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2019-01-03 Los Angeles Times

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$2.75 DESIGNATED AREAS HIGHER
© 2019 WST
latimes.com
THURSDAY, JANUARY 3, 2019
A BOON
FOR
‘FIRST 5’
EFFORTS
Trump
in the
mood to
grumble
He talks about his
‘lonely’ holiday,
defends Syria decision
and criticizes Mattis.
Gov.-elect Newsom
will propose nearly
$2 billion for early
childhood programs in
his initial budget plan.
By Eli Stokols
WASHINGTON — President Trump, as he often
does, had a few things to say.
After admitting that he
had been lonely over the holidays, Trump took advantage of his first public appearance of the new year
Wednesday to air lingering
grievances, make multiple
false claims and reinforce recent decisions that have rattled financial markets and
his party’s leaders.
As he held forth for more
than 90 minutes before a
small pool of reporters and
photographers, members of
his Cabinet, ostensibly
called to the White House for
a meeting, sat quietly
around a long conference table.
Trump defended his decision last month to withdraw U.S. troops from Syria
and sharply cut the deployment to Afghanistan, moves
that disturbed Republican
allies in Congress and
prompted the resignation of
Defense Secretary James N.
Mattis. In doing so, he contradicted his own recent
claim that the U.S. had
achieved its objectives of total victory over Islamic State
militants in Syria.
“Syria was lost long ago,”
he said.
“Look, we don’t want Syria,” he continued. “We’re
talking about sand and
death. That’s what we’re
talking about. We’re not
talking about vast wealth.
We’re talking about sand
and death,” he said, seemingly contrasting the war[See President, A4]
By John Myers
Gina Ferazzi Los Angeles Times
RANGERS close off the road to a campground at Joshua Tree National Park. All of its campgrounds were
closed at noon Wednesday because the government shutdown prevented routine cleanup and maintenance.
National parks, trashed in
shutdown, restrict access
Yosemite and Joshua
Tree overwhelmed by
bad behavior and
human waste.
By Javier Panzar
If Californians ever wondered how the state’s most
majestic open spaces would
fare without adult supervision, the partial federal government shutdown is offering a grim picture.
At Joshua Tree National
Park, champagne bottles
were left strewn on the
desert floor on New Year’s
morning, along with a prom
dress. Someone had kicked
one of the iconic trees, perhaps to see how sturdy it
was. Human waste was piling up.
At Yosemite, Death Valley, Joshua Tree and beyond,
the nearly two-week-long
shutdown has taken a toll.
Reports of vandalism, illegal
camping and off-road driving have led to restricted operations.
Even under the best conditions, California’s popular
outdoor destinations can
strain under the throngs of
visitors. But the skeleton
crews and volunteers now
patrolling the parks have
shown how essential maintenance and rules enforcement are to keeping the order.
“We just can’t continue at
the pace we have been at for
the last 12 days,” said Sabra
Purdy, co-owner of Joshua
Tree, Calif.-based Cliffhanger Guides, who has
been coordinating volunteer
cleanup efforts.
Campgrounds at Joshua
Tree closed at noon Wednesday, officials said, citing
health and safety concerns
over vault toilets that are
near capacity. The waterless
bathrooms in which visitors
can relieve themselves into a
sealed container buried
underground had remained
open. But with no workers to
pump out the waste, those
are being closed now as well.
Meanwhile, rangers at
Yosemite National Park
have set a roadside checkpoint up at the southern entrance, along California
Highway 41. Only people
with reservations for lodging or camping inside the
park will be allowed entrance between 9 a.m. and 6
p.m., officials said.
According to National
Park Service spokesman
Andrew Munoz, illegal offroad vehicles have damaged
some habitat, and the build[See Parks, A12]
President fires
back at Romney
‘I won big, and he
didn’t,’ Trump tweets
after the senator-elect
says he falls short.
By Janet Hook
Melina Mara Washington Post
DEMOCRATS Sylvia Garcia, left, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Debbie Mucarsel-
Powell and Abby Finkenauer gather for the member-elect photo in November.
New House Democrats
already making waves
Several freshmen have asked for, even demanded,
powerful committee posts usually taken by veterans
By Jennifer Haberkorn
WASHINGTON — Even
before they are sworn in
Thursday, the 100 newly
elected House members are
promising to be one of the
most independent — and
difficult to control — freshman classes in years.
They are far younger and
more diverse than their
predecessors. It’s the largest
freshman class in nearly 50
years, with a record number
of women, the youngest female House member ever
elected and the first two Native American women and
first two Muslim American
women elected. They include the first single moth-
ers with young children,
more than 18 veterans, two
NFL players and even a
mixed martial arts fighter.
But along with that generational shift and diversity
has come a fresh outlook
and willingness to buck
party and cast aside timehonored Washington precedents. It is particularly true
of House Democrats, many
of whom as candidates last
year distanced themselves
from their party’s leader,
Rep. Nancy Pelosi (D-San
Francisco).
The first test of how these
newcomers will approach
their jobs comes as soon as
next week, when coveted
committee assignments are
doled out to lawmakers.
Several freshmen have
asked for — some have demanded — prime slots on
powerful legislative committees writing laws regulating
taxes, healthcare and environmental policy. Such positions are typically out of
reach for first-year lawmakers.
“We’ve got a really assertive, take-charge fresh[See Freshmen, A9]
Shutdown meeting
yields no progress
The president and congressional leaders are
still deadlocked after the
first meeting since the
shutdown. NATION, A6
WASHINGTON — Sen.elect Mitt Romney’s scathing attack on President
Trump — and the withering
response it provoked — has
rung in the new year by intensifying the debate about
the future of the Republican
Party.
In the war between oldguard Republicans and
Trump’s more populist
GOP, Romney presented
himself as a dissident leader,
writing an op-ed article in
Tuesday’s Washington Post
that concluded, “the president has not risen to the
mantle of the office.”
But while some Senate
Republicans privately share
that view, few are likely to
publicly follow Romney’s
lead in a party that has been
remade in Trump’s image
over the last two years.
“I won big, and he didn’t,”
Trump shot back on Twitter,
ribbing Romney for losing
his 2012 presidential bid to
Barack Obama.
Indeed, despite political
losses in 2018 and the perils
of mounting legal challenges, Trump’s hold on his
party has tightened in the
aftermath of the midterm
election.
Capitol Hill has been
depleted of Republicans
who showed any inclination
to speak out or vote against
the president and his
agenda: Longtime Arizona
Sen. John McCain died; fellow Sens. Jeff Flake of Arizona and Bob Corker of Ten[See Romney, A8]
Bill Clark CQ Roll Call
FELLOW Republican
Mitt Romney criticized
Trump in a Washington
Post op-ed Tuesday.
Stolen celebrity
items recovered
LAPD finds “millions”
in goods in the storage
locker of man linked to
break-ins of celebrity
homes in Hollywood
Hills. CALIFORNIA, B1
Mild penalties in
airport gun cases
SACRAMENTO — Seeking to frame his new administration as one with a firm
focus on closing the gap between children from affluent
and poor families, Gov.-elect
Gavin Newsom will propose
spending some $1.8 billion on
an array of programs designed to boost California’s
enrollment in early education and child-care programs.
Newsom’s plan, which he
hinted at in a Fresno event
last month, will be a key element in the state budget
proposal he will submit to
the Legislature shortly after
taking office Monday, a
source close to the governorelect’s transition team said.
The spending would
boost programs designed to
ensure children enter kindergarten prepared to learn,
closing what some researchers have called the “readiness gap” that exists based
on a family’s income. It
would also phase in an expansion of prekindergarten
and offer money to help
school districts that don’t
have facilities for full-day
kindergarten.
“The fact that he’s making significant investments
with his opening budget is
really exciting,” Ted Lempert, president of the Bay
Area-based nonprofit Children Now, said Tuesday.
“What’s exciting is the comprehensiveness of it, because it’s saying we’re going
to focus on prenatal through
age 5.”
A broad overview document reviewed by The Times
on Tuesday shows that most
of the outlay under the plan
— $1.5 billion — would be a
one-time expense in the
budget year that begins July
1. Those dollars would be a
single infusion of cash, an
approach favored by Gov.
Jerry Brown in recent years.
Most of the money would
be spent on efforts to expand
child-care services and kindergarten classes. By law, a
governor must submit a full
budget to the Legislature no
later than Jan. 10. Lawmakers will spend the winter and
spring reviewing the proposal and must send a final
budget plan to Newsom by
June 15.
Though
legislative
Democrats have pushed for
additional early childhood
funding in recent years — a
key demand of the Legislative Women’s Caucus —
those actions have typically
come late in the budgetwriting season in Sacramento.
“Quite frankly, to start
out with a January proposal
[See Child care, A5]
Ultima Thule
comes into
fuzzy focus
NASA reveals images
of small, frozen world
in Kuiper belt captured
by New Horizons probe
during recent flyby.
CALIFORNIA, B2
Few travelers trying
to sneak firearms past
security at LAX face
the maximum punishment, a review finds.
BUSINESS, C1
Weather
Sunny.
L.A. Basin: 66/45. B6
Printed with soy inks on
partially recycled paper.
ULTIMA THULE
in first color image
released by NASA.
A2
THU R S DAY , JA N UA RY 3, 2019
LAT IMES. C OM
BACK STORY
What his many departing
aides had to say of Trump
By Philip Bump
WASHINGTON — To
hear President Trump tell it,
his administration is, at any
given moment, nearly ideal
in its composition and capabilities. It is, as he tweeted in
September, a “smooth running machine” — never mind
that, prior to the tweet, 15
senior White House and administration officials had
quit or been fired and that, in
the months since, eight
more have joined them.
What makes those departures particularly tricky
isn’t just that those who left
undercut the idea that the
administration hasn’t hit
speed bumps. It’s also that,
in at least a third of the
cases, those who left offered
words of disagreement with
or criticism of Trump or his
administration.
Below is a review of those
who left in 2018, the conditions under which they did
and what they’ve said about
the White House since.
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1. Brenda Fitzgerald,
director of the U.S. Centers
for Disease Control and
Prevention. She quit Jan. 31.
Criticisms: None.
2. Rob Porter, staff secretary, was fired Feb. 7.
Criticisms: In Bob Woodward’s book “Fear,” Porter is
quoted as saying, “A third of
my job was trying to react to
some of the really dangerous ideas that he had and
try to give him reasons to
believe that maybe they
weren’t such good ideas.”
3. Hope Hicks, communications director. Quit on
Feb. 28.
Criticisms: None. Hicks
now works for Fox.
4. Gary Cohn, National
Economic Council director.
Quit on March 6.
Criticisms: Cohn is also
quoted in “Fear.”
“It’s not what we did for
the country,” he reportedly
said. “It’s what we saved him
from doing.” In another
anecdote, Cohn is described
as removing a document
from Trump’s desk to prevent the president from
signing it.
5. Rex Tillerson, secretary of State. Fired on
March 13.
Criticisms: It was challenging to “go to work for a
man who is pretty undisciplined, doesn’t like to read,
doesn’t read briefing reports, doesn’t like to get into
the details of a lot of things,
but rather just kind of says,
‘This is what I believe,’ ”
Tillerson said in an interview. He also said Trump
had to be told when proposed actions were potentially illegal.
6. Andrew McCabe,
deputy FBI director. Fired
on March 16.
Andrew Caballero-Reynolds AFP/Getty Images
JOHN F. KELLY, then-White House chief of staff, with President Trump last
year. Kelly said after his ouster last month that it was a “bone-crushing hard job.”
Criticisms: McCabe
called Trump’s attacks on
him “unhinged.” Working at
the FBI, he said, “is the best
job you will ever have. Even
if a president decides to
attack you and your family.”
7. H.R. McMaster, national security advisor.
Fired on March 22.
Criticisms: Prior to leaving the White House, McMaster was reported to have
said that Trump was a
“dope” who was no smarter
than a kindergartner.
8. David Shulkin, secretary of Veterans Affairs.
Fired on March 28.
Criticisms: Shulkin says
he butted heads with advocates for VA privatization
who saw him “as an obstacle
to privatization who had to
be removed.”
9. Tom Bossert, homeland security advisor. Fired
on April 10.
Criticisms: None. He is
currently employed by ABC
News. It’s not clear whether
he signed a nondisclosure
agreement when joining the
White House.
10. Nadia Schadlow,
deputy national security
advisor. Quit on April 11.
Criticisms: None. In a
lengthy interview with CBS,
Schadlow was complimentary about Trump’s involvement in the security team’s
processes.
11. Ty Cobb, White House
lawyer. Quit on May 2.
Criticisms: “Bob Mueller
is an American hero in my
view,” Cobb said of the Russia investigation special
counsel in an interview in
October. “I don’t believe this
is a witch hunt.”
12. Joe Hagin, deputy
chief of staff. Quit on June
19.
Criticisms: None.
13. Scott Pruitt, Environmental Protection Agency
administrator. Quit on July
5.
Criticisms: None. Pruitt’s
departure followed a series
of questions about his behavior while leading the
EPA.
14. Marc Short, legislative affairs director. Quit on
July 12.
Criticisms: None. Short
is now a CNN contributor.
He signed a nondisclosure
agreement while working
with the Trump campaign,
but says he did not sign one
at the White House. (The
campaign agreement was
expansive in its terms.)
15. Donald McGahn,
White House counsel. Quit
on Aug. 29.
Criticisms: People close
to McGahn told CNN that in
his last meeting with
Trump, the president
blamed him for Mueller’s
appointment.
16. Jeff Pon, Office of
Personnel Management
director. Fired on Oct. 5.
Criticisms: None.
17. Nikki Haley, U.N.
ambassador. Quit on Oct. 9.
Criticisms: Haley described to NBC News how
she leveraged Trump’s
personality: “I got the job
done by being truthful but
also by letting him be unpredictable and not showing
our cards.”
18. Jeff Sessions, attorney general. Fired on Nov. 7.
Criticisms: None. Despite ongoing criticism from
Trump that ultimately led
to his ouster, Sessions told
an audience last month that
he “enjoy[ed] the honor and
appreciate[d] the president
allowing [him] to serve
almost two years in one of
the greatest jobs in the
world.”
19. Mira Ricardel, deputy national security advisor.
Fired on Nov. 14.
Criticisms: None.
20. John F. Kelly, chief of
staff. Fired on Dec. 8.
Criticisms: Working as
chief of staff was a “bonecrushing hard job,” Kelly
said in an interview with the
Los Angeles Times. He said
Trump never asked him to
do anything illegal “because
we wouldn’t have.”
21. Nick Ayers, Vice
President Mike Pence’s
chief of staff. Quit on Dec. 9.
Criticisms: None. Ayers
did, however, decline to step
up as Trump’s chief of staff,
a job the president had
made very clear he hoped
Ayers would accept.
22. Ryan Zinke, secretary of the Interior. Quit on
Dec. 15.
Criticisms: None.
23. James N. Mattis,
secretary of Defense. Announced his resignation
Dec. 20.
Criticisms: “Our
strength as a nation is inextricably linked to the
strength of our unique and
comprehensive system of
alliances and partnerships,”
he wrote in his resignation
letter. “My views on treating
allies with respect and also
being clear-eyed about both
malign actors and strategic
competitors are strongly
held and informed by over
four decades of immersion
in these issues,” he added,
remarking that he was leaving because Trump had “the
right to have a Secretary of
Defense whose views are
better aligned with [his] on
these and other subjects.”
Bump writes for the
Washington Post.
1,000 WORDS: KOCHI, India
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Indian police intervene as protesters try to disrupt a celebration after two women entered Sabarimala
temple in Kochi on Wednesday. The women in their 40s defied traditionalists by entering the Hindu pilgrimage site, which was once forbidden to females between the ages of 10 and 50. Their act sparked protests across southern Kerala state, with police firing tear gas at several sites to disperse people throwing
stones, authorities said. The Supreme Court in September had lifted a ban on women worshiping at the
centuries-old temple, but Hindu priests and conservatives continued to block women of menstruating age
from entering. The court has agreed to reexamine its decision in response to dozens of petitions; opponents of the ruling say the celibacy of the temple’s presiding deity, Lord Ayyappa, is protected by India’s
constitution and that women of all ages can worship at other Hindu temples. On Tuesday, millions of women formed a human chain more than 375 miles long across the state to support gender equality.
T HURSDAY , JANUARY 3, 2019
L AT I ME S . CO M
A3
THE WORLD
Vietnam booming, aided by old foe
China, amid U.S. trade
war, funnels money to
its neighbor, which
welcomes it warily.
By Ralph Jennings
HO CHI MINH CITY,
Vietnam — As communications manager for a decadeold chain of boutique hotels,
Phuong Hong has a close
look at the latest business
trend in booming Vietnam:
the coming of Chinese money.
Although her company
saw some benefit from the
nearly 5 million Chinese visitors to Vietnam in 2018, she
also viewed the influx with
skepticism. She complained
about the prices and quality
of service she recently experienced at a Chinese medical clinic.
“Doing business with
Chinese people is OK, but
Vietnamese people are so
open, so friendly,” the 38year-old said recently at one
of her company’s hotels.
The flow of Chinese money into Vietnam — largely to
escape the trade war with
the U.S. — has drawn a cautious welcome from Vietnamese, who worry about
the prospect of a longtime
foe increasing its economic
control in their country.
Chinese money permeates Vietnam these days:
Besides China being the top
source of tourists in 2018,
Chinese investors are snapping up properties in Ho Chi
Minh City’s buzzing real estate market while Chinese
companies are building infrastructure and eyeing land
in special economic zones
Vietnam is opening to lure
foreign investment.
While Vietnam’s government has aggressively pursued investment from the
European Union, Japan and
South Korea, it has been less
openly welcoming of China,
in part due to public opposition to a heavy Chinese economic presence. But the
country’s
manufacturing
sector depends on raw materials from China, and analysts said officials in Vietnam have tried to work with
Beijing on economic issues
while not appearing proChinese in the eyes of the
Vietnamese people.
Maxfield Brown, senior
associate with the business
Imaginechina
TOURISTS , mostly Chinese, visit Vietnam’s coastal resort city of Nha Trang. China is the main source of
tourism in Vietnam, and Chinese also are investing in real estate and building infrastructure projects there.
consultancy Dezan Shira &
Associates in Ho Chi Minh
City, Vietnam’s largest city,
said that when the U.S. and
China began a tit-for-tat
trade war by escalating tariffs on the other’s goods,
many multinational clients
with factories in China approached the firm, asking
whether they could avoid
duties by transshipping
their U.S.-bound goods
through Vietnam.
Chinese interest in Vietnam is likely to go far beyond
that, Brown said.
“I think you’ll probably
see in the short term money
flowing into manufacturing
operations, and on the people-to-people level you’re going to see a lot of tourism
coming to Vietnam,” he said.
“Real estate is an interesting
area at the moment, as well.”
These inflows would accelerate Vietnam’s economic growth — already averaging a fast 6%-7% per year
since 2012 — by adding jobs,
raising wages and helping to
expand the middle class.
The Boston Consulting
Group forecasts that nearly
one-third
of
Vietnam’s
93 million people will attain
middle-class status by 2020,
an about-face from the
rampant post-Vietnam War
poverty of the late 1970s.
“There are so many companies coming to look at
Vietnam now that there are
people talking about labor
shortages,
especially
around Ho Chi Minh City,”
said Frederick Burke, partner with the law firm Baker
McKenzie in Ho Chi Minh
City. Malls and luxury apartments have sprung up on
land once earmarked for factories, too, he said.
Chinese firms and multinationals with factories in
China hope to avoid U.S. tariffs that took effect in 2018,
particularly a round in September that hit $200 billion
in exports from China. Some
have already announced
plans to move; others are
making frantic inquiries to
business consultants in Ho
Chi Minh City about how to
ship made-in-China goods
through Vietnam without
paying U.S. tariffs.
Foxconn Technology, the
world’s largest contract assembler of consumer elec-
tronics, has spoken to officials in Hanoi about setting
up an iPhone plant, the Vietnam Investment Review reported. Foxconn, whose Chinese factories employ hundreds of thousands, declined to comment but said
it had invested in Vietnam
since 2007 and hired 23,000
people there.
Chinese bike parts maker
HL Corp. told investors in
August that tariffs had influenced its decision to move
production to Vietnam.
Vietnam has other advantages for investors, too.
It enjoys most-favored-nation trading status with the
U.S., ensuring that it faces
the fewest trade barriers
and lowest tariffs. Its manufacturing workers earn 30%
of what counterparts get in
China, Dezan Shira & Associates says, and the government is close to finalizing
free trade deals with the European Union and with 11 Pacific Rim countries.
In the Ho Chi Minh City
property market, where demand leads supply, Chinese
bought 31% of higher-end
homes sold in the first nine
months of 2018, up from 2%
in 2016, real estate services
firm CBRE calculated based
on transactions in which it
took part. It attributed the
influx to Vietnam’s decision
to relax foreign ownership
rules to attract more international investors.
China is pushing Vietnam to accept more infrastructure aid as part of its $1trillion Belt and Road initiative that’s designed to expand trade routes and project Chinese influence across
dozens of countries. A $670million Chinese loan paid for
a commuter rail system that
opened last year in Hanoi.
Companies from China
are also eyeing 99-year
leases in three special economic zones that Vietnam’s
National Assembly is expected to open this year for
foreign investment. Chinese
direct investment comes to
about 7.7% of Vietnam’s total
now — $11.2 billion invested
in 1,616 active projects.
At a seaport near Hanoi,
Chinese investors are lining
up to invest in a special economic zone with low land
prices and tax incentives,
said Zhao Xijun, associate
dean of the School of Finance at the People’s University of China in Beijing.
All the investment comes
despite long-standing resentment of Chinese behavior toward Vietnam. After
fighting off U.S. forces in the
Vietnam
War,
Vietnam
pushed back an incursion by
Chinese troops during a
brief border war in 1979.
Many Vietnamese resent
Beijing’s expansion in parts
of the South China Sea also
claimed by Vietnam.
Too much inflow from
China could set off another
backlash, some experts fear.
Anti-China riots in 2014
damaged Chinese-owned
factories after Beijing authorized placement of an oil
rig in the disputed sea, and
thousands protested in June
2018 as legislators debated
letting foreigners, including
Chinese, lease land in the
special economic zones.
The protests prompted
Vietnamese legislators to
twice delay the leasing of
tracts to foreign investors.
Zhao, who visited the
Hanoi port zone in November, said Vietnam will ultimately accept Chinese investment because the two
countries’ ruling Communist parties get along.
“Chinese investors got
[to the port zone] faster
than other countries and
their corporate effectiveness
is a bit higher,” Zhao said.
“The Chinese and Vietnamese Communist parties
have a bond and lots of
understandings.”
Other analysts warn of
the potential for greater
backlash. Further Chinese
influence in the Ho Chi Minh
City housing market could
frustrate local buyers who
already face supply shortages, Brown and others said.
Chinese firms also have
the scale to hurt local companies by flooding Vietnam
with cheap goods, said
Trung Nguyen, international relations dean at the
Ho Chi Minh University of
Social Sciences and Humanities.
“I don’t think small local
businesses will welcome
China’s money,” Nguyen
said. “Maybe they can dominate the market. They will
flood the market with Chinese goods in the future.”
Jennings is a special
correspondent.
Xi warns Taiwan against ‘separatist activities’
Chinese president
rebuts Taipei’s call to
respect the island’s
democratic heritage.
By Robyn Dixon
and Ralph Jennings
BEIJING — Chinese
President Xi Jinping on
Wednesday warned Taiwan
that independence would be
disastrous and both sides
must work for “reunification,” calling for political
negotiations to achieve this.
Speaking in the Great
Hall of the People, Xi said
China would strive for
peaceful reunification but
would not rule out force to
recover the island it sees as
an errant province.
“We are willing to create
broad space for peaceful reunification, but will leave no
room for any form of separatist activities. We make no
promise to renounce the use
of force and reserve the option of taking all necessary
means,” Xi said.
China and Taiwan have
been governed separately
since the Chinese civil war of
the 1940s, when Chiang Kaishek’s Nationalists lost to
Mao Tse-tung’s Communists. The fleeing Nationalists moved their government
to Taiwan, but China has insisted that the two sides
must eventually unite, by
force if necessary.
Xi’s comments were a rebuttal to the Taiwanese
president, Tsai Ing-wen,
who on Tuesday called on
China to respect Taiwan’s
existence and the democratic heritage of the island
of 23 million residents.
In her annual New Year’s
speech in Taipei, the Tai-
wanese capital, she called on
China to “face squarely the
reality of the existence” of
Taiwan, adding that Beijing
“must respect the insistence
of 23 million people on freedom and democracy, and
must use peaceful, on-parity
means to handle our differences.”
Tsai said Chinese respect
for Taiwan’s existence and
democracy formed “the
most basic and most key
foundation for the positive
development of relations between Taiwan and China.”
But Xi’s speech Wednesday underscored the gulf between the governments
when he said nobody could
change the fact that Taiwan
was part of China and
warned that all Taiwanese
people must recognize that
independence would be a
profound disaster.
“It’s a legal fact that both
sides of the strait belong to
one China, and cannot be
changed by anyone or any
force,” he said.
However, he softened his
rhetoric from a speech in
March when he declared
China would never cede one
inch of its territory and was
ready to fight a bloody battle
against its enemies.
He warned Wednesday
that foreign interference in
the matter would be unacceptable.
The
speech
marked the 40th anniversary of the commencement of
communications between
China and Taiwan after decades of hostility.
Responding
to
Xi’s
speech Wednesday, Tsai reiterated that she does not
accept the one-China principle. Her election in 2016 and
subsequent repudiation of
the one-China principle led
to a sharp deterioration in
relations, as Beijing cut dia-
Mark Schiefelbein Pool Photo
PRESIDENT Xi Jinping’s comments Wednesday marked the 40th anniversary of
open communications between China and Taiwan after decades of hostility.
logue and exchanges with
the island. It has also conducted military maneuvers
near the island and scaled
back mainland group tourism to Taiwan.
In recent times China has
also issued warnings to foreign companies, including
airlines, that failed to recognize its one-China policy —
for example, by including
Taiwan in drop-down menus
listing nations on their websites. U.S. and other foreign
airlines fell into line with
China’s demands, rather
than risk losing access to
routes into China.
With Taiwan’s presidential election due in 2020,
China has piled pressure on
Tsai since her party suffered
losses in November city and
local government elections,
when the opposition Nationalist Party, or Kuomintang
— which advocates closer
ties with China — picked up
support, winning 15 of 22 local seats.
China portrayed the result as indicating a strong
will in Taiwan for better relations with the mainland —
although analysts say the results were partly due to disapproval of Tsai’s economic
reforms.
Tsai said Tuesday the results “absolutely do not
mean that grass-roots public opinion in Taiwan favors
abandoning our sovereignty,
nor do they mean that the
people want to make concessions regarding Taiwanese
identity.”
Xi’s speech aimed to entice young Taiwanese with
the hopes of joining China’s
economic advance, saying
reunification would bring
the island great benefits. He
promised that China would
respect “private assets, religions, beliefs and legitimate
rights.” He held out the
Hong Kong model of governance — one country, two systems — under which Hong
Kong retains its own democratic system and laws for at
least 50 years. Critics have
accused China of encroaching on Hong Kong’s freedom
of speech and laws in recent
years.
Tsai said the island’s
greatest current challenge is
China’s use of Taiwan’s open
democratic system to interfere in its affairs, a claim
China denies, and suggested
that both sides try to understand each other better.
“What’s really needed between the two sides is a practical understanding of the
differences between values,
beliefs and lifestyles,” she
said.
An opinion poll in September by the Taiwan Public
Opinion Foundation indicated Taiwanese support for
independence had waned
from 51.2% in 2016 to 36.2%. In
March the level had been
38%. Support for unification
with the mainland was
lower, at 26.1%, while 23.2%
supported the status quo.
Mainland China and Taiwan have close business, cultural and family ties. A June
survey by the same group
marked the first time that
more Taiwanese had a good
impression of China than
those with a negative view,
49% to 44%.
Raymond Wu, managing
director of Taipei-based political risk consultancy E-telligence, said there was a lack
of trust between the two governments, meaning negotiations on the island’s status
were unlikely.
“With the current situation between China and Taiwan, I don’t think there is
that foundation of trust for
any kind of in-depth discussion or debate on these issues,” Wu said.
In her speech Tuesday,
Tsai warned local officials
against exchanges with Beijing based on “vague prerequisites.”
Those remarks were
largely aimed at warning any
of Taiwan’s opposition party
mayors and county magistrates who talk with Chinese
officials on their own, said
Shane Lee, political scientist
with Chang Jung Christian
University in Taiwan.
robyn.dixon@latimes.com
Times staff writer Dixon
reported from Beijing and
special correspondent
Jennings reported from
Taiwan.
A4
T HU R S DAY , JA N UA RY 3, 2019
LAT IMES. C OM
Six killed in Danish railway accident
Falling cargo from a
freight train may have
caused passenger train
to crash on a bridge.
associated press
COPENHAGEN — Six
passengers were killed and
16 others injured Wednesday
when a Danish train apparently struck an object while
crossing a bridge that had
been closed to automobiles
because of high winds.
Authorities said they
were investigating whether
falling cargo from a second
train was to blame for Denmark’s deadliest railway accident in 30 years.
Authorities said the two
trains — one carrying passengers, the other freight —
were traveling in opposite directions on the bridge
linking Denmark’s islands.
Aerial TV footage showed a
front side of the passenger
train ripped open.
Photos showed crates of
beer on the freight train and
a tarpaulin on top torn in
pieces.
Jesper Nielsen told Denmark’s TV2 he was riding in
the passenger train and it
“was out on the bridge when
there was a huge ‘bang.’ ...
Very quickly thereafter, the
train braked.”
The rail operator, Danish
Railways, told TV2 the victims were passengers on a
train going from the city of
Odense, on the central Danish island of Funen, to the
capital of Copenhagen when
the accident took place
about 8 a.m.
Police declined to comment directly on a report
from TV2 that a large container car had probably fallen off the freight train.
“It is much too early to
speculate as to what might
have caused it,” chief police
investigator Joergen Andersen told reporters. “It has
been a pretty serious accident.”
The accident took place
on a road-and-rail bridge
that is part of the Storebaelt
system of bridges and a tunnel that link the islands of
Zealand and Funen. The
system was closed to cars
overnight because of strong
winds, but trains were allowed to continue using it.
Police spokesman Lars
Braemhoej said one possible
cause of the “considerable
damage” to the passenger
train was from cargo that fell
from the freight train, but
noted that authorities “do
not know precisely what
caused the accident,”
Police urged passengers
to contact relatives if they
are safe and urged people
not to share photos or videos
of the accident.
Flemming Jensen, the
chief executive of stateowned Danish Railways,
said police and the Danish
Accident
Investigation
Board were investigating.
Tim Kildeborg Jensen Ritzau Scanpix
THE TRAIN accident on a bridge linking the islands of Zealand and Funen was Denmark’s deadliest in 30 years. Sixteen were injured.
He said the operator “will
contribute everything that
we can to the investigation.”
Bo Haaning of the investigation board was quoted
as saying it could take
months before the cause is
determined.
Kasper Elbjoern, spokesman for the Danish brewery
group Carlsberg, confirmed
that a freight train transporting its products was involved in the accident.
The government agency
responsible for Danish rail
operations said on Twitter
that no further trains would
cross the Storebaelt link on
Wednesday, adding that it
was aiming to allow train
crossings to resume Thursday. Road traffic resumed
Wednesday with a speed limit of 31 mph.
“Ordinary Danes on their
way to work or heading
home from the Christmas
holidays have had their lives
smashed,” Prime Minister
Lars Loekke Rasmussen
said as he issued his condolences.
Denmark’s Queen Margrethe said the “terrible accident ... touches me deeply.”
In 1988, eight people were
killed and 72 injured when a
train derailed because of
high speed near Soroe, west
of Copenhagen.
Denmark’s worst train
accident occurred in 1919,
when an express train collided with a stopped train in
Copenhagen due to a dispatcher error. Forty people
were killed and about 60 injured.
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Trump in mood to grumble
[President, from A1]
wracked country with Iraq
and its vast oil reserves.
Iran “can do what they
want there, frankly,” he added, a comment likely to unnerve officials in Israel, who
have worried that a U.S.
withdrawal from its positions in eastern Syria would
allow Iran to expand its influence there.
“It’s not my fault,” he
said. “I didn’t put us there.”
Trump offered little further clarity on the U.S. withdrawal from Syria, which he
initially said would take
place in 30 days, saying now
that the pullout will “take
place over a period of time.”
Later, in a long riff
about Afghanistan, Trump
seemed
to
endorse
Moscow’s 1979 invasion of
the country — an act that
the U.S. viewed as an attempt to spread communism and waged a long, covert operation to combat during the Carter and Reagan
administrations.
“The reason Russia was
in Afghanistan was because
terrorists were going into
Russia,” Trump said, making a case to leave the policing of hot spots in the Mideast and Central Asia to
countries in the region.
“They were right to be there.
The problem is it was a
tough fight.”
The Soviet Union eventually was bankrupted by its
Afghan war, Trump added.
“Russia used to be the Soviet
Union. Afghanistan made it
Russia, because they went
bankrupt fighting in Afghanistan.”
Historians
generally
agree that the Russian invasion and subsequent occupation of much of Afghanistan was one of several
factors that contributed to
the collapse of the Soviet
Union, although the country
never went bankrupt.
For years, Republicans
have credited President
Reagan with bringing an
end to the Soviet Union by
his aggressive increase in
U.S. military spending.
Trump’s
comments
stood in stark contrast to
the view Mattis espoused in
the resignation letter he pre-
Evan Vucci Associated Press
PRESIDENT TRUMP talked to reporters for more than 90 minutes on Wednes-
day, airing lingering grievances during a Cabinet meeting at the White House.
sented last month after failing to convince the president
to hold off on withdrawing
from Syria.
“We must do everything
possible to advance an international order that is most
conducive to our security,
prosperity and values, and
we are strengthened in this
effort by the solidarity of our
alliances,” Mattis wrote.
Mattis’ comments clearly
stung Trump, who responded last month with criticism
of his former Pentagon chief.
On Wednesday, he stepped
that up, claiming that he
fired Mattis.
“What’s he done for me?
How had he done in Afghanistan? Not too good,”
Trump said. “As you know,
President Obama fired him,
and essentially so did I.”
Obama did not fire Mattis, although the general did
retire several months early
in 2013 from his position as
the head of the military’s
Central Command after dissenting from Obama administration policy decisions.
Tuesday was Mattis’ final
day at the Pentagon.
Trump, in a fit of pique after
the resignation letter became public, had moved up
Mattis’ termination date
In addition to his foreign
policy comments, Trump
L.A. Times Store
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Space jam: In the Jan. 2
Section A, an article about
Xcor ticket holders seeking
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der Sluis as Vandersluys.
Cal Poly f loat lab: In the
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‘Look, we don’t
want Syria. We’re
talking about sand
and death. That’s
what we’re talking
about. We’re not
talking about vast
wealth. We’re
talking about sand
and death.’
— President Trump
also downplayed December’s stock market losses,
which erased all positive
gains for the year, as “a little
glitch” and asserted —
wrongly — that there are
“probably 30-35 million” immigrants in the U.S. illegally.
The nonpartisan Pew Research Center estimates
that as of 2016, there were 10.7
million unauthorized immigrants living in the country,
a number that has declined
in recent years.
Trump repeated his call
for Democrats to agree to
$5.6 billion in funding for a
border wall, and expressed
surprise not to have received
overtures from them over
the holidays to negotiate an
end to the government shutdown.
“I was in the White House
all by myself for six or seven
days,” he said. “It was very
lonely. My family was down
in Florida. I said, ‘Stay there
and enjoy yourself.’ I felt I
should be here just in case
people wanted to come and
negotiate the border security.”
Trump, who met later in
the day with congressional
leaders away from TV cameras, has already dismissed
a funding proposal from
House Democratic leader
Nancy Pelosi that includes
$1.3 billion in border security
funding.
While leaving the door
open to a compromise,
Trump continued to argue
for the importance of a wall,
pointing to other examples
of barriers. He incorrectly
asserted that Obama’s
Washington residence is
surrounded by a 10-foot wall
and cited the Vatican, which
he said “has the biggest wall
of them all.”
“When they say the wall is
immoral, then you better do
something about the Vatican,” he said. “Walls work.”
As Trump spoke, a
“Game of Thrones”-style
movie poster teasing Iran
sanctions — “SANCTIONS
ARE COMING,” it read —
lay unfurled across the table
directly in front of him. But
he made no remarks on the
subject.
He did, however, comment on Sen.-elect Mitt
Romney of Utah, who wrote
in the Washington Post on
Tuesday that he was troubled by Trump’s “deep descent in December” and that
his deficit in “presidential
leadership in qualities of
character … has been most
glaring.”
“I wish Mitt could be
more of a team player,”
Trump said. “And if he’s not,
that’s OK too.”
Seeming to warn Romney about the fate that lies
ahead for Republican lawmakers who vocally criticize
him and his presidency,
Trump boasted that he “got
rid of ” former Sens. Jeff
Flake of Arizona and Bob
Corker of Tennessee, both of
whom opted not to seek new
terms last year.
Accusing both men of
seeking publicity in taking
stands against him, Trump
suggested that Flake would
be seeking a job as a paid cable news contributor — or
perhaps in another profession that Trump himself
once plied.
“Jeff Flake is now selling
real estate or whatever he’s
doing,” he said dismissively.
eli.stokols@latimes.com
Twitter: @EliStokols
T HURSDAY , JANUARY 3, 2019
L AT I ME S . CO M
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Brian van der Brug Los Angeles Times
GAVIN NEWSOM visits the UCLA Early Care and Education Center last year.
The governor-elect will propose $1.8 billion for early education in his budget plan.
A state budget boon
for early education
[Child care, from A1]
that includes that investment in California’s children
reflects a new day,” state
Sen. Holly J. Mitchell (D-Los
Angeles) said.
The governor-elect will
propose a $750-million boost
to kindergarten funding,
aimed at expanding facilities to allow full-day programs. A number of school
districts offer only partialday programs, leaving many
low-income families to skip
enrolling their children because kindergarten classes
end in the middle of the
workday. Because the money would not count toward
meeting California’s threedecades-old
education
spending guarantee under
Proposition 98, which sets a
minimum annual funding
level for K-12 schools and
community colleges, it will
not reduce planned spending on other education services.
Close behind in total cost
is a budget proposal by Newsom to help train child-care
workers and expand local facilities already subsidized by
the state, as well as those
serving parents who attend
state colleges and universities. Together, those efforts
could cost $747 million, according to the budget overview document.
An
expansion
of
prekindergarten programs
would be phased in over
three years at a cost of
$125 million in the first year.
The multiyear rollout would,
according to the budget
overview, “ensure the system can plan for the increase
in capacity.”
Lempert said the Newsom proposal is notable for
trying to avoid the kinds of
battles that in recent years
pitted prekindergarten and
expanded child care against
each other for additional
taxpayer dollars.
“The reality is we need to
expand
both
simultaneously,” he said.
Another $200 million of
the proposal would be earmarked for programs that
provide home visits to expectant parents from limited-income families and
programs that provide
healthcare screenings for
young children. Some of the
money would come from the
state’s Medi-Cal program,
and other money from federal matching dollars. Funding for the home visits program was provided in the
SAO PAULO, Brazil —
Newly installed President
Jair Bolsonaro targeted
Brazil’s indigenous groups,
descendants of slaves and
the LGBTQ community
with executive orders in the
first hours of his administration, moving quickly after a
campaign in which the farright leader said he would
radically overhaul many aspects of life in Latin America’s largest nation.
Sao Paulo’s stock market, meanwhile, jumped
3.56% to a record closing of
91,012 points as new Cabinet
ministers reinforced the intent to privatize stateowned companies and a
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NEWSOM has framed his administration as one that
‘Quite frankly, to
start out with a
January proposal
that includes that
investment in
California’s
children reflects
a new day.’
— State Sen.
Holly J. Mitchell,
on Gavin Newsom’s $1.8-billion
spending proposal for child care
budget Brown signed last
summer; the Newsom effort
would build on that.
Emphasizing a policy
area with broad appeal in his
first state budget could reflect Newsom’s political sensibility about the challenges
ahead. Democratic lawmakers and interest groups will
be especially eager to see
how Newsom addresses the
demand for an overhaul of
healthcare coverage in California — especially after a
2017 effort to create a singlepayer, universal system fizzled. The path forward on
healthcare is complex and
costly, making early childhood education a more
achievable goal in the governor-elect’s early tenure.
Newsom is likely to face
considerable demands for
other additional spending.
In November, the Legislature’s independent analysts
projected that continued
strength in tax revenues
could produce a cash reserve of some $29 billion over
the next 18 months. Almost
$15 billion of that could be in
unrestricted reserves, the
kind that can be spent on
any number of government
programs.
Kim Belshé, executive director of the child advocacy
organization First 5 LA and
a former state health and
human services secretary,
said the initial Newsom
budget proposal suggests
the next governor will focus
on a comprehensive approach to improving outcomes for children from lowincome families.
“School-ready kids deserve quality early learning,
strong and well-supported
families, and access to early
screening services,” Belshé
said. Newsom “understands
the ‘whole child,’ multifaceted needs of our kids and is
clearly ready to lead.”
Mitchell, the chair of the
Senate budget committee,
said she’s eager to see the details of the governor-elect’s
proposal
to
determine
whether it might signal the
beginning of an even
broader expansion of early
education efforts. Similar efforts have been hindered by
a lack of money and ongoing
debate over which services
to help children 5 and younger need state funding the
most. Universal preschool,
in particular, has been debated for more than a decade. California voters rejected a ballot measure to
fund a full prekindergarten
system in 2006.
“It’s clear there’s a new
movement afoot trying to
engage on investment for
universal preschool,” Mitchell said. “How we invest, and
how we prioritize that investment, is going to be a
great conversation for the
coming months.”
Brazilian arms maker benefited from Bolsonaro’s
plans to loosen gun controls.
Similar surges in stock
prices occurred during last
year’s presidential campaign.
One of the orders issued
late Tuesday, hours after
Bolsonaro’s inauguration,
probably will make it all but
impossible for new lands to
be identified and demarcated for indigenous communities. Quilombos, remote areas inhabited by descendants of former slaves,
are also affected by the decision.
Another order removed
the concerns of the LGBTQ
community from consideration by the new human
rights ministry.
BODY
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In doing so, Bolsonaro
did not name any agency to
consider LGBTQ issues.
He has strongly criticized
what he calls “gender-based
ideology,” saying it is a
threat to Brazil’s Christian
values.
In a move favorable to the
new president’s allies in agribusiness, who have criticized giving large swaths of
land to the indigenous, Bolsonaro transferred the responsibilities for delineating
indigenous territories from
the Justice Ministry to the
Agriculture Ministry.
The new agriculture minister, Tereza Cristina, is part
of the agribusiness caucus in
Brazil’s lower house and has
opposed requests from native communities.
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john.myers@latimes.com
Brazil’s new leader swiftly
targets minority groups
associated press
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A6
T HU R S DAY , JA N UA RY 3, 2019
LAT IMES. C OM
THE NATION
Trump, legislators unyielding on wall
The president and
congressional leaders
meet for the first time
since the government
shutdown began.
By Sarah D. Wire
WASHINGTON — The
shuttered parts of the federal government were no
closer to being reopened
Wednesday after President
Trump and congressional
leaders met for the first time
since the shutdown began
nearly two weeks ago.
“I don’t think any particular progress was made
today, but we talked,” Senate Majority Leader Mitch
McConnell (R-Ky.) told reporters. “We’re hopeful that
somehow in the coming days
and weeks we’ll be able to
reach an agreement.”
The White House described Wednesday’s meeting, held in the Situation
Room, as a border security
briefing.
Trump has rejected
Democrats’ efforts to separate the border security
funding fight from unrelated
government agencies that
have also been closed.
Trump
told
reporters
Wednesday that the shutdown would last “as long as
it takes.”
“I mean, look, I’m prepared. I think the people of
the country think I’m right,”
Trump told reporters at a
Cabinet meeting.
This is already the
fourth-longest government
shutdown
since
the
mid-1970s, and the third of
Trump’s presidency.
Democrats have scheduled votes on two bills to reopen the closed parts of government when they take
control of the House on
Thursday. Republican leaders say the Senate will not
Mark Wilson Getty Images
CHRISTAIN Saint-Surin, 7, of Miami tries to see inside the National Museum of African American History
and Culture in Washington. The museum was closed because of the partial shutdown of the U.S. government.
consider
either
unless
Trump endorses them.
One bill would fund all
the closed agencies except
for the Department of
Homeland Security through
September when the fiscal
year ends. (Senate appropriators previously approved spending levels for
these agencies.)
The other bill would fund
Homeland Security through
Feb. 8, allowing the department to use $1.3 billion provided by Congress last year
for border security. But it
would not permit the money
to be used for a wall. This is
identical to legislation the
Senate unanimously ap-
proved in December in an attempt to avoid the shutdown.
“We have given the Republicans a chance to take
‘yes’ for an answer,” Pelosi
said after the White House
meeting. “We are asking the
president to open up government. We are giving him
a Republican path to do
that. Why would he not do
it?”
McConnell
reiterated
Wednesday that he would
not bring a bill to reopen the
government up for a vote unless the president backed it.
“The Senate will be glad
to vote on a measure that
the House passes and ... the
president will sign, but we’re
not going to vote on anything else,” McConnell said.
White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee
Sanders on Tuesday called
Democrats’ plan a “nonstarter” because it didn’t include the $5 billion Trump
wants for a wall at the southern border, a down payment
on the wall he says is necessary for national security.
Trump previously promised
Mexico would pay for the
wall.
Senate Minority Leader
Charles E. Schumer (DN.Y.) said after the meeting
that he had asked Trump
why Republicans couldn’t
back the bill to reopen the
unrelated government agencies, such as Interior and
State, and debate border security with the government
fully functioning.
“He could not give a good
answer,” Schumer said.
“They couldn’t give us one
answer why they wouldn’t
support the first bill … that
will open up the government.”
Incoming House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy
(R-Bakersfield) said it was
“disappointing” that Democratic leaders wanted to talk
about their bills rather than
hearing the briefing from
Homeland Security Secre-
tary Kirstjen Nielsen. He
said that Trump invited the
leaders to come back to the
White House on Friday.
In the Cabinet meeting,
Trump also indicated that
he might be willing to accept
“a little bit less” than $5 billion, though he did not provide an amount. He closed
the door on the compromise
plan of $2.5 billion for border
security that Vice President
Mike Pence had proposed to
Schumer the day the shutdown began. Schumer has
already said Senate Democrats would not back that
amount.
The effects of the shutdown have become more noticeable as the holidays have
passed and federal agencies
have drained their reserves.
National parks have
closed campsites that are
overflowing with feces and
trash as visitors stream into
protected sites despite the
park closures. Some new
home loans and small-business loans have been slowed;
new farm loans are on hold.
The Internal Revenue Service is short-staffed, delaying
tax refunds. In Washington,
new marriage licenses aren’t
being issued because the office wasn’t considered essential.
More than 800,000 federal employees aren’t getting paid during the shutdown, though more than
half of them are deemed essential to public safety and
are still at work while the
rest are furloughed. Federal
employees will probably receive back pay once the government reopens, but thousands of people paid
through government contracts, such as the cleaning
crews that maintain the departments, aren’t likely to
recover the money they aren’t paid during the shutdown.
sarah.wire@latimes.com
Twitter: @sarahdwire
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A7
A8
THU R S DAY , JA N UA RY 3, 2019
LAT IMES. C OM
President fires back at Mitt Romney
[Romney, from A1]
nessee retired. The incoming class of GOP senators,
including Kevin Cramer of
North Dakota and Marsha
Blackburn of Tennessee,
were elected with big help
from Trump’s endorsement
and appearances at rambunctious campaign rallies.
In the House, Democrats’ sweep of the nation’s
suburban districts took its
heaviest toll on the Republicans’ already diminished
centrist ranks: Democrats
flipped all but 3 of the 25
House Republican districts
that Hillary Clinton won in
2016.
The result is a congressional GOP that is smaller
but more closely tied than
ever to Trump. Polling
shows his support among
GOP voters remains solid. A
December 2018 Wall Street
Journal/NBC News poll
found that 85% of Republicans approved of Trump —
about the same share as in
February 2017, right after he
was inaugurated.
“There’s really no data
out there to indicate that the
president’s stranglehold on
Republicans has softened
much,” said GOP pollster
Neil Newhouse. “His base of
support among GOPers remains strong.”
Romney’s article, however, signaled that even within
his own party, the president
is still vulnerable to pushback despite the departure
of many of his leading Republican critics.
Blunt attacks of the sort
Romney made are rare, but
establishment Republicans
have been more open about
their disagreements with
Trump since his decision
last month to withdraw U.S.
troops from Syria. They
have been more candid
about their anxieties over
the departures of former Defense Secretary James N.
Mattis and former White
House Chief of Staff John F.
Kelly, both of whom many
Republican elected officials
saw as steadying forces in an
all-drama presidency.
Even some close Romney
allies were shocked by the
words of the usually cautious Republican, who had
dialed back his past criti-
years. Collins’ home state
went for Hillary Clinton by 3
percentage points in 2016.
She voted for Trump’s tax
cut and the Supreme Court
nomination of Brett M. Kavanaugh but against legislation to repeal the Affordable
Care Act.
Also up for reelection in
2020 are GOP Sens. Cory
Gardner of Colorado, a state
Trump lost by almost 5
points in 2016; and Martha
McSally of Arizona. She lost
her bid in November to succeed Flake but was appointed by the state’s governor to fill a vacant seat and
will have to run again in
2020.
Trump allies’ blunt response to Romney was a
warning shot to would-be
dissenters. Trump berated
Romney on Twitter and, later, in comments to reporters.
“I wish Mitt could be
more of a team player,” he
said to reporters. “I endorsed him and he thanked
me profusely.”
Republican
National
Committee
Chairwoman
Ronna McDaniel — a niece
of the senator-elect who
stopped using her maiden
name, Romney, during the
2016 presidential campaign
— responded on Twitter:
“For an incoming Republican freshman senator to attack [Trump] as their first
act feeds into what the
Democrats want and is disappointing and unproductive.”
Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.),
an erstwhile Trump critic
turned golfing buddy and
ally, held a news conference
call to denounce Romney as
a grandstander whose attacks on the president hurt
all Republicans.
“It’s a minority opinion,”
said Paul, who has been at
odds with his own party and
Trump on many occasions.
“I don’t think it serves any
useful purpose for Republican senators to be out there
attacking the character of
the president.”
Bill Clark CQ Roll Call
“MITT ROMNEY is positioning himself as the voice of the establishment wing,” says one GOP observer.
A former advisor says Romney is just “laying down a marker for what he intends to do in the Senate.”
cism of Trump as he campaigned to succeed retiring
Sen. Orrin G. Hatch in 2018.
He won with Trump’s endorsement but, after this
public attack, seems unlikely to return the favor in a
Trump 2020 reelection campaign.
On Wednesday, Romney
denied speculation that he
was positioning himself to
challenge Trump in 2020,
but left open the possibility
that he would endorse another GOP challenger.
“I haven’t said who I’m
endorsing in 2020; I’m going
to wait and see,” he said in a
CNN interview. “I’m not running again. We’ll see if someone else does in a Republican primary.”
The op-ed landed with a
bang in the capital on the eve
of a new Congress being
sworn in, including a Democratic majority in the House
that will pose a dramatic
new test of Trump’s ability
to cope with a legislature
spring-loaded to confront
rather than cooperate.
“Mitt Romney is positioning himself as the voice
of the establishment wing of
the Republican Party,” said
Ken Spain, former spokesman for the National Republican Congressional Committee. “The blue-collar,
populist wing of the party is
on the ascent under Trump,
but Romney can still play a
significant role within the
GOP even though the constituency he embodies is
shrinking.”
In his op-ed, Romney described the administration
tumult of December — with
the departures of Mattis and
Kelly — as a “deep descent”
and part of why he concluded that “the president
has not risen to the mantle of
the office.”
“With the nation so divided, resentful and angry,
presidential leadership in
qualities of character is indispensable,”
Romney
wrote. “And it is in this province where the incumbent’s
shortfall has been most glaring.”
Lanhee J. Chen, a Romney advisor in his 2012 presidential campaign, said
Romney was simply “laying
down a marker for what he
intends to do in the Senate
and what kind of senator he
will be.”
A big question is whether
Romney’s defiant words will
translate into leadership in
opposition to administration policies. Flake and Corker, especially after announcing their retirement,
made similar arguments
about Trump’s failure to
lead with a steady and unifying hand, although they
continued to vote with
Trump on major issues.
During the 2016 campaign, Sen. Susan Collins
(R-Maine) published an oped of her own lambasting
then-candidate Trump, for
whom she did not vote.
Collins — one of a cadre of
potentially vulnerable Republicans up for reelection
in 2020 — will be an especially telling measure of
Trump’s sway within the
GOP over the next two
janet.hook@latimes.com
Twitter: @hookjan
Times staff writer Noah
Bierman in Washington
contributed to this report.
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L AT I ME S . CO M
T HURSDAY , JANUARY 3, 2019
A9
Freshmen House Democrats make waves
[Freshmen, from A1]
man class…. They’re demanding a lot of opportunities that have historically
not been made available to
freshmen,” said Rep. Jackie
Speier
(D-Hillsborough),
who said she has waited 10
years to get on the House
Energy and Commerce
Committee, one of the prime
committees. “They’re going
to shake this place up, and
that’s kind of a good thing.”
Other veteran lawmakers were less charitable,
viewing the newcomers’ demands as audacious. “I don’t
know if I want to say ‘Sit
down and shut up’ ” in the
newspaper, said one Democrat.
Friction between the
freshman class and the veterans will be one of several
challenges facing Pelosi,
who is expected to be elected
as House speaker in a vote
Thursday. She’ll also have to
bridge the gap between progressives who want to take a
strong stand against President Trump and those
Democrats who won in moderate districts where Trump
is more popular.
The influx of brash,
young House members will
be particularly precarious
for a Democratic leadership
team in which the top three
members are all over 78. The
new members will be seeking to make waves in a
Democratic caucus that has
not seen leadership turnover
in more than 15 years.
Rep.-elect
Alexandria
Ocasio-Cortez, 29, of New
York, the youngest woman
ever elected to Congress and
perhaps the highest profile
freshman, has asked for a
slot on the Ways and Means
Committee, which oversees
tax policy. Democracy for
America, a progressive advocacy organization, circulated a petition demanding
Pelosi put her on the committee and included a fundraising link — a point that
galled veteran House Democrats.
“That’s not how things
work,” said another Democrat who didn’t want to be
named criticizing a colleague.
On Wednesday, OcasioCortez asserted her independence again by announc-
Zach Gibson Getty Images
REP. JACKIE SPEIER (D-Hillsborough), seen in November, says that this time around, “We’ve got a really
assertive, take-charge freshman class.... They’re going to shake this place up, and that’s kind of a good thing.”
‘Freshmen
generally don’t
go to the Ways
and Means
Committee.’
— Richard E. Neal,
Massachusetts Democrat and
incoming chairman of the
committee
Susan Walsh Associated Press
REP.-ELECT Donna Shalala (D-Fla.), 77, has a chance at taking a prime seat on
the Energy and Commerce Committee that oversees healthcare policy.
ing she would not vote on a
rules package endorsed by
Democratic leadership because it would require that
any new spending programs
be offset by taxes or other
revenue, rather than adding
to the deficit.
The Congressional Progressive Caucus has also advocated for freshmen to get
on
committees.
Rep.
Pramila Jayapal (D-Wash.)
and her co-chair, Rep. Mark
Pocan (D-Wis.), “made it
very clear that we thought
some of these seats should
be for new members because
new members bring in incredible talent,” she said.
Even so, Ocasio-Cortez is
not expected to get a position on Ways and Means, according
to
Democratic
sources, and neither are
many other freshmen.
Incoming
Chairman
Richard E. Neal (D-Mass.)
declined to weigh in on who
will fill open positions on his
committee, but said he’s
hearing from “everybody.”
“It took me four years to
get on the committee,” he
added. “Freshmen generally
don’t go to the Ways and
Means Committee.”
Some new lawmakers
could get prime positions.
Rep.-elect Donna Shalala
(D-Fla.), 77, who served as a
secretary of Health and Human Services and is one of
the oldest freshman lawmakers in history, has a shot
at a seat on the Energy and
Commerce Committee that
oversees healthcare policy.
Orange County Rep.-elect
Katie Porter, who has significant experience investigating consumer bankruptcy, could get on the Financial Services Committee.
Fellow California Rep.elect Katie Hill, who is one of
the freshman class’ two representatives to House leadership and serves on the
group that will make committee assignments, acknowledged the struggle between putting freshmen in
key roles and respecting the
more experienced lawmakers who want the same slots.
“You’re talking about
people who have dedicated
years and sometimes decades to hard work in the
hopes or the goal of getting
on these exclusive committees,” she said. Now there are
freshmen who are “sort of
wanting to jump the line. It’s
tough. I understand.”
The new lawmakers have
also shown that they’re willing to air their grievances
loudly and directly to the
public. Unhappy with climate policy, Ocasio-Cortez
protested in Pelosi’s office
on her first day in Washington for freshman orientation.
And when lobbyists presented to an orientation program for new members at
the
Harvard
Kennedy
School, Rep. Rashida Tlaib
(D-Mich.) went to Twitter to
chastise them for what she
viewed as their cynical, outdated approach.
A lot of politicians come
to Washington promising to
change the way the system
works and end up becoming
part of it. It’s unclear
whether members of this
freshman class will be able to
deliver on their pledges.
“There is a narrative of
‘Washington fighting’ because it’s interesting and it’s
drama,” Hill said. “There is a
change that is happening
that is hopefully not going to
be as entertaining because
it’s going to be about trying
to make Washington functional.”
jennifer.haberkorn
@latimes.com
Twitter: @jenhab
Hunt underway
for a child killer
Gunman opens fire
on a Houston family
driving in a car, killing
a 7-year-old girl.
associated press
HOUSTON — Investigators in Houston are searching for a man in a pickup
who pulled up next to a family’s car and started shooting, killing a 7-year-old girl
and wounding the girl’s
mother.
A $35,000 reward has
been offered for any tip leading to an arrest in the fatal
shooting of Jazmine Barnes.
A red four-door pickup
was captured on surveillance video shortly before
the shooting Sunday morning in the eastern outskirts
of Houston.
Jazmine,
a
secondgrader, died at the scene and
her
mother,
LaPorsha
Washington, was shot in the
arm. One of Jazmine’s three
sisters, who were also in the
car, was hurt by shattered
glass.
Sheriff Ed Gonzalez has
declined to speculate on
what prompted the shooting, describing it as “totally
unprovoked.”
The Harris County Sheriff ’s Office has asked people
who live nearby to review
their surveillance videos.
Lee Merritt, a national
civil rights attorney with an
office in Dallas, and Shaun
King, a New York-based activist and writer, have of-
fered a $35,000 reward for a
tip that would lead to an arrest.
Merritt said Wednesday
that he understood his and
King’s high profiles as activists meant they would reach
a lot of people with their appeal. Merritt said they would
pass on any leads to the
Sheriff ’s Office.
A distraught Washington
told KTRK-TV from her hospital bed that the gunman
sped up after firing into her
car, only to pull in front and
slow down before firing
again.
“He intentionally killed
my child for no reason,” she
said. “He didn’t even know
her; he didn’t know who she
was.”
Gonzalez said the shooting occurred on a service
road as the family was heading to a store.
The gunman was described as a white, bearded
man in his 40s wearing a red
hoodie.
Jazmine’s father, Christopher Cevilla, who appeared with Gonzalez at a
Monday
news
briefing,
pleaded with the public to
provide relevant tips to authorities so that an arrest
could be made.
“My daughter was 7 years
old, loving, caring, very passionate with people, very
sweet, just an innocent
young girl,” Cevilla said.
“Very smart in school.
There’s just a lot of things
that’s being robbed of me
and my family at this moment that we will never be
able to get back.”
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CHRISTOPHER CEVILLA appeals to the public for
help in finding the man who killed his daughter.
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THU R S DAY , JA N UA RY 3, 2019
LAT IMES. C OM/ OPINION
OPINION
EDITORIALS
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
LETTERS
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The looming primary battle
Should the Democrats mute
their differences to beat Trump
in 2020? Or fight them out?
S
en. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts announced on Monday
that she would form an exploratory
committee, the likely prelude to a
formal declaration that she will seek
her party’s 2020 presidential nomination.
She is one of many potential Democratic
candidates: young and old, male and female,
white and black, political veterans and relative newcomers, centrists and progressives.
By now it seems quaint as well as futile to
complain about the early onslaught of presidential campaigns. But the prospect of a
large and dizzyingly diverse Democratic
field raises another question: Would a competitive primary campaign undermine the
effort to unseat President Trump, assuming
that he will be the Republican nominee? It’s
widely believed, though hard to prove, that
the nasty 2016 primary battle — and lingering resentment by supporters of Sen. Bernie
Sanders — cost Hillary Clinton crucial support in the general election.
Ideological and generational fault lines
are already evident among Democrats, with
centrists and progressives drawing very
different lessons from the “blue wave” in the
midterm elections. Outgoing Rep. Beto
O’Rourke hasn’t yet announced his candidacy but is already being criticized for not
being progressive enough. The likely presence of several women in the race — including, perhaps, California Sen. Kamala Harris
— almost guarantees disappointment if the
party ends up nominating a male candidate.
But this presidential election will be different from the last one in two important
ways. First, Democratic candidates and voters now understand that Trump is a highly
formidable candidate with a deeply committed core of supporters. Second, it will be
harder for supporters of losing candidates
to claim, as Sanders’ backers did, that the
nomination process was “rigged.” The party
has dramatically reduced the influence of
“superdelegates“ — party notables not chosen in primaries or caucuses.
Some might argue that Trump’s manifest unfitness for office is a reason for the
Democrats to mute their differences with
one another and settle quickly on a consensus nominee. But even if party rules allowed
for such a top-down decision (and they
don’t), it would be a disservice to the party’s
voters and to the democratic process.
Of course the Democrats need to keep
their eyes on the ultimate prize: the defeat of
the current president. But the all-too-real
possibility of a Trump reelection will likely
concentrate Democrats’ minds on the importance of unity in the general election.
That argues for a spirited nomination contest in which differences among the candidates — on economics, foreign policy and
heathcare reform — are fully ventilated.
Then, when a nominee has been selected,
the focus can shift to unseating Trump.
2018, the year of the women
W
hen the 116th Congress
convenes Thursday, it will
include more women than
ever before: 25 in the Senate and 102 in the House.
The freshwomen in the House of Representatives will also be more ethnically diverse than in the past, including two Native
American and two Muslim women — up
from zero. And for the first time, six states
will be represented in the Senate by two
women: California, Washington, Nevada,
New Hampshire, Minnesota and Arizona.
If 1992 was dubbed the Year of the Woman in American politics — and it was, for
those who can’t remember that far back —
then perhaps 2018 could be called the Year of
the Women. Because an unprecedented
number of women ran for — and won — political offices across the nation.
There are likely many reasons for the
surge. Some women had been preparing to
run for a while; others may have been motivated by the election of Donald Trump after
he talked in a leaked recording about groping women, political scientists say. The political action committee Emily’s List reported that it received more than 34,000
inquiries from women interested in running
for office in the year after Trump won.
The number of women serving in state
legislatures increased too. Collectively,
28.5% of the seats in statehouses are now
held by women, up from 25.4%, according to
the Center for American Women and
Politics. Nevadans elected so many women
on Nov. 6 that their Legislature will have the
nation’s first-ever female majority.
We’re nowhere close to parity. Women
compose more than half of the U.S. population but hold only a quarter of the seats in
the Senate and slightly less in the House.
Still, the increase is worth celebrating.
Why should anyone care? Well, for one
thing, it stands to reason that a representative democracy will be most effective when it
actually represents all its people, not just a
lucky elite. Furthermore, studies show that
women govern differently from men — not
necessarily better, just differently. They are
often more collaborative than their male
counterparts and more likely to seek to
build consensus and are more likely to focus
on “women’s” issues, such as healthcare,
child care and education. A move in those
directions would be welcome.
It’s too bad that the record was lopsided,
with gains by women made primarily on the
Democratic side. In fact, the number of Republican women in the House will drop by 10
in the new Congress.
Still, early signs indicate that women will
continue to seek higher office in the years
ahead — and perhaps even finally break
through the ultimate political glass ceiling
into the White House.
Saving the whales, 33 years on
G
one are the days when the
great whales were hunted
across the globe. A worldwide
moratorium on commercial
whaling that went into effect 33
years ago has mostly put an end to the practice, reviving the numbers and prospects of
the majestic sea creatures — although some
whale species are still considered threatened or endangered.
But among the more than 80 nations
that belong to the International Whaling
Commission and have signed on to its ban
on commercial whaling, Japan has always
been a renegade member. Its whalers continue to hunt and kill hundreds of whales
each year under an exemption for “scientific
research,” which conservationists consider
a ridiculous sham. Then they sell the meat.
Early last year Japan killed 333 minke
whales —122 of them pregnant. (Whales are
slow to mature and reproduce in small numbers, so the demise of a pregnant whale is a
double blow to the population.)
Then, last week, Japan went a big step
farther, announcing that it would leave the
International Whaling Commission altogether and resume commercial whaling
starting next July. Japan said it would stop
the so-called research whaling in the Antarctic (which is good news for whales there).
But the start-up of commercial whaling in
its coastal waters in the North Pacific is an
outrageous flouting of a long-established
and still necessary global effort to preserve
whale species and help them thrive.
The International Whaling Commission’s moratorium extends to coastal waters. Japan says it no longer wants to participate. But that decision makes Japan, essentially, a rogue whaling nation in the view
of animal welfare organizations.
Whalers are likely to find mostly minke
whales in Japanese coastal waters, and although their populations are healthy off
Antarctica, they are more threatened off the
coast of Japan. Conservationists and the International Whaling Commission consider
all these large whale species to be living
under unstable conditions. Even if they are
not in immediate danger, they’re facing new
environmental challenges. Whales are
threatened not just by hunters, but also by
climate change, pollution and toxic runoff
and ships that strike them.
Japan should reassess its decision, stay
in the commission and give up whaling.
There is no reason for to continue a practice
that is cruel — the whales, often, don’t die
instantly — and depletes the stock. The
days are past when Japan needed whale
meat to feed its own people. Eating whale
meat in Japan is a dying custom. It’s past
time for the Japanese to join the overwhelming majority of the world and put the practice of whale hunting to rest, once and for all.
EXECUTIVE CHAIRMAN Dr. Patrick Soon-Shiong
EXECUTIVE EDITOR Norman Pearlstine
MANAGING EDITOR
Scott Kraft
SENIOR DEPUTY MANAGING EDITOR
Zach Gibson Getty Images
THE U.S. CAPITOL is seen on New Year’s Day
during the partial government shutdown.
Ignoring Trump
Re “Meeting set on border security,” Jan. 2
Why is the government shutdown portrayed as a
battle between congressional Democrats and the
president? Even Republicans concede that President
Trump’s demand for $5 billion in border wall funding
cannot pass out of Congress.
Instead, Congress should pass a government funding
bill and override any presidential veto. Both parties need
to get serious about creating a comprehensive border
security and immigration policy and not pretend that
Trump’s tantrums are any substitute for leadership.
Focus not on the president, but on Republicans who
know better but are too afraid to stand up to Trump.
Bill Carlson
Pacific Palisades
The president is negotiating as if he were of regal
heritage from a bygone era.
When he proposed a secure, physical barrier
between the U.S. and Mexico, and to have a foreign
government pay for it, his
supporters accepted his
nonsense.
In the words of Rep.
Henry Cuellar (D-Texas), a
wall is a “14th-century
solution to a 21st-century
problem.” The president
argues that walls work, but
he offers no evidence. He
says it will keep out drugs
and terrorists, also with no
evidence. Since Mexico
bluntly refused to pay for
the wall, he is asking taxpayers to fund it.
He now wants the leaders of Congress to negotiate with him, but there will
not be any such negotiation. That’s because
Trump will rely on his
lifetime business experience, which doesn’t include
any real negotiation.
James Severtson
Reseda
::
The question of
whether we should build a
wall on our southern border is a no-brainer. I can’t
imagine why anyone would
oppose it.
Many Democrats want
U.S. Immigration and
Customs Enforcement
abolished, oppose the
deportation of immigrants
in the U.S. illegally, welcome the establishment of
so-called sanctuary cities,
support a pathway to
citizenship for “Dreamers”
and oppose construction of
a wall. Why can’t they just
admit that they want open
borders?
We already have millions of undocumented
immigrants in this country.
Building a wall should not
have even been the subject
of a debate, let alone one
that shuts down parts of
the federal government.
Ed Trillo
South Gate
::
Trump is merely the
temporary president of the
United States, but he acts
as if his word is the law.
The division of power
between the legislative and
executive branches of
government require both
sides to modify their positions and enact appropriate legislation. The president cannot use his demand of $5 billion for a wall
to partially shut down the
government.
Trump must compromise, and the Democrats
are willing to compromise.
Jason G. Brent
Las Vegas
Doctors don’t
want to be sued
Re “ ‘Just to be safe’ is no
reason to get a medical
test,” Opinion, Dec. 30
Kimi Yoshino
DEPUTY MANAGING EDITORS
Sewell Chan, Colin Crawford, Julia Turner
ASSISTANT MANAGING EDITORS
FOUNDED DECEMBER 4, 1881
Len De Groot, Shelby Grad, Loree Matsui,
Angel Rodriguez, Michael Whitley
Opinion
Nicholas Goldberg EDITOR OF THE EDITORIAL PAGES
Sue Horton OP-ED AND SUNDAY OPINION EDITOR
Dr. Eric Snoey is only
partially correct about
putting seemingly healthy
patients through unnecessary medical tests. When
doctors say they’re ordering a test “just to be safe,”
they’re often trying to
avoid a litigious outcome.
Medicine once relied on
the well-trained physician’s clinical judgment
and the probability it
would be right in the overwhelming majority of
cases. In today’s world, any
unexpected outcome is
grounds for a lawsuit, since
every possible outcome
was not accounted for by
ordering an additional
easy-to-obtain test.
Technology also enters
into this question. The
more advanced technology
is pushed by its inventors,
the more tests there will be
to find small “possible”
problems that lead to more
testing to rule those problems out.
Dr. Snoey is correct that
this has made healthcare
much more expensive, but
it is sadly the cost of doing
business to the public’s
expectation.
Robert
Goldstone, MD
Corona del Mar
::
“Just to be safe” is no
reason to get a medical test
— until it is.
For four years, I was
offered a breast ultrasound
because I have “dense
breast tissue.” Each year I
turned it down because my
mammograms were perfect, no one in my family
had breast cancer, and I
thought it was just a way
for the imaging center to
make money.
This year, after discussing it with my gynecologist, I thought, what the
heck, I’ll get the ultrasound
— what do I have to lose?
Well, as it turned out, I had
everything to save — my
life. The ultrasound found
cancer that the mammogram did not.
So, two surgeries later
and on my way to radiation, I say, if you’re offered
a test, take it. It’s always
better to be safe. You might
have everything to gain.
J. Gordon
Santa Monica
::
Reading Dr. Snoey’s
op-ed article made me
wonder if I missed something — was there no mention of over-medicating
doing more harm than
good, with the danger of
negative side effects? It
happened to me (I am a
90-year-old independent
woman), and I could very
much relate to Dr. Snoey’s
wise words.
Perhaps now we will be
more willing to speak up
when we are concerned
about what we are putting
into our bodies.
Joan Lewis
Dana Point
China versus
overpopulation
Re “One-child policy leaves
enduring pain in China,”
Opinion, Dec. 30
This article ignored
some important facts.
During the time the
one-child policy was in
effect, China went through
an unprecedented econo-
mic transformation. It
would have been worthwhile to explore the question of whether this revolution could have been accomplished without controlling population growth.
Certainly there were
excesses during the implementation of the one-child
policy, but that does not
prove that the goal of stopping population growth is
counterproductive. In fact,
the end of population
growth is a necessity that
we all must confront.
The planet can support
only so many people. China
is now the world’s largest
emitter of carbon dioxide
and the largest consumer
of many of the world’s
resources. How much
worse would this be if
China had not consciously
limited its population
growth?
John La Grange
Solana Beach
::
Much of this article
focused on the personal
anguish of a woman (only
one of China’s 1.4 billion
people) who evidently did
not take the necessary
precautions after having
her first child.
Has the author not
considered what China
and the world would be like
without the one-child
policy? The world is already overpopulated,
critical resources are dwindling, and the rate of individual consumption of
energy and resources is
rising, especially in China.
They are building many
new coal-fired power
plants over there.
With this in mind, any
suggestion that we should
have more kids to prevent a
similar demographic impact in our country is absurd.
Mark Henry
San Luis Obispo
Money buys
a longer life
Re “We can save 500,000
lives,” Opinion, Dec. 27
Dr. Robert Pearl reports that for the third
consecutive year, U.S. life
expectancy fell despite the
fact that the United States
leads the world in spending
on healthcare. Looking at
the leading causes of
death, he expresses optimism that at least half of
these could be dramatically reduced with the
knowledge and technology
that physicians now possess.
The reality is that life
expectancy rates are not
falling for all Americans.
While poor and middleclass Americans are dying
earlier, the wealthiest
among us are enjoying
unprecedented longevity.
A 2016 study published
in the Journal of the American Medical Assn. found
that 40-year-old men who
were among the top 1% of
income earners could
expect to live 15 years longer than 40-year-old men in
the bottom 1%.
We need to see the
widening income gap as a
major threat to the health
of the nation.
Leonard
Schneiderman
Thousand Oaks
The writer is dean
emeritus of the UCLA
School of Social Welfare.
::
The third leading cause
of death in the U.S., after
heart disease and cancer, is
medical error. A Johns
Hopkins University study
reported that more than
250,000 people die every
year from mistakes or
outright ineptitude by
caregivers and hospitals.
Our system is broken.
The recent death of an
8-year-old Guatemalan
boy while under Homeland
Security’s “care,” his flu
misdiagnosed as a cold,
made the headlines. But
tens of thousands more die
each year with no such
attention.
Francis Moss
Joshua Tree
HOW TO WRITE TO US
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T HURSDAY , JANUARY 3, 2019
L AT I ME S . CO M/ OP I N IO N
A11
OP-ED
The president made the right call on Syria
By Aaron Miller
and Richard Sokolsky
M
uch of America’s
foreign policy establishment, on both
the right and the
left, has been in an
uproar over President Trump’s decision to withdraw 2,000 U.S.
troops from Syria. If Trump’s critics are to be believed, it amounts to
one of the worst foreign policy
blunders in American history, a catastrophe for the nation’s interests
and influence in the Middle East.
Although the president’s failure to
consult and coordinate with Congress and allies in making the decision was a head-spinning case of
diplomatic and political malpractice, on balance, critics’ fears about
the withdrawal are overblown.
Here are five reasons why.
The Islamic State “caliphate”
isn’t going to return.
Islamic State now controls 1% of
the territory it once held in Syria
and Iraq. It has lost thousands of
fighters and recruitment is down.
Syria is not Iraq in 2011, where Islamic State militants advanced
when there were no countervailing
forces. The group’s fighters still
confront thousands of determined
Kurdish forces, and Syria, Iran, Is-
rael, Turkey and Russia share a
common interest in preventing an
Islamic State resurgence. Jihadist
attacks in northeast Syria will continue and could certainly contribute to keeping Syria unstable. But
a continued U.S. military presence
won’t change that, or eliminate the
risk of a terrorist attack on the
United States. Wiping out Islamic
State was never realistic — the political, economic and sectarian
grievances that inspire its fighters
cannot be eliminated by military
means alone, and the Trump administration refuses to invest in
stabilization efforts that might address those issues.
Israel and the Kurds can survive
without U.S. troops in Syria.
It’s true that the foothold that
Iran and its Lebanese proxy,
Hezbollah, have established in
Syria threatens Israeli security.
But Israel can defend itself and is
doing so by attacking Iranian and
Hezbollah targets in Syria. “Our
enemies understand our intelligence and air superiority,” said the
Israel Defense Forces chief of staff
after Trump’s announcement.
As for the Kurds, U.S. officials
always made it clear that Washington viewed its partnership with
these fighters as transactional,
temporary and tactical. It simply
isn’t in U.S. interests to help carve
out the autonomous enclave the
Kurds seek in northeast Syria.
That fight could lead to a direct
military confrontation with Syrian
President Bashar Assad’s forces or
with NATO ally Turkey, which sees
the Syrian Kurds, allied as they are
with the militant Kurdistan Workers Party, or PKK, as a mortal enemy. The major actors, including
Turkey, have an interest in avoiding an all-out battle with the
Kurds, who, in the wake of Trump’s
decision, have begun to seek reconciliation with the Assad regime.
Vital U.S. interests won’t be
sacrificed when the troops
are withdrawn.
The United States doesn’t have
vital interests in Syria. This was
true under President Obama just
as it is under Trump. Yes, the Syrian war is a proxy conflict between
the U.S. and Iran and Russia, and
yes the war has had a horrific toll —
hundreds of thousands of civilians
killed, a massive refugee crisis, cities destroyed, terrorists sent
around the world — but neither the
White House, Congress nor the
American public, after protracted
wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. support a huge military and economic
investment in Syria.
Syria is not a major source of oil.
It isn’t an existential threat to Israel. The terrorist threat it poses to
the U.S. has been inflated and is
better handled by means other
than military action. The country
is broken, dysfunctional; neither
Russia nor Iran will be able to use
its influence there to establish hegemony in the Middle East.
As U.S. troops depart, Russia
and Iran aren’t left with a win.
Iran and Russia will dominate
Syria as they have done for years.
Both countries have always had a
greater strategic stake in Syria
than the U.S. and thus were more
willing to accept a high price to protect their interests there. Now both
will struggle with the difficulties of
pacifying and reconstructing a
war-torn state. With American
forces in place, Putin and the Iranians could leave some of the dirty
work of confronting the remnants
of Islamic State to Washington; no
longer. And with the U.S., a common adversary, gone, tensions between Iran and Russia could rise.
The more Syria becomes a burden
for Russia and Iran, the better for
the United States.
American credibility hasn’t
been destroyed.
Any damage to the U.S. stems
from our own reckless rhetoric and
confused policy in Syria — we never
committed to ousting Assad, pushing out Iran or helping the Syrian
Kurds realize their political goals.
Other U.S. allies and partners will
judge America’s support based on
how the U.S. responds to them individually, not on how Washington
has behaved in a country where it
has no vital interests.
Two U.S. presidents have failed
to come up with an effective policy
toward Syria and the Syrian civil
war. Withdrawing 2,000 U.S. forces
from a battlefield in which other
powers have the will and resources
to prevail may make Syria even
messier than it is now. But keeping
U.S. military forces in place with no
serious, long-term strategy or attainable objectives to guide them
would not make the situation significantly better. Syria was never
America’s to win or lose, and getting out now is not a catastrophe.
Aaron David Miller, a vice
president at the Woodrow Wilson
Center, has been a State
Department advisor in
Republican and Democratic
administrations. Richard
Sokolsky, a non-resident senior
fellow at the Carnegie Endowment
for International Peace, worked in
the secretary of State’s Office of
Policy Planning from 2005 -15.
2019 will be
the worst year
of Trump’s life
By Jon Wiener
S
George Rose Getty Images
CALIFORNIA’S COASTLINE is fully searchable with a new app by the Coastal Commission.
Where’s the beach?
There’s an app for that
By Conor Friedersdorf
C
alifornia’s best beach is a secret that
I’ve never told. It took me years of exploring the Golden State’s nearly 1,000 miles of
Pacific coastline before I first descended
to its tide line.
If I wrote about it, I might not have the place
mostly to myself. And yet, a part of me has wanted to
tell you. What better to do with a marvel than share
it.
The California Coastal Commission is less
guarded with its knowledge. Last month, it released
YourCoast, a smartphone app that maps almost every publicly accessible beach between Mexico and
Oregon. Another feature enables users to search for
spots with disabled access, tide pools, a bike path, an
area where dogs can run around, volleyball courts,
fishing and bluff-top trails, among other amenities.
The app will help a lot of people to enjoy more of
California’s coast. Still, when I first heard that the
coastline would formally enter the smartphone era, I
thought again about that very best beach: Was it better kept from, or shared with, the masses?
Those competing impulses are as old as this
state. Imagine the fortunes that the first men to
strike gold would have amassed had they kept quiet
just half a year longer! Instead, word traveled so far
and wide as to trigger a mass migration of wealthseekers.
Their descendants and the neighbors who joined
them would inhabit a state that kept getting more
and more crowded, decade after decade, until every
surf break, fishing spot and relatively affordable
neighborhood was worth keeping quiet.
The internet has added a new wrinkle, giving rise
to a generation that mapped paradise and flagged all
the Instagram spots. Even the most picturesque
vista loses something when one is surrounded by
people with selfie sticks, their backs to the view, trying to share everything except the moment.
“Tourists are destroying the places they love,” the
publication Spiegel recently declared, highlighting a
bookstore in Portugal so crowded with sightseers
that no one buys books there anymore.
“I found the best burger place in America,” food
critic Kevin Alexander wrote, “and then I killed it.”
The crowds had changed it irrevocably. I never wrote
about California’s best beach for fear of making it
among the worst.
Hence my trepidation when I first opened YourCoast. Imagine finding out that your favorite neighborhood restaurant is listed first in an upcoming edition of Lonely Planet Los Angeles. I braced for a blow
of that sort as I opened up the app, not knowing its
contents.
As it turns out, I needn’t have worried. What
YourCoast offers is information about more than
1,500 seaside spots. What it lacks is any judgment
about which beaches are best, like Trip Advisor, or
any function allowing users to rate California’s various beaches, as on Yelp. May it stay forever thus.
This is an app that will help anyone intent on visiting a particular beach, or embarking on a quest to
visit every publicly accessible beach in California, in
a state where some private landowners are still intent on thwarting visitors to particular stretches of
sand that front their private property. YourCoast
won’t change them, but might cause fewer people to
be fooled by their bluffs.
“It reinforces people’s sense that the coast belongs to them,” a spokesperson from the Surfrider
Foundation told the San Jose Mercury News. “A lot of
times you might not see the access ways or know if
something is public or private. The app arms people
with more information and confidence.”
But it isn’t an app that will send hordes of the
most malleable tourists to a given destination, impelled less by what they love than a “fear of missing
out” on what someone else loved, even though its notoriety has long since made it impossible to share the
original experience.
Ours is a hyper-connected era. On many future
occasions, Californians will struggle with how best to
share something wonderful about this state without
ruining its charm.
For now, YourCoast has hit the sweet spot, even if
one of its many listings is the beach I’d prefer the
masses never find.
Conor Friedersdorf is a contributing writer to
Opinion, a staff writer at the Atlantic and founding
editor of the Best of Journalism, a newsletter that
curates exceptional nonfiction.
ome presidents have
really bad years.
For Nixon, it was 1974 —
the Watergate year, which
ended with his resignation.
For Clinton, it was 1998 — the Monica year, which culminated with an
impeachment trial in the Senate in
1999. He won that vote easily and
came out more popular than before.
It’s a good guess that Donald
Trump’s really bad year will be 2019.
And it’s not yet clear whether he’ll
survive, like Clinton, or be forced
out of office, like Nixon.
Nixon’s worst year resulted
from crimes in his 1972 reelection
effort, when burglars working for
the campaign got caught breaking
into the Democratic headquarters,
and then Nixon and others conspired to stop the break-in investigation and cover up what had happened.
The events that brought Clinton to an impeachment trial in the
Senate had nothing to do with his
political campaigns. His misdeeds
were strictly personal: He had sex
with a White House intern, Monica
Lewinsky, and then denied it under
oath.
The storm clouds gathering
around Trump involve both the
personal and the political. More
than a dozen federal and state investigations are underway focused
on Trump and those who worked
on his election effort. He will also
soon be facing aggressive congressional investigations by the House
Democrats.
It’s easy to get lost in the details
of Russiagate and the guilty pleas
of Trump associates involved in a
range of crimes, but what is developing is not that complicated: It’s a
political corruption scandal with
the potential to be larger than anything we’ve seen before in American history.
The infamous Trump Tower
meeting, where Don Jr., Jared
Kushner and campaign chief Paul
Manafort met with a Russian operative offering help in the election,
could turn out to be far worse than
anything that happened in Watergate. And Trump’s sexual troubles
would be worse than Clinton’s, too,
if he is found to have violated campaign funding laws in trying to buy
the silence of women he slept with.
Still, there are many similarities
between Trump’s troubles and earlier presidential scandals — along
with some differences.
Both Nixon and Clinton faced
allegations of obstruction of justice. They were tripped up not so
much by the acts themselves, but
rather by attempts to cover them
up.
Obstruction is also a focus of
the investigations facing Trump.
For Trump, the possible obstruction involves his efforts to stop the
Russiagate investigation and his
firing of FBI Director James B.
Comey.
Trump is also facing potential
charges that neither Nixon nor
Clinton had to deal with. The biggest question is whether Russiagate was a quid pro quo in which
Russia offered to help Trump win
the election in exchange for Trump
easing Russia sanctions. We will
probably learn more this year
about what Russia did, exactly,
during the election,with “information influence” spread through social media and cyberattacks on the
Dems. But the big question will remain: What the Trump campaign
knew about those efforts, and who
exactly was in the loop.
Trump also faces campaign finance issues that neither Nixon
nor Clinton had to deal with. If, as
Trump’s former lawyer Michael
Cohen has said, Trump directed
that payments be made to two
women to keep them silent during
the election campaign, then the
payments could be construed as illegal campaign contributions.
Trump also faces allegations
that he violated the emoluments
provision of the U.S. Constitution,
which prohibits federal officeholders from receiving payments from
foreign or state governments while
in office. The attorneys general of
the District of Columbia and Maryland argue that Trump violated
the emoluments clause by receiving money from foreign governments while holding office,
through hotels owned by his family.
And if that weren’t enough,
Trump also faces investigations
into alleged illegalities at the
Trump Foundation and in the
fundraising and spending by his inauguration committee.
Nixon’s troubles hold another
possible caution for Trump in a
year when committees in the
House will almost certainly be subpoenaing the president’s tax returns. For Nixon, news that he had
violated tax laws by taking an illegal write-off did a lot to turn the
public against him. Nixon had
backdated the deed of gift of his papers to the National Archives in order to take his write-off in a more
advantageous year.
People who shrugged off Watergate on the grounds that “everybody does it” were outraged that
the president had claimed an illegal deduction of $576,000 — the
equivalent today of more than $3
million.
We don’t know whether
Trump’s tax returns contain dubious write-offs, but it seems likely
we’ll find that out this year — and
also, perhaps, whether the public is
more forgiving of him than of Nixon
for tax shenanigans.
Both Clinton and Nixon faced
impeachment proceedings. The
House Judiciary Committee voted
articles of impeachment in 1974
against Nixon, but the full House
never voted on them, and the Senate never held an impeachment trial. He resigned before that — and
was promptly pardoned by his successor, his former vice president,
Gerald Ford, for any crimes he may
have committed. Clinton was impeached by the House and went on
to face a Senate trial, which fell far
short of the required two-thirds
vote for conviction.
I’m betting that, in the end,
Trump resigns and gets an advance pardon for himself and his
children. That may not happen until 2020, but in the meantime, 2019
will be the worst year of his life.
Jon Wiener is a historian and a
contributing editor to the Nation.
He is the author of “How We
Forgot the Cold War: A Historical
Journey Across America.”
A12
THU R S DAY , JA N UA RY 3, 2019
WST
LAT IMES. C OM
Shutdown is hard on open spaces
[Parks, from A1]
up of trash and litter has had
a significant effect on the environment. There is also
concern that the increased
trash could attract wildlife,
including bears, to populated areas, increasing the
risk of dangerous encounters.
Problems with human feces and urine along Highway
41 in the south part of Yosemite have led to the closure of the Mariposa Grove
of Giant Sequoias, as well as
the Wawona and Hodgdon
Meadow campgrounds last
week. Two snow play areas
and all the park visitor centers remain closed.
Park officials said additional facilities or areas in
Yosemite National Park may
close at any time for health
and safety reasons.
Federal lands around the
country are suffering from a
lack of basic government
services as the shutdown
continues. Trash is piling up
around national monuments in Washington, forcing the city government to
pick it up instead. Tourists
are posting photos on social
media of trash overflowing
at national parks and recreation areas, including Lake
Mead in Nevada.
In Sequoia and Kings
Canyon National Parks,
about 250 miles north of Los
Angeles,
sections
were
closed this week because
furloughed employees have
been unable to maintain the
safety of roads and certain
walking paths in winter conditions.
Park officials said that as
of 6 p.m. Monday, they had
closed the Generals Highway at Hospital Rock. The
closure extends from Giant
Forest
and
Lodgepole
through to Lost Grove.
At Joshua Tree, visitor
centers, flush toilets, waterfilling stations and dump
stations are all closed. The
park had left the main gates
open and let cars stream in
for free, as there are no government employees to collect the typical $30 entrance
fee.
Rangers at Joshua Tree
and Yosemite remain on
duty and are enforcing clo-
Gina Ferazzi Los Angeles Times
AT JOSHUA TREE , Natalie Elsman of Iowa packs her car at Jumbo Rocks after getting word Tuesday that campgrounds were closing.
‘Once those pit
toilets are full
the volunteers
can’t really do
anything about it.
We have to get
the toilets
pumped before
they can take any
more stuff.’
— Sabra Purdy,
Joshua Tree businesswoman
sures. Individuals who violate closures are being cited,
Munoz said.
December is a favorite
time for climbers, hikers and
tourists to visit the desert
park. Rangers at Joshua
Tree counted 284,398 visitors in December 2017, most
in the second half of the
month.
And unlike the 2013 government shutdown, the park
has remained open — leaving locals to pick up the
slack.
The situation is being
aided by local volunteers
who have been emptying
dumpsters, replacing garbage bags in trash cans and
scrubbing bathrooms daily.
A group of eight volunteers organized by the city of
Twentynine Palms Tourism
Business Improvement District went out New Year’s
Day to clean up the detritus
left over from the year-end
revelry in the park the night
before. They hauled more
than 40 garbage bags worth
of trash in the beds of their
pickup trucks and Priuses,
said Breanne Dusastre, the
director of marketing and
tourism development for the
district.
“And a whole lot of champagne bottles,” she said.
Purdy has been leading a
group of 10 to 12 volunteers
into the park every morning
to clean bathrooms and haul
trash away in trucks and
trailers to a local dump.
But the grind is wearing
on volunteers and the
amount of trash generated
over the holidays has been
staggering, she said. She
found a discarded prom
dress in the park recently.
Another problem is that
without park staff around to
check on camping groups,
people have been doubling
or quadrupling the number
of people allowed at campsites.
She said she agreed with
park officials decision to
close down the campground
sites and leave the park open
only as a day use site.
“I think that it is the right
call,” she said. “Once those
pit toilets are full the volunteers can’t really do anything
about it. We have to get the
toilets pumped before they
can take any more stuff.”
Death Valley National
Park also has been feeling
the strain of overused outhouses and uncollected
trash, though the Furnace
Creek Visitor Center reopened after a nonprofit organization made a donation.
javier.panzar@latimes.com
Twitter: @jpanzar
Times staff writers Michael
Ottey in Joshua Tree and
Mary Forgione in Los
Angeles contributed to this
report.
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CALIFORNIA
B
T H U R S D A Y , J A N U A R Y 3 , 2 0 1 9 :: L A T I M E S . C O M / C A L I F O R N I A
9th Circuit
faults U.S. in
‘no-fly’ case
Feds knew woman was
listed by mistake yet
fought her for years,
court rules in ordering
millions in legal fees.
By Maura Dolan
Photographs by
Allen J. Schaben Los Angeles Times
L.A. POLICE DET. Jared Timmons discusses the burglary investigation at a news conference Wednesday.
A man was arrested in September in connection with a string of heists from high-end homes in 2017 and 2018.
Trove seized in celebrity
burglary probe unveiled
LAPD hopes other possible victims will spot stolen items
By James Queally
A man who is thought to
have posed as a prospective
home buyer or Realtor to
scout targets for future burglaries has been accused of
boosting millions of dollars
in expensive artwork, jewelry and liquor from highend residences, police said
Wednesday.
Benjamin Eitan Ackerman, 32, of Los Angeles was
arrested in September. Police think he spearheaded
the theft of more than 2,000
valuable items from at least
13 homes in the Hollywood
Hills, Encino, Tarzana and
PHOTOS of items believed to have been stolen can be
viewed online at hollywoodburglary.smugmug.com.
Sherman Oaks in 2017 and
2018, authorities said during
a news conference at police
headquarters in downtown
Los Angeles.
The items, valued in the
millions of dollars, were
found during a search of a
storage locker belonging to
Ackerman, the Los Angeles
Police Department said.
Some of the famous victims
included singers Usher,
Adam Lambert and Jason
Derulo, and a member of the
cast of “The Real Housewives of Beverly Hills,” said
LAPD Det. Jared Timmons,
the lead investigator in the
case.
[See Burglaries, B6]
SAN FRANCISCO — A
federal appeals court decided Wednesday that the
U.S. government must pay
millions of dollars to lawyers
for a Muslim woman who
was mistakenly classified as
a potential terrorist and
placed on a “no-fly” list.
The U.S. 9th Circuit
Court of Appeals, in an 8-3
ruling, found that federal
lawyers engaged in “scorched earth litigation” for nearly
a decade against the former
Stanford University graduate student, even though
they knew she posed no
threat.
“Once the government
discovers that its litigation
position is baseless, it may
not continue to defend it,”
Judge Kim McLane Wardlaw, a Clinton appointee,
wrote for the majority.
The case was brought by
Rahinah Ibrahim, who was
detained at San Francisco
International Airport in
2005 when she attempted to
leave the country for a Stanford conference.
Although she eventually
was allowed to depart, she
was denied reentry. She
challenged the government’s denial in a lawsuit.
“While Dr. Ibrahim stood
in limbo, unaware of her
status on any list and unable
to return to the United
States, even to attend the
trial of her own case, the government was well aware that
her placement on the no-fly
list was a mistake from the
get-go,” Wardlaw wrote.
Ibrahim ended up on the
Lack of diversity
trips up a city’s
Women’s March
Organizers in Eureka
call off their event,
saying the committee
in charge is too white.
By Alejandra
Reyes-Velarde
An event organized to
bring women together is
proving to be much more divisive than intended.
The annual women’s
march in Eureka has been
canceled after organizers
decided the planning committee was too white.
The move has prompted
newfound criticism of the
global gatherings that were
launched two years ago in
protest of the inauguration
of President Trump. Many
have said the marches are
not diverse enough and have
accused the organization of
being anti-Semitic and homophobic.
The Eureka group, which
is not an official Women’s
March chapter, said that instead of the planned Jan. 19
march, it will focus on organizing an event for March 9, in
conjunction with International Women’s Day. The
move will allow more time to
reach out to women of color
and those who identify as
gender nonconforming, organizers said in a Facebook
post last week.
“The local organizers are
continuing to meet and discuss how to broaden representation in the organizing
committee to create an
event that represents and
supports peoples who live
here” in Humboldt County,
an organizer said in the post.
“Up to this point, the participants have been overwhelmingly white, lacking representation from several perspectives in our community.”
The decision made by a
handful of women in the
small town of Eureka —
which Census data show is
71% non-Hispanic white —
drew mixed reactions, both
locally and across the country. Supporters were thrilled
the group was taking steps
[See March, B4]
Six Green Line stations
will close for two weeks
so a connection to the
Crenshaw Line can be
finalized. B3
Comedian-writer
Bob Einstein dies
Best known for his
portrayal of goofy
daredevil Super Dave
Osborne, he also won
two writing Emmys. B5
Lottery ......................... B2
School’s
reaction
to Nazi
symbol
faulted
Ojai parents worry
after receiving a letter
saying students posed
in shape of a swastika.
By Brittny Mejia
George Wilhelm Los Angeles Times
‘THE FIRST MOTIVATION ... WAS ALWAYS KIDS’
Roberta Weintraub, followed by a few students, in 2004 opens High Tech
High, an innovative charter school with a focus on science and technology.
RO B E RTA W E I N T R AU B , 19 35 - 2 019
School board member,
police ‘guardian angel’
By Doug Smith
Part of Green
Line to close
starting Friday
no-fly list in 2004 because an
FBI agent misread a form,
the court said.
Ibrahim’s case was the
first to test the no-fly list and
provided a legal road map
for others to challenge mistaken placements on government watchlists.
The government finally
admitted that Ibrahim had
been placed on the list by
mistake two days before trial
— and eight years after the
suit was filed.
During those years, the
government
“vigorously
contested” Ibrahim’s attempts to discover information about her placement on
the list and lodged more
than 200 objections during
depositions of witnesses, the
9th Circuit said.
Although the government knew as early as 2005 of
the mistake, its lawyers “essentially doubled-down over
the course of the litigation
with a no-holds-barred” defense, the court said.
After Ibrahim won her
case, a district judge
awarded her $419,987.36 in legal fees and $34,768.71 in expenses. She appealed, arguing that the amount was too
low, and Wednesday’s decision overturned that award.
The appeals court reversed a finding that the
government had not acted in
bad faith. A bad-faith finding allows for legal fees to be
recovered at market rates
instead of at $125 an hour.
[See List, B4]
R
oberta Weintraub emerged as
a polemic figure in the antischool-busing movement that
swept the San Fernando Valley
in the late 1970s.
Elected to the Los Angeles school
board as an activist, she became a coalition builder, being elected president four
times during her 14 years as a school
board member.
After an unsuccessful run for City
Council in 1995, Weintraub moved from
politics to what admirers call her most
important work, blending her passions
for education and law enforcement.
Weintraub, who founded the Police
Academy Magnet School Program, died
early Tuesday after a long fight with
glioblastoma, an aggressive brain cancer.
She was 83.
Former Los Angeles Police Chief
William J. Bratton called Weintraub “the
guardian angel of the Los Angeles law enforcement community.”
[See Weintraub, B5]
Shortly before Christmas
break, Ojai parents received
a troubling letter from junior
high administrators sharing
that nine students had apparently lain down on a field
together in the shape of a
swastika.
The letter, which a parent
shared with The Times, has
prompted concerns over the
response from Matilija Junior High School as well as the
safety of students.
In the Dec. 14 letter, administrators shared that 12
students were part of a
group chat that included
racist, sexually inappropriate and threatening commentary, including a comment about bringing knives
to school.
“It brings us great pain to
share with you reprehensible student actions that
have taken place over the
course of the last few weeks,”
the letter, from the principal
and vice principal, said.
School administrators
told parents they immediately partnered with police
“given the severity of the
threats.” The police found
no active threat toward students on campus, according
to the letter.
“It’s crazy that nine kids
could lay on a playground
with 400 kids and teachers
everywhere and no one see
it,” said one parent, who
asked not to be identified for
fear of retaliation.
The parent said there is a
[See Ojai, B4]
B2
T HU R S DAY , JA N UA RY 3, 2019
LAT IMES. C OM
SCIENCE FILE
A first, fuzzy look at primordial world
NASA probe transmits
shots of Ultima Thule,
a likely remnant of
solar system’s origins.
DEBORAH NETBURN
It’s rust-colored and
lumpy. It’s about as dark as
potting soil. And shaped like
a snowman.
Two days after NASA’s
New Horizons spacecraft
hurtled past a small, frozen
world 4.5 billion miles from
Earth, Ultima Thule is
finally coming into focus.
“What we are seeing is
the first contact binary ever
explored by a spacecraft,”
Alan Stern, the mission’s
principal investigator, said
Wednesday as he revealed
new images from the spacecraft. “These are two completely separate objects.”
Although the pictures
are a bit fuzzy, it is clear that
the Kuiper belt object consists of two circular lobes
held together by gravity and
a thin neck of material.
One of the lobes is about
three times the size of the
other one. The members of
the science team, who have
not had a lot of sleep over
the last several days, nicknamed the larger lobe “Ultima” and the smaller one
“Thule.”
“It’s pretty easy to remember,” said Stern, who is
based at the Southwest
Research Institute in Boulder, Colo.
The new images came
down to Earth on Tuesday
evening, so scientists have
not had much time to analyze them. But already, they
said, their first close-up
view of Ultima Thule confirms current theories about
how the planets of our solar
system first came into being.
Both parts of Ultima
Thule are spherical, and
researchers say they probably formed from small
particles in the original
solar disk of gas and dust
that came together in a
process known as accretion.
Once the two distinct
objects reached their present size, they slowly collided at a speed of less than
1 mile per hour, said Jeff
Moore, the geology and
geophysics lead for New
Horizons who is based at
NASA’s Ames Research
Center in the San Francisco
Joel Kowsky NASA
PROJECT SCIENTIST Hal Weaver speaks Tuesday about data from NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft’s flyby of Ultima Thule, a tiny,
frozen world 4.5 billion miles from Earth. The object’s two lobes probably formed from particles in the early solar system, scientists say.
Bay Area.
“They came together at
such a gentle speed that
they are really sort of resting
on each other,” Moore said.
Scientists have theorized
that all objects in the solar
system probably formed in a
similar way, but they never
had the opportunity to
study these primordial
structures until now.
Several comets that have
flown into the inner solar
system have had a bilobed
shape, but it was unclear
whether they were formed
that way or took that shape
as ices on their surface
sublimated away in the
warmth of the sun.
Ultima Thule, on the
other hand, has remained in
the Kuiper belt’s deep freeze
for billions of years, receiving 900 times less sunlight
‘These are the
only remaining
building blocks
of the planets,
scattered in the
backyard of the
solar system.’
— Jeff Moore,
geology and geophysics lead for
NASA’s New Horizons mission
than Earth.
“What we are looking at
is the first planetesimals,”
Moore said. “These are the
only remaining building
blocks of the planets, scattered in the backyard of the
solar system.”
The new images also
revealed significant color
variation on Ultima Thule’s
surface. The darkest
patches reflect just 6% of
the sun’s light, while the
brightest patches reflect up
to 13% of the light. At times,
these two extremes can be
seen right next to each
other.
Cathy Olkin, a New
Horizons science investigator from the Southwest
Research Institute, pointed
out that the most reflective
region of the object is a thin
band around its neck.
That’s probably because
fine-grained materials
rolled down the slopes of the
two lobes and settled in the
space in between, she said.
Small components tend to
be more reflective than
larger ones, she added.
Scientists have also
determined that Ultima
Thule is rotating at a rate of
about once every 15 hours,
give or take an hour, and
confirmed that its surface is
deep red. They are not yet
sure what the surface is
made of, however.
“As we are speaking, data
is streaming down that will
allow us to map the surface
composition,” Olkin said.
“That’s definitely what I’m
most excited about today.”
Stern said the images
unveiled Wednesday were
just a small taste of the vast
amounts of data that New
Horizons will transmit in
the coming weeks and
months.
This initial look at Ultima Thule was taken from a
distance of about 30,000
JUSTICE SYSTEM
Keeping mentally ill offenders out of jail
New diversion law is
off to slow start in San
Diego area, with two
of 19 requests granted.
GREG MORAN
SAN DIEGO — Just
after 3 a.m. April 7, Matthew
Gioia pressed the accelerator of his white Hyundai
Elantra, leading Carlsbad
police on a one-mile pursuit
that reached speeds of
80 mph before the car
crashed.
Gioia’s arrest would have
been an otherwise routine
skirmish between police and
a motorist if not for what
happened when he went to
court a month later. There,
he was among the first
defendants to test a controversial new state law that
allows people with certain
mental illnesses to go into a
pretrial diversion program,
receive treatment and ultimately erase the charges
against them.
Gioia was charged with
felony evading police, and
his lawyer, George Gedulin,
sought the treatment option. In court papers, the
attorney said Goia had an
extensive mental health
history, was a diagnosed
schizophrenic and was
receiving treatment at a
Carlsbad facility.
“I think this case was
exactly the kind of case the
law was written for,”
Gedulin said in an recent
interview.
Prosecutors opposed the
motion and argued that
Gioia should not be given
diversion, but San Diego
County Superior Court
Judge Harry Elias disagreed. Gioia is now in treatment and must report regularly back to the judge to see
whether he is complying
‘We always said this law is way too
broad. And this is an exact example of
that. This decision is one of the
consequences of the legislation.’
— Asst. Dist. Atty. David Greenberg,
on the law being applied retroactively
with his treatment.
The mental health diversion law, AB 1810, was
slipped inside a massive
budget trailer bill, stuffed
with other provisions, that
was passed by the Legislature and signed by Gov.
Jerry Brown on June 27. The
law is intended to steer
people with mental health
conditions into treatment
and away from jail. It gives
judges discretion to order
defendants into a pretrial
diversion program instead
of prosecution.
If the person’s mental
health treatment is ultimately deemed successful
— the diversion can last up
to two years — then all
charges will be dropped. If
at any time the judge determines the treatment isn’t
working, the criminal case
can start again.
The law was hailed as a
breakthrough by advocates
for the mentally ill and
criminal justice reformers
but drew fierce and ongoing
opposition from law enforcement and prosecutors.
Gioia’s is one of only two
cases in San Diego in which
diversion has been granted
— both by Elias. In 17 other
cases, petitions by defendants arrested for crimes
ranging from residential
burglary to vandalism have
been turned down, according to Assistant Dist. Atty.
David Greenberg.
In December, the state’s
4th District Court of Appeal
issued a ruling that added a
new wrinkle to the debate in
the case of Patrick Woldmskel, who was convicted of
multiple felony charges of
domestic violence, assault,
false imprisonment and
dissuading a witness. He
was sentenced to 29 years in
prison in September 2017.
The court upheld the
conviction but sent the case
back down for a resentencing, reasoning that Woldmskel should be given a
mental health diversion
hearing. Although the law
was passed after he was
convicted, the court said it
could be applied retroactively in this case.
Last week, the state
Supreme Court decided it
would also step into the
issue. The court accepted a
case decided in Orange
County in September that
said the law could be applied retroactively to cases
that were not yet final. That
means it would apply to
defendants such as Woldmskel — who was convicted
but is still appealing — and
potentially thousands of
others who were charged
before the law became effective and whose cases are
still in the pipeline.
Greenberg said Woldmskel had argued at his
sentencing hearing that he
had a mental illness, but
Superior Court Judge David
M. Gill apparently was not
persuaded to lessen his
punishment. Although it is
unclear what will happen at
a second hearing, the ap-
peals court noted that if Gill
decides Woldmskel is eligible for diversion and he
successfully completes a
program, the charges would
be dropped.
The ruling can’t be cited
as precedent in other cases
and applies now only to
Woldmskel. Yet the possibility that charges will be
dropped is the kind of scenario that fueled opposition
to the law.
In its initial form, the
diversion law said anyone
charged with a crime was
eligible. After a sustained
outcry from law enforcement, the Legislature
amended the law and said
certain crimes were not
eligible for pretrial diversion, including murder,
manslaughter, rape and
child sexual abuse.
“We may see more of
those,” Greenberg said,
referring to cases in which
the law is applied retroactively. That could open
many cases up for a diversion hearing.
“We always said this law
is way too broad,” he said.
“And this is an exact example of that. This decision is
one of the consequences of
the legislation.”
San Diego prosecutors
have opposed pretrial mental health diversion in every
case in which it has been
sought. A review of some of
those cases shows the district attorney’s office contends the law is unconstitutional on a variety of
grounds, including that it is
too vague and violates
victims’ rights.
In court papers in each
case, prosecutors call the
law “a dangerous change to
the manner in which criminals with mental health
diagnoses” are treated in
the criminal justice system.
And they also argue that
defendants may have a
qualifying mental disorder
but lack a specific plan for
treatment — which should
disqualify them from diversion.
For the most part, those
arguments seem to be winning.
For example, James
Haider was arrested in June
on a misdemeanor vandalism charge for hurling a rock
through the window of a
Massage Envy store in Mission Valley in September
2016.
Haider has a long history
of mental health problems,
court records said, and has
a diagnosis of schizophrenic
disorder. At the time of the
incident, he was living at a
board-and-care facility but
had stopped taking his
medications. He was agitated and hearing voices,
court records say.
Defense lawyers submitted a psychiatric report
detailing his mental illness,
but prosecutors countered
that he had not “credibly
demonstrated” that he
would respond well to treatment. After a hearing, a
judge denied diversion —
court records don’t spell out
why — and Haider ended up
pleading guilty. He was
sentenced to time already
served in jail and placed on
three years’ probation.
Gedulin, Gioia’s lawyer,
said he was able to present a
detailed plan of treatment,
and had a doctor testify
about the diversion program — and did not simply
present diagnostic records
showing his client was mentally ill and willing to get
treatment.
“Most people are submitting statements of diagnoses, and that’s it,” he said.
greg.moran
@sduniontribune.com
Moran writes for the San
Diego Union-Tribune.
miles, when the spacecraft
was zooming toward the
small, distant world. At the
moment of closest approach, New Horizons came
within 2,200 miles of the
surface.
“Everything we are
telling you is just the tip of
the iceberg,” he said. “Far
less than 1% of the data is
already down on the
ground.”
The new images revealed
that Ultima Thule’s topography rises and falls by
about a mile in height, but
whether those differences in
elevation are due to craters
or mountains and hills is
still to be determined.
Future images taken
from different angles will
allow scientists to analyze
the shadows falling on Ultima Thule’s surface, which
may help answer those
questions.
Scientists will also look
for opportunities to peer
into the planetesimal’s
interior and search for signs
of layering, or regions with
different chemical compositions.
And they’ll hunt for
evidence of small moons or
satellites orbiting Ultima
Thule, which could help
them determine its mass.
“It’s just going to get
better and better,” Stern
said.
deborah.netburn
@latimes.com
Twitter: @DeborahNetburn
Lottery results
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California winners per category:
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Fantasy Five: 5-7-17-24-30
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L AT I ME S . CO M
T HURSDAY , JANUARY 3, 2019
B3
CITY & STATE
Murder
charge
filed in
officer’s
death
Lawyer says suspect,
living in U.S. illegally,
is incompetent
to stand trial.
By Brittny Mejia
Prosecutors
have
charged a man with murder
in connection with the fatal
shooting of a Central Valley
police officer.
Gustavo Perez Arriaga, a
Mexican national living in
the country illegally, was
charged Wednesday, according to John Goold, spokesman for the Stanislaus
County district attorney’s
office. At an arraignment
that afternoon, Arriaga’s attorney said his client was incompetent to stand trial.
“Criminal proceedings
were suspended as required
by law and a doctor was appointed to examine the defendant and provide a report
on whether or not he is legally competent to stand trial,” Goold said in an email.
In court, Arriaga told the
judge his true name is Paulo
Virgen Mendoza, according
to local news outlets. A criminal complaint includes several aliases.
His next court date is set
for Feb. 7.
Authorities arrested Arriaga last week in the death
of Newman police Cpl. Ronil
Singh on Dec. 26. The 33year-old officer had stopped
Arriaga on suspicion of driving under the influence, authorities said.
Arriaga, who had two prior drunk driving arrests,
tried to flee to his native
Mexico after the fatal shooting, Stanislaus County Sheriff Adam Christianson said.
After Singh’s death, U.S.
Immigration and Customs
Enforcement issued a statement expressing concern
“that California’s sanctuary
laws continue to undermine
public safety and cause preventable crimes by restricting law enforcement cooperation and allowing public safety threats back into
the community to reoffend.”
ICE had had no prior encounters with Arriaga.
There have been several
arrests in connection with
Singh’s death, including
Arriaga’s two brothers, his
girlfriend and a co-worker,
who are facing charges of
being accessories after the
fact.
Last week, President
Trump tweeted about the
case: “Time to get tough on
Border Security. Build the
Wall!”
Local news outlets reported that dozens of demonstrators showed up outside the courthouse for Arriaga’s arraignment, holding
signs that read “Blue Lives
Matter” and “Make California Safe Again Amend
SB-54.”
“I’m not here to talk
about the president of the
United States, but I will repeat what I said before,”
Christianson said in a news
conference last week. “Border security goes hand in
hand with national security,
goes hand in hand with public safety, goes hand in hand
with the safety of our community.”
brittny.mejia@latimes.com
Twitter:
@Brittny_Mejia
Mark Boster For The Times
PARADEGOERS and others surround the Chinese American Heritage Foundation float Tuesday morning after a small fire onboard.
Float maker may be fined for fire
Rose Parade entry’s smoky malfunction jammed traffic and confused spectators
By Hannah Fry
The builders of a Rose
Parade float that caught fire
and caused a delay in the parade on New Year’s Day
could face a fine, Tournament of Roses officials said
Wednesday.
The Chinese American
Heritage Foundation’s float,
which depicted the moment
when two locomotives met
face to face upon the com-
Stanislaus Co. Sheriff’s Dept.
killing Newman Police
Cpl. Ronil Singh.
mist of transmission fluid,
which made contact with a
hot exhaust pipe, according
to Tim Estes, the president
of Fiesta Parade Floats,
which
built
“Harmony
Through Union.”
The group aboard the
float used a fire extinguisher
to put out the flames. The
driver immediately stopped,
and everyone was evacuated. The float was stopped
along the parade route for
several minutes before it was
towed. The situation created
a traffic jam along the route
and confused spectators,
who thought the parade had
ended and started to leave,
spilling onto the parade
route. The cause of the fire is
being investigated.
“We will be working with
the Tournament to determine and verify the cause of
the leak … once the float returns from the post-parade
showcase later today,” Estes
said in a statement Wednes-
day.
Tournament of Roses officials said it can issue fines
for “unexpected mechanical
and design elements” on
floats. Fines start at $1,000
and can jump to tens of
thousands of dollars, depending on the violation. “At
this time, we’re not sure the
specific fine until the float is
inspected,” the Tournament
of Roses said in a statement.
hannah.fry@latimes.com
Part of Green Line to close for two weeks
Metro will halt
service to six stations
to finalize a link to
the Crenshaw Line.
By Laura J. Nelson
The Metropolitan Transportation Authority will halt
service to six Green Line stations for two weeks so workers can finalize a connection
to a new light rail line that is
under construction through
South Los Angeles.
Service to the Green
Line’s Redondo Beach,
Douglas, El Segundo, Mariposa,
Aviation
and
Hawthorne/Lennox stations
will stop at 9 p.m. Friday and
will resume the morning of
Jan. 20, Metro said.
The $2-billion, 8.5-mile
Crenshaw Line is scheduled
to open in mid-2020, about
six months behind schedule.
After its ribbon-cutting,
Metro trains will run seamlessly from the Mid-City area
of Los Angeles onto the
Green Line along the 105
Freeway.
During the shutdown,
Metro crews will finish connecting
communications
and power systems at the
junction where the two rail
lines intersect, work that re-
Christina House Los Angeles Times
THE AVIATION Green Line station is one of the six that will be closed for two
weeks starting Friday night. The stations are scheduled to reopen Jan. 20.
quires shutting off power to
parts of the Green Line.
“We’re working really
hard to make sure that when
we open the Crenshaw Line,
everything
runs
really
smoothly,” Metro spokesman Jose Ubaldo said.
Trains will run as usual
between the Green Line’s
eastern terminus in Norwalk
and the Crenshaw station in
Hawthorne. Passengers will
then need to transfer to
shuttle buses to reach the
South Bay.
The buses will mirror the
Green Line’s schedule, arriving every six minutes during
rush hour, every 15 minutes
at midday and every 20 minutes after 8 p.m. The closures could add 20 minutes
to a one-way trip, Ubaldo
said.
Last January, riders endured a nine-week closure at
five Green Line stations in
the South Bay while Metro
built the connection between the two light rail lines.
The closures lengthened
commutes and caused delays for local bus lines that
pick up riders at Metro stations.
The shutdown scheduled
for this week has been
planned since before the 2018
closure, said Metro community relations manager Ayda
Safaei.
It follows years of ridership woes on the Green Line,
the only Metro rail line that
does not connect to downtown. Monthly trips have
fallen by about 25% over the
last five years — from more
than 1.2 million trips in November 2013 to fewer than
845,000 trips in the same
month in 2018.
The Metro board approved a service plan last
month for the first year of
the Crenshaw Line’s operation that calls for two-car
trains running between MidCity and Norwalk and twocar trains running from Redondo Beach to a Blue Line
station in Willowbrook.
When the Crenshaw Line
opens, Metro will add eight
stations — in Inglewood and
in the Los Angeles neighborhoods of Baldwin Hills,
Hyde Park, Leimert Park
and Westchester — to Los
Angeles County’s growing
rail map.
A ninth station, scheduled to open in 2023, will provide the region’s longawaited rail connection to
Los Angeles International
Airport.
Metro also plans to open
a station at 96th Street and
Aviation Boulevard that will
serve as a transfer point to a
smaller, automated train
system. That train, similar
to systems in Denver and
San Francisco, will include
stops at a consolidated carrental facility, a ground
transportation hub and
LAX’s terminal area.
laura.nelson@latimes.com
Twitter: @laura_nelson
Bodies found in house fire after domestic dispute
By Hannah Fry
GUSTAVO PEREZ
ARRIAGA is accused of
pletion of the Transcontinental Railroad, was disabled as it approached Colorado Boulevard about
9:45 a.m. by a small fire that
created a plume of smoke.
Descendants of the Chinese,
Irish, German, African and
Mexican laborers who built
the railway were aboard the
float, called “Harmony
Through Union.”
The fire and ensuing
smoke were likely the result
of a small leak that created a
A fire broke out Tuesday
inside a Santa Ana home
that was the setting, days
earlier, of a domestic violence dispute, police said.
After the fire, two bodies
were found.
Firefighters and Santa
Ana
police
responded
shortly after 10:30 a.m. to a
blaze at a two-story house at
2314 Manly Ave. When authorities arrived, the house
was full of smoke, and flames
were visible in the second
story.
A body was found in the
front living room, and another was found inside a bedroom. The remains were
burned beyond recognition,
but authorities believe the
body in the living room was a
man, based on the size,
Santa Ana police Cpl. Anthony Bertagna said.
Firefighters rescued a
dog from the inferno, but
two cats died.
A woman who rents a
room in the house heard a
smoke alarm and left before
fire crews arrived. She told
authorities she heard someone else in the home who
needed help but couldn’t get
the person out, Bertagna
said.
It wasn’t the first time
that police had visited the
home. Officers responded to
the location three days earlier and arrested Ahmad
Alassad, 39, on suspicion of
abusing his wife.
Bertagna said authorities secured a protective order barring Alassad from
contacting her, but family
members told police he had
threatened to return to the
house. He was released from
Orange County Jail on Sunday evening on bond.
Bertagna said authorities thought the two people
found dead inside the home
were Alassad and his wife,
but coroner’s officials have
not yet confirmed their identities.
A man who identified
himself as the wife’s brother
told KABC-TV Channel 7
that Alassad threatened to
“come back and kill everyone and burn down the
house” if the family called
police on him.
A canine that searched
the house with investigators
Wednesday morning found
several locations where ig-
nitable liquid had been used,
providing authorities with
evidence that the blaze was
intentionally set, Bertagna
said.
“He had made threats to
come back, but whether he
did, that has yet to be determined,” Bertagna said. “A
lot of questions remain unanswered. Did he kill her and
set a fire to cover it up? Or
did he set a fire and wasn’t
able to get out? We’re not
sure yet.”
hannah.fry
@latimes.com
Twitter: @Hannahnfry
B4
T H U R S DAY , JA N UA RY 3 , 2 019
L AT I M E S . C O M
Swastika on
campus stirs
parents’ fears
[Ojai, from B1]
lot of “subtle racism” in the
city, which is 82% white, 12%
Latino and 0.5% black, according to census data.
Her children, who are
black, have been the victims
of racial slurs in the city, she
said. She is concerned by the
letter because some of her
other children will be entering Matilija Junior High
soon.
“I just can’t believe
there’s no parent meeting,
nothing,” she said. “My hope
is that there’s exposure, because I think that the school
needs to know how seriously
they should be taking this.
This is way more serious
than sending out a small
letter.”
The principal of the
school was contacted by a
parent whose child was part
of the group sharing photos,
according to an Ojai Police
Department incident report. The principal then contacted police.
“Long story short, the
posts were of a juvenile with
a sword and some off-color
comments, but ultimately
there were no weapons
brought on campus, there
was no discrimination at the
school,” said Sgt. Shane
Matthews of the Ventura
County Sheriff ’s Office. “It
was not determined to be a
crime.”
The student with the
sword denied any affiliation
with Nazis or white supremacists, Matthews said, and
did not appear to be associated with the photo of the
swastika. Deputies interviewed multiple students,
along with their parents.
“At the end, there was
some school discipline given, but there was no criminal
violations,” Matthews said.
Administrators are reviewing various options at
the school and district levels
for “educational experiences
to help bring more sensitivity and understanding to
these topics,” said Ojai Unified School District Supt.
Andy
Cantwell,
who
thanked the parent who reported the messages.
“It does not represent the
character of our school…. It
also doesn’t represent the
character of these students,” Cantwell said. “They
made very poor choices, not
understanding the gravity of
these symbols.”
Matilija students have
been on winter break since
Dec. 24 and will return to
school next week.
A parent reported the incident to Documenting
Hate, a project that tracks
bias incidents and hate
crimes around the country.
The Southern Poverty
Law Center has collected
disturbing
anecdotes
nationwide: white students
in Arizona raising a Confederate flag during the Pledge
of Allegiance at an assembly; a Georgia high school
teacher reporting students
who repeated an offensive
phrase about women and
joked “about Latino students ‘going back to Mexico.’ ”
In an analysis of 472 hate
and bias incidents in K-12
schools over the last three
years, Education Week and
ProPublica
found
that
“most incidents that took
place in schools between
January 2015 and December
2017 targeted black and Latino students, as well as those
who are Jewish or Muslim.”
The Matilija students’
group chat, which began in
mid-November and continued through the first week of
December, was reported by
a parent. In photos shared in
the chat, there was evidence
of students forming the
shape of a swastika during
lunch.
“The Matilija administration and staff are beyond
saddened that this occurred,” the letter stated.
Administrators also added
that they were confident
“this incident has been a
profound learning experience for each student involved.”
There were “appropriate
consequences to those involved,” the letter said, although it is unclear what
those were.
In the letter, parents were
told to expect to hear about
follow-up activities and a
student assembly to address
topics including “the gravity
of using racial slurs, the severity of making threats to
students, the inappropriate
use of social media, and the
role of bystanders who observe such serious offenses.”
“We want you to know
that in no way do we think
these interactions characterize our school as a whole,”
the letter read. “However,
these interactions greatly
impact all of us.”
brittny.mejia@latimes.com
Twitter: @Brittny_Mejia
Times staff writer Howard
Blume contributed to this
report.
Court rebukes
federal defense
in ‘no-fly’ lawsuit
[List, from B1]
The 9th Circuit called
Ibrahim’s legal efforts “pathbreaking” and “extraordinary.”
“Dr. Ibrahim was the first
person ever to force the government to admit a terrorist
watchlisting mistake,” the
court said.
As a result of her efforts,
“those misplaced on the nofly list can contest that
placement, and, if misplaced, regain their right to
flight,” the court said.
Lawyers
representing
Ibrahim without charge incurred more than $3.6 million in expenses, and the
“vast majority” of that
amount should be reim-
bursed, the 9th Circuit said.
Judge Consuelo M. Callahan, an appointee of
George W. Bush, dissented,
joined by Judges N. Randy
Smith, also appointed by
Bush, and Jacqueline H.
Nguyen, an Obama appointee.
They disagreed with the
majority’s conclusion that
the government’s position in
the case was unjustified.
They also disagreed with
the majority’s decision to
overturn the finding that the
government had not acted in
bad faith.
maura.dolan
@latimes.com
Twitter: @mauradolan
Stuart Palley For The Times
DEMONSTRATORS rally at Los Angeles City Hall during the first Women’s March, held on Jan. 21, 2017, one
day after President Trump’s inauguration. The march drew hundreds of thousands of participants in L.A.
Women’s march called
off over lack of diversity
[March, from B1]
toward increasing its diversity and inclusion. Others,
however, said the move was
a criticism of people of color
for not joining in and that by
postponing the march, organizers were placing the
burden on participants to
make the local women’s
march appear less white.
“I have deep concerns
that people of color are being
used as a crutch for the organizing committee failing
to do the work it takes to encourage diversity,” Caterina
Kein wrote on Facebook.
“Please do not blame ‘us’ for
your failures.”
The backlash prompted
Women’s March Eureka to
release a second statement
on Monday noting the decision to cancel the event was
based on the lack of diversity
among the group’s leadership, not among the march’s
attendees.
In an interview with
KHSU-FM radio, organizer
Kelsey Reedy said the original organizers were all white
women and that only two recent additions have increased the diversity of the
small group.
“It wasn’t just we felt
there wasn’t enough representation. There literally
was no representation,” she
said.
The organizers acknowledged that past attempts at
being inclusive have been
shallow.
“We could have done a lot
more,” Reedy said. “We did
not push ourselves to really
create a space that was welcoming for everyone to be involved. We did reach out to
several groups led by people
of color, but only having a few
people in the group that
even had those connections
means it was pretty limited.”
The larger Women’s
March organization has
faced other problems, including accusations of being
anti-Semitic. Leaders of the
national group came under
fire last year after co-chair
Tamika Mallory attended a
February event with Nation
of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan, in which he said, “The
powerful Jews are my enemy.”
Between March and November, the larger group issued three statements in response to criticism that
Women’s March leaders are
anti-Semitic and homophobic, but it has repeatedly expressed support for its leaders, including Mallory.
Luis Sinco Los Angeles Times
PEOPLE gather at L.A.’s Pershing Square on Jan. 20, 2018, as part of the second
Women’s March. It was a scene repeated in many cities across the nation.
‘It wasn’t just we
felt there wasn’t
enough
representation.
There literally
was no
representation’ of
people of color.
— Kelsey Reedy,
on why her group in Eureka
canceled its planned
Women’s March
“It’s
become
clear,
amidst this media storm,
that our values and our message have — too often —
been lost,” the national
group said. “That loss
caused a lot of harm, and a
lot of pain. We should have
been faster and clearer in
helping people understand
our values and our commitment to fighting anti-Semitism. We regret that.”
In Eureka, 38-year-old
Robyn Moreno said she has
boycotted the last two
marches because organizers
have done little to help people of color in Humboldt
County.
The county has grappled
with racial tensions after a
19-year-old Humboldt State
University student, Josiah
Lawson, was fatally stabbed
outside an Arcata house
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party in April 2017. Lawson’s
family members and supporters have fiercely criticized local law enforcement,
saying authorities have
stalled the investigation and
failed to do enough to capture Lawson’s killer.
In a county that’s 74%
non-Hispanic white, the investigation into Lawson’s
slaying is just one event that
has roiled the towns of Eureka and Arcata. The community also successfully rallied to remove a statue of
President William McKinley,
who oversaw federal policies
that undercut Native American tribal authority and reduced reservation lands.
“I am angered when I see
thousands coming together
to protect their rights but
[they] don’t make any effort
to listen to people of color
when they are telling them
that the march is exclusive
and not representative of
people of color or the
LGBTQ community,” said
Moreno, who has been an active supporter of the Justice
for Josiah movement and efforts to remove the McKinley statue. “Nor do they show
up any other day of the year
to fight for the rampant racism within our community.”
Given the county’s past,
Moreno said she’s proud of
the local women’s march organizers for canceling the
upcoming event and working toward being more inclusive.
But many members of
the Eureka group are unhappy with the change of
plans, and some have even
said they’d organize their
own march.
“This group has excellent
intentions and I sincerely
hope that they can accomplish the goals they have set,
the issues they are passionate about absolutely need to
be addressed, they are
meaningful and significant,”
Terri Selfridge wrote on
Facebook. “But they do
NOT have the right to speak
for the 1,000s that have
marched and would march
again in support of the
WOMEN’S MARCH.”
Women’s March Eureka
organizers did not respond
to multiple requests for
comment.
The small Northern California group is not one of the
state’s several chapters in
the
National
Women’s
March organization that act
as year-round nonprofits
but is a “loose coalition” of
women who organize a
yearly event in coordination
with official chapters, said
Emiliana Guereca, executive director of the Women’s
March Los Angeles chapter.
“It’s unfortunate they
canceled, and the reason
they canceled is even more
egregious,” she said. “Our
leadership should look like
what our community looks
like.”
alejandra.reyesvelarde
@latimes.com
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T H U R S DAY , JA N UA RY 3 , 2 019
L AT I M E S . C O M
B5
OBITUARIES
ROBERTA WEINTRAUB, 1935 - 2019
School board member boosted police
[Weintraub, from B1]
In the late 1990s, Weintraub brought the Los Angeles Unified School District
and the Los Angeles Police
Department into a partnership, founding the Police
Academy Magnet School
Program to teach high
school students the principles of law enforcement, constitutional law and the criminal justice system.
The program has grown
to nine campuses.
“With graduation rates
that consistently exceeded
other school programs,
most of these young people
went on to college or the military,” Bratton said in an
email to The Times. “Some
of my favorite moments with
her while I was chief were the
graduation ceremonies of
these young cadets and police officers.”
“She was an extraordinary woman,” added former
Los Angeles Police Chief
Charlie Beck, who got to
know Weintraub through
the police training programs.
“The first motivation for
Roberta was always kids,”
Beck said. “She saw this as a
way to mold them to a career
in which they could be very
successful, or preparation
for life if they don’t become
police officers.”
In addition to her efforts
in law enforcement training,
Weintraub in 2004 founded
High Tech High, an innovative charter school on the
Birmingham High School
campus with a focus on science, math and technology.
In 2007 Weintraub returned to law enforcement
with a new initiative to fill
the gap between high school
graduation and the 20-year,
six-month minimum age to
become a police officer.
Weintraub started the
Los Angeles Times
‘THE ORIGINAL “JUST DO IT” CIVIC LEADER’
Roberta Weintraub began as an anti-busing school board member, became a coalition builder, then blended
her passions for education and law enforcement by founding the Police Academy Magnet School Program.
Police Orientation Preparation Program, which combines criminal justice programs provided by the Los
Angeles Unified School District, the Los Angeles Police
Department, the Los Angeles Community College District and Cal State L.A.
“Together, these programs have touched the
lives of thousands of students who are now proudly
serving in a variety of roles
across many agencies,”
Bratton said.
A third-generation Angeleno, Weintraub was raised
in a household where fighting for the underdog was a
way of life, a statement released by her family said.
She attended public
schools and graduated from
UCLA in 1960. She worked on
John F. Kennedy’s presidential campaign, participated in the civil rights
movement and obtained a
certificate in state and local
government from Harvard
University’s
Kennedy
School of Government.
As a board member she
earned a reputation for arguing her beliefs bluntly. She
BOB EINSTEIN, 1942 - 2019
down silos, and was singularly determined to make
sure that politics, ideology
and bureaucracy never got
in the way of getting the right
things done,” said her close
friend Alan Arkatov, professor and Katzman/Ernst
Chair in Educational Entrepreneurship,
Technology
and Innovation at USC.
“That meant a woman
riding a conservative electoral wave from the Valley
would work closely with a liberal like Jackie Goldberg to
make sure that everyone
had access to high-quality
doug.smith@latimes.com
Twitter: @LATDoug
Obituaries
Comedian and writer
By Nardine Saad
mmy Award-winning writer Bob
Einstein, who was
best known as
cocky
stuntman
Super Dave Osborne and
Larry David’s newly devout
friend, Marty Funkhouser,
on HBO’s “Curb Your Enthusiasm,” has died. He was
76.
Einstein died at home in
Indian Wells, Calif., on
Wednesday, shortly after being diagnosed with cancer,
spokesman Michael Hansen
confirmed to The Times.
The Einstein family did
not specify the type of cancer
the actor was diagnosed
with but asked that donations be made to the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society, Hansen said.
The raspy-voiced star
was born Stewart Robert
Einstein in Los Angeles on
Nov. 20, 1942. His father was
radio comedian Harry Einstein, who was also known as
“Parkyakarkus,” and his
mother was actress Thelma
Leeds. The actor’s older
brother is retired advertising executive Cliff Einstein,
and his younger brother is
comedian, writer and director Albert Brooks.
“R.I.P. My dear brother
Bob Einstein. A great
brother, father and husband. A brilliantly funny
man. You will be missed forever,”
Brooks
tweeted
Wednesday.
The comedy veteran got
his start in television writing
in the 1970s for variety shows
such as the “The Smothers
Brothers Comedy Hour,” on
which he played Officer
Judy, who memorably gave
Liberace a speeding ticket
for playing the piano too fast
in a 1969 episode.
“Tom Smothers made
our life by giving us that,”
Einstein said in a statement
released by the family.
The quick-witted, physical comedian also wrote
and appeared on “The
Sonny & Cher Comedy
Hour” and NBC’s “Van Dyke
and Company,” the latter of
called Rita Walters — then
the only African American
school board member — a
“bitch” during a radio broadcast and sought expulsion of
students caught carrying
weapons to school.
She also pushed for more
magnet schools and helped
open the first school-based
health clinics that dispensed contraceptives.
Though she entered politics as an anti-busing activist, Weintraub later formed
alliances across ideological
lines, including with Walters.
“Roberta loved breaking
education and health services. Roberta was the original ‘Just Do It’ civic leader.”
She also went through
personal changes. In 1985,
her 17-year-old son, Michael,
died in a car accident.
She became a fitness fanatic and helped create Students Run LA, a program
that encourages children to
embrace physical fitness
and make healthy nutritional choices.
She hosted a television
show, “School Beat,” that
won an Emmy.
She became known for
her flashy suits and dangling
earrings. She was divorced
and remarried.
After the Northridge
earthquake, Weintraub left
the severely damaged Sherman Oaks home where she
had lived for nearly 30 years
and moved to the Westside.
The 1995 defeat for City
Council ended her political
career but launched a new
one.
“There’s a lot of women
who have made contributions in the city; for me she
stands near the top,” said
former school board member Marlene Canter, who
followed Weintraub to the
board and idolized her
leadership.
“A lot of people, after
they’re in office, they slow
down,” Canter said. “Not Roberta. She continued to
grow and find new ways to
contribute to Los Angeles.”
Weintraub is survived by
her husband, Ira Krinsky,
her son Richard Weintraub,
daughter-in-law Liane and
grandchildren Ava and Cole.
Her stepson Brian Krinsky,
his wife, Estelle, and their
daughter Lauren also survive her.
E
Getty Images
COMEDY VETERAN
Bob Einstein was best
known for playing the
goofy daredevil Super
Dave Osborne.
which launched the goofy
daredevil
Super
Dave
Osborne, whose white-andblue jumpsuit Einstein repeatedly donned in comedy
specials over the years.
Super Dave’s feats always went wrong, with the
stuntman usually ending up
crushed, mangled or flattened. The character was
popularized on Showtime
and late-night talk shows,
and one iconic sketch included a reluctant Super
Dave falling off Toronto’s CN
Tower.
“The whole character of
Super Dave is a takeoff on
people who pontificate,”
Einstein told The Times in
1995. “So one thing I never
want to do is pontificate why
this works, why this is funny.
I have no idea what the appeal is. All we are trying to do
is make people have a good
time and laugh.”
He won his two Primetime Emmy Awards in 1969
and 1977 for his work on “The
Smothers Brothers Comedy
Hour” and “Van Dyke and
Company.”
Einstein most recently
appeared in 22 episodes of
HBO’s “Curb Your Enthusiasm,” playing Larry David’s
devout neighbor Marty
Funkhouser from 2004 to
2017, notably appearing in
the
show’s
“Seinfeld”
reunion episode in which he
recites an off-color joke to
the show’s star, Jerry Seinfeld. Because of his illness,
Einstein was unable to complete episodes in the show’s
upcoming 10th
season,
which airs this year.
“Never have I seen an
actor enjoy a role the way
Bob did playing Marty
Funkhouser on ‘Curb,’ ”
David said in a statement to
The Times. “It was an amazing, unforgettable experience knowing and working
with him. There was no one
like him, as he told us again
and again. We’re all in a state
of shock.”
“Curb” costar Cheryl
Hines and writer and producer David Mandel shared
their condolences on social
media.
“We lost a friend today.
Thanks for all of the laughs
on ‘Curb Your Enthusiasm.’
Our love to Bob’s family,”
Hines wrote. “The comedy
world will miss you.”
“Very
sad,”
Mandel
tweeted. “Got to work with
him on #Curb. Had heard he
was sick. Will never forget
him telling @jerryseinfeld
the dirty joke about the
newlyweds.”
Einstein is survived by
his wife, Roberta Einstein;
his daughter, Erin Einstein
Dale; son-in-law Andrew
Dale; and his grandchildren
Ethan and Zoe. He is also
survived by his brothers.
nardine.saad@latimes.com
A message to our readers
Because of an unforeseen technical issue, we are unable
to publish a comprehensive list of obituary notices in
today’s edition. You can view additional information
and notices at legacy.com. If you have any questions or
need assistance placing an obituary, please call (800)
234-4444.
Reyes, Feliciana G.
Feliciana G. Reyes (née Guinto). The law
firms Watkins Law & Advocacy, PLLC
and Adduci, Mastriani & Schaumberg LLP
mourn the loss of our extraordinary yet
humble client Feliciana, 91, of Panorama
City, CA, who passed away on December
22, 2018 after suffering a stroke following
lengthy ill-health. She will be interred on
January 4, 2019 at the Forest Lawn—
Hollywood Hills cemetery in Los Angeles.
Born in Arayat, Pampanga, she was a
teenager when she joined the guerrillas
during WWII while the Philippines was
still a U.S. territory, serving in the Medical
Corps of the 75th Infantry Regiment, 7th
Military District in Negros Oriental, a force
“recognized” by General MacArthur. As a
ward attendant under the supervision of
medical officers and nurses, she cared for
sick and wounded American soldiers. By
virtue of being a guerrilla in a recognized
military force under U.S. operational
control, Feliciana also was deemed to be
in active service in the Philippine Army.
When the liberation campaign on Negros
island ended, she was “processed” on
June 30, 1945 by the Eighth Army, U.S.
Army, in Luzuriaga, served for a short time
in USAFFE, and then was discharged.
For the last seven decades, she was
haunted by the Rescission Acts of 1946
which essentially rendered her and fellow
Filipinos ineligible for U.S. veterans’
benefits. Congress finally confronted
this historical inequity in 2009, granting
Filipinos a one-time, remedial payment for
their service, and Feliciana applied for the
benefit. However, she spent the last 3,232
days of her life battling the Department of
Veterans Affairs which inexplicably refused
to find her eligible for the benefit and the
modicum of respect that accompanied
it. To her death, VA and the Army argued
that because her name does not appear
on the reconstructed guerrilla roster—a
notoriously incomplete list of Filipinos
created by the U.S. Army three years after
her service ended—Feliciana’s service
could not be verified. Yet, the U.S.
Army’s records maintained since the war
include numerous affidavits confirming her
service—only recently disclosed to her in
response to a Privacy Act request—signed,
as the war ended, by officers in both the
Army of the U.S. and the Philippine Army.
And during her legal case against VA, she
discovered why her name is missing from
the roster: an obscure U.S. Army report
from 1949, previously classified “secret,”
reveals that except registered nurses,
no Filipino women were permitted to be
recognized as having served. She also
learned through a Freedom of Information
Act request that pursuant to a previously
“secret,” 1951 Army memo, she could
not even seek to fix the injustice of her
name being excluded from the roster. The
Army has prohibited access to its Board
for Correction of Military Records by any
aggrieved Filipino guerrilla. Feliciana’s
appeal of VA’s misapplication of the
eligibility criteria for the benefit she sought,
and the discrimination practiced against
her, was fully briefed before the U.S.
Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit,
and argued on December 3, 2018. Three
years earlier, she wrote VA imploring that
she qualified for the one-time $15,000
benefit and pled that “I am in poor health
and I am endangered of being homeless.”
Nevertheless, she died without grant of the
benefit and before learning the outcome
of her appeal. Feliciana was a naturalized
U.S. citizen. She married the late Anacleto
B. Reyes in 1968 and is survived by two
sons, Roberto and Fernando. Her appellate
counsel has especially appreciated her
positive spirit, her “hope” that her legal fight
might have a lasting impact on how history
views Filipino veterans let alone her own
invisibility to date, and her many messages
stating “may God bless us all a lot always
forever.” She will be sorely missed by us.
To honor her service, donations may be
made to the Filipino Veterans Recognition
and Education Project.
Strunk, Marilyn A.
Strunk, Marilyn A. services on 01/04/2019
at 10:00 am at Armstrong Family Mortuary
Eisenberg, Sharon Diane
Sharon Eisenberg, loving mother and
grandmother, passed away suddenly at
home with her family. Sharon moved with
her parents from North Dakota and grew
up in Burbank. She attended Burbank
High School. She was the sweetest, most
caring, loving, and selfless mother and
grandmother. She leaves behind daughter
Karen, 38, her granddaughters Katie, 14,
and Luella, 6, and her furry best friend Lulu
the yorkie. We are all shocked, saddened,
and devastated by her sudden passing.
Services will be held shortly at Forest Lawn,
Hollywood Hills. For any further information
please email: eisenberg.karen@gmail.com.
Jacobsen, Blanche
Blanche Jacobson (Weiss), 102, of Los
Angeles, CA, died peacefully in her sleep
on December 28, 2018, at Pacifica Senior
Living, Santa Clarita, CA. Born June 16,
1916, in St. Louis, MO, she is predeceased
by her parents, Meyer and Bessie
(Eisenstein) Weiss of St. Louis, MO, her
late husband of 48 years, Sam Jacobson
of Amarillo, TX, her son, Norman Irving
Jacobson, and brother Marvin Weiss.
Survivors include her daughter Suzanne
(Jacobson) Hodgkin and Son-in-Law
Robert Hodgkin, Sister-in-Law, Carol
(Plotkin) Jacobson, granddaughters Stacey
Susser and Marcey Utter, and five great
grandchildren Kyle, Ben, Devyn, Cameron
& Ryan.
Grave side services and burial were held at
Hillside Memorial Park, 6001 W. Centinela
Ave., Los Angeles, CA on Monday
December 31, 2018.
B6
T H U R S DAY , JA N UA RY 3 , 2 019
L AT I M E S . C O M
Today in North America
Snowy southern Plains: Snow and ice will target parts of Oklahoma
and northern Texas. Torrential rain will hit Louisiana and
Mississippi. Rain will dampen the Southeast while morning snow
coats the Northeast. Ice will glaze parts of the Upper Midwest.
5-day forecasts
Pressure:
L
Low
H
High
◗
Today in Southern California
A bit warmer with sunshine: A northward bulge in the upper-level wind flow will help bring warmer
weather across Southern California today. High pressure that brought chilly and windy weather the
past few days will move to the east, leading to warmer temperatures today and Friday. A storm system
moving across the Pacific will bring clouds and rain this weekend.
▲
Warm Front
Cold Front
Jet Stream
Trough
High/low temperatures are average forecasts for entire zone.
Today
L.A. Basin
66/45
Valleys
66/42
Friday
Saturday
Sunday
Monday
Sunshine
Sunny
A little rain
A little rain
Partly sunny
Sunshine
Sunny
A little rain
A little rain
Clouds
67/47
61/49
60/46
63/49
Los Angeles Basin: Sunny.
Clear and cool tonight.
Partly to mostly sunny
Friday. Cloudy Saturday
with rain late in the day.
Valleys/canyons: Sun.
Mainly clear and cool
tonight. Partly to mostly
sunny Friday. Cloudy
Saturday with rain at night.
Air quality
Beaches
65/45
Sunshine
Sunny
A little rain
A little rain
Partly sunny
66/42
58/45
57/42
63/44
Moderate
Deserts
65/40
Sunny and breezy
Sunny
48/23
Clouds
42/25
A shower
37/23
Not as cold
44/24
Sunshine
Sunny
Clouds
A shower
Partly sunny
Partly cloudy tonight.
Partly to mostly sunny
Friday. Sunny Saturday
morning then cloudy.
Local mountains: Sunny.
Clear tonight. Mostly sunny
Friday. Cloudy Saturday
with rain late.
High desert: Sunny. Clear
and cool tonight. Sunny
Orange County: Sunny.
Clear and cool tonight.
Mostly sunny Friday. Rain
late Saturday.
Ventura/Santa Barbara:
Sunshine. Clear and chilly
tonight. Friday will be
sunny. Mostly cloudy
Saturday with rain late.
San Diego County: Sunny.
Good
66/48
60/49
59/46
61/48
Unhealthful for:
Temps
Mountains
46/22
Sensitive people
–0
0s 10s 20s 30s 40s 50s 60s 70s 80s 90s 100+
Anchorage
19/3
67/43
65/47
61/45
64/46
Friday. Cloudy Saturday
with rain at night.
Low desert: Sunny. Clear
tonight. Partly to mostly
sunny Friday. Cloudy
Saturday with rain at night.
San Francisco Bay Area:
Partly cloudy today and
tonight. Cloudy Friday. Rain
Saturday.
All
Rain T-storm Snow Ice
Seattle
53/46
New York
47/35
Denver Chicago
51/28 39/28
Las Vegas
52/35
Houston
51/37
Los Angeles
66/45
Not Available
Miami
83/71
South Coast Air Quality Management District forecasts air quality
SANTA
BARBARA CO.
Santa Clarita
Hesperia
65/40
Santa Paula
LOS ANGELES CO.
56/27
Ojai
67/39
Santa
Simi Valley
Barbara
65/38
Chatsworth
SAN BERNARDINO CO.
Burbank Monrovia
66/41
63/37
66/42
Camarillo
Ventura
67/41
62/44
67/41
63/46
Yucca Valley
Pomona/
UCLA
55/32
Fairplex
Oxnard
San
Bernardino
LA
Downtown
Westlake
Ontario
66/44
64/44
67/40
Woodland
66/39
66/45
Village
67/40
Hills
Whittier
Santa Barbara Co.
67/41
Chino
69/41
Height
Period
Direction
Santa Monica Hills
Riverside
69/35
RIVERSIDE CO.
Fullerton
67/42
1-3’
15 sec WNW
65/45
65/31
68/42
Torrance
Santa Ana
Ventura Co.
65/42
ORANGE CO.
Palm
Hemet
Long
Height
Period
Direction
66/46
Springs
64/33
Irvine
Beach Newport
2-4’
15 sec WNW
65/43
65/40
66/43 Beach
Mission Viejo
Los Angeles Co.
63/44
Temecula
Height
Period
Direction
65/43
Laguna
65/32
2-4’
15 sec WNW
Beach
San
62/44
Clemente
Orange Co.
Surf and sea
62/40
SAN DIEGO CO.
Height
Period
Direction
POINT CONCEPTION TO MEXICO
Oceanside
1-3’
15 sec W
Inner waters: Wind northeast becoming
65/30
northwest 5-10 knots. Wind waves 1-4
San Diego Co.
feet and a west swell of 1-3 feet.
Ramona
Escondido
Height
Period
Direction
65/32
66/35
Surf zone: The risk for dangerous rip
2-3’
15 sec WNW
currents will be moderate for Ventura,
Poway
Los Angeles and San Diego counties
66/39
and low for Santa Barbara and Orange
VENTURA CO.
Tides
counties.
Station
Morro Bay
Santa Barbara
Ventura
Zuma Beach
Marina del Rey
Hermosa Beach
Cabrillo Beach
Hunt’n. Beach
Newport Beach
Dana Point
San Clemente
Oceanside
Solana Beach
Mission Beach
Avalon
UV index
L.A. Outer Harbor, in feet.
Time
4p
4p
4p
4p
4p
4p
4p
4p
4p
4p
4p
4p
4p
4p
4p
Wind
WNW10
VAR5
VAR5
NE10
VAR5
VAR5
VAR5
VAR5
VAR5
VAR5
VAR5
VAR5
VAR5
VAR5
SSE10
Waves
4/15
2/15
1/15
2/15
1/15
1/15
1/15
1/15
1/15
1/15
1/15
2/15
2/15
3/15
1/15
Temp
55/57
59/60
59/60
60/60
60/60
60/61
61/62
62/61
61/59
61/57
61/58
60/59
59/60
58/60
60/58
Wind speed in knots; wave heights in feet/intervals in seconds;
temperatures for sea/air
Today 7:04a
8:43p
Fri.
7:37a
9:21p
6.1 Hi 12:42a 2.0 Lo
3.7 Hi 2:17p -0.6 Lo
6.1 Hi 1:20a 2.1 Lo
3.8 Hi 2:52p -0.8 Lo
Minutes to burn for
sensitive people
Las Vegas, 45
Los Angeles, 45
Phoenix, 45
San Francisco, 60
San Diego
65/44
Almanac
Wednesday downtown readings
Temperature
Los Angeles Fullerton
Ventura
High/low
63/38
65/37
65/43
High/low a year ago
78/52
80/51
68/54
Normal high/low for date 68/47
68/44
66/44
Record high/date
85/1994 84/2012 82/1996
Record low/date
32/1886 37/2019 32/1954
Precipitation
24-hour total (as of 4 p.m.) 0.00
0.00
0.00
Season total (since Oct. 1)
4.26
3.96
3.04
Last season (Oct. 1 to date) 0.12
0.08
0.06
Season norm (Oct. 1 to date) 4.24
4.15
4.93
Humidity (high/low)
52/16
54/17
54/10
Sun and moon
Today’s rise/set
New Moon
Jan. 5
Los Angeles County
Sun 6:59a/4:56p
Moon 4:51a/3:20p
First Quarter
Jan. 13
Orange County
Sun 6:57a/4:55p
Moon 4:49a/3:19p
Full Moon
Jan. 20
Ventura County
Sun 7:04a/5:00p
Moon 4:55a/3:24p
Last Quarter
Jan. 27
California cities
City
Wed.
Today
Hi Lo Prcp. Hi Lo
Friday
Hi Lo
Anaheim
Avalon/Catalina
Bakersfield
Barstow
Beaumont
Big Bear Lake
Bishop
Burbank
Camarillo
Chatsworth
Chino
Dana Point
Death Valley
Del Mar
Escondido
Eureka
Fallbrook
Fillmore
Fresno
Fullerton
Hemet
Hesperia
Huntington Beach
Idyllwild
Irvine
L.A. D’ntown/USC
L.A. Int’l. Airport
67
64
55
50
53
42
57
60
69
62
64
59
65
59
61
54
61
65
55
65
58
51
63
46
65
63
61
68
58
63
60
63
48
58
66
68
66
70
62
65
65
67
58
66
67
61
68
66
60
65
52
66
67
65
40
39
30
19
31
20
26
36
37
50
33
38
50
40
34
31
38
32
33
37
31
25
35
18
45
38
39
----------------------------
68
58
59
56
60
46
59
67
67
66
69
61
62
65
66
58
65
67
58
68
64
56
65
50
65
66
65
40
49
35
30
34
22
26
41
41
42
35
42
38
43
35
46
33
40
35
42
33
27
43
34
43
45
45
46
47
40
32
33
23
25
44
45
43
40
47
42
48
42
46
39
39
42
47
34
36
49
32
47
47
48
City
Wed.
Today
Hi Lo Prcp. Hi Lo
Friday
Hi Lo
Laguna Beach
Lancaster
Long Beach
Mammoth Lakes
Mission Viejo
Monrovia
Monterey
Mt. Wilson
Needles
Newport Beach
Northridge
Oakland
Oceanside
Ojai
Ontario
Oxnard
Palm Springs
Pasadena
Paso Robles
Pomona/Fairplex
Poway
Redding
Rialto
Riverside
xx
50
63
47
62
63
61
54
54
62
62
53
60
63
62
65
64
62
58
60
62
58
59
63
63
57
66
48
66
62
59
56
63
63
68
56
64
65
68
65
67
67
59
68
66
55
66
67
xx
20
38
20
39
40
36
29
38
46
48
33
31
25
35
39
40
39
25
36
32
29
44
49
xx
------------------------
62
55
66
50
65
62
60
56
59
63
68
56
65
65
67
64
65
66
61
67
66
56
66
65
44
22
43
20
43
44
40
32
36
44
42
39
30
38
40
44
40
44
27
40
39
34
40
31
Forecasts provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. ©2019
48
31
49
21
46
43
48
31
41
50
43
47
39
39
43
47
43
46
39
42
47
38
42
35
City
Wed.
Today
Hi Lo Prcp. Hi Lo
Friday
Hi Lo
Sacramento
San Bernardino
San Clemente Pier
San Diego
San Francisco
San Gabriel
San Jose
San Luis Obispo
Santa Ana
Santa Barbara
Santa Clarita
Santa Monica Pier
Santa Paula
Santa Rosa
Simi Valley
Tahoe Valley
Temecula
Thousand Oaks
Torrance
UCLA
Van Nuys
Ventura
Whittier Hills
Woodland Hills
Wrightwood
Yorba Linda
Yosemite Valley
53
63
59
62
54
xx
57
60
65
61
57
65
64
57
60
45
61
60
63
63
64
65
63
64
38
65
45
56
67
63
65
56
68
60
61
65
62
66
66
66
55
67
48
67
66
64
67
69
64
67
69
52
67
54
29
32
49
41
38
xx
33
30
44
32
41
42
32
28
41
14
31
48
38
45
49
43
33
40
25
38
25
-----xx
----------------------
56
66
62
65
54
67
60
65
66
63
65
65
67
56
66
49
65
66
65
66
69
63
67
69
49
67
55
34
39
40
44
43
43
39
36
46
37
40
45
39
32
41
23
32
41
42
44
41
46
42
41
29
40
35
39
42
46
50
50
46
46
45
51
43
39
48
39
44
42
27
37
42
46
47
44
48
47
43
33
43
33
U.S. cities
High 88 in Immokalee, Fla.
Low –38 in Daniel, Wyo.
City
Wednesday
Hi Lo Prcp.
Today
Hi Lo Sky
Albuquerque
Amarillo
Anchorage
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Brownsville
Buffalo
Burlington, Vt.
Casper
Charleston, S.C.
Charleston, W.Va.
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Colo. Springs
Columbia, S.C.
Columbus
Concord, N.H.
Dallas/Ft.Worth
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
Duluth
El Paso
Eugene
Fairbanks
Fargo
Flagstaff
Grand Junction
Grand Rapids
Green Bay
Hartford
Helena
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jacksonville, Fla.
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Louisville
Medford
Memphis
Miami
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York
Oklahoma City
Omaha
Orlando
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, Maine
Portland, Ore.
Providence
Pueblo
Raleigh
Rapid City
Reno
Richmond
St. Louis
Salt Lake City
San Antonio
San Juan, P.R.
Santa Fe
Seattle
29
40
35
59
44
39
45
28
54
32
37
52
32
24
22
71
47
58
30
42
41
38
68
42
33
37
38
33
35
16
37
51
24
29
25
20
32
26
35
34
83
53
37
81
33
48
40
45
42
43
82
31
22
48
72
39
29
36
83
43
52
40
31
45
37
35
53
35
44
49
34
25
42
82
24
44
32 13
46 25
19 3
58 54
51 36
53 33
50 30
42 32
56 52
36 28
47 32
64 41
35 31
33 27
35 25
72 59
46 32
59 51
39 28
44 29
39 32
50 27
64 56
41 29
39 24
39 32
51 28
46 28
38 30
33 24
47 26
53 42
2-21
37 25
41 11
32 14
37 31
33 26
44 26
41 28
83 70
51 37
42 27
80 63
47 27
52 35
45 38
46 34
47 30
48 43
83 71
36 29
36 26
49 43
67 47
47 35
36 25
48 25
83 65
49 33
58 37
39 28
40 25
52 45
47 29
52 19
57 47
48 30
50 28
55 39
47 28
32 20
57 36
84 72
30 11
53 46
11 Tr
11 -34 .03
52 .21
38 -37 2.04
37 -14 -48 .19
18 -28 -50 .15
23 -15 -6 Tr
61 -40 -51 Tr
26 .01
39 Tr
32 Tr
0 -58 .15
37 -19 -32 .72
0 -14 Tr
26 .04
-6 .03
24 -25 -8 .02
-8 .02
8 Tr
-4 -25 .04
7 .04
24 -10 -73 .02
50 .71
36 .02
57 -17 .02
28 -39 .31
42 Tr
25 -41 .42
71 -24 .03
2 Tr
45 .01
62 Tr
35 -23 .02
12 -63 -37 -30 -34 .02
22 -30 -28 --6 -47 --3 -19 -40 .02
31 -11 -39 .68
73 .10
1 -32 --
Su
Pc
Pc
Cy
Pc
Cy
Pc
W
R
Cy
Pc
Pc
Pc
Sn
Pc
Cy
Pc
R
Su
Pc
Pc
Su
Sh
Pc
Sn
R
Su
Su
Pc
I
Pc
Cy
Pc
Pc
Su
Su
Su
Pc
Pc
Cy
Pc
R
Su
Fg
Pc
Su
R
Pc
Cy
Cy
Pc
Su
Su
Cy
R
Pc
Sn
Su
Fg
Pc
Su
Pc
Sn
R
R
Su
R
Pc
Pc
Sh
Su
Pc
Pc
Pc
Su
R
Taken at 3 p.m. Wednesday
Spokane
Springfield, Mo.
Tallahassee
Tampa
Tucson
Tulsa
Washington, D.C.
Wichita
Yuma
35
30
75
83
44
32
48
37
56
21
28
66
67
32
25
42
19
38
----.04
-----
38
47
77
80
56
41
52
47
59
35
29
65
67
33
29
37
24
34
I
Pc
Cy
Pc
Su
R
Pc
Pc
Su
90
45
50
60
86
83
34
38
84
73
63
52
84
39
46
36
43
41
84
81
58
46
52
76
48
88
44
56
90
91
70
14
27
90
74
32
45
90
58
32
31
87
68
49
52
29
42
37
19
37
73 -42 .54
44 -41 -72 -77 -15 -32 .06
75 .60
59 -52 .01
41 -74 .09
33 .13
36 .01
24 -37 .03
32 -68 -75 .23
56 .06
43 .14
39 -59 1.25
8 -73 -39 .12
24 -74 .01
72 .05
43 -5 -26 .45
72 -47 -27 -34 -79 -32 -8 -26 .30
71 -61 .45
37 .04
38 -16 .06
37 .07
34 .29
-4 .11
36 .07
87
44
49
64
86
84
36
36
75
75
64
44
84
38
46
39
37
37
86
88
63
46
52
73
51
86
41
53
86
86
73
24
31
89
71
32
41
94
47
35
31
82
67
47
52
35
50
31
35
33
73
39
37
42
73
77
19
26
58
58
50
31
72
34
34
33
30
28
62
76
61
37
38
58
28
76
28
27
76
69
47
21
24
68
45
27
30
79
28
17
28
71
66
34
37
30
44
24
19
25
Cy
Cy
R
Su
Cy
Su
Su
Pc
Hz
Pc
Su
Pc
Pc
Pc
Cy
Pc
Cy
Su
Pc
Sh
R
R
Pc
Pc
Pc
Pc
Pc
Pc
Su
Pc
Pc
Pc
Sn
Hz
Hz
Cy
Pc
Ts
Pc
Su
Sf
Pc
R
R
Su
Pc
R
W
Cy
Cy
World
Acapulco
Amsterdam
Athens
Baghdad
Bangkok
Barbados
Beijing
Berlin
Buenos Aires
Cabo San Lucas
Cairo
Calgary
Cancun
Copenhagen
Dublin
Edinburgh
Frankfurt
Geneva
Havana
Ho Chi Minh City
Hong Kong
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kabul
Kingston
London
Madrid
Manila
Mecca
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Mumbai
New Delhi
Oslo
Paris
Rio de Janeiro
Rome
Seoul
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei City
Tehran
Tokyo
Toronto
Vancouver
Vienna
Winnipeg
Zurich
Key: Su sunny; Pc partly cloudy; Cy cloudy; Fg
foggy; Prcp precipitation; Dr drizzle; Hz;hazy
Sh showers; Ts thunderstorms; R rain; Sn snow;
Sf snow flurries; I ice; Rs rain/snow; W windy;
Tr trace. Notes: National extremes are for NWS
stations; excludes Alaska and Hawaii.
Missing data indicated by “xx”.
Police seek help in burglary investigation
[Burglaries, from B1]
Ackerman was arrested
Sept. 20, but he has yet to be
formally charged with a
crime. Online jail records
show he was released on
$1-million bond Sept. 24, and
police said there were no restrictions on his travel as a
condition of his release. Paul
Eakins, a spokesman for the
Los Angeles County district
attorney’s office, said the
LAPD had not yet presented
a case against Ackerman.
Timmons said police are
gathering additional evidence.
Attempts to contact Ackerman were not successful
Wednesday, and it was not
clear whether he had retained an attorney. Investigators said they believed he
had been involved in “criminal activity for the past several years.” Court records
show Ackerman was convicted of burglary or petty
theft on three occasions in
Los Angeles County in 2013
and 2014.
Detectives said they began to focus on Ackerman after they noticed he had
signed his middle name in
guest books at open house
events for multiple homes
that later were ransacked,
Timmons said. Some employees at the open houses
also noticed Ackerman had
asked specific questions
about rare artwork that was
on display.
Timmons described Ackerman as a sophisticated
criminal with a penchant for
modifying artwork so it
could be resold. In some
Allen J. Schaben Los Angeles Times
PICTURES of Benjamin Eitan Ackerman are displayed among photos of items that police say were stolen
from Southland homes. Items found at a locker belonging to Ackerman, police say, are valued in the millions.
cases, Ackerman may have
modified identifying numbers or marks on certain
paintings and photo prints
so he could conceal from
buyers that the items had
been stolen, authorities
said. He also destroyed or
otherwise tampered with
surveillance cameras during
several of the burglaries,
Timmons said.
“When he showed up, he
was dressed to the nines,”
Timmons said. “He acted
the part; he was very slick.
He appears to be very fluent
with ... technology.”
Police said they thought
Ackerman had accomplices
who helped him steal the
items or resell them, but no
one else has been arrested or
charged in the case. Timmons said Ackerman also
had “connections to New
York” and may have been
fencing
stolen
artwork
there. The detective declined to elaborate.
The LAPD is trying to locate possible additional victims and has asked people
who live in the neighborhoods that were targeted to
visit a website with pictures
of the recovered stolen
items.
The burglaries are part of
a surge in celebrity break-ins
during the last two years.
High-value thefts have occurred at the homes of singer Alanis Morissette, ex-Lakers guard Nick Young, re-
cently traded Dodgers outfielder Yasiel Puig and
hip-hop star Nicki Minaj.
The hauls from each were
substantial, with the jewelry
carried out of Morissette’s
home in February 2017 valued at $2 million.
In November, 13 men with
alleged ties to a South Los
Angeles set of the Crips
street gang were charged in a
series of burglaries that
dated to at least October
2017. At least 10 were in cus-
tody at the time, and prosecutors said they thought the
suspects might have been
responsible for additional
crimes in Pasadena, Santa
Monica and other cities with
affluent neighborhoods.
In some of those cases, investigators said, the robbers
monitored celebrities’ social
media posts to determine
when they would be out of
town.
Puig’s house was broken
into while he was at spring
training with the Dodgers in
2017. Burglars struck again
about an hour after the Dodgers lost Game 7 of the 2017
World Series, with officers
responding to another burglar alarm at Puig’s Encino
home. Officers found a
smashed window and items
missing.
Young’s house was hit
while he was attending the
NBA’s All-Star weekend in
2017. Last year, a break-in occurred at the home of Los
Angeles Rams wide receiver
Robert Woods while the
team played host to the Minnesota Vikings.
Timmons said police
were still trying to determine
whether Ackerman was connected to the other celebrity
burglaries. Detectives have
been in contact with police
in Santa Monica and Beverly
Hills and with the Los Angeles County Sheriff ’s Department to see whether there
are other victims in other jurisdictions.
james.queally@latimes.com
Twitter:
@JamesQueallyLAT
C
BuSINESS
T H U R S D A Y , J A N U A R Y 3 , 2 0 1 9 :: L A T I M E S . C O M / B U S I N E S S
DOW 23,346.24 ▲ 18.78
S&P 500 2,510.03 ▲ 3.18
NASDAQ 6,665.94 ▲ 30.66
GOLD $1,281.00 ▲ 2.70
OIL $46.54 ▲ 1.13
EURO $1.1344 ▼ .0123
U.S. T-NOTE (10-yr.) 2.66% ▼ 0.03
TESLA
DATA
CAST
MORE
DOUBT
Production and sales
fall short, and the
automaker cuts prices.
By Russ Mitchell
Robert Gauthier Los Angeles Times
A TIMES review found that 50 people were arrested for bringing a gun to LAX during a 33-month period. Above, a checkpoint in 2016.
TSA gun seizures are rising,
but penalties usually are light
Review of LAX cases shows maximum punishment is rarely imposed
By Hugo Martin
and Ben Poston
The 9-millimeter pistol was
loaded when actor David Henrie
tried to bring it onto a flight at Los
Angeles International Airport.
A Transportation Security Administration officer operating an Xray machine at Terminal 2 spotted
the handgun in the carry-on bag of
the former star of the Disney Channel’s “Wizards of Waverly Place.”
Henrie was arrested Sept. 10 and
charged with three misdemeanor
violations, including carrying a concealed weapon and possession of a
prohibited item in an airport.
In a Twitter message, the 29year-old actor apologized for the
trouble caused by what he described as his “legally owned gun.”
“More than anything, I’m humiliated and embarrassed that this
even happened,” he said in the
tweet.
Henrie pleaded no contest Nov.
Transportation Security Administration
PISTOL PARTS were found by TSA in a stuffed animal at an
airport in Rhode Island in 2012. In 2017, a record 3,957 firearms
were discovered in carry-on bags at U.S. airports, a 17% increase.
21 to one count of possession of a
prohibited item in an airport and
was sentenced to 20 days of community labor and attendance at a gun
safety class. He also was put on two
years of summary probation, which
doesn’t require regular check-ins
with a probation officer.
TSA officers are finding significantly more weapons at airport
checkpoints every year, according
to data from the federal agency,
which screens travelers at the nation’s 440 airports.
To determine what happens to
people arrested for bringing a gun
to LAX, The Times analyzed court
records for the 33 months from Jan.
1, 2016, through Sept. 30, 2018, and
found that most air travelers
caught with a firearm were, like
Henrie, charged with misdemeanors and received sentences that
were much lighter than the maximum six months in jail, $1,000 in
fines and other punishments that
could be imposed.
[See Firearms, C5]
Netflix takes heat for ‘bowing’ to Saudis
Company is criticized
for pulling a ‘Patriot
Act’ episode in the
kingdom. It says it was
following local law.
By David Ng
Netflix has been on a
global tear: spending billions of dollars on content a
year to expand its reach in
hundreds of countries amid
slowing U.S. subscriber
growth.
But as it pushes into
countries with authoritarian regimes, the Los Gatos,
Calif., company is learning
that some of its edgy and
progressive content doesn’t
always sit well with local officials.
Netflix found itself in the
crosshairs of an international controversy this week
when it yanked an episode of
comedy show “Patriot Act”
in Saudi Arabia that contained references to the
killing of journalist Jamal
Khashoggi.
Netflix said it made the
decision to comply with local
laws. But the action provoked sharp criticism from
some groups that see it as a
form of censorship and capitulation to an autocratic
government.
“By bowing to the Saudi
Arabian authorities’ demands, Netflix is in danger
of facilitating the kingdom’s
zero-tolerance policy on
freedom of expression and
assisting the authorities in
denying people’s right to
freely access information,”
Amnesty International said
in a statement on its website
Wednesday.
Sarah Leah Whitson, executive director of advocacy
group
Human
Rights
Watch, said on Twitter:
“Netflix’s claim to support
artistic freedom means
nothing if it bows to demands of government officials who believe in no freedom for their citizens — not
artistic, not political, not comedic.”
Experts say that Netflix
has to balance the creative
aspirations of its talent with
[See Netflix, C3]
Bryan Bedder Getty Images for Bob Woodruff Foundation
IN THE “Patriot Act” episode that was pulled in Saudi Arabia by Netflix, host
Hasan Minhaj, above, in November 2017, criticizes the kingdom’s conflicting explanations of the torture and killing of journalist Jamal Khashoggi.
Tesla started the new
year by releasing data that
throw its growth story into
doubt.
The company reported
Wednesday that at the end
of the fourth quarter it was
making 6,668 cars per week
on average — far less than
what Chief Executive Elon
Musk once promised analysts. “What people should
absolutely have zero concern about is that Tesla will
achieve a 10,000-unit production week by the end of next
year,” Musk said on a conference call in August 2017.
Sales growth, meanwhile, slowed dramatically.
After a bang-up second
quarter that saw unit sales
more than double over a year
earlier, the growth rate
slowed in the fourth quarter
to 8%, with total sales of
90,700 vehicles.
Sales of the new Model 3
electric sedan — crucial to
Tesla’s reputation as a
growth stock — fell well below analyst expectations,
rising 13% in the fourth quarter, to 63,150. The consensus
expectation was for a 17%
boost.
[See Tesla, C6]
Tribune
stations’
blackout
begins
Fee dispute causes
Chicago firm’s TV
outlets, including
KTLA, to go dark on
Charter’s Spectrum.
By Meg James
Nearly three dozen Tribune Media television stations,
including
KTLA
Channel 5 in Los Angeles,
went dark Wednesday afternoon on Charter Communications’ Spectrum pay-TV
service after the two companies failed to reach agreement on a new distribution
deal.
Customers in more than
6 million Charter Spectrum
cable TV homes nationwide
— including 1.5 million in the
Los Angeles region — were
swept up in the latest fee dispute between two major TV
companies. The two sides
have spent nearly two weeks
in a tense standoff over Tribune Media’s proposed fee increase for the right to carry
Tribune Media’s programming as part of the Spectrum pay-TV packages.
Spectrum is the brand
name for Charter’s pay-TV,
internet and phone service.
“We’re extremely disappointed that we do not have
an agreement on the renewal of our contract with Spectrum,” Gary Weitman, Tribune Media spokesman, said
Wednesday in a statement.
“We’ve offered Spectrum fair
[See Dispute, C3]
C2
T H U R S DAY , JA N UA RY 3 , 2 019
L AT I M E S . C O M / B U S I N E S S
BUSINESS BEAT
Sears
bidders
await
Friday
decision
Suitors include the
retailer’s chairman,
Edward Lampert, who
offered $4.4 billion.
By Lauren Zumbach
By the end of this week,
Sears Holdings Corp. Chairman Edward Lampert could
find out whether his push to
keep the bankrupt retailer
together and open for business still has a shot.
Lampert’s hedge fund,
ESL Investments, said last
week that it’s prepared to
pay $4.4 billion for many of
the retailer’s remaining assets, including about 425
Sears and Kmart stores. Friday was the deadline for
parties interested in acquiring Sears’ assets to submit
bids.
Transform Holdco, a new
entity controlled by Lampert’s fund, said in a letter to
Sears’ investment banker
that it believes keeping
Sears in business is the best
way to preserve as many as
50,000 jobs and recover money Sears owes. The letter,
dated Friday, was released
Wednesday in a regulatory
filing.
If Sears doesn’t accept
the $4.4-billion bid packaging many of the remaining
assets together, Transform
Holdco said it also would bid
on certain assets individually, including the Sears
Home Services business,
certain intellectual property
and real estate, and the logistics operation.
Sears has until Friday to
notify parties that submitted offers to buy its assets
whether they have been accepted as qualifying bids, according to a timeline approved by the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the Southern District of New York.
Transform Holdco said
that if Sears doesn’t accept
either proposal as a qualifying bid by Friday, both will
be withdrawn.
It’s unclear how many
other offers Sears received
or whether any would attempt to rescue the Hoffman Estates, Ill., company
rather than liquidate it.
Great American Group
submitted a bid with Tiger
Capital Group but declined
to share details of the offer. A
subsidiary of Los Angelesbased B. Riley Financial
Inc., Great American Group
partnered with Tiger Capital Group last year to buy
many of bankrupt retailer
Bon-Ton Stores’ assets and
liquidate that company. Another firm has since purchased Bon-Ton’s intellectual property and is working to revive its brands.
ESL’s $4.4-billion offer for
Sears includes $850 million
in cash, funded by a new $1.3billion loan from three financial institutions. It also includes a $1.3-billion credit
bid, in which ESL would
trade Sears debt it holds for
ownership in the new company.
Transform Holdco said it
wants Sears to confirm it will
be able to use the credit bid
to finance the purchase. The
company also wants Sears
to release ESL from liability
related to transactions with
the retailer before its bankruptcy filing.
In the letter, Transform
Holdco said it expects to
continue employing as many
as 50,000 Sears employees
under the $4.4-billion proposal, “depending on any
further actions Sears may
take between now and closing.”
Sears said it had 68,000
employees and 687 Sears
and Kmart stores when it
filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in October.
Last week, Sears said it
would close 80 stores in
March, bringing the total
number of closures announced since its bankruptcy filing to 262.
Zumbach writes for the
Chicago Tribune.
Wu Hong EPA-EFE/REX
AN APPLE STORE in Beijing. China and other emerging markets accounted for most of the company’s 2018 decline in iPhone revenue.
Apple cuts revenue forecast
CEO cites ‘economic deterioration’ in China, exacerbated by the U.S. trade war
By Tony Romm
Apple Inc. announced
Wednesday that it would
miss its revenue estimate for
the quarter that included
the holiday season — a rare
misfire that the company
blamed on unexpected challenges in the Chinese economy and the trade war between the United States and
China.
Months after unveiling
two new iPhones, Apple
Chief Executive Tim Cook
said in a note to investors
that the company had lowered its revenue guidance for
its fiscal first quarter —
which ended Dec. 29 — to $84
billion, down from its previous estimate of between $89
billion and $93 billion. The
announcement, made after
the close of markets, sent
Apple’s stock plunging more
than 7% in after-hours trading.
In explaining the change,
Cook said in his note that
Apple “did not foresee the
magnitude of the economic
deterioration” in markets including greater China. He
said most of the revenue
shortfall to the company’s
initial guidance “occurred in
greater
China
across
iPhone, Mac and iPad.”
Along
with
slowed
growth there in the second
half of last year, Cook said
that the “economic environment in China has been further impacted by rising
trade tensions with the
United States.”
“As the climate of mounting uncertainty weighed on
financial markets, the effects appeared to reach consumers as well, with traffic to
our retail stores and our
channel partners in China
declining as the quarter
progressed,” Cook said.
Shares of Apple have fallen 32% from an October
peak amid growing concerns
about the iPhone — by far
Apple’s most important
product line, comprising
more than 60% of the company’s 2018 revenue.
Although China and
other emerging markets accounted for the vast majority of year-over-year iPhone
revenue decline, in some developed markets, iPhone upgrades also weren’t as
strong as the company anticipated, Cook said.
In November, the company said it would stop reporting
unit
sales
of
iPhones, iPads and Macs beginning in fiscal 2019. That
sparked concern that Apple
wanted to avoid disclosing
weak growth numbers. But
the move also highlighted
the company’s desire to become more of a services
business. In the letter
Wednesday, Cook said Apple generated $10.8 billion in
services revenue during the
quarter. That would be a
27% increase from a year earlier.
Apple’s announcement is
likely to add further volatility to the stock market,
where
U.S.
technology
stocks have helped drive a
major correction in recent
months.
It also comes as the
Trump administration and
the Chinese are trying —
without success, so far — to
resolve a trade war in which
the two countries have put
tariffs on hundreds of billions of dollars’ worth of each
other’s goods.
While economists have
suspected that the Chinese
economy has been slowing,
it has not been clear how
much that might translate
into a decline in global economic growth that would hit
the United States.
The Apple earnings miss
suggests that the effects of
the China slowdown could
be reaching U.S. shores fairly
quickly.
The earnings miss also
shows how the trade war is
enveloping one of the biggest U.S. brands, which had
worked hard to get its product exempted from tariff
lists released by the Trump
administration.
Investors will probably
be wondering Thursday
whether Apple’s news is a
preview of what other technology, retail, auto and manufacturing companies are
facing.
Trump has put tariffs on
nearly half the goods China
sells to the United States
and has threatened to place
hefty tariffs on all Chinese
products coming into the
country
—
including
iPhones, which are currently
excluded from the additional taxes — if China’s
president doesn’t make a
deal Trump likes by early
March.
Romm writes for the
Washington Post.
Bloomberg was used in
compiling this report.
Stock analyst to
Amazon: Look
into gas stations
Such stores provide
delivery outposts, fuel
revenue and customer
data, firm advises.
By Ryan Vlastelica
Getty Images
CATHAY PACIFIC Airways this week erroneously offered business-class tickets
from Vietnam to North America worth $16,000 for economy prices as low as $675.
Travelers score in pricing error
Cathay will honor
airfares mistakenly
sold at steep discount.
bloomberg
Cathay Pacific Airways
made a mistake selling firstand business-class tickets at
a steep discount. Now, the
lucky few who made the
bookings will travel in style
after all.
The Hong Kong-based
airline said on its Twitter
and
Facebook
pages
Wednesday that it would
still welcome passengers
who bought the businessclass tickets from Vietnam
to Canada and the U.S. at
economy prices this week.
The online ticketing foulup meant fares as low as $675
from Da Nang in Vietnam to
New York at the front end of
the plane — a small fraction
of its original round-trip
price of about $16,000.
“We do not want to go
back on our promise to our
customers,” Cathay said on
its Twitter account. “We
made a mistake but we look
forward to welcoming you on
board with your ticket issued.”
While those passengers
will be happy, the mistake
adds to the embarrassments for the carrier that’s
struggling to turn its fortunes around while competition intensifies from Chinese
and budget airlines. The
pricing gaffe comes on the
heels of a sophisticated hack
on Cathay’s computer systems last year that exposed
the private information of 9.4
million passengers in the
world’s biggest airline data
breach.
Gary Leff, a travel and
loyalty-program blogger on
View from the Wing, wrote
on Dec. 31 that the Cathay
business-class round-trip
ticket from Da Nang to New
York started at $675 for travel in August. On Wednesday,
the same journey cost
around $16,000 for July and
September, according to the
airline’s website. Prices weren’t available for August.
Travel from Hanoi to
Vancouver and back in a mix
of business and first class
could cost less than $1,000,
according to a post on One
Mile at a Time.
Other airlines have made
similar pricing errors. Singapore Airlines in 2014 and
Hong Kong Airlines last year
honored business-class tickets mistakenly sold at economy prices. The carriers
didn’t disclose how many
people
purchased
the
cheaper tickets.
Cathay had sold tickets
to the U.S. and other destinations from Vietnam in a
promotional
offer
that
ended Dec. 31, according to
its website. Round-trip business tickets to Los Angeles
were priced from $2,940.
Amazon.com Inc. is a
dominant player in industries as diverse as cloud
computing, streaming media and e-commerce, but the
next area it should set its
sights on is more old-fashioned: gas stations.
That view comes courtesy of investment banking
firm D.A. Davidson, which
wrote that Amazon could
benefit from expanding its
portfolio of physical stores
— which already includes
pop-up shops and the Whole
Foods grocery chain — as
“another means for it to advance its delivery efforts.”
This comes after the Wall
Street Journal reported
Monday that Amazon was
planning to expand the
number of Whole Foods
stores.
Adding gas stations
would “provide the company
thousands of commercial locations to advance its delivery efforts,” analyst Tom
Forte wrote to clients.
He suggested that such
outposts could be used for
Amazon Locker, the company’s centralized packagepickup locations, or Amazon
Go, its cashierless checkout
technology. In addition, sell-
ing gas would provide another revenue source for Amazon; Forte noted that Costco
Wholesale Corp. derived 10%
of its revenue from gasoline
sales.
D.A. Davidson has a
“buy” rating on the stock,
along with a $2,450 price target, the highest of any on
Wall Street, according to
data
compiled
by
Bloomberg. The average
price target is $2,155, which
implies upside of 40% from
current levels. (The stock
rose 2.5% on Wednesday to
$1,539.13 a share.)
Gas stations would also
“provide the company additional data on the physical
whereabouts of consumers,”
as it would have “thousands
more locations where it
would know where consumers were shopping,” Forte
wrote in a Wednesday note
to clients.
Amazon derived 7.5% of
its third-quarter revenue
from physical stores, data
compiled by Bloomberg
show. More than half its
third-quarter revenue came
from online stores.
Amazon’s stock encountered bouts of heavy volatility in the second half of
2018. The shares dropped
more than 30% of their value
between
a
September
record high and a Dec. 24
bottom, though it ended the
year with a solid gain, up
28%.
Vlastelica writes for
Bloomberg.
T H U R S DAY , JA N UA RY 3 , 2 019
L AT I M E S . C O M / B U S I N E S S
C3
Average investor’s ally at SEC? Netflix
faulted
after
pulling
episode
Brett Redfearn is
praised as a regulator
who puts the little guy
first. Stock exchange
officials say he’s unfair.
By Stephen Gandel
It’s harder these days to
find reasons for stocks to
rise. But the recent 5,000point market plunge, and
seemingly daily swings,
when consumers are still
spending and the unemployment rate is at historical
lows, has more and more
people thinking that it’s not
the economy that is broken
— but the market.
Last month, Treasury
Secretary
Steven
T.
Mnuchin blamed high-frequency traders and the Volcker Rule, which restricts
trading by large banks, for
the market’s volatility. Better Markets, a nonprofit
group that advocates for
more market regulation and
is not normally aligned with
officials from the Trump administration,
seems
to
agree.
The group has called on
the Securities and Exchange
Commission to start monitoring for signs the market is
being impaired by new trading systems. “Computerdriven, high-frequency algo
trading has been driving
market drops, swings and
volatility for too long. The
damage to investors and our
economy has been incalculable,” Better Markets Chief
Executive Dennis Kelleher
said in a statement.
Even before the recent
volatility, SEC Chairman
Jay Clayton had linked the
drought in initial public offerings to a perception that
public markets were essentially rigged against “Mr. and
Mrs. 401(k).” Making markets appear more fair, Clayton has said, will bring back
IPOs and the economic opportunity they create.
And if there is a problem
with the stock market, the
person in charge of fixing it is
a former political science
graduate student who once
led student efforts against
nuclear waste and took a
year off from college to travel
the world with his guitar.
Meet Brett Redfearn, a
1987 graduate of Evergreen
State College who earned a
master’s degree in political
science from the New School
for Social Research. He was
named head of the SEC’s division of markets and trading in October 2017, and since
then has become, at least on
Wall Street, one of the most
divisive market regulators
under President Trump.
Investor advocates have
hailed Redfearn, a former
JPMorgan Chase & Co. exe-
deal needs regulatory approval. Tribune, which used
to belong to the same company as the Los Angeles
Times, struggled through a
four-year bankruptcy and
management changes.
“That company has gone
through major struggles and
felt lucky to get what they
could,” Nielson said.
There were about 140
television blackouts in 2018.
An impasse between Verizon
Communications Inc. and
TV broadcaster Tegna Inc.
resulted in an outage Monday of network affiliate stations in Washington, D.C.,
Norfolk, Va., and Buffalo,
N.Y., on Verizon FiOS systems.
Blackouts in 2018 were
down from a record 213 outages in 2017, according to the
American Television Alliance, a Washington lobbying
group that represents payTV operators.
The conflict is over socalled retransmission fees —
the money that cable, satellite TV and telephone companies must pay to broadcast local TV station signals
as part of their channel lineups. Television station owners in 2018 collected a combined $10 billion in such fees,
up from $9.3 billion in 2017,
according to the alliance.
Charter and the Los Angeles Times are collaborating on a news magazine
show called “L.A. Times Today,” which is scheduled to
launch in February on Charter’s Spectrum News 1 channel.
[Netflix, from C1]
its fiduciary duties as a public company.
“Streaming-media CEOs
aren’t going to be the guardians of moral principles.
They are the guardians of escalating share prices,” said
Eric Schiffer, chief executive
of Patriarch Equity, a private
equity firm specializing in
media
and
technology.
“We’re in the early innings of
how we navigate content
that’s designed to hit certain
audiences but is released to
a global village.”
“Patriot Act” host Hasan
Minhaj made the references
in an episode of the series titled “Saudi Arabia,” in which
the American comedian
criticized the kingdom’s conflicting explanations of
Khashoggi’s death.
“This is the most unbelievable cover story since
Blake Shelton won Sexiest
Man Alive,” Minhaj said in
the show.
The comedian also made
critical
remarks
about
Crown Prince Mohammed
bin Salman, saying in the episode that “now would be a
good time to reassess our relationship with Saudi Arabia.”
Netflix pulled the episode
after Saudi Arabia’s Communication and Information Technology Commission notified the company
that the episode was in violation of the kingdom’s anticybercrime law.
“We strongly support artistic freedom worldwide
and removed this episode
only in Saudi Arabia after we
had received a valid legal demand from the government
— and to comply with local
law,” a Netflix representative said in a statement.
The series went live globally in October and was
available around the world,
including Saudi Arabia, for
about two months before
the episode was pulled.
Khashoggi was killed
Oct. 2 in the Saudi Consulate in Istanbul, Turkey. The
Saudi citizen, who wrote columns for the Washington
Post, was critical of Mohammed, often taking the prince
to task over his domestic
and foreign policies.
The Saudi government’s
explanation of Khashoggi’s
torture and death has been
inconsistent. Although at
first the kingdom denied any
knowledge, it later said that
his killing was the result of a
rogue operation.
The Netflix incident further clouds Saudi Arabia’s
efforts to promote itself as
an entertainment destination. The kingdom has been
easing its restrictions on entertainment
in
recent
months, including signing a
pact with AMC Theatres to
open its first cinema.
This isn’t the first time
that Netflix has pulled its
content from a foreign country.
The streaming company
has removed drug-themed
content from its offerings in
Singapore, which has strict
laws regarding illegal substances. The shows and
movies affected by the decision included “Disjointed,”
“Cooking on High” and “The
Legend of 420.”
Major Hollywood studios
have long had to grapple
with censors in China. Studios frequently cast Chinese
actors in Hollywood films
and avoid thorny subjects
that might run afoul of regulators.
Netflix, however, has not
had to make such adjustments because it does not
have access to China’s vast
market.
For 2018, Netflix was expected to spend as much as
$15 billion on original and licensed movies and TV
shows, outpacing rivals such
as HBO and Amazon.
Netflix has been funding
its growth plans largely
through debt. For the recent
third quarter, the company
reported that its long-term
debt rose to $8.34 billion
from $4.89 billion in the yearago period.
Shares of Netflix broke
the $400 mark for the first
time in June but finished
2018 at $267.66. The stock
price is still up about 36% for
the year.
meg.james@latimes.com
Twitter: @MegJamesLAT
david.ng@latimes.com
Twitter: @DavidNgLAT
Spencer Platt Getty Images
AMID MARKET volatility, more and more people think it’s not the economy that is broken — but the market.
cutive who has long specialized in market structure, as
the first regulator in years
who puts individual investors first. “It was a room
driven by conflicts of interest,” said former Sen. Ted
Kaufman of Delaware, who
served on a panel on market
structure during the Obama
administration. “That was
not the case with Brett.”
Officials from the main
stock exchanges, though,
have a different view of Redfearn. They contend he has
little care for fairness and is
just trying to rewrite the
rules to boost the profits of
his former employer and
other large banks. Redfearn
and the SEC declined to
comment.
But even if Redfearn’s
proposed reforms come with
good intentions, some seem
positive they will do little to
address the market’s growing volatility or the lack of
IPOs. “Market structure is
about the 13th most important contributor to the lack
of IPOs,” said University of
Florida finance professor
Jay Ritter, an expert on initial public offerings. “It has
contributed to perhaps one
less IPO a decade.”
Redfearn has long been
one of Wall Street’s top experts on market structure.
He was laid off from his first
job in urban planning at New
York’s Port Authority before
landing at the American
Stock Exchange. “He would
take the lead in client meetings even when I was there,”
says Sal Sodano, who was
CEO of the Amex at the
time. Redfearn later went to
Bear Stearns and joined JPMorgan when it bought Bear
in the run-up to the financial
crisis. At JPMorgan, he
wrote a widely followed
newsletter on market structure.
Now at the SEC, the issues that Redfearn is tackling have been around for a
while. In mid-2009, Sen.
Chuck Schumer of New York
called on the SEC to outlaw a
technique, called flash orders, that some argued unfairly allowed certain traders to see the buy and sell
intentions of others before
the rest of the market. It was
only one of the techniques
that high-frequency traders
used, but the name stuck. A
few years later, Michael Lewis wrote “Flash Boys,” and
the controversy over highfrequency went high pitch.
Lewis called the market
rigged. Mary Jo White, who
headed the SEC at the time,
pledged to investigate but in
the end did little to curtail
high-speed traders.
Redfearn, on the other
hand, seems intent on taking action. Brad Katsuyama, who founded the
upstart
exchange
IEX
Group and is the hero of
“Flash Boys,” is a Redfearn
fan. “I know the exchanges
are pushing the narrative
that Brett is conflicted, but
it is counterfactual,” Katsuyama said. “The exchanges should be held to a
higher standard. Brett has a
lot of support and a longterm track record of protecting the interests of investors.”
Redfearn’s most controversial proposal, which
would affect the trading of
hundreds of stocks for as
long as two years, is a pilot
program that would limit
the incentives — in the form
of rebates — that exchanges
pay to attract trades.
Critics contend the system of access fees and rebates, for which the exchanges typically charge a
stock buyer 30 cents for every 100 shares, and rebate as
much as 27 cents of that fee
to the seller, or vice versa —
lead brokers, particularly
those who cater to individual investors, to send their
trades to exchanges that offer the highest rebates but
not necessarily the best
price. The difference in price
is probably cents or less,
which is why many individual investors don’t notice, but
that adds up on millions of
trades
A number of large pension funds and mutual fund
companies support the pilot
program, which has been approved but has no official
start date. Others say it’s unnecessary. Virtu Financial
Inc., one of the largest highfrequency firms, argues it
will be disruptive and that
the rebates improve the
prices that individuals receive, not the opposite. Brokers say the rebates don’t alter where they send trades.
The exchanges say they, like
any other company, should
have the right to price their
products as they like.
But at the very least, the
access fees that are largely
rebated seem like the equivalent of duct tape — a messy
and incomplete solution to
the real problem, which is
that equity markets left
largely alone have evolved
into a complicated and fragmented mess.
Redfearn has also caught
ire from the exchanges for
questioning the fees they
charge for data, which many
contend are too high and a
result of the duopoly hold
Nasdaq and the New York
Stock Exchange have on
stock markets. Redfearn has
been a vocal critic of those
data fees for years, something that has won him
friends even among the
high-frequency
trading
crowd.
“He’s invited everyone to
the table, and there has been
some heated discussions,”
said Kirsten Wegner, the
CEO of Modern Markets Initiative, a group that advocates for the interests of
high-frequency
trading
firms. “He’s done a great job,
but he’s going to have a busy
next year.”
The biggest question is
whether any of these
changes will make markets
fairer. With Uber Technologies Inc. and other prominent private companies considering going public, the
IPO market seems to be on
the upswing. What’s more,
investors pay far less than
they did to trade even a decade ago, so it’s hard to argue
they’re getting a raw deal.
And achieving a level
playing field between average investors and professionals, who spend millions
on data and computing
power, may be an unrealistic
goal. But for markets to appear fair, investors need a
regulator who is putting in
some effort to seek it. And
whether Redfearn finds the
right balance, it’s clear that
he is looking. In the end, that
could be the most important
thing he does.
Gandel writes a column for
Bloomberg.
Tribune TV stations go dark on Charter
[Dispute, from C1]
market rates for our toprated local news, live sports
and high-quality entertainment programming.... Spectrum has refused our offer
and failed to negotiate in a
meaningful fashion.”
Charter, in a statement,
called the blackout “unfortunate.” The Stamford,
Conn.,
company
complained that Tribune simply
wanted too much money for
its programming.
“Tribune is demanding
an increase of more than
double what we pay today
for the same programming,”
a Charter representative
said in an email statement.
“That is more than we pay
any other broadcaster.
They’re not being reasonable.”
Tribune Media has been
demanding that Charter
pay higher fees for the rights
to retransmit the signals of
33 Tribune television stations in Charter Spectrum
markets.
The
Chicago
broadcaster also asked
Charter to pay more to carry
Tribune Media’s cable channel, WGN America.
The outage occurred during
KTLA’s
afternoon
broadcast of the “Jerry
Springer” show. Some Spectrum customers in Los Angeles instead saw a message
on their screens saying:
“Tribune is demanding a ridiculous increase.... We offered a fair price and they insist we pay them materially
more than we pay any other
of the 1,700 broadcast stations we carry.”
Spectrum customers will
miss KTLA’s popular morn-
Allen J. Schaben Los Angeles Times
THE OUTAGE of Tribune Media TV stations occurred Wednesday afternoon
during KTLA’s broadcast of “Jerry Springer.” Above, KTLA’s studios in L.A.
ing newscasts — unless they
use a digital antenna to continue to receive the station’s
signal. Tribune’s KSWB
Channel 5 station in San Diego, which carries Fox network programming, including NFL football, also is included in the outage.
The companies’ previous
contract expired at 9 p.m.
Monday, but the two sides
agreed to a short-term extension to bridge the New
Year’s holiday. But that extension expired at 2 p.m.
Wednesday.
Tribune also owns CBS
and Fox affiliate stations, including KSWB, so the two
companies will be under
pressure to strike an accord
before Saturday, when the
NFL playoffs begin. In San
Diego, KSWB is scheduled
to air the Seattle SeahawksDallas Cowboys wildcard
game Saturday. In Indianapolis, Tribune owns both
the Fox and CBS station affiliates — and the Colts are in
the playoffs too.
Charter said NFL football fans could access playoff
games through mobile apps
that are available from the
NFL and Yahoo Sports.
The showdown comes at
a troubled time for the payTV industry. Charter and
other cable operators have
struggled to control programming costs in an effort
to stanch a migration of customers
to
lower-cost
streaming services. The payTV industry was projected
to lose 1.1 million customers
in 2018, including more than
200,000 cable TV subscribers
from Charter, according to
recent estimates from MoffettNathanson Research.
“Retransmission renewals have become more contentious,” said Justin Nielson, a senior research analyst with Kagan. “The distributors are just getting
squeezed. They are losing
customers to cord-cutting
and paying higher and
higher fees for programming.”
Nielson added that Tribune’s rates were considerably lower than rates of
other TV station owners,
such as CBS or Nexstar Media Group Inc., which agreed
in December to buy Tribune
Media for $4.1 billion. That
C4
THURSDAY, JANUARY 3, 2019
LOS ANGELES TIMES
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T H U R S DAY , JA N UA RY 3 , 2 019
L AT I M E S . C O M / B U S I N E S S
C5
Light penalties for seized firearms
[Firearms, from C1]
In addition, such offenders seldom face the maximum penalty that the TSA
could impose: up to $13,333
in civil fines and possible referral for criminal prosecution.
Some lawmakers and law
enforcement
representatives consider the punishment for such offenses to be
too lenient and have pushed
for more stringent penalties.
The Times’ analysis of
court records for the 50
weapons-toting travelers arrested at LAX and brought
before the Los Angeles city
attorney for prosecution
during the sample period
found:
8 In 70% of the cases, suspects were convicted or referred to a diversion program.
8 The remaining 30% of
the cases were dismissed,
are still pending or the city
attorney declined to prosecute.
8 Of the travelers who
were convicted, more than
half were sentenced to 12
months or more of probation.
8 The most common fine
imposed by the court for
possession of a prohibited
item at an airport was $500
— half the maximum. The
lightest fine was $250.
8 The most severe punishment was imposed on a
rock singer from Missouri,
who spent 20 days in jail and
was placed on three years of
summary probation for trying to bring a pellet gun onto
a plane.
Three of the 50 cases were
directed to the city’s Neighborhood Justice Program.
Under that program, people
accused of misdemeanor
crimes appear before a community panel, which can order the offender to perform
community service, write a
letter of apology, pay restitution or take self-improvement classes.
“Sentences vary based on
the individual facts and
strength of the case, and the
defendant’s criminal history,” said Rob Wilcox, a
spokesman for the Los Angeles city attorney’s office.
If a passenger is suspected of trying to bring a
weapon through an airport
checkpoint with the intention of committing a terrorist act, the case is turned
over to the U.S. attorney’s office for prosecution. The records analyzed by The
Times showed no such instance during the 33-month
period.
The TSA separately can
impose fines for bringing a
firearm or other forbidden
items to a security checkpoint or onto an airplane.
The fines vary based on the
item and whether there are
aggravating circumstances,
such as repeat violations.
For the cases analyzed
since the start of 2016, the
TSA imposed an average
fine of $1,109.
In 35% of the LAX cases,
the TSA imposed no fine,
with the agency explaining
in a statement that gunpacking fliers who were
members of law enforcement or the military often
aren’t fined. In those cases,
the TSA said it usually notifies the traveler’s employer
or the Defense Department
and lets it decide on punishment.
“Under the agency’s civil
enforcement guidance, TSA
has the latitude to determine the amount of the penalty based on the specific cir-
Irfan Khan Los Angeles Times
THE HEAD of the union that represents TSA employees wants harsher penalties imposed on travelers who try to carry guns onto planes.
Frazer Harrison Getty Images
ACTOR David Henrie
had a loaded handgun in
his carry-on bag at LAX.
TSA
BESIDES firearms, forbidden items that TSA officials found in carry-on luggage
include explosives, knives, replica weapons, axes, blowtorches and machetes.
cumstances of each incident, including considering
the person’s prior history,
whether the firearm was
loaded or had ammunition
nearby, the amount of ammunition, etc.,” TSA spokeswoman Lorie Dankers said.
TSA penalties imposed
on the LAX violators ranged
from $125 to $3,000, with the
fine rising if the firearms
were loaded or were purposely hidden to try to get
past screeners, the agency
said.
The TSA may impose a
lower penalty or none at all if
the firearms are inoperable.
The TSA will cut the fine in
half if the violator agrees to
pay it within 30 days.
Despite the potential
punishment, the number of
firearms uncovered at the
nation’s airports has grown
sharply over the last five
years.
In 2017, the most recent
year for which data are available, a record 3,957 firearms
— nearly 11 a day — were discovered in carry-on bags at
airport checkpoints across
the country, a 17% increase
from the previous year, according to the TSA. Of the
guns uncovered in 2017, 84%
were loaded.
The total does not include the hundreds of other
forbidden items found in
carry-on luggage, including
explosives, knives and replica weapons.
Several lawmakers and
police unions say stiffer penalties might deter such behavior.
Marshall McClain, president of the Los Angeles Airport Peace Officers Assn.,
the union that represents officers who make arrests at
LAX, said his group supports harsher punishment
and would like for guns to be
declared illegal in all airport
terminals and gates.
“Our stance is: What do
you need a gun at an airport
for?” he said.
McClain noted that TSA
Officer Gerardo Hernandez
was killed Nov. 1, 2013, at LAX
by a gunman who had a fixation with TSA officers, accusing them of mistreating
innocent travelers.
“A lot hasn’t changed
since then,” he said.
J. David Cox Sr., president of the American Federation of Government Em-
ployees, whose members include TSA workers, also
wants to see harsher penalties imposed on travelers
who try to carry guns onto
planes but declined to say
what those penalties should
be.
“These dangerous weapons have no place in our airports, and their presence is a
danger to our officers,” he
said. “We fully support increases in fines and penalties for bringing firearms
into TSA checkpoints, and
hope those penalties will deter future travelers from trying to sneak them through
security.”
The legislation to continue funding of the Federal
Aviation Administration for
five years included language
calling for the TSA to review
regulations and policies on
the transportation of firearms, said Rep. Bennie G.
Thompson (D-Miss.), soon
to be chairman of the House
Committee on Homeland
Security.
The bill was signed into
law by President Trump on
Oct. 5.
The TSA has started the
policy review and plans to
submit a report to Congress
on the one-year anniversary
of the FAA bill, as required
by law.
Thompson said he hopes
the review will include looking at raising penalties for
people who try to carry firearms onto a plane.
“While mistakes happen,
it is clear there’s been a
dramatic increase in firearms discovered at airport
security checkpoints that
should not be dismissed or
go unaddressed,” he said.
It was apparently a mistake when Kevin Patrick
Cavanaugh, 60, was caught
in April 2017 with a loaded
.32-caliber handgun in his
carry-on bag at LAX. An Xray machine detected the
gun, and TSA screeners
alerted Los Angeles Airport
Police.
He was arrested on three
misdemeanor counts, including possession of a prohibited item at an airport.
In court a month later,
Cavanaugh pleaded no contest and was fined $720, put
on probation for 12 months
and ordered to perform
three days of labor for the
state.
When reached by email,
he described the incident as
“an embarrassing mistake”
but declined to comment
further.
Wesley Reid Scantlin, the
frontman for the postgrunge band Puddle of Mud
d, was arrested in September 2017 for trying to board a
plane at LAX with a BB gun.
His punishment was the
most severe of all the cases
analyzed in the 33-month
period beginning Jan. 1, 2016.
When he was arrested at
LAX, Scantlin, originally
from Kansas City, Mo., was
already on probation for allegedly vandalizing a Hollywood Hills house he lost to
foreclosure in 2016. He
pleaded no contest in that
case and was sentenced to
three years of formal probation.
After his arrest at LAX,
Scantlin’s bail was set at
$36,000 — an amount that is
common for such charges —
though he did not post bond
and remained in jail. At a
pretrial hearing three weeks
later, he withdrew his initial
not-guilty plea and pleaded
no contest to one count of
having a prohibited item in
an airport, according to
court records.
He was sentenced to 20
days in jail and three years’
probation, fined $245 and ordered not to possess or use
drugs, court records show.
The judge credited Scantlin
for the time he already had
spent behind bars waiting
for trial.
The TSA declined to disclose the civil fines imposed
on Henrie, Cavanaugh and
Scantlin in addition to the
penalties ordered by the
court, but a TSA official said
fines are adjusted to reflect
the severity of the crimes.
Scantlin never got his BB
gun back.
As usually happens with
firearms collected by TSA
screeners, the court ordered
that Scantlin’s gun be destroyed by airport police.
hugo.martin@latimes.com
ben.poston@latimes.com
MARKET ROUNDUP
Stock indexes start new year with more turbulence
First trading day of
2019 sees a plunge and
then a slight gain.
associated press
The roller-coaster ride on
Wall
Street
resumed
Wednesday, the first trading
day of the new year. Stocks
plunged early on, then
slowly recovered and finished with a slight gain.
The Dow Jones industrial
average dropped as much as
398 points in the first few
minutes of trading after
more shaky economic news
from China. But it gradually
recouped those losses, and a
small rally in the last 15 minutes of trading left major indexes a bit higher than
where they started.
A Chinese government
survey and one by a major
Major stock indexes
Index
Dow industrials
Close
Daily
change
Daily %
change
YTD %
change
+0.08
23,346.24
+18.78
+0.08
S&P 500
2,510.03
+3.18
+0.13
+0.13
Nasdaq composite
6,665.94
+30.66
+0.46
+0.46
S&P 400
1,657.93
-5.11
-0.31
-0.31
Russell 2000
1,355.90
+7.34
+0.54
+0.54
2,758.77
-1.29
-0.05
-0.05
20,014.77
25,130.35
—
-687.97
—
-2.66
—
-2.66
EuroStoxx 50
Nikkei (Japan)
Hang Seng (Hong Kong)
Source: AP
business magazine showed
manufacturing in China
weakened in December as
global and domestic demand cooled. That weighed
on big exporters. Tech companies such as Microsoft
and industrials such as Boeing took sharp losses early
on, then bounced back.
That kind of whiplash
was typical during the last
three months of 2018, and
many strategists think it is
likely to continue.
After trading ended
Wednesday, Apple gave a
sales forecast that was far
worse than expected. In aftermarket trading, Apple fell
7%. Other tech firms, especially chipmakers, sank too.
Some of last year’s worst
performers, including energy and internet companies,
led the gainers Wednesday.
After gliding gently up for
years, propelled by rising
corporate profits and extremely low interest rates
from the Federal Reserve,
stocks have been heaving up
and down in recent months
as fears weigh on investors.
Stocks are coming off
their worst year in a decade.
The benchmark Standard &
Poor’s 500 index fell 6% in
2018, its first substantial loss
since 2008, and slid 14% since
late September. Many stock
indexes around the world
fared even worse last year.
The U.S. economy has
been expanding for almost a
decade, and stocks have risen steadily over that time. In
September through December, however, investors became more and more worried that challenges such as
the U.S.-China trade war,
rising interest rates and political uncertainty could
slow the economy and com-
pany profits, and possibly
tip the U.S. economy and the
global one into recession.
Many Wall Street banks
are forecasting a year of
modest gains for stocks. But
most also say they expect
sharp reversals to continue
as investors try to handicap
so many unknowns.
Vinay Pande, head of
trading strategies for UBS
Global Wealth Management, said company earnings jumped in 2018 and are
likely to keep improving.
The S&P 500 index finished Wednesday with a gain
of 3.18 points, or 0.1%, at
2,510.03. The Dow rose 18.78
points, or 0.1%, to 23,346.24.
The Nasdaq composite
climbed 30.66 points, or 0.5%,
to 6,665.94.
Most
markets
were
closed Tuesday for New
Year’s Day.
Prices on long-term government bonds rose, a sign
investors were looking for
safer options. The yield on
the 10-year Treasury note fell
to 2.63% from 2.69%.
After sharp losses at the
start of trading, benchmark
U.S. crude jumped 2.5% to
$46.54 a barrel. Brent crude,
used to price international
oils, rose 2.1% to $54.91 a barrel. Those gains helped lift
energy stocks.
Oil prices have fallen
about 40% since early October, with investors thinking
demand for energy could
weaken as economic growth
slowed. That led to sharp
drops in energy stocks.
Julian Emanuel, chief equity and derivatives strategist for BTIG, said investors
often start a new year by
buying the stocks that did
the worst the year before.
Healthcare firms, 2018’s
best-performing sector, fell
Wednesday as drugmakers
and insurers lost ground.
C6
T H U R S DAY , JA N UA RY 3 , 2 019
L AT I M E S . C O M / B U S I N E S S
Tesla shares slide 7% on sales report
[Tesla, from C1]
Perhaps most worrying
of all, from a financial standpoint, the company cut
prices $2,000 on all vehicles
sold in the U.S. — the Model
S, the Model X and the Model 3. That move, which the
company said is meant to
offset expiring federal subsidies for zero-emission vehicles, could boost demand
but at the cost of revenue,
cash flow and profit margins.
Investors didn’t take the
news well. Tesla’s stock price
slid as much as 10% in early
trading, and closed down
nearly 7%, at $310.12.
Even Tesla optimists
were taken aback. “This
quarter, the bulls were hoping for more, and we didn’t
get it,” said Daniel Ives, a
stock analyst at Wedbush
Securities who has a target
price of $440 on Tesla stock.
The results “bolster the
bears in the near term,” he
said, although he thinks
Tesla is in the “early innings”
of its corporate history.
Naturally, the bears take
a different view.
“The
Tesla
‘hypergrowth’ story is over,” said
Mark Spiegel, whose Stanphyl Capital hedge fund
holds a significant short position in Tesla. “Now it’s just
an egregiously overpriced,
money-losing car company
in an extremely competitive,
capital-intensive industry
bringing out a massive number of newer and better electric cars.”
Tesla noted that it sold
245,240 vehicles in 2018 —
145,846 Model 3s and 99,394
of the models S and X. “To
put our growth into perspective, we delivered almost as
many vehicles in 2018 as we
did in all prior years combined,” the company said in
a news release. But the company has yet to turn an annual profit on those sales.
Bulls and bears both acknowledge that 2019 will
prove a challenge for Tesla.
The pioneer for the first time
will face serious electric-car
competition from the likes of
Jaguar, Audi, Porsche and
Mercedes-Benz on the high
end, and from Hyundai, Kia
and others in lower-price
categories.
David Zalubowski Associated Press
SALES of Tesla’s Model 3 fell below expectations, rising 13% in the fourth quarter; hopes were for 17%. Above, a Model 3 in July.
Ives sees Model 3 sales in
Europe and China this year
restoring investor faith in
Tesla growth. Both are huge
markets,
though
Tesla
hasn’t yet begun shipping
Model 3s to either.
But China’s auto market
declined in 2018 and is expected to fall further this
year. Tariffs and trade tensions with China add more
uncertainty. A punitive tariff
of 25% on U.S. automakers
imposed by China was recently suspended for three
months, starting Tuesday.
That put U.S. carmakers
such as Tesla on par with the
rest of the world, at 15%.
Tesla said Wednesday
that Model 3 deliveries in
Europe and China will begin
in February, but made no
mention of volume.
Tesla apparently has not
received so-called “homologation” approval to sell cars
in Europe. Safety standards
in the U.S. and Europe differ,
and approval indicates the
cars are safe to sell in European countries.
The company said it is
working closely with European regulators and expects
approval “after the holidays,” but declined to say
how long after the holidays.
In an investor report, according to Bloomberg, Nomura Securities said fourthquarter deliveries will prove
to be “as good as it gets” for
the next one to two quarters,
partly due to the phase-out
of federal taxpayer subsidies
for Tesla buyers. On Tuesday, the federal tax credit
available to Tesla buyers
dropped from $7,500 to
$3,750. California’s $2,500
credit remains in place.
The federal credit begins
winding down after an automaker has sold a total of
200,000 electric cars. For
Tesla, the credit will be re-
Legal Notices
CITY OF LOS ANGELES
ENVIRONMENTAL NOTICES
Notice is hereby given to the general public of the availability
for public review and comment on the following environmental
documents. Please call the telephone number listed in each
particular item for information regarding the location where
the document is available for the review and where written
comments must be addressed. CD indicates the City
Council District. The publication is intended to serve as our
Notice of Intent to adopt the following Proposed Mitigated
Negative Declaration (MND) or Negative Declaration (ND).
NG-18-086-BE: Mitigated Negative Declaration/Initial Study
for the 1st and Broadway Civic Center Park project. The
project site is located at the northeast corner of 1st Street
and Broadway in the Civic Center area of downtown Los
Angeles. The address is at 126 N. Broadway, Los Angeles,
California 90012.
In 2013, the City of Los Angeles acquired the project
site from the State of California, with the intent to seek
development opportunities that would reduce blight, and
increase the health and safety at the site. The acquisition
process included site demolition, and hazardous materials
remediation and abatement activities. The project site is
currently a vacant dirt lot that is used as a surface parking
facility and holds occasional special events. The proposed
project includes construction of a 1.96-acre park, featuring
both landscaped and hardscaped areas to accommodate
a wide variety of park activities, programs, and events, at
the northeast corner of West 1st Street and Broadway in
downtown Los Angeles. The proposed project would also
include a new two-story, 19,200-square-foot building for
restaurant uses. Other site improvements would include a
bicycle parking area, outdoor seating areas, landscaping
with a variety of plants and trees for public enjoyment,
walking pathways and passive recreational uses, and new
lighting. The intent of the proposed project is to create a
world-class iconic park at the core of Los Angeles’ Civic
Center area. Construction of the proposed project would last
for approximately two years beginning in Summer/Fall 2019
and concluding in Summer/Fall 2021.
The proposed project Initial Study/Mitigated Negative
Declaration will be circulated for a thirty (30) day public
review period, beginning on January 3, 2019 and ending on
February 1, 2019. Copies of the document are available for
review at the following locations:
Little Tokyo Branch Library, 203 S. Los Angeles Street, CA
90012
Chinatown Branch Library, 639 N. Hill Street, Los Angeles,
CA 90012
Los Angeles Central Library, 630 W. 5th Street, Los Angeles,
CA 90071
Council District 14 Office, 200 N. Spring Street, Room 465,
Los Angeles, CA 90012
City of Los Angeles Department of Public Works, Bureau
of Engineering, EMG, 1149 S. Broadway, Suite 600, Los
Angeles, CA 90015
A copy of the document may also be obtained by contacting
Talmage Maxwell Jordan of the Bureau of Engineering at
(213) 485-5754, by visiting the office address listed below, or
by viewing the Bureau of Engineering website at: http://eng.
lacity.org/techdocs/emg/projects.htm
All comments must be submitted in writing no later than
5:00 p.m. on February 4, 2019 by mailing, emailing (please
include “First and Broadway Civic Center Park Comments”
in the subject line), faxing to (213) 847-0656, or hand delivery
to: Talmage Maxwell Jordan (talmage.jordan@lacity.org),
City of Los Angeles, Department of Public Works, Bureau
of Engineering, 1149 S. Broadway, Suite 600, Mail Stop 939,
Los Angeles, CA 90015
PUBLIC MEETING: A public meeting will be held during the
Initial Study/Mitigated Negative Declaration public review
period to solicit comments from interested parties on the
content of the Initial Study/Mitigated Negative Declaration.
This meeting will be held at the following date, time, and
location:
Tuesday, January 15, 2019 - 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 pm
Los Angeles Police Department Headquarters, Ronald F.
Deaton Civic Auditorium, 100 W. 1st Street
Los Angeles, CA 90012
LAT 01/03/2019
PUBLIC AUCTION
In accordance with the provisions of State law, there being
due and unpaid charges for which the undersigned is
entitled to satisfy an owner and/or manager’s lien of the
goods hereinafter described and stored at the Life Storage
location(s) listed below.
And, due notice having been given, to the owner of said
property and all parties known to claim an interest therein,
and the time specified in such notice for payment of such
having expired, the goods will be sold at public auction at the
below stated location(s) to the highest bidder or otherwise
disposed of on:
Day/Time: Tuesday, January 22nd, 2019 at 11:00 a.m.
Location: Life Storage #605
17392 Murphy Ave. Irvine CA 92614
Direct #: (949)222-0270
Customer Name/Inventory
Ray Smith Household Goods/Furniture, Tools/Appliances
Gwendolyn Hill Household Goods/Furniture
Melissa Rincon-Diaz Household Goods/Furniture, Tools/
Appliances
Charles Johnston Household Goods/Furniture, Tools/
Appliances
Ruka Itazu Household Goods/Furniture, TV/Stereo
Equipment, Tools/Appliances Offce Furn/Machine/Equip.
DP 01/04 & 01/11/2019
NOTICE TO CREDITORS OF BULK SALE
AND OF INTENTION TO TRANSFER
ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE LICENSE(S)
(UCC Sec. 6105 et seq. and
B & P 24073 et seq.)
Escrow No. 18-36987-MK
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a bulk sale of assets
and a transfer of alcoholic beverage license(s) is about to
be made. The name(s) and business address(es) of the
Seller(s)/Licensee(s) are: FINEWELL CORPORATION, 2052
NEWPORT BLVD, STE 1 & 2, COSTA MESA, CA 92627
Doing Business as: MINUTE KING LIQUOR
All other business names(s) and address(es) used by the
Seller(s)/Licensee(s) within the past three years, as stated by
the Seller(s)/Licensee(s), is/are: NONE
The name(s) and address of the Buyer(s)/Applicant(s) is/are:
MINUTE KING ALHOSRY, INC., 13040 GLENOAKS BLVD,
SYLMAR, CA 91342
The assets being sold are generally described as:
FURNITURES,
FIXTURES,
EQUIPMENTS,
TOOLS,
TRADENAME, GOODWILL, LEASEHOLD INTEREST,
LEASEHOLD IMPROVEMENTS, ALL TRANSFERABLE
PERMITS, LICENSES AND INVENTORY OF STOCK IN
TRADE and is/are located at: 2052 NEWPORT BLVD, STE 1
& 2, COSTA MESA, CA 92627
The type of license(s) and license no(s) to be transferred is/
are: 21-OFF-SALE-GENERAL License #21-378042 And are
now issued for the premises located at: SAME
The bulk sale and transfer of alcoholic beverage license(s)
is/are intended to be consummated at the office of: TEAM
ESCROW, 17310 REDHILL AVE, SUITE 140, IRVINE, CA
92614 and the anticipated sale/transfer is FEBRUARY 19,
2019
The purchase price or consideration in connection with the
sale of the business and transfer of the license, is the sum of
$730,000.00, including inventory estimated at $100,000.00,
which consists of the following: DESCRIPTION, AMOUNT:
CHECK (LOAN) $350,000.00; PROMISSORY NOTE
$100,000.00; CASH $280,000.00; ALLOCATION TOTAL
$730,000.00
It has been agreed between the Seller(s)/Licensee(s) and the
intended Buyer(s)/Applicant(s), as required by Sec. 24073 of
the Business and Professions code, that the consideration
for transfer of the business and license is to be paid only
after the transfer has been approved by the Department of
Alcoholic Beverage Control.
Seller(s)/Licensee(s): FINEWELL CORPORATION
Buyer(s)/Applicant(s): MINUTE KING ALHOSRY, INC.
LA2173741 DAILY PILOT 01/03/2019
CITY OF LOS ANGELES
ENVIRONMENTAL NOTICES
Notice is hereby given to the general public of the
availability for public review and comment on the following
Environmental documents. Please email your comments
to Darlene Navarrete at darlene.navarrete@lacity.org. CD
indicates the City Council District, sf indicates square feet
and LAMC indicates Los Angeles Municipal Code. This
publication is intended to serve as our Notice of Intent to
adopt the following Mitigated Negative Declaration (MND)
or Negative Declaration (ND). Documents are also available
online at the Dept. of City Planning’s website http://planning.
lacity.org/.
NEGATIVE
DECLARATION-NG-18-087-PL:
ENV-20184709. 10247 N Variel Ave; Chatsworth-Porter Ranch.
CD12. The proposed project involves the demolition of
an existing single-family dwelling unit & the construction,
use & maintenance of a new 3-story, 32-unit multi-family
dwelling with 1 level of at grade parking. The project will
involve the grading & export of approx. 84 cubic yards of
dirt to accommodate the proposed development. The
requested entitlement includes a Zone Change from (T)P-1
to (T)(Q)RAS3-1. Please call (213)978-1262 to review file.
Documents are available for review at: Los Angeles City Hall,
200 N. Spring St., Rm 763 Los Angeles, CA 90012. REVIEW/
COMMENT period ends: Jan.23, 2019
LAT 01/03/2019
duced again in July, to $1,875,
and will disappear Jan 1.
General Motors hit the
200,000 threshold in December with its Volt and Bolt EV
hybrid and all-electric vehicles, according to Reuters.
Under the federal credit
rules, GM’s $7,500 credit
would be extended until
April 1, after which it would
decline to $3,750 for qualifying cars. Both GM and Tesla
are lobbying Congress to extend the subsidies.
The coming year will determine how price-sensitive
Model 3 shoppers are. As recently as May, the company
reported at least 420,000
people had put down $1,000
deposits for a Model 3. But
by summer Tesla had ended
the reservation program.
How many of the reservation holders have asked for
refunds and how many remain, Tesla won’t say. Also
unknown: how many are
waiting for the least-expensive, $35,000 version. More
than three-quarters of Mod-
el 3 orders in the fourth
quarter came from new customers, rather than reservation holders, Tesla said
Wednesday, which may indicate that those with reservations are waiting for the lessexpensive car.
In a note to investors,
Bernstein stock analyst
Toni Sacconaghi said: “We
estimate that nearly three
quarters of Model 3 reservation holders in the U.S. have
not yet ordered a Model 3. It
is unclear if this is bullish
(latent demand) or bearish
(lost interest).”
Musk has indicated Tesla
might ship the $35,000 Model 3 in 2019, though he acknowledged it couldn’t do so
profitably at current production numbers. To date
it’s impossible to buy a Model 3 for under $45,000, when
delivery charges are included. A high-end Model 3
with full options can carry a
price tag of more than
$70,000.
Analyst Ives said in a
written report he was puzzled that, with the $7,500
credit running out, more
Model 3s weren’t sold. “The
lack of a significant pull forward [of future sales] was a
bit of a surprise to the bulls
in terms of 4Q Model 3 deliveries and will weigh on
shares accordingly.”
russ.mitchell@latimes.com
Times staff writer
Samantha Masunaga and
the Associated Press
contributed to this report.
Drug
firms
delaying
hikes?
They may be altering
their timing to avoid
scrutiny, analysts say.
bloomberg
With drugmakers under
the microscope, price increases on branded medicines are off to a slow start in
2019.
According to a Goldman
Sachs analysis, prices were
raised on about 27% of the
top 500 branded drugs,
down from 47% last year.
The average list price increase was 4%, half what it
was in 2018.
“The lower magnitude of
brand price increases could
present modest downside
risk to wholesaler earnings,”
healthcare services analyst
Robert Jones wrote in a note
to clients.
Michael Rea, the founder
and chief executive of RX
Savings Solutions, thinks
many pharmaceutical companies will wait to raise drug
prices until after the first
week of January, when most
pricing activity has historically taken place. “People
will play the game differently
to avoid the spotlight and fly
under the radar,” he said.
“We think it is worth noting that 98% of the annual
January list price increases
were taken by this time last
year,” Raymond James analyst Elliot Wilbur wrote.
“Clearly, more caution is in
the air and many major
multinationals such as
Pfizer and Novartis, which
found themselves making
the
headlines
several
months back, have yet to implement their January increases.”
Wilbur suspects that
many of the major drugmakers are taking a “wait-andsee approach,” although one
player that hasn’t held off is
Allergan. The maker of
Botox and other aesthetic
treatments as well as specialty medicines has raised
prices on seven product
lines with a median increase
of 9.5%, the same as last year,
Wilbur said.
The Wall Street Journal
reported more dramatic
price hikes at Hikma Pharmaceuticals. The London
company boosted prices on
some medicines by as much
as 30%.
D
SPORTS
T H U R S D A Y , J A N U A R Y 3 , 2 0 1 9 :: L A T I M E S . C O M / S P O R T S
By George,
Thunder
sink Lakers
Forward answers boos
from Staples Center
crowd with game-high
37 points.
OKLAHOMA CITY 107
LAKERS 100
By Tania Ganguli
Paul George went to the
free-throw line to attempt
two free throws for his injured teammate Terrance
Ferguson. As he waited to
take the shots, a section of
fans at Staples Center began
to chant four words at him.
“We don’t need you!”
George made the two free
throws and the chant didn’t
catch on. Moments later, his
dunk gave the Oklahoma
City Thunder a 10-point lead
that was too much for the
Lakers to overcome.
Wednesday
night,
George showed the Lakers
just what they missed out on
when he chose to stay in
Oklahoma City without even
meeting with the Lakers. Behind 37 points from George
— and only four of those in
the first quarter — the
Thunder beat the shorthanded Lakers 107-100 as LeBron James and Rajon
Rondo watched from the
bench.
Russell Westbrook finished with a triple double,
but made only three of his 20
shots and one of seven threepoint shots.
The Lakers were led by
Kentavious Caldwell-Pope,
who scored 25 points, 18 of
them in the first half, when
he took over for Kyle Kuzma,
who left in the second quarter because of a back injury.
[See Lakers, D6]
Luis Sinco Los Angeles Times
COACH BILLY DONOVAN brought his Oklahoma City Thunder to Staples Center on Wednesday to
play the Lakers. Donovan led Florida to consecutive NCAA titles before becoming an NBA head coach.
Westwood waltz
getting started
UCLA can dare to
dream but Donovan
stays focused on NBA
TODAY’S PAC-12
OPENERS
DYLAN HERNANDEZ
To be affiliated with UCLA
basketball is to dream.
To dream of becoming
the program that properly
collects and nurtures
Southern California’s
reservoir of talent. To
dream of returning to
national prominence. To
dream of recapturing the
magic from the period when John Wooden was coach.
Reality is optional.
Now that Steve Alford has been fired,
UCLA is dreaming again, more specifically about his permanent replacement
and how that next coach will do what he
couldn’t.
While some prominent alumni have
started advocating for former Bruins
point guard Earl Watson, the school’s
fantasy appointment remains Billy
Donovan, the architect of the Florida
program that won consecutive national
[See Hernandez, D4]
UCLA vs.
Stanford
AT PAULEY PAVILION
TV: ESPN, 8 p.m.
USC at Cal
TV: Pac-12 Networks, 7 p.m.
Ready to start: USC
coach Andy Enfield is
eager for Trojans to begin conference play. D5
-----------------------------------
Bland pleads
guilty to bribery
Former USC assistant
basketball coach Tony
Bland admitted to accepting a $4,100 bribe. D5
Bartow starts working
to get Bruins going
in the right direction
By Ben Bolch
The onetime UCLA ball boy stood behind the baseline all these years later,
hand curled in front of his mouth, openly
giving his thoughts to the team he now
ran.
“Come on, Mo,” Murry Bartow
shouted at Moses Brown early Wednesday afternoon while the 7-foot-2 center
completed a layup drill during practice
inside the Mo Ostin Center.
“Wrong foot,” Bartow said as the next
player laid the ball off the glass.
“Way too slow,” Bartow said in assessing the player who followed.
More than 30 years after his late father, Gene, finished a two-year coaching
run as the successor to the legendary
John Wooden, Murry was in charge of the
Bruins.
Wearing a blue polo shirt and gray
pants, he walked onto the court with a
folded piece of paper that presumably
contained his practice plan on the eve of
[See UCLA, D4]
Luis Sinco Los Angeles Times
LAKERS CENTER JaVale McGee blocks a first-
quarter shot by Oklahoma City center Steven Adams.
Kingsbury set
to interview
for NFL jobs
USC’s new offensive
coordinator to talk
with Jets, Cardinals
about their vacancies.
By Sam Farmer and
J. Brady McCollough
New USC offensive coordinator Kliff Kingsbury will
interview for multiple NFL
head coaching jobs in the
coming days, creating a
nervous new year for Trojans head coach Clay Helton
and the USC fan base.
Kingsbury reportedly rejected an offer to be the head
coach at the University of
Houston, where he began his
coaching career. He is ex-
pected to interview for head
coach with the New York
Jets and Arizona Cardinals,
people with knowledge of
those situations said. Both
teams feature talented
young quarterbacks he
could groom in Sam
Darnold and Josh Rosen,
respectively.
Former Miami Dolphins
coach Adam Gase is believed to be the favorite to replace the fired Steve Wilks in
Arizona. But other NFL
franchises could have interest in Kingsbury too, as the
league reacts to the success
of young, offensive-minded
head coaches like the Rams’
Sean McVay and the Chicago Bears’ Matt Nagy.
After Kingsbury was
[See Kingsbury, D4]
N F L W I L D - CA R D ROU N D :: C H A R G E R S AT B A LT I M O R E
SUNDAY, 10 A.M. PST | TV: CHANNEL 2
Allen J. Schaben L.A. Times
PAC-12 BOSS Larry
Scott stays the course.
ANALYSIS
Pac-12 hurting
under Scott
The conference
struggles in football
and basketball under
Commissioner Larry
Scott’s rule. D4
Goff facing
another test
Rams quarterback
Jared Goff wants to
redeem himself after
after last season’s
playoff exit. D3
THE CHARGERS’
SAFETY VALVE
Derwin James is only a rookie, but his
energy and talent spark team’s defense
By Jeff Miller
He made the Pro Bowl en
route to leading the team in
passes defended and tackles, becoming the first rookie
in franchise history to reach
100 stops in a season.
He drew comparisons to
All-Pros and all-timers, doing so at age 22 and with two
years of collegiate eligibility
still unused.
Derwin James lighted up
the opposition in his first
NFL season. And he lighted
up the Chargers as well.
“He brings a lot of energy,” coach Anthony Lynn
said. “Not just on the football field. It’s also just walking down the hallways. … He
loves football. He’s very passionate about what he does.”
James wears that passion as obviously as he does
the tattoos that decorate his
torso.
[See Chargers, D3]
Robert Gauthier Los Angeles Times
CHARGERS safety Derwin James intercepts a pass against the Steelers. The
rookie can also play the equivalent of linebacker, cornerback and even edge rusher.
D2
T H U R S DAY , JA N UA RY 3 , 2 019
L AT I M E S . C O M / S P O RT S
PRO CALENDAR
THU.
3
FRI.
4
SAT.
5
SUN.
6
MON.
7
NEXT: JAN. 12 VS. TBD, 5:15 P.M., CH. 11*
RAMS
at
Baltimore*
10 a.m.
Channel 2
CHARGERS
NEW YORK
7:30
SpecSN
at
Minnesota
12:30
SpecSN
at Phoenix
6
Prime
ORLANDO
12:30
Prime
LAKERS
at Dallas
5:30
SpecSN
CLIPPERS
at San Jose
7:30
NBCSN
EDMONTON
7
FSW
TAMPA BAY
7:30
FSW
KINGS
EDMONTON
5
Prime
VEGAS
7
FSW
Alex Gallardo Associated Press
DUCKS
KINGS GOALIE Jack Campbell tried many playing styles before a development coach said “just be yourself.”
Shade denotes home game; *NFL playoffs
KINGS REPORT
Campbell finds his style,
develops into solid goalie
TODAY ON THE AIR
TIME
EVENT
ON THE AIR
5 p.m.
Toronto at San Antonio
TV: TNT
7:30 p.m.
Houston at Golden State
TV: TNT
BASKETBALL
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
4 p.m.
Penn State at Michigan
TV: ESPN
4 p.m.
Women, Duke at North Carolina State
TV: FSW
4 p.m.
North Carolina State at Miami
TV: ESPNU
4 p.m.
Iowa at Purdue
TV: Big Ten
4 p.m.
Women, Mississippi State at Arkansas
TV: SEC
4 p.m.
Illinois at Indiana
TV: FS1
4:30 p.m.
George Mason at St. Joseph’s
TV: CBSSN
4:30 p.m.
Western Kentucky at Charlotte
TV: beIN1
5 p.m.
Women, California Baptist at New Mexico State
TV: Prime
5 p.m.
Utah at Arizona State
TV: Pac-12
6 p.m.
Women, Connecticut at Baylor
TV: ESPN
6 p.m.
St. Mary’s (Calif.) at San Francisco
TV: ESPN2
6 p.m.
Jacksonville State at Belmont
TV: ESPNU
6 p.m.
Minnesota at Wisconsin
TV: Big Ten
6 p.m.
Women, South Carolina at Texas A&M
TV: SEC
6 p.m.
Colorado at Arizona
TV: FS1
6:30 p.m.
Wichita State at Memphis
TV: CBSSN
7 p.m.
Loyola Marymount at Pepperdine
TV: SpecSN
7 p.m.
California at USC
TV: Pac-12 R: 710
8 p.m.
Stanford at UCLA
TV: ESPN R: 570
8 p.m.
Brigham Young at Pacific
TV: ESPNU
By Curtis Zupke
GOLF
3 p.m.
PGA Tour, Sentry Tournament of Champions, first TV: Golf
round
HOCKEY
4:30 p.m.
Chicago at N.Y. Islanders
TV: NBCSN
7:30 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Kings
TV: FSW R: iHeart
HORSE RACING
2:30 p.m.
Racing Coast to Coast featuring Penn National
TV: TVG
5 p.m.
Race Night featuring Pompano Park
TV: TVG
Portugal, Sporting vs. Belenenses
TV: GOLTV
SOCCER
10 a.m.
11:45 a.m. England, Manchester City vs. Liverpool
TV: NBCSN
12:15 p.m. Portugal, Aves vs. Porto
TV: GOLTV
12:15 p.m. Spain, Villareal vs. Real Madrid
TV: beIN1, beINES
The more Dusty Imoo
watched his pupil on television, from his hotel room
near the Kings’ practice facility, the more he liked it.
His pupil, Jack Campbell,
came up with a memorable
New Year’s Day performance that still wowed a day
later. Campbell’s save on
Jonathan Marchessault of
the Vegas Golden Knights
might have been his best.
The Kings tweeted out a video of it, and Imoo retweeted it with a fist-bump
emoji.
The game was another
moment of affirmation for
Imoo as he’s helped rebuild
Campbell’s career from the
ground up. Even before
Campbell’s career-best 46save game Tuesday, Imoo
and fellow Kings goalie
coach Bill Ranford have seen
the former first-round draft
pick go from reclamation
story to bona fide NHL stopper.
“He’s come such a long
way,” Imoo said. “Like anything, he’s worked so hard.
Finally, the dream is happening for him. You don’t
want to lose that, right?”
Imoo
remembers
a
younger Campbell with no
identity when he first
started working with him.
Like a golfer changing his
swing, Campbell was stuck
between styles and full of
confusion.
“When he first came to
me, he was a mess,” Imoo
said. “Different people were
telling him to play different
ways. Instead of being him,
he tried to take things from
different guys.”
Campbell tried to model
his style after Winnipeg Jets
goalie Connor Hellebuyck,
but Imoo said Campbell was
too rigid. At one point, Imoo
said he told Campbell,
“Dude, just be yourself.”
Imoo and Campbell actually did use Boston Bruins
goalie Tuukka Rask as an example of a controlled but
athletic stance that has given Campbell his base. He
didn’t miss a beat Tuesday
after nearly two months off
for knee surgery.
“I just missed it,” Campbell said. “I missed the guys a
lot and missed being out
there. It was nice to be back
[Monday] night — get on the
bench and watch the boys
get a huge win and it kind of
got me ready to go [Tuesday].”
Imoo and Ranford’s work
have resulted in the one facet the Kings have been able
to hang their hat, or their
glove, on this season. In addition to Campbell’s career
uptick, rookie Cal Petersen
has entered the conversation. Meanwhile, franchise
goalie Jonathan Quick’s next
win will be his 300th and his
301st will tie him with Mike
Richter for fourth among
American-born goalies.
Campbell’s career arc is
vastly different, but it’s
equally impressive in his
mentor’s eyes.
“He has all the attributes,” Imoo said. “Usually
goalies play supporting
roles, but teams have nights
off. He can win hockey
games.”
Doughty, Ducks’
Gibson All-Stars
Drew Doughty and John
Gibson were named to the
Pacific Division roster for
the All-Star game in San Jose on Jan.26.
Gibson, also selected in
2016, will be the first Ducks
goalie to appear in multiple
All-Star games. He has garnered Vezina Trophy talk for
buoying the Ducks in net
and co-leads the NHL in
saves.
It is the fifth straight AllStar selection for Doughty.
He leads the NHL in average
ice time per game at nearly
27 minutes.
Anze Kopitar and Ryan
Getzlaf are the Kings and
Ducks representatives eligible to be voted in by fans.
Four players from each divi-
sion will be added through
this process.
Another outdoor
game for Kings?
The Kings are under
strong consideration to play
the Colorado Avalanche in
an outdoor game at Air
Force Academy’s Falcon
Stadium
in
Colorado
Springs, on Feb.15, 2020, a
team source said.
It was first reported by
Elliotte Friedman of Sportsnet.
The Kings have played in
two outdoor games since the
NHL began staging them
regularly in 2008. They
played the Ducks at Dodger
Stadium in 2014 and the San
Jose Sharks at Levi’s Stadium in 2015.
TONIGHT
VS. TAMPA BAY
When: 7:30
On the air: TV: FSW; Radio:
iHeartRadio (Kings Audio
Network)
Update: Nikita Kucherov
had nine goals and 21 assists
in December to become the
first player to record 30
points in a month since
Jaromir Jagr in March of
2001. Steven Stamkos had 21
points in that span for
Tampa Bay, which is 14-0-1
over its past 15 games.
curtis.zupke@latimes.com
TENNIS
3 p.m.
Schelotto accepts Galaxy job
TV: Tennis
Center Court, Hopman Cup, Spain vs. France,
Session 11
NHL STANDINGS
EASTERN CONFERENCE
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Pacific
Calgary
Vegas
San Jose
DUCKS
Vancouver
Edmonton
Arizona
KINGS
Central
Winnipeg
Nashville
Dallas
Colorado
Minnesota
Chicago
St. Louis
W
25
24
22
19
20
19
17
16
W
25
24
21
19
18
15
15
L
12
15
13
15
19
18
21
22
L
12
15
16
14
17
21
18
OL
4
4
7
7
4
3
2
3
OL
2
2
4
8
3
6
4
Pts
54
52
51
45
44
41
36
35
Pts
52
50
46
46
39
36
34
GF
146
130
145
102
128
114
101
92
GF
134
124
113
138
110
121
102
GA
115
115
133
120
136
127
115
121
GA
111
104
110
128
108
153
123
Note: Overtime or shootout lossesworth one point.
Metropolitan
Washington
Pittsburgh
Columbus
NY Islanders
NY Rangers
Carolina
New Jersey
Philadelphia
Atlantic
Tampa Bay
Toronto
Boston
Buffalo
Montreal
Florida
Detroit
Ottawa
W
24
22
23
21
17
16
15
15
W
31
26
22
21
21
17
15
15
L
11
12
13
13
15
17
17
19
L
7
11
14
13
14
15
20
21
OL
3
6
3
4
7
5
7
5
OL
2
2
4
6
5
6
7
5
Pts
51
50
49
46
41
37
37
35
Pts
64
54
48
48
47
40
37
35
GF
138
140
129
114
113
94
117
111
GF
168
144
114
115
128
124
118
129
GA
112
117
119
102
130
109
132
140
GA
117
109
105
115
128
134
145
163
RESULTS
VANCOUVER 4
AT OTTAWA 3 (OT)
CALGARY 5
AT DETROIT 3
PITTSBURGH 7
AT N.Y. RANGERS 2
AT DALLAS 5
NEW JERSEY 4
SAN JOSE 5
AT COLORADO 4
EDMONTON 3
AT ARIZONA 1
Rookie Elias Pettersson completed a hat trick in overtime
after Ottawa rallied from a 3-1 deficit.
Johnny Gaudreau’s power-play goal with 10:23 left gave
Calgary the lead after it fell behind early 2-0.
Sidney Crosby, Evgeni Malkin, Jake Guentzel, Kris Letang
and Dominik Simon each had a goal and an assist.
Rookie Miro Heiskanen had two goals, including the
tie-breaking goal 6:27 into the third period, to lift Dallas.
The Sharks built a 5-1 lead then held on as the Avalanche
scored three straight goals, including two by Tyson Jost.
Connor McDavid scored two goals and added an assist as
the Oilers ended their six-game losing streak.
For complete NHL summaries, go to latimes.com/sports/scores
TODAY’S GAMES
Tampa Bay at KINGS, 7:30 p.m.
Carolina at Philadelphia, 4 p.m.
Calgary at Boston, 4 p.m.
Vancouver at Montreal, 4:30 p.m.
Minnesota at Toronto, 11 a.m.
Florida at Buffalo, 4 p.m.
Chicago at N.Y. Islanders, 4:30 p.m.
Washington at St. Louis, 5 p.m.
FRIDAY’S GAMES
Vegas at DUCKS, 7 p.m.
Nashville at Detroit, 4:30 p.m.
Washington at Dallas, 5 p.m.
N.Y. Rangers at Colorado, 6 p.m.
Winnipeg at Pittsburgh, 4 p.m.
Columbus at Carolina, 4:30 p.m.
New Jersey at Arizona, 6 p.m.
SATURDAY’S GAMES
Edmonton at KINGS, 7 p.m.
Minnesota at Ottawa, 10 a.m.
Vancouver at Toronto, 4 p.m.
Buffalo at Boston, 4 p.m.
Tampa Bay at San Jose, 8 p.m.
Calgary at Philadelphia, 10 a.m.
Columbus at Florida, 4 p.m.
Nashville at Montreal, 4 p.m.
N.Y. Islanders at St. Louis, 5 p.m.
New coach takes over
struggling team that
has missed playoffs
last two seasons.
By Kevin Baxter
The Galaxy’s four-monthlong search for a coach officially ended Wednesday when
the team announced it had
signed former Boca Juniors
manager Guillermo Barros
Schelotto.
The Times reported last
week that Schelotto had accepted the job. He will be introduced Thursday afternoon
at a news conference at Dignity Health Sports Park.
Schelotto, 45, becomes the
team’s fifth manager in 26
months, replacing interim
coach Dominic Kinnear, who
led the team through the final
six games of the 2018 season
after Sigi Schmid was fired in
September.
Schelotto takes over a
team that has missed the
playoffs in consecutive seasons for the first time in a decade and hasn’t played in an
MLS Cup final since 2014, the
longest drought in franchise
history.
“This is a tremendous
opportunity for me and I am
excited to get to work,” Schelotto said in a statement
issued by the club. “The
Galaxy have long been the
standard in MLS and I am
ready to push the club to new
heights.”
Schelotto, an Argentine,
began his managing career
with Club Atletico Lanus of
Argentina’s Primera Division
in 2012 and guided it to a Copa
Sudamericana title a year
later. He moved to Boca Juniors, Argentina’s second-most
successful team, in March 2016
Javier Soriano AFP/Getty Images
NEW GALAXY COACH Guillermo Barros Schelotto has had success as a coach
in Argentina and player in MLS. “I am excited to get to work,” Schelotto said.
and won league titles in each
of his first two seasons.
As a player, Schelotto won
six league titles and four Copa
Libertadores in 10 seasons
with Boca Juniors before signing with the Columbus Crew
in 2007. In Columbus, he won
an MLS Cup, two Supporters’
Shields and was named
league and MLS Cup MVP in
2008 when he played for
Schmid.
“After a comprehensive
search, domestically and internationally, we believe Guillermo will be a landmark
signing for this club,” Galaxy
general manager Dennis te
Kloese said. “Guillermo is a
proven winner who has experience coaching, playing and
winning for big clubs.”
Last month, the Galaxy
were close to signing former
Portland coach Caleb Porter
but those negotiations fell
apart. Terms of Schelotto’s
contract with the Galaxy have
not been announced, but a
person with knowledge of the
deal said it is longer in length
than the two-year deals the
team gave its last coaches,
Schmid and Curt Onalfo.
Schelotto is the second
Latin American-born coach
in Galaxy history after Ecuadoran Octavio Zambrano,
who led the team to a leaguerecord 24 wins in his only full
season.
LAFC signing
Veteran defender Jordan
Harvey, whose contract expired at the end of last season,
re-signed with the Los Angeles Football Club, the team announced.
A 14-year veteran Harvey,
34, is the longest-tenured
MLS player on LAFC’s roster.
He was fifth on the team with
29 regular-season appearances — including 23 starts —
in 2018 and surpassed the
2,000-minute mark for the
sixth straight season.
Harvey is just the 33rd
player in MLS history to reach
25,000 minutes in his career
and his next game will mark
his 300th MLS appearance.
“Jordan is a reliable, experienced player that played a
key role in the club’s first season in MLS,” John Thorrington, LAFC’s general manager
and executive vice president
of soccer operations, said in a
statement. “One of our offseason priorities was to keep
the core of our group intact,
and we’re delighted that Jordan has re-signed for the 2019
season.”
The club continues to negotiate with center back
Walker Zimmerman, whose
contract also expired last
year.
kevin.baxter@latimes.com
T H U R S DAY , JA N UA RY 3 , 2 019
L AT I M E S . C O M / S P O RT S
D3
NFL
For Goff, redemption must wait a week
With Rams on a bye,
quarterback eager to
atone for last season’s
playoff performance.
By Gary Klein
A divisional-round playoff
game is still more than a week
away, but Rams quarterback
Jared Goff is already under
scrutiny.
Will he play better than he
did last season in a wild-card
loss to the Atlanta Falcons?
Will the No. 1 pick in the 2016
draft take the next step?
Goff said Wednesday that
he learned from last season’s
26-13 defeat to the Falcons, the
first postseason game for him,
most teammates and coach
Sean McVay.
Goff completed 24 of 45
passes for 259 yards and a
touchdown in the loss at the
Coliseum.
“It was a game that I
would’ve liked to play better,
we would’ve all liked to play
better,” Goff said after practice. “Ended not the way we
would’ve liked it to.
“Hopefully, we can use
some of those experiences as a
positive and move forward
with them.”
Goff, 24, rebounded from
the playoff defeat with a Pro
Bowl season. He passed for 32
touchdowns, with 12 interceptions. After some late-season
struggles, he finished with efficient games against the Arizona Cardinals and the San
Francisco 49ers, cellar-dwellers of the NFC West.
The victories helped the
Rams earn the No. 2 seed in
the NFC playoffs behind the
New Orleans Saints, and also
a bye through the wild-card
round of the playoffs.
On Jan. 12 at the Coliseum,
the Rams will play either the
Chicago Bears, Seattle Seahawks or Dallas Cowboys, depending on outcomes of this
weekend’s wild-card round
games.
The fourth-seeded Cowboys play host to the fifthseeded Seahawks on Saturday at AT&T Stadium in
Arlington, Texas. The thirdseeded Bears play host to the
sixth-seeded
Philadelphia
Eagles on Sunday at Chicago’s Soldier Field. The
Rams will play the highestseeded remaining team.
Goff has not finalized his
weekend plans, but the wildcard games are must-see TV.
“Sit on my couch and
watch them,” he said.
Goff had success this season in two victories over the
Seahawks.
On Oct. 7, he completed 23
of 32 passes for 321 yards and a
Wally Skalij Los Angeles Times
AFTER a rough early December, Jared Goff got back
in rhythm in the final two games of the season.
touchdown, with two interceptions, in a 33-31 victory at
CenturyLink Field. He also
executed a critical quarterback sneak for a first down on
fourth-and-one with less than
two minutes left.
Five weeks later, he completed 28 of 39 passes for 318
yards and two touchdowns,
without an interception, in a
36-31 victory at the Coliseum.
“Happy with the way the
Seattle games went,” he said.
The Dec. 9 game against
the Bears was a different
story. With temperatures in
the 20s, Goff completed only
20 of 44 passes, with four interceptions, in a 15-6 defeat at
Soldier Field.
Goff said he would wel-
come a chance to play the
Bears again.
“You always want to play a
team that you lost to, that you
wanted to play better against
to get another chance at
them,” he said.
The Rams did not play the
Cowboys this season.
But in 2017, Goff completed
21 of 36 passes for 255 yards
and two touchdowns in a 35-30
victory over the Cowboys at
AT&T Stadium that included
a team-record seven field
goals by Greg Zuerlein.
“Whoever it is,” Goff said,
naming each of the possible
playoff opponents, “we’ll be
ready.”
Goff “never gets too high,
never gets too low,” and remains consistent in his demeanor, McVay said. So the
quarterback’s reaction to last
season’s playoff loss was no
different.
“He knows that there’s
some things that we can all
learn from,” McVay said, “that
when we get an opportunity in
those settings, in those situations again, we expect to be
better.”
Goff helped make the
Rams an early Super Bowl favorite by playing well through
the first 11 games. He then
struggled in a victory against
the Detroit Lions and in defeats to the Bears and Eagles
before
rebounding
with
strong performances against
the Cardinals and 49ers.
“The last couple weeks
specifically, he’s done an outstanding job just playing
within himself and distributing the ball, getting a variety of
play-makers involved,” McVay said.
Now Goff will get another
playoff opportunity, with a
game of postseason experience to draw from.
“The more experience you
have in those situations,” he
said, “the better you are.”
Etc.
McVay confirmed that
quarterbacks coach Zac Taylor would interview with the
Denver Broncos for their head
coach position. Taylor also
will interview with the Cardinals and the Cincinnati Bengals. Passing game coordinator Shane Waldron also will interview with the Bengals. ...
Safety Blake Countess remains in concussion protocol,
but running back Todd Gurley (knee) and safety Lamarcus Joyner (ankle) are “making good progress” and are expected to play in the playoff
game, McVay said. ... The
Rams will practice Thursday
and then be off Friday and
Saturday. They will reconvene
Sunday.
gary.klein@latimes.com
AROUND THE NFL
Brown’s absence
frustrates Tomlin
associated press
Robert Gauthier Los Angeles Times
DERWIN JAMES led the Chargers in passes defended and tackles and also contributed 31⁄2 sacks.
Chargers feed off James’ energy
[Chargers, from D1]
A safety by definition, he
is the one player on the
Chargers whose presence is
most glaring, James at times
also employed as the equivalent of a linebacker, cornerback and even edge rusher.
And, fittingly, his spirit is
just as everywhere.
“Every day, he brings
that,” defensive coordinator
Gus Bradley said. “I mean,
this guy genuinely loves the
game and has a passion for
it. I think that filters to our
other players.”
The Chargers will need
James — physically, spiritually, completely — in their
wild-card playoff game Sunday at Baltimore, an opponent they just lost to 22-10 in
Week 16.
In order to flip the outcome, the Chargers will need
to make more plays than do
the Ravens, and few Chargers are capable of making
the plays that James can.
“This game’s no different,” he said, when asked
about his professional postseason debut.
“It’s not like, ‘It’s the playoffs. I have to try harder
now.’ I’ve been playing like
this all year. It’s just a greater opportunity.”
He has broken up passes
40 yards downfield and
dropped quarterbacks deep
in the backfield. James finished the regular season
with 105 tackles, 31⁄2 sacks
and three interceptions,
which tied for the team lead.
He might be the NFL’s
defensive rookie of the year.
James did things routinely
and weekly that surprised.
Surprised, at least, others.
“I knew what type of player I was,” he said. “I knew
what I wanted to do. I feel
like I’ve done those things
here.”
Against the Ravens on
Dec. 22, James had six tackles and broke up one pass as
the Chargers kept quarterback Lamar Jackson in
check and limited Baltimore
to one offensive touchdown.
Entering Sunday, however, James said the defense
will have to do even more,
particularly since the Chargers’ offense continues to
search for production that
has faded.
Over the final two weeks
of the regular season, the
Chargers put together only
three series that resulted in
touchdowns. One covered 75
yards. The other two — both
set up by turnovers — went
16 and 17 yards.
In a game in which points
will be yielded begrudgingly,
the Chargers can’t afford to
keep sputtering and allow
Baltimore to dominate possession.
“Get takeaways, get the
ball out,” James said of the
key to beating the Ravens.
“We gotta get the offense the
ball. Change the game somehow, change the momentum.”
Lynn called this matchup
“an execution game,” meaning it will be decided more by
the precision on the field
than by any wide-ranging
adjustments from the previ-
ous meeting.
James called it “Round 2”
and noted that the expectation of the run-heavy Ravens
trying to bully the Chargers
again will be motivation
enough.
“That should put a chip
on your shoulder there
alone,” he said. “They’re going to run it right at us. We
know that. We gotta stop
’em.”
They’re going to need
their muscle and their spirit
Sunday. In James, the Chargers have impressive doses
of both.
“Well, you hear things
about it,” Bradley said of the
rookie’s presence. “I think
they talked about his energy,
his love for the game. But I’d
be lying if I said I thought it
was to this level.”
Gordon good to go
Running back Melvin
Gordon was a full participant in practice Wednesday
and declared that he will
play. He rolled his ankle late
in the Chargers’ 23-9 victory
Sunday at Denver.
“Feel good,” Gordon said.
“Ready to roll.”
But defensive tackle
Brandon Mebane did not
practice because of a non-injury situation. The veteran
has been away from the
team repeatedly in recent
weeks as his infant daughter,
Makenna, deals with a medical issue.
Running back Austin
Ekeler was limited during
the workout because of a
groin injury. Ekeler missed
two games near the end of
the regular season because
of a bruised nerve in his
neck.
The Chargers’ official injury report also included
safety Jahleel Addae (shoulder), guard Dan Feeney
(knee) and tackle Sam Tevi
(groin) as full participants.
Getting picky
Each of the last three
games for the Chargers’ offense has begun with a Philip Rivers first-possession interception.
He was picked off by Baltimore’s Brandon Carr on
the first play from scrimmage in Week 16.
The Chargers also have
trailed at halftime in three of
their past five games and
have scored first just twice
since Nov. 18.
In the first game against
Baltimore, they led for one
minute in the third quarter
before Jackson hit tight end
Mark Andrews for a 68-yard
touchdown that put the
Ravens up for good.
Falling behind again
Sunday won’t make winning
any easier. Baltimore led the
NFL in the regular season allowing an average of only 6.9
points after halftime.
Etc.
The Chargers signed
safety Dexter McCoil to their
practice squad. They waived
safety A.J. Hendy, who was
picked up by Houston.
jeff.miller@latimes.com
Twitter: @JeffMillerLAT
Mike Tomlin doesn’t
want to say Antonio Brown
bailed on the Pittsburgh
Steelers.
The longtime head coach
is not ruling it out either.
The star wide receiver
went radio silent in the days
before the team’s regularseason finale against Cincinnati on Sunday, in essence
abandoning the club in what
Tomlin described as its
“darkest hour.”
Though Brown did make
a cameo appearance on the
sideline — rocking a fur coat
— as the Steelers edged the
Bengals, he vanished before
the final gun and did not
show up on Monday for exit
interviews and to clear out
his locker.
Tomlin said Brown arrived at practice Dec. 26 reporting discomfort in his
lower body. The team gave
Brown the day off, did so
again on the next day. On
Friday, Tomlin sent Brown
home to rest and suggested
he get an MRI on the
banged-up knee.
Tomlin did not hear from
Brown on Saturday to get an
update. When Drew Rosenhaus,
Brown’s
agent,
reached out on Sunday
morning to tell Tomlin that
Brown was available to play,
Tomlin “drew a line in the
sand” and said Brown could
best serve the Steelers by
cheering on the sideline.
“The bottom line is we
were playing a significant
game and he didn’t do a good
enough job of communicating of being available in the
hours leading up to that performance,” Tomlin said.
Joseph to interview
with the Bengals
Former Broncos head
coach Vance Joseph will interview for Cincinnati’s job
this week as the Bengals begin their search for Marvin
Lewis’ replacement.
Joseph will be in Cincinnati on Thursday and Friday
to talk to owner Mike Brown
and members of the front of-
NFL PLAYOFFS
fice. The Bengals’ familiarity
with Joseph works in his favor. Joseph was the defensive backs coach under Lewis in 2014 and 2015.
Manning meets with
general manager
General manager Dave
Gettleman and two-time
Super Bowl MVP Eli Manning had a no-holds barred
conversion about the longtime quarterback’s future
with the New York Giants after the team missed the playoffs for the sixth time in seven seasons.
Gettleman would not say
whether Manning, who will
turn 38 on Thursday, would
be back for a 16th season.
Gettleman said he will do
what is in the best interests
of the Giants (5-11) and
would not say whether Manning’s $23-million salary cap
hit will play a role in the decision, noting those decisions
are not made in a vacuum.
Etc.
The Cleveland Browns interviewed former Colts and
Lions head coach Jim Caldwell. The Browns interviewed interim coach Gregg
Williams earlier in the week.
... Buffalo Bills shook up their
coaching staff by firing offensive line coach Juan Castillo
and receivers coach Terry
Robiskie following a 6-10 finish. A person familiar with
the decision confirmed to
the Associated Press of
Robiskie’s firing after his
first season in Buffalo. The
person spoke on the condition of anonymity because
the team has not announced
the move first reported by
Sirius XM’s Alex Marvez. ...
Indianapolis Colts center
Ryan Kelly expects to play in
Saturday’s wild-card round
game at Houston. Kelly practiced Wednesday after sitting out Sunday’s regularseason finale with a stinger.
... John Elway’s search for
his fourth coach in six seasons began with former
Colts coach Chuck Pagano,
a native of Boulder, Colo. Pagano was head coach in Indianapolis from 2012 to 2017.
Times Pacific
WILD-CARD ROUND
Saturday
AFC: No. 6 Indianapolis at No. 3 Houston .....1:30 p.m. (Ch. 7, ESPN)
NFC: No. 5 Seattle at No. 4 Dallas ..........................5:15 p.m. (Ch. 11)
Sunday
AFC: No. 5 CHARGERS at No. 4 Baltimore ...................10 a.m. (Ch. 2)
NFC: No. 6 Philadelphia at No. 3 Chicago ................1:30 p.m. (Ch. 4)
DIVISIONAL ROUND
Jan. 12
Lowest AFC seed at No. 1 Kansas City .....................1:30 p.m. (Ch. 4)
Highest NFC seed at No. 2 RAMS............................5:15 p.m. (Ch. 11)
Jan. 13
Highest AFC seed at No. 2 New England......................10 a.m. (Ch. 2)
Lowest NFC seed at No. 1 New Orleans...................1:30 p.m. (Ch. 11)
CONFERENCE CHAMPIONSHIPS
Jan. 20
NFC .................................................................................Noon (Ch. 11)
AFC ...........................................................................3:30 p.m. (Ch. 2)
SUPER BOWL
Feb. 3 at Mercedes-Benz Stadium, Atlanta
AFC champion vs. NFC champion .............................3:30 p.m. (Ch. 2)
D4
T H U R S DAY , JA N UA RY 3 , 2 019
L AT I M E S . C O M / S P O RT S
COLLEGES
ANALYSIS
Leadership has Pac-12 reeling
BOWL SCHEDULE
BOWL
WHEN (PST), TV
CFP Championship: Clemson vs. Alabama
Monday, 5 p.m., ESPN
FAVORITE
Alabama by 5
Odds through Wednesday
By David Wharton
Two words best summarize the Pac-12 Conference’s
performance in bowl games
this season.
They were uttered by
California coach Justin
Wilcox after his team stumbled against Texas Christian in the Cheez-It Bowl, a
10-7 overtime loss in which
his quarterbacks had five
passes intercepted.
“Losing sucks,” Wilcox
said.
To be fair, the Pac-12
improved from last season’s
embarrassing 1-8 postseason, but not by much.
Fighting for redemption,
the conference was favored
in the majority of its seven
bowl games over the last
month. The final tally?
Three wins, four losses,
too many doses of dreadful
offense.
This is a conference that
engaged a high-powered
public relations agency in
the fall, but positive spin
goes only so far if you can’t
prevail on the field.
As Utah linebacker Cody
Barton said after his team
lost to Northwestern in the
Holiday Bowl: “We wanted
to show those East Coast
boys what we’re about … we
were on the short end of the
stick.”
At the football media day
last summer, Pac-12 Commissioner Larry Scott
mused about the cyclical
nature of winning.
“Much has been written
and discussed about our
bowl record last year,” he
said. “From our perspective,
a handful of season-ending
games are not a key indicator of a conference’s overall
strength and competitiveness.”
Judging the conference
by one year might not be
fair, but broadening that
focus doesn’t help much.
Pac-12 teams have gone
7-15 over the last three bowl
seasons. The last time one
of its teams won a New
Year’s Six game was Jan. 2,
2017, when USC defeated
Penn State in the Rose
Allen J. Schaben Los Angeles Times
COMMISSIONER Larry Scott oversees a conference
that struggles nationally in basketball and football.
Bowl.
The last College Football
Playoff victory was in 2015
with Oregon’s semifinal win
over Florida State. The
favored Ducks subsequently
lost to Ohio State in the
championship.
The 2018-19 postseason
was marked by a distressing
lack of firepower.
Washington stalled at
three points over three
quarters before launching a
belated, unsuccessful comeback against Ohio State in
the Rose Bowl. Utah built a
20-3 lead in that Holiday
Bowl, then went scoreless
in the second half, losing
31-20.
Among the winners,
Oregon managed only a
touchdown in defeating
Michigan State 7-6 at the
Redbox Bowl and Stanford
needed a late score to get
past Pittsburgh 14-13 in the
Sun Bowl.
Football isn’t the only
sport that has suffered.
Conference schools
endured a tough December
in men’s basketball. Not a
single team remains in the
Associated Press Top 25,
and the flagship UCLA
program is searching for a
coach after firing Steve
Alford at midseason.
Like most discussions
about big-time college
sports, the Pac-12 debate
inevitably turns to the subject of money.
While other Power Five
conferences were launching
networks in partnership
with established broadcasters such as ESPN and Fox,
making deals that brought
immediate paydays, Scott
convinced his schools to
gamble on their own television venture.
The Pac-12 Networks
have struggled to build
viewership, in part because
they cannot reach an agreement with DirecTV.
This helps explain why
the conference ranks down
the list in overall revenue
distribution, with its
schools receiving about $30
million as compared with
the $40 million-plus payouts
in the Southeastern Confer-
Bruins can only
dream of Donovan
[Hernandez, from D1]
championships in 2006 and
2007.
Two days after Alford’s
dismissal, Donovan happened to be in Los Angeles,
about 10 miles from Pauley
Pavilion. He wasn’t here to
stump for the UCLA post,
but to coach his Oklahoma
City Thunder against the
Lakers at Staples Center.
Donovan said pretty
much what would be expected from a coach under
contract.
“We have a great group of
guys and I’ve enjoyed, really,
working with these guys
each and every day,” he said.
“My focus is totally on the
Thunder right now.”
Donovan’s All-Star
guard, Russell Westbrook,
wouldn’t get involved in the
discussion. Asked for his
thoughts on what his alma
mater should do, Westbrook
replied, “It ain’t up to me,
champ.”
Westbrook is a UCLA
donor, however. The Bruins’
practice court is named
after him.
“I ain’t that big of a damn
donor,” he wisecracked.
To be clear, the chances
of UCLA landing Donovan
are remote. The Thunder
recently exercised his option for the 2019-20 season,
meaning he almost certainly won’t be available
when UCLA intensifies its
search in the coming
months.
But for the argument’s
sake, let’s say UCLA can
figure out a way to free
Donovan from his deal.
Would he really want a move
to Westwood?
The Thunder entered
Wednesday in third place in
the Western Conference.
The team has a couple of
superstars in Westbrook
and Paul George.
Alford earned $2.6 million annually. Even if UCLA
goes all Chip Kelly and
doubles that figure for its
next coach, it will be less
than Donovan’s average
annual salary of $6 million
with the Thunder.
What the 53-year-old
Donovan did say was recruiting obligations
wouldn’t be what deters him
from returning to college
basketball.
“I think a lot of times, to
be honest with you, sometimes that gets overblown,”
Donovan said. “I think
there’s this feeling that guys
that have made the jump
from college to the NBA left
because of recruiting. I
never felt that way. I always
enjoyed recruiting. I liked
recruiting.”
Donovan spent more
than two decades on the
recruiting trail before he
was appointed coach of the
Thunder in 2015.
He started coaching as
an assistant to then-Kentucky coach Rick Pitino,
under whom he was a standout point guard at Providence. His first head coaching job consisted of a twoyear stint at Marshall, after
which he took over Florida
at the age of 30.
Donovan constructed
the program at Florida from
the ground up. The school
experienced limited basketball glory before his arrival.
Over his 19 seasons with the
Gators, he enjoyed the kind
of sustained success UCLA
is craving — four Final
Fours, seven Elite Eights, 14
NCAA tournament appearances and 16 consecutive
20-win seasons.
The train wreck at UCLA
can in part be traced back to
him. Florida’s opponent in
the 2006 national championship game was UCLA.
Florida’s opponent in the
2007 national semifinal was
also UCLA. The Bruins win
those games and, who
knows, maybe the second
half of Ben Howland’s reign
would have played out differently.
So there was no truth to
reports Donovan moved to
the Thunder in part because he was exhausted of
recruiting?
“I think there’s a lot of
speculation …” he started.
He caught himself and
asked a question in return:
“Did I say that?”
No.
“OK,” he said with a
smile.
Donovan continued,
“People say that all the time
about different things and I
ence, according to information contained in tax returns.
There is a direct connection to on-the-field performance, with athletic departments having less money to
sign the coaches and build
the facilities that lure top
recruits.
Still, Scott has continued
to argue for his strategy.
Outside networks might
ignore such sports as volleyball and water polo, he says.
They might push every
football and men’s basketball game to a nighttime
start, too late for viewers in
other parts of the country.
But scheduling is already
problematic because the
Pac-12 signed a 12-year,
$3-billion side deal that
diverts many of its best
games to those outsiders.
Asking for patience,
Scott says the conference
will close the financial gap
no later than 2024, when the
side deal comes up for renegotiation.
The question is, how
much longer can his football
and men’s basketball teams
wait?
When does the financial
shortfall trickle down to
those Olympic sports the
so-called “Conference of
Champions” often boasts
about?
Another gloomy season
has turned up the heat on
the commissioner. There
was an instant-replay scandal — which coincided with
conference officials hiring
the FleishmanHillard public
relations agency — followed
by the bowl results.
If Scott were a big-time
football or basketball coach,
it would be hard to imagine
him surviving in his job.
And Washington coach
Chris Petersen could have
been speaking for the entire
conference when he assessed his football program
after the Rose Bowl loss.
“Well, I think it means
we’re close to being where
we want to be,” he said. “But
we’re not there.”
david.wharton@latimes.com
Twitter: @LAtimesWharton
Results
Celebration: N. Carolina A&T 24, Alcorn St. 22
Cure: Tulane 41, Louisiana Lafayette 24
New Mexico: Utah State 52, North Texas 13
Boca Raton: Ala. Birmingham 37, N. Illinois 13
Gasparilla: Marshall 38, South Florida 20
Idaho Potato: BYU 49, Western Michigan 18
Armed Forces: Army 70, Houston 14
Hawaii: Louisiana Tech 31, Hawaii 14
Quick Lane: Minnesota 34, Georgia Tech 10
Independence: Duke 56, Temple 27
Texas: Baylor 45, Vanderbilt 38
Camping World: Syracuse 34, W. Virginia 18
Peach: Florida 41, Michigan 15
Arizona: Nevada 16, Arkansas State 13 (OT)
Orange: Alabama 45, Oklahoma 34
Sun: Stanford 14, Pittsburgh 13
Liberty: Oklahoma State 38, Missouri 33
Gator: Texas A&M 52, North Carolina State 13
Fiesta: Louisiana State 40, Central Florida 32
Outback: Iowa 27, Mississippi State 22
Las Vegas: Fresno State 31, Arizona State 20
Camellia: Georgia Southern 23, E. Michigan 21
New Orleans: Appal. St. 45, Middle Tenn. 13
Frisco: Ohio 27, San Diego State 0
Bahamas: Florida International 35, Toledo 32
Birmingham: Wake Forest 37, Memphis 34
Dollar General: Troy 42, Buffalo 32
First Responder: Bos. Coll. vs. Boise St., cncl.
Cheez-It: Texas Christian 10, California 7 (OT)
Pinstripe: Wisconsin 35, Miami 3
Music City: Auburn 63, Purdue 14
Alamo: Washington State 28, Iowa State 26
Belk: Virginia 28, South Carolina 0
Cotton: Clemson 30, Notre Dame 3
Military: Cincinnati 35, Virginia Tech 31
Redbox: Oregon 7, Michigan State 6
Holiday: Northwestern 31, Utah 20
Rose: Ohio State 28, Washington 23
Citrus: Kentucky 27, Penn State 24
Sugar: Texas 28, Georgia 21
NFL interviews set for
USC offensive coordinator
[Kingsbury, from D1]
fired by his alma mater, Texas
Tech, where he had a 35-40
record in six seasons as head
coach, he accepted the position at USC after speaking
with McVay about a potential
role with the Rams.
Kingsbury told The Times
in an interview last month
that he found college football
more attractive than the NFL
because of the chance to continue to have an influence on
young people.
But will NFL head coaching openings pique his interest more than assistant positions?
McVay was interested in
Kingsbury
and,
asked
Wednesday about his reported head coaching candidacy in the NFL, expressed
confidence in how Kingsbury
carried himself.
“You know he’s got a lot
more experience in a head
coaching role than I do,” McVay said, “but I know being
able to lean on people and do
it together and not feel like
you got to have all the answers
because there are other people that are there with you
that have been through things
you just haven’t been through.
“I think he’s a great coach.
And he’s got a nice presence
about himself. Even when he
came here this offseason, just
watching him interact with
some of our guys, you know it’s
not really anything you can
put your thumb on, but when
you’re around certain people,
you can just get a feel that that
guy’s got some stuff to ’em,
where people will follow him.
So I’ve got a lot of respect for
Kliff in that regard.”
Kingsbury’s style of offense — with a heavy reliance
on a quick-paced passing
game — could put extra pressure on his own team’s defense. NFL teams might also
question whether he has the
cachet among NFL coaches to
build a strong and experienced staff of assistants, people in the league familiar with
coaching searches said.
Kingsbury has had a hand
in the development of three
current NFL starting quarterbacks — MVP candidate Patrick Mahomes of Kansas City,
Cleveland Browns rookie success story Baker Mayfield and
Denver Broncos quarterback
Case Keenum.
brady.mccollough@latimes.com
sam.farmer@latimes.com
Times staff writer Gary
Klein contributed to this
report.
Bartow takes the reins at UCLA
Streeter Lecka Getty Images
WHILE COACH at
Florida, Billy Donovan’s
teams ended UCLA’s
season in 2006 and 2007.
don’t think I’ve ever said
that. I’ve always enjoyed the
time that I had to recruit
and meet different people
and those kinds of things. Is
it a lot of work? Yeah. Is it a
lot of effort? Yes.”
Sounds promising for
UCLA? Well, here comes the
“but” …
“When the season ended
in March, you couldn’t really
do anything basketballwise,” Donovan said. “There
was a lot of time. I feel like in
the NBA, it’s 12 months a
year you’re thinking about
your team and you’re thinking about basketball. I don’t
think that the notion that
guys that leave college to go
to the NBA is all because
they don’t want to recruit. I
don’t think it has anything
to do with that. I think you’ll
probably find most basketball coaches in college would
love to be able to do basketball more than they’ve been
able to do.”
He later reiterated that
what he likes about the
NBA is that “you’re just
dealing with basketball all
day long.”
So Donovan didn’t exactly open the door for a
move to Westwood. Then
again, he didn’t completely
close it, either.
That will have to suffice
for UCLA, where reality
rarely lives up to the dream.
dylan.hernandez@latimes.com
Twitter: @dylanohernandez
[UCLA, from D1]
UCLA’s Pac-12 Conference
opener against Stanford at
Pauley Pavilion. Bartow
stuffed the paper into his
pocket and moments later
called the players together for
a huddle.
“One-two-three-four,
team!” everyone shouted.
It was hardly a triumphant
moment. Bartow, 57, became
the first interim coach to take
over midseason in the 100-year
history of UCLA basketball after the school fired Steve Alford, the coach and longtime
friend who had brought him to
Westwood last spring as his
top defensive assistant. Together they had guided the
Bruins (7-6) to a 4-0 start before the team dropped six of
its last nine games, resulting
in Alford’s dismissal.
“Obviously, the last couple
of days have been hard. …
Steve and I have been great
friends for 30 years. Great guy,
very good coach, incredible
person and he’s been a heck of
a basketball coach for a lot of
years, so I’m standing here
with obviously a heavy heart
because of that, but what
we’re going to do now is move
on,” Bartow said to a media
throng three times its normal
size.
Junior shooting guard
Prince Ali said Alford bid players farewell Monday during an
emotional meeting at the
team’s practice facility. Ali
had learned of Alford’s dismissal the previous night
from reports on social media.
“I would say I was shocked,
surprised,” Ali said. “You never want to see that happen to
anyone.”
Said sophomore forward
Kris Wilkes, who had come to
UCLA from Indiana, where he
and Alford had been the
state’s Mr. Basketball as high
school players: “He recruited
me and he was a big part of the
reason I came out here. So
yeah, it’s definitely tough to
see him go.”
Wilkes appeared upbeat
before practice. As players
took warmup shots, Wilkes
noticed teammate Cody Riley
sitting on a courtside chair
next to Chris Carlson, the associate athletic director who
will be part of the search committee for Alford’s permanent
successor.
“Hey, Cody, let’s go,”
Wilkes yelled. “It’s time to
win.”
PAC-12
STANDINGS
TEAM
Arizona State
Colorado
Arizona
Oregon
Washington
Oregon State
Stanford
UCLA
USC
Washington State
Utah
California
Conf.
W L
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
Overall
W L
9 3
9 3
9 4
9 4
9 4
8 4
7 5
7 6
7 6
7 6
6 6
5 7
TODAY’S GAMES
California at USC ............................. 7 p.m.
Stanford at UCLA ..............................8 p.m.
Utah at Arizona State ........................ 5 p.m.
Colorado at Arizona .......................... 6 p.m.
SATURDAY’S GAMES
California at UCLA ............................ 1 p.m.
Utah at Arizona ............................... 11 a.m.
Colorado at Arizona State .................. 3 p.m.
Oregon State at Oregon ..................... 5 p.m.
Washington State at Washington .... 7:30 p.m.
SUNDAY’S GAME
Stanford at USC ............................... 5 p.m.
The teammates commenced a brief three-pointshooting contest, smiling and
laughing as they launched
shots.
Bartow said the Bruins
would tweak their approach
but not overhaul anything offensively or defensively, noting that they mainly needed to
execute better. They have averaged 65 points and 16.5 turnovers, and made only 41.6% of
their shots during a fourgame losing streak.
The hope is that they can
correct their flaws against
conference counterparts who
have been equally bad; the
Pac-12 became the first Power
Five conference to finish December with a sub.-500 record
in the last 20 years.
Bartow is not new to taking over a team in the midst of
upheaval. He was the interim
coach at South Florida, having replaced Orlando Antigua
midway through the 2016-17
season. The Bulls were 1-16
overall and 1-15 in the American Athletic Conference
under Bartow, whose overall
coaching record of 328-264
over 19 seasons also includes
stops at Alabama Birmingham and East Tennessee
State.
Bartow fondly recalled his
time at UCLA while his father
was the coach from 1975 to
1977, mentioning that they
had played golf with Wooden,
but said he was not lobbying
to become the permanent
coach.
“I’ve got zero concern
about that right now,” Bartow
said. “I just want to try to pour
everything into the players
and see if we can get a little bit
better.”
Bartow said the primary
coaching decisions would be
made by himself and assistants Tyus Edney and Duane
Broussard. The team has promoted Kory Barnett from director of operations to a third
assistant to fill the vacancy
created by Bartow’s promotion. Kory Alford, Steve’s son,
will also remain on the staff as
video and analytics coordinator.
“He’s an incredibly strong
young man and I’m thrilled
that he’s staying with us,”
Bartow said of Kory Alford.
“He’s incredibly bright, he’s
good at what he does, he’s got
an incredible future in the
game and he wants to be here
and we certainly want him
here because he’s a big part of
our staff.”
The Bruins will enter
Pac-12 play as part of no one’s
projected NCAA tournament
bracket, but coaches and
players alike said the ultimate
goal remained within reach.
Wilkes said the team would
try to sustain Alford’s mantra
of “One team, one chance, one
mission.”
“We have an optimistic
vibe,” Ali said. “Everybody is
aware that we’re still a talented basketball team. The
Pac-12 is wide open. So we just
continue to work hard, and we
can do some things.”
TONIGHT
VS. STANFORD
When: 8.
Where: Pauley Pavilion.
On the air: TV: ESPN; Radio:
570.
Update: The Cardinal (7-5)
bring some momentum into
this Pac-12 opener after having beaten Long Beach State
93-86 on Saturday in their
most recent game.
ben.bolch@latimes.com
Twitter: @latbbolch
T H U R S DAY , JA N UA RY 3 , 2 019
L AT I M E S . C O M / S P O RT S
D5
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Former USC assistant admits to bribery
In accepting plea deal,
Bland tells court he
was paid to direct
players to agents.
By Nathan Fenno
NEW YORK — Tony
Bland stared at the sheet of
paper, shook his head in
seeming disgust and sighed.
Fifteen months after FBI
agents arrested the former
USC associate head coach in
the college basketball bribery and corruption investigation, he reviewed the three
double-spaced paragraphs
a final time Wednesday.
Then, in front of a dozen
spectators in a sixth-floor
room at the Thurgood Marshall Courthouse in Manhattan, Bland pleaded guilty
to a felony count of conspiracy to commit bribery as part
of a deal with federal prosecutors.
“From on or about 2016,
up to and including September 2017, within the Southern
District of New York and
elsewhere, I knowingly and
willfully conspired with others to commit federal funds
bribery, an offense against
the United States of America,” Bland read from the
sheet of paper during the
half-hour hearing.
“Specifically, I agreed to
receive payments in exchange for directing basketball players from the University of Southern California ... to retain the services of
certain financial advisors
and business managers.”
He concluded with the
line: “I knew that my conduct was wrong.”
Mary Altaffer Associated Press
FORMER USC assistant basketball coach Tony Bland, center, leaves federal
court in New York after admitting that he accepted a $4,100 bribe in 2017.
Inside the courtroom —
decorated with six gold
chandeliers and blue carpet
emblazoned with gold stars
and wreaths — Bland’s
once-ascendant coaching
career felt far away. He used
to serve as USC coach Andy
Enfield’s top assistant, built
a reputation as one of the nation’s top recruiters and appeared poised to take over
his own program in the next
year or two.
Then came the sudden
arrest, the headlines, the indictment on four felony
charges, the termination by
USC.
“This drove a stake
through the heart of his career,” said Jeffrey Lichtman,
Bland’s attorney.
Moving forward with his
life and whatever remains of
his career meant revisiting
the past.
Bland sat at a long table
between Lichtman, who also
represents accused drug
kingpin Joaquin “El Chapo”
Guzman, and attorney Jeffrey Einhorn. The former
coach repeatedly tapped his
feet while answering a series
of questions from U.S. District Judge Edgardo Ramos
about the six-page plea
agreement signed late last
month.
The sentencing guideline
in the deal calls for six to 12
months in prison. Bland,
however, is expected to receive probation at the sentencing April 2 since he
doesn’t have a criminal
record. The deal doesn’t include any requirement for
him to cooperate with prosecutors.
At the heart of the agreement is Bland’s admission
that he accepted a $4,100
bribe during a meeting in
Las Vegas on July 29, 2017, in
exchange for directing USC
players to use a sports management company led by
Christian Dawkins and financial advisor Munish
Sood.
“As he admitted in court
today, Tony Bland ... abused
his position as a mentor and
coach to student-athletes
and aspiring professionals,”
U.S. Atty. Geoffrey Berman
said in a statement. “He
treated his players not as
young men to counsel and
guide, but as opportunities
to enrich himself.”
Representatives of the
NCAA and USC declined to
comment.
Prosecutors
originally
accused Bland of receiving a
$13,000 bribe during the
meeting. An undercover FBI
agent posing as an investor
in the sports management
company provided the cash
in an envelope. The government also alleged the former
coach directed a combined
$9,000 in payments to associates of USC player De’Anthony Melton and recruit
Taeshon Cherry. Neither
player has been accused of
any wrongdoing.
During one gathering recorded by an undercover
FBI agent, Bland told
Dawkins and Sood: “I defi-
nitely can get the players. …
And I can definitely mold the
players and put them in the
lap of you guys.”
But The Times reported
in November that bank records show Dawkins, the
would-be chief executive of
the sports management
company who attended the
meeting, deposited $8,900 in
cash at a Bank of America
ATM in Las Vegas the same
day Bland received the
bribe. People familiar with
the case who spoke on the
condition they not be identified said Dawkins kept the
bulk of the money and gave
some cash to Bland to use
while in Las Vegas.
The $4,100 Bland admitted taking is believed to be
the difference between the
$13,000 he was alleged to
have accepted and the
$8,900 that Dawkins deposited.
“This is a case that is a
product of a very broken, antiquated system,” Lichtman
said. “He was looking to help
the players, but the problem
is the way he went about it
was wrong.”
The attorney added: “If
the NCAA is unwilling to police itself, I have respect for
the Southern District of New
York prosecutors for being
willing to do it. This is a broken system.”
Lichtman lauded Bland
as someone who has become
a friend during the last 15
months and the “most decent man” he has ever represented.
“It’s a tragic, tragic day,”
Lichtman said.
Bland, 38, declined to
comment.
nathan.fenno@latimes.com
Enfield eager for
conference play
USC coach hopes his
team can get players
back from injury and
make tournament run.
By J. Brady McCollough
Patrick Semansky Associated Press
BRUNO FERNANDO , center, and Jalen Smith, who scored the winning basket, celebrate Maryland’s victory.
TOP 25 ROUNDUP
Nebraska is upset by Maryland
associated press
Top 25 scores
Jalen Smith made a driving layup with 3.8 seconds
left to end a tie and host
Maryland used a late push to
get past No. 24 Nebraska 7472 on Wednesday night.
Bruno Fernando had 18
points and 17 rebounds for
the Terrapins (11-3, 2-1 Big
Ten Conference), Anthony
Cowan Jr. scored 19 and
Smith accounted for Maryland’s final seven points to
finish with 15.
Maryland trailed 71-70 before Smith made a follow
shot off a three-point try by
Cowan with 28 seconds remaining.
After James Palmer converted one of two free throws
for the Cornhuskers (11-3,
1-2), Smith drove the middle
of the lane for his decisive
layup.
Palmer finished with 26
points.
No. 5 Kansas
No. 23 Oklahoma
70
63
No. 6 Nevada
Utah State
72
49
No. 8 Michigan State
Northwestern
81
55
No. 11 Texas Tech
West Virginia
62
59
No. 15 North Carolina
Harvard
77
57
No. 19 Houston
Tulsa
74
56
Maryland
No. 24 Nebraska
74
72
at No. 5 Kansas 70, No. 23
Oklahoma
63:
Dedric
Lawson had 13 points and 15
rebounds, and the Jayhawks
survived a nervous final
minute to win their 28th consecutive Big 12 Conference
opener.
The last time Kansas lost
its initial Big 12 game was
against Oklahoma on Jan. 8,
1991.
The Sooners (11-2) nearly
turned the trick again, rallying just about every time the
Jayhawks (12-1) went on a
run.
Brady Manek led the
Sooners with 16 points and 11
rebounds.
at No. 8 Michigan State
81, Northwestern 55: Nick
Ward scored all 21 of his
points in the first half to help
the Spartans (12-2, 3-0 Big
Ten) build a big lead on the
way to their seventh consecutive victory.
The Spartans, who led by
30-plus points at times in the
second half, have defeated
the Wildcats 10 consecutive
times.
Derek Pardon scored 19
points and was the only player in double-digit scoring for
Northwestern (9-5, 0-3).
No. 11 Texas Tech 62, at
West Virginia 59: Jarrett
Culver scored all of his 18
points in the second half and
the Red Raiders overcame
early shooting woes in the
Big 12 opener for the teams.
The Red Raiders (12-1)
blew a nine-point lead in the
second half.
The Mountaineers (8-5)
got 22 points from Lamont
West.
at No. 19 Houston 74,
Tulsa 56: Corey Davis Jr.
scored 21 points and made
six three-point baskets, and
the Cougars (14-0) cruised in
the American Athletic Conference opener for the
teams.
Houston has won 27 consecutive games at home, the
longest streak in the nation.
Martins Igbanu had 18
points for the Golden Hurricane (10-4), who shot 31%.
In one way, USC basketball coach Andy Enfield
would love for this season to
mirror last season. The 201718 Trojans started slowly
and were plagued by personnel issues, but they turned it
on once they entered Pac-12
play with a 12-6 record and
put themselves firmly on the
NCAA tournament bubble.
“League play is different
than nonconference,” Enfield said, “and you really
can’t just go on out-of-conference schedules or performance to say who will be
the favorite.”
In another way, though,
Enfield would prefer a different scenario to play out. A
year ago, the Trojans never
got NBA talent De’Anthony
Melton back in the lineup because of his indefinite suspension stemming from the
federal investigation into
USC assistant coach Tony
Bland, and they lost Bennie
Boatwright to a seasonending injury in mid-February.
This season, USC enters
the league slate with eight
scholarship players available, as projected NBA lottery pick Kevin Porter Jr. recovers from a lingering thigh
bruise that has kept him out
since Thanksgiving.
“We had a similar situation last year with De’Anthony Melton being out,” Enfield said. “We were expecting him back. We were hopeful. It’s almost like Kevin
Porter this year.”
Porter has not returned
to practice, Enfield said, and
will not be available Thursday night for the conference
opener against California at
the Galen Center. Porter is
“very doubtful” for the game
Sunday against Stanford.
“We are still in the process of waiting,” Enfield said,
“and he’s diligently doing
therapy to try to get back on
the court.”
The Trojans (7-6) have a
chance to build momentum
early in the Pac-12. Their first
three games are against the
Golden Bears (5-7), Stanford (7-5) and Oregon State
(8-4).
They’ll have to do it without Porter, Charles O’Bannon Jr. (finger injury) and
Jordan Usher, who announced his transfer from
the program this week after
he was suspended indefinitely before the win Sunday
over UC Davis.
Usher is a big loss for USC
because he was able to play
on the wing and as a smaller
inside option.
Now, if big men Nick
Rakocevic or Boatwright get
into foul trouble, the Trojans
will have to play small or
break in little-used big men
J’Raan Brooks or Victor
Uyaelunmo.
USC will also need more
from freshman point guard
Elijah Weaver as the lone perimeter player off the bench.
“Our team’s been playing
better basketball the last
two weeks,” Enfield said.
“We’ve had great practice,
and we’ve played good team
defense the last two games,
and we’ve shared the ball on
offense with 44 assists in two
games.
“Even though it’s been
extremely challenging with
our injuries and lineup
changes and lack of depth in
certain games, we’re excited
to see what we can do in the
Pac-12, because the players
that are on the court right
now are playing well.”
TONIGHT
VS. CALIFORNIA
When: 7
Where: Galen Center.
On the air: TV: Pac-12 Networks; Radio: 710.
Update: The Golden Bears
have struggled mightily this
season, going 5-7 with the
latest loss coming at home
to Seattle 82-73. California is
led by guard Paris Austin,
who averages 14.2 points.
brady.mccollough@latimes.com
Twitter: @BradyMcCollough
SOUTHLAND
MEN
at UC Santa Barbara 100, Bethesda 47: Freshman Jay Nagle
scored 20 points, 18 coming on three-point baskets, to lead
the Gauchos (11-3) in the rout. Joante Avery had 11 points for
the Flames, an NCCAA member.
MEN TONIGHT
Loyola Marymount at Pepperdine ............................................... 7
New Mexico State at Cal Baptist ................................................... 7
Texas Rio Grande Valley at UC Irvine ......................................... 7
D6
T H U R S DAY , JA N UA RY 3 , 2 019
L AT I M E S . C O M / S P O RT S
NBA
LAKERS REPORT
STANDINGS
Standings have been arranged to reflect how the teams will be
determined for the playoffs. Teams are ranked 1-15 by record. Division standing no longer has any bearing on the rankings. The top
eight teams in each conference make the playoffs, and the topseeded team would play the eighth-seeded team, the seventh team
would play the second, etc. Head-to-head competition is the first of
several tiebreakers, followed by conference record. (Western Conference divisions: S-Southwest; P-Pacific; N-Northwest; Eastern Conference divisions: A-Atlantic; C-Central; S-Southeast).
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Team
1. Denver
2. Golden State
3. Oklahoma City
4. Houston
5. Portland
6. CLIPPERS
7. San Antonio
7. LAKERS
W
24
25
24
21
22
21
21
21
L
11
13
13
15
16
16
17
17
PCT
.686
.658
.649
.583
.579
.568
.553
.553
GB L10
7-3
1
⁄2 6-4
1
7-3
31⁄2 9-1
31⁄2 7-3
4
4-6
41⁄2 7-3
41⁄2 4-6
9. Sacramento
10. Memphis
10. Dallas
12. Utah
13. Minnesota
14. New Orleans
15. Phoenix
19
18
18
18
17
17
9
18
19
19
20
21
22
30
.514 11⁄2
.486 21⁄2
.486 21⁄2
.474 3
.447 4
.436 41⁄2
.231 121⁄2
4-6
2-8
3-7
5-5
4-6
3-7
4-6
Rk.
N1
P1
N2
S1
N3
P2
S2
P3
P4
S3
S4
N4
N5
S5
P5
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Team
1. Milwaukee
2. Toronto
3. Indiana
4. Philadelphia
5. Boston
6. Miami
7. Charlotte
8. Detroit
W
26
28
25
25
22
18
18
17
9. Brooklyn
10. Orlando
11. Washington
12. Atlanta
13. Chicago
14. New York
15. Cleveland
18
17
15
11
10
9
8
L
10
11
12
14
15
18
19
19
21
20
23
26
28
29
30
PCT
.722
.718
.676
.641
.595
.500
.486
.472
GB L10 Rk.
1
⁄2 8-2 C1
6-4 A1
2
8-2 C2
3
6-4 A2
5
5-5 A3
81⁄2 7-3 S1
9
4-6 S2
91⁄2 4-6 C3
1
.462
⁄2
1
⁄2
.459
.395 3
.297 61⁄2
.263 8
.237 9
.211 10
7-3
5-5
4-6
5-5
4-6
1-9
1-9
A4
S3
S4
S5
C4
A5
C5
TODAY’S GAMES
Favorite
at San Antonio
Denver
at Golden State
Line
11⁄2
3
81⁄2
Underdog
Toronto
at Sacramento
Houston
Mavericks 122, Hornets 84
Ball is endorsing Watson
to be next UCLA coach
By Tania Ganguli
and Brad Turner
Lonzo Ball would like to
see Earl Watson become
UCLA’s basketball coach.
The Lakers’ second-year
point guard spent one season at UCLA under recently
fired coach Steve Alford and
spoke well of him.
“He’s a good person, good
coach, he helped me a lot,
but the job’s open,” Ball said
Wednesday. “I’d like to see,
maybe, Earl Watson get the
job. I know Earl personally. I
think he has coaching experience in the league. Obviously, he went there, he’s
alumni, so I think he’s a good
fit.”
Watson was a four-year
starter for the Bruins and an
All-Pac-10 Conference firstteam selection as a senior in
2001. He played 13 years in
the NBA and coached the
Phoenix Suns from 2015 to
2017.
Ball brought up Watson
after being asked about the
search in general. Although
he didn’t see much of Watson
while he played at UCLA,
Watson has advised him.
“I know he’s in the practice facility all the time in the
summer working with guys
and helping teams out,” Ball
said. “I just know him personally off the court. He’s
helped me with a few things
off the court, business-wise.
I think he’s a good person for
the job.”
UCLA fired Alford on
New Year’s Eve after the
Bruins suffered their fourth
consecutive loss. They are
7-6 after starting the season
4-0. It was the first time in
the program’s history that
UCLA fired a men’s basketball coach in the middle of
the season.
“I got a lot of love for him,”
Ball said of Alford. “It’s
tough, but he’ll be all right.”
Caldwell-Pope
comes through
It was the most aggressive the Lakers had seen
Kentavious Caldwell-Pope
play all season and it is the
same approach they want
the 6-foot-5 guard to take
even when the team is injury
free.
Caldwell-Pope scored a
season-high 26 points on the
Sacramento Kings on Sunday night.
He took a season-high 21
shots, making nine. He had a
season high in three-point
shots (13) and makes (five).
Caldwell-Pope displayed
all this when the Lakers
needed him the most, when
LeBron James (strained left
groin) and Rajon Rondo
(right ring finger surgery)
were out.
“I tell him all the time,
he’s been playing great for
us,” coach Luke Walton said
about Caldwell-Pope. “The
way he’s playing the game of
basketball, as far as cutting
without the ball, defending
other team’s scoring guards,
playing unselfish, giving it
up. If he’s open, we want him
letting that [ball] fly. He’s
one of our best shooters and
we need shooting. So, when
he’s playing like that, we’re a
better team.”
Before
Wednesday
night’s game against the
Oklahoma City Thunder at
Staples Center, CaldwellPope was averaging 9.5
points. He was shooting
42.4% from the field, 36.3%
from three-point range and
90% from the free-throw
line.
tania.ganguli@latimes.com
Twitter: @taniaganguli
broderick.turner@latimes.com
Twitter: @BA_Turner
Time
5 p.m.
7 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
RESULTS
Embiid’s 42 power
76ers past Suns
PHILADELPHIA 132
PHOENIX 127
Joel Embiid, playing despite a
sore left knee, matched his season
high with 42 points, 30 in the first
half, and grabbed 18 rebounds and
the Philadelphia 76ers held off a
strong second-half rally Wednesday to beat the host Phoenix Suns
132-127.
Ben Simmons added 29 points
and J.J. Redick 27 for the 76ers, who
were without Jimmy Butler and
Wilson Chandler, both due to an
upper respiratory infection.
Devin Booker scored 37 points
for the Suns. Deandre Ayton added
18 points and 11 boards and Josh
Jackson scored 16 points.
Detroit 101, at Memphis 94: Blake
Griffin had 26 points, eight rebounds and seven assists, and the
Pistons beat the Grizzlies to stop a
three-game skid. Griffin closed out
a 13-0 Detroit run in the fourth
quarter to put the game out of
reach.
Orlando 112, at Chicago 84: Nikola
Vucevic had 22 points and 12 rebounds before sitting out the
fourth quarter, Aaron Gordon added 18 points and a career-high nine
assists, and the Magic led the entire way. Terrence Ross scored 15
off the bench and Evan Fournier
had 13 points and seven assists for
Orlando, which shot 58% from the
field.
at Boston 115, Minnesota 102: Gordon Hayward came off the bench to
score a season-high 35 points, and
the Celtics beat the Timberwolves.
Terry Rozier scored 11 of his 16
points in the first quarter while
making his third start of the season because Kyrie Irving scratched
both of his eyes in Monday’s game
against San Antonio.
at Brooklyn 126, New Orleans 121:
D’Angelo Russell had 22 points and
13 assists, and the Nets built up a
big enough lead with a 73-point
first half to withstand Anthony
Davis’ monstrous return to the
lineup. Davis finished with 34
points and a career-high 26 rebounds after a one-game absence.
Dallas 122, at Charlotte 84: Luka
Doncic and Dennis Smith Jr. fueled an early long-range shooting
blitz and the Mavericksended a
nine-game road skid. Dallas won
its first road game since Nov. 28.
at Washington 114, Atlanta 98:
Bradley Beal had 24 points, Jeff
Green added 22 and Thomas Bryant scored 16 to go with a careerhigh 15 rebounds as the Wizards
beat the Hawks.
Miami 117, at Cleveland 92: Josh
Richardson scored 24 points and
the Heat — playing without
Dwyane Wade — rolled past the
8-30 Cavaliers.
Oklahoma City 107, at Lakers 100
— associated press
MINNESOTA
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Barnes .......29 5-14 5-5 0-4 1 1 17
Matthews....25 3-7 4-4 0-3 1 1 11
Jordan........24 4-7 0-0 4-13 1 3 8
Doncic .......26 7-16 1-2 1-10 4 0 18
Smith Jr. .....22 6-10 3-4 0-0 7 1 18
Powell ........23 5-6 3-3 3-8 2 1 15
Fnny-Smith..21 3-8 0-0 1-7 3 1 7
Barea.........13 2-5 0-0 1-2 6 2 5
Harris.........12 2-4 0-0 0-0 1 0 5
Kleber ........12 3-3 0-0 0-4 1 0 8
Brunson .....12 1-6 0-0 0-0 4 1 2
Mejri............9 1-5 0-0 2-4 0 3 2
Nowitzki........6 2-4 0-0 0-2 0 0 6
Totals
44-95 16-18 12-57 31 14 122
Shooting: Field goals, 46.3%; free throws, 88.9%
Three-point goals: 18-45 (Smith Jr. 3-5, Doncic 3-7,
Kleber 2-2, Powell 2-3, Nowitzki 2-4, Barnes 2-8, Harris
1-1, Barea 1-3, Finney-Smith 1-5, Matthews 1-5, Brunson
0-2). Team Rebounds: 8. Team Turnovers: 10 (4 PTS).
Blocked Shots: 4 (Barnes, Jordan, Matthews, Powell).
Turnovers: 10 (Finney-Smith 3, Doncic 2, Kleber 2, Smith
Jr. 2, Powell). Steals: 9 (Smith Jr. 3, Barea, Barnes, FinneySmith, Kleber, Matthews, Powell). Technical Fouls: Jordan,
5:26 first.
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Gibson .......25 4-7 0-0 2-5 1 4 8
Wiggins ......43 10-18 9-12 0-2 3 3 31
Towns.........37 12-21 3-3 4-12 7 3 28
Jones .........40 7-14 0-0 0-1 9 2 14
Okogie .......24 0-4 3-4 0-3 2 4 3
Tolliver........25 3-8 0-0 1-3 0 0 9
Saric..........22 3-7 0-0 0-6 0 0 7
Dieng.........10 1-1 0-0 0-0 0 0 2
Bayless ........5 0-1 0-2 0-1 1 0 0
Terrell...........2 0-2 0-0 0-0 1 0 0
Nunnally.......2 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0 0
Totals
40-83 15-21 7-33 24 16 102
Shooting: Field goals, 48.2%; free throws,
71.4%
Three-point goals: 7-23 (Tolliver 3-8, Wiggins
2-5, Saric 1-2, Towns 1-2, Bayless 0-1, Terrell 0-1,
Gibson 0-2, Jones 0-2). Team Rebounds: 9. Team
Turnovers: 14 (16 PTS). Blocked Shots: 2 (Tolliver,
Towns). Turnovers: 14 (Jones 4, Towns 4, Gibson 2,
Bayless, Okogie, Tolliver, Wiggins). Steals: 7 (Jones
4, Okogie 2, Tolliver). Technical Fouls: None.
CHARLOTTE
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Batum........28 3-6 0-0 1-5 4 2 8
Williams .....22 4-9 0-0 1-2 2 2 10
Hrnangmz ...18 3-8 0-0 3-10 1 2 6
Graham......33 3-13 2-2 0-1 2 6 10
Walker........26 4-14 3-4 0-3 5 1 11
Bridges.......24 2-9 4-5 2-5 2 2 8
Bacon ........16 2-3 0-0 0-3 0 2 4
Kaminsky....16 2-6 1-2 4-6 3 0 5
Biyombo .....14 4-5 2-4 1-7 1 0 10
Macura.......13 2-8 0-0 0-2 2 0 4
Kdd-Glchrst.13 2-4 2-2 0-0 1 2 6
Parker ..........6 1-3 0-0 0-1 0 1 2
Monk ...........5 0-2 0-0 0-1 0 0 0
Totals
32-90 14-19 12-46 23 20 84
Shooting: Field goals, 35.6%; free throws, 73.7%
Three-point goals: 6-32 (Batum 2-3, Williams 2-3, Graham 2-8, Bacon 0-1, Kaminsky 0-2, Monk 0-2, Bridges
0-4, Macura 0-4, Walker 0-5). Team Rebounds: 5. Team
Turnovers: 14 (8 PTS). Blocked Shots: 3 (Biyombo, Hernangomez, Monk). Turnovers: 14 (Bacon 4, Graham 3, Batum
2, Bridges 2, Hernangomez, Kaminsky, Monk). Steals: 4
(Graham 2, Batum, Kaminsky). Technical Fouls: Walker,
8:35 third.
Dallas
42 23 29 28— 122
Charlotte
26 15 24 19— 84
A—16,955. T—2:04. O—Curtis Blair, Kane Fitzgerald,
Phenizee Ransom
Heat 117, Cavaliers 92
MIAMI
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
J.Johnson....16 4-8 0-0 0-1 2 2 11
McGruder ...20 4-8 0-0 3-4 0 1 10
Whiteside ...23 4-8 0-0 5-12 0 1 8
Richardson .31 9-16 2-2 0-2 5 2 24
Winslow......27 3-11 4-4 1-4 7 0 10
Jones Jr. .....31 4-8 2-3 3-7 2 1 13
Olynyk ........27 3-3 2-2 1-6 1 1 10
T.Johnson....26 6-10 3-4 0-4 4 2 16
Adebayo .....24 4-5 0-0 0-5 5 3 8
Waiters.......10 3-9 0-2 0-2 3 0 7
Totals
44-86 13-17 13-47 29 13 117
Shooting: Field goals, 51.2%; free throws,
76.5%
Three-point goals: 16-31 (Richardson 4-7,
J.Johnson 3-4, Jones Jr. 3-4, Olynyk 2-2, McGruder
2-4, T.Johnson 1-3, Waiters 1-6, Adebayo 0-1).
Team Rebounds: 10. Team Turnovers: 13 (14 PTS).
Blocked Shots: 3 (Jones Jr., McGruder, Whiteside).
Turnovers: 13 (Adebayo 3, T.Johnson 3, Richardson
2, Whiteside 2, Jones Jr., McGruder, Winslow).
Steals: 8 (T.Johnson 3, Jones Jr. 2, Adebayo,
J.Johnson, Winslow). Technical Fouls: None.
Luis Sinco Los Angeles Times
City in the first half for two of his seven points. The Thunder won 107-100.
George scores 37 points
to answer jeers in Staples
[Lakers, from D1]
Kuzma is having an MRI
exam Thursday.
“I thought the effort and
the compete level was top
notch for us,” Lakers coach
Luke Walton said. “You try
to give yourself a chance to
win the game. … We gotta
work on cleaning up fourth
quarters. … We gotta continue to trust in the pass and
trust in each other no matter
what down the stretch.
Oklahoma city did a nice job
of turning their defense up.”
For most of the fourth
quarter, the Lakers couldn’t
score a field goal. The
drought started after a basket by Ivica Zubac with 11
minutes 29 seconds to play.
It ended when Josh Hart
made a layup with 5:13 left.
The Lakers were lucky
that the Thunder scored
only nine points during that
span, giving L.A. an opportunity to cut the deficit to 9188.
But George returned to
the court with 5:12 remaining. He scored five quick
points to give the Thunder a
six-point lead.
As the game began, the
crowd was eager to show
George its displeasure, booing him often.
His forgettable first quarter, which included four
points and three fouls, emboldened them.
Neither team shot well to
open the game. Not until
Caldwell-Pope hit one with
1:50 left in the first quarter
did the Lakers make their
first three-point basket after
missing their first seven
tries.
The Thunder made their
THUNDER 107, LAKERS 100
OKLAHOMA CITY
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
George ..............34 15-29 5-7 2-4 2 3 37
Grant ................35 5-10 2-2 0-7 0 3 13
Adams ..............36 5-10 4-6 8-15 3 3 14
Ferguson ...........18 1-7 0-0 0-1 0 2 2
Westbrook .........35 3-20 7-10 1-16 10 4 14
Schroder ...........29 4-13 1-4 1-7 6 1 10
Nader ...............14 4-6 0-0 0-4 1 4 10
Patterson...........12 1-4 0-0 2-4 0 1 2
Noel .................11 2-3 1-2 2-4 0 0 5
Diallo................11 0-3 0-0 1-2 0 3 0
Totals
40-105 20-31 17-64 22 24 107
Shooting: Field goals, 38.1%; free throws, 64.5%
Three-point goals: 7-31 (Nader 2-3, George 2-11,
Schroder 1-2, Grant 1-4, Westbrook 1-7, Patterson 0-1,
Ferguson 0-3). Team Rebounds: 13. Team Turnovers: 11
(10 PTS). Blocked Shots: 5 (Adams 2, Westbrook 2,
Noel). Turnovers: 11 (Westbrook 4, Schroder 3, Adams
2, Diallo, George). Steals: 8 (George 4, Westbrook 2,
Noel, Patterson). Technical Fouls: coach Billy Donovan,
6:33 second
LAKERS
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Ingram ..............40 8-21 1-2 1-11 5 3 17
Kuzma ..............16 1-4 2-2 0-1 1 2 4
McGee ..............20 7-16 1-3 3-8 1 3 15
Ball ..................35 1-4 1-5 1-4 7 4 3
Hart..................37 5-16 2-4 1-15 2 5 13
Caldwell-Pope ....34 6-14 8-10 1-3 2 2 25
Stephenson .......21 1-5 0-0 0-6 4 3 3
Chandler ...........17 2-2 3-4 0-3 1 2 7
Zubac ...............10 4-4 0-0 1-2 1 2 8
Mykhailiuk ...........6 2-3 1-2 0-1 0 0 5
Totals
37-89 19-32 8-54 24 26 100
Shooting: Field goals, 41.6%; free throws, 59.4%
Three-point goals: 7-27 (Caldwell-Pope 5-11,
Stephenson 1-3, Hart 1-8, Ball 0-1, Ingram 0-2, Kuzma
0-2). Team Rebounds: 10. Team Turnovers: 17 (16 PTS).
Blocked Shots: 9 (McGee 4, Ball 2, Hart, Ingram,
Zubac). Turnovers: 17 (Ingram 4, Kuzma 3, Ball 2, McGee 2, Stephenson 2, Caldwell-Pope, Hart, Mykhailiuk,
Zubac). Steals: 8 (Kuzma 3, Caldwell-Pope 2, Ball, Hart,
Stephenson). Technical Fouls: None.
Oklahoma City
25 34 19 28— 107
LAKERS
25 32 25 18— 100
A—18,997. T—2:25. O—Tom Washington, Josh
Tiven, J.T. Orr
first three-point basket in
the closing seconds of the
first quarter, having also
missed their first seven attempts. During that period,
the teams combined to
make only two of 18 threepoint shots.
Just before halftime,
George’s game turned.
Westbrook stole the ball
from Brandon Ingram with
3:57 left in the second quarter and raced toward the
basket with only Lonzo Ball
in front of him. But George
wasn’t far behind him.
Instead of trying to score,
Westbrook lofted the ball for
George, who dunked it forcefully and then slapped the
backboard before coming
down. He got a technical foul
and motioned a “T” with his
hands as he ran down the
court, scowling.
It was the start of an
awakening for Staples Center’s latest villain.
“Heard what the crowd
was doing, seeing his aggression toward that, kind of felt
like he fed off that a little bit,”
Caldwell-Pope said. “But
Paul George is a great player. He missed a lot of shots in
the first half but came back
real aggressive in the second
half.”
After a first quarter in
which George scored four
points and committed three
fouls, after a start to the
game in which he missed six
three-point shots, George
roared back to life and relished his black hat. He
scored seven consecutive
points, including his first
three-pointer.
After hitting a jumper
near halftime on which his
former teammate Lance
Stephenson fouled him,
George bellowed at the
crowd that had been jeering
him. Westbrook launched
into an air guitar, mimicking
Stephenson’s typical threepointer celebration.
At halftime, the Thunder
led 59-57 and George had 17
points. He carried that fire
into the second half.
tania.ganguli@latimes.com
Twitter: @taniaganguli
BOSTON
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Morris ........23 3-9 4-5 0-3 1 4 12
Tatum.........31 3-11 2-2 0-3 4 0 8
Horford.......23 7-9 0-0 0-5 4 1 15
Rozier ........32 6-10 2-2 0-3 5 0 16
Smart ........22 1-2 0-0 0-3 8 1 2
Hayward .....31 14-18 3-3 0-1 5 1 35
Brown ........29 4-7 1-2 0-5 2 5 10
Ojeleye .......18 2-4 0-0 1-3 1 1 5
Theis..........13 3-4 1-1 1-4 3 3 8
Yabusele.....11 2-2 0-0 1-1 1 4 4
Wanamaker...2 0-0 0-0 0-2 0 1 0
Dozier ..........0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0 0
Totals
45-76 13-15 3-33 34 21 115
Shooting: Field goals, 59.2%; free throws,
86.7%
Three-point goals: 12-30 (Hayward 4-7, Rozier
2-5, Morris 2-7, Theis 1-1, Brown 1-2, Horford 1-2,
Ojeleye 1-2, Smart 0-1, Tatum 0-3). Team Rebounds: 7. Team Turnovers: 16 (14 PTS). Blocked
Shots: 8 (Horford 2, Brown, Morris, Rozier, Tatum,
Theis, Yabusele). Turnovers: 16 (Brown 5, Hayward
2, Rozier 2, Smart 2, Yabusele 2, Horford, Morris,
Tatum). Steals: 10 (Rozier 5, Smart 2, Brown, Morris, Ojeleye). Technical Fouls: None.
Minnesota
21 21 39 21— 102
Boston
25 35 27 28— 115
A—18,624. T—2:09. O—Jason Phillips, Gediminas Petraitis, James Williams
Magic 112, Bulls 84
ORLANDO
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Gordon.......37 8-14 2-3 0-7 9 1 18
Isaac .........25 2-5 2-2 0-3 0 0 7
Vucevic.......26 10-15 1-3 2-12 3 2 22
Augustin .....25 4-7 1-2 0-2 6 1 10
Fournier......30 5-10 0-0 0-1 7 2 13
Ross ..........24 6-9 0-0 0-6 2 1 15
Iwundu.......21 1-2 4-4 0-2 1 2 6
Bamba.......19 4-7 2-3 2-5 0 1 10
Grant .........18 2-4 0-0 0-2 2 0 6
Caupain .......3 0-1 0-0 0-1 1 0 0
Martin..........3 1-1 1-1 0-0 0 0 3
Briscoe.........3 1-1 0-0 0-0 0 0 2
Totals
44-76 13-18 4-41 31 10 112
Shooting: Field goals, 57.9%; free throws,
72.2%
Three-point goals: 11-26 (Ross 3-4, Fournier
3-6, Grant 2-3, Vucevic 1-1, Isaac 1-2, Augustin
1-4, Bamba 0-1, Caupain 0-1, Iwundu 0-1, Gordon
0-3). Team Rebounds: 8. Team Turnovers: 13 (10
PTS). Blocked Shots: 9 (Bamba 3, Vucevic 3, Isaac
2, Gordon). Turnovers: 13 (Augustin 2, Bamba 2,
Fournier 2, Ross 2, Vucevic 2, Gordon, Isaac,
Iwundu). Steals: 5 (Vucevic 2, Augustin, Isaac,
Ross). Technical Fouls: None.
CLEVELAND
CHICAGO
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Hood .........26 5-7 0-0 0-2 1 1 13
Osman .......29 2-6 3-3 0-3 3 1 9
Thompson...23 5-9 4-6 1-2 1 2 14
Burks .........27 4-7 0-0 0-3 0 2 9
Sexton .......30 5-15 0-0 0-4 4 3 12
Clarkson .....24 4-9 0-0 0-0 5 2 11
Nance Jr. ....21 3-5 0-0 1-5 6 4 6
McCaw .......18 1-2 0-0 0-0 1 0 2
Dellavedova 17 3-8 0-0 0-0 1 0 7
Jones .........14 2-5 4-4 0-1 1 1 9
Blossomgame3 0-0 0-0 0-2 0 0 0
Frye .............2 0-2 0-0 0-0 0 0 0
Totals
34-75 11-13 2-22 23 16 92
Shooting: Field goals, 45.3%; free throws,
84.6%
Three-point goals: 13-31 (Hood 3-4, Clarkson
3-8, Sexton 2-4, Osman 2-5, Burks 1-2, Dellavedova 1-3, Jones 1-3, Frye 0-1, McCaw 0-1). Team
Rebounds: 10. Team Turnovers: 12 (9 PTS).
Blocked Shots: 3 (Clarkson, Hood, Nance Jr.).
Turnovers: 12 (Nance Jr. 3, Clarkson 2, Blossomgame, Dellavedova, Hood, Jones, Osman, Sexton, Thompson). Steals: 8 (Nance Jr. 3, Hood 2,
Thompson 2, McCaw). Technical Fouls: None.
Miami
22 36 35 24— 117
Cleveland
23 20 30 19— 92
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Holiday.......26 1-7 0-0 0-4 1 2 3
Markkanen..28 6-12 0-0 2-6 1 1 14
Carter Jr......13 0-5 0-0 0-1 0 3 0
Dunn .........27 6-12 1-1 0-3 4 2 14
LaVine........28 6-10 4-5 0-3 3 1 16
Harrison .....26 5-14 0-0 1-3 2 0 11
Blakeney ....24 5-12 0-2 0-4 1 0 11
Hutchison ...21 3-5 0-0 0-2 2 2 6
Lopez.........15 0-1 0-0 2-3 0 1 0
Arcidiacono.15 2-4 0-0 0-2 3 3 5
Felicio..........7 2-3 0-0 0-0 0 1 4
Payne...........5 0-1 0-0 0-1 1 1 0
Totals
36-86 5-8 5-32 18 17 84
Shooting: Field goals, 41.9%; free throws,
62.5%
Three-point goals: 7-20 (Markkanen 2-3, Blakeney 1-1, Dunn 1-2, Arcidiacono 1-3, Harrison 1-4,
Holiday 1-5, Hutchison 0-1, LaVine 0-1). Team Rebounds: 9. Team Turnovers: 11 (15 PTS). Blocked
Shots: 0. Turnovers: 11 (Dunn 2, Harrison 2, LaVine
2, Arcidiacono, Blakeney, Carter Jr., Hutchison,
Markkanen). Steals: 8 (Dunn 3, Harrison 3,
Markkanen 2). Technical Fouls: None.
Orlando
32 30 28 22— 112
Chicago
16 29 17 22— 84
A—19,432. T—1:56. O—Marc Davis, Nick
Buchert, Kevin Scott
TYSON CHANDLER of the Lakers dunks in front of Steven Adams of Oklahoma
Celtics 115, Timberwolves 102
DALLAS
A—19,013. T—1:54. O—Justin Van Duyne, Courtney Kirkland, Mark Ayotte
Pistons 101, Grizzlies 94
Wizards 114, Hawks 98
DETROIT
ATLANTA
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Bullock.......27 4-8 2-2 1-1 3 2 13
Griffin.........38 11-23 2-5 1-8 7 3 26
Drummond .38 4-13 3-5 2-10 2 2 11
Brown ........20 1-4 0-0 2-5 2 4 3
Jackson......31 6-11 0-0 0-7 5 1 16
Kennard .....27 4-11 3-6 0-5 2 0 13
Galloway.....18 4-8 0-0 0-0 1 1 11
Calderon.....16 1-1 0-0 0-0 1 2 3
Leuer .........14 0-1 2-2 1-5 0 1 2
Johnson .......5 1-3 1-2 0-1 0 1 3
Totals
36-83 13-22 7-42 23 17 101
Shooting: Field goals, 43.4%; free throws,
59.1%
Three-point goals: 16-40 (Jackson 4-8, Galloway 3-6, Bullock 3-7, Kennard 2-5, Griffin 2-8,
Calderon 1-1, Brown 1-3, Johnson 0-1, Leuer 0-1).
Team Rebounds: 10. Team Turnovers: 7 (14 PTS).
Blocked Shots: 3 (Jackson 2, Drummond). Turnovers: 7 (Jackson 4, Calderon, Drummond, Leuer).
Steals: 7 (Drummond 2, Galloway 2, Griffin 2,
Jackson). Technical Fouls: Drummond, 4:14 second.
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Collins........26 8-14 1-2 1-8 3 4 21
Hamilton ....20 3-8 1-2 2-7 1 1 8
Dedmon .....27 3-8 0-0 3-9 1 3 6
Huerter.......44 5-14 1-1 0-1 5 2 12
Young.........27 2-8 0-0 0-3 9 2 5
Len............27 11-19 1-2 6-11 0 3 24
Bembry ......25 5-9 1-2 1-7 0 3 11
Lin.............19 2-7 3-4 0-2 5 0 8
Carter ........13 1-6 0-0 0-2 2 0 3
Anderson......5 0-2 0-0 0-0 0 1 0
Dorsey .........0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0 0
Totals
40-95 8-13 13-50 26 19 98
Shooting: Field goals, 42.1%; free throws,
61.5%
Three-point goals: 10-31 (Collins 4-5, Young
1-2, Hamilton 1-3, Len 1-3, Carter 1-4, Lin 1-4,
Huerter 1-7, Anderson 0-1, Bembry 0-1, Dedmon
0-1). Team Rebounds: 9. Team Turnovers: 14 (27
PTS). Blocked Shots: 6 (Len 3, Dedmon, Huerter,
Young). Turnovers: 14 (Young 4, Collins 2, Huerter
2, Lin 2, Anderson, Bembry, Dedmon, Len). Steals:
5 (Lin 3, Bembry, Dedmon). Technical Fouls: coach
Lloyd Pierce, 9:51 third.
WASHINGTON
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Ariza ..........39 5-15 1-3 1-5 4 1 12
Green.........36 7-13 4-4 0-6 6 4 22
Bryant........39 5-7 6-6 1-15 1 3 16
Beal...........36 9-20 3-3 0-4 6 5 24
Satoransky..36 5-10 3-6 4-11 7 1 14
Randle .......17 3-6 0-1 2-3 1 3 7
Dekker .......15 4-10 0-0 2-2 1 2 8
Porter Jr......13 4-8 0-0 0-1 2 1 9
Brown Jr. ......6 1-3 0-0 0-1 1 0 2
Totals
43-92 17-23 10-48 29 20 114
Shooting: Field goals, 46.7%; free throws,
73.9%
Three-point goals: 11-29 (Green 4-8, Beal 3-7,
Randle 1-2, Satoransky 1-2, Porter Jr. 1-3, Ariza
1-5, Brown Jr. 0-1, Bryant 0-1). Team Rebounds: 8.
Team Turnovers: 10 (13 PTS). Blocked Shots: 2
(Bryant 2). Turnovers: 10 (Beal 3, Randle 2, Ariza,
Bryant, Green, Porter Jr., Satoransky). Steals: 10
(Randle 3, Beal 2, Bryant 2, Satoransky 2, Ariza).
Technical Fouls: None.
Atlanta
29 24 31 14— 98
Washington
35 29 24 26— 114
A—15,324. T—2:09. O—Ben Taylor, Mike Callahan, Ray Acosta
Nets 126, Pelicans 121
NEW ORLEANS
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
A.Davis.......42 12-25 8-10 5-26 4 3 34
Moore ........36 6-11 2-2 1-1 1 1 16
Randle .......34 8-13 5-9 2-4 2 4 21
Holiday.......37 8-16 1-2 1-4 4 3 20
Payton........33 10-15 3-4 1-2 7 0 25
Miller .........28 1-4 0-0 0-3 0 5 3
Frazier..........8 1-3 0-0 0-0 0 1 2
Clark............8 0-0 0-0 0-0 1 1 0
Hill ..............6 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 1 0
Jackson........4 0-0 0-0 0-1 0 1 0
Totals
46-87 19-27 10-41 19 20 121
Shooting: Field goals, 52.9%; free throws,
70.4%
Three-point goals: 10-23 (Holiday 3-5, Moore
2-3, Payton 2-4, A.Davis 2-6, Miller 1-3, Frazier
0-1, Randle 0-1). Team Rebounds: 8. Team Turnovers: 12 (15 PTS). Blocked Shots: 5 (A.Davis 3,
Randle 2). Turnovers: 12 (Payton 4, Holiday 3,
Randle 2, A.Davis, Frazier, Miller). Steals: 7 (Moore
2, A.Davis, Clark, Holiday, Miller, Randle). Technical Fouls: coach Alvin Gentry, 7:24 fourth.
BROOKLYN
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Dudley .......23 3-5 0-0 0-2 0 2 8
Kurucs .......26 4-7 0-0 1-2 1 3 10
Allen..........31 3-6 4-4 3-11 0 1 10
Harris.........29 9-16 0-0 2-2 1 3 21
Russell .......34 9-21 2-2 2-5 13 3 22
Carroll........29 6-12 4-7 1-6 3 3 19
Dinwiddie ...24 5-12 6-6 0-0 4 3 18
Napier........24 5-11 0-0 0-3 4 1 12
E.Davis.......16 3-3 0-2 3-12 1 4 6
Totals
47-93 16-21 12-43 27 23 126
Shooting: Field goals, 50.5%; free throws,
76.2%
Three-point goals: 16-31 (Harris 3-4, Carroll
3-6, Dinwiddie 2-3, Dudley 2-3, Kurucs 2-3, Napier 2-4, Russell 2-8). Team Rebounds: 8. Team
Turnovers: 10 (20 PTS). Blocked Shots: 5 (Allen 2,
E.Davis, Kurucs, Russell). Turnovers: 10 (Dinwiddie
3, Harris 2, Napier 2, Dudley, Kurucs, Russell).
Steals: 7 (E.Davis 2, Russell 2, Allen, Dudley, Harris). Technical Fouls: None.
New Orleans
29 29 29 34— 121
Brooklyn
39 34 32 21— 126
A—16,890. T—2:10. O—Matt Myers, Kevin Cutler, James Capers
MEMPHIS
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Anderson....30 7-9 1-2 1-5 1 2 15
Jackson Jr. ..35 8-11 8-8 3-10 2 6 26
Gasol.........29 4-10 2-2 1-7 3 3 11
Conley........28 0-8 0-0 0-3 1 0 0
Temple .......37 2-8 2-3 0-1 3 1 7
Green.........23 4-8 0-0 1-7 3 3 8
Mack .........22 3-10 2-2 1-4 6 2 8
D.Brooks.....18 6-10 2-2 1-4 1 4 14
Selden .........5 2-2 1-2 0-1 0 0 5
Casspi .........4 0-2 0-0 0-1 0 0 0
Noah ...........3 0-0 0-0 0-1 1 1 0
Totals
36-78 18-21 8-44 21 22 94
Shooting: Field goals, 46.2%; free throws,
85.7%
Three-point goals: 4-18 (Jackson Jr. 2-2, Gasol
1-3, Temple 1-4, Conley 0-1, D.Brooks 0-2, Green
0-3, Mack 0-3). Team Rebounds: 5. Team Turnovers: 11 (12 PTS). Blocked Shots: 5 (Gasol 2, Anderson, Noah, Temple). Turnovers: 11 (Conley 3,
Anderson 2, Gasol 2, Jackson Jr. 2, D.Brooks,
Green). Steals: 2 (Temple 2).
Detroit
26 25 21 29— 101
Memphis
24 31 12 27— 94
A—14,109. T—2:13. O—Fraher, Collins, Kogut
76ers 132, Suns 127
PHILADELPHIA
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Bolden .......15 2-3 0-0 1-4 2 4 4
Korkmaz .....29 4-9 0-0 0-4 3 4 10
Embiid .......36 12-23 17-19 4-18 2 3 42
Redick........36 7-12 8-10 1-4 4 1 27
Simmons ....40 7-11 15-23 0-3 6 3 29
McConnell ..28 3-7 1-2 2-4 6 2 7
Muscala .....23 0-1 0-0 0-4 2 5 0
Shamet ......16 2-5 0-0 0-3 1 5 5
D.Jackson ...13 3-3 0-0 0-0 1 3 8
Totals
40-74 41-54 8-44 27 30 132
Shooting: Field goals, 54.1%; free throws,
75.9%
Three-point goals: 11-24 (Redick 5-8, D.Jackson 2-2, Korkmaz 2-7, Embiid 1-1, Shamet 1-4,
Bolden 0-1, Muscala 0-1). Team Rebounds: 12.
Team Turnovers: 17 (29 PTS). Blocked Shots: 3
(Embiid 2, Simmons). Turnovers: 17 (Embiid 4,
Simmons 4, Korkmaz 3, McConnell 2, Muscala 2,
Redick 2). Steals: 9 (Embiid 3, Redick 2, Korkmaz,
McConnell, Muscala, Shamet).
PHOENIX
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Bridges.......26 1-8 0-0 2-6 1 2 2
Warren .......20 2-8 2-3 0-2 0 5 7
Ayton .........33 8-12 2-2 7-11 2 5 18
Booker .......35 10-22 15-17 1-2 8 4 37
Melton .......22 3-6 3-4 1-3 3 2 10
J.Jackson ....26 6-14 3-4 0-6 4 6 16
Oubre Jr......23 4-8 0-0 0-0 0 3 9
Okobo........17 3-5 0-0 0-1 2 2 9
Daniels.......15 2-6 0-0 0-2 0 3 6
Holmes ......14 4-5 5-6 2-4 2 2 13
Crawford.......5 0-1 0-0 0-0 0 0 0
Totals
43-95 30-36 13-37 22 34 127
Shooting: Field goals, 45.3%; free throws,
83.3%
Three-point goals: 11-34 (Okobo 3-3, Daniels
2-6, Booker 2-7, Melton 1-2, J.Jackson 1-3, Warren
1-3, Oubre Jr. 1-4, Bridges 0-6). Team Rebounds:
12. Team Turnovers: 15 (18 PTS). Blocked Shots: 3
(Holmes, J.Jackson, Melton). Turnovers: 15 (Melton
4, Booker 3, J.Jackson 2, Okobo 2, Oubre Jr. 2,
Ayton, Bridges). Steals: 10 (Daniels 3, Ayton 2,
Melton 2, Okobo 2, J.Jackson). Technical Fouls:
None.
Philadelphia
44 28 32 28— 132
Phoenix
32 17 38 40— 127
A—15,226. T—NA.. O—Ken Mauer, Mitchell
Ervin, Matt Boland
T H U R S DAY , JA N UA RY 3 , 2 019
L AT I M E S . C O M / S P O RT S
D7
NBA
George enjoys life in the slower lane
Thunder star spurned
Lakers to stay in a
much smaller market
and has no regrets.
DAN WOIKE
ON THE NBA
During a perfect January
morning on Wednesday, the
sun shining brightly, the air
with just a slightest bit of
bite, LeBron James’ videogame likeness slammed
home dunk after dunk on a
giant screen affixed to a
hotel across the street.
You don’t have to work
hard to imagine Paul
George right there with him,
throwing James lobs, celebrating wins, putting the
Lakers instantly back into
championship contention.
All he had to do was to
show up, to do what he
thought he wanted. All of it
could’ve been his had he
signed with the Lakers.
Instead, that night,
George ran onto the court in
front of a filled arena that
had been waiting months to
boo him.
A year ago, Lakers fans
cheered every time he touched the ball to show
George how much they
wanted him to sign in free
agency. Wednesday, they
cheered when he botched a
pick-and-roll with center
Steven Adams, missed
three-pointers and committed three early fouls, showing him how upset they were
that he instead picked the
Oklahoma City Thunder.
What makes George’s
story unique is that he
picked Oklahoma City. And
he did it at a time where
executives are bracing for
New Orleans’ Anthony
Davis and Milwaukee’s
Giannis Antetokounmpo to
head to bigger markets like
New York or Los Angeles
because that’s what superstar players do. They leave.
Why did George stay,
announcing his decision to
sign a four-year, $137-million
contract in the first seconds
of free agency, especially
when he had a pretty good
idea that James would later
end up with the Lakers?
“This wasn’t a thing
Luis Sinco Los Angeles Times
PAUL GEORGE says the slow pace of Oklahoma City allows him time to bond
with teammates. Besides, L.A. is his home, so “it’s not like I’m missing much.”
against LeBron, as if I didn’t
want to play with him,”
George said. “And, it wasn’t
if I chose Russ [Russell
Westbrook ] over LeBron. I
just enjoyed where I was at.
To be honest, those are two
great players.
“To be honest, I wanted
to give another chance,
another shot, playing with
Russ, who is one of the best
It hasn’t been perfect —
the Thunder lost Kevin
Durant in free agency and
the team traded James
Harden. But keeping
George and Westbrook?
The Thunder are an outlier
in a league in which power
seems ready to move more
and more to the coasts.
There are theories:
There’s a lot of talk about
point guards in the league. I
gave it one year. I wanted to
give it more time to develop
and see what we could do.”
Thunder executives and
staff members don’t know
exactly how they managed
to keep George — or for that
matter how they were able
to get Russell Westbrook to
commit to a five-year extension in the summer of 2017.
ownership and management creating the right
environment. The Thunder
went out and got George,
trading key players in Victor
Oladipo and Domantas
Sabonis to the Indiana
Pacers, showing him they
wanted him. They didn’t
wait like the Lakers, who
never made an offer that the
Pacers couldn’t turn down.
And maybe Oklahoma
City is kind of the right place
for a player who wants to
build a closeness with teammates with minimal distractions.
It’s more of a mosaic
than one particular reason.
Organizationally, there’s
a reputation that Oklahoma
City is a place where people
can do their jobs, where
coaches can coach, where
salespeople can sell, where
players can play. Staffers
swear that comes from a
tone set by owner Clay
Bennett.
“I just felt comfortable,
felt at home,” George said.
There’s stability — a
general manager, owner and
star who have all been with
the Thunder since their first
seconds in Oklahoma City.
That’s just not the case with
the Lakers, who have had a
major overhaul from the top
parts of management on
down in the last two years.
People also insist that
Westbrook deserves a lot of
the credit — not just for
keeping George in Oklahoma City but for helping
establish an on-court culture that matches what is
happening in the front
office.
At a shootaround
Wednesday morning, Westbrook said he was proud of
his role in keeping George
and in proving that market
size doesn’t have to matter.
He’s spent his entire professional career in Oklahoma
City, something that hasn’t
kept him from trying to put
a Mountain Dew in your
hand and Air Jordans on
your feet.
Westbrook didn’t want to
trick George into staying in
town. There was a more
sincere desire to find the
right partner to move forward with in the West.
“It’s not about making
someone want to stay. It’s
about creating a bond and
friendship outside of
basketball,” Westbrook
said. “I think all the things
that go on the court, all the
numbers, are irrelevant.
The most important thing is
creating a bond and friendship with somebody.”
And George believed
that the slower-paced way
of living in Oklahoma City —
a nicer way to say that
there’s not as much to do as
there is almost anywhere
else in the NBA — is more
conducive to forming those
bonds.
A place like Oklahoma
City, one of the NBA’s smallest markets, allows for
players to linger around the
locker room more. No one is
worried about traffic. No
one is worried about an
incredible club night that
they can’t miss.
“After practice, we’re not
like, ‘Hey, let’s jet out of
here. We’ve got to go to this
place or go to that place.’
No, we’re spending time at
the arena and at practice
because there’s not as much
going on,” George said.
“There’s time for us to talk
and just enjoy the fellowship. After practice, after
games, we’re chilling. We’re
laughing. We’re vibing.
There’s no rush. Nothing is
rushed in Oklahoma.”
And if George came to
Los Angeles, it would’ve
been rushed. Paired with
James, the expectations
would’ve been no less than a
trip to the NBA Finals in
Year One. And that kind of
pressure helped doom the
Westbrook-GeorgeCarmelo Anthony Thunder
team that lost in the firstround of the playoffs last
spring.
Instead of that, George
chose to stay, to build with
Westbrook, to try and take
on the Warriors and James
from sleepy Oklahoma City.
And the excitement of
Los Angeles? That’s not
going anywhere.
“The thing is L.A. is
home,” George said. “I’m
here every summer. I spend
three or four months here
every year. It’s not like I’m
missing much.”
dan.woike@latimes.com
Twitter: @DanWoikeSports
Clippers look to get more physical from the start
Beverley believes the
team needs aggressive
approach to bounce
back from rut.
By Andrew Greif
The NBA regular season
is a grind that eventually reveals every team’s inconsistencies, and entering this
season, the Clippers knew
they wouldn’t be the exception.
The introduction of new
defensive principles would
cause growing pains. An offense without a superstar
would struggle if the ball
movement wasn’t quite
right.
But if there was one area
where they figured to be the
steadiest it was, as guard
Patrick Beverley said, “looking to throw the punch first.”
Their incentive to scrap
was strong. The contracts of
only five Clippers are guaranteed beyond this season.
The players enjoyed feeling
overlooked in a crowded
Western Conference. Their
personalities seek conflict
on the court.
But after a 119-113 loss to
Philadelphia on Tuesday,
several Clippers questioned
why their fight again arrived
closer to the end than the
start.
“Don’t get my words
mixed up, we’re a team that
has to come in and throw the
punches,” Beverley said.
“We’re not a team that can
ease into a game.
“We have to be dogs, we
have to be gritty, that’s our
M.O. … As of late we’ve been
trying to ease into games
and we can’t do that. We’ll fix
it.”
Is that easier said than
done? Since Dec. 1, the Clippers have trailed after the
first quarter nine times and
gone on to win only one of
those games, and that was
against Phoenix, the West’s
worst team.
The 76ers led the Clippers by 13 points after one
quarter Tuesday, 18 after
one half and as many as 24 in
the second half. A Clippers
rally cut the lead to four
points with under three minutes remaining but they
Brian van der Brug Los Angeles Times
PATRICK BEVERLEY , guarding Jimmy Butler,
then with Minnesota, wants Clippers to be gritty.
would come no closer.
“It just feels like right now
we are in this defensive rut
where we have to search for
the right unit, and the right
group of guys to give us defensive fight, and it’s hard to
win that way. ... [Philadelphia] played harder for longer and I thought they were
more physical for a longer
period in the game and I
think they deserved to win,”
coach Doc Rivers said. “It
would have been nice to steal
a game but we would have
stolen it, not necessarily
earned it.”
Fixes will come either in
the Clippers’ structure, spirit or both.
Rivers has shuffled the
lineup before, and said there
were a “lot of adjustments”
to be made after opposing
centers such as San Antonio’s LaMarcus Aldridge
and Philadelphia’s Joel Embiid feasted while their
starting Clippers counter-
parts Marcin Gortat and
Boban Marjanovic struggled to counter their effectiveness at either end.
“No. 1, we have to be better at that position defensively,” Rivers said. “We have
to be more physical.”
A shift to include the energy of reserve Montrezl
Harrell from the start
doesn’t appear to be a serious consideration, however.
The 6-foot-8 center works
best with guard Lou
Williams, who prefers coming off the bench, and the
two have often dominated
opponents’ second units.
Whether the Clippers alter their rotation, several
players said they wanted to
see better fight from their
teammates.
Guard Avery Bradley was
ejected late in the fourth
quarter against the 76ers after a scrap with Jimmy Butler and Beverley later fouled
out not long after earning a
technical foul after responding to a forearm push from
Embiid. Their absences
stunted the Clippers’ comeback effort but the acts were
cheered internally for what
they symbolized.
“I thought we retaliated
most of the game, then I
thought in the fourth quarter we started instigating
the actions,” Rivers said.
Added Harrell: “That’s
the type of team that we
need everyone in the locker
room to be.”
Retaining that kind of
edge for 82 games would
seem incredibly difficult, if
not impossible.
But Harrell didn’t agree.
“It’s not hard, man, it’s
not hard. … We can’t just sit
back and let guys come in
and run their plays freely,”
he said. “You watched the
game. The whole first half
those guys, it looked like
they were in a shootaround.
Coming out, JJ Redick was
coming off handoffs, pindowns, wide open for easy
threes and that’s a tough
person to leave in that sort of
situation, especially when he
shoots the ball at a high clip.
“We’ve just got to go into
games looking to throw the
punch first. Simple as that.”
andrew.greif@latimes.com
Twitter: @andrewgreif
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D8
T H U R S DAY , JA N UA RY 3 , 2 019
L AT I M E S . C O M / S P O RT S
THE DAY IN SPORTS
Pulisic’s contract
sold for $73 million
TENNIS
$1.5-MILLION BRISBANE INTERNATIONAL
At Brisbane, Australia
Surface: Hard-Outdoor
MEN’S SINGLES (second round)—Grigor Dimitrov (6), Bulgaria, d. John Millman, Australia,
6-3, 6-4; Yasutaka Uchiyama, Japan, d. Kyle Edmund (3), Britain, 7-6 (6), 6-4; Kei Nishikori (2),
Japan, d. Denis Kudla, 7-5, 6-2; Nick Kyrgios
(8), Australia, d. Jeremy Chardy, France, 7-6 (5),
2-6, 6-3; Milos Raonic (5), Canada, d. Miomir
Kecmanovic, Serbia, 6-3, 7-6 (2); Daniil Medvedev (4), Russia, d. Andy Murray, Britain, 7-5, 6-2;
Alex de Minaur (7), Australia, d. Jordan Thompson, Australia, 6-4, 6-2.
WOMEN’S SINGLES (second round)—Anastasija Sevastova (8), Latvia, d. Harriet Dart, Britain, 6-2, 6-0; Anett Kontaveit, Estonia, d. Petra
Kvitova (4), Czech Republic, 7-5, 7-6 (1); Donna
Vekic, Croatia, d. Kiki Bertens (6), Netherlands,
7-6 (5), 1-6, 7-5; Ajla Tomljanovic, Australia, d.
Johanna Konta, Britain, 6-2, 7-6 (2); Karolina
Pliskova (5), Czech Republic, d. Marie Bouzkova,
Czech Republic, 7-5, 6-2; Aliaksandra Sasnovich, Belarus, d. Elina Svitolina (1), Ukraine,
6-4, 0-6, 6-3.
MEN’S DOUBLES (quarterfinals)—John Millman-John-Patrick Smith, Australia, d. Ben
Mclachlan, Japan-Jan-Lennard Struff (2), Germany, 7-6 (5), 6-4; Marcus Daniell, New Zealand,-Wesley Koolhof, Netherlands, d. Kyle Edmund-Neal Skupski, Britain, 6-1, 7-6 (5).
WOMEN’S DOUBLES (quarterfinals)—Chan
Hao-ching-Latisha Chan (4), Taiwan, d. Kristina
Mladenovic, France-Galina Voskoboeva, Kazakhstan, 6-1, 7-5.
$1.195-MILLION ExXONMOBIL OPEN
At Doha, Qatar
Surface: Hard-Outdoor
SINGLES (second round)—Stan Wawrinka,
Switzerland, d. Nicolas Jarry, Chile, 6-4, 7-6 (3);
Roberto Bautista Agut (7), Spain, d. Guillermo
Garcia-Lopez, Spain, 6-1, 6-4; Dusan Lajovic,
Serbia, d. Ricardas Berankis, Lithuania, 7-6 (4),
0-6, 7-5; Marco Cecchinato (4), Italy, d. Guido
Pella, Argentina, walkover; Novak Djokovic (1),
Serbia, d. Marton Fucsovics, Hungary, 4-6, 6-4,
6-1; Pierre-Hugues Herbert, France, d. Maxi Marterer, Germany, 6-3, 6-7 (6), 7-6 (6); Nikoloz
Basilashvili (5), Georgia, d. Andrey Rublev, Russia, 6-3, 6-4; Tomas Berdych, Czech Republic, d.
Fernando Verdasco (8), Spain, 4-6, 6-3, 7-5.
$750,000 SHENZHEN OPEN
At Shenzhen, China
Surface: Hard-Outdoor
SINGLES (second round)—Wang Yafan, China,
d. Ons Jabeur, Tunisia, 3-6, 6-4, 6-4; Maria
Sharapova (5), Russia, d. Wang Xinyu, China,
6-7 (4), 5-2 retired; Aryna Sabalenka (1), Belarus, d. Ekaterina Alexandrova, Russia, 6-3, 6-3;
Monica Niculescu, Romania, d. Kristyna
Pliskova, Czech Republic, 6-7 (2), 6-3, 6-4.
$501,345 TATA OPEN MAHARASHTRA
At Pune, India
Surface: Hard-Outdoor
SINGLES (second round)—Ernests Gulbis,
Latvia, d. Chung Hyeon (2), South Korea, 7-6
(2), 6-2; Ivo Karlovic, Croatia, d. Evgeny Donskoy,
Russia, 6-4, 7-5; Kevin Anderson (1), South Africa, d. Laslo Djere, Serbia, 7-6 (3), 7-6 (6);
Benoit Paire (5), France, d. Jiri Vesely, Czech Republic, 6-4, 6-2; Jaume Munar (7), Spain, d. Simone Bolelli, Italy, 7-5, 6-0; Steve Darcis, Belgium, d. Michael Mmoh, 4-6, 7-6 (4), 6-2; Gilles
Simon (3), France, d. Ilya Ivashka, Belarus, 6-7
(3), 6-2, 6-1; Malek Jaziri (4), Tunisia, d. Ramkumar Ramanathan, India, 6-7 (6), 7-6 (5), 6-3.
$226,750 ASB CLASSIC
At Auckland, New Zealand
Surface: Hard-Outdoor
SINGLES (first round)—Caroline Wozniacki
(1), Denmark, d. Laura Siegemund, Germany,
6-3, 6-2. (Second round)—Sarah Sorribes
Tormo, Spain, d. Kirsten Flipkens (7), Belgium,
6-4, 1-6, 6-1; Hsieh Su-wei (3), Taiwan, d. Monica Puig, Puerto Rico, 6-1, 7-6 (3); Eugenie
Bouchard, Canada, d. Bibiane Schoofs, Netherlands, 6-7 (5), 6-4, 6-4; Julia Goerges (2), Germany, d. Mona Barthel, Germany, 6-4, 6-4.
SOCCER
INTERNATIONAL
ENGLAND
Premier League
Huddersfield 1, Burnley 2
Chelsea 0, Southampton 0
West Ham 2, Brighton 2
Bournemouth 3, Watford 3
Wolverhampton 0, Crystal Palace 2
Newcastle 0, Manchester United 2
Tuesday’s Results
Everton 0, Leicester 1
Arsenal 4, Fulham 1
Cardiff 0, Tottenham 3
VOLLEYBALL
MEN
Nonconference
UCLA d. Princeton, 25-17, 26-24, 25-18
wire reports
Tertius Pickard Associated Press
D ELIVERING THE NEWS
Rafael Nadal announces his withdrawal from the Brisbane International to focus on the Australian Open. A knee injury forced
Nadal to retire from the U.S. Open semifinals in September.
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
SOUTHLAND
UC Santa Barbara 109, Bethesda 47
Point Loma 68, Biola 65
WEST
Fresno St. 73, San Jose St. 53
Nevada Las Vegas 78, Colorado St. 76
Nevada 72, Utah St. 49
EAST
American U. 86, Boston U. 74
Brown 75, Maine 67
Bucknell 64, Army 63
Columbia 65, Binghamton 63
Lehigh 86, Lafayette 83
Texas Tech 62, West Virginia 59
Vermont 73, Dartmouth 59
Villanova 73, DePaul 68
Yale 92, Kennesaw St. 65
SOUTH
Campbell 95, Allen 48
Central Florida 78, Temple 73
Georgia Tech 79, S.C. Upstate 63
High Point 101, Washington College (Md.) 60
Maryland 74, Nebraska 72
Nicholls 78, Northwestern St. 72
North Carolina 77, Harvard 57
North Florida 104, Florida National 76
Presbyterian 72, SC State 70
South Florida 76, UConn 68
Wake Forest 83, Cornell 61
MIDWEST
Cincinnati 93, Tulane 61
Evansville 82, Drake 77, 2OT
Georgetown 84, Butler 76
Kansas 70, Oklahoma 63
Loyola of Chicago 79, Indiana St. 44
Michigan St. 81, Northwestern 55
N. Iowa 65, Bradley 47
Nebraska-Omaha 90, N. Dakota St. 77
S. Illinois 75, Missouri St. 70
Seton Hall 80, Xavier 70
Texas 67, Kansas St. 47
Valparaiso 58, Illinois St. 56
SOUTHWEST
Abilene Christian 68, New Orleans 58
Houston 74, Tulsa 56
Houston Baptist 88, Lamar 82, OT
Iowa St. 69, Oklahoma St. 63
McNeese St. 88, Incarnate Word 77
Prairie View 81, Huston-Tillotson 65
SMU 82, East Carolina 54
Stephen F. Austin 65, SE Louisiana 60
Texas A&M CC 87, Cent. Arkansas 75
ROCKIES
South Dakota 71, Denver 70
New Mexico 65, Air Force 58
Boise St. 69, Wyoming 55
WOMEN
AP TOP 25
No. 13 Texas 60, Oklahoma St. 51
No. 25 Iowa St. 96, Kansas St. 58
SOUTHLAND
Point Loma 60, Biola 42
WEST
Fresno St. 77, San Jose St. 48
EAST
Albany (NY) 61, Binghamton 56
Columbia 88, Hampton 63
Duquesne 54, Temple 53
Hartford 64, Stony Brook 36
Maine 67, New Hampshire 46
Mass. Lowell 54, Vermont 51
Mount St. Mary’s 89, Radford 77
SOUTH
Abilene Christian 59, New Orleans 52
Furman 76, Presbyterian 68
Gardner-Webb 62, W. Carolina 52
Incarnate Word 68, McNeese St. 66
Jacksonville 71, Mercer 66
Liberty 61, West Chester 42
N.C. Central 55, Wilberforce 49
Nicholls 97, Northwestern St. 86
Richmond 59, UNC Greensboro 48
Stephen F. Austin 62, SE Louisiana 51
MIDWEST
Iowa St. 96, Kansas St. 58
SOUTHWEST
Lamar 63, Houston Baptist 50
North Dakota 75, Oral Roberts 67
Oklahoma 66, Texas Tech 61
TCU 62, West Virginia 48
Texas 60, Oklahoma St. 51
ROCKIES
Boise St. 72, Wyoming 64
Colorado St. 52, UNLV 49
New Mexico 78, Air Force 57
Utah St. 79, Nevada 76
TRANSACTIONS
PRO FOOTBALL
Buffalo—Fired offensive line coach Juan
Castillo and receivers coach Terry Robiskie.
Houston—Signed safety A.J. Hendy from the
practice squad; put safety Mike Tyson on injured
reserve.
HOCKEY
Calgary—Called up goaltender Jon Gillies
from Stockton (AHL).
Detroit—Called up defenseman Brian Lashoff
from Grand Rapids (AHL).
St. Louis—Assigned defenseman Chris Butler
and forward Jordan Nolan to San Antonio (AHL).
Vancouver—Traded goaltender Anders
Nilsson and forward Darren Archibald to Ottawa
for goaltender Mike McKenna, forward Tom Pyatt
and a sixth-round draft choice.
NOTES
OLYMPIC SPORTS
USOC—Announced that Rich Bender, Brad
Snyder and Beth Brooke-Marciniak had been
named to the board of directors.
THE ODDS
College Basketball
Favorite
at USC
at UCLA
at Purdue
N.C. State
at Indiana
at Michigan
at St. Joseph’s
W. Kentucky
at Middle Tenn.
at S. Alabama
at Ala. Birm.
at Milwaukee
at North Texas
at La. Lafaye.
at Green Bay
at Arizona St.
at UTSA
at La. Monroe
at Wisconsin
at Arizona
at S. Francisco
at Memphis
San Diego
LMU
BYU
Line
121⁄2
6
7
4
111⁄2
12
81⁄2
9
PK
3
61⁄2
3
41⁄2
12
111⁄2
101⁄2
6
7
101⁄2
6
4
61⁄2
7
31⁄2
31⁄2
Underdog
California
Stanford
Iowa
at Miami
Illinois
Penn St.
George Mason
at Charlotte
Fla. Internat.
Appalach. St.
Fla. Atlantic
Cleveland St.
La. Tech
Arkansas St.
Yngstown St.
Utah
UTEP
Ark. L. Rock
Minnesota
Colorado
St. Mary’s
Wichita St.
at Santa Clara
at Pepperdine
at Pacific
Pro Football Playoffs
Saturday’s Wild-Card Games
Favorite
Line (O/U)
Underdog
at Houston
2 (481⁄2)
Indianapolis
at Dallas
1 (421⁄2)
Seattle
Sunday’s Wild-Card Games
Favorite
Line (O/U)
Underdog
at Baltimore
21⁄2 (411⁄2)
CHARGERS
at Chicago
6 (41)
Philadelphia
Updates at Pregame.com.
—Associated Press
HOCKEY
WORLD JUNIOR TOURNAMENT
Quarterfinals
At Victoria, Canada
United States 3, Czech Republic 1
Switzerland 2, Sweden 0
At Vancouver
Finland 2, Canada 1, OT
Russia 8, Solvakia 3
Regulation, Best of Three
Kasakhstan 4, Denmark 1; Kasakhstan leads,
1-0
Christian Pulisic became the
most expensive American soccer
player in history after completing a
transfer to English club Chelsea from
Germany’s Borussia Dortmund on
Wednesday.
Chelsea paid $73 million for the 20year-old winger, who will be lent back
to Dortmund for the rest of the season. The German club won’t have to
pay Chelsea for the loan.
The fee surpasses the reported
$22.5 million spent by German team
Wolfsburg for John Brooks in 2017.
“He’s one of the great young talents in the world,” former U.S. defender Alexi Lalas wrote on Twitter.
“He just happens to be American,
which makes him even more valuable.
All brands want to continue to mine
the fertile U.S. market, having Pulisic
doesn’t hurt.”
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
Holgorsen is hired
by Houston as coach
Dana Holgorsen was hired as
coach by Houston, ending at eight
years his run at West Virginia.
Holgorsen was 61-41 overall, 33-30
in Big 12 Conference play with the
Mountaineers. He replaces Major
Applewhite, who was fired Sunday
and had a 15-10 record in two seasons
with the Cougars.
Holgorsen was Houston’s offensive coordinator in 2008 and 2009.
Oklahoma receiver Marquise
Brown, Florida linebacker Vosean
Joseph, Washington safety Taylor
Rapp and Michigan cornerback
David Long are making themselves
available for the NFL draft.
BASEBALL
Tulowitzki, Yankees
agree to one-year deal
Shortstop Troy Tulowitzki, 34,
and the New York Yankees agreed to a
one-year contract for the major
league minimum $555,000, a person
familiar with the negotiations told
the Associated Press.
The person spoke on condition of
anonymity because the agreement is
subject to a physical.
A five-time All-Star, Tulowitzki
has not played in the majors since
July 2017 because of injuries.
Yankees shortstop Didi Gregorius had elbow ligament-replacement surgery in October and is not
expected to return until summer.
Tulowitzki is owed $20 million for
next year, $14 million for 2020 and a
$4-million buyout of a 2021 team option. Toronto would pay all but the
big league minimum in the Yankees
deal, which would be offset against
his 2018 salary.
Left-hander Yusei Kikuchi, 27,
finalized a four-year contract with the
Seattle Mariners that guarantees $56
million and includes club options
that would be make it worth $109 million over seven seasons.
Kikuchi was posted in early December by the Seibu Lions of Nippon
Professional Baseball.
He was 14-4 with a 3.08 earned-run
average last season and 16-6 with a
1.97 ERA in 2017.
Slugger Nelson Cruz, 38, signed a
one-year, $14.3-million contract with
the Minnesota Twins.
The six-time All-Star batted .256
with 37 home runs and 97 runs batted
in for the Mariners last season.
Former All-Star infielder Mark
Loretta was hired as bench coach by
the Chicago Cubs.
HOCKEY
Ovechkin to sit out
All-Star weekend
Winger Alex Ovechkin of the
Washington Capitals, the NHL’s leading scorer, will not participate in the
All-Star weekend this month in San
Jose to get extra rest and will be penalized with an automatic one-game
suspension.
It’s not clear when Ovechkin will
be suspended. The league waives the
penalty only for players who are injured.
Noah Cates, Josh Norris and
Sasha Chmelevski scored and the
U.S. (4-0-1) defeated the Czech Republic 3-1 in a quarterfinal game of the
IIHF junior world championships at
Victoria, Canada.
E
CALENDAR
★
T H U R S D A Y , J A N U A R Y 3 , 2 0 1 9 :: L A T I M E S . C O M / C A L E N D A R
TELEVISION
REVIEW
Kids
will put
myths
to the
test
‘MythBusters’ is back,
younger and still full
of experiments with
the new ‘Jr.’ spinoff.
ROBERT LLOYD
TELEVISION CRITIC
J. Paul Getty Museum
SALLY MANN’S “The Ditch” from 1987 anchors a retrospective exhibition of 100-plus works at the Getty Museum on the photographer.
ART REVIEW
Not just
resting
on their
Laurels
Sons of the Desert,
founded to enjoy the
output of Laurel and
Hardy, keeps laughing.
By Donald Liebenson
For the members of Sons
of the Desert, the recent release of “Stan & Ollie” is akin
to a new “Star Wars” episode
for armchair Jedis.
Sons of the Desert is the
official international appreciation society celebrating
the lives and films of the
comedy team Stan Laurel
and Oliver Hardy. Members
are ecstatic this holiday season about “Stan & Ollie,”
starring Steve Coogan and
John C. Reilly in the title
roles.
Who would have thought
that at this point, when Laurel and Hardy have long
been off the pop culture
radar, that a new movie with
a heralded cast would be
produced about the duo?
A dozen members of A
Haunting We Will Go, one of
the august but irreverent organization’s 100-plus global
chapters — or as members
call them, tents — donned
fezzes or signature derbies
in honor of “the Boys” to attend the film’s North American premiere in November
at the Egyptian Theatre in
Hollywood.
“Everyone was absolutely thrilled,” reports Ray
Karch, the tent’s grand
sheik. “John C. Reilly and
Steve Coogan created such a
powerful illusion that we all
felt we actually saw Stan and
Ollie on screen, and it was
truly wonderful to have that
magical feeling again.”
But then again, who
would have thought that the
Sons of the Desert — formed
in 1965 “to perpetuate the
spirit and genius of Laurel
and Hardy,” according to the
group’s constitution —
would still be around to offer
fans of the comedy team a
safe space to enjoy their Grated humor in the company
of kindred spirits? Certainly
not Orson Bean, the last surviving founder.
“Not for a moment could I
imagine the Sons of the
[See Sons, E4]
The mysteries
of the South
A mix of past and future haunts the images of
Sally Mann in a compelling Getty retrospective
BY CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT ART CRITIC >>> “The Ditch,” a 1987 photograph by Sally Mann
at the start of her nearly 35-year retrospective exhibition at the J. Paul Getty Museum, sets
the stage for much of what follows. Memory collides with forgetfulness in an image just ambiguous enough to pull viewers in and leave them hanging.
Black-and-white, the entrancing picture shows a young boy lying on his back in a short,
shallow, narrow trench that has been clawed into the earth beside a peaceful river. Six more
children surround him, silently observing, although all but one of their heads are outside the
frame or otherwise obscured.
The one that isn’t looks directly at the camera — and through it at us, as if to see whether
we are also closely observing. Another of the children is just emerging, naked or nearly so,
from the water at the far end of the ditch.
At the near end, a burst of radiant sunlight glows reflected in the watery foreground puddle. The photograph’s darkly shadowed edges use tonality to focus concentration on the pictorial center. Our viewpoint is almost voyeuristic, as if caught in the act of spying on a furtive
event.
This image of kids at play on an ordinary summer day unfurls as a multivalent metaphor
for birth — for the delivery of a child into a world where others have gone before. The topical
subject is further layered with a suggested epic that stretches to the [See Mann, E5]
“MythBusters,” the show
that made science and engineering crazy and hilarious,
like a cross between “Mr.
Wizard” and “Jackass,” has a
new
offspring:
“MythBusters Jr.,” a 10-episode series premiering Wednesday
on Science Channel.
The original “MythBusters,” which ran from
2003 to 2016 on Discovery
Channel, came back to life in
2017 on Science, with new
hosts Jon Lung and Brian
Louden chosen through a
reality-show competition,
“MythBusters: The Search.”
(I have not seen it.)
Only a horrible person
would have a bad word to say
about “MythBusters Jr.” Do
you have a problem with the
scientific method? Do you
hate children?
Original MythBuster Adam Savage, the one who enjoyed being on television —
his partner, Jamie Hyneman, did not especially,
though he is seen here in
flashback snippets — is
back, as the troop leader to a
sextet of teens and preteens, smart, skillful and
telegenic without being the
sort of kids who come with
head shots. They are fearless
too, both in the face of machinery and in being on television — they are called on,
at times, if only in snippets,
to do comedy and acquit
themselves well.
Crashes and explosions
loom large in the series’ history, but nothing is blown up
in “Jr.’s” opening episode or
purposely run into something else, although a 12year-old is allowed to drive a
car. The matter is all duct
tape-related, an old favorite
on “MythBusters,” where it
has been used to make a
bridge, a cannon, a catapult,
a boat and an airplane fuselage; lift an automobile; and
trap a chicken — no, not with
the sticky side.
Here, the Junior MBs,
splitting into two teams of
three, investigate whether
duct tape can be used to
make a workable parachute
— Buster the dummy is the
fall guy, as it were — and also
to determine whether you
can use it to make a set of
drivable tires. As to whether
either of these notions were
[See ‘Jr.,’ E2]
The mind of a musical omnivore
The cerebral Tom
Holkenborg’s unusual
style as a composer
has him in demand.
By August Brown
mel melcon Los Angeles Times
TOM HOLKENBORG , a.k.a. Junkie XL, thinks outside of the box to find ways to
create interesting noise. He’s learned from and worked with Hans Zimmer too.
When Tom Holkenborg
arrived in New Zealand to
work on the score for one of
his recent films, he set up in a
warehouse next door to the
set and filled it with garbage.
Well, not trash exactly,
but a hangar full of leftover
pipes and cables and scraps
of metal and anything from
the set that might make an
interesting noise. To capture
the sound of the film, in this
case the dystopian action
movie “Mortal Engines,”
Holkenborg went straight to
the source: the materials
[See Holkenborg, E4]
Jay L. Clendenin L.A. Times
Going deep on
a power play
“Vice” writer-director
Adam McKay says he
aims to be informative
in his Dick Cheney
film. THE ENVELOPE
What’s on the
horizon in music
Expect surprises in
the pop music scene,
but here’s a look at
what won’t come as a
shock in 2019. E3
Comics ................... E6-7
TV grid ...................... E8
E2
T H U R S DAY , JA N UA RY 3 , 2 019
QUICK
TAKES
‘Stranger’
Season 3
set for July
The new season of
“Stranger Things” will be
landing on Netflix on Independence Day, breaking
with its usual Halloweentimed release.
The
announcement
came — surprise, surprise —
on another holiday, New
Year’s Eve, teasing the latest
supernatural spooks that
Sheriff Hopper (David Harbour), his adoptive daughter
Eleven
(Millie
Bobby
Brown) and her sleuthing
friends have to contend with.
With Season 3 of “Stranger Things” set to debut July 4
this year, the hit series is further building on its summer
1985 teases, which presumably will have the Hawkins
gang idling around the
town’s new state-of-the-art
shopping mall, the Starcourt.
— Nardine Saad
L AT I M E S . C O M / CA L E N DA R
Resolve to turn a page to these
The last year was a great one for literature, and from early
signs, 2019 could actually be even better. There’s no shortage
of anticipated books coming out over the next several
months, from debut authors and from those who already
have a few books under their belt. Here are 11 authors who
look all but certain to have a great 2019, presented with links
to samples of their writing:
Christine Jean Chambers
CHANELLE BENZ‘S first novel is due out in June.
Her literary debut came with a short story collection.
Chanelle Benz
Memphis-based author
Benz made her literary debut
in 2017 with the short story
collection “The Man Who
Shot Out My Eye Is Dead.”
(She talked with The Times
about the book that year.)
Her first novel, “The Gone
Dead,” due for a June release,
has the potential to bring her
gritty, audacious and often
violent fiction to a wider
audience. You can read her
short story “The Mourners”
at Electric Literature.
Richard Chiem
Authors including Dennis
Cooper and Kate Zambreno
have praised Seattle author
Chiem for his deeply original
short fiction, some of which
was collected in the 2017 book
“You Private Person.” Berkeley-based Soft Skull Press
will publish his debut novel,
“King of Joy,” about a troubled young woman dealing
with a great loss, in March.
You can read an excerpt from
his novel at Pacifica Review.
Davidson takes
C.K. to task
Pete Davidson kicked
2018 to the curb Monday
night with a stand-up set
about breakups, tattoos and
Louis C.K.
The “Saturday Night
Live” star performed in Boston on New Year’s Eve and
had some choice words for
the fellow comedian, who
recently made headlines for
a stand-up set mocking
Parkland, Fla., shooting survivors.
Davidson told the audience that in May 2015, when
C.K. hosted “SNL,” the
“Louie” star “told all the producers in front of me that all
this kid does is smoke weed
and he’s gonna smoke his career away.”
The New Year’s Eve show
was Davidson’s first standup appearance since a mental health scare last month
left fans worried about his
well-being.
— Libby Hill
at The Punch Magazine.
By Michael Schaub
Dominique Faget AFP/Getty Images
MARLON JAMES is a Man Booker winner. He
describes his next as an “African ‘Game of Thrones.’ ”
Niklas Halle’n AFP/Getty Images
CHIGOZIE Obioma has also won the Man Booker.
His next is getting ecstatic pre-publication reviews.
Juliet Escoria
The San Diego-raised
Escoria stunned critics with
her 2014 short story collection, “Black Cloud,” and has
been getting even more literary buzz for “Juliet the Maniac,” a dark coming-of-age
novel that’s set to be published by indie press Melville
House in May. For a taste of
her brash fiction, you can
check out her story “The
Other Kind of Magic” at Vol. 1
Brooklyn.
Marlon James
The Jamaican novelist is
already well known to literary
observers; his 2014 novel, “A
Brief History of Seven
Killings,” won the prestigious
Man Booker Prize. February
will see the release of his next
novel, “Black Leopard, Red
Wolf,” the first in a fantasy
trilogy that he describes as
an “African ‘Game of
Thrones.’ “ To get a feeling for
his bravura writing, you can
read an excerpt from “Seven
Killings” at Literary Hub.
Yiyun Li
Born and raised in Beijing, Li made her literary
debut in 2005 with the critically acclaimed short story
collection “A Thousand
Years of Good Prayers.”
Random House will publish
her highly anticipated novel
“Where Reasons End,” about
a mother whose child commits suicide, in February. If
you’re unfamiliar with her
work, read her gorgeous,
heartbreaking story “When
We Were Happy We Had
Other Names“ at the New
Yorker.
Valeria Luiselli
The Mexican author’s
novel “The Story of My
Teeth” and long essay “Tell
Me How It Ends” were both
finalists for the National
Book Critics Circle Award.
Her next book, a family
road-trip novel called “Lost
Children Archive,” tackles
the issue of immigration, and
has garnered praise from
authors such as Tommy
Orange and Max Porter. You
can read her short story
“Shakespeare, New Mexico”
at Guernica Magazine.
Chigozie Obioma
Critics couldn’t say
enough good things about
the Nigerian author’s debut
novel, “The Fishermen,”
which was a finalist for
the 2015 Man Booker Prize.
His second book, “An
Orchestra of Minorities,”
which follows a poultry
farmer who falls in love with
a wealthy woman, has gotten
ecstatic pre-publication
reviews. Check out an excerpt from “The Fishermen”
Morgan Parker
Los Angeles poet Parker
became a literary sensation
with her second collection,
“There Are More Beautiful
Things Than Beyoncé,”
which was released to admiring reviews in 2017. Her next
collection, “Magical Negro,”
will be published by indie
press Tin House in February,
with her debut young adult
novel “Who Put This Song
On?” following later in 2019.
You can read her poem “Magical Negro#607: Gladys
Knight on the 200th Episode
of The Jeffersons“ at Electric
Literature.
Maurice Carlos Ruffin
One of the most anticipated debut novels of 2019 is
“We Cast a Shadow,” a dystopian satire about a man who
considers getting a “demelanization” for his biracial son
to spare him from the violence that faces African
Americans. It’s the debut
book from New Orleans
author Ruffin, whose story
“Beg Borrow Steal“ you can
read at the Kenyon Review.
Rion Amilcar Scott
The Maryland author
stunned critics with his 2016
short story collection, “Insurrections,” which won the PEN
American Robert W. Bingham Award for Debut Fiction. His follow-up, “The
World Doesn’t Require You,”
comes out in August, and has
the potential to make Scott
the breakout fiction writer of
the year. His short story
“Boxing Day” is available to
read at Catapult magazine.
Ocean Vuong
Ho Chi Minh City native
Vuong captured the imagination of the poetry community
with his acclaimed collection
“Night Sky with Exit
Wounds,” which took home
the prestigious T. S. Eliot
Prize for Poetry. In June,
Penguin Press will publish
his highly anticipated debut
novel, “On Earth We’re
Briefly Gorgeous.” You can
read his poem “Someday I’ll
Love Ocean Vuong” at the
New Yorker.
calendar@latimes.com
“ONE OF THE MORE ELEGANT AND
ACCOMPLISHED PIANISTS
ON THE PLANET.”
– Los Angeles Times
Photographs by Science Channel
ELIJAH HORLAND is duct-taped to a wall by his fellow Junior MythBusters.
Why? In the name of science, just to see if it can be done, and, of course, for laughs.
JORGE
FEDERICO
OSORIO
, PIANO
January 16, 2019
Ja
Program
JOHANN SEBASTIAN BACH
ISAAC ALBÉNIZ
Two Chorale Preludes
Mallorca (Barcarola)
FRANZ SCHUBERT
RICARDO CASTRO
Sonata in A Major, D. 959
Barcarola
FRANZ LISZT
MANUEL PONCE
Vallée d’Obermann
Rapsodia Cubana
Balada Mexicana
CLAUDE DEBUSSY
Three Preludes
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Kids put it to the test
[‘Jr.,’ from E1]
ever discussed enough in the
world to merit being called
myths — if, indeed, they have
ever been discussed at all,
anywhere but here — I have
my doubts. But, you know, so
what?
Similarly, these kids obviously do not bear the full
weight of research and development for putting these
projects into motion, as
much responsibility as the
editing seems to give them.
There are things we don’t
see, or don’t see much —
adult assistants popping up
here and there around the
margins.
But what we do see is actual enough. The cast has
knowledge and skills and
real-world awards. (Cannan
Huey-You, 12, is a college
sophomore, “which is more
college than I have,” Savage
says confidentially to however many people will be watching.) And the experiments,
which take place on hallowed
MythBusters ground around
the East Bay, across the water from San Francisco, are
necessarily authentic. There
is a reputation to safeguard.
Savage, who had the energy of a kids’ show host even
before he hosted a show full
of kids, manages to play both
the responsible adult and the
inner child that his outer
adult keeps in check. (Here
he comes on a skateboard.)
He’s a sort of Jimmy Dodd to
ALLIE WEBER , from left, Elijah Horland, Rachel
Pizzolato, Adam Savage, Jesse Lawless, Valerie Castillo and Cannan Huey-You, from “MythBusters Jr.”
‘MythBusters
Jr.’
Where: Science
When: 6 and 9 p.m.
Wednesday
Rated: TV-PG (may be
unsuitable for young
children)
these STEAM-tastic Mythkateers, if I may be obscure, a
combination pied piper,
chaperone (“If there is some
reason we have to run,” he
says, on the ground where
Buster will descend slowly or
quickly by parachute, “follow
me”) and surrogate parent,
giving a kid his first driving
lesson or taking three kids on
a helicopter ride: “The sheer
delight on their faces,” he
says, with sheer delight on
his face.
I have no figures to back it
up, but it seems likely that
“MythBusters,” a show
about doing serious science
unseriously, did as much as
anything on television to get
young people interested in
science and engineering; certainly, it shared a moment
with maker culture, the advancement of STEAM curriculum. This teenage version feels right somehow; less
like a gimmick than the next
step, a mission fulfilled. With
duct tape.
robert.lloyd@
latimes.com
T H U R S DAY , JA N UA RY 3 , 2 019
L AT I M E S . C O M / CA L E N DA R
E3
POP & HISS
latimes.com/pophiss
5 NIGHTS
OUT
A curated calendar of live
music not to be missed
THURSDAY
FRIDAY
SATURDAY
SUNDAY
MONDAY
Jeff Tweedy
Largo
366 N. La Cienega Blvd.
$50, 8 p.m.
(also Fri., Sun. and Mon.)
T.S.O.L.,
Youth Brigade, more
Regent Theater
448 S. Main St.
$15, 8 p.m.
The Smell’s 21st
birthday feat. Retox,
Shannon Lay, more
The Smell, 247 S. Main St.
$15, 8 p.m. (also Fri.)
Jad Fair
Zebulon
2478 N. Fletcher Ave.
$12, 8 p.m.
Hunnypot Live feat. Jen
Malone (DJ Set), Jesse
Palter, more
The Mint, 6010 W. Pico Blvd.
free, 7 p.m.
Photographs by, clockwise from top left,
Dave Kotinsky Getty Images, Christophe Archambault AFP / Getty Images, Katie Falkenberg L.A. Times; Gina Ferazzi L.A. Times
NEW MUSIC might not be the only thing to watch out for from Kanye West, clockwise from top left, Justin Bieber, Rivers Cuomo’s Weezer and the Backstreet Boys.
Making noise in 2019
MIKAEL WOOD POP MUSIC CRITIC >>> On this date in 2018, we didn’t know that Kanye West would visit the White House or that Beyoncé would blow
up Coachella. We didn’t know about Kendrick Lamar’s Pulitzer Prize or Childish Gambino’s “This Is America.” And though we might’ve suspected that
BTS would release an album (or two), we didn’t know that the K-pop group would become the first of its kind to top the Billboard 200 (and then do it again
a few months later). Plenty more is sure to go down in pop music without warning in 2019, at least if we’re lucky. But as we set off into the new year, there
are also things we can safely look forward to — and some big questions that should be answered in the next 12 months. Here are a few to keep in mind.
Will Kanye West continue his
bromance with Donald Trump?
Looks like yes. After pledging in
October to distance himself from
politics — “My eyes are now wide
open and now realize I’ve been
used to spread messages I don’t believe in,” he tweeted — the rapper
re-embraced the president this
week.
“Trump all day,” he wrote on
Twitter, before adding that “from
now on” he plans to perform while
wearing his Trump hat, which he
said represents the idea that “people can’t tell me what to do because
I’m black.”
How this will impact his music
remains to be seen. West has said
he’s at work on a new album, possibly titled “Yandhi,” that was due
to be released in September before
being bumped to November and
again to an unspecified date.
Backstreet might actually be back
It’s been years since the Back-
street Boys mattered — which isn’t
to say that the veteran boy band
hasn’t been out there trying, as
anyone who’s seen the group’s recent awards-show appearances (or
its painfully eager Las Vegas gig)
can attest.
But with their latest single, the
throbbing and sensual “Don’t Go
Breaking My Heart,” the Backstreets have raised hopes for
“DNA,” the act’s comeback album
due Jan. 25. Set to feature songs
written by Shawn Mendes and
Ryan Tedder, as well as folks
who’ve worked with Charli XCX
and J Balvin, “DNA” promises
more than shameless nostalgia at
a moment when BTS has raised
the bar for boys of any age.
Say it ain’t so
Speaking of nostalgia, Weezer
last year returned to the upper
reaches of the pop charts (and
spawned a viral “Saturday Night
Live” sketch) with its stunt cover of
Toto’s indelible ’80s hit “Africa.”
Now the long-running L.A. altrock combo is using that renewed
attention to unleash an experiment it’s been threatening forever:
a self-titled effort, due March 1,
known as the Black Album, which
frontman Rivers Cuomo was saying as far back as 2016 would represent a striking about-face from its
crunchy guitar-pop sound.
Judging by a couple of synthedup advance tracks, including one
called “Zombie Bastards,” Weezer
has followed through on that idea,
and not because Cuomo is confident his audience will like it.
Indeed, if that “SNL” sketch
made anything clear, it’s that the
Black Album is precisely the kind
of record most Weezer diehards
don’t want from this band — as
good a reason as any I can think of
to listen up.
Whither Justin Bieber?
Thanks to his breathlessly
documented relationship with
Hailey Baldwin — that’s Mrs.
Bieber, if you please — the onetime teen-pop idol was seen more
than he was heard in 2018.
True, there was “No Brainer,”
his appropriately by-the-numbers
reunion with DJ Khaled, Chance
the Rapper and Quavo (with
whom he hit No. 1 in 2017 with “I’m
the One”).
But for the most part Bieber
spent the year “just living life,” as
his frequent producer Diplo put it
to me not long ago. “Michael Jackson was a guy that never had a life,
really, and then tried to live it when
he was older,” Diplo said. “Justin,
maybe he’s self-aware enough so
that he’s like, ‘I’m a human being
and I love a person — let me do that
for a minute.’ ”
That said, the singer’s longawaited follow-up to 2015’s “Purpose” may be on the way. Diplo said
he’s been trading songs with
Bieber for what he reckons is shap-
ing up as “a Christian album.”
Taylor might be swift
The three years Taylor Swift
put into 2017’s “Reputation” represented the longest stretch of time
she’d ever taken to make a record
— and then the thing went on to
earn lukewarm reviews and no major nominations at next month’s
Grammy Awards.
So although she’s said nothing
about when we should expect her
next album, perhaps it’s reasonable to think that Swift will work
faster this time, either to avoid bogging down or simply to keep up
with an industry that’s accelerated
immeasurably over her decadeplus in the biz.
Also: Releasing her “Reputation” Netflix special on New Year’s
Eve felt an awful lot like a chapterending move from this most storyminded of pop stars.
mikael.wood@latimes.com
REVIEW
How to just drop into a Taylor Swift concert
A film of her Reputation
tour feels like an extended
awards show performance
but captures her energy.
By Nardine Saad
There are two types of audiences taking in Taylor Swift’s new
concert special: die-hard fans who
want to relive the Reputation Stadium Tour and the casual observers who didn’t fork over a small
fortune for the coveted concert
tickets.
Enter Netflix, which made
Swift’s sold-out Oct. 6 show in Arlington, Texas’ AT&T Stadium accessible to both kinds of viewers by
streaming a full-length film starting Monday.
The film documents the last
show on the American leg of the
global pop star’s tour, which became the highest-grossing tour in
U.S. history by earning a whopping
$266 million off more than 2 million
ticket sales.
Different performances of the
landmark tour have been reviewed
twice by the Los Angeles Times.
Aside from a few post-show
morsels, Netflix’s film doesn’t offer
any additional insight or behindthe-scenes footage for fans to savor. Instead, it’s a straightforward
re-creation of the upbeat show that
simply caters to an at-home audience.
“You decided not only to spend
your Saturday night with us,” she
tells the Arlington crowd, “but to
come here to commemorate the
last night on this tour that has
meant so much to me. That is such
a beautiful thing.”
Clocking in just over two hours,
the concert film plays like an extended awards-show performance
— though much more accessible,
with plenty of cutaways to her
adoring fans, snake imagery and
even Swift blowing her nose onstage. (A tissue was even regally
presented to her.)
Gary Coronado Los Angeles Times
TAYLOR SWIFT’S Reputation Stadium Tour stopped at the
Rose Bowl in May. A film of the tour is now showing on Netflix.
Of course, director Paul Dugdale takes some cinematic liberties
and offers up glimpses of onstage
minutiae that fans in the nosebleed
seats probably missed. Also, there
are surprise appearances from
Swift’s pals and fellow stars Camila
Cabello and Charli XCX, the show
openers, and a cameo by the lovable Tiffany Haddish, who recites
the sassy lyrics about how the old
Taylor can’t come to the phone
right now.
The 10-time Grammy-winner’s
star power is tantamount, as evidenced when she makes her way
through the crowd flanked by a security detail while emotional concertgoers clutch at her ever-fleeting hands.
And there’s sparkle — a whole
lot if it. Whether it’s Swift’s glimmering eye shadow or nail polish,
sequined costumes, fireworks or
the shimmering light-up bracelets
worn by the crowd, there’s eyecatching flare in every frame.
Sure, viewers are removed from
that intoxicating, electric, live-performance energy — no matter how
many flashes of hopping singalongs there are — but it’s cost-effective, comfortable and easy to
watch.
nardine.saad@latimes.com
Twitter: @NardineSaad
E4
T H U R S DAY , JA N UA RY 3 , 2 019
L AT I M E S . C O M / CA L E N DA R
Group’s not
just resting
on Laurels
[Sons, from E1]
Desert would still be around,”
he said with a laugh in a
phone interview. “I am astonished.”
Laurel and Hardy, fortuitously partnered by producer
Hal Roach, made just over 100
shorts and features as a
team. Sons of the Desert
takes its name from their 1933
feature — one of their best —
which finds Laurel and
Hardy as members of the
titular fraternal organization
who lie to their wives about
attending its annual convention (unlike the movie, wives
— indeed all women — are
welcome to join).
The founders included
John McCabe, author of the
seminal 1961 biography “Mr.
Laurel and Mr. Hardy”; Bean;
cartoonist Al Kilgore; comedian Chuck McCann; and
John Municino. It is said
when the legend becomes
fact, print the legend; the
founding of the Sons of the
Desert has at least two.
“I loved them as a kid, and
when I became a stand-up
comic, I used to study them,”
Bean recalled. “I bought a 16millimeter projector and I invited friends to watch [their
films]. I think it was Chuck
who said that Laurel and
Hardy were underappreciated, so we said, ‘Let’s form this
club.’ We got together once a
month, got drunk, and
watched Laurel and Hardy
movies, which seems appropriate in this day and age.”
McCabe, who became
friends with Laurel in 1953 after seeing him and Hardy perform onstage in England (the
tour dramatized in “Stan &
Ollie”), claimed inspiration to
create Sons of the Desert
came from Laurel’s fan mail.
“His fans wished there was
some way to honor Laurel
and Hardy,” he told the Chicago Tribune in 2005. “There
was nothing really to perpetuate their fame. I was determined I would have something much more than a fan
club. It would be socially active and yet concerned with
scholarship."
Laurel not only gave his
blessings but provided the organization’s motto (“Two
minds without a single
thought”) and suggested a
design for the logo. Laurel
died in 1965; McCabe in 2005.
The Sons of the Desert
constitution
prescribes
meetings to follow a set routine that includes several
rounds of cocktails, afterdinner speeches, and toasts
to Laurel, Hardy and their
frequent “eternally everpopular” costars, Jimmy Finlayson, Mae Busch and Charlie Hall; the screening of a
Laurel and Hardy film; an after-film critique; and, finally,
as suggested by Laurel, “All
members are requested to
park their camels and hire a
taxi; then return for ‘One for
the desert’!”
The Sons of the Desert
have their own anthem, courtesy of the film: “We are the
Sons of the Desert / Having
the time of our lives / Marching along, two thousand
strong / Far from our sweethearts and wives / God bless
them.”
John Kobal Foundation / Getty Images
OLIVER HARDY , left, and Stan Laurel in the film “Sons of the Desert,” now the name of a society of fans.
All under one tent
There are 111 tents, 72 in
the United States and 39 international, according to
Scott MacGillivray, the
group’s corresponding secretary (California has the most
with 13). The individual tents
are led by a grand sheik (or
“exhausted ruler” to quote a
Laurel malapropism from
“Sons”). Founded in 1967, the
Way Out West tent, which
meets in North Hollywood,
counts itself among the first
five tents established. It has a
mailing list of roughly 200
and is open to the public.
“Tents do things their
own way,” observed Jim Wiley, whose parents became
members of Way Out West 44
years ago when he was 1. The
group meets every other
month. “There are tents that
do not do the toasts or sing
the song,” said Wiley, who remains involved with the
group. “Some tents are far
more social, and some are far
more academic.
“We stick pretty close to
the rules for a club that has
no rules.
“We do have an occasional
guest, such as an author. We
used to have people who were
in the films, and they would
share their memories. We
have a full bar in our meeting
place, but we don’t emphasize the drinking. We don’t
Jim Wiley
THE WAY OUT WEST chapter of the Sons of the Desert appreciation group meets in North Hollywood.
follow the constitution that
carefully.”
Another
Hollywoodbased tent, Hollywood Party,
“do the toasts proudly,” notes
grand sheik Stan Taffel, who
is also president of Cinecon,
an annual film festival that
focuses on silent films and
early talkies. From his personal film collection comes
“the widest breadth of Laurel
and Hardy motion pictures
[for screening] available,
some not even available on
home video,” he said.
Like many baby boomer
Laurel and Hardy fans, he
discovered the team’s films
on television. “Brats,” in
which Laurel and Hardy had
dual roles as their own children, was the first to make an
impression on him. The year,
he recalled, was 1966 B.C. (before cable), when contentstarved networks tended to
show Laurel and Hardy films
during after-school hours.
He would eventually become grand sheik of the foun-
ding tent in New York and
started his own when he
moved to Los Angeles in 1997.
Hollywood Party meets five
times a year at the Hollywood Heritage Museum. But
what began as a way to honor
Laurel and Hardy has
evolved into a community,
Taffel said.
“It is as much about the
people who come to the
meetings. I have friends all
over the world because of
Laurel and Hardy.”
Not surprisingly, he says
he is more excited about
“Stan & Ollie” “than I’ve been
about any movie in a long
time.” That delights Reilly,
who has been nominated for
a Golden Globe for his performance.
Growing up in Chicago, he
too watched Laurel and
Hardy movies after school
and on “Family Classics,” a
family film showcase. His father was a fan, and when
VCRs were introduced,
“Sons of the Desert” was one
of the films in his collection,
Reilly said in a phone interview. He jokingly thinks of
himself as an honorary member of the organization.
“I’m definitely simpatico
with them,” Reilly said. “[It]
is testament that what Laurel and Hardy did was so profound. I love Charlie Chaplin,
Buster Keaton and Harold
Lloyd, and I’m sure there are
fan clubs [for them], but Laurel and Hardy tapped into
some kind of quintessential
human experience. They’ve
moved everyone from little
kids to Samuel Beckett. I’m
honored to be part of this.”
A new generation
Wiley hopes “Stan &
Ollie” serves to introduce a
new generation to the team.
“Any time Laurel and Hardy
are mentioned, people say, ‘I
like those guys; hey, is there
still that club?’ and they
might check it out. The films
stand up; the comedy is timeless. We have members who
came in as a lark and keep
coming back. And there are
plenty of members who own
all the films; they just want to
watch them and laugh with a
crowd.”
Adds Karch, “Current humor runs toward being dirty
or denigrating someone.
Laurel and Hardy are not
mean-spirited or super violent; they’re just funny. I encourage members to bring
kids to our meetings, and
they laugh.”
In comedy, timing is
everything, and at a time of
seemingly
unprecedented
discord and fractious partisanship, Bean says the time is
right for a Laurel and Hardy
revival. “The Titanic’s going
down and the band is
playing,” he joked. “And Laurel and Hardy are still making
us laugh. Thank God for the
Sons of the Desert. That’s
who’s been keeping them
alive.”
calendar@latimes.com
From the creative mind of a musical omnivore
[Holkenborg, from E1]
used to craft the picture.
“They walked in and saw
me making all that noise and
were like ‘You’re crazy,’ ”
Holkenborg said. “I said ‘No,
it’s going to be great.’ ” He
pulled up an iPhone video of
him thwacking an oil drum to
build to an ominous crescendo. “I just started banging on
it and throwing stuff around.
It starts super quiet, but then
it gets super loud.” Yes, it did.
Holkenborg’s career as a
composer is built on those
moments. He’s used such unusual techniques to become
not only an in-demand film
composer — he conceived the
percussive pyrotechnics of
“Mad Max: Fury Road” — but
one that’s reshaping the art
form. He’s on a path to become as influential as Hans
Zimmer, his onetime mentor
and collaborator.
Directors used to turn to
full orchestras or more traditional means of creating big
sweeps of drama. But
Holkenborg embodies a new
era of composers, equally fluent in traditional arrangements, electronics and modern sound design, and capable of delivering a worldcrushing backdrop in a matter of weeks.
Bold and balanced
After writing the thunderous music for “Mad Max:
Fury Road” and the winking
’80s synth-pop in “Deadpool,”
he’s taking another stab at
cerebral action with the
forthcoming “Alita: Battle
Angel,” directed by Robert
Rodriguez (and a longtime
passion project of producer/
writer James Cameron, of
“Titanic” and “Avatar”).
It’s a significant second
act for the Dutch-born producer who, as the DJ Junkie
XL, was a fixture in the electronica scene of the ’90s and
2000s. But now, even more are
watching and listening.
“Alita” is an extremely
stylized manga adaptation
20th Century Fox
HOLKENBORG will compose the score for the upcoming “Alita: Battle Angel.”
with a relentless, eerie futurism (the title character’s eyes
are exaggerated to the point
of the uncanny). Yet director
Robert Rodriguez knew it a
needed a heart to balance out
that side. Holkenborg gave
him both.
“There’s nothing more exciting than hearing new
sounds and textures from
Junkie’s self-built arsenal,”
Rodriguez said. “His production gives even his orchestral
work a fresh spin, so it does
appeal to those who want
something bold and exciting,
and he’s got the experience
and chops to masterfully
weave between them all.”
Holkenborg’s studio, in
the deep San Fernando Valley, looks more like a NASA
mission control center than a
recording space. The walls
are lined floor-to-ceiling with
flickering modular synthesizers, filters and effects
racks that can mangle any
signal beyond recognition (or
just spice it up). His desk is
surrounded by rare vintage
synths that could make a
producer bite a hole through
a Moog with envy.
“Sometimes I sit in the
backyard with a cup of coffee,
and it’s like, man, your life is
like so incredibly blessed,” he
said. “But what’s very important that I understand from
these directors is that they
feel like they really want to
push the envelope. What’s
possible with filmmaking?”
Holkenborg’s studio isn’t
exactly a one-man shop (he
has assistants and collaborators), but it is remarkably
self-contained for a composer responsible for some
of the biggest sounds in contemporary film. Think of the
humid South Seas dread of
“Tomb Raider” or the doomstricken taiko drums that
signal impending carnage in
“Fury Road” (not to mention
that flame-throwing guitarist). All this noise from this
one room in a leafy suburban
neighborhood.
“I’ve been privileged to
work with some wonderful
composers, and I’ve learned
so much from them. With
Tom, it was a master class,”
said George Miller, the “Fury
Road” director. “He has a
scholar’s mind. He studied
law, taught music and sound
design, and has a fierce, wide-
ranging intellect. I guess he’s
a kind of musical omnivore.
But none of this gets in the
way of an agile and powerful
artistic intuition.”
Much of this was honed in
his life as Junkie XL, where he
first developed his omnivorous approach to synths and
samples,
combining
elements of rock, breakbeats,
techno and synth-pop into a
crowd-pleasing sound that
took him all over the European rave circuit (he even
notched a chart-topping pop
single, with a remix of Elvis
Presley’s “A Little Less Conversation”).
He dabbled in film work,
with tracks appearing in
“The Beach” and “Blade,”
but the roles began shifting
after he moved to L.A. in 2003.
Slowly,
film
composing
proved both more interesting
and more lucrative, and he all
but retired Junkie XL after
2012’s LP “Synthesized.”
For him, leaving behind
the life at the front of the
stage for the studio wasn’t a
sacrifice at all.
“Now in retrospect, I can
see I was never supposed to
just be an engineer or a pro-
ducer. I was never supposed
to be an artist just on my own.
I can only say this now looking back that I felt shackles,”
Holkenborg said. “There was
always this internal fight
whether I could deliver what I
wanted but then also satisfy
fans. It wasn’t until I started
doing films that I really felt
like a fish in the water.”
While it took him a decade
and a half to settle into this
new role, Holkenborg’s DJ career gave him an edge in composing. Having honed his
skills in treating and re-shaping samples in his DJ career,
his sounds have the gravity of
peers like Zimmer but with a
malleability that can enhance
all sorts of moods and settings. He’s become known for
big-budget action franchises
and indeed has a preternatural talent for creating tension
in that setting.
“The best thing about
working with Tom — aside
from his immense talent — is
the pure enthusiasm he
brings to the work,” said
“Deadpool” director George
Miller. “And I’m talking about
the pure, childlike glee that he
has when digging into the
work. He’s just so excited —
and it’s mostly about the opportunity to do something
new and different. His first
suggestions are usually way,
way out there, but in the best
possible way.”
From the witty “Miami
Vice”-style throb of his
“Deadpool” score to the quiet
menace of “Black Mass” and
the ruminative “Brimstone,”
his range is much deeper
than his biggest credits might
suggest.
Studios and directors
have dabbled in letting electronic acts take the reins of
big projects — see Daft
Punk’s score for “Tron” or
M83’s work for the Tom
Cruise sci-fi epic “Oblivion.”
But some of those results
have ended up as a diluted
version of the artist’s aesthetic, shoehorned into a big-
budget film. Holkenborg
feels that now, by embracing
his role as an artisan in service of a director’s vision, his
work feels more authentic
than it did when he was a solo
producer.
Watch his process
And he’s not afraid to let
viewers in on his process.
One of his favorite pet projects is his YouTube series
“Studio Time,” where he
walks viewers through some
basics of composing and
sound design from the captain’s chair in his studio.
The sessions are approachable and even funny,
and any aspiring producer
will glean something useful
from them. Rather than take
away from the drama of a
huge action flick, the series
shows how one of film music’s
most formidable minds
makes all those new sounds
and twists them to his necessary ends.
“I love to make music,
which is my heart, my soul,
my everything,” he said. “ But
for me, [education] is such a
beautiful thing and for me
that’s even more rewarding
than actually making music
on my own.”
As
Holkenborg
unscrewed an old drum machine, his eyes lit up as he told
the story of how he tracked
down
long-discontinued
chips to breathe new life into
it for “Deadpool.” He fired up
the score on his computer
and true enough, the weird
little machine gave the music
a vintage edge that cut
through the bombast. He
made something the size of a
dinner plate feel like an orchestra, all from the couch in
his living room.
“Just figure it out on your
own,” he said, turning the
machine over in his hands.
“You want to leave that magic intact.”
august.brown@
latimes.com
T H U R S DAY , JA N UA RY 3 , 2 019
L AT I M E S . C O M / CA L E N DA R
E5
Images from J. Paul Getty Museum
SALLY MANN’S “Triptych” from 2004 is among the more than 100 images in “A Thousand Crossings,” a retrospective of the photographer at the Getty Museum.
Mann’s mysteries of the South
[Mann, from E1]
dawn of time: We stand atop
an evolutionary lineage that
began tens of millions of
years ago when fish developed limbs and tetrapods
first crawled onto land from
out of the sea.
Here, those evolutionary
limbs also play a retrogressive role. The legs and arms
of the boy lying in the ditch
are bent beneath his torso,
hidden from view. Corpselike, a body with severed
limbs and cast into a trench
is a discreet echo of renowned wartime photographs that chronicle brutal
carnage.
Roger Fenton’s were shot
at Sebastopol on the Crimean Peninsula in 1855, Florence Farmborough’s on the
Russian Front during World
War I. Most immediately for
Mann, who was born and
has lived most of her 67 years
in Lexington, Va., Alexander
Gardner’s famous battlefield pictures date to the
aftermath of Gettysburg
and Antietam. A quiet shock
of
recognition
unfolds,
death entering an otherwise
sunny summer picture, its
intimations of birth and human evolution now joined by
insinuations of the grave.
Mann’s photograph was
self-evidently
composed
(unlike some of Gardner’s
Civil War pictures, which
concealed the artist’s occasional manipulation of the
scene). She’s a visual storyteller — the show’s title, “A
Thousand
Crossings,”
comes from the Scottish poet John Glenday — and her
work forthrightly partakes
of the romantic, sometimes
even Gothic expressionism
that often characterizes
Southern literary traditions.
Her subject is always the legacy of the American South,
which includes her family.
The show was jointly or-
‘Sally Mann: A
Thousand
Crossings’
Where: J. Paul Getty
Museum, 1200 Getty
Center Drive, Brentwood
When: Through Feb. 10;
closed Mondays
Admission: Free; parking
$15
Info: (310) 440-7300,
getty.edu
“DEEP SOUTH , Untitled (Fontainebleau)” showcases the romantic and often
Southern Gothic turn that Mann’s photographs have taken over the years.
ganized by the National
Gallery of Art and the Peabody Essex Museum in
Salem, Mass. It is weighted
toward photographs made
since 2000, which account for
roughly two-thirds of 110
works, all but five black-andwhite.
Mann first came to widespread attention in a less
than auspicious way. In 1992,
conservative culture warriors attacked the publication
of her fourth book, “Immediate Family,” which includes
13 images (of 65) in which one
or more of her three thenyoung kids is unclothed — a
not uncommon occurrence
at a cabin on isolated land
during a humid summer day.
A brilliant picture like “The
Ditch” unravels the fearful
hysteria that fueled the uproar.
The photograph further
exposes the role played by
landscape in her art, one
that became central after
1994. Some of her scenic
views are bland and conventional if beautifully composed — especially the luminous ruins of a once-grand,
now-decayed
Mississippi
plantation built with the awful labor of chattel slavery.
Others attempt, with mixed
success, to coax the ghosts of
history from the land.
Among the most successful are those of Civil War
battlefields — 10 large-format images, each printed
just over 3 feet by 4 feet, their
surfaces lush, dense and
blackened. Staring into
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darkness to parse what you
see is not a bad way to describe the act of coming to
terms with a defining national event, which still
churns today’s social and political environment.
The foreground half of a
leafy view of Cold Harbor,
where nine days of trench
warfare
left
staggering
losses for the Union army,
slides downhill from an
opaque forest, as if into a
grave opening at a viewer’s
feet. When printed, flecks of
dust on the photographic
negative translated into dozens of horizontal lines of
scratchy light, which streak
across the surface. Neither
fireflies nor bullets, though
reminiscent of both, the
bright, abrasive smudges
upend the stillness of the
landscape and render it dynamic.
Even the close-up, framefilling portraits Mann has
made during the last decade
often have the feel of landscapes. Some are of black
men — a fraught territory for
an artist who is white and female, given a terrible national history — while others
are of her adult children. The
“landscapes” of Mann’s intimate yet monumental human heads and bodies are
endowed with a fitting gravity, nature being indifferent
to our passing vagaries.
Perhaps the show’s most
moving photograph records
her husband, Larry, turning
away as he strides across a
grassy field above a shallow
vale. Smoke rises on either
side from a controlled burn
that he has set to replenish
depleted earth. Its drifting
vapors echo in the clouds
that meander above the hilly
distant horizon.
You don’t need to know
the melancholy of Larry’s
late-onset muscular dystrophy, recorded in other portrait photographs here, to
read this as a walk through a
valley of the shadow of
death. The 23rd Psalm
emerges among Mann’s lit-
erary sources.
The show is very good in
articulating
the
varied
photographic
processes
that Mann, a largely selftaught artist, has employed
since the 1980s — many of
them technically obsolete.
(Death again.) In addition to
concise and helpful wall
texts, don’t miss the illuminating video in an adjacent
gallery. With incarnate history as an aesthetic aim,
Mann’s 19th century techniques often play a material
role. The pictures are thrown
into high-relief simply by
their visual differences,
sometimes stark, from today’s sleek digital images.
The artist is a first-generation Virginian from a comfortable background. Her
physician father hailed from
Dallas; her mother, who ran
the bookstore at Washington and Lee University, from
Boston.
Maybe that’s why, when
facing life lived mostly
around the rural town of
Lexington, she’s been a kind
of Janus figure. A quasi-outsider, she looks back, trying
to parse a region’s history as
soaked in blood and tragedy
as any place on Earth, at the
same time as she looks forward into an unknowable tomorrow, sometimes with her
growing children as markers
of time’s passages.
In Mann’s photographs,
past and future exult in their
mysteriousness. Yet, an alert
and lucid invitation to engage in scrutiny of the constructed image almost always grounds the experience in the present. Even on
the occasion when a picture
doesn’t finally succeed, the
encounter can feel momentous.
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T H U R S DAY , JA N UA RY 3 , 2 019
L AT I M E S . C O M / CA L E N DA R
COMICS
BRIDGE
SUDOKU
By Frank Stewart
“How good is your
math?”
Unlucky
Louie
asked me.
“I know that five parking
meters do not equal 500
parking centimeters,” I offered.
“Look,” Louie groaned, “I
just want to know the percentage play at this slam.”
Louie had taken the ace
of hearts, drawn trumps and
ruffed dummy’s last heart.
He next cashed the king of
clubs and led to dummy’s
jack. East took the queen
and led the 10. When West
discarded, Louie took the
ace and finessed with his
jack of diamonds. West produced the queen for down
one.
“I had many chances,”
Louie said.
KENKEN
Every box will contain a number; numbers depend on the size of the grid. For a 6x6
puzzle, use Nos. 1-6. Do not repeat a number in any row or column. The numbers in each
heavily outlined set of squares must combine to produce the target number found in the
top left corner of the cage using the mathematical operation indicated. A number can be
repeated within a cage as long as it is not in the same row or column.
Louie’s play wasn’t best.
When West follows low to the
second club, Louie should
play dummy’s eight. (If West
played the nine or 10, dummy
would play the jack.)
East must then return a
club, yielding a free finesse,
or lead a heart, conceding a
ruff-sluff. If he leads a diamond, Louie plays the nine
from his hand. If West had
the 10, Louie could still succeed if East had the queen, if
clubs broke 3-3 or with a
squeeze.
Question: You hold: ♠ A
10 8 5 ♥ 6 3 ♦ A 8 2 ♣ A J 8 2.
Your partner opens one
spade, and you bid 2NT, a
conventional forcing raise.
Partner next bids three
clubs. What do you say?
Answer: As most pairs
agree, partner’s new-suit bid
over your 2NT shows a singleton there. Since the
hands seem to fit well, cuebid three diamonds. At your
next turn, given the chance,
you will cue-bid four clubs.
West dealer
Both sides vulnerable
NORTH
♠ A 10 8 5
♥63
♦A82
♣AJ82
WEST
EAST
♠6
♠J9
♥ K Q J 10 9 4 2
♥875
♦Q63
♦ 10 7 5 4
♣74
♣ Q 10 9 6
SOUTH
♠KQ7432
♥A
♦KJ9
♣K53
WEST
NORTH EAST
SOUTH
3♥
Pass
Pass
Dbl
Pass
4♥
Pass
6♠
All Pass
Opening lead — ♥ K
Tribune Media Services
ASK AMY
His pal’s life has changed
1/3/19
HOROSCOPE
By Holiday Mathis
Aries (March 21-April 19):
You can be angry with someone and love that person at
the same time. You can be
disappointed in an action
and stand behind the plan.
Taurus (April 20-May
20): The only thing you
should be comparing yourself with is your own past
performance, and even that
might be a bad idea.
Gemini (May 21-June 21):
It’s easy to get excited about
your own idea, but when
someone else’s idea has you
excited and willing to work,
you know it must be good .
Cancer (June 22-July 22):
When the choice is between
what you know and what you
don’t know, you’ll choose
what you don’t know as long
as it’s not inconvenient.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22): Relationships improve because you put thought into
resolving your issues with
another person.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22):
The basics of good communication aren’t universally
distributed at birth. And not
everyone you’ll deal with today has learned it yet.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23):
Oscar Wilde said, “Anybody
can sympathise with the sufferings of a friend, but it requires a very fine nature to
sympathise with a friend’s
successes.”
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 21):
You know that inner guidance can be illogical and
sometimes doesn’t quite culminate into something you
can make sense of. But it
does often enough.
Sagittarius (Nov. 22Dec. 21): When you really
comb back over what you’ve
been taught, you’ll find that
you disagree with more of it
than you care to bring up
over the dinner table.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan.
19): You’ll take notice of who
you are around different
people so you can surround
yourself with people who
bring out your best and
brightest.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb.
18): Oddly enough, your
work will be best noticed
when you do not do it. So pull
back on the efforts.
Pisces (Feb. 19-March
20): Basic niceties are well
within normal expectations,
but you may have to educate
others about what you need.
Today’s birthday (Jan.
3): The beauty of this new
chapter is in its breeziness. A
burden drops within five
week’s time, leaving you
physically buoyant, mentally unfettered and emotionally exuberant. Keep it
small, save up and don’t
complicate things with too
many partners or contracts.
Gemini and Virgo adore you.
Your lucky numbers are: 10,
31, 4, 47 and 37.
Holiday Mathis writes her
column for Creators
Syndicate Inc. The
horoscope should be read
for entertainment.
Dear Amy: I’ve been
friends with a guy since high
school. We’re now in our
early 30s. Within the span of
a year, my friend met someone, they moved in together,
got married and had a child.
I thought they were moving
too fast at every step of the
way because they were panicking. Being in their 30s
scared them.
I talked to my friend at
each event and told him I
thought he was moving too
fast. I wanted him to realize
that he was rushing into
these momentous occasions
and, although I support him,
he should really think about
it. For some of these choices,
like having a kid, there is no
turning back.
My friend seems happy,
but they’re now a couple.
Whenever I text him, he and
she reply to me in a group
text. Whenever I want to coordinate a night to watch TV
with him, she wants to pick a
night where they can come
over with the baby. I just
want to hang out with my
friend, but she makes this
impossible, and he’s OK
with it because he wants to
include her in everything.
I know that some friendships just hit a dead end, and
I feel like this is the case. I’ve
dealt with breakups when it
comes to relationships, but
how do I break up with a
friend? Do I make one final
plea that I want alone time
with my friend?
Casper
Dear Casper: I’ll be blunt.
You have not been a supportive friend. Stopping
your friend at each major life
turn to tell him he is making
a series of mistakes is not
supportive, or appropriate.
Telling a man with a new
baby that it is “too late for
him to turn back” is selfish
and rude. The fact that his
wife likes you and he still
wants to spend any time
with you at all is a tribute to
the two of them.
These two (and their
child) are now a package
deal. Yes, you could make an
individual plea to your
friend: “I’d like to hang out
with you alone one of these
days. Would that be possible?” After that, you will
have to accept his answer.
Dear Amy: I am seeking
your advice and input on my
situation.
Three months ago, I
separated from my partner
of 17 years. We were planning
to marry in a few months.
We had a huge argument,
and we both said things to
hurt one another.
The one thing he said
that is unforgivable was that
he “used me” during our
time together. I left my home
immediately and moved to
another state to live with my
only child and grandson.
I no longer take meds for
anxiety or smoke as much as
I did when we were together.
While in this relationship, I
was emotionally, physically
and verbally abused.
Please help me make
sense of my life! I am 62,
physically disabled and financially stable.
What do I do now?
Alone
Dear Alone: Leaving a
longstanding relationship is
challenging — even when
the relationship is toxic, because sometimes the devil
you know can seem preferable to the uncertainty of being on your own. It’s the way
we humans are wired.
The stress of being in this
unhealthy relationship has
taken a toll on you. As hard
as it was to leave, your behavior has already changed
and your health will improve. What you should do
now is to give yourself time
to heal. Enjoy your family.
Volunteer, if you are able.
And engage in the slow but
satisfying work of remaking
your life.
Send questions for Amy
Dickinson to askamy@
amydickinson.com.
FAMILY CIRCUS By Bil Keane
DENNIS THE MENACE By Hank Ketcham
ARGYLE SWEATER By Scott Hilburn
MARMADUKE By Brad & Paul Anderson
BLISS By Harry Bliss
BALLARD STREET By Jerry Van Amerongen
CROSSWORD
Edited By Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
By Pawel Fludzinski
ACROSS
1 Save for later
9 Place to doodle
15 Smooth talker
16 1969 World Series
competitor
17 Watchmakers never
retire, they just __
18 Elite area of the pop
charts
19 Passionate about
20 Musicians never retire,
they just __
22 Beetle-shaped artifact
25 Grad school grillings
26 FDA overseer
27 Urban network
30 First name in
architecture
33 Prime letters?
34 Acclimate gradually
36 One not seen on “MTV
Unplugged”
39 Beekeepers never retire,
they just __
41 Anonymous surname
42 Pal
44 Polish language
45 Actress Collette of
6 “What was __ do?”
“United States of Tara”
7 Columnist Maureen
46 “Chasing Pavements”
8 Marine eagle
singer
9 Hustle
47 Some mil. hospitals
10 Kitchen magnet?
50 Spew out
11 Gentle waves
53 White weasel
12 Farmers never retire,
55 Tree surgeons never
they just __
retire, they just __
13 Dots in la mer
59 State categorically
14 Aloha State bird
60 Ides of March word
21 Prefix with play
61 Teachers never retire,
23 Oranjestad’s island
they just __
24 Petty officer
64 Roughly three nautical
28 Woodworking tool
miles
29 Out of it
65 Often-fried tropical fruit 31 __ Grande
66 Least candid
32 Only partner?
67 It may be diagrammed
34 System used for many
returns
DOWN
35 Word with dark or hours
1 On the paltry side, as
36 Suitable
an offer
37 1972 host to Nixon
2 Between-finger-and38 Lumberjacks never
thumb quantity
retire, they just __
3 They mind your own
40 Horatian creation
business
43 Billboards and posters
4 Fervor
46 From __ Z
5 Glum
47 Vance of “I Love Lucy”
© 2019 Tribune Content Agency
48 Lackluster
49 Calm
51 Stocking shades
52 It may be fitted
54 Finish choice
55 OPEC units
56 Lively country dance
57 Decides what’s fair,
among other things
58 Tall __
62 Got on the ballot
63 Round Table VIP
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1/3/19
L AT I M E S . C O M / CA L E N DA R
T H U R S DAY , JA N UA RY 3 , 2 019
COMICS
DOONESBURY By Garry Trudeau
Doonesbury is on vacation. This is a reprint.
DILBERT By Scott Adams
LA CUCARACHA By Lalo Alcaraz
BABY BLUES By Jerry Scott & Rick Kirkman
CANDORVILLE By Darrin Bell
CRANKSHAFT By Tom Batiuk & Chuck Ayers
HALF FULL By Maria Scrivan
PEARLS BEFORE SWINE By Stephan Pastis
NON SEQUITUR By Wiley
LIO By Mark Tatulli
JUMP START By Robb Armstrong
9 CHICKWEED LANE By Brooke McEldowney
BLONDIE By Dean Young & John Marshall
GET FUZZY By Darby Conley
ZITS By Jerry Scott & Jim Borgman
BIZARRO By Wayno and Piraro
TUNDRA By Chad Carpenter
DRABBLE By Kevin Fagan
PRICKLY CITY By Scott Stantis
MUTTS By Patrick McDonnell
FRAZZ By Jef Mallett
PEANUTS By Charles M. Schulz
E7
E8
T H U R S DAY , JA N UA RY 3 , 2 019
L AT I M E S . C O M / CA L E N DA R
TV HI GHL I GHTS
Thursday Prime-Time TV
Fury (2014) 5 p.m. IFC
Ben-Hur (1959) 5 p.m. TCM
SERIES
The Big Bang Theory
Penny and Leonard (Kaley
Cuoco,
Johnny
Galecki) organize a paintball game for fun, but it
soon devolves into a medium for settling grudges
when Sheldon (Jim Parsons) becomes jealous of
Amy (Mayim Bialik). Kunal Nayyar and Kevin
Sussman also star in this
new episode. 8 p.m. CBS
The Titan Games Dwayne
Johnson hosts this energetic new athletic competition testing contestants’
physical prowess and
mental abilities. Liam
McHugh and Alex “Goldenboy” Mendez provide
commentary and Cari
Champion
interviews
competitors. 8 p.m. NBC
Gotham The comic book-inspired drama returns for
its fifth and final season,
which will see the city’s
criminal
landscape
emerge, pitting Gordon
and Bullock (Ben McKenzie, Donal Logue) against
depraved and mercurial
villains. David Mazouz
also stars. 8 p.m. Fox
Young Sheldon Sheldon
(Iain Armitage) uses his
unwitting sister (Raegan
Revord) as a test subject
for an experiment. Also,
Georgie (Montana Jordan) joins Mary’s (Zoe
Perry) Bible group to get
close to his crush (Isabel
May). 8:30 p.m. CBS
The Orville Ed (Seth MacFarlane) and the crew discover a planet about to be
destroyed by its sun in this
new episode of the science-fiction parody. Adrianne Palicki, Penny Johnson Jerald and Scott
Grimes also star. 9 p.m.
Fox
Surviving R. Kelly This
three-night documentary
series, premiering tonight
with two episodes and
concluding
Saturday,
sheds a light on many of
the dark rumors surrounding R&B superstar
R. Kelly. Among those
sharing their perspectives
on Kelly’s controversial
past are civil rights activist Tarana Burke, musician John Legend, talk
show
host
Wendy
Williams, ex-wife Andrea
Kelly and brothers Carey
and Bruce Kelly. 9 and 10
p.m. Lifetime
CBS
TALK SHOWS
The Blacklist This crime
drama returns for a new
season with a two-part
story (concluding Friday)
that opens as Red (James
Spader) hands off a new
case to the team, prompting a search for a plastic
surgeon who specializes in
creating new identities for
fugitives. Elsewhere, Liz
(Megan Boone) and her
sister Jennifer (guest star
Fiona Dourif) mount
their own covert investigation into what happened the night the real
Raymond
Reddington
died. Kenneth Tygar and
Christopher
Lambert
guest star. 10 p.m. NBC
CBS This Morning (N) 7
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Today (N) 7 a.m. KNBC
KTLA Morning News (N) 7
a.m. KTLA
Good Morning America
Aidan Gillen. (N) 7 a.m.
KABC
Good Day L.A. David Mazouz (“Gotham”); Dr.
Steve Perry; Mary Wilson
performs; Mayor Eric
Garcetti (D-Los Angeles).
(N) 7 a.m. KTTV
Live With Kelly and Ryan
Jada Pinkett Smith; Shay
Mitchell; Sam Heughan;
Troye Sivan. (N) 9 a.m.
KABC
The View Author Alan Dershowitz. (N) 10 a.m. KABC
The Talk Shemar Moore.
(N) 1 p.m. KCBS
Dr. Phil Kathy Bates talks
about her battle with cancer and living with lymphedema. (N) 3 p.m.
KCBS
The Ellen DeGeneres Show
Podcaster Dax Shepard;
special education teacher
Jenna Albi. (N) 3 p.m.
KNBC
The Dr. Oz Show A gynecologist recorded patients
before being caught; how
caffeine impacts weight
gain and anxiety. (N) 3
p.m. KTTV
Amanpour and Company
(N) 10 p.m. KVCR; 11 p.m.
KOCE; 1 a.m. KLCS
Nightline (N) 12:37 a.m.
KABC
SPECIALS
SPORTS
The Last Days of John F.
Kennedy Jr. This new special looks back at the
weeks leading up to the
plane crash that killed
Kennedy, his wife, Carolyn
Bessette-Kennedy, and
her sister, Lauren. 9 p.m.
ABC
College Basketball Penn
State at Michigan, 4 p.m.
ESPN; Illinois at Indiana,
4 p.m. FS1; Saint Mary's at
San Francisco, 6 p.m.
ESPN2; Colorado at Arizona, 6 p.m. FS1; Loyola
Marymount
at
Pepperdine, 7 p.m. SPST;
Stanford at UCLA, 8 p.m.
ESPN
NHL Hockey The Chicago
Blackhawks at the New
York Islanders, 4:30 p.m.
NBCSP; the Kings host
the Tampa Bay Lightning, 7:30 p.m. FSN.
NBA Basketball The Toronto Raptors at the San
Antonio Spurs, 5 p.m.
TNT; the Houston Rockets visit Golden State
Warriors, 7:30 p.m. TNT
Fox
SETH MacFARLANE
stars in a new episode of
the science fiction parody “The Orville” on Fox.
S.W.A.T. The team receives a
warning that a copycat
plans to reenact an old
school shooting the team
had responded to, in this
new episode. Shemar
Moore, Stephanie Sigman, Alex Russell and
Lina Esco star. 10 p.m.
CBS
MOVIES
Planes, Trains and Automobiles (1987) 10 a.m.
Showtime; 11 p.m. Ovation
Madagascar: Escape 2 Africa (2008) 2 and 9 p.m.
Nickelodeon
The Lord of the Rings: The
Fellowship of the Ring
(2001) 2:31 p.m. Starz
Chuck (2016) 4:30 p.m. TMC
NBC
KTLA
ABC
8 pm
8:30
The Big
Bang Theory
Young Sheldon The Big
Sheldon ex- Bang Theory
FOX
Supernatural (TV14) Å
The Conners
The Conners
KOCE
KDOC
KLCS
A&E
AMC
ANP
BET
Bravo
CMT
CNN
Com
Disc
Disn
E!
ESPN
Food
FNC
Free
FX
Hall
HGTV
Hist
IFC
Life
The Orville (TV14) Ed and the News (N) Å
MTV
NGC
Nick
OWN
Para
Sund
Syfy
TBS
TCM
TLC
TNT
Toon
Travel
Tru
TV L
USA
VH1
WGN
Cine
Encr
EPIX
HBO
Show
Starz
TMC
11 pm
News (N) Å
Sports Central 2 Broke Girls
The Big
Bang Theory
crew discover a planet about
to be destroyed by its sun.
(N) Å
The Good Wife (TV14) Å
Seinfeld Å
Seinfeld Å
Independent Lens (TVPG) Å Amanpour and Company (N)
Death in Paradise (TVPG) Å And Then There Were None Å
Mi marido tiene más familia
Amar a muerte (TV14)
(TVPG) Å
King of Queens
Between Lines
Doc Martin Å
Jesús
Noticias
The Secret Life of Dogs
The Secret Life of Dogs (TVG) The Secret Life of Dogs
Amanpour (N)
Dateline (TVPG) Å
The Goldbergs The Goldbergs Family Guy Å Family Guy Å Seinfeld Å
Globe Trekker (TVG) Å
Roadtrip Å
Bare Feet Å
Changing Seas Wild Travels
Seeing Canada
Live PD (TV14) (N) Å
60 Days In (TV14) (N) Å
The First 48
The Day After Tomorrow (2004) Dennis Quaid, Jake Gyllenhaal. (PG-13) Å Deep Impact ›› (10:35) Å
The Secret Life of the Zoo
Crikey! It’s the Irwins (TVPG) The Secret Life of the Zoo
The Zoo
Rhino Romance. Å
(TVPG) Å
The Karate Kid ››› (1984) Ralph Macchio, Noriyuki “Pat” Morita. (PG) Å
Karate Kid II
White Chicks (2004) (6:28) Hustle & Flow (2005) Terrence Howard, Anthony Anderson. (8:50) (R)
Top Chef (TV14) (N) Å
Million Dollar Listing Los Angeles (TV14)
Get a Room: Carson & Thom
Last Man
Last Man
Last Man
Last Man
Music City (Season premiere) Almost Famous
(R) Å
Jessica is engaged. (N) Å
Standing Å
Standing Å
Standing Å
Standing Å
CNN Tonight: Don Lemon (N) Anderson Cooper (TVPG) Å Anderson Cooper (TVPG) Å CNN Tonight
The Office Å The Office Å The Office Å The Office Å The Office Å The Office Å The Office Å
Building Off the Grid: Island
Building Off the Grid: Desert
Building Off the Grid: High
Building Off
Raven’s Home Raven’s Home Bunk’d (TVG) Bizaardvark
Bunk’d (TVG) Bunk’d (TVG) Raven’s Home
Chrisley Å
Chrisley Å
Chrisley Å
Chrisley Å
Chrisley Å
Chrisley Å
Botched Å
College Basketball Stanford at UCLA. (N) Å
SportsCenter (N) Å
SportsCenter
Chopped (TVG) Å
Chopped (TVG) Å
Beat Bobby
Beat Bobby
Beat Bobby
Fox News at Night (N) Å
Tucker Carlson Tonight Å
Hannity Å
Ingraham Å
Movie (6)
Miss Congeniality 2: Armed and Fabulous ›› (2005) Sandra Bullock. (PG-13) The 700 Club
Riddick ›› (2013) Vin Diesel, Karl Urban. (R) Å
Riddick ›› (2013) (R) Å
Love’s Complicated (2015) Holly Marie Combs, Ben Bass. Å One Winter Weekend (2018) Taylor Cole. Å
Flip or Flop Å Flip or Flop Å Flip or Flop (N) Flip or Flop Å House Hunters House Hunters House Hunters
American Pickers: Bonus Buys Hitler’s Secret Tunnels (TVPG) (N) Å
Pickers Å
Full Metal Jacket ››› (1987) Matthew Modine, Adam Baldwin. (R) Å
Full Metal Jacket (1987) (R) Å
Aaliyah: The Princess of R&B
Surviving R. Kelly (TV14) (Pre- Surviving R. Kelly (TV14) Hiding in Plain
(2014) Alexandra Shipp. (7) miere) (N) Å
MSN
10:30
warned that a copycat plans
to re-enact an old school
shooting. (N) Å
News (N) Å
The Blacklist (Season premiere) Plastic surgery. (N) Å
News (N) Å Sports (10:45) News (N) Å
the deadly plane crash. (N) Å
News (N) Å
News (N) Å
(TVPG) Å
News (N) Å
Gotham (TV14) (Season
Steve’s Legacy Continues. Å Growing Pains. (N) Å
BBC
10 pm
Young Sheldon S.W.A.T. (TV14) The team is
Legacies (TV14) Å
The Last Days of John F. Kennedy Jr. The weeks leading up to News (N) Å
premiere) The villains who
survived the attack resurface. (N) Å
MyNt The Good Wife (TV14) Å
KVCR Polytrauma Rehab in the VA Å
KCET Doc Martin (TVPG) Å
UNI
Sports News Movies (N) New Å Closed Captioning
9:30
Mary’s faith is
shaken by a
(TVPG) Paint- periments on (TVPG) Å
Missy. (N) Å
tragedy. Å
ball. (N) Å
The Titan Games (TVPG) Dwayne Johnson hosts. (N) Å
(TVPG) Å
KCAL
9 pm
Sight. (N) (10:03) Å
11th Hour Å
The Rachel Maddow Show Å The Last Word Å
11th Hour Å
Ex on the Beach (TV14) (N)
Floribama Shore (TV14)
Lindsay Lohan’s Beach Club Å Ex on-Beach
Life Below Zero (TVPG) Å
Life Below Zero: Ice Breakers
Life Below Zero: Ice Breakers
Life Below Zero
SpongeBob
SpongeBob
Madagascar: Escape 2 Africa ››› (2008) Ben Stiller. (PG) Friends Å
20/20 on OWN (TV14) Å
20/20 on OWN (TV14) Å
20/20 on ID (TV14) (N) Å
20/20 on OWN
Friends (TV14) Friends Å
Star Trek Beyond ››› (2016) Chris Pine, Zachary Quinto. (PG-13) Å
Law & Order (TV14) Å
Law & Order (TV14) Å
Law & Order (TV14) Å
Law & Order
I Am No. Four Constantine ›› (2005) Keanu Reeves, Rachel Weisz. (R) Å
Futurama
Seinfeld Å
Seinfeld Å
Big Bang Å
Big Bang Å
Big Bang Å
Big Bang Å
Seinfeld Å
Ben-Hur ›››› (1959) (5)
Demetrius and the Gladiators ››› (1954) Victor Mature. Å Spartacus Å
Dr. Pimple Popper (TV14) (N) Dr. Pimple Popper (TV14) (N) My 600-Lb. Life (TVPG) (N)
Basketball Houston Rockets at Warriors. (7:30) (N) Å
Inside the NBA (N) Å
Basketball Å
Samurai Jack American Dad American Dad Bob’s Burgers Bob’s Burgers Family Guy
Family Guy
The Dead Files (TVPG) Å
The Dead Files (TVPG) Å
The Dead Files (TVPG) (N)
Most Haunted
Jokers Å
Jokers Å
Jokers Å
Jokers Å
Jokers Å
Carbonaro (N) Carbonaro Å
Raymond Å
Raymond Å
Raymond Å
Raymond Å
2 1/2 Men Å 2 1/2 Men Å King of Queens
Iron Man ››› (2008) Robert Downey Jr., Terrence Howard. (PG-13) Å
Modern Family
Forgetting Sarah Marshall ››› (2008) Jason Segel. (R) Å
Dumb & Dumber ››› (1994)
Last-Standing Last-Standing Married ... With Married ... With Married ... With Married ... With How I Met
The Ring Two (2005) Naomi Watts, Simon Baker. (PG-13) Å Arizona (2018) Danny McBride. (9:55) Å
Brewster’s Millions ›› (7:16) The Saint ›› (1997) Val Kilmer, Elisabeth Shue. (PG-13) Å Sin City Å
Chinatown ›››› (1974) Jack Nicholson. (R) Å
The Two Jakes ›› (1990) (10:15) Å
Life of the Party ›› (2018) (PG-13) Å
Traffic ››› (2000) Michael Douglas. (9:45) (R) Å
Escape at Dannemora (7:15) Å A Bad Moms Christmas ›› (2017) (R) Å
American Dream … Knightmare
Showtime › (2002) Robert De Niro. (8:22) (PG-13) Å
Counterpart (TVMA) Å
Jumanji Å
Inglourious Basterds ››› (2009) Brad Pitt, Mélanie Laurent. (R) Å
True Romance (1993) (R) Å
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F
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BEST ACTRESS
BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR
BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS
KATHRYN HAHN
PAUL GIAMATTI
KAYLI CARTER
“KATHRYN HAHN IS TREMENDOUS.
KAYLI CARTER GIVES A VIBRANT
BREAKTHROUGH PERFORMANCE.”
S4
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“PAUL GIAMATTI CAN DO NO WRONG.”
INDEPENDENT SPIRIT
AWARDS NOMINATIONS
INCLUDING
BEST DIRECTOR TAMARA JENKINS
Written and Directed by
TAMARA JENKINS
THE ENVELOPE
latimes.com/envelope
WHAT’S INSIDE
THE QUOTE
16
TRAGIC POWER
16
Writer-director Adam McKay
explains how he views former
“Vice” President Cheney.
LIKE A ROCK STAR
Kirk McKoy Los Angeles Times
What film or performance made
an impression on you this year?
“ ‘The Favourite’ is phenomenal.
Everyone talks about the wide-angle
shots, and rightly so, but [director
Yorgos Lanthimos] knew when to go
to a nice close-up. He never wore out
his welcome, and I was nervous
when I saw the trailer: ‘Oh, there’s a
lot of stuff going on here.’ It was so
elegantly made. I just loved it.”
—Director Paul Thomas
Anderson
20
20
Natalie Portman, normally a
“harried mom,” leaps into the
pop diva life for “Vox Lux.”
REAL-LIFE DRAMAS
22
The documentarians behind
the bumper crop of true tales
gather for our roundtable.
‘WIDOWS’ MAKER
22
24
Director Steve McQueen
turns a British TV miniseries
into a very American film.
B I G DAT E S
Today: Palm Springs International Film Festival
Awards gala; ACE Eddie Awards nomination voting
closes; BAFTA EE Rising Star Award nominees
announced; PGA nomination voting for feature and
animated films closes; Cinema Audio Society
nomination voting closes.
Friday: Art Directors Guild nomination voting
closes; Costume Designers Guild nomination
voting closes; AFI Awards luncheon; PGA Awards
nominations.
Saturday: National Society of Film Critics awards
announced.
Sunday: Golden Globe Awards.
Monday: WGA nominations; Academy Award
nomination voting opens; New York Film Critics
Circle awards dinner; Art Directors Guild nominations; ACE Eddie Awards nominations; Makeup &
Hairstyle nomination voting closes; DGA final
voting for feature films closes; DGA documentary
nominations.
Tuesday: DGA nominations; Art Directors Guild
final voting opens; WGA final voting opens; National Board of Review gala; Cinema Audio Society
nominations.
Also
LET’S BE DIRECT
8
These female directors can upend the status quo.
SPIRITUAL SCRIPT
12
Paul Schrader’s 50-year trip to “First Reformed.”
24
VISUALLY EFFECTIVE
26
How the 10 shortlisted films dazzled viewers.
THE GOLD STANDARD
30
Glenn Whipp forecasts the likely craft nominees.
Photographs by, from top,
Matt Kennedy Annapurna Pictures
Marcus Yam Los Angeles Times
Kirk McKoy Los Angeles Times
Carolyn Cole Los Angeles Times
THE ENVELOPE
{ This week on latimes.com/envelope }
BUZZMETER
ORIGINAL
SCREENPLAY
S6
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The Envelope scoured the darkest of theaters to find six of the world’s most highly trained (or maybe that’s opinionated) Oscar pundits, writers and film critics to predict who this
season’s nominees will be in several key categories. Down the road, after the academy announces its choices Jan. 22, the Buzzmeter panelists will offer their predictions on who the
winners will be. Check back here each week as they weigh in on a new category, or go online for all their picks at once at latimes.com/buzzmeter. Their predictions will change after
all the contenders have screened, so check back often.
Justin Chang
Los Angeles Times
Kenneth Turan
Los Angeles Times
“The Favourite”
“First Reformed”
“Green Book”
“Roma”
“Vice”
“Cold War”
“The Favourite”
“First Reformed”
“Roma”
“Vice”
I expect “Roma” to be the first
non-English-language film since
“Amour” to earn picture, directing and
writing nominations.
The two foreign-language films,
“Roma” and “Cold War,” might end
up duking it out.
Netf lix
“ROMA” is a unanimous panel pick for original screenplay. Alfonso Cuarón’s
autobiographical film is in black and white and spoken mostly in Spanish.
Tom O’Neil
Gold Derby
Anne Thompson
IndieWire
Nicole Sperling
Vanity Fair
Glenn Whipp
The Envelope
“Roma”
“The Favourite”
“Green Book”
“Vice”
“Cold War”
“Eighth Grade”
“The Favourite”
“First Reformed”
“Green Book”
“Roma”
“Eighth Grade”
“The Favourite”
“Green Book”
“Roma”
“Vice”
“The Favourite”
“Roma”
“First Reformed”
“Eighth Grade”
“Cold War”
“Roma,” “Favourite,” “Green Book”
and “Vice” seem like locks. I pick “Cold
War” for the fifth slot, but it has strong
rivals: “First Reformed,” “Eighth
Grade,” “A Quiet Place,” “Sorry to
Bother You” and “Capernaum.”
The immersive “Roma” has so little
dialogue that it might not register as an
extraordinary screenplay; well-crafted
dramedy “Green Book” is a contender,
and Paul Schrader (“First Reformed”)
is long overdue for his first nomination.
Adam McKay not only captures
Dick Cheney in “Vice,” but he
articulates the entire trajectory of
the Republican Party, and he does it
in a brisk two hours.
Yes, I didn’t list “Green Book.”
There are better scripts, people.
BEST ACTRESS
MUSICAL
OR
COMEDY
OLIVIA COLMAN
14
B E S T
P I C T U RE
BE ST DIRECTOR YORG O S LAN T H I MO S
B E ST AC TRE S S O L I V I A C O L M A N
BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS EMMA STONE
BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS RACHEL WEISZ
3
S A G AWA R D S
N O M I NAT I O N S
®
BE ST ACTRE S S OLI VIA COL MAN
BE ST SU PPORT I NG AC T R E S S E M MA STON E
BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS RACHEL WEISZ
ONE OF THE BEST FILMS OF THE YEAR
“SUMPTUOUS AND GLORIOUSLY ALIVE,
‘T H E F A V O U R I T E’ I S T H E B E S T
C O S T U M E D R A M A I N A G E S.”
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FOXSEARCHLIGHT.COM/FYC
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MUSICAL
OR
COMEDY
NO M I N AT ION S I NC LU DI NG
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CRITICS’ CHOICE AWARDS
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5
GOLDEN GLOBE
BEST PICTURE
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CLOCKWISE
from here:
Josie Rourke;
Debra Granik
(far right);
Karyn
Kusama;
Marielle
Heller;
Chloé Zhao.
Kirk McKoy Los Angeles Times
Scott Green Bleecker Street
THE DIRECTORS
EDGING INTO
THE BOYS CLUB
voice rises up to energize its momentum. At the 2018 Golden Globes,
Natalie Portman lent hers, calling out the 88 members of the Hollywood Foreign Press Assn. for its best director nominations. Seven
words could not have been more prophetic. “And here are the allmale nominees.” ¶ In the 75-year history of the Golden Globes, a
woman has earned a nomination for best director seven times — two
of those seven were second nominations, meaning that just five dif[See Women, S10]
ferent women have ever been recognized.
Christina House Los Angeles Times
S8
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LOS ANGELES TIMES
T H U R S D A Y , J A N U A R Y 3 , 2 019
BY DARON JAMES >>> Change can spread like wildfire when a
Sony Pictures Classics
Jennifer S. Altman For The Times
“FELICITY JONES AND
ARMIE HAMMER ARE EXCEPTIONAL.”
PRODUCED BY ROBERT
BEST DIRECTOR MIMI LEDER
BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR
ARMIE HAMMER
JUSTIN THEROUX
CORT, p.g.a. JONATHAN KING, p.g.a.
BEST ACTRESS FELICITY JONES
BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS
KATHY BATES
CAILEE SPAENY
For more on this film, go to www.FocusFeaturesGuilds2018.com
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YOL ANDA MACHADO, THE WRAP
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CLOSE
AT HAND
[Women, from S8]
Of those five — Barbra Streisand
(“Yentl,” “The Prince of Tides”), Jane Campion (“The Piano”), Sofia Coppola (“Lost in
Translation”), Kathryn Bigelow (“The
Hurt Locker,” “Zero Dark Thirty”) and Ava
DuVernay (“Selma”) — Streisand stands as
the lone winner, for 1983’s “Yentl.”
The Academy Awards are no different,
with just five female director nominees and
only a single winner: Bigelow for 2009’s
“The Hurt Locker.” The Oscars gender barrier was initially broken more than four
decades ago by director Lina Wertmuller
for “Seven Beauties” (1976), a drama set in a
WWII German prison camp. Campion,
Coppola and Greta Gerwig (“Lady Bird”)
round out the remaining past nominees.
But this year’s Oscar conversations are
looking to upend the status quo, with films
from seven women making an impact.
“It feels like things are changing,” says
Karyn Kusama, whose awards-contending
Christmas release, “Destroyer,” stars Nicole Kidman as a damaged undercover cop.
“But when you look at the reports, it’s not
encouraging.”
The numbers don’t lie. In 2017, of the 175
U.S.-produced films that earned at least
$250,000 at the box office, only 22 of the 181
credited directors were women, according
to a study released by the Directors Guild
of America. The news is as dismal when
considering any box office amount. Of the
651 films analyzed by the DGA in 2017, 114 directors were women. (It’s worth noting the
stats do not include documentaries or animated films.)
Kusama cautions female storytellers to
not rush into projects. “It’s important to
find movies that have a point of view, that
speak to people. Find a mythology that
hasn’t been truly explored.”
But it’s not just a matter of picking the
right project. “I do think there’s a boys-club
Jonathan Wenk Focus Features
MIMI LEDER , right, felt a connection with RBG, played by Felicity Jones, left.
mentality,” says director Marielle Heller,
whose November release “Can You Ever
Forgive Me?” is on many best picture lists.
“It’s an unconscious bias that happens
when recognizing talent. It seems decision
makers are more willing to take risks on
young men over young women.”
N O MI N E E
CRITICS’ CHOICE
AWARD
BEST ACTRESS GLENN CLOSE
BEST ACTRESS GLENN CLOSE
SE
GOLDEN GLOBE AWARD
LOS ANGELES TIMES
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(DRAMA)
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®
S10
Director Mimi Leder, whose awards season release “On the Basis of Sex” chronicles
the life of Ruth Bader Ginsburg, found herself connecting to the Supreme Court justice in many ways. “I don’t compare myself
to RBG, but there are a lot of similarities
that I felt close to,” says Leder, who was the
NO M IN E E
SCREEN ACTORS
GUILD AWARD
®
N O MI NE E
BEST ACTRESS GLENN CLOSE
BEST ACTRESS
Glenn Close
The
Wife
WINNER
HOLLYWOOD ACTRESS AWARD • GLENN CLOSE
HOLLYWOOD FILM AWARDS
“GLENN CLOSE DELIVERS A BREATHTAKING PERFORMANCE.
THIS IS SCREEN ACTING AT ITS FINEST. WITH ‘THE WIFE,’
SHE HAS BEEN GIVEN THE PERFECT PLATFORM TO DECLARE
THAT, LIKE HER CHARACTER IN ‘FATAL ATTRACTION’ AND
LIKE JOAN IN THIS ONE, SHE WILL NOT BE IGNORED.”
-Ann Hornaday, THE WASHINGTON POST
BEST ACTRESS
NOMINEE
DALLAS/FT. WORTH FILM CRITICS ASSOCIATION • ST. LOUIS FILM CRITICS ASSOCIATION
SAN DIEGO FILM CRITICS ASSOCIATION • WASHINGTON FILM CRITICS ASSOCIATION
—D EBRA G RANIK
Jay L. Clendenin Los Angeles Times
ELIZABETH Chomko’s “What They Had” is too personal to not direct herself.
first woman to graduate from the AFI Conservatory and has had more than 50 producing and directing credits since. “I had a
lot of doors closed in my face as Ruth had,
and she always stood up and kept going.
Her fight against gender discrimination,
her work as an educator, then moving on to
become a Supreme Court justice, was
something I deeply admired and was inspired by during this project.”
In the December release “Mary Queen
of Scots,” the plot pinpoints the cost of
power and what that means to two powerful women, Mary Stuart and Queen Eliza-
beth I. For director Josie Rourke, the approach was guided by her interest in female
leadership over the last decade. “I have met
many women in British society and America that are in positions of power and had
deep conversations with them about what
it means personally and professionally.
Those conversations were a preoccupation
of the film,” says Rourke, who was appointed the first female artistic director to
run a major theater in London.
For writer-director Debra Granik, who
received the Los Angeles Film Critics Assn.
best director prize last month, the magnetism of her “Leave No Trace,” an allegory
that follows a homeless man — struggling
with PTSD — and his daughter, was
brought on by its kinship with everyday existence. “The plot doesn’t have to be big for
me to be attracted to how they’re going to
survive,” says the Oscar nominee for adapted screenplay for 2010’s “Winter’s Bone.”
“I’m attracted to stories of how people are
going to make their lives work and find
ways to make them interesting.”
Independent Spirit Award nominee
“The Rider” struck a similar chord for writer-director Chloé Zhao, as the film is based
on the real life of Brady Jandreau, a cowboy
who lost his ability to ride after a severe
head injury. “There’s a masculinity and
feminism in each of us. I think that’s true
for Brady as a cowboy and a man and for
me as a filmmaker and a woman,” says
Zhao. “My experience as a woman is part of
this film. It helped show Brady, who is very
strong, that it’s OK to show vulnerability.
That connection and collaboration played
its part in how we created this film.”
In developing the Toronto International
Film Festival award-nominated “What
They Had,” a stirring story about a family
struggling over the future of an ailing
mother, writer-director Elizabeth Chomko
says she would rather have left the script
on her computer than have someone else
direct it. “It was such a personal story I had
written to preserve a memory for my family,
I don’t think someone else could have done
it with the love I had written it with.”
calendar@latimes.com
“A TOUR-DE-FORCE. GLENN CLOSE TAKES IT TO THE NEXT LEVEL WITH A POWERFULLY
IMPLOSIVE PERFORMANCE. EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT JOAN COMES THROUGH
IN CLOSE’S SUBTLE AND SIMMERING PORTRAYAL. YOU CAN’T TAKE YOUR EYES OFF HER.”
“GLENN CLOSE DELIVERS WHAT
MIGHT BE HER GREATEST BIG-SCREEN
PERFORMANCE. CLOSE BUILDS
TO A CRESCENDO THAT IS A
MASTER CLASS IN SCREEN ACTING.”
“A MAGNETIC PERFORMANCE BY
GLENN CLOSE THAT IS NOTHING SHORT
OF MIRACULOUS. SHE PUTS
‘THE WIFE’ IN LOCKDOWN AND
THROWS AWAY THE KEY.”
-Moira Macdonald, THE SEATTLE TIMES
-Pete Hammond, DEADLINE
-Rex Reed, OBSERVER
S11
“A SHOWSTOPPING
PERFORMANCE. GLENN CLOSE
CREATES MOVIE MAGIC.
SHE OWNS THIS MOVIE,
FROM BEGINNING TO END.”
THE ENVELOPE
LOS ANGELES TIMES
-Peter Travers, ROLLING STONE
T H U R S D A Y , J A N U A R Y 3 , 2 019
‘I’m
attracted
to stories
of how
people are
going to
make their
lives
work.’
THE ENVELOPE
latimes.com/envelope
ON WRITING
BY PAUL SCHRADER >>>‘FIRST REFORMED’
FAITH IN HIS
GUT INSTINCT
irst Reformed” is the script I swore I’d
never write. As a young film critic, I’d
written a book about spirituality and
cinema (“Transcendental Style in Film”),
but ’60s Hollywood came in like a howling
wind and hauled me away. I became enamored of psychological realism, action and
empathy, sex and violence — these are not
in the transcendental tool kit.
When interviewers would try to connect
the films I’d made with the Transcendental
style I wrote about, I’d say, “No, no, no. I like
spiritual movies, I wrote about them, but
S12
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F
I’ll never make one. That’s not me. You’ll
never catch me skating on that thin Bressonian ice.”
As a young person, I didn’t see films for
the simple reason no one in my church saw
films. They were proscribed by synodical
decree. I can’t say I felt I was missing much.
I came to movies as an adult, as a college
student in the ’60s, and fell in love with
European art cinema: Bergman, Antonioni,
Bresson, Resnais, Godard, Fellini, Buñuel.
That was the music that was playing when
I walked into the corridors of cinema, and
“JONATHAN PRYCE GIVES A
DEVILISHLY EFFECTIVE PERFORMANCE AS
ASTONISHINGLY SELF-CENTERED
JOE CASTLEMAN.”
-Richard Roeper, CHICAGO SUN-TIMES
HHHHH!
( H I G H E S T R AT I N G )
“JONATHAN PRYCE IS EXCELLENT.”
BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR
Jonathan Pryce
-Peter Bradshaw, THE GUARDIAN
“JONATHAN PRYCE HAS POSSIBLY
NEVER BEEN BETTER.”
-Jordan Ruimy, THE FILM STAGE
The Wife
BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS
Christian Slater
Björn Runge
Annie Starke
HHHH!
( H I G H E S T R AT I N G )
“DIRECTOR BJÖRN RUNGE GIVES THE FILM A SOLID DRAMATIC BACKBONE,
LOOPING ACROSS TIME AND PLACE WITHOUT EVER LOSING FOCUS. THE FILM SHOWS US THE NAIVE HERO WORSHIP
THAT YOUNG JOAN, SEAMLESSLY PLAYED BY ANNIE STARKE, FELT FOR HER ELOQUENT, HANDSOME PROFESSOR
AND ITS GROWTH INTO TRUE MUTUAL ROMANCE. CHRISTIAN SLATER ADDS A LEVEL OF INTRIGUE
TO THE STORY AS NATHANIEL BONE - HE CAPTURES A FINE NOTE OF PROFESSIONAL PRYING.”
-Colin Covert, MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE
T H U R S D A Y , J A N U A R Y 3 , 2 019
BEST DIRECTOR
LOS ANGELES TIMES
BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR
THE ENVELOPE
Ricardo DeAratanha Los Angeles Times
write. You’ll be 70 next year. Do it just like
Pawel did it. Black and white. Academy
ratio. What can you lose? It’s time.”
It was at heart an intellectual decision,
not an emotional one. Could I write and
direct such a film? If so, how would I do it?
But once I made the intellectual decision,
the emotional implications became overwhelming. It was as if a dam broke free and
50 years of thinking about and making
movies came bursting in.
I re-watched the dozen or so films that
had informed my thinking 50 years ago. I
watched the several dozen films made in
the intervening years that approached the
transcendent with austere and contemplative techniques (Andrei Tarkovsky, Theo
Angelopoulos, Béla Tarr). I began to pick
and choose, creating my own buffet of
story elements, characters and stylistic
choices. From this assemblage (no artist
actually creates anything new), a script
evolved. And it felt like it was mine.
Several things surprised me during the
writing of the script. First, how “of the
[See Schrader, S14]
S13
I thought to myself, ‘It’s
time to write the script you
swore you’d never write.
You’ll be 70 next year.’
I’ve loved it ever since.
Having left Grand Rapids and Calvin
College 50 years ago for UCLA film school,
I assumed that my “sacred” past and my
“profane” present would never meet. Then,
in March of 1969, as a critic for the Los
Angeles Free Press, I attended a screening
of Bresson’s “Pickpocket” at the Los Feliz
Theatre. In the 75 minutes it took to watch
the film, I realized two things: (1) There
was a bridge between my past and present,
and it was a bridge of style, not content.
Out of that realization came “Transcendental Style in Film” two years later. (2) I
realized there might be a place for me in
the world of filmmaking. Out of that came
“Taxi Driver” three years later.
Three years ago, I gave Pawel Pawlikowski an award for “Ida” at the New
York Film Critics Circle dinner. He knew
my book, I loved his film and we talked
about the ways cinema can evoke the
spiritual. That night, walking the nine
blocks uptown from Tao to my Chelsea
condo, I thought to myself, “It’s time to
write the script you swore you’d never
THE ENVELOPE
FULL
CIRCLE
A24
REV. TOLLER (Ethan Hawke) in “First Reformed” has some Travis Bickle — Schrader’s first screen character — in him.
S14
THE ENVELOPE
LOS ANGELES TIMES
T H U R S D A Y , J A N U A R Y 3 , 2 019
[Schrader, from S13]
moment” it felt even though my reference
films were over 50 years old. Second, how
much the ghost of Travis Bickle (the protagonist of “Taxi Driver,” my first screen
character, written in 1972) came to inhabit
the body of Rev. Toller, my new character. I
had not expected this. When I sensed this
happening, I resisted. At first. But Travis
was not to be denied. I let him in. Third,
although the subject matter was dark and
disheartening, the writing felt weightless.
Writing could still do that thing it does.
The result is a sense of completion. The
two seeds that fell into my petri dish that
morning in March 1969 had grown tall and
finally met. I felt that with “First Reformed,” I’d done whatever I’d set out to do
50 years ago, and I’m still not sure what
that was, but I had done it.
“MEG WOLITZER’S CHARACTERS HAVE BEEN
SHREWDLY CAPTURED AND ADAPTED BY JANE ANDERSON.
IT’S A PLEASURE SIMPLY TO WATCH CLOSE AND PRYCE
ESTABLISH SUCH MINUTE AND CAREFUL GRADATIONS
OF HAPPINESS, DESOLATION AND EXASPERATION.”
BEST ADAPTED SCREENPLAY
Jane Anderson
Based on the book by Meg Wolitzer
-Michael Phillips, CHICAGO TRIBUNE
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IN ALL CATEGORIES
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Wife
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The
THE ENVELOPE
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ADAM MCKAY TURNS HIS LENS
ON DICK CHENEY AND THE
UGLY TWISTS OF POWER IN ‘VICE’
By Glenn Whipp
S16
THE ENVELOPE
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A
dam McKay has a copy of Jill Lepore’s acclaimed, 960-page American history volume,
“These Truths: A History of the United States,” sitting on the corner of his desk. I have a
copy too, lying on my nightstand, silently judging me the last couple of weeks for barely
reading it. And because McKay’s new movie, “Vice,” suggests that American indifference
helps politicians like Dick Cheney get away with torture and murder, I’m feeling doubly
implicated by my failure to feed my mind and burrow into Lepore’s book.
“I haven’t opened it either,” McKay says, laughing, adding that, by way of contrast, he
could tell me all about the Milwaukee Bucks’ season, down to the fact that, apparently,
Khris Middleton isn’t playing enough defense lately for the basketball team. “It shows you
how tired I’ve been. When I get home, I just want to watch basketball or ‘Antiques Roadshow.’ ”
McKay’s exhaustion comes from the years he spent making “Vice,” an ambitious movie about the life of Dick Cheney and the
corrupting power of politics. Like “The Big Short,” a freewheeling and scorching look at the 2008 financial crisis that won McKay
the Oscar for adapted screenplay, “Vice” employs an array of audacious approaches to present unappealing subject matter — in
this case, one of the most disliked politicians in American history — with an entertaining energy that might entice audiences.
The approach has divided critics, with some dismissing “Vice” as shallow and glib. McKay is undaunted.
“The goal was to make a movie that’s informative and empowering, that has the same stickiness to it as something like
‘Goodfellas’ or ‘Jaws,’ where if you flip past it five years from now, you’re watching at least 10 or 15 minutes of it.”
Sprawled on the sectional sofa in his office in the Funny or Die production company building in West Hollywood, McKay
spoke at length about Cheney and “Vice,” which earned a leading six Golden Globes nominations — best picture comedy, nods
for Adam McKay’s direction and screenplay, and acting recognition for Christian Bale, who plays Cheney; Amy Adams who
plays his wife, Lynne; and Sam Rockwell as George W. Bush.
Early in the film, Cheney’s interning with Donald Rumsfeld
and he asks Rumsfeld, “What do we believe?” And Rumsfeld just laughs at him. You didn’t find any core ideology
with these guys?
Not really. It’s always about simultaneously expanding and
hanging onto power. Cheney’s dad was an FDR Democrat. His
mom too. Certainly in the early days, ideology wasn’t driving
him. It was more making something of himself. He wanted in
on the action. Rumsfeld was the same way. Rumsfeld was
against the Vietnam War because it was a good way to counter
[Henry] Kissinger. He wanted to take Kissinger out. Then
later he was hawkish with the Ford administration when
Kissinger was trying to negotiate a missile treaty with the
Russians. So when you look at these guys, it’s hard to find an
ideological throughline.
Reading the film, you believe Cheney was more motivated
by making his wife proud.
We were joking about it. [Screenwriting gurus] Syd Field
and Robert McKee will talk about your first act and providing
an inciting incident for your character. Honestly, Cheney’s
inciting incident is one and the same with Lynne’s: when she
reads him the riot act after his DUI.
Without Lynne, you don’t have Dick Cheney. If they don’t
meet, Dick Cheney is a lineman in Wyoming with a bunch of
kids and you never hear his name. Maybe he runs for some
state office at most. But we interviewed some people from the
town, and they still say to this day that anyone Lynne Cheney
married would have been president or vice president.
Positions which, with Cheney and Bush, seemed interchangeable. The film does show Lynne to be formidable.
Watching Amy Adams play her, I’d occasionally think of her
character in “The Master.”
If Lynne’s born and raised in a more progressive state, I
don’t think there’s any question she becomes a congresswoman or a tough-as-nails governor. But Wyoming at the time was
very conservative, probably a couple of decades behind the
country.
Their love story is part of the engine that drives the movie,
which makes some people mad. They think you’ve gone too
soft on Cheney.
My whole idea was to understand how power can twist
someone. I think by the end, the movie’s a grand tragedy. I
think he’s given everything away. I don’t think that’s going soft
on someone at all, saying that he ends with an emptiness. His
family is split apart. His country is split apart. And it was all
for this power they were chasing that metastasized by the end.
[See McKay, S18]
WRITERDIRECTOR
Adam McKay
sees his film
about former
Vice President
Dick Cheney
as “a grand
tragedy.”
S17
Wally Skalij Los Angeles Times
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POWER
PLAYS
‘It’s not like
Cheney is some
beloved, cuddly
figure in the
Republican party.’
[McKay, from S16]
— A DAM M C K AY,
S18
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I don’t know. You see him today and he
doesn’t strike me as someone burdened
with regret.
Well, you see him out there now, and he
just kind of repeats his talking points. I feel
like he’s more a shell of a man. He’s going
to defend his legacy, and he’s going to push
[daughter] Liz [Wyoming’s lone representative in the House] up the Republican
hierarchy. To me it feels like a rickety clock
just hitting the second hand over and over.
Whereas there were points in his life
when he was secretary of Defense, when he
did a pretty good job, and he could have
left with a full family and good public
record. In the end, he just gave it away.
Without going into specifics, the movie
tries to give him that happy ending. Do
you think he would have been more content if things had turned out that way
and he hadn’t taken that call from Bush
to run on the ticket?
It’s impossible to know for sure. My
opinion is yes. They were a big, unified
family. They were very wealthy. They had a
beautiful house. He had a nice public
record. It seems like that would have been
a good time. Now his daughters have a
very fractured relationship — because of
politics. [During a failed 2014 Senate bid,
Liz said she opposed same-sex marriage.
Cheney’s younger daughter, Mary, is gay
and has been married to her wife since
2012.]
In a way, that’s what happened to our
country as well. That wedge issue actually
wedged their own family. And you think of
all the other families that has happened to.
To me, it feels like high tragedy.
The movie I really looked at was “The
Godfather Part II” where you see the
warmth of the father, De Niro playing the
young Vito, balanced against Michael with
those dead eyes, closing the door on Diane
Keaton. A lot of these stories about power
happen around the family table. And here
you have this family that’s ambitious and
wanted good things, and then somewhere
along the line for the good of the family,
you have to destroy the family. When I
discovered that doing the research, I knew
on whether Republicans
will buy tickets to see “Vice”
Matt Kennedy Annapurna Pictures
ADAM McKAY , left, works with Christian Bale (as Dick Cheney), producer
Kevin Messick and cinematographer Greig Fraser on the set of “Vice.”
I had a movie.
Hasn’t your own family been divided by
politics?
I’ve lived it. My mom and her husband
are very right-wing, Fox News, pro-Trump.
They never talked a lot about “The Big
Short.” Kind of everyone hates banks.
[Laughs] Banks don’t poll very well. But
Cheney was polling under 20% when he left
office. When we did our test groups, there
were Republicans who were OK with the
movie.
I wonder though in our current political
climate how many will actually buy tickets to see your movie.
I do think there’s going to be a surprising chunk of Republicans who go watch
this. It’s not like Cheney is some beloved,
cuddly figure in the Republican party.
Who might you call a cuddly figure in the
Republican party?
[Laughs] That’s a good one. It’s not
Mitch McConnell. It’s not Paul Ryan. It’s
not Orrin Hatch, is it? [John] McCain had
his moments before he passed away. John
Kasich? Close? On a really cold night.
[Laughs]
But back to who sees the movie — far
more people saw “The Big Short” after it
left theaters. You come across it on cable
or streaming, it lets people relax.
We find it with our comedies; people see
them in a different way years later.
It feels like I could find that Baby Jesus
scene from “Talladega Nights” on cable
no matter the time of day or night if I
look long enough for it.
To this day, I still say that’s the best
scene I’ve ever directed. And that scene’s
really long — like seven and a half minutes.
You give Cheney the last word in the
movie. When he looks in the camera and
says, “It has been my honor to be your
servant. You chose me and I did what
you asked,” who’s he talking to? Who’s
the “you” in that?
There’s a lot of ways to interpret it.
“You chose me by not caring. You chose
me by abdicating your choice.” The “you”
in it, I like the idea that “you” is not really
the people, it’s power. “I serve you, power.
And you chose me and I did it all for you,
power.”
Nebulous, shapeless power. Some sort
of William Blake abstract painting of
power.
You note too in the movie that people are
working longer hours for less pay these
days. And, as we talked about, sometimes you’re too tired to think about
whether a sitting president can be indicted.
We used to have unions which would
marry your work and politics so the two
would be the same. You’d be at work and
there would be some discussion of government. Unions created the middle class in
America, and the greatest legacy of America, the reason all the other countries give a
crap about us, is that we created the first
sizable middle class. And they took it
apart by targeting unions. In the 1970s,
27% percent of the workforce belonged to
unions. Now it’s 6% percent. That’s a massive change.
So people are being paid less money,
they’re not getting healthcare and they
have to work two or three jobs. And, good
Lord, the last thing you want to do when
you come home is turn on the BBC World
News to find out what happened at the
G-20 summit.
So what do you hope those people might
take away from “Vice” if they see it?
My hope is this movie can weather
these times we’re living in. We’re going into
different territory here because this rightleft craziness is so embedded. This guy,
Duncan Hunter, got caught red-handed,
and what does he say? It was a liberal
conspiracy. And he got re-elected. That
was shocking to me.
So I just hope the movie can leave that
junk behind and become what it is, which
is just a portrait of a man, a portrait of
power, a portrait of the times. And, no, it
doesn’t have Will Ferrell praying to Baby
Jesus. But it does have Christian Bale and
Amy Adams — two of the greatest actors
on the planet — conversing in iambic
pentameter for three minutes as Dick and
Lynne Cheney. I think that’s a pretty fair
trade.
glenn.whipp@latimes.com
T H U R S D A Y , J A N U A R Y 3 , 2 019
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PRIVATE AND
PUBLIC FACES
By Michael Ordoña
S20
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T
here’s a fairly clear divergence scape, like in ‘Annihilation.’ It feels like getpoint in the career path of one ting to lead another life. A little Superman:
Natalie Portman. Since win- One thing by day, one thing by night.”
ning an Oscar as a ballerina
Celeste in “Vox Lux” seems both Superpirouetting on the edge of man and Bizarro. Portman gets to be rude
madness in 2010’s “Black Swan,” she has and extreme as someone who has grown up
chosen fewer big studio projects and zeroed in the public eye and has become expert at
in on more idiosyncratic indie fare for direc- presenting public and private faces. Porttors with distinctive voices. But it wasn’t man’s first day of shooting captured what
just the Oscar and how “Swan” changed di- she calls the character’s “drug meltdown.”
rectors’ perceptions of her that caused the The actress also sings and dances in an exswerve.
tended performance sequence and doesn’t
“The other thing was I had my first child worry about Celeste being likable.
after ‘Black Swan,’ so … it kind of ups the
“She definitely does things that are
stakes of what you want to
monstrous,” Portman says
do because it’s time away
with that frequent laugh. “I
from your kid,” says the
think that’s part of what’s
Harvard grad and mother
reflective of our moment in
of two. “Now it feels like, I
time: that someone who
want to be so passionate
can say awful things and
and committed to what I’m
do awful things can also be
doing; it feels like an incharismatic and alluring.
credible use of my time.”
It’s all in one package, and
She laughs and adds,
it’s hard to take out.
“You have, obviously, very
“Brady said, ‘Someimportant people waiting
times she says total nonfor you at home.”
sense. Sometimes she’s
Her 16 features since
— N ATALIE P ORTMAN, saying really horrible
on looking for roles that bear
2010 include work with Terthings. Sometimes she’s
little resemblance to herself
rence Malick, Pablo Larsaying really interesting
raín, Alex Garland and Xathings. And sometimes
vier Dolan. And now, currently in that line is she’s a good person.’ It’s so much more inBrady Corbet’s “Vox Lux.”
teresting and real that someone is different
In the new film, Portman plays Celeste, in different scenarios.”
a Madonna-ish pop star whose life and caWriter-director Corbet has said the film
reer are marked by two horrific acts of vi- isn’t meant to comment on the issue of gun
olence. In the film’s first half, young Raffey control, though two murderous shootings
Cassidy portrays her during her formative do shape its themes.
years. By the time Portman takes over in
“It’s not a message movie; he calls it a
the story, the hardened Celeste bears little ‘portrait’ of the time we live in,” Portman
resemblance to that girl. The actress is de- says. “He was like, ‘What are the big, violent
lighted that the careening, loose-cannon conflicts of our time? This is our civil war.’
character also bears little resemblance to Currently, it’s school shootings and terrorherself.
ism — one is the domestic conflict, and one
“I don’t want to go to work and play, like, is the international conflict.
a harried mom,” she says. “I am a harried
“It’s the violence we live in right now and
mom. It’s fun to go to work and be a pop how we react to it, and kind of seeing this
star. Or an astronaut, which I just did. Or a relationship between the treatment of
military operative in a science-fiction land- media, journalism, news culture and audi-
‘I don’t want
to go to work
and play, like,
a harried
mom. I am
a harried
mom.’
Marcus Yam Los Angeles Times
NATALIE Portman sings, dances and gets rude and extreme as a pop star in
“Vox Lux.” The first day of shooting captured her character’s “drug meltdown.”
ence attention — that the audience for
news and the audience for a pop show are
becoming one, and the more attention that
you give is what gives it power.”
In researching pop stars, Portman’s
takeaway was that being adored by millions
is very hard work.
“It’s crazy. They’re in a different city every night and constantly flying and away
from their homes. It’s like a marathon when
you’re on tour,” she says, noting just how
much of a physical feat she found the stage
show to be.
She saw a divide between the pop-music
stardom such as Celeste gains at about 13
and the acting fame Portman has known
since she debuted in “Léon: The Professional,” also at about 13.
“The part that [actors display] in the
public eye — our creative work — is a character that’s not us, whereas for a pop star,
you’re expected to be in your private life the
same persona as what people see you as in
performance.”
calendar@latimes.com
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T H U R S D A Y , J A N U A R Y 3 , 2 019
DOCUMENTARY ROUNDTABLE
A HUNGER
FOR THE
REAL THING
From left: Tim Wardle, Betsy West, Sandi Tan, Elizabeth Chai Vasarhelyi and
Morgan Neville
By Amy Kaufman
Photographs by
Kirk McKoy Los Angeles Times
I
t was a big year for documentaries: abundant critical acclaim with four grossing more than $10 million each at the box office. That
may not sound like Hollywood blockbuster money, but to put things in context, only one doc achieved that feat in 2017. ¶ So why the
sudden interest in real-life fare? We gathered the filmmakers behind the year’s biggest and most interesting nonfiction films, all
shortlisted for the Oscar nominations Jan. 22, to discuss their theories on the documentary boom: Tim Wardle, pictured above from
left, who helmed the separated-at-birth mystery “Three Identical Strangers”; Betsy West, who with Julie Cohen directed the examination of Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s life in “RBG”; Sandi Tan, whose search for the lost footage of her teenage feature film became a story in
itself in “Shirkers”; Elizabeth Chai Vasarhelyi, who with husband Jimmy Chin followed climber Alex Honnold’s ascent of El Capitan without
ropes in “Free Solo”; and Morgan Neville, whose “Won’t You Be My Neighbor?” examines Fred Rogers’ ideas about children.
So why do you think that audiences
have such a voracious appetite for
documentary film right now?
Betsy West: There is a hunger for real
stories that are inspiring. The news landscape is filled with somewhat depressing
political developments, and people are
turning to documentaries to find stories
that are both educating them and also, I
think, inspiring them.
Morgan Neville: I also feel like we’re
making the kinds of films you don’t see
that much anymore, which are adult,
hopefully smart, entertaining films that
engage with the real world. There’s just a
hunger for those types of stories that
people aren’t finding in scripted fare.
Sandi Tan: And it’s stories. Sometimes
they don’t realize they’re watching a documentary. Like in “Three Identical Strangers,” I mean, that’s something that could
be in a feature film. And when people are
watching it, they don’t necessarily think of
it as some kind of “boring” documentary
thing.
Tim Wardle: I think for a long time, in
certain circles, documentaries were re-
garded as just fact-based and dispassionate. If they were entertaining, it was almost like that was against the whole documentary ethos. I certainly reject that.
Elizabeth Chai Vasarhelyi: But I also
think there’s something about this communal experience of watching these films.
People are also enjoying being in a theater
and looking up at the screen and having
What was it like to show your films to
your subjects for the first time?
Neville: I sat in the living room with
[Joanne], in Fred’s TV room, and screened
it. I made a horrible strategic error in that I
sat in front of Joanne, so I couldn’t watch
her watching the film. I just had to sit there
for 90 minutes, terrified as to what her
reaction was going to be. And I turned to
Joanne afterward, and she said, “That was
so great. I didn’t even cry once.” Like, it
made her so happy to see all that come
alive.
The next comment was, “This is so good
for my boys,” because her sons had never
talked publicly before, and it was like a
chance for them to reconnect and take
their father back in some way. And the last
thing she said was, “Fred would love this
film.” So that was a success.
West: There is nothing like watching a
film with an audience around. I was very
grateful that Justice Ginsburg agreed to
see it at Sundance for the first time with
500 people.
People were laughing, and she was very
responsive to that. And, of course, Julie
and I were sitting across the aisle, just
staring at her obsessively. The opening
music is kind of big operatic music, and
she turned to her companion and she said,
“Well, I like the music.” And I turned to
Julie and said, “She likes the music,” and it
went on like that for the whole screening.
What is it like bringing your film to a
festival when you’re seeking distribution?
Tan: You don’t enjoy a single moment.
It’s like, everyone thinks you’re having a
great time, but you’re like, “Ugh.” That’s
the big secret. I mean, it’s costing a lot of
money, and it’s the worst time ever. I had a
great stake in it myself. So therefore, it’s
like, OK, boom or bust.
Wardle: You were going to be totally in
debt if you didn’t sell that film.
Tan: Yeah. I would have died.
Wardle: Like, it was a crazy amount.
She probably won’t say how much, but it
was a crazy amount of money that you
invested going in.
Tan: Yeah, with a bit of help from people and taking loans and stuff and then
worrying if you could pay them back. So,
yeah, it was a nightmare.
So when you were weighing who to go
with, why did Netflix feel like the right
choice?
Tan: Growing up in the place where I
was basically a kid who wasn’t in New York
and L.A. and just having no access to all
the art house movies I wanted to see, I just
wanted this movie to go out to all these
kinds of people around the world who were
like me.
What are the challenges you face in
getting your subjects to open up?
There is a narrative film about Ruth
Bader Ginsburg that just released and
Tom Hanks just finished a film in which
he plays Mr. Rogers. How do you think
your films are connected to those projects?
West: When we started, there was already a screenplay for “On the Basis of
Sex,” which is written by Justice Ginsburg’s nephew. Our film took three years to
make from the time we thought of it to
getting it out. And theirs sort of took more
like, I don’t know, five or six. So it’s somewhat coincidental. Or maybe it is the sense
that people are recognizing the importance of the women’s movement.
Neville: Yeah, and similarly, the Fred
Rogers scripted film had been around for
years and had been close to getting made a
couple of times. I think there are things like
that — just the awareness of the kind of
audience that was hungry for that kind of
thing aligns.
Aren’t they making “Three Identical
Strangers” into a narrative now?
Wardle: They are. If you want to make a
scripted movie, look to documentaries for
ideas!
amy.kaufman@latimes.com
T H U R S D A Y , J A N U A R Y 3 , 2 019
Chai, you and Jimmy struggled with the
ethics of filming Alex Honnold free climb,
with your very presence possibly contributing to a mishap.
Vasarhelyi: The ethical question was:
By filming it, is he more likely to fall to his
death? Are we going to endanger him? Are
we going to drop something, pull off a rock
unintentionally? And we had to sit with it
for a long time.
Where we ended up was that we trusted
Alex and trusted his judgment. And we
also really respected the “why” of what he
does. Alex has thought more deeply about
his own mortality than anyone else I know.
He chooses to climb with no ropes because
that’s how he feels something. And this
idea of living your life with intention was
something that Jimmy and I were very
moved by, and we thought that Alex’s story
could inspire others.
— T IM WARDLE ,
“Three Identical Strangers”
LOS ANGELES TIMES
Was Justice Ginsburg hard to sway?
West: Well, initially she said, “Not yet.”
So she didn’t say no, and then we worked
on it. I think that she understands that she
is inspiring to many people and that her
life story has a lot of lessons for many different people. And I think ultimately that’s
why she agreed to do it and to be open
about both her professional accomplishments and her personal life. She understands the personal’s political.
‘You have to have a plan when you go in....
But you totally have to be open to going off
in all kinds of crazy tangents.’
THE ENVELOPE
How did you convince your subjects to be
a part of your documentaries?
Neville: My pitch was: “I don’t want to
make a biography; I want to make a film
about ideas.” And I think that was the
right thing to say for two reasons: One,
because Joanne Rogers, his widow, said to
me, “Fred always thought if anybody made
a biography of his story it would be the
most boring movie ever made.” But also
because I feel like his ideas were never
taken seriously. He was always treated as a
two-dimensional character. Nobody ever
appreciated the depth of what he was
doing.
Neville: I started as a journalist, and I
know film people don’t like to hear this, but
I always say journalism school is the perfect training to be a documentary filmmaker. Film school is the worst training to
be a documentary filmmaker because film
school is all about what your voice is and
what you want to say, and journalism is
about what you hear, what you’re listening
to. And I feel like our super power is listening, understanding, taking it in and then
figuring out where it goes from there.
Wardle: You have to have a plan when
you go in and know the kind of areas you
want to cover. But you totally have to be
open to going off in all kinds of crazy tangents. If you’ve just got your list of questions, you’re like, “Tick, tick, tick,” you’re
never going to have that connection.
Vasarhelyi: And also, some of the best
moments happen in the silences, in the
gaps and the hesitation.
West: And not jumping in. With Justice
Ginsburg, she is an introvert. Her clerks
would always say that they would count
“one one-thousand, two one-thousand,
three one-thousand, four one-thousand”
before she replies, because she thinks
before she speaks.
S23
this experience with other people in a time
where we’re increasingly more disconnected.
Tan: On the flip side of that — because
I’m the Netflix person who doesn’t get to
have a theatrical thing in a big way — if
you’re slotted under “New Releases” [in the
streamer’s categories] you’re not ghettoized as a documentary. It’s stories. … If you
can grab people’s attention, hold it, you
have something.
THE ENVELOPE
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THE DIRECTORS
‘I LOVE HEARING THE GASPS’
By Glenn Whipp
“WIDOWS” director
Steve McQueen
sees moviegoing
as a shared activity.
S24
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S
teve McQueen isn’t used to moviegoers telling him they want to see
his films again. Though uniformly
excellent, McQueen’s movies are
raw, unsettling and often brutal
examinations of history and the human
condition. One viewing is usually enough
for these demanding endurance tests.
“Certainly, that was the case for
‘Hunger,’ ” McQueen says of his 2008 debut
about a prison hunger strike. “ ‘12 Years a
Slave’ too, for obvious reasons. Maybe
‘Shame’ was something of an exception.
The dog whistles go off in the room for
that.”
But now, with the layered heist-thriller
“Widows,” McQueen has made a film that,
although not a full-blown crowd-pleaser —
it’s a bit too shrewd and stylish to fall under
that umbrella — has been roping people in
for repeat viewings. A remake of a 1983
British limited series that hooked McQueen when he was 13, “Widows” follows a
group of women, led by Viola Davis, carrying out a robbery that their husbands
planned but never completed. (The film’s
title betrays the reason why.)
McQueen, working from a screenplay he
co-wrote with Gillian Flynn (“Gone Girl”),
moved the action to Chicago, weaving in
commentary on income inequity, toxic
masculinity and a broken political system.
We spoke recently about his personal connection to the film.
Why did you connect with “Widows” so
deeply when you were 13?
It was a hard time for black children
growing up in the ’80s, dealing with what
people perceived you were capable of. You
were judged on your appearance. And I
saw this program with these women being
judged and going on a journey and tilting
these stereotypes on their head. It was
thrilling.
Do you remember clearly identifying
with the women?
What happens with black people is that
you get politicized much earlier. Definitely
in the UK, and also in the United States,
depending on where you grow up. You
Carolyn Cole Los Angeles Times
start asking questions at a young age.
What was it like then to return to this
story and these women that you’ve held
so close for 35 years?
Bittersweet. I’ve returned to the story,
and nothing’s changed — other than maybe the conversation that just started with
#MeToo. I suppose that’s something. If
this picture can help advance the conversation, then great. That was never my
intention, however.
What was your intention?
My intention was to make a picture
where the answer to a lot of things is within
us all. What I mean is that you have these
four women from different social and racial
backgrounds and they form a team and
they accomplish a goal. It’s very American,
this story. That’s why I love America.
You’ve got people from all parts of the
world who come together to make this
great country.
I remember rainy days in London, I
would open this book, “Made in the
U.S.A.,” and dream of America. America
was a mecca of freedom and possibilities.
And that’s the foundation of this picture.
The women forget their differences and
accomplish something.
You have a long history with Chicago,
going back to your first museum show at
the Museum of Contemporary Art. What
were your first impressions of the city?
It was 1996, and my girlfriend, who is
now my wife, went to the Democratic
convention when Bill Clinton was president. And, yes, that was my first museum
show. So I always say my first footprint in
Chicago was art and politics.
The racial divisions in the city were
obvious. People looked at my wife [writer
Bianca Stigter, who is white] and I in a
very mistrustful manner. I remember
walking across a bridge with my wife and
some guy knocked into her really hard. I
was fuming. Very odd. Yeah, I remember
that.
What more did you learn about Chicago
making “Widows”?
I didn’t know the geography and the
close proximity between wealth and some
of the poorest parts of America. Doing
research, I’d travel from an amazing
apartment, looking at this man’s collection of Olympic torches, to talking to a
woman who was losing the house where
she had lived for 50 years because she
couldn’t pay the interest on her mortgage.
It was heartbreaking. It messed with my
head, for sure.
Was that the genesis of that three-minute
shot in the film where Colin Farrell’s
politician is being chauffeured home and
we see the neighborhoods changing
through the car window?
It wasn’t planned. We saw the neighborhoods were close and we said, “OK. Let’s
do it like that.” You adapt to the location
and you discover. And because we’re not
seeing Colin in that shot, you lean in. You
listen more. It’s like great radio. What we
see through the car windows gives us a
great deal of information about the divisions of this city. They are enormous.
I’ve seen the movie twice, and on both
occasions the audience audibly gasped
multiple times. Have you heard the
gasps?
I love the gasps. It’s very satisfying. It’s
why I love cinema. I’m not making a picture for someone at home with a laptop.
Going to the cinema is a shared, participatory activity.
What movies have made you gasp?
I saw “North by Northwest” on one of
my first dates with my wife. People stood
at the end and applauded. It was incredible. And then “Beau Travail” by Claire
Denis. You couldn’t find two more different
movies. One is a suspense-thriller, the
other, Claire Denis, an art house … well,
people call it that. I don’t have that distinction. I have good movies and bad movies.
That’s it.
glenn.whipp@latimes.com
BEST PICTURE
B E ST D I R E CTO R B E ST S C R E E N P LAY
PAUL GREENGRASS
T H U R S D A Y , J A N U A R Y 3 , 2 019
PAUL GREENGRASS
LOS ANGELES TIMES
WRITTEN AND DIRECTED BY
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PAUL GREENGRASS HAS MADE THE PERFECT FILM FOR THESE DIFFICULT TIMES.
S25
“‘22 JULY ’ IS DEEPLY FELT,
BRAVE AND MASTERFUL.
”
THE ENVELOPE
latimes.com/envelope
THE CRAFT
THESE VISUAL
EFFECTS COME
IN ALL SHAPES
AND PIXELS
By Daron James
“Avengers: Infinity War”
Dan DeLeeuw
The mantra behind its 2,623 visual
effects shots was “the best idea always
wins,” says DeLeeuw. Fourteen vendors
were tapped to give life to the colossal
project that pitted its famed superheroes
against Thanos, an 8-foot-tall villain
played by Josh Brolin. Motion-capture
technology placed Brolin in the role,
where the team used scans and texture
photos to create the CG-based character.
The size of Thanos was decided from a
digital police lineup of sorts in which each
character was placed next to one other.
“We considered a 16-foot-tall version and
Marvel Studios
AN 8-FOOT Josh Brolin as Thanos.
even a 12-foot-tall version, but the bigger
you get, the less you believe it,” says DeLeeuw.
ith the announcement of the visual effects shortlist last month, the
Oscar race has tightened, leaving 10 contenders to fill five coveted
nomination slots. Among the hopefuls are superhero films, franchise
favorites and heartwarming stories.
But history shows the odds may be stacked against the superhero
hopefuls; only two such films have taken home that prize in the last 40 years, 1978’s
“Superman” and 2004’s “Spider-Man 2.” At the 91st Academy Awards in February, “AntMan and the Wasp,” “Avengers: Infinity War” and “Black Panther” will look to end that
long losing streak not only for the genre but for Marvel Studios.
The trio face stiff competition. Three of the other shortlisted films — “Jurassic World:
Fallen Kingdom,” “Mary Poppins Returns” and “Solo: A Star Wars Story” — come from
franchises that have previously won VFX Oscars. New contenders “Christopher Robin,”
“First Man,” “Ready Player One” and “Welcome to Marwen” are equally immersive stories, each finding a way to make a real-world visual language. Here, the VFX supervisors
on each of the shortlisted films weigh in on their challenges and innovations.
S26
THE ENVELOPE
LOS ANGELES TIMES
T H U R S D A Y , J A N U A R Y 3 , 2 019
W
Film Frame / Marvel Studios
COMMON THEMES of color, material and texture unite “Black Panther.”
“Black Panther” | Geoffrey Baumann
Shooting this film was a unique experience for Baumann as the collaboration
with director Ryan Coogler extended to
multiple departments. “Ryan made sure
we all had common themes of color, material and texture that translated throughout the whole film,” says Baumann. The
visual grammar was cast in authentic
Marvel Studios
MOTION CONTROL lets more of Paul Rudd’s face be seen when he’s small.
“Ant-Man and the Wasp” | Stephane Ceretti
The team relied on previs animation (a
previsualization technique) to guide the
complex workflow behind shrinking and
enlarging its heroes. Specially made props,
miniature sets and macro photography
helped transition real-world environments
into their CG counterparts. Complete 3-D
scans of the actors wearing their superhero
suits allowed visual effects to re-create the
characters in realistic form down to the
wrinkles in their suits when they moved.
“We also shot some motion control on a
green screen so that we could have [star
Paul Rudd] there really playing the part.
There’s a lot more of his face when he’s
small in the film,” says Ceretti.
African cultural references and connected
its production design, costumes and cinematography with the visual effects. The
Wakanda skyline combined mountainous
terrain and the warmer tones of Africa
while staying true to its architecture rather
than the big glass buildings and hard
edges more often found in Western society.
“Christopher Robin”
Chris Lawrence
“Christopher Robin” combined liveaction and CGI to create Winnie the Pooh
and friends. Animators extensively tested
character movements to develop distinct
personalities for each and unique interactions with the world. Characters were
then designed based on toy-like stitching
patterns with some of those stitches looking broken to replicate the wear of old
cloth.
Disney
THE CGI animals in “Christopher
Robin” incorporate toy-like stitching.
“First Man”
Paul Lambert
Daniel McFadden Universal Pictures
“FIRST MAN” used projected digital
footage instead of a green screen.
The idea for “First Man” was to get as
much in camera as possible. “We didn’t
want anything to take you out of the
story,” says Lambert. For its spacecraft
launches, including the death-defying X-15
flight that opens the movie, rather than
have actors reacting to a blank green
screen with effects to be filled in later, a
35-foot-tall, 60-foot-wide, 180-degree circular screen projected digital footage of the
actual flight paths. Miniatures and fullscale builds of certain spacecraft were
used for exterior shots.
Universal Pictures / DreamWorks Pictures
“WELCOME to Marwen” used game engine technology to bring dolls to life.
“Welcome to Marwen” | Kevin Baillie
“Mary Poppins Returns”
Matt Johnson
Disney
tains a sense of real-world physics.
LOS ANGELES TIMES
Jaap Buitendijk Warner Bros. Entertainment
“READY PLAYER One” action re-
“Solo: A Star Wars Story”
Rob Bredow
Universal Pictures
ANIMATRONICS and digital work meld in “Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom.”
calendar@latimes.com
To make “Solo,” a prequel to the original 1977 “Star Wars,” filmmakers
grounded the visual effects in the filmmaking styles of the ’60s and ’70s. It
meant framing camera movements to
those of that era but still using today’s
technology to create them. Such was the
case with the Millennium Falcon. Rather
than having the actors sitting in front of a
green screen, hyperspace was projected
as a real-time effect. “We didn’t tell the
cast the entire plan, and when Donald
Glover [as Lando Calrissian] pushed the
Lucasfilm
“SOLO” replicates the visual effects
of filmmaking of the ’60s and ’70s.
button for the first time, we were able to
cue the screens to go into hyperspace,”
says Bredow.
THE ENVELOPE
formances,” he says. Anatomically correct
models were created and sent to the creature effects team to build full-scale puppets of specific dinosaurs. “Animatronics
can have limitations and lack the subtle
performance of a digital character, while
digital characters can lack a sense of quality. We wanted to find a way to merge
[them] into one realistic experience.”
In Steven Spielberg’s “Ready Player
One,” people escape to the Oasis, a virtual
reality environment, to avoid their own
lives. Photo-realistic landscapes were
powdered with vivid colors while maintaining a sense of real-world physics.
“Creating the Oasis was a brick-by-brick
process where every level of detail was
considered,” says Guyett. Nearly 50 environments were designed from the ground
up for 60-plus minutes of screen time.
T H U R S D A Y , J A N U A R Y 3 , 2 019
“Ready Player One”
Roger Guyett
FULLY 3-D animals were created for
this scene in “Mary Poppins Returns.”
“Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom” | David Vickery
An artful balance between VFX and
creature effects was needed to pull off
“Fallen Kingdom.” “Bringing tennis balls to
set was not an option,” says Vickery of the
old-school method of using a ball on a
string to give actors an idea of where the
creatures will be. “We instead wanted to
find ways to bring in lifelike creatures with
animatronics to add energy to the per-
stage and lighting it to match the real
world of the film’s story. The team then
transplanted the actors’ eyes and mouths
onto the faces of the dolls and added
effects to give them a plastic look. “The
faces of the dolls are driven by the actors’
performances almost pixel for pixel,”
notes Baillie.
S27
A combination of live-action, animation and CGI forms its visual language.
During the song “Can You Imagine
That?” characters visit a fantastical
underwater world where fully 3-D environments and animals were created from
scratch. The VFX team also re-created
1934 London. But computers didn’t make
everything: Poppins’ talking umbrella is a
practical effect controlled remotely.
The challenge of “Welcome to Marwen,” says Baillie, was to bring the dolls to
life through motion capture in a way that
didn’t evoke that disturbing “uncanny
valley” look of being almost human but
not quite there. A new workflow was created through game engine technology
that involved filming the motion-capture
THE ENVELOPE
latimes.com/envelope
THE ENVELOPE LIVE
THE
BRAINS
RULE
LOS ANGELES TIMES
T H U R S D A Y , J A N U A R Y 3 , 2 019
T
he Envelope welcomes a select audience of Hollywood
guild members and awards
voters during the season to
consider some of the year’s
most talked about films and television
with The Envelope Live event series. Each
screening is followed by a Q&A with the
cast and filmmakers moderated by an L.A.
Times journalist. For those of you unable
to attend, The Envelope brings you highlights right here. And for videos of these
sessions, go to latimes.com/screenings.
Recently, Times journalist Chris Barton was joined by directors Darren Foster
and Cristina Costantini, whose documentary “Science Fair” celebrates high school
students who compete at the International Science and Engineering Fair held
every year in L.A. The filmmakers chose
nine participants to follow, including student Robbie Barrat and instructor Serena
McCalla, who joined them at the Envelope
Live event at the Montalbán theater in
Hollywood.
Costantini herself is a former science
fair winner. The ISEF hosts 1,700 students
in competition from 78 different countries.
Michael Owen Baker For The Times
‘There’s obviously a very serious problem from the national
level with the tone that is set about science in this country.
We had that opportunity to go there, but when you have
amazing people and leaders on the local level like Dr.
McCalla, why would you overshadow them?’
— D ARREN F OSTER
THE ENVELOPE
S28
Photographs by
THE PANEL, from left: The Times’ Chris Barton; Darren Foster; Cristina Costantini; Serena McCalla; Robbie Barrat.
INSTRUCTOR Serena McCalla
is among the subjects of the
documentary “Science Fair.”
‘It’s like a
really funny
way to flex
on everyone
else at
science fair.’
‘I felt in high school like the football
players get celebrated all the time and
all the kids who are going to change the
world sometimes don’t get quite the
same reception. We wanted to celebrate
them like rock stars like ISEF does.’
— R OBBIE B ARRAT
— C RISTINA C OSTANTINI
F O R
YO U R
C O N S I D E R AT I O N
WINNER
EUROPEAN FILM AWARDS
BEST EUROPEAN DOCUMENTARY FEATURE
“Communion scores a perfect
10 in drawing out viewer empathy...
There’s an unadorned, direct
quality to everything in the film.”
– Dennis Harvey, Variety
TONIGHT
A film by Anna Zamecka
communion
IN SELECT THEATERS STARTING JANUARY 4
OPENS
TOMORROW
LOS ANGELES:
Laemmle’s Glendale
NEW YORK:
IFC Center
207 N. Maryland Avenue, Glendale, CA 91206
Daily at 1:00, 3:00, 5:20, 7:30 & 9:55.
323 6th Avenue, New York, NY 10014
Plus special screenings at AMC Sunset 5 and Laemmle's Monica Film Center this week.
AMPAS, PGA, DGA, and WGA members: Laemmle Theatres will admit you and a guest to any screening Monday-Thursday, excluding holidays and subject to seating availability.
LOS ANGELES TIMES
T H U R S D A Y , J A N U A R Y 3 , 2 019
at 7:30 pm
at Ahrya Fine Arts
by Laemmle in Beverly
Hills with director
Anna Zamecka
in-person!
THE ENVELOPE
– Caroline Madden, Reverse Shot
See it first
S29
“Zamecka follows her destitute
subjects with a patient and
intimate observational style,
imbuing the narrative with a
palpable tension and touching
upon her film’s many emotional
notes with a quiet grace.”
THE ENVELOPE
latimes.com/envelope
THE GOLD STANDARD | GLENN WHIPP
CRAFT SINGLES CAN ADD UP
O
scar-winning best pictures don’t always vacuum up nominations. “Spotlight,” for example, earned just six. And
movies that pull down a bevy of noms don’t always make the cut for best picture. “Dreamgirls” earned a leading
eight nods in 2007 without punching through the picture and director categories. “Close Encounters of the Third
Kind”? Same thing. Eight nominations, but shut out of best picture. (Damn you, “Goodbye Girl”!) ¶ That said, the
clearest indication of a movie’s strength with Oscar voters is its popularity within the film academy’s various
branches. And on that count, the forecast is excellent for “Black Panther” to become the first superhero movie to
earn a nomination for best picture. ¶ To learn why, let’s look at the likely nominees in the craft categories. Check
off how many times you see “Black Panther” among them while you’re reading.
detail in November, noting that Cuarón
would become the first filmmaker who
doubled as director of photography to
be nominated for his black-and-white,
65mm digital exploration of memory
and nostalgia. He’s a lock, as are Laxton
and Sandgren. The remaining two spots
are up for grabs among the four cinematographers I’ve listed. Each one is
deserving but, for now, I’ll stick with my
original set.
PRODUCTION DESIGN
S30
THE ENVELOPE
LOS ANGELES TIMES
T H U R S D A Y , J A N U A R Y 3 , 2 019
Hannah Beachler and Jay R. Hart, “Black
Panther”
Fiona Crombie and Alice Felton, “The
Favourite”
Eugenio Caballero and Bárbara Enrı quez,
“Roma”
John Myhre and Gordon Sim, “Mary Poppins Returns”
Nathan Crowley and Kathy Lucas, “First
Man”
On the cusp: Mark Friedberg and Kris
Moran, “If Beale Street Could Talk”;
Stuart Craig and Anna Pinnock, “Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald”; Karen Murphy and Ryan Watson,
“A Star Is Born”; James Merifield and
Gina Cromwell, “Mary Queen of Scots”;
Nelson Coates and Andrew Baseman,
“Crazy Rich Asians”
-----------------------------------------------------------------
FILM EDITING
Tom Cross, “First Man”
Alfonso Cuarón and Adam Gough, “Roma”
Jay Cassidy, “A Star Is Born”
Yorgos Mavropsaridis, “The Favourite”
Hank Corwin, “Vice”
On the cusp: Debbie Berman and
Michael P. Shawver, “Black Panther”;
Joe Walker, “Widows”; Barry Alexander
Brown, “BlacKkKlansman”; Wyatt
Smith, “Mary Poppins Returns”; Joi
McMillon and Nat Sanders, “If Beale
Street Could Talk”
Analysis: Period films and the fantasy
movies always dominate this category,
which could put “Beasts” among the
nominees. (Voters went for the series’
first entry.) There’s no shortage of
worthy possibilities, but given the meticulous care and effort the “Roma” team
made in re-creating Alfonso Cuarón’s
childhood home and early ’70s Mexico
City, it’d be a travesty if it wasn’t recognized.
-----------------------------------------------------------------
CINEMATOGRAPHY
Alfonso Cuarón, “Roma”
James Laxton, “If Beale Street Could Talk”
Linus Sandgren, “First Man”
Rachel Morrison, “Black Panther”
Robbie Ryan, “The Favourite”
On the cusp: Matthew Libatique, “A
Star Is Born”; Lukasz Zal, “Cold War”
Analysis: I wrote about this category in
Film Frame / Marvel Studios
A CLEAR SIGN of a movie’s strength with Oscar voters is its popularity
within the academy’s various branches. And “Black Panther” has that down.
Analysis: Oscar obsessives know the
correlation between this category and
best picture, with only 10 movies winning
the academy’s top prize without also
netting an editing nomination. (“Birdman” was the most recent exception in
2015, and it was indeed an exception,
since it was designed to look like it was
shot in a single take.) On that note, I’m
putting three of the year’s leading best
picture contenders here, along with
Corwin’s showy work in “Vice” (he
earned a nomination for 2016’s “The Big
Short”) and Oscar winner Cross’ elaborate editing of the Neil Armstrong film
“First Man.”
COSTUME DESIGN
Ruth E. Carter, “Black Panther”
Sandy Powell, “The Favourite”
Sandy Powell, “Mary Poppins Returns”
Alexandra Byrne, “Mary Queen of Scots”
Colleen Atwood, “Fantastic Beasts: The
Crimes of Grindelwald”
On the cusp: Andrea Flesch, “Colette”;
Julian Day, “Bohemian Rhapsody”; Erin
Benach, “A Star Is Born”; Mary E. Vogt,
“Crazy Rich Asians”; Caroline EselinSchaefer, “If Beale Street Could Talk”;
Jenny Beavan, “The Nutcracker and the
Four Realms”
Analysis: Powell owns 12 nominations
and three Oscars. She’ll probably add
a pair of nods to her haul for the eyepopping “Poppins” and her monochromatic creations for “The Favourite.”
But she might have to cede the Oscar to
two-time nominee Carter for the way she
wove fantastical Afrofuturism into
Wakanda’s world.
On the cusp: “Mary Poppins Returns,”
“Bohemian Rhapsody,” “Ready Player
One,” “Incredibles 2,” “Mission Impossible: Fallout”
MAKEUP AND
HAIRSTYLING
“Vice”
“Black Panther”
“Mary Queen of Scots”
--------------------------------------------------------------------
On the cusp: “Border,” “Suspiria,” “Bohemian Rhapsody,” “Stan & Ollie”
Analysis: Last year, this Oscar went to
the team who transformed Gary Oldman
into Winston Churchill. Christian Bale’s
metamorphosis is no less striking in
“Vice,” but that would feel repetitive.
Besides, all of the braids, locs and twists
in “Black Panther” were central to its
story and its celebration of black culture.
--------------------------------------------------------------------
SOUND EDITING
“First Man”
“A Star Is Born”
“A Quiet Place”
“Roma”
“Black Panther”
SOUND MIXING
some remarkable, immersive work this
year including the sparse, narrativedriving soundscapes in “A Quiet Place”
and the intricate and detailed environments in “Roma.” Last year, the categories matched. Let’s do it again.
--------------------------------------------------------------------
“A Star Is Born”
“First Man”
“A Quiet Place”
“Black Panther”
“Roma”
VISUAL EFFECTS
On the cusp: “Mary Poppins Returns,”
“Bohemian Rhapsody,” “Ready Player
One,” “Incredibles 2,” “Mission Impossible: Fallout”
Analysis: These two categories don’t
always overlap, with music-heavy movies
sometimes figuring more prominently in
the mixing category. (The editor collects
the film’s sounds, including dialogue and
effects; the mixer determines how the
audience hears those sounds.) There’s
“Black Panther”
“Avengers: Infinity War”
“Mary Poppins Returns”
“First Man”
“Ready Player One”
On the cusp: “Ant-Man and the Wasp,”
“Christopher Robin,” “Jurassic World:
Fallen Kingdom,” “Solo: A Star Wars
Story,” “Welcome to Marwen”
Analysis: Probably a battle between two
of the Marvel movies — “Avengers: Infinity
War” and “Black Panther.” Look for
T’Challa to get the best of Thanos in this
contest.
“BEAUTIFULLY SHOT AND ACTED”
NPR
FILMWEEK
FOR YOUR CONSIDERATION
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ZWART FILM
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Deadline
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S31
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glenn.whipp@latimes.com; Twitter: @glennwhipp
FOR
YOUR
CONSIDER ATION
Best Picture
Best Original Score
Best Original Song
Carter Burwell
“When a Cowboy Trades His Spurs for Wings”
Written by Gillian Welch and David Rawlings
Performed by Willie Watson and Tim Blake Nelson
!!!!
LARIOUS, EA
IFULLY
“
AN
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AD
NJOYABLE.”
TH UARDIAN
“CARTE
CARTER BURWELL
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ANOTHE
UPER
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VENICE FILM
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F O R
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WINNER•BEST PICTURE
T1
ALFONSO CUARÓN
THE ENVELOPE
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YALITZA APARICIO
“YALITZA APARICIO GIVES
THE BEST PERFORMANCE
OF THE YEAR.”
STEPHANIE ZACHAREK,
“YALITZA APARICIO’S
PERFORMANCE DOMINATES
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Yalitza Aparicio possesses what only true movie stars have —
a unique amalgam of magnetism, fearlessness and craft.”
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MARINA DE TAVIRA
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EXQUISITE.
It is
filmmaking on the highest level.”
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T4
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BEST DIRECTING • WRITING
CINEMATOGRAPHY
ALFONSO CUARÓN
“THE BEST PICTURE
OF THE YEAR.
Alfonso Cuarón’s masterpiece.
Breathtaking and life-giving.”
RICHARD LAWSON,
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