
2. Michigan (13-0) did not play. Next: vs. Penn
State, Thursday.
3. Tennessee (11-1) did not play. Next: vs.
Georgia, Saturday.
4. Virginia (12-0) did not play. Next: vs. No. 9
Florida State, Saturday.
5. Kansas (11-1) did not play. Next: vs. No. 23
Oklahoma, Wednesday.
6. Nevada (13-0) did not play. Next: vs. Utah
State, Wednesday.
7. Gonzaga (13-2) did not play. Next: vs. Santa
Clara, Saturday.
8. Michigan State (11-2) did not play. Next: vs.
Northwestern, Wednesday.
9. Florida State (12-1) beat Winthrop 87-76.
Next: at No. 4 Virginia, Saturday.
10. Virginia Tech (12-1) beat Notre Dame 8166. Next: vs. Boston College, Saturday.
11. Texas Tech (11-1) did not play. Next: at
West Virginia, Wednesday.
12. Auburn (11-2) did not play. Next: at Mississippi, Wednesday, Jan. 9.
13. Kentucky (10-2) did not play. Next: at Alabama, Saturday.
14. Ohio State (12-1) did not play. Next: vs. No.
8 Michigan State, Saturday.
15. North Carolina (9-3) did not play. Next: vs.
Harvard, Wednesday.
16. Marquette (11-2) at St. John’s. Next: vs. Xavier, Sunday.
17. Mississippi State (12-1) did not play. Next:
at South Carolina, Tuesday, Jan. 8.
18. North Carolina State (12-1) did not play.
Next: at Miami, Thursday.
19. Houston (13-0) did not play. Next: vs. Tulsa, Wednesday.
20. Buffalo (12-1) did not play. Next: at Eastern Michigan, Friday.
21. Indiana (11-2) did not play. Next: vs. Illinois, Thursday.
22. Wisconsin (10-3) did not play. Next: vs.
Minnesota, Thursday.
23. Oklahoma (11-1) did not play. Next: at No. 5
Kansas, Wednesday.
24. Nebraska (11-2) did not play. Next: at
Maryland, Wednesday.
25. Iowa (11-2) did not play. Next: at Purdue,
Thursday.
USA Today Top 25 Poll
The top 25 teams in the USA Today men’s college basketball poll, with first-place votes in
parentheses, records through Dec. 30, points
based on 25 points for a first-place vote
through one point for a 25th-place vote and
previous ranking:
Record
Pts
Pvs
1. Duke (10)
11-1
759
2
2. Virginia (11)
11-0
757
1
3. Tennessee (7)
11-1
734
3
4. Michigan (4)
13-0
729
4
5. Nevada
13-0
655
6
6. Kansas
11-1
643
5
7. Michigan St.
11-2
593
7
8. Gonzaga
12-2
577
8
9. Florida State
11-1
518
9
10. Virginia Tech
11-1
490
10
11. Texas Tech
11-1
442
13
12. Ohio State
12-1
413
11
13. Auburn
11-2
403
11
14. Kentucky
10-2
391
15
15. N. Carolina
9-3
374
14
16. Miss. St.
12-1
299
17
17. Houston
13-0
233
19
18. Marquette
11-2
211
20
19. N.C. State
12-1
179
24
20. Buffalo
12-1
134
22
20. Iowa
11-2
134
21
22. Indiana
11-2
128
25
23. Nebraska
11-2
117
23
23. Wisconsin
10-3
117
16
25. Oklahoma
11-1
96
—
Others receiving votes: Arizona State 71, Villanova 37, Cincinnati 34, TCU 27, Kansas State
26, Iowa State 23, Seton Hall 18, Florida 12,
UCF 9, Purdue 7, Furman 5, North Texas 3, St.
John’s 1, Toledo 1.
AP Top Twenty Five
The top 25 teams in the Associated Press’ college basketball poll, with first-place votes in
parentheses, records through Dec. 30, total
points based on 25 points for a first-place
vote through one point for a 25th-place vote
and last week’s ranking:
Record
Pts
Prv
1. Duke (35)
11-1
1530
1
2. Michigan (9)
13-0
1478
2
3. Tenn. (12)
11-1
1469
3
4. Virginia (4)
11-0
1428
4
5. Kansas (4)
11-1
1378
5
6. Nevada
13-0
1317
6
7. Gonzaga
12-2
1200
7
8. Michigan St.
11-2
1146
8
9. Florida St.
11-1
1063
9
10. Virginia Tech
11-1
934
10
11. Texas Tech
11-1
893
11
12. Auburn
11-2
820
12
13. Kentucky
10-2
799
16
14. Ohio St.
12-1
769
13
15. N. Carolina
9-3
744
14
16. Marquette
11-2
595
18
17. Miss. St.
12-1
572
19
18. N.C. State
12-1
424
20
19. Houston
13-0
368
22
20. Buffalo
12-1
353
21
21. Indiana
11-2
330
23
22. Wisconsin
10-3
250
15
23. Oklahoma
11-1
244
25
24. Nebraska
11-2
204
—
25. Iowa
11-2
182
24
Others receiving votes: Arizona St. 116, Kansas St. 61, Villanova 43, Seton Hall 24, TCU 20,
Cincinnati 14, Iowa St. 10, Florida 6, Purdue 6,
Toledo 5, Louisville 3, North Texas 1, St. John’s
1.
USA Today Women’s Top 25
The top 25 teams in the USA Today women’s
college basketball poll, with first-place votes
in parentheses, records through Dec. 30,
points based on 25 points for a first-place
vote through one point for a 25th-place vote
and previous ranking:
Record
Pts
Pvs
1. UConn (31)
11-0
775
1
2. Notre Dame
12-1
736
2
3. Louisville
12-0
716
3
4. Maryland
12-0
668
4
5. Oregon
11-1
646
5
6. Miss. St.
12-1
595
7
7. Baylor
8-1
590
6
8. Stanford
10-1
583
8
9. N.C. State
13-0
532
9
10. Tennessee
11-1
502
10
11. Oregon St.
10-2
442
11
12. Texas
10-2
419
12
13. Minnesota
12-0
370
15
14. Syracuse
11-2
367
14
15. Kentucky
13-1
310
17
16. Marquette
10-3
255
19
17. Michigan St.
11-1
249
22
18. Gonzaga
12-1
246
21
19. California
9-2
210
13
20. Iowa
9-3
193
16
21. Texas A&M
11-2
126
24
22. Arizona St.
9-3
116
18
23. Florida St.
12-1
110
25
24. DePaul
9-4
81
20
25. Virginia Tech
13-0
67
—
Others receiving votes: Iowa State 32, Miami
30, South Carolina 26, UAB 18, South Alabama
13, UCF 9, Indiana 9, West Virginia 9, Missouri
8, Southern Cal 5, New Mexico 4, Arizona 2,
Central Michigan 2, South Dakota 2, Tulane 2.
ODDS
Pregame.com Line
NBA
Wednesday
Favorite
Miami
WASHINGTON
CHARLOTTE
BROOKLYN
BOSTON
MEMPHIS
CHICAGO
PHOENIX
Oklahoma City
Line O/U
6 (206)
5
229
2
223
1 (2301⁄2)
OFF OFF
6
199
OFF OFF
OFF OFF
51⁄2 (230)
College Basketball
Wednesday
Favorite
CINCINNATI
Nebraska
XAVIER
NORTH CAROLINA
WAKE FOREST
EVANSVILLE
Texas Tech
BUTLER
UCF
BRADLEY
VALPARAISO
SMU
HOUSTON
S. ILLINOIS
UCONN
VILLANOVA
MICHIGAN ST
Iowa St
KANSAS ST
LOYOLA OF CHIC.
KANSAS
New Mexico
Boise St
Fresno St
UNLV
NEVADA
Line
20
2
3
17
8
PK
41⁄2
10
6
71⁄2
3
15
11
81⁄2
3
12
13
5
3
7
10
1
3
15
9
10
Underdog
CLEVELAND
Atlanta
Dallas
New Orleans
Minnesota
Detroit
Orlando
Philadelphia
LA LAKERS
Underdog
Tulane
MARYLAND
Seton Hall
Harvard
Cornell
Drake
WEST VIRGINIA
Georgetown
Temple
N. Iowa
Illinois St
East Carolina
Tulsa
Missouri St
SOUTH FLORIDA
Depaul
Northwestern
OKLAHOMA ST
Texas
Indiana St
Oklahoma
AIR FORCE
WYOMING
SAN JOSE ST
Colorado St
Utah St
National Hockey League
Wednesday
Favorite
Calgary
Pittsburgh
Vancouver
DALLAS
ARIZONA
San Jose
Line
-169
-148
-130
OFF
-105
-107
Underdog
DETROIT
NY RANGERS
OTTAWA
New Jersey
Edmonton
COLORADO
Line
+159
+138
+120
OFF
-105
-103
College Football
Monday National Championship Game
Favorite
Alabama
Line
6
O/U
591⁄2
NFL
Playoffs Saturday
Favorite
HOUSTON
DALLAS
Line O/U
2
47
1
43
Playoffs Sunday
Favorite
BALTIMORE
CHICAGO
Line O/U
21⁄2 411⁄2
6
41
Underdog
Clemson
Underdog
Indianapolis
Seattle
Underdog
LA Chargers
Philadelphia
DEALS
FOOTBALL
National Football League
CHICAGO BEARS — Signed QB Tyler Bray to the
practice squad. Released OL Willie Beavers
from the practice squad.
CINCINNATI BENGALS — Signed K Tristan Vizcaino to a reserve/future contract.
DETROIT LIONS — Signed QB Connor Cook to a
reserve/future contract.
MIAMI DOLPHINS — Signed LB James Burgess, C Connor Hilland, S Chris Lammons, DT
Jamiyus Pittman, LB Quentin Poling and DE
Jeremiah Valoaga to reserve/future contracts.
OAKLAND RAIDERS — WR Saeed Blacknall, RB
James Butler, LB Cayson Collins, LB James
Cowser, WR Rashard Davis, DB Makinton Dorleant, P Drew Kaser, OT Jamar McGloster, QB
Nathan Peterman and FB Ryan Yurachek to reserve/future contracts.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
ARIZONA COYOTES — Assigned G Calvin Pickard to Tucson (AHL) for conditioning purposes.
NEW JERSEY DEVILS — Placed F Taylor Hall on
injured reserve, retroactive to Dec. 23. Recalled D Egor Yakovlev and F Blake Pietila
from Binghamton (AHL).
SPORTS
6C ❚ WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2019 ❚ USA TODAY
NFL PLAYOFFS
POWER RANKINGS
Saints march into playoffs at No. 1
Bears, Rams, Chiefs and Ravens round out top five at end of regular season
Nate Davis
USA TODAY
NFL power rankings, post-regular
season edition:
1. Saints (last week, 1): Talented,
balanced team armed with home-field
advantage at one of NFL’s toughest venues. Pretty much your prohibitive Super
Bowl favorites.
2. Bears (2): League’s stingiest defense has gotten deserved acclaim after
being overlooked in recent years. Coordinator Vic Fangio now a hot head coach
candidate.
3. Rams (3): Needed bye with Todd
Gurley, Andrew Whitworth on mend.
Won’t open playoffs hosting Kryptonite
Eagles, who have beaten Rams six
straight times.
4. Chiefs (5): Finally completed
quest for AFC’s top seed. But what do
they do with it given they’ve lost six
consecutive playoff games at Arrowhead?
5. Ravens (6): Appropriate they
reached wild-card round given they’re
ultimate wild cards with dynamic rookie
quarterback, grind-’em-up attack and
jackhammer defense.
6. Chargers (4): They crest too soon?
Philip Rivers has looked quite mortal
since heroics in Kansas City and didn’t
come close to solving Ravens in Week 16.
7. Patriots (8): Tempting to pencil
them into eighth straight AFC title
game, though that seems far likelier if
they draw Texans — their personal
punching bags — in divisional round.
8. Colts (7): Was there a better free
agent signing in 2018 than tight end Eric
Ebron? His career year included 14
touchdowns after he scored 12 in four
combined seasons with Detroit.
9. Seahawks (9): Reboot pretty much
complete. Paul Allen would be proud. Be
tough to win in New Orleans, but they
can easily beat anyone else in January.
10. Texans (10): They’re 3-1 all time in
wild-card games, so history says they’re
primed to notch that signature win
skeptics say they’ve lacked all season.
11. Cowboys (11): Efficacy of their battered offensive line could be the key to
their ability to survive Seattle in Saturday’s wild-card showdown.
The Saints and quarterback Drew Brees tied with the Rams for the best record at
13-3 but defeated Los Angeles 45-35 in Week 9. DERICK E. HINGLE/USA TODAY SPORTS
12. Eagles (14): Gotta feel for Carson
Wentz as he watches another playoff
push from sideline while Nick Foles is
again hailed as Philly’s savior.
13. Steelers (15): Numbers suggest
Ben Roethlisberger had career year with
5,129 passing yards and 34 touchdowns,
but will he really want to remember this
season?
14. Browns (16): What if Baker Mayfield had started sooner? What if Hue
Jackson had been fired sooner? Regardless, Cleveland thrilled Factory of Sadness has apparently been shuttered.
15. Vikings (12): Maybe this is what
Minnesota fans should’ve reasonably
expected — since becoming full-time
starter in 2015, Kirk Cousins’ record is
32-30-2.
16. Falcons (18): This just got interesting. One of league’s most stable and
talented rosters in recent years about to
get whole new band of coordinators.
17. Titans (13): They realized, a bit too
late, that Derrick Henry should be their
offensive identity. Now it’s time to decide if they can rely on Marcus Mariota.
18. Packers (17): This figures to be
most scrutinized coaching hire of offseason as candidates decide whether
working with Aaron Rodgers is a pro or
con.
19. Giants (19): Scintillating Saquon
Barkley clearly new face of this franchise. What it means for OBJ’s ego and
Eli Manning’s future remains to be seen.
20. Panthers (30): Ron Rivera has
apparently survived one of most baffling collapses in recent memory. But he
is 24-26 since Super Bowl 50 and probably can’t endure another bad year.
21. 49ers (20): They gave some of
league’s best teams all they could handle in December. Once again look
primed for liftoff when Jimmy Garoppolo returns.
22. Bills (25): We’re left wondering
why retiring Kyle Williams wasn’t integrated into offense sooner. Another club
that fought hard with nothing on line.
23. Raiders (26): Latest roll of dice —
so Vegas — is turning over all those draft
picks to new general manager Mike
Mayock, who knows college talent but
has never worked in an NFL front office.
24. Jets (24): Presence of quarterback Sam Darnold, Pro Bowl safety Jamal Adams and a boatload of salary cap
space actually make this one of league’s
most desirable open jobs.
25. Bengals (31): Just when you
thought Marvin Lewis had lifetime appointment, Mike Brown makes a
change. Next, he needs to change his
spending habits.
26. Broncos (27): John Elway still insists this is a plum job, but next coach
will be well aware he might end up paying for GM’s personnel mistakes.
27. Jaguars (28): What good is stability at the top when you’re looking for a
quarterback, voiding your star running
back’s guaranteed money, and your best
player is unhappy?
28. Lions (29): You’d think an engineer like Matt Patricia would navigate
his learning curve a little more gracefully. Hard to see where Detroit is headed.
29. Buccaneers (21): GM Jason Licht
has made more than his share of questionable decisions over the years, but
apparently he gets to continue making
them.
30. Cardinals (32): They need a
coach. But they do (apparently) have
franchise quarterback, stud tailback
and top pick of the 2019 draft. Turnaround could be quick.
31. Redskins (22): How many self-inflicted mistakes can one franchise
make? Embarrassing second half
capped with sacking of business department the day after Christmas.
32. Dolphins (23): Who’s the coach
going to be? Who’s the quarterback going to be? Will their best player be a 36year-old running back? Happy New
Year!!
X factors that could decide wild-card games
Chargers RB Melvin Gordon. Though
Gordon has been dealing with injuries,
he has excelled as a ballcarrier and pass
catcher. But in Week 16’s Baltimore victory, Gordon tallied a season-low 54
yards from scrimmage in his first game
back from a sprained MCL. One of the
favorite moves for the running back and
quarterback Philip Rivers is when Gordon acts as if he’ll be in pass protection
only to shoot upfield and cut to either
side for a pass. Mosley has to be ready
for those plays or have someone else in
position.
Lorenzo Reyes
USA TODAY
The NFL playoffs are here, so it’s time
to dig into the matchups. Here’s one
X factor for each team in the wild-card
round:
Colts at Texans
Indianapolis: Cornerback Pierre
Desir: The biggest difference between
Indy’s Week 4 loss to the Texans and its
Week 14 win was the production of
Houston receiver DeAndre Hopkins.
While mostly in zone coverage, Indianapolis gave up 10 catches on 12 targets to
Hopkins in the first meeting for 169
yards and one touchdown. In the rematch, the Colts used a lot of press-bail
techniques to jam Hopkins at the line
and disrupt his timing, with Desir often
shadowing him. Colts defensive coordinator Matt Eberflus did an excellent job
of occasionally giving him help and funneling Hopkins into tighter spaces.
Houston: Pass rush: Indianapolis allowed six sacks in its 10 victories but
gave up 12 in its six losses. When Andrew Luck has time to throw, he can be
surgical. When he faces pressure, he
can be prone to making mistakes. Houston’s pass rush is going to have to be
more than just defensive end J.J. Watt
and linebacker Jadeveon Clowney, who
combined for 25 of the 43 sacks.
Seahawks at Cowboys
Seattle: Third-down defense: The
Seahawks ranked fifth in the NFL in
third-down defense, allowing opponents to convert 34.97 percent of their
tries. The Cowboys, even with their
early-season struggles, ranked 10th in
conversion rate at 41.4. Although Dallas
has changed significantly from when
these two teams played in Week 3
thanks to a midseason trade for receiver
Amari Cooper, the Seahawks won that
Eagles at Bears
A wild-card round matchup to watch is Chargers running back Melvin Gordon
(28) being chased by the Ravens’ C.J. Mosley (57). JAKE ROTH/USA TODAY SPORTS
game, in large part, because they held
the Cowboys to 3 of 13 on third-down attempts. Both teams emphasize ball control, with Dallas ranking fifth in time of
possession (31:32) and Seattle sixth
(31:28). Keeping Dak Prescott, Ezekiel
Elliott and Cooper on the bench will be
an important step for Seattle as it looks
to set the game’s terms.
Dallas: Stopping receiver Tyler
Lockett: Few are discussing the season
Lockett had, but his production was remarkable. He caught 57 passes for 965
yards and 10 TDs as Russell Wilson established a perfect 158.3 passer rating
on the 70 throws targeting him. According to NFL operations, no passer since
2002 had posted a perfect rating when
targeting one receiver more than 15
times. Dallas primarily uses its cornerbacks in the same positions, with Byron
Jones on the right, Anthony Brown in
the slot and Chidobe Awuzie out left. Seattle moves Lockett inside and outside,
and how Dallas defends him could be
key to slowing Seattle’s big-play ability.
Chargers at Ravens
Los Angeles: Clogging lanes and using spies: Since rookie quarterback Lamar Jackson became the starter, the
Ravens have won six of seven games
and averaged 229.6 rushing yards per
game. Jackson can take off on designed
runs but can also scramble when a play
is about to break down, making Baltimore’s attack incredibly unpredictable.
The Chargers might try to keep Jackson
from breaking free by staying disciplined to clog potential rushing lanes
and using a linebacker as a spy.
Baltimore: Linebacker C.J. Mosley:
Arguably the Ravens’ most important
defender, Mosley makes the pre-snap
adjustments and calls defensive plays.
From his spot in the middle of the defense, he’s central in the effort to stop
Philadelphia: Offensive tackles Jason Peters and Lane Johnson: The Eagles have one of the league’s most formidable offensive lines but haven’t
faced a test like Chicago. The Bears
ranked third in the league with 50 sacks,
two behind the Steelers and Chiefs.
While Vic Fangio’s defense generates
pressure from multiple points, the focus
will be on Peters and Johnson to contain
linebacker Khalil Mack. When he was
with the Raiders, Mack mainly lined up
on the left side of the defense, which
would put more stress on the right tackle. But in Chicago, coordinator Vic Fangio has moved him all over, often dropping him into coverage to disguise pressure from elsewhere. When Mack
comes off the edge, he’s a game changer.
Chicago: Defense in the red zone: In
games Nick Foles has started this season, the Eagles have scored TDs on 68.8
percent of trips inside the 20 after posting a 53.7 percent rate when Carson
Wentz led the team. Granted, a lot of
that can be attributed to the teams Foles
faced (Falcons, Buccaneers, Rams, Texans and Redskins), but Chicago will
have to hold firm in the red zone. The
Bears rank fifth in the NFL, allowing
only half of opponents’ trips to end in
touchdowns. Chicago also led the NFL
in takeaways with 36.
K1
USA TODAY ❚ WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2019 ❚ SECTION D
IN LIFE
Settle in for some good listening
15 albums to look forward to in 2019. 2D
New year, new mind and body
Instagram trainers and other fitness options. 3D
Belly up to a $5,000 burger
Check out these budget-busting meals. 5D
ARIANA GRANDE BY AFP/GETTY IMAGES
LIFELINE
TELEVISION
TELEVISION
Dwayne
Johnson’s
destiny:
‘Titan
Games’
Carly Mallenbaum
USA TODAY
VAN AGOSTINI/INVISION/AP
MAKING WAVES
KEVIN SPACEY
The disgraced actor will plead not
guilty to groping a teenage boy in a
Nantucket bar in 2016, but he insists
he doesn’t need to be present at his
arraignment next week to do so.
Spacey filed a motion Monday with
the District Court on Nantucket Island
seeking to be excused from appearing at the arraignment Jan. 7 on the
grounds that the publicity surrounding his first public appearance since
being accused last fall probably will
taint the jury pool. The 14-page
document includes an affidavit
signed by Kevin S. Fowler (Spacey’s
real name) in which he says he believes that “my presence will amplify
the negative publicity already generated in connection with this case.” “I
wish to enter a plea of not guilty,” his
affidavit says. “I understand that
if I fail to appear and answer to the
charges pending against me without
sufficient excuse, I can be subject to
a fine or imprisonment or both.”
There’s a celebrity under that getup in “The Masked Singer.” MICHAEL BECKER/FOX
Unmasked:
Ten new shows
you must see
Dwayne Johnson doesn’t exactly
have a “ninja” body. But it’s fair to say
the former WWE star is “titan”-size.
So it’s fitting that one of the biggest
stars in the world is the host of NBC’s
newest obstacle-course competition,
“The Titan Games” (Thursday, 8 EST/
PST), which asks super-strong competitors on supersize head-to-head
courses to knock over 1,000-pound
walls, position and light 600-pound
torches, and play a blind tug of war.
Johnson says he has been “looking
for a series we could create to give a
platform to really good athletes. And
what was out there inspiring us was
‘American Ninja Warrior.’ ”
So Johnson teamed up with NBC for
the new eight-episode series based on
a Japanese format that features
contests inspired by Johnson’s gym
workouts (such as one involving a
300-pound cinder block) and inspired
ideas (including a “lunar eclipse” challenge that has athletes running around
a half-moon shape).
Kelly Lawler and Patrick Ryan
USA TODAY
DAN MACMEDAN/USA TODAY
GOOD DAY
DWAYNE JOHNSON
Only The Rock could fit a whole
house into a tiny envelope. That’s
how the action superstar won Christmas, surprising his mother, Ata, with
a new home. The actor posted to
Instagram on Saturday a video of the
heartwarming moment when she
discovered her gift. “This one felt
good. Surprise! Bought my mom a
new home for Christmas,” Johnson
wrote in the caption. OK, so there
wasn’t an actual house in the card;
Ata Johnson gets to pick where she
wants to live.
USA SNAPSHOTS ©
Top five best-sellers
1. Dog Man: Brawl of the Wild
Dav Pilkey
2. Becoming
Michelle Obama
3. The Hive Queen
Tui T. Sutherland
4. Girl, Wash Your Face
Rachel Hollis
5. Long Road to Mercy
David Baldacci
New year, new TV.
While you work on New Year’s resolutions and put 2018 behind you, your
favorite TV networks and streaming
services are doing the same. Early 2019
is full of new TV shows jockeying for
your attention, along with returning
favorites (“Star Trek: Discovery”),
shows you probably forgot were never
canceled (“True Detective” on HBO)
and fan-powered seasons (“Brooklyn
Nine-Nine,” which moves to NBC).
To help you sort through the shows
you haven’t yet heard of, we picked
10 must-see shows, ranging from one
that features singing celebrities
dressed as monsters to a superhero
show that actually stands out.
‘The Masked Singer’
Fox, Wednesdays, 9 EST/PST
Not since “The Voice” arrived in 2011
has a new reality competition captured the nation’s attention. At last,
Fox might have found a variation on
the formula that will shock and delight
you even more. Ten celebrities – described as athletes and Emmy and
Grammy winners – in elaborate costumes sing their hearts out, and viewers and celebrity judges – Robin
Thicke, Jenny McCarthy, Ken Jeong
and Nicole Scherzinger – try to guess
who they are. Each week the losing
singer, decided by the in-studio audience and judges, leaves the show and
takes off their mask. It’s such bizarre
and brilliant fun that you may not even
care who the celebrities are. Or you
might wish that your favorite voices
lose quickly so you can see who’s
hiding secret talents. – Kelly Lawler
‘The Passage’
SOURCE: USA TODAY; TOP 50 BOOKS THURSDAY
Fox (Jan. 14), Mondays, 9 EST/PST
“The Passage” is adapted from the
kind of epic sci-fi/fantasy book series
Dwayne Johnson says the women’s
contests are the most rewarding. NBC
Showtime (Jan. 20), Sundays,
10 EST/PST
Starring Don Cheadle, Regina Hall
and Andrew Rannells, “Black Monday”
is like “The Wolf of Wall Street” without all the annoying parts. It’s a nearparody of 1980s macho finance culture
mixed in with a fictionalized account
of how the so-called Black Monday
crash happened. The costumes and
style are all you’d ever want from a
series set in this period, but it’s the
“I was probably on my third tequila
and looking outside and seeing the
moon and thought, ‘What if there was
something like this?’ ”
Each episode features four female
and four male athletes in two rounds of
paired battles, with a finale pitting the
best of both groups. There are commentators, a sideline reporter and, of
course, Johnson, who introduces the
battles and gives pep talks before
races. In all, 64 contestants are whittled down to one male Titan and one
female Titan, who win $100,000 each.
Unlike “Ninja Warrior,” the races are
woman-to-woman and man-to-man
(not just athlete versus course), and
instead of testing grip strength and
agility, the battles rely more on brute
strength and power, or their “inner
mana,” the Polynesian term for spiritual energy, as Johnson calls it.
But what makes the contest “Rock”like isn’t just its “Mount Olympus”
finale course or the thickness of
competitors’ biceps: It’s the athletes’
backstories.
Johnson’s fans know that he wasn’t
born into fame and fortune. At a young
age, after he was evicted from his
apartment in Hawaii, “I would go to the
gym and think: ‘I can control my future. I can build my body to become
something,’ ” he says. After several arrests and a failed attempt to become
an NFL player, we all know what happened: Johnson became one of the biggest movie stars on the planet.
Like many a reality show, in casting
See NEW SHOWS, Page 2D
See ‘TITAN’, Page 4D
Saniyya Sidney and Mark-Paul
Gosselaar star in “The Passage.”
ELIZA MORSE/FOX
you’d expect to see brought to life on
premium cable or streaming, with bells,
whistles and a huge budget. But Fox
manages to scale down a massive and
complex story to fit into its lineup without corrupting what makes it fun and
gripping. The series is about a government research project that, while aiming to cure all diseases, inadvertently
creates vampires. Researchers believe
experimenting on a child is the only
way to fix the problem and send a covert operative (Mark-Paul Gosselaar) to
kidnap one, but his morals get in the
way. It’s a lot to take in, but it’s packaged cleanly and tensely. – Lawler
‘Black Monday’
LIFE
2D ❚ WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2019 ❚ USA TODAY
MUSIC
15 albums we can’t wait to hear in 2019
Maeve McDermott
studio to make her visions
come to life.
New year, new music.
From releases that already
have a confirmed date to the tobe-announced projects that
artists have hinted at in interviews and on social media, 2019
is already shaping up to be
promising when it comes to the
new albums on the horizon.
Some familiar names, such
as Avril Lavigne and Carly Rae
Jepsen, haven’t shared a fulllength album in years, while
others such as Ariana Grande
and Kanye West will return
with new projects mere months
after their previous releases.
Read on for the 15 confirmed
and strongly rumored albums
we’re expecting, and excited, to
hear in 2019.
Miley Cyrus, title TBA
(release date TBA)
USA TODAY
After stepping away from
hip-hop influences for a twangier sound on her 2017 album
“Younger Now,” Cyrus confirmed she recorded songs for a
forthcoming album with Mike
WiLL Made-It, the rap producer behind Cyrus’s 2013 album “Bangerz.”
Pearl Jam, title TBA
(release date TBA)
Ariana Grande, ‘Thank U,
Next’ (release date TBA)
Bruce Springsteen is one of many artists who’s hinted at new music coming in 2019. GREG ALLEN/AP
Arianators – the preferred
name for Ariana Grande fans –
received great news in late 2018
when the singer announced
she was finishing her new release “Thank U, Next,” which
shares the name of her No. 1
single, just months after her
fourth album “Sweetener”
came out in August.
World Like This” in 2013.
Avril Lavigne, ‘Head Above
Water’ (Feb. 15)
Lavigne’s sixth album is her
first release in five years, a
stretch in which she battled
Lyme disease and spent a while
away from singing, struggles
she documents on the “Head
Above Water” lead single and
title track.
Backstreet Boys, ‘DNA’
(Jan. 25)
Six years and one hit Las Vegas residency later, the Backstreet Boys are returning in
2019 with their 10th studio album, “DNA,” the band’s first
full-length effort since “In a
Bruce Springsteen, title
TBA (release date TBA)
Ahead of closing his yearlong “Springsteen on Broadway” run Dec. 15, the rocker
shared he’d be spending his
2019 working on “various recording projects” and told the
U.K’s Sunday Times that he has
a finished album locked and
loaded, “a singer-songwriter album – more of a solo record.”
Carly Rae Jepsen, title TBA
(release date TBA)
The “Call Me Maybe” hitmaker turned cult pop icon
confirmed that her effervescent
new single “Party For One” will
be part of a new album set for
2019, her first full-length release since 2015’s “Emotion.”
Florida Georgia Line,
‘Can’t Say I Ain’t Country’
(Feb. 15)
The cheeky album title is a
New shows
performances from the three
leads that make the series more
than just another take on
“Greed is good.” – Lawler
‘The Other Two’
‘I Am the Night’
TNT (Jan. 28), Mondays,
9 EST/PST
Long before she shattered
box-office records with 2017’s
“Wonder Woman,” director Patty Jenkins gave us the brutal
yet human “Monster” (2004),
starring Charlize Theron as serial killer Aileen Wuornos. The
filmmaker returns to her truecrime roots with the ’60s-set
“Night,” which reunites her
with “Wonder Woman” heartthrob Chris Pine, who plays a
disgraced journalist whose life
becomes intertwined with that
Kanye West, ‘Yandhi’
(release date TBA)
West has been teasing a new
release titled “Yandhi” for a
good chunk of 2018. The album
had been set for release Black
Friday, but the rapper delayed it
again, saying his recent performance with Kid Cudi inspired
him to get back in the studio
and keep tinkering with his
music.
Lana Del Rey, ‘Norman
(Expletive) Rockwell’
(release date TBA)
For her sixth album, the
singer teamed with producer
Jack Antonoff – who was behind recent albums from Taylor
Swift, Lorde and St. Vincent –
and has since released the
promising lead single “Mariners Apartment Complex.”
‘Miracle Workers’
Continued from Page 1D
Comedy Central (Jan. 24),
Thursdays, 10:30 EST/PST
Chris Kelly’s bittersweet cancer comedy “Other People” was
one of our favorite films of 2016,
so we couldn’t have been more
excited for the “Saturday Night
Live” writer’s latest TV outing,
which re-teams him with “SNL”
alums Sarah Schneider and
Molly Shannon. The show follows a hapless aspiring actor
named Cary (Drew Tarver) who,
along with his sister Brooke
(Helene Yorke), is riding the
coattails of his winsome teenage brother (Case Walker), a
Justin Bieber-esque pop star
known as Chase Dreams. Like
Hulu’s canceled “Difficult People,” “Other Two” is acerbically
funny and deeply cynical, with
snappy showbiz humor and a
fully formed leading man who
just happens to be gay (which is,
sadly, still a rarity on the big and
small screen). – Patrick Ryan
fitting description for the country band, whose forthcoming
fourth release also includes
features from guests Jason Aldean and Jason Derulo.
Annie (Aidy Bryant) shines in
“Shrill.” ALLYSON RIGGS/HULU
of Fauna Hodel (India Eisley), a
young woman seeking answers
about her apparently mixedrace background and wealthy
grandfather (Jefferson Mays), a
prime suspect in the infamous
“Black Dahlia” murder. Pine is
charismatic as always, but it’s
Eisley’s mesmerizing performance that gives this mystery
its beating heart. – Ryan
‘Pen15’
Hulu (Feb. 8)
Try not watching this one
through your fingers. Andy
Samberg and his Lonely Island
cohorts produce this cringeworthy coming-of-age comedy,
set in middle school and featuring actual middle-schoolers.
The catch? The show’s adult
creators, Anna Konkle and
Maya Erskine, star as seventhgrade versions of themselves,
awkwardly cursing out bullies
in the schoolyard and swooning over crushes in homeroom.
While the joke seems one-note
at best (and creepy at worst)
the premise works because of
Konkle and Erskine’s commitment to their painfully relatable characters. And although
the jokes are decidedly not
family-friendly, their believable friendship as brace-face
besties gives “PEN15” a sweet
center. – Ryan
TBS (Feb. 12), Tuesdays,
10:30 EST/PST
“SNL” producer Lorne Michaels is behind this spiritual
cousin to “The Good Place,” a
quirky workplace comedy set
in heaven where God (Steve
Buscemi) is a lazy, semi-sadistic oaf whose employees carry
out his bidding on Earth. Tired
of her insipid job in the dirt division, angel Eliza (Geraldine
Viswanathan) transfers to the
Department of Answered Prayers, where she works alongside
neurotic recluse Craig (Daniel
Radcliffe). While it lacks the
brain of “Good Place” – one episode centers on God seeking to
explode Bill Maher’s penis –
“Miracle Workers” still has
plenty of heart, morphing into a
rom-com as Eliza and Craig try
to match up two lovebirds
whose romance could literally
save the world. – Ryan
‘The Umbrella Academy’
Netflix (Feb. 15)
There was no shortage of
superhero shows on TV in 2018,
but Netflix is making another
run – or, rather, flight – with
“Umbrella,” an adaptation of
the comic book series by My
Chemical Romance singer
Gerard Way. It’s about a misfit
group of superkids, adopted by
an eccentric millionaire, who
grow up to become troubled
adults. It’s a darker and more
demented take on the “family
of superheroes” story than
you’ve seen before, but it still
maintains a sense of fun. It certainly stands out amid the glut
of interchangeable caped hero
series. – Lawler
‘Desus & Mero’
Showtime (Feb. 21), Thursdays, 11 EST/PST
Showtime is wading into the
late-night talk-show waters
Madonna, title TBA
(release date TBA)
The pop legend told WWD in
October that she would be releasing her 14th studio album in
2019, sharing on Instagram the
next month that the music was
in the final mixing stages.
Mike Posner, ‘A Real Good
Kid’ (Jan. 18)
The “I Took a Pill in Ibiza”
singer/producer shared that
his forthcoming third album
was inspired by a particularly
difficult two-year stretch in his
life during which he moved
back to his childhood home
outside Detroit to care for his
terminally ill father.
Meghan Trainor, ‘Treat
Myself’ (Jan. 25)
The pop singer delayed her
third studio album from an
August release to January,
sharing on Instagram that she
“(couldn’t) stop writing songs”
and needed more time in the
with “Desus & Mero,” which
moves from its daily home on
Viceland. Hosts Desus Nice
and The Kid Mero, who first
gained popularity in 2013 with
their “Bodega Boys” podcast,
don’t appear to be switching up
the format much: inviting famous guests on to chop it up
about music, sports and pop
culture. But knowing their
raunchy comedy, easy chemistry and frequently insightful
takes on politics, this dynamic
duo promises to be as unpredictable as ever. – Ryan
‘Shrill’
Hulu (March 15)
Aidy Bryant finally gets a
chance to step outside her
Legal Notice
Pearl Jam fans were given a
serious reason to believe the
band’s new album will be arriving soon when frontman Eddie
Vedder announced at the
band’s final show of 2018 in
Boston that the next time the
bandmates would play together would be in the studio. A local Seattle record store also
confirmed Vedder was hard at
work recording.
Weezer, ‘Weezer (The
Black Album)’ (March 1)
The follow-up to 2017’s “Pacific Daydream,” the band’s
self-titled “Black Album” may
or may not include its successful cover of Toto’s “Africa” from
earlier last year, which followed
a social media campaign to get
Weezer to record the cult classic song released in 1982.
Jennifer Lopez, title TBA
(release date TBA)
Way back in 2017, Lopez confirmed she had a Spanish-language album on the way, sharing that the title would be “Por
Primera Vez” (“For the First
Time”). And while that album
never materialized, she returned in early 2018 with the
single “Dinero” featuring DJ
Khaled and Cardi B, raising
questions about whether more
new music would follow soon.
“Saturday Night Live” personas
with this series, adapted by
writer and fat-acceptance activist Lindy West from her
memoir. “Shrill” tells the story
of Annie (Bryant) a young
woman and aspiring journalist
trying to sort through her
messy love life and career in
Portland, Oregon. She also
happens to be plus-size and
isn’t consumed with trying to
change that. Fat women in pop
culture are rarely allowed to be
happy with their bodies (unless
they’re villains), so the mere
concept of the show is radical
and novel enough. But it avoids
being a public service announcement in sitcom form;
instead, it’s as sweet and chill
as Portland itself. – Lawler
Legal Notice
LIFE
USA TODAY ❚ WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2019 ❚ 3D
TRENDS
These Instagram trainers get you fit
Rasha Ali
USA TODAY
If you’re guilty of aimlessly scrolling
through multiple Instagram fitness accounts promising yourself that you’ll
start your new “healthy routine” tomorrow, say aye.
Yeah, we’ve all been there. Finding
the motivation to change your life
around can be difficult for some of us
couch potatoes, and for non-couch potatoes, trying to maintain that drive can
become exhausting too – it’s just hard
all around. So the next time you’re
scrolling through Instagram either
creeping on your ex’s best friend’s cousin’s stepsister’s page or looking for the
latest celebrity tea, follow these six
trainers for a boost of inspiration.
Massy Arias
How long she’s been training: Eight
years
Specialties: Full body (your mind
included)
Forget about the workouts and her
physique; Arias’ life journey is enough
to encourage you and let you know that
you can do anything you set your mind
to. She’s not just going to get your body
right but your mind as well.
“Many people think they have to have
the perfect scenario, the perfect situation to reach their goals,” says Arias,
who first started out hosting fitness
classes at Central Park in New York
where only one or two people would
show up. She now has 2.5 million followers on Instagram and a whole community of Massy Arias Warriors.
As an Afro-Latina, Arias is dedicated
to transforming her community’s
health. She says the black community
has the highest ratio of diabetes and hypertension and has some unhealthy
habits. She wants to change that by
changing the way we perceive fitness.
“I don’t believe in restrictions. I’m
teaching you how to cook healthier. I’m
teaching you how food can be medicine
and it can be poison.”
When you follow Arias, you’re getting
more than just a physical transformation; you’re going to change your life.
Gerald Washington
How long he’s been training: Eight
years
Specialties: Women’s fitness, enhancing body shape, building glutes
A quick scan through Washington’s
Instagram page will show you why you
should hit that follow button – his clients are the ultimate body goals. And
it’s no wonder once you see the type of
workouts he puts them through.
His approach to fitness is realistic.
“There’s no chance to lose anything
with all the squats you’re doing,” Washington says. “There’s no downgrade;
you’re always getting better by incorporating full-body movements, cardio,
burpees, jump ropes – the more you get
Fitness trainer Gerald Washington suggests followers start with a four-week commitment. GETTY IMAGES
your body off the ground, the more you
can burn more calories.”
He encourages followers to commit
four weeks to a consistent regimen.
Washington says that once you get over
that 30-day hurdle, it will put you in the
right mindset to continue.
an eight-pack? It’s no wonder Dotson
has trained aspiring NFL athletes, celebrities and regular degular shmegular
people wanting to transform their lives.
“There is nothing that can’t be done. I
preach positivity and having the right
mindset,” he says. “Anything you want
is possible if you put in the effort to get
it. ... If my message gives just one of my
followers the push or the drive they
need to make a change or even turn their
drive up a notch, then I feel I am doing
my job.”
Osamoje Imoohi
How long he’s been training: Seven
years
Specialties: Fat loss and muscle
building and toning
Michael B. Jordan’s trainer is his
mentor. That’s not enough for a follow?
Imoohi first started working out at 14
years old with a group of friends in their
garage when he was challenged to lift a
weight. The weight overpowered him,
and he was humiliated in front of his
friends. He promised himself one thing:
“I’m never going to be the weakest
person in the room,” Imoohi says.
Now, he’s a certified personal trainer
who works with MusclePharm and has
been featured in Bodybuilding.com and
facilitated workouts with Nike.
“What’s more important is aside
from the physical changes I can deliver
for my clients, it’s also the mental transformation. I want to make sure that not
only is your body healthy, I want the
mind, body and spirit to be healthy.”
Ca’Shawn Sims
How long she’s been training: Four
years
Specialties: Weight gain, weight loss
and toning/building
Everyone say this with me: “booty
goals.” Sims, who also goes by the name
“The Booty Doctor,” will not only help
you grow those glutes, but she’ll also
Adrianne Nina
Trainer Osamoje Imoohi helps people
get in shape. OSAMOJE IMOOHI
make you feel beautiful and confident.
“I love helping empower people to
love themselves in a society that constantly tells you you aren’t good
enough,” Sims says.
She has one piece of advice for staying motivated: Fix your fitness goals on
something other than just wanting a
nice body. She says you’re more likely to
stick to your goals if they’re related to
something that’s not fleeting.
Austin Dotson
How long he’s been training: Three
years
Specialties: Core strength, weight
loss and dynamic strength training
How many people do you know with
How long she’s been training: Four
years
Specialties: Core strength and glutes
Warning: Before you head to Nina’s
Instagram page, make sure you’ve
cleared your schedule for the day. Her
movements are so hypnotizing that
you’ll probably be stuck watching her
videos for a long minute, then thinking
to yourself, “I can probably do that,”
then trying it out in your living room before coming to the realization that you
shouldn’t have done that, but wow this
woman is strong.
Nina specializes in core strength
through body awareness and controlled
breathing and building stronger, fuller
and more defined backsides, which
work hand in hand. Since she’s an expert in body movement, you can expect
to see a lot of creative, fun and unique
exercises on her page.
Whether you choose to be her client
or just follow on Instagram, you can rest
assured you will feel inspired through
her own self-discipline: “In order to hold
someone accountable for their goals, I
must hold myself to the same standard
– or higher.”
Make those New Year’s resolutions stick
take care of ourselves,” Faye says.
The wellness chef adds that you
should listen to your body when it
comes to food. Some days you may need
to eat carbs, so go ahead and eat carbs,
and another week you may not need to
eat meat, so skip the steak.
Huntley also agrees that you can’t
just work out and not change anything
about your dietary habits. She says that
in addition to writing down your fitness
plans, write down your dietary one.
Keep a food journal; that way it will be
easy to track how many calories you’re
consuming and slowly cut from there.
Rasha Ali
USA TODAY
“I’m going to start working out and
eating healthy once the New Year
starts.”
If that goal has been on your New
Year’s resolution list for the past however many years, and you’re still seeking a
way to stick to your plans, we’re not
judging you. We’ve all been there.
This time around, though, things will
be different because you’re going to
have a plan, and you’re going to be
armed with tips on how to stick to your
New Year’s resolutions.
BreAnna Wiley, a personal trainer for
four years, cautions that if you’re new to
fitness, starting a new routine is going to
be difficult.
Write your goals down
Tuekeha Huntley, who has been a
personal trainer for two years, recommends writing down your goals and
then writing down specific plans for
your goals – basically, make plans for
your plans.
“What can you do to hit those goals?
Be specific,” Huntley says. “Break it
down into realistic goals. Not just ‘I
want to lose 10 pounds in three months,’
but write down baby steps. ‘This is the
way that I’m going to lose 10 pounds in
three months’ – so you’re writing down,
Fitness instructor Shaina Lynn urges
trying yoga and meditation. SHAINA LYNN
‘I’m going to join a gym,’ ‘I’m going to do
30 minutes of cardio.’ ”
Don’t neglect your diet
Charity Faye, a chef and wellness expert, recommends you remind yourself
that you are a valuable human being and
to treat yourself that way by eating
foods that make your body feel good –
like fruits and vegetables.
“Our diet is critical to our ability to
have good moods, to think clearly, and
to rid ourselves of illnesses and diseases
and other factors that prevent us from
having the willpower to go work out and
Don’t buy into fads
We’re constantly bombarded with
new dietary fads or workout trends, but
fitness experts recommend you steer
clear of those.
“If you say ‘I’m going to do the keto
diet for 30 days’ because it’s a trend,
you’re going to fall off,” Faye says. “Don’t
set a goal for the next 30 days – say,
‘Today this is what my body needs;
therefore, this is what I’m going to give
my body.’ ”
Huntley agrees that one of the most
important parts about achieving your
goals is being consistent and staying on
your own path, and buying into fads will
distract you from your own journey.
“I feel like everyone knows the recipe
to lose weight and be fit is to exercise
and eat right, but they don’t have a connection with being consistent or the
ability to follow through,” Huntley says.
Consistency is what will help you
achieve your goals for the long term.
It’s not going to happen overnight
Starting a new fitness routine and
committing to eating healthy is not a
small feat, and that’s why most people
think of it as a lifestyle change.
“A lot of people start a journey focusing on the big picture, saying I want to
lose 50 to 100 pounds, instead of focusing on the day-to-day work,” Wiley says.
Hold yourself accountable
Grab a friend, a trainer, your neighbor
– anyone to hold you accountable to
your goals.
Huntley advises getting someone
who will check up on you and ask if
you’ve been to the gym today or ask
what you had to eat.
Plan, plan and plan some more
Make your new goals a priority. Faye
says people should plan their meals the
same way they plan on going to work or
hanging out with friends.
“We will stick to our health commitments if we plan it in our day to do so,”
Faye says.
LIFE
4D ❚ WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2019 ❚ USA TODAY
‘Titans’
“The emotional and physical arc
women on the show go through is extraordinary,” he says. “The women are
digging deep. One contest lasted 30
minutes, with legs shaking, lactic acid
build-up and with one woman right at
the edge, saying ‘Not today.’ ”
Johnson’s own daughters are being
raised to have that same kind of mental
and physical toughness.
His eldest, 17-year-old Simone, “is a
very athletic young girl who goes to the
gym with myself and Dany (Garcia, Simone’s mother and Johnson’s business
partner and ex-wife). “She wants to become a WWE wrestler. The idea of committing to a goal of physicality and
training, she has embodied.”
Johnson’s young daughters with girlfriend Lauren Hashian are getting there,
too.
“Every day while I’m working out,
Lauren will bring in Jazzy, who’s 3 and
running around the gym. Every time I do
a set, she knows to sit down. When (8month-old) Tiana gets old enough,
she’ll be right in the gym with me.”
Continued from Page 1D
“Titans,” Johnson sought “men and
women who have overcome odds and
challenges in their life.” Athletes include
a man who spent 17 years hiding an arm
shortened by a birth defect and a woman who dealt with a heart condition and
was homeless as a teenager.
“When I was 17, I was going through
abusive relationships. I bargained with
people that owned the establishment I
was working at, and I slept on the couch
in the kitchen,” says 26-year-old Charity
Witt. But “Titan” fans will see her as a
powerlifter who appears to effortlessly
drag a several-hundred-pound ball and
chain across the arena floor.
“My whole mission in fitness is to
give some kind of example to other
women,” she says.
Though the men tend to be faster on
the course, Johnson says, the women’s
contests are the most rewarding.
When conceiving “Titan Games” courses, “we couldn’t find a space big enough,
but we built in arena,” producer Arthur Smith says. VIVIAN ZINK/NBC
To view more Classified listings,
visit: www.classifieds.usatoday.com
NOTICES
AUTO
BUSINESS
FINANCIAL
MARKETPLACE
HEALTH / FITNESS
LEGAL NOTICE
AUTO SERVICES
Special Alert to
Auto Owners
FORECLOSURE
DEFENSE HELPLINE
HEALTH / FITNESS
The federal Fair Credit Reporting Act permits individuals to notify
consumer reporting agencies that they wish to be excluded from lists,
sometimes called “prescreened offer” or “pre-approved offer” lists,
used by creditors to provide firm offers of credit not initiated by the
individual (“prescreened offers”). Advanced Resolution Services Inc.
(“ARS”) is a consumer reporting agency that maintains consumer
information in their files which may be used in connection with prescreened offers. Individuals who wish to have ARS exclude them from
lists used for prescreened offers may do so by contacting the
consumer reporting agency at the following address or telephone
number: Advanced Resolution Services Inc. at 5005 Rockside Road,
Suite 600, Independence, OH 44131, (800)392-8911.
BUSINESS
OPPORTUNITIES
TALCUM POWDER
WARNING
Try CBD Hemp
Business Opp. Avail.
Call now for a
free quote!
800-339-8193
COULD YOUR HOUSE GO INTO
FORECLOSURE? DOES IT SEEM
LIKE THE BANK HAS NO INTEREST
IN HELPING YOU SAVE YOUR
HOME AND YOU FEEL LIKE YOU
GENERIC VIAGRA
THE FORECLOSURE DEFENSE
HELPLINE CAN HELP SAVE YOUR
CALL TODAY: 800-478-7009
*Guaranteed if you qualify
Owe 10k+ to the IRS?
Got Unfiled Returns?
Call The Tax Doctor
GET NOTICED!
Advertise in
USA TODAY’s
Marketplace Today
Classifieds!
Bond
Docket #
Requested
Effective
Estimated
Amount
Cancellation Cancellation Payout Month
$75,000 MC-673190 9/10/2018
10/10/2018
March 2019
Report puzzle problems to us at
feedback@usatoday.com or 1-800-872-7073
EDITED Fred Piscop
By David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
BY Gail Grabowski
Find and Circle:
Five words starting and ending with G
Four four-letter bodies of water
Three meals
Word for “twelve”
Scandinavian country
1/2
☑☐☐☐☐
☐☐☐☐
☐☐☐
☐
☐
Monday’s answer: PIKE SOLE TUNA BASS CARP / INCH FOOT MILE
YARD / HAMSTER LEOPARD DOLPHIN / HISTORY SCIENCE MATH /
PESO EURO
QUICKCROSS
© Andrews McMeel
DISTANCES
APART
G U L F
C OWD
G N N E
T O Z G
P O I N
DW E N
H D L C
L B R E
G
N
Z
M
R
O
G
A
B
A
A
G
V
J
G
K
L
R
M
E
J
D
O
F
K
U
R
B
I
Z
L
A
P D Z
DW E
N N T
N C E
L K H
A I H
F I N
S T R
R
G
I
V
I
N
G
G
UP & DOWN WORDS
By John Wilmes
1/2
By David L. Hoyt and Russell L. Hoyt
1/2
1. TECHNICAL
Used a golf peg
2.
Dwyane of basketball
3.
4.
Offshore
5.
Transmit email or mail
6.
© Andrews McMeel
“____ the Night Before
Christmas”
Simplicity
Monday’s Answer
© Andrews McMeel
55 “Out of my way!”
26 Hirsch of “Lone
Survivor”
56 Skull session
27 Rolls along the
offering
runway
57 Back in the day
29 Is in the hole
58 Color in four-color
30 Woods on the links
printing
32 Hero pilot
59 Fictional plantation
played by Hanks,
of Georgia
informally
60 Rotten to the core
33 “I’m at your
61 Jeans line
service”
62 Grass grown on
34 Acapulco cash
farms
36 Tinker Bell’s
Monday’s
Answer
home
38 Polo of “The
Fosters”
41 Marlins
part-owner
Jeter
42 Dance that
“takes two”
47 Battlefield
plan
49 Simple-toswallow
dosage
52 Savanna
12/31
heavyweight
54 Fruit-filled
CROSSWORDS
pastries
ON YOUR PHONE
2
TXTPERT
Across
1. 26782
3. 447
4. 735847
5. 863
8. 6673
9. 77463
10. 3937
4
5
7
8
1/2
9
Down
1. 27736349
2. 2243
5. 86776
6. 5633
7. 5347
© USA TODAY and Rich Coulter
1
Use the
phone
keypad to
decode the
clues.
For example:
2 could be A,
B or C ... and
5678 could
be LOST
2
D O M
E
5
7
C
A
E
S
I
2
5
1/2
O O
F
F
R
9
H O
T
S
L
S
T
Monday’s solution
U
D
DIFFICULTY RATING
Actor Errol Flynn jokes
about his spending
habits.
T
PLAY ONLINE
PUZZLES.USATODAY.COM
© Andrews McMeel
Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x2
box contains the numbers 1 through 6 (no repeats).
9
3
2
5
2
© Andrews McMeel
1
1
2 6 3
4 3 5
1
2 6
5
8
✮✮✮✩✩
✮✮✮
DIFFICULTY RATING
✩✩
Monday’s Answers
8
9
3
6
4
7
5
2
1
4
6
5
8
2
1
9
7
3
1
2
7
5
9
3
6
4
8
7
1
9
2
6
5
3
8
4
6
4
8
3
1
9
7
5
2
5
3
2
4
7
8
1
9
6
9
7
6
1
8
2
4
3
5
3
8
1
7
5
4
2
6
9
2
5
4
9
3
6
8
1
7
6
5
3
1
2
4
4
1
6
2
5
3
2
3
5
4
6
1
5
2
1
3
4
6
1
6
4
5
3
2
12/31
Rearrange the words to complete the quote.
GROSS HABITS INCOME LIES NET
PROBLEM
___________ WITH MY ________ ___________.
E
3
4
2
6
1
5
© WIGGLES 3D GAMES
1/2
R
Y
Monday’s Answer
THINK
FAST
BUCK
FAST
BUCK
OFF
AND
OFF
THAT
AND
GIRL
THAT
SCOUTS
GIRL
RECONCILING
MY ___________ ________ IN ______________ MY ___________
T
8
Clues:
1. Type of learning institution
2. Field of study
3. David Bowie’s astronaut
4. Mark Twain character
5. Country music band
6. Whole-grain side dish
7. Quaker snacks
DON’T QUOTE ME®
C
L
O
3
8
3 2
1
5 7 3
8
2
9
4
4
9
1
9
SUDOKU FUSION
ON YOUR PHONE
puzzles.usatoday.com
A
L
CAKES
puzzles.usatoday.com
6
9
8 7
6
2
1
8
I
6
QUICKCROSS
ON YOUR PHONE
8
L
R
10
4
(Drop [?) end]
3
9
I
R
E
T
Actress Barbara
R
E
N
T
Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3
box contains the numbers 1 through 9 (no repeats).
R
O
A
3
E
G
O
S
7.
SUDOKU
puzzles.usatoday.com
Today’s theme
Human body
W
A
R
E
12/31
12/31
DOWN
1 Fix for a wobbly
table, perhaps
2 Spelling of “Scary
Movie 2”
3 USAF truant
4 They show lots
of leg
5 Sauces made with
pine nuts
6 Emotional
damage
7 Not much of a
challenge
8 Electrical networks
9 Like Wikipedia
or YouTube
Premium
10 Unavoidable
11 End of a bully’s
threat
12 “Aw, nuts!”
13 Country music’s ___
Young Band
21 “The Rookie”
network
22 City northwest of
Orlando
25 One without a
home base
3
E
R
I
N
1/2
Answers: Call 1-900-988-8300, 99 cents a minute; or, with a credit card, 1-800-320-4280.
10
IVC FILTER WARNING
THE FDA HAS ISSUED A WARNING TO ALL IVC FILTER PATIENTS.
THESE IVC FILTERS MAY CAUSE SERIOUS INJURIES.
IF YOU OR YOUR LOVED ONE HAD AN IVC FILTER IMPLANTED
YOU MAY BE ENTILTED TO FINANCIAL COMPENSTATION
THERE ARE NO FEES UNLESS YOU GET A SETTLEMENT
CALL NOW FOR A FREE LEGAL CONSULTATION
Call now: 800-340-1530 (24/7)
Additional online listings are
available on
Classifieds.usatoday.com
Call:1-800-397-0070
WORD ROUNDUP
6
Visit Viamedic.com/USA
for special offers
800-847-9607
CROSSWORD
1
(24hrs)
New Tax Laws!
Pay Lower Taxes!
Struggling to make minimum payments
Owe $10,000 or more?
Call for our debt reset program!
PUZZLES
ACROSS
1 Notary’s imprint
6 “Sonic Dash” game
company
10 “A ___ coincidence!”
14 “Deal or No Deal”
host Mandel
15 Swiped item
16 It doesn’t fly on
Shabbat
17 Dungeon restraints
18 “You wish!”
19 Source of Italian
bubbly
20 Deliverers of
unmanned strikes
23 Get all blubbery
24 Offshoot of a
denomination
25 Pay stub figure
28 One speaking with
a burr
31 Thoroughly enjoys
35 Neighbor of
Yemen
37 Annoying sort
39 Unethical sort
40 Combo item in the
frozen food aisle
43 Still in the running
44 Inoculation fluids
45 “Blondie” tyke
46 Leave in the lurch
48 Bathtub residue
50 “You betcha!”
51 Target of a
spanking
53 Exact revenge on
55 Hershey’s Kisses,
e.g.
62 Fizzy part of a gin
fizz
63 Like Tim Cratchit
64 Have a yen for
65 Range part
66 Machu Picchu
dweller
67 Sunlit areas of
malls
68 Like an out-of-play
baseball
69 Either of two
directing brothers
70 Song of David
800-208-3526
USA Licensed Physicians
and Pharmacies
800-509-1635
DROWNING IN CREDIT CARD
DEBT?
PUBLIC NOTICE
Call to see if you qualify NOW:
Prescription Included
HOME. IT’S CRITICAL THAT
YOU CALL US RIGHT NOW AT:
FINANCIAL
Users of Johnson and
Johnson’s Baby Powder
and Shower to Shower
may be at a higher risk of
developing ovarian cancer.
If you or a loved one used
talcum powder and were
diagnosed with ovarian
cancer, you may be entitled
to financial compensation.
FDA APPROVED
HAVE NOWHERE TO TURN?
www.EarnWithHemp.com
or call 1-860-248-4000
Public Advertisement for Property Broker Bond (FMCSA Form BMC-84) Claims
Pursuant to 49 U.S.C. § 13906, as amended by MAP-21 § 32918, if it is determined that a FMSCA broker principal is
experiencing financial failure or insolvency, the surety provider of the FMSCA broker principal is required to publicly
advertise for claims for 60 days. Based on information and belief, Fidelity and Deposit Company of Maryland, the surety
provider, has determined that the company listed below is experiencing financial failure or insolvency in that:
• The FMSCA broker principal has failed to adequately settle or respond to claims, which the surety provider has
determined are valid; or
• To the best of the surety provider’s knowledge, the FMSCA broker principal is insolvent or is otherwise
experiencing financial failure.
Please direct all claims’ inquiries/notices to: Reportsfclaims@zurichna.com or call: Commercial Surety Claims 1-888-320-9659.
All claims must be received in writing within 60 days of the first publication date in order to ensure consideration for
payment. Fidelity and Deposit Company of Maryland reserves the right to determine the validity of a claim presented
prior to payment. Fidelity and Deposit Company of Maryland does not express any opinion as to the overall financial
position of the named principal, its owners, shareholders, officers, members, partners, employees, joint venturers,
or affiliates and this notice in no way constitutes a report that said principal has entered into any legal proceedings.
Claimants should take reasonable steps to protect their own interests.
FMCSA BOND NOTICE OF CANCELLATION
Company Bond Number
Name
Worley &
LPM9105849
Obetz, Inc.
MORTGAGE PAYMENTS?
Next Billion Dollar Industry
Ground Floor Positions Avail
Free Personalized Website
No Credit Card Required
NOTICES
First
Publication Date
12/19/2018
50%
SAVINGS
ARE YOU BEHIND ON YOUR
Does your vehicle have less
than 200,000 miles, with an auto
warranty about to expire or no
warranty coverage at all? You
can pay NOTHING for repairs,
as well as receive free towing,
free car rental and free roadside
assistance
Monday’s Answer: “Don’t trust a brilliant idea unless
it survives the hangover.” - Jimmy Breslin
LIFE
USA TODAY ❚ WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2019 ❚ 5D
FOOD & DINING
Any way you slice it, $2,700 is a lot to pay for pizza
Zillion Dollar Lobster Frittata
Rasha Ali
USA TODAY
What’s a savings account for if you
can’t spend it on the things you enjoy
most – like food?
In your years of life and eating, you’ve
probably come across some great food,
some horrible food that dared to call
itself “food,” some cheap food and some
ridiculously overpriced food. Today,
we’re talking about the latter – ridiculously expensive food.
Like, ridiculously expensive. You
might want to find a seat before you
continue reading.
There are some meals that are going
to cost you a pretty penny, or 200,000
pennies – like a $2,000 frittata.
The average American spends
$70,000 on takeout in a lifetime, so
when you put that into perspective,
what’s $2,000 for a little egg dish?
Five meals you can splurge on:
So it doesn’t actually cost a zillion
dollars, but it may as well. Norma’s restaurant in Manhattan serves a $2,000
breakfast with Sevruga caviar, six eggs
and a whole lobster. If you’re on a budget, you could get the smaller, 1-ounce
serving of the frittata for $200. Don’t
worry if you can’t make it all the way to
New York to drop thousands on a frittata; it’s also available at the Norma’s
location in Palm Springs, California.
Ice cream sundae
It’s just vanilla bean ice cream,
dressed up in fancy accessories. The ice
cream is served at the Baccarat Hotel
New York and is made with vanilla imported from Madagascar (fancy). It’s
served with black truffle crumble with
dark chocolate and hibiscus champagne
sauce, and it’s donned with and edible
gold leaf, then served in a $1,200 crystal
bear. The ice cream alone costs $300,
but if you want the whole ensemble, it’ll
cost you $1,500.
24K gold pizza
In 2017, this pizza held the Guinness
World Record for the most expensive
pizza. The extravagant pie is sold at Industry Kitchen in New York for $2,700.
Why does it cost about two months’ rent
(although in New York it’s probably
cheaper than rent)? Why, all the bougie
toppings of course – Ossetra caviar from
the Caspian Sea, 24-karat gold leaves,
English stilton cheese, and truffles and
foie gras from France.
FleurBurger 5000
If your kids have ever frustrated you,
consider spending their college savings
on a good old American burger. Head on
over to Las Vegas’ Mandalay Bay, and
visit Fleur by Hubert Keller for this
$5,000 burger. The patty is made from
Wagyu beef, and it’s topped with foie
gras and black truffles and paired with a
bottle of 1995 Chateau Petrus.
Billion-dollar popcorn
Thought movie theater popcorn was
expensive? Ha! Pocket change. One
kernel of Berco’s billion-dollar popcorn
will run you $5. A few gallons of gas or a
tiny taste of popcorn? The decision is
yours. But if you’d like to buy a 61⁄2-gallon
tin of the billion-dollar popcorn, it’ll cost
you a good $2,500. What really makes
this popcorn a billion-dollar popcorn is
the salt; the creator had to fly to Denmark to pick up salt from an island that
was apparently home to Aegir the King
of the Sea and the feasting place of gods.
Also, the popcorn is also covered in
23-karat edible gold flakes.
TONIGHT ON TV
8:00
8:30
9:00
9:30
10:00
10:30
11:00
11:30
NETWORK
ABC
The Goldbergs Adam’s
American Housewife
parents forget his birthday. Parenting duties.
Modern Family Haley must Single Parents
make a decision.
Angie becomes jealous.
Local Programs
Jimmy Kimmel Live
CBS
Big Bang Theory
Sheldon in Vegas.
SEAL Team Bravo Team and British SAS save passengers Criminal Minds Team investigates abduction that could Local Programs
from flight hijacked by terrorists. (N)
be connected to earlier double murder. (N)
The Late Show with
Stephen Colbert
Fox
Gordon Ramsay’s 24 Hours to Hell and Back
Cajun café. (N) (Season premiere)
NBC
Chicago Med A pregnant lady delivers; Dr. Rhodes operates Chicago Fire A car pileup affects someone close to
on someone close to Det. Halstead.
the firehouse family.
Nature Red foxes thrive in varied environments.
NOVA (N)
Chicago P.D. Antonio oversteps a boundary that puts Local Programs
the entire crew in danger.
American Masters (N)
All American Spencer celebrates his birthday.
All American Spencer tries to reunite with Coop.
Local Programs
Blue Bloods Temporary partners.
Blue Bloods Frank is put in a difficult position.
Blue Bloods Henry’s cruel remarks are leaked.
Blue Bloods A criminal who gets away with murder.
La Sultana (N)
Falsa identidad (N)
Señora Acero Una mujer en narcotráfico. (N)
Al rojo vivo (N)
Jesús La historia de Jesús. (N)
Mi marido tiene más familia
Amar a muerte (N)
Primer impacto extra (N) Noti. Univi. Ed. noc. (N)
Live PD: Police Patrol
Live PD: Police Patrol (N) Live PD: Police Patrol (N) Live PD: Police Patrol (N) Live PD: Police Patrol (N) Live PD: Police Patrol
PBS
CW
ION
Telemundo
Univision
Young Sheldon
Family feud.
The Masked Singer Guess identity of masked
singers. (N) (Series premiere)
Match Game Actress Pamela Anderson;
“Goliath” star Mark Duplass; actress Ali Wentworth.
Local Programs
The Tonight Show
Starring Jimmy Fallon
Amanpour & Co. (N)
Titulares y más
CABLE
A&E
AMC
Animal Planet
BBC America
BET
Bravo
Cartoon
CMT
CNBC
CNN
Comedy
Discovery
Disney
DisXD
DIY
E!
Food
Fox News
Freeform
FX
FXX
GSN
Hallmark
HGTV
History
HLN
ID
IFC
Lifetime
MotorTrend
MSNBC
MTV
NatGeo
NatGeo Wild
Nick
OWN
Oxygen
Paramount
Pop
Science
Sundance
Syfy
TBS
TCM
TLC
TNT
Travel
TruTV
TV Land
USA
VH1
Viceland
WE
Weather
WGN America
Live PD: Police Patrol
Twister A storm chaser teams up with his ex-wife in pursuit of killer tornadoes. Helen Hunt, Bill Paxton (1996)
North Woods Law: Uncuffed Wardens investigate fishy activity. (N)
Live PD: Police Patrol
Double Jeopardy A man fakes his death to frame his wife. (1999) (10:35)
North Woods Law A bear gets stuck in a tree.
North Woods Law An illegal hunt is investigated.
The Green Mile The veteran guard of a prison’s death row struggles with a crisis of conscience when he begins to question whether a kindhearted prisoner murdered two girls. Tom Hanks, Michael Clarke Duncan (1999)
Tyler Perry’s I Can Do Bad All By Myself (2009) (6:00) I Am Legend A military scientist is immune to a virus that transforms humans into monsters. Will Smith, Alice Braga (2007)
The Real Housewives of New Jersey
The Real Housewives of New Jersey (N)
The Real Housewives of New Jersey
What Happens
Real Housewives
Samurai Jack
American Dad!
American Dad!
Bob’s Burgers
Family Guy
Rick and Morty
Last Man Standing
Last Man Standing
Mermaids Teen faces the turmoil between her flighty but sexy mom and her own sexuality. Cher, Bob Hoskins (1990)
Deal or No Deal
Bob’s Burgers
Deal or No Deal (N)
Family Guy
Deal or No Deal
CNN Tonight with Don Lemon (N)
Anderson Cooper 360° (N)
Anderson Cooper 360° (N)
CNN Tonight with Don Lemon (N)
South Park
South Park
South Park Boys divided over video game system.
South Park
Moonshiners (N)
South Park
Moonshiners (N)
Mermaids Cher (1990)
Deal or No Deal (N)
Homestead Rescue (N)
South Park
Homestead Rescue
Raven’s Home
Raven’s Home
BUNK’D
Bizaardvark
BUNK’D
BUNK’D
Raven’s Home
Raven’s Home
Polaris Player Select
Polaris Player Select
Parker Plays
Big City Greens
Big City Greens
DuckTales
DuckTales
Marvel’s Spider-Man
Bargain Mansions
Bargain Mansions
Bargain Mansions
Bargain Mansions
Bargain Mansions
Bargain Mansions
Bargain Mansions
Bargain Mansions
Botched
Botched (N)
Botched
Botched
Guy’s Grocery Games Cooking experiments.
Guy’s Grocery Games Soup and sandwich. (N)
Guy’s Grocery Games International dish.
Guy’s Grocery Games Seafood dinner.
Tucker Carlson Tonight (N)
Hannity (N)
The Ingraham Angle (N)
Fox News @ Night(N)
Grown-ish (N)
Life-Size 2: A Christmas Eve A doll helps the CEO of a toy company. Francia Raisa, Tyra Banks (2018) (9:02)
Grown-ish (N)
Thor: The Dark World Thor is faced with an enemy that even Odin and Asgard cannot endure. Chris Hemsworth, Natalie Portman (2013)
The 700 Club
Thor: The Dark World Thor is faced with a hazardous mission. (2013)
Spy A meek and demure CIA analyst goes undercover to help her partner. Melissa McCarthy, Jason Statham (2015)
The Heat Uptight agent and crude cop partner up. Sandra Bullock (2013)
Family Feud
Family Feud
Family Feud
America Says (N)
Family Feud
Family Feud
Cash Cab
Cash Cab
Love on Ice A young coach talks a former figure-skating champion into making a comeback. (2017)
Love at First Dance A dancer must teach a groom how to dance before his wedding. Becca Tobin (2018)
Property Brothers
Property Brothers (N)
House Hunters (N)
Vikings Bishop Heahmund struggles with guilt.
Vikings Bjorn makes Ragnar’s dream a reality. (N)
The Curse of Oak Island: Drilling Down (N)
The Curse of Oak Island Knights Templar.
Forensic Files
Forensic Files
Forensic Files
Forensic Files
Forensic Files
Homicide Hunter: Lt. Joe Kenda Escaped inmates.
Forensic Files
Homicide Hunter: Lt. Joe Kenda (N)
Hunters International (N) Property Brothers
Forensic Files
The Sound of Terror Mysterious beeper. (N)
Road House A bouncer takes a job at a small-town bar but gets more than he bargained for. Patrick Swayze, Ben Gazzara (1989)
Forensic Files
Homicide Hunter: Lt. Joe Kenda Tragic death.
Road House Bouncer cleans up violence-ridden bar. Patrick Swayze (1989) (10:45)
Project Runway All Stars A seven-piece set. (N)
Project Runway All Stars World championship. (N)
American Beauty Star (N) (Season premiere)
Texas Metal
Texas Metal (N)
FantomWorks 1975 Bricklin; 1954 Imperial. (N)
Project Runway All Stars World championship.
FantomWorks 1969 Chevelle.
All in with Chris Hayes (N)
The Rachel Maddow Show (N)
The Last Word with Lawrence O’Donnell (N)
The 11th Hour with Brian Williams (N)
Lindsay Lohan’s Beach Club Entrepreneur life.
Catfish: The TV Show (N)
Catfish: The TV Show (N)
True Life/ Now (N) (Series premiere)
Locked Up Abroad: Breakout (N)
Locked Up Abroad (N)
Locked Up Abroad (N)
Locked Up Abroad
The Incredible Dr. Pol Santa Paws visits.
The Incredible Dr. Pol A four-dog attack.
The Incredible Dr. Pol Dr. Michele.
The Incredible Dr. Pol Santa Paws visits.
SpongeBob
SpongeBob
The Office
Friends
SpongeBob
SpongeBob
The Office
Friends
Four Weddings Snow, unity canvas, cotton and heart. Four Weddings Four brides compete to have the best wedding to win a special honeymoon.
Four Weddings Elvis-themed reception.
NCIS: Los Angeles Torture and betrayal
NCIS: Los Angeles Retirement home con artists.
NCIS: Los Angeles Nell and Eric go undercover.
Friends Thumbs up.
I, Robot Technophobic cop investigates a murder that may have been committed by a robot. Will Smith, Bridget Moynahan (2004)
Friends Nosy neighbors.
NCIS: Los Angeles Old alias for undercover mission.
Star Trek Beyond (2016)
Love Actually People deal with their love lives during the frantic weeks before Christmas. Hugh Grant (2003) The Family Stone A bohemian family clashes with their son’s uptight New Yorker girlfriend. (2005)
MythBusters
MythBusters Jr. (N) (Series premiere)
Outrageous Acts of Science Overachiever videos. (N) MythBusters
Criminal Minds A case of mind control.
Criminal Minds Vigilante UnSub.
Criminal Minds Kate’s niece is abducted by predator. Criminal Minds Seeking four missing Seattle women.
Day Earth Stood (2008)
I Am Number Four A group of eight teenage aliens living on Earth are chased by different aliens. Alex Pettyfer, Timothy Olyphant (2011) Ender’s Game A gifted child prepares for an invasion.
Big Bang Theory
Big Bang Theory
Big Bang Theory
Big Bang Theory
On the Waterfront A dockworker is asked to testify after a friend falls victim to corruption. (1954)
Big Bang Theory
Full Frontal with Samantha Bee
Five Armies (2014)
A Streetcar Named Desire A faded Southern belle finds tragedy. Vivien Leigh, Marlon Brando (1951)
My 600-Lb. Life Octavia must ignore her worst enabler as she turns to Dr. Now for help. (N) (Season premiere) Family by the Ton (N) (Season premiere)
The Intern A 70-year-old widower takes position as senior intern at online fashion site. Robert De Niro, Anne Hathaway (2015)
My 600-Lb. Life Starting a new diet for surgery.
Blended Two families must share same suite. Adam Sandler (2014)
Mysteries at the Museum An ape-like beast. (N)
The Hindenburg Disaster 1937 airship crash. (N)
Beyond the Unknown Religious icon. (N)
Monsters and Mysteries in America
Impractical Jokers
Impractical Jokers
Impractical Jokers
Impractical Jokers
Impractical Jokers
Impractical Jokers
I’m Sorry
I’m Sorry
Loves Raymond
Everybody Loves Raymond Marriage counselor.
Loves Raymond
Two and a Half Men
Two and a Half Men
The King of Queens
The King of Queens
Modern Family
Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Pregnant teen.
Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Distinctive tattoo. Law & Order: Special Victims Unit
Modern Family
Love & Hip Hop Miami (N) (Season premiere)
Black Ink Crew: Chicago (N) (Season premiere)
Love & Hip Hop Miami
Black Ink Crew: Chicago
Hamilton’s Pharmacopeia Hallucinogenic fish.
Hamilton’s Pharmacopeia Psychedelic figure. (N)
Kentucky Ayahuasca Steve’s stepson. (N)
Kentucky Ayahuasca Prison sentence.
Sex and the City A writer prepares for her wedding. Sarah Jessica Parker (2008) Sex and the City A magazine columnist plans her wedding and her friends reunite to celebrate. Sarah Jessica Parker, Kim Cattrall (2008)
Highway Thru Hell Families team up.
Highway Thru Hell Truck trapped.
Highway Thru Hell Al and Gord take a major risk.
Highway Thru Hell Wrecks revisited.
Last Man Standing
Last Man Standing
Last Man Standing
Last Man Standing
Last Man Standing
Last Man Standing
Last Man Standing
Last Man Standing
MOVIE NETWORKS
Cinemax
The Usual Suspects Five crooks fall into a scheme directed by a mysterious
criminal mastermind. Stephen Baldwin, Gabriel Byrne (1995)
Encore
AVPR: Aliens vs. Predator - Requiem Warring aliens
terrorize the citizens of a small Colorado town. (2007)
FXM
Lone Survivor Team of Navy SEALs given mission to capture or kill an infamous
Taliban Leader. Mark Wahlberg, Taylor Kitsch (2014) (7:25)
Hallmark Movies
The Magical Christmas Ornaments A mother revives
daughter’s spirit. Jessica Lowndes (2017) (7:00)
HBO
Never Been Kissed A copy editor writes about high school by passing herself off Pete Holmes: Dirty Clean A stand-up special covering
as a student. Drew Barrymore, David Arquette (1999)
numerous topics including fatherhood is presented.
Lifetime Movie
Psycho Mother-In-Law What was supposed to be a benign meeting between a woman’s mother and future Psycho In-Law A woman contends with her fiancé’s former mother-in-law, who is determined to stop their
mother-in-law turns into a competion between the two that spirals out of control. Romy Rosemont (2019)
marriage so that she can keep his daughter to herself. Katie LeClerc, Catherine Dyer (2017)
Showtime
Maid in Manhattan A maid in a first-class Manhattan hotel is mistaken for a guest and a wealthy socialite
when she crosses paths with a handsome, well-to-do politician. Jennifer Lopez, Ralph Fiennes (2002)
Starz
Along Came a Spider A police profiler helps a Secret Service Country Strong An up-and-coming songwriter helps a fallen country singer revive her career by going on
agent find a U.S. Senator’s daughter. (2001)
her tour with her husband and a former beauty queen-turned-singer. Gwyneth Paltrow, Tim McGraw (2011)
TMC
Marshall Future Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall fights racism and Anti-Semitism as he defends a Madea’s Family Reunion A straight-talking grandma plans a family reunion but it becomes complicated by
black chauffeur charged with assaulting his socialite employer. Chadwick Boseman, Josh Gad (2017)
family dramas including her niece’s wedding and her sister’s funeral. Tyler Perry, Blair Underwood (2006)
Out of Sight A federal agent develops feelings for the career criminal, but she attempts to look past her emotions in order to help the
FBI track him down and catch him. George Clooney, Jennifer Lopez (1998) (9:50)
Jeepers Creepers A cannibalistic demon pursues twin college students on their
way home. Gina Philips, Justin Long (2001)
Saw Two men find themselves chained at opposite ends of a bathroom by a
serial killer who wants one man to kill the other in order to save his family. (2004)
Lone Survivor Four members of a special Navy SEAL team are given the mission to capture or kill an extremely infamous and violent
Taliban Leader named Ahmad Shahd. Mark Wahlberg, Taylor Kitsch (2014) (9:45)
Return to Christmas Creek When an app developer returns to her small hometown to rediscover the
A Christmas to Remember TV star gets amnesia after a
meaning of Christmas, she reunites with her childhood friend and her estranged uncle. Tori Anderson (2018) car accident, putting her in a stranger’s path. (2016)
Fifty Shades Freed Ana and Christian’s new life together is threatened by new foes
and a stalker. Dakota Johnson, Jamie Dornan (2018) (10:50)
The Back-Up Plan Expectant mom fears that her dream man will bail out of their Spotlight Team uncovers
relationship. Jennifer Lopez, Alex O’Loughlin (2010)
sexual abuse cover-up.
Shock and Awe A group of journalists investigate claims
Iraq has weapons of mass destruction. (2018)
SPORTS NETWORKS
ESPN
ESPN2
FS1
Golf
MLB
NBA
NBCSports
NFLN
NBA Basketball Minnesota Timberwolves at Boston Celtics from TD Garden (Live)
NBA Basketball Oklahoma City Thunder at Los Angeles Lakers (Live)
College Basketball Harvard vs. North Carolina (Live) College Basketball Oklahoma Sooners at Kansas Jayhawks from Allen Fieldhouse (Live)
SportsCenter
College Basketball (Live) College Basketball DePaul Blue Demons at Villanova Wildcats from Finneran Pavilion (Live)
Speak for Yourself with Whitlock and Wiley
Hoops Extra (Live)
PGA Tour Golf Sentry Tournament of Champions: Final Round from Plantation Course at Kapalua in Maui, Hawaii
Golf Central
MLB Tonight
Mr. Baseball A washed-up ball player infuriates his teammates after he is traded to Japan. Tom Selleck (1992) MLB Tonight
The Starters
NBA GameTime
NHL Hockey Pittsburgh Penguins at New York Rangers (Live)
NHL Hockey San Jose Sharks at Colorado Avalanche from Pepsi Center (Live)
NFL Football
NFL Total Access
MOVIES
COMPLETE LISTINGS
TVLISTINGS.USATODAY.COM
Customized to your location
Eastern Time may vary in some cities
(N) New episode.
6D ❚ WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2019 ❚ USA TODAY
LIFE
Документ
Категория
Журналы и газеты
Просмотров
0
Размер файла
10 106 Кб
Теги
USA Today
1/--страниц
Пожаловаться на содержимое документа