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2019-01-02 The Washington Post

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Democracy Dies in Darkness
Mostly cloudy, cooler 48/42 • Tomorrow: Partly cloudy 51/35 B6
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2 , 2019
Carson disdains power on
systemic discrimination,
pursues individual cases
BY
BOLSONARO HAS
VOWED CHANGE
For nation, inauguration
marks sharp turn to right
T RACY J AN
HOUSING CONTINUED ON A4
‘Eric Trump agrees’
A rivalry at HUD led one adviser to
name-drop her connections. A4
BY E LLIS R UA, M ARINA L OPES
AND M ARY B ETH S HERIDAN
brasilia — Jair Bolsonaro, a
NICK KIRKPATRICK/THE WASHINGTON POST
Joshua Tree National Park remains accessible, despite fears that the unsupervised flow of visitors would damage fragile ecological
systems in the Southern California desert. Basic park sanitation and maintenance — if it’s done at all — is handled by volunteers.
The grime and the grandeur
National parks fend for themselves as toilets overflow and garbage piles up during the shutdown
M EGHANN C UNIFF,
J OHN W ATERS
AND J OEL A CHENBACH
BY
joshua tree, calif. — The
government shutdown has left
America’s national parks largely unsupervised. No one is at the
gate. No one is collecting a fee.
The visitor centers are closed.
There are some law enforcement and emergency personnel
on site, but certainly nothing as
standard as a park ranger who
can answer a question.
People are streaming into the
parks, enjoying the free access,
I AN S HAPIRA
He has auctioned off the journals of Nazi death camp doctor
Josef Mengele for $300,000, Hitler’s telephone from the Führerbunker for $243,000 and Hitler’s
ring featuring a swastika made of
16 rubies for more than $65,000.
And just before Thanksgiving, a
Hitler-inscribed propaganda photograph that shows the architect of
the Holocaust hugging a German
girl of Jewish heritage went for
more than $11,000.
Big money abounds in the Nazi
artifact market, and Basil “Bill”
Panagopulos, founder of Alexander Historical Auctions in Maryland, is the trade’s unabashed promoter. But at a time of growing
anti-Semitism and white nationalism, the buying and selling of Hitler’s belongings and other Third
Reich tchotchkes — including
counterfeits — is stirring up the
same kind of debate that has
dogged displays of Confederate
flags and Civil War statues.
Which items of the past are
worth keeping? Which spoils of
war should be preserved? And
but they’re finding trash cans
overflowing and restrooms
locked. Vault toilets are not
serviced, and there’s hardly a
flush toilet to be found anywhere. If nature calls — well,
the woods are over that way.
At Joshua Tree National Park,
in particular, conditions are deteriorating.
“Once those port-a-potties
fill up, there’s no amount of
cleaning that will save them,”
said Sabra Purdy, who along
with her husband, Seth, owns
the rock-climbing guide service
Cliffhanger Guides in the town
Trump invites Hill leaders
Border security briefing follows
“let’s make a deal” tweet. A6
Museums closing
The Smithsonian’s institutions
and NGA run out of funds. C3
of Joshua Tree. “At that point, I
think I’m going to have to tap
out.”
The 40-year-old Purdy is
among dozens of volunteers
who have been collecting garbage, cleaning bathrooms and
generally keeping an eye on the
park. Local business owners
and park supporters are donating toiletries and cleaning supplies.
“People are doing it because
we love this place and we know
how trashed it’ll get if we don’t,”
she said.
“It’s not quite ‘Lord of the
Flies’ yet,” said Bryan Min, 30,
who traveled to Joshua Tree
with friends from Orange County and is camping outside the
park. “Who knows how it’ll be
tonight?”
The partial government shutdown, triggered by a dispute
PARKS CONTINUED ON A14
former army captain who has
promised radical measures to cut
soaring crime and widespread
corruption, was sworn in as Brazil’s president Tuesday, marking
the nation’s starkest shift to the
right since its return to democracy three decades ago.
Bolsonaro, 63, became the
world’s latest politician to reach
the presidency by riding a
populist revolt
against
the
governing
class. He has
pledged to take
South America’s largest nation in a new
direction,
adopting
an Jair Bolsonaro
iron-fisted approach to crime and promoting
more development in the environmentally sensitive Amazon
rain forest. An ardent admirer of
President Trump, Bolsonaro has
vowed to move Brazil away from
its left-leaning foreign policy.
“I invite all of Congress to join
me in the mission to restore and
rebuild our homeland, liberating
it from corruption, crime, economic irresponsibility and ideological traps,” he said after being
sworn in.
BRAZIL CONTINUED ON A7
Between history and hate:
A thin line for Nazi artifacts
BY
. $2
Populist
takes
the helm
in Brazil
HUD cuts
anti-bias
e≠orts in
housing
At a training session in November for hundreds of fair-housing
advocates, Housing and Urban
Development Secretary Ben Carson crowed about his suspension
of an Obama-era rule mandating
that communities fix long-standing patterns of segregation.
The regulation, hailed as one of
the most ambitious efforts to
fight racial bias in housing in
decades, was too burdensome on
cities, he said, according to four
people present. So was another
Obama rule that held lenders and
landlords liable for policies that
lead to discrimination even if
none was intended, he added.
The audience, many of whom
had spent years working to make
sure marginalized groups get
equal access to housing, was
stunned. “Tone deaf,” said one
attendee.
The scene illustrated an uncomfortable reality for Carson as
he nears the end of his second
year as HUD secretary. Though
he is charged under the law with
eliminating discriminatory housing practices, Carson is also a
longtime skeptic of using government power to remedy such inequality.
Beyond his attempts to roll
back the agency’s fair-housing
rules, Carson is overseeing a de-
SU V1 V2 V3 V4
which symbols of hatred are better
off consigned to history’s trash
heap?
Online giants such as Facebook
and eBay, along with Christie’s
and Sotheby’s, have come down
hard against the sale of Nazi
artifacts, curbing or banning
their sale. Right after the sale of
the Hitler photo in Maryland, another sale in December in Australia of some 75 Nazi artifacts
kicked up a national controversy
and prompted a rebuke from the
local Anti-Defamation Commission.
Still, the demand for these objects is intensifying, according to
Terry Kovel, the co-founder of a
51-year-old annual price guide for
antiques and memorabilia.
“The market for historic Nazi
memorabilia is definitely growing,” she said. “A lot of people are
afraid the whole Nazi thing has
been forgotten, and they want to
show what was going on. More of it
is coming out of hiding, too,
because so much of the material
came home with soldiers who are
getting to the age of dying, and
ARTIFACTS CONTINUED ON A7
NASA spacecraft visits farthest object ever explored
Scientists hope study of ancient Ultima Thule will offer insight on formation of the planets
BY
BILL INGALLS/NASA/ASSOCIATED PRESS
New Horizons principal investigator Alan Stern, center, celebrates with schoolchildren at a Laurel,
Md., lab. The research vessel had just zoomed by its target, a rocky relic 4 billion miles from Earth.
In the news
THE NATION
LORENZO TUGNOLI FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Armed by an ally A Yemeni warlord
acknowledged backing from the UAE, a move
at odds with the U.S. counterterror push. A8
Worry on the menu Students in the D.C. area
owe $500,000 in school lunch debt, and for
many, that means no hot meal. A10
U.S. authorities fired
tear gas into Tijuana,
Mexico, to foil migrants’
efforts to cross the border fence. A2
Verizon Fios customers experienced a blackout of some broadcast
television channels after
talks with another
media company fell
through. A3
Elizabeth Warren had
been a presidential candidate for only a few
hours Monday, but the
line of attacks against
the Democrat was already taking shape. A5
A top Pentagon spokeswoman under internal
investigation abruptly
resigned on New Year’s
Eve within hours of Jim
Mattis’s departure as
secretary of defense. A6
THE WORLD
North Korean leader
Kim Jong Un said that
he is ready to meet President Trump at any time
to discuss denuclearization. A9
Russian rescue workers
found a baby boy alive
in the rubble nearly
36 hours after an
apartment building
collapsed. A9
In Britain, police said
they are treating a New
Year’s Eve stabbing in
Manchester as an act of
terrorism. A9
The family of an American detained in Russia
on spying charges said
that he is innocent and
that they are worried
about his safety. A9
The Vatican said it
blocked a vote by U.S.
bishops on abuse policy
because of a lack of consultation. A14
THE ECONOMY
Wells Fargo admitted
its errors pushed hundreds of homeowners
into foreclosure. For one
woman who lost her
home, the admission
was a gut punch. A10
THE REGION
The Healthy Babies
Project is raising money
to buy a Northeast
Washington property
where six young mothers and their kids live. B1
More than three years
after it was proposed, a
0.6-mile bike lane on
Louisiana Avenue between Union Station
and the U.S. Capitol
awaits a green light
from the Hill. B1
A Marine was killed in
the barracks on Capitol
Hill early Tuesday —
apparently by accidental
gunfire. B1
SPORTS
Coach Urban Meyer
won his final game at
Ohio State, a 28-23 victory over Washington in
the Rose Bowl. D1
S ARAH K APLAN
As Earthlings marked the start
of a new year, one of the most
distant spacecraft successfully explored the farthest — 4 billion
miles from Earth — and most
primitive objects that humans
have ever seen.
NASA received confirmation
Tuesday that its New Horizons
probe survived its 12:33 a.m. Eastern time encounter with Ultima
Thule, a rocky relic from the solar
system’s infancy whose name
means “beyond the borders of the
known world.”
The midnight rendezvous occurred in the Kuiper belt, a halo of
icy bodies so far from Earth that it
takes more than six hours for
signals to travel at the speed of
light to reach our planet.
But just after 10:30 a.m. Eastern time on Tuesday, at the Johns
Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, Md., mission operations manager Alice Bowman
turned to her colleagues with a
wide grin.
The probe’s systems were
NASA CONTINUED ON A2
Inside
FOOD
Skip the dietary
straitjacket
Try pivoting in a healthy
direction instead. E1
ST YLE
An end of an era
Women’s magazines are
dying. Will we miss them
when they are gone? C1
BUSINESS NEWS ........................ A10
COMICS........................................C8
OPINION PAGES..........................A11
LOTTERIES ................................... B3
OBITUARIES ................................. B4
TELEVISION..................................C4
WORLD NEWS .............................. A8
CONTENT © 2019
The Washington Post / Year 142, No. 28
DAILY CODE, DETAILS, B2
8 1 5 2
A2
EZ
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Pulitzer Prize-winning
reporting:
Uncovering Trump
In February 2016, presidential
candidate Donald Trump promised
$6 million in donations, including
$1 million from his own pocket, to
charities along his campaign trail.
But by the time he won the New
Hampshire Republican primary, he
had stopped giving away money
and had donated far less than his
pledged amount. Post reporter
David A. Fahrenthold went in
search of the missing money and
found a bigger story than he ever
expected.
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tijuana, mexico — U.S. authorities fired tear gas into Mexico during the first hours of the
new year to repel about 150
migrants who tried to breach the
border fence in Tijuana.
U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) said in a statement
later Tuesday that the gas was
used to target rock throwers
apart from the migrants who
were trying to cross.
“No agents witnessed any of
the migrants at the fence line,
including children, experiencing
effects of the chemical agents,
which were targeted at the rock
throwers further away,” the statement said.
An Associated Press photographer saw at least three volleys of
gas launched onto the Mexican
side of the border near Tijuana’s
beach.
The gas was seen to affect the
migrants, including women and
children, as well as journalists.
The Associated Press saw rocks
thrown only after U.S. agents
fired the tear gas.
CBP said agents saw “toddler
sized children” being passed over
concertina wire with difficulty. It
said its agents could not assist
the children because of the rocks
being thrown.
Agents responded with smoke,
pepper spray and tear gas, it said.
The Associated Press journalist
also saw plastic pellets fired by
U.S. agents.
The agency said 25 migrants
were detained while others
crawled back into Mexico
through a hole under the fence.
CBP said that under its useof-force policy, the incident
would be reviewed by its Office
of Professional Responsibility.
Migrants who spoke with
the Associated Press said they
arrived in Tijuana last month
with the caravan from Honduras.
Ancient object is the farthest studied
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in your
new
working. Its cameras and recorder were pointed in the right direction.
“We have a healthy spacecraft,”
Bowman announced. “We have
just completed the most distant
flyby. We are ready for Ultima
Thule science transmission — science to help us understand the
origins of our solar system.”
At mission control, and in an
APL auditorium where the rest of
the science team was watching,
people jumped from their seats
and burst into cheers. The borders of the known world had expanded just a little bit more.
“I don’t know about you, but
I’m really liking 2019 so far,” said
the mission’s principal investigator, Alan Stern.
Although coincidental, the timing of New Horizons’s encounter
— in the early hours of a new year
— is “auspicious,” Stern said. At a
moment when humanity marks
the passage of time, looking forward and thinking back, New Horizons is doing the same. At 4 billion miles from Earth, Ultima
Thule is the farthest celestial body
scientists have ever viewed up
close; it is a door to future exploration in a region that is still almost
entirely unknown. But it is also a
window to the past — a time
capsule from the era when the
planets formed, and one that
might contain clues about how
Earth came to be.
Already, scientists are analyzing early data collected just before
the moment of closest approach.
An image taken from half a million miles away from Ultima
Thule showed a blurry bowlingpin-shaped body about 20 miles
across.
Until New Horizons’s flyby, no
person had ever seen a Kuiper belt
object as anything but a pinpoint
of light in the distance. By
Wednesday, the scientists at APL
will receive their first high-resolution images of the distant rock,
revealing whether it has craters
and whether it is one long object
or comprises two small bodies
orbiting each other.
As for answers to other questions about the Kuiper belt object,
Stern advised patience. “This mission has always been about delayed gratification,” he said. “It
took us 12 years to sell the spacecraft, five years to build it, 13 years
to get here.”
It will take as long as 20 months
for scientists to download and
process all the data collected during that brief encounter.
But the resulting science will be
worth the wait, project scientist
Hal Weaver said. “Ultima Thule
will be turned into a real world.”
‘This is history-making’
New Horizons was the first
mission dedicated to exploring
the outermost edges of the solar
system. In 2015, it took the first
close-up photos of Pluto, reveal-
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PORCH ENCLOSURES
BILL INGALLS/NASA/EPA-EFE/SHUTTERSTOCK
ing a complex and colorful world
mottled with methane mountains
and a vast, heart-shaped nitrogen
ice plain.
When the mission was first
conceived in the early 1990s, no
one knew what lay beyond the
distant dwarf planet. But in the
intervening decades, scientists
discovered that the Kuiper belt —
which extends from Neptune’s orbit to 5 billion miles from the sun
— is home to millions of small and
icy objects.
Out there, where sunlight is
0.05 percent as strong as it is on
Earth and temperatures hover
near absolute zero, primitive bodies such as Ultima Thule have
existed in a “deep freeze” since
they first formed.
The Kuiper belt object, whose
official name is 2014 MU69, was
discovered five years ago during a
sky-wide search for potential New
Horizons targets after the probe
left Pluto.
But the rock is so dim and so
distant that even the most powerful telescopes could barely make
it out. Before Tuesday, some of the
only information about its size
and shape came from coordinated
observations last summer, when
astronomers measured the shadow Ultima Thule cast as it passed
in front of a star.
The encounter was riddled
with uncertainties, making it
among the more difficult feats
NASA has attempted. Ultima
Thule is 1 percent the size of Pluto,
and New Horizons had to get four
times closer to image it. At the
moment of closest approach, the
spacecraft was moving at a
breathtaking 32,000 miles per
hour. If its cameras were even
slightly off track, or if scientists’
projections about Ultima Thule’s
trajectory were just a little bit
wrong, the probe might fail to
capture useful information about
its target.
Besides, New Horizons is a 13year-old vehicle; operators must
carefully prioritize their use of
remaining fuel.
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“This is history-making, what
we’re doing, in more ways than
one,” Stern said. Every image sent
back from New Horizons is the
most distant photograph ever
taken. Each maneuver is farther
than anything NASA has done
before.
Helene Winters, the mission’s
project manager, said Monday
that spacecraft operators had
been subsisting on chocolate and
sleeping on air mattresses at APL
so they could make the most of
every minute until New Horizons
reached its target. Navigators
kept a watchful eye out for potential hazards, which can be hard to
spot in this faraway corner of the
solar system.
Asked whether she thought she
would be able to sleep that night,
Winters laughed. “Ask me again
tomorrow.”
But as minutes to the close
encounter ticked by, the atmosphere at APL was festive. Scientists and their guests munched on
crudités in a room lit with sparkling blue-and-white lights. Small
children up long past their bedtimes scurried between chairs
and sneaked cookies from the
buffet.
“This is like a dream come
true,” said Chuck Fields, a podcast
producer from Indianapolis who
drove nine hours to attend Monday’s event. He was dressed in a
blindingly bright blazer and tie
bearing images of planets, galaxies and the sun. His wife, Dawn,
wore matching pants.
NASA nodded to the encounter
by counting down to 12 a.m. and
distributing plastic cups of champagne. Astrophysicist Brian May,
better known as lead guitarist for
the rock band Queen, debuted a
song he wrote for the occasion.
“This is an anthem to human
endeavor,” he said.
Festive flyby
Thirty-three minutes after the
rest of the East Coast had already
popped their champagne, the scientists at APL were still waiting.
Way out in the Kuiper belt, they
knew, New Horizons was performing its riskiest observations
yet. Particle and dust detectors
were probing the chilly Kuiper
belt environment. Three cameras
were snapping as many images as
possible in an effort to map the
tiny world and determine its composition. And Ultima Thule was
growing ever larger in New Horizons’s field of vision, glowing like
a full moon.
“Thirty seconds to flyby,” Stern
said. “Are you ready? Are you
psyched? Are you jazzed?”
Twenty seconds. Ten. And then
Stern raised his hand in the air
while confetti fell from the ceiling. The crowd cheered.
“New Horizons is at Ultima
Thule,” Stern proclaimed.
Or so he hoped.
The following morning, New
Horizons’s operators sat in mission control, anxious. Data from
the Deep Space Network, a chain
of radio antennas NASA uses to
communicate with distant spacecraft, was displayed on their
screens.
Bowman sat with her hands
folded, leaning toward her computer.
“In lock with telemetry,” Bowman said.
In the APL auditorium, where
the rest of the team and their
families were watching, the
crowd erupted.
Next came the status check:
Planning — nominal. Power —
green. Solid-state recorders —
pointed right where NASA wanted them. Every subsystem looked
good. New Horizons had survived.
Thirty minutes later, members
of the New Horizons mission operations team entered the APL
auditorium to high-fives and riotous cheers.
“I’m not a New Year’s kind of
guy,” said Mike Ryschkewitsch,
the head of APL’s space exploration sector. “But I can’t think of a
better reason to stay up late.”
sarah.kaplan@washpost.com
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Alan Stern,
center,
celebrates
with New
Horizons
team
members at
Johns
Hopkins
University’s
Applied
Physics
Laboratory in
Laurel, Md.
They had just
received
signals from
the spacecraft
that it was
healthy and
had collected
data during its
brief flyby of
Ultima Thule.
NASA FROM A1
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Politics & the Nation
Some channels go dark on Verizon TV after talks fail
BY
B RIAN F UNG
blackout.
In a statement issued shortly
after the blackout began, Tegna
said it was disappointed it could
not reach a deal with Verizon despite sealing agreements with
hundreds of other distributors.
“We remain hopeful this will get
resolved quickly,” said Tegna.
“However, Verizon customers
should know our channels remain
available on every other service
provider in their community as
well as many over-the-top (OTT)
providers, who offer instant access when viewers sign up. Our
station’s
high-quality
news,
sports, weather and entertainment programming is also available for free over-the-air and viewers can continue watching our
newscasts live on our stations’
apps.”
As Verizon subscribers grappled with the programming outage, customers of Comcast in
Washington were having troubles
of their own — with many reporting disruptions of cable Internet,
phone service and television.
ILLINOIS
OKLAHOMA
Killings in Chicago fall
15% from year before
Quakes continue to fall
after new drilling rules
Preliminary numbers indicate
that homicides in Chicago fell by
about 100 last year compared
with 2017, though the total again
eclipsed the number of killings in
Los Angeles and New York
combined, according to data
released Tuesday.
Police in Chicago, the nation’s
third-largest city, reported 561
homicides between Jan. 1 and
Dec. 31, 2018. That compares
with 660 homicides in 2017 and
more than 770 in 2016, which
marked a 19-year high that put a
national spotlight on Chicago’s
persistently high rates of gun
violence.
Chicago police credited the
decreases in part to the addition
of more than 1,000 officers in
recent years. Police also cited the
creation of high-tech nerve
centers in 20 out of 22 police
districts, where officers rely on
gunshot-detection technology
and predictive analytics that
help quickly get police to areas
where violence is most likely to
erupt.
“Are we where we want to be?
Of course not,” Police
Superintendent Eddie Johnson
told the Chicago Tribune in a
The number of Oklahoma
earthquakes registering a
magnitude 3.0 or greater has
declined for the third
consecutive year after state
regulators began directing oil
and natural gas producers to
close some wells and reduce
injection volumes in others.
The number of such quakes
began declining in mid-2015
when the state Corporation
Commission took action after the
quakes were linked to the
underground injection of
wastewater, according to the
Oklahoma Geological Survey.
State seismologist Jake Walter
told the Tulsa World he was
optimistic the downward trend
would continue, but he said not
to expect the temblors to end
anytime soon. He said the quakes
were likely to continue for at
least a decade “because
earthquakes beget earthquakes.”
“There’s complex interactions
among these networks of faults
that can continue to propagate
the seismicity back and forth, up
and down in all directions,”
Walter said.
Through late December, the
survey reported 196 quakes of
magnitude 3.0 or stronger, down
from 302 in 2017, 623 in 2016 and
a record 903 in 2015.
From 2008 to 2013, the state
averaged 44 earthquakes of that
size every year. And from 1976 to
2007, Oklahoma averaged about
one such quake a year.
Verizon Fios subscribers across
the country are experiencing a
sudden television blackout of key
broadcast channels this week after the company’s content negotiations with a major media company, Tegna, fell through.
Affected channels include
WUSA, the CBS station in the nation’s capital; WVEC, the local
ABC station in Norfolk; and
WGRZ, Buffalo’s NBC station.
As many as 1 million FiOS customers across the country have
been affected by the outage, ac-
cording to an estimate by the
American Television Alliance
(ATVA), which represents TV distributors and independent programmers.
Ensuring uninterrupted television programming for customers
is vital to TV providers, in part
because of high-profile live sports
events that occur in January. For
instance, customers in Washington may miss out on part of the
NFL playoffs, which will be broadcast on CBS. Viewers can tune in to
broadcast signals without their
Fios-provided video subscriptions, but that typically requires
using separate equipment such as
a digital broadcast antenna, or
signing up for new streaming video apps and services.
TV viewers were hit by programming blackouts 140 times in
2018, according to the ATVA.
The Tegna blackout came hours
after Verizon resolved a separate
carriage dispute with Disney, preventing ESPN and ABC from going
dark on Fios customers in numerous markets.
Stephen Kidera, a spokesman
for Tegna, said there is no update
on when an agreement may be
reached. The channels went dark
Monday evening after Verizon and
Tegna failed to renew their programming contract before a 5 p.m.
deadline.
The talks stalled because Tegna
demanded a “significant rate increase” for its channels, Verizon
said in a statement on its website.
“The rising cost of programming is the single biggest factor in
higher TV bills, and we are standing up to broadcasters like Tegna
in order to protect you from rate
increases,” Verizon said.
Verizon spokeswoman Adria
Tomaszewski said Verizon is continuing to negotiate through the
brian.fung@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/the-switch
DIGEST
JOHN TAGGART/EPA-EFE/SHUTTERSTOCK
The Coney Island Polar Bear Club makes its New Year’s Day Plunge off the Brooklyn beach Tuesday.
The club, which is the oldest winter bathing organization in the United States, raised money for the New
York Aquarium, the Coney Island History Project and other local arts and history groups.
recent interview. But he added:
“I do think we are taking steps in
the right direction.”
Despite the decrease in 2018,
the homicide total in Chicago
was still higher than the total in
the country’s two other largest
cities. As of mid-December, New
York reported 278 homicides and
Los Angeles had 243.
— Associated Press
— Associated Press
ALABAMA
Fears of contamination
spark sausage recall
An Alabama company has
recalled tons of hot sausages
because they may be
contaminated with bits of metal.
The U.S. Department of
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The notice dated Sunday said
the recall affects about 5.8 tons of
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They all are 24-ounce packages
holding about nine links with a
Jan. 24 use-by date.
The USDA’s Food Safety and
Inspection Service said Zeigler
received complaints on Dec. 13
and 27, investigated them, and
notified the agency Saturday.
— Associated Press
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THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. WEDNESDAY,
JANUARY 2 , 2019
In HUD power struggle, a longtime family aide dropped Eric Trump’s name
BY T RACY J AN
AND J ULIET E ILPERIN
Just three weeks into the
Trump presidency, Lynne Patton,
a longtime Trump family aide and
freshly minted senior adviser at
the Department of Housing and
Urban Development, had a personnel problem she deemed serious enough to invoke her powerful connections.
In a flurry of emails to the
Office of Presidential Personnel
in February 2017, Patton sought to
remove Maren Kasper, the White
House’s HUD liaison, because
Patton felt undermined.
“Dr. Carson & his team deem
her divisive and disruptive, as
do I,” Patton wrote to John DeStefano, assistant to Trump and
director of presidential personnel, and his deputy director, Sean
Doocey, on Feb. 8. “If it helps, Eric
Trump agrees that it’s best to nip
this potential problem in the bud
& told me to call Jared [Kushner],
if necessary, but I prefer to go
through you all first.”
The emails were obtained by
the liberal watchdog group American Oversight through a public
records request. The 504-page
response was shared with The
Washington Post.
The correspondence about
Kasper highlighted the extent to
which top Trump officials scrutinized their appointees’ personal
loyalties in the early days of the
administration. In several emails,
which took place before HUD
Secretary Ben Carson was confirmed, Patton and White House
ALEX WONG/GETTY IMAGES
Lynne Patton, shown at the Republican National Convention in 2016, tried to have a HUD rival fired.
officials discussed their colleagues’ support for Trump.
Patton wrote in another email
that Carson’s team was “dismayed
by the pace of [Kasper’s] removal”
and suggested that the White
House or Kushner, Trump’s sonin-law and senior adviser, tell
Kasper that “ ‘ . . . she’s done such
a great job laying the ground
work at HUD that Labor (or
whatever) permanently needs her
talents there now . . .’ Thoughts?
The less drama, the better.”
Twenty-four hours later, Patton
followed up: “This is effectively
Code Red status now.”
Patton wrote in a Feb. 9 email,
using her own brackets for dramatic effect, that Kasper had expressed anti-Trump opinions and
had advised another member of
the HUD transition team to stay
with the agency for the duration
of Trump’s first term instead of
joining his reelection team.
“She told a beachhead member
who expressed her desire to re-
join the campaign again in 2 years
not to bother,” Patton wrote.
“That she’d be better off staying at
HUD for 4 since he won’t win a
second term. [insert eye roll]”
Patton, in other emails that
day, said that Carson’s deputy
chief of staff, Shermichael Singleton, was threatening to leave if
Kasper wasn’t transferred by the
following morning, at the latest.
“I know Carson prefers to have
both him & me here in lieu of her,”
Patton wrote, after Doocey re-
sponded with a link to an October
2016 op-ed by Singleton in The
Hill in which he wrote that Trump
is “unfit to be president and undeserving to represent the Republican Party.”
Patton, who now oversees
HUD’s New York and New Jersey
region, said Monday that Eric
Trump never inserted himself
into HUD personnel matters, and
that she did not reach out to
Kushner about her problems with
Kasper.
“The early days of this administration experienced many learning curves, and I was no exception,” Patton said. “Eric made it
very clear to me not to involve
him in any government issues
and to go through proper channels. It was wrong of me to misspeak.”
Eric Trump declined a request
for comment, and the emails
show no evidence that he took
any action. Kasper did not immediately respond to a request
for comment.
As it turned out, Kasper was
not immediately transferred.
On Feb. 11, 2017, Patton sent an
email to the White House apologizing for what she had characterized as a “misunderstanding”
about Carson’s wishes. The White
House had been prepared to
move Kasper, but Carson, who
had never advocated for Kasper’s
removal, intervened, Patton told
The Post.
Instead, Singleton was fired on
Feb. 15, 2017, for his earlier writings criticizing Trump, according
to media reports at the time.
Kasper, whom Patton said she
now admires, was transferred to
the Government National Mortgage Association in June 2017 to
serve as executive vice president.
Singleton, who had worked on
Carson’s 2016 presidential campaign, told The Post on Monday
that he fully backed Patton’s attempt to remove Kasper.
“My loyalties had to be with Dr.
Carson,” Singleton said. “I wanted
to make sure he could get through
unscathed, and Maren had her
own agenda that I thought conflicted with Dr. Carson’s best interests.”
Eric Trump has generally
steered clear of federal policy and
personnel matters since his father won the presidency. His sister Ivanka Trump and her husband, Kushner, serve as White
House advisers.
Eric and his brother, Donald
Trump Jr., withdrew as honorary
co-chairman for a “Camouflage &
Cufflinks” fundraiser connected
to the 2017 inauguration after
outside groups raised ethics questions about their participation.
However, Eric Trump’s wife,
Lara, has worked on animal welfare issues over the past two
years, meeting with White House
officials and Cabinet members.
She has advocated connecting
homeless pets with veterans, preventing wild horses and burros
from being euthanized, and enforcing policies related to “puppy
mill” operations with greater
stringency.
tracy.jan@washpost.com
juliet.eilperin@washpost.com
Critics of Carson’s HUD see agency in retreat from its duty
HOUSING FROM A1
partment whose fair-housing
budget and staffing have been
cut. And, notably, he has departed
from the practices of recent Democratic and Republican predecessors who used their secretarial
power to root out systemic racial
discrimination by launching
broad-based investigations into
bias by banks, real estate companies and others.
Carson has only once used his
authority as HUD secretary to
scrutinize widespread housing
discrimination, moving ahead
under public pressure on an investigation against Facebook that
was initiated during the Obama
administration.
President Barack Obama’s
HUD secretaries used the tool —
known as “secretary-initiated
complaints” — an average of 10
times per year, while President
George W. Bush’s second HUD
secretary used it an average of
five times per year, according to a
Washington Post examination of
the agency’s annual fair-housing
reports to Congress.
“If you’re going to have this
position, you have to use it,” said
Kim Kendrick, who began championing the use of secretary-initiated actions as the HUD assistant
secretary for fair housing and
equal opportunity during Bush’s
second term. “You can potentially
have an impact nationwide.”
The Obama and Bush administrations wielded the HUD secretary’s enforcement powers to investigate home insurance companies that refused to sell policies in
African American neighborhoods, real estate brokers who
refused to show certain houses to
black home buyers, and mortgage
lenders that illegally denied loans
to black and Hispanic borrowers
or charged them higher rates,
according to HUD records.
The intense scrutiny of racist
or otherwise discriminatory
housing practices resulted in financial compensation for large
numbers of victims and forced
offending companies to change
practices, according to HUD’s reports to Congress.
Defenders of Carson, who as a
presidential candidate decried a
federal effort to desegregate
American neighborhoods as
“failed socialist experiments,” argue he is not retreating from the
agency’s civil rights mission.
Rather, HUD spokesman Jereon
Brown said, the agency is prioritizing a backlog of 600 individual
complaints of discrimination instead of initiating broad-based
actions.
More than half of the individual complaints pertained to discrimination on the basis of disability, according to HUD. A
quarter pertained to race, and
fewer than a third to national
origin.
“Nearly 500 people had their
cases resolved” since 2017, Brown
said, “versus focusing our resources on larger secretary-initiated cases.”
Each year, HUD receives thousands of complaints from individuals alleging discrimination that
the agency is required to investigate. Unlike broader secretary-
JABIN BOTSFORD/THE WASHINGTON POST
The Department of Housing and Urban Development’s civil rights focus has shifted under Ben Carson, seen at the White House in October.
initiated cases that seek redress
for victims who may not even
have been aware that their rights
had been violated, individual
complaints may focus on issues
such as wheelchair access at an
apartment building, sexual harassment by a landlord or allowances for service animals, former
and current HUD officials say.
Carson’s focus on responding
to individual allegations of bias
over actively seeking solutions to
patterns of disparity aligns with
Republican orthodoxy, said Robert Driscoll, a deputy assistant
attorney general in the Justice
Department’s civil rights division
during the Bush administration.
“If an individual is rejected for
housing because he is black —
those kinds of cases should always gain traction in a conservative administration,” Driscoll
said. “Republicans are more likely to see problems with defining
discrimination based on group
statistics.”
Other civil rights lawyers say
that while it is important to
resolve individual complaints of
discrimination, those efforts are
unlikely to address structural inequality or result in widespread
change.
“The fact there has only been
one complaint by Secretary Carson says to everyone that HUD
will no longer be in the business
of aggressively enforcing fairhousing laws,” said Aderson François, a professor at Georgetown
University Law Center who directs the Institute for Public Representation Civil Rights Law Clinic. “HUD is in danger of becoming
something of a zombie agency.”
Among steps Carson has taken
to scale back civil rights enforcement: Municipalities no longer
have to submit plans to desegregate their communities to receive
HUD funds. The 2015 Obama
administration rule was an attempt to push local governments
to comply with the 1968 Fair
Housing Act, which requires municipalities to use federal money
to address historical housing discrimination.
Since Carson’s suspension of
the rule, communities in Miami
and Memphis have stopped participating in regional efforts to
analyze housing patterns and disparities in access to jobs and good
schools, according to Lisa Rice,
president and chief executive of
the National Fair Housing Alliance.
The Memphis Housing Authority, which oversees subsidized apartments and the development of affordable units, has
pulled out of the process to dismantle segregation. So have a
handful of jurisdictions in the
Miami area. That means fewer
resources and less data, Rice said,
making the task of understanding the barriers to equality even
more difficult.
Kendrick said Carson is poorly
positioned to use his authority to
investigate communities that
perpetuate discrimination, given
his attempt to dismantle the 2015
rule — even though practices
such as isolating low-income
housing to the same neighborhood limits opportunities.
“It’s not just housing. It’s jobs.
It’s education. It’s experiences
and opportunity,” Kendrick said.
“But you can’t say the rule is
flawed and then go and try to
enforce it.”
HUD in June also gave notice
that it would reexamine its 2013
“final” rule barring banks, land-
lords and others in the housing
industry from enacting policies
that may appear innocuous —
such as requiring criminal background checks for tenants — but
could wind up discriminating
against minority groups.
The Supreme Court in 2015
established that such practices
can be deemed discriminatory
under the Fair Housing Act even
if there was no explicit intent to
do so, a concept known as “disparate impact.” But some conservatives view such policies as an
attack on capitalism, and Carson,
in a 2015 op-ed in the Washington
Times, said that such “government-engineered attempts to legislate racial equality create consequences that often make matters
worse.”
Trump’s Treasury Department,
along with the home insurance
and mortgage industries, lobbied
Carson to reconsider the agency’s
stance.
At times, though, Carson, a
retired neurosurgeon, has shown
a willingness to be swayed by civil
rights advocates.
After initially suspending a
preliminary investigation into
Facebook that began under
Obama in late 2016, Carson in
August filed his sole secretaryinitiated complaint against the
platform.
He accused Facebook of giving
landlords and developers advertising tools that made it easy to
exclude groups protected by the
Fair Housing Act. Among the
many ways Facebook did so, HUD
said: literally drawing a red line
around majority-minority Zip
codes and not showing housing
ads to users who live in those
areas.
Facebook said its policies pro-
hibit discrimination and that it
would continue working with
HUD to address the agency’s
concerns.
The investigation continues.
Brown, the HUD spokesman, said
Carson chose to exercise his authority against Facebook because
the case “potentially affects millions.”
Dennis Parker, director of the
racial justice program at the
American Civil Liberties Union,
said the Facebook case encapsulates the hidden discrimination
enabled by modern technology
that is best investigated on a wide
scale through a secretary-initiated complaint. Victims of this sort
of “modern-day redlining” would
not otherwise have known to file
individual complaints to HUD, he
said.
“Who would think that the fact
that they surfed the Web looking
for a mosque might mean information would not be provided to
them about housing?” Parker
said. “You would have no way of
knowing you were being excluded without someone looking at
broader issues to recognize that
this is a brave new world of
discrimination.”
In past years, HUD career staffers often brought to the attention
of senior political appointees suggestions for secretary-initiated
investigations.
But Anna Maria Farias, Carson’s assistant secretary for fair
housing and equal opportunity,
told managers during a conference call that “unless you’re the
secretary, you shouldn’t be initiating them, leaving the impression that career staff had usurped
authority,” said a HUD official,
who spoke on the condition of
anonymity because the person
was not authorized to comment
publicly. The official said Farias’s
statement indicated that she did
not understand the role of career
staffers in flagging potential violations.
Some career staff members say
they would be more inclined to
flag discrimination cases involving religion, disability, sexual harassment or familial status over
race or national origin because,
as one staffer put it, “those are the
only protected classes this administration seems to vaguely
care about or understand.”
Brown, the HUD spokesman,
said the agency does not prioritize certain types of discrimination over others.
In deciding whether it is worth
investing time and resources in
filing a secretary-initiated complaint, “you have to look at the
merits of each case and the number of folks affected,” Brown said.
The bipartisan U.S. Commission on Civil Rights is investigating a broader pullback in civil
rights enforcement as Trump’s
attempts to shrink the federal
government cast doubt on agencies’ ability to uncover and investigate violations of anti-discrimination laws.
Congress, following Trump’s
recommendations, cut the 2018
budget for staffing in HUD’s fairhousing office by more than
$2 million. Trump, in his 2019
budget, has also proposed cutting
$3 million from fair-housing activities, including grants to organizations that help enforce civil rights law.
Since 2003, staffing in the fairhousing office, which investigates housing discrimination
that is based on race, national
origin, religion, sex, familial status and disability, has fallen by
40 percent — and that decline has
accelerated under Trump.
Normal attrition and retirements have been exacerbated by
the slowed pace of hiring and the
departures of career staffers who
perceive a diminished commitment to the agency’s fair-housing
mission, HUD officials have said.
“People are just leaving and no
one is trying to stanch the bleeding,” one official said. “It’s dysfunctional.”
In an era of austerity, the
agency should make greater use
of the secretary’s authority, said
Kendrick, the Bush appointee.
“It provides you with the opportunity to do more with less,”
she said.
Carson’s limited actions so far
on racist housing practices send a
chilling message and will ultimately hurt the agency’s efforts to
enforce civil rights law, said François, the Georgetown Law professor.
“What the secretary is telling
the market is, ‘We have looked at
the entire state of fair housing in
the U.S., and we do not believe
that there is anything going on
that is so significant that requires
us to put our resources, reputation and prestige behind enforcement,’ ” François said.
“If the folks you are supposed
to regulate know you are essentially not enforcing the law, they
have no incentive to behave.”
tracy.jan@washpost.com
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2 , 2019
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A5
RE
And they’re o≠! Announcing run, Warren ends year by setting stage for next two.
At 8:43 a.m. on
the final day of
2018, Sen.
Elizabeth
DAVID
Warren tweeted
WEIGEL
that she was
exploring a bid for president. By
10 a.m., we saw what she was in
for. A CNN analysis called
her a “below par” candidate,
Breitbart labeled her
“Pocahontas” in a headline, and
the editor of the socialist
magazine Jacobin predicted that
Warren would lose her
own state in a primary.
More than most potential
candidates for the president,
Warren seemed to be ready for
the brickbats. The senator from
Massachusetts is the first highprofile Democratic
contender, with preexisting
grass-roots support, a national
fundraising network and
credible poll numbers in earlyvoting states. Four years ago,
Warren rejected a campaign to
draft her into the presidential
primary. Since then, she has
grown more influential in the
party, introducing bills that
would give workers more
control of corporations, shrink
the influence of lobbyists and
turn the federal government
into a generic-drug
manufacturer.
Warren’s also the first 2020
contender with a serious army
of political enemies, most of
them on the right, who have
spent much of the past decade
trying to stop her rise. It’s not
easy to be Rep. John Delaney (DMd.), who has toiled to raise
awareness of his presidential
campaign since July 2017. But
he’s been able to do so without
Republicans sending trackers,
filing requests for public
information and asking for
ethics investigations.
Warren’s most controversial
decision of 2018 — to take a
DNA test and release the
results — was spurred by
six years of questions about why
she once identified as Native
American.
Warren’s announcement can
be fairly seen as the start of the
2020 Democratic primaries. The
question for Democratic voters
is whom to nominate; the
question for the press is
whether we’ve learned anything
from a 2016 campaign that
The
Trailer
SARAH RICE FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) speaks in Boston after her reelection in November.
The question for Democrats is whom to nominate. The question for the press
is if we’ve learned from a 2016 race that made fools out of many experts.
made fools out of many experts.
Plenty of first-look commentary
on Warren is repeating the
mistake that led many to
suggest that Donald Trump
could not win the 2016
Republican nomination or that
Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.)
would be, at best, a token
challenger for Hillary Clinton.
So, we don’t know who’s going
to win this thing. But we have a
better idea of what is and isn’t
going to matter when
Democrats start piling in.
First, the party in power is
not great at guessing whom it
should run against. It’s an open
secret that Republicans consider
Warren to be the weakest toptier Democratic candidate. The
arguments for that run from the
sensible (President Trump has
defined her effectively as
“Pocahontas”) to the fanciful
(she’s a female baby boomer and
Trump already beat one of
those). Early polling backs some
of this up; Quinnipiac’s pre-
Christmas survey found that
37 percent of voters already
viewed Warren negatively, more
than any other Democrat.
That would be compelling if
not for two small details: Barack
Obama and Trump. Both
entered their primaries as
underdogs seen by the other
party’s front-runners as
beatable. In Trump’s case,
Democrats were literally rooting
for him to succeed; a memo
published after the hack of
Clinton campaign emails
revealed that the Democratic
front-runner wanted far-right
candidates such as Trump to
serve as “Pied Pipers,”
serenading the rest of their
party off a cliff.
“We need to be elevating the
Pied Piper candidates so that
they are leaders of the pack and
tell the press to [take] them
seriously,” the campaign wrote.
That email was sent in April
2015. One month later, a
Quinnipiac poll showed Clinton
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leading Trump by 18 points.
Second, the “establishment”
isn’t operating the way it used
to. One of the great paradoxes of
the last Democratic primary
season is that the forces that
lost — supporters of Sanders —
routed the forces that won. For
more than a year, they fought
for, and won, changes to the
Democratic primary rules that
eliminated the voting power of
superdelegates on the first
ballot at any convention. At the
same time, they won
commitments from the
Democratic National Committee
that set up earlier debates and
prioritized candidates with
“grassroots fundraising.” The
rules that infuriated Sanders
supporters in 2016, allowing
Clinton to build a huge delegate
lead before facing her
opponents, have been
overturned.
But the party is not behaving
the way it did in 2016. By this
point in the previous cycle, 63
Democratic members of
Congress had already endorsed
Clinton, who was months away
from announcing her campaign.
As of right now, no
Democratic member of Congress
has endorsed a potential
presidential candidate. The idea
of candidates jumping in to
prevent a rallying effect for
someone else is, for now,
defunct, and the results in 2016
(such as Sanders’s landslide win
in New Hampshire) cut against
the idea that endorsements from
prominent Democrats can move
votes.
What don’t we know? Well,
for the first time since 2004,
Democrats have a wide-open
primary field with no
“establishment” favorite, and
not much of an establishment to
decide on one. The 2008 and
2016 primaries eventually
settled into battles between
Clinton, representing the old
party leadership, and
a candidate who could define
himself as a change agent. Some
Democrats see Joe Biden
potentially filling that
establishment role, but none see
him consolidating party support
the way Clinton did.
Third, the two parties’ voters
are different. The most
interesting aspect of Warren’s
launch video was how it
diverged from the messaging of
every recent Democratic
nominee for president. In 2016,
Republicans got behind a
candidate who argued that there
was no compromise with the
political class and that a strong
leader was needed to dismantle
it. Democrats have generally
argued that good people can
differ and unite against
the minority of special interests
keeping the government from
answering voters’ needs.
“What’s stopped us is the
failure of leadership, the
smallness of our politics — the
ease with which we’re distracted
by the petty and trivial, our
chronic avoidance of tough
decisions, our preference for
scoring cheap political points
instead of rolling up our sleeves
and building a working
consensus to tackle big
problems,” Obama said in the
first speech of his 2008
campaign.
Warren’s first message to
voters is different, identifying
the economic anxieties of voters
and then immediately assigning
blame. “These aren’t cracks
families are falling into —
they’re traps,” she says in her
launch video. “America’s middle
class is under attack. How did
we get here? Billionaires and big
corporations decided they
wanted more of the pie. And
they enlisted politicians to cut
them a bigger slice.”
Like Sanders, who may end
up joining the race, Warren
simply does not use the
language of compromise or
national unity; she uses the
language of resistance. As they
pile into the race, some
Democrats will find themselves
arguing for a return to the less
divisive politics of the preTrump era, while others, such as
Warren, will call for a president
to dismantle the financial forces
that made Trump’s win possible.
To those in the latter camp,
Trump never could have won
had he not been able to define
himself as a “blue-collar
billionaire” against Clinton’s
Wall Street supporters. For
them, in 2020 the job will be
giving him an opponent who
can make a populist case against
him.
What we don’t know is how
much Democratic voters crave
that. For a very long time,
Democratic voters told pollsters
that they wanted leaders who
could compromise with the
other party. From 2017 to 2018,
according to Pew Research, the
proportion of Democrats saying
that fell from 69 percent to
46 percent.
That’s still a substantial bloc
of voters, and in interviews with
Iowa Democrats last month, The
Post found plenty of them
worrying that a “divisive”
candidate could not win the
presidency. The forces that
ended up giving the Republican
nomination to Trump do not
exist on the left. What is
motivating Democratic voters?
Thanks to Warren, we’ll find out
pretty soon.
david.weigel@washpost.com
Get news and insight on political
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Sunday evenings. Sign up for The
Trailer at wapo.st/trail.
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A6
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. WEDNESDAY,
JANUARY 2 , 2019
For Democrats, the race to 2020 will be unlike any seen in modern times
Anyone who has
paid close
attention to past
Democratic
presidential
nominating
Dan Balz
campaigns should
strike what they
THE TAKE
know from their
memory bank. Old
rules and previous assumptions
aren’t likely to be worth much.
What’s ahead for the Democrats
will be unlike any nomination
battle in recent years.
The campaign started Monday,
when Sen. Elizabeth Warren of
Massachusetts jumped into the
race by announcing the
formation of a presidential
exploratory committee. Her 41/2minute video tied biography to
philosophy to ideology. She
adopted an aggressive posture,
toward President Trump, big
banks and large corporations.
But if Warren was the first
major candidate to leap into the
2020 campaign, she will soon
have much company. If Trump
proved anything in 2016, it is that
even the unlikeliest of candidates
can become president. As a
result, all kinds of Democrats,
from those with decades of public
service to those with only a few
years (or even none), from those
in their 70s to those decades
younger, have decided, “Why not
me?”
Jeff Berman, a veteran of past
campaigns and the architect of
Barack Obama’s successful
delegate strategy in 2008, said
that, for the Democrats, the 2020
race will be “the least predictable
cycle in 25 years or more.”
Most recent Democratic
nominating contests have been
binary choices featuring a
mainstream liberal vs. a
progressive or insurgent. In 2008,
though there were others in the
field, the campaign always was,
fundamentally, one that pitted
then-Sen. Obama against thenSen. Hillary Clinton. That model
applied to 2016, as well, a race
between Clinton and Sen. Bernie
Sanders (I-Vt.) despite the
presence of others.
That was also true in 2000,
when then-Vice President Al
Gore took the establishment lane
BRIAN SNYDER/REUTERS
Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass), with her husband, Bruce, outside her Cambridge home Monday.
and former senator Bill Bradley
ran as a progressive reformer. In
2004, though others figured into
some of the early maneuvering,
the contest was largely between
then-Sen. John F. Kerry, the
establishment choice, and former
Vermont governor Howard Dean,
the antiwar insurgent.
There will be nothing binary
about the battle that is about to
unfold, at least not for many
months. The field will be bigger
than it has been in many cycles,
probably bigger even than 1992
or 1988. There are two dozen or
more names on handicapping
charts, and while many of them
will not enter the race, the field
could number in double digits by
the time everyone makes a
decision.
Beyond that, the traditional
lanes will be more crowded than
ever. Former vice president Joe
Biden, should he decide to run,
will be cast as a traditional
mainstream Democrat, but there
will be others who fit that
identity. There won’t be just one
progressive candidate — there
will be several. Sanders and
Warren will be drawing from
much the same constituency, and
Sen. Sherrod Brown of Ohio will
also compete in the progressive
lane if he runs. And there will be
candidates who don’t fit neatly
into either.
In 2008, Obama benefited
enormously by being the sole
African American candidate,
although that edge wasn’t
evident when he announced his
candidacy. Initially he was
buoyed by support from the
party’s progressive base, which
was unhappy with Clinton over
her vote on the Iraq War. For
most of 2007, polls showed
Obama and Clinton dividing the
black vote. Once he won the Iowa
caucuses, Obama consolidated
support among African
Americans. The combination of
progressives and African
Americans was crucial to
Obama’s ultimate success.
This time it is likely there will
be two African American
candidates — Sens. Kamala D.
Harris of California and Cory
Booker of New Jersey — looking
to consolidate support from the
party’s most loyal constituency.
But many other candidates will
be seeking a piece of the black
vote, as well. Biden has ties to
black voters dating to the days of
the civil rights movement.
Warren’s opening video is
explicit, highlighting the wealth
gap between white and black
families and the history of
discrimination against African
Americans. Sanders struggled in
2016 with African Americans and
could face similar challenges this
time.
There won’t be just one
woman running this time —
there could be many. They
include Harris and Sens. Kirsten
Gillibrand of New York and Amy
Klobuchar of Minnesota. The
success of female candidates
running for Congress during the
midterm elections, the
organizing activity led by women
across the country and the
#MeToo movement have
illustrated the rising power of
women in politics, especially in
the Democratic Party.
The Democratic race will
quickly become a kind of Noah’s
ark of candidates, with at least
two of almost everything. There
will be multiple senators
running, along with multiple
governors or ex-governors, along
with multiple mayors or exmayors (a rarity in presidential
politics), along with the
possibility of multiple candidates
with business backgrounds and
even a couple of billionaires. One
other clear dividing line will be
familiar faces vs. fresh ones — a
Biden or a Sanders vs. the likes of
outgoing congressman Beto
O’Rourke of Texas or Gov. Steve
Bullock of Montana.
The permutations are endless,
given the mix-and-match appeals
of the field. The challenge will be
finding a way to break out of the
pack, whether through celebrity
appeal, money or preferably a
messenger with a distinctive
message that can capture the
imaginations of party activists
and also prove viable with the
electorate in a general election.
Having a clear sense of strategy
and the discipline to follow it will
separate long-distance runners
from the others.
The media environment will
be unlike what past campaigns
have seen. Trump showed what
the power to control the
conversation can mean in a
nominating contest. The
intensity of social media and
cable chatter will test the ability
of candidates to roll with what
comes at them. Mastering the
digital space and free media will
be critically important.
Money will divide the field.
Veterans of past campaigns
believe the era when candidates
counted on an extensive list of
donors who contributed the legal
maximum to their campaigns has
largely passed, replaced by the
existence of a well-funded super
PAC or by the ability to generate
small-dollar contributions with a
candidate that generates genuine
excitement.
Sanders sustained himself
with grass-roots contributions
against Clinton in 2016. Many
House and Senate challengers
did the same in their races this
year. How many 2020 candidates
can do this is an open question.
O’Rourke, while losing his Senate
race this fall to incumbent Ted
Cruz (R-Tex.), amassed huge
amounts of money from
throughout the country,
including an astonishing
$38 million in the third quarter
of 2018.
Others might have to depend
on super PACs to keep themselves
afloat. There is talk among
Democrats that some candidates
are trying to figure out how they
could raise $100 million or more
in such committees. Republican
Jeb Bush tried this approach in
2016 without success, but that
doesn’t mean some Democrats
won’t pursue a similar plan in
2020. Staying viable as long as
possible will be important if
there is a truly crowded field.
New rules will make this
contest different. The role of
superdelegates has been reduced,
although if there is a brokered
convention they still could play a
decisive role. Caucuses will
undergo changes to make them
more small-d democratic,
including the introduction of
absentee voting. Think how that
could affect the outcome in Iowa.
The early states — Iowa, New
Hampshire, South Carolina and
Nevada — will be important as
always. But Super Tuesday,
especially now that California
again has joined the list of states
voting in early March, will be a
strategic and financial challenge
and potentially key to victory.
The biggest question is what
all this will say about the state of
the Democratic Party. AntiTrump sentiment will carry
Democrats some distance but not
all the way. Will this jumble of
candidates — and the arguments
they have among themselves on
the way toward their national
convention — result in a nominee
with a clear and compelling
message or produce a cacophony
that does more to highlight the
fissures that exist within the
party? And if a Democrat wins in
2020, will she or he be ready to
govern?
That’s all in the future, of
course. It’s the start of the new
year, and all things seem possible
to the candidates. Their wild ride
is just beginning.
dan.balz@washpost.com
Trump to host a border security briefing at White House
Top lawmakers invited to
first bipartisan session as
shutdown drags on
BY A NNE G EARAN
AND E RICA W ERNER
President Trump invited congressional leaders to the White
House for a briefing on border
security, the first face-to-face session involving Republicans and
Democrats as the partial government shutdown entered its second
week.
The briefing will occur one day
before Democrats take control of
the House and Trump gets his first
taste of divided government.
It was unclear whether the
Wednesday session would break
the budget impasse — in its 11th
day Tuesday — as Trump has demanded billions of dollars for a
U.S.-Mexico border wall, and Democrats have rejected his request.
Trump had campaigned on a
pledge to build the wall at Mexico’s
expense, a proposition Mexican
officials called ludicrous.
Officials from the Department
of Homeland Security are scheduled to brief the top two leaders in
each party in the House and the
Senate. “Border Security and the
Wall ‘thing’ and Shutdown is not
where Nancy Pelosi wanted to
start her tenure as Speaker! Let’s
make a deal?” Trump tweeted
Tuesday.
In a televised White House session on Dec. 11, Trump said he
would take responsibility for a
shutdown over the wall as House
Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-
MOHAMMED SALEM/REUTERS
A migrant from Honduras jumps to cross illegally from Mexico into the United States on Tuesday.
Calif.) and Senate Minority Leader
Charles E. Schumer (D-N.Y.) said
they would not support wall funding.
Pelosi responded to Trump’s
“let’s make a deal” invitation by
tweeting the president had “given
Democrats a great opportunity to
show how we will govern responsibly & quickly pass our plan to end
the irresponsible #TrumpShutdown — just the first sign of things
to come in our new Democratic
Majority committed to working
#ForThePeople.”
The shutdown began Dec. 22,
and there has been no sign of
direct negotiations involving Republicans, Democrats and the
White House. Members of Congress left Washington while
Trump remained at the White
House, and each side blamed the
other. Trump refers to the partial
government closure as the “Schumer shutdown.”
On Thursday, House Democrats
plan to use their new majority to
vote through measures that would
reopen nearly all of the shuttered
federal agencies through the end
of September, at funding levels
Senate Republicans have previously agreed to. Those spending
bills contain scores of priorities
and pet projects for lawmakers on
both sides of the aisle.
The Democratic proposal holds
out one exception: The Department of Homeland Security, which
oversees border security, would
keep its current level of funding,
with no new money for a border
wall. The plan would also extend
the department’s budget only
through Feb. 8, allowing Democrats to revisit funding for key
parts of Trump’s immigration pol-
Top Pentagon spokeswoman resigns amid probe
BY
T HOMAS H EATH
The Defense Department’s top
spokeswoman, who had been under investigation since May over
whether she mistreated employees, abruptly resigned Monday
night within hours of the departure of Defense Secretary Jim
Mattis.
Dana W. White said on Twitter:
“I appreciate the opportunity afforded to me by this administration to serve alongside Secretary
Mattis, our service members and
all the civilians who support
them. It has been my honor and
privilege. Stay safe and God
bless.”
A Defense Department spokesman Tuesday confirmed White
had resigned from her position as
assistant to the secretary of defense for public affairs. Charles E.
Summers Jr. replaced White, becoming “acting” assistant to the
defense secretary, according to
the Pentagon.
Patrick Shanahan, a former
Boeing executive and the No. 2
man at the Pentagon, became acting secretary Monday night, replacing Mattis who resigned after
disagreements with President
Trump.
It is not clear whether White’s
departure was related to reports
of the probe by the inspector
general to determine whether she
mistreated staff members or retaliated against them after they
raised concerns.
The Pentagon’s media operations office Tuesday did not respond to emailed questions about
the status of the investigation.
Six current and former Pentagon officials had said at least two
complaints were filed against
White. The probe focused in part
on allegations that staff members
carried out personal tasks for her,
such as retrieving her dry cleaning, getting her lunch and driving
her to work during a snowstorm.
At least five staff members had
been abruptly transferred or removed from their jobs since
White, a Trump administration
political appointee, took over in
April 2017.
Others said they had questions
about the moves but kept quiet for
fear of becoming a target themselves. They spoke to The Washington Post on the condition of
anonymity, citing those concerns.
White also sent a farewell mes-
icy in a month.
The president has asked for
$5 billion in border money, far
beyond the $1.3 billion Democrats
plan to vote through this week.
Trump, who tweeted his opposition to the plan Tuesday, has reiterated he had no plans to back down.
Word of the White House briefing was first reported by Politico.
Trump also used Twitter on the
first day of 2019 to insult a retired
U.S. commander in Afghanistan,
sing the praises of an ultranationalist former aide and tell the United States to chill and “ENJOY THE
RIDE.”
Trump’s cheery tone in an allcaps tweet welcoming the new
year did not last the morning.
“HAPPY NEW YEAR TO EVERYONE, INCLUDING THE HATERS AND THE FAKE NEWS MEDIA! 2019 WILL BE A FANTASTIC
YEAR FOR THOSE NOT SUFFERING FROM TRUMP DERANGEMENT SYNDROME. JUST CALM
DOWN AND ENJOY THE RIDE,
GREAT THINGS ARE HAPPENING FOR OUR COUNTRY!”
Trump wrote.
That may have been before he
read all his mail. Trump went on to
bash retired Army Gen. Stanley
McChrystal over remarks McChrystal made Sunday, calling the
president untruthful and immoral. “ ‘General’ McChrystal got fired
like a dog by Obama. Last assignment a total bust. Known for big,
dumb mouth. Hillary lover!”
Trump opined.
McChrystal was forced to resign
in 2010 after making disparaging
comments about Obama administration officials in a Rolling Stone
article. He had been a rising star in
the Army, a decorated expert on
counterinsurgency tasked with
turning around the stalemated Afghanistan war.
Although McChrystal’s comments were made on ABC two days
prior, Trump did not comment
publicly until he responded Tuesday morning to a tweet from conservative commentator Laura Ingraham.
Ingraham had tweeted an article Monday headlined “Media
Didn’t Like McChrystal Until He
Started Bashing Trump.” Catching
up to it Tuesday, Trump evidently
agreed.
The president’s very first words
of the new year were an endorsement of a pro-Trump book by former White House aide Sebastian
Gorka. The former Breitbart writer, a frequent television defender
of the president, quit or was fired
in 2017 partly in protest that
Trump’s first major speech about
the U.S. military strategy in Afghanistan made no mention of
what he called “Radical Islam.”
“Dr. Sebastian Gorka, a very
good and talented guy, has a great
new book just out, “Why We
Fight.” Lots of insight — Enjoy!”
Trump wrote.
Trump has been holed up in the
White House instead of vacationing at his Mar-a-Lago resort in
Florida, as planned, because of the
government shutdown and his
standoff with Democrats over
funding for a border wall.
In a second tweet, he said: “The
Democrats, much as I suspected,
have allocated no money for a new
Wall. So imaginative! The problem
is, without a Wall there can be no
real Border Security — and our
Country must finally have a Strong
and Secure Southern Border!”
sage to Defense Department public affairs personnel Monday.
“It is with a heavy heart that I
have submitted my letter of resignation to Secretary Mattis. I am
grateful to the administration for
giving me the opportunity to
serve alongside Secretary Mattis,
the brave men and women in
uniform, and all of the civilians
who support them,” the message
read.
Mattis departed Monday night
with none of the pageantry typically associated with the position.
In a short message to U.S. troops,
he said: “Hold fast.”
Mattis resigned Dec. 20 but had
planned to stay on as defense
secretary through Feb. 28 to ensure a smooth transition. Trump
forced an early departure, as the
president complained about the
media coverage he was receiving
over the resignation.
Summers is a graduate of the
University of Illinois at UrbanaChampaign and holds the rank of
captain in the U.S. Navy Reserve.
White was also a foreign policy
adviser on the 2008 presidential
campaign of Sen. John McCain
(R-Ariz.) and an editorial writer
for the Wall Street Journal based
in Hong Kong, according to her
Defense Department biography.
White has a bachelor’s degree
in East Asian Languages and Civilization from the University of
Chicago and speaks Mandarin
Chinese and French.
anne.gearan@washpost.com
erica.werner@washpost.com
thomas.heath@washpost.com
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2 , 2019
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A7
SU
Sale of Hitler’s belongings and Nazi items stirs a backlash
ARTIFACTS FROM A1
their families are selling it off.”
Many Jewish groups, though
not all, have denounced these
sales.
Haim Gertner, the archives director of Yad Vashem, Israel’s leading Holocaust memorial, said
some of Hitler’s personal items are
worth saving, especially if the owners of Nazi artifacts believe that the
material and anti-Semitic history
should never be forgotten. But the
act of selling these artifacts to the
highest bidder, he said, “is incorrect and even immoral.”
Rabbi Marvin Hier, the founder
of the Simon Wiesenthal Center in
Los Angeles, said some Hitler or
Nazi party documents or objects
should be preserved, particularly
their writings revealing their murderous aims. But he said other
kinds of Nazi memorabilia —
much of which was smuggled out
of Germany by American service
members — just inflate the dictator’s mystique and embolden antiSemites.
“The Hitler salute is coming
back in this country, and bigots get
their nourishment from seeing
things like this photo and the girl,”
Hier said. “People will see that
photo and say, ‘Maybe Hitler had a
good side to him’ and ‘Don’t judge
him so badly.’ ”
But Panagopulos, 60, whose
auction house is based in Cecil
County, Md., said the market is
being driven by World War II movies, documentaries and endless
segments on the History Channel,
once derided as “The Hitler Channel.” Many of the buyers of the
expensive, headline-generating
Nazi memorabilia are Jewish.
One of them is Michael Bulmash, 74, a retired Jewish clinical
psychologist from Delaware. He
has spent the last two decades buying Holocaust material, a sizable
portion from Alexander Historical
Auctions. He has donated everything — including children’s books
published by the anti-Semitic publisher Julius Streicher and an old
back issue of Streicher’s newspaper, Der Stürmer — to his alma
mater, Kenyon College in Ohio, for
the Bulmash Family Holocaust Collection.
“It’s all about getting this stuff
out in people’s faces,” Bulmash
said, “especially when you had neoNazis marching in Charlottesville
and the president of the United
States creating a false equivalence
between what neo-Nazis were doing and what the people who were
trying to stop them were doing.”
Another Panagopulos client,
Howard Cohen, 68, a retired Jewish optometrist in Pittsburgh,
keeps all kinds of “anti-Semitica”
from Nazi Germany in his home,
including a Der Stürmer ashtray
featuring a caricature of a hooknosed Jew he got for about $2,000.
He hides the material in drawers
and boxes, so no houseguest would
ever see them. His wife and adult
children do not necessarily approve or understand, he said.
All his clients are serious history
buffs, Panagopulos said, not skinheads or white nationalists.
PHOTOS BY EILEEN BLASS FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
ABOVE: Basil “Bill”
Panagopulos, president of
Alexander Historical Auctions,
holds a 1933 Heinrich
Hoffmann photograph of Adolf
Hitler with Rosa Bernile
Nienau, known as “the Führer’s
child.” RIGHT: A likeness of
Hitler’s head on a stick — with a
black eye — is a striking
example of some of the Allied
propaganda consigned to the
auction house.
“Skinheads don’t have the
means for it, and, even if they did
have the means, they would have
no historical appreciation for it,”
Panagopulos said. “I’m not some
knucklehead blood-drooling neoNazi. My wife is Jewish. Her mother is an Orthodox Jew. Her father is
a Jew. And my father’s hometown
in Greece was wiped out by Germans in World War II.”
But the image of Hitler still resonates with extremists. James A.
Fields Jr. — a self-professed neoNazi convicted of first-degree murder on Dec. 7 for driving his car into
a crowd of counterprotesters in
Charlottesville, killing one woman
and wounding 35 others — texted
his mother a meme of Hitler when
she urged him to be careful at the
“Unite the Right” rally. “We’re not
the one who need to be careful,”
Fields told her.
Panagopulos established his
auction house in Stamford, Conn.,
in 1991, first specializing in far less
incendiary fare: a lock of President
Abraham Lincoln’s hair or presidential autographs. Then, about
eight years ago, he got into Third
Reich memorabilia.
His first attention-getters were
two sets of Mengele journals. In
2010, he sold one notebook for
close to $50,000 to an Orthodox
Jew whose grandmother survived
Auschwitz. But the American
Gathering of Jewish Holocaust
Survivors and Their Descendants
organization found the sale disgusting and asked Richard Blumenthal, who then was Connecticut’s attorney general, to investigate its authenticity.
“I sympathize with their revulsion regarding the apparent profit
from this journal,” Blumenthal
said in a statement at the time.
Spokesmen for Blumenthal and
the Holocaust survivors group said
they do not recall whether a probe
was ever launched. Panagopulos
said Blumenthal, now a Democratic senator from Connecticut, never
contacted him.
A year later, he sold the remainder of Mengele’s journals, this time
for $300,000. The buyer was also a
Jew, Panagopulos said. But the sale
still generated a backlash.
“If you really want to despise
someone, look no further than
Stamford, Conn., where you can
find Basil (Bill) Panagopulos who
runs Alexander Historical Auctions,” began an op-ed in the New
York Daily News by an American
Gathering executive.
Undeterred, Panagopulos continued selling all manner of paraphernalia: A cache of medical documents showing the Führer suffered from flatulence and was injected with an extract of bull
testicles to jump-start his libido;
an archive of letters, poetry and
school papers of Nazi propaganda
chief Joseph Goebbels; and a U.S.
Army interrogator’s notes of his
interview with Hitler’s doctors
that revealed Hitler took female
hormones.
He said he earns a commission
from consignors — about 12 to 25
percent, depending on the item —
as well as one from buyers, typically 21 percent.
In 2014, after Panagopulos
moved the auction house to Chesapeake City, Md., he sold perhaps
his grisliest item: a bloodstained
scrap of fabric from the sofa where
Hitler shot himself on April 30,
1945. The winning bid: $18,000.
He kept another piece for himself
but does not display it.
“Strange, isn’t it? Why would
someone keep this?” he asked,
holding the cloth. “But what a rarity!”
Although Panagopulos is a
proud spokesman for his trade,
many others who deal in Nazi material are far more secretive.
Case in point: the consignor and
buyer of the photo showing Hitler
hugging Rosa Bernile Nienau, a
girl of Jewish descent. Hitler’s
close friend Heinrich Hoffman
photographed Hitler with many
children. He made multiple prints
of the same photos, which were
widely distributed across Germany. But Hitler liked Nienau so
much — they shared the same
birthday, April 20 — that she
earned the moniker, “the Führer’s
child” and she called him “Uncle
Hitler.”
As is customary in the auction
world, Panagopulos declined to reveal the identities of his clients. At
The Washington Post’s request, Panagopulos asked the top bidder for
the photo, who lives in Britain, to
come forward for an interview, but
the winner never responded to his
request. The photo’s consignor declined via Panagopulos to comment.
But when The Post reached Don
Boyle of Scranton, Pa., a wellknown collector of World War II
German artifacts, he said he had
once owned the photo and traded
it in 2007 to Arizona collector Jeff
Clark, who runs a website that sells
Nazi party uniforms.
It was Clark who consigned the
photo to Panagopulos, Boyle said.
In an email, Clark denied knowing about the photograph, let
alone selling it. “I had to google to
find out what you were talking
about,” he wrote.
The sale of the photo was covered by news outlets around the
world. One Amsterdam-based
journalist, though, questioned the
authenticity of Hitler’s inscription,
“The dear and [considerate?] Rosa
Nienau Adolf Hitler Munich, the
16th June 1933.”
“[C]ounterfeit Nazi junk,” declared Bart FM Droog, who is
working on a book about fake Hitler artifacts.
But Elaine Quigley, who chairs
the British Institute of Graphologists, said the photo’s inscription
does match with some of Hitler’s
earlier known handwriting, especially his autograph.
Panagopulos noted the photo
came with multiple supporting
documents. The photo was also
consigned with the original envelope — featuring the blind-embossed stamp of Hoffman’s studio
— in which it was delivered to the
Nienau family.
And shortly after the auction,
Panagopulos said, he got word
from the Dokumentation Obersalzberg in Germany, a government-funded museum chronicling
the area’s ties to the Nazi party, that
it wants to put a copy of the photograph in a permanent exhibit.
“I’ve seen hundreds of Hitler
autographs. I am confident in the
signature,” Panagopulos said. “And
if I’m wrong? I’m on the hook in
perpetuity. We offer a one-hundred
percent warranty of authenticity.”
ian.shapira@washpost.com
Brazil’s new president is sworn in, pledging an end to ‘political correctness’
BRAZIL FROM A1
With Bolsonaro’s inauguration, Latin America’s two biggest
economies are now in the hands
of anti-establishment populists.
Andrés Manuel López Obrador, a
leftist, took office in Mexico on
Dec. 1. But while he built a reputation as a pragmatist when he
served as mayor of Mexico City,
the new Brazilian leader appears
more unpredictable.
Bolsonaro is a strong supporter
of the military regime that ruled
Brazil from 1964 to 1985 and is the
most conservative ruler to come
to power in the region in decades.
His vice president and several key
ministers are former military officers. Lawmakers who support the
new president greeted him Tuesday by pointing their fingers in
the shape of a gun.
The new president repeatedly
emphasized his commitment to
democracy Tuesday.
In his speech to Congress, Bolsonaro promised to reduce bureaucratic regulations and promote a more free-market economic policy. He hinted that he
would try to loosen gun laws,
saying, “A good citizen deserves
methods of defending himself.”
That move, though, could be
challenged by Congress. Even
more difficult may be injecting
steam into the sluggish Brazilian
economy, which analysts say will
require broad austerity measures.
And Bolsonaro will need to mediate among the country’s three
dozen political parties.
“His government will be judged
based on the economy and corruption, issues that take time to
fix. But he can act on security fast,
and that will give his electorate
RICARDO MORAES/REUTERS
Jair Bolsonaro, with wife Michelle Bolsonaro, waves as he rides to his inauguration ceremony in
Brasilia. The new president has promised to take a hard line on crime and corruption.
the impression that things have
changed,” said Mauricio Santoro,
a political science professor at the
State University of Rio de Janeiro.
During the campaign, Bolsonaro suggested that he may support giving police officers license
to kill on the job by protecting
them from murder charges. While
that would require major changes
to Brazilian law, many fear that
even raising the idea could exacerbate an already serious problem
of police brutality.
Tens of thousands of people
filled Brasilia’s Praca dos Tres Poderes, a massive lawn akin to the
“Join me in the mission
to restore and rebuild
our homeland.”
Jair Bolsonaro, addressing
Brazil’s Congress
Mall in Washington, for Bolsonaro’s first presidential speech to
the public Tuesday afternoon.
The government launched a
huge security operation, mobilizing more than 3,000 police offi-
cers, firefighters and soldiers.
During the campaign, Bolsonaro
was wounded by a knife-wielding
assailant, and he takes office at a
moment when the country is
deeply polarized.
Many Brazilians oppose Bolsonaro because of his history of
incendiary statements — he has
insulted women and minorities
and said he would prefer a dead
son to a gay one. On Tuesday, the
new president emphasized in his
congressional speech his “commitment to building a society
without discrimination or division.” But later, addressing the
public, Bolsonaro proclaimed
that the era of “political correctness” was over.
He held up a Brazilian flag and
chanted along with the crowd:
“Our flag will never be red” — a
reference to communism.
For Bolsonaro, “there is a need
to maintain a sense of polarization because that was the platform that got him elected,” said
Alexandre Bandeira, a political
strategist in Brasilia. “We are seeing a government formed in opposition to a party,” the leftist Workers’ Party, which dominated Brazilian politics from 2003 to 2016.
The Workers’ Party boycotted
the ceremony. Its leader, Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva, a darling of the
global left for his progressive welfare policies, is in prison fighting
a corruption conviction. The party was resoundingly defeated in
the October election, with many
citizens blaming it for a devastating recession from which Brazil is
only now emerging.
Among them was Lorena Abdaba, 32, a professor who traveled 33
hours by bus from her native state
of Espirito Santo to attend the
inauguration. She said Bolsonaro
represented a historic moment
for her country — a moment she
couldn’t miss.
“I also came to watch the official exit of the Workers’ Party
from the presidency,” she said.
A few miles away, 19-year-old
college student Grace Kelly Silveira waited at a bus station as
Bolsonaro supporters poured
through the terminal, cheering as
they waved Brazilian flags.
“I think he is too radical,” she
said.
She cast a blank ballot in the
election, saying she couldn’t vote
for the Workers’ Party because of
its corruption scandals.
In foreign policy, Bolsonaro
has signaled that he plans major
changes and that he may follow
Trump’s lead on some issues. For
example, he has threatened to
pull out of the Paris climate accord and said he will relocate
Brazil’s embassy in Israel to Jerusalem from Tel Aviv.
Trump congratulated the new
Brazilian leader, writing in a
tweet: “The U.S.A. is with you!”
Secretary of State Mike
Pompeo flew to Brasilia for the
inauguration, as did Israeli Prime
Minister Benjamin Netanyahu.
Meanwhile, the incoming Brazilian government rescinded invitations to the inauguration that had
been sent to Cuban and Venezuelan leaders, traditional allies of
the Workers’ Party.
Like Trump, Bolsonaro won the
presidency after a campaign
fueled by popular anger. Many
Brazilians were wary of established politicians after a multibillion-dollar corruption scandal
linked to the national oil company wound up tainting vast swaths
of the country’s political elite.
Bolsonaro spent nearly three
decades in Congress. But as a
fringe legislator, he was one of the
few to emerge unscathed from the
scandals.
He replaces Michel Temer, who
leaves the presidency with the
worst approval ratings in Brazilian history.
marina.lopes@washpost.com
mary.sheridan@washpost.com
Lopes reported from Miami. Sheridan
reported from Mexico City. Carol
Morello in Washington contributed to
this report.
A8
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. WEDNESDAY,
THE WASHINGTON POST
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JANUARY 2 , 2019
The World
U.S. ally arms Yemeni warlord on sanctions list
Abu al-Abbas acknowledges backing from UAE, a partner in Saudi-led fight against rebels. That support is at odds with Washington’s counterterror push.
BY
S UDARSAN R AGHAVAN
taiz, yemen — In 2017, the
Trump administration imposed
sanctions on a powerful Yemeni
Islamist warlord, accusing him of
being a “prominent military instructor” and fundraiser for alQaeda who had also at one point
“served with” the Islamic State
and financed its forces.
But Abu al-Abbas is not on the
run. He is not even in hiding.
By his own admission, Abbas
continues to receive millions of
dollars in weapons and financial
support for his fighters from one
of Washington’s closest Middle
East allies, the United Arab Emirates, undermining U.S. counterterrorism goals in Yemen.
The UAE, along with Saudi
Arabia, leads a regional coalition
waging war in Yemen even as a
humanitarian crisis there worsens. The coalition’s main goal is
to defeat the northern Yemeni
rebels known as Houthis and
restore the country’s ousted
government. The United States
assists it with intelligencegathering, logistical support and
the sale of billions of dollars in
weapons and equipment — including several MRAP armored
vehicles that have ended up in
Abbas’s hands, according to one
of the warlord’s top aides and
photos publicly available online.
“The coalition is still supporting me,” Abbas, 47, said in a rare
interview last month in a heavily
guarded house in the southern
city of Aden. “If I really was a
terrorist, they would have taken
me in for questioning.”
To the extent that it is
strengthening suspected extremists, the coalition is working
against U.S. efforts to defuse
global threats emanating from
southern Yemen, where the
Trump administration is waging
a separate conflict against alQaeda’s Yemen affiliate and a
nascent branch of the Islamic
State. The al-Qaeda affiliate has
targeted the United States several times, and U.S. officials consider it the terrorist network’s
most dangerous arm.
Abbas’s case underscores the
awkward alliances and odd bedfellows that pervade all sides in
Yemen’s four-year war. Archenemies have turned into allies.
Secessionists fight alongside
those favoring a unified Yemen.
Socialists are in the same camp as
Islamists, who themselves come
in various ideological shades.
Increasingly, the divisions are
touching off sub-conflicts intensified by tribal rivalries, political
ambitions and the quest for influence. In such a tangled and
fragmented landscape, the priorities driving the primary war
against the rebels often clash
with the priorities of the U.S. war
against Islamist extremists.
“We are aware of these reports
and are seeking additional information,” said Cmdr. Rebecca Rebarich, a Defense Department
spokeswoman, referring to the
coalition’s arming and financing
of Abbas, who uses a nom de
guerre. His name, as stated on the
U.S. sanctions list, is Adil Abduh
Fari Uthman al-Dhubhani.
Neither the UAE government
nor the Riyadh-based coalition
responded to requests for comment.
U.S. weapons sold to the coalition have killed and injured thousands of Yemeni civilians. Those
casualties, and warnings of fam-
PHOTOS BY LORENZO TUGNOLI FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
A member of Abu al-Abbas’s militia oversees a checkpoint in the south-central city of Taiz. The Trump administration says Abbas has aided al-Qaeda and the Islamic State.
ine, prompted the recent Senate
vote to end U.S. military backing
for the coalition. The Senate also
held Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman responsible
for the killing in October of Jamal
Khashoggi, the Saudi-born Washington Post contributing columnist whose death has triggered
greater scrutiny of the prince’s
conduct in the war in Yemen.
The funding of Abbas raises
more questions about that conduct. Even as the UAE states that
it is a key partner in the United
States’ counterterrorism fight
here, Abbas — a follower of the
ultraconservative strain of Islam
known as Salafism — is a linchpin
of the Sunni Muslim coalition’s
strategy for defeating the Shiite
rebels and, by extension, their
ally Iran. The warlord is also vital
to the UAE’s long-term ambitions
of exerting influence over southern Yemen.
A senior administration official told reporters in Cairo last
year that the United States knows
there are coalition-backed mili-
tias in the south-central city of
Taiz, where Abbas operates, that
are “al-Qaeda all but in name,
and in some cases openly identifying themselves with al-Qaeda.”
Asked whether the United
States is concerned about the
coalition’s support for Abbas and
other Islamist militias, the official, who spoke on the condition
of anonymity to discuss sensitive
matters freely, said the UAE “preferred to work with” some Islamic fundamentalists who serve as a
“counterweight” to its enemies in
Members train at the al-Najah school in Taiz, headquarters of the Abbas militia. “The coalition is still
supporting me,” Abbas said. “If I really was a terrorist, they would have taken me in for questioning.”
the south. Under such circumstances, the official acknowledged, “it’s very easy for al-Qaeda
to insinuate itself into the mix.”
Al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula, or AQAP, as the Yemeni
affiliate is known, was responsible for sending parcel bombs on
flights into the United States in
2010 and a failed plot to bomb an
airliner over Detroit on Christmas Day 2009, among other attacks against the West.
But the Sunni militants have
also long sought to destabilize
local authorities, finding recruits
and safe havens among tribes
frustrated with poor government
services.
In the central province of Bayda, tribes aligned with both alQaeda and the Islamic State are
battling the Houthis, and tribal
leaders and local officials said the
coalition is arming and financing
them.
“At the same time,” said Ahmed
Fadhil Abu Suraima, the province’s deputy governor, “they try
to make it appear in the media
that they are with the United
States and they are fighting
against al-Qaeda and the Islamic
State.”
When the Houthis seized Taiz
in 2015, Abbas joined tribal forces
that drove the rebels to the city’s
outskirts, where they remain.
The coalition has since merged
Abbas’s militia into the army. But
his 3,000 fighters follow only his
orders.
Abbas, who is 5 feet 6 inches
tall with a wispy black beard, is
now in a struggle against other
coalition proxies for influence in
Taiz. His main foes are militias
aligned with Islah, an Islamist
party viewed by the UAE as a
radical wing of the Muslim
Brotherhood and a threat to its
aspirations in southern Yemen.
“He has become a type of
indispensable man for the UAE
in Yemen,” said Nicholas Heras, a
Middle East expert at the Center
for a New American Security, a
Washington-based think tank.
Abbas denies the terrorism
allegations, saying his opponents
in Taiz fed U.S. authorities false
intelligence. Yet he admits that
his militia fought alongside alQaeda and Islamic State fighters
when the Sunni extremists joined
the resistance. Some militants, he
said, operated in areas he controlled. But he said that “we
didn’t approve of their ideology”
and that his men later pushed
them out.
In Taiz, senior pro-Islah military commanders questioned
why the coalition continues to
arm Abbas after he was placed on
the U.S. sanctions list.
“According to the information
I have, he still provides protection for those outlaws,” said
Sadiq Sarhan, who commands
the Yemeni army’s 22nd Brigade.
Others defend him, citing his
efforts against the rebels. “We
know Abu al-Abbas as a fierce
fighter on the battlefield,” said
Arif Jamil, one of the city’s deputy
governors.
Abbas said he has asked the
coalition to conduct an investigation to “bring out the truth” and
clear his name.
“I am even willing to be taken
to the United States for questioning,” he said.
challenged at the entrance,
according to a statement from the
military. The Pakistani Taliban,
which is separate from the
Afghan Taliban, asserted
responsibility.
linked gunmen, raising fears that
the fighting will escalate.
sudarsan.raghavan
@washpost.com
DIGEST
ISRAEL
Livni ditched by her
opposition partner
The new year did not start
well for veteran Israeli leftist
politician Tzipi Livni, who was
publicly ditched by her
opposition partner on television
Tuesday, as Israel’s political
drama ramps up ahead of
elections.
Livni, formerly Israel’s foreign
minister, sat stony-faced and
silent next to Avi Gabbay, leader
of the left-leaning Zionist Union,
as he announced the move in a
news conference in the Knesset,
Israel’s parliament. Gabbay’s
Labor Party and Livni’s Hatnua
party have been in an alliance
since 2014.
“I hoped and believed this
alliance would bring about our
blossoming,” Gabbay said. “But
the public is smart, saw this is not
the situation and distanced itself
from us.”
The move came as Israel
prepares for early elections,
which Israeli Prime Minister
Benjamin Netanyahu’s coalition
last month announced would
take place in April. Opinion polls
predict another win for the
prime minister’s Likud party,
despite his being investigated in
three corruption cases and the
police recommending that he be
indicted.
As Gabbay pointed out in
his speech, support for the
opposition Zionist Union has
slipped away, with polls
predicting it will do poorly in the
elections, winning as few as eight
seats compared with the 24 it
now holds.
— Loveday Morris
JAPAN
Driver rams minivan
into crowd, injuring 8
A Japanese man drove a
minivan directly into a crowd of
pedestrians out for New Year’s
celebrations just after midnight
Tuesday morning, injuring eight
people, in what he said was
retaliation for Japan’s “death
penalty,” Tokyo police said.
A 21-year-old man was
arrested. “I hit them with an
intention to kill,” police
spokesman Satoshi Mishima said
the man told officers. “I did that
to retaliate against the death
penalty.”
Some media reports said the
suspect had linked the attack to
the executions in July of
13 members of the Aum Shinrikyo
or Aum Supreme Truth cult who
were responsible for a 1995 sarin
gas attack on the Tokyo subway.
Japan’s NHK World also said the
alleged assailant was driving a
rental van registered in Osaka,
the western city where two other
executions were carried out last
month.
The crash occurred on Tokyo’s
Takeshita Street, a popular spot
for tourists and trendy young
Japanese people in the
fashionable Harajuku
neighborhood. NHK World said
the street, which had been closed
to traffic, was packed with people
paying a New Year’s visit to the
Meiji Shrine, which is supposed
to bring good luck.
The man was also carrying
kerosene in his car, police said.
Media reports added he had
initially planned to spread the
kerosene around to start a fire,
but had been unable to do so
because of security restrictions.
— Simon Denyer
and Akiko Kashiwagi
Gunmen attack Pakistani
security forces in Baluchistan:
Gunmen attacked a security
forces’ training base in the restive
southwestern Pakistani province
of Baluchistan, setting off a gun
battle in which at least four
members of the security forces
and four attackers were killed,
officials said. The attackers
apparently intended to hit a
residential compound at a
training center of the
paramilitary Frontier Corps in
the Loralai district but were
Up to 7 dead in clashes between
Syrian insurgent groups:
Clashes broke out between two
powerful insurgent groups in
northern Syria, leaving up to
seven people dead in the most
serious fighting in months in the
last major rebel stronghold in the
country. The al-Qaeda-linked
Hayat Tahrir al-Sham — Arabic
for Levant Liberation Committee
— and the Turkey-backed Nour
el-Din el-Zinki group blamed
each other for triggering the
fighting in Aleppo province. Nour
el-Din el-Zinki is part of a 15member coalition known as the
National Liberation Front that
has clashed with extremists in the
past. Other factions in the NLF
have sent reinforcements to
rebel-held parts of Aleppo to back
their allies against al-Qaeda-
Attack in Germany targeted
foreigners, police say: A 50-year-
old German man clearly intended
to kill foreigners when he
rammed his car into a crowd in
the northwestern German town
of Bottrop in the early hours of
New Year’s Day, injuring four, a
senior government official said.
“There was a clear intention by
this man to kill foreigners,” said
Herbert Reul, interior minister of
the state of North RhineWestphalia, where Bottrop is
located. Police said the suspect,
who was not identified, made
racist comments when he was
stopped and arrested in the
nearby city of Essen. They also
said that there was preliminary
information the man was
mentally ill but that he had no
police record. A police
spokeswoman said Syrian and
Afghan citizens were among
those injured, but gave no details.
— From news services
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2 , 2019
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
Kim says he’s open to Trump meeting
N. Korean leader warns
U.S. not to misjudge his
country's ‘patience’
tokyo — North Korean leader
KOREAN CENTRAL NEWS AGENCY/KNS/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, center, pays homage to his predecessors Tuesday in Pyongyang.
so well that North Korea possesses
great economic potential!”
Robert Carlin, a visiting scholar
at Stanford University, said the
last time North Korea made such a
commitment not to make nuclear
weapons was a 1992 joint declaration with South Korea.
“What we have is the DPRK
leader, on the record, telling us the
North Koreans will not, have not
produced any more nuclear weapons,” he said. “I wouldn’t dismiss
it. I don’t know what it means
exactly, but Kim said it, and we
should take it seriously and probe
it.”
Carlin, who was involved in
North Korea talks from 1992 to
2000 and is a nonresident fellow
at the Stimson Center, also noted
that Kim’s warning to the United
States used relatively soft words
such as “might” and “explore” —
while he attached his own “firm
will” to the commitment to denuclearize.
“Now what Kim has done is laid
out in a very positive way for his
domestic audience how forwardleaning he is in terms of engaging
with the U.S., and in fact, he makes
it very personal,” he said. “He did
that for a reason — because, I
believe, he thinks this is going to
move ahead.”
Whether North Korea is not
producing nuclear weapons remains very doubtful, but at least
Kim is pledging to act with restraint for now, said Andrei Lankov, a professor at Kookmin University in Seoul. But Lankov pointed
out that Kim had again talked of
the denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula rather than of
North Korea, which are two different things.
“That’s not a new formula. It’s
more than 25 years old,” he said,
“and it essentially implies the
withdrawal of U.S. forces from Korea and maybe from adjacent areas, as well.”
Lankov says that Kim is offering
a reduction in his nuclear arsenal
Taliban attacks kill 21
Afghan police o∞cers
BY A LEX H ORTON
AND S AYED S ALAHUDDIN
kabul — At least 21 Afghan police
officers were killed in three simultaneous Taliban assaults Monday
night in northern Afghanistan. Although civilians were nearby, security forces fired artillery rounds
to repel the militant advances.
The hours-long attack focused
mostly on overtaking oil wells and
vehicles near the capital in Sar-e
Pol province, officials said, as the
Taliban bids to demonstrate power and undermine government
control during peace talks to end
the 17-year-old war.
Militants used rifles and rocketpropelled grenades in the assault,
which also injured at least 23 police officers, Zabihullah Amani, a
spokesman for the provincial governor, told The Washington Post
on Tuesday.
“The areas are with the government, but they are under range of
Taliban fire,” Amani said. “We still
have not received any assistance.”
Three senior security officials —
an intelligence officer and two police commanders — were killed in
the attacks, said Mohammad Noor
Rahmani, provincial council chief.
Afghan forces fired Soviet-era
D-30 howitzers to repel militants
on the capital outskirts, Amani
said. The Associated Press reported this forced civilians to flee, although officials said there were no
reports of civilian casualties.
The Taliban, which asserted responsibility for the attack, suffered casualties in the assault,
Amani said. But officials have not
said how many militants were
killed or wounded.
Family of man arrested
in Russia fears for him
BY
BY S IMON D ENYER
AND M IN J OO K IM
Kim Jong Un said he is ready to
meet President Trump at any time
to discuss the denuclearization of
the Korean Peninsula but warned
he might have to seek “new ways”
if the United States maintains
sanctions and demands unilateral
concessions.
In a closely watched, nationally
televised annual New Year’s Day
speech, Kim said for the first time
that his country had already
stopped producing nuclear weapons, adding that progress on denuclearization could accelerate if the
United States also makes concessions.
But he balanced a willingness to
talk with a reminder that North
Korea has its own demands if denuclearization is to happen. He
also warned that the United States
should not misjudge North Korea’s “patience.”
Kim called his June summit
meeting with Trump “instructive”
and said they had shared “constructive opinions” on mutual
concerns and “speedy solutions to
the tangled issues” they faced.
“I am ready to sit face to face
with the U.S. president again any
time in the future and will strive to
produce an outcome welcomed by
the international community,” he
said.
“However, if the U.S. does not
keep the promises it made in front
of the world, misjudges the patience of our people, forces a unilateral demand on us, and firmly
continues with sanctions and
pressures on our republic, we
might be compelled to explore
new ways to protect our autonomy
and interests, and establish peace
and stability on the Korean Peninsula,” he said.
On the other hand, Kim reminded his audience that he and
Trump had agreed to proceed
toward the “complete denuclearization” of the peninsula, and he
said that remained the “unchangeable stance” of the ruling
Workers’ Party of Korea and the
government of the Democratic
People’s Republic of Korea
(DPRK), as well as his own “firm
will.”
“We have announced that we
will not produce, test nor proliferate any more nuclear weapons,
and have taken practical measures accordingly,” he said. “If the
United States responds to our preemptive and autonomous efforts
with credible measures and corresponding actions, the relationship
between the two countries will
accelerate for the better.”
In a tweet later Tuesday, Trump
referenced Kim’s speech and said
he looked forward to “meeting
with Chairman Kim who realizes
A9
SU
The assault joins a stream of
near-daily Taliban strikes designed in part to exert pressure
during peace negotiations between the militants, the United
States and regional powers. Militants infiltrated a government
building in Kabul on Dec. 24, killing 29 people.
Analysts have said President
Trump’s sudden announcement
that he would withdraw about half
of the 15,000 U.S. troops stationed
in Afghanistan would strengthen
the Taliban’s negotiating position
as Afghan forces struggle to maintain security, suffering recordhigh casualties in 2018.
There are signs those attacks
will continue through the winter, a
time the Taliban historically has
used to rest and regroup in Pakistan through bitterly cold months,
said Khalid Pashtun, a lawmaker
in Kandahar.
“This year we have noticed
they’re staying inside Afghanistan,” he said, adding that it was
possible Afghan forces have been
caught off guard after expecting
assaults to become less frequent.
Monday’s attack also may have
been a bid to claim territory to
further undercut Islamic State
militants mustering in the north,
he said. In August, more than 150
Islamic State fighters surrendered
to government forces after battling the Taliban in neighboring
Jowzjan province.
Government forces also have
battled Islamic State militants;
the latest offensive came Tuesday
in eastern Nangahar province, in
which 27 Islamic State fighters
were killed, the AP reported.
alex.horton@washpost.com
and detente in return for sanctions relief and diplomatic gains
but not total nuclear disarmament. That is a compromise that
appeals to many people who say it
will reduce regional tensions considerably — but not to many senior
figures in Washington, who say it
would set a dangerous precedent
by recognizing North Korea as a de
facto nuclear weapons state.
Kim delivered the speech in a
more relaxed setting than in previous years, sitting in a plush leather
armchair in a book-lined study,
with large paintings of his father
and grandfather alongside flags of
North Korea and the Workers’ Party on the wall behind him.
Overall, it felt like a North Korean imitation of the British aristocracy of the 19th century, mixed
with a touch of President Franklin
D. Roosevelt’s “fireside chats” of
the 1930s and 1940s, Lankov said
— even if the canned mass applause at the end of the speech was
more typical of Pyongyang’s heavy
propaganda touch.
Portraying a more approachable image than his father, Kim
was seen sauntering to the study
along a corridor, his Western-style
jacket unbuttoned, followed by his
younger sister, Kim Yo Jong, who
is emerging as a key figure in his
entourage.
The speech, primarily aimed at
a domestic audience, was mostly
concentrated on the economy and
stressed the need for self-reliance,
technological progress and scientific research while upholding socialist values. He urged North Korea to improve its infrastructure,
address power shortages by raising electricity production and
boost the munitions industry to
bring the country’s defense capabilities “up to the level of developed countries.”
He spoke warmly of his three
meetings with South Korean President Moon Jae-in in 2018 and the
rapprochement between the two
nations but said that progress
should be consolidated by ending
joint military exercises with the
United States. He also called for a
halt to the deployment of “strategic assets” on the Korean Peninsula, an apparent reference to U.S.
bombers and submarines capable
of carrying nuclear weapons.
Kim said he wanted to restart a
joint economic zone in Kaesong
and a joint tourism project at
Mount
Kumgang
in
the
North
“without
preconditions.” However, neither step will
be possible unless sanctions are
lifted.
South Korea’s presidential Blue
House praised the speech, saying
Kim’s commitment to closer inter-Korean ties would “make a
positive contribution to the prospect of Korean Peninsula issues
being solved smoothly in the New
Year.”
Kim also sent a letter to Moon
on Sunday, expressing his willingness to meet the South Korean
leader “often” in the coming year
to move their peace process and
denuclearization talks forward,
according to the Blue House. He
also sent a “conciliatory message”
to Trump, according to Bloomberg
News.
A year ago, the 2018 New Year’s
Day address came at a time of
much greater tension, but Kim
used that opportunity to balance
tough talk with a rare olive branch
to South Korea.
In that speech, Kim said he had
a “nuclear button” on his desk
with weapons capable of reaching
the United States, but he also
opened a path to dialogue with
Seoul and expressed willingness
to send a delegation to the Winter
Olympics in South Korea.
In this year’s address, Kim reminded viewers that athletes from
the two Koreas had marched together under a joint Korean flag at
the Opening Ceremonies of those
Games.
simon.denyer@washpost.com
minjoo.kim@washpost.com
A MIE F ERRIS- R OTMAN
moscow — The family of
an American arrested in Russia
on espionage charges said on
Tuesday that he is innocent and
that they fear for his safety.
Paul Whelan, 48, who once
served in the Marines, was detained last week by Russia’s domestic security services while he
was in Moscow for what they
described as a “spy mission.”
“We are deeply concerned for
his safety and well-being,” his
family said in a statement. “His
innocence is undoubted and we
trust that his rights will be respected.”
Whelan’s twin brother, David,
said Paul was in Moscow for a
wedding of a fellow Marine,
which took place at an upscale
hotel in central Moscow on
Dec. 28, the day he was detained.
“It is inconceivable to me that
he would have done anything to
break the law in Russia,” David
Whelan told The Washington
Post.
By Russian law, foreigners
found guilty of spying on Russia
face between 10 and 20 years in
jail.
A member of the U.S. government should have visited Paul
Whelan in detention by now, according to Russia’s obligations
under the Vienna Convention,
which dictates that consular access must be provided within a
72-hour window from the time of
arrest.
But the U.S. government shutdown may have hindered this
process, said a person familiar
with Whelan’s case, who spoke on
the condition of anonymity because of the sensitivity of the case.
Although
U.S.
embassies
are not closed during the shutdown, they are working with reduced staff. The person added
that it could take months before
the case is resolved.
Whelan’s arrest comes as tensions between Washington and
Moscow continue to escalate
over issues including election interference, the crises in Syria and
Ukraine, and the poisoning of
a former Russian spy in Britain.
Whelan works as the corporate
security director for BorgWarner,
an automotive parts supplier
based in Auburn Hills, Mich., that
has business contracts in Russia.
“BorgWarner has been in contact with the relevant U.S. Government authorities in order to
help our employee and the U.S.
government,” the company said
in a statement.
Whelan is a regular visitor to
Russia. According to Whelan’s
brother and Russian acquaintances reached by The Post, he
has been visiting Russia since
2007.
He enlisted in the Marines in
1994 and rose through the ranks
to become a staff sergeant, serving two tours in Iraq, in 2004 and
2006, according to military records released to The Post. Whelan
was discharged for bad conduct
in 2008 after being convicted of
several charges related to larceny,
according to the records.
Several Russian acquaintances
described Whelan as a friendly
man who greatly appreciated
Russia and had a basic command
of the language.
An acquaintance in St. Petersburg said the pair had made plans
to meet in that city around Jan. 1,
but contact with the American
abruptly stopped on the day of his
arrest.
The timing of Whelan’s arrest
— coming weeks after Russian
gun rights activist Maria Butina pleaded guilty to Kremlin interference in the United States
— has raised questions about a
potential swap. The two countries do not have an extradition
treaty.
The arrest of and guilty plea by
Butina, 30, have become a sharp
thorn in the side of U.S.-Russian
relations. Butina is the first Russian national to be convicted of
seeking to influence U.S. policy in
the 2016 election campaign, and
Moscow has gone to great lengths
to paint her as a political prisoner.
amie.ferris-rotman@
washpost.com
Paul Sonne in Washington
contributed to this report.
FAMILY PHOTO
Paul Whelan, shown in Iceland, was arrested in Russia on Dec. 28
on espionage charges. Whelan, 48, once served in the Marines.
British police probe station stabbing as terrorism
BY
K ARLA A DAM
london — Police in the northwestern English city of Manchester said Tuesday that a stabbing attack at the train station
overnight is being treated as
terrorism.
On New Year’s Eve shortly
before 9 p.m., a man wielding a
knife attacked a couple in their
50s and a police officer at Manchester’s Victoria Station. Officers tackled the suspect, a 25year-old man, who was arrested
at the scene.
The couple sustained “serious”
injuries and are recovering in a
hospital, police said. The officer
stabbed in the shoulder while
subduing the suspect was released from the hospital Tuesday.
Chief Constable Ian Hopkins
commended the bravery of the
four officers involved in stopping
the attacker.
“Last night we experienced a
horrific attack on people out to
simply enjoy the New Year’s Eve
celebrations in Manchester,” he
said in a statement. “We are
through the night to determine
the identity of the suspect. Police
later searched an address in the
city’s Cheetham Hill neighborhood.
Sam Clack, a BBC producer
who was at the train station
Monday night, told the BBC that
“Last night we experienced a horrific attack on
people out to simply enjoy the New Year’s Eve.”
Chief Constable Ian Hopkins, Greater Manchester Police
treating this as a terrorist investigation which is being led by
counterterrorism officers with
support from Greater Manchester Police.”
He added that they worked
police detained the suspect with
pepper spray and an electric stun
gun.
“I heard the guy shout, as part
of a sentence, as part of a sentence, he shouted, ‘Allah.’ And
then I thought, that doesn’t
sound good,” he said, referring to
the Arabic word for God.
Clack also later tweeted that
the suspect had a “long kitchen
knife.”
The BBC also broadcast video
footage of the suspect shouting
“God is greatest” in Arabic as he
was being taken away by police.
Manchester was the scene of a
devastating suicide bombing at
an Ariana Grande concert in 2017
that killed 22 people.
British Prime Minister Theresa May tweeted that her
“thoughts are with those who
were injured in the suspected
terrorist attack in Manchester
last night,” and she thanked
emergency services for their
“courageous response.”
karla.adam@washpost.com
Russian baby rescued after hours in frozen rubble
BY
J IM H EINTZ
moscow — Laboring through
subfreezing temperatures, Russian rescue workers were digging
into a sprawling heap of jagged
rubble from a collapsed apartment building when one heard
the faintest sound.
It was the sound of life.
On Tuesday, to everyone’s delight and surprise, they pulled a
baby boy out of the rubble alive,
nearly 36 hours after the disaster
that blew apart his home. His
father called it “a New Year’s
miracle.”
The building collapse in the
Russian city of Magnitogorsk before dawn Monday has killed at
least nine people so far, and more
than 30 people who lived in the
building have not been accounted for.
The collapse followed an explosion that was believed to have
been caused by a gas leak.
The boy, an 11-month-old
named Ivan Fokin, was in extremely serious condition, officials said, with fractures and a
head injury. He was also suffering
from hypothermia after his ordeal in temperatures around
minus-4 degrees.
He was flown to Moscow late
Tuesday in a desperate attempt to
save his life.
The father was at work when
his wife phoned to say the build-
ing had collapsed. She escaped
the rubble with a 3-year-old son,
Russian news reports said.
“I was sleeping on the couch
with my older son, hugging him,
and the young one was sleeping
in his baby bed,” mother Olga
Fokina said on Russian TV. “I and
the older one fell down and
quickly got out, and I didn’t know
what happened to the baby bed
afterward.”
Rescue worker Pyotr Gritsenko said on Russian television that
the baby’s discovery came after
one of the crew heard faint cries.
“They stopped all the equipment. He began to cry louder,” but
the crew couldn’t find him, he
said. A search dog was brought in
and confirmed that someone was
under the rubble, focusing the
rescue effort.
Regional governor Boris Dubrovsky said the child apparently
had been protected by being in a
crib and being wrapped warmly,
according to the Interfax news
agency.
The rescue operation, aided by
powerful heaters and lights, was
continuing
overnight
into
Wednesday in the city about
870 miles southeast of Moscow.
However, Russian officials say
the odds of finding anyone else
alive in the debris look increasingly slim, given the extreme
weather.
— Associated Press
A10
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. WEDNESDAY,
JANUARY 2 , 2019
Economy & Business
Area schools face a growing worry: Lunch debt
With K-12 students in D.C. region owing nearly $500,000, a hot meal becomes a cold cheese sandwich for many children
BY
H EATHER L ONG
As students in the Washington
area went home for winter break,
a substantial number were in
debt — to the school cafeteria.
Students in the Washington
area owe nearly half a million
dollars so far this school year in
“lunch debt,” according to an
analysis by The Washington Post.
These are K-12 students in public
schools who did not have enough
money to pay for meals in their
school cafeteria, so they racked
up debt to eat.
In some cases, students who
cannot pay for lunch are denied
hot food and handed a cheese
sandwich, according to policy in
numerous school districts across
the country, including in Prince
George’s County Public Schools.
The National School Lunch
Program, established in the
1940s, pays for free and reducedcost lunches for millions of U.S.
students, but the debts make
clear some students still aren’t
getting by.
School lunch debt in the Washington area ranges from about
$20,000 in the Alexandria City
Public Schools to $127,000 in D.C.
Public Schools. Tens of thousands
of students in the six public
school districts in and around the
nation’s capital are in the red,
according to district officials.
Debt per student varies greatly. In the 161,000-student Montgomery County Public Schools,
officials said about 11,000 students have accumulated $80,000
in meal debt so far this school
year. That works out to an average of about $7 a student, the
equivalent of about three lunches, but officials said that figure
can be misleading, as many students owe small amounts and
then a few have large negative
balances.
Teachers, principals, cafeteria
workers and poverty experts describe a hidden crisis. And the
problem isn’t confined to the
Washington area: Seventy-five
percent of U.S. school districts
have unpaid student meal debt,
according to a survey of 1,550
districts nationwide by the
School Nutrition Association, the
national organization of school
nutrition professionals.
Prince George’s County Public
Schools has $24,000 in total meal
debt outstanding. In Northern
Virginia,
Arlington
Public
Schools has more than $100,000,
and Fairfax County Public
Schools has more than $110,000.
For a child to qualify for free
lunch under the National School
Lunch Program, a family of four
must make less than $32,630 a
year. That amount is the same for
all states (except Alaska and
LAURA SEITZ/THE DESERET NEWS/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Middle school students line up for lunch in Sandy, Utah. A survey found 75 percent of U.S. school districts have unpaid student meal debt.
Hawaii), which puts kids in highcost regions such as the D.C. area
at a disadvantage over those in
more rural areas.
“Every time I see the freelunch application, I say a little
prayer thanking the Lord I don’t
have to fill it out,” said Diane
Pratt-Heavner, spokeswoman for
the School Nutrition Association.
“It’s a complicated form that asks
a lot of personal information, so I
understand why immigrant families don’t complete it.”
Many students in debt belong
to families who earn slightly too
much to qualify for free meals, or
have parents or guardians who
fail to complete the free-lunch
paperwork, which must be done
annually, according to interviews
with 11 Washington-area school
officials.
A family of four earning less
than $46,435 but more than the
free-lunch limit would qualify for
reduced-price meals. There is
also a special program for the
nation’s most low-income schools
in which all students automatically qualify for free lunch if more
than 40 percent of the student
body comes from homes on food
stamps or welfare.
School leaders said some immigrant families are afraid to
return the free-meal application
after the Trump administration
announced plans in September to
make it harder for immigrants
who receive public benefits and
are “burdens on American taxpayers” to obtain green cards or
permanent residency status.
The high debt burden puts
some schools in a gut-wrenching
position in which school policy
dictates that cafeteria workers
are instructed not to give hot
food to a child and to offer an
“alternate meal” instead, usually
a cold cheese sandwich. Lawmakers and anti-poverty activists
have dubbed this practice “lunch
shaming,” because other students
notice what’s going on.
“We don’t want to see a kid get
a ‘shame sandwich,’ ” said Michael J. Wilson, director of Maryland Hunger Solutions. “We
know good meals help fuel kids’
brains and helps with attendance.”
Montgomery County stopped
serving alternate meals in November. But some other Maryland school districts still do,
including Prince George’s County.
Schools in Prince George’s
have tried to make the process as
dignified as possible for students
in this situation by trying to
“prevent any embarrassment in
the lunch line due to lack of
funds.”
“Cashiers will no longer take a
tray from a student,” Prince
George’s County Public Schools
policy states. “The alternate meal
will be distributed to the student
before lunch to avoid the student
going through the serving line.”
Virginia outlawed the practice
earlier this year, barring school
districts from singling out students who can’t afford to pay for
lunch by making them do chores
or putting wristbands, stamps or
other markers on children. The
law effectively stops Virginia
public schools from serving alternate lunches, because that is
another way of singling kids out.
D.C. Public Schools also do not
serve alternate meals.
Many D.C. public schools give
all students free lunch because
the school’s student body meets
the high-poverty criteria, but
about a quarter of the city’s
schools still charge students and
have unpaid meal debt.
Districts are growing more
aggressive at sending letters,
emails and texts and calling parents when a child has a negative
balance, according to their policies, so that schools are not left
paying off the remaining debt at
the end of the school year.
School districts sometimes
withhold report cards or records
of students with outstanding
meal debt. Some districts allow
the debt to carry over from year
to year, while others don’t.
Schools are caught in a hard
place — they don’t want children
going hungry or feeling ashamed,
but they don’t have extra money
to cover the debts, and they want
to make sure parents who can
pay are paying.
The new tactic many districts
are employing is to aggressively
seek community donations to
help pay off student meal debt.
More than half of U.S. school
districts are now doing this, the
School Nutrition Association
found, and D.C.-area schools are
part of the trend.
The Montgomery County Public Schools Educational Foundation is trying to raise $300,000
for its “Dine With Dignity” campaign to wipe out lunch debt. The
foundation partnered with Starbucks to put information on how
to donate on Starbucks cups sold
at stores in the county.
“A gentleman walked up to me
in a Starbucks store to make a
donation because he said when
he grew up the alternate meal
was a peanut butter and jelly
sandwich, and to this day he can’t
eat one without feeling sad,” said
Yolanda Johnson Pruitt, executive director of the MCPS Educational Foundation. “Kids are entitled to their dignity in the lunch
line.”
Business owners and concerned parents are running fundraisers and GoFundMe campaigns to eliminate debt at their
local schools, part of a nationwide movement that took off in
2017 after New Mexico became
the first state to ban any form of
lunch shaming.
Katie Martin is head of the
Parent Teacher Student Association at West Frederick Middle
School in Maryland. As soon as
she heard about the lunch debt at
her child’s school, she launched a
GoFundMe campaign to wipe it
out. The effort has raised about
$500, which would cover only a
few months.
Black Flag Brewing Co. in
Columbia, Md., held a big party
on Dec. 23 and donated all proceeds from the event and a GoFundMe campaign to pay off
$47,000 of lunch debt in Howard
County Public Schools.
“Many people don’t even know
this debt exists here in Maryland,” said Brian Gaylor, the
brewery founder and an alumnus
of Howard County Public
Schools. “My teacher friends say
they see kids who can’t pay for
lunch every day.”
The problem is that the debts
come back every year. Ashley
D’Amico, who owns a real estate
investment company, paid off all
the lunch debt in Frederick County Public Schools before Christmas last year, but the debt is
back. The Frederick schools’ unpaid lunch balance is $8,000,
more than double what it was a
year ago.
While school district officials
acknowledge some parents are
forgetful or taking advantage of
the system, they estimate the vast
majority of the kids in debt are
from
financially
struggling
homes. They report a frequent
spike in debt payments every few
weeks as families living paycheck
to paycheck have money again.
The D.C. Council considered a
proposal to give free lunches to
all students, but the cost,
$2.5 million a year, was considered too high. Maryland passed
legislation to cover the costs of all
meals for kids who qualify for
reduced-price meals starting in
2023, but for now, debts keep
amassing.
“Maryland was willing to put
up lots of money to get Amazon.
We didn’t get Amazon, so we
should have some money to
spend to feed kids in our state,”
Wilson said.
heather.long@washpost.com
‘They destroyed me’: Wells Fargo’s mistake forced her to sell her home
For Arizonan and others,
bank’s efforts to ‘make
things right’ fall short
BY
R ENAE M ERLE
Michaela Christian lost a long
battle with Wells Fargo in 2013 to
save her Las Vegas home, a defeat
she says changed the course of
her life. When the bank refused to
modify her mortgage, Christian
moved in with a friend and
scrambled to rebuild her life.
Five years later, Wells Fargo
admitted it made a mistake.
Christian, 46, qualified for the
kind of mortgage help that might
have saved her home after all.
It is a mistake the giant bank
admits it made nearly 900 times
over several years, pushing hundreds of distressed homeowners
into foreclosure.
Christian said when she
learned of Wells Fargo’s error, “I
was sick to my stomach.”
“They destroyed me and destroyed my everything,” she said.
Wells Fargo’s admission comes
after cascade of lapses that increased scrutiny of the San
Francisco-based bank. Some
Democrats in Congress are calling for the ouster of its chief
executive, Tim Sloan. Over the
past two years, the bank paid
more than $1 billion in fines after
admitting it opened millions of
bogus accounts customers did
not want and then found itself in
more trouble after improperly
repossessing thousands of cars.
Critics have also jumped on
JOE BUGLEWICZ FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Michaela Christian outside of her current home in Lake Havasu City, Ariz., last month.
Wells Fargo’s decision to cut
26,000 jobs while it reaps the
benefits of a corporate tax cut
that is expected to boost its profits $3.7 billion this year.
The bank has repeatedly apologized for its missteps but is struggling to repair its image. Customers who lost their homes are
being offered compensation or
can enter mediation, company
officials say.
Wells Fargo says an internal
review found that the bank denied help to hundreds of homeowners after fees charged by foreclosure attorneys were improper-
ly used when the bank determined who would be offered
mortgage help. The computer error began in 2010 and was not
corrected until last April, the
bank said.
Overall, 870 homeowners were
denied help for which they qualified, including 545 who lost their
homes to foreclosure. Wells Fargo
says it has reached most of the
customers affected and set aside
$8 million to compensate them,
though industry analysts say that
number is likely to increase.
The revelation echoes the complaints of thousands of borrowers
in the years after the financial
crisis that banks were stingy
about offering help with borrowers’ exploding loans.
“Wells Fargo failed to maintain
its systems, failed to find problems when they occurred and
then masked the problem for
years,” said Alys Cohen, staff attorney for the National Consumer
Law Center.
Christian bought her home in
1998 when she was 24. At the
time, the three-bedroom home
was on the outskirts of a growing
Las Vegas. There weren’t a lot of
stores nearby, but Christian said
she loved the neighborhood. “In
the 15 years we were there, everything was perfect,” she said.
But in 2011, Christian lost her
job as a bartender as the economy
continued to sputter after the
global financial crisis. Then she
was in a car accident that left her
with a fractured pelvis and
crushed tibia. “I wasn’t even able
to walk for seven months,” she
said. “I couldn’t work.”
One of her first calls for help,
she said, was to Wells Fargo.
Christian asked the bank to defer
her more than $1,000 monthly
mortgage payment or lower the
7 percent mortgage interest rate
to the prevailing rate at the time,
about 4 percent, sharply lowering
her monthly payment.
“They said ‘Have a nice day’
and denied it,” she said.
A few months later, Christian
said, Wells Fargo began foreclosure proceedings against her.
With the help of her father, she
found a job that allowed her to
maneuver with a cane and spent
months searching for help, she
said. Christian said she even offered Wells Fargo an additional
$4,000 to make up for some of
her missed payments.
Ultimately, Christian said, she
faced what she considered an
unfathomable choice: Sell her
home or lose it in foreclosure.
“It was the last thing I wanted,”
she said. “I didn’t want to uproot
my son. He had grown up there.”
After a quick sale of the home,
Christian temporarily moved in
with a friend and then into an
apartment.
“I was in a daze,” Christian said
through tears. “I thought,
100 percent, I was going to be able
to save my home. I had my
finances in order. I could not for
the life of me figure out why they
wouldn’t refinance.”
The answer came in September
when Christian received a letter
and a $15,000 check from Wells
Fargo, admitting its mistake.
“We want to make things
right,” the letter states. “We realize that our decision impacted
you at a time you were facing a
hardship.”
Wells Fargo’s letter did not
explain how it determined Christian was due $15,000. After the
home was sold for $135,000 in
2013, Redfin now estimates it is
worth about $250,000. Christian
estimates she had already accumulated about $30,000 in equity
after making mortgage payments
for more than a decade. And that,
she said, doesn’t include the
$20,000 pool she had installed.
“You can’t put a price on what
we lost. The scars will be there
forever. I will never get over it,”
said Christian, now part of a
class-action lawsuit against the
bank. “I still miss my neighbors.”
Wells Fargo has declined to
discuss what, if any, formula it
has used to determine how much
each customer is owed. The compensation offered to each homeowner is based on “individual
circumstances,” said Tom Goyda,
a bank spokesman.
Wells Fargo worked extensively with Christian and “completed
multiple reviews in an effort to
find an option that would allow
her to keep the home,” Goyda
said.
Unfortunately, he said, the
bank was unsuccessful.
renae.merle@washpost.com
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2 , 2019
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
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WEDNESDAY Opinion
DANA MILBANK
WASHINGTON SKETCH
Don’t blame
me, says
another coward
O
ne by one they leap — or are pushed
— from the foundering USS Trump,
each offering a variation of the same
plea: Don’t blame me.
Comes now retired Gen. John F. Kelly, the
second of President Trump’s chiefs of staff to
be discarded. Days before departing, he
paused for a two-hour telephone interview
with the Los Angeles Times. It was an extended exercise in self-absolution.
Don’t blame him for Trump’s border-wall
obsession. “To be honest, it’s not a wall,” Kelly disclosed, insisting “we left a solid concrete wall early on in the administration.”
(A day after the interview was published,
Trump tweeted: “An all concrete Wall was
NEVER ABANDONED.”)
Don’t blame Kelly for Trump’s fabricated
“crisis” at the southern border. “If you want
to stop illegal immigration, stop U.S. demand for drugs and expand economic opportunity” in Central America, Kelly proposed.
Don’t blame him for Trump’s claims that
Hispanic immigrants spread violence and
drugs. “Illegal immigrants, overwhelmingly,
are not bad people,” Kelly said.
And don’t blame him for the travel ban or
the family separation policies, either. Rather, he argued, he should be judged for what
Trump didn’t do: withdraw from Syria and
Afghanistan (which he’s doing now), pull
troops out of South Korea or withdraw from
NATO (which remain uncertain).
Right. And if we judge success by things
that didn’t happen, we should also credit
Kelly for avoiding a zombie apocalypse.
Kelly served his country honorably for
decades. But there’s nothing courageous in
announcing, on the way out the door, that
he didn’t agree with many awful things
Trump did on his watch. There was, once, a
good argument that qualified people, by
taking administration jobs, could temper
Trump’s worst instincts. But it turned out
Trump was not to be tempered. Those who
disagreed with the madness had an obligation to resign, or at least to speak out — not
to wash their hands of responsibility after
the fact.
Don’t blame Rex Tillerson. The ousted
secretary of state recently told Bob Schieffer
of CBS News he reined in Trump by saying
“you can’t do it that way. It violates the law.
It violates a treaty.”
Don’t blame Jim Mattis. The former defense secretary waited until resigning to
publicly state his disagreements with
Trump over NATO, “malign actors” such as
Russia and “treating allies with respect.”
Don’t blame Reince Priebus. Trump’s first
chief of staff spoke up about Trump’s chaos
after he was ousted, telling author Chris
Whipple: “Take everything you’ve heard and
multiply it by 50.”
Don’t blame Nikki Haley. Trump’s former
ambassador to the United Nations, in a
parting shot, said “our opponents are not
evil. They’re just our opponents.”
Don’t blame Gary Cohn. The former economic adviser denounced Trump’s trade
war and defended the Federal Reserve’s
interest-rate policy against Trump’s criticism (“I don’t think he should make comments on any independent agency”).
Also, don’t blame Omarosa Manigault
Newman (she knew Trump was a racist but
took a job in his White House anyway) or
Michael Cohen (at his sentencing, the president’s former personal lawyer said his
“blind loyalty” to Trump led him to “cover
up his dirty deeds”) or Stephen K. Bannon
(after he departed the White House, the former top strategist suggested Donald Trump
Jr., Jared Kushner and Paul Manafort had
engaged in “treasonous” and “unpatriotic”
behavior) or Anthony Scaramucci (who now
brands Trump “an intentional liar”) or H.R.
McMaster (Trump’s second of three national
security advisers took issue with softness
toward Russia) or David Shulkin (fired amid
a scandal, he criticized Trump’s Veterans Affairs privatization plans).
The self-absolution extends into the
diaspora of Trump apologists. Departing
House Speaker Paul D. Ryan (R-Wis.) gave a
farewell speech denouncing the use of social
media to “play on anger” and “on people’s
fears.” Departing Sen. Orrin G. Hatch (RUtah), a Trump cheerleader, gave a farewell
speech lamenting the loss of “comity, compromise and mutual respect.” Rep. Mia Love
(R-Utah), in defeat, denounced Trump for
operating with “no real relationships, just
convenient transactions.”
Better late than never? Perhaps. Those
taking parting shots are certainly more honorable than those who, with nondisparagement agreements, get paid to defend Trump on the airwaves. The postemployment critics also compare favorably
with Mick Mulvaney, who called Trump a
“terrible human being” before becoming
Trump’s budget director and now acting
chief of staff.
But the after-the-fact criticism seems selfserving — a way for Trump enablers to rebuild their reputations and find new jobs.
Tucker Carlson, an unstinting Trump booster, used the anonymity of a Germanlanguage weekly to put on the record that he
questions Trump’s competence, knowledge,
self-aggrandizement and personnel choices.
Even Carlson, though, is braver than the
anonymous Trump official who wrote the
New York Times op-ed about efforts to sabotage Trump from within. How long before
the author emerges to claim credit — and
perhaps a book contract? Proposed title:
“Don’t blame me.”
Twitter: @Milbank
A better approach to ‘America First’
BY ANTONY J. BLINKEN
AND ROBERT KAGAN
F
oreign policy was the last thing
on voters’ minds in the midterm elections, but as we look
toward 2020, one thing is clear:
President Trump’s “America First” foreign policy — or its progressive cousin,
retrenchment — is broadly popular in
both parties. Trump’s recent decision
to withdraw all troops from Syria and
7,000 from Afghanistan has been condemned by Democrats and Republicans alike in Washington. But it is not
at all clear that Americans beyond the
Beltway are equally outraged.
The fact is, whatever tolerance most
Americans had for the global role the
United States embraced after World
War II began to fade with the collapse
of the Soviet Union and was shattered
by the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan
and the 2008 financial crisis. Whoever
wins office in 2020 will have a hard
time bucking a trend that preceded
Trump and will likely survive him.
Yet that president is going to face an
increasingly dangerous world that
looks more like the 1930s than the end
of history — with populists, nationalists
and demagogues on the rise; autocratic
powers growing in strength and increasingly aggressive; Europe mired in
division and self-doubt; and democracy
under siege and vulnerable to foreign
manipulation. Then there are the new
challenges of our own century — from
cyberwarfare to mass migration to a
warming planet — that no one nation
can meet alone and no wall can contain.
Doubling down on “America First,”
with its mix of nationalism, unilateralism and xenophobia, would only exacerbate these problems. But so would
embracing the alternative offered by
thinkers across the ideological spectrum who, concerned that our reach
exceeds our means, advise us to pull
back without considering the likely
consequences, as we did in the 1930s.
Back then, the result was an even
greater global conflagration. But after
World War II, when Americans stayed
engaged, built strong alliances with
fellow democracies, and shaped the
rules, norms and institutions for relations among nations, we produced unprecedented global prosperity, democracy and security from which Americans benefited more than anyone. It
wasn’t a perfect world, but it was far
better than the alternative.
So here is the challenge: Can we find
a foreign policy of responsible global
engagement that most Americans support, that draws the right lessons from
our past mistakes, that steers between
the equally dangerous shoals of confrontation and abdication, and that
understands the difference between
self-interest and selfishness? Such a
policy would rest on four pillars:
Preventive diplomacy
and deterrence
A responsible foreign policy seeks to
prevent crises or contain them before
they spiral out of control. That requires
a combination of active diplomacy and
military deterrence.
Successive administrations have
underfunded and undervalued our diplomacy, none more dangerously than
the present one. With a depleted senior
diplomatic corps and key posts still
unfilled, with cuts to foreign aid, with
tariffs targeted at our closest allies and
with confidence in U.S. leadership at a
nadir, we are depleting one of our
greatest assets: the ability to defuse
conflicts and mobilize others in collective action.
Most Americans do not know the
role our diplomats have played over
the decades in preventing wars between nuclear-armed nations such as
India and Pakistan; between Israel and
the Arab states; and between China
and Japan in the East China Sea. U.S.
diplomacy helped end the Cold War,
reunify Germany and build peace in
the Balkans. The United States led
others to begin addressing climate
change, to prevent the proliferation of
nuclear weapons, to fight the Ebola
epidemic, to confront the Islamic State
and to level economic playing fields.
Properly empowered, U.S. diplomacy
can save trillions of dollars and many
thousands of lives that would otherwise be spent responding to crises that
explode because we ignored problems
while they were still manageable.
As geopolitical competition intensifies, we must supplement diplomacy
with deterrence. Words alone will not
dissuade the Vladimir Putins and Xi
Jinpings of this world. Recognizing
their traditional imperial “spheres of
interest” will only embolden them to
expand farther while betraying the
sovereign nations that fall under their
dominion. Because we face real budget
constraints, we have to make tough
choices about how best to defend our
interests. We’ll have to strike the right
balance of modernization, readiness,
asymmetric capabilities and force
structure. Whatever formula we
choose, we must convince rivals and
adversaries that trying to achieve their
objectives by force will fail and that
they have more to gain through peaceful cooperation and economic development than through aggression.
What about our own use of force? In
the 1990s, we drove Saddam Hussein
HUSSEIN MALLA/ASSOCIATED PRESS
A U.S. armored vehicle near the front line in Manbij, Syria, in April 2018.
out of Kuwait, removed a drug-dealing
dictator in Panama, and brought peace
to the Balkans with minimal American
casualties; later we killed Osama bin
Laden. But the mistakes we made in
Iraq and Afghanistan — including bad
intelligence, misguided strategy and
inadequate planning for the day after
— have sapped support for projecting
American power.
Yet force can be a necessary adjunct
to effective diplomacy. In Syria, we
rightly sought to avoid another Iraq by
not doing too much, but we made the
opposite error of doing too little. Without bringing appropriate power to
bear, no peace could be negotiated,
much less imposed. Today we see the
consequences, in hundreds of thousands of civilians dead, in millions of
refugees who have destabilized Europe and in the growing influence of
Russia, Iran and Hezbollah. If the retreat from Syria announced by Trump
proceeds, we will likely see the return
of the Islamic State as well.
Going forward, we have to be judicious in our use of force; to focus on the
aftermath of war, as well as the war
itself; to involve allies; to work with
Congress and insist that it play its
constitutional role. Americans need to
know that if we use force, it has been
carefully thought out — and by more
than just a handful of officials. They
deserve to know what our objectives
are and to have reasonable confidence
that we can achieve them.
talism of modern autocracies. We
should use our market power to set the
highest standards for protecting workers, the environment, intellectual property and middle-class wages, while insisting on transparency and basic commercial reciprocity. In other words,
we’ll treat you the way you treat us.
We also need to stay ahead of the
competition in new technologies, especially artificial intelligence, which
will reshape the future global balance
of power. We cannot cede to China or
anyone else a technological sphere of
influence. To maintain our edge, we
must preserve the free flow of ideas
and international collaboration that
spark innovation, but we also need to
crack down on espionage, technology
transfer and intellectual property
theft. Our tech firms need to take more
responsibility for national security,
both in preventing foreign efforts to
manipulate our political system, and
protecting data and privacy. If they
won’t, government will.
Together, government and the private sector must renew investments in
our human resources — through affordable education, training, health
care, housing, infrastructure, and research and development — to help our
citizens weather the ups and downs of
the global economy and the uneven
effects of technological change. We
need budget and tax policies that put a
higher priority on these national requirements.
Trade and technology
Trump treats trade as a zero-sum
game where “winning” means making
more money than the other guy. Some
progressive critics see free trade as the
source of our greatest inequities.
The reality is more complex. It’s true
that global trade, along with rapid
technological change, is profoundly
disruptive. Managed improperly, it can
increase the gap between rich and
poor, and fuel fears that today’s jobs
will be lost tomorrow. But the fact is, 70
years of free trade also helped lift
hundreds of millions of people out of
poverty, and many into a global middle
class — which in turn helped produce
decades of peace and stability.
Americans have never backed away
from the challenges posed by competition and innovation. Trying to revive
the industrial economy of the 1950s is
impossible; nor should we embrace
the protectionism of the 1930s that
helped destroy the global economy and
hasten world war. When we pull out of
trade agreements, such as the Trans-Pacific Partnership, we hand a win
to countries such as China. If we opt
out, they will shape global trade and
innovation to their benefit, not ours.
We should insist on competing in a
rules-based system that protects our
people from the aggressive state capi-
Allies and institutions
The United States doesn’t have to
address these challenges or bear these
costs alone. After World War II, we
wisely advanced the security and prosperity of countries that shared our
interests, values and fears. Enlightened self-interest produced a community of democracies with new markets
for our products, new partners to help
meet global challenges and new allies
to deter aggression. That strategy produced victory in the Cold War. Turning
away from it invites defeat in the struggles that lie ahead. It’s no coincidence
that Russia has launched attacks
against two nations that are not members of NATO — but has yet to strike a
member of the alliance.
Today, the rise of an alternative, techno-authoritarian model of governance
is the principal threat to the community of democracies. Autocrats, fearing
democracy’s strength and appeal, have
weaponized the tools of social control
they use at home to sow division within
and among democracies.
To rally and protect ourselves, we
must adapt. Our alliances are out of
date in one key respect: The United
States has European allies and Asian
allies, but no institution links the
Asian and European democracies. As
China’s Belt and Road initiative draws
JABIN BOTSFORD/THE WASHINGTON POST
President Trump in the Oval Office on Nov. 27.
Asia, Europe and the Middle East closer together in ways that serve Beijing’s
interests, the democracies also need a
global perspective — and new institutions to forge a common strategic,
economic and political vision. Why
shouldn’t Germany and France work
with India and Japan on strategic issues? Such an organization — call it a
league of democracies or a democratic
cooperative network — would not just
address military security but also cybersecurity and other threats that democracies face today, from terrorism
to election interference.
Immigration and refugees
Finally, we have to contend with the
most divisive and destabilizing phenomenon in geopolitics: mass migration. There are more people forcibly on
the move around the globe — about
70 million — than at any time since
World War II.
Democracies have a right and obligation to control their borders, humanely. But as conflicts and economic,
political and climatic crises drive people from their homes, we are not going
to solve the problem with barbed wire
and bayonets. With allied democracies
struggling to cope with greater flows of
migrants and refugees, the United
States needs to lead, in our own interest, in addressing the causes and consequences of migration. That means
doing more, not less, to prevent conflict and help others to withstand migratory shocks, and to build strong and
resilient democratic institutions.
We must start in our own hemisphere. Today, out of $50 billion in
foreign and military assistance, about
$20 billion goes to the Middle East,
North Africa and South Asia. Roughly
$12 billion goes to sub-Saharan Africa.
Only $2 billion goes to Latin America
— and less than half of that to the
Northern Triangle countries — El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras. That
is not proportionate to our interests.
The answer is not throwing aid at
problems; we need to tie our increased
investments to genuine reforms in
governance, policing, judicial systems
and the economy while combating corruption. We also need to bolster our
neighbors’ economies by trading with
them, just as we did in Europe after
World War II.
Americans have been given a false
choice. Of course, we need to put
America first. But what does that
mean? Decades ago, we learned that to
advance America’s interests required
building and defending a more peaceful, prosperous and democratic world.
Nation-building at home and promoting the stability and success of others
go hand in hand.
We also learned that the world does
not govern itself. If the United States
abdicates its leading role in shaping
international rules and institutions —
and mobilizing others to defend them
— then one of two things will happen:
Some other power or powers will step
in and move the world in ways that
advance their interests and values, not
ours. Or, more likely, the world will
descend into chaos and conflict, and
the jungle will overtake us, as it did in
the 1930s.
We don’t need to make that mistake
a second time. For all the flaws of the
present world and the mistakes of our
nation, we should not lose sight of
what we have accomplished, and of
what the world will look like if the
United States, shortsightedly, forfeits
the future.
Antony J. Blinken served as U.S. deputy
secretary of state from 2015 to 2017 and
deputy national security adviser from 2013
to 2015. Robert Kagan is a senior fellow at
the Brookings Institution and a
contributing columnist for The Post. His
latest book is “The Jungle Grows Back:
America and Our Imperiled World.”
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letters@washpost.com
Speaking falsely
EDITORIALS
The irony of it all
Mr. Trump’s shutdown has shuttered immigration courts, leaving undocumented immigrants free indefinitely.
I
jammed: The backlog is now 1.1 million cases. That
means in the 11 days of the shutdown so far, thousands of cases have already been postponed.
Technically, those cases will be rescheduled for
three or four years from now. In fact, the backlog has
reached such gargantuan proportions that judges
are already double- and triple-booking future court
dates, like an airline overbooking flights, meaning
that many cases on the docket will inevitably be
postponed repeatedly. The dysfunction calls to
mind the famous New Yorker cartoon in which an
executive suggests: “No, Thursday’s out. How about
never—is never good for you?”
In many instances, a postponement’s effects are
more than administrative; they may impose real hardships. Take the example of undocumented immigrants
with clean records who have been in the United States
for more than a decade. An immigration judge may
exempt such immigrants from the risk of deportation
if they can show it would result in exceptional hardship for a spouse, parent or minor child who is a citizen
A necessary fox
for this henhouse?
or legal permanent resident. But that chance of relief is
lost if, owing to a case’s postponement, the immigrant’s child turns 21, or the parent or spouse dies.
Mr. Trump has poured scorn on the immigration
courts, variously suggesting that newly hired judges
would be crooked and that immigrants routinely fail
to appear for court hearings. In fact, there is zero
evidence for the former, and the latter claim has been
debunked: While many respondents do not show up
for hearings, a sizable majority of them do, especially
those represented by lawyers.
What distinguishes the Trump shutdown is that it
contravenes the president’s own long-standing insistence on a more rational and efficient immigration
system, as he himself defines it. A president who
attacks “catch and release” now embraces a policy that
ensures indefinite release. A president hungry for ever
more deportations now ensures that thousands of
would-be deportees get reprieves. And a president
who conjures migrant no-shows in courts manages to
close the courts entirely.
TOM TOLES
The nomination of a critic to oversee
Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac might
prompt a much-needed discussion.
A
HALLMARK OF President Trump’s administration so far has been to put certain
regulatory agencies under the control of
their longtime critics. Scott Pruitt got (and
later resigned from) the top job at the Environmental Protection Agency; Mick Mulvaney ran the
Consumer Financial Protection Bureau before giving way to his former aide Kathy Kraninger. On
Dec. 11, the president tapped Mark Calabria to run
the agency that not only regulates but also directly
operates the giant federal housing finance entities —
Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac — under a special law
designed to cope with the 2008 financial crisis. Mr.
Calabria, currently the chief economist for Vice
President Pence, has a long record of opposing not
only the way Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac do
business but also their very purposes.
Is this another fox-in-the-henhouse situation?
The liquidity that Fannie and Freddie provide — by
purchasing home loans and packaging them into
bonds for resale — enables lenders to provide a
30-year fixed-rate home loan. Mr. Calabria, a freemarket purist previously affiliated with the libertarian Cato Institute, has questioned the sustainability
of that mortgage product and, therefore, the propriety of having the federal taxpayer implicitly subsidize it. As director of the Federal Housing Finance
Agency (FHFA), Mr. Calabria would, at least on
paper, have wide power to reduce Fannie and
Freddie’s roles in mortgage support, a fact that
worries affordable-housing advocates and their allies on Capitol Hill. Sen. Mark R. Warner (Va.), a
Democrat on the Senate Banking Committee, has
already voiced “serious concerns” about Mr. Calabria’s nomination.
Nevertheless, to the extent Mr. Calabria is calling
for a fundamental reconsideration of two entities
which did, after all, collapse under stress at great
taxpayer expense, he is neither inherently wrong
nor, among housing experts, alone. There are real
constraints on the FHFA director’s ability to do
anything radically disruptive with his powers. Those
constraints are legal, economic and political; the
latter category includes the facts that the incoming
House Financial Services Committee chairwoman,
Maxine Waters (D-Calif.), is a strong defender of
Fannie and Freddie’s missions, and that Mr. Trump
himself would not be eager for a shock to housing
before the 2020 election. In any case, there are
bigger threats on the horizon: Wall Street investors
who own the two entities’ depressed stock continue
to agitate for a form of privatization that would
restore Fannie and Freddie to the pre-crisis status
quo, in which stockholders absorbed all the profits
and taxpayers were on the hook for excessive
risk-taking.
All sides in the housing policy debate should
A large share of antibiotics, including those
medically important to human health, are given to
food-producing animals. While it is proper for sick
animals, the industry practice for decades has also
been to use antibiotics so animals will grow faster
and larger on the same amount of feed, and for
prevention of disease in a whole herd or flock. The
agriculture industry defended these practices by
saying they were not the culprit in the rising tide of
resistance. But studies show key factors in resistance
are overuse and abuse of antibiotics on the farm, as
well as in human health. Farms and people do not
exist in a world apart but in a “linked ecosystem,” as
pointed out by a predecessor of Mr. Gottlieb,
Commissioner Donald Kennedy, in 1977.
The Obama administration proposed that manufacturers stop selling antibiotics for growth promotion and that veterinary oversight be strengthened
for other uses. The FDA data now shows the fruits of
this wise step. There was a 33 percent decline
between 2016 and 2017 in domestic sales and
remember that Mr. Calabria’s nomination would not
be such a potential watershed, and might not have
occurred at all, if Congress had acted years ago on
previous bipartisan proposals to replace Fannie and
Freddie and to limit federal exposure to housing
risk. If putting Mr. Calabria in charge of Fannie and
Freddie would indeed endanger housing, the way to
avoid the danger is to end federal control through a
balanced, sustainable and permanent legislative fix
to the system. From the Trump administration, the
Calabria nomination is a provocative move, but if it
provokes serious discussion about the most important unfinished business of the financial crisis, it
may prove to be a positive move as well.
distribution of all medically important antimicrobials for use in food-producing animals — and a drop
of 43 percent since 2015. There are still some
unknowns in the data, which reflects sales and
distribution, not actual use. More research and data
are needed. Still, the trend does seem to herald a new
direction and fresh thinking about the problem.
Importantly, change is being driven by the market
and consumers. Fast-food outlets such as McDonald’s are demanding meat with less use of antibiotics. Also, there are signs of greater consensus. In an
impressive joint effort, major food companies, retailers, livestock producers, and trade and professional associations announced Dec. 18 a comprehensive “framework” aimed at strengthening stewardship of antibiotic use in food animals, the result of a
two-year discussion moderated by the Pew Charitable Trusts and the Farm Foundation. While much
more needs to be done to protect antibiotics for
future generations, having so many players at the
table is a great first step.
ABCDE
L O CA L O P I N I O N S
FREDERICK J. RYAN JR., Publisher and Chief Executive Officer
Baltimore suffers from a vacuum of accountability
The Dec. 28 front-page article “Murder with impunity: Baltimore’s ‘open season’ ” neglected three major issues relating to the horrific
murder problem in Baltimore:
• The lack of outrage by Baltimore’s political leadership regarding the problem. We do not
hear calls for action to solve the
problem from the political leadership there, even when we see
3-year-olds being shot. This lack
of outrage and action equates to
tolerance of the problem.
• Similarly, we don’t see outrage on the part of Baltimore residents to hold the
political leadership accountable.
• The legal system also plays a huge part in the
The concept of a land wall between the United
States and Mexico to control the flow of refugees and
illegal immigrants is just stupid. And foolish. If
realized, it would only increase the cost in human
lives, suffering and government spending while
spreading the problem it seeks to diminish.
There are 1,954 miles of continental border between the nations. According to the official National
Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration estimate,
there are 95,471 miles of shoreline in the United
States.
For those lacking historical perspective, it is
instructive to note that the original inhabitants of
the Americas millennia ago rapidly peopled the
continents by following shorelines. Would a landlocked wall have stopped Europeans from flooding
into what is now the United States beginning in
1492? Would it have stopped the Cuban refugees
from reaching the United States in the mid-20th
century? Would any physical wall protect Europe
from the incursion of refugees who come by sea from
the Middle East and Africa?
While you can go over or under any wall, you can
simply go around this one. On this issue, as on some
others, the president and his supporters are simply
foolish.
Bruce Milhans, Fredericksburg, Va.
Has the GOP no decency?
Progress is being made in restricting antibiotic use in animal agriculture.
V
The Dec. 31 front-page Fact Checker column,
“Trump averaged 15 false statements a day in 2018,”
noted that President Trump has made more than
7,600 untrue claims in 2018. I appreciate not only the
big picture but also the specific falsehoods named
and how frequently and when they were made.
Many of Mr. Trump’s false claims related to
immigration and were intended to boost his demand
for a southern border wall. Mr. Trump’s misstatements are startling in their lack of basis in reality,
according to various studies by the State Department, the Department of Homeland Security, and
Customs and Border Protection.
Let’s keep in mind that his falsehoods are preventing hundreds of thousands of government workers
from doing their jobs or forcing them to do their jobs
without pay. They have to pay their bills. Their
services affect millions of Americans.
What part of a president’s fitness to do the job am
I missing here?
Ruth Salinger, Bethesda
Regarding the Dec. 30 news article “Living
paycheck to paycheck: A common struggle”:
I empathize with my hardworking fellow citizens
who struggle to make ends meet. I was shocked
when Rep. Scott Perry (R-Pa.) seemed oblivious to
our struggles, demanding to know, “Who’s living that
they’re not going to make it to the next paycheck?”
Surely the salaries of Congress and the president
should be included as part of the shutdown. Regarding the leadership of the two branches of government, it’s debatable whether their services are
“essential” to a working democracy. Perhaps the
delay of a paycheck or two would spur them to find a
solution quicker than they are currently.
Heidi Marohn, Takoma Park
Saving the miracle drugs
ERY PROMISING news about antibiotic use
in farm animals has come from the Food and
Drug Administration. The problem of resistance — the tendency of bacteria to fight
back against antibiotic drugs — has been growing
for decades, fueled by overuse and misuse of antibiotics in human health, as well as widespread and
often indiscriminate use in farm animals. But new
data shows the use of antibiotics in animal agriculture has taken a marked downward turn.
As FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb noted
Dec. 18, this is a costly public-health problem, with
an estimated 2 million Americans suffering from
antibiotic-resistant infections every year, leading to
23,000 deaths. Mr. Gottlieb correctly pointed out
that it is impossible to outrace resistance, but efforts
must be made to “slow its pace and reduce its impact
on both human and animal health.” Otherwise,
antibiotics, the “miracle drugs” of the 20th century,
will become useless, and a foundation of modern
medicine could crumble.
JANUARY 2 , 2019
LE TTE R S TO TH E E D I TOR
AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER
N THE name of securing the border and keeping
out illegal immigrants, President Trump has
opted for a partial government shutdown. Irony
of ironies, that shutdown has paralyzed the
nation’s immigration courts, shuttering many of
them and allowing several hundred undocumented
immigrants to dodge deportation orders each day the
shutdown continues. They are among many hundreds of others whose cases will be postponed for
years — or, in effect, indefinitely — for every day the
closure lasts.
Those are among the more perverse effects of the
Trump shutdown, which has resulted in many of the
nation’s roughly 400 immigration judges receiving
furlough orders, barring them from coming to work
or hearing cases. (Judges who handle cases involving
detained migrants in Department of Homeland Security custody remain at work, but not those handling non-detained migrants, whose cases are more
numerous.)
The immigration courts are already massively
. WEDNESDAY,
problem. It is not uncommon to see young people with
repeated gun offenses (often three or four) placed
back on the streets after being
arrested. For the acting police
commissioner to cite a 10 percent
drop in homicides in 2018 as a
positive stride is like saying a
student increased a grade on an
exam from 20 percent to 30 percent. It’s still a failing grade.
Both the political leadership
and the entire community must
come together and chart a course
to resolve this problem. Currently, we see a vacuum of accountability and an unwillingness to solve the problem.
Where is the outrage from
Baltimore’s political
leadership about a horrific
murder problem?
Tom Jurkowsky, Annapolis
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Regarding the Dec. 30 news article “Trump calls
deaths of immigrant children ‘fault’ of Democrats”:
The stone-cold Republican silence after a presidential tweet blaming the deaths of two children on
his political opponents notifies us there will be no
“Have you no sense of decency?” moment from
congressional Republicans or administration officials in the year ahead.
Who deserves a sharper rebuke? A callous president so desperate for reelection he morphs dead
children into pawns for attempted political advantage? Or his congressional and administrative enablers, who continuously look away from inhumanity masquerading as government policy? Legislators willing to ignore the undermining of moral,
ethical and institutional norms to secure tax cuts for
corporations and weaken the Consumer Financial
Protection Bureau?
On Broadway in 1924, a new play by Maxwell
Anderson and Laurence Stallings asked “What Price
Glory?” In refusing to stand up to a president who
scorns facts, briefing books and now children who
lose their lives fleeing violence, Republicans have
given Americans their answer.
Maryellen Donnellan, Falls Church
No friend to the animals
The Dec. 28 Metro article “Goodlatte blocks bill
protecting the abused” reported on the maneuvers
of outgoing House Judiciary Committee Chairman
Bob Goodlatte (R-Va.) to block a bill that would help
Native American women who are victims of domestic violence.
He also blocked a bill that would stop the most
egregious acts of animal cruelty, including bestiality. That bill, the Preventing Animal Cruelty and
Torture Act, was introduced by former House
Judiciary Committee chairman Lamar Smith (RTex.) and Rep. Ted Deutch (D-Fla.). It had an
incredible 284 co-sponsors in the House and passed
the Senate by unanimous consent.
But the bill didn’t move in the House because
Mr. Goodlatte had a fit when Majority Leader Kevin
McCarthy (R-Calif.) put it on the “suspension
calendar” for floor action, and Mr. Goodlatte vowed
to never let it pass.
We never heard any substantive reason for
Mr. Goodlatte’s opposition. He has a history of
opposing just about every kind of animal-welfare
reform, even bills that nearly every other lawmaker
supports. Humane policies will benefit with
Mr. Goodlatte’s departure from Congress.
Holly Gann, Washington
The writer is director of federal affairs
for Animal Wellness Action.
Person of the year
The Dec. 31 National Digest item “Armed man
headed to church is arrested” reported, “Seguin
[Tex.] police say a passerby who saw the man Sunday
notified authorities.” This unnamed person who
heeded the call to, “when you see something, say
something” is my nomination for person of the
year. Who can say what carnage the person may have
prevented by this courageous act when this passerby
saw a man wearing police tactical-style clothing who
later said he was on his way to a church to fulfill “a
prophecy”?
Beatrice Fitch, Bethesda
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2 , 2019
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A13
RE
MEGAN MCARDLE
DAVID IGNATIUS
Blame the
Internet for
the Trumps
of the world
A look into
the crystal
ball for
Jan. 1, 2020
S
B
o here we are at 2019. In the two
years since Donald Trump’s unexpected victory, everyone seems
to have developed a strong theory about what’s wrong with modern
politics. It could be the economic decline of the white working class — or
maybe, less charitably, the problem is
the white working class’s incorrigible
racism. Others prefer to blame immigration, political correctness or simply
the overweening arrogance of America’s self-appointed mandarin class.
Proponents of these explanations
can point to compelling evidence. But
that evidence conceals the same fatal
flaw in each story: the attempt to
explain a novel phenomenon by way of
some long-term factor that hasn’t
changed, or else to explain a global
phenomenon in terms of some local
peeve.
American racism, for example, is the
left’s favorite explanation for the rise of
Trump. Columbia University sociologist
Musa Al-Gharbi has pointed out a
number of flaws in this thesis, the most
glaring of which is that the United
States has been racist for a long time
and much more racist in the past than
now — but now is when America
elected Trump.
You might argue that it took a novel
event to fan the embers of the nation’s
latent racism — something like, say, the
presidency of Barack Obama.
But that argument only briefly satisfies, because Trumpish leaders seem
increasingly popular throughout the
world. Rodrigo Duterte in the Philippines, Jair Bolsonaro in Brazil, Viktor
Orban in Hungary — it’s hard to argue
that all those voters, of different races,
languages and cultures, were identically unnerved by the sight of Obama in
the Oval Office.
In fact, it’s hard to argue that any
flavor of American identity politics can
explain what has become a global
phenomenon: the collapse of the formerly liberal left into two wings, one
increasingly socialist, the other increasingly identity-focused; and the displacement of the formerly liberal right
by unapologetically nativist, protectionist and populist upstarts.
Trying to detect a hidden order
behind the rise of Trumpish figures
around the world might be as pointless
as a child’s search for faces in the
clouds. But there’s a good chance that
they really are linked. To find out how
that happened will require letting go of
local grievances and starting to look for
the global thread that ties together such
distant, disparate characters.
The most obvious candidate is the
global financial crisis of 2008, which
was certainly widespread, and offers
eerie parallels with 1930s Europe. But
that explanation doesn’t quite work,
because the crisis wasn’t the same
everywhere — World Bank statistics on
per-capita gross domestic product
show that Brazil and the Philippines
were relatively unscathed.
Perhaps the most compelling answer
is that the Internet, and particularly
social media, is disrupting politics the
way it has disrupted everything else —
nearly everywhere, and all at once. No,
I’m not talking about Russians buying
Facebook ads. I’m talking about something much deeper and more pervasive.
It’s striking that two of the 20th century’s periods of greatest political upheaval followed the arrival of a revolutionary communications technology —
the 1930s were preceded by the spread of
radio, the 1960s by the arrival of television. Both mediums fundamentally
changed people’s relationship with information, and in the process, radio and
television necessarily altered politics.
Many of the explanations for what’s
going on in politics ultimately describe
a product of this sort of technological
change. Take mass immigration, which
conservatives love to blame for inflaming a populist revolt. By making it
easier to stay in touch with family back
home, the Internet and cellphones have
dramatically lowered the emotional
cost of migration. They’ve also made it
easy to disseminate successful strategies for evading border controls or to
recruit new migrants, as the recent
migrant caravan from Central America
reportedly did, on Facebook and WhatsApp.
The Internet also let candidates such
as Trump rail against those migrants.
He has no trouble finding a platform
now, but it’s hard to see how he could
have gotten there without social media
to turn him into a one-man broadcasting station. One can’t really imagine
him writing a serious book such as
Barry Goldwater’s “The Conscience of a
Conservative”; devoting a substantial
portion of his own fortune to a political
campaign, a la Ross Perot; or spending
patient decades building up a grassroots organization, as Ronald Reagan
did.
The nice thing about this theory of
the Internet’s influence in politics is
that it offers a global explanation.
What’s less nice is that it probably
means more convulsions until societies
have fully processed the technological
shift: 2019 is apt to look like 2018, only
more so.
Twitter: @asymmetricinfo
Contrast it with Trump’s disparagement
of federal workers. Kennedy asked;
Kennedy asked not. Presidents have
measured themselves against him ever
since.
Not Trump, though. He is a rhetorical
pratfall. His soul is dark. His vision is to
shrink the traditional American spirit.
He offers the world no moral leadership
and slaps the back of authoritarians such
as Vladimir Putin. He lies with every
breath — not because he must, as
Eisenhower did about the downing of
Francis Gary Powers in his U-2 spy plane
— because it’s the easier course. There’s
not a parent out there who wants his or
her child to be like Trump.
Trump’s one certain achievement will
be to leave his successor an America that
will become greater just by his leaving
office. A president who does not lie, who
does not try to buy the silence of a porn
star, who makes his taxes public, who
leaves moneymaking behind, who does
not turn his political party into a
beer-hall collection of ideological goons,
who rages at the murder of a journalist
by a foreign country, who respects the
importance of a free press . . . such a
president will make America greater just
by showing up.
Now, though, as I pass the White
House, it looks sad, the home of a
hoarder — lies and scandals and crimes
spilling out of the closets and Trump
tweeting some inanity. It’s a madhouse
that I’ve conjured. It’s a madman we’ve
elected.
ill Safire, the late, great New
York Times columnist, made a
tradition over 35 years of publishing a year-end “office pool,”
a multiple-choice quiz in which, as he
liked to say, “every reader becomes a
pundit” because nobody knows the
right answers.
The office pool died with Safire in
2009, but perhaps readers will enjoy
speculating about what might animate
the President’s Daily Brief a year hence,
on Jan. 1, 2020. Remember, your guesses are as good as mine (and those of any
sources who may have wandered my
way).
1. As North Korean leader Kim Jong
Un prepares his 2020 New Year’s address, his big challenge will be: (a)
finding a thesaurus with more adjectives
to praise President Trump for canceling
U.S. military exercises; (b) planning a
high-speed railway line between Seoul
and Pyongyang, despite protests from
the United States; (c) finding a graceful
way to remove spy chief Kim Yong Chol
as the channel to the United States and
have someone else talk with envoy Steve
Biegun; (d) avoiding military incidents
at sea and in the air with U.S. and
Japanese forces.
2. By the end of 2019, Saudi Crown
Prince Mohammed bin Salman will:
(a) take the additional title of prime
minister and declare elections for a
Saudi parliament; (b) hand over day-today power to Minister of State Musaed
al-Aiban, who promises to rescue collapsing investment in Saudi Arabia;
(c) go into exile at a Seychelles Islands
resort owned by Crown Prince Mohammed bin Zayed of Abu Dhabi; (d) hold a
secret meeting with Iranian leaders in
Oman — with Russian sponsorship —
to discuss terms for regional stability.
3. Chinese President Xi Jinping’s
biggest problem in 2019 will be: (a) fallout from the life imprisonment of his
corrupt former spy chief, Ma Jian; (b)
publication abroad of Xi phone calls
tapped by Liang Ke, who headed Beijing’s state security bureau until 2014;
(c) a liquidity squeeze caused by slowing trade and rising debt; (d) a military
showdown in the Taiwan Strait as
Beijing tries to pressure Taiwan to
abandon its quasi-independent “status
quo.”
4. The biggest headache for Iran’s
Ayatollah Ali Khamenei in 2019 will
be: (a) sustaining a deteriorating economy made worse by harsh U.S. sanctions; (b) waging covert wars in Syria
and Yemen without direct conflict with
Israel or Saudi Arabia; (c) spurning
Trump’s eagerness for a new nuclear
deal without boosting national security adviser (and Iran hawk) John
Bolton’s arguments for regime change;
(d) staying healthy enough at 79,
despite his prostate cancer, to celebrate his 80th birthday in July 2019
and his 30 years as autocratic supreme
leader.
5. By 2020, the United States will be
locked in a global arms race featuring:
(a) hypersonic missiles that can travel
more than five times the speed of
sound and turn aircraft carriers into
sitting ducks; (b) maneuverable “killer
satellites” that can destroy communications, surveillance and commandand-control systems in space; (c) autonomous submarines, surface ships,
drones, land vehicles and missiles that
can be hidden in peacetime and activated for surprise attacks as combat
begins; (d) lasers that can disable or
destroy satellites, planes, surface ships
and other weapons; (e) all of the above.
6. As a result of the continuing
Brexit mess, in 2019: (a) Britain crashes out of the European Union without a
deal, triggering chaotic border conditions and a recession in Britain and
Europe; (b) Parliament calls a second
referendum, which brings victory for
“Remain” but also continued policy
paralysis and growing domestic unrest; (c) Russia exploits European
chaos by attacking Ukraine and creating a breakaway ministate in the east;
(d) France and Germany lead a new
European military alliance under a
French “nuclear umbrella.”
7. The Democratic candidate leading
in public opinion polls on Dec. 31, 2019,
will be: (a) Joe Biden, who promises to
nominate former Homeland Security
secretary Jeh Johnson as vice president; (b) Beto O’Rourke, whose campaign is boosted by a barnstorming
country-music band headed by cable
TV host Joe Scarborough; (c) Kamala
D. Harris, who gains the endorsements
of Michelle Obama, Elizabeth Warren
and Hillary Clinton; (d) Amy Klobuchar, who runs on a platform of “Make
America Smart Again.”
8. On New Year’s Day 2020, the
status of President Trump will be:
(a) impeached by the House for “high
crimes and misdemeanors” but acquitted by the Senate; (b) resigned to
return to his first love of real estate;
(c) rejected by a unanimous Supreme
Court in his effort to block grand-jury
access to evidence gathered by deposed
special counsel Robert S. Mueller III;
(d) holding steady at 35 percent public
approval.
My answers: (1) b; (2) d; (3) c; (4) d;
(5) e; (6) b and d; (7) b; (8) d.
cohenr@washpost.com
Twitter: @IgnatiusPost
CHARLES DHARAPAK/ASSOCIATED PRESS
The presidential seal is placed on a lectern in the White House briefing room in August 2014.
How a president shapes
the public character
BY
M ITT R OMNEY
T
he Trump presidency made a
deep descent in December.
The departures of Defense
Secretary Jim Mattis and
White House Chief of Staff John
F. Kelly, the appointment of senior
persons of lesser experience, the abandonment of allies who fight beside us,
and the president’s thoughtless claim
that America has long been a “sucker”
in world affairs all defined his presidency down.
It is well known that Donald
Trump was not my choice for the
Republican presidential nomination.
After he became the nominee, I hoped
his campaign would refrain from
resentment and name-calling. It did
not. When he won the election, I
hoped he would rise to the occasion.
His early appointments of Rex Tillerson, Jeff Sessions, Nikki Haley, Gary
Cohn, H.R. McMaster, Kelly and Mattis were encouraging. But, on balance, his conduct over the past two
years, particularly his actions last
month, is evidence that the president
has not risen to the mantle of the
office.
It is not that all of the president’s
policies have been misguided. He was
right to align U.S. corporate taxes
with those of global competitors, to
strip out excessive regulations, to
crack down on China’s unfair trade
practices, to reform criminal justice
and to appoint conservative judges.
These are policies mainstream Republicans have promoted for years.
But policies and appointments are
only a part of a presidency.
To a great degree, a presidency
shapes the public character of the
nation. A president should unite us
and inspire us to follow “our better
angels.” A president should demonstrate the essential qualities of honesty and integrity, and elevate the national discourse with comity and
mutual respect. As a nation, we have
been blessed with presidents who
have called on the greatness of the
American spirit. With the nation so
divided, resentful and angry, presidential leadership in qualities of
character is indispensable. And it is in
this province where the incumbent’s
shortfall has been most glaring.
The world is also watching. America has long been looked to for leadership. Our economic and military
strength was part of that, of course,
but our enduring commitment to
principled conduct in foreign relations, and to the rights of all people to
freedom and equal justice, was even
more esteemed. Trump’s words and
actions have caused dismay around
the world. In a 2016 Pew Research
Center poll, 84 percent of people in
Germany, Britain, France, Canada
and Sweden believed the American
president would “do the right thing in
world affairs.” One year later, that
number had fallen to 16 percent.
This comes at a very unfortunate
time. Several allies in Europe are
experiencing political upheaval. Several former Soviet satellite states are
rethinking their commitment to democracy. Some Asian nations, such as
the Philippines, lean increasingly
toward China, which advances to
rival our economy and our military.
The alternative to U.S. world leadership offered by China and Russia is
autocratic, corrupt and brutal.
The world needs American leadership, and it is in America’s interest to
provide it. A world led by authoritarian regimes is a world — and an
America — with less prosperity, less
freedom, less peace.
To reassume our leadership in
world politics, we must repair failings
in our politics at home. That project
begins, of course, with the highest
office once again acting to inspire and
unite us. It includes political parties
promoting policies that strengthen us
rather than promote tribalism by
exploiting fear and resentment. Our
leaders must defend our vital institutions despite their inevitable failings:
a free press, the rule of law, strong
churches, and responsible corporations and unions.
We must repair our fiscal foundation, setting a course to a balanced
budget. We must attract the best
talent to America’s service and the
best innovators to America’s economy.
America is strongest when our
arms are linked with other nations.
We want a unified and strong Europe,
not a disintegrating union. We want
stable relationships with the nations
of Asia that strengthen our mutual
security and prosperity.
I look forward to working on these
priorities with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) and other
senators.
Furthermore, I will act as I would
with any president, in or out of my
party: I will support policies that I
believe are in the best interest of the
country and my state, and oppose
those that are not. I do not intend to
comment on every tweet or fault. But
I will speak out against significant
statements or actions that are divisive, racist, sexist, anti-immigrant,
dishonest or destructive to democratic institutions.
I remain optimistic about our future. In an innovation age, Americans
excel. More importantly, noble instincts live in the hearts of Americans. The people of this great land
will eschew the politics of anger and
fear if they are summoned to the
responsibility by leaders in homes, in
churches, in schools, in businesses, in
government — who raise our sights
and respect the dignity of every child
of God — the ideal that is the essence
of America.
The writer, a Republican from Utah and
the party’s 2012 nominee for president,
will be sworn into the U.S. Senate on
Thursday.
RICHARD COHEN
The madness at 1600 Pennsylvania Ave.
I
drove past the White House the
other day. It had been a while, and
the place seemed smaller, somewhat
tawdry, almost haunted. I imagined
bats winging in and out, spider webs in
the corners, and the president upstairs in
the family quarters, talking back to the
TV, railing against Nancy Pelosi, the
Federal Reserve, Robert S. Mueller III,
Emmanuel Macron, Theresa May, Jim
Mattis, Jeff Sessions, Stormy Daniels and
. . . who am I forgetting? Oh, yes, Barack
Obama for, well, everything.
The car slowed. I thought I heard a
wail from the upper floor: President
Trump going mad.
Or maybe I am. I would not be surprised. Trump has that effect on people.
It’s hard to believe we’re into another year
and he’s still the president of the United
States. The shock of it has not worn off. He
has never achieved normalcy. Often, when
I see him on TV, I react with a kind of
nausea: Him! How? I know, the electoral
college. I know, a slice of three states. Yes,
yes, but how did we elect such a dummy,
such a liar, such a baby, such a fool, such a
dirty man? He walks the same halls
Abraham Lincoln did. He sleeps where
the Roosevelts did. He bathes where the
visiting Winston Churchill did. Would
Churchill have ever visited this president?
Trump has soiled America. He has not
made it greater but, in a word, whose
need is now apparent, worser. The America that previous presidents boasted
about — Ronald Reagan’s “shining city on
a hill” — is now a slum among nations.
The goodness of the American people,
another refrain of presidents past, is now
a mere memory. But American goodness
was always like the banner that tour
guides held up: Follow me. Follow the
United States because we saved Europe
from the Nazis and Asia from Imperial
Japan — and then Europe again, this
time from the Stalinist thugs of Soviet
communism. We saved Berlin with an
airlift and eradicated polio with a vaccine. We thought we were good people.
We thought we were great people.
Trump wants to make America great
again. It is an old presidential refrain.
John F. Kennedy used it over and over
again in his 1960 campaign against
Richard M. Nixon. “This is a great
country,” he’d say. “But I think it could be
a greater country . . . I think it’s time
America started moving again.”
The amazing thing is that the previous
administration had been Dwight
D. Eisenhower’s. Looking back now, that
era is known for a kind of kitschy
middle-class affluence: the huge cars,
the creep of suburbia, the martinis of
“Mad Men” and, in general, a sense that
things were pretty good — for white men
in particular. But, overall, with no war
and a thriving economy, things may
never have been better.
The reason the brief Kennedy presidency still shines — despite the steady
involvement in Vietnam and the messiness of his private life — is not just his
image of high glamour but the urgency
of his rhetoric. His call to follow his own
example, his call to do good, his call to
government service was compelling.
A14
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
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. WEDNESDAY,
JANUARY 2 , 2019
Important steps to take if the government shutdown is paralyzing you financially
Many federal
workers living
paycheck to
paycheck haven’t
yet felt an income
shock because of
Michelle
the partial
Singletary government
shutdown.
THE COLOR
Most federal
OF MONEY
employees
received their last
checks based on time worked
before the shutdown began the
night of Dec. 21. Some, who were
required to work the Saturday
following the shutdown — the
last day of the pay period —
weren’t paid for one day,
according to Tony Reardon,
national president of the National
Treasury Employees Union.
But if the shutdown continues
into the next pay cycle and
paychecks aren’t retroactively
restored, many people will face
extreme hardship.
As we get further into January,
“it is going to get dramatically
worse,” Reardon said.
Already, this political tug-ofwar has harmed government
contractors and people working
in businesses that cater to and
depend on money from federal
employees. Much of the lost
revenue and wages won’t be
recovered.
A 2015 study for the National
Bureau of Economic Research
looked at the impact of the 2013
federal government shutdown.
The pay of a typical affected
worker was 40 percent below
normal. The government was
closed Oct. 1-16, which included
four days of the previous federal
pay period, according to the
report. By the next pay period,
however, employees were back at
work and were reimbursed for
the wages they lost while
furloughed.
But look how little people had
prepared for such a financial
emergency.
“Many affected workers
maintained low levels of liquid
assets (checking and saving
account balances), especially in
the days just before their regular
paychecks arrive,” the study
found. “Prior to the shutdown,
the median worker . . . held an
average liquid assets balance
sufficient to cover just eight days
of average spending.”
A disruption in your income
can create a paralyzing situation.
If you’re affected by the
shutdown, you need to act fast.
Here are moves to make when
your paycheck is stopped.
Talk to your landlord or
lender. I was stunned to see that
the Office of Personnel
Management posted a sample
letter to government workers
suggesting that they barter for
rent reductions. OPM proposed
that people offer to perform
maintenance such as painting or
carpentry work in exchange for a
rent break due to being
furloughed.
OPM pulled that letter, saying
it was released by mistake. The
agency said it was a letter from
the 2013 shutdown. Whenever it
was written, it was an idiotic
recommendation. Professionally
run rental complexes typically
have staff or contractors who
maintain their properties.
Nonetheless, OPM is right in
encouraging employees to
immediately contact their
landlords and explain their
situation. Find out what, if any,
relief you can get.
If you have a mortgage, call
your lender. Ask about deferring
January’s payment if you don’t
have enough in savings. Get a
clear understanding of your
options and any fees that may still
be imposed.
OPM has posted two sensible
template letters that you can use
to try to get concessions in
writing. Personalize them with
your individual information. Go
to OPM and click the link on the
homepage that says “Funding
Lapse.” On the information page,
look for “Sample Letters for
Creditors and Mortgage
Companies.”
Call your creditors. Don’t
wait until you’ve missed a check
to see what reprieve you can get
from any credit bills due in
January. Also ask that the credit
card company not report you as
late, which can significantly ding
your credit history.
Delay debt reduction. Until
the shutdown is over, just make
your minimum payments if you
aren’t able to delay a payment.
You need to preserve your cash.
Concentrate on covering essential
expenses.
Cut back on nonessentials
now. There’s reason to hope the
shutdown won’t last much longer,
but what if it does? I see a lot of
budgets, and many people living
paycheck to paycheck are paying
$200 to $300 a month for their
cable and Internet packages.
Before January’s bill comes due,
cut back on your service. You
probably should do this anyway.
I fully understand that many
workers are barely able to pay for
basic needs — food, rent, utilities,
etc. So having excess cash just
sitting in a savings account isn’t
doable. As Reardon pointed out,
we should show some empathy
for people living paycheck to
paycheck. They don’t need to be
shamed.
At the same time, there are
workers — you know who you are
— who can afford to live on less so
that they can save more. For all of
us, the shutdown is a reminder of
how essential it is to have an
emergency fund.
michelle.singletary@washpost.com
With parks unsupervised, fears of long-term damage grow
PARKS FROM A1
between President Trump and
Congress over funding for a
U.S.-Mexico border wall, is now
well into its second week, with no
resolution in sight. Democrats,
who take control of the House on
Thursday, plan to vote on a bill to
open much of the government
while denying Trump money for
the wall. The president, in a tweet
on Tuesday, rejected the legislation, which would provide money
for border security but nothing
for the wall.
One of the most dramatic repercussions of the shutdown will
arrive Wednesday, when the
Smithsonian Institution, having
depleted temporary funding, will
close all of its museums and the
National Zoo.
Some parks across the country
have remained partially operational with state funding. Contingency plans adopted by the National Park Service last year have
allowed many national parks to
remain accessible, but without
staffing. The result is that
“closed” parks are essentially
wide open. In some cases, that
gives them a Wild West vibe.
The Park Service runs a constellation of parks, monuments,
battlefields and historical sites.
At Antietam National Battlefield
in Maryland, the visitor center
has a notice on the front door
advising people “to use extreme
caution if choosing to enter” park
property. On the hallowed
ground, where the federal Army
of the Potomac collided with the
rebel Army of Northern Virginia
in the bloodiest day in American
military history, the flagpole in
front of the visitor center remains
conspicuously bare.
The access road to Maryland’s
Great Falls of the Potomac, part
of C & O Canal National Historical Park, has been blocked. At
midday Tuesday, hundreds of
cars were lined up on nearby
neighborhood roads and streets
as people walked into the park,
many taking advantage of the
canal towpath, which remains
unblocked.
The situation is fluid: Rumors
spread Monday that Joshua Tree
would close the campgrounds,
though the Park Service’s contingency plan indicates that campers will be allowed to stay.
Some advocates for the parks
aren’t happy about this situation,
fearing that visitors will do permanent damage to the parks and
disrupt
fragile
ecosystems.
They’d like to see the parks fully
closed.
“The parks are supposed to be
heritage sites for generation after
generation. I would rather they
PHOTOS BY STUART W. PALLEY FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
ABOVE: Volunteers carry toilet paper that they’ll use to restock Joshua Tree National Park’s restrooms. Employees of an area resort have
joined the effort. BOTTOM RIGHT: Windblown trash collects among the California park’s vegetation on Saturday. BOTTOM LEFT: A
pickup truck is parked illegally in brush. Some advocates want the parks to be closed to avoid such potential for environmental damage.
close than be damaged,” said Joe
De Luca, a sales associate at
Nomad Ventures in the town of
Joshua Tree.
During a government shutdown in 2013, Joshua Tree was
closed to all visitors. The winter
holiday season is a busy time here
and important for local businesses, and some people are grateful
that the park hasn’t blocked access this time, said Kenji Haroutunian, president of Friends of
Joshua Tree, a nonprofit climbing
organization.
But he’s not happy with the
shutdown and the attendant loss
of normal services in the huge
park that he said is within a
two-hour drive of 14 million people in Southern California.
“It’s hugely disappointing,”
Haroutunian said. The border
wall dispute, he said, “is not a
priority that deserves to close
down the government.”
At Big Bend National Park in
Texas, George Cashman of Milwaukee said he was disappointed
by the absence of park rangers.
Last year, he said, he took his
family — including four kids
under the age of 10 — to Yellowstone, where the kids enjoyed the
junior ranger program.
“There are no rangers to talk to
and help the kids out. Last year,
one of the rangers in Yellowstone
let them take the temperature of
one of the geysers. Those memories aren’t going to happen this
year,” Cashman said.
Greg Henington, owner of Far
Flung Outdoor Center in Terlingua, a town just outside the park,
said he voted for President
Trump but blames the president
for the shutdown, which he says
creates confusion and uncertainty for local businesses.
“If we are going to continue to
use the federal government as a
weapon for not getting what we
want in the sandbox, then this is
untenable for small business. We
can’t make decisions, we layoff
employees, we take cancellations,” he said.
Even more seriously affected is
the Mexican town of Boquillas,
which is just across the Rio
Grande from the national park
and has always enjoyed a stream
of visitors this time of year. But
the border crossing normally
staffed by the U.S. Department of
Homeland Security has been
closed during the shutdown, and
no one is coming or going across
the river.
“It has been terrible. We were
waiting for our best time of the
year,” said Lilia Falcon, who owns
a restaurant and a bed-andbreakfast in Boquillas. “It’s when
we wait and stock up and save the
money we make for the rest of the
year. Christmas has not been
good for us because of the shutdown, but what can we do? Nothing! Nobody will ever hear us.”
In Death Valley National Park,
employees of the Oasis at Death
Valley, a private resort inside the
park, have joined other concessionaires in picking up trash and
cleaning bathrooms, said Trey
Matheu, general manager of the
resort. “We’re in it for the long
haul,” he vowed.
At Yellowstone National Park,
access this time of year depends
on grooming of snow-covered
roads — but the National Park
Service’s shutdown plan does not
consider such activity to be essential. That means the private concessionaires have had to pool
their money to pay for the grooming.
“If we don’t do this, we’re
closed. That’s really not much of
an option. Having said that, we’re
doing this certainly in hope and
anticipation that the shutdown
does not go on indefinitely,” said
Rick Hoeninghausen, director of
sales and marketing for Xanterra
Travel Collection, a concessionaire in Yellowstone and many
other parks.
Back at Joshua Tree, Sabrina
Krafton, 50, who traveled to the
park from London for some New
Year’s climbing, said she appreciates the hard work by volunteers
who are collecting litter and donating toilet paper.
“I think they actually provide
better rolls than the government,” Krafton said. “It’s better
quality paper.”
joel.achenbach@washpost.com
Waters reported from Big Bend
National Park; Achenbach reported
from Washington. Emily WaxThibodeaux contributed to this
report.
Vatican letter undercuts U.S. cardinal on blocking of vote on abuse policy
BY
N ICOLE W INFIELD
vatican city — The Vatican
blocked U.S. bishops from taking
measures to address the clergy
sex abuse scandal because U.S.
church leaders did not discuss the
legally problematic proposals
with the Holy See enough beforehand, according to a letter obtained by the Associated Press.
The Nov. 11 letter from the Vatican’s Cardinal Marc Ouellet provides the primary reason that
Rome balked at the measures that
were to be voted on by the U.S.
Conference of Catholic Bishops at
its Nov. 12-14 meeting. The blocking of the vote stunned abuse
survivors and other Catholics who
were demanding action from U.S.
bishops to address clergy sex
abuse and coverup.
Ouellet’s letter undermines the
version of events provided by the
conference president, Cardinal
Daniel DiNardo. It could also provide fodder for questions during a
spiritual retreat of U.S. bishops,
dedicated to the abuse crisis, that
opens Wednesday in Chicago.
The bishops may want to know
why, as Ouellet noted in the letter,
the draft proposals only arrived at
the Vatican on Nov. 8, four days
before the U.S. bishops’ meeting
began. While the Vatican is known
for its slow pace, even the speediest bureaucracy would have found
it difficult to review and sign off
on sensitive legal documents in
that amount of time.
“Considering the nature and
scope of the documents being proposed by the [conference], I believe it would have been beneficial
to have allowed for more time to
consult with this and other congregations with competence over
the ministry and discipline of
bishops,” Ouellet wrote to DiNardo.
Such back-and-forth, he wrote,
would have allowed the documents to “properly mature.”
The main goal of the U.S. bishops’ fall meeting had been to approve a code of conduct for bishops and create a lay-led commission to receive complaints against
them. The measures were a crisis
response to the scandal over former cardinal Theodore McCarrick, a once-senior American cleric who is now accused of molesting minors and adults, and new
revelations of old sex abuse cases
in Pennsylvania. McCarrick once
served as archbishop of Washington.
DiNardo stunned the bishops
when he opened the assembly
Nov. 12 by announcing that “at the
insistence of the Holy See” the
bishops would not be voting on
the measures after all. He said the
Vatican wanted them to delay a
vote until after Pope Francis host-
ed a global summit in February on
preventing sex abuse by priests.
It is not surprising that Rome
wanted a say in crafting the text,
given that the Holy See has exclusive authority to investigate and
discipline problem bishops.
“While fully aware that a bishops’ conference enjoys a rightful
autonomy . . . to discuss and eventually approve measures that are
within the conference’s powers,
the conference’s work must always be integrated within the
hierarchical structure and universal law of the church,” Ouellet
wrote.
In a statement Tuesday to the
Associated Press, DiNardo characterized the dispute as a misunderstanding. He said he assumed
the Vatican would have had a
chance to “review and offer adjustments” to the measures after
the U.S. bishops approved them,
not before. He insisted that U.S.
bishops were not trying to appropriate Vatican powers for themselves.
“It is now clear there were different expectations on the bishops conference’s part and Rome’s
part that may have affected the
understanding of these proposals,” DiNardo said in a statement.
“From our perspective, they were
designed to stop short of where
the authority of the Holy See began.”
Legally speaking, the U.S. bishops did not need Vatican approval
before the vote. But since the Holy
See would have to approve the
proposals afterward for them to
become binding, consulting on
the text beforehand was necessary
and strategically wise, said Nicholas Cafardi, a U.S. canon lawyer.
DiNardo, in his statement to
the Associated Press, said he had
shared the “content and direction” of the proposals with multi-
ple Vatican offices in October and
drafted the final text after encountering no opposition.
“We had not planned, nor had
the Holy See made a request, to
share the texts before the body of
bishops having had an opportunity to amend them,” he said.
During a Nov. 12 news conference, DiNardo was asked when
the Vatican was actually consulted about the measures. He replied
that the texts were finalized
Oct. 30 and that the delay in finishing them might have been a
problem.
“So it’s not surprising, on one
level, that people would be catching their breath, perhaps even in
Rome,” he told reporters. DiNardo
also acknowledged, when pressed
by a reporter, that the texts themselves had some legal problems,
though he played down the severity of them.
— Associated Press
KLMNO
METRO
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2 , 2019
High today at
approx. 1 p.m.
8 a.m.
Noon
4 p.m.
8 p.m.
42 47 46 44°
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Precip: 0%
Wind: ESE
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EZ
B
SU
JOHN KELLY’S WASHINGTON
RETROPOLIS
OBITUARIES
Technology helps young
brains develop language
at a D.C. preschool for
vulnerable children. B3
Abraham Lincoln declared
an end to slavery on New
Year’s Day 1863. It went
on for two more years. B3
Héctor Timerman, a former
Argentine foreign minister,
denied a coverup in probe
of a 1994 terror attack. B4
Criminal
justice gets
push from
left in N.Va.
The Healthy Babies Project is raising money to buy the Northeast Washington property
where six young mothers and their children live from its owner, who has decided to sell it
TOP PROSECUTORS
FACE PRIMARY FOES
Policies on death penalty,
bail, pot are challenged
BY R ACHEL W EINER
AND J USTIN J OUVENAL
BONNIE JO MOUNT/THE WASHINGTON POST
Parisa Tafti became a lawyer
because a college friend was
wrongly found guilty of rape, a
conviction that was overturned
five years later. Over the past two
decades she has sought to get other innocent people out of prison by
challenging the work of prosecutors. Now she wants to become
one.
Tafti has launched a Democratic primary campaign to unseat
Arlington County Commonwealth’s Attorney Theo Stamos, a
prosecutor for the past 30 years.
The clash is part of a national
criminal justice reform movement that has come to Northern
Virginia and could radically reshape law and order in Arlington,
Fairfax and Loudoun. In all three
counties, liberal challengers are
taking on prosecutors whose
views they see as retrograde and
excessively punitive.
“I think there’s a lot of frustration with the lack of progress on
criminal justice reform both in the
country and in the commonwealth,” said state Sen. Scott A.
Surovell (D-Fairfax). “A lot of people in the reform community
think prosecutors should exercise
their discretion in cases more.”
CHALLENGE CONTINUED ON B2
W
hen she plays with her
4-year-old son, Jacob, Victoria Scheinman sometimes can’t help thinking
about what her own childhood was like when she was his age.
Her biological parents had just abandoned her at a Ukrainian orphanage,
where she would stay until she was 10.
She didn’t have a mother to cuddle her
and sing with her and teach her. On
Christmas, sometimes, she got a handful
of donated candy.
Jacob has a big box overflowing with
Christmas gifts and an attentive mother
who is constantly playing with him.
For teaching her to be the sort of
mother she never had, Scheinman credits
the Healthy Babies Project. The nonprofit
organization in Northeast Washington
houses her and her two young sons, along
with five other young mothers and their
babies, and teaches skills to more than
300 young women and girls annually in
the District, including pregnancy preven-
tion classes for teenagers and parenting
classes for baffled new mothers, as
Scheinman once was.
“When I came here, I had nowhere to
go, no family,” Scheinman recalls. Her
relationship with her adoptive mother
had broken down. Jacob was 6 weeks old.
“I had this just-born fresh baby. I had to
learn to be a mom. I was 18. Jacob cried a
lot, and everyone at the house would
pitch in. He was always being held by
somebody.”
The Healthy Babies Project is scrambling to raise money to try to keep
possession of the families’ house, a onelevel brick building that serves all at once
as classroom and office space and home
to a half-dozen toddlers and their moms.
The landlord wants to sell the building, with no guarantee that a new owner
would continue to rent it to Healthy
Babies Project. So the organization is
trying to raise money so that it can buy
the building itself.
A nonprofit
home
is rooted
to its house
BY
J ULIE Z AUZMER
Victoria Scheinman, 23, snuggles with her
sons, King Alexander, 1, and Jacob, 4, at
the Healthy Babies Project home.
Louisiana Avenue path is
at the mercy of Congress
Apparent murder-suicide
still a mystery to those
who knew Va. woman
L UZ L AZO
In its effort to expand the city’s
network of bike lanes, the District has encountered many roadblocks, from neighbors opposing
the removal of curbside parking
to drivers clamoring to keep their
travel lanes.
And then, there’s Congress —
literally standing in the way of
one bike path.
More than three years after it
was proposed, a 0.6-mile cycle
track on Louisiana Avenue between Union Station and the U.S.
Capitol awaits a green light from
the Hill.
The problem? Louisiana Avenue, though it looks like a city
street, is actually owned by the
Architect of the Capitol, the stew-
BY
LUZ LAZO/THE WASHINGTON POST
A proposed bike lane could displace 37 spots down the middle of
Louisiana Avenue that are used by Senate staffers.
ard of the Capitol grounds, and
major fixes go through that office.
“Here we have a road that is a
very local road . . . and the people
who get to make all the decisions
are coming here from all over the
United States,” said Garrett Hennigan, a community organizer
Gunfire just hours into
new year is thought to be
accidental, officials say
BY
P ETER H ERMANN
HOME CONTINUED ON B6
Road to bike lane leads to U.S. Capitol A struggle for answers
in death of mother, sons
Advocates fear proposed
BY
Marine
killed in
barracks
shooting
with the Washington Area Bicyclist Association who has been
lobbying for the bike lane since
2015. “This is exactly why statehood is such a frustrating issue
for us local folks.”
Federal officials say they supLANE CONTINUED ON B2
J USTIN J OUVENAL
Kate Schubert remembers Noera Ayaz as one of the best moms
she had ever known. Schubert
was looking for a playgroup for
her son after moving to Qatar in
2009 when she found Ayaz’s “Storytime Under the Trees.”
Ayaz commandeered a choice
spot in a Doha park, where kids
would frolic, eat healthy snacks
and listen to book readings. Schubert considered Ayaz such a role
model that she consulted her
during her next pregnancy.
Ayaz was a professional pillar,
too. After returning to the United
States, she won plaudits as a
lawyer working with immigrant
Muslim women who were seeking refuge from domestic abuse,
part of two decades of charity
work.
Schubert said that background
makes it so hard to understand
what came next. In early September, Ayaz and her two sons were
found fatally shot in their house
in Herndon, Va. Police are still
investigating but say they think
Ayaz, 42, killed the boys and then
herself.
Schubert said she is haunted
by the case. So are some members
of Ayaz’s family and community,
who are still reeling and trying to
fit together pieces that don’t
seem to match. Her family said
she left no note.
“I cannot reconcile the Noera I
knew with the tragic story of her
death,” Schubert wrote in an
email.
The case is all the more unAYAZ CONTINUED ON B4
A U.S. Marine was shot and
killed Tuesday morning inside
the Marine Barracks on Capitol
Hill in Southeast Washington,
prompting a D.C. police investigation.
Two officials with knowledge
of the investigation said the Marine appeared to have been
struck by an accidental discharge
from another Marine’s weapon.
Authorities cautioned that the
investigation was in its beginning stages.
No arrests had been made, and
police classified the case as a
“death investigation,” an indication that, at least at the moment,
investigators did not believe a
crime had been committed. The
shooting occurred about 5 a.m. A
Marine Corps spokeswoman,
Capt. Colleen McFadden, said she
could confirm only that the victim did not suffer “a self-inflicted
injury.”
The name of the victim, described as in his early 20s, was
not made public on Tuesday.
D.C. police, who lead all death
investigations in the District,
said officers were contacting the
victim’s relatives. The military
MARINE CONTINUED ON B2
Courtland
Milloy
He is away. His column will resume
when he returns.
B2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. WEDNESDAY,
JANUARY 2 , 2019
District’s long road to building a half-mile bike lane leads to the U.S. Capitol
LANE FROM B1
port a bike-lane concept proposed by the District Department
of Transportation, but they have
some reservations that are stalling progress: Chiefly, the Senate
sergeant at arms, who manages
the Senate parking supply, isn’t
thrilled about giving up diagonal
parking used by Senate staffers in
the easternmost block of the
road.
“As with most things,” Hennigan said. “It comes down to
parking.”
Thirty-seven parking spaces,
to be exact. The road is only
0.4 miles long stretching from
Constitution Avenue NW at the
foot of the Capitol to Columbus
Circle NE across from Union
Station.
“We think there’s a much better use of that public space, which
is making that street more accessible for more people,” Hennigan
said.
But keeping the parking is
turning out to be the dealbreaker
to get the project going. In a
Sept. 14 letter to DDOT, Architect
of the Capitol Stephen T. Ayers
listed eight concerns that must be
resolved before the city can move
forward with the final design,
among them to retain the parking spaces “to the greatest extent
possible.”
Parking is a high-demand commodity in the nation’s capital and
is at the center of many of the
city’s street debates. On Capitol
Hill, doing without those three
dozen parking spots, isn’t a
choice Senate Sergeant at Arms
and Doorkeeper Michael C.
Stenger wants to make — espe-
cially with a renovation of a
Senate parking facility in the
works, officials familiar with the
negotiations say.
Questions to the office of the
Senate sergeant at arms about its
parking concerns were referred
to the Architect of the Capitol.
The Architect’s spokeswoman,
Erin Courtney, did not respond to
parking questions but said the
agency is supportive of a bikefriendly Capitol Hill and looks
“forward to continuing to work
with DDOT on this initiative.”
In his letter to DDOT, Ayers
said while the DDOT concept is
satisfactory to allow the agency
to formally begin the design
phase, unresolved issues must be
addressed.
Among the demands: a better
connection at Columbus Circle to
link to the Metropolitan Branch
Trail and modifications to the left
turn lanes at New Jersey Avenue
and North Capitol Street. DDOT
must ensure that the project
meets the needs of the U.S. Capitol Police and that the cycle track
barrier is removable to support
events such as the presidential
inauguration parade.
Sam Zimbabwe, chief project
delivery officer for DDOT, said
the agency is advancing the detail
design for the project and working on answers to concerns
spelled out in Ayers’s letter before
requesting final permission.
A conceptual design for the
bike lane puts it in the middle of
Louisiana Avenue, an option that
officials say not only provides the
best cycling connectivity but also
has fewer traffic impacts, does
not affect bus operations and
preserves the most parking.
DISTRICT DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION
A rendering of a proposed bike lane where 37 Senate staffers park on Louisiana Avenue near Union
Station. The road is owned by the Architect of the Capitol, and any major fixes go through that office.
This option would require
moving the electrical lines to put
new signals closer to the median.
As part of the project, the city is
also set to improve the bike
connection with the First Street
bike lane.
Ultimately, city officials said,
the bike lane may end at North
Capitol Street instead of going all
the way to Columbus Circle, leaving that last block closer to Union
Station untouched to preserve
the median parking available to
the Senate.
If and when Ayers gives the
project the green light, it will
then need to be approved by the
Senate Rules Committee and the
House Office Building Commission, D.C. Del. Eleanor Holmes
Norton (D) said.
“The Senate and the House
committees are not going to do
anything until we get to the
formal design plan and we are
nowhere near that now,” said
Norton, the District’s nonvoting
member of Congress. She has
urged federal officials to move on
the bike lane, saying that losing a
few parking spaces is only a “a
small price to pay to ensure
public safety and help alleviate
congestion near the Capitol.” Besides, she said, the bike lane has
wide support, even from members of Congress.
“They are moving very, very
slowly,” Norton said. “This is not a
city street, but it’s in our city and
it messes our city up by not being
able to add the bike lane.”
The proposed bike lane is a
missing piece in the region’s bike
network. It would link the Metropolitan Branch Trail, a major bike
route from south of Fort Totten to
Union Station with the Pennsylvania Avenue Cycle Track, one of
the city’s busiest bike paths connecting other major bike corridors such as 15th and M streets
NW.
The project is one of about a
dozen the city is counting on to
double its 10 miles of protected
lanes by 2024. City elected officials say the bike lane is critical to
ensure the safety of cyclists and
reduce traffic. The Congressional
Bike Caucus, a group of more
than 130 lawmakers, supports
the project. More than 650 residents have signed a petition calling for the path to be moved
forward, while advocates say the
project is more critical than ever
to address the growing number
of people in the region who are
getting around on two wheels —
whether that’s bicycles or electric
scooters.
City transportation officials recall two other instances in recent
years where they sought a permit
from the Architect of the Capitol
to build new bike facilities. Both
cases involved minor changes to
the roadway, such as repainting.
But the city frequently works
with federal agencies on roads or
other issues. The National Park
Service, for example, has jurisdiction of streets on the Mall.
Zimbabwe said construction is
unlikely in 2019, but he anticipates a plan that the Capitol
agrees with this year.
“We will work with them on
whatever steps are necessary to
keep this project going,” he said.
luz.lazo@washpost.com
Commonwealth’s attorneys in Northern Va. face primary challenges from left
CHALLENGE FROM B1
Unlike the incumbents, the
challengers are promising to stop
prosecuting simple marijuana possession, to refuse to request cash
bond for defendants awaiting trial
and to not seek the death penalty.
“The American criminal justice
system is now a mass incarceration machine set on auto-pilot,”
Tafti said in a statement announcing her run. “As a public defender,
I know all too well how this machine dismantles communities,
destroys families, uses bad science, and wastes money.”
She pointed to statistics showing
black people make up less than
10 percent of Arlington’s population
but two-thirds of its jail inmates.
In neighboring Fairfax County,
incumbent top prosecutor Raymond F. Morrogh (D), who ran
unopposed in the past two elections, faces a challenge from a former federal prosecutor and Army
helicopter pilot. Steve Descano
calls his run a “values campaign.”
“The most important thing is
we have to bring Fairfax County
values to office,” Descano said. “I
don’t think we have that in Fairfax
County right now.”
Like Tafti, he criticized his opponent for signing on to a 2016
brief that denounced the move by
then-Gov. Terry McAuliffe (D) to
restore voting rights to more than
200,000 felons as too broad. Both
challengers want to expand alternatives to prosecution for drug
addicts, the mentally ill and teens.
Morrogh and Stamos say they
are reformers — within a complex
system where victims also have
rights.
“It’s interesting that she describes herself as an ‘Innocence
Protection Attorney,’ as that is
what I’ve been engaged in for
more than thirty years,” Stamos
said of Tafti in a statement.
While Stamos recently announced that she will no longer
seek cash bail for most minor misdemeanors, she argued that it is an
important tool to ensure people
show up for court in more-serious
cases. On that and other issues, she
argued that state law prevents the
kind of dramatic change Tafti and
other challengers seek.
“If she wants to decriminalize
marijuana, she should go to Richmond,” Stamos said in an interview. “Unless and until these laws
on the books are repealed, I don’t
think it’s the appropriate exercise
of prosecutorial discretion to
usurp the will of the legislature.”
Morrogh, who has also been a
prosecutor for over 30 years, said
he was “progressive before progressive was cool.” He noted that
he worked to help establish a veterans court, drug court and mental-health court in Fairfax County,
as well as efforts to divert the
mentally ill charged with crimes
into treatment instead of jail.
He said he heavily uses a program that places defendants in
pretrial supervision rather than
asking for bond. But he also said
those concerns should be balanced with victims’ rights.
“I have a vast amount of experience trying the most complicated
criminal cases,” Morrogh said.
The race for commonwealth’s
attorney in Loudoun County will
pit incumbent Republican Jim
Plowman against a Democratic
challenger in November. Buta Biberaj is the only Democrat to have
entered the race.
Plowman, who is in his fourth
term, swept into office in 2003
promising a traditional tough-oncrime approach. He said crime in
Loudoun County has dropped
each of the past five years, making
it one of the safest communities in
the area.
“During my tenure we’ve continued to hold violent and repeat
offenders accountable, seeking
fair and just resolutions for victims and the community,” Plowman wrote in an email.
Biberaj, a 25-year trial lawyer
and former substitute judge, said
on her campaign website that she
would take the office in a different
direction, focusing on bond reform and pushing treatment for
the addicted and mentally ill instead of jail. She did not respond to
requests for comment.
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THE DAILY QUIZ
Which wine ranks number one
on Dave McIntyre’s great values
of 2018 list?
(Hint: The answer is in today’s Food section.)
EARN 5 POINTS: Find the answer, and then go to
washingtonpost.com/postpoints, Quizzes to enter the
correct response.
MEMBER EXCLUSIVES
Straight Up: Free Tickets to Vertical Horizon on
January 18 at City Winery
The popular pop-rock entity recently released The Lost Mile, “the most indulgent album
I’ve ever made.” (Frontman Matt Scannell, Billboard.com)ŏ$bORWRIWKHVHVRQJVDUHORYH
letters and glass-is-half-full songs, and I don’t feel particularly comfortable with that.
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to manufacture the emotions that inspire my songs and that if I’m in a good place, to
honor that.” See details at washingtonpost.com/postpoints, Events & Contests.
Theo Stamos
Parisa Tafti
Raymond F. Morrogh
Steve Descano
Lawyers and political watchers
are also waiting to hear whether
Prince William County Commonwealth’s Attorney Paul B. Ebert (D)
runs again. Ebert, who has held
office for 50 years and has sent
more people to death row than any
prosecutor in Virginia’s history,
would be seeking his 14th term.
Ebert is an institution in Prince
William but has faced criticism in
recent years after a federal judge
overturned one of his high-profile
capital convictions and death-
penalty sentences, saying his office had withheld key evidence
from the defense.
Ebert is expected to face a challenger if he runs. He did not respond to requests for comment.
Rick Conway, Ebert’s chief deputy, said his boss and other incumbents are “open to discussion concerning criminal justice reform”
and have advocated for some
changes. But “when you’re talking
about your head prosecutor of your
jurisdiction,” he said, “you want
somebody who believes in law and
order and understands that we
don’t make the laws — we’re
charged with enforcing them.”
It is too early to say whether the
challengers will be competitive,
but they may take heart from the
surprise November victory of
Democrat Scott Miles, who unseated the incumbent Republican
prosecutor in Chesterfield County
by promising to end his “War on
Drugs” approach to crime.
Across the country, groups associated with George Soros, the
liberal philanthropist, and members of the Black Lives Matter
movement have spent millions in
dozens of local races, helping elect
progressive prosecutors in Philadelphia, Chicago, St. Louis and
other cities.
Tafti and Descano said they had
not received similar funding to date.
rachel.weiner@washpost.com
justin.jouvenal@washpost.com
Marine killed by gunshot at barracks
MARINE FROM B1
typically releases names of deceased members 24 hours after
the next of kin are notified.
A D.C. police report said the
Marine was shot about 5:05 a.m.
and was pronounced dead at
5:59 a.m. at MedStar Washington
Hospital Center.
As a result, the post canceled
Tuesday’s traditional New Year’s
Day serenade, a formal affair in
which an audience is invited as
the Marine Corps Band plays for
the commandant at his home.
In a statement from Marine
Barracks Washington, Col. Don
Tomich, the commanding officer,
said officials were taking care of
the victim’s family and friends
“during this challenging time.”
The statement confirmed the
Marine’s death but did not provide
details such as the victim’s age,
assignment or in which building
the shooting occurred on the installation that is also known by its
address, “Eighth and I.”
“No threat to local residents
exists,” the statement says.
The Marine Barracks Washington, founded in 1801 by President Thomas Jefferson, is the
oldest active Marine Corps post.
Its personnel perform both cer-
Tuesday’s shooting
marks at least the third
time in six years that
a Marine was shot at
the compound.
emonial and security missions in
the District, and the post is home
to the Marine Drum and Bugle
Corps and the Marine Band, as
well as the site of the Home of the
Commandants. The post is south
of Eastern Market and next to a
newly sprouted nightlife and res-
taurant district called Barracks
Row.
Tuesday’s shooting marked at
least the third time in six years
that a Marine was shot at the
compound.
In June, a Marine standing
guard at the home of the commandant suffered a self-inflicted
gunshot wound and was hospitalized. The Marine survived
what officials at the time called a
negligent discharge of a weapon.
In 2013, a 19-year-old Marine
from South Dakota suffered a fatal
gunshot wound to the head. Authorities said they believed Lance
Cpl. Cody S. Schoenfelder accidentally shot himself in the building where the commandant lives.
Authorities did not describe
the circumstances that led up to
Tuesday’s fatal shooting or what
caused them to believe it might
have been accidental.
peter.hermann@washpost.com
Dan Lamothe contributed to this
report.
DID YOU KNOW?
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WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2 , 2019
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
B3
M2
At preschool for vulnerable kids, technology helps language develop
L O C A L D IG ES T
VIRGINIA
Woman, 20, is killed
in Fairfax car crash
A woman was killed Monday
when she apparently lost
control of her car and struck
another in Fairfax County, police
said.
Melanie McKenna, 20, of
Centreville died at the scene.
The crash occurred about 8:45
p.m. on Fairfax County Parkway
near New Road, police said.
McKenna was driving a 1996
Toyota Corolla south on the
parkway when she lost control
of the car on a curve,
overcorrected, crossed into
oncoming traffic and hit a 2015
Acura MDX, police said.
Police said the driver of the
Acura and two passengers in
McKenna’s vehicle were treated
at hospitals.
— Peter Hermann
Death in Arlington
called suspicious
A woman died on New Year’s
Day after a call about a stabbing
to Arlington County police,
authorities said.
Arlington police said they
were investigating the matter as
a suspicious death.
The woman was found
shortly after 10 a.m. at an
apartment complex in the 5100
block of Eighth Road South and
died at a hospital, police
spokeswoman Ashley Savage
said.
The woman was not
identified, and few details of the
incident were available.
Investigators think they have
identified all parties involved
and do not believe there is a
threat to the community, Savage
said.
The investigation continues,
the spokeswoman said, and
there was no report of any
charges in the case.
— Donna St. George
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There’s a new
student at Bright
Beginnings, a
preschool in
Southeast
Washington. She’s
John
called LENA, and
Kelly's
while she doesn’t
Washington say much, she’s
very attentive.
LENA isn’t a
person. It’s a machine, a little
gadget smaller than a cellphone
that students wear in a pouch in
a smock.
“What the LENA device does
is capture audio fields for
language interaction in that
child’s environment,” said
Anthony Sims, director of
organizational learning at
Bright Beginnings, a school that
serves families experiencing
homelessness. The charity is a
partner in The Washington Post
Helping Hand fundraising
campaign.
LENA — it stands for
Language Environment Analysis
— is both hardware (that little
$250 recorder) and software
(the programs that parse the
recordings). It was developed by
a nonprofit organization
headquartered in Colorado. The
program has just been rolled out
at Bright Beginnings, where
once or twice a week, one or two
pre-K classes of 3-, 4- and 5-
year-olds don LENA-equipped
smocks.
“The kids like [the smock]
because it’s bright and colorful,”
Sims said. “One person said
their kid called it their
‘superhero uniform.’ ”
At the end of the day, the
recorders are collected and the
data they captured is uploaded
to a hub to be analyzed. If this
all sounds a bit Big Brotherish,
Sims points out that LENA
doesn’t record the specific
dialogue.
“No one is actually listening
to their conversations,” he said.
“The computer is counting the
words, not what words are said.”
The LENA software is able to
tally discrete words. More
importantly, it notes who is
talking. The difference in
frequency between a child and
an adult voice lets it discern
“conversational turns.” These
are the back-and-forth
interactions when one person
stops talking and the next
person starts.
And that is the key to LENA,
Sims said. Exposure at a young
age to a large vocabulary is
important, but research
suggests that back-and-forth
conversation can help in the
development of the growing
brain.
“The objective really is to
build on the research that’s
shown that the early childhood
talk environment really
advances language and brain
development for children,” Sims
said. “This particular approach
seeks to increase language and
what they call conversational
turns between adults and their
children.”
The LENA program just
started at Bright Beginnings, so
they’re still in the process of
establishing baselines for their
students. What happens next?
The data will be shared with
teachers so they can see how
they’re interacting with the kids
under their supervision.
The data will also be shared
with parents. Sims said LENA
can encourage parents to adjust
the way they interact with their
children.
“If you don’t understand the
difference between talking to
kids and prompting them with
questions, and inviting them to
ask questions, then we really
aren’t improving the language
gap that we’re hearing about in
kids in lower socioeconomic
backgrounds,” he said.
Take, for example, a familiar
question: How was school?
Questions that elicit one-word
answers from children — “okay”
— aren’t as beneficial as ones
that invite something richer.
Better, Sims said, is a layered
question that leads to greater
elaboration: “You had science
today. What are you guys
working on in science? Is that a
new subject? What do you think
about it?”
In addition to the children
enrolled at its two locations in
Southeast Washington, Bright
Beginnings has home-based
programs. Staff members visit
children at their homes and
provide parenting help. The
LENA devices will be worn
there, too, then collected, the
data uploaded and crunched so
parents can gauge interaction
with their children.
Sims joined Bright
Beginnings in September. He
holds a doctorate from Howard
University and has been an
educator for 28 years.
“Gone are the days where we
look for those silent classrooms,”
he said. Unless students are
working independently, he’d
rather see children querying the
teacher as they strive to learn.
The wonder of the young
noggin is that the brain doesn’t
just produce language.
john.kelly@washpost.com
Twitter: @johnkelly
For previous columns, visit
washingtonpost.com/johnkelly.
In 1863, Lincoln declares slavery’s end. It lasts two more years.
BY
R ONALD G . S HAFER
On New Year’s morning of 1863,
President Abraham Lincoln hosted
a three-hour reception in the White
House. That afternoon, Lincoln
slipped into his office and — without fanfare — signed a document
that changed America forever.
It was the Emancipation Proclamation, decreeing “that all persons held as slaves” within the
rebellious Southern states “are,
and henceforward shall be free.”
However, the proclamation did
not immediately free any of the
nation’s nearly 4 million slaves.
The biggest impact was that for the
first time, ending slavery became a
goal of the Union in the bloody
Civil War with the Confederacy.
The news sent shock waves
throughout the divided country.
Southern newspapers responded
with outrage. Lincoln’s action was
“the most startling political crime,
the most stupid political blunder
yet known in American history,”
the Richmond Enquirer thundered. “The Southern people have
now only to choose between victory and death.”
In the North, the Cleveland
Morning Leader exulted, “The day
of Jubilee has arrived, and the all
important words ‘Be Free’ have
been spoken.” The New York Times
declared that “President Lincoln’s
proclamation marks an era in history, not only of this war, but of the
world.” But some Northern whites
opposed fighting for the freedom
of black slaves. The Cincinnati Enquirer said Lincoln’s proclamation
represented the “complete overthrow of the Constitution he swore
to protect and defend.”
Free African Americans in the
North celebrated the news. “We
are all liberated by this proclamation,” said the noted orator and
former slave Frederick Douglass.
“Everybody is liberated. The white
man is liberated, the black man is
liberated, the brave men now
fighting the battles of their country against rebels and traitors are
now liberated.” But Douglass cau-
LIBRARY OF CONGRESS PRINTS AND PHOTOGRAPHS DIVISION
“The first reading of the Emancipation Proclamation before the cabinet,” a painting by F.B. Carpenter,
shows a reenactment of President Abraham Lincoln delivering his draft of a preliminary order in 1862.
tioned that the proclamation was
only a first step; slaves who celebrated the proclamation risked
being beaten or hung.
The proclamation was not a
surprise. Lincoln had presented
his draft of a preliminary order at
a Cabinet meeting on July 22,
1862. Secretary of State William
Seward suggested the president
wait until after the North had
scored a fresh win over Southern
troops before releasing the document. On Sept. 22, a few days after
Union forces claimed victory in
the Battle of Antietam, Lincoln
issued the preliminary proclamation. It stated that if Southern
states did not surrender by Jan. 1,
1863, the president would issue a
final order to make their slaves
“forever free.”
The fighting continued. Some
doubted Lincoln would back up his
threat. But on the afternoon of
Jan. 1, he paused only to steady his
hand before signing the final
Emancipation Proclamation. “I
never, in my life, felt more certain
that I was doing right than I do in
signing this paper,” Lincoln said. “If
my name goes into history, it will be
for this act, and my whole soul is in
it.”
Many abolitionists criticized
Lincoln’s action as too limited.
The proclamation purported to
free millions of slaves in the
Southern states that had seceded
from the Union. It exempted
850,000 slaves in border states
and parts of three Southern states
that were not in rebellion. The
New York Herald said of Lincoln’s
order: “While the proclamation
leaves slavery untouched where
his decree can be enforced, he
emancipates slaves where his decree cannot be enforced.”
While Lincoln believed freeing
the slaves was the right thing to do,
his proclamation was a strategic
“war measure” in the battle to defeat the Confederacy. The proclamation allowed black men to join
the Union military forces. Eventually, nearly 200,000 African
Americans fought for the North. By
making the abolition of slavery a
Union goal, the proclamation also
discouraged intervention by antislavery foreign nations, such as
England, on the Confederate side.
Lincoln, who won reelection in
1864, knew his war order was temporary and pressed Congress to
amend the Constitution to end
slavery forever. By Jan. 31, 1865,
both houses of Congress passed
the 13th Amendment that “neither
slavery or involuntary servitude
. . . shall exist in the United States.”
Slavery officially ended on
Dec. 18, 1865, after 27, or two-thirds,
of the 36 states ratified the amend-
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Read more from Retropolis, a blog
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washingtonpost.com/retropolis.
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ment. Lincoln did not live to see the
culmination of his proclamation.
On April 14, 1865 — five days after
the South surrendered — the president was shot and killed by Southern sympathizer John Wilkes Booth
at Ford’s Theatre in Washington.
The end of slavery was just the
beginning of a long struggle by
African Americans for full rights
as U.S. citizens. Racial segregation
in the South continued into the
1960s in everything from public
accommodations to schools. At
the dedication of the Lincoln Memorial in Washington in 1922, the
crowd of 50,000 people was segregated by race.
An integrated crowd of more
than 250,000 swarmed around
the Lincoln Memorial in August
1963 for the March on Washington. The Rev. Martin Luther King
Jr. began his “I Have A Dream”
speech by praising the Emancipation Proclamation as a “great beacon light of hope to millions of
Negro slaves who had been seared
in the flames of withering injustice. … But 100 years later, the
Negro still is not free.”
Though the outcome was far
from certain when Lincoln signed
the proclamation, one group of
black Americans had faith when
they met in mid-January 1863 at
the Oak Grove school in Leesburg,
Ohio. The group agreed on a resolution expressing hope that the proclamation would lead to freedom for
all black people in America.
“Should all this be accomplished,” the resolution said, “the
name of Abraham Lincoln will ever
be gratefully remembered by the
colored race of America; and the
1st of January should be celebrated
to our latest posterity as the most
important event in all our history.”
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You can help
Here’s the question I’m
prompted to ask: Will you help
Bright Beginnings, a school that
serves some of the most
vulnerable children in
Washington?
To give, visit
posthelpinghand.
com and click “Donate.” To
contribute by mail, make a
check payable to “Bright
Beginnings” and send it to:
Bright Beginnings, Attn:
Helping Hand, 3418 Fourth St.
SE, Washington, D.C. 20032.
Our fundraising drive ends
Friday, so please give today.
RETROPOLIS
SIDING SPECIAL
36
Language helps improve the
brain. Homelessness and
poverty can starve young brains
of the developmental capital
they need.
Sims thinks the Bright
Beginnings parents will want to
know what they can do to make
sure their sons and daughters
are ready for kindergarten and
the world beyond.
“That’s the true power of
data,” he said. “It’s not just the
answers it gives us. It’s the
questions that it prompts.”
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EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. WEDNESDAY,
JANUARY 2 , 2019
‘Tragic story’ still shocks
woman’s family, friends
AYAZ FROM B1
usual because it breaks a grim
mold. About 90 percent of the
perpetrators who carried out
murder-suicides in the first half
of 2017 were men, and the majority of the victims were wives or
girlfriends, according to the
most recent data on the phenomenon by the Violence Policy
Center. Cases in which mothers
kill their children are rare.
The weeks since the deaths
have provided some clues, but
much remains murky. Fairfax
County police have not released a
motive, and Ayaz’s husband, the
sole surviving member of the
immediate family, said he is not
ready to talk and has not shared
key details with Noera’s relatives.
That has left people like Schubert and Yasir Ayaz, Noera Ayaz’s
brother, to try to figure out answers. Yasir Ayaz said he wishes
he had access to the police report
and his sister’s journal, but police
said those items can be shared
only by her husband, who is her
official next of kin.
“I want to understand what
happened,” Ayaz said. “There are
other families that might be going through such things. If some
of the evidence becomes clear,
you can help some of these families. We can’t reverse the situation that occurred, but we can try
to prevent similar situations.”
Ayaz said he learned after Noera’s death that she had been
suffering from depression and
had been in treatment for about
six months. He said she was
taking antidepressants. She also
had stopped responding to his
texts and phone calls in the weeks
before the shootings.
Ayaz Lari, Noera and Yasir’s
father, had visited the family in
recent months and had a pleasant time. He recalled Noera’s
sons, Tihami, 11, and Miraaj, 9,
beating their grandparents at
chess.
“They were even brighter than
Noera,” Lari said. “I couldn’t believe it, they were so smart.”
The last time Lari talked to his
daughter in the weeks before her
death, she told him she wasn’t
feeling well and had been working late nights. Her husband also
called with concerns about her
mental health, but Lari said the
depth of her problems remained
masked.
“I had no idea what was cooking,” Lari said.
That veil extended through
the day of the killings. Yasir Ayaz
said that on Sept. 5, his sister
went out to lunch with her husband and some friends at Taco
Bell. Nothing seemed amiss, but
Lari said he now knows that his
daughter had purchased the gun
used in the killings the day
before.
Lari said that on the evening of
Sept. 5, he received a call from his
son-in-law after he arrived home
from work. “I see the children in
blood,” Lari said the husband told
him. “I’m going to call 911.”
When officers arrived, they
found Ayaz in an upstairs bathroom. First responders attempted to revive the children, but the
mother and sons were pronounced dead.
In the days that followed,
Ayaz’s husband and relatives put
out a statement saying they were
“shocked and devastated.”
“Noera was a devoted mother,
a dedicated attorney, and a champion for the rights of women
everywhere,” it said. “Noera will
be remembered for her warmth,
wisdom, and artistic spirit.”
Her husband and family set up
a charity fund that has raised
about $10,000. Murder-suicides
are often met by public silence,
but the Web page for the fund has
drawn an outpouring of support.
Noera Ayaz lived a “noble and
generous life,” one donor said.
Another offered, “What I learned
from her will always live in my
heart,” and another said that
Ayaz “was an inspiration to
many.”
Ayaz had been the director of
Women in Islam, a group that
worked to empower Muslim
women. Lari said his daughter
had spent two decades largely
doing charity work for various
organizations, including most recently for Just Neighbors in Annandale, Va.
Before that, she worked in
intellectual property law for the
firm Baker Botts. Her father said
she had worked for former secretary of state James A. Baker after
he stepped down from public life.
She also traveled widely.
There is little research on
women who carry out murdersuicides because the overwhelming number of such perpetrators
are men. David Adams, co-director of Emerge, a domesticviolence counseling program in
Massachusetts, said men and
women engage in the acts for
different reasons.
“With men, it’s pretty typically
a scenario where they are possessively jealous and looking to punish a partner for thinking about
leaving them or having left them,”
Adams said. “For women, it’s sort
of operating out of hopelessness
and despondency.”
justin.jouvenal@washpost.com
MATT MCCLAIN/THE WASHINGTON POST
In the clouds
A child catches some air while scampering along the water’s edge at Jones Point Park in Alexandria on New Year’s Day as a jet moves across
the mottled sky. Expect the cloud cover to stick around on Wednesday — but there should be some sun as well. Weather, B6
THE REGION
Warm, dry day is perfect for outdoors exploration
BY
M ARTIN W EIL
Possibly as a symbol of getting
started on the right foot, hiking
has apparently become a tradition on New Year’s Day, both
nationally and in the Washington
area, where many took to streets
and trails.
Indeed, with the mercury in
Washington climbing to 64 degrees, many may have found the
lure of the outdoors difficult to
resist. People hiked, strolled, ambled and sauntered, alone or in
groups. Some took dogs. Excursions and expeditions were duly
reported on social media.
For example, Maryland Lt. Gov.
Boyd K. Rutherford was photographed, clad in blue jeans and
hiking boots, striding along a
trail in Patapsco Valley State Park.
He was accompanied by the
state’s deputy secretary of natural
resources, Joanne Throwe, and
others could be seen marching
along near the two.
Closer to the metropolitan
area, Liz Hayes described “a
pleasant New Year’s Day walk
around” downtown Silver Spring.
She said by email that several
passersby “wished me a happy
new year.”
Another woman posted that an
animal shelter in Falls Church
wished to get all of its kennel dogs
out on a New Year’s Day adventure.
She said she took her walk with
a dog named Ada.
“The girls and I picked up Ada
for a few hours,” the woman said.
“We had a nice long walk and
playtime, and nap time at home.”
A man from Alexandria said he
went to the District with his dog,
and they took a trip on foot
around the monuments.
However, he said, it was not
possible for the two of them to
explore the Lincoln Memorial.
This, apparently, had nothing to
5 shootings reported;
two in critical condition
A man described as a bystander
was critically wounded in one of
five separate shootings in the District on the first day of the New
Year, according to D.C. police. Another of the day’s shooting victims
was also critically wounded.
About 12:35 a.m., a man was
wounded in the 4600 block of
Martin Luther King Jr. Avenue
SW. Another shooting occurred
about 2:50 p.m. in the 2000 block
of Rhode Island Avenue NE. In
both cases, police said, the injuries
were not thought to be life-threatening.
A woman who apparently lives
nearby posted a Twitter message,
reporting “a very frightening start
to the New Year after a shooting on
our street. We were about to walk
out the door to take our toddler to
the park.”
A shooting about 12:20 p.m. on
Kennedy Street NW near North
Capitol Street left a man in critical condition.
In that shooting, D.C. Police
Chief Peter Newsham said, two
groups got into a dispute and
someone fired. “It appears the
victim may have been an unintended target,” he said.
On Tuesday night, two more
shootings were reported.
One was about 8 p.m. in the 700
block of N Street NW.
The site is near the Shaw and
Mount Vernon Square neighborhoods.
Within an hour, the second was
reported in the 4200 block of
Barnaby Road SE. That victim
was in critical condition, according to authorities.
peter.hermann@washpost.com
martin.weil@washpost.com
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suggest a serious problem.
The call, according to Capt.
Scott Svoboda of the city’s fire
department, was for a child with
part of his body caught in a
clothes dryer.
As it turned out, he said, it was
nothing so dire.
He said that a second call to the
fire department added detail, indicating that the child’s arm had
become entangled in clothing in
the dryer.
Sometimes in the excitement
of the moment, apparently, people decide that outside help is
required in such a situation.
“If they can’t figure it out,”
Svoboda said, “they call the fire
department.
“That’s,” he added, “what we’re
here for.”
As of Tuesday afternoon, the
first day of the New Year departed
a bit from last year. No measurable rain fell in Washington.
martin.weil@washpost.com
OBITUARIES
THE DISTRICT
BY P ETER H ERMANN
AND M ARTIN W EIL
do with the partial government
shutdown.
Instead, he tweeted, they could
not go up the steps because “they
don’t allow dogs.”
A Fairfax County family tweeted that having grown up next to
Lake Accotink, it was the perfect
place for their hike.
In Arlington, a tweet posted
under the name of Zak Wenning
indicated that many people took
advantage of the warm temperatures to enjoy other outdoor activities.
He remarked on the heavy
usage of tennis courts in Arlington on what was, after all, a
winter’s day.
“A wait to get onto the courts in
January,” he noted.
While many people enjoyed
the recreational activities, public
safety personnel were on duty —
as on any other day.
In Annapolis, one call received
Tuesday afternoon appeared to
HÉCTOR TIMERMAN, 65
Argentine diplomat, foreign minister
F ROM
STAFF REPORTS
AND NEWS SERVICES
Héctor Timerman, the foreign
minister in former Argentine
president Cristina Fernández de
Kirchner’s government who
played a key role in the disputed
investigation into the deadly
1994 bombing of a Jewish center
in Buenos Aires, died Dec. 30. He
was 65.
His brother, Javier, confirmed
his death in a tweet and said the
cause was cancer.
Mr. Timerman, a onetime
journalist and human rights activist, was Argentina’s top diplomat from 2010 to 2015. He was
detained in late 2017 and placed
under house arrest, accused of
taking part in a coverup of Iran’s
role in the bombing of the Asociación Mutual Israelita Argentina
building, which left 85 people
dead and was Argentina’s worst
terrorist attack.
Prosecutor Alberto Nisman,
whose slaying in 2015 remains
unsolved, had contended that a
2013 agreement with Iran,
which was portrayed as a joint
attempt to solve the case, in
reality ensured that the Iranians
involved would never be prosecuted. A joint “truth commission” called for by the deal was
approved by Argentina’s National Congress, but it was never
formed because it was later
ruled by local courts to be
unconstitutional.
Mr. Timerman, a signatory to
the agreement, and Fernández
both denied there was a coverup.
Investigators have linked for-
2011 PHOTO BY SILVINA FRYDLEWSKY FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
As foreign minister, Hector Timerman played a key role in the
disputed probe into Argentina’s deadliest terrorist attack, the 1994
bombing of the Asociación Mutual Israelita Argentina building in
Buenos Aires, in which 85 people were killed.
Wake up to home delivery.
1-800-753-POST
mer Iranian officials to the attack, but Iran has denied any
connection with it and has declined to turn over suspects.
Héctor Marcos Timerman
was born in Buenos Aires on
Dec. 16, 1953. His father, Jacobo
Timerman, was an Argentine
journalist who wrote the bestselling book “Prisoner Without a
Name, Cell Without a Number”
about his imprisonment and
torture by a military junta from
1977 to 1979. Jacobo Timerman
became a public face of opposition to the military regime and,
in exile after 1979, a global
symbol of its human rights
abuses.
The younger Mr. Timerman
rose through the editorial ranks
of his father’s publications. During his own period of exile in
New York from 1978 to 1982, he
helped start the human rights
group Americas Watch, which
became part of Human Rights
Watch, and received a master’s
degree in international affairs
from Columbia University.
After democracy was restored
in Argentina, Mr. Timerman returned to his native country and
to journalism. He joined the
administration of President Néstor Kirchner, whose 2003 election he had championed, and
served as consul general in New
York. He was later ambassador to
the United States before being
tapped as foreign minister under
Fernández, who succeeded her
husband as president.
A complete list of survivors
was not immediately available.
newsobits@washpost.com
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SF
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2 , 2019
IN MEMORIAM
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
DEATH NOTICE
BERNHARD
TURNER
GWENDOLYN CLINTON BERNHARD
Of Berwyn Heights, MD died December 18,
2018 at Hospice of Chesapeake, Harwood,
MD. Born March 21, 1928 in Clover, SC. Predeceased by her loving husband Robert and
her youngest son Steven. She is survived by
her brother Jim Firth; four of her five children
Chuck, Wendy (Dave) Shepherd, Robert (Mary),
Michael; nine grandchildren, and 14 great
grandchildren.
Celebration of life service and burial arrangements will be shared privately.
In lieu of flowers, contributions can be made
to Hospice of Chesapeake and Holy Cross
Lutheran Church in Gwen's memory.
BROAD
GEORGE R. TURNER, JR.
We love you and miss you. You went home to
God on January 2, 1997. We continue to honor
you. From your loving daughters, grandson
and the rest of your family and friends.
ADAMS
ARMSTRONG
WILLIAM J. ARMSTRONG "Bill"
Died peacefully December 13, 2018 at the Virginia Hospital Center in Arlington, VA. A retired
federal employee he spent his career as a
historian first with the Army and later with the
Navy. For over twenty years, he was Historian,
Naval Air Systems Command and recognized
as the official historian of U.S. Naval Aviation
procurement. In retirement he remained active
in the National Association of Retired Federal
Employees and pursued his studies of history
while adding to the Armstrong family’s genealogy, a project requiring extensive time and
travel. He is survived by his brother and sisterin-law John and Deborah Armstrong, Silt, CO;
and a cousin Linda Armstrong, Stevensville,
MD. Services will be held at a later date.
www.murphyfuneralhomes.com
BALDWIN
DARLENE BALDWIN
Darlene Baldwin passed away on Thursday,
December 27, 2018 in Easton, MD surrounded
by family. She is survived by her husband,
Kenneth Baldwin and three children; Steven
(Michelle) Baldwin, Sharon (Dan) Byrd and Scott
Baldwin, five grandchildren and nine greatgrandchildren. A memorial service will be held
at 12:00 on January 5, 2019 at St. Mark’s
United Methodist Church 100 Peachblossom
Rd., Easton, MD 21601.
www.fhnfuneralhome.com
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
FRIDKIN
PELLING
GATTON
ROBINSON
HARRIET B. FRIDKIN
On Sunday, December 30,
2018 of Potomac, MD. Beloved
wife of Jerome Fridkin; and
devoted mother of Cheryl
(Timothy) Kitt, Eleanor (John)
Preta and Marjorie (Dona
Alvarez) Fridkin. She is also
survived by grandchildren Elizabeth, Alex,
Evan, Caroline, Benjamin and Audrey.
Funeral services will be held on January
3, 2019 at 11 a.m. at Congregation Har
Shalom, 11510 Falls Road, Potomac, MD.
Interment to follow at Judean Memorial
Gardens, Olney, MD. The family will be
observing Shiva at Cheryl's house: Thursday, Saturday and Sunday at 7 p.m. Memorial contributions may be made to the
National
Multiple
Sclerosis
Society.
Arrangements by Hines-Rinaldi Funeral
Home, LLC under Jewish Funeral Practices
Committee of Greater Washington Contract.
GRACE E. GALETSKY
On Sunday, December 23, 2018, Grace (age
98) died peacefully at her home in Bowie,
MD. She was the devoted wife of the
late Alexander Galetsky; loving mother of
Nancy Galetsky, John Galetsky, Dale (Gary)
Bjarnason; and proud grandmother of Elsie.
Visitation will be at Beall Funeral Home,
6512 NW Crain Hwy (Rt. 3 South), Bowie,
MD on Friday, January 4, 2018, from 1 to 2
p.m., where a funeral service will begin at
2 p.m. Interment will occur at a later date.
www.beallfuneral.com
LONNIE BOTHWELL ADAMS III,
Col, US Army (Ret.)
Passed away on December 22, 2018 surrounded by family. Husband and best friend of 43
years to his beloved Patricia; devoted father
to Anne-Marie, Mary-Frances Vivarelli (Daniel),
Mary-Katherine Batterton (Shawn), and Lonnie
B. IV (Jill); adoring grandfather of eight grandchildren; loving brother; brother-in-law and
uncle; and steadfast companion to many loyal
friends. The family will receive family and
friends at Jefferson Funeral Chapel, Alexandria,
VA, January 3 from 6 to 8 p.m. A Funeral Mass
will be celebrated at St. Raymond of Penafort
Roman Catholic Church, Springfield, VA, January 4 at 11 a.m. Interment will take place at
Arlington National Cemetery at a later date.
DEATH NOTICE
GALETSKY
DEATH NOTICE
GELLERT
ROBERT BROAD (Age 82)
Died December 20, 2018 at his home in Reston.
Born in Detroit to Clifford and Florence Broad,
Bob was a graduate of the University of Florida
College of Engineering. He is survived by Lyn,
his high school sweetheart and wife of 60
years. A pianist since childhood, Bob filled
her life with music, curiosity and humor, dogs,
golf and a love of the outdoors. He leaves
also his cherished son, Christopher Robert
Broad and his wife, Susan, and grandchildren,
Christopher, Jack and Kate.
Services will be 3 p.m., January 5 at The Church
of the Good Shepherd, 2351 Hunter Mill Rd.,
Vienna, VA.
Donations in Bob's memory may be made
to Insight Memory Care Center, 3955 Pender
Drive, #100, Fairfax, VA 22030 or a charity of
choice.
CHARLES GELLERT
On Monday, December 31,
2018, CHARLES GELLERT of
Gaithersburg, MD. Beloved
husband of Susan Gellert. Loving father of Jesse and Chana
Gellert. Dear brother of Eugene
Gellert. Graveside funeral services will be held on Wednesday, January 2,
2019, 11 a.m. at Garden of Remembrance
Memorial Park, Clarksburg, MD. Memorial
contributions may be made to the Hebrew
Immigrant Aid Society. Arrangements
entrusted to TORCHINSKY HEBREW FUNERAL HOME, 202-541-1001.
HACKETT
MILTON L. HACKETT, JR. "Butch"
CRAWL
CALVIN CRAWL (Age 77)
Passed peacefully surrounded by his family,
on Sunday, December 23, 2018 at Mandrin
Hospice, near Annapolis, MD. He is survived by
his wife, Bettie; five children, Megan, Darrell,
Katrina, Kali and Kobie; 11 grandchildren; 12
great-grandchilden; three siblings; several inlaws. Funeral Service will be held on Thursday,
January 3 at Reid Temple AME Church, 11400
Glendale Blvd., Glen Dale, MD. Visitation 10
a.m. until Service at 11 a.m. Interment Fort
Lincoln Cemetery, Brentwood, MD. Arrangements by J.B. Jenkins Funeral Home, Inc .
BATTLE
Departed this life peacefully on Thursday,
December 27, 2018. Son of the late Milton
L. Hackett, Sr. He is survived by his devoted
mother Edith R. Hackett; two brothers James
and Dennis Hackett; sister Hillary Hill and a host
of nieces, nephews other relatives and friends.
Family will receive friends Friday, January 4,
2019 at Norbeck Community Church, 2631
Norbeck Road, Silver Spring, MD from 9 a.m.
until services at 11 a.m. Arrangements with
SNOWDEN FUNERAL HOME.
www.snowdencares.com
HARRISON
DEAN
MELVIN HOWARD BATTLE
On December 21, 2018, Melvin Howard Battle
of Mitchellville, MD, the beloved husband of
the late Jacqueline E. Battle went home to be
with the Lord. He leaves to mourn his daughter,
Patrice Battle and her husband, Derek Moore;
five grandchildren, Kelsey, Devin, Madison,
Morgan, Derek Jr.; one great-grandchild,
Kamari and a host of family and friends. Viewing begins at 10 a.m. and Mass at 11 a.m. on
Friday, January 4, 2019 at St. Joseph's Church,
Upper Marlboro, MD 20774. Later burial at
Arlington National Cemetery. Arrangements by
Pope Funeral Home.
KEVIN BRUCE DEAN
Entered into eternal rest on Tuesday,
December 25, 2018. Survived by wife,
Vanessa; children, Kevin II, Marcus and
Aliyah; father, Wade P. Dean; one granddaughter, Harmony Stewart; one brother
Keith; one sister, Ninette; and a host of
other relatives and friends. Family will
receive friends on Thursday, January 3,
2019 from 10 a.m. until service 11 a.m. at
Metropolitan AME Church 1518 M. St., NW.
Interment Fort Lincoln Cemetery.
MATSUMOTO
enlisted in the U.S. Air Force immediately
after high school graduation. He spent time
in Texas, Louisiana, and Georgia before being
sent to the Korean War Theater. He was
honorably discharged in 1955 as a Staff
Sergeant.
HISAO MATSUMOTO "Mat" (Age 89)
Hiroshima survivor, U.S. Air Force Veteran,
lifelong U.S. Government employee, honoree
of the nation of Japan, beloved husband,
wonderful father, and adoring grandfather
died February 13, 2018.
Mat was born on February 9, 1929 in Los
Angeles, the son of Japanese immigrants.
When he was two, his parents moved back
to Hiroshima, Japan to care for elderly family
members. World War II started when Mat
was 12, and students like him were mobilized
to work in factories. Mat was 16 and working
in a rifle factory in Hiroshima when the
atomic bomb exploded. He recalled a white
flash through the windows and an enormous
bang, causing the glass to shatter and the
ceiling to collapse. The family house, located
approximately three miles from the hypocenter, was miraculously spared and served as
a refuge for survivors. His father died two
months after the bombing and, following
the war, Mat worked in the fields around
the house and continued to help survivors.
Because Mat was born in the U.S .and
a U.S. citizen, he bravely chose, at age
19 all alone and speaking little English, to
make the voyage back to America to seek
a better future. He arrived in Sacramento
California and attended Sacramento High
School, graduating in 1951 at age 22. During
this time, the Korean War had begun and Mat
He attended The University of California
Berkeley, graduating in 1958. He and his
new bride, Reiko, settled in Northern Virginia
where Mat began work at the Library of
Congress. Mat received his Masters Degree
from American University in 1963. Mat’s
36-year career at the Library of Congress
took him and his family to Japan for eight
years where he was the Field Director of
the National Program for Acquisitions and
Cataloging in Tokyo, and the Washington
DC area where he was the Head of the
Library of Congress Japanese Section and
later acting Head of the Asian Division. For
his exemplary service and contribution to
Japan-U.S. understanding and relations, in
1995 he was awarded by His Majesty the
Emperor of Japan, one of Japan’s highest
honors: the prestigious Order of the Sacred
Treasure Gold Rays with Neck Ribbon at the
Imperial Palace in Tokyo.
Mat loved driving cross-country, visiting relatives, friends and national parks across
the U.S., taking his kids to baseball games,
college basketball, golf, and doting on his
grandkids. He believed in and lived a life
of education, patriotism, hard work, and
humility.
Mat and his loving wife of 57 years, Reiko,
lived amazingly resilient lives during tumultuous world times. Reiko predeceased him
in 2016, and he is survived by his children,
Kent (Connie) Matsumoto; Mimi (Herbert)
Backhausen; and Cal (Lisa) Matsumoto;
grandchildren Sarah, Andrew, and Michelle;
and brother Akira (Teiko) Matsumoto of
Hiroshima, Japan.
Funeral services will be at the Old Post
Chapel on Fort Myer Friday January 4, 2019
at 230 p.m. Vehicles must enter Fort Myer
through the Hatfield Gate for a security
check. Inurnment at the Columbarium in
Arlington National Cemetery will immediately follow the funeral followed by a reception
at the Fort Myer Officers’ Club.
EVELYN MILLER HARRISON
(Age 97)
Of Arlington, VA died at her residence on
December 21, 2018. She was preceded in
death by her husbands, Harold S. Harrison,
Howard J. Dudley and William B. Ferber; her
son, Paul Harrison and her grandson, Brad
Knudson. Survived by her children, Mark
Harrison and wife, Karen, John Harrison and
wife, Mindy and Pamela Knudson and husband,
Homer. She is also survived by 13 grandchildren, 40 great-grandchildren and eight greatgreat-grandchildren. Funeral services will be
held on Saturday, January 5, 2019 at 11 a.m. at
The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints,
16th and N. Inglewood Street, Arlington, VA.
The family will receive friends one hour prior
to the service. Interment at a later date in
Arlington National Cemetery. In lieu of flowers
the family ask that donations be made to the
Humanitarian Fund of the above mentioned
church.
KRAMER
DR. ROBERT KRAMER
On Sunday, December 30, 2018,
Dr. Robert Kramer, 91, of
Potomac, Maryland. Beloved
husband of Loretta Kramer;
devoted father of Ann Jacobs,
Deborah Weinman (Brad), Julie
Fox (Jerry) and Cheryl Kramer. Beloved
grandfather of Jaclyn Weinman Beck
(Jason), Jamie Weinman, Eric, Alexandra
and Michael Fox, Allison, Lauren, and Erica
Jacobs. Originally from the Bronx, New
York, Dr. Kramer moved to Washington,
DC after completing four years of medical
school in Lausanne, Switzerland. He
interned, completed his residency, and then
became the first Chief Resident of Internal
Medicine at the Washington Hospital Center. He met and married the love of his
life, Loretta, and together they created a
family of four loving daughters and eight
grandchildren. Dr. Kramer, with Loretta by
his side, built a thriving internal medicine
practice and cherished practicing medicine
for
49
years.
Dr. Kramer lived a long and wonderful
life. He was a true family man and loved
nothing more than to be surrounded by
his wife, children and grandchildren and
spending the day with his grand-dog, Tiger.
Funeral services will be held on Thursday,
January 3, 2019 at 10:30 a.m. at B'Nai
Israel Congregation, 6301 Montrose Road,
Rockville, Maryland. The family will hold a
private interment at King David Memorial
Gardens in Falls Church, Va. Shiva will be
held on Thursday, January 3 at B'Nai Israel
at 7 p.m. Donations can be made to the
University of Maryland Hospital, Division
of Nephrology/Transplant Section. Services
entrusted to Sagel Bloomfield Danzansky
Goldberg Funeral Care.
www.sagelbloomfield.com
McCRAY
RICHARD PAUL McCRAY
On December 13, 2018, Richard Paul McCray
age 69, peacefully went to be with the Lord.
He was born on November 21, 1949, and
raised in Arlington County, Virginia. He served
in the United States Air Force, and retired from
the U.S. Postal Service. He is survived by his
sister, Elinor Dulin. A memorial service will be
held Wednesday, January 9, 2019 at 11 a.m.,
at National Funeral Home, 7482 Lee Highway,
Falls Church, VA, 22042, with inurnment to
follow at 12 Noon.
C0979 2x3
To place a notice call 202-334-4122 or 800-627-1150, ext. 44122
GHI
CLARENCE E. GATTON
Passed away on December 31, 2018 in Falls
Church, VA. He was born on May 23, 1928
to Thomas Lee and Freddie Cornelia Gatton in
Harmony, NC.
Ed was born in Virginia in February, 1922. He
was raised on a farm in Snow Hill, Greene
County, North Carolina. After 17 years of farm
life, he moved to Washington to take college
classes and took a job with the Department
of Agriculture. He enlisted in the Marines
on December 8, 1941, and served in the
Virgin Islands, in several Pacific campaigns, in
the landing at Okinawa, and the occupation
of Japan. After promotion to sergeant, he
was discharged in 1946, and returned to the
Department of Agriculture.
He is survived by his wife, Donna Gatton;
children, David Gatton (Alla), Mary Anne Gatton
(Kourush), Patty Adair (John) and Keith Koerbel;
grandchildren, Dolores Anne Gatton (William),
Ethan Saraf and Keturah Adair.
In 1943, while on a train to Texas for a
training stint, he met Dorothy Sebree, a music
teacher working in Cumberland, Maryland.
They married shortly thereafter, and happily
shared the next 65 years.
Ed lived in Cheverly, and owned a historic
house in Berryville, Virginia. In 1981, he retired
to the Providence neighborhood of Annapolis,
on Chesapeake Bay. He and his wife loved
fishing and boating there.
He was a very kind, but also practical man, who
knew how to grow his own food, raise animals,
repair equipment, thread pipes, rewire his
house, and give experienced advice when
asked. A second father to his nephew, Ed was
also a great friend to the nephew’s wife and
children.
Clarence was proceeded in death by his first
wife, Dolores Gilleland; brothers, James Gatton,
T. Harry Gatton, Clyde F. Gilmore, and Frank D.
Gatton; and sister, Marie Gatton Myers.
He served in the United States Coast Guard
(USCG) during the Korean War. After completing his service with the USCG, Clarence began
a career with the Government Printing Office
(GPO) as a Linotype Operator. While serving in
the US Government, Clarence started his own
business as a real estate broker. He was a
member of the Elmer Timberman Lodge #54
and their Past Master. He was also a member
of Kena Shriners and Eastern Star.
On December 5, 2018 in Washington, DC.
Beloved Husband to the late Joan McGough,
his wife of more than 50 years. Loving father
to Christine McGough Grunebaum, who
preceded him in death. Brother to Marcella
M. Campagnolo. Predeceased by his sister
Catherine Palmer, and brothers Matthew,
Ernest, and Hugh McGough. John is survived by many nieces and nephews of the
Buist, Campagnolo, and McGough families.
Mr. McGough was a Naval Engineer who
served in the US Merchant Marines, and
Navy. He was a civilian employee at the
Pentagon for 40 years. The family will
receive friends at the Holy Trinity Church,
1315 36th St. NW, Washington, DC on
Friday, January 4, 2018 from 9 a.m. to
10:30 a.m. Mass of Christian Burial will
follow at 10:30 a.m. Private interment at
Arlington National Cemetery at a later date.
Memorial donations may be made to the
Alzheimer’s Association, PO Box 96011,
Washington, DC 20090.
WILLIE G. ROBINSON (Age 70)
Of Washington, DC, formally of Wilmington,
NC passed away on December 24, 2018 at
Prince George’s Hospital in Maryland after
a short illness. He retired from the Office
of Personnel Management in 2013. He will
be fondly remembered by his brothers, John
(Margie) and Ronald (Annette) sisters, Pearl
(Paul) and Wilma. He was preceded in death by
both parents (James and Thelma Robinson) and
two sisters, (Doris and Rosa). Funeral Services
will be held at Vermont Avenue Baptist Church,
1630 Vermont Avenue NW, Washington, DC
20009 on Friday, January 4, 2019. Viewing 10
a.m. until Service time at 11 a.m.
WILSON
The visitation will be held from 10 a.m. until 12
noon on Thursday, January 3, 2019 at Murphy
Funeral Home, Falls Church with the funeral
service beginning at 12 noon. The Graveside
service will be held at 12 noon on Saturday,
January 5, 2019 at Oakwood Cemetery 114
Oakwood Rd., Statesville, NC 28677.
Ed is survived by four generations of nieces
and nephews. Memorial services will be held
on Thursday, January 3 at 3 p.m. at Ginger
Cove, 4000 River Crescent Drive, Annapolis,
MD. He will rest in Arlington Cemetery, with
his late wife and near his nephew and his
wife. Please give donations in lieu of flowers
to Maryland Public Television, www.mpt.org or
the Veterans of Foreign Wars, www.vfw.org.
An online guest book is available at
www.johnmtaylorfuneralhome.com
THURLOW RAMSEY WILSON
(Age 90)
POTOSKY
ALICE E. POTOSKY (Age 67)
On Saturday, December 29, 2018, of Alexandria, VA, from metastatic breast cancer.
Beloved daughter of the late Melvin I. and
Geraldine Potosky; sister of Melvin Potosky,
Jr., the late Ann Sheridan, Mary Albert, Bryant
Potosky and Arnie Potosky. Also survived by
three sisters-in-law, eight nieces and nephews,
one grand-niece and two grand-nephews.
Alice has lived in the DC area her entire life.
After graduating from Immaculate Conception
Academy in Washington DC, she attended Ohio
University. During her college years she went
to work on a kibbutz in Israel, then traveled in
the Middle East and Europe for a few months.
Her love of travel stayed with her throughout
her life. Alice returned to OU and got her BS
in Journalism in 1976. Then went to India as
an intern for United Press International.. Upon
her return, she joined the Peace Corps to serve
in the Philippines. In 1994, she completed her
MBA at American University. Alice had a long
and varied career in marketing, public relations
and publishing. She has a large loving family
and countless friends. A Memorial Service will
be held at a private home on January 12, 2018.
DEATH NOTICE
HANCE
ROBERTS
JOAN MARIE MALONEY ROBERTS
Joan Roberts of Alexandria, VA. passed away
peacefully on December 26, 2018. She is survived by her loving husband, Kenneth Roberts,
and daughter, Susanne Roberts of Fort Lee,
NJ, and by her sisters, Carol Graves of
Canandaigua, NY and Barbara Lamb of Wills
Point, Texas. Born in Tokyo, Japan, she is a
graduate of Oklahoma State University and
the University of Illinois at Chicago Circle. She
retired from the Department of Commerce in
2010 after 39 years of government service.
Funeral services will be held Friday, January
4, at 4 p.m., Pohick Episcopal Church, 9301
Richmond Highway, Lorton, VA. In lieu of
flowers, gifts may be made to the Alzheimer’s
Association.
Additional information is at
http://www.funeralchoices.com/obituary.
JAMES A. HANCE, JR. (Age 84)
On December 30, 2018. Beloved husband of
Sharon (nee Alwine). Predeceased by first
wife JoAnn (nee Cook) in 1998. Loving father
of Jim Hance (Joan), John Hance, Joe Hance
(Donna), Jodi Whalen, and Jean Marie Havens
(Dan); brother of Patricia Houck. Proud owner
of Gentleman Jim’s Restaurant in Rockville,
MD and the Carriage House Restaurant in
Emmitsburg. Mass of Christian Burial, 10:30
a.m. on Friday, January 4, 2019 at St. Joseph
Catholic Church, 47 DePaul St., Emmitsburg,
MD, Visitation 2 to 4 and 6 to 8 p.m. on
Thursday, January 3 at Myers-Durboraw Funeral Home, 210 W. Main St., Emmitsburg, MD.
Memorial suggestions and condolences to
family at
www.myersdurborawfh.com
MOODY
ROMANO
VINCENT B. ROMANO
Members of the Association of
Retired Police Officers of D.C. are
notified of the December 28, 2018
death of Vincent B. Romano. He
was a SGT with MPD-4D when
retired on September 1, 1978.
Passed away peacefully on December 24, 2018
at Greenspring Village in Springfield, VA. The
son of CJR Wilson and Mildred Guinn Wilson,
he was born on March 14, 1928 and grew up
in Berkeley, CA. He enlisted in the army and in
1947 served in the U.S. Army of Occupation in
South Korea. After receiving a B.A. in psychology from Stanford University, he earned a Ph.D.
from Harvard University in social psychology
in 1955. Early in his career, Dr. Wilson was a
professor at the University of New Mexico, the
University of Pittsburgh, and the City University
of New York. Later he was a research scientist
at the Human Resources Research Organization in Alexandria, VA.
Dr. Wilson was a long-time member of the
Unitarian Universalist Church of Arlington
(UUCA), where he sang in the choir for many
years. He enjoyed singing folk and popular
songs and accompanying himself on the guitar
or banjo.
Survivors include his wife of 50 years, Arlene
Ethel Lange Wilson; his daughters, Julie Wilson
Childers (Bruce Childers) of Pittsburgh, PA,
and Elizabeth Arlene Wilson (Craig Berkey) of
Arlington, VA; and his brother, Gordon Wilson
of San Rafael, CA.
A service in celebration of Dr. Wilson’s life will
be held on Saturday, January 19, 2019 at 2 p.m.
at UUCA, 4444 Arlington Blvd., Arlington VA. In
lieu of flowers, contributions may be made in
his memory to UUCA.
When the
need arises,
let families
find you in the
Funeral Services
Directory.
To be seen in the
Funeral Services
Directory, please call
paid Death Notices at
202-334-4122.
DEATH NOTICE
WOOD
SANDERLIN
ELIZABETH PETERS SANDERLIN
On Wednesday, December 26, 2018; beloved
mother of Susan Stewart-Williams and Ronald
Stewart; devoted grandmother of Ronald
Wright, Delonte and Ashanti Savage; greatgrandmother of Mason Marriott and Aryah
Wright. She is also survived by a host of
other relatives and friends. Ms. Sanderlin will
lie in state at Sargeant Memorial Presbyteian
Church, 5109 Nannie Helen Burroughs Avenue
NE on Thursday, January 3, from 10 a.m. until
Service at 11 a.m. Online condolences may be
made at:
www.stewartfuneralhome.com
THORNTON
ROBERT R. THORNTON, SR. "Bob"
Died December 19, 2018. Wake 10:30 a.m.
Services 11:30 a.m. on January 4, 2019 at
Gospel Faith Fellowship Ministries, 6016 Allentown Rd., Camp Springs, MD 20746. Burial to
follow at Cheltenham Veterans Cemetery.
JOHN PIERMONT MOODY JR.
"Freedom Rider"
On Friday, December 14,
2018 Beloved father of Jon
P. Moody, III (Rev. Denise
Moody),
Dahaomine
Moody-Ward
(Kirkland),
Imani
Diahlo
Moody
(Monique) and Akintunde Moody. He is also
survived by dear grandchildren Jonice Moody,
Hiari K. and Nishani H. Ward, Kaya Naima
and Xola Simone Moody, and a host of other
relatives and friends. On Friday, January 4,
2019 a visitation will be held from 10 a.m. until
hour of service 11 a.m. at Corinthian Baptist
Church, 6705 Good Luck Rd., Lanham, MD
20706. Interment Quantico National Cemetery.
Condolences to
www.pridgenfuneralservice.com
RHONE
DEATH NOTICE
BRACEY
JOHN PETER McGOUGH (Age 87)
Military emblems are available with death notices and in-memoriams
Now death notices on
washingtonpost.com/obituaries allow you
to express your sympathy with greater ease.
Visit today.
EDWARD S. PELLING
On December 28, 2018, in Annapolis, Ed
passed away after 96 years of active life.
Beloved husband of the late Dorothy Sebree
Pelling.
McGOUGH
Because your loved one served proudly...
POST YOUR
CONDOLENCES
B5
RE
IRVING L. RHONE
EDDIE F. BRACEY
Departed this life on December 23, 2018.
Preceded in death by her husband Earl Bracey
and daughters, Krista Williams and Earlena
Morris. She is survived by her sons, Earl
Bracey (Mary) and Rene’ Ford (Michelle), nine
grandchildren, seven great-grandchildren and
a host of other relatives and friends. Family
will receive friends on Friday, January 4, 2019
from 10 a.m. until time of service 11 at Seaton
Memorial AME Church, 5507 Lincoln Avenue,
Lanham, MD. Interment Fort Lincoln Memorial
Cemetery.
www.StewartFuneralHome.com
On December 21, 2018 Irving L. (Buddy) Rhone
was called home to be at God’s side. He was
born on May 19, 1930 to Charles W. and Alberta
J. Rhone of Washington, DC who preceded him.
Left to cherish his memories are his loving
Wife Miriam V. Jackson-Rhone, his son, Vincent
A. Rhone (Karla), and grandchildren, Lemuel
Bunting, LeMuria Kent (Fred), Sarah Brown,
Jonathan and Matthew Rhone of Atlanta, GA;
step-sons, Ronald (Loretta), Jerald (Doris),
David (Belinda) and Robert (Natalie) Jackson.
He was also preceded in death by his daughter,
Rosita Bunting; sons, Victor M. Rhone and
Bernard Fountain; step-sons, William, Larry,
Richard and Tyrone Jackson, ex-wife, Juanita V.
Rhone and brother, Charles Rhone. He leaves
behind to cherish many memories a host of
other family members and many dear friends.
The funeral will be held at Lee Funeral Homes,
6633 Old Alexandria Ferry Road, Clinton, MD
20735 on January 7, 2019. Visitation from
10 a.m. to 12 noon, Funeral from 12 noon
to 1 p.m. Interment at Washington National
Cemetery 4101 Suitland Rd., Suitland-Silver
Hill, MD 20746. “Online condolences at
www.leefuneralhomes.com
MILTON JOSEPH WOOD
"Bud" (Age 80)
Passed away peacefully on December 27,
2018. Bud, as he was known by most, was
the son of Army General Herferd Milton and
Lucille Wood, born on November 16, 1938 in
Ridgway, Pennsylvania. He was preceded in
death by his parents and his sisters, Margaret
Wood Stephenson and Doris Wood Oravis. He
grew up in Ridgway, living in the Hyde Hotel
owned and managed by his parents. He earned
a Bachelor’s degree in History from Bethany
College, WV.
Bud married his beautiful bride, Janet
Creighton on June 25, 1960. He soon began
working for Fairfax County Public Schools as a
social studies teacher, working at Fairfax High
School the majority of his career. He enjoyed
being the freshman football coach for Fairfax
the majority of his tenure. He was loved by
the many students he taught and coached over
the years. When Bud was not teaching he
spent time managing the pool in Fairfax and
Sterling Park for many years. Still managing
to guide and influence students even over the
summer. After retirement, he loved spending
time at the Outer Banks with family and friends.
He enjoyed spending time with his wife, kids,
grandkids and had been a beloved owner of a
few dogs over the years.
Bud is survived by his wife Janet of Sterling,
VA; two children, daughter, Sharon M. Brango,
and her husband Nicholas Jr. (Skip) of Ashburn,
VA; son, Michael J. Wood and his wife Cheryl
of Potomac Falls, VA; five grandchildren and
two great grandchildren, Nichole Weirick and
her husband David, and daughter Reece of
Malvern, PA; Bryant Picou of Unionville, IN;
Kirk Picou and his wife Jessica, and daughter
Delaney of Harpers Ferry, WV; Morgan Wood of
Centreville, VA and Mitchell Wood of Potomac
Falls, VA as well as much loved nieces and
nephews.
A mass will be held on January 7, 2019 at Christ
the Redeemer Catholic Church in Sterling,
VA at 11 a.m. In lieu of flowers, memorial
donations may be made to Friends of Homeless
Animals (FOHA). Arrangements handled by
Adams Green Funeral Home, 721 Elden St.,
Herndon, VA. To sign the online guest book,
send condolences, or view a detailed obituary,
please visit
www.adamsgreen.com.
B6
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. WEDNESDAY,
JANUARY 2 , 2019
The Weather
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/WEATHER
Partly cloudy
We’re stuck in the clouds, although
we should see some sun, as well,
with highs reaching the mid- to
upper 40s. Mostly light breezes flow
from the north. In the evening,
mostly cloudy with a chance of a few showers or
light rain as lows range in the mid-30s to low 40s.
.
TWITTER: @CAPITALWEATHER
Monday
Partly sunny
51° 43
55° 40
51° 43
FEELS: 45°
FEELS: 53°
FEELS: 48°
P: 70%
W: SSW 4–8 mph
P: 70%
W: WNW 7–14 mph
P: 0%
W: WNW 7–14 mph
P: 10%
W: SSW 6–12 mph
H: Moderate
H: High
H: Moderate
H: Moderate
Saturday
Cloudy, rain
51° 35
51° 43
FEELS: 44°
FEELS: 48°
CHNCE PRECIP: 0%
WIND: ESE 4–8 mph
P: 25%
W: NW 10–20 mph
HUMIDITY: Moderate
H: Moderate
Thursday
Partly cloudy
48° 42
°
°
FEELS*: 48°
FACEBOOK.COM/CAPITALWEATHER
Sunday
Partly sunny,
mild
Friday
Cloudy,
afternoon rain
Today
Mostly cloudy,
cooler
.
°
°
°
OFFICIAL RECORD
Temperatures
NATION
Harrisburg
43/36
Hagerstown
43/37
Davis
44/32
Sa
Su
High
Low
Weather map features for noon today.
Normal
Philadelphia
43/36
Record high
Record low
Baltimore
45/39
Dover
44/37
Washington
48/42
M
Tu
W
Th
F
Sa
Su
M
Tu
W
Th
F
through 5 p.m.
yesterday
Reagan
Dulles
BWI
64° 10:00 a.m.
50° 12:37 a.m.
44°/29°
69° 2005
–14° 1881
62° 8:04 a.m.
47° 12:12 a.m.
43°/24°
68° 2005
–6° 1968
61° 9:00 a.m.
49° 12:01 a.m.
42°/25°
67° 2005
–6° 1881
Difference from 30–yr. avg. (Reagan): this month: +20.6° yr. to date: +20.6°
Precipitation
PREVIOUS YEAR
NORMAL
LATEST
OCEAN: 49°
OCEAN: 44°
Richmond
52/44
Norfolk
50/45
Virginia Beach
49/45
Past 24 hours
OCEAN: 48°
Total this month
Normal
Total this year
Kitty Hawk
51/47
OCEAN: 49°
Normal
Snow, past 24 hours
Pollen: Low
Air Quality: Good
Grass
Trees
Weeds
Mold
Dominant cause: Particulates
Low
Low
Low
Low
Totals for season
Reagan
Dulles
BWI
0.05"
Trace
0.09"
Trace
0.09"
0.0"
1.4"
0.04"
0.00"
0.08"
0.00"
0.08"
0.0"
3.0"
0.26"
0.03"
0.09"
0.03"
0.09"
0.0"
1.7"
Moon Phases
UV: Low
Solar system
1 out of 11+
Blue Ridge: Today, mostly cloudy, colder. High 38–42. Wind
west 8–16 mph. Tonight, cloudy, rain. Low 34–38. Wind
southwest 6–12 mph. Thursday, mostly cloudy. High 38–42.
Wind northwest 7–14 mph. Friday, cloudy, rain. High 41–45.
Atlantic beaches: Today, partly sunny. High 41–49. Wind
northeast 6–12 mph. Tonight, cloudy, rain. Low 36–45.
Wind south 4–8 mph. Thursday, cloudy, shower. High
47–55. Wind west 6–12 mph. Friday, cloudy, afternoon rain.
High 46–53. Wind south 5–10 mph.
Waterways: Upper Potomac River: Today, mostly cloudy. wind east
5–10 knots. Waves around 1 foot. Visibility clear. • Lower Potomac
and Chesapeake Bay: Today, mostly cloudy. Wind east 5–10 knots.
Waves around a foot on the Chesapeake Bay and Potomac River.
Visibility clear.• River Stages: The stage at Little Falls will be near 6.7
feet today, falling to 6.2 feet on Thursday. Flood stage at Little Falls
is 10 feet.
Annapolis
FORECAST
Ocean City
45/39
Lexington
47/40
Washington
ACTUAL
Cape May
42/38
Annapolis
44/40
Charlottesville
48/42
Today’s tides
RECORD
°
F
REGION
AVERAGE
(High tides in Bold)
4:07 a.m.
10:54 a.m.
4:31 p.m.
11:44 p.m.
12:59 a.m.
7:20 a.m.
2:16 p.m.
8:19 p.m.
10:09 p.m.
OCEAN CITY
3:47 a.m.
10:10 a.m.
3:58 p.m.
Norfolk
5:50 a.m.
12:07 p.m.
6:09 p.m.
none
POINT LOOKOUT 3:20 a.m.
10:05 a.m.
4:48 p.m.
9:43 p.m.
T-storms
<–10
Rain
–0s
Showers
0s
10s
Snow
20s
Flurries
30s
Ice
40s
50s
Cold Front
Warm Front
60s
80s
70s
90s
Stationary Front
100s
110+
Yesterday's National
High: Immokalee, FL 88°
Low: Daniel, WY –39°
for the 48 contiguous states
NATIONAL
Albany, NY
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Austin
Baltimore
Billings, MT
Birmingham
Bismarck, ND
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Cheyenne, WY
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Dallas
Denver
Today
33/24/pc
32/12/sn
36/13/sn
61/51/r
44/38/r
45/39/c
34/31/s
56/46/r
31/24/pc
33/21/pc
34/29/s
33/29/pc
22/17/pc
70/60/sh
51/37/c
59/50/c
41/22/s
33/23/c
44/29/c
40/30/c
39/34/r
44/19/s
Tomorrow
40/27/sn
32/11/s
18/2/pc
59/51/sh
50/35/c
49/28/pc
43/32/pc
56/49/r
41/27/s
36/27/c
41/31/sn
35/30/pc
33/27/sn
69/58/c
45/30/pc
61/48/r
46/31/s
38/29/s
42/28/pc
41/31/pc
39/34/i
50/27/s
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Fairbanks, AK
Fargo, ND
Hartford, CT
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson, MS
Jacksonville, FL
Kansas City, MO
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Miami
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York City
Norfolk
32/21/s
35/28/sf
39/27/sn
25/–2/sn
24/17/pc
35/24/s
84/73/s
51/47/r
39/25/c
53/46/r
78/61/pc
36/22/pc
49/31/s
42/35/r
62/42/s
46/33/c
45/37/r
82/73/s
31/22/sn
21/16/s
48/37/r
71/60/c
38/33/pc
50/45/c
45/26/s
37/29/pc
46/25/pc
2/–21/pc
36/26/pc
41/26/sn
82/72/pc
52/39/r
40/27/s
54/47/r
78/60/pc
47/25/pc
53/34/s
47/37/r
65/45/s
47/33/pc
49/42/r
83/72/pc
37/30/s
36/25/s
49/40/c
67/51/r
47/32/pc
55/39/r
Oklahoma City
Omaha
Orlando
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, ME
Portland, OR
Providence, RI
Raleigh, NC
Reno, NV
Richmond
Sacramento
St. Louis
St. Thomas, VI
Salt Lake City
San Diego
San Francisco
San Juan, PR
Seattle
Spokane, WA
Syracuse
Tampa
Wichita
36/26/c
36/20/s
81/64/pc
43/36/pc
54/32/s
41/30/c
30/19/s
44/40/pc
36/26/s
55/47/c
43/23/s
52/44/c
54/30/s
38/25/c
84/74/sh
26/16/pc
62/41/s
55/40/s
81/74/sh
46/44/r
33/29/pc
31/24/pc
81/67/pc
40/19/pc
37/27/sn
47/24/s
83/66/pc
48/33/pc
57/35/s
39/28/pc
36/23/sn
52/45/r
43/28/sn
58/41/r
51/29/pc
54/35/sh
55/33/pc
46/29/s
84/74/pc
32/21/pc
64/44/s
55/42/s
84/73/pc
53/45/r
38/35/r
35/28/sn
80/68/pc
48/22/c
World
High: Paraburdoo, Australia 115°
Low: Tompo, Russia –49°
Jan 5
New
Jan 14
First
Quarter
Jan 21
Full
Jan 27
Last
Quarter
Sun
Moon
Venus
Mars
Jupiter
Saturn
Rise
7:27 a.m.
4:10 a.m.
3:44 a.m.
11:20 a.m.
5:14 a.m.
7:25 a.m.
Set
4:57 p.m.
2:39 p.m.
2:05 p.m.
11:28 p.m.
2:52 p.m.
4:56 p.m.
excludes Antarctica
WORLD
Today
Addis Ababa
77/48/pc
Amsterdam
45/39/c
Athens
52/43/pc
Auckland
75/65/pc
Baghdad
59/48/c
Bangkok
88/71/pc
Beijing
33/13/pc
Berlin
37/27/pc
Bogota
70/43/pc
Brussels
44/34/pc
Buenos Aires
87/59/t
Cairo
64/52/pc
Caracas
71/64/pc
Copenhagen
38/33/s
Dakar
84/68/pc
Dublin
44/35/c
Edinburgh
37/27/s
Frankfurt
41/27/s
Geneva
40/28/pc
Ham., Bermuda 71/64/sh
Helsinki
31/15/sn
Ho Chi Minh City 83/75/c
Tomorrow
77/46/pc
44/38/c
52/37/r
76/66/c
64/42/s
86/73/pc
36/16/s
36/28/pc
68/44/pc
42/33/c
75/59/pc
64/50/s
72/66/pc
37/33/pc
82/67/c
45/34/pc
40/34/pc
38/30/c
38/27/s
71/67/c
20/10/c
87/78/sh
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kabul
Kingston, Jam.
Kolkata
Lagos
Lima
Lisbon
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Mumbai
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo
Ottawa
Paris
Prague
59/56/r
62/37/s
46/40/c
54/40/s
78/57/t
48/21/s
85/76/s
77/52/pc
90/76/pc
76/69/pc
61/40/s
42/33/pc
54/28/s
85/74/s
74/45/pc
13/7/s
31/29/sn
89/68/pc
81/56/pc
72/45/pc
31/26/s
11/6/pc
43/32/pc
35/23/sf
65/63/r
65/39/pc
45/37/r
52/39/s
72/58/t
51/28/pc
83/75/s
78/53/pc
89/77/pc
76/69/c
54/42/pc
41/28/pc
53/28/s
86/75/s
73/47/pc
23/22/pc
30/26/sn
89/70/pc
80/60/s
71/44/pc
32/26/c
25/23/pc
41/29/pc
30/22/sf
Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome
San Salvador
Santiago
Sarajevo
Seoul
Shanghai
Singapore
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei City
Tehran
Tokyo
Toronto
Vienna
Warsaw
91/80/pc
79/59/pc
58/33/pc
87/65/s
92/57/s
34/22/c
33/15/s
44/38/pc
88/78/pc
31/23/pc
85/71/s
65/63/r
50/41/pc
50/38/pc
29/26/pc
39/26/sf
37/24/sn
95/80/s
82/53/s
47/30/s
88/65/pc
94/58/s
26/19/sn
35/18/s
50/45/c
89/78/pc
30/27/pc
83/72/pc
69/67/r
48/34/r
50/37/s
35/29/pc
32/24/pc
29/21/sf
Key: s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, r-rain,
sh- showers, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries,
sn-snow, i-ice
Sources: AccuWeather.com; US Army Centralized
Allergen Extract Lab (pollen data); airnow.gov (air
quality data); National Weather Service
* AccuWeather's RealFeel Temperature®
combines over a dozen factors for an accurate
measure of how the conditions really “feel.”
A nonprofit home for mothers is trying to keep its house
HOME FROM B1
It has significant supporters,
including Marriott, which made
a $50,000 donation, according to
Healthy Babies Project Executive
Director Regine Elie. But the goal
of buying the building is a tough
one. So far, Elie has drummed up
more than $130,000 in donations; the owner is asking
$650,000 for the house, which is
on a residential street not far
from the Minnesota Avenue Metro station.
Since moving into the building
in 2012, the organization has put
a lot of work into fixing it up. Elie
found donors and volunteers to
provide carpeting for the bare
floors and a playground out front
for the many resident children;
she got churches and other
groups to decorate each individual bedroom in its own theme;
she got Sherwin Williams to
provide paint for the walls.
The house now is a bustling
hub. In the kitchen, between
high chairs, bouncy seats and
strollers, the moms consult a
bulletin board advertising a variety of services, goods and classes,
including preschools, diapers
and a training program to get a
commercial driver’s license. In
the room that a team of volunteers converted into a cramped
office for the eight-person staff,
one employee simultaneously
makes a professional phone call
and waves hi to Jacob, who just
wandered in with a toy firetruck.
In the classroom in the center of
the house, energetic teenage girls
are shouting the lyrics to a rap
song. They’re voluntarily spending four days of their winter
break taking a pregnancy prevention class; their peer educator, Rose, a high school student
at D.C. International School, is
using the song to point out
negative lessons in pop culture
that the girls need to overcome.
Re-creating all of this in a new
house would be a daunting burden that Elie hopes she won’t
have to face. This is the house
that she worked hard to convert
to meet the many needs of her
clients, pregnant and parenting
young women up to age 24. She
would like the Healthy Babies
Project to own it.
The organization offered
$450,000, which Elie thought
was a reasonable bid in a neigh-
PHOTOS BY BONNIE JO MOUNT/THE WASHINGTON POST
TOP: Regine Elie, executive
director of the Healthy Babies
Project, shares a moment with
4-year-old Jacob at her desk.
LEFT: The Northeast
Washington house that houses
the nonprofit home is for sale,
and the organization has raised
more than $130,000 toward the
$650,000 asking price.
borhood where real estate estimators price most homes on the
block in the $300,000 range. But
District tax assessors said in 2018
that this property is worth
$633,570, almost $100,000 more
than the 2017 estimate.
The owner turned down her
initial offer.
According to property records,
the house is owned by a corporation called 500 Eastern Avenue
LLC. There is no individual listed
in the records. Elie says her
rental documents give the landlord’s name as Dixon A. Oladele,
a Washington landlord who has
been arrested and fined hundreds of thousands of dollars for
housing code violations. Oladele
did not respond to phone calls
from The Washington Post about
the house.
This house was what Elie first
dreamed of when she came to the
Healthy Babies Project, which
was founded in 1990. “I always
wanted to do housing,” she said.
“A lot of the girls were homeless
when they were coming in to us.
My vision for the agency came to
be a reality.”
It’s a place where Elie, who has
a long history of working with
struggling youths, and her coworkers support each individual
young mother in whatever way
they can — whether that means
finding Scheinman a tutor to
help her get her GED, stopping in
the middle of a workday if a mom
wants advice about a romantic
conundrum, helping the moms
save money so they can rent their
own apartments someday, or
teaching a new mom about
breast-feeding or nutrition or
bonding with her baby.
Elie says she strives to offer all
options to the pregnant teenagers and young women who
come to this house, often drawn
by the promise of drop-in pregnancy tests for just $2 for anyone
younger than 21.
“If they say they want an
abortion, we look up resources.
We’ll support either direction.
It’s not my decision,” she said.
What she tells the mothers
who decide to raise their babies
is that she can help them complete their educations and start
stable lives for their children.
She looks at the Christmas
cards on her office wall, pointing
out moms who came through
this house who are married now,
who own their own homes, who
went to college. Scheinman will
be the next, when she starts
classes at UDC this semester. She
wants to become a registered
nurse.
Just outside her office door,
Jacob is running up to Scheinman, holding out his hand. “I was
dancing and then I got hurt!” he
says. Scheinman scoops him up
and kisses his fingers.
“You were dancing too hard?
Too awesomely?” she says, holding him close. He’s giggling now.
“I got you though. I love you.”
julie.zauzmer@washpost.com
KLMNO
Style
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2 , 2019
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/STYLE
EZ
RE
THE RELIABLE SOURCE
THE SHUTDOWN
BOOK WORLD
CAROLYN HAX
It’s time to stop trying to
make sense out of 2018
and start predicting
2019’s headlines. C2
The Smithsonian and the
National Gallery of Art
are closing as their
funding runs out. C3
A critic’s look at some of
the most anticipated
fiction and nonfiction
releases in January. C6
Throwing cold water on
an old-flame scenario,
beyond the fact that
he’s still married. C10
C
BOOK WORLD
A wild ride
fit for the
Cowboy
King
BY
RON CHARLES
Who wouldn’t want to grow old
like Jerome Charyn? Now in his
80s, the prolific writer seems ever
more daring. With “The Secret
Life of Emily Dickinson” (2010), he
snuck into
the
bedroom of the
Belle of Amherst and
felt the palpitations of
her erotic
heart. Four
years later,
he
reanimated Lincoln’s sainted bones in
THE PERILOUS
ADVENTURES OF
a
novel
THE COWBOY KING called “I Am
Abraham.”
A Novel of Teddy
And now,
Roosevelt and His
with “The
Times
Perilous AdBy Jerome Charyn
ventures of
Liveright. 283 pp.
the Cowboy
$26.95
King,”
he
scales the
mountainous personality of Theodore Roosevelt, who died 100
years ago this month.
Few novelists would tread on
such hallowed ground, and the
challenges of writing historical
fiction about Teddy are particularly formidable. After all, that chamber of our national pantheon is
guarded by a number of fine biographies, including Edmund Morris’s Pulitzer Prize-winning trilogy.
What’s even more daunting, any
would-be novelist interested in
creating a fresh version of
Roosevelt must compete with the
version that Roosevelt left of himself in more than 40 of his own
books. Given the man’s penchant
for autobiography, writers of historical fiction would seem to be
stuck between creating a pale version of Roosevelt’s own work or a
counterfactual burlesque.
These glossy periodicals helped change the world.
Their demise feels like a loss — but is it?
BOOK WORLD CONTINUED ON C6
BY LAVANYA RAMANATHAN
In late November, Glamour came to the same
conclusion reached by so many other women’s magazines these days: After 80 years in mailboxes and
grocery store checkouts, it will stop publishing its
glossy monthly, ending with the January issue. For
Glamour, print is officially dead, the inexorable “pivot
to digital” now complete.
Teen Vogue, a junior version of the fashion bible,
was already there. Self, purveyor of 1,000 ways to say
goodbye to your back fat, disappeared from the racks
in 2017. Seventeen, once a lifestyle primer for high
school girls everywhere, now will publish only special
issues, and Redbook, one of the “Seven Sisters” of
magazines for suburban housewives, is high-tailing it
to the Web as well.
The magazine industry as a whole has been belt-
Press corps
often gets
the silent
treatment
BY PAUL FARHI
The New York Times published
a powerful story last week about
President Trump’s growing isolation in the White House, with
colorful details such as Trump’s
tendency to interrupt advisers
during meetings to call them
“freaking idiots” (except he
doesn’t use the word “freaking”).
Asked to comment by the
Times’s reporters about this, the
White House said nothing. It did
not respond.
Similarly, it offered no response
when The Washington Post asked
the White House about Trump’s
false claim during a post-Christmas Day visit to U.S. troops in Iraq
that he boosted military pay by 10
percent.
Reporters are used to officials
who respond to their inquiries
with a terse “no comment.” This
was typically the practice in prior
presidential
administrations
when officials saw no strategic
value in rebutting an unflattering
story.
But as in so many things, the
Trump administration is different. Instead of “no comment,”
Trump’s press representatives often don’t bother saying anything
at all.
“This is the least responsive
White House press operation I’ve
ever dealt with by far,” said Peter
Baker, a veteran White House
reporter for the New York Times
NO RESPONSE CONTINUED ON C7
tightening for years thanks to a print advertising
famine, eliminating costly paper copies while trying
to establish a beachhead on the Internet. Yet women’s
publications somehow feel much more endangered
than the rest, especially now that even the woke
online upstarts that once aimed to replace them —
sites such as the Hairpin, Rookie and the Toast — are
themselves turning off the lights.
From Ladies’ Home Journal (still hanging in there,
but downgraded to a quarterly) to email-based Lenny
Letter (extinguished this fall, after a wild three years),
these publications helped mold tastes, define mainstream feminism (as well as femininity) and give
talented female journalists a leg up into highflying
media careers. Their demise feels like a loss — but is it?
MAGAZINES CONTINUED ON C3
Democrats who wonder about, think about or consider running
BY
BEN TERRIS
In the world according to
Democrats, the president is a
bully, a sexist, a criminal and a
megalomaniac. Democracy and
its institutions are under siege.
The time has come to take urgent action.
But first . . . some “mulling.”
Joe Biden has made it known
that he’s “the most qualified”
person to be the next president
— but he wants to run it by his
family first. Sen. Sherrod Brown
of Ohio shifted his stance from
“not actively considering” a
2020 campaign to “I’d be lying if
I said I wasn’t considering it.”
And Sen. Michael F. Bennet of
Colorado is somewhere between
“wondering” about a White
House bid and “seriously thinking” about it.
While competing organizations are begging Rep. Beto
O’Rourke to run, the departing
congressman from Texas maintains that he and his wife are
YASMINA CHAVEZ/LAS VEGAS SUN/ASSOCIATED PRESS
For former vice president Joe Biden, the fire in the belly might turn into heartburn in a nasty race.
simply thinking “about what we
can do next to contribute to the
best of our ability.” Pete Buttigieg, the mayor of South Bend,
Ind., said he would spend the
holidays “looking at things” —
things that presumably include
polling data and résumés for
field staff. And in a bold, early
move, Sen. Elizabeth Warren of
Massachusetts released a slick,
soaring video Monday announcing her decision to . . . form a
committee to explore the possibility of running for president.
“People hate all that stuff,”
said Rep. John Delaney (D-Md.).
“One thing we are learning in
politics is people want authenticity. This cat-and-mouse game
does rub people the wrong way.”
Delaney is perhaps the bestpositioned Democrat to say, Get
in or get out already. The littleknown congressman announced
his own bid for the presidency
way back in July — of 2017.
“When I go to Iowa, a lot of
MULLING CONTINUED ON C2
C2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. WEDNESDAY,
JANUARY 2 , 2019
The Reliable Source
Helena Andrews-Dyer and Emily Heil
Keeping up with the Kardashians and other 2019 newsmakers
What a year, right? Was it
really just 52 weeks? 12 months?
365 days? It felt like a lifetime,
at least by news cycle standards.
Almost too much happened —
midterms, investigations,
firings, hirings, splits,
weddings, babies and books (so
many books) — and now, here
we are again with another
round of fresh headlines on the
horizon. Predicting the future is
a tricky exercise (especially in a
world where reality stars are
now real movers and shakers),
but we’re going to try anyway.
Breakout book
2018 saw a flurry of Big Books
that caused even bigger
splashes, including titles such
as Michael Wolff ’s “Fire and
Fury,” Omarosa’s “Unhinged”
and Michelle Obama’s recordbusting “Becoming,” to name a
few. Forget going platinum: The
Washington success barometer
is “get published.” So who’s up
next on 2019’s rock-star
bookshelf ? We think John F.
Kelly, President Trump’s
longest-serving chief of staff —
which is saying a whole heck of
a lot — has many stories to tell.
The man played an outsize role
in other people’s books, from
calling the president an “idiot”
(according to Wolff ) to giving
Omarosa the boot (according to
Omarosa), so it’s high time he
controlled his own narrative.
And the public is waiting.
The #goals relationship
Remember Ariana and Pete?
Priyanka and Nick? Don Jr. and
Kimberly? There is never a
shortage of random romantic
pairings to pick apart. With a
presidential election looming,
2019 will probably be the year
when Cory Booker, 49, and Cleo
Wade, 29, make it or break it.
Booker, the junior Democratic
senator from New York, is an
unofficially official contender
for the race to the White House,
and Cleo, an Instagram poet
and author, is wildly popular
with millennials. If the couple
(and we’re pretty sure they’re a
“On the Basis of Sex,” “The
Front Runner,” those Roger
Ailes projects. There’s no doubt
that 2019 will have its own
movie moment. And while the
2016 presidential election
wasn’t all that long ago, we
think a behind-the-scenes look
at how it all went down would
be a smart move. Alec Baldwin
and the entire cast of “Saturday
Night Live” are probably
writing the script as we speak.
EVAN AGOSTINI/INVISION/ASSOCIATED PRESS
CHRIS O'MEARA/AP
JOEL C RYAN/INVISION/AP
FROM LEFT: Will Ariana Grande make news next year by endorsing a presidential candidate? Will
Andrew Gillum get Kanye’s support? And will Kendall Jenner continue to speak up about anxiety?
couple) decide to take the leap
this year, it’ll be a power move
that dominates headlines.
past 12 months. We smell an Alist delegation and a news
conference brewing.
The reality star turned
advocate
In 2018, Kim Kardashian got
a woman’s life sentence
commuted by the president and
prison reform pushed through
Congress. That was a few
months after older sister
Kourtney Kardashian came to
Washington to help boost
cosmetic safety laws. Who will
be the next member of the
Kardashian clan to bring
reality-TV cameras to the
nation’s capital? We’re going
with Kendall Jenner, the
supermodel sister, who opened
up on “Keeping Up With the
Kardashians” in February about
her struggle with anxiety,
saying that her panic attacks
were hindering her career.
Several big names — Carson
Daly, Kristen Bell, Michael
Phelps — have been outspoken
about anxiety disorders over the
The big resignation
The White House is a lot like
the “Big Brother” house. Who’s
getting the ax — er, gracefully
resigning next is a top-of-mind
question that could score points
in Vegas. Our money (we do not
gamble) is on senior advisers
Ivanka Trump and her husband,
Jared Kushner. While they’re
the rare staffers to have
embraced Washington (actually
going somewhere besides the
Trump International Hotel for
dinner), the city hasn’t exactly
returned the favor. Though
loyalists who have at least
photogenically weathered the
Trump storm, Ivanka and Jared
just might be at the end of their
collective ropes.
The celebrity endorsement
everyone’s waiting for
2018 saw an onslaught of Alister advocacy. Even Tay Tay
(that would be formerly
politically reticent superstar
Taylor Swift) threw caution to
the wind and announced whom
she was backing in the midterm
elections. It was a big deal —
and then, well, her candidates
lost. So which surprise famous
person will be an early
Hollywood surrogate for 2019?
Kim Kardashian is basically a
Washingtonian now. But what
about Ariana Grande? (The
“Thank U, Next” campaign
slogans alone? We mean,
c’mon.) And not to mention, in
the music video for that wildly
popular single, the pop star,
pretending to be iconic law
student Elle Woods, can be seen
reading from the legal tome
“Immigration and Refugee Law
and Policy.”
The next big Hollywood
adaptation
There were sooo many
“ripped from the headlines”
movies in theaters or in
development last year — “Vice,”
Kanye West’s new BFF
Oh, Kanye. The rapper’s
relationship with Trump, from
the MAGA hat and that SNL
rant to his wildly off-script
cameo in the Oval has been
dissected endlessly. West is
probably the one celebrity no
politician wants at a rally. But
the hip-hop icon still has his
opinions, and his wife, Kim, is a
bona fide influencer now, so Ye
ain’t going away. A great cause
for West’s tweetstorms? Andrew
Gillum. The rising political star
and former mayor of
Tallahassee is a fellow Gen Xer
who is trying to buck the
system. Diddy and DJ Khaled
already love him so why not Ye?
Who’s doing an arena tour?
Michelle Obama basically
rewrote the book on book tours
last year. Those hologram boots
alone. But someone else has to
take the crown, right? Former
Supreme Court justice John
Paul Stevens and former House
speaker John A. Boehner both
have memoirs on the horizon,
but we’re guessing they won’t be
filling up stadiums. But what
about former president George
W. Bush who, 10 years removed
from the White House, has
become something of a pop
culture figure with his mint
candies and modern paintings?
Okay . . . maybe this is a stretch.
Mrs. O will probably be wearing
that crown for the foreseeable
future: Her arena tour has been
extended through May.
Sarah Polus contributed to this
report.
GOT A TIP? EMAIL US AT RELIABLESOURCE@WASHPOST.COM. FOR THE LATEST SCOOPS, VISIT WASHINGTONPOST.COM/RELIABLESOURCE
@helena_andrews @emilyaheil
Democrats hem and heehaw about the 2020 donkey race
MULLING FROM C1
people thanked me,” said Delaney, who chose early on not to
seek a fourth term in Congress to
focus on his long-shot quest to
lead the nation. “Not for running
for president, per se, but for
being honest with them about
my intentions.”
In fairness, the decision to
run for president is a big one.
The more anyone thinks about
it, the less they would want to do
it. There’s the fundraising, the
time away from families, the
pretending you care about ethanol subsidies in Iowa or enjoy
the food at that South Carolina
fish fry, the negative stories
published about you and the
ones you love.
“There is so much of your
private life you sacrifice to do
this,” Amy O’Rourke said in an
interview during her husband’s
failed Senate campaign in Texas
last year. “A presidential campaign is just not something that
would ever appeal to me. You
just cross a line that you almost
forgo being able to have any real
life as a family.”
And that’s coming from a
woman whose family lived much
of last year on Facebook Live.
Every potential candidate has
different things to weigh. Beto
O’Rourke has young children:
Are they up for this? Brown just
depleted most of his fundraising
to win reelection in Ohio: Does
he actually have the wherewithal to take on a truly competitive
race? Biden is as popular as he’s
ever been: Is he really willing to
have his name dragged through
the mud in a race that’s no sure
thing?
It’s been said there’s no downside to running for president —
that in the worst-case scenario
your book sales spike, your
speaking fees rise and you find a
nice soft landing spot on cable
television. But then again, you
could end up like Gary Hart or
John Edwards, an also-ran unable to outrun a tarnished repu-
MICHAEL ROBINSON CHAVEZ/THE WASHINGTON POST
MICHAEL ROBINSON CHAVEZ/THE WASHINGTON POST
ANDREW HARNIK FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
SARAH RICE FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: Former HUD secretary and San Antonio mayor Julián Castro, Rep. Beto O’Rourke of Texas, Sen.
Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts and Rep. John Delaney of Maryland are among Democrats running or considering a run for president.
tation. Even worse, you could
win and never get the chance to
start your own grievance-fueled
broadcast network, destined instead to brood and fume in a
lonely White House.
So how, exactly, does someone
go about making a decision of
this magnitude?
Brown has been talking it
through on a daily basis with his
wife and confidant, the Pulitzer
Prize-winning newspaper columnist Connie Schultz.
“It’s like popcorn ricocheting
in a hot skillet,” Schultz said
about the process. “It’s all over
the place.”
Yes, she said, the problems the
country faces are existential. But
deciding to run for president —
especially in a cycle that is
expected to serve up all kinds of
nasty — comes with its own
existential dread.
“Do you really not want to see
your dog?” Schultz said she asks
her husband. “He’s too long to
take on a plane!”
But the struggle to make a
decision is a healthy thing, she
contends: We probably don’t
want to elect someone who has
known all along that they want
to be president.
“I have said many times I love
being married to a man who
looks in the mirror and doesn’t
see the next president of the
United States,” she said, though
adding that she feels a little
differently now “because of
Trump.” Still, running for president should be rooted in a
“heartfelt commitment to public
service,” she said, not personal
ambition.
Which, of course, is why so
few people have come right out
and said they want to be president. They have to be “called”;
no one wants to be seen as too
eager. It’s one of the many reasons potential candidates are
holding off on their candidacies,
along with the complications of
hiring staff, coordinating postannouncement trips to Iowa and
New Hampshire, and timing
their kickoff speeches with the
start of a fundraising quarter.
During the 2016 election, Julián Castro was seen by many as
a possible running mate for
Hillary Clinton. It didn’t happen. But the process primed him
to put serious thought into a
national campaign, and after
talking it over with his wife, and
doing the requisite amount of
mulling, the former San Antonio
mayor and HUD secretary
launched his exploratory committee in December.
Why? “It allows you to raise
money,” he said.
So why not just announce a
presidential run?
“Folks should stay tuned for
January 12th,” he said. In the
meantime, Castro continues to
talk things through with friends
and advisers. He’s even seeking a
coveted sit-down with former
president Barack Obama to talk
things through, he said.
Soon we can finally go from
dozens of candidates weighing
their options to dozens of candidates admitting they want to be
president. If that makes you feel
a bit ambivalent, you’re not
alone.
“Of course I would like to have
cleared the field,” said Delaney.
“But I’m looking forward to the
race actually beginning and having some people to run against.”
ben.terris@washpost.com
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2 , 2019
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
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Out of funding, National Gallery, Smithsonian museums closing amid shutdown
BY
F RITZ H AHN
Mount Pleasant residents are
accustomed to the roars of lions
and cries of gibbons emanating
from the National Zoo. And while
they’ll still be able to hear the
animals Wednesday, they won’t
be able to see them in person for
the foreseeable future.
When the government shutdown was announced the week
before Christmas, every Washingtonian expecting visitors experienced a moment of terror:
“Ohmigod, are they going to close
the Smithsonian?” Relax, we
were told: The Smithsonian
found enough unused “prior-year
funds” to stay open through the
holidays, while the National Gallery of Art pieced together “unexpired two-year and no-year appropriations” to do the same.
Except that funding has finally
run out.
Tourists hoping to see the StarSpangled Banner, the Hope Diamond and Harriet Tubman’s
shawl will find locked doors at all
17 of the District’s Smithsonian
museums and the National Zoo
Wednesday. The National Gallery
— both the East and West buildings as well as the popular skating rink in the sculpture gardens
— will follow suit Thursday.
They’ll join the museums and
National Park Service-run sites
across the region — the BelmontPaul Women’s Equality National
Monument, the Frederick Douglass National Historic Site, the
DEA Museum — that have been
shuttered since Dec. 22 due to a
lack of government funding.
What makes this especially
confusing for visitors is that
while Washington is full of government-funded cultural attractions, it’s not always clear how a
shutdown impacts their individual operations. The National Archives closed when the shutdown
began on Dec. 22, for instance.
But the Library of Congress and
the U.S. Botanic Garden — and
the Capitol Visitor Center and
Capitol Building, ironically — are
operating as normal, since they
were funded by the 2019 Legislative Branch Appropriations Bill.
The Kennedy Center and Ford’s
Theatre operate in a gray area:
Neither uses federal funds for
performances, so those will go on
as scheduled, but the Kennedy
Center’s hours are slashed, because the government pays for
essential services, such as cleaning and security, and the National Park Service-run museum at
Ford’s Theatre is closed.
And to further add to the
confusion: Smithsonian-sponsored events scheduled to take
place at non-museum sites —
such as a free listening party for
the new Smithsonian Folkways
album “The Social Power of Music” at Songbyrd Music House in
Adams Morgan on Wednesday —
will go on as planned.
With Washington’s star attractions closed, the nonfederal museums are vying for attention
from frustrated tourists and furloughed locals. The Phillips Collection, the National Building
Museum, President Lincoln’s
Cottage and the Woodrow Wilson
House are all offering free admission to federal workers with government IDs. (This is an effective
marketing technique: The Phillips Collection says its daily visi-
tors more than doubled during
the extended shutdown in 2013.)
The Newseum, the National Geographic Museum and the Museum of the Bible are open as
usual.
Bars and restaurants are doing
their part to entertain and feed
furloughed workers. José Andrés’s ThinkFoodGroup restaurants offer different free sandwiches every day between 2 and
5 p.m., including chicken shawarma at Zaytinya and pulled pork at
America Eats Tavern, for anyone
with a government ID. Also available to those carrying around
their work badge: Capitol Lounge
has a menu of $5 cocktails with
such names as “Nothing Really
Mattis”; Satellite Room is offering $2 slices of pizza; and City
Tap House extended happy hour
until 10 p.m. nightly.
Tourists are locked out of the
Smithsonian, but renovation of
galleries in the National Air and
Space Museum, including the
World War I and World War II
exhibits, will continue behind
closed doors, says Smithsonian
spokeswoman Linda St. Thomas.
Art lovers should hope this
shutdown is mercifully brief —
especially those who haven’t yet
gotten around to seeing the National Gallery of Art’s landmark
Rachel Whiteread exhibition,
which closes Jan. 13, or the American Art Museum’s “Diane Arbus:
A Box of Ten Photographs,” which
ends Jan. 21. Is there any chance
that, if the shutdown stretches
even longer, those exhibitions
might be extended? “That has yet
to be determined,” says NGA
publicist Isabella Bulkeley.
fritz.hahn@washpost.com
At women’s magazines: How to shed 140 pages overnight
MAGAZINES FROM C1
F
or
generations,
women’s
magazines filled a complex
cultural niche, adopting
the voice of a concerned big
sister to chide women into keeping up with the current hemlines
— but also the current headlines.
One Sassy cover touted a piece
explaining why Israelis and Palestinians would never achieve
peace and another on why women really ought to pout more.
Jane told women how to wear
jeans to work without getting
fired. You could read a somber
article about abusive boyfriends,
or kill time with a quiz about
your flirting style.
The glossies were relatable,
visually pleasing and useful all at
once — a tactile, addictive habit.
“You could tear out the page
and say, ‘This is the haircut I’m
going to bring to my hairdresser,’ ” says Lisa Pecot-Hébert, an
associate professor of journalism at the University of Southern
California’s Annenberg School.
“There was just something about
a glossy, to read and engage
with.”
Even if you didn’t subscribe,
dog-eared copies of Marie Claire
and Good Housekeeping and
Seventeen found their way to
you — at the doctor’s office, at a
friend’s apartment, in a middleschool classroom. For every copy
of a thick glossy that landed in a
mailbox, there was usually not
one but several readers.
It was the homemaking magazines, beginning with McCall’s
and Ladies’ Home Journal in the
late 1800s, that spurred the
craze for women’s tips and advice. Glamour, initially a Hollywood gossip rag, followed in
1939. Seventeen, which offered
the same formula for the notquite-yet-a-woman set, dispatched its first issue in 1944.
Cosmopolitan homed in on a
female audience in 1965, when
Helen Gurley Brown took the
helm of the dusty literary magazine and unveiled a brand intertwined with sex and feminism;
among the first stories she edited was one about the pill.
“At a time when mainstream
media didn’t pay attention to
issues that mattered to women,
they were a place that could
bring attention to those things,”
says Harriet Brown, a Syracuse
University magazine journalism
professor whose own career took
her, briefly, to Redbook.
In 1966, Glamour was the first
fashion magazine to feature a
black woman, Katiti Kironde, as
the cover model, a gesture
toward inclusion amid the civil
rights movement. In 1976, dozens of editors of women’s and
teen magazines agreed to cover
the Equal Rights Amendment,
with stories that would reach
their collective 60 million readers. In the 1990s, Self launched
the now-ubiquitous pink ribbon
campaign to raise awareness of
breast cancer. And back when
you could still clutch the miniature Teen Vogue in your hands,
the magazine delivered one of
the most talked-about op-eds of
the 2016 election, titled “Donald
Trump Is Gaslighting America.”
In their heyday, these publications also offered a pipeline for
the nation’s best female journalists. Joan Didion worked for
Vogue in the 1960s. Susan Orlean and Gloria Steinem wrote
for Glamour. Good Housekeeping published Betty Friedan,
who used her word count to . . .
not-so-subtly eviscerate women’s magazines. These publications gave us iconic editors such
as Brown and Anna Wintour, not
to mention a sea of lesser-known
ladybosses.
Thumb through old issues of
women’s magazines, says Katie
Sanders, a freelance journalist
who writes for several women’s
magazines, “and you see how a
woman’s role in history is not only
G. PAUL BURNETT/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Helen Gurley Brown, editor of Cosmopolitan magazine for 32 years, in her office in 1985. The Internet has radically altered the landscape for women’s magazines.
was discussing recipes or that
person was selling a bathing suit,
there was that same kind of
woman that I don’t know if most
women could identify with.”
They also often felt the same.
Most of the widest-read titles
shared the same publishers —
Condé Nast, Meredith and
Hearst. Writers and editors, too,
seemed to shuffle from one glossy
to another, in a great big game of
lady-media musical chairs.
The magazines’ insistence on
the status quo, even as womanhood changed dramatically, led
them to irrelevance, Brown says.
In an era of radical body acceptance and umpteenth-wave feminism, “I don’t want to read 2,500
articles a year on how to lose 10
pounds or get rid of my love
handles. It’s reductive, and it’s
superficial.”
T
JASON MERRITT/GETTY IMAGES
Victoria Justice at Teen Vogue’s Young Hollywood Party in 2012. The party was over for print by 2017.
changing, but how Glamour and
some of the other women’s magazines were driving that change.”
S
till, these magazines battled a
sense that they were somehow lesser. “A lot of it was
sexism, and people not taking
them seriously because they
were meant for women,” says
Andrea Bartz, a novelist who
worked at five such magazines,
all of which have folded their
print editions. “But men’s magazines — they were allowed to
have a grooming section and a
clothing section, and that was
fine.”
Plenty of the criticism leveled
at the magazines came from
women themselves. In 1990, Glo-
ria Steinem announced that Ms.
magazine would part company
with all of its advertisers; she
also took a swipe at what she saw
as the cynical mission of other
women’s magazines: “to create a
desire for products, teach how to
use products, and make products
a crucial part of gaining social
approval, pleasing a husband,
and performing as a homemaker.”
On one 1959 cover, Glamour
trumpeted that “9 out of 10
American women can be more
beautiful.” Cosmopolitan in 1966
offered its readers a “Poor Girl’s
Guide to America’s Rich Young
Men” and “New, Kooky (but
Workable) Cures for Frigidity.”
But the rise of feminism in the
’70s and the have-it-all aspirations of the ’80s hardly changed a
thing. A 2016 Marie Claire cover
still hawked Brazilian secrets for
better hair and Korean solutions
for skin care.
Many critics believe women’s
magazines clung far too long to
the
problematic
formula
Steinem described, pummeling
readers with messages that their
bodies were less than desirable
and that their boyfriend’s eyes
probably wandered and that only
products could fill the void.
They are much more diverse
now, Pecot-Hébert says, but
through the ’80s and ’90s, “You
still had that Westernized, ‘beautiful’ person on the cover of the
magazine. Whether that person
heir formula is also everywhere these days.
What women’s magazines once delivered to readers
from New York to Topeka to
Sacramento — the girlfriendstyle advice, the gospels of orgasms and equal pay, the reminders to always be dieting —
can now be found many places
online, from the #fitspo posts on
Instagram to junior-feminist
sites such as Jezebel, which has
elbowed in on coverage of pop
culture, #MeToo and the workplace. Makeup bloggers and YouTube influencers now dictate the
Next Big Lipstick Color and how
to get that no-makeup makeup
look. Culinary sites such as
Food52 have cornered what the
lady rags used to call “cookery,”
with none of the gendered notions about who does the cooking. And low-stakes, cheerfully
unscientific personality quizzes?
Now, there’s BuzzFeed for that.
And, of course, some of stuff
you once loved can be found
online under the same old banners of yore, as legacy titles try to
find new life as Web products.
Cosmo’s website lures more
than 19 million unique visitors a
month, according to Comscore,
and Glamour can attract more
than 6 million. The old brands
are drawing YouTube followers
with original videos, and with
the viral success of pieces such as
Teen Vogue’s gaslighting essay,
embracing anew the brisk, women-focused political reporting
that made them must-reads a
couple decades ago. Their mystique certainly lives on: “The
Bold Type,” a TV dramedy inspired by the life of former Cosmo editor Joanna Coles, just
taped its third season.
But some fear for what will be
lost in the transition.
The old magazines “had factcheckers on staff,” Bartz says.
“They had a team of people
whose job was to verify every
detail in the magazine. . . . Everything those magazines were telling me about at the time —
nutrition or sexual assault statistics or mental health — it was
coming from legitimate sources,
and it was verified by the staff
there.”
Even if they could still afford
that level of rigor, the time when
the glossies were one of the most
influential resources in women’s
lives has come and gone.
“This whole industry is on a
wild roller-coaster ride,” Syracuse’s Brown says. She’s skeptical of the assumption that print
magazines are doomed. But titles in the women’s sector — a
Better Homes and Gardens vs. a
Good Housekeeping, say — have
always struggled to differentiate
from each other.
“I guess in the stock market
they call it ‘a correction,’ ” she
says. “There’s a lot of overlap. In
a different media climate, maybe
they could survive, but this one
won’t support it.”
lavanya.ramanathan
@washpost.com
C4
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. WEDNESDAY,
JANUARY 2 , 2019
Television
TV HIGHLIGHTS
1/2/19
7:00
7:30
BROADCAST CHANNELS
8:30
9:00
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8:00
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4.1 WRC (NBC)
Frasier
Frasier
4.2 WRC (IND)
◆ TMZ
Fox 5
5.1 WTTG (Fox)
◆ Wheel
◆ J’pardy!
7.1 WJLA (ABC)
◆ ET
9.1 WUSA (CBS) Off Script
14.1 WFDC (UNI) ◆ La Rosa de Guadalupe
20.1 WDCA (MNTV) ◆ Family Feud ◆ Family Feud
◆ MotorWeek
22.1 WMPT (PBS) Project
26.4 WETA (PBS) PBS NewsHour
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32.1 WHUT (PBS) DW News
◆ blackish
50.1 WDCW (CW) ◆ blackish
66.1 WPXW (ION) Blue Bloods
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Jesús
Fox 5 News ◆ Family Feud
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◆
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(9:01) ◆ SEAL Team
Mi marido tiene más familia
Fox 5 News ◆ Family Feud
◆ NOVA
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◆ All American
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◆
10:00
10:30
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AMC
North Woods Law
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Animal Planet
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BET
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Watch What Housewives
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Moonshiners: Outlaw Cuts
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Homestead Rescue
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Bunk’d
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Botched
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FX
(6:00) A Novel Romance
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Hallmark
Movie: Return to Christmas Creek (2018)
A Christmas to Remember
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Pete Holmes: Dirty Clean
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HBO
Property Brothers
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Locked Up Abroad: Break Locked Up Abroad
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(6:15) Movie: The Day the Earth Stood Still Movie: I Am Number Four ★★ (2011)
Movie: Ender’s Game ★★
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(6:00) Old Acquaintance
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Last-Standing Last-Standing Last-Standing Last-Standing Last-Standing Last-Standing Last-Standing Last-Standing Last-Standing Last-Standing
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RAMONA ROSALES/ LIFETIME
American Beauty Star (Lifetime at 10) From left, Christie Brinkley, Leah
Wyar and Yu Tsai judge on the second season of the beauty competition
show.
PREMIERES
Project Runway All Stars
(Lifetime at 9) Season 7.
The Masked Singer (Fox at 9)
Famous singers perform in
disguise as the judges attempt to
guess their true identity.
Homestead Rescue
(Discovery at 10) Season 4.
MythBusters Jr. (Science at 9) A
teenage version of the hit show.
Family by the Ton (TLC at 10)
Season 2.
True Life/Now (MTV at 10:02)
See where the people from the
show about addictions are now.
MIDSEASON PREMIERES
RETURNING
Chicago Med (NBC at 8) A
shooting injures April and leaves
everyone shaken up.
Gordon Ramsay’s 24 Hours to
Hell and Back (Fox at 8) Season
2.
Chicago Fire (NBC at 9) Casey
and Naomi encounter a fire in
Casey’s apartment.
Grown-ish (Freeform at 8) Season
2.
Chicago P.D. (NBC at 10) The
team investigates a carjacking
that results in a murder.
Love & Hip Hop: Miami (VH1 at 8)
Season 2.
My 600-Lb. Life (TLC at 8) Season
7.
Criminal Minds (CBS at 10) The
team goes to Portland to
investigate an abduction.
— Sarah Polus
Black Ink Crew: Chicago
(VH1 at 9) Season 5.
More at washingtonpost.com/
entertainment/tv
Moonshiners (Discovery at 9)
Season 8.
LEGEND: Bold indicates new or live programs
◆
High Definition Movie Ratings (from TMS) ★★★★ Excellent ★★★ Good ★★ Fair ★ Poor No stars: not rated
DNA testing reveals half sibling, but Dad doesn’t want to have the conversation
Ask Amy
Dear Amy: I am
one of the many
who have found a
AMY
half sibling
DICKINSON
through DNA
testing. The birth
mother never told my father
that she was pregnant, and the
child was put up for adoption
over 50 years ago.
I told my dad about this, and
he reacted by getting angry and
stopping the conversation by
telling me to not have contact
with the new half sibling. I gave
it a few months and gently
brought it up again, only to be
shut down right away. He does
not wish to discuss it. I was
going to ask him to tell my
sibling that we have a newly
discovered half sibling out
there, but I know that is out of
the question.
I am excited about my new
relative and would like to meet
and get to know them. I wish my
dad would be open to discussing
this. Before moving forward, I
would like to tell my other
sibling about our new half
sibling. I am not sure if they will
share my excitement but then
they can decide if they’d like to
pursue a relationship as well. I
worry that I am going behind my
dad’s back and he’ll be furious
that I have shared his secret.
The cat is already out of the bag;
all it would take is another
relative to take a DNA test for
someone else to tell my sibling.
I am feeling quite anxious
about having to keep this a
secret. How do I tell my sibling
that we have a half sibling if our
father is not open to discussing
this? I’d like to move forward.
Reluctant Secret Holder
Reluctant Secret Holder: Your
father had no knowledge of this
child he fathered, so the
existence of your half sibling has
not been a long-held secret.
Don’t hold this as a secret now.
Your father’s response to this
is completely understandable.
He feels betrayed and, of course,
he is unhappy about it. He does
not want to face the
imponderable complications of
this possible relationship. He
assumes it will upend your
family, but, if anecdotal
evidence I’ve collected on DNA
discoveries is accurate, the
toughest part of the experience
is the anticipation. Your father
will not give you permission to
pursue this. Understand it and
forgive him for his reaction.
I suggest you take this in
discreet stages. Keep your own
expectations modest. After you
make some initial contact with
your half sibling, tell your father
that you are going to inform
your other sibling. Reassure
your father every step of the way,
and if he refuses to discuss it,
proceed on your own.
Dear Amy: I believe my
husband is cheating on me. I
went through his phone once
and he had another girl’s naked
picture on it.
He is also on a dating website
talking to other girls.
Amy, he works very long
hours and comes home
extremely exhausted.
He is a delivery driver, and I
believe he may be delivering
more than just packages.
He hardly looks at me or talks
to me anymore, and our sex life
has been devastating. What
should I do? Please help.
Wronged Wife
Wronged Wife: Instincts are
powerful. But you also seem to
have ample evidence of your
husband’s extracurricular
activities. If your husband is
having sex with random people,
you should get tested for STDs.
Surely the holiday season was
an especially busy time for your
package-toting Casanova. Now
it’s your turn. You should
schedule a special delivery:
Hand him an ultimatum.
You two need to talk, urgently,
about your relationship. And
then you have a tough decision
to make. Marriages can recover
from infidelity — or suspected
infidelity. But you can’t recover
without communication and
trust.
Dear Amy: Thank you for your
literacy campaign, promoting
the idea of giving books to
children at Christmastime.
Ever since my three daughters
were babies, our tradition has
been to give a book on the first
night of Hanukkah.
The kids are now between the
ages of 18 and 25, and they still
anticipate their first-night book.
Even though the authors have
evolved from Sandra Boynton
and Dr. Seuss to Ruth Bader
Ginsburg and Lin-Manuel
Miranda, I have nurtured their
literacy and love of books, which
I hope they pass to their own
children someday.
Andrea
Andrea: Ever since announcing
my annual “Book on Every Bed”
literacy campaign, I have been
flooded with beautiful literacy
stories. Reading them is a warm
and wonderful way to get
through these dark, cold days.
Your story is lovely.
Amy’s column appears seven days a
week at washingtonpost.com/advice.
Write to askamy@amydickinson.com
or Amy Dickinson, P.O. Box 194,
Freeville, N.Y. 13068. You can also
follow her @askingamy.
©2018 by Amy Dickinson distributed by
Tribune Content Agency
THEATRE
“Thrilling, soaring
& spectacular”
—The London Times
“Miss Saigon”
Now Through Jan 13
Wed-Fri & Select Tue
at 7:30
Sat & Sun at 1:30 & 7:30
Added Matinee Jan 9
Mosaic Theater Company
Oh, God
Tonight @ 8PM
Thurs, Jan 3 @ 8PM
Fri, Jan 4 @ 8PM
Sat, Jan 5 @ 3PM
Experience the acclaimed new production of the legendary
musical Miss Saigon, from the creators of Les Misérables. This
is the epic story of a young Vietnamese woman named Kim.
who meets an American G.I. in an encounter that will change
their lives forever. Featuring stunning spectacle, a sensational
cast, and a soaring score including Broadway hits like “Last
Night of the World,” “The Movie in My Mind,” and “The Heat
Is on in Saigon,” this is a theatrical event you will never forget.
Kennedy Center
Opera House
kennedy-center.org
or call (202) 467-4600
“ … what makes Oh, God a masterpiece isn’t just the
humor, but also the deeper philosophies and truths of
humanity that it touches on.” —Broadway World
Atlas Performing Arts Center
1333 H St NE,
202-399-7993 mosaictheater.org
Tickets
available
at the
Box Office
$20-65
Recommended for
age 12 and up
Now Extended
Thru Jan 20!
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SF
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2 , 2019
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
MOVIE DIRECTORY
DISTRICT
AMC Loews Georgetown 14
3111 K Street N.W.
Ralph Breaks the Internet (PG)
CC: 12:00-5:40
Aquaman (PG-13) CC: 2:00-9:20
Mary Poppins Returns (PG) CC:
12:10-3:15-6:30-9:40
A Star is Born (R) CC: 8:30
Mortal Engines (PG-13) CC:
1:30-10:30
Aquaman 3D (PG-13) CC: 5:30
Aquaman: The IMAX 2D Experience (PG-13) CC: 12:15-3:407:00-10:20
Holmes & Watson (PG-13) CC:
1:30-4:00-7:45-10:20
Bumblebee (PG-13) CC: 1:15-7:15
Mary Queen of Scots (R) CC: 1:004:00-7:00-10:00
Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse
(PG) CC: 1:10-4:10-7:10
Bumblebee in 3D (PG-13) CC:
4:15-10:10
The Favourite (R) CC: 2:45-4:456:45-9:40
Second Act (PG-13) CC: 2:15-5:007:40-10:15
Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse
3D (PG) CC: 9:00
Welcome to Marwen (PG-13) CC:
12:30-4:30-7:20-10:10
Vice (R) CC: 1:40-3:30-6:40-9:45
The Mule (R) CC: 12:45-3:406:30-10:00
Mary Poppins Returns (PG) CC:
1:20-4:30-7:30
AMC Loews Uptown 1
3426 Connecticut Avenue N.W.
Mary Poppins Returns (PG) CC:
9:15-12:30-3:45-7:10-10:20
AMC Mazza Gallerie
5300 Wisconsin Ave. NW
Aquaman (PG-13) CC: 10:00-1:104:20-7:30
Aquaman 3D (PG-13) CC: 10:00
Bumblebee (PG-13) CC: 10:301:20-4:10-10:50
Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse
(PG) CC: 10:35-1:25-7:00-10:40
Bumblebee in 3D (PG-13) CC: 7:10
Second Act (PG-13) CC: 11:402:20-5:00-7:40-10:15
Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse
3D (PG) CC: 4:15
Welcome to Marwen (PG-13) CC:
11:30-2:20-5:10-8:00-10:45
Vice (R) CC: 10:50-1:50-4:507:50-9:50
The Mule (R) CC: 10:50-1:40-4:307:20-10:05
Albert Einstein Planetarium National Air & Space Museum
6th Street and Independence Ave SW
Journey to the Stars (NR) 12:001:00-2:00-3:00-4:00-5:00
Dark Universe (R) 11:30-12:301:30-2:30-3:30-4:30
To Space and Back 11:00AM
Angelika
Pop-Up at Union Market
550 Penn Street NE - Unit E
Bohemian Rhapsody (PG-13) CC:
2:25-5:00-7:45
Mary Poppins Returns (PG) CC:
11:00-1:40-4:20-7:00
Vice (R) CC: 12:00-2:00-4:45-7:20
Avalon Theatre
5612 Connecticut Avenue
Green Book (PG-13) 11:15-2:005:00-8:00
Shoplifters (Manbiki kazoku) (R)
11:00-1:45-4:45-7:45
Landmark
Atlantic Plumbing Cinema
807 V Street NW
Bumblebee (PG-13) CC: 11:452:30-5:10-7:55-10:20
Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse
(PG) CC: 11:35-2:20-5:00-7:4510:10
Vice (R) CC: 11:00-11:25-2:054:20-4:55-7:00-7:35-10:15
Aquaman (PG-13) CC: 11:00-1:351:45-4:30-7:15-9:40-10:00
Green Book (PG-13) CC: 11:151:55-4:45-7:25-10:05
Landmark E Street Cinema
555 11th Street NW
Can You Ever Forgive Me? (R)
CC: 12:40
On The Basis Of Sex (PG-13) CC:
12:30-1:15-3:30-4:15-6:30-6:357:15-9:15-9:40
Mary Queen of Scots (R) CC: 1:054:05-7:05-9:30
The Favourite (R) CC: 1:10-3:004:10-7:10-9:40
If Beale Street Could Talk (R) CC:
1:00-1:45-4:00-4:45-7:00-7:45-9:30
Roma (R) CC: 12:45-3:45-9:20
Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse
(PG) CC: 1:45-5:00-7:30
Bumblebee in 3D (PG-13) CC:
10:00-12:50-4:40
Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse
3D (PG) CC: 11:00AM
The Mule (R) CC: 10:20-2:054:50-7:45
MARYLAND
AMC Magic Johnson
Capital Center 12
800 Shoppers Way
Widows (R) CC: 11:00-1:35-4:106:45-9:20
The Favourite (R) CC: 11:45-2:154:40-7:10-9:35
Vice (R) CC: 11:00-1:40-4:207:00-9:40
AMC Academy 8
6198 Greenbelt Road
Dr. Seuss' The Grinch (PG) CC:
4:05
Aquaman (PG-13) CC: 4:15
Mary Poppins Returns (PG) CC:
12:50-4:00-7:00
Mortal Engines (PG-13) CC: 6:40
Aquaman 3D (PG-13) CC:
1:00-7:30
Bumblebee (PG-13) CC: 1:20-4:20
Creed II (PG-13) CC: 1:05
Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse
(PG) CC: 1:15-4:00-6:55
Bumblebee in 3D (PG-13) CC: 7:15
Second Act (PG-13) CC: 1:304:25-7:20
Vice (R) CC: 1:10-4:10-7:10
The Mule (R) CC: 1:45-4:40-7:45
AMC Center Park 8
4001 Powder Mill Rd.
Aquaman (PG-13) CC: 11:00-2:153:15-5:25-8:45
Mary Poppins Returns (PG) CC:
12:00-3:00-6:15-9:15
Mortal Engines (PG-13) CC:
1:00-4:00
Aquaman 3D (PG-13) CC: 12:006:30-9:45
Holmes & Watson (PG-13) CC:
11:45-2:15-4:45-7:15-9:45
Bumblebee (PG-13) CC: 1:45-7:15
Creed II (PG-13) CC: 7:00-10:00
Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse
(PG) CC: 3:00-8:45
Bumblebee in 3D (PG-13) CC:
11:00-4:30-10:00
Second Act (PG-13) CC: 11:152:00-4:30-7:00-9:30
Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse
3D (PG) CC: 12:00-6:00
Ralph Breaks the Internet (PG)
CC: 2:00-4:45
Dr. Seuss' The Grinch (PG) CC:
2:45-5:00
Mary Poppins Returns (PG) CC:
12:15-3:15-6:45-9:45
Mortal Engines (PG-13) CC:
7:15-10:10
Aquaman 3D (PG-13) CC: 2:456:00-9:30
Aquaman: The IMAX 2D Experience (PG-13) CC: 12:30-3:457:00-10:15
Holmes & Watson (PG-13) CC:
12:00-2:30-5:10-7:40-10:20
Bumblebee (PG-13) CC: 4:1510:10
Creed II (PG-13) CC: 7:25-10:25
Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse
(PG) CC: 1:45-4:30-7:30-10:15
Bumblebee in 3D (PG-13) CC:
1:15-7:15
Second Act (PG-13) CC: 12:052:15-5:05-7:40-10:20
Welcome to Marwen (PG-13) CC:
1:50-4:55-7:45-10:30
Vice (R) CC: 1:05-4:10-7:20-10:25
The Mule (R) CC: 1:55-5:00-7:4510:30
ArcLight Bethesda
7101 Democracy Boulevard
Ralph Breaks the Internet (PG)
10:20-3:50
Dr. Seuss' The Grinch (PG)
10:15-12:45
Aquaman (PG-13) 10:35-1:404:25-7:50
Mary Poppins Returns (PG)
12:25-10:55
Mortal Engines (PG-13) 12:20
Holmes & Watson (PG-13) 11:502:05-5:55-8:05-10:20
Bohemian Rhapsody (PG-13)
2:50-9:40
The Favourite (R) 11:15-1:55-4:407:20-9:55
On The Basis Of Sex (PG-13)
11:00-12:05-1:45-2:30-4:30-5:156:30-7:15-8:10-9:15-10:00
Second Act (PG-13) 11:45-2:154:35-7:05-10:30
AMC Columbia 14
Welcome to Marwen (PG-13)
10300 Little Patuxent Parkway
11:40-2:25-5:05-7:40-10:25
Ralph Breaks the Internet (PG)
Vice (R) 11:20-2:20-3:20-5:20-6:15CC: 11:50-2:55
8:15-9:20
Dr. Seuss' The Grinch (PG) CC:
The Mule (R) 11:55-2:55-5:3511:40-2:30-5:05-7:30-9:55
8:20-11:00
Aquaman (PG-13) CC: 11:40Aquaman (PG-13) 10:50
6:30-8:30
Mary Poppins Returns (PG) 11:10Mary Poppins Returns (PG) CC: 2:00-5:00-8:00
6:15-9:30
Bumblebee (PG-13) 11:25-2:10Mortal Engines (PG-13) CC:
4:45-7:35-10:15
11:10AM
Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse
Aquaman 3D (PG-13) CC:
(PG) 10:25-1:10-4:15-7:00-9:25
3:10-9:45
Green Book (PG-13) 10:30-1:30Aquaman: The IMAX 2D Experi- 4:50-7:30-9:00
ence (PG-13) 10:30-2:10-5:30-9:00 Aquaman (PG-13) 6:00
Holmes & Watson (PG-13) CC:
Mary Poppins Returns (PG) 3:05
11:10-1:50-4:20-7:05-10:00
Bow Tie Annapolis Mall 11
Bumblebee (PG-13) CC: 10:301020 Westfield Annapolis Mall
4:15-10:05
Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse Ralph Breaks the Internet (PG)
12:30-3:20
(PG) CC: 1:25-2:25-5:25-7:05
Aquaman (PG-13) 3:50-7:00-10:15
Bumblebee in 3D (PG-13) CC:
Dr. Seuss' The Grinch (PG)
1:20-7:05
The Favourite (R) CC: 10:40-1:35- 11:00-7:20
Mary Poppins Returns (PG) 12:50
4:25-7:15-10:05
Holmes & Watson (PG-13) 11:45Second Act (PG-13) CC: 10:302:10-4:30-7:45-10:00
1:10-4:00-6:50-9:50
Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse Bumblebee (PG-13) 11:40-1:202:20-4:00-5:00-6:40-7:40-9:303D (PG) CC: 10:35-4:10-9:55
10:35
Rachel Hollis Made for More
Mortal
Engines (PG-13) 9:40
Encore 7:30
Into the Spider-Verse
Welcome to Marwen (PG-13) CC: Spider-Man:
11:10-1:00-2:00-3:40-4:40(PG)
11:35-2:50-6:00-9:00
6:30-7:30-9:20-10:20
Vice (R) CC: 11:20-2:40-6:00-9:10 Aquaman (PG-13) 11:30-12:40Mary Poppins Returns (PG) 11:50- 1:40-2:50-4:50-6:00-8:00-9:153:25-6:50-10:00
11:10
The Mule (R) 11:00-1:50-4:35Mary Poppins Returns (PG) 11:5010:20
3:30-4:20-6:15-7:10-9:10-10:10
AMC DINE-IN Rio Cinemas 18
9811 Washingtonian Center
Ralph Breaks the Internet (PG)
CC: 11:10-2:10-5:00-7:50
Dr. Seuss' The Grinch (PG) CC:
11:45-2:00-4:30
Aquaman (PG-13) CC: 11:30-3:006:30-10:00
Mary Poppins Returns (PG) CC:
12:45-3:50-7:00-10:10
Mortal Engines (PG-13) CC: 9:15
Aquaman 3D (PG-13) CC: 1:15Landmark West End Cinema 4:45-8:15
Aquaman: The IMAX 2D Experi2301 M Street NW
ence (PG-13) CC: 12:20-3:4542nd Street (NR) 1:30-4:30-7:30 7:10-10:30
Boy Erased (R) CC: 1:00
Holmes & Watson (PG-13) CC:
Ben Is Back (R) CC: 7:15
12:10-2:40-5:10-7:40-10:15
Free Solo (PG-13) CC: 4:30-7:30 Bumblebee (PG-13) CC: 11:00Bird Box (R) CC: 1:15-4:00
2:00-5:00-8:00-10:50
Regal Gallery Place
Mary Queen of Scots (R) CC:
Stadium 14
12:15-3:15-6:15-10:30
701 Seventh Street NW
Simmba (NR) 11:20-3:00-6:40Ralph Breaks the Internet (PG)
10:10
12:55
Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse
Dr. Seuss' The Grinch (PG) 12:35- (PG) CC: 11:00-2:15-5:15-7:002:55-5:15-7:35
8:15-9:50
Aquaman (PG-13) 12:00-3:10Bumblebee in 3D (PG-13) CC:
3:40-6:30-7:00-10:00-10:35
12:00-6:00
Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Zero (Hindi) (NR) 12:00-3:20Grindelwald (PG-13) 12:20
6:50-10:25
Mary Poppins Returns (PG) 12:30- The Favourite (R) CC: 1:50-4:503:30-6:30-7:15-9:30-10:15
7:50-10:40
Mortal Engines (PG-13) 9:55
Second Act (PG-13) CC: 1:00-3:40Aquaman 3D (PG-13) 1:00-4:20- 6:20-9:00
7:45-11:05
Welcome to Marwen (PG-13) CC:
Holmes & Watson (PG-13) 12:15- 12:50-3:40-6:40-9:40
2:35-4:55-7:15-9:50
Vice (R) CC: 12:05-3:15-6:20-9:35
Bohemian Rhapsody (PG-13)
The Mule (R) CC: 11:15-2:15-5:1012:00-3:00
8:00-10:50
Bumblebee (PG-13) 12:00-2:45Bumblebee (PG-13) CC: 3:00-9:00
4:00-10:25
AMC Loews
Creed II (PG-13) 9:00
St. Charles Town Ctr. 9
Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse
11115 Mall Circle
(PG) 12:00-2:50-5:35-8:20-11:05
Second Act (PG-13) 12:15-2:45- Ralph Breaks the Internet (PG)
5:20-8:15-10:45
CC: 1:30-4:15
Rachel Hollis Made for More
Dr. Seuss' The Grinch (PG) CC:
Encore 7:30
2:25-4:50
Welcome to Marwen (PG-13) 1:15- Aquaman (PG-13) CC: 10:304:10-7:10-10:00
10:45-1:10-4:35-7:45
Vice (R) 12:00-3:00-6:00-9:00
Mary Poppins Returns (PG) CC:
The Mule (R) 12:55-4:00-6:55-9:45 11:15-1:15-4:20-7:30
Bumblebee (PG-13) 6:10
Mortal Engines (PG-13) CC:
Smithsonian - Lockheed Martin 11:30-7:15
IMAX Theater
Aquaman 3D (PG-13) CC: 10:00601 Independence Avenue SW
3:45-7:15
D-Day: Normandy 1944 3D (NR) Holmes & Watson (PG-13) CC:
10:40-2:15-4:45-7:05
1:10
Aquaman: The IMAX 2D Experi- Bumblebee (PG-13) CC: 2:05-8:00
Creed II (PG-13) CC: 7:10
ence (PG-13) 4:00
Wednesday, January 2, 2019
www.washingtonpost.com/movies
(!) No Pass/No Discount Ticket
Aircraft Carrier: Guardians of
the Seas 3D (2018) (NR) 10:5012:00-2:35
Journey to Space: The IMAX 3D
Experience (NR) 10:20-11:2512:35-2:00-3:10
Aquaman: An IMAX 3D Experience
(PG-13) 6:45
AFI Silver Theatre
Cultural Center
8633 Colesville Road
C5
RE
Bow Tie Harbour 9
2474 Solomons Island Road
Mary Queen of Scots (R) 12:453:50-6:45-9:40
The Favourite (R) 1:00-3:456:40-9:30
Second Act (PG-13) 11:40-2:104:50-7:20-10:20
Welcome to Marwen (PG-13)
11:00-1:40-4:30-7:10-9:50
Ben Is Back (R) 12:00-2:30-5:007:40-10:30
The Mule (R) 10:50-1:30-4:157:15-10:10
Vice (R) 12:30-3:30-7:05-10:05
Mary Poppins Returns (PG) 12:504:00-7:00-10:00
Aquaman (PG-13) 1:10-4:207:30-10:40
Cinemark Egyptian 24 and XD
7000 Arundel Mills Circle
Ralph Breaks the Internet (PG)
10:55-1:40-4:25-7:10
Dr. Seuss' The Grinch (PG) 10:551:10-3:30-5:50-8:20
Aquaman (PG-13) 11:00-1:303:00-5:35-6:15-8:00-9:00-9:35
K.G.F (Kannada) (NR) 7:00
Mary Poppins Returns (PG) 11:0012:00-1:00-2:05-3:10-4:10-5:107:20-8:25-10:25
Mortal Engines (PG-13) 9:55
Aquaman 3D (PG-13) XD: 10:35
Holmes & Watson (PG-13) 12:002:30-5:00-7:30-10:00
Bumblebee (PG-13) 11:30-12:151:35-2:15-3:00-4:25-5:45-7:458:00-8:35
Mary Queen of Scots (R) 10:501:45-4:45-7:40-10:35
Simmba (NR) 11:00-2:40-6:3510:15
Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse
(PG) 10:55-12:00-12:40-1:50-3:003:40-6:00-7:40-9:00-10:30
Bumblebee in 3D (PG-13) 5:15
Zero (Hindi) (NR) 11:15-9:30
Second Act (PG-13) 11:05-1:404:25-7:05-9:45
If Beale Street Could Talk (R)
10:55-1:45-4:35-7:25-10:20
Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse
3D (PG) 4:45-10:30
Welcome to Marwen (PG-13)
11:10-1:55-4:45-7:35-10:25
Fantastica (NR) 3:00-6:30
Vice (R) 12:25-3:25-6:30-9:35
The Mule (R) 10:50-1:35-4:207:10-10:00
Aquaman (PG-13) 11:00-5:00-8:15
Aquaman 3D (PG-13) 1:45
Bumblebee (PG-13) 11:30-2:158:00
Bumblebee in 3D (PG-13) 10:505:15-10:30
Aquaman (PG-13) XD: 12:454:00-7:15
Aquaman 3D (PG-13) 11:402:15-4:45
Hoyt's West Nursery
Cinema 14
1591 West Nursery Road
Ralph Breaks the Internet (PG)
CC: 11:00-1:30-4:05-6:40
Dr. Seuss' The Grinch (PG) CC:
11:15-2:25-4:35-6:45-8:55
Aquaman (PG-13) CC: 11:3012:30-2:45-4:00-6:15-7:15-9:2510:25
Mary Poppins Returns (PG) CC:
11:20-1:10-4:00-6:50-9:40
Mortal Engines (PG-13) CC: 9:10
Holmes & Watson (PG-13) CC:
12:00-2:30-5:05-7:40-9:55
Widows (R) CC: 12:15-3:506:40-9:30
Bumblebee (PG-13) CC: 11:101:45-4:25-7:00-9:35
Creed II (PG-13) CC: 1:15-4:107:05-10:10
Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse
(PG) CC: 11:00-1:40-4:20-7:00-9:40
Second Act (PG-13) CC: 11:502:20-4:50-7:25-9:50
Welcome to Marwen (PG-13) CC:
11:10-1:50-4:30-7:10-10:00
Vice (R) CC: 11:00-2:05-4:457:20-10:15
The Mule (R) CC: 11:35-2:15-5:007:40-10:20
Landmark
Bethesda Row Cinema
7235 Woodmont Avenue
Can You Ever Forgive Me? (R) CC:
1:15-6:45
On The Basis Of Sex (PG-13) CC:
10:20-11:00-1:00-1:50-3:50-4:407:00-7:35-9:40-10:05
Roma (R) CC: 10:10-4:00-9:45
Vice (R) CC: 10:00-12:50-3:406:40-7:10-9:20
If Beale Street Could Talk (R) CC:
10:35-1:10-1:40-4:30-7:30-10:05
Mary Queen of Scots (R) CC:
10:25-1:20-4:10-7:20-10:00
Ben Is Back (R) CC: 10:15-3:3510:00
The Favourite (R) CC: 10:30-1:304:20-7:15-9:55
Old Greenbelt Theatre
129 Centerway
Mary Queen of Scots (R) 2:305:00-7:45
Phoenix Theatres Marlow 6
3899 Branch Avenue
Mary Poppins Returns (PG) 11:0012:50-4:00-6:20-7:45-9:30-10:30
Mortal Engines (PG-13) 4:50-10:50
Holmes & Watson (PG-13) 12:102:50-5:30-8:00-10:45
Bohemian Rhapsody (PG-13)
1:35-7:35
Bumblebee (PG-13) 11:05-1:454:40-7:50-10:40
Creed II (PG-13) 4:35-10:35
Simmba (NR) 11:45-3:10-6:30-9:50
Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse
(PG) 11:00-2:10-4:55-8:00-10:45
Second Act (PG-13) 11:00-1:404:35-7:30-10:10
Rachel Hollis Made for More
Encore 7:30
Welcome to Marwen (PG-13) 1:554:40-7:25-10:15
Vice (R) 11:05-2:10-5:10-8:30
The Mule (R) 12:40-3:50-6:45-9:30
1419 South Main Chapel Way
Ralph Breaks the Internet (PG)
1:00-4:05
Ralph Breaks the Internet (PG)
Dr. Seuss' The Grinch (PG) 1:5012:35-3:30
4:30-7:00
Dr. Seuss' The Grinch (PG) 1:30- Mortal Engines (PG-13) 9:30
4:00-6:30
Aquaman: The IMAX 2D ExperiAquaman (PG-13) 12:00-1:00ence (PG-13) 12:00-3:20-6:403:20-4:20-6:40-7:40-10:00-11:00 10:00
Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Holmes & Watson (PG-13) 12:20Grindelwald (PG-13) 12:10-7:05 2:50-5:20-7:50-10:20
Mary Poppins Returns (PG) 12:15- Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse
3:40-6:50-9:15-10:00
(PG) 4:20-7:30-10:20
Mortal Engines (PG-13) 9:00
Second Act (PG-13) 1:30-4:20Aquaman: The IMAX 2D Experi- 7:20-10:00
ence (PG-13) 12:30-3:50-7:10Welcome to Marwen (PG-13) 1:0010:30
4:00-7:10-10:20
Holmes & Watson (PG-13) 12:05- Vice (R) 12:20-3:30-6:40-9:50
2:35-5:05-7:35-10:05
The Mule (R) 1:00-3:50-6:40-10:30
Bohemian Rhapsody (PG-13)
Aquaman (PG-13) 12:30-3:503:30-10:20
7:10-9:30
Bumblebee (PG-13) 12:20-1:00- Mary Poppins Returns (PG) 12:403:10-4:05-6:00-9:05-10:30
3:50-6:50-7:00-10:00-10:10
Mary Queen of Scots (R) 12:50Bumblebee (PG-13) 1:00-4:103:55-7:00-10:00
7:10-10:10
Creed II (PG-13) 1:20-4:30-7:40- Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse
10:50
(PG) 1:20
Simmba (NR) 12:00-3:35-7:10Regal Westview
10:45
Stadium 16 & IMAX
Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse
5243 Buckeystown Pike
(PG) 12:45-3:35-6:30-9:20
Ralph Breaks the Internet (PG)
The Favourite (R) 12:30-3:3512:45-3:40
6:30-9:30
Dr. Seuss' The Grinch (PG) 12:10Second Act (PG-13) 1:15-4:003:00-6:10
6:55-9:40
Aquaman (PG-13) 12:00-2:50Rachel Hollis Made for More
3:30-6:20-7:00-9:50-10:30
Encore 7:30
Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of
Green Book (PG-13) 12:45-3:50- Grindelwald (PG-13) 11:40AM
7:00-10:25
Mary Poppins Returns (PG) 12:50Welcome to Marwen (PG-13) 1:20- 4:00-6:40-7:30-9:50-10:45
4:20-7:25-10:35
Mortal Engines (PG-13) 9:10
Vice (R) 12:50-4:10-7:20-10:30
Aquaman: The IMAX 2D ExperiThe Mule (R) 1:05-3:55-6:45-9:50 ence (PG-13) 1:00-4:30-8:00-11:30
Bumblebee (PG-13) 6:30
Holmes & Watson (PG-13) 12:40Regal Germantown
3:10-5:40-8:10-10:55
Stadium 14
Bumblebee (PG-13) 11:20-1:1520000 Century Boulevard
2:20-4:15-5:20-7:15-8:20-10:1511:20
Ralph Breaks the Internet (PG)
11:00-2:05
Mary Queen of Scots (R) 1:204:40-7:40-10:40
Dr. Seuss' The Grinch (PG)
1:45-3:55
Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse
(PG) 1:40-5:00-7:55-11:10
Aquaman (PG-13) 11:00-11:5012:30-3:30-4:10-6:50-7:40-10:15- The Favourite (R) 11:00-1:50-5:108:15-11:15
10:50
THE TRAILER:
On the road to 2020
UA Snowden Square
Stadium 14
9161 Commerce Center Drive
Ralph Breaks the Internet (PG)
12:50-4:00
Dr. Seuss' The Grinch (PG) 12:152:40-5:10-7:45
Aquaman (PG-13) 12:20-1:103:30-4:20-6:50-7:30-10:00-10:40
Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of
Grindelwald (PG-13) 12:00
Mary Poppins Returns (PG) 12:003:00-6:00-7:00-9:00-10:10
Regal Hyattsville Royale
Bohemian Rhapsody (PG-13)
Stadium 14
3:10-10:20
6505 America Blvd.
Bumblebee (PG-13) 12:30-1:30Ralph Breaks the Internet (PG)
3:20-4:30-6:30-7:20-9:30-10:15
1:25
Dr. Seuss' The Grinch (PG) 12:15- Second Act (PG-13) 1:40-4:407:15-9:50
2:30-4:55-7:20
Rachel Hollis Made for More
Aquaman (PG-13) 12:20-12:553:35-4:10-7:00-7:30-10:25-10:55 Encore 7:30
Mary Poppins Returns (PG) 12:30- Welcome to Marwen (PG-13) 1:003:40-4:15-6:50-7:20-10:00-10:30 3:50-6:40-9:40
Vice (R) 1:15-4:10-7:10-10:20
Mortal Engines (PG-13) 9:50
Holmes & Watson (PG-13) 12:05- The Mule (R) 1:50-4:50-7:40-10:30
Mortal Engines (PG-13) 10:00
2:25-4:50-7:10-9:40
Holmes & Watson (PG-13) 12:10Bohemian Rhapsody (PG-13)
2:30-5:00-7:50-10:25
12:40-4:00-7:15
Bumblebee (PG-13) 12:00-2:45- Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse
(PG) 12:40-3:40-6:20-9:10
5:30-8:15-11:00
Creed II (PG-13) 10:20
Xscape Theatres
Brandywine 14
Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse
7710 Matapeake Business Drive
(PG) 1:15-4:10-7:05-9:55
Second Act (PG-13) 12:10-2:45- Dr. Seuss' The Grinch (PG) CC: (!)
10:15-1:00-3:45-6:20
5:20-7:55-10:30
Aquaman (PG-13) OC; CC: (!)
Green Book (PG-13) 1:25-4:409:20-10:10-12:30-1:20-3:40-4:307:50-11:00
6:50-7:40-10:10-10:50
Welcome to Marwen (PG-13)
Mary Poppins Returns (PG) OC;
12:00-2:50-5:35-8:20-11:05
CC: (!) 9:40-10:50-12:10-12:50-3:10Vice (R) 1:00-4:20-7:30-10:40
The Mule (R) 1:30-4:30-7:35-10:35 3:50-6:10-7:00-9:10-10:00
Mortal
Engines (PG-13) CC:
Regal Laurel Towne Centre 12
(!) 8:40
14716 Baltimore Avenue
Aquaman 3D (PG-13) CC: (!)
Ralph Breaks the Internet (PG)
11:50-9:30
11:50-2:25
Holmes & Watson (PG-13) CC: (!)
Dr. Seuss' The Grinch (PG)
10:40-12:40-3:00-5:30-8:10-10:30
12:30-5:40
Bumblebee (PG-13) OC; CC: (!)
Aquaman (PG-13) 12:00-1:3010:20-1:10-4:10-7:20-10:20
3:20-5:10-6:50-8:40-10:10
Creed II (PG-13) CC: 7:30-11:10
Mary Poppins Returns (PG) 12:20- Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse
3:30-5:00-6:40-8:10-9:50
(PG) CC: (!) 9:10-10:00-12:20-1:30Mortal Engines (PG-13) 2:50-8:00 3:20-4:40-6:30-9:20
Holmes & Watson (PG-13) 12:10- Bumblebee in 3D (PG-13) CC: (!)
2:40-5:15-7:40-10:30
3:30-6:40
Bumblebee (PG-13) 1:20-4:20Second Act (PG-13) CC: 9:30-2:307:20-10:20
5:10-7:50-10:40
Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse Welcome to Marwen (PG-13) CC:
(PG) 1:00-3:50-7:00-9:40
(!) 11:00-1:40-4:20-7:10-9:50
Second Act (PG-13) 2:00-4:50Vice (R) CC: 11:30-1:50-4:507:50-10:35
8:00-11:00
Welcome to Marwen (PG-13)
The Mule (R) CC: (!) 11:40-2:4012:50-3:40-6:55-10:00
6:00-8:50
Vice (R) 12:40-4:05-7:30-10:35
iPic Pike & Rose
The Mule (R) 1:40-4:30-7:10-9:55
11830 Grand Park Avenue
Aquaman (PG-13) 12:55-4:05-7:15
Mary Poppins Returns (PG) 10:301:30-4:30-7:30
Bumblebee (PG-13) 11:00-1:454:25-7:00
Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse
(PG) 10:35-1:15-4:00-7:20
Ralph Breaks the Internet (PG)
Regal Rockville Center
1:20-3:55
Stadium 13
Dr. Seuss' The Grinch (PG) 12:15199 East Montgomery Avenue
2:30-4:45-7:30
Ralph
Breaks
the Internet (PG)
Creed II (PG-13) 7:40
12:30-4:05
Regal Bowie Stadium 14
Dr. Seuss' The Grinch (PG) 12:3515200 Major Lansdale Boulevard
2:55-5:10
Ralph Breaks the Internet (PG)
Aquaman (PG-13) 3:15
1:45
Mary Poppins Returns (PG) 7:30
Dr. Seuss' The Grinch (PG) 1:20- Mortal Engines (PG-13) 10:30
4:05-6:45
Holmes & Watson (PG-13) 12:30Aquaman (PG-13) 1:45-2:40-5:00- 3:15-5:35-8:05-10:25
5:55-8:15-9:15
Bohemian Rhapsody (PG-13)
Mary Poppins Returns (PG) 2:00- 6:45-10:00
4:30-5:20-7:30-8:40-10:30
Bumblebee (PG-13) 12:40-3:40Mortal Engines (PG-13) 9:05
6:25-9:20
Holmes & Watson (PG-13) 2:35- Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse
4:55-7:25-10:05
(PG) 1:25-4:15-7:15-10:10
Bumblebee (PG-13) 3:00-5:50-9:00 Second Act (PG-13) 1:30-4:25Creed II (PG-13) 1:25-4:20-7:20- 7:20-10:00
10:20
Rachel Hollis Made for More
Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse Encore 7:30
(PG) 1:15-4:00-6:45-9:35
Green Book (PG-13) 12:45-3:45
Second Act (PG-13) 2:10-4:50Welcome to Marwen (PG-13) 1:257:35-10:10
4:25-7:25-10:15
Rachel Hollis Made for More
Vice (R) 12:35-3:40-6:50-10:00
Encore 7:30
The Mule (R) 1:25-4:15-7:15-10:10
Green Book (PG-13) 1:30-4:30Mary Poppins Returns (PG) 1:057:30-10:30
4:15-6:55-9:45-10:00
Welcome to Marwen (PG-13)
Aquaman (PG-13) 12:30-1:001:40-4:30-10:25
4:00-6:30-7:15-10:00-10:30
Vice (R) 2:50-6:00-9:20
Regal Waugh Chapel
The Mule (R) 2:55-6:05-9:10
Stadium 12 & IMAX
Regal Cinemas Majestic
Stadium 20 & IMAX
900 Ellsworth Drive
Second Act (PG-13) 12:30-3:206:00-9:00
Rachel Hollis Made for More
Encore 7:30
Welcome to Marwen (PG-13)
12:20-3:50
Vice (R) 1:10-4:20-7:45-11:00
The Mule (R) 12:55-3:55-6:5010:10
Aquaman (PG-13) 11:30-2:303:15-6:15-6:45-10:00-10:30
Mary Poppins Returns (PG) 12:304:00-7:15-10:40
Mortal Engines (PG-13) 11:00AM
Holmes & Watson (PG-13) (!) 2:004:30-7:30-10:50
Bumblebee (PG-13) 1:30-4:457:45-11:00
Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse
(PG) 11:15-2:15-6:00-9:15
Second Act (PG-13) 12:45-3:307:00-9:45
Vice (R) (!) 11:45-3:00-6:30-10:15
VIRGINIA
AMC Courthouse Plaza 8
2150 Clarendon Blvd.
Ralph Breaks the Internet (PG)
CC: 1:30-4:15-7:15-10:00
Dr. Seuss' The Grinch (PG) CC:
10:45-12:15-2:30-4:50
Aquaman (PG-13) CC: 3:45-7:0010:15
Mary Poppins Returns (PG) CC:
10:30-12:00-3:00-6:00-9:00
Mortal Engines (PG-13) CC:
7:05-10:05
Aquaman 3D (PG-13) CC: 12:30
Bumblebee (PG-13) CC: 7:0010:00
Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse
(PG) CC: 4:30-7:20
Bumblebee in 3D (PG-13) CC:
1:10-4:00
Second Act (PG-13) CC: 1:00-3:506:30-9:10
Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse
3D (PG) CC: 1:45-10:10
Vice (R) CC: 12:45-3:50-6:50-9:50
Aquaman (PG-13) 10:30AM
AMC Hoffman Center 22
206 Swamp Fox Rd.
Ralph Breaks the Internet (PG)
CC: 12:15-3:15-6:15-9:15
Dr. Seuss' The Grinch (PG) CC:
11:15-1:30-3:45-6:00-8:15-10:30
Aquaman (PG-13) CC: 10:0011:30-3:00-6:30-9:45
Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of
Grindelwald (PG-13) CC: 10:05AM
Mary Poppins Returns (PG) CC:
12:30-3:30-6:30-9:30
Mortal Engines (PG-13) CC: 10:454:50-10:45
Aquaman 3D (PG-13) CC: 1:154:45-8:15
Aquaman: The IMAX 2D Experience (PG-13) CC: 12:30-4:007:20-10:30
Holmes & Watson (PG-13) CC:
11:10-2:00-4:40-7:20-10:00
Widows (R) CC: 10:25-4:25-10:25
Bohemian Rhapsody (PG-13) CC:
1:25-7:25
Bumblebee (PG-13) CC: 11:001:45-4:45-7:45-9:45-10:45
Mary Queen of Scots (R) CC:
10:30-1:30-4:30-7:30-10:30
Creed II (PG-13) CC: 1:05-4:057:05-10:05
Instant Family (PG-13) CC:
10:00AM
Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse
(PG) CC: 10:15-12:45-3:30-6:157:00-9:00
Bumblebee in 3D (PG-13) CC:
10:00-12:45-3:45-6:45
The Favourite (R) CC: 10:10-1:104:10-10:10
Second Act (PG-13) CC: 11:001:45-4:30-7:15-10:00
Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse
3D (PG) CC: 1:15-4:15-9:45
Rachel Hollis Made for More
Encore 7:30
Green Book (PG-13) CC: 1:50-7:50
Welcome to Marwen (PG-13) CC:
10:50-1:40-4:35-7:10-10:20
Ben Is Back (R) CC: 10:15-12:453:15-5:45-8:15-10:45
Vice (R) CC: 10:00-1:00-4:007:00-10:00
The Mule (R) CC: 10:50-1:35-4:257:15-10:05
Mary Poppins Returns (PG) CC:
10:30-1:30-4:30-7:45-10:45
Angelika Film Center Mosaic
2911 District Ave
The Mule (R) CC: (!) 9:50-12:303:10-5:50-8:30-11:05
Mary Queen of Scots (R) CC: (!)
11:15-2:15-5:15-8:15-11:05
On The Basis Of Sex (PG-13) CC:
(!) 9:45-12:25-3:00-4:00-5:40-6:408:20-11:00
If Beale Street Could Talk (R) CC:
(!) 10:40-1:25-4:15-7:00-9:45
AMC Potomac Mills 18
Mary Poppins Returns (PG) CC: (!)
2700 Potomac Mills Circle
10:30-1:30-4:30-7:30-10:30
Ralph Breaks the Internet (PG)
Bohemian Rhapsody (PG-13) CC:
CC: 1:10-4:05-7:05-9:55
10:00-1:00
Dr. Seuss' The Grinch (PG) CC:
Vice (R) CC: (!) 10:10-1:10-4:1011:40-2:20-4:50-7:10-9:25
Aquaman (PG-13) CC: 10:50-8:35 7:15-9:30-10:15
Mary Poppins Returns (PG) CC: The Favourite (R) CC: 10:45-1:454:45-7:45-10:45
10:40-1:40-4:40-7:40-10:40
Bow Tie
Mortal Engines (PG-13) CC:
Reston Town Center 11 & BTX
6:50-9:50
11940 Market Street
Aquaman 3D (PG-13) CC:
2:05-5:20
Aquaman (PG-13) 6:00-9:20
Aquaman: The IMAX 2D Experi- Mary Poppins Returns (PG)
ence (PG-13) CC: 12:30-3:4511:20-2:40
7:00-10:15
Holmes & Watson (PG-13) 10:40Holmes & Watson (PG-13) CC:
1:10-4:40-7:40-10:30
10:35-1:00-3:20-5:40-8:00-10:25 Bumblebee (PG-13) 10:30-1:25Bumblebee (PG-13) CC: 10:304:20-7:20-10:10
1:30-4:30-7:20-10:05
Dr. Seuss' The Grinch (PG) 10:30Creed II (PG-13) CC: 1:25-4:3512:55-3:20
7:35-10:45
Mortal Engines (PG-13) 9:10
Instant Family (PG-13) CC:
Mary Queen of Scots (R) 10:1512:40-3:40
1:10-4:10-7:15-10:20
Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse
(PG) CC: 10:30-1:20-4:20-7:30(PG) 10:05-12:50-3:30-6:20-9:00
10:20
Second Act (PG-13) 11:20-2:00Bumblebee in 3D (PG-13) CC:
4:50-7:25-9:55
12:00-3:00-6:00-8:45
Green Book (PG-13) 6:10
The Favourite (R) CC: 12:50Vice (R) 10:20-1:30-4:30-7:306:30-9:20
10:40
Second Act (PG-13) CC: 11:45Mary Poppins Returns (PG) 10:002:35-5:10-7:50-10:30
1:00-4:00-7:10-10:05
Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse The Mule (R) 10:25-1:15-3:503D (PG) CC: 12:05-2:50-5:50-8:40 6:40-9:30
Welcome to Marwen (PG-13) CC: Aquaman (PG-13) 10:10-1:2010:45-1:35-4:25-7:15-10:00
3:30-7:00-10:00
Vice (R) CC: 12:25-3:35-6:40-9:45
Cinema Arts Theatre
The Mule (R) CC: 11:15-2:00-4:459650 Main St
7:45-10:35
Mary
Poppins
Returns (PG) CC:
Mary Poppins Returns (PG) CC:
10:00-1:00-4:00-7:00-9:35
12:10-3:10-6:10-9:10
Mary Queen of Scots (R) CC: 9:45AMC Shirlington 7
12:05-2:35-5:05-7:40-10:05
2772 South Randolph St.
The Favourite (R) CC: 9:40-12:00Mary Poppins Returns (PG) CC: 2:30-5:00-7:30-9:55
1:20-4:20-7:20
Green Book (PG-13) CC: 10:05Mary Queen of Scots (R) CC:
1:15-4:15-7:10-9:45
1:10-4:10-7:10
Vice (R) CC: 10:10-1:25-4:25The Favourite (R) CC: 1:457:20-10:00
4:30-7:15
The Mule (R) CC: 9:55-12:15-2:40On The Basis Of Sex (PG-13) CC: 5:10-7:50-10:05
1:00-4:00-7:00
Cinemark
If Beale Street Could Talk (R) CC:
Fairfax Corner and XD
1:30-4:30-7:30
11900 Palace Way
Vice (R) CC: 1:40-4:40-7:40
The Mule (R) CC: 1:50-4:50-7:50 Ralph Breaks the Internet (PG)
11:25-2:10-4:50
AMC Tysons Corner 16
Dr. Seuss' The Grinch (PG) 10:357850e Tysons Corner Center
12:55-3:20-5:40-8:00
Ralph Breaks the Internet (PG)
Aquaman (PG-13) 10:05-3:00CC: 10:10-1:05-4:00-6:55
4:25-6:50-7:45-11:05-11:40
Dr. Seuss' The Grinch (PG) CC:
Mary Poppins Returns (PG) 10:109:40-12:00-2:40-5:05-7:25-9:45
1:15-4:20-7:25-10:30
Aquaman (PG-13) CC: 11:00-6:00 Mortal Engines (PG-13) 10:20
Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes
Aquaman 3D (PG-13) 1:10
of Grindelwald (PG-13) CC:
Holmes & Watson (PG-13) 10:001:15-10:10
12:25-2:50-5:15-7:40-10:05
Mary Poppins Returns (PG) CC: Bohemian Rhapsody (PG-13)
9:00-12:15-3:30-6:30-9:35
7:30-10:40
Mortal Engines (PG-13) CC: 10:25- Bumblebee (PG-13) 10:25-1:251:25-4:40-7:40-10:35
7:05-9:55
Aquaman 3D (PG-13) CC:
Simmba (NR) 10:55-6:05
2:30-9:15
Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse
Aquaman: The IMAX 2D Experi- (PG) 9:30-10:20-12:15-4:05-6:10ence (PG-13) CC: 9:30-12:45-4:15- 8:55-10:00
7:30-10:45
Bumblebee in 3D (PG-13) 4:15
Holmes & Watson (PG-13) CC:
Zero (Hindi) (NR) 2:30-9:40
9:20-12:05-2:50-5:20-7:50-10:20 Second Act (PG-13) 10:45-1:50Bumblebee (PG-13) CC: 10:004:40-7:45-10:20
1:00-7:00
Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse
Creed II (PG-13) CC: 9:40
3D (PG) 1:10
Instant Family (PG-13) CC:
Vice (R) 9:40-12:45-3:50-7:0010:20-4:20
10:10
Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse The Mule (R) 11:00-1:55-4:45(PG) CC: 10:30-1:45-7:45
7:35-10:45
Bumblebee in 3D (PG-13) CC:
Aquaman (PG-13) XD: 9:25-12:404:05-9:55
3:55-7:15-10:35
Zero (Hindi) (NR) 9:05-12:50-4:10- Mary Poppins Returns (PG) XD:
7:35-10:55
11:10-2:20-5:20-8:25-11:25
Second Act (PG-13) CC: 9:45Cobb Village 12 Leesburg
12:25-3:00-5:40-8:15-10:50
1600 Village Market Boulevard
Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse
Ralph Breaks the Internet (PG)
3D (PG) CC: 4:40-10:30
2:20
Rachel Hollis Made for More
Dr. Seuss' The Grinch (PG)
Encore 7:30
Welcome to Marwen (PG-13) CC: 11:00-3:40
Mary Poppins Returns (PG) 11:2510:15-1:30-4:30-7:20-10:05
1:15-4:15-5:30-7:15-8:30
Vice (R) CC: 9:10-12:10-3:10Mortal Engines (PG-13) 12:20
6:15-9:20
The Mule (R) CC: 11:05-1:55-5:10- Holmes & Watson (PG-13) 11:151:30-3:50-6:00-8:15
7:55-10:40
Mary Poppins Returns (PG) CC: Bumblebee (PG-13) 11:30-2:104:50-6:10-7:30-8:45
10:45-2:00-5:00-8:00-11:00
Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse
AMC Worldgate 9
(PG) 11:10-1:50-4:30-7:10
13025 Worldgate Drive
Second Act (PG-13) 12:00-2:40Ralph Breaks the Internet (PG)
5:20-7:45
CC: 9:30-2:25-7:25
Welcome to Marwen (PG-13)
Dr. Seuss' The Grinch (PG) CC:
11:35-2:15-4:55-7:40
12:10-5:10
Aquaman (PG-13) CC: 11:30-6:00 Vice (R) 1:00-4:00-7:25
Mary Poppins Returns (PG) CC: The Mule (R) 11:50-2:30-5:10-7:55
Aquaman (PG-13) 11:00-12:3010:25-1:00-4:30-7:05-9:40
Mortal Engines (PG-13) CC: 10:10 2:00-3:30-5:00-7:00-8:00; 11:002:00-5:00-8:00
Aquaman 3D (PG-13) CC:
Manassas 4 Cinemas
3:15-9:20
8890 Mathis Ave.
Holmes & Watson (PG-13) CC:
10:10-1:45-3:45-7:20-9:25
Mary Poppins Returns (PG) 11:30Bumblebee (PG-13) CC: 10:002:15-5:00-7:45
4:05
Aquaman (PG-13) 11:00-2:00Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse 5:00-8:00
(PG) CC: 3:00-10:15
Bumblebee (PG-13) 11:15-1:40Bumblebee in 3D (PG-13) CC:
4:05-6:30-9:00
1:30-7:35-10:30
Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse
Second Act (PG-13) CC: 9:50(PG) 11:00-1:30-4:00-6:30-9:00
12:45-3:35-6:15-9:00
Medal of Honor Theater Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse
NMMC
3D (PG) CC: 9:40-12:25-6:35
18900 Jefferson Davis Highway
Vice (R) CC: 10:40-12:40-4:20We, the Marines (NR) 10:00-11:006:20-10:00
12:00-1:00-2:00-3:00-4:00
The Mule (R) CC: 10:30-1:20-4:05Rave Cinemas Centreville 12
6:50-9:35
Bumblebee (PG-13) 1:30-4:307:30-10:20
Simmba (NR) 12:30-4:00-6:00-9:30
Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse
(PG) 1:15-4:15-7:20-10:10
Second Act (PG-13) 12:50-3:406:30-9:15
Welcome to Marwen (PG-13)
12:35-3:15-6:15-9:20
Rachel Hollis Made for More
Encore 7:30
Vice (R) 12:40-3:45-7:00-10:15
The Mule (R) 12:45-3:50-6:50-9:40
Vice (R) 12:30-3:45-6:50-10:00
The Mule (R) 11:25-2:15-5:007:45-10:45
Aquaman (PG-13) 11:00-11:4012:10-2:30-3:30-6:00-7:00-9:1510:15
Mary Poppins Returns (PG)
10:30-1:30-3:00-4:30-6:15-7:309:30-10:30
Regal Manassas
Stadium 14 & IMAX
11380 Bulloch Drive
Ralph Breaks the Internet (PG)
Regal Countryside Stadium 20 12:10-2:40-5:10
Dr. Seuss' The Grinch (PG) 12:2045980 Regal Plaza
Ralph Breaks the Internet (PG)
12:05
Dr. Seuss' The Grinch (PG)
2:25-4:35
Aquaman (PG-13) 12:30-2:453:45-6:05-7:00-9:20-10:15
K.G.F (Kannada) (NR) 11:40-6:15
Mary Poppins Returns (PG) 11:451:10-4:10-7:10-10:10
Mortal Engines (PG-13) 6:50-9:45
Holmes & Watson (PG-13) 12:202:50-5:15-7:55-10:20
Bohemian Rhapsody (PG-13)
11:55-3:05-6:20-9:30
Bumblebee (PG-13) 11:50-2:155:00-7:45-10:30
Mary Queen of Scots (R) 2:104:55-7:40-10:25
K.G.F (Hindi) (NR) 3:00
K.G.F (Telugu) (NR) 9:40
Simmba (NR) 11:45-3:15-6:4510:15
Zero (Hindi) (NR) 2:05-5:35-9:10
The Favourite (R) 12:35-3:306:30-9:15
Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse
(PG) 11:45-2:30-5:10-7:50-10:35
Second Act (PG-13) 11:40-2:355:05-7:35-10:05
Padi Padi Leche Manasu (NR)
3:10-6:35-10:00
Welcome to Marwen (PG-13) 1:404:25-7:05-9:50
Antariksham 9000 kmph (NR)
2:40-6:00-9:25
Kanaa (NR) 12:15-3:25-6:40-9:55
Green Book (PG-13) 12:00-2:556:10-9:05
Vice (R) 12:10-3:15-6:15-9:35
2:30-4:40-6:50
Aquaman (PG-13) 12:00-3:106:40-10:00
Mary Poppins Returns (PG) 12:303:30-6:30-7:50-9:30-10:40
Mortal Engines (PG-13) 9:00
Aquaman: The IMAX 2D Experience (PG-13) 1:00-4:20-7:40-10:50
Holmes & Watson (PG-13) 12:403:00-5:20-8:00-10:20
Bumblebee (PG-13) 1:20-4:107:00-9:40
Simmba (NR) 11:50-3:20-6:4510:10
Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse
(PG) 12:15-2:50-5:30-8:20-11:00
The Favourite (R) 1:10-4:007:10-9:50
Second Act (PG-13) 11:45-2:104:45-7:20-9:45
Welcome to Marwen (PG-13)
11:40-2:20-5:00-8:10-11:00
Vice (R) 1:30-4:30-7:30-10:30
The Mule (R) 12:50-3:40-6:20-9:10
Regal Potomac Yard
Stadium 16
3575 Potomac Avenue
Ralph Breaks the Internet (PG)
1:30
Dr. Seuss' The Grinch (PG) 1:004:15-7:00
Aquaman (PG-13) 1:00-2:25-3:205:45-7:00-8:55-10:15
Mary Poppins Returns (PG) 1:003:55-7:05-10:20-10:30
Mortal Engines (PG-13) 9:15
Holmes & Watson (PG-13) 1:454:25-7:10-9:40
Bohemian Rhapsody (PG-13)
1:00-3:50-6:55
Regal Dulles Town Center 10 Bumblebee (PG-13) 1:00-2:0521100 Dulles Town Circle
3:50-4:50-5:15-7:35-8:10-10:40
Ralph Breaks the Internet (PG)
Creed II (PG-13) 10:00
1:20
Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse
Dr. Seuss' The Grinch (PG)
(PG) 1:50-4:50-7:40-10:20
4:15-6:30
The Favourite (R) 1:00-3:55-7:05Aquaman (PG-13) 1:00-4:1510:15
7:30-10:30
Second Act (PG-13) 2:10-4:45Mary Poppins Returns (PG) 12:00- 7:20-10:05
4:15-7:15-10:15
Rachel Hollis Made for More
Mortal Engines (PG-13) 8:45
Encore 7:00
Holmes & Watson (PG-13) 12:30- Green Book (PG-13) 1:05-3:553:15-5:45-8:00-10:30
6:55-9:55
Bumblebee (PG-13) 12:00-1:10- Welcome to Marwen (PG-13) 1:354:00-7:00-9:45
4:25-7:10-10:10
Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse Vice (R) 1:15-4:10-7:10-10:05
(PG) 2:45-5:30-8:15-11:00
The Mule (R) 2:00-4:40-7:25-10:10
Second Act (PG-13) 12:30-3:30Regal
6:00-8:30-11:00
Springfield Town Center 12
Welcome to Marwen (PG-13) 1:306500 Springfield Town Center
3:00-6:15-9:00
Ralph Breaks the Internet (PG)
Vice (R) 1:45-4:45-7:45-10:45
The Mule (R) 12:45-3:45-6:45-9:30 10:20-1:20
Dr. Seuss' The Grinch (PG) 11:05Regal Fairfax Towne Center 10 1:25-4:00-6:20
4110 West Ox Road
Aquaman (PG-13) 11:00-2:30Dr. Seuss' The Grinch (PG) 11:55- 6:00-7:00-9:30-10:30
2:15-4:45
Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of
Aquaman (PG-13) 12:30-3:50Grindelwald (PG-13) 12:20-3:45
7:10-10:15
Mary Poppins Returns (PG) 10:40Mortal Engines (PG-13) 10:35
1:40-4:40-7:40-10:10-10:40
Holmes & Watson (PG-13)
Holmes & Watson (PG-13) 11:157:20-9:50
1:40-4:15-6:40-9:15
Bumblebee (PG-13) 11:10-2:00- Bumblebee (PG-13) 11:30-2:208:10-10:45
4:55-7:40-10:25
Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse
(PG) 11:20-2:10-5:10-8:00-10:50 (PG) 11:10-2:00-5:10-8:05-10:50
Second Act (PG-13) 11:20-2:00- Second Act (PG-13) 10:50-1:504:30-7:20-10:00
4:35-7:20-10:00
Rachel Hollis Made for More
Welcome to Marwen (PG-13)
Encore 7:30
11:00-1:50-4:45-7:40-10:30
Welcome to Marwen (PG-13)
Rachel Hollis Made for More
10:35-1:30-4:20-7:30-10:20
Encore 7:30
Vice (R) 11:00-2:00-5:00-8:00-11:00
Vice (R) 12:05-3:30-6:40-9:45
The Mule (R) 10:25-1:10-3:50The Mule (R) 11:00-1:40-4:206:50-9:40
7:00-9:40
Mary Poppins Returns (PG) 4:15
Swing Kids (seu-wing-ki-jeu)
Mortal Engines (PG-13) 9:10
12:25-3:40-6:50-9:55
Holmes & Watson (PG-13) 12:10- Bumblebee (PG-13) 5:15
2:30-4:50
Regal Virginia Gateway
Regal Fox Stadium 16 & IMAX
22875 Brambleton Plaza
Stadium 14 & RPX
8001 Gateway Promenade Place
Ralph Breaks the Internet (PG)
3:40
Dr. Seuss' The Grinch (PG) 1:10
Aquaman (PG-13) 1:45-2:45-5:006:00-8:15-9:15
Mary Poppins Returns (PG)
12:10-1:40-3:10-4:40-6:10-7:409:10-10:40
Mortal Engines (PG-13) 6:20-9:20
Aquaman: The IMAX 2D Experience (PG-13) 12:30-3:45-7:0010:15
Holmes & Watson (PG-13) 1:003:20-5:50-8:10-10:30
Bumblebee (PG-13) 12:45-2:003:30-4:45-6:15-7:30-9:00-10:15
Mary Queen of Scots (R) 1:504:50-7:50-10:45
Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse
(PG) 1:30-4:15-7:15-10:10
The Favourite (R) 2:30-5:15-8:0010:45
Second Act (PG-13) 1:50-4:307:10-9:50
Welcome to Marwen (PG-13) 1:154:00-6:45-9:30
Vice (R) 1:20-4:20-7:20-10:20
The Mule (R) 2:10-5:00-7:50-10:40
Ralph Breaks the Internet (PG)
1:05-3:55
Dr. Seuss' The Grinch (PG) 12:152:30-4:50-7:00
Aquaman (PG-13) 4:00-7:15-10:30
Mary Poppins Returns (PG) 12:45
Mortal Engines (PG-13) 9:15
Holmes & Watson (PG-13) 1:003:30-5:50-8:15-10:45
Bohemian Rhapsody (PG-13) 1:104:10-7:10-10:10
Bumblebee (PG-13) 1:25-4:056:55-9:45
Creed II (PG-13) 6:40-9:40
Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse
(PG) 1:15-4:30-7:30-10:15
Second Act (PG-13) 12:10-2:405:10-8:00-10:40
Rachel Hollis Made for More
Encore 7:30
Welcome to Marwen (PG-13) 1:204:20-7:20-10:20
Vice (R) 12:05-3:05-6:05-9:05
The Mule (R) 12:55-3:55-10:25
Aquaman (PG-13) 12:00-12:303:15-6:30-9:45
Mary Poppins Returns (PG) 1:453:45-4:45-6:45-7:45-9:50-10:50
Regal Kingstowne
Stadium 16 & RPX
5910 Kingstowne Towne Center
Smithsonian - Airbus
IMAX Theater
14390 Air and Space Museum Parkway
Ralph Breaks the Internet (PG)
12:15
Dr. Seuss' The Grinch (PG) 10:356201 Multiplex Drive
12:50-3:05-5:20-7:40
Alamo Drafthouse Cinema Aquaman (PG-13) 9:45-1:00Aquaman (PG-13) 2:55-6:30-9:45
One Loudoun
7:20-10:40
20575 East Hampton Plaza
Mary Poppins Returns (PG)
Mary Poppins Returns (PG) 10:00- 11:30AM
Laurel & Hardy Festival (NR)
1:10-4:20-7:40-10:50
Mortal Engines (PG-13) 9:55
(!) 7:40
Aquaman 3D (PG-13) 4:10
Holmes & Watson (PG-13) 11:50Aquaman (PG-13) (!) 10:45-2:20
Bumblebee (PG-13) 9:10-2:452:10-4:35-7:05-9:25
Mary Poppins Returns (PG) (!)
Bohemian Rhapsody (PG-13)
11:25-12:30-3:10-4:00-6:40-10:10 5:30-8:15-11:00
Bumblebee (PG-13) (!) 10:35-1:40- Bumblebee in 3D (PG-13) 12:00 11:35AM
Regal Ballston Quarter
Bumblebee (PG-13) 11:15-2:004:45-8:00-11:05
Stadium 12
4:45-7:35-10:20
Mary Queen of Scots (R) (!) 11:35671 North Glebe Road
Mary Queen of Scots (R) 10:552:55-6:20-10:00
1:50-4:50-7:50-10:35
Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse Dr. Seuss' The Grinch (PG)
Simmba (NR) 2:40-6:10-9:40
(PG) (!) 10:10-1:10-4:15-8:10-11:05 1:45-4:10
The Favourite (R) (!) 10:30-1:45- Aquaman (PG-13) 2:00-4:00-5:30- Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse
7:15-9:00-10:30
(PG) 10:50-1:25-4:10-6:45-9:20
5:05-8:20-11:25
Vice (R) (!) 12:10-3:40-7:00-10:25 Mary Poppins Returns (PG) 12:30- Zero (Hindi) (NR) 3:10-6:35-10:05
1:00-3:30-6:45-10:00
Second Act (PG-13) 11:10-1:45Aquaman (PG-13) (!) 6:00-7:20Mortal Engines (PG-13) 9:10
4:20-6:55-9:35
9:45-11:15
The Mule (R) (!) 11:00-2:05-5:25- Holmes & Watson (PG-13) 1:05- Welcome to Marwen (PG-13)
3:35-6:40-10:05
8:40-11:45
10:45-1:35-4:25-7:15-10:10
D-Day: Normandy 1944 3D (NR)
11:10-12:35
Aquaman: The IMAX 2D Experience (PG-13) 3:30-8:55
Pandas: An IMAX 3D Experience
(G) 2:35
Aircraft Carrier: Guardians of
the Seas 3D (2018) (NR) 10:0012:00-2:00
Journey to Space: The IMAX 3D
Experience (NR) 10:35-1:25
Aquaman: An IMAX 3D Experience
(PG-13) 6:15
University Mall Theatre
10659 Braddock Road
Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of
Grindelwald (PG-13) CC: 1:154:15-7:15-9:55
A Star is Born (R) CC: 7:00-9:45
Bohemian Rhapsody (PG-13) CC:
4:30-7:30-10:05
Smallfoot (PG) CC: 12:20-2:25
The Nutcracker and the Four
Realms (PG) CC: 12:10-2:20-4:40
The latest election news
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N1282 6x3
C6
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. WEDNESDAY,
JANUARY 2 , 2019
book world
The missing
piece, but in
whose puzzle?
Roosevelt
himself
would ride
along
BY
BOOK WORLD FROM C1
Fortunately, Charyn has found a path
all his own — neither a substitute for
biography nor a violation of it. The Teddy
Roosevelt who narrates “The Perilous
Adventures of the Cowboy King” is a
whirlwind of activity, a man so caught up
in the escapades of his intrepid life that he
can’t always be bothered with details. As
Henry Adams once said, “All Roosevelt’s
friends know that his restless and combative energy was more than abnormal,” and
that’s the dynamo whom Charyn has spun
into being.
For fans of Roosevelt, this is tremendous fun. But readers unfamiliar with his
life and the political history of the late
19th century should be forewarned: There
will be no coddling on this breakneck tour.
The five dozen names listed in the novel’s
dramatis personae offer a handy guide to
who’s who, but those terse descriptions
will hardly bring the uninitiated up to
speed.
The story opens in panicked gasps.
Little asthmatic Teddy spies a werewolf at
the foot of his bed. The boy’s life might
have been snuffed out early if not for the
unorthodox response of his heroic father
who prescribed cigars to his 5-year-old
son and took him on wild carriage rides
through the most dangerous slums of
New York. It was from this man — nicknamed “Brave Heart” — that Teddy acquired his deep sympathy for “the ragged,
the lonely, and the lame” that would later
guide his military and political crusades.
But Charyn never lets us forget that this
concern for the less fortunate rested upon
a secure family fortune. “The Roosevelts
did not strike their servants,” Teddy notes
with pride. “It was considered vile.”
The Roosevelts did not dirty themselves in New York’s political machine,
either, but Teddy is determined to be the
exception. At 23, he strolls into the district
Republican Club over a saloon near Fifth
Avenue and announces his intention to
become an assemblyman. The party thugs
think he’s a rube, and he’s willing to play
the part — complete with his gold pincenez and cylindrical trousers — but before
long, he’s getting in fistfights with bartenders who want their liquor licenses
lowered and political rivals who want this
principled reformer driven out of town. “I
rose like a rocket,” Teddy says, in a voice
perfectly calibrated between egotism and
amusement. (This is an entirely one-sided
version, of course, though Teddy acknowledges periodically that others considered
him despotic, crazy, desperate for fame.)
He goes after child labor, police corruption and the whole gamut of criminality
infecting New York. “ROOSEVELT ON
THE RAMPAGE,” the headlines scream,
giving him his first taste of the symbiotic
role the press will play in his future reform
efforts. It’s an extraordinary beginning for
a man who will one day put the United
States on the world stage and reshape the
20th century.
But Charyn restricts himself to the
decades before an assassin killed President William McKinley and thrust Vice
President Roosevelt into the White House.
These are, as the title says, the adventures
of the Cowboy King, which means we
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Theodore
Roosevelt while
ranching and
hunting in the
Dakota Territory
in 1885. The
future president
was famously
rustic, as
portrayed in
Jerome Charyn’s
historical fiction
novel “The
Perilous
Adventures of the
Cowboy King.”
follow this irrepressible young man out to
the Badlands of the Dakota Territory with
his silver stirrups and a Bowie knife from
Tiffany’s. Despite the luxury into which he
was born, Roosevelt was famously rustic.
Equipped with a rocking chair, a few
dozen books and a rubber bath, he once
said, “I do not see how any one could have
lived more comfortably.” Charyn channels
that spirit in all its original exuberance. “I
hunted cougars,” Teddy says, “howled
with the wolves.” He also works his own
ranch, chases down desperadoes and develops his interest in conserving America’s natural grandeur. “It was our sacred
duty,” he says, “to preserve the forests and
an abundance of forest creatures.”
Oh, what happened to you, Republican
Party?
One of the melancholy pleasures of this
novel is the contrast it continually presents to our current president, another
bigger-than-life man of wealth and privilege but otherwise a grim opposite of the
brave warrior, the curious scholar, the
principled legislator. That contrast is never more striking than in the novel’s central
adventure: Roosevelt’s audacious decision to leave his position as assistant
secretary of the Navy and help lead a band
of volunteers — the Rough Riders — to
Cuba during the Spanish-American War.
(Asthma? Poor eyesight? Bone spurs?
Pshaw — there is no stopping this man!)
Charyn provides little historical context, but he drums up the personal drama
of war in all its absurdity and horror. Even
knowing that Roosevelt survived, you’ll be
gripped by the suspense of the chaotic
Battle of San Juan Hill. The famous Cowboy Colonel, dressed in his Brooks Brothers tunic with 12 extra pairs of glasses,
charges through the smoke on his horse,
Little Texas. “I should have been shot off
Little Texas a hundred times, but we took
the heights,” he says, “and I’m still here.”
Indeed, thanks to Charyn, he is, along
with fantastic cameos from J.P. Morgan;
Buffalo Bill Cody; Roosevelt’s pet cougar,
Josephine, and many others.
The reviewer’s handbook says I’m not
supposed to judge a book by its cover, but I
have to offer some praise for this unusually witty dust jacket. Designed to look like a
turn-of-the-century dime novel, the cover
shows Roosevelt standing tall in the Badlands with Josephine straining her leash.
It strikes just the right tone, as does this
delightful novel.
ron.charles@washpost.com
Ron Charles writes about books for The
Washington Post and hosts
TotallyHipVideoBookReview.com.
On Jan. 14 at 7 p.m., Jerome Charyn will be at
Politics & Prose Bookstore, 5015 Connecticut
Ave. NW.
E LLEN M ORTON
Diane Setterfield haunts familiar
ground in “Once Upon a River,” an eerily
mystic tale of a mute child who captivates
the local townspeople after she’s seemingly brought back from the dead.
The author of “The Thirteenth Tale”
and “Bellman & Black” begins this account
on a winter solstice more than a hundred
years ago. A near-drowned stranger arrives at a rural inn,
grievously injured and
carrying a young girl
who, to all appearances, has already died.
Despite the child’s
corpse-like state, however, the local nurse,
Rita, discovers a pulse.
Though the girl is
revived, the stranger
lapses into unconONCE UPON A
sciousness and so the
RIVER
mysteries
quickly
By Diane
stack up like branches
Setterfield
snagged in the river:
Atria/Emily
What accident befell
Bestler. 480 pp.
him? How was he
$28.
saved? Who is the
child? How did she die and then live again?
Most importantly, to whom does she
belong?
Three separate families lay claim to the
girl: Helena and Anthony Vaughan believe she’s their kidnapped daughter; Robert and Bess Armstrong think she’s the
illegitimate grandchild they would dearly
love to welcome home; and Lily White
hopes she’s the sister whose loss has
drowned her in guilt.
These characters are finely drawn and
wholly sympathetic, their lives rendered
in precise, poignant detail. The female
characters particularly are gifted with
uncommon clarity, each of a different
kind. Rita is a woman of science; Helena
has strong emotional instincts; Bess is
blessed with insight; and Lily takes an
unflinching view of practical realities.
Even so, each character lives in a state
of profound denial, easing painful realities by telling themselves stories. Setterfield illuminates how such stories can be
our most compelling forays into fiction.
Even amid swirling doubts about the
child’s identity, Helena so depends on
finding her daughter in this lost girl that
she builds an elaborate new world on top
of the ruins of her old life, with the mute
girl at its center.
At different points the narrative emphasizes the powers of oral tradition, photography and performance, using stories that
straddle fiction and fact to reveal essential
truths to the speaker and the audience.
The river acts as both setting and character, a force in the everyday lives of its
neighbors. Though Setterfield writes emotions with marvelous truth and subtlety,
her most stunning prose is reserved for
evocative descriptions of the natural
world, creating an immersive experience
made of light, texture, scent and sensation.
The timeline is slippery, flashing back
at length and jumping months ahead.
Though each branch of the story is well
served, we spend some intervals away
from each character. Rather than resenting these diversions, however, the reader
finds herself yearning for the updates the
next chapter will bring.
The novel’s central mysteries are dispatched in one dramatic scene that feels
overwrought, especially given that this is
not a tightly plotted whodunit so much as
a story for those who appreciate the tale’s
telling as much as its end — who mark
with interest the bends in the river, and
who will treasure the friends they bump
into along the way.
bookworld@washpost.com
Literary Calendar
SATURDAY | 1 P.M. Garrett Peck will discuss “The Great War in America: World War I and Its Aftermath” at Politics and Prose, 5015 Connecticut Ave. NW. 202-364-0724.
Ellen Morton is a writer in Los Angeles.
J A NU A RY REA D I NG LI S T
by Bethanne Patrick
H
appy new year, readers! After
finishing more than 200 books in
2018 — largely novels and short
stories — my resolution this year is to
read more nonfiction, which may
explain why this month’s list includes
less fiction than usual (although the
three novels that made the cut are
stellar).
“The Martha Manual: How to Do
(Almost) Everything,” by Martha
Stewart (Jan. 1)
Billed as instructions for everything
from “pruning roses to patching
drywall,” this might be the tome to give
young householders — or anyone
looking to learn a new skill. Caveat
lector: Recent photos of Stewart may
make you want her lessons on cosmetic
surgery rather than cosmetic DIY.
“Thick: And Other Essays,” by
Tressie McMillan Cottom (Jan. 8)
The professor and author of “Lower
Ed” could school us all on the
intersections of race, gender and
capitalism. Consider her collection this
year’s “Bad Feminist” and buy a copy for
everyone you know.
“Scrublands,” by Chris Hammer
(Jan. 8)
My pick for debut thriller of the
month (and maybe of 2019): Hammer, a
journalist, uses Australia’s bleak rural
territory to great effect in the story of a
priest’s killing rampage set against the
backdrop of a small town where
drought, economic decline and drugs
combine in a toxic stew. Beautifully
written, this would make a terrific
small-screen series.
“The Truths We Hold: An American
Journey,” by Kamala Harris (Jan. 8)
The political memoir is alive and well
with this installment from Sen. Harris
(D-Calif.), in which she revisits her
upbringing as the daughter of a
Jamaican economist and a South Asian
cancer researcher who were both active
in the civil rights movement.
“The Water Cure,” by Sophie
Mackintosh (Jan. 8)
Longlisted for the 2018 Man Booker
Prize and praised by Margaret Atwood,
Mackintosh’s sinister dystopian tale
hardly needs my recommendation —
but I’ll give it in the hopes that readers
find this novel about a family living in a
ramshackle dwelling where four
daughters are raised to control all
emotions and shun men. Blend “The
Virgin Suicides” with “My Family and
Other Animals” and “The Decameron”
and you’ll have some idea of the strange
atmosphere Mackintosh creates.
her stomach! Or are you supposed to
wear her in a sling at all times? Traig
has a PhD in English and several books
to her name, but when she became a
parent she was as confused as the rest
of us. Her analysis of over a millennium
of parenting advice will make you laugh
so hard you’ll forget you have children.
“An Orchestra of Minorities,” by
Chigozie Obioma (Jan. 8)
“Inheritance: A Memoir of
Genealogy, Paternity, and Love,” by
Dani Shapiro (Jan. 15)
Last year saw a new translation of
Homer’s “The Odyssey,” by Emily
Wilson, as well as Madeline Miller’s
reimagining, “Circe.” This year’s
version? A love story between a
Nigerian chicken farmer and a wealthy
young woman. Gorgeously written, with
a twist of magical realism and a heavy
dose of sad reality, this is your big novel
of the winter.
Shapiro has already written a
number of memoirs, including
“Hourglass,” “Devotion” and “Family
History,” but she didn’t know she would
be writing “Inheritance” until DNA
analysis revealed her father was not
really her father. For a writer who has
focused so intently on identity, this
news was a bombshell, leading Shapiro
on a hunt to discover who she really is.
“Act Natural: A Cultural History of
Misadventures in Parenting,” by
Jennifer Traig (Jan. 8)
“Shameless: A Sexual Reformation,”
by Nadia Bolz-Weber (Jan. 29)
Lay your baby on her back. No, prop
her on her side. Wait, let her sleep on
Stand-up comic, recovering alcoholic
and Lutheran minister Bolz-Weber
wants you to heal from your sexual
pain. While the frank, funny former
pastor has penned her new book with
Christians foremost in mind, anyone
whose ideas about sex have been
informed by their upbringing (hello,
Planet Earth) can benefit from her
manifesto to “burn it . . . down and start
over.”
“Dreyer’s English: An Utterly
Correct Guide to Clarity and Style,” by
Benjamin Dreyer (Jan. 29)
Dreyer is a VP and copy chief at
Random House, not to mention the
unofficial language guru on Twitter,
where he dispenses grammar bon mots
such as: “Only godless savages eschew
the series comma.” Talk to the AP Style
hand, Mr. Dreyer . . .
bookworld@washpost.com
Bethanne Patrick is the editor, most
recently, of “The Books That Changed My
Life: Reflections by 100 Authors, Actors,
Musicians and Other Remarkable People.”
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2 , 2019
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
C7
RE
What are ‘Vox Lux,’ ‘A Star Is Born’ trying to say about pop?
BY
S ONIA R AO
The power ballad that anchors
“Vox Lux” might stick with you
for some time — if not for its
almost mechanical catchiness,
then for the circumstances surrounding its creation. In real life,
“Wrapped Up” was co-written by
Sia, the Australian multihyphenate known for her pop
earworms. In the movie, it’s cowritten by Celeste (Raffey Cassidy), a Staten Island eighth-grader
who narrowly survives a school
shooting in 1999.
Celeste and her older sister
perform “Wrapped Up” in front of
their community as a means to
heal. But after a record label takes
notice and encourages Celeste to
change a lyric from “I” to “we,” the
song leaps from the memorial
service to the radio waves. Suddenly, her trauma belongs to the
world.
“A lot of the songs that are early
on in this movie . . . they weren’t
designed for the masses. They
just came from the heart,” director Brady Corbet told The Washington Post. “As the film progresses, the songs sort of change. The
lyrics, at least in the context of the
film, speak to generalities and
platitudes that are a little bit like
an audience having their tarot
read.”
That could apply to many
forms of mainstream art, but
“Vox Lux” posits that it is especially true of pop music. Corbet’s
film highlights the sincere but
fixates on what he calls the “rather disturbing aspects” of pop stardom, both of which 31-year-old
Celeste (a melodramatic Natalie
Portman) captures when she explains the reasoning behind her
shallow lyrics: “I don’t want people to think too hard,” she says
about halfway through the film. “I
just want them to feel good.”
But are those experiences mutually exclusive? What is “Vox
Lux,” a movie sympathetic to its
troubled artist, trying to say
about pop music?
If the questions sound familiar,
that’s because similar ones came
up a few months ago with “A Star
Is Born,” Bradley Cooper’s movie
featuring enamored protagonists
ATSUSHI NISHIJIMA/ NEON
Raffey Cassidy plays the teenage Celeste in “Vox Lux.” This movie and the recent “A Star Is Born,” which both feature struggling artists,
have sparked conversations about pop music’s place in our culture.
who famously sing about being
“far from the shallow now.” (Jude
Law, who plays Celeste’s manager,
once referred to “Vox Lux” as the
other film’s “wicked sister.”) As
country rocker Jackson Maine
(Cooper) struggles with addiction
and witnesses his career fall
apart,
aspiring
songwriterturned-pop star Ally (Lady Gaga)
goes from writing songs Jackson
considers meaningful to performing a catchy song with lyrics that
praise his, ahem, assets on “Saturday Night Live.”
Jackson doesn’t take the compliment well and instead laments
the direction Ally’s career has
taken — basically, the selling-out
story line that we’ve seen many
times before. But this conversation is layered. The songwriters,
including Diane Warren, didn’t
intend for “Why Did You Do
That?” to be considered a bad
song. And while Gaga told Variety
the song is “relatively shallow,”
Cooper said he didn’t “necessarily
view [Ally’s] music as superficial.
I think she’s performing with all
her heart.”
The song signifies Ally selling
out, yes, but is that from Jackson’s
point of view or the filmmaker’s?
Are we, as audience members,
supposed to side with him? Or is
he, as some have cleverly mused
online, an “unreliable narrator
whose world view the film critiques throughout”?
When asked whether he thinks
his film and “A Star Is Born”
portray pop music in a negative
light, Corbet laughed at the implied notion that, as he put it,
“something which is very popular
is under attack.”
“The idea that anybody needs
to come to the defense of one of
the most lucrative industries in
America is totally ridiculous,” he
continued.
The songs in “Vox Lux” aren’t
supposed to be bad, per se. Corbet
recruited Sia to co-write the music and described the results as
“affected and intoxicating,”
which is especially true of
“Wrapped Up.” Songs such as
“Private Girl,” in which Celeste
declares that she is “a private girl
in a public world,” and “Firecracker,” in which she claims to
have “a sixth sense on where the
party is headed,” are a bit more
grating.
“Natalie’s character serves as
an avatar to talk about the . . .
patterns that mark our contem-
porary values in this country,”
Corbet explained. “It’s not about
pop music, it’s about pop culture.
The pop songs are avatars to
describe the pros and cons of pop
culture.”
So it isn’t necessarily Celeste’s
music at which “Vox Lux” takes
aim, but the detriments of the
culture surrounding it. Her tragedy is “exploited by the pop music
industry,” according to Corbet,
and she is encouraged to produce
music that often speaks more to
generic experiences than her
own. Without a proper emotional
outlet, and haunted by childhood
trauma, she acts out. She uses
drugs. She yells at her manager.
She yells at her sister. She yells at
complete strangers.
Celeste ends up a cog in a
machine, but at the same time,
she sort of is the machine. The
first half of the film is about how
the culture shaped her, Corbet
said, and the second is about how
she, in turn, shapes the culture.
Celeste not only sings but also
speaks to her fans in those “generalities and platitudes.” During the
concert sequence that closes out
the film, she asks her audience:
Have you ever had a boy break
your heart? Has anyone ever
called you ugly? Has anyone ever
called you fat? If so, this one’s for
you.
“There’s something so pathetic
about this moment and yet, of
course, what she’s saying is so
commonplace — it’s totally ordinary, but it’s delivered as if it’s
vital and important and unique,”
Corbet said. “There’s something
about that I find really interesting, the idea of exploiting the
insecurities that, of course, people have.”
But pop stars no longer shape
culture with generic messages —
at least, not to the same extent.
While Taylor Swift sells out stadiums and speaks to the masses
about issues they all face, such as
online bullying, she has also
started to speak out on topics that
in another era could have ended
her career, including politics. Ariana Grande’s “Thank U, Next”
preaches self-acceptance in a way
that few breakup songs have. On
top of it all, a recent Vanity Fair
piece argues that the definition of
“pop star” has been so in flux
throughout 2018 that traditional
pop stars like Ally and Celeste are
“no longer the de-facto agendasetters” for mass audiences. The
New York Times adds that the
power has been transferred to
pop subgenres: “K-pop, Latin
trap, melodic hip-hop and more.”
Perhaps “Vox Lux” presents an
image of pop stardom that will
soon feel dated. Regardless, unlike Celeste’s lyrics, it makes you
think — and that’s all Corbet
wants.
“I really appreciate the debate
that ensues when the film is
finished,” he said. “I think that it’s
important, and it’s welcome. The
film was designed to stir these
kinds of conversations.”
sonia.rao@washpost.com
In taxis, courtesy doesn’t take back seat
Miss
Manners
Dear Miss
Manners: Is there
a rule of etiquette
about where a
couple is seated in
a taxicab? I think
the couple should
sit in the back. My
gentleman friend
believes he should
sit in the front with the driver to
give directions (despite GPS
navigation and the fact that taxi
drivers usually know where they
are going).
I feel it is discourteous to let
me sit alone in the back while he
chats with the driver. We are
both elderly and somewhat
stubborn in our beliefs. Your
thoughts may help keep the
peace.
Your gentleman friend’s place is
in the back with you — not
sitting on the driver’s phone and
unanswered mail in the front
seat, not driving, and not sitting
on the hood, satisfying though
the last might be.
Miss Manners recognizes that
not all taxi drivers are good
navigators and that the customer
is allowed reasonable say in the
route. But back-seat driving can
be done from the back seat and,
if done properly, with decent
consideration for the
JUDITH
MARTIN,
NICHOLAS
MARTIN AND
JACOBINA
MARTIN
JABIN BOTSFORD/THE WASHINGTON POST
President Trump’s White House often does not respond to reporters’ requests for comment.
Not even a ‘no comment’ for reporters
NO RESPONSE FROM C1
and one of the co-authors of the
story about Trump’s isolation.
“There are certainly individuals
there who are professional and try
to be helpful when they can, and I
appreciate their efforts, I really do.
But as a whole, I’ve learned not to
expect answers even to basic questions.”
Adds Baker, “I don’t know why
that is. I don’t take it personally.
But it’s a lost opportunity on their
part to get their side of the story
out.”
The White House has had no
response to stories large and small
in recent days: reports that Trump
planned to meet with Federal
Reserve Chairman Jerome H.
Powell, whom he has criticized (no
response to Agence FrancePresse); the partial shutdown of
the federal government (no response to Reuters or USA Today);
a report by an advocacy group that
wealthy donors gave $55 million
to groups supporting his reelection, despite Trump’s stated opposition to such donations during
the 2016 campaign (no response
to The Washington Post); Trump’s
statement that former secretary of
state Rex Tillerson was “dumb as a
rock” (no response to CNBC); a
piece in the Times reporting that a
podiatrist may have helped
Trump dodge the draft when
Trump was a young man at the
height of the Vietnam War.
At the same time, the White
House seems to have all but
stopped explaining Trump’s bi-
zarre tweets.
After Trump tweeted on Christmas Eve that the border wall “will
be built with the Shutdown money plus funds already in hand,” the
New York Times sought comment
from the White House about what
“shutdown money’’ was. It got no
response.
There was also no response to
reporters’ inquiries about what
Trump meant when he tweeted a
few hours later that he “just gave
out a 115 mile long contract for
another large section of the Wall
in Texas.”
Reporters say White House
press secretary Sarah Sanders and
her deputies don’t always give
them the silent treatment. But
getting a response often depends
— on the news outlet, on the
reporter, on the nature of the
story. Favored outlets, such as Fox
News, tend to get a better hearing.
Others, not so much.
“I would say they can be responsive but not always helpful,” said
Jonathn Karl, ABC News’s chief
White House correspondent. “We
can usually get some kind of
acknowledgment of a request, but
the answer is likely to be ‘no
comment.’”
Another prominent correspondent, who spoke on the condition
of anonymity, citing company policy, said the nonresponsiveness
was a result of understaffing and a
boss — Trump — who believes he’s
his own best spokesman. The
press office reportedly has lost
about half its staff since its peak
last year, this correspondent said.
As for working under Trump:
The press staff “doesn’t have a
natural message to drive every
day,” as other presidents tried to
do, the reporter said. “He [Trump]
makes it up every few seconds, so
they’re afraid to do anything. . . .
It’s not a place where being a
freewheeling thinker is valued
and rewarded. It’s all about the
whims of one man.”
As a practical matter, the White
House’s silence violates one of the
core tenets of public relations —
that is, always get a word in
edgewise, no matter how damaging a story may be.
But Trump may be playing a
different game, said Larry Parnell,
who directs the strategic public
relations program at George
Washington University’s graduate
school of political management.
By being nonresponsive, he
said, the White House and Trump
get to have it both ways: It
“proves” to his base that the mainstream media is ignoring his
views while enabling him to complain about press bias and “fake
news.”
Trump’s predecessors tried to
engage “more than the hardcore
base” to broaden the president’s
support, Parnell said. “Not him.
What matters are those who already agree with him.”
What does the White House
think of this? It’s hard to know.
The White House did not respond to a request for comment
about its tendency not to respond
to requests for comment.
paul.farhi@washpost.com
professional feelings of the
driver.
Dear Miss Manners: A good
friend of many years is
experiencing hard times; she has
very little income and multiple
major health problems that
prevent her from working, and
she has no family close by.
I invite her over for dinner
every so often, as I enjoy cooking,
and I try to find inexpensive or
free things we can do together. I
happen to work in social services
and have referred her to several
agencies that helped her with
various problems.
She often tries to repay me,
which she really cannot afford —
she even attempts to pay for the
cost of ingredients when I cook
dinner, which of course I don’t
accept. She has gladly done
favors for me, such as looking
after my pet and plants when I
have traveled, which I appreciate
very much and have told her so.
I would love to know how to
keep her from spending money
to “repay” me or to buy gifts for
me. At the same time, I don’t
want to make her feel like Poor
Pitiful Pearl either. I am far from
wealthy but can afford to treat an
old friend to a home-cooked
meal or a movie every so often.
Manners will take the blame for
your not accepting cash gifts.
When your friend attempts to
pay for groceries, Miss Manners
recommends acting scandalized:
“Ask an old friend to pay for her
dinner when I have invited her
for the pleasure of her company?
Never!”
The tone to be cultivated is
humorous exaggeration. The
humor will mask the
embarrassment you are
nevertheless trying to create to
prevent a recurrence. Truly
expensive gifts must be accepted
with genuine pleasure, and a
direct, firm but kindly request
that she recognize that you
prefer her company to
unaffordable gifts. (Note that
Miss Manners has intentionally
constructed the previous
sentence so as to imply that no
one can afford the gift in
question.) As this technique will
be neither totally effective — nor
totally free of embarrassment —
on all sides, it should not be used
for inexpensive, incidental gifts.
New Miss Manners columns are
posted Monday through Saturday on
washingtonpost.com/advice. You can
send questions to Miss Manners at
her website, missmanners.com.
©2019, by Judith Martin
What is oat flavor extract powder?
Hints
From
Heloise
Dear Heloise:
What is oat flavor
extract powder?
What do you use
it for?
Marty in Indiana
Marty in Indiana: Here’s what I
found: Oat extract powder is a
cereal grain grown primarily for
its seeds. In powder form, it’s
used in beauty products and to
lower LDL cholesterol for those
with coronary heart disease.
While it’s fit for human
consumption, it is more
commonly used to feed livestock.
Dear Heloise: Got any recipes for
pralines? My husband loves them,
but I don’t really know how to
make them.
Amber F., Klamath Falls, Ore.
Amber F.: Yes, I have a terrific
recipe for Buttermilk Pecan
Pralines that is found in my book
“In the Kitchen With Heloise.” I
use a 6- to 8-quart pot for this
because the mixture foams to
great heights while cooking.
Buttermilk Pecan Pralines
1 cup buttermilk
2 cups sugar
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon butter or margarine
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
2 cups pecan halves
Pour the buttermilk into the
very large pot, then stir in the
sugar and baking soda until
dissolved. Cook over medium
heat, letting it bubble until it
turns brownish in color and
reaches the soft ball stage (about
235 F on a candy thermometer).
While cooking, you will need to
stir constantly so the mixture
doesn’t stick. At the soft ball
stage, remove the pot from the
stove and add the butter (or
margarine), vanilla extract and
pecans. Return to the stove and
heat the mixture until it becomes
glossy and starts to crystallize. On
wax paper or a well-greased
cookie sheet, quickly spoon out
little patties. Let them cool, and
store in an airtight container. If
it’s overcooked, it will be too
sugary. If it’s undercooked, it
won’t be firm, which is why a
candy thermometer is needed.
Dear Heloise: My husband and I
are celebrating our 25th wedding
anniversary, and we want to do it
up in style with champagne for
our very closest friends. The
question is, how much
champagne to order?
Connie K. in Honolulu
Connie K. in Honolulu: Here is a
list that might be of help to you:
Champagne portions per
bottle:
Quart: Five glasses.
Magnum: 10 glasses.
Jeroboam: 21 glasses.
Rehoboam: 31 glasses.
Methuselah: 41 glasses.
Enjoy!
Heloise’s column appears six days a
week at washingtonpost.com/advice.
Send a hint to Heloise, P.O. Box
795001, San Antonio, TX 78279-5000,
or email it to Heloise@Heloise.com.
©2019, King Features Syndicate
C8
EZ
CLASSIC DOONESBURY
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
GARRY TRUDEAU
RED AND ROVER
BRIDGE
PICKLES
. WEDNESDAY,
JANUARY 2 , 2019
BRIAN CRANE
BRIAN BASSET
AGNES
TONY COCHRAN
TOM THAVES
WUMO
MIKAEL WULFF & ANDERS MORGENTHALER
BOTH SIDES VULNERABLE
NORTH
J43
K4
832
A9632
WEST (D)
95
AJ873
AKJ5
J7
EAST
8
Q 10 9 6 5 2
10 9 4
Q 10 8
FRANK AND ERNEST
SOUTH
A K Q 10 7 6 2
None
Q76
K54
The bidding:
WEST
NORTH
EAST
1
Pass
4
All Pass
Opening lead — K
SOUTH
4
e know we’re better CLASSIC PEANUTS
than this, but we
can’t prove it.” — the late
Tony Gwynn, when his San
Diego Padres were mired in a
losing streak.
You can improve your play
through reading and study,
but knowing that a technique
exists is not enough. You
need the presence of mind
to recognize and apply it at
the table.
RHYMES WITH ORANGE
Against four spades, West
led the king of diamonds.
When East signaled with the
four, West shifted to a trump.
South took the A-K, then led
the A-K and a third club. East
won and led a diamond, and
West took the jack and ace
for down one.
This is a textbook deal.
How should South play?
South can win West’s
trump shift with the ace and LIO
lead his seven to dummy’s
jack. He next leads the king
of hearts and discards a
club: a loser on a loser.
If West takes the ace
and errs by leading another
heart, South ruffs, cashes
the K-A of clubs and ruffs
a club. He can return to
dummy by leading his deuce
of trumps to the four and discard diamonds on the good
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
clubs.
“W
CHARLES SCHULZ
HILARY PRICE
MARK TATULLI
CHRIS BROWNE
MIKE DU JOUR
MIKE LESTER
MARK TRAIL
JAMES ALLEN
MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM
MIKE PETERS
BALDO
HECTOR CANTU & CARLOS CASTELLANOS
DAILY QUESTION
You hold:
95AJ873
AKJ5J7
Your partner opens one
club, you bid one heart, he
rebids two clubs and you try
two diamonds. Partner next
bids two spades. What do
you say?
ANSWER: Partner doesn’t
BLONDIE
have four cards in spades;
he didn’t bid one spade over
your one-heart response.
Your two diamonds was forcing, so he had to bid something at his third turn. He
may have a hand such as A 3
2, 2, Q 7 6, A K 10 9 5 4. Bid
three clubs, which he should
treat as forcing.
DEAN YOUNG & JOHN MARSHALL
SALLY FORTH
FRANCESCO MARCIULIANO & JIM KEEFE
— Frank Stewart
©2019, TRIBUNE CONTENT AGENCY, LLC.
SUDOKU
SHERMAN’S LAGOON
CURTIS
BREWSTER ROCKIT: SPACE GUY!
JIM TOOMEY
RAY BILLINGSLEY
TIM RICKARD
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2 , 2019
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
MUTTS
EZ
PATRICK McDONNELL
C9
RE
ZITS
JERRY SCOTT & JIM BORGMAN
HOROSCOPE
BIRTHDAY | JANUARY 2
DILBERT
SCOTT ADAMS
JUDGE PARKER
FRANCESCO MARCIULIANO & MIKE MANLEY
This year, although
you experience
greater confidence
and self-expression,
you still seem to hold yourself
back. If you need to, dig into
your psyche to discover where
your resistance is coming
from. If you are single, you will
meet many people. If you are
attached, you long for time
with just your sweetie. Create
more time together, and you
both will benefit. Sagittarius
verbalizes his or her opinion.
ARIES
(MARCH 21-APRIL 19).
Your mind floats to other
matters that do not necessarily
revolve around your daily life.
You could be looking at the
year as a whole and deciding
when to visit an important
person in your life. Others
might be eyeing a workshop or
seminar.
FRAZZ
JEF MALLETT
GARFIELD
JIM DAVIS
CANDORVILLE
DARRIN BELL
TAURUS
(APRIL 20-MAY 20).
Your relating skills come
forward. The time has come to
have an intense conversation
with someone. You have put
off this talk for a while. At this
time, you see a situation from
a different perspective.
GEMINI
(MAY 21-JUNE 20).
Others knock on your door
with expectations that might
surprise you. Examine new
possibilities with care. You
might not be ready to jump
on any of your options just
yet. However, if you don’t, you
WEINGARTENS & CLARK might lose one.
BARNEY AND CLYDE
CANCER
(JUNE 21-JULY 22).
Your emotions run high. Once
you mellow out, you’ll find a
solution with ease. Meditate.
Take a walk. Do what is
necessary to chill out. Your
ability to read between the
lines emerges. Someone will
approach you, and you might
not be able to say “no.”
DUSTIN
STEVE KELLEY & JEFF PARKER
PRICKLY CITY
SCOTT STANTIS
THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN
STAN LEE & ALEX SAVIUK
LOOSE PARTS
DAVE BLAZEK
LEO
(JULY 23-AUG. 22).
Your playful side emerges.
You act like a kid left alone in
a candy store. You’ll get into
each experience and make
the most of it. Be careful not to
mess up your schedule. Seek
out someone from a distance
who has had a profound
influence on your life.
VIRGO
(AUG. 23-SEPT. 22).
A domestic matter takes up
your time. To many people, you
don’t seem to be present in
conversation. To get a reaction
from you, a friend or loved one
could say something quite
absurd. In the future, try to
stay present with the people
around you.
LIBRA
(SEPT. 23-OCT. 22).
Open up to what appears to be
a serious talk that could affect
your personal life. You might
be concerned with where
this conversation is heading.
However, you also are likely to
feel energized because of it.
NON SEQUITUR
WILEY
BABY BLUES
RICK KIRKMAN & JERRY SCOTT
SCORPIO
(OCT. 23-NOV. 21).
You might not be aware of your
need to spend money. You
know that you need to tame
an inner wildness. If you don’t,
your behavior could cause you
to go overboard. You might
want to discuss this issue with
someone and get his or her
feedback.
SAGITTARIUS
(NOV. 22-DEC. 21).
You feel more in control than
you have in a while. You also
have the energy to start and
complete a project that has
been on the back burner.
You might be on the verge of
realizing a key goal or desire.
BIG NATE
LINCOLN PEIRCE
BEETLE BAILEY
MORT, BRIAN & GREG WALKER
ON THE FASTRACK
BILL HOLBROOK
PEARLS BEFORE SWINE
STEPHAN PASTIS
CAPRICORN
(DEC. 22-JAN. 19).
Let others express their
feelings in meaningful ways.
However, you might not be
comfortable with what you
hear. Be clear about your
objectives and your needs. Not
everything is going your way,
but give it time.
AQUARIUS
(JAN. 20-FEB. 18).
Friends always remain a high
priority in your life, and today
is no different. You might feel
as though your loved ones
keep coming toward you with
requests, gossip and fun tales.
PISCES
(FEB. 19-MARCH 20).
Take charge of a personal
matter first, then you can
kick back and relax. Your
responsiveness to life will be
enhanced. You can be found
smiling more often, and you
willingly throw yourself into
whatever you want to be
involved with.
— Jacqueline Bigar
© 2019, KING FEATURES SYNDICATE, INC.
PREVIOUS SUDOKU SOLUTION
SPEED BUMP
DAVE COVERLY
DENNIS THE MENACE
H. KETCHAM
FAMILY CIRCUS
BIL KEANE
REPLY ALL LITE
DONNA A. LEWIS
PREVIOUS SCRABBLEGRAMS SOLUTION
More online: washingtonpost.com/comics. Feedback: 1301 K St. NW, Washington, D.C., 20071; comics@washpost.com; 202-334-4775.
Plus, in Comic Riffs, Michael Cavna blogs about all things comics.
C10
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. WEDNESDAY,
JANUARY 2 , 2019
kidspost
CHIP SAYS
TODAY
KIDSPOST.COM
The Harbin International Ice and Snow Sculpture
Festival has been around since the 1980s. Other icy
destinations include Canada’s Quebec Winter Carnival
and the Sapporo Snow Festival in Japan.
Wintry weather is returning with
mostly cloudy skies and a high
around 45 degrees.
Find more colorful photos
from the ice festival in our
online photo gallery.
ILLUSTRATION BY JORDAN ADDIS, 6, ARLINGTON
In China, a chilly — but colorful — celebration
W
hen it’s cold out,
some people want
to escape to warmer locations. But
hundreds of thousands of people head to Northeast
China to revel in the cold . . . or, at
least, a cold-weather spectacle.
The 35th Harbin International
Ice and Snow Sculpture Festival,
which officially opens Saturday,
invites visitors to walk in and
around hundreds of ice castles
and monuments lit up in rainbow
colors — while temperatures at
night often drop below zero.
The structures, which take
thousands of workers several
weeks to build, are made of ice
blocks cut from the city’s Songhua
River.
This chilly celebration started
as the Ice Lantern Garden Party,
during which local artists displayed lanterns out of hollowedout ice blocks. The party now lasts
two months — unless an early
spring turns the sculptures into
slush.
CHINA STRINGER NETWORK/REUTERS
AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
CLOCKWISE FROM ABOVE: People visit the Harbin International Ice and Snow Sculpture Festival in
Northeast China in 2018. The ice castles and monuments are lit up in rainbow colors. Thousands of
workers need several weeks to build the structures out of ice, from a river, that they have cut into
blocks. Visitors can walk in and around castles for two months until they start to melt.
— Christina Barron
AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
KEVIN FRAYER/GETTY IMAGES
ACROSS
1 Fictional
archaeologist
Croft
5 Prep for fight
night
9 Furry critters
who helped
disable the
shield generator
on Endor
14 Major work
15 La Scala song
16 “Mack the
Knife” singer
17 *Jewelry alloy
19 Pull together
20 Frenzy
21 Plumeria
garlands
23 CIA relative
24 “__ recall ...”
25 *Genre that may
be featured in
the Eurovision
Song Contest
29 Serenade
31 “Good
comeback”
32 Palm starch
33 Julia LouisDreyfus comedy
37 London
insurance
pioneer
38 *Sleight-of-hand
scam
41 Dispatch boat
44 Apple desktop
45 Former Virginia
senator Charles
49 Sesame paste
51 Daffy, for one
53 *Food brand
whose products
include Caribbean curry paste
and Jamaican
jerk seasoning
57 Lyft approx.
58 Strike caller
59 H.G. Wells race
60 Actor Pratt or
Pine
62 Flower girl,
perhaps
65 1978 novelty
song with the
line “Eat them
up! Yum!” ... and
what both parts
of the answers
to starred clues
can be
67 Come next
KEVIN FRAYER/GETTY IMAGES
By Robin Stears
NICK GALIFIANAKIS FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
LA TIMES CROSSWORD
KEVIN FRAYER/GETTY IMAGES
An old flame and fears of getting burned
© 2019 Tribune Content Agency, LLC.
68 “Dies __”
69 Exactly,
with “to”
70 Baby carrier?
71 Sleek swimmers
72 Gerritsen who
created Rizzoli
and Isles
DOWN
1 Catholic service
with minimal
ceremony
2 Loss of speech
3 Making a mess of
4 Bubbly city
5 Mattress
problem
6 Orwellian
worker
7 Didn’t feel well
8 Diameter halves
9 College URL
ending
10 Pallid
11 Venezuelan river
12 Tacky
13 Moved furtively
18 NCAA’s Big __
22 Mach 1 flier
26 Made on a loom
27 Ian who plays
Bilbo Baggins
1/2/19
28 Things used for
good measure?
30 Scuttlebutt
34 Nutmeg State
Ivy Leaguer
35 Shade tree
36 Vardon Trophy
org.
39 Hägar the
Horrible’s
daughter
40 Civil rights gp.
41 Brings into
harmony
42 Critter, in dialect
43 “Fingers
crossed!”
46 Perform surgery
47 Happens to,
quaintly
48 Copper-zinc
alloys
50 Party host’s
bagful
52 Snowfall
measure
54 2004 Jude Law
title role
55 Orléans’ river
56 Rope fiber
61 __ index
63 Mongrel
64 Startled cry
66 “__ Just Not
That Into You”:
2009 film
TUESDAY’S LA TIMES SOLUTION
Dear Carolyn: I
rejected “Sam”
years ago in favor
of “Aaron.” Aaron
and I are newly
divorced —
Carolyn
initiated by me —
Hax
after 25 years of
marriage and three
kids.
Sam has been alienated from
his wife for many years and moved
out five years ago at her insistence.
Sam initiated divorce proceedings,
but they ultimately stalled and
Sam and “Gina” remain married.
Sam says he stays in the
marriage for the sake of their only
son, who is 21 and finishing
college. In my opinion he stays
married because the finances
work out better that way.
Now that I’m divorced, Sam
wants to see me. (We have not
actually been face-to-face in 10
years.) I have refused his advances.
He is still married, after all.
If I didn’t want to see him, there
would be no problem. Alas, I do.
Please provide a long list of
reasons seeing Sam is an awful
idea. Thank you.
— Someone Who Wants to Not
Want Sam
Someone Who Wants to Not
Want Sam: This is your game; I
have no interest in playing it.
You obviously want to satisfy
your curiosity about Sam, so do it.
Whatever you decide, the
likeliest potential snag isn’t that
Sam is still married to a woman he
doesn’t live with and hasn’t lived
with for years, but instead that you
and Sam are operating from a
quarter-century-old idea of what
it’s like to be together.
And possible amnesia
regarding possibly excellent
reasons you didn’t choose Sam
back then.
And possible blindness to the
fact of billions of men/women on
Earth besides each other.
And possible temptation to
snuggle into something familiar
when braving some time alone
might be better for you.
So if you do approach Sam, then
be self-aware, logical, patient,
open-minded, as skeptical as you
can be without veering into
cynicism and self-aware (you say
redundant, I say emphatic). And
set your bulls--- detectors to 11.
That way, when his reasons for
staying married sound like excuses
— to use a not-random example —
you will be prepared to say, “Those
reasons sound like excuses.”
This posture is the very
antithesis of game-playing. A.k.a.,
bliss.
And if I’ve misread your letter
and you genuinely don’t want to
see Sam, because he’s still married
or whatever else, then don’t.
Dear Carolyn: Can one stay happy
while living with an active addict?
Spouse of 35 years is a truly good
and caring person yet lies, steals
others’ prescription pills and
wrecks cars under the influence.
— Dog Tired
Dog Tired: Who is this
hypothetical “one”?
We are talking about you.
You are talking about you.
Yet you’ve erased you, gone
outside yourself both for your
problem (the addict) and solution
(“can one stay happy?”).
So humor me, please, and say
aloud: “This is about me.”
Your spouse may be lovely
inside somewhere, but the
addiction runs the show now,
apparently into a tree, or worse.
And you are “dog tired” because
the addiction is running you, too.
So please get help, for you.
(Spouse’s problem is their
problem.) A therapist whose
training and experience focus on
families of addicts is where I’d
start, but if there’s a cost or
scheduling issue, start with the
closest Al-Anon group in the book.
Please. Soon. Take care.
Write to Carolyn Hax at
tellme@washpost.com. Get her column
delivered to your inbox each morning at
wapo.st/haxpost.
Join the discussion live at noon
Fridays at live.washingtonpost.com
KLMNO
SPORTS
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2 , 2019
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/SPORTS
Buckeyes win it for Meyer
BY
C HUCK C ULPEPPER
pasadena, calif. — One of the
most football-tormented brains
in college football history began
the tricky process of shutting
down large areas of its normal
function in favor of other areas
Tuesday. This began in early-evening darkness at the 105th Rose
Bowl, when Ohio State quarterback Dwayne Haskins took one
last knee, and Urban Meyer
walked to midfield for the handshake.
It continued as Meyer did
interviews amid such a phalanx
of cameras that it retold of a
football-mad culture. It continued as Meyer walked around the
OHIO STATE 28,
WASHINGTON 23
Coach’s final game
is a Rose Bowl triumph
stage to the front to receive the
trophy for No. 6 Ohio State’s
28-23 win over No. 9 Washington.
It persisted when he walked
down the field to join the band in
the traditional song, when he
stepped up the ladder to give the
band and fans the thumbs-up
and when he returned back down
the field to the tunnel with family
members and others moving
with him in a considerable blob.
It went on as Ohio State fans
chanted, “Urban! Urban!” toward
a coach who will step down after
sharing their insatiability and
giving them one more national
championship (2014), three more
Big Ten titles, five more bowl
wins (in seven tries), seven more
wins (in seven tries) over Michigan and 83 wins in the 92 games
he coached over seven loud seasons, never more than two losses
in any.
“And I operated — it’s not
healthy all the time — but I
operated under the sense of fear,”
he said shortly thereafter. Then
he spoke of Ohio State royalty
ROSE BOWL CONTINUED ON D2
D
M2
Quarterback
is Redskins’
top priority
in o≠season
BY
HARRY HOW/GETTY IMAGES
Urban Meyer finished with an 83-9 record over seven seasons in
Columbus as Ohio State survived Washington’s second-half rally.
K AREEM C OPELAND
Hall of Fame executive Ron
Wolf learned a lesson in 1995 that
would shape his roster-building
philosophy for the rest of his life
in the NFL: Don’t get caught
shorthanded at quarterback.
The Green Bay Packers led
24-16 at Minnesota when Brett
Favre went down with a sprained
ankle. Ty Detmer entered but
tore a ligament in his thumb in
the fourth quarter. That left T.J.
Rubley to finish the game, but he
threw an interception with the
score tied at 24, and Warren
Moon led a Vikings drive that
ended in a Fuad Reveiz 39-yard
field goal for a 27-24 win.
“We snatched defeat from
victory right there,” Wolf said.
The Packers would never be
left in a precarious position at
quarterback again, as far as Wolf
was concerned. The team drafted
a quarterback every year from
1995 to 1999, and Wolf picked
seven, including Mark Brunell
and Matt Hasselbeck, in 11 years
as general manager.
The architect of the Favre-era
Packers decided to continually
draft and develop quarterbacks
so the team could survive a
calamity, even though Favre never missed a start. The Washington Redskins find themselves in
that position after Alex Smith
snapped multiple bones in his
right leg during a November
game and developed an infection
during a lengthy hospital stay.
Smith’s future is in doubt after
the gruesome injury in which the
bone broke through the surface
of the skin. He signed a four-year,
$94 million deal with $71 million
guaranteed last offseason to replace Kirk Cousins, but he may
never play again. Colt McCoy
replaced Smith but broke his leg
in his second start. Those were
the only two quarterbacks on the
REDSKINS CONTINUED ON D5
James Akinjo wants to return Georgetown basketball to glory, then bring some of it home to Oakland, Calif.
hungry for greatness
BY
A VA W ALLACE
James Akinjo is looking for good
Chinese food and fried chicken.
Georgetown’s starting point
guard has lived in Washington for
several months but still hasn’t
settled on go-to spots for his two
favorite foods — but if he’s being
honest with himself, he knows he
won’t find what he really wants in
the District.
He’s hungry for the Chinese food
he orders back home. And what
he’s really craving is his grandmother’s fried chicken.
“Ooooooh,” Akinjo said as he
leaned back in his chair one recent
day after practice, squeezing his
eyes shut and patting his stomach.
“Nobody beats Grandma’s.”
When Akinjo decided to move
across the country for college, far
away from his hometown of Oakland, Calif., he knew he would be
leaving certain things behind.
“I’m from Oakland, so there’s a
lot of stuff going on off the court,”
Akinjo said, before specifying that
for him, home means dodging
PHOTOS BY JONATHAN NEWTON/THE WASHINGTON POST
Coach Patrick Ewing said freshman point guard
James Akinjo “plays with a chip on his shoulder.”
Georgetown at Butler
Today, 7 p.m., MASN2
gang violence, worrying about
family and friends who are in and
out of jail and making sure he
doesn’t go certain places after
dark. But home is also his grandmother and her cooking, his father,
his uncle, the blacktop in his
neighborhood — the people and
places that raised him.
Almost 3,000 miles away at
Georgetown, the 6-foot, 180-pound
freshman has found his place.
He is a leader on second-year
Coach Patrick Ewing’s team. With
the Hoyas opening Big East play at
Butler on Wednesday night, Akinjo
is second on the roster behind
senior center Jessie Govan in both
points (14.2) and minutes (29.7)
per game. A capable distributor
with the ability to get to the rim
and a solid jumper, Akinjo is a key
piece of the Hoyas’ young core that
represents the promise of better
days to come at Georgetown.
“A leader. A great point guard,”
Ewing said when asked to describe
what Akinjo means to the
program. “He could be one of the
HOYAS CONTINUED ON D3
Free land or
public money
— for Snyder?
Pure madness.
You’ve got to be a
drunk, a gambler
or Daniel Snyder
to tank your
business in the
NFL. The
Sally
Washington
Jenkins
Redskins’ owner
has firmly
established just what a bad
investment risk he is. It is
therefore the height of
irresponsibility for any local
government to even think of
giving him a dime of public
money, or a foot of free land, for a
new stadium. It would be nothing
but a bailout, welfare.
For 19 years, Snyder has run
the team as a wild personal
indulgence, while a seemingly
inexhaustible fan base picked up
the tab. But no more. Oh, he’ll
never go broke, for the simple
reason that it’s virtually
impossible to lose money as an
NFL owner, especially of such a
marquee franchise with so many
built-in market advantages.
Nevertheless, Snyder has done
his best to squander and gouge
until the team has suffered a
precipitous plunge in attendance,
ratings and game-day income.
Legislators take note: This is
what happens to people who
partner with him. Nobody
JENKINS CONTINUED ON D5
Cousins’s fresh start with Vikings has turned rotten for all sides
BY
M ARK M ASKE
When the NFL season got underway, it didn’t seem outrageous
to think that the quarterback
shuffling resulting from Kirk
Cousins’s divorce with the Washington Redskins could end up
benefiting everyone involved.
Cousins landed in Minnesota,
with a fully guaranteed, threeyear contract worth $84 million,
to be the final piece of the Super
Bowl puzzle for the Vikings. The
Redskins, acting preemptively before Cousins’s free agent departure, lined up a trade just before
the Super Bowl for Alex Smith, the
NFL’s top-rated passer in 2017 for
the Kansas City Chiefs. Case
Keenum, unseated in Minnesota
after taking the Vikings to the
NFC title game, moved on to Denver as the potential solution to the
Broncos’ quarterback dilemma.
It had a chance to be a winners-
all-around scenario, didn’t it? Not
so much, as it turned out.
The NFL playoffs begin Saturday with the Vikings, Redskins
and Broncos sitting at home. One
year into his deal, Cousins is being
described as a free agent bust.
Smith’s NFL future is uncertain
because of the broken right leg
that ended his season and the
infection that complicated his recovery. Keenum’s interceptionprone play could have the
Broncos back in the quarterback
market, but only after they replace coach Vance Joseph, whom
they fired Monday.
So far, at least, the breakup of
Cousins and the Redskins has
produced no winners.
The paychecks have been enormous for Cousins, of course. But
that was going to be the case
wherever he signed. And that was
the case when he twice played
under the franchise tag for the
Redskins. The issue was whether
he could be a quarterback worthy
of those dizzying numbers between the dollar sign and the
decimal point.
It didn’t happen in his first year
with Minnesota. The Vikings never resembled a Super Bowl team.
And they missed the NFC playoffs
when they lost at home to the
Chicago Bears on Sunday. Cousins
threw for only 132 yards and got
COUSINS CONTINUED ON D6
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Maryland’s young core will
be tested when Big Ten
play resumes tonight. D3
HOCKEY
Captain Alex Ovechkin
skates into the new year
in a rare drought. D4
PRO BASKETBALL
Eager to make up for lost
time, Otto Porter Jr. eyes
return to the Wizards. D4
D2
EZ
D I G ES T
TENNIS
Federer tops Serena
in meeting of aces
Roger Federer claimed
bragging rights over fellow tennis
great Serena Williams as they
faced each other on court for the
first time Tuesday, with Federer
spearheading Switzerland’s 4-2,
4-3 victory over the United States
in a mixed doubles decider at the
Hopman Cup in Perth, Australia.
“I was nervous returning
[Williams’s serve],” Federer said.
“People talk about her serve so
much, and I see why it is such a
wonderful serve because you just
can’t read it.”
Federer and playing partner
Belinda Bencic overcame
Williams and Frances Tiafoe in
the Fast4 format as Switzerland
beat the U.S. tandem, 2-1, in front
of a capacity crowd of 14,000.
Federer and Williams shared a
good-natured interview
afterward and then engaged in a
selfie.
“It was so fun. This is super
cool that we get to do it at such a
pinnacle point of our careers,”
Williams said. “I was so excited,
and literally it was the match of
my career. Just playing someone
so great, and someone you
admire so much, and a match
that actually means something.”
Federer and Williams, both 37,
have won 43 Grand Slam singles
titles between them.
Defending champion
Switzerland will qualify for
Saturday’s final if it beats Greece
on Thursday in Group B.
Earlier, Federer beat Tiafoe,
6-4, 6-1, in men’s singles before
Williams’s 4-6, 6-4, 6-3 victory
over Bencic. . . .
Andy Murray, 31, returned to
competition for the first time
since September and took the last
four games for a 6-3, 6-4 win over
James Duckworth at the
Brisbane International in
Australia.
Murray, still recovering after
hip surgery from January, said
he’s dealing with regular pain,
but it didn’t hamper his shotmaking ability. He missed the last
five weeks of the season with an
ankle injury. . . .
In Auckland, New Zealand,
Venus Williams rallied from a
break down in the third set to
beat Victoria Azarenka, 6-3, 1-6,
6-3, in the first round of the ASB
Classic.
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
Oklahoma agreed to a contract
extension with second-year
Coach Lincoln Riley.
Riley, 35, led the Sooners to
consecutive Big 12
championships and College
Football Playoff berths.
Oklahoma is 24-4 overall and 16-2
in the Big 12 under Riley, with
two Heisman Trophy winners:
quarterbacks Baker Mayfield
and Kyler Murray. . . .
Stanford tight end Kaden
Smith will skip his final season to
enter the NFL draft. He had 47
catches for 635 yards and two
touchdowns this season but
missed the final three games with
a foot injury.
SOCCER
Harry Kane’s third-minute
goal set Tottenham on its way to a
3-0 win at Cardiff, and the prolific
England striker now has scored
against all 28 teams he has faced
in the Premier League.
Christian Eriksen and Son
Heung-min also netted first-half
goals as Tottenham moved back
into second place, a point above
Manchester City and six behind
Liverpool.
Kane had failed to breach
Cardiff’s defense in his three
previous matches against the
Welsh club and only did so this
time because of a touch of good
luck. Cardiff defender Sean
Morrison tried to clear the ball
out of his area, but it struck the
midriff of Kane and ended up
dribbling over the goal line.
It was Kane’s 14th goal of the
league season, moving him
alongside Arsenal striker PierreEmerick Aubameyang atop the
scoring list and one above
Liverpool’s Mohamed Salah. . . .
Arsenal eased past Fulham, 4-1,
to move within two points of the
Champions League qualification
positions. Aubameyang wrapped
up a routine victory in the 84th
minute with his 14th goal of the
campaign. . . .
Jamie Vardy scored the
Premier League’s first goal of
2019 to earn Leicester a 1-0 win at
Everton.
The former England striker
slotted a low finish past
goalkeeper Jordan Pickford and
celebrated his 58th-minute goal
with a somersault.
It was Leicester’s third win in
four matches. Before Christmas,
there had been much speculation
that Leicester Manager Claude
Puel’s job was at risk.
Everton, though, has only one
victory in eight games since the
start of December.
MISC.
Petra Vlhova of Slovakia took
advantage of her height to beat
World Cup leader Mikaela
Shiffrin in both runs of the final
and win a parallel slalom city
event in Oslo.
The 5-foot-11 Vlhova was able
to crosscheck gates out of her way
with both fists while the 5-7
Shiffrin had to maneuver further
around the gates.
Crosschecking is a key tactic in
parallel events, which use wider
gates with panels compared to
traditional slaloms which have
only poles as gates.
Vlhova finished 0.39 seconds
ahead of Shiffrin for the sixth
victory of her career and second
in five days following a giant
slalom win last week in
Semmering, Austria. Wendy
Holdener of Switzerland finished
third.
In the men’s race, Austria’s
Marco Schwarz claimed the first
World Cup victory of his career
when British opponent Dave
Ryding missed a gate.
The night event was held in the
Holmenkollen ski jumping arena,
which was used for the 1952
Olympics. . . .
Tyler Madden scored twice,
and Jason Robertson had a goal
and an assist as the United States
closed out the preliminary round
of the world junior hockey
championship late Monday night
with a 4-1 win over Finland in
Victoria, B.C.
The Americans finished
second in Group B behind
unbeaten Sweden and will face
the Czech Republic in the
quarterfinals. Russia will play
Slovakia, Canada will face off
with Finland, and Sweden will
play Switzerland when the
competition resumes Wednesday.
— From news services
TELEVISION AND RADIO
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10:30 p.m.
Atlanta at Washington » NBC Sports Washington, WFED (1500 AM)
Minnesota at Boston » ESPN
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NHL
7 p.m.
9:30 p.m.
Pittsburgh at New York Rangers » NBC Sports Network
San Jose at Colorado » NBC Sports Network
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6:30 p.m.
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THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. WEDNESDAY,
JANUARY 2 , 2019
BOWL ROUNDUP
Longhorns take Sugar Bowl in upset
TEXAS 28,
GEORGIA 21
A SSOCIATED P RESS
Sam Ehlinger ran for three
touchdowns, the Texas defense
largely held Georgia’s offense in
check, and the No. 15 Longhorns
earned their first 10-win season
since 2009 by beating the No. 5
Bulldogs, 28-21, in the Sugar Bowl
on Tuesday night in New Orleans.
Ehlinger ran for a two-yard
touchdown in the first quarter, a
nine-yard score in the second and
a one-yard touchdown in the
fourth. The 6-foot-3, 230-pound
sophomore finished with 64 yards
on 21 carries and also threw for 169
yards.
Texas (10-4) continued its quick
rise under Coach Tom Herman,
capping his second season with a
win that is sure to send expectations soaring.
Texas stretched its lead to 28-7
with 11:49 left on Ehlinger’s oneyard run, finally scoring on fourth
down after his first three attempts
fell just short of the end zone.
Texas, a 121/2-point underdog,
took a 17-0 lead early in the second
quarter, largely because of mistakes on special teams and on
offense by Georgia (11-3).
The most costly was when
D’Andre Swift fumbled deep in
Georgia territory, giving Texas
possession at the 12-yard line.
Three plays later, Ehlinger escaped trouble in the pocket and
scored on a nine-yard run to make
it 17-0 with 14:53 left in the second
quarter.
Jake Fromm completed 20 of 34
passes for 212 yards, three touchdowns and an interception for the
Bulldogs, who scored with 14 seconds left before Texas recovered
the ensuing onside kick.
About an hour before kickoff,
the Texas mascot, a large longhorn
steer named Bevo, caused a stir
when it knocked down its barricade and briefly charged in the
direction of Georgia’s mascot, a
bulldog name Uga. There were no
reported injuries, and Bevo quickly was restrained.
KENTUCKY 27, PENN
STATE 24: Benny Snell Jr. ran for
144 yards and two touchdowns to
become Kentucky’s career rushing
leader as the No. 14 Wildcats completed their best season in more
than four decades with a win over
the No. 12 Nittany Lions in the
Citrus Bowl in Orlando.
Snell scored on runs of two and
12 yards in the second half, then
carried for a couple of crucial first
downs to help Kentucky (10-3) run
out the clock after Penn State’s
Trace McSorley trimmed a 27-7
deficit to three points despite playing with a foot injury.
McSorley threw for 246 yards
and two touchdowns and ran for
75 yards and a score for the Nittany Lions (9-4).
Lynn Bowden Jr. scored on a
58-yard punt return for Kentucky,
and Josh Allen had three of the
Wildcats’ six sacks. Kentucky finished with only its third 10-win
season and its first since 1977,
when it went 10-1. The team also
did it in 1950.
Snell, a junior who has said he
will enter the NFL draft, broke
Sonny Collins’s school rushing
record on a 12-yard scoring run in
the third quarter. Collins rushed
for 3,835 yards from 1972 to 1975;
Snell finished with 3,873 in three
seasons.
IOWA 27, MISSISSIPPI
STATE 22: Safety Jake Gervase
had an interception in the end
zone to preserve a late lead as the
Hawkeyes beat the No. 18 Bulldogs
in the Outback Bowl in Tampa.
Gervase also batted down a
fourth-down pass to end the Bulldogs’ final drive with 25 seconds
left. The Hawkeyes (9-4) had just
199 yards, but 75 came on a scoring
pass from Nathan Stanley to Nick
Easley, and they converted three
takeaways into 17 points.
Stanley threw for 214 yards and
three touchdowns. The Hawkeyes
won despite netting minus-15
rushing yards. Three running
backs had four yards on 15 carries.
Mississippi State (8-5) lost to a
team outside the top 15 for the first
time. Iowa had no penalties; the
Bulldogs were penalized for 90
yards, including a holding call that
negated a 51-yard completion.
Burrow’s toughness lets Tigers end Knights’ run
LSU 40,
CENTRAL FLORIDA 32
BY
J OHN M ARSHALL
glendale, ariz. — Joe Burrow
watched the ball land in an opposing player’s hands and immediately gave chase. Locked in
on preventing the interception
from being returned for a touchdown, LSU’s quarterback didn’t
see Joey Connors, Central Florida’s 313-pound defensive lineman, bearing down on him.
With a thunderous, blind-side
collision, Burrow found himself
flat on his back, woozy and wondering what happened. Minutes
later, after being helped to his
feet, Burrow was back on the
field, hitting receivers all over the
field.
The nation’s longest winning
streak soon ended. So did any
claims to another self-proclaimed national title. And LSU
was the Fiesta Bowl champion,
thanks to its junior quarterback.
Burrow shook off the big early
hit to throw for 394 yards and
four touchdowns, helping No. 11
LSU end No. 8 Central Florida’s
25-game winning streak with a
40-32 victory Tuesday at the Fiesta Bowl.
“I didn’t really think about the
hit too much after it happened,”
said Burrow, who ended up with
a cut on his neck. “It hurt for a
second, I got right up and went
on to the next play.”
LSU (10-3) started its first Fiesta Bowl without several key play-
NORM HALL/GETTY IMAGES
LSU’s Joe Burrow threw for four touchdowns to help the Tigers halt UCF’s winning streak at 25 games.
ers on defense and fell into an
early 11-point hole against the
high-scoring Knights (12-1).
The Tigers clawed back behind
Burrow and a defensive front that
made life difficult for UCF quarterback Darriel Mack Jr.
Burrow returned from the early hit to pick apart UCF’s secondary, hitting 21 of 34 passes, including two touchdowns to Justin Jefferson.
“It looked like the passing
game we wanted,” Coach Ed Orgeron said. “Joe was on the money.”
LSU sacked Mack five times
and made him rush numerous
throws, holding the nation’s
third-best offense to 250 yards —
295 below its average — while
spoiling the Knights’ bid for a
second straight self-proclaimed
national title.
Taj McGowan scored on a twoyard run and the Knights con-
verted a two-point conversion to
pull within 40-32. After LSU recovered the onside kick, the
Knights’ last-ditch attempt finished with a tipped interception,
ending a winning run that started after a loss in the 2016 Cure
Bowl.
“Obviously, everyone in the
locker room is really upset,” defensive lineman Mason Colubiale
said.
— Associated Press
Meyer retires with Rose Bowl victory
ROSE BOWL FROM D1
such as Archie Griffin, John Cooper, Earle Bruce and Jim Tressel,
and he said, “And I just felt an
obligation to not let them down.”
He headed for one last tunnel
after a season that qualified as
both 13-1 and bumpy, and he
found this tunnel would differ
from the others. The brain was
telling the coach with the thirdhighest winning percentage in
the 149 years of the sport, just
behind Knute Rockne and Frank
Leahy, that he no longer had to
call recruits immediately, no longer had to “put pencils to who is
coming back, who is not coming
back and what we do at left
tackle, what do we do this, what
do we do that.”
That will be the job of Ryan
Day, who coached one of the
country’s foremost programs for
three games during Meyer’s suspension in September, which
stemmed from an investigation
into
his
handling
of
domestic-violence
charges
against an assistant. As the
39-year-old Day takes over for the
54-year-old Meyer, who went
187-32 at four programs, if Meyer
might struggle to adapt, his
betrothed won’t.
“I would be ecstatic if he didn’t
coach again,” Shelley Meyer said
in that last tunnel outside the
Ohio State locker room. “I’m
done. I want him to be done. He’s
too intense. He has a lot of other
things to give people.”
In the month since he announced his retirement, the
month leading up to the Rose
Bowl, he had been “fun again,
and funny, and relaxed, and smiling,” she said.
“What an up-and-down year,”
JAE C. HONG/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Ohio State Coach Urban Meyer and quarterback Dwayne Haskins
take it all in after Tuesday’s win. Haskins had three scoring passes.
Urban Meyer said, the kind of
statement that reflects the vilification he took in August but also
the merciless tempest of expectations into which he fit so snugly.
It sounded like a dose of reality
when he reminded that Ohio
State had been “Big Ten division
champs, Big Ten champs, Rose
Bowl champs and one of the great
teams in Ohio State history.”
He had grown up in Ashtabula,
Ohio, up on Lake Erie. He had
dreamed of Rose Bowls “about as
long as I’ve been watching Ohio
State football, which is as long as
I’ve been around.” He had never
coached in one, so he got there in
his 219th game. Having announced his departure in early
December, he tried to keep preparations as free as possible from
the tenor of the fact that he had
announced his departure in early
December.
“I think Coach Meyer does a
great job of hiding his emotions,”
wide receiver Parris Campbell
said. “He didn’t really let that get
in the way of, you know, winning
the Rose Bowl. . . . So it was more
serious than anything; everyone
just prepared to go in this game.”
The Rose Bowl arrived with its
usual stunning array of hues,
from its cloudless blue sky to the
Ohio State scarlet jerseys to the
Washington purple pants. Meyer’s team always looked the better
in the match of Big Ten and
Pac-12 champions. It always
looked just that notch faster. The
offense, long a staple of his work
since his days at Bowling Green
and Utah, where he had a perfect
2004 season, and Florida, where
he won two national championships, fairly sang. It went masterfully to a 28-3 lead in the third
quarter via touchdown drives of
77, 75, 57 and 80 yards, with the
57-yarder perhaps most expert,
coming in the closing 60 seconds
of the first half.
On that drive, Haskins threw
four completions to four different people. On the afternoon, he
threw touchdowns to three different people: Campbell (12
yards), Johnnie Dixon (19 yards
on third and long) and Rashod
Berry (one yard). In the fourth
quarter, Washington cobbled together three touchdowns but
never seemed poised to surmount.
All along, in his white pullover,
Meyer took all the postures familiar across 17 seasons: hands on
knees, jogging downfield to follow the game after a big gain,
hands on hips, barking at assistants on his headset. He busied
that brain with the things that
have distracted it with years of
fret, things such as “worrying
about getting the hands team
lined up and making sure the
punt was off,” he said.
Suddenly, at 54, one of the elite
American coaches, if a controversial one toward the ends at
Florida and Ohio State, will aim
to stop thinking about such
details.
“I know this is relatively young
[to stop],” he said, “but I started
young — 17 years as a head coach,
33 years doing this — and just
very fortunate, and I do believe
I’m done.”
He’ll help Day try to make “a
very strong program” stronger,
but as to what he’d do Thursday,
or next week, he said: “I have no
idea, to be honest with you. I’ve
been thinking about that a little
bit and trying not to think about
it,” because it got in the way of the
details his brain was about to try
to shoo.
chuck.culpepper@washpost.com
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2 , 2019
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D3
SU
United lands Argentine midfielder to bolster attack
BY
S TEVEN G OFF
D.C. United finalized its acquisition of attacker Lucas Rodriguez from Argentine club Estudiantes, a one-year loan with an
option to purchase next winter.
To acquire his MLS discovery
rights, United sent $50,000 in
general allocation money to Atlanta, which had first taken interest in the 21-year-old midfielder.
Rodriguez promises to bolster
an already formidable attack, led
by Luciano Acosta and Wayne
Rooney, and add to an Argentineseasoned midfield. Acosta, the
playmaker, is coming off his finest season in Washington, and
United is attempting to retain
countryman Yamil Asad, who
was on loan from Argentina’s
Velez Sarsfield in 2018.
In theory, Coach Ben Olsen
could start the three Argentines
in a line behind Rooney, the
English striker who revived the
organization last summer.
The undisclosed loan fee, one
person familiar with the terms
said, would go toward the price
of purchasing Rodriguez’s contract, a transfer that could cost
more than $3 million. His international value is listed at about
$3.7 million.
Despite his age, Rodriguez has
played regularly in the Argentine
first division, starting 53 league
matches in the past 21/2 seasons
and 12 Copa Libertadores games
over two years. He also started
for Argentina at the 2017 Under20 World Cup in South Korea.
“We are excited to add a player
of Lucas’s pedigree and experience,” Dave Kasper, United’s general manager and vice president
of soccer operations, said in a
statement. “Lucas can play any of
the attacking positions centrally
and in wide areas and has all the
qualities to succeed in Major
League Soccer.”
Although Rodriguez scored
just seven league goals since
2015, United projects him to
serve in a more influential role
than he filled at Estudiantes.
He first appeared on United’s
radar in 2015 when D.C. officials
were scouting Acosta, Rodriguez’s teammate with Estudiantes. United acquired Acosta in
2016 on loan and bought him
outright the following year.
Rodriguez’s arrival would allow United to consider shifting
winger Paul Arriola to the back
line — if the organization does
not acquire a starting-caliber
player to fill a glaring void at
right back. Nick DeLeon signed
with Toronto FC, and Oniel
Fisher is unavailable until the
summer after undergoing ACL
surgery in the fall.
The Rodriguez move seems
likely to prompt a midfield departure: Asad’s return would
jeopardize Hungary’s Zoltan
Stieber, who was relegated to
reserve duty late last season and,
with a $1 million guaranteed
contract, might end up elsewhere
in MLS or back in Europe.
Also, with training camp set to
start in three weeks, United continues to pursue defensive help
— the team has just four healthy
candidates — and a forward to
back up Rooney after Darren
Mattocks’s departure. The club is
also trying to cut ties with reserve goalkeeper David Ousted,
who became expendable when
United made its first move of the
offseason,
acquiring
Earl
Edwards Jr. from Orlando City.
steven.goff@washpost.com
LAUREN RAKES/GETTY IMAGES
Terps’ young core is set to get tested
VIRGINIA TECH 81,
NOTRE DAME 66
E MILY G IAMBALVO
When No. 4 Virginia visited
College Park in late November, the
Cavaliers’ veteran squad played
up to its billing as one of the
nation’s premier programs. Maryland’s 76-71 loss against an elite
team that remains undefeated
seemed encouraging for the
young Terrapins, but in the game’s
final 28 minutes, they never came
within a possession of tying the
score.
Jalen Smith, a freshman starter,
struggled, scoring just six points.
Apart from guard Eric Ayala,
Maryland’s freshmen “clearly
weren’t ready for that one,” Coach
Mark Turgeon said a month later.
Since then, though, Turgeon
said his young players have grown,
a necessary development considering five freshmen have been part
of the Terps’ primary eight-man
rotation. Maryland (10-3) split a
pair of games against Big Ten opponents early in December, and
the Terrapins will see how far they
have come when they begin the
bulk of their conference schedule,
starting Wednesday with No. 24
Nebraska’s visit to Xfinity Center.
“I think from those two [early
conference] games to now, we’re
all a lot more comfortable with
them and they’re a lot more comfortable,” Turgeon said of the
freshmen. “They’ve played in
enough big games, so I think we
feel good about where our young
kids are and how well they’re playing.”
Against Nebraska, the Terps
probably will have all of their
starters at full strength for the first
time in a few weeks. Sophomore
guard Darryl Morsell started
against Loyola Chicago on Dec. 8
but was limited with an ankle
injury. He sat out the next game
and then came in off the bench
against Seton Hall on Dec. 22.
Morsell returned to the starting
lineup for Saturday’s win against
Radford, but Smith could not play
because of an illness. Turgeon said
Smith has been practicing and
“should be close to 100 percent”
Wednesday, meaning the team’s
regular starting five is intact.
COLLEGE BASKETBALL ROUNDUP
Outlaw, Hokies go deep
to shoot past the Irish
A rugged Big Ten slate
will determine whether
their freshmen are ready
BY
Ty Outlaw finished with 14 points Tuesday, and he made three key
three-pointers during a second-half run to boost the No. 10 Hokies.
F ROM NEWS SERVICES
AND STAFF REPORTS
JONATHAN NEWTON/THE WASHINGTON POST
Sophomore forward Bruno Fernando is learning how to deal with the many double-teams he faces.
Nebraska at Maryland
Today, 6:30 p.m., Big Ten Network
In Smith’s absence against Radford, fellow freshman forward
Ricky Lindo Jr. had one of his best
games with a career-high eight
points and 10 rebounds. He played
aggressively and protected the
rim well.
“The more that Coach Turgeon
and the coaching staff trust me,
the more confidence I gain,” Lindo
said.
Freshman guard Serrel Smith
Jr. matched a season high with 19
minutes against Radford, and
guard Aaron Wiggins, the last of
the freshman contributors, scored
nine points in 28 minutes off the
bench. In that 78-64 win, nobody
on Maryland, which has lacked
depth this year, played more than
30 minutes. For comparison, in
three games this season — two
losses (Virginia and Seton Hall)
and a win (Penn State) — the Terps
have used four players for more
than 30 minutes each.
The Radford game “gave us all a
lot of confidence that our bench is
really growing,” Turgeon said.
“This young team’s growing up
right before your eyes, which is
good to see. Hopefully it will start
translating into us playing better
on game day.”
One key development has been
that Bruno Fernando, a 6-foot-10
sophomore averaging 14.5 points,
has improved when doubleteamed by making the right play
to his teammates, who Turgeon
said have been finding the right
spots.
“I tried not to make a big deal
out of it in the media and talk
about it, but we weren’t good
against it,” Turgeon said. “We feel
like Bruno’s probably still going to
get double-teamed at times. We’ve
got to continue to work on that.
That’s really been a big positive
step for us.”
In its 78-74 loss to Seton Hall,
Maryland had late-game execution issues that led to a missed
opportunity to bolster the team’s
résumé. A week later against Radford, the Terrapins started slowly,
allowing the Highlanders to hold
the lead for most of the first half.
The Terps’ three losses have
come by a combined 11 points, but
they still have 11 games remaining
against ranked teams and can’t
afford inconsistency. For the next
two months, with teams such as
No. 2 Michigan and No. 8 Michigan State looming on the schedule, Maryland will have little margin for error as it ventures through
the remaining 18 games on the
conference slate.
“We are who we are,” Turgeon
said Saturday after the win over
Radford. “Our record’s what it is,
but it’s really about what lies
ahead. That’s really what’s important.”
emily.giambalvo@washpost.com
Ty Outlaw hit the first threepointer, and suddenly it was his
turn to carry No. 10 Virginia Tech
during a victory when four players took turns leading the way.
“He fuels me, and we feed off
each other,” Outlaw said of
Ahmed Hill, who made consecutive baskets before Outlaw’s first
three-pointer from the corner,
right in front of the Hokies’ bench,
splashed through during an 81-66
win against Notre Dame on Tuesday in Blacksburg, Va. “If one of us
is going, we look at the other like,
‘Hey, come on.’ That’s what we do.”
Outlaw hit three three-pointers
in a 22-9 run that allowed the
Hokies to pull away, then added a
fourth after Notre Dame closed
within 71-60 with 3:51 to play.
Earlier, Hill hit a pair of threepointers after the Fighting Irish
closed within 43-42 with about
15 minutes to play.
The red-hot shooting made it a
low stress afternoon for point
guard Justin Robinson, who
scored just seven points but had
eight assists, moving him past
Jamon Gordon and into third
place in program history with 521.
Gordon had 514 from 2003 to
2007.
“When you have four guys on
the court with you that are not
missing and they’re making every
shot, you know that you just have
to hit them at the right time in the
right spot or call a play that you
know where they’re tagging from
and hit them,” Robinson said.
Kerry Blackshear Jr. led the
Hokies (12-1, 1-0 ACC) with 21
points, Nickeil Alexander-Walker
and Hill scored 17 apiece, and
Outlaw finished with 14.
Virginia Tech led just 49-44
before Alexander-Walker sparked
a run with a pair of driving baskets, and Hill followed with two.
Outlaw’s trio of threes and one
from Blackshear pushed the margin back to 18, and the Irish never
got within 10 again.
“They’re old and they know
who they are and they spread you
out and make shots. Really, really
good,” Irish Coach Mike Brey said.
“We’re kind of a youth-movement
group playing against men today.
We gave ourselves some chances a
couple times. Just couldn’t get
over the hump on the road against
a really good team. They made
every big shot any time we kind of
got within striking distance.”
In the half, Virginia Tech was
20 for 28 (71.4 percent) from the
field and made 8 of 9 tries from
three-point range.
T.J. Gibbs scored 19 points, 13
in the second half, as Notre Dame
(10-4, 0-1) had its four-game winning streak snapped. D.J. Harvey
added 16, and Nate Laszewski had
14. The Fighting Irish made 13
threes but needed 34 attempts; it
shot 41 percent overall.
St. John’s routs Marquette
Shamorie Ponds scored 20 of
his 26 points in the first half, and
St. John’s rebounded impressively
from its first loss of the season by
routing No. 16 Marquette, 89-69,
in New York.
Marvin Clark II had 22 points
for the Red Storm (13-1, 1-1 Big
East). St. John’s had lost at Seton
Hall on Saturday.
With leading scorer Markus
Howard held to eight points on
2-for-15 shooting, the Golden Eagles (11-3, 0-1) got blown out in
their conference opener. Howard
had been scoring 25.1 points per
game, and the Golden Eagles had
won eight straight games.
FLORIDA STATE 87, WINTHROP 76: In Tallahassee,
Terance Mann scored 22 points
and Phil Cofer added 14, helping
the No. 9 Seminoles (12-1) hold off
the Eagles (8-5).
GW women halt their slide
George Washington snapped a
five-game skid with a 51-38 victory over Memphis at Smith Center.
The Colonials (3-10) held the
Tigers (5-8) to a season low in
points, just 12 field goals and
24.0 percent shooting. Neila
Luma led GW with nine points
and nine rebounds.
From the streets of Oakland, Akinjo provides a new toughness for Georgetown
HOYAS FROM D1
great guards to come out of here.”
Akinjo has a laundry list of
things he wants to accomplish
through basketball: He wants to
revitalize the Hoyas’ program, he
wants to win a Big East title, and
he wants to make the NBA.
But above all else is Akinjo’s
desire to bring a little basketball
glory back home, where the
freshman feels the likes of threetime NBA all-star Damian Lillard
and nine-time all-star Gary Payton don’t get their due.
“I feel like we don't get the
credit we deserve as far as basketball, but there are a lot of
people I know who were really
talented, could have played at
[the college] level, but were sidetracked by off-court things,” Akinjo said. “I feel like I owe it to
them, to make the most of this
opportunity that I’ve got.”
‘I liked his toughness’
When Akinjo first came across
Ewing’s radar, the Basketball
Hall of Famer liked his talent and
drive. On a personal level, it was
also easy for Ewing to relate to
the baby-faced point guard who
wore a permanent snarl on
the court.
“I liked his toughness,” Ewing
said. “He plays well. He plays
with a chip on his shoulder.”
Akinjo grew up living with his
maternal grandmother after his
mother died when he was 4. His
aunt, his uncle and his father,
with whom Akinjo shares a particularly close bond because
they’re just 16 years apart, round
out the family unit that worked
to keep the young player out of
trouble in a tough neighborhood.
“I’ve seen my uncle going to
prison, I've seen my dad go to
jail, I’ve seen my friends get
killed at an early age,” Akinjo
said. “My brother, I lost him
when I was 13. So it was a
decision I had to make for myself
. . . what I wanted to do with my
life.”
Where he wanted to go was far
from home — first to Connecticut, where he committed during
the fall of his senior year, and
then, after coach Kevin Ollie was
fired in March, to Georgetown.
Akinjo felt a different connection to Ewing than he had with
other coaches who recruited him.
“He came up from kind of the
same stuff in Jamaica; we can
speak a different language than
most,” Akinjo said.
The guard had always admired
was smaller — just 5-foot-8 entering high school — and younger —
he turned 18 in November — than
other kids he grew up with.
“Prove myself ? No, no, no, no,”
Akinjo said, shaking his head. “I
was the kid where you’d see an
NBA player — everybody wants
to take pictures of them. I was
like, ‘You want to play one-onone?’ Yeah, that’s me. My city
made me that way.”
TONI L. SANDYS/THE WASHINGTON POST
“He could be one of the great guards to come out of here,”
Georgetown Coach Patrick Ewing said of freshman James Akinjo.
Allen Iverson and John Thompson Jr., whom he calls “Big
Coach.” Akinjo said he likes that
Georgetown has an illustrious
history, and it means something
to him that a kid from Oakland
can be a part of it.
Akinjo is naturally competitive — Govan calls him the most
competitive player on the roster
— but the freshman didn’t particularly care that Mac McClung,
who had been a viral dunking
sensation for about a year by the
time Akinjo signed with Georgetown, overshadowed him as a
recruit.
Akinjo had developed a cockiness along with his toughness as
a kid. Maybe it was because he
‘Looking at me to lead’
Before he brings basketball
renown back to Oakland, Akinjo
first has to create it at Georgetown. To Ewing, fulfilling Akinjo’s potential doesn’t just mean
molding him into an NBA-caliber
point guard. Ewing wants the
freshman, his youngest player, to
be a well-rounded leader as well.
That means learning to control his energy on the court.
Akinjo is the team’s chief trashtalker, but Ewing has to remind
him to control it in practice
because his energy trickles down
to the team.
“Early in the year, I didn’t
realize that it doesn’t matter that
I’m young, I’m a freshman — I’m
the point guard, so everybody’s
paying attention to what I say,”
Akinjo said. “I’ve got to be mind-
ful of learning guys’ personalities, knowing that they all listen
to me, that when I talk, they’re
looking at me to lead them.”
Ewing isn’t the only voice
Akinjo has in his mind when it
comes to the mental aspect of the
game. He also has the advice of
Lillard in his head.
The Portland Trail Blazers’
star, who grew up across town
from Akinjo, reached out to him
over the summer, before the
point guard left for Georgetown.
Lillard mentored him on the
mental side of the game, what he
can expect in college and what
it’s like to leave home for the first
time.
“Dame is a really genuine
dude,” Akinjo said. “He made me
see things a little different with
basketball. He remembers being
a kid and being in my shoes. He’s
been through everything that I’m
going through.”
Akinjo admits that he tried to
absorb every word from Lillard,
but the experience was a little
surreal. He couldn’t stop daydreaming about five or 10 or 15
years in the future, when he
would be the NBA all-star returning home to mentor Oakland’s
next big thing.
ava.wallace@washpost.com
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EZ
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M2
As new year dawns, Ovechkin weathers a drought
BY
I SABELLE K HURSHUDYAN
Alex Ovechkin almost sounded
disappointed after he skated
more than 25 minutes against the
Buffalo Sabres on Dec. 15, finishing with a goal and the winning
shootout strike.
“You can’t score every night,” he
said, an amusing perspective at
the time because he had just
scored his seventh goal in three
games and was on a six-game goal
streak. But as steady of a scorer as
Ovechkin has been in his 14-season career, even he knows goals
can come in waves and then dry
up. Perhaps that night he sensed
what was on the horizon.
On the precipice of his 30th
goal, Ovechkin hasn’t scored in six
games — since that night against
the Sabres. He still leads the NHL
with 29, and no one is remotely
concerned about his production
because he’s still on pace to finish
with 60 goals — a total that no
player has reached since Tampa
Bay’s Steven Stamkos in 2011-12.
A six-game goal drought
wouldn’t be notable for pretty
much any other player in the
NHL, but because it’s Ovechkin
and this is his worst stretch of the
season, he was asked about his
dry spell after a New Year’s Eve
matinee against the visiting
Nashville Predators, which his
Washington Capitals lost, 6-3.
“It’s okay,” Ovechkin said before the reporter could even finish
the question. “It’s the end of the
year, you know? Tomorrow is going to be a new day, a new year and
new hockey.”
He might also get new linemates, which could be enough to
get him going again. Ovechkin
has been skating with center
Nicklas Backstrom and right wing
T.J. Oshie for the past nine games,
and that trio was considered one
of the league’s best from 2015 to
2017. But former coach Barry
Trotz avoided using those three
NBA ROUNDUP
Leonard’s
career-high
45 points
lift Toronto
RAPTORS 122,
JAZZ 116
A SSOCIATED P RESS
Kawhi Leonard scored a career-high 45 points, Pascal
Siakam had a career-best 28
points with 10 rebounds, and the
Toronto Raptors beat the Utah
Jazz, 122-116, on Tuesday night.
Norman Powell added a
season-high 14 points for the
Raptors, who won their fourth
straight at home.
Jae Crowder scored a careerhigh 30 points as the Jazz
dropped to 10-12 on the road and
18-20 overall.
Leonard made all seven of his
field goal attempts in the third
quarter and added five foul
shots. His 19 points were the
second most in any quarter by a
Raptors player this season.
Toronto guard Kyle Lowry sat
for the eighth time in nine games
because of a sore lower back.
BUCKS
121, PISTONS 98:
Brook Lopez had 25 points,
Giannis Antetokounmpo threw
down a spectacular one-handed
dunk, and Milwaukee cruised
past Detroit at home.
Khris Middleton had 22
points, and Eric Bledsoe had 18
for Milwaukee. Antetokounmpo
had just 15 points, but his slam
over Jon Leuer was the highlight
of the night.
Milwaukee has won four
straight and eight of nine. The
Bucks are an NBA-best 26-10.
NUGGETS 115, KNICKS
108: Nikola Jokic had 19 points,
14 rebounds and 15 assists as
Denver kept rolling by beating
visiting New York for its ninth
straight home victory.
Malik Beasley added a careerhigh 23 points for the Western
Conference-leading
Nuggets,
who have knocked off the Knicks
11 straight times at Pepsi Center.
The struggling Knicks have lost
eight in a row.
TRAIL
BLAZERS
113,
KINGS 108 (OT): Damian Lil-
lard shook off a sluggish shooting night to score five of his 25
points in overtime as Portland
rallied after blowing a 14-point
halftime lead to win in Sacramento.
Lillard wasn’t much of a factor
until late in the fourth quarter,
when he scored seven of Portland’s final nine points, including a layup with 15.5 seconds
remaining to force overtime.
C APITALS’ NEX T THREE
at St. Louis Blues
Tomorrow 8 p.m.
8 p.m.
NHL ROUNDUP
Boston takes it outside
and takes down Chicago
NBCSW+
BRUINS 4,
BLACKHAWKS 2
at Detroit Red Wings
Sunday
5 p.m.
NBCSW,
NHLN
Radio: WJFK (106.7 FM),
WFED (1500 AM)
NICK WASS/ASSOCIATED PRESS
On the precipice of his 30th goal of the season, Alex Ovechkin
hasn’t scored in six games — since a Dec. 15 victory against Buffalo.
together last season because he
privately worried that the line
would lack the necessary speed to
be effective in today’s NHL, which
is getting faster with each
infusion of young talent.
Like Trotz, Coach Todd Reirden
has preferred to keep Backstrom
and Oshie together because they
form a reliable defensive duo that
can be matched against the
opponent’s top forwards.
When Oshie returned to the
lineup after missing 11 games
with a concussion, forward Tom
Wilson was still out with a concussion, so Reirden plugged in
Oshie with Ovechkin and Backstrom. Ovechkin had hat tricks in
each of the trio’s first two games
together — a good reason for
Reirden to keep that line intact
over the next three weeks.
It’s testament to the growth of
Ovechkin’s two-way play that he
has been a good fit with those two.
In a win at the Ottawa Senators on
Saturday, all three players were on
the ice for the last minute of
regulation, when the Senators
had pulled their goaltender for an
extra attacker in a one-goal game.
In past years, Ovechkin wouldn’t
have been considered reliable
enough defensively to play in that
situation; he typically would be
on the ice in a five-on-six situation
only if Washington were up by
two.
“I said it all year long — even
before he scored 29 goals — that
it’s about his two-way play and the
things that help our team and
that’s what he’s able to add,”
Reirden said. “Obviously, goalscoring is nice and we all love that,
but at the end of the day it’s about
our team finding ways to win like
we did at the end of last year.”
The encouraging thing for the
Capitals is that they’ve won four
of the six games in which Ovechkin hasn’t scored, and they are
still atop the Metropolitan Division. But against the Predators on
Monday, the top line of Ovechkin,
Backstrom and Oshie seemed to
have run its course.
Reirden first had Wilson replace Oshie there, and by the third
period, he switched the centers,
too, with Evgeny Kuznetsov between Ovechkin and Wilson. That
left a second trio of Backstrom,
JANUARY 2 , 2019
NBCSW
at Dallas Stars
Friday
. WEDNESDAY,
Oshie and left wing Jakub Vrana,
and it essentially reconstructed
the top-six forward corps from
Washington’s Stanley Cup run.
Between Wilson’s 16-game suspension to start the season and
then both Kuznetsov and Wilson
missing games with concussions,
a combination of Ovechkin, Wilson and Kuznetsov has been on
the ice for just 20:55 at five-on-five
this season, according to Natural
Stat Trick. But in that small sample size, it has dominated, taking
63.6 percent of the shot attempts.
2018 was undoubtedly the best
year of Ovechkin’s life — along
with winning his first Stanley
Cup, he welcomed his first child,
son Sergei, into the world — but as
he stood in front of his dressingroom stall Monday, he was excited
for 2019 and what the new year
might bring — and that it could
somehow top the last.
“I think he’s gotten some
chances, gotten some really good
looks,” Reirden said. “We saw him
score an outrageous number
there for a while, and it was not
humanly possible really to continue at that pace in today’s game. I
think he’s just got to continue
doing what he’s been doing. He’s
been getting a lot of the same
chances, and they’re not going in
at this point.”
isabelle.khurshudyan@washpost.com
A SSOCIATED P RESS
David Pastrnak delivered once
again, Patrice Bergeron showed
off his all-around game, and Tuukka Rask made a couple of big stops.
Oh, and those suits. It was a
stylish start to the new year for the
Boston Bruins.
Pastrnak had a goal and an assist, Rask made 36 saves, and the
Bruins beat the Chicago Blackhawks, 4-2, on Tuesday in the Winter Classic at Notre Dame Stadium
in South Bend, Ind.
“You want to win those games
when you’re on the big stage like
that,” Bergeron said. “I know it’s a
regular season game, but still you
know the meaning’s different
when you’re playing in front of
76,000 people and on national TV.
So we know what’s at stake with
those games, and we want to make
the most of it.”
They certainly dressed for the
occasion. Bergeron and his teammates wore tailored suits, vests
and hats to the game in a nod to
their surroundings. Rask also had
Notre Dame’s iconic “Play Like A
Champion Today” sign painted on
the back of his helmet.
“I think these are the experiences that, once you are done with
the hockey career, you can look
back and be happy that you were a
part of and kind of cherish those
moments,” Rask said.
Bergeron, Sean Kuraly and
Brad Marchand also scored as
Boston won for the second time in
three appearances in the NHL’s
annual outdoor game on New
Year’s Day. The Bruins went 2 for 5
with the man advantage and killed
off each of the Blackhawks’ four
power plays.
The score was tied at 2 when
Boston caught a break in the third
period — a little luck in the home
of the Fighting Irish. Matt
Grzelcyk’s big slap shot went off
teammate Chris Wagner in front,
and Kuraly beat Blackhawks defenseman Gustav Forsling to the
rebound before backhanding the
puck past Cam Ward at 10:20.
Backed by most of the sellout
crowd of 76,126 in perfect conditions for outdoor hockey — the
game-time temperature was
35 degrees, and a gray, overcast sky
took the sun out of the equation —
Chicago pushed hard for the tying
score in the closing minutes but
came up empty.
Chicago had won five of six, but
it remained winless in an NHLhigh fourth appearance in the
Winter Classic. Brendan Perlini
and Dominik Kahun scored for
the Blackhawks.
The NHL announced that the
2020 Winter Classic will be at the
Cotton Bowl in Dallas. The Stars
will host the 12th edition of the
game, but Commissioner Gary
Bettman said the league hasn’t
decided on their opponent.
PREDATORS
4, FLYERS 0:
Viktor Arvidsson scored twice,
Juuse Saros made 32 saves, and
Nashville defeated visiting Philadelphia. Craig Smith and Rocco
Grimaldi also scored for Nashville,
which has won two in a row.
Michal Neuvirth made 26 saves
for the Flyers, who have lost four
straight.
GOLDEN KNIGHTS 2,
KINGS 0: Brandon Pirri and Alex
Tuch scored third-period goals to
propel Vegas past visiting Los
Angeles.
With Wall out, Porter is ready to return — and make an impact
BY
C ANDACE B UCKNER
After his coach had shared his
vision for how the Washington
Wizards must play moving forward, and after the team’s starting
point guard had just talked to
local reporters for the last time
before undergoing season-ending
surgery, forward Otto Porter Jr.
strolled through the team’s practice facility with a little extra
bounce.
Porter, who has been sidelined
for 10 games with a quadriceps
strain, spent Monday afternoon
running, cutting and shooting
with his teammates for the first
time in weeks. After participating
in practice and feeling free of pain,
Porter is slated to return to the
lineup Wednesday night against
the Atlanta Hawks.
“I’m back,” he said through a
wide smile. “I love playing basketball.”
Porter had to temper his enthusiasm, though. When he returns, the
Wizards (14-23) will be a different
team in light of John Wall’s pending
surgery on his left heel. The Wizards have played for long stints
without Wall, including when he
missed 41 games last season, so
losing him isn’t a shock. Still, without Wall, changes are afoot within
the Wizards’ ecosystem.
WIZ ARDS’ NEX T THREE
vs. Atlanta Hawks
Today
7 p.m.
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at Miami Heat
Friday
at Oklahoma City Thunder
Sunday
7 p.m.
NBCSW+
Radio: WFED (1500 AM)
“We all have to step up,” Porter
said, “including me.”
Last season, in the 27 consecutive games Wall missed after surgery on his left knee, the Wizards
relied on moving the ball and created 28.5 assists per game, three
more than their team average for
the season.
Porter benefited from the distribution; 95.9 percent of his
made three-point shots came
from assists. Although Bradley
Beal emerged as the go-to scorer,
Porter stepped into the “Robin”
role during Wall’s absence and
averaged 16.6 points during that
stretch.
For the remaining 45 games of
this season, Coach Scott Brooks
said he does not want to burden
Beal with all of the responsibility.
TONY DEJAK/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Wizards forward Otto Porter Jr. has missed the past 10 games with
a quadriceps injury but is expected to play Wednesday vs. Atlanta.
Brooks predicted the Wizards will
embrace more ball movement,
giving more players freedom to
create for their teammates.
“There’s definitely things that
we have to do, because we don’t
have [Wall’s] playmaking and
speed and ability to be a one-man
fast break,” Brooks said. “We do a
lot more pass-aheads, and then
other guys are going to have to be
playmakers as well. It’s not just
going to be put on Brad’s shoulders to make a play for everyone.
We had 35 assists last game, and a
lot of guys had it.”
This philosophy should open
more opportunities for Porter.
While Porter believes his biggest
impact will come in securing rebounds, the upcoming stretch
should reset the Wizards to their
preseason pledge to give Porter
space to grab a rebound and push
the ball in the open court.
“We want to play that way, and
we have to,” Brooks said, looking
back on the team’s preseason emphasis on passing. “With John,
there’s always a balance. We’re not
going to take away one of our best
players’ strengths that has been so
effective for a lot of years and just
say, ‘You’re just going to be a passahead guy, and you’re going to go
to the corner and you’re going to
come off of a down-screen or a
pin-down action.’ But now, we
have to have more of it.
“Brad is still going to be able to
take that role. He can now be that
guy, and he can initiate our offense
with his playmaking. So we can
still play that way,” Brooks continued, “but we’re going to have to
have definitely more opportunities for other guys to make decisions.”
Porter has not played since
Dec. 12, and Brooks was noncommittal about putting him back in
the starting lineup for his first
game back. Still, Porter’s arrival
should help make up for the loss of
Wall.
“He feels good. He looked good,”
Brooks said. “We obviously missed
him and [are] glad that he’s back.”
candace.buckner@washpost.com
After years in NBA wilderness, Nets show signs of an awakening
BY
T YLER B LINT- W ELSH
Last month, the Brooklyn Nets
seemed destined for another
disappointing 82-game slog.
A gruesome leg injury to Caris
LeVert — just days after the most
improved player award candidate
hit a game-winning shot against
the Western Conference-leading
Denver Nuggets — sucked the air
out of the team after an encouraging 6-7 start during which Brooklyn got its first glimpse of potential success after a years-long purgatory.
Losing LeVert, who was averaging 18.4 points and nearly four
assists on 47.5 percent shooting
and was beginning to establish
himself as a go-to player, led to an
uncomfortable adjustment period in which the Nets dropped
eight straight, blowing multiple
double-digit fourth-quarter leads
in the process.
LeVert is back hanging around
the locker room, and while there
is no timetable for his return to
the court, it looks as if Brooklyn is
finally starting to figure things
out.
The Nets have won nine of their
past 12 and are one of hottest
teams in the league. Brooklyn’s
egalitarian, pass-happy offense,
led by Spencer Dinwiddie, D’Angelo Russell and, more recently,
rookie Rodions Kurucs, sparked a
seven-game winning streak in
which the Nets beat the Toronto
Raptors, Los Angeles Lakers and
Philadelphia 76ers. After playing
just 44 minutes last season for
Barcelona in Spain’s top pro
league, Kurucs, 20, has been key
to the Nets’ resurgence, with
Brooklyn going 9-3 since the last
time he didn’t play because of a
coach’s decision.
Lacking a bona fide star, the
Nets have found success by committee, predicated on drive and
kicks, well-set screens, extra passes and limiting the opponent’s
three-point attempts. Brooklyn’s
311 passes per game are fourth
most in the NBA, and during their
recent hot stretch, those passes
have been leading to 14 more
points off assists per game than
they averaged during their eightgame losing streak. The Nets also
lead the league in points off
drives, and since Dec. 7 they rank
third in screen assists per game,
defined as screens for a teammate
that lead directly to a made shot.
After their 134-132 win over
Charlotte in double overtime last
week, players and coaches alluded to feeling as if the team had
turned a corner. Jared Dudley
couldn’t contain his excitement
recounting a corner three-pointer
he hit in the second overtime off
an assist from a driving Dinwiddie.
“The times we had the 20-point
leads and lost, we weren’t boxing
out, we weren’t making the extra
pass,” he said. “The old Spencer, I
don’t know if he would’ve made
that play. So for him, it’s his
evolution as a player.”
Dinwiddie, Joe Harris and
Rondae Hollis-Jefferson, who all
play essential roles for Brooklyn,
are the products of a culture that
hasn’t just found intriguing talent
through alternative avenues but
that also pushes players to evolve,
cultivating them over the long
term. Kenny Atkinson’s history as
a player development guru is rare
for an NBA coach; Atlanta’s Lloyd
Pierce is the only other one with a
player development background.
But Atkinson’s experience and
General Manager Sean Marks’s
superb talent identification have
helped carve a rotation of key
contributors out of players
plucked from the fringes of the
NBA.
Harris, who was nearly out of
the league after being waived by
the Orlando Magic in 2016, has
transformed into a versatile offensive player. He is third in the
league in three-point shooting at
48.3 percent, helping create space
for the Nets’ plethora of drives,
and he has also become adept at
getting into the paint to finish or
find an open man. He credited
Atkinson’s player development
regime with helping change the
trajectory of his NBA career.
“He kind of gives a unique
perspective as a head coach, just
having that background,” he said.
“We do these things called vitamins — it’s something that you
take every day — and for us the
vitamins are individual skill work
with our coaches.”
Dinwiddie, who was in the
NBA Development League before
signing with Brooklyn in 2016, is a
sixth man of the year candidate
who’s averaging 17.5 points and
5.3 assists off the bench while
displaying much-improved decision-making and late-game shotmaking ability.
Atkinson caters to his players’
needs, Dinwiddie said, creating
an open dialogue that helps facilitate improvement.
It’s not uncommon for Atkinson to text players images from
game film to give tips on nuances
such as when to split the defense
when you’re being blitzed on the
pick and roll as the ballhandler.
And he said he frequently has
one-on-one film sessions with
players, a job typically reserved
for assistants.
“When you’re an assistant,
you’re much more on top of these
guys. You’re watching a lot more
individual clips. But I do that,
too,” he said. “With [Russell], before a game, I brought him in and
we watched about 20 clips.
“I think of the team — that’s my
job as head coach. But I do try to
still put on the player development hat and try to help those
guys there.”
At 17-21, Brooklyn is far from an
elite team. The Nets remain 22nd
in defensive rating and rank near
the bottom of the league in second
chance points allowed, a product
of their subpar rebounding. The
Nets’ philosophy of keeping their
big men near the rim has led to
multiple highlight reel blocks
from Allen, but it has also forced
him to try to clean up a steady
barrage of opponent forays into
the paint if the perimeter defenders are struggling to contain penetration. Overall, Brooklyn allows
opponents to shoot 46.9 percent,
a bottom-10 mark in the league.
As their playoff aspirations
come into clearer focus — the
Nets entered Tuesday a game behind eighth-place Detroit — continuity and selflessness are going
to be the pillars of their success, a
message Atkinson has been
preaching all year that finally
may be starting to stick. For now,
though, they just hope to prove
that December wasn’t an aberration.
“Hopefully it’s not a hot streak,”
Dinwiddie said, “and it’s just how
we play.”
tyler.blint-welsh@washpost.com
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2 , 2019
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D5
M2
professional Football
ANALYSIS
Redskins should consider adding these five free agents
BY
S AM M ONSON
Following their 1-6 closing
stretch to finish the season 7-9,
the Washington Redskins have a
lot of questions to answer this
offseason.
Some of the answers will come
via health updates on quarterback Alex Smith, who is recovering from a broken right leg, and
the Redskins’ approach to the
draft. But the team will also have
to look at the free agent market.
Here are five players the team
should consider as it seeks to
upgrade its roster:
S Landon Collins, Giants
Following the release of D.J.
Swearinger Sr. and with midseason trade pickup Ha Ha ClintonDix’s contract expiring, the Redskins have decisions to make at
safety. Clinton-Dix earned an
overall Pro Football Focus grade
of 79.3 (on a scale of 0 to 100),
good for 13th in the league, but
there’s no guarantee he’ll be back.
If he goes elsewhere in free agency, Collins could be a replacement
with a much higher ceiling.
In 2016, Collins had a season
that was the caliber of a defensive
player of the year, notching five
interceptions, seven pass breakups and four sacks to go with 46
defensive stops — most among
safeties. He backed that up with
another excellent season in 2017
before an underwhelming 2018
reflective of the Giants’ struggles.
Collins showed in his rookie
year that he has limitations as a
safety — namely that he will
struggle being the single-high
player in a scheme — but playing
the right position, he can be a
dominant force and transform a
defense.
S Earl Thomas, Seahawks
Washington is among a num-
ber of teams that have leaned
heavily on using a single-high
free safety in running variations
of the cover-one or cover-three
defense. The Seattle Seahawks
were the first team that showed
what that scheme could do, and
Thomas was the player whose
unrivaled range made that
scheme and the “Legion of Boom”
secondary excel.
As the scheme proliferated
throughout the league, no team
was able to match Seattle’s original success, in part because nobody could find another Thomas.
The Redskins could change
that by securing Thomas to play
in the middle of their secondary.
Thomas is 29 and coming off a
broken leg, but he had shown no
signs of slowing down before he
was hurt.
Thomas has unique range that
allows him not only to make plays
along the sideline, but also to do
so when lining up about 21/2 yards
closer to the line of scrimmage
than the average free safety. This
season, he had an overall PFF
grade of 91.3 before his injury, his
fourth elite mark in the past five
years.
DE Brandon Graham, Eagles
The Redskins have a decision
to make on Preston Smith, who is
an unrestricted free agent, at
outside linebacker opposite Ryan
Kerrigan. Smith, a 2015 secondround pick, was productive this
season, producing 53 quarterback pressures, but if he departs,
Graham would be a very good
option as a veteran replacement.
Graham has been underrated
throughout his career, in large
part because his sack totals have
not reflected how effective he is
at generating pressure. He is
versatile enough to play in any
scheme, and he proved again this
season that he is one of the NFL’s
spot vacated by oft-injured pending free agent Shawn Lauvao.
Paradis ended 2018 as the No. 2
center in PFF grading, having
also ranked in the top 10 each of
the two previous seasons. He has
a proven track record, allowing
just five pressures this season
and only one sack over the past
two years. Roullier surrendered
just one sack this season, but he
gave up 19 total pressures.
It’s not a glamour position, but
shoring up a key spot along the
offensive line could bolster the
Redskins’ offense in 2019 and
beyond.
BILL KOSTROUN/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Landon Collins could be a replacement at safety who offers a higher ceiling than Ha Ha Clinton-Dix.
most productive edge rushers.
Graham recorded 70 pressures,
fourth most of any NFL edge
defender.
C Matt Paradis, Broncos
Chase Roullier was solid, but
he finished the season ranked
17th in the NFL among centers
and hasn’t really shown a ton of
untapped potential that the
Redskins can rely upon moving
forward.
Bringing in a player such as
Paradis from Denver would be a
huge upgrade and secure a quality player at one of the most
important positions along the
offensive line — and possibly
allow the Redskins to move Roullier to left guard to shore up the
CB Ronald Darby, Eagles
While Redskins fans probably
want to see an upgrade at wide
receiver, the free agent class
doesn’t offer much this year. Instead, addressing cornerback —
particularly if the team decides to
release Josh Norman, which
would produce significant salary
cap savings — could be a different
way to upgrade the roster.
Darby missed time this season,
but when he was on the field for
Philadelphia, he wasn’t beaten
for a catch longer than 33 yards.
He allowed just 9.5 yards per
catch and turned in a passer
rating against of 86.5 — higher
than he allowed a year ago but
reflective
of
an
overall
leaguewide increase.
Norman, on the other hand,
surrendered a passer rating of
114.2 along with four touchdowns, and he has seen his status
as a top cornerback eroded. Replacing Norman with Darby
could go a long way toward improving the defense next year — if
the finances make sense for
Washington.
sports@washpost.com
Sam Monson is the lead NFL analyst
for Pro Football Focus.
SALLY JENKINS
Snyder has turned this franchise into a mess, so he should be left to wallow in it
JENKINS FROM D1
emerges with their name or
business better off.
Even his fellow ownerbillionaires in the NFL are
embarrassed and unhappy about
the yawning decks of unfilled
seats, and the black mood of the
few influentials who still go to
Redskins games, a league
executive told me. If there is one
thing that NFL owners don’t like,
it’s “apathy in a major market,”
the longtime exec said. They are
especially bothered by apathy in
the nation’s capital, where they
rely on strong interest and
relationships to protect their
business practices. “Washington,
D.C. is Washington, D.C.,” the
executive said, “and there is a
trickle-down effect.” NFL owners
put the blame for the bleeding of
goodwill squarely on the so-called
management of Snyder and his
pally team president, Bruce Allen,
whom they regard as “literally, a
joke.”
All Snyder has done as an NFL
owner is freeload off massive
revenue streams he didn’t help
create, while breeding fan ill will.
He bought the Redskins for
$800 million with a brand-new
stadium that was the largest in
the league, then sat back and
collected his built-in cut of the
league’s massive TV contracts —
which paid every team
$255 million last year, no matter
how they performed. He pressed
long-suffering fans to pay $7 for
JONATHAN NEWTON/THE WASHINGTON POST
Redskins President Bruce Allen, left, and owner Daniel Snyder have presided over the team’s collapse.
short beers and $40 to park and
gave them among the worst food
for the highest prices in all of the
NFL. In 2016, the Redskins
offered the most expensive game
day for a family of four in the
entire league, even though
they’ve won eight games or fewer
in 15 of 19 years.
All around Snyder is scorched
earth. He has made FedEx Field,
for which he sold the stadium
naming rights for an extravagant
$205 million back in 1999,
perpetually synonymous with low
quality. How’s that for branding?
Then there are the city fathers
of Richmond. Here’s how they
fared in becoming partners with
Snyder: In 2012, they made an
eight-year deal to host Redskins
training camp through 2020,
agreed to build the team an
$11 million facility for nothing
and gave the team an additional
$500,000 a year in cash and
services. In return, Snyder and
Allen promised to lure thousands
of tourists to the city, to flood
hotels and restaurants, and to
generate sponsorship fees that
would pay for it.
None of it materialized.
Richmond had to rob a school
fund of more than $5 million to
help pay for it and is facing
$750,000 per year in ongoing
debt payments. It’s a total
albatross. When the Richmond
City Council expressed distress
and unwillingness to extend the
deal last summer, Allen told the
Washington Times: “I’m not
going to worry about that right
now. I’m just hoping for some
sunshine to dry out our fields.”
Now do the multiplication and
think about the 10-figure damage
Snyder could do to any city that
takes on a billion-dollar stadium
project for him. Even the best
arenas rarely deliver on the
extravagant promises of their
builders; economists say a
shopping center is a better
investment for your community.
To give a single tax dollar to
Snyder given his track record
would be absolute madness, and
anyone who even contemplates it
should be turned out of office for
malpractice. If Maryland
Gov. Larry Hogan and various
members of the D.C. Council
continue to play footsie with
Snyder, they will get burned,
become just another in a long line
of people who came to the
Redskins with good reputations
and left as damaged goods.
Snyder should be left alone to
feel the effects of his own
mismanagement, without relief.
He seeded distrust with poor
business practices and made fans
hostages to his personal whims,
until he has fatally weakened
interest in the team. He should
have to live with FedEx Field until
it is totally empty. Maybe then he
will finally get bored, do everyone
a mercy and sell.
sally.jenkins@washpost.com
For more by Sally Jenkins, visit
washingtonpost.com/jenkins.
Washington has draft’s 15th pick, but 2019 class of quarterbacks appears weak
REDSKINS FROM D1
roster, and the team was left to
bring in Mark Sanchez and Josh
Johnson off the street. Coach Jay
Gruden and his staff had to try to
teach them the scheme on short
notice, and they eventually
tweaked the offense to take advantage of Johnson’s athleticism.
The team was left without an
insurance policy after Kevin
Hogan was released at the
53-man roster cut before the
season. Wolf never wanted to be
in that position.
“I approached it like that because I thought that was the No.
1 position in professional football,” Wolf said. “If you didn’t
have a quarterback, you spent a
lot of Sundays bemoaning the
fact that you didn’t have one. I
wanted to make sure, with such a
critical position, that my butt
was covered.
“Everybody has a different
[philosophy]. . . . To me, it was
always about the quarterback.
We were going to carry three
quarterbacks.”
Quarterback again has become the priority for Washington
this offseason. Smith, even if he
returns to the field, won’t be
ready for the beginning of 2019.
McCoy probably would have returned in 2018 had the team
made the playoffs, so he is expected to go into next season as
the starter, but it’s unlikely he is
the long-term answer at the
position.
Smith’s salary restricts the
amount of money the team can
use to sign an established veteran, so Washington is likely to
select one in the draft, but Vice
President of Player Personnel
Doug Williams said that decision
has not been made. Johnson
could return in a reserve role, at
least for training camp.
“There’s no question that
quarterback flies right to the top
of the charts as far as things
they’re going to need to address
and have a plan for,” said Louis
Riddick, a former member of the
Redskins’ front office who is now
an ESPN analyst. “Do they believe Colt is someone who can
hold down the fort in a healthy
situation? . . . I don’t know. I
know there’s a lot of people who
don’t feel that way. But obviously
the Redskins feel very strongly
about the guy.
“From the outside looking in,
they need to address the position. They’re going to have to
have a succession plan that involves someone with more quarterbacking upside than Colt
McCoy. . . . That’s not a position
you can just mess around with
and play it by ear. You have to get
out ahead of it — even if it means
having more cap money and
more assets tied up into the
position than you’d ideally want.”
The Redskins rolled the dice
with just Smith and McCoy and
lost, which could change
Gruden’s thinking in the future.
He explained that every year is
different, and that injuries play
into the numbers game. Gruden
would prefer to have two quarterbacks on the roster and one on
the practice squad, but he
thought the need for additional
offensive linemen and wide receivers because of injuries took
precedence.
And then there’s always the
concern of filling special teams
positions with those final roster
spots.
Riddick called that kind of
roster construction “fluid,” as
being able to develop your quarterback of the future at your own
pace is easier said than done.
Everyone wants a Favre-Aaron
Rodgers scenario, but that rarely
happens.
Teams would love to hit on a
Russell Wilson or Tom Brady in
the draft’s later rounds, but that
is similarly uncommon.
Regardless of Smith’s injury
situation, the team probably
needed to start thinking about
his successor since he will turn
35 in May. The Redskins hold the
No. 15 pick in the 2019 draft, and
a quarterback certainly could be
in play, although this draft is
widely considered weak at the
position.
“When you think about a succession plan at quarterback,
you’re talking, ‘How do I get up
into the top half of the first
round to have my crack at whatever quarterback is coming out
or whatever number of quarterbacks are coming out?’ ” Riddick
said. “It’s always a significant
investment. . . . You plan to
spend. You plan to pay a premium.”
Wolf can’t comprehend why a
front office would leave itself
short at the most important
position in football. He hears
excuses about how the collective
bargaining agreement’s rules
limit the amount of time coaches
can spend with players and how
that doesn’t allow for developing
a third quarterback.
“I find that hard to believe
because that’s your lifeblood, for
gosh sake,” Wolf said. “My belief
is, you don’t have a quarterback,
you’re not going to win.
“I can’t be convinced you
wouldn’t find a way to incorporate quarterback practice with
that third guy somewhere with
one of those other assistants. I
can’t believe you wouldn’t do
that.”
kareem.copeland@washpost.com
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professional Football
NFL NOTES
Cleveland
interviews
Williams
for top job
A SSOCIATED P RESS
Gregg Williams has interviewed with the Cleveland
Browns, who were impressed by
his leadership in the second half
of the season, for their coaching
vacancy.
Williams went 5-3 as interim
coach after taking over when Hue
Jackson was fired Oct. 29. The
60-year-old was the first candidate to meet with General Manager John Dorsey.
The Browns are looking for
their ninth coach since 1999. But
unlike previous years, the team
seems to have a promising future
with quarterback Baker Mayfield,
and Dorsey is determined to find
the right person to lead the team.
Williams spent the past two
seasons as Cleveland’s defensive
coordinator, and his impressive
run after replacing Jackson could
lead to him coaching the Browns
or another team.
Dorsey has contacted as many
as eight candidates. He’ll also
interview Browns offensive coordinator Freddie Kitchens.
JAGUARS: Leonard Fournette’s season-long struggles
proved costly for his position
coach.
Jacksonville fired running
backs coach Tyrone Wheatley and
three more assistants, according
to a person familiar with the
situation. The person spoke to
the Associated Press on the condition of anonymity and said
offensive line coach Pat Flaherty,
secondary coach Perry Fewell
and defensive line coach Marion
Hobby also were let go a day after
the season finale. All four assistants had been with the team for
two seasons.
Wheatley’s dismissal was the
least surprising. It came a day
after Fournette and T.J. Yeldon
were sharply criticized for being
disengaged from coaches and
teammates during a 20-3 loss at
Houston.
Tom Coughlin, the team’s head
of football operations, ripped
both players for being “disrespectful” and “selfish.” He said
“their behavior was unbecoming
of a professional football player.”
Fournette has missed 11 games,
including two because of suspensions, over two seasons.
SEAHAWKS: Seattle placed
Delano Hill on injured reserve
after the safety suffered a nondisplaced fracture of his hip in
the regular season finale against
Arizona.
The loss of Hill is somewhat
countered by the expectation that
fellow safety Tedric Thompson
will be able to play after missing a
pair of games with a pair of
injuries.
Seattle Coach Pete Carroll said
that Hill’s injury didn’t become
apparent until the day after the
Seahawks closed the regular season with a 27-24 win over the
Cardinals.
Hill started the final two
games of the season at strong
safety as Thompson dealt with
chest and ankle injuries that
forced Bradley McDougald to
switch to free safety.
JETS: It wasn’t long after
Todd Bowles was fired as New
York’s coach that frustrated fans
started asking an inevitable question: What about Mike Maccagnan?
The Jets’ general manager was
hired a day before Bowles in 2015,
so the two were linked — but were
separate in the team’s reporting
structure — for the next four
seasons, which featured lots of
losing and disappointment.
A few hours after completing a
4-12 season, Bowles was fired
Sunday by Christopher Johnson,
the team’s acting chairman and
chief executive, who opted to
keep Maccagnan in place.
“I think Mike is a good talent
evaluator — period,” Johnson
said Monday. “Looking at the
plan we have going forward, I’m a
believer in Mike.”
LIONS: Detroit will not
renew offensive coordinator Jim
Bob Cooter’s contract.
The Lions announced their decision Tuesday, two days after
finishing 6-10 in Coach Matt Patricia’s first season at the helm.
Cooter was a holdover from Jim
Caldwell’s staff, but his first season with Patricia did not go well.
Only two teams in the NFC
scored fewer points than
Detroit’s 324. The Lions won
their finale, 31-0, over Green Bay,
but that was the only time in their
last 10 games that they scored
more than 22 points.
Sorting out NFL coaching vacancies, from most to least desirable
6. Arizona Cardinals
Top candidates: McCarthy,
Bieniemy, Gase, Carmichael,
LaFleur, Taylor, Caldwell
McCarthy would be the natural
fit, but it sounds as if he might sit
out the 2019 season. To get
McCarthy, the Cardinals might
have to give him authority to
bring in the players.
This isn’t a bad job. There is
talent on defense. Josh Rosen has
the chance to be a decent
quarterback. The Cardinals have
the No. 1 pick. The biggest
challenge is rebuilding the
offensive line.
At least the
Jacksonville
Jaguars recognize
the difficulty of
replacing a head coach in the NFL.
No team suffered a more
demoralizing season than the
Jaguars. They went from playing
in the AFC championship game to
finishing 5-11, they have no
quarterback plan for the future
following an awful season from
Blake Bortles, and they saw their
high-priced defense struggle
unexpectedly. Nevertheless,
ownership is sticking with Doug
Marrone, knowing that the pool
of replacement head coaches this
season is as weak as it’s been in
recent memory.
The constant churn of six to
seven new head coaches each
season has left the market thin.
Owners are looking for the next
Sean McVay, Doug Pederson or
Matt Nagy — the bright offensive
coach who can call plays and
develop quarterbacks.
But with roughly 14 offensive
head coaches who call their plays
already in the league, those
candidates are harder to find.
Some owners will look to the
college ranks and might find
some willing candidates, given
the increase in NFL coaching
salaries of late.
Black Monday is behind us,
and the changes have begun. Let’s
rank the open head-coaching
positions, from best to worst,
while looking at the top
candidates for each job.
John
Clayton
7. Miami Dolphins
Top candidates: John Harbaugh
(in a trade), McDaniels, Caldwell,
Michigan Coach Jim Harbaugh,
LaFleur, McCarthy
One of the problems with this
job is that so much talent has been
chased away. Losing Jarvis
Landry, Ndamukong Suh, Jay
Ajayi, Mike Pouncey and others
over the past year lessens the
value of this job. Owner Stephen
Ross said he would not pursue Jim
Harbaugh this year, but he has to
think about it.
Ross should have hired
Harbaugh years ago. Ross is a big
Michigan supporter, and the
thought was he would stay with
Gase one more year and go after
Harbaugh in 2020. Whoever takes
this job has to decide whether
Ryan Tannehill is the franchise
quarterback. Gase would not have
made a change at quarterback; he
believed in Tannehill. The next
coach might have a different
opinion.
1. Green Bay Packers
Top candidates: Patriots
offensive coordinator Josh
McDaniels, Northwestern Coach
Pat Fitzgerald, former Colts and
Lions coach Jim Caldwell, Chiefs
offensive coordinator Eric
Bieniemy, Titans offensive
coordinator Matt LaFleur
The main attraction with this
job is linking up with Aaron
Rodgers, a quarterback who can
take a team to a Super Bowl.
Despite the team’s disappointing
season, his game hasn’t declined.
He still has incredible arm
strength. His knee injury slowed
him early in the season, but he
fought through the pain and had
a good season in which he rarely
turned the ball over. You have to
figure the Packers will be looking
to hire an offensive coach who can
work with Rodgers and capitalize
on his talent.
2. Cleveland Browns
Top candidates: Former Packers
coach Mike McCarthy, McDaniels,
Rams quarterbacks coach Zac
Taylor, Ravens Coach John
Harbaugh (in a trade), former
Cardinals coach Bruce Arians
The incredible rookie season of
Baker Mayfield makes this a good
job. The Browns surprised
8. Cincinnati Bengals
MIKE ROEMER/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aaron Rodgers makes Green Bay an attractive job, and there is interest elsewhere in Mike McCarthy.
everyone by going 7-8-1 and,
thanks to Mayfield, the Browns
are relevant. A good offseason
could make them a playoff
contender next year. They have
built a good core of young players
on defense. Their offensive line is
decent. If they can add a quality
wide receiver, there will be
enough good players around
Mayfield to create a good offense.
As much as the Browns have
changed coaches over the years,
the coach who gets this job gets
the best Browns team in a while.
3. New York Jets
Top candidates: McCarthy,
former Dolphins coach Adam
Gase, Taylor, Bieniemy, Iowa State
Coach Matt Campbell, Saints
offensive coordinator Pete
Carmichael, Caldwell
What makes this job attractive
is working with a talented young
quarterback in Sam Darnold, the
No. 3 draft pick in 2018. McCarthy
might opt for other jobs because
he might not want to be in the
spotlight of the Big Apple, but
others would love the
opportunity.
The past couple of drafts have
made the defense better. Most of
the work has to be done on
offense. The Jets have major
weaknesses at wide receiver and
in the backfield, but the front
office can focus on fixing that in
the offseason.
4. Denver Broncos
Top candidates: Harbaugh (in a
trade), LaFleur, Bieniemy, Taylor,
former Vikings offensive
coordinator John DeFilippo,
Steelers offensive coordinator
Mike Munchak
Harbaugh makes the most
sense here, but it would have to
happen if Harbaugh wants out of
Baltimore and John Elway can
work out a deal. Harbaugh would
be the perfect fit in Denver. He can
hire Gary Kubiak as the offensive
coordinator and give Elway what
he wants as an overall leader of
the team. It might cost a second-
round draft pick — and Baltimore
would have to be willing to go for
the trade, following the team’s run
to the playoffs — but the trade
would be worth it.
5. Tampa Bay Buccaneers
Top candidates: McCarthy, Saints
tight ends coach Dan Campbell,
Carmichael, McDaniels,
Bieniemy, Eagles defensive
coordinator Jim Schwartz,
Cowboys defensive coordinator
Kris Richard
To take this job, you have to
believe in quarterback Jameis
Winston. The decision by
Oregon’s Justin Herbert to return
to school leaves the draft without
a top quarterback prospect, so
teams such as Tampa Bay that are
looking for help there are likely
better served to wait until 2020.
Like most teams on this list,
the Bucs will be looking for an
offensive-minded head coach, but
if the top offensive coaches are
gone, they will have to look
to defense.
Top candidates: Former Broncos
coach Vance Joseph, Browns
offensive coordinator Freddie
Kitchens, Kris Richard, Bears
defensive coordinator Vic Fangio,
Schwartz, Munchak
This is probably the least
attractive job. Bengals
ownership likes to hire coaches
whom they know, which is why
Joseph should have a decent
chance of getting the job.
Before he left for the Dolphins
as defensive coordinator, Joseph
was told he would be considered
as Lewis’s replacement if Lewis
retired.
The Bengals are the one team
that wouldn’t be married to the
idea of only hiring an offensive
head coach.
sports@washpost.com
John Clayton has covered the NFL for
40 years, including 22 for ESPN. He
hosts radio shows in Seattle and for
SiriusXM in addition to doing
television sideline reporting. He is
writing a weekly column for The
Washington Post that publishes online
Monday mornings during the NFL
season.
Cousins cashed in, but three teams paid a price
COUSINS FROM D1
into an animated sideline exchange with wide receiver Adam
Thielen.
“It’s been building,” Hall of
Fame tight end Shannon Sharpe
said Sunday on NFL Network.
“It’s been brewing because he
hasn’t delivered like they thought.
Because he was the only thing
that they changed. . . . They said
they were one player away, and it
was the quarterback. So you
change the quarterback, and now
you don’t even make the playoffs.”
Sharpe’s comments came during a televised exchange with another Hall of Famer, cornerback
Deion Sanders, in which Sanders
said of Cousins: “We don’t talk
about his money till his game gets
funny. All right — his game is
funny.”
The sideline interaction Sunday between Cousins and Thielen,
in which Cousins demonstrated
route-running technique to Thielen, signaled a deeper problem,
Sanders said.
“When you see this,” Sanders
said, “what transpired on the
sideline right there, you’ve got a
receiver and a quarterback openly
going at it . . . you never see that.”
It’s not that Cousins played
horribly this season. He threw for
4,298 yards and 30 touchdowns,
and he finished with a passer
rating of 99.7. But he lost seven
fumbles to go with his 10 interceptions, and he remained unable to
produce victories in high-profile
games against strong competition.
“In Washington, he made critical mistakes,” former Redskins
quarterback Joe Theismann said
before the season. “He turned the
ball over at crucial times in
games. That will spell the difference of whether he does what he’s
expected to do in Minnesota. If
JIM MONE/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Kirk Cousins took over a Minnesota team expected to be a Super Bowl contender, but the Vikings went 8-7-1 and did not make the playoffs.
he’s driving toward a winning
touchdown and he throws an interception, the answer will be,
‘That’s the Kirk we’ve seen before.’
If he doesn’t, people will say he’s
worth every penny.”
At this point, no one is saying
Cousins has been worth every
penny for Minnesota.
The Vikings have little choice
but to retool their roster around
Cousins and try to make things
work better next season. Smith
and the Redskins can only hope
they are as fortunate. There have
been no indications about when,
or if, Smith will be able to play
football again. The four-year,
$94 million contract extension he
signed with the Redskins includes
$71 million in guaranteed money
and would be burdensome to any
efforts by the team to replace him
if he’s unable to resume playing.
For Smith and the Redskins, it
was mostly bad luck. For Keenum
and the Broncos, it was bad play.
Keenum threw 15 interceptions
and had a passer rating of 81.2,
down from last season’s 98.3 with
the Vikings, as the Broncos stumbled to 6-10. Once Broncos executive John Elway hires a new
coach, the team will have to decide whether to go into another
season with Keenum as its starter.
There’s no going back now.
There’s no undoing what has been
done. For the Vikings, there are no
refunds on that $84 million. But if
there is to be anything positive
that results from Cousins leaving
Washington, something will have
to be dramatically different next
season and beyond for at least one
of these teams or at least one of
these quarterbacks.
mark.maske@washpost.com
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2 , 2019
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
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D7
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scoreboard
FOOTBALL
NFL postseason
FIRST ROUND
SATURDAY’S GAMES
CITRUS BOWL
ROSE BOWL
Sugar Bowl winners
NBA
Kentucky 27, Penn St. 24
Ohio St. 28, Washington 23
Jan. 1, 2019: Texas 28, Georgia 21
Jan. 1, 2018: Alabama 24, Clemson 6 (CFC SF)
Jan. 2, 2017: Oklahoma 35, Auburn 19
Jan. 1, 2016: Mississippi 48, Oklahoma St. 20
Jan. 1, 2015: Ohio St. 42, Alabama 35 (CFC SF)
Jan. 2, 2014: Oklahoma 45, Alabama 31
Jan. 2, 2013: Louisville 33, Florida 23
Jan. 3, 2012: Michigan 23, Virginia Tech 20, OT
Jan. 4, 2011: Ohio St. 31, Arkansas 26
Jan. 1, 2010: Florida 51, Cincinnati 24
Jan. 2, 2009: Utah 31, Alabama 17
Jan. 1, 2008: Georgia 41, Hawaii 10
Jan. 3, 2007: LSU 41, Notre Dame 14
Jan. 2, 2006: West Virginia 38, Georgia 35
Jan. 3, 2005: Auburn 16, Virginia Tech 13
Jan. 4, 2004: LSU 21, Oklahoma 14
Jan. 1, 2003: Georgia 26, Florida St. 13
Jan. 1, 2002: LSU 47, Illinois 34
Jan. 2, 2001: Miami 37, Florida 20
Jan. 4, 2000: Florida St. 46, Virginia Tech 29
Jan. 1, 1999: Ohio St. 24, Texas A&M 14
Jan. 1, 1998: Florida St. 31, Ohio St. 14
Jan. 2, 1997: Florida 52, Florida St. 20
Dec. 31, 1995: Virginia Tech 28, Texas 10
Jan. 2, 1995: Florida St. 23, Florida 17
Jan. 1, 1994: Florida 41, West Virginia 7
Jan. 1, 1993: Alabama 34, Miami 13
Jan. 1, 1992: Notre Dame 39, Florida 28
Jan. 1, 1991: Tennessee 23, Virginia 22
Jan. 1, 1990: Miami 33, Alabama 25
Jan. 2, 1989: Florida St. 13, Auburn 7
Jan. 1, 1988: Syracuse 16, Auburn 16, tie
Jan. 1, 1987: Nebraska 30, LSU 15
Jan. 1, 1986: Tennessee 35, Miami 7
Jan. 1, 1985: Nebraska 28, LSU 10
Jan. 2, 1984: Auburn 9, Michigan 7
Jan. 1, 1983: Penn St. 27, Georgia 23
Jan. 1, 1982: Pittsburgh 24, Georgia 20
Jan. 1, 1981: Georgia 17, Notre Dame 10
Jan. 1, 1980: Alabama 24, Arkansas 9
Jan. 1, 1979: Alabama 14, Penn St. 7
Jan. 2, 1978: Alabama 35, Ohio St. 6
Jan. 1, 1977: Pittsburgh 27, Georgia 3
Dec. 31, 1975: Alabama 13, Penn St. 6
Dec. 31, 1974: Nebraska 13, Florida 10
Dec. 31, 1973: Notre Dame 24, Alabama 23
Dec. 31, 1972: Oklahoma 14, Penn St. 0
Jan. 1, 1972: Oklahoma 40, Auburn 22
Jan. 1, 1971: Tennessee 34, Air Force 13
Jan. 1, 1970: Mississippi 27, Arkansas 22
Jan. 1, 1969: Arkansas 16, Georgia 2
Jan. 1, 1968: LSU 20, Wyoming 13
Jan. 2, 1967: Alabama 34, Nebraska 7
Jan. 1, 1966: Missouri 20, Florida 18
Jan. 1, 1965: LSU 13, Syracuse 10
Jan. 1, 1964: Alabama 12, Mississippi 7
Jan. 1, 1963: Mississippi 17, Arkansas 13
Jan. 1, 1962: Alabama 10, Arkansas 3
Jan. 2, 1961: Mississippi 14, Rice 6
Jan. 1, 1960: Mississippi 21, LSU 0
Jan. 1, 1959: LSU 7, Clemson 0
Jan. 1, 1958: Mississippi 39, Texas 7
Jan. 1, 1957: Baylor 13, Tennessee 7
Jan. 2, 1956: Georgia Tech 7, Pittsburgh 0
Jan. 1, 1955: Navy 21, Mississippi 0
Jan. 1, 1954: Georgia Tech 42, West Virginia 19
Jan. 1, 1953: Georgia Tech 24, Mississippi 7
Jan. 1, 1952: Maryland 28, Tennessee 13
Jan. 1, 1951: Kentucky 13, Oklahoma 7
Jan. 2, 1950: Oklahoma 35, LSU 0
Jan. 1, 1949: Oklahoma 14, North Carolina 6
Jan. 1, 1948: Texas 27, Alabama 7
Jan. 1, 1947: Georgia 20, North Carolina 10
Jan. 1, 1946: Oklahoma A&M 33, Saint Mary’s (Cal.) 13
Jan. 1, 1945: Duke 29, Alabama 26
Jan. 1, 1944: Georgia Tech 20, Tulsa 18
Jan. 1, 1943: Tennessee 14, Tulsa 7
Jan. 1, 1942: Fordham 2, Missouri 0
Jan. 1, 1941: Boston College 19, Tennessee 13
Jan. 1, 1940: Texas A&M 14, Tulane 13
Jan. 2, 1939: TCU 15, Carnegie Tech 7
Jan. 1, 1938: Santa Clara 6, LSU 0
Jan. 1, 1937: Santa Clara 21, LSU 14
Jan. 1, 1936: TCU 3, LSU 2
Jan. 1, 1935: Tulane 20, Temple 14
EASTERN CONFERENCE
KENTUCKY ............................. 10
PENN ST. .................................. 0
Indianapolis at Houston (-2), 4:35 (ESPN, ABC)
Seattle at Dallas (-1), 8:15 (Fox)
0
7
17
0
0 — 27
17 — 24
KEN: FG Butler 28, 12:23 first.
KEN: Bowden 58 punt return (Butler kick), :45 first.
PSU: Bowers 1 pass from McSorley (Pinegar kick), 13:56
second.
KEN: Snell 2 run (Butler kick), 12:38 third.
KEN: FG Butler 28, 12:23 third.
KEN: Snell 12 run (Butler kick), 1:35 third.
PSU: McSorley 1 run (Pinegar kick), 13:37 fourth.
PSU: Freiermuth 18 pass from McSorley (Pinegar kick),
9:00 fourth.
PSU: FG Pinegar 32, 4:12 fourth.
A: 59,167.
SUNDAY’S GAMES
L.A. Chargers at Baltimore (-21/2), 1:05 (CBS)
Philadelphia at Chicago (-6), 4:40 (NBC)
NCAA
BOWL GAMES
SATURDAY, DEC. 15
CELEBRATION BOWL — ATLANTA
N.C. A&T 24, Alcorn State 22
Georgia Southern 23, Eastern Michigan 21
KENTUCKY
First Downs ..................................... 16
Rushes-Yards ........................... 42-176
Passing .......................................... 121
Comp-Att-Int ............................ 9-15-0
Return Yards .................................... 89
Punts-Avg. ............................... 9-44.66
Fumbles-Lost .................................. 1-0
Penalties-Yards ............................ 3-27
Time Of Possession .................... 30:42
NEW ORLEANS BOWL
RUSHING
CURE BOWL — ORLANDO
Tulane 41, Louisiana-Lafayette 24
NEW MEXICO BOWL — ALBUQUERQUE
Utah State 52, North Texas 13
LAS VEGAS BOWL
Fresno State 31, Arizona State 20
CAMELLIA BOWL — MONTGOMERY, ALA.
Appalachian State 45, Middle Tennessee 13
PENN ST.
22
41-161
246
17-35-1
30
5-37.6
1-1
3-24
29:18
Kentucky: Snell 26-144, T.Wilson 10-29, Rose 4-9,
Middleton 0-0, Bowden 1-0, Richardson 1-(minus 6).
Penn St.: McSorley 19-75, Sanders 13-51, Slade 4-27,
Hamler 1-11, Jo.Brown 1-4, J.Thomas 1-0, (Team)
1-(minus 3), Clifford 1-(minus 4).
TUESDAY, DEC. 18
BOCA RATON (FLA.) BOWL
UAB 37, Northern Illinois 13
PASSING
WEDNESDAY, DEC. 19
FRISCO (TEX.) BOWL
Kentucky: T.Wilson 9-15-0-121. Penn St.: Clifford 0-20-0, McSorley 17-33-1-246.
Ohio 27, San Diego State 0
THURSDAY, DEC. 20
GASPARILLA BOWL — ST. PETERSBURG, FLA.
Marshall 38, South Florida 20
FRIDAY, DEC. 21
BAHAMAS BOWL — NASSAU
FIU 35, Toledo 32
RECEIVING
Kentucky: Bowden 5-84, Richardson 2-12, Conrad 1-21,
Bouvier 1-4. Penn St.: Thompkins 4-74, Bowers 3-32,
Freiermuth 2-38, Shorter 2-17, Ju.Johnson 2-13, Sanders 2-7, Hamler 1-41, J.Dotson 1-24.
Citrus Bowl winners
FAMOUS IDAHO POTATO BOWL — BOISE
BYU 49, Western Michigan 18
SATURDAY, DEC. 22
BIRMINGHAM (ALA.) BOWL
Wake Forest 37, Memphis 34
ARMED FORCES BOWL — FORT WORTH
Army 70, Houston 14
DOLLAR GENERAL BOWL — MOBILE, ALA.
Troy 42, Buffalo 32
HAWAII BOWL — HONOLULU
Louisiana Tech 31, Hawaii 14
WEDNESDAY, DEC. 26
SERVPRO FIRST RESPONDER BOWL — DALLAS
Boston College vs. Boise State, ccd., weather
QUICK LANE BOWL — DETROIT
Minnesota 34, Georgia Tech 10
CHEEZ-IT BOWL — PHOENIX
TCU 10, California 7, OT
THURSDAY’S RESULTS
INDEPENDENCE BOWL — SHREVEPORT, LA
Duke 56, Temple 27
PINSTRIPE BOWL — NEW YORK
Wisconsin 35, Miami 3
TEXAS BOWL — HOUSTON
Baylor 45, Vanderbilt 38
FRIDAY’S RESULTS
MUSIC CITY BOWL — NASHVILLE
Auburn 63, Purdue 14
CAMPING WORLD BOWL — ORLANDO
Syracuse 34, West Virginia 18
ALAMO BOWL — SAN ANTONIO
Washington State 28, Iowa State 26
SATURDAY’S RESULTS
PEACH BOWL — ATLANTA
Florida 41, Michigan 15
BELK BOWL — CHARLOTTE
Virginia 28, South Carolina 0
ARIZONA BOWL — TUCSON
Nevada 16, Arkansas State 13, OT
COTTON BOWL — ARLINGTON, TEX.
CFP Semifinal, Clemson 30, Notre Dame 3
ORANGE BOWL — MIAMI
CFP Semifinal, Alabama 45, Oklahoma 34
MONDAY’S RESULTS
MILITARY BOWL — ANNAPOLIS
Cincinnati 35, Virginia Tech 31
SUN BOWL — EL PASO
Stanford 14, Pittsburgh 13
REDBOX BOWL — SANTA CLARA, CALIF.
Oregon 7, Michigan State 6
LIBERTY BOWL — MEMPHIS
Oklahoma State 38, Missouri 33
HOLIDAY BOWL — SAN DIEGO
Northwestern 31, Utah 20
GATOR BOWL — JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
Texas A&M 52, N.C. State 13
TUESDAY’S RESULTS
OUTBACK BOWL — TAMPA
Jan. 1, 2019: Kentucky 27, Penn St. 24
Jan. 1, 2018: Notre Dame 21, LSU 17
Dec. 31, 2016: LSU 29, Louisville 9
Jan. 1, 2016: Michigan 41, Florida 7
Jan. 1, 2015: Missouri 33, Minnesota 17
Jan. 1, 2014: South Carolina 34, Wisconsin 24
Jan. 1, 2013: Georgia 45, Nebraska 31
Jan. 2, 2012: South Carolina 30, Nebraska 13
Jan. 1, 2011: Alabama 49, Michigan St. 7
Jan. 1, 2010: Penn St. 19, LSU 17
Jan. 1, 2009: Georgia 24, Michigan St. 12
Jan. 1, 2008: Michigan 41, Florida 35
Jan. 1, 2007: Wisconsin 17, Arkansas 14
Jan. 2, 2006: Wisconsin 24, Auburn 10
Jan. 1, 2005: Iowa 30, LSU 25
Jan. 1, 2004: Georgia 34, Purdue 27, OT
Jan. 1, 2003: Auburn 13, Penn St. 9
Jan. 1, 2002: Tennessee 45, Michigan 17
Jan. 1, 2001: Michigan 31, Auburn 28
Jan. 1, 2000: Michigan St. 37, Florida 34
Jan. 1, 1999: Michigan 45, Arkansas 31
Jan. 1, 1998: Florida 21, Penn St. 6
Jan. 1, 1997: Tennessee 48, Northwestern 28
Jan. 1, 1996: Tennessee 20, Ohio St. 14
Jan. 2, 1995: Alabama 24, Ohio St. 17
Jan. 1, 1994: Penn St. 31, Tennessee 13
Jan. 1, 1993: Georgia 21, Ohio St. 14
Jan. 1, 1992: California 37, Clemson 13
Jan. 1, 1991: Georgia Tech 45, Nebraska 21
Jan. 1, 1990: Illinois 31, Virginia 21
Jan. 2, 1989: Clemson 13, Oklahoma 6
Jan. 1, 1988: Clemson 35, Penn St. 10
Jan. 1, 1987: Auburn 16, Southern Cal 7
Dec. 28, 1985: Ohio St. 10, Brigham Young 7
Dec. 22, 1984: Florida St. 17, Georgia 17
Dec. 17, 1983: Tennessee 30, Maryland 23
Dec. 18, 1982: Auburn 33, Boston College 26
Dec. 19, 1981: Missouri 19, Southern Miss. 17
Dec. 20, 1980: Florida 35, Maryland 20
Dec. 22, 1979: LSU 34, Wake Forest 10
Dec. 23, 1978: N.C. State 30, Pittsburgh 17
Dec. 23, 1977: Florida St. 40, Texas Tech 17
Dec. 18, 1976: Oklahoma St. 49, Brigham Young 21
Dec. 20, 1975: Miami, Ohio 20, South Carolina 7
Dec. 21, 1974: Miami, Ohio 21, Georgia 10
Dec. 22, 1973: Miami, Ohio 16, Florida 7
Dec. 29, 1972: Tampa 21, Kent 18
Dec. 28, 1971: Toledo 28, Richmond 3
Dec. 28, 1970: Toledo 40, William & Mary 12
Dec. 26, 1969: Toledo 56, Davidson 33
Dec. 27, 1968: Richmond 49, Ohio U. 42
Dec. 16, 1967: Tennessee-Martin 25, West Chester 8
Dec. 10, 1966: Morgan St. 14, West Chester 6
Dec. 11, 1965: East Carolina 31, Maine 0
Dec. 12, 1964: East Carolina 14, Massachusetts 13
Dec. 28, 1963: Western Kentucky 27, Coast Guard 0
Dec. 22, 1962: Houston 49, Miami, Ohio 21
Dec. 29, 1961: Lamar 21, Middle Tennessee St. 14
Dec. 30, 1960: Citadel 27, Tennessee Tech 0
Jan. 1, 1960: Middle Tennessee St. 21, Presbyterian 12
Dec. 27, 1958: East Texas St. 26, Missouri Valley 7
Jan. 1, 1958: East Texas St. 10, Southern Miss. 9
Jan. 1, 1957: West Texas A&M 20, Southern Miss. 13
Jan. 2, 1956: Juniata 6, Missouri Valley 6
Jan. 1, 1955: Nebraska-Omaha 7, Eastern Kentucky 6
Jan. 1, 1954: Arkansas St. 7, East Texas St. 7
Jan. 1, 1953: East Texas St. 33, Tennessee Tech 0
Jan. 1, 1952: Stetson 35, Arkansas St. 20
Jan. 1, 1951: Morris Harvey 35, Emory & Henry 14
Jan. 2, 1950: St. Vincent 7, Emory & Henry 6
Jan. 1, 1949: Murray St. 21, Sul Ross St. 21
Jan. 1, 1948: Catawba 7, Marshall 0
Jan. 1, 1947: Catawba 31, Maryville (Tenn.) 6
Note: Tangerine Bowl (1947-1982); Citrus Bowl (19832002); Capital One Bowl (2003-2014)
Iowa 27, Mississippi State 22
CITRUS BOWL — ORLANDO
FIESTA BOWL
Kentucky 27, Penn State 24
LSU 40, UCF 32
FIESTA BOWL — GLENDALE, ARIZ.
LSU 40, Central Florida 32
LSU ......................................... 10
UCF ......................................... 14
ROSE BOWL — PASADENA, CALIF.
Ohio State 28, Washington 23
SUGAR BOWL — NEW ORLEANS
Texas 28, Georgia 21
MONDAY’S GAME
COLLEGE FOOTBALL CHAMPIONSHIP
SANTA CLARA, CALIF.
Clemson (14-0) vs. Alabama (14-0), 8 (ESPN)
OUTBACK BOWL
Iowa 27, Mississippi St. 22
MISSISSIPPI ST. ...................... 6
IOWA ........................................ 0
0
17
13
7
3 — 22
3 — 27
MSST: FG Christmann 44, 6:37 first.
MSST: FG Christmann 42, :45 first.
IOW: FG Recinos 44, 10:02 second.
IOW: Easley 75 pass from Stanley (Recinos kick), 7:55 second.
IOW: Smith-Marsette 15 pass from Stanley (Recinos
kick), 6:18 second.
MSST: Hill 1 pass from Fitzgerald (pass failed), 11:26
third.
MSST: Fitzgerald 33 run (Christmann kick), 11:08 third.
IOW: Easley 8 pass from Stanley (Recinos kick), 1:55 third.
MSST: FG Christmann 20, 12:04 fourth.
IOW: FG Recinos 40, 5:51 fourth.
A: 40,518.
MISSISSIPPI ST.
First Downs ........................................... 15
Rushes-Yards ................................ 42-190
Passing ................................................ 152
Comp-Att-Int ................................ 14-32-2
Return Yards .......................................... 42
Punts-Avg. ...................................... 5-41.6
Fumbles-Lost ....................................... 1-1
Penalties-Yards ................................. 8-90
Time Of Possession .......................... 33:34
IOWA
11
20-(min
214
21-31-1
154
7-33.14
1-1
0-0
26:26
RUSHING
Mississippi St.: Fitzgerald 20-103, Hill 12-43, Ae.Williams 6-22, Gibson 1-12, K.Thompson 3-10. Iowa:
T.Young 3-7, Kelly-Martin 5-0, (Team) 1-(minus 1),
Sargent 7-(minus 3), Stanley 4-(minus 18).
PASSING
Mississippi St.: Fitzgerald 14-32-2-152. Iowa: Stanley
21-31-1-214.
RECEIVING
Mississippi St.: Ae.Williams 3-19, Hill 3-12, Mitchell
2-42, De.Thomas 2-16, Ju.Johnson 2-5, S.Guidry 1-51,
F.Green 1-7. Iowa: Easley 8-104, Smith-Marsette 4-29,
Hockenson 3-43, B.Smith 3-33, T.Young 2-1, Sargent 1-4.
Outback Bowl winners
Jan. 1, 2019: Iowa 27, Mississippi St. 22
Jan. 1, 2018: South Carolina 26, Michigan 19
Jan. 2, 2017: Florida 30, Iowa 3
Jan. 1, 2016: Tennessee 45, Northwestern 6
Jan. 1, 2015: Wisconsin 34, Auburn 31, OT
Jan. 1, 2014: LSU 21, Iowa 14
Jan. 1, 2013: South Carolina 33, Michigan 28
Jan. 2, 2012: Michigan St. 33, Georgia 30, 3OT
Jan. 1, 2011: Florida 37, Penn St. 24
Jan. 1, 2010: Auburn 38, Northwestern 35, OT
Jan. 1, 2009: Iowa 31, South Carolina 10
Jan. 1, 2008: Tennessee 21, Wisconsin 17
Jan. 1, 2007: Penn St. 20, Tennessee 10
Jan. 2, 2006: Florida 31, Iowa 24
Jan. 1, 2005: Georgia 24, Wisconsin 21
Jan. 1, 2004: Iowa 37, Florida 17
Jan. 1, 2003: Michigan 38, Florida 30
Jan. 1, 2002: South Carolina 31, Ohio St. 28
Jan. 1, 2001: South Carolina 24, Ohio St. 7
Jan. 1, 2000: Georgia 28, Purdue 25, OT
Jan. 1, 1999: Penn St. 26, Kentucky 14
Jan. 1, 1998: Georgia 33, Wisconsin 6
Jan. 1, 1997: Alabama 17, Michigan 14
Jan. 1, 1996: Penn St. 43, Auburn 14
Jan. 2, 1995: Wisconsin 34, Duke 20
Jan. 1, 1994: Michigan 42, NC State 7
Jan. 1, 1993: Tennessee 38, Boston College 23
Jan. 1, 1992: Syracuse 24, Ohio St. 17
Jan. 1, 1991: Clemson 30, Illinois 0
Jan. 1, 1990: Auburn 31, Ohio St. 14
Jan. 2, 1989: Syracuse 23, LSU 10
Jan. 2, 1988: Michigan 28, Alabama 24
Dec. 23, 1986: Boston College 27, Georgia 24
Note: Hall of Fame Bowl (1986-95)
B AS K E TBALL
14
7
10
3
6 — 40
8 — 32
LSU: FG Tracy 24, 12:38 first.
UCF: McCrae 25 run (Wright kick), 10:56 first.
UCF: B.Moore 93 interception return (Wright kick), 6:39 first.
LSU: Jefferson 22 pass from Burrow (Tracy kick), 1:27 first.
LSU: Dillon 49 pass from Burrow (Tracy kick), 12:59 second.
LSU: Jefferson 33 pass from Burrow (Tracy kick), 7:11 second.
UCF: G.Davis 32 pass from Mack (Wright kick), :04
second.
LSU: Chase 32 pass from Burrow (Tracy kick), 12:38 third.
LSU: FG Tracy 28, 5:18 third.
UCF: FG Wright 37, 3:01 third.
LSU: FG Tracy 28, 5:18 fourth.
LSU: FG Tracy 26, 4:12 fourth.
UCF: McGowan 2 run (O.Anderson pass from Mack), 2:24
fourth.
A: 57,246.
LSU
First Downs ..................................... 32
Rushes-Yards ........................... 52-161
Passing .......................................... 394
Comp-Att-Int .......................... 21-34-1
Return Yards .................................. 111
Punts-Avg. ................................. 3-36.0
Fumbles-Lost .................................. 1-1
Penalties-Yards ........................ 14-145
Time Of Possession .................... 44:31
UCF
17
30-130
120
12-31-1
6
6-49.33
1-1
12-104
15:29
RUSHING
LSU: Brossette 29-117, Edwards-Helaire 10-32, Burrow
9-24, Jefferson 1-(minus 5), (Team) 3-(minus 7). UCF:
McCrae 10-81, O.Anderson 3-23, Killins 3-17, Mar.Williams 1-6, McGowan 2-6, Mack 11-(minus 3).
WASHINGTON ......................... 3
OHIO ST. .................................. 7
0
14
0
7
20 — 23
0 — 28
OSU: Campbell 12 pass from Haskins (Haubeil kick), 9:04
first.
WAS: FG Henry 38, 1:19 first.
OSU: Dixon 19 pass from Haskins (Haubeil kick), 12:23
second.
OSU: Berry 1 pass from Haskins (Haubeil kick), :14
second.
OSU: Dobbins 3 run (Haubeil kick), 8:23 third.
WAS: Sample 2 pass from Gaskin (Henry kick), 12:17
fourth.
WAS: Gaskin 1 run (Henry kick), 6:42 fourth.
WAS: Gaskin 2 run (pass failed), :42 fourth.
A: 91,853.
WASHINGTON
First Downs ..................................... 27
Rushes-Yards ........................... 36-129
Passing .......................................... 315
Comp-Att-Int .......................... 36-55-0
Return Yards .................................... 28
Punts-Avg. ............................... 7-35.71
Fumbles-Lost .................................. 0-0
Penalties-Yards ............................ 6-46
Time Of Possession .................... 35:02
OHIO ST.
22
32-113
251
25-37-0
0
8-41.75
0-0
9-53
24:58
RUSHING
Washington: Gaskin 24-121, McGrew 1-7, Ahmed 5-4,
Pleasant 1-0, (Team) 1-(minus 1), J.Browning 4-(minus
2). Ohio St.: Weber 15-96, Dobbins 7-24, McCall 2-12,
(Team) 2-(minus 5), Haskins 6-(minus 14).
PASSING
Washington: Gaskin 1-1-0-2, J.Browning 35-54-0-313.
Ohio St.: Haskins 25-37-0-251.
RECEIVING
Washington: Baccellia 12-109, A.Fuller 7-80, H.Bryant
4-51, Ahmed 3-22, T.Jones 3-22, Gaskin 3-(minus 1),
Sample 2-1, Otton 1-16, Chin 1-15. Ohio St.: Campbell
11-71, Hill 3-54, Dobbins 3-15, Victor 2-34, Dixon 2-27,
McLaurin 1-32, Farrell 1-9, Weber 1-8, Berry 1-1.
Rose Bowl winners
Jan. 1, 2019: Ohio State 28, Washington 23
Jan. 2, 2017: Southern Cal 52, Penn St. 49
Jan. 1, 2016: Stanford 45, Iowa 16
Jan. 1, 2015: Oregon 59, Florida St. 20
Jan. 1, 2014: Michigan St. 24, Stanford 20
Jan. 1, 2013: Stanford 20, Wisconsin 14
Jan. 2, 2012: Oregon 45, Wisconsin 38
Jan. 1, 2011: TCU 21, Wisconsin 19
Jan. 1, 2010: Ohio St. 26, Oregon 17
Jan. 1, 2009: Southern Cal 38, Penn St. 24
Jan. 1, 2008: Southern Cal 49, Illinois 17
Jan. 1, 2007: Southern Cal 32, Michigan 18
Jan. 4, 2006: Texas 41, Southern Cal 38
Jan. 1, 2005: Texas 38, Michigan 37
Jan. 1, 2004: Southern Cal 28, Michigan 14
Jan. 1, 2003: Oklahoma 34, Washington St. 14
Jan. 3, 2002: Miami 37, Nebraska 14
Jan. 1, 2001: Washington 34, Purdue 24
Jan. 1, 2000: Wisconsin 17, Stanford 9
Jan. 1, 1999: Wisconsin 38, UCLA 31
Jan. 1, 1998: Michigan 21, Washington St. 16
Jan. 1, 1997: Ohio St. 20, Arizona St. 17
Jan. 1, 1996: Southern Cal 41, Northwestern 32
Jan. 2, 1995: Penn St. 38, Oregon 20
Jan. 1, 1994: Wisconsin 21, UCLA 16
Jan. 1, 1993: Michigan 38, Washington 31
Jan. 1, 1992: Washington 34, Michigan 14
Jan. 1, 1991: Washington 46, Iowa 34
Jan. 1, 1990: Southern Cal 17, Michigan 10
Jan. 2, 1989: Michigan 22, Southern Cal 14
Jan. 1, 1988: Michigan St. 20, Southern Cal 17
Jan. 1, 1987: Arizona St. 22, Michigan 15
Jan. 1, 1986: UCLA 45, Iowa 28
Jan. 1, 1985: Southern Cal 20, Ohio St. 17
Jan. 2, 1984: UCLA 45, Illinois 9
Jan. 1, 1983: UCLA 24, Michigan 14
Jan. 1, 1982: Washington 28, Iowa 0
Jan. 1, 1981: Michigan 23, Washington 6
Jan. 1, 1980: Southern Cal 17, Ohio St. 16
Jan. 1, 1979: Southern Cal 17, Michigan 10
Jan. 2, 1978: Washington 27, Michigan 20
Jan. 1, 1977: Southern Cal 14, Michigan 6
Jan. 1, 1976: UCLA 23, Ohio St. 10
Jan. 1, 1975: Southern Cal 18, Ohio St. 17
Jan. 1, 1974: Ohio St. 42, Southern Cal 21
Jan. 1, 1973: Southern Cal 42, Ohio St. 17
Jan. 1, 1972: Stanford 13, Michigan 12
Jan. 1, 1971: Stanford 27, Ohio St. 17
Jan. 1, 1970: Southern Cal 10, Michigan 3
Jan. 1, 1969: Ohio St. 27, Southern Cal 16
Jan. 1, 1968: Southern Cal 14, Indiana 3
Jan. 2, 1967: Purdue 14, Southern Cal 13
Jan. 1, 1966: UCLA 14, Michigan St. 12
Jan. 1, 1965: Michigan 34, Oregon St. 7
Jan. 1, 1964: Illinois 17, Washington 7
Jan. 1, 1963: Southern Cal 42, Wisconsin 37
Jan. 1, 1962: Minnesota 21, UCLA 3
Jan. 2, 1961: Washington 17, Minnesota 7
Jan. 1, 1960: Washington 44, Wisconsin 8
Jan. 1, 1959: Iowa 38, California 12
Jan. 1, 1958: Ohio St. 10, Oregon 7
Jan. 1, 1957: Iowa 35, Oregon St. 19
Jan. 2, 1956: Michigan St. 17, UCLA 14
Jan. 1, 1955: Ohio St. 20, Southern Cal 7
Jan. 1, 1954: Michigan St. 28, UCLA 20
Jan. 1, 1953: Southern Cal 7, Wisconsin 0
Jan. 1, 1952: Illinois 40, Stanford 7
Jan. 1, 1951: Michigan 14, California 6
Jan. 2, 1950: Ohio St. 17, California 14
Jan. 1, 1949: Northwestern 20, California 14
Jan. 1, 1948: Michigan 49, Southern Cal 0
Jan. 1, 1947: Illinois 45, UCLA 14
Jan. 1, 1946: Alabama 34, Southern Cal 14
Jan. 1, 1945: Southern Cal 25, Tennessee 0
Jan. 1, 1944: Southern Cal 29, Washington 0
Jan. 1, 1943: Georgia 9, UCLA 0
Jan. 1, 1942: Oregon St. 20, Duke 16
Jan. 1, 1941: Stanford 21, Nebraska 13
Jan. 1, 1940: Southern Cal 14, Tennessee 0
Jan. 2, 1939: Southern Cal 7, Duke 3
Jan. 1, 1938: California 13, Alabama 0
Jan. 1, 1937: Pittsburgh 21, Washington 0
Jan. 1, 1936: Stanford 7, SMU 0
Jan. 1, 1935: Alabama 29, Stanford 13
Jan. 1, 1934: Columbia 7, Stanford 0
Jan. 2, 1933: Southern Cal 35, Pittsburgh 0
Jan. 1, 1932: Southern Cal 21, Tulane 12
Jan. 1, 1931: Alabama 24, Washington St. 10
Jan. 1, 1930: Southern Cal 47, Pittsburgh 14
Jan. 1, 1929: Georgia Tech 8, California 7
Jan. 2, 1928: Stanford 7, Pittsburgh 6
Jan. 1, 1927: Alabama 7, Stanford 7
Jan. 1, 1926: Alabama 20, Washigton 19
Jan. 1, 1925: Notre Dame 27, Stanford 10
Jan. 1, 1924: Navy 14, Washington 14
Jan. 1, 1923: Southern Cal 14, Penn St. 3
Jan. 2, 1922: Washington & Jefferson 0, California 0
Jan. 1, 1921: California 28, Ohio St. 0
Jan. 1, 1920: Harvard 7, Oregon 6
Jan. 1, 1919: Great Lakes 17, Mare Island 0
Jan. 1, 1918: Mare Island 19, Camp Lewis 7
Jan. 1, 1917: Oregon 14, Pennsylvania 0
Jan. 1, 1916: Washington St. 14, Brown 0
Jan. 1, 1902: Michigan 49, Stanford 0
BOXING
Fight schedule
JAN. 11
At StageWorks of Louisiana, Shreveport (SHO), Devin
Haney vs. Xolisani Ndongeni, 10, lightweights.
PASSING
JAN. 13
LSU: Burrow 21-34-1-394. UCF: Mar.Williams 1-1-0-23,
Mack 11-30-1-97.
At the Microsoft Theater, Los Angeles (FS1), Jose
Uzcategui vs. Caleb Plant, 12, for Uzcategui’s IBF super
middleweight title; Brandon Figueroa vs. Moises Flores,
10, featherweights; Ahmed Elbiali vs. Allan Green, 10,
light heavyweights; Hugo Centeno Jr. vs. Juan De Angel,
10, middleweights.
RECEIVING
LSU: Chase 6-93, Jefferson 4-87, Sullivan 3-76, Edwards-Helaire 3-25, Dillon 2-86, Moreau 2-22, Brossette
1-5. UCF: G.Davis 3-59, M.Colubiale 3-20, Snelson 2-24,
Killins 2-(minus 8), Mack 1-23, McCrae 1-2.
Fiesta Bowl winners
Jan. 1, 2019: LSU 40, UCF 32
Dec. 30, 2017: Penn St. 35, Washington 28
Dec. 31, 2016: Clemson 31, Ohio St. 0 (CFC SF)
Jan. 1, 2016: Ohio St. 44, Notre Dame 28
Dec. 31, 2014: Boise St. 38, Arizona 30
Jan. 1, 2014: UCF 52, Baylor 42
Jan. 3, 2013: Oregon 35, Kansas St. 17
Jan. 2, 2012: Oklahoma St. 41, Stanford 38, OT
Jan. 1, 2011: Oklahoma 48, UConn 20
Jan. 4, 2010: Boise St. 17, TCU 10
Jan. 5, 2009: Texas 24, Ohio St. 21
Jan. 2, 2008: West Virginia 48, Oklahoma 28
Jan. 1, 2007: Boise St. 43, Oklahoma 42, OT
Jan. 2, 2006: Ohio St. 34, Notre Dame 20
Jan. 1, 2005: Utah 35, Pittsburgh 7
Jan. 2, 2004: Ohio St. 35, Kansas St. 28
Jan. 3, 2003: Ohio St. 31, Miami 24, 2OT
Jan. 1, 2002: Oregon 38, Colorado 16
Jan. 2, 2001: Oregon St. 41, Notre Dame 9
Jan. 2, 2000: Nebraska 31, Tennessee 21
Jan. 4, 1999: Tennessee 23, Florida St. 16
Dec. 31, 1997: Kansas St. 35, Syracuse 18
Jan. 1, 1997: Penn St. 38, Texas 15
Jan. 2, 1996: Nebraska 62, Florida 24
Jan. 2, 1995: Colorado 41, Notre Dame 24
Jan. 1, 1994: Arizona 29, Miami 0
Jan. 1, 1993: Syracuse 26, Colorado 22
Jan. 1, 1992: Penn St. 42, Tennessee 17
Jan. 1, 1991: Louisville 34, Alabama 7
Jan. 1, 1990: Florida St. 41, Nebraska 17
Jan. 2, 1989: Notre Dame 34, West Virginia 21
Jan. 1, 1988: Florida St. 31, Nebraska 28
Jan. 2, 1987: Penn St. 14, Miami 10
Jan. 1, 1986: Michigan 27, Nebraska 23
Jan. 1, 1985: UCLA 39, Miami 37
Jan. 2, 1984: Ohio St. 28, Pittsburgh 23
Jan. 1, 1983: Arizona St. 32, Oklahoma 21
Jan. 1, 1982: Penn St. 26, Southern Cal 10
Dec. 26, 1980: Penn St. 31, Ohio St. 19
Dec. 25, 1979: Pittsburgh 16, Arizona 10
Dec. 25, 1978: Arkansas 10, UCLA 10
Dec. 25, 1977: Penn St. 42, Arizona St. 30
Dec. 25, 1976: Oklahoma 41, Wyoming 7
Dec. 26, 1975: Arizona St. 17, Nebraska 14
Dec. 28, 1974: Oklahoma St. 16, BYU 6
Dec. 21, 1973: Arizona St. 28, Pittsburgh 7
Dec. 23, 1972: Arizona St. 49, Missouri 35
Dec. 27, 1971: Arizona St. 45, Florida St. 38
JAN. 18
At Turning Stone Resort & Casino, Verona, N.Y., Bryant
Jennings vs. Oscar Rivas, 12, for Jennings’ IBF International-WBO-NABO heavyweights titles; Carlos Adames
vS. Paul Valenzuela Jr., 10, super welterweights.
At Madison Square Garden Theater, New York, Demetrius Andrade vs. Artur Akavov, 12, for Andrade’s WBO
middleweight title; Jorge Linares vs. Pablo Cesar Cano,
12, for Linares’ WBC International Silver super lightweight title; Chris Algieri vs. Daniel Gonzalez, 10,
welterweights.
TENNIS
ATP/WTA
BRISBANE INTERNATIONAL
At Queensland Tennis Centre; In Brisbane, Australia
Purse: Men, $501,345 (WT250)
Surface: Hard-Outdoor
MEN’S SINGLES — FIRST ROUND
Denis Kudla, United States, def. Taylor Fritz, United
States, 7-6 (7-5), 6-7 (7-2), 6-4; Andy Murray, Britain,
def. James Duckworth, Australia, 6-3, 6-4; Jeremy
Chardy, France, def. Jan-Lennard Struff, Germany, 4-6,
6-3, 6-4; Nick Kyrgios (8), Australia, def. Ryan Harrison,
United States, 7-6 (7-5), 5-7, 7-6 (7-5); Jo-Wilfried
Tsonga, France, def. Thanasi Kokkinakis, Australia, 7-6
(8-6), 6-4; Jordan Thompson, Australia, def. Alex Bolt,
Australia, 6-3, 6-0; Alex de Minaur (7), Australia, def.
Alexei Popyrin, Australia, 6-2, 6-2.
WOMEN’S SINGLES — FIRST ROUND
Johanna Konta, Britain, def. Sloane Stephens (3), United
States, 6-4, 6-3; Ajla Tomljanovic, Australia, def. Katerina Siniakova, Czech Republic, 1-6, 6-3, 6-0; Anastasija
Sevastova (8), Latvia, def. Daria Gavrilova, Australia,
6-3, 6-3; Petra Kvitova (4), Czech Republic, def. Danielle
Collins, United States, 6-7 (8-6), 7-6 (8-6), 6-3; Aliaksandra Sasnovich, Belarus, def. Anastasia Potapova, Russia, 6-4, 7-5.
WOMEN’S SINGLES — SECOND ROUND
Naomi Osaka (2), Japan, def. Destanee Aiava, Australia,
6-3, 6-2; Lesia Tsurenko, Ukraine, def. Kimberly Birrell,
Australia, 6-4, 6-3.
ATP
QATAR OPEN
At The Khalifa International Tennis & Squash Complex
In Doha, Qatar
Purse: $1.195 million (WT250)
Surface: Hard-Outdoor
SINGLES — FIRST ROUND
Ricardas Berankis, Lithuania, def. David Goffin (6),
Belgium, 3-6, 6-4, 7-6 (7-4); Guido Pella, Argentina, def.
Cem Ilkel, Turkey, 7-6 (7-1), 6-3; Marco Cecchinato (4),
Italy, def. Sergiy Stakhovsky, Ukraine, 6-4, 6-2; Stan
Wawrinka, Switzerland, def. Karen Khachanov (3), Russia, 7-6 (9-7), 6-4; Guillermo Garcia-Lopez, Spain, def.
Mubarak Shannan Zayid, Qatar, 6-1, 6-3; Dusan Lajovic,
Serbia, def. Adrian Mannarino, France, 6-3, 7-6 (7-5);
Novak Djokovic (1), Serbia, def. Damir Dzumhur, BosniaHerzegovina, 6-1, 6-2; Marton Fucsovics, Hungary, def.
Marius Copil, Romania, 6-3, 6-2; Pierre-Hugues Herbert,
France, def. Dominic Thiem (2), Austria, 6-3, 7-5.
MAHARASHTRA OPEN
At Mhalunge Balewadi Tennis Complex; In Pune, India
Purse: $501,345 (WT250)
Surface: Hard-Outdoor
SINGLES — FIRST ROUND
Ivo Karlovic, Croatia, def. Felix Auger-Aliassime, Canada, 6-4, 7-5; Simone Bolelli, Italy, def. Denis Istomin,
Uzbekistan, 6-4, 6-4; Ilya Ivashka, Belarus, def. Hubert
Hurkacz, Poland, 6-7 (11-9), 6-2, 6-3; Benoit Paire (5),
France, def. Saketh Myneni, India, 7-6 (7-5), 6-3; Jiri
Vesely, Czech Republic, def. Antoine Hoang, France, 4-6,
6-4, 6-4; Ramkumar Ramanathan, India, def. Marcel
Granollers, Spain, 4-6, 6-4, 6-3; Laslo Djere, Serbia, def.
Arjun Kadhe, India, 7-5, 7-6 (8-6).
WTA
SHENZHEN OPEN
At Longgang Tennis Center; In Shenzhen, China
Purse: $750,000 (Intl.)
Surface: Hard-Outdoor
SINGLES — FIRST ROUND
Kristyna Pliskova, Czech Republic, def. Peng Shuai,
China, 3-6, 7-6 (8-6), 3-3 retired; Monica Niculescu,
Romania, def. Jelena Ostapenko (4), Latvia, 6-0, 6-2.
SINGLES — SECOND ROUND
Vera Zvonareva, Russia, def. Ivana Jorovic, Serbia, 7-5,
4-6, 6-4; Sorana Cirstea, Romania, def. Pauline Parmentier, France, 6-2, 6-2; Alison Riske, United States, def.
Evgeniya Rodina, Russia, 4-6, 6-2, 6-3; Veronika Kudermetova, Russia, def. Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova (8),
Russia, 6-2, 1-6, 6-2.
JAN. 19
At MGM Grand, Las Vegas (SHO), Manny Pacquiao vs.
Adrien Broner, 12, for Pacquiao’s WBA welterweight
title; Badou Jack vs. Marcus Browne, 12, for the WBA
interim light heavyweight title; Rau’shee Warren vs.
Nordine Oubaali, 12, for the vacant WBC bantamweight
title; Jhack Tepora vs. Hugo Ruiz, 12, featherweights.
JAN. 26
At Barclays Center, New York (FOX), Keith Thurman vs.
Josesito Lopez, 12, for Thurman’s WBA Super World
welterweight title; Adam Kownacki vs. Gerald Washington, 10, heavyweights.
At Toyota Center, Houston, Jaime Munguia vs. Takeshi
Inoue, 12, for Munguia’s WBO junior middleweight title;
Jesus Rojas vs. Xu Can, 12, for Rojas’ WBA featherweight title; Lucas Fernandez vs. Joshua Franco, rematch, 10, bantamweights; Joshua Franco vs. Lucas
Fernandez, 10, for the vacant NABF bantamweight title;
Vergil Ortiz Jr. vs. Abraham Cordero, 10, super lightweights.
AUCKLAND OPEN
At ASB Bank Tennis Centre; In Auckland, New Zealand
Purse: $226,750 (Intl.)
Surface: Hard-Outdoor
SINGLES — FIRST ROUND
Sofia Kenin, United States, def. Petra Martic (4), Croatia,
7-5, 2-6, 6-2; Kirsten Flipkens (7), Belgium, def. Sachia
Vickery, United States, 6-2, 6-2; Barbora Strycova (5),
Czech Republic, def. Taylor Townsend, United States, 6-2,
6-7 (7-5), 6-3; Hsieh Su-wei (3), Taiwan, def. Polona
Hercog, Slovenia, 6-2, 6-3; Bibiane Schoofs, Netherlands,
def. Alison Van Uytvanck (8), Belgium, 3-4 retired; Julia
Goerges (2), Germany, def. Johanna Larsson, Sweden,
6-0, 6-4; Mona Barthel, Germany, def. Silvia Soler-Espinosa, Spain, 6-2, 7-6 (1); Venus Williams (6), United
States, def. Victoria Azarenka, Belarus, 6-3, 1-6, 6-3;
Amanda Anisimova, United States, def. Jana Cepelova,
Slovakia, 6-2, 3-0 retired; Bianca Andreescu, Canada, def.
Timea Babos, Hungary, 6-4, 7-6 (8-6).
FEB. 2
At Ford Center, Frisco, Texas (ESPN), Eleider Alvarez vs.
Sergey Kovalev, 12, for Alvarez’s WBO light heavyweight title; Richard Commey vs. Isa Chaniev, 12, for
vacant IBF lightweight title.
FEB. 9
At StubHub Center, Carson, Calif. (SHO), Gervonta Davis
vs. Abner Mares, 12, for Davis’ WBA featherweight title.
FEB. 16
At Los Angeles (FOX), Leo Santa Cruz vs. Miguel Flores,
12, for Santa Cruz’s WBA featherweight title; Omar
Figueroa Jr. vs. John Molina Jr., 10, welterweights.
FEB. 23
At Minneapolis Armory (FS1), Anthony Dirrell vs. Avni
Yildirim, 12, for the vacant WBC super middleweight
title.
BASEBALL
MLB calendar
Jan. 11: Salary arbitration figures exchanged.
Jan. 22: BBWAA Hall of Fame voting announced.
Jan. 28-Feb. 15: Salary arbitration hearings, St. Petersburg, Fla.
Feb. 6-8: Owners’ meetings, Orlando, Fla.
Feb. 10: Voluntary reporting date for Oakland pitchers,
catchers and injured players.
Feb. 11: Voluntary reporting date for Seattle pitchers,
catchers and injured players.
Feb. 13: Voluntary reporting date for other teams’
pitchers, catchers and injured players.
H OC K E Y
NHL
EASTERN CONFERENCE
ATLANTIC
W
Toronto ........................................28
x-Philadelphia ..............................23
Boston..........................................21
Brooklyn .......................................17
New York........................................9
L
11
14
15
21
29
Pct
.718
.622
.583
.447
.237
GB
—
4
51/2
101/2
181/2
SOUTHEAST
W
Charlotte ......................................18
Miami ...........................................17
Orlando.........................................16
Washington .................................14
Atlanta .........................................11
L
18
18
20
23
25
Pct
.500
.486
.444
.378
.306
GB
—
CENTRAL
W
Milwaukee ...................................26
Indiana .........................................25
Detroit..........................................16
Chicago.........................................10
Cleveland........................................8
L
10
12
19
27
29
Pct
.722
.676
.457
.270
.216
GB
—
11/2
91/2
161/2
181/2
SOUTHWEST
W
Houston........................................21
San Antonio .................................21
Memphis ......................................18
Dallas ...........................................17
New Orleans ................................17
L
15
17
18
19
21
Pct
.583
.553
.500
.472
.447
GB
—
1
3
4
5
NORTHWEST
W
Denver..........................................24
Oklahoma City..............................23
Portland .......................................22
Utah..............................................18
Minnesota....................................17
L
11
13
16
20
20
Pct
.686
.639
.579
.474
.459
GB
—
11/2
31/2
71/2
8
PACIFIC
W
Golden State ................................25
x-L.A. Clippers..............................21
L.A. Lakers ...................................21
Sacramento..................................19
Phoenix ..........................................9
L
13
15
16
18
29
Pct
.658
.583
.568
.514
.237
GB
—
3
31/2
51/2
1
1/
2
2
41/2
7
WESTERN CONFERENCE
x-Late game
MONDAY’S RESULTS
at Indiana 116, Atlanta 108
at Charlotte 125, Orlando 100
at Houston 113, Memphis 101
at San Antonio 120, Boston 111
at New Orleans 123, Minnesota 114
at Oklahoma City 122, Dallas 102
Golden State 132, at Phoenix 109
TUESDAY’S RESULTS
at Toronto 122, Utah 116
at Milwaukee 121, Detroit 98
at Denver 115, New York 108
Portland 113, at Sacramento 108, OT
Philadelphia at L.A. Clippers, Late
W
31
26
22
21
21
17
15
15
L OT Pts GF GA
7
2 64 168 117
11
2 54 144 109
14
4 48 114 105
13
6 48 115 115
14
5 47 128 128
15
6 40 124 134
19
7 37 115 140
21
4 34 126 159
METROPOLITAN
GP
Washington ................. 38
Columbus ..................... 39
Pittsburgh.................... 39
N.Y. Islanders............... 38
N.Y. Rangers ................ 38
Carolina ........................ 38
New Jersey .................. 38
Philadelphia ................. 39
W
24
23
21
21
17
16
15
15
L OT Pts GF GA
11
3 51 138 112
13
3 49 129 119
12
6 48 133 115
13
4 46 114 102
14
7 41 111 123
17
5 37 94 109
16
7 37 113 127
19
5 35 111 140
WESTERN CONFERENCE
CENTRAL
GP
Winnipeg...................... 39
Nashville ...................... 41
Colorado ....................... 40
Dallas ........................... 40
Minnesota.................... 38
Chicago......................... 42
St. Louis ....................... 37
W
25
24
19
20
18
15
15
L OT Pts GF GA
12
2 52 134 111
15
2 50 124 104
13
8 46 134 123
16
4 44 108 106
17
3 39 110 108
21
6 36 121 153
18
4 34 102 123
PACIFIC
GP
Calgary ......................... 40
Vegas ........................... 43
San Jose....................... 41
Anaheim....................... 41
Vancouver .................... 42
Edmonton..................... 39
Arizona......................... 39
Los Angeles.................. 41
W
24
24
21
19
19
18
17
16
L OT Pts GF GA
12
4 52 141 112
15
4 52 130 115
13
7 49 140 129
15
7 45 102 120
19
4 42 124 133
18
3 39 111 126
20
2 36 100 112
22
3 35 92 121
MONDAY’S RESULTS
Nashville 6, at Washington 3
at New Jersey 4, Vancouver 0
at Carolina 3, Philadelphia 1
Pittsburgh 3, at Minnesota 2
N.Y. Islanders 3, at Buffalo 1
N.Y. Rangers 2, at St. Louis 1
at Columbus 6, Ottawa 3
Florida 4, at Detroit 3, SO
Tampa Bay 2, at Anaheim 1, OT
Los Angeles 3, at Colorado 2, OT
Montreal 3, at Dallas 2, OT
at Calgary 8, San Jose 5
Winnipeg 4, at Edmonton 3
TUESDAY’S RESULTS
Boston 4, at Chicago 2, at Notre Dame Stadium
at Nashville 4, Philadelphia 0
at Vegas 2, Los Angeles 0
WEDNESDAY’S GAMES
WEDNESDAY’S GAMES
Atlanta at Washington, 7
Dallas at Charlotte, 7
Miami at Cleveland, 7
New Orleans at Brooklyn, 7:30
Detroit at Memphis, 8
Minnesota at Boston, 8
Orlando at Chicago, 8
Philadelphia at Phoenix, 9
Oklahoma City at L.A. Lakers, 10:30
Pittsburgh at N.Y. Rangers, 7
Calgary at Detroit, 7
Vancouver at Ottawa, 7
New Jersey at Dallas, 8:30
Edmonton at Arizona, 9:30
San Jose at Colorado, 9:30
THURSDAY’S GAMES
THURSDAY’S GAMES
Toronto at San Antonio, 8
Denver at Sacramento, 10
Houston at Golden State, 10:30
Raptors 122, Jazz 116
UTAH .................................. 24
TORONTO ........................... 26
ATLANTIC
GP
Tampa Bay ................... 40
Toronto ........................ 39
Boston.......................... 40
Buffalo ......................... 40
Montreal ...................... 40
Florida .......................... 38
Detroit.......................... 41
Ottawa ......................... 40
29
25
32
44
31 — 116
27 — 122
Washington at St. Louis, 8
Minnesota at Toronto, 2
Carolina at Philadelphia, 7
Florida at Buffalo, 7
Calgary at Boston, 7
Chicago vs. N.Y. Islanders at Nassau Veterans Memorial
Coliseum, 7:30
Vancouver at Montreal, 7:30
Tampa Bay at Los Angeles, 10:30
UTAH: Ingles 0-5 2-3 2, Favors 8-12 5-8 21, Gobert 6-7
4-5 16, Rubio 6-17 2-3 14, Mitchell 7-23 3-3 19, Crowder
9-15 7-7 30, O’Neale 0-0 0-0 0, Sefolosha 1-3 0-0 3, Exum
4-11 0-0 8, Korver 1-4 0-0 3. Totals 42-97 23-29 116.
Bruins 4, Blackhawks 2
TORONTO: Leonard 16-22 13-17 45, Siakam 9-15 7-7 28,
Ibaka 3-10 1-4 8, VanVleet 3-5 1-2 8, Green 1-4 0-0 2, Miles
0-0 0-0 0, Powell 6-11 0-0 14, Anunoby 1-2 0-0 2, Monroe
2-5 3-4 7, Wright 4-8 0-1 8. Totals 45-82 25-35 122.
FIRST PERIOD
Three-point Goals: Utah 9-32 (Crowder 5-7, Mitchell 2-8,
Sefolosha 1-2, Korver 1-4, Favors 0-2, Rubio 0-4, Ingles 0-5),
Toronto 7-20 (Siakam 3-4, Powell 2-4, VanVleet 1-2, Ibaka
1-3, Wright 0-2, Green 0-2, Leonard 0-3). Fouled Out: None.
Rebounds: Utah 43 (Favors, Gobert 9), Toronto 45 (Siakam
10). Assists: Utah 23 (Rubio 8), Toronto 18 (VanVleet 5).
Total Fouls: Utah 27, Toronto 21. Technicals: Toronto coach
Raptors (Defensive three second). A: 19,800 (19,800).
Bucks 121, Pistons 98
DETROIT ............................. 27
MILWAUKEE ...................... 35
25
33
21
24
25 — 98
29 — 121
DETROIT: Bullock 2-8 0-1 6, Griffin 9-20 7-7 29,
Drummond 6-12 3-5 15, Jackson 8-10 1-1 19, B.Brown
0-7 0-0 0, Leuer 3-5 0-0 6, Calderon 0-5 0-0 0, Galloway
0-7 0-0 0, Kennard 3-10 0-0 8, Robinson III 1-2 0-0 2,
Thomas 3-6 5-7 13. Totals 35-92 16-21 98.
MILWAUKEE: Middleton 9-14 3-4 22, Antetokounmpo
6-11 3-5 15, Lopez 7-13 4-5 25, Bledsoe 7-14 4-4 18,
Brogdon 6-7 0-0 13, J.Smith 0-1 0-0 0, Wilson 0-2 0-0 0,
Maker 1-2 1-3 3, Hill 3-4 2-5 8, DiVincenzo 0-0 0-0 0,
S.Brown 2-3 0-0 4, Snell 4-5 0-0 9, Connaughton 2-3 0-0
4. Totals 47-79 17-26 121.
Three-point Goals: Detroit 12-33 (Griffin 4-9, Thomas
2-2, Jackson 2-3, Kennard 2-4, Bullock 2-5, B.Brown 0-1,
Leuer 0-1, Calderon 0-4, Galloway 0-4), Milwaukee 10-27
(Lopez 7-12, Snell 1-2, Brogdon 1-2, Middleton 1-4, Hill
0-1, Maker 0-1, S.Brown 0-1, Antetokounmpo 0-1,
Wilson 0-1, Bledsoe 0-2). Fouled Out: None. Rebounds:
Detroit 43 (Leuer, Griffin 9), Milwaukee 43 (Antetokounmpo 8). Assists: Detroit 23 (Griffin 4), Milwaukee 28
(Antetokounmpo 7). Total Fouls: Detroit 26, Milwaukee
19. Technicals: Detroit coach Pistons (Defensive three
second), Milwaukee coach Bucks (Defensive three second) 2, Maker, Lopez. A: 17,534 (17,500).
BOSTON ................................... 1
CHICAGO .................................. 1
1
1
2 —
0 —
4
2
Scoring: 1, Chicago, Perlini 5 (Sikura, Kampf), 8:30. 2,
Boston, Pastrnak 24 (Bergeron), 12:38 (pp).
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 3, Chicago, Kahun 5 (Gustafsson, Toews), 11:24.
4, Boston, Bergeron 13 (Pastrnak, Krug), 18:48 (pp).
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 5, Boston, Kuraly 4 (Wagner, Grzelcyk), 10:20.
6, Boston, Marchand 13 (Krejci), 19:27.
SHOTS ON GOAL
BOSTON ................................. 14
10
12 — 36
CHICAGO ................................ 12
16
10 — 38
Power-play opportunities: Boston 2 of 5; Chicago 0 of 4.
Goalies: Boston, Rask 10-8-2 (38 shots-36 saves).
Chicago, Ward 6-7-4 (35-32). A: 76,126 (77,622). T: 2:37.
Predators 4, Flyers 0
PHILADELPHIA ........................ 0
NASHVILLE .............................. 0
0
2
0 —
2 —
0
4
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Nashville, Smith 11 (Fiala), 2:03. 2, Nashville,
Arvidsson 10 (Hartman, Johansen), 12:03.
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 3, Nashville, Arvidsson 11 (Ellis), 6:15. 4,
Nashville, Grimaldi 3 (Rinaldo), 11:37.
SHOTS ON GOAL
PHILADELPHIA ...................... 13
12
7 — 32
NASHVILLE .............................. 6
16
8 — 30
Power-play opportunities: Philadelphia 0 of 2; Nashville
0 of 2. Goalies: Philadelphia, Neuvirth 1-3-1 (30 shots-26
saves). Nashville, Saros 9-5-1 (32-32).
Golden Knights 2, Kings 0
Nuggets 115, Knicks 108
NEW YORK ......................... 32
DENVER .............................. 28
24
27
28
27
LOS ANGELES .......................... 0
VEGAS ..................................... 0
24 — 108
33 — 115
NEW YORK: Knox 7-16 2-3 18, Vonleh 2-8 1-1 5, Kornet
6-9 3-3 19, Mudiay 7-20 0-2 15, Hardaway Jr. 7-12 1-1 16,
Kanter 6-11 5-6 17, Ntilikina 4-6 0-0 10, Trier 3-9 0-0 7,
Dotson 0-2 1-2 1. Totals 42-93 13-18 108.
DENVER: Hernangomez 2-4 2-2 8, Jokic 8-16 2-3 19, Plumlee
4-5 0-0 8, Murray 4-12 0-0 8, Craig 5-10 1-2 13, Millsap 6-13
4-10 16, Lyles 4-7 0-0 9, Morris 2-8 0-0 5, Beasley 8-15 2-2 23,
Harris 1-5 4-4 6. Totals 44-95 15-23 115.
Three-point Goals: New York 11-27 (Kornet 4-7, Ntilikina 2-3, Knox 2-7, Trier 1-1, Mudiay 1-2, Hardaway Jr. 1-4,
Dotson 0-1, Vonleh 0-2), Denver 12-34 (Beasley 5-9,
Hernangomez 2-4, Craig 2-5, Jokic 1-2, Lyles 1-3, Morris
1-4, Murray 0-3, Millsap 0-4). Fouled Out: None. Rebounds: New York 43 (Vonleh 14), Denver 53 (Jokic 14).
Assists: New York 28 (Mudiay 9), Denver 36 (Jokic 15).
Total Fouls: New York 21, Denver 19. A: 19,520 (19,520).
Trail Blazers 113, Kings 108 (OT)
PORTLAND .................... 26
SACRAMENTO .............. 25
38
25
19
27
20
26
10 — 113
5 — 108
PORTLAND: Harkless 5-10 0-0 11, Aminu 4-9 2-2 13, Nurkic
5-10 14-16 24, Lillard 8-21 8-8 25, McCollum 8-19 0-2 16,
Collins 2-7 0-0 4, Leonard 0-2 0-0 0, Curry 6-9 2-2 18,
Stauskas 0-2 0-0 0, Turner 1-1 0-0 2. Totals 39-90 26-30 113.
SACRAMENTO: Shumpert 4-11 0-0 9, Bjelica 4-12 5-7 14,
Cauley-Stein 2-14 1-2 5, Fox 6-19 1-1 13, Hield 11-23 0-0 27,
Jackson 2-6 0-0 5, Giles III 3-5 0-0 6, Koufos 1-2 0-0 2, Ferrell
4-4 0-0 8, Bogdanovic 7-19 2-2 19. Totals 44-115 9-12 108.
Three-point Goals: Portland 9-32 (Curry 4-6, Aminu 3-5,
Harkless 1-2, Lillard 1-9, Stauskas 0-2, Collins 0-3,
McCollum 0-5), Sacramento 11-33 (Hield 5-8, Bogdanovic 3-11, Jackson 1-4, Shumpert 1-4, Bjelica 1-5, Fox
0-1). Fouled Out: Bjelica. Rebounds: Portland 56 (Nurkic
23), Sacramento 53 (Bjelica 16). Assists: Portland 22
(Nurkic 7), Sacramento 24 (Bogdanovic 5). Total Fouls:
Portland 19, Sacramento 23. A: 17,583 (17,608).
NCAA men
TUESDAY’S RESULTS
EAST
San Diego St. 65, CSU Northridge 60
No. 10 Virginia Tech 81,
Notre Dame 66
Notre Dame (10-4)
Durham 1-2 0-0 2, Mooney 3-4 2-4 9, Hubb 1-10 0-0 3, Gibbs
6-13 2-3 19, Harvey 6-13 3-6 16, Laszewski 5-9 0-0 14,
Nelligan 0-0 0-0 0, Goodwin 1-5 0-0 3. 23-56 Totals 7-13 66.
Virginia Tech (12-1)
Blackshear 9-18 2-2 21, Alexander-Walker 7-8 2-3 17, Hill
7-8 0-0 17, Robinson 3-9 0-0 7, Bede 1-2 0-0 3, Horne 1-1 0-0
2, Wilkins 0-0 0-0 0, Outlaw 5-9 0-0 14. Totals 33-55 4-5 81.
Halftime: Virginia Tech 30-28. Three-point goals: Notre
Dame 13-34 (Gibbs 5-10, Laszewski 4-8, Mooney 1-1,
Goodwin 1-2, Harvey 1-5, Hubb 1-8), Virginia Tech 11-18
(Outlaw 4-7, Hill 3-4, Alexander-Walker 1-1, Blackshear
1-2, Robinson 1-2, Bede 1-2). Fouled out: Durham .
Rebounds: Notre Dame 30 (Mooney 10), Virginia Tech 24
(Blackshear 7). Assists: Notre Dame 13 (Gibbs 4),
Virginia Tech 19 (Robinson 8). Total fouls: Notre Dame
10, Virginia Tech 13. A: 8,008 (10,052).
0
2
SHOTS ON GOAL
LOS ANGELES .......................... 8
4
5 — 17
VEGAS ..................................... 9
18
21 — 48
Power-play opportunities: Los Angeles 0 of 2; Vegas 0 of
3. Goalies: Los Angeles, Campbell 5-8-0 (47 shots-46
saves). Vegas, Fleury 23-10-4 (17-17). A: 18,319
(17,367). T: 2:22.
Flames 8, Sharks 5
Late Monday
SAN JOSE ................................ 1
CALGARY ................................. 3
2
2
2 —
3 —
5
8
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Calgary, Backlund 7 (Tkachuk, Frolik), 1:10. 2,
San Jose, Radil 4 (Couture, Meier), 6:53. 3, Calgary,
Backlund 8 (Tkachuk, Frolik), 10:55. 4, Calgary, Tkachuk
17 (Giordano, Monahan), 17:24 (pp).
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 5, San Jose, Burns 6 (Pavelski), 3:55 (pp). 6,
Calgary, Tkachuk 18 (Gaudreau, Monahan), 10:47. 7, San
Jose, Donskoi 8 (Kane, Hertl), 18:22. 8, Calgary, Lindholm 18 (Monahan, Gaudreau), 19:33.
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 9, San Jose, Donskoi 9 (E.Karlsson, Kane), 0:48.
10, Calgary, Neal 4 (Bennett, Hanifin), 3:00. 11, Calgary,
Gaudreau 20 (Lindholm, Monahan), 5:48. 12, Calgary,
Gaudreau 21 (Monahan, Lindholm), 6:29. 13, San Jose,
Thornton 6 (E.Karlsson, Burns), 13:15 (pp).
SHOTS ON GOAL
SAN JOSE .............................. 11
13
9 — 33
CALGARY ................................. 9
7
11 — 27
Power-play opportunities: San Jose 2 of 4; Calgary 1 of 4.
Goalies: San Jose, Dell 5-5-3 (27 shots-19 saves).
Calgary, Rittich 13-4-3 (33-28). A: 19,289 (19,289). T:
2:45.
TR ANS AC TI ONS
SOUTH
WEST
0 —
2 —
Scoring: 1, Vegas, Pirri 6 (Eakin, Schmidt), 3:43 (pp). 2,
Vegas, Tuch 14 (Pirri, Engelland), 19:27.
St. John’s 89, Marquette 69
Florida St. 87, Winthrop 76
Radford 80, Mars Hill 51
Virginia Tech 81, Notre Dame 66
0
0
THIRD PERIOD
NFL
Chicago Bears: Signed QB Tyler Bray to the practice
squad. Released OL Willie Beavers from the practice
squad.
Cincinnati Bengals: Signed K Tristan Vizcaino to a
reserve/future contract.
Detroit Lions: Signed QB Connor Cook to a reserve/future contract. Announced the are not renewing offensive
coordinator Jim Bob Cooter’s contract.
Miami Dolphins: Signed LB James Burgess, C Connor
Hilland, S Chris Lammons, DT Jamiyus Pittman, LB
Quentin Poling and DE Jeremiah Valoaga to reserve/future contracts.
Oakland Raiders: Signed WR Saeed Blacknall, RB James
Butler, LB Cayson Collins, LB James Cowser, WR
Rashard Davis, DB Makinton Dorleant, P Drew Kaser, OT
Jamar McGloster, QB Nathan Peterman and FB Ryan
Yurachek to reserve/future contracts.
NHL
Carolins Hurricanes: Recalled F Saku Maenalanen from
Charlotte (AHL). Reassigned F Janne Kuokkanen to
Charlotte.
New Jersey Devils: Placed F Taylor Hall on injured
reserve, retroactive to Dec. 23. Recalled D Egor Yakovlev
and F Blake Pietila from Binghamton (AHL).
COLLEGES
NCAA women
TUESDAY’S RESULT
EAST
George Washington 51, Memphis 38
North Carolina State: Announced junior WR Jakobi
Meyers will enter the NFL draft.
Oklahoma: Agreed to terms with Lincoln Riley football
coach on a contract extension.
Stanford: Announced junior TE Kaden Smith will enter
the NFL draft.
EFGHI
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Bids & Proposals
825
Bids & Proposals
INVITATION FOR BID
188733/CABW/2018
The Chief of the Brazilian Aeronautical Commission in
Washington D.C. (“BACW”), located at 1701 22nd Street, N.W.
- Washington, D.C. 20008 –USA, hereby notifies, to whom
it may concern, that the BACW shall carry out a Bidding
Process, to be awarded based on the LOWEST GLOBAL
PRICE POR PROJECT for the contracting of a company for
the procurement of consumable items, commodities for
use in the general overhaul, repair or exchange all cell
components, equipment handling and transportation, in
order to fulfill scheduled and unscheduled maintenance for
the COMAER’S aircraft, both for the aircraft itself, as well as
off-wing components of all repairable items in the aircraft,
for AIPC, CMM, all aircraft systems and any other parts
catalogue which mentions the aircrafts C-105 (C2), C/P95, C-98, F-5, H-60, P-3, T-25, T-27, G-19, in accordance
with terms, quantities, and other applicable requirements
established in the solicitation package.
Open session for the receipt of the Qualification Documents
and Price Proposals shall be held on February 4, 2019 at
9:00 a.m. EST at the BACW.
Additional information regarding this Bidding Process may
be obtained from the BACW’s Bidding Department in Washington D.C. from Monday to Friday between 08:30 am and
03:00 pm (EST).
1405
Cars
VOLVO
VOLVO 2004 C70 - Black on silver,
gorgeous convertible, excellent
condition, runs great, 150k miles.
$2,500. Call 214-808-4812
1408
Antiques & Classics
CHEVROLET 1962 CORVETTE Orignial
numbers matching, 327/340, white
with black interior, 4 speed, 2 tops,
engine rebuilt, complete mechanical
front end rebuilt, including fuel and
brakes, $62,000. 703-759-0783
1447
Autos Wanted
DONATE YOUR AUTO, TRUCK, SUV,
RV. Lutheran Mission Society Compassion Place helps local families
with food, clothing, shelter. Tax
deductible. MVA License#W1044.
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Career Training - Emp Svcs
AIRLINES ARE HIRING-Get
FAA approved hands on
Aviation training. Financial aid
for qualified students – Career
placement assistance.
CALL Aviation Institute of
Maintenance
888-896-7869
820
Official Notices
ABC LICENSE: Andy's Pizza, LLC
trading as Andy's Pizza, 2051 International Drive, Space 3 (Market)
McLean (Fairfax County) Virginia
22102-3909. The above establishment is applying to the VIRGINIA
DEPARTMENT OF ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE CONTROL (ABC) for a Wine
and Beer On; Mixed Beverage seating capacity:151 or more license
to sell or manufacture alcoholic
beverages. Andrew Brown, Member NOTE: Objections to the issuance
of this license must be submitted to
ABC no later than 30 days from the
publishing date of the first of two
required newspaper legal notices.
Objections should be registered at
www.abc.virginia.gov or 800-5523200.
ABC LICENSE: Sen Khao, LLC trading as SenKhao, 2051 International
Drive, Space 7 (Market) McLean
(Fairfax County) Virginia 221023909. The above establishment is
applying to the VIRGINIA DEPARTMENT OF ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE
CONTROL (ABC) for a Wine and
Beer On; Mixed Beverage seating
capacity:151 or more license to sell
or manufacture alcoholic beverages.
Bounprachanh
Souvannavong, Member NOTE: Objections
to the issuance of this license must
be submitted to ABC no later than
30 days from the publishing date of
the first of two required newspaper
legal notices. Objections should be
registered at www.abc.virginia.gov
or 800-552-3200.
ABC LICENSE: Family Dollar Stores
of Virginia, Inc. trading as Family
Dollar #6070, 2900 Dale Blvd., Dale
City (Prince William County), Virginia 22193. The above establishment is applying to the VIRGINIA
DEPARTMENT OF ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE CONTROL (ABC) AUTHORITY
for a Wine and Beer Off Premises license to sell or manufacture
alcoholic beverages. Lonnie Wayne
McCaffety, President; Sandra Loftis
Boscia, Assistant Secretary; William
Abner Old, Jr., Secretary NOTE:
Objections to the issuance of this
license must be submitted to ABC no
later than 30 days from the publishing date of the first of two required
newspaper legal notices. Objections
should be registered at www.abc.virginia.gov or 800-552-3200.
ABC LICENSE: Donburi Tysons, LLC
trading as Donburi, 2051 International Drive, Space 5 (Market)
McLean (Fairfax County) Virginia
22102-3909. The above establishment is applying to the VIRGINIA
DEPARTMENT OF ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE CONTROL (ABC) for a Wine
and Beer On; Mixed Beverage seating capacity:151 or more license to
sell or manufacture alcoholic beverages. Seung Joon Jang, Member
NOTE: Objections to the issuance of
this license must be submitted to
ABC no later than 30 days from the
publishing date of the first of two
required newspaper legal notices.
Objections should be registered at
www.abc.virginia.gov or 800-5523200.
ABC LICENSE: Stomping Ground
Tysons, LLC trading as Stomping
Ground, 2051 International Drive,
Space 1 (Market) McLean (Fairfax
County) Virginia 22102-3909. The
above establishment is applying to
the VIRGINIA DEPARTMENT OF
ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE CONTROL
(ABC) for a Wine and Beer On; Mixed
Beverage seating capacity:151 or
more license to sell or manufacture
alcoholic beverages. Nicole Brown,
Member NOTE: Objections to the
issuance of this license must be
submitted to ABC no later than 30
days from the publishing date of the
first of two required newspaper
legal notices. Objections should be
820
Official Notices
registered at www.abc.virginia.gov
or 800-552-3200.
825
Bids & Proposals
Capitol Paving of D.C., Inc.
Capitol Paving is soliciting qualified
vendors and subcontractors for
citywide rehabilitation of sidewalks
including curb and gutter, wheelchair ramps, driveways and alley
entrances at various DC locations.
Contract #: DCKA-2019-B-0005.
Email – bids@capitolpaving.com;
Call – 202 529-7225 or fax – 202
832-4642 – Bid Opening 1/10/2019.
850
Montgomery County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR MONTGOMERY COUNTY
MARYLAND
DIANE S. ROSENBERG
MARK D. MEYER
JOHN A. ANSELL, III
JENNIFER ROCHINO
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway
Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiff(s)
v.
SIAMAK pAYDAR
10 Plummer Court
Germantown, MD 20876
Defendant(s)
Case No. 451793V
NOTICE
Notice is hereby given this 17th
day of December 2018, by the Circuit Court for Montgomery County, Maryland, that the sale of 10
Plummer Court, Germantown, MD
20876, made and reported, will
be ratified and confirmed, unless
cause to the contrary thereof be
shown on or before the 16th day
of January, 2019, provided a copy
of this notice be inserted in a
daily newspaper printed in said
County, once in each of three
successive weeks before the 16th
day of January, 2019. The Report
of Sale states the amount of the
foreclosure sale price to be
$367,225.00.
Barbara H. Meiklejohn
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Montgomery County, MD
Dec 26,Jan 2,9,2019
12228790
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR MONTGOMERY COUNTY
MARYLAND
STEPHEN B. JACKSON and
STEVEN P. HENNE
Substituted Trustees
Plaintiffs
v.
ESTATE OF EDITH EVANS
Defendant
Civil Action No. 414141V
NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 20th
day of December, 2018, by the Circuit Court for Montgomery County, Maryland, that the sale of the
property known as 18616 Walkers
Choice Road, Unit 2, Montgomery
Village, Maryland 20886, made by
Stephen B. Jackson and Steven P.
Henne, Substituted Trustees, to:
Sara Assadullah and reported in
the above-entitled cause be ratified and confirmed unless cause to
the contrary thereof be shown on
or before the 22nd day of January,
2019, provided a copy of this
NOTICE be inserted in some newspaper published in said Montgomery County, once a week for
three consecutive weeks on or
before the said 22nd day of January,
2019.
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $105,000.00.
Barbara H. Meiklejohn
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Montgomery County, Maryland
Attorney Louis S.Pettey, Esq
Heise Jorgensen & Stefanelli P.A.
18310 Montgomery Village
Avenue, Suite 400
Gaithersburg, MD 20879
(301) 977-8400
Dec 26, Jan 2,9,2019
12229314
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Trustees Sale - DC
840
Trustees Sale - DC
ALEX COOPER AUCTS., INC.
4910 MASSACHUSETTS AVE., NW #100
WASHINGTON, DC 20016 202-364-0306
WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM
Excellent part-time income!
Reliable transportation required.
825
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SALE OF 318 Cape Drive SE, Washington, DC 20019
Pursuant to the June 1, 2018 Court Order in DuPont
Commons Homeowners Association, Inc., v Murray; 2017
CA 007645 R(RP), (District of Columbia Superior Court), the
Notice of Foreclosure Sale for Unpaid HOA Assessments
dated December 12, 2018, and at the request of the
Attorney for the DuPont Commons Homeowners Association, Inc. (the “Association”), we shall sell at public auction
on the January 17, 2019 at 10:47 a.m., within the office
of Alex Cooper Auctioneers, Inc. at 4910 Massachusetts
Ave., NW #100, Washington, DC 20016, the following
described premises situated in the District of Columbia and
designated as and being:
Lot 0129, in Square 5402 in a subdivision made by
WIN/Enterprise Fort Dupont Nehemiah Homes, Inc., as per
plat recorded in Liber 190 at folio 37 among the Records
of the Office of the Surveyor of the District of Columbia.
Premises known as:
318 Cape Drive SE
Washington, District of Columbia 20019
Parcel ID: Square 5402, Lot 0129
TOGETHER WITH all the appurtenances incident to said
Unit, as contained in said Declaration of the Association.
The Declaration was recorded with the DC Recorder of
Deeds on August 2, 2002.
SUBJECT, HOWEVER, to all the provisions, restrictions,
easements liens, and conditions of record, including but
not limited to those contained in prior deeds, said Declaration of Association and the Bylaws relating thereto, or in
law or equity.
TERMS OF SALE: Sold subject to a Deed of Trust that
was recorded on January 22, 2008 in the amount of
$184,000.00. Also sold subject to any real estate taxes
if any and any other prior liens, encumbrances and
municipal assessments if any, further particulars of which
will be announced at time of sale. Property is sold “asis, where-is”, without warranty. A deposit of $10,000.00
will be required at time of sale, such deposit to be in
cash, certified check, or in such other form as DuPont
Commons Homeowners Association in its sole discretion
may determine. All conveyances, recordings, recordation
tax, transfer tax, etc. shall be at purchaser’s cost. All
adjustments made as of date of sale. The balance of
the purchase price, together with interest at the rate of
10% per annum from date of sale to date of receipt of
the balance of the purchase price, must be paid in cash
or by cashier’s or certified check and all other terms to
be complied with within 30 days, otherwise deposit is
forfeited and the property may be re-advertised and resold
at the discretion of the Association and at the risk and cost
of the defaulting purchaser. In the event of failure on the
part of the DuPont Commons Homeowners Association
to convey such deed purchaser’s sole remedy shall be
a return of the deposit. The Association shall convey
a deed pursuant to the June 1, 2018 Order in DuPont
Commons Homeowners Association, Inc., v Murray; 2017
CA 007645 R(RP) (District of Columbia Superior Court),
and makes no further representations or warranties as to
title. The Association does not guarantee clear title or
the purchaser’s ability to obtain title insurance. For this
reason, the purchase may not be able to obtain financing
and must be able to pay the purchase balance in any case
within 30 days.
Contact Attorney for Danbury Station
Homeowners Association, Inc.:
Aaron Sokolow 202-269-3333/Aaron@SokolowLaw.com
Washington Post
Jan. 2, 9, 16, 2019
12229703
ALEX COOPER AUCTS., INC.
4910 MASSACHUSETTS AVE., NW #100
WASHINGTON, DC 20016 202-364-0306
WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM
SALE OF 53 DANBURY STREET, SW, WASHINGTON, DC
20032
Pursuant to the October 29, 2018 Court Order in Danbury
Station Homeowners Association v. Robinson; 2018 CA
001741 R(RP), the Notice of Foreclosure Sale for Unpaid
HOA Assessments, dated December 6, 2018, and at
the request of the Attorney for the Danbury Station
Homeowners Association, Inc. (the “Association”), we shall
sell at public auction on January 17, 2019 at 10:45
am, within the office of Alex Cooper Auctioneers, Inc.,
at 4910 Massachusetts Ave., NW #100, Washington, DC
20016, the following described premises situated in the
District of Columbia and designated as and being:
PART of Lot 30 in subdivision made by Danbury Street, LLC,
of the land known as Square 6201, as per plat recorded in
Liber No. 198 at Folio 58 among the Land Records of the
Office of the Surveyor of the District of Columbia.
COMMENCING from the easterly end of the South; 140.00
foot plat line of Lot 30 as shown on the said plat, said
line also being the common division line between Lot 30
and Danbury, S.W., as shown on said plat; thence binding
on said line, South, 90.00 feet to a point; thence running
perpendicular North 73.00 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING
of the piece or parcel of land to be described; thence and
running thence so as to cross and include part of said Lot
30, and binding on the common division line of lots 875 and
876 the following courses
1)West, 40.00 feet to a point; thence
2)North, 14.00 feet to a point; thence binding on the
common division lot line between 874 and 875
3)East, 40.00 feet to a point; thence
4)South, 14.00 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING; continuing
560 square feet of 0.0129 of an acre of land.
NOTE: at the date hereof the above described land is
designated on the Records of the Assessor of the District
of Columbia for assessment and taxation purposes as Lot
875 and Square 6201
Parcel ID: Square 6201, Lot 0875.
TOGETHER WITH all the appurtenances incident to said
Unit, as contained in said Declaration of the Association.
The Declaration was recorded with the DC Recorder of
Deeds on October 17, 2005.
SUBJECT, HOWEVER, to all the provisions, restrictions,
easements liens, and conditions of record, including but
not limited to those contained in prior deeds, said Declaration of Association and the Bylaws relating thereto, or in
law or equity.
TERMS OF SALE: Sold subject to a deed of trust of
approximately $245,630.00 (balance as of March 21, 2008)
and real estate taxes, if any. Also sold subject to any other
prior liens, encumbrances and municipal assessments, if
any, further particulars of which will be announced at time
of sale. Property is sold “as-is, where-is”, without warranty.
A deposit of $10,000.00 will be required at time of sale,
such deposit to be in cash, certified check, or in such
other form as Danbury Station Homeowners Association
in its sole discretion may determine. All conveyances,
recordings, recordation tax, transfer tax, etc. shall be at
purchaser’s cost. All adjustments made as of date of sale.
The balance of the purchase price, together with interest
at the rate of 10% per annum from date of sale to date of
receipt of the balance of the purchase price, must be paid
in cash or by cashier’s or certified check and all other terms
to be complied with within 30 days, otherwise deposit is
forfeited and the property may be re-advertised and resold
at the discretion of the Association and at the risk and
cost of the defaulting purchaser. In the event of failure on
the part of the Danbury Station Homeowners Association
to convey such deed purchaser’s sole remedy shall be a
return of the deposit. The Association shall convey a deed
pursuant to the October 29, 2018 Court Order in Danbury
Station Homeowners Association v Robinson; 2018 CA
001741 R(RP) (District of Columbia Superior Court), and
makes no further representations or warranties as to
title. The Association does not guarantee clear title or
the purchaser’s ability to obtain title insurance. For this
reason, the purchase may not be able to obtain financing
and must be able to pay the purchase balance in any case
within 30 days.
Contact Attorney for Danbury Station
Homeowners Association, Inc.:
Aaron Sokolow 202-269-3333/Aaron@SokolowLaw.com
Washington Post
Jan. 2, 9, 16, 2019
12229702
840
840
Trustees Sale - DC
Pardo & Drazin, LLC
Jason A. Pardo, Attorney
4400 Jenifer Street, NW, Suite 2
Washington, DC 20015
202-223-7900
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF REAL PROPERTY
1272 Oates Street NE,
Washington, D.C. 20002
(Lot 49 in Square 4060)
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Commercial Deed
of Trust, Assignment of Rents and Security Agreement in the
original principal amount of $522,900.00 dated November 29,
2017 and recorded on November 30, 2017 as Instrument
No. 2017131819 among the Land Records of the District of
Columbia from 1272 Oates Street NE, LLC, as Grantor, to
Eric Sayles and Seth Slomovitz, as Trustees, for the benefit
of Clear Sky Financial LLC, as Beneficiary ('Deed of Trust'),
default having occurred under the terms thereof, and following
the mailing and recordation in the Land Records of a Deed of
Appointment of Substitute Trustees appointing Jason A. Pardo
and Russell S. Drazin as Substitute Trustees under the Deed
of Trust ('Substitute Trustee'), an Affidavit of Non-Residential
Mortgage Foreclosure, and a Notice of Foreclosure Sale of Real
Property or Condominium Unit, at the request of the current
noteholder, the Substitute Trustee will sell at public auction at
the office of Harvey West Auctioneers, Inc., 5335 Wisconsin
Avenue, NW, Suite 440, Washington, DC 20015, on
JANUARY 8, 2019 AT 2:45 PM
ALL THAT LOT OF GROUND AND THE IMPROVEMENTS
THEREON situated in the City of Washington, District of
Columbia, known as 1272 Oates Street NE, Washington, D.C.
20002 (Lot 49 in Square 4060), and more fully described in the
Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an 'AS IS' condition, with no warranty
of any kind, and subject to conditions, restrictions, agreements,
liens, and encumbrances of record affecting the same except
those encumbrances of record that are released by operation of
District of Columbia law by virtue of the foreclosure of the Deed
of Trust.
Purchaser will take title to the property subject to all taxes, water
and sewer charges, and other utility charges, if any. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the
date of sale forward. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 by cash or
cashier's check will be required of the purchaser at the time and
place of sale. Purchaser shall settle within thirty (30) days of
sale. TIME SHALL BE OF THE ESSENCE WITH RESPECT TO
SETTLEMENT BY PURCHASER. Balance of the purchase price
to be paid in cash or certified funds at settlement. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money from the date of sale to the
date of settlement at the interest rate of 15% secured by the
Deed of Trust. Purchaser shall be responsible for payment of all
settlement costs.
The noteholder and its affiliates, if a bidder, shall not be required
to post a deposit or to pay interest.
In the event that purchaser does not settle as required for any
reason, purchaser shall be in default. Upon such default, the
deposit shall be forfeited to the Substitute Trustee and all of
the expenses of this sale (including attorneys' fees and full
commission on the gross sale price) shall be charged against and
paid out of the forfeited deposit. Substitute Trustee may resell
the property at the risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser.
The defaulting purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus
proceeds or profits resulting from any resale of the property.
If the Substitute Trustee does not settle as set forth herein,
purchaser's sole remedy at law and in equity shall be limited to a
refund of the deposit and the sale shall be considered null and
void and of no effect whatsoever.
The Substitute Trustee reserves the right, in his sole discretion,
to reject any and all bids, to withdraw the property from sale
at any time before or at the auction, to extend the time to
receive bids, to waive or modify the deposit requirement, to
waive or modify the requirement that interest be paid on the
unpaid purchase money, and/or to extend the period of time for
settlement.
Additional terms may be announced at the sale. The successful
bidder will be required to execute and deliver to the Substitute
Trustee a memorandum or contract of the sale at the conclusion
of bidding.
Jason A. Pardo and Russell S. Drazin,
Substitute Trustees
mypublicnotices.com/
washingtonpost/PublicNotice.asp
FREE UNDER $250
840
Trustees Sale - DC
850
Trustees Sale - DC
Pardo & Drazin, LLC
Jason A. Pardo, Attorney
4400 Jenifer Street, NW, Suite 2
Washington, DC 20015
202-223-7900
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF REAL PROPERTY
2605 Irving Street, N.E.,
Washington, D.C. 20018
(Lot 805 in Square 4340)
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Commercial Deed
of Trust, Assignment of Rents and Security Agreement in the
original principal amount of $525,000.00 dated April 27, 2018
and recorded on May 1, 2018 as Instrument No. 2018043092
among the Land Records of the District of Columbia from Luxe
Studio LLC, as Grantor, to Eric Sayles and Seth Slomovitz,
as Trustees, for the benefit of Clear Sky Financial LLC, as
Beneficiary ('Deed of Trust'), default having occurred under the
terms thereof, and following the mailing and recordation in the
Land Records of a Deed of Appointment of Substitute Trustees
appointing Jason A. Pardo and Russell S. Drazin as Substitute
Trustees under the Deed of Trust ('Substitute Trustee'), an
Affidavit of Non-Residential Mortgage Foreclosure, and a Notice
of Foreclosure Sale of Real Property or Condominium Unit, at
the request of the current noteholder, the Substitute Trustee will
sell at public auction at the office of Harvey West Auctioneers,
Inc., 5335 Wisconsin Avenue, NW, Suite 440, Washington, DC
20015, on
JANUARY 8, 2019 AT 2:50 PM
ALL THAT LOT OF GROUND AND THE IMPROVEMENTS
THEREON situated in the City of Washington, District of
Columbia, known as 2605 Irving Street, N.E., Washington, D.C.
20018 (Lot 805 in Square 4340), and more fully described in
the Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an 'AS IS' condition, with no warranty
of any kind, and subject to conditions, restrictions, agreements,
liens, and encumbrances of record affecting the same except
those encumbrances of record that are released by operation of
District of Columbia law by virtue of the foreclosure of the Deed
of Trust.
Purchaser will take title to the property subject to all taxes, water
and sewer charges, and other utility charges, if any. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the
date of sale forward. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 by cash or
cashier's check will be required of the purchaser at the time and
place of sale. Purchaser shall settle within thirty (30) days of
sale. TIME SHALL BE OF THE ESSENCE WITH RESPECT TO
SETTLEMENT BY PURCHASER. Balance of the purchase price
to be paid in cash or certified funds at settlement. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money from the date of sale to the
date of settlement at the interest rate of 15% secured by the
Deed of Trust. Purchaser shall be responsible for payment of all
settlement costs.
The noteholder and its affiliates, if a bidder, shall not be required
to post a deposit or to pay interest.
In the event that purchaser does not settle as required for any
reason, purchaser shall be in default. Upon such default, the
deposit shall be forfeited to the Substitute Trustee and all of
the expenses of this sale (including attorneys' fees and full
commission on the gross sale price) shall be charged against and
paid out of the forfeited deposit. Substitute Trustee may resell
the property at the risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser.
The defaulting purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus
proceeds or profits resulting from any resale of the property.
If the Substitute Trustee does not settle as set forth herein,
purchaserâ ™s sole remedy at law and in equity shall be limited
to a refund of the deposit and the sale shall be considered null
and void and of no effect whatsoever.
The Substitute Trustee reserves the right, in his sole discretion,
to reject any and all bids, to withdraw the property from sale
at any time before or at the auction, to extend the time to
receive bids, to waive or modify the deposit requirement, to
waive or modify the requirement that interest be paid on the
unpaid purchase money, and/or to extend the period of time for
settlement.
Additional terms may be announced at the sale. The successful
bidder will be required to execute and deliver to the Substitute
Trustee a memorandum or contract of the sale at the conclusion
of bidding.
Jason A. Pardo and Russell S. Drazin,
Substitute Trustees
Montgomery County
850
Montgomery County
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
10407 Sweetbriar Parkway
Silver Spring, MD 20903
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to JEFF KRIDER, Trustee(s), dated December 19,
2006, and recorded among the Land Records of MONTGOMERY
COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 33664, folio 634, MODIFIED
MARCH 2, 2011 IN LIBER 41219, FOLIO 106 the holder of the
indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having appointed the
undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument duly recorded
among the aforesaid Land Records, default having occurred
under the terms thereof, and at the request of the party secured
thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at
public auction at THE MONTGOMERY COUNTY COURTHOUSE
LOCATED AT 50 MARYLAND AVENUE, ROCKVILLE, MD 20850
ON,
JANUARY 4, 2019 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and described
as follows:
THE LAND REFERRED IS LOCATED IN THE CITY OF SILVER
SPRINGS, COUNTY OF MONTGOMERY, STATE OF MARYLAND
AND IS DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: LOT NUMBERED EIGHTEEN (18) IN BLOCK NUMBERED EIGHTEEN (18) IN THE
SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "HILLANDALE", AS PER PLAT
THEREOF DULY RECORDED AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MARYLAND IN PLAT BOOK 74 AT
PLAT NO. 7173. ADDRESS: 10407 SWEETBRIAR PARKWAY;
SILVER SPRINGS, MD 209031526 TAX MAP OR PARCEL ID
NO.: #00284573
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $47,000.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser
at time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of MONTGOMERY
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 4.125%
on unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of
settlement. The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be
required to post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the
secured party) will be required to complete full settlement of
the purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS
of the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (17-07986)
Thomas W. Hodge, Gene Jung, Laura D. Harris,
Robert M. Oliveri, Christine Johnson,
Scott Robinson, Louis Gingher,
Substitute Trustees
DECEMBER 26, 28, 2018, JANUARY 2, 4, 7, 2019 12216340 DECEMBER 26, 28, 2018, JANUARY 2, 4, 7, 2019 12216261
850
850
Montgomery County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR MONTGOMERY COUNTY
MARYLAND
STEPHEN B. JACKSON and
STEVEN P. HENNE
Substituted Trustees
Plaintiffs
v.
CHRIS FELTON
Defendant
Civil Action No. 444950V
NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 20th
day of December, 2018, by the Circuit Court for Montgomery County, Maryland, that the sale of the
property known as 506 Dean Drive,
Rockville, Maryland 20851, made
by Stephen B. Jackson and Steven
P. Henne, Substituted Trustees, to:
Libra Investments, LLC, and reported in the above-entitled cause be
ratified and confirmed unless
cause to the contrary thereof be
shown on or before the 22nd day
of January, 2019, provided a copy
of this NOTICE be inserted in some
newspaper published in said Montgomery County, once a week for
three consecutive weeks on or
before the said 22nd day of January,
2019.
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $280,000.00.
Barbara H. Meiklejohn
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Montgomery County, Maryland
Attorney Louis S.Pettey, Esq
Heise Jorgensen & Stefanelli P.A.
18310 Montgomery Village
Avenue, Suite 400
Gaithersburg, MD 20879
(301) 977-8400
Dec 26, Jan 2,9,2019
12229315
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v.
ESTATE OF PHILIP E. PIERCE
Defendant(s)
Civil Action No. 448726V
NOTICE
CHARMAINE CASTRO PETERSEN
OLLIE LAPERAL LEJARDE
8331 Cottage Hill Court
Gaithersburg, MD 20877
Defendant(s)
Case No. 452689V
NOTICE
Notice is hereby given this 17th
day of December 2018, by the Circuit Court for Montgomery County, Maryland, that the sale of 8331
Cottage Hill Court, Gaithersburg,
MD 20877, made and reported,
will be ratified and confirmed,
unless cause to the contrary
thereof be shown on or before
the 16th day of January, 2019,
provided a copy of this notice
be inserted in a daily newspaper
printed in said County, once in
each of three successive weeks
before the 16th day of January,
2019. The Report of Sale states
the amount of the foreclosure
sale price to be $571,863.00.
Barbara H. Meiklejohn
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Montgomery County, MD
Dec 26,Jan 2,9,2019
12228791
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The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale to be
$187,000.00.
Barbara H. Meiklejohn
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Montgomery County, Maryland
Dec 19,26,2018,Jan 2, 2019
12227125
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William K. Brown
Defendant(s)
Civil No. CAEF18-03336
NOTICE PURSUANT
TO MD RULE 14-215 (A)
ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for
Prince George's County, Maryland,
this 20th day of December, 2018,
that the foreclosure sale of the
property described in the deed of
trust docketed herein and located
at 11412 Honeysuckle Court #6,
Upper Marlboro, Maryland 20774,
made and reported by James E.
Clarke, Hugh J. Green, Shannon
Menapace, Christine M. Drexel and
Brian Thomas, Substitute Trustees,
be RATIFIED and CONFIRMED,
unless cause to the contrary be
shown on or before the 22nd day
of January, 2019, provided a copy
of this Order be inserted in The
Washington Post once in each of
three (3) successive weeks before
the 22nd day of January, 2019.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale at $144,226.00.
Mahasin ElAmin #544
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
DISCOVER MORE
THEATER
12229304
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12225358
James E. Clarke
Hugh J. Green
Shannon Menapace
Christine M. Drexel
Brian Thomas
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
v.
Dec 26,Jan 2,9, 2019
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www.hwestauctions.com
DECEMBER 19, 26, 2018, JANUARY 2, 2019
SF
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Notice is hereby given this 10th
day of DECEMBER, 2018, by the
Circuit Court for Montgomery
County, Maryland, that the sale of
the property mentioned in these
proceedings and described as
18000 Rolling Meadow Way, Unit
283, Olney, MD 20832 will be ratified and confirmed unless cause
to the contrary thereof be shown
on or before the 9th day of January, 2019, provided a copy of this
NOTICE be published at least once
a week in each of three successive weeks in some newspaper
of general circulation published in
said County before the 9th day of
January, 2019.
1-800-753-POST
Prince Georges County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
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851
Montgomery County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR MONTGOMERY COUNTY
MARYLAND
1-800-753-POST
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850
Montgomery County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR MONTGOMERY COUNTY
MARYLAND
DIANE S. ROSENBERG
MARK D. MEYER
JOHN A. ANSELL, III
JENNIFER ROCHINO
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway
Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiff(s)
v.
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Trustees Sale - DC
Trustee Sales
202-334-5782
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850
850
Montgomery County
851
Montgomery County
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
16905 OLD COLONY WAY
Rockville, MD 20853
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a
certain Deed of Trust to FRIEDMAN & MAC FAYDEN PA,
Trustee(s), dated August 31, 2005, and recorded among the
Land Records of MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber
30727, folio 569, the holder of the indebtedness secured by
this Deed of Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute
Trustees, by instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land
Records, default having occurred under the terms thereof, and
at the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned
Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at
THE MONTGOMERY COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 50
MARYLAND AVENUE, ROCKVILLE, MD 20850 ON,
JANUARY 18, 2019 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and described
as follows:
BEING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED AS LOT EIGHT (8) IN BLOCK
2 IN A SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "PLAT 8, NORBECK ESTATES"
AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 89 AT
PLAT 9516 AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF MONTGOMERY
COUNTY, MARYLAND.
Said property is subject to a 120 day IRS Right of Redemption.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $40,500.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser
at time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of MONTGOMERY
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 2.0% on
unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement.
The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to
post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured
party) will be required to complete full settlement of the
purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of
the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (17-13449)
Thomas W. Hodge, Gene Jung, Robert M. Oliveri,
Christine Johnson, Melissa Alcocer,
Jeana McMurray, Brennan Ferguson, Jessica Elliott,
Substitute Trustees
www.hwestauctions.com
JANUARY 2, 9, 16, 2019
851
12228881
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
Prince Georges County
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings
and improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and
described as Unit numbered 7959-8 in Building numbered five (5) in a
subdivision known as "Bedford Towne Condominium" and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #17-1884618.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as
is" condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $15,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 71202.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
Prince Georges County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND
Prince Georges County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
Trustee(s)
Plaintiff(s)
vs.
KEITH COATES
CYNTHIA COATES
Defendant(s)
Mortgagor(s)
CIVIL NO: CAEF18-26352
NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 20th
day of December, 2018 by the Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S, Maryland and
by the authority thereof, that the
sale made by Kristine D.
Brown,William M. Savage, Gregory
N. Britto, R. Kip Stone and Thomas
J. Gartner, Trustees, of the Real
Property designated as 12804
Jeanie Court, Fort Washington, MD
20744, and reported in the above
entitled cause, will be finally
ratified and confirmed, unless
cause to the contrary thereof be
shown on or before the 22nd day
of January, 2019 next; provided a
copy of this Order be inserted
in THE WASHINGTON POST, 1150
15th Street, Washington, DC, MD
in said COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S once a week for three
successive weeks before the 22nd
day of January, 2019.
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $276,000.00.
BY THE COURT:
Mahasin ElAmin #544
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Shapiro & Brown, LLP
10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200
Manassas, Virginia 20109
703 449-5800
12/26/18, 1/2,1/9/19 12229308
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 20th
day of December, 2018 by the Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S, Maryland and
by the authority thereof, that the
sale made by Kristine D.
Brown,William M. Savage, Gregory
N. Britto, R. Kip Stone, Thomas J.
Gartner, Philip S. Shriver, Trustees,
of the Real Property designated as
4204 Urn Street, Capitol Heights,
MD 20743, and reported in the
above entitled cause, will be finally
ratified and confirmed, unless
cause to the contrary thereof be
shown on or before the 22nd day
of January, 2019 next; provided a
copy of this Order be inserted
in THE WASHINGTON POST, 1150
15th Street, Washington, DC, MD
in said COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S once a week for three
successive weeks before the 22nd
day of January, 2019.
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $110,000.00.
BY THE COURT:
Mahasin ElAmin #544
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Shapiro & Brown, LLP
10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200
Manassas, Virginia 20109
703 449-5800
12/26/18, 1/2,1/9/19 12229310
1-800-753-POST
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Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
P
G
C
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
9912 DOUBLETREE LA.
SPRINGDALE, MD 20774
6508 DISTRICT HEIGHTS PKWY.
DISTRICT HEIGHTS, MD 20747
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Mogana N.
Richards dated April 25, 2005 and recorded in Liber 23475, folio 42 among
the Land Records of Prince George's County, MD, default having occurred
under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the
Circuit Court for Prince George's County, 14735 Main St., Upper Marlboro,
MD, 20772 (Duval Wing entrance, located on Main St.), on
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Joyce
Campbell Hamer dated August 28, 2007 and recorded in Liber 28691, folio
13 among the Land Records of Prince George's County, MD, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public
auction at the Circuit Court for Prince George's County, 14735 Main St.,
Upper Marlboro, MD, 20772 (Duval Wing entrance, located on Main St.), on
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings
and improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and
described as Unit numbered 142 in a Horizontal Property Regime known
as "Section VIII, Cromwell Station Condominium" and more fully described
in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #10-1091248.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as
is" condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $19,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 72702.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Dec 19, Dec 26 & Jan 2
12225790
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
2801 FOREST RUN DR., UNIT #205
DISTRICT HEIGHTS, MD 20747
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings
and improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and
described as Unit Number 205, Phase One (1), Building One (1), The
Avenue at Forest Run Condominium and more fully described in the
aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #06-3798998.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as
is" condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $20,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 64655.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Dec 19, Dec 26 & Jan 2
12225792
6970 HANOVER PKWY., UNIT #200
GREENBELT, MD 20770
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Taiwo
Odebo a/k/a T. Odebo dated March 24, 2006 and recorded in Liber 24896,
folio 192 among the Land Records of Prince George's County, MD, default
having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at
public auction at the Circuit Court for Prince George's County, 14735 Main
St., Upper Marlboro, MD, 20772 (Duval Wing entrance, located on Main St.),
on
JANUARY 8, 2019 AT 10:33 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings
and improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and
described as Unit Numbered 6970-200, in the subdivision known as
"Phase Four, Hunting Ridge Condominium" and more fully described in
the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #21-2374205.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as
is" condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $15,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 61287.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Dec 19, Dec 26 & Jan 2
851
12225800
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
James E. Clarke
Hugh J. Green
Shannon Menapace
Christine M. Drexel
Brian Thomas
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
v.
vs.
LENTEZ D. ELLIS
ANGELE ELLIS
Defendant(s)
Mortgagor(s)
CIVIL NO: CAEF18-27781
NOTICE
Beverly R. Epps and James C. Epps
Defendant(s)
Civil No. CAEF18-13958
NOTICE PURSUANT
TO MD RULE 14-215 (A)
ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for
Prince George's County, Maryland,
this 20th day of December, 2018,
that the foreclosure sale of the
property described in the deed of
trust docketed herein and located
at 7748 Garrison Road, Hyattsville,
Maryland 20784, made and reported by James E. Clarke, Hugh J.
Green, Shannon Menapace, Christine M. Drexel and Brian Thomas,
Substitute Trustees, be RATIFIED
and CONFIRMED, unless cause to
the contrary be shown on or
before the 22nd day of January,
2019, provided a copy of this Order
be inserted in The Washington Post
once in each of three (3) successive weeks before the 22nd day of
January, 2019.
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $228,000.00.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale at $161,500.00.
BY THE COURT:
Mahasin ElAmin #544
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Mahasin ElAmin #544
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
Dec 26,Jan 2,9, 2019
How about some
home delivery?
12229305
You, too, could have
home delivery.
SF
How about some
home delivery?
JANUARY 22, 2019 AT 10:57 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #06-0651745.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as
is" condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as
is" condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as
is" condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $43,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 59241.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $22,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 71560.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $17,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 72715.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Dec 19, Dec 26 & Jan 2
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Dec 19, Dec 26 & Jan 2
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Jan 2, Jan 9 & Jan 16
12225788
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Bernette
Powell dated December 20, 2006 and recorded in Liber 27969, folio 96
among the Land Records of Prince George's County, MD, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public
auction at the Circuit Court for Prince George's County, 14735 Main St.,
Upper Marlboro, MD, 20772 (Duval Wing entrance, located on Main St.), on
JANUARY 8, 2019 AT 10:31 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #09-0899138.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as
is" condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $18,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 53826.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Dec 19, Dec 26 & Jan 2
12225796
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Vincent
Edward Matthews dated October 18, 2005 and recorded in Liber 23829,
folio 648 among the Land Records of Prince George's County, MD, default
having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at
public auction at the Circuit Court for Prince George's County, 14735 Main
St., Upper Marlboro, MD, 20772 (Duval Wing entrance, located on Main St.),
on
JANUARY 8, 2019 AT 10:34 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #18-2027357.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as
is" condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $18,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 65402.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
12225901
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Larry
Parrish and Nicci Parrish a/k/a Nicclolius M. Parrish dated January 26,
2006 and recorded in Liber 25866, folio 1 among the Land Records of
Prince George's County, MD, default having occurred under the terms
thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court
for Prince George's County, 14735 Main St., Upper Marlboro, MD, 20772
(Duval Wing entrance, located on Main St.), on
JANUARY 15, 2019 AT 10:35 AM
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Ebony
K. Price-Tucker dated December 29, 2006 and recorded in Liber 27364,
folio 504 among the Land Records of Prince George's County, MD, default
having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at
public auction at the Circuit Court for Prince George's County, 14735 Main
St., Upper Marlboro, MD, 20772 (Duval Wing entrance, located on Main St.),
on
JANUARY 22, 2019 AT 10:58 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings
and improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and
described as Unit No. 33, Phase IV, Woodview Village West Condominium
and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #133147238.
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #09-0893479.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $33,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 60866.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as
is" condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $19,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 68453.
Jan 2, Jan 9 & Jan 16
12229196
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Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Donna
Nelson a/k/a Donna V. Nelson and Bethune A. Forbes dated June 6, 2007
and recorded in Liber 28162, folio 504 among the Land Records of Prince
George's County, MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof,
the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Prince
George's County, 14735 Main St., Upper Marlboro, MD, 20772 (Duval Wing
entrance, located on Main St.), on
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JANUARY 22, 2019 AT 11:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #15-1771229.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as
is" condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $18,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
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If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 51064.
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Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
12229022
Prince Georges County
852
Anne Arundel County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III, et al
Plaintiffs, Substitute Trustees
Diane S. Rosenberg, et. al.
Substitute Trustees
v.
Versus
RANDY ALPHONSO HARRIS
JACQUELINE HARRIS-DORSEY
Defendant(s)
Markesa Oliver
Nathaniel Oliver
Defendants
Civil Action No. CAEF18-08447
NOTICE
Notice is hereby given this 20th day
of December, 2018, by the Circuit
Court for Prince George's County, Maryland, that the sale of the
property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 10015
Nicol Court East, Mitchellville, MD
20721, will be ratified and confirmed unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or
before the 22nd day of January,
2019, provided a copy of this
NOTICE be published at least once
a week in each of three successive
weeks in some newspaper of general circulation published in said
County before the 22nd day of January, 2019.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale to be
$344,000.00.
Mahasin ElAmin #544
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
Dec 26,Jan 2,9,2019 12229306
Home delivery starts
your day off right.
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No. C-02-CV-18-001923
NOTICE
Notice is hereby issued this Friday,
December 14, 2018 that the sale
of the property in the proceedings mentioned, made and reported by Mark D. Meyer Esq., Substitute Trustee.
BE RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED,
unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 14th
day of January, 2019 next; provided,
a copy of this Notice be inserted
in some newspaper published in
Anne Arundel County, once in each
of three successive weeks before
the 14th day of January, 2019 next.
The report states that the amount
of sale of the property at 5612
SANDY BLUFF WAY, BROOKLYN, MD
21225 to be $186,200.00.
Robert P. Ductworth
Circuit Court for
Anne Arundel County, MD
Dec 26,Jan 2,9,2019
12228777
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You, too, could have
home delivery.
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Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
SF
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $36,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
bo
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12227821
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
1719 TULIP AVE.
FORESTVILLE, MD 20747
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #06-0441741.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as
is" condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
The property will be sold subject to a 120 day right of redemption by the
Internal Revenue Service.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
Jan 2, Jan 9 & Jan 16
JANUARY 22, 2019 AT 10:59 AM
6008 EDWARD DR.
CLINTON, MD 20735
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as
is" condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
851
2317 KIRBY DR.
TEMPLE HILLS, MD 20748
12229405
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Dec 26, Jan 2 & Jan 9
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
1006 BARNESBURY CT.
CAPITOL HEIGHTS, MD 20743
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Dec 19, Dec 26 & Jan 2
12226307
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
1503 POST OAK DR.
MITCHELLVILLE, MD 20721
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
1-800-753-POST
SF
JANUARY 8, 2019 AT 10:25 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #13-3122140.
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Gerald
Preston Raudabaugh dated December 14, 2010 and recorded in Liber
32355, folio 508 among the Land Records of Prince George's County, MD,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will
sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Prince George's County,
14735 Main St., Upper Marlboro, MD, 20772 (Duval Wing entrance, located
on Main St.), on
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 20th
day of December, 2018 by the Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S, Maryland and
by the authority thereof, that the
sale made by Kristine D. Brown,
William M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto, R. Kip Stone, Thomas J. Gartner,
Trustees, of the Real Property designated as 7313 Havre Turn, Upper
Marlboro, MD 20772, and reported
in the above entitled cause, will
be finally ratified and confirmed,
unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 22nd
day of January, 2019 next; provided
a copy of this Order be inserted
in THE WASHINGTON POST, 1150
15th Street, Washington, DC, MD
in said COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S once a week for three
successive weeks before the 22nd
day of January, 2019.
Shapiro & Brown, LLP
10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200
Manassas, Virginia 20109
703 449-5800
12/26/18, 1/2,1/9/19 12229312
JANUARY 8, 2019 AT 10:26 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #15-1750785.
5605 EAST BONIWOOD TURN
CLINTON, MD 20735
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Cheryl
Ann Green dated January 26, 2007 and recorded in Liber 29608, folio 367
among the Land Records of Prince George's County, MD, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public
auction at the Circuit Court for Prince George's County, 14735 Main St.,
Upper Marlboro, MD, 20772 (Duval Wing entrance, located on Main St.), on
JANUARY 8, 2019 AT 10:28 AM
1-800-753-POST
SF
851
8912 SIMEON CT.
UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772
1-800-753-POST
SF
D9
Prince Georges County
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Aja J.
Allen dated April 24, 2009 and recorded in Liber 31832, folio 171 among
the Land Records of Prince George's County, MD, default having occurred
under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the
Circuit Court for Prince George's County, 14735 Main St., Upper Marlboro,
MD, 20772 (Duval Wing entrance, located on Main St.), on
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
Trustee(s)
Plaintiff(s)
CIVIL NO: CAEF18-14780
NOTICE
851
15611 MILLBROOK LA., UNIT #142
LAUREL, MD 20707
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
Trustee(s)
Plaintiff(s)
vs.
BOBBY KETTLES
Defendant(s)
Mortgagor(s)
Prince Georges County
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Delores
Nicholson a/k/a Deloris Nicholson and Phillip Nicholson dated December
21, 2006 and recorded in Liber 27015, folio 82 among the Land Records
of Prince George's County, MD, default having occurred under the terms
thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court
for Prince George's County, 14735 Main St., Upper Marlboro, MD, 20772
(Duval Wing entrance, located on Main St.), on
JANUARY 8, 2019 AT 10:27 AM
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is convenient.
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12225793
851
851
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
7959 RIGGS RD., UNIT #8
F/K/A 7959 OLD RIGGS RD., UNIT #8
HYATTSVILLE, MD 20783
851
Prince Georges County
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Delfin
Huarcacho dated December 29, 2005 and recorded in Liber 24302, folio
553 among the Land Records of Prince George's County, MD, default
having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at
public auction at the Circuit Court for Prince George's County, 14735 Main
St., Upper Marlboro, MD, 20772 (Duval Wing entrance, located on Main St.),
on
JANUARY 8, 2019 AT 10:29 AM
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Dec 19, Dec 26 & Jan 2
851
Home delivery is so easy.
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851
Prince Georges County
OPQRS
851
Prince Georges County
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
9905 Harbor Avenue
Glenn Dale, MD 20769
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in
a certain Deed of Trust to COMMONWEALTH LAND TITLE
INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee(s), dated November 16, 2006,
and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 26907, folio 005, the holder
of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER
MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
JANUARY 3, 2019 at 11:30 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOT NUMBERED SEVENTY (70), BLOCK NUMBERED THIRTYTWO (32), IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "PLAT FOUR,
GLENNDALE HEIGHTS", AS RECORDED AMONG THE LAND
RECORDS OF PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND IN
PLAT BOOK REP 201 AT PLAT 44.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $36,000.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 2.0% on
unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement.
The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to
post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured
party) will be required to complete full settlement of the
purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of
the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (16-17094)
Robert E. Frazier, Gene Jung, Laura D. Harris,
Thomas W. Hodge, Robert M. Oliveri, Erin M. August,
Substitute Trustees
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
13926 Chadsworth Terrace
Laurel, MD 20707
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to DEBORAH CURRAN OR LAURA OSULLIVAN,
Trustee(s), dated December 18, 2006, and recorded among
the Land Records of PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND
in Liber 27212, folio 408, the holder of the indebtedness
secured by this Deed of Trust having appointed the undersigned
Substitute Trustees, by instrument duly recorded among the
aforesaid Land Records, default having occurred under the
terms thereof, and at the request of the party secured thereby,
the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE
LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772
ON,
JANUARY 3, 2019 at 11:30 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
ALL THAT LOT OF GROUND SITUATE IN PRINCE GEORGE'S,
MARYLAND AND DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS, THAT IS TO
SAY: LOT NUMBERED FOURTEEN (14) "A" IN SUBDIVISION
KNOWN AS IN BLOCK "NICKLES PROPERTY" AS PER PLAT
THEREOF RECORDED AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S AT REP 197 PAGE 78. FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY: THE APN IS SHOWN BY THE
COUNTY ASSESSOR AS 10-3556610; SOURCE OF TITLE IS
BOOK 23609, PAGE 228 (RECORDED 11/28/05).
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $40,500.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 2.0% on
unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement.
The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to
post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured
party) will be required to complete full settlement of the
purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of
the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (17-08787)
Thomas W. Hodge, Gene Jung, Robert M. Oliveri,
Christine Johnson, Melissa Alcocer,
Jeana McMurray, Louis Gingher,
Substitute Trustees
851
Prince Georges County
851
EZ
Prince Georges County
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
17114 Madrillon Way
Accokeek, MD 20607
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to DONAL W. COURTNEY, Trustee(s), dated July
29, 2011, and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 32899, folio 382,
MODIFIED NOVEMBER 30, 2017, IN LIBER 40302, FOLIO
361 the holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of
Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by
instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the
request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN
ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
JANUARY 3, 2019 at 11:30 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
BEING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED AS LOT NO. 4 IN BLOCK
A, AS SHOWN ON A PLAT OF SUBDIVISION ENTITLED, "PLAT
FIVE, SUMMERWOOD", AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED
AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND IN PLAT BOOK REP NO. 198, FOLIO 75.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $42,000.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 4.375%
on unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of
settlement. The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be
required to post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the
secured party) will be required to complete full settlement of
the purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS
of the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (18-04441)
Thomas W. Hodge, Gene Jung, Robert M. Oliveri,
Christine Johnson, Melissa Alcocer,
Jeana McMurray, Brennan Ferguson, Jessica Elliott,
Substitute Trustees
www.hwestauctions.com
DECEMBER 19, 26, 2018, JANUARY 2, 2019
12227664
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
www.hwestauctions.com
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
DECEMBER 19, 26, 2018, JANUARY 2, 2019
12226573
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
TRUSTEE'S SALE
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
12308 RONALD BEALL ROAD,
KNOWN AS
UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20774
6303 BRINKLEY COURT
Trustee's
Sale
of
valuable fee simple property improved by
Temple Hills, MD 20748
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain premises known as 12308 RONALD BEALL ROAD, UPPER
MARLBORO,
MD
20774.
By virtue of the power and authority
Deed of Trust to MITCHELL L. HEFFERNAN, Trustee(s), dated
November 30, 2006, and recorded among the Land Records contained in a Deed of Trust, dated December 28, 2005, and
of PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 26965, recorded in Liber 24056 at Page 181 among the land records
folio 123, the holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, in the original principal
of Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, amount of $332,000.00. Upon default and request for sale, the
by instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the
default having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the Courthouse for the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front
request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute of the Duval Wing of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735
Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE Main Street, Upper Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on January 4,
GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN 2019 at 2:00 PM, all that property described in said Deed of
Trust including but not limited to:
ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
Tax ID# 03-0195073
JANUARY 17, 2019 at 11:30 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
described as follows:
affect same, if any.
LOT 11 IN BLOCK A "GRIMES ACRES', AS PER PLAT THEREOF
RECORDED AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF PRINCE TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND IN PLAT BOOK W.W.W. 89 AT or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
PLAT 92. BEING THE SAME PROPERTY CONVEYED BY DEED balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
DATED JULY 6, 1995 AND RECORDED JULY 11, 2005 AT from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
LIBER 10239 FOLIO 648 IN THE LAND RECORDS OF PRINCE TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD, FROM MOHAMMAD AKBAR AND on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
LEAH AKBAR TO WILLIAM E. BURWELL AND GWENDOLYN T. will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
BURWELL
association dues and assessments that may become due after
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
without either express or implied warranty or representation, Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, mer- property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
chantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold Trustee's File No. 15-253080.
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $21,500.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 3.125%
on unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of
settlement. The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be
www.hwestauctions.com
required to post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the DECEMBER 19, 26, 2018, JANUARY 2, 2019
12226112
secured party) will be required to complete full settlement of 852
Anne Arundel County 852 Anne Arundel County
the purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
of the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
FOR
FOR
ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY
ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
D. BROWN, et al.
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser. KRISTINE
Substitute Trustees
Substitute Trustees
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
Versus
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be David MorenoVersus
Ortiz
Brian Shedd
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and aka David Ortiz Moreno
Jovan Shedd
Ana Moreno
Defendants
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement Defendants
NO. C-02-CV-18-002283
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
NO. C-02-CV-18-002110
NOTICE
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
NOTICE
Notice is hereby issued this Friday,
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for Notice is hereby issued this Friday, December 14, 2018 that the sale
December
14,
2018
that
the
sale
of
the
property
in the proceedings
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute of the property in the proceedings mentioned, made
and reported by
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to mentioned, made and reported by Gregory N. Britto, Esq. Substitute
Gregory N. Britto, Esq. Substitute
Trustee.
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law Trustee.
RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED,
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned BE RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED, BE
unless cause to the contrary therecause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 14th
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against unless
of be shown on or before the 14th
day of January 2019 next; provided,
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These day of January 2019 next; provided, a copy of this Notice be inserted
of this Notice be inserted
in some newspaper published in
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit, ain copy
some newspaper published in
Anne Arundel County, once in each
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser Anne Arundel County, once in each of three successive weeks before
three successive weeks before
the 14th day of January 2019,
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees. of
the 14th day of January 2019, next.
next. The report states that the
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the The report states that the amount amount of sale of the property at
sale of the property at 1896
1716 Manning Road, Glen Burnie,
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered of
Scaffold Way, Odenton, MD 21113
MD 21061 to be $153,750.00.
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale to be $261,440.00.
Robert P. Duckworth
Robert P. Duckworth
Circuit Court For
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
Circuit Court For
Anne Arundel County, Maryland
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
Anne Arundel County, Maryland
Dec 26,2018,Jan 2,9,2019 1228767
Dec 26,2018,Jan 2,9,2019 1228769
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (15-03599)
Home delivery
Thomas W. Hodge, Gene Jung, Robert M. Oliveri,
is convenient.
Christine Johnson, Melissa Alcocer,
Wake up to
Jeana McMurray, Brennan Ferguson, Jessica Elliott,
1-800-753-POST
home delivery.
SF
Substitute Trustees
1-800-753-POST
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
www.hwestauctions.com
JANUARY 2, 9, 16, 2019
12229737
1-800-753-POST
SF
12229278
TRUSTEE'S SALE
6308 Skillman Street, Capitol Heights, MD 20743
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 6308 Skillman Street, Capitol Heights,
MD 20743. By virtue of the power and authority contained
in a Deed of Trust, dated August 30, 2006, and recorded
in Liber 25961 at Page 390 among the land records of the
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, in the original principal
amount of $156,000.00. Upon default and request for sale, the
undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the
Courthouse for the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front
of the Duval Wing of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735
Main Street, Upper Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on January 4,
2019 at 2:00 PM, all that property described in said Deed of
Trust including but not limited to:
Tax ID# 18-2843852
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 15-255314.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
6311 Seminole Street
Berwyn Heights, MD 20740
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to JAMES SAMSING, Trustee(s), dated November
7, 2006, and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 26536, folio 326, the
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER
MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
JANUARY 17, 2019 at 11:30 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
ALL THAT PROPERTY SITUATE IN PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, STATE OF MARYLAND, DESCRIBED AS; LOT NUMBERED
TWENTY-FIVE (25) IN BLOCK NUMBERED 44 IN A SUBDIVISION KNOW AS BERWYN HEIGHTS, PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MARYLAND AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN
PLAT BOOK WWW 29 FOLIO 6.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $27,000.00 payable in certified
www.hwestauctions.com
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at DECEMBER 19, 26, 2018, JANUARY 2, 2019
12223941
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final 852
Anne Arundel County 852 Anne Arundel County
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S
IN THE
IN THE
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 2.0% on
CIRCUIT COURT FOR
CIRCUIT COURT FOR
unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement.
ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY
ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY
The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to JAMES E. CLARKE
JAMES E. CLARKE
post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured Substitute Trustees
Substitute Trustees
Versus
party) will be required to complete full settlement of the Versus
Mimi Fincham
Maame Nyarko Ababio
purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of Robert A. Fincham aka Robert
Justice M. Armattoe
Defendants
the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the Fincham
Defendants
No. C-02-CV-17-002333
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
No. C-02-CV-17-0001956
is hereby issued this Friday,
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser. Notice is hereby issued this Friday, Notice
December 14, 2018 that the sale
14, 2018 that the sale
of the property in the proceedings
All other public charges and private charges or assessments, December
of the property in the proceedings
mentioned, made and reported by
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be mentioned, made and reported by Hugh J. Green, Substitute Trustee.
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and Hugh J. Green, Substitute Trustee.
BE RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED,
RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED,
unless cause to the contrary theretransfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement BE
unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium of be shown on or before the 14th day of January, 2019 next;
14th
day
of
January,
2019
next;
a copy of this Notice
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be provided, a copy of this Notice provided,
be inserted in some newspaper
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for be inserted in some newspaper published in Anne Arundel County,
published in Anne Arundel County,
once
in
each
three successive
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute once in each of three successive weeks before of
the 14th day of JanTrustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to weeks before the 14th day of Jan- uary 2019 next. The report states
uary 2019 next. The report states
that the amount of sale of the
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law that the amount of sale of the property at 7920 Thrush Meadow
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned property at 1520 Shoreside Trail Place, Severn, Maryland 21144, to
210 Eastern Road, Pasadena,
be $191,855.19.
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against FKA
MD 21122, to be $218,875.00.
Robert P. Duckworth
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
Robert P. Duckworth
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Clerk of the Circuit Court
for Anne Arundel County
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
for Anne Arundel County
Dec
26,Jan
2,9,2019
12228773
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
Dec 26,Jan 2,9,2019
12228775
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
Wake
up
to
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
home delivery.
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
Wake up
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
1-800-753-POST
SF
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without to home delivery.
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (17-07703)
Wake up to
home delivery.
Thomas W. Hodge, Gene Jung, Robert M. Oliveri,
1-800-753-POST
Christine Johnson, Melissa Alcocer,
1-800-753-POST
SF
SF
Jeana McMurray, Brennan Ferguson, Jessica Elliott,
Substitute Trustees
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
www.hwestauctions.com
SF
DECEMBER 19, 26, 2018, JANUARY 2, 2019
Prince Georges County
www.hwestauctions.com
12226574 JANUARY 2, 9, 16, 2019
How about some
home delivery?
1-800-753-POST
851
www.hwestauctions.com
SF
You, too, could have
home delivery.
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2019
Prince Georges County
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
2604 Ballston Court
Bowie, MD 20721
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to FRIEDMAN & MAC FAYDEN PA, Trustee(s),
dated October 3, 2006, and recorded among the Land Records
of PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 26442,
folio 240, the holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed
of Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees,
by instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the
request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN
ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
JANUARY 17, 2019 at 11:30 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOT NUMBERED ONE HUNDRED FIVE (105), BLOCK LETTERED "A", AS SHOWN ON A PLAT ENTITLED "PLAT 17, LOTS
103-111, BLOCK A, BALK HILL" WHICH PLAT IS RECORDED
AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND, IN PLAT BOOK NO. REP 204, FOLIO 48.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $43,000.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 3.375%
on unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of
settlement. The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be
required to post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the
secured party) will be required to complete full settlement of
the purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS
of the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (13-24571)
Robert E. Frazier, Gene Jung, Laura D. Harris,
Thomas W. Hodge, Robert M. Oliveri,
Christine Johnson, Scott Robinson
Substitute Trustees
12226757
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
5800 Carlyle Street
Cheverly, MD 20785
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to VICKI L. PARRY, Trustee(s), dated October
31, 2007, and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 29161, folio 384, the
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER
MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
JANUARY 3, 2019 at 11:30 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOT 13 IN BLOCK 51 IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS AND
CALLED "SECTION 8, CHEVERLY", AS PER PLAT RECORDED
IN PLAT BOOK BB 14 AT PLAT 70, AMONG THE LAND
RECORDS OF PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND. THE
IMPROVEMENTS THEREON BEING KNOWN AS 5800 CARLYLE
STREET.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $30,500.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 6.74% on
unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement.
The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to
post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured
party) will be required to complete full settlement of the
purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of
the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (16-01695)
Robert E. Frazier, Gene Jung, Laura D. Harris,
Thomas W. Hodge, Thomas J. Gartner, Robert M. Oliveri,
David M. Williamson, Keith M. Yacko,
Substitute Trustees
851
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
8005 Greenfield Drive
Lanham, MD 20706
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a
certain Deed of Trust to LINDA LESTER, Trustee(s), dated March
18, 2004, and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 19362, folio 575, the
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER
MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
JANUARY 3, 2019 at 11:30 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOT NUMBERED THREE (3) IN BLOCK LETTERED "B" IN A
SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "DRESDEN GREEN", AS PER PLAT
THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK WWW 65 AT PLAT 81
AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $10,000.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 5.0% on
unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement.
The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to
post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured
party) will be required to complete full settlement of the
purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of
the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (18-09613)
Thomas W. Hodge, Gene Jung, Robert M. Oliveri,
Christine Johnson, Melissa Alcocer,
Jeana McMurray, Brennan Ferguson,
Substitute Trustees
DECEMBER 19, 26, 2018, JANUARY 2, 2019
www.hwestauctions.com
DECEMBER 19, 26, 2018, JANUARY 2, 2019
851
www.hwestauctions.com
12227668 JANUARY 2, 9, 16, 2019
12229735
Wake up to
home delivery.
SF
If only you had home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
1-800-753-POST
Home delivery is so easy.
1-800-753-POST
SF
SF
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2019
851
Prince Georges County
851
OPQRS
EZ
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
851
D11
Prince Georges County
TRUSTEE'S SALE
5211 59th Street, Riverdale, MD 20737
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 5211 59th Street, Riverdale, MD 20737.
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of
Trust, dated February 12, 2008, and recorded in Liber 29390
at Page 109 among the land records of the County of Prince
George's, in the original principal amount of $332,666.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees
will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front of the Duval Wing
of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper
Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on January 4, 2019 at 2:00 PM,
all that property described in said Deed of Trust including but
not limited to:
Tax ID# 02-0174680
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 18-276096.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
TRUSTEE'S SALE
12409 Gable Lane, Fort Washington, MD 20744
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 12409 Gable Lane, Fort Washington, MD
20744. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed
of Trust, dated January 26, 2010, and recorded in Liber 31449
at Page 278 among the land records of the COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S, in the original principal amount of $215,966.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees
will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front of the Duval Wing
of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper
Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on January 4, 2019 at 2:00 PM,
all that property described in said Deed of Trust including but
not limited to:
Tax ID# 05-0409763
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 17-271816.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
TRUSTEE'S SALE
11821 Duley Station Road, Upper Marlboro, MD 20772
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 11821 Duley Station Road, Upper
Marlboro, MD 20772. By virtue of the power and authority
contained in a Deed of Trust, dated January 18, 2008, and
recorded in Liber 29331 at Page 030 among the land records
of the County of Prince George's, in the original principal
amount of $228,000.00. Upon default and request for sale, the
undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the
Courthouse for the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front
of the Duval Wing of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735
Main Street, Upper Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on January 4,
2019 at 2:00 PM, all that property described in said Deed of
Trust including but not limited to:
Tax ID# 04-0261750
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 18-275530.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
TRUSTEE'S SALE
4212 Steeds Grant Way, Fort Washington, MD 20744
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 4212 Steeds Grant Way, Fort Washington, MD 20744. By virtue of the power and authority contained
in a Deed of Trust, dated May 14, 2008, and recorded in
Liber 29762 at Page 595 among the land records of the
County of Prince George's, in the original principal amount
of $429,605.00. Upon default and request for sale, the
undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the
Courthouse for the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front
of the Duval Wing of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735
Main Street, Upper Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on January 4,
2019 at 2:00 PM, all that property described in said Deed of
Trust including but not limited to:
Tax ID# 05-2925626
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 18-273333.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
TRUSTEE'S SALE
4922 Colonel Contee Place, Upper Marlboro, MD 20772
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 4922 Colonel Contee Place, Upper
Marlboro, MD 20772. By virtue of the power and authority
contained in a Deed of Trust, dated April 3, 2012, and recorded
in Liber 33557 at Page 527 among the land records of the
County of Prince George's, in the original principal amount
of $276,200.00. Upon default and request for sale, the
undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the
Courthouse for the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front
of the Duval Wing of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735
Main Street, Upper Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on January 4,
2019 at 2:00 PM, all that property described in said Deed of
Trust including but not limited to:
Tax ID# 03-0222422
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 18-276197.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
DECEMBER 19, 26, 2018, JANUARY 2, 2019
12223971 DECEMBER 19, 26, 2018, JANUARY 2, 2019
12224643 DECEMBER 19, 26, 2018, JANUARY 2, 2019
12225688 DECEMBER 19, 26, 2018, JANUARY 2, 2019
12226132 DECEMBER 19, 26, 2018, JANUARY 2, 2019
12224648
TRUSTEE'S SALE
12708 Live Oak Place, Upper Marlboro, MD 20772.
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 12708 Live Oak Place, Upper Marlboro,
MD 20772. By virtue of the power and authority contained
in a Deed of Trust, dated February 26, 2009, and recorded
in Liber 30435 at Page 506 among the land records of the
County of Prince George's, in the original principal amount
of $274,928.00. Upon default and request for sale, the
undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the
Courthouse for the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front
of the Duval Wing of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735
Main Street, Upper Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on January 4,
2019 at 2:00 PM, all that property described in said Deed of
Trust including but not limited to:
Tax ID# 15-1749993
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 18-275391.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
TRUSTEE'S SALE
15700 Paramont Lane, Bowie, MD 20716
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 15700 Paramont Lane, Bowie, MD 20716.
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of
Trust, dated January 5, 2005, and recorded in Liber 21328 at
Page 099 among the land records of the COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S, in the original principal amount of $248,000.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees
will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front of the Duval Wing
of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper
Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on January 4, 2019 at 2:00 PM,
all that property described in said Deed of Trust including but
not limited to:
Tax ID# 07-0692681
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 18-273942.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
TRUSTEE'S SALE
10008 Erion Court, Bowie, MD 20721
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 10008 Erion Court, Bowie, MD 20721. By
virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust,
dated December 23, 2005, and recorded in Liber 24248 at
Page 565 among the land records of the County of Prince
George's, in the original principal amount of $443,000.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees
will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front of the Duval Wing
of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper
Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on January 4, 2019 at 2:00 PM,
all that property described in said Deed of Trust including but
not limited to:
Tax ID# 13-3336450
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 18-275799.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
TRUSTEE'S SALE
4700 Cardinal Ave, Beltsville, MD 20705.
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 4700 Cardinal Ave, Beltsville, MD 20705.
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of
Trust, dated August 23, 2013, and recorded in Liber 35772
at Page 506 among the land records of the County of Prince
George's, in the original principal amount of $111,200.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees
will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front of the Duval Wing
of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper
Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on January 4, 2019 at 2:00 PM,
all that property described in said Deed of Trust including but
not limited to:
Tax ID# 01-0015313
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 18-275341.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
TRUSTEE'S SALE
2203 Penfield Lane, Bowie, MD 20716
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 2203 Penfield Lane, Bowie, MD 20716.
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of
Trust, dated March 24, 2005, and recorded in Liber 22056 at
Page 297 among the land records of the COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S, in the original principal amount of $469,342.50.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees
will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front of the Duval Wing
of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper
Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on January 4, 2019 at 2:00 PM,
all that property described in said Deed of Trust including but
not limited to:
Tax ID# 07-0794693
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 17-270442.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
DECEMBER 19, 26, 2018, JANUARY 2, 2019
12223968 DECEMBER 19, 26, 2018, JANUARY 2, 2019
12224646 DECEMBER 19, 26, 2018, JANUARY 2, 2019
12225689 DECEMBER 19, 26, 2018, JANUARY 2, 2019
12226720 DECEMBER 19, 26, 2018, JANUARY 2, 2019
12217467
TRUSTEE'S SALE
7005 Giddings Dr, Capitol Heights, MD 20743
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 7005 Giddings Dr, Capitol Heights, MD
20743. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed
of Trust, dated June 20, 2005, and recorded in Liber 22947 at
Page 211 among the land records of the COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S, in the original principal amount of $136,909.05.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees
will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front of the Duval Wing
of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper
Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on January 4, 2019 at 2:00 PM,
all that property described in said Deed of Trust including but
not limited to:
Tax ID# 18-2050680
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 15-254937.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
TRUSTEE'S SALE
109 Bonhill Drive, Fort Washington, MD 20744
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 109 Bonhill Drive, Fort Washington, MD
20744. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed
of Trust, dated January 26, 2009, and recorded in Liber 30336
at Page 632 among the land records of the County of Prince
George's, in the original principal amount of $345,950.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees
will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front of the Duval Wing
of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper
Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on January 4, 2019 at 2:00 PM,
all that property described in said Deed of Trust including but
not limited to:
Tax ID# 05-0394668
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 18-274583.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
TRUSTEE'S SALE
9513 Woodyard Circle, Upper Marlboro, MD 20772
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 9513 Woodyard Circle, Upper Marlboro,
MD 20772. By virtue of the power and authority contained
in a Deed of Trust, dated November 30, 2006, and recorded
in Liber 26919 at Page 332 among the land records of the
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, in the original principal
amount of $355,000.00. Upon default and request for sale, the
undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the
Courthouse for the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front
of the Duval Wing of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735
Main Street, Upper Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on January 4,
2019 at 2:00 PM, all that property described in said Deed of
Trust including but not limited to:
Tax ID# 15-3076593
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 17-268108.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
TRUSTEE'S SALE
1711 Mystic Avenue, Oxon Hill, MD 20745
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 1711 Mystic Avenue, Oxon Hill, MD
20745. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed
of Trust, dated July 26, 2005, and recorded in Liber 23072 at
Page 243 among the land records of the COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S, in the original principal amount of $196,000.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees
will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front of the Duval Wing
of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper
Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on January 4, 2019 at 2:00 PM,
all that property described in said Deed of Trust including but
not limited to:
Tax ID# 12-1303106
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 17-267423.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
TRUSTEE'S SALE
825 FairOak Ave, Hyattsville, MD 20783
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 825 FairOak Ave, Hyattsville, MD 20783.
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of
Trust, dated February 20, 2014, and recorded in Liber 35741
at Page 614 among the land records of the County of Prince
George's, in the original principal amount of $207,570.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees
will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front of the Duval Wing
of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper
Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on January 4, 2019 at 2:00 PM,
all that property described in said Deed of Trust including but
not limited to:
Tax ID# 17-1871748
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 17-271558.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
DECEMBER 19, 26, 2018, JANUARY 2, 2019
12217470 DECEMBER 19, 26, 2018, JANUARY 2, 2019
12224647 DECEMBER 19, 26, 2018, JANUARY 2, 2019
12226128 DECEMBER 19, 26, 2018, JANUARY 2, 2019
12225685 DECEMBER 19, 26, 2018, JANUARY 2, 2019
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S0447A 10x3
12225692
D12
851
Prince Georges County
OPQRS
851
Prince Georges County
TRUSTEE'S SALE
2871 Chippawa Street, Bryans Road, MD 20616
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 2871 Chippawa Street, Bryans Road, MD
20616. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a
Deed of Trust, dated September 11, 2009, and recorded in Liber
06986 at Page 0415 among the land records of the County
of Charles, in the original principal amount of $231,632.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will
offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the COUNTY
OF CHARLES, at 200 Charles St (in the Breezeway between
Circuit & District Courts), LaPlata, MD, on January 4, 2019
at 12:00 PM, all that property described in said Deed of Trust
including but not limited to:
Tax ID# 07-011288
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 18-277181.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
852
Anne Arundel County
852
Anne Arundel County
8514 BRAUN AVE.
A/R/T/A 8514 BRAUNS AVE.
SEVERN, MD 21144
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Tina R.
Phipps f/k/a Tina R. Wagner n/k/a Tina R. Mattingly dated February 9, 2005
and recorded in Liber 15952, folio 658 among the Land Records of Anne
Arundel County, MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof,
the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Anne
Arundel County, at the Court House Door, 8 Church Circle, Annapolis, MD
21401, on
JANUARY 8, 2019 AT 9:21 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Anne Arundel County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #04-000-00005350.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as
is" condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $34,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Anne Arundel County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 68411.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Dec 19, Dec 26 & Jan 2
852
Anne Arundel County
852
12225690
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
208 WATER FOUNTAIN CT., UNIT #103
GLEN BURNIE, MD 21060
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Mary M.
Rosso dated March 30, 2007 and recorded in Liber 18966, folio 463 among
the Land Records of Anne Arundel County, MD, default having occurred
under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the
Circuit Court for Anne Arundel County, at the Court House Door, 8 Church
Circle, Annapolis, MD 21401, on
JANUARY 8, 2019 AT 9:22 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings
and improvements thereon situated in Anne Arundel County, MD and
described as Unit 103, Building 7, as shown on the Plats entitled "Phase
14, Building 7, Cromwell Fountain, Section 1" and more fully described in
the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #05-151-90061065.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as
is" condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $22,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Anne Arundel County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 72505.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Aaron
Williams dated July 21, 2014 and recorded in Liber 27498, folio 328 among
the Land Records of Anne Arundel County, MD, default having occurred
under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the
Circuit Court for Anne Arundel County, at the Court House Door, 8 Church
Circle, Annapolis, MD 21401, on
JANUARY 8, 2019 AT 9:25 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Anne Arundel County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #05-545-02341600.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as
is" condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $17,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Anne Arundel County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 71945.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
LICENSE NOS. A000004, A000176, A000177, A000234, A000297,A000338,
A000394, A000424, A000429, A000445, A000465
Dec 19, Dec 26 & Jan 2
12225784
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
LICENSE NOS. A000004, A000176, A000177, A000234, A000297,A000338,
A000394, A000424, A000429, A000445, A000465
Dec 19, Dec 26 & Jan 2
12225781
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
458 WATSON CT.
MILLERSVILLE, MD 21108
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings
and improvements thereon situated in Anne Arundel County, MD and
described as Unit No. 20, as shown on a Plat entitled, "Plat 1 of 2,
Condominium Phase 3, Watson Place Condominium, (Phase II, Olde Mill
Shopping Center)" and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
Tax ID #03-930-90059906.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as
is" condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $26,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Anne Arundel County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 56366.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
LICENSE NOS. A000004, A000176, A000177, A000234, A000297,A000338,
A000394, A000424, A000429, A000445, A000465
Dec 19, Dec 26 & Jan 2
12225779
852
Anne Arundel County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
Substitute Trustees
852
Anne Arundel County
IN THE
CIRCUIT COURT FOR
ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY
Versus
Torria J. Evans
Defendant
No. C-02-CV-18-002203
Notice is hereby issued this Friday,
December 14, 2018 that the sale
of the property in the proceedings
mentioned, made and reported by
Hugh J. Green, Substitute Trustee.
BE RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED,
unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the
14th day of January, 2019 next;
provided, a copy of this Notice
be inserted in some newspaper
published in Anne Arundel County,
once in each of three successive
weeks before the 14th day of January 2019 next. The report states
that the amount of sale of the
property at 10 Birch Avenue, Glen
Burnie, MD 21061,
to be
$190,000.00.
Robert P. Duckworth
Clerk of the Circuit Court
for Anne Arundel County
Dec 26,Jan 2,9,2019
12228776
1-800-753-POST
SF
1-800-753-POST
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 65490.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
LICENSE NOS. A000004, A000176, A000177, A000234, A000297,A000338,
A000394, A000424, A000429, A000445, A000465
Dec 19, Dec 26 & Jan 2
12225786
872
Frederick County
Fairfax County
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
3701 S GEORGE MASON DR,
FALLS CHURCH, VA 22041
CIRCUIT COURT FOR
FREDERICK COUNTY
MARYLAND
Case Number: C-10-CV-18-000613
JAMES E. CLARKE
VS.
ROY SHURTLEFF, ET AL.
NOTICE OF SALE
be ratified and confirmed thirty
(30) days from the date of this
Notice, unless cause to the contrary be shown, provided a copy
of this Notice be inserted in some
Newspaper published in this
County, once in each of three (3)
successive weeks.
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $155,800.00.
Sandra K. Dalton
Clerk of the Circuit Court
of Frederick County
Dec 26, Jan 2,9,2019 12228789
Home delivery
is convenient.
SF
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as
is" condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $25,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Anne Arundel County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 27782.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
12226126
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
1472 LOWELL CT., UNIT #17XA
CROFTON, MD 21114
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from
Zakery Peterson and Jessica Peterson n/k/a Jessica Leigh Henson dated
September 20, 2016 and recorded in Liber 30120, folio 96 among the Land
Records of Anne Arundel County, MD, default having occurred under the
terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit
Court for Anne Arundel County, at the Court House Door, 8 Church Circle,
Annapolis, MD 21401, on
JANUARY 22, 2019 AT 9:34 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings
and improvements thereon situated in Anne Arundel County, MD and
described as Unit 17XA, in Building X, as set forth in "Declaration
establishing a Plan for Condominium Ownership of Crofton Mews
Condominium No. 1" and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of
Trust. Tax ID #02-208-90005597.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as
is" condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $25,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Anne Arundel County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 72759.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount of
$214,423.00, with an annual interest rate of 4.750000% dated February 15, 2011, recorded among
the land records of the Circuit
Court for the County of Fairfax
as Deed Book 21553, Page 1465,
the undersigned appointed Substitute Trustee will offer for sale
at public auction all that property
located in the County of Fairfax,
on the courthouse steps at the
front of the Circuit Court building
for the County of Fairfax located
at 4110 Chain Bridge Road, Fairfax, Virginia on February 6, 2019
at 2:30 PM, the property with
improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 0623-09N-2606
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: FHA. Reference Number
18-277346.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Dec 10, Jan. 2, 9
12226494
852
Anne Arundel County
852
Anne Arundel County
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
8549 O'KEEFE DRIVE
SEVERN , MD 21144
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from
BENEDICTTA T. GAMBRAH AND EBENEZER O. GAMBRAH,
dated October 26, 2006 and recorded in Liber 19085, folio
756 AND MODIFIED IN LIBER 23224, FOLIO 292 among
the Land Records of ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, MD, default
having occurred thereunder (Foreclosure Case docketed as
Case No.C-02-CV-17-001952; Tax ID No.04-760-90218140)
the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the ANNE
ARUNDEL COUNTY COURTHOUSE, located at 8 CHURCH CIR,
ANNAPOLIS, MD 21401, on
JANUARY 4, 2019 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, MD and more
fully described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $50,000.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR
BY CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED.
Balance of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten
days of final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for ANNE
ARUNDEL COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser.
If the purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
www.hwestauctions.com
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent, A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association DECEMBER 19, 26, 2018, JANUARY 2, 2019
12225693
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 547489)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
RENEE DYSON,
HUGH J. GREEN,
SHANNON MENAPACE,
CHRISTINE M. DREXEL,
BRIAN THOMAS,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
IS YOUR CAR
HOLDING UP?
CLASSIFIED
1-800-753-POST
SF
1-800-753-POST
SF
200501310016109, the undersigned
appointed
Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction, at the main entrance of
the courthouse for the Circuit Court
of Prince William County, 9311 Lee
Ave, Manassas, VA on January 25,
2019 at 9:30 AM, the property
described in said deed of trust,
located at the above address and
briefly described as: LOT 366A,
SECTION 14C, ''DALE CITY'', AS
THE SAME APPEARS DULY DEDICATED, PLATTED AND RECORDED
IN DEED BOOK 1128, PAGE 0468,
RESUBDIVIDED AT INSTRUMENT
NO. 200110050104731, AMONG
THE LAND RECORDS OF PRINCE
WILLIAM COUNTY, VIRGINIA. Tax
ID: 8092-89-4559.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of $13,000.00 or 10%
of the sale price, whichever is
lower, will be required in the form
of a certified or cashier’s check.
Cash will not be accepted as a
deposit. Settlement within fifteen
(15) days of sale, otherwise Trustee
may forfeit deposit. Additional
terms to be announced at sale.
This is a communication from a
debt collector. This notice is an
attempt to collect on a debt and
any information obtained will be
used for that purpose.
(Trustee # 584207)
Substitute Trustee: ALG Trustee,
LLC, C/O Orlans PC PO Box 2548,
Leesburg, VA 20177, (703) 7777101,
website:
http://www.orlans.com
Towne #: 5000.1569
Jan. 2, 9, 2019
How about some
home delivery?
SF
Home delivery is so easy.
1-800-753-POST
www.hwestauctions.com
SF
A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463
DECEMBER19, 26, 2018, JANUARY 2, 2019
12227661
853
Calvert County
Calvert County
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
4040 Birch Drive
Huntingtown, MD 20639
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to GEORGE MANTAKOS, Trustee(s), dated June
21, 2011, and recorded among the Land Records of CALVERT
COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 3737, folio 0291, the holder
of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the party
secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for
sale at public auction at THE CALVERT COUNTY COURTHOUSE
LOCATED AT 175 MAIN ST, PRINCE FREDERICK, MD 20678
ON,
JANUARY 17, 2019 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in CALVERT COUNTY, MD and described as
follows:
BEING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED AS LOT NUMBERED FORTY
NINE (49), IN BLOCK LETTERED "A", IN THE SUBDIVISION
KNOWN AS "POPLAR WOODS, SECTION FOUR", AS PER
PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK JLB 2, AT PLAT
160 AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF CALVERT COUNTY,
MARYLAND.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $24,500.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
www.hwestauctions.com
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463
DECEMBER 19, 26, 2018, JANUARY 2, 2019
12226716 ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of CALVERT COUNTY,
MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 4.5% on unpaid
purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement. The
secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to post a
deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured party) will
be required to complete full settlement of the purchase of the
TRUSTEE'S SALE
property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of the ratification
808 209th Street, Pasadena, MD 21122
of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the purchaser's
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be resold at
premises known as 808 209th Street, Pasadena, MD 21122. the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser. All other
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of public charges and private charges or assessments, including
Trust, dated September 13, 2006, and recorded in Liber 18290 water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be adjusted to
at Page 398 among the land records of the COUNTY OF ANNE date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and transfer taxes
ARUNDEL, in the original principal amount of $356,250.00. and all other costs incident to the settlement shall be borne by
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will the purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the COUNTY association dues and assessments will be adjusted to date of
OF ANNE ARUNDEL, at 8 Church Circle, Annapolis, Maryland, sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for any reason,
on January 4, 2019 at 4:00 PM, all that property described in including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute Trustees are
unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to take place for
said Deed of Trust including but not limited to:
any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law or equity shall
Tax ID# 03-388-90109407
be limited to the refund of the aforementioned deposit. The
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and purchaser waives all rights and claims against the Substitute
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants, Trustees whether known or unknown. These provisions shall
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit, this sale shall be
affect same, if any.
void and of no effect, and the purchaser shall have no further
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash claim against the Substitute Trustees. The sale is subject to postor certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The sale review of the status of the loan and that if any agreement to
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6% per annum cancel the sale was entered into by the lender and borrower prior
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within to the sale then the sale is void and the purchaser's deposit shall
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments be refunded without interest. Additional terms and conditions, if
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments applicable, maybe announced at the time and date of sale. File
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed No. (18-02960)
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
Thomas W. Hodge, Gene Jung, Robert M. Oliveri,
association dues and assessments that may become due after
Christine Johnson, Melissa Alcocer,
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Jeana McMurray, Brennan Ferguson,
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
Substitute Trustees
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
www.hwestauctions.com
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
JANUARY 2, 9, 16, 2019
12229733
Trustee's File No. 17-270230.
TRUSTEE'S SALE
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
3812 9th Street, North Beach, MD 20714.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 3812 9th Street, North Beach, MD 20714.
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust,
dated August 1, 2008, and recorded in Liber 3192 at Page
0449 among the land records of the County of Calvert, in the
original principal amount of $258,936.00. Upon default and
request for sale, the undersigned trustees will offer for sale at
www.hwestauctions.com
public auction at the Courthouse for the COUNTY OF CALVERT,
A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463
DECEMBER 19, 26, 2018, JANUARY 2, 2019
12223975 at 175 Main Street, Prince Frederick, Maryland, on January 4,
2019 at 9:30 AM, all that property described in said Deed of
Trust including but not limited to:
Tax ID# 03-165078
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
TRUSTEE'S SALE
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
1072 Wrighton Rd, Lothian, MD 20711
affect same, if any.
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
premises known as 1072 Wrighton Rd, Lothian, MD 20711. or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust, balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
dated October 4, 2006, and recorded in Liber 18373 at Page from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
420 among the land records of the County of Anne Arundel, TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
in the original principal amount of $576,000.00. Upon default on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will offer for sale will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
at public auction at the Courthouse for the COUNTY OF ANNE by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
ARUNDEL, at 8 Church Circle, Annapolis, Maryland, on January association dues and assessments that may become due after
4, 2019 at 4:00 PM, all that property described in said Deed of the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Trust including but not limited to:
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
Tax ID# 08-000-90081270
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants, property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
affect same, if any.
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The Trustee's File No. 18-276045.
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
www.hwestauctions.com
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for DECEMBER 19, 26, 2018, JANUARY 2, 2019
12223970
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the 873
Prince William County 876 Loudoun County
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
5022 Quell Court
18334 BUCCANEER TERRACE,
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
Woodbridge, VA 22193
LEESBURG, VA 20176
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
In execution of a Deed of Trust
In execution of a Deed of Trust
Trustee's File No. 18-277100.
in the original principal amount
in the original principal amount
of $465,871.00, dated January 27,
of $612,850.00, with an annual
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
2005, recorded among the land
interest rate of 2.625000% dated
records of the Circuit Court for
30, 2005, recorded
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200, Prince William County on January September
among the land records of the
31, 2005, as Instrument Number
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
Circuit Court for the County of
KLMNO
Home delivery
is convenient.
853
TRUSTEE'S SALE
7728 Gatewood Court, Pasadena, MD 21122
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 7728 Gatewood Court, Pasadena, MD
21122. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed
of Trust, dated April 30, 2003, and recorded in Liber 12995
at Page 079 among the land records of the County of Anne
Arundel, in the original principal amount of $178,489.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will
offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the COUNTY
OF ANNE ARUNDEL, at 8 Church Circle, Annapolis, Maryland,
on January 4, 2019 at 2:00 PM, all that property described in
said Deed of Trust including but not limited to:
Tax ID# 03-676-06304411
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 16-258324.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
SF
Wake up to
home delivery.
1-800-753-POST
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $33,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Anne Arundel County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
1-800-753-POST
Wake up to
home delivery.
Wake up
to home delivery.
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Anne Arundel County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #07-156-00589700.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as
is" condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
856
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Anne Arundel County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #05-693-17328750.
LICENSE NOS. A000004, A000176, A000177, A000234, A000297,A000338,
A000394, A000424, A000429, A000445, A000465
Jan 2, Jan 9 & Jan 16
12228860
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Donald
A. Tyner dated May 7, 2009 and recorded in Liber 21076, folio 406 among
the Land Records of Anne Arundel County, MD, default having occurred
under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the
Circuit Court for Anne Arundel County, at the Court House Door, 8 Church
Circle, Annapolis, MD 21401, on
JANUARY 8, 2019 AT 9:26 AM
Notice is hereby issued by the
Circuit Court for Frederick County
this 12th day of December, 2018,
that the sale made and recorded
by James E. Clarke et al., for the
sale of the property described in
these proceedings
15125B Barnes Road,
New Windsor, MD 21776
JAMES E. CLARKE
Substitute Trustees
Versus
Eunice M. Cherry
Defendants
NO. C-02-CV-18-001497
NOTICE
Notice is hereby issued this Friday,
December 14, 2018 that the sale
of the property in the proceedings
mentioned, made and reported by
Gregory N. Britto, Esq. Substitute
Trustee.
BE RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED,
unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 14th
day of January 2019 next; provided,
a copy of this Notice be inserted
in some newspaper published in
Anne Arundel County, once in each
of three successive weeks before
the 14th day of January 2019, next.
The report states that the amount
of sale of the property at 1254
Washington Drive, Annapolis, MD
21403 to be $982,000.00.
Robert P. Duckworth
Circuit Court For
Anne Arundel County, Maryland
Dec 26,2018,Jan 2,9,2019 1228768
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
1501 ROBINSON RD.
SHADY SIDE, MD 20764
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Stephen
Karas dated July 11, 2007 and recorded in Liber 19320, folio 630 among
the Land Records of Anne Arundel County, MD, default having occurred
under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the
Circuit Court for Anne Arundel County, at the Court House Door, 8 Church
Circle, Annapolis, MD 21401, on
JANUARY 8, 2019 AT 9:20 AM
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Brenda C.
Haynes dated April 22, 2005 and recorded in Liber 16388, folio 718 among
the Land Records of Anne Arundel County, MD, default having occurred
under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the
Circuit Court for Anne Arundel County, at the Court House Door, 8 Church
Circle, Annapolis, MD 21401, on
JANUARY 8, 2019 AT 9:19 AM
Dec 19, Dec 26 & Jan 2
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2019
EZ
Anne Arundel County
12225780
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
212 CEDAR TERR.
GLEN BURNIE, MD 21060
Anne Arundel County
852
LICENSE NOS. A000004, A000176, A000177, A000234, A000297,A000338,
A000394, A000424, A000429, A000445, A000465
LICENSE NOS. A000004, A000176, A000177, A000234, A000297,A000338,
A000394, A000424, A000429, A000445, A000465
DECEMBER 19, 26, 2018, JANUARY 2, 2019
Anne Arundel County
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
204 CHURCH ST.
BROOKLYN, MD 21225
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
www.hwestauctions.com
852
202.334.6200
washingtonpost.com/classified
Open 24/7
12229231
1-800-753-POST
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 16-258752.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
January 2, 9, 2019
12230220
How about some
home delivery?
1-800-753-POST
SF
If only you had home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
Wake up to
home delivery.
C054E 2x3
Loudoun as Deed Instrument
Number 20051004-0112579, the
undersigned appointed Substitute Trustee will offer for sale
at public auction all that property
located in the County of Loudoun,
on the courthouse steps in front
of the Circuit Court building for
the County of Loudoun located at
18 East Market Street, Leesburg
Virginia on February 6, 2019 at
9:30 AM, the property with
improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 079-15-9652
SF
Wake up to home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
853
Calvert County
853
OPQRS
EZ
Calvert County
TRUSTEE'S SALE
12460 Sedalia Trl, Lusby, MD 20657
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 12460 Sedalia Trl, Lusby, MD 20657. By
virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust,
dated August 29, 2007, and recorded in Liber 03086 at Page
493 among the land records of the COUNTY OF CALVERT, in the
original principal amount of $176,000.00. Upon default and
request for sale, the undersigned trustees will offer for sale at
public auction at the Courthouse for the COUNTY OF CALVERT,
at 175 Main Street, Prince Frederick, Maryland, on January 4,
2019 at 9:30 AM, all that property described in said Deed of
Trust including but not limited to:
Tax ID# 01-141635
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 18-273549.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
855
855
Charles County
Charles County
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
3279 WESTDALE CT.
WALDORF, MD 20601
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Richard
Vines, Angela Davis and Latarsha L. Brown dated July 15, 2005 and
recorded in Liber 5552, folio 183 among the Land Records of Charles
County, MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub.
Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Charles County,
200 Charles St., La Plata, MD 20646, (Sale will be held in the breezeway
between the Circuit Court and the District Court), on
JANUARY 15, 2019 AT 1:09 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Charles County, MD and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #06-171931.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as
is" condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $38,000 by cash or certified check. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for Charles County. Interest
to be paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to
the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are
received in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement
of interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 67298.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Dec 26, Jan 2 & Jan 9
878
www.hwestauctions.com
DECEMBER 19, 26, 2018, JANUARY 2, 2019
878
Stafford County
878
12218594
Stafford County
TRUSTEE‘S SALE OF
15 Rosepetal St.
Stafford, VA 22556
Pursuant to the terms of a certain Deed of Trust, in the original principal
amount of $369,747.00 , dated June 5, 2009, and recorded in the Clerk's
Office of the Circuit Court of Stafford, Virginia (the "Clerk's Office"), as
Instrument Number 090009666, default having been made in the payment
of the note thereby secured, the undersigned Sole Acting Substitute
Trustees, pursuant to the request of the holder of the Note thereby
secured, will offer for sale at public auction outside of the Stafford Circuit
Court, located at 1300 Courthouse Road, Stafford, VA 22555 on January
15, 2019 at 12:00 PM, the property briefly described as 15 Rosepetal St.,
Stafford, VA 22556, and more particularly described in said Deed of Trust
as follows:
All that certain lot or parcel of land situate in the County of Stafford,
Commonwealth of Virginia, and being more particularly described as
follows:
Being known and designated as Lot No. 53, Section 5, Rosedale, as the
same is duly dedicated, platted and recorded in Plat Book 9, (erroneously
stated as Deed Book 9), Page 174, among the Land Records of Stafford
County, Virginia. The improvements thereon being known as 15 Rosepetal
Street, with improvements thereon.
TERMS OF SALE: Cash. A ten percent (10%) bidder's deposit in cash
or certified check payable to the Trustee(s) shall be required of the
successful bidder at the time of sale before the bidding will be closed;
settlement must be made within twenty (20) days from the date of sale
or property to be resold at cost of defaulting purchaser. All costs of
conveyancing, examination of title, recording charges, etc. will be at
cost of purchaser. Neither the Substitute Trustees, nor any other party
guarantees or covenants to deliver, or in any way, to obtain possession
of the premises for any third party purchaser. Additional terms may be
announced at the time of sale. Sale will also be subject to additional terms
contained in the Memorandum of Sale to be executed by the successful
bidder upon purchase.
Commonwealth Asset Services, LLC
Sole Acting Substitute Trustees
This communication is from a debt collector. This is an attempt to collect
a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose.
FOR INFORMATION CONTACT:
Commonwealth Asset Services, LLC
281 Independence Boulevard, Pembroke One Building, 5th Floor,
Virginia Beach, VA 23462
www.sykesbourdon.com
(757) 965-5097 BETWEEN HOURS OF 9:00 A.M. and 11:00 A.M. ONLY
Our Case No: CA18-190032-3
January 2, 9, 2019
12228878
Stafford County
855
855
Charles County
856
Charles County
TRUSTEE'S SALE
3106 Knolewater Court, Waldorf, MD 20602
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 3106 Knolewater Court, Waldorf, MD
20602. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed
of Trust, dated July 30, 2004, and recorded in Liber 4872 at
Page 0489 among the land records of the County of Charles,
in the original principal amount of $220,000.00. Upon default
and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will offer for
sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the COUNTY OF
CHARLES, at 200 Charles St (in the Breezeway between Circuit
& District Courts), LaPlata, MD, on January 4, 2019 at 12:00
PM, all that property described in said Deed of Trust including
but not limited to:
Tax ID# 06-073026
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash or
certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The balance
of the purchase price with interest at 9.125% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 18-275328.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
12227073
878
Stafford County
TRUSTEE‘S SALE OF
201 Wimbeldon Ct
Stafford, VA 22556
www.hwestauctions.com
DECEMBER 19, 26, 2018, JANUARY 2, 2019
Pursuant to the terms of a certain Deed of Trust, in the original principal
amount of $116,000.00 , dated March 14, 2005, and recorded in the
Clerk's Office of the Circuit Court of Stafford, Virginia (the "Clerk's Office"),
as Instrument Number LR050011544, default having been made in the
payment of the note thereby secured, the undersigned Sole Acting
Substitute Trustees, pursuant to the request of the holder of the Note
thereby secured, will offer for sale at public auction outside of the Stafford
Circuit Court, located at 1300 Courthouse Road, Stafford, VA 22555 on
January 15, 2019 at 12:00 PM, the property briefly described as 201
Wimbeldon Ct, Stafford, VA 22556, and more particularly described in said
Deed of Trust as follows:
UNIT 207, PHASE 22, SUNNINGDALE MEADOWS CONDOMINIUM, ESTABLISHED PURSUANT TO THE DECLARATION RECORDED IN DEED BOOK
705, Al‘ PAGE 311, AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF STAFFORD COUNTY,
VIRGINIA., with improvements thereon.
TERMS OF SALE: Cash. A ten percent (10%) bidder's deposit in cash
or certified check payable to the Trustee(s) shall be required of the
successful bidder at the time of sale before the bidding will be closed;
settlement must be made within twenty (20) days from the date of sale
or property to be resold at cost of defaulting purchaser. All costs of
conveyancing, examination of title, recording charges, etc. will be at
cost of purchaser. Neither the Substitute Trustees, nor any other party
guarantees or covenants to deliver, or in any way, to obtain possession
of the premises for any third party purchaser. Additional terms may be
announced at the time of sale. Sale will also be subject to additional terms
contained in the Memorandum of Sale to be executed by the successful
bidder upon purchase.
Commonwealth Asset Services, LLC
Sole Acting Substitute Trustees
This communication is from a debt collector. This is an attempt to collect
a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose.
12223967
856
Frederick County
856
856
Frederick County
D13
Frederick County
BWW Law Group, LLC
6003 Executive Blvd., Suite 101
Rockville, MD 20852
(301) 961-6555
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE
OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON
1655 COLONIAL WAY
FREDERICK, MD 21702
BWW Law Group, LLC
6003 Executive Blvd., Suite 101
Rockville, MD 20852
(301) 961-6555
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE
OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON
3329 SUE MAC CT.
MONROVIA, MD 21770
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated June 12,
2015 and recorded in Liber 10602, Folio 10 among the Land Records of
Frederick County, MD, with an original principal balance of $164,956.00,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will
sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Frederick County, at the Court
House Door, 100 W. Patrick St., Frederick, MD 21701, on
JANUARY 4, 2019 AT 10:50 AM
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated March
7, 2007 and recorded in Liber 6515, Folio 202 among the Land Records of
Frederick County, MD, with an original principal balance of $488,000.00,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will
sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Frederick County, at the Court
House Door, 100 W. Patrick St., Frederick, MD 21701, on
JANUARY 11, 2019 AT 10:50 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or
improvements thereon situated in Frederick County, MD and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or
improvements thereon situated in Frederick County, MD and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $14,000 in the form of certified check,
cashier’s check or money order will be required of the purchaser at time
and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest
on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by
the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of
the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due
from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before
settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale,
and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years
including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. Purchaser
is responsible for any recapture of homestead tax credit. All other public
and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such amounts
survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges, ground rent,
whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. Any
deferred water and sewer charges that purports to cover or defray cost
during construction of public water or wastewater facilities constructed
by the developer and subject to an annual fee or assessment are to be
paid by the purchaser to the lienholder and are a contractual obligation
between the lienholder and each owner of this property, and is not a fee or
assessment imposed by the county. Any right of prepayment or discount
for early prepayment of water and sewer charges may be ascertained by
contacting the lienholder. All costs of deed recordation including but not
limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges
assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are
payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time
Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession
of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the
loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of
whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated
or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall
be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall
be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle
within ten days of ratification, subject to order of court, purchaser agrees
that property will be resold and entire deposit retained by Sub. Trustees
as liquidated damages for all losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default
and purchaser shall have no further liability. The defaulted purchaser shall
not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if
such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted
purchaser. Sub. Trustees will convey either marketable or insurable title.
If they cannot deliver one or the other, or if ratification of the sale is denied
by the Circuit Court for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law
or equity, is return of the deposit without interest. (Matter No. 329036-1)
PLEASE CONSULT WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM FOR STATUS OF
UPCOMING SALES
Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et. al., Substitute Trustees
The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $30,000 in the form of certified check,
cashier’s check or money order will be required of the purchaser at time
and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest
on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by
the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of
the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due
from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before
settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale,
and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years
including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. Purchaser
is responsible for any recapture of homestead tax credit. All other public
and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such amounts
survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges, ground rent,
whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. Any
deferred water and sewer charges that purports to cover or defray cost
during construction of public water or wastewater facilities constructed
by the developer and subject to an annual fee or assessment are to be
paid by the purchaser to the lienholder and are a contractual obligation
between the lienholder and each owner of this property, and is not a fee or
assessment imposed by the county. Any right of prepayment or discount
for early prepayment of water and sewer charges may be ascertained by
contacting the lienholder. All costs of deed recordation including but not
limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges
assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are
payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time
Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession
of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the
loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of
whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated
or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall
be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall
be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle
within ten days of ratification, subject to order of court, purchaser agrees
that property will be resold and entire deposit retained by Sub. Trustees
as liquidated damages for all losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default
and purchaser shall have no further liability. The defaulted purchaser shall
not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if
such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted
purchaser. Sub. Trustees will convey either marketable or insurable title.
If they cannot deliver one or the other, or if ratification of the sale is denied
by the Circuit Court for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law
or equity, is return of the deposit without interest. (Matter No. 86255-1)
PLEASE CONSULT WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM FOR STATUS OF
UPCOMING SALES
Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et. al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Dec 19, Dec 26 & Jan 2
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Dec 26, Jan 2 & Jan 9
12226767
12227507
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FOR INFORMATION CONTACT:
Commonwealth Asset Services, LLC
281 Independence Boulevard, Pembroke One Building, 5th Floor,
Virginia Beach, VA 23462
www.sykesbourdon.com
(757) 965-5097 BETWEEN HOURS OF 9:00 A.M. and 11:00 A.M. ONLY
Our Case No: CA18-190299-1
January 2, 9, 2019
12229403
NEITHER SHOULD
YOUR SUBSCRIPTION.
Frederick County
202.334.6200
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N2569 6x10.5
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2019
OPQRS
Charles County
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Charles E.
Harris, Jr. dated December 21, 2006 and recorded in Liber 6150, folio 623
among the Land Records of Charles County, MD, default having occurred
under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the
Circuit Court for Charles County, 200 Charles St., La Plata, MD 20646, (Sale
will be held in the breezeway between the Circuit Court and the District
Court), on
JANUARY 15, 2019 AT 1:08 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Charles County, MD and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #09-027866.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as
is" condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $38,000 by cash or certified check. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for Charles County. Interest
to be paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to
the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are
received in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement
of interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 33072.
The property will be sold subject to a 120 day right of redemption by the
Internal Revenue Service.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
12227070
TRUSTEE'S SALE
3451 Rose Place, Unit C, Waldorf, MD 20602
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 3451 Rose Place, Unit C, Waldorf, MD
20602. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed
of Trust, dated April 25, 2016, and recorded in Liber 09374 at
Page 0013 among the land records of the County of Charles,
in the original principal amount of $191,177.00. Upon default
and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will offer for
sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the COUNTY OF
CHARLES, at 200 Charles St (in the Breezeway between Circuit
& District Courts), LaPlata, MD, on January 4, 2019 at 12:00
PM, all that property described in said Deed of Trust including
but not limited to:
Tax ID# 06-128882
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 18-276634.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
www.hwestauctions.com
DECEMBER 19, 26, 2018, JANUARY 2, 2019
12224652
TRUSTEE'S SALE
4800 Underwood Court, Waldorf, MD 20602
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 4800 Underwood Court, Waldorf, MD
20602. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed
of Trust, dated April 30, 2004, and recorded in Liber 4745 at
Page 0559 among the land records of the County of Charles,
in the original principal amount of $145,713.00. Upon default
and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will offer for
sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the COUNTY OF
CHARLES, at 200 Charles St (in the Breezeway between Circuit
& District Courts), LaPlata, MD, on January 4, 2019 at 12:00
PM, all that property described in said Deed of Trust including
but not limited to:
Tax ID# 06-081266
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 18-274419.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
www.hwestauctions.com
DECEMBER 19, 26, 2018, JANUARY 2, 2019
Frederick County
856
Frederick County
857
857
Howard County
12224650
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated April 21,
2008 and recorded in Liber 6984, Folio 478 among the Land Records of
Frederick County, MD, with an original principal balance of $282,000.00,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will
sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Frederick County, at the Court
House Door, 100 W. Patrick St., Frederick, MD 21701, on
JANUARY 4, 2019 AT 10:51 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or
improvements thereon situated in Frederick County, MD and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $28,000 in the form of certified check,
cashier’s check or money order will be required of the purchaser at time
and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest
on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by
the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of
the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due
from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before
settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale,
and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years
including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. Purchaser
is responsible for any recapture of homestead tax credit. All other public
and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such amounts
survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges, ground rent,
whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. Any
deferred water and sewer charges that purports to cover or defray cost
during construction of public water or wastewater facilities constructed
by the developer and subject to an annual fee or assessment are to be
paid by the purchaser to the lienholder and are a contractual obligation
between the lienholder and each owner of this property, and is not a fee or
assessment imposed by the county. Any right of prepayment or discount
for early prepayment of water and sewer charges may be ascertained by
contacting the lienholder. All costs of deed recordation including but not
limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges
assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are
payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time
Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession
of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the
loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of
whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated
or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall
be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall
be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle
within ten days of ratification, subject to order of court, purchaser agrees
that property will be resold and entire deposit retained by Sub. Trustees
as liquidated damages for all losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default
and purchaser shall have no further liability. The defaulted purchaser shall
not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if
such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted
purchaser. Sub. Trustees will convey either marketable or insurable title.
If they cannot deliver one or the other, or if ratification of the sale is denied
by the Circuit Court for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law
or equity, is return of the deposit without interest. (Matter No. 330475-1)
PLEASE CONSULT WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM FOR STATUS OF
UPCOMING SALES
Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et. al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Dec 19, Dec 26 & Jan 2
12226768
BWW Law Group, LLC
6003 Executive Blvd., Suite 101
Rockville, MD 20852
(301) 961-6555
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE
OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or
improvements thereon situated in Frederick County, MD and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $28,000 in the form of certified check,
cashier’s check or money order will be required of the purchaser at time
and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest
on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by
the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of
the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due
from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before
settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale,
and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years
including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. Purchaser
is responsible for any recapture of homestead tax credit. All other public
and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such amounts
survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges, ground rent,
whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. Any
deferred water and sewer charges that purports to cover or defray cost
during construction of public water or wastewater facilities constructed
by the developer and subject to an annual fee or assessment are to be
paid by the purchaser to the lienholder and are a contractual obligation
between the lienholder and each owner of this property, and is not a fee or
assessment imposed by the county. Any right of prepayment or discount
for early prepayment of water and sewer charges may be ascertained by
contacting the lienholder. All costs of deed recordation including but not
limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges
assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are
payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time
Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession
of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the
loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of
whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated
or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall
be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall
be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle
within ten days of ratification, subject to order of court, purchaser agrees
that property will be resold and entire deposit retained by Sub. Trustees
as liquidated damages for all losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default
and purchaser shall have no further liability. The defaulted purchaser shall
not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if
such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted
purchaser. Sub. Trustees will convey either marketable or insurable title.
If they cannot deliver one or the other, or if ratification of the sale is denied
by the Circuit Court for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law
or equity, is return of the deposit without interest. (Matter No. 328034-1)
PLEASE CONSULT WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM FOR STATUS OF
UPCOMING SALES
Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et. al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Dec 26, Jan 2 & Jan 9
12227508
BWW Law Group, LLC
6003 Executive Blvd., Suite 101
Rockville, MD 20852
(301) 961-6555
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE
OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON
5300 TALLADEGA CT., UNIT K
FREDERICK, MD 21703
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated
December 13, 2005 and recorded in Liber 5803, Folio 327 among the
Land Records of Frederick County, MD, with an original principal balance
of $143,900.00, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the
Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Frederick
County, at the Court House Door, 100 W. Patrick St., Frederick, MD 21701,
on
JANUARY 18, 2019 AT 10:50 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or
improvements thereon situated in Frederick County, MD and described as
Unit 5300-101 in Stage 9, pursuant to a Condominium Regime established
by and as shown on a plat entitled "Final Condominium Plat, Section IV,
Plat 1, Stage 9, Ballenger Crossing Condominium No. 3" and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $24,000 in the form of certified check,
cashier’s check or money order will be required of the purchaser at time
and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest
on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by
the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of
the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due
from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before
settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale,
and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years
including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. Purchaser
is responsible for any recapture of homestead tax credit. All other public
and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such amounts
survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges, ground rent,
whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. Any
deferred water and sewer charges that purports to cover or defray cost
during construction of public water or wastewater facilities constructed
by the developer and subject to an annual fee or assessment are to be
paid by the purchaser to the lienholder and are a contractual obligation
between the lienholder and each owner of this property, and is not a fee or
assessment imposed by the county. Any right of prepayment or discount
for early prepayment of water and sewer charges may be ascertained by
contacting the lienholder. All costs of deed recordation including but not
limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges
assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are
payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time
Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession
of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the
loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of
whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated
or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall
be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall
be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle
within ten days of ratification, subject to order of court, purchaser agrees
that property will be resold and entire deposit retained by Sub. Trustees
as liquidated damages for all losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default
and purchaser shall have no further liability. The defaulted purchaser shall
not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if
such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted
purchaser. Sub. Trustees will convey either marketable or insurable title.
If they cannot deliver one or the other, or if ratification of the sale is denied
by the Circuit Court for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law
or equity, is return of the deposit without interest. (Matter No. 100032-2)
PLEASE CONSULT WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM FOR STATUS OF
UPCOMING SALES
Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et. al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Jan 2, Jan 9 & Jan 16
12229050
872
872
Fairfax County
Fairfax County
UNIT OWNERS' ASSOCIATION'S SALE OF
11526 SENECA WOODS COURT
GREAT FALLS, VA 22066
Under and by virtue of the power of sale granted it in the Virginia Property
Owners' Association Act and the governing documents for the Great Falls
Woods Homeowners Association, Inc. ("Association"), the Association will
offer for sale at public auction to the highest bidder on:
Thursday, January 17, 2019 at 2:00 p.m.
By the main entrance of the Fairfax County Courthouse,
located at 4110 Chain Bridge Road, Fairfax, VA 22030
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
9100 TUMBLEWEED RUN, UNIT J
LAUREL, MD 20723
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Van
K. Lewis and Michele J. Lewis dated June 5, 2006 and recorded in Liber
10201, folio 516 among the Land Records of Howard County, MD, default
having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell
at public auction, AUCTION SALE TO BE HELD AT THE THOMAS DORSEY
BUILDING, 9250 BENDIX ROAD, COLUMBIA, MD 21045, on
JANUARY 7, 2019 AT 9:26 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Howard County, MD and described as
Unit Numbered 9100-J established pursuant to the horizontal property
act of the state of Maryland known as and called "Whiskey Bottom
Condominium Five" and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of
Trust. Tax ID #06-443281.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as
is" condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $25,000 by cash or certified check. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for Howard County. Interest
to be paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to
the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are
received in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement
of interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 56555.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Dec 19, Dec 26 & Jan 2
12226697
6278 NEWPORT CT.
FREDERICK, MD 21701
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated
November 23, 2015 and recorded in Liber 10908, Folio 179 and rerecorded in Liber 11532, Folio 124 among the Land Records of Frederick
County, MD, with an original principal balance of $286,083.00, default
having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at
public auction at the Circuit Court for Frederick County, at the Court
House Door, 100 W. Patrick St., Frederick, MD 21701, on
JANUARY 11, 2019 AT 10:51 AM
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
11730 FREDERICK RD.
F/K/A 11524 EAST WINCHESTER LA.
ELLICOTT CITY, MD 21042
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Bernhard
A. Mann dated March 5, 2003 and recorded in Liber 7195, folio 542 among
the Land Records of Howard County, MD, default having occurred under
the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction, AUCTION
SALE TO BE HELD AT THE THOMAS DORSEY BUILDING, 9250 BENDIX ROAD,
COLUMBIA, MD 21045, on
JANUARY 7, 2019 AT 9:25 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Howard County, MD and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #03-283798.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as
is" condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $56,000 by cash or certified check. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for Howard County. Interest
to be paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to
the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are
received in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement
of interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 49105.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Dec 19, Dec 26 & Jan 2
12226695
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
6021 FLOREY RD.
HANOVER, MD 21076
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Justin W.
Triplett and Erin K. Triplett dated August 14, 2006 and recorded in Liber
10212, folio 146 and re-recorded in Liber 10500, Folio 71 and re-recorded
in Liber 15571, Folio 108 among the Land Records of Howard County, MD,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will
sell at public auction, AUCTION SALE TO BE HELD AT THE THOMAS DORSEY
BUILDING, 9250 BENDIX ROAD, COLUMBIA, MD 21045, on
JANUARY 14, 2019 AT 9:25 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Howard County, MD and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #01-288342.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as
is" condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $100,000 by cash or certified check.
Balance of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for Howard County. Interest
to be paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to
the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are
received in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement
of interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 64605.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Dec 26, Jan 2 & Jan 9
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2019
EZ
Howard County
BWW Law Group, LLC
6003 Executive Blvd., Suite 101
Rockville, MD 20852
(301) 961-6555
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE
OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON
2194 BELLEMONTE CT.
JEFFERSON, MD 21755
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
5763 BRANDYWINE RD.
HUGHESVILLE, MD 20637
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Dec 26, Jan 2 & Jan 9
856
12227069
610
GERMAN SHEPHERD PUPS 4 M, 1 F, black & sable. $600/obo.
S/W, parents on premises. AKC reg.
Ready now. Call 240-606-3815
LAB PUPPIES - AKC Registered Black
Lab Puppies, 1 Male, 5 females,
8 weeks $500. Harrisonburg, VA
Call or text 540-830-4701
Wake up
to home
delivery.
Labrador Pups, AKC Pure bred silver,
well bred, low COI, DNA tested, pedigree titles, health guar., $1600. Ready
1/18. Call 540-855-7359
PUG PUPPIES -CKC, pure bred 3 fawn
females, 1st shots, vet check'd &
dewormed. Irresistibly cute. $900.
Ready now Call 540-879-9492
A bidder's deposit of $2,300.00 in cash, certified check or cashier's check
payable to the Association shall be required to qualify as a bidder before
the sale, except from the Association. Notwithstanding the foregoing, the
Association reserves the right to waive the requirements of the deposit.
The balance of the purchase price shall be in cash or its equivalent and
shall be due within fifteen (15) days from the date of the sale; otherwise
the deposit shall be forfeited and the property may be resold at the
discretion of the Association and at the risk and cost of the defaulting
purchaser. Time is of the essence. The successful bidder shall assume all
loss or damage to the property from and after the time of the sale. If the
Association or trustee cancels or rescinds the sale prior to settlement due
to a bankruptcy filing or other cause, the purchaser's sole remedy shall be
the refund of the deposit, plus interest.
Interest to be paid by the purchaser at a rate of 12% per annum from
the date of the sale to the date of the settlement. Settlement shall be
at the offices of the Association's legal counsel or appointed Trustee or
other mutually agreed location. Real estate taxes pro-rated to the date
of sale. All costs of conveyance, which shall be by special warranty
deed, including, but not limited to, recordation charges, notary fees and
settlement fees shall be at the cost of the purchaser. The sale is subject
to such additional terms as the Association may announce at the time of
sale. At the time of sale, the successful bidder shall be required to sign a
Memorandum of Sale incorporating all the terms of the sale.
The information contained herein was obtained by sources deemed to be
reliable but is offered for informational purposes only. The Association
cannot make any representations or warranties with respect to the
accuracy of this information. It is the responsibility of the potential
bidders to confirm the chain of title for the subject lot.
For information, contact:
Chadwick, Washington, Moriarty, Elmore & Bunn, P.C.
Attorneys for Great Falls Woods Homewoners Association Inc.
3201 Jermantown Road Ste. 600
Fairfax, Virginia 22030
(703) 352-1900/telephone
Gelber and Associates, PLLC, Trustee
201 Park Washington Court, First Floor
Falls Church, VA 22046
(703) 237-1200/telephone
December 26, 2018, JANUARY 2, 9, 16, 2019
12226711
878
Howard County
German Shepherd—German World
Champs lines, AKC, shots/wormed,
M/F, black/tan, $1500 (703) 765-4624
LM or text (910) 880-0689
ALL OF THAT LOT AND PARCEL OF LAND, together with all improvements
located thereon, situated in Fairfax County, Virginia and more particularly
described as:
Lot 30, Section 2, GREAT FALLS WOODS, as the same appears duly dedicated,
platted and recorded in Deed Book 11071 at Page 950 among the land
records of Fairfax County, Virginia.
Tax Map No. 0064 15 0030
TERMS OF SALE: This property will be sold in an "AS IS" condition and
without any warranty, either expressed or implied, and subject to and
without disturbing all restrictions, covenants, conditions, rights of ways,
easements, violations, filed or unfiled mechanics' and/or materialmen's
liens, if any, to the extent any of the foregoing may lawfully apply to the
property being sold.
The satisfaction of all statutory prior liens, as set forth in Section 55516(A) of the Code of Virginia, as amended, shall be a condition of sale.
Assessment liens filed by the Association include those recorded at Deed
Book 24475, Page 0350, Deed Book 25213, Page 0866, and Deed Book
25446, Page 0674, among the Land Records; it is the aforementioned
assessment liens upon which this foreclosure is based.
857
Dogs for Sale
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Roommates
In execution of a certain Deed
of Trust dated March 10, 2015,
in the original principal amount
of $311,748.00 recorded in the
Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for
Stafford County, Virginia as Instrument No. 150003586 . The undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer
for sale at public auction in the
front of the Circuit Court building
for Stafford County, 1300 Courthouse Road, Stafford, Virginia on
February 7, 2019, at 2:00 PM, the
property described in said Deed
of Trust, located at the above
address, and more particularly
described as follows: ALL THAT
CERTAIN LOT, PIECE OR PARCEL
OF LAND LYING AND BEING IN
FALMOUTH-HARTWOOD MAGISTERIAL DISTRICT OF STAFFORD
COUNTY, VIRGINIA, MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS LOT 851
SECTION TWELVE-C, STAFFORD
LAKES VILLAGE, AS SHOWN ON
PLAT RECORDED AS INSTRUMENT
NUMBER 130000013, AMONG THE
LAND RECORDS OF STAFFORD
COUNTY, VIRGINIA.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser’s
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence.
If the sale is set aside for any
reason, the Purchaser at the sale
shall be entitled to a return of the
deposit paid. The Purchaser may,
if provided by the terms of the
Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be entitled to a $50
cancellation fee from the Substitute Trustee, but shall have no
further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Additional terms
to be announced at the sale. A
form copy of the Trustee’s memorandum of foreclosure sale and
contract to purchase real property
is available for viewing at
www.bwwsales.com. This is a
communication from a debt collector and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. The
sale is subject to seller confirmation. Substitute Trustee: Equity
Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson Blvd.,
Suite 1004, Arlington, VA 22201.
For more information contact:
BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for
Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003 Executive Blvd, Suite 101, Rockville,
MD 20852, 301-961-6555, website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-3089411.
Jan. 2, 9, 2019
12227032
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
1108 KINGS CREST DRIVE,
STAFFORD, VA 22554
BROOKLAND DC - 2 blocks Metro,
small furn BR w/ cbl, AC, kit privs,
share ba $650. M pref. 202-526-1054
MARYLAND
Roommates
BOWIE, MD - Furnished rm for rent
in SFH in Fairwood community. Utils
& cable inc. $850. Call 213-454-9156
FT. Wash/Indian Head-Senior home.
3 rooms. $600 - $700 + $350 sec
dep. 1BA, kit, W/D. Pvt ent. Need
transp. 2 wks free. Text 202-568-0792
LANDOVER—Share. $625 ea, Month
Rent Furn RM. Prof work refs req.
301-801-8822. Ref. BG.
Mitchellville— $1200, 1 bedrm, 1 ba,
1117 Baybury Court, 240-899-5366,
Balc, DW, Fpl, Loft, new carpet, WW
Carpet, WD, Nr Pub Transp, pkg,
water
Sign up for PostPoints to discover
exclusive, member-only offers at
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Silver Spring, Bsmt for rent, room,
kit, liv rm, bath, all incl. $1200/mo.
Room & bath $700. 240-475-5780
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with PostPoints
TAKOMA PARK - Room for rent, pref
fem. $500/mo plus dep. No Smoking. 301-448-2363 or 301-448-2048
VIRGINIA
Roommates
FAIRFAX - 1 room avail w/ shared ba.
$800 inc util. Avail now. Pref 1 resp
person. 703-520-3729
225
Collectibles
SMALL COLLECTOR PAYS CASH
FOR COINS/COLLECTIONS.
Call Al, 301-807-3266.
Will Come to you!
360
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washingtonpost.com/postpoints
MEMBERSHIP IS REWARDING
Estate Sales
2810 Ellicott St. NW
Washington, DC
TM SALES Wed-Sun 9-4
House full of Mid Century furniture,
Chandeliers and Sconces, Imari,
Rosenthal, marble top Bombay
chest, art and sculptures, Louis XV
, XVI furniture, vintage clothing and
accessories, toys, books,
For more info see
www.estatesales.net
Dogs for Sale
Amer. Bulldog—2 Females,
8wks old, $550,
301-893-4702
BERNESE MTN DOG / GREAT PYRENEES MIXED PUPS - Ready 1/4/19.
Parents on premises.
Call 301-366-5542 or 301-223-8702
English Cream Golden Doodles
9 weeks old, wonderful family dogs.
Silver Creek Goldens, $1400,
301-908-0767
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser’s
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence.
If the sale is set aside for any
reason, the Purchaser at the sale
shall be entitled to a return of the
deposit paid. The Purchaser may,
if provided by the terms of the
Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be entitled to a $50
cancellation fee from the Substitute Trustee, but shall have no
further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Additional terms
to be announced at the sale. A
form copy of the Trustee’s memorandum of foreclosure sale and
contract to purchase real property
is available for viewing at
www.bwwsales.com. This is a
communication from a debt collector and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. The
sale is subject to seller confirmation. Substitute Trustee: Equity
Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson Blvd.,
Suite 1004, Arlington, VA 22201.
For more information contact:
BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for
Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003 Executive Blvd, Suite 101, Rockville,
MD 20852, 301-961-6555, website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-3282021.
Jan. 2, 9, 2019
12229748
Lung Cancer? And Age 60+?
You And Your Family May Be
Entitled To Significant Cash Award.
Call 844-591-5210 for information.
No Risk. No Money Out Of Pocket.
Home delivery is so easy.
1-800-753-POST
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1-800-753-POST SF
SF
MUSIC
Silver Spring: Furn rm, W/D, shwr,
kit, nr trans, cable/int, $350 biwkly inc util. Adam 240-286-5451
610
In execution of a certain Deed
of Trust dated June 6, 2007, in
the original principal amount of
$222,000.00 recorded in the
Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for
Stafford County, Virginia as Instrument No. 070013984 . The undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer
for sale at public auction in the
front of the Circuit Court building
for Stafford County, 1300 Courthouse Road, Stafford, Virginia on
January 24, 2019, at 2:00 PM, the
property described in said Deed
of Trust, located at the above
address, and more particularly
described as follows: LOT 243, AS
SHOWN ON A PLAT OF SUBDIVISION FOR SECTION 6-B, POTOMAC
HILLS, PREPARED BY HARRY A.V.
LUNDSTROM, JR., AND RECORDED
IN THE CLERK‘S OFFICE OF THE
CIRCUIT COURT OF STAFFORD
COUNTY, VIRGINIA IN PLAT BOOK
28 AT PAGE 215.
DISCOVER MORE
FRENCH BULLDOGS- M & F, rare
colors incl blue fawn, black & tan,
fawn & brindle. 9-14 wk old, AKC
reg, UTD shot, vet chkd. Reduced
$1750-$3750. 301-252-9213 or
visit: www.windsoroakfarm.com
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German
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REGISTERED
SHOTS/VET
CHECKED
READY 1/24
$1,250. 540-241-9996
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LEGAL SERVICES
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NEITHER SHOULD YOUR SUBSCRIPTION.
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S0447B 10x3
SF
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
Stafford County
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
28 HOPKINS BRANCH WAY,
FREDERICKSBURG, VA 22406
S0897A 2x6
855
S0897B 2x7
D14
855
Charles County
ENROLL TODAY Visit sub.wpsubscribe.com/easy or call 202-334-6100.
KLMNO
Food
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2 , 2019
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/FOOD
EZ
E
EE
STACY ZARIN GOLDBERG FOR THE WASHINGTON POST; FOOD STYLING BY LISA CHERKASKY FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Start a better way of eating right here
This honey-glazed
glazed salmon can
be part of your plan
to cook foods that
make you feel better
in the new year
BRING IT!
Comfort-food
weather? Salad
for me, please.
BY
C ATHY B ARROW
Special to The Washington Post
After holiday indulgences, I am
craving salad. It should be bitter and
toothy, crunchy and acidic. I need the
bright color and the snap of greens.
Every January, I head straight for the
sturdy, bitter, cold-weather lettuces
to build a bowlful certain to be a
welcome guest when my friends and
family gather for game day or a
snow-day Netflix binge.
Making salad for a crowd is best
when the effort is an intentional,
rather than accidental, confluence of
ingredients. A dressed party salad
needs to hold up for a couple of
hours on a buffet table without
browning or wilting. You’re really
onto something when it is visually
interesting and easy to eat while
standing.
Because they are widely available,
radicchio and Belgian endive go into
BRING IT! CONTINUED ON E7
BY
E LLIE K RIEGER Special to The Washington Post
A
fter you’ve been sitting awhile, it feels good to stand. Eventually your body aches to unfurl
from the chair: Your muscles announce what they need loud and clear. It works on the flip
side, too; when you’ve been standing for hours, your feet bark for a break. The same kind of
internal cues can apply to eating. After weeks of holiday feasting it feels good — a relief, even
— to eat lighter and more healthfully again. But complicating what might otherwise be a gentle shift
toward healthier fare this time of year are the judgment and guilt we often shackle to our food choices.
We’ve been eating for pure pleasure (gasp!) and may have gone a bit overboard, so our impulse is to
counter with a punishing, hyper-strict diet. It’s as if after binge-watching Netflix on the sofa all day,
instead of getting up and enjoying a nice, juicy stretch or walk outside, we force ourselves to stand
REBOOT CONTINUED ON E4
indefinitely in a corner facing the wall.
TOM SIETSEMA
VORACIOUSLY
A new chef has taken the
menu at Hazel in a new
direction: Turkey. E3
Full steam ahead, kitcheneers
CUBE RULE
A Twitter user makes a
case to end the hot dogsandwich debate. E3
WINE
Dave McIntyre puts
together a year-end mixed
case of Great Values. E6
MORE AT WASHINGTONPOST.COM/
RECIPES
Flank Steak Gyros With Quick-Pickled
Carrot E2
Pesto Socca Pizza E2
RECIPE
Chopped Winter Salad With
Meyer Lemon Vinaigrette E7
Buttermilk Corn Bread E2
Fast Focaccia Online
Chat At noon: live.washingtonpost.com
BY
RECIPES ON PAGE E8
Breakfast Smoothie Pack
Quick Quinoa Pilaf
Roasted Vegetable Trio
Pasta Fagioli With Zucchini
Honey-Mustard Glazed
Salmon With Endive and
Green Apple Salad, pictured
above
B ONNIE S . B ENWICK
In this era of programmable,
appliance-specific cooking, it’s easy to
overlook one of the most reliable, widely
used ways to render food properly: with
steam. It is that simple: If you can boil
water, you can learn how to steam foods.
And that, in turn, will help make you a
better cook.
Steaming has long been considered a
healthful way to cook. Steamed vegetables retain more of their nutrients and
unique flavor, even when different ones
are cooked together. No added fats are
needed. The chance you’ll overcook
ingredients is greatly reduced because
of the gentle nature of steam heat —
whether it’s fish and seafood, whole
eggs, dumplings, custards, rice, fruit or
even certain cuts of steak.
Pressure cookers and electric multicookers harness the power of steam, of
course. But you can steam foods on the
stove top, in a conventional oven and in
the microwave, all in fairly short order.
Packet, or en papillote, cookery is basically creating a steamy environment on
a small scale. A bain-marie or hot-water
bath achieves the same steaming results
for foods in ramekins. Bamboo steamer
baskets allow for steaming multiple
ingredients with one pot or wok, and
they can be lined with parchment paper,
cheesecloth and edible leaves.
Professional kitchens use special
equipment like perforated pans (avail-
GORAN KOSANOVIC FOR THE WASHINGTON POST; FOOD STYLING BY BONNIE S. BENWICK/THE WASHINGTON POST
Some of the easy ways to steam foods
include (clockwise, from center) the
hotel pan with perforated inset for
large foods, available at restaurant
supply stores; the standard metal inpot basket; with a little water and
plastic wrap (not touching the food)
in the microwave; a bamboo basket;
and a fine-mesh strainer suspended
over a saucepan.
able at restaurant supply stores and
online), but home cooks can achieve the
same results with a strainer, saucepan
and lid, as well as a simple bamboo
steamer. The liquid transformed by heat
is typically plain water, but when you
add aromatics to it such as lemon grass,
ginger and citrus, they can infuse
steamed foods with wonderful aromas.
Beer works, too: In a 2015 recipe for The
Post Magazine’s Plate Lab column, chefSTEAMING CONTINUED ON E4
E2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
EE
. WEDNESDAY,
JANUARY 2 , 2019
VORACIOUSLY
We’re bringing sugar, but just a little,
to the classic corn bread debate
BY
DEB LINDSEY FOR THE WASHINGTON POST; FOOD STYLING BY BONNIE S. BENWICK/THE WASHINGTON POST
The secret to crisp, fast and gluten-free
vegetarian pizza? Chickpea flour.
My favorite
recipes are those
that open up a
new lane of
cooking and
prompt me to
Joe Yonan imagine that lane
leading in all sorts
WEEKNIGHT
VEGETARIAN
of new directions.
Take the Pesto
Socca Pizza I came across recently
in “The Ultimate Vegan
Cookbook,” a collection of more
than 600 recipes by seven authors.
Now, I’ve used chickpea flour in
myriad ways, starting with
pancakes that take shape in
France, called socca, and in Italy,
known as farinata. But writer
Marie Reginato does something
different, using much less water —
and a touch of almond flour — to
quickly form a dough you can roll
out and bake until crisp. The flavor
and texture of the crust remind me
of pastry more than pizza: It’s a
little crumbly, in a good way.
After baking the crust by itself,
I followed her lead and topped it
with pesto, roasted squash and
sliced radishes, adding pumpkin
seeds and arugula for color and
crunch. This pizza is designed for
just one or two servings, and the
crust might be too delicate to
make much bigger, but you can
always make more than one.
Reginato offers that any roasted
vegetable could work in place of
the squash, and I’m envisioning
the sauces that could swap in for
the pesto, too — marinara,
hummus, garlicky yogurt. The
crust could even turn into a
cookie.
Did I mention that it happens
to be gluten-free? Sweet.
joe.yonan@washpost.com
B ECKY K RYSTAL
There is a lot that divides us as
a country, and I’m not talking
about politics.
I write about food, which can
be just as divisive. Ketchup with
fries? Thick- or thin-crust pizza?
Does avocado toast signal the end
of times? Is a hot dog a sandwich?
Even when I delve into what I
thought were neutral topics —
pound cake, cooking with apples
and buckwheat waffles — the
fists have come out. I don’t typically start writing a Voraciously
recipe or how-to guide expecting
— much less angling for — a fight.
Until now.
I am confident I am going to
alienate about, oh, half of y’all
here who like corn bread. The
half of you who say sugar has
absolutely no place in corn bread.
After trying it with and with-
out sugar, I’ve found that apparently I like my corn bread with a
little bit of it. My fellow tasters
agreed, at least in my recent
face-off.
There have been some pretty
interesting takes on how the line
in the sugar is drawn. It’s not
necessarily a North-South thing.
As veteran food journalist Kathleen Purvis explored in the Charlotte Observer a few years ago,
there are racial divides even
among Southern cooks.
The type of cornmeal most of
us use seems to play a significant role, as Purvis explains. A
lot of the grocery store cornmeal we have in our pantries is
industrial-milled, yellow, finegrained and lacking in corn
flavor, unlike the coarser, white,
and yes, sweeter stuff that was
once more common. Small producers, such as Anson Mills,
specialize in that heritage type
of cornmeal, which is why chefs
who use it, such as Sean Brock,
can get away with a classic
sugar-free corn bread. But to
say that everyone has easy access to a local mill or online
ordering would be a stretch.
When I baked a “Southern”
cast-iron skillet corn bread featuring typical store-bought cornmeal without sugar or flour, we
found the flavor a bit dull and the
texture dry and crumbly. The
sugar-and-flour version baked in
a regular cake pan had a wonderful, moist texture and tasted
cornier, like sweet corn on the
cob. It was well rounded and not
overly saccharine, especially because the recipe calls for a fairly
restrained 1/3 cup of sugar. It
would be a welcome addition to
your table.
becky.krystal@washpost.com
Buttermilk Corn Bread
12 servings (makes one 8-inch slab)
MAKE AHEAD: The cooled
corn bread can be tightly
wrapped in plastic or stored in an
airtight container at room temperature for up to a day. Reheat,
covered with aluminum foil, in a
275-degree oven for about 15 minutes, or until warmed through.
For long-term storage, tightly
wrap in plastic, place in a zip-top
bag and freeze for up to several
months.
Adapted from “Fast Breads: 50
Recipes for Easy, Delicious
Bread,” by Elinor Klivans (Chronicle Books, 2010).
Ingredients
1 tablespoon unsalted butter,
plus 4 tablespoons (1/2 stick),
melted
1 cup (5 ounces; 142 grams)
flour
1/3 cup (23/4 ounces, 77 grams)
sugar
2 teaspoons baking powder
1 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
1 cup (41/2 ounces; 128 grams)
yellow cornmeal
11/4 cups buttermilk (regular or
low-fat)
1 large egg
Pesto Socca Pizza
2 servings
Feel free to replace the squash with the seasonal vegetables of your
choice.
Adapted from “The Ultimate Vegan Cookbook: The Must-Have
Resource for Plant-Based Eaters,” by Emily von Euw, Kathy Hester,
Linda and Alex Meyer, Marie Reginato, Celine Steen and Amber St.
Peter (Page Street Publishing, 2018).
Ingredients
2/3 cup chickpea flour
1/3 cup almond flour/meal (may
substitute chickpea flour)
1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
3 tablespoons water
1 tablespoon plus 2 teaspoons
extra-virgin olive oil
8 ounces peeled and seeded
butternut squash, cut into 1/4inch-thick slices
3 to 4 tablespoons store-bought
or homemade pesto (preferably
cheese-free to keep it vegan,
such as Trader Joe’s Kale,
Cashew and Basil Pesto)
1/4 cup roasted unsalted
pumpkin seeds (pepitas)
Sliced radish, for garnish
Handful arugula leaves, for
garnish
Steps
Preheat the oven to 400 degrees.
Whisk together the chickpea
flour, almond flour and salt in a
small bowl. Stir in the water and
1 tablespoon of the oil, and keep
stirring for a couple of minutes
to make sure it is very well
blended, with the tacky-butnot-wet consistency of PlayDoh. Form into a small disk,
cover with plastic wrap and
refrigerate for 10 minutes.
Meanwhile, toss the squash
with 1 teaspoon of the oil on a
small rimmed baking sheet,
then sprinkle with 1/4 teaspoon
of the salt. Roast until tender,
for 10 minutes.
Roll the rested dough between
sheets of parchment paper to an
8-inch round that’s 1/4-inch
thick. Peel off the top layer of
parchment, and lightly rub or
brush the top of the dough with
the remaining teaspoon of oil.
Transfer the dough, still on the
bottom sheet of parchment, to a
regular-size baking sheet. Bake
until the crust is firm and its
edges are turning a light golden
brown, 10 to 12 minutes.
Carefully transfer the crust,
which is a little delicate, to a
serving plate. Immediately
spread the pesto evenly over the
surface of the crust, then top
with roasted squash and pumpkin seeds. Garnish with the radishes and arugula. Serve warm.
Nutrition | Per serving (using 3 tablespoons
pesto): 530 calories, 17 g protein, 38 g
carbohydrates, 38 g fat, 5 g saturated fat, 5
mg cholesterol, 510 mg sodium, 9 g dietary
fiber, 8 g sugar
Recipe tested by Joe Yonan; email questions
to food@washpost.com
Steps
Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Put the tablespoon of
unmelted butter in an 8-inch
square metal pan or ceramic
baking dish. About 2 minutes
before you are ready to pour the
batter into the pan, put the pan
in the preheated oven to melt
the butter.
Sift or whisk together the flour,
sugar, baking powder, baking
soda and salt into a medium
bowl. Whisk in the cornmeal.
Whisk together the buttermilk,
egg and the 4 tablespoons of
TOM MCCORKLE FOR THE WASHINGTON POST;
FOOD STYLING BY BONNIE S. BENWICK FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
melted butter in a mixing bowl
or large liquid measuring cup,
until well incorporated. Pour
the flour mixture over the buttermilk mixture, then stir slowly until just combined. You will
see some small lumps in the
batter; that’s okay.
Remove the pan from the oven
and tilt it to coat the bottom and
sides with its now-melted butter, which may be browned but
should not be burnt. Scrape the
batter into the pan, smoothing
the top and spreading it into the
corners.
Bake (middle rack) for about 20
Any hand that’s holding this
steak sandwich is a winning one
Flank Steak Gyros With Quick-Pickled Carrot
In my makebelieve world of
sandwich poker, I
offer the following
hierarchy: A
warm sandwich
Bonnie S. beats a pair of
Benwick
cold ones. Steak
as filling, when
DINNER IN
cooked properly,
30 MINUTES
ranks right up
there with oneeyed jacks. And when a
nutritional analysis for the whole
thing manages to stay within the
healthful zone, well, you’ve got a
winning hand.
Exhibit A: These steak gyros,
juicy and slathered with a
charred-onion yogurt sauce. The
meat’s flavor is enhanced with a
quick rub before it is broiled.
Thinly sliced onion goes on the
same pan, to save time and
energy. While those are
underway, you give carrot slices
the quick-pickle treatment; they
lend welcome crunch and
acidity.
When you are making this on
a weeknight and have the flank
steak already in the freezer
(Dinner in Minutes pantry
#forthewin; wapo.st/pantry),
you can transfer the meat to the
refrigerator the night before, and
it will be defrosted and ready to
go. On the night of, you can
defrost via the microwave.
Ingredients
1 pound flank steak
Four 6-inch whole-wheat pitas
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive
oil
3/4 teaspoon ground cumin
3/4 teaspoon dried thyme leaves
1 teaspoon kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground
black pepper
1 medium red onion
2 large carrots
1 cup water
1/2 cup distilled white vinegar
1 teaspoon sugar
1/4 cup full-fat plain yogurt
Green leaf lettuce (optional)
Based on a recipe at
EatingWell.com.
Steps
Defrost the steak using a quick
method, as needed (see the
headnote).
Position an oven rack 6 inches
from the broiler element; preheat the broiler. Line a rimmed
baking sheet with aluminum
foil. Stack then wrap the pitas in
aluminum foil and place on the
rack farthest from the broiler
element while the oven is preheating.
Whisk together 1 tablespoon of
oil, the cumin, thyme, 1/2 teaspoon of the salt and 1/4 teaspoon
of the pepper in a wide, shallow
bowl. Place the meat on the baking sheet, then rub all the mixture on both sides of the steak.
Cut the onion into thin slices,
placing them in the bowl that
just held the steak mixture.
Drizzle them with the remaining tablespoon of oil and season
them with the remaining 1/4 teaspoon of pepper, tossing to coat.
Arrange them around the steak.
Remove the pita packet from the
oven. Transfer the baking sheet
with steak and onion to the
oven; broil (top rack) for 5 to 7
minutes, then turn the steak
over; broil for about 5 minutes,
or just long enough to monitor
the meat (if you have an instantread thermometer, the interior
temperature should register 140
to 145 degrees, for mediumrare). Transfer the now-nicely
charred onion slices to a plate,
then return the baking sheet to
the oven and broil for another 2
minutes, or as needed. Transfer
the steak to a cutting board to
rest for a few minutes.
Meanwhile, scrub the carrots
well. Trim and then cut them on
the diagonal into thin slices.
Combine the water, vinegar,
sugar and the remaining 1/2 teaspoon of salt in a medium sauce-
Nutrition | Per serving: 160 calories, 3 g
protein, 22 g carbohydrates, 6 g fat, 4 g
saturated fat, 30 mg cholesterol, 150 mg
sodium, 1 g dietary fiber, 7 g sugar
Recipe tested by Becky Krystal; email
questions to food@washpost.com
pan over high heat. Bring to a
boil, then add the carrots and
cook for about a minute. Turn
off the heat.
Drain the carrots, discarding
the quick-pickling liquid.
Combine the charred onion slices, yogurt and a small pinch
each of salt and pepper in a
medium bowl, stirring to incorporate. Cut the steak on the
diagonal into thin slices.
Unwrap the pitas and cut each
one in half; gently pry open each
half and fill with the steak, pickled carrot, some onion-yogurt
sauce and lettuce, if desired.
Serve warm.
Nutrition | Per serving (without the pickled
carrots): 380 calories, 31 g protein, 31 g
carbohydrates, 15 g fat, 4 g saturated fat, 70
mg cholesterol, 520 mg sodium, 6 g dietary
fiber, 4 g sugar
bonnie.benwick@washpost.com
PHOTOS BY TOM MCCORKLE FOR THE WASHINGTON POST;
FOOD STYLING BY LISA CHERKASKY FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Bonnie S. Benwick tested this recipe. Questions? Email her:
food@washpost.com. Have a quick dinner recipe that works for you? Send it
along, too.
4 servings, Healthy
minutes, until the top feels firm
when pressed and the goldenbrown edges have pulled away
from the sides of the pan a bit. A
tester inserted into the center
should come out clean.
Let cool in the pan on a wire
rack for about 10 minutes, then
use a round-edged knife to loosen the edges, lift out the slab,
cut into squares and serve
warm.
Find other quick meals with The
Post’s Recipe Finder:
washingtonpost.com/recipes
Onions cook along with the
flank steak, to be added to the
sauce (see bottom photo).
Broil the steak to medium-rare,
or the degree of doneness you
like best.
Thinly sliced carrots are
pickled in a few minutes.
While the meat rests, stir the
charred onions into yogurt to
make the sandwiches’ sauce.
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2 , 2019
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
E3
EE
Under a new chef entranced by Istanbul, Hazel refocuses as a Turkish delight
First sign of
change at Hazel:
the bread on the
table. It’s bakedFIRST BITE
to-order balon
ekmek, puffed up
like a balloon, with a texture akin
to pita crossed with tortilla. Do
yourself a favor and try it with
some creamy carrot haydari, one
of a handful of better-than-butter
spreads.
Six months after opening chef
Rob Rubba left the youngest
brand in the Neighborhood
Restaurant Group, his
replacement, Robert Curtis, is
making his presence known.
Erased are the many Asian
accents that characterized his
predecessor’s menu. Taking their
place are notions Curtis, 29, has
picked up from Turkey and
elsewhere.
Falafel make a memorable first
bite. Their centers are green and
fluffy with the help of fava beans
and quinoa; a light application of
potato starch gives the orbs a
pleasant crackle. The snack is just
as easy on the eyes. Curtis spreads
labneh and hazelnut dukkah on
the plate, which is finished with
mounts of cucumber to display
the falafel.
Indeed, vegetables, sometimes
in the company of grains, rate
among the chef’s best efforts. A
round of applause, please, for a
wedge of charred, near-melting
cabbage, carpeted with fried
garlic and ginger and delivered
with a creamy pool of orangecaraway “vinaigrette.” Beets are
smoked and arranged as a salad,
with diced apple, feathery dill and
a ring of green puree that
provides a surprise stab of heat.
Jalapeños will do that to a sauce.
Not that meat doesn’t turn in
some fine performances. Crispy
rice with duck confit, for instance,
does a great imitation of Cajun
dirty rice. The funk of the ground
liver has a nice foil in the pickled
peppers that top the dish. From a
category called “Animal
Kingdom” come tender gnocchi
draped with crisp-soft pork ragu
and a novel rethinking of lamb
sausage. Curtis serves it as a
rectangular bar of charcoalkissed ground meat set off with
ribbons of marinated cucumber
and a hint of mint. Now you see it.
Now you don’t.
Lesser moments are few, but
Tom
Sietsema
CLOCKWISE FROM TOP
LEFT: William Lee, Hazel’s
general manager and
sommelier, pours wine for
diners on the restaurant’s patio.
New chef Robert Curtis has
erased the many Asian accents
of his predecessor and
introduced offerings such as
tender gnocchi draped with
crisp-soft pork ragu, and
charred cabbage with fried
garlic and ginger and orangecaraway vinaigrette.
PHOTOS BY DIXIE D. VEREEN FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Washington area at Bourbon
Steak, Restaurant Eve and Brabo.
Curtis’s focus on things Turkish
was piqued by a fiancee who lived
for 16 years in Istanbul, where the
chef says he fell hard for the
aforementioned haydari, made
with shredded carrots plus
yogurt, lemon, dill and olive oil
and eaten even at breakfast.
The food holds our attention as
we graze. But a pause in the
action reminds me how much I
appreciate mismatched banisters
repurposed as a see-through wall
separating bar from dining room
— and how nice it is to know
about fluffy white pillows on
couches parked near space
heaters on the front patio.
Pro tip: Get an alfresco seat
while the weather allows.
they surface. Fork-defying squash
and a shy red curry vinaigrette
have me pushing away a rye berry
salad. And while the smear of
spiced yogurt on whole branzino
is pleasant enough, $46 seems
like a lot for an otherwise okay
slab of fish, one of a trio of familystyle platters.
That said, early meals under
Curtis’s watch make me want to
know more about the young man
behind so many impressive
dishes, including delicate
chocolate cremeux and rice
pudding with pumpkinseed
granola. Born in Philadelphia but
raised in Montgomery County,
Md., Curtis comes to Hazel from
the late RN74 in San Francisco
(and more recently, a monthslong apprenticeship at the worldclass Noma in Copenhagen).
Previously, he cooked in the
tom.sietsema@washpost.com
808 V St. NW, 202-847-4980.
hazelrestaurant.com. Small plates,
$6 to $19; family-style “feasts,” $46 to
$59.
VORACIOUSLY
The Cube Rule settles it: A hot dog is not a sandwich. It’s a taco.
BY
M AURA J UDKIS
Since the beginning of time,
philosophers have debated the
questions that define us as humans: Where did our universe
come from? What is the meaning
of life? Is a hot dog a sandwich?
We’re still trying to answer the
first two, but we can definitively
answer the third question.
A hot dog is not a sandwich.
A hot dog is a taco.
Let me explain.
Whether a hot dog is a sandwich is a problem that has long
divided people who like to get
into meaningless arguments on
the Internet. Some say that a
sandwich is anything in between
bread, which would make a hot
dog a sandwich. But some say
bread that is not in two distinct
slices is different — and that
tubular meat within it deserves
its own distinct category. The
National Hot Dog and Sausage
Council does not call a hot dog a
sandwich: “Limiting the hot dog’s
significance by saying it’s ‘just a
sandwich’ is like calling the Dalai
Lama ‘just a guy,’ ” says its website. But the Merriam-Webster
dictionary disagrees. New York
and California tax law say a hot
dog is a sandwich. And Supreme
Court justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, when asked by comedian
Stephen Colbert, issued this ruling:
Ginsburg: You’re asking me?
Well, you tell me what a sandwich
is, and then I’ll tell you if a hot dog
is a sandwich.
Colbert: A sandwich is two
pieces of bread with almost any
type of filling in between, as long
as it’s not more bread.
Ginsburg: You say two pieces
of bread. Does that include a roll
that’s cut open but still not completely?
Colbert: That’s the crux. You’ve
gotten [it] immediately. See, this
is why you’re on the Supreme
Court. That gets immediately to
the question: Does the roll need
to be separated into two parts?
Because a sub sandwich — a sub is
not split, and yet it is a sandwich.
Ginsburg: Yes.
Colbert: So then a hot dog is a
sandwich?
Ginsburg: On your definition,
yes, it is.
I am sorry to report that this
decision is incorrect. Everyone
who has been approaching the
hot dog vs. sandwich problem has
been looking at it all wrong. It is
not a question about bread and
the unique nature of cylindrical
beef. It is a geometry problem.
Enter the Cube Rule, a simple
way to categorize What Foods Are
and What Foods Aren’t. According to the Cube Rule, there are
eight categories of food, each defined by the placement of starch.
Use a cube as your guideline for
THE WASHINGTON POST
where the bread or starch goes,
and it will determine what a food
truly is — and whether it is a
sandwich. Starch only on the bottom? It’s a toast. Starch on the top
and bottom that is not connected
is, obviously, a sandwich. But
starch on the bottom and two
opposing sides is a taco. Therefore, a hot dog is a taco. And, to
correct RBG, a sub is also a taco.
Rolled starch on the top, bottom
and two opposing sides is, according to the Cube Rule, maki roll
sushi. Therefore, an enchilada is
sushi. Starch on every side except
the top, like a quiche, is a bread
declined to give his last name
because he didn’t want to be seen
as taking credit for the theory,
even though the diagram and
many of the clarifications and
rulings on particular food items
are his.
“I like the idea of having clarity
in how we talk about food,” Brandon told The Post. “I would be
very amused to see the Cube Rule
start taking off.”
So what about starches that
don’t have “sides,” like spaghetti?
Simple answer: All starches that
do not hold a defined shape, or
foods that do not contain starch-
A piece of crispy fried chicken is technically a
calzone. Mashed potatoes are a salad.
A vanilla soy latte is a three-bean soup.
bowl. Any food fully enclosed in
starch is a calzone. A corn dog is a
calzone. A Pop-Tart is a calzone. A
bean pupusa is a calzone.
Twitter user @Phosphatide
created a diagram that makes it
easy to understand the Cube Rule
and issue decrees on other dishes.
He drew it after the hot dog
debate came up on a video game
stream he was watching, and another user outlined the basis of
the Cube Rule. His name is Brandon, but the 25-year-old student
es, are salads. Poutine is a salad.
Fried rice is a salad. Mashed
potatoes are a salad. A steak is a
salad, albeit one with only one
ingredient. Any starches or nonstarches suspended in liquids are
soups, which are just wet salads.
A vanilla soy latte is technically,
according to the Cube Rule, a
three-bean soup. And while a loaf
of bread, the building block of
this formula, might be a six-sided
starch, it is not a calzone: it is
merely an uncut toast. This ap-
FROM TWITTER USER @PHOSPHATIDE
plies to any breads that do not
have a filling. A plain doughnut is
a toast, but a jelly doughnut is a
calzone. A dinner roll is a toast.
As the illustrator of the Cube
Rule, Brandon is also its arbiter of
disputes. Ask him about any food,
and he will issue a ruling.
Let’s start with an easy one:
pizza. “It’s just a toast,” he says.
“It’s a large piece of bread.” A
cherry pie is a bread bowl if it has
an open top, but it’s a calzone if it
has a closed top.
For the latter, “If you were to
serve it as a slice, it would be a
taco, because it has three sides,
technically,”
Brandon
said.
“That’s what brought this whole
thing together as mostly a joke.
That was my favorite example.”
A burrito is a trickier food to
consider. “That would be a topic
of debate — it’s created with a
single tortilla roll, by nature it
feels like more of a four-sided
object,” he said. “I would be willing to consider it as a calzone, as
well.” Interestingly, the sandwich
chain Panera tried to argue in
Massachusetts court that a burrito is a sandwich — they felt that
the addition of a Qdoba to a mall
shopping court violated a contract that said they were to be the
only sandwich chain in the space
— but the judge disagreed, ruling
the burrito not a sandwich in
2006. Nevertheless, the USDA’s
Food Standards and Labeling Pol-
icy Book describes a burrito as “a
Mexican style sandwich-like
product.”
Wrong.
A piece of fried chicken, if it has
a nice, crunchy breading on it,
would technically be a calzone. A
shepherd’s pie or a chicken pot
pie, with crust only at the top, is
another difficult categorization.
“By the nature of the starch
location, I would also rule them
as toasts with the ‘jam side
down,’ ” Brandon said.
After Brandon posted his illustration, thousands of people
chimed in with other applications
of the Cube Rule. Nigiri sushi,
with the starch at the bottom, is a
type of toast, one user pointed
out. A Twinkie is a calzone, and a
Swiss Roll is sushi. Pigs in a
blanket are sushi. Some posited
that a multi-decker sandwich is
an additional category — a cake —
which makes lasagna a meat-andcheese cake.
How seriously you decide to
take any of this is up to you. But it
is very amusing to look at, say, a
piece of Gushers candy and declare it a calzone or to call a
meatloaf a salad. Because, yes, for
the record: It is a salad of meat
and vegetables and bread crumbs
that has been cooked. Unless you
make it an open-faced meatloaf
sandwich. Then, it’s actually a
toast.
maura.judkis@washpost.com
DOUG KAPUSTIN FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Whatever you think you see, the photos on the left and the right are both tacos according to the completely unscientific Cube Rule, which is explained by the technical doodle in the middle.
E4
MG
THE WASHINGTON POST
EE
. WEDNESDAY,
Harness
the power
of steam in
the kitchen
of yellow-fleshed potatoes in a
glass or other microwave-safe
baking dish with a 1/4 cup of
water. Cover with a vented glass
lid or partially with silicone lid or
with vented plastic wrap that
does not touch the food. Microwave in five-minute increments
until fork-tender.
Scallops. Line a bamboo
steamer with a few layers of wide
lettuce leaves. Place the scallops
on the leaves, cover and steam for
about eight minutes, or until the
scallops are just opaque all the
way through.
Tenderloin steak. We had to
try this method from Keith
Schroeder, author of “Cooking
Light Mad Delicious,” and came
away impressed. Steaming lean
medallions takes about eight
minutes and cooks them to an
even
medium-rare,
much
as sous-vide can accomplish. But
steaming also turns the meat an
unappetizing color, so he coats
them in a port-wine reduction as
soon as they’re done. They look
and taste restaurant-quality presentable.
Keep in mind that steam heat is
intense, so be sure to open or
uncover your just-cooked foods
with a protected hand and with
the steam directed away from
your face.
STEAMING FROM E1
restaurateur Victor Albisu chose
to steam pork shanks over a
citrus-chicken broth-IPA combination instead of braising them.
The meat becomes incredibly tender with hours of low-and-slow
cooking without falling apart or
off the bone as it would when it
spends that time submerged in
liquid.
Are you ready to give steaming
a try? Here’s how to handle some
foods for which the method
works especially well:
Peas. Place fresh or frozen ones
in a perforated double-boiler type
pot or in a fine-mesh strainer set
over a few inches of simmering
water in a pot. Cover and cook for
about two minutes (add about 30
seconds for frozen), until the peas
are a brighter shade of green.
Sticky rice. A glutinous variety
of rice or sushi rice typically calls
for a long soak and rinsing. Then
it takes about 20 minutes of
steam heat, in a cheesecloth-lined
bamboo steamer over a pot of
simmering water. The grains will
be sticky, but somewhat separate.
Frozen rice. Place in a finemesh strainer over a pot of simmering water. Cover and defrost
until you can break up the block
into individual grains.
Winter squash. Cut into thick
slices or wedges. Place in a shallow glass baking dish with 2 to 4
tablespoons of water. Microwave
on HIGH for four to six minutes,
checking after the first four minutes, until tender enough to
pierce with the tip of a knife.
Small potatoes. Place 8 ounces
bonnie.benwick@washpost.com
PHOTOS BY GORAN KOSANOVIC FOR THE WASHINGTON POST; FOOD STYLING BY BONNIE S. BENWICK/THE WASHINGTON POST
Steaming medallions of beef
tenderloin cooks the meat
evenly, but leaves it with an
unappetizing appearance. But
once it’s covered with a sauce of
reduced port wine, its
presentation looks worthy of a
restaurant.
VORACIOUSLY
Garlic packs something to love in every clove
BY
B ECKY K RYSTAL
warm it.
Mincing makes for especially
potent flavor. If it’s going into a
dish raw and you’re worried
about its strength, consider this
tip from deputy Food editor and
recipes editor Bonnie S. Benwick: Mince the cloves and place
in a small microwave-safe bowl
with a teaspoon or two of extravirgin olive oil. Microwave in
10-second increments until fragrant, and the bits have turned
slightly golden in color.
If you prefer to have your
minced garlic on the smooth
side, chop it with a pinch of
kosher salt, smearing the two
together on your cutting board to
form a paste. That’s especially
good for something like salad
dressing, Winslow says.
Roasting garlic is another versatile option. Winslow and Ambrosino suggest cutting off the
top quarter-inch of two heads to
expose the cloves, drizzling them
with 2 tablespoons of oil, wrapping in aluminum foil and roasting at 500 degrees for about 40
minutes. The garlic will be very
soft, which makes it easy to
squeeze cloves out of the papery
skins once they have cooled
slightly. Incorporate the cloves
into butter for a compound butter, or add to mayonnaise for a
quasi-aioli. Or just spread directly onto bread. Use them wherever you want mellow, sweet
garlic flavor. Roasted garlic has
the potential to win over skeptics.
There are probably plenty of
small but mighty ingredients
hanging out in your kitchen.
Cinnamon sticks, dried chile
peppers, cardamom and herbs
are all proof that size is definitely
not proportionate to how much
flavor a food has.
Perhaps the MVP of the culinary featherweights is garlic.
Easy to buy, easy to store and
easy to incorporate into a wide
variety of dishes, this little bulb
can do it all.
“It’s such a simple way to get a
lot of flavor. It’s a simple bulb,”
says Kate Winslow, who wrote
“Onions Etcetera: The Essential
Allium Cookbook” with her husband, Guy Ambrosino. It’s complex, too. When raw, it’s sharp,
spicy and pungent. But cooking
garlic gives way to sweetness,
even caramelization.
Want to make the most out of
your garlic? Here is some helpful
info and a few clever hacks.
Know what you’re getting. Win-
slow and Ambrosino write in
their book that there are two
main subspecies of garlic: Softneck, which features large cloves
around a center of (annoying)
smaller cloves, and hard-neck,
which sports larger cloves in a
single ring around a woody stalk.
You’re most likely to come across
hard-neck at the farmers market.
Don’t bother with elephant garlic, they advise, which is more
closely related to leeks, boasting
a mild onion flavor that is not a
suitable stand-in for regular garlic.
When choosing garlic, try to
find the freshest. The taste gets
“funkier” and stronger as it ages,
Winslow says. The cloves should
be plump and juicy, not wrinkled. Ideally, they won’t have a
green sprout running through
the middle, but if that’s the only
garlic you have, just pop it out
with the tip of your knife and
move on.
Store garlic in a spot with good
air circulation; cool and dark are
helpful, too.
Peeling. There are plenty of ways
to accomplish this somewhat
tedious task, but the widely favored method is the good ol’
knife smash. The other, including microwaves and silicone rollers, involve more steps, more
equipment and sometimes, more
mess. If you have to peel a lot, as
in several heads worth, the microwave or skillet might be
worth considering. Otherwise,
for everyday garlic tasks, stick
with the trusty knife.
“It’s a little fiddly,” Winslow
says of peeling. Even so, she
advises against buying peeled
and minced garlic, which include
preservatives and can be of ques-
JANUARY 2 , 2019
PHOTOS BY STACY ZARIN GOLDBERG FOR THE WASHINGTON POST;
FOOD STYLING BY AMANDA SOTO/THE WASHINGTON POST
Roasting garlic makes it soft and sweet and could sway a skeptic.
Conventional wisdom says that the more you break down garlic, the
stronger the flavor will be in the dish.
tionable flavor and age. Best to
work your way through a head a
week.
Prepping. The general rule is
that the more you break down
the garlic, the stronger the flavor
will be. So if you want to gently
flavor the oil you’re sauteing
vegetables in, throw in halved or
whole cloves, as Winslow and
Ambrosino do. “I use it almost
every single time I saute a vegetable,” Ambrosino says. If you
want just a whisper of garlic in
your mashed potatoes, throw
some cloves in as you boil the
potatoes (remove or crush and
incorporate into the final dish)
or steep it in the milk as you
Cooking with it. If you want to
start using garlic in more of your
everyday cooking, there are a lot
of ways you can go. One of the
simplest is to rub a raw clove on
toasted or broiled bread. “It’s like
salt in a way,” Ambrosino says. “It
just adds more flavor.” Serve with
salad and soup, as well as dips,
spreads, bruschetta and tapenade.
Winslow is a fan of adding
garlic to marinades, especially
for the Cuban pork roast in her
book. “It makes such a full-flavored marinade,” she says.
As mentioned, garlic is a natural in dressings. It’s also right at
home in stir-fries, particularly
when mixed with scallions and
ginger. (Just keep your eye on it,
as once garlic is minced, it can
cook and turn fragrant in as little
as 30 seconds.)
Ambrosino likes to do a simple
pasta with oil, garlic and hot
pepper.
That’s only the beginning.
“Garlic is definitely our second
love behind onions,” Winslow
says. “I think it’s an ingredient
that should be in every cook’s
kitchen.
“It’s used in cuisines all
around the world. It’s really
worthwhile getting to know it.”
becky.krystal@washpost.com
All-or-nothing isn’t a
plan for healthful eating
REBOOT FROM E1
The culturally ingrained notion
that we need to repent after indulging is one reason the diet
industry booms in January. Another reason is the social-media
amplified rallying cry that going
keto or paleo or doing some kind of
“cleanse” is THE ANSWER. If you
feel untethered eating-wise, uncomfortable in your clothes and
you’ve sworn to yourself you
would start getting healthy in January, you are especially vulnerable
to the promise of these diets. There
are the convincing before-and-after pictures, the rules that seem so
comfortingly straightforward, and
the tribe of converts ready to welcome you into their fold.
Instead of punishing
yourself in a dietary
straitjacket, try pivoting
in a healthy direction
that gives you room to
move freely.
That’s the veneer, anyway; the
reality behind it is a lot more
nuanced. While there are valid
rationales for going on certain
diets, there are just as many — if
not more — for going on no diet at
all. If you haven’t noticed yet, or
you forgot from when you were
on one last year, diets can mess
with your head. Many are so
restrictive they set you up for
failure, which you inevitably pin
on yourself and subsequently feel
so bad that you binge on all the
forbidden foods and spiral down
from there. Diets can get you
obsessing about things like macro
ratios and (ugh!) talking about
them at the dinner table (if the
plan even allows for dinner at a
table) when you could be focusing
on the joys of eating good food
and engaging in meaningful conversation. And the truth is, in the
long run, no single plan has
proved to be markedly better at
keeping you fit than any other.
So instead of punishing yourself in a dietary straitjacket this
year, try pivoting in a healthy
direction that gives you room to
move more freely. Take a path you
can realistically stay on, one that
allows for the occasional “unhealthy” food so you can finally
get off the all-or-nothing diet seesaw. But without the prefab instruction manual of a formal
plan, where do you start? How
about by checking in with the
person who knows you best? You.
Take a moment to think about
your usual eating habits, the patterns you have settled into — and
do it with a kind, nonjudgmental
mind-set. What are your major
stumbling blocks for eating well
in your typical day? Are there
healthy habits that have worked
for you in the past that have
slipped away? I’m a registered
dietitian, so I know that you
might want to enlist the help of a
professional for more complex
issues, but I also know that most
of us could easily list several ways
to improve our eating habits.
More vegetables, fewer sugary
foods, less snacking while watching late-night TV, eating more
slowly and mindfully: It’s not as
complicated as it’s often made out
to be. Write down three changes
that you believe will propel you in
the right direction and make
them specific enough that you
can check them off as “done” each
day or week. Then anticipate obstacles and decide on the tools
you need and prep you have to do
to put these new habits into play.
The accompanying recipes are
designed to be such tools. Each
addresses a specific habit that can
help you make a shift toward
eating better in a way that is so
simple and pleasurable, it will
feel good to go there.
food@washpost.com
Krieger is a registered dietitian,
nutritionist and author who hosts
public television’s “Ellie’s Real Good
Food.” She blogs and offers a weekly
newsletter at elliekrieger.com. Her
Nourish column will return next week.
STACY ZARIN GOLDBERG FOR THE WASHINGTON POST;
FOOD STYLING BY LISA CHERKASKY FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Quick Quinoa Pilaf and four other healthful recipes to get you
started are on Page E8.
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2 , 2019
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
MG
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EE
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Kendall Jackson
Vintner’s
Reserve
Chardonnay
California
750ml
Jim Beam
1.75L
25.99
Kim Crawford
Sauvignon Blanc
New Zealand
750ml
10.97
Apothic Red
California
750ml
7.97
J Lohr Cabernet
Seven Oaks
California
750ml
Menage a Trois
Red
California
750ml
11.97
6.97
Tito’s Handmade
Vodka
1.75L
Tanqueray Gin
1.75L
Santa Margherita
Pinot Grigio
Italy
750ml
La Marca
Prosecco
Italy
750ml
17.97
19 Crimes Red
Blend
Australia
750ml
12.47
6.97
9.97
Ketel One
1.75L
35.99
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Captain Morgan
Spiced Rum
1.75L
23.99
Patron Silver
750ml
42.99
Bailey’s Irish
Cream
1.75L
39.99
28.99
29.99
Jameson Irish
Whiskey
1.75L
Jack Daniel’s
Black
1.75L
39.99
39.99
Johnnie Walker
Black
1.75L
59.99
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Stella Artois
24-11.2oz loose
btls
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Blue Moon
Belgian White
12-12oz btls
25.99
15.49
Yuengling Traditional
Lager
24-12oz loose btls
Heineken
24-12oz loose
btls
17.99
24.99
Heavy Seas
Loose Cannon
Hop3 Ale
6-12oz btls
Flying Dog
Variety Pack
12-12oz btls
1 -сѶфпп -.
Guinness Extra
Stout
6-11.2oz btls
Dogţsh Head
60-Minute IPA
6-12oz btls
6.99
Founders All Day
IPA
15-12oz cans
Corona Extra
24-12oz loose
btls
8.99
25.99
17.99
8.99
16.99
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E6
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
EE
. WEDNESDAY,
JANUARY 2 , 2019
The 12 best bargain wines of 2018 cost as little as $9. Stock up while you can!
As 2018 is finally
relegated to the
history books, we
can at least
console ourselves
that we drank
Wine
well while the
circus unfolded
DAVE
MCINTYRE
around us. And
we didn’t have to
drink expensively.
Here is our second annual list
of Greatest Values of the Year: a
case of 12 wines, each costing
less than $20 a bottle, that I
awarded the Great Value label.
Of the more than 250 wines I
recommended in this column
over 2018, I labeled 121, nearly
half, as Great Values. This
designation is the second part of
my personal evaluation system,
along with star ratings: three
stars for exceptional wine, two
for excellent and one for very
good. If I recommend a wine, I
believe it is a good value for its
price, given its category and its
quality. Great Values perform
above their price. A Great Value
isn’t necessarily cheap, but you
might think it would cost more
than it does when you taste it.
My Great Values in 2018
ranged in price from $4, for the
nonalcoholic sparkling rosé
grape cocktail from Welch’s, to
$45, for the Argyle Spirit Hill
Blanc de Blanc 2014, a top-notch
single-vineyard sparkling wine
from Oregon. Very few were
over $25, mostly sparkling wines
and port, two specialty
categories. Seventeen were
rosés.
I gave the Great Value label to
31 three-star wines and 42 with
2.5 stars, while 45 two-star
wines and three 1.5-stars
impressed me enough for the
designation.
And where did these come
from? France accounted for
more Great Values than any
other country, with 37. That
reflects France’s history with
wine, of course, but also some
very strong vintages in 2015 and
2016. One of my favorite wines
of the year was the Chateau de
Santenay Clos Philippe le Hardi
Hautes-Côtes de Beaune
Bourgogne 2016, a delicious and
voluptuous steal at $26. Italy
had 17 Great Values, the United
States 13 and Spain 12. Ten came
from Portugal, while countries
south of the equator had a
strong showing, including 10
from South Africa.
Most years, when I
recommend kosher wines for
Passover, my reaction is, “Okay, I
could drink this once a year.”
This year, however, I rated three
kosher wines as Great Values,
and I’d be happy drinking them
any day. One of them makes this
list of 12 under $20.
Selecting this list of greatest
values wasn’t easy. There were
many more wines that qualify,
and the list could easily look
different. I chose a variety of
categories and countries to
reflect the diversity of wines
available in our markets. This
diversity and quality are
testaments to the work done by
winemakers and importers,
especially, but also distributors
and retailers. The ranking was
determined by a simple formula
that combines price with my
quality ratings.
The top two wines were easy
selections, though. The Colonia
Las Liebres Bonarda from
Argentina and the Badenhorst
Curator white from South Africa
are the type of fist-pumping,
table-thumping, OMG-how-didthey-do-this type of wines every
oenogeek lives for. For $10 a
bottle, we can drink like royalty.
A caveat: Some of these wines
have moved to the next vintage
or are no longer available from
the distributor. Use these
recommendations as a guide to
look for other wines from these
producers. Where possible, I
have updated the store lists to
reflect the distributors’
assessment of current
availability.
food@washpost.com
McIntyre blogs at dmwineline.com.
On Twitter: @dmwine.
RECOMMENDATIONS
Exceptional
Excellent
Very Good
Fine Wines & Cheese, Once Upon a Vine
(both locations) and Union Market in
Richmond; Department of Beer and Wine
and Grape + Bean (Old Town, Rosemont)
in Alexandria; Tastings of Charlottesville
and Wine Warehouse in Charlottesville;
Vino Market in Midlothian.
1. Colonia Las Liebres Bonarda
Clasica 2018
Mendoza, Argentina, $9
Wow. Make this your winter house
red. We associate Argentina with
malbec, but here’s the country’s
sleeper red. Bonarda is known as
charbono in California, where just a
few old vineyards survive, and this
wine should make California
winemakers sorry they replanted to
cabernet. (There is a grape called
Bonarda in Italy, but the Argentine/
Californian grape actually hails
from the Savoie, in France.) This
wine, from the producers of the
popular Altos los Hormigas malbec,
is a juicy delight, packing explosive
fruit and just enough earthiness to
keep it grounded. Stock up. ABV:
13 percent.
9. La Fille de Boucher Cotes du
Rhone 2016
JENNIFER CHASE FOR THE WASHINGTON POST;
STYLING BY LISA CHERKASKY FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
A.A. Badenhorst Family Wines the Curator White Blend 2017.
JENNIFER CHASE FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Ruttenstock Gruner Veltliner 2017. It’s a good thing it comes in
a liter bottle, because you’ll be looking to keep pouring.
Imported by Altos Las Hormigas, distributed
by Bacchus: Available in the District at Ace
Beverage, Cork Wine Bar and Market, Eye
Street Cellars, Grand Cata, Magruder’s,
Paul’s of Chevy Chase, Potomac Wine &
Spirits, Rodman’s; on the list at Daikaya,
Magnolia. Available in Maryland at Bay
Ridge Wine & Spirits in Annapolis, Dawson’s
Liquors and Goska’s Liquors in Severna
Park, Chesapeake Wine Co. and Wine
Source in Baltimore, Fishpaws Marketplace
in Arnold, Iron Bridge Wine Company in
Columbia, State Line Liquors in Elkton,
Wishing Well Liquors in Easton.
Piemonte, Italy, $15
I love this for its dark cherry fruit
and aromas of old leather and
wood smoke, and for the way it
continued to gain complexity over
several evenings. The distributor
is out of stock for this vintage, but
stores may still have some — and
the winery also produces a
delicious barbera and nebbiolo.
ABV: 13 percent.
Imported and distributed by Dionysos:
Available in the District at Cleveland Park
Wine and Spirits, Rodman’s. Available in
Maryland at Balducci’s and Bradley Food
& Beverage in Bethesda, Wine Source in
Baltimore. Available in Virginia at
Balducci’s in McLean, Screwtop Wine Bar
& Cheese Shop in Arlington, Unwined
(Alexandria, Belleview).
11. 1+1=3 Cava Brut
GORAN KOSANOVIC FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Dave McIntyre’s top Great Value pick of 2018 is the Colonia Las Liebres Bonarda Clasica. At just $9, this should be your new house red.
Imported by Broadbent Selections,
distributed by Country Vintner: Available in
the District at 1 West Dupont Circle Wine &
Liquors, Grape Intentions, Manhattan
Market, Pearson’s, Rodman’s; on the list at
Millie’s in Spring Valley. Available in
Maryland at Beers & Cheers Too and
Downtown Crown Wine and Beer in
Gaithersburg, the Bottle Shop in Potomac,
Georgetown Square Wine and Beer in
Bethesda, Old Town Market in Kensington,
Rodman’s in White Flint, Wells Discount
Liquors in Baltimore; on the list at
Gertrude’s in Baltimore. Available in Virginia
at Cheesetique in Shirlington; on the list at
Northside Social (Arlington, Falls Church).
3. Ruttenstock Gruner Veltliner
2017
Austria, $12 (1 liter)
Gruner veltliner is one of my
favorite white wines; top bottlings
offer impressive complexity and
nuance, while basic offerings such
as this Ruttenstock provide pure,
simple pleasure. Put this in the
“patio pounder” category, as it
goes down easily. So it’s a good
thing it comes in a liter-size bottle,
because you’ll be looking for the
extra wine! ABV: 12 percent.
Klaus Wittauer Selection, imported by
Select Wines and Siema, distributed by
Siema in the District, Maryland and most of
Virginia, by Select Wines in Northern
Virginia: Available in the District at
Cleveland Park Wine and Spirits, Wagshal’s
(Massachusetts Avenue, New Mexico
Avenue), Wardman Wines; on the list at Cafe
Berlin. Available in Maryland at Cranberry
Liquors in Westminster, Dunkirk Wine &
Spirits in Dunkirk, Hop N Grape in North
Bethesda, Orion Wine & Spirits in Frederick,
Town & Country Wine Liquor Etc. and
Wishing Well Liquors in Easton, Wine Bin in
Ellicott City. Available in Virginia at Bon
Vivant Wine & Brew in Smithfield, Capital
Wine in Fredericksburg, Chain Bridge Cellars
in McLean, Foods of All Nations and Tastings
of Charlottesville in Charlottesville, Great
Bottles in Suffolk, Little Washington Winery
Tasting Room in Washington, Oakton Wine
Shop in Oakton, Screwtop Wine Bar &
Cheese Shop in Arlington, Unwined
(Alexandria, Belleview), Vienna Vintner in
Vienna, Vino Market in Midlothian; on the
list at Rincome in Arlington, Trummer’s on
Main in Clifton.
4. Yalumba the Y Series Viognier
2017
South Australia, $13
This is a lovely viognier, with scents
Distributed by M. Touton: Available in the
District at Burka’s Wine & Liquor, Cairo
Wine & Liquor, Capital City Wine & Spirits,
Cleveland Park Wine and Spirits, Eye
Street Cellars, Harry’s Reserve Fine Wine
& Spirits, Magruder’s, Morris Miller Wine &
Liquor, Rodman’s, Wine Specialist.
Available in Maryland at the Bottle Shop in
Potomac, Bradley Food & Beverage in
Bethesda, Moti’s Market in Rockville, Old
Farm Liquors and Riverside Liquors in
Frederick, Quench! Beer-Wine-Deli in Silver
Spring, Silesia Liquors in Fort Washington,
the Wine Harvest in Potomac.
10. Massucco Dolcetto d’Alba
2017
2. A.A. Badenhorst Family Wines
the Curator White Blend 2017
Swartland, South Africa, $11
I have not made a secret of my love
for the wines of Adi Badenhorst,
especially his Secateurs chenin
blanc, which I have reviewed here
for several vintages and regard as
a perennial “great value” at about
$15. When I tasted the Curator, a
blend of chenin blanc, chardonnay
and viognier, I thought it was a
more expensive wine in
Badenhorst’s line, but no, it is
priced even lower. It floored me
with its quality for the price, racy
acidity, medium body and pure fruit
unencumbered by oak. This is
another “patio pounder,” a “table
pounder,” whatever cliche you
want to use for an exciting,
inexpensive wine. The Curator red
blend is also delicious and a great
value, though the white has an
edge. Run. Don’t walk. ABV:
12.5 percent.
Rhone Valley, France, $18
This lively kosher wine is just what
we expect from Cotes du Rhone:
bright dark fruit flavors with a hint
of wild herbs and mountain air. I’d
drink this any day of the year, but
preferably the day after it’s
opened; it gets even better with
some air. Kosher for Passover. ABV:
14 percent.
GORAN KOSANOVIC FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Yalumba’s Y Series Viognier 2017 has
scents of jasmine and honeysuckle.
GORAN KOSANOVIC FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Domaine des Pasquiers Cotes du Rhone
offers everything we want in such a wine.
DEB LINDSEY FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Chateau La Mothe du Barry Bordeaux
Superieur is deep, rich and minerally.
Penedes, Spain, $17
This is a perennial favorite of
mine for bargain bubbly, from a
local importer and with great
availability throughout the region.
It is the classic Cava grapes of
xarello, parellada and macabeo,
fermented and aged in the
traditional champagne method,
with the second (bubbly)
fermentation in the bottle. Enjoy
this with spicy salami, pasta or
other light foods, or just turn a
tough workday into a celebration.
ABV: 11.5 percent.
Imported by Grapes of Spain, distributed
by Elite: Widely available in the District
and Virginia at independent wine retailers,
grocers and Whole Foods Markets.
Available in Maryland at Balducci’s in
Bethesda, Old Line Fine Wine, Spirits and
Bistro in Beltsville, Snider’s Super Foods
and Veridian Market & Wine in Silver
Spring, Wine Source in Baltimore.
12. Dila-O Rkatsiteli-Mtsvane
Dry Amber Wine 2016
of jasmine and honeysuckle, and a
hint of ginger on the full-bodied
palate. Wine Spectator magazine
agreed, ranking it in its top 100
wines of the year. So buy it up while
you can! ABV: 13 percent.
that define our image of southern
France. The balance and depth are
exceptional. It could be enjoyed
and admired by itself, but it
exceeds with any roast meat. ABV:
14 percent.
Imported by Negociants USA; distributed by
Country Vintner: Available in the District at
Cairo Wine & Liquor, Calvert Woodley, Chevy
Chase Wine & Spirits, Paul’s of Chevy
Chase, Rodman’s, Whole Foods Market (P
Street, South Capitol), Wide World of Wines;
on the list at Eno Wine Bar. Available in
Maryland at the Bottle Shop in Potomac,
Decanter Fine Wines in Columbia,
Georgetown Square Wine and Beer and
Geste Beer and Wine in Bethesda, Pine
Orchard Liquors in Ellicott City, Ridgely
Wines & Spirits in Lutherville, Rip’s Wine
and Spirit Shop in Bowie, Rodman’s in White
Flint, Snider’s Super Foods in Silver Spring,
Valley Wine & Spirits in Hagerstown, Wells
Discount Liquors and Wine Source in
Baltimore, Woodmore Wine and Spirits in
Lanham, World Market in Rockville; on the
list at Harry Browne’s in Annapolis. Available
in Virginia at Locke Store in Millwood, Total
Wine & More (McLean, Fredericksburg),
Wegmans (various locations), World Market
(Falls Church, Pentagon City); on the list at
Rincome in Arlington.
Imported and distributed by Well Crafted
Wine and Beverage Co.: Available in the
District at MacArthur Beverages. Available
in Maryland at Wine Works in Baltimore; on
the list at Antrim 1844 in Tenleytown.
Available in Virginia at Cheesetique (various
locations), Farm Fresh and Union Market in
Richmond, Leesburg Vintner in Leesburg,
Swirl & Sip in Fairfax, Uncork’d in Suffolk.
5. Domaine des Pasquiers Cotes
du Rhone 2017
Rhone Valley, France, $14
This red offers everything we want
in a Cotes du Rhone: dark fruit
flavors, the “garrigue” of wild
herbs, and a hint of the mistral
wind and Mediterranean sea air
6. Chateau La Mothe du Barry
Bordeaux Superieur 2016
Bordeaux, $14
This wine tastes much more
sophisticated than the price would
imply, a factor of good winemaking
and an exceptional vintage in
Bordeaux. It’s deep, rich and
minerally, with dark fruit flavors
and amazing persistence. Buy
several bottles to drink over the
next few years with steaks, roasts
or anything from the grill. Certified
organic. ABV: 14 percent.
Distributed by Elite: Available in the District
at Arrowine and Spirits, the Bottle Shop,
District Liquors, Downtown Liquors, D’Vines,
Lion’s Fine Wine & Spirits, Morris Miller
Wine & Liquor, P & C Market, Rodman’s, S &
R Liquors, Streets Market (Massachusetts
Avenue), Tenley Market, Tenley Wine &
Liquor, Virginia Market, Wardman Wines,
Watergate Vintners & Spirits, Whole Foods
Market (Foggy Bottom, H Street, P Street,
Tenleytown), Yes! Organic Market (Georgia
Avenue); on the list at 1230 DC, Bacio
Pizzeria, Prego Again. Available in Maryland
at Balducci’s in Bethesda, Cheers & Spirits
in Arnold, Dawson’s Liquors in Severna
Park, Decanter Fine Wines in Columbia,
Greenbelt Co-op in Greenbelt, Hops & Vines
in Odenton, Old Farm Liquors and Riverside
Liquors in Frederick, Shawan Liquors in
Hunt Valley, Snider’s Super Foods in Silver
Spring, Wine Cellars of Annapolis, Wine
Underground in Baltimore, Yes! Organic
Market in Hyattsville. Available in Virginia at
Arrowine and Cheese, Grand Cru and
Twisted Vines Bottleshop in Arlington,
Balducci’s (Alexandria, McLean), Branch &
Vine and Libbie Market in Richmond, Lee’s
Market and Planet Wine & Gourmet in
Alexandria, Leesburg Vintner, Norm’s Beer &
Wine in Vienna, Streets Market (Alexandria,
Arlington), Wine Warehouse in
Charlottesville, Whole Foods Market (various
locations), Secret Garden Cafe in Occoquan.
7. Avalon Pinot Noir 2016
California, $10
Really good California pinot noir at
$10 that actually tastes like pinot
noir and not some steroidal
cocktail mixed from a recipe of
concentrates and flavorings? I’m
in. The winemakers at Avalon have
sourced some excellent fruit from
coastal vineyards, and enough of it
to get it into national distribution.
ABV: 13.5 percent.
Distributed by Bacchus in the District and
Maryland, Republic National in Virginia:
Available in the District at Ace Beverage,
Magruder’s, Paul’s of Chevy Chase,
Rodman’s. Available in Maryland at Bay
Ridge Wine & Spirits in Annapolis,
Fairgrounds Discount Beverages in
Timonium, Hop N Grape in North Bethesda,
Total Wine & More (Laurel, Towson), the
Wine Harvest (Gaithersburg, Potomac), Wine
Source in Baltimore. Available in Virginia at
Ashburn Wine Shop in Ashburn, Dominion
Wine and Beer in Falls Church, Leesburg
Vintner in Leesburg, Total Wine & More
(various locations), Vienna Vintner in Vienna.
8. Chateau Moulinat 2015/2016
Bordeaux, France, $16
Textbook Bordeaux, offering the
traditional “pencil” graphite
aromas over scents of plum, cherry
and black currant. And the wine
kept getting better over a few days,
suggesting that it will last for
several years in your cellar and
that it will reward decanting.
Sustainably farmed, it is packaged
in a traditional wooden box for a
case. Since I wrote this up in April,
the wine has moved to the 2016
vintage and the price has gone up
a bit. That shouldn’t deter you from
trying it. ABV: 13 percent.
Imported and distributed by Le Storie:
Available in the District at Ace Beverage,
DCanter. Available in Virginia at Arrowine
and Cheese in Arlington; Chain Bridge
Cellars in McLean; Corks & Kegs; J. Emerson
Georgia, $15
Rkatsiteli is grown in some states
in the eastern United States, but
its homeland is Georgia, the
nation in the Caucasus region
that lays claim to being the
birthplace of wine. This Dila-O is
blended with mtsvane, another
native Georgian grape, and is an
“amber” wine, fermented on its
skins in the traditional style that
is enjoying a new vogue, and aged
underground in clay qvevri.
Alcohol by volume: 13 percent.
Imported and distributed by Georgian
Wine House: Available in the District at
Batch 13, Cordial Fine Wine & Spirits
(Union Market, the Wharf), Potomac Wine
& Spirits, Yes! Organic Market (12th Street
NE); on the list at Compass Rose, Maydan,
Maxwell Park, Supra, Tabard Inn, Tail Up
Goat, Tyber Creek. Available in Maryland
at Annebeth’s and Mills Fine Wine and
Spirits in Annapolis, Bin 604 Wine Sellers
and Wine Source in Baltimore.
Availability information is based on
distributor records. Wines might not
be in stock at every listed store and
might be sold at additional stores.
Prices are approximate. Check
Winesearcher.com to verify
availability, or ask a favorite wine
store to order through a distributor.
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2 , 2019
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
E7
EE
Chopped Winter Salad
With Meyer Lemon Vinaigrette
8 servings
The sturdy lettuces hold well at room temperature, retaining both
crunch and color for a couple of hours.
MAKE AHEAD: The vinaigrette can be refrigerated up to 4 hours in
advance. Shake to re-emulsify and bring to room temperature before
using. Chop the vegetables and fruit, then toss in lemon juice up to an
hour before serving; toss them with the dressing just before serving.
From Bring It! columnist Cathy Barrow.
Ingredients
For the vinaigrette
2 Meyer lemons, each cut in
half
1/ teaspoon minced shallot
2
1/ teaspoon kosher salt
2
1 teaspoon honey, or more as
needed
1/ teaspoon freshly ground
8
white pepper, or more as
needed
1/ cup extra-virgin olive oil, or
4
more as needed
For the salad
Leaves from 2 heads radicchio
(softball size), carefully
separated, then rinsed and
dried
Leaves from 2 heads green or
red Belgian endive (about the
length of your hand), carefully
separated, then rinsed and
dried
4 ribs celery, leaves attached
1 fennel bulb, stalks removed
and some fronds reserved
1 firm, crisp apple, such as
Granny Smith
4 radishes
1/ cup sunflower seeds,
2
toasted, for garnish (see
NOTE)
Steps
For the vinaigrette: Juice 3 of
the lemon halves into a small
jar. Add the shallot and salt; let
the mixture sit for 5 minutes
(to slightly pickle the shallot),
then add the honey and white
pepper. Seal and shake lightly
to blend, then add the oil. Seal
and shake again, vigorously, to
form an emulsified dressing.
Taste and add more lemon
juice, oil, honey, salt and/or
pepper, as needed.
For the salad: Reserve 8 bowlshaped leaves from the heads
of radicchio, each about the
GORAN KOSANOVIC FOR THE WASHINGTON POST; FOOD STYLING BY BONNIE S. BENWICK/THE WASHINGTON POST
size of your palm. Working
with a few at a time, stack and
roll up the remaining leaves,
then cut them crosswise into
1/ -inch slices and add them to a
4
large salad bowl as you go.
As you prep the next ingredients, add them to the bowl, too.
Stack the endive leaves, then
cut them crosswise into 1/2-inch
slices. Cut the celery ribs
lengthwise in half, and then cut
the halves into slim wedges
and then cut all those crosswise in half. Cut the radishes
into very thin rounds.
Use your clean hands to toss
together the salad ingredients
in the bowl. To keep the components from browning, squeeze
the juice of the remaining lemon half (or what’s left of it) over
them and toss gently to coat.
When ready to serve, add half
the vinaigrette to the salad and
toss gently to coat. Taste, and
add more of the vinaigrette as
needed. Garnish with sunflower seeds and the reserved fennel fronds. If you are serving
the salad at a buffet or at the
table, place the reserved radicchio leaves on a pretty platter
and fill each with about 3/4 cup
of salad. Garnish each with a
reserved fennel frond or two.
NOTE: Toast the sunflower
seeds in a small, dry skillet over
medium heat for a few minutes, until fragrant and lightly
browned, shaking the pan to
avoid scorching. Cool completely before using.
Nutrition | Per serving: 140 calories, 3 g
protein, 10 g carbohydrates, 11 g fat, 2 g
saturated fat, 0 mg cholesterol, 105 mg
sodium, 3 g dietary fiber, 5 g sugar
into 1/2-inch wide slices (add
the leaves too). Halve the fennel bulb lengthwise, discard
the core and dice each half into
1/ -inch cubes. Cut the apple in
2
half, discarding the core; cut
Recipe tested by Cathy Barrow; email
questions to food@washpost.com
Crunchy, bitter greens and a nicely acidic vinaigrette are a winter treat
BRING IT! FROM E1
my winter salad. If you can find
puntarelle, frisee or mache, mix
and match your greens at will.
But do make sure to chop the
sturdier leaves into bite-size
pieces. The juicy apple bits could
just as easily be pear or
grapefruit or clementine. Adding
the crunch of sunflower seeds,
toasted of course, makes an
impeccable topping, but pepitas,
sliced almonds and pistachios
are welcome substitutions.
You’ll be getting in some good
knife-skills practice here,
chopping the ingredients into
morsels that blend into a multiingredient mouthful. Some
lettuces can be sliced into
ribbons, the apples into mini
wedges and the fennel cubed, no
bigger than whole almonds. Thin
rounds of red radish add color as
well as crunch, but you could
also stack those rounds and cut
them into tiny matchsticks.
A citrusy vinaigrette brings
the elements together; using
Meyer lemon softens the acidic
edge just a bit yet still offsets the
bitter greens. You also can use
standard lemons and add a touch
more honey. I’m looking forward
to making the vinaigrette with
blood oranges when they are in
season.
By the way, if you have a
By the way, if you
have a special honey
that arrived in a gift
box, use it.
special honey that arrived in a
gift box, use it. I was delighted
when I made the dressing
recently with one that was chiliinfused. I double this vinaigrette
recipe, because it keeps well and
I use a splash or two to flavor
leftover roasted vegetables as
well.
Top the salad with the crunch
of toasted nuts or seeds and then
toss the whole thing using your
hands. You can feel it: There is no
better way to ensure the salad
won’t be overdressed.
Yes, this is the salad I will lean
on heavily through the winter
months. Invite me, and I’ll bring
it along. That, and the hope of
spring, will keep my spirits up.
food@washpost.com
Barrow is a Washington cookbook
author. She’ll join Wednesday’s Free
Range chat at noon:
live.washingtonpost.com.
FREE RANGE EXCERPTS
The right book can give
a young chef a good start
Each week, we field questions
about all things food at
live.washingtonpost.com. Here
are edited excerpts from that
chat. Recipes whose names are
capitalized can be found in our
Recipe Finder at
washingtonpost.com/recipes.
Q: My son, age 11, is pretty good
in the kitchen with stuff he likes
— eggs, omelets, pancakes,
cookies, muffins. I bought him an
apron, oven mitts and some
utensils for Christmas. I came up
short, though, on finding a good
cookbook that will let him
branch out into general cooking.
I’m looking for one with simple,
basic, all-around recipes and
techniques, a kind of advancedbeginner primer. He’s too old for
“kids” cookbooks, and the books
aimed at college freshmen don’t
fit either. Any good
recommendations?
A: I will always offer this
underappreciated title for
beginner cooks: “Cooking School
Secrets for Real World Cooks,” by
Linda Carucci. Basic information,
uncomplicated recipes, lots of
tips and explanations for why
things work (and don’t).
Bonnie S. Benwick
A: Your son sounds a lot like my
10-year-old niece. I gave her a copy
of “The Complete Cookbook for
Young Chefs” from America’s Test
Kitchen, and she loves it. They also
have a kids’ site you two might
enjoy.
Becky Krystal
Q: I made Guinness lamb stew
for Christmas dinner. I bought
the lamb (already cut up and
frozen) at an organic farm, and
when I defrosted it on Christmas
Eve, nearly every chunk had
silverskin on it. I tediously cut off
as much as I could. Tell me, was
this necessary? When I served
the stew, the meat was fallingapart tender, so I wonder if the
silverskin would have dissolved.
(Also, it was delicious!)
A: I think you did the right thing.
Generally, that tough membrane
does not dissolve, but if your stew
cooks for hours, some of it might
have.
B.S.B.
Q: Is there any downside to
making cookies smaller than the
recipe calls for? I make a variety
for the holidays (typically drop as
well as roll-and-slice), and some
cookies are so big that they
dominate the cookie plate and
people don’t want to take more
than one. I wonder this each
holiday season, and now I want
to be prepared for next year!
A: The only downside I can think
of is the texture might be affected
— for example, if you have a
cookie that has particularly
crispy edges and a soft, chewy
center, then that might be harder
to accomplish with a smaller
cookie.
Kara Elder
Q: Which type of coffee machine
makes the strongest coffee? I
have played around with brand,
filter and grind. I would like to
know how the home barista can
reproduce Starbucks-strength
coffee.
A: That’s a complicated question
that requires a nuanced answer.
But first let me bottom-line a
basic answer for you: Pulls of
espresso will give you the most
jolt per ounce, between 30 to 50
milligrams of caffeine per ounce.
(Compare that with brewed or
drip coffee, which gives you 65 to
120 mgs of caffeine per EIGHT
ounces.)
But are you really going to buy
an espresso machine for home?
The good ones will set you back
some serious cash. Plus, you said
you were looking for strongest
“coffee,” not espresso, and I’ll
take that at face value.
According to at least one site,
Turkish coffee and percolator
coffee methods will result in the
strongest java, with the highest
caffeine content. But in my
humble opinion, those processes
also brew crummy coffee. You’re
trading caffeine for flavor.
Most of the caffeine extracted
from coffee beans occurs in the
first minute or so of brewing.
Some say that dark roasts will
give you more caffeine, but I
haven’t personally tested that. So
here’s what I would suggest:
Invest in a simple pourover
device, like a Kalita Wave or a
Hario v60. Use the standard
filters for each device. Now here’s
the trick: I would increase the
amount of coffee that you brew
for a single cup. Generally
speaking, coffee is brewed at a 16to-1 ratio, meaning 16 parts water
to 1 part coffee. I would lower
that ratio to 12-to-1 or 13-to-1. I
would also grind the beans finer
than you would for a typical
pourover. I would grind them
somewhere between a drip and
espresso grind; not sandlike, but
not a powder either. That way,
you will use more beans per cup
and you will slow down the initial
extraction. Also, make sure your
water is between 195 and 205
degrees Fahrenheit for the
proper extraction.
If you’re still not satisfied with
the brew strength, you could
lower the ratio even more, use
dark roast beans or, God forbid,
try robusta beans (instead of the
common arabica beans), which
have higher caffeine content.
Tim Carman
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Pasta Fagioli With Zucchini
4 servings (makes 6 cups)
This feel-good comfort food is powered by plant protein, chock-full of vegetables, and it incorporates whole-grain
pasta. Make a pot of it on a weekend to
have at your fingertips in the refrigerator
for busy weeknights.
MAKE AHEAD: The dish can be refrigerated for up to 4 days.
Adapted from “Weeknight Wonders:
Delicious, Healthy Dinners in 30 Minutes
or Less,” by Ellie Krieger (Houghton
Mifflin Harcourt, 2013).
Ingredients
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
1 small onion, coarsely chopped
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 large or 2 medium zucchini (about 12
ounces total), quartered lengthwise
and then cut into 1/2-inch chunks
15 ounces canned, low-sodium
cannellini beans
141/2 ounces canned, no-salt-added
diced tomatoes and their juices
3 cups low-sodium chicken broth
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground pepper
1/2 cup dried whole-wheat elbow
macaroni or other similarly shaped
pasta
1/ cup freshly grated Parmigiano3
Reggiano cheese
Steps
Heat the oil in a medium pot over
medium-high heat. Once the oil shimmers, stir in the onion and cook for 2 or
3 minutes, just until softened. Add the
garlic and cook for 1 minute more.
Meanwhile, coarsely chop the zucchini.
Drain and rinse the beans, then add to
the pot along with the tomatoes and
their juices, the broth, salt and pepper.
Once the mixture begins to bubble at
the edges, stir in the zucchini and pasta.
Once the mixture begins to boil, reduce
the heat to medium and cook for about
12 minutes, stirring occasionally, until
the pasta is tender (if the pasta is
thicker than elbow macaroni, it may
need a few more minutes).
Serve hot, topped with the cheese.
Nutrition | Per serving: 280 calories, 14 g protein, 35 g
carbohydrates, 11 g fat, 3 g saturated fat, 10 mg
cholesterol, 490 mg sodium, 8 g dietary fiber, 7 g
sugar
Recipe tested by Lisa Cherkasky; email questions to
food@washpost.com
Honey-Mustard Glazed
Salmon With Endive
and Green Apple Salad
4 servings, Healthy
These salmon fillets are slathered
with a tasty coating and served over a
crisp salad.
Eating fish at least twice a week is a
healthful habit most of us should get
hooked on.
Serve hot, or chilled (and good over
any kind of salad greens). So make it for
dinner one night and pack in a cooler for
a take-to-work lunch a day or two after.
MAKE AHEAD: The roasted fish can
be refrigerated for up to 2 days; the salad
should be made right before serving.
Adapted from “Weeknight Wonders:
Delicious, Healthy Dinners in 30 Minutes or Less,” by Ellie Krieger (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2013).
Ingredients
3 tablespoons Dijon mustard
2 tablespoons honey
Juice of 1/2 lemon
Four 6-ounce skinless salmon fillets,
preferably center-cut
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black
pepper
5 medium Belgian endive (about 1
pound)
1/2 large Granny Smith apple, cored
About 20 fresh chives (2 tablespoons
finely chopped)
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
1/4 teaspoon salt
PHOTOS BY STACY ZARIN GOLDBERG FOR THE WASHINGTON POST; FOOD STYLING BY LISA CHERKASKY FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
CLOCKWISE FROM ABOVE:
Pasta Fagioli With Zucchini,
Breakfast Smoothie Pack,
Roasted Vegetable Trio, Quick
Quinoa Pilaf.
Steps
Position an oven rack in the upper
third of the oven (5 or 6 inches from
the broiler element); preheat to 400
degrees. Line a rimmed baking sheet
with aluminum foil.
Whisk together the mustard, honey
and 1/2 teaspoon of the lemon juice in a
small bowl.
Arrange the salmon fillets on the
baking sheet, skinned sides down,
then use half the pepper to season
each one. Drizzle a heaping tablespoon of the honey-mustard sauce on
top of each fillet. Roast (upper rack)
for 10 minutes per inch of thickness.
Increase the oven temperature to
broil; broil for a minute or two, just
until the fillets are lightly browned.
Watch them closely to avoid overcooking.
Meanwhile, pour the remaining lemon juice into a medium bowl. Cut the
endive crosswise into 1/2-inch pieces
and add to the bowl, discarding the
endive’s tough ends. Toss to coat.
Cut the apple into thin wedges, then
cut the wedges into 1/2-inch pieces;
add to the bowl and toss to coat.
Cut the chives into 1/2-inch pieces,
then add to the bowl along with the
oil, salt and the remaining 1/4 teaspoon of pepper, tossing to incorporate.
Divide the salad among individual
plates, then top each portion with a
salmon fillet. Serve warm or at room
temperature.
Nutrition | Per serving: 490 calories, 36 g protein, 19
g carbohydrates, 30 g fat, 6 g saturated fat, 95 mg
cholesterol, 420 mg sodium, 5 g dietary fiber, 13 g
sugar
Recipe tested by Lisa Cherkasky; email questions to
food@washpost.com
Roasted Vegetable Trio
4 servings (makes a generous 3 cups total),
Healthy
This out-of-the-ordinary trio of common ingredients is made supremely
tasty with an easy sprinkle of spices.
It’s a simple way to get more vegetables into your life. Serve hot, alongside
rotisserie chicken one night; topped
with fried egg on another night; and at
room temperature, as a snack with
hummus.
MAKE AHEAD: The vegetables can
be prepped and refrigerated in an airtight container for up to 4 days.
From nutritionist and cookbook author Ellie Krieger.
Quick Quinoa Pilaf
Breakfast Smoothie Pack
4 servings (makes 4 cups), Healthy
1 serving (makes about 2 1/2 cups), Healthy
This quinoa recipe takes less than 30 minutes, start to finish, and makes for a
no-brainer side dish or base for a grain bowl.
Whole grains keep you fuller longer, help keep your blood sugar steady, and have
more antioxidants and other nutrients than refined grains.
MAKE AHEAD: The pilaf can be refrigerated for up to 4 days, and it can be reheated
or served at room temperature.
From nutritionist and cookbook author Ellie Krieger.
This thick, milkshake-like recipe will put you on the right track for busy mornings:
The idea is to fill separate containers with all the ingredients (except the milk) for an
individual portion to keep in the freezer. In the morning, you just add milk and blend.
The smoothies come out frothy and sweet from the ripe banana — no added sugar
needed — and super satisfying with almonds for extra protein and healthful fat, and
fiber from whole fruit and oats.
A good breakfast sets the tone for the rest of the day. Shifting your eating pattern
earlier while eating less at night has multiple benefits including heart health, blood
sugar control and weight management.
MAKE AHEAD: The pack can be frozen for a month.
From nutritionist and cookbook author Ellie Krieger.
Ingredients
3 large scallions
1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
1 cup quinoa (rinsed)
13/4 cups water
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/8 teaspoon freshly ground black
pepper
1/3 cup sliced almonds, toasted (see
NOTE)
Steps
Thinly slice the scallions, keeping the
white/light green parts and dark-green
parts separate.
Heat the oil in a medium saucepan over
medium heat. Once the oil shimmers,
add the white/light green sliced scallions and cook for 1 minute, stirring
occasionally, until they have softened.
Add the quinoa and cook for 30 seconds, stirring, until evenly coated. Add
the water and bring to a boil, then
reduce the heat to low, cover and cook
for 15 minutes, or until the water is
absorbed. Remove from the heat and
allow to sit and steam (covered) for 5
minutes, then uncover and fluff with a
fork.
Stir in the salt, pepper, almonds and the
sliced dark scallion greens, and serve.
NOTE: Toast the almonds in a small,
dry skillet over medium-low heat, until
fragrant and lightly browned. Cool before using.
Nutrition | Per serving: 230 calories, 7 g protein, 26 g
carbohydrates, 11 g fat, 1 g saturated fat, 0 mg
cholesterol, 160 mg sodium, 4 g dietary fiber, 0 g
sugar
Recipe tested by Lisa Cherkasky; email questions to
food@washpost.com
Ingredients
1 medium-size very ripe banana, cut
into chunks
3/4 cup fresh or frozen cut fruit, such as
berries, pitted cherries, mango,
peaches
3 tablespoons old-fashioned rolled
oats
3 tablespoons sliced almonds
11/4 cups milk of choice (whole, low-fat
or plant-based milk)
Steps
Combine the banana, fruit, oats and
almonds in a lidded plastic container.
Seal and freeze.
When ready to eat, empty the contents
of the container into a blender. Add the
milk and blend until smooth. (Even
when well blended, the smoothie will
have some texture from the oats, nuts
and fruit.)
Nutrition | Per serving (using 1 percent low-fat milk):
330 calories, 8 g protein, 57 g carbohydrates, 10 g fat,
1 g saturated fat, 0 mg cholesterol, 0 mg sodium, 9 g
dietary fiber, 29 g sugar
Recipe tested by Bonnie S. Benwick; email questions
to food@washpost.com
Ingredients
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
1/2 teaspoon paprika (sweet)
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon ground cumin
1/4 teaspoon granulated garlic (garlic
powder)
1/8 teaspoon freshly ground black
pepper
4 cups cauliflower florets (one 12ounce package) cut further as needed
into 1-inch florets
3 large carrots, scrubbed well and cut
on the diagonal into 1-inch-long
pieces, thicker pieces halved
lengthwise
1 medium red bell pepper, stemmed,
seeded and cut into 2-by-1-inch
pieces
Steps
Preheat the oven to 425 degrees. Line
a rimmed baking sheet with aluminum foil, if desired (for easy cleanup).
Whisk together the oil, paprika, salt,
cumin, garlic and pepper in a mixing
bowl. Add the vegetables and toss to
coat.
Spread them out on the baking sheet;
roast (middle rack) for about 20 minutes, stirring once or twice, until they
are tender and browned in spots,
about 20 minutes.
Nutrition | Per serving: 120 calories, 3 g protein, 12 g
carbohydrates, 8 g fat, 1 g saturated fat, 0 mg
cholesterol, 360 mg sodium, 4 g dietary fiber, 5 g
sugar
Recipe tested by Lisa Cherkasky; email questions to
food@washpost.com
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