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2019-01-01 Los Angeles Times

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$2.75 DESIGNATED AREAS HIGHER
© 2019
latimes.com
TUESDAY, JANUARY 1, 2019
GOP
feeling
health
law’s
sting
Tired of
sitting,
she told
her tale
‘Dreamer’ leaves her
comfort zone, joining
a new wave of young
immigrant activists.
After years of working
to gut Obamacare,
some Republicans
now pledge to save its
most popular benefits.
By Jazmine Ulloa
MODESTO — Gabriela
Cruz, who was brought to
the U.S. illegally when she
was 1, couldn’t vote, but in
the final hours before the
Nov. 6 election, she was making one last run to get people
to the polls.
The sun was setting in
Modesto when she found
Ronald Silva, 41, smoking a
cigarette on a tattered old
couch behind a group home.
He politely tried to wave her
off until she reminded him
he had a right that she as an
immigrant without citizenship didn’t have.
“It could really make a
change for us,” said Cruz, 29.
Half an hour later, she
was helping Silva look up
candidates as he filled out
his ballot by the light of her
phone. “I’m glad you guys
came,” he said. “I was going
to leave it in my drawer.”
Young
immigrants,
known as “Dreamers,” have
become a political force over
the last two decades as they
have pushed Congress to
overhaul the nation’s immigration laws. Part of a new
wave of immigrant activists
who mobilized this year to
return control of the House
to Democrats, Cruz and others in the movement see in
President Trump an existential threat to their futures,
and to their friends and family.
Less than a year ago,
Cruz had a steady job at a
mortgage bank, with health
benefits and a retirement
plan. She wanted to go back
to college and dreamed of
buying her own house.
But when Trump instituted a travel ban, tightened
immigration enforcement
[See Dreamer, A10]
By Jennifer Haberkorn
Rich Pedroncelli Associated Press
GOV. JERRY BROWN surveys his ranch in rural Colusa County. The governor, who will leave office Jan.
7, will turn his efforts to blocking a 2020 ballot measure that would rewrite parts of his parole overhaul.
Reflecting on his legacy,
Brown eyes work ahead
It’s unclear what the California governor will do after
he leaves office, but retirement seems far from likely
By John Myers
COLUSA
COUNTY,
Calif. — Deep in the recesses
of Jerry Brown’s mind, there
seems to be an anecdote or a
philosopher’s teaching for
most every quandary faced
by an elected official.
Which explains why on a
chilly December morning,
after fussing with the fireplace in his rural Colusa
County ranch home, a discussion of his historic tenure
as governor turned to his
Yale Law School studies in
the early 1960s.
Settling into a comfortable chair with a cup of coffee, Brown likened a lesson
Associated Press
IN 1975, Brown was sworn in for his first
term as governor. He evolved from an erratic,
idealistic leader to “the adult in the room.”
learned in governing to the
teachings
of
Friedrich
“Fritz” Kessler, a Yale professor who specialized in
contract law.
“He had a German accent and he always said, ‘For
every principle, there is a
counterprinciple!’ ” Brown
said, mimicking Kessler by
adding a gravelly tone to his
own raspy voice. He smiled
slightly at his effort.
The point — in a way that
only Brown would make it —
is that things work until they
don’t. The more you know,
the better you’re prepared.
Or as he routinely tells audiences in a self-deprecating
nod to his age as the state’s
[See Brown, A7]
Goats provide South Africa
with climate change buffer
By Krista Mahr
Tim Bradbury Getty Images
STEVE ALFORD , shown in his last game as UCLA’s
basketball coach, never seemed comfortable here.
UCLA basketball
should recruit its
own rock-star coach
BILL PLASCHKE
Firing Steve
Alford was the
easy part.
Finding a
marquee
replacement
for a onceproud program that has
become ignored and irrelevant is
going to be the hard part.
UCLA axed its embattled basketball coach in a
rare midseason change late
Sunday, a day after a 15point loss to Liberty in front
of fans who filled Pauley
Pavilion with boos. While
the move mercifully ended
Alford’s five-plus-year tenure, one marked by consistent underachievement
despite three Sweet 16 appearances, the Bruins’ real
challenge lies ahead.
They have to convince a
NCUNJANA, South Africa — Mvezelwa Mhlabunzima stands in a wooden pen
of a hundred or so shaggy
young goats and points out
his charges, one by one.
“This one’s a twin,” he says,
gesturing to a kid leaning
into his leg. He points to two
others. “That one’s a twin,
with that one ... I know them
all.”
The 35-year-old farmer in
the arid mountains of South
Africa’s
KwaZulu-Natal
province gnaws on a red
plastic coffee straw with the
look of a harried parent. His
young goats are getting antibiotic injections, and there’s
a nervous energy in the
bleating crowd of brown,
black and white kids.
A few clamber up the
sides of the wooden pen, as if
seeking an escape route into
the grazing land beyond, an
expanse of spindly acacia
trees and short, scrubby
green grass.
For Mhlabunzima, who
came to help run his family
farm after losing his job in
Johannesburg, these goats
are bringing much-needed
stability to the business,
which has been at the mercy
of the region’s increasingly
unpredictable weather.
The farm lost dozens of
head of cattle — and thousands of dollars in income —
in a drought from 2014 to 2017.
At one point, Mhlabunzima’s family herd went from
60 cows to 10. Other farms in
the area also lost up to 80%
of their herds.
South Africans are coming to grips with how their
[See South Africa, A4]
worthy candidate they can
provide an environment
that will empower him to
restore glory to a championship culture that has
clearly lost its way.
I never thought I would
write this, but the stark
reality is that coaching the
UCLA men’s basketball
team is not a great job.
Your bosses seem to care
more about football. Your
arena sits mostly quiet and
half-empty. Your recruiting
efforts rarely benefit from
the legend of John Wooden
because most of today’s
prospects have never heard
[See Plaschke, A4]
UCLA dismisses
Alford as coach
His tenure with the
men’s basketball team is
over after five-plus
seasons. SPORTS, D1
WASHINGTON — Republicans in Congress, fresh
off an election that punished
their party for opposing
healthcare protections, now
worry that a recent federal
court ruling undermining
Obamacare
could
give
Democrats new ammunition for 2020, and they’re
scrambling to thwart any attacks.
Particularly in the Senate, some Republicans want
to prove to voters that they
will protect popular benefits
mandated by President
Obama’s signature 2010 law,
especially insurance coverage for people with preexisting medical conditions.
They are eager to neutralize
an issue that Democrats
effectively used in the
midterm election to gain a
net 40 House seats and take
control of the chamber.
“I think it would be in our
best interest as Republicans
to assure the public that
[on] the issues like preexisting conditions, staying
on your parents’ insurance
until age 26 and things like
that, we’re committed,” said
Sen. Shelley Moore Capito,
who is up for reelection in
West Virginia in 2020.
Republican senators, including Sen. John Barrasso
of Wyoming, are discussing
what healthcare legislation
they could introduce next
year that would allow Republicans to show support
for preexisting conditions
protections. One possibility
is legislation to address the
court decision, in which federal District Judge Reed
O’Connor of Texas ruled two
weeks ago that the entire
healthcare law should be
struck down.
In the ruling, widely criticized by legal scholars,
O’Connor said Congress’
2017 decision to repeal the
law’s mandate requiring individuals to have health insurance meant that the
entire law needed to be
scrapped. O’Connor on Sunday said the law could remain in place until the appeals process was completed.
Although the suit before
O’Connor was initiated by
Republican state officials,
reflecting the party’s longstanding vow to repeal Obamacare, the law’s increased
popularity has some Repub[See Obamacare, A6]
Scott Eisen Getty Images
Inching toward
presidential run
Democratic Sen. Elizabeth Warren announces an exploratory committee for the
2020 race. NATION, A5
U.S. citizen
held in Moscow
Russia says the American was detained amid
an “espionage mission.” WORLD, A3
Mel Melcon Los Angeles Times
B R R R I NG O N T H E RO SE PA R A DE
Bryan Rendon and Erika Ramos of Pasadena stay warm on the Rose Parade
route. It’s expected to be a windy and cold New Year’s Day. CALIFORNIA, B1
Weather
Sunny and windy.
L.A. Basin: 61/38. B6
A2
TU E S DAY , JA N UA RY 1, 2019
LAT IMES. C OM
ANALYSIS
Global challenges in 2019
Trade, politics, war and divorce are among issues in several countries
By Times staff
No one could have predicted half the major global developments of 2018. President Trump sitting down
with North Korea’s Kim
Jong Un? French workers
rising up by the hundreds of
thousands, all wearing DayGlo yellow vests? The world
transfixed by the rescue of a
dozen Thai boys in a cave?
So we exercise caution
here in casting an eye forward to likely global trends
in 2019. The Times’ network
of global correspondents
takes a look at what’s looming in nine countries around
the world in the new year:
China
The U.S.-China trade
war has brought China’s
economic slowdown into
sharp relief. Chinese authorities will need to address heavy debt, weak
growth and a loss of consumer confidence in the
coming year. How they do so
depends in part on the trade
talks with the U.S., which
are on a deadline for March
1.
Trust is deteriorating in
the meantime, with cybersecurity concerns, accusations of espionage and
detention of civilians on
both sides (Canada has also
been drawn into the fray).
China sees U.S. policy as
unpredictable, decided by a
White House seeming at
odds with multiple parts of
its own government.
China, on the other
hand, seems to be on a fixed
path of consolidating Communist Party control. Xi
Jinping’s recent speech on
the 40th anniversary of
Deng Xiaoping’s economic
reforms confirmed that,
with its emphasis on party
correctness and no mention
of new reforms. China’s
focus on “maintaining stability” is likely to drive domestic policies as well, with
continued restriction of
religious minorities, civil
society, labor unions and
the press.
— Alice Su
Nigeria
Nigeria, Africa’s most
populous nation, goes to the
polls in high-stakes elections on Feb. 16, a vote that
comes as the country grapples with a volatile economy,
rising poverty and unrelenting insecurity as the militant group Boko Haram
holds its ground.
The incumbent, President Muhammadu Buhari,
is a former military leader
who vowed to defeat Boko
Haram when he was elected
in 2015; but the militant
Islamist group, while weakened, continues to stage
deadly attacks in the nation’s northeast as underresourced troops grow
weary.
With more than 70 presidential candidates expected
to run, Buhari’s biggest
competition in next year’s
polls will be opposition
leader and former Vice
President Atiku Abubakar,
now a successful businessman who promises to alleviate poverty and create jobs.
It’s expected to be a close
contest that observers say
could be a turning point for
one of Africa’s most powerful nations. If the vote is fair
and peaceful, it could solidify Nigeria’s place as one of
the continent’s strongest
democracies. If election day
is instead marred by fraud
and violence, the country
risks sliding into deeper
instability — and dragging
its neighbors down with it.
— Krista Mahr
India
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He is India’s most charismatic politician in a generation, and for 4½ years he
has ruled with a swagger
that captivated Indians who
have long believed their
country wasn’t taken seriously enough on the world
stage. But Prime Minister
Narendra Modi’s hype
seems to have caught up
with him.
His 2016 decision to cancel the two most valuable
currency notes looks increasingly like a colossal
blunder. Relations with
nuclear-armed rival Pakistan are at an ebb. And
Modi has been silent as
partisans and officials of his
Hindu nationalist party are
implicated in hate crimes
against minority Muslims.
In December, Modi’s
party lost control of three
state assemblies, portending a tougher-than-ex-
Daniel Leal-Olivas AFP/Getty Images
BRITAIN is to formally leave the European Union on March 29, but given how
challenging the Brexit negotiations have been to date, nothing is yet guaranteed.
Getty Images
MEXICO’S new presi-
dent faces high expectations on his pledges.
Russia
Korea Summit Press Pool
THE LEADERS of North and South Korea meet in
April 2018. It remains to be seen whether North Korea will take meaningful steps to denuclearize.
pected battle for him to
retain power in nationwide
elections in May. His opponents are divided and lack a
leader of his stature. But
even if Modi wins again, his
allure as a statesman and
reformer has faded.
— Shashank Bengali
Israel
The new year promises
legal, political and security
challenges for Israeli Prime
Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, who is facing reelection in 2019.
More than any other
foreign leader, Netanyahu
tethered his nation’s fortunes to President Trump, a
strategy whose wisdom was
called into doubt after the
surprise announcement of
the withdrawal of American
troops from Syria, where
they have supported Israel’s
efforts to counter Iranian
entrenchment.
In addition, Netanyahu’s
indictment in several corruption cases seems inevitable. After more than a
year of investigation, the
police and the state attorney recommended he be
charged, and leading jurists
believe there is no realistic
possibility of avoiding prosecution.
At year’s end, Netanyahu
was forced to confront the
fact that he could no longer
hold together his ruling
coalition. He dissolved
parliament and called new
elections for April 9.
— Noga Tarnopolsky
Syria
When President Trump
announced his pullout from
Syria last month, he reaffirmed a growing sense that
the civil war raging through
the country, which has
killed hundreds of thousands and made Syria a
byword for suffering, is
finally winding down.
Yet for many of the belligerents, the war is not over.
The government of President Bashar Assad, at its
strongest since the conflict
began in 2011, insists it will
again control every inch of
Syria. It has ousted its rebel
adversaries from almost all
their areas. The announcement by the United Arab
Emirates that it was reopening its embassy in
Damascus sent a signal that
even Assad’s former foes
consider him the victor.
But it now faces a more
complicated challenge in
Turkey, with much of northern Syria in its grip. And in
the desert, Islamic State,
defeated but not vanquished, awaits the opportunity to rise again.
— Nabih Bulos
Mexico
If Mexico is indeed facing
a fundamental “transformation” — as new President
Andres Manuel Lopez
Obrador has vowed — then
2019 should be the year when
the country begins to head
in a more positive direction.
Lopez Obrador took
office Dec. 1 for a six-year
term, becoming Mexico’s
first avowedly leftist president in a generation. His
grandiose campaign promises included pledges to
reduce soaring crime, eliminate long-ingrained corruption, address deep social
inequalities and spur the
country’s sluggish economy.
It is a sweeping agenda.
Many are pessimistic that
the new administration can
pull it off — despite effective
majorities in both houses of
the Mexican Congress.
The business community
remains leery of Lopez
Obrador’s populist pronouncements. He does
appear to have charmed
President Trump. The two
populists from different
ends of the ideological spectrum seem to get along well,
at least for now.
His biggest challenge
will be fulfilling newly
stirred hopes that Mexico
can be a better place for its
citizens. Expectations are
high.
— Patrick J. McDonnell
Koreas
After a year of historic
breakthroughs and celebratory photo ops, the Korean
peninsula heads into 2019 in
something of a waiting
game: Will North Korea take
meaningful steps to
denuclearize?
That question is complicated by the fact that there’s
disagreement on what
“denuclearization” even
means — North Korea’s
state-run news agency
published a statement last
month contending it meant
not only its relinquishing of
nuclear weapons but also
the removal of the U.S.
arsenal in the region.
While talks between the
U.S. and North Korea have
stalled, South Korea’s liberal government is trying its
best to continue engaging
with its neighbor to the
north while not running
afoul of its U.S. ally or of
economic sanctions designed to pressure North
Korea.
Projects to link up
railways and roadways,
jointly host the Olympics in
2032 and provide humanitarian aid are all underway.
Those efforts may be threatened in the new year by
criticisms within South
Korea of President Moon
Jae-in as being unable to fix
domestic economic problems while his attention is
consumed by the North.
On the North Korean
side, experts say that it
remains to be seen whether
strict economic sanctions
are making a significant
dent on a domestic economy that had been much
improved under Kim Jong
Un’s rule. If they are, it could
force North Korea back to
the table.
— Victoria Kim
Russian President Vladimir Putin may be facing one
of the most serious political
challenges of his career in
2019. But this time, the
Kremlin leader’s obstacles
aren’t coming from abroad
by way of sanctions or diplomatic standoffs. Putin’s
biggest problem in 2019 may
be his own people’s anger
and frustrations.
Putin’s approval ratings
dropped significantly after
he introduced controversial
pension reforms in the
summer. Thousands of
Russians took to the streets
to protest the move, saying
that by raising the retirement age, the Kremlin was
planning to fund depleting
budget revenues at the
people’s expense. Public
opinion polls — which the
Kremlin is said to watch
very closely — showed that
only 39% of Russians surveyed in October considered
Putin a politician they could
trust. That’s a 20-percentage-point drop from the
response to the same question a year ago.
Dissatisfaction rippled
across the country. In fall
elections, Putin’s ruling
party, United Russia, lost
several local races for the
first time, signaling that the
Kremlin may be losing
power in the regions. Meanwhile, economic growth has
almost flatlined, inflation is
rising, and incomes are
stagnant. Put together, it
could be a perfect storm for
larger protests against the
Kremlin. But that, some
observers warn, could be an
impetus for Putin to crack
down harder on dissent.
— Sabra Ayres
Britain
After decades of membership and years of fraught
debate, 2019 is expected to
be the year that Britain
finally leaves the European
Union.
Brexit is scheduled to
formally take effect March
29, but given how challenging the negotiations have
been to date, nothing is yet
guaranteed. The first three
months of the year will be
critical to ensuring that
timeline goes according to
plan. As soon as the holidays are over, British Prime
Minister Theresa May will
summon her Cabinet back
together in preparation for
lawmakers voting on her
Brexit divorce deal in the
week of Jan. 14.
The deal has already
been approved by the other
27 EU members but also
needs to win passage in the
British Parliament. If it
passes, the way ahead looks
clear for May, who has
vowed to honor the results
of the 2016 referendum,
which saw 52% of the country vote to leave the EU.
If it fails, the path ahead
for May, the country and
Brexit is far from certain
and calls will grow louder
for a second referendum or
a general election in order
to put the Brexit decision
back into the hands of the
people.
— Christina Boyle
T UESDAY , JANUARY 1, 2019
L AT I ME S . CO M
A3
THE WORLD
Trump committed to Syria pullout
President is not giving
up on his plan despite
mixed signals, though
timetable may change.
By Eli Stokols
and Nabih Bulos
WASHINGTON — President Trump’s already confusing policies toward Syria
have become even more difficult to parse, both in Washington and in the region convulsed by nearly eight years
of civil war, after a flurry of
contradictory statements
over the last 72 hours.
On Sunday, Trump met
with Sen. Lindsey Graham
(R-S.C.), a vocal critic of the
president’s plan to pull
troops out of Syria. After the
meeting, Graham said he
“felt a lot better” about the
situation, describing the
withdrawal plan as being “in
a pause situation.”
Graham later outlined
three conditions he said
Trump had set down for a
full withdrawal: permanent
destruction of the Islamic
State militants; protection
for Syria’s Kurds, whose militias have been the main
U.S. ally in the fight against
Islamic State; and curbs on
Iran. Those requirements
would be extremely difficult
to meet.
On Monday, Trump
tweeted praise for himself,
claiming he should be getting more plaudits for the
decision to pull out — a move
that has spooked Republican foreign policy hawks and
prompted Defense Secretary James N. Mattis’ sudden resignation.
In his tweets, the president alluded for the first
time to a timetable that
could be slower than the 30day withdrawal he first suggested.
“If anybody but Donald
Trump did what I did in Syria, which was an ISIS loaded
mess when I became President, they would be a national hero,” Trump wrote,
referring to Islamic State.
“ISIS is mostly gone,
we’re slowly sending our
troops back home to be with
their families, while at the
same time fighting ISIS
remnants.”
According to multiple administration officials, however, neither Graham’s comments nor Trump’s tweet
mean that the president is
abandoning his plan to withdraw the 2,000 U.S. troops
from Syria.
What remains unsettled
is how and when the with-
Delil Souleiman AFP/Getty Images
AFTER President Trump announced he was withdrawing troops from Syria, Kurdish fighters invited the Syrian army to move into Man-
bij. Syrian troops advanced to the Syrian city’s outskirts, but no farther, apparently to avoid clashes with U.S. forces, one group said.
drawal will take place, matters that national security
advisor John Bolton will
take up with the leaders of
Israel and Turkey when he
travels to the region for
meetings this week. The administration’s special representative for Syria, James
Jeffrey, is scheduled to accompany Bolton.
In the region, meanwhile,
all the warring factions already have begun repositioning themselves for a Syria without the United States
— while keeping an eye on
the mixed signals from
Washington.
Iran, which sees Syria as
a crucial link to its allies in
Lebanon, stands to gain
from having U.S. forces out
of the area. Its officials expressed satisfaction with
Trump’s move.
A U.S. withdrawal will
lead to “strengthening stability in the region,” Maj.
Gen. Mohammad Bagheri,
the Iranian armed forces
chief of staff, said.
“America’s withdrawal
from Syrian territories is a
humiliating
retreat
for
Washington, which had put
its forces in Syria without
the permission of its government or people,” he said.
“Americans cause chaos
everywhere they go,” he added.
By contrast, America’s
main ally in the Syrian fighting, the Kurdish militia
groups, have much to fear.
Under U.S. protection,
the Kurds have carved out a
de facto state covering a
large swath of northern and
eastern Syria, territory that
includes roughly 90% of the
country’s gas as well as essential water and hydroelectric resources. But they fear
attack from Turkey, which is
also a U.S. ally, but which
sees the Kurds as a national
security threat because of
the large Kurdish minority
in its territory.
The Kurdish areas are
now under threat from all
sides, which has caused
Kurdish militia leaders to
move closer to Syria’s president, Bashar Assad, who is
allied with Iran and Russia
and whose forces the U.S.
has fought.
Protecting the Kurds has
been a chief concern for U.S.
military officials and for
Graham.
After his meeting Sunday, Graham suggested that
Trump would slow down the
withdrawal to make sure the
Kurds were not harmed.
“I think we’re in a pause
situation where we are reevaluating what’s the best
way to achieve the president’s objective of having
people pay more and do
more,” Graham said, refer-
ring to Trump’s call for Middle Eastern countries to pay
the cost of rebuilding Syria.
The meeting allowed
both Graham and Trump
some degree of political cover — a chance for the senator
to dial back his harsh criticism of Trump’s policy and
for the president to appear
more measured and strategic after reports that he had
impulsively agreed to the
troop withdrawal in a phone
call in mid-December with
Turkish President Recep
Tayyip Erdogan, shocking
his own advisors.
But the vague statements from both camps created additional confusion
about the administration’s
intentions, which are often
subject to uncertainty and
second-guessing
given
Trump’s penchant for blustery, sometimes self-contradicting statements.
“It’s more that Trump is
assuring him that there is a
plan and less that there is a
change to the idea that
troops are coming out,” said
Jim Hanson, a Trump ally
and president of the Security Studies Group think tank.
Trump’s surprise announcement shortly before
Christmas of a withdrawal
from Syria came in the form
of a tweeted declaration of
victory over Islamic State
and then a video message
from the Rose Garden. Since
then, advisors from the Pentagon and the National Security Council have been
briefing the president on
various options for engineering the pullout, administration officials said.
One such meeting took
place on Air Force One last
week as the president flew
home after making an unannounced visit to U.S. troops
stationed in Iraq, a U.S. official said, speaking on condition of anonymity because
he was not authorized to discuss the topic on the record.
In GOP national security
circles, some are unconvinced by Graham’s rhetoric
reversal and, like Mattis and
other outspoken former generals, remain frustrated
with the president’s decision
to withdraw forces from Syria, no matter how slowly it
may be carried out.
“It’s still a disaster, no
matter how they try and present it,” said one senior Republican national security
advisor on Capitol Hill, who
was also not authorized to
comment by name.
Already, the impact can
be seen on the ground. Last
week, after Trump’s initial
announcement,
Kurdish
fighters invited the Syrian
army to move into their positions in the northern Syrian
city of Manbij.
By Monday, government
troops had advanced to
Manbij’s outskirts, but no
farther, apparently to avoid
clashes with U.S. forces, according to the Syrian Observatory
for
Human
Rights, a pro-opposition
watchdog group.
The pending U.S. withdrawal has also caused a
warming of ties between
Assad’s government in Syria
and officials in Iraq, its
neighbor to the east.
Iraqi Prime Minister Adel
Abdul Mahdi, whom Trump
did not meet on his trip to
Iraq, said Sunday that he
was dispatching a delegation to Damascus to ramp
up coordination between
the two countries’ forces
battling the remaining pockets of Islamic militants along
their shared border.
The two countries are
also agreeing to cross-border airstrikes by their respective warplanes, officials
said, with the first such
strike occurring Monday, according to Iraqi state media.
eli.stokols@latimes.com
nabih.bulos@latimes.com
Stokols reported from
Washington and Bulos from
Amman, Jordan. Times
staff writers Tracy
Wilkinson and Noah
Bierman in Washington
contributed to this report.
Russia holds American accused of spying
The case comes amid
espionage trial in U.S.,
Ukraine tension and
the Mueller inquiry.
By Laura King
WASHINGTON — A U.S.
citizen’s detention in Moscow on suspicion of espionage could be the opening
gambit in a Cold War-style
spy drama — one overshadowed by a young Russian
woman’s pending sentencing in the United States and
the ongoing Russia investigation by special counsel
Robert S. Mueller III.
Russia’s domestic security agency, the FSB, announced Monday that an
American identified as Paul
Whelan was taken into custody on Friday and a criminal investigation had been
opened against him. The
brief statement said Whelan
was detained amid an “espionage mission,” but provided no details.
In Russia, a conviction
for spying could carry a 20year prison sentence.
Russia’s Foreign Ministry said American authorities had been notified of the
detention, and the U.S. Embassy in Moscow referred
queries to the State Department. The department said
the U.S. had requested consular access.
The episode coincides
with a fraught period for
U.S.-Russia relations. In addition to the Mueller inquiry,
Wei wei Imaginechina
THE U.S. Embassy in Moscow. Russia’s domestic security agency announced
Monday that American Paul Whelan was detained amid an “espionage mission.”
which has been yielding a
growing trove of indictments, tensions have been
running high over recent developments in Ukraine, including Russia’s seizure of
two Ukrainian warships in
November, and Moscow’s
role in the war in Syria.
The FSB announcement
raised immediate speculation about the case of
Maria Butina, a Russian national who made a plea deal
with U.S. prosecutors and
pleaded guilty last month in
Washington to conspiracy
charges.
Butina, who agreed to cooperate with U.S. investiga-
tors, acknowledged she had
worked to infiltrate politically conservative organizations like the National Rifle
Assn., working as an unregistered foreign agent on behalf of the Russian government.
The felony charge that
the 30-year-old pleaded
guilty to carries a five-year
prison term, but the estimated sentencing guidelines are considerably lighter: zero to six months in
prison. After being freed,
Butina would face deportation.
Retired
CIA
official
Steven L. Hall, a former
head of Russia operations in
Moscow, suggested a link between that case and the accusations against Whelan.
“The Russians LOVE reciprocity,” he wrote on Twitter. “Think Maria Butina.”
Russia has sent mixed
signals on the Butina case.
President Vladimir Putin
has said she is not known to
any of the country’s spy
agencies. But after the former graduate student’s arrest, Russia’s Foreign Ministry spearheaded a highprofile social media campaign in her defense, characterizing her as a political
prisoner and at one point us-
ing her image as its Twitter
avatar.
Little was immediately
known about Whelan — even
the English-language spelling of his name was not certain. That rendering came
not from the FSB’s announcement but from the
English-language service of
Russia’s official Tass news
agency.
A number of Russians
have been indicted by
Mueller as part of his ongoing investigation of links
between Russia and the
Donald Trump campaign,
although none of those
charged was in the U.S. and
there is little prospect of
them ever standing trial.
In July, Mueller indicted
12 Russian intelligence officers in connection with cyberattacks including the
2016 hacking of the Democratic National Committee
and the presidential campaign of Hillary Clinton.
Those charges constituted
the clearest and most detailed accusations yet by
U.S. investigators regarding
Russian interference in the
2016 vote.
Nearly a year ago, an additional 13 Russians and
three Russian companies
were charged in connection
with
election-tampering.
Those charges also centered
on Russian efforts to aid the
Trump campaign.
The Kremlin has denied
any state-directed interference in the 2016 election, and
Trump has denied any coordination with Moscow on the
part of his campaign. But
Trump’s presidency has
been colored by his continued dismissal of U.S. intelligence findings on Russia’s
interference, and by his
striking public deferrals to
Putin, most notably following a summit in July in Helsinki, Finland.
Over the last 18 months,
the president has taken to
Twitter hundreds of times to
angrily denounce Mueller’s
investigation as a politically
motivated “witch hunt.”
Western nations moved
to punish Moscow after the
2014 annexation of the Crimean peninsula, imposing a
range of sanctions against
individuals and corporate
entities. The poisoning in
March, on British soil, of
turncoat Russian spy Sergei
Skripal and his daughter
drew another round of diplomatic reprisals.
The pair survived the poisoning with a military-grade
nerve agent, and Russia issued months of aggrieved
denials of involvement even
after painstakingly reconstructed British surveillance showed two Russian
agents making their way to
the town of Salisbury, where
the attack took place.
On Sunday, Putin conveyed a New Year’s greeting
to Trump, in which he called
Russian-U.S. ties the key
factor in ensuring “strategic
stability and international
security.”
laura.king@latimes.com
Times staff writer Tracy
Wilkinson in Washington
contributed to this report.
A4
T U E S DAY , JA N UA RY 1, 2 019
L AT I M E S . C O M
Help from goats as climate changes
[South Africa, from A1]
environment and lives are
shifting in the changing climate, as are people across
the globe.
Climate change is already affecting agriculture
in many vulnerable countries, posing a widespread
threat to food security, according to the United
Nations. Farmers in some
drought-stricken nations
such as India are abandoning crops now deemed unsuitable as productivity and
farmers’ incomes fall.
In southern Africa, temperatures have been increasing since the middle of
the last century and are projected to rise drastically
across the region by the end
of this one, according to the
Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, a government research body. That’s
creating huge challenges for
South Africa’s vital agricultural industry, with smallscale cattle farmers hit particularly hard by intensifying dry spells.
Goats could be part of
the answer.
Veld goats, native to
South Africa, aren’t worth as
much as cattle per head, but
they fare better in long periods of dry, unforgiving
weather, and their populations recover faster. They
also have a taste for the trees
and bushes that have been
impinging on local grasslands, shrinking the space
where cattle can graze.
The impact of climate
change is already noticeable
throughout South Africa,
says Guy Midgley, a global
change researcher and professor at Stellenbosch University. As in California, the
intensity of wildfires has
been increasing. Dry periods, including the severe
drought that brought Cape
Town to the brink of having
to turn off residents’ taps,
have been getting longer,
while rainfall when it comes
has become intense, causing
more damage.
As for the grasslands, an
iconic landscape that extends across southern Africa, scientists believe the rising levels of carbon dioxide
in the atmosphere, which
the United Nations says
reached record levels in 2017,
are taking a toll.
For millions of years,
southern Africa’s grasslands have thrived in a relatively low carbon dioxide environment, replenished by
natural fires that have kept
trees and shrubs in their vicinity small. But as carbon
dioxide levels have risen,
those trees and shrubs that
thrive on the greenhouse gas
Krista Mahr For The Times
NATIVE goats fare better than cattle in South Africa’s long periods of dry, unforgiving weather, and their
populations recover faster. They also help clear the trees and bushes that have been impinging on grasslands.
SWAZILAND
SOUTH
AFRICA
KWAZULU-NATAL
Detailed
Ncunjana
Bloemfontein
LESOTHO
Sources: Nextzen, OpenStreetMap
have grown faster while the
grasses receded.
In South Africa, more
than 20,000 square miles of
grasslands have been replaced by woodlands since
1990, according to a survey
by the South African National Biodiversity Institute.
In neighboring Namibia, the
impact has been even more
severe, with roughly 100,000
square miles of land affected
by bush encroachment,
drastically reducing cattle
herds and the incomes of
tens of thousands of households.
“We used to have big
areas of open grass,” says
Khonani Majozi, another
farmer in Ncunjana. “Now
we have to take our animals
even farther. You can see the
small trees growing instead
of grass.”
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‘We still keep
cattle, but our
priority now is
goats. We can
make a quicker
turnover.’
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The problem isn’t unique
to southern Africa; bush
encroachment has also been
tracked in North America
and Australia. It’s been a
cause of concern in South
Africa since the late 19th
century, with other factors,
such as rainfall, the way
livestock are left to graze
and how fires are managed,
also influencing grassland
health.
Though an increase in
trees and woody plants
means that more carbon dioxide may be captured — to
be sure, planting trees has
become one global strategy
to combat high CO2 levels —
some here argue that the
loss of income and biodiversity is not a reasonable
trade-off for helping to offset
emissions that this part of
the world is not even respon-
sible for.
“Why should southern
Africa sacrifice its beautiful
open ecosystems to create
forests to suck up the CO2
being emitted by the Northern Hemisphere?” asks
Midgley. “It’s completely unfair.”
A few miles from Mhlabunzima’s farm, Rauri Alcock stands at the edge of a
lonely road and points at an
expanse of thorny acacia
trees. “This used to be grassland — open grassland, the
whole area,” says Alcock,
chief executive of Mdukatshani, a nonprofit organization that has partnered with
the government to help farmers increase their goat
herds. “A lot of these places
have flipped into something
we don’t know.”
Goats have been used to
keep encroaching trees and
shrubs off grasslands in Europe, and in several U.S. cit-
ies you can rent a goat herd
to eat weeds or unwanted foliage in your field or yard.
Many rural South African households already
keep a few indigenous goats.
In 2016, there were about 14
million cattle kept on family
farms in South Africa, and
about 8 million goats, according to the government’s
last survey of agricultural
households.
Goats are always in demand — they’re widely used
in ritual slaughter — but the
goat trade that supplies animals for traditional purposes is mostly conducted
on an individual basis and
not widely commercialized,
says Alcock. Goat sacrifice
has long been practiced in
Zulu culture to mark major
life events, such as births
and weddings, and the goat’s
meat is then eaten within
the family.
But fewer than 1% of the
goats slaughtered in South
Africa are in the commercial
sector, according to the Department of Agriculture,
Forestry and Fisheries, and
goat meat, though common,
is mostly not formally
traded.
Mdukatshani has been
helping farmers build up
their herd numbers and also
sell goats in a more formal
market.
The income farmers get
from those sales may make
their households more resilient to a changing climate
than keeping cattle alone.
More than a million cattle
died in KwaZulu-Natal province during the 2014-17
drought, with economic
losses exceeding $1 billion,
according to Mdukatshani’s
estimates.
The number of households that own cattle fell
from more than 613,000 in
2011 to 588,000 in 2016, according to the government
survey. During the same
time, the number of households that own goats rose.
“If you’re a cattle farmer,
you have to think about
what you’re going to do
next,” says Alcock.
Not only do they survive
droughts better than cattle,
but goats also have other advantages in the global climate’s new normal: They are
used to traveling long distances each day in the bush,
they’re cheaper than cows,
and they grow faster, so
they’re easier to sell.
“We still keep cattle, but
our priority now is goats,”
says Bongekile Ndimande, a
farmer in her late 60s who
lives in Ncunjana. “We can
make a quicker turnover.”
Around Mhlabunzima’s
farm, there is noticeably
less thorny tree growth than
the woodier areas beyond
the goats’ reach. Until fairly
recently, the farm raised
mostly cattle, with a few
goats on the side. Now, the
family keeps 40 cows, 60
sheep and 250 goats.
As he’s increased his goat
herd, Mhlabunzima is figuring out how to protect the
younger goats from disease,
including having them vaccinated. In 2017, he had 90
baby goats, but more than
half of them died. In 2018, he
“only had one goat die, and
that was my mistake,” he
says.
Though goats more or
less herd themselves — they
walk and graze the same
paths every day in a pack —
Mhlabunzima
grumbles
they can still be a little high
maintenance. Predators in
the bush sometimes eat the
kids. Females wander off to
give birth and then it’s hard
to find them. But, he says,
“It’s new income. I’m happy
with that.”
Just before lunch, Mhlabunzima’s
younger
brother opens the gate to the
goat pen and gives a loud
whistle. The goats trot out,
heading down a well-worn
path out into the bush to
graze. A couple of goats at
the back of the pack linger at
a young acacia sapling, and
dig in.
Mahr is a special
correspondent.
UCLA needs a rock-star coach
[Plaschke, from A1]
of him.
You don’t have the amenities of a Kansas or Kentucky, where every road trip
is on a chartered plane and
where the coaches recruit
from private jets. You
mostly fly commercial,
which affects everything
from practice schedules to
body clocks.
You don’t have the national exposure of a North
Carolina or Duke, where
every game is played in a full
arena.
You play home games
that are scheduled at 6 p.m.
during the middle of the
week because of the enduring embarrassment of the
Pac-12 Conference’s TV deal,
and your players are virtually unknown because of the
sham that is the Pac-12
Network.
The ticket prices at new
Pauley Pavilion are too high.
The local perception of the
program is shockingly low.
The school’s support of the
program has lagged such
that when the Bruins traveled to Dayton, Ohio, for an
NCAA tournament play-in
game last March, the pep
band didn’t even make the
trip.
In ways that stretch far
beyond the current 23-year
national championship
drought — the longest since
before Wooden stepped on
campus — the reality is as
chilling as the malaise that
often runs through Pauley
when the team occupies the
floor.
UCLA basketball is no
longer UCLA basketball.
The most important, yet
trickiest, task of Dan Guerrero’s tenure as UCLA athletic director will be to find
somebody with the coaching chops and public charisma to change all that.
They need a John Calipari type, but they don’t
operate in John Calipari’s
neighborhood.
They need a Jay Wright
clone, but they don’t run a
Jay Wright-type program.
Stealing Billy Donovan
from the Oklahoma City
Thunder would be great,
but why on earth would he
leave the NBA for a job that
isn’t even deemed the most
important coaching job at
that college?
Gregg Marshall from
Wichita State would be
outstanding, but why would
he leave his revered smalltown status for a program
that consistently exists in
the shadows of its own
campus?
I thought I would also
never write this, but UCLA
needs to start treating the
men’s basketball program
with the same respect it
treats the football program.
You want to hire a
basketball version of Chip
Kelly? Then you need to pay
Chip Kelly prices, offer Chip
Kelly-style control, and
install Chip Kelly-style bells
and whistles.
In hiring Kelly, Guerrero
took the kind of big swing he
had never taken before,
broadening his vision with
the nudging of booster
Casey Wasserman and
former Bruins quarterback
Troy Aikman.
In this new hire, which
UCLA says will be conducted with the help of
another former Bruin, Golden State Warriors general
manager Bob Myers, Guerrero needs to swing with the
same launch angle.
In other words, he can’t
hire a coach from New Mexico who, in 18 years of Division I coaching, had reached
the Sweet 16 only once.
That was Steve Alford,
and, let’s face it, his biggest
problem was that he never
should have been hired in
the first place.
From his messy opening
news conference in 2013,
during which he made comments about a rape charge
against one of his former
players at Iowa for which he
later apologized, Alford
never seemed comfortable
here.
It was like he took the job
not because he wanted it,
but because he felt he
couldn’t turn it down. He
never connected with the
fans or alumni. He never
sold the program through
either entertaining regular
seasons or deep tournament runs.
I supported him in this
space because of his and his
staff ’s great recruiting —
they had seven NBA firstround draft picks — and
because of those three
Sweet 16 appearances in five
years, an underrated and
difficult task.
But in each of those
Sweet 16 games they were
badly outclassed, losing by
double digits. And then last
season’s China shoplifting
scandal was followed by the
humiliating loss to St. Bonaventure in that play-in game
where the Bruins barely
showed up.
I thought Alford might
be fired after that game.
When he survived, I wrote
that this year’s team was
talented enough to save his
job, if only he could coach it
out of them. He couldn’t.
The mid-December home
loss to Belmont sealed his
fate, and then Saturday’s
loss to Liberty hastened
that fate.
“While Steve led us to
three Sweet 16 appearances,” Guerrero said in a
statement announcing the
change, “we simply have not
been performing at a consistent level and our struggles
up to this point in the season do not bode well for the
future.”
Guerrero made the right
move at the right time for
the sake of a gifted but
broken team that deserves
every opportunity to mend
and succeed.
The 7-6 Bruins will need
to dominate the mediocre
Pac-12 if they have any hope
of making the NCAA tournament, and the chances of
that are slim, but if they pull
it off under Gene Bartow’s
son, Murry, wouldn’t that be
a great story?
Yet the real story lies in
Guerrero’s next move,
which is actually two moves.
Can he convince a bright
and magnetic basketball
personality to take on the
burden of resurrecting a
formerly great basketball
culture that is in free fall?
And, just as important, will
Guerrero give the new guy
the tools to implement that
rebirth?
“This is one of the most
important hires they can
make,” said Don MacLean,
former Bruins great who is a
broadcaster.
“It has to be a coach that
really, really wants to be
there and can inject life into
the program and fan base,”
he added. “And that has to
translate into tournament
success, consistent tournament success.”
That coach is certainly
somewhere out there.
The question is whether
UCLA can transform itself
into a great place for that
coach to work, and is willing
to do whatever it takes to
get him.
bill.plaschke@latimes.com
Twitter: @BillPlaschke
T U E S DAY , JA N UA RY 1, 2 019
L AT I M E S . C O M
A5
THE NATION
Warren moves toward 2020 race
The Democrat, an
outspoken critic of
Trump, forms an
exploratory panel.
By Noah Bierman
WASHINGTON — Sen.
Elizabeth Warren took the
first major step toward a
White House run Monday,
announcing a presidential
exploratory committee as
she attempts to redefine
populism for the left in the
age of Donald Trump.
“These aren’t cracks that
families are falling into.
They’re traps. America’s
middle class is under attack,” the Massachusetts
Democrat said in a 4½-minute video posted online. “Billionaires and big corporations decided they wanted
more of the pie, and they enlisted politicians to cut ’em a
fatter slice.”
Aside from a few images
of Trump and polarizing
figures in his administration, Warren’s largely biographical video steered clear
of directly taking on the
president. Instead, it echoed
some of the complaints that
brought him to power by
asserting that “corruption
is poisoning our democracy”
and that government has
“become a tool for the
wealthy
and
well-connected.”
Warren is the biggest
name to take a formal step
into a race that is expected
to feature a large primary
field for a party eager to displace Trump.
A fundraising juggernaut
who was among the first to
tap into the anger of a resurgent left, Warren figures to
be a major factor in the
Democratic primary with a
significant chance of winning the nomination.
Some detractors say
Suzanne Kreiter Boston Globe
SEN. ELIZABETH WARREN talks to reporters in Cambridge, Mass., on Mon-
day. She is the biggest name to take a formal step into the presidential race.
Warren would have a hard
time in a general election,
however, both because some
voters see her as too far to
the left and because the former Harvard University law
professor’s style can appear
pedantic and lecturing to
some ears.
She has also been dogged
by controversy over her thin
claims of Native American
ancestry.
But she has proved adept
at capturing the frustrations
and aspirations of many on
the left. She’s skilled at
putting core beliefs about
the need for government
regulation and income distribution into simple terms
on videos that go viral.
And she has successfully
used her position on Senate
committees to grill administration figures from both
parties whom she has accused of going easy on big
banks and other powerful
players — attracting accusations of grandstanding from
detractors.
“I’m in this fight all the
way,” she said at a Monday
news conference in Cambridge, Mass., using her favorite word, “fight,” multiple
times.
The rhetoric puts her at
the forefront of a Democratic debate over how best
to take on the president.
Warren believes in a combative approach based on a leftwing alternative to his rightwing populism.
“She was a pioneer of a lot
of the populist themes that
are coursing through the
veins of Democratic primary
voters, and she’s able to
channel their frustration at
the current administration,”
said Colin Reed, a consultant who has run a campaign
against Warren and later
headed a Republican opposition research group.
Like Trump, Warren attempts to channel the anger
in the middle class over the
decline in employment in
the nation’s industrial base
and stagnant incomes for a
large share of American
workers.
Unlike Trump, she favors
more government regulation and spending — including Medicare for all — to lift
more people from poverty.
She also opposes him on the
long list of issues of cultural
and ethnic diversity that
have become litmus tests for
both parties.
In announcing on New
Year’s Eve, Warren jumped
ahead of several Senate colleagues who are expected to
join the race soon, including
Sens. Kamala Harris of California, Bernie Sanders of
Vermont, Kirsten Gillibrand
of New York, Sherrod Brown
of Ohio, Amy Klobuchar of
Minnesota and Cory Booker
of New Jersey. Rep. Beto
O’Rourke of Texas and former Vice President Joe Biden are also among the long
list of Democrats considering the race.
Warren, who is completing her first term in the Senate, is 69, younger than
Trump and other potential
front-runners such as Biden
and Sanders, but far from
the generational change
some in her party are urging.
Trump has gone after her
repeatedly, mocking her
claims to Native American
heritage with the nickname
“Pocahontas.”
In a Fox interview Monday, Trump continued to belittle her, saying he would
“love to run against her” and
attacking her mental fitness
by saying “you’d have to ask
her psychiatrist” whether
she could win the election.
Warren’s attempts to put
the Native American controversy to rest, including a
DNA test this year that
showed trace genetic links to
Native American peoples,
have largely fallen flat, drawing criticism not only from
Republicans but prominent
Native Americans as well.
Several reviews of her records, including an exhaustive investigation by the
Boston Globe, have found
that her ethnicity claims
played no role in her hiring at
a series of law school jobs, including at Harvard.
“Her message is a resonant one, but in terms of the
messenger there are questions that weren’t there a few
months ago,” said Tracy
Sefl, a Democratic consultant who has been involved in
many presidential races.
Sefl called the imperative
to defeat Trump in 2020 “almost beyond description”
and said “Democrats will be
less inclined to choose a
messenger who’s been called
into question.”
Warren has tried to
counter another potential liability — her image as part of
the coastal elite — by telling
her life story, which she highlighted in Monday’s video.
She grew up in Oklahoma
to middle-class parents. Her
mother took a job at Sears
when her father was unable
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to work following a heart attack.
A champion high school
debater, she was able to
make it to college and then
law school while also starting a family.
Those early struggles fit
within her economic argument that middle- and working-class families are often
left without a safety net in
the face of healthcare emergencies and other setbacks.
As a member of the
Democratic minority in the
Senate, Warren can’t claim
many legislative accomplishments, but she has succeeded in commanding attention.
She has kept financial
regulation at the center of
her message, the issue that
brought her to prominence
as an academic and allowed
her to first make her mark on
national politics while serving as a special advisor in the
Obama administration.
In that role, she advocated for and helped establish a consumer protection
agency as part of the financial services and banking
overhaul passed in the aftermath of the financial collapse.
Warren, a longtime critic
of Wall Street, was passed
over by President Obama to
lead the agency on a permanent basis after Republicans
made it clear they would
fight her nomination.
She ran for the Senate instead, winning her first term
in 2012.
Warren stayed out of the
2016 presidential race, believing Hillary Clinton was
unbeatable in the primary.
Since then, other contenders for the White House,
including Sanders, have
captured much of the attention and energy that had
been directed toward her.
noah.bierman
@latimes.com
A6
T U E S DAY , JA N UA RY 1, 2 019
L AT I M E S . C O M
Republicans rethinking Obamacare
[Obamacare, from A1]
licans on Capitol Hill distancing themselves from the
decision, which is likely to remain in the news as appeals
move through the courts.
“I intended to repeal the
individual mandate. I did
not intend to eliminate preexisting conditions coverage,” said Sen. Jerry Moran of Kansas. “We ought to
be prepared for dealing with
preexisting conditions.”
From a policy standpoint, however, the two issues were linked, as the
Obama administration argued before the Supreme
Court. The individual mandate, originally a conservative idea, was intended to ensure that insurance companies would get more customers — and younger and
healthier ones — to offset
the companies’ costs of covering people with medical
conditions. Severing the two
posed difficulties for insurers as well as politicians
writing legislation.
As Republicans maneuver for a response, Democrats will continue to stoke
the issue.
Senate Democrats plan
to make healthcare the focus
of their January retreat,
where they will set the year’s
political message. House
Democrats, with their new
majority,
are
weighing
whether to join appeals of
the Texas lawsuit. They’re
also considering legislation
making minor changes to
the healthcare law and undoing some Trump administration regulations, notably
one allowing health plans
that don’t adhere to Obamacare’s coverage requirements — “junk plans,” critics
call them, because insurers
can drop patients when they
get sick.
Healthcare “is not going
away as the No. 1 issue for
the electorate and the No. 1
wedge issue between Republicans and Democrats,”
said Sen. Christopher S.
Murphy (D-Conn.). “Separate and aside from the policy, do Republicans really
want to gift us with this issue
for the next two years?”
For years after the passage of the Affordable Care
Act in 2010, Republicans had
Aaron P. Bernstein Getty Images
HEALTHCARE is “the No. 1 issue for the electorate and the No. 1 wedge issue between Republicans and Democrats,” one senator said.
the upper hand politically,
using opposition to the law
to retake control of the
House that year. But public
opinion on the law, long
closely divided, turned more
favorable in 2017, when President Trump and congressional Republicans tried
and failed to repeal it. Democrats used that record of opposition to their advantage
in the midterm campaigns,
arguing that Republicans
were willing to let insurance
companies drop people with
health conditions.
Republicans
counter
that their “repeal and replace” bills against Obamacare would have protected people with preexisting conditions in different but equally comprehensive ways. One alternative would have banned
companies from charging
patients more as long as
they maintained insurance
coverage, though health experts say it would not have
been as comprehensive as
Obamacare.
Even as the political dynamic has shifted around
the healthcare law, the most
conservative Republicans
remain unbowed.
“Shame on us — we never
put [Democrats] on the defensive about how they used
the individual mandate to
fine 8 million poor people in
America by $2 billion,” said
Sen. David Perdue of Georgia.
Still, Republicans say
there are ways around the issue. One of the leaders
among the Republican state
attorneys
general
who
brought the lawsuit against
Obamacare, Josh Hawley of
Missouri, managed to defeat
Democratic Sen. Claire McCaskill in November. Bar-
rasso credited Hawley with
talking directly to voters
about his concern for people
with preexisting conditions.
Such tactics didn’t work
for many Republicans, however. Reps. Dana Rohrabacher of Costa Mesa, David
Young of Iowa and Dave
Brat of Virginia, and Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker,
among others, cut campaign
ads touting their concerns
for people with preexisting
medical conditions. They all
lost.
For Republican survivors, attempts to draft
healthcare bills that address
the issues holds risks. While
almost every Republican is
on the record in support of
guaranteeing coverage for
people with medical conditions, the party is still divided on how best to do so
given the complexities of
healthcare policy. They re-
main split as well on whether
to try again to repeal Obamacare.
Sens. Lamar Alexander
(R-Tenn.) and Charles E.
Grassley (R-Iowa), who will
lead the Senate committees
that oversee healthcare policy next year, have tried to reshape the debate to one
about the cost of healthcare
premiums, a big concern for
most Americans.
Alexander
said
he
wanted to convert “all the
energy we’ve had arguing
about the 6% of the health
insurance market” — referring to the share of people in
Obamacare plans — “to how
do we [reduce] that $1.8 trillion number that we spend
every year on healthcare
costs.”
“We don’t have to do anything on preexisting conditions right now because
that’s the law,” Alexander
added.
In the House, the new
chairman of the Energy and
Commerce Committee, Rep.
Frank Pallone Jr. of New Jersey, declined to say what
kind of healthcare legislation Democrats would pursue. His goals, he said, will be
to roll back the administration’s regulations allowing
insurance plans to skirt
Obamacare’s rules and to
stabilize the Obamacare
markets. And taking Republicans at their word, Pallone
said he sees an opportunity
to work with them.
“The No. 1 thing I think
we can work with them on is
no discrimination based on
preexisting conditions,” he
said. “They’ve all articulated
that they’re opposed to it,
even the president.”
jennifer.haberkorn
@latimes.com
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T U E S DAY , JA N UA RY 1, 2 019
L AT I M E S . C O M
A7
Brown reflects on legacy in office
[Brown, from A1]
oldest governor, “There is no
substitute for experience.
“In an experienced mind,
there’s a knowledge, a
depth,” Brown said. “A clarity, a wisdom that is profoundly important. But
there also can be rigidity,
and a lack of imagination as
people do the same thing
over and over again for decades.”
Brown’s critics may not
like his decisions, but few
would describe him as rigid.
Equal parts politician and
perpetual-motion machine,
the 80-year-old Democrat
leads by the Socratic
method — rigorously questioning the conclusions in
policy briefs, the precedent
set by decades of state laws
and the precise wording of
questions posed by journalists. Brown pounces, bursting with additional points
while others try to move to a
new topic.
But it’s not clear what
he’ll do with all that frenetic
energy after Jan. 7, when
Gov.-elect Gavin Newsom
takes the oath of office. The
governor and First Lady
Anne Gust Brown are settling into their newly built
house at Rancho Venada,
the sprawling cattle ranch
founded by Brown’s greatgrandfather, a Gold Rushera immigrant from Germany. Gust Brown, often
credited as a calming force in
the life of her peripatetic
husband, has been scouting
office space in nearby
Williams, the small city a
half-hour’s drive to the east.
Brown was coy about
what he’ll do there. “I can’t
tell you,” he said. Sensing the
answer wasn’t going to suffice, he tried something else.
“Well, the internet speeds
are rather slow here.”
Whatever the reason, the
soon-to-be private citizen
isn’t ready to share it.
One safe bet for Brown’s
near future is a full-throated
defense of his criminal justice legacy. The governor has
his sights set on squashing a
2020 ballot initiative that
would undo some of his efforts to overhaul state prisons by providing new parole
opportunities for some convicted of lower-level felonies.
Last month, he filed a lawsuit challenging the initiative’s place on the ballot, insisting that the measure —
which aims to rewrite his
parole overhaul, Proposition
57 — was improperly
drafted.
Brown took issue not
only with the process used
by the crime victims group
that drafted the measure,
but also what he believes is
its intent.
“In my view, it’s deeply
anti-Christian, because it
denies redemption,” the
governor said. “And redemption is at the heart of our
whole civilization.”
Those beliefs have led to
a record no future governor
may ever break: approval of
more than 2,000 requests for
clemency over his four terms
in office. On Christmas Eve,
Brown added 273 people to
the list of those offered a second chance after prison or
who are incarcerated with
little or no chance of parole.
He also ordered a new round
of tests into the case of Kevin
Cooper, a death row inmate
whose conviction in four 1983
murders has been called into
question. Brown labored
over the particulars of clemency cases, carefully considering in long meetings with
advisors where the line
stood between relief and rejection.
Brown’s views on crime
and punishment in his second tour of duty were deepened, he said, by his experience as mayor of Oakland
from 1999 to 2007. So too was
his concern about state
leaders making pronouncements from Sacramento
that played much differently
on the streets of communities across the state.
“I would say that direct
experience with disputes
about apartment complexes,
disputes
about
schools … that’s very concrete,” Brown said. “I think
the experience of the concrete issues of Oakland illuminated for me a lot of the
more general issues that I
face as governor.”
But as California grows
— its population is now 39.8
million, state demographers
reported last month — the
veteran politician admits
the balance between local
and state decision-making
might need to shift toward
Sacramento. Tops on the list
of power struggles is
whether the state’s residents should be allowed to
move farther into remote,
vegetation-heavy
areas
Carolyn Cole Los Angeles Times
GOV. JERRY BROWN , left, tours Paradise, Calif., with Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke, right, after the Camp
fire. Brown predicts big battles between state and local officials over developments near fire-prone areas.
Rich Pedroncelli Associated Press
BROWN WITH First Lady Anne Gust Brown and their dog Cali. Under his watch, the state budget’s bottom
line rose by some $24 billion in three fiscal years and about 3 million new jobs were created since early 2010.
Luis Sinco Los Angeles TImes
GOV.-ELECT Gavin Newsom, right, will inherit billions in state cash reserves from Brown, but the new gov-
ernor also will have to tackle some of Brown’s unfinished work, including the high-speed rail system.
where wildfire is almost a
year-round danger.
“The locals get overwhelmed,” Brown said of the
ability of community leaders
to determine how to prepare
for natural disasters. “I do
think flood and fire are matters of real importance. And
state authority is needed.”
He predicted fierce political battles ahead.
“They’ll be very contested because you’re going
to tell, you’re going to say to
people, ‘Your land can’t be
developed.’ And they’re not
going to like that,” he said.
Brown tussled with business and interest groups last
year over the state’s future
wildfire policies, urging lawmakers to loosen the legal
standards used to calculate
costs paid by utility companies whose equipment is involved in the start of a blaze.
Lawmakers rebuffed his effort to significantly change
the standard of “inverse
condemnation” by giving
judges wide discretion to decide how much utilities
should pay affected residents and communities.
Instead, Brown signed
into law a less expansive
version of that proposal, failing to placate critics who
said he had been too willing
to offer the companies — especially Pacific Gas & Electric — a “bailout.”
“There will be real
changes,” Brown said. “And
there need to be changes.
Obviously, the infrastructure hasn’t gotten the attention that it needs. But it’s not
going to be pleasant because
it costs money.
“I don’t think you should
call that a bailout. That’s the
investment needed.”
The devastation wrought
by the Camp fire in Butte
County and the Woolsey fire
in Ventura and Los Angeles
counties gave Brown the
only real chance he’s had in
the last two years to assess
up close the man who now
dominates the nation’s politics, President Trump.
Expectations were that
the irascible president’s visit
to California would be tense.
No state has positioned itself as an alternative to
Trump’s America more than
the one led by Brown. The
governor,
who
himself
sought the presidency three
times, has taken jabs at the
Republican chief executive,
though far fewer than state
legislative leaders or Newsom.
But there was no awkward silence with Trump on
Marine One as they flew
north, Brown said, or later
on Air Force One en route to
Southern California. Quiet
with Trump is rare, the governor said.
“He’s very voluble and expressive and he’s talking a
lot,” Brown said. “And so he
has his views. He carries the
conversation quite well, because he does most of the
talking.”
The governor said he
sidestepped any debate with
Trump
about
climate
change, one of Brown’s signature policy efforts capped
by the 2017 extension of a
landmark greenhouse gas
reduction law.
“Global warming is real.
He doesn’t think it’s real. We
didn’t talk about climate
change
because,
quite
frankly, he’s not open to
that,” Brown said.
He did, however, use the
ride to the fire lines on Marine One — Brown sat in front
of the presidential aide who
carries the “nuclear football,” the briefcase of missile
launch codes — to opine on
the dangers of nuclear war.
It is a topic on which Brown
has
proselytized
for
decades. In October, he
agreed to serve as executive
chairman of the Bulletin of
the Atomic Scientists, the
nonprofit that sets the
hands on the apocalyptic
“Doomsday Clock.”
“I raised that topic. And
Trump did express concern
about nuclear war and I
thought that, so, that was a
positive,” Brown said. “He
expressed, ‘That’s really
bad’ or something. So that
was good. I felt that was a
comforting thought that I
think he’s going to be trying
to avoid nuclear war.”
For the last eight years,
Brown has led California
with one of the smallest
inner circles of any governor
in decades. All within it are
fiercely loyal and share his
view: Pick your battles, work
behind the scenes, don’t say
much in public. His top
staffer, Diana Dooley, was a
legislative aide in the 1970s.
Her predecessor, Nancy McFadden, died in March and
was a key architect of the idiosyncratic governor’s recent
success.
Brown credits his staff as
responsible for much of his
success in the final act of his
career as an elected official.
He said his ability to pick the
right advisors and to connect with influential activists has improved over time
and helped him navigate the
state’s rough political waters.
“And that shows up in the
people that I bring into the
governor’s office,” he said.
“It also shows up in the relationship with the Legislature, and the relationship
with unions, relationship
with representatives and
lobbyists of the various businesses and environmental
groups.”
The man who went from
being elected a Los Angeles
junior college trustee in 1969
to governor in just five years
— in no small part due to
having the same name as his
legendary father — has embraced his evolution from an
erratic but idealistic young
politician to a senior statesman.
Brown is frequently
called “the adult in the
room” when dealing with the
Legislature, sometimes offering bitter medicine to his
fellow Democrats — he took
the unprecedented step of
vetoing a budget in 2011 and
has spurned ambitious bills
to expand gun control and
government spending. Lawmakers applauded Brown in
public while sometimes privately grumbling that they,
too, were clear-eyed partners in governing the state.
Brown said youth was a
disadvantage for him in his
earlier terms as governor.
“That didn’t give me the
credibility I now have when
I’m older than the other people and I’m more experienced,” he said. “So not only
do I have ideas where people
would say, ‘Well, you’re the
adult in the room,’ but I also
have the position that one
earns by being on the front
lines for a long time. Just like
a general has more credibility than a corporal.”
His legacy, though, is far
from being written. The governor is quick to mention his
father’s work to build California’s system of sending
northern water to a thirsty
Southland. But Brown will
leave unfinished a sweeping,
contentious modification of
that system — a pair of tunnels diverting water underneath the Sacramento-San
Joaquin Delta. His highspeed rail system, too, must
be completed by others.
Brown acknowledges the
limits of the job, and admits
some of his most recent accomplishments
were
shaped by good fortune.
Last month, state officials
said California has created
more than 3 million new jobs
since the end of the Great
Recession in early 2010.
“A governor doesn’t create that,” Brown said matter
of factly.
He did, however, persuade voters in 2012 to impose temporary taxes — a
hike in personal income
taxes on the most wealthy
and sales taxes on everyone.
That, plus the extension of
the income tax rates by voters in 2016, has boosted the
state budget’s bottom line
by some $24 billion in the
most recent three fiscal
years.
“That affected schools,
healthcare, in-home supportive services, child-care
slots, prison reform, public
safety,” the governor said.
Under current projections, Brown will leave Newsom some $28 billion in
short- and long-term cash
reserves by the end of summer. The outgoing governor
said his successor will need
it.
“I’ve always been saying,
‘Watch out, we’re about
ready to go over the cliff,’ ”
Brown said. “I wouldn’t be a
bit surprised if we’re already
in a recession, but it won’t
really be noticed for another
four or five months.”
Brown admits to having
few real hobbies besides a
voracious appetite for reading. In a speech to the Sacramento Press Club on Dec. 18,
he gushed to have loved
everything about his time in
politics.
“I like sparring with the
press, I like raising money, I
like attacking my opponents, I like being attacked
by my opponents,” he told
the crowd.
No one may ever again
see politics from as many
vantage points — local government, three different
statewide elected offices,
three campaigns for the
presidency. Brown, who said
there are no plans for a vacation in the coming months,
seems at ease with whatever
California’s historians might
someday write about him.
“I’ve been able to leave on
fairly good terms,” he said. “I
think I was skillful and we
got a lot done.”
john.myers@latimes.com
Twitter: @johnmyers
A8
T U E S DAY , JA N UA RY 1, 2 019
L AT I M E S . C O M / O P I N I O N
OPINION
EDITORIALS
LETTERS
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Times’ 2019 wish list
Here are some changes we’d like
to see. Some are likely to happen;
others, we realize, are not.
ew Year’s Day is the moment
when we start over, trading
last year’s calendar (and resolutions) for this year’s. With so
much of the 2019 story yet to be
written, it’s a good time to think about the
changes we’d like to see in ourselves, our
communities, our leaders and the world
around us. Here are some of the new beginnings and changed approaches that we’d
welcome:
Enough rain to quench our thirst and
grow our food, but not so much as to make
us forget to conserve.
A Super Bowl featuring at least one team
from Los Angeles, and a final game of the
World Series that the Dodgers actually win.
A bold move by California lawmakers to
craft a tax system whose revenues don’t
fluctuate from feast to famine.
A change of heart among NIMBYs to
support much-needed housing — whether
it be for low-income tenants or high-rolling
homeowners.
A mayor of Los Angeles who generates
more headlines for his work on the homelessness crisis than for his visits to states
with early presidential primaries.
A commitment by families across the
country to stop using disposable plastic
straws, beverage lids and cutlery that eventually come to rest on the beach and in the
ocean.
A year without a single mass shooting at
a school, a nightclub, a concert, a sporting
event, a church, a synagogue, a salon, a
newspaper, a restaurant, an airport, a
barbershop, a block party, a convenience
store….
A new civility in public discourse, with
partisans on both sides remembering that
people who disagree with you aren’t necessarily evil. Most of the time, they just have a
different point of view.
A shift among the world’s leaders and
governments from talking about climate
change to actually reducing carbon emissions. Yes, Washington, D.C., we’re looking
at you.
And a clean car so head-turning, fun to
drive, affordable and cool that we all dump
our gas guzzlers.
A significantly shorter Oscar telecast,
preferably with a host.
A strategic decision by Fox News Channel’s hosts to put down the Trump pom-
N
poms and stop acting like a state-controlled
media outlet.
A stock market that moves more like
tides than yo-yos.
A respite from the tabloid reports about
Meghan Markle, the American-born wife of
Prince Harry, feuding with her sister-in-law,
Kate, the Duchess of Cambridge. And could
Meghan’s own father stop dissing her in TV
interviews?
A speech by Myanmar’s de facto leader,
Aung San Suu Kyi, in which she finally utters the word “Rohingya,” then calls for an
end to the persecution of the country’s Muslim minority.
An admission by Facebook that, actually,
it hasn’t respected its users’ privacy. Then,
perhaps, it can actually change.
An end to the #MeToo meme because
there are no more #MeToo moments.
A slew of start-up businesses launched
by federal employees idled by the latest idiotic government shutdown.
An end to the federal government’s reefer madness approach to marijuana, so
states can continue to develop legal, regulated and controlled cannabis marketplaces
without fear of a crackdown.
A return to the United States’ historic position of welcoming refugees fleeing war,
persecution and violence.
A U.S. Supreme Court that finds ways to
issue more unanimous rulings, rather than
continuing to churn out the sharply divided,
conservatives-vs.-liberals decisions that
have undermined confidence in the court as
an impartial arbiter. And while the justices
are at it, they should find that capital punishment is imposed too arbitrarily and fallibly to be constitutional.
A bid by a serious Republican to challenge President Trump for the party’s presidential nomination in 2020. A Democratic
primary process free of favoritism by party
insiders. And a presidential campaign
where the Russian trolls remain quietly
sleeping under Russian bridges.
A comprehensive immigration reform
bill that finally passes Congress and is
signed by the president, providing relief to
“Dreamers,” shoring up border security, assuring a steady supply of farmworkers and
giving the millions of people who’ve lived
years in this country without legal status a
path to citizenship.
A concerted effort by Trump to display
some impulse control and give Twitter a
rest. That’s probably too much to hope for,
so we’d settle for congressional Republicans
calling out Trump’s erratic decision making
and offensive comments, instead of bearing
mute witness to the carnage of presidential
norms.
Women in the boardroom
hen Gov. Jerry Brown
signed a bill requiring publicly traded corporations
based in California to have
at least one woman director by the end of 2019, he did so even though
he expressed doubt that it could survive a
court challenge.
In a letter accompanying his signature,
Brown justified his support of SB 826 by
declaring that “recent events in Washington,
D.C. — and beyond — make it crystal clear
that many are not getting the message.” The
“recent events” to which Brown was referring
were the contentious U.S. Senate Judiciary
Committee hearings in which Christine Blasey Ford testified to a male-dominated panel
that Supreme Court nominee Brett M. Kavanaugh sexually assaulted her when they
were in high school. And by “message,”
Brown was presumably alluding to the continued concentration of political and corporate power in the hands of men, despite the
great advances that women have made in
both worlds.
The new law sends a pretty powerful message itself that California, at least, values diversity. So much so that its lawmakers are
willing to enact a law that takes government
coercion to an uncomfortable extreme in
pursuit of that goal. Under the law, companies headquartered in California must have
at least one female director by the end of this
year, and those with larger boards must have
as many as three by 2021. Failure to comply
with the law will draw a hefty fine, equivalent
to a six-figure director salary, as well as public shaming.
Some legal scholars agree with the governor’s assessment that the new measure is legally flawed on constitutional and other
grounds. The law may be challenged as soon
as this week. Or it may not be. What company relishes the publicity it would earn by
complaining about how damaged it would be
if it added a woman to its all male-board at
this particular moment in U.S. history?
To be clear, we’re not fans of this type of
W
government overreach, but we are troubled
by the underlying problem the law is seeking
to address. There is a shocking lack of women in corporate boardrooms, even though
women make or influence 70% or more of the
consumer purchases in this country. Female
directors occupy just about 18% of the seats
of the boards of the 3,000 largest publicly
traded U.S. companies. Even in liberal California, one-fourth of public companies have
all-male boards. The reality in executive
suites is equally appalling: Only 5% of Fortune 500 companies are run by women, and
relatively few women hold the other top corporate posts that are stepping stones to chief
executive offices — and corporate boards.
Forward-thinking corporations should
not need a law to prompt them to diversify
their boardrooms. And those based in other
states, especially those where legislators
might be entertaining laws similar to California’s, would be wise to accelerate efforts to
diversify their own boards — not just because
they’re eager to avoid onerous government
boardroom mandates, but because it is the
right thing to do for both gender equality and
the bottom line. Research, including a muchcited study by Credit Suisse in 2016, indicates
a link between higher profits and companies
with female leadership. That just makes
sense. If you want to sell your product or
service to women, it helps to have women
guiding the decisions about what products
and services to offer.
One provision of California’s law that
should not be controversial requires the California secretary of state to produce annual
reports tracking companies’ compliance.
Even if the law is struck down, the state
should continue to gather and share this information (and data on boardroom ethnic
diversity as well) as a service to consumers
who may well care whether the companies
they patronize are committed to diversifying
their leadership. When it comes to business,
consumers’ disdain can be a more powerful
social engineering tool than the heavy hand
of government.
EXECUTIVE CHAIRMAN Dr. Patrick Soon-Shiong
EXECUTIVE EDITOR Norman Pearlstine
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Angel Rodriguez, Michael Whitley
Opinion
Nicholas Goldberg EDITOR OF THE EDITORIAL PAGES
Sue Horton OP-ED AND SUNDAY OPINION EDITOR
Jabin Botsford Washington Post
OUTGOING White House Chief of Staff John F.
Kelly during a meeting in the Oval Office.
Taming Trump
Re “Despite tumult, Kelly defends tenure,” Dec. 30
Outgoing Chief of Staff John F. Kelly’s description of
his tenure in the White House reminds me of a trip down
the rabbit hole, with Kelly as the Mad Hatter.
Kelly did not keep President Trump in line. On
immigration, Kelly himself not only supported Trump’s
statements but also offered his own disparaging
comments with regard to Mexicans and Central
Americans.
The sad part of his story is that he, along with so
many of those who resigned or got fired, refuse to say
what is wrong with Trump. To much of the country, even
clinically delusional people have a better grasp of reality
than the Trump White House.
Homer Alba
Glendale
Kelly’s comments on
immigration sound reasonable now. Yet when he
was trying to implement
Trump’s awfully inhumane
policy, he stated that immigrants coming across the
Mexican border “don’t
speak English and don’t
integrate well.”
He had evidently forgotten about his great-grandparents who spoke no
English when they immigrated from Avellino, Italy.
Kelly may have had
some success in blocking
his boss from some of his
worst instincts. His major
contribution, however, is in
making crystal clear that
Trump cannot work with a
chief of staff.
That’s why the 45th
president will have an
interim chief of staff who
accepted the job reluctantly, knowing only too
well sycophancy is the
basic requirement.
Domenico Maceri
San Luis Obispo
::
In October 2017, the six
solid border wall prototypes in San Diego were
completed and Trump
viewed them in March 2018
— facts that illuminate
Kelly’s assertion, “But we
left a solid concrete wall
early on in the administration.”
So if Trump revised his
thinking about his wall
“early on,” then mentioning it to Ann Coulter, Rush
Limbaugh and the other
howling far-right media
types could have prevented
our present government
shutdown. If Trump did
revise his thinking back
then, doesn’t this make his
border wall theater an even
bigger waste?
Trump’s mendacity and
misdirection is commemorated by these six monuments.
Tim Tunks
Santa Monica
School district
or welfare state?
Re “If teachers strike, poor
students will lose,” Dec. 28
Fred Ali, Antonia
Hernández and Robert K.
Ross did a great job outlining just what the Los Angeles Unified School District
should not be doing —
providing basic sustenance
to students.
Public schools should
not be offering a refuge for
homeless people, hygiene
facilities and other services
unrelated to education.
Our schools were never
meant to function as second homes, and teachers
were never meant to take
the place of parents.
Our school system was
never designed to support
students in all facets of
their lives, and certainly
our taxpayers should not
be shouldering this burden. There would be plenty
of money available to give
the teachers a muchneeded raise if the LAUSD
wasn’t doubling as a welfare state.
Charles Reilly
Manhattan Beach
Unfortunately, we educators are not valued as
public servants as much as
law enforcement, firefighters or nurses. The district
has capitalized on this
indifference and has
painted us as money hungry.
This cannot be further
from the truth, as anyone
working in our field understands that teachers do
not aspire to great wealth,
but rather want to give
back to our communities.
The writers highlight
the great inconvenience
students will suffer because of a strike. But remember, many of our own
children will be directly
affected as well. This
should serve more evidence of just how strongly
we feel about a strike.
Ramon Angel
Sanchez Jr.
Los Angeles
::
As your readers and the
citizens of Los Angeles
consider all sides in the
possible pending teachers
strike, it’s worth noting
something that seemingly
receives no ink: Students
attending independent
and non-unionized charter
schools will suffer no upheaval and chaos in their
educational schedules.
Hmm, if only students
had a union that put their
needs ahead of bloated,
top-heavy LAUSD bureaucracies and teachers
unions that too frequently
protect ineffective, irresponsible and uncaring
teachers.
Jim Tetreau
South Pasadena
::
Good working conditions for teachers are the
same as good learning
conditions for students.
Every classroom should be
safe, uncrowded, clean,
comfortable, well supplied
and staffed with a welltrained, respected teacher
who earns a middle-class
salary.
If we paid attractive
starting salaries, we would
not have to hire mediocre
applicants, and good
teachers would stay in the
profession. Less turnover
would save money and give
students the undeniable
benefit of experienced
teachers.
Helen H. Gordon
Santa Barbara
Education for
trade workers
Re “Technology will help
workers, not replace
them,” Dec. 28
Oren Cass’ observations about automation in
the workplace underline
conditions that have not
only affected students but
also workers who have
been replaced by robots.
One of the problems is that
today’s education system
is geared toward students
who will continue their
studies and earn a fouryear college degree.
In my junior high school
days some three generations ago, we were expected to take a shop class.
I still recall making a Cclamp from a misshapen
piece of metal. When working on this item, I realized
my inabilities that ultimately encouraged me to
enter a lifetime occupation
that didn’t require the
ability to produce a first
class C-clamp.
Shop classes, arts
classes, music appreciation classes and home
economics classes all had
their day and developed
people who could manufacture items at the height
of war production. Like it
or not, those skills, which
can be developed in the
teenage years, are still in
demand.
Eric David
Long Beach
The writer is a retired
professor of electrical
technology at Long Beach
City College.
::
Cass writes: “Imagine a
widget factory in which 10
people produce one widget
each day. If the workers’
productivity doubles, each
can make two widgets
daily, and five workers can
now make what once required 10. Did that improvement ‘destroy’ five
jobs?”
Good question, and it’s
one he fails to adequately
answer.
Among many possibilities, two stand out: One, if
the increased output from
10 to 20 widgets daily has a
ready market, no one loses
a job. If instead the market
only supports 10 widgets a
day, five workers will lose
their jobs. Prudent owners
and managers would be
hard-pressed to see it any
other way, especially if they
answer to stockholders or
multiple partners.
Check out the staffing
of fulfillment warehouses
today and not-so-long-ago
yesterday.
Mark Davidson
Santa Ana
Secular justice
for abuse victims
Re “Parishioner tells of
abuse by McCarrick,”
Dec. 29
As a lapsed Roman
Catholic, I’m saddened but
not surprised that my
erstwhile religion is facing
an existential crisis of its
own making.
For decades evidence
has mounted that the
church’s teaching on contraception is environmentally harmful. The Vatican
has responded by doubling
down on faith-based deceptions. Shrouding reality
comes naturally to the
church’s hierarchy, so it
long managed to cover up
most clerical child abuses.
The recent spate of
belated sex-abuse disclosures moved the pope to
call for an end to cover-ups.
Let’s pray that this long
overdue edict reflects the
church’s sincere repentance more than expedient
public relations.
Nancy A. Stone
Santa Monica
::
Each new report of
decades-old child abuse by
Roman Catholic clergy
sets me off.
Their victims’ suffering,
often lifelong, must make
many of them question
their core beliefs. More
power to courageous clerical abuse victims who
finally bring themselves to
counter the church’s systemic concealment of such
unthinkable crimes.
Where ecclesiastical
justice has proved to be an
oxymoron, the Catholic
God doubtless blesses
those victims who seek
secular redress through
criminal prosecution and
civil lawsuits. Heaven
knows what church officials have trouble grasping:
Abusive clerics should be
held fully accountable
without undue delay.
Greg Gilbert
Burney, Calif.
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T U E S DAY , JA N UA RY 1, 2 019
L AT I M E S . C O M / O P I N I O N
A9
OP-ED
HERE’S HOPING
Business is getting political
By Adam Winkler
This article is one in a series
about reasons for optimism
in 2019.
F
rom the Muslim travel
ban to the rollback of
transgender rights, President Trump’s policies
and rhetoric have put
proponents of tolerance and
equality on the ropes for two years.
But social justice warriors have
also discovered a new, rich and
powerful ally who can help them in
the year ahead: big business.
For decades, corporations
mostly limited their political involvement to fighting off regulation, lowering taxes and promoting the free market. When it came
to hot-button social issues like gay
civil rights, gender identity, gun
control and others, CEOs believed
that companies should remain
neutral to avoid alienating potential customers. No more.
California companies, notably
San Francisco-based Salesforce.com, were early leaders in this
new corporate political activism.
Salesforce.com chief executive
Marc Benioff mastered the use of
Twitter to campaign publicly
against state “religious freedom”
bills (which generally allow for discrimination against gays and lesbians) and so-called bathroom
bills (trying to dictate which restrooms transgender people have to
use) in 2015. He also quietly lobbied his CEO peers to get more political.
That activism started to work.
In 2016, after Walt Disney Company and AMC Networks threatened to cease film production in
Georgia, for instance, the governor vetoed a bill that would have
allowed discrimination against
same-sex couples. Arizona’s governor vetoed a similar bill that
would have allowed businesses to
discriminate on the basis of sexual
orientation after American Airlines, Delta, Marriott Hotels and
other businesses objected. PayPal, Deutsche Bank, Monsanto,
MasterCard, Intel and IBM all
went on the record opposing state
laws targeting LGBTQ people.
So when Trump issued his ban
on entry into the U.S. by citizens
and refugees from seven Muslimmajority countries in 2017, the momentum was there for corporate
activism to move from the state
level to the national stage. Apple,
Amazon, Uber and other corporations immediately spoke out
against the policy. Despite polls
showing the ban had significant
popular
support,
Facebook,
Microsoft and Google joined more
than 175 other companies in calling for the U.S. Supreme Court to
strike it down. (The justices upheld a slightly watered-down version of the ban this year.)
Big business has earned its
credibility on these issues: 91% of
Fortune 500 companies have policies against discrimination on the
basis of sexual orientation. (Only
42% of states ban such discrimination.) And many high-profile
companies, especially in the technology sector, rely heavily on immigrants and have long advocated
for easing restrictions on entry for
skilled workers.
No one should be fooled into
thinking big business has become
suddenly altruistic. CEOs are legally obligated to run corporations
in the interest of their shareholders, not the public interest.
And yet the pressures on business to get political are increasing
and coming from many sources.
Customers demand it; according
to a recent study, 81% of Americans agree that “corporations
should take action to address important issues facing society.” And
76% agreed that corporations
should “stand up for what they believe politically regardless of
whether or not it is controversial.”
Surveys also show that millennials strongly prefer employers
that reflect their own values. Social media plays a role too: Firms
that remain on the sidelines could
find themselves the unwanted
subject of a viral shame campaign.
Even institutional investors
are pushing corporations to be
more socially conscious. In January 2018, BlackRock — the world’s
largest investment firm, with over
$6 trillion in assets under management — issued a letter from Chief
Executive Larry Fink encouraging
companies to do more than make
a profit. “Companies must benefit
all of their stakeholders, including
shareholders, employees, customers and the communities in which
they operate.”
The speed with which companies can now respond to events
was most evident after the Feb. 14
mass shooting at a high school in
Parkland, Fla. Within 24 hours
some companies began cutting
ties to the National Rifle Association. Two weeks later Dick’s
Sporting Goods and Walmart announced they would no longer sell
guns to people under 21. Dick’s
also stopped all sales of militarystyle rifles. “We’re going to take a
stand and step up and tell people
our view,” said CEO Edward
Stack. “Enough is enough.”
Perhaps it should be no surprise that corporations have become more political in recent
years given the Supreme Court’s
2010 decision in Citizens United.
By holding that political speech by
corporations is at the heart of the
1st Amendment, the justices emboldened corporate executives to
use their firms for political advocacy. The result is both worrisome
— more corporate money in elections — but also, as the battles
over immigration, guns and
LGBTQ rights suggest, sometimes welcome.
If, however, corporations are
going to continue to play an active
role in our political life, perhaps
they should be accountable to
more than just shareholders.
Companies have long paid lip
service to this ideal but now, for
the first time in years, there are serious proposals to make it part of
the very architecture of American
corporations. Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) has introduced legislation in Congress that would
give workers, and not just shareholders, representation on the
boards of directors of large corporations. California recently became the first state to require publicly traded corporations to have
women on their boards.
Absent such legal interventions, the marketplace will have to
be the engine for corporate political responsibility. And while the
marketplace is hardly perfect, it
does provide a way for “we the people” — in our roles as customers,
employees and investors — to exert some influence over the institutions that govern our lives.
Adam Winkler is a law professor
at UCLA and author of “We the
Corporations: How American
Businesses Won Their Civil
Rights,” a finalist for the 2018
National Book Award.
Turnbull Ikon Images
Resolve to pay if you fail
By Ian Ayres
I
n the next few days millions of Americans will make New Year’s
resolutions, and about a third of those will have something to do
with improving health and fitness. Lose weight (12%), eat better
(9%) and exercise more (9%) are three common goals, according
to polling from the Marist Institute for Public Opinion.
We already know that most will fail. If you’re serious about not
abandoning your resolutions before Groundhog Day, let behavioral
economics lend a hand.
The first thing to do is set a specific, but rational, target. Too many
people skip over this part because they think they know how to measure success: They’ll be able wear their favorite skinny
jeans again.
But it’s unreasonable, for instance, to set a goal of
losing more than 10% of your current weight. A study
of obese dieters, by contrast, found that most wanted
to lose more than 30% of their initial weight. The sad
truth is that short of undergoing gastric bypass
surgery, most people don’t lose that kind of weight, let
alone keep it off. Only about 1 in 5 successful dieters are able to maintain a 10% weight loss for at least a year. It’s hard work to join the 10%
club, but it’s even harder to remain a member.
Likewise, resolutions for fitness and eating better should be attainable, and success should be measurable on a weekly basis: Logging
10,000 Fitbit steps each week, or taking your lunch to work and not
drinking soda. Inputs are often more under your control than results.
Resolving to exercise three times a week might be better than resolving to bench press 150 pounds.
Once you have the right goal, you need the right incentives.
We treat getting into shape as an information problem, and spend
freely on diet and fitness books. What we should do with our money is
stiffen our resolve. Personally, I’m going to put some meaningful money at risk for the next several weeks to help me reach my weight loss
goal. Each week I will either lose one pound or I will forfeit $500 to a political action committee that I oppose.
I’ve used this kind of commitment contract several times in the
past and it’s worked like a charm. Every week when confronted with
the stark choice of whether I want to forfeit $500, I’ve found it easy to
forgo dessert and hit the gym.
I might instead have looked for a rich relative to offer me some prize
if I reached my goal weight, but behavioral economics teaches that carrots aren’t as effective as sticks. I’ll work harder toward my goal because the pain of losing is psychologically about twice as powerful as
the pleasure of gaining.
The suggestion of putting $500 at risk will probably scare a lot of
people away from even considering this method of keeping resolutions. Who wants to go broke trying to slim down or
get in better shape? But the beauty of this approach is
that it can be free. A commitment contract uses the
threat of losing a chunk of cash to increase the likelihood that you will persist toward your goal. A financial
penalty for missing your weekly target literally increases the cost of eating or failing to use your gym
membership. But it’s a price you need not pay.
You could enter into this kind of a contract with a friend or family
member who can also adjudicate whether you succeed. One of my colleagues has had a commitment contract in place for more than 20
years: She vowed to pay a friend $10,000 if she ever smokes another cigarette.
If risking $500 a week is too rich for your blood, choose a smaller but
meaningful amount. Think about how much you spend each week on
things that you enjoy (lattes at Starbucks, or Saturday-night movies)
and put those privileges at risk. Everyone has the ability to put 10% or
20% of their discretionary income at stake.
Many New Year’s resolutions are only half-intended from the getgo. But if you’re serious about improving your health or fitness, a commitment contract can give you hundreds of reasons to see it through
each week.
A stick works
to enforce your
resolutions.
Ian Ayres is a professor at Yale Law School, the author of “The $500
Diet” and a co-founder of the commitment contract site StickK.com.
Nudge
doctors
to reduce
opioid use
By Atul Nakhasi
A
n Orange County doctor was arrested by federal authorities in December on suspicion of illegally prescribing narcotics, “flooding Southern California
with huge quantities of opioids,” according to the U.S. attorney’s office.
Dr. Dzung Ahn Pham is accused of
distributing drugs to five people who
died of overdoses and a sixth who has
been charged in a DUI crash that
killed a Costa Mesa fire captain. In
addition, the gunman who killed 12
people in Thousand Oaks in November had pills that Pham had prescribed for someone else.
Although the allegations against
Pham paint a stark picture of extreme
negligence and violation of the Hippocratic Oath to do no harm, most of
us doctors have the best of intentions
when prescribing medications, including narcotics. However, even
when our motivations are pure, the
reality is that we still vastly overprescribe opioids. In Los Angeles
County, doctors in 2017 wrote 4,266,149
opioid prescriptions. That includes
me.
So how can that number be reduced?
Nudge us.
In August, researchers at the University of San Diego published the results of a groundbreaking experiment
that showed the value of a little
nudge. Their subjects were 861 doctors who had prescribed narcotics
such as oxycodone. All of these doctors had patients who had died of
such drugs. The researchers arranged for half of the doctors to receive letters notifying them of the
deaths; the other half did not receive
a letter.
After three months, the doctors
who received the letter prescribed
4.5% fewer high-dose opioids and
were 7% less likely to start a patient
on any opioid. The reality is that most
of us doctors never know what good
or bad ultimately comes from many
our prescriptions. The “Dear Dr.” letter gave the physicians direct feedback in a nonjudgmental and informative way and nudged them to correct
course. Who thought a simple letter
could have such a life-saving impact?
This simple idea deserves to be
spread. While the vast majority of media and policymaking attention has
focused on solving downstream consequences, such as increasing access
to the overdose-reversal agent Narcan, far less attention has been paid
to changing doctors’ prescribing patterns. Pham’s story appears to be a
tragic case in point.
Of the 49,000 Americans who died
from opioid overdoses in 2017, the U.S.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that nearly half
died from prescription drugs rather
than illicit opioids like heroin or synthetic fentanyl. Research has shown
that most people addicted to opioids
today began taking them because of a
prescription.
Now behavioral economics is
cracking the case.
In 2018, Yale researchers inserted a
simple trick into the software that
doctors in the Yale New Haven Health
System use to place prescription orders: They changed the default number of opioid pills from 30 to 12. Doctors could still order 30, but it meant
thinking about the number enough to
change it from the default. The average number of opioid pills prescribed
plummeted by 33% across the entire
system.
Using social norms to influence
doctor behavior is another “trick”
with tremendous potential.
In a recent study conducted on the
overprescribing of antibiotics for viral
infections, monthly reports sent to
doctors comparing their prescribing
practices with those of top peer performers resulted in a 71% decline in inappropriate antibiotic prescriptions.
Harnessing the ultra-competitive instincts of doctors, this effect lasted a
year after the reports stopped.
Now University of Pennsylvania
researchers are undertaking a largescale three-year trial to see if the same
nudge works on opioid prescribing
practices.
Nudges are a low-cost, high-impact way to change behavior. L.A.
County is a believer in this idea. In October, the Board of Supervisors took
the progressive step of tapping into
behavioral economics. They voted to
create the Prescriber Notification
Process: a letter mailed to doctors every time a patient who had received a
narcotic prescription from that doctor dies from an overdose.
The notification process starts in
early 2019, a helpful policy to alter the
behavior of doctors. When we positively change doctors’ behaviors, we
might just save lives. Even if it’s with a
simple letter.
Dr. Atul Nakhasi is a primary care
physician at Department of Health
Services-managed MLK Outpatient
Center whose patients include
opioid addiction survivors.
A10
T U E S DAY , JA N UA RY 1, 2 019
L AT I M E S . C O M
‘Dreamer’ joins wave of new activists
he said.
It was Cruz’s grandmother who brought her family to
California nearly 30 years
ago. Manuela Cruz made her
way to Santa Cruz from the
Mexican state of Oaxaca in
search of one of her sons, a
surfer who, after a stint in
prison, became a youth
mentor in the city nestled on
the cliffs of Monterey Bay.
Gabriela Cruz was only a
baby when her mother, then
21 and pregnant with her sister, carried her across the
border illegally to join them.
They arrived in Beach Flats,
at the time an immigrant
neighborhood
not
yet
crowded with condos, where
Gabriela learned English
and played with her little sisters near the wharf and an
old amusement park.
Her grandmother sold
plates of food from her home
and her mother, Irma Cruz,
packaged dried pineapples
and became a cook at a cafe.
They kept their immigration
status a secret, wrestling
with it each time Gabriela
asked to go to Disneyland or
needed to see a doctor.
“I didn’t want to tell [Gabriela] and affect the person
she could become,” Irma
Cruz said.
By eighth grade, there
was no avoiding it. Gabriela
begged to go on a class trip to
Washington,
D.C.
She
wanted to see the nation’s
capital and wander through
the halls of power. But her
mother objected, making excuses.
Airplanes are dangerous.
There’s too much crime in
the city.
And finally: “You weren’t
born here.”
Gabriela struggled to
bury her resentment.
The subtle differences
she detected in how she had
been treated suddenly made
sense, she said. She didn’t
have a regular dentist like
her sisters. Her mother always seemed to make more
rules for her. And her future
seemed
limited:
She
wouldn’t be able to go to college or get a driver’s license,
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“I felt like when I was in
school, I could pretend to be
like everybody else,” Cruz
said. “But as soon as I became an adult, it was going
to be even more apparent
that I did not have citizenship.”
More than 16 years ago,
Rep. Lucille Roybal-Allard
(D-Downey) helped introduce legislation to pave a
path to citizenship for thousands of immigrants who,
like Cruz, were brought into
the country illegally as children. Young immigrant activists have been fighting for
what became the Dream Act
ever since, even as the federal proposal and broader
immigration reform failed
four times in Congress,
starting in 2007.
Their plight has resonated in California, where
some state leaders fought
against 1994’s Proposition
187, which sought to cut off
schooling and health services for immigrants here illegally. Under Gov. Jerry
Brown, the state became the
first to approve its own version of the Dream Act in 2011,
and now provides financial
aid and in-state tuition for
students without legal status.
The Deferred Action for
Childhood Arrivals program, or DACA, an Obamaera effort, came a year later
and provided protections to
some 800,000 young immigrants in the U.S. illegally —
roughly a quarter of whom
lived in California — if they
didn’t have a criminal record
and worked or went to
school.
While other young immigrants organized, Cruz was
afraid to speak to anyone
about her status. But the
seeds of her political education were quietly being
planted, she said. The state’s
efforts helped her afford college, and six years ago DACA
enabled her to quit two jobs
waiting tables to work at a
credit union. After a painful
divorce from her high school
boyfriend, she treasured the
independence, she said.
But Irma Cruz was initially nervous for her daughter. Would DACA truly protect her?
Gabriela Cruz compiled
NS
Under President Obama, she was granted protections from deportation.
racial slurs, she said.
Three weeks before election day, she returned to the
city, where by then Denham
and Democrat Josh Harder
were locked in one of the
most closely contested races
in the state. In a district with
historically low Latino turnout, the Turlock congressman had pledged support
for the Dream Act and angered his party’s leadership
in an unsuccessful attempt
to salvage some form of
DACA.
But Cruz urged residents
to oppose him, pointing to
his votes to expand the border wall, make significant
cuts to legal immigration
and penalize so-called sanctuary cities, which limit collaboration with federal immigration agencies.
In Modesto days before
the election, she told voters,
“Jeff Denham has had eight
years to do something in our
favor, and he has done nothing
but
rubber-stamp
things.”
Pollsters and political
analysts
attribute
the
midterm victories to a variety of reasons: efficient organizing, a rejection of
Trump and concerns over
taxes and healthcare. Republicans have criticized
groups such as United We
Dream for sending volunteers into districts where
they don’t live and targeting
moderates. But young immigrants activists see the victories as proof that Americans are weary of anti-immigrant rhetoric.
“People
would
say,
‘You’re going after Jeff Denham — but he is a good
bridge between both sides of
the aisle on this issue,’ ”
United We Dream campaign
manager Adrian Reyna said.
“And we said, ‘Great, show
me the receipt.’ ”
As the conversation
turns to sustaining momentum through the next presidential election, hundreds of
thousands of young people
like Cruz remain in deportation limbo. For many, DACA
protections are set to expire
by 2020 if Congress does not
pass a more permanent solution. For countless others,
they’ve already expired.
Some never had the chance
to apply at all.
Irma Cruz says she is
proud of her daughter for all
she has accomplished, but
the two still debate about
how much Gabriela is
putting herself out there.
Some friends praise her.
Others wish she would keep
quiet.
She hopes to remain an
activist, is looking for work
with an immigrant rights organization and plans to help
campaign again in 2020.
“Someone fought for me
when I didn’t know they
were fighting for me,” she
said.
Last month, with help
from other activists, she revived the Santa Cruz posadas, a series of processions retracing Mary and Joseph’s biblical search for
lodging in Bethlehem. As
rain poured down, Cruz and
others held candles as they
walked and sang door to
door.
The holiday tradition
had once been organized by
her grandmother, started
when she came looking for
her son all those years ago.
IO
Katie Falkenberg Los Angeles Times
GABRIELA CRUZ was a baby when her mother brought her to the U.S. illegally.
her application against her
mother’s advice, stuffing a
manila folder with school
transcripts, photos and addresses, evidence of a life almost entirely lived in the
United States.
“ ‘Right now, you basically don’t exist in this country,’ ” Cruz recalls her
mother warning. “ ‘You’re
going to expose yourself to
the U.S. government and
you don’t know how this information can be used
against you.’ ”
After Trump was elected
on promises to increase deportations and build a wall
on the U.S.-Mexico border,
Cruz worried her mother’s
worst fears might materialize. So she took her dream
vacation to Maui with a
boyfriend — her first time on
a plane — not knowing her
fate in the country or
whether she would get to
travel again. Trump rescinded DACA months later.
That day, her eyes
swollen from crying, she
walked to a protest a few
blocks from the Santa Cruz
bank where she worked.
Cruz said she felt stares as
she crossed the street,
and realized she might be
the only Dreamer in the
crowd of roughly 40 people.
Someone handed her a
microphone.
She didn’t want to speak,
but she thought the least she
could do was thank the
group for making her feel
loved, she said.
“I told them, ‘I am not a
bad person, I had no say in
coming here,’ ” she said.
It was the first time she
shared her story aloud. But
she still felt alone.
So she called United We
Dream, a Washington-based
immigrant rights organization founded by Dreamers,
to start her own local group.
Soon after, she quit her job
and made her way to Republican members’ offices after
Congress again failed to
pass the Dream Act. Over
the summer, she and other
activists traveled to Texas,
where she said she saw herself in the migrant children
who were bused into a tent
city in Tornillo. There, federal immigration officials
were separating migrant
families at the border.
And as the midterm election neared, she was among
7,000 Dreamers who made
calls, texted and knocked on
doors to reach voters in California, New Mexico, Texas
and Florida. The effort was
the first by United We
Dream to target congressional races, but volunteers
said they were able to tap
into a network of elected officials and activists who had
come of age and risen
through previous immigrant rights movements.
Perhaps nowhere was
that network more established than in California,
where Democratic state
leaders introduced measures to oppose Trump administration policies and
Atty. Gen. Xavier Becerra,
himself the son of immigrants, led a lawsuit against
the federal government over
the termination of DACA
that temporarily allowed the
program to continue.
Yet even in a state billed
as a counterweight to
Trump, Cruz said she experienced hate. At a demonstration outside the Modesto office of Republican Rep.
Jeff Denham, a handful of
counter-protesters shouted
F R EE
[Dreamer, from A1]
and tried to end a program
that granted temporary protections for young people
brought into the country illegally as children, she grew
tired of sitting helplessly at
her desk and quit to become
an activist.
“I realized I needed to
share my story with as many
people as possible,” she said.
“We shouldn’t be living in a
world of fear because we are
undocumented.”
In California, Dreamers
like Cruz phoned voters,
walked precincts and protested outside Republican
lawmakers’ offices, reaching
people who had not been
called or visited by either
party. Their efforts helped
boost turnout among Latinos in this year’s midterm
election — 29 million nationwide were eligible to vote, according to the Pew Research
Center — which is projected
to surpass levels higher
than in past presidential
election years, political analysts said.
An analysis of data from
eight states by the Latino
Policy and Politics Initiative
at UCLA shows that the Latino vote grew by an estimated 96% from 2014 to 2018,
compared with 37% among
non-Latinos. The surge, researchers said, helped move
20 House districts held by
Republicans to Democratic
control in California, Arizona, Nevada, Texas, New
Mexico, Florida, New Jersey
and New York.
In another study, the political research firm Latino
Decisions found that an increase in Latino voter turnout contributed to flipping
six GOP-held congressional
seats in California — four in
the once conservative bastion of Orange County and
two in the Central Valley
that have long eluded
Democrats.
The results “spoke to the
power within the Latino
community,” said Adrian
Pantoja, a senior analyst
with Latino Decisions and a
professor of politics at Pitzer
College.
“Latinos were talking to
each other, and there’s no
doubt that Dreamers were
instrumental to the effort,”
FREE
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B
CALIFORNIA
T U E S D A Y , J A N U A R Y 1 , 2 0 1 9 :: L A T I M E S . C O M / C A L I F O R N I A
Concerns over
toilets prompt
closure of park
campgrounds
Joshua Tree officials
cite safety issues as
shutdown drags on.
By Javier Panzar
and Mary Forgione
Doug Duran Bay Area News Group
STANISLAUS County Sheriff Adam Christianson angrily criticized California’s “sanctuary” law after the
killing of Newman Police Officer Ronil Singh. The suspect is an immigrant living in the U.S. illegally.
Violence in Central Valley
fuels ‘sanctuary’ backlash
The fun is over at Joshua
Tree National Park. Blame
feces.
Campgrounds will close
at noon Wednesday, officials
said, citing health and safety
concerns over the park’s
vault toilets, which are near
capacity.
Park visitor centers, flush
toilets, water-filling stations
and dump stations are all
closed because of the federal
government’s partial shutdown.
Vault toilets — the waterless bathrooms in which visitors can relieve themselves
into a sealed container that
is buried underground —
had remained open. But
with no workers to pump out
the waste, those are being
closed as well.
But the park left the main
gates open and let cars
stream in for free, as there
are no government employees to charge the $30-a-car
entrance fee.
Some rangers remained
to patrol the 1,235-squaremile park, a popular winter
destination for hikers and
rock climbers.
Park officials said Monday in a news release that
human waste in public
areas, off-road driving and
other infractions are becoming a problem as the government shutdown drags on.
The park’s restrooms
and visitor centers have
been closed and trash collection suspended since the
partial shutdown began
Dec. 22, but the park itself remains open.
At Joshua Tree, the Indian Cove and Black Rock
campgrounds will be open
for day use only, from sunrise
to sunset. Rattlesnake Canyon will be closed to reduce
the number of search and
rescue events for rangers already spread thin, park officials said.
Volunteers have been doing their part to clean up the
[See Joshua Tree, B5]
Two sheriffs strike different tones in criticizing state law
By Brittny Mejia
Before releasing the name of the
suspect in the death of Newman Police
Officer Ronil Singh, authorities released his legal status.
Standing before a battery of reporters and television cameras, Stanislaus County Sheriff Adam Christianson declared: “Unlike Ron, who immigrated to this country lawfully and legally to pursue his lifelong career of
public safety, public service and being
a police officer, this suspect is in our
country illegally. He doesn’t belong
here. He’s a criminal.”
The suspect in Singh’s death, eventually identified as Gustavo Arriaga,
had known gang ties and two prior arrests on suspicion of driving under the
influence — and had been living in the
country illegally for years.
It was the second time in a month
that a sheriff in the rural, conservative
Central Valley had angrily criticized
Andy Alfaro Modesto Bee
A PHOTOGRAPH of Singh, 33,
is displayed at a vigil for him Friday. He was shot and killed during a traffic stop Wednesday.
California’s so-called sanctuary law
after an immigrant in the country illegally was accused of killing someone.
But the sheriffs of Stanislaus and Tulare counties, communities with large
immigrant populations, struck different tones in the wake of the kind of
crimes that the Trump administration often uses as ammunition against
illegal immigration.
After a deadly rampage in mid-December, Tulare County Sheriff Mike
Boudreaux voiced frustration over
the sanctuary law. But he also expressed broader support for the county’s large immigrant population and
acknowledged that crimes by immigrants are relatively low.
“We have a large agricultural community, we have a large population of
undocumented persons that every
day don’t violate the law,” Boudreaux
said. “That’s not my opposition. My
opposition is that person who is a
known criminal element.”
[See Sanctuary, B5]
Paradegoers have goose bumps
Pasadena’s overnight
campers brave low
temps and high winds.
By Alexa Diaz
and Alejandra
Reyes-Velarde
Tamya Roberts prepared
for frigid weather when she
packed
to
camp
out
overnight for the Rose Parade with her husband and
two children.
Her family brought a picnic table, a grill, four camping cots, two heat lamps,
games and shiny, silver New
Year’s decorations to liven
up their strip of sidewalk.
They packed chicken soup
and carne asada burritos for
New Year’s Eve dinner, and
hash browns, eggs and sausage for breakfast on New
Year’s Day.
She and dozens of other
campers began staking out
spots along the parade’s 5.5mile route about noon Mon[See Rose Parade, B6]
California
Journal
Robin Abcarian’s
column does not
appear today.
mel melcon Los Angeles Times
ROSE PARADE CAMPERS Stella Graber, 8, left, and Lucy Corbin, 6, of Phoenix
have fun and keep warm in foldable wagons on Colorado Boulevard in Pasadena,
where they were with family members Monday all set for Tuesday’s parade.
Jay L. Clendenin Los Angeles Times
RANGER Rob Evans places temporary barriers off
the side of the road near Joshua Tree National Park.
Murder charge in
Walgreens death
Guard shot man in the
back in Hollywood,
prosecutors say.
By Javier Panzar
A security guard who police say shot and killed a 21year-old man last month in
Hollywood was charged with
murder by the Los Angeles
County district attorney’s
office Monday.
Donald Vincent Ciota, 28,
of Covina faces one count of
murder with an allegation
that he used a firearm as a
deadly weapon. Ciota shot
and killed Jonathan Hart inside a Walgreens at Vine
Street and Sunset Boulevard on Dec. 2, authorities
said.
Ciota suspected Hart of
shoplifting, and the two got
into a physical altercation.
Ciota pulled his firearm and
fatally shot Hart in the back
as he ran away, prosecutors
said.
Hart died from a gunshot
wound to the neck, according to a spokeswoman for
the Los Angeles County coroner’s office.
Family attorney Carl
Douglas said Hart was unarmed and was not shoplifting that night. Detectives
told family members that
Hart had a California ID
card in his hand at the time
of his death.
The attorney said Hart
had gotten into a confrontation earlier that night with
the same security guard and
had spoken with the store
manager before continuing
to shop.
Douglas said Monday
that Hart’s family was
“heartened and encouraged” that Los Angeles
County Dist. Atty. Jackie
Lacey’s office has charged
Ciota.
Douglas said Hart’s family is planning to file a $525million wrongful-death suit
against Walgreens. Douglas
said the family is calling for a
boycott of Walgreens until
armed guards are removed
from its stores.
“Walgreens, the blood of
Jonathan Hart is on your
hands,” Douglas said last
month.
Hart was profiled, harassed and ultimately shot
because he was a homeless,
gay black man, the lawyer
said.
A company spokesman
said previously that Walgreens had fired the security
firm that worked at the store
and is cooperating with police.
“We are committed to
providing a safe environment for our employees, patients and customers in the
communities we serve,”
spokesman Phil Caruso said
last month. “We contract for
armed and unarmed security, as well as video surveillance, in our stores based on
the public safety needs of
each location.”
Ciota is scheduled to be
arraigned
Thursday,
a
spokesman for the district
attorney’s office said. His
bail is set at $3 million. If
convicted as charged, he
faces a maximum sentence
of 50 years to life in prison.
javier.panzar@latimes.com
Twitter: @jpanzar
B2
T U E S DAY , JA N UA RY 1, 2 019
L AT I M E S . C O M
COMPANY TOWN
TV blackout averted ahead of parade
came to an agreement Sunday on a comprehensive
distribution deal that
averted an ESPN blackout
for 4.6 million Verizon Fios
customers in the Northeast
and Mid-Atlantic states.
Verizon was determined to
avoid an outage that would
have frustrated sports fans
who watch ESPN’s coverage
of college football bowl
games. The previous Disney-Verizon contract also
was set to expire on New
Year’s Eve.
The conflict has been
over so-called retransmission fees — the money that
cable, satellite TV and telephone companies must pay
to broadcast local TV station signals as part of their
cable channel lineups. Television station owners this
year will collect a combined
$10 billion in such fees, up
from $9.3 billion in 2017,
according to the alliance.
Charter and Tribune
extend the deadline
for a deal in time for
KTLA viewers.
MEG JAMES
A contract dispute that
had threatened to disrupt a
New Year’s Day tradition in
Los Angeles was averted
late Monday when Charter
Communications and Tribune Media agreed to a
short-term contract extension to give the two companies more time to hammer
out a new distribution deal.
Facing a looming New
Year’s Eve deadline of 9 p.m.
Pacific time, the 11th-hour
truce delayed at least until
Wednesday afternoon the
threat of a blackout of Tribune stations, including
KTLA Channel 5 in Los
Angeles, from Charter’s
Spectrum cable television
service.
Without a deal, hundreds
of thousands of Spectrum
customers in Southern
California could have
missed seeing KTLA’s popular broadcast of the Tournament of Roses Parade — a
tradition in many Southern
California homes.
The new deadline for a
contract is 2 p.m. Wednesday, according to the two
companies. The deadline
extension suggests that
both sides have made progress in the negotiations.
Stamford, Conn.-based
Charter and Chicago-based
Tribune Media — which
owns KTLA and 32 other
television stations in Charter markets, including
KSWB Channel 5 in San
Diego — have spent the last
few days in a tense standoff
as they haggled over details
of a new agreement to allow
Charter to transmit Tribune Media’s station signals.
The companies have been
wrangling over a proposed
fee hike by Tribune Media.
Charter has an estimated 1.5 million Spectrum
customers in the Los Angeles region. Spectrum is the
brand name for Charter’s
pay-TV, internet and phone
service.
meg.james@latimes.com
Inmate
escapes
from
camp
Patrick Fallon For The Times
A CONTRACT extension until 2 p.m. Wednesday in the Charter-Tribune Media talks means Spectrum cus-
tomers can watch the New Year’s Day Rose Parade on KTLA-TV Channel 5. Above, floats at last year’s event.
Negotiations have been
fraught. Tribune Media over
the weekend complained
about a lack of “meaningful”
progress in the talks. On
Monday, callers to KTLA
who wanted to hear an
update on the situation
were routed to a Spectrum
customer service center.
Tribune Media urged viewers to demand that Charter
provide their local station as
part of their Spectrum
packages.
Like other cable operators, Charter has been
struggling to control programming costs in an effort
to stanch a migration of
customers to lower-cost
streaming services. Pay-TV
operators had a tough year
in 2018: The industry was
projected to lose 1.1 million
customers during the year,
including more than 200,000
cable TV subscribers from
Charter, according to recent
estimates from MoffettNathanson Research.
“Charter is committed to
holding down the cost of
programming and, in turn,
the cost our customers pay
for cable television service.
Charter’s intention is to
continue to provide Tribune
programming to our customers,” the company said
in a statement Monday.
There were at least 140
television blackouts in 2018,
including a lingering stalemate between satellite TV
provider Dish Network and
Spanish-language media
giant Univision Communications. On Monday, an
impasse between Verizon
Communications and TV
broadcaster Tegna Inc.
resulted in an outage of
network affiliate stations in
Washington, D.C., Baltimore, Norfolk, Va., and
Buffalo, N.Y., on Verizon
Fios systems.
Still, the number of
outages was down substantially from a record of 213 in
2017, according to the American Television Alliance, a
Washington-based lobbying
group that represents payTV operators.
Walt Disney Co. and
Verizon Communications
SURROUNDINGS
Forgotten history of KKK at Pendleton
Podcast explores an
episode that reporter
didn’t want to let
‘fade into the past.’
ANDREW DYER
In the 1970s, the Ku Klux
Klan was operating in the
open on Marine Corps Base
Camp Pendleton. Members
of the white supremacist
group — active-duty Marines — wore KKK insignia
on base, posted threatening
fliers in common areas and
carried large knives to intimidate black Marines.
After a series of altercations on- and off-base, a
group of black Marines
responded to a flier advertising a meeting of the KKK
on the base. On Nov. 13, 1976,
they barged into the room in
which they believed that
meeting was taking place
and attacked their fellow
Marines inside, according to
news reports at the time.
They had the wrong
room. The KKK, sitting on a
cache of weapons, was
actually in the next room.
A new podcast, “Free the
Pendleton 14,” by reporter
Steve Walsh, aims to tell the
story of this group of black
Marines and bring to light a
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associated press
chapter of military history
that he says has almost
been forgotten.
“This story was just
going to fade into the past,”
he said. “And as we know,
just wishing stuff away does
not solve the problem.”
Reports from the time
suggest that is just what the
Marines attempted to do.
While 13 black Marines
were jailed and charged
with crimes, the members of
the KKK were taken into
protective custody and
quietly shipped off to other
bases. (One of the 14 black
Marines originally arrested
ended up testifying against
the others.)
The American Civil
Liberties Union was
involved and worked with
both groups — the accused
black Marines as well as the
white KKK members.
Membership in supremacist and extremist groups
is now against Marine regulations, although in 1976, it
was tolerated.
Walsh said he became
interested in the story after
hearing about it early in 2017.
After reporting by ProPublica and PBS’ “Frontline”
identified a Marine who had
participated in the white
supremacist riot in Charlottesville, Va., the podcast
took on a new urgency.
“This was not a history
piece we’re talking about,”
he said. “This really is a
continuation of something
that’s been happening for a
very long time. Every element from the command to
the media — everybody
involved in this case — the
community as a whole …
just simply did not take this
stuff very seriously. The only
people who took this seriously were 14 African American Marines.”
The Marine who participated in the Charlottesville
riot, Vasillios Pistolis, was
booted from the corps in
July.
One of the challenges
Walsh faced with the project
was finding people to interview. The Marine commanders from the time have since
died, and many of those
SACRAMENTO — Corrections officials are searching for an inmate who escaped from a minimum-security facility in Northern
California.
The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation said Nicolas
Dunning, 32, was discovered
missing from the Konocti
Conservation Camp on
Monday morning.
The camp in Lake
County is home to about 95
minimum-security inmates
who help fight wildfires, according to the agency’s website. Lt. Charlene Billings
said Dunning was assigned
as a firefighter but was not
working when he disappeared.
Dunning was the fifth
state inmate to escape last
month. Three were captured. Authorities are still
searching for Justin Franks,
27, who escaped from Folsom State Prison on Dec. 22.
Shalom Mendoza, 21, was
taken into custody Saturday
at a fast-food restaurant in
Paso Robles after escaping
from San Quentin State
Prison three days earlier.
Officers
kill man
armed
with knife
By Alejandra
Reyes-Velarde
Man
Steve Walsh
REPORTER Steve Walsh made a podcast series about 14 black Marines who tried
to take on a group of Ku Klux Klan members at Camp Pendleton in 1976.
Union-Tribune archives
A SAN DIEGO UNION story from Nov. 30, 1978,
details Ku Klux Klan activity at Camp Pendleton.
involved have common
names, which (with only
scant military records to go
on) makes tracking them
down exceedingly difficult.
Walsh was also unable to
locate any of the KKK members.
He did interview one of
the accused black Marines
— Ricky McGilvery, a Dallas-area preacher — and
some of the attorneys involved in the case.
Walsh said he questioned
whether he — a white, middle-aged reporter from the
Midwest — was the right
person to tell this largely
African American story.
“That always kind of
concerned me somewhat,”
he said. “Should I even be
the person telling this
story?”
His concerns were assuaged, he said, when he
realized that people needed
to face the issue of institutional racism head-on.
“It’s whites,” he said. “It’s
us. We need to validate that
this is real, this happened.”
Walsh is a reporter at
KPBS, but his employer
was not involved in the
project. Four of the five
planned episodes are now
available on most podcast
apps.
andrew.dyer
@sduniontribune.com
Dyer writes for the San
Diego Union-Tribune.
Los Angeles police Monday shot and killed a man
who was threatening them
with a knife at a Van Nuys
apartment complex after he
injured a tenant there, authorities said.
Officers responded to a
radio call of a woman
screaming at the apartments in the 13000 block of
Vanowen Street about 4:30
a.m., LAPD Det. Meghan
Aguilar told reporters at the
scene.
A neighbor heard a woman screaming and tried to
help her, Aguilar said. The
neighbor and a man in the
apartment got into a physical altercation, and the
neighbor was taken to the
hospital with significant injuries, Aguilar said.
When police arrived, they
were met at the door by a
man holding a large knife,
they said. Officers said they
told the man several times to
put the weapon down, but he
refused, and they shot him.
The man, who authorities
said was 18 to 20, died at the
scene.
Aguilar said the woman
and the man may have been
related.
alejandra.reyesvelarde
@latimes.com
T U E S DAY , JA N UA RY 1, 2 019
L AT I M E S . C O M
B3
CITY & STATE
Oceanside resort is ready to rise USC
opens
new
ethics
office
After quarter century
of delays, luxurious
hotels may soon go up
on vacant lots in a
popular tourist area.
By Phil Diehl
OCEANSIDE — Two of
what would be Oceanside’s
tallest, largest and most luxurious hotels may soon go up
on a pair of vacant lots overlooking the city’s downtown
beach and pier, an area
that’s long been a popular
tourist destination.
“It’s a matter of weeks,
not months” until construction begins, said Jeremy Cohen of the San Diego office of
developer S.D. Malkin Properties.
Final details are being
ironed out on an agreement
between Malkin, the city of
Oceanside and Denverbased Two Roads Hospitality, Cohen said. Two Roads,
which was acquired by the
Hyatt Hotels Corp. in November, operates high-end
resorts across North America and Asia, including
L’Auberge in Del Mar.
A destination resort has
been planned for the site
since Oceanside formed its
redevelopment agency in
the 1970s. The city has
courted developers interested in building there since
the 1980s.
The current deal, expected to close escrow in
days, sells Malkin the twoblock site for $1.5 million, a
bargain for the developer.
The City Council voted 3
to 2 in 2001 to spend about
$3.6 million to buy the property, which at the time was
24 lots occupied mostly by
old, small, single-family
homes. The area was considered blighted, and the city
acquired some of the lots
through eminent domain.
In addition to the lowcost deal for the land, the
City Council approved a
$13.6-million subsidy in 2014
for the resort, primarily in
the form of a rebate on a
transient occupancy tax to
be spread over its first 15
years. The so-called room
tax is added to the rate
charged to hotel guests.
City officials say the benefits of the resort will far outweigh the costs to taxpayers.
“As a four-star destination resort, it will attract a
new visitor segment to
Oceanside and will bring
new patrons to downtown,”
Assistant City Manager
Deanna Lorson said by
email.
The high-end beachfront
resort will bolster Oceanside’s image as a tourism
destination, create permanent jobs and boost business in the area’s downtown
retail and tourist-oriented
communities, she said.
“The project is projected
to generate $30.7 million in
revenue to the city in its first
15 years, and create 225 fulltime and 55 part-time jobs
upon completion,” Lorson
said.
Malkin has an approved
grading permit and is obtaining building permits so
that construction can begin
soon after escrow closes,
Lorson said. Completion is
expected to take about two
years.
Both hotels will face Pacific Street and the ocean,
one on the city block north of
Mission Avenue and the
other on the block south of
Mission. The southern hotel
will be six stories tall with
226 rooms, and the northern
building will be seven stories, with 158 rooms and a
restaurant on the top floor.
Oceanside offers a rare
opportunity to build a large
beachfront resort, Cohen
said.
“There are very few fullservice hotels on the [San
Diego County] coastline
that offer ballrooms and
large meeting facilities,” Cohen said. “That is one thing
that will be unusual. The
scale of interior design and
quality is something you
don’t see often on the coastline.”
The Oceanside Transit
Center is another benefit for
the resort, he said.
“You can literally step off
the train and walk to the hotel,” Cohen said. “It’s probably the best rail access to a
hotel anywhere. It’s very
green and in tune with mass
transportation.”
After scandals, school
hires a former cop to
look into complaints.
By Julia Sclafani
Peronne said.
“Friday, he wasn’t able to
stand,” Peronne said, “and
Saturday, he started to
crash.”
The bird went into shock
as he was handled by rescuers, so they allowed him to
rest in a quiet area, where he
began making a slow and
steady recovery. By Sunday,
the bird was eating and
walking around.
In the last several years,
the rescue center has received similar calls of birds
being shot with arrows. But
treating intoxicated birds
was a first for the group, Peronne said. The drugged Canada goose was released
Wednesday, the day before
the second goose came in,
and the ring-billed gull will
be released this week.
Peronne said rescuers
didn’t know whether the two
incidents were related.
A longtime member of
the Costa Mesa Police Department has exchanged his
uniform for an iconic cardinal-and-gold “SC” baseball
cap, which is visible in his
new office at USC.
The former captain for
field operations plans to call
on his experiences at the Police Department, which
underwent a protracted
conflict with previous city
leaders, in order to help USC
weather a series of storms.
Mark Manley, 47, became
the director of USC’s new Office of Professionalism and
Ethics in September. The office was created partly in response to a string of campus
scandals, including inappropriate drug use by the former medical school dean
and a campus gynecologist
accused of preying on
patients. The scandals led to
the resignation of university
President C.L. Max Nikias.
Launched in September,
Manley’s office is a centralized hub assigned with receiving and responding to
campus complaints. Manley
has met with student and
faculty groups, as well as
university stakeholders to
communicate the office’s
goals for oversight and accountability and to introduce new internal systems
to receive, review and manage sensitive personnel
problems.
“The office is a central
hub for complaints and investigations into serious issues like workplace conflict,
inappropriate behavior and
discrimination,” according
to a USC news release about
Manley’s appointment.
Manley, a Huntington
Beach resident who grew up
in Anaheim and graduated
from UC Irvine with a degree
in criminology, left the Costa
Mesa police after 23 years in
September.
“That’s where I really
learned the sense of customer services, the value of a
smile and good interaction,”
he said.
The former homicide investigator always envisioned himself working in a
university setting, calling his
new position “a unique
chance to be part of a team
to take crisis and turn it into
opportunity.”
His time in Costa Mesa
might have been ideal
preparation.
“I had to learn how to be a
transformative leader and
adapt to my circumstances,”
he said.
Manley said he helped
lead in challenging times.
Police staffing was reduced a
few years ago during a de
facto hiring freeze that left
staffing below budgeted levels. He was promoted to captain in 2014 — a period of acrimony involving the department, the police union and a
majority of the City Council.
“The challenging and difficult years probably provided exponential personal
and professional growth for
all involved,” Manley said.
“Absent the crisis and challenge that we experienced I
probably wouldn’t have been
prepared, and I’m grateful
for that.”
Still, Manley will miss
some parts of his life in uniform.
“I’ve eaten fewer doughnuts and drink less coffee,”
he quipped, adding that in
all seriousness, “I will miss
the internal camaraderie
from the Police Department
and community, but I’ve
found that same level of camaraderie
here,
which
wasn’t expected.”
alejandra.reyesvelarde
@latimes.com
Twitter: @r_valejandra
julia.sclafani@latimes.com
Sclafani writes for Times
Community News.
Phil Diehl San Diego Union-Tribune
ADDING TO the lure of the resort site is the Graves House, which appeared in the hit 1983 movie “Top Gun.”
Oceanside chose Malkin
from a field of three finalists
with proposals for the property in 2005. It was Oceanside’s fourth try in 25 years to
land a luxury hotel for the
site.
One of the previous proposals was a 12-story project
by hotel magnate and former San Diego Union-Tribune owner Doug Manchester.
Manchester’s plan included closing parts of three
streets, including Pacific, to
vehicular traffic. That and
the overall huge scale of the
proposal created controversy and opposition.
In 2003, the City Council
voted to pay Manchester
$2.2 million to settle a $15million lawsuit he filed
against the city after the
Coastal Commission rejected his plan.
Malkin’s plan was more
widely accepted, but it, too,
hit some rough waters.
The Great Recession
slowed many developers,
and the city granted multiple time extensions for
Malkin to obtain financing.
Also, a group called San
Diegans for Open Government filed a lawsuit in 2014
alleging the city had violated
the state’s open meeting
laws when it awarded the
subsidy. The lawsuit was resolved in the project’s favor
in early 2017.
“Coming soon” signs recently went up on the property and boosted the longsimmering interest in the
site.
The time is right for construction to begin, Cohen
said. The nearby Coast
Highway
corridor
and
beachfront areas have been
revitalized, and new multistory buildings with a mixture of residential and retail
uses are going up on nearby
blocks.
Adding to the lure and
lore of the location is the
Graves House, a little blue
cottage built in 1887 and now
more widely known as the
“Top Gun” house for the 1983
hit movie starring Tom
Cruise and Kelley McGillis.
Fenced off and boarded up,
it’s the only structure remaining on the property.
“The ‘Top Gun’ house will
be moved off the site during
construction,” Cohen said.
The building will be restored to historical standards and returned to the
property as part of the hotel,
on the block north of its current location, and will probably become a boutique ice
cream parlor.
Two Roads Hospitality is
the new kid on the Oceanside block. The hotel and resort management company
was created in 2016 with the
merger of Destination Ho-
tels and Commune Hotels
and Resorts.
Two Roads announced
its partnership with Malkin
in January 2018, with plans to
design and operate the two
halves of the Malkin resort
— one as a Destination Hotel
and the other as a Joie de
Vivre Hotel.
The Joie de Vivre Hotel
on the northern block will include a restaurant, a coffee
house, a cafe and market, a
fitness center, 3,000 square
feet of street-front retail, and
an indoor-outdoor rooftop
pool and bar.
The Destination Hotel on
the southern block will have
a restaurant, an indoor-outdoor bar, an elevated pool
deck, a spa and space for
large meetings and events.
phil.diehl
@sduniontribune.com
Diehl writes for the San
Diego Union-Tribune.
Carolyn Cole Los Angles Times
LIGHTING UP FOR 2019
A crowd begins to gather at the Countdown Stage in front of an illuminated L.A. City Hall for the sixth
annual N.Y.E.L.A. celebration, which organizers said is the West Coast’s flagship New Year’s Eve event.
Goose found with arrow through his neck
Bird is discovered at
same park where two
others ingested drugs.
By Alejandra
Reyes-Velarde
The birds at a Huntington Beach park have had a
rough holiday season, and a
wildlife rescue center has
had to handle the unfortunate events.
Around the same time
the Wetlands & Wildlife Care
Center got a call about two
birds that had been found
drugged after consuming
pills scattered on the grass
at Carr Park, the rescue
group received another call
about a goose roaming the
park with an arrow through
the base of his neck.
While the first two birds
— a Canada goose and a
ring-billed gull — were getting IV fluids and supplements to flush the drugs
Wetlands & Wildfire Care Center
BY SUNDAY, a Canada goose that was found with an
arrow through his neck was eating and walking.
from their system, rescuers
were trying to catch the
goose that had been shot.
The bird flew around
with the large arrow through
his neck for about a week before he was captured Thursday, said Lisa Peronne, wildlife manager at the rescue
center, which is also in Hunt-
ington Beach.
The projectile missed the
bird’s muscle, but the wound
became infected. The shaft
of the arrow — the kind used
for recreational target practice, not professional hunting — was removed, and the
goose was given antibiotics,
IV fluids and painkillers,
B4
TUESDAY, JANUARY 1, 2019
LOS ANGELES TIMES
The news that matters.
From a source you trust.
Now you can get our award-winning coverage
of news, sports, entertainment and lifestyle in Spanish.
latimes.com/Espanol
T U E S DAY , JA N UA RY 1, 2 019
L AT I M E S . C O M
B5
Sheriffs attack state’s ‘sanctuary’ law
[Sanctuary, from B1]
After Singh’s death on
Dec. 26, U.S. Immigration
and Customs Enforcement
issued a statement expressing concern “that California’s sanctuary laws continue to undermine public safety and cause preventable
crimes by restricting law enforcement cooperation and
allowing
public
safety
threats back into the community to reoffend.”
ICE had had no prior encounters with Arriaga.
In the last few weeks,
Christianson
and
Boudreaux have criticized
Senate Bill 54, which provides expanded protection
for immigrants who have entered the country illegally.
The law, which took effect in
January 2018, prohibits state
and local police agencies
from notifying federal officials in many cases when immigrants potentially subject
to deportation are about to
be released from custody.
The law was drastically
scaled back in the final days
of the negotiations because
of opposition from sheriff ’s
groups.
Last week, the president
tweeted about the Stanislaus County case: “Time to
get tough on Border Security. Build the Wall!”
“I’m not here to talk
about the president of the
United States, but I will repeat what I said before,”
Christianson said. “Border
security goes hand in hand
with national security, goes
hand in hand with public
safety, goes hand in hand
with the safety of our community.”
Last month, ICE lodged
an immigration detainer on
36-year-old Gustavo Garcia,
after he was arrested on a
misdemeanor for being
under the influence of a controlled
substance,
the
agency said in a statement.
Garcia had twice been deported.
Because of SB 54,
Evan Vucci Associated Press
SHERIFF Adam Christianson, left, with President Trump and Assemblywoman Melissa Melendez in May.
Boudreaux said, authorities
would have needed a federal
arrest warrant to hold Garcia for immigration officials.
As a result, Garcia was released from custody.
A couple of days later, on
Dec. 16, authorities allege,
Garcia shot a farm worker as
he picked fruit in Exeter. The
victim survived. Three minutes later, Garcia, authorities say, robbed a mini mart
at gunpoint. After the robbery, police believe he may
have been involved in a fatal
shooting in Lindsay. That
night, he tried to shoot and
kill a woman at a Motel 6 in
Tulare, authorities said.
Other allegations against
Garcia include an assault
with a deadly weapon, a fatal
shooting at a gas station and
firing into homes. His apparent rampage ended only after he was killed when he
drove the wrong way down a
highway and was thrown
from his vehicle.
“Our county was shot up
by a violent criminal that
could have easily been prevented had we had the opportunity to reach out to our
fellow
counterparts,”
Boudreaux said.
But Boudreaux added
that he believes in the
Obama-era Deferred Action
for Childhood Arrivals program, which has protected
nearly 800,000 young immigrants in the country illegally after they were
brought to the U.S. when
they were children. He said
he employs two deputy sheriffs who are so-called
Dreamers.
“I’m not against any of
our documented or undocumented community, or
those who are wanting to
make a better life … that’s
not
the
point
here,”
Boudreaux said. “I hope the
narrative is clear that the
state law is missing a component and that component is
us working together with …
Immigration and Customs
Enforcement.”
A little over a week later,
and less than 200 miles away
in Stanislaus County, Singh
was tipped off about an intoxicated man in a silver
pickup, authorities said.
The officer radioed that he
was pulling over a vehicle at
an intersection.
Singh probably didn’t
know that the driver, Arriaga, had two warrants out
for his arrest. Minutes after
the traffic stop, the officer
called out “shots fired” over
his radio, authorities said.
The officers who responded found Singh, 33,
had been shot and the motorist he stopped had fled.
Singh was taken to a hospital, where he died.
Days later, Arriaga was
arrested as he tried to flee to
his native Mexico, authorities said. Arriaga, who is
from the Mexican state of
Colima, was arrested by the
California Highway Patrol in
2011 on suspicion of a felony
DUI, after apparently causing bodily injury to someone
other than himself. He was
arrested again in June 2014
on charges of exhibition of
speed, DUI over 0.08 and
driving
unlicensed,
Chowchilla Police Chief
Dave Riviere said.
In both cases, he failed to
appear in court.
Arriaga, who is known to
ICE as Pablo Virgen Mendoza, has not had previous
encounters with the agency,
officials said. It is unclear
when he entered the country.
“He might have got a DUI
arrest and we might not
have been notified because
he could have just been cited
and released,” an ICE official
said.
In emotional news conferences after Arriaga’s arrest, Christianson touted
Singh as someone who had
legally immigrated to the
U.S. and devoted his life to
public service.
“The last thing in the
world I want to do is politicize the death of Officer
Singh,” Christianson said.
“But we need to have a conversation about restrictive
legislation that puts our
communities at risk.”
The suspect’s 25-year-old
brother, Adrian Virgen Mendoza, and a co-worker, 27year-old Erik Razo Quiroz,
both of whom are also in the
country illegally, were arrested on felony charges that
they interfered with the investigation, authorities said.
Adrian Virgen Mendoza
has a previous misdemeanor
conviction and no known immigration encounters, according to ICE. Razo Quiroz
has a previous felony conviction and two prior returns to
Mexico, the most recent removal in March 2012.
Police also arrested Arriaga’s girlfriend, Ana Leyde
Cervantes, and another
brother, Conrado Virgen
Mendoza, who are in the
country illegally, on suspicion of aiding Arriaga in
evading authorities. Three
Bakersfield residents were
arrested on suspicion of aiding and abetting, authorities
said.
ICE has lodged detainers
on at least seven people arrested in connection with
Singh’s death.
brittny.mejia@latimes.com
Times staff writer Jazmine
Ulloa contributed to this
report.
J UNE WHITFIELD, 1925-2017
‘Absolutely Fabulous’ costar
had long career in comedy
associated press
ritish actress and comedic star June
Whitfield,
whose
long career included
memorable roles in the TV
series “Absolutely Fabulous”
and “Terry and June,” has
died. She was 93.
She died Friday night, according to her agent.
Whitfield enjoyed a career spanning decades, appearing on some of Britain’s
most popular TV shows and
earning generations of fans
drawn by her wide range and
impeccable timing.
She was prominent in the
“Carry On” series and the
sitcom “Terry and June”
with Terry Scott in the 1980s
before playing a vital role in
“Absolutely Fabulous.”
Her time on “Ab Fab”
playing the slightly odd
mother of Jennifer Saunders’ boozy character Edina
introduced Whitfield to fans
who hadn’t been born when
she started on radio decades
earlier.
Fellow “Ab Fab” stars
Saunders and Joanna Lumley praised Whitfield for the
warmth and wit she brought
to the hugely popular show.
“I will always be grateful
that she agreed to be in ‘Ab
Fab’ and even more grateful
that she became a dear
friend,” Saunders said in a
statement. “She lived and
worked with an extraordinary grace.”
Lumley said she was
“heartbroken to lose such a
B
Jay L. Clendenin Los Angeles Times
MAPS of Joshua Tree National Park were left by rangers outside closed restrooms
at the park’s entrance. Vehicles entered without having to pay the usual $30 fee.
Park will close campgrounds
[Joshua Tree, from B1]
park and restock toilets.
“I want to extend a sincere thanks to local businesses, volunteer groups
and tribal members who
have done their best to assist
in picking up litter and helping
maintain
campgrounds,” park Supt. David
Smith said in a statement.
“This is no reflection on their
efforts and the park is very
fortunate to have a community that exhibits the kind of
care and concern witnessed
over the last week.”
The lack of restrooms has
been an issue at other national parks as well.
Yosemite National Park
visitors using the side of the
road as a toilet have
prompted the park to close
two campgrounds and a
popular redwood grove for
public safety reasons.
“With restrooms closed,
some visitors are opting to
deposit their waste in natural areas adjacent to hightraffic areas, which creates a
health hazard for other visitors,” National Parks Service spokesman Andrew
Munoz said in an email Saturday.
Human feces and urine
along Wawona Road, also
known as California Highway 41, in the south part of
the park contributed to the
closure of the Mariposa
Grove of redwoods as well as
the Wawona and Hodgson
Meadows campgrounds, a
park statement said.
Officials are urging visitors to use restrooms in
nearby communities before
they enter the park and to
pack out their trash. Yosemite Valley’s lodgings, restaurants, ski area at Badger
Pass and park shuttle remain open.
Death Valley, whose
most popular landmarks
have been crowded during
the winter holidays, said
outhouses are open but aren’t being cleaned or
stocked with toilet paper
during the closure.
javier.panzar
@latimes.com
mary.forgione
@latimes.com
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Keystone / Getty Images
‘AN EXTRAORDINARY GRACE’
June Whitfield, right and Terry Scott starred as a
married couple in the TV comedy “Terry and June.”
darling friend.”
Whitfield’s father was a
telephone company executive and her mother was an
amateur actress. She once
told the Telegraph newspaper she knew very early in
life that she wanted to be a
performer.
“There was never one
moment when I decided,”
she said. “I went to dancing
classes
and
elocution
classes and the appeal was
simply that I loved it all.”
She trained at London’s
renowned Royal Academy of
Dramatic Art and started
her career in radio comedy in
the 1950s, moving into TV as
the medium eclipsed radio.
She received dozens of
honors, including receiving
the title of “Dame,” the
equivalent of a knighthood,
from Prince Charles in a
Buckingham Palace ceremony in 2017.
Her
husband,
Tim
Aitchison, died in 2001. She is
survived by their daughter,
actress Suzy Aitchison.
A message to our readers
Because of an unforeseen technical issue, we are unable
to list obituaries in today’s edition. You can view
today’s listings at legacy.com. If you have any questions
or need assistance placing an obituary, please call
1-800-234-4444.
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B6
T U E S DAY , JA N UA RY 1, 2 019
L AT I M E S . C O M
Today in North America
Sunshine and Santa Ana winds: Strong Santa Ana winds will gust through most of Southern California
on New Year’s Day. Winds will be strongest along passes and canyons, especially within the San
Gabriel Mountains. High pressure with very cold air building toward the east will cause
wind-protected valley areas to have freezing temperatures again tonight.
More snow in the Southwest: Another snowstorm will blanket parts
of New Mexico, southern Colorado and eastern Arizona. Strong
winds bring dry air to the Northeast. The northern Plains will be
quite cold while the Northwest will be dry and relatively mild.
5-day forecasts
Pressure:
L
◗
Today in Southern California
Low
H
High
Warm Front
Cold Front
Jet Stream
Trough
High/low temperatures are average forecasts for entire zone.
Temps
Today
L.A. Basin
61/38
Valleys
56/38
Beaches
63/41
Mountains
27/11
Deserts
58/37
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Saturday
Sunny and breezy
Sunny
62/41
Sunny
65/44
Sunny
67/46
Partly sunny 62/53
Windy with sunshine
Sunny
61/38
Sunny
65/41
Sunny
67/42
Partly sunny 61/49
Sunny and breezy
Sunny
63/41
Sunny
64/42
Sunny
65/45
Partly sunny 63/53
Sunny and windy
Not as cold
38/16
Sunny
49/21
Sunny
52/23
Clouds, sun 45/26
Sunny
Sunny
Sunny
Sunny
Clouds, sun
Los Angeles Basin: Strong
winds of 15 to 25 mph,
gusting to 45 mph. Cold
and windy tonight with
gusts up to 40 mph.
Valleys/canyons: Sunny
with winds of 15 to 25 mph,
gusting to 45 mph. Clear,
cold and windy tonight with
gusts reaching 40 mph.
Air quality
Orange County: Winds of
30 to 40 mph, gusts to 55
mph. Clear tonight with
winds of 20 to 30 mph and
gusts up to 45 mph.
Ventura/Santa Barbara:
Sunshine with strong
northeast winds gusting
past 30 mph. Clear and
chilly tonight with less wind.
Good
Moderate
San Diego County: Sunny
and cool. Clear tonight.
Freezing temperatures in
some inland valley areas.
Local mountains: Sunshine
with winds of 30 to 40 mph,
gusts to 65 mph. Clear and
windy tonight with gusts up
to 50 mph.
High desert: Sunny with
Unhealthful for:
Sensitive people
–0
0s 10s 20s 30s 40s 50s 60s 70s 80s 90s 100+
Anchorage
41/32
62/38
65/43
68/44
63/48
winds of 15 to 25 mph,
gusting to 40 mph. Clear
tonight and a hard freeze.
Low desert: Winds of 15 to
25 mph, gusting to 35 mph.
Clear with a freeze in
wind-protected areas.
San Francisco Bay Area:
Mostly sunny. Clear tonight.
Mostly sunny Wednesday.
All
Seattle
43/32
Los Angeles
61/38
Not Available
South Coast Air Quality Management District forecasts air quality
SANTA
BARBARA CO.
Santa Clarita
Hesperia
55/35
Santa Paula
LOS ANGELES CO.
45/21
Ojai
59/34
Santa
Simi Valley
Barbara
58/33
Chatsworth
SAN BERNARDINO CO.
Burbank
57/37
Monrovia
60/33
57/37
Camarillo
Ventura
59/36
53/37
64/38
61/41
Yucca Valley
Pomona/
UCLA
43/29
Oxnard
San Bernardino
LA Downtown Fairplex
Westlake
Ontario
63/40
62/39
59/35
Woodland
56/36
61/38
Village
58/36
Hills
Whittier
Santa Barbara Co.
59/38
Chino
60/36
Height
Period
Direction
Santa Monica Hills
Riverside
60/31
RIVERSIDE CO.
Fullerton
61/37
2-4’
6 sec NE
63/41
54/26
64/36
Torrance
Santa Ana
Ventura Co.
61/37
ORANGE CO.
Palm
Hemet
Long
Height
Period
Direction
62/41
Springs
54/26
Irvine
Beach Newport
2-4’
6 sec NE
62/39
58/37
64/38 Beach
Mission Viejo
Los Angeles Co.
61/40
Temecula
Height
Period
Direction
61/39
Laguna
55/26
2-4’
6 sec ESE
Beach
San
60/40
Clemente
Orange Co.
Surf and sea
59/36
SAN DIEGO CO.
Height
Period
Direction
POINT CONCEPTION TO MEXICO
Oceanside
2-3’
13 sec S
Inner waters: Wind northeast at 20-30
61/26
knots today, gusts to 35 knots. Wind
San Diego Co.
waves a foot or less; west swells 3-4
Ramona
Escondido
Height
Period
Direction
feet.
55/27
60/29
2-4’
13 sec WNW
Surf zone: A moderate risk for strong rip
Poway
currents today at all area beaches
63/34
except in Santa Barbara and Orange
Tides
UV index
counties, where the risk will be low.
L.A. Outer Harbor, in feet.
Minutes to burn for
San Diego
Today 5:51a 5.8 Hi 12:56p 0.0 Lo sensitive people
Station
Time Wind
Waves Temp
62/39
Las Vegas, 45
Morro Bay
Santa Barbara
Ventura
Zuma Beach
Marina del Rey
Hermosa Beach
Cabrillo Beach
Hunt’n. Beach
Newport Beach
Dana Point
San Clemente
Oceanside
Solana Beach
Mission Beach
Avalon
4p
4p
4p
4p
4p
4p
4p
4p
4p
4p
4p
4p
4p
4p
4p
Rain T-storm Snow Ice
Las Vegas
47/28
Chicago
30/21
Denver
19/5
New York
59/30
Houston
62/49
Miami
82/71
VENTURA CO.
N10
VAR5
NW20
NNE30
NNW15
NW10
NNW15
NNE25
NE25
NE20
NE15
NE15
NE15
VAR5
N25
5/10
3/6
4/6
4/6
2/6
1/6
2/6
2/6
2/6
2/6
1/6
3/13
3/13
2/13
2/6
56/56
60/58
59/57
59/60
59/59
60/60
61/57
62/59
62/58
62/56
62/56
61/58
61/58
60/59
60/56
Wind speed in knots; wave heights in feet/intervals in seconds;
temperatures for sea/air
Wed.
7:07p 3.6 Hi
------ Lo
6:29a 6.0 Hi 12:01a 1.8 Lo
8:00p 3.7 Hi 1:39p -0.4 Lo
Los Angeles, 45
Phoenix, 45
San Francisco, 60
Almanac
Monday downtown readings
Temperature
Los Angeles Fullerton
Ventura
High/low
63/48
65/48
63/46
High/low a year ago
69/49
68/49
66/49
Normal high/low for date 68/47
68/44
66/44
Record high/date
86/1897 76/2011 85/1981
Record low/date
36/1882 32/2010 32/1950
Precipitation
24-hour total (as of 4 p.m.) 0.00
0.00
0.00
Season total (since Oct. 1)
4.26
3.96
3.04
Last season (Oct. 1 to date) 0.12
0.08
0.06
Season norm (Oct. 1 to date) 4.03
3.92
4.70
Humidity (high/low)
82/45
81/20
82/20
Sun and moon
Today’s rise/set
New Moon
Jan. 5
Los Angeles County
Sun 6:59a/4:55p
Moon 2:54a/2:00p
First Quarter
Jan. 13
Orange County
Sun 6:57a/4:54p
Moon 2:52a/1:59p
Full Moon
Jan. 20
Ventura County
Sun 7:03a/4:58p
Moon 2:58a/2:04p
Last Quarter
Jan. 27
California cities
City
Monday
Today
Hi Lo Prcp. Hi Lo
Wed.
Hi Lo
Anaheim
Avalon/Catalina
Bakersfield
Barstow
Beaumont
Big Bear Lake
Bishop
Burbank
Camarillo
Chatsworth
Chino
Dana Point
Death Valley
Del Mar
Escondido
Eureka
Fallbrook
Fillmore
Fresno
Fullerton
Hemet
Hesperia
Huntington Beach
Idyllwild
Irvine
L.A. D’ntown/USC
L.A. Int’l. Airport
65
62
50
51
53
40
42
62
67
60
62
61
63
60
59
51
61
63
52
65
48
47
65
40
64
63
64
63
54
54
51
55
38
54
62
65
62
64
59
60
62
61
56
60
62
55
64
58
49
62
43
62
62
63
48
46
36
39
41
23
29
42
41
43
41
50
39
56
52
35
49
36
36
48
42
39
44
27
47
48
48
-----.01
----Tr
---.08
-.12
---.28
--.12
----
62
51
52
49
50
27
45
59
64
57
60
59
59
62
60
55
59
58
51
64
54
45
62
36
62
61
62
36
44
30
24
26
11
19
36
38
37
31
37
33
38
29
36
28
35
29
36
26
21
40
25
39
38
41
37
46
32
26
27
16
23
37
37
38
31
39
33
40
33
42
30
35
32
38
28
24
42
29
38
41
43
City
Monday
Today
Hi Lo Prcp. Hi Lo
Wed.
Hi Lo
Laguna Beach
Lancaster
Long Beach
Mammoth Lakes
Mission Viejo
Monrovia
Monterey
Mt. Wilson
Needles
Newport Beach
Northridge
Oakland
Oceanside
Ojai
Ontario
Oxnard
Palm Springs
Pasadena
Paso Robles
Pomona/Fairplex
Poway
Redding
Rialto
Riverside
xx
50
65
29
59
63
58
51
55
64
59
58
62
62
60
64
57
63
55
60
59
55
55
58
60
50
63
43
61
56
58
50
54
60
63
55
60
60
61
62
62
61
56
62
62
55
60
59
xx
40
46
19
49
46
42
32
37
50
42
43
50
33
44
43
41
47
34
46
53
41
45
40
xx
---------------.01
---.08
----
60
47
64
31
61
53
57
43
50
61
58
56
61
58
58
62
58
58
53
59
63
58
54
54
40
17
38
13
39
37
35
23
34
40
37
36
26
33
36
39
37
37
23
35
34
32
37
26
Forecasts provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. ©2019
40
20
40
17
38
39
38
26
33
41
39
38
26
35
35
41
38
40
25
36
37
32
35
27
City
Monday
Today
Hi Lo Prcp. Hi Lo
Wed.
Hi Lo
Sacramento
San Bernardino
San Clemente Pier
San Diego
San Francisco
San Gabriel
San Jose
San Luis Obispo
Santa Ana
Santa Barbara
Santa Clarita
Santa Monica Pier
Santa Paula
Santa Rosa
Simi Valley
Tahoe Valley
Temecula
Thousand Oaks
Torrance
UCLA
Van Nuys
Ventura
Whittier Hills
Woodland Hills
Wrightwood
Yorba Linda
Yosemite Valley
55
59
60
61
55
xx
56
58
64
61
56
68
61
58
58
31
59
58
61
65
63
63
62
60
48
63
44
54
60
59
62
56
62
58
61
62
62
60
63
62
56
62
43
58
63
61
63
64
61
62
64
42
62
51
37
42
55
57
44
xx
41
35
50
39
38
49
38
38
42
20
46
42
46
49
44
46
45
37
27
46
27
---.01
-----------Tr
.14
-----------
55
56
59
62
54
60
54
60
62
60
55
63
59
57
57
30
55
60
61
63
60
61
61
60
33
60
43
29
36
36
39
39
37
33
31
41
33
35
41
34
26
37
13
26
38
37
40
38
41
37
36
22
36
28
29
35
38
41
39
39
34
34
42
36
36
41
35
30
35
20
27
36
40
40
38
42
39
39
27
35
30
U.S. cities
High 86 in Immokalee, Fla.
Low –23 in Stanley, Idaho
City
Monday
Hi Lo Prcp.
Today
Hi Lo Sky
Albuquerque
Amarillo
Anchorage
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Brownsville
Buffalo
Burlington, Vt.
Casper
Charleston, S.C.
Charleston, W.Va.
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Colo. Springs
Columbia, S.C.
Columbus
Concord, N.H.
Dallas/Ft.Worth
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
Duluth
El Paso
Eugene
Fairbanks
Fargo
Flagstaff
Grand Junction
Grand Rapids
Green Bay
Hartford
Helena
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jacksonville, Fla.
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Louisville
Medford
Memphis
Miami
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York
Oklahoma City
Omaha
Orlando
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, Maine
Portland, Ore.
Providence
Pueblo
Raleigh
Rapid City
Reno
Richmond
St. Louis
Salt Lake City
San Antonio
San Juan, P.R.
Santa Fe
Seattle
32
46
42
71
51
64
47
9
75
37
45
64
43
39
5
70
63
65
39
63
58
24
68
59
40
61
17
35
43
22
53
44
27
-1
22
24
36
32
42
15
82
59
60
81
38
50
54
65
38
70
82
39
31
68
78
47
51
33
84
47
52
52
40
45
45
33
64
9
37
54
48
28
61
82
26
43
29
23
41
64
60
52
61
20
65
31
58
70
40
43
14
76
53
70
30
45
42
16
72
43
49
43
19
18
37
6
50
43
30
-2
23
22
32
23
56
24
83
62
39
82
22
47
50
48
43
50
82
27
10
52
66
59
30
17
83
62
52
45
50
44
58
22
68
18
35
67
36
23
55
83
23
43
13
24
27
54
38
39
30
6
55
25
30
49
25
29
1
60
34
53
31
37
34
18
56
33
23
39
12
31
27
19
34
32
1
-5
19
21
27
25
26
9
71
46
32
64
34
38
41
44
26
48
72
28
29
51
71
36
34
26
66
32
37
29
23
33
25
20
46
8
26
41
40
16
41
70
2
34
--.12
.04
.19
.18
.28
.20
1.02
-.03
.01
.30
-.19
Tr
.37
.16
.76
1.49
.90
.02
.02
.91
.02
.46
.01
.11
.83
.33
---.03
.27
.21
.46
.37
.06
.03
.04
.05
1.32
-.80
-1.17
1.43
-3.23
-.50
.03
2.20
.13
.27
.37
.02
-.28
.06
.48
-.02
.03
.03
.13
.18
-.18
1.15
.02
.08
.07
.01
--
16
12
32
48
37
39
35
19
45
18
23
58
19
8
5
60
36
46
21
31
28
3
53
31
14
33
5
8
25
-7
27
26
19
-6
4
4
19
8
22
15
73
49
28
58
13
28
34
37
24
38
71
17
-3
39
60
30
21
7
65
34
32
28
15
30
25
0
45
5
19
41
25
9
40
71
9
32
Sn
Pc
Cy
Cy
W
Su
Pc
Pc
Pc
Pc
W
Cy
Sn
Sn
Pc
Pc
Cy
Cy
Cy
Cy
Cy
Pc
R
Cy
Cy
Pc
Su
Cy
Cy
Pc
Pc
Pc
Cy
Su
Pc
Pc
Cy
Cy
W
Cy
Su
Fg
Cy
Fg
Pc
Su
Cy
Cy
Pc
Cy
Su
Cy
Cy
Cy
Pc
W
Pc
Pc
Fg
W
Pc
Cy
Cy
Pc
W
Pc
Cy
Pc
Su
Pc
Cy
Pc
Su
Pc
Sn
Cy
Taken at 3 p.m. Monday
Spokane
Springfield, Mo.
Tallahassee
Tampa
Tucson
Tulsa
Washington, D.C.
Wichita
Yuma
32
46
76
83
54
49
51
44
57
23 -41 1.18
66 Tr
68 -37 -37 .83
39 .48
34 Tr
41 .09
29
33
80
81
48
33
64
25
54
20
23
61
66
29
21
40
13
34
Cy
Pc
Sh
Fg
Pc
Pc
Pc
Pc
Su
92 71 -48 44 .01
50 46 .79
63 40 -86 72 -84 77 .04
29 10 -45 36 Tr
79 62 -73 53 -66 52 -18 7 .05
84 75 .16
45 34 .19
50 44 Tr
52 49 -48 42 .14
46 30 .02
84 67 -88 75 -58 53 -50 39 -51 43 -71 59 1.11
54 25 -86 74 -50 48 -61 27 -82 73 .31
88 66 -73 46 -28 16 .06
27 23 .28
90 70 -72 45 -36 21 .09
48 44 Tr
88 77 -59 41 -30 6 -36 19 .05
91 72 .14
65 59 .14
52 37 -49 33 -40 28 .13
41 28 -43 40 --13 -20 .02
43 36 .14
88
49
50
65
88
84
34
47
85
74
67
38
84
44
50
44
46
44
86
84
60
48
56
68
41
87
52
57
85
90
74
32
28
87
71
42
46
90
56
32
39
88
64
51
53
34
41
46
-1
40
73
40
44
48
69
77
11
33
73
59
52
29
73
33
36
25
35
35
65
71
53
41
41
58
23
74
33
27
75
67
45
0
23
67
47
25
37
77
38
14
26
72
60
35
37
13
33
34
-3
31
Pc
Sh
R
Cy
Pc
Su
Su
R
Ts
Pc
Pc
Pc
Pc
W
Cy
Pc
Sh
Su
Su
R
Pc
Cy
Su
Ts
Sh
Su
Pc
Su
Pc
Pc
Pc
Sn
Sn
Pc
Su
Su
Cy
Pc
Su
Su
Sh
Su
R
Su
Pc
Pc
Pc
Cy
Su
Pc
World
Acapulco
Amsterdam
Athens
Baghdad
Bangkok
Barbados
Beijing
Berlin
Buenos Aires
Cabo San Lucas
Cairo
Calgary
Cancun
Copenhagen
Dublin
Edinburgh
Frankfurt
Geneva
Havana
Ho Chi Minh City
Hong Kong
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kabul
Kingston
London
Madrid
Manila
Mecca
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Mumbai
New Delhi
Oslo
Paris
Rio de Janeiro
Rome
Seoul
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei City
Tehran
Tokyo
Toronto
Vancouver
Vienna
Winnipeg
Zurich
Key: Su sunny; Pc partly cloudy; Cy cloudy; Fg
foggy; Prcp precipitation; Dr drizzle; Hz;hazy
Sh showers; Ts thunderstorms; R rain; Sn snow;
Sf snow flurries; I ice; Rs rain/snow; W windy;
Tr trace. Notes: National extremes are for NWS
stations; excludes Alaska and Hawaii.
Missing data indicated by “xx”.
Braving the cold for prime parade viewing
[Rose Parade, from B1]
day, bracing for overnight
temperatures that forecasters said would be in the 30s
and winds of 25 to 45 mph,
with gusts up to 65 mph. The
high temperature in Pasadena will be about 60 degrees on New Year’s Day.
The weather had officials
on alert for hazards, such as
pop-up tents that could
blow away and cooking fires.
“People will bring old
washing machine bins and
throw firewood in,” said Lisa
Derderian, a spokeswoman
for the city of Pasadena.
“That creates a lot of embers
… that can cause injuries or
fires to nearby structures.”
Any outbreak of fire
could be especially dangerous because of high winds
and low humidity, which
prompted the National
Weather Service to issue a
fire weather watch through
Wednesday for the mountains in L.A. and Ventura
counties.
The parade will begin at
8 a.m. Tuesday, with a
theme of “The Melody of
Life” and an opening number that includes Chaka
Khan, this year’s parade
grand marshal.
The parade route begins
at Green Street and Orange
Grove Boulevard, and floats
will travel north on Orange
Grove before turning east
onto Colorado Boulevard.
Near the end of the route, the
parade will turn north onto
Sierra Madre Boulevard and
conclude at Villa Street.
Street closures along the
Rose Parade route began at
mel melcon Los Angeles Times
ROBERTA ACEVEDO holds a spot on the parade route. Tuesday’s high in Pasadena will be about 60 degrees.
10 p.m. Monday and will continue through 2 p.m. Tuesday, officials said.
Many families were braving the chilly weather to
keep longtime traditions
alive. Roberts grew up
watching the parade with
her
grandmother
and
started bringing her own
children 15 years ago.
“They can’t go to the club,
and I’m too old to go to the
club,” she said, laughing. “So
this is just a good family atmosphere. ... Hopefully my
kids will grow up and bring
their kids.”
Aaron Rodriguez started
watching the parade in the
1970s, when all the kids in his
family would pile into his
grandparents’ camper to
admire the floats. He re-
members 2000, when there
were fireworks to celebrate
the new millennium. And
2007 — his favorite year —
when “Star Wars” creator
George Lucas was the grand
marshal.
“I’ve been to other parades around the country,
but this one is the most spectacular,” Rodriguez said.
“Here, we have elaborate
floats. In other parades,
they just have celebrities
driving cars and it fades out.
It’s not the same.”
Erica Rede and her 14year-old son, Aidan Howard-Rede, were celebrating
their fifth year attending the
Rose Parade. But this year
marked the first time they
actually worked on a float.
The South Pasadena resi-
dents tucked four crates’
worth of roses into small
beakers to decorate their
city’s float.
“We wanted to go and get
it done,” Rede said. “I love
South Pas. It’s amazing to be
part of our small-town
float.”
Others,
including
Heather Wipfli of La Cañada
Flintridge, were first-timers.
Wipfli stopped by her
family’s spot near Orange
Grove Boulevard on Monday afternoon to set up their
mattresses, blankets and
space heaters. Showing off
her white, puffy winter coat,
she joked that she’s ready for
the Arctic.
“I’m worried about the
cold, but I keep getting assured it’s not a problem,”
Wipfli said. “I’m excited. The
parade is something I’ve always wanted to participate
in and have never had the
opportunity.”
Wipfli was invited by
Jaime Herrera, her son’s
coach at the Rose Bowl
Aquatics Center, who has
camped out the night before
the event for more than 18
years. Wipfli admits she almost chickened out because
of the weather, but Herrera
persuaded her to stay.
“The parade is something you need to try once in
your life when you’re from
the area,” she said.
alexa.diaz@latimes.com
alejandra.reyesvelarde
@latimes.com
Times staff writer Alene
Tchekmedyian contributed
to this report.
C
BuSINESS
T U E S D A Y , J A N U A R Y 1 , 2 0 1 9 :: L A T I M E S . C O M / B U S I N E S S
DOW 23,327.46 ▲ 265.06 S&P 500 2,506.85 ▲ 21.11
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GOLD $1,278.30 ▼ 1.60
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EURO $1.1455 ▲ .0013
U.S. T-NOTE (10-yr.) 2.69% ▼ 0.04
A RISE
IN SEX
ABUSE
IN AIR
Flight attendants and
lawmakers seek more
training and protocols
from airlines to handle
growing misconduct.
By Hugo Martin
Jae C. Hong Associated Press
THE U.S. IMMIGRATION crackdown is the nasty boss’ best friend, worker advocates say. Above, workers pick broccoli in Salinas.
In Trump era, fear a potent
weapon for abusive bosses
Mexican guest workers and advocates report rising abuse and threats of retaliation
By Kartikay Mehrotra, Peter Waldman
and Jonathan Levin
Evan Vucci Associated Press
AN EMPLOYMENT attorney with a Boston legal services group says, “I don’t
think it’s an exaggeration to call some of the cases we’re seeing Trump slavery.”
The hours would be long, the sun blazing, the food
terrible — Oscar Ivan Contreras knew what to expect as
the bus rumbled toward the United States.
He’d been on this bus before, bound for California
and a season’s work picking blueberries. It was partly
math that pulled him back now: Six hours’ pay as a legal,
temporary worker for Munger Bros., North America’s
largest blueberry grower, equals a week’s wages back
home in the Mexican state of Nayarit.
But almost as soon as he and some 600 other Mexican
guest workers arrived in California’s Central Valley, he
realized something was very different from the year before. It was spring 2017, and America had changed.
Munger’s managers were surlier, he says, and more
demanding. On many days, workers got no lunch until 3
p.m. — and when the food came, it was often rotten or
there wasn’t enough, Contreras says. Munger failed to
supply sufficient drinking water or toilets at one of its facilities, resulting in a $6,000 fine from the state. Workers
say they were compelled to work even when sick or injured. Ultimately, the company fired dozens of them
when they walked off the job for a day after one man collapsed in the fields.
Throughout, those who complained heard a new refrain from Munger supervisors, tuned to the era of President Trump’s strict immigration policies: “Go back to
Mexico.” This response to every gripe “was a way to remind the worker the company [See Immigration, C6]
The man shuffled into
the flight late, after all the
other
passengers
were
seated. He acted “like he was
jumping out of his skin,” recalled the woman in the next
seat.
After the lights had
dimmed for the overnight
flight from Los Angeles International Airport to Panama, the man sexually assaulted her, said the woman,
a Los Angeles film executive
who asked that her identity
be shielded.
After yelling and struggling with the man, she got
the attention of a flight attendant, who moved her to
another seat on the October
2017 flight. The assailant remained seated next to another female passenger, the
woman said, and no attempt
was made to isolate or restrain him.
The trauma from the incident has lingered. “I avoid
all night flights,” she said.
Reports of sexual harassment and assault on commercial flights are on the
rise, although law enforcement officials say the problem is underreported. Airlines and federal officials
have moved to address the
issue by voicing a policy of
zero tolerance for such acts
and improving training to
deal with reports.
But flight attendants and
lawmakers say airlines need
to do more. They are calling
for carriers to adopt a consistent set of protocols for responding to such incidents.
They want airlines to collect
data on the reports of attacks and harassment. They
want carriers to offer new
training for flight attendants to respond to these occurrences.
“We want to make sure we
have all the tools to deal with
these incidents,” said Taylor
Garland, a spokeswoman
for the Assn. of Flight Attendants, which represents
nearly 50,000 flight attend[See Misconduct, C4]
An app for jet noise complaints Ryuk suspected
in papers’ attack
San Diego engineer’s
Airnoise device gives
people living under a
flight path an easy
way to file grievances.
The malware that hit
L.A. Times is similar
to one linked to the
North Korean group
behind WannaCry.
By Lori Aratani
Barbara Deckert has a
new weapon in the war
against airplane noise, and
she’s not afraid to use it.
Every time a plane flies
over her suburban Maryland
home, rattling her windows
and setting her teeth on
edge, she presses a small
white button and feels a tiny
sense of triumph.
That’s because with one
click Deckert has done what
could have taken her hours
to do a few months ago: She
has filed a noise complaint
with officials at the Maryland Aviation Administration.
Thanks to the ingenuity
of a software engineer from
San Diego, Deckert and
hundreds of others with similar beefs now have an easy
way to register their annoyance with the jets that fly
[See Airnoise, C3]
By Sam Dean
Katherine Frey Washington Post
AIRNOISE is the idea of Chris McCann, who repurposed the Amazon Dash But-
ton so that users can quickly lodge their anger about jets flying over their homes.
Malware comes in many
forms.
Bad links can lead to obnoxious adware that unleashes a plague of pop-ups.
Nefarious attachments can
hijack your processor for a
bitcoin-mining botnet.
Ryuk, a malware program believed to have been
used in an attack this weekend that hobbled newspapers nationwide, including the Los Angeles Times, is
a sophisticated twist on an
extortionate classic.
Once Ryuk gets into a
network, it automatically
spreads from computer to
computer, node to node, encrypting important files
along the way with an unbreakable code. Try to access the encrypted data, and
the malware presents a ransom note: deposit bitcoin
into an anonymous wallet
and receive a key to decrypt
your entire system. Refuse
to pay, and the files remain
locked for good.
This piece of ransomware
managed to throw a monkey
wrench into Tribune Publishing newspaper operations, which under-gird its
printing plants as well as
those of The Times and the
San Diego Union-Tribune.
The Times and Union-Tribune are no longer owned by
Tribune Publishing — they
were purchased by Dr. Patrick Soon-Shiong in June —
but still share many systems.
The problem surfaced
[See Ryuk, C5]
Wall St. ends a
turbulent year
Stocks finish 2018
with their worst
showing in a decade,
and 2019 could bring
more volatility. C4
C2
T U E S DAY , JA N UA RY 1, 2 019
L AT I M E S . C O M / B U S I N E S S
BUSINESS BEAT
Manufacturing takes a fall
Lower indexes in five
Fed districts reflect
the toll of tariffs and
uncertainty around
U.S. trade policy.
associated press
bloomberg
Five Federal Reserve indexes of regional manufacturing slumped in December, the first time they’ve
fallen in unison since May
2016 and the latest evidence
that a pillar of the U.S. economy has started to wobble
heading into the new year.
The Dallas Fed’s factory
index unexpectedly contracted in December, falling
to a two-year low of minus 5.1
from 17.6 in November, and
the steepest decline since
2013. The district bank covers the oil-producing region
of Texas, northern Louisiana and southern New Mexico. Oil prices are down about
40% from a nearly four-year
high in October.
More than 20% of manufacturers said their outlook
worsened in December, according to the regional Fed
report released Monday.
“Expectations regarding future business conditions remained positive but retreated notably in December,” it said.
The report follows other
weakening
Fed
factory
gauges in the New York; Philadelphia; Richmond, Va.;
and Kansas City, Mo., districts, just the sixth time
that’s happened during the
economic expansion now in
its 10th year, a Bloomberg
analysis of Fed data shows.
The Dallas gauge tracking the outlook for manufacturing contracted for the
first time in more than two
years, while measures of
shipments, capacity utilization and unfilled orders all
fell to the lowest levels since
late 2016. The measure for
China’s factory
activity falls, adds
to Beijing’s woes
Fred Zwicky Journal Star
REVITALIZING American industrial might has been a hallmark of the Trump
presidency. Above, Tyler Snowden of Case IH welds at a plant in Goodfield, Ill.
employment weakened to
the lowest level in more than
a year.
In the oil and gas industry, U.S. shale producers
have begun to rein in spending to ride out the sudden
crash of crude prices. Some
explorers in the Permian
Basin of Texas have begun
to shut down rigs and fracking crews in response to the
plunge in crude. A separate
survey by the Dallas Fed
showed that no one in the industry saw a crash in crude
prices coming.
Revitalizing American
industrial might has been a
hallmark of Donald Trump’s
presidency. The economy
has created an average of
20,000 manufacturing jobs a
month during his term,
more than double the pace
during President Obama’s
second term.
Now there are increasing
signs that factories are suffering from the uncertainty
around Trump’s trade policy, which includes tariffs on
imported steel, aluminum
and about $250 billion in Chinese products.
The Fed’s latest Beige
Book compilation of anecdotal accounts from district
banks showed that tariffs remained a concern for manufacturers, even as most
districts saw moderate
growth.
“Optimism has waned in
some as contacts cited increased uncertainty from
impacts of tariffs, rising interest rates, and labor market constraints,” according
to the Dec. 5 report.
For the economy more
broadly, 2018 closed with a
few other cautionary signs.
Consumer
confidence
slumped last month to the
lowest since July, the latest
sign that Americans are
growing less optimistic as
stock markets gyrate and
the expansion moderates,
according to a recent Conference
Board
report.
Underneath that drop was
the biggest plunge in 41
years in a measure of the employment outlook. Housing
data are also looking less upbeat.
The next big look at the
nation’s job market is scheduled for Friday, when the Labor Department releases
the employment report. The
data are expected to show
180,000 jobs added in December while the jobless rate
held at 3.7%, the lowest since
1969, according to the
median
estimates
in
Bloomberg’s survey of economists.
China’s factory activity
shrank in December for the
first time in more than two
years, an official survey
showed Monday, intensifying pressure on Beijing to reverse an economic slowdown as it enters trade talks
with the Trump administration.
The purchasing managers’ index of the National
Bureau of Statistics and an
industry group, the China
Federation of Logistics &
Purchasing, fell to 49.4 from
November’s 50.0 on a 100point scale. Any reading below 50 shows that activity is
contracting. The December
figure was the lowest since
February 2016 and the first
drop since July 2016.
In the quarter that ended
in September, China’s economic growth sank, compared with a year earlier, to a
post-global crisis low of 6.5%.
The slowdown occurred despite government efforts to
stem the downturn by ordering banks to lend more and
by boosting spending on
public works construction.
Forecasters expect annual growth of about 6.5%,
down slightly from 2017’s
6.7%. But some industry segments, including auto and
real estate sales, have suffered more serious declines.
“Downward pressure on
the economy is still large,”
economist Zhang Liqun said
in a statement issued with
the purchasing managers’
index.
Overall orders and exports both shrank, indicating that Chinese factories
are suffering from weak demand at home and abroad.
Exports to the United States
kept growing at double-digit
monthly rates through late
2018
despite
President
Trump’s punitive tariffs. But
growth in exports to the rest
of the world fell sharply in
November, and forecasters
expect American demand to
weaken in early 2019.
That adds to complications for Chinese leaders
who are trying to reverse a
broad economic slowdown
and avert politically dangerous job losses.
Chinese and U.S. envoys
are slated to meet in early
January for negotiations intended to resolve their economically threatening trade
war. Over the weekend,
Trump sounded an optimistic note, saying on Twitter that he had spoken with
Chinese President Xi Jinping by phone.
“Deal is moving along
very well,” Trump tweeted.
But economists say the
90-day moratorium on new
penalties that was agreed to
by Trump and Xi on Dec. 1 is
probably not enough time to
resolve their dispute.
Chinese economic activity already was weakening
after Beijing tightened controls on bank lending in late
2017 to cool a debt boom. The
downturn was more abrupt
than
expected,
which
prompted regulators to shift
course and ease credit controls.
But they moved gradually to avoid reigniting a rise
in debt. Their measures
have yet to put a floor under
declining growth.
Chinese leaders promised at an annual economic
planning meeting in midDecember to shore up
growth by instating tax cuts,
easier lending for entrepreneurs and other steps.
T U E S DAY , JA N UA RY 1, 2 019
L AT I M E S . C O M / B U S I N E S S
C3
Muscle cars still flex amid sedans’ demise
Challenger, Camaro
and Mustang are likely
to survive as Detroit
kills off slow-selling
passenger cars.
By Gabrielle Coppola
The list of passenger cars
sent to the scrap heap keeps
getting longer.
The Dodge Dart and
Chrysler 200 are goners,
Ford models such as the Fusion and Fiesta are going to
be finished, and last month
General Motors Co. announced plans to cull the
Buick LaCrosse, Chevrolet
Impala and others.
But as Detroit kills off
slow-selling sedans, there’s
one niche of passenger cars
that’s hung on: retro-styled,
testosterone-fueled reincarnations of muscle cars introduced in the 1960s and 1970s.
“What’s dying is the commoditized, four-door nothingburger, no-personality
cars,” said Tim Kuniskis,
who ran the Dodge brand at
Fiat Chrysler Automobiles
from 2013 to early 2018, before
taking over Jeep North
America. Muscle cars “have
a really well-defined personality and positioning.”
They also generate respectable revenue. Fiat
Chrysler, which kicked off
the sedan-slashing trend in
early 2016, commands an average transaction price of
about $36,000 for its muscular Dodge Challenger.
It might not be enough to
match the fat margins on the
trucks and sport utility vehicles that have become the focus for Detroit, but these
powerful throwbacks can
still be moneymakers. And
that can help big automakers finance their shift to a
more electric future — especially because the initial investment on developing a
Challenger (on the same
platform since 2008) or a
Dodge Charger (2011) has
long since been paid off.
Looking for growth in
muscle cars still might be a
bit of a stretch. Fiat Chrysler
expects to sell roughly 65,000
Challengers this year, about
Ford Motor Co.
RETRO-STYLED, testosterone-fueled muscle cars generate respectable revenue. The Mustang is the top-selling muscle car in the U.S.
the same as last year and
just below the record 66,000
in 2015. Sales of the four-door
Charger dropped 11% this
year through November.
Still, compared with the
death spiral that’s consumed sedans, the Dodge
muscle cars are doing all
right. Retail sales of large
passenger cars, a segment
that includes the Nissan
Maxima and Chevy Impala,
are down 21% in 2018, according to J.D. Power. The Ford
Mustang, the top-selling
muscle car in the U.S., was
down a modest 3.6% through
November.
Fiat Chrysler, with less
cash to plow into new models than its Detroit rivals, revitalized the Dodge brand by
appealing to core drag-racing enthusiasts; it regularly
one-ups itself with more
powerful engine variants
with sinister names — Hellcat, Demon, Redeye — that
boost horsepower.
“There’s almost been a
resurgence with some of the
younger [people], even kids
that aren’t of driving age
that are interested in those
products,” said Jeff Schuster, senior vice president of
forecasting for LMC Automotive. “Those kind of special additions and add-ons
have really put some life into
the vehicles.”
David Kelleher, a Philadelphia-area Jeep, Ram and
Chrysler dealer who has a
marketing agreement with
several basketball and football players from the Philadelphia 76ers and Philadelphia Eagles, finds that
twentysomething athletes
often opt for Challengers
and Chargers over highervolume models.
“The kids think it’s the
coolest thing going,” Kelleher said. “Those are cars
that say something about
who you are.”
Josh Towbin, co-owner of
Towbin Automotive in Las
Vegas, has sold Dodge Hellcats and Demons — with 707
and 808 horsepower, respectively — to collectors who
find his business on social
media. His dealership’s Instagram feed features videos, some with thousands of
views, of people doing burnouts in their Challengers.
Manufacturers of more
mass-market sedans are trying some of the same tricks
— though to a lesser degree
— as a way to revive flagging
sales. Even Fiat Chrysler is
looking to stanch the bleeding from Americans’ lack of
interest in compacts by
packing more power into its
engines. Every Fiat model
starting in 2019 will be turbocharged,
said
Steve
Beahm, head of Fiat
Chrysler’s
passenger
brands. U.S. sales for the Fiat brand were down 41%
through November.
“What we have to do is no
different from what we’ve
tried to do on Dodge,”
Beahm said. “How do we cut
against the grain? How do
we be different?”
Of course, it’s worth considering that drag racers in
Challengers, Camaros and
Mustangs are already being
bested by Tesla drivers on
the track, a portent of the
electric future awaiting the
muscle-car world. Kuniskis
said he expects performance
cars to become more electrified over time, with plug-in
hybrid versions taking off in
the future. Both he and
All it
takes is
push of
button
[Airnoise, from C1]
over their homes: the
Airnoise button.
“It’s a fabulous tool,”
Deckert said. “Clicking that
button is really psychologically satisfying.”
Officials at airports from
Seattle to Baltimore said
Airnoise had led to a dramatic surge in complaints. At
Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport, officials are almost certain Airnoise is the
reason complaints surged to
17,228 in August from just
2,692 the previous month. In
San Diego, more than 90% of
the
complaints
came
through third-party apps
such as Airnoise.
Airnoise is the brainchild
of San Diego resident Chris
McCann, who repurposed
the same plastic Dash Button that Amazon customers
use to order toilet paper and
detergent.
One click of the red-andwhite button, and McCann’s
software sends a detailed
complaint directly to the
agency in charge.
“Airport
authorities
don’t make it easy to file
noise complaints, but we
do,” McCann’s site boasts.
“With the click of a button,
instantly locate loud, bothersome flights, automatically file a complaint
and get back to things that
matter to you.”
McCann
launched
Airnoise in 2017 to help fellow
residents in their fight about
noise from flights at San Diego International Airport,
near his home in the La Jolla
neighborhood. Word quickly
spread. Soon other communities’ residents who are engaged in similar skirmishes
wanted the buttons.
So far, he has sent out
more than 700 of the clickers.
As of mid-December, users
Beahm declined to go into
detail on Fiat Chrysler’s
product plans, and the automaker so far hasn’t invested heavily to bring electric vehicles to market.
With their cult following,
muscle cars are always going
to be a niche segment, leading some analysts to still
question how much longer
they’ll hang around. The
Dodge, Fiat and Chrysler
brands were all left out of the
automaker’s five-year strategic plan that the company
presented in June, and
Schuster of LMC said it may
be hard to sustain enough
volume to keep the Charger
and Challenger alive beyond
three or four years.
Fiat Chrysler’s Beahm
insisted the Challenger isn’t
going anywhere because it
sets the tone for the whole
Dodge brand.
“I’m not going to tell you
it’s going to grow,” Beahm
said. “But it’s going to dramatically buck the trend in
regards to where passenger
cars have gone lately and
where they’re going to go in
the next couple of years.”
Coppola writes for
Bloomberg.
Video
game
maker to
fire CFO
Katherine Frey Washington Post
BARBARA DECKERT of Maryland points out data from her Airnoise device. The device has led to a surge in
bloomberg
complaints, U.S. airport officials say, but it’s unclear whether it will be effective in the battle over plane noise.
had filed nearly 1.1 million
noise complaints at 29 U.S.
airports.
“People want to do something about the problem,
but they have lives to live,
kids to raise, and they don’t
want to spend an hour or two
filing noise complaints,” said
McCann, who is also a former Air Force test pilot.
Airnoise is a “low-impact
way for people to do and say
something about the issue.”
Scott Stevson, who works
with the Quiet Skies Coalition near Seattle, said the
two dozen buttons the group
recently
ordered
were
quickly snapped up.
Mark Anderson, who
lives in Park Ridge, Ill., keeps
his on his nightstand — all
the better to report those
late-night
flights
into
O’Hare International Airport. Since he and his wife,
Mary, got their buttons four
months ago, they’ve filed
roughly 5,000 complaints.
“It’s almost too easy,” he
said. “But these are real
complaints.”
Robyn Winder of Hanover, Md., received her button
in August — and life hasn’t
been the same since.
“Oh, the joy, the sheer
pleasure of pushing that
button and seeing the complaints mount up,” she wrote
in response to a reporter’s
query. “We are over 115,000
complaints for BWI, more
than 35,000 in just the past
30 days! So now when MAA
wants to know ‘which flight
bothered you,’ I have a real
answer! ALL OF THEM.”
Even before the arrival of
Airnoise, airports had been
dealing with a surge in complaints linked to the Federal
Aviation Administration’s
effort to modernize the air
traffic system, known as
NextGen.
The multibillion-dollar
program is changing the
way air traffic is managed,
moving it from radar to satellite navigation. Proponents say it makes the air
traffic system more efficient
because it enables planes to
fly more direct routes to
their destinations.
But the shift has angered
people who live in neighborhoods that are below the
new flight paths. Residents
in northwest Washington
sued the FAA over the
changes but lost in court. A
suit filed by the state of
Maryland is pending.
McCann was one of those
affected. He lived in La Jolla
for more than a decade and,
aside from the occasional
stray plane, had not had
problems with noise. But
that began to change in fall
2016.
As he got more involved
in the issue, he realized it
wasn’t easy to file a complaint with the local airport
authority. Those who were
able to figure out how to do
so often couldn’t provide the
kind of detailed information
useful to officials.
He remembered reading
a story about a guy who had
rigged a Dash Button to help
him easily donate $5 to the
American Civil Liberties
Union every time he got angry at President Trump. He
figured he could do something similar.
When users press the
button, Airnoise uses publicly available data sources to
determine which aircraft is
closest to a person’s home. It
gathers information about
the flight and sends it to the
local airport authority.
Users sign up via the
Airnoise website. With a free
account, they can file up to
15 complaints a month; for
$5 a month, they can file unlimited complaints. The button costs $24. McCann, who
has a full-time day job, says
he charges just enough to
cover his costs.
The button might make
its users feel good, but
whether it will be effective in
the battle against airplane
noise is unclear. Airport officials often try to downplay
complaints, noting that they
are the work of just a few
people. Maryland airport officials, for example, were
quick to note that 80% of the
complaints filed in 2018 came
from fewer than 100 users of
the Airnoise app. McCann
said he tangled with a few
airports that early on tried
to block reports generated
by Airnoise.
Still, some airport officials say more information is
always helpful.
“The bottom line for us is
if you are an individual expressing a complaint about
airport noise, we don’t care
about how we’re getting the
information,” said Mike
Jeck, manager of the noise
office for the Metropolitan
Washington Airports Authority.
Deckert says she firmly
believes complaining makes
a difference, so she tries to
do her part each day. When
her Airnoise button arrived
in August, she hooked it
onto a red, white and blue
lanyard so she would have it
with her all the time — in the
morning when she’s making
breakfast, in the afternoon
while she’s puttering around
the house and in the evening
when she’s watching her favorite TV shows. The button
has clearly gotten a lot of
use: The plastic coating is
partially peeled off. A few
weeks ago, the battery gave
out. So for now, she’s using
her iPad to file complaints.
“People can try to discredit me, but I don’t worry
about that,” she said. She
paused and remembered
the day she filed her first
complaint with the Airnoise
button.
“It felt so good,” she said.
“It’s highly, highly therapeutic. It makes you feel like you
can make a difference.”
Aratani writes for the
Washington Post, which is
owned by Amazon Chief
Executive Jeff Bezos.
Activision Blizzard Inc.
said it plans to fire Chief Financial Officer Spencer
Neumann for cause unrelated to the video game company’s financial performance and has placed him on
paid leave.
Neumann will be on leave
pending an opportunity to
demonstrate
why
he
shouldn’t be let go, the
Santa Monica company said
Monday in a statement. Activision — a leading video
game publisher whose titles
include the “Call of Duty”
and “World of Warcraft” series — didn’t elaborate.
Dennis Durkin, chief corporate officer, will assume
the duties of the principal financial officer, Activision
said.
In at least a dozen U.S.
departures this year, companies directly accused senior executives of misconduct
unrelated to financial performance.
Neumann came to Activision from Walt Disney Co.
and has been finance chief
since May 2017. In the last fiscal year, he had total compensation of $9.47 million,
according to data compiled
by Bloomberg, including
$2.8 million in options
awards and $4.15 million in
stock awards.
The company made its
announcement after the
markets closed. Activision
shares fell 1.2% to $46.03 in
extended trading. The stock
dropped 26% in 2018.
C4
T U E S DAY , JA N UA RY 1, 2 019
L AT I M E S . C O M / B U S I N E S S
Sexual misconduct on flights is rising
[Misconduct, from C1]
ants at 20 airlines.
The number of sex assaults on commercial flights
reported to the FBI jumped
to 63 in 2017, up from 38 incidents in 2014 — probably a
tiny fraction of the number
of assaults that occur, according to the agency.
“We believe it’s highly
underreported
because
some women are embarrassed to report it,” said
Laura Eimiller, an FBI
spokeswoman in Los Angeles. “Some people report the
crimes much later.”
But the increase in reported assaults and harassment and attention in the
news media have prompted
the FBI to be more vocal
about warning fliers in recent months. In April, the
agency issued a bulletin that
included five precautions for
air passengers, such as keeping the armrest down.
“We have done a proactive push to spread awareness,” Eimiller said.
Flight attendants have
been victims too, according
to a recent survey by the
Assn. of Flight Attendants
that found 68% of flight attendants had suffered some
form of sexual harassment
during their career.
The 2018 funding bill for
the Federal Aviation Administration called for the creation of a National In-Flight
Sexual Misconduct Task
Force to review existing protocols and to recommend
new training, reporting and
data collection about incidents of sexual assaults on
flights.
“The problem is a lack of
training for pilots and flight
attendants,” said Sen. Patty
Murray (D-Wash.), who
pushed for the language in
the FAA funding bill. “If it
happens, they don’t know
what to do.”
Murray advocated for the
task force partly in response
to a 2016 incident on a Delta
Air Lines flight from Seattle
to Amsterdam.
A passenger on the plane,
Allison Dvaladze, says her
seatmate assaulted her. She
appeared on television to
talk about the incident and
in February filed a lawsuit
accusing the airline of failing
to train crew members to
deal with attacks.
The nation’s airlines say
they have taken steps to address the problem. Several
carriers, including American, Alaska, Spirit and
United, say they have implemented get-tough policies
Jerome Adamstein Los Angeles Times
FLIGHT ATTENDANTS and lawmakers are calling for carriers to adopt consistent protocols for responding
to incidents. They also want airlines to collect data on claims and offer new training for attendants.
‘The problem is a
lack of training
for pilots and
flight attendants.
If it happens, they
don’t know what
to do.’
— Sen. Patty
Murray,
Washington Democrat who
pushed for an FAA sexual
misconduct task force
and new training for crew
members to identify and respond to the problem.
“I’ve asked each of our
leaders to ensure that
proper policies and procedures, proper training,
and proper awareness exists
to respond promptly and
thoughtfully to incidents,
and to report quickly, if incidents of harassment or assault do occur,” Alaska Airlines Chief Executive Brad
Tilden wrote in a memo to
employees in April.
To advertise
in this directory, go to
www.latimes.com/placebpsdad,
or call 1.800.528.4637, ext.72769
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vented flight attendants
from separating an alleged
assailant from other passengers.
“If you have planes full
but you shrink the seats and
the passenger space, people
are body to body,” said Hudson, president of FlyersRights.org, which has
about 60,000 members.
Among the 19 incidents
was a complaint by a woman
who said she was attacked
on a March 2017 Swiss Air
flight. She said a male seatmate repeatedly grabbed
her and kissed her on the
neck when she fell asleep, according to the complaint.
“The flight attendants
did not offer any help and
could not re-seat me as the
flight was full,” the woman
said in her complaint.
Swiss Air said in an email
it could not comment on the
incident without the written
consent of the accuser,
whose name was not provided by the Transportation
Department.
In December, a federal
judge sentenced a Michigan
man to nine years in prison
for assaulting a female seatmate on a nighttime Spirit
Airlines flight from Las
Vegas to Detroit. Spirit flight
attendants separated the
victim from her assailant on
the plane and alerted police,
court records show.
Prosecutors in the case
attributed the increase in assaults on planes to “increasingly cramped, confined
spaces; alcohol and drugs;
fewer flight attendants; and
dark cabins on night flights
— factors that likely embold-
en offenders. The cramped
style of airplane seating can
exacerbate trauma for victims,” according to court
documents.
Even when an airline cabin isn’t full, the close quarters and communal nature
of flying on a commercial
plane make complaining
about a fellow passenger intimidating and awkward,
said Kristen Houser, a
spokeswoman for the National Sexual Violence Resource Center in Harrisburg,
Penn.
“That proximity of an airplane makes it extra uncomfortable,” she said.
In addition to training
flight attendants to better
respond to such incidents,
airlines should include in the
pre-takeoff
safety
announcement a warning to
passengers that sexual misconduct won’t be tolerated
and that violators may be
banned by the airline,
Houser said.
“They could start doing
some consistent messaging
and campaigning to let them
know it’s a priority,” she said.
When a passenger complains to a flight attendant
about being harassed or assaulted by another flier, airline representatives say,
flight attendants are instructed to speak to both fliers, separate the passenger
and the alleged attacker and
notify police.
“Flight attendants are
empowered to look at every
option,” said Bobbie Egan, a
spokeswoman for Alaska
Airlines, which launched
new training on the problem
hugo.martin@latimes.com
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On Delta Air Lines, law
enforcement officials are
now automatically notified
when a passenger complains
about being harassed or assaulted. In the past, law enforcement was called only if
a passenger requested that
police meet the plane upon
landing or if crew members
witnessed an attack.
“Our new policy entails
being more direct to engage
law enforcement when allegations of assault occur,”
Delta spokesman Anthony
Black said. The new policy
took effect in March,
prompted by growing concerns about harassment,
human trafficking and intoxicated fliers on planes, he
said.
Flight attendants and
passenger advocates say the
problem is compounded by
the airline industry’s efforts
to maximize profits by flying
planes near capacity. The
more crowded a flight, the
less likely flight attendants
will have empty seats to
separate victims and assailants.
“There are only so many
seats,” said Garland of the
Assn. of Flight Attendants.
“We are in a confined space.”
Passenger rights advocate Paul Hudson obtained
records of 19 complaints of
assaults and harassment
filed by airline passengers
with the U.S. Department of
Transportation since 2012.
The records, obtained
through a Freedom of Information Act request, described at least two incidents in which crowded conditions on the plane pre-
last spring.
In several of the complaints filed with the Transportation Department, the
accusers said police weren’t
notified and the assailants
walked off the plane without
punishment.
On a Spirit Airlines flight
from Las Vegas to Chicago in
August 2016, a female passenger said in one of the
complaints, a man seated
behind
her
repeatedly
reached around the seat to
touch her. She said crew
members didn’t take action.
“Spirit Airlines feels that
it was OK for that passenger
in seat 28F to do that to me
and because I did not ask to
move my seat that it was my
fault for being sexually harassed,” the woman said in
her complaint.
A Spirit Airlines representative declined to comment on the incident described in the complaint but
pointed to an employee
memo released in May by
Bob Fornaro, chief executive
of the Florida-based carrier.
“Our leadership team will
not tolerate any form of harassment, including sexual
harassment, intimidation,
bullying, or any other demeaning or offensive conduct,” he wrote.
In her lawsuit against
Delta, Dvaladze said that after she was assaulted a crew
member told her to “let it roll
off your back.” Delta crew
members also failed to identify the man before he got off
the plane, making it impossible for law enforcement officials to prosecute him, according to the lawsuit.
Black, the Delta spokesman, declined to comment
on the lawsuit.
The Los Angeles film executive said she had a similarly frustrating experience
with her complaint.
When her Copa Airlines
flight landed in Panama, she
said, the plane was met by
Panamanian law enforcement officials who took a
sworn statement from her.
When
the
woman
checked with officials at the
Panamanian Consulate by
phone later for an update on
her case, she was told the
matter was turned over to
U.S. officials for prosecution.
In a statement, Copa said
the airline had “zero tolerance for this type of behavior
and is strongly committed to
the safety and well-being of
its passengers.”
In Los Angeles, FBI officials said they did not prosecute the assailant because
the case fell under Panama’s
jurisdiction. (An international agreement adopted in
Tokyo says that prosecution
of a crime on a plane flying
on an international route is
the responsibility of the
country where the plane is
registered. Panama signed
the agreement in 1963.)
“I can’t get a straight answer from anyone,” the
woman said.
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Stocks finish worst year since 2008
associated press
Major stock indexes
Wall Street closed out a
dismal, turbulent year for
stocks on a bright note Monday, but the market still finished 2018 with its worst
showing in a decade.
After setting a series of
records through the late
summer and early fall, major
U.S. indexes fell sharply
starting in October and
ended the year in the red.
The Standard & Poor’s
500 index, the market’s main
benchmark, finished the
year with a loss of 6.2%. The
last time the index fell for the
year was in 2008 during the
financial crisis. The S&P 500
posted tiny losses in 2011 and
2015 but eked out small gains
in both years once dividends
were included.
The Dow Jones industrial
average declined 5.6%. The
Nasdaq composite slid 3.9%.
Major indexes in Europe
also ended 2018 in the red.
France’s CAC 40 finished the
year down 11%. Britain’s
FTSE 100 lost 12.5%. Germany’s DAX ended the year in a
bear market, down 22% from
a high in January and 18%
from the start of the year.
“This was really the year
that market volatility returned with a vengeance,”
said Jeff Kravetz, regional
investment strategist at
U.S. Bank Wealth Management.
Wall Street started 2018
strong, buoyed by a growing
economy and corporate
Index
Dow industrials
Close
Daily
change
Daily %
change
YTD %
change
23,327.46
+265.06
+1.15
-5.63
S&P 500
2,506.85
+21.11
+0.85
-6.24
Nasdaq composite
6,635.28
+50.76
+0.77
-3.88
S&P 400
1,663.04
+16.55
+1.01
-12.50
Russell 2000
1,348.56
+10.64
+0.80
-12.18
EuroStoxx 50
2,760.06
+4.90
+0.18
-13.15
20,014.77
25,818.32
—
+314.12
—
+1.23
-12.08
-13.71
Nikkei (Japan)
Hang Seng (Hong Kong)
Source: AP
profits. Stocks climbed to
new highs early, shook off a
sudden, steep drop by spring
and rode a wave of tax-cutjuiced corporate earnings
growth to another all-time
high by September. Then
the jitters set in.
Investors grew worried
that the testy U.S.-China
trade war and higher interest rates would slow the U.S.
economy and hurt corporate
profits. A slowing U.S. housing market and forecasts of
weaker global growth in 2019
stoked traders’ unease.
In October the market’s
gyrations grew more volatile. The autumn sell-off
knocked the benchmark
S&P 500 index into a correction — a drop of 10% from a
recent high — for the second
time in nine months. A
Christmas
Eve
plunge
brought it to the edge of bear
market territory — a 20%
drop from a recent peak —
before closing just short of
the threshold that would
have meant the end of the
nearly 10-year bull market.
The risks have market
strategists forecasting another turbulent year for
stocks in 2019, and potentially one of the most difficult years for investors since
the bull market began.
On Monday, the S&P 500
rose 21.11 points, or 0.9%, to
2,506.85. The Dow climbed
265.06 points, or 1.2%, to
23,327.46. The Nasdaq rose
50.76 points, or 0.8%, to
6,635.28. The Russell 2000 index of smaller-company
stocks rose 10.64 points, or
0.8%, to 1,348.56; for the year,
it sank 12.2%.
Bond prices rose. The
yield on the 10-year Treasury
note fell to 2.68% from 2.73%
late Friday. The yield started
off the year at 2.41%.
Healthcare stocks paved
the way for Monday’s modest gains. The sector ended
the year with a 4.7% increase,
leading all sectors in the
S&P 500. Utilities was the
only other sector to eke out
an annual gain, adding 0.5%.
Technology firms, a big
driver of the market’s gains
before things deteriorated in
October, ended the year with
a 1.6% loss. Three of the five
“FAANG” stocks — Facebook, Amazon, Apple, Netflix and Google parent Alphabet — ended 2018 lower:
Facebook slid 25.7%, Apple
slipped 6.8%, and Alphabet
edged down 0.8%. Amazon,
meanwhile, climbed 28.4%,
and Netflix jumped 39.4%.
Energy companies fared
the worst, plunging 20.5% for
the year, as the price of U.S.
crude oil tumbled about 40%
from a four-year peak of $76 a
barrel in October.
On Monday, benchmark
U.S. crude inched up 0.2% to
$45.41 a barrel. Brent crude
rose 1.1% to $53.80 a barrel.
Investors drew encouragement from a Sunday
tweet by President Trump,
which said he had a “long
and very good call” with Chinese President Xi Jinping.
He added: “Deal is moving
along very well. If made, it
will be very comprehensive,
covering all subjects, areas
and points of dispute. Big
progress being made.”
Meanwhile, the official
Xinhua News Agency cited a
Chinese Foreign Ministry
spokesman as saying that
“China stands ready to work
with the United States to
move forward the ChinaU.S. ties which are underpinned by coordination, cooperation and stability.”
Trading will be closed
Tuesday for New Year’s Day.
T U E S DAY , JA N UA RY 1, 2 019
L AT I M E S . C O M / B U S I N E S S
C5
A look at Ryuk malware
[Ryuk, from C1]
near midnight Thursday,
when sports editors at the
Union-Tribune struggled to
transmit finished pages to
the printing facility. It
spread rapidly over the following day, impeding distribution of the Saturday editions of The Times and
Union-Tribune, as well as
papers in Florida, Chicago
and Connecticut and the
West Coast editions of the
Wall Street Journal and New
York Times, which are
printed in downtown Los
Angeles.
By Monday, problems in
production and delivery
were largely resolved, said
Marisa Kollias, spokeswoman for Tribune Publishing.
A screen shot of affected
company files obtained by
The Times shows a ransom
note titled RyukReadMe
that is similar to messages
reported in other Ryuk incidents. No ransom amount
was specified. The company
would not confirm that it
had been affected by Ryuk in
particular or a ransomware
attack in general.
Such attacks are increasingly common. In 2016, devices and medical records at
Hollywood
Presbyterian
Medical Center were locked
down until the hospital paid
a $17,000 ransom in bitcoin.
In May 2017, the WannaCry
ransomware spread to an estimated 200,000 computers
in 150 countries, triggering a
crisis in the United Kingdom
when it hit the National
Health Service. Similar
threats targeted the Port of
Long Beach in July and the
Port of San Diego in September.
Ryuk itself appeared on
the radar of cybersecurity
experts in August, when the
security researchers MalwareHunterTeam reported
five initial victims. An analysis by Check Point Research
published later that month
estimated that it had already netted the attackers
more than $640,000, and that
much of its code matched
that of a known ransomware
program called Hermes,
which has been linked to the
North
Korean
hacking
group that many believe was
behind the WannaCry attack.
Determining the origin of
an attack is exceedingly difficult, as is establishing any
links to state actors.
“Really the only way is,
once you go in and raid
someone and knock down
their door and seize their
computers, you find the
code on their computers,”
said Clifford Neuman, director of USC’s Center for Computer System Security.
“That’s the only way to absolutely attribute.”
The name Ryuk appears
to be a reference to a character in the popular anime and
manga series “Death Note.”
In the comics, Ryuk is a demon of death who, bored
with his immortality, decides to introduce into the
world a notebook that allows
its finder to kill anyone by
writing their name.
Most ransomware attacks come from programs
that target a vast number of
individuals with infected
links or attachments, and
then ask for a small amount
of money to unlock the computers, said Ben Herzog, a
security researcher with
Check Point.
Ryuk, he said, is different.
“Commodity
ransomware like GandCrab has
a large affiliate program,
many possible infection vectors, and a constant drip of
victims and ransom payments,” Herzog wrote in an
email. “Ryuk, in contrast, is
a relatively ‘artisanal’ malware,” which is used to target specific companies with
little tolerance for disruption such as hospitals, ports,
and, now, apparently newspapers.
Since emerging as a mass
phenomenon over the last
few years, ransomware and
those who deploy it have
been locked in an arms race
with security systems and
researchers. Both have
grown more sophisticated
as a result.
Newer models can exploit known security weak-
Richard Vogel Associated Press
RYUK is the malware program believed to have been used in an attack this week-
end that hobbled newspapers nationwide, including the Los Angeles Times.
nesses to jump from user to
user, accessing more secure
files along the way.
The Check Point security
analysis did not find that
Ryuk had a method for automatically spreading among
a network, which Itay Cohen, another security researcher with Check Point,
said might indicate “prior,
manual work that was done
by the attackers in order to
take these networks as a
hostage.”
sam.dean@latimes.com
Staff writer Meg James
contributed to this report.
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C6
T U E S DAY , JA N UA RY 1, 2 019
L AT I M E S . C O M / B U S I N E S S
Fear as weapon against migrants
[Immigration, from C1]
has the power to fire them
and send them home,” according to a court affidavit
by Sierra Giovanna, who
managed Munger’s guest
worker program before she
was fired in August 2017. The
affidavit was filed in a federal
lawsuit in which workers
accuse Delano, Calif.-based
Munger of labor trafficking.
Munger’s treatment of its
guest workers in 2017 has
drawn fines from regulators
in California and Washington state, and a federal investigation by the Labor Department. The company declined to answer questions
for this article, but said after
the workers sued last January that it intended to “vigorously fight” their claims.
“All employees are treated
well and are paid well,” it
said.
In court filings, Munger
denies wrongdoing, claims
the guest workers’ production was “exceedingly low,”
and says that it provided
enough food but that some
of the laborers in 2017 were
picky eaters.
Between the blueberry
harvests of 2016 and 2017,
something did change in
America. In Trump’s first
year as president, arrests of
immigrants suspected of being in the country illegally
jumped 41%, stoking fear of
deportation in immigrant
communities.
Such arrests accelerated
further in 2018, increasing
55% over 2016. Other administration
policies
have
eroded protections against
labor trafficking — that is,
compelling people to work
through force, fraud or coercion — according to immigration lawyers.
In short, worker advocates say, Trump’s immigration crackdown has become
the nasty boss’ best friend.
Terrified of “la migra,” more
workers are putting up with
unpaid wages, untreated injuries and various forms of
abuse, says David Weil, who
was director of the U.S. Labor Department’s Wage and
Hour Division under President Obama.
It’s impossible to quantify how employers’ behavior
is changing, but data from
the California Labor Commissioner’s Office offer a
glimpse. Since Trump’s January 2017 inauguration, the
agency has received at least
172 complaints alleging that
employers threatened to retaliate against workers
based on their immigration
status — illegal under federal and California law. In
2014 through 2016, it received
just 29 such complaints.
It’s not just California.
Audrey Richardson, an employment attorney with
Greater Boston Legal Services, says she sees far worse
cases. “I don’t think it’s an
exaggeration to call some of
the cases we’re seeing
Trump slavery,” she said.
The White House and the
U.S. Department of Labor
didn’t respond to repeated
requests for comment.
Gregory Bull Associated Press
A WESTERN GROWERS official says that “most employers who use the H-2A temporary visa program comply with its rules.”
Mel Melcon Los Angeles Times
A BLUEBERRY grower’s treatment of guest workers in 2017 drew fines in Cali-
fornia. But Munger Bros. asserts, “Employees are treated well and are paid well.”
::
Even as the administration’s hard line at the border
has led to tear gas and turmoil, the agricultural guest
worker program that brings
foreign nationals to the
United States on temporary
visas has grown rapidly.
Berry growers are the leading source of demand for the
workers, government data
show, accounting for more
than 10% of the 200,049 positions certified in 2017 and the
242,762 certified in 2018.
In 2017, Munger paid Contreras and his fellow guest
workers about $13 an hour, a
rate set by the federal Department of Labor, state
regulations and unions. Employers that use the guest
worker program must cover
costs for travel to the United
States once the workers
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have completed half the contract period — and then cover the trip home at the contract’s end. They must provide lodging and three meals
a day, at minimum cost to
the workers. And they must
provide some workers’ compensation insurance to cover illnesses and injuries.
For Contreras, as for
thousands of other Central
Americans, not all the reasons for heading north were
economic. A summer in the
United States offered at
least temporary escape from
Nayarit, a pocket of Mexico
where Joaquin “El Chapo”
Guzman’s arrest had triggered a murderous turf war
between drug cartels.
Contreras wanted a better life. He went to California
to support his three young
children and try to earn
enough money for tuition for
a medical imaging degree.
Not long after work began, an apparent allergic reaction caused his face to
swell and his throat to constrict, Contreras says. His
head pounded in the heat,
but he pressed on. He
watched another laborer, Jesus Solorzano Leon, try to
keep working through a sudden facial paralysis.
Leon says he spent the
last of his savings on co-pays
for injections and doctors’
bills. Munger refused to pay
for his trip home, so co-workers chipped in for his bus
ticket, Leon says. Munger
denies it sent sick workers
back to Mexico without paying for their transportation.
Workers say their bosses
had little sympathy for such
ailments. “You came here to
suffer, not for vacation,” a
supervisor named Jessica
told the workers, according
to sworn affidavits filed in
the labor-trafficking lawsuit. One hotel for the workers was riddled with bedbugs, says Giovanna, the
former Munger labor manager.
::
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After the California harvest, most of the Munger
workers were bused 900
miles north to another of the
company’s blueberry plantations in Sumas, Wash.,
called Sarbanand Farms.
They were housed in a barracks-style camp, enclosed
by a fence with a guard at the
gate. Threats and abuse got
worse, the workers say.
There, Munger supervisor Nidia Perez admonished
them that only those “on
their deathbeds” could miss
work, according to workers’
affidavits. The warning was
reinforced by the sight of
U.S. Customs and Border
Protection agents in marked
SUVs patrolling outside the
camp, a few miles from the
Canadian border. In her answer to the workers’ complaint, Perez, who is named
as a defendant in the suit,
admits she told workers not
to miss work “unless you’re
dying” but denies she meant
they shouldn’t take sick days
or report medical problems.
Pressure to pick faster intensified as summer temperatures reached the 90s
and smoke from forest fires
enveloped the fields.
In the dining hall, proctors marked workers’ hands
when they went through the
buffet line to ensure no one
got seconds, according to affidavits. When food ran out,
some workers didn’t eat.
Munger often served
spoiled meat and 3-day-old
scrambled eggs, says Maria
Gallardo, who worked at
Sarbanand as a cook and
food server in August 2017.
Gallardo says that when she
pointed this out to one of the
supervisors, the woman told
her “it doesn’t matter.” As
the camp population tripled
to almost 600 workers, the
food budget didn’t keep up,
she says. She thinks most of
them left hungry. “It was
very unjust,” says Gallardo,
who was fired after 10 days
on the job.
In court filings, Munger
has said that its food was
nourishing and that workers
complained only because
some had different tastes.
“Coastal workers preferred
seafood,” a filing says. “Others preferred carne asada.”
::
One man at Sarbanand
was particularly skinny.
Honesto Ibarra would eat
only a few beans, no rice or
meat, Gallardo recalls. She
asked him why. “I just don’t
feel well,” he told her.
In truth, Ibarra had diabetes, and he’d apparently
run out of medicine. In court
filings, company officials say
he never disclosed his condition to them.
On Aug. 1, Ibarra didn’t
get up for work. He told a
Munger office assistant who
brought all three meals to
his bedside that day that he
had a headache and wanted
to sleep it off. He called Mexico and told his wife he was
going to give his notice and
come home, according to
Corrie Yackulic, the Ibarra
family’s Seattle attorney.
The
next
morning
Munger manager Javier
Sampedro rejected Ibarra’s
request for the company’s
help to fly home and ordered
him back to work, according
to co-worker Barbaro Rosas,
one of the two named plaintiffs in the labor-trafficking
suit. That day, Ibarra collapsed in the field.
Sampedro asked the office assistant to drive Ibarra
to the emergency room, but
the assistant refused and
called 911, according to
Washington state investigative documents.
Ibarra’s co-workers demanded information in a
meeting with Sampedro the
next night. They warned the
farm manager that others
might collapse without more
water and shade. Some
asked why Munger provided
medical attention only after
workers were deathly ill.
On Aug. 4, about 60 of the
workers didn’t show up for
work, saying they were striking for better conditions. A
day later, Munger fired
them. Company officials
cited “insubordination” and
told them they had an hour
to leave camp before Munger
called police and immigration agents to take them
away, according to workers’
affidavits. Oscar Contreras
was among those fired.
Meanwhile, Ibarra, 28, lay
comatose in a Seattle hospital. He died two days later.
The cause was complications from diabetes, according to the medical examiner.
A state investigation found
that his death was unrelated
to work conditions.
After his death, Ibarra’s
wife, Brenda, and their three
kids were evicted from their
home in the rural Mexican
state of Zacatecas and had
to move into a shack with no
electricity, according to
Yackulic,
her
lawyer.
Munger gave nothing, she
says.
Munger referred questions about Ibarra’s death to
a statement Sarbanand
Farms issued in August,
which said the grower “fully
supported his family during
this ordeal.” It added: “We
are committed to the wellbeing of every worker.”
::
Most employers who use
the H-2A temporary visa
program comply with its
rules, but a few unscrupulous users tarnish the rest,
says Jason Resnick, vice
president and general counsel of Western Growers,
which represents farmers in
California, Arizona, New
Mexico and Colorado.
“We know Americans are
not willing to engage in labor-intensive agriculture at
any wage, but if we’re going
to feed this country, we’re
going to need to rely on foreign labor,” Resnick says.
“We don’t want workers to be
exploited or denied benefit.
But when someone intentionally violates the rules, it
casts a pall on the entire program,” he added, referring to
the industry as a whole, not
Munger specifically.
A bedrock principle of
U.S. labor law is that every
job holder, regardless of immigration status, enjoys
equal protection from abusive employers. It’s illegal to
hire immigrants who aren’t
authorized to be in the country, but it’s just as illegal to
pay them less than minimum wage, skimp on over-
time or make them work in
unsafe conditions.
Meanwhile, the United
States traditionally has
been viewed as a sanctuary
for victims of labor trafficking. By law, immigrant victims can apply for special
“T” visas that allow them to
work in the country for four
years and apply for permanent residency.
Historically, even if such a
trafficking visa was denied,
applicants were no worse off.
But that ended last year.
Trump’s administration
announced in June that anyone rejected for T visas must
appear in immigration court
for deportation proceedings. And according to immigration and labor lawyers,
the government is making it
harder to qualify for T visas.
Federal law says “any
credible evidence” will be
considered in establishing
whether
an
immigrant
worker was a victim of trafficking — language that has
given applicants wide latitude. But now Trump administration officials are
peppering applicants with
requests for evidence, effectively revoking any benefit of
the doubt, attorneys say.
::
In their trafficking claim
against Munger, the Mexican guest workers in Washington state claim that managers forced them to work
with “a common scheme of
threats and a common practice of abusing the law to
keep workers in the fields.”
The threats were so institutionalized, workers came
to believe they had no choice
but to suffer abuse or find
their way home, says Joe
Morrison, their Seattle attorney. They also knew that
by leaving early, they’d risk
being blacklisted by labor recruiters for other U.S. firms.
Oscar Contreras is back
in Nayarit, earning about
$60 a week as a construction
worker and dreaming of the
college degree he’d hoped to
pursue. He didn’t hear from
Munger’s recruiter last year.
Munger has said it did
nothing wrong. It says the
work stoppage after Ibarra’s
collapse wasn’t a strike at all.
Sampedro, the supervisor accused of sending
Ibarra back to the field, said
in an affidavit that many
workers were already sick
when they left Mexico. He
said that all workers’ medical complaints were taken
seriously and that he or his
assistant made as many as
15 trips with workers to the
doctor that summer.
After Ibarra’s death, investigators with the Washington state Department of
Labor and Industries interviewed dozens of the workers. Many said they felt
forced to work while sick and
injured, according to state
documents. “Workers were
told if they caused problems
or complained about anything they would never be
contracted to come back to
work,” one investigator
wrote in a memo.
The state fined Munger
almost $146,000 for providing
insufficient breaks and meal
periods, the largest fine ever
levied for those violations in
Washington state. A local
lawyer, serving as a temporary state judge, cut the fine
in half. He cited the fact that
Munger kept good records.
Mehrotra, Waldman and
Levin write for Bloomberg.
D
SPORTS
T U E S D A Y , J A N U A R Y 1 , 2 0 1 9 :: L A T I M E S . C O M / S P O R T S
Not the
grand
prize,
but it
will do
Ohio State and
Washington, out of
title mix, meet in Rose
Bowl for the first time.
By J. Brady
McCollough
Out of respect for the
place, for the bowl game he
grew up watching and for his
players who put everything
into their 12-1 record and Big
Ten championship, Urban
Meyer was hesitant to use a
particular phrase to describe the Buckeyes’ season
and their slotting in Tuesday’s 105th Rose Bowl game.
“I don’t want to say we
failed,” Meyer said, “because
that’s a really, really tough
word. But we have.”
A few days ago, Ohio
State quarterback Dwayne
Haskins could not bring
himself to watch much of the
College Football Playoff
semifinal games won by
Clemson over Notre Dame
and Alabama over Oklahoma. Oklahoma had the
same record as Ohio State
but was chosen as the playoff ’s fourth team by the CFP
selection committee. Haskins’ takeaway from what he
saw Saturday?
“I thought we should
have been in it,” the sophomore said, “but, take it out
on Washington.”
Woody Hayes would be
throwing a headset in his
grave if he heard an Ohio
State football player viewing
a trip to the Rose Bowl as a
glorified consolation prize, a
chance to prove the Buckeyes should have spent their
holiday at another bowl
game. But Meyer could not
deny the way the introduction of the College Football
Playoff in 2014 has altered
the sport’s priorities and the
[See Rose Bowl, D3]
ROSE BOWL
6 Ohio State (12-1) vs.
9 Washington (10-3)
at the Rose Bowl
Today, 2 p.m.
TV: ESPN
Mark J. Terrill Associated Press
STEVE ALFORD’S tenure at UCLA comes to an end, the first in-season firing of a men’s basketball coach in the 100-year history of
a program that has won 11 national championships. The Bruins are 7-6 after starting 4-0 and lost to Liberty by 15 points Saturday.
Alford is out at UCLA
Father’s success,
Knight’s attention
to detail shaped
Bartow’s outlook
Men’s basketball
coach is fired after
five-plus seasons
as Bruins struggle
By Ben Bolch
By Ben Bolch
One of Murry Bartow’s biggest
basketball influences was his mildmannered, professorial father.
The other was Bobby Knight.
The artful blending of the wildly
varying styles has sustained Bartow
during a coaching career that took an
unexpected turn Monday when he was
named UCLA’s interim basketball
coach after the firing of Steve Alford.
Known as a tireless worker, Bartow, 57, will coach the Bruins (7-6) for
the rest of the season while the search
for a permanent coach gets underway.
It’s a homecoming of sorts, Bartow
taking over the program once run by
his late father. Gene Bartow went 52-9
over two seasons as coach John Wooden’s successor, reaching the Final
Four during the 1975-76 season and the
second round of the NCAA tournament the following season.
The Bartows lived in Northridge at
the time, with Murry serving a stint as
sports editor of his junior high news[See Bartow, D9]
Steve Alford was hired at UCLA to
revive the offense, reinvigorate the fan
base and connect with a new generation of players.
In what turned out to be his final
game with the Bruins, Alford’s offense
generated more turnovers than baskets in front of fans who booed the
team in the midst of a fourth consecutive loss. Afterward, Alford blamed
the players for their inability to execute simple fundamentals that the
coach described as “seventh-grade
stuff.”
The increasingly poisonous environment surrounding UCLA’s flagship program resulted in the dismissal of Alford as men’s basketball coach
late Sunday, one day after a humiliating 15-point defeat at home to Liberty
and four days before the start of Pac-12
Conference play.
UCLA announced Monday that assistant Murry Bartow would take over
as the interim coach through the rest
[See UCLA, D9]
Jessica Hill Associated Press
MURRY BARTOW , shown coaching South Florida in Feb-
ruary 2017, takes over as interim basketball coach at UCLA.
Will Dodgers
Chargers could add weapon swing for fences
in free agency?
N F L W I L D - CA R D ROU N D :: C H A R G E R S AT B A LT I M O R E
SUNDAY, 10 A.M. PST | TV: CHANNEL 2
Henry, a playmaking
tight end expected to
miss 2018 season, may
play against Ravens.
By Jeff Miller
The Chargers finished
the regular season looking
like a team in need of offensive help.
A boost once considered
unlikely could arrive this
week, just in time for Sunday’s
wild-card
game
against Baltimore.
Hunter Henry is scheduled to participate in practice with the starters as the
Chargers gauge the tight
end’s availability for the
postseason.
“We want to give him a
good look this week to see
where he’s at,” coach Anthony Lynn said. “I like the
progress that he’s been making. But he hasn’t played
football in a long time. … He’s
going to have to really show
us that he’s ready.”
Henry’s most recent
game came on Dec. 16, 2017,
Chris Carlson Associated Press
THE CHARGERS’ Hunter Henry tore the anterior
cruciate ligament in his right knee in May.
Black Monday
hits NFL coaches
Rams to stay busy
after earning bye
The Jets, Buccaneers,
Cardinals, Broncos, Bengals and Dolphins get rid
of leader after finale. D5
NFC West champions
will focus on fundamentals, techniques and getting healthy this week. D5
at Kansas City. He tore the
anterior cruciate ligament in
his right knee during practice in May and was expected to miss the 2018 season. He progressed to the
point where the Chargers in
mid-December designated
him to potentially return.
They have until Monday
to activate Hunter or rule
him out.
“He’s one of the better
combo tight ends in our
game,” Lynn said. “His size,
his red-zone touchdowns …
Hunter definitely can add to
that. His pass protection, his
blocking. … He can do a lot of
things.”
Henry has 81 career receptions for 1,057 yards and
12 touchdowns in 29 games
over two seasons.
In his absence, veterans
Virgil Green and Antonio
Gates have given the Chargers stability.
Henry, however, would
present the offense with
more playmaking ability.
“I believe that the knee is
stable,” Lynn said. “We did
some things last week and I
thought he looked really
[See Chargers, D5]
Whether they go after
Harper, Realmuto or
others, here’s a look
at the possibilities.
By Jorge Castillo
Recently, a post appeared on Major League
Baseball’s Instagram account featuring a photo of
Bryce Harper and a question splashed across the bottom: Are the Dodgers the favorites for Bryce?
It’s a possibility the baseball universe is pondering as
the winter progresses without an obvious destination
for the free-agent outfielder.
Then Harper’s account
“liked” the post and that universe exploded. Conjectures
had already formulated after the Dodgers traded outfielders Yasiel Puig and Matt
Kemp as part of a sevenplayer deal with the Cincinnati Reds that signaled
other moves were looming.
Harper’s account later “unliked” the post but the double-tap’s power was irreversible. The dots were too
easy to connect for social
media’s detectives. Harper
[See Dodgers, D10]
Kings win in OT
against Colorado
Ducks fall in OT
to hot Lightning
Winger Dustin Brown’s
breakaway goal 54
seconds into the extra
period gives L.A. five
wins in six games. D6
Brayden Point scores
only 35 seconds into
overtime as Tampa Bay
completes a thoroughly
dominant December. D6
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LAA6010005-1
D2
T U E S DAY , JA N UA RY 1, 2 019
L AT I M E S . C O M / S P O RT S
D3
PRO CALENDAR
TUE.
1
WED.
2
THU.
3
FRI.
4
SAT.
5
NEXT: JAN. 12 VS. TBD, 5:15 P.M., CH. 11*
RAMS
NEXT: SUNDAY AT BALTIMORE, 10 A.M. PST, CH. 2*
CHARGERS
OKLAHOMA
CITY
7:30
SpecSN, ESPN
LAKERS
NEW YORK
7:30
SpecSN
at Phoenix
6
Prime
PHILA.
7:30
Prime
CLIPPERS
at Vegas
6
FSW
EDMONTON
7
FSW
TAMPA BAY
7:30
FSW
KINGS
VEGAS
7
FSW
DUCKS
Shade denotes home game; *NFL playoffs
TODAY ON THE AIR
TIME
EVENT
BASKETBALL
4:30 p.m. Utah at Toronto
7:30 p.m. Philadelphia at Clippers
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
10 a.m. Notre Dame at Virginia Tech
4 p.m.
Marquette at St. John’s
7 p.m.
Cal State Fullerton at Washington
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
9 a.m.
Outback Bowl, Iowa vs. Mississippi State
10 a.m. Citrus Bowl, Kentucky vs. Penn State
10 a.m. Fiesta Bowl, Louisiana State vs. Central Florida
2 p.m.
Rose Bowl, Washington vs. Ohio State
5:45 p.m. Sugar Bowl, Texas vs. Georgia
HOCKEY
10 a.m. Boston vs. Chicago
5:30 p.m. Philadelphia at Nashville
6 p.m.
Kings at Vegas
HORSE RACING
Noon
Trackside Live! Santa Anita
5 p.m.
Race Night
SOCCER
6:45 a.m. England, Arsenal vs. Fulham
9:15 a.m. England, Cardiff City vs. Tottenham Hotspur
TENNIS
3 p.m.
Center Court, Hopman Cup, France vs. Germany,
Session 7
Michael Conroy Associated Press
OHIO STATE QUARTERBACK Dwayne Haskins, who believes his team belonged in the College Football
ON THE AIR
Playoff, said he would like to vent his frustration by punishing Washington in the Rose Bowl.
TV: NBATV
TV: Prime R: 570
TV: ESPNU
TV: FS1
TV: Pac-12
TV: ESPN2
TV: 7
TV: ESPN
TV: ESPN
TV: ESPN
TV: 4
TV: NHL
TV: FSW R: iHeart
TV: TVG
TV: TVG
TV: NBCSN
TV: NBCSN
TV: Tennis
ROSE BOWL GAME:
TRAVEL PRIMER
Ohio State and Washington will meet in the 105th Rose Bowl
game Tuesday at 2 p.m. Parking near the stadium will be limited. Ticket holders are encouraged to use public transportation or carpool and to arrive early.
Pasadena
210
mont
Ave.
.
t Dr
Mountain
St.
210
Maple St.
Linda
Vista Ave. Walnut St.
PARSONS
PARKING
134
M
PICK-UP/
DROP-OFF
ZONE
110
Parking and shuttle services
Arrive early. Fans driving to
the stadium on game day
can expect significant delays and long walks. To avoid
traffic congestion from the
Rose Parade, arrive before 10
a.m. Parking is provided on a
first-come, first-served basis.
8 General stadium parking is $60 on event day for
golf course parking at the
Rose Bowl stadium. Parking
lots open at 4 a.m. There is
no reserved parking and
cars may be stack-parked in
rows of five on a first-come,
first-served basis. In-andout privileges are prohibited
in all parking areas.
8 Motor home parking:
Game day motor-home
parking opens at 4 a.m. on
Tuesday and costs $200.
Overnight
motor-home
parking closes at noon
Wednesday. There is a onetime charge of $40 for tow vehicles.
8 Bus and limo parking: On
game day, limousine parking
(or any commercial vehicle
less than 23 feet long) is $250
and bus parking (or any
commercial vehicle more
than 23 feet long) is $350. Call
(626) 397-4220 for more information.
For further information:
www.rosebowlstadium.com,
(626) 449-4100.
[Rose Bowl, from D1]
role of the bowl season’s
“Granddaddy of Them All,”
as legendary broadcaster
Keith Jackson first called it.
Alabama and Clemson
have taken over the sport’s
hierarchy and Monday in
Santa Clara will meet in the
championship game for the
third time in five seasons.
The 2014 national champion Buckeyes, the only
team other than the Crimson Tide and Tigers to win a
national title in the playoff
era, have won consecutive
Big Ten titles but have been
left out of the party each
time.
“Devastating,”
Meyer
said.
Meyer, coaching Ohio
State for the last time Tuesday before handing over the
program to offensive coordinator and coach-in-waiting
Ryan Day, sees his program
on the same level as Alabama and Clemson and has
had to work on accepting
that his team’s fate is out of
its hands once it loses a
game — particularly a
shocking blowout such as
the one it suffered at Purdue
this season, and at Iowa last
year, the 2017 team’s second
loss.
“Any time I see someone
like, ‘Man, this is’ — no, no
it’s not. You made a choice to
come here,” Meyer said.
“This is a place of excellence.
Well, we had a great year, 12-1.
Yeah, but we missed the ultimate prize. That doesn’t
mean we make everything so
miserable around there.”
Ohio State, despite its
dominion over the Big Ten
the last 15 years, has played
in only one Rose Bowl game
since 1997, defeating Oregon
26-17 in 2010.
Given that and the Rose
Bowl’s changing place in college football in the Bowl
Championship Series and
CFP eras, Meyer assumed he
would have to motivate his
players and share some history with them about what
the game means to their
elders.
He did not.
“I was pleasantly surprised that our players knew
about it too,” Meyer said. “I
was thinking guys would sit
out, maybe this, maybe that,
but the minute we were in
the Rose Bowl — I mean,
there was disappointment
we weren’t in the playoff, but
it quickly shifted to respect
to the Rose Bowl.”
Generationally, for the
players, this is the Rose Bowl
of the USC-Texas 2006 class,
of Vince Young and Reggie
Bush.
For their coaches, it is
still all Big Ten and the old
Pac-8 and Pac-10, Hayes and
Bo Schembechler battling
for the right to play John
McKay’s USC Trojans.
“Both these programs
grew up with this being the
pinnacle of the season,”
Washington coach Chris
Petersen said. “And it’s
changed a little bit, a little bit
with the playoff system now.
But if you’re not going to be
in that, what other bowl is
there to be at? This is it. This
is the history, the tradition,
this is what college football is
about.”
For Washington, the 10-3
Pac-12 champion, the trip to
Pasadena felt like much
more of a gift than something to which the Huskies
had to adjust their minds.
Part of it was that they lost
two more games than the
Buckeyes, and part of it was
that this game was the key to
their rise to national prominence decades ago and to return for the first time in 18
years serves as a symbol of
the program’s comeback
under Petersen.
“I can’t speak for their
fans,” Washington senior
linebacker Ben Burr-Kirven
said, “but the Rose Bowl is
the game that made our program when Don James was
here, and all that stuff.
“You can just tell around
Seattle, before we came
down here, how excited people are. It means so much to
everyone to be back in this
game and to hopefully bring
back a win, because the Rose
Bowl really has been kind of
the pillar that our program
first kind of grew up on.
“It’s obviously different
now with the playoffs, but it’s
the Rose Bowl, and it will always be that game, for Washington football and especially for Pac-12 teams, it’s
hard not to get excited about
going to the Rose Bowl.”
Still, one reporter at media day Sunday kept posing
the same question to players
from both sides: Why should
someone watch this year’s
Rose Bowl?
If college football fans aren’t intrigued by Haskins
and Ohio State’s bevy of
speedy wide receivers going
against Washington’s topnotch secondary or seeing
Meyer and Petersen match
wits for 60 minutes, there’s
the fact that Ohio State and
Washington have never met
in the Rose Bowl.
They have each made 15
appearances, tied for third
all-time with Stanford, behind USC (34) and Michigan
(20).
It will be scarlet and gray
and purple and gold for the
first time, and that is special,
playoff game or not.
“That seems pretty impossible,” Burr-Kirven said,
“and hopefully we can make
this first matchup really
fun.”
brady.mccollough@latimes.com
Twitter: @BradyMcCollough
MATCHUPS: No. 6 Ohio State (12-1) vs. No. 9 Washington (10-3)
Washington
Blvd.
ROSE
BOWL
co
Se .
St
Fair Oaks Ave.
BROOKSIDE
GOLF COURSE Woodbury Rd.
Wes
Gold Line
The Memorial Park station
is a three-block walk from
the Parsons Corp. parking
lot shuttle stop. The free
shuttle stops near gates B
and C at the stadium (see
map). For more information
on public transportation,
call (323) 466-3876.
1 MILE
Rose
Drop-off for taxis, ride-hailing services
No drop-offs or pickups, including taxi and ride-hailing
services, are allowed at the
stadium. Drop-off location is
on Holly Street between Fair
Oaks Avenue and Raymond
Avenue. From there, all patrons may use the free Rose
Bowl shuttle or walk to the
stadium.
Stadium parking
Shuttle stop
Lincoln Ave.
Getting to the game
Rose still a coveted bowl
Prohibited items
and clear-bag policy
Allowed
12-by-6-inch clear plastic
bag
One-gallon plastic freezer
bag
Clutch with wrist strap or
shoulder strap (not larger
than 4.5 inches by 6.5 inches)
Diaper bag, as long as accompanied by a child
Not allowed
Backpack
Camera case
Mesh bag
Purse
Clear backpack
Tinted plastic bag
Oversized tote bag
Printed pattern plastic bag
Fanny pack
Binoculars case
Public FanFest
Activities from 8 a.m. to 1
p.m. Tuesday in parking lot
1A north of the stadium include:
8 Music/DJ and interactive games
8 Photos with the Rose
Bowl game trophy
8 TV walls to watch the
Rose Parade and other bowl
games
8 Secure zone for expedited entry into the stadium
Sources: Tournament of
Roses, Rose Bowl Operating Co.
has experience on the big
stage after playing in the
College Football Playoff
semifinal at the Peach Bowl
and in the Fiesta Bowl the
last two seasons. Washington will depend on running
backs Myles Gaskin and
Salvon Ahmed and hope to
play ball control in an effort
to not strand its top-notch
defense against Ohio State’s
offense.
Marquee matchup
Washington
defensive
front vs. Ohio State offensive
line. Against Michigan’s
then-No. 1-ranked defense,
Ohio State quarterback
Dwayne Haskins spent
much of the game with a
clean pocket from which to
pick apart the Wolverines.
The result was a 62-39 demolition of the Buckeyes’ rival
and Haskins passing for 396
yards and six touchdowns.
By the end of the game, the
talented redshirt sophomore had vaulted himself
into the discussion as perhaps the top quarterback
available in April’s NFL
draft. Haskins has not made
a decision about whether to
turn pro, instead choosing to
focus on sending Urban
Meyer out with a Rose Bowl
victory over Washington in
the coach’s first appearance
in the game. Washington’s
secondary, led by lockdown
cornerbacks and future NFL
draft picks Byron Murphy
and Jordan Miller, gets all of
the attention, and rightfully
so. But if the Huskies’ defensive line and linebackers are
not able to get to Haskins
and get him out of rhythm, it
will be a long day even for
Murphy and Miller. If Haskins is given time, the Buckeyes have a way of getting
the ball to their playmakers
in space. Against Michigan’s
man-to-man coverage, it
was an array of crossing
routes that befuddled the
Wolverines and exposed
their lack of speed at the second and third levels compared to receivers such as
Parris Campbell, Johnnie
Dixon and KJ Hill. Expect
Washington to mix in more
zone coverage and, with a
month to prepare, challenge
the Buckeyes with new looks
and diverse coverages.
Getting defensive
Joe Robbins Getty Images
OHIO STATE’S JK Dobbins has accounted for nearly
1,300 yards and 11 touchdowns rushing and receiving.
Ohio State (400.3 ypg/25.7
ppg): The Buckeyes took a
step back defensively this
season and are susceptible
to being exploited by explosive plays on the outside.
Ohio State still has plenty of
bulk up front, though, which
will make it tough sledding
for Gaskin and Ahmed.
Washington (301.8 ypg/15.5
ppg): Washington defensive
coordinator Jimmy Lake deserves much of the credit for
getting the Huskies through
the Pac-12 to the Rose Bowl.
But the unit will face by far
its toughest test of the season against Ohio State.
Something special
Ezra Shaw Getty Images
MYLES GASKIN has run for more than 5,200 yards
and 55 touchdowns in four seasons at Washington.
Getting offensive
Ohio State (548.8 ypg/43.5
ppg): What makes Ohio
State so tough to stop is
that, on top of Haskins’ ability in the passing game, the
Buckeyes feature two talented running backs in JK
Dobbins and Mike Weber,
who have combined for more
than 1,800 yards rushing.
Washington kicker Peyton Henry has been nearly
automatic from 30 yards or
closer, hitting nine of 10 fieldgoal attempts, but he is only
six for 11 from beyond 30
yards.
Dobbins and Weber can hurt
opponents out of the backfield too, combining for 43 receptions.
Of note
Washington (412.4 ypg/26.6
ppg): The Huskies’ offense
struggled to produce at
times, and it feels like Washington made it this far despite the unit. Senior
quarterback Jake Browning
Injury report
The Huskies and Buckeyes have never met in the
Rose Bowl.
Ohio State offensive lineman Thayer Munford is
dealing with an undisclosed
injury and it’s not known
whether he will play.
— J. Brady McCollough
D4
T U E S DAY , JA N UA RY 1, 2 019
L AT I M E S . C O M / S P O RT S
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
BOWL ROUNDUP
Northwestern rallies to beat Utah
associated press
Northwestern converted
three Utah turnovers into 21
points in a dizzying nineminute stretch in the pouring rain Monday night in the
third quarter of a 31-20 Holiday Bowl victory over the
No. 20 Utes at San Diego.
The
Wildcats
(9-5)
scored 28 points in the third
quarter, including Jared McGee’s 82-yard fumble return
for a touchdown, in their
third consecutive bowl victory under coach Pat
Fitzgerald. The Green Bay
Packers reportedly want to
interview Fitzpatrick for
their head coaching job.
Northwestern
senior
Clayton Thorson completed
21 of 30 passes for 241 yards to
run his career total to 10,731
yards,
breaking
Brett
Basanez’s previous school
record of 10,580. Thorson
passed for two touchdowns
and had one pass intercepted in his 53rd consecutive start for the Wildcats,
the most by a quarterback in
Big Ten history. Thorson,
who was replaced after taking a hard shot midway
through the fourth quarter,
is the program’s all-time
winningest quarterback at
36-17.
Utah (9-5) cruised to a
20-3 halftime lead behind
redshirt freshman quarterback Jason Shelley before
falling apart in the third
quarter. Shelley had two
passes intercepted and lost
a fumble.
Shelley was making his
fourth start in place of Tyler
Huntley, who suffered a broken collarbone against Arizona State on Nov. 3. He resumed practicing before the
bowl but coach Kyle Whittingham said it would have
taken a miracle for him to
have played. Also sidelined
were leading rusher Zack
Moss, leading receiver Britain Covey and leading tackler Chase Hansen, a senior.
Utah lost for only the second time in its last 16 bowl
games dating to 1999.
Liberty
Taylor
Cornelius
matched a Liberty Bowl
record with four touchdown
passes and Kolby Peel made
a critical fourth-down stop
with 1:01 left as Oklahoma
State edged No. 24 Missouri
38-33 at Memphis, Tenn.
Missouri (8-5) faced
fourth and one when
quarterback Drew Lock attempted a keeper around
the right end. Peel made an
ankle tackle that stopped
Lock short of the first-down
marker.
That allowed Oklahoma
State (7-6) to hang on to win
an end Missouri’s four-game
winning streak after leading
35-19 heading into the fourth
quarter.
Cornelius, a fifth-year
senior and former walk-on,
completed 26 of 44 passes,
including two interceptions
by Cam Hilton that sparked
Missouri’s comeback. Both
interceptions led to Missouri touchdowns.
Missouri’s Larry Rountree III ran for 204 yards, including a 55-yard touchdown.
Gator
Trayveon Williams ran
for 236 yards and three
touchdowns, smashing a 30year-old school record and
carrying No. 21 Texas A&M
to a 52-13 victory over North
Carolina State at Jacksonville, Fla.
Denis Poroy Associated Press
TREY KLOCK , a 285-pound offensive lineman who lined up as an eligible receiver and caught a pass, dives past Utah defensive back Jaylon
Johnson into the end zone to score a third-quarter touchdown that gave Northwestern a 24-20 lead in the Holiday Bowl.
The Aggies (9-4) ended
the season with a four-game
winning streak and broke a
three-game bowl game skid.
It capped an impressive
inaugural season for coach
Jimbo Fisher.
Williams ran for 61 yards
in the first half and then got
rolling in the third quarter.
He carried five times for 82
yards on one drive, including a 17-yard touchdown run.
He topped that with a 93yard scoring run on Texas
A&M’s ensuing drive.
Kellen Mond completed
14 of 26 passes for 140 yards,
with a touchdown and an interception. Mond also ran
five times for 85 yards and a
touchdown.
TODAY’S BOWL GAMES
BOWL SCHEDULE
BOWL
WHEN (PST), TV
FAVORITE
Outback: Mississippi State vs. Iowa
Today, 9 a.m., ESPN2
Miss. State by 7
Fiesta: Louisiana State vs. Central Florida
Today, 10 a.m., ESPN
LSU by 71⁄2
Citrus: Kentucky vs. Penn State
Today, 10 a.m., Ch. 7
Penn State by 6
Rose: Washington vs. Ohio State
Today, 2 p.m., ESPN
Ohio State by 61⁄2
Sugar: Texas vs. Georgia
Today, 5:45 p.m., ESPN
Georgia by 12
CFP Championship: Clemson vs. Alabama
Monday, 5 p.m., ESPN
Alabama by 9
Odds through Monday
Results
Sun
Cameron Scarlett scored
on a one-yard run and recovered a fumble in the end
zone for a second score to
help Stanford to a 14-13 victory over Pittsburgh at El
Paso, Texas.
The Cardinal (9-4) finished on a four-game winning streak, much the same
way they did two years ago
when Stanford won the Sun
Bowl to cap a season-ending
six-game streak.
The Panthers (7-7) have
lost their last four bowl
games and six of seven. They
lost to College Football Playoff finalist Clemson in the
ACC title game.
Pitt, which had a 10-7 halftime lead and was up 13-7
early in the fourth quarter,
was led by tailback Darrin
Hall, who ran for 123 yards
and a touchdown.
Scarlett ran for 91 yards
in 21 carries in place of tailback Bryce Love, who decided to skip the bowl game
to rehab an ankle injury
ahead of the NFL draft.
Love was the second
Stanford back to do that in
the last three Sun Bowls.
Redbox
Justin Herbert shook off
a sluggish game, passing to
Celebration: N. Carolina A&T 24, Alcorn St. 22 Las Vegas: Fresno State 31, Arizona State 20
Cure: Tulane 41, Louisiana Lafayette 24
Camellia: Georgia Southern 23, E. Michigan 21
New Mexico: Utah State 52, North Texas 13
New Orleans: Appal. St. 45, Middle Tenn. 13
Boca Raton: Ala. Birmingham 37, N. Illinois 13 Frisco: Ohio 27, San Diego State 0
Gasparilla: Marshall 38, South Florida 20
Bahamas: Florida International 35, Toledo 32
Idaho Potato: BYU 49, Western Michigan 18
Birmingham: Wake Forest 37, Memphis 34
Armed Forces: Army 70, Houston 14
Dollar General: Troy 42, Buffalo 32
Hawaii: Louisiana Tech 31, Hawaii 14
First Responder: Bos. Coll. vs. Boise St., cncl.
Quick Lane: Minnesota 34, Georgia Tech 10
Cheez-It: Texas Christian 10, California 7 (OT)
Independence: Duke 56, Temple 27
Pinstripe: Wisconsin 35, Miami 3
Texas: Baylor 45, Vanderbilt 38
Music City: Auburn 63, Purdue 14
Camping World: Syracuse 34, W. Virginia 18
Alamo: Washington State 28, Iowa State 26
Peach: Florida 41, Michigan 15
Belk: Virginia 28, South Carolina 0
Arizona: Nevada 16, Arkansas State 13 (OT)
Cotton: Clemson 30, Notre Dame 3
Orange: Alabama 45, Oklahoma 34
Military: Cincinnati 35, Virginia Tech 31
Sun: Stanford 14, Pittsburgh 13
Redbox: Oregon 7, Michigan State 6
Liberty: Oklahoma State 38, Missouri 33
Holiday: Northwestern 31, Utah 20
Gator: Texas A&M 52, North Carolina State 13
It was the third time in
four games that Michigan
State (7-6) failed to score a
touchdown.
Dillon Mitchell for a fourthquarter touchdown, and Oregon held on for a 7-6 victory
at Santa Clara after Michigan State botched a fieldgoal attempt.
Herbert passed for 166
yards and extended his
streak of consecutive games
with a touchdown pass to 28
on a day when the Ducks offense mostly sputtered.
Oregon (9-4) crossed
midfield only three times
and couldn’t get into the end
zone until Herbert found
Mitchell in the right front of
the end zone for a 28-yard
touchdown.
The Ducks defense held
up from there but got some
help from Michigan State’s
special teams.
Spartans quarterback
Brian Lewerke completed 22
of 40 passes for 172 yards
with one interception.
Military
Michael Warren ran for a
career-high 166 yards and
scored the go-ahead touchdown with 1:29 left in soggy
Annapolis, Md., as Cincinnati rallied for a 35-31 win
that ended Virginia Tech’s
run of 25 consecutive winning seasons.
A tight game that featured more than 900 yards in
offense and seven lead
changes wasn’t decided until Warren busted up the
middle for his second touchdown to cap a 64-yard drive
directed by backup quarterback Hayden Moore.
Virginia Tech (6-7) was
unable to avoid its first losing season since 1992.
Outback
NO. 18 MISSISSIPPI STATE (8-4) VS. IOWA (8-4)
at Tampa, Fla., 9 a.m. PST, ESPN2
Mississippi State’s only regular-season losses were against
teams ranked among the top 15. Only one of the Bulldogs’
games, a 13-6 loss to Florida, was decided by fewer than 14
points. Nick Fitzgerald broke Tim Tebow’s all-time Southeastern Conference record for most yards rushing by a
quarterback. He has run for 3,504, this season rushing for
1,018 yards and 12 touchdowns. Iowa, led by ends A.J. Epenesa
and Anthony Nelson, ranks seventh in the nation in total defense. The Hawkeyes’ T.J. Hockenson won the John Mackey
Award as the nation’s best tight end. He has caught 46 passes
for 717 yards and six touchdowns.
Citrus
NO. 14 KENTUCKY (9-3) VS. NO. 12 PENN STATE (9-3)
at Orlando, Fla., 10 a.m. PST, Channel 7
Kentucky last won 10 games in a season in 1977. Linebacker
Josh Allen, the SEC’s defensive player of the year, anchors a
Wildcats team that has given up 332.2 yards a game and
ranks seventh nationally in scoring defense at 16.2 points.
Allen led the conference with 181⁄2 tackles for loss, among
them a school-record 14 sacks. Quarterback Trace McSorley
leads a Penn State offense that averages 424.3 yards and 34.6
points a game. The Nittany Lions are appearing in a New
Year’s game for the 25th time.
Fiesta
NO. 11 LOUISIANA STATE (9-3) VS. NO. 8 CENTRAL
FLORIDA (12-0)
at Glendale, Ariz., 10 a.m. PST, ESPN
Central Florida has a 25-game winning streak and making a
bid for a second unbeaten season in a row. The Knights proclaimed themselves national champions after last season
and will probably do so again with a victory over the Tigers,
who are vying for their first 10-win season since 2013. Redshirt
freshman Darriel Mack Jr., filling in for the injured McKenzie
Milton, passed for 348 yards and accounted for six touchdowns in the Knights’ comeback victory over Memphis in the
American Athletic Conference title game. Louisiana State’s
Nick Brossette and Clyde Edwards-Helaire have combined
for 1,588 yards rushing and 21 touchdowns.
Sugar
NO. 15 TEXAS (9-4) VS. NO. 5 GEORGIA (11-2)
at New Orleans, 5:45 p.m. PST, ESPN
Georgia missed out on a berth in the College Football Playoff
when it squandered a 14-point second-half lead in a loss to Alabama in the SEC championship game. Georgia quarterback Jake Fromm is 23-4 as a starter, 8-4 against ranked opponents. The Bulldogs have given up only 18.5 points a game,
which ranks 15th nationally. Texas is trying to cap an impressive season under second-year coach Tom Herman and provide further proof that it’s on track to reclaim its place among
the nation’s elite programs. The Longhorns’ Lil’Jordan
Humphrey has caught 79 passes for 1,109 yards and nine
touchdowns.
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T U E S DAY , JA N UA RY 1, 2 019
L AT I M E S . C O M / S P O RT S
D5
NFL
‘Help wanted’
is a sign of the
times in NFL
Coaches who drafted
quarterbacks in first
round in hopes of a
quick turnaround are
among unemployed.
SAM FARMER
ON THE NFL
Marcio Jose Sanchez Associated Press
TODD GURLEY (30), scoring a touchdown against the Philadelphia Eagles in December, is nursing a sore
knee but Rams coach Sean McVay says the running back is making good progress but remains day to day.
RAMS REPORT
It’s playoff mode already
By Gary Klein
The Rams earned a bye
through the wild-card round
of the NFL playoffs, but they
won’t be taking the week off.
Players were on site Monday at the team’s Thousand
Oaks training facility and
they will go through light
workouts Wednesday and
Thursday before reconvening Sunday to begin preparations for their Jan. 12 divisional-round game at the
Coliseum.
The Rams, seeded second in the NFC behind the
New Orleans Saints, will
play the highest-seeded
team remaining after wildcard games.
The fourth-seeded Dallas Cowboys play host to the
fifth-seeded Seattle Seahawks and the third-seeded
Chicago Bears play host to
the sixth-seeded Philadelphia Eagles this weekend.
The Rams will “get ourselves healthy” and focus on
fundamentals and techniques this week, coach
Sean McVay said during a
teleconference.
The Rams’ late-season
scheduled week off, which
came after 11 games, was a
true break, left tackle Andrew Whitworth said. This
is more of a “preparation
week,” he said.
“To just fine tune and
really get ourselves clicking
on all cylinders for the final
stretch,” he said.
Whitworth left the game
Sunday, a 48-32 victory over
the San Francisco 49ers, because of a bruised knee. He
said he collided with another
player’s leg but felt fine.
“It’s nothing,” he said. “I
mean we could’ve played. It
was more precautionary.”
Said McVay: “Thank God
it wasn’t anything worse
than that. We’ll get our guy
back, ready to roll for the
playoffs.”
Whitworth is one of several players who can use the
week to heal. Safety Blake
Countess is in concussion
protocol but was asymptomatic Monday, McVay said.
Running back Todd Gurley sat out the last two
games because of knee soreness, and safety Lamarcus
Joyner was sidelined Sunday because of an ankle injury suffered the previous
week against the Arizona
Cardinals.
Gurley was making “good
progress,” McVay said, but
remains day to day.
“I would be very, very surprised if he wasn’t going to
be ready to go for the playoffs,” McVay said, “but I
think we’re going to be
smart with whether he goes
or not this week with those
extra days.
“We’ll still continue to
have that same rehab program. He’s taking steps in
the right direction and I
would be very surprised if
he’s not feeling good, ready
to roll for our divisional
game.”
Defensive lineman Aaron
Donald, who finished the
season with a league-best
201⁄2 sacks, said he would use
the week to improve.
“Just trying to stay fresh,
keep working, try to find a
way to get better,” he said.
Coaching search
reaches Rams
The Cardinals and the
Cincinnati Bengals were
granted permission to interview Rams quarterbacks
coach Zac Taylor about
their vacant head coach position, and the Bengals also
were given permission to interview passing game coordinator Shane Waldron, McVay said.
The Cardinals, Bengals,
Cleveland Browns, Denver
Broncos, Green Bay Packers, Miami Dolphins, New
York Jets and Tampa Bay
Buccaneers are searching
for head coaches.
“These days are just gutwrenching as a coach,” McVay said of Monday’s firings.
“It makes you sick and you
hate to see it and it’s an unfortunate part of this business.”
McVay said Rams assistants would be available for
teams to interview in the Los
Angeles area Friday and
Saturday.
“You want to do every-
thing that you can to kind of
help these guys anticipate
some of the things that
might come up in these interviews,”
McVay
said.
“You’d hate to lose them, but
man, I’d sure be so happy for
them if that was an opportunity that they decided to
pursue and it worked out for
them and their families.
“They’ve done a phenomenal job with us and I feel
lucky to work with guys like
that.”
Next season’s
opponents
The Rams’ opponents for
2019 are set. The NFC West is
matched with the AFC
North and NFC South.
Home games will be
against the Cardinals, 49ers,
Seahawks, Bears, Bengals,
Saints, Buccaneers and Baltimore Ravens.
Road opponents will be
the Cardinals, 49ers, Seahawks, Cowboys, Browns,
Pittsburgh Steelers, Carolina Panthers and Atlanta
Falcons.
The Rams will play again
at the Coliseum as a temporary home stadium, so one
“home” game will be an international series game in
London or Mexico City.
Dates and times for all
games will be announced in
the spring.
gary.klein@latimes.com
Twitter: @latimesklein
Gordon expects to play Sunday
[Chargers, from D1]
good. Now it’s just about his
conditioning, getting back
with the chemistry of the offense, just playing football.”
Henry also would give
quarterback Philip Rivers
another option at a time
when the Chargers are
struggling on offense.
Over the last two games,
they’ve had 24 possessions,
half of which have ended in
punts. They’ve also turned
the ball over six times with
four interceptions and two
fumbles. Twice the clock ran
out. They’ve scored three
touchdowns and kicked one
field goal on the four possessions that have netted
points.
“There’s some concern,”
Lynn said. “But it’s definitely
something that I believe we
can fix.”
The Chargers have struggled particularly in trying to
sustain drives, picking up
more than two first downs
on only three of those 24 series. Against a Ravens team
that loves to hog the ball on
offense and pressure the
quarterback on defense, the
ability to prolong drives figures to be paramount.
The Chargers converted
only four of 13 third downs
against Baltimore in a 22-10
loss at StubHub Center on
Dec. 22. (They are eight for
24 over the last two games.)
During the regular season, they finished 16th in the
NFL with a third-down conversion rate of 40%. The
Ravens defense ended up
third, allowing opponents a
34% success rate.
Running back Melvin
Gordon was hobbling be-
Alex Gallardo Associated Press
IN 29 GAMES with the Chargers, Hunter Henry
had 81 receptions for 1,057 yards and 12 touchdowns.
cause of a tweaked ankle at
the end of a 23-9 victory Sunday at Denver.
Afterward, he said he expected to be ready to face
Baltimore, something Lynn
confirmed
Monday,
although the coach sounded
more cautious.
“I don’t know how serious
his ankle injury is,” Lynn
said. “Knowing Melvin, this
type of game, I mean, these
are the games he definitely
plays for. I do think he’ll be
available.”
Another spark could
come from Austin Ekeler,
who missed the previous
game against the Ravens because of a bruised nerve in
his neck. He returned Sunday and finished with eight
carries for 58 yards.
Despite the sputtering offense, Lynn said he remains
confident in the group and
recalled how, as a player, he
experienced a team righting
itself just as the playoffs
were beginning.
Lynn was a running back
for the 1997 Denver Broncos,
who lost two of their final
three regular-season games
before winning the Super
Bowl as a wild card.
“I think we can do the
same thing here,” he said. “I
am concerned but not overly
concerned.
“It’s a new season. It’s a
different energy right now.
These guys are excited. They
can’t wait to play.”
Brown is out
The defense suffered a
loss Sunday when linebacker Jatavis Brown went down
with an ankle injury. He will
miss the postseason.
Hayes Pullard, who replaced Brown after he was
hurt on the final play of the
first quarter, figures to stay
in that position against the
Ravens. The Chargers could
employ more packages using their defensive backs.
Against Baltimore and
mobile quarterback Lamar
Jackson in the Week 16 loss,
Brown played 51 of 62 defensive snaps and finished with
a team-high eight tackles.
“They make you play very
disciplined because of their
quarterback,” Lynn said.
“We just have to do a better
job this time than we did the
first time.”
Pullard played 11 snaps
against the Ravens in the
first meeting. He does provide the Chargers with some
experience having started 10
games last season.
Coaching cuts
The numerous firings in
the NFL on Sunday and
Monday left Lynn as one of
only two African American
head coaches. Pittsburgh’s
Mike Tomlin is the other.
Lynn said as of Monday
afternoon he hadn’t had the
opportunity to reach out to
any of the dismissed
coaches, explaining that he
had been preoccupied with
preparing for the Ravens.
He also said he longed for
a time when skin color
wasn’t a topic of discussion
in the NFL.
“I’m watching tape on
Baltimore, I’m not counting
the black players and the
white players,” Lynn said.
“They’re just football players to me. I look forward to
the time when we just talk
about good coaches. Not
black coaches, not white
coaches. Just coaches.”
jeff.miller@latimes.com
Twitter: @JeffMillerLAT
At least a quarter of the
NFL’s 32 teams are changing head coaches, and that
should startle no one.
Black Monday is such a
predictable event, the
league should create a logo,
move it from city to city, and
sell it to the networks.
Six teams announced
after their finales that they
are getting rid of their
coaches, starting with the
New York Jets (Todd
Bowles) and Tampa Bay
Buccaneers (Dirk Koetter)
on Sunday, and followed
Monday by the Arizona
Cardinals (Steve Wilks),
Denver Broncos (Vance
Joseph), Cincinnati Bengals
(Marvin Lewis), and Miami
Dolphins (Adam Gase).
Earlier in the season, the
Cleveland Browns (Hue
Jackson) and Green Bay
Packers (Mike McCarthy)
showed their coaches the
door.
And another trend has
emerged: If your existing
coach is drafting a quarterback in the first round in
hopes of saving his job, he’s
almost certainly getting
fired.
That was the case this
season with Jackson drafting Baker Mayfield, and
Bowles drafting Sam
Darnold.
Wilks is a bit of an exception, even though the Cardinals took Josh Rosen in the
first, because he came in
with the UCLA standout
and lasted just one season.
But it happened with Jeff
Fisher after the Rams
drafted Jared Goff, Ken
Whisenhunt after Tennessee drafted Marcus Mariota,
John Fox after Chicago took
Mitch Trubisky, and Lovie
Smith after the Buccaneers
selected Jameis Winston.
There are exceptions, of
course. Kansas City’s Andy
Reid traded up in the first
round to take Patrick Mahomes.
The Chiefs are the AFC’s
top-seeded team, and Mahomes is a league mostvaluable-player candidate.
But he had the luxury of
sitting a season behind Alex
Smith, so he wasn’t taken on
the basis of urgent need.
Doug Pederson drafted
Carson Wentz in Philadelphia, but those two came in
together in 2016, so Pederson wasn’t selecting him to
save his job.
Again, this shouldn’t be
surprising in a quarterbackdriven league. If you’re
relying on a young, untested
player at the most important position, hoping that
player can reverse your
fortunes, you’re not in a
good situation.
Then there’s the Sean
McVay effect.
The Rams made an
astounding turnaround
with their dynamic coach,
who was 30 when the team
hired him in January 2017.
Goff was widely derided
as a bust at the time, going
0-7 for a team that under
Fisher had a historically bad
offense.
In two seasons under
McVay, the Rams are 24-8,
tied with New England and
NFL PLAYOFFS
Steven Senne Associated Press
THE JETS parted ways
with Todd Bowles after
finishing last in the AFC
East with a 4-12 record.
New Orleans for the best
record during that span,
teams led by future Hall of
Fame quarterbacks Tom
Brady and Drew Brees.
During the McVay era,
the Rams have scored more
points than any other team
in the league and have the
largest points differential.
In short, other NFL
owners are looking for their
McVay, a coach who can
rescue a franchise in short
order. Some clubs believe
they have found theirs, such
as San Francisco with Kyle
Shanahan, Chicago with
Matt Nagy, Indianapolis
with Frank Reich, and the
Chargers with Anthony
Lynn. But everyone knows it
can be done.
After all, seven of the
eight teams in the first
round of the playoffs were
watching the postseason
from the couch last season.
There’s another factor to
be considered.
Five of the fired coaches
fired are African American
— Jackson, Lewis, Wilks,
Joseph, and Bowles — leaving Pittsburgh’s Mike Tomlin and Lynn as the league’s
only remaining black head
coaches.
This comes less than a
month after the NFL modified the 2003 Rooney Rule,
which requires teams to
interview at least one minority candidate before
hiring a head coach or general manager.
The league is trying to
avoid situations where
teams follow the letter of the
law but not the spirit, as
when the Raiders set their
sights on hiring Jon Gruden
and made it happen.
Under the adjusted
rules, a club must interview
at least one diverse candidate from a list compiled by
the Career Development
Advisory Panel, or one not
currently employed by the
club. That eliminates the
end-around of a team simply interviewing someone
from the current staff and
checking that box.
The Rooney Rule was
put in place not to save jobs
or provide special protections, but to open the avenues of opportunity and
create a level playing field.
In the case of each firing,
every club can provide a
statistical argument for why
the move was made.
In some cases, as with
Wilks and Joseph, the frontoffice decisions and the
inability to find the answer
at quarterback played a
huge role in the lack of success.
If history is a guide, this
won’t be the end of the
firings, all of which underscores a basic truth: NFL
owners, long on expectations, are painfully — and
often unrealistically — short
on patience.
sam.farmer@latimes.com
Twitter: @LATimesfarmer
Times Pacific
WILD-CARD ROUND
Saturday
AFC: No. 6 Indianapolis at No. 3 Houston .....1:30 p.m. (Ch. 7, ESPN)
NFC: No. 5 Seattle at No. 4 Dallas ..........................5:15 p.m. (Ch. 11)
Sunday
AFC: No. 5 CHARGERS at No. 4 Baltimore ...................10 a.m. (Ch. 2)
NFC: No. 6 Philadelphia at No. 3 Chicago ................1:30 p.m. (Ch. 4)
DIVISIONAL ROUND
Jan. 12
Lowest AFC seed at No. 1 Kansas City .....................1:30 p.m. (Ch. 4)
Highest NFC seed at No. 2 RAMS............................5:15 p.m. (Ch. 11)
Jan. 13
Highest AFC seed at No. 2 New England......................10 a.m. (Ch. 2)
Lowest NFC seed at No. 1 New Orleans...................1:30 p.m. (Ch. 11)
CONFERENCE CHAMPIONSHIPS
Jan. 20
NFC .................................................................................Noon (Ch. 11)
AFC ...........................................................................3:30 p.m. (Ch. 2)
SUPER BOWL
Feb. 3 at Mercedes-Benz Stadium, Atlanta
AFC champion vs. NFC champion .............................3:30 p.m. (Ch. 2)
D6
T U E S DAY , JA N UA RY 1, 2 019
L AT I M E S . C O M / S P O RT S
NHL
Brown’s goal in overtime settles matters
Winger scores 54
seconds into the
period. Walker and
Doughty also score.
KINGS 3
COLORADO 2 (OT)
By Curtis Zupke
DENVER — Sean Walker
waited for an equipment
staffer to retrieve his souvenir puck when a teammate
jokingly asked a question:
Does he get one puck or
two pucks?
Walker’s initial score was
nullified Monday night, but
he eventually did get his first
NHL goal, and it was the
running gag in a relaxed
Kings dressing room at
Pepsi Center. It was emblematic of a delayed victory
by the Kings, who thought
they secured a regulation
win but needed Dustin
Brown’s overtime breakaway goal for a 3-2 New
Year’s Eve triumph against
the Colorado Avalanche.
It was a mix of youth and
veteran leadership in a
clutch victory, their fifth in
six games. Walker, Brown
and Drew Doughty scored,
and Anze Kopitar and Jonathan Quick provided bluecollar work as the Kings
ended the calendar year
with reason to celebrate.
“We feel a little bit more
confident in our game,”
coach Willie Desjardins said.
“We feel, when we’re going in,
we’ve got a chance to win every night, and that’s a good
feeling. We’ve had lots of
tough games lately ... nothing’s ever easy.”
Tell that to Walker. He
initially celebrated his first
goal in the first period but it
was waved off because officials ruled that Matt Luff interfered with goalie Semyon
Varlamov. But Walker made
it count in the second period
when he took Kopitar’s clever no-look pass and executed a wraparound goal.
It’s not a move Walker
practices.
“I think I can honestly say
that might be my first wraparound goal ever,” he said.
“It was definitely a roller
coaster — pretty high and
then pretty low and then
luckily I got the other one, so
it was good.”
Brown took a stretch
pass from Jake Muzzin and
beat Varlamov 54 seconds
into an overtime in which
Colorado never had the
puck. It righted the game for
the Kings after they lost a 2-0
lead on third-period goals by
Nathan MacKinnon and
Carl Soderberg, who had the
puck bounce off his leg and
into the net with under two
minutes left in regulation.
The Kings won with only
18 shots. They killed eight
minutes of power-play time
given to the NHL’s fourthranked unit, and Quick
made 22 saves for his 299th
Petersen “played amazing,
so it was great to see that
and it definitely helped
[when I was] out, seeing success with the goalies. It was
really tough to not be out
there, at least practicing
with the guys.”
Petersen was reassigned.
Dion Phaneuf returned to
the lineup.
David Zalubowski Associated Press
ANZE KOPITAR can’t get the puck past Semyon Varlamov in the first period.
win.
“I think ultimately what’s
happening is we’re playing a
lot better in our d-zone, and
that’s been something we’ve
been really good at for a
really long time here,”
Brown said. “We weren’t
very good for the first … part
of the season. We haven’t
given up nearly as many
chances, nearly as many
shots and, as a result, it
helps us win games.”
Kopitar buzzed from the
start and hit the post twice
in the opening eight minutes. He drew a tripping penalty that led to Doughty’s
power-play goal, and won 13
of 24 faceoffs while matched
up frequently with fellow
Hart Trophy finalist MacKinnon.
“He plays good in this
building,” Desjardins said of
Kopitar. “He’s a big, strong
guy. He had to go against
that big line a lot tonight,
and that’s a tough line to
play against.”
Campbell returns
It always pains Jack
Campbell to be away from
the Kings, so he was in expectedly good spirits upon
his recall earlier in the day.
Ducks can’t get over hump
as Lightning refuse to lose
— Brandon
Montour,
Ducks defenseman
halt their struggles. The
NHL’s most high-powered
offense (4.18 goals per game)
found the game-winner on
the stick of Brayden Point 35
seconds into overtime.
The Ducks picked up a
point in a second consecutive overtime loss. They
showed signs of improvement in the New Year’s Eve
contest Monday before a
sellout crowd at Honda Center, but their skid now totals
six games.
Still, they occupy a wildcard spot in the playoffs if
the season ended today. The
Ducks can also take solace in
holding Tampa Bay to only
one regulation goal.
“If we were winning right
now it wouldn’t be as frustrating, but it’s tough when
you’ve lost a few in a row,”
Ducks captain Ryan Getzlaf
said. “We’re obviously in a little bit of a skid at the moment.”
Success is a distant
memory. The Ducks reeled
off winning streaks of five
and four games before hitting their current skid. The
offense continues to struggle
with only nine goals over
their last six contests.
Without their top goalscorer from a season ago
(Rickard Rakell is nursing
an ankle sprain), the offense
shows no signs of breaking
out; they’re ranked 29th in
the NHL.
Nick Ritchie has been a
bright spot, though. The
power forward scored the
Ducks’ lone goal, his fifth
Mark J. Terrill Associated Press
TAMPA BAY right wing Nikita Kucherov reaches for the puck as Ducks right
wing Kiefer Sherwood shadows him in the first period at Honda Center.
sports@latimes.com
LIGHTNING 2, DUCKS 1
Tampa Bay ........................1
DUCKS .............................1
0
0
0
0
1 — 2
0 — 1
FIRST PERIOD: 1. Tam., Kucherov 19 (Cernak, Point),
6:06. 2. DUCKS, Ritchie 5 (Kase, Mahura), 17:08.
Penalties—Kucherov, TB, (hooking), 6:43. Mahura,
ANA, (high sticking), 10:34.
SECOND
PERIOD:
Scoring—None.
Penalties—Montour, ANA, (holding), 12:38.
THIRD PERIOD: Scoring—None. Penalties—Gourde,
TB, (unsportsmanlike conduct), 0:46. Ritchie, ANA,
(roughing), 0:46. Lindholm, ANA, (interference), 3:44.
OVERTIME: 3. Tam., Point 23 (Hedman, Kucherov),
0:35. Penalties—None.
SHOTS ON GOAL: T.B. 9-12-13-1—35. DUCKS 16-713—36. Power-play Conversions—T.B. 0 of 3. DUCKS 0 of
1.
GOALIES: Tam., Vasilevskiy 15-3-2 (36 shots-35
saves). DUCKS, Gibson 15-11-6 (35-33).
WESTERN CONFERENCE
W
24
23
21
19
19
18
17
16
W
25
23
19
20
18
15
15
L
12
15
13
15
19
18
20
21
L
12
15
13
16
17
20
18
OL
4
4
7
7
4
3
2
3
OL
2
2
8
4
3
6
4
Pts
52
50
49
45
42
39
36
35
Pts
52
48
46
44
39
36
34
EASTERN CONFERENCE
GF
141
128
140
102
124
111
100
92
GF
134
120
134
108
110
119
102
GA
112
115
129
120
133
126
112
119
GA
111
104
123
106
108
149
123
Note: Overtime or shootout losses are worth one
point.
Metropolitan
Washington
Columbus
Pittsburgh
N.Y. Islanders
N.Y. Rangers
Carolina
New Jersey
Philadelphia
Atlantic
Tampa Bay
Toronto
Buffalo
Montreal
Boston
Florida
Detroit
Ottawa
W
24
23
21
21
17
16
15
15
W
31
26
21
21
21
17
15
15
L
11
13
12
13
14
17
16
18
L
7
11
13
14
14
15
19
21
OL
3
3
6
4
7
5
7
5
OL
2
2
6
5
4
6
7
4
Pts
51
49
48
46
41
37
37
35
Pts
64
54
48
47
46
40
37
34
GF
138
129
133
114
111
94
113
111
GF
168
144
115
128
110
124
115
126
GA
112
119
115
102
123
109
127
136
GA
117
109
115
128
103
134
140
159
RESULTS
KINGS 3
AT COLORADO 2 (OT)
TAMPA BAY 2
AT DUCKS 1 (OT)
NASHVILLE 6
AT WASHINGTON 3
AT NEW JERSEY 4
VANCOUVER 0
N.Y. ISLANDERS 3
AT BUFFALO 1
AT CAROLINA 3
PHILADELPHIA 1
PITTSBURGH 3
AT MINNESOTA 2
AT COLUMBUS 6
OTTAWA 3
N.Y. RANGERS 2
AT ST. LOUIS 1
FLORIDA 4
AT DETROIT 3 (SO)
MONTREAL 3
AT DALLAS 2 (OT)
AT CALGARY 8
SAN JOSE 5
WINNIPEG 4
AT EDMONTON 3
The Kings’ Dustin Brown sent a wrist shot past goalie
Semyon Varlamov for the game winner in overtime.
Brayden Point scored 35 seconds into overtime for the
Lightning, who compiled a 12-0-1 record in December.
Trailing 3-1 in the second, the Predators scored five
unanswered goals and snapped a six-game losing streak.
The Devils’ Mackenzie Blackwood became the first rookie
goalie in franchise history to post back-to-back shutouts.
Islanders victory moved coach Barry Trotz into fourth
place on the NHL’s all-time win list with 783.
Flyers goalie was benched after giving up goals to Lucas
Wallmark, Jordan Martinook and Andrei Svechnikov.
1 — 3
0 — 2
FIRST
PERIOD:
Scoring—None.
Penalties—Clifford,KINGS, major (high sticking), 10:52.
Barrie, COL, (tripping), 19:56.
SECOND PERIOD: 1. KINGS, Doughty 3 (Toffoli, Kopitar), 0:22 (pp). 2. KINGS, Walker 1 (Brown, Kopitar),
12:58. Penalties—Toffoli, KINGS, (tripping), 1:34. Carter, KINGS, (slashing), 5:02. Soderberg, COL, (delay of
game), 8:15.
THIRD PERIOD: 3. Col., MacKinnon 24 (Rantanen),
0:32. 4. Col., Soderberg 11 (Barrie, Landeskog), 18:10.
Penalties—Compher, COL, (interference), 0:57. .
OVERTIME: 5. KINGS, Brown 11 (Muzzin), 0:54.
Penalties—None.
SHOTS ON GOAL: KINGS 8-5-4-1—18. Col. 9-7-8—
24. Power-play Conversions—KINGS 1 of 3. Col. 0 of 4. .
GOALIES: KINGS, Quick 6-9-2 (24 shots-22 saves).
Col., Varlamov 11-8-5 (18-15).
Att—18,017 (18,007). T—2:27.
Dallas Stars’ chief operating officer Jim Lites unleashed
expletive-spiced criticism of the two elite forwards Friday,
comments he surprisingly urged media to publish. In addition to calling them words we can’t print, he said the team
was “getting terrible play from our top two players” who are
“consistently out-efforted and outperformed by everybody
else’s best players.” Lites didn’t care that Tyler Seguin (11
goals, 33 points through Sunday) had hit the post or crossbar about a dozen times. “Wah-wah, that’s what I say about
hitting posts,” Lites said. “Get a little closer to the action, actually go to the spot where you score goals. He doesn’t do
that. He never does that anymore. He used to be a pest to
play against. People hated playing against Tyler Seguin.
They don’t anymore.” Seguin and team captain Jamie Benn
(15 goals, 30 points) acknowledged they could do more, and
the Stars won their next game. But the subtext likely is that
both are under contract long-term — Seguin through 202627 and Benn through 2024-25 — with no-move clauses. Did
Lites want to anger them so they’d waive those clauses and
accept trades that would get them off the payroll? In a statement issued Sunday the NHL Players’ Assn. called Lites’ remarks “reckless and insulting.” Too bad the NHLPA doesn’t
use such strong language about players who irresponsibly
bash opponents’ heads.
In urgent need of help on defense, Edmonton general
manager Peter Chiarelli nibbled around the edges of his
problem Sunday by making two minor deals. He acquired
Brandon Manning and Robin Norell from Chicago for forward Drake Caggiula and defenseman Jason Garrison, and
got Edmonton-born defenseman Alexander Petrovic from
Florida for defenseman Chris Wideman and a 2019 thirdround draft pick. The Oilers added physicality but really
need defensemen who can get the puck out of their zone. Odd
note: During the 2015-16 season, Manning — then with Philadelphia — hit Oilers forward Connor McDavid hard and into
the boards, causing McDavid to break his clavicle and cut
short his rookie season. Mark Spector of Sportsnet reported
that Chiarelli got McDavid’s blessing before completing the
trade for Manning.
No man is an island
After the New York Islanders lost dynamic forward John
Tavares to free agency last summer — a decision he announced by posting a photo of himself as a child wearing Toronto Maple Leafs pajamas — they had every excuse to collapse. Instead they’ve united under coach Barry Trotz and
are among the NHL’s best defensive teams, an asset they
used Saturday in a 4-0 victory over the Maple Leafs at Toronto in the teams’ first encounter since Tavares left for a
seven-year, $77-million contract. Tavares described the defeat as a “like-you-got-punched-in-the-gut kind of feeling,”
but Trotz said the Islanders are focused on moving forward.
“Any time you lose a John Tavares, that’s a big piece,” Trotz
told reporters in Toronto. “We’re not looking back, though.
We have to look forward, and that’s what our organization is
wanting from the players, wanting from everybody. That era
is done and we’re trying to create a new era.” Kudos to them
for being surprisingly competitive in this new era.
If there’s an outdoor game, the
Blackhawks must be in it
Jeff Petry scored 14 seconds into the extra period and
Antti Niemi stopped 45 shots for the Canadiens.
The NHL will roll out the Winter Classic on Tuesday at
Notre Dame Stadium, with Chicago facing the Boston Bruins. This will be the Blackhawks’ sixth outdoor contest, including three Winter Classic appearances. Aside from the
usual nostalgia, some real and some manufactured, the uniforms will be a prime attraction: The Blackhawks will wear
replicas of the black-and-white uniforms worn by their first
Stanley Cup championship team in 1934, and the Bruins will
wear modified versions of jerseys they wore in the early 1930s,
but with a B in the front instead of a bear. Notre Dame football legends will join the festivities, as will Bruins and Blackhawks alumni.
Johnny Gaudreau and Matthew Tkachuk each had two
goals and two assists for the Flames.
It’s time to bid farewell to 2018
Phil Kessel (one goal, two assists) had his third straight
three-point game for Penguins, who have won six in a row.
Zach Werenski broke a tie with 2:01 remaining and the
Blue Jackets sealed the win with two empty-net goals.
Henrik Lundqvist made 39 saves for the Rangers and
Mats Zuccarello and Boo Nieves provided the offense.
Jonathan Huberdeau scored the only goal in a shootout
for the Panthers, who rallied from a 3-0 deficit.
Brendan Lemieux scored two goals against the Oilers,
who lost all five games on their homestand.
For complete NHL summaries, go to latimes.com/sports/scores
TODAY’S GAMES
KINGS at Vegas, 6 p.m.
Philadelphia at Nashville, 5:30 p.m.
Boston vs. Chicago
at South Bend, Ind., 10 a.m.
WEDNESDAY’S GAMES
Pittsburgh at N.Y. Rangers, 4 p.m.
Vancouver at Ottawa, 4 p.m.
Edmonton at Arizona, 6:30 p.m.
0
2
Trades won’t stop Oilers’ defensive leaks
STANDINGS
Pacific
Calgary
Vegas
San Jose
DUCKS
Vancouver
Edmonton
Arizona
KINGS
Central
Winnipeg
Nashville
Colorado
Dallas
Minnesota
Chicago
St. Louis
2
0
Maybe Lites had reasons to light up
forwards Seguin and Benn
By Mike Coppinger
‘You gotta take the
positives out of it. It
was a better game
overall.’
KINGS 3, AVALANCHE 2
KINGS ..............................0
Colorado ..........................0
What we learned from the last week of play in the NHL:
TAMPA BAY 2
DUCKS 1 (OT)
point in three games. Ritchie
was situated on the right
side of the crease and finished off a nifty cross-ice setup from Ondrej Kase.
That first-period marker
tied the score after Nikita
Kucherov opened the scoring about six minutes in with
a one-timer goal off an assist
from Point.
“You gotta take the positives out of it,” said defenseman Brandon Montour, the
only Ducks player on the ice
for both Lightning goals. “It
was a better game overall.”
The Ducks are left to
search for positives in lieu of
victories. John Gibson was
stellar in goal with 33 saves.
The team denied the
league’s best power-play
unit in six minutes of manadvantage time. But sooner
rather than later, the goals
need to come in bunches.
“I wouldn’t call it a funk,”
coach Randy Carlyle said.
“Obviously we missed another point here tonight,
and that’s what’s disappointing because it’s an
overtime.
“But again, if we continue
to work the way we worked
tonight, and have our team
commit to the game plan in
which we were able to put
forward tonight, we give ourselves a really good chance
for success going forward.”
New beginnings for everyone, including the Ducks
starting Friday at home
against the Vegas Golden
Knights.
curtis.zupke@latimes.com
Twitter: @curtiszupke
WHAT WE LEARNED IN
THE NHL
Anaheim’s skid hits six
games, while streaking
Tampa Bay finishes a
dominant December.
Hours before the clock
strikes midnight, flipping
the calendar to 2019, millions
of Americans are keen on a
positive outlook.
So, too, are the Ducks,
whose season-long losing
streak will roll into the new
year.
The club played on par
with the league-best Tampa
Bay Lightning for 60 minutes, but it wasn’t enough to
“It’s such a good feeling,”
Campbell said. “It’s been so
long. I missed it.”
Campbell tore the meniscus in his knee in a Nov. 10
game against the Calgary
Flames, and his initial
thought was to wear a brace
and play through it. The
Kings quickly nixed that
idea and opted for surgery,
but it showed Campbell’s
stubborn passion to keep
the net.
“Just whatever I had to do
to help the team,” Campbell
said.
Campbell also said it
helped that Quick and Cal
TONIGHT
AT VEGAS
When: 6.
On the air: TV: FS West; Radio: iHeartRadio (LA Kings
Audio Network)
Update: This is the fourth
matchup between the teams
in 24 days. Vegas is the first
franchise in NHL history
with 50 points or more before New Year’s Day in each
of its first two seasons. Goalie Marc-Andre Fleury is 60-3 in his last nine appearances.
Calgary at Detroit, 4 p.m.
New Jersey at Dallas, 5:30 p.m.
San Jose at Colorado, 6:30 p.m.
The year’s highlights included the Washington Capitals
winning their first Cup championship, the unlikely on- and
off-ice success of the expansion Vegas Golden Knights, and a
recent uptick in scoring. The lowlights: The NHL didn’t allow
players to represent their homelands in the Pyeongchang
Olympics, 16 people died in the crash of the junior-level Humboldt Broncos’ team bus, and death claimed Hall of Fame
executive Bill Torrey, Hall of Famer Stan Mikita, former Bruin Johnny (Pie) McKenzie, and U.S. hockey executive Jim Johannson, among others. Happy 2019 and happy hockey to all.
— Helene Elliott
LOS ANGELES TIMES
TUESDAY, JANUARY 1, 2019
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2 at this exact payment—VIN 545902, 209430
Purchase Starting At
†24 Month closed end lease. On approved credit. $3,550 Consumer Cash +
$750 Factory cap cost reduction = $4,300 total due at signing. Total due at
signing includes sales tax, license, dealer, bank and government fees and first
month’s payment. $0 security deposit. 25 cents per mile over 10,000 miles
per year. $395 Disposition fee due at lease termination. See dealer for details.
20,995*
$
1
2 at this exact net cost— VIN 545902, 209430
Must finance through GM Financial to qualify for Down Payment assistance.
off MSRP!*
4,400 Savings
Lease for only
2019 TRAVERSE
62 AVAILABLE
UP
TO
259
$
27
MPG
MP
with
3,950
$
HW
HWY
$
Per Month
Plus tax†
Total Consumer Cash
due at signing.
5 at this savings!
VIN 171409, 169991, 186582, 170045, 122573
OR
Employee Discount ................................. $2,524
Rydell Bonus Savings............................... $1,126
Bonus Cash ................................................... $750
1 at this exact payment — VIN 171409
Purchase Starting At
†36 Month closed end lease. On approved credit. $3,950 Consumer Cash +
$750 factory cap cost reduction = $4,620 total due at signing. Total due at
signing includes sales tax, license, dealer, bank and government fees and first
month’s payment. $0 security deposit. 25 cents per mile over 10,000 miles
per year. $395 Disposition fee due at lease termination. See dealer for details.
1 at this exact net cost— VIN 171409
off MSRP!*
4,730 Savings
Lease for only
2019 COLORADO
39 AVAILABLE
29,595*
$
UP
TO
179
$
26
MPG
MP
HWY
HW
with
3,690
$
$
ALL IN STOCK!
Per Month
Plus tax†
Total Consumer Cash
due at signing.
Employee Discount................................ $1,680
Rydell Bonus Savings............................ $1,550
Factory Rebate ......................................... $500
Bonus Cash .............................................. $1,000
OR
3 at this exact payment—VIN 104385, 119537, 105330
†36 Month closed end lease. On approved credit. $3,690 Consumer Cash +
$1250 Factory cap cost reduction = $4,940 total due at signing. Total due at
signing includes sales tax, license, dealer, bank and government fees and first
month’s payment. $0 security deposit. 25 cents per mile over 10,000 miles
per year. $395 Disposition fee due at lease termination. See dealer for details.
Lease for only
2019 BOLT EV
40 AVAILABLE
UP TO
238 MILES
ALL ELECTRIC!
Purchase Starting At
21,405*
$
3 at this exact net cost— VIN 104385, 119537, 105330
Lease for only
2019 VOLT
299
$
Per Month
Plus tax†
Total Consumer Cash
$
with
,
due at signing.
1 at this exact payment—VIN 101425
8 AVAILABLE
3 725
UP
TO
106
MPGe
†36 Month closed end lease. On approved credit.
$3,725 Consumer Cash + $3000 Factory cap cost
reduction = $6,725 total due at signing. Total due at signing
includes sales tax, license, dealer, bank and government
fees and first month’s payment. $0 security deposit.
25 cents per mile over 10,000 miles per year. $395 Disposition
fee due at lease termination. See dealer for details.
2018 CAMARO
19 AVAILABLE
4,930
$
UP
TO
31
MPG
HWY
Savings
off MSRP!
5 at this savings!
VIN 170221, 189139, 188326, 179082, 179944
289
$
Per Month
Plus tax†
Total Consumer Cash
$
with
,
due at signing.
1 at this exact payment— VIN 113776
3 750
†36 Month closed end lease. On approved credit.
$3,750 Consumer Cash + $4,300 Factory cap cost
reduction = $8,050 total due at signing. Total due at signing
includes sales tax, license, dealer, bank and government
fees and first month’s payment. $0 security deposit.
25 cents per mile over 10,000 miles per year. $395 Disposition
fee due at lease termination. See dealer for details.
2018 MALIBU
16 AVAILABLE
49
UP
TO
MPG
Employee Discount....................................$1,730
Rydell Bonus Savings.............................. $1,700
Factory rebate ..............................................$500
Select Market Bonus Cash.....................$1,000
off MSRP!*
6,630 Savings
$
CITY
4 at this savings!
VIN 277622, 277109, 272037, 274543
Employee Discount................................... $1,830
Rydell Bonus Savings............................... $1,550
Factory Rebate ......................................... $2,500
GMF Down Payment assistance1 ............. $750
Purchase Starting At
Purchase Starting At
21,970
$
8,836
$
20,675*
$
*
2 at this exact net cost— VIN 277622, 277109
1 at this exact net cost—VIN 170221
2018 SILVERADO DOUBLE CAB 1500
10 AVAILABLE
UP
TO
23
MPG
HWY
Savings
off MSRP!*
5 at this savings!
VIN 368432, 360854, 320641, 330407, 359737
Employee Discount.................................. $2,686
Rydell Bonus Savings............................... $1,650
Factory Rebate ......................................... $2,000
Bonus Cash .................................................$1,000
GMF Down Payment assistance1 .......... $1,500
1
Must finance through GM Financial to qualify for Down Payment assistance. See dealer for details.
off MSRP!*
6,700 Savings
2019 TAHOE
33 AVAILABLE
$
UP
TO
22
MPG
MP
CITY
CI
5 at this savings!
VIN 144784, 157338, 150481, 151678, 133776
Employee Discount.................................. $4,200
Factory Rebate ............................................ $750
Bonus Cash .................................................. $750
GMF Down Payment assistance1 .......... $1,500
Purchase Starting At
Purchase Starting At
27,869*
42 ,245*
$
$
1 at this exact net cost — VIN 368432
1
1 at this exact net cost— VIN 144784
qualify for Down Payment assistance. See dealer for details.
Must finance through GM Financial to qua
Lease for only
2019 CORVETTE
27 AVAILABLE
UP
TO
25
MPG
HWY
529
$
Per Month
Plus tax†
Total Consumer Cash
$
with
,
due at signing.
1 at this exact payment—VIN 111655
1
Must finance through GM Financial to qualify for Down Payment assistance. See dealer for details.
2018 CRUZE
13 AVAILABLE
4 690
†36 Month closed end lease. On approved credit. $4,690
Consumer Cash = $4,690 total due at signing. Total due
at signing includes sales tax, license, dealer, bank and
government fees and first month’s payment. $0 security
deposit. 25 cents per mile over 10,000 miles per year.
$395 Disposition fee due at lease termination. Not all
customers will qualify. See dealer for details
(888) 556-8214 www.Rydells.com
18600 Devonshire St.
Northridge, CA 91324
off MSRP!*
6,546 Savings
$
UP
TO
42
MPG
HWY
3 at this savings!
VIN 207501, 215879, 189155
Employee Discount .................................. $1,396
Rydell Bonus Savings............................... $1,900
Factory Rebate ......................................... $2,500
GMF Down Payment assistance1 ............ $750
Purchase Starting At
15,914*
$
2 at this exact net cost— VIN 208112, 207501
qualify for Down Payment assistance. See dealer for details.
Must finance through GM Financial to qualif
1
follow us
on facebook
LAA6047075-1
UP
TO
63 AVAILABLE
off MSRP!*
10,650 Savings
$
2018 SILVERADO CREW CAB 1500
D8
T U E S DAY , JA N UA RY 1, 2 019
L AT I M E S . C O M / S P O RT S
NBA
CLIPPERS REPORT
STANDINGS
Standings have been arranged to reflect how the teams will be determined for the playoffs. Teams are ranked 1-15 by record. Division
standing no longer has any bearing on the rankings. The top eight
teams in each conference make the playoffs, and the top-seeded
team would play the eighth-seeded team, the seventh team would
play the second, etc. Head-to-head competition is the first of several
tiebreakers, followed by conference record. (Western Conference divisions: S-Southwest; P-Pacific; N-Northwest; Eastern Conference
divisions: A-Atlantic; C-Central; S-Southeast).
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Team
1. Denver
1. Golden State
3. Oklahoma City
4. CLIPPERS
4. Houston
6. LAKERS
6. Portland
8. San Antonio
W
23
25
23
21
21
21
21
21
L
11
13
13
15
15
16
16
17
PCT
.676
.658
.639
.583
.583
.568
.568
.553
GB L10
6-4
6-4
1
6-4
3
4-6
3
9-1
31⁄2 4-6
31⁄2 6-4
4
7-3
9. Sacramento
10. Memphis
11. Utah
12. Dallas
13. Minnesota
14. New Orleans
15. Phoenix
19
18
18
17
17
17
9
17
18
19
19
20
21
29
.528 1
.500 2
.486 21⁄2
.472 3
.459 31⁄2
.447 4
.237 12
5-5
3-7
5-5
2-8
4-6
3-7
5-5
Rk.
N1
P1
N2
P2
S1
P3
N3
S2
P4
S3
N4
S4
N5
S5
P5
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Team
1. Milwaukee
2. Toronto
2. Indiana
4. Philadelphia
5. Boston
6. Charlotte
7. Miami
8. Detroit
W
25
27
25
23
21
18
17
16
L
10
11
12
14
15
18
18
18
PCT
.714
.711
.676
.622
.583
.500
.486
.471
GB L10 Rk.
1
⁄2 8-2 C1
6-4 A1
1
8-2 C2
3
5-5 A2
41⁄2 5-5 A3
71⁄2 5-5 S1
8
6-4 S2
81⁄2 3-7 C3
9. Brooklyn
10. Orlando
11. Washington
12. Atlanta
13. Chicago
14. New York
15. Cleveland
17
16
14
11
10
9
8
21
20
23
25
27
28
29
.447
.444
.378
.306
.270
.243
.216
1
1
31⁄2
6
71⁄2
81⁄2
91⁄2
7-3
4-6
3-7
5-5
4-6
1-9
2-8
A4
S3
S4
S5
C4
A5
C5
TODAY’S GAMES
Favorite
at CLIPPERS
at Toronto
at Milwaukee
at Denver
Portland
Line
OFF
31⁄2
101⁄2
14
11⁄2
Underdog
Philadelphia
Utah
Detroit
New York
at Sacramento
Time
7:30 p.m.
4:30 p.m.
5 p.m.
6 p.m.
6 p.m.
RESULTS
Spurs swamp Celtics
in 46-point quarter
SAN ANTONIO 120
BOSTON 111
San Antonio coach Gregg
Popovich had to use some colorful
language to explain to the Spurs at
halftime that their lack of aggression was troubling him. The Spurs
responded with their highest-scoring quarter in 25 years.
LaMarcus Aldridge scored 32
points and San Antonio rode a 46point third quarter to a 120-111 victory over the Boston Celtics on
Monday night.
DeMar DeRozan, who had 13
points and 10 assists, said the
Spurs were “cussed out by Pop” at
halftime after shooting 22% in the
first quarter.
“We were playing really tentative, real indecisive, hesitating,
wasn’t being aggressive,” DeRozan
said. “The whole dynamic of us, our
aggression, changed. We just got
out [in the second half] and played
like we’ve been playing.”
Derrick White had a career-high
22 points for San Antonio, which
has won 11 of 13 to close within four
games of the top spot in the Western Conference.
at Charlotte 125, Orlando 100:
Kemba Walker scored 24 points in
just 27 minutes, and the Hornets
beat the Magic for the 13th straight
matchup. Malik Monk added 21
points as the Hornets had six players in double figures in the rout.
at Indiana 116, Atlanta 108: Victor
Oladipo scored 22 points while Domantas Sabonis and Myles Turner
each added 20 to lead the Pacers
past the Hawks. John Collins finished with 22 points and 16 rebounds to lead Atlanta.
at Houston 113, Memphis 101:
James Harden had a triple-double
of 43 points, 10 rebounds and 13 assists to lead the Rockets to their
fifth consecutive victory. Harden
set an NBA record with his eighth
straight game with at least 35
points and five assists, besting Oscar Robertson, who twice had seven-game streaks.
at New Orleans 123, Minnesota 114:
Julius Randle had 33 points and 11
rebounds and the Pelicans overcame Anthony Davis’ absence in a
victory over the Timberwolves.
at Oklahoma City 122, Dallas 102:
Russell Westbrook had 32 points, 11
rebounds and 11 assists, and the
Thunder gained a split of their
back-to-back against the Mavericks, never trailing in the victory.
Paul George added 22 points and
Jerami Grant had 16 for Oklahoma
City.
Golden State 132, at Phoenix 109:
Stephen Curry scored 34 points
and Kevin Durant added 25, leading the Warriors over the Suns. It
marked the 17th straight time that
the Warriors have beaten the Suns.
— associated press
Practices are rare,
but they’re effective
By Andrew Greif
When the Clippers roster
featured veterans Blake
Griffin, Chris Paul and DeAndre Jordan, the team
often went weeks without
practicing.
With those three gone
and a cast of new faces in
their place this season, practices are no longer an afterthought but a necessity.
“Practice,” coach Doc
Rivers said, “has been very
important for us.”
The Clippers returned 10
players from last season’s
roster, but the number is
misleading because a nucleus was rarely together.
Tobias Harris, Avery
Bradley and Boban Marjanovic arrived via trade at
midseason, and three others
— Patrick Beverley, Milos
Teodosic and Danilo Gallinari — were on the roster the
entire season but rarely on
the court, sitting out a combined 169 games because of
injuries.
One more, Tyrone Wallace, spent the second half of
the season shuttling between the Clippers and the
team’s G League affiliate.
A weeklong September
training camp in Hawaii and
the two weeks of preseason
in Los Angeles that followed
familiarized players and
coaches with one another,
but by mid-November the
Clippers began a monthlong
stretch where they didn’t
play consecutive games in
the same arena.
Shootarounds were often
held the morning of games,
but the near-constant travel
left the team with few opportunities to run through the
skeleton of their various offensive
and
defensive
schemes or to go over gameplanning details in depth on
the court, Harris said.
Practices, said center
Marcin Gortat, are an “opportunity for you just to be in
shape, get a lift, get your
shots, get a little sweat, refresh our schemes and refresh our offense.
“It’s opportunity to just
stay sharp.”
It was no accident that
the Clippers (21-15) were
sharper against the Dallas
Mavericks on Dec. 20, Rivers
said.
They had practiced the
day before at their Playa
Vista facility.
After the victory over the
Mavericks, Rivers said an assistant told him, “ ‘I don’t
say this often, but that practice won the game.’ ”
The workout Monday
was the Clippers’ third since
Dec. 19 but only their fifth in
Harry How Getty Images
DANILO GALLINARI , left, and Tobias Harris celebrate during a victory over the Timberwolves.
six weeks.
“When we didn’t have
practice for that stretch, we
struggled because we didn’t
have that time to teach,”
Rivers said.
“This is a new team. It’s
not just because there are a
lot of new guys; this team
has not been together that
long, so everything is new for
the group, not just the young
guys.”
Seven of the Clippers’
next nine games are at
home, but Rivers won’t fill
that time with workouts to
make up for lost time.
“You’ve still got to temper
your practice,” he said. “You
have so many games you’ve
got to be careful with your
practice, and I think there
are times we’ve done that
well. And I think there are
times where I have not done
that well and I’ve gone too
hard. I think I saw that in
games too.”
Pride Night
The Clippers are hosting
an LGBTQ “Pride Night” on
Tuesday at Staples Center
that will include a pregame
panel featuring professional
wrestler Fred Rosser, Paralympian Angela Madsen,
WNBA coach Curt Miller
and activist Dr. Julie Shaw
and moderated by Santa
Ana College basketball
coach Jason Jaramillo.
The panel is accessible to
fans who purchase tickets
with a promotional code of
“PRIDE,” the team said.
The team has hosted a
Pride Night before, but this
is the first time it has been
accompanied by a full marketing effort.
That means the team will
sell special jerseys and apparel and also bestow on
Miller, a former coach of the
Los Angeles Sparks who
now coaches the Connecticut Sun and is the first
openly gay male coach of a
professional sports team, its
first Clippers Award for
Equality and Diversity.
The award is given to an
individual or organization
that has “made significant
contributions
to
the
LGBTQ+ community and
has made a difference in the
city of Los Angeles,” according to the team.
TONIGHT
VS. PHILADELPHIA
When: 7:30.
On the air: TV: Prime
Ticket; Radio: 570, 1330.
Update: Coming off a twogame stretch where he has
struggled to make shots,
Clippers forward Tobias
Harris took part in a heavy
pre-practice workout Monday with coaches. Harris,
who averages 21 points a
game and has made 50.4% of
his shots, has averaged 12.5
points in his last two games
while making 38.1% of his
shots overall and only one
three-point attempt. “It’ll
come at some point, but one
thing I’m afforded from
coaching for a long time is I
know they’re human,” coach
Doc Rivers said. “They don’t
make shots every night. You
go through the list: Klay
Thompson, Russell Westbrook the last couple nights,
but overall, the numbers say
they’ll be good players so I’m
not that concerned.”
andrew.greif@latimes.com
Twitter: @andrewgreif
Caldwell-Pope heats up
in hot-and-cold season
Having seen his previous
two three-pointers go in,
Kentavious Caldwell-Pope
thought it was about time
for a heat check on Sunday
night.
So he launched a shot
from the Staples Center logo
and when it went in, Caldwell-Pope knew it was his
night.
“After I made the first two
and then the shot from the
logo, it went in,” CaldwellPope said. “So I felt like
whatever I throw up was going in so I just kept shooting.”
That plan met the approval of the Lakers, who
have wanted Caldwell-Pope
to shoot more and be more
involved in general.
He scored 26 points
against the Sacramento
Kings on Sunday, making
five of 13 three-pointers —
four of those makes in the
second half.
“I tell him all the time, I
tell him just walk around in a
shooting stance,” Lakers
coach Luke Walton said.
“Just be ready to shoot all
day long. And I want anytime that the ball gets swung
to him, if their guy is not
right on him, I want him
shooting the ball. But as far
as his energy, he’s been cutting, he’s been playing defense. He’s been doing all the
Pacers 116, Hawks 108
things we ask of him, and
we’re always encouraging
him to take more shots.”
It’s been a complicated
season for Caldwell-Pope,
who signed a one-year deal
worth $12 million over the
summer on the heels of a
one-year deal worth $18 million last season. He was a
Lakers starter for most of
last season and began this
season in the same role. But
it wasn’t long before Walton
replaced him.
His name leaked in early
December as the Lakers
worked on a deal to acquire
Trevor Ariza. With some say
over his destination, Caldwell-Pope’s agent Rich Paul,
who also represents LeBron
James, worked to find a destination for his client with a
better role.
That opportunity hasn’t
materialized, but in the
meantime Caldwell-Pope
has worked to make the best
of his situation.
His performance Sunday
was one he might have seen
coming. That morning during shootaround, Walton
told Caldwell-Pope he’d like
to see him shooting more.
“I was like, ‘Coach, I’m
gonna get ’em up tonight,’ ”
Caldwell-Pope said.
He took 21 shots in the 28
minutes 28 seconds he
played Sunday night. His
plus/minus rating of 19 was
the highest of any player in
the game.
“He’s someone who can
knock down shots, but when
he’s involved, not even making shots, but when he’s involved defensively he’s big
for us,” teammate Josh Hart
said. “He got a couple steals.
One at the end to end the
half or end the quarter, that
was big for us. And another
one down the stretch, got a
big steal for us. When he
does that, we’re able to kind
of get him more engaged offensively and it gets the ball
rolling for us.”
McGee returns
JaVale McGee returned
on Sunday after missing seven games as he recovered
from pneumonia.
“A little out of shape, but
it felt good being out there,”
McGee said.
McGee first began to feel
ill two weeks ago and played
on Dec. 15 despite flu symptoms. His condition worsened and eventually developed into pneumonia. McGee stayed with the Lakers
for the end of that weeklong
trip, but then was hospitalized.
McGee played 23 minutes
30 seconds in his return.
“He wanted more minutes than he got, but for just
our whole team it was nice to
have him back on the court,”
Walton said.
tania.ganguli@latimes.com
Twitter: @taniaganguli
Pelicans 123, Timberwolves 114
ATLANTA
MINNESOTA
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Collins........37 8-15 4-4 7-16 4 3 22
Hamilton ....15 4-8 0-0 2-6 3 0 8
Len............24 8-16 3-7 5-7 2 3 19
Huerter.......39 8-15 0-2 0-0 2 3 22
Tr.Young ......29 6-10 0-0 2-4 7 3 16
Bembry ......27 2-8 0-0 1-6 1 1 4
Lin.............20 1-7 5-5 1-3 2 5 7
Carter ........17 0-7 0-0 2-5 1 2 0
Plumlee......12 2-4 0-0 0-2 2 1 4
Anderson......6 1-2 0-0 0-1 0 1 3
Poythress......4 0-0 0-0 0-1 0 1 0
Dorsey .........4 1-3 1-1 1-2 0 0 3
Totals
41-95 13-19 21-53 24 23 108
Shooting: Field goals, 43.2%; free throws,
68.4%
Three-point goals: 13-32 (Huerter 6-9, Tr.Young
4-6, Collins 2-4, Anderson 1-1). Team Rebounds:
8. Team Turnovers: 17 (21 PTS). Blocked Shots: 5
(Bembry 2, Huerter, Len, Lin). Turnovers: 17
(Tr.Young 8, Bembry 2, Huerter 2, Len 2, Anderson,
Carter, Lin). Steals: 8 (Bembry 3, Tr.Young 3, Carter, Len). Technical Fouls: coach Hawks (Defensive
three second), 3:07 first
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Covington ...38 6-13 0-1 1-2 3 4 16
Gibson .......31 6-6 5-6 2-5 2 1 17
Towns.........36 10-23 6-8 3-17 6 6 28
Jones .........38 6-11 2-2 1-2 13 0 15
Wiggins ......38 8-21 2-2 1-2 3 1 20
Okogie .......19 2-5 2-2 1-2 1 2 6
Saric..........16 1-6 0-0 1-3 1 3 2
Dieng.........11 4-6 2-2 2-6 0 0 10
Bayless ........9 0-2 0-0 0-0 0 1 0
Totals
43-93 19-23 12-39 29 18 114
Shooting: Field goals, 46.2%; free throws,
82.6%
Three-point goals: 9-28 (Covington 4-8, Towns
2-5, Wiggins 2-8, Jones 1-2, Dieng 0-1, Okogie
0-1, Saric 0-1, Bayless 0-2). Team Rebounds: 6.
Team Turnovers: 7 (7 PTS). Blocked Shots: 9
(Towns 5, Covington, Dieng, Gibson, Wiggins).
Turnovers: 7 (Covington 2, Towns 2, Wiggins 2,
Okogie). Steals: 10 (Covington 5, Okogie 2, Bayless, Jones, Wiggins). Technical Fouls: Towns,
00:35 fourth.
INDIANA
LAKERS REPORT
By Tania Ganguli
BOX SCORES
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Bogdanovic .32 6-12 3-3 0-4 3 1 16
Th.Young.....36 3-7 0-2 1-5 2 4 6
Turner.........23 7-9 3-5 2-8 4 2 20
Collison......28 4-7 3-3 0-4 6 3 12
Oladipo ......33 9-19 2-2 0-4 7 2 22
Sabonis......27 7-12 6-8 4-8 0 2 20
Joseph .......24 2-4 2-2 1-4 3 0 7
Evans.........18 3-7 2-4 0-2 2 3 10
McDermott..14 1-7 0-0 0-0 2 1 3
Totals
42-84 21-29 8-39 29 18 116
Shooting: Field goals, 50.0%; free throws,
72.4%
Three-point goals: 11-24 (Turner 3-4, Evans 2-4,
Oladipo 2-4, Collison 1-2, Joseph 1-2, Bogdanovic
1-3, McDermott 1-4). Team Rebounds: 10. Team
Turnovers: 11 (14 PTS). Blocked Shots: 6 (Turner 4,
Joseph, Th.Young). Turnovers: 11 (Bogdanovic 5,
Evans, McDermott, Oladipo, Sabonis, Th.Young,
Turner). Steals: 13 (Oladipo 4, Th.Young 3, Bogdanovic 2, Collison 2, Joseph, Sabonis). Technical
Fouls: coach Pacers (Defensive three second),
4:45 first.
Atlanta
25 35 21 27— 108
Indiana
33 30 34 19— 116
A—17,923. T—2:09. O—Justin Van Duyne, Scott
Twardoski, James Williams
Hornets 125, Magic 100
ORLANDO
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Gordon.......33 6-17 0-0 2-8 5 1 14
Isaac .........22 4-9 2-2 1-2 1 4 11
Vucevic.......23 5-13 1-4 1-5 2 2 12
Fournier......25 3-6 1-1 0-3 4 1 9
Grant .........25 4-10 0-0 0-2 5 1 9
Briscoe.......27 3-5 0-0 0-2 2 2 6
Iwundu.......22 3-5 3-4 1-3 0 3 9
Ross ..........18 4-14 0-0 2-5 1 0 10
Bamba.......18 2-5 1-2 3-12 0 5 5
Martin..........7 2-3 0-0 1-2 0 1 4
Birch............6 0-1 4-4 1-2 0 0 4
Caupain .......5 2-3 0-0 0-1 2 0 5
Jefferson.......3 0-1 2-2 1-1 0 1 2
Totals
38-92 14-19 13-48 22 21 100
Shooting: Field goals, 41.3%; free throws, 73.7%
Three-point goals: 10-35 (Fournier 2-4, Gordon 2-6,
Ross 2-7, Caupain 1-1, Vucevic 1-3, Grant 1-4, Isaac 1-5).
Team Rebounds: 7. Team Turnovers: 11 (16 PTS). Blocked
Shots: 5 (Bamba 2, Vucevic 2, Isaac). Turnovers: 11
(Fournier 4, Briscoe 3, Iwundu 2, Isaac, Ross). Steals: 6
(Birch, Caupain, Grant, Iwundu, Ross, Vucevic).
NEW ORLEANS
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Moore ........33 7-13 0-0 1-2 3 1 17
Randle .......37 13-23 5-6 3-11 3 5 33
Okafor........13 3-7 1-1 5-7 0 3 7
Holiday.......38 8-17 8-8 0-4 9 0 26
Payton........24 3-9 2-2 0-1 6 2 9
Hill ............29 2-3 0-0 0-4 2 4 4
Miller .........27 7-11 2-2 0-3 3 4 21
Frazier........21 2-4 0-0 1-3 3 1 5
Diallo.........15 0-0 1-2 1-9 0 1 1
Davis ...........0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0 0
Totals
45-87 19-21 11-44 29 21 123
Shooting: Field goals, 51.7%; free throws,
90.5%
Three-point goals: 14-25 (Miller 5-8, Moore
3-4, Holiday 2-3, Randle 2-4, Frazier 1-2, Payton
1-3, Hill 0-1). Team Rebounds: 9. Team Turnovers:
15 (20 PTS). Blocked Shots: 2 (Miller, Okafor).
Turnovers: 15 (Holiday 5, Payton 4, Moore 3, Hill 2,
Diallo). Steals: 3 (Frazier, Hill, Payton). Technical
Fouls: None.
Minnesota
22 29 38 25— 114
New Orleans
27 36 25 35— 123
A—14,904. T—2:16. O—Derrick Collins, Jason
Goldenberg, Kane Fitzgerald
Thunder 122, Mavericks 102
DALLAS
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Barnes .......29 8-11 2-2 0-5 1 3 25
Matthews....24 2-9 2-2 0-3 0 4 7
Jordan........23 1-2 0-0 1-10 1 4 2
Doncic .......22 4-10 6-6 1-6 3 0 17
Smith Jr. .....20 3-6 2-4 0-1 3 4 10
Fnny-Smth ..23 3-9 4-5 3-8 1 2 10
Barea.........20 1-8 4-6 0-3 8 0 6
Kleber ........18 0-1 1-2 0-6 0 1 1
Harris.........15 1-4 3-4 0-2 1 3 5
Powell ........15 1-1 1-2 0-3 0 6 3
Brunson .......9 1-4 0-0 0-0 3 2 2
Mejri............8 4-4 0-0 0-1 0 0 8
Broekhoff......6 2-5 1-1 0-1 0 0 6
Totals
31-74 26-34 5-49 21 29 102
Shooting: Field goals, 41.9%; free throws,
76.5%
Three-point goals: 14-38 (Barnes 7-9, Doncic
3-6, Smith Jr. 2-3, Broekhoff 1-4, Matthews 1-6).
Team Rebounds: 11. Team Turnovers: 26 (36 PTS).
Blocked Shots: 3 (Powell 2, Matthews). Turnovers:
26 (Jordan 6, Doncic 5, Powell 3, Barea 2, Barnes
2, Harris 2, Matthews 2, Smith Jr. 2, Brunson, Kleber). Steals: 7 (Matthews 2, Barea, Barnes, Doncic, Finney-Smith, Mejri). Technical Fouls: coach
Mavericks (Excess timeout), 6:43 fourth.
CHARLOTTE
OKLAHOMA CITY
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Batum........26 3-6 0-0 1-5 3 1 7
Williams .....23 3-9 2-2 0-5 2 1 10
Zeller .........24 3-5 8-8 0-6 2 1 14
Lamb ...........9 4-4 1-1 0-2 2 0 9
Walker........27 10-16 2-2 1-3 7 1 24
Monk .........24 7-14 4-4 0-3 4 0 21
Graham......24 3-8 2-2 0-3 4 2 10
Bridges.......20 2-5 2-2 0-2 1 2 6
Kdd-Glchrst.19 2-5 1-1 1-2 0 2 5
Hrnngmz.....13 2-5 6-7 1-8 1 1 10
Parker ........12 0-4 1-2 0-3 2 1 1
Kaminsky......7 2-2 1-2 1-2 1 0 6
Biyombo.......6 1-2 0-0 1-2 0 4 2
Totals
42-85 30-33 6-46 29 16 125
Shooting: Field goals, 49.4%; free throws, 90.9%
Three-point goals: 11-24 (Monk 3-6, Graham 2-3,
Williams 2-3, Walker 2-5, Kaminsky 1-1, Batum 1-2). Team
Rebounds: 4. Team Turnovers: 8 (10 PTS). Blocked Shots: 1
(Monk). Turnovers: 8 (Walker 3, Graham, Kaminsky, Monk,
Williams, Zeller). Steals: 8 (Graham 3, Hernangomez,
Kidd-Gilchrist, Lamb, Monk, Williams). Technical Fouls:
coach Hornets (Defensive three second), 11:43 first.
Orlando
23 30 24 23— 100
Charlotte
36 27 32 30— 125
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
George .......32 7-21 6-7 2-4 1 5 22
Grant .........27 6-11 3-3 0-4 0 1 16
Adams .......33 5-8 2-8 6-13 4 3 12
Ferguson ....24 2-6 1-2 0-1 1 5 5
Westbrook...34 13-24 6-6 0-11 11 4 32
Schroder.....27 3-14 0-1 0-2 3 2 6
Patterson ....18 1-4 0-0 0-3 1 1 3
Noel ..........14 5-7 5-6 2-5 0 3 15
Diallo.........13 0-2 1-2 0-0 0 2 1
Nader ........12 4-6 0-0 1-3 1 4 10
Totals
46-103 24-35 11-46 22 30 122
Shooting: Field goals, 44.7%; free throws,
68.6%
Three-point goals: 6-24 (Nader 2-3, George
2-6, Patterson 1-3, Grant 1-4). Team Rebounds:
13. Team Turnovers: 10 (5 PTS). Blocked Shots: 3
(Ferguson, Grant, Noel). Turnovers: 10 (Westbrook
5, Schroder 2, Adams, Diallo, Ferguson). Steals:
13 (George 4, Westbrook 4, Grant 3, Adams, Ferguson).
Dallas
21 22 32 27— 102
Oklahoma City
32 28 32 30— 122
A—14,694. T—2:04. O—Michael Smith, Natalie Sago,
James Capers
A—18,203. T—2:24. O—C.J. Washington, Scott
Foster, Mark Ayotte
Warriors 132, Suns 109
GOLDEN STATE
Rockets 113, Grizzlies 101
MEMPHIS
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Anderson....38 9-13 0-6 1-3 5 5 20
Jackson Jr. ..13 2-8 0-0 0-2 0 5 4
Gasol.........35 5-10 3-4 0-12 4 3 14
Conley........36 7-18 5-6 1-6 5 2 19
Temple .......25 4-9 2-2 0-1 0 3 10
J.Green.......19 5-6 4-5 2-6 2 4 17
D.Brooks.....18 1-7 1-2 2-2 1 4 3
Casspi........16 2-5 4-4 0-4 0 1 8
Mack .........13 2-2 0-1 0-0 3 0 4
Noah ...........8 1-2 0-0 0-3 1 3 2
Carter ..........5 0-1 0-0 0-0 2 0 0
Selden .........4 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 1 0
M.Brooks......2 0-1 0-0 0-0 1 0 0
Totals
38-82 19-30 6-39 24 31 101
Shooting: Field goals, 46.3%; free throws,
63.3%
Three-point goals: 6-25 (J.Green 3-3, Anderson
2-4, Gasol 1-3). Team Rebounds: 8. Team Turnovers: 10 (9 PTS). Blocked Shots: 4 (Anderson,
Casspi, Gasol, J.Green). Turnovers: 10 (D.Brooks 3,
Anderson 2, Conley, Gasol, J.Green, M.Brooks, Noah). Steals: 11 (Anderson 3, Gasol 2, Temple 2,
Conley, D.Brooks, J.Green, Jackson Jr.). Technical
Fouls: coach JB Bickerstaff, 9:05 third.
HOUSTON
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
House Jr. ....27 5-8 2-2 2-3 1 2 16
Tucker ........37 0-5 4-6 0-7 2 5 4
Capela .......38 7-9 5-8 3-13 0 2 19
Harden.......41 8-19 21-27 1-10 13 3 43
Rivers.........40 5-11 0-0 0-1 1 5 12
G.Green......24 6-11 0-0 0-5 0 1 18
Knight ........10 0-3 1-2 0-1 2 2 1
Clark............9 0-0 0-0 0-2 0 3 0
Nene ...........9 0-4 0-0 1-4 0 2 0
Totals
31-70 33-45 7-46 19 25 113
Shooting: Field goals, 44.3%; free throws,
73.3%
Three-point goals: 18-41 (G.Green 6-11, Harden
6-12, House Jr. 4-6, Rivers 2-5). Team Rebounds:
13. Team Turnovers: 13 (18 PTS). Blocked Shots: 4
(Capela, G.Green, House Jr., Rivers). Turnovers: 13
(Harden 9, G.Green 2, Rivers 2). Steals: 5 (Harden
2, Clark, Knight, Rivers).
Memphis
18 20 35 28— 101
Houston
27 34 25 27— 113
A—18,055. T—2:17. O—Sean Wright, Aaron
Smith, Matt Boland
Spurs 120, Celtics 111
BOSTON
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Morris ........28 7-13 2-3 0-4 0 2 18
Tatum.........35 6-14 0-0 2-11 1 3 12
Horford.......25 4-7 0-0 1-3 3 2 9
Irving .........28 7-14 1-2 1-3 8 0 16
Smart ........26 3-5 1-2 0-3 4 2 7
Brown ........30 10-15 7-8 1-4 2 0 30
Hayward .....21 0-6 0-0 1-4 5 0 0
Rozier ........20 4-9 3-5 1-2 5 1 15
Theis..........18 2-5 0-0 2-6 1 4 4
Yabusele.......3 0-0 0-0 0-0 1 3 0
Totals
43-88 14-20 9-40 30 17 111
Shooting: Field goals, 48.9%; free throws,
70.0%
Three-point goals: 11-34 (Rozier 4-6, Brown
3-5, Morris 2-3, Horford 1-2, Irving 1-5, Theis 0-1,
Smart 0-2, Hayward 0-5, Tatum 0-5). Team Rebounds: 10. Team Turnovers: 12 (9 PTS). Blocked
Shots: 8 (Brown 2, Tatum 2, Morris, Rozier, Smart,
Theis). Turnovers: 12 (Irving 3, Smart 3, Tatum 2,
Hayward, Horford, Theis, Yabusele). Steals: 5 (Irving 2, Hayward, Horford, Smart).
SAN ANTONIO
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Poeltl .........20 1-4 0-0 3-6 5 2 2
White .........28 8-9 4-5 0-3 3 2 22
Aldridge......35 13-23 6-7 3-9 5 1 32
DeRozan.....35 6-18 1-1 0-7 10 1 13
Forbes........38 6-14 0-0 0-2 2 3 15
Bertans ......30 6-12 0-0 2-5 0 3 17
Belinelli......23 1-4 5-5 0-3 2 3 8
Mills ..........19 4-7 0-0 0-1 0 1 11
Gasol...........5 0-0 0-0 0-5 0 1 0
Cunningham..3 0-0 0-0 0-2 0 0 0
Totals
45-91 16-18 8-43 27 17 120
Shooting: Field goals, 49.5%; free throws,
88.9%
Three-point goals: 14-26 (Bertans 5-8, Mills
3-6, Forbes 3-7, White 2-2, Belinelli 1-3). Team
Rebounds: 6. Team Turnovers: 11 (12 PTS). Blocked
Shots: 4 (Aldridge 2, White 2). Turnovers: 11
(Aldridge 2, Forbes 2, Mills 2, Belinelli, Bertans,
DeRozan, Poeltl, White). Steals: 6 (Aldridge, Belinelli, Bertans, DeRozan, Forbes, White).
Boston
23 29 30 29— 111
San Antonio
17 29 46 28— 120
A—18,354. T—2:03. O—Marc Davis, Phenizee
Ransom, Courtney Kirkland
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Durant........29 8-14 6-9 0-2 4 1 25
Green.........32 2-4 2-2 0-3 7 3 7
Looney .......13 2-3 1-1 0-4 1 4 5
Curry .........31 11-17 7-7 1-9 4 2 34
Thompson...24 5-13 3-4 3-5 1 5 15
Iguodala.....21 1-2 2-4 1-5 6 2 5
Jerebko ......19 2-8 3-3 0-2 1 1 7
Livingston ...16 5-6 0-0 0-2 3 0 10
Cook..........16 3-6 0-0 1-3 2 3 8
Bell ...........15 5-5 0-0 0-6 2 2 10
McKinnie ....13 2-5 0-0 0-2 0 1 4
Derrickson ....3 0-1 2-2 1-1 0 0 2
Totals
46-84 26-32 7-44 31 24 132
Shooting: Field goals, 54.8%; free throws,
81.3%
Three-point goals: 14-28 (Curry 5-9, Durant
3-4, Cook 2-3, Thompson 2-4, Green 1-2, Iguodala 1-2). Team Rebounds: 6. Team Turnovers: 15
(19 PTS). Blocked Shots: 8 (Bell 3, Iguodala 3,
Green, Livingston). Turnovers: 15 (Durant 4, Cook
3, Curry 3, Bell, Green, Iguodala, McKinnie,
Thompson). Steals: 7 (Green 2, Curry, Iguodala,
Livingston, Looney, Thompson).
PHOENIX
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Bridges.......32 2-6 1-2 0-3 3 3 6
Warren .......34 8-17 6-6 0-4 4 2 24
Ayton .........34 9-17 7-8 4-10 1 3 25
Booker .......32 6-15 6-6 0-2 6 4 20
Melton .......26 2-5 2-2 1-3 2 5 7
Oubre Jr......21 6-12 2-2 1-3 0 4 15
Crawford.....17 0-2 0-0 0-4 2 0 0
Jackson......13 1-4 0-0 0-1 0 6 2
Bender .......12 1-3 1-2 0-3 2 0 3
Moreland......4 0-0 0-0 0-3 0 1 0
Daniels ........4 1-2 0-0 1-1 0 0 3
Okobo..........3 1-2 1-2 0-1 0 1 4
Totals
37-85 26-30 7-38 20 29 109
Shooting: Field goals, 43.5%; free throws,
86.7%
Three-point goals: 9-26 (Booker 2-5, Warren
2-5, Okobo 1-1, Daniels 1-2, Melton 1-2, Bridges
1-4, Oubre Jr. 1-4). Team Rebounds: 8. Team Turnovers: 13 (17 PTS). Blocked Shots: 3 (Bender,
Crawford, Melton). Turnovers: 13 (Booker 5, Crawford 2, Jackson 2, Ayton, Daniels, Okobo, Oubre
Jr.). Steals: 7 (Melton 4, Bender, Booker, Warren).
Golden State
31 38 39 24— 132
Phoenix
27 25 35 22— 109
A—16,906. T—2:10. O—Tom Washington,
Mousa Dagher, Brent Barnaky
CLIPPERS, LAKERS STATS
Through Monday
CLIPPERS
Harris
Gallinari
Williams
Harrell
Gilgeous-Alexander
Bradley
Marjanovic
Beverley
Mbah a Moute
Scott
Gortat
Wallace
Teodosic
Robinson
Thornwell
LAKERS
James
Kuzma
Ingram
McGee
Ball
Caldwell-Pope
Hart
Rondo
Stephenson
Zubac
Beasley
Chandler
Williams
Mykhailiuk
Wagner
Bonga
Caruso
PPG
21.0
19.6
18.1
15.6
10.3
7.8
7.4
6.9
5.0
4.8
4.7
3.8
3.2
2.9
1.4
PPG
27.3
18.7
16.0
11.7
9.6
9.5
9.5
8.4
7.6
5.6
4.4
3.7
3.3
3.1
3.1
1.2
0.0
RPG
8.2
6.3
2.6
6.6
2.9
2.6
4.4
3.7
1.8
3.7
5.5
1.4
1.1
.4
1.1
RPG
8.3
6.0
4.2
6.8
5.1
2.5
3.3
4.4
3.0
3.8
1.4
7.4
3.0
.7
1.4
.8
.5
APG
2.3
2.3
4.9
1.6
2.7
2.0
.6
3.4
.5
.9
1.6
.5
2.1
.1
.4
APG
7.1
2.5
2.3
.8
5.0
.9
1.2
6.7
1.8
.6
.3
.8
.6
.8
.7
.6
.0
T U E S DAY , JA N UA RY 1, 2 019
L AT I M E S . C O M / S P O RT S
D9
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
TOP 25 ROUNDUP
Gonzaga
has no
trouble
at home
associated press
Rui Hachimura scored 22
points to help No. 7 Gonzaga
beat Cal State Bakersfield
89-54 on Monday night in
Spokane, Wash.
Brandon Clarke and
Zach Norvell Jr. each scored
16 points for the Bulldogs
(13-2), who have easily won
four consecutive games after
losing to No. 3 Tennessee
and No. 15 North Carolina to
fall from the top spot in the
Associated Press top 25. Jeremy Jones had 11 points and
10 rebounds.
Jarkel Joiner scored 24
points for the Roadrunners
(8-5), whose winning streak
ended at five games.
The Bulldogs went on an
11-0 run and held the Roadrunners scoreless for six
minutes to take a 13-6 lead.
A 13-0 run a few minutes
later put the Bulldogs ahead
28-12. They led 43-24 at halftime, behind 13 points by
Hachimura. Joiner scored
the last 10 points of the half
for the Roadrunners.
The teams traded baskets early in the second half,
and Joiner’s three-point
basket cut Gonzaga’s lead to
55-35.
A 10-2 run put Gonzaga
up 65-37 with 12 minutes left.
The Roadrunners could not
make up the difference.
Gonzaga has won 15 consecutive home games dating
to last year.
at No. 4 Virginia 100,
Marshall 64: Kyle Guy made
seven three-point baskets
and scored a career-high 30
points, and the Cavaliers
(12-0) kept alive their best
start since the 2014-15 team
won its first 19 games.
Guy also had a careerbest eight rebounds to help
Tony Bennett pick up his
300th coaching victory.
Jon Elmore scored 14
points but missed 14 of 17
shots for the Thundering
Herd (7-6), who shot 35.1%
(20 for 57) but became only
the second team to score as
many as 60 points against
Virginia.
USC’s Usher
announces
he’s leaving
By J. Brady McCollough
Sophomore forward Jordan Usher announced Monday on his Twitter account
that he has been granted his
release to transfer from USC
and will do so before the Trojans begin Pac-12 Conference play this week.
Usher’s sudden departure hurts a team already
hurting for quality depth in
its rotation.
The Trojans are waiting
for injured wing players
Charles O’Bannon Jr. (finger) and Kevin Porter Jr.
(bruised quad) to return to
the lineup.
Usher, who averaged 8.6
points and 3.7 rebounds a
game, provided versatility
by playing on the wing and
inside at power forward.
He did not play in USC’s
Sunday night win over UC
Davis because of an indefinite suspension.
USC (7-6) opens conference play Thursday night at
the Galen Center against
California.
brady.mccollough@latimes.com
Twitter: @BradyMcCollough
SOUTHLAND
MEN
at Pepperdine 100, Alabama
A&M 64: Jade’ Smith scored
a career-high 19 points, and
Colbey Ross had 10 points
and 13 assists for the Waves
(7-7), who have one more victory than last season. Eric
Cooper made four threepoint baskets and had 17
points. Tre Todd scored 14
points for the Bulldogs (1-13).
MEN TODAY
Cal State Northridge
at San Diego State.........noon
Cal State Fullerton
at Washington ...............7 p.m.
Two recruits still firm on UCLA
Jaquez, Kyman plan to
play basketball for the
Bruins; Sherfield is
undecided.
By Ben Bolch
and Eric Sondheimer
The flurry of text messages started not long after
learning the basketball
coach they hoped to play for
had been fired.
Grant Sherfield checked
in with fellow UCLA signees
Jaime Jaquez and Jake Kyman on Monday, seeking
their thoughts on the dismissal of Steve Alford.
The consensus among
Jaquez and Kyman was that
they were sticking with their
pledge to become Bruins.
Sherfield was more uncertain about his future, but all
three players shared a similar reaction to the news.
“I’m disappointed. I’m
sad,” Jaquez, a small forward from Camarillo High,
said in a telephone interview. “I had a good relationship with the coaches, but
UCLA is still a great school.
Me and my family are still
talking [about] what’s going
to happen. We’re taking it
one step at a time.”
Kyman’s father, Coley,
said his son is headed to
Westwood as planned.
“Jake is very bummed
and really respects, appreciates and loves the coaching
staff,” Coley Kyman said of
Jake, a small forward from
Santa Margarita High. “But
he chose UCLA because he
wanted to play basketball
for UCLA. That’s not changing for him.
“Jake is a high-IQ basketball player who can shoot it.
He’s going to keep working
hard and wait for the opportunity to meet the new coach
and build a new relation-
ship.”
UCLA’s chances of retaining Kyman are bolstered
by his mother, Michelle, having played volleyball for the
Bruins.
Together with Sherfield,
a guard from Wichita (Kan.)
Sunrise Christian High,
Jaquez and Kyman comprise a class that’s ranked
No. 27 nationally and No. 4 in
the Pac-12 Conference by
247Sports.
Sherfield’s father, Antoine, told 247Sports that
the family was evaluating
the situation and would decide about Grant’s college
plans “in the near future.”
There’s always a chance
UCLA’s new coach could pivot in his assessment of the
prospects. Former Bruins
coach Ben Howland once
encouraged Sean Phaler, a
forward from Villa Park
High, to seek another school
after he had signed a letter of
intent to play for Howland’s
predecessor, Steve Lavin.
Kyman and Jaquez won’t
have to pull out their phones
to confer with each other
about their college choice
this week; their teams play
each other Friday.
ben.bolch@latimes.com
eric.sondheimer@latimes.com
Father,
Knight
shaped
Bartow
Matt Barnes.
“We are not very good,”
Martin recently wrote on
Twitter. “We are stagnant on
offense and we run the most
antiquated offense I have
ever seen.”
After holding himself accountable for a home loss to
Belmont on Dec. 15, Alford
increasingly blamed players
for the team’s shortcomings.
He suggested that they
needed to spend more of
their free time in the gym after a 29-point loss at Cincinnati on Dec. 19 and seemed
baffled after the loss to Liberty that players were unable to execute what they
had been taught in practice.
“We’d prepared for the
trap in the post,” Alford said
after the Bruins committed
a season-worst 24 turnovers.
“If we threw it to the post, we
more times than not turned
it over. And we prepped for
that.”
In many ways, Alford was
an uneasy fit in Westwood
from the start. Some fans accused him of nepotism after
he played his son Bryce over
promising
guard
Zach
LaVine,
who
departed
UCLA after one season and
is now averaging 23.5 points
per game for the Chicago
Bulls. Alford also hired his
son Kory as the video and
analytics coordinator, a role
he will retain despite his father’s departure.
A disciple of former Indiana coach Bobby Knight,
who has long been a detractor of Wooden, Alford
sparked unease at his introductory news conference
when he said he followed the
advice of administrators at
Iowa in defending Pierre
Pierce after the star player
was accused of sexual assault by another student in
2002.
Pierce was later kicked
off the team after a separate
incident involving a former
girlfriend and spent 11
months in a correctional facility after pleading guilty to
a litany of charges.
Alford issued a statement nearly two weeks after
his hiring at UCLA apologizing for the way he handled
the sexual-assault charge
while he was at Iowa.
In the end, after 51⁄2
mostly underwhelming seasons, Alford would not have
the final say.
[Bartow, from D1]
paper, The Testimonial.
Gene Bartow went on to
become quite a story, leaving
UCLA to shepherd a nascent athletic department
at Alabama Birmingham for
18 years as coach and athletic director before being inducted into the National
Collegiate Basketball Hall of
Fame. Murry played for his
father before embarking on
a coaching career that has
spanned more than three
decades.
Murry has gone 328-264
during 19 seasons as the
head coach at Alabama
Birmingham, East Tennessee State and South Florida.
His teams have made the
NCAA tournament four
times but never advanced
past the first round.
Bartow was a graduate
assistant for two seasons
under Knight at Indiana,
where the Hoosiers won the
national championship in
1987 largely thanks to a
shooting guard named
Steve Alford. Bartow was
known to scribble his
thoughts in red notebooks
that he brought with him to
Westwood after Alford hired
him last spring as his lead
defensive assistant coach.
The Bruins rank No. 79 nationally in adjusted defensive efficiency, an improvement from No. 103 last season.
Bartow will now run all
aspects of a team that has
lost four consecutive games
going into its Pac-12 Conference opener against Stanford on Thursday night at
Pauley Pavilion. Bartow is
not expected to meet with
the media until Wednesday.
This is not the first time
Bartow has taken over a program in upheaval.
He was named interim
coach at South Florida in
January 2017 after a team
with no seniors and only seven available scholarship
players on some nights had
started 6-7 under coach Orlando Antigua. The Bulls
went 1-16 overall and 1-15 in
the American Athletic Conference
under
Bartow,
though two other losses
might have stung more.
The team inadvertently
left napping players Troy
Holston and Geno Thorpe
at a Houston airport terminal while boarding a connecting flight, leading to national
ridicule.
Bartow
called it “an unfortunate circumstance, for which I apologize.”
That wasn’t sufficient for
Holston’s mother, who criticized the way the team was
being run.
“It’s very disappointing,
and it’s a reflection of how
terrible a program the men’s
basketball program is,”
Monique Holston-Greene
told the Tampa Bay Times.
Bartow has said he’s
known he wanted to go into
coaching since he was 12 or 13
years old. He said in 2017 that
he learned how to be demanding but supportive
from his father and derived
much of his detail-oriented
nature from Knight.
UCLA players said before
the season that Bartow had
upped the team’s defensive
intensity several notches.
“When I’m not in a
stance, he gets at me,” guard
Prince Ali said in October.
“He’ll get in your face. …
[He’ll say], ‘You’re not doing
this very well, son.’ ”
ben.bolch@latimes.com
Twitter: @latbbolch
ben.bolch@latimes.com
Twitter: @latbbolch
Mark J. Terrill Associated Press
STEVE ALFORD , who in many ways was an uneasy fit at UCLA, increasingly blamed players for the team’s
shortcomings, saying they were unable to execute simple fundamentals he described as “seventh-grade stuff.”
Alford is fired by UCLA
[UCLA, from D1]
of the season, with fellow assistants Tyus Edney and
Duane Broussard remaining on the staff. Alford,
whose contract ran through
April 2021, will receive a $3.6million buyout from athletic
department-generated
funds plus the balance of his
salary for this season.
It was the first in-season
firing of a coach in the 100year history of a program
with a record 11 national
championships, though Jim
Harrick was jettisoned only
two weeks before the start of
the 1996-97 season over lies
involving an expense report
for a recruiting dinner.
Athletic director Dan
Guerrero said in a statement that he usually disliked the idea of making a
coaching change during the
season but felt it was imperative given the state of a
team with a 7-6 record after a
4-0 start.
“While Steve led us to
three Sweet 16 appearances,” Guerrero said, “we
simply have not been performing at a consistent level
and our struggles up to this
point in the season do not
bode well for the future.”
The school announced
that the search for Alford’s
successor would be led by
Guerrero, senior associate
athletic director Josh Rebholz, associate athletic director Chris Carlson and
Golden State Warriors general manager Bob Myers, a
member of the Bruins’ 1995
national title team.
Potential candidates to
replace the 54-year-old Alford could include the Oklahoma City Thunder’s Billy
Donovan, Virginia’s Tony
Bennett, Michigan’s John
Beilein, Gonzaga’s Mark
Few, North Carolina State’s
Kevin Keatts, Texas Christian’s Jamie Dixon, Texas
Tech’s Chris Beard, Cincinnati’s Mick Cronin, Wichita
State’s Gregg Marshall,
Utah’s Larry Krystkowiak
and former Chicago Bulls
coach Fred Hoiberg.
Bartow, 57, is the son of
the late Gene Bartow, who
had a 52-9 record in two seasons at UCLA as John Wooden’s successor. Alford hired
Bartow last spring to improve the Bruins’ defense,
which ranks No. 79 nationally in adjusted defensive efficiency.
Bartow took over as the
interim coach at South Flor-
ida during the 2016-17 season,
finishing 1-16 overall and 1-15
in American Athletic Conference play. He has a 328264 record overall in 19 seasons with stops at Alabama
Birmingham, East Tennessee State and South Florida.
His teams made four appearances in the NCAA
tournament, never advancing past the first round.
Alford finished at UCLA
with a 124-63 record in fiveplus seasons, with four trips
to the NCAA tournament
and three appearances in a
regional semifinal. But the
Bruins never won a Pac-12
regular-season
championship and backslid considerably after winning the
Pac-12 tournament title in
Alford’s first season.
“I’m extremely appreciative to everybody at UCLA
for what has been a tremendous run and the chance to
work with such special student-athletes and coaches,”
Alford said in a statement.
“While I wish we could have
had more success, my family
and I are so grateful for our
time in Westwood. We wish
this program nothing but
the best. I sincerely hope
that the UCLA community
will rally around this team,
its players and the coaching
staff as Pac-12 play begins.”
UCLA was a surprise pick
for the 2015 NCAA tournament with a No. 11 seeding
and needed a controversial
goaltending call and a second-round matchup against
14th-seeded Alabama Birmingham to reach a regional
semifinal.
The Bruins finished 15-17
in 2015-16, prompting Alford
to write a letter to fans saying he would give back a oneyear contract extension
while vowing to never allow
his defense to rank outside
the top 100 nationally. Fans
paid for a banner to be flown
over campus calling for Alford to be fired.
UCLA rebounded the
next season, finishing 31-5
behind the play of freshman
point guard Lonzo Ball and
a strong supporting cast,
though the Bruins lost to
Kentucky in an NCAA tournament regional semifinal.
That was followed by
more defensive struggles
last season, when the Bruins
scraped their way into the
NCAA tournament before
losing to St. Bonaventure in
a play-in game. Another
banner was flown over cam-
Murry Bartow’s
coaching record
Alabama Birmingham
(Six seasons)
Year
1996-97
1997-98
1998-99*
1999-00
2000-01
2001-02
W-L
18-14
21-12
20-12
14-14
17-14
13-17
Pct.
.563
.636
.625
.500
.548
.433
East Tennessee State
(12 seasons)
Year
2003-04*
2004-05
2005-06
2006-07
2007-08
2008-09*
2009-10*
2010-11
2011-12
2012-13
2013-14
2014-15
W-L
27-6
10-19
15-13
24-10
19-13
23-11
20-15
24-12
17-14
10-22
19-16
16-14
Pct.
.818
.345
.536
.706
.594
.676
.571
.667
.548
.313
.543
.533
South Florida
(One season)
Year
2016-17
W-L
1-16
Pct.
.059
*-made NCAA tournament
pus reading “Final Fours not
First Fours #FireAlford.”
The Bruins started this
season nationally ranked
but regressed after their
first four games, losing six of
their last nine games. Now
they will probably have to
win the Pac-12 tournament
just to qualify for the NCAA
tournament.
Alford recruited well,
regularly landing classes
ranked among the best in
the nation, but the free-flowing, fast-paced offense that
was his calling card usually
required an elite point guard
such as Ball or Kyle Anderson to run it effectively. The
Bruins have been stagnant
with their ball movement
this season, forcing jumpers
and failing to effectively
space the court, cut or
screen.
Alford also struggled to
develop players. UCLA’s inability this season to maximize a young roster stacked
with four- and five-star
recruits triggered criticism
from notable former alumni,
including Darrick Martin,
Andy Hill, Kris Johnson and
D10
T U E S DAY , JA N UA RY 1, 2 019
L AT I M E S . C O M / S P O RT S
THE DAY IN SPORTS
Former USC safety Bolden is reinstated
staff and wire reports
Former USC safety Bubba
Bolden has been reinstated to the
university, the school said in a
statement Monday afternoon.
The question now is whether
Bolden, who left USC in October
because of a 28-month university
suspension for an alleged violation
of the student code of conduct, will
enroll for spring classes at USC or
continue on his current path
toward transferring to another
school for the 2019 season.
“Because of recent state court
rulings changing the procedures
required during an investigation,
the office that oversees student
discipline at USC is reopening an
investigation involving Bubba
Bolden, a former safety on the football team,” the university statement said. “As a result, he will be
permitted to return to classes for
the spring semester if he so
chooses, pending the outcome of
the reopened investigation. Because the case involves student
disciplinary matters that are pro-
tected by privacy laws, USC is unable to provide additional details.”
Bolden earned a starting position in 2018 fall camp, but only days
before the season-opener, coach
Clay Helton announced Bolden
would not be available for the game
and said he could not provide more
details.
On Oct. 7, a day after USC officially removed Bolden from its roster, the sophomore from Las Vegas
posted an explanation to his Instagram account of what happened.
Bolden said there was not much of
an investigation to begin with.
Bolden said that USC’s office of
Student Judicial Affairs and Community Standards (SJACS) “believes that I am responsible for violating the student code of conduct
pertaining to underage drinking at
an off-campus party back in February 2018 wherein I participated in
mutual trash-talking with fellow
partygoers. As the vibe at the party
turned unfriendly, I left with several friends. Approximately nine
days afterward, the party hosts reported feeling threatened by me
that night, which sparked a USC
SJACS investigation.”
Bolden said that USC’s chief
threat assessment officer did not
find him to be a threat.
But, “USC’s Title IX Office declined to even open an investigation. I was not charged with any
criminal activity and several partygoers refuted the allegations.
SJACS sanctioned me with a 28month suspension based on the
projected graduation date of the
party hosts.”
His return to the team, if the
SJACS investigation were to go his
way, would be huge for a Trojans
secondary that loses cornerbacks
Iman Marshall, Ajene Harris,
Jonathan Lockett and Isaiah
Langley, and safety Marvell Tell
to graduation.
Bolden would likely start at
safety alongside Talanoa Hufanga
or Isaiah Pola-Mao.
— J. Brady McCollough
Mississippi hired Rich Rodriguez as offensive coordinator.
Rodriguez, 55, has been the
coach at West Virginia, Michigan
and Arizona.
Dodgers might land
big-ticket targets
[Dodgers, from D1]
was signing with the Dodgers, the internet decided.
Harper, of course, hasn’t signed
with anyone yet. Neither has Manny
Machado, the co-headliner of this
free-agent class. The Dodgers
reached out to Machado’s camp early
in free agency, but the two sides
haven’t engaged since, according to a
person with knowledge of the situation. Machado will sign elsewhere after recently completing a three-city
tour. But the Dodgers remain in contention for Harper.
Before this offseason, the assumption was a team would give Harper a
record-breaking 10-year deal. With
the Philadelphia Phillies and Chicago
White Sox willing to spend lavishly,
that remains conceivable. But the
line of teams willing to guarantee
Harper more than $325 million, the
total-value record Giancarlo Stanton
set with his 13-year contract, reportedly isn’t long. That has kept the window open for the Dodgers because for
Harper to land in Los Angeles, he and
agent Scott Boras would probably
have to accept a shorter contract.
The Puig-Kemp trade afforded
the Dodgers more financial wiggle
room while unclogging some of their
outfield glut. The Dodgers saved
around $14 million against baseball’s
$206-million competitive-balance tax
(CBT) line, dropping their projected
CBT payroll to approximately $24
million below the threshold, according to Cot’s Baseball Contracts,
which isn’t always 100% accurate but
is one of the best resources available
to the public. But $24 million per season isn’t enough to sign Harper. The
Dodgers would either have to surpass
$206 million or shave more salary to
avoid a tax penalty if they think Harper — a 26-year-old, six-time All-Star
and former MVP whose uneven production year to year confounds — is
worth the investment. But should the
penalty even concern Los Angeles?
By staying below the CBT line last
season after paying a tax bill the previous five years, the Dodgers reset
their next penalty to 20% on every dollar spent over the threshold up to $20
million. Surpassing the ceiling in consecutive years produces a 30% penalty. Three straight seasons and the tax
rate climbs to 50%. Teams that surpass the line by $20 million up to $40
million must also pay a 12% surtax.
The penalty grows to 42.5% if they exceed the threshold by more than $40
million and includes having the top
pick in the next draft drop 10 spots.
The Dodgers could sign Harper to
a contract this winter with an unprecedented average annual value of $40
million that would put them about
$15 million over the luxury-tax line for
2019 and in line for a $3-million penalty — less than half the amount they
sent to the Reds in last week’s trade —
based on their current commitments
listed by Cot’s Baseball Contracts.
The Dodgers treasure having the
flexibility to acquire veteran contributors during the season, but midseason additions usually don’t significantly increase CBT payrolls. They
could then have the penalty reset
again when their payroll plummets
for the 2020 season. Around $90 million is slated to come off the Dodgers’
CBT payroll next offseason (before
the 2020 season), when the threshold
jumps to $208 million.
For reference, the Boston Red Sox
and the Washington Nationals were
the only teams to exceed the CBT line
in 2018. The Red Sox, who soared
more than $40 million over the
threshold, paid approximately $12
million in taxes and had their top pick
in June’s draft plunge 10 places. They
won the World Series. The Nationals,
who have paid the tax the last two
seasons, were charged around $1.2
million. They didn’t advance to the
playoffs.
Even if Harper and the Dodgers
aren’t a match, Los Angeles could add
payroll to address other areas,
namely upgrading their starting rotation and filling their hole at catcher.
ODDS
NBA
Favorite
at CLIPPERS
at Toronto
at Milwaukee
at Denver
Portland
Line (O/U)
OFF (OFF)
31⁄2 (212)
101⁄2 (218)
14 (2171⁄2)
11⁄2 (230)
Underdog
Philadelphia
Utah
Detroit
New York
at Sacramento
Line
11
151⁄2
PK
121⁄2
Underdog
Notre Dame
Cal St.Northridge
Marquette
Cal St.Fullerton
Underdog
OFF KINGS
-133 at Chicago
OFF Philadelphia
OFF
+123
OFF
College Football
jorge.castillo@latimes.com
Twitter: @jorgecastillo
Coach Doug Pederson said
quarterback Nick Foles is “feeling
good” after suffering a chest injury
and will start when the Philadelphia Eagles take on the Chicago
Bears in an NFC wild-card game
Sunday.
Pederson said Nate Sudfeld is
the backup but couldn’t provide an
update on Carson Wentz’s back injury. He wouldn’t commit to starting Foles if the Eagles advance.
BASKETBALL
NBA — Fined Golden State forward Andre
Iguodala $25,000 for recklessly throwing the
game ball into the spectator stands during a Dec.
29 game at Portland.
Atlanta — Transferred forward Alex Poythress
from Erie (NBAGL).
Cleveland — Signed guard/forward Patrick
McCaw to a two-year contract.
FOOTBALL
Arizona — Fired coach Steve Wilks. Signed OL
Justin Evans, OL Will House, QB Charles Kanoff,
CB Jonathan Moxey, CB Deatrick Nichols, LB Pete
Robertson, OL Coleman Shelton and RB Brandon Wilds to reserve/future contracts.
Atlanta — Fired offensive coordinator Steve
Sarkasian, defensive coordinator Marquand Manuel and special teams coordinator Keith Armstrong.
Buffalo — Re-signed QB Derek Anderson to a
one-year contract.
Carolina — Signed RB Reggie Bonnafon, LB
Brandon Chubb, DB Cole Luke, DB Kai Nacua, DT
Elijah Qualls, G Ian Silberman, G Landon Turner,
WR DeAndrew White and LB Antwione Williams
to reserve/future contracts. Waived QB Garrett
Gilbert. Signed OT Isaiah Battle, DB Quin Blanding, DT Woodrow Hamilton and WR Andre Levrone.
Cincinnati — Fired coach Marvin Lewis.
Signed TE Moritz Bohringer, S Demetrious Cox, C
Brad Lundblade, TE Andrew Vollert and WR Kermit Whitfield to reserve/future contracts.
Denver — Fired coach Vance Joseph.
Detroit — Signed WR Deontez Alexander, LB
Garret Dooley, S David Jones, OL Jarron Jones
and DE Jonathan Wynn to reserve/future contracts.
Green Bay — Signed TE Evan Baylis, DL Eric
Cotton, OT Gerhard de Beer, G Anthony Coyle, FB
Malcolm Johnson, S Tray Matthews, WR Teo
Redding, LB Brady Sheldon, DL Deon Simon and
S Jason Thompson to reserve/future contracts.
Indianapolis — Signed S Rolan Milligan to the
practice squad and G William Poehls to a reserve/future contract.
Miami — Fired coach Adam Gase.
Oakland — Named Mike Mayock general
manager.
Tennessee — Announced the retirement of LB
Brian Orakpo. Signed RB Dalyn Dawkins, OL
Jamil Douglas, CB Mike Jordan, WR Roger Lewis,
LB Gimel President, OL David Quessenberry, WR
Kalif Raymond, WR Devin Ross and S Damon
Webb to reserve/future contracts.
HOCKEY
Kings — Recalled goalie Jack Campbell from
Ontario (AHL). Loaned goalie Cal Petersen to Ontario.
COLLEGE
UCLA — Fired men’s basketball coach Steve
Alford. Named Murry Bartow interim men’s
basketball coach.
Duke — Announced junior quarterback Daniel
Jones and junior LB Joe Giles-Harris will enter the
NFL draft.
Florida — Junior DE Jachai Polite announced
he will enter the NFL draft.
Mississippi — Named Rich Rodriguez offensive coordinator.
NHL
The Cleveland Indians are still reportedly engaged in talks for starters
Corey Kluber and Trevor Bauer, but
their need to discard salary has lessened after they traded Yonder
Alonso, Edwin Encarnacion and Yan
Gomes. Kluber, 32, is owed $17 million
next season and has club options for
the next two years for a combined
$35.5 million. Bauer turns 28 next
month and is under team control the
next two seasons.
Meanwhile, J.T. Realmuto, to the
bewilderment of many in the industry, is still a Miami Marlin. The Marlins’ price for the All-Star catcher remains steep, according to a person
with knowledge of the situation, but
the Marlins are expected to cash in
their final significant trade chip with
a couple of years of team control left.
Yasmani Grandal, who turned
down the Dodgers’ $17.9-million qualifying offer, remains a free agent after
declining a four-year, $60-million offer
from the New York Mets, according to
a person with knowledge of the situation. But a Los Angeles reunion with
the catcher is unlikely unless he is
willing to sign a short contract. If
Realmuto isn’t an option, the Dodgers, with catching prospects Will
Smith and Keibert Ruiz nearing the
majors, would prefer a one-year stopgap. Choices in that aisle include the
Pittsburgh
Pirates’
Francisco
Cervelli, who is entering the final year
of his contract, and free agent Martin
Maldonado.
Then there’s the Dodgers’ sudden
dearth of power right-handed bats after offloading Puig and Kemp. As it
stands, the Dodgers have six outfielders on their 40-man roster. Two, Enrique Hernandez and Chris Taylor,
are right-handed-hitting utility players. The other four, Cody Bellinger,
Joc Pederson, Andrew Toles and Alex
Verdugo, all hit left-handed. As do
Corey Seager and Max Muncy. Justin
Turner, David Freese and Austin
Barnes are the only other projected
contributors who bat right-handed.
If the Dodgers believe they need
another right-handed bat, Realmuto
would fill the void. They’ve reached
out to the Detroit Tigers about outfielder Nick Castellanos, but the initial asking price was Verdugo or Ruiz,
according to a person with knowledge
of the situation. Los Angeles has also
been linked to St. Louis Cardinals
first baseman Jose Martinez, who is
without a position after the Cardinals
acquired first baseman Paul Goldschmidt. Outfielder A.J. Pollock and
second baseman D.J. LeMahieu are
potent right-handed hitters still
available in free agency, as are utilityman Marwin Gonzalez and infielder
Jed Lowrie, who are switch-hitters.
Harper is a left-handed batter, but
that is irrelevant for a player of his caliber. He would play every day against
pitchers from both sides, and perhaps make Verdugo, a 22-year-old
with nothing left to prove in the minors, disposable in a trade to improve
in another area. With or without
Harper, the Dodgers’ offseason, already bustling with activity, promises
to include more moves.
Eagles to start Foles
in wild-card game
TRANSACTIONS
Favorite
at Las Vegas
Boston
at Nashville
headliner of this free-agent class.
ETC.
INTERNATIONAL FRIENDLY
South Korea 0, Saudi Arabia 0
Iran 2, Qatar 1
Favorite
at Virginia Tech
at San Diego
St.
at St. John’s
at Washington
Carolyn Kaster Associated Press
Georgia Tech coach Geoff
Collins announced the hiring of
Dave Patenaude as offensive coordinator and Andrew Thacker as
defensive coordinator.
The two worked with Collins at
Temple the last two seasons.
SOCCER
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
BRYCE HARPER is the co-
He replaces Phil Longo, who
left to take the same job at North
Carolina.
Favorite
Outback Bowl
Mississippi St
Citrus Bowl
Penn St
Fiesta Bowl
LSU
Rose Bowl
Ohio State
Sugar Bowl
Georgia
Line (O/U)
Underdog
7 (41)
Iowa
6 (47)
Kentucky
71⁄2 (58)
UCF
61⁄2 (57)
Washington
121⁄2 (58)
Texas
TENNIS
$1.195-MILLION QATAR OPEN
At Doha, Qatar
Surface: Hard-Outdoor
SINGLES (first round)—Fernando Verdasco,
Spain, def. Paolo Lorenzi, Italy, 6-3, 6-4. Roberto
Bautista Agut (7), Spain, def. Matteo Berrettini,
Italy, 6-1, 6-4. Nicolas Jarry, Chile, def. Robin
Haase, Netherlands, 6-7 (7), 6-4, 7-6 (4).
Tomas Berdych, Czech Republic, def. Phillip
Kohlschreiber, Germany, 6-4, 7-6 (5). Nikoloz
Basilashvili (5), Georgia, def. Albert Ramos-Vinolas, Spain, 6-1, 1-6, 6-1. Maxi Marterer, Germany, def. Peter Gojowczyk, Germany, 6-1, 6-4.
Andrey Rublev, Russia, def. Andreas Seppi, Italy,
7-5, 6-1.
DOUBLES (first round)—Marton Fucsovics,
Hungary, and Guido Pella, Argentina, def. Jamie
Murray, Britain, and Bruno Soares (2), Brazil,
6-3, 6-4.
The Buffalo Bills re-signed veteran quarterback Derek Anderson to a one-year contract in a
move reflecting the role he played
in mentoring rookie Josh Allen
through the final two-plus months
of the season.
The signing comes a day after
Buffalo closed the season with a 4217 win over Miami, in which Allen
had a career-best three touchdown
passes and ran for two.
Andre Iguodala of the Golden
State Warriors was fined $25,000 by
the NBA for heaving a ball into the
stands at the end of the first half of
a game in Portland on Saturday.
Iguodala immediately received
a technical foul for hurling the ball
deep into the end-zone seats.
Former Warriors swingman
Patrick McCaw is practicing with
the Cleveland Cavaliers, who
signed him to a two-year, $6-million offer sheet last week.
McCaw officially joined the
Cavaliers on Monday after Golden
State decided not to match Cleveland’s offer.
COLLEGE
BASKETBALL
COLLEGE
HOCKEY
MEN
AP TOP 25
No. 4 Virginia 100, Marshall 64
No. 7 Gonzaga 89, Cal State Bakersfield 57
SOUTHLAND
Pepperdine 100, Alabama A&M 64
EAST
Albany (NY) 79, Niagara 74
Creighton 79, Providence 68
Hartford 79, Boston College 78, OT
Md.-Eastern Shore 68, Chestnut Hill 62
Monmouth (NJ) 76, Penn 74, OT
NJIT 78, Duquesne 67
UMBC 98, Centenary (NJ) 48
SOUTH
South Carolina 97, North Greenville 46
Vanderbilt 90, UNC-Asheville 59
Virginia 100, Marshall 64
MIDWEST
Kent St. 71, Oberlin 48
SOUTHWEST
Sam Houston St. 84, Texas Lutheran 54
WEST
E. Washington 65, Idaho St. 55
Montana 89, Southern Utah 76
N. Arizona 74, Montana St. 68
N. Colorado 73, Portland St. 60
Weber St. 93, Idaho 87
WOMEN
AP TOP 25
Rutgers 73, No. 4 Maryland 65
No. 8 Baylor 98, UT Rio Grande Valley 37
Michigan 76, No. 12 Minnesota 60
No. 17 Gonzaga 79, Pepperdine 54
No. 20 Marquette 85, Creighton 67
No. 24 DePaul 88, Providence 62
EAST
Butler 59, Georgetown 50
Cornell 58, St. Bonaventure 44
Dartmouth 63, Binghamton 39
Md.-Eastern Shore 73, UMBC 67
Navy 49, Saint Joseph’s 48
Niagara 74, Colgate 69
Villanova 75, Xavier 71
SOUTH
George Mason 66, Coll. of Charleston 52
Penn 75, Stetson 53
VCU 97, Delaware St. 55
MIDWEST
Indiana 83, Penn State 75
Kent St. 92, Clarion 38
N. Illinois 109, Brown 102
Nebraska 78, Ohio St. 69
Northwestern 68, Illinois 45
Valparaiso 85, Indiana-Northwest 59
W. Michigan 75, Saginaw Valley State 51
Wisconsin 76, Purdue 69
SOUTHWEST
Texas A&M-CC 73, Cent. Arkansas 65
Texas State 89, Texas A&M International 25
WEST
BYU 67, San Francisco 59
Idaho 79, Weber St. 74
Loyola Marymount 76, Portland 58
Montana 79, S. Utah 57
Montana St. 80, N. Arizona 70
San Diego 57, Santa Clara 49
UC Riverside 79, CS Bakersfield 67
EAST
UConn 3, Yale 1
Colorado College 5, Merrimack 1
MIDWEST
Lake Superior St. 6, Michigan Tech 3
Omaha 4, Alaska Anchorage 0
Michigan 2, Michigan St. 2, OT
Notre Dame 4, Boston College 0
THIS DAY IN
SPORTS
1902 — Michigan beats Stanford 49-0 in the
first Rose Bowl. Neil Snow scores four touchdowns in a game that ends with eight minutes to
play. The Wolverines earned the nickname as the
“Point a Minute” team, having scored 501 points
in their ten games. The next Rose Bowl game
does not occur until 1916.
1934 — Columbia upsets Stanford 7-0 in the
Rose Bowl when Al Barabas scores in the third
quarter on a 17-yard hidden-ball play.
1935 — Bucknell beats Miami 26-0 in the first
Orange Bowl.
1935 — Tulane defeats Temple 20-14 in the
first Sugar Bowl. The Green Wave complete a
14-0 comeback when Temple defender Horace
Mowery tips a pass into the direction of Dick
Hardy, who takes it in to the end zone.
1961 — The Houston Oilers top the Los Angeles Chargers 24-16 to win the first AFL Championship.
1961 — Boston Bruins rookie Willie O'Ree, the
first black player in NHL history, scores his first
goal in a 3-2 win over the Montreal Canadiens at
Boston Garden.
1971 — Notre Dame ends Texas' 30-game
winning streak with a 24-11 win in the Cotton
Bowl.
1992 — Miami beats Nebraska 22-0 in the
Orange Bowl, the first shutout of the Cornhuskers
since 1973, and finishes with a 12-0 record.
1993 — No. 2 Alabama wins its first national
championship in 13 years and deprives Miami of
its fifth title, defeating the No. 1 Hurricanes 3413 in the Sugar Bowl.
2014 — Central Florida pulls off one of the
biggest upsets of the bowl season by outlasting
No. 6 Baylor 52-42 in the Fiesta Bowl. It's the
highest-scoring game in Fiesta Bowl history and
second-highest BCS bowl.
BOXING
FIGHT SCHEDULE
Jan. 11
At StageWorks of Louisiana, Shreveport
(SHO), Devin Haney vs. Xolisani Ndongeni, 10,
lightweights.
Jan. 13
At the Microsoft Theater, Los Angeles (FS1),
Jose Uzcategui vs. Caleb Plant, 12, for Uzcategui's IBF super middleweight title; Brandon
Figueroa vs. Moises Flores, 10, featherweights;
Ahmed Elbiali vs. Allan Green, 10, light heavyweights; Hugo Centeno Jr. vs. Juan De Angel, 10,
middleweights.
SANTA ANITA RESULTS
Fifth day of a 61-day thoroughbred meet.
1040-FIRST RACE. 1 mile turf. Claiming. 3-year-olds and up.
Claiming prices $25,000-$22,500. Purse $25,000.
P# Horse
Jockey
Win
Place
Show
10 Offshore
Rosario
6.00
3.60
3.00
6 All I Can Say
Quinonez
25.00 17.00
1 Hoover Tower
Bejarano
7.80
8 Also Ran: Friendly Steve, Hot American, Roaring Fork, Smokin B, Ayacara
(GB), Buck Duane, Gray Admiral, Platinum Equity.
8 Time: 22.33, 45.96, 1.10.55, 1.22.81, 1.35.22. Clear & Firm. Trainer:
Richard Baltas. Owner: Slam Dunk Racing, Nentwig, Michael and Baltas,
Richard.
8 Scratched: Bellerin, Camino de Estrella, Topgallant.
8 Exotics: $2 Roulette (BLACK) paid $2.20, $1 Exacta (10-6) paid $70.50,
10-Cent Superfecta (10-6-1-7) paid $595.60, 50-Cent Trifecta (10-6-1) paid
$302.80, $1 X-5 Super High Five (10-6-1-7-3) , X-5 Super High Five Carryover
$778.
1041-SECOND RACE. 7 furlongs. Maiden claiming. Fillies
and mares. 3-year-olds and up. Claiming price $16,000.
Purse $18,000.
P# Horse
Jockey
Win
Place
Show
8 Trappiza
Maldonado
10.60
4.60
3.00
7 Crackling Bread
Cruz
4.00
2.80
3 Second Fiddle
Baze
2.40
8 Also Ran: Heloise, Venice, Here’slookinatya, Tell My Fortune, Brite Rivers.
8 Time: 22.69, 45.98, 1.12.26, 1.25.59. Clear & Fast. Trainer: Michael
Pender. Owner: Pender Racing LLC, Roberts, Clint and Roberts, Tom R.
8 Scratched: none.
8 Exotics: $2 Roulette (BLACK) paid $5.20, $2 Daily Double (10-8) paid
$28.80, $1 Exacta (8-7) paid $17.10, 10-Cent Superfecta (8-7-3-5) paid
$18.96, $1 Super High Five (8-7-3-5-1) paid $2,405.30, 50-Cent Trifecta
(8-7-3) paid $28.35.
1042-THIRD RACE. 1 mile turf. Allowance. 3-year-olds and
up. Purse $67,000.
P# Horse
Jockey
Win
Place
Show
3 Brandothebartender Talamo
9.80
4.00
3.40
7 King Abner
Baze
4.20
3.40
4 Accountability
Rosario
3.20
8 Also Ran: He Will, Fashionably Fast, Start a Runnin, More Power to Him.
8 Time: 23.29, 47.47, 1.11.54, 1.23.37, 1.35.44. Clear & Firm. Trainer:
Craig Dollase. Owner: Flawless Racing, Flanagan, Brian and Jarvis, Michael.
8 Scratched: none.
8 Exotics: $2 Roulette (BLACK) paid $8.20, $2 Daily Double (8-3) paid
$48.80, $1 Exacta (3-7) paid $17.80, 10-Cent Superfecta (3-7-4-1) paid
$15.06, $1 Super High Five (3-7-4-1-5) paid $409.60, 50-Cent Trifecta (37-4) paid $35.50, 50-Cent Pick Three (10-8-3) paid $35.75.
1043-FOURTH RACE. 1 mile. Maiden special weight.
3-year-olds and up. Purse $55,000.
P# Horse
Jockey
Win
Place
Show
4 Route Six Six
Talamo
8.00
4.00
2.80
2 Justin’s Quest
Prat
3.00
2.10
6 Caribbean (AUS)
Smith
2.40
8 Also Ran: Aced, Holly Blame, Persuasive Cat.
8 Time: 23.67, 47.62, 1.11.80, 1.24.30, 1.37.26. Clear & Fast. Trainer:
Brian J. Koriner. Owner: Jay Em Ess Stable.
8 Scratched: Dawood.
8 Exotics: $2 Roulette (RED) paid $2.80, $2 Daily Double (3-4) paid
$45.20, $1 Exacta (4-2) paid $11.00, 10-Cent Superfecta (4-2-6-3) paid
$7.74, 50-Cent Trifecta (4-2-6) paid $16.45, 50-Cent Pick Three (8-3-4)
paid $58.80.
1044-FIFTH RACE. about 61⁄2 furlongs turf. Allowance.
3-year-olds and up. Purse $57,000.
P# Horse
Jockey
Win
Place
Show
3 Count Alexander
Franco
15.00
9.00
6.40
10 Jungle Warfare
Desormux
7.80
4.60
2 Paddock Pick
Pereira
5.80
8 Also Ran: Mesut, North County Guy, Luke’s On Fire, War Chest, Quick
Finish, Mantracker (IRE).
8 Time: 21.93, 44.58, 1.07.06, 1.13.09. Clear & Firm. Trainer: Vladimir
Cerin. Owner: Wilson, Holly and David.
8 Scratched: Montmartre.
8 Exotics: $2 Roulette (GREEN) paid $9.00, $2 Daily Double (4-3) paid
$105.00, $1 Exacta (3-10) paid $63.50, 10-Cent Superfecta (3-10-2-7) paid
$159.48, 50-Cent Trifecta (3-10-2) paid $200.75, $1 X-5 Super High Five
(3-10-2-7-9) , X-5 Super High Five Carryover $2,602, 50-Cent Pick Three
(3-4-3) paid $99.90, 50-Cent Pick Four (8-3-4-3) 274 tickets with 4 correct
paid $529.25, 50-Cent Pick Five (5/10/11/14-8-3-4-3) 278 tickets with 5
correct paid $1,881.95.
1045-SIXTH RACE. 6 furlongs. Starter allowance. Fillies.
2-year-olds. Claiming price $50,000. Purse $33,000.
P# Horse
Jockey
Win
Place
Show
5 Tiz a Master
Figueroa
31.80
8.60
5.40
4 Diosa
Bejarano
3.20
2.80
1 Be Lifted Up
Prat
5.40
8 Also Ran: Kate’s Princess, Sass Machine, Divine Dharma, Blew by You.
8 Time: 22.33, 45.53, 58.09, 1.11.45. Clear & Fast. Trainer: William E.
Morey. Owner: Hall, Greg and SAYJAY Racing, LLC.
8 Scratched: none.
8 Exotics: $2 Roulette (BLACK) paid $7.00, $2 Daily Double (3-5) paid
$295.40, $1 Exacta (5-4) paid $47.90, 10-Cent Superfecta (5-4-1-7) paid
$88.33, $1 Super High Five (5-4-1-7-3) paid $6,084.20, 50-Cent Trifecta
(5-4-1) paid $161.15, 50-Cent Pick Three (4-3-5) paid $229.65.
1046-SEVENTH RACE. 11⁄8 mile turf. Allowance. Fillies and
mares. 3-year-olds and up. Purse $57,000.
P# Horse
Jockey
Win
Place
Show
1 Tell Me More
Figueroa
9.20
5.00
3.40
5 Catoca
Smith
5.60
4.60
8 Mongolian Window Van Dyke
4.20
8 Also Ran: Super Patriot, Don’t Blame Judy, Tig Tog (IRE), Believe Indeed,
Screenshot, Dancing Belle, Katherine.
8 Time: 23.06, 47.51, 1.11.67, 1.36.37, 1.48.66. Clear & Firm. Trainer:
Peter Miller. Owner: Ballena Vista Farm.
8 Scratched: none.
8 Exotics: $2 Roulette (RED) paid $5.20, $2 Daily Double (5-1) paid
$167.20, $1 Exacta (1-5) paid $32.50, 10-Cent Superfecta (1-5-8-4) paid
$36.76, $1 Super High Five (1-5-8-4-7) paid $2,756.40, 50-Cent Trifecta
(1-5-8) paid $74.00, 50-Cent Pick Three (3-5-1) paid $190.35.
1047-EIGHTH RACE. 6 furlongs. Maiden claiming.
2-year-olds. Claiming prices $50,000-$40,000. Purse
$32,000.
P# Horse
Jockey
Win
Place
Show
10 Unleash the Tiger
Pereira
23.40 12.40
6.60
5 John’s Intuition
Fuentes
27.80 11.80
7 Starring John Wain Rosario
2.60
8 Also Ran: Handsome John, Scrappy Deville, Mulzoff, M C Burkey, Bob’s
Sniper, Calder Vale, C J My Boy, Jack’s Reign, Dual Account.
8 Time: 22.12, 45.74, 58.67, 1.11.89. Clear & Fast. Trainer: Jeffrey Metz.
Owner: Highlander Racing Stable.
8 Scratched: Blue Skye Jade, Loud Mouth.
8 Exotics: $2 Roulette (RED) paid $10.80, $2 Daily Double (1-10) paid
$82.00, $1 Exacta (10-5) paid $290.00, 10-Cent Superfecta (10-5-7-1) paid
$561.69, $1 Super High Five (10-5-7-1-9) , Super High Five Carryover $8,998,
50-Cent Trifecta (10-5-7) paid $485.30, $2 Consolation Double (1-12) paid
$7.20, 50-Cent Pick Three (5-1-10) paid $368.60, 50-Cent Consolation Pick
Three (5-1-12) paid $48.85, 50-Cent Pick Four (3-5-1-10) 371 tickets with 4
correct paid $1,167.35, 50-Cent Pick Five (4-3-5-1-10) 17 tickets with 5
correct paid $15,703.20, 20-Cent Pick Six Jackpot (3-4-3-5-1-10) 3 tickets
with 6 correct paid $48,909.24, Pick Six Jackpot Carryover $323,045.
ATTENDANCE / MUTUEL HANDLE
On-Track Attendance-7,346 Mutuel handle-$928,903
Inter-Track Attendance-N/A Mutuel handle-$1,562,687
Out of State Attendance-N/A Mutuel handle-$6,938,307
Total Attendance-7,346 Mutuel handle- $9,429,897
SANTA ANITA ENTRIES
Sixth day of a 61-day thoroughbred meet.
1048-FIRST RACE. (noon post) 1 mile turf. Starter
allowance. 4-year-olds and up. Purse $33,000.
PR
Horse (PP)
Jockey,Wt
Odds
8132 Blitzkrieg,2
J Talamo,124
5-2
7160 Jimmy Chila,5
J Rosario,122
3-1
(8022) Rumpus Cat,1
F Prat,124
7-2
8101 Acclimate,4
H Figueroa,X119
6-1
8042 Hard Fought,8
E Roman,124
6-1
8132 East Rand,6
D Van Dyke,122
8-1
....
Tigerbeach,7
G Franco,122
8-1
8132 Fortune of War (GB),3 M Pedroza,122
30-1
1049-SECOND RACE. 6 furlongs. Claiming. Fillies and
mares. 4-year-olds and up. Claiming prices
$25,000-$22,500. Purse $25,000.
PR
Horse (PP)
Jockey,Wt
Odds
8075 Kindred,1
M Gutierrez,124
5-2
9002 Jeweled,5
E Roman,122
3-1
8129 Smitten Kitten,7
T Pereira,124
3-1
(6051) Dannie Joe,2
H Figueroa,X119
4-1
5222 Winsinfashion,3
T Baze,124
6-1
4029 Proper Drink,6
G Franco,122
8-1
9017 Greater Glory,4
L Fuentes,XX115
20-1
1050-THIRD RACE. 1 mile. Claiming. Fillies and mares.
4-year-olds and up. Claiming prices $16,000-$14,000.
Purse $22,000.
PR
Horse (PP)
Jockey,Wt
Odds
8018 Bunny Yogurt,4
T Pereira,124
2-1
9041 Midnight Lilly,3
E Flores,122
5-2
9056 Carrie’s Success,1
G Franco,124
7-2
8094 Lea’s Reward,2
A Espinoza,X119
5-1
9041 Road Test,5
E Roman,122
6-1
(9017) Swallows Inn Gal,6
H Figueroa,X117
8-1
9049 Magicalchic,7
E Payeras,124
20-1
1051-FOURTH RACE. 6 furlongs. Maiden special weight.
4-year-olds and up. State bred. Purse $55,000.
PR
8006
8113
8006
Horse (PP)
Dubnation,2
Goldie’s Hills,3
Red Envelope,7
Jockey,Wt
H Figueroa,X119
E Payeras,124
D Van Dyke,124
Odds
5-2
3-1
3-1
2252
Coil to Strike,1
R Fuentes,124
5-1
3246 Sea’s Journey,6
G Franco,124
5-1
8068 Bouncing Around,4
T Baze,124
8-1
8106 Sidepocket Action,5 A Espinoza,X119
12-1
1052-FIFTH RACE. 1 mile turf. Maiden claiming. 3-year-olds.
Claiming prices $50,000-$40,000. Purse $32,000.
PR
8097
9048
6012
7205
8097
8004
8088
9060
....
8097
7196
....
Horse (PP)
Jockey,Wt
Odds
You Must Chill,9
M Gutierrez,122
7-2
Red Clem,5
G Franco,120
4-1
Tikkun Olam,8
F Prat,122
6-1
Zorich,3
J Talamo,122
6-1
Surprise Fashion,11 J Rosario,122
8-1
Montana Moon,6
R Fuentes,122
10-1
Diamond Blitz,12
D Sanchez,122
12-1
Hard to Come Home,7 O Vergara, Jr.,120
12-1
Blame It On Kitty,2
T Baze,122
15-1
Indy Jones,4
A Quinonez,122
15-1
Silent Musketier,1
E Payeras,120
15-1
Sir Andover,10
R Bejarano,122
15-1
Also Eligible
8047 Sea of Liberty,14
J Rosario,122
4-1
7205 Dyf,13
F Prat,122
5-1
1053-SIXTH RACE. 1 mile. Claiming. 4-year-olds and up.
Claiming prices $40,000-$35,000. Purse $38,000.
PR
Horse (PP)
Jockey,Wt
Odds
8069 Very Very Stella,5
A Delgadillo,122
8-5
8016 Ike Walker,3
J Rosario,124
5-2
9069 Avanti Bello,6
F Prat,122
7-2
9024 Sheer Flattery,1
H Figueroa,X117
4-1
(9012) Arch Prince,4
A Quinonez,122
5-1
9024 Upper Room,2
T Baze,120
20-1
1054-SEVENTH RACE. 61⁄2 furlongs. Allowance optional
claiming. 4-year-olds and up. Claiming price $62,500. Purse
$59,000.
PR
8135
(8067)
7181
(9007)
8135
8135
8135
Horse (PP)
Captain Scotty,5
Solid Wager,1
Threefiveindia,3
Microrithms,4
Lord Simba,7
Red Lightning,6
Apalachee Bay,2
Jockey,Wt
F Prat,122
D Van Dyke,124
J Rosario,124
E Roman,122
J Talamo,122
R Fuentes,122
H Figueroa,X119
Odds
5-2
3-1
7-2
4-1
5-1
8-1
15-1
1055-EIGHTH RACE. about 61⁄2 furlongs turf. Joe Hernandez
Stakes. 4-year-olds and up. Purse $100,000.
PR
Horse (PP)
Jockey,Wt
Odds
(7006) Stormy Liberal,3
D Van Dyke,124
8-5
7006 Conquest Tsunami,7 J Rosario,124
3-1
(8091) Caribou Club,8
J Talamo,124
4-1
8121 Calculator,2
F Prat,120
5-1
(7157) Law Abidin Citizen,5 T Pereira,122
6-1
8121 Cistron,1
T Baze,120
12-1
8015 Afleet Ascent,4
K Desormeaux,120
20-1
8125 Pubilius Syrus,6
G Franco,120
20-1
1056-NINTH RACE. 6 furlongs. Claiming. Fillies and mares.
4-year-olds and up. Claiming price $8,000. Purse $18,000.
PR
Horse (PP)
Jockey,Wt
Odds
(8098) Lucky Student,8
D Van Dyke,124
9-5
9022 Princess Kendra,4
A Delgadillo,122
5-2
9022 Hero for Hire,2
E Maldonado,122
6-1
8098 Sought More Pep,5
J Talamo,124
6-1
9065 Ciao Luna,3
E Flores,124
8-1
(9039) Eskenforadrink,1
A Cruz,122
8-1
9043 Tiger Mom,6
E Roman,124
10-1
9043 Forthenineteen,7
O Vergara, Jr.,122
30-1
9058 Lovely Linda,9
L Fuentes,XX115
30-1
1057-TENTH RACE. about 61⁄2 furlongs turf. Allowance
optional claiming. 3-year-olds. Claiming price $50,000.
State bred. Purse $57,000.
PR
Horse (PP)
Jockey,Wt
Odds
(8062) Teacher’s Treasure,2 E Payeras,122
7-2
8099 Takeo Squared,8
R Bejarano,122
5-1
7194 Listing,1
M Gutierrez,122
6-1
(9018) Scouted,7
J Talamo,122
6-1
....
Clem Labine,10
H Figueroa,X117
8-1
(7195) Irish Heatwave,4
A Espinoza,X117
8-1
8099 Sayin Grace,3
F Prat,122
8-1
9067 Feeling Strong,6
K Desormeaux,122
12-1
8033 Grab the Munny,11
J Rosario,120
12-1
(8107) Offshore Affair,12
T Baze,122
12-1
5281 Eighty Proof,9
M Pedroza,120
20-1
9067 Principe Carlo,5
L Fuentes,XX113
20-1
Also Eligible
7194 Whooping Jay,14
J Rosario,122
3-1
(7131) Just Hit Play,13
G Franco,122
15-1
LOS ANGELES TIMES
TUESDAY, JANUARY 1, 2019
Family Owned & Operated Since 1975
D11
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MPG
HWY
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238
MPG-E
HWY
0% 72
ON SEL
FOR
MOS.
EC T 201
8 MODE
LS
BUICK REGAL
PREFERRE
D
SAVE
8,715
$
21
,995
1
$
(082182)
LOW MILE PRIOR SERVICE LOANERS
LO
SAVE
$10,000
2.5L DOHC , 4 C Y L , 6 - SP E
32
MPG
HWY
OR L INE R
LEASE FOR ONLY
289
$
S , 3R D R
MO*
PLUS
TAX
(322418)
MPG!!
PICK A COLOR!!
ALL INN SSTTOOCCK W/
W/M
MSSRP $34,575
NEW 2018 GMC
SIERR A DE
26
NALI 1500 C
MPG
HWY
6.2L , V 8 , E CO T E C 3 , 8 -SP EED A U T O
MA
20” P OL ISHED A L UMINT IC, T R A IL ER P KG. W/ BR A
UM W HE E L S , UN
K
DERSE AT S E CON T ROL L ER , B
T OR A GE
E D L INE
MSRP.............................
MSRP
.............................$57,620
R,
MARK CHRIS DISC .......... $7,075
SALE PRICE ................. $50,545
FACTORY REBATE ..........
..........$6,550
GM FINANCIAL CASH*
CASH*....
....$1,000
AUTO SHOW BONUS CASH....
CASH ....$1,000
62,475
O W SE A
T
7 PASSENGER SE ATING + 26
* $ 0 down, plus tax. 36 months closed-end Lease on approved above averagec
redit through GM Financial.I
ncludes $3,500 rebat
Competitive or GM Lease in household. $0 Security deposit. $.25 per m
eand1,500
ile in excess of 12k miles p
er year.Total due a
tsigning $0.
$
1 AT THIS OFFER
2019 GMC A
CADIA SL
, A L L L E AT H
E
ER F L O
ED A U T OM AT IC
DOWN!
FIRST
$0 DUE!
$0 SECURITY
DEPOSIT $0
PAYMENT
MSRP .............................$78,475
MSRP.............................
$78,475
MARK CHRIS DISC ......... $9,000
SALE PRICE ..................
..................$69,475
$69,475
FACTORY REBATE ......... $5,500
GM FINANCIAL CASH*
CASH*....
....$1,500
$1,500
NET
COST
T
PKG.
AT THIS OFFER
STR
28
22
MSR P $
GMC
MARKN SLCE HRISTOPHALEL R
NEW
NET
COST
T
MPG
HWY
2018
NET COST
ludes $2,000 Rebate and
AI
MC TERRAR
G
8
CH INF O TAINMEN T
1
0
2
NEW L, 9-SPEED AUTOMATIC, ANTEILAOMCIKNGB, REKAERSCYASMTEEMR,ACOLOR TOU
1.5 L T URB
N I E NC E
*$995 down plus tax and drive offs. 36 M
Competitive or GM Lease loyalty in househonths closed-end lease on approved above aver
old. $0 Security deposit. $.
25 per milein excessage credit.Includes $3,000 facto
r
of12k miles per y
ear. Total due ayrebate and $500
tsigning $1,8
87.
MARK CHRIS DISC.....
DISC ..... $4,715
SALE PRICE ...............
...............$25,995
$25,995
FACTORY REBATES ..... $3,250
GM FINANCIAL CASH* ..$750
.. $750
d abov
6,050
year. Total due at signing $979.
end lease on approve
MSRP $2 plus drive-offs. 24 months closed- urity deposit. $.25 per mile in excess of 12,000 miles per
, p l us t a x ,
ehold*. $0 Sec
*$129 down petitive or GM Lease in hous
m
o
C
0
0
$1,5
+ C ON V E
2.0L , 4CYL TURBO, 9- S
PEED AU
INFOTAINMENT S TOMATIC, REMOTE ST
A
YSTEM W/NA
VIGATION RT, ALLOYS,
MSRP.......................
MSRP
....................... $30,710
5 AT THIS OFFER
33
GE R SE A
TIN
MO*
PLUS
TA X
MARK CHRISTOPHER BUICK
D
CORE PREFERRE
N
E
K
C
I
U
B
ISPL AY
K 8” COLOR TOUCH D
8-P
-PA SSEN
COMFORT
ONLY $995 DOWN
$
29
5)
MPG
HWY
G + 26 M
PG !
C H EV Y B
DC FAST CH A RGE
O
, DR I V E R C O N
L
T EV LT
F I DE NC E P K
G.,
NET COST
THIS OFFER
26
N EW 2019
1.5L T U R BO DOHC, 4CY L, 6-SPEED AU TOM ATIC, M Y LI N K COLOR TOUCH AUDIO
M I NG 16” A LU M I N U M W H EELS, R EA R CA M ER A & MOR E! ,
W/ BLU ETOOTH STR EA
$ 97 9 D O W N
279
27,995
$
NEW 2018 CHEV Y MALIBU LS AUTOMATIC
2019 ECUNIT, LOW EMISSIOTNISEPPKKGG.,
W
E
N R IC DR I V
BOW
BL ACK
S
SAVE
$6,250
T CO S T
2 AT THIS OFFER
MPG
HWY
OFFER
AT THIS
T HATCHBROATECCK
L
T
L
O
V
T IO N
Y
H EV
I N T E R IO R P
L EC T
1 . 5L E
5,500
ICE ............
......
FACTOR
Y R EBAT ........... $28,745
E ..................
.. $750
NE
23,995
29
MPG
HWY
3.6L V6, SI DI , V V
T, 9-SPEED A
UTOM ATIC
I N FOTA I N M ENT
, RE
, B LU E T O O T
H S T R E A M A R CA M E R A , C O
MSR P ......
I N G , 18 ” A
L
.....................
LU M I N U OR TOUCH
MARK C
M WHE
H R IS DIS ............... $34 ,245
ELS
C
................ $
S A L E PR
$
,
23
OR!!
NEW 2019
C H EV Y T
R AVERS
EL
EED AU TOM AT IC, POW ER L I FT GAT E , R E A R PA R K
A S SIST, BL I N D ZON E A L ERT
SAVE
$10,285
. $22 ,470
M WHE
T U R BO
........................
A LU M I N U
T, 4CY L
SR P ............ DISC ........... $3,225
M
1.4L V V TR EA MING, 16”
S
45
CH R IS
SAVE
$7,475
PICK A
COL
NET
COST
T
$
SAVE
AVE
$15,625
5,625
41,995
1 AT THIS OFFER
RE W CA B
(575807)
23
MPG
HWY
2131 Convention Center Way, Ontario, CA 91764
855-611-5212
CONVENIENTLY LOCATED
RIGHT ON THE 10 FWY. IN
ONTARIO
All vehicles subject to prior sale. All advertised prices exclude government fees and taxes, any finance charges, any dealer documentation preparation charge, any electronic filing charges and any
emission testing charge. Factory rebates in lieu of special finance offers. Must own or lease “99 or newer GM/non-GM vehicle in household. **RESIDENCY RESTRICTION APPLY. End of lease term disposition
fees: Chevy $395; GMC/Buick $495; Cadillac $595. All Lease drive-offs are calculated in San Bernardino County. *Must Finance thru GM Financial. Sale ends close of business on publication date.
LAA6042936-1
www.markchristopher.com
TUESDAY, JANUARY 1, 2019
LOS ANGELES TIMES
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THANK YOU FOR MAKING US THE
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#
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AT ROTOLO.COM
THIS SALE!!
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1
IN CALIFORNIA – 2017 – 5 YEARS IN A ROW!!
GM EMPLOYEE PRICING ON ALL 2018 MODELS!
NEW 2019 CHEVROLET
CRUZE LS
MSRP... .................................$22,405
ROTOLO DISCOUNT ..................$3,156
$19,249
SALE PRICE ............................
............................$19,249
FACTORY REBATE .................... $2,250
YOU SAVE
INCLUDING REBATES
6,406
MSRP... .................................. $24,450
ROTOLO DISCOUNT .................. $2,951
SALE PRICE ..............................$21,499
FACTORY REBATE ......................$3,000
GM FINANCIAL CASH* .................. $750
AUTO SHOW BONUS CASH** ........ $750
YOU SAVE
AUTOMATIC
7,451
$
NET COST
INC
INCLUDING
INCL
NC
NCL
REBATES
2 AT THIS NET COST
(191040/118070, 191093/119254)
NEW 2018 CHEVY MALIBU LS
AUTO SHOW BONUS CASH** ....$1,000
$
14,999
$
5,186
$
MSRP..........................................$20,185
ROTOLO DISCOUNT ....................... $3,686
SALE PRICE ..................................$16,499
FACTORY REBATE .......................... $1,500
AUTOMATIC
MATIC
NEW 2019 CHEVROLET TRAX
NET COST
YOU SAVE
NET COST
INCLUDING REBATE
15,999
$
16,999
$
1 AT THIS NET COST
2 AT THIS NET COST
(191304T/222111, 191305T/215600)
NEW 2019 CHEVROLET EQUINOX LS
YOU SAVE
6,996
$
MSRP... ..................................$26,995
ROTOLO DISCOUNT .................. $4,246
SALE PRICE .............................$22,749
FACTORY REBATE ........................ $500
DOWN PAYMENT ASSIST .......... $1,000
BONUS CASH............................$1,250
INCLUDING REBATES
(186361/226373)
*Must Finance with GM Financial.
NEW 2019 CHEVROLET TRAVERSE
VERSE LS
YOU SAVE
MSRP... ................................ $34,380
ROTOLO DISCOUNT ..................$5,631
SALE PRICE ............................$28,749
FACTORY REBATE ........................$750
6,381
$
NET COST
INCLUDING
INC
NC
REBATES
19,999
$
NET COST
27,999
$
1 AT THIS NET COST
2 AT THIS NET COST
(191456T/205753)
(191431T/567234, 191427T/567591)
NEW 2018 CHEVROLET
SILVERADO 1500 LT
CREW CAB
Financial
*Must Finance with GM Financial.
ALL STAR EDITION!
NET COST
YOU SAVE
31,999
$
12,966
$
INCLUDING REBATES
MSRP... .......................................$44,965
ROTOLO DISCOUNT ........................$5,716
SALE PRICE ..................................$39,249
FACTORY REBATE .......................... $5,750
GM FINANCIAL CASH* ................... $1,500
NEW 2019 CHEVROLET
TAHOE LS
2 AT THIS NET COST
(185637T/493625, 185622T/488054)
NET COST
YOU SAVE
8,256
$
INCLUDING REBATES
36,999
$
MSRP..........................................$45,255
ROTOLO DISCOUNT ....................... $5,256
SALE PRICE ..................................$39,999
FACTORY REBATE .......................... $1,500
DOWN PAYMENT ASSIST ............... $1,500
1 AT THIS NET COST
(190621T/164327)
Our Exceptional GM Certified Vehicles!!
‘18 CHEVY CRUZE LS SDN
‘17 CHEVY TRAX LS AWD
Black, 4 Cyl Turbo, Auto, A/C, P/W, P/L, My Link,
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GM Certified
SILVER, 4 CYL, AUTO, A/C, P/W, P/L, BLUETOOTH,
MYLINK, REAR CAMERA, LOW MILES,
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13,988
14,988
$
$
1 AT THIS PRICE (183790A/182808)
1 AT THIS PRICE (181966A/119838)
‘17 CHEVY EQUINOX LT SPORT UTIL
‘18 CHEVY MALIBU LT SDN
‘18 CHEVY COLORADO Z71 CREW CAB
BLACK, 4 CYL, AUTO, A/C, P/W, P/L, MP3 CD,
P/SEAT, ALLOYS
GM Certified
Silver, 4 Cyl Turbo, Auto, A/C, P/W, P/L, MyLink, Back Up Cam,
P/Seat, Alloy, Low Miles
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GRAY,V6,AUTO,A/C,NAVIGATION,MYLINK,BACKUPCAMERA,HEATEDSEATS,P/SEATS,
ALLOYS,ONLY2KMILES,BALANCEOF10YEAROR100,000 MILEPOWERTRAINWARRANTY
GM Certified
17,988
$
1 AT THIS PRICE (14815Y/1547704)
‘17 CHEVY CRUZE LS SEDAN
‘16 CHEVY CRUZE LT SDN
16,988
1 AT THIS PRICE (14818Y/207383)
$
‘14 CHEVY EQUINOX LS SPORT UTILITY
29,988
$
1 AT THIS PRICE (185143A/221122)
‘17 CHEVY CRUZE LT SDN
‘16 CHEVY MALIBU LT SEDAN
LT. BLUE, 4 CYL TURBO AUTO, P/W, P/L, AM/FM , BLUETOOTH, SILVER, 4 CYL, AUTO, A/C, P/W, P/L, MP3, BLUETOOTH, 4 CYL, AUTO, A/C, P/W, P/L MP3 CD, BLUETOOTH, P/SEAT, WHITE, 4 CYL, TURBO, AUTO, A/C, P/W, P/L, REAR
GRAY, 4CYL, TURBO, AUTO, A/C, P/W, P/L, P/SEAT, MY LINK,
BACK UP CAMERA, LOW MILES. GM CERTIFIED
REAR CAMERA, LOW MILES, GM CERTIFIED
ALLOYS, ONLY 42K MILES. GM CERTIFIED.
BLUETOOTH, BACK UP CAMERA, ALLOYS. GM CERTIFIED.
CAMERA, ALLOYS, LOW MILES, GM CERTIFIED
(185970A/226984)
(14801Y/302055)
(190360A/196035)
(184484A/249561)
(191049A/241809)
1 AT THIS $
1 AT THIS $
1 AT THIS $
1 AT THIS
1 AT THIS $
$
,
,
,
,
,
PRICE
PRICE
PRICE
PRICE
PRICE
11 988
‘17 CHEVY MALIBU LS SDN
13 988
‘18 CHEVY TRAX LT SPORT UTIL
14 988
‘16 CHEVY COLORADO LT CREW CAB
14 988
14 988
‘14 CHEVY TRAVERSE LTZ AWD SPORT UTIL. ‘15 CHEVY COLORADO Z71/4WD CREW CAB
SILVER, 4 CYL, AUTO, A/C, P/W, P/L, MYLINK, BACKUP
4 CYL, AUTO, A/C, P/W, P/L, MYLINK, BLUETOOTH, REAR
BLK, AUTO, A/C, P/W, P/L, P/SEAT, MYLINK, BLUETOOTH, WHITE DIAMOND, V6, AUTO, A/C, LEATHER, DUAL MOON ROOF, NAVIGATION, GRAY, V6, AUTO, A/C, NAVIGATION, HEATED SEATS, BACKUP CAMERA,
CAMERA, BLUETOOTH, LOW MILES, GM CERTIFIED
CAMERA, P/SEATS, ALLOYS, ONLY 8K MILES, GM CERTIFIED BACKUP CAMERA , ALLOYS, ONLY 12K MILES, GM CERTIFIED DVD, HOT & COLD SEATS, BACK UP CAMERA, LOW MILES. . GM CERTIFIED.
P/SEATS, TOW PKG, ALLOYS, ONLY 29K MILES, GM CERTIFIED
(185420A/185420A)
(190444A/602037)
(190275A/268416)
(185465A/362202)
(190045A/118289)
1 AT THIS $
1 AT THIS $
1 AT THIS $
$
1 AT THIS
1 AT THIS $
,
,
,
,
PRICE
PRICE
PRICE
,
PRICE
PRICE
15 988
15 988
24 988
24 988
29 988
MANAGER’S SPECIALS MANAGER’S SPECIALS MANAGER’S SPECIALS
‘17 CHEVY CRUZE LT SEDAN
‘15 JEEP COMPASS SPORT UTIL
‘14 CHEVY SILVERADO 1500 LT PU
‘16 CHEVY COLORADO LT CREW CAB
‘15 JEEP CHEROKEE TRAILHAWK 4WD SPORT UTIL
BLACK, 4CYL, TURBO, AUTO, AIR, P/W, P/L, BACK UP
GRAY, 4 CYL, AUTO, A/C, P/W, P/L, MP3 CD,
GRAY, AUTO, A/C, P/W, P/L, MP3 CD, BLUETOOTH, BACKUP
BLUE, V6, AUTO, A/C, P/W, P/L, P/SEATS, MYLINK, BLUETOOTH, DK GRAY, V6, AUTO, A/C, P/W, P/L, MP3 CD, NAV, BLUETOOTH,
CAMERA, ALLOYS ONLY 9K MILES (GM CERTIFIED)
ALLOYS, ONLY 28K MILES
BACKUP CAMERA, H/SEAT, ALLOYS, LOW LOW MILES
BACKUP CAMERA, TOW PKG, ALLOYS, ONLY 29K MILES
CAMERA, POWER SEAT, TOW PKG, ALLOYS (GM CERTIFIED)
(190583A/256118)
(190946A/589705)
(190630A/759287)
(183216A/210020)
(186007A/175736)
1 AT THIS
1 AT THIS $
1 AT THIS $
1 AT THIS $
1 AT THIS $
$
,
,
,
,
,
PRICE
PRICE
PRICE
PRICE
PRICE
14 988
14 988
20 988
23 988
24 988
VISIT WWW.ROTOLOCHEVY.COM TO SEE OUR ENTIRE INVENTORY
Fontana, 210 Freeway, Exit Sierra,
16666 S. Highland Avenue, Fontana, 92336
Open Daily 8:30am-10pm • Sunday 9-10pm
Service: Monday-Friday 7am-6pm • Sat 7am-5pm
Free Shuttle • Appointments Welcome,
Call 909-822-1111
San Gabriel Valley 210 FWY
57
FWY
15
10 FWY
Ontario
Rotolo
Chevy
215
FWY
Y
FW
San
Bernardino
LAA6040809-1
LAA6042969-1
8 6 6 -2 75 - 8 45 0
All advertised prices exclude government fees and taxes, any finance charges, any dealer documentation/preparation charges, any electronic filing charges and any emission testing charge. GM Factory
Rebates in lieu of special finance offers. **0% for 60 months on approved Tier 1 credit thru GM Financial. Tier A-2 or A-3 payment may be slightly higher. $18.88 per thousand financed. All vehicle
images are for illustration purposes only. OnStar and XM require subscription from GM after 90 days**. Southern California residency restrictions apply. Ad prices good 12/27/18 thru 1/02/19.
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D12
E
CALENDAR
T U E S D A Y , J A N U A R Y 1 , 2 0 1 9 :: L A T I M E S . C O M / C A L E N D A R
Big wit
comes
across
in tiny
designs
COUNTDOWN TO THE OSCARS
Sou Fujimoto uses
potato chips, staples
and sushi grass to craft
architectural models.
Screen Gems
A24
“HEREDITARY’S” scares hit home with a riveting Toni Collette.
JOHN CHO rides a roller coaster of emotions in “Searching.”
Netf lix
FIRST-TIMER Yalitza Aparicio is the glowing heart of “Roma.”
A24
ETHAN Hawke’s inner turmoil is palpable in “First Reformed.”
Worthy star turns
In the thick of Hollywood’s annual awards season, there are 17 performances from 2018 that have earned nominations for both a Golden Globe and SAG Award. That positions those fortunate few for almost inevitable Oscar attention when Academy Award nominations are announced Jan. 22. ¶ But there was even more brilliant work
this past year that didn’t land nominations from either of those groups. ¶ Though getting left out isn’t a kiss of
death (most recently Lesley Manville earned an Oscar nomination for “Phantom Thread” after being overlooked
for other honors), they don’t call them precursors for nothing. ¶ With that in mind, Times staff writers and
contributors are offering up 14 overlooked performances we’d most like to see enter the Oscar race. Film fans (and
voters), take note: If you haven’t seen these, you’re missing out.
Yalitza Aparicio | “Roma”
John Cho | “Searching”
Toni Collette | “Hereditary”
Alfonso Cuarón’s astonishing “Roma” is arguably the film of the year, and it wouldn’t be the
masterpiece that it is without its center of gravity, Cleo, portrayed with a quietly glowing luminescence by first-time actress Yalitza Aparicio.
Her empathy and care make Cleo the heart and
soul of the family, but it’s her personal journey
the film takes us on — her experiences of heartbreak, loss, grief and love. Aparicio is compulsively watchable as Cleo goes about her daily
routine, but the cracks in the veneer that reveal
her deepest emotions and her demonstrations
of solemn bravery are nothing short of riveting.
— Katie Walsh
In the groundbreaking thriller “Searching,”
John Cho’s work as David Kim, a single father
who desperately attempts to find his missing
daughter by tracing her digital footprint, is as refreshing as it is impressive. Because the film unfolds almost entirely on a computer screen, Cho
is often asked to convey a roller coaster of emotions using only his face. And his expertly nuanced performance should silence anyone who’s
ever questioned how expressive or magnetic
Asian actors can be on screen. The Spirit Awards
nominated Cho for his out-of-the-box star turn,
but this deserves even more recognition.
— Ashley Lee
Sleep on Toni Collette’s riveting work in the
supernatural horror film “Hereditary” and you’ll
miss the most shattering high-wire trick of the
year: a woman who is caught in the grinding
gears of filial love and resentment, an artist
grasping for understanding and control, and a
mother desperately trying to piece together a
gruesome puzzle from within the jigsaw walls of
her own family home. Writer-director Ari Aster’s
debut film closes in on its unsuspecting characters with masterful dread and menace, but it’s
the acutely human turns at its core that make
the devastating emotional horrors hit home.
Collette makes one of
[See Overlooked, E4]
She’s taking a stab at horror
Sophia Takal’s ‘New
Year, New You’ views
the sinister side of
social media fame.
By Sonaiya Kelley
At a time when women
are making strides in film
and television production,
the horror genre remains
primarily a boys’ club. Sophia Takal, Blumhouse’s first
female horror director, is
aiming to change that.
The former actress has
been directing well-received
female-led
psychological
thrillers since 2011’s “Green”
and made waves with “Always Shine” in 2016. Her
latest,
Hulu’s
reunion
thriller “New Year, New
You,” is streaming as the
first installment in Blumhouse Television’s “Into the
Dark” anthology series.
[See Takal, E4]
By Carolina A.
Miranda
Michael Nagle
THE HORROR GENRE has long been male-dominated, something that Sophia
Takal, director of Blumhouse Television’s “New Year, New You,” aims to change.
Few are the architectural
models that can be eaten
with onion dip. But then
again, few are the architects
who create experimental
models quite like Sou Fujimoto does.
The
Japanese-born
architect, now based in
France, is known for designing playful buildings that
draw their forms from nature, such as House NA in
Tokyo, completed in 2011,
whose delicate glass rooms
are staggered in space, evoking branches that radiate
from a tree.
Less known are the small,
architectural sketches he
crafts out of whatever happens to be in reach: binder
clips, staple strips, an old
headband, a crumpled dryer
sheet and even, yes, potato
chips — the last of which he
arranges in mounds and
peoples with architectural
figurines,
producing
a
rough, three-dimensional
sketch for what could be a
space-age band shell or outdoor pavilion.
About 100 of these whimsical models are on display
in an intriguing exhibition at
Japan House Los Angeles
through Sunday.
The show, “Futures of the
Future,” brings together
some of Fujimoto’s formal
architectural models from
built projects, such as the
stacked, pitched-roof forms
of his Tokyo Apartment
(made with Styrofoam in the
model) and the spiraling
passageways
of
the
Musashino Art University
library (crafted from wood).
It also contains dozens of his
joyfully unorthodox architectural thought experiments, all made from the detritus of everyday life.
“They are doodles,” said
Trast Howard, senior cura[See Fujimoto, E5]
A poetic cheer
for the new year
“Auld Lang Syne” is
nice, but here are
other poems to help
welcome 2019. E3
Comics ................... E6-7
TV grid ...................... E8
BEST OF THE YEAR | BOX SETS
This is music you
want to hold on to
It’s hard not to wonder
whether the increasingly
elaborate (and pricey) retrospective box sets appearing
these days represent the last
gasp of a dying industry of
music being sold in physical
form. Since peak plastic in
2001, CD sales have dropped
88%, from 712 million units to
85.4 million in 2017, according
to Nielsen Music.
But even as the industry
shifts to streaming music,
box sets offer labels and historians the chance to be curator, and that’s still valuable in
this everything-all-the-time
era. Thus, 2018 brought a
wealth of box sets that offer
fans everything they may
have wanted to know — and
then some — about individual albums or the entire careers of some of pop music’s
most important figures.
Here’s our highly selective
roundup of the best of the
year, as chosen by Times pop
music writers Randy Lewis
and Randall Roberts.
The Beatles
“The Beatles
(The White Album)”
(Apple Corps Ltd./Capitol/UMe)
The seven-disc, 50th anniversary, “super deluxe” edition ($159.98 on the Beatles’
official site) of the Fab Four’s
sprawling 1968 double album
serves up a genuine feast that
should keep fans new and old
nourished for weeks, months
or even years. In addition to
the vibrant yet historically respectful new stereo remix by
latter-day Beatles producer
Giles Martin, which highlights all the sonic richness,
[See Box sets, E3]
E2
TUESDAY, JANUARY 1, 2019
LOS ANGELES TIMES
“ THE BEST
PICTURE
OF THE YEAR.
Alfonso Cuarón’s masterpiece.
Breathtaking and life-giving.”
3 NEW YORK FILM CRITICS
CIRCLE AWARDS
2 LOS ANGELES FILM CRITICS
ASSOCIATION AWARDS
RICHARD LAWSON,
“ONE
OF THE BEST MOVIES
’VE EVER SEEN.
I
Yalitza Aparicio’s performance dominates
5 CHICAGO FILM CRITICS
ASSOCIATION AWARDS
3 SAN FRANCISCO FILM
CRITICS CIRCLE AWARDS
every moment she’s on screen.”
JOE MORGENSTERN,
4 WASHINGTON DC AREA
FILM CRITICS ASSOC. AWARDS
3 NEW YORK FILM CRITICS
ONLINE AWARDS
INCLUDING
WINNER
WINNER
BEST FILM
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T U E S DAY , JA N UA RY 1, 2 019
L AT I M E S . C O M / CA L E N DA R
E3
Box sets collect music
you want to hold on to
[Box sets, from E1]
rhythmic punch and vocal
nuance evident in the original tapes, the disc containing the long-bootlegged 27
Esher demos allows for close
inspection of the genesis of
most of the album’s songs,
while the 50 sessions recordings over two more CDs provide an illuminating look
into the evolution of so many
of these now-classic tracks.
The set also is available in
various less-pricey (and less
comprehensive) editions.
(Randy Lewis)
Tom Petty
“An American Treasure”
(Reprise).
Rhino Records
Alice Coltrane
ARETHA FRANKLIN’S ascendance to Queen of
“Spiritual Eternal:
The Complete Warner
Bros. Studio Recordings”
Soul is charted in a set of her early Atlantic albums.
(Real Gone).
If 2018 had you stressed,
Coltrane’s spiritual optimism might offer salve for
the coming year. This twoCD $19.98 set by the spiritual
jazz leader compiles three
newly remastered albums
that she released for Warner
Bros. from 1975-77. Featuring
the longtime Angeleno variously working on harp, Wurlitzer organ and analog synthesizer, the collection documents an artist seeking new
avenues in instrumental
worship music. (Randall
Roberts)
Liz Phair
“Girly-Sound to Guyville:
The 25th Anniversary
Box Set”
(Matador)
Real Gone
ALICE COLTRANE’S inspiring form of spiritual jazz
is revisited in a compilation of albums from 1975-77.
Creedence
Clearwater Revival
“The Studio Albums
Collection”
Eric Dolphy
“Musical Prophet: The
Expanded 1963 New York
Studio Sessions”
(Resonance)
Issued first as a limited
edition vinyl release, this
psyche-shattering triple LP
by the esteemed Los Angeles
jazz imprint Resonance presents previously unreleased
studio sessions by the expert saxophonist, clarinetist
and flutist, who died a year
after he made these recordings while performing in
Berlin. In the studio with
him were jazz players including Clifford Jordan, Woody
Shaw, Bobby Hutcherson,
Richard Davis and Charles
Moffett. They combine to
create propulsive, full band
energy. The set will come out
Jan. 25 as a three-CD box
($28.98). (R.R.)
Bob Dylan
“More Blood, More
Tracks: The Bootleg
Series, Vol. 14”
(Sony Legacy Recordings)
As the story goes, Dylan
was nearly done with this album, which was to consist of
intimate, nearly all-acoustic
recordings made in New
York of some of the sharpest
and most revealing songs
he’d ever committed to tape.But at the last minute —
surprise — he changed his
mind, booked more studio
time in Minneapolis and had
another go at several of the
songs. All the New York sessions are available with the
six-CD
deluxe
edition
($81.34), including anywhere
from half a dozen to 13 or 14
passes at these songs, plus
the final versions of the Minnesota sessions. (R.L.)
Aretha Franklin
“Atlantic Records 1960s
Collection”
(Atlantic, $89.99)
There’s never a bad time
to revisit Franklin’s work in
the ’60s that established her
as the undisputed Queen of
Soul. This set of half a dozen
LPs includes her first five
studio releases after she
switched from Columbia to
Atlantic and found her
R&B/soul groove. (R.L.)
Liz Phair on this set delivers repeated evidence of her
preternatural genius. Celebrating a quarter-century
since her great double album “Exile in Guyville,” the
seven LP ($89.99) or threeCD ($25.98) box presents a
newly mastered version of
those 18 songs, which still
sound fresh, but the real revelations are the lyrically raw
pre-“Exile” songs she released under the GirlySound moniker. (R.R.)
Elvis Presley
(Craft Recordings)
For all too brief a time,
the fiery quartet out of El
Cerrito, Calif., led by singer,
songwriter and lead guitarist John Fogerty, was, along
with the Band, the most
compelling American rock
group to emerge in the wake
of the Beach Boys. From
1968 through 1972, at a furious pace that rivaled the
Beatles, Creedence issued
seven albums jammed with
songs that often, and miraculously, injected stinging social commentary into irresistible hit singles that became radio hits. This updated $259 edition — all
seven albums were released
in a box just four years ago —
features remastered halfspeed mastered vinyl pressings. (R.L.)
This thoughtfully chosen
set — chiefly the work of his
widow, Dana, daughter
Adria and Heartbreakers
band members Mike Campbell and Benmont Tench —
digs deep into Petty’s archive of alternate takes of
their many hits, embryonic
versions of classic songs and
many songs never previously released to celebrate
his role as one of the great
songwriters of the rock era.
These 83 tracks spread
across four CDs (super
deluxe box, $149.99) or six
LPs ($149.98) make an extremely convincing case for
that accolade. (R.L.)
“ ’68 Comeback Special:
50th Anniversary Edition”
(Sony Legacy Recordings)
Rhino / WMG
JONI MITCHELL curated a selection of classics and
obscurities for a 2014 project now available on vinyl.
The Glands
“I Can See My House
From Here”
(New West).
In a just world, singer and
songwriter Ross Shapiro’s
rock band the Glands would
be adored outside of the
Athens, Ga., scene that supported them. Two decades
after the band’s debut,
“Double Thriller,” came out,
its three- and four-minute
songs remain sturdy and unweathered.
Shapiro, who died in 2016,
and
band
maneuvered
through Kinks- and Beatlesinspired structures, with
Shapiro’s distinctive wit and
thoughtful way with a lyric
leading the way. This box,
$89.98, also compiles the
band’s equally magnetic
eponymous follow-up and a
new record called “Double
Coda,” compiled from Shapiro’s never-issued but
nearly finished third album.
(R.R.)
Haruomi Hosono
Archival Reissue Series
(Light in the Attic)
Those who know about
the late-1970s Japanese electronic band Yellow Magic
Orchestra likely arrived at
the music through composer Ryuichi Sakamoto,
the group’s co-founder.
YMO’s
secret
weapon,
though, was multi-instrumentalist Hosono, whose
work across the 1970s and
’80s is the subject of this series of archival Japanese reissues, available individually
as a $14 CD or a $22 LP.
As evidenced by his 1973
album “Hosono House,” before joining with Sakamoto
he drew from rock and
Americana to craft sophisticated Paul McCartneyesque experimental pop.
As the decade passed,
Hosono’s attraction to synthesizers and electronics
became central to his
narrative, and he revels
in the potential both rhythmically and sonically.
(R.R.)
The Kinks
“The Kinks Are the Village
Green Preservation Society”
(Sanctuary)
Those who rightfully consider this album to be superior in most ways to the
Beatles’ “Sgt. Pepper’s
Lonely Hearts Club Band”
likely have ample versions of
this Brit-rock return-to-nature concept album.
This “super-deluxe” version at $157 is the king of
them all: 174 tracks on five
CDs, a double vinyl LP,
an LP of the Swedish mix of
the album, a trio of 7-inch
singles and various ephemera.
Also available in two-LP
vinyl configuration ($25.98),
two-CD set ($15.98) and single CD ($11.98). (R.R.)
John Lennon
“Imagine — The Ultimate
Collection”
(Apple Corps Ltd./Capitol/
UMe)
The second solo album
John Lennon released after
the Beatles officially disbanded in April 1970 is arguably his most beloved, containing as it does the iconic
title track. This six-disc box
set at $72 takes a rather freewheeling approach to reevaluating
the
album
through a new mix of the
original tracks by Paul
Hicks, along with alternate
takes of the 10 songs and an
inventive new surround mix
that places Lennon’s vocals
at the center of the room and
puts the listener at ground
zero of the recording studio.
(R.L.)
Joni Mitchell
“Love Has Many Faces:
A Quartet, A Ballet,
Waiting to Be Danced”
(Rhino/WMG)
The first vinyl issue of
Mitchell’s self-curated fourCD set from 2014 is heavy,
both literally and figuratively — and pricey at $175.
Born, as she describes in terrific, hilarious liner notes,
“like a phoenix rising from
the ashes of two dead projects — a ballet and a horrendously ill-conceived box
set,” this eight-LP beast is
divided into four acts, each
its own double-LP and gathered around Mitchell-organized themes.
Mitchell chose both classics and obscurities from
across her decades.
The vinyl on four of the
set’s 16 sides has been etched
in Mitchell-written cursive
and the pressings are clean
and dynamic.
(R.R.)
This NBC-TV special
could have been the last nail
in the coffin of Presley’s increasingly moribund career
as the ’60s wound to a close
— if his manager, Col. Tom
Parker, had gotten his original wish for the show to be a
holiday special à la Andy
Williams or Perry Como. Instead, thanks in large part to
the instincts of producer
and director Steve Binder,
Presley was freed from Parker’s tight leash to a large extent and viewers were reminded in no uncertain
terms just how feral a performer he once had been and
still could be. This sevendisc $149.98 set provides all
the audio and all the video
from the two performances
that were edited down to the
original 47-minute TV show.
(R.L.)
Various Artists
“At the Louisiana Hayride
Tonight”
(Bear Family)
Nashville’s Grand Ole
Opry has always been the
best-known venue for live
and broadcast performances by country, bluegrass,
folk, gospel and other roots
musicians, but the Louisiana Hayride was a rowdier,
more adventurous younger
sibling. Hank Williams, Elvis
Presley,
George
Jones,
Johnny Cash, June Carter,
Webb Pierce and dozens of
others complement their
studio recordings with frequently revelatory live performances on this 20-CD,
559-track and $205 box.
(R.L.)
Various Artists
“Battleground Korea
(Songs and Sounds of
America’s Forgotten
War)”
(Bear Family)
The obsessive Bear Family label in Germany earned
a Grammy nomination earlier this month for best historical album for this intriguing
and enlightening compilation, which brings together
songs and excerpts of newscasts documenting the U.S.’
involvement in Korea in the
late 1940s and early 1950s.
The music here is less a collection of hits than songs
that channeled the singers’
feelings about the conflict,
many of them from African
American blues musicians
and white country singers
from the South who disproportionately made up the
ranks of the armed forces.
Among the four-CD set’s 121
tracks, which retails for
about $117, are recordings by
Fats Domino, the Louvin
Brothers, B.B. King, Gene
Autry, Jean Shepard and
many others who never
achieved fame or fortune.
(R.L.)
randy.lewis@latimes.com
randall.roberts@latimes
.com
Bullit Marquez Associated Press
Some words
of wisdom to
greet new year
By Michael Schaub
Even if you’re one of the few people in the world who actually
understand what “Auld Lang Syne” means, you have to admit that Robert Burns’ traditional New Year’s poem is getting a little old. Luckily, there are other poems you can use to
pay tribute to the year that’s gone by and celebrate the potential of the one to come. Here are poems that will help you
say goodbye to 2018 and hello to 2019.
Dorianne Laux, “Blossom” — This was a challenging year
for some people, but in this poem, Laux suggests that we
come to terms with our wounds and take any opportunity we
can to move on:
Say goodbye to disaster. Shake hands
with the unknown, what becomes
of us once we’ve been torn apart
and returned to our future, naked
and small, sewn back together
scar by scar.
Evie Shockley, “on new year’s eve” — Shockley, a Pulitzer
Prize finalist for her collection “semiautomatic,” is one of the
country’s most accomplished poets. In this powerful poem,
she considers the resolutions and promises that we make at
the start of each new year:
... we cosset the space
of a fey hour, anxious gods molding our
hoped-for adams with this temporal clay:
each of us edacious for shining or
rash enough to think sacrifice will stay
this fugacious time ...
Joseph Brodsky, “1 January 1965” — The Russian-born
Brodsky was one of America’s greatest poets, serving as U.S.
poet laureate and winning the Nobel Prize in literature in
1987. In this poem, he urges those whose hearts have grown
bitter to embrace their lives as a gift:
It’s clear that you are now too old
to trust in good Saint Nick;
that it’s too late for miracles.
— But suddenly, lifting your eyes
to heaven’s light, you realize:
your life is a sheer gift.
W.S. Merwin, “To the New Year” — Author and environmental activist Merwin is possibly America’s greatest living
poet. In this poem, he offers a reflection on the importance of
keeping hope alive:
so this is the sound of you
here and now whether or not
anyone hears it this is
where we have come with our age
our knowledge such as it is
and our hopes such as they are
invisible before us
untouched and still possible
Charles Baudelaire, “Be Drunk” — We at The Times
strongly recommend you do not take life advice from Baudelaire, whose love of liquor and laudanum likely contributed
to his death at 46. But if you insist on finding a literary justification for your hair-of-the-dog New Year’s Day Bloody
Mary, you could do worse than the hedonistic Frenchman:
You have to be always drunk. That’s all there is to it
— it’s the only way. So as not to feel the horrible burden
of time that breaks your back and bends you to the
earth, you have to be continually drunk.
But on what? Wine, poetry or virtue, as you wish.
But be drunk.
calendar@latimes.com
QUICK TAKES
Spacey’s request denied
A Massachusetts judge has denied Kevin Spacey’s
request to skip his appearance in court on accusations that
he groped a young man.
The decision by Nantucket District Court Judge Thomas
Barrett on Monday means Spacey will have to attend his
Jan. 7 arraignment.
Spacey had argued he should be excused from appearing
because his presence would “amplify the negative publicity
already generated in connection with this case.” He’s
pleading not guilty.
The 59-year-old Oscar-winning actor is accused of
groping the 18-year-old man in a Nantucket restaurant in
2016. He is charged with felony indecent assault and battery.
— associated press
Louis C.K. jokes
spark backlash
Louis C.K. is back in hot
water after cracking jokes
about nonbinary youth and
survivors of the high school
shooting in Parkland, Fla.
The embattled comedian, who fell from grace last
year after a series of sexual
misconduct allegations were
levied against him, sparked
online outrage when leaked
audio from a recent standup comedy performance was
posted over the weekend.
According to TMZ, the
audio first appeared on
YouTube, noting that the set
took place on Dec. 16, though
it did not specify a location.
The clip has since been
removed, but former “Jimmy
Kimmel Live” writer Jack Allison shared a particularly
coarse snippet on Twitter on
Sunday that highlighted
some of C.K.’s offending remarks. (Allison also got heat
for posting the bit.)
“I’m a little disappointed
in the younger generation,”
C.K. said, explaining that today’s youth should be up to
no good and getting high.
The Emmy Award winner
then skewered them, calling
them boring and too politically correct, and mocked
those who prefer to be addressed in gender-neutral
ways.
— Nardine Saad
E4
T U E S DAY , JA N UA RY 1, 2 019
L AT I M E S . C O M / CA L E N DA R
A look at other Oscar-worthy turns
[Overlooked, from E1]
2018’s most difficult roles
look easy.
— Jen Yamato
Elizabeth Debicki |
“Widows”
Three women evolve
from unassuming wives to
hardened criminals in Steve
McQueen’s heist thriller
“Widows,” a film that boasts
a fully stacked ensemble led
by the indomitable Viola
Davis (also inexplicably
overlooked this awards season). But it’s Australian actress Elizabeth Debicki who
often shines brightest as Alice, a seemingly superficial
young working-class woman
who’d previously been under
the thumb of her harsh
mother and abusive husband. Thanks to a minute attention to detail (that Polish
accent!) and Debicki’s ability to convey an entire range
of emotions in a single look,
Alice steals the show despite
the cast’s endlessly crafty
competition.
— Sonaiya Kelley
Kathryn Hahn |
“Private Life”
and Regina Hall |
“Support the Girls”
Playing average, everyday people doesn’t often
bring accolades, but if ever
two actresses deserved to be
recognized for just that it’s
Kathryn Hahn in “Private
Life” and Regina Hall in
“Support the Girls.” Messy
and raw, Hahn plays a woman dealing with infertility issues who will try anything —
be it adoption, surrogacy or
IVF. (She and her husband
are labeled “fertility junkies”
in writer-director Tamara
Jenkins’ sharp script.) Hahn
vividly captures the out-ofcontrol feelings of someone
put in a position to reassess
her marriage, her career, her
desires, her feminism and
herself. And “Private Life”
brings heart and humor to a
story of finding the strength
to continue. Meanwhile,
Hall’s Lisa, the manager of a
Hooters-like restaurant, is
having one of those days
where everything seems to
go wrong all at once. Navigating the demands of an insensitive owner and the
needs of a coterie of irrepressible waitresses, Lisa is
just trying to keep everything working. With graceful
sensitivity, Hall finds both
the comic notes and emotional core in the struggle to
hold on to a sense of self as
the world swirls around
her.
— Mark Olsen
“Fruitvale Station” and
“Creed” star Michael B. Jordan to play the villain. As
shrewd as he is angry, Jordan’s Erik Killmonger is a
different kind of bad guy:
one whose tragic origin
story and well-argued motivations make him at times
more sympathetic than the
stodgier, stingier hero. The
actor brings real passion to
the character of this outcast,
who has a dangerous but
fiercely logical vision for his
native land. He makes sure
that the debate that animates “Black Panther” isn’t
one-sided.
— Noel Murray
Ethan Hawke |
“First Reformed”
Ethan
Hawke’s
restrained and devastating
performance as a spiritually
adrift pastor dominates
every frame of writer-director Paul Schrader’s “First
Reformed.” A former military chaplain whose son
was killed in Iraq, the Rev.
Ernst Toller (Hawke) is
haunted by loss and searching for redemption. His
inner turmoil matches a
world degraded by pollution
and climate change. Pale
and gaunt — as if every
movement, thought and
prayer werer freighted with
pain — Hawke delivers an indelible portrait of isolation
and suffering. It is the finest
work of his career, ideally
suited to Schrader’s vision of
the enduring battle between
the sacred and profane.
— Jeffrey Fleishman
Kelly Macdonald |
“Puzzle”
Magnolia Pictures
REGINA Hall is a funny force in “Support the Girls.”
Russell Hornsby |
“The Hate U Give”
After witnessing a white
police officer shoot her unarmed
black
friend,
Amandla Stenberg’s teenage protagonist at the center of “The Hate U Give”
seeks comfort in her father.
As played with boundless
sensitivity
by
Russell
Hornsby, the ex-con-turnedfamily-man gently steers his
daughter through the complicated emotions she’s
struggling with in the wake
of the racially charged crime.
Hornsby, who studied at the
British Academy of Dramatic Arts and has spent the
majority of his career working on television, finds the
role that deserves to make
him a star: the dad you can’t
help but wish would adopt
you, instilling you with both
confidence and grit while
still loving you with abandon.
— Amy Kaufman
Brady Jandreau |
“The Rider”
It would be easy to say
that Brady Jandreau was
simply playing himself in
Some actors “act,” emphasizing performance over
empathy, while others, in
some extraordinary way,
simply become other people,
disappearing
completely
into the widest variety of
roles. Kelly Macdonald is
one of the best of those, and
in “Puzzle” she shows us
what she can do on a bigger
stage. The Scottish performer has shined in supporting work in everything
from “Trainspotting” to “No
Country for Old Men,” but
“Puzzle” is her first starring
role, and she takes on the
part of a housewife discovering unlooked-for aspects of
herself in a way that manages to be both delicate and
deeply felt.
— Kenneth Turan
Jesse Plemons |
“Game Night”
Sony Pictures Classics
BRADY Jandreau gives authenticity to “The Rider.”
Chloe Zhao’s lyrical, meditative drama “The Rider.” After all, like his character —
also named Brady — Jandreau is a former bronco
rider who suffered a nearly
fatal head injury during a
rodeo competition. But that
wouldn’t do justice to the
subtlety and quiet magnetism that the first-time actor
brings to the screen. As he
wrestles with the pain of no
longer being able to do the
one thing he loves above
everything, Jandreau creates an authentic and moving portrait of masculinity in
crisis and a way of life that is
fading away.
— Josh Rottenberg
Michael B. Jordan |
“Black Panther”
Of all the smart choices
director Ryan Coogler made
with his stylish, politically
charged Marvel movie, his
best idea was hiring his
Oscar voters love broken
characters. Maybe they’re
grieving the loss of a loved
one (Natalie Portman in
“Jackie”), the abandonment
of principle (Bryan Cranston in “Trumbo”) or the
death of jazz (Ryan Gosling
in “La La Land”). The reason isn’t important. What
matters is we feel their pain.
So why isn’t Jesse Plemons
getting any awards season
plaudits for his brokenhearted next-door neighbor
in “Game Night”? Yes, that’s
a
rhetorical
question.
“Game Night” being a comedy almost disqualifies Plemons from the get-go, despite the fact that his creepy,
dead-eyed, brilliantly awkward turn is a stone-cold
master class in comic timing
and character work. So, OK,
ignore him. Paul Thomas
Anderson, Martin Scorsese
and Steven Spielberg have
all cast Plemons in recent
films. They know what
they’re doing, even if voters
don’t.
— Glenn Whipp
Michelle Yeoh |
“Crazy Rich
Asians”
Constance Wu’s sparkling star turn is the relatable core at the heart of
what was arguably the year’s
biggest sleeper hit, “Crazy
Rich Asians,” but her journey to self-discovery and
true love wouldn’t be
anything without a formidable rival to challenge a
particularly Western worldview. That’s where Michelle
Yeoh’s Eleanor Young steps
in and leaves an effortlessly
elegant stamp on the picture. Eleanor is very, very
rich. She’s also anything
but crazy. Best known for
her action work — and already robbed of an Oscar
nomination once in her career for 2000’s celebrated
“Crouching Tiger, Hidden
Dragon” — Yeoh keeps her
physicality restrained and
instead lets every steelyeyed gaze, every withering
observation and even her
mere presence in a room register Eleanor’s immense intimidation factor. A potential mother-in-law from hell?
In Yeoh’s hands, it’s never
that simple.
— Geoff Berkshire
Steven Yeun |
“Burning”
A young man of leisure,
maddeningly polite yet
shockingly devoid of empathy, Ben must be one of the
year’s most insufferable
screen characters. But as
played by the hypnotically
unnerving Steven Yeun
(who won the Los Angeles
Film Critics Assn.’s supporting actor prize), he is also
one of the most mysterious
and magnetic. Is Ben an arsonist? A serial killer? A runof-the-mill sociopath? Yeun,
doing more with a yawn or a
chuckle than some actors
manage with an entire performance, keeps every option in play. He incarnates a
void and makes it impossible to look away.
— Justin Chang
She’s taking a stab at the horror genre
[Takal, from E1]
The feature-length episode, which premiered Friday, follows four high school
friends, including a popular
social media influencer
dubbed Get Well Danielle
(Carly Chaikin of “Mr. Robot”). They must reckon
with sins of the past after a
New Year’s Eve celebration
turns deadly. Suki Waterhouse (“Assassination Nation”), Kirby Howell-Baptiste (“Killing Eve”) and Melissa Bergland also star.
“There’s nothing the
same about any of the movies [in ‘Into the Dark’], except that they’re holiday
horror movies,” Takal said
by phone from New York.
“It’s a fun concept. Christmas and Halloween are classic horror movie holidays,
but so many others would be
fun.” Blumhouse contacted
Takal to direct the New
Year’s Eve episode.
“Usually, when I come up
with an idea, I’m going
through some big emotional
thing,” she said. “I’m struggling with something that I
want to work through my
art. But with this, I had to
do something that someone
else was thinking about and
find my way into it. It felt a
little bit like working from
the outside in.”
By focusing on a reunion
among friends at differing
levels of success, Takal explored themes of female jealousy and resentment, a
through-line of her previous
work.
“I really related to the
idea of people regretting
how they’ve lived their lives
and having a quarter-life crisis. All the themes around
the New Year’s Eve backdrop were exciting and relatable to me,” she said.
The Times talked with
Takal about social media,
working with Blumhouse
and bringing the female gaze
to horror films.
You seem especially interested in the dark side of
social media influencers.
What was the inspiration?
I gravitated toward this
actress on traditionally
male-dominated sets definitely informs not only the
way I interact with actors
but the way I choose to
shoot. The male gaze definitely influences the way we
choose to frame women
on-screen, how we shoot
them and the stories we are
comfortable telling about
women. People shy away
from telling stories about
flawed women. There’s an
idea that female characters
have to be likable. ... I feel
more comfortable with
showing the nastier sides of
[our experiences] and don’t
feel the need to show perfection on-screen. I’d say that’s
what I bring to it as myself,
who happens to be a woman.
Richard Foreman Hulu
SUKI WATERHOUSE stars in “New Year, New You,” a thriller in which friends must reckon with past sins.
idea that social media can
be psychologically damaging. People compare themselves to these curated
images that social media
celebrities put out, in particular this “self-care, selflove” way of thinking. I think
self-care is really important,
but when it’s taken to the
extreme, it can cause people
to be pretty narcissistic.
This is about exploring that.
What was your experience
like with Blumhouse?
Jason Blum recently had
some blowback for saying
that women are less inclined to direct horror than
men, and he apologized.
I’d shot this by the time
that came out ... I didn’t
experience any sexism. . I
was supported throughout
the process. I also love the
movies Blumhouse makes.
“Get Out” is one of my favorite horror movies, and I
think they do a great job of
finding different voices to
tell different stories.
Is there something about
horror that’s pushed female filmmakers away?
I can’t speak for anyone
but myself. I think there is a
strain of horror movies that
is a little misogynistic.
There’s another strain
where the women are the
heroes and really powerful.
But there are certain pockets of horror that I think can
be a little bit… I don’t know.
I think something that’s
really exciting for me is that
in the past it has been maledominated — like much of
movies in general — and so
it feels like it’s an opportunity for me to put out a new
point of view or to show a
new way of thinking about
things within this genre.
Do you think studios’ interest in hiring female filmmakers and directors of
color is more of a gimmick?
This experience was
pretty illuminating to me in
that I didn’t feel like I was
just being hired because I
was a woman. I felt they
were really interested in how
a woman would tell this
particular story.
My own opinion is like,
“Whatever it takes to get us
in the door.” I think it’s OK
for people that are aware
that they have had blind
spots [to acknowledge] that
men, especially white men,
have gotten the majority of
jobs in film for so long, so it’s
OK to make a concerted
effort to open the door to
new types of filmmakers. I
don’t feel like it’s gimmicky. I
kind of feel like if I looked at
it that way, it would be loselose. Because either they
won’t do it at all or if they do,
they’re doing it for the
wrong reasons.
What do you think a female
director brings to horror
that a man doesn’t or
can’t?
I’m a particular woman,
and I bring what I bring to it.
Another woman might
bring a totally different
thing to the table in the
same way that different men
bring different things to the
table. What I bring to the
table comes from the fact
that I was an actress before
I started directing. One of
the things that drew me
more to direct as opposed to
focus on acting was that
sometimes being on set I felt
a little bit like a man’s puppet. I did one movie where I
had to get naked, and I
walked away from the process feeling a bit like, “All they
wanted was for me to show
my boobs.” They didn’t
really care about the artistic
side of things or what I
thought would be creatively
interesting.
My experience as an
Psychological themes
about women dealing with
envy and resentment recur
in your work.
[Women are] very, very
cutthroat. But because [we
are] taught that being aggressive is unattractive and
unfeminine, the ways in
which we compete with one
another is so subtextual and
psychological. I’ve experienced it a lot on both sides
as someone who’s been
teased a lot and also as
someone who was competitive and totally felt like there
wasn’t enough to go around.
I feel like it’s changing a
little bit, but I don’t know if
it’s because I’m getting
older or because ... as a
society women are being
really supportive of one
another right now. I think
both are happening, but for
a long time in the past there
was a scarcity mentality —
[that] there wasn’t enough
to go around for all the
women in the world. [Now]
I’m definitely feeling a lot of
support among other female filmmakers. I hope
that’s the direction we go in,
continuing to be more and
more supportive of one
another, rather than being
pitted against one another.
sonaiya.kelley
@latimes.com
T U E S DAY , JA N UA RY 1, 2 019
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INSPIRED BY A TRUE STORY OF
RUTH BADER GINSBURG
Photographs by
Ryan Miller Japan House Los Angeles
SOU FUJIMOTO is celebrating his first solo exhibition in North America, now at Japan House Los Angeles.
A big wit in tiny designs
[Fujimoto, from E1]
tor at Japan House Los Angeles. “He is trying to get
people to be sensitive to
architecture. That is his
premise: to be inquisitive
and to look at his surroundings as inspiration for future
work.”
Collectively, the experimental models — part of a
series dubbed “Architecture
Is Everywhere” — represent
a dexterous ability with materials. In Fujimoto’s hands,
a gray dishwashing sponge
becomes the facade of a
tower, an overturned glass
ashtray is a rudimentary
cave and the bright plastic
grass that dresses up trays
of take-out sushi is transformed into a miniature
landscape.
“That
whimsicality
comes from his sense of humor,” said Howard, “but also
this sensitivity to the end
user, designing something in
a way that humans find enjoyable.”
Each of Fujimoto’s models is accompanied by a
short text, a sort of architectural note-to-self that reflects on the nature of the
forms or the materials. In
the plastic sushi grass, he
observes an “artificial thing
that imitates green might as
well open the door to a new
possibility of green.”
Of the chips, he notes: “It
should be possible to make
architecture like hills.” (No
architecture, however experimental, can exist without koan-like pronouncement.)
Born in Hokkaido in 1971,
Fujimoto creates designs
that are as much experiments inspired by nature as
they are architectural provocations.
His first major project, in
2006, was a children’s psychiatric hospital in Hokkaido
that eschewed the typical institutional profile. Instead,
Fujimoto constructed an array of simple boxes strewn
on a hillside that resembled
a miniature city. These he
connected with a series of
passageways, creating a network of public and private
spaces for doctors and patients — some of which faced
the greenery outdoors.
“It was important to
think about how I could create a comfortable residential environment,” he later
said of that project. “It was
really more like making a
“I T W I L L L E A V E Y O U
CHEERING”
- SANDY SCHAEFER, SCREEN RANT
“GUARANTEED TO BE A CROWDPLEASER”
- ERIK ANDERSON, AWARDSWATCH
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ENGAGING”
ENTERTAINING”
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- TIM GRIERSON,
SCREEN DAILY
“ARCHITECTURE Is Everywhere No. 132” is a tiny structure made of staples.
tured a warren of climbing
and gathering spaces.
The installation, wrote
critic Oliver Wainwright in
the Guardian, seemed to reveal “an invisible geometric
order of which the whole
world is made.” It also had
moments in which it seemed
to dissolve into the surroundings. “On an overcast
day,” noted Wainwright, “it’s
hard to tell where it ends.”
Currently, the architect is
at work on an apartment
tower
in
Montpellier,
France. L’Arbre Blanc, or
White Tree, as the project is
titled, is an asymmetrical
structure that features a series of cantilevered balconies that evoke the scales
of a pine cone. The project,
said Howard, shows how
“Fujimoto’s designs tend to
transform as you walk
through a room and see it
from different angles.”
The exhibition makes no
visual distinction between
models from the architect’s
built projects and the experimental pieces. In a way,
they are all thought experiments — observations of
space that function equally
well as wry sculpture. A door
handle is transformed into
shelter. A piece of netting is
made into a see-through
cave. A crumpled tissue
bears the text, “Is this architecture?”
Perhaps. One day it could
be.
THIS MODEL for a house of overlapping spherical
voids in Caldes de Malavella, Spain, is made of foam.
‘Sou Fujimoto:
Futures
of the Future’
Where: Japan House Los
Angeles, Hollywood &
Highland Center, Level 2,
6801 Hollywood Blvd.,
Hollywood
When: Through Sunday
Info: japanhouse.jp
house than a hospital.”
And, indeed, it is his
houses that have helped
raise his architectural profile. That same year, he created a wooden “house” in
Kumamoto out of a series of
artfully arranged beams
that created a series of
stacked crevices for contemplation. (Think architectural folly meets Jenga.) Two
years later, in nearby Oita,
he built House N, a veritable
nesting doll of geometric
forms: a box within a box
within a box that contained
a garden in the outer band
and a house at the core.
In 2011, came House NA in
Tokyo, with its hovering
glass boxes. In that building,
said Howard, “the floor becomes furniture in some
spaces.” It is “open to a diversity of use.”
In 2013, at age 41, Fujimoto became the youngest
architect to be invited to create a temporary pavilion for
the Serpentine Gallery in
London (an honor previously bestowed on figures
such as Oscar Niemeyer and
Zaha Hadid). For that project — represented by a pair
of models at Japan House —
he created a white, cloudlike cage that hovered over
the museum’s lawn and fea-
carolina.miranda
@latimes.com
Twitter: @cmonstah
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E6
T U E S DAY , JA N UA RY 1, 2 019
L AT I M E S . C O M / CA L E N DA R
COMICS
BRIDGE
SUDOKU
By Frank Stewart
When I watched today’s
deal at the club, East-West
were a dentist and a manicurist we call “Tooth and
Nail” because that’s how
they argue.
Against 3NT, Nail led the
four of spades: five, 10, ace.
South next led the king of
diamonds. Nail won and led
a second low spade, but declarer guessed right, playing
dummy’s nine. Tooth took
his king and returned a
spade, but South made his
game with two spade tricks,
three diamonds, four clubs
and one heart.
Then the argument:
Nail: “You goofed. Play
the six on the first spade.”
Tooth: “What if declarer’s
spades were 8-2? Besides, he
still makes 3NT by playing
KENKEN
Every box will contain a number; numbers depend on the size of the grid. For a 6x6
puzzle, use Nos. 1-6. Do not repeat a number in any row or column. The numbers in each
heavily outlined set of squares must combine to produce the target number found in the
top left corner of the cage using the mathematical operation indicated. A number can be
repeated within a cage as long as it is not in the same row or column.
the nine on the second
spade, blocking the suit.”
Nail: “Baloney. He would
surely play the queen.”
Nail had the better argument. East could use the
Rule of 11 to ascertain that
South held only one spade
higher than the four. If he
had two low spades, he
would play dummy’s queen
on the first spade as his best
chance for a spade trick.
Question: You hold: ♠ A 2
♥ A J 9 3 ♦ K J 5 ♣ Q J 5 2. Neither side vulnerable. The
dealer, at your right, opens
three spades. What do you
say?
Answer: This is a judgment call. Some experts
would double, and that action could be a winner. In my
view, this hand has too many
losers and too few high-card
values to undertake a contract at the four level. If part-
ner has enough strength to
make four hearts, he may
bid more than that and get
overboard. I would pass.
South dealer
Both sides vulnerable
NORTH
♠Q95
♥ Q 10 5
♦ Q 10 8 3
♣AK3
WEST
EAST
♠J8743
♠ K 10 6
♥K82
♥764
♦A72
♦964
♣74
♣ 10 9 8 6
SOUTH
♠A2
♥AJ93
♦KJ5
♣QJ52
SOUTH WEST
NORTH EAST
1 NT
Pass
3 NT
All Pass
Opening lead — ♠ 4
2019, Tribune Media
Services
ASK AMY
9 roommates, dirty house
1/1/19
HOROSCOPE
By Holiday Mathis
Aries (March 21-April 19):
It may seem as though
you’re not so much for a
cause as you are against the
opposition to that cause.
Taurus (April 20-May
20): It’s been said that 80% of
success is showing up. But
when the showing up happens 100% of the time, the rewards grow exponentially.
Gemini (May 21-June 21):
You and a friend are far
apart. What can you bring to
the situation to enable you
to stand together a while?
Cancer (June 22-July 22):
You enjoy what you can do
very well, and you can do
very well what you enjoy.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22):
You don’t realize it, but if you
think about it, you’ll learn
that you’ve been needlessly
selling yourself short. You’re
enough just as you are. Take
this statement with you into
the new year.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22):
You’ll build on your accomplishments in the new year,
even though, right now, you
may be forgetting what they
are. List them and look at
the list often.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23):
If you have the energy but
not the time, rearrangement
and reordering will help you.
If you have the time but not
the energy, rest and recuperation will help you.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 21):
You’re working on a victory.
Maybe it started out as a victory for you, or for your
group, but it could be a victory for humanity.
Sagittarius (Nov. 22Dec. 21): Get on track and
stay there. Know what
brings you joy and head into
that area with the full fire of
your spirit.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan.
19): Your senses allow you to
perceive
this
beautiful
world, and you’ll find they
are heightened by first-time
experiences.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb.
18): You’ll be your own publicist, arranging the facts in
such a way as to build interest in all you have to offer.
Pisces (Feb. 19-March
20): Push into the new year
with boldness and optimism, focusing on what you
want and leaving no room
for what you don’t want.
Today’s birthday (Jan.
1): The symbolic ritual of
making a birthday wish will
launch you into your next incarnation with a solid sense
of purpose. You’re willing to
do what it takes to make this
wish happen, and you’ll be
flanked by loyal partners.
Also this solar journey: an
excellent financial opportunity, domestic beautification and winning teams.
Aquarius and Pisces adore
you. Your lucky numbers
are: 6, 38, 32, 1 and 50.
Holiday Mathis writes her
column for Creators
Syndicate Inc. The
horoscope should be read
for entertainment.
Dear Amy: I have eight
roommates (five men and
three women), all living together in a large house.
All of the roommates rent
separately from a landlord;
we are not friends sharing a
house as friends (the rent is
cheap, and so is the landlord).
The things that have never been resolved over the
years are primarily people
taking out the trash and
keeping the kitchen and
front hallway floor clean.
Dishes are left in the sink for
days, weeks or over a month
and also general cleaning
the kitchen.
It seems that some people just don’t care — and
some people seem to be obstructing any resolution.
How can we get people to
finally get on the same page
as much as possible and resolve this?
Grunged
Dear Grunged: You should
certainly try to call a “house
meeting” to address these issues. One logical solution
would be for all of you to chip
in to hire a cleaner (or “Hazmat” specialist) to come every other week and clean the
common areas of the house.
However, my instinct is that
the individuals who care the
least will continue to care
the least and, therefore, will
refuse to either help or pay.
With nine people all renting cheaply and separately
on individual leases, your
only advantage is the freedom to choose to move when
your own lease runs out.
Dear Amy: My husband
and I (along with our 4-yearold) live next to a childless
couple in their 40s. They
moved in after the husband
inherited the house about
two years ago.
Last summer, we were
awakened at 3 a.m. by the
husband from next door. He
was sobbing and yelling to
himself on their front porch.
Apparently, the neighbor
was drunk, and his wife
locked him out of the house.
My husband tried to help
— he managed to get him
into their garage.
This has happened at
least 20 more times in the
last six months: Husband
comes home late, is locked
out and then yells or cries for
hours. Eventually, he passes
out or the wife relents and
lets him in.
I left them a note asking
them to be more considerate. A neighbor got slapped
by the husband when he
tried to move him inside. Another neighbor has called
the police several times.
Now, they avoid us at all
costs. The police have said
that there is no assault or
abuse happening, and that
the issue is domestic, and
the most they can do is write
them a citation for disturbing the peace.
I understand that there is
probably a serious addiction
problem here, but their issues should not be our issues. Especially at 3 a.m.
Do you have any recommendations for a strategy to
get them to take it inside?
Awake and Pacing
Dear Awake: “Taking it inside” might be best for you,
but not necessarily for them.
If this husband is drunk, belligerent and (sometimes)
physically violent, forcing
this couple into home confinement might not be best
for either of them.
You’ve been neighborly;
you’ve also contacted them
discreetly. Calling the police
is the appropriate thing for
you to do at this point. If at
some point the wife is ready
to leave or needs a restraining order, a history of police
visits might help her to build
a case. Being threatened
with arrest for public intoxication might force him
toward getting help.
Send questions to Amy
Dickinson by email to
askamy@amydickinson
.com.
FAMILY CIRCUS By Bil Keane
DENNIS THE MENACE By Hank Ketcham
ARGYLE SWEATER By Scott Hilburn
MARMADUKE By Brad & Paul Anderson
BLISS By Harry Bliss
BALLARD STREET By Jerry Van Amerongen
CROSSWORD
Edited By Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
By Derek Bowman
ACROSS
1 Language of southern
Africa
6 City west of Tulsa
10 Gas station machines
15 Bran benefit
16 Traditional teachings
17 Undersea WWII threat
18 Pre-euro coin
19 Historical times
20 Email back
21 With 27-Across,
50-Across classic
24 “Star Trek” captain
Jean-__ Picard
27 See 21-Across
28 Dean’s list no.
31 Number that’s a square
of itself
32 “Neither snow __
rain ... ”
33 Tags on bags
34 Fishy bagel topper
35 Play sections
37 Words repeated after
“Whatever” in a Doris
Day song
40 Halloween garb
41 Because of
43 With 59-Across, liver
delicacy
44 Tear up
45 50-Across work
featuring the two
youngest Glass siblings
48 “La Cage aux Folles,”
for one
49 Come up
50 Author born 1/1/1919
55 “Assuming that’s
true ... ”
58 John Roberts’ group:
Abbr.
59 See 43-Across
63 Having regrets about
65 Corn cover
66 Kitchen strainer
67 Come to terms
68 Title heroine in one
of 50-Across’ “Nine
Stories”
69 Trip around the sun
70 Adventurous expedition
71 Like pink hair
72 And/or divider
DOWN
1 Bud 4 life
2 Broadcast
3 Cavs’ org.
4 Camp shelter
5 Sea __: spiny critter
6 Really amaze
7 “CBS This Morning”
co-anchor O’Donnell
8 Infuriated
9 Gave details of
10 Baby food options
11 Ride-sharing app
12 Messy hairdo
13 Bud
14 Farmyard pen
22 Plenty, in old poems
23 Jekyll’s bad side
24 “Get a __ of this!”
25 Release from shackles
26 Part of etc.
28 If-looks-could-kill looks
29 Olive Oyl’s guy
30 Used a hatchet on
36 Original co-host of “The
View”
38 Hawaii’s Mauna __
39 “Mary Poppins Returns”
actor __-Manuel
Miranda
40 Miss singing on
Sunday?
42 Like some audiobooks
44 Irritated
46 Bitter end?
© 2019 Tribune Content Agency
47 Turns abruptly
51 Throbbed
52 Crummy
53 “I’m here”
54 Microwaved
55 Baghdad’s country
56 Japanese pufferfish
57 Colt’s father
60 Country’s McEntire
61 Rental car choice
62 Actor Rogen
64 Understand
66 Distress letters
ANSWER TO
PREVIOUS PUZZLE
1/1/19
L AT I M E S . C O M / CA L E N DA R
T U E S DAY , JA N UA RY 1, 2 019
COMICS
DOONESBURY By Garry Trudeau
Doonesbury is on vacation. This is a reprint.
DILBERT By Scott Adams
LA CUCARACHA By Lalo Alcaraz
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JUMP START By Robb Armstrong
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DRABBLE By Kevin Fagan
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MUTTS By Patrick McDonnell
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E7
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T U E S DAY , JA N UA RY 1, 2 019
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L AT I M E S . C O M / CA L E N DA R
Tuesday Prime-Time TV
TV HI GHL I GHTS
8 pm
SERIES
8:30
9 pm
Sports News Movies (N) New Å Closed Captioning
9:30
10 pm
10:30
NCIS (TV14) Å
FBI (TV14) Å
NCIS: New Orleans (TV14) Å
NBC Ellen’s Game of Games (TVPG) This Is Us (TV14) Å
New Amsterdam (TV14) Å
KTLA 130th Tournament of Roses Parade (TVG) Hosts Mark Steines News (N) Å
Sports Final
CBS
Lethal Weapon While on the
rebound from Natalie’s
(Maggie Lawson) engagement news, Cole (Seann
William Scott) discovers
that his new romantic interest (guest star Haley
Strode) has a connection
to the DA. Damon
Wayans, Keesha Sharp
and Thomas Lennon also
guest star. 8 p.m. Fox
We'll Meet Again Two men
search for the people who
helped them when they
fled Cuba to come to the
U.S. in this new episode. 8
p.m. KOCE and KPBS
Doctor Who In this New
Year’s special episode of
the long-running science
fiction series, a terrifying
evil rises from across the
centuries as a new year on
Earth begins. Jodie Whittaker stars with Tosin
Cole, Mandip Gill and
Bradley Walsh. 8 p.m.
BBC America
The Gifted The Mutant
Underground debates enlisting the help of the
Inner Circle, and an alliance may be the only way
to rescue John (Blair Redford) from the Purifiers.
Stephen Moyer, Percy
Hynes White and Natalie
Alyn Lind also star. 9 p.m.
Fox
Great Performances In the
new episode “From Vienna: The New Year's Celebration 2019,” the Vienna
Philharmonic presents a
festive concert that features Strauss Family
waltzes and celebrates
the 150th anniversary of
the Vienna State Opera.
Hugh Bonneville hosts. 9
p.m. KOCE and KPBS
I a.m. Jazz Transgender
teen advocate Jazz Jennings returns for a new
season of the unscripted
series. 10:02 p.m. TLC
SPECIALS
The Twilight Zone Marathon Episodes of Rod Serling’s groundbreaking science fiction anthology series air back to back
throughout the day. 6 a.m.
Syfy
130th Annual Tournament
of Roses Parade Grammy
winner Chaka Khan is
grand marshal of the
event, which features 46
floats reflecting the 2019
theme “The Melody of
and Leeza Gibbons. (Tape) (7:30) Å
(10:45)
11 pm
News (N) Å
News (N) Å
News (N) Å
The Kids Are black-ish
Splitting Up
The Rookie (TV14) Å
News (N) Å
(TVPG) Å
Alright (TVPG) (TVPG) Å
Together Å
KCAL News (N) Å
News (N) Å
News (N) Å Sports Central 2 Broke Girls
FOX Lethal Weapon (TV14) Cole
The Gifted The Mutant Under- News (N) Å
The Big Bang
is on the rebound after Na- ground considers recruiting
Theory (TV14)
ABC
“DOCTOR WHO” ends its season on BBC America.
With Mandip Gill, left, Jodie Whittaker, Charlotte
Ritchie, Nikesh Patel, Tosin Cole and Bradley Walsh.
Life.” Also featured are 22
marching bands from
around the world, 18
equestrian teams (including the Budweiser Clydesdales), and this year’s
Rose Queen with her
court. 8 a.m. NBC; 8, 10
a.m., 12:30, 3, 7:30 p.m.
KTLA. Also, “Backstage
at the Parade” and “Rose
Parade Countdown” air at
6 and 7 a.m. on KTLA
AKC National Championship Dog Show Highlights from the 2018 AKC
National Championship
Dog Show from Orlando,
Fla. 6 p.m. Animal Planet
Raiders oef the Lost Ark
(1981) 2:06 and 9:49 p.m.
Paramount
The Warriors (1979) 2:13
p.m. Encore
Twentieth Century (1934)
3:15 p.m. TCM
Neighbors (2014) 4 p.m. FX
Spider-Man: Homecoming
(2017) 4:06 p.m. Starz
Game Night (2018) 4:30 p.m.
HBO
Love, Gilda (2018) 6 and 8
p.m. CNN
Gremlins (1984) 6 and 11 p.m.
IFC
Blockers (2018) 6:15 p.m.
HBO
MOVIES
TALK SHOWS
Mean Girls (2004) 8 a.m. and
3 p.m. MTV
Back to School (1986) 8 a.m.
TMC
This Is the End (2013) 8:30
a.m. FX
Home Alone (1990) 9:16 a.m.
Encore
His Girl Friday (1940) 9:30
a.m. TCM
The Parent Trap (1998) 10
a.m. and 5 p.m. MTV
Baby Driver (2017) 11 a.m.
Showtime
You Can’t Take It With You
(1938) 11:15 a.m. TCM
Frances Ha (2012) 11:30 a.m.
TMC
Pretty in Pink (1986) 12 p.m.
Sundance
The Silence of the Lambs
(1991) 12:05 p.m. Cinemax
Thank You for Your Service
(2017) 1 p.m. Showtime
Patriots Day (2016) 1 and
11:05 p.m. TMC
Dirty Dancing (1987) 1:05
p.m. Freeform
The Awful Truth (1937) 1:30
p.m. TCM
Only the Brave (2017) 1:49
p.m. Starz
cape From Cuba. (N) Å
KDOC
KLCS
A&E
AMC
ANP
BET
Bravo
CMT
CNN
Com
Disc
Disn
E!
ESPN
Food
FNC
FX
Hall
MTV
SPORTS
TBS
Montalbán Theater in Hollywood
Å
New Year’s Celebration 2019. (N) Å
HGTV
Hist
IFC
Life
MSN
NGC
Nick
OWN
Para
Sund
Syfy
TCM
TNT
Toon
Travel
Tru
TV L
USA
VH1
WGN
Cine
Encr
EPIX
HBO
Show
Starz
TMC
Å
Palace in London. (Tape) Å
Why Did I Get Married? (5:57) Tyler Perry’s I Can Do Bad All By Myself (2009) Tyler Perry. (8:57) (PG-13)
Below Deck (TV14) Å
Below Deck (TV14) Å
Elf ››› (2003) Will Ferrell. (PG) Å
Grease ››› (1978) (6:30)
Sixteen Candles ›› (1984) Molly Ringwald. (PG) Å
Stepford Wives
Love, Gilda ››› (2018) Chevy Chase. Å
American Style The Seventies (TVPG) Å
The Sixties
Chappelle Å Chappelle Å Chappelle Å Chappelle Å Chappelle Å Chappelle Å Chappelle Å
Street Outlaws (TV14) (Season premiere) (N) Å
Bad Chad Customs (N) Å
Street Outlaws
Zombies (2018) (7:30) Å
Raven’s Home Coop & Cami Bizaardvark
Bunk’d (10:35) Star New Year
Botched (TV14) Å
Botched (TV14) Å
Botched (TV14) Å
Botched Å
Sugar Bowl Texas vs Georgia. (5:40) (N)
SportsCenter (N) Å
SportsCenter
Chopped (TVG) Å
Chopped (TVG) (N) Å
Chopped (TVG) Å
Chopped Å
Scandalous Å
Scandalous Å
Scandalous Å
Scandalous Å
Just Go With It Pitch Perfect ››› (2012) Anna Kendrick, Skylar Astin. (8:25) (PG-13) Å The 700 Club
Daddy’s Home ›› (2015) Will Ferrell. (PG-13) Å
Daddy’s Home ›› (2015) (PG-13) Å
Coming Home for Christmas (2017) Danica McKellar. Å
Reunited at Christmas (2018) Å
HGTV Dream Home 2019 (TVG) Windy City Rehab (TVG) (N) House Hunters House Hunters House Hunters
Oak Island: Digging Deeper
The Curse of Oak Island (TVPG) (N) Å
Oak Island Å
Gremlins (6) Gremlins 2: The New Batch ››› (1990) Zach Galligan. (PG-13) Å
Gremlins (PG)
Married at First Sight (N) Å
Married at First Sight (TV14) (Season premiere) (N) Å
Married at 1st…
Dateline (TVPG) Å
Dateline (TVPG) Å
Dateline Extra (TVPG) Å
Lindsay Lohan’s Beach Club
Teen Mom OG (TVPG) (N)
Ex on the Beach (TV14)
Lindsay Lohan
Life Below Zero (TVPG) (N)
Life Below Zero (TVPG) (N)
Life Below Zero (TVPG) (N)
Life Below Zero
Ice Age: Dawn of Dinosaurs (7) SpongeBob Å SpongeBob Å The Office Å The Office Å Friends (TV14)
Haves and Have Nots (TV14)
Haves and Have Nots (TV14)
Haves and Have Nots (TV14)
Haves, Nots
Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade ››› (1989) (7:06) Å
Raiders of the Lost Ark ›››› (1981) (9:49)
Weird Science (1985) (6:45) Revenge of the Nerds ›› (1984) (R) (8:45) Å Uncle Buck (1989) (10:45)
Twilight Zone Twilight Zone Twilight Zone Twilight Zone Twilight Zone Twilight Zone Twilight Zone
(TVPG) Å
To Serve Man. Living Doll.
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Game of Pool.
Big Bang Å
Big Bang Å
Big Bang Å
Big Bang Å
Big Bang Å
Big Bang Å
Conan Å
One Million B.C. ›› (1940) (8:15)
Topper Returns ›› (1941) Roland Young. (9:45) Å
My Big Fat Fabulous Life (TVPG) Whitney visits Buddy in D.C. I Am Jazz (TVPG) (N)
I Am Jazz
Suicide Squad ›› (2016) Will Smith. (7:45) (PG-13) Å
Suicide Squad ›› (2016) Will Smith.
Samurai Jack American Dad American Dad Bob’s Burgers Bob’s Burgers Family Guy Å Family Guy Å
Ghost Adventures (TVPG)
Demon House (2018) Zak Bagans. Å
Demon House
Jokers Å
Jokers Å
Jokers Å
Jokers Å
Adam Ruins Å Adam Ruins Å Inside Jokes Å
King of Queens King of Queens King of Queens King of Queens King of Queens King of Queens King of Queens
WWE SmackDown! (TVPG) (N) Å
Miz & Mrs
Miz & Mrs
Miz & Mrs
Love & Hip Hop: Atlanta (TV14) Love & Hip Hop: Atlanta (TV14) Love & Hip Hop: Atlanta (TV14) Love, Hip Hop
Cops (TVPG) Cops (TVPG) Married ... With Married ... With Married ... With Married ... With How I Met
Back to the Future ››› (1985) Michael J. Fox. (PG) Å
Back to the Future Part II ››› (1989) (PG) Å
Grown Ups › (2010) (7:15)
The Hunt for Red October ››› (1990) Sean Connery. (PG) Å
Deep State (TVMA) Å
Deep State (TVMA) Å
Deep State (TVMA) Å
Unprotected
The Hangover ››› (2009) (R) Å
Half Baked › (1998) (9:45) (R) Å
Escape at Dannemora (7:20) Å Inside the NFL (TVPG) (N) Å Ray Donovan (TVMA) Å
Inside the NFL
Just Married (2003) (7:23) Å Outlander (TVMA) Å
Be Cool ›› (2005) John Travolta. (PG-13)
Pearl Harbor ›› (2001) Ben Affleck, Josh Hartnett. (PG-13) Å
Find out where to stay, where to eat,
and what to see along with travel tips,
the hottest deals and how to get the
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(focus features)
Noticias
Amanpour
Duncan’s life. (N) Å
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(TVG) Å
Doctor Who (TVPG) As the New Year begins, World Darts Championship (TVPG) Final. From Alexandra
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TLC
King of Queens
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Globe Trekker
Dateline (TV14) Å
The Goldbergs The Goldbergs Family Guy Å Family Guy Å Seinfeld Å
Good Work: Building Arts Å
Thank You for Coming (2017) Live Better Now With Mimi Guarneri, MD (TVG)
Leah Remini: Scientology and Leah Remini: Scientology and Elizabeth Smart: Autobiography (TV14) Part 1:
The Kidnapping. Å
the Aftermath Å
the Aftermath (N) Å
Walking Dead The Matrix ››› (1999) Keanu Reeves, Laurence Fishburne. (8:34) (R) Å
AKC National Championship Dog Show (TVPG) Highlights from Dogs: The Untold Story (TVG) Wild Workers.
a terrifying evil is stirring, from across the
centuries of Earth’s history. (N) Å
CBS This Morning (N) 7
a.m. KCBS
Today (N) 7 a.m. KNBC
Good Morning America
Chef Alex Guarnaschelli;
Lukas Graham performs.
(N) 7 a.m. KABC
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KTTV
The Talk (N) 1 p.m. KCBS
Amanpour and Company
(N) 10 p.m. KVCR; 11 p.m.
KOCE; 1 a.m. KLCS
MONDAY, JANUARY 7th
the Inner Circle. (N) Å
Chicago P.D. (TV14) Å
the 2018 event. (N) (6)
BBC
Free
College Football Iowa versus Mississippi State, 9
a.m. ESPN2; Citrus Bowl:
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State, 10 a.m. ABC; Fiesta
Bowl: LSU versus Central
Florida, 10 a.m. ESPN;
Rose Bowl: Washington
versus Ohio State, 2 p.m.
ESPN; Sugar Bowl: Texas
versus Georgia, 5:40 p.m.
ESPN
NHL Hockey The Kings visit
the
Vegas
Golden
Knights, 6 p.m. FSN
NBA Basketball The Clippers host the Philadelphia
76ers, 7:30 p.m. FS Prime
talie’s engagement. (N) Å
Chicago P.D. (TV14) Å
Seinfeld Å
Seinfeld Å
KVCR Archives Å
Museum Å
Born to Explore: Namibia Å
Amanpour & Company (N) Å
KCET SoCal Connect- Lost LA (TVG) Artbound (TVPG) Artist Doug The Migrant
Tending Nature
Aitken. Å
ed Å
Kitchen (TVG) (TVPG)
Å
UNI
Jesús (N)
Mi marido tiene más familia (N) Amar a muerte (TV14) (N)
KOCE We’ll Meet Again (TVPG) Es- Great Performances (TVG) From Vienna: The LAaRT Isadora
MyNt
Sophie Mutevelian BBC Studios 2018
The Conners
LOS ANGELES TIMES
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