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2019-01-02 Republican Herald

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NEW YEAR’S STAPLE
UNHAPPY NEW YEAR
Many eat pork, sauerkraut
dinner for good luck | 3
Penn State falls to
Kentucky in Citrus Bowl | 11
www.republicanherald.com
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2019
SOUND OF LIFE
Baby rescued from rubble in Russia | 4
7-day home delivery $5.30 / $1.50
Border briefing on tap
Trump tweet to Congressional leaders: ‘Let’s make a deal?’
BY ZEKE MILLER AND LISA MASCARO
ASSOCiAtEd PRESS
WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump on Tuesday invited congressional leaders to a White House
briefing on border security as the
partial government shutdown
dragged on over funding for a border
wall, with Trump tweeting, “Let’s
make a deal?”
The briefing would happen today,
the day before the Democrats take
control of the House, but the exact
agenda wasn’t immediately clear,
according to a person with knowledge of the briefing who was not
authorized to speak publicly about
the issue and spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity.
Republican leaders will be attending. Senate Majority Leader Mitch
McConnell, as well as the top incoming House Republicans, Kevin
McCarthy of California and Steve
Scalise of Louisiana, are planning to
be at the briefing, according to aides.
Retiring Speaker Paul Ryan will not.
Nancy Pelosi, who is expected to
take over as House speaker, was also
expected to attend, but she and top
Senate Democrat Chuck Schumer
were awaiting more details. Pelosi
said Democrats would take action to
“end the Trump Shutdown” by passing legislation Thursday to reopen
government.
“We are giving the Republicans
the opportunity to take yes for an
answer,” Pelosi wrote In a letter to
colleagues late Tuesday. “Senate
Republicans have already supported
this legislation, and if they reject it
now, they will be fully complicit in
chaos and destruction of the President’s third shutdown of his term.”
The White House invitation
comes after House Democrats
released their plan to re-open the
government without approving
money for a border wall — unveiling
two bills to fund shuttered government agencies and put hundreds of
thousands of federal workers back
on the job. They planned to pass
them as soon as the new Congress
convenes Thursday.
Trump spent the weekend saying
Democrats should return to WashASSOCiAtEd PRESS
ington to negotiate, firing off Twitter taunts. He then revised his aides’ People gather near the Capitol in Washington as New Year’s Day comes
comments to state that he really still to a close Tuesday with the partial government shutdown in its second
wants to build a border wall.
week. The new House majority led by Democrat Nancy Pelosi gavels
Please see DEAL, Page 5
into session this week with legislation ready to end the shutdown.
WADING INTO 2019
Plunge
marks
decade
Letter undermines
cardinal on abuse
BY NICOLE WINFIELD
ASSOCiAtEd PRESS
BY AMY MARCHIANO
StAFF wRitER
VALLEY VIEW — The
water was still cold Tuesday
despite temperatures in the
50s, but that didn’t stop about
40 people from jumping in for
the Pine Creek Polar Bear
Plunge.
This year marked the 10th
anniversary of the event that
benefits Pine Creek Trout
Nursery, a cooperative of the
state Fish and Boat Commission and Valley View Gun
Club.
Participants splashed into
the water at 1:02 p.m. They all
had to wear shoes and were
not permitted to dive.
“It’s always good to start
the new year jumping into
freezing cold water,” Christina E. Hale, a magisterial district judge in Frackville, said.
Tuesday wasn’t the first
time she participated, having
done so four years ago.
“I’m still numb,” Hale said
of her cold feet.
Allison Hein, 31, of Minersville, wore a Batman T-shirt
and shorts. She was also
numb upon getting out of the
water she described as “invigorating.” Hein said the water
was that cold she wanted the
experience to be over as
quickly as possible. She said
the “thrill” was fun and exactly what she expected.
Ed Koropchak, 40, of Pottsville, admitted he was disappointed that the outside temperatures were not frigid.
“I wanted it cold. A polar
JACQUELiNE dORMER / StAFF PHOtOGRAPHER
Christina E. Hale, Fountain Springs, center, makes her way across Pine Creek with fellow thrill-seekers Tuesday during the 10th annual Pine Creek Polar Bear Plunge in
Valley View Park. The event benefits Pine Creek Trout Nursery.
LEFT: Randy Koppenhaver, Hegins, has participated in all 10 Pine Creek Polar Bear Plunge
events. RIGHT: Joe Gudinas, Pottsville, takes a sip of boilo before dipping into Pine Creek.
plunge is supposed to be
cold,” he said before entering the water wearing an
ugly Santa sweater over a
Superman T-shirt, shorts
and sneakers.
Koropchak marked his
third time participating.
“It restarts the year. It
washes away the year and
starts the new year fresh,”
he said.
Randy Koppenhaver, 70, of
Please see PLUNGE, Page 5
VATICAN CITY — The Vatican blocked U.S. bishops from
taking measures to address
the clergy sex abuse scandal
because U.S. church leaders
didn’t discuss the legally problematic proposals with the
Holy See enough beforehand,
according to a letter obtained
by The Associated Press.
The Nov. 11 letter from the
Vatican’s Cardinal Marc Ouellet provides the primary reason that Rome balked at the
measures that were to be voted on by the U.S. Conference
of Catholic Bishops at its Nov.
12-14 meeting. The blocked
vote stunned abuse survivors
and other Catholics who were
demanding action from U.S.
bishops to address clergy sex
abuse and cover-up.
Ouellet’s letter undermines
the version of events provided
by the conference president,
Cardinal Daniel DiNardo. It
could also provide fodder for
questions during a spiritual
retreat of U.S. bishops, dedicated to the abuse crisis, that
opens Wednesday in Chicago.
They may want to know
why, as Ouellet noted in the
letter, the draft proposals only
arrived at the Vatican on Nov.
8, four days before the U.S.
bishops’ meeting began.
While the Vatican is known
for its slow pace, even the
speediest bureaucracy would
have found it difficult to
review and sign off on sensitive legal documents in that
time.
“Considering the nature
and scope of the documents
being proposed by the (conference), I believe it would have
been beneficial to have
allowed for more time to consult with this and other congregations with competence
over the ministry and disci-
CARDINAL
DANIEL
DINARDO
Archdiocese
of GalvestonHouston
pline of bishops,” Ouellet
wrote to DiNardo.
Such back-and-forth, he
wrote, would have allowed the
documents to “properly
mature.”
The main goal of the U.S.
bishops’ fall meeting had been
to approve a code of conduct
for bishops and create a layled commission to receive
complaints against them. The
measures were a crisis
response to the scandal over
ex-Cardinal Theodore McCarrick, a once-senior American
cleric who is now accused of
molesting minors and adults,
and new revelations of old sex
abuse cases in Pennsylvania.
DiNardo stunned the bishops when he opened the
assembly Nov. 12 by announcing that “at the insistence of
the Holy See” the bishops
would not be voting on the
measures after all. He said the
Vatican wanted them to delay
a vote until after Pope Francis
hosts a global summit in February on preventing sex abuse
by priests.
While DiNardo blamed the
Vatican, the letter from Ouellet suggests that the Vatican
thought DiNardo had tried to
pull a fast one by intentionally
withholding legally problematic texts until the last minute.
It is not surprising that
Rome wanted a say in crafting
the text, given the Holy See
has exclusive authority to
investigate and discipline
problem bishops.
“While fully aware that a
bishops’ conference enjoys a
Please see VATICAN, Page 5
Lawmakers take oath of office
Commonwealth General Assembly organizes to begin 2-year term
BY MARK SCOLFORO
ASSOCiAtEd PRESS
HARRISBURG — Pennsylvania
lawmakers took the oath of office
Tuesday, convening in the state Capitol on New Year’s Day under a state
constitutional mandate they meet on
the first Tuesday of the year.
Forty-two House members and
seven senators were sworn in for the
first time after winning elections in
ASSOCiAtEd PRESS November.
Both chambers have smaller
House Speaker Mike Turzai, R-Allegheny, center, takes the oath of
office, Tuesday in Harrisburg. Pennsylvania state lawmakers are ready but still substantial Republican
for the coming two-year session, with the House welcoming 42 new majorities compared to last session, 110 to 93 in the House and
members and the Senate swearing in seven new senators.
6
0 9 5 4 3
1 7 9 0 1
Copyright© 2019
5
39°/34°
Details, Page 2
Business...............8
Calendar .............17
Classifieds ..... 19-20
Comics........... 14-15
Editorial.................6
Food ............. 16, 18
29 to 21 in the Senate.
There are two vacancies among
the 93 House Democratic seats, and a
Republican senator is expected to
step down and be sworn in to Congress later this week.
The 43rd House freshman, Rep.elect Liz Hanbidge, D-Montgomery,
will likely be sworn in later this
month, after she returns from her
honeymoon.
The biggest change in leadership is in the House, where Rep.
Bryan Cutler took over as majority leader, replacing Rep. Dave
Reed, R-Indiana, who did not seek
Obituaries ........ 9-10
Sports...... 10-13, 20
State.....................8
re-election to the Legislature.
Cutler urged members to “learn
one another’s life stories in a personal and meaningful way,” recounting
details of his own background in
Lancaster County.
The House voted 142-58 to approve
rule changes that including having
the Ethics Committee investigate
sexual harassment allegations, to
cut from 24 hours to 12 hours the
time that must pass before a final
vote on an amended bill and to allow
people who are not legislators or religious leaders to give the House’s
Please see LAWMAKERS, Page 5
GOOD MORNING
Connie Aungst, Pine Grove
Our valued subscriber
2
POTTSVILLE (PA.) REPUBLICAN HERALD
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2019
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POTTSVILLE TODAY
9
39
Intervals of clouds and sun
today. Turning cloudy this evening followed by low clouds late.
34
Preciip Chance 0%
Humidity 72%
Winds SE 4-8 mph
8 a.m
Noon
4 p.m
28
36
37
43
26
Scranton
n
37/32
Partly sunny
I-955 DC TO PHILLY:
rain tonight; arriving
late in the north.
Harrisburrg
43/36
Trenton
42/35
I-800 EASTERN
PA: Partly sunny
todaay. A bit of snow
toniight, but a snow
shoower in the west.
Philadelph
hia
43/36
Wilmington
43/36
Atlantic City
44/37
Ocean City
42/37
Washington, D.C
C.
48/42
Dover
44/37
Cape May
42/38
ALMANAC
Recorded for the 24 hours through 4 p.m. yesterday
in Reading
TEMPERATURE
High/low temperature ............................... 55°/43°
Normal high/low ....................................... 38°/23°
Record high ........................................ 64° in 1973
Record low ........................................... 0° in 2018
PRECIPITATION
24-hour precip. ending 4 p.m. Tuesday ......... 0.64”
Month to date
Year to date
12
12
60
60
10
10
50
50
8
8
40
40
6
6
30
30
4
4
20
20
2
2
10
10
K BORDER
I-84 NEW YORK
AREA: Clouds annd sun today. A
bit of snow tonight.
0
0
0
Normal
0.12”
Actual
Trace
Normal
0.12”
24-hour snow ending 4 p.m. Tuesday ............. 0.0”
Season to date ................................................ 8.0”
Normal season to date .................................... 5.8”
Last season to date ....................................... 11.2”
2
2
8 a.m. 10 a.m. Noon
1
2 p.m. 4 p.m.
WBRE Weather Wise
We’ll likely see some snow and rain showers later this
evening, tonight and early Thursday morning. At this point,
any accumulations will be around an inch or less.
Once this wraps up early Thursday morning, clouds will
hold tough for the rest of the day with highs around 40.
— Meteorologist Josh Hodell
Newsmaker
Christmas weed
strangely uprooted
an edition of
The Pottsville REPUBLICAN
USPS 440-460
ISSN - 1055-8403
TOLEDO, Ohio (AP) — A
street corner weed that had
been decked out with Christmas lights and brought out
holiday goodwill in Ohio has apparently met an early demise.
WTVG-TV in Toledo reported
that someone pulled out the
“Christmas weed” early Friday morning and drove off
with it in his trunk.
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Kate Bosworth, actress, 36
Trombone Shorty, musician, 33
E-poll
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
3 Months....................................$68.90
6 Months..................................$130.00
12 Months................................$250.00
Yesterday’s results
Q. Have you made a New
Year’s resolution?
No — 92%
Yes — 8%
Total votes — 170
At Newsstands
Single Copy Daily.......................... $1.50
Sunday Edition ............................. $2.50
Mail Subscriptions
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SKI FORECAST
Today’s question:
Q. Do you eat pork and sauerkraut for New Year’s?
Vote at republicanherald.com
Todayy
7:29 a.m.
4:49 p.m.
4:10 a.m.
2:32 p.m.
Planets
Rise
Mercury ..................... 6:25 a.m.
Venus ........................ 3:44 a.m.
Mars ........................ 11:17 a.m.
Jupiter ....................... 5:16 a.m.
Saturn ....................... 7:27 a.m.
Uranus ..................... 12:27 p.m.
Jan 5
0
0-2 Low; 3-5 Moderate; 6-7 High;
8-10 Very High; 11+ Extreme
Port Jervis
5.12’
5.57’
+0.45’
18.0’
Old Forgge
3.44’
3.51’
+0.07’
11.0’
Wilkes-Barre
7.40’
7.05’
-0.35’
22.0’
Tunkhannock
2.46’
2.40’
-0.06’
11.0’
Less wind will whip through the ski resorts today with
high pressure in control. It will be colder with temperatures returning back to more typical early January
highs. Snow showers late tonight will deliver a fresh
coating to an inch.
........
........
........
........
Thursdayy
7:29 a.m.
4:50 p.m.
5:11 a.m.
3:11 p.m.
Set
........ 3:37 p.m.
........ 1:59 p.m.
...... 11:25 p.m.
........ 2:44 p.m.
........ 4:48 p.m.
........ 1:46 a.m.
IN THE SKY
New
Minneapolis
21/16
Chicago
33/23
Callicoon
4.80’
4.71’
-0.09’
12.0’
Archbald
2.83’
2.86’
+0.03’
8.0’
Meshoppen
14.42’
13.88’
-0.54’
27.0’
Sunrise ......................
Sunset .......................
Moonrise ...................
Moonset ....................
Today’s Forecast
0 50 100 150 200
300
500
0-50 Good; 51-100 Moderate; 101-150 Unhealthy
for sensitive groups; 151-200 Unhealthy; 201-300
Very Unhealthy; 301-500 Hazardous
PA Department of Environmental Protection
0
Billings
34/31
Rather cloudy
SUN AND MOON
UV INDEX TODAY
0
R epublican
HeR ald
Delaware
Mondayy
Yesterday
24-hr change
Flood stage
Lackawanna
Monday
Yesterday
24-hr change
Flood stage
Susquehanna
Monday
Yesterday
24-hr change
Flood stage
Tunkhannock
Monday
Yesterday
24-hr change
Flood stage
AIR QUALITY INDEX
32
Seatttle
46/44
42
33
Forecasts and graphics provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. ©2019
The presence of man-made particulates affecting
aspects of human health.
Yesterday’s reading
45
27
RIVER GAUGES
The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index™ number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.
Actual
Trace
SNOWFALL
I-476 LEHIGH VA
ALLEY AREA:
Clouds and sun today. Snow
near the Lehigh Tunnel tonight; a
bit of snow and rain in the south.
NATIONAL WEATHER
MONDAY
Occasiionall rain and Partly sunny and
drizzle
mild
New York City Timees of sun and
clouuds today. A little
38/33
POTT
TTSVILLE
T
39/34
SUNDAY
43
36
I-811 HARRISBURG
AREEA: Mostly
clouudy today and
toniight. Breezy
Thuursday with
clouuds breaking.
35/26
Hazleton
36/30
Baltimore
45/39
SATURDAY
44
30
Breezy with clouds
breaking
Wilkes-Barre
38/33
State College
37/31
FRIDAY
Shown is
today’s forecast.
Temperatures are
today’s highs and
Port
rtt Jervis tonight’s lows.
Binghamton
g
30/2
2
26
Williamsport
40/35
EXTENDED FORECAST
THURSDAY
First
Full
Last
Jan 14
Jan 21
Jan 27
In the sky: As the winter constellations rise higher,
fall constellations like Pegasus continue their
march into the western sky.
Source: Longway Planetarium; Flint, MI
San Francisco
55/40
Denver
44/19
Kansas City
36/22
Los Angeles
62/42
Ne
ew York
38/33
Washington
48/42
Atlanta
61/51
El Paso
39/27
Houston
51/47
Miami
82/73
Shown are today’s noon positions of weather systems and
precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
NATIONAL CITIES
Today
City
Hi/Lo/W
Albany
33/24/pc
Anchorage
36/13/sn
61/51/r
Atlanta
Atlantic City
44/37/pc
Baltimore
45/39/c
Boston
34/29/s
Buffalo
33/29/pc
Cape May
42/38/pc
Charlotte
59/50/c
Chicago
33/23/c
Cincinnati
44/29/c
Cleveland
40/30/c
Columbus, OH 43/30/c
Dallas
39/34/r
Denver
44/19/s
Harrisburg
43/36/pc
Hartford
35/24/s
Honolulu
84/73/s
Las Vegas
49/31/s
Los Angeles
62/42/s
Louisville
46/33/c
Miami
82/73/s
Myrtle Beach 62/55/c
New Orleans
71/60/c
New York City 38/33/pc
Orlando
81/64/pc
Philadelphia
43/36/pc
Phoenix
54/32/s
Pittsburgh
41/30/c
Portland, OR
44/40/pc
Raleigh
55/47/c
Rochester
33/28/pc
San Francisco 55/40/s
Seattle
46/44/r
State College 37/31/c
Syracuse
31/24/pc
Tampa
81/67/pc
Washington, DC 48/42/c
Wilmington, DE 43/36/pc
Thursday
Hi/Lo/W
40/27/pc
18/2/pc
59/51/sh
50/34/pc
49/28/pc
41/31/sn
35/30/pc
48/32/pc
61/48/r
38/29/s
42/28/pc
41/31/pc
40/28/pc
39/34/i
50/27/s
46/28/pc
41/26/pc
82/72/pc
53/34/s
65/45/s
47/33/pc
83/72/pc
64/54/r
67/51/r
47/32/pc
83/66/pc
48/33/pc
57/35/s
39/28/pc
52/45/r
58/41/r
36/30/pc
55/42/s
53/45/r
38/28/pc
35/28/pc
80/68/pc
51/35/pc
49/29/pc
Friday
Hi/Lo/W
45/27/s
10/2/pc
62/43/r
47/41/pc
49/37/pc
45/34/s
42/30/pc
46/39/pc
55/45/r
45/30/pc
47/34/r
47/32/pc
46/34/r
54/35/s
57/29/s
48/35/pc
45/27/s
82/72/pc
56/36/s
66/46/s
50/37/r
84/70/s
64/50/r
59/44/s
47/39/pc
83/61/t
47/40/pc
64/39/s
46/31/r
51/40/sh
54/49/r
45/30/pc
56/48/s
50/39/sh
42/31/pc
44/28/s
79/64/t
51/43/r
48/37/pc
WORLD CITIES
Today
Thursday
Friday
City
Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W
Amsterdam
45/39/c
44/38/c
44/42/c
Athens
52/43/pc 52/37/r
45/34/sh
Baghdad
59/48/c
64/42/s
64/43/s
Beijing
33/13/pc 36/16/s
36/16/pc
Bermuda
71/64/sh 71/67/c
69/63/sh
Buenos Aires 87/59/t
75/59/pc 81/64/pc
Cancun
83/74/pc 83/73/pc 85/70/sh
Cape Town
79/58/pc 87/62/s
80/63/s
Caracas
83/73/pc 84/74/pc 85/74/s
Dublin
44/35/c
45/34/pc 45/35/c
Frankfurt
41/27/s
38/30/c
38/37/c
Geneva
40/28/pc 38/27/s
38/28/pc
Hong Kong
59/56/r
65/63/r
70/66/r
Istanbul
46/40/c
45/37/r
41/36/sn
Jerusalem
54/40/s
52/39/s
56/40/s
Kabul
48/21/s
51/28/pc 39/28/r
London
42/33/pc 41/28/pc 40/31/pc
Madrid
54/27/s
53/27/s
52/26/s
Melbourne
77/58/c
85/66/s
103/61/s
Montreal
13/7/s
23/22/pc 36/26/c
Moscow
31/29/sn 30/26/sn 29/19/sn
Mumbai
89/68/pc 89/69/pc 90/68/pc
Ottawa
11/6/pc
25/23/pc 35/20/pc
Paris
43/32/pc 41/29/pc 40/32/pc
Rio de Janeiro 91/80/pc 93/80/s
91/79/t
Riyadh
79/59/pc 82/53/s
69/49/s
Rome
56/33/pc 47/30/s
45/30/s
St. Thomas
84/74/sh 84/74/pc 85/75/pc
San Juan
81/74/sh 84/73/pc 84/73/pc
Singapore
88/78/pc 89/78/pc 90/78/c
Stockholm
31/23/pc 30/27/pc 39/33/pc
Sydney
85/71/s
83/72/pc 87/73/s
Tehran
50/41/pc 48/34/r
53/36/s
Tokyo
50/38/pc 50/37/s
49/39/pc
Toronto
29/26/pc 35/29/pc 40/30/s
Warsaw
37/24/sn 29/21/sf 32/29/sf
Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy,
c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain,
sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.
Craft reaches edge of
solar system to open year
By MARCIA DUNN
ASSOCIATED PRESS
LAUREL, Md. — NASA’s New Horizons
spacecraft pulled off the most distant exploration of another world Tuesday, skimming
past a tiny, icy object 4 billion miles from
Earth that looks to be shaped like a bowling
pin.
Flight controllers in Maryland declared
success 10 hours after the high-risk, middleof-the-night encounter at the mysterious
body known as Ultima Thule on the frozen
fringes of our solar system, an astounding 1
billion miles beyond Pluto.
“I don’t know about all of you, but I’m really liking this 2019 thing so far,” lead scientist
Alan Stern of Southwest Research Institute
said to applause. “I’m here to tell you that last
night, overnight, the United States spacecraft
New Horizons conducted the farthest exploration in the history of humankind, and did
so spectacularly.”
The close approach came a half-hour into
the new year, and 3 1/2 years after New Horizons’ unprecedented swing past Pluto.
For Ultima Thule — which wasn’t even
known when New Horizons departed Earth in
2006 — the endeavor was more difficult. The
spacecraft zoomed within 2,200 miles of it, more
than three times closer than the Pluto flyby.
Operating on autopilot, New Horizons was
out of radio contact with controllers at Johns
Hopkins University’s Applied Physics Laboratory from late Monday afternoon until late
Detroit
35/28
Lottery
Tuesday, Jan. 1
WILD BALL
Day.................................. 5
Night ............................... 9
PICK 2
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Night ............................. 3-5
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Night ........................... 2-0-2
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Night ........................6-4-8-7
PICK 5
Day........................4-4-3-1-1
A new image of Ultima Thule, right, is Night .....................4-2-1-3-1
NASA VIA AP
displayed during a press conference
CASH 5
Tuesday after the New Horizons team
11-23-26-38-42
received confirmation from the space- 4 of 5 ...................... $324.50
craft, which has completed a flyby of 3 of 5 ............................. $13
Ultima Thule.
2 of 5 ............................... $1
No players matched all
Tuesday morning. Scientists wanted the
five numbers.
spacecraft staring down Ultima Thule and
collecting data, not turning toward Earth to
TREASURE HUNT
phone home.
7-15-16-17-30
Mission operations manager Alice Bow- 4 of 5 ........................... $100
man said she was more nervous this time 3 of 5 ............................... $6
than she was with Pluto in 2015 because of 2 of 5 ............................... $1
the challenges and distance, so vast that mes- One player matched five,
sages take more than six hours, one way, to
receiving $10,497.50.
cross the 4 billion miles. When a solid radio
MATCH 6
link finally was acquired and team members
13-23-28-40-45-49
reported that their spacecraft systems were
green, or good, she declared with relief: “We
MEGA MILLIONS
have a healthy spacecraft.” Later, she added
34-44-57-62-70
MB: 14 MP: 4
to more applause: “We did it again.”
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LOCAL
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2019
POTTSVILLE (PA.) REPUBLICAN HERALD
Christmas kettle drive falls short
Salvation Army cites lack of volunteers
BY AMY MARCHIANO
STAFF WRITER
POTTSVILLE — The 2018 Salvation Army Red Kettle Drive fell
$19,886 short of its $96,000 goal.
Envoy Brad Harris said $76,114
was raised for the effort that started in November and ended 5 p.m.
Dec. 24.
“We are definitely not looking
to cut programs. That would be a
last resort,” Harris said Monday.
In light of the shortfall, his organization will reevaluate its budget
to see how the organization can
reduce expenses and save money.
He said he was a little disappointed the goal was not met, but
he is thankful for those who con-
“We are definitely not
looking to cut programs.
That would be a last
resort.”
Envoy Brad Harris,
Pottsville Salvation Army
“Who knows what it would have
been,” he said.
Of the 12 kettle stands planned,
all of them were up except the
kettle at Boyer’s Food Markets,
Shenandoah, which was not
active due to lack of volunteers.
Harris said that between 18 and 20
volunteers were at the various
locations. Ideally, 30 people are
needed. In 2019, Harris said they
will make a more concerted effort
earlier to get the word out about
volunteers, although he said the
DAVID MCKEOWN / STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER
kettle coordinator did a great job
this year.
A Salvation Army kettle stands
tributed.
“It does make it a little more
stressful. I can’t say anything negative about the community,” he
said, Harris said. Last year, the
drive also failed to meet its goal,
netting $84,300 of the $92,400 goal.
Harris said he think the lack of
out at the Salvation Army in
consistent volunteers was “a big Contact the writer: amarchiano@
deal,” in not meeting the target.
republicanherald.com; 570-628-6028 Pottsville.
The Ashland Area Public Library
recently acknowledged the following memorials: For Joseph Cress
by Paul Franco, Mary Balkiewicz,
Edna P. Labie, Universal Forest
Products; for Mary Ellen Marchalonis by the Ashland Public Library
Bridge Club; for Lewis Harter by
Class of 1959-Ashland Area Joint
High School; for Jean L. Glessner
by the Ashland Public Library Staff:
Margaret, Rene, Bev, Dolores and
Debbie, Margaret Mary Brown,
Mr. and Mrs. William Farley, Mr.
and Mrs. Andrew Smarkanic; for
Margaret Moss by Margaret Mary
Brown; for Giraldine Dillman by Mr.
and Mrs. William Farley; for Shirley Klinger by Mr. and Mrs. Louis
Swatski; for Patrick W. Kempsey
by Ursaline Fitzpatrick; for Shirley
Klinger by Shirley Boehmer; for
Florence Morrow and Paul Zelez by
Mr. and Mrs. Louis Swatski.
Friedensburg
A meeting regarding the
Schuylkill County Fair and Foundation for Agriculture and Resource
Management is set for 7 p.m. Jan.
17 in the Friedensburg Firehall. For
more information, call Kim Morgan
at 570-739-2627 or email kamorgan11@gmail.com.
BY JOHN E. USALIS
STAFF WRITER
Please see FEES page 8
AROUND
THE REGION
Ashland
No increase
in Frackville
sewer fees
FRACKVILLE — The customers
of the Frackville Area Municipal
Authority should expect no
increase in their sewer service fee
in 2019.
The authority board tentatively
adopted its 2019 operating budget at
its Dec. 19 meeting that will keep
the residential sewer service fee at
$112.50 per quarter ($450 per year)
for the seventh year in a row. The
last increase went into effect in 2013
when the quarterly fee was raised
from $90 to $112.50.
“Rates will be staying the same
with no changes,” Office Manager
Rhonda Frantz said, adding that
customers who pay their annual
bill by Feb. 28 will receive a 10 percent discount.
The board will formally adopt
the budget at its Jan. 16 regular
monthly meeting.
The projected 2019 budget
includes projected income of
$2,749,514 ($2,598,644 in 2018) and
estimated expenses of $2,735,050
($2,582,200 in 2018), leaving a surplus balance of $14,464.
A budget breakdown of expenditures for 2019 includes:
• Operations expenses: $1,065,850
($982,650 in 2018). The larger line
items in this category are wages
($95,000), workers compensation
($12,000), equipment rental
($50,000), engineering fees ($75,000),
health benefits ($8,600), stone
($50,000), street restoration
($75,000), collection system repairs
($110,000), capital outlay operations
($175,000), liability insurance
($25,000) and M&T Bank financing
payments ($314,000).
• Administrative expenses:
$295,500 ($272,950 in 2018). The larger line items are salaries ($85,000),
board of directors salaries ($4,500),
computer service ($15,000), legal
fees/bond counsel ($10,000) health
benefits ($18,000), financial audit
($10,000), and capital outlay administration ($85,000).
• Sewa g e plant expenses:
$1,373,700 ($1,326,600 in 2018). The
larger line items are salaries
($110,000), pump maintenance
($50,000), supplies ($40,000), electricity ($90,000), natural gas-heating
($15,000), licenses/fees/permits
($15,000), plant chemicals ($25,000),
lab testing ($25,000), equipment
rental ($20,000), health benefits
($29,000), repairs and improvements ($500,000), biosolids disposal
($50,000), capital outlay plant
($295,000), and Pennsylvania Infrastructure Investment Authority
payment ($60,000).
Employee raises will be discussed at Jan. 16 meeting.
The FAMA board acknowledged
a letter from Frackville borough
that the borough council approved
at its Dec. 12 meeting the following
to serve on the authority board for
five-year terms:
• Harrison Harper was reappointed as the Butler Township representative, and Paul Klevis was
reappointed as a representative of
the borough.
• Raymond Tomko was appointed as the West Mahanoy Township
represenative, filling the vacancy
left by David Gera.
Board Vice President Carl
Pyzowski commended Gera for the
years he has been a board member
and his service was invaluable.
Gera became a board member in
2009.
The five-member FAMA is comprised of three Frackville residents
and one each from Butler and West
Mahanoy townships, portions of
which are served by the authority.
3
Orwigsburg
A free session called Healthy
Living with Essential Oils will be
held at 6 p.m. Jan. 9 in the Pinebrook Activity Room, 2 Woodbridge Road, according to a release from Bobbie Cicioni. All are
welcome. For more information,
call 570-590-6491.
Pottsville
JACQUELINE DORMER / STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER
Sally Behney, left, prepares a New Year’s Day pork and sauerkraut platter with Caylee
Stambaugh, 8, of Valley View, Tuesday at the Valley View Gun Club.
Pork and sauerkraut
brings luck in 2019
Pottsville
Medicare 101: Answers to Your
Medicare Questions, is a Lunch
and Learn series insurance overview scheduled for noon Tuesday
at Providence Place Senior Living,
2200 First Ave. Darin Troutman
will be the presenter; a question/
answer session will follow the presentation. For more information or
to RSVP, call 570-628-6950.
BY AMY MARCHIANO
STAFF WRITER
SAINT CLAIR — The traditional pork and sauerkraut meal
is thought to bring good luck for
the new year.
The Saint Clair Lions Club
sold 125 dinners by 2 p.m. Last
year, they sold about 105 meals
that included the pork and sauerkraut, applesauce, dessert and
drinks. The cost of this year’s
meals was $9.50 at Saint Clair.
Most of the meals were ordered
as takeout, Dorothy Pomian, a
member said.
The Lions have been serving
pork and sauerkraut for New
Year’s Day since 2011. Starting
at 11 a.m. hungry people came to
partake in the tradition.
“This is tradition. We always
have sauerkraut,” Frank Meyer,
of Pottsville, said.
Usually Meyer and his wife,
Peg, eat at a friend’s house, but
this year they came to the club
to eat the good food.
Meyer said he is looking forward to 2019.
“I feel it’s going to be a good
year,” he said.
Lemar Staller, 79, of Pottsville, ordered pork and sauerkraut for his wife.
“The food is good,” he said.
Staller said he has come to the
Lions Club for the last two or
three years.
Grace Karrer, a member of
the club and sister of Pomian,
said their parents belonged to
the club. The sisters want to continue the service to the community, having been members since
1977. Other family members
were there Tuesday preparing
the food. Proceeds go back to the
club that in turn helps out the
community. The potatoes were
peeled starting Monday. Members were at the club at 8 a.m.
Tuesday getting ready for the
rush.
At the Valley View Gun Club,
the room was full of people eating pork and sauerkraut.
The meal was $10 and was
free to those who participated in
the Pine Creek Polar Bear
Plunge. Guests at the club
enjoyed the traditional meal,
dessert and beverage.
Anna Marie Kolva, of Lykens,
said the food was “delicious.”
She always tries to eat pork and
Free blood pressure and blood
sugar readings are offered monthly at Diakon Senior Community
centers for people 60 and older.
Those interested should call for
dates and times at the following
senior community centers: Mahanoy City, 138 W. Centre St., 570773-0738; Pottsville, 201 N. Centre St., 570-628-3513; Schuylkill
Haven, 340 Haven St., 570-3855611; Shenandoah, 116 N. Main
St., 570-462-1965; Tremont, 139
Clay St., 570-695-3500.
Schuylkill Haven
People gather on Tuesday for a New Year’s Day pork and
sauerkrat Dinner at the Valley View Gun Club.
The Schuylkill Haven Senior Citizens Association board will have
a breakfast meeting at 9:30 a.m.
Jan. 16 at The Country Squire restaurant, Route 61. All board members and members of the senior
travelers board should attend, according to a release. For more information, call 570-385-5323.
Schuylkill Haven
The Schuylkill Haven High School
Class of 1960 will meet for lunch
at noon Jan. 17 at 3-Cs Restaurant, Port Clinton. Class members
and guests are welcome. For more
information, call 570-385-5323.
Shenandoah
Frank and Peg Meyer, Pottsville, prepare to enjoy a New
Year’s Day pork and sauerkraut dinner on Tuesday, at the
Saint Clair Lions Club.
Divine Mercy Roman Catholic
Parish has a needed and ongoing collection of items for the food
bank that distributes food from
the parish office, 108 W. Cherry
St. Donations of nonperishable
food items can be taken to Divine
Mercy Church, Cherry and Chestnut streets, or to the parish’s St.
Casimir Church sacred worship
site, 229 N. Jardin St., on weekends, or dropped off at the parish
office during regular office hours.
Useful items include tuna, Spam,
canned meats, powdered milk,
peanut butter and jelly, cereal, spaghetti, sauce, pasta and similar
fare. For more information, call the
parish office at 570-462-1968.
Shenandoah
Harry Wentzel, Saint Clair, prepares the pork for the New
Year’s Day pork and sauerkraut dinner on Tuesday at the
Saint Clair Lions Club.
sauerkraut on New Year’s Day
because of the good luck it is
suppose to bring.
Sally Behney, 43, and her
daughter, Caylee Stambaugh, 8,
of Valley View, were there to
ring in 2019 the correct way.
“It’s tradition. Pork and sauerkraut,” Behney said.
The amount of meals sold at
the gun club was not available.
Contact the writer: amarchiano@republicanherald.com; 570628-6028
Exercise in Motion, a health/fitness event, is set for 9:30 a.m.
Thursday at the Shenandoah Senior Living Center, located in the
Anthony P. Damato American Legion “Medal of Honor” Post 792,
116 N. Main St. The club meets
from 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. on Tuesdays and Thursdays. Participants
must register at the center. It is
for people 50 and older of all fitness levels. For more information,
call Diakon Community Services
at 570-624-3017.
4
POTTSVILLE (PA.) REPUBLICAN HERALD
BRIEFS
LONDON
Stabbing suspect
is questioned
Police in the english city
of Manchester are quizzing
a suspect and searching a
house for clues about the
“terror-related” stabbings
of three people at a train
station on New Year’s eve.
the attack Monday night
by a knife-wielding man
yelling islamic slogans
brought terrorism back
to Manchester after a
19-month hiatus. it took
place at a key transport
hub.
Monday’s attack left a
man and a woman hospitalized with “very serious”
but not life-threatening injuries and a man in custody, police said.
MOSCOW
Man arrested as
spy in for wedding
Paul Whelan, a former
U.s. Marine arrested in
russia on espionage
charges, was visiting Moscow over the holidays to
attend a wedding when he
suddenly disappeared, his
brother said tuesday.
Whelan, 48, who is head
of global security for a
Michigan-based auto parts
supplier, was arrested Friday. in announcing the arrest three days later, the
russian Federal security service said he was
caught “during an espionage operation,” but gave
no details.
“We are deeply concerned for his safety and
well-being,” his family said
in a statement that his
brother david Whelan posted on twitter.
NATION/WORLD
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2019
ACA mandate gone for most
Some states still require health coverage
BY BOB SALSBERG
AssociAted Press
The mandate directing individuals to obtain health insurance or face tax penalties ended Tuesday for most, but not
all Americans.
In Massachusetts, an individual mandate that has been
on the books since 2006 will
continue in the absence of the
federal fines that had been in
effect since 2014 under the
Affordable Care Act but were
eliminated as part of the
Republican-backed tax reform
law passed in 2017.
Most residents of New Jersey and the District of Columbia must also be covered or
incur fines in 2019 after lawmakers, fearing widespread
disruption in health insurance
markets and sharply higher
premiums, enacted laws
replacing the federal mandate.
Vermont also approved an
individual requirement that
will take effect in 2020. Several
other Democratic-leaning
states are weighing similar
moves, though in some cases
officials may want to gauge
how the repeal of penalties for
being uninsured impacts rates
and enrollment in ACA-compliant plans before deciding
whether to act.
“The theory behind the
mandate is that it buttresses
protections for people with preexisting conditions,” said Stan
Dorn, director of the National
Center for Coverage Innovation at Families USA, a health
care advocacy group. “Without
an individual mandate, the
concern is that healthy people
can wait until they get sick
before they sign up for coverage since insurance companies are now legally required
to sell insurance to people with
pre-existing conditions.”
The individual mandate
was among the more unpopular aspects of the law known
as “Obamacare.” Critics said
forcing people to buy health
coverage violated personal liberties and imposed financial
hardships on individuals who
cannot afford the cost of insurance.
Backers argued the mandate was needed to spread risk
widely among people both sick
and healthy. And they pointed
out the ACA had key protections built in for those with
lower incomes, including subsidized insurance plans and an
expansion of the Medicaid
program.
G ove r n m e n t f i g u r e s
released in December showed
the number of people enrolled
in ACA coverage for 2019
through HealthCare.gov fell
from 8.8 million to 8.5 million.
But the drop was smaller than
experts had forecast, suggesting the threat of fines may be a
less decisive factor in personal
insurance decisions than previously thought. Premiums
have largely remained stable
as well.
Massachusetts has achieved
coverage rates as high as 97.5
percent since the health care
overhaul signed by thenRepublican Gov. Mitt Romney,
which served as a model for
the Affordable Care Act. The
state mandate requires adults
to carry insurance that meets
a set of minimum standards
and exempts people for whom
available insurance options
are deemed “unaffordable.”
The state tax penalty for
noncompliance is generally set
at half the lowest cost plan
available to an individual
through the state’s health
Forces
launch
new fight
against IS
Taliban attacks kill
15 members of
security forces
BY AMIR SHAH
AssociAted Press
BEIRUT
Rival groups
clash in Syria
clashes broke out between two powerful insurgent groups in northern
syria on tuesday, leaving
up to seven people dead
in the most serious fighting in months in the last
major rebel stronghold in
the country.
the al-Qaida-linked Hayat tahrir al-sham and the
turkey-backed Nour eldin el-Zinki group blamed
each other for triggering
the fighting in the northern
province of Aleppo.According to activist collectives
in northern syria, both
groups used heavy weapons, including tanks, in the
fighting.
PARIS
U.S., Israel exit U.N.
cultural agency
the United states and israel
officially quit the U.N.’s educational, scientific and cultural
agency at the stroke of midnight, amid concerns that the
organization fosters anti-israel bias.
the withdrawal is mainly procedural yet serves a new blow
to UNesco, co-founded by the
U.s. after World War ii to foster peace.
the trump administration
filed its notice to withdraw
in october 2017 and israeli Prime Minister Benjamin
Netanyahu followed suit.
BRASILIA, Brazil
Bolsonaro vows
big changes
Jair Bolsonaro was sworn
in as Brazil’s president tuesday, taking the reins of Latin
America’s largest and most
populous nation with promises to overhaul myriad aspects
of daily life and put an end to
business-as-usual governing.
He promised to combat the
“ideology of gender” teaching in schools, “respect our
Judeo-christian tradition” and
“prepare children for the job
market, not political militancy.”
“i call on all congressmen to help me rescue
Brazil from corruption,
criminality and ideological
submission,” he said.
For the far-right former
army captain, the New
Year’s day inauguration
was the culmination of a
journey from a marginalized and even ridiculed
congressmen to a leader
who many Brazilians hope
can combat endemic corruption as well as violence
that routinely gives the nation the dubious distinction of being world leader
in total homicides.
— associated press
insurance marketplace.
“Massachusetts has led the
way on keeping consumers
covered on health insurance
and part of that has been the
individual mandate,” said
Hannah Frigand, an associate director of Health Care
for All, a nonprofit that is
helping state officials get the
word out that coverage is still
required despite the federal
change.
In New Jersey, where about
800,000 residents have insurance through the ACA or
expanded Medicaid, the 2019
individual mandate carries a
penalty of 2.5 percent or $695
per taxpayer, whichever is
greater. Democratic Gov. Phil
Murphy announced in September that rates for the individual health insurance market would drop by an average
9.3 percent in 2019, attributing
the decline to the state’s new
coverage mandate.
rUssiAN MiNistrY For eMerGeNcY sitUAtioNs PHoto viA AP
An Emergency Situations employee carries an 11-month-old baby Tuesday at the scene of a collapsed section of
an apartment building in Magnitigorsk, a city of 400,000 about 870 miles southeast of Moscow, Russia.
THE SOUND OF LIFE
Russian baby rescued
from frozen rubble
BY JIM HEINTZ
AssociAted Press
MOSCOW — Laboring
through sub-freezing temperatures, Russian rescue
workers were digging into a
sprawling heap of jagged
rubble from a collapsed
apartment building when
one heard the faintest
sound.
It was the sound of life.
On Tuesday, to everyone’s
delight and surprise, they
pulled a baby boy out of the
rubble alive, nearly 36 hours
after the disaster that blew
apart his home. His father
called it “a New Year’s miracle.”
The building collapse in
the Russian city of Magnitogorsk before dawn Monday has killed at least nine
people so far, and officials
said 32 people who lived in
the building have still not
been accounted for.
The collapse followed an
explosion that was believed
to have been caused by a gas
leak.
The boy, an 11-month-old
named Ivan Fokin, was in
extremely serious condition, officials said, with fractures, a head injury and suffering from hypothermia
and frostbite after his ordeal
in temperatures around
minus 4 degrees.
AssociAted Press
Emergency Situations employees work at the scene
of a collapsed apartment building in Magnitogorsk.
He was flown to Moscow
late Tuesday in a desperate
attempt to save his life. He
was in stable condition on
arrival in the capital, the
head of the national public
health institute Vladimir
Uiba was quoted as telling
state news agency Tass.
Although Ivan’s prospects for survival appeared
dire, “it’s a New Year’s miracle,” his father Yevgeny was
quoted as saying by the RT
satellite TV channel.
The father was at work
when his wife phoned to say
the building had collapsed.
She escaped the rubble with
a 3-year-old son, Russian
news reports said.
“I was sleeping on the
couch with my older son,
hugging him and the young
one was sleeping in his baby
bed,” mother Olga Fokina
said on Russian TV. “I and
the older one fell down and
quickly got out and I didn’t
know what happened to the
baby bed afterward.”
Rescue worker Pyotr Grit-
senko said on Russian television that baby’s discovery
came after one of the crew
heard faint cries.
“They stopped all the
equipment. He began to cry
louder,” but the crew
couldn’t find him, he said. A
search dog was brought in
and confirmed that someone was under the rubble,
focusing the rescue effort.
The father said he helped
rescuers dig in the rubble
and “showed them a place
where he approximately
could be.”
Regional governor Boris
Dubrovsky was quoted as
saying by the Interfax news
agency that the child apparently had been protected by
being in a crib and being
wrapped warmly.
The rescue operation, aided by powerful heaters and
lights, was continuing overnight into Wednesday in the
city about 870 miles southeast of Moscow.
Russian President Vladimir Putin visited the accident site Monday and went
to a local hospital, where he
spoke to a 13-year-old boy
who had head injuries and
frostbite after spending an
hour under the rubble.
“You will get well soon,
you are a fighter,” Putin told
the boy.
German man drives into crowds, injures 5
BY FRANK JORDANS
AssociAted Press
BERLIN — A German
man has been arrested after
repeatedly driving into
crowds of people, injuring at
least five, in what authorities
said Tuesday appeared to
have been intentional attacks
against foreigners.
Four people were injured
in the western city of Bottrop and one person was
injured in nearby Essen,
while pedestrians managed
to jump out of his path in two
other attempted attacks in
those cities, police said.
“The man had the clear
intention to kill foreigners,”
‘The man had the clear intention
to kill foreigners.’
Herbert Reul
top security official as quoted by German news agency dpa
German news agency dpa
quoted the top security official
in North Rhine-Westphalia
state, Herbert Reul, as saying.
The victims included a
46-year-old woman, who suffered life-threatening injuries, and a child. Some of the
victims were Syrian and
Afghan citizens.
The attacks began shortly
after midnight while people
were celebrating New Year’s
out on the streets.
The 50-year-old driver first
attempted to hit a group of
people in Bottrop, but failed.
He then drove into the city
center, where he slammed
his silver Mercedes into a
crowd, injuring four.
He then drove toward Essen,
where he twice attempted to
run people down, injuring one
person, before being arrested
by police.
The man, whose name
wasn’t released, is being held
on suspicion of attempted
homicide. Police said the suspect made anti-foreigner
comments during his arrest
and there were indications
he had been treated for mental illness in the past.
It’s not the first time that a
vehicle has been used as an
apparent weapon in Germany.
In April, a German man
drove a van into a crowd in
Muenster, killing four people
and injuring dozens. The
driver, who had sought psychological help in the weeks
preceding the attack, then
killed himself.
KABUL, Afghanistan —
A f g h a n s p e c i a l fo rc e s
launched a new offensive
against the Islamic State
group in eastern Nangarhar
province, killing 27 militants,
officials said Tuesday. Meanwhile, Taliban attacks in
northern Afghanistan killed
15 members of the country’s
security forces.
According to provincial
council member Ajmal
Omar, the special forces,
backed by helicopter gunships, targeted IS in Achin
district of Nangarhar on
Monday. The province has
been an IS stronghold and
the site where the militant
group’s regional branch first
emerged a few years ago.
The militants’ media arm,
the Aamaq news agency,
claimed IS repulsed a joint
Afghan-U.S. operation in the
area.
Omar, who could not confirm whether U.S. troops
took part in the operation,
said two local IS leaders,
Sediq Yar and Syed Omar,
were among those killed. The
remoteness of the area
makes it impossible to independently investigate conflicting reports.
In the north, the Taliban
launched two blistering
attacks on police outposts in
Sar-e-Pul province on Monday night, killing 15 policemen and wounding 21, the
latest in near-daily assaults
by the insurgents against
Afghanistan’s beleaguered
security forces.
Fierce gunbattles raged for
several hours in Sayyad district and outside Sar-e-Pul,
the provincial capital. In the
attack on the outskirts of the
city, heavy artillery fire by
Afghan forces trying to repel
the Taliban sent local residents fleeing for safety, said
provincial council chief
Mohammad Noor Rahmani.
Taliban spokesman Qari
Yousof Ahmadi claimed
responsibility for both
attacks in Sar-e-Pul province.
The Taliban have been carrying out near-daily attacks
targeting Afghan forces
despite stepped-up efforts by
the United States to find a
negotiated end to the country’s 17-year war.
The size and strength of
the IS affiliate in Afghanistan, which emerged in 2013,
is estimated at anywhere
between several hundred
and several thousand fighters. The group comprises
mostly of disgruntled Taliban fighters and Uzbek militants of the Islamic Movement of Uzbekistan, as well
as Pakistani militants who
were driven out of Pakistan’s
tribal region along the border with Afghanistan.
FROM PAGE 1
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2019
POTTSVILLE (PA.) REPUBLICAN HERALD
ADVERTISEMENT
PLUNGE: Event marks 10 years
FROM PAGE 1
Hegins, who has faithfully
taken the dive all 10 years,
said overall conditions were
not bad compared to last year
when the outside air temperature was 5 degrees and water
33 degrees.
“Last year, I was frozen solid,” he said. “I thought I was
going to lose some toes or
something.”
The reversal of temperatures didn’t go unnoticed.
“The water felt really cold
this year. Last year it was
warm,” Koppenhaver said.
He is proud to join other
diehards in the annual tradition.
“It’s a challenge. I like a little adventure,” Koppenhaver
said.
Brandon Bohn, 22, of Mahanoy City, said he also was not
afraid of the jump into the
new year “ ’cause you only
live once.” This was his first
time taking the plunge.
Dressed in a Philadelphia
Eagles knit hat, shorts and
T-shirt, Bohn was trying to
keep warm with a pink towel
draped around his shoulders.
“My legs feel like they are
burning right now. They are
on fire,” he said.
Andy Gudinas, 36, of West
Reading, participated for the
first time. He wore pajamas
for the occasion and
DEAL
FROM PAGE 1
On Tuesday morning, after
tweeting a New Year’s mess a g e t o “ E V E RYO N E
INCLUDING THE HATERS
AND THE FAKE NEWS
MEDIA,” Trump tweeted:
“The Democrats, much as I
suspected, have allocated no
money for a new Wall. So
imaginative! The problem is,
without a Wall there can be no
real Border Security.”
But he seemed to shift tactics later in the day, appealing
to Pelosi.
“Border Security and the
Wall ‘thing’ and Shutdown is
not where Nancy Pelosi wanted to start her tenure as
Speaker! Let’s make a deal?”
he tweeted.
Whether the Republicanled Senate, under McConnell,
would consider the Democratic bills — or if Trump would
sign either into law — was
unclear. McConnell spokesman Donald Stewart said Senate Republicans would not
take action without Trump’s
backing.
Even if only symbolic, the
passage of the bills in the
House would put fresh pressure on the president. At the
same time, administration
officials said Trump was in no
rush for a resolution to the
impasse.
Trump believes he has public opinion on his side and, at
very least, his base of supporters behind him, the officials
said, speaking on the condition of anonymity because
they were not authorized to
speak publicly.
White House officials,
including the departing chief
of staff, had indicated that
Trump’s signature campaign
pledge to build the wall would
not be fulfilled as advertised.
Chief of staff John Kelly told
the Los Angeles Times in an
interview published Sunday
that Trump abandoned the
notion of “a solid concrete
wall early on in the administration.”
The Democratic package to
end the shutdown would
include one bill to temporarily
fund the Department of
Homeland Security at current
levels — with $1.3 billion for
border security, far less than
the $5 billion Trump has said
he wants for the wall —
through Feb. 8 as talks continued. It would also include
another measure to fund the
departments of Agriculture,
Interior, Housing and Urban
Development and others
closed by the partial shutdown. It would provide money
through the remainder of the
fiscal year, to Sept. 30.
Democrats under Pelosi
were all but certain to swiftly
approve the package in two
separate votes Thursday. They
would take place after the election of a new House speaker, a
contest Pelosi was expected to
win as leader of the new
House majority.
JACQUELINE DORMER /
STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER
Jim Reed, Pine Creek Polar
Bear Plunge organizer, announces details for plungers
before dipping into the creek
for the 10th annual event in
Valley View.
“Warning I do dumb things.”
He said the shirt is what he
wears when he does something that might not be a good
idea.
Jim Reed, event organizer,
said Tuesday could have been
the warmest since the plunge
started.
“I think we went from the
coldest (2018) to the warmest
year,” he said.
Reed didn’t know how
much the weather played a
role in people coming out to
the park. He is thankful the
annual event has continued
for 10 years.
“The first year, it was the
roll of the dice,” he said.
Participation from people
outside of the county has
helped spread the word about
the event.
“I think it’s starting to
become a nostalgic thing
almost,” he said.
Reed said the goal for the
event was about $3,000. He
said they met that by receiving approximately $3,450.
For $20, participants
received a T-shirt that said “10
years of freezing my hiney in
the Piney. Pine Creek Polar
Bear Plunge 2019” that features two polar bears having
fun on the ice.
described the water as cold.
Joe Gudinas, 41, of Saint
Clair, wore a Santa hat that
said “Merry Christmas” and
Santa pajamas and a holiday
sweater. He drank a sip of
moonshine and boilo that
friends made for him before
taking the plunge.
The desire to take part in
the tradition of entering the
water was something Bob
Price, 69, of Pottsville, wanted
to say he experienced.
“This is on my bucket list,”
he said.
Contact the writer: amarchiaJason Smith, 46, of Pottsno@republicanherald.com; 570ville, wore a shirt that said
628-6028
LAWMAKERS
FROM PAGE 1
opening prayer.
The House also set up a new
panel called the House Government Oversight Committee, made up of five majorityparty members and four from
the minority. It will have subpoena power and authority to
take up matters on referral
from the speaker or either
floor leader.
Allegheny County Republican Rep. Mike Turzai was reelected to retain the gavel as
speaker, as was Republican
Sen. Joe Scarnati of Jefferson
County as his chamber’s president pro tempore.
Scarnati urged his colleagues to treat one another
with civility and “come
together to find a compromise, to get results, because
it’s results that we’re judged
by at the end of the day.”
The Senate will have a new
presiding officer once Braddock Mayor John Fetterman
becomes lieutenant governor
later this month.
Senate r ule chang es
addressed proper attire for
members and staff, phone use
in the chamber and access to
amendments.
Fetterman beat incumbent
Lt. Gov. Mike Stack in last
year’s Democratic primary
and was elected along with
Democratic Gov. Tom Wolf,
who won a second term.
In the Senate, Scarnati ended weeks of uncertainty Friday by announcing he supported the seating of Demo-
crat Lindsey Williams in an
Allegheny County district.
Republicans had raised questions about whether she had
lived in the state for four years
to the day before being elected, a state constitutional requirement. She was sworn in.
Williams’ win was one of
five Republican seats in the
Senate that Democrats flipped
in November. The two new
Republican senators are Judy
Ward of Blair County and
Kristin Phillips-Hill of York
County, both filling vacancies
created when an incumbent
sought higher office.
Sen. Guy Reschenthaler,
R-Allegheny, is scheduled to
be sworn in to Congress on
Thursday. A Senate GOP
spokeswoman said he resigned his state legislative
seat, effective Monday.
There are two vacancies in
the House. Rep. Vanessa Lowery Brown, D-Philadelphia,
resigned after being sentenced to probation in November for a bribery conviction,
and Rep. Sid Michaels Kavulich, D-Lackawanna, died in
office in October.
The first major item of legislative business will occur
Feb. 5, when Wolf gives the
governor’s annual budget
address. Lawmakers may also
again consider legislation,
spiked last fall by Senate
Republicans, to provide a
“window” for civil lawsuits
over claims of child sexual
abuse that would otherwise be
too old to pursue.
VATICAN
FROM PAGE 1
rightful autonomy ... to discuss and eventually approve
measures that are within the
conference’s powers, the conference’s work must always be
integrated within the hierarchical structure and universal
law of the church,” Ouellet
wrote.
In a statement Tuesday to
AP, DiNardo characterized
the dispute as a misunderstanding. He said he assumed
the Vatican would have had a
chance to “review and offer
adjustments” to the measures
after the U.S. bishops approved them. He insisted that
U.S. bishops were not trying to
appropriate Vatican powers
for themselves.
The U.S. strategy, it seems,
was to avoid drawn-out negotiations before the vote so the
U.S. bishops could present the
Vatican with documents after
the fact. Legally speaking, the
U.S. bishops didn’t need Vatican approval prior to the vote.
But since the Holy See would
have to approve the proposals
afterward for them to become
binding, consultation on the
text was necessary and strategically wise to do so beforehand, said Nicholas Cafardi, a
U.S. canon lawyer.
DiNardo, in his statement
to the AP, said he had shared
the “content and direction” of
the proposals with multiple
Vatican offices in October and
drafted the final text after
encountering no opposition.
“We had not planned, nor
had the Holy See made a
request, to share the texts prior to the body of bishops having had an opportunity to
amend them,” he said.
During a Nov. 12 press conference, DiNardo was asked
when the Vatican was actually consulted about the measures. He replied the texts
were finalized Oct. 30 and that
the delay in finishing them
might have been a problem.
“So it’s not surprising, on
one level, that people would be
catching their breath, perhaps
even in Rome,” he told reporters. DiNardo also noted, when
pressed by a reporter, that the
texts had some legal problems, though he downplayed
the severity of them.
In his statement to AP, DiNardo said he had told Ouellet
that failing to vote on the texts
“would prove a great disappointment to the faithful, who
were expecting their bishops
to take just action. Although
there were canonical precisions mentioned, the emphasis seemed to be on delaying
votes and not wanting to get
ahead of the (pope’s) February meeting of episcopal conference presidents,” he said.
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OPINION
POTTSVILLE (PA.) REPUBLICAN HERALD
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2019
OUR VIEWS
How To
ConTaCT Us
Minimum
wage stays
same in Pa.
MAIN OFFICE
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20 states across nation
OK raise in hourly pay
Millions of workers across the United
States have begun the new year with a
brighter outlook because their state legislatures or local governments, or both,
have mandated higher minimum wages.
In Pennsylvania, however, Republican
legislative majorities cling to discredited
notions, promulgated by narrow special
interests, that boosting the minimum
wages will harm workers and the economy.
Due to that political cowardice, Pennsylvania remains an island of povertylevel wages at the bottom rung of the
ladder. Its minimum wage is the federal
minimum of $7.25, which was established in 2009.
State lawmakers shamelessly have
maintained that Bob Cratchit-like minimum wage while ensuring that their
own compensation automatically
increases each year without a debate or
vote.
Pennsylvania is surrounded by states
that have raised their minimum wages
over the last several years, yet have not
experienced the economic calamity that
supposedly flows from such sensible policy.
Nationwide, 20 states have raised their
minimum wages with the dawn of the
new year, from a nickel-an-hour in Alaska to a dollar an hour in Maine, Massachusetts and California. In several conservative states, notably Arkansas and
Missouri, voters mandated significant
wage increases by referendum after legislators declined to act. And more than
20 large cities have raised base wages
beyond the state levels.
Gov. Tom Wolf likely will propose a
minimum-wage increase in his budget
address in February. State lawmakers
should adopt one as a simple matter of
economic justice. For them, doing so
would produce the bonus of reduced reliance on expensive state-funded social
services and increases in state income
and sales tax revenues.
YOUR LETTERS
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Year of wolves on horizon
In Willa Cather’s novel “My
Antonia,” there are two kind Russian farmers named Peter and
Pavel who have settled on the
Nebraska prairie. On his deathbed, Pavel tells the story of how
they came to emigrate there.
Many years before, back in
Russia, the two young men had
been the groomsmen at a friends’
wedding. The party went on well
after midnight and eventually a
caravan of seven sledges carried
the families through the snow,
back to where they were staying.
As they rode, faint streaks of
shadow — hundreds of them —
could be seen dashing through
the trees along the trail. Suddenly,
the howling of wolves erupted
from all directions.
The horses took off and the
wolves attacked. The rear sledge
hit a clump and overturned. The
shrieks were horrific as the
wolves pounced on their human
prey. Another sledge tipped and
then another, and the swarms of
wolves descended on the families.
Pavel and Peter were in the
lead sledge, carrying the bride
and groom. They were careening
at top speed, but one of their horses was now near death with
exhaustion. Pavel turned to the
groom. They would have to lighten their load. He pointed to the
bride. The groom refused to let
her be tossed over. Pavel fought
with him and tried to rip her
away. In the scuffle he threw them
both out and to the wolves.
Peter and Pavel survived — but
lived in infamy. They were the
monsters who had thrown a bride
to the wolves. They were forced to
flee to the New World.
The story reminds us how thin
the crust of civilization really is.
It reminds us of what otherwise
good people are capable at
moments of severe stress and crisis, when fear is up and when con-
Activate Your Unlimited
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leaders will face the defining
choice of their careers: Where
does their ultimate loyalty lie, to
David
the Constitution or to their party?
Brooks
If their loyalty is to the ConstiPlace A Classified Ad
tution, they will step back and figrepublicanherald.com/
ure out, in a bipartisan way, how
classifieds
to hold the sort of hearings that
Email: classifieds@
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Congress held during the Waterrepublicanherald.com
It’s an especially good story to
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tell as we enter 2019, because this gate scandal — hearings that
looks to be the year of the wolves. inspired trust in the system. They
Place A Display Ad, PreIt will be a year of divided gov- will step back and find men and
women
of
integrity
—
the
modPrinted
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tisan conflict. It will be a year in
Elliot Richardson and Judge
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which Donald Trump is isolated
John Sirica — who would work to
Specials & Promotions
and unrestrained as never before.
restore decency amid the moral
advertising@
And it will be in this atmosphere
rot.
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that indictments will fall.
On the other hand, if they put
570-628-6060
There are now more than a
party above nation, they will see
dozen investigations into
this crisis as just another episode
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Trump’s various scandals. If we
in our long-running political cirMobile, Social
lived in a healthy society, the
cus. They’ll fall back in partisan
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ensuing indictments would be
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handled in a serious way. Everyprimary concern will be: How
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body would step back and be
can this help me in 2020?
sobered by the fact that our very
If that happens, then the
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society and we don’t have a
ous evidence that he committed
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Trump doesn’t recognize,
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al authority. He only understands political show trial. They’ll see
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personal power.
there is no higher authority that
Anniversaries, Notable
When the indictments come
all Americans are accountable to.
Achievements
down, Trump won’t play by the
It’s just power and popularity
jleffler@
rules. He’ll seek to delegitimize
straight through.
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those rules. He’ll seek to delegitiIf that happens, we’ll have to
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mize our legal institutions. He’ll
face the fact that our Constitution
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slander every prosecutor. He’ll
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Mail to: P.O. Box 209
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the left and right for the past few
where good people lay low and
decades: The establishment is
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Calendar of Events
corrupt, the game is rigged, the
on the weak.
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Joy challenge to rise to, and urgent one
I’m a little fascinated around
this time of year with the fact
that we seem to be drowning in
joy. You can buy knick-knacks
adorned with the word, and it’s
written on coffee cups and doughnut boxes. We sing of tidings of
comfort and joy. And if you’re a
Christian actually celebrating the
Incarnation of God, there’s some
real overwhelming joy for you.
But what is joy at a time when
people seem to opt more for anger
and despair? When joy seems illusory or impossible to others? And
how does joy work when you get
grim news?
Sister Wendy Beckett, a recently deceased nun and art historian
known best for her BBC documentaries, wrote this in her book
“In the Midst of Chaos, Peace”:
“Joy is a liberating power, an
absolute gift. And though it is not
won or deserved, it is often the
resource which transforms our
times of despair and horror. Joy
is the victory over our struggles.”
“Our neighbors are now experiencing the singular joy of foster
parenting,” Mike Aquilina, author of many books on church history, including the new “Villains
of the Early Church,” tells me.
“It’s demanding. They look
exhausted a lot of the time. But
they radiate joy.”
“Where do I find it?” Aquilina
goes on. “Like my father before
me, I find it in babies and toddlers
— my kids, back in the day, but
my nieces and nephews before
that, and now my grandkids. ...
This, I think, is why we associate
joy with Christmas. ... A baby
570-628-5985
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Peter F. Banko
Editor
570-628-6103
pbanko@republicanherald.com
home after a long day; and in the
liturgy of the Church, that foretaste of heaven. And yes, I do
experience these joys every day
Brian Smith
or nearly every day.”
City editor
Kelly Rosati, the mother of
570-628-6005
teens whom she and her husband bsmith@republicanherald.com
adopted out of foster care, says
calls us out of ourselves, makes
Tina Heintzelman
that “after 10 straight years of life
us forget ourselves. We lose ourLifestyles editor
full
of
circumstances
that
are
selves in service of the divine
570-628-6250
most parents’ worst nightmare ...
baby.”
theintzelman@
I decided I wasn’t going to make it
Father Chad Gion, pastor of
republicanherald.com
in this life if my joy was held capIndian mission churches in
tive to life’s circumstances.” She
Eric Peddigree
North Dakota, is quick to point
News editor
out that “Joy is in no way a disas- knew that meant she needed an
interior
strength
that
only
God
570-628-6202
sociation from the pain of life, but
epeddigree@
a profound faith in and apprecia- could provide.
Rosati,
who
is
also
an
author
republicanherald.com
tion for the fundamental goodand adoption advocate and conness of life even as all hell is
Leroy Boyer
sultant, shares her “joy stealers”:
breaking loose.
Sports editor
“too much social media, going for
“Those who live in joy are
570-628-6026
the quick ‘pick up my spirits’ hit
incredibly powerful in their abiliof something I know is unhealthy lboyer@republicanherald.com
ty to win the hearts of others. We
for me and too much noise and
David McKeown
all know deep down we are made making my joy contingent on othMultimedia editor
for joy. We ache for joy like the
ers’ actions, feeling and thoughts.
570-628-6033
empty stomach aches for food. In I think the best way to spread joy
dmckeown@republicanherald.com
its absence, we don’t simply stop
is to be filled to the brim with
Visit our online customer
hungering for joy, we slip into a
God’s love so that I can simply be
service page:
broken-hearted cynicism. Some
present and available for the peorepublicanherald.com/
part of us dies when our belief in ple God puts in our paths.”
customer-service
the possibility of joy dies. So,
Another friend of mine who
Answers to most frequently
when someone manifests this oth- has known more than her fair
asked questions can be
erworldly joy in a weary, jaded
share of suffering and challenge
found online. You’ll also be
world, they are an object of fasci- notes: “We must strive to overable to manage your subnation, if not hope, to others.”
come our selfishness, mend our
scription, download forms,
Sohrab Ahmari, author of the ways, reconcile with those we
buy photos and more.
upcoming spiritual memoir
have hurt and rediscover the
“From Fire, By Water,” observes: authentic path to joy.”
CORRECTIONS
“I still couldn’t define joy if I
The good news is “joy” doesn’t
It is our policy to correct
tried, but I can tell you that I find disappear with the holiday decoerrors promptly in the secit in doing my work well, in order- rations. But it is a challenge to
tion in which they occur. To
ly fashion and offered up to God;
rise to. And an urgent one.
report an error, please call
in my little boy, his laughter, how
(Lopez is a write for
City Editor Brian Smith at
United Feature Syndicate)
he exclaims ‘Baba!’ when I get
570-628-6005.
Republican HeRald
A Pulitzer Prize-winning paper
OUR MISSION STATEMENT
Steeped in family tradition and spirit, this organization shall always seek
unique growth opportunities through exploration and innovations. We will be pioneers of this dynamic industry.
The foundation for the continued growth will be our people and our involvement with the communities we serve. Management will be progressive; the community involvement strong and identifiable. We will provide our people the opportunity to become the best at what they do.
Kathryn
Lopez
Pottsville REPUBLICAN, Inc.
Established and founded in 1884
by Joseph Henry Zerbey (18841933)
Successor officers and terms
President J.H. Zerbey II (1933-45)
General Manager, Managing Editor
J.H. Zerbey III (1945-58)
President Nelson J. Clayton
(1945-62)
President Uzal H. Martz (1962-75)
President Uzal H. Martz Jr. (19752003)
Henry H. Nyce (2003-2018)
Affiliated publications
Weekly Schuylkill REPUBLICAN
1875-1918
Pottsville Morning Paper 1922-39
The Pottsville Journal 1825-1953
Mahanoy City Record American
1871-1968
Ashland Daily News 1904-66
COMMENTARY
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2019
POTTSVILLE (PA.) REPUBLICAN HERALD
YOUR VIEWS
DAYS GONE BY
BOLD Act
brings hope for
Alzheimer’s
To the Editor:
It is time for change in
our thinking on Alzheimer’s disease. Too often
Alzheimer’s is treated as
an aging issue, but it’s a
disease.
Someone develops
Alzheimer’s every 65 seconds in the United States.
On Dec. 13, the U.S. Senate
unanimously voted to
pass the BOLD Act.
On Dec. 19, just before
the end of the lame duck
session, the U.S. House of
Representatives also voted
to pass the BOLD Act. It
now awaits the president’s
signature.
Is this change on the
horizon? Has Congress
begun to recognize
Alzheimer’s disease as a
public health crisis affecting a combined 22 million
Americans?
There are 5.7 million
Americans living with
Alzheimer’s disease, and
16.1 million providing
care. I am hopeful.
In passing the Building
Our Largest Dementia
Infrastructure for
Alzheimer’s Act (S 2076/
HR 4256), Congress has
taken decisive action. The
BOLD Act creates an
Alzheimer’s public health
infrastructure across the
country to implement
effective Alzheimer’s
interventions, public
awareness campaigns,
early detection and diagnosis, reduce risk and prevent avoidable hospitalizations.
Join me in thanking
Rep. Matt Cartwright,
Sen. Pat Toomey and Sen.
Bob Casey for fighting for
all Pennsylvanians affected by Alzheimer’s and voting in favor of the BOLD
Infrastructure for
Alzheimer’s Act.
Phyllis Gallagher,
Alzheimer’s Ambassador — Frackville
Alzheimer’s
Congressional Team
DAY IN HISTORY
Today is Wednesday,
Jan. 2, the second day of
2019. There are 363 days
left in the year.
Highlight in history:
On Jan. 2, 1900, U.S. Secretary of State John Hay
announced the “Open
Door Policy” to facilitate
trade with China.
On this date:
In 1788, Georgia became
the fourth state to ratify
the U.S. Constitution.
In 1792, the first classes
began at Georgetown University in Washington,
D.C.
In 1929, the United
States and Canada
reached agreement on
joint action to preserve
Niagara Falls.
In 1935, Bruno Hauptmann went on trial in
Flemington, New Jersey,
on charges of kidnapping
and murdering the
20-month-old son of
Charles and Anne Lindbergh. (Hauptmann was
found guilty, and executed.)
In 1942, the Philippine
capital of Manila was captured by Japanese forces
during World War II.
In 1960, Sen. John F.
Kennedy of Massachusetts launched his successful bid for the presidency.
In 1967, Republican Ronald Reagan took the oath
of office as the new governor of California in a ceremony that took place in
Sacramento shortly just
after midnight.
In 1974, President Richard Nixon signed legislation requiring states to
limit highway speeds to 55
miles an hour as a way of
conserving gasoline in the
face of an OPEC oil
embargo. (The 55 mph
limit was effectively
phased out in 1987; federal
speed limits were abolished in 1995.) “Singing
cowboy” star Tex Ritter
died in Nashville at age
68.
In 1983, the original
Broadway production of
the musical “Annie”
closed after a run of 2,377
performances.
In 1986, former baseball
owner Bill Veeck, remembered for his well-publicized stunts and promotional gimmicks, including an exploding
scoreboard and a midget
pinch-hitter, died in Chicago at age 71.
In 2000, Retired Admiral
Elmo R. Zumwalt Jr.,
known early in his career
for modernizing the Navy
and later for ordering the
spraying of Agent Orange
in Vietnam, died in Durham, North Carolina, at
age 79.
In 2006, a methane gas
explosion at the Sago
Mine in West Virginia
claimed the lives of 12
miners, but one miner,
Randal McCloy Jr., was
eventually rescued. The
roof of a skating rink collapsed in the German
town of Bad Reichenhall,
killing 15 people.
Ten years ago, President George W. Bush
branded Hamas rocket
attacks on Israel an “act
of terror” and outlined
his own condition for a
cease-fire in Gaza. President-elect Barack Obama
and his family arrived in
Chicago after a holiday
vacation in Hawaii.
AirTran Airways apologized to nine Muslims
kicked off a New Year’s
Day flight to Florida.
Actor John Travolta’s
16-year-old son, Jett, died
at the family’s vacation
home in the Bahamas.
Peyton Manning won a
record-tying third Associated Press NFL Most Valuable Player award. No. 7
Utah finished a perfect
season with a 31-17 upset
of No. 4 Alabama in the
Sugar Bowl.
Five years ago, 52 passengers trapped for more
than a week on an icebound Russian research
ship in the Antarctic were
rescued when a Chinese
helicopter swooped in and
plucked them from the ice
a dozen at a time. In the
Sugar Bowl, No. 11 Oklahoma took down thirdranked Alabama 45-31.
One year ago, Republican Sen. Orrin Hatch of
Utah said he would not
seek re-election after serving more than 40 years in
the Senate; the announcement cleared the way for
2012 GOP presidential
nominee Mitt Romney to
successfully run for the
seat. Sen. Al Franken formally resigned from the
Senate a month after the
Minnesota Democrat
announced his plan to
leave Congress amid a
series of sexual misconduct allegations. NBC
News announced that
Hoda Kotb would be the
co-anchor of the first two
hours of the “Today”
show, replacing Matt Lauer following his firing due
to sexual misconduct allegations.
7
100 years ago — 1919
Reports were current that
the J. Miehle estate property
on Centre Street, Pottsville,
now owned by N. Levey, had
been sold to an out-of-town
firm. The sale is believed to
have been consummated
today. No definite information on the matter is obtainable as Mr. Levey is out of
town and representatives of
the Miehle estate knew nothing about the matter. The deal
is reported to have been made
of a consideration of $150,000.
75 years ago — 1944
Child’s Colds. Relieve Misery. Rub on time-tested Vicks
VapoRub.
50 years ago — 1969
Pottsville YMCA, in cooperation with the Appalachian Trail Boy Scout CounI am happy to see someone
Share your opinion They want the right to be
cil will be a six-week course
from Hegins noticed the faded
reckless
too.
Enough
already
.
I
To submit your views to
in aquatics Saturday, Jan. 25.
stop signs on Mahantongo
own
responsibly
and
have
no
Thunder/Enlightning, call
The program is for the speStreet. Hopefully they will fix
problem with obeying laws.
(570)
that situation before someMahanoy City cific purpose of meeting the
needs of Boy Scouts who
body gets hurt. I guess it will
•
wish to pass their swimming
take someone from out of
I have a great idea for the
and lifesaving merit badges.
town to notice the clothing
Mexican wall. Sell advertisebox in the parking lot across
ments. Put up signs. You can
25 years ago — 1994
from Maroons where the
buy one piece of the wall at a
Gasoline is under 90 cents
Then,
when
prompted,
clothes are strewn around. It’s
time. It will sell like crazy.
press 1
disgusting.
Turkey Run a gallon at some Schuylkill
Check with your local calling provider to
County pumps for the first
Woodlawn Acres ensure toll-free access to this number from
•
your home and mobile phones.
time this decade. Prices are
•
The orange grifter would
I went to Blue Mountain
be proud to shut down he gov- at 88.9 cents per gallon in at
dent Trump is, here’s a fact.
High School gym for a JV
ernment but blames the Dem- least three stations: Aabbot’s
Discount Fuels, Route 61 and
After he wrote the book called ocrats. Huh?
wrestling tournament. They
charged $12 to get in the door. “The Art of the Deal,” he
Norwegian Township East Norwegian Street,
Pottsville, and at the Mount
went bankrupt four times. I
They have no senior citizen
•
Carbon Getty and Fisca Oil
discount. It is the most ridicu- repeat, four times. Simply
Partial government shutCo., both on Route 61 south
put, and there is no other way down? I love it. I don’t know
lous price. I have never, ever
of the city. The average price
to put it, Trump has been a
paid $12 to get in anywhere,
one person who isn’t a bum
county-wide has dropped 5
total embarrassment as the
except at high school and
that works for the governcents from the Dec. 1 average
president of the United
statewide tournaments.
ment. Anyhow, as long as
of 97.6 cents per gallon
Lake Wynonah States.
Social Security keeps rolling
despite the 4.3 cent federal
Pottsville in, I will be happy with it.
•
•
The last thing we need in
Pottsville gas tax increase of Oct. 1.
Prices vary throughout the
Mr. Blackwell, thanks for
this town is a dog park. Tax•
county, but most stations
sharing your opinion on
payer dollars should pay for
Funny, I noticed that CNN
have seen prices drop several
playgrounds to be fixed and to guns. I agree. These people
didn’t report that the concents since the beginning of
fix the potholes in the streets. who battle against laws that
gressmen and their aides all
the month. At the higher end
No dog park.
only make them practice
get paid during this partial
Pottsville more responsibility for owngovernment shutdown. I won- of the price range, Harris
•
Mini-Market, Pine Grove,
der why. I wonder if they are
ing a gun, prove that those
To the all the Trump supand Fegley’s Mini-Market,
trying to lead people in a cerlaws are needed. Nobody is
porters who constantly brag
tain way. Brainwash them?
Tamaqua, are selling gas for
stopping them from owning
about how intelligent PresiMinersville 95.9 cents per gallon.
guns is not enough for them.
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POTTSVILLE (PA.) REPUBLICAN HERALD
Trump asks trade czar to
seek peace with China
GLENN THRUSH
THE NEw YORk TIMES
WASHINGTON — In the
middle of his crowded dinner in Buenos Aires, Argentina, with President Xi Jinping of China, President
Donald Trump leaned across
the table, pointed to Robert
Lighthizer, the U.S. trade representative whose skepticism
of China runs deep, and
declared, “That’s my negotiator!”
He then turned to Peter
Navarro, his even more
hawkish trade adviser, adding, “And that’s my tough
guy!” according to aides with
knowledge of the exchange.
Now, with talks between
China and the United States
set to begin this week in Beijing, Lighthizer, aided by
Navarro, faces the assignment of a lifetime: redefining
the trade relationship
between the world’s two largest economies by Trump’s
March 2 deadline to reach an
agreement.
And he must do it in a way
that tilts the balance of power toward the United States.
Their approach will have significant ramifications for
American companies, workers and consumers whose
fortunes, whether Trump
likes it or not, are increasingly tied to China.
First, however, Lighthizer
will need to keep a mercurial
president from wavering in
the face of queasy financial
markets, which have suffered
their steepest annual decline
since 2008. Despite his declaration that trade wars are
“easy to win” and his recent
boast that he is a “Tariff
Man,” Trump is increasingly
eager to reach a deal that will
help calm the markets, which
he views as a political electrocardiogram of his presidency.
Trump has repeatedly told
his advisers that Xi is someone with whom he can cut a
big deal, according to people
who have spoken with the
president. On Saturday,
Trump called Xi to discuss
the status of talks, tweeting
afterward that good progress
was being made. “Deal is
moving along very well,”
Trump said.
The administration has
tried to force China to change
its ways with stiff tariffs on
$250 billion worth of Chinese
products, restrictions on Chinese investment in the United States and threats of additional levies on another $267
billion worth of goods. China
has responded with its own
tit-for-tat tariffs on U.S. goods.
But over a steak dinner during the Group of 20 meeting
in Argentina, Xi and Trump
agreed to a 90-day truce and
to work toward an agreement
that Trump said could lead to
“one of the largest deals ever
made.”
“It’s not some subtle shift;
Trump has flipped since September,” said Derek Scissors,
who studies China’s economy
for the American Enterprise
Institute. “He went from saying how he was going to slap
tariffs on everything to all
this talk about making the
greatest deal ever.”
Lighthizer — whose top
deputy will meet with Chinese officials this week
before more high-level talks
in February — has played
down any differences with
Trump and views his role as
ultimately executing the
directive of his boss. But the
trade representative, who
declined to be interviewed,
has told friends and associates that he is intent on preventing the president from
being talked into accepting
“empty promises” like temporary increases in soybean
or beef purchases.
Lighthizer, 71, is pushing
for substantive changes, such
as forcing China to end its
practice of requiring American companies to hand over
valuable technology as a condition of doing business
there. But after 40 years of
dealing with China and
watching it dangle promises
that do not materialize, Lighthizer remains deeply skeptical of Beijing and has
warned Trump that the United States may need to exert
more pressure through additional tariffs in order to win
true concessions.
When Lighthizer senses
that anyone — even Trump
— might be going a little soft
on China, he opens a paperclipped manila folder he totes
around and brandishes a single-page, easy-reading chart
that lists decades of failed
trade negotiations with Beijing, according to administration officials.
operator Lon Antalosky
said the annual instrument
and flow meter calibrations
were performed at the treatment plant. It was determined that the influent flow
meter, which is original
equipment and about 25
years old, needs to be
replaced as soon as possible.
The replacement cost is
about $2,000, which the
board approved.
Bids were received and
opened for services and
materials for 2019. Pottsville
Materials LLC, Pottsville,
will supply stone for road
w o rk , w i t h Ro n - T r o y
Asphalt Paving, Frackville,
to provide paving services
and materials. Main Pool
and Chemical Inc., Avoca,
provided the low bids on
treatment plant chemicals
(ferric chloride, soda ash,
polymer and lime). Flagy’s
Excavating, Frackville, will
provide equipment rental as
needed.
FEES: No increase in charges
FROM PAGE 3
The board voted to retain
the services of attorney
Paul G. Domalakes of the
law firm of Rubright, Domalakes, Troy and McDonald
as authority solicitor. The
annual retainer remains at
$3,000 as in 2018 with an
hourly rate of $100 per hour
for time spent on FAMA
business outside of the regular meetings, plus at additional charge of $10 per lien
prepared.
In the monthly treatment
plant monthly report, plant
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Body found in Ohio
Electrical fire kills Teen charged in
death
of
infant
son
young girl in house
River identified
NORTH MAHONING (AP) —
A fast-moving house fire in
western Pennsylvania that
killed an 11-year-old girl has
been ruled an accident.
Investigators said an electrical problem sparked Sunday’s blaze in North Mahoning. The girl’s father and her
sister were injured in the fire,
which destroyed the family’s
home.
The fire broke out shortly
before 7 a.m. and flames
were burning through the
roof when firefighters arrived. The father told them
one of his daughters was
trapped in a second-floor
bedroom.
Firefighters then used a
ladder to get into the house,
but the girl was pronounced
dead a short time later. The
father and the other girl were
treated at a hospital for undisclosed injuries.
The names of the girls and
their father have not been
released.
PHILADELPHIA (AP) — A
15-year-old Philadelphia girl
has been charged in the
death of her newborn son
who was found in a dumpster.
Authorities said a woman
approached some police
officers on patrol around
10:30 p.m. Monday and told
them she had found a baby
that had been placed in the
dumpster by her daughter’s
friend. The woman and the
baby were taken to a hospital, where the infant was pronounced dead a short time
later.
Officers then went to the
home of the daughter’s
friend. The girl who had
given birth and her mother
were taken to a police building and the teen was arrested.
The girl was later taken to
a hospital for what authorities said was “precautionary
medical treatment,” though
further details were not disclosed.
Emsworth (AP) — Authorities said a man found dead
in a waterway in western
Pennsylvania has been identified as a New Jersey man.
But it’s not yet known how
he died or how he ended up
in the Ohio River.
Authorities say 48-yearold Drew Camoosa, of Little
Egg Harbor, was pulled from
the Ohio River near the Emsworth Locks and Dams
around 10:30 a.m. Monday.
Emergency responders had
gone to the scene after a
911 caller reported seeing
the body face down in the
river.
Camoosa was pronounced
dead at the scene a short
time later. It’s not known
how long he may have been
in the river before he was
discovered, and a cause of
death has not been determined.
Allegheny County police are
leading the investigation.
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Obituaries
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2019
today’s obituaries
ashland
Leibig, Richard
Shaner, Robin L.
Girardville
Burke, Jean Anne
Grady, Irene G.
Hazleton
Schiavo, Pasco L.
Llewellyn
Depsky, Irene
Locust Valley
Herbig, Mary
Minersville
Prelovsky, Michael G.
Pottsville
Garland, Harry P. Jr.
Primrose
Kopinetz, Robert M.
Walker township
Roberts, Matthew R.
Robert M.
Kopinetz
December 26, 2018
Mass of Christian Burial
for Robert M. Kopinetz, 73, of
Primrose, who passed away
Dec. 26 at Rosewood Rehabilitation and Nursing Center,
Schuylkill Haven, will be celebrated at 11 a.m. Friday in
St. Matthew the Evangelist
Church, 139 Spruce St., Minersville. The Rev. Leo J.
Maletz will officiate. Relatives and friends may call
from 10 to 11 a.m. Friday at
the church. Interment will be
private at the convenience of
the family. Arrangements are
by Donald J. Butler Funeral
Home, Minersville. To offer
condolences to the family or
to light a candle in Robert’s
memory, visit us at www.donaldjbutlerfh.com.
Sign the guest book at
republicanherald.com
Irene Depsky
December 31, 2018
Irene De psk y, 82, of
Llewellyn, for merly of
Jonestown, Cass Township,
died Monday at Seton Manor,
Orwigsburg.
Dutcavich Funeral Home
has charge. Visit www.dutcavich.com.
BURKE, JAMES “JIM/JAZZ,” died
Dec. 25 at age 92 in his home in
Alexandria, Va. He was born in
Mahanoy City.
Friends will be received for a
visitation from 4 to 8 p.m. Thursday
at Fairfax Memorial Funeral Home,
9902 Braddock Road, Fairfax, VA
22032. A funeral service will be
held at 10 a.m. Friday at the funeral
home. The interment will follow in
Fairfax Memorial Park. Memorial
contributions may be made in Jim’s
name to St. Jude Children’s
Research Hospital, www.stjude.
org/donate. Please view and sign
the family guestbook at www.fmfh.
com.
•
CARL, KATHERINE L., 65, of
Tamaqua, formerly of Lehighton,
died Dec. 29 at Lehigh Valley
Hospital- Cedar Crest, Allentown.
A memorial service will be held
at 2 p.m. Saturday at Zion Church
Lewistown Valley, 489 Valley Road,
Tamaqua. Private interment will
take place in Heidelberg Union
Cemetery. Online expressions of
sympathy may be recorded at www.
heintzelmancares.com. In lieu of
flowers, donations may be made to
the funeral home to defray expenses, Heintzelman Funeral Home
Inc., P.O. Box 196, Schnecksville, PA
18078-0196.
•
DIETRICH, JANET ELAINE TOBIAS,
81, of Cressona, passed away
among her loved ones Wednesday.
A Celebration of Life will be held
at 11 a.m. Thursday at Hamilton
Breiner Funeral Home & Cremation
Services
Inc.,
Orwigsburg.
Memorial gathering will be from 10
a.m. until the time of service.
•
DOUGHERTY, ELIZABETH M.
“BETTY,” 84, a lifelong resident of
Girardville, passed away peacefully
Friday morning at her home.
Mass of Christian Burial will be
held at 11 a.m. today at St. Vincent
de Paul Catholic Church, Girardville,
concelebrated by the Rev. Edmund
Brennan and the Rev. Paul
Rothermel. Friends may call at the
church from 10 a.m. until the time
of Mass today. Interment will be in
St. Joseph’s Catholic Cemetery,
Fountain Springs. In lieu of flowers,
the family prefers contributions be
made in Betty’s name to the
Girardville Good Time Club in care
Matthew Roy
Roberts
December 30, 2018
MATTHEW ROY ROBERTS
and Chad Harig.
Services will be held at 11
a.m. Friday at Zizelmann-Gulla Funeral Home, 500 E. Broad
St., Tamaqua, with Pastor
James Williams officiating.
Interment in Zion Cemetery,
Lewistown Valley, will follow.
Call from 6 to 9 p.m. Thursday
and 10 to 11 a.m. Friday at the
funeral home. Online condolences may be made at www.
zgfuneralhome.com. Arrangements are being handled by
Zizelmann-Gulla Funeral
Home and Cremation Services Inc., Tamaqua.
Sign the guest book at
republicanherald.com
Robin Lynne
Shaner
December 29, 2018
Robin Lynne Shaner, 49, of
Germanville Road, Ashland,
passed away Saturday at Geisinger Medical Center, Danville.
Born June 3, 1969, in Reading, she was a daughter of Ron
and Sherry Quinter Slichter,
Reading.
Robin graduated from Reading High School. She was a
Boy Scout leader and enjoyed
camping.
Surviving are her husband,
married July 29, 2005, Barry
Shaner, Ashland; children, Tiffany and Trisha Quinter,
James Billman Jr., Cody, Alexis and Amber Shaner; nine
grandchildren.
Viewing will be held from
9
Harry P. Garland Jr.
December 30, 2018
Matthew Roy Roberts, 22,
of Walker Township, died
Sunday in Cressona.
Born in Pottsville, Feb. 24,
1996, he was a son of Brian
and Tina Koch Roberts, Walker Township.
A 2014 graduate of Tamaqua Area High School, Matthew was currently a student
at Penn State University,
Schuylkill Campus. He was a
member of Zion Church,
Lewistown Valley.
He was predeceased by his
paternal grandfather, Charles
Roberts; maternal grandparents, George and Eleanor Koch;
maternal aunt, Lori Harig;
maternal uncle, George Koch.
In addition to his parents,
he is survived by a brother,
Tyler G. Roberts, Lewistown
Valley; paternal grandmother,
Linda Roberts, Lewistown
Valley; paternal aunt, Karen
Reidler and her husband,
David, Orwigsburg; maternal
uncles, Mark Koch and Howard Harig; and cousins, Serena Reidler, Alanna Reidler
POTTSVILLE (PA.) REPUBLICAN HERALD
ROBIN LYNNE SHANER
noon until 2 p.m. Friday at KullHeizenroth Funeral Home,
Ashland. Kull-Heizenroth
Funeral Home Inc. is in charge
of the arrangements. Charles
Heizenroth III, supervisor.
Sign the guest book at
republicanherald.com
Richard Leibig
December 31, 2018
Arrangements are incomRichard Leibig, 68, of Ashland, passed away suddenly plete and will be announced
Monday at Geisinger-Shamokin Area Community Hos- by Kull-Heizenroth Funeral
pital, Shamokin.
Home, Ashland.
Harry P. Garland Jr., 72,
passed away peacefully with his family by his side Sunday at Lehigh Valley Hospital-Cedar Crest, Allentown.
Born March 13, 1946, in
Pottsville, he was a son of the
late Harry Sr. and Evelyn
East Garland.
Harry was a graduate of
Vacaville High School in California.
He was a veteran of the
Army and also served in the
National Guard and
Reserves.
Harry attended Salem
United Methodist Church in
Orwigsburg.
He was the owner of Garland Communications Systems Inc., which he began 23
years ago.
Harry was an avid hunter
and fisherman. He loved the
ocean and spending time on
his boat. But what Harry
HARRY P. GARLAND JR.
enjoyed most was spending
time surrounded by his loving family.
Harry is survived by his
wife of 37 years, Peggy
Kapusta Garland. He is survived by his children, Tammy Bowers, wife of Anthony,
Saint Clair, Jill Reber, wife of
Kendall, Pottsville, Tonya
McJunkin, wife of Joshua,
Schuylkill Haven, and Harry
Garland III, husband to Missy, Bernville; his grandchildren, Konnor, Emma, T.J.,
Caden and Callie; his sisters,
Velma Troxel, wife of Gary,
Oregon, Gloria Mitsock,
partner to Joe Parry Jr., Friedensburg, and Joy Prokop,
wife of Dave, Florida; nieces
and nephews.
Services are private at the
convenience of the family. In
lieu of flowers, the family asks
that donations be made in Harry’s name to either Hillside
SPCA, 51 SPCA road, Pottsville,
PA 17901, or Ruth M. Steinert
Memorial SPCA, P.O. Box 332,
Schuylkill Haven, PA 17972.
Grabowski Funeral Home,
Schuylkill Haven, is entrusted
with the services.
Sign the guest book at
republicanherald.com
Michael G. Prelovsky
December 30, 2018
Michael G. Prelovsky, 89,
o f M i n e r s v i l l e,
passed away Sunday at Schuylkill
Center.
Mike was born in Minersville, Oct. 2, 1929, a son of the
late Mary Krolick and Stephen Prelovsky.
He was the widower of
AnneMarie Ryan Prelovsky,
who died April 10, 2013.
He was a graduate of Minersville High School, Class of
1949.
He was a member of St.
Michael the Archangel
Church, Minersville.
He served in the Army as a
sergeant in the Korean War
where he was a paratrooper
with the 82nd Airborne Division and then a tank commander.
He was a machine operator at Allied Signal/Chemical. He was a former member
of the Catholic War Vets.
Mike was an avid sports fan
who favored the Philadelphia
Eagles, Philadelphia Phillies
and the Minersville Battlin’
Miners.
Although he enjoyed his
sports, his favorite pastime
was spending time with his
MICHAEL G. PRELOVSKY
family, especially his beloved
grandchildren, Ryan, Kelcie
and Kamryn, who lovingly
referred to him as “Pop.” He
was known for his friendly
disposition and positive outlook on daily life.
In addition to his parents
and his wife, AnneMarie, he
was preceded in death by
brothers, Milan and Robert
Prelovsky, Frank, Rudy, Stephen and John Koscil; sisters, Theresa Leonard and
Agnes Lord.
Mike is survived by two
daughters, Michelle, wife of
Bud Yacobowsky, and Kelli,
wife of Craig Williard. He is
also survived by three sisters, Mary Cesari, Ann
DiRenzo and Stella Campion;
two brothers, William Prelovsky and Joseph Prelovsky; grandchildren, Ryan,
Kelcie and Kamryn Williard;
nieces and nephews.
A Mass of Christian Burial will be held at 11 a.m. Friday at St. Michael the Archangel Church, Minersville,
with the Rev. Christopher M.
Zelonis officiating. All are
respectfully invited to attend
a visitation from 6 to 8 p.m.
Thursday and Friday morning at Mahal-Ritzel Funeral
Home Inc., Minersville. In
lieu of flowers, memorial
contributions may be made
to Disabled American Veterans, www.secure.dav.org.
Interment with military honors will be at Indiantown
Gap National Cemetery,
Annville. Mahal-Ritzel
Funeral Home Inc. is entrusted with the arrangements.
Sign the guest book at
republicanherald.com
Please see Obituaries, Page 10
FuneraL nOtices
of Todd Selgrade at 1 Powder Mill
Road, Girardville, PA 17935. Sign
the guest book, leave personal
condolences and for further information, please visit www.thomasmsullivanfuneralhome.com.
Thomas M. Sullivan Funeral Home,
Girardville, Timothy M. Sullivan,
supervisor, is in charge of the
arrangements.
•
DUNSAVAGE, EDITH ANNE, 85,
passed away peacefully in the early
morning of Dec. 26 at Shenandoah
Manor Nursing Center.
A religious service will be held
at 11 a.m. today at Louis D.
Truskowsky Funeral Home &
Crematory Inc., Mahanoy City, with
the Rev Greg Zimmerman officiating. Friends and family may call
from 9 to 11 a.m. today. Interment
will follow in Sky-View Memorial
Park, Tamaqua. Memorial contributions are preferred and can be
made to Hillside SPCA. Louis D.
Truskowsky Funeral Home &
Crematory Inc., Mahanoy City, is in
charge of arrangements. Visit www.
truskowskyfuneralhome.com to
sign the guest book, view video
tribute and send sympathy cards.
•
KOPINETZ, ROBERT M. 73, of
Primrose, passed away Wednesday
morning
at
Rosewood
Rehabilitation and Nursing Center,
Schuylkill Haven.
Mass of Christian Burial will be
celebrated at 11 a.m. Friday in St.
Matthew the Evangelist Church,
139 Spruce St., Minersville. The
Rev. Leo J. Maletz will officiate.
Relatives and friends may call at
the church from 10 to 11 a.m.
Friday. Interment will be private at
the convenience of the family.
Arrangements are by the Donald J.
Butler Funeral Home, Minersville.
To offer condolences to the family
or to light a candle in Robert’s
memory, visit www.donaldjbutlerfh.
com.
•
KURTZ, HARRY B., 89, of Sweet
Arrow Lake Road, Pine Grove,
passed away Dec. 20 at Lehigh
Valley Hospital-Schuylkill E.
Norwegian Street.
Memorial services will be held
at 11 a.m. Saturday at Manbeck’s
Church, 110 Wild Cherry Road,
Schuylkill Haven, with Pastor Norm
Dixon officiating. Interment will be
in Manbeck’s Cemetery at the convenience of the family. In lieu of
flowers, the family would prefer
contributions be made to the Pine
Grove Council of Churches
Weekday Church School, c/o Cathy
Nagle, 527 Dad Burnhams Road,
Schuylkill Haven, PA 17972, in his
memory. H.L. Snyder Funeral Home
Inc., Pine Grove, is in charge of
arrangements and you may send
condolences to the family at our
website www.hlsnyderfuneralhome.
com.
•
HAAS, ROBERT “BUBBY,” 92, of
Pitman, passed away Sunday at his
home.
Visitation will be held from 9:30
to 11 a.m. Thursday at St. Paul’s
E.C. Church, Pitman, with the funeral service following at 11 a.m. with
Pastor Todd Wolfe officiating.
Interment will follow in St. Paul’s
Cemetery. Memorial contributions
may be made to St. Paul’s E.C.
Church or Hospice of Central
Pennsylvania, 1320 Linglestown
Road, Harrisburg, PA 17110. The
Stephen R. Rothermel Funeral
Home, Klingerstown, has charge of
arrangements. To sign the online
guest book, please visit www.srrfh.
com.
•
HORNBERGER, BLANCHE, 90, a
resident
of
Rosewood
Rehabilitation and Nursing Center,
Schuylkill Haven, died Thursday at
the nursing home.
Memorial Mass of Christian
Burial will be celebrated at 11 a.m.
Friday from St. Patrick Roman
Catholic
Church, Pottsville.
Visitation will be held from 10 a.m.
until the time of Mass at the
church. Interment will be at the
convenience of the family in St.
Patrick No. 3 Cemetery, Pottsville.
Arrangements are under the care
of James E. Humphrey Funeral
Home, Pottsville. Please share your
memories and condolences with
Blanche’s family by signing the
guest book at www.jehumphreyfuneralhome.com.
•
LAUDEMAN, EARL F., 96, formerly
of Minersville, passed away
Tuesday at Ephrata Manor, Ephrata.
A funeral service will be held at
11:30 a.m. Saturday at MahalRitzel Funeral Home Inc.,
Minersville, with Pastor Howard
SIGN THE GUEST BOOK AT REPUBLICANHERALD.COM
Fernsler officiating. Calling hours
are from 10 a.m. until the time of
the service. Interment will be in
Mount Peace Cemetery. In lieu of
flowers, the family requests donations made to the United Methodist
Church. Mahal-Ritzel Funeral Home
Inc., Minersville, is entrusted with
the arrangements.
•
LURWICK, DOROTHY B., 87, a
resident of Rosewood Nursing
Home, Schuylkill Haven, formerly of
Port Carbon, passed away Thursday
at Lehigh Valley Hospital,
Bethlehem.
A religious service will be held
at 11 a.m. Friday at Robert A.
Evans Jr. Funeral Home, 208 Pike
St., Port Carbon, with Pastor Lois
Sterling officiating. Relatives and
friends are invited to a viewing from
9 to 11 a.m. at the funeral home.
Interment will be in Schuylkill
Memorial Park, Schuylkill Haven. In
lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to St. Paul’s
Lutheran Church, c/o Denise
Krater, 124 Canal St., Port Carbon,
PA 17965. Please send condolences to www.robertaevansjrfh.
com.
•
MOORE, DOROTHY M., 94, of
Providence Place, formerly of
Orwigsburg, passed away Saturday
at Lehigh Valley Hospital-Cedar
Crest, Allentown.
A religious service will be held
at 11 a.m. Saturday at St. John’s
United Church of Christ,Orwigsburg,
with the Rev. Dr. Jan Remer-Osborn
officiating. Friends are invited to
call from 6 to 8 p.m. Friday at
Hamilton-Breiner Funeral Home &
Cremation
Services
Inc.,
Orwigsburg, and from 10 to 11
a.m. Saturday at the church. In lieu
of flowers, memorial contributions
may be made to St. John’s UCC,
236 E. Market St., Orwigsburg PA
17961, in memory of Dorothy
Moore.
•
NEY, SHIRLEY I., 81, of Pine Grove,
passed away Saturday at Lehigh
Valley Hospital, Allentown.
Funeral services will be held at
11:30 a.m. Saturday at H.L. Snyder
Funeral Home Inc., Pine Grove, with
Pastor Rod Finster and Donald Ney
officiating. There will be a viewing
from 10 to 11:30 a.m. Saturday at
the funeral home. Interment will
follow in the St. Paul’s Reformed
Cemetery, Ravine. In lieu of flowers,
the family would prefer contributions be made to the Echo Valley
Grace Brethren Church, 46 Tremont
Road, Tremont, PA 17981, in her
memory. You may send condolences to the family online at www.
hlsnyderfuneralhome.com.
•
REIGHTLER, SHIRLEY ELAINE,
Tower City, passed away peacefully
Friday at home.
Funeral services will he held at
2 p.m. Saturday from the Chapel of
the Dimon Funeral Home Inc.,
Tower City, with Pastor Annette
Shutt officiating. Burial will be in
Greenwood Cemetery. In lieu of
flowers, memorial contributions are
encouraged to the charity of your
choice. Online memories and condolences can be shared at www.
dimonfuneralhome.com.
•
RIEDEL, EVELYN R., 94, formerly of
Spruce Street, Kulpmont, went
home to be with Jesus on Saturday
at Mount Carmel Senior Living
Community surrounded by her family.
Funeral services will be held at
11 a.m. today in C.J. Lucas Funeral
Home Inc., 1053 Chestnut St.,
Kulpmont, with the Rev. Anthony
“Tony” Zibolski officiating. Burial
will be in Mount Carmel Cemetery,
Mount Carmel Township. A viewing
will be held from 10 a.m. until the
time of service today in C.J. Lucas
Funeral Home Inc., C.J. Lucas,
supervisor. In lieu of flowers, kindly
make a donation to Evelyn’s
Church, Friedens United Church of
Christ, 520 Chestnut St., Hegins,
PA 17938. To send condolences to
the family, please visit www.cjlucasfuneralhome.com.
•
In Loving Memory Of
ELIZABETH EDITH
(TOOTSIE) LORD
December 27, 2000
To our Angel in Heaven, who is
always loved and never forgotten.
Love, Betty Jane (Sissy)
& Family
UMLAUF, BARBARA, 68, of
Ashland, passed away the evening
of Dec. 20 at home with family
after a long battle with cancer.
A Celebration of Life Service will
be held at 6 p.m. Saturday at
Thomas M. Sullivan Funeral Home,
Girardville. Friends are invited to a
visitation from 3 p.m. until the time
of service Saturday at the funeral
home. Interment will be private at
the convenience of the family. In
lieu of flowers, and to honor
Barbara’s dying wish to continue to
save as many animals as possible,
donations can be made to either
Joe and Caroline Spay/Neuter and
Emergency Fund or Hillside SPCA,
P.O. Box 233, Pottsville, PA 17901.
Please make checks payable to
Hillside SPCA and please clearly
mark on your envelope whether
your gift is to the general fund or
Joe and Caroline’s fund.
•
ZELINSKY, MARY SUE, 48, of
Pottsville, met with her Lord the
evening of Dec. 22 at her home.
A Celebration of Mary Sue’s life
will be held 11 a.m. Saturday at the
Salvation Army, Pottsville. Schlitzer
Allen Pugh Funeral Home, 515 W.
Market St., Pottsville, has been
entrusted with arrangements.
Please visit www.schlitzerallenpugh.com to share a memory or
leave a condolence for the Zelinsky
family.
With sincere gratitude
we express our thanks
to the family, friends
and neighbors who
supported us during
the loss of our mother,
grandmother and
great-grandmother.
Thank you to everyone
who sent cards,
flowers and food and
who made donations
in her memory. Your
expressions of sympathy,
love and support will
remain in our hearts
forever.
The Family of
Geraldine (Gerry)
Dillman
10
obituaries
POTTSVILLE (PA.) REPUBLICAN HERALD
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2019
Pasco L. Schiavo
FROM PAGE 9
Jean Anne Trynosky Burke
December 29, 2018
December 27, 2018
Jean Anne Trynosky Burke,
83, of Farmingdale, passed
away at home Dec. 27.
She was born in Ashland
and raised in Girardville. She
graduated from St. Vincent de
Paul Grammar School and
Girardville High School. After
residing in Warehouse Point,
Conn., and Newark, N.J., she
adopted Farmingdale as her
hometown, where she lived for
more than 50 years and served
as municipal clerk, tax collector and assistant to the zoning
officer. Prior to this, she
worked as administrative
assistant to the president of
Compounders Inc. Afterward,
Jean served as a mortgage
loan officer. Jean served as an
usher at St. Catherine of Siena
Catholic Church, a councilwoman, planning board member, Cub Scout den mother and
PTA member, all in the community of Farmingdale. She
was a loving and devoted wife,
mother and grandmother.
Jean was preceded in death
by her parents, John Trynosky
a n d M i l d re d S we n s o n
Trynosky.
Jean is survived by her
JEAN ANNE
TRYNOSKY BURKE
beloved husband, Michael
Burke, Farmingdale; her son,
Michael John Burke and his
wife, Mary, Farmingdale; Jiji
to grandchildren, Katie, Mikey
and Alex; sister, Tina; cousin,
Ronald; cousins, nieces, nephews, grand-nieces and grandnephews.
Jean had an abiding love of
family, church and country.
She made it a personal mission
to see that as many veterans as
possible were remembered on
the National World War II
Memorial Registry and spent
numerous hours adding the
names of thousands of veterans to this registry, many now
deceased, but their legacies
now duly noted. Jean said that
she never forgot that it was
these brave people who saved
America and preserved it as a
free country, and was determined to honor as many veterans as she could.
In respect to Jean’s
expressed wishes, there will be
no viewing or cemetery funeral ceremony. There will be a
funeral Mass at 10 a.m. Friday
at St. Catherine of Siena Catholic Church, 31 Asbury Road,
Farmingdale, N.J. In lieu of
flowers, memorial donations
in Jean’s name may be made to
St. Catherine of Siena Catholic
Church, Farmingdale, N.J. For
information, directions or condolence messages to the family,
visit www.claytonfuneralhome.com.
Sign the guest book at
republicanherald.com
Irene G. Grady
December 31, 2018
Irene G. Grady, 68, of Girardville, passed away Monday at
Geisinger Medical Center,
Danville.
Born in Gordon, Sept. 10,
1950, she was a daughter of the
late George and Beatrice Carl
Kukuk.
She graduated from North
Schuylkill High School in 1968.
She worked at the Ashland
State General Hospital, as well
as a home health caregiver,
and worked for many years as
a waitress at Split Rock Lodge.
She was preceded in death
by her husband, William
Grady, who died March 14,
2012. Also preceding her in
death were three sisters, Verna, Beatrice (Joyce) and Mary;
one grandson, David Anthony
Grady.
She is survived by a daughter and two sons, Corrina
Kojeszewski and her husband,
Keith, Hazleton, William
Grady Jr. and his wife, Nicole,
IRENE G. GRADY
Teaneck, N.J., and Timothy
Grady and his wife, Theresa,
Girardville; 12 grandchildren,
Candace Redis and her husband, Patrick, Samantha Martzen and her husband, Christopher, Alyssa and Justin Grady,
Keith Kojeszewski II, Lillian,
Michael, Jacob and Carter
Grady, and Angel, Timothy Jr.
and Adriana Grady; four greatgrandchildren, Cason and
Holden Redis, Ayden Martzen
and Keeva Kojeszewski; two
brothers and four sisters,
George Kukuk and his wife,
Jeanette, Ashland, Lincoln
Kukuk, Pitman, Faye Orser,
Lewisburg, Katherine Schreiber and her husband, Dale,
Pitman, Judith Connor, Pitman, and Donna Scully,
Locustdale.
Funeral services will be held
at 11 a.m. Saturday at Kull-Heizenroth Funeral Home, Ashland. Interment will be in St.
Joseph’s Cemetery, Fountain
Springs. Viewing will be from 9
to 11 a.m. at the funeral home.
Kull-Heizenroth Funeral Home
Inc. is in charge of arrangements. Charles Heizenroth III,
supervisor. Visit www.kullfuneral.com.
Sign the guest book at
republicanherald.com
Mary Herbig
December 30, 2018
Mary Herbig, 93, formerly
of Locust Valley, Barnesville
and Tamaqua, passed away
Dec. 30 at St. Luke’s fifth
floor.
She was the widow of Kenneth T. Herbig, who died in
2006. At the time of Kenneth’s passing, they had been
married 58 years.
She was born in Girardville, a daughter of the late
Roman and Natalie Firman.
During World War II, from
1942 until 1945, she worked at
Linden Aircraft, New Jersey,
building B-29 bomber airMARY HERBIG
craft. She later worked in
garment factories in Mahawere among the original
noy City and Brockton.
Mary and her husband occupants of the Majestic
aldo Parisot, 100, eminent cello teacher
by anthony tommasini
THE NEW YORK TIMES
Aldo Parisot, a renowned
cellist who toured the world as
a soloist and settled into a
career as an eminent teacher
that included a 60-year tenure
at the Yale School of Music,
died Saturday at his home in
Guilford, Connecticut. He was
100.
His death was announced
by his son, Dean Parisot, a film
director and producer in Los
Angeles. The cellist had retired
from Yale only last June.
During the busiest stage of
his solo career, Aldo Parisot
performed with the major
orchestras of Berlin, London,
Paris and Munich, and with
conductors including Leopold
Stokowski, Pierre Monteux
and Leonard Bernstein, winning plaudits for his warm,
focused sound; prodigious
technique; and a temperament
that balanced passion and elegance.
For a 1955 New York Philharmonic appearance under
conductor Walter Hendl, he
gave the premiere of Heitor
Villa-Lobos’ Cello Concerto
No. 2, one of many works Parisot would commission during
his career to expand the cello
repertory.
But by his 30s he had started
teaching. He held positions at
the Peabody Conservatory at
Johns Hopkins University,
Mannes College of Music and
elsewhere before joining the
faculty at Yale in 1958.
Many Parisot students have
gone on to solo careers and to
prominent positions in ensembles, orchestras and conservatories. They include Roman
Jablonski, Ole Akahoshi and
Shauna Rolston.
Carter Brey, the principal
cellist of the New York Philharmonic, who studied with
Parisot at Yale in the late 1970s,
shared his memories in an
email.
Parisot’s teaching style
“was not based on the transmission of a grand, overarching view of music,” Brey
wrote. “Neither was it greatly
concerned with historical
detail. It was practical, reactive
and prescriptive.”
House apartments in Tamaqua and resided there for 38
years.
She was a member of the
Tamaqua Senior Citizens
and enjoyed her trips to the
casinos.
She was preceded in death
by a brother, Bogdan J. Firman, and a sister, Margaret
Romero.
She is survived by nieces
and nephews.
Private service will be at
the convenience of the family
with interment in Sky-View
Memorial Park, Tamaqua.
Lamar Christ Funeral Home,
Hometown, has charge.
Sign the guest book at
republicanherald.com
Attorney Pasco L. Schiavo
departed this life
Dec. 29 in the loving
company of his sister, Linda L. Schiavo, and his
friend, Brian Kwiatkowski.
The best summary of
Attorney Schiavo’s life is
inscribed on a bronze plaque
in his honor within Pasco L.
Schiavo Hall at Penn State
Hazleton which states:
“Distinguished lawyer,
author, educator, community
leader and philanthropist
Pasco L. Schiavo, like generations of his family, has tirelessly, effectively and proudly
worked to advance the best
interests of Penn State Hazleton and the community of
which it is on vital part.”
Also must be added to this
is that he was a fair and just
person. He graduated from
Hazleton High School, Lafayette College with a Bachelor
of Arts degree and University of Pennsylvania Law
School with a Juris Doctor
degree and returned to the
Hazleton area community to
practice law in 1962, following his graduation from law
school. He served as a first
lieutenant in the Ar my
Reserves.
Always of greatest importance and pride to him were
his family, his parents, brother and sisters and his Hazleton area community, state
and country. He always
worked to advance the best
interests of his community
and opposed anything which
threatened those best interests, whether his position
was popular or not. He was
dedicated to doing what was
right, just and helpful and
encouraging others to do the
same. He was a true American.
During his tenure as solicitor for the Hazleton Area
School District, he worked
tirelessly and successfully
with his board of directors to
keep the Hazleton Area
School District from being
split up into splinter school
districts to be annexed by out
of Hazleton area community
school districts and to consolidate several high schools
into one high school and a
resultant stem school to
unite the Hazleton area community educationally and
otherwise to provide the best
educational opportunities for
its students. Subsequently, he
led successful resistance to a
movement to build a second
high school, which would
have permanently divided
the community and lowered
educational standards and at
immense cost to the taxpayers. Attorney Schiavo also
worked toward amicable
acceptance of the new residents of the community by
the older residents and for
the new residents to befriend
and integrate with the older
residents. Without hesitation, he led resistance
against forces which attempted to slander, integrate and
harm the Hazleton area community. He always recognized, encouraged and
applauded other people of
the community who worked
PASCO L. SCHIAVO
toward the same goals.
Fo l l o w i n g y e a r s o f
research, Attorney Schiavo
authored the book “Betrayal
and Deliverance of a Community,” which not only presented compelling reasons
why the Hazleton area community, the people living
within the Hazleton Area
School District, should be
united into one separate
county and not continue to
be divided up into three separate counties. His book
revealed that the Pennsylvania Legislature years ago
had passed a bill, which
would become enabling legislation to allow a binding referendum vote for such a new
county by the people of the
Hazleton area community,
only to be unjustly vetoed by
the then governor who had
no regard for those people.
The book also contained proposed legislation drawn up
by Attorney Schiavo for the
Pennsylvania legislature and
governor to approve for the
deliverance of the people of
the Hazleton area community from this continuing injustice by allowing its people to
decide on a new and independent county for them and
future generations by binding referendum.
In 2015, he was selected by
the Pennsylvania State University as an honorary alumnus of the university for his
significant work and philanthropy for Penn State Hazleton and its students from the
Hazleton area community, an
honor given annually to five
or six people across the
entire university system to
nongraduates of the university who have been outstanding in their help to the university.
His public service and continuing philanthropy extended to many other areas of the
community, namely, the
Hazleton Area Public
Library, Hazleton Area
School District, Immanuel
Christian School, MMI Preparatory School, Hazle Township, Hazleton City, Downtown Hazleton Alliance for
Progress, Eckley Miners’ Village Associates and many
other such groups and people. It consisted of monetary
and other personal and real
estate gifts to the community,
including the development
and donation of public parks.
He was responsible for
assembling and making
available large tracts of land
in the community for industrial and commercial development, resulting in thousands of employment positions.
He was a Luzerne County
assistant district attorney, a
member of the Disciplinary
Board of the Supreme Court
of Pennsylvania, a designated super lawyer and held the
highest rating a lawyer may
receive by Martindale-Hubbell, the National American
Law Directory and continuously as a civil trial specialist
by the National Board of Trial Advocacy. He served as
solicitor for the Hazleton
Area School District during
the period of Hazleton Area
High School consolidation,
solicitor for the Township of
Hazle, solicitor for the
Municipal Authority of
Hazle Township, solicitor for
the Hazleton Area Industrial
Development Authority and
other governmental entities.
As member and president
of the Luzerne County Commission on Economic Opportunity, Eckley Miners’ Village Associates, Penn State
Hazleton Council, Lower
Luzerne County Bar Association and Alcoholism & Drug
Services of Lower Luzerne
County Inc., as well as a
member of Kiwanis Club of
Hazleton and the Columbus
Club, he gave freely of his
professional and private time
to these and other nonprofit
charitable and civic organizations.
He was honored as the Distinguished Citizen of the
Year by the Boy Scouts of
America, by the Luzerne
County Bar Association for
years of distinguished law
practice and by The Knights
of Columbus and UNICO
Club of Hazleton as an Outstanding Italian-American.
He authored numerous
legal articles in the American Bar Association Journal,
The Pennsylvania Lawyer
magazine and the Pennsylvania Bar Association Journal.
Attorney Schiavo always
hoped that present and
future generations of the
Hazleton area community
will continue with positive
active community work and
service.
He was the son of the late
Louis Schiavo and Josephine
(Shayna) (Cortese) Schiavo
and the grandson of the late
Attorney Pasco L. Schiavo.
He is survived by his sister,
Linda L. Schiavo; brother,
Louis Eugene Schiavo; his
sister, Judith R. Schiavo.
Services will be held in his
memory under the direction
of Fierro Funeral Services
Inc. Friends may call from
noon to 3 p.m. Jan. 11 and a
memorial service will be
held at 11 a.m. Jan. 12. In lieu
of flowers, donations may be
made to Hazleton Area Public Library, Eckley Miners’
Village Associates or the
Hazleton Animal Shelter.
Sign the guest book at
republicanherald.com
Teacher Feature
Maureen Challenger, Nativity BVM High School
She has been teaching physics for 16 years.
What is a first day of school tradition for you?
given me some really engaging lab activities.
What accomplishment at school fills you with pride?
I’m so fortunate that I have a handy husband! He builds cool
gadgets for my Physics labs. My school budget does provide
the necessities, but I purchase supplies for additional activities I decide to do.
Ice Breaker Bingo - it gets the kids talking about common
interests and lets me know what is important to them.
I was proud to coach/mentor Nativity’s STEM Team. They
won the regional competition last season! However, all credit
goes to the students for developing the idea, building the project, and presenting it so professionally.
How do you keep things fresh year after year?
I’ve taken some great (free) summer courses, which have
Do you spend your own money for your classroom or school?
What do you do with your “free” period?
My schedule includes four lab sciences, so I’m usually prepping a lab or cleaning up from a lab!
EDUCATORS INSPIRE AND TRULY GIVE THEIR ALL!
Support All Our Local Teachers!
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20 Slide continues
sports editor
LEROY BOYER
may be reached at (570) 628-6026
FAX: (570) 628-6068
email: lboyer@republicanherald.com
slumping philadelphia Flyers
drop their fourth straight
game with a 4-0 loss to the
nashville predators.
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2019
www.republicanherald.com
PAGE 11
COLLEGE FOOTBALL: CITRUS BOWL, KENTUCKY 27, PENN STATE 24
Unhappy New Year
Snell runs
Kentucky
past PSU
BY FRED GOODALL
AssociAted press
ORLANDO, Fla. — Winning 10 games, beating Penn
State on New Year’s Day, and
finishing in the Top 20 is no
small deal for the Kentucky
Wildcats.
So when Mark Stoops took
a seat on the podium flanked
by linebacker Josh Allen and
running back Benny Snell Jr.
after Tuesday’s 27-24 victory
in the Citrus Bowl, the coach
understandably was beyond
excited.
“It was extremely important to this team, to all of us,
to come home with some
hardware, to come home
with a trophy,” Stoops said.
Snell ran for 144 yards and
two touchdowns to become
Kentucky’s career rushing
leader and helped the 16thranked Wildcats end their
best season in more than four
decades on a winning note.
“There’s no question that
these guys changed the culture,” Stoops said. “They’ve
done so much and meant so
much to this team and this
program that it was very
important to finish, to collect
the trophy, win 10 games and
win a game on New Year’s
Day. Believe me, we had a
great belief that we didn’t
AssociAted press
have to do anything special
Kentucky’s Benny Snell Jr. (26) breaks free for a 12-yard touchdown run in the second half of Tuesday’s Citrus Bowl against Penn State in
(to win), just be us.”
Please see CITRUS, Page 12
Orlando, Fla. Snell rushed for 144 yards and two touchdowns as Kentucky held off the Nittany Lions 27-24.
McSorley battles
through injury to
direct comeback
Same story, same song,
same old Penn State
when it mattered most
ORLANDO, Fla.
hame on everyone who
thought this might be different.
Just because some time had
passed?
Just because they got some
extra practices in before
Christmas?
Just because some talented
young prospects could play as
much as anyone wanted them
to, or because their starting
quarterback — no, their heartbeat — was playing his last
game and hoping his teammates could get him through
the gates on a white stallion?
Just because it was Kentucky, an upstart team that,
frankly, never gets to play in a
game this big?
None of it mattered on the
first day of 2019, just like none
of it ever mattered in 2018. Or
in 2017, either.
The well-earned reputation
these Nittany Lions have saddled themselves with over the
last two seasons is that they
can’t close. On a sun-baked
New Year’s Day at Camping
S
BY DONNIE COLLINS
stAFF Writer
DONNIE
COLLINS
Staff Writer
World Stadium on Tuesday,
they showed a development
toward not opening, either.
Kentucky took advantage of
a series of Penn State mistakes
to take a big lead, and quarterback Trace McSorley’s trademark heroics couldn’t bail
them out in what became a
27-24 loss to the No. 14 Wildcats
in the Citrus Bowl.
For head coach James
Franklin, the postgame press
conference might as well have
been advertised as previously
recorded.
Question: What went wrong
for you guys, coach?
Answer: “(Kentucky) played
well for four quarters,” he said.
“We didn’t play well for four
quarters. ... We didn’t make
plays in the first half. If you
look at it, our defense played
ORLANDO, Fla. — On
that unscientific 1-to-10
scale, Trace McSorley
gauged the pain as a solid seven or eight.
Not that he planned to
let that stop him.
No. 12 Penn State’s
furious fourth-quarter
rally fell just short Tuesday in the Citrus Bowl at
AssociAted press
Camping World StadiKentucky linebacker Kash Daniel (56) sacks Penn State um, but not without a
quarterback Trace McSorley during the first half of gutsy performance by
Tuesday’s Citrus Bowl. The Wildcats had six sacks in their the legendary Nittany
Lions quarterback that
27-24 victory over the Nittany Lions.
made for a fitting final
extremely well in the first half, teams play. He could also have
chapter in his college
and our offense outgained
mentioned ill-timed turnovers career.
them. But, we didn’t make
and, yes, curious coaching
The senior threw for
plays when we had opportuni- decisions as part of the list.
246 yards and two touchAll of that has been part of
ties to make plays.
downs, then ran for 75
“Really, the same things that the Penn State football story
and a third score, but
troubled us throughout the sea- this year. It hasn’t been just
No. 14 Kentucky outlastflashy young prospects and
son troubled us here again
ed the Nittany Lions
gritty quarterbacking and
today.”
anyway 27-24.
tackles for loss and off-theBeen there, heard that.
After an uneven first
Franklin mentioned dropped charts recruiting.
half, McSorley missed
It’s fair to say there has also the first series of the secpasses and missed chances and
ond half, giving way to
below-the-standard special
Please see COLLINS, Page 12
AssociAted press
Trace McSorley walks
off the field for the
final time as Penn
State’s QB after Tuesday’s loss to Kentucky
in the Citrus Bowl.
redshirt freshman Sean
Clifford. With Clifford
on the field, a Penn State
spokesperson announced McSorley had suffered a broken foot in the
Please see NOTES, Page 12
NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE PLAYOFFS
Hard road ahead for Eagles
BY BOB FORD
the philAdelphiA inquirer
AssociAted press
Washington Redskins quarterback Josh Johnson loses
his helmet as he’s sacked by Philadelphia Eagles
defensive tackle Treyvon Hester (90) and defensive
end Brandon Graham (55) during the second half of
Sunday’s game. The Eagles won 24-0.
NFL Playoff Glance
Wild-card Playoffs
PHILADELPHIA — The PhiladelSaturday, Jan. 5
phia Eagles are looking to prolong their
indianapolis at houston, 4:35 p.m.
title defense on the road Sunday
(espn)
against a really good football team that
seattle at dallas, 8:15 p.m. (FoX)
is particularly difficult to beat at home.
Sunday, Jan. 6
Fortunately for them, they’ve already
l.A. chargers at Baltimore, 1:05
done that once this season.
When the Eagles went to Los Angeles p.m. (cBs)
philadelphia at chicago, 4:40 p.m.
to play the Rams on Dec. 16, their
(nBc)
record was 6-7 and — as we suspected
then and know for a fact now — one
thing. The Rams were 6-0 in the L.A.
more loss was the end of the line for
Coliseum and had racked up an overall
any hope of repeating as champions.
11-1 start to the season before being
Not that it was a tough spot or any-
shut down the previous week in Chicago. They would be looking to rebound
in front of their home fans, and what
better opportunity than against the
Super Bowl champions, a team that
had come in and beaten them the year
before. And this time, the visitors
would be starting Nick Foles for the
first time after a 13-week layoff. No, it
didn’t look all that good.
Similarly, things don’t look promising on paper for the Eagles in their
wild-card round playoff game this Sunday against the Bears in Soldier Field.
Chicago is 7-1 at home, has one of the
Please see EAGLES, Page 20
12
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
POTTSVILLE (PA.) REPUBLICAN HERALD
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2019
COLLINS: Same old PSU
when it mattered most
FROM PAGE 11
been an inconsistency in every
phase of the game that didn’t go
away with adjustments or teaching
or, most concerning, experience.
No single play wins a game. No
single play loses it. Fans can gripe all
they want about the fake punt on the
first drive that came up short of the
sticks. Or either one of freshman
kicker Jake Pinegar’s two missed
field goals. Or about Franklin’s decision to kick the field goal with four
minutes left instead of trying to keep
the drive alive on a fourth-and-7.
Problem is, it’s never really one
thing that dooms Penn State.
It’s everything. It’s a pile of problems. Always a pile.
If Penn State played merely OK
instead of flat miserable on special
teams, it might have won going away.
But an offline snap by Kyle Vasey
and a bad handle on it by upback
Jonathan Thomas on the fake punt
attempt forced that play to fall short.
Punter Blake Gillikin’s second punt
of the game was too low, not far
enough toward the sideline, and dangerous Kentucky punt returner
Lynn Bowden Jr. brought it back 58
yards for a score.
Add in Pinegar’s two misses — one
that was altered at the line by leaping
Kentucky linebacker Josh Allen —
and that’s 16 points worth of mistakes
from special teams coordinator Phil
Galiano’s group that just never
seemed to be good enough this season.
“I think it’s a couple things,”
Franklin said of the special teams.
“It’s inconsistency; we punt the ball
FROM PAGE 11
Rose Bowl
Ohio State 28
Washington 23
73 yards once and then shank the
next one. That has kind of happened
throughout the year.
“It’s our execution. It’s the responsibility of us as coaches making sure
they’re confident and understanding
their responsibilities. We haven’t
done it consistently, all year long.
That’s a concern.
“We’ll do whatever we have to do
to get better. But it was not up to our
standards. Not today. Not all year
long.”
But it’s not all on the special
teams.
Linebacker Cam Brown was ejected on a targeting call that gave Kentucky extra yards on one drive in the
third quarter. That penalty helped
the Wildcats score a touchdown.
Honestly, Penn State did something to help Kentucky out on every
one of its scoring drives. Every one.
And it still had a chance to win.
That’s hard to do.
The chance Penn State took on the
fake punt in the first half, it didn’t
late in the game when Franklin
elected to have Pinegar try a field
goal rather than go for it on fourthand-7. The 32-yarder was good, and
Penn State moved within a field goal.
That decision will be knocked as
one that was a bit too conservative
for fans’ liking, especially considering the Nittany Lions never got the
ball back. But with more than four
minutes on the clock and all their
timeouts in hand, it honestly wasn’t
the worst play there.
But, again, Penn State’s defense
that has been so good at times this
CITRUS: Kentucky
squeezes by Lions
Snell scored on runs of 2
and 12 yards in the second
half, then carried for a couple
of crucial first downs to help
Kentucky (10-3) run out the
clock after Penn State’s Trace
McSorley trimmed a 27-7 deficit to three points despite
playing with a foot injury.
McSorley threw for 246
yards and two touchdowns,
and the Nittany Lions’ career
passing and wins leader also
rushed for a team-high 75
yards and one TD.
“The same thing that troubled us throughout the season troubled us here again
today. Dropped balls, missed
opportunities. That’s really
kind of the story of the
game,” said Penn State coach
James Franklin, whose team
started slowly on offense,
missed one field goal and had
another blocked.
Lynn Bowden Jr. scored on
a 58-yard punt return for
Kentucky. Allen, the Southeastern Conference defensive
player of the year, had three
of the Wildcats’ six sacks.
“The three guys we knew
we needed to stop were
Bowden, Snell and Allen. All
three of them showed up
today,” Franklin said.
“They’ve built their program around those guys,
they built their season
around those guys,” Franklin added. “They made plays.
That’s what great players
do.”
Penn State (9-4) trailed 27-7
entering the fourth quarter,
but McSorley’s wasn’t finished. His 1-yard TD run
capped a 75-yard drive, and
he followed with an 18-yard
TD pass to Pat Friermuth to
cut Kentucky’s lead to six.
The Lions marched to the
Kentucky 14 on their next
possession and pulled within
27-24 with 4:12 left.
Thanks to Snell, a junior
who already has declared for
the NFL Draft, McSorley
didn’t get the ball back until
just one second was left on
the clock.
Franklin declined to discuss specifics of McSorley’s
injury.
“We don’t typically get into
specifics. ... Obviously Trace
was experiencing some discomfort. The doctors felt like
he could go, but it really just
came down to Trace on how
Trace felt,” Franklin said.
McSorley, who was to
undergo further evaluation,
said he hadn’t received
“definitive information” on
whether his foot was broken.
“I’ve been through too
much, the team has been
through too much. ... They
BOWL
ROUNDUP
Kentucky 27, Penn State 24
Kentucky ...............10 0 17 0 — 27
Penn State...............0 7 0 17 — 24
First Quarter
KEN — FG Butler 28, 12:23
KEN — Bowden 58 punt return (Butler kick),
:45
Second Quarter
PSU — Bowers 1 pass from McSorley (Pinegar kick), 13:56
Third Quarter
KEN — Snell 2 run (Butler kick), 12:38
KEN — FG Butler 28, 12:23
KEN — Snell 12 run (Butler kick), 1:35
Fourth Quarter
PSU — McSorley 1 run (Pinegar kick), 13:37
PSU — Freiermuth 18 pass from McSorley
(Pinegar kick), 9:00
PSU — FG Pinegar 32, 4:12
A — 59,167.
KEN
PSU
First downs
16
22
Rushes-yards
42-176
41-161
Passing
121
246
Comp-Att-Int
9-15-0
17-35-1
Return Yards
89
30
Punts-Avg.
9-44.66
5-37.6
Fumbles-Lost
1-0
1-1
Penalties-Yards
3-27
3-24
Time of Possession
30:42
29:18
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING — Kentucky, Snell 26-144, T.Wilson
10-29, Rose 4-9, Middleton 0-0, Bowden 1-0,
Richardson 1-(minus 6). Penn State, McSorley
19-75, Sanders 13-51, Slade 4-27, Hamler 1-11,
Jo.Brown 1-4, J.Thomas 1-0, (Team) 1-(minus 3),
Clifford 1-(minus 4).
PASSING — Kentucky, T.Wilson 9-15-0-121.
Penn State, Clifford 0-2-0-0; McSorley 17-331-246.
RECEIVING — Kentucky, Bowden 5-84, Richardson 2-12, Conrad 1-21, Bouvier 1-4. Penn
State, Thompkins 4-74, Bowers 3-32, Freiermuth
2-38, Shorter 2-17, Ju.Johnson 2-13, Sanders
2-7, Hamler 1-41, J.Dotson 1-24.
MISSED FIELD GOALS—Penn State, Pinegar
40, Pinegar 36.
told me it was a matter of if I
could deal with the discomfort,” the quarterback said.
“If I could do that, I was
going to play.”
HISTORIC SEASON
Kentucky finished with its
first 10-win season since 1977
— when the Wildcats went
10-1 — and just the third time
in program history. The
school also did it in 1950.
Snell, meanwhile, broke Sonny Collins’ career rushing
record on his 12-yard TD run
that made it 27-7 late in the
third quarter. Collins rushed
for 3,835 yards from 1972-75.
THE TAKEAWAY
Kentucky: Facing a tradition-rich opponent in a New
Year’s bowl was significant for
the Wildcats, who made the
most of the opportunity. Along
with the three sacks, Allen
blocked a field goal to key a
strong defensive effort, while
the offense shrugged off a slow
start to help the Wildcats pull
away in the second half.
Penn State: The Nittany
Lions fell short of their goal
to finish with 10 wins in three
consecutive seasons for the
first time since 1980-82. Three
of their four losses were by a
total of eight points.
UP NEXT
Penn State: Nittany Lions
face challenge of replacing
McSorley, the school’s career
leader for wins, completions,
passing yards, passing TDs,
total offense and rushing
TDs by a quarterback.
PASADENA, Calif. (AP) —
Dwayne Haskins passed for
251 yards and three touchdowns, and Urban Meyer
finished his coaching career
at Ohio State with a victory
after the Buckeyes held off
Washington’s thrilling fourthquarter comeback in the
105th Rose Bowl.
Parris Campbell, Johnnie Dixon and Rashod Berry
caught TD passes in the
ASSOCIATED PRESS
first half for the fifth-ranked
Kentucky running back Benny Snell Jr. (26) drops to his knees after Buckeyes (13-1), who took a
scoring a touchdown on a 12-yard run during the second half of 25-point lead into the fourth.
Tuesday’s win over Penn State in the Citrus Bowl. The TD run made But Myles Gaskin threw a
Snell the all-time leading rusher in Kentucky school history.
touchdown pass and rushed
for two more scores for the
season wasn’t good enough when it
we were going to go out there, stop
No. 9 Huskies (10-4), scormattered.
them and get the ball back for our
ing from 2 yards out with 42
Wasn’t good enough late against
offense. We had all the confidence in seconds left.
Ohio State or Michigan State.
the world. We just didn’t execute.”
The Buckeyes intercepted
Wasn’t good enough against KenIn the end, as the 2018 Penn State
Jake Browning’s pass on the
tucky. Benny Snell Jr., the Wildcats’
2-point conversion attempt
Nittany Lions’ season is eulogized,
and then recovered the Husbull of a running back, got eight car- the epithet might as well read, “We
kies’ onside kick to wrap up
ries, picked up 25 yards, forced Penn didn’t execute.”
the final game of Meyer’s
State to burn all three of its timeouts
If they did, at varying points of
seven-year tenure.
and left the offense with no chance at the fall, this probably would have
a comeback.
been a very different game, likely not
Fiesta Bowl
Snell got the ball again and again
played in Orlando, but probably in a
LSU 40, UCF 32
and again, like they knew he would. much bigger setting with quite a bit
GLENDALE, Ariz. (AP) —
They couldn’t stop him when a
more on the line.
Joe Burrow shook off a vistop was all they needed.
Which makes how it ultimately
cious early hit to throw for
“That’s a position every defense
ended very fitting and makes the
394 yards and four touchwants to be in,” safety Garrett Taynext few months leading into the fall
downs, helping No. 11 LSU
lor said. “Go out there, game on the
very important, indeed. Not all was
end No. 7 Central Florida’s
line, four minutes left, you know
lost. All the same, this is a young
25-game winning streak with
they’re going to run their bread-and- team that needs to find itself first.
a victory in the Fiesta Bowl.
butter running plays, and we have to
(Collins covers Penn State football for
LSU (10-3) started its first
bow up and stop them. ... Everyone
Times-Shamrock. Follow him Fiesta Bowl without several
on Twitter @DonnieCollinsTT) key players on defense and
on the field had that mentality that
fell into an early 11-point
hole against the high-scoring
Penn State
Knights (12-1). The Tigers
clawed back behind Burrow
Insider Report
and a defensive front that
PLAYER OF THE
sacked UCF quarterback Darriel Mack Jr. five times.
GAME
NOTES: McSorley
plays through injury
OLB Josh Allen
Kentucky
The Wildcats’ star defender didn’t disappoint
in Kentucky’s first New
Year’s Day bowl appearance in 20 years. He had
four tackles, but three of
them were sacks, including two on third downs to
stall Penn State drives
and set an already inconsistent Nittany Lions offense on its heels. He
also got a hand on Penn
State kicker Jake Pinegar’s 36-yard field goal attempt in the closing minute of the first half.
GAME BALLS
RB Benny Snell
Kentucky
Kentucky’s bulldog of
a back rushed for 144
yards and a pair of touchdowns on 26 carries,
but he iced the game by
rushing eight times on
the Wildcats’ final drive
that started with 4:12 to
play, grinding out two first
downs and leaving Penn
State with no time left.
QB Trace McSorley
Penn State
Almost willed the Nittany Lions back from a 27-7
deficit, reportedly with a
broken foot. He threw for
246 yards and two touchdowns, then ran for 75
and one more score in
the final game of his storied Penn State career.
PR/WR Lynn Bowden
Kentucky
Finished with 84 yards
receiving, most coming
on big catch and runs.
But his 58-yard punt return for a score in the
first quarter put Penn
State in a hole it could
not overcome.
BY THE NUMBERS
0 — Successful thirddown conversions for
Penn State through the
first three quarters. The
Nittany Lions were 4-for-5
in the fourth.
2 — Missed field goals
in the first half for Penn
State.
3 — Career punts of 70
yards or longer for Penn
State punter Blake Gillikin
after his 71-yard boot in
the first half.
6 — Quarterback sacks
recorded by Kentucky’s
defense.
76.8 — Percentage of
Kentucky’s 297 yards of
total offense that were
gained by RB Benny Snell
Jr. and WR Lynn Bowden
Jr.
— Compiled by
Donnie Collins
FROM PAGE 11
first half and would not
return to the game.
Five plays later, with the
Nittany Lions trailing by 13,
McSorley jogged back onto
the field.
After the game, McSorley
somewhat denied the broken
foot diagnosis, saying only
that tests were “unclear” as
to an exact problem with the
right foot. But he said he felt
significant, centralized pain
in the foot, and when he
came out to talk more with
the gathered press after his
press conference and another round of treatment, he
had a boot on his lower leg,
ankle and foot area.
Head coach James Franklin said team doctors were
going to make the final decision on whether McSorley
could play, and they determined that whatever the injury was, he couldn’t do more
damage playing on it. However, to play on it, he’d have to
decide whether to plow
through a great deal of pain.
“For me, my personality,
they were going to have to
take my pads off of me,”
McSorley said. “It was just a
matter of dealing with it.
“I didn’t want my career to
end like that. I also wanted to
be out there with my teammates. I knew that was going
to be the last time I was going
to be able suit up with those
guys. We’ve gone through too
much as far as winter workouts, spring ball, summer
conditioning. I went through
too much with those guys for
it to end on something where
it was pain management.”
Teammates took the news
of McSorley returning to
action with varying degrees
of surprise and excitement.
Safety Nick Scott, a fellow
senior, praised McSorley’s
competitive spirit and toughness, but admitted to thinking about the ramifications
further injuring the foot
could have on McSorley’s
professional prospects.
“As a friend,” Scott said,
“I’m looking at Trace like,
‘Dude, what are you doing?’”
Running back M i l e s
S a n d e r s , though, said
McSorley’s return to the field
fired up the offense, and
nobody on it more than the
junior who rushed for 51
yards.
“I got excited. I actually
punched him in the chest
when I saw him there,” Sanders said. “Trace shows you
every week how tough he is
and how much he competes. I
respect him so much. I was
really excited to see him back
on the field.”
No decisions yet
Two Penn State players
who said they were considering leaving the program after
the season for the NFL Draft
said Tuesday they still hadn’t
made a decision.
Sanders said he would
make one in the next few
days, while defensive end
Shareef Miller — who had
eight tackles in the Citrus
Bowl — added that he is not
leaning one way or another
on a decision.
“I really don’t know right
now,” he said. “I’m going to
decide in a couple of days.
I’m just trying to get through
this loss, and I hate losing. So
I’m not really worrying
about that. It’s up in the air
right now.
Lake-Lehman product
Connor McGovern, the
right guard who also was
considering a jump to the
NFL, wasn’t made available
to reporters after the game.
Bold statement
As advertised, Southeastern Conference Defensive
Player of the Year Josh
Allen dropped Penn State
quarterbacks three times to
lead a solid defensive effort
for Kentucky.
After the game, he dropped
the mic.
“I’ve got something to say.
I’m leaving you with this.
You all record this,” the
senior Allen said, unprompted, as he left the postgame
press conference. “If I don’t
go number one (in the 2019
NFL Draft), I don’t know who
is. And I stand true to that.”
Two of Allen’s three sacks
on McSorley came on third
down pass attempts to stall
drives. Allen also got a piece
of kicker Jake Pinegar’s
36-yard field goal attempt in
the closing minute of the
first half.
Allen is expected to be
selected in the first round of
next year’s draft.
Nittany notes
Defensive tackle Robert
Windsor missed the game
for what Franklin called “a
violation of team rules.”
Sophomore Antonio Shelton started in his place. ...
Linebacker Cam Brown
was ejected for targeting on a
helmet-to-helmet tackle of
receiver Lynn Bowden Jr.
on the first series of the second half. By rule, Brown will
have to sit out the first half
of Penn State’s 2019 opener
against Idaho on Aug. 31. ...
The announced attendance
for the game was 59,167.
Contact the writer:
dcollins@timesshamrock.com
Outback Bowl
Iowa 27
Mississippi State 22
TAMPA, Fla. (AP) — Safety
Jake Gervase’s interception
in the end zone helped preserve a late lead, and a ballhawking defense compensated for a sputtering offense
as Iowa beat No. 18 Mississippi State.
Gervase also batted down
an errant fourth-down pass
to end the Bulldogs’ final
drive at the Iowa 32 with 25
seconds left.
The Hawkeyes (9-4) totaled just 199 yards, with
75 coming on a touchdown
pass from Nathan Stanley
to Nick Easley, but they converted three takeaways into
17 points. Their three running backs totaled 4 yards
in 15 carries.
Monday’s late games
Liberty Bowl
Oklahoma State 38
Missouri 33
MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) —
Taylor Cornelius tied a Liberty Bowl record with four
touchdown passes and Kolby
Peel made a critical fourthdown stop with 1:01 left as
Oklahoma State edged No.
24 Missouri.
Holiday Bowl
Northwestern 31
Utah 20
SAN DIEGO (AP) — Northwestern converted three
Utah turnovers into 21
points in a dizzying nineminute stretch in the pouring rain in the third quarter, including Jared McGee’s
82-yard fumble return for a
touchdown, to stun the 20thranked Utes.
The Wildcats (9-5) scored
28 points in the third quarter to win their third straight
bowl game under coach Pat
Fitzgerald. The Green Bay
Packers reportedly want to
interview Fitzpatrick for their
head coaching job.
Gator Bowl
Texas A&M 53
N.C. State 13
JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (AP)
— Trayveon Williams ran for
236 yards and three touchdowns, smashing a 30-yearold school record and carrying No. 21 Texas A&M past
North Carolina State.
Redbox Bowl
Oregon 7
Michigan State 6
SANTA CLARA, Calif. (AP)
— Justin Herbert shook off
a sluggish day and threw a
touchdown pass to Dillon
Mitchell in the fourth quarter, and Oregon held on after
Michigan State botched a
field goal attempt.
Scoreboard
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2019
Jr. high hoopS
traNSactioNS
Satuday’s boys’ results
9th grade
Pottsville 57, Tamaqua 37
Leading scorers: Pottsville — Sukeena 20; Tamaqua — P. Coleman 13, J.
Coleman 13
FOOTBALL
National Football League
CHICAGO BEARS — Signed QB Tyler
Bray to the practice squad. Released OL
Willie Beavers from the practice squad.
CINCINNATI BENGALS — Signed
K Tristan Vizcaino to a reserve/future
contract.
DETROIT LIONS — Signed QB Connor Cook to a reserve/future contract.
Announced the are not renewing offensive coordinator Jim Bob Cooter’s
contract.
MIAMI DOLPHINS — Signed LB
James Burgess, C Connor Hilland, S
Chris Lammons, DT Jamiyus Pittman, LB
Quentin Poling and DE Jeremiah Valoaga to reserve/future contracts.
OAKLAND RAIDERS — Signed WR
Saeed Blacknall, RB James Butler, LB
Cayson Collins, LB James Cowser, WR
Rashard Davis, DB Makinton Dorleant,
P Drew Kaser, OT Jamar McGloster, QB
Nathan Peterman and FB Ryan Yurachek to reserve/future contracts.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
ARIZONA COYOTES — Assigned G
Calvin Pickard to Tucson (AHL) for conditioning purposes.
CAROLINA HURRICANES — Recalled F Saku Maenalanen from Charlotte (AHL). Reassigned F Janne Kuokkanen to Charlotte.
NEW JERSEY DEVILS — Placed F
Taylor Hall on injured reserve, retroactive to Dec. 23. Recalled D Egor Yakovlev
and F Blake Pietila from Binghamton
(AHL).
American Hockey League
MILWAUKEE ADMIRALS — Signed D
Scott Savage and F Jared Van Wormer
to professional tryout contracts.
SAN DIEGO GULLS — Signed RW
Johno May to a professional tryout.
Released C Jake Marchment from his
professional tryout contract.
COLLEGE
NORTH CAROLINA STATE — Announced junior WR Jakobi Meyers will
enter the NFL Draft.
OKLAHOMA — Agreed to terms with
Lincoln Riley football coach on a contract extension.
STANFORD — Announced junior TE
Kaden Smith will enter the NFL Draft.
SportS oddS
America’s Line
NFL
Favorite
Points
Underdog
Current O/U
Wild Card Playoffs
Saturday
TEXANS
2 (47.5)
Colts
COWBOYS
2 (43.5)
Seahawks
Sunday
RAVENS
2.5 (41.5)
Chargers
BEARS
6 (41.0)
Eagles
College Football
Favorite
Points
Underdog
Current O/U
Saturday
FCS Championship Game
Frisco, TX
N Dakota State 14 (61.5) E Washington
Monday
National Championship Game
Santa Clara, CA
Alabama
6 (59.5)
Clemson
NBA
Favorite
Points
Underdog
Heat
6 (206.5)
CAVALIERS
WIZARDS
5 (229.5)
Hawks
HORNETS
2.5 (222.5)
Mavericks
NETS
PK (230.5)
Pelicans
CELTICS
NL (NL)
T’wolves
GRIZZLIES
6 (199.5)
Pistons
BULLS
PK (NL)
Magic
76ers
4 (NL)
SUNS
Thunder
5 (230.0)
LAKERS
NOTE: O/U is the over/under total
(combined points for both teams) for
each game.
College Basketball
Favorite
Points
Underdog
CINCINNATI
21
Tulane
Nebraska
1
MARYLAND
XAVIER
3
Seton Hall
N CAROLINA
16
Harvard
WAKE FOREST
8.5
Cornell
EVANSVILLE
PK
Drake
Texas Tech
3.5
W VIRGINIA
BUTLER
8.5
Georgetown
C FLORIDA
6
Temple
BRADLEY
7.5 Northern Iowa
VALPARAISO
2.5
Illinois St
SMU
15
E Carolina
HOUSTON
13
Tulsa
SO ILLINOIS
8.5
Missouri St
Connecticut
3.5
S FLORIDA
VILLANOVA
12.5
DePaul
MICHIGAN ST
13
Northwestern
Iowa St
4 OKLAHOMA ST
KANSAS ST
3.5
Texas
LOYOLA-CHICAGO6.5
Indiana St
KANSAS
8
Oklahoma
New Mexico
1.5
AIR FORCE
Boise St
3
WYOMING
Fresno St
14.5 SAN JOSE ST
UNLV
8
Colorado St
NEVADA
10
Utah St
Added Games
S Dakota
1.5
DENVER
NHL
Favorite
Points
Underdog
Flames
-$170/+$150 (6.0) R WINGS
Penguins -$150/+$130 (6.0) RANGERS
Canucks -$125/+$105 (6.5)
SENS
STARS
-$165/+$145 (6.0)
Devils
COYOTES -$110/-$110 (5.5)
Oilers
AVALANCHE-$110/-$110 (6.0) Sharks
Grand Salami: Over/under 36.5 goals.
NOTE: O/U is the over/under total
(combined goals for both teams) for
each game.
NOTE: The ‘’Grand Salami’’ is the total
combined goals for all the games on the
card.
college hoopS
How the Top 25 Fared Tuesday
9. Florida State (12-1) beat Winthrop
87-76. Next: at No. 4 Virginia, Saturday.
10. Virginia Tech (12-1) beat Notre
Dame 81-66. Next: vs. Boston College,
Saturday.
16. Marquette (11-3) lost to St. John’s
89-69. Next: vs. Xavier, Sunday.
Tuesday’s other scores
SOUTH
Lincoln Memorial 109, North Greenville 59
Radford 80, Mars Hill 51
FAR WEST
San Diego State 65, CS Northridge 60
college Football
Nba
National Basketball Association
EASTERN
Atlantic Division
Toronto
Philadelphia
Boston
Brooklyn
New York
W
28
23
21
17
9
L
11
14
15
21
28
Pct
.718
.622
.583
.447
.243
GB
—
4
5½
10½
18
Charlotte
Miami
Orlando
Washington
Atlanta
18
17
16
14
11
18
18
20
23
25
.500
.486
.444
.378
.306
—
½
2
4½
7
26
25
16
10
8
10
12
19
27
29
.722
.676
.457
.270
.216
—
1½
9½
16½
18½
Houston
San Antonio
Memphis
Dallas
New Orleans
W
21
21
18
17
17
L
15
17
18
19
21
Pct
.583
.553
.500
.472
.447
GB
—
1
3
4
5
Denver
Oklahoma City
Portland
Utah
Minnesota
23
23
21
18
17
11
13
16
20
20
.676
.639
.568
.474
.459
—
1
3½
7
7½
Golden State
L.A. Clippers
L.A. Lakers
Sacramento
Phoenix
25
21
21
19
9
13
15
16
17
29
.658
.583
.568
.528
.237
—
3
3½
5
16
Southeast Division
Milwaukee
Indiana
Detroit
Chicago
Cleveland
Central Division
WESTERN
Southwest Division
Northwest Division
Pacific Division
Monday’s scores
Indiana 116, Atlanta 108
Charlotte 125, Orlando 100
Houston 113, Memphis 101
San Antonio 120, Boston 111
New Orleans 123, Minnesota 114
Oklahoma City 122, Dallas 102
Golden State 132, Phoenix 109
Tuesday’s scores
SportS card
TODAY
Non-League Girls’ Basketball
Mahanoy Area at Tamaqua, 7 p.m.
Shen. Valley at Jim Thorpe, 7:30 p.m.
Pottsville at Reading, 7:30 p.m.
Biglerville at Upper Dauphin, 6:30 p.m.
Selinsgrove at Lourdes, 7:30 p.m.
THURSDAY
Schuylkill Boys’ Basketball
Jim Thorpe at Lehighton, 7 p.m.
Tamaqua at Blue Mountain, 7 p.m.
Pottsville at Panther Valley, 7:30 p.m.
Pine Grove at N. Schuylkill, 7:30 p.m.
Schuylkill Haven at Tri-Valley, 7:30 p.m.
Lourdes at Minersville, 7:30 p.m.
Mahanoy Area at Shen. Valley, 7:30 p.m.
Weatherly at Marian, 7:30 p.m.
Tri-Valley Boys’ Basketball
Upper Dauphin at Halifax, 7:30 p.m.
Non-League Girls’ Basketball
Schuylkill Haven at CMVT, 7:30 p.m.
Newport at Williams Valley, 7:30 p.m.
Tri-Valley Wrestling
Halifax at Newport, 7 p.m.
Berks Wrestling
Hamburg at Wyomissing, 6:30 p.m.
Non-League Wrestling
Emmaus at Tamaqua, 7 p.m.
Non-League Swimming
Schuylkill Haven at Shamokin, 4:30 p.m.
Saucon Valley at Blue Mtn., 4:30 p.m.
Daniel Boone at Pottsville, 4:30 p.m.
Toronto 122, Utah 116
Milwaukee 121, Detroit 98
Denver 115, New York 108
Portland 113, Sacramento, 108
Philadelphia at L.A. Clippers, late
Today’s games
Atlanta at Washington, 7 p.m.
Dallas at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Miami at Cleveland, 7 p.m.
New Orleans at Brooklyn, 7:30 p.m.
Detroit at Memphis, 8 p.m.
Minnesota at Boston, 8 p.m.
Orlando at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Philadelphia at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
Mlb
Major League Baseball Calendar
Jan. 11 — Salary arbitration figures
exchanged.
Jan. 22 — BBWAA Hall of Fame voting announced.
Jan. 28-Feb. 15 — Salary arbitration
hearings, St. Petersburg, Fla.
Feb. 6-8 — Owners’ meetings,
Orlando, Fla.
Feb. 10 — Voluntary reporting date
for Oakland pitchers, catchers and
injured players.
Feb. 11 — Voluntary reporting date
for Seattle pitchers, catchers and
injured players.
Feb. 13 — Voluntary reporting date
for other teams’ pitchers, catchers and
injured players.
tV SportS
TODAY
Afternoon
2:55 — Premier League Soccer: Chelsea vs. Southampton.................(NBCSN)
Evening
6:30 — College Basketball: Nebraska at Maryland ................................. (BTN)
6:30 — College Basketball: Tulane at Cincinnati.................................(CBSSN)
6:30 — College Basketball: Seton Hall at Xavier......................................(FS1)
7:00 — College Basketball: Harvard at North Carolina........................ (ESPN2)
7:00 — College Basketball: Temple at Central Florida .................... (ESPNEWS)
7:00 — College Basketball: Georgetown at Butler.................................... (ATT)
7:00 — College Basketball: Texas Tech at West Virginia...................... (ESPNU)
7:00 — NHL Hockey: Pittsburgh Penguins at New York Rangers ...........(NBCSN)
8:00 — NBA Basketball: Minnesota T’wolves at Boston Celtics............. (ESPN)
8:30 — College Basketball: Northwestern at Michigan State................... (BTN)
8:30 — College Basketball: UConn at South Florida............................(CBSSN)
8:30 — College Basketball: DePaul at Villanova ......................................(FS1)
9:00 — College Basketball: Oklahoma at Kansas............................... (ESPN2)
9:00 — College Basketball: Iowa State at Oklahoma State ............ (ESPNEWS)
9:00 — College Basketball: Texas at Kansas State............................. (ESPNU)
9:00 — NBA Basketball: Philadelphia 76ers at Phoenix Suns..............(NBCSP)
9:30 — NHL Hockey: San Jose Sharks at Colorado Avalanche .............(NBCSN)
10:30 — College Basketball: Colorado State at UNLV...........................(CBSSN)
10:30 — NBA Basketball: Oklahoma City Thunder at L.A. Lakers............. (ESPN)
11:00 — College Basketball: Utah State at Nevada.............................. (ESPNU)
THURSDAY
Afternoon
2:55 — Premier League Soccer: Manchester City vs. Liverpool............(NBCSN)
Evening
6:00 — High School Football: Under Armour All-America Game............ (ESPN2)
6:00 — Golf: PGA Sentry Tournament of Champions, first round ..............(GOLF)
7:00 — NHL Hockey: Carolina Hurricanes at Philadelphia Flyers...........(NBCSP)
7:00 — College Basketball: Penn State at Michigan ............................. (ESPN)
7:00 — College Basketball: Iowa at Purdue............................................ (BTN)
7:00 — College Basketball: North Carolina State at Miami.................. (ESPNU)
7:00 — College Basketball: Illinois at Indiana..........................................(FS1)
9:00 — Women’s College Basketball: Duke at North Carolina State ......... (ATT)
7:30 — NHL Hockey: Chicago Blackhawks at New York Islanders.........(NBCSN)
7:30 — College Basketball: George Mason at St. Joseph’s .................(CBSSN)
8:00 — NBA Basketball: Toronto Raptors at San Antonio Spurs................(TNT)
9:00 — College Basketball: Minnesota at Wisconsin .............................. (BTN)
9:00 — College Basketball: St. Mary’s at San Francisco ..................... (ESPN2)
9:00 — College Basketball: Jacksonville State at Belmont .................. (ESPNU)
9:00 — College Basketball: Colorado at Arizona ......................................(FS1)
9:00 — College Basketball: Wichita State at Memphis........................(CBSSN)
9:00 — Women’s College Basketball: UConn at Baylor ......................... (ESPN)
10:30 — NBA Basketball: Houston Rockets at Golden State Warriors ........(TNT)
11:00 — College Basketball: Stanford at UCLA...................................... (ESPN)
11:00 — College Basketball: BYU at Pacific......................................... (ESPNU)
2018-19 Bowl Glance
Saturday, Dec. 15
Celebration Bowl
At Atlanta
NC A&T 24, Alcorn State 22
New Mexico Bowl
Albuquerque
Utah State 52, North Texas 13
Cure Bowl
Orlando, Fla.
Tulane 41, Louisiana-Lafayette 24
Las Vegas Bowl
Fresno State 31, Arizona State 20
Camellia Bowl
Montgomery, Ala.
Ga. Southern 23, Eastern Michigan 21
New Orleans Bowl
Appalachian State 45, Middle Tennessee 13
Tuesday, Dec. 18
Boca Raton (Fla.) Bowl
UAB 37, Northern Illinois 13
Wednesday, Dec. 19
Frisco (Texas) Bowl
Ohio 27, San Diego State 0
Thursday, Dec. 20
Gasparilla Bowl
At St. Petersburg, Fla.
Marshall 38, South Florida 20
Friday, Dec. 21
Bahamas Bowl
Nassau
FIU 35, Toledo 32
Famous Idaho Potato Bowl
Boise
BYU 49, Western Michigan 18
Saturday, Dec. 22
Birmingham (Ala.) Bowl
Wake Forest 37, Memphis 34
Armed Forces Bowl
Fort Worth, Texas
Army 70, Houston 14
Dollar General Bowl
Mobile, Ala.
Troy 42, Buffalo 32
Hawaii Bowl
Honolulu
Louisiana Tech 31, Hawaii 14
Wednesday, Dec. 26
SERVPRO First Responder Bowl
Dallas
Boise State (10-3) vs. Boston College
(7-5), canceled
Quick Lane Bowl
Detroit
Minnesota 34, Georgia Tech 10
Cheez-It Bowl
Phoenix
TCU 10, California 7, OT
Thursday, Dec. 27
Independence Bowl
Shreveport, La.
Duke 56, Temple 27
Pinstripe Bowl
Bronx, N.Y.
Wisconsin 35, Miami 3
Texas Bowl
Houston
Baylor 45, Vanderbilt 38
Friday, Dec. 28
Music City Bowl
Nashville, Tenn.
Auburn 63, Purdue 14
Camping World Bowl
Orlando, Fla.
Syracuse 34, West Virginia 18
Alamo Bowl
San Antonio
Washington St. 28, Iowa St. 26
Saturday, Dec. 29
Peach Bowl
Atlanta
Florida 41, Michigan 15
Belk Bowl
Charlotte, N.C.
Virginia 28, South Carolina 0
Arizona Bowl
Tucson, Ariz.
Nevada 16, Arkansas State 13, OT
Cotton Bowl Classic
Arlington, Texas
CFP Semifinal, Clemson 30, Notre
Dame 3
Orange Bowl
Miami Gardens, Fla.
CFP Semifinal, Alabama 45, Oklahoma
34
Monday, Dec. 31
Military Bowl
Annapolis, Md.
Cincinnati 35, Virginia Tech 31
Sun Bowl
El Paso, Texas
Stanford 14, Pittsburgh 13
Redbox Bowl
Santa Clara, Calif.
Oregon 7, Michigan State 6
Liberty Bowl
Memphis, Tenn.
Oklahoma State 38, Missouri 33
Holiday Bowl
San Diego
Northwestern 31, Utah 20
Gator Bowl
Jacksonville, Fla.
Texas A&M 52, NC State 13
Tuesday’s scores
Outback Bowl
Tampa, Fla.
Iowa 27, Mississippi State 22
Citrus Bowl
Orlando, Fla.
Kentucky 27, Penn State 24
Fiesta Bowl
Glendale, Ariz.
LSU 40, UCF 32
Rose Bowl
Pasadena, Calif.
Ohio State 28, Washington 23
Sugar Bowl
New Orleans
Texas (9-4) vs. Georgia (11-2), late
Monday, Jan. 7
College Football Championship
Santa Clara, Calif.
Clemson (14-0) vs. Alabama (14-0), 8
p.m. (ESPN)
Saturday, Jan. 19
East-West Shrine Classic
At St. Petersburg, Fla.
East vs. West, 3 p.m. (NFLN)
NFLPA Collegiate Bowl
At Pasadena, Calif.
American vs. National, TBA (NFLN)
Saturday, Jan. 26
Senior Bowl
At Mobile, Ala.
North vs. South, 2:30 p.m. (NFLN)
Iowa 27, Mississippi State 22
Mississippi St.........6 0 13 3 — 22
Iowa .........................0 17 7 3 — 27
First Quarter
MSST — FG Christmann 44, 6:37
MSST — FG Christmann 42, :45
Second Quarter
IOW — FG Recinos 44, 10:02
IOW — Easley 75 pass from Stanley (Recinos
kick), 7:55
IOW — Smith-Marsette 15 pass from Stanley
(Recinos kick), 6:18
Third Quarter
MSST — Hill 1 pass from Fitzgerald (pass
failed), 11:26
MSST — Fitzgerald 33 run (Christmann kick),
11:08
IOW — Easley 8 pass from Stanley (Recinos
kick), 1:55
Fourth Quarter
MSST — FG Christmann 20, 12:04
IOW — FG Recinos 40, 5:51
A — 40,518.
MSST
IOW
First downs
15
11
Rushes-yards
42-190 20-(minus 15)
Passing
152
214
Comp-Att-Int
14-32-2
21-31-1
Return Yards
42
154
Punts-Avg.
5-41.6
7-33.14
Fumbles-Lost
1-1
1-1
Penalties-Yards
8-90
0-0
Time of Possession
33:34
26:26
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING — Mississippi St., Fitzgerald 20103, Hill 12-43, Ae.Williams 6-22, Gibson 1-12,
K.Thompson 3-10. Iowa, T.Young 3-7, Kelly-Martin 5-0, (Team) 1-(minus 1), Sargent 7-(minus 3),
Stanley 4-(minus 18).
PASSING — Mississippi St., Fitzgerald 14-322-152. Iowa, Stanley 21-31-1-214.
RECEIVING — Mississippi St., Ae.Williams
3-19, Hill 3-12, Mitchell 2-42, De.Thomas 2-16,
Ju.Johnson 2-5, S.Guidry 1-51, F.Green 1-7.
Iowa, Easley 8-104, Smith-Marsette 4-29, Hockenson 3-43, B.Smith 3-33, T.Young 2-1, Sargent
1-4.
MISSED FIELD GOALS — None.
LSU 40, UCF 32
LSU ........................10 14 10 6 — 40
UCF ........................14 7 3 8 — 32
First Quarter
LSU — FG Tracy 24, 12:38
UCF — McCrae 25 run (Wright kick), 10:56
UCF — B.Moore 93 interception return
(Wright kick), 6:39
LSU — Jefferson 22 pass from Burrow (Tracy
kick), 1:27
Second Quarter
LSU — Dillon 49 pass from Burrow (Tracy
kick), 12:59
LSU — Jefferson 33 pass from Burrow (Tracy
kick), 7:11
UCF — G.Davis 32 pass from Mack (Wright
kick), :04
Third Quarter
LSU — Chase 32 pass from Burrow (Tracy
kick), 12:38
LSU — FG Tracy 28, 5:18
UCF — FG Wright 37, 3:01
Fourth Quarter
LSU — FG Tracy 28, 5:18
LSU — FG Tracy 26, 4:12
UCF — McGowan 2 run (O.Anderson pass
from Mack), 2:24
LSUUCF
First downs
3217
Rushes-yards
52-16130-130
Passing
394120
Comp-Att-Int
21-34-112-31-1
Return Yards
1116
Punts-Avg.
3-36.06-49.33
Fumbles-Lost
1-11-1
Penalties-Yards 14-14512-104
Time of Possession 44:3115:29
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING — LSU, Brossette 29-117, Edwards-Helaire 10-32, Burrow 9-24, Jefferson
1-(minus 5), (Team) 3-(minus 7). UCF, McCrae 1081, O.Anderson 3-23, Killins 3-17, Mar.Williams
1-6, McGowan 2-6, Mack 11-(minus 3).
PASSING — LSU, Burrow 21-34-1-394. UCF,
Mar.Williams 1-1-0-23, Mack 11-30-1-97.
RECEIVING — LSU, Chase 6-93, Jefferson
4-87, Sullivan 3-76, Edwards-Helaire 3-25, Dillon
2-86, Moreau 2-22, Brossette 1-5. UCF, G.Davis
3-59, M.Colubiale 3-20, Snelson 2-24, Killins
2-(minus 8), Mack 1-23, McCrae 1-2.
MISSED FIELD GOALS — None.
Ohio State 28, Washington 23
Washington ............3 0 0 20 — 23
Ohio State................7 14 7 0 — 28
First Quarter
OSU — Campbell 12 pass from Haskins (Haubeil kick), 9:04
WAS — FG Henry 38, 1:19
Second Quarter
OSU — Dixon 19 pass from Haskins (Haubeil
kick), 12:23
OSU — Berry 1 pass from Haskins (Haubeil
kick), :14
Third Quarter
OSU — Dobbins 3 run (Haubeil kick), 8:23
Fourth Quarter
WAS — Sample 2 pass from Gaskin (Henry
kick), 12:17
WAS — Gaskin 1 run (Henry kick), 6:42
WAS — Gaskin 2 run (pass failed), :42
WAS
OSU
First downs
27
22
Rushes-yards
36-129
32-113
Passing
315
251
Comp-Att-Int
36-55-0
25-37-0
Return Yards
28
0
Punts-Avg.
7-35.7
18-41.75
Fumbles-Lost
0-0
0-0
Penalties-Yards
6-46
9-53
Time of Possession
35:02
24:58
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING — Washington, Gaskin 24-121,
McGrew 1-7, Ahmed 5-4, Pleasant 1-0, (Team)
1-(minus 1), J.Browning 4-(minus 2). Ohio St.,
Weber 15-96, Dobbins 7-24, McCall 2-12, (Team)
2-(minus 5), Haskins 6-(minus 14).
PASSING — Washington, Gaskin 1-1-0-2,
J.Browning 35-54-0-313. Ohio St., Haskins 2537-0-251.
RECEIVING — Washington, Baccellia 12109, A.Fuller 7-80, H.Bryant 4-51, Ahmed 3-22,
T.Jones 3-22, Gaskin 3-(minus 1), Sample 2-1,
Otton 1-16, Chin 1-15. Ohio St., Campbell 11-71,
Hill 3-54, Dobbins 3-15, Victor 2-34, Dixon 2-27,
McLaurin 1-32, Farrell 1-9, Weber 1-8, Berry 1-1.
MISSED FIELD GOALS — None.
Monday’s late boxes
Oregon 7, Michigan State 6
Michigan State.......0 0 6 0 — 6
Oregon .....................0 0 0 7 — 7
Third Quarter
MSU — FG Coghlin 34, 9:57
MSU — FG Coghlin 34, 9:57
Fourth Quarter
ORE — Mitchell 28 pass from Herbert (Stack
kick), 11:19
A — 30,212.
MSU
ORE
First downs
19
11
Rushes-yards
46-159
27-37
Passing
172
166
Comp-Att-Int
22-40-1
19-33-0
Return Yards
65
54
Punts-Avg.
7-39.0
11-35.5
Fumbles-Lost
3-0
1-0
Penalties-Yards
5-35
2-15
Time of Possession
37:15
22:45
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING — Michigan St., L.Scott 24-84,
Lewerke 16-63, Heyward 4-9, Nailor 1-3, Stewart Jr. 1-0. Oregon, Verdell 14-43, Tra.Dye 6-18,
Maimone 1-(minus 7), Herbert 4-(minus 7),
(Team) 2-(minus 10).
PASSING — Michigan St., Lewerke 22-40-1172. Oregon, Herbert 19-33-0-166.
RECEIVING — Michigan St., Stewart Jr. 9-45,
White 6-64, L.Scott 3-0, Dotson 2-27, Nailor 1-26,
Ma.Sokol 1-10. Oregon, Redd 7-65, Mitchell
6-70, Breeland 2-26, Verdell 2-3, Johnson III
1-10, Tra.Dye 1-(minus 8).
MISSED FIELD GOALS — Michigan St.,
Coghlin 50
Oklahoma State 38, Missouri 33
Missouri .............3 13 3 14 — 33
Oklahoma St. .........7 7 21 3 — 38
First Quarter
OKS — Stoner 30 pass from Cornelius (Ammendola kick), 9:27
MIZ — FG McCann 24, 6:46
Second Quarter
MIZ — Gicinto 5 pass from Lock (McCann
kick), 7:49
OKS — T.Johnson 7 pass from Cornelius
(Ammendola kick), 5:31
MIZ — Blanton 16 pass from Lock (kick
failed), 3:35
Third Quarter
OKS — Ty.Wallace 9 pass from Cornelius
(Ammendola kick), 11:49
OKS — Hubbard 4 run (Ammendola kick),
10:21
MIZ — FG McCann 26, 4:20
OKS — T.Johnson 46 pass from Cornelius
(Ammendola kick), 3:08
Fourth Quarter
MIZ — J.Johnson 86 pass from Lock (McCann kick), 14:41
MIZ — Rountree 55 run (McCann kick), 11:50
OKS — FG Ammendola 27, 5:54
A — 51,587.
MIZ
OKS
First downs
27
27
Rushes-yards
42-264
35-169
Passing
373
333
Comp-Att-Int
23-38-0
27-45-2
Return Yards
41
0
Punts-Avg.
3-45.3
33-50.0
Fumbles-Lost
3-1
1-0
Penalties-Yards
6-65
7-76
Time of Possession
32:25
27:35
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING — Missouri, Rountree 27-204, Lock
6-30, Badie 9-30. Oklahoma St., Hubbard 18145, Cornelius 12-21, Hockett 1-5, L.Brown 2-3,
Keyes 0-0, (Team) 2-(minus 5).
PASSING — Missouri, Lock 23-38-0-373.
Oklahoma St., Ty.Wallace 1-1-0-(minus 3), Cornelius 26-44-2-336.
RECEIVING — Missouri, J.Johnson 9-185,
Blanton 4-35, Banister 3-37, E.Hall 2-72, Gicinto
2-30, J.Knox 1-6, Badie 1-5, Rountree 1-3. Oklahoma St., T.Johnson 7-141, Ty.Wallace 7-83,
Stoner 6-59, Hubbard 3-37, Wolf 3-16, Cornelius
1-(minus 3).
MISSED FIELD GOALS — Missouri, McCann
42.
POTTSVILLE (PA.) REPUBLICAN HERALD
Nhl
13
MiNor hocKeY
National Hockey League
EASTERN
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts. PF PA
Tampa Bay 40 31 7 2 64 168 117
Toronto
39 26 11 2 54 144 109
Boston
40 22 14 4 48 114 105
Buffalo
40 21 13 6 48 115 115
Montreal
40 21 14 5 47 128 128
Florida
38 17 15 6 40 124 134
Detroit
41 15 19 7 37 115 140
Ottawa
40 15 21 4 34 126 159
Metropolitan Division
Washington 38 24 11 3 51 138 112
Columbus
39 23 13 3 49 129 119
Pittsburgh 39 21 12 6 48 133 115
N.Y. Islanders38 21 13 4 46 114 102
N.Y. Rangers 38 17 14 7 41 111 123
Carolina
38 16 17 5 37 94 109
New Jersey 38 15 16 7 37 113 127
Philadelphia 39 15 19 5 35 111 140
WESTERN
Central Division
GP W L OT Pts. PF PA
Winnipeg
39 25 12 2 52 134 111
Nashville
41 24 15 2 50 124 104
Colorado
40 19 13 8 46 134 123
Dallas
40 20 16 4 44 108 106
Minnesota 38 18 17 3 39 110 108
Chicago
42 15 21 6 36 121 153
St. Louis
37 15 18 4 34 102 123
Pacific Division
Calgary
40 24 12 4 52 141 112
Vegas
43 24 15 4 52 130 115
San Jose
41 21 13 7 49 140 129
Anaheim
41 19 15 7 45 102 120
Vancouver 42 19 19 4 42 124 133
Edmonton
39 18 18 3 39 111 126
Arizona
39 17 20 2 36 100 112
Los Angeles 41 16 22 3 35 92 121
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point
for overtime loss. Top three teams in
each division and two wild cards per
conference advance to playoffs.
Monday’s scores
Nashville 6, Washington 3
New Jersey 4, Vancouver 0
Carolina 3, Philadelphia 1
Pittsburgh 3, Minnesota 2
N.Y. Islanders 3, Buffalo 1
N.Y. Rangers 2, St. Louis 1
Columbus 6, Ottawa 3
Florida 4, Detroit 3, SO
Tampa Bay 2, Anaheim 1, OT
Los Angeles 3, Colorado 2, OT
Montreal 3, Dallas 2, OT
Calgary 8, San Jose 5
Winnipeg 4, Edmonton 3
Tuesday’s scores
Boston 4, Chicago 2
Nashville 4, Philadelphia 0
Vegas 2, Los Angeles 0
Today’s games
Pittsburgh at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m.
Calgary at Detroit, 7 p.m.
Vancouver at Ottawa, 7 p.m.
New Jersey at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Edmonton at Arizona, 9:30 p.m.
San Jose at Colorado, 9:30 p.m.
Thursday’s games
Minnesota at Toronto, 2 p.m.
Carolina at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Florida at Buffalo, 7 p.m.
Calgary at Boston, 7 p.m.
Chicago vs. N.Y. Islanders at Nassau
Veterans Memorial Coliseum, 7:30 p.m.
Predators 4, Flyers 0
Philadelphia ......................... 0 0 0 — 0
Nashville .........................
022—4
First Period — None.
Second Period — 1, Nashville, Smith
11 (Fiala), 2:03. 2, Nashville, Arvidsson
10 (Hartman, Johansen), 12:03.
Third Period — 3, Nashville, Arvidsson 11 (Ellis), 6:15. 4, Nashville, Grimaldi
3 (Rinaldo), 11:37.
Shots on Goal — Philadelphia
13-12-7 — 32. Nashville 6-16-8 — 30.
Power-play opportunities — Philadelphia 0-of-2 Nashville 0-of-2. Goalies
— Philadelphia, Neuvirth 1-3-1 (30
shots-26 saves). Nashville, Saros 9-5-1
(32-32). A — 17,481 (17,113).
American Hockey League
EASTERN
Atlantic Division
GP W L OL SOLPts.GF GA
Charlotte
Bridgeport
Leh. Valley
WB/Scr.
Springfield
Hartford
Providence
Hershey
35
35
32
36
33
34
34
34
24
21
19
17
15
15
14
14
8
9
10
14
11
15
15
18
3
4
1
4
4
2
5
0
0
1
2
1
3
2
0
2
51 118100
47 112105
41 120102
39 112106
37 118110
34 105113
33 105102
30 84113
Syracuse
Rochester
Cleveland
Utica
Toronto
Belleville
Binghamton
Laval
30
33
33
36
33
35
37
34
20
20
17
17
15
16
15
13
8
11
11
16
13
17
19
16
2
2
4
2
3
2
3
3
0
0
1
1
2
0
0
2
42 121 79
42 108 97
39 100105
37 109128
35 116123
34 107113
33 101131
31 91 98
34
33
35
32
34
35
33
31
20
18
19
17
16
15
15
13
10
8
11
11
12
13
17
16
3
4
3
3
5
3
1
2
1
3
2
1
1
4
0
0
44 129102
43 117 95
43 107104
38 120100
38 90 95
37 79100
31 86 98
28 75100
North Division
WESTERN
Central Division
GP W L OL SOLPts.GF GA
Chicago
Iowa
Gr. Rapids
Texas
Milwaukee
Rockford
San Antonio
Manitoba
Pacific Division
San Jose
29 19 6 1 3 42 103 76
Tucson
30 17 9 3 1 38 102 92
Bakersfield 29 16 11 1 1 34 93 84
Colorado
31 15 12 3 1 34 84 96
San Diego 29 14 11 1 3 32 105104
Stockton
32 14 15 3 0 31 108125
Ontario
29 10 14 3 2 25 94123
NOTE: Two points are awarded for a win, one
point for an overtime or shootout loss.
Monday’s scores
Toronto 5, Charlotte 4, OT
Iowa 3, Chicago 1
Manitoba 4, Colorado 1
Grand Rapids 2, Rockford 1
WB/Scranton 5, Binghamton 2
San Jose 6, Stockton 5
Bakersfield 3, Ontario 1
Today’s games
Syracuse at Utica, 7 p.m.
Bridgeport at Rochester, 7:05 p.m.
Belleville at Laval, 7:30 p.m.
Iowa at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Manitoba at San Antonio, 8 p.m.
Milwaukee at Rockford, 8 p.m.
San Diego at Bakersfield, 9:30 p.m.
ECHL
Eastern Conference
North Division
GP W L OL SOLPts.GF GA
Newfdland
Adirondack
Maine
Reading
Brampton
Worcester
Manchester
31
31
31
31
33
32
31
20
18
18
15
14
13
14
10
9
12
9
16
14
15
1
2
0
2
2
3
1
0
2
1
5
1
2
1
41 113 89
40 96 84
37 99 95
37 104104
31 106108
31 74 91
30 99 98
Florida
Jacksonville
So. Carolina
Orlando
Norfolk
Greenville
Atlanta
32
32
32
31
33
35
30
21
18
18
16
14
12
7
6
13
13
12
16
18
17
5
1
1
3
1
3
5
0
0
0
0
2
2
1
47 119 83
37 99 90
37 105101
35 106114
31 96129
29 95130
20 79100
Cincinnati
Toledo
Indy
Wheeling
Fort Wayne
Kalamazoo
32
31
31
31
31
32
22
21
17
16
16
15
6
7
14
13
14
16
2
3
0
2
0
0
2
0
0
0
1
1
48 120 74
45 118 99
34 106109
34 111 95
33 94 98
31 101119
South Division
Western Conference
Central Division
GP W L OL SOLPts.GF GA
Mountain Division
Idaho
32 19 10 1 2 41 107 83
Utah
29 17 8 3 1 38 100 78
Tulsa
33 16 11 4 2 38 99 98
Wichita
34 15 12 4 3 37 103105
Kansas City 30 17 11 1 1 36 102 93
Rapid City 35 14 16 2 3 33 85116
Allen
36 8 26 0 2 18 88141
NOTE: Two points are awarded for a win, one
point for an overtime or shootout loss.
FYi
MeetiNgS
tamaqua area baseball association — Today, at 7:30 p.m. at the
Tamaqua Elks. Regular monthly meeting. Anyone interested in coaching
or volunteering for the upcoming season should attend.
pottsville boys’ basketball league — Sunday, Jan. 6, at 8 p.m. at
the Mount Hope Amvets, Seneca Street, Pottsville. Additional meetings
will be held Jan. 27 and March 3, all at 8 p.m. at Mount Hope Amvets.
All coaches and members are urged to attend. For more information,
contact Frank Schuettler at (570) 622-2849 or (570) 640-3020.
pottsville area little league — Sunday, Jan. 13, at 7 p.m. at the
Good Intent Fire Company, Second Street, Pottsville. Regular monthly
meeting. All members and coaches are urged to attend.
Schuylkill county girls’ Softball league — Sunday, Jan. 27, at 3
p.m. at St. Joseph the Worker Parish Hall (formerly Annunciation Hall),
34 S. Line St., Frackville. Reorganization meeting for the 2019 summer
season. All organizations should send a representative. Any new
organizations should contact Larry Domalakes at (570) 590-3818.
regiStratioNS
pottsville area little league — Thursday, Jan. 10, from 6-8 p.m.;
Sunday, Jan. 13, from 5-7 p.m.; Thursday, Feb. 7, from 6-8 p.m.; and
Sunday, Feb. 10, from 5-7 p.m. at the Good Intent Fire Company,
Second Street, Pottsville. For players interested in playing Instructional,
Minor League and Little League baseball in 2019.
tremont baseball inc. — Wednesday-Thursday, Jan. 16-17, from
6-8 p.m.; and Saturday, Feb. 2, from 10 a.m. to noon, at the Tremont
Borough Building (old Tremont Elementary School), 139 Clay St.,
Tremont. For children ages 4-12. Registration fee is $35 per player and
$5 for additional children in the same family. Late sign-ups will be an
additional $10 after registration dates. For more information, contact
Jim Scheibley at (570) 449-3123.
Special eVeNtS
philadelphia phillies Winter caravan/King of baseballtown
banquet — Tuesday, Jan. 22, at the Crowne Plaza Hotel, Wyomissing.
Philadelphia Phillies players Andrew Knapp, Dylan Cozens and Nick
Pivetta, along with the Phillie Phanatic, are scheduled to attend. Dr.
Richard Kratz will be crowned as the 2019 King of Baseballtown. More
special guests from the Phillies are expected to be announced at a
later date. Presented by Baseballtown Charities, the program entitled
“Not Your Father’s Chicken Dinner Banquet ... This is a Baseball
Celebration!” begins at 7 p.m. and also includes a family-friendly
cocktail party from 5:30-7 p.m., an auction featuring sports collectibles
and other items; raffles, highlight videos and much more. Individual
tickets are $25 per person; $20 when you purchase 10 or more
tickets. Doors open at 5:30 p.m. and the program gets under way at 7
p.m. For more information or to purchase tickets, call (610) 370-BALL
or visit fightinphils.tix.milbstore.com.
WreStliNg
Upper dauphin area elementary team duals — Sunday, Jan. 13,
beginning at 9:30 a.m. at Upper Dauphin Area High School. Weigh-ins
at 8 a.m., with coaches meeting at 9 a.m. Teams being sought for
eight-team tournament for wrestlers ages kindergarten through sixth
grade. No all-star teams will be accepted. Each team will be
guaranteed at least four matches. Teams will be divided into two pools.
The top team from each pool will be moved into championship match,
with the other teams slotted into matches for third-, fifth- and
seventh-places. Weight classes will be 45, 48, 52, 55, 59, 63, 67, 72,
78, 82, 86, 90, 95, 100, 110, 120, 150. All bout lengths are 1-1-1,
with overtime 1-minute sudden death, 30-second ride out. Each team
may bring as many wrestlers as they like, as exhibition matches with
extra wrestlers will be competed after each dual. Cost is $200 per
team. Fee must be paid by Jan. 3. Cost of admission for fans is $5 for
adults and $2 for students, with concession stand open all day. For
more information, contact Todd Rupp at (717) 329-8985 or email
ruppt@udasd.k12.pa.us.
baSeball
east coast Sandhogs travel team tryouts — Saturday, Jan. 12,
from 9-11 a.m. (ages 7-12) and 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. (ages 13-18);
Sunday, Jan. 27, from 9-11 a.m. (ages 13-18) and 11:30 a.m. to 1:30
p.m. (ages 7-12); and Saturday, Feb. 9, from 9-11 a.m. (ages 7-12) and
11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. (ages 13-18). For more information or to
register, visit www.sandhogsbaseball.com.
rUNNiNg
29th annual Shiver by the river 5K and 10K No. 2 — Sunday,
Jan. 13, at 10 a.m. at Jim Dietrich Park, Muhlenberg Township.
Application and online registration available at www.pretzelcitysports.
com. For more information, contact Sue Jackson at (610) 779-6556 or
visit www.pagodapacers.com.
polar bear 5K trail run and hike — Saturday, Jan. 19, at
Lancaster County Park. Application and online registration available at
www.pretzelcitysports.com. For more information, contact Ron Horn,
Pretzel City Sports, 112 W. 36th St., Reading, PA 19606, (610)
779-2668 or email rhornpcs@aol.com.
13th annual chilly cheeks 11K trail run — Sunday, Jan. 20, at
10 a.m. in Reading. Application and online registration available at
www.pretzelcitysports.com. For more information, contact Ron Horn,
Pretzel City Sports, 112 W. 36th St., Reading, PA 19606, (610)
779-2668 or email rhornpcs@aol.com.
repUblicaN-herald
SportS departMeNt
The Republican-Herald Sports Department wants to print your
meeting, banquet, special event and sports notices in our calendar,
which runs twice a week. Items submitted by non-profit organizations
are free of charge, while items submitted by for-profit groups require
the purchase of a display ad to appear in the calendar. To contact the
Sports Department, call (570) 628-6026 or email Sports Editor Leroy
Boyer at Lboyer@republicanherald.com.
14 P O T T SV ILLE (P A .) R E P UBLIC A N HE R A LD
BABY BLUES
W E DNE SDA Y , JA NUA R Y 2, 2019
MUTTS
WALLACE THE BRAVE
BLONDIE
WIZARD OF ID
BEETLE BAILEY
ALLEY OOP
PICKLES
ZITS
FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE
SHOE
CRANKSHAFT
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
BORN LOSER
GARFIELD
CUL DE SAC
DENNIS THE MENACE
TAKE IT FROM THE TINKERSONS
FAMILY CIRCUS
ARLO & JANIS
W E DNE SDA Y , J A NUA R Y 2, 2019
P O T T SV ILLE (P A .) R E P UBLIC A N HE R A LD
15
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01/02/19
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BRIDGE
SUDOKU
Complete the grid so that every row, column
and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9
inclusively.
HOROSCOPE
Previous Solution
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
Take control of a situation that you
feel has potential. Share your ideas
and be willing to put time and effort
into making your dream a reality.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19)
Take a leap forward. Make progress
with regard to vocational decisions
and goal-setting. Now’s the time to
get down to brass tacks.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20)
Keep a stiff upper lip, regardless of
the emotional issues or insensitive
comments you face. Spending a
quiet day reading or relaxing with a
loved one is encouraged.
ARIES (March 21-April 19)
You’ll have an idea that can help you
get out of a stressful situation. Trust
in your ability to take advantage of
an opportunity, and use your resources to make sure it happens.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20)
Go over the fine print and think
about what you can afford to lose.
If you run your idea past someone
who has supported you in the past,
you’ll make the right choice.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
Look at the big picture, but don’t
try to take everything on all at once.
Formulate a strategy that will help
you get things done incrementally.
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
Keep busy with projects that allow
you to use your creative imagina-
tion. Spending time with children or
a loved one will give you a sense of
belonging and fulfillment.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)
Make a couple of changes that will
get you moving in a positive direction. Once you begin, it will be easy
to build momentum and achieve
your goal.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
Take on what you know you can do.
If you overload your to-do list, you
will fall short of your expectations. A
physical activity will alleviate stress.
Personal improvement is encouraged.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23)
Visit someone you enjoy being
around, and do your best to avoid
people who criticize you. Encouragement will help you choose your
goals and give you the will to finish
what you start.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22)
If you visit an older friend or relative,
you’ll learn something valuable.
Someone’s suggestion will change
the way you do things this year. A
positive change at home is apparent.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21)
Make positive changes at home.
Clear a space that will allow you to
work on a project that can provide a
little extra income. A lifestyle change
is encouraged.
INSIDE
17 Past relationships
INSIDE
18 ’70s-style party
Woman asks dear abby why
husband won’t talk about
previous marriages.
Fondue is a warming winter
dish incorporating cheese
and winter staples.
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2019
www.republicanherald.com
PAGE 16
Beef, lamb or
crumbled tempeh would all
be fine substitutes for the
pork in this
stir-fry.
republicanherald.com
WHAT’S NEW
IMAG!NE Cheese Stars
Varieties: Available in Parmesan and White Cheddar
Suggested retail price: $3.49
per 4.5-ounce resealable bags
TEST KITCHEN
Washington post
A fresh look
Give celery star status it deserves with these recipes
BY JOY MANNING
special to the Washington post
H
ave you ever felt overshadowed,
your hard work, talents and
range going unnoticed while
some more ostentatious soul
gets promoted, awarded or otherwise heaved into the spotlight? I have. And
I’m not alone. Celery, my favorite winter vegetable, also knows the feeling.
Celery selflessly props up other ingredients
with its subtly salty bite and savory aroma,
unifying with a dish after being sauteed to a
docile translucence, essentially disappearing.
It’s the kind of ingredient you never single
out, but if it weren’t there in your workaday
tuna salad or minestrone, your tongue would
know that something was missing.
I bet you have a bag of celery in your
crisper drawer right now. Most of us do.
Soup-making season is upon us, and a vast
number of those recipes start with a mirepoix, that stalwart trio of onion, celery and
carrots. You need it for things like meatloaf,
chicken stew, pot roast and many other wintry dishes. Celery is cheap and lasts a long
time in the refrigerator, so there’s no compelling reason to leave it out.
Without T-shirt slogans promoting it (see:
kale) or chefs cooking it like a steak (see: cauliflower), celery languishes in the deep background of our collective culinary unconscious. But it’s time to take a fresh look at
this staple vegetable. Really, when was the
last time you cooked or ate a celery-forward
dish? Give it its moment. Celery earned it.
Stir-fried with dried chiles, Sichuan peppercorns, ginger and garlic, celery really
shows you what’s it got. It becomes juicy as it
soaks up those bold flavors. The pork in this
dish accents the celery without overshadowing it, glossing the crisp vegetable slices with
fat. My recipe is inspired by Fuchsia Dunlop’s gong bao chicken in her cookbook
“Every Grain of Rice.” I use a simplified version of her stir-fry sauce and pungent spicing, but ditch the chicken in favor of a mountain of sliced celery, some green bell peppers
and a little bit of meat - just 2 ounces per
serving. I like this stir-fry over steamed
white rice and served with a smashed
cucumber salad.
In July, a green, leafy salad practically
tosses itself. The farmers market overflows
with a variety of sweet greens, and even the
CASHEW GREEN GODDESS DIP
servings: 8 (makes 1½ cups)
this bright and creamy dip is ready in 20 minutes.
For a vegan version of this dressing, omit the anchovies and season with additional
salt to taste. replace the honey with agave nectar.
if you don’t have a high-speed blender (such as a Vitamix), soak the cashews overnight in cold water and drain before using in this
recipe. the dip can be refrigerated in an airtight
container for up to 5 days.
1 cup raw cashews
½ cup water
½ cup chopped parsley
¼ cup lemon juice
¼ cup chopped fresh tarragon
2 tablespoons chopped chives
3 canned anchovies, drained
1 teaspoon honey
1 clove garlic
½ teaspoon salt
8 celery stalks, peeled and cut into spears, for serving
combine the cashews, water, parsley, lemon juice, tarragon, chives, anchovies, honey,
garlic and salt in a blender. puree until smooth. chill before serving with the celery
spears.
typical supermarket offers more and better
options through the growing season. But
now? Bagged greens packed in plastic - and
showing signs of decay before you’ve even
bought them - do not inspire me to break out
the salad bowl. But humble celery can.
When it comes to making celery the base
for an appealing cold-weather salad, there
are several important things to remember.
First and foremost: Slicing. You want to cut
celery on a bias in thin, almost shaved strips.
If possible, use the leafy stalks from the
bunch’s inner heart. (Those outer stalks are
better in the above-mentioned stir-fry anyway.) Once you turn your stalks into a fragrant, feathery pile of greens, dress them
early. Allowing the salt and acid to work on
the vegetables will render them crisp-tender
in roughly 30 minutes.
Rich, tangy cheese complements the flavor
and texture of celery the way few other
ingredients can. Think back to the afterschool snack of cream-cheese-filled stalks or
the cooling bite of spears drenched in blue
cheese sauce that are so often enjoyed with
hot wings. I call for feta in the recipe here,
but a funky, creamy, richly veined blue is
also a good idea.
Winter salads need one warm element to
entice me on cold days. I like roasted creminis for their meaty, earthy savor. Roasted
sweet potato cubes would be good if you
wanted to lean in a sweeter direction. And
warm, cubed chicken makes this a complaint-proof main course. My hope is less
that you make this exact recipe and more
that you recognize celery’s stealth star power.
It’s easily transformed into a salad base in a
way that wrecks baby spinach’s self-esteem.
I’m also giving you a recipe for a cashewbased green goddess dressing — the perfect
dip for celery spears. This rich, tangy, herbhued sauce has myriad applications you will
likely discover on your own once you’ve
made it. Unlike typical cashew-based versions of green goddess, this one isn’t vegan.
Anchovies’ salty punch defines the dressing
for me. If you leave them out, you’ll still have
a tasty dressing or dip with plenty of freshherb flavor.
On your typical crudite platter, the celery
is picked lasted and frequently ends up going
to waste. But it doesn’t have to. Just this
once, use your Y-peeler to remove that
stringy exterior that can make snacking on
raw celery a drag. Without that tooth-snarling husk, celery becomes a dream of a dipper: Hearty, crisp, light and filling. It just
might make you feel guilty for underestimating celery all this time.
Please see CELERY, Page 18
For foolproof poached chicken, turn to sous vide cooking
associated press
Poached chicken gets a bad rap
for being tough, dry and a little
squeaky between your teeth. But
that’s probably because poaching is
a relatively imprecise cooking
method.
If your poaching water’s too hot,
the meat overcooks; if you leave the
meat in the water too long, it overcooks; if you use too little water, the
meat — you guessed it — undercooks. There are a lot of variables
when poaching chicken. Thankfully, cooking sous vide eliminates
most of them.
For foolproof poached chicken,
associated press
we cook chicken breasts at a moderCooking chicken breasts sous ate temperature for about an hour,
vide elimates a lot of the vari- which results in a juicy, tender texables you may encounter when ture that’s just firm enough that it
poaching it.
doesn’t fall apart. While this recipe
is finished in an hour, you can hold
the chicken in the bath for up to 3
hours before the texture starts to
change_giving you some flexibility.
This perfectly poached chicken is
great on its own or sliced over salad. In addition, this method is a
great starting point for experimentation and variation, so feel free to
add spices, herbs, or boldly flavored
marinades to the bag (just don’t add
fresh garlic; it is particularly susceptible to botulism).
FOOLPROOF POACHED
CHICKEN BREASTS
Servings: 4
Sous Vide Temperature: 150 F
Sous Vide Time: 1 to 3 hours
Active Cooking Time: 25 minutes
4 8 ounce boneless, skinless
chicken breasts, trimmed
Salt and pepper
¼ cup vegetable oil
Using sous vide circulator, bring
water to 150 F in 7 quart container.
Season chicken with salt and
pepper. Place chicken and oil in 1
gallon zipper-lock freezer bag and
toss to coat. Seal bag, pressing out
as much air as possible. Gently lower bag into prepared water bath
until chicken is fully submerged,
and then clip top corner of bag to
side of water bath container, allowing remaining air bubbles to rise to
top of bag. Reopen 1 corner of zipper, release remaining air bubbles,
and reseal bag. Cover and cook for
at least 1 hour or up to 3 hours.
Transfer chicken to paper towellined plate and let rest for 5 to 10
minutes. Serve.
Q: What’s the best way to make a
breakfast casseroles?
A: Breakfast casserole dishes,
also called stratas, are culinary
wonders, especially around the holidays. They’re layered with ingredients, require little prep work and
are time savers. They are also a setit-and-forget-it type of dish.
Breakfast casseroles are everything you might eat at breakfast
cooked together
in one dish. Eggs
get mixed with a
liquid (milk or
cream) to make a
custardlike base.
Cooked meats
like ham, bacon
or sausage are
added. Most reciSUSAN
pes call for
shredded cheese. SELASKY
You can add vegetables such as
onions and peppers. And, of
course, there’s the bread base made
from dry (never soft) bread.
Although there are no hard-andfast rules for these types of casseroles, here are some basic guidelines:
Bread: Use plain sandwich
bread, sweet challah, leftover rolls,
croutons or anything you have on
hand. Cut bread into cubes or leave
in slices. Figure a good 6 cups of
bread cubes if you’re using a 9-by13-inch baking dish. Make sure the
bread is several days old and dry.
Cheese and add-ins: Use shredded cheddar, Monterey Jack, mozzarella, fontina or fontinella.
Cheese blends such as Italian or
Mexican also work well, or you can
use some Parmesan or Gruyere.
Add-ins include cooked sausage
and bacon, sautéed ham and vegetables like peppers, onions, spinach
and kale.
Eggs and milk: Epicurious.com
recommends using equal parts
eggs and milk. These, along with
the bread, help bind the casserole
together. The combination of eggs
and milk should equal or come
close to the amount of bread you
use.
OVERNIGHT CROISSANT
BREAKFAST CASSEROLE
Serves: 10
12 to 15 day-old mini croissants
2 tablespoons olive oil, divided
8 ounces diced ham
1½ pounds sweet onions or other
onions, chopped or sliced into
1-inch long pieces (about 4 cups)
5 ounces baby spinach, roughly
chopped
6 large eggs
2 cups whole milk
1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
1 teaspoon kosher salt
1 teaspoon black pepper
6-8 ounces fontina cheese, shredded (about 2 cups), divided
Lightly butter a 9-by-13-inch baking dish. Arrange croissants,
slightly overlapping, in 2 rows.
In a large skillet, heat 1 tablespoon of the oil over medium heat.
Add the ham and saute until it’s
lightly browned. Using a slotted
spoon, transfer ham to a large bowl.
Add the remaining 1 tablespoon oil
to skillet; stir in onions. Cook, stirring occasionally, until deeply
browned, about 20-30 minutes. Add
the spinach; cook, stirring often,
until wilted, 1 to 2 minutes. Transfer onion/spinach mixture to bowl
with ham; let cool 10 minutes.
In a medium bowl, whisk together eggs, milk, mustard, salt and
pepper. Add egg mixture and 1½
cups cup of the cheese to bowl with
onion mixture and stir to combine.
Pour mixture over croissants.
Sprinkle the top with the remaining ½cup cheese. Cover with aluminum foil and chill 8 hours or up
to overnight.
When you’re ready to serve, preheat oven to 375 degrees. Uncover
casserole and place on a large
rimmed baking sheet. Bake in preheated oven until golden brown
and center is set, about 50 minutes
to 1 hour. Cover with foil after 25
minutes, if necessary, to prevent
excess browning.
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2019
calendar
today
indoor walking club
— 9 to 10:30 a.m. Monday
to Friday, Tremont Borough
Building gymnasium, Tremont. Free. Ages 50 and older,
all fitness levels. Participants
must be registered at Tremont Senior Community Center. For more information, call
570-624-3017. Sponsored
by Diakon Community Services.
orders for “almost
armondo’s
unbaked
pizza sale” — To be
picked up after 3 p.m. Jan.
11, William Penn Fire Company. Cost $10 plain, $12
pepperoni and 75 cents extra for hot sauce. Advance
orders only, no walk-ins or
delivery. Call 570-462-0338
or 570-590-4397 by Monday.
orders for hoagie
sale — To be delivered
Jan. 17, Humane Steam Fire
Company, Mahanoy City.
Cost $6 hoagies, $5 pretzel
sandwiches. Call Kelly at
570-225-1090 by Friday.
registration for bollywood dance class
— To be held 6:45 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 15, 22, 29 and Feb.
5, Trinity Episcopal Church,
Pottsville. Cost $20 for four
sessions. Call 570-624-3018
by Monday. Sponsored by Diakon Community Services.
registration for daytime chalk and chew
— To be held 10 a.m. to
noon Jan. 16, Tamaqua Community Arts Center, 125 Pine
St., Tamaqua. Cost $40 includes wood canvas and a
treat by “Sweet Treats” Bakery. Mail payment payable to
Amy J. Mogish, 16 Meadow
Ave., Tamaqua, PA 18252, or
payment at www.classicamyjoanne.com (workshop page)
registration for fire
and ice winter fest
chili cook-off — To be
held 2 p.m. Jan. 20, Sweet
Arrow Lake Clubhouse, Pine
Grove. Free admission. Cost
for some activities. Compete
in Fire Hot Chili Cook-off, fire
up hot dogs over an open fire,
homemade ice-cream demo
and more. To compete in
cook-off, call 570-624-3018.
registration for wineries at corks and
chocolate event — To be
held 2 to 6 p.m. Jan. 26, Walk
In Art Center, 220 Parkway,
Schuylkill Haven. Cost $45,
includes one 8-foot table and
two chairs with registration.
Setup 11 a.m. to 1:45 p.m.
Each winery must produce
proof of their PA Liquor License and bring own supplies
including sample cups and linens. A night of sampling and
selling your wine. Register
at https://bit.ly/2yszl1E or
www.walkinartcenter.org.
registration
for
paint like monet class
— To be held 3 to 5 p.m.,
Jan. 27, Tamaqua Community Arts Center, 125 Pine St.,
Tamaqua. Cost $40, includes
canvases, brushes, supplies
and light refreshments. Paint
your very own Claude Monet
masterpiece with Hilary England. Call 570-668-1192 or
online www.TamaquaArts.org
registration for winter rabbit hunt — To be
held Jan. 19, South End Field
and Stream, Whippoorwill
Dam, Frackville. Cost $5. Prizes being awarded to the two
heaviest rabbits. Final weigh-in
6 p.m. Food and refreshments
available throughout the day.
Registration must be completed prior to start of hunt. Call
Joe at 570-205-5527.
registration
for
“winter wonderland”
luncheon — To be held
11:30 a.m. Jan. 15, Grace
Evangelical Free Church,
101 Graeff St., Cressona.
Cost $15 inclusive. Featuring
speaker Grace Fabian, Douglassville; special music by Michelle Canfield; Michelle Canfield, Better Brands Boutique,
demonstrating different ways
to wear scarves. Call Gale at
570-527-2224 or Michelle at
570-617-3896 by Jan. 9.
reservations for bus
submit events
To publicize an
upcoming event:
Visit
www.republicanherald.
com/SubmitEvent
•
Email calendar
@republicanherald.com.
•
Drop off forms at our
Pottsville office. Forms
can be picked up at our office or downloaded from
the “Customer
Service” section of
republicanherald.com.
trip — Cape Cod and Boston, Massachusetts, May 1317, 2019, sponsored by St.
Matthew Travelers, Minersville. For more information,
call Julie at 570-544-5231 or
Millie at 570-628-5413.
reservations for bus
trip — Pigeon Forge and
Gatlinburg, Tennessee, July
14-19, sponsored by Blessed
Teresa Golden Age, Mahanoy
City. For information, call Elizabeth at 570-773-1753.
tickets for citizens
of the year dinner — To
be held 6 p.m. Jan. 26, Mahanoy City Elks Lodge 695,
Mahanoy City. Cost $22 person. Honoring Mahanoy City
police officers Patrolman Jennifer Dempsey and Patrolman
Thomas “TJ” Rentschler.
Cocktails 6 p.m., dinner 6:30
p.m., dancing 8 p.m. Coat
and tie required. Call 570773-0467, 570-467-2612,
570-497-4986 by Jan. 14.
tickets for new interactive experience
— “National Lampoons
Animal House,” to be held
9:30 p.m. Jan. 18, Hamburg
Strand Theater, 6 S. Fourth
St., Hamburg. Cost $15, includes prop bag. Doors open
9 p.m. Come dressed in a
toga outfit, prizes awarded.
Rated R, 18 and older. BYOB.
Snow date Jan. 19. Tickets
available at the theater or at
hamburgstrand.org.
tickets
for
matt
mcandrew
performance — To be held 8 p.m.
Jan. 19, The Stitch, Tamaqua
Community Arts Center, 125
Pine St., Tamaqua. Cost $15
for theater seating, $20 pub
table seating. Doors open 7
p.m. Meet and greet 6:30
p.m. For tickets, visit www.
TamaquaArts.org. Meet-andgreet tickets available at
www.MattMcAndrewMuisc.
com. He participated in season 7 of the Voice.
tickets for trivia
night — To be held 6 p.m.
Jan. 19, William Penn Fire
Company. Cost $25, includes
food and beverages. Must
be 21. Call 570-590-9075
or 570-985-9716. Teams
forming now. Benefits the
Shenandoah Valley classes
of 2020 and 2022.
baton class fundraiser — 6 to 7 p.m., Yorkville Hose social hall, Pottsville. Cost $5. Sponsored by
Pottsville Area High School
majorette
squad.
Open
to students in first grade
through high school. Batons
will be available to purchase.
All proceeds benefit Pottsville
Area majorette uniform fund.
Classes will be held every
other Wednesday
bucket list book club
— 7 p.m., Tamaqua Community Arts Center, 125 Pine
St., Tamaqua. Call 570-6681192. Group meets first
Wednesday of month.
cash bingo — 7 p.m.,
Sacramento Community Fire
Company, 2206 E. Main St.,
Sacramento. Doors open 5
p.m., early bird games 6 p.m.
gentle
tone
and
stretch — 9:30 to 10:30
a.m.
every
Wednesday,
Schuylkill Haven Center, 340
Haven St., Schuylkill Haven.
Cost $6 per class. No registration required. Sponsored
by Diakon Living & Learning.
Call Susan at 570-624-3018.
god’s
chuckwagon
mobile soup kitchen —
Every Wednesday, 4 to 4:30
p.m., BMW garage, Route
901 Minersville; 5 to 5:30
p.m., corner of Chestnut and
Balliet streets, Frackville;
and 6 to 6:30 p.m., Senior
towers by Subway, Ashland.
Call Pastor James Bowers at
570-492-2392.
god’s helping hands
— Free clothing and shoes,
open 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. every Wednesday, Grace Bible
Church, near intersection
of routes 61 and 895 East
at 12 Molino Road, Orwigsburg. Call Sandy Kupres at
570-386-5893 or visit www.
gbchawkmtn.org, click on
God’s Helping Hands.
indoor walking club
— 8:30 to 9:30 a.m. Monday, Wednesday and Friday,
Schuylkill
Haven
Recreation Center gymnasium,
Schuylkill Haven. Free. Ages
50 and older, all fitness levels. Participants must be registered at Schuylkill Haven
Senior Community Center.
For more information, call
570-624-3017. Sponsored
by Diakon Community Services.
meeting — Port Carbon
Seniors, 1 p.m., senior building, 90 Washington St., Port
Carbon. Group meets first
Wednesday of every month.
lifestyles
POTTSVILLE (PA.) REPUBLICAN HERALD
17
Husband refuses to tell wife
details of long-ago marriages
Dear Abby:
My husband and I have
been together for 34 good
years. He’s a little older than
I am and was married twice
before we met while in our
20s. (They were very brief
marriages.) When we married, I knew about one of his
marriages, but lear ned
about the other one only
much later from his sister. I
was stunned and felt
betrayed that he hadn’t told
me, but we worked it out.
My husband loves to tell
stories about everything he’s
ever done, but he never says
a word about those earlier
relationships. Long ago, I
asked a few times about
what happened, and he cut
me off. My question is why,
especially after our 34 years
together, can’t he be straight
with me once and for all and
tell me what happened?
I haven’t brought this up
in a long time, but it seems
like we should be able to talk
about it openly. I’m curious,
but not in a petty way. I just
wonder what happened. In
the past he has said it is
“none of my business.”
Why is he so rude and
closemouthed about these
DEAR
ABBY
marriages from so long ago?
Should I never ask again?
Missing The
Whole Story
Dear Missing:
I am guessing the reason
your husband reacts the way
he has when you tried to talk
about his first two marriages
is because he is ashamed
about what happened. He
may have cheated on his
wives, or they cheated or
took advantage of him in
some way.
I don’t blame you for wanting to know your husband’s
history, but your marriage
has worked for 34 years, and
really, how relevant is this
information in the scheme
of things? Let it go.
spousal problems
Dear Abby:
After my sister got pregnant, she married the baby’s
father. They struggle financially, and my family helps as
percent milk.
Wednesday — Italian
chicken breast, brown rice,
broccoli with cheese sauce,
pear, 2 percent milk.
Thursday — Hot dog on
bun, baked beans, mixed vegetables, string cheese, 2 percent milk.
Friday — Choice of pollock fish patty with cheese or
hamburger, both on bun,
green beans, orange, multigrain Sun Chips, 2 percent
milk.
Rising rates of STDs among
young cause for concern
by eve glazier, m.d.,
and elizabeth ko, m.d.
Dear Doctor:
My son and daughter are
now 17 and 19, and my sister,
who worries about everything, keeps telling me that
STDs in teens are on the rise.
Is this really true? If so, is
there anything I can say to
my kids? You know how
teens are; will they even listen?
Dear Reader:
Considering the context,
we regret to inform you that
your sister is correct. According to data collected by the
Centers for Disease Control
and Prevention, the rate of
sexually transmitted diseases in the United States has
hit a record high for the
fourth year in a row, and a
whopping 50 percent those
new infections were acquired
by young people aged 15 to 24
years old. It’s estimated that
one-quarter of all adolescent
females who are sexually
active currently have an
STD, such as chlamydia or
human papillomavirus, also
known as HPV.
Despite an increase in the
numbers of young people
using condoms, which are an
effective (but not foolproof)
barrier against STDs, and
the fact that teens and young
adults are less sexually active
and have fewer partners than
did previous generations, the
numbers continue to climb.
Statistics show that adolescents between the ages of 15
and 19 and young adults
between the ages of 20 and 24
have the highest risk of
acquiring an STD.
This trend is believed to be
the result of a complex combination of factors. A drop in
federal funding for STD prevention education, as well as
clinics for screening and outreach, has certainly played a
role. So have cultural factors.
The advent of effective antiviral drugs, which have
turned once-deadly AIDS
into a manageable chronic
condition, may have also had
the unintended effect of
making other STDs seem less
may not) have dyslexia is no
excuse for his lack of motivation. Many successful people
have dyslexia and are able to
thrive.
Because your sister’s husband is threatening to take
their child and run, she
should talk to a lawyer about
what steps she needs to take
in order to prevent this deadbeat from following through.
Call your state bar association or contact a local law
school for guidance about
getting low-cost or free legal
advice. She may also want to
ask about divorce so she
doesn’t wind up supporting
him forever.
dealing with anger
Good advice for everyone
— teens to seniors — is in
“The Anger in All of Us and
How to Deal With It.” To
order, send your name and
mailing address, plus check
or money order for $7 (U.S.
funds) to: Dear Abby, Anger
Booklet, P.O. Box 447, Mount
Morris, IL 61054-0447. (Shipping and handling are
included in the price.)
(Dear Abby is written
by Jeanne Phillips)
columnists’ addresses
senior menu
The following is the Preferred Senior Menu for the
Meals on Wheels and Senior
Community Center participants through the Schuylkill
County Office of Senior Services for Jan. 7 to 11:
Monday — Meatloaf with
jardiniere sauce, potatoes
O’Brien, peas and carrots,
whole wheat bread, 2 percent
milk.
Tuesday — Cheese lasagna with green beans, brussels sprouts and carrots,
mixed fruit cup, breadstick, 2
much as we can, but it still
isn’t enough.
Her husband has no high
school diploma, and he has a
criminal record from 20
years ago, although he hasn’t
been in trouble since. He
claims he has dyslexia and
health problems, but he still
smokes and drinks.
No doctor will sign off on
his being disabled. He isn’t
motivated enough to find a
job or help my sister with
chores. She finally asked me
to help by talking to him.
How do I start a conversation with him to say he needs
to step up and contribute?
We’re cordial but not close. I
don’t want to alienate him.
He has threatened to take my
nephew, but he has no money or place to go. This man is
40 years old and lives like a
teenager. Any advice?
Anna In Illinois
Dear Anna:
Your brother-in-law isn’t
likely to listen to you any
more than he has listened to
your sister. If there are any
male relatives in your family,
it might be more effective if
he hears the message from
them.
The fact that he may (or
ASK THE
DOCTORS
For answers to medical,
food, etiquette or personal
questions, write to the columnists featured on the Lifestyle pages.
Etiquette or personal questions can be answered by
Dear Abby at:
P.O. Box 69440
Los Angeles, CA 90069
You can also email at www.
DearAbby.com.
Drs. Eve Glazier and
Elizabeth Ko can help
answer medical questions.
Their address is:
Ask the Doctors
c/o Media Relations,
UCLA Health
924 Westwood Blvd., Suite
350
Los Angeles, CA, 90095.
You can also email to askthedoctors@mednet.ucla.
edu.
lifestyles policy
The following is the policy
for submitting anniversary,
wedding and engagement
stories to the newspaper:
The Republican-Herald
offers an option at no cost,
however, an announcement
with expanded information
and a photograph carries a
$45 fee.
Please fill out the forms
available at the newspaper’s
office at 111 Mahantongo St.,
Pottsville. You can also
obtain forms by calling 570622-3456.
All announcements will be
posted online at republicanherald.com at no additional
charge.
All photographs will be
published at a uniform size.
If you want your photo
returned, please enclose a
self-addressed, stamped envelope.
Tuesday anniversary page.
Photos must be of the couple
only, a clear print, black and
white or color.
weddings
The wedding page will be
published on Sundays.
Photos must be of the
bride or couple only, a clear
print, black and white or color. Proofs are accepted.
engagements
dangerous. Also at play may
Engagements are pubbe the increasingly changing
lished on Fridays.
views of gender identity,
Photos must be of the couwith more young people havple only, a clear print, black
ing sexual partners of both
and white or color.
sexes.
Whatever the cause, the
MAIN STREET
spike in STDs in people of all
ages is a serious concern. In
Sandwich Shop
their early stages, these dis& Beer
eases are asymptomatic,
which makes it easy for an
BEER - ICE
infected person to unknowingly transmit the disease.
6 PACKS TO GO
anniversaries
That’s why baseline STD
SPECIALS
Only announcements
screening for young people
who are sexually active is so received within two months Chicken Fingers, French
important. In its later stages, of the couple’s anniversary
Fries & Cole Slaw
each STD comes with its own date will be published on the
$7.95
serious health concerns. A
number of viruses and bacteLarge Unbaked Pizza
ria have become antibiotic$8.00
resistant, which means prob570-544-2274
lems continue even after Citizens Fire Co., Palo Alto
seeking treatment.
25 Gun Prizes - Only $2 a game to win a Gun
401 Sunbury St.,
The truth is the only fool- Benefits Ruth Free Meal Included with Package
Minersville
Tickets Call Ron 527-6822
Steinert SPCA
proof way to avoid STDs is to
not have sex. But whether or
not your kids are sexually
active, protection begins
with education. That means
teaching your kids about
STDs and the grave health
problems they cause. Stress
CONTAINER SERVICE NOW AVAILABLE
using condoms as a barrier,
570-366-0781
even when other birth conM-F 8 AM - 4:30 PM • Sat 8 AM - 12 PM • Sun - CLOSED
trol methods are in use. As
355 East Second Mountain Road, Schuylkill Haven, PA 17972
you point out, a single conversation probably won’t be
enough.
Young people feel invincible, so this should be an ongoing dialogue. And don’t forget about the HPV vaccine,
which is recommended for
preteens and young adults of
Guest Teacher Training Available!
both sexes. You’ll find specifics at vaccines.gov/diseases/
Are you interested in becoming a
hpv.
Substitute Teacher and have a
Some parents fear the STD
talk implies approval of sexBachelor’s Degree?
ual activity. In our opinion,
2 Day Training available at IU29
it’s an opportunity to state
(or restate) your position on
January 9, 2019 and January 14, 2019
sex, and to offer up some
stark reality.
For more information, visit www.iu29.org
(Glazier and Ko are
or call 570-544-9131 ext 1276
syndicated writers)
SPORTSMAN
BINGO 3/03
18
POTTSVILLE (PA.) REPUBLICAN HERALD
CELERY
FROM PAGE 16
CELERY AND PORK
STIR-FRY
Servings: 4
For the sauce:
2 tablespoons water
1 tablespoon sugar
1 tablespoon Chinkiang
black vinegar (may substitute balsamic vinegar)
2 teaspoons soy sauce
1 teaspoon cornstarch
1 teaspoon toasted sesame
oil
For the stir-fry:
1 tablespoon canola oil
4 dried red chiles, crumbled
1 teaspoon Sichuan peppercorns
5 medium ribs celery,
sliced on the diagonal
1 green bell pepper, seeded
and cut into thin strips
3 large cloves garlic, sliced
thin
One 2-inch piece of fresh ginger root, peeled and sliced thin
6 scallions, sliced, white
and green parts divided
8 ounces ground pork
¼ cup roasted, unsalted
peanuts, coarsely chopped
Kosher salt
For the sauce: Whisk
together the water, sugar,
Chinkiang vinegar, soy sauce,
cornstarch and toasted sesame oil in a medium bowl.
For the stir-fry: Heat the
oil in a wok or large nonstick
skillet over medium-high
heat. Add the red chiles and
Sichuan peppercorns; stirfry for about 1 minute, until
the chiles darken slightly.
Add celery and green pepper; stir-fry for 3 to 4 minutes,
until crisp-tender. Add the
garlic, ginger and white parts
of the scallion and stir-fry an
additional 1 minute, until fragrant. Transfer to a plate.
Add the pork to the skillet
and cook, breaking up the
meat as you stir-fry, about 5
minutes, until browned. Add
the celery mixture and stir to
combine. Stir the sauce, add
it to the skillet, and stir to
coat everything. Sprinkle the
peanuts over the top, and
season lightly with salt.
Serve right away.
CELERY SALAD WITH
ROASTED MUSHROOMS,
WHITE BEANS AND FETA
Servings: 4 to 6
The celery mixture needs
to marinate in the refrigerator for at least 30 minutes and
up to 1 hour. The salad can be
refrigerated for up to 3 days.
For the marinated celery:
2 tablespoons minced shallot
2 tablespoons champagne
or other white wine vinegar
2 tablespoons extra-virgin
olive oil
½ teaspoon salt
¾ teaspoon sugar
¼ teaspoon freshly
ground black pepper
8 ribs celery (preferably leafy
ones from the heart), sliced
very thin on the diagonal
1 cup cooked or canned
white beans (rinsed and
drained if canned)
For the roasted mushrooms:
12 ounces cremini mushrooms, each cut into quarters
2 tablespoons extra-virgin
olive oil
¼ teaspoon salt
For assembly:
¼ cup chopped parsley
¼ cup chopped fresh mint
2 tablespoons chopped
fresh dill
3 ounces crumbled feta
cheese (Goat cheese, blue
cheese or Parmigiano-Reggiano would all be good
swaps for the feta)
For the marinated celery: Whisk together the
shallot, vinegar, oil, salt, sugar and black pepper in a
large salad bowl until the
sugar has dissolved. Add the
celery and white beans, toss,
and let marinate in the
refrigerator for 30 minutes to
1 hour.
While the celery marinates, make the roasted
mushrooms: Preheat the
oven to 375 degrees. Arrange
the mushrooms on a rimmed
baking sheet, then drizzle
with oil, season with salt and
toss to coat. Roast (middle
rack) for 30 to 40 minutes,
until the mushrooms have
browned and are tender.
Reserve 2 tablespoons of
the mixed herbs to garnish
the salad.
To assemble just before
serving, toss the rest of the
herbs with the celery and
white bean mixture. Arrange
on a platter. Top with the
roasted mushrooms, crumbled feta and reserved herbs.
Serve right away.
FOOD
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2019
Fondue more than ’70s-style party
It perplexes me when the
subject of cheese fondue
comes up, and it’s often
accompanied by a smile and
a reference to the ’70s. This
quintessential alpine dish
should not be relegated to
that bygone era evoking
images of shag rugs, shaggier hair and textured bell-bottoms. This was certainly not
intended when the rural
inhabitants of Swiss and
French mountainous villages devised a warming winter
dish incorporating their local
cheese and winter staples.
This recipe has been
tweaked and fine-tuned over
the years, influenced by taste
and available ingredients. In
addition to serving it with the
LYNDA
BALSLEV
TasteFood
usual bread, I like to pass
around bowls of parboiled
baby potatoes, cauliflower and
broccoli florets for dipping. Do
not skimp on the cheese. Purchase the best-quality, caveaged Swiss or French alpine
cheese you can find and feel
free to blend them to your
taste. I like to use a blend of
two-thirds Gruyere to onethird Emmental.
ALPINE CHEESE
FONDUE
Yield: 6 servings
¼ cup Calvados or Poire
Williams brandy
3 tablespoons cornstarch
½ teaspoon salt
½ teaspoon freshly
ground black pepper
¼ teaspoon nutmeg
3 cups dry white wine,
such as Sauvignon Blanc
1 garlic clove, minced
1½ pounds alpine cheese,
such as Gruyere and
Emmental, coarsely grated
1 loaf country style or
sourdough bread, cut in
¾-inch cubes
Note: Have all of your
ingredients ready before you
begin. Once you start, the
fondue will come together
quickly, and during this time
it must be constantly stirred.
The fondue must not come to
a boil during this time.
Whisk the brandy, cornstarch, salt, ½ teaspoon
black pepper and the nutmeg
in a small bowl, until
smooth. Set aside.
Combine wine and garlic
in a large heavy saucepan or
fondue pot. Heat over medium until tiny bubbles form,
giving wine a fizzy appearance without bringing to a
boil. Add cheese one handful
at a time, stirring constantly,
until each handful is melted
before adding the next — do
not let the fondue boil.
Once the cheese is added,
continue stirring 1 minute —
do not let the fondue boil.
Stir in the cornstarch mix-
ture and continue stirring
until it thickens to a fondue
consistency. (Some cornstarch brands thicken more
easily than others. If your fondue remains thin, whisk 1
more tablespoon cornstarch
with 2 tablespoons white wine
and stir into the cheese.)
When the fondue is ready,
remove from the heat. Pour
cheese into a warm fondue
pot if necessary and place
over a fondue burner. Serve
immediately with extra
ground pepper, the bread,
and parboiled vegetables
such as small potatoes, cauliflower and broccoli florets.
(Balslev can be reached
at tastefood@
tastefoodblog.com)
PRESERVE
THE MOMENT
MAIL OR BRING THE COMPLETED ORDER FORM
ALONG WITH PAYMENT TO
Photo Reprints, The Republican Herald
111 Mahantongo Street, Pottsville, PA 17901-3008
ORDER FORM
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Phone ____________________________________________________
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other uses.
Circle the unframed photo size and price for the photo you would like:
4x6
$8
5x7
$11
Photo Size
5x7 (2)
$18
8x10
$18
1. Cost of color photograph(s)
2. Add 6% sales tax (line 1 x .06)
3. Flat rate standard shipping
4. Total payment due
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W E DNE SDA Y , J A NUA R Y 2, 2019
P O T T SV ILLE (P A .) R E P UBLIC A N HE R A LD
19
To place an ad call 570.622.6632 • Fax 570.628.6259 • Toll Free 800.622.5277 • Email classified@timesshamrock.com
In-column Ad Placement Deadlines
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday at 4 p.m.
Monday at 4 p.m.
Tuesday at 4 p.m.
Wednesday at 4 p.m.
Friday
Saturday
Sunday
LEGAL NOTICE
Part Time
& Substitute /
Permanent
PreSchool / Child Care
Early Education Staff needed.
Possibility to lead to full time.
Apply at
Jerusalem Child Care Center
252 Dock St.
Schuylkill Haven, PA
or email resume to
jccckids@yahoo.com
PUBLIC NOTICE
During the year 2019, the Schuylkill
County Airport Authority shall conduct its regularly scheduled public
meetings at 4:00 P.M. On the third
Tuesday of each month at the
Schuylkill County (Joe Zerbey) Airport.
In-Column Ad
Placement Deadlines:
Sunday..........................Friday 4 p.m.
Monday.........................Friday 4 p.m.
Tuesday......................Monday 4 p.m.
Wednesday................Tuesday 4 p.m.
Thursday..............Wednesday 4 p.m.
Friday........................Thursday 4 p.m.
Saturday........................Friday 1 p.m.
2 BURIAL PLOTS
in Pine Lawn
& 1 deluxe burial vault
at Schuylkill Memorial Cemetery.
$1,500.
Call 570-728-2410
3 CEMETERY PLOTS
Sky-View Memoriam Park
Rest Haven lawn section
Lot 10A, sites 1, 2 & 3
$900 total
Call 570-789-2319
CEMETERY LOTS IN
POTTSVILLE
3 lots at:
ST. JOHN'S CEMETERY
$1000
Call 570-366-2225
General
CARRIER
NEEDED
To Deliver The
REPUBLICAN HERALD
HEISLER'S VALLEY
About 80 Papers
Less than 2 Hours/Day
Between $600-700/month
...................
Contact:
Chuck Rushannon
District Manager
570-628-6116
or
In person at the
Circulation Department
121 Mahantongo
Pottsville PA17901
or
On-Line:
republicanherald.com
Go to Customer Service
Become a Carrier
REDUCED TO
$90,000
PART -TIME Delivery
2-3 days per week
Afternoon/ evening
Must have a valid drivers license
And clean driving record
Please send all resumes/
applications to address above/
apply in person or email
kstraight@conceptmedical.net
POTTSVILLE *
SAINT CLAIR
Half Double, No Pets, Hot Water
Heat, Includes Water & Sewer.
$525 month. Call 570-728-6192
or 570-990-2595
POTTSVILLE
*
rd
222 N. 3 St.
New Listing
2nd floor, very nice, quiet, wall/wall,
refrigerator, stove, free parking.
You pay lights and rent. Free heat.
$450/month. Non smoking, no pets.
Call 570-429-3100
POTTSVILLE
206 ANDERSON STREET
Completely remodeled! 3 bedrooms, 1 bath. New roof, siding,
windows, doors, kitchen cabinets,
granite counter tops. New bathroom, lights, fixtures, central air
condition, porch, rear deck, railing,
paint, interior doors and moldings.
Ceramic tile in kitchen & bathroom.
$143.500
Open house Jan. 12-13 10 am – 2pm
570-449-3395
LEHIGHTON, PA.
Large half double, 5 bedrooms,
1,900 sq. ft. New windows, wiring
and carpet. Quiet neighborhood. Off
street parking. $110,000. Call &
leave message. 610-377-6167.
DIRECTORY
For Sale.
570-739-1140
POTTSVILLE
Greenwood Hill. Quiet 2 bedrooms,
2 bath with wall/wall carpet & ceramic
tile. Gas heat, garage, deck, patio,
fireplace, office. $1,250/month.
570-628-5533
WALT'S MASONRY & HOME IMPROVEMENTS: Meeting all your inte rior & exterior needs. 570-874-2170
or 570-874-9195.
AAA JUNK REMOVAL.
BARLOW PLUMBING,
HEATING & ELECTRIC
Residential & Commercial.
24 hr service. Repairs & new
installations. 717-210-8906.
PA009553. Licensed & Insured.
All Types of Clean Outs. Great Rates.
570-622-4441 or 570-778-9450
*************************
Classifieds Work!
ROCK SALT
TWIN MOUNTAIN TILE / HOME
IMPROVEMENTS Interior & exterior work. 570-509-4023
$150 & UP MATTRESS SALE!
NEW in factory plastic.
Full warranty. Made in USA.
50-80% off fancy retail store prices.
Call John at 610-451-8823
BY THE PALLET – 50 LB BAGS
Call: 570-739-1140 Ext. 11
For Fast Action List Your Business or Service Here • PA toll free: 800-622-5277
Place Your ad 24/7 - Fax: 570-628-6259
• e-mail: classifieds@republicanherald.com
FAIR HOUSING
REGULATIONS
The Republican Herald Classifieds reserves the right to edit any copy that
does not conform to Fair Housing Regulations.
POTTSVILLE *
309 Mahantongo St.
New listing. 2nd floor. Very nice, quiet. Wall/wall carpeting. Refrigerator,
stove. Non smoking, no pets. FREE
Parking. $465/month.
Call 570-429-3100
POTTSVILLE
1 bedroom, 2nd floor. Recently
remodeled. Stove & refrigerator,
laundry. No pets.
Call 570-728-7680.
NEED MONEY? I BUY!
GOLD & SILVER COINS, COSTUME
JEWELRY. PRE 1980 TOYS
INCLUDING MATCHBOX
& HOT WHEELS. COMICS,
SPORTS CARDS.
Call TODAY! 570-449-3083
CHEVY 1999 MALIBU
LS SEDAN
BUICK 2015 REGAL
SEDAN
UNDER $2000
FREE PROPNAE GRILL: Old but
still in working condition. Call 570622-6313.
Beige exterior, beige leather, V-6,
automatic, AM/FM stereo, power
drivers seat, sunroof, keyless entry,
power windows & door locks,
aluminum wheels, new front brakes
& rotors, ONLY 69,000 miles.
POTTSVILLE
2 Bedroom Apartment for Rent Down-
Call 570-581-6140
SAINT CLAIR
Neumann Apartments
Servicing seniors 62+ with income
under $21,200.
Studio apartments available.
Equal Housing provider.
For more information
Call 570-429-0699
UNFURNISHED
MT. CARMEL
Cozy half double, 1 bedroom, 1
bath, huge kitchen, beautiful living
& dining rooms, full basement, pets
welcome with approval. $425 per
month. (570) 274-0972.
Silver exterior, gray leather, 4 cylinder, automatic, AC, AM/FM/CD, XM
radio, remote start, keyless entry,
sunroof, back-up camera, aluminum
wheels, only 42,000 miles.
$3,995*
Tamaqua 309 Auto Sales
tamaqua309auto.com
570-668-1001
CLASSIFIEDS
WORK!
Buying A New Car?
Call Us Today To Sell
Your Old One!
$14,995*
Tamaqua 309 Auto Sales
tamaqua309auto.com
570-668-1001
The
Republican Herald
Classified Ad
Department
570-622-6632
CADILLAC 1999
ELDORADO ESC
When you place your
ad with a photo.
Call today for pricing!
3 bedroom, 1 bath, half double, all
electric, move in ready, $550 per
month. (570) 274-0972.
New paint and carpeting, 1.5 bath,
quiet neighborhood, large yard, off
street parking. (610) 698-8035.
UNFURNISHED
ASHLAND
3 bedroom home. Recently remodeled.
Nice location. $575/month. Tenant
pays utilities. Pet friendly. HUD approved. 570-875-7646.
CHEVY 2005
SILVERADO
Get Better
Results
MT. CARMEL
Start The New Year Off Right!
NEW PHILADELPHIA
$5.00
For • Professional Services • Home Improvements
• Supplies • Equipment, and much more
FIREWOOD & BAGGED COAL
1514 Howard Ave.
New Ad
Efficiency apartment. Very nice, quiet.
Wall/wall carpeting. Refrigerator &
stove. Private entrance. $450/ month
includes all utilities. Non smoking. No
pets.
Call 570-429-3100
37 West Main Street
1st floor efficiency.
Heat, hot water and trash
included. $375/month.
570-573-8772 or 610-965-2700
CDL-A Truck Driver
Drivers
CONCEPT Pharmacy
Services, LLC
P.O. Box 201
639 Chestnut Street
Ashland, PA 17921
570-875-3611
MINERSVILLE
1 Bedroom, 1 bath, new appliances
hardwood floor, big back yard. Heat,
water, sewer + sanitation included.
$575. Call 570-590-8170
TREMONT
Call 570-384-3299
Looking for an experienced truck
driver to haul US Mail from the
Pottsville Post Office to the
Philadelphia Post Office
Pays -- $19.73 per hour
Plus an additional $5.06 per hour
for your Health & Welfare
Phone 570-640-5730
Email- rfanelli@
fanellitrucking.com
FANELLI BROS. TRUCKING
FRACKVILLE
1 bedroom house with a garage. Many
upgrades...very nice. Washer/dryer
hook-up, shared yard. References &
security required. $600/month.
570-875-1530 or 570-933-4181
POTTSVILLE Downtown
Single 3 Bedroom, Bi- level,
2 baths, All Electric, 2 Car Garage,
.6 Acre, 1,176 sq ft.
Gated Community near Rt 924
and Sheppton.
Drivers
Pottsville/Yorkville
1621 West Market St.
5 bedroom, newly remodeled, Living room, Dining room, Kitchen, 1.5
bath, full basement, large fenced
yard. Gas heat/hot water. No pets allowed. $800/month. 570-366-0942
1-2 Bedroom Apartment, Fully
Carpeted, Nice Location. $600-$650
Call 570-739-1238
AUTO PARTS COUNTER
PERSON
Auto parts counter person needed.
Previous parts experience preferred.
Automotive knowledge a must. Candidate must have a pleasant personality and be willing to work weekends. Must have valid drivers license. Apply in person at Napa Auto
Parts, 10 West William Street,
Schuylkill Haven.
UNFURNISHED
ASHLAND
1-2 BEDROOM, Section 8 Approved,
Pets Allowed $450-$550
570-581-6140
Items
under $250
CONSULT OUR
town. Modern, Appliances included.
Pets allowed. Call 570-527-6006
NORTH UNION TWP
$1,800 for all
or $500 each.
Fees includes.
$29.99
UNFURNISHED
MINERSVILLE
1 bedroom, 1 bath, New stove and
fridge, Off street parking. Heat, satiation included. $550. Tenant pays
water and sewage. 570-590-8170
SCHUYLKILL
MEMORIAL
PARK
GARDEN OF
THE CROSS
Lot #31A Grave 1, 2, 3, 4
15 days
6 lines
Starting at
Education
Girardville Borough is accepting letters of interest for Girardville Area
Municipal Authority Board member.
Please have letter submitted by January 8 at the Municipal Building located at 201 North 4th St. Girardville
PA 17935.
Thursday at 4 p.m.
Friday at 1 p.m.
Friday at 4 p.m.
MERCHANDISE FOR SALE
REAL ESTATE & AUTO SPECIAL
Polo green with beige interior, 20
mpg, No rust, holes, rips or tears.
Very good tires and exhaust, new
battery, radiator, new rear brake
lines, and rear brakes and rotors,
EVERYTHING WORKS! Almost
all Cadillac options! 12 CD aftermarket player. Garage kept, 2nd
owner. 110,000 miles. $2,500
firm. Call Rick (570) 875-4489
after 4pm.
Extended Cab
4.8 Litre V-8
Automatic transmission
4WD
109,000 miles
Rust Free- Clean truck
New Tires
$8,600
Reasonable offers considered.
Classifieds Work!
AKC CHOCOLATE LAB PUPS
1 male, 1 female, vet checked, very
friendly, 12 weeks old, family raised.
No Sunday calls. (570) 573-2784
UNDER $2000
FREE KITTENS: 2 gold, 1 gray, all
shots & wormed. Call 570-628-5593.
Looking For A
Buyer, Seller,
Employer Or
Employee?
The Republican-Herald
Want Ads Will Help You!
570-622-6632 or
1-800-768-2877
Call 570-449-0699
LOSE SOMETHING?
FIND SOMETHING?
Let
The Republican-Herald
help you!
Place Your Ad Today!
570-628-6632
COAL TWP./SHAMOKIN
FRACKVILLE
Hotel rooms. Directv, laundry room,
Fully furnished. Off street parking.
Weekly / monthly rates plus security.
570-617-3475
SHENANDOAH
FURNISHED ROOMS FOR RENT
Microwave & Fridge
Monthly & Weekly
Background Check Required.
570-497-9451
3 bedroom home. Recently remodeled.
Nice location. $550/month. Tenant
pays utilities. Pet friendly. HUD approved. 570-875-7646.
COALDALE: Quiet 2 bedroom, 1
bath. Refrigerator, stove. Off-street
parking. No Pets, non-smoking.
$950/month. Tenant pays electric.
Call 484-273-3279 or email
snservices921@gmail.com
POTTSVILLE
1534 West Norwegian
4 private bedrooms, fenced yard, oil
heat. $900/mo + utilities. (610) 2235030
Do you have furniture that needs
a new home?
sell it
HERE
570-622-6632 or 800-622-5277
Republican HeRald
JOB OPPORTUNITY
ADVERTISING
SALES CONSULTANT
The Republican Herald has an immediate opening for an Advertising Sales Consultant in
the Advertising Department.
Applicants should be aggressive, motivated, and goal-oriented to help local businesses
satisfy their advertising needs while achieving the company’s sales goals. The individual
selected will sell print and digital advertising packages to an existing list of area
businesses, plus generate new business within a geographic sales territory.
Previous sales experience preferred but we will train an ambitious, willing candidate with
strong communication and interpersonal skills who can also focus on customer service.
Valid PA driver’s license and reliable vehicle are a must.
We offer a competitive salary plus commission and benefits. This is a great work
atmosphere for a team player. The position reports directly to the advertising director.
If interested, send cover letter and resume to: Dawn Fisher, Advertising Director,
The Republican Herald, 111 Mahantongo Street, Pottsville, PA 17901
or email dfisher@republicanherald.com
EOE • No phone calls please • Drug Free Workplace
20
SPORTS
POTTSVILLE (PA.) REPUBLICAN HERALD
FORD 2011 TRANSIT
CONNECT XLT
CARGO VAN
White, gray cloth, 4 cylinder, automatic, AC, AM/FM/CD, tilt wheel,
cruise control, power windows &
door locks, keyless entry, rear
back-up sensors.
JEEP 2013 PATRIOT
SPORT 4X4
Blue exterior, gray cloth, 4 cylinder,
automatic, AC, AM/FM/CD, XM radio, power windows & door locks,
keyless entry, aluminum wheels 1owner.
$11,995*
Tamaqua 309 Auto Sales
tamaqua309auto.com
570-668-1001
LINCOLN 2003 LS
$6,995*
Tamaqua 309 Auto Sales
tamaqua309auto.com
570-668-1001
CONTACT US
Phone 570-622-6632
Fax 570-628-6259
To place your ad
CHEVROLET 2002
TRAILBLAZER LTZ
All options. Dual exhaust.
86K miles. Garage Kept.
Showroom Condition.
$7,000
Call 570-294-3115
CLASSIFIEDS
WORK!
2014 SUZUKI RMZ 450
Low hours, original tires on bike.
Spare rear tire and bike stand.
$2,900. Call 570-900-1039
1 AAAUTO PARTS NAFTZINGER'S
Used Car & Truck Parts
Always Buying Wrecked, Running &
Junk Vehicles, Trucks & Equipment.
Auburn - 570-754-7491
The
Republican Herald
Classified Ad
Department
570-622-6632
Excellent condition, garage kept.
Full screening Eagle package in
blue. 4400 miles.
REDUCED!!
$17,000
CALL 570-691-8484
Yamaha 2011 V Star
$13,995*
Tamaqua 309 Auto Sales
tamaqua309auto.com
570-668-1001
Less than 1,000 miles.
Hard locking bags.
Windshield.
$5,500 or best offer.
Call 570-417-0744
Flyers drop
4th straight
Philly beaten by Nashville, 4-0
Ready to
SELL?
Find Someone Ready
to
Gray, gray cloth, 4 cylinder, automatic, AC, AM/FM/CD. Keyless entry, power windows & door locks,
rear defroster, new front barkes &
rotors, New Tires.
inspiring Purdue
fan loses fight
against cancer
INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Tyler
Trent, a former Purdue University student and enthusiastic college football fan
TIRES- 2 Continental All Season Rawho inspired many with his
dials, P215-70 R-16 Used, Only
18,000 Miles. $60 for Pair.
battle against cancer, has
Call 570-739-1237
died. He was 20.
His family confirmed to The
Indianapolis Star that he
died Tuesday.
HARRY'S
Trent had wanted to be a
U-PULL IT!
sportswriter and was deterBring Your Vehicle To Us
mined to attend Purdue de570-459-9901
spite suffering three bouts
* Enter to Win $500
ASSOCIATED PRESS
with a rare bone cancer.
Gift Card every month
www.wegotused.com
Philadelphia Flyers right wing Jakub Voracek (93) and He became a social media
Nashville Predators center Rocco Grimaldi (23) vie for star with his positive attitude
Buying A New Car?
the puck during the second period of Tuesday’s game and determination to live evCall Us Today To Sell
in Nashville. The Predators won 4-0.
ery day to the fullest despite
Your Old One!
the illness.
$4899
Call 570-590-3023
HONDA 2013 CRV LX
All Wheel Drive
SPORTS
in bRief
A-All Parts Used
Joe's Used Auto Parts
New Ringgold
800-222-2457
www.wehavecars.com
Foreign & domestic parts.
Tires $20 & up. Buying any vehicle
from scrap to late model wrecks.
Mon.-Fri. 8-5; Sat. 8-12.
Credit Cards accepted.
2012
HARLEY DAVIDSON
CVO SOFTAIL
CONVERTIBLE
Black with Grey leather interior, sunroof, 4WD. Well maintained and
garage kept. New tires. Power windows, doors, seats and locks.
ONLY 79K miles!
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2019
BUY!
570-622-6632
or
800-622-5277
Republican HeRald
One Man’s junk is
another man’s
treasure.
by JiM DiaMOnD
ASSOCIATED PRESS
nHl
NASHVILLE, Tenn. —
Viktor Arvidsson scored
twice, Juuse Saros made 32
saves and the Nashville Predators defeated the Philadelphia Flyers 4-0 on Tuesday.
Craig Smith and Rocco
Grimaldi also scored for
Nashville, which has won
two straight.
Michal Neuvirth made 26
saves for the Flyers, who
have lost four in a row.
The shutout was Saros’
second of the season and the
sixth of his career.
Making his first start since
Dec. 15, Saros was busy early,
stopping 13 shots in the first
period. He made 12 saves in
the second and seven in the
third period. His best
sequence came just over
three minutes into the second period when he made
back-to-back saves in close on
Sean Couturier and Jakub
Voracek.
Saros also denied Wayne
Simmonds on a breakaway
just under six minutes into
the third. That save came just
before Arvidsson scored his
second goal of the night on a
wrist shot from the slot at
6:15.
Smith scored the game’s
first goal at 2:03 of the second
period.
Kevin Fiala skated the
puck into the Philadelphia
zone on the left side. From
the left circle, Fiala sent a
cross-ice pass to Smith at the
right faceoff dot, where his
wrist shot beat Neuvirth
high to the stick side just
underneath the crossbar.
Arvidsson made it 2-0 at
12:03 of the second.
In the left circle, Ryan
Johansen drove toward the
Philadelphia net before slipping a pass to Arvidsson, who
was unchecked at the back
post. He tapped it in for his second goal in as many games.
Grimaldi scored his third
of the season at 11:37 of the
third.
FROM PAGE 11
Sell your “treasures”
in the Classifieds.
No shipping hassles
when you sell locally.
570-622-6632 or 800-622-5277
Fax:
570-628-6259
e-mail:
classifieds@republicanherald.com
SEATTLE (TNS) — The Seattle Mariners reached an
agreement Tuesday with
Japanese left-hander Yusei
Kikuchi.
The contract calls for four
years guaranteed — three
years for a total of $43 million and a player option for
2022 for $13 million per
year. Kikuchi can opt out after three years. The Mariners
can also extend him for four
more years at a total of $66
million after the first three
years of the deal, making it
a seven-year contract.
Pastrnak, bruins
beat blackhawks
in Winter Classic
SOUTH BEND, Ind. (AP) —
David Pastrnak had a goal
and an assist, Tuukka Rask
made 36 saves and the Boston Bruins beat the Chicago
Blackhawks 4-2 on Tuesday in the Winter Classic at
Notre Dame.
Patrice Bergeron, Sean
Kuraly and Brad Marchand
also scored as Boston won
for the second time in three
appearances in the NHL’s
annual outdoor game on
New Year’s Day.
Backed by most of the sellout crowd of 76,126 in perfect conditions for outdoor
hockey — the game-time
temperature was 35.5 deUP neXT
grees, and a gray, overcast
Flyers: Host Carolina sky took the sun out of the
equation — Chicago pushed
Hurricanes on Thursday.
hard for the tying score in
the closing minutes, but
came up empty.
During the second intermission, NHL Commissioner
Gary Bettman said the 2020
Winter Classic will be held
at the Cotton Bowl in Texas.
takeaways and percentage of
The Dallas Stars will host
passes intercepted.
the 12th edition of the NHL’s
When the opponent can
annual outdoor game on
run, however, the Bears are
New Year’s Day against an
vulnerable. They have only
undetermined opponent.
given up 100 or more rushing
federer, Swiss
yards in a game four times
top Serena, U.S.
this season. Three of those
were among their four losses. at Hopman Cup
The Eagles aren’t a great
PERTH, Australia (AP) —
running team, but since DarRoger Federer won the bragren Sproles has returned, they ging rights over fellow tenhave an added dimension to
nis great Serena Williams
complement Josh Adams and as they faced each other on
Wendell Smallwood, and are
court for the first time Tuesmore efficient with the short
day, with Federer spearheadpasses and screens that act as ing Switzerland’s 4-2, 4-3 (3)
runs in their hybrid West
victory in a mixed doubles
decider at the Hopman Cup.
Coast offense.
Federer and playing partChicago’s offense isn’t
anything remarkable, either. ner Belinda Bencic overcame
Among the 12 playoff teams, Williams and Frances Tiafoe
only Dallas has gained fewer in the Fast4 format in front
of a 14,000 capacity crowd.
yards this season than the
Bears. But those league-lead- Murray secures
ing 36 takeaways by the
win at brisbane
defense have given Mitch
BRISBANE, Australia (AP)
Trubisky and the offense a
— Andy Murray doesn’t
lot of short fields.
know how long his latest
“You look at that (Bears
comeback can last, so he’s
game Sunday), they are getplanning on making the most
ting after Kirk Cousins, and of it.
it’s another challenge. I
The 31-year-old Murray rethink going into L.A., and
turned to competitive tenthat defense and that offense, nis for the first time since
prepares us for opportuniSeptember and gradually
ties like this,” Pederson said. warmed into it, taking the
“I even go back to the New
last four games in a 6-3, 6-4
win over Australian wild-card
Orleans game where, yeah,
we didn’t win the game, but I entry James Duckworth at
the Brisbane International
think (learned) from that
on Tuesday.
environment as well.”
“It’s been really hard. EighLet’s leave aside everyteen
months, a lot of ups
thing the Eagles learned in
that game against the Saints, and downs. It was tricky just
to get back on the court
and focus on the experience
competing
again,” said Murof having everything against
ray, who had a noticeable
you, just as it was in Los
limp between points from his
Angeles, and just as it will be
troublesome right hip.
in Soldier Field on Sunday.
No. 2-ranked Rafael NadIf they beat the Bears, they al is scheduled to play his
get another crack at the
first competitive match
Saints, and maybe that will
since September in a secbecome part of the new story ond-round match Thursday
being told. But it’s best at this against Jo-Wilfried Tsonga,
time of year to take things
who beat Thanasi Kokkinaone tough spot at a time.
kis 7-6 (6), 6-4.
eagleS: Hard road
ahead in playoffs
best defenses in the league,
and exerts its dominance by
stuffing the run, harassing
the quarterback and creating turnovers.
Again, a tough spot, but
the 30-23 win over the Rams
three weeks ago should have
carryover benefit for a team
that has survived a tough
one before with its season in
the balance.
“I think there are some
great lessons we can learn as
a football team,” coach Doug
Pederson said Monday, a day
after the Eagles made the
postseason with a win over
Washington, “(By) going into
a hostile environment
against good football teams,
offense and defense, special
teams included. Obviously,
now it’s heightened because
it is the playoffs and it’s the
wild-card round against a
team that defensively has
really kind of staked a claim.
They’re creating turnovers.
They’re getting after the
quarterback.”
The win over Los Angeles
was the only time this season
the Eagles won on the road
against a team that would
make the playoffs. They lost
on the road to New Orleans
and Dallas. Last year, they
were 2-1 on the road against
playoff teams, beating the
Rams and Panthers, and losing to the Chiefs. In Pederson’s first season as coach, a
building year with a 7-9 overall record, the Eagles were 0-4
on the road against playoff
teams.
To beat the Bears, the hippocket analysis calls for running effectively, keeping heat
off Foles, and not giving
away the ball. Well, that will
take some doing. Chicago
has the second-ranked rushing defense in the league,
and leads the NFL in both
Mariners sign
Japanese pitcher
to 3-year deal
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