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2019-01-06 Newsday

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| LI EDITION
Sunday
Jan. 6, 2019
T H E L O N G I S L A N D N E W S PA P E R
HI 45° LO 22°
MOSTLY SUNNY
POWER ON TRIAL
Papers: Mangano prosecutors
deny withholding evidence A4-5
JAMES CARBONE
REPORT A POTHOLE AT NEWSDAY.COM/REPORTPOTHOLES | A2-3
WHAT’S IN STORE
How gyms, doctors and restaurants
are filling LI’s retail spaces LI BUSINESS
COPYRIGHT 2019, NEWSDAY LLC, LONG ISLAND, VOL. 79, NO. 125
JOHN DUNN
\ How craters affect your car, your wallet, your psyche
\ What local officials are doing to smooth the roads
TOP STORIES
A2
A BANG-UP
POTHOLE
SEASON
LI’s annual crop of cavities appears early,
and here’s what you can do about it
BY ROBERT BRODSKY
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
newsday.com
robert.brodsky@newsday.com
Shai Eapen’s 2017 Mercedes
has seen better days.
Six weeks ago, Eapen struck
a pothole on the Northern State
Parkway. The crater cost him
$600 to replace a rim. Then,
just a few days ago on New
Year’s Eve, the New Hyde Park
resident heard a familiar thud
as he was traveling along the
Throgs Neck Bridge.
“I hit it and knew right away,”
said Eapen, 42, of the pit that
damaged a rim and tire.
The price tag this time: $400.
Eapen isn’t alone in his frustration.
Peak pothole season is still a
good two to three months away,
but already the annual crop of
dips is popping up across Nassau
and Suffolk counties — rattling
teeth and draining bank accounts for trips to the mechanic.
The $1,000 that Eapen has
forked over since early November is a few hundred dollars
more than the $719 that Long Island drivers on average pay
every year for driving on
poorly maintained roads, new
research shows. The total, calculated by Washington-based
transportation think tank TRIP,
covers repairs as well as accelerated vehicle depreciation and
increased fuel consumption.
“Rough roads are a silent thief
costing the public money,” said
Rocky Moretti, TRIP’s director
TIPS ON HOW TO
AVOID A POTHOLE
Heads up: A driver focused on
the road may have time to avoid
a pothole.
Watch the water: Go through
every puddle as if it is hiding a
pothole.
Slow down: The faster the car is
going, the worse the damage is
likely to be.
Back off: If you give yourself a
little room, you also give yourself
a little time to avoid the pothole
that the driver ahead just hit.
Hang on: Hitting a pothole
causes quite a jolt. Keep a solid
grip so you don’t lose control.
Don’t brake: Avoid braking as
you hit the pothole or you just
might do more damage.
Pumpin’ air: Properly inflated
tires are less likely to be
damaged and will protect the
wheels and suspension.
SOURCES: AAA and Ally, a digital financial
services company
of policy and research. “Investing in the transportation system
will require more money from
municipalities. But when these
repairs are not done, the costs to
everybody escalate.”
Public officials know all too
well just how much potholes
bug motorists. They field thousands of grievances annually
through an intragovernment
network of 311 call centers,
email tip lines and mobile apps,
numbers show.
And, officials said, they take
the complaints to heart and
are making an effort to fill the
cavities.
In the Town of Hempstead,
for example, Supervisor Laura
Gillen is budgeting $26 million
this year and again next year
for road resurfacing — roughly
four times more than the $6.3
million in 2017. In 2018, the dollar amount was $17.5 million.
“We need a lot of work,”
Gillen said. “It’s going to take
time, but we have made potholes a major priority.”
A patchwork approach
Counties, towns and other localities maintain 80 percent of
roads nationwide and states
take care of the other 20 percent, according to the U.S. Department of Transportation.
The Town of North Hempstead, as most towns and villages
do, funds pothole repairs
through the operating budget of
its roads department, said town
spokeswoman Carole Trottere.
The annual amount varies,
depending on the number and
dimensions of the potholes,
Trottere said. Last year, North
Hempstead received 837 requests for repairs, she said.
Tight budgets coupled with
countless potholes forces many
local transportation departments to simply fill the craters
rather than resurface streets, officials said. Spending the time —
State workers repair potholes on Jericho Turnpike east of Route 110
and money — for repaving can
significantly extend the life span
of a road, an industry expert said.
“The problem is that governments take a reactive approach
to potholes rather than being
proactive,” said Larry Galehouse, who heads the National
Center for Pavement Preservation at Michigan State University
in East Lansing. “There needs to
be a true strategy to deal with
the problem.”
On Long Island, municipalities are being creative in dealing with pothole repairs.
The Town of Huntington is
using a program this year called
“Pothole Killers” that’s designed
to lower the cost of repairs and
speed up the work. In 60 to 90
seconds, a specially equipped
truck blows debris out of the
pothole, sprays a substance that
helps the asphalt stick, fills the
hole with the asphalt and then
puts on a dry top coat.
Last year, Huntington sent
out three workers with shovels
who could fill about 40 potholes a day for $2,000, which
covered materials and wages.
The truck makes about 100
patches a day at a cost of
$2,500, officials said in March,
during a two-week trial run.
In the Town of Hempstead, a
new interactive online map lets
residents plot potholes. The map
also shows whether the road in
need of attention belongs to the
town, county or state. About 40
percent of the residents who report a problem are ultimately
rerouted to a different government agency, Gillen said.
Timing of repairs — indeed
all roadwork — is key to coping
with the plethora of potholes,
officials said.
The Town of Islip, for example, paves as many streets as
possible in spring and summer
as part of its strategy to prevent
potholes, said town spokeswoman Caroline Smith.
“The more dollars a municipality invests in its road repaving
program, the less potholes you
will likely have,” she said.
Suffolk’s chief public works engineer, William Hillman, strives
TOP STORIES
A3
NOW ONLINE
Use LI Pothole Tracker
to report, track them
on the road to repairs
newsday.com/reportpotholes
BY THE NUMBERS
$3 billion
What pothole damage costs
drivers nationwide
Two-thirds
The number of Americans
concerned about potholes
16 million
The estimated number of drivers who suffered pothole damage in the past five years
$306
The average costs for pothole
repairs nationwide
BARRY SLOAN
SOURCE: 2016 AAA survey
in Huntington Station on Friday. LI’s heavily traveled roads can be susceptible to a plethora of potholes.
3
Cars and trucks pass over the
weakened surface, which
collapses, creating a pothole.
to identify troublesome spots on
the county’s 1,575 miles of roads
at just the right moment.
Repave too early and valuable years of roadway service
are wasted; wait too long and
the project becomes more complex and expensive, he said.
“It’s all about finding that
sweet spot,” Hillman said.
on Long Island and in New
York City and northern New
Jersey, TRIP figures show.
A fundamental reason is a
surge in traffic, transportation
experts said.
From 1990 through 2016, the
number of vehicles on state
highways jumped 15 percent, according to an analysis by TRIP.
Slightly more than 20 percent
of the 11.3 million vehicles in
New York are registered in Nassau and Suffolk, according to the
Department of Motor Vehicles.
Suffolk has roughly 1.3 million
and Nassau’s total stands at
roughly a million, figures show.
All the daily wear and tear
works with the weather, especially in the late winter and
early spring, to turn the roads
into an obstacle course of potholes. Water — maybe rain,
maybe melting snow — seeps
into cracks in the pavement,
first freezing and then expanding to make the fissures bigger,
experts said.
New York patches anywhere
from 1.5 million to 2 million potholes each year, depending on
Rough roads
Nearly half of New York’s
major roads are in poor or
mediocre condition, a number
that climbs to nearly 70 percent
Potholes drive motorists to
distraction. That’s a no-brainer.
But why? What’s the thought
process?
The answer is layered, said
psychologist Leon James, who
has spent a good deal of his career studying the effect of driving on the human mind.
First, there is the stress of
bumping along a bad road. That
stress, in turn, creates a negative
climate that encourages dangerous expressions of road rage.
Here’s how: A driver who is on
the lookout for potholes slows
down, upsetting others behind
him. They don’t realize how bad
the road is and get angry at the
driver ahead for holding them up.
There’s even more, though.
The driver who knows about the
pothole is getting hot under the
collar, too — at roads officials,
said James, who teaches at the
University of Hawaii at Manoa.
“Drivers who hit a pothole display an extreme emotional reaction due to fear of damage to
their car,” he said. “This negative
psychological state can last minutes during which the driver is
not in full control. . . . During
these dangerous minutes, the
driver engages in thoughts of
blaming transportation officials
and fantasizing punishing them
in various cruel ways.”
Many times, the fear translates into reality.
At Al’s Hubcaps in Mineola,
owner Al Eisenberg starts seeing his pothole business pick
up beginning in January. Most
drivers, he said, come in with
bent or cracked wheels, bubbles in their tires or their tires
completely blown out.
Damage to wheels and tires
will set drivers back an average
of about $600 at TLC Auto and
Truck Center in Farmingdale,
said operations manager Jim
Sabellico. Once in a rare while,
Sabellico sees serious suspension damage — a broken control arm or a blown-out shock.
Gerardo Russo of Long Island City knows all about the
damage and the anger. Recently, Russo hit what he described as a “massive crater”
near Exit 32 of the Long Island
Expressway, sending his brandnew 2019 BMW to the shop for
repairs on a rim and a tire.
“I bought the thing nine days
ago,” Russo said as he waited at
Al’s Hubcaps. “I was so freaking mad.”
With Rachel Uda
and David Schwartz
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
2
Water freezes and expands,
forcing the asphalt surface up
and fracturing it.
Behind the wheel
newsday.com
1
Water seeps through cracks
in the pavement and penetrates
into the soil under the roadway.
NEWSDAY
HOW POTHOLES FORM
pavement conditions and the
weather, said Glenn Bain, a
spokesman for the state Department of Transportation.
“The safety of the traveling
public is always our top priority,” Bain said. “Department
maintenance crews work aggressively to address potholes
as they develop.”
Repairs don’t come cheap.
The Transportation Department spends from $30 million
to $50 million annually on potholes, Bain said.
The money comes from federal and state coffers.
The Federal Highway Trust
Fund provides a chunk of the
funding — roughly 40 percent
— for state road and bridge
projects, federal data show.
Revenue for the fund comes
primarily from the federal fuel
tax. But because the tax hasn’t
been raised in 25 years and
isn’t pegged to inflation, the
fund has had to increasingly
rely on transfers from the general fund to stay solvent, according to the Tax Policy Center, a nonpartisan think tank
based in Washington, D.C.
The state’s Consolidated
Highway Improvement Program, which helps pay for
local roadway resurfacing
projects, has remained largely
flat at about $438 million. Nassau and Suffolk, however, saw
slight dips in their respective
allocations last year, state
numbers show.
CHIPS funding is critical for
localities strapped for cash because it lets them do the routine maintenance that prevents
potholes, said Marc Herbst, executive director of the Long Is-
land Contractors Association.
“The longer we delay, the
more it will cost in the long
run,” Herbst said.
TOP STORIES
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A26
A16
A18
A79
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A25
PROSECUTORS RESPOND TO
Feds deny withholding
evidence, court papers say
BY ROBERT E. KESSLER
robert.kessler@newsday.com
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Federal prosecutors denied
claims they withheld evidence
favorable to the defense in the
corruption case against former
Nassau County Executive Edward Mangano, saying the assertions “are meritless once the hyperbole and accusations are
stripped way,” newly filed court
documents say.
“The court should reject this
feeble attempt to manufacture
[prosecutorial] prejudice where
there is none,” according to opposition papers filed late Friday
night by Eastern District prosecutors to claims by the defendants in the run-up to the corruption retrial of Nassau
County Executive Edward
Mangano and his wife, Linda.
The remarks came in response to a 42-page motion
filed in December by Kevin
Keating of Garden City, the attorney for Edward Mangano,
that asked for a dismissal of the
charges against him because of
what he said was government
misconduct. The defense asked
that if the presiding judge, U.S.
District Judge Joan Azrack,
failed to dismiss the case outright, she should, at least, conduct a hearing to determine the
methods the government used
in forwarding or withholding evidence from the defense.
The Mangano defense has
until Thursday to respond to
the prosecutors’ filings — the
same day that several hundred
potential jurors are expected to
be summoned to the federal
courthouse in Central Islip to
fill out forms to be used in
screening them for the final
panel that will hear the case.
The Manganos’ trial is scheduled to start on Jan. 22.
Azrack is expected to rule on
the Mangano motion before the
start of the trial.
‘Vigorous reply’
Employment ads
now inside Fanfare
“We are working on a vigorous reply,” Keating said when
asked about the government’s
filing.
In a separate letter to the
judge, Linda Mangano joined in
her husband’s motion, to have
her case dismissed.
Her attorney, John Carman of
Garden City, declined to comment.
Edward Mangano, 56, faces
seven felony counts, including
federal program bribery, honest-services wire fraud, extortion and conspiracy to obstruct
justice.
Linda Mangano, 54, faces five
felony counts, including conspiracy to obstruct justice, obstruction of justice and making false
statements to the FBI. The
Manganos pleaded not guilty to
the charges.
Singh at center of case
The
government’s
case
against the Manganos centers
on their relationship with their
longtime friend and restaurateur Harendra Singh, who was
the prosecution’s star witness at
the earlier trial and is expected
to testify at the retrial.
Keating said in December
that the dismissal was warranted — in part — because the
government
had
recently
handed over new material.
“The defendants now learn
that they were deprived of a full
acquittal due to serious and pervasive prosecutorial misconduct,” Keating wrote in his motion.
In their point-by-point rebuttal, federal prosecutors Catherine Mirabile, Lara Treinis Gatz
and Christopher Caffarone said,
“The court should not give credence to Mangano’s baseless allegations and should deny his request for a hearing or an in camera review.”
The prosecutors’ 47-page response also vehemently denied
Keating’s assertions that they
had concealed “a key witness”
who could have helped exonerate Edward Mangano; engaged
in “withholding thousands of
undisclosed recordings of Mr.
Singh,” some of which included
exculpatory material; permitted
Singh to lie on the witness
stand; and concealed evidence
that a government witness had
mistakenly
claimed
that
Mangano had pushed for the
Oyster Bay loans for Singh.
RANDEE DADDONA
Business
Editorials/Opinion
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Mangano’s retrial on corruption charges is to begin on Jan. 22.
The prosecutors scoffed at
the idea that they concealed “a
key witness” who could have
helped
exonerate
Edward
Mangano of being instrumental
in getting Singh a lucrative contract to supply bread and rolls
to the county jail. The supposed
key witness was instrumental in
getting her then-boss, the late
county legislative Presiding Officer Peter Schmitt, behind the
Singh contract, not Mangano,
Keating said.
But prosecutors said the account of the witness, former
deputy majority counsel Mered-
ith Anne Hughes, was not that
helpful to Mangano because the
defense already had a similar account from Hughes’ boss, Chris
Ostuni, Schmitt’s counsel, and
chose not to call him as a witness. Ostuni is the son-in-law of
former Nassau GOP leader
Joseph Mondello.
The prosecutors maintained
during the trial that it was
Mangano’s chief aide, thenDeputy County Executive Rob
Walker, who was involved for
Mangano in Singh’s getting the
contract.
The woman in charge of pur-
TOP STORIES
A5
MANGANO DEFENSE
❛
The
defendants
now learn that
they were
deprived of a full
acquittal due to
serious and
pervasive
prosecutorial
misconduct.”
— Kevin Keating,
attorney for Edward
Mangano
— Eastern District
federal prosecutors
tion with government investigators.
Singh’s attorney, Anthony La
Pinta, has said the calls were for
the most part “trivial and irrelevant.”
Prosecutors said the defense
already knew most of what was
in them.
“To suggest that [this type of]
additional impeachment evidence would have altered the
outcome of the trial is absurd,”
the prosecutors said.
Claim of misstatements
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NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
As for Singh lying on the witness stand, prosecutors said that
in the instances Keating cited,
he mischaracterized Singh’s testimony to make it appear that
the restaurateur’s truthful answers were perjurious. Those instances included the time Singh
had purchased properties in
India, and whether leases for
Mangano’s Bethpage election
headquarters were forgeries.
The defense claimed that the
“forged” leases showed that
Singh had not given Mangano a
break on his headquarters
rental, as prosecutors alleged.
In the case of a witness stating that Mangano had not
pushed for the loans to Singh,
prosecutors said the witness, attorney William Savino, had said
in testimony that he had originally thought his notes indicated that then-Oyster Bay
Town Attorney Leonard Genova had pushed for the Singh
loan. But Savino, a longtime
Mangano friend, said he realized later that he was mistaken
and it was Mangano whom he
talked to.
The government said the new
material came from their re-examination of their case after the
mistrial.
“Because the prosecutors
take their obligations seriously,
they re-examined their entire
file after the first trial, and directed agents working on the
case to do the same,” the filings
said. “The government took an
expansive view of what was discoverable during this re-examination process and produced
many materials that were
marginally related to the case
and that did not fall within any
of the categories of discoverable
materials.”
The government’s memo
calls Mangano’s attacks on the
prosecutors’ integrity “unfounded and unfair.”
The Manganos’ first trial
lasted 12 weeks and ended in a
mistrial on May 31.
The Manganos are being retried on the same charges.
During the trial, prosecutors
contended that a flow of significant gifts from Singh to the
Manganos began only after Edward Mangano became county
executive and that they
amounted to bribes.
Among the bribes prosecutors said Edward Mangano accepted from Singh were free
meals, free vacations to destinations that included the Caribbean, two chairs each valued at
more than $3,000, a $7,300 luxury watch for his son, hardwood
flooring for his home, and a
$450,000 no-show job for Linda
Mangano.
In
return,
prosecutors
charged that the former county
executive got Singh two lucrative Nassau County contracts,
each worth more than $200,000,
and help obtaining $20 million
in indirect loan guarantees from
the Town of Oyster Bay. Former
Town of Oyster Bay Supervisor
John Venditto, a co-defendant in
the case against the Manganos,
was acquitted of multiple
charges.
Defense attorneys staunchly
maintained in the first trial that
the items were just gifts based
on friendship.
l
newsday.com
chasing food for the jail testified
that Walker showed up at her office apparently to push for
Singh’s contract. In all her 17
years working for the county,
the woman, Linda Mills, testified that she had never previously had such a high-ranking
official come to her office.
The government said the material was not relevant to the defense, was not the type of evidence that they were required
to hand over, and mainly involved the beginnings of socalled minimized conversations
— conversations that agents
were legally barred from recording because they did not involve
criminal activity, such as Singh
discussing everyday personal or
business matters that defense attorneys knew about.
The prosecutors acknowledged that they had not handed
over several dozen calls on a
wiretap on Singh phones that
they should have, among 2,700
other wiretapped phone calls
given to the defense.
As a result of Keating’s repeated questioning about missing evidence, prosecutors decided in October to hand over
all of the calls, even though the
vast bulk were irrelevant, prosecutors said.
One call involved Singh, before he became a cooperating
government witness, telling his
then-attorney that he was having a meeting with the
Manganos. Singh says on that
recorded call that he would tell
Linda Mangano to tell the truth
when she herself had a conversa-
❛
The court
should not
give credence to
Mangano’s
baseless
allegations and
should deny his
request for a
hearing or an in
camera review.”
TOP STORIES
A6
No compromise as
Negotiators plan to try again Sunday to end stalemate
BY TOM BRUNE
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
newsday.com
WASHINGTON — White
House officials and congressional aides ended talks on Saturday in a stalemate with no
deal to reopen closed agencies
or fund a border wall, but both
sides said they would meet
again Sunday with the federal
shutdown in its third week.
The White House and
Democrats remained dug into
the positions that led to and
have prolonged the partial government shutdown, accusing
each other of refusing to compromise on President Donald
Trump’s demand for more than
$5 billion for a border wall.
Vice President Mike Pence
described the 2½-hour meeting as “productive” in a tweet,
but Democrats called it a
missed opportunity to reopen
the unfunded agencies that
had left 800,000 federal employees without pay, either furloughed or required to work.
“Not much headway made
today,” Trump tweeted after
being briefed by Pence and his
team at the meeting. White
House chief of staff Mick Mulvaney told CNN’s Jake Tapper
that Democrats were “actually,
in my mind, there to stall.”
A Democratic source familiar
with the meeting said, “The vice
president made clear that the
White House will not move off
of the 5.7 billion dollar proposal
that led to the Trump shutdown,” calling that demand “an
untenable position that cannot
pass the Congress.”
The Democratic congressional staff at the meeting requested “a formal budget justification” for the Trump administration’s request for border
security and border wall funding. The Pence aide said that
would be provided before the
Sunday meeting.
But Democrats also told
Pence and Republican staffers
that negotiations would be
hard to conduct as long as the
government remained partially closed. Pence, however,
refused to reopen government
with a spending deal until
Democrats agree to fund a
wall, the source said.
AP / MANUEL BALCE CENETA
tom.brune@newsday.com
President Donald Trump
With the shutdown likely to
continue at least through the
middle of next week when Congress returns, some Senate Republicans up for re-election in
2020 — including Susan
Collins of Maine and Cory
Gardner of Colorado — are
urging Trump to allow the government to reopen.
Nine departments, including
Treasury, Justice, Homeland Security, State, Transportation
and Interior, and other independent agencies shut down
on Dec. 22 when they ran out
of funding after Trump rejected a compromise bill to
keep them open because it did
not fund a wall.
Later
Saturday,
House
Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.)
doubled down on her strategy
to have the new House Democratic majority pass appropriation bills already approved by
the Senate to show her party is
trying to reopen government.
“Next
week,
House
Democrats will begin passing individual appropriations bills to
reopen all government agencies, starting with the appropriations bill that covers the Department of the Treasury and the Internal Revenue Service,” Pelosi
said in a statement. “This action
is necessary so that the American people can receive their tax
refunds on schedule.”
When the full Congress reconvened
Thursday,
House
Democrats passed two bills,
without money for a wall — one
to fund eight departments
through September with Senate
Republican spending measures
and another to fund Homeland
Security to Feb. 8.
Trump responded by saying
he would veto both bills unless
they included $5.6 billion for a
border wall. Senate Majority
Leader Mitch McConnell
(R-Ky.) said the Senate would
not take up any bill that Trump
would not sign into law.
On Friday, Trump held a
White House meeting with congressional leaders without
reaching an agreement.
Afterward, Schumer said
Trump threatened to keep the
shutdown going for “months
or even years” to get funding
for a border wall. At a Rose
Garden news conference,
Trump agreed he had, saying,
“If we have to stay out for a
very long period of time, we’re
going to do that.”
Trump also announced that
Pence would lead a White
House team of his senior adviser and son-in-law Jared
Kushner and Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen
to work with staffers of Democratic and Republican congressional leaders.
Saturday’s meeting focused
on the administration’s case
for a physical wall at the southern border, without any “in
depth” discussion of Trump’s
demand for money, a Pence
aide said. Nielsen gave “a full
briefing on the crisis at the
southern border.”
At least two dozen top White
House officials and congressional aides attended the meeting, held in the Eisenhower Executive Office Building next to
the White House, a photo
tweeted by Pence showed.
Before Saturday’s meeting,
Trump posted tweets urging
Democrats to end their opposition to border wall funding, assessing the effect on unpaid federal workers through a political
lens that employee union chiefs
say mischaracterizes the workforce.
“I don’t care that most of the
workers not getting paid are
Democrats,” Trump tweeted,
“I want to stop the Shutdown
as soon as we are in agreement
on Strong Border Security!”
VOLUNTEERS STEP IN
AT NATIONAL PARKS
Nonprofits, businesses and
state governments nationwide
are putting up money and volunteer hours in a battle to keep
national parks safe and clean
for visitors as the partial U.S.
government shutdown lingers.
But such makeshift arrangements haven’t prevented some
parks from closing and others
from being inundated with trash.
Support groups say donations of
money and time could run short
if the budget impasse between
President Donald Trump and
congressional Democrats lasts
much longer. Some are calling
for parks to close for the duration of the standoff, which
Trump said Friday could last
“months or even years.”
“Our national parks deserve
better than an improvised patchwork of emergency care,” Diane
Regas, CEO of the Trust for Public Lands, said in a letter to
Trump that noted reports of
theft, poaching and piles of
garbage and human waste.
Ryan Zinke, who recently
stepped down under fire as Interior Department secretary, had
ordered many national parks to
stay open, saying visitors should
not be penalized for the political
feud over a border wall with
Mexico. During an interview
with The Associated Press,
Zinke said visitors should take action to keep parks clean.
“Grab a trash bag and take
some trash out with you,” he
said. “In order to keep them
open, everybody has to pitch in.”
The park service has reached
deals with more than 60 partner
groups, concessionaires and
states to handle trash removal, restroom cleanup and other basic
tasks at more than 40 parks —
and, in a few cases, to keep park
staffers on the job, spokesman
TOP STORIES
A7
shutdown rolls on
AGENCIES TOLD TO HOLD OFF SHUTDOWN RAISES
GETTY IMAGES / MARIO TAMA
The Associated Press
WASHINGTON — Federal
agencies have been directed to
hold off enacting pay raises for
top administration officials during a government shutdown that
has left hundreds of thousands
of federal workers without pay.
The guidance was issued Friday in a memo from Margaret
Weichert, the acting director of
the Office of Personnel Management.
The raises were the result of
a pay freeze for top federal officials, including the vice president and cabinet secretaries,
that was on the verge of expiring because of the shutdown.
In the memo, Weichert
writes that, “In the current absence of Congressional guidance,” OPM “believes it would
be prudent for agencies to continue to pay these senior politi-
cal officials at the frozen rate
until appropriations legislation
is enacted that would clarify
the status of the freeze.”
White House press secretary
Sarah Huckabee Sanders had
said earlier Friday that the administration was “aware of the
issue” and “exploring options
to prevent this from being implemented while some federal
workers are furloughed.”
Trump had also told reporters at a news conference
that he “might consider” asking
cabinet secretaries and other
top officials to forgo the raises.
Vice President Mike Pence
committed to doing so.
The raises, which were first
reported by The Washington
Post, appear to be an unintended consequence of a shutdown that is affecting hundreds
of thousands of federal employees, forcing many to work with-
out pay. Trump and congressional leaders met again Friday
to try to hash out a resolution,
but emerged no closer to a
deal. Trump is demanding billions of dollars for his longpromised wall along the southern border. Democrats refuse
to give him the money.
Sanders, in her statement,
called the raises “another unnecessary byproduct of the
shutdown” and put the onus on
Congress, saying it “can easily
take care of this by funding the
government and securing our
borders.”
House Majority Leader Steny
Hoyer, a Democrat, also called
on Senate Majority Leader
Mitch McConnell to hold a
vote on the measures passed by
the House Thursday night to reopen the government and provide back pay to those affected
by the shutdown.
Jeremy Barnum said Friday.
The state of New York was
footing the bill to operate the
Statue of Liberty-Ellis Island
National Monument, while a
private company donated portable toilets at several locations
on the National Mall in Wash-
ington, D.C.
At Joshua Tree National Park
in Southern California, volunteers have hauled away garbage,
cleaned restrooms and restocked toilet paper, said John
Lauretig, executive director of
Friends of Joshua Tree.
— AP
AP / NAM Y. HUH
Transportation Security Administration officers at Chicago O’Hare.
Donald Trump pushed back Saturday on suggestions that the
callouts represented a “sickout” that was having significant
consequences on U.S. air travel.
TSA spokesman Michael
Bilello tweeted that 5.5 percent
of the TSA workforce at Dallas/Fort Worth International
Airport called out Friday, compared with 3.5 percent on a normal day. He said wait times
“may be affected” but that all
passengers would be screened
as normal.
Hydrick Thomas, president
of the national TSA employee
union, told CNN that up to 170
TSA employees at John F.
Kennedy Airport have called
out each day this week. Union
officials did not respond to requests for comment Saturday.
— AP
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
Top: Volunteer Alexandra Degen cleans a restroom at Joshua Tree
National Park in California. Above: Visitors at the Statue of Liberty,
which New York is paying to keep open during the shutdown.
NEW YORK — The federal
agency tasked with guaranteeing U.S. airport security acknowledged an increase in the
number of its employees calling off work during the partial
government shutdown.
Employees of the Transportation Security Administration
are expected to work without
pay during the shutdown because their jobs are considered
essential.
The TSA said in a statement
Friday that callouts that began
over the holiday period have increased. The agency did not
say how many of its employees
have called out, but it said the
callouts have had “minimal impact given that there are 51,739
employees supporting the
screening process.” The statement said wait times “may be affected” but so far “remain well
within TSA standards.”
“TSA is closely monitoring
the situation,” the agency statement said. “Security effectiveness will not be compromised.”
The Department of Homeland Security and President
newsday.com
AFP/GETTY IMAGES
Airports see rise in TSA callouts
TOP STORIES
A8
Derailment probes
LIRR investigates cause of two
nonpassenger trains leaving tracks
alfonso.castillo@newsday.com
The Long Island Rail Road has
started 2019 having to investigate
two train derailments that occurred over four days, raising
concerns by one state lawmaker
about the agency’s safety practices.
Early Monday morning, a nonpassenger LIRR train derailed at
a Port Washington rail yard, causing some delays and cancellations during the morning rush.
On Thursday afternoon, another nonpassenger train derailed at a Jamaica yard, causing
problems during the evening
rush hour. Shortly before 8 p.m.
Thursday, the railroad told customers that crews had put the
train back on the tracks and
“track personnel are on-scene assessing any track damage and
are working to clear the area.”
“Safety is a core value of the
Long Island Rail Road,” the LIRR
said in a statement Friday.
“While there were no injuries
and no risk to our customers or
the public, we regret any impact
these events may have had on
service and to the quality of our
customers’ experience.”
The railroad said it was still investigating both derailments to
By the numbers
LIRR derailments
in the first 10
months of 2018:
5
LIRR derailments
in the past week:
2
Derailments
among 790 U.S.
railroads in first 10
months of 2018:
1,097
SOURCE: LIRR, FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION
determine their causes — a
process that involves examining
human factors, infrastructure,
equipment and environmental
conditions. The LIRR will use
the findings to help prevent such
incidents from happening again,
railroad officials said.
Although the LIRR described
both derailments as “minor,”
newly elected Sen. Jim Gaughran
(D-Huntington) took to Twitter
on Thursday to voice concern
for what he called “continued
troubling incidents” and “near
abdication for safety standards.”
“This is just happening way
too often,” Gaughran said in an interview Friday. “Even when
they’re minor, they’re creating
such disruption for my con-
CHARLES ECKERT
BY ALFONSO A. CASTILLO
Long Island Rail Road personnel respond to a derailed passenger train near the Sunnyside Yards in 2018.
stituents and others on Long Island who are just trying to get
back and forth to work everyday.”
Gaughran also noted on Twitter that an LIRR train struck a
tractor trailer at a Quogue crossing Thursday morning, causing a
suspension of service on the
Montauk line. The tractor trailer
was stuck on the tracks, and the
driver of the vehicle later was issued a summons. Because of the
incident, there were delays of 15
to 20 minutes Friday morning on
the branch.
The incidents raise concerns
about the state of the LIRR’s
aging infrastructure, Gaughran
said. He said it was imperative
that the Senate allocate funding
as part of the state budget
process “to just fix it.”
According to the Federal Railroad Administration, the LIRR
reported five derailments in the
first 10 months of 2018. The railroad reported four derailments
in all of 2017.
Among 790 railroads in the
United States reporting to the
FRA, there were 1,097 train derailments in the first 10 months
of 2018, a 3.6 percent increase
over the same period in 2017.
Although last week’s derailments affected relatively few passenger trains, some LIRR riders
expressed frustration over the incidents on social media.
“2nd #LIRR derailment in the
last week!” @JohnDillworth
tweeted.
A new push to rename Trump park DEMS’ ABORTION RIGHTS BILL
BY YANCEY ROY
BY YANCEY ROY
ALBANY — Democrats now
in control of the State Senate
reintroduced a bill that would
strip Donald Trump’s name from
a long-closed state park in the
Hudson Valley.
Sen. Brad Hoylman (D-Manhattan) filed two versions of his
proposal. One would strip the
President’s name from the park,
which straddles Westchester
and Putnam counties. The other
would rename the park in honor
of Heather D. Heyer, the woman
who was run over and killed by a
white supremacist at a Charlottesville, Virginia, rally in 2017.
Trump donated the land to
New York in 2006 after his plans
for a golf course fell through. The
park closed in 2010 because of bud-
yancey.roy@newsday.com
THE NEW YORK TIMES / JAMES ESTRIN
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
newsday.com
yancey.roy@newsday.com
Democrats want to change signs like this one on the Taconic Parkway.
get cuts and has remained shuttered; some signs are still there.
Hoylman has sponsored the renaming bills before, but neither
went anywhere in 2017 or 2018 in
the Republican-led Senate. That
could change this year after the
Democrats won a resounding
Senate majority on Election Day.
“Having a park named after
you is an honor Donald Trump
doesn’t deserve,” Hoylman said
Friday. “New Yorkers should
take a stand against his racism
and divisiveness by renaming
this state park.”
ALBANY — Now controlling both houses of the State
Legislature, Democrats introduced a long-stalled abortion
rights bill Friday and said
they’d pass it by the anniversary of the landmark Roe v.
Wade court decision, Jan. 22.
Supporters say the bill
would codify into state law
rights guaranteed by Roe V.
Wade and was necessary because a new U.S. Supreme
Court majority could threaten
abortion protections.
“With reproductive rights
and access under attack from
Washington in a way we
haven’t seen in decades, now is
the time to pass the Reproduc-
tive Health Act and reclaim
New York’s place as a leader on
women’s reproductive freedom,” State Sen. Liz Krueger
(D-Manhattan) said, referring
to the sponsors’ title for the
abortion bill.
The Democrat-dominated
Assembly has approved the bill
annually for several years. But
it always stalled in the Republican-led State Senate.
On Election Day, however,
Democrats seized a commanding 40-23 State Senate majority and vowed to rapidly approve an array of “progressive” bills dealing with abortion, criminal justice, voting
rights and guns.
State Senate Republicans
didn’t immediately comment
Friday.
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A10
BY JOHN ASBURY AND STEFANIE DAZIO
john.asbury@newsday.com,
stefanie.dazio@newsday.com
A Long Beach volunteer firefighter driving to a call early
Saturday struck two pedestrians, killing a Lindenhurst
woman and injuring her husband as they crossed the street,
police said.
The 22-year-old firefighter,
whose name was not released,
was responding to a call about
a house fire with the blue emergency lights of his 1999 Buick
Century turned on, Nassau
County police said.
Julia M. Morales, 57, and her
husband, 60, were walking
north across East Park Avenue
around 12:30 a.m. after leaving
the Half Moon Bar and Grill,
Nassau County police said in a
news release. The name of the
man injured was not released.
The Buick, traveling west on
East Park Avenue near Riverside Boulevard, struck the duo,
police said. The woman was
pronounced dead at the scene
by an emergency medical technician, also from the Long
Beach Fire Department.
The man was taken to a hospital in critical but stable condition, with injuries including a
broken spine, lacerated kidney
and multiple fractures, police
said.
The Buick was impounded
for a safety check. The investigation is ongoing, including
whether the driver was speeding. An official said he was
questioned at the scene and released.
The firefighter was responding to a report of smoke coming from a house, Long Beach
Fire
Commissioner
Scott
Kemins said. The call was
found to be related to a backyard fire pit in the 200 block of
West Market Street, about two
blocks from the crash.
The firefighter was first heading to the nearby Long Beach
fire station at City Hall.
Volunteer firefighters are generally trained to respond to the
firehouse before going to a call.
PAUL MAZZA
Firefighter driving to call hits 2, killing 1
Police investigate the scene on East Park Avenue in Long Beach on Saturday morning.
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TOP STORIES
A12
‘Agiftto
America’
Lester Wolff, 100, is the oldest person
alive to have served in Congress
BY CRAIG SCHNEIDER
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
newsday.com
Former U.S. Congressman Lester Wolff with his children Diane Yorg
and Bruce Wolff at the celebration at the Garden City Hotel.
credits with bringing him into
politics. Working at the time as
a television interviewer, Wolff
sat down with Kennedy before
the 1960 Democratic convention. Kennedy started talking
about a Long Island representative who was no fan of his, and
suggested Wolff run against
him.
Wolff eventually did, and
won a trip to Congress in 1964
that lasted until he was defeated in 1980.
There is a photo of Wolff and
Anwar Sadat, the former president of Egypt. During a trip to
the Middle East, Sadat gave
Wolff a message to bring back
to then-President Jimmy Carter.
“At that time relations between Israel and the Arab
world were very difficult,”
Wolff recalled. “Sadat told me
to pass word to Carter that
(then-Secretary of State Henry)
Kissinger should make more
trips back and forth.”
That, Wolff added, helped
spur the Camp David Accords,
the 1978 agreements between Israel and Egypt that led to the
first peace treaty between Israel and an Arab country.
Even at age 100, Wolff is
sharp and alert. The years, of
course, have taken their toll. He
wears a hearing aid, gets
around with a cane and needs
help getting up and down
stairs. He long ago stopped playing tennis. And cardiac troubles have left him with five
stents near his heart.
But the man who represented Long Island’s North
Shore retains his charm and the
big smile that endeared him to
numerous historic figures.
“He’s able to get so many people to like him in a short period
of time,” said former New York
Congressman Charles Rangel,
who has been close with Wolff
through the years. “He has an
endearing personality.”
Rangel recalled that 40 years
ago Wolff was a major force behind the Taiwan Relations Act.
The act has largely defined the
U.S. relationship with Taiwan,
which has become a major ally
and trading partner.
Wolff also made a trip to
China in 1978 and met with
leader Deng Xiaoping. Their
conversations are credited with
helping to establish formal
diplomatic relations between
the People’s Republic of China
and the United States.
“We turned out to be good
friends,” Wolff said. “We stayed
in touch for years after I left
Congress.”
In a statement Friday, House
Speaker Nancy Pelosi said:
“The service of Congressman
Lester Wolff was in office from 1964 until his defeat in 1980. Today
DANIELLE SILVERMAN
How does a man who has influenced world events — helping establish relations between
the United States and China, advancing Arab-Israeli accords —
celebrate his 100th birthday?
There was talk of a celebration at the United Nations, but
former Long Island Democratic
Congressman Lester Wolff said
he preferred a different option:
A small get-together with family on Saturday.
“I really didn’t want to make
this occasion seem like a signoff or something like that,”
Wolff said. “It just feels like a
number.”
Besides, the oldest living person to have served in Congress
remains busy. He is writing
three books on topics ranging
from Asian affairs to the keys to
living a long life. He still makes
regular trips to Washington,
where he hosts an internet
show called “Ask Congress.”
And he remains feisty as ever
in his posts on Facebook and
Twitter. (A recent tweet on the
partial government shutdown:
“Here LIES the Rep party. Dead
on arrival.”)
At the same time, the occasion of leaving a century behind him doesconjure up some
memories and thoughts on life.
Wolff, whose birthday was
Friday, started that day as he
does every day — working in
the office of his home in Muttontown, answering emails,
posting on social media and taking phone calls. On this day,
most of the calls came from
birthday well-wishers.
In between calls, the eightterm congressman pointed out
some of the photos on the wall
featuring himself with some of
the world’s most notable figures
of the last half-century. The stories behind the photos serve as
a kind of connect-the-dots tapestry of modern world history.
There’s Wolff with President
John F. Kennedy, the man he
NEWSDAY / HOWARD SIMMONS
craig.schneider@newsday.com
Lester Wolff with President John F. Kennedy
Lester Wolff has been a gift to
America. . . . In the Congress,
he was a champion of a strong
and smart foreign policy that
forged new friendships and alliances across the globe that
continue to keep us safe today.”
‘Most Fortunate’
If Wolff seems like a man
who has cheated death, that’s
because he has, time and again.
He was targeted for death five
times over the years, he said.
A Burmese militia of 5,000
was dispatched to shoot down
his helicopter in 1979, aiming to
stop his efforts to interrupt the
drug trade, Wolff said. He was
the chairman of the House Se-
lect Committee on Narcotics
Abuse and Control, and visiting
the country with the authorization of Congress. The militia
didn’t get him.
Around the same time period, Wolff said a Thai assassin,
also wanting to stop his antidrug work, also failed.
In the mid-’60s, a father who
lost a son in the Vietnam War
was arrested after he sent Wolff
a death threat because of
Wolff’s opposition to the war,
he said.
In the late ’60s, two Palestinian groups, angered over his
support of Israel, tried to kill
him as well, he said. In one instance, they hijacked a plane,
TOP STORIES
A13
Bluefin goes for $3M
at Tokyo market sale
DANIELLE SILVERMAN
he writes, hosts a podcast and is active on social media.
On Saturday, Wolff’s birthday party lived up to its billing
— about 20 people, most immediate family, gathered around
three tables in the restaurant
of the Garden City Hotel.
His wife of more than 60
years, Blanche, died in 1997.
But his son and daughter, who
he hears from twice a day,
a former gas plant site on
Tokyo Bay. The move was delayed repeatedly due to concerns over soil contamination.
Japanese are the biggest consumers of the torpedo-shaped
bluefin tuna, and surging consumption here and overseas
has led to overfishing of the
species. Experts warn it faces
possible
extinction,
with
stocks of Pacific bluefin depleted by 96 percent from their
pre-industrial levels.
“The celebration surrounding
the annual Pacific bluefin auction hides how deeply in trouble
this species really is,” said Jamie
Gibbon, associate manager for
global tuna conservation at The
Pew Charitable Trusts.
There are signs of progress
toward protecting the bluefin,
and Japan and other governments have backed plans to rebuild Pacific bluefin stocks,
with a target of 20 percent of
historic levels by 2034.
ARIZ. WOMAN IN VEGETATIVE STATE GIVES BIRTH
The Associated Press
PHOENIX — A woman said
to have been in a vegetative
state for at least a decade at a
private health care facility in
Phoenix reportedly gave birth
recently, triggering a police investigation and reviews by
state agencies in a situation
that the state governor’s office
called “deeply troubling.’”
Azfamily.com, a news website for television stations
KPHO and KTVK, first reported late Thursday that, according to sources not identified by the website, a woman
gave birth Dec. 29 living at a
Hacienda HealthCare facility
where the staff was unaware
that she was pregnant.
Two other Phoenix television stations later aired similar
reports.
According to some reports,
the woman was a victim of a
near-drowning more than 10
years ago. Her identity hasn’t
been reported, and it’s not
known if she has family or a
guardian.
Sources quoted in the reports said the woman was
heard to be moaning and that
the baby’s head was starting to
emerge when a nurse came in.
“None of the staff were
aware that she was pregnant
until she was pretty much giving birth,” azfamily.com quoted
a source familiar with the situation as saying. That person
said the baby was said to be
alive and healthy.
Following the azfamily.com
report, Hacienda Health Care
and state officials issued brief
statements about the situation,
expressing concern and describing reviews being conducted and steps being taken.
But they did not specifically
confirm the reported pregnancy and birth.
A Phoenix Police Department
spokesman, Sgt. Tommy Thompson, said only that the “the matter is under investigation.”
Hacienda said it in a state-
ment it was cooperating with
law enforcement and reviewing its security protocols after
becoming aware of a “deeply
disturbing incident and “an unprecedented matter.”
“While federal and state privacy laws prohibit us from publicly discussing a patient’s
health or case, Hacienda has
and will continue to cooperate
fully with law enforcement and
all the relevant regulatory agencies regarding this matter,” Hacienda said in its statement.
Hacienda’s website said it
serves infants, children and
young adults who are “medically fragile” or have developmental disabilities.
The state Department of Economic Security, a social-service agency whose functions
include serving disabled people, said it performed health
and safety checks on all of the
residents at the Hacienda facility after the birth was reported
and was working with police
on their investigation.
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
Looking Ahead
were among those gathered.
Wolff sat at the head of the
front table, looking dapper in a
crisp navy blue suit. He appeared thrilled to see so much
family around him, right down
to his great-grandchildren.
“Some are in college, and
one is getting married in June,”
he said.
There were no big speeches
by celebrities or high-ranking
officials. Just a lot of the feeling that only family can provide. And memories.
His granddaughter, Sonya
Everett, who drove up from
her home in the Washington
area, recalled that when she
was 4, her grandfather took
her onto the floor of the U.S.
House of Representatives,
where she sat on the knee of
Massachusetts Rep. Thomas
“Tip” O’Neill Jr.
“I made a speech,” Everett,
51, recalled. “I said, “You have
to stop pollution now.’”
Looking ahead, Wolff aims
to stay active as ever, keeping
up on politics, posting on social media, hosting his show.
His keys to living a long life?
A good night’s sleep, a low-salt
diet, good genes and some lox
on a bagel every morning.
“It’s been a great ride,” he
said. “After all, I’ve made it this
far.”
Kiyomura Corp. owner Kiyoshi Kimura, left, stands near the bluefin
tuna for which he made a winning bid in Tokyo on Saturday.
newsday.com
but he had taken another.
“I think I’ve been most fortunate,” said Wolff, giving much
credit to God.
Though many of his accomplishments have been on the international stage, Wolff has
also taken on major issues
closer to home. Upset about a
plan to build an 8.5-mile bridge
connecting Oyster Bay and
Rye in Westchester County, he
pushed to create a wildlife
refuge as a way to block it.
The Oyster Bay National
Wildlife Refuge was created in
1968. Rep. Thomas Suozzi has
introduced a bill to rename the
refuge in Wolff’s honor.
“The Long Island Sound is
our national park and, without
Lester’s tenacity and willingness to stand up to powerful interests, the environmental security of the Sound would have
been compromised,” Suozzi
said in a statement Friday.
TOKYO — A 612-pound
bluefin tuna sold for a record
$3 million at the first auction of
2019, after Tokyo’s famed Tsukiji market was moved to a new
site on the city’s waterfront.
The winning bid for the
prized but threatened species
at the predawn auction Saturday was more than double the
2013 annual New Year auction.
It was paid by Kiyomura
Corp., whose owner, Kiyoshi
Kimura, runs the Sushi Zanmai
chain. Kimura has often won
the annual auction in the past.
Japanese broadcaster NHK
showed a beaming Kimura saying that he was surprised by
the high price of tuna this year.
But he added, “The quality of
the tuna I bought is the best.”
The auction prices are way
above usual for bluefin tuna.
The fish normally sells for up
to $40 a pound, but the price
rises to over $200 a pound
near the year’s end, especially
for prized catches from Oma in
northern Japan.
Last year’s auction was the
last at Tsukiji before the market shifted to a new facility on
AP / KOKI SENGOKU
The Associated Press
TOP STORIES
A14
POWER POLES COMING DOWN
3 dead in
shooting
at lanes
BY MARK HARRINGTON
mark.harrington@newsday.com
LIPA and PSEG Long Island
have agreed to remove 24 tall
steel poles and instead bury the
power line along a busy section
of roadway in Eastport following
an outcry from residents and a
lawsuit by Brookhaven Town.
The cost of the makeover
could reach $13.5 million, PSEG
said.
Under terms of a settlement,
PSEG will remove the steel
poles along a milelong stretch
of Eastport Manor Road from
Sunrise Highway south service
road to a LIPA substation on
Montauk Highway. The poles,
which are around 80 feet tall
and some 9 feet around, are set
in concrete foundations and
carry heavy high-voltage transmission lines. The poles were
placed in spring 2017 on LIPA
rights of way near homes, businesses and a shopping center.
The agreement doesn’t address the nearly 200 additional
steel poles that remain on a bucolic stretch of County Road 51
from Eastport to Riverhead in
the pine barrens. Brookhaven
Supervisor Edward P. Romaine,
who said he was “happy” about
the settlement, nevertheless expressed “concern” about the remaining poles, which have already been struck at least
twice, once resulting in a traffic
fatality.
“We are gravely concerned
about the traffic safety aspect
of these poles being so close to
the roadway in what appears to
be a violation of federal and
state highway safety standards,” Romaine said.
PSEG spokesman David
Gaier said the poles on Route 51
“were placed in compliance
with, and meet all, applicable
permitting and regulatory requirements.”
PSEG said removal of the
steel poles on Eastport Manor
Road and burying the power
line are expected to be completed in 2020 after “permitting, procurement, engineering
studies and design” work.
Gaier said the cost, estimated
between $9 million and $13.5
million, would not “create an incremental increase for ratepayers,” coming from the utility’s
capital budget.
Nearly all LIPA costs are ultimately paid by ratepayers.
PSEG chief operating officer
Dan Eichhorn said the agreement, reached after talks with
State Sen. Kenneth LaValle (RPort Jefferson) and Assemb.
Fred Thiele (I-Sag Harbor), “upholds our commitment to provide safety, reliability and customer satisfaction.”
PSEG in 2017 had previously
agreed to remove the nearly
one-mile stretch of poles, but
withdrew the agreement after
Brookhaven sued.
NEWSDAY / JOHN PARASKEVAS
Burying line to settle suit
The steel poles on Eastport Manor Road in Eastport.
Cops: Teacher had sex with former student
nicholas.spangler@newsday.com
Suffolk County police arrested a Brentwood middle
school teacher Friday on
charges he had sexual contact
with a former student.
Thomas Barton, 54, was arrested by Special Victims Section and Computer Crimes Unit
detectives at his Medford home
at 4:45 p.m. He has been charged
with rape, criminal sex act and
endangering the welfare of a
child, police said in a release.
The former student is a
16-year-old girl, a police
spokesman said. In the release,
police accused Barton of engag-
SCPD
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
newsday.com
BY NICHOLAS SPANGLER
Thomas Barton
ing in an “inappropriate sexual
relationship” with her. The
spokesman would not say how
police learned of the relation-
ship.
The spokesman said Barton,
who works at North Middle
School, was a physical education teacher. School board meeting minutes from 2018 list Barton as a North Middle School
wrestling coach.
In a statement emailed by a
representative,
Brentwood
schools Superintendent Richard
Loeschner said, “The employee
has been administratively reassigned from his job responsibilities and is prohibited from entering school grounds.”
District officials are cooperating with the police investigation, Loeschner said. “The
safety of our students is our top
priority,” he said.
A district representative said
Barton had worked at the district for about 30 years.
Barton was arraigned Saturday at First District Court in Central Islip and pleaded not guilty
to two felony counts of rape. Suffolk County Judge John Schettino ordered him held on
$40,000 cash bail or $20,000
bond and issued an order of protection barring contact with the
victim in the case. He is set to return to court Thursday.
Detectives are asking anyone
with information to contact the
Special Victims Section at
631-852-6531 Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to midnight.
TORRANCE, Calif. —
Three men were fatally shot
late Friday and four injured
when a brawl at a popular Los
Angeles-area bowling alley
and karaoke bar erupted into
gunfire that had terrified patrons, some children, running
for their lives.
Police in the coastal city of
Torrance responded shortly
after midnight to calls of
shots at the Gable House
Bowl. They found seven people with gunshot wounds.
Three men were pronounced dead at the scene
and two were taken to a hospital, Sgt. Ronald Harris said.
Two other men were struck
by gunfire but “opted to seek
their own medical attention.”
Authorities have not identified the victims nor suspects or released details
about what led to the shooting. But witnesses said it
stemmed from a fight between two large groups.
Dwayne Edwards, 60, of
Los Angeles, said he received
a call from his nephew that
his 28-year-old son, Astin Edwards, was one of those
killed. His nephew told him
his son was attempting to
break up a fight when a gunman “just started unloading.”
A grieving mother told
KABC-7 her 28-year-old son,
Robert Meekins, was also
trying to break up the fight
and that Meekins and Astin
Edwards were friends.
“They were friends so I
know he probably jumped in
and helped Astin and whoever he was with ... but I don’t
think my son deserves to die,”
Anglean Hubbard said.
The third victim was
20-year-old Michael Radford,
his sister Latrice Dumas told
the Torrance Daily Breeze.
“He was happy. He was always a protector,” Dumas
said. “That’s how he got into
this, he was trying to protect
others.”
Wes Hamad, a 29-year-old
Torrance resident, was at
the bowling alley with his
13-year-old niece and cousin
when he saw a “huge fight”
break out. Hamad said the
brawl, which lasted about
five minutes, blocked the entrance and spiraled into
“complete chaos.”
— AP
TOP STORIES
A15
A gift of one’s self
Liver from rabbi
he didn’t know
saves man’s life
with kidney donors, said she
was “ecstatic” the surgery took
place. “There was a long road
until I reached this point,” she
said.
Simon said that when the
two men first met, it was “emotional.” But an even more moving moment came when he first
saw Levitz two days after the
surgery.
“Just to be able to see how
healthy he looked,” Simon said.
“You could see that the operation was successful, you could
see the light in his eyes, you
could see the color of his skin
had already changed. ... I was
overcome with emotion.”
BY BART JONES
bart.jones@newsday.com
STEFANIE LEVITZ
Showing by example
Rabbi Ephraim Simon, left, and Adam Levitz, of Woodbury, at the Cleveland Clinic.
transplanted liver portion and
the portion left behind in the
donor’s body regenerate rapidly,
reaching normal volume within
a couple months, according to
Mayo.
Rare donation
Increasingly frustrated, he
connected through relatives
with Chaya Lipschutz, a Brooklyn resident and kidney donor
who devotes part of her life to
matching kidney donors and recipients. She runs the KidneyMitzvah.com website.
Lipschutz knew that Simon,
who donated one of his kidneys
in 2009, had been hoping since
2012 to donate part of his liver.
But regulations and policies
against being a live donor twice
made it difficult to arrange.
Eventually, Lipschutz heard
that the Cleveland Clinic might
perform such surgery. She suggested Simon and Levitz try.
The two were a match, and
the clinic accepted.
Lipschutz, who deals mainly
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
The Cleveland Clinic said it
was rare for a kidney donor to
then donate part of his or her
liver, and many hospitals will
not carry out such surgery.
Levitz is still in Cleveland recovering, staying at a hotel on
the grounds of the hospital. He
hopes to return to Long Island
within the next few weeks.
Levitz’s health ordeal dates
to his teenage years, when he
was diagnosed with Crohn’s disease at 15. He was able to func-
tion adequately until several
years ago, when complications
from the condition began to affect his liver. He developed primary sclerosing cholangitis, or
PSC.
He grew weak, had to quit his
job as a credit manager for a food
distributor and was hospitalized
five times in the past year alone
— often for weeks at a time. “I
have not worked in the last couple of years because I could not
get off the couch,” he said.
He started looking for a
donor, mainly in New York, and
twice rushed to Philadelphia
when livers were available
from deceased donors. In one
case the liver was not in good
enough condition; in the other
it was too large.
He said part of his motivation for the transplant was to
give an example to his children
of what Jewish values mean.
“A rabbi’s greatest sermon is
the way he lives his life,” Simon
said. “A parent’s greatest lecture is the way we live our
lives. ... What I want my story
to do is to inspire others to
leave their comfort zone to sacrifice to help another human
being.”
Rabbi Tuvia Teldon, head of
the Chabad movement on Long
Island and a friend of Simon’s,
said doing a mitzvah, or good
deed, does not require a person
“to give up your lung, give up
your organs. ... That you are
able to translate a mitzvah into
such a high calling is, I think,
very rare amongst human beings. It’s a real act of pure
unadulterated kindness. It’s just
an amazing thing to do. I think
he literally saved a life.”
The mitzvah commandment
has parallels in other faiths, he
said. “There is no question that
I think every religion has some
type of precept of going the
extra yard for a fellow human
being and not just being concerned about your own needs.”
Levitz, whose two oldest children are seniors at Syosset High
School, said he is still taken
aback by Simon’s sacrifice.
“With all the bad that goes
on in the world, there are good
people out there who are doing
things just to do it. They don’t
want any kind of payback, they
don’t want anything in return,
they just want to help another
human out,” he said. “It’s like a
guardian angel looking over
you.”
newsday.com
Adam Levitz of Woodbury
was dying, desperately in need
of a liver transplant. For nearly
two years he searched for a
donor.
Then, partly through a
woman who runs a website
called
KidneyMitzvah.com,
Levitz, 44, found Rabbi
Ephraim Simon.
Simon, who had already donated a kidney to another patient, wanted to take the unusual step of also donating part
of his liver.
Levitz and Simon met in person for the first time in December at the renowned Cleveland
Clinic. Two days later, on Dec.
20, surgeons performed the
transplant.
So far, Levitz is thriving.
“I was speechless,” Levitz said.
“What do you say to a guy you
don’t even know, that has no relationship to you, that is willing to
put his health at risk by undergoing major surgery to help a complete stranger out, to give me life
so I can see my 17-year-old twins
and my 11-year-old grow up and
graduate from high school, graduate college?”
Simon, 50, leader of the Orthodox Chabad Lubavitch
movement based in Teaneck,
N.J., and himself the father of
nine, said he was grateful for
the chance to help.
“To be able to bring somebody life, to be able to bring a
husband back to his wife, a father back to his children — it’s
a powerful experience,” Simon
said. “Sometimes you have a situation where somebody is
dying and there is nothing you
can do. But here ... you have a
situation where somebody is
dying, but there is something
that can be done.”
In a liver transplant, surgeons
first operate on the donor, removing the portion of the liver for
transplant, according to the
Mayo Clinic. Then surgeons remove the recipient’s diseased
liver and replace it with the donated liver portion, connecting
blood vessels and bile ducts. The
flash!
See who should, will
win Golden Globes
newsday.com/movies
ANNAPURNA PICTURES / TATUM MANGUS
A16
Stephan James, left, and Brian Tyree Henry star in “If Beale Street Could Talk.”
Globes showcase
Hollywood diversity
“Absolutely
The No. 1 Show
in the world.”
—Kenn Wells, former lead dancer of English National Ballet
“
I’ve reviewed about 4,000 shows.
None can compare to what I saw tonight.”
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
newsday.com
—Richard Connema, renowned Broadway critic
“Absolutely the greatest of the great!
It must be experienced.”
—Christine Walevska, “Goddess of the Cello”, watched Shen Yun 5 times
JAN 10–20 LINCOLN CENTER
MAR 6–17 David H. Koch Theater
ShenYun.com/NY
888.907.4697
MAR 20–24 SUNY Purchase • MAR 29-31 Stamford, CT • APR 26-MAY 4 NJPAC Newark
BY RAFER GUZMÁN
rafer.guzman@newsday.com
Four movies about people of color
will compete for the top prize at Sunday
night’s Golden Globes ceremony, a milemarker for diversity at the 76-year-old
awards show.
The superhero film “Black Panther,”
Spike Lee’s “BlacKkKlansman” and the
literary drama “If Beale Street Could
Talk,” all featuring largely black casts,
are in the running for best dramatic motion picture, along with “Bohemian
Rhapsody,” a biopic about the rock
singer Freddie Mercury, who was of
Parsi descent.
The Globes’ diverse slate of film nominees, chosen by the Hollywood Foreign
Press Association, comes at a time when
the Oscars are trying to shed long-standing perceptions of bias and elitism. After
two years of criticism from the
#OscarsSoWhite campaign, the Academy
of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences
added more than 900 new members in an
effort to diversify its ranks of Oscar voters.
While that move was well-received, the
Academy’s proposal for a so-called best
popular film award, intended to honor
blockbusters and comic-book movies, met
with such widespread mockery that the notion was quickly scrapped. The HFPA, by
nominating so many films with nonwhite
casts — including a superhero movie —
seems to be laying down a challenge to the
Academy, which announces its nominees
on Jan. 22.
Even the fact that the Globes has two
hosts, Andy Samberg and Sandra Oh,
feels like a tweak to the Academy, which
has had trouble finding even one. After
comedian Kevin Hart stepped down as
Oscars host following new criticism
over old homophobic tweets, the Acad-
emy has yet to name a replacement.
Four actors of color are also in the running for awards this year. John David
Washington, who plays a cop in “BlacKkKlansman,” is a best dramatic actor nominee; Regina King and Mahershala Ali, two
black supporting actors, have been nominated for “If Beale Street Could Talk” and
“Green Book,” respectively; Constance
Wu is competing for best comedic actress
in “Crazy Rich Asians.”
As always, the Globes will marshal
plenty of star-power for its roster of presenters. Scheduled to take the stage are
Bill Murray, Antonio Banderas and Chris
Pine, among many others. Adam Driver
a current nominee for his performance
in “BlacKkKlansman,” will also serve as
a presenter.
At least two winners have already
been announced. Jeff Bridges, a six-time
Globe nominee, is this year’s recipient of
the Cecil B. DeMille Award for lifetime
achievement, while the first-ever Carol
Burnett Award, for achievement in the television field, will be given to its namesake.
As for the night’s competitive awards,
the Dick Cheney biopic, “Vice,” is a clear
favorite with six nominations, more
than any other film. In the high-profile
dramatic categories, “A Star Is Born” is
widely considered a front-runner for
best film, best actress for Lady Gaga and
best actor for Bradley Cooper, who is
also nominated for best director.
Alfonso Cuarón’s critically acclaimed
“Roma” seems poised to win best foreign
language film.
The Golden Globes ceremony airs at 8
p.m. Sunday on NBC.
MORE
INSIDE
Do awards shows
still matter?
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LONG ISLAND
The Wainscott Sand and Gravel sand pit. Wainscott Sand is one of the defendants in the lawsuit.
Towns sue makers over
chemicals found in wells
BY VERA CHINESE
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
newsday.com
vera.chinese@newsday.com
Southampton and East
Hampton towns are taking
legal actions against the manufacturers of products containing perfluorinated compounds
— chemicals linked to cancers
and other health impacts —
after those chemicals were
found in public and private
wells across the South Fork.
East Hampton Town last
month filed a lawsuit against
the manufacturers of products
containing
perfluorooctane
sulfonic acid (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA),
once used in nonstick products such as Teflon, made by
DuPont, and Scotchguard,
made by the 3M Company.
Both companies are defendants in the lawsuit, as are
other corporations.
The suit, electronically filed
in State Supreme Court in Suffolk County on Dec. 28, alleges the companies were
aware of the health risks associated with the compounds
and failed to alert the public.
“Defendants acted with
knowledge, intent, fraud and/or
malice driven by their own motives to profit from their products with conscious disregard
for public health or the environment,” the lawsuit states.
The Southampton Town
Board voted last month to hire
Melville law firm Napoli Shkolnik to represent the town in
possible similar litigation on a
contingency basis. The firm is
representing the town-owned
Hampton Bays Water District
in a similar suit filed after
those compounds were found
in three public wells in the
hamlet in 2016 and 2017.
Health effects associated
with the chemicals include
liver damage, decreased fertility, developmental delays in fetuses and children, and being
a possible carcinogen, according to the U.S. Environmental
Protection Agency.
The compounds were also
once contained in firefighting
foam, which environmental
agencies have identified as a
major source of perfluorinated
compound contamination.
Other defendants in the
East Hampton Town lawsuit
include East Hampton Village,
which owns the East Hampton
Fire Department; the Bridgehampton Volunteer Fire Department; and the owners of
the Wainscott Sand & Gravel
sand pit. The East Hampton
and Bridgehampton fire departments used the foam at
the airport and the sand pit,
the lawsuit states.
A 3M spokeswoman said the
company acted responsibly in
handling products containing
the substances. East Hampton
Village declined to comment
and
representatives
from
Dupont, the Bridgehampton fire
department and Wainscott Sand
& Gravel could not be reached.
The Wainscott contamination was first announced in October 2017. Since then, PFOS
and PFOA have been detected
in more than 200 wells in the
hamlet. The state Department
of Environmental Conservation
is investigating both the townowned East Hampton Airport
and the Wainscott sand pit as
possible
contamination
sources, state officials said.
The town and the Suffolk
County Water Authority are
nearing completion on 45,000
feet of water mains to bring public water to hamlet residents, a
project estimated to cost $24
million. Public water, unlike private wells, is regularly monitored and must meet drinking
water standards.
The town lawsuit seeks unspecified damages to cover
the cost of providing bottled
water to affected homes, connecting residents to public
water, investigating and remediating the problem, and paying for potential damages
from a similar lawsuit filed
against the town and the manufacturers by Wainscott resident Kim Shipman in March.
East Hampton Town officials declined to discuss either
lawsuit, citing the town’s policy of not commenting on
pending litigation.
In Southampton, the chemicals have been detected in
more than 40 wells in East
Quogue as well as other areas
surrounding Gabreski Airport
in Westhampton Beach.
“We hired them [Napoli
Shkolnik] to go beyond the
Hampton Bays Water District,”
said Southampton Town Supervisor Jay Schneiderman. “We
have problems in Sagaponack,
Westhampton, East Quogue and
where else, we don’t know yet.”
The Southampton Town
Board also voted last month to
pay Toxic Targeting Inc., an
Ithaca-based environmental
site assessment firm, $25,000
to prepare a report mapping
potential sources and detailing the hazards the chemicals
pose in the town.
A PLAQUE
Couple travels to
Austria to honor
former teacher
BY PATRICIA KITCHEN
patricia.kitchen@newsday.com
It was summer of 2017 when
Ray Mascolo and his wife, Evelyn, booked a Danube River
cruise for this past October, taking them from Budapest, Hungary, to Passau, Germany.
Taking in the scenery and culture of central Europe was a
byproduct of their main mission: The East Northport couple was intent on honoring Sister Eileen Christie of the Sisters of St. Joseph in Brentwood,
who went missing in July 2016
in the Austrian village of Hallstatt.
The couple chose that particular cruise because one of its
stops put them within an hour
and a half drive of the village
where Sister Eileen, 72, had
sent her final email in July 2016.
The subsequent numerous
searches there were to no avail.
It bothered Ray Mascolo that
the villagers knew nothing
about Sister Eileen, so he hung
a weatherproof plaque, at his
expense, telling a bit about
“who she was, what she did and
that she touched a lot of people’s lives.”
At a ceremony Oct. 15, coordinated with Austrian officials,
Mascolo, a dentist, was given
the honor of fixing in place the
final screw of the commemorative panel, hung on a park shed
located near Lake Hallstatt.
The sister, an avid hiker and
swimmer, is believed to have
perished in that lake.
The veteran solo traveler
went missing while on a summer excursion first to Croatia,
then Austria — making her
fourth visit to Hallstatt, with
plans to move on to Italy, said
her nephew Bill Freda of Valley
Stream.
Indeed, the death certificate
issued this summer from the
U.S. State Department gave the
place of her “presumptive
death” as the “Lake Hallstatt
area,” with no remains found as
of yet, Freda said.
COURTESY BILL FREDA
GORDON M. GRANT
A18
Sister Eileen Christie
The certificate “is as close to
closure as we have,” Freda said,
and, unlike Hollywood scenarios, in the real world, “sometimes you’re left hanging.”
Freda said he still sees this in
terms of probability, with a lake
accident most likely, followed
by a hiking mishap, and then,
least likely, foul play.
Sister Eileen had retired a
year earlier after 25 years teaching theology at St. Anthony’s
High School in South Huntington, and before that teaching at
what’s now Trinity Regional
School, East Northport, with
the Mascolos’ two children
among her students.
One of her former colleagues,
Brother
Vincent
Adams, director of ministry at
LONG ISLAND
A19
CHRISTIAN SCHUSTER
FOR A MISSING LI NUN
CHRISTIAN SCHUSTER
The plaque the Mascolos placed near a lake in Hallstatt, Austria.
St. Anthony’s, said he first
heard of the Hallstatt trip at an
October fundraiser dinner honoring the Mascolo family.
“Everybody felt so good,” he
said. It was “such a gift” for
them to go and place the
plaque in her memory.
“It let people have a little bit
of comfort knowing there was a
way Sister was honored” in the
place she was last known to
visit. There’s a connection now,
Adams said, between “people
there and people here.”
Freda, too, said Mascolo’s ef-
fort was “very nice, very cool,
very respectful.”
With the cruise ship’s 14-hour
layover in Linz, Austria, Mascolo
said the idea had been to make
the three-hour round trip by car
to and from Hallstatt, with 15
minutes or so in between for a
The couple made it back to
the ship with two hours to
spare, Mascolo said, already
planning their next visit in two
years to celebrate their 45th
wedding anniversary — and to
gift the village with a park
bench in Sister Eileen’s memory.
He said he also left with the
satisfaction of hearing of the effort Austrian law enforcement
put into the many searches —
hundreds of people scouring
the woods, continuing lake
dives as more advanced equipment came along, cadaver dogs
that traced the sister’s path into
the lake.
And, as they were leaving the
village, something remarkable
occurred, he said.
The area had been in a
drought, with no precipitation
so far on their trip. But, a bit of
drizzle developed, and when it
cleared — there it was — a rainbow that reached right across
the lake.
To Mascolo, it was Sister
Eileen saying “thank you” for
the “recognition for what she
had done in her life.”
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
Ray and Evelyn Mascolo of East Northport went to Austria to honor Sister Eileen, who disappeared there.
brief plaque hanging.
In reality, that’s not how
things turned out, said Mascolo, 63, who also serves as a
consulting Suffolk County police surgeon, specializing in
dentistry.
About 10 officials came out
for the installation, including
the mayor and the chief of Austria’s federal police force, who
gave the couple a lift to and
from the cruise ship.
Mascolo’s Suffolk law enforcement connections helped
open doors that ultimately led
to his getting permission from
Austrian authorities to place
the plaque on village property,
he said.
Following the ceremony, the
Mascolos were taken for a tour
of the village, including a trip
up the funicular to visit its ancient salt mine.
The village is beautiful, he
said — the kind of place where
people don’t lock their doors.
And, while the couple’s aim was
to do something nice for Sister
Eileen, they also ended up having “a great time — the best day
of the vacation,” he said.
newsday.com
BARRY SLOAN
Lake Hallstatt, where Sister Eileen is believed to have drowned.
LONG ISLAND
A20
Their last goodbyes
Family braces for
funeral of LI teen
killed in crash
in El Salvador
❛
It’s obviously a
painful
situation. That’s
my baby sister.”
— Freddy Castro,
Ana’s brother
BY JEAN-PAUL SALAMANCA
More than two weeks after a
car crash in El Salvador killed
an 18-year-old Southampton
High School senior during the
holiday break, her friends and
family will be able to say their
goodbyes when her body
returns for Thursday funeral
services.
After what they described as
a long and difficult period of
waiting due to government services in El Salvador being
closed for the holidays, family
members of Ana Castro, who
died Dec. 23 in a car crash in
San Miguel, said her body will
be flown back from El Salvador
to New York Wednesday night.
“The hardest part has been
the waiting,” said her brother
Freddy Castro, 29, of Southampton, adding the family had been
anxious to bring his sister
home. Despite the delays, Castro said the U.S. Embassy had
been “very helpful” in expediting the return of Ana’s body.
Ana Castro was killed instantly when a drunken driver
struck the car she was traveling
in with her cousins and an
aunt, her family has said.
Costs for bringing Ana back
for her burial — estimated to
CASTRO FAMILY
jeanpaul.salamanca@newsday.com
The body of Ana Castro is to be returned to LI on Wednesday.
be $18,000 — have been a
major concern for her family,
Castro said. Already, the family
has spent $6,000 trying to bring
her home. However, other costs
were still coming in, such as
the $4,300 the family will have
to pay to have her body flown
home, he said.
Despite those expenses, Cas-
tro said it was likely they would
be covered via the GoFundMe
page the family set up to raise
money for Ana’s funeral. The
page had raised $25,520 by 5
p.m. Saturday.
Castro said his family had
been deeply moved by the support they had received.
“The community really came
together to help,” Castro said.
“As hard as this has been, at
least my parents will not be in
debt, and I’m very grateful for
that.”
Castro said his sister’s
death was “still fresh” for his
family, who he said were still
in shock.
“It’s obviously a painful situation. That’s my baby sister,” Castro said. “But we’re preparing
to face reality, and realize when
she gets home that this is it.
This is our final chance to say
goodbye to Ana.”
Services for Ana will be held
11 a.m. Thursday at Hampton
Bays United Methodist Church
in Hampton Bays, followed by
burial at Good Grounds Cemetery. The Whitting Funeral
Home in Glen Head will handle
funeral services, Castro said.
With Joie Tyrrell
5-15 years for driver in fatal hit-run DWI crash
john.asbury@newsday.com
A West Hempstead man was
sentenced Friday to 5 to 15
years in prison after pleading
guilty to a drunken hit-and-run
crash last year that killed a Baldwin man.
Acting
Nassau
County
Supreme Court Justice Meryl
Berkowitz sentenced Roy
Gomez, 39, in the death of Jovanni Bien-Amie in the March
13 crash on Grand Avenue in
Baldwin.
Gomez pleaded guilty in October to aggravated vehicular homicide, felony leaving the scene of
an incident resulting in death,
NCPD
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
newsday.com
BY JOHN ASBURY
Roy Gomez
two counts of third-degree misdemeanor assault and misdemeanor aggravated DWI. Prosecutors had recommended a sentence of 7 to 21 years in prison.
Nassau District Attorney
Madeline Singas said Gomez
was driving his 2004 Chevy TrailBlazer “while highly intoxicated”
when he crashed about 10:15 p.m.
into the back of a Nissan Altima
stopped at a red light.
Bien-Amie was riding in the
car with his parents Jacques
Bien-Aime
and
Kettelye
Plantin, who also were injured.
“The Bien-Amie family was
simply driving home after getting dinner together,” Singas said
in a statement. “It is unthinkable
that in a split second the selfish,
drunk and criminal driving of
the defendant stole the life of an
innocent 21-year-old man, injured his parents and imposed a
life sentence on the shattered
Bien-Amie family. Our thoughts
and sympathy are with them.”
Gomez’s attorney could not be
reached for comment Saturday.
The crash pushed the back of
the Altima into the front seats
of the car and trapped the family inside as it spun down
Grand Avenue, prosecutors
said. Jovanni Bien-Amie died
the next day from his injuries.
Prosecutors said Gomez sped
away and abandoned the SUV in
a parking lot before running to
hide in a charter boat in
Freeport, about three miles from
the crash. Police found him sleeping in the boat on Woodcleft Avenue, where he was arrested.
Long Island Office
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THIS DATE IN HISTORY
1838 Samuel Morse and
Alfred Vail gave the first
successful public demonstration of their telegraph, in
Morristown, New Jersey.
1919 The 26th president of
the United States, Theodore
Roosevelt, died at Sagamore
Hill in Oyster Bay at age 60.
1941 President Franklin D.
Roosevelt, in his State of the
Union address, outlined a
goal of “Four Freedoms”:
Freedom of speech and
expression; the freedom of
people to worship God in
their own way; freedom from
want; freedom from fear.
1993 Jazz trumpeter Dizzy
Gillespie, 75, died in Englewood, New Jersey; ballet
dancer Rudolf Nureyev died
in suburban Paris at age 54.
1994 Figure skater Nancy
Kerrigan was clubbed on the
leg by an assailant at Detroit’s Cobo Arena.
2001 With Vice President Al
Gore presiding in his capacity
as president of the Senate,
Congress formally certified
George W. Bush the winner
of the bitterly contested
2000 presidential election.
2018 Japanese air bag
maker Takata said it was
recalling an additional 3.3
million faulty air bag inflators.
A21
newsday.com
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
2145442101
LONG ISLAND
A22
Step 1 in Suffolk public campaign financing
POLITICS
& POWER
Rick Brand
rick.brand@newsday.com
S
uffolk County’s entry
into the brave new
world of public campaign financing may
still be two years away
from its official launch, but
work starts this month to create the bureaucracy needed to
get the system up and running.
At the same time, Republicans, who originally voted
against the plan at the end of
2017, are making a last-ditch
proposal to do away with the
whole idea before it can get off
the ground.
Bill sponsor Legis. Rob
Calarco (D-Patchogue) said the
legislation will create a system,
similar to New York City’s law,
that will level the playing field
for new candidates with matching funds while capping donations in local campaigns. “This
will increase public confidence
that their voices matter in elections and increases their influence over that of big money,”
Calarco said.
But Legis. Robert Trotta (RFort Salonga) is sponsoring a repeal measure saying the county
cannot afford it. “Given our repeated bond downgrades, we
should be using what money
we have to reducing our deficit,
not put it in politicians’ pockets,” he said. Trotta also said it
will raise campaign costs.
The new system would
allow legislative candidates,
beginning with the 2021 election, to get as much as $50,000
in a 4-to-1 public match to contributions of $250 or less from
residents in a legislative district. Starting in 2023, county
executive candidates could
qualify for as much as $1 million, while donations would
be capped at $25,000, about
$20,000 less than the current
limit. Legislative candidate taking public funding would be
capped to spending $100,000
and county executive candi-
dates $2 million.
But to make the system
work, the law creates a threemember campaign finance
board to make rules and policies. The legislature’s majority
and minority leader each have
a pick as does the county executive. And the apparatus has
to be ready to go the day after
this November’s legislative
races, when the new campaign cycle begins, and give
contenders time to decide if
they want to take part in the
voluntary program.
Under the law, board members must have expertise in either law, academia, education
or the nonprofit sector, and not
be a party official, campaign operative, lobbyist or a spouse of
an elected or appointed official.
No two members should come
from the same political party.
While selections were due
by Jan. 1, so far only Republicans have named their selection — retired District Court
Judge John J. Toomey Jr. The
board’s first meeting is sched-
uled for Jan. 15. Once in place,
the new board needs to appoint
an executive director, secretary,
independent counsel, a secretary and other needed staff.
Dating back to last summer,
County Executive Steve Bellone got a waiver spend up to
$30,000 to hire Nicole Gordon,
founding executive director of
the city campaign finance
board, to help develop plans, despite pushback from lawmakers
that the as-yet-unnamed board
should drive such decisions,
not the county executive.
The legislation calls for the
funding for matching funds and
operations to come from Suffolk Off-Track Betting Corp.’s
Jake’s 58 casino — initially $1
million a year or 20 percent of
the county’s share of revenues,
whichever is greater. However,
funding for board operations is
limited to 20 percent.
Trotta said he proposed the
repeal measure because of the
county’s continued fiscal decline and changes in the legislature’s make-up since the law
was first approved a little more
than a year ago. The bill originally passed in an 11-7 vote
when Democrat Legis. Al Krupski joining Republicans citing
fiscal concerns.
Since then, Democratic
Legis. Monica Martinez of
Brentwood departed for the
State Senate and term-limited
ex-Legis. Kate Browning of
Shirley was replaced by Republican Legis. Rudolph Sunderman of Mastic. One new Democrat lawmaker, Tom Donnelly
of Deer Park, said he is undecided and wants to review the
legislation further, but is leaning to backing Calarco’s original bill. Fellow freshman Democratic Legis. Susan Berland of
Dix Hills said she is “looking at
the [Calarco’s] bill and reviewing it.”
However, Calarco expressed
confidence that support for
public financing will remain
strong. “I’m confident my colleagues will give my bill time to
see if it can accomplish its
goals,” he said.
HUTTON HOUSE LECTURES
LIU School of Professional Studies
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Corot: The Painter and
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NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
newsday.com
3 Sessions • 1/7/19 – 1/21/19
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New parks boss named
City lawyer
arrested on
sex charges
Erik Kulleseid
brings decades
of experience
BY JOAN GRALLA
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
newsday.com
New York State’s new parks
commissioner will be Erik
Kulleseid, who has spent more
than two decades striving to expand and improve the state’s
parks and open spaces, raising
donations and re-imagining
ways to enjoy the outdoors.
On Long Island, Kulleseid,
who is leaving the Open Space
Institute as senior vice president, found contributors for
the multimillion-dollar revitalization of Jones Beach State
Park in Wantagh and the new
nature center at Letchworth
State Park in Castile, the New
York City-based nonprofit institute said in a statement.
“I’m elated,” Adrian Benepe,
New York City’s former parks
commissioner said by telephone
Saturday. Benepe now is a senior vice president and director
of city park development for
The Trust for Public Land, a nonprofit where Kulleseid previously worked for a dozen years.
“This is not a patronage
pick; this is picking the right
person with the right background,” Benepe said. “It’s
somebody who really cares
about parks. You couldn’t find
a more knowledgeable person
about parks in New York.”
Before joining the Open
Space Institute, Kulleseid
served three years as the state
parks department’s deputy
MIKE GROLL
joan.gralla@newsday.com
Kulleseid, shown here in May 2017, has been named the new commissioner of New York State Parks.
commissioner for open space
protection, the group said.
He holds a bachelor’s degree
from Yale University, where he
also earned a master’s in
forestry. And he is a Stanford
Law School graduate.
“This administration is laserfocused on the advancement
and enforcement of policies that
improve the lives of residents in
every corner of this state, from
strengthening
gun
safety
reforms and protecting our
natural resources, to fostering
economic opportunities that create new, 21st century jobs for
New Yorkers,” Gov. Andrew M.
Cuomo said in a news release announcing this and other appoint-
ments on Friday.
Kulleseid succeeds Rose Harvey, who for eight years helped
select designs and prioritize
projects for Cuomo’s 10-year,
$900 million plan to restore
many of the 180 state parks and
35 historic sites that fell into
disrepair
during
budget
crunches. Harvey also springs
from The Trust for Public
Land, where she held several
leadership posts.
The new commissioner
called leaving his current nonprofit post bittersweet. “Having the opportunity to build
the Parks program at the Open
Space Institute has been the
most rewarding stretch of my
career to date,” his statement
said.
His accomplishments include
transforming
Minnewaska State Park Preserve in
upstate Kerhonkson, whose
acreage nearly doubled in the
past few decades, by restoring
10 miles of the carriage roads,
and creating the six-mile
River-to-Ridge Trail in New
Paltz, officials said.
Benepe, recalling Kulleseid
helped acquire much needed
acres for open space and wetlands, from upstate to Brooklyn,
said: “He’s thoughtful, committed, fun, outdoorsy — all the
things you look for in a park
commissioner.”
Fair Fares program starts in city
BY LAUREN COOK
lauren.cook@amny.com
The Fair Fares program to
help low-income New Yorkers
struggling to afford MetroCards
launched on Friday with availability to roll out in phases,
Mayor Bill de Blasio said.
The announcement comes
several days after the program
was expected to start on Jan. 1.
The city began contacting
30,000 qualified, working New
Yorkers who receive cash assistance through the city Depart-
ment of Social Services to let
them know how they can sign
up for a half-priced MetroCard.
In April, the program will be
made available to about 130,000
eligible New Yorkers who receive Supplemental Nutrition
Assistance Program benefits.
For its initial launch, the program only offers participants discounted weekly and monthly
MetroCards, which can be used
on all MTA subways and non-express buses. The de Blasio administration hopes to expand
the program to include single
swipe MetroCards in April.
“This is the beginning of
something great. For thousands
and thousands of New Yorkers,
it means the doors of opportunity will open up,” de Blasio
said at a news conference at the
125th Street subway station in
Manhattan. “They’re going to
have so many ways that they
can use this that will change
their lives for the better.”
While speaking about the program, de Blasio was interrupted
by Theo Chino, who said he is
running for public advocate and
accused the mayor of not doing
enough to serve the city’s poor.
“What are you doing for the
poor? Why don’t you abolish the
fare all together?” Chino
shouted.
The mayor did not address
the comments before handing
the mic to City Council Speaker
Corey Johnson, who secured
$106 million in the city budget
for the program, while NYPD
officers removed Chino from
the station.
With Matthew Chayes and
Vincent Barone
A New York City lawyer has
been arrested on charges of assaulting three women from
late 2014 to early 2015.
Rashaun Kelley, 35, was
arrested Friday on multiple
charges of burglary, attempted
rape and sex abuse.
Police say Kelley sneaked
up behind the three women as
they entered their Manhattan
apartment buildings or elevators and grabbed them. He is
also a suspect in two more
similar attacks.
The Daily News reports
that Kelley was arrested by
warrants
officers
after
members of the Manhattan
special victims squad built a
case against him.
Kelley was awaiting arraignment Saturday. Information on
his lawyer wasn’t immediately
available.
Kelley’s own legal practice
focuses on business, corporate
and securities law. A phone
message left at his law office
was not answered.
— AP
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FOR SLOW-MOVING
VEHICLES TO 35 MPH
ALBANY — Farm tractors
and other slow-moving vehicles
will be allowed to travel a little
faster on New York roads under
a new law.
Gov. Andrew Cuomo recently signed legislation that
raises the speed at which slowmoving vehicles can travel from
25 mph to 35 mph. Farm vehicles and construction equipment must have orange triangular signs indicating that they are
slow-moving vehicles.
The measure was sponsored
by state Sen. Pam Helming, a
Republican from Canandaigua
in Ontario County, and Assemblywoman Carrie Woerner, a
Democrat from Round Lake in
Saratoga County.
The lawmakers say the new
legislation was needed because
construction equipment and
farm tractors are being designed to travel at speeds higher
than 25 mph.
The New York Farm Bureau
endorsed the measure, which
goes into effect in the spring.
— AP
NATION & WORLD
U.S. envoy in Israel for talks
Meetings aim
to reassure ally
about Syria exit
TEL AVIV, Israel — The
White House has sent national
security adviser John Bolton on
a mission to allay Israel’s concerns about President Donald
Trump’s decision to withdraw
U.S. troops from Syria.
The pullout announced before Christmas was initially expected to be completed within
weeks, but the timetable has
slowed as the president acceded to requests from aides, allies and members of Congress
for a more orderly drawdown.
Bolton planned to meet with
Israel’s prime minister, Benjamin Netanyahu, and other officials on Sunday before traveling to Turkey. Israeli officials
have expressed alarm that a
swift withdrawal of the roughly
2,000 troops could enable Iran
to expand its influence and
presence in Syria, wracked by a
yearslong civil war and the Is-
AP / CLIFF OWEN
The Associated Press
John Bolton
lamic State militancy.
Trump’s move has raised fears
about clearing the way for a
Turkish assault on Kurdish fighters in Syria who have fought
alongside American troops
against IS extremists. Turkey
considers the Kurdish People’s
Protection Units, or YPG, a terrorist group linked to an insurgency within its own borders.
A Trump administration official told reporters traveling
with Bolton that Bolton intended to discuss the pace of
the drawdown, as well as American troop levels in the region.
Bolton was expected to explain
that some U.S. troops based in
Syria to fight IS will shift to
Iraq with the same mission and
that some American forces may
remain at a key military outpost in al-Tanf, in southern
Syria, to counter growing Iranian activity in the region.
Bolton also was to convey
the message that the United
States will be “very supportive”
of Israeli strikes against Iranian
targets in Syria, according to
the official, who was not authorized to publicly discuss
Bolton’s plans before the meetings and spoke on condition of
anonymity to preview the talks.
Bolton warned Syria’s president, Bashar al-Assad, not to use
the U.S. drawdown as a pretext
to use chemical weapons
against Syrians, saying there is
“no change” to the U.S. position
that their use is a “red line.”
Trump has twice carried out
airstrikes in Syria in response to
apparent chemical attacks, with
the intention of deterring Assad.
“We’ve tried twice through
the use of military force to
demonstrate to the Assad
regime the use of chemical
weapons is not acceptable,”
Bolton said while en route to Israel. “And if they don’t heed the
lessons of those two strikes, the
next one will be more telling.”
Trump’s
announcement
about the intended troop withdrawal was greeted by surprise
and condemnation from many
U.S. lawmakers and allies, and
prompted the resignation of Defense Secretary Jim Mattis and
the U.S. special envoy for the
anti-IS coalition in protest.
Secretary of State Mike Pompeo is following Bolton to the
Mideast this coming week for
an eight-country tour of Arab
allies to shore up support for
the administration’s partners in
the region.
While in Israel, Bolton
planned to encourage officials
to take a tougher stance against
Chinese electronics manufacturers ZTE and Huawei. The
U.S. has expressed concerns
about potential cyber-penetration by those companies.
Joining Bolton in Turkey will
be the chairman of the Joint
Chiefs of Staff, Gen. Joseph
Dunford. In meetings with Turkey’s president, Recep Tayyip
Erdogan, and other officials,
they are expected to warn
against an offensive targeting
the Kurdish fighters in Syria.
A25
US DEPLOYS TROOPS
AMID CONGO VOTE
KINSHASA, Congo —
On the eve of the first expected results of Congo’s
long-delayed presidential
election, President Donald
Trump said military personnel had deployed to Central Africa to protect U.S. assets from possible “violent
demonstrations,” while the
country’s
powerful
Catholic Church warned of
a popular “uprising” if untrue results are announced.
Congo faces what could
be its first democratic,
peaceful transfer of power
since independence from
Belgium in 1960, but election observers and the opposition have raised concerns about voting irregularities as the country
chooses a successor to
longtime President Joseph
Kabila. The first results
are expected on Sunday.
The U.S. ahead of the
vote ordered “nonemergency” government employees and family members to leave the country.
— AP
The Associated Press
Demonstrators stand in tear gas thrown by riot police during a protest in Paris on Saturday.
PARIS — French security
forces fired tear gas and flashballs after a march through central Paris went from peaceful
to provocative Saturday as several
thousand
protesters
staged the yellow vest movement’s first action of 2019 to
keep up pressure on President
Emmanuel Macron.
A river boat restaurant
moored below the clashes on
the Left Bank of the Seine
River caught fire. Smoke and
tear gas wafted above the
Orsay Museum and the gold
dome of the French Academy
as riot police, nearly invisible
at the start of the demonstration, moved front and center
when protesters deviated from
an officially approved path.
Police boats patrolled the
river while beyond the Seine,
motorcycles and a car were set
on fire on the Boulevard Saint
Germain, a main Left Bank
thoroughfare.
In a first, the building housing the office of the French government spokesman was attacked. It was the first such attack on government property
since the yellow vest movement
began weekly protests eight Saturdays ago, in mid-November.
Saturday’s march had been
declared in advance and approved.
— AP
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
French protests erupt in fires, clashes
newsday.com
SAN FRANCISCO — A California police officer who was
killed in the line of duty was
hailed Saturday as a “Fiji-born
American hero” who made the
ultimate sacrifice for his
adopted country.
At a funeral held for Cpl.
Ronil Singh, mourners remembered the 33-year-old officer as
a hardworking immigrant who
worked his way up to become
an officer in the small town of
Newman.
He “stood so much for what
is right in our world and yet unfortunately was taken too soon
from us by what is wrong in
our world,” Modesto police Officer Jeff Harmon said at the
service in a Modesto church.
He “probably more than anything else wanted to be home
on Christmas night with his
wife and his young son, but instead made a selfless choice to
serve all of his community
knowing that there are many
more than just his own family
that needed his protection that
night.”
Singh was shot to death in
the early hours of Dec. 26 after
he pulled over a suspected
drunken driver. The gunman
fled, and a two-day-long manhunt led to the arrest of a man
who authorities said was in the
country illegally and was preparing to flee to Mexico.
Gustavo Arriaga Perez, also
33, has since been charged
with murder.
Singh grew up in a Fijian
farming town and emigrated to
central California in 2003. He
joined the 12-member Newman police department in 2011
after attending police academy
and serving as a volunteer, animal control officer and code
enforcement officer at other
agencies in the region.
After Saturday’s funeral,
Singh’s body was taken on a procession to its final resting place
at Lakewood Memorial Park in
the nearby town of Hughson.
AP / KAMIL ZIHNIOGLU
Funeral held for slain
Calif. police officer
A26
DEBBY KRENEK Publisher
NEWS
OPINION
“Where there is no vision, the people perish.”
DEBORAH HENLEY Editor, VP
RICHARD ROSEN Managing Editor
OPINION
RITA CIOLLI Editor of the Editorial Pages
ELI REYES Deputy Editor
EDITORIAL
A can-do list
for the
116th Congress
Some Trump probes are
warranted, but lawmakers
should get right to work
on critical national issues
\ Tax reform 2.0
BY THE EDITORIAL BOARD
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
newsday.com
EPA-EFE/REX/SHUTTERSTOCK/JIM LO SCALZO
T
he first few days of the new
year contain the seeds of promise that Washington can move
forward. Despite the shutdown
of some federal operations,
there is an appetite in Congress to retake
that branch’s seat at the table of government. Democrats, who now control the
House of Representatives, want to address the economic worries of many
Americans, and some Republican senators want a compromise to end the more
than 2-week-old shutdown over the
funding of a wall on the Southern border.
There really is no alternative but for
Congress to provide more checks and
balances on the Trump administration.
More chaos will only harden the cynicism and alienation that are corroding
our democracy.
Speaker Nancy Pelosi will have to
guide a new class of House members,
historic in its diversity and more
aligned with the nation’s population,
toward delivering on what she calls
kitchen-table concerns. And while the
House must provide the oversight that
Republicans in the last session failed to
do, it must be done smartly and effectively. Simply lining Pennsylvania Avenue with subpoenas and repeating the
pathetic political shenanigans of the
GOP will ensure a divided government,
not a bipartisan one.
Democrats would be wise to wait
until special counsel Robert Mueller
completes his investigation before
deciding how to respond to the results.
However, the House should investigate
House Speaker Nancy Pelosi swears in the 116th Congress on Thursday at the Capitol.
the separation of families policies of
the Department of Homeland Security,
and the rollback of regulations by the
Environmental Protection Agency, and
it must probe President Donald
Trump’s financial entanglements with
foreign governments, particularly Russia and Saudi Arabia.
The game also has changed for Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell.
Utah’s Mitt Romney already has signaled he is willing to take on Trump,
and vulnerable members up for re-election in 2020 want to steer a path toward
more independence from the administration. In all of this, there is opportunity for Congress to move forward on
needed legislative changes.
\ Health care
Patch up the holes poked in the
Affordable Care Act by shoring up
the health care exchanges. Cement
the requirement that insurers cannot
deny coverage or increase premiums
because of pre-existing conditions.
Increase funding for marketing and
outreach to get more people enrolled.
Reduce the cost of prescription
drugs.
\ Infrastructure
Rebuilding, repairing and improving roads, bridges, rails, airports and
sewers should be an easy area of
agreement. Trump has talked about
such investments since the 2016 campaign, but little has happened since
his initial proposal in early 2018,
which came up short. It included just
$200 billion in federal funds over 10
years, and would have forced state
and local governments to cough up
the rest. Any infrastructure agreement has to involve significant federal funds and a commitment to the
nation’s most critical needs, including
rail-safety technology, sewer upgrades
and the Gateway project to build a
new Hudson River rail tunnel.
The 2017 tax overhaul has mistakes
that need correction. There’s a concern,
for instance, about how and when restaurant owners and retailers can depreciate
costs from renovations. As of now, neither industry can immediately write off
such renovations. That’ll require a fix —
and it’s not the only one like that. So,
while Congress fixes sloppy draftsmanship and mistakes, it needs to make one
big change, too. Eliminate the egregious
and damaging $10,000 deduction cap on
state and local taxes, or SALT. Among the
new Democrats in the House who won
solid red seats are some from California,
New Jersey and other high-tax states who
campaigned on and recognize the need
for a SALT fix. When Congress considers
tax legislation this year, it must consider
this: No fix to last year’s tax law would be
complete without fixing SALT.
\ Immigration
After the wall impasse is resolved,
Congress should take the next, ever more
difficult step of trying to repair our broken immigration system — one in which
more people arrive by air and illegally
overstay their visas than actually cross
our Southern border. It should grant legal
status to people brought here as children
and extend temporary protected status to
Haitians, Hondurans, Nicaraguans and
Salvadorans who were granted legal
status to live and work here after they
fled social unrest and natural disasters. A
significant number of these immigrants
came to Long Island and have become
integral members of their communities,
having bought homes and started businesses. Trump’s decision to revoke their
status is cruel. Overall, we must redesign
the visa system to make it more flexible
to meet our labor needs.
There is common ground for both
parties and both chambers of Congress.
Find it.
OPINION
A27
NEWSDAY/MATT DAVIES
OPINION
MATT DAVIES
And they’re off to the . . . 2020 race
Democratic field grows almost daily —
that could be good or bad for all of us
Michael
Dobie
michael.dobie@newsday.com
serve their candidacies.
Every campaign starts with
many unknowns. The more candidates, the more mysteries. It’s
going to take a lot of bank shots
to pull off a win on Nov. 3, 2020.
Will the sexism of Bernie’s
Bros sink him? Will Harris’ and
Booker’s lack of achievements
do them in? Does Bloomberg
have enough personality? Who
has a leg up — pontificating
senators or accomplished governors? Who negates whom?
Who takes over one so-called
lane and crowds out others?
Will Trump be the GOP nominee? Can anyone stay above the
fray that’s poisoning Washington? Is the country yearning for
a shiny new thing it can’t stop
looking at, or a comfortable old
sweater it feels good about
wearing? Does it want a politician or another outsider?
Time to start running.
Michael Dobie is a member of
Newsday’s editorial board.
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
porate excess, and Michael
Bloomberg’s effort to target gun
violence, among others.
But a real scrum could also
make scrumbinis more desperate to stand out. And with all
the confirmation and oversight
hearings being planned, there
will be lots of opportunities for
blowhards — apologies, for
earnest elected officials working hard on behalf of their grateful constituents — to score televised points. Is it too much to
ask these truth-seekers to seek
to score substantive points, not
merely political ones?
Washington’s rabid dog and
pony shows, with contributions
from members of both parties,
are a real turnoff. How about
asking questions intended to
elicit information, not fuel electoral attractiveness?
And call me naive, but I’m
also hoping all these lawmakers
while they’re working their day
jobs take votes they truly believe in, not votes they have exhaustingly triangulated to best
newsday.com
A
nd they’re off.
Whether you’re applauding the unofficial
start of the 2020 presidential
campaign or breaking into a
cold sweat thinking of the endless slog ahead, it’s here.
Several Democrats — Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren,
Washington Gov. Jay Inslee, former U.S. housing secretary Julian Castro — have announced
exploratory committees, former Rep. John Delaney has
been campaigning in Iowa for
nearly 18 months already, and a
bunch of others are “close” to
deciding. Not to mention a few
subterranean
Republicans
mulling a primary challenge to
President Donald Trump.
The field figures to include
several members of the 116th
Congress, which promised to
be conspicuously dynamic
even without the backdrop of a
presidential contest.
Consider the restive House,
now under Democratic control
and spoiling for an oversight
fight with Trump. Thanks primarily to freshman Dems, it’s
the most racially diverse House
in history, with more women
than ever. And many of those
newbies are spoiling for a policy fight with their own party’s
more mainstream members.
The split Senate will ladle its
own dysfunctional spice, with
several GOP members from
blue or purple states facing reelection in 2020 likely to consider breaking ranks with the
president at times, as two already have over the shutdown.
While the House might contribute a member or two to the
presidential lovefest, the Senate
is virtually certain to send an
army. Warren, Bernie Sanders,
Cory Booker, Kamala Harris,
Amy Klobuchar, Kirsten Gillibrand and Sherrod Brown appear to be in the mix. Add in a
sprinkling of governors (like
Colorado’s John Hickenlooper)
and mayors (like L.A.’s Eric
Garcetti), former pols (like Joe
Biden and Beto O’Rourke), business folks (like Howard Schultz)
and the odd celebrity, and even
two debate stages might not be
enough to field this field.
That could bode well — or
poorly — for the rest of us.
It would be a plus if this diversity of contenders generated real
discussions about issues and
policies, not debates over slurs
and temperament. The potential
is there — with Inslee’s focus on
climate change, Warren’s work
on economic inequality and cor-
OPINION
Trump’s decisions on great powers
The choices before him are difficult,
but his administration is playing an angle
Ted R.
Bromund
F
rom criticizing NATO and
the World Trade Organization, to quitting the UN
Human Rights Council, to dropping out of the Paris climate deal
and the Iran nuclear deal, and
now to pulling U.S. forces out of
Syria, President Donald Trump
is not shy about making big calls.
And those big calls all have the
same target.
The Trump administration
has a theme — even if, amid
resignations and firings, it’s hard
to keep your eye on this ball. It
believes great power competition has returned and the United
States needs to recognize it. This
theme is a useful guide to policy
and an accurate description of
the world. And it has corollaries.
One of these corollaries is
that the United States can no
longer afford to waste time and
resources on commitments or
institutions that can’t last or
don’t work. In the 1990s, it was
easy to be blasé about these, in
the hope that they would come
to something, or out of unwillingness to rock the boat.
But today, those hopes have
been dashed. The boat needs
rocking. So the administration
has challenged approaches that
aren’t sustainable. Like me, you
may not always agree with how
the challenges have been made.
But they had to be made.
Low European military
spending has been a sore point
for the United States since
President Dwight D. Eisenhower. But now, facing a resurgent Russia, a U.S. commitment to NATO that requires us
to do most of the fighting is
militarily and politically intolerable. This can’t go on.
Unlike Trump, I believe in
free trade. But China is a trade
cheat and an intellectual property thief. It also benefits from
developing country status in the
WTO, even as it has risen to be
the world’s second-largest economy. This can’t go on.
Again, unlike Trump, I don’t
think tariffs are the best way to
challenge China. No matter
what the White House says, it
AP / ANDREW HARNIK
OPINION
A28
President Donald Trump speaks at a hangar rally at Ayn al-Asad
Air Base, Iraq, last month.
is U.S. consumers, not Chinese
exporters, who pay the tariffs
we impose. But the old approach on China wasn’t working. It couldn’t go on.
The Iran nuclear deal also
wasn’t made for the long haul:
It would expire in 2030. The
Paris climate deal was built on
the premise that the developed
world would hurt its
economies by taxing carbon,
while China played the part of
the developing nation and did
nothing. This can’t go on.
The UN Human Rights
Council is a bit different. Unlike China or Syria, the council
doesn’t matter in the real
world. We’ve tried to fix its
anti-Israel bias, and we’ve
failed. The council is an embarrassment and a waste of our
time. So the only sensible thing
to do is to stop pretending it
matters, and get out.
So what about Syria? My
instincts haven’t changed. The
United States should stand by its
friends and allies, and what we
start, we have to finish — and if
we don’t plan on finishing, we
shouldn’t start. Being a great
power means keeping going
when the going gets tough. My
heart is against quitting.
But yet Trump may be right.
The United States can help only
those who want to help themselves. Of course, there are
people in the Middle East who
want to do that. But there may
not be enough of them.
And we have now had two
presidents in a row who were
eager to get out of the Middle
East. It’s too simple to say that
the American people also want
to get out. But they clearly have
no overriding preference for
staying. If we are going to leave,
we shouldn’t drag out the
process of withdrawal unduly.
I wish this wasn’t a choice
between bad options. But at this
level, all the choices are hard,
which is why leadership matters.
If Trump wanted to, he could
make the case for staying. If he
doesn’t want to, the U.S. commitment in Syria will become another thing that can’t go on.
Ted R. Bromund is a senior
research fellow in The Heritage
Foundation’s Thatcher Center
for Freedom.
EXPRESSWAY
When your kids become your parents
BY CAROL COTT GROSS
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
newsday.com
A
t 76, I’m endorsing the
adage “Old age is always 10 years older
than you are.”
Readers my age might understand, but my adult children
don’t, so let me explain.
It was drizzling one evening
in August when my husband,
Herb, and I caught a local
movie in Elwood.
Afterward, when I turned on
my cellphone at 9 p.m., I had
texts, voice messages and
emails from my daughter,
Terri, in Commack, and my
son David in Los Angeles,
asking where I was and why I
was out in wet weather.
“Next time, tell us where
you’re going,” Terri texted.
“Call ASAP!” she also demanded in a voicemail.
I told Herb, “They’ll be
getting me an app to track me.”
Yes, indeed, I’m grateful for
my kids’ loving concern, but I
haven’t lost my marbles — yet.
However, at this age, I seem to
be on a shorter leash than
when I was 17, when my curfew
was 11 p.m.
My step down in family
stature started recently when
my autoimmune disease flared
up. For weeks, my only forays
out of bed were to consult big
doctors at teaching hospitals.
Again, I appreciated my children’s concern and loving
assistance, and still do, but I
expected that when I recuperated, I’d be treated again like a
competent adult.
So, yes, I can’t easily access
the name of the actress who
starred in my favorite summer
movie, “The Book Club,” nor
the name of the Smithtown
diner where I ate recently. My
friend Richard, a comedy
writer, dubbed this aging ailment “proper noun disease.”
Luckily, it hasn’t affected my
driving. Speaking of which,
when I got the medical OK to
resume driving, my grandson
Kevin, then 16, who meant
well, advised, “Ga, please don’t
drive at night, or drive on the
Northern State or LIE.”
My cranky response was,
“Your Ga has been driving for
half a century, and you only
have a permit.”
My bad! I had snapped out
of frustration, I apologized to
him.
In addition, I’m monitored
by the pantry and prescription
police. Once when David and
Terri were visiting, they
ditched food in my refrigerator
even if it was dated two weeks
before “best if used by.”
I asked them, “Who junks
mustard and ketchup unless
it’s moldy?”
Nobody chuckled. Instead,
they moved to my medicine
cabinet, checking expiration
dates and quizzing me about
why I’m taking what.
But now that I think about it, I
started dispensing well-meaning
advice to my late, great mother
when she was being treated for
breast cancer in her 70s.
I must apologize for killing
Mom’s buzz at Terri’s wedding
19 years ago. My mother, she
should rest in peace, danced
on Broadway as a teen and was
doing a mambo with my
cousin Jules. She wore a dropdead hot pink dress with
matching spike heels.
I rushed out on the floor to
save her from maybe breaking
a hip.
Mom snapped, “Carol, I’m
not an old biddy!”
And she warned, “One day, if
you’re lucky to live that long,
your kids become your parents. Get ready, Carol! It’s
flattering, and infuriating.”
Back then, I silently assured
myself, “Never happen to me.”
So Mom, you were right!
And so was Bette Davis, who
famously warned, “Old age
ain’t no place for sissies.”
Reader Carol Cott
Gross lives in East
Northport.
SEND AN ESSAY about life on Long
Island (about 550 words) to
expressway@newsday.com, or to
Expressway/Opinion Dept., Newsday,
235 Pinelawn Road, Melville, NY
11747. Essays will be edited and may
be republished in all media.
LETTERS
Immigrants are not barred
from obtaining driver’s licenses in New York; immigrants here illegally are! That
is a distinction some
Democrats and media refuse
to acknowledge.
America is a nation of laws,
yet we seem to have become a
nation where only Americans
are expected to follow the laws.
Anthony Johnson Sr.,
Brentwood
When you do not possess a
driver’s license, you cannot
secure vehicle insurance. So tell
me, how will it affect the lawabiding citizens if an unlicensed,
uninsured driver kills or maims
someone in an accident? Sorry,
but my concern is for the people
who play by the rules. Walk, take
a bus, taxi or Uber, or relocate
within your travel zone.
Oh, here’s an idea. Come here
legally and go through the processes to be part of this great
nation.
John Tarantino,
Bayville
JOHN CUNNINGHAM VIA TWITTER
The writer of “How cash bail
can ruin immigrants’ lives”
[Opinion, Jan. 1] tells a story that
places blame for his mother’s
plight everywhere but where it
belongs. Actions have consequences.
His mother was here illegally.
He does not deny this. Rather it
is worn as a badge of honor.
Everything and everybody else
is at fault. She was driving without a license. New York issues
licenses to those who are legal
residents and pass tests. Driving
is a privilege, not a right.
The judge followed the law in
requiring a cash bond after the
writer’s mother was arrested.
That bond ensures that the
defendant have skin in the game.
Using a credit card would make
the issuing company responsible
for his mom’s appearance.
Clearly untenable.
Roy Sperrazza,
Northport
OPINION
Her first offense was
illegal immigration
Fans of Billy Joel wait in pouring rain during slow security screening at NYCB Live’s Nassau
Coliseum on New Year’s Eve.
I cannot believe the chutzpah
of op-ed writer Angel Reyes. He
blames society for his mother’s
arrest on a charge of not having
a driver’s license, and for her
deportation to Peru. She was
here illegally. He’s lucky he and
his brother weren’t deported,
too. Of course, they could have
gone with their mom to Peru
voluntarily, keeping the family
together. And for good measure,
he threw in the really tired
statement about how the state
continues to criminalize black
and brown communities, etc.
Don’t break the law, then!
Joe Cesare,
Copiague
Soaked at the Coliseum
Zoologist Alan Rabinowitz
Billy Joel put on a spectacular show, singing his hits for
more than three hours, but
there was a disaster outside
the Coliseum before the show.
The private management
company limited entrance to
the building. With so much
money being spent on tickets
and parking, would it have
killed the company to hire
more security people to screen
concertgoers faster? Of course,
the situation was compounded
by a driving rain.
I suggest that Nassau
County fire this management
company and hire one that
knows how to handle capacity crowds.
Lloyd Nadel,
Glen Head
Having attended a recent
Coliseum event with my family on a similarly rainy night,
these revelations were not a
surprise. Unreasonably long
lines subjected patrons to
extensive waits in a downpour
due to a lack of security gates.
In addition, poor lighting in
the parking lot made travel
there dangerous for drivers
and pedestrians, and the gridlock in the hallway as patrons
exited was frightening.
Had an emergency occurred, the result would have
been devastating. As much as
we enjoyed the concert, it
might be a long time before
we consider attending another event there. We will
pay close attention to the
response of management in
hopes that these serious
issues are addressed.
Maryellen Viola,
Massapequa Park
We went to see Elton John
at the Coliseum recently and
arrived about one hour before the show. The security
gates were closed. Personnel
just milled about while hundreds of attendees were
locked out. This is more than
disrespectful for those who
arrive early to have a bite to
eat and settle in. I imagine
that the concessionaires pay
a decent fee to be there, but
their potential customers
were locked out. A “blip” in
service at the Coliseum? I
don’t believe so. Poor management needs to be addressed.
Anthony Vernola,
Centerport
The editorial reminded me
of my Coliseum experience
attending the Trans-Siberian
Orchestra concert on Dec. 20.
After paying $30 to park,
we had to stand in line in
pouring rain while waiting
for personnel to open the
security check area, which
is outside and unprotected
from the weather. We were
asked to take off our hats
and hoods, open our coats
and empty our pockets. We
had to put handbags, keys,
wallets and mobile phones
into trays filled with rainwater. Finally, our tickets were
checked and we had just
minutes to get food and
drink, use the overcrowded
bathrooms, get to our seats
and enjoy the show in our
wet clothes.
Very sad situation!
Philip J. Guarino,
Islip Terrace
EMAIL LETTERS OF UP TO 200
WORDS to letters@newsday.com,
or mail to Letters, Newsday, 235
Pinelawn Road, Melville, NY 11747.
Include your name, address, phone
numbers, and relevant political affiliations or expertise. Letters become
property of Newsday and are edited
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one letter in print every 45 days.
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
with animals because they did
not judge him harshly. He
became an impassioned
spokesman for those that have
no voice. All creatures of nature feel a great sense of loss,
as do all of us who enjoyed
Alan’s marvelous writings. A
life well lived!
Jim Jones,
Bayville
Editor’s note: The writer is
a director of Volunteers for
Wildlife, an animal rescue
organization.
With torrential rain, linecutting and irritable guests,
the potential for something
much worse than catching a
cold was bubbling as people
waited to enter NYCB Live’s
Nassau Coliseum on New
Year’s Eve [“A concerning
night of troubles at Coliseum,” Editorial, Jan. 3].
At 9:30 p.m., after we had
waited 45 minutes to get into
the north entrance, a fistfight
broke out in the line. The
crowd disbursed as people
were shoved. A man wielded
an umbrella as a weapon,
hitting a woman in the face.
During and even after all this
commotion, we did not see a
venue security guard or
Nassau County police officer.
Fortunately, the men were
pulled apart. The poor attempt at an apology by the
venue should take into consideration that it could have
been much, much worse.
Joe Jankowski,
West Babylon
newsday.com
PANTHERA
Also gone: A true
friend of animals
Although any listing of
prominent people who have
died in any year will always be
subject to discussion, I would
like to add to your 2018 list the
name of Alan Rabinowitz
[Passings, Dec. 30].
Rabinowitz’s death on Aug. 5
at age 64 was a great loss. He
was a tireless champion of
nature, especially the world’s
imperiled big cats, and an
author of many books who
spoke directly from his heart
about his fascination and concern for the natural world.
A leading field biologist for
the Wildlife Conservation
Society, and later the cofounder, CEO and chief scientist for Panthera, a global wildcat conservation organization,
he traveled the world to help
preserve wild creatures and
the wild places they need to
survive.
As a child, Alan struggled
with stuttering and found he
felt more comfortable speaking
A29
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A31
LI BUSINESS
LIBusiness
FINANCE
WHENWINTER
WRECKS
TRAVEL PLANS
A35
WHAT’S IN STORE
newsday.com
DANIEL GOODRICH
Shoppingcentersandmalls seeknewtypesoftenantsastheretail vacancyratesrise
tory.parrish@newsday.com
Arcade-restaurant
venue
Dave & Buster’s set up shop in
part of a former Walmart space
in Massapequa in May.
Planet Fitness moved into
part of a former Waldbaum’s supermarket in Greenlawn in November.
Discount retailer Burlington
is headed to a former Toys R
Us/Babies R Us store in Commack late this year.
Local malls and shopping
centers are increasingly seeking to fill vacancies with tenants that aren’t susceptible to
online competition, such as
medical offices, gyms, restaurants and other entertainment
options, as well as off-price
stores, including Burlington
and Marshalls, which are faring
well as shoppers’ demand for
bargains grows.
The bankruptcies and closings of several national retailers in recent years, including
Toys R Us, Sears and Mattress
Firm, have pushed up Long Island’s retail vacancy rate, espe-
cially at shopping centers that
had big-box anchors.
The vacancy rate at Long Island shopping centers between
10,000 and 350,000 square feet
rose above 7 percent in the second and third quarters of 2018,
up from 6.7 percent in both quarters a year earlier, according to
data from Manhattan real estate
information company Reis Inc.
The second-quarter vacancy
rate of 7.3 percent was the highest for that period in 18 years.
“The area has seen larger
fluctuations in vacancy and
rent growth [both positive and
negative] over the past two
years when compared to the nation,” said Reis economic ana-
See VACANCIES on A32
PEOPLE ON THE MOVE See who has been hired or promoted on Long Island newsday.com/business
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
BY TORY N. PARRISH
LI BUSINESS
DANIELLE SILVERMAN
LI BUSINESS
A32
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
newsday.com
The transition in
tenants
Retail real estate is undergoing a shift to diversity
VACANCIES from A31
lyst Cody Bond. “The second
quarter of 2018 was particularly challenging, consistent
with the closings of Toys R Us
and some Sears stores.”
The picture could be worse,
were it not for the area’s high
demand for retail, and the abil-
ity of its mall and shopping
center managers to pull in
new, diverse tenants, local real
estate experts said.
In fact, prime retail locations can still be hard to find
on Long Island. “On a macro
level, yes, there is certainly
more anchor space available
in certain markets, but real
estate in our business is a location business. So, for the
best location, for the right intersection, they’re still very
hard to get,” said Joshua
Weinkranz, president of the
Northern region for Kimco
Realty Corp., based in New
Hyde Park.
The local area wasn’t hit as
hard as other parts of the
country by the so-called retail apocalypse in 2017 and
2018, when an unprecedented
number of stores closed due
to online competition. The
vacancy rate at U.S. shopping
centers was 10.2 percent in
the third quarter, the highest
since the same period four
years ago, according to Reis.
But Long Island felt some
pain as well. In 2018 alone:
\ Sears Holdings Corp., which
filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy
protection in October, had several rounds of closings last year,
including three Sears stores in
Garden City, New Hyde Park
and Hicksville, and three
Kmarts in West Babylon, Riverhead and Huntington.
\ Bed Bath & Beyond closed
two stores, in Inwood and
South Huntington, in November, after saying in July that it
would close about 40 stores
nationwide if it couldn’t negotiate more favorable leases.
\ Mattress Firm, which filed
for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in October, closed two
locations, in Plainview and
Oceanside.
\ Fortunoff Mattress closed
two stores, in Carle Place and
Huntington, in September,
only a few months after opening them.
\ Leonardo Furniture in Westbury and Casco Kids Furniture
in Centereach closed in the
fall, which their owners
LI BUSINESS
A33
NEWSDAY / J. CONRAD WILLIAMS JR.
NEWSDAY / J. CONRAD WILLIAMS JR.
In Veterans Memorial Plaza in Commack, a Christmas store opened
for holiday shoppers in a former Toys R Us/Babies R Us location.
The Hobby Lobby chain took space vacated by Sports Authority,
which went bankrupt, at Veterans Memorial Plaza in Commack.
ON THE COVER
In Sayville Plaza, a Babies R Us
was shut as part of the bankrupt
Toys R Us closings. The chain
had 12 locations on Long Island.
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
president of Schuckman Realty Inc. in Lake Success.
So rising vacancy rates that
push rents down are providing
opportunities for retailers that
had trouble breaking into business on Long Island in the
past, he said.
Schuckman handles the marketing for the former Sears
store in New Hyde Park. Interest in the store space is high
because western Nassau
County is densely populated
and there is no new construction, he said.
“Before that store closed,
we already had a tenant,” said
Schuckman, who said he
couldn’t disclose the name of
Sears’ replacement yet. The
120,000-square-foot space will
be subdivided among two to
three tenants, he said.
market. Now they have a
smaller format . . . where
they could pick up some of the
large-market share,” Weinkranz said.
In May, Dave & Buster’s
opened in 36,680 square feet
of a former two-level Walmart, which was 130,000
square feet, at the Westfield
Sunrise Mall in Massapequa.
A Raymour & Flanigan furniture store will take the rest
of the remaining space when
it opens on the second floor,
beside Dave & Buster’s, in
35,000 square feet of space in
February.
The former Walmart’s lower level was leased to Dick’s
Sporting Goods in April 2017.
Also, set for a spring opening in Commack, a Whole
Foods will take 45,000 square
feet of a former King Kullen
grocery store space, which
was 60,000 square feet, in Veterans Memorial Plaza, which
is owned by Kimco.
In the same shopping center, a Burlington is set to open
in late 2019 in about 40,000
square feet of a former Toys R
newsday.com
blamed in part on competition
from online retailers.
\ Toys R Us closed its 12 Long
Island stores, some of which
were combined with Babies R
Us locations, after the bankrupt retailer called it quits for
all of its approximately 700
stores.
Retail store occupancy on
Long Island “is still heavier
and denser than other markets
across the country. But we’re
facing challenges,” said Greg
Batista, a broker at Ripco Real
Estate Co. in Jericho.
Long Island has seen little
new retail construction in recent years, which has helped
keep its vacancy rate from rising too quickly, Bond said.
Retailers seeking to expand on Long Island or enter
the market here face significant barriers, including high
property taxes, strict zoning
laws that vary by municipality, and higher-priced square
footage than in other regions,
said Kenneth R. Schuckman,
Before its demise last summer, Toys R Us Inc. had 12
stores here and a nearly 20
percent market share for toy
sales on Long Island, compared with 12 percent nationwide, according to retail analyst Marshal Cohen of NPD
Group, market researchers in
Port Washington.
And most of those locations
remain vacant, in part because
big-box spaces are more difficult to fill in the current retail
climate, experts said.
“I would say in general it’s
just because retailers don’t
want to be at larger spaces. So
the days of the 60,000- to
100,000-square-foot,
super
big-box tenants . . . there are
few of those [opening] today,”
Kimco’s Weinkranz said.
Target, for example, opened
a small-format store — 52,000
square feet — in a former
King Kullen grocery in Selden
in November. Target’s full-size
stores have averaged about
130,000 square feet.
“Target historically wanted
very large stores, but they
could never find space in that
LI BUSINESS
Planet Fitness moved into
part of a former
Waldbaum’s grocery store
space in Greenlawn in
November.
Us/Babies R Us store that was
about 63,000 square feet.
And though landlords and
real estate managers are willing to subdivide larger spaces
for several small tenants, it
often is not the preferred
route because of the added
cost of construction work and
splitting utility services, said
Michael Mattone, chief financial officer for Mattone Group,
a real estate firm in College
Point, Queens.
The firm’s Roosevelt Raceway Center in Westbury includes a 50,000-square-foot
former Babies R Us store that
closed in the fall after 23 years
on the property.
Given the turnover rate of
retailers now, landlords are
getting pickier.
Target on Feb. 5 will close a
143,000-square-foot store in
the Commack South shopping
center that it is leasing from
Cosentino Realty Group,
which is scrutinizing the next
tenant for more than just the
ability to pay the rent in the
bustling retail area near
Crooked Hill Road.
“We’re turning users away.
They weren’t what we were
looking for,” because they
would have been in conflict
with the Walmart, Kohl’s,
Costco or ShopRite in the
shopping center, said John
Baker, vice president of construction and development at
Cosentino in Commack.
Years ago, retailers hated to
see gyms as their neighbors in
shopping centers because
there was a perception that
gym customers worked out
and went home without shopping, Weinkranz said.
“Today people walk around,
work out . . . it’s trendy to be
in workout clothes all the
time. It’s trendy to be healthy
and fit,” he said.
Recent gym openings include two Planet Fitness locations — one opened in December in Selden, where it replaced a gym that closed two
years ago, and one opened in
November in Greenlawn,
where it took 33 percent of the
space remaining from a closed
Waldbaum’s.
A 24-Hour Fitness opened
in December in Carman’s
Plaza in Massapequa, replacing a HomeGoods that relocated to nearby Westfield Sunrise Mall.
In March, a Blink Fitness
location opened in a former
Sears Hardware space that
had been vacant for five
years in a Lindenhurst shopping center.
LI BUSINESS
TECHREVIEW
TECH bytes
Google’s picks for
2018’s top games
Season’s greetings
Readytostartonyour2019 holidaygiftlist?The
annualfour-dayConsumerElectronicsShowkicks
offinLasVegasonTuesday.Thebigbuzzthisyearis
expectedtocenteron5Gsmartphones,8K TVs,
self-drivingcartechnology,tons of“smart”home
devicesand thelatest incomputerprocessorsand
graphicscards.About4,500companieswillbe
displayingnew products.
— PETER KING
Returner 77
Special to Newsday
(iOS, Android; $4.99)
obile games in 2018 hit
new heights in graphics
and creativity. These four
games, chosen by editors
at Google Play’s app store
as best of the year, are also available for
iOS. Next week: Best 2018 games as selected by editors at Apple’s App Store.
Independent developers continue to
carve out a strong niche with creative
and inventive games, and this new
take on a classic puzzle game from
Copenhagen-based Fantastic, Yes is a
perfect example. As you solve the puzzles, you are also getting close to discovering the truth about an alien invasion. In naming Returner 77 Best Indie
Game of 2018, Google Play editors said
it “caught our eyes and captured our
imagination.”
M
PUBG Mobile
(iOS, Android; free)
Instagram reverses on sideways
Instagraminadvertently rolledout atest forhorizontalscrolling—andthe planalmost
wentsideways.Insteadofscrollingthroughpostsvertically,somepeople wereforcedto
swipe andtapleftandrightthroughtheirfeeds.Userswentberserkonsocialmedia,with
#instagramupdatetrendingonTwitter.Instagram,callingtheimplementation“abug,”
quicklyrevertedtothe originaltop-to-bottom scrollingfeature.
— BLOOMBERG NEWS
‘Bachelor’ party
“The Bachelor” didn’t make Nielsen’s top 10
most popular 2018 TV shows, but it was No. 1
on another Nielsen list: Most Social TV Series.
The list is compiled by adding the number of
discussions about a show on Facebook and
Twitter three hours before and after the telecast. The rest of the top 5: “WWE Monday
Night RAW,” “America’s Got Talent,” “American
Idol and WWE SmackDown!”
— PETER KING
Alto’s Odyssey
Another indie delight singled out by
Google Play editors, Alto’s Odyssey is
a follow-up to the successful Alto’s Adventure, which was one of the best
games of 2015. In Alto’s Odyssey, you
sandboard across beautifully rendered
desert landscapes where you try to
complete nearly 200 goals. The game
also features an immersive soundtrack.
In addition to being lauded by Google,
Alto’s Odyssey was named the Apple
TV Game of the Year.
Sims Mobile
ELECTRONIC ARTS
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
newsday.com
(iOS, Android; free)
Many mobile games today feature
gameplay that is so complicated, you
feel as if you have to take a course before you can compete. But Sims Mobile,
the latest in the series that dates to 2000
when it was a PC gaming sensation, is
an exception. Google Play editors
named it Best Casual Game of 2018.
What does that mean: Google says it is
“easy for anyone to pick up and play —
anytime, anywhere.”
NOODLECAKE STUDIOS
TENCENT GAMES
(iOS, $4.99; Android, free)
Selected Best Game of 2018 by Google
Play’s editors, the wildly popular battle
royal game raised the bar on gameplay
and graphics. Google said PUBG
sparked “a worldwide craze” for “massively fun, survival-of-the-fittest showdowns.” PUBG was also chosen by Android gamers as the Fan Favorite Game
of 2018.
CONSUMER TECHNOLOGY ASSOCIATION
ABC / CRAIG SJODIN
BY PETER KING
THIS week
ED BETZ
LI BUSINESS
A34
Hauppauge-based Voxx International reports earnings this week.
KEY EVENT: The Federal Reserve on
Wednesday releases the minutes from
its December meeting. When the
central bank hiked interest rates at the
meeting, it provoked anger from President Donald Trump, who claimed the
decision was responsible for a stock
market sell-off. The minutes are expected to give insight into the decision
and touch on the Fed’s plans concerning rates this year.
MONDAY: The Institute for Supply
Management releases the December
services-sector index, an update on
economic activity in a wide range of
nonmanufacturing business such as
restaurants, technology and retail.
TUESDAY: The number of unfilled U.S.
jobs as of Nov. 30 from the Labor
Department. In the last report, there
were 7.1 million job openings at the
end of October, more than 1 million
more jobs available than the number
of people unemployed.
WEDNESDAY: Earnings from Melville
industrial supplies distributor MSC
Industrial Direct, Bed Bath & Beyond
and consumer electronics seller Voxx
International.
THURSDAY: Jobless benefits claims
for the week ended Jan. 5 from the
Labor Department.
FRIDAY: An update on inflation as
2018 ended: consumer prices in December from the Labor Department.
The report includes a breakout of prices
in 25 Northeast counties, including Long
Island.
— PETER KING
LI BUSINESS
A35
Newsday
GETTY IMAGES/ISTOCKPHOTO
Institution
Int Chking Money 3 mo
Acct Mkt Acct CD
Min
Min
Min
0.50
Apple Bank
1.25
When winter wrecks travel
plans, a credit card can help
YOUR
FINANCE
BY JOE CORTEZ
NerdWallet.com
W
uggage canbeleftbehindina
winterstorm.Dependingon the
policy,travelerscanfileareimbursementclaimforincidentalsiftheirluggage ismissingfromsixto12hours.
Andinsomesituations,creditcard
insurancemayofferbettercoverage
thantravelinsurance.Ifbagsarepermanentlylost,creditcard travelinsurance
canalsoprovidesomereimbursement.
Buttime isofthe essence:Aftera
reportismadewiththe carrier,some
insuranceproviderswillonlyaccept
claimsfiledwithin 20days.
18 mo 24 mo
CD
CD
Min
Min
36 mo
CD
Min
60 mo
CD
Min
2.70
2.80
1.60
2.15
2.50
2.55
2.60
1,000
1,000
1,000
1,000 1,000 1,000
1.75
1.75
2.20
2.30
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2.55
2.75
50
50
50
50
50
50
50
855-446-0340
Ask about our 2.55% APY 39 Month “Bump Up” Certificate Account.
www.lovebethpage.com
1
500
NA
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2.12
2.17
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1000
10000
1000
1000
1000
1000 1000
2.53
Getpersonalfinancetips,from
handlingcreditcarddebtto
savingforretirement.
newsday.com/business
631-537-1000
www.bnbbank.com
BNB Bank
0.15
Empire National
Bank
HAB Bank
0.40
0.15
1.20
1.60
2.00
2.10
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1,000 2,500
500
500
500
500
500
500
500
631-348-4444
Ask us about our ePersonal and eBusiness MMA/Tiered MMA accounts.
www.empirenb.com
NA
0.90
0.25
0.75
2.18
2.28
2.38
2.48
2.68
NA
1,500 1,500
1,500
1,500
1,500
1,500 1,500 1,500
212-532-4444
516-681-5200
www.habbank.com
18 Month CD 2.75% APY; Minimum to open & earn APY $500
Hanover Bank
VIP Money Market 2.00% APY balances up to $99,999.99
516-548-8500
2.15% APY for balances over $100,000; Minimum to open and earn APY $2,500
www.hanovercommunitybank.com
1.00
Nassau
Financial FCU
0
1
NEFCU
0.50
1.25
2.20
2.30
2.50
75,000 1,000
1,000
1,000
1,000
1,000 1,000 1,000
0
2.80
0.30
1.25
2.00
2.30
2.15
250,000 1,000
2.00
1,000
1,000
1,000
1,000 1,000 1,000
3.00
516-742-4900
2.75
0.75
0.30
1.25
2.30
2.50
2.55
2.50
2.80
50,000 500
500
500
500
500
500
500
2.85
NA
1.20
NA
NA
2.65
2.75
2.80
NA
0
NA
NA
2,000
2,000
2,000 2,000 2,000
0.50
0.40
2.60
516-873-7171
www.sperryfcu.org
3.10
800-869-3813
www.synchronybank.com
Great Rates + Safety = Peace of Mind. Member FDIC.
Teachers Federal 2,500 2,500 1,000
888-763-2446
www.myNEFCU.org
Ask us about our 1.75% APY Reward Checking Account!
0.05
Credit Union
2.55
Ask about our Liquid Savers IRA that earns 2.00% APY
1.75
Synchrony
Bank
0.75
www.islandfcu.com
Ask about our Free Checking with interest, get up to $10 back monthly, and more! www.nassaufinancial.org
1.00
Sperry Federal
Credit Union
631-851-1100
$1,000 minimum to open. Limited time only!
Island Federal
Credit Union
1.25
2.55
2.60
2.70
1,000
1,000
1,000
1,000 1,000 1,000
2.80
631-595-0708
www.teachersfcu.org
TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS FEATURE,
CALL SALES DEPARTMENT @ 773-320-8492
Rate Criteria: Rates effective as of 1/2/19 and may change without notice. RateSeeker, LLC. does not guarantee
the accuracy of the information appearing above or the availability of rates in this table. Banks, Thrifts and
credit unions pay to advertise in this guide. NA means rates are not available or not offered at the time rates
were surveyed. All institutions are FDIC or NCUA insured. Yields represent annual percentage yield (APY) paid
by participating institutions. Rates may change after the account is opened. Fees may reduce the earnings
on the account. A penalty may be imposed for early withdrawal. To appear in this table, call 773-320-8492.
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
NOW ONLINE
914-902-2775
www.applebank.com
Call us for more details about our products and services.
15 Month Special 2.75%APY
trip cancellation. If a flight or tour is canceled by an airline, train, or bus line because of severe weather, travelers could
file a claim to recover nonrefundable
costs lost as a result of the storm.
\ Named storms: A traditional travel insurance plan may not cover claims resulting from a named storm, unless the plan
was purchased before it was named.
Travel insurance from credit cards may
not have the same restrictions, but it often
only covers incidents directly resulting
from weather. Read the explanation of
benefits to see what may be covered.
\ Trip cancellation: Not all reasons for
canceling a trip are covered. Travelers
can’t file a travel insurance claim because they anticipate bad weather. But if
the weather forces them to miss a trip
or return home early, credit card travel
insurance could help recover costs.
\ Trip delay insurance: Getting stuck at
the airport for an hour or two may not
be covered; it’s often six to 12 hours before you can request reimbursement. Before spending for a hotel or meals during a delay, check benefit explanations.
Phone / Website
newsday.com
hen major winter storms
pass overhead, travelers
run into trouble.
Airlines can be forced
to cancel thousands of
flights that affect travelers throughout
the country, hotels may abruptly sell
out, and cruise ships have to change departure times to get to safe waters.
The good news is that many travelers
have some protection from the moment
they purchase their trips. Many travel
credit cards offer insurance benefits to
cover weather-related incidents.
But that may not cover every situation when you have to cancel or change
plans due to winter weather. Experts
suggest considering purchasing additional travel insurance to cover the gaps
left by a credit card on long trips, trips
where medical insurance is required, or
trips that cost $10,000 or more.
Before buying any policy, be sure to
understand what coverage is included
from your credit card. Here’s what to
look for.
\ Are you covered? This depends on
how travelers buy their trip. If it is purchased with a credit card, some travel insurance benefits may already apply. But
if they pay by debit card or check, they
may not have any coverage without purchasing a travel insurance policy.
And note: “For third-party travel insurance policies, you have to collect receipts and credit card statements to submit with a claim,” says Steven Benna,
marketing specialist at travel insurance
website Squaremouth.com.
\ Winter weather: If airplanes are still
flying, trip cancellation and trip delay
benefits usually don’t apply. But flights
changed by an airline may count toward
L
12 mo
CD
Min
2,500 2,500 1,000
1.00 2.00
Bethpage Federal
Credit Union
6 mo
CD
Min
LI BUSINESS
Deposit & Loan Guide
LI BUSINESS
A36
TOP U.S. SAVINGS YIELDS
LI BUSINESS
StatPack
Nationwide high yields are based on a Bankrate.com survey of the
minimum amounts required to open a deposit account. National average
as of Wednesday is based on a weekly national survey of the 100 largest
U.S. institutions. National yields are as of Tuesday.
Telephone
number
Institution
MMA/Savings*
877-998-2265
$100
800-383-6266 $100,000
888-720-8756
$0
800-975-HSBC
$1
800-837-4136
$2,500
5-year CD
Newsday L.I. Index
S&P 500 Index
%
12
6
–6
–12
J
F
M
A
M
J
newsday.com
Gainers and Losers
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
2.48
2.46
2.45
2.35
2.28
888-426-2253
888-873-3424
877-998-2265
888-201-8185
855-228-6755
$1,000
$1,000
$10,000
$10,000
$5,000
2.90
2.89
2.86
2.80
2.79
$5,000
$0
$1,000
$1,000
$1,000
2.85
2.80
2.38
2.32
2.27
$1,000
$1,000
$5,000
$1,000
$0
3.40
3.25
3.25
3.20
3.10
A
S
O
Top gainers in bold
Aceto Corp
Close
1.05
Chg
7.0%
Lifetime Brands
10.82
4.9%
7.79
4.1%
D
Major indexes
Close
Dow
1-D move
1-Yr chng
23,433 746.94
–6.5%
NASDAQ
6,739 275.36
–4.8%
2,532 84.05
–7.1%
3.22
3.9%
S&P 500
Verint Systems
42.21
3.8%
Getty Realty Corp
29.00
1.1%
Commodity Prices
Henry Schein Inc
74.50
1.0%
Systemax Inc
23.14
–0.2%
Misonix Inc
16.38
–0.7%
FONAR Corp
20.20
–1.5%
Cedar Realty
N
Market Snapshot
Biggest movers in Newsday L.I. Index
Veeco Instruments
J
Closing price of select goods
Close
Gold (t. oz) 1,285.80
Silver (t. oz) 15.79
Oil (barrel)
47.96
1-D move 1-Yr chng
–9.00
–2.7%
–0.01
–8.6%
0.87
–22.7%
888-873-3424
800-383-6266
877-484-2372
800-837-4136
800-289-1992
6-month CD
1-year CD
5-year CD
This week
0.47
0.87
1.47
Last week
0.46
0.89
1.47
Last year
0.25
0.44
1.02
Park Electrochemical
(PKE) Melville
20.82(week’schange:+15.3%)
52-week return: +19.8%
The aerospace products
provider had its biggest
weekly gain in two years after
posting better-than-expected
earnings and declaring a
one-time $4.25 per share
dividend.
Note: Accounts are FDIC insured to $250,000 per person, including
principal and interest. Rates are subject to change without notice.
* National Average for MMA/Savings is specific to Money Market
Accounts only.
COST OF FUNDS
The prime rate, as reported by the Wall Street Journal’s bank survey, is
among the most widely used benchmark in setting home equity lines of
credit and credit card rates. It is in turn based on the fed funds rate, which
is set by the Federal Reserve. The COFI (11th District cost of funds index) is
a widely used benchmark for adjustable-rate mortgages.
This week
Prime Rate
Fed Funds Rate
11th Dist. COF
5.50
2.50
1.060
Treasury Yields
Value of U.S. Dollar in...
2-year 2.49
10-year 2.66
British Pound 0.79
Canadian Dollar 1.34
Last change
5.25
2.25
1.079
5-year 2.50
30-year 2.98
Euro
Japanese Yen 108.45
Last year
4.50
1.50
0.746
0.88
LI STOCKS
National average: 1.47%
Bankrate National Index
0
–18
$1,000
$10,000
$5,000
$10,000
$5,000
855-228-6755
800-289-1992
800-776-2265
800-666-2012
800-583-8295
First Internet Bank of Indiana
Presidential Bank, FSB
Colorado Federal Savings Bank
TAB Bank
Capital One 360
Long Island vs. U.S.
888-873-3424
877-998-2265
855-512-0989
888-201-8185
877-484-2372
After a wild ride in 2018 for
stock investors, it was back on
the roller coaster for the first
week of the new year as the
Dow Jones Industrial Average
fell 660 points Thursday and
rose 747 points Friday. As for
local stocks, the Newsday
Long Island Index kicked off
2019 with a weekly gain, led
higher by Port Washington
drugmaker Aceto (+28%)
and Park Electrochemical
(below). Henry Schein (below)
led the decliners.
National average: 1.13%
TIAA Bank
Capital One 360
5 Star Bank
Luana Savings Bank
USAA
MARKET RECAP
2.36
2.25
2.20
2.05
2.02
National average: 0.87%
ableBanking, a Div. of Northeast Bk
First Internet Bank of Indiana
VirtualBank
CD Bank
TIAA Bank
2.5-year CD
Annual
% yield
National average: 0.47%
First Internet Bank of Indiana
VirtualBank
My eBanc, A Div. of BAC Florida Bk
CD Bank
Colorado Federal Savings Bank
1-year CD
310.99 (week’s change: 2.1%)
52-week return: -9.6%
National average: 0.22%
VirtualBank
Presidential Bank, FSB
Barclays
HSBC Bank USA, N.A.
TAB Bank
6-month CD
Minimum
to open
LI INDEX
Henry Schein (HSIC)
Melville
74.50 (week’s change: -4.4%)
52-week return: +1.6%
Analysts at Robert W. Baird
downgraded the health products distributor to “neutral”
from “overperform” and
lowered the stock price target
to $85 from $95. — PETER KING
A37
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Newsday’s Morning Update
WEATHER
Watch for updates
throughout the day
A38
Get your town’s latest forecast
at newsday.com/weather
NYC AND LONG ISLAND
L
MA
NH
AT
TA
N
High and low temperatures forecast for today
BRONX
47/25
QUEENS
47/25
BROOKLYN
STATEN ISLAND
Today
Mostly sunny
Highs, 45 47
Tonight
Clear
Lows, 20 27
Monday
Partly cloudy
36 34
Tuesday
Mostly cloudy
50 40
Wednesday
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
newsday.com
4
Full
Jan. 21
Partly cloudy
JFK
45/25
NASSAU
Garden
City
47/23
Cold Spring
Harbor
45/23
SUFFOLK
Port Jefferson
45/22
Islip/MacArthur
45/22
LOCAL FORECAST
LONG
LONG ISLAND:::
ISLAND: Mostly sunny
and breezy. Highs in the mid 40s.
Northwest winds 15 to 25 mph
with gusts up to 35 mph.
Tonight: Mostly clear. Lows in the
mid 20s.
NYC:: Mostly sunny and breezy.
NYC:
Highs in the mid 40s. Northwest
winds 15 to 25 mph with gusts
up to 35 mph. Tonight: Mostly
clear and breezy. Lows in the mid
20s. Northwest winds 15 to 25
mph with gusts up to 35 mph.
ON THE WATER
Wind::: NW winds 20 to 25 kt
WIND:
with gusts up to 35 kt. Tonight:
NW winds 20 to 25 kt with gusts
up to 35 kt.
WAVE HEIGHTS:::
WAVE
HEIGHTS: Seas 4 to 6 ft.
Tonight: Seas 3 to 5 ft. Monday:
Seas 2 to 3 ft.
TEMPERATURE::: Sandy Hook to
TEMPERATURE:
Sheepshead Bay air: ##,
44 water:
44 North Shore air: ##,
##;
42 water:
41 South Shore air: ##,
50 water:
##;
44
51 East End air: ##,
##;
40 water: ##
VISIBILITY:::
VISIBILITY: unrestricted.
SUN & MOON
Sunrise today
7:16 a.m.
Sunset today
4:41 p.m.
Sunrise tomorrow
7:16 a.m.
Sunset tomorrow
4:42 p.m.
Moonrise today
7:39 a.m.
Moonset today
5:22 p.m.
MOON PHASES
Full
Jan. 21
Last
Jan. 27
New
Feb. 4
43 32
Want an
update?
Get the forecast
wherever you are
whenever you
want with the
Newsday app.
H
L
Montauk
45/27
Amityville
45/22
First
Jan. 14
Greenport
45/22
Southampton
45/20
L
H
H
H
EXTREMES
HIGH: Marathon, FL 79°
LOW: Alamosa, CO -13°
SUN.
MON.
TUE.
WED.
THU.
FRI.
TIDES
ALMANAC
HIGH FOR:
am pm am pm am pm am pm am pm am pm
Islip readings as of 4 p.m.
Amityville
10:10 10:34 10:48 11:15 11:27 11:56
12:06 12:37 12:45 1:19
1:26
YESTERDAY'S TEMPERATURES
10:08 10:31 10:49 11:15 11:29 11:58
12:11 12:42 12:53 1:28 1:38
Bay Shore
High............................................. 47
12:04 12:33 12:28 1:01 12:45 1:17
1:12 1:41 1:46 2:15 2:27 Low.............................................. 42
College Point
Coney Island
7:46 8:10 8:24 8:51 9:03 9:32 9:42 10:13 10:21 10:55 11:02 11:37 High last year.............................. 21
East Rockaway In. 7:43 8:07 8:21 8:48 9:00 9:29 9:39 10:10 10:18 10:52 10:59 11:34 Low last year............................... 10
7:11
7:35 7:49 8:16 8:28 8:57 9:07 9:38 9:46 10:20 10:27 11:02 Normal high................................ 38
Fire Island Inlet
Fort Hamilton
7:52 8:16 8:30 8:57 9:09 9:38 9:48 10:19 10:27 11:01 11:08 11:43 Normal low................................. 24
Barometer.............................. 29.41
8:23 8:47 9:01 9:28 9:40 10:09 10:19 10:50 10:58 11:32 11:39
Freeport
10:24 10:56 11:02 11:35 11:40
12:16 12:19 12:59 1:00 1:44 1:44 YESTERDAY'S PRECIPITATION
Greenport
12:14 12:09 12:42 12:26 12:58 12:53 1:22 1:27 1:56 2:08 Islip as of 4 p.m.................. 0.45 in.
Hempstead Harbor 11:45
8:18 8:42 8:56 9:23 9:35 10:04 10:14 10:45 10:53 11:27 11:34
0.70 in.
Howard Beach
Previous 7 days..........................
12:23 12:34 1:00
1:11 1:38 1:50 2:17 2:31 Total for the month............ 0.70 in.
Huntington Beach 11:19 11:46 11:57
Jones Inlet
7:30 7:54 8:08 8:35 8:47 9:16 9:26 9:57 10:05 10:39 10:46 11:21 Total for the year................ 0.70 in.
Normal for the year........... 0.60 in.
Mastic Beach
11:17 11:41 11:55
12:22 12:34 1:03
1:13 1:44 1:52 2:26 2:33
11:21 11:48 11:59
12:25 12:36 1:02
1:13 1:40 1:52 2:19 2:33 HEATING DEGREE DAYS
Mattituck Inlet
An estimate of energy needed for heating:
Mill Basin
8:18 8:42 8:56 9:23 9:35 10:04 10:14 10:45 10:53 11:27 11:34
each unit equals a degree that the daily mean
temperature
falls below 65.
Montauk Point
7:59 8:16 8:32 8:50 9:00 9:22 9:26 9:54 9:55 10:26 10:28 11:03
6:53 7:17 7:31 7:58 8:10 8:39 8:49 9:20 9:28 10:02 10:09 10:44 Yesterday.................................... 20
Moriches Inlet
New Suffolk
11:46
12:18 12:24 12:57 1:02 1:38
1:41 2:21 2:22 3:06 3:06 Total for the month................... 121
Nissequogue River 11:13 11:40 11:51
12:17 12:28 12:54 1:05 1:32 1:44 2:11 2:25 Total since July 1...................... 1911
11:24 11:51
12:02 12:28 12:39 1:05 1:16 1:43 1:55 2:23 2:36 Normal since July 1............... 2096
Oyster Bay
Patchogue
11:12 11:36 11:50
12:17 12:29 12:58 1:08 1:39 1:47 2:21 2:28 WIND CHILL (at noon)
Port Jefferson
11:23 11:51
12:02 12:31 12:42 1:11
1:23 1:51 2:04 2:33 2:48 Wind speed was 12 mph.
11:54
12:24 12:17 12:49 12:35 1:06 1:03 1:33 1:39 2:07 2:19 Actual air temperature was 46°,
Port Washington
10:19 10:51 10:57 11:30 11:35
12:11 12:14 12:54 12:55 1:39 1:39 making it feel like 40° yesterday.
Sag Harbor
7:50 8:14 8:28 8:55 9:07 9:36 9:46 10:17 10:25 10:59 11:06 11:41 HUMIDITY (at noon)
Sandy Hook
............ 100%
6:59 7:23 7:37 8:04 8:16 8:45 8:55 9:26 9:34 10:08 10:15 10:50
Shinnecock Inlet
9:15 9:42 9:53 10:22 10:31 11:03 11:10 11:45 11:49
12:27 12:29 SNOW TOTALS
Spuyten Duyvil
Yesterday.............................. 0.0 in.
SLACK WATER AFTER HIGH TIDE:
Total for the month.............. 0.0 in.
East Rockaway In. 8:57 9:21 9:33 10:03 10:15 10:45 10:57
11:39 11:27 12:09 12:27 Total for the season............. 4.3 in.
Fire Island Inlet
10:29 10:53 11:05 11:35 12:17
12:29 12:59 1:11 1:41
1:59
Jones Inlet
9:12 9:36 9:48 10:18 10:30 11:00 11:12
11:54 11:42 12:24 12:42 PARTICULATES READING
Montauk Point
10:28 11:04 11:10 11:40 11:46
12:16 12:22 12:52 12:58 1:34 1:40 Today...................................... Good
Moriches Inlet
10:27 10:51 11:03 11:33 12:15
12:27 12:57 1:09 1:39
1:57
Shinnecock Inlet
9:30 9:54 10:06 10:36 10:48 11:18 11:30
12:00 12:12 12:42 1:00 UV INDEX.......................................2
Last
New
Jan.
27
Feb. 4
Forecasts, graphics and data provided by ©IBM Corporation 1994, 2019
NATIONAL
Albany
38/12
snow
Denver
56/26 pcldy
New Orleans
68/49 sunny
Anchorage
5/-12
pcldy
Des Moines
43/39 cldy
Omaha
45/34 cldy
Atlanta
64/46 pcldy
Detroit
39/28 pcldy
Orlando
72/54 sunny
Atlantic City
49/25 pcldy
Honolulu
79/71
pcldy
Philadelphia
49/27 pcldy
Boston
44/17
pcldy
Indianapolis
47/38
fog
Phoenix
57/42
shwrs
Buffalo
34/16
pcldy
Kansas City MO
53/45
cldy
Portland OR
45/37 t-stm
Burlington VT
34/8
snow
Las Vegas
55/43
shwrs
Salt Lake City
40/30 snow
Charleston SC
69/45 sunny
Lexington
52/41
pcldy
San Francisco
56/51
rain
Charlotte
65/40 pcldy
Los Angeles
59/47
shwrs
Seattle
46/36 shwrs
Chicago
37/35
cldy
Miami
75/63 pcldy
Syracuse
35/10
snow
Cleveland
37/30
pcldy
Minneapolis
34/33 cldy
Tampa
70/54 sunny
Columbus
42/32 pcldy
Mobile
68/47
sunny
Topeka
55/42
fog
Dallas-Ft. Worth
67/56
pcldy
Myrtle Beach
65/47
sunny
Washington DC
53/32 pcldy
FOREIGN
Amsterdam
Ankara
Athens
Baghdad
Bangkok
Beijing
Berlin
Bermuda
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calgary
Cancun
Dublin
45/40
32/10
49/38
64/45
92/76
36/16
38/34
71/64
83/72
58/45
39/19
80/66
49/47
cldy
snow
sunny
pcldy
fog
sunny
pcldy
cldy
t-stm
pcldy
cldy
pcldy
cldy
Edmonton
Hong Kong
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kabul
Karachi
Kingston
Lima
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Montreal
25/10
66/63
49/37
82/60
42/7
78/51
85/73
78/69
46/40
56/25
85/74
75/48
31/1
cldy
pcldy
rain
sunny
sunny
pcldy
t-stm
cldy
pcldy
sunny
sunny
sunny
snow
Moscow
New Delhi
Paris
Rio
Riyadh
Rome
Sao Paulo
Seoul
Sydney
Tehran
Tokyo
Toronto
Warsaw
19/6
65/47
42/39
94/77
79/59
55/33
82/69
36/15
74/68
50/41
44/38
36/19
24/15
snow
fog
cldy
pcldy
pcldy
sunny
t-stm
pcldy
rain
rain
pcldy
pcldy
pcldy
A39
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OBITUARIES
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GRAVESIDE BURIAL SERVICES
Ackerman’s
Graveside Burial
$1995
516-354-6200
NASSAU
O’Brien-Sheipe FH
At-Home
640 Elmont Road,
Arrangements,
The Moore
Funeral
Home
54 W. Jamaica Ave.
Valley Stream
(516) 825-0036
themoorefuneralhome.com
Elmont, NY
Traditional Funeral &
No Obligation
(516) 285-5856
Low Cost Cremation Svcs.
obriensheipefuneralhome.com
Serving All Boroughs
SUFFOLK
Noce
Funeral
Home
Funerals and Cremation
at Dignified Prices
255 Higbie Lane
West Islip, NY
(631) 669-8338
boyd-spencerfuneralhome.com
189 Route 109
West Babylon
(631) 422-0100
nocefuneralhome.com
Family Owned
and
Operated
CREMATION SERVICES
Lindenhurst
Funeral
Inc.
424 So. Wellwood Ave.
Lindenhurst
(631) 957-0300
lindenhurstfuneralhome.com
Metropolitan
Funeral
Service
Nassau
Suffolk
Crematory Ltd.
PrePlanning
22 83 Grand Ave.
Baldwin
516-223-3516 • 1-800-332-1880
lidirectcremation.com
132 Ronkonkoma Ave.
Lake Ronkonkoma
(631) 467-2900
nassausuffolkcrematory.com
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SERVICES • ASSISTANCE
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
Pegi Young, musician, school
founder, ex-wife of Neil Young
The Associated Press
lowcostjewishburial.com
1529 Hempstead Tpke., Elmont, NY
Claude R.
Boyd-Spencer
Funeral Homes
NATION
A Single Place To Turn To For
Help With All The Little Things
Umbrella is an affordable service for people 65+
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2144264601
Pegi Young, who with fellow musician and then-husband Neil
Young helped found the Bridge
School for children with speech
and physical impairments, has
died. She was 66.
Young died of cancer Tuesday in
California, according to spokeswoman Michelle Gutenstein-Hinz.
Additional details about her death
were not immediately available.
Pegi Young first conceived of
the California-based school in
1986 after she and her husband
struggled to educate their son
Ben, born with cerebral palsy.
Over the next three decades, the
Youngs helped stage all-star concert benefits, with guest performers including Bruce Springsteen,
David Bowie and Tom Petty.
“I look at it with a great deal of
satisfaction,” Pegi Young told
speakersincode.com in 2016. “It’s
kind of amazing that the school has
not only sustained itself for all
these years by way of the concert,
of course, but how it’s grown and
evolved.
“We started with the four parent-placed kids, very humbled beginnings, and it has just grown to
have a global impact. Obviously,
looking at the need for the endowment, to keep the school going,
that’s been the big focus for us, and
it has been for some time.”
AP / JIM COOPER
A40
Pegi Young helped found a school for disabled students.
The Youngs, who also had a
daughter, Amber, had been one of
rock’s most enduring couples.
They met in 1974, when Pegi was
living in a teepee, and married four
years later. Neil Young’s 1992 country-rock ballad, “Harvest Moon,” is
a tribute to Pegi.
“Because I’m still in love with
you,” he sings. “I want to see you
dance again. Because I’m still in
love with you/On this harvest
moon.”
But the Youngs divorced in 2014, a
breakup Pegi Young addressed candidly in her 2016 album “Raw” and
which also led to a rift between Neil
Young and former bandmate David
Crosby. After Young began dating actress Daryl Hannah, Crosby called
her a “purely poisonous predator.”
Crosby later apologized, but Young,
who married Hannah last year, was
enraged and has not played with
Crosby since.
Pegi Young made several previous albums, including “Bracing for
Impact” and “Foul Deeds.” On her
self-titled debut, which came out
in 2007, Neil Young played guitar,
harmonica and sitar.
“Neil was always encouraging
me to do it,” she told The Associated Press in 2007. “But I didn’t
want to lean on him and he didn’t
want me to have to lean on him.”
NATION
‘Death Wish’ author Brian Garfield, 79
The Associated Press
“Death Wish” novelist Brian
Garfield, whose murderous classic
about a right-wing vigilante
launched a film franchise starring
Charles Bronson, has died at age 79.
Garfield died peacefully on Dec.
29 at his home in Pasadena, California, literary agent Judy Coppage
said. He is survived by his wife, Bina.
A New York City native who grew
up in Arizona, Garfield wrote
dozens of books, in a variety of genres, from thrillers to war stories, and
his worldwide sales topped 20 million copies. Many of his works were
adapted into feature films and television movies, including “Hopscotch,”
which he helped produce and write;
“Wild Times” and the acclaimed
“The Stepfather,” which starred
Terry O’Quinn as a serial killer.
Garfield’s awards included an Edgar
in 1976 for “Hopscotch” for the
year’s best crime novel.
He was best known for “Death
Wish,” the story of a liberal New
Yorker who becomes a right-wing
vigilante after his family is viciously
assaulted. It was published in 1972.
The first “Death Wish” film, inevitably compared to Clint Eastwood’s “Dirty Harry,” came out two
years later and was followed by several others with Bronson, including
LEGACY
Read recent obituaries,
in memoriams.
newsday.com/obituaries
“Death Wish II” and “Death Wish 3.”
Bruce Willis starred in a “Death
Wish” remake last year, and
Garfield, who disliked many of the
“Death Wish” sequels, continued
the story himself with the 1975 novel
“Death Sentence.”
“One does get stuck with a reputation,” Garfield told the online
publication NovelRocket in 2007.
“Sometimes one may deserve it.
All one can do is keep working and
ignore the idiots.”
Garfield’s mother was Frances
Garfield, a portrait artist and longtime friend of Georgia O’Keeffe’s.
He was writing from an early age
and completed his first novel, the
Western “Range Justice,” when he
was 18. He also was a musician and
toured with an early rock and roll
group, the Palisades.
631-843-3162
or visit us at newsday.com/obituaries
ALLEN - Ruth A. of Wantagh,
NY on January 2, 2019, at the
age of 98. Beloved wife of the
late David. Loving mother of
John (Barbara) and Donald
(Helene). Cherished grandmother of Chad (Jeanne),
Christie (Mark), and the late
John (Beth). Proud greatgrandmother of Jack, John,
Teddy, Emily, Katie, and Hunter. Family will receive friends
Tuesday, 2-4 pm and 7-9 pm,
at the Charles J. O'Shea Funeral Homes, 603 Wantagh
Ave. (Exit 28N SS PKWY)
Wantagh, NY. Religious Service
will be held Tuesday, 8 pm, in
the funeral home. Funeral
Wednesday, 9:30 am - 10 am,
with an interment to follow
at L.I. National Cemetery.
www.osheafuneral.com
BRAUER
- Robert W. of
Hicksville on January 1, 2019.
Proud Navy Veteran of WW II.
Served on the Leonard Wood,
APA-12. Life-time member of
William Gouse VFW Post
#3211. High roller at Syosset
Bowling Lanes. Beloved husband of the late Elizabeth.
Loving nephew of Christina
Semler. Cherished uncle of
Donna, Deborah, John &
Marianne Lavine. Fond great
uncle of Michael and Katelyn
Lavine. He was loved and
adored by all and forever
remembered in our hearts.
Family and friends may visit
at the Vernon C. Wagner FH,
125 W. Old Country Rd.,
Hicksville on Monday, Jan. 7th
from 9:00-11:00AM. Mass of
Christian Burial to follow at
Holy Trinity Episcopal Church
at 11:30AM. Interment to
follow at Calverton National
Cemetery, Calverton, NY. In
lieu of flowers, please make
donations to Paws for Pets,
www.pawsofwars.org or the
Wounded Warrior Project in
Robert’s memory.
C A R B O N E - Dolores 90, of
Vero Beach FL, formerly of
Bethpage LI, passed away on
January 2, 2019. Arrangements
are entrusted to Chapey Funeral Home, Bethpage. Viewing will be Sunday January 6,
from 2-4:30pm. and 7-9:30pm.
at the Funeral Home.
PAID DEATH
NOTICES
Sat 9:30 am to 4:30 pm,
Sun 11:30 am to 4:30 pm
Fax and E-mail
deadline 4 pm daily
Photo deadline 3 pm
Fax# 631-843-3257
Email: vn@newsday.com
newsday.com/obits
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A Time
To
Remember
SERIE - Susan Engel, 72, of St.
James, New York and Ruskin,
Florida passed away on December 27, 2018. She was a
devoted wife of 51 years to
Michael Serie. She is survived
by her daughters, Jessica and
Andrea and their spouses. She
was a loving grandmother to
Megan, Rebecca, Andrew and
Aidan. She is also survived by
her brother Bruce Engel and
Carol Mountain, their spouses
as well as nieces and nephews.
In lieu of flowers donations
can be made to the Pulmonary
Hypertension Association, online at www.phaassociation.org
Cemetery Plots
PINELAWN Gdn of Normandie
1 plot/2, $3800. 718-530-5810
PINELAWN MEM PARK Grave loc
70 sect 80. Cemetery Cost $7495
1 plot/2 selling for $5000 obo
Call or Text 727-204-1380
KRATOCHVIL - Kenneth W., of
West Islip, LI on December 31,
2018. Beloved husband of the
late Marilyn Kratochvil (nee
Petrolino). Loving son of the
late
William
and
Rose
Kratochvil. Devoted father of
Kenneth (Margaret) Kratochvil
and Donna (Dr. Anthony)
Termini. Adored grandfather of
Isabella, Joseph and Lucy
Termini and Valerie and Laurie
Kratochvil. Kenneth was a
proud retired Police Officer of
the NYPD. Reposing at The
Fredrick J. Chapey & Sons West
Islip Funeral Home, 1225
Montauk Hwy. (1/4 mile west
of the Robert Moses Cswy.).
Religious Service Friday January 11th at 1:00 PM at the
Funeral Home. Entombment to
follow at Pinelawn Memorial
Park, Pinelawn, LI. Visiting
Wednesday, January 9th and
Thursday, January 10th, 2:00
PM until 4:00 PM and 7:00 PM
until 9:00 PM.
www.chapeyfamily.com
A41
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notices and find
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newsday.com/obits
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
Mon - Fri 9 am to 5 pm,
CO NTE - Paul F., of Garden
City, NY, on January 1, 2019.
Beloved Husband of the
late Hope. Devoted Father of
Carolyn, and the late Brian.
Loving grandfather of Michelle
(Allen) Button, and Kristina
Conte. Cherished great-grandfather of Ryan, and Matthew
Button. President of Paul
Conte Cadillac from 1979 to
Present. Visiting for family &
friends Saturday and Sunday,
3 - 8pm at Fairchild Sons Funeral Home, Inc, 1201 Franklin
Avenue, Garden City, NY. Mass
of Christian Burial Monday,
10 am at St. Joseph’s R.C.
Church, Garden City, NY. Interment to follow at Locust Valley Cemetery, Locust Valley,
NY. In lieu of flowers, donations to American Heart Association would be appreciated.
PALUMBO-Anthony of Mattituck (formerly of Patchogue)
on January 3, 2019 at the age
of 80. Retired SCPD Homicide
Detective and SCDA Investigator. Beloved husband of
Diane Palumbo. Loving father
of Lori, Sharon and Anthony
Palumbo. Caring brother of
Virginia Palumbo, Rita Perry,
Nancy Mason and the late
George, William and John
Palumbo. Cherished grandfather of Lorelei, Ryan and
Madeline Palumbo. Friends
may call on Tuesday from 2-4
& 7-9 P.M. at DeFriest-Grattan
Funeral Home, 13805 Main
Road, Mattituck, New York
11952. Liturgy of Christian Burial, Wednesday at 10:00 A.M.,
at Our Lady of Good Counsel
R.C. Church (Opposite Funeral
Home). Interment, with U.S.
Coast Guard Honors, at Sacred
Heart R.C. Cemetery. Memorial
donations, in lieu of flowers,
may be made to Maureen’s
Haven, 28 Lincoln Street,
Riverhead, New York 11901.
www.defriestgrattan.com
PUZIO - Arnold of Selden on
1/03/2019. Beloved husband
of the late Natalie. Loving
father of Josephine (Richard)
Santo, Arnold, and Robert
(Denise). Cherished Grandfather of
Richard, James,
Chris, Nick, Thomas, Amanda,
Natalie,
Michael,
Robert,
Daniel and Emily. Also survived by sister Nettie. Proud
Veteran of the US Army. Visitation will be held at Marinello
Funeral Home, Inc., 493 Middle
Country Road, Coram Monday,
1/7/2019 from 2-4 & 7-9 PM.
Funeral Mass 9:45 AM Tuesday
1/8/2019 at St. Margaret of
Scotland. Interment to follow
at Calverton National Cemetery. Marinellofh.com
newsday.com/obits
MEM2X50CL
newsday.com
To place an announcement
in Death Notices, In
Memoriam, In Sympathy
or Card of Thanks,
call 631-843-3162
CHIAMPOU - Kenneth Charles,
91, passed away in Vero Beach,
Florida on December 31, 2018.
Born November 18, 1927 to
Eleanor (nee Placilla) and
Charles Chiampou, Ken was
raised in Valley Stream, Long
Island, New York. He graduated from Brooklyn Polytechnical
Institute, now part of New
York University, with a degree
in
Civil
Engineering
and
later received his Professional
Engineering certification. He
retired to Vero Beach, Florida
after several decades as an
engineer and manager with the
New York State Department of
Transportation. Ken was a veteran of the U.S. Army. He is
survived by his wife of 67
years, Elizabeth (nee Cooney)
Chiampou, six children Lisa,
Charles (Sandra), Claire (Eric
Yoder), Kenneth Robertson,
Gregory and Katie (Brian Jobe);
nine grandchildren: Madeline,
Charles, Emma, Emily, Maggie,
Glenn, Elizabeth, Jenna and
Alexandra; and four great
grandchildren: Louise, Ted,
Grace and Norrine. Ken was
known as much for his dry
humor as his avid love of golf.
He played a crackerjack game
of Bridge! Ken loved his family
dearly and took his children
and grandchildren on many fun
outings to parks, lakes and
beaches. He read avidly and
was always up on current
events. Ken did not take life
for granted and he cherished
sunrises, watching the bird life
from his window at Vista
Plantation, friendships old and
new and especially the love of
his life, his wife “Bette.” He
was preceded in death by a
son, Daniel, and a brother,
Calvin (Bud) Chiampou. Funeral
arrangements pending.
HESSEMER - Philip F. formerly
of North Merrick, NY entered
into eternal rest January 4,
2019 at the age of 94. Beloved
husband of the late Margaret.
Loving father of Philip E.
(Roxanne), Deacon Donald P.
(Joan), Janice Ciasullo (Bob),
and Thomas G. (Joyce). Cherished by his 13 grandchildren
Kristin (Jay), Allison, Michael,
Brian,
Brittany
(Chris),
Kenneth, Katie, Megan, Bobby,
Philip T., Peter, James, John &
3 great-grandchildren Ethan,
Daniel and Claire. Proud WWII
veteran of the United States
Navy. Philip graduated with a
masters degree from NYU.
Devoted teacher for over 35
years in the Valley Stream
School District. Phil was a
Nassau County High School
athletic official for multiple
sports for 50 years. Phil was a
lifelong fan of the Brooklyn
Dodgers/New York Mets, New
York Jets, and the New York
Islanders. In his leisure, Phil
enjoyed camping, photography
and attending Mets spring
training in Port St. Lucie.
Family will receive friends
Monday, 2-4 pm and 7-9 pm, at
the Charles J. O'Shea Funeral
Home at 603 Wantagh Avenue
(Exit 28N SS PKWY) Wantagh,
NY. Mass of Christian Burial
will be held on Tuesday,
10:15 am, at St. Sacred Heart
R.C. Church in North Merrick,
NY. Interment to follow at
Calverton Cemetery. In lieu of
flowers, the family requests
donations to be made in Phil's
memory to the Dominican
Village Senior Living Center
Amityville, NY.
www.osheafuneral.com
McGEEVER - James M. on
January 2, 2019. Beloved husband of Barbara (nee Davies).
Loving father of James Bryan
(Tiffany). Dear grandfather of
Aubrey Marie. Beloved son of
Rose (nee Caruso) and the
late James Thomas. Loving
brother of Barbara (John)
Grillo, Michael and Robert
(Nanette). Proud Veteran of
The United States Air Force.
After his military service,
Jamie went to work at the
family store; Long Island Furniture Company. Viewing Tuesday 2 – 4 and 7 - 9 pm at the
Thomas F. Dalton Funeral
Home, 47 Jerusalem Avenue,
Hicksville. Mass of Christian
Burial Wednesday, 11:00 am
at St. Ignatius R.C. Church.
Interment to follow at
Calverton National Cemetery.
STY1X154
SPORTS STATS
A42
BASKETBALL
NBA STANDINGS
y
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic
W
Toronto ....................29
Philadelphia .............26
Boston ....................23
Nets .........................19
Knicks .....................10
Southeast
W
Miami ......................19
Charlotte ..................18
Orlando ...................17
Washington .............15
Atlanta ....................11
Central
W
Milwaukee ...............27
Indiana .....................26
Detroit .....................17
Chicago ....................10
Cleveland ...................8
L
12
14
15
21
29
L
18
20
21
24
27
L
11
12
20
29
32
Pct GB
.707
—
.650 21/2
.605 41/2
1
.475 9 /2
.256
18
Pct GB
.514
—
.474 11/2
.447 21/2
.385
5
.289 81/2
Pct GB
.711
—
.684
1
.459 91/2
.256 171/2
.200
20
Southwest
W
Houston ...................22
San Antonio ............23
Memphis ..................18
Dallas .......................18
New Orleans ............18
Northwest
W
Denver .....................26
Oklahoma City .........25
Portland ...................23
Utah .........................20
Minnesota ...............18
Pacific
W
Golden State ...........26
LA Clippers ..............22
LA Lakers ................21
Sacramento .............19
Phoenix ......................9
L
16
17
21
21
22
L
11
13
17
20
21
L
14
16
18
20
31
Pct GB
.579
—
.575
—
.462 4 1/2
1
.462 4 /2
.450
5
Pct GB
.703
—
.658 11/2
.575 4 1/2
.500 71/2
.462
9
Pct GB
.650
—
.579
3
.538 4 1/2
.487 61/2
.225
17
WESTERN CONFERENCE
NBA SCHEDULE
Friday
Knicks 119 .............................LA Lakers 112
Nets 109 ................................Memphis 100
Utah 117 ....................................Cleveland 91
Boston 114 .....................................Dallas 93
Indiana 119 .................................Chicago 116
Miami 115 ...........................Washington 109
Minnesota 120 ...........................Orlando 103
Milwaukee 144............................Atlanta 112
LA Clippers 121 .........................Phoenix 111
Oklahoma City 111 ....................Portland 109
Saturday
Denver 123 ..............................Charlotte 110
Utah 110 ......................................Detroit 105
Philadelphia 106 ............................Dallas 100
New Orleans 133 .......................Cleveland 98
San Antonio 108 .......................Memphis 88
Toronto 123 ..........................Milwaukee 116
Golden State 127 ................Sacramento 123
Portland 110 ..............................Houston 101
Sunday
Nets at Chicago, 3:30 p.m.
LA Lakers at Minnesota, 3:30 p.m.
Orlando at LA Clippers, 3:30 p.m.
Miami at Atlanta, 6 p.m.
Washington at Oklahoma City, 7 p.m.
Indiana at Toronto, 7:30 p.m.
Charlotte at Phoenix, 8 p.m.
Monday
Nets at Boston, 7:30 p.m.
Knicks at Portland, 10 p.m.
San Antonio at Detroit, 7 p.m.
Denver at Houston, 8 p.m.
Memphis at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Utah at Milwaukee, 8 p.m.
LA Lakers at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Orlando at Sacramento, 10 p.m.
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
newsday.com
Raptors 123, Bucks 116
Raptors Min FG FT Reb A PF Pts
Leonard ........38 8-16 12-15 0-6 6 1 30
Siakam .........38 11-15 5-7 2-4 3 4 30
Ibaka ............35 11-17 2-3 0-9 5 3 25
Green ...........40 5-7 0-0 2-9 0 2 12
VanVleet.......35 6-12 4-4 0-5 8 4 21
Anunoby ......16 1-6 0-0 0-2 0 4 3
Powell...........15 0-5 2-2 0-1 4 1 2
Wright .........13 0-4 0-0 0-1 2 2 0
Monroe ..........5 0-0 0-0 0-1 0 1 0
Totals ..........240 42-82 25-31 4-38 28 22 123
FG%: .512, FT%: .806. 3PM-A: 14-31, .452 (VanVleet 5-8, Siakam 3-5, Green 2-3, Leonard
2-3, Ibaka 1-3, Anunoby 1-5, Wright 0-1, Powell 0-3). BS: 6 (Siakam 2, Green, Ibaka, Powell, VanVleet). TO: 11 (Ibaka 3, Green 2,
Leonard 2, Powell 2, Anunoby, Monroe). STL:
9 (Leonard 5, Powell 2, Green, Wright). Tech:
coach Nick Nurse, 4:01 second.
Bucks
Min FG FT Reb A PF Pts
Antetokonmpo 39 16-25 8-11 1-18 4 2 43
Middleton ....32 6-13 0-1 0-2 9 6 14
Lopez ...........24 2-6 0-0 0-2 0 3 5
Bledsoe.........32 4-9 4-5 0-3 8 2 14
Brogdon .......33 5-11 4-4 1-3 5 2 15
Hill ...............28 2-4 6-6 0-2 1 1 11
S.Brown........14 4-7 0-0 0-2 0 2 11
Ilyasova ........13 1-5 0-0 1-2 1 1 3
Snell .............13 0-0 0-0 0-2 1 0 0
Wilson ...........8 0-1 0-0 1-2 0 1 0
Totals ..........240 40-81 22-27 4-38 29 20 116
FG%: .494, FT%: .815. 3PM-A: 14-37, .378 (Antetokounmpo 3-5, S.Brown 3-6, Bledsoe 2-6,
Middleton 2-6, Hill 1-3, Ilyasova 1-3, Brogdon
1-4, Lopez 1-4). BS: 2 (Brogdon 2). TO: 14
(Antetokounmpo 6, Bledsoe 3, Hill, Ilyasova,
Lopez, Middleton, Wilson). STL: 9 (Bledsoe
2, Hill 2, Antetokounmpo, Brogdon, Ilyasova,
Middleton, Wilson). Tech: coach Bucks (Defensive three second), 7:41 third; Lopez, 3:23
third. A: 18,028.
Toronto ................27 29 35 32 — 123
Milwaukee ..........34 23 25 34 — 116
Knicks 119, Lakers 112
Nuggets 123, Hornets 110
Hornets Min
Batum ..........33
Williams ......34
Biyombo ......30
Graham.........26
Walker .........33
Monk ...........22
Parker ..........16
Kidd-Gilchrist 16
W. Hrnangomez15
FG
4-6
6-15
7-10
3-9
6-17
6-11
1-2
2-4
3-7
FT
0-0
1-2
2-3
2-2
7-9
2-2
0-0
3-4
4-4
Reb
1-7
3-6
4-12
0-3
0-4
0-3
1-1
1-5
A PF Pts
3 2 11
0 2 16
0 4 16
8 2 10
3 2 20
2 1 16
3 2 2
2 2 7
2-5 1 1
10
Bridges ........12 1-1 0-0 0-1 0 0 2
Totals ...........240 39-82 21-26 12-47 22 18 110
FG%: .476, FT%: .808. 3PM-A: 11-29, .379
(Batum 3-5, Williams 3-8, Graham 2-5, Monk
2-5, Walker 1-6). BS: 4 (Biyombo 2, Batum,
Williams). TO: 17 (Walker 5, Monk 3, Parker 3,
Williams 3, Biyombo 2, Batum). STL: 7
(Williams 3, Batum 2, Biyombo 2). Tech: None.
Nuggets Min FG FT Reb A PF Pts
J.Hernangomez19
0-3
0-0
0-2 0 1
0
Jokic .............34 16-29 4-5 8-12 6 1 39
Plumlee .......19 4-5 0-0 0-3 5 5 8
Craig ............28 4-7 2-4 1-3 1 4 12
Murray..........31 3-13 0-0 0-6 7 2 8
Millsap..........27 7-14 3-4 4-6 3 1 18
Harris ...........25 7-15 0-1 2-6 5 1 17
Beasley.........22 2-4 0-0 0-2 0 3 4
Morris...........15 2-7 2-2 1-1 1 0 8
Lyles ............14 2-5 4-4 1-5 2 1 9
Goodwin ........0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0 0
Lydon .............0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0 0
Totals ...........240 47-102 15-20 17-46 30 19 123
FG%: .461, FT%: .750. 3PM-A: 14-39, .359
(Harris 3-8, Jokic 3-9, Morris 2-3, Craig 2-4,
Murray 2-4, Lyles 1-3, Millsap 1-3, Beasley
0-2, J.Hernangomez 0-3). BS: 6 (Plumlee 3,
Beasley, Craig, Jokic). TO: 7 (Jokic 2, Millsap
2, Murray 2, J.Hernangomez). STL: 10 (Millsap 4, Jokic 3, Harris, Lyles, Morris). Tech:
None. A: 19,861.
Charlotte..............26 30 28 26 — 110
Denver .................31 27 31 34 — 123
Jazz 110, Pistons 105
Jazz
Min FG FT Reb A PF Pts
Favors ..........28 3-8 6-7 1-5 3 2 13
Ingles............32 6-11 2-3 0-4 1 5 16
Gobert ..........26 4-7 1-4 3-11 3 4 9
Mitchell .......38 10-21 5-6 0-5 5 3 26
Rubio ...........29 6-13 5-5 1-2 4 1 18
Crowder .......25 1-8 2-3 2-5 3 1 4
Korver...........14 3-4 0-0 0-2 0 2 8
Neto .............12 2-3 0-0 0-0 0 1 4
Sefolosha ......8 2-4 2-2 0-3 0 1 6
O‘Neale...........8 0-0 0-0 0-2 0 2 0
Exum .............8 1-1 2-2 0-2 5 0 4
Udoh ..............6 1-2 0-0 0-1 0 1 2
Totals ...........240 39-82 25-32 7-42 24 23 110
FG%: .476, FT%: .781. 3PM-A: 7-21, .333 (Korver 2-3, Ingles 2-4, Favors 1-2, Mitchell 1-3,
Rubio 1-4, Sefolosha 0-1, Crowder 0-4). BS: 6
(Favors 2, Gobert, Ingles, Korver, Mitchell).
TO: 12 (Rubio 4, Ingles 3, Mitchell 2, Crowder, Gobert, Korver). STL: 12 (Crowder 3,
Mitchell 3, Sefolosha 2, Favors, Ingles, Neto,
Rubio). Tech: coach Jazz (Defensive three
second), 4:29 third.
Pistons
Min FG FT Reb A PF Pts
Bullock..........39 7-14 0-0 2-3 2 2 19
Griffin ..........39 13-21 5-6 2-10 5 2 34
Drummond ..37 7-10 1-4 1-18 0 4 15
Brown ..........34 3-7 6-6 0-3 7 3 12
Jackson.........25 4-10 2-2 0-2 3 5 12
Calderon ......22 3-6 0-0 0-1 1 3 7
Johnson .......14 1-5 2-2 0-3 0 2 4
Kennard .......13 1-5 0-0 0-2 0 0 2
Leuer ............10 0-3 0-0 0-2 0 2 0
Galloway ........3 0-1 0-0 0-0 0 0 0
Totals ...........240 39-82 16-20 5-44 18 23 105
FG%: .476, FT%: .800. 3PM-A: 11-25, .440
(Bullock 5-8, Griffin 3-7, Jackson 2-4,
Calderon 1-1, Brown 0-1, Kennard 0-1, Johnson 0-3). BS: 2 (Drummond, Johnson). TO:
18 (Brown 4, Drummond 3, Griffin 3, Bullock
2, Calderon 2, Jackson 2, Johnson 2). STL: 7
(Drummond 3, Griffin 2, Johnson, Kennard).
Tech: None. A: 17,255.
Utah ....................13 35 28 34 — 110
Detroit .................31 22 25 27 — 105
NBA CALENDAR
\ Jan. 10 — All contracts guaranteed for
rest of season.
\ Feb. 7 — Trade deadline, 3 p.m. EST.
\ Feb. 16 — 3-point, slam dunk contests,
Charlotte, N.C.
\ Feb. 17 — NBA All-Star Game, Charlotte,
N.C.
\ April 10 — Regular season ends.
\ April 13 — Playoffs begin.
Friday Night
Knicks
Min FG FT Reb A PF Pts
Knox ............37 4-12 4-4 1-5 1 4 14
Vonleh .........17 2-6 2-2 5-10 1 4 7
Kornet .........21 2-8 1-2 1-5 1 1 6
Hardaway Jr. 38 7-18 5-5 1-6 2 0 22
Mudiay ........33 4-16 6-7 1-7 6 1 15
Kanter .........26 5-11 5-7 4-15 3 4 16
Dotson..........24 4-10 2-2 0-2 3 1 11
Burke ............18 6-13 4-4 0-1 1 0 16
Hezonja .......13 3-4 3-6 0-2 1 1 10
Trier ...............8 0-1 2-2 0-2 1 3 2
Ntilikina..........0 0-0 0-0 0-1 0 1 0
Totals ...........240 37-99 34-41 13-56 20 20 119
FG%: .374, FT%: .829. 3PM-A: 11-37, .297
(Hardaway Jr. 3-10, Knox 2-5, Hezonja 1-2,
Kanter 1-2, Vonleh 1-3, Kornet 1-4, Dotson
1-5, Mudiay 1-5, Burke 0-1). BS: 4 (Kanter 3,
Hezonja). TO: 6 (Trier 2, Hezonja, Kanter, Mudiay, Ntilikina). STL: 12 (Dotson 4, Vonleh 4,
Burke, Hezonja, Knox, Kornet). Tech: None.
Lakers
Min FG FT Reb A PF Pts
Hart .............33 2-11 1-1 1-7 4 5 6
Ingram .........36 8-21 5-5 0-9 3 3 21
McGee .........24 9-14 0-0 5-9 1 3 18
Ball ..............33 6-13 0-2 2-6 2 4 17
CaldwellPope36 6-16 3-3 0-6 3 4 19
Stephenson .29 4-9 0-1 0-4 7 5 8
Beasley.........11 2-3 2-4 0-4 1 1 6
Zubac............11 4-6 2-2 2-6 2 1 10
Chandler ......11 1-1 2-2 2-4 0 1 4
Mykhailiuk....11 1-4 0-0 0-0 0 0 3
Totals ...........240 43-98 15-20 12-55 23 27 112
FG%: .439, FT%: .750. 3PM-A: 11-37, .297
(Ball 5-7, Caldwell-Pope 4-12, Mykhailiuk
1-4, Hart 1-9, Ingram 0-2, Stephenson 0-3).
BS: 7 (Hart 2, Stephenson 2, Ball, McGee,
Zubac). TO: 16 (Ball 6, Ingram 5, Stephenson
2, McGee, Mykhailiuk, Zubac). STL: 4 (Ball 2,
Ingram, Mykhailiuk). Tech: None.
Knicks ..................39 24 23 33 — 119
L.A. Lakers...........25 34 33 20 — 112
76ers 106, Mavericks 100
Mavs
Min FG FT Reb A PF Pts
Barnes .........26 2-9 3-4 1-5 2 3 7
Matthews.....24 7-11 0-0 1-2 0 5 18
Jordan ..........30 4-5 0-0 2-8 5 4 8
Doncic...........26 4-16 5-10 0-8 4 1 14
Smith Jr........22 1-5 0-0 0-1 4 4 2
Brunson ........25 4-14 4-4 1-11 8 0 13
Finney-Smith23 2-8 0-0 0-2 0 2 4
Kleber ..........21 3-6 0-0 2-7 0 3 6
Broekhoff ....21 6-8 0-0 0-1 3 0 15
Powell...........17 5-6 3-5 2-4 1 1 13
Totals ...........240 38-88 15-23 9-49 27 23 100
FG%: .432, FT%: .652. 3PM-A: 9-31, .290
(Matthews 4-7, Broekhoff 3-5, Brunson 1-3,
Doncic 1-8, Kleber 0-1, Smith Jr. 0-1, Barnes
0-3, Finney-Smith 0-3). BS: 3 (Powell 2,
Broekhoff). TO: 15 (Broekhoff 3, FinneySmith 3, Jordan 3, Barnes 2, Brunson 2, Powell, Smith Jr.). STL: 4 (Doncic 2, Brunson,
Powell). Tech: None.
76ers
Min FG FT Reb A PF Pts
Bolden .........29 4-8 3-6 3-9 3 4 11
Korkmaz ......27 2-8 2-2 0-6 4 1 7
Embiid .........34 7-17 10-11 0-12 5 4 25
Redick...........33 8-14 2-3 0-2 2 0 20
Simmons .....35 9-17 2-6 4-14 11 2 20
McConnell.....29 2-5 2-4 0-1 4 2 6
Shamet.........23 3-6 0-0 0-1 1 3 7
Muscala ........15 2-5 0-0 2-3 1 4 4
Milton...........10 2-4 1-1 0-2 0 0 6
Totals ...........240 39-84 22-33 9-50 31 20 106
FG%: .464, FT%: .667. 3PM-A: 6-26, .231
(Redick 2-6, Milton 1-2, Embiid 1-3, Shamet
1-4, Korkmaz 1-6, Bolden 0-2, Muscala 0-3).
BS: 5 (Bolden 2, Milton 2, Embiid). TO: 10
(Simmons 4, Embiid 2, Bolden, McConnell,
Muscala, Redick). STL: 7 (McConnell 3, Redick
2, Embiid, Shamet). Tech: None. A: 20,656.
Dallas ..................26 25 19 30 — 100
Philadelphia .........31 28 28 19 — 106
NBA G LEAGUE
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W
L
Pct
GB
LI Nets .....................16
6 .727
—
Westchester.............16
8 .667
1
Raptors ....................14
9 .609 21/2
Delaware ...................8 13 .381 71/2
Maine ........................8 15 .348 81/2
Friday
Capital City 122 ...........OT ...........Canton 117
Fort Wayne 125 .....................Wisconsin 120
Lakeland 117 .........................Greensboro 107
Windy City 120 ................................Erie 118
Westchester 113 ........................Raptors 110
Salt Lake City 110 ..................Sioux Falls 105
Agua Caliente 112 .............Oklahoma City 94
Saturday
LI Nets 126 ...............................Raptors 105
Memphis 110 ................................Austin 97
Delaware 108 .........................Greensboro 86
Maine 109 .........................Grand Rapids 102
Iowa 127.................................Fort Wayne 99
Windy City 123 ........................Stockton 114
Santa Cruz 121 ..............................Texas 116
Sunday
Capital City at Westchester, 3 p.m.
Sioux Falls at Northern Arizona, 5 p.m.
Wisconsin at Lakeland, 6 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Iowa, 7 p.m.
LI NETS
WATCH
HOCKEY
Spurs 108, Grizzlies 88
Grizzlies Min FG FT Reb A PF Pts
Anderson ......28 3-6 1-2 0-4 3 2 7
Jackson Jr.....33 5-8 4-5 2-7 1 3 15
M.Gasol .......25 2-9 2-2 2-11 6 2 6
Conley...........25 7-12 4-4 1-1 3 3 21
Temple..........29 3-11 0-0 0-2 2 2 7
Green............29 2-8 3-3 2-10 0 6 8
Carter ..........22 2-8 0-0 0-3 3 4 6
Holiday ........20 1-7 0-0 1-2 2 2 2
Brooks .........16 6-11 0-1 0-0 1 4 15
Noah...............6 0-2 1-2 0-2 0 1 1
Rabb ..............0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0 0
Totals ...........240 31-82 15-19 8-42 21 29 88
FG%: .378, FT%: .789. 3PM-A: 11-28, .393
(Brooks 3-5, Conley 3-5, Carter 2-5, Green
1-2, Jackson Jr. 1-3, Temple 1-4, M.Gasol 0-2,
Holiday 0-2). BS: 3 (Anderson 2, M.Gasol).
TO: 20 (Green 4, M.Gasol 4, Temple 4, Carter
2, Jackson Jr. 2, Anderson, Brooks, Conley,
Noah). STL: 12 (Jackson Jr. 4, Carter 3, Anderson 2, Green, M.Gasol, Temple). Tech:
Noah, 11:22 second.
Spurs
Min FG FT Reb A PF Pts
Gay ..............24 4-12 0-0 1-8 2 1 9
White ..........27 8-9 2-2 1-4 0 3 19
Aldridge ........30 5-9 8-10 0-2 7 4 18
DeRozan .......34 3-10 6-7 1-9 4 2 12
Forbes...........30 2-7 2-2 0-1 2 1 7
Mills ............23 5-6 2-3 0-2 4 0 15
Bertans ........21 1-5 1-2 0-5 2 2 4
Belinelli .......19 2-6 5-5 0-4 1 3 9
Poeltl ............17 5-5 1-2 0-6 2 3 11
Cunningham ...7 1-3 0-0 0-0 1 0 2
Eubanks..........2 0-0 2-2 0-0 0 0 2
Pondexter .......2 0-1 0-0 0-2 1 0 0
Totals ...........240 36-73 29-35 3-43 26 19 108
FG%: .493, FT%: .829. 3PM-A: 7-22, .318
(Mills 3-4, White 1-1, Gay 1-2, Bertans 1-5,
Forbes 1-5, Cunningham 0-1, Pondexter 0-1,
Belinelli 0-3). BS: 2 (Bertans, Poeltl). TO: 15
(DeRozan 5, Gay 2, Mills 2, Poeltl 2, White 2,
Belinelli, Forbes). STL: 10 (Aldridge 2,
Bertans 2, Gay 2, DeRozan, Forbes, Mills,
White). Tech: coach Spurs (Defensive three
second), 1:03 first; coach Gregg Popovich,
3:50 second. A: 18,354.
Memphis .............25 19 22 22 — 88
San Antonio .......27 37 24 20 — 108
Pelicans 133, Cavaliers 98
Pelicans Min FG FT Reb A PF Pts
Holiday ........26 9-13 0-0 2-5 3 1 22
Randle .........32 8-14 5-5 2-12 8 1 22
Davis ...........28 6-12 8-10 3-10 3 3 20
Moore ...........27 3-6 3-3 0-1 3 0 10
Payton .........23 5-8 2-2 0-0 3 2 13
Miller ............22 4-6 2-3 0-1 1 2 14
Frazier .........19 1-2 0-0 0-1 3 1 3
Okafor .........19 3-5 4-4 1-4 1 3 10
Jackson ........18 3-8 0-0 1-5 3 3 6
Diallo .............8 2-2 1-2 1-3 0 1 5
Clark ..............7 3-5 0-0 0-2 1 0 8
Hill..................4 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 1 0
Totals ...........240 47-81 25-29 10-44 29 18 133
FG%: .580, FT%: .862. 3PM-A: 14-27, .519
(Miller 4-5, Holiday 4-6, Clark 2-3, Payton
1-1, Frazier 1-2, Moore 1-3, Randle 1-3, Davis
0-2, Jackson 0-2). BS: 7 (Davis 2, Okafor 2,
Clark, Frazier, Holiday). TO: 14 (Frazier 2,
Moore 2, Payton 2, Randle 2, Clark, Davis, Diallo, Hill, Jackson, Miller). STL: 13 (Davis 4,
Holiday 2, Moore 2, Payton 2, Jackson, Miller,
Randle). Tech: Okafor, 2:44 fourth.
Cavs
Min FG FT Reb A PF Pts
Nance Jr. ......25 2-7 2-2 3-6 2 3 6
Osman..........32 5-12 1-1 0-1 5 5 13
Thompson ...26 4-8 2-2 2-11 2 4 10
Burks ............35 2-9 2-2 1-3 6 2 8
Sexton ..........30 5-12 3-4 1-3 2 2 15
Jones ............27 7-13 0-2 2-5 0 1 15
Clarkson ......24 8-17 4-5 1-4 3 0 23
Frye .............19 3-8 0-0 0-0 2 5 8
McCaw ........16 0-2 0-0 0-1 0 1 0
Totals ...........240 36-88 14-18 10-34 22 23 98
FG%: .409, FT%: .778. 3PM-A: 12-33, .364
(Clarkson 3-6, Osman 2-4, Frye 2-5, Sexton
2-5, Burks 2-6, Jones 1-4, Nance Jr. 0-1,
McCaw 0-2). BS: 3 (Clarkson, Frye, Thompson). TO: 17 (Jones 4, Osman 3, Sexton 3,
Clarkson 2, Nance Jr. 2, Burks, Frye, Thompson). STL: 12 (Jones 3, Osman 3, Thompson
2, Burks, Clarkson, McCaw, Nance Jr.). Tech:
Jones, 2:44 fourth. A: 19,432.
New Orleans .......28 33 37 35 — 133
Cleveland ............26 26 20 26 — 98
Nets 126, Raptors 105: Shannon Scott had 17
points, 16 assists and 11 rebounds for the Nets,
who outscored the Raptors 72-42 in the first half.
Thomas Wimbush and Tahjere McCall each had 21
points and Drew Gordon added 19 points and 10 rebounds.
NHL STANDINGS
Islanders 4, Blues 3
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts
Tampa Bay ....42 32 8 2 66
Toronto ..........41 27 12 2 56
Boston ...........42 24 14 4 52
Buffalo ..........42 22 14 6 50
Montreal .......42 22 15 5 49
Florida ..........40 17 16 7 41
Detroit ...........43 16 20 7 39
Ottawa ..........42 15 22 5 35
Metropolitan Division
GP W L OT Pts
Washington ..40 24 12 4 52
Pittsburgh .....41 23 12 6 52
Columbus .....41 24 14 3 51
Islanders .......40 23 13 4 50
Carolina ........40 18 17 5 41
Rangers .........40 17 16 7 41
New Jersey ..40 16 17 7 39
Philadelphia ..41 15 20 6 36
GF
176
152
122
120
131
130
122
132
GA
124
113
110
120
132
142
148
167
GF
141
144
135
121
103
114
120
116
GA
119
117
126
107
114
136
134
148
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT
Nashville ......43 25 15 3
Winnipeg .......40 25 13 2
Dallas ...........42 22 16 4
Colorado .......42 20 14 8
Minnesota .....40 20 17 3
Chicago ..........43 15 21 7
St. Louis ........39 16 19 4
Pacific Division
GP W L OT
Calgary .........43 26 13 4
Vegas ...........44 25 15 4
San Jose ........43 23 13 7
Anaheim........42 19 16 7
Vancouver .....45 20 21 4
Edmonton .....41 19 19 3
Arizona ..........41 17 21 3
Los Angeles ..43 17 23 3
Pts
53
52
48
48
43
37
36
GF
131
134
115
144
118
123
110
GA
109
115
111
129
114
156
129
Pts
56
54
53
45
44
41
37
37
GF
153
133
150
104
128
114
103
98
GA
123
117
135
123
143
131
118
127
NHL SCHEDULE
Friday
Colorado 6 ....................................Rangers 1
Pittsburgh 4.................................Winnipeg 0
Detroit 4 .................OT .................Nashville 3
Carolina 4 ...................................Columbus 2
Dallas 2 ..............OT ..............Washington 1
New Jersey 3 .............SO ..............Arizona 2
Vegas 3 ........................................Anaheim 2
Saturday
Islanders 4 ..................................St. Louis 3
Calgary 3 .............OT .............Philadelphia 2
Minnesota 4....................................Ottawa 3
Columbus 4 ................OT.................Florida 3
Toronto 5 ....................................Vancouver 0
Nashville 4 ...................................Montreal 1
Boston 2 ..........................................Buffalo 1
Los Angeles 4 ............................Edmonton 0
San Jose 5 ................................Tampa Bay 2
Sunday
Rangers at Arizona, 4 p.m.
Carolina at Ottawa, 1 p.m.
New Jersey at Vegas, 4 p.m.
Washington at Detroit, 5 p.m.
Dallas at Winnipeg, 5 p.m.
Edmonton at Anaheim, 8 p.m.
Chicago at Pittsburgh, 8 p.m.
Monday
Nashville at Toronto, 7 p.m.
St. Louis at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Minnesota at Montreal, 7:30 p.m.
Calgary at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.
Los Angeles at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.
Flames 3, Flyers 2
Calgary ........................0 1 1 1 — 3
Philadelphia.................1 0 1 0 — 2
SCORING
1st period: 1, Philadelphia, Sanheim 4 (Weal,
Provorov), 12:10 (pp).
2nd period: 2, Calgary, Gaudreau 24 (Hanifin,
Monahan), 8:51.
3rd period: 3, Philadelphia, Konecny 10, 5:57.
4, Calgary, Tkachuk 19 (Bennett, Hanifin),
15:43.
Overtime: 5, Calgary, Brodie 5 (Tkachuk),
1:59.
Shots on goal: Calgary 11-10-10-1—32. Philadelphia 13-12-9—34. Power plays: Calgary 0
of 2; Philadelphia 1 of 4. Goalies: Calgary, Rittich 14-4-3 (34 shots-32 saves). Philadelphia, Hart 2-3-1 (32-29). A: 19,236.
Wild 4, Senators 3
Minnesota ........................0 3 1 — 4
Ottawa ..............................1 1 1 — 3
SCORING
1st period: 1, Ottawa, Duchene 17 (Smith),
19:06.
2nd period: 2, Minnesota, Spurgeon 6
(Kunin, Parise), 0:41. 3, Ottawa, Dzingel 16
(Ryan, DeMelo), 8:08. 4, Minnesota, Greenway 7 (Granlund, Staal), 14:10. 5, Minnesota,
Spurgeon 7 (Parise, Coyle), 16:31.
3rd period: 6, Minnesota, Parise 19 (Coyle,
Kunin), 6:07. 7, Ottawa, Stone 20 (Ceci,
Wolanin), 10:10.
Shots on goal: Minnesota 8-13-5—26. Ottawa 15-4-8—27. Power plays: Minnesota 0
of 3; Ottawa 0 of 2. Goalies: Minnesota, Dubnyk 15-14-3 (27 shots-24 saves). Ottawa,
Nilsson 3-9-1 (26-22). A: 14,124
Islanders ............................0 1 3 — 4
St. Louis ...........................2 0 1 — 3
SCORING
1st period: 1, St. Louis, Schenn 8 (Schwartz,
Bouwmeester), 4:11. 2, St. Louis, Sanford 5
(Bozak, Dunn), 16:37.
2nd period: 3, Islanders, Martin 5 (Cizikas,
Clutterbuck), 2:25.
3rd period: 4, Islanders, Eberle 8 (Lee,
Pelech), 8:27. 5, Islanders, Boychuk 3
(Cizikas), 8:38. 6, Islanders, Lee 15 (Toews,
Mayfield), 15:04. 7, St. Louis, O‘Reilly 16
(Perron, Tarasenko), 18:27.
PENALTIES
1st period: Ho-Sang, NYI, (hooking), 5:08;
Fabbri, STL, (hooking), 19:16.
2nd period: Fabbri, STL, (hooking), 10:01; Pulock, NYI, (hooking), 12:12.
3rd period: Lee, NYI, (high sticking), 3:44;
Mayfield, NYI, (tripping), 11:14; Pulock, NYI,
(holding), 19:40.
Shots on goal: Islanders 6-2-6—14. St. Louis
10-8-14—32. Power plays: Islanders 0 of 2;
St. Louis 0 of 5. Goalies: Islanders, Lehner
11-6-3 (32 shots-29 saves). St. Louis, Allen
14-13-4 (14-10). A: 16,801
Bruins 2, Sabres 1
Buffalo ...............................0 0 1 — 1
Boston ..............................1 1 0 — 2
SCORING
1st period: 1, Boston, Wagner 5 (Acciari),
10:10.
2nd period: 2, Boston, Backes 4, 2:00.
3rd period: 3, Buffalo, Ristolainen 5, 17:22.
Shots on goal: Buffalo 10-10-12—32. Boston
13-15-13—41. Power plays: Buffalo 0 of 1;
Boston 0 of 2. Goalies: Buffalo, Ullmark
9-2-3 (41 shots-39 saves). Boston, Rask
11-8-2 (32-31). A: 17,565
Blue Jackets 4, Panthers 3
Columbus ....................1 1 1 1 — 4
Florida .........................2 0 1 0 — 3
SCORING
1st period: 1, Columbus, Duclair 9
(Wennberg), 1:37. 2, Florida, Huberdeau 11
(Barkov, Yandle), 13:19. 3, Florida, Hoffman
20, 18:09.
2nd period: 4, Columbus, Anderson 15 (Murray, Jenner), 17:04.
3rd period: 5, Columbus, Dubinsky 4, 6:58. 6,
Florida, Ekblad 8 (McCann, Yandle), 17:47.
Overtime: 7, Columbus, Jones 7 (Panarin,
Dubois), 0:18.
Shots on goal: Columbus 14-11-9-1—35. Florida 10-7-13—30. Power plays: Columbus 0 of
2; Florida 0 of 1. Goalies: Columbus, Bobrovsky 18-12-1 (30 shots-27 saves). Florida,
Reimer 8-7-4 (35-31). A: 15,213
Maple Leafs 5, Canucks 0
Vancouver ..........................0 0 0 — 0
Toronto .............................2 0 3 — 5
SCORING
1st period: 1, Toronto, Tavares 27 (Rielly,
Brown), 8:54. 2, Toronto, Moore 1
(Ozhiganov), 14:30.
2nd period: None.
3rd period: 3, Toronto, Matthews 20 (Johnsson), 4:45. 4, Toronto, Johnsson 9
(Matthews), 11:55. 5, Toronto, Ozhiganov 2
(Dermott, Matthews), 14:49.
Shots on goal: Vancouver 11-8-9—28.
Toronto 12-12-10—34. Power plays: Vancouver 0 of 3; Toronto 0 of 0. Goalies: Vancouver, Markstrom 17-12-3 (34 shots-29 saves).
Toronto, Hutchinson 2-2-2 (28-28). A: 19,388
Predators 4, Canadiens 1
Nashville ...........................2 1 1 — 4
Montreal ............................0 1 0 — 1
SCORING
1st period: 1, Nashville, Smith 13 (Subban,
Ekholm), 10:44. 2, Nashville, Ekholm 4
(Grimaldi, Jarnkrok), 19:24.
2nd period: 3, Montreal, Weber 6
(Kotkaniemi), 12:47. 4, Nashville, Smith 14
(Subban, Fiala), 13:05.
3rd period: 5, Nashville, Arvidsson 12, 19:15.
Shots on goal: Nashville 16-11-5—32. Montreal 11-9-8—28. Power plays: Nashville 0 of
2; Montreal 0 of 1. Goalies: Nashville, Saros
10-5-1 (28 shots-27 saves). Montreal, Price
16-11-4 (31-28). A: 21,302
NHL LEADERS
Saturday’s games not included
GP G A
Nikita Kucherov, TB............41 20 49
Mikko Rantanen, COL.........42 19 46
Nathan MacKinnon, COL ...42 25 38
Johnny Gaudreau, CGY .......42 23 38
Connor McDavid, EDM ......39 23 38
Mitchell Marner, TOR .........40 15 40
Brayden Point, TB ..............41 24 30
David Pastrnak, BOS .........41 25 27
Patrick Kane, CHI ...............42 23 28
Sean Montrealahan, CGY ..42 22 29
Leon Draisaitl, EDM ..........40 22 29
Sidney Crosby, PIT..............38 19 32
Blake Wheeler, WPG..........40 6 44
Mark Scheifele, WPG ........40 22 27
Jack Eichel, BUF ................40 15 34
PTS
69
65
63
61
61
55
54
52
51
51
51
51
50
49
49
SPORTS STATS
A43
COLLEGES
BASKETBALL SUMMARIES
Hofstra 75, Northeastern 72
Stony Brook 75, Mass.-Lowell 63
STONY BROOK (13-3)
Olaniyi 4-10 2-2 11, Otchere 1-2 4-4 6, Cornish 2-10 0-0 4, Latimer 4-8 6-6 16, Garcia
2-5 2-2 7, Ochefu 1-1 2-2 4, Christie 2-2 0-0
4, Long 0-0 0-0 0, Moor 0-3 2-2 2, McKenzie
1-2 0-0 2, Yeboah 8-18 0-2 19. Totals 25-61
18-20 75.
MASS.-LOWELL (8-8)
Henderson 0-2 0-0 0, Lutete 4-13 2-2 13,
R.Jones 4-12 3-3 13, Noel 4-8 5-8 13, Gantz
2-6 4-4 10, Bennett 2-2 0-1 4, Blunt 1-3 0-0
2, Daley 1-1 1-2 3, Rivera 1-8 2-2 5. Totals
19-55 17-22 63.
Halftime — Mass.-Lowell 33-31. 3-Point
Goals — Stony Brook 7-20 (Yeboah 3-9, Latimer 2-3, Olaniyi 1-3, Garcia 1-3, Moor 0-1,
McKenzie 0-1), Mass.-Lowell 8-35 (Lutete
3-10, Gantz 2-6, R.Jones 2-8, Rivera 1-7, Henderson 0-1, Noel 0-1, Blunt 0-2). Fouled Out
— None. Rebounds — Stony Brook 38
(Otchere, Olaniyi 6), Mass.-Lowell 28
(Lutete 8). Assists — Stony Brook 10 (Latimer 4), Mass.-Lowell 13 (Gantz 4). Total
Fouls — Stony Brook 21, Mass.-Lowell 18.
St. John’s 97, Georgetown 94, OT
ST. JOHN’S (14-1)
Clark 4-10 0-0 11, Simon 7-11 0-3 14,
Heron 5-11 1-2 12, Ponds 11-21 9-12 37,
Figueroa 4-8 3-4 11, Keita 1-2 1-2 3, Trimble
1-1 2-2 5, Williams 2-3 0-0 4. Totals 35-67
16-25 97.
GEORGETOWN (11-4)
Pickett 5-12 1-2 13, LeBlanc 5-6 2-3 12,
Govan 9-22 6-8 25, Malinowski 3-8 4-6 13,
Akinjo 2-10 11-12 17, Mosely 2-2 0-0 5, Blair
2-9 1-1 7, Johnson 1-1 0-1 2. Totals 29-70
25-33 94.
Halftime — St. John’s 42-39. End Of Regulation — Tied 85. 3-Point Goals — St. John’s
11-27 (Ponds 6-10, Clark 3-8, Trimble 1-1,
Heron 1-5, Williams 0-1, Figueroa 0-2), Georgetown 11-34 (Malinowski 3-7, Akinjo 2-5, Pickett 2-7, Blair 2-8, Mosely 1-1, Govan 1-6).
Fouled Out — Simon, Heron, Clark. Rebounds
— St. John’s 29 (Simon, Figueroa 9), Georgetown 42 (LeBlanc 13). Assists — St. John’s 23
(Simon, Ponds 6), Georgetown 23 (Malinowski
7). Total Fouls — St. John’s 24, Georgetown 21.
NATIONAL RESULTS
MEN‘S BASKETBALL
East
Binghamton 71................New Hampshire 62
Bryant 69 ..............................LIU Brooklyn 62
Duquesne 60 ..................St. Bonaventure 54
Fordham 50 ..............George Washington 38
Maine 84 ........................................UMBC 44
Marist 71 .....................................Canisius 66
NJIT 66 ...............................Kennesaw St. 60
Niagara 61 ...............................Manhattan 51
Ohio 74 .........................................Buffalo 71
Penn 66 .....................................Princeton 60
Robert Morris 70 ..........Mount St. Mary‘s 58
Sacred Heart 66 ..............................CCSU 61
South Florida 63 ............................Temple 53
St. Francis (Pa.) 75 .....Fairleigh Dickinson 64
St. Francis Brooklyn 76.................Wagner 61
Stony Brook 76 ...................Mass.-Lowell 56
Vermont 52 ..........................Albany (NY) 39
NCAA FCS CHAMPIONSHIP
Saturday — At Frisco, Texas
North Dakota St. 38... Eastern Washington 24
NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP
Monday — At Santa Clara, Calif.
Clemson (14-0) vs. Alabama (14-0), 8 p.m.
Saturday
Indianapolis 21 ..............................Houston 7
Dallas 24 .......................................Seattle 22
Sunday
L.A. Chargers at Baltimore, 1:05 p.m.
Philadelphia at Chicago, 4:40 p.m.
DIVISIONAL PLAYOFFS
Saturday, Jan. 12
Indianapolis at Kansas City, 4:35 p.m.
Chicago/Dallas at L.A. Rams, 8:15 p.m.
Sunday, Jan. 13
Baltimore/Los Angeles Chargers at New
England, 1:05 p.m.
Dallas/Philadelphia at New Orleans,
4:40 p.m.
CONFERENCE CHAMPIONSHIPS
Sunday, Jan. 20
NFC: TBD, 3:05 p.m.
AFC: TBD, 6:40 p.m.
PRO BOWL
Sunday, Jan. 27 — At Orlando, Fla.
AFC vs. NFC, 3 p.m.
SUPER BOWL
Sunday, Feb. 3 — At Atlanta
AFC champion vs. NFC champion, 6:30 p.m.
INJURY REPORT
Sunday
\ LOS ANGELES CHARGERS at BALTIMORE RAVENS: CHARGERS: OUT: LB
Jatavis Brown (ankle). DOUBTFUL: DT Brandon Mebane (not injury related). QUESTIONABLE: RB Austin Ekeler (groin). RAVENS:
QUESTIONABLE: G Alex Lewis (shoulder),
WR Chris Moore (shoulder, hip), CB Tavon
Young (groin).
\ PHILADELPHIA EAGLES at CHICAGO
BEARS: EAGLES: OUT: LB D.J. Alexander
(hamstring), CB Sidney Jones (hamstring),
WR Mike Wallace (ankle), QB Carson Wentz
(back). QUESTIONABLE: DE Michael Bennett (foot), CB Avonte Maddox (oblique), T
Jason Peters (quadricep), G Isaac Seumalo
(chest). BEARS: DOUBTFUL: LB Aaron Lynch
(elbow). QUESTIONABLE: S DeAndre Houston-Carson (ribs), S Eddie Jackson (ankle),
DT Bilal Nichols (knee).
NFL CALENDAR
Jan. 12-13 — Divisional playoff round.
Jan. 20 — NFC, AFC championship games.
Jan. 27 — Pro Bowl, Orlando, Fla.
Feb. 3 — Super Bowl, Atlanta.
Feb. 26-March 4 — NFL combine, Indianapolis.
March 13 — League year and free agency
begin.
March 24-27 — Annual owners meeting,
Phoenix.
April 25-27 — NFL draft, Nashville, Tenn.
TENNIS
QATAR EXXONMOBIL OPEN
At Doha, Qatar
Singles — Championship
Roberto Bautista Agut (7), Spain, def.
Tomas Berdych, Czech Republic, 6-4, 3-6, 6-3.
TATA OPEN MAHARASHTRA
At Pune, India
Singles — Championship
Kevin Anderson (1), South Africa, def. Ivo
Karlovic, Croatia, 7-6 (4), 6-7 (2), 7-6 (5).
Doubles — Championship
Rohan Bopanna and Divij Sharan (1),
India, def. Luke Bambridge and Jonny
O’Mara, Britain, 6-3, 6-4.
BRISBANE INTERNATIONAL
At Brisbane, Australia
Men’s Singles — Semifinals
Kei Nishikori (2), Japan, def. Jeremy
Chardy, France, 6-2, 6-2.
Daniil Medvedev (4), Russia, def. Jo-Wilfried Tsonga, France, 7-6 (6), 6-2.
Women’s Singles — Semifinals
Lesia Tsurenko, Ukraine, def. Naomi Osaka
(2), Japan, 6-2, 6-4.
Karolina Pliskova (5), Czech Republic, def.
Donna Vekic, Croatia, 6-3, 6-4.
Women’s Doubles — Championship
Nicole Melichar, United States, and Kveta
Peschke (3), Czech Republic, def. Chan Haoching and Latisha Chan (4), Taiwan, 6-1, 6-1.
SHENZHEN OPEN
At Shenzhen, China
Singles — Semifinals
Alison Riske, United States, def. Vera
Zvonareva, Russia, 6-0, 1-0 retired.
Aryna Sabalenka (1), Belarus, def. Wang
Yafan, China, 6-2, 6-1.
Singles — Championship
Aryna Sabalenka (1), Belarus, def. Alison
Riske, United States, 4-6, 7-6 (2), 6-3.
Doubles — Championship
Peng Shuai and Zhaoxuan Yang (2), China,
def. Duan Yingying, China, and Renata Voracova, Czech Republic, 6-4, 6-3.
ASB CLASSIC
At Auckland, New Zealand
Singles — Semifinals
Julia Goerges (2), Germany, def. Viktoria
Kuzmova, Slovakia, 6-1, 7-6 (6).
Bianca Andreescu, Canada, def. Hsieh Suwei (3), Taiwan, 6-3, 6-3.
Doubles — Semifinals
Paige Mary Hourigan, New Zealand, and
Taylor Townsend, United States, def. Kirsten
Flipkens, Belgium, and Johanna Larsson (2),
Sweden, 6-3, 7-5.
ATP WORLD TOUR SCHEDULE
H-hard, C-clay, G-grass
\ Sunday-Jan. 12 — Sydney International, H
\ Monday-Jan. 12 — ASB Classic, Auckland, New Zealand, H
\ Jan. 14-27 — Australian Open, Melbourne, H
WTA SCHEDULE
H-hard, RC-red clay, GC-green clay, G-grass
\ Monday-Jan. 12 — Sydney International, H
\ Monday-Jan. 12 — Hobart (Australia) International, H
\ Jan. 14-27 — Australian Open, Melbourne, H
\ Jan. 28-Feb. 3 — St. Petersburg (Russia)
Ladies Trophy, H
\ Jan. 28-Feb. 3 — Thailand Open, Hua Hin, H
Colts 21, Texans 7
Indianapolis
Houston
14 7 0 0 — 21
0 0 0 7 — 7
Q1 IND: Ebron 6 pass from Luck (Vinatieri
kick), 10:32. Drive: 9 plays, 75 yards,
4:28. Key Plays: Luck 12 pass to Hilton;
J.Watt 5-yard defensive offside penalty
on 3rd-and-7; Mack 5 run on 3rd-and-7;
Luck 13 pass to Hilton on 3rd-and-2;
Luck 38 pass to Hilton. Indianapolis 7,
Houston 0.
IND: Mack 2 run (Vinatieri kick), 4:03.
Drive: 9 plays, 74 yards, 5:25. Key
Plays: Mack 25 run; Mack 2 run on
3rd-and-1; Pascal 14 run; Luck 16 pass
to Rogers. Indianapolis 14, Houston 0.
Q2 IND: Inman 18 pass from Luck (Vinatieri
kick), 6:24. Drive: 7 plays, 65 yards,
3:23. Key Plays: Luck 2 pass to Hilton
on 3rd-and-1; Luck 21 pass to Inman;
Luck 15 pass to Ebron. Indianapolis 21,
Houston 0.
Q4 HOU: Coutee 6 pass from Watson
(Fairbairn kick), 10:57. Drive: 16 plays,
89 yards, 6:13. Key Plays: Watson 10
pass to Miller; Watson 7 pass to Akins
on 3rd-and-10; Watson 7 pass to
Coutee on 4th-and-3; Watson 13 pass
to Hopkins. Indianapolis 21, Houston 7.
A: 71,798.
First downs ...................
Rushing.......................
Passing ......................
Penalty........................
Third down eff ...............
Fourth down eff .............
Total net yards ...............
Total Plays .................
Avg Gain ....................
Net yards rushing ..........
Rushes ........................
Avg per rush ...............
Net yards passing ..........
Sacked-Yds lost ..........
Gross-Yds passing ......
Completed-Att. ...........
Had Intercepted ..........
Yards-Pass Play ..........
Kickoffs-EndZone-TB .....
Punts-Avg. .....................
Punts blocked. ............
FGs-PATs blocked ..........
Total return yardage ......
Punt Returns .............
Kickoff Returns ..........
Interceptions ..............
Penalties-Yds .................
Fumbles-Lost .................
Time of possession ........
IND
26
10
14
2
9-14
0-0
422
67
6.3
200
35
5.7
222
0-0
222
19-32
1
6.9
4-3-3
4-37.0
0
0-0
30
2-20
0-0
1-10
2-10
0-0
31:14
HOU
20
7
13
0
3-13
2-5
322
68
4.7
105
16
6.6
217
3-18
235
29-49
1
4.2
2-2-2
5-46.8
0
0-0
26
0-0
1-26
1-0
8-67
0-0
28:46
Individual Statistics
RUSHING: Indianapolis, Mack 24-148, Luck
8-29, Pascal 1-14, Wilkins 2-9. Houston, Watson 8-76, Miller 5-18, Blue 2-8, Foreman 1-3.
PASSING: Indianapolis, Luck 19-32-1-222.
Houston, Watson 29-49-1-235.
RECEIVING: Indianapolis, Hilton 5-85,
Inman 4-53, Rogers 4-46, Ebron 3-26, Mack
2-6, Pascal 1-6. Houston, Coutee 11-110,
Miller 8-63, Hopkins 5-37, Blue 2-11, Akins
2-8, Griffin 1-6.
PUNT RETURNS: Indianapolis, Rogers 2-20.
Houston, None.
KICKOFF RETURNS: Indianapolis, None.
Houston, Carter 1-26.
TACKLES-ASSISTS-SACKS: Indianapolis,
Leonard 5-8-0, Geathers 5-4-0, Moore 5-1-1,
Wilson 4-1-0, Desir 4-1-0, Walker 2-4-0,
Hunt 2-1-0, Muhammad 2-0-1, Turay 2-0-0,
Mitchell 2-0-0, Hooker 1-1-0, Odum 1-0-0,
Sheard 0-3-0, Ridgeway 0-2-.5, Stewart
0-1-.5, Franklin 0-1-0. Houston, Mathieu
8-0-0, McKinney 5-4-0, Cunningham 5-2-0,
Joseph 4-2-0, Reader 3-3-0, Jackson 3-1-0,
Clowney 2-3-0, Cole 2-2-0, Reid 2-1-0, Watt
2-0-0, Hal 1-1-0, Dunn 1-0-0, Ejiofor 1-0-0,
Mercilus 0-1-0.
INTERCEPTIONS: Indianapolis, Moore 1-10.
Houston, Dunn 1-0.
MISSED FIELD GOALS: None
TRANSACTIONS
BASEBALL
National League
MILWAUKEE BREWERS : Traded OF Keon
Broxton to the Mets for RHPs Bobby Wahl
and Adam Hill and INF Felix Valerio.
PITTSBURGH PIRATES : Named David Eckstein special assistant/baseball operations.
ST. LOUIS CARDINALS : Assigned RHP
Ryan Meisinger outright to Memphis (PCL).
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
COLORADO AVALANCHE : Assigned G Joe
Cannata from Colorado (AHL) to Utah
(ECHL).
LOS ANGELES KINGS : Assigned F Drake
Rymsha from Ontario (AHL) to Manchester
(ECHL).
RANGERS : Recalled D Vince Pedrie from
Maine (ECHL) to Hartford (AHL).
ST. LOUIS BLUES : Assigned G Evan Fitzpatrick to San Antonio (AHL). Recalled G Jordan Binnington from San Antonio. Released
G Ben Halford from a professional tryout
agreement.
Cowboys 24, Seahawks 22
Seattle
Dallas
0 6 8 8 — 22
3 7 0 14 — 24
Q1 DAL: FG Maher 39, 9:50. Drive: 10 plays,
54 yards, 5:10. Key Plays: Prescott 14
pass to Cooper; Prescott 14 pass to
Beasley; Prescott 2 pass to Cooper on
3rd-and-10. Dallas 3, Seattle 0.
Q2 SEA: FG Janikowski 27, 7:03. Drive: 6
plays, 69 yards, 2:45. Key Plays:
R.Wilson 26 pass to E.Dickson; R.Wilson
40 pass to Lockett. Seattle 3, Dallas 3.
SEA: FG Janikowski 42, 1:43. Drive: 6
plays, 28 yards, 1:29. Key Play:
R.Wilson 25 pass to Lockett. Seattle 6,
Dallas 3.
DAL: Gallup 11 pass from Prescott
(Maher kick), :24. Drive: 7 plays, 75
yards, 1:19. Key Play: Elliott 44 run on
3rd-and-1. Dallas 10, Seattle 6.
Q3 SEA: R.Wilson 4 run (Davis run), 1:59.
Drive: 9 plays, 44 yards, 5:01. Key
Plays: Davis 2 run on 3rd-and-7;
R.Wilson 22 pass to Baldwin on
4th-and-5; R.Wilson 7 run on 3rd-and-5.
Seattle 14, Dallas 10.
Q4 DAL: Elliott 1 run (Maher kick), 12:28.
Drive: 9 plays, 67 yards, 4:31. Key
Plays: Prescott 6 pass to N.Brown on
3rd-and-1; Prescott 34 pass to Cooper.
Dallas 17, Seattle 14.
DAL: Prescott 1 run (Maher kick), 2:08.
Drive: 11 plays, 63 yards, 5:12. Key
Plays: K.Wright 6-yard defensive pass
interference penalty on 3rd-and-8;
J.Coleman 8-yard defensive pass
interference penalty on 3rd-and-4;
Elliott 17 run; Prescott 16 run. Dallas
24, Seattle 14.
SEA: McKissic 7 pass from R.Wilson
(Carson run), 1:18. Drive: 6 plays, 75
yards, 00:50. Key Plays: R.Wilson 53
pass to Lockett; R.Wilson 6 pass to
McKissic on 3rd-and-10. Dallas 24,
Seattle 22.
A: 94,327.
First downs ....................
Rushing ......................
Passing ......................
Penalty .......................
Third down eff................
Fourth down eff .............
Total net yards ...............
Total Plays ..................
Avg Gain .....................
Net yards rushing ..........
Rushes ........................
Avg per rush ...............
Net yards passing ..........
Sacked-Yds lost ..........
Gross-Yds passing ......
Completed-Att. ...........
Had Intercepted ..........
Yards-Pass Play ..........
Kickoffs-EndZone-TB ....
Punts-Avg. .....................
Punts blocked..............
FGs-PATs blocked ..........
Total return yardage .....
Punt Returns ..............
Kickoff Returns ..........
Interceptions ..............
Penalties-Yds .................
Fumbles-Lost .................
Time of possession .......
SEA
11
5
6
0
2-13
2-2
299
52
5.8
73
24
3.0
226
1-7
233
18-27
0
8.1
5-3-3
7-51.4
0
0-0
74
3-22
1-52
1-0
5-36
0-0
25:10
DAL
23
9
11
3
4-11
0-0
380
68
5.6
164
34
4.8
216
1-10
226
22-33
1
6.4
5-5-4
5-45.0
0
0-0
95
6-80
1-15
0-0
6-36
0-0
34:50
Individual Statistics
RUSHING: Seattle, Penny 4-29, Carson
13-20, Wilson 3-14, Davis 4-10. Dallas, Elliott 26-137, Prescott 6-29, Smith 1-1,
Austin 1-(minus 3).
PASSING: Seattle, Wilson 18-27-0-233. Dallas, Prescott 22-33-1-226.
RECEIVING: Seattle, Lockett 4-120, Dickson
4-42, Baldwin 3-32, Davis 2-22, McKissic
2-13, Carson 2-(minus 1), Vannett 1-5. Dallas, Cooper 7-106, Elliott 4-32, Beasley 3-28,
Jarwin 3-15, Gallup 2-18, Hurns 1-14, Austin
1-7, Brown 1-6.
PUNT RETURNS: Seattle, Lockett 3-22. Dallas, Austin 5-73, Beasley 1-7.
KICKOFF RETURNS: Seattle, Lockett 1-52.
Dallas, Smith 1-15.
TACKLES-ASSISTS-SACKS: Seattle, McDougald 9-1-0, Wright 7-2-0, Thompson
4-1-0, Griffin 4-0-0, Wagner 3-2-0, Reed
2-2-0, Coleman 2-1-0, Ford 2-0-0, Flowers
2-0-0, Stephen 2-0-0, Clark 1-3-1, Martin
1-2-0, Jefferson 1-1-0, Mingo 1-0-0, King
1-0-0, Jordan 0-1-0. Dallas, Vander Esch
6-4-0, Awuzie 5-1-0, Smith 3-4-0, Lawrence
3-3-0, Heath 3-0-0, Collins 2-2-1, Jones 2-2-0,
Woods 2-1-0, Gregory 2-0-0, Woods 2-0-0,
Brown 1-0-0, Crawford 0-3-0, Wilson 0-1-0.
INTERCEPTIONS: Seattle, Wright 1-0. Dallas, None.
MISSED FIELD GOALS: Seattle, Janikowski
57. Dallas, Maher 58.
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
WOMEN‘S BASKETBALL
FOOTBALL
NFL PLAYOFFS
WILD-CARD PLAYOFFS
newsday.com
East
Army 77.....................................Lafayette 69
Binghamton 69................New Hampshire 58
Boston U. 87................................Bucknell 80
Canisius 70 ......................................Siena 66
Delaware 77 ......................................Elon 65
Fairleigh Dickinson 79 .....St. Francis (Pa.) 61
Hofstra 75 ..........................Northeastern 72
Iona 94 .........................................Fairfield 87
LIU Brooklyn 79 ..............................Bryant 70
La Salle 69 .....................................UMass 60
Manhattan 90 ...............................Niagara 80
Maryland 77 ................................Rutgers 63
Monmouth (NJ) 61 .................St. Peter‘s 44
NJIT 72 ..............................Kennesaw St. 52
North Carolina 85 ....................Pittsburgh 60
Princeton 68 ...............OT ...............Penn 65
Rider 72 ...................................Quinnipiac 67
Robert Morris 62 ..........Mount St. Mary‘s 59
Sacred Heart 73 ..............................CCSU 61
St. Francis Brooklyn 66 ................Wagner 59
St. John‘s 97 ..........OT ..........Georgetown 94
Stony Brook 75 ....................Mass.-Lowell 63
UCF 65 ...........................................UConn 53
UMBC 61 ........................................Maine 52
UNC-Wilmington 67 .....................Towson 61
VCU 76 ........................................Fordham 51
Vermont 80 ..........................Albany (NY) 51
Villanova 65 .............................Providence 59
William & Mary 84..........................Drexel 66
South
Alabama 77 ...............................Kentucky 75
Alabama St. 74 ...................Grambling St. 53
Austin Peay 81 ....................Morehead St. 67
Belmont 79 ......................Tennessee Tech 67
Campbell 72 .......................Gardner-Webb 61
Cent. Arkansas 73 ................SE Louisiana 71
Coppin St. 73 .......................Savannah St. 67
South
Alabama A&M 58 ..................Jackson St. 55
Campbell 51 .........................Presbyterian 46
Florida Gulf Coast 68 ....................Liberty 50
Grambling St. 80 ...................Alabama St. 72
Green Bay 81 .........................N. Kentucky 61
Hampton 74 ............Charleston Southern 66
High Point 87 .........................SC-Upstate 61
Howard 74 ............................Florida A&M 68
Jacksonville 62 ...........................Lipscomb 47
Jacksonville St. 62 .............Tennessee St. 52
Marshall 63 ...............................Charlotte 62
Maryland 75 ................................Ohio St. 69
Middle Tennessee 74 .........................FAU 55
Murray St. 81 .........................E. Kentucky 63
NC A&T 58 ..................................SC State 44
Radford 60 ........................UNC-Asheville 46
Rhode Island 66 ........................Richmond 60
Rice 61 ...............................Louisiana Tech 51
Tennessee Tech 77 ......................Belmont 72
Troy 83 ............................Appalachian St. 72
Tulane 68 .............................East Carolina 57
UAB 83 ...............................................FIU 59
UCF 68........................................Memphis 55
VCU 59 ..............................Saint Joseph‘s 40
W. Kentucky 75 ...................Old Dominion 60
Winthrop 77 .............................Longwood 69
Midwest
Cent. Michigan 94 ...........................Akron 71
Dayton 84 .....................................La Salle 45
Iowa St. 82 ....................................Kansas 73
Kansas St. 86............................Oklahoma 56
Kent St. 71 .............................E. Michigan 64
N. Illinois 82 ........................Miami (Ohio) 71
Purdue 71 ...................................Michigan 70
Toledo 65 .......................................Ball St. 58
W. Michigan 84..................Bowling Green 82
Wright St. 61 ..........................Milwaukee 57
Youngstown St. 70 .........................IUPUI 52
Southwest
Arkansas St. 64 ...........Louisiana-Monroe 54
UALR 62 ...................Louisiana-Lafayette 48
UTEP 73 ..........................................UTSA 60
West
BYU 55 .......................Loyola Marymount 44
Boise St. 69 .........................San Diego St. 66
CS Northridge 73 .........UC Santa Barbara 65
Cal St.-Fullerton 72 ........................Hawaii 68
Fresno St. 66 .........................Colorado St. 55
Gonzaga 88 ....................................Pacific 65
Grand Canyon 55 ...........................Seattle 53
Idaho St. 80 ..............................N. Arizona 69
Montana St. 69 ................Sacramento St. 53
N. Colorado 86 ..................................Idaho 72
New Mexico 66 ............................Nevada 64
Portland St. 78 ...........................Montana 60
Saint Mary‘s (Cal) 98 .................Portland 91
Santa Clara 71 .....................San Francisco 66
UC Davis 67 ..........................UC Riverside 59
UC Irvine 75..................................Cal Poly 59
Wyoming 90.....................................UNLV 62
yy
NORTHEASTERN (7-8)
Green 2-7 2-2 6, Brace 7-12 2-3 17, Pusica
4-10 1-4 11, Gresham 2-6 2-3 7, Occeus 5-8
0-1 13, Murphy 1-2 2-2 4, Miller 0-0 0-0 0,
Roland 4-9 2-2 14, Walters 0-0 0-0 0. Totals
25-54 11-17 72.
HOFSTRA (13-3)
Taylor 4-5 2-3 10, Coburn 2-6 1-1 5,
Wright-Foreman 15-30 8-9 42, Pemberton
3-8 2-4 8, Buie 2-8 2-2 7, Dwyer 0-0 0-0 0,
Ray 1-1 0-0 3. Totals 27-58 15-19 75.
Halftime — Hofstra 40-34. 3-Point Goals
— Northeastern 11-28 (Roland 4-8, Occeus
3-5, Pusica 2-8, Gresham 1-3, Brace 1-4), Hofstra 6-15 (Wright-Foreman 4-7, Ray 1-1,
Buie 1-4, Pemberton 0-1, Coburn 0-2).
Fouled Out — None. Rebounds — Northeastern 30 (Green 9), Hofstra 31 (Coburn,
Wright-Foreman 7). Assists — Northeastern
20 (Brace 6), Hofstra 12 (Buie 5). Total Fouls
— Northeastern 18, Hofstra 15.
Davidson 65 ..............................Duquesne 61
Duke 87 ......................................Clemson 68
ETSU 96 ................................Chattanooga 70
East Carolina 73 ........................Cincinnati 71
FAU 63..........................Middle Tennessee 56
Florida A&M 82 ............................Howard 72
Furman 101 ............................The Citadel 85
Georgia Tech 92 ....................Wake Forest 79
High Point 51 ..........Charleston Southern 50
Jackson St. 54 .......OT ......Alabama A&M 51
Jacksonville St. 69 .............Tennessee St. 62
James Madison 69.......Coll. of Charleston 58
Liberty 81 ....................Florida Gulf Coast 63
Lipscomb 77 ..........................Jacksonville 74
Louisiana-Lafayette 75 ...................UALR 61
Louisiana-Monroe 85 ...........Arkansas St. 75
Marshall 85 ...............................Charlotte 84
Mississippi 81 ..........................Vanderbilt 71
Morgan St. 66 ............Md.-Eastern Shore 53
Murray St. 97 ........................E. Kentucky 85
NC A&T 80...............OT ..............SC State 77
NC Central 68 .............Bethune-Cookman 59
New Orleans 81 ....OT.....Houston Baptist 76
Norfolk St. 77 .......................Delaware St. 63
North Florida 96 ...............North Alabama 67
Northwestern St. 66.............McNeese St. 61
Old Dominion 69 ..................W. Kentucky 66
Prairie View 82 ......................Southern U. 73
Presbyterian 64 ......................SC-Upstate 61
Radford 71 ................................Longwood 64
South Alabama 84 ..........Coastal Carolina 77
South Carolina 71 ..........................Florida 69
Tennessee 96 ...............................Georgia 50
Texas Southern 87 ...................Alcorn St. 70
Troy 89 .............................Appalachian St. 85
UAB 84 ...............................................FIU 65
UNC-Greensboro 71 ...........................VMI 68
Virginia 65 ................................Florida St. 52
Virginia Tech 77 ................Boston College 66
W. Carolina 76 .............................Samford 69
Winthrop 80 ......................UNC-Asheville 65
Wofford 78 ....................................Mercer 74
Midwest
Akron 56 ...............................W. Michigan 48
Bowling Green 86 ........................Kent St. 64
Butler 84 ...................................Creighton 69
Cent. Michigan 84 ...............Miami (Ohio) 77
E. Illinois 84 .......OT ......SIU-Edwardsville 81
Green Bay 90........................Cleveland St. 89
Illinois St. 58 ............................Evansville 46
Indiana St. 65................................Bradley 60
Iowa St. 77 ...................................Kansas 60
Loyola of Chicago 85 ........................Drake 74
Michigan St. 86 ............................Ohio St. 77
N. Illinois 72 ................OT .................Ohio 66
N. Kentucky 95 ..............................Detroit 73
S. Illinois 58 ..................................N. Iowa 51
SE Missouri 74 ..........OT .........UT Martin 69
Syracuse 72 ...........................Notre Dame 62
UMKC 80 ................................Chicago St. 72
Valparaiso 82 .........................Missouri St. 66
Wright St. 89 ..............................Oakland 73
Youngstown St. 76 ..................Milwaukee 51
Southwest
Ark.-Pine Bluff 64 ..........................MVSU 52
Arkansas 73 ...........................Texas A&M 71
Georgia Southern 77........Texas-Arlington 64
Georgia St. 73 .......................Texas State 69
Incarnate Word 65 .......................Nicholls 58
Lamar 61 ..........................Texas A&M-CC 55
North Texas 65 .................Southern Miss. 62
Oklahoma 74 ......................Oklahoma St. 64
Oral Roberts 82 .........................W. Illinois 63
Rice 78 ...............................Louisiana Tech 66
Sam Houston St. 71 .....Abilene Christian 68
TCU 85 ............................................Baylor 81
Texas Tech 63 ..........................Kansas St. 57
Tulsa 78 ...............................South Florida 75
UTSA 67 ..........................................UTEP 63
West
Arizona 84 ..................OT .................Utah 81
Arizona St. 83 ............................Colorado 61
Grand Canyon 71 ...........................Seattle 57
Loyola Marymount 76 .................Portland 64
Montana St. 84 ...............Sacramento St. 70
N. Arizona 81 .............................Idaho St. 69
N. Colorado 83 ..............OT ..............Idaho 79
New Mexico 85 ............................Nevada 58
North Dakota 80 ...........................Denver 59
Oregon St. 77 ...............................Oregon 72
San Francisco 72 ....................Pepperdine 69
UC Davis 90 ...........................Holy Names 60
UCLA 98 ....................................California 83
Utah St. 79 .................................Air Force 62
FOOTBALL
SPORTS STATS
A44
ON TV & RADIO
STEVE MATTHEWS | SUNDAY AT AQUEDUCT
NY PRO TEAMS THIS WEEK
SUN. 1/6
MON. 1/7
y
Arizona
4:00
MSG
Portland
10:00
MSG
Chicago
3:30
YES
TUE. 1/8
WED. 1/9
THU. 1/10
HOME
FRI. 1/11
AWAY
SAT. 1/12
Vegas
10:00
MSG+
Islanders
7:00
MSG
Islanders
1:00
MSG
*Carolina
7:00
MSG+
Rangers
7:00
MSG+2
Rangers
1:00
MSG+2
Gold. State
10:30
MSG
Boston
7:30
YES
Indiana
7:30
ESPN
Atlanta
7:30
YES
Toronto
7:30
YES
RADIO: Rangers ESPN / 1050 | Islanders WRHU / 88.7, WRCN / 103.9 | Knicks ESPN /98.7 |Nets WCBS
/ 880
*-at NYCB Live’s Nassau Coliseum
MORE SPORTS SUNDAY
Basketball
G Lg., Capital City at Westchester
3 p.m.
MSG2
Indiana at Toronto
7:30 p.m.
NBA
Bowling
PBA Hall of Fame Classic
11 a.m.
FS1
College basketball Xavier at Marquette
Noon
Ch. 5
Richmond at Dayton
Noon
NBCSN
Seton Hall at DePaul
1 p.m.
FS1, WNYM (970)
George Washington at St. Joseph’s
2 p.m.
NBCSN
Temple at Wichita State
4 p.m.
ESPNEWS
Rhode Island at St. Louis
4 p.m.
ESPNU
St. Bonaventure at George Mason
4 p.m.
NBCSN
Memphis at Houston
6 p.m.
ESPNEWS
Miami at Louisville
6 p.m.
ESPNU
Wisconsin at Penn State
7:30 p.m.
BTN
Stanford at USC
8 p.m.
ESPNU
Women
UConn at Houston
Noon
CBSSN
SMU at Cincinnati
Noon
ESPN2
Alabama at South Carolina
Noon
ESPNU
Baylor at Texas Tech
1 p.m.
MSG+
St. John’s at Butler
1 p.m.
FS2
Women
Football
Golf
Hockey
Luge
Rugby
Soccer
Wrestling
Auburn at Florida
1 p.m.
SEC
Georgetown at Creighton
2 p.m.
CBSSN
Missouri at Tennessee
2 p.m.
ESPN2
TCU at Oklahoma State
2 p.m.
ESPNU
Arkansas at Mississippi
3 p.m.
SEC
Texas at West Virginia
4 p.m.
ESPN2
Kentucky at Mississippi State
5 p.m.
SEC
Los Angeles Chargers at Baltimore
1:05 p.m.
Ch. 2, WFAN (660)
Philadelphia at Chicago
4:40 p.m.
Ch. 4, WFAN (660)
Sentry Tournament of Champions
2:30 p.m. Ch. 4 6 p.m. Golf Channel
New Jersey at Vegas
4 p.m.
MSG+
Washington at Detroit
5 p.m.
NHL
Chicago at Pittsburgh
8 p.m.
NBCSN
Men’s singles
6 p.m.
NBCSN
Wasps vs. Northampton
10 a.m.
NBCSN
Sevilla vs. Atletico Madrid
10:05 a.m.
beIN
Real Madrid vs. Real Sociedad
12:20 p.m.
beIN
Getafe vs. Barcelona
2:35 p.m.
beIN
North Carolina State at Ohio State
6 p.m.
ESPN2
Best Bet: PARLAPIANO (6)
Best Value: FIERY OPAL (8)
Totals: 6-26 ($48.50)ˇ
1
1
2
3
4
5
6
One Mile. 4&Up. Claiming $40,000-$35,000 Purse: $43,000. Post —
12:50 p.m.
Regal Quality(L)
Rogue Nation(L)
Double Deep(L)
Domain(L)
Starship Zeus(L)
Dooley(L)
123
121
123
123
121
121
Alvarado
Diaz, Jr
Franco
Lezcano
Davis
Cancel
2-5-1
1-1-6
1-2-2
1-1-4
2-3-5
4-3-4
newsday.com
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
SECOND: 1 Mile. 4&Up. Starters Allowance.
Purse: $55,000
5-Monteleone (J.Alvarado) ..........5.10 3.00 2.60
1-Trustworthy (M.Franco) ...................3.30 2.90
2-Unpredictable (D.Panell) ..........................5.20
Time — 1:40.08
Showers — Sloppy
Also Ran — Playwright, Expert, Stronger
$1 Double (8-5) $11.60 $1 Exacta (5-1) $7.30
$1 Quinella (1-5) $4.05 $0.1 Super(5-1-2-4) $11.25
$0.5 Trifecta (5-1-2) $25
THIRD: 1 Mile. 3yo. F. Maiden Special Weight.
Purse: $60,000
5-Intoxicologist (M.Franco) ......13.40 5.30 2.90
7-Delta Gamma (J.Alvarado) ...............3.20 2.20
6-Cornetta’s Choice (J.Lezcano) ..................3.20
Time — 1:44.09
Showers — Sloppy
Scratched — Tzipi. Also Ran — Bee’snbee’s,
Winifred J, Sarah’s Rainbow
$1 Pick 3 (8-5-5) $64 $1 Double (5-5) $19.20
$1 Exacta (5-7) $18.10 $0.5 Tri (5-7-6) $31.25
$0.1 Super(5-7-6-2) $14.80
FOURTH: 6 1/2 Furlongs. 4&Up. F&M. Maiden
Special Weight. Purse: $60,000
1-Turn and Bern (D.Davis) .........12.80 7.70 5.20
6-Anne’s Song (E.Cancel) ....................6.70 4.40
4-Bourbon High (S.Jimenez) .....................10.40
Time — 1:22.18
Showers — Sloppy
Scratched — In Denile. Also Ran — Joule, Overtime Olivia, Dreamers and Me, Mrs. Orb, Sonic
Force
$1 Pick 3 (5-5-1) $127.50 $1 Double (5-1) $35.25
$1 Exacta (1-6) $44.50 $1 Quinella (1-6) $22.40
$0.1 Super(1-6-4-5) $423.40
$0.5 Tri(1-6-4) $180.75
WINNER PICKED BY MATTHEWS
FIFTH: 6 1/2 Furlongs. 4&Up. Allowance Optional
Claiming. Purse: $75,000
4-Eye Luv Lulu (J.Lezcano) ..........8.30 4.10 2.70
1-Almithmaar (D.Davis) .....................7.30 3.80
6-Preservationist (J.Alvarado) ....................2.30
Time — 1:19.17
Showers — Sloppy
Scratched — Sudden Surprise. Also Ran — Reed
Kan, Still Krz, Angry Moon
$0.5 Pick 5 (8-5-5-1-4) $1,676.50
$0.5 Pick 4 (5-5-1-4) $340.50
$1 Pick 3 (5-1-4) $196
$0.5 Tri (4-1-6) $39
$0.1 Super (4-1-6-5) $20.37 $1 Double (1-4) $37.75
$1 Exacta (4-1) $33
SIXTH: 5 1/2 Furlongs. 3yo. Maiden Special
Weight. Purse: $60,000.
9-Hushion (M.Luzzi) ....................9.50 3.60 2.90
3-Castle Casanova (J.Alvarado)...........2.80 2.60
8-Top of the Mint (R.Maragh) ....................5.50
Time — 1:06.62
Cloudy — Sloppy
Scratched — Falsifier, Bobby Man, D Emcee,
Judge Stanton. Also Ran — Smooth Tales, Jack
Bo, Fleet Warrior, Big Browning, Therisastormbrewin, Pour It Out.
$1 Pick 3 (1-4-9) $259 $1 Double (4-9) $30.75
$1 Exacta (9-3) $15.90 $0.1 Super (9-3-8-2) $54.45
$0.5 Tri (9-3-8) $63.50
WINNER PICKED BY MATTHEWS
SEVENTH: 6 Furlongs, Allowance, 4&Up, Purse:
$70,000.
8-Fully Vested (J.Lezcano)...........8.70 4.20 3.30
1-Wegotoldyougotsold (R.Maragh) .....4.00 2.90
3-The Caretaker (D.Davis) ..........................4.70
Time — 1:11.38
Showers — Sloppy
Scratched — Ark in the Dark, Stoney Bennett.
Also Ran — Bon Raison, Redyornothereicome,
Forced, Have Another.
$1 Pick 3 (4-9-8) $130 $1 Double (9-8) $22.70
$1 Exacta (8-1) $19.80 $0.1 Super (8-1-3-2) $38.15
$0.5 Trifecta (8-1-3) $46.37
8-5
8-1
5-1
2-1
7-2
15-1
Regal Quality owns fast late-pace figures and makes
first start since claimed by Linda Rice. Domain, also
from Rice barn, is riding a two-race winning streak;
very dangerous. Starship Zeus almost always fires but
appears to prefer minor awards.
2
1
2
3
4
5
6
Five and One Half Furlongs. 4&Up. Claiming $25,000 Purse: $36,000
Chateau(L)
Takeoff(L)
Ragnar Lothbrok(L)
Thefinalcrazydude(L)
I Love Jaxson(L)
Latin Love Bug(L)
123
114
123
123
121
123
Lezcano
Hernandez
Worrie
Davis
Escobar
Luzzi
1-5-4
3-3-3
3-6-1
2-1-7
6-5-4
4-1-2
Servis
Contessa
Gullo
Brown
Miceli
Toscano, Jr
7-5
6-1
5-1
3-1
4-1
8-1
Latin Love Bug should pack amplified kick with cutback
to abbreviated sprint. Thefinalcrazydude is speedy and
will prove very tough on a soft lead. Ragnar Lothbrok
was a front-end third behind repeat winner last time;
must consider.
3
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
Six and One Half Furlongs. 4&Up. Maiden Claiming $40,000 Purse: $41,000
Our Honor(L)
Justinspeightofit(L)
Siena Magic(L)
Racing Raven(L)
Shanghai Check(L)
Alrahaal(L)
Bold Gem(L)
121
121
121
121
114
116
121
Lezcano
Escobar
Davis
Maragh
Carmona
Gutierrez
Reyes
3-2-3
6-6-7
2-6-5
5-2-2
3-3-2
3-2-x
4-5-5
Rice
Gutierrez
Ryerson
Levine
Velazquez
McLaughlin
Gyarmati
2-1
20-1
7-2
6-1
9-2
5-2
15-1
Shanghai Check is 0-for-16 but owns field’s fastest figures on best efforts; now or never. Alrahaal regressed in
last after game placing in prior; bounce-back threat.
Siena Magic was a hard-charging second in last; right in
the thick of this.
4
1
2
3
4
5
6
One Mile. 3yo. Purse: $60,000.
Classic Czar(L)
Twelfthofneverland(L)
Captain Frost(L)
Letzgometz(L)
Success Hurricane(L)
Durkin’s Call(L)
119
119
119
119
122
117
Lezcano
Franco
Alvarado
Davis
Luzzi
Gutierrez
4-1-x
1-7-4
1-7-x
1-7-x
7-3-5
3-1-9
Asmussen
Handal
Rice
Englehart
Potts
Trombetta
9-5
6-1
7-2
6-1
10-1
2-1
Classic Czar fired 5-furlong bullet since tough-trip
fourth in last; forward move predicted. Durkin’s Call
also is training swiftly and looms the dominant speed
with soft flow. Twelfthofneverland exits facile maiden
score in last; worth long look.
One Mile. 3yo. NY Bred. Maiden Claiming $30,000 Purse: $35,000
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Poker Game(L)
120
Dash for Dollars(L1) 120
Marble Moon(L)
115
Shock Therapy(L)
120
Awesome Adversary(L) 120
Oh K Funnybone(L)
120
My Amanjena(L1)
120
Tazmonian Devil(L)
120
Franco
Worrie
Gutierrez
Davis
Diaz, Jr
Luzzi
Cancel
Hernandez
2-4-x
3-x-x
7-4-x
4-4-x
3-6-9
4-3-5
x-x-x
6-5-x
Asmussen
Englehart
Baker
Baker
Friedman
Brown
Weaver
Maymo
5-2
10-1
8-1
9-2
6-1
5-1
7-2
12-1
6
Six and One Half Furlongs. 4&Up. Fillies and Mares Claiming $25,000
Purse: $36,000
Third Card Down(L)
123 Davis
3-2-11 Toscano, Jr
8-1
Tayler’s the Boss(L)
121 Reyes
3-3-2 Kantarmaci 8-1
Sweet August Lady(L) 121 Franco
4-2-5 Brown
8-5
Zecha(L)
123 Diaz, Jr
1-3-2 Levine
5-1
Fingerpaint(L)
123 Amaro
3-5-3 Hillegass
12-1
Parlapiano(L)
123 Cancel
7-4-1 Donk
6-1
Solitary Gem(L)
116 Gutierrez
3-4-2 Gyarmati
3-1
She’saprettylady(L)
123 Maragh
1-4-4 Brown
20-1
Dash for Dollars gets Lasix and compiled tight work tab
for first start since Halloween; primed for breakthrough. Tazmonian Devil makes first start with
maiden-claiming tag; worth long look at long price. Oh
K Funnybone is riding a forward line on the numbers;
must be factored into the mix.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Parlapiano gets class relief after displaying improved
speed in last; career-best predicted. Solitary Gem runs
late and could be in the garden spot if pace meltdown
ensues. Tayler’s the Boss drops and has hit the board in
last three starts; don’t ignore.
7
1
2
3
4
5
6
Six Furlongs. 3yo. NY Bred. Fillies Allowance Optional Claiming Purse:
$64,000
Quietude(L)
111 Martinez
5-1-4 Ribaudo
12-1
Mary’s Girl(L)
120 Cohen
4-1-3 Schosberg
8-1
Diamond Princess(L) 120 Alvarado
1-4-6 Rice
6-5
My Best Friend(L)
113 Gutierrez
2-4-1 Wyner
8-5
Stabilize(L)
111 Hernandez 1-x-x
Brown
10-1
Shak’s Hidden Gem(L) 120 Davis
6-1-7 Contessa
5-1
My Best Friend was a game second in last at Parx and tallied faster final numbers in prior two outings; more to
give. Diamond Princess engaged swift splits when a convincing maiden winner in last; big-time threat. Stabilize
made sustained rally to win debut by more than two
lengths; don’t dismiss.
8
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
Seven Furlongs. 4&Up. NY Bred. Allowance Optional Claiming Purse:
$67,000
Speightful Kitten(L) 119 Alvarado
3-2-2 Rice
4-1
Sicilia Mike(L)
121 Cohen
4-4-2 Sciacca
6-1
Tribecca(L)
119 Franco
4-2-3 Rodriguez
7-2
Arthur’s Hope(L)
114 Gutierrez
2-4-7 Salazar
5-2
Retonova(L)
123 Worrie
2-3-1 Englehart
15-1
Horoscope(L)
119 Reyes
6-3-5 Rodriguez
12-1
Mascarello(L)
121 Lezcano
2-7-1 Bond
12-1
Playthatfunnymusic(L) 123 Davis
1-2-2 Englehart
8-1
Fiery Opal(L)
119 Rivera
3-2-3 Arriaga
8-1
Fiery Opal packs solid late kick that should be well
served in wide-open nightcap. Mascarello also runs late
and could be aided by probable pace dynamics; very
playable. Tribecca is fleet-footed and makes first start
since gelded; very dangerous. Horoscope also is speedy
and owns fast final numbers on best efforts.
(c) 2019 Equibase Company LLC, all rights reserved.
BETTING LINE
PREGAME.COM LINE
HOME TEAM IN CAPS
NFL
Favorite
Line O/U
Underdog
BALTIMORE
3 411/2
LA Chargers
CHICAGO
61/2 411/2
Philadelphia
NBA
Favorite
Line O/U
Underdog
Nets
2
208
CHICAGO
LA CLIPPERS
7
220
Orlando
MINNESOTA
OFF OFF
LA Lakers
Miami
6
222
ATLANTA
OKLA. CITY
10
225 Washington
TORONTO
OFF OFF
Indiana
PHOENIX
2
224
Charlotte
SATURDAY AT AQUEDUCT
FIRST: 1 Mile. 4&Up. F&M. Maiden Claiming
$25,000. Purse: $33,000.
8-Needs No Ice (R.Maragh) ........6.40 3.30 2.60
4-Promise Me Roses (M.Franco) .........3.60 3.10
5-Low Is Laine (J.Martinez) .......................8.70
Time — 1:44.67
Showers — Sloppy
Scratched — Irish Glitter, Causin’ Trouble. Also
Ran — Got the Gist, Reyana Reya Dreams,
Youmakemeblush
$1 Exacta (8-4) $9.50 $0.1 Super (8-4-5-3) $38.15
$0.5 Trifecta (8-4-5) $63.37
WINNER PICKED BY MATTHEWS
Rice
Rodriguez
Rodriguez
Rice
Baker
Donk
5
NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE
Favorite
Line Underdog
Line
Carolina
-156 OTTAWA
+146
ARIZONA
-127 Rangers
+117
LAS VEGAS
-235 New Jersey
+215
Washington
-165 DETROIT
+155
WINNIPEG
-169 Dallas
+159
ANAHEIM
-124 Edmonton
+114
PITTSBURGH
-245 Chicago
+225
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Favorite
Line
Underdog
DAYTON
10
Richmond
MARQUETTE
71/2
Xavier
Seton Hall
2
DEPAUL
NORTHWESTERN
8
Illinois
MICHIGAN
8
Indiana
ST. JOSEPH’S
141/2
G. Washington
Nebraska
31/2
IOWA
GEORGE MASON
7 St. Bonaventure
WICHITA ST
PK
Temple
SAINT LOUIS
5
Rhode Island
LOUISVILLE
61/2
Miami
HOUSTON
10
Memphis
Wisconsin
2
PENN ST
USC
71/2
Stanford
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
National Championship Game
Monday — At Santa Clara, Cal.
Favorite
Line O/U
Underdog
ALABAMA
5 581/2
Clemson
GOLF
EIGHTH: 7 Furlongs. 4&Up. F&M. LA VERDAD
STAKES. Purse: $100,000
3-Kathryn the Wise (M.Franco)...5.40 3.70 2.80
5-Playinwiththeboys (R.Gutierrez) ...12.20 4.80
10-Pauseforthecause (R.Maragh) ...............2.70
Time — 1:25.22
Showers — Sloppy
Scratched — Out of Orbit, Satisfy. Also Ran —
Starlite Mission, Sunset Ridge, Palladian Bridge,
Silly Sister, Byself.
$1 Pick 3 (9-8-3) $73.50 $1 Double (8-3) $11.30
$1 Grand Slam (1,4,6,7/3,4,8,9,10,12,13/1,3,8) $9.50
$1 Exacta (3-5) $30.25 $0.5 Tri (3-5-10) $53.62
$0.1 Super (3-5-10-2) $81.90
NINTH: 1 1/8 Miles. 4&Up. Claiming $16,000.
Purse: $28,000.
1-Never Nevermore (E.Cancel) .13.80 7.10 3.80
5-Raging Fire (B.Hernandez) ...............6.60 3.40
6-Bobby G (M.Franco)..................................2.60
Time — 1:57.18
Showers — Sloppy
Scratched — Golden Giant, Simma Cum Laude,
Metaphorical. Also Ran — Won’t Be Missed,
Storm Scat, Carmine’s Honor, Rockin Jo.
Pick 6 (1-4-9-8-1/3/9-1) $30,083;
5 Cor. paid $270.50
$0.5 Pick 5 (4-9-8-1/3/9-1) $918.75
$0.5 Pick 4 (9-8-1/3/9-1) $186
$1 Pick 3 (8-3-1) $62.75
$0.5 Tri (1-5-6) $42.87
$0.1 Super (1-5-6-8) $58.95
$1 Exacta (1-5) $37.50 $1 Double (3-1) $16.50
Handle: $796,726
Total Handle: $6,087,021
(c) 2019 Equibase Company LLC, all rights reserved
TOURNAMENT OF CHAMPIONS
At Kapalua, Hawaii — Par 73
Gary Woodland ......................67-67-68—202
Rory McIlroy ..........................69-68-68—205
Marc Leishman ......................68-70-68—206
Xander Schauffele .................72-67-68—207
Bryson DeChambeau .............69-68-70—207
Justin Thomas .......................67-72-70—209
Kevin Tway ............................66-71-72—209
Dustin Johnson.......................67-74-69—210
Jon Rahm................................70-71-69—210
Patton Kizzire ........................69-71-71—211
Paul Casey ..............................73-71-68—212
Andrew Putnam ....................69-73-70—212
Troy Merritt ...........................73-71-69—213
Charles Howell III ..................74-70-69—213
Ian Poulter .............................71-69-73—213
Cameron Champ ....................71-68-74—213
Webb Simpson ......................70-72-72—214
Andrew Landry ......................69-75-71—215
Brandt Snedeker .....................75-69-71—215
Jason Day ..............................69-71-75—215
Scott Piercy ............................76-72-69—217
Matt Kuchar ...........................72-73-72—217
Patrick Reed............................70-75-72—217
Francesco Molinari ..................73-71-73—217
Billy Horschel..........................72-75-71—218
Keegan Bradley .......................77-69-72—218
Aaron Wise.............................74-71-73—218
Brice Garnett .........................73-72-73—218
Ted Potter, Jr. ........................75-73-71—219
Brooks Koepka ........................76-70-73—219
Bubba Watson ........................70-79-74—223
Michael Kim............................71-72-80—223
Satoshi Kodaira .....................77-76-73—226
PGA TOUR SCHEDULE
\ Jan. 10-13: Sony Open, Waialae CC, Honolulu
\ Jan. 17-20: Desert Challenge, PGA West
(Stadium Course, Nicklaus Tournament
Course) and La Quinta CC, La Quinta, Calif.
\ Jan. 24-27: Farmers Insurance Open, Torrey Pines GC (North and South), San Diego
\ Jan. 31-Feb. 3: Waste Management
Phoenix Open, TPC Scottsdale, Scottsdale,
Ariz.
\ Feb. 7-10: AT&T Pebble Beach Pro-Am,
Pebble Beach, Spyglass Hill, Monterey Peninsula (Shore Course), Pebble Beach, Calif.
\ Feb. 14-17: Genesis Open, Riviera CC, Los
Angeles
\ Feb. 21-24 — WGC-Mexico Championship, Chapultepec GC, Mexico City
\ Feb. 21-24 — Puerto Rico Open, Coco
Beach Golf & CC, Rio Grande, Puerto Rico
HIGH SCHOOL SPORTS
SCOREBOARD
BOYS BASKETBALL
GIRLS BASKETBALL
NASSAU
Conference AA-I
Oceanside ..........................................17 15 17 8 --57
Uniondale ...........................................16 12 12 18 --58
UDALE: Bradshaw 24, Babatunde 20, Giles 6, Williams
6, Bonner 2. Totals 16-5-58. OC: Behar 23, Contorno 23,
Modzelewski 5, Knott 4, Ward 2. Totals 15-4-57. Threepointers: UDALE 5 (Giles 2, Babatunde, Bradshaw,
Williams); OC 4 (Behar 2, Contorno 2).
Freeport .............................................10 10 11 9 --40
Syosset ..............................................13 11 20 18 --62
SY: Mahler 17, Halpern 16, Ruggiero 16, Grubman 7, DeCapite 2, Krotz 2, Mark 2. Totals 25-0-62. FR: Abraham
21, Parker 9, Hawkins 6, Peterson 2, Enrique 1,
Frometta 1. Totals 10-3-40. Three-pointers: FR 3 (Abraham 2, Parker).
BS: Drain 16, Fargas 14, Hester 14, Bishop 9, Barry 5,
Boneparte 1. Totals 17-5-59. CON: Erdman 12, McCall
9, Bunicci 7, Callaway 6, Jasinski 3, Hickey 2, Kelly 2. Totals 13-1-41. Three-pointers: BS 5 (Hester 3, Fargas 2);
CON 1 (Jasinski).
League IV
Harborfields .............................................3 8 8 5 --24
Half Hollow Hills West .........................10 14 9 4 --37
HHHW: Ross 14, Anton 7, Johnson 4, Robertson 4, Vaccarelli 4, Alper 2, Engelhardt 2. Totals 13-3-37. HAR: Argiriou 8, Simkins 8, Stebbins 5, Seligmann 3. Totals
5-4-24. Three-pointers: HHHW 3 (Ross 2, Anton); HAR
4 (Argiriou 2, Seligmann, Stebbins).
West Babylon ....................................15 4 16 19 --54
Kings Park ...........................................1 17 7 17 --42
WB : Heller 31, Doyle 13, Winkler 3, Downey 2,
Downey 2, Moran 2, Vergano 1. Totals 17-1-54. KIP: Pellettieri 13, Buffa 6, Hogan 6, Bossert 5, Jette 4,
Perciballi 4, Bianco 2, Jette 2. Totals 13-2-42. Threepointers: WB 1 (Doyle); KIP 2 (Bossert, Pellettieri).
League V
Miller Place ..........................................5 7 9 13 --34
Amityville ...........................................11 13 10 14 --48
AMV: Lawhorne 13, Tobin 12, Hamlet 8, Milsap 6,
Jones 5, Billinger 4. Totals 14-6-48. MP: Corbin 19,
Iavarone 10, Hampson 3, Reese 2. Totals 8-2-34. Threepointers: AMV 6 (Hamlet 2, Lawhorne 2, Milsap 2); MP
2 (Corbin, Iavarone).
Shoreham-Wading River ...................12 11 10 12 --45
Sayville ..............................................16 15 12 24 --67
SAY: Harclerode 18, Gunther 13, Famularo 11, Blaskiewicz 10, Rinaldi 8, Baldante 5, Buffardi 2. Totals
21-2-67. SWR: Korzekwinski 12, Corona 10, Marchese
10, Constant 5, Sheehan 4, Greene 2, Lachenmeyer 2.
Totals 19-0-45. Three-pointers: SAY 2 (Harclerode 2).
Westhampton ...................................14 11 10 11 --46
Bayport-Blue Point .............................6 7 10 12 --35
WHP: Smith 22, Mendoza 9, Henke 6, McCarthy 2, Murphy 2, Rongo 2, Skorobohaty 2, Rongo 1. Totals
17-2-46. BBP: Mason 11, Monturo 11, Miller 5, Niblock
4, Lawrence 2, Moller 2. Totals 12-0-35. Three-pointers:
WHP 2 (Henke, Smith).
League VI
Wyandanch...........................................10 11 1 18 --40
East Hampton .....................................10 10 10 5 --35
WY: Ervin 23, White 8, Davis 3, Fleurentin 2, Mayhew
2, Grayson 1, Jean 1. Totals 8-4-40. EH: Cordone 11, Silvera 8, Chase 7, Brewer 2, Guallpa 2, Powers 2, Weiss
2, Wojtusiak 1. Totals 13-0-35. Three-pointers: WY 4
(Ervin 3, Davis).
CHSAA
Our Lady of Mercy ..............................7 14 18 11 --50
Holy Trinity ........................................12 15 12 5 --44
OLMA: Goldberg 18, Rottkamp 10, Anderson 7, Clancy
7, Shea 6, Maleady 2. Totals 11-2-50. HT: Stark 12,
Fuhrer 7, Long 6, Partridge 6, Sinclair 5, Gaeckler 4, Bayley 2, Misser 2. Totals 11-5-44. Three-pointers: OLMA
2 (Rottkamp 2); HT 5 (Partridge 2, Long, Sinclair,
Stark).
Sacred Heart .....................................10 12 27 24 --73
St. John the Baptist .........................16 19 10 20 --65
SH: O’Connell 22, Pierre 17, Mitchell 13, Paprocky 11,
Biscardi 5, Martello 3, Sandford 1, Ungania 1. Totals
18-6-73. SJB: McCormack 18, Maguire 14, Gress 11,
Gaffney 10, Keenan 5, Ponzio 3, Degan 2, Watson 2. Totals 16-7-65. Three-pointers: SH 6 (Pierre 3, Biscardi,
Mitchell, Paprocky); SJB 7 (McCormack 4, Maguire 2,
Ponzio).
NON-LEAGUE
St. Anthony’s ....................................15 10 9 15 --49
Capitol Prep (Connecticut) .................5 6 10 11 --32
SA: Smith 15, Santacruce 11, Taylor 7, McCullagh 5,
Taylor 4, Clarke 2, Kinard 2, Szarmach 2, Parham 1. Totals 13-4-49. Three-pointers: SA 4 (Santacruce 3,
Smith).
WRESTLING
Rocky Gilmore Tournament — at East Islip
99: Gallagher (BBP) over Romero (BRENT) (Fall 2:29)
106: Rivera (BS) over Sparacio (BBP) (Dec. 13-4) 113:
Gallub (HHHE) over Portillo (BRENT) (Dec. 2-1) 120:
Pierre-Louis (BRENT) over Aucancela (BRENT) (Dec.
10-2) 126: Santora (BBP) over Mableton (BS) (Dec.
12-6) 132: M. O’Brien (MS) over Corsini (BS) (Dec. 7-5
OT) 138: J. O’Brien (MS) overHunter (CI) (Dec. 7-5)
145: DeJesus (CI) over Akcay (MS) (Fall 2:31) 152:
Spadafora (HHHE) over Campo (MS) (Dec. 17-0) 160:
Goodrich (MS) over J. Thompson (BS) (Dec. 7-0) 170:
Cascio (K) over A. Thompson (BS) (Dec. 8-0) 182:
Lord-Kelly (CI) over Guadagno (EI) (Fall 0:50) 195: Butler (BS) over Agresta (EI) (Fall 3:09) 220: Rahman-Bailey (BS) over Mesa (EI) (Fall 3:14) 285: Castillo
(BRENT) over Mazella (MS) (Inj.).
Team: Brentwood 275.5, Mount Sinai 241.5, Bay Shore
239, MOW: Rivera, Bay Shore 106. Most Pins/Least
Time: Rahman-Bailey, Bay Shore, 3 pins in 5:18.
Lindenhurst Invitational Tournament
99: Esposito (TOT) over Moor (RIV) (Dec. 8-0) 106:
Lennon (LINDY) over Hao (CARD) (Dec. 9-7) 113: Silva
(TOT) over Reich (CARD) (Fall 5:40) 120: Carter (NB)
over Quintanilla (LINDY) (MD 16-5) 126: Lobo (COP)
over Correa (TOT) (Dec. 6-3) 132: Cabrera (LINDY) overRozenman (TOT) (Dec. 6-4) 138: Meisner (LINDY) over
Justin (LINDY) (TF 6:00) 145: Howard (CARD) over
Pitocco (DP) (Fall 3:46) 152: Baez (TOT) over Tsavaris
(NB) (Fall 3:18) 160: Otero (COP) over Rodriguez (TOT)
(MD 14-5) 170: Illicete (COP) over Giannelli (LINDY)
(Fall 5:28) 182: Scaffidi (DP) over Mroczka (BAB) (Fall
1:13) 195: Thomas (SYR) over Winey (LINDY) (Fall :30)
220: Leftenant (COP) over Caceres (LINDY) (Fall 3:54)
285: Perez (LINDY) over Bloom (LINDY) (Fall 1:23)
Team: Lindenhurst 408.5, Tottenville 175, Copiague
173. MOW: Carter, North Babylon, 120. Most Pins/Least Time: Thomas, Syracuse 195, 4 pins in 4:15.
GIRLS FENCING
Oyster Bay 20 ...............................................Hewlett 7
BOYS FENCING
Oyster Bay 19 ...............................................Hewlett 8
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
3, Labita 3, Pepe, Terrizzi); HEW 9 (Rochler 3, Weiss 3,
Karkus, Korkos, Shmuel).
Division ................................................8 7 13 7 --35
Roosevelt ............................................9 16 19 13 --57
ROO: Boykin 11, Torres 10, Fiallo 8, Anderson 6, Jackson 6, Daniels 4, Hall 4, parks/bau 4, Branch 2, Kirby 2.
Totals 20-4-57. DIV: Nortwich 9, Weinert 8, Huggins 6,
Lemieux 6, Moran 4, faton 2. Totals 13-3-35. Threepointers: ROO 4 (Fiallo 2, Boykin, Torres); DIV 3
(Lemieux 2, Nortwich).
Glen Cove ..........................................16 12 12 22 --62
Roslyn.................................................16 20 18 20 --74
R: Drenis 16, Levy 16, Johnson 15, Weiner 7, Welker 7,
Goldschmidt 5, Davey 4, Gatto 4. Totals 18-7-74. GCV:
Jackson 22, Vaughan 13, Gibson 9, Battle 6, Hernandez
6, Graf 4, Phillip 2. Totals 20-2-62. Three-pointers: R 7
(Drenis 4, Levy 2, Weiner); GCV 2 (Gibson, Vaughan).
Bethpage ...........................................12 8 10 16 --46
South Side..........................................16 10 18 7 --51
SSIDE: Thomas 16, McGowan 14, McDonald 7, Seplowe
6, Ledwith 5, Grace 2, Shannon 1. Totals 9-9-51. BPG:
Soybas 13, Sheehan 11, Lane 9, Reggio 8, Keener 4,
Saugy 1. Totals 10-4-46. Three-pointers: SSIDE 9 (McGowan 3, Seplowe 2, Thomas 2, Ledwith, McDonald);
BPG 4 (Sheehan 3, Soybas).
Conference A-IV
Floral Park .........................................17 12 14 34 --77
Valley Stream North ...........................9 19 21 17 --66
FLP: Delgado 30, Chery 10, Buzzeo 9, Freely 9, O’Donnell 8, Ollen 7, Espinel 2, Jounakos 2. Totals 25-3-77.
VSN: Parris 26, Manzi 14, Ferreira 11, Phillips 7, Abidin
3, Grey 3, Ye 2. Totals 18-6-66. Three-pointers: FLP 3
(Buzzeo, Chery, Freely); VSN 6 (Manzi 4, Parris 2).
Lynbrook .............................................19 11 18 12 --60
North Shore ........................................6 7 11 2 --26
LY: Blondo 22, Montgomery 15, Donaldson 11, Pekale
8, Barrett 2, deMenezes 2. Totals 16-7-60. NS: O’Day
17, Jacklin 5, Ledden 2, Scarola 2. Totals 6-3-26. Threepointers: LY 7 (Donaldson 3, Blondo 2, Pekale 2); NS 3
(O’Day 2, Jacklin).
Mineola ..............................................16 10 13 12 --51
Friends Academy ...............................14 13 12 10 --49
MIN: Alonso 16, Causcut 15, Eccher 6, O’Connell 6, Abdelaziz 4, Flood 2, Lubrano 2. Totals 11-7-51. FA:
Popoola 14, Daal 13, Douglas 10, Daniels 6, Mott 6. Totals 14-4-49. Three-pointers: MIN 7 (Alonso 4, Eccher
2, Causcut); FA 4 (Popoola 3, Daal).
Wantagh...............................................13 18 8 18 --57
Valley Stream South .........................14 18 20 10 --62
VSS: Powell 16, Williams 15, Johnson 14, Davis 9, Traill
4, Ahye 2, Hicks 2. Totals 16-5-62. WAN: Teresky 15,
VonBargen 12, Rathgaber 10, Goldberg 8, Chatham 4,
Graham 4, Insinga 4. Totals 16-5-57. Three-pointers:
VSS 5 (Powell 2, Williams 2, Davis); WAN 5 (Rathgaber 2, VonBargen 2, Teresky).
Conference A-V
Island Trees ........................................20 14 16 13 --63
West Hempstead ...............................12 11 12 16 --51
IT: Connors 19, Ferrufino 19, Acevedo 11, Avery 8, Wilson 4, Costanza 2. Totals 19-6-63. WH: Bernard 19,
McMillan 9, Parnell 8, Garcia 6, Bonet 5, Raipatty 2,
Santiago 2. Totals 16-5-51. Three-pointers: IT 6 (Avery
2, Connors 2, Acevedo, Ferrufino); WH 5 (Bernard 2,
Parnell 2, Bonet).
Locust Valley ......................................16 12 17 13 --58
Clarke .................................................11 10 12 17 --50
LV: Mangiarotti 28, Fox 9, Paz 6, Reisiger 5, Smith 4,
Murphy 3, Tini 3. Totals 16-4-58. CL: Sullivan 15, Paul
11, Dalipi 10, Caputo 6, DeSimone 4, Brioso 2, Caputo
2. Totals 16-4-50. Three-pointers: LV 4 (Mangiarotti 3,
Fox); CL 4 (Paul 3, Sullivan).
Conference BD
East Rockaway ...................................14 19 11 14 --58
Wheatley ..............................................6 12 15 13 --46
ER: Infante 14, Levins 13, O’Connor 13, McCann 8, Cilluffo 4, Barth 3, Perri 3. Totals 14-7-58. WHE: Barres
17, Sivin 10, Wong 9, Koty 8, Ferrone 2. Totals 13-5-46.
Three-pointers: ER 7 (Levins 2, O’Connor 2, Barth, McCann, Perri); WHE 5 (Wong 3, Koty, Sivin).
Carle Place ...........................................9 13 5 2 --29
Malverne ...........................................14 7 17 17 --55
MAL: Edwards 13, Hampton 12, Gaston 9, Ulysse 6,
Warren 5, Seraphin 4, Castin 2, Floyd-Gordon 2, Nealy
2. Totals 17-4-55. CP: Deveau 9, Ruscillo 9, Alfaro 5,
Anastasio 2, Chiappone 2, Cola 1, Vincenti 1. Totals
1-7-29. Three-pointers: MAL 4 (Edwards 3, Warren);
CP 7 (Deveau 3, Ruscillo 3, Alfaro).
Academy Charter ...............................17 17 12 10 --56
Cold Spring Harbor ............................22 15 12 20 --69
CSH: Suter 18, Milana 15, Adomaites 13, Sanna 10,
Vavassis 8, Gagne 3, Licciardi 2. Totals 22-3-69. AC:
Hall 12, Rodriguez 11, Dingle 9, Faulkner 7, Shim 5, Bailey 4, Martin 4, Bankasingh 2, Cobb 2. Totals 16-5-56.
Three-pointers: CSH 3 (Sanna 3); AC 5 (Hall 2, Dingle,
Rodriguez, Shim).
SUFFOLK
League I
Central Islip ........................................14 22 17 17 --70
Sachem North ....................................15 18 16 10 --59
CI: Pannell 30, Delva 13, Lowery 10, Sween 6, Antwi 5,
Lawrence 4, Jean-Baptist 2. Totals 18-6-70. SN:
Anacreon 28, Butler 17, Letteresse 5, Bittlingmeyer 3,
Galdamez 3, Gambino 2, Davide 1. Totals 8-11-59.
Three-pointers: CI 6 (Pannell 4, Delva, Sween); SN 11
(Anacreon 6, Butler 4, Bittlingmeyer).
League II
Lindenhurst ........................................11 6 6 11 --34
Half Hollow Hills East .......................18 12 17 13 --60
HE: Dean 22, Moore-Hough 12, Caspi 10, Russo 5,
Cohen 4, Green 4, Selmer 2, Sekler 1. Totals 20-6-60. LI:
Gregg 13, Mangers 6, Rhein 5, Agunloye 4, Monahan 4,
Varela 2. Totals 5-5-34. Three-pointers: HE 6 (Dean 3,
Moore-Hough 2, Russo); LI 5 (Gregg 3, Mangers,
Rhein).
Conference AA-II
Hicksville ...............................................4 8 6 9 --27
East Meadow .......................................17 17 7 10 --51
EM: Hippner 18, Tannenblatt 10, Williams 9, Solenski
6, Yablansky 4, Sanzone 2, Sparkowski 2. Totals
17-3-51. HI: Yanopulos 9, Chiariello 8, Pierce 8, DeJesus
2. Totals 8-1-27. Three-pointers: EM 3 (Tannenblatt 2,
Williams); HI 1 (Pierce).
Long Beach ...........................................8 13 19 13 --53
Westbury ............................................2 13 3 12 --30
LB: Zeiba-Rosa 17, Simbari 9, Kassap 8, Nunez 6, Rafferty 4, Soriano 4, Plunkett 3, Cheung 2. Totals
22-1-53. WE: Azemar 15, Brabham 6, Gousse 6, Telesford 3. Totals 11-2-30. Three-pointers: LB 1 (Simbari);
WE 2 (Azemar, Telesford).
Conference A-I
Calhoun ..............................................13 11 8 17 --49
MacArthur............................................8 13 11 7 --39
CAL: Bayat 12, Devlin 9, Kessler 8, Orlich 7, McGuire 6,
Baumann 4, DiPalo 2, Raines 1. Totals 8-7-49. MAC:
Cardon 14, Tolve 10, D’Angelo 8, Kilian 4, Accordino 3.
Totals 7-6-39. Three-pointers: CAL 7 (Bayat 3, Kessler
2, Devlin, McGuire); MAC 6 (Cardon 3, Tolve 2, D’Angelo).
Garden City .......................................15 22 16 10 --63
Herricks .............................................14 8 6 2 --30
GC: Kelly 21, Worrell 14, Brennan 9, Murray 5, Fitzgerald 4, Suau 4, O’Connor 3, Flanigan 2, McGuire 1. Totals
22-3-63. HER: O’Mara 10, Liriano 7, Carson 6, O’Shea 3,
Adessa 2, Osieczkowski 2. Totals 11-0-30. Three-pointers: GC 3 (Worrell 2, Murray).
Conference A-II
Great Neck North ..............................14 14 13 9 --50
Bellmore JFK ......................................15 13 16 21 --65
BJFK: Lewin 24, Montalbano 16, Lewin 11, Marino 6,
Maroos 6, Field 1, Samuels 1. Totals 17-4-65. GNN: Rabbany 24, Yazdanpanah 16, Chau 6, Sassouni 4. Totals
14-5-50. Three-pointers: BJFK 4 (Maroos 2, Lewin,
Lewin); GNN 5 (Yazdanpanah 3, Rabbany 2).
New Hyde Park ....................................9 9 15 3 --36
Jericho ...............................................27 13 11 11 --62
J: Stoler 25, DeLuca 13, Chestler 7, Browne 6, Peters 4,
Albicocco 3, Kallansrude 2, Klappert 2. Totals 9-11-62.
NHP: Sinkler 9, White 9, Sosa 5, Waldron 4, Langan 3,
Coope 2, Gonzalez 2, Duggan 1, Mauceri 1. Totals
11-3-36. Three-pointers: J 11 (Stoler 6, Browne 2,
Chestler 2, Albicocco); NHP 3 (White 2, Langan).
Port Washington ..................................6 9 14 8 --37
Plainview-Old Bethpage JFK .................8 17 14 7 --46
PJFK: Ortsman 13, Mastorides 10, Yim 9, Kimmel 8,
Gordon 4, Howell 2. Totals 12-4-46. PW: Shanahan 16,
DeMeo 8, Kane 5, Gindi 4, Rosaya 4. Totals 9-3-37.
Three-pointers: PJFK 4 (Ortsman 2, Kimmel, Yim); PW
3 (Shanahan 2, Kane).
Carey ....................................................13 7 9 6 --35
Sewanhaka ...........................................19 20 21 5 --65
SEW: Hunte 23, Bolivar 18, Cattle 13, Weinschreider 4,
Akinwunmi 3, Lariosa 2, Lazo 2. Totals 22-3-65. CAR:
McGrath 19, Cavalli 5, Lim 5, Todzia 3, Tzakas 2, Millan
1. Totals 12-3-35. Three-pointers: SEW 3 (Hunte 3);
CAR 3 (Lim, McGrath, Todzia).
Conference A-III
Roosevelt ............................................9 4 12 9 --34
Division ..............................................12 16 8 12 --48
DIV: Gillis 20, Gillis 19, Cronin 4, Bonsignore 3, Vespa 2.
Totals 19-1-48. ROO: Innocent 16, Yisrael 10, Jones 6,
White 2. Totals 6-6-34. Three-pointers: DIV 1 (Gillis);
ROO 6 (Innocent 4, Yisrael 2).
Plainedge............................................22 15 22 10 --69
Hewlett .............................................14 11 16 19 --60
PE: Svraka 26, Cavaliere 18, Krystall 9, Marigliano 7,
Wise 5, Tierney 4. Totals 20-8-69. HEW: Weiss 29,
Borsellino 9, Panzarella 7, Williams 6, Sapienza 4,
Mack 2, Pincus 2, Morgan 1. Totals 18-6-60. Threepointers: PE 8 (Krystall 3, Svraka 3, Marigliano, Wise);
HEW 6 (Weiss 4, Borsellino, Panzarella).
South Side............................................12 19 15 8 --54
Bethpage ..............................................13 5 13 13 --44
SSIDE: Barrett 11, McElwain 11, Medford 10, McMahon 8, Allen 4, Kenny 4, McLean 3, Cavanugh 1. Totals
17-2-54. BPG: Hughes 14, Sierra 8, Bestany 7, Cusack
5, Hughes 5, O’Neill 4, Sholander 1. Totals 12-4-44.
Three-pointers: SSIDE 2 (McElwain, Medford); BPG 4
(Hughes 2, Bestany, Hughes).
Conference A-IV
Valley Stream North .............................6 0 13 9 --28
Floral Park ...........................................27 17 6 4 --54
FLP: Harkins 16, Bateau 6, Brimingham 6, Lubicich 6,
Reilly 6, Reilly 4, Ventura 4, Cheslock 2, Kozak 2,
Minogue 2. Totals 18-4-54. VSN: Santo 12, Smith 7, Alcala 4, Saracino 3, D’Clemente 2. Totals 9-2-28. Threepointers: FLP 4 (Harkins 4); VSN 2 (Saracino, Smith).
North Shore ......................................14 9 11 17 --51
Lynbrook...............................................8 15 7 10 --40
NS: Walton 20, Griffin 14, Casale 9, Colbert 4, Scott 4.
Totals 8-5-51. LY: Nembach 14, Bahri 8, Schwizer 5,
Bahri 4, Bamman 4, Foley 2, Sullivan 2, Weinkauf 1. Totals 10-4-40. Three-pointers: NS 5 (Walton 4, Griffin);
LY 4 (Nembach 3, Bahri).
Conference B
Malverne ...............................................1 8 3 1 --13
Carle Place............................................11 19 22 8 --60
CP: Selhorn 10, Tumino 10, Burden 9, McKeough 9,
Leary 7, Leary 6, Ruiz 4, Leary 3, McLaughlin 2. Totals
25-1-60. MAL: Davidson 7, Cordova 2, Ulysse 2, Jones
1, Mayes 1. Totals 5-0-13. Three-pointers: CP 1 (Leary).
Wheatley..............................................8 14 11 6 --39
East Rockaway ....................................8 20 10 11 --49
ER: McCarthy 18, DeGiulio 9, Chelius 7, Vertuccio 6, Hyland 5, O’Hagan 4. Totals 11-5-49. WHE: Jozef 16, Rothstein 9, Werney 8, Ali 2, Braito 2, Yagoda 2. Totals
12-3-39. Three-pointers: ER 5 (McCarthy 5); WHE 3
(Werney 2, Rothstein).
SUFFOLK
League II
Bay Shore ...........................................15 13 15 16 --59
Connetquot .........................................6 15 8 12 --41
newsday.com
NASSAU
Conference AA-I
Farmingdale ......................................15 15 14 17 --61
Hempstead ........................................18 4 14 20 --56
F: Chambers 17, Cason 11, Maroldo 10, Smikle Jr. 6,
Lewis-Flood 5, Brady 4, Decker 2, Hayden 2, McCarthy
2, Winkler 2. Totals 15-5-61. H: Guy 13, Young 12, Uzamere 10, Newton 9, White 7, Jackson 3, Joseph 1, Narcisse 1. Totals 18-1-56. Three-pointers: F 5 (Cason 3,
Lewis-Flood, Maroldo); H 1 (Jackson).
Syosset ..............................................19 13 10 15 --57
Freeport..............................................14 6 23 16 --59
FR: Jackson 27, Jones 15, Fergus 13, Bumpass 2, Sabb
2. Totals 9-9-59. SY: Breslow 16, Berland 13, Kula 13,
Puthussery 8, Newman 7. Totals 12-8-57. Three-pointers: FR 9 (Fergus 4, Jackson 3, Jones 2); SY 8 (Breslow
4, Berland 3, Kula).
Uniondale ...........................................14 16 13 16 --59
Oceanside ...........................................10 11 16 18 --55
UDALE: Williams 17, Shuford 15, Meyers-Turner 7,
Joseph-Brock 6, Foster 5, Gorham 5, Evelyn 4. Totals
21-0-59. OC: Amitrano 19, Garrett 12, Pod 10, Estevez
6, Cesar 4, McCabe 4. Totals 12-6-55. Three-pointers:
OC 6 (Amitrano 3, Pod 2, Garrett).
Conference AA-II
East Meadow .....................................11 18 17 14 --60
Hicksville ............................................21 13 8 11 --53
EM: Nicholson 25, Mirza 22, Williams 6, Prunty 4,
Lanza 3. Totals 13-6-60. HI: McBride 19, McAleese 9,
Hoffmann 8, Mateo 8, Cerrato 5, Leonardi 2, Singh 2.
Totals 14-7-53. Three-pointers: EM 6 (Mirza 2, Nicholson 2, Williams 2); HI 7 (McAleese 3, Hoffmann 2,
McBride 2).
Westbury ............................................8 17 8 24 --57
Long Beach ........................................16 12 24 17 --69
LB: Barwicki 14, Burns 10, Cochran 10, White 10, Hankins 7, Bauer 6, Decicco 6, Merritt 4, Michaels 2. Totals
17-6-69. WE: Redd 15, Sainbert 12, Frazier 11, Maglorie 6, Bertrand 5, Vineyard 3, Washington 3, Volatire 2.
Totals 15-6-57. Three-pointers: LB 6 (Barwicki 2, Bauer
2, Hankins 2); WE 6 (Redd 3, Bertrand, Sainbert, Washington).
Plainview-Old Bethpage JFK ...............8 14 10 16 --48
Port Washington................................18 8 20 19 --65
PW: Daly 15, Spier 14, Bellini 13, Blakeman 13, Melkonian 5, Schmitz 3, Schwirzbin 2. Totals 23-4-65. PJFK:
Nemickas 13, Galasso 10, Purnell 10, Weber 6, Kapla 3,
Lambert 2, Schmidlapp 2, Tierno 2. Totals 9-7-48.
Three-pointers: PW 4 (Bellini 3, Daly); PJFK 7 (Nemickas 3, Weber 2, Kapla, Purnell).
Conference A-I
MacArthur .........................................13 10 10 8 --41
Calhoun .............................................18 12 14 15 --59
CAL: Jones 26, Stokel 12, Edwards 10, Graham 4,
Solomon 4, Sanchez 3. Totals 17-8-59. MAC: Chmiel 14,
Knapp 10, Schwartz 7, DeVecchis 4, Kelleher 4, DeVecchis 2. Totals 11-6-41. Three-pointers: CAL 8 (Jones 6,
Sanchez, Stokel); MAC 6 (Chmiel 4, Knapp 2).
Herricks ..............................................14 14 9 20 --57
Garden City ........................................23 8 12 17 --60
GC: Franz 24, Pappas 10, Duff 9, Long 9, Basile 4,
Downey 4. Totals 13-9-60. HER: McCreery 14, Coriat
13, Grau 12, Zhu 12, Memon 4, Gerazounis 2. Totals
19-3-57. Three-pointers: GC 9 (Franz 6, Pappas 2,
Long); HER 3 (Zhu 2, Coriat).
Great Neck South ................................9 12 13 26 --60
Valley Stream Central..........................9 14 15 13 --51
GNS: Sabvehroo 20, Lee 16, Hamooz 8, Huang 8, Bacchus 4, Dewitt 4. Totals 9-8-60. VSC: Okoko 20, Fanor
10, O’Brady 6, Peat 5, Sangui 5, Chevry 3, Lewis 2. Totals 16-4-51. Three-pointers: GNS 8 (Lee 3, Sabvehroo
3, Hamooz 2); VSC 4 (Fanor, Okoko, Peat, Sangui).
Conference A-II
Bellmore JFK .....................................14 12 24 19 --69
Great Neck North ................................4 8 10 22 --44
BJFK: Travaglione 18, Wexler 14, Yablon 11, Rosenfeld
8, Root 6, Levy 5, Feldman 4, Rosenberg 2, Pitti 1. Totals 21-7-69. GNN: Kamali 15, Jacobs 12, Cronin 9, Yazdan 3, Hyman 2, Nouriely 2, McAward 1. Totals
4-10-44. Three-pointers: BJFK 7 (Travaglione 4, Yablon
3); GNN 10 (Jacobs 4, Kamali 3, Cronin 2, Yazdan).
Elmont................................................14 8 18 15 --55
Manhasset .........................................14 14 12 14 --54
EL: Santos 15, Lawson 12, Barnes 10, Louis 6, Kellman
5, Maldonado 4, Gordon-Younge 3. Totals 13-8-55.
MAN: Mastando 20, Santella 10, Crowell 8, Perfetto 5,
Themelis 4, Zaffiro 3, Busch 2, LoCurto 2. Totals
18-3-54. Three-pointers: EL 8 (Lawson 4, Santos 3, Kellman); MAN 3 (Mastando 2, Santella).
Sewanhaka ........................................19 20 15 12 --66
Carey .................................................10 8 10 6 --34
S: Hicks 24, Rodriguez 13, Cherubin 9, Cothias 4, Grant
4, Jean-Baptiste 4, Harts 3, Brown 2, Denhart 2,
Thommesen 1. Totals 21-4-66. C: Cosgrove 8, Giacalone
8, Toscano 8, Cosgrove 3, Scavelli 3, Dawoodbhai 2, McGrath 2. Totals 14-1-34. Three-pointers: S 4 (Hicks 2,
Cherubin, Rodriguez); C 1 (Scavelli).
Jericho ................................................16 12 19 13 --60
New Hyde Park ..................................11 7 9 22 --49
J: Weiss 23, Malik 13, Wong 13, Gerschwer 5, Jaffe 5,
Miller 1. Totals 15-3-60. NHP: Levkulic 13, Orbon 12,
Bangug 10, Estapinian 7, Langan 5, Baumann 2. Totals
13-5-49. Three-pointers: J 3 (Weiss 2, Gerschwer);
NHP 5 (Bangug, Estapinian, Langan, Levkulic, Orbon).
Conference A-III
Hewlett .............................................11 12 12 16 --51
Plainedge ...........................................16 17 13 16 --62
PE: Labita 23, Pepe 11, Hagerstrom 10, DeSantis 9,
Yarusso 6, Terrizzi 3. Totals 15-8-62. HEW: Karkus 16,
Rochler 11, Weiss 9, Shmuel 5, Wilson 4, Korkos 3,
Lawes 3. Totals 8-9-51. Three-pointers: PE 8 (DeSantis
League III
Huntington ..........................................7 16 11 18 --52
Deer Park ...........................................23 14 18 11 --66
DP: Edwards 23, Edmead 21, Rios 12, Perkins 4, Johnson 3, Van Dorn 2, Defense 1. Totals 18-9-66. HU:
Rentsch 15, Ardell 9, Danzinger 9, Rowe 8, Girimonti 7,
Stephen 4. Totals 11-7-52. Three-pointers: DP 9 (Edwards 5, Rios 3, Edmead); HU 7 (Rentsch 3, Danzinger
2, Girimonti, Rowe).
League IV
East Islip ............................................20 13 21 20 --74
Islip .....................................................10 17 18 22 --67
EI: Cassiano 34, Boyd 14, Audain 7, Mosley 7, Harty 6,
Miller 6. Totals 17-10-74. I: Juengerkes 20, Giuliani 19,
Karachannas 12, Arey 8, Mai 8. Totals 20-5-67. Threepointers: EI 10 (Cassiano 5, Boyd 4, Mosley); I 5
(Juengerkes 2, Arey, Giuliani, Mai).
Half Hollow Hills West ........................13 15 20 9 --57
Harborfields .........................................19 19 12 5 --55
HHHW: Bland 16, Gordon 13, Rader 11, Jordan 9, Bland
4, Seay 2, Turner 2. Totals 15-7-57. HAR: Williamson
16, McDermott 13, Mitchell 8, Robinson 8, Werbitsky
6, Gold 3, Desimone 1. Totals 16-6-55. Three-pointers:
HHHW 7 (Bland 4, Gordon 2, Jordan); HAR 6 (Robinson
2, Williamson 2, McDermott, Mitchell).
Kings Park ..........................................20 24 18 20 --82
West Babylon ......................................6 13 9 18 --46
KIP: Kehoe 26, Bianco 18, Garside 14, Wolf 12, Graci 4,
Svolos 4, Gunnell 2, Ingraffia 2. Totals 22-8-82. WB :
Terry 15, Scotto 14, Austin 6, Barnes 4, Vecchio 4, Seawright 2, Torres 1. Totals 10-3-46. Three-pointers: KIP
8 (Kehoe 8); WB 3 (Scotto 2, Barnes).
League V
East Hampton ...................................13 16 11 20 --60
Mount Sinai .......................................13 16 12 27 --68
MS: Hurowitz 23, Pintabona 15, Romelien 9, McNeely
7, Rudolph 6, Gomes 4, Rinck 4. Totals 23-1-68. EH: Foster 18, Miller 16, Proctor 9, Leach 6, Vizcaino 6, Esquievl 2, Musinicki 2, Gurney 1. Totals 13-8-60. Threepointers: MS 1 (McNeely); EH 8 (Foster 3, Leach 2,
Miller, Proctor, Vizcaino).
Sayville ................................................8 10 8 6 --32
Shoreham-Wading River ....................2 5 10 10 --27
SAY: Kloska 12, Llewellyn 8, Casaburi 7, Mas 5. Totals
9-3-32. SWR: Costello 9, Bell 8, LoSchiavo 3, Mercado
3, Cook 2, Gawreluk 2. Totals 8-2-27. Three-pointers:
SAY 3 (Kloska 2, Mas); SWR 2 (LoSchiavo, Mercado).
Amityville ..........................................22 12 12 26 --72
Wyandanch...........................................8 26 19 24 --77
WY: Jordan 24, Evans 21, Haywood 12, McNaughton 5,
Green 4, Molloy 4, Faustin 3, Barker 2, Rich 2. Totals
19-5-77. AMV: Goddard 30, Lucas 14, Owens 9, Augustine 6, Miles 6, Gillzen 5, Williamson 2. Totals 19-3-72.
Three-pointers: WY 5 (Evans 3, Jordan 2); AMV 3
(Owens 2, Miles).
League VI
Center Moriches.................................21 21 16 22 --80
Mattituck .............................................6 11 14 21 --52
CM: Braithwaite 22, Franklin 15, Snowden 15, Falco 13,
Frazier 8, Nix 7. Totals 26-7-80. MAT: Allen 16, Seifert
14, Woods 10, Poole 6, Joyner 4, Ford 2. Totals 15-2-52.
Three-pointers: CM 7 (Braithwaite 3, Falco 3, Nix);
MAT 2 (Seifert 2).
Hampton Bays ...................................13 13 7 18 --51
Glenn ..................................................32 24 21 15 --92
GLENN: Fenner 19, Ford 10, Salerno 10, Johnson 9,
Szokoli 9, Tiernan 9, Aufiero 7, Tartaglia 6, Uss 6, Scott
5, Davis 2. Totals 29-10-92. HB: Brown 20, Ottati 13,
Dean 4, Mora 4, Srdanovic 4, Butters 3, Hanes 3. Totals
10-5-51. Three-pointers: GLENN 10 (Fenner 3, Szokoli
3, Salerno 2, Johnson, Uss); HB 5 (Ottati 3, Butters,
Hanes).
Port Jefferson .....................................16 8 17 19 --60
Southampton .....................................33 22 23 13 --91
SHMPT: Faggins 17, Smith 16, Trent 14, Trent 11,
Gavalas 10, Wheeler 10, Bontempo 6, Kraszewski 5,
Napier 2. Totals 29-9-91. PJ: Florio 15, Feinstein 14, Calendrille 9, Ford 5, Idir 5, Bachman 4, Saeiva 4, Rolfe 3,
Everson 1. Totals 18-3-60. Three-pointers: SHMPT 9
(Bontempo 2, Gavalas 2, Trent 2, Faggins, Kraszewski,
Wheeler); PJ 3 (Feinstein, Florio, Ford).
League VII
Southold ..............................................15 9 9 14 --47
Pierson ................................................11 8 17 7 --43
SHLD: Grathwohl 18, Russell 16, Krazeski 6, Karsten 3,
Brigham 2, Eckhardt 2. Totals 7-7-47. PI: Brooks 18, Barranco 9, Schiavoni 8, Egbert 6, Cowen 2. Totals 14-2-43.
Three-pointers: SHLD 7 (Grathwohl 4, Russell 3); PI 2
(Brooks 2).
NON-LEAGUE
Holy Cross ..........................................12 10 20 8 --50
Holy Trinity ........................................15 10 16 19 --60
HT: Knight 24, Sixsmith 23, Kiggins 7, Roberts 4, Kalimian 2. Totals 16-6-60. Three-pointers: HT 6 (Knight 4,
Kiggins, Sixsmith).
Iona Prep ................................................9 15 8 8 --40
Chaminade .............................................8 16 15 9 --48
CHA: O’Connell 23, Drennan 7, Young 7, Gray 5, Colletti
2, Leyden 2, Parks 2. Totals 14-2-48. Three-pointers:
CHA 2 (O’Connell 2).
A45
HIGH SCHOOL SPORTS
A46
Rivera picks the right sport
Bay Shore star
outstanding at
Gilmore tourney
BY GREGG SARRA
The springtime decision
came easily for Bay Shore’s Elijah Rivera.
The three-sport athlete was
going to commit to one sport
year-round. The change of seasons would not bring a change
of sport. Rivera was going to
wrestle all year long
“All my life I’ve enjoyed playing different sports,” Rivera
said. “And I knew it was time to
dedicate myself to one sport
and reach my potential. I’ll
miss football and lacrosse but I
know what needs to be done to
win in wrestling. And it’s my
one love.”
The decision to focus on
wrestling and travel the country throughout the offseason
has paid mighty dividends for
Rivera. The junior cruised
through three opponents to capture the 106-pound class at the
32nd Rocky Gilmore Memorial
Tournament on Saturday in
East Islip.
Rivera beat Joe Sparacio of
Bayport-Blue Point, 13-4, in the
final. Sparacio gained a singleleg takedown at the edge of the
circle for an early 2-0 lead.
That advantage was short-lived
GEORGE A. FAELLA
gregg.sarra@newsday.com
Bay Shore’s Elijah Rivera gets a takedown against Bayport-Blue Point’s Joe Sparacio in the 106 final.
as Rivera used a reversal and
two back points for a 4-2 lead
after one period.
“He’s a very good wrestler,”
Rivera said. “But I used some
quickness and a great defense
to build a big lead.”
Rivera scored on a welltimed duck-under and spin behind and a single-leg takedown
with back points to build an 11-3
lead. The win helped Rivera improve to 24-0, including 18 pins
this season.
“He’s a perfect example of a
Jon Spadafora, Hills East wrestling
BY OWEN O’BRIEN
owen.o’brien@newsday.com
Jon Spadafora’s training goes
beyond the mat.
Growing up in a wrestling
household, Jon and his older
brothers, James and Phil, would
constantly train together at Half
Hollow Hills East practices. But
occasionally, the competition
would spill over to the house.
“There have been some
fights over who’s the best and
we always battled it out,” Jon
Spadafora said. “Sometimes it
got a little too crazy.”
The work with his older brothers, who are currently sophomores at the University of Maryland, helped develop Jon into a
standout wrestler as he enters
his senior season, winning his
first 14 matches of the season.
Spadafora had four pins in 2:44
to win the 145-pound title at the
Sal DiFazio Tournament at Hills
East Dec. 28, and be named
Newsday’s Athlete of the Week.
Spadafora also won the
Rocky Gilmore Tournament on
Saturday with a 17-0 win by
technical fall over Matt Campo
of Mount Sinai at 152 pounds.
“My mindset is to either wrestle as short as possible or if I am
going to wrestle without pinning
the kid, get as many points as I
can and go for the tech fall,”
Spadafora said. “Mentally break
them.”
Bill Davey, who has coached
Spadafora since eighth grade,
said he can sometimes be on
“cruise control” watching his experienced wrestler. “He was on
his game, he looked good, he was
feeling good,” Davey said. “Every
time we go into a tournament,
his goal is to try to be the most
outstanding wrestler, so it’s kind
JON SPADAFORA
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
newsday.com
ATHLETE OF THE WEEK
Jon Spadafora
of nice to be on his level of
wrestling and knowing he has
that capability of doing it every
time.”
Spadafora, who started as an
eighth grader at 99 pounds, has
matured to a 145 pounder. He
will occasionally wrestle up to
152, either to face a tougher opponent or for the good of the team.
kid who’s all in,” Bay Shore
coach Alex Porcelli said. “His
work ethic is outstanding.”
Rivera, who was 35-2 and finished fifth in Suffolk as a sophomore, was named the tournament’s
most
outstanding
wrestler.
“I worked all summer with
different styles like freestyle
and Greco Roman to improve
my hips and balance,” Rivera
said. “It’s definitely paid off.
And my confidence is much better than last year.”
Mount Sinai’s Mike O’Brien
punctuated an exciting final
round with a 7-5 overtime win
over Bay Shore’s Nick Corsini
at 132 pounds. At the start of
overtime and the mat surrounded by more than 800 spectators, the two exhausted
wrestlers looked for that big
takedown to win it. O’Brien just
missed a takedown 14 seconds
into overtime and then earned
the win when he took Corsini
down on the edge of the circle.
Brentwood won the team
title for the 16th time with 275.5
points and two champions, in
Wenchard Pierre-St. Louis at
120 pounds and London Castillo at 285. Mount Sinai finished second with 241.5 points
and Bay Shore was third with
239.
Izayah Rahman-Bailey of
Brentwood, the 220-pound
champion, earned the most
pins in the least amount of time
award after he pinned three opponents in 5:18.
“Sometimes at 145, it won’t
be as good competition as 152,”
Spadafora said. “I’ll get these
close matches and that will
help because when I do get to a
close match, I’ll know I can
close it out. So when I wrestle
kids my own weight, I know I
can be stronger than them.”
After a 38-2 season last year
and finishing third in the county,
Spadafora is looking for a county
title with hopes of competing for
a state crown.
And during the holiday break,
Spadafora had a special trainer,
working with Phil, who is competing at Maryland and
Spadafora hopes join his brother
next year. “I have an advantage
because college wrestling and
high school wrestling is a totally
different level,” Spadafora said.
“So I get to know what works on
really good guys.”
HIGH SCHOOL SPORTS
BIG 10
MASSAPEQUA WRESTLING The Chiefs
recently won their own tournament over a
stacked field. They crowned five champions,
including Anthony Conetta (99 pounds), Chase Liardi
(106), Mike Blando (132), John Casamassina (170), and
Angelo Petrakis (182) and are 16-0 in dual meets.
WARD MELVILLE GIRLS FENCING Lauren
Cappello went 3-0 in sabre in a 19-8 victory
over Hills on Dec. 18. Cappello is 13-0 on the
season for the Patriots (5-0). Ivanna Zavala-Arbelaez is
12-0 in foil, and Cat Cao (11-1) and Olivia Becchina (8-0)
have been dominant in epee.
KELLENBERG GIRLS TRACK Coach Marty
Brown was inducted into the Armory Coaches
Hall of Fame in December and it looks like he
has another winner on his hands. Maureen Lewin ran a
4:50.75 in the 1,500 meters at the Armory Coaches Hall
of Fame Invitational, the fastest on Long Island.
PETER FRUTKOFF
EAST ISLIP BOYS BOWLINGTheRedmenare
poisedtocapturetheirthirdconsecutiveSuffolk
team championship,andare8-0tobeginthe
season.Lastyear’sNewsdayBowlerofthe Year,Aaron
Rice,ownsthe bestaverageinthe countyat240.96.
Massapequa’s Chase Liardi
WARD MELVILLE BOYS FENCING The Patriots improved to 5-0 and extended their regular season winning
streak to 167 games with a 25-2 win over Half Hollow Hills. Ben Rogak (7-1) and Will Lehr (8-2) lead the epee team.
ST. ANTHONY’S BOYS SWIMMING St. Anthony’s is 6-0 and led by Justin
Meyn, who has the second-best time in the state in the 100-yard butterfly
(47.28) and Michael Chang, who has the fourth-best time in the 100 breaststroke (59.84).
EAST ISLIP GIRLS BOWLING East Islip’s Julianna Spina (235.33) and Julia
Bocamazo (234.72) round out the top two averages on Long Island. Natalie
Mavrich (220.39) is fifth in overall average.
PATRICK E. MCCARTHY
UNIONDALE BOYS TRACK Giordano Williams placed second in the 55
meters in 6.69 seconds at the North Shore Invitational and finished fifth in
the 200 in 22.32 seconds at the Marine Corps Invitational. Asiel King was
second in the 55 hurdles in 7.67 seconds at the North Shore.
Ward Melville’s Lauren Cappello
LONG ISLAND LUTHERAN BOYS BASKETBALL Lutheranisofftoa 6-0
startandfeaturesanother talented,athleticgroup,ledbyAndre Curbelo
(15.7pointsper game),ZedKey(14.8)and TylerStephenson(14.0).
OCEANSIDE GYMNASTICS LedbyLexiKesslerand AmandaEidelman,
theSailorsareopeningtheseasonona roll, going 4-0inNassauIand5-0
overall.TheSailors’most recentwinagainstlastseason’s countychampion,
Plainview-OldBethpageJFK,wasaclosecontest,164.45-161.2. Kesslerwasfirst on
floor(9.35)andvault(8.35),andEidelmanwonthebeam(9.0).
Baldwin girls basketball, Rocky Point wrestling, Baldwin boys basketball, Huntington boys track.
L.I. Lutheran’s Andre Curbelo
GIRLS BASKETBALL
1. Baldwin (4-1)
2. Longwood (6-1)
3. Long Island Lutheran (3-1)
4. Ward Melville (6-1)
5. Half Hollow Hills East (7-0)
6. Northport (6-2)
7. Island Trees (9-0)
8. North Babylon (6-0)
9. Westhampton (8-1)
10. Plainedge (7-1)
BOYS BASKETBALL
1. Long Island Lutheran (6-0)
2. Baldwin (7-0)
3. Brentwood (8-0)
4. North Babylon (9-0)
5. Uniondale (7-0)
6. Longwood (8-1)
7. Chaminade (4-2)
8. Bellport (5-1)
9. Deer Park (4-2)
10. Farmingdale (6-1)
BOYS TRACK
1. Uniondale
2. Huntington
3. St. Anthony’s
4. Mount Sinai
5. Massapequa
GIRLS TRACK
1. Kellenberg
2. Valley Stream South
3. Longwood
4. West Babylon
5. Uniondale
BOYS SWIMMING
1. St. Anthony’s (6-0)
2. Half Hollow Hills (5-0)
3. Chaminade (5-0)
4. Long Beach (5-0)
5. Syosset (3-0)
BOYS FENCING
1. Ward Melville (5-0)
2. Great Neck South (7-0)
3. Commack (7-0)
4. Jericho (4-1)
5. Garden City (3-1)
GIRLS FENCING
1. Ward Melville (5-0)
2. Great Neck South (8-0)
3. Commack (6-1)
4. Great Neck North (7-1)
5. Centereach (4-1)
WRESTLING
1. Massapequa (16-0)
2. Rocky Point (15-1)
3. Eastport-South Manor (14-0)
4. Hauppauge (4-0)
5. Wantagh (14-3)
6. Connetquot (7-1)
7. Sachem East (4-0)
8. Kings Park (6-1)
9. Bay Shore (10-2)
10. Lindenhurst (9-2)
GIRLS BOWLING
1. East Islip (6-0)
2. Middle Country (6-0)
3. Commack (7-0)
4. Port Washington (9-0)
5. Garden City (7-0)
BOYS BOWLING
1. East Islip (8-0)
2. Chaminade (4-0)
3. Patchogue-Medford (9-0)
4. Sachem (8-0)
5. Hewlett (7-0)
GIRLS GYMNASTICS
1. Oceanside (5-0)
2. Massapequa (5-0)
3. Port Washington (4-1)
4. Syosset (4-0)
5. South Side (3-1)
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
ON THE
CUSP
RANKINGS
newsday.com
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Gregg Sarra
picks
Long Island’s
top 10 Winter
sports teams
PATRICK E. MCCARTHY
1
A47
CURLING
A48
AP / JIM MONE
Former Vikings star Jared Allen
practices recently with his curling
team for a match in Minnesota.
PIGSKINS TO ROCK SLIDING
Former NFL stars try their hand
at curling with Olympics in mind
BY JIMMY GOLEN
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
newsday.com
The Associated Press
Defensive lineman Jared Allen
retired from the NFL in 2015 and
wasn’t ready to give up on the
competition he’d come to enjoy
as a five-time All-Pro.
His solution: The Olympics.
The problem: He wasn’t an
Olympic athlete.
Less than a year later, Allen
and three other former NFL
stars — none with any prior experience — are attempting to
qualify for the U.S. national curling championships against players who have been throwing
stones for most of their lives.
It would be the first step toward competing in the 2022
Winter Games in Beijing.
“Every team in the NFL —
whether you’re hot garbage or
the defending Super Bowl
champions — every coach
come August says the same
thing: ‘We’re trying to win the
Super Bowl,’ ” Allen said. “We
come from that mentality,
where we set lofty goals.
“Our short term goals are continually to get better: Fundamentals, strategy, sweeping. We
know if we master these little
things, it will take us a long way.”
A 12-year NFL veteran who
spent most of his career with the
Chiefs and Vikings, Allen was
lamenting the end of his playing
days when a friend dared him to
try the Olympics. Allen toyed
with the idea of badminton but
rejected it as too taxing.
“We thought about curling. It
was chill, and the winners have
to buy the losers beer,” he said.
“We thought it was a win-win.”
He rounded up former Rams
quarterback Marc Bulger and Titans linebacker Keith Bulluck
and tackle Michael Roos to form
a team; all were Pro Bowl selections in their NFL careers, and
living near Nashville, Tennessee.
Adopting the name All-Pro
Curling Team, they started from
scratch in March and kept their
plans under wraps until they felt
like they had made progress.
“We wanted the reaction
when we got on the ice to be ‘Oh,
how long have you guys been
doing this?” Allen said in a telephone interview after practicing
on a converted hockey rink in
Nashville. “We were serious. We
didn’t want it to seem like it was
just some media hype, or just trying to stay relevant.”
The first test was in November, when Allen and Bulger —
with two “regular” curlers —
competed in the Curl Mesabi
Classic in Northern Minnesota.
Their first opponent: The gold
medal-winning team from
Pyeongchang led by four-time
Olympian John Shuster.
They lost, 11-3, giving up five
points in the sixth end.
“Honestly, they were a little
better than I had expected,” said
Matt Hamilton, the second on
that team. “All in all, Jared was
technically pretty sound. But at
MEET THE
‘ALL-PRO
CURLING TEAM’
JARED ALLEN, DE
Chiefs, Vikings,
Bears, Panthers
MARC BULGER, QB
Rams
KEITH BULLUCK, LB
Titans, Giants
MICHAEL ROOS, T
Titans
the end of the day, I’ve seen thousands of curling shots and situations and that is ultimately going
to win us more games.”
Although matches are often
conceded when out of reach, the
Olympians kept playing through
the eighth (of 10) ends, to help
them gain experience. “We had
one bad end, and we just kept
playing with them. We just
wanted to be a sponge,” Bulger
said. “The key was they knew we
were taking it seriously. It wasn’t
just us saying ‘We’re going to
take over curling,’ kind of as a
gimmick. We hope to play them
again when we’re better.”
The All-Pros are back at it at
the USA Men’s Challenge Round
this weekend in Blaine, Minnesota, where they are competing
for one of four remaining spots
in next month’s national championships. They got off to a rough
start in their first match, falling
10-1 to Steve Birklid’s Seattlebased rink. But by hopping into
the sport early in the cycle, they
have almost three more years before the 2022 Games.
Hamilton confessed he was
put off at first about newcomers
thinking they could reach the
Olympics in a sport he’d worked
a lifetime to master. But he also
realized it was good publicity.
“If I really think I’m that good,
I should be like ‘Bring it on!’ ”
Hamilton said. “How much they
respected the game, though, is
what made me realize they aren’t
making a mockery. We just have
some extremely athletic individuals who respect sport but have
a need to compete in their blood.
Can’t disrespect that!”
SPORTS
GOLF
Woodland leads in Hawaii
Gary Woodland made a
65-foot eagle putt and finished
with a birdie for 5-under-par 68
to keep his three-shot lead in
the Tournament of Champions
at Kapalua, Hawaii, on Saturday.
Rory McIlroy starts the new
year playing in the final group
after a 68. They were tied late
in the third round when McIlroy missed birdie chances at
the par-5 15th and had to scramble for par on the 16th. In the
group behind him, Woodland
made his long eagle putt to regain the lead.
COLLEGES
Cyclones rout No. 5 Kansas
Marial Shayok scored 24
points as host Iowa State
routed No. 5 Kansas, 77-60. The
Jayhawks (12-2, 1-1 Big 12) committed a season-high 24
turnovers. The Cyclones are
12-2, 2-0 . . . Anthony Mathis
scored 27 points as host New
Mexico (8-6) took control with
a 20-6 first-half run on the way
to an 85-58 victory over No. 6
Nevada (14-1) . . . Cassius Winston scored 18 of his 25 points
in the second half, and Nick
Ward had 21 as No. 8 Michigan
State pulled away late in the second half to beat host No. 14
Ohio State, 86-77 . . . Tevin
Mack made six first-half threepointers on his way to 22
points, and Alabama held off
No. 13 Kentucky, 77-75.
TENNIS
Americans on display
Merrick’s Rubin
set to join Isner,
Querrey at ‘Open’
NEW YORK OPEN
Feb. 9: New York Tennis Expo,
10:30a.m.
Taste of New York Open, 6 p.m.
Andy Roddick-Jim Courier
exhibition, 7:30 p.m.
Feb. 10: Qualifying, 11 a.m.
Feb. 11: Qualifying, main draw, 11
a.m., 7:30 p.m.
Feb. 12-14: Main draw, 11 a.m.,
7:30 p.m.
Feb. 15: Quarterfinals, noon,
7:30 p.m.
Feb. 16: Semifinals,2p.m., 7p.m.
Feb. 17: Final, 2 p.m.
BY JEFF WILLIAMS
jeff.williams@newsday.com
When the second New York
Open tennis tournament gets
underway at NYCB Live’s Nassau Coliseum next month,
there will be a heavy American presence.
At least 11 players in the
28-man field of the ATP Tour
event are from the United
States, with the world No. 10
John Isner heading that contingent along with No. 33 Steve
Johnson and No. 51 Sam Querrey. The field also includes
wild-card selection Noah
Rubin of Merrick.
The main draw of the tournament begins Feb. 11 and runs
through the final Feb. 17. The
other Americans in the field
are Ryan Harrison, Bradley
Klahn, Mackenzie McDonald,
Michael Mmoh, Reilly Opelka,
Tennys Sandgren and wild
card Jack Sock. Currently, 19
players are entered through direct acceptance, with qualifying, wild cards and special exemptions filling out the field.
Defending champion Kevin Anderson, who defeated Querrey
in the inaugural final last year,
has also committed. Anderson
is currently No. 6 in the world.
The doubles array will feature the all-time great pairing
of Mike and Bob Bryan, the
JOSEPH D. SULLIVAN
IN BRIEF
A49
John Isner, who is ranked 10th in the world, leads large American
contingent scheduled to play in next month’s New York Open.
Americans reuniting this year
after Bob had hip surgery last
summer that truncated his season. Sock took Bob Bryan’s
place alongside Mike and he
rose to No. 2 in the world in
doubles because of it. Sock
will play doubles at the Coliseum with as yet an undetermined partner. Also in the doubles field is Grand Slam winner Lleyton Hewitt, who will
play with up and coming fellow Aussie Alex de Minaur,
who is in the singles field.
The festivities kick off Saturday, Feb. 9, with a tennis expo
followed at night by an exhibition between former U.S.
Open champion Andy Roddick
and major winner Jim Courier.
Before that match, Roddick
and Courier will participate in
a Taste of New York Open
event that begins at 6 p.m. and
requires a separate ticket.
“Heading into the last 30
days, we are exceeding expectations on interest and ticket
sales,” tournament director
Josh Ripple said. “We are
pleased the seeds planted in
the first year are yielding positive results in year two.”
The New York Open aims
for a complete entertainment
package.
“The broad offering of Hall
of Famers like Roddick and
Courier, new ancillary events
like the Taste of New York
Open starring Garden City’s
David Burke and the Wolfpack
Ninjas, and most importantly a
solid ATP field including two
top 10 players and three top 10
doubles players means the
New York area will have a
great winter week of world
class entertainment on and off
the court,” Ripple said.
Anderson wins in India
Finland tops U.S. for title
Kaapo Kakko beat goalie Cayden Primeau on a backhander
off a rebound with 1:26 left to
give Finland its fifth world junior
hockey title, 3-2, over the United
States in Vancouver.
— AP
Marquez lifts Old Westbury in OT
Pedro Marquez scored nine
of his 16 points in overtime to
lead SUNY-Old Westbury (6-5,
4-2 Skyline) in an 88-81 overtime win over Sarah Lawrence
College in men’s basketball on
Saturday. Alan McDonald and
Justin
Alleyne-Washington
each scored 20 points
Nassau CC 80, Manhattan CC
78: Cheyenne Nettleton scored
40 points, including six threepointers, to lead Nassau Community College (13-5) in
NJCAA. Nettleton made two
free throws with six seconds
left in the fourth quarter to put
the Lions up, 80-76.
Farmingdale State 94, Mount
Saint Mary 71: Anthony Miller Jr.
scored 21 points to lead Farmingdale State (8-5, 6-2 Skyline).
Adelphi 90, NYIT 48: Conor
McGuinness scored 15 points
and made six assists to lead
Adelphi (8-6).
St. Joseph’s 80, Mount Saint
Vincent 67: Frank Basile scored
33 points, including seven threepointers, to lead St. Joseph’s
(3-8, 2-5 Skyline). Mike Harris
added 20 points.
Bentley University 84, Molloy
71: Curtis Jenkins scored 19
points and grabbed eight rebounds for Molloy (8-5). Nick
Corbett added 18 points.
Stonehill College 81, LIU Post
51:
Alonzo
Ortiz-Traylor
scored 21 points and grabbed
nine rebounds (eight defensive) for LIU Post (0-11).
Women’s games
Adelphi 74, University of the
District of Columbia 68: Niajah
Morgan scored 18 points and
grabbed 10 rebounds to lead
Adelphi (7-6).
SUNY-Old Westbury 97, Sarah
Lawrence 37: Monique Joseph
scored 23 points and Charlotte
Reinker had 23 points and 17 rebounds to lead SUNY-Old
Westbury (11-1, 5-1) in Skyline.
Nassau CC 80, Manhattan CC
44: Cherish Francis scored 15
points to lead Nassau Community College (10-4) in NJCAA.
Bentley 74, LIU Post 59: Sasha
Patterson had 18 points and
eight rebounds and Dominique
Williams added 12 points in a
loss for LIU Post (11-3).
Mount Saint Mary 59, Farmingdale State 37: Destiny Hunt
scored 12 points and grabbed
seven rebounds for Farmingdale State (2-10, 2-5).
Mount Saint Vincent 61, St.
Joseph’s 31: Alicia Indence
scored 12 points for St.
Joseph’s (2-10, 1-5 Skyline).
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
HOCKEY
LOCAL COLLEGE BASKETBALL
newsday.com
Kevin Anderson, the defending champion of the New York
Open at Nassau Coliseum, won
his sixth ATP title when he recovered from 5-2 down in the
tiebreaker to beat Ivo Karlovic,
7-6 (4), 6-7 (2), 7-6 (5), in the
Maharashtra Open final in
Pune, India . . . Roberto
Bautista Agut didn’t waste his
win over Novak Djokovic as he
won the Qatar Open by beating
Tomas Berdych, 6-4, 3-6, 6-3.
SPORTS
A50
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
newsday.com
neil.best@newsday.com
Commuters from New Jersey
to Manhattan can be ornery,
given the frustrations involved.
But this weekend some might be
more ornery than most.
Bulls can be like that, especially ones whose job it is to
throw professional riders off
their backs as quickly as possible, often on national television.
Hey, it’s a living, and unlike
most commuters, these bovines
get private rides into town over
the George Washington Bridge.
“The bulls get treated better
than we do,” Jim White said
with a laugh.
White is production manager
for Professional Bull Riders,
which is making its annual season-opening, first-weekend-inJanuary, fish-out-of-water visit
to Madison Square Garden
through Sunday.
He is responsible for overseeing logistics, and logistics always are a challenge on the
PBR tour. At the Garden, they
are a bigger challenge.
“But it’s a fun challenge,” he
said. “We call ourselves the
‘Toughest Crew on Earth,’ because if a building can handle
us they can handle anything.”
It began in 2007, when PBR
was looking to add a New York
stop in search of sponsor and
media attention and was told
that early January was all that
was available at the Garden in
winter. Deal!
Since then, it has become an incongruous post-New Year’s tradition, with fans who are increasingly knowledgeable and turn
out in numbers that CEO Sean
Gleason called it one of the season’s top-grossing events.
“It’s been an important market for us to spread the word in
mainstream media that PBR is
out there and doing well,” he
said, adding that after not-soprofitable early years it has become “one of the most hotly requested tickets I get.”
That includes fans of the
sport in the immediate area,
and ones who travel to combine a visit to New York with
watching the competition. “It’s
turned into a major destination,” Gleason said.
PBR said about 20 percent of
fans at the Garden travel from
more than 51 miles away and 9.3
percent from more than 101
miles. But the spectators still
are predominantly local, and
that makes for an atmosphere
that riders say is unique.
Keyshawn Whitehorse first
visited the event several years
ago as a spectator, then competed in 2017. Last year, he was
RAGINGBULLS
MSG has become one of the go-to venues for Professional Bull Riders
Jess Lockwood won
the PBR Monster
Energy Buck Off at
MSG last January.
GETTY IMAGES / AL BELLO
BY NEIL BEST
PBR Rookie of the Year.
“The energy of the fans, how
reactive, how into it they are,
there’s nothing like it on any of
the other stops,” said Whitehorse, a member of Navajo Nation who is from Utah.
“They boo when they want to
boo and they’ll cheer when they
want to cheer. Some places they
only cheer. Here you get positive
and negative . . . They know
when the rider deserves a reride, so they boo the judge.”
Tanner Byrne, a nine-year
PBR veteran who is from
Saskatchewan, said, “Growing
up in Canada, going to smalltown rodeos across my home
province and country, to get to
ride bulls at the Garden is a
dream come true.
“The first few years it was definitely very foreign [to fans], and
that was entertaining in itself.
People weren’t too sure what
was going on. They were cheering everything and booing everything and were unlike any other
crowd we have . . . But it’s
grown. The New York City fan
base picked it up and started to
figure out what we’re actually
doing out here.”
In the early years, White said,
there was a steep learning curve
regarding everything from how
the Garden operates to how to
set up a bull-riding arena on a
fifth-floor hockey rink in the mid-
SPORTS
8
Seconds
needed for qualified ride.
35 Riders
40-45 Bulls
$21,000
Tolls paid daily to tranport the
bulls back and forth from N.J.
$140,000
Total purse for three-day event
that ends Sunday
40,000
Pounds of plywood needed to
cover Rangers’ ice for the event
$1 million
Bonus to rider who wins seasonending World Championship belt
buckle, Nov. 10 in Las Vegas.
UConn’s loss is
unusual, but is
it a new reality?
BY STEPHEN HAWKINS
The Associated Press
WACO, Texas — Connecticut All-America players
Katie Lou Samuelson and
Naphessa Collier won a national title and went to two
other Final Fours before experiencing this. The team’s
only seniors are coming off a
loss in the regular season for
the first time.
The top-ranked Huskies’
126-game regular-season winning streak that stretched
over five seasons ended with
a 68-57 loss at No. 8 Baylor
on Thursday night.
“It’s different. Clearly it’s
nowhere near the emotions
as the past two years when
we lost in the Final Four,”
Samuelson said. “I think it’s
more anger this year, feeling
like you could have done
things to help the team.”
The Huskies had an undefeated national championship season when Samuelson and Collier were freshmen in 2015-16. UConn went
to the Final Four without a
loss each of the past two seasons before two-point overtime losses in consecutive
national semifinal games to
Mississippi State and Notre
Dame, respectively.
UConn (11-1) hadn’t lost a
Connecticut’s
Napheesa Collier
(24), Crystal
Dangerfield (5) and
Katie Lou Samuelson
(33) are not used to losing
during the regular season.
regular-season game in regulation since a 76-70 home
loss to Baylor in a Nos. 1 vs.
2 matchup Feb. 18, 2013, a
span of 163 games. The
Huskies’ only regular-season
loss since then was 88-86 in
overtime at Stanford on Nov.
14, 2014.
In his 34th season, Auriemma said: “How long did
you think you were going to
win every game in the regular season, 10 years? Stanford
in 2014. Think about that.”
The loss at Baylor was the
fifth road game in a sixgame stretch for UConn that
started with an 89-71 win at
then-No. 1 Notre Dame. But
the Huskies hadn’t played
since a tough win Dec. 22 at
then-No. 14 Cal, three days
after trailing by double digits in the second half at Oklahoma, before pulling out a
72-63 win.
“I think people sometimes
get this impression that
UConn, we have this magic
dust and our kids are all perfect
players and all great students,
they all shoot the ball great and
every time we shoot it, it goes
in and it’s just a matter of how
much we’re going to win by,”
Auriemma said of his 11-time
national champion program.
“And it’s taken for granted I
think . . . You’re allowed to get
beat once in a while.”
In their last game before
starting American Athletic
Conference play Sunday at
Houston, the Huskies shot only
29 percent (20-for-68) and had
their lowest point total this season. It was their first doubledigit loss since 72-59 to Notre
Dame in the final 2011-12 regular-season game.
“We’ll be in this situation
again. You just see it, you can
feel it,” Auriemma said. “I said
before the season started, this
is not going to be a typical
UConn comes in and wins by
40 and hey, thanks for coming.
It’s not going to be like that.”
After the Huskies lost at Stanford in the second game of the
2014-15 season, they won 37 in a
row for a national championship. The last time UConn
had consecutive losses was in
1993, a span of 937 games.
ST. JOHN’S TO HOST ALL BIG EAST GAMES AT MSG?
BY ROGER RUBIN
roger.rubin@newsday.com
should be attractive.”
And playing all those
games at the Garden no doubt
would be an excellent recruiting tool for coach Chris
Mullin and his staff.
Cragg said that in talking
with alumni and administrators, the consensus was a desire to play conference home
games at the Garden. He
added, “It was making an observation from my time in college athletics: People see the
Garden and the St. John’s
brand as tied together. Kids
come to New York City and
St. John’s to play there.”
Though he would not characterize the progress of the negotiations, Cragg said that
what it would take to make
the vision real is “making the
partnership
between
St.
John’s and Madison Square
Garden better.”
He is negotiating with a familiar face in MSG’s Joel
Fisher, executive vice president for marquee events and
operations. The two have
been doing business with one
another for approximately 20
years, Cragg said, and “Joel
and I know what a good partnership looks like.”
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
WASHINGTON — St. John’s
is in negotiations to play all of
its Big East home games at
Madison Square Garden next
season, athletic director Mike
Cragg told Newsday.
The Red Storm’s presence at
the Garden has dwindled in recent years. Only four of this season’s nine conference home
games are being played at the
World’s Most Famous Arena:
Georgetown, Providence, Villanova and Seton Hall.
Cragg, who became St.
John’s AD in October after
30-plus years as a top athletics
administrator at Duke, is working toward reversing that tide.
“We want Madison Square
Garden to be our home,” he
said at halftime of St. John’s
97-94 overtime victory over
Georgetown on Saturday at
Capital One Arena. “We look at
our history and feel like that’s
where we want to be. Kids
want to play at Madison Square
Garden — it’s magical.
“St. John’s is committed to
[being a] championship-caliber program,” he added. “We
are becoming that, and that
newsday.com
dle of Manhattan.
“I got a lot of gray hair that
[first] year,” White said.
PBR lays 40,000 pounds of plywood over the ice used for
Rangers games, then installs
about 130,000 pounds of steel
bucking chutes, panels, gates
and posts.
Finally, there is the dirt — 750
tons of it that arrives on 45
trucks from Lyndhurst, New Jersey.
Getting the surface just right
is essential. If it is too soft, it is
dangerous for bulls because
they are unable to get proper
footing; if it is too hard, it is dangerous for riders because they
are unable to find a (relatively)
safe landing spot.
PBR spends more than
$21,000 in bridge tolls alone for
the event, trucking in bulls
daily from New Jersey.
Gleason pointed to a 2010
event in which top riders competed in Times Square, giving
the sport a key boost in New
York, which has come to embrace the novelty.
Byrne rang the opening bell
at the New York Stock Exchange on Friday.
“As cosmopolitan as New
York is — there are so many people that come and go from this
place — there are usually 50 percent that have never been to PBR
before,” White said. “They have
a blast. They enjoy it. It’s Americana in the heart of probably the
most unique city in the world.
“There’s nothing like Manhattan, and when people come and
they see this, they’re like,
‘Wow! Cowboys!’ ”
A brand-new world
AP / RAY CARLIN
MONSTER ENERGY
BUCK OFF
At MSG, 1:45 p.m., Sunday
A51
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
A52
JUSTIN TIME!
HOFSTRA WINS
AT THE BUZZER
Wright-Foreman’s three-pointer as
time expires nets him career-high 42
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
newsday.com
steven.marcus@newsday.com
It seemed just a matter of
time before Justin Wright-Foreman entered the rarefied air
still occupied by Speedy Claxton, who set the standard for
everyone who has played basketball for Hofstra since the
end of his brilliant career.
On Saturday, Wright-Foreman joined the club. He
scored a career-high 42 points
— the last three on a 34-foot
shot at the buzzer that beat
Northeastern, 75-72 — in perhaps the most dominating performance since Claxton, who
had two 40-point games as a
senior in the 1999-2000 season. No one had scored at
least 40 since Charles Jenkins
in 2010-11.
“Just to get 40 points, I
guess, is an honor,’’ WrightForeman said after Hofstra’s
10th straight victory. “But I’d
rather win with my teammates.’’
A victory seemed in doubt
when Hofstra trailed 70-61 with a
little more than five minutes remaining, but Wright-Foreman,
who played all 40 minutes, led
the comeback.
His three-pointer cut the
deficit to six. When Northeastern fouled him, he connected on
four free throws to make it 70-68.
Jacquil Taylor tied the score with
two foul shots.
With the score tied at 72 in
the final seconds, Northeastern’s Vasa Pusica missed a
three-pointer from the top of
the key. Taylor tipped the ball
to Wright-Foreman in the lane
and the senior guard raced
downcourt with less than two
seconds remaining.
“I just kind of looked at the
clock before I was going to
heave it,’’ he said. “But I saw
SCORECARD
75 : 72
HOFSTRA
NORTHEASTERN
Hofstra at
at Wm. & Mary
Radio: WRHU (88.7)
Thursday
how much time was on the
clock. I just wanted to get as
close to the basket as possible.’’
His shot from the middle of
the court hit the backboard and
banked in, and Wright-Foreman was mobbed by his teammates.
There was no set play before the wild finish. During
Hofstra’s last timeout, according to coach Joe Mihalich,
“We said in the huddle, ‘We’re
gonna stop them, then we’re
gonna get a rebound and just
go rather than call a timeout
and try to get some play to
work that probably won’t
work.’ We just said, ‘Get it and
go.’ ”
Mihalich was asked about
the impossible nature of the
shot. “I don’t know if ‘impossible’ and ‘shot’ go together
with Justin, I really don’t,’’ he
said. “He makes shots every
day you would say, ‘That was
impossible.’ But he made it.
He’s just a marvelous, marvelous basketball player who
every game, every day, he
does something to make you
say ‘wow.’ ’’
Hofstra is 13-3 and 3-0 in
the
CAA.
Northeastern
dropped to 7-8, 1-2 but is expected to be one of the contenders for the conference
title now that the team has
key players back from injury.
Wright-Foreman
shot
LEE S. WEISSMAN
BY STEVEN MARCUS
Hofstra’s Justin Wright-Foreman launches winning shot from 34 feet past Huskies guard Vasa Pusica.
15-for-30 from the floor and
8-for-9 from the free-throw
line. The reigning CAA player
of the year, who is averaging
26.6 points a game, also had
seven rebounds.
Taylor had 10 points and
seven rebounds. Bolden Brace
had 17 points for Northeastern.
“I think when you are a having a good year, you’re going
to have a game like that. You
just find a way to win,’’ Mihalich said, “Our guys did
that. It was 70-61, a lot of people thought we were dead in
the water, except us. We rallied, we believe in ourselves,
we did what we had to do in
those last four minutes.
“There’s a lot of ways we
could have lost. We found a
reason to win, we found a way
to win.’’
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
A53
SBU’s positive finish
Yeboah nets 19
as Seawolves
rally in AE opener
BY LAURA AMATO
laura.amato@newsday.com
It wasn’t the start, it was the
finish that mattered for the
Stony Brook men’s basketball
team on Saturday afternoon.
Fresh off their most successful non-conference start at the
Division I level, the Seawolves
rallied late, scoring the final
eight points of the game, to top
UMass Lowell, 75-63, in their
America East opener at the
Costello Athletic Center. Stony
Brook held UMass Lowell
scoreless in the final three minutes to secure its eighth nonneutral road win of the season.
“We were down two at halftime and I told them that we
weren’t doing the same things
we’d done [in non-conference],” Stony Brook coach Jeff
Boals said. “We didn’t share the
ball, defensively we weren’t
communicating, but I thought
we had great energy in the second half and came out to play.”
Despite Boals’ speech, Stony
Brook (13-3, 1-0) struggled to hit
SCORECARD
75 : 63
STONY BROOK
UMASS LOWELL
Binghamton at
Stony Brook
TV: ESPN3, 7 p.m.
Radio: WUSB (90.1)
Wednesday
its stride early in the second half
as UMass Lowell answered
every basket with one of its own.
That changed when Miles Latimer found Akwasi Yeboah for
back-to-back three-pointers with
8:17 left, capping an 8-0 Stony
Brook run to give the Seawolves a 10-point lead.
“[The first three] was a play
we wanted to run and the second
happened because I knew [Yeboah] was a reliable shooter,”
said Latimer (16 points). “It was
momentum. To get those couple
of buckets was key.”
Yeboah finished with a
game-high 19 points, but
UMass Lowell (8-8, 0-1) refused to go down without a
fight, clawing back to within
64-61 on Obadiah Noel’s layup
with 4:04 to play.
Andrew Garcia scored on
Stony Brook’s next possession,
draining a three-pointer and giving the Seawolves the cushion
they needed to lock in on defense, dropping into a zone that
stifled UMass Lowell.
The River Hawks were
19-for-55 from the floor, and
Stony Brook’s work on the boards
also proved a difference-maker.
The Seawolves held a 43-33 lead
in rebounds, including an 11-7
edge in offensive rebounds.
The Seawolves hope to keep
momentum going at home
against Binghamton Wednesday.
“Our goal is to win the moment,” Boals said. “We’re battle
tested. They know what they
have to do to win.”
‘Shorty’ big
for Seawolves
BY KENNY DeJOHN
76 : 56
STONY BROOK
UMASS LOWELL
Stony Brook
at Binghamton
TV: ESPN3, 2 p.m.
Wednesday
60-49 lead and effectively deflating the River Hawks, who had
closed the gap to eight points on
Bri Stiers’ putback. Oksana
Gouchie-Provencher
(nine
points) opened the fourth quarter with a putback and a short
jumper for Stony Brook (12-3, 1-1
America East), which didn’t look
back from a 64-49 lead.
“I think it gave us a lot of momentum,” coach Caroline McCombs said. “I think it gave us
confidence. You saw Shorty
give Hailey a big hug, so I think
everyone was pumped up.”
“That’s expected from Hailey,”
Pagan said. “For Hailey to make
that, the whole bench was up.”
McCombs lauded Zeise for
her performance in the five
games without senior guard
Jerell Matthews, who McCombs
said is without a timetable to return from an injured hand.
Matthews averaged 15.9 points in
10 games this season.
Two of Stony Brook’s three
losses have come in games
Matthews has missed, including a rough 64-36 loss to Hartford in the America East
opener on Jan. 2. Hartford and
Maine are considered Stony
Brook’s two biggest competitors in the conference.
Anastasia Warren, who
started in Matthews’ place, had
six points and four assists.
She’s one of a trio of role players — the other two being
Jonae Cox and Chantz Cherry
— who have played meaningful
minutes these last five games.
“It was big,” Pagan said of the
way the Seawolves answered
the loss to Hartford. “We knew
we could get the win. We just
knew we needed to bounce
back off that loss.”
Stony Brook held UMass
(5-10, 1-1) to just eight secondquarter points. Johnson had 10
points in the period, and Stony
Brook took a 42-30 lead into
the half. McCombs wasn’t short
in defining Johnson’s impact.
“She just is a spark,” McCombs said. “She pushes the
ball, she finds the open player.
She’s just a dynamic player.
She’s exciting to coach.”
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
Stony Brook guard Shania “Shorty’’ Johnson had 28 points, 11
assists, five rebounds and four steals.
Shania “Shorty” Johnson is
often the smallest player on the
court. The nickname, which she
wears like a badge of honor, is fitting. At 5-1, Johnson stares
down taller defenders with a
confidence and swagger befitting her production. Saturday
afternoon was just another day
at the office.
The senior guard had 28
points, 11 assists, five rebounds
and four steals as the Stony
Brook women’s basketball team
rolled past UMass Lowell, 76-56,
in front of 791 at Island Federal
Credit Union Arena. India Pagan
scored a career-high 20 points,
including 12 in the first quarter.
“[The nickname] came from
my mom’s friend in middle
school, and it stuck with me
since then,” Johnson said. “I
take that name anywhere I go.
Even in school, I tell my professors to call me ‘Shorty.’ I let people know. I’m not afraid of anybody taller than me, ever.”
With time winding down in
the third quarter, Johnson dished
to Hailey Zeise in the right corner. Wide open, Zeise drained a
three-pointer as the horn
sounded, giving Stony Brook a
SCORECARD
newsday.com
KATHLEEN MALONE-VAN DYKE
kenny.dejohn@newsday.com
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
A54
TUA VS. TREV: YOUNG GUNS
Soph, freshman
in the middle of
Tide-Tigers IV
BY ROBBY GENERAL
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
newsday.com
SAN JOSE, Calif. — Tua Tagovailoa of Alabama and Trevor
Lawrence of Clemson have become household names as each
young quarterback prepares to
lead his team in the College
Football Playoff National Championship Game on Monday
night.
Tagovailoa, a sophomore, has
No. 1 Alabama perfect as the
program seeks its third national title in four seasons.
Lawrence led No. 2 Clemson
back to the title game as a true
freshman and its fourth playoff
contest against Alabama in as
many years.
A year ago, the two were in
much different circumstances.
As a freshman at Alabama,
Tagovailoa went through the entire season as Jalen Hurts’
backup.
Trailing 13-0 at halftime to
Georgia in the 2018 title game,
Alabama coach Nick Saban replaced Hurts with Tagovailoa.
The true freshman capped off a
26-23 Alabama comeback victory with a stunning 41-yard
touchdown throw to DeVonta
Smith in overtime.
“Being able to play over and
over, you start to gain confidence and you start to get comfortable,” Tagovailoa said. “I
just wanted an opportunity and
I was hoping for it and I ended
up getting it.”
As a sophomore, he has
thrown for 3,671 yards, 41 touchdowns, only four interceptions,
and has run for 199 and five
TDs. Tagovailoa had surgery on
his right ankle after suffering a
sprain against Georgia in the
Southeastern
Conference
Championship Game a month
ago.
After a month of rehabilitation, he went 24-for-27 for 318
yards and four touchdowns in
Alabama’s 45-34 semifinal victory over No. 4 Oklahoma.
“I thought last week we saw
him healthy,” Alabama offensive coordinator Michael Locksley said. “Usually when he’s
AP / RICHARD SHIRO
Special to Newsday
Clemson freshman Trevor Lawrence took over as the starting QB in midseason and threw for 27 touchdowns and four interceptions.
NATIONAL
CHAMPIONSHIP
Alabama
vs.
Clemson
Monday
TV: ESPN, 8 p.m.
Radio: ESPN (98.7)
healthy and he has the ability to
be a threat as a thrower as well
as a runner, it opens things up
on the offensive side.”
Associate head coach Dan
Enos says Tagovailoa’s ability
to battle injuries, which began
with an injury to his right knee
Oct. 8 against Arkansas, is an
underappreciated part of his
game. For Saban, it’s just a part
of who he is.
“Tua is a special guy in terms
of his work ethic, the kind of
person he is, the drive that he
has to be really a good player,”
Saban said.
While Tagovailoa’s secondhalf heroics last January took
the world by storm, Lawrence
was stepping onto Clemson’s
campus for the first time.
Former Clemson quarterback
Deshaun Watson led the Tigers
past Alabama for the 2017 national championship. It didn’t
take long for Clemson coach
Dabo Swinney to realize he had
another player of that caliber.
“The day he got there, literally,” Swinney said. “The first
day, because we have a lot of
stuff that we install … Physically, [Lawrence] was a little bit
ahead [of Watson]. But just his
demeanor, his poise, his ability
to absorb the playbook.”
Lawrence has the chance to
become the first true freshman
to lead his team to a national
championship since Jamelle
Holieway led Oklahoma past
Penn State in the 1986 Orange
Bowl.
Through the first four games,
Lawrence split time with Kelly
Bryant, who transferred to Missouri after Lawrence was
named the Tigers’ starter.
In his starting debut against
Syracuse, Lawrence exited the
game after taking a hit to the
head while running out of
bounds. As Hurts has stepped
up for Alabama, Clemson
backup quarterback Chase
Brice kept Clemson’s championship hopes alive against the
Orange by stringing together a
late 94-yard touchdown drive to
give Clemson the 27-23 victory.
Lawrence returned the next
game and has 2,933 passing
yards, 27 touchdowns and four
interceptions this season.
“I think it’s crazy to have this
opportunity, especially as a
freshman,” Lawrence said. “You
never know when you’re going
to get a shot like this and you
might not.”
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
A55
AP / JEFFREY MCWHORTER
FACE OFF
Tua Tagovailoa won last year’s national title in a relief role. He’s
back from recent ankle surgery and had 41 TD passes, four INTs.
ALABAMA-CLEMSON:
THE PLAYOFF RIVALRY
National Championship Game, Jan. 11, 2016
Clemson 35, Alabama 31: No. 2 Clemson rallied for 21 points in the
fourth quarter behind Deshaun Watson, who threw a winning, 2-yard
touchdown pass with one second left. It was the Tigers’ first national
title since 1981.
CFP national semifinal, Sugar Bowl, Jan. 1, 2018
Alabama 24, Clemson 6: No. 4 Alabama scored 14 points in the third
quarter to break open the game. No. 1 Clemson was held to just 188
yards of offense. The Crimson Tide would beat Georgia in the final to
claim their fifth national title under Saban.
— MIKE ROSE
Easton Stick ran for three
touchdowns and threw for two.
and 129 total touchdowns (88
passing, 41 rushing).
“This place is special,” Stick
said. “Quarterback’s a unique
position. You’re only as good
as players you’re surrounded
with . . . I’m so thankful for
every guy I played with because as a freshman, you come
in and you just want to be a
part of it.”
Eastern Washington (12-3)
got to within 17-10 with a
2-yard touchdown on a fake
field goal in the final minute
of the first half.
The second half began with
the teams combining for three
turnovers and three long
touchdowns in less than 4 1/2
minutes. All of the scores, including Stick’s TD passes of 23
and 78 yards to Darrius Shepherd, came in a span of four
plays over 68 seconds.
“A five-minute frenzy,”
EWU coach Aaron Best said.
“It was so back and forth. It
was pretty crazy,” said Sam
McPherson, who had a 75-yard
TD run on EWU’s only play
between Stick’s two TD
passes.
There were interceptions
on consecutive plays before
EWU turned it over again
when backup QB Gunner Talkington, playing while starter
Eric Barriere sat out a series to
get his throwing hand looked
at, fumbled when being
sacked by Stanley Jones.
— AP
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
National Championship Game, Jan. 9, 2017
FRISCO, Texas — Easton
Stick ran for three touchdowns and threw for two
more as North Dakota State
beat Eastern Washington,
38-24, on Saturday for its
record seventh FCS title, the
fourth in five years with Chris
Klieman as head coach before
he takes over at Kansas State.
“It was a special journey —
15-0, end it with a national
championship . . . The story’s
complete,” said Klieman, 69-6
as head coach and part of all
of those titles, three as defensive coordinator. “That’s something that movies are made
out of, dreams are made out
of, books are written about.”
The Bison (15-0) have won
those seven FCS titles over the
past eight seasons.
Stick, who succeeded Carson Wentz as NDSU’s quarterback, threw for 198 yards and
ran for 121 in his 49th victory
to become the winningest FCS
quarterback. Stick leaves with
school records for total yards
(11,216), passing yards (8,693)
newsday.com
Alabama 45, Clemson 40: No. 2 Alabama scored 24 points in the
fourth quarter to overcome No. 1 Clemson and quarterback Deshaun
Watson, who threw for 405 yards and four touchdowns. It was the
Crimson Tide’s fourth national title under Nick Saban.
NORTH DAKOTA STATE:
A RECORD 7TH TITLE
AP / JEFFREY MCWHORTER
AP / WADE PAYNE
North Dakota State coach Chris Klieman has the FCS hardware before he moves on to the Big 12.
A56
BASKETBALL
JOURNEY
CONTINUES
FOR DIALLO
Our Savior New American alum’s
family motivates him on NBA road
BY LAURA ALBANESE
AP / PAUL SANCYA
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
newsday.com
laura.albanese@newsday.com
Mali-born Cheick Diallo has earned praise for his hard work from Pelicans coach Alvin Gentry.
Cheick Diallo’s life has been
an unending series of journeys,
one more unlikely than the last.
As a teen, he traveled from
his home country of Mali, then
in the throes of civil war, to the
hallways of Our Savior New
American in Centereach to
play basketball — a game he
had picked up only a few years
earlier.
That game took him to the
University of Kansas, bounced
him around the NBA’s developmental league and finally
landed him with the Pelicans in
New Orleans, where he hopes a
bench role could lead to something more.
Last week, life took him to Barclays Center and a game against
the Nets (he didn’t play). Diallo
still travels back in time every
time he comes here, he said
hours before tip-off. He still can
hear the crowd and feel the energy from when he played here
in tournaments in high school.
For an athlete and nomad,
this is home. Or one of them, at
least.
“Every time I come to New
York, especially Brooklyn, to
play here, it makes me feel like
I’m here back in the day,” he said.
“It makes me go ‘wow.’ I can picture myself here a few years ago
when I won MVP [during the Jordan Brand Classic as a high
school senior]. It feels different,
but it feels like yesterday.”
Like most journeys worth taking, Diallo’s path hasn’t been an
easy one.
Now 22, he moved here alone
at age 15 and was hosted by a
CHEICK
DIALLO
New Orleans Pelicans
No. 13, power forward
Vitals: 6-9, 220
Born: Sept. 13, 1996, in
Kayes, Mali (age 22)
High school: Our Savior
New American
in Centereach
College: Kansas
Drafted: 2016 by Clippers
(33rd overall)
2018-19 STATS
27 Games
9.7 minutes/game
3.4 ppg
family in Coram, Mike and
Cathy Fortunato. He spoke three
languages at the time, but English wasn’t one of them.
His parents in Mali, Mamadou and Ramata, did everything to give him this opportunity, he said, but they’ve never
seen him play, except for on TV,
when they can manage the sixhour time difference between
Mali and New Orleans.
They’re getting up there in
age, he said, and his dream is to
have them move to the United
States, but the hurdles to immigration have been too tough to
overcome.
They are his reason, he said
— the reason he keeps pressing
despite the long odds he’s faced
along the way and, in many
ways, still faces.
“I’m not going to forget where
I came from,” he said. “I thank
my dad for everything he did for
BASKETBALL
AP
TEAM-BUILDING
UCLA coach John Wooden left an impression on many coaches, including Knicks’ David Fizdale.
Watching the 76ers endure
the bumps of working Jimmy
Butler into the mix — with
reports surfacing that Butler
was disrespectful in a video
session this past week and
Joel Embiid voiced his displeasure with a changing role —
serves as a reminder that the
best-laid plans of rebuilds are
easier on paper.
CoachBrettBrownhadto
“TrusttheProcess”while losing
foryearsandwaitingfortalent
like this.Now heistaskedwith
makingthepiecesfittogether.
“What’smost— byamile —
latelyonmymind isthegrowth
ofateam,andthe cohesion
andtheabilitytoshare insomebodyelse’ssuccess,”Brown
toldreporters.“Youdon’tjust
clickyour heelsandthrow
JimmyButlerinand everybody’sgoingto beplaying the
samewayand style.It
[doesn’t]worklike that.”
STEVE POPPER’S
KNICKS/NBA INSIDER
WHEN FIZ MET THE
WIZ OF WESTWOOD
F
legendary coach John
Wooden that holds the allure.
“I met John Wooden,”
Fizdale said of the Wizard
of Westwood. “I was lucky
enough my college coach,
Brad Holland, was his last
recruit to UCLA. I was
lucky enough to spend
some time with coach
Wooden. I still have his
autographed book and one
of his cards of his pyramid
[of success] and the whole
pyramid in my office. I
cherish those . . . Obviously,
this is a big part of influence on my life and my
basketball world.
“I just find it phenomenal,
the thought that went into
building it. You have to go
through some stuff to be
able to figure out that that
was what’s necessary. I think
all coaches take a look at
that pyramid to learn from it.
It’s all of it, it’s a very holistic
approach to basketball.”
Fizdale does live the
lessons of praise and attentiveness, which certainly aid
him as he endures a nightmarish first season with the
Knicks.
He noted that though he
grew up revering Wooden, he
never had the opportunity to
play at UCLA even though
he played nearby.
“Oh, man, I would have
had to walk on,” he said. “No,
I wanted to play. So I went to
[the University of San Diego].
But I got to play against
them [at Pauley Pavilion] my
freshman year. They beat us.
But I got a few minutes. I
think I dropped a couple of
buckets in there.”
Frank Ntilikina dunked on pal.
FRIENDS LIKE THESE
The Knicks have tried to
prodFrankNtilikinatobemore
aggressive,andforamoment
thispastweek,theysaw ahint
ofwhatthatwouldlooklike.
Ntilikinadrove to therimin
Utah,andwithfriendandfellow
FrenchmanRudy Gobert
bearingdownonhim,he
dunkedwithauthoritybefore
theshot-blockergottohim.
“I saw him. It was pretty
funny because I ate at his
house the day before,” Ntilikina said. “So he says, ‘I feed
you and that’s how you treat
me?’ That was funny. It was a
good play, [but] at the end,
we didn’t win. We learned
from it and came back
stronger the next game. We
didn’t win, but we go back
and try to get a win.’’
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
LOS ANGELES
or most of the
Knicks players,
practicing at UCLA
held no special
allure other than
presenting them a leafy
green campus to stroll
through in the middle of
winter. The days of the
school’s basketball program
being a powerhouse predates
the birth of most of them.
But for Knicks coach David
Fizdale, who grew up in
South Central Los Angeles
and went to high school 20
miles from the UCLA campus, there still is something
magical about the place.
While the Bruins just fired
coach Steve Alford with
struggles far less daunting
than what Fizdale is enduring, it is the history and
JIM MCISAAC
steve.popper@newsday.com
newsday.com
me. Whatever I’m doing here,
whatever I’m doing in life
right now, it’s for my family.
My family is behind my hand .
. . I play hard [AND]my family
is my No. 1 motivation.”
As for basketball, he can
play power forward or center,
but on a team with Anthony
Davis, Jahlil Okafor, Julius
Randle and Nikola Mirotic,
playing time is hard to come
by. Diallo is averaging 3.4
points, 3.7 rebounds, and 0.5
blocks in a little less than 10
minutes per game. He had a
strong
summer
league,
though, and seemed to thrive
last season after an injury to
DeMarcus Cousins led to
more playing time.
He’s not big by NBA standards (he’s 6-9), nor is he wide
(at 220, he’s best described as
lanky), but he does have a 7foot, 4 1/2-inch wingspan. He
also has the type of young, infectious energy that lends
some life to a team that’s near
the bottom of the Western
Conference standings.
Old newspaper articles
from his high school days
show coaches praising his
tenacity and hard work. Pelicans coach Alvin Gentry often
has praised him for the same.
Diallo hopes it all clicks someday in a way that leads to
more chances, more playing
time and longevity in this
league.
Above all, though, he wants
to get his parents here with
him. Until then, he has a foster family in his host family,
the Fortunatos. They were
there that day at Barclays, and
in New Orleans the previous
week, to see him play and to
catch a Saints game. When
“home” was more than 4,000
miles away, they made him a
home here to which he still
loves to return.
So it makes sense that Diallo has a lot to play for. While
many professional athletes
are reserved, Diallo is open
about his motivations and his
driving desire to make both
families proud. He’ll keep trying, he said, and he hopes to
give the coaching staff a
chance to trust him more
every day.
“That’s the goal, that’s the
goal,” he said of an increased
role. “I just want to keep
doing what I’m doing and
eventually something might
happen for me.”
That’s another difficult journey, of a completely different
kind, but Diallo sounded neither intimidated nor insecure.
After all, he’s made it happen
plenty of times before.
A57
BASKETBALL
A58
NETS HALFTIME REPORT
KNEE-DEEP IN TALENT AND
Skilled roster has
pieces to fill holes,
stay in contention
BY GREG LOGAN
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
CHICAGO — Two years ago
at this time, the Nets were
caught in a miserable 1-27 midseason spiral on their way to an
NBA-worst 20-62 record in
their first season under the
leadership of general manager
Sean Marks and coach Kenny
Atkinson. There was a ray of
hope last season when they
reached the midpoint with 15
wins, but it fell apart in a 3-19
stretch before a 28-54 finish.
But Year Three of the
“Markinson” regime has a
much brighter appearance that
looks suspiciously like major
progress. A victory over the
Bulls on Sunday afternoon at
United Center would give the
Nets a 20-21 record at the halfway mark, matching their win
total for the 2016-17 season.
They lost 10 of 12 games after
Caris LeVert suffered a dislocated ankle that might keep him
out until the All-Star break in
February, but they held together
with the benefit of great veteran
leadership, found a way to close
out games and have won 11 of
their past 14 games to become
playoff contenders in the Eastern Conference.
Joe Harris, who is one of the
poster boys for the Nets’ development program along with
LeVert and Spencer Dinwiddie
over the past three seasons,
said, “Just across the board,
we’re more talented. We have
more depth. We’re a little shorthanded now, but we have a lot
of guys that are pros and are
able to come in any moment
that you ask . . . It’s pretty simple just by the fact we have
those pieces in comparison to
previous years.”
A year ago, Marks traded for
D’Angelo Russell, the No. 2
overall pick in the 2015 draft,
Allen Crabbe and DeMarre Carroll. Last summer, he added seasoned veterans Ed Davis, Jared
JIM MCISAAC
newsday.com
greg.logan@newsday.com
Spencer Dinwiddie has been one of the keys to the Nets’ turnaround and has been rewarded with three-year contract extension worth $34 million.
Dudley, Shabazz Napier and
Treveon Graham. Nets 2017
first-round pick Jarrett Allen
has developed exponentially,
and when a slew of injuries to
LeVert, Crabbe and Rondae
Hollis-Jefferson opened playing
time, second-round rookie Rodions Kurucs seized the opportunity to show what he could
do.
Carroll, who was sidelined
earlier by ankle surgery, said
depth has made all the differ-
ence for these Nets. “I think
our depth is remarkable,” he
said. “We’ve got guys that go
out and guys that come back
and just fill in spots. The more
guys we get back, the deeper
we’re going to be and it’s going
to be hard to beat us.”
Atkinson credits Davis, Dudley and Carroll for setting a more
physical tone and for showing
younger players “the tricks of
the trade” in terms of playing a
smarter brand of basketball.
“Those guys add a collective
IQ with their experience,”
Atkinson said. “I think that’s
helping our young guys. I think
it’s helping Jarrett Allen and
D’Angelo. Before, those guys
were kind of on an island. And
[the veterans] actually are out
there on the floor with them.
It’s not like they’re talking from
the locker room or the bench.
It’s huge.”
No one has benefited more
from a supportive veteran pres-
ence than Russell, who lately
has shown tremendous signs of
growth. “We’ve got a great
group of vets this year,” he said.
“They communicate on the
court or off the court. They let
you know straight up what it is.
They’ll get into you if they
need to. It’s really a great vibe
we’ve got around here.”
Any opposing coach would
say the point guard play of Russell and Dinwiddie off the
bench is what makes the Nets a
BASKETBALL
SEE
IT
A59
LIVE
AT THE COLISEUM
KATHLEEN MALONE-VAN DYKE
GROWING
Joe Harris can
slash to the
basket or shoot
the three and has
helped solidify a
shorthanded
Nets lineup.
“Sometimes, when you’re that talented, you think it’s all about your scoring,” Carroll said of Russell. “But he can
do so much for this team as far as assists
and talking to guys. I feel like he’s kind
of found his groove.
“He’ll get his points, but I think now
he’s really seeing the game as a bigger
picture. Now he understands that ‘hey,
I can get 10 assists, I can play defense
on the top point guards.’ He’s still
young, so he’ll just continue to keep
growing.”
Right along with the rest of the Nets.
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
JIM MCISAAC
challenge to handle. Napier has joined
that mix, and Atkinson even had all
three on the floor along with Harris at
the end of Friday’s victory in Memphis.
The Nets already have rewarded Dinwiddie with a three-year contract extension worth $34 million and face a decision on Russell, who can become a restricted free agent next summer and is a
valued target for some teams at the Feb.
7 trade deadline. But given the signs of
maturity and all-around improvement
he is showing, the prudent thing might
be to sign him.
newsday.com
Caris LeVert
was having a
breakout season
before his injury,
but he might
return after the
All-Star break.
FOR TICKETS GO TO NYCBLIVE.COM
2144703101
BASKETBALL
y
A60
FEARFUL KANTER TO SKIP
Thinks life will be
put in danger by
Turkish president
BY STEVE POPPER
LOS ANGELES — The wins
and losses — mostly losses —
and frustration about his playing
time and role with the Knicks
have irritated Enes Kanter lately.
But all that has taken a back seat
to the realities of life in which he
has found himself embroiled.
Kanter announced Friday
night that he will not join the
Knicks on their trip to London
for a Jan. 17 game against the Wizards. Team officials tried to carefully word the reason, but Kanter
was blunt. He said he is afraid
that if he goes to England, he will
be killed.
Kanter, who has not been to
his home country of Turkey
since 2015 and is unable to visit
or speak with his family there,
has been in a long-running battle
with Turkish president Recep Erdoggan.A vocal critic of Erdogg
an
and a supporter of Pennsylvaniabased exiled dissident Fethullah
Gülen, Kanter has had his passport revoked. He was stranded
in a Romanian airport in 2017
while on a trip to support his
charity and needed help from
the NBA and U.S. politicians to
escape.
“Well, I talked to the [Knicks’]
front office,” he said after the
win over the Lakers on Friday
night. “Sadly, I’m not going because of that freaking lunatic, the
Turkish president. There’s a
chance that I can get killed out
there. So that’s why I talked to
the front office. I’m not going. So
I’m just going to stay here, just
practice here.
“It’s pretty sad that just all this
stuff affects my career and basketball, because I want to be out
there helping my team win. But
just because of that one lunatic
guy, one maniac or dictator, I
can’t even go out there and just
do my job.”
Asked if he is serious in his
concern that he could be killed,
Kanter said: “Oh yeah, easy.
They’ve got a lot of spies there. I
can get killed very easy. That will
be a very ugly situation.”
Just over a year ago, news sur-
AP / MARK J. TERRILL
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
newsday.com
steve.popper@newsday.com
A Knicks official said Friday night that Enes Kanter is not going to London because of a visa issue.
faced from Turkey’s state-run
news agency that Kanter will be
tried in absentia, an indictment
seeking more than four years in
prison for his criticism of Erdogan. His father, Mehmet, a professor, was detained at one point, indicted and then released, having
disavowed his son.
At that time, Kanter said: “I’ve
said this before, that dude is a ma-
niac. Think about it. I mean,
America, you’ve got freedom of
speech — or you had. You’ve got
freedom of speech. You’ve got
freedom of whatever you want
to say. I mean, it’s a free country.
“But it’s not like that in Turkey.
You cannot criticize or you cannot even say nothing bad about
the dude, Erdogan. Just like say
he’s a bad guy and you’re in a
prison. It’s politics. People can
choose or say whatever they
want to say. I think right now the
situation there is pretty messed
up.”
Kanter said he has been unable to fly anywhere outside the
United States other than Canada.
A team official came to the
media room after Kanter spoke
and said Kanter is not going be-
cause of a visa issue.
The 26-year-old center had 16
points and 15 rebounds Friday,
but his presence is not urgent for
the Knicks right now with the
team mired near the bottom of
the standings with a 10-29
record. Kanter was removed
from the starting lineup in favor
of Luke Kornet for the last four
games.
BASKETBALL
y
LONDON TRIP
Know the
Score!
A61
Victory helps Knicks
ease on down the road
BY STEVE POPPER
steve.popper@newsday.com
AP / MARK J. TERRILL
Tim Hardaway Jr. had
22 points Friday night
to help Knicks stop an
eight-game skid.
Newsday’s Sports Now Newsletter
Monday
though, as they head to Portland
and Golden State to finish off the
six-game road trip.
“Well, you just hope that they understand, and I think our team at
least gets that part, on the road,
there is a certain way you got to
The latest scores,
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NDSPORTSNEWSLETTER2X154
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
Knicks
at Portland
TV: MSG, 10 p.m.
Radio: WNYM (970)
play to give yourself a chance to
win,” Fizdale said.
“For the most part, I feel like this
year, being on the road has been better for us than being at home because it galvanizes us. It’s all we got.
So obviously we got to figure out
home a little bit better.
“I just feel like this team understands how to really just lock in
when we go into a tough environment. Hopefully they can build
some confidence from these last
two and go up there and give it a
game.”
newsday.com
LOS ANGELES — The visitors’
locker room at Staples Center was
loud and crowded. Knicks principal owner James Dolan was with
the team, congratulating the players, and Public Enemy’s Chuck D
was saying hello to his fellow
South Central native, Knicks
coach David Fizdale.
It was an oddly celebratory mood
after a 119-112 win over the Lakers
that left the Knicks tied for the thirdworst record in the NBA (10-29). But
maybe it was the scarcity of opportunities to celebrate that had the
Knicks feeling good for a night.
“When we win, we celebrate
like it’s a Super Bowl,” Fizdale
said. “Why not?”
There were plenty of reasons
not to celebrate — the place near
the bottom of the standings and
the fact that the Lakers team the
Knicks beat was missing LeBron
James, Kyle Kuzma and Rajon
Rondo. But it’s baby steps for the
Knicks, and breaking an eightgame losing streak is as good a
reason as any to smile for a night.
Even the owner was smiling.
“He came in here and gave everybody dab like the coaching staff
would do after a game,’’ Tim Hardaway Jr. said. “He brought it in with
us. He was just happy how we competed on both ends of the floor and
said, ‘Get the next one.’ ”
The Knicks did have one reason to celebrate. They had threatened to blow out the Lakers early,
taking a 22-5 lead six minutes into
the game after a flurry of threepoint field goals. But they lost
Frank Ntilikina to a strained tendon in his right ankle, an injury
that leaves him day-to-day, and
they lost the lead, too, falling behind in the fourth quarter — and
won anyway.
With a strong defensive effort
down the stretch from unlikely
sources, the focus of Fizdale’s
practice and shootaround in Los
Angeles, the Knicks were able to
survive. It doesn’t get easier,
HOCKEY
y
A62
Quinn calls audible
Makes Rangers
practice after a
lackluster defeat
BY COLIN STEPHENSON
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. — With
a day in between Friday night’s
game in Colorado and Sunday
afternoon’s game in Arizona,
the Rangers had booked ice
time for Saturday in case coach
David Quinn decided he
wanted to hold a practice.
Initially, Quinn didn’t plan on
using it. Then his team committed 10 penalties and lost to the
Avalanche, 6-1, on Friday night
in the opener of their threegame western trip.
“Listen, you know, there are
some times when a game dictates whether you’re going to
practice or not,’’ Quinn said after
his team skated through a short
but intense practice at the Arizona Coyotes’ practice rink here.
“My original plan was to not
[practice], and then after watching the game, I thought that we
needed to practice.’’
Kevin Hayes, though, did not
participate. The 26-year-old center, who sat out Friday’s game because of a lingering upper-body
injury originally suffered in midDecember, remains out on a dayto-day basis, Quinn said.
“One of the things with
Hayesie, this is more of a nagging thing — it’s not anything
serious,’’ he said. “And with
him, he’s such a quick healer,
you think he’s going to be out
for three or four days and
boom, he’s coming back. So it’s
still day-to-day. He wasn’t good
enough to skate today, but it’s
really just a nagging injury.’’
Mika Zibanejad, the team’s
No. 1 center and leading scorer,
also did not practice Saturday,
but that, Quinn said, was just
normal “maintenance.’’ Zibanejad’s status for Sunday’s game
is not in question.
Hayes’ status, though, is
something of a problem for the
Rangers. The second-line center is the team’s second-leading scorer (10 goals, 23 points),
and the 23-man roster includes
two extra defensemen and
only one extra forward. So if
the 6-5, 216-pound Hayes is un-
JIM MCISAAC
newsday.com
colin.stephenson@newsday.com
Rangers coach David Quinn said there will be times “when a game dictates whether you’re going to practice [the next day] or not.”
Sunday
Rangers
at Arizona
TV: MSG, 4 p.m.
Radio: ESPN (98.7)
available, the Rangers will
have only 12 healthy forwards,
meaning they don’t have a
spare forward and therefore no
lineup flexibility up front.
Quinn was asked if the
Rangers might need to make a
roster move to bring up an
extra forward from their Hartford farm team. He inhaled
deeply before answering carefully.
“Right now, we won’t, but
that’s something we’ll talk about
later today,’’ he said. “Because,
again, we thought [Hayes] was
going to be able to skate today,
and that wasn’t the case.’’
The complication with making a call-up is that the
Rangers are at the 23-man
limit, so to bring a forward
up, they’d need to put Hayes
(or someone else) on injured
reserve or send down a defenseman. And they can’t do
that without passing that
player through waivers.
Notes & quotes: Quinn said
Henrik Lundqvist, who was
pulled from his last start
Wednesday against Pittsburgh, will start in goal
against Arizona . . . D Brendan
Smith partnered with Kevin
Shattenkirk at practice, a possible indication that he might
re-enter the lineup Sunday.
Fredrik Claesson partnered
with Tony DeAngelo.
HOCKEY
A63
COLIN STEPHENSON’S
RANGERS INSIDER
colin.stephenson@newsday.com
draft pick in 2005, became the
10th Rangers player to get to
800 games as a Blueshirt.
Entering Sunday’s game against
the Coyotes, he has played in
801 games, with 41 goals and
133 assists for 174 points, and
402 penalty minutes.
This season, Staal is having
something of a revival, playing
in each of the first 40 games
and producing three goals and
10 points. That is more points
than he had all of last season
(1-7-8) and as much as he
scored in 72 games two seasons ago.
“Ifeel like there’s more opportunitytofind thoseholesthis
year,Ithink,’’Staalsaidofhis
increasedscoring. “Ifeellike I
triedtodo thatlastyearand the
sameplaysweren’topening up,
where theyare thisyear. And
guysaremaking plays— pulling
upand findinglate guys— somethingthatI’ve been onthe receiv-
Defenseman Marc Staal, right, became the 10th man to play in 800 games with the Blueshirts.
ingend ofa few nice plays.”
Partnering on the top defense pair with second-year
player Neal Pionk, Staal has
been a stalwart for the
Rangers, and first-year coach
David Quinn.
“For me, he’s been unbeliev-
FIVE-FORWARD PP UNIT ON HOLD FOR NOW
mains to be seen if Hayes’
return — whenever that is —
also will mean the return of the
five forwards.
The players on the unit see
no reason why it shouldn’t. “It’s
five skilled guys out there that
can make plays and move
around,’’ Mika Zibanejad said.
According to Zibanejad, the
main difference in having five
forwards — himself, Hayes,
Kreider, Mats Zuccarello and
Vladislav Namestnikov — is
that there is more interchanging of positions than when the
power play has a more traditional look, with four forwards
Kevin Hayes’ status: Day-to-day.
stuff,’’ Zibanejad said. “You
don’t have to go to a certain
spot. You play wherever you
end up at. And I think everyone
can handle the different positions and different spots on the
power play.’’
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
phia Flyers in the final game
before the Christmas break,
Quinn talked about blowing it
up. “Kaboom,’’ he said, after it
failed to produce in its second
game together.
The coach changed his mind,
though, and stuck with it coming out of the break. And he
was rewarded with goals from
the unit in three straight
games, before the Rangers
went 0-for-2 in the 7-2 loss to
the Penguins on Wednesday.
Without Hayes, Quinn put
defenseman Kevin Shattenkirk
on the first power-play unit
against Colorado, and it re-
and a defenseman such as
Shattenkirk or Neal Pionk.
Pionk had been the point
man on the first power-play
unit for most of the season up
until that Toronto game, and he
generally quarterbacked the
action from the blue line, with
Zibanejad (a righthanded shot)
usually operating atop the left
circle, and Hayes or Zuccarello
(both lefthanded shots) atop
the right circle.
With the five forwards,
Zibanejad said, the emphasis is
having players in the right
positions — but not necessarily
the same players in the same
positions all the time.
“We’ve been switching, depending on how we get into the
zone, and off the faceoffs, and
people listen. And we’ve been
lucky to have him.’’
“Hebrings aleadership, andI
thinkit’s anincredible accomplishment,’’Pionk said of Staal
andhis 800games. “I thinkevery
singleguy on the team respects
himandlooks up to him.’’
newsday.com
When Kevin Hayes was
forced out of the lineup Friday
against the Colorado Avalanche
because of an upper-body
injury, that put an end, at least
for one game, to the Rangers’
five-forward power-play unit.
Quinn, who said he occasionally used a five-forward power
play when he coached Boston
University, initially deployed the
unit with the Rangers at
Toronto on Dec. 22. He did it,
he said, because he was trying
to get his best five players on
the power play.
But the next night, after a
frustrating loss to the Philadel-
able,’’ Quinn said. “I think he’s
had a really good year on the
ice, but boy, he’s a guy you
really enjoy to coach. You enjoy
your interaction with him; he’s
a stabilizing force in the locker
room. He’s a guy that’s not very
loud, but when he speaks,
JIM MCISAAC
GLENDALE, Ariz.
he night he reached
the milestone, the
Rangers lost to the
Pittsburgh Penguins
and Henrik Lundqvist
got pulled from the game. So
Marc Staal appearing in his
800th game with the Rangers
sort of got overshadowed. But
a couple of days later, when
given the chance to reflect on
it, the number meant something to the 12-year veteran,
who turns 32 on Jan. 13.
“It’s a pretty cool milestone,
obviously,’’ Staal said. “It’s
something where you weren’t
keeping track of it, and then
you start hitting those numbers
as you go. I think you just appreciate being in the game for that
long, to be able to play that
many games and to do what I
love to do.’’
The 6-4, 213-pound defenseman, the Rangers’ first-round
JIM MCISAAC
STAAL REACHES
800 GAMES
AS A RANGER
T
HOCKEY
yy
A64
Isles’ streak hits 6
Negative
reviews
for Eberle
Eberle, Boychuk
score 11 seconds
apart to key rally
BY ANDREW GROSS
andrew.gross@newsday.com
BY ANDREW GROSS
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
newsday.com
ST. LOUIS — Good teams,
playoff teams, win some
games in which they don’t play
their best.
And the Islanders continue
to show, more and more, that
they are a good team and a
solid playoff contender.
“We definitely weren’t at
our best,” right wing Jordan
Eberle said after the Isles’ 4-3
victory over the Blues on Saturday night at Enterprise Center.
“We found a way to win. Good
teams do that. They find ways
to win when they’re not playing well.”
It wasn’t just that the Islanders weren’t at their best.
For two periods, they didn’t
play anything close to the
hard-working, detail-oriented
game that has suited them
this season.
Despite managing only 14
shots on Jake Allen, the Islanders shrugged off a twogoal first-period deficit and
rallied for three third-period
goals — including two in 11
seconds — to extend their
winning streak to a seasonhigh six games.
“Tonight was a great example
of us coming together,” said captain Anders Lee, who put back
his own rebound to make it 4-2
at 15:04 of the third period. “We
all agreed we weren’t very good
the first 40 minutes. Everyone
pulled on the same rope the last
20 minutes. We played the right
way and, thankfully, with
[Robin] Lehner, we only needed
20.
“We can’t make this a habit.
We can’t rely on having an off
two periods and have Lehner or
[Thomas] Greiss back us up.”
Lehner made 29 saves in winning his seventh straight decision.
The Islanders (23-13-4), who
have won nine of 10, are on their
longest winning streak since the
end of 2016-17. The win vaulted
them into the first wild-card
spot in the Eastern Conference.
They also moved to within
two points of the first-place
Washington Capitals and Pitts-
AP / JEFF ROBERSON
andrew.gross@newsday.com
Islanders’ Anders Lee battles for the puck with a fallen Ryan O’Reilly of the Blues in second period.
SCORECARD
4
ISLANDERS
Tuesday
:
3
BLUES
Hurricanes
at Islanders
TV: MSG+, 7 p.m.
Radio: WRHU (88.7),
WRCN (103.9)
burgh Penguins. The Columbus
Blue Jackets are in third with 51
points.
The Islanders have not had
seven straight victories since
they won their last three games
in 2013-14 and their first four
games of the next season. They
haven’t won seven straight in a
single season since a ninegame winning streak from Dec.
31, 1989 to Jan. 19, 1990.
They face the Hurricanes on
Tuesday night at NYCB Live’s
Nassau Coliseum, and coach
Barry Trotz already is worried.
“This is a little bit of a red
flag that you win a game
you’re not supposed to because you think it’s going to
happen easy,” Trotz said.
“Hopefully it’s a little bit of a
wake-up call. At the end of the
year, the hockey gods always
even things out. They’ll probably take one away at some
point because I felt we stole
this one a little bit.”
Eberle, in the lineup after
missing four games with an upper-body issue, tied the score
at 2 at 8:27 of the third period
as he skated toward the left
post. Off the ensuing faceoff,
defenseman Johnny Boychuk
connected from the right point
at 8:38.
The Blues (16-19-4) thought
they had tied the score at 11:22
of the third period, but
Vladimir Tarasenko’s apparent
power-play goal was waved off
upon video review because of
his kicking motion.
With Allen off for an extra
skater and the Blues skating
six-on-five, Ryan O’Reilly
made it 4-3 at 18:27.
Brayden Schenn collected a
loose puck off the right post
to give the Blues a 1-0 lead at
4:11 of the first period and
Zach Sanford tipped Vince
Dunn’s shot to make it 2-0 at
16:37.
But Matt Martin, now halfway to matching his career
high of 10 goals, brought the
Islanders within 2-1 at 2:25. He
parked low in the slot and took
Casey Cizikas’ feed from behind the net.
“Marty’s goal was huge,”
Trotz said. “If they get the
third goal, it might have been a
six-, seven-goal game the way
we were playing.”
ST. LOUIS — Right wing Jordan Eberle returned to the Islanders’ lineup in Saturday
night’s 4-3 win over the Blues
after missing four games with an
upper-body injury.
He scored a third-period
goal to tie the score at 2, but
Eberle said the game felt fast
for him. Coach Barry Trotz
thought it was a subpar performance.
“I didn’t think much of his
game. I didn’t think much of
that whole line,” said Trotz,
who started him on the top
line with Brock Nelson and
captain Anders Lee before
temporarily dropping him to
the third line in the second period.
“I just threw the puck on net,”
Eberle said of his goal at 8:27 of
the third period. “I haven’t
played for a couple of weeks, so
the game seems fast out there. It
takes a period or two to get into
it. When you come back, the biggest thing is to try and simplify
the game a little bit.”
Eberle, in the final season of a
six-year, $36-million deal and a
20-goal scorer the previous five
seasons, has only eight goals and
10 assists in 36 games.
“Ebs probably hasn’t had the
year he would like,” Trotz said.
“This is a good opportunity for
him to reset. You don’t lose your
job when you get injured. He
should be excited. But he also
sees there’s pressure [for his
spot] as well.”
\ Lehner OK
Goalie Robin Lehner was
briefly shaken up with 19.3 seconds left in regulation when he
collided with Blues defenseman
Alex Pietrangelo.
“I got hit pretty hard there,”
Lehner said. “It’s 20 seconds left
and we’ve got to win a game. It’s
not very hard to get up and do
your best again.”
\ Isles files
The Islanders are 3-9-0
when trailing after two periods but have won two straight
in that scenario . . . The Islanders play five of the next
six at home. The lone road
game in that stretch is Thursday night against the Rangers
at Madison Square Garden.
HOCKEY
A65
ANDREW GROSS’
ISLANDERS INSIDER
andrew.gross@newsday.com
Barry Trotz
CRAZY TALK
After the Islanders’ dominating 4-0 win over Toronto
and former captain John
Tavares on Dec. 29, Barry
Trotz was asked if he was
ready to say the Islanders are
at least as good, if not better,
without Tavares.
“No,I’mnot,”Trotzsaidwith
more thana hintofincredulity.
“You’realwaysbetterwitha
playerofJT’sability.He’san
exceptionaltalent.Anytime
youlose aJohn Tavares,that’s
abigpiece.
“But we’re not looking
back,” he added. “We’ve got
to look forward. That’s what
our organization is wanting
from our players.”
JIM MCISAAC
NOW HE GETS IT
Mathew Barzal will play in his first NHL All-Star Game on Jan. 26 in San Jose.
SELECT COMPANY
Rookie defenseman Devon Toews, 24, became the 18th player in
the NHL and third Islander to have his first career goal be an
overtime winner in Thursday’s 3-2 victory over the Blackhawks.
How the other two fared:
Players
Thomas
Hickey
Tenure
Games
Goals
Assists
2013Present
441
22
93
2001-11,
2012-14
479
24
85
ends for the players because
of the commitments they do
have, from the players’ commitment to the sponsors’ commitment. It’s actually quite taxing
on the players. The game is
not taxing, for the most part. I
told [Barzal] just to make sure
to share it with his family.”
Bailey said one of the other
interesting aspects — he called
it a “highlight” — of the AllStar festivities is getting to
know the other players.
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
Radek
Martinek
First
goal
Feb.
21,
2013
Oct.
18,
2001
“There are definitely guys
there you already know and
some guys you don’t really
know personally but you’ve
played a long time against,”
Bailey said. “Just getting to
know different guys and their
personalities. Getting to chat
with them a little bit.”
While the All-Star Game — a
tournament, really, between
the four divisional squads —
concludes the weekend’s
events, the skills competition
held a day earlier is very popular among players and fans.
Barzal is excited about that,
too.
“I’vewatchedit,”hesaid.“It
seemsfun. I’msureI’llbealittle
nervousbutI’malso excited.It
willbefuntoseealltheother
guysintheroom.”
When president and general
managerLouLamorielloand
coachBarryTrotzjoinedthe
Islanders,theywereadamant
abouttheneedto createa
culture change withinaclub
thathaswononlyoneplayoff
seriessince 1993.Alteringthe
team’sidentitytothiscurrent
incarnationofahard-working,
defensivelyresponsibleclub
wasthenew management’s
goal,one furtherhastenedby
JohnTavares’departure.
Trotz saidhedidn’tunderstandatfirsthowsigning
formerMapleLeafLeoKomarovtoafour-year,$12-milliondealandreacquiringfan
favorite MattMartinfrom
Toronto wouldcontributeto
theIslanders’renovation.
“Iknew [Martin]alittlebit
because wehadplayedalot
againsthim,”Trotzsaid.“Ididn’t
knowLeo verywell. . .Lou
explaineditto me,thereasons,
butIwasn’tsure.Now I’msure.
Iunderstandfully.They’ve
beengreatforus.”
newsday.com
here’s a decent
chance, given
Mathew Barzal’s
career arc, that this
month’s All-Star
Game in San Jose will be remembered as his first appearance, not the only time he
participated. But there are no
guarantees, and the advice
from others who have experienced the showcase event is to
savor the moment.
“I think you really just embrace the whole thing,” said
Islanders right wing Josh Bailey, who earned his first AllStar selection last season
when the game was held in
Tampa. “Just try to enjoy every
minute of it. That’s what I did.
It’s only a couple of days and it
flies by. But the memories last
a lifetime.”
Barzal, a 21-year-old center
who won the Calder Trophy
as the NHL’s top rookie last
season, learned Wednesday
that the league’s Hockey
Operations Department had
named him to the Metropolitan Division squad for the
three-on-three game on Jan.
26.
Barzalsaiditwillbea“cool
experienceforme,beingyoung,
myfirsttime.I’llgetmyfamily
downandthey’llenjoyitaswell.”
Barzal is from Coquitlam,
British Columbia, and played
junior hockey in Seattle, so the
West Coast setting works well
for his family.
Bailey said the “biggest
part” of his All-Star experience
was sharing it with his family.
“It meant so much, not only
to me but to them,” he said.
“To have them all there — my
wife and kids, my mom, dad
and brother and his girlfriend
and then my wife’s side — it
was a big family affair. I put
them all up in a house. I tried
to get over there as much as I
could.”
Islanders coach Barry Trotz,
who led the Capitals the previous four seasons, was behind
the Metropolitan Division
bench in two of the previous
three seasons.
“It’s a process,” Trotz said.
“There’s a lot of work that
goes into those All-Star Week-
JIM MCISAAC
ADVICE TO BARZAL: ENJOY IT!
T
BASEBALL
A66
Yanks, Britton agree
Source: Sides
work out 3-year,
$39-million deal
BY DAVID LENNON
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
After passing on a reunion
with David Robertson days earlier, the Yankees instead chose to
bring back another member of
their 2018 bullpen by agreeing to
a three-year, $39-million deal
with Zach Britton, a source confirmed Saturday night.
Britton, who is represented by
Scott Boras, easily eclipsed
Robertson’s two-year contract
worth $23 million and also has
the ability to opt out after Year 2
if the Yankees don’t pick up an
additional fourth year ($14 million) after the 2020 season. All
told, Britton’s new deal could be
worth a total of $53 million.
ESPN’s Jeff Passan was the first
to report the contract details.
The Yankees had zeroed in on
Britton during the past week and
intensified their efforts after closing on Troy Tulowitzki’s deal Friday morning. Next up could be
reliever Adam Ottavino as Brian
Cashman continues methodically checking off boxes from his
winter to-do list.
“We were slowly addressing
all aspects of our roster that are
obvious needs,” Cashman said
Friday during a conference call
to announce the Tulowitzki signing. “That doesn’t preclude us
from looking and exploring upgrades in places that we have existing players regardless because
that’s the job at hand.”
Clearly, the Yankees aren’t
waiting for any resolution on
Manny Machado’s decision, as
Cashman moved quickly to ink
Tulowitzi as Didi Gregorius’ replacement and then wrapped up
Britton with a sizable check.
There was some question as
to just how far Britton had made
it back from the Achilles tendon
surgery that delayed the start to
his 2018 season, but evidently
the Yankees were satisfied after
his second-half audition.
Britton had a 2.88 ERA in 25 appearances after his July 24 trade
from the Orioles, and just as importantly, seemed equipped to
handle the new experience in
pinstripes. The Yankees like the
fact that Britton has pitched all
JIM MCISAAC
newsday.com
david.lennon@newsday.com
Zach Britton — along with Aroldis Chapman and Dellin Betances — will give Yankees familiar strength at the back of their bullpen.
eight years in the American
League East, and that familiarity
pretty much removes what typically is a huge question mark for
free agents coming to the Bronx.
As of now, Britton lines up to
create a formidable back end of
the bullpen with Aroldis Chapman and Dellin Betances, but
given the Yankees’ penchant for
relief overkill, signing Ottavino
is likely on their radar, too — especially with few boxes left to
check. On Friday, Cashman said
he is satisfied with his everyday
lineup as it is currently con-
structed, but he didn’t rule out
making additional upgrades if
the opportunity presents itself.
To this point, the Yankees
have filled their intended holes
this offseason. Cashman fortified
the rotation by trading for James
Paxton along with re-signing CC
Sabathia and J.A. Happ. Despite a
Bronx sitdown with Machado before Christmas, Cashman pivoted to a low-cost, high-potential
reclamation project in Tulowitzki and penciled him in to be
the Yankees’ Opening Day shortstop.
The bullpen was the most
significant area left on Cashman’s agenda, and with
Robertson bolting to the
Phillies — seemingly with little interest from the Yankees
— Britton was the obvious
choice left to take his spot for
2019. The feeling is that a full
offseason of his regular workout regime should further
help Britton return to his previously dominant, pre-surgery
self.
Whether it’s posturing or not,
Cashman appears confident in
his strategy to improve the Yankees, even if that doesn’t include
getting Machado in pinstripes.
On Friday, the GM alluded to
going about his business with an
eye on payroll, but the Yankees
still haven’t laid out a ton of cash.
They got Happ on a two-year
deal worth $34 million and Tulowitzki costs only the MLB minimum of $550,000. Even with Britton’s $39 million, that seems to
leave room for another upgrade
or two. It’s just a matter of how
big Cashman is willing to go for
those additional pieces.
BASEBALL
A67
Mets get Broxton
STARTSNOW!
as CF insurance
BY DAVID LENNON
david.lennon@newsday.com
The Mets acquired a centerfielder
Saturday, but not one of the headlinemaking, splashy free-agent variety.
Think more defensive specialist. Sort
of another Juan Lagares, without the
thick binder of medical reports.
He’s Keon Broxton, whom the Mets
obtained by sending three minor-leaguers to the Brewers, most notably
hard-throwing reliever Bobby Wahl,
the return from last year’s Jeurys
Famila deal. Reliever Adam Hill and infielder Felix Valerio also went to the
Brewers.
Despite the enduring availability of
A.J. Pollock — and, for the dreamers,
Bryce Harper — the Mets tapped Broxton, a move that at least gives them
some much-needed centerfield depth
behind the oft-injured Lagares, who
has averaged 68 games the past three
seasons.
As it stands now, the Mets intend to
go with an outfield alignment that features Lagares flanked by Michael Conforto in left and Brandon Nimmo in
right.
Adding Broxton as a healthier alternative in centerfield could be a catalyst for a renewed effort to trade Lagares, who has been on the block before. The Mets likely would prefer to
shed Lagares’ $9-million salary before
making a serious bid for Pollock,
whose market could be dropping from
the initial estimates of a four-year deal
in the neighborhood of $60 million.
In Broxton, 28, the Mets have another
stellar glove, with limited production at
the plate. The team’s announcement highlighted the fact that Broxton had 13 defensive runs saved since 2016, which ranks
him 14th among all outfielders during that
span (according to FanGraphs).
“Keon is a dynamic athlete with the abil-
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newsday.com
Like Juan Lagares, Keon Broxton is a
good-field, no-hit player, but cheaper.
ity to impact the game in the outfield, on
the bases and with his bat,” general manager Brodie Van Wagenen said in a statement. “He adds depth to our major-league
roster for 2019 and into the future.”
Broxton, a righthanded hitter, does
have speed, with a total of 49 stolen
bases (over 269 games) during the last
three years. But he’s a .221 career hitter
with a .734 OPS over fragments of four
seasons.
Broxton hit 20 homers in 143 games in
2017, but his playing time was curtailed
significantly last year by Milwaukee’s
offseason acquisitions of Christian
Yelich, who went on to be named National League MVP, and Lorenzo Cain.
The Brewers needed to move Broxton
because he’s out of minor-league options, and the Mets can’t demote him
without having him clear waivers first.
Wahl, 26, appeared in seven games for
the Mets last season, giving up a pair of
homers and striking out seven in 5 1/ 3 innings. During his 58-game stretch in
Triple-A, mostly in the A’s system, Wahl
had a 2.66 ERA and 14.5 K/9.
Hill, 21, was the Mets’ fourth-round
pick from last year’s draft and had a 2.35
ERA in nine relief appearances for the
Cyclones. Valerio, 18, batted .319 with 17
doubles in 67 games in the Dominican
Summer League last year, his first pro
season.
Mets add Santiago. Looking for some
versatility as well as depth for their
pitching staff, the Mets agreed to terms
on a minor-league deal with Hector Santiago, a 31-year-old lefthander who went
6-3 with a 4.50 ERA in 49 appearances
(seven starts) for the White Sox last season. It’s expected to become official
Monday. The Newark native has a 4.06
ERA in eight major-league seasons.
BASEBALL
A68
Amazin’ outrage:
Put Hodges in Hall
1969 Mets say
manager should
be enshrined
MIRACLE METS
BY MARK HERRMANN
June 28-30 at Citi Field during a
Mets-Braves series, will highlight Hodges and possibly put a
new shine on his body of work
before the Hall’s Golden Days
Committee votes in 2020.
“He should have been voted in
when he was first eligible. It’s really a travesty, a joke, that he is
not in the Hall of Fame. It ticks
me off and I know it ticks Tom
Seaver off, big time,” said Rod
Gaspar, a backup outfielder in
1969 who, under Hodges’ onerule-for-all-players policy, was
treated equally with Seaver.
Art Shamsky came to the club
in 1968 and heard its then-new
manager say during spring training, “You will not be the same
old Mets.”
Said Shamsky, “I grew up in St.
Louis and I got a chance to see
the Dodgers come in. Gil was
part of that terrific Brooklyn
team . . . He was one of the best
players in the National League of
that era.”
Some of Hodges’ totals come
up short against other Hall of
Famers, including Baines. The
latter had 384 home runs and
1,628 RBIs through 22 seasons.
Hodges had 370 homers and
1,274 RBIs in 18 seasons.
But a case can be made that
Hodges was particularly impactful, having been an eight-time
All-Star and seven-time World
Series participant (with a .267 average despite the infamous
0-for-21 in 1952 that evoked
Brooklyn parishioners’ prayers).
He hit at least 30 home runs six
times and had seven consecutive
seasons of at least 100 RBIs. For
much of his career, there was no
50TH ANNIVERSARY
June 26-28 At Citi Field
Gil Hodges was such a powerful presence that he often
did not have to say a word to
his players on the 1969 Mets.
They always knew exactly
what their manager wanted.
They admired him for it and
for everything else about his
life in baseball.
They still do. They respect
the fact that he led them to
one of the most remarkable
World Series championships
in history and they admire the
presence he was in the lineup
and in the field for the eradefining Brooklyn Dodgers of
the 1950s.
“I’ve forgotten the stats now,
but I’ve always been a big backer
of getting Gil into the Hall of
Fame. He deserves it in so many
ways, not only as a player but as
a manager,” said Jerry Koosman,
who avoided eye contact with
Hodges late in the clinching
Game 5 in the 1969 World Series
for fear that the manager would
replace him with a reliever. (It
worked. Koosman finished the
complete game.)
The sad part, for people who
knew Hodges best, is that when
it comes to his candidacy for
Cooperstown, his presence has
been overcome by his absence.
He died of a heart attack on
April 2, 1972, after a round of golf
with his Mets coaches.
“Passing away at a very young
age and not being able to be out
at the ballparks, to be with the
press and to be seen everywhere,” Gil Hodges Jr. said on
AP / JOHN LINDSAY
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
newsday.com
mark.herrmann@newsday.com
Gil Hodges flashes a smile after signing his contract as a player with the Mets in 1962, their inaugural
season in the National League. He managed the Mets for four seasons, beginning in 1968.
the phone from his home in Florida, “well, the adage ‘out of sight,
out of mind’ comes into play.”
There is new hope, though.
Hodges is one of many players receiving support after the Today’s
Game Era Committee last month
elected Harold Baines, a long
shot whose original candidacy
had drawn only about one-tenth
of the voting percentage that
Hodges did when each was on
the Baseball Writers’ Association of America ballot.
Plus, the flip of the calendar to
2019 launched a 50th anniversary tribute to the 1969 Mets, a
club that transformed from a
perennial loser to a stunning
champion. Reflection on that,
marked by a reunion weekend
BASEBALL
A69
GETTY IMAGES / B BENNETT
Ed Kranepool, “dean” of
the Mets, receives
mortarboard from Hodges
after signing 1968 contract.
Hodges and outfielder Ron Swoboda look on during spring training
in 1970 in St. Petersburg, Florida.
FOR YOUR
CONSIDERATION
How Hodges ranks with the 19 Hall of Fame first basemen:
Batting average
Gil Hodges’
career stats:
Average HOF
first basemen
.273
.311
HR
370
279
AP / JACK HARRIS
\ His .273 batting average is three points higher than
Willie McCovey’s.
\ His 370 home runs would rank ninth.
\ His 1,451 RBIs are more than Jim Bottomley, Orlando
Cepeda, Frank Chance, Roger Connor, Hank Greenberg,
George Kelly, Johnny Mize,George Sisler and Bill Terry.
\ His 1,921 hits are more than Chance, Greenberg and
Kelly.
\ His .359 OBP is tied with Eddie Murray and would
outrank Cepeda, Kelly and Tony Perez.
\ His .487 slugging percentage is higher than Cap
Anson, Jake Beckley, Roger Connor, Kelly, Murray, Perez
and George Sisler.
\ His WAR (44.9) beats Bottomly and Kelly.
Only Chance and Terry also managed a World Series
championship team.
RBIs
Hits
On-base
1,274 1,921 .359
1,451 2,246 .386
WAR
44.9*
66.0
*(Wins above replacement, Baseball-Reference version) **(Players must have played 50 percent of games at first base)
and mentally.
“He had weigh-ins once a
week so nobody would get out
of shape. One time he came up
to me and said, ‘You know,
Kooz, I don’t think you’re in
the best shape you can be in.’
He didn’t say anything more.
That night, I knew he was
watching me and I ran 10 extra
wind sprints. He had a way of
saying things like that.”
Warm and fuzzy, Hodges was
not. Shamsky, whose book “Beyond the Miracle” will be released in March, admits he
tried to stay away from the guy.
There also was the matter of
platooning: Hodges alternated
righty and lefty batters in rightfield and at first, second and
third bases.
“We hated it,” Shamsky said.
“But it worked. Gil was fair. If
he had lived, the Mets would
have won a lot more championships.”
Tommy Lasorda, 92, the Hall
of Fame manager who was a
teammate of Hodges with the
1954-55 Dodgers, would like to
see Hodges in Cooperstown.
“It’s a sorry thing him not
being in the Hall of Fame,” Lasorda said Thursday. “I’m really,
really upset about it . . . Terrible shame.’’
Will Hodges ever be a presence in Cooperstown?
Hard to say. Would he have
made a big deal out of that question? Even harder.
“I think he would have appreciated it,” Hodges Jr. said. “But I
think what would surpass it for
him would be the legacy that he
left on this planet.”
With Steven Marcus
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
By that token, his Mets players
believe he should be a shoo-in.
“Everyone came of age under
the leadership of Gil Hodges.
He was a great leader. He was
the right manager in the right
place at the right time,” said Ed
Kranepool. “He had that strong
Marine background. He didn’t
take anything from anybody.
He put you in a position to
win.”
Said Koosman, “He had the
ability to read players and
know what they could and
couldn’t do, both physically
newsday.com
such thing as a Gold Glove
award, but when it was established in 1957, he won it for the
first three years at first base.
“And that was for all of baseball. They didn’t go league by
league back then,” Hodges Jr.
said.
While the Hall does not have
a hybrid player/manager category, Rule B in its eligibility criteria says, “Those whose careers entailed involvement in
multiple categories will be considered for their overall contribution to the game of Baseball.”
FOOTBALL
A70
WILD CARD
Chargers
at Ravens
LAMAR
JACKSON
TV: Ch. 2, 1:05 p.m.
Radio: WFAN (660, 101.9)
IN 2018
6-1 Record
PASSING
58.2 Comp. pct.
1,201 Yards
7.1 Yards/attempt
6 TD
3 INT
84.5 Rating
RUSHING
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
newsday.com
GETTY IMAGES / TODD OLSZEWSKI
147 carries
695 yards
5 TDs
LAST QB CHOSEN,
ONLY ONE PLAYING
Four were drafted ahead of Jackson,
but he’s Ravens’ starter in playoffs
BY BOB GLAUBER
bob.glauber@newsday.com
Lamar Jackson was almost a
first-round afterthought in last
year’s NFL Draft, with Baker
Mayfield, Sam Darnold, Josh
Rosen and Josh Allen all going
ahead of the former Louisville
star and all projected as more
conventional NFL quarterbacks.
As it turns out, Jackson is the
last man standing.
Taken by the Ravens with the
32nd and last pick of the first
round, Jackson is the only rookie
quarterback to make it into this
year’s playoffs. And given how
well he has played and the
unique skill set he brings to the
position, it’s anyone’s guess how
far he can take the Ravens — this
year and into the future.
“Some people think they’re
Superman, and he’s kind of one
of those, so it’s sort of been that
way all season,” Ravens offensive coordinator Marty Mornhinweg said of Jackson.
Mornhinweg, a former offensive coordinator with the Jets
under Rex Ryan, has done a
splendid job maximizing Jackson’s talents, and it has taken
some out-of-the-box thinking
to put him in the best position
to succeed. Since taking over
for Joe Flacco, who suffered a
hip injury midway through the
season, Jackson has a 6-1 record
as a starter and is proving to be
a major headache for opposing
defenses.
He has modest passing numbers — 1,201 yards, six touchdown passes and three interceptions — but his threat as a runner makes him one of the NFL’s
most dangerous and unpredictable offensive weapons.
Jackson has rushed 147 times
for 695 yards and five touchdowns. At that rate over a full
season, he’d have 1,588 yards
and 11 touchdowns — more
than NFL rushing leader
Ezekiel Elliott of the Cowboys,
who finished with 1,434 yards
and six touchdowns.
Jackson, who won the 2016
Heisman Trophy and turns 22
on Monday, was rarely mentioned in the same breath as the
four quarterbacks taken ahead
of him. That’s because most
teams didn’t believe he could
easily adapt as an NFL passer
after excelling in a college
game in which running quarterbacks aren’t often projected to
become reliable pocket passers.
But Jackson has managed to rewrite the rules and will put his
skills to the test in his first postseason game Sunday as the
Ravens host the Chargers in the
AFC wild-card round.
“I’ll tell you, experience matters [in the playoffs]. There’s
no substitute for experience,”
Mornhinweg said. “Now sometimes it’s the quality of experience as well. So [Jackson] has
had some pretty good experiences going. Man alive, look at
all the things he’s done — a
very mature young man for
that age in many, many ways.
And he’s a very confident guy.
He’s taken every game in stride
and he’s very well-prepared.”
Jackson doesn’t seem ruffled
by the increased intensity of a
playoff
environment.
On
Wednesday, his first full day of
practice for his first playoff
game, when asked if anything
was different, he quipped: “I
changed my clothes. That’s
about it. Everything else is the
same.”
He admits he didn’t think
he’d be in this position, not
after being drafted by a team
that started the season with
Flacco — even though the former Super Bowl MVP’s recent
struggles prompted the team to
take Jackson.
“I can’t lie. No, I didn’t think
about it at all,” he said about
the possibility early in the season that he’d be starting a playoff game. “I came to learn,
whether it’s this year or next
year, or I just want to sit out
and learn. I just got my ticket in
the middle of the season. They
threw me out there, and we’ve
been having success.”
Combine Jackson’s run/pass
abilities and a dominant defense
that is among the best in the
NFL, and the Ravens go into the
playoffs as a dangerous opponent. Especially against the
Chargers, who were beaten by
the Ravens in Los Angeles, 22-10,
on Dec. 22. Jackson threw for
204 yards and a touchdown and
ran 13 times for 39 yards in that
game.
He’s now about to become the
youngest quarterback in NFL history to start a playoff game.
No big deal.
“I’m here to play football,”
Jackson said. “I was 21 all year,
so this is another game for me.”
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FOOTBALL
A72
HIGHER HE FLIES, MORE HE
Super Bowl-winning QB again fills
in for Wentz, has Eagles in playoffs
BY TOM ROCK
tom.rock@newsday.com
The fact that Carson Wentz
missed the final three games of
the regular season and likely a
second straight playoff run actually might hurt the Giants more
than it does the Eagles.
At least it will if you subscribe
to the theory that the Giants are
ready to move on from Eli Manning and will be in the market
for a veteran quarterback in free
agency. If that’s the situation the
Giants find themselves in, a
likely target of theirs will be
Nick Foles.
WILD CARD
Eagles
at Bears
TV: Ch. 4, 4:40 p.m.
Foles, who has helped the Eagles win three straight games
just to reach the postseason, will
start against the Bears on Sunday in Chicago in the NFC wildcard round. And the deeper he
brings the Eagles in the playoffs,
the higher his price tag will get.
In fact, if Foles were to replicate the magical run of a year
ago and bring a second straight
Super Bowl title to Philadelphia,
it might eliminate him from free
agency altogether.
The Eagles have a $20-million
option for Foles in 2019 that, as
of now, no one in the NFL believes they will use, but another
Lombardi Trophy might change
their minds on that. The Eagles
hadn’t won a championship in
six decades. If they win two and
let the quarterback who led
them to those titles walk away,
there might be a bigger revolt in
Philadelphia than there was in
1776.
Foles, who will turn 30 this
month, likely is on the Giants’
short list to replace Manning because of his history with Pat
Shurmur. They worked together
during Foles’ first stint with the
Eagles, when Shurmur was the
offensive coordinator. In 2013,
Foles threw 27 touchdown
passes and two interceptions
with a passer rating of 119.2, the
SUPER
SUB
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
GETTY IMAGES / SCOTT TAETSCH
newsday.com
Nick Foles’ march to MVP
of Super Bowl LII:
\ Replaced Carson Wentz
late in Eagles’ 43-35 win at
the Rams.
\ Leadstop-seededPhilly
to15-10win Falcons in
divisionalround.
\ Goes 26-for-33 for 352
yards and three TDs in
38-7 win over Vikings in
NFC Championship Game.
\ Throws for 373 yards
and three TDs in 41-33 win
in Super Bowl. He also
catches 1-yard TD on
“Philly Special” play.
Eagles QB
Nick Foles
third highest in NFL history.
That may seem like a long
time ago, and it was. After that,
Foles played for two other teams
before contemplating retirement, returning to the Eagles
and replacing Wentz, an MVP
candidate who tore his ACL in
December 2017. Next thing you
know, Foles was MVP of the
Super Bowl.
He started the 2018 season
for the Eagles while Wentz
was recovering from knee
surgery, then hopped back in
the saddle last month when
Wentz suffered a back injury.
The Eagles needed to win
their final three games to advance to the postseason, and
Foles gave them that.
Foles could give the Giants an
offensive scheme closer to what
Shurmur employed in Minnesota in 2017. Shurmur had to
slant his Giants offense in 2018 toward Manning’s skill set. The
quarterback responded and was
able to run a lot of bootlegs and
throw on the run, but Manning
will never be able to use much
run-pass option the way Foles
can.
Foles also gives his offense a
chance to extend plays by scrambling or running for first downs.
“I’m fond of quarterbacks that
can move around, but you have
to be able to throw the ball from
the pocket to have success in the
league,” Shurmur said this past
week.
Foles can do both, and Shurmur knows it.
He’s also not above being a
backup, which is something that
could appeal to the Giants if they
want to groom a rookie quarterback in 2019 as well.
The last time the Giants
picked a quarterback in the first
round, they brought in a former
Super Bowl MVP to keep the
seat warm for him. By that November in 2004, Kurt Warner
had yielded the job to Manning.
Following the same pattern
SPORTS
A73
WILL COST W
Congressional honors
GETTY IMAGES / CHIP SOMODEVILLA
hen the 116th Congress was sworn in Thursday, the 435 members of the House
of Representatives included former Indianapolis Colts wide receiver Anthony
Gonzalez and former Tennessee Titans linebacker Colin Allred. A look at former
NFL, NBA and Major League Baseball athletes who served on Capitol Hill:
NFL Titans
NBA Knicks
Jim Bunning
MLB Phils
LaVern DilWeg
Anthony Gonzalez
Jack Kemp
Steve Largent
Tom McMillen
Wilmer Mizell
Tom Osborne
Heath Shuler
Jon Runyan
Morris Udall
NFL Packers
NFL Colts
AFL Bills
NFL Seahawks
NBA Knicks
MLB Cardinals
NFL Redskins
NFL Redskins
NFL Eagles
NBL*
Branch, years Party, state
House, 2019- D, Texas
Senate, 1979-97 D, New Jersey
House, 1987-99 R, Kentucky
Senate, 1999-2011
House 1943-45 D, Wisconsin
House, 2019- R, Ohio
House, 1971-89 R, New York
House, 1995-2003 R, Oklahoma
House 1987-93 D, Maryland
House, 1969-75 R, North Carolina
House, 2001-07 R, Nebraska
House, 2007-13 D, North Carolina
House, 2011-15 R, New Jersey
House, 1961-91 D, Arizona
*NBL was a precursor to the NBA
Jack
Kemp
Anthony
Gonzalez
Worth noting: Gerald Ford, our 38th President, had offers to play for the Detroit Lions and Green Bay
Packers after being a star center on the University of Michigan’s national championship football teams
in 1932 and 1933. He went on serve as Republican congressman from Michigan from 1949-73,
ultimately becoming Speaker of the House, Vice President and then President.
AP / CAROLYN KASTER
Jim
Bunning
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
Week 17 action for New Orleans
and was far from impressive
(14-for-22, 118 yards, one touchdown, one interception). But he
is only 26 years old, and before
his injury in 2016, he seemed to
be a rising star in the NFL.
So it’s most likely that the only
real possibility at quarterback
that the Giants will get to see in
action this postseason is Foles.
Despite suffering a rib injury in
the finale against the Redskins,
he has been cleared to start Sunday’s playoff game.
He’s the Eagles’ quarterback
of their immediate future.
Which team’s long-term future
he’s tied to could be determined
by how well he performs this
month.
Colin Allred
Bill Bradley
newsday.com
with, say, Foles and Dwayne
Haskins might be appealing to
an organization that has talked
about walking a “tightrope” between trying to win in the
present and building for longterm success.
He’s not the only potential Giants quarterback who will be in
the playoffs, though he might
wind up being the only one who
actually plays.
Saints backup Teddy Bridgewater also has a history with
Shurmur from their days with
the Vikings. Shurmur gushed
over Bridgewater in the preseason when the quarterback was
with the Jets. Bridgewater saw
his first extensive playing time
since his serious knee injury in
Key team
AP
Nick Foles likely is on the Giants’ short list to replace Eli Manning.
Player
AP
AP / MATT ROURKE
Former NFL player Colin Allred takes the oath of office for the United States House of
Representatives on Dec. 3, 2019.
FOOTBALL
A74
Colts keep rolling
Luck starts hot
for 21-0 lead as
Indy dominates
BY RICHARD DEAN
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
newsday.com
HOUSTON — Indianapolis
relied heavily on Andrew
Luck’s passing in overcoming a
1-5 start, and the Colts entered
Saturday’s AFC wild-card playoff game against the Texans as
the league’s hottest team.
That didn’t change. Behind
Luck’s passing, the Colts built
a 21-point halftime lead and
beat the Texans, 21-7, in the
season’s rubber match between the two AFC South rivals.
The Colts had an extra
weapon Saturday: a running attack. They rushed for 200
yards, with Marlon Mack gaining 148 yards and scoring a
touchdown.
“A lot of guys are real
happy,” Colts coach Frank
Reich said. “Not just fight and
scratch to get in the playoffs,
but to do something, make
some noise.”
Sixth-seeded Indianapolis
scored touchdowns on its first
two possessions, going 75 and
74 yards, against the thirdseeded AFC South champion
Texans before a crowd of
71,798. The Colts will play the
Chiefs in Kansas City in the
AFC divisional round.
“We have goals. We realize
it’s about what are we doing
to get to that goal,” Luck said.
“We’ve been getting better
and better and it’s very energizing.”
Making the playoffs after a
horrendous start was quite an
achievement for Indianapolis.
The Colts ended the season
with four wins, including a
playoff play-in game against
the Titans in the season finale.
On Saturday, the Colts
showed what they can do
when they put out a balanced
offense. They needed only 35
carries to reach exactly 200
yards against a defense that
features J.J. Watt, Jadeveon
Clowney and Whitney Mercilus.
“There were some effective
GETTY IMAGES / TIM WARNER
Special to Newsday
Colts’ Eric Ebron fights off Texans’ Tyrann Mathieu and reaches for the end zone for a 6-yard TD in first quarter of AFC wild-card game.
AFC WILD CARD
COLTS
21
:
7
TEXANS
AFC Divisional
Colts at Chiefs
TV: Ch. 4, 4:35 p.m.
Radio: WFAN (660, 101.9)
Saturday
runs early in the game, and to
finish the game like we did. It’s
not easy to run the ball on that
defense, a lot of good players,”
Luck said. “We made the most
of it. We have confidence in
our run game.”
Houston managed only 105
rushing yards. Quarterback Deshaun Watson gained 76 yards,
mostly on scrambles, on eight
carries. Lamar Miller was limited to 18 yards on five carries.
“We came into this game saying we need to dominate up
front, we need to run the football and we need to stop the
run,” Reich said. “I can’t say
enough about that.”
Run the ball, stop the run.
“That’s December football
into January,” said tight end
Eric Ebron, who caught a
6-yard touchdown pass on the
Colts’ initial drive. “That’s the
kind of football you have to
play now. We pass it when we
have to, but we’re going to try
and dominate the run game.”
Indianapolis made it 21-0 in
the second quarter when Luck
connected with Dontrelle
Inman on an 18-yard touchdown pass.
Indianapolis recorded the
opening nine first downs and
was successful on its first seven
third-down conversions. The
Colts, who had 16 of the first 18
first downs, dominated the Texans in all facets.
“A lack of execution on our
part,” said Watson, who completed 29 of 49 passes for 235
yards. “I didn’t make plays. I
didn’t give my receivers a
chance.”
Luck, the league’s likely
comeback player of the year,
was 19-for-32 for 222 yards with
one interception. In the first
half, he passed for 191 yards.
“Before you knew it, we were
down 14-0,” Texans coach Bill
O’Brien said. “That just changes
your offensive game plan.”
FOOTBALL
y
DALLAS ADVANCES
COWBOYS’
RICHARD
IN DEMAND
Zeke, Dak make
big plays late for
first playoff wins
Cowboys
assistant
coach Kris Richard is
going to be a busy man
this weekend.
First up was leading
the Cowboys secondary
against his former team
in Saturday night’s 24-22
wild-card win over the
Seahawks.
After that, he’ll take off
for a whirlwind day of interviews with three NFL
teams with head-coach
openings, according to
ESPN’s Adam Schefter.
Richard reportedly is
set to meet with the Jets,
Bucs and Dolphins. The
former USC and NFL defensive back has emerged
as one of the hottest
names among prospective coaches after helping
turn around the Cowboys’ defensive backfield
this season.
Richard,
who
also
serves as the defensive
passing game coordinator, has earned high
praise from Cowboys defensive coordinator Rod
Marinelli.
“Whoever is interviewing him, they are smart
people,” Marinelli told
the Dallas News. “He’s
sharp. He’s got great communication skills. He has
a great background. He relates well with players.
“He has high standards
and he’ll hold you to the
standards.”
— Field Level Media
BY SCHUYLER DIXON
GETTY IMAGES / TOM PENNINGTON
ARLINGTON, Texas — Dak
Prescott saw an opening up the
middle, then three defenders between him and the first down.
The Dallas quarterback found a
way to get there, and earn his
first playoff victory two years
after a sensational rookie season
ended in disappointment.
Ezekiel Elliott rushed for 137
yards and the go-ahead touchdown in the fourth quarter and
Prescott scored on a sneak after
his dazzling head-over-heels run
as the Cowboys hung on for a
24-22 wild-card win over the
Seattle Seahawks on Saturday
night.
The playoff victory was the
first for Elliott and Prescott,
whose Cowboys lost a divisional
game in their playoff debut as
first-year stars two years ago.
Dallas will play at either New Orleans or the Los Angeles Rams in
the divisional round next weekend.
“It’s really just a chance to
keep going on, simple as that,”
Prescott said. “Me and this
whole team, we want to win it
all. You can’t do that without taking care of the first one. A lot of
excitement, but my goal is bigger
than just one playoff win.”
The loss ended a run of nine
straight victories in playoff openers for the Seahawks. According
to the Elias Sports Bureau, it was
the longest streak in NFL history.
Leading 17-14, Prescott faced
third-and-14 from the Seattle 17
with the two-minute warning approaching. He took off up the
middle on a quarterback draw,
barged through a trio of defenders 6 yards short of the first
down and went down at the 1
when he was flipped headfirst by
Tedric Thompson.
Prescott, who also had an
11-yard scoring pass to Michael
Gallup in the first half, scored on
the next play.
“He’s just a rare guy,” coach
Jason Garrett said. “His leadership, his toughness, just his way,
his spirit. It’s like none other.
Somehow, some way, he’s going
Ezekiel Elliott gets into the end zone on a 1-yard run in the fourth quarter to give Dallas a 17-14 lead.
to figure this thing out for us.”
Dallas’ defense, ranked in the
top 10 most of the season, stifled
the NFL’s No. 1 rushing offense
and mostly kept quarterback Russell Wilson under control, handing him his first loss in four wildcard games. “This has been a
special, special year,” Wilson
said. “Just the growth of our
team, the men in the locker
room, just the way that we’ve
played together, just eliminating the doubters and the things
that people thought that we
could only do.”
Prescott threw for 226 yards,
and his sneak for a 24-14 lead appeared to be a clinching score.
But Tyler Lockett’s 53-yard catch
NFC WILD CARD
24 : 22
COWBOYS
SEAHAWKS
set up a quick Seattle touchdown
on Wilson’s 7-yard pass to J.D.
McKissic. The Seahawks got
within two on their second twopoint conversion after an injury
suffered by kicker Sebastian
Janikowski.
Janikowski’s absence left the
Seahawks no good options on an
onside kick with 1:18 left. Punter
Michael Dickson’s drop kick was
caught by Cole Beasley at the
Dallas 31, sealing the first playoff
win for the Cowboys since they
beat Detroit in the wild-card
round in the 2014 season.
After Wilson ran for a 4- yard
touchdown and Mike Davis’
two-point conversion run put
Seattle up 14-10 late in the third
quarter, Prescott led a 67-yard
drive to put the Cowboys back in
front for good. A 34-yard pass to
Amari Cooper, who had seven
catches for 106 yards, led to Elliott’s 1-yard plunge after an apparent touchdown by Prescott
was overturned on replay.
Hurns has surgery. Dallas receiver Allen Hurns had surgery
Saturday night after breaking his
ankle in the first quarter.
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
AP
The Associated Press
newsday.com
Kris Richard will meet with
Jets, Bucs and Dolphins.
A75
FOOTBALL
A76
McCARTHY IS RIGHT GUY
Bob
Glauber
bob.glauber@newsday.com
I
t’s simple: Mike McCarthy is the right coach
at the right time for the
New York Jets.
The former Packers
coach met Saturday with chief
executive officer Christopher
Johnson and general manager
Mike Maccagnan, and with the
Jets desperately needing to
make this hire work, McCarthy
makes the most sense at so
many levels.
He’s got previous head-coaching experience, something that
no Jets coach has had since Bill
Parcells came to the team in
1997. He’s got a Super Bowl ring
and all the cachet that goes
with it. And he already has
proved he can develop quarterbacks, as evidenced by his work
with Aaron Rodgers. For Sam
Darnold, the Jets’ 21-year-old
Mentor
McCarthy’s MO:
He’s a QB guru,
offensive brain
BY AL IANNAZZONE
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
AP / DAVID GOLDMAN
newsday.com
al.iannazzone@newsday.com
Former Green Bay Packers coach Mike McCarthy seems like the ideal choice to further develop Jets quarterback Sam Darnold.
The Jets interviewed a candidate for their coaching vacancy
on Saturday who checks off
many boxes on their wish list.
Former Packers coach Mike
McCarthy met with Jets officials
and presumably laid out his plan
on how he would get the most
out of Sam Darnold.
The Jets want their next head
coach to be someone who
helped develop a young quarterback. CEO Christopher Johnson
said that would be “a big plus.”
McCarthy, considered by
many to be the top coach available, helped Aaron Rodgers become one of the best quarterbacks in the league. McCarthy
went 125-77-2 in parts of 13 seasons with the Packers, guided
them to nine playoff ap-
FOOTBALL
A77
FOR JETS AND DARNOLD
quarterback, that’s a perfect fit.
With eight openings in this
year’s hiring cycle, this is an extremely competitive environment for finding the right
coach, and McCarthy clearly is
the most qualified candidate.
There will be competition for
him; Browns general manager
John Dorsey already has
worked with McCarthy when
the two were with the Packers,
and the Browns have their own
talented young quarterback in
Baker Mayfield.
But if the Jets can convince McCarthy that they have what it
takes for him to come aboard
and begin working with
Darnold, who showed plenty of
promise in his rookie season, the
Jets will be in good position to
flourish in the coming years.
Is McCarthy perfect? Of
course not. Every coach has
flaws, and the 55-year-old McCarthy is no exception. He has
had game management issues
— not unlike many coaches —
that have come under scrutiny
in Green Bay. He had a sometimes-contentious relationship
with Rodgers, especially in recent years. And you could
argue he should have gotten
more than one Super Bowl title
when the Packers’ roster was
championship-worthy.
His
relationship
with
Rodgers might be the biggest
area of concern among skeptical Jets fans, but let’s face it:
What coach and quarterback —
even the most successful in
NFL history — haven’t butted
heads on occasion?
Bill Belichick and Tom Brady
have had their differences, especially the last two seasons. Parcells and Phil Simms had
plenty of sideline arguments.
Bill Walsh and Joe Montana
had their differences. Same
with Mike Holmgren and Brett
Favre.
Rodgers is one of the NFL’s
most gifted players, but he’s also
one of the most headstrong personalities, so it’s small wonder
that he’d bristle under what he
considered McCarthy’s conservative play-calling tendencies. But
Darnold is wired completely differently, and I just don’t see that
kind of fractious relationship developing.
Darnold was a sponge when
it came to trying to absorb NFL
concepts in his rookie season,
and he had no problem going
along with offensive coordinator Jeremy Bates, quarterbacks
coach Mick Lombardi and veteran backup Josh McCown.
There’s no reason to think he
wouldn’t do the same with McCarthy.
Darnold is much more of a
laid-back personality than
Rodgers, and it’s difficult to envision him getting to the point
that there would be serious
communication problems with
a coach like McCarthy. If anything, Darnold would be helped
by the steadying influences of a
veteran coach whose offensive
expertise is widely respected
around the NFL.
Does it guarantee there
wouldn’t be issues between
the two? Of course not. No
one is naïve enough to believe
there won’t be hiccups along
the way. But there’s a much
better chance of the two forging a peaceful coexistence
than developing an adversarial relationship.
Darnold isn’t the only thing
to like about the Jets’ job. With
nearly $100 million in salarycap space, McCarthy and
Maccagnan can bring in some
big-time talent — especially on
offense — to build on some of
the good things we saw in 2018.
Le’Veon Bell forced his way
out of Pittsburgh by sitting out
the season, and the multi-talented running back can fill a
huge void.
Steelers receiver Antonio
Brown also might be available
— albeit in a trade — but the
Jets would be wise to stay away
from a potentially divisive
locker room presence. Brown’s
no-show in the Steelers’ regular-season finale after disagree-
ments with Ben Roethlisberger
and coach Mike Tomlin is something the Jets should avoid. Despite Brown’s exceptional talents, the Jets can do without
the theatrics. Things can just as
easily go off the rails with a
new team as they have with the
Steelers.
There is a chance to get a
bona fide pass rusher with the
third overall pick, and there’s
more help to be found on both
sides of the ball in free agency
and the later rounds of the
draft.
It has to be an enticing opportunity for McCarthy, and if
Johnson and Maccagnan can
convince him to come aboard,
the Jets will be in terrific position moving forward. And McCarthy can think about what
kind of reputation he might
earn if he succeeds on the big
stage of New York.
As Johnson said on Monday,
“If you make it here, you’re a
freaking legend. That counts
for something.”
to Favre & Rodgers seems like a perfect fit
HELP WANTED
The eight NFL coaching vacancies:
Team
Former coach
Marvin Lewis
Vance Joseph
Dirk Koetter
Hue Jackson
Steve Wilks
Adam Gase
Todd Bowles
Mike McCarthy
Johnson and general manager
Mike Maccagnan have met with
or will meet with have an offensive background. McCarthy’s is
extensive, as he has worked on
the offensive side of the ball
since beginning his coaching career with the Chiefs in 1993.
McCarthy, 55, started out as an
offensive quality control coach
for the Chiefs before becoming
their quarterbacks coach. From
there, he spent one season as the
Baylor coach Matt Rhule.
Other candidates include former Colts and Lions coach Jim
Caldwell and Buccaneers offensive coordinator Todd Monken.
The Jets reportedly will interview Monken on Tuesday.
Former Texas Tech coach and
current USC offensive coordinator Kliff Kingsbury also is in the
mix, but ESPN reported that
USC has denied the Jets and Cardinals permission to interview
Kingsbury. That could change.
McCarthy has limited the
teams with which he has talked,
though the Jets and Browns are
two that pique his interest. Both
teams have promising young
quarterbacks in Darnold and
Baker Mayfield. McCarthy reportedly turned down the Cardinals.
Darnold is expected to be a
lure for many candidates, and
the Jets have roughly $100 million in cap space available for
free agency. Johnson sounds
committed to turning around
their fortunes, which means they
will spend on a coach and for
players.
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
Thursdays we used to spend in
the team room or Friday upstairs
or Saturday in the QB room —
and we’d hug each other and tell
each other we love each other. I
mean, we had a close-knit bond.”
The Jets want Todd Bowles’ replacement to be someone who is
offensive-minded and can help
Darnold become the franchisechanging quarterback they believe he can be.
Many of the candidates whom
GETTY IMAGES / JOHN GRIESHOP
Bengals
Broncos
Bucs
Browns
Cardinals
Dolphins
Jets
Packers
Packers’ quarterbacks coach and
the next five as the Saints’ offensive coordinator. McCarthy also
served as the 49ers’ offensive coordinator for one season before
taking over in Green Bay.
In his 12 full seasons, in which
he worked with Brett Favre and
Rodgers, the Packers finished in
the top 10 in offense nine times
and in scoring eight times. The
Jets ranked 29th in yards this
past season and 23rd in scoring.
McCarthy is the Jets’ third
known interview. Chiefs offensive coordinator Eric Bieniemy
was the first person the Jets interviewed. They also met with former Dolphins coach Adam
Gase.Things should start picking
up as their search enters its second week.
They also have expressed interest in Cowboys defensive
backs coach/passing game coordinator Kris Richard, whom
they’re expected to interview
Sunday in Texas after Dallas’
wild-card playoff win Saturday night. While they are in
Texas, they could meet with
other candidates, including
newsday.com
pearances and won one Super
Bowl.
He has been criticized for not
winning more with Rodgers,
though, and his exit from Green
Bay has raised concerns. With
the Packers 4-7-1, he was fired in
December amid reports of discord with his star player.
Rodgers openly criticized McCarthy’s game plan after a September victory over Buffalo, but
he has said he and McCarthy had
a close working relationship and
tried to dispel the belief that a
rift got McCarthy fired.
“I think him and I, like any relationship, we have our amazing
times, we have our times when
we butt heads,” Rodgers said
after McCarthy was let go. “As
much as what was made, conjecture about [our] relationship, it
was always built on mutual respect and communication . . . We
accomplished a lot together. We
had some incredible moments.”
He also said at the time, “It’s a
close-knit relationship. We
would finish every time that we
talked — whether it’s Monday afternoon up in his office or the
BASKETBALL
A78
FOR ONCE, STORM ARE
BY ROGER RUBIN
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
newsday.com
roger.rubin@newsday.com
WASHINGTON — You could see it as
Shamorie Ponds kept driving to the basket in the final minutes to get to the line
and keep the game close. You could see it
when LJ Figueroa picked off a backcourt
pass in the final desperate moments and
made the tying free throws with 11.3 seconds left in regulation. And it was there
again when Justin Simon opened overtime by swiping a pass and hitting
Figueroa for a dunk on the break.
St. John’s had suffered through more
than a decade of misery against archrival
Georgetown in the nation’s capital, but it
wasn’t going to let the ghosts of failures
past haunt it this time. The Red Storm
scored four points in the final 18.6 seconds of regulation to force overtime,
scored on their first four possessions of
the extra period to take an eight-point
lead and defended a pair of potential tying
three-pointers in the final 23 seconds to
pull out a 97-94 Big East win on Saturday
before 11,115 at Capital One Arena.
St. John’s (14-1, 2-1) halted a run of 13
straight road losses to the Hoyas with the
win. The Red Storm hadn’t beaten Georgetown in D.C. since Jan. 18, 2003. “Last year
we kind of [went] down this road and
we’d lose these games,” Ponds said. “We
told ourselves it’s time to fight it out, overcome everything and get the win.”
Red Storm coach Chris Mullin called
St. John’s Hall of Fame coach Lou Carnesecca in the morning to wish him a
happy 94th birthday and said, “It’s all he
wanted: a win against Georgetown. I’m
glad that happened for him.”
The victory over the Hoyas (11-4, 1-1),
along with Tuesday’s trouncing of No. 16
Marquette in New York, likely puts the
Red Storm in line for a national ranking
when the AP poll is released on Monday.
Ponds had 37 points — his 10th 30-point
effort — six assists and four steals. He also
had what might have been the highlight
play of the game when he anticipated an
alley-oop pass by the Hoyas with less than
two minutes left in OT, snared it on the
way up and started a break that ended
with a dunk by Simon.
Simon had 14 points, nine rebounds and
six assists, Mustapha Heron added 12
points and Marvin Clark II and Figueroa
scored 11 points each for the Red Storm.
Jessie Govan had 25 points and 10 rebounds, freshman James Akinjo scored 17
points and Josh LeBlanc added 12 points
SCORECARD
ST. JOHN’S
Tuesday
97 : 94
GEORGETOWN
St. John’s
at Villanova
TV: FS1, 7 p.m.
Radio: WNYM (970)
MORE
STORM
St. John’s in talks
to play all Big East
games at Garden
A51
and 13 rebounds for the Hoyas.
Figueroa had six steals, none bigger
than the one he made with 12 seconds left
as St. John’s erased a four-point deficit
late in regulation. Jamorko Pickett had an
open lane to a dunk that would’ve made it
a five-point game, but Heron was called
for his final foul, and Pickett made one of
two free throws for an 85-81 edge. Ponds
made two free throws with 15.2 seconds
left. St. John’s trapped the ensuing inbounds pass and Figueroa made the steal
and put up a shot. It went in but was ruled
to have come after a foul on the floor.
Figueroa, a 57 percent free-throw
shooter entering play, made both shots to
tie it, and St. John’s forced an off-balance
three at the buzzer from Jahvon Blair. “We
fight through adversity all the time, so
you just have to knock down the two free
throws and keep it moving,” Figueroa said
of having his basket taken off the board.
St. John’s couldn’t have opened the overtime better. Simon’s steal and pass to
Figueroa for an alley-oop dunk started a
9-1 run. Figueroa found Simon on the
break for an alley-oop dunk on the next
possession. Ponds hit Clark for an open
three-pointer on the next, and Figueroa
hit Ponds for a layup on the one after that.
“They gave us a chance and we capitalized,” Ponds said. “We knew coming out
of the gate [in OT], it would be who
started out strong. We hit them in the
mouth first and came out with the win.”
Added Simon: “We just felt like we had
the momentum.”
Clark fouled out on a four-point play
and after Ponds’ spectacular steal ignited
Simon’s dunk, Simon fouled out with 25.2
seconds left. Greg Malinowski made two
free throws to get the Hoyas within 96-94.
After Ponds made one of two free throws,
the Hoyas missed two hotly contested
threes on the final possession. “In overtime we played probably our best basketball,” Mullin said. “We executed offensively and [stopped] three or four looks at
the end to tie it. It was a heck of a game.”
GETTY IMAGES / MITCHELL LAYTON
Ponds (37), Figueroa
lead St. John’s to first
win in D.C. since 2003
Justin Simon dunks in overtime for two of his 14 points. He added nine rebounds.
BASKETBALL
A79
HOYA DESTROYAS
NFL
CHARGERS
AT RAVENS
A seat at the
table (No. 25)
roger.rubin@newsday.com
S
EAGLES
AT BEARS
4:40 p.m., Ch. 4
Former Big East rivals Patrick Ewing and Chris Mullin before game.
at the end of the Seton Hall
game, saved it from going out of
bounds and got it to Mustapha
Heron for what should have
been the final second. Against
the Hoyas, he came up with a
steal with 12 seconds left in regulation. Then the 57-percent freethrow shooter hit two with 11.3
seconds left in regulation to tie it
at 85 and send the game to OT.
“Coach puts the confidence in
us. We play hard every play,”
Figueroa said. “We can’t control
what the refs do — we just have
to play through it.”
St. John’s will get another test
on Tuesday. The Red Storm will
travel to defending national
champion and current Big East
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ROLLS ON
Once again, “backup” QB plays
leading role for Eagles A72
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Pick 10: 2, 3, 5, 7, 20, 23, 27,
28, 32, 34, 37, 44, 48, 49, 53,
57, 66, 69, 74, 78.
Daily number: 891.
Win4: 6772.
Take 5: 5, 19, 30, 34, 36.
Midday daily: 917.
Midday Win4: 6285.
Sat. Lotto: 28, 33, 38, 45, 54,
57. Bonus: 59.
Fri. Mega Millions: 21, 29, 35,
54, 60. Mega Ball: 15.
Megaplier: 4.
Thur. Cash4Life: 5, 9, 25, 33,
55. Cash Ball: 2.
Sat. Powerball: 3, 7, 15, 27, 69.
Powerball: 19. Power Play: 2.
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
WIN BIGGER WITH BOOSTER BALL
favorite Villanova (11-4, 2-0).
Four players from that championship team left early for the
NBA, but as Mullin said, “They
are the gold standard in college
basketball.”
“I am beyond excited,” said
Figueroa, who is in his first season with the Red Storm after
transferring from junior college.
“I’ve been watching them on TV
my whole life and this is my first
time playing Villanova. It’s going
to be a big battle.”
And it is something for fans to
anticipate. But there is one thing
to look forward to before that
game. Will St. John’s get the national attention it deserves?
Pick a number, any number.
newsday.com
WASHINGTON
omebody fit this team
for a number. After
what St. John’s did
against Georgetown on
Saturday in the nation’s
capital, it is clear that the Red
Storm belong in the Top 25.
St. John’s ended a 13-game losing streak at Capital One Arena
in impressive fashion, earning a
97-94 overtime victory over
archrival Georgetown. The Red
Storm hung in through the
Hoyas’ strong second half, overcoming what had been an eightpoint deficit, scoring four unanswered points in the last 15.2 seconds of regulation and blitzing
Georgetown out of the gate in
the extra frame.
The Red Storm’s 14-1 start
matches those of the Chris
Mullin-led 1982-83 Big East
champion and the 1985-86 Walter Berry-led Big East champion
— which is pretty interesting.
But that’s not the big point.
St. John’s should be a perfect
15-0. And were it not for the atrocious whistle that negated the its
game-winning defensive play
against Seton Hall last Saturday
and inexplicably gave the Pirates
a second chance for a game-winning basket (that they made) in
the final seconds, it would be.
Yes, you can say that St. John’s
missed the front end of two oneand-ones in the final 30 seconds
to give Seton Hall that chance.
But it still made the defensive
play it needed at the end.
Mullin and his players want
no part of a discussion about
these topics, the bad whistle and
the absence of national attention
attributed to a weak non-conference schedule. Their consensus:
All you can do is win the game in
front of you and officiating isn’t
under their control.
However, the St. John’s community cares about these topics
a lot. All one had to see was the
raucous scene at sold-out Carnesecca Arena for the Marquette
game. And sure, their social
media voices on the topics are
angry, but they continue to show
how they’ve thirsted for a team
like this since conquering hero
Mullin returned. The on-campus
game against DePaul on Jan. 12 is
sold out and there’s only a handful of tickets left for the one
against Creighton on Jan. 16.
In an event that can only be attributed to karma paying a debt,
LJ Figueroa was the central figure in the play Saturday that
opened the door to the win.
The 6-7 forward is the player
who deflected the inbounds pass
1:05 p.m., Ch. 2
GETTY IMAGES / MITCHELL LAYTON
Roger
Bob
Rubin
Glauber
y
ON THE TUBE
FINAL
JIM MCISAAC
Source: Yanks, Britton
agree on 3-year, $39M
dealforhimtoreturn A66
SUNDAY, JAN. 6, 2019
Hoops updates at
newsday.com/college
St. John’s makes case
for Top 25 with OT win
at Georgetown A78-79
St. John’s Shamorie Ponds
roars during overtime
of 97-94 win. Ponds scored
37 points for Storm (14-1).
GETTY IMAGES / MITCHELL LAYTON
yy
ZACH’S BACK
DAK, DALLAS HOLD OFF SEATTLE
A75
LUCK, COLTS DOMINATE TEXANS
A74
SUNDAY, JAN. 6, 2019
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OVER AGAIN.
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HOT STUFF
“A Dog’s Way Home” opens, “America’s
Got Talent: Champions” airs, and rapper
Noname performs. C4
MOVIES
Who should win, who will win in the
movie categories at Sunday’s Golden
Globes. C9
PHOTO GALLERY
Celebrities behaving badly
newsday.com/celebs
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When the gang was all here
MUSIC
Taking Back Sunday celebrates 20
years together with a greatest hits
compilation. C12
BOOKS
Sophie Mackintosh envisions a
dystopian war between the sexes in
her first novel. C13
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
newsday.com
TRAVEL
Airport lounges offer soothing
escapes from the bustle. C17
also inside
ASK AMY C5
BIRTHDAYS C21
HOROSCOPES C21
THE LONG ISLAND SOUND C12
TV LISTINGS C26
on the cover
Our critics tackle some questions
about award shows, in honor of
Sunday’s Golden Globes ceremony.
ENTERTAINMENT C6
The stars, from left, Tony Sirico, Steve Van Zandt, James
Gandolfini, Michael Imperioli, Vincent Pastore. Below, David Chase.
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TELEVISION
Our winter TV preview has all the
network and streaming shows to
watch this season, such as NBC’s
“The Enemy Within,” above C10
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T
he year 1999 arrived
somewhere on the
planet bright and
clear. Everywhere
else — here, for instance —
felt dark and gloomy.
Impeachment hearings had
gridlocked Washington.
Something called a “Y2K
bug” threatened to smite our
fast-growing digital
addiction. The year 2000
loomed ahead like an iceberg. Doomsday was nigh,
and a classic 1982 song
(“1999”) suddenly felt
prophetic:
“Woke up this mornin’,
coulda sworn it was judgment
day. . . .”
Coincidentally, or not, that
line echoed the first spoken
(and sung) line of a new
series launching Jan. 10 on
HBO: “Woke up this mornin’,
got myself a gun. . . .”
That series needs no
introduction, just context,
because 20 years later that
context has largely been
forgotten. Awash, nearly
drowning, in TV, we now look
back at “The Sopranos” as the
lonely sentinel that birthed
our golden age. Wrong: There
was lots of good TV then (and
“Seinfeld” had ended just
eight months earlier). We
think of Tony (James
Gandolfini) as culture’s first
anti-hero. Wrong again: There
had been many.
“The Sopranos” was in
fact culture’s first anti-TV
show — emphatically more
so than “Twin Peaks” (1990)
which had almost seemed to
stumble into the medium by
accident. Creator and TV
veteran David Chase hated
TV, with its conventions and
tropes abetted by the willful
stupidity of those who ran it.
Fox and CBS passed on the
pilot because (after all) who
ever heard of a mobster
swimming with ducks? His
lodestars in no particular
order were Fellini, French
New Wave, “Goodfellas” and
hometown North Caldwell,
New Jersey. TV had never
really had such lodestars
before. TV was largely about
reassurance and meeting
expectations, preferably after
the last commercial break.
Chase would subvert all
expectations, at launch and
eight years later. We couldn’t
say we hadn’t been warned.
More context: Gandolfini
was a virtual unknown in
1999. That would change —
electrifying so — when he
slumped like dead-weight
into a chair across from Dr.
Melfi (Lorraine Bracco).
“I dunno,” he muttered.
“The morning I got sick I’d
been thinking it’s good to be
in something from the
ground floor. I came too late
for that. I know. But lately,
I’m gettin’ the feelin’ that I
came in at the end. The best
is over.”
Melfi: “Many Americans
feel that way. . . .”
There was instantly a
whole series in those lines, a
hook, too: A mobster, this
mobster, feeling like “many
Americans”? Do tell us more.
Northport’s Edie Falco —
Carmela — had a solid Broadway career (“Frankie and
Johnny in the Clair de
Lune”) and a little TV (“Oz”)
by the time she got here. But
with Gandolfini, she was
magic, and “The Sopranos”
was all about magic, too.
There was also something
both degrading and
ennobling about this anti-TV
series, also something beautiful and repulsive. By keeping
us off-balance, Chase kept us
focused. The year 1999 —
the ennui, the gloom, the end
times, even the Prince lyrics
— was in its bones. “The
Sopranos” taught us how to
watch TV all over again. It
taught us how to approach
TV as art as opposed to
commerce, and how to see
our culture — and ourselves
— through its glass darkly.
Twenty years later, we
remain — as always and
forever — indebted.
— VERNE GAY
C3
NBC / VIVIAN ZINK
Melissa Fumero and Andy
Samberg get married on
“Brooklyn Nine-Nine.”
NBC locks
onto Fox
cop comedy
T
ans of Bryan Cranston,
best known for his
Emmy-winning
portrayal of the
depraved Walter White in
TV’s “Breaking Bad,” have a
chance to catch him now in
two very different roles.
He explores an alternate
shade of brokenness, starring
as a billionaire turned
frustrated quadriplegic, in
“The Upside,” a new film
hitting cinemas Friday. Based
on a true story, the comedy
also stars Nicole Kidman as a
devoted assistant and Kevin
Hart as a recently paroled
ex-con who winds up being
hired as a (very unconventional) health care attendant.
Or you can head to Broadway’s Belasco Theatre and
catch Cranston up close (seriously close — some audience
members are seated onstage)
as he stars in “Network,” an
electric, multimedia production based on the acclaimed
1976 film. In the play, which
opened last month, Cranston
plays TV news anchor
Howard Beale, who goes mad
on-air as colleagues (“Scandal’s” Tony Goldwyn and
“Orphan Black’s” Tatiana
Maslany) try to save him, or
score ratings off of him.
Cranston, 62, recently
spoke by phone with
Newsday contributor
Joseph V. Amodio.
mother, who had Alzheimer’s.
Just the day-to-day care these
people provide — it astonishes
me. It’s something I know I
couldn’t do.
The film, for me, brought back
memories. I knew Christopher
and Dana Reeve, and watching
your character go through his
daily routine reminded me of all
the little things Dana did for
Chris.
Well, you know,
she was an angel,
to be able to
accept that kind
of new reality in
her life. She
accepted it as
part of their
marriage
agreement . . .
in good times
and in bad. The
caretakers of
the world are
really the unsung heroes. I
witnessed that
with my
Really?
No, I don’t think my
constitution is strong enough
to withstand that pressure,
sustaining that kind of
positive personality, and
being so incredibly patient.
How did you learn
about the world of
quadriplegics?
I visited three
different
quadriplegic
men. One was
an athlete — a
football player
at Rutgers who
had a head-tohead tackle and
down he went.
Then there was
another fellow
who lived outside
Philadelphia.
And I visited this young guy
who lives close to me in the
San Fernando Valley. He’s
married and had a baby. And
yet you can’t help but . . . [He
sighs.] This is a remarkable
thing. And when someone
goes through it, they go
through all the stages of loss.
In fact, it’s healthy to do that.
And there’s no such thing as,
oh, now I’m past this stage.
You revert back [sometimes].
It’s messy. I’ve talked to the
real guy, Philippe [Pozzo di
Borgo, the French businessman whose book and
subsequent French film inspired this movie]. He’s in his
60s and very surprised he’s
still alive. He told me, “I’m
shocked. But I’m good.”
So . . . from losing control of
your muscles to losing control
of your mind, as Howard Beale
in “Network.” What do you
hope people feel from this
story? What’s the take-away?
The [movie] was written
over 40 years ago but its
themes are still applicable
today. One . . . is about being
addicted to whatever the
current technology is. Back
then . . . Howard railed
against television, how only 3
percent of you read books
and all the “truth,” quote
unquote, you think you
know, you get from
television. The same could
be said now — our
television screens are just
in the palm of our hands.
And we’re just as addicted,
if not more. It’s an
incredible tool, but a tool
is only as good as the
person using it. We have
to learn how to use our
tools properly — and
when not to use them.
For example, it’s
interesting — when you
step inside the theater,
[you see] all the
technology . . .
GETTY IMAGES / ROY ROCHLIN
Right. The stage is awash
in TV screens with
commercials playing, and
camera crews film you as
you deliver the news.
And yet you’re
asked to turn off your
phones, put
everything away, pay
attention and watch.
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
So I bet there’s nothing
like playing a paralyzed
man to make you
appreciate just being able
to move.
Yeah. When I was
thinking of playing the
role . . . I got a mechanical wheelchair, all the
bells and whistles, sent
to my house, so I could
practice [controlling it]
with the little stick on
my chin. At first I
thought, wow, I have to
just be like a rigid
piece of wood. I tried
. . . and realized it’s
exhausting. It’s as if
you’re holding yourself
tight, and there’s only so
much time — less than a
couple minutes — before
you start vibrating with
fatigue. I realized, no, I
have to go to the complete
opposite end of this spectrum
— to be so relaxed . . . that I
have no need to move. I had to
get into a real Zen-like
position in mind and body.
newsday.com
hanks in large
part to an outcry
by fans, some
very famous, the
99th Precinct remains
open for business.
After five seasons on
Fox, “Brooklyn Nine-Nine’’
moves to NBC (which
passed on the show in the
beginning) as new episodes
of the police sitcom begin
Thursday. The original cast
returns, with Andy Samberg and Melissa Fumero
developing the married life
of their characters Jake and
Amy. Andre Braugher,
Terry Crews, Stephanie
Beatriz, Chelsea Peretti, Joe
Lo Truglio, Dirk Blocker
and Joel McKinnon Miller
also are back.
“The mandate from NBC
all along has been, ‘We
know this show. We love
this show. That’s why we
picked up this show. Please
keep making the same
show,’ ” says executive
producer Dan Goor. “I
don’t want to say it’s the
same show. I think it’s going
to be even better this year.”
A Golden Globe winner
for the first season of
“Nine-Nine,’’ Samberg
notes that “really small,
detail-oriented storylines
about their finances’’ are
among the Jake-and-Amy
aspects he looks forward
to showing now. “They’ll
maintain pretty much the
same dynamic, but it will
be fun to see it explored
through the lens of marriage, for sure.’’
“The day that they
combine their bank
accounts is going to be a
big day for them,’’ adds
Fumero. ‘”It’s going to be
little stories like that, I
think, that will be really
fun to explore.’’ — Zap2it
F
fastchat { Bryan Cranston }
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Jonah Hauer-King and Amber star in “A Dog’s Way
Home,” based on a W. Bruce Cameron novel.
MOVIES
A DOG’S WAY HOME When
Bella the canine is separated
from her human, she embarks
on a 400-mile journey to
return home. Based on the
novel by W. Bruce Cameron
(“A Dog’s Purpose”). Charles
Martin Smith, of “Air Bud”
and “Dolphin Tale,” directs.
With Ashley Judd. Opens
Friday.
REPLICAS A synthetic biologist
(Keanu Reeves) attempts to
re-create the family he lost in a
car accident. With Alice Eve
and Thomas Middleditch.
Opens Friday.
THE UPSIDE A wealthy
paraplegic (Bryan Cranston)
hires an inexperienced ex-con
(Kevin Hart) to be his caregiver. Based on the French hit
“Les Intouchables,” itself
based on a true story. Opens
Friday.
— RAFER GUZMÁN
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
newsday.com
POP MUSIC
NONAME The Chicago
rapper has opened her
“Room 25” album to the
world, blending sharp
rhymes with neosoul and
jazzy beats. She wraps up
her New York run of shows
on Sunday at Brooklyn Steel.
Tickets are $25 through AXS,
888-929-7849, axs.com.
BILL CHARLAP The Grammywinning pianist, who has
worked with everyone from
Tony Bennett to Wynton
Marsalis, teams with a variety
of artists, including Jon
Faddis, Sean Smith and his
own Bill Charlap Trio, during
his run of shows from
Tuesday through Saturday at
the Jazz Standard. Tickets are
$35 through TicketWeb,
ticketweb.com.
McCOY TYNER The jazz
pianist, who had to cancel his
August show at My Father’s
Place at the Roslyn Hotel due
to illness, is back on tour and
will play the club on Saturday.
He may even showcase some
of his work on the “lost”
John Coltrane album that
had so many rediscovering both jazz greats last
year. Tickets are $80
through My Father’s
Place, 516-413-3535,
myfathersplace.com.
— GLENN GAMBOA
TV
76th GOLDEN GLOBE
AWARDS Andy Samberg
and Sandra
Oh host this
year’s festivities. The
Dude himself, Jeff
Bridges, will
receive the
prestigious
Cecil B. DeMille Award. Sunday
at 8 p.m. on NBC/4.
See C9 for more
AMERICA’S GOT
TALENT: CHAMPIONS A bunch of
the show’s favorites, including
L.I.’s own Sal Valentinetti, compete to
see who can be the
best of the best. Monday at 8 p.m. on NBC/4.
BROOKLYN NINE-NINE And
speaking of Samberg: His
cop comedy begins its
second life on network TV
after being canceled by Fox.
Premieres Thursday at 9
p.m. on NBC/4.
hotstuff
BRUCE GILBERT
newsday.com/fanfare
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Long Island’s Sal Valentinetti competes in
“America’s Got Talent: Champions.”
banned 19th century German
play, set in a school where the
teenagers explore their sexual
awakenings. The show runs
Jan. 17 to Feb. 24 at the Argyle
Theatre, 34 W. Main St.,
Babylon; tickets, from $49,
argyletheatre.com,
844-631-5483.
NASSIM Iranian playwright Nassim Soleimanpour invites a different
guest actor to share the
stage every night for the
unscripted show (early
on they included Linda
Emond, Tracy Letts
and Cush Jumbo)
about making
friends and fitting
in. The Barrows
Street Theatricals
production runs
through April 20 at
City Center Stage
II, 131 W. 55th St.
Tickets, from
$69.50, at
nycitycenter.org
or 212-581-1212.
— BARBARA SCHULER
DANCE
AMERICAN DANCE
PLATFORM Stephen
Petronio and Martha Graham
are among the companies
taking part in the fourth
annual program presented by
the Joyce Theater Foundation. It runs through Jan. 7
at the theater, 175 Eighth
Ave. Get full schedule
and purchase tickets,
from $51, at joyce.org.
— BARBARA SCHULER
— ANDY EDELSTEIN
THEATER
SPRING AWAKENING Emotions run high in Duncan
Sheik’s powerful rock
musical, based on a once-
Chicago rapper
Noname brings her
blend of sharp
rhymes and jazzy
beats to Brooklyn
Steel on Sunday.
INVISION / AMY HARRIS
advice
AMY
Amy Dickinson
askamy@amydickinson.com
DEAR AMY: I would like your
opinion on something. My son
and I always had and still have a
normal, loving, good relationship.
Fifteen years ago, when he was
25, my son was diagnosed with
a brain tumor. At the time, he
had been married for two years
to his college sweetheart. I was
fortunate enough to get referrals
for the best surgeons. The
operation went on for several
hours. Upon his recovery, he was
placed in a hospital bed. He was
still kind of groggy and in a lot
of pain when my husband,
daughter and I went to see him.
I asked if there was anything he
needed. He told me to get out
of the room. His wife’s mother
came in and he started calling
out to her: “Mom!” and she
went to him. I was never so
crushed in my entire life. I
started to cry and ran out, and
kept running. My daughter and
husband brought me to the
cafeteria in the hospital to try to
calm me down. After the
surgery, he and his wife came
back to stay at my house until
he was healed enough to go to
his home. This incident was
never brought up or talked
about. Now, 15 years later, I still
harbor hurt and resentment.
How do I handle it? I’m not in
good health. Should I keep it
buried or bring it up? I’m not
sure if he remembers it and do
not want him to feel bad. However, it gnaws away on my mind
and heart.
The Real Mother
DEAR REAL MOTHER:
Unfortunately, I feel that the
real pathology here is your
holding onto an obviously
hallucinatory statement made
under extreme circumstances
15 years ago.
I don’t know if you have
ever been hospitalized and
recovered from a major
operation using anesthesia,
but I have seen people hallucinate and suffer from delirium while in the grip of
“ICU psychosis.”
My own children were
completely loopy after only
getting their wisdom teeth
extracted. (One seemed to
think that our dog, Calvin,
would be driving her home
from the dental office.)
I don’t think your son’s
reaction while emerging from
anesthesia is out of the
ordinary. I do think that you
were traumatized by watching your son suffer and skate
so close to death.
Please, do yourself and
your family a favor and bring
this up with your son.
I hope you can temper
your reaction to this enough
so that you will understand
that he didn’t know what he
was saying and that he probably has no memory of it. I
hope a reassuring hug and an
“I love you, Mom,” will allow
you to finally close the book
on this strange chapter in
your emotional life. Holding
on to this is not good for
your own health. Find a way
to let it go.
DEAR AMY: My first girlfriend,
“Annie,” and I went out for two
months. Then I found out that
Annie cheated on me with
another guy. They were at a bar,
drinking and laughing. I broke up
with Annie, and I never went
back to her. Last month, I met a
pretty girl, “Rebecca,” who is a
warm and kindhearted person.
We hit it off right away. Yesterday, I saw her with another guy
at a shopping mall. I’m afraid I’m
being cheated on again. What
should I do?
Cheated Upon?
DEAR CHEATED UPON: You
are new to this. You cannot
police women you have
known for a relatively short
time and declare that
laughing with a guy in a bar,
or walking with a guy
through a mall is cheating.
The assumptions you are
making, and your behavior
concerning these women,
reveals how inexperienced
you are.
Dating is a process of getting to know someone, and
communicating your various
needs and expectations. Unless you and someone you’re
seeing mutually decide that
you are “exclusive,” you’re
not. Seeing other people
under these circumstances is
not cheating.
You need to get a handle
on your jealousy.
DEAR AMY: “Lost and Sad”
reported having “lost” their
father. It wasn’t until I read the
full letter that I understood the
father wasn’t “lost,” but dead!
Why can’t people talk plainly
about death?
Plain Talker
DEAR TALKER: People use
C5
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Ask AmyASK
newsday.com/lifestyle
many different euphemisms
when referring to death.
These indirect expressions —
“lost,” “late,” “passed” — all
imply that the beloved person is more or less waiting in
another room.
And for bereaved people,
that’s how it feels. Let it be.
DEAR AMY: “Upset” was
concerned that her husband’s
ex-wife was the beneficiary of
his retirement account. You
questioned the fact that the
beneficiary can’t be changed.
Amy, I have a pension from a
government job. You name the
beneficiary when you retire, and
I assure you it is set in stone. I
hope they take your advice to
see a professional estate planner.
Retired
DEAR RETIRED: I’ve heard
from dozens of people about
this. Many report being
locked in place.
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entertainment
Should the shows still
With the Golden Globes upon us,
our entertainment critics tackle some
tough award show questions
G
Grammy host LL Cool J
paid tribute to singer
Whitney Houston the
night after she died in
2012.
lamour! Speeches! Envelopes! Yes, it’s
award show season again — starting with
the Golden Globes on Sunday night
(hosted this year by Andy Samberg and
Sandra Oh). What better time for Newsday’s entertainment critics to weigh in on
some burning questions about these glitzy events, starting with: Are these ceremonies still relevant in 2019?
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
newsday.com
Verne Gay (Newsday’s TV critic):
The awards shows matter
because the awards matter.
Awards remain the arbiters of
artistic accomplishment, where
otherwise commercial
accomplishment (box office,
ratings) would be the only
benchmark. The awards shows
are the framework within
which they are presented, ipso
facto, they matter. Of course,
these shows can be insufferable — sometimes overstuffed,
overlong turkeys. That’s part of
their fun, part of their aggravation (in equal measure).
Viewers still care — they’re
just not chained to the shows
like they once were.
Rafer Guzmán (Newsday’s film
critic): They do for the movies —
particularly the Golden Globes
but, even more so, the Oscars.
Over many decades, both shows
have built up a reputation for
prestige and credibility, driven
primarily by star-power and an
aura of glamour. Despite downward trends in viewership, that
reputation hasn’t gone away.
The “Oscar bump,” in which
ticket sales rise for winning
movies, is still in effect, and
studios know that movie posters
look more attractive when
dotted with awards. What’s
more, the Oscar in particular
bestows a knight-like honor
upon the receiver, whose name
will forevermore be preceded by
the title “Oscar winner.”
Glenn Gamboa (Newsday’s music
critic): Now that streaming
dominates music consumption,
the Grammys arguably matter
even more than they did in the
past. With tens of thousands of
albums released each year, the
nominations offer artists a way
to cut through the evercrowded field, land muchneeded attention and offer
incentive for fans to sample
some new releases since it
doesn’t cost anything extra to
stream them. The Grammys
moved to capitalize on that
this year, expanding the top
categories from five nominees
to eight.
Barbara Schuler (Newsday’s
theater critic): Do the Tony
Awards matter? Producers
certainly think so, judging
from the annual April crush
when shows fight to open
before the award cutoff date.
For musicals, especially, the
June telecast is one giant commercial, with each of the nominated shows getting a spot to
showcase its best number right
before the summer tourist
crush. How that translates to
ticket sales is tough to quantify, but psychologist Russell T.
Warne of Utah Valley University in Orem, Utah, tried with a
recent study that showed,
among other things, best
musical winners were 3.1 to 3.6
times more likely to stay open.
GETTY IMAGES / KEVIN WINTER
DO AWARD SHOWS STILL
MATTER?
WHO’S WATCHING?
Guzmán: The Academy Awards
have gained and lost viewers
dramatically over the years.
Conventional wisdom has it
that ceremonies featuring
well-known best picture contenders tend to draw bigger
ratings, though that doesn’t
always hold true. The recent
trend seems to be downward.
In 2014, when Ellen DeGeneres
hosted and “12 Years a Slave”
won best picture, a healthy 43.7
million viewers tuned in, according to Deadline.com. Last
year, when Jimmy Kimmel
hosted and “The Shape of
Water” won the top Oscar,
viewership dropped to a worrisome 26.5 million.
The Golden Globes, by
contrast, has always had a
smaller viewership, but has
newsday.com/entertainment
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go on?
C7
GETTY IMAGES / KEVIN WINTER
Andy Samberg and
Sandra Oh will host the
Golden Globes on Sunday
night.
Jimmy Kimmel hosted the
Academy Awards last year.
slipped only slightly over the
same period, beginning with
20 million viewers in 2014,
when Tina Fey and Amy
Poehler hosted, and ending
with 19 million in 2018, when
Seth Meyers did the honors.
As for the Grammys and
Emmys, they’ve also seen a
downward trend in viewers.
The music awards have
dropped to 19.8 million viewers
in 2018, down from 28.5 million
in 2014, according to reports
from TVByTheNumbers.
Oddly, the new resurgence of
television has coincided with a
drop in Emmy Awards viewership: Only 10.1 million viewers
watched the awards in 2018,
compared with 15.6 million in
2014, according to trade magazine reports.
HOW IMPORTANT
IS THE HOST?
WHAT 76th Annual Golden
Globe Awards
WHEN|WHERE 8 p.m.
Sunday, NBC/4
NBC / TRAE PATTON
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
See SHOWS on C8
newsday.com
Guzmán: The job of Oscar host
is a thankless one, as this year’s
lack of applicants proves.
Because the Academy Awards
ceremony is of grave importance to the industry, yet
strives to entertain a general
audience, the host is tasked
with the impossible: Be funny
yet respectful, stay loose but
keep things moving, define the
show but don’t hog the spotlight. A rare few, like Bob Hope
and Billy Crystal, were naturalborn court jesters who became
repeat hosts. More often,
though, charismatic personalities like David Letterman,
Steve Martin, Ellen DeGeneres
and Chris Rock have come off
as merely passable or downright stiff, paralyzed by the
show’s potential land mines
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entertainment
Should the shows go on?
SHOWS from C6
and glue-trap scripts.
On the other hand, at the
freewheeling Golden Globes,
where stakes are lower and the
drinks tend to flow, hosting
looks rather fun. Ricky Gervais
insulted all of Hollywood as a
four-time host and arguably hit
the peak of his fame; Fey and
Poehler hosted three times and
earned plaudits for their feminist jabs and saucy attitude.
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
newsday.com
Gay: Unfortunately, very important. The host is the most
easily promotable part of any
show, and the reason many
viewers tune in for the opening part of these programs. As
gatekeepers, hosts play to the
TV audience, also to the room,
while a good one can ease
tension or improve mood
simply by getting people to
laugh. But in recent years,
hosts have been beset by what
might be called a Goldilocks
syndrome — too hot or too
cold. DeGeneres was the best
Oscar host since the Billy
Crystal heyday. But she doesn’t
want to do the Oscars or
Emmys any longer. Lack of
continuity among hosts
has meant lack of consistency.
Tonys bucked the trend, with
a slight uptick of 4 percent,
from 6 million to 6.3 million
viewers. Sara Bareilles and
Josh Groban were the charming hosts of the show, but it’s
highly unlikely that they can
take credit for more viewers
— though their salute to all
the losers (accompanied by
ensemble members from
every Broadway musical) was
fun. Over the years, Hugh
Jackman and Neil Patrick
Harris have been the most
popular hosts, each getting
the gig four times. James
Corden hosted the highly
rated 2016 telecast, with a
33 percent increase in
overnight ratings.
But as good as
he was, it
was
really
all about the juggernaut
known as “Hamilton.”
That said, I have a suggestion for a couple who could
ensure a huge ratings increase
for the 2019 show: Considering
her impressive book tour and
his Twitter-busting appearance
on the last HamilDrops, the
Tonys should go after Michelle
and Barack
Obama.
WHAT HAVE BEEN SOME
OF THE BIGGEST
DISAPPOINTMENTS? UPSETS?
Guzmán: Though awards are
subjective, there have been a
few instances where the
groans from moviegoers were
hard to ignore. “The Dark
Knight” (2008), a film that
treated superheroes with a
new seriousness, didn’t make
the cut for best picture, a
snobbish oversight that the
Oscars are still trying to
live down. “Shakespeare
in Love” (1998), a period
rom-com starring
Gwyneth Paltrow and
Joseph Fiennes, won
Best Picture over
“Saving Private Ryan”
and is often cited as a
wispy film bolstered
by a strong Oscar
campaign (spear-
Gay: You know you’ve had a
good Emmys season (and
awards ceremony) when there
is no particularly egregious
misstep. The 70th annual
Emmys held in September, in
fact, managed that not-inconsiderable feat. Sure, there were
(and always are) quibbles with
some winners. Should “The
Americans” have won best
drama? I think so, but “Game
of Thrones” — the winner —
was hardly a mistake. The
winning seventh season was
magnificent. To suggest
otherwise is peevish. Same
goes for each of the major
categories. Thanks to rule (and
eligibility) adjustments over
the last several years, the
Emmys (and voting body) have
done a much better job of
selecting the right nominees.
Gamboa: In 2018, Kendrick
Lamar’s album “Damn”
dominated the charts, as well
as cultural discussion. And
though hip-hop albums
traditionally do poorly in the
prestigious album of the year
category, many thought
“Damn” had the power to
change the trend. It didn’t.
Bruno Mars’ likable,
lightweight “24K Magic” won.
Nevertheless, “Damn” went on
to make history anyway,
becoming the first hip-hop
album to win the Pulitzer Prize
for Music.
Gamboa: The
Grammys, especially
in these ratingsobsessed days, are all
about the performances — not the
host. Maybe that’s why
CBS seems to be considering not having one
this year, since James
Corden, who has hosted
the past two years, is too
busy. However, in 2012, when
Manhasset’s LL Cool J led the
awards show in prayer for
Whitney Houston, who had
died the night before, he was a
shining example of how important a host can be in setting the
tone for the evening.
Schuler: Ratings for award
shows have been on the
decline for years, but the
CBS telecast of the 2018
Kendrick Lamar’s “Damn,” which
went on to win a Pulitzer, was
snubbed at last year’s Grammys
in the album of the year category.
headed by a then-powerful
Harvey Weinstein). As for Paul
Haggis’ race-relations drama
“Crash” (2004), rightly or
wrongly it has gone down as a
quintessential example of the
Oscars choosing a safe bet
over a riskier one, “Brokeback
Mountain,” for best picture.
GETTY IMAGES / PARAS GRIFFIN
Schuler: To this day I remember
the shock on the faces of the
“Avenue Q” cast when the show
won the 2004 best musical Tony,
upsetting what seemed to be a
sure win for “Wicked.” No need
to feel bad for either show,
though. “Avenue Q” closed in
2009, but almost immediately
moved to Off-Broadway, where
it will end its long run on
April 28. “Wicked” is still going
strong at the Gershwin Theatre
— in 2018 it surpassed “A
Chorus Line” to become the
sixth-longest-running show on
Broadway.
newsday.com/entertainment
lack
Panther” for
best
dramatic
motion
picture? It
could
happen at “The 76th Golden
Globe Awards” on Sunday.
As always, the loosey-goosey
Globes ceremony will serve as
a precursor to the more serious
Oscars, but this year seems
particularly noteworthy. With
“Black Panther,” “BlacKkKlansman” and “If Beale Street
Could Talk” in the running for
the top award, the Globes seem
to be issuing a challenge to the
Oscars: We’re not so white —
how about you? What’s more,
“Black Panther” is exactly the
kind of populist pick the Oscars
have long pooh-poohed, an
attitude that has begun to seem
elitist and out of touch. Earlier
this year, the Academy tried to
placate moviegoers by suggesting a “best popular movie”
award — only to be viciously
pelted by social-media tomatoes. (The idea has been
shelved.) By contrast, the
Globes are looking pretty savvy
this year.
In other Globes categories,
expect the usual mix of obvious-to-baffling choices. Here’s
how things look likely to
shake out:
BEST PICTURE, DRAMA
□ Regina King, “If Beale Street
Could Talk”
□ Emma Stone, “The Favourite”
□ Rachel Weisz, “The Favourite”
WHO SHOULD WIN Weisz. Her
comedic timing, not utilized
nearly enough, gets to shine
here as a haughty aristocrat
who meets her match in an
ambitious chambermaid
(Stone, her competitor in this
category).
WHO WILL WIN Adams.
Despite polarizing reviews for
“Vice,” critics generally
agreed on Adams’ empathetic
performance as Lynne
Cheney, wife of former veep
Dick Cheney.
BEST ACTOR, DRAMA
□ Bradley Cooper, “A Star Is Born”
□ Willem Dafoe, “At Eternity’s
Gate”
□ Lucas Hedges, “Boy Erased”
□ Rami Malek, “Bohemian
Rhapsody”
□ John David Washington,
“BlacKkKlansman”
WHO SHOULD WIN Cooper.
His washed-up singer Jackson
Maine strikes the perfect
balance between deep-reaching performance and screenstar charisma.
WHO WILL WIN Cooper.
BEST PICTURE,
MUSICAL OR COMEDY
□ “Crazy Rich Asians”
□ “The Favourite”
□ “Green Book”
□ “Mary Poppins Returns”
□ “Vice”
WHO SHOULD WIN “The
Favourite.” This story of 18th
century court intrigue seems
like a whole new kind of
period piece: Wickedly funny,
sexually perverse and slightly
surreal. Critical buzz has been
feverishly high.
WHO WILL WIN “The
Favourite.”
BEST ACTRESS,
MUSICAL OR COMEDY
□ Emily Blunt, “Mary Poppins
Chadwick Boseman stars in Marvel Studios’ “Black Panther,” which
is up for the best picture, drama, award at the Golden Globes.
□ Christian Bale, “Vice”
□ Lin-Manuel Miranda, “Mary
Poppins Returns”
□ Viggo Mortensen, “Green Book”
□ Robert Redford, “The Old Man
& The Gun”
□ John C. Reilly, “Stan & Ollie”
WHO SHOULD WIN
Mortensen. He brings pathos
and humor to the real-life
figure of a bouncer (Tony
“Lip” Vallelonga) who ends
up working for a black musician (Mahershala Ali) in 1962.
WHO WILL WIN Mortensen.
BEST PICTURE, ANIMATED
Viggo Mortensen, left, and Mahershala Ali are both up for a Globe
for their roles in “Green Book,” which is also up for an award.
□ “Incredibles 2”
□ “Isle Of Dogs”
□ “Ralph Breaks the Internet”
□ “Spider-Man: Into the
Spider-Verse”
WHO SHOULD WIN “SpiderMan: Into the Spider-Verse.”
The ink-and-paint-style visuals,
with multi-panel screens and
spelled-out sound effects, are a
blast of fresh creative energy in
a Pixar-dominated era.
WHO WILL WIN “Spider-Man:
Into the Spider-Verse.”
BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS
□ Amy Adams, “Vice”
□ Claire Foy, “First Man”
□ Mahershala Ali, “Green Book”
□ Timothée Chalamet, “Beautiful
Boy”
□ Adam Driver, “BlacKkKlansman”
□ Richard E. Grant, “Can You
Ever Forgive Me?”
□ Sam Rockwell, “Vice”
WHO SHOULD WIN Grant. A
cult favorite since “Withnail
& I” (1987), Grant delivers his
second performance of a
lifetime as a bargain-basement libertine. He and McCarthy make a terrific tragicomic duo in this movie.
WHO WILL WIN Grant.
BEST DIRECTOR
□ Bradley Cooper, “A Star Is Born”
□ Alfonso Cuarón, “Roma”
□ Peter Farrelly, “Green Book”
□ Spike Lee, “BlacKkKlansman”
□ Adam McKay, “Vice”
WHO SHOULD WIN Cuarón.
His “Roma” is so beautiful it’s
difficult to imagine anyone
else accepting this award —
even Cooper, who is probably
a close second.
WHO WILL WIN Cuarón.
BEST ORIGINAL SONG
□ “All The Stars,” from “Black
Panther”
□ “Girl In The Movies,” from
“Dumplin’ ”
□ “Requiem For ‘A Private
War,’” from “A Private War”
□ “Revelation,” from “Boy Erased”
□ “Shallow,” from “A Star Is Born”
WHO SHOULD WIN “Shallow.”
Lady Gaga’s original composition (with Mark Ronson and
others) is the backdrop to the
movie’s most riveting moment — the “trust me” scene.
It’s a great example of a song
tailor-made for a film.
WHO WILL WIN “Shallow.”
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
BEST ACTRESS, DRAMA
□ Glenn Close, “The Wife”
□ Lady Gaga, “A Star Is Born”
□ Nicole Kidman, “Destroyer”
□ Melissa McCarthy, “Can You
BEST ACTOR,
MUSICAL OR COMEDY
Returns”
□ Olivia Colman, “The Favourite”
□ Elsie Fisher, “Eighth Grade”
□ Charlize Theron, “Tully”
□ Constance Wu, “Crazy Rich
Asians”
WHO SHOULD WIN Theron.
She gained 50 pounds —
and bared much of it on
screen — to play an exhausted, three-time mother
in this overlooked psychological drama.
WHO WILL WIN Colman. Her
Queen Anne is one complicated piece of work, a physically disabled monarch
whose emotional neediness
hides a ruthless, Machiavellian core.
BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR
newsday.com
□ “Black Panther”
□ “BlacKkKlansman”
□ “Bohemian Rhapsody”
□ “If Beale Street Could Talk”
□ “A Star Is Born”
WHO SHOULD WIN “Black
Panther.” Rare is the movie
that breaks a cultural barrier,
becomes a commercial smash
and — all that aside —
qualifies as truly top-quality.
WHO WILL WIN “A Star Is
Born.” With its Bradley Cooper
and Lady Gaga star-power and
sacred sense of Hollywood
history (Gaynor, Garland and
Streisand graced previous
versions), this movie is as
Golden Globey as they come.
Ever Forgive Me?”
□ Rosamund Pike, “A Private War”
WHO SHOULD WIN McCarthy.
Her transformation into the
real-life literary forger Lee
Israel is subtle and unexpectedly moving.
WHO WILL WIN Lady Gaga.
Playing a pop star may not be
a stretch, but Gaga’s best
moments come in the prefame phase of her character
— a shy, openhearted California girl named Ally.
MARVEL STUDIOS / MATT KENNEDY
‘B
rafer.guzman@newsday.com
UNIVERSAL PICTURES / PATTI PERRET
BY RAFER GUZMÁN
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television
WINTER TV PREVIEW
Cool shows
to chill with
Networks and
streaming services
continue to vie
for the eyes of
viewers this season
pal of an eccentric school and
the high jinks therein. Set in
Philadelphia of the 1990s.
THURSDAY
BROOKLYN NINE-NINE
(NBC/4, 9 p.m.)
Canceled at Fox, revived at
NBC, with the gang all mostly
intact, including Andy Samberg,
Andre Braugher, Melissa
Fumero, Stephanie Beatriz,
Terry Crews and Joe Lo
Truglio.
BY VERNE GAY
verne.gay@newsday.com
AMERICA’S GOT TALENT: THE
CHAMPIONS (NBC/4, 8 p.m.)
Hosted by Terry Crews (the
regular season judges will
return), this brings a couple
dozen former winners, runners-up, and runners-up to the
runners-up, including Prince
Poppycock (Season 5), Sara
and Hero (Season 12) and of
course, Sal Valentinetti, L.I.’s
own, who had a fifth-place
finish in Season 11.
Lindsay Lohan stars in MTV’s
“Lindsay Lohan’s Beach Club.”
WEDNESDAY
SCHOOLED (ABC/7, 8:30 p.m.)
Spinoff of “The Goldbergs”
stars Tim Meadows as princi-
FAM (CBS/2, 9:30 p.m.)
This new Nina Dobrev and
Tone Bell sitcom is about a
woman who moves in with her
older half-sister and fiance.
JAN. 13
TRUE DETECTIVE (HBO, 9 p.m.)
Series creator Nic Pizzolatto
writes and directs this third
season — one episode by
David Milch — set in the
Ozarks, starring Mahershala
Ali (“Moonlight”) as Wayne
Hays, a state police detective
investigating the disappear-
ance of two missing children in
1980 (the series will cover
three different time periods).
Also stars Scoot McNairy as
the father who had a terrible
loss and Mamie Gummer as
mom of the missing kids.
Much is riding on this third
edition after the second faltered so badly.
VALLEY OF THE BOOM
(Nat Geo, 9 p.m.)
This scripted six-parter is
about the ’90s tech bubble, and
stars Bradley Whitford and
Steve Zahn as a pair of tech
entrepreneurs.
JAN. 14
TUESDAY
LINDSAY LOHAN’S BEACH CLUB
(MTV, 8 p.m.)
MTV says it all — “welcome
to Lindsay Lohan’s Beach Club:
It’s her club. Done her way.”
It’s also in Greece, and this is
the regular season launch.
NETFLIX
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
newsday.com
MONDAY
MTV / SEBASTIAN KIM
W
inter is
here, and
along with
it, enough
TV to keep you fully
engaged until the spring.
Here are 33 of the most
notable programs that will
air or stream over the next
three months.
Natasha Lyonne and Elizabeth Ashley star in “Russian Doll,” an eight-part series coming to Netflix.
THE PASSAGE (Fox/5, 9 p.m.)
This pre-apocalyptic thriller
is based on the Justin Cronin
trilogy about government
experiments to wipe out
disease in the human race gone
badly wrong; with Mark-Paul
Gosselaar (“NYPD Blue”) as a
fed who is also surrogate dad
to a 10-year old girl who is the
test subject for this
experiment.
newsday.com/tv
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ABC / CRAIG SJODIN
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JAN. 17
JAN. 19
DYNASTIES (BBC America, 9 p.m.)
Yet another sprawling
BLACK MONDAY
(Showtime, 10 p.m.)
Raucous comedy about the
1987 stock market crash, with
Don Cheadle and Regina Hall
(also starring Paul Scheer and
Andrew Rannells) with the
series’ opener directed by Seth
Rogen and Evan Goldberg.
JAN. 22
CONAN (TBS, 11 p.m.)
After months of looking for
friends (he says) and roaming
the world, Conan O’Brien
returns to late night, this time
without Jimmy Vivino and the
Basic Cable Band. The new
“The Enemy Within” stars, from
left, Morris Chestnut, John Finn
and Jennifer Carpenter, who
portrays a traitor working her way
back, coming Feb. 25 on NBC.
Kiersey Clemons as Joanne
Jefferson, Joran Fisher as Mark
Cohen, Mario as Benjamin
Coffin, and Valentina as Angel
Dumott Schunard.
show will be only a half-hour,
and the emphasis is now on
comedy.
JAN. 28
JAN. 25
THE UNBREAKABLE KIMMY
SCHMIDT (Netflix)
The final six episodes of the
final season drop.
JAN. 27
RENT: LIVE (Fox/5, 8 p.m.)
The Jonathan Larson
musical — originating from the
Fox Studios and directed by
Obie winner Michael Greif —
stars Vanessa Hudgens as
Maureen Johnson, Tinashe as
Mimi Marquez, Brandon
Victor Dixon as Tom Collins,
BRESLIN AND HAMILL: DEADLINE
ARTISTS (HBO, 8 p.m.)
This portrait of the longtime
Daily News (and Newsday)
columnist and rival-friend,
Pete Hammill of the News and
the Post (and briefly, Newsday,
too), is directed by Jonathan
Alter, John Block and Steve
McCarthy.
I AM THE NIGHT (TNT, 9 p.m.)
“Wonder Woman” director
Patty Jenkins directs this sixepisode series about a reporter,
Jay Singletary (Chris Pine) who
helps Fauna Hodel (India Eisley,
“The Secret Life of the American Teenager”) investigate her
mysterious past — which possi-
bly involves one of Hollywood’s
most infamous crimes, the
“Black Dahlia.” Based on Hodel’s
autobiography.
FEB. 1
RUSSIAN DOLL (Netflix)
This 8-episode comedy
created in part by Amy Poehler
is about Nadia (Natasha
Lyonne, Nicky of “Orange is
the New Black”) who goes to a
party held in her honor. The
problem for poor Nadia: It
never ends, except with her
death, and then — a la
“Groundhog Day” — it restarts
with her alive, as though
nothing ever happened.
FEB. 9
VICTORIA GOTTI: MY FATHER’S
DAUGHTER (Lifetime, 8 p.m.)
Gotti finally breaks into the
See PREVIEW on C16
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
JAN. 18
CARMEN SANDIEGO (Netflix)
Another Netflix reboot —
this time Gina Rodriguez
(“Jane the Virgin”) voices
Carmen, while the series will
focus on her origin story.
JAN. 20
“Carmen Sandiego” gets a reboot with the voice of Gina Rodriguez
on Netflix. The origin story starts streaming on Jan. 18.
newsday.com
STAR TREK: DISCOVERY
(CBS All Access)
The second season drops on
this day, with new episodes
streaming weekly on Thursdays;
this one will feature a new and
young Spock — played by Ethan
Peck (grandson of Gregory) —
while Anson Mount joins the
cast as captain of the Enterprise.
(Rebecca Romijn is also aboard
this season.)
beautiful world trek by TV’s
pre-eminent naturalist, David
Attenborough, as he explores
five imperiled species —
penguins, chimpanzees, lions,
painted wolves and tigers.
NETFLIX
NBC / WILL HART
Tim Meadows, right, stars as a principal in “Schooled,” on ABC/7
with, from left, Brett Dier, AJ Michalka and Bryan Callen.
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music
newsday.com/music
the long island sound
Celebrating 20 years of hits
Taking Back Sunday
releases ‘Twenty,’
a musical look back
at the band’s sound
Glenn
Gamboa
glenn.gamboa@newsday.com
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
newsday.com
SHAMUS CONEYS
M
aybe the most
impressive
thing about
Taking Back
Sunday’s
greatest-hits
compilation, “Twenty” (Craft),
is how it chronicles how much
the Long Beach-based band
has grown in its 20 years.
As important as its genredefining debut, “Tell All Your
Friends,” was in 2002, the
band’s 2016 album, “Tidal
Wave” — somehow made with
the same members, despite
numerous personnel changes
along the way — is even
stronger. Taking Back Sunday,
recently inducted into the
Long Island Music Hall of
Fame as its youngest members,
has managed the rare artistic
feat of not just evolving, but
also improving.
“Twenty,” which hits stores
Friday, is solid from start to
finish, pulling songs from all
seven of the band’s albums and
including its new single, “All
Ready to Go.” It’s a testament to
the band’s catalog that there are
plenty of great songs that could
have been added here to take the
collection in a different direction. Adding the gorgeous “Divine Intervention” and “New
American Classic,” along with
the regretful “Where My Mouth
Is” show they can craft a rock
ballad as well as anyone. “Error
Operator” and “Death Wolf”
show how hard they can hit.
And, as a fan of their punkier
side, I would have put “Stood a
Chance” and “Twenty-Twenty
Surgery” in this collection, along
with “You Know How I Do.”
Nevertheless, “Twenty”
shows what Taking Back
Sunday has always done best
Taking Back Sunday, from left: Shaun Cooper, Mark O’Connell, Adam Lazzara and John Nolan.
— setting personal, often
painful, stories to uplifting,
edgy rock anthems. It’s what
allowed “A Decade Under the
Influence” and “MakeDamnSure” to establish them on rock
radio, just as their powerful
live shows made them arena
headliners.
But the reason the band’s
bond with its fans remains
strong is in the poignant
favorites like “One Eighty by
Summer” and “Call Come
Running.” It’s why the band —
singer Adam Lazzara, guitaristsinger John Nolan, drummer
Mark O’Connell and bassist
Shaun Cooper — has launched
a yearlong international tour
that will take it to five
continents to celebrate its 20th
anniversary by playing “Tell
All Your Friends” in its
entirety, along with either all
of “Where You Want to Be” or
“New Again,” depending on a
coin flip. (Though no Long
Island date has been set on the
anniversary tour yet, at least
one show is expected to be
added.) The tour is a chance to
share in the special connection
Taking Back Sunday has with
its fans, the one that caused
thousands of fans to leap over
barricades and evade security
so they could share in an
unforgettable communal
moment on the floor of the
Nassau Coliseum when the
band headlined there in 2006.
Of course, that was a
moment that went well beyond
music. It was a time for Long
Islanders of a certain age to
revel in something that was all
their own, when the area’s
music scene that they
supported and helped build
wasn’t just seen as cool, but
also the focal point of the
indie-rock world.
“Twenty” serves as a
memento of that time, when
Taking Back Sunday put two
albums in the Top 3 within
three years and helped lead a
generation of young, post-hardcore indie rockers. But it also
much more.
“Twenty” shows a band
looking back to celebrate its
accomplishments, but also
ready to continue evolving as
artists.
Taking Back Sunday’s
greatest hits “Twenty” hits
stores Friday.
Chuck D as chairman
Fear not. Strong Island will
definitely be represented in
the Universal Hip Hop
Museum.
Public Enemy’s Chuck D has
been elected as the museum’s
chairman of the celebrity
board, as the organization
formed “to celebrate and
preserve the history of local
and global hip-hop music and
culture” moves into a new
development phase.
“My life has been dedicated
to the hip-hop genre, both
serving it as an artist and
curating it to share with
others, and I want to carry that
work over to the Universal Hip
Hop Museum,” the Roosevelt
rapper said in a statement.
“The museum is what we need
to organize as a collective and
present its history while
having a hand in its future.”
The museum, which recently
secured $20 million in initial
funding, plans to break ground
in December 2019 at Bronx
Point, not far from where hiphop was born at a house party in
the Bronx where DJ Kool Herc
was playing. Organizers hope
the museum will be open to the
public in 2022.
“Chuck D is one of the most
intelligent and well-respected
MCs in the culture of hip-hop,”
the museum’s chairman Kurtis
Blow said in a statement. “The
credibility he brings to our
team is mammoth. He also
understands the importance of
the Universal Hip Hop
Museum, and vows to let the
world know via a star-studded
celebrity board in the near
future. Flame on!!!”
Contact The Long Island
Sound at glenn.gamboa@
newsday.com or follow
@ndmusic on Twitter.
newsday.com/books
A dystopian debut
Sophie Mackintosh
envisions a war between
the sexes in first novel
THE WATER CURE, by Sophie
Mackintosh. Doubleday, 266 pp., $25.95.
BY MARION WINIK
Special to Newsday
‘W
Welsh writer
Mackintosh is
the author of
“The Water
Cure.”
island shifts to include the visitors,
sexual longings and sibling rivalries
bloom amid increasing toxicity and
violence. “Part of what made the
old world so terrible, so prone to
destruction, was a total lack of
preparation for the personal energies often called feelings,” Lia
observes. “Especially dangerous
for women, our bodies already
so vulnerable in ways that the
bodies of men are not.” Despite
the near-tortures the girls
have endured to cauterize
such energies, they
quickly burst forth.
By definition, a
dystopian novel can’t
really have a happy
ending. But Mackintosh’s profound faith in
sisterhood imbues her
particular dark
vision with
beauty and a
kind of hope.
newsday.com
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
hat must it be
like, to live in a
world that wants
to kill you?”
This question,
posed by one of the characters in “The
Water Cure,” the debut novel by Welsh
writer Sophie Mackintosh, seems to
express the inspiration of a whole
generation of women writers, the
literary granddaughters of Margaret
Atwood and Angela Carter, who have
recently been mesmerizing readers
with stories of dystopian futures
fueled by climate change, pollution,
pandemics and patriarchal politics.
With “The Water Cure,” which was
on the longlist for the 2018 Man
Booker Prize, Mackintosh joins debut
novelists Leni Zumas (“Red Clocks”),
Ling Ma (“Severance”) and Naomi
Alderman (“The Power”), as well as
established writers such as Louise
Erdrich and Joyce Carol Oates, in
trying to imagine just what the hell is
going to happen to us all. Generally, it
is hell indeed. In Mackintosh’s version,
masculinity and femininity are explicitly pitted against each other — the
toxic climate and savage culture of
men has burgeoned unchecked, creating an environment in which women
can barely survive.
A man named King attempts to
protect his wife and daughters by
removing them to an isolated island
on the other side of a poisoned sea.
On a rundown estate surrounded by
woods and barbed wire, he and his
wife have raised three girls, Grace,
Lia and Sky. King and Mother regularly administer a “water cure” and
other strange, sadistic therapies to
toughen and protect their daughters,
and also receive parties of battered,
withered women from the mainland
coming in search of these treatments.
“We shudder when we think of how
some of the women looked when
they came to us. Like they had been
bled out, their skin limp. Eyes water-
ing involuntarily, hair thinning.”
The refugees are invited to write
their stories in a Welcome Book, which
contains “reason after reason after
reason. Testament of how men hurt
women. Testament of the old world.”
Some excerpts:
“Stupid to meet a stranger, but I was
still convinced by the intrinsic goodness of people. I was an innocent, and I
had not been exposed to the world
very much. I didn’t understand how
rapidly things had changed . . . that
there was no longer any need for the
men to hold their bodies in check or to
carry on the lie that we mattered.”
“My husband left the village. My
brothers left. Everyone else’s husbands,
brothers, sons and fathers and uncles
and nephews left too. They went in
droves. They apologized for leaving.
There was danger in them. They
hoped that we would understand.”
These entries appear at brief intervals throughout the main narrative,
which is essentially a psychological
thriller about what happens to the
family after King disappears, then is
presumed dead. Absent their ultra-controlling yet beloved leader, the women
are devastated (also, the eldest daughter, Grace, is mysteriously pregnant),
but at first, things go fairly well. “Incidences of joy like playing hide-andseek together on a rare raining day.
Water rinsing the walls of the house,
pouring to the drains. From the tall
glass doors of the ballroom we watch it
pooling on the ground, and filling
empty burnt-earth pots that once held
small, fragrant trees.” Even in descriptions of more painful activities, there’s
something Joni Mitchell-esque about
the lyrical, emotional tone of the prose.
Not long after King disappears,
two men and a boy wash ashore.
Though the narration in the first part
of the book shifts between Grace, Lia
and the three sisters as a group, from
here the story is told exclusively by
Lia: “Emergency has always been
with us; if not present emergency
then always the idea that it is
coming. The ringing in the air after a
loud sound has passed. The count
before the thunder hits. And here,
finally, is the emergency we’ve been
waiting for all our lives.”
As the emotional economy of the
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SECOND CHANCES WITH
PAPERBACK REDESIGNS
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Read more reviews and news
newsday.com/books
SOPHIE DAVIDSON
books
thisweek
Readings & signings on LI
Monday
Fran Hawthorne
talks about and
signs copies of
her novel “The
Heirs.” At 7 p.m.,
Turn of the
Corkscrew Books and Wine,
110 N. Park Ave., Rockville
Centre; 516-764-6000,
turnofthecorkscrew.com.
Author Nicholas
Hirshon talks
about and signs
copies of “We
Want Fish
Sticks: The
Bizarre and
Infamous
Rebranding of the New York
Islanders.” At 7 p.m., Book
Revue, 313 New York Ave.,
Huntington; 631-271-1442,
bookrevue.com.
Tuesday
Sara L. Merwin
talks about and
signs copies of
“The Informed
Patient: A Complete Guide to a
Hospital Stay,”
written with Karen A. Friedman. At 2 p.m., Plainview-Old
Bethpage Public Library, 999
Old Country Rd., Plainview;
516-938-0077, poblib.org/events.
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
newsday.com
Jacqueline Becker talks about and
signs copies of “Raging Against
Aging: kicking & screaming,
laughing & crying, stretching &
kvetching.” At 2 p.m., Great Neck
Library, 159 Bayview Ave., Great
Neck; 516-466-8055,
greatnecklibrary.org.
Compiled by Nyasia Draper
reviews
Eric Clapton, restless rocker
SLOWHAND: The Life and Music
of Eric Clapton, by Philip Norman.
Little, Brown and Co., 419 pp., $30.
BY PHILIP BOOTH
The Washington Post
‘H
ave I ever been satisfied? Definitely for one night, yeah,” Eric
Clapton once told Rolling Stone.
He referred fondly to a 1968 show
in Philadelphia with Cream, his innovative
and enormously successful band with drummer Ginger Baker and bassist Jack Bruce.
When it comes to musical genres, bandmates,
relationships with women and even his place in
the rock universe, Clapton has always been
driven by an unquenchable thirst for genuine
satisfaction, Philip Norman contends in “Slowhand.” It’s a comprehensive and often illuminating account of the life and career of a musician
who has had an outsize influence on generations of guitarists. Norman, a former journalist,
is best known for his 2,000-plus pages of Beatles
biographies.
Cream’s brilliant but brief run yielded sales
of more than 15 million albums. Their
breakup was characteristic of Clapton’s musical wanderings: Nearly every time he joined
or started a band, his dissatisfaction or curiosity about exploring new musical terrain led
him to bolt just when the group hit its artistic
and/or commercial stride.
Clapton made his name with an 18-month
stint in the Yardbirds, whose version of the
blues chestnut “Good Morning Little Schoolgirl” featured the first truly distinctive Clapton
solo. Disappointed by the group’s shift toward
pop, he exited about the time “For Your Love”
became its first charting U.S. single.
Clapton joined British blues godfather John
Mayall’s band in April 1965 and left a little more
than a year later, before the release of Mayall’s
LITTLE, BROWN
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“Slowhand” examines the life of Clapton, an
outsize influence on generations.
“Blues Breakers With Eric Clapton.” The supergroup Blind Faith unofficially began when
former Cream drummer Baker barged his way
into Clapton’s jam session with singer-organist
Steve Winwood. Four months, one big-selling
album and an arena tour later, the band broke
up.
A stint with the rootsy folk-blues group
Delaney and Bonnie and Friends was followed
by Clapton’s self-titled 1970 solo debut. A musically exhilarating collaboration with Allman
Brothers slide-guitar genius Duane Allman
resulted in the double album “Layla and Ot
Love Songs,” and the two became fast frien
“He was like the musical brother I never ha
but wished I did,” Clapton said. His chart-b
ing solo singles have included “I Shot the S
iff,” “Lay Down Sally” and “Change the Wo
Norman draws on his extensive interview
with Clapton’s music industry associates, fa
members and ex-wife Pattie Boyd, along wi
Clapton’s diaries and 2008 autobiography.
Notably, the author didn’t interview Clapto
the book.
By law, rock star biographies must focus o
wine and women, along with song. So Norm
dutifully details Clapton’s prodigious intake
heroin, cocaine, pills and alcohol. He finally
committed to sobriety in 1987. The author
spends much time, too, on Clapton’s variou
infidelities and his wooing of Harrison’s wi
former model Boyd, who inspired The Beat
“Something” and Clapton’s “Layla” and “Wo
derful Tonight.” The new couple’s nine-yea
marriage was rocky: “The obsession he had
nurtured at a distance for five years began t
away the moment he won her,” Norman wr
Clapton settled into a more stable family life
2002, when he wed Melia McEnery; they ha
three daughters.
The book’s darkest passage arrives with
loss of Clapton’s son, Conor, 4, who fell fro
window of the 53rd-floor Manhattan apartm
where he was staying with his mother, Lory
Santo, in 1991. “Tears in Heaven,” written fo
Conor, became Clapton’s second-biggest si
Exhaustive as it is, “Slowhand” might h
delved more deeply into why Clapton’s m
has resonated so strongly with the public
so long, and how other rock and blues gui
tarists now view the playing of the man fr
quently called one of the greatest six-strin
slingers of all time. “Clapton Is God,” acco
ing to graffiti famously scribbled on walls
around central London in 1965. Do we stil
hear the spark of the divine?
He can’t spell, but his message is clear
FOX 8, by George Saunders.
Random House, 48 pp., $17.
BY TOM BEER
tom.beer@newsday.com
‘D
eer Reeder: First may I say,
sorry for any werds I spel
rong,” begins the new story by
George Saunders, published as
a diminutive stand-alone book with illustrations by Chelsea Cardinal. No, the Man
Booker Prize-winning author of “Lincoln in
the Bardo” and “Tenth of December” has
not been struck with dyslexia or
deactivated his spell-checker. “Fox 8” is
narrated by the titular creature, who has
learned “Yuman” language by listening at
the window as a mother reads bedtime
stories to her children.”They sounded like
prety music!” reports the fox. Unfortunately, Fox 8 has learned only the sound of
our “werds” — proper spelling eludes him.
Or perhaps fortunately. The idiosyncratic
spelling is one of the charms of this slight,
sweet, odd fable — one that is not really
sophisticated enough for adult readers but
is too dark for children. (Kids, though,
would love the brazen misspellings —
“Bare” for “bear,” “Berd” for “bird,” “Kar”
for “car,” and so forth.)
The story, such as it is, concerns Fox 8’s
journey in search of food for his band, which
takes him and his loyal friend Fox 7 to
FoxViewCommons, a newly constructed
“Mawl” where rumors of a “Fud Cort” hold
hope for the starving foxes. (“What is BonTon, what is Compu-Fun, what is Hooters,
what is Kookies-N-Cream?” wonder the
animals.) Our narrator is a dreamy, idealistic
sort, and what he knows of humans he has
learned at the bedroom window, a scene of
domestic love sealed with a “gudnite kiss.” It
has not prepared Fox 8 for the dangers of
crossing the “Par King” or for the cruelties
visited upon Fox 7 by a pair of sadistic construction workers they encounter.
Of course, it is not just the intentional
harm caused by a pair of individual humans
that threatens the
foxes; the construction of the mall is
what has destroyed
their ecosystem and
decimated their food
supply in the first
place. That makes “Fox
8” a timely lesson
about environmental
stewardship — though
one that has been more
compellingly delivered
in works such as Richard
Adams’ “Watership Down,” a classic that
just been adapted as an animated series,
streaming on Netflix.
newsday.com/books
bestsellers
bookshelf
r Second chances in print
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‘STICKY FINGERS,’ BY JOE HAGAN
Graphic designer Linda Huang admits the advent of
social media has changed her job, allowing her to see
the latest work of fellow designers and get a peek at
book jackets before they hit shelves. Huang has noticed
that a simpler look can telegraph a lot, like the cleverly
straightforward cover for Elif Batuman’s “The Idiot,”
which features a photo of a vaguely brain-shaped rock
against a pink background.
For her redesign of the biography “Sticky Fingers:
The Life and Times of Jann Wenner and Rolling Stone
Magazine,” she wanted to use streamlined imagery —
she ultimately chose a photo of Wenner, Rolling Stone’s
co-founder and publisher — while incorporating the
feel of the 1960s and ’70s music scene that the magazine
became famous for covering. Departing from the hardback design, Huang achieved the rock vibe by using the
gradient, color-blocked background typically found on
concert posters and fliers from that era.
have
music
c for
ireng
ords
ll
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t has
now
PAPERBACK
HARDCOVER
COUNTERPOINT
Hoping to modernize the Turkish illustration that
graced the hardcover, Nicole Caputo, creative director of
Counterpoint, and her in-house team decided a human
element paired with photography would draw in more
readers. Caputo reached out to freelance designer
Allison Saltzman, known for the striking photographic
covers of “Tangerine” and “Sunset City,” to freshen up
one of Counterpoint’s most celebrated books; the 2018
PEN/Faulkner Award winner for fiction features a series
of interwoven stories, including the tales of a woman,
whose boyfriend is in prison, and her aunt, who once
lived in Turkey. Saltzman staged a quick photo shoot in
her living room with her daughter and a rug she picked
up on a trip to Istanbul, then submitted nine designs.
While the team originally settled on a cover with a
woman in a blue dress beside a red suitcase, Caputo
switched it out just days before going to the presses.
“We felt the hand design would reach the widest
audience,” she said, “and that the image was more
relatable and more striking.”
on for
VINTAGE
‘IMPROVEMENT,’ BY JOAN SILBER
(INCLUDING ALL FORMATS
AND AGE RANGES)
THAMES & HUDSON
paperback release is a second chance of sorts.
If for some reason a book’s hardcover design
doesn’t resonate with readers, publishers have
an opportunity to go back to the drawing
COUNTERPOINT
Special to Newsday
AMAZON.COM
ther
nds.
ad,
bustSherorld.”
ws
amily
ith
TOP 25 OVERALL
BESTSELLERS
board and reinvigorate the vibe of the book, not to
mention show off any fancy awards that might have
been bestowed.
While most of us just see a pretty cover, a lot goes
on behind the scenes. We asked designers and creative
directors to tell us how three hardback-to-paperback
redesigns came together.
THAMES & HUDSON
BY ARLENE GROSS
Publishers Weekly’s U.S. list powered by NPD
BookScan for the week ending Dec. 22.
Latest list: newsday.com/books
HOUSE
RANDOM
‘THE UNFINISHED PALAZZO,’ BY JUDITH MACKRELL
Lower production costs allow Rosie Keane, the
cover design manager at Thames & Hudson (United
Kingdom), to sprinkle embellishments on paperbacks
that can’t be extended to hardbacks. She did just that
with the redesign for “The Unfinished Palazzo,” a
history of three socialites — Luisa Casati, Doris
Castlerosse and Peggy Guggenheim — who had
connections to Venice’s Palazzo Venier. Keane
swapped out the more literal black-and-white cover,
which featured photos of the women and the Venice
skyline, and amped up the paperback version with
shimmery gold ink and embossed lettering to evoke
the glitz and glamour of the socialites’ time in Venice.
The noirish geometric cover looks nothing like an
art history book, which is the point: It aims to appeal
to fiction readers and others looking for an escape.
1. BECOMING, by Michelle Obama (Crown)
2. THE MELTDOWN (DIARY OF A
WIMPY KID #13), by Jeff Kinney
(Amulet)
3. THE WONKY DONKEY,
by Craig Smith (Scholastic)
4. HOMEBODY, by Joanna Gaines
(Harper Design)
5. GIRL, WASH YOUR FACE,
by Rachel Hollis (Thomas Nelson)
6. THE RECKONING, by John Grisham
(Doubleday)
7. THE POINT OF IT ALL,
by Charles Krauthammer
(Crown Forum)
8. MAGNOLIA TABLE,
by Joanna Gaines (Morrow)
9. FIRE & BLOOD, by George R.R. Martin
(Bantam)
10. EVERY BREATH, by Nicholas Sparks
(Grand Central)
11. WHOSE BOAT IS THIS BOAT?,
by The Late Show (Simon & Schuster)
12. EDUCATED, by Tara Westover
(Random House)
13. KILLING THE SS, by Bill O’Reilly
and Martin Dugard (Holt)
14. GUINNESS WORLD RECORDS 2019
(Guinness World Records)
15. LORD OF THE FLEAS (DOG MAN #5),
by Dav Pilkey (Graphix)
16. FANTASTIC BEASTS: THE CRIMES OF
GRINDELWALD, by J.K. Rowling
(Scholastic/Levine)
17. TARGET: ALEX CROSS,
by James Patterson (Little, Brown)
18. COOK LIKE A PRO, by Ina Garten
(Clarkson Potter)
19. GMORNING, GNIGHT!,
by Lin-Manuel Miranda
(Random House)
20. CRAVINGS: HUNGRY FOR MORE,
by Chrissy Teigen (Clarkson Potter)
21. YOU ARE A BADASS,
by Jen Sincero (Running)
22. THE NEXT PERSON YOU MEET IN
HEAVEN, by Mitch Albom (Harper)
23. WHERE THE CRAWDADS SING,
by Delia Owens (Putnam)
24. HOW THE GRINCH STOLE
CHRISTMAS!, by Dr. Seuss
(Random House)
25. SHADE, by Pete Souza (Little, Brown)
C15
Fanfare N
C16
What’s Inside The
Newsday App?
Cool shows to chill with
PREVIEW from C10
Will there be one?
Lifetime movie business, with this
film that she wrote, in part, about her
life and family.
FEB. 25
FEB. 10
MARGARET: THE REBEL ROYAL
(WNET/13, 10 p.m.)
This BBC two-parter is described by
the network as an “Intimate series
profiling Princess Margaret, whose life
and loves reflected the social and
sexual revolution that transformed
Britain during the 20th century.”
FEB. 12
MIRACLE WORKERS (TBS, 10 p.m.)
Described as a “workplace”
comedy, where the workplace is
heaven, presided over by an unkempt
God (Steve Buscemi) who directs one
of his angel minions (Daniel
Radcliffe) to handle humanity’s
prayers. Adapted from a comic novel
by Simon Rich (“Man Seeking
Woman”) with recurring guest stars
Tituss Burgess, Margaret Cho, Tim
Meadows, Chris Parnell, and Angela
Kinsey.
FEB. 15
PROVEN INNOCENT (Fox/5, 9 p.m.)
Legal procedural about firm that
represents the wrongfully convicted
stars Kelsey Grammer — also Rachelle
Lefevre (“Under the Dome”), Vincent
Kartheiser (“Mad Men”), Russell
Hornsby (“Grimm”), Nikki M. James
(“Brain Dead”) and Laurie Holden
(“The Walking Dead” and “The
Americans”); produced by “Empire’s”
Danny Strong.
Personalized Alerts
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NDAPPALERTS3X154
THE UMBRELLA ACADEMY (Netflix)
Ten-parter with Ellen Page, Tom
Hopper and Mary J. Blige in this
adaptation of the graphic novel by
Gerard Way, about a dysfunctional
family of superheroes, in 1977.
FEB. 17
ELVIS ALL-STAR TRIBUTE (NBC/4, 9 p.m.)
This Blake Shelton-hosted special
celebrates Elvis with a look back at the
Dec. 3, 1968, special on NBC — his first
live TV performance since 1961, and an
eye-popping one too (recall the black
leather jumpsuit). Lots of guest
performances.
FEB. 19
AMERICAN MASTERS: SAMMY DAVIS
JR.: I’VE GOTTA BE ME (WNET/13, 10 p.m.)
Davis — who died in 1990 — gets the
“Masters” treatment.
FEB. 24
THE ACADEMY AWARDS (ABC/7, 8 p.m.)
So far the 91st Academy Awards
show — which will originate from
the Dolby Theatre in Hollywood —
still does not have a host for the
telecast, leaving open the question:
THE ENEMY WITHIN
(NBC/4, 10 p.m.)
Thriller with Jennifer Carpenter
(“Dexter”) about a CIA-agent-turned
traitor, who gets a get-out-fail pass by
an agent (Morris Chestnut) if she helps
him track down a dangerous criminal.
FEB. 27
WHISKEY CAVALIER
(ABC/7, 10 p.m.)
Dramedy from Bill Lawrence
(“Scrubs”) and David Hemsington is
about a CIA/FBI interagency task force,
starring Scott Foley (“Scandal”) and
Lauren Cohan (“The Walking Dead”).
MARCH 3
COSMOS: POSSIBLE WORLDS
(Fox/5, 9 p.m.)
This long-awaited sequel to the
successful 2014 series — “Cosmos: A
Spacetime Odyssey,” produced by Seth
MacFarlane — will again be hosted by
Neil deGrasse Tyson.
MARCH 12
THE VILLAGE (NBC/4, 10 p.m.)
A “This Is Us” clone, about the
interconnected lives of people who live
in a Brooklyn apartment building —
starring Moran Atias, Dominic
Chianese, Warren Christie, Frankie
Faison, Jerod Haynes, Daren Kagasoff,
Michaela McManus, Lorraine
Toussaint, and Grace Van Dien. This is
a preview episode; the series launches
April 2 at 9.
MARCH 18
THE FIX (ABC/7, 10 p.m.)
Former O.J. prosecutor Marcia Clark
helped produce-inspire this legal
drama, about a Los Angeles district
attorney (Robin Tunney) who loses a
high-profile murder trial featuring a
celebrity suspect (“Lost’s” Adewale
Akinnuoye-Agbaje). Afterward, she
moves to the Pacific Northwest, and is
drawn back eight years later.
MARCH 20
THE ACT (Hulu)
True crime anthology series begins
with an eight-episode story, about a
“toxic mother/daughter relationship,”
starring Patricia Arquette, Joey King,
Chloë Sevigny, AnnaSophia Robb and
Calum Worthy. New episodes weekly.
MARCH 27
MILLION DOLLAR MILE
(CBS/2, 9 p.m.)
This 10-episode reality competition
— from LeBron James’ production
company, hosted by Tim Tebow —
features a mile-long obstacle course.
The obstacle: elite athletes who try to
stop the contestant from winning the
$1 million pot.
ELI GROSS-DUCKFAT & CHORIZO
newsday.com/travel
TRAVEL N
travel
C17
OFF THE BEATEN PATH
DISCOVER EUROPE’S
REMOTE ATTRACTIONS
C20
Airport lounges, such as the Escape Lounge seen here, have upped their games and now offer luxury escapes for those willing to pay.
BY LAURA DAILY
The Washington Post
Most travelers now can get day-pass access to lounges
class ticket or one of those
fancy premium credit cards to
gain entry. A number of
lounges sell single-use day
passes that are just the ticket
for travelers with time to kill or
in need of a quiet respite.
Once Spartan spaces where
harried frequent flyers could
get a cup of coffee, make a
phone call and read the newspaper, airport lounges have
changed dramatically in the
past decade, and are now
nicely designed, comfortable
spaces offering better food and
worthwhile amenities.
“Airlines used to focus on the
corporate traveler. Now across
the industry, we’re seeing them
invest in lounges to create a
total experience for both the
business and leisure traveler,”
says Brett Catlin, managing
See LOUNGES on C18
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
Soothing ESCAPES
from airport bustle
newsday.com
S
tuck at the airport.
Ugh. Whatever the
reason — long layover,
bad weather or an
unexpected delay —
and no matter how nice the
terminal, you’re probably bored
or tired. Wouldn’t it be lovely
to have somewhere to escape
the crowds, relax comfortably,
charge your cellphone without
battling for an electrical outlet
and grab a bite that doesn’t
take a chomp out of your wallet? Such a place exists — an
airport lounge.
You don’t you need a membership, elite status, a first-
director of alliances and
product at Alaska Airlines,
which is spending $40 million
to build and renovate lounges
across the United States. In
addition to the U.S. airlinebranded lounges, there are
some operated independently,
such as the Club Airport
Lounge and Escape Lounge.
Want to enter the inner
sanctum? Expect to pay $40 to
$60 per person, typically at the
door, for those operated by
major U.S. carriers. (As of Nov.
15, Delta Air Lines discontinued
the sale of single-visit passes to
Delta Sky Clubs, and with the
exception of Air Canada, Etihad
TRAVEL N
C18
travel
Havens amid airport bustle
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
ALASKA AIRLINES’
ALASKA LOUNGE
LOCATIONS Seven airports,
including Kennedy Airport in
New York City, Los Angeles;
Portland, Oregon; Anchorage,
and three in Seattle-Tacoma.
DAY PASS $50
AMENITIES Food and snacks,
beverages (including wine and
beer), TVs, high-speed Wi-Fi,
online access to newspapers,
concierge service stations to
help with last-minute upgrades.
ON THE MENU Steel-cut oatmeal, scones, bagels, a salad bar
AMERICAN AIRLINES
American Airlines Admirals Club are at 50-plus locations worldwide offering shower suites and business centers as well as Wi-Fi and food.
ALASKA AIRLINES
Airways and Emirates, few
international carriers sell day
passes.)
You’ll be asked to show a
government-issued ID and a
boarding pass for same-day
travel on the airline or a
partner airline. These spaces
are capacity-controlled; you
may be denied entry if it is
crowded with card-carrying
members and other passengers
entitled to club use.
Once inside, travelers often
receive access to complimentary eats, ample workspace
with high-speed internet,
comfy spots to kick back,
oodles of power outlets, private
restrooms (where no one looks
askance if you brush your teeth
or change your clothes) and, in
some lounges, a fully staffed
travel desk.
That travel desk may be the
most important. Airlines assign
only their best-of-the-best gate
agents to their lounges. So, if
you miss a connection or your
flight is canceled, you have an
experienced airline pro acting
as a concierge who knows all
the tricks to get you rebooked.
If you know in advance that
you’ll have a long layover during your travels, you may want
to check out programs such as
LoungeBuddy or Lounge Pass,
in addition to the airline you
are flying. These websites offer
access to hundreds of lounges
globally. Amenities and pricing
vary by lounge — for example,
some passes are only good for
a few hours, or at limited times
— and you may need to book
at least 24 hours in advance, so
read the fine print and plan
accordingly.
Here are some lounge
options and the services the
airlines list:
AIRPORT LOUNGE DEVELOPMENT
newsday.com
LOUNGES from C17
The Club has airport lounges across the United States.
Alaska Airlines has lounges nationwide, including at Kennedy Airport.
with breads, soups, veggies,
hummus. Custom-crafted
cocktails. Additional menu
with fresh-made entrees such
as a Korean rice bowl or
chicken pesto panini for $8 to
$10.
LITTLE EXTRAS Starbucks
coffee prepared by professional
baristas in some locations
(Kennedy now, Seattle soon).
Wide selection of local
airports in Charlotte, North
Carolina; Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; Logan in Boston, and
Dallas-Fort Worth in Texas
because of construction that
has limited seating)
AMENITIES Lounge-style seating, high-speed Wi-Fi, personal
travel assistance, snacks and
beverages, shower suites and
business centers.
ON THE MENU Breakfast might
microbrews — 12 on tap in
Seattle-Tacoma.
IF YOU LOVE IT Purchase a
membership within 30 days of
purchasing a day pass and
Alaska Airlines will refund the
cost of the day pass.
AMERICAN AIRLINES’
ADMIRALS CLUB
LOCATIONS 50-plus worldwide
DAY PASS $59 (not available at
include hard-boiled eggs, oatmeal and cereal, fruit, yogurt,
bagels. The afternoon finds
soups, fresh salads, vegetables,
hummus and cheese. Some
clubs offer full meals for sale as
well as premium cocktails.
LITTLE EXTRAS Fresh-brewed
La Colombe coffee. Day-pass
holders may be accompanied
by up to three children younger
than 18 for no charge,
newsday.com/travel
C19
TRAVEL N
PREPARE
FOR ARRIVAL
UNITED AIRLINES
PA R A D I S E I S A S H O R T F L I G H T AW AY
Palm Beach’s best is even more enticing. Our private
beachfront, world-class amenities, gracious service,
and unparalleled seaside glamour will make your stay
unforgettable. We invite you to explore all this iconic
resort has to offer. Once you stay, you’ll understand®
Visit thebreakers.com, call 888-844-6650
or consult your travel professional.
United Airlines has United Club lounges at 31 airports worldwide.
Brewing Co.
LITTLE EXTRAS Wines selected by a
master sommelier.
2144115201
HAWAIIAN AIRLINES
THE CLUB AIRPORT LOUNGE
Hawaiian Airlines Plumeria Lounge at
Honolulu’s main airport.
UNITED AIRLINES’ UNITED CLUB
LOCATION Honolulu’s Daniel K.
Inouye Airport
DAY PASS $40
AMENITIES Food and snacks, beverages (including wine and beer), highspeed Wi-Fi, USB charging stations.
ON THE MENU Limited buffet for
breakfast, lunch and dinner. Pastries
by La Tour Cafe. Craft beer from Maui
LOCATIONS At airports including
Minneapolis-St. Paul in Minnesota;
Oakland in California; Bradley in
Connecticut; Reno-Tahoe in Nevada;
Greenville-Spartanburg in South Carolina, and Ontario in California.
DAY PASS $40 if you prepurchase, $45
at the door
AMENITIES Plenty of seating, quiet
library area, full bar, business space,
high-speed Wi-Fi.
ON THE MENU Food and beverage
menu with complimentary lighter fare
including cereals and pastries at breakfast, and sandwiches, salads and soups
the rest of the day. You can also order
heartier dishes from an extensive
menu for an additional charges.
LITTLE EXTRAS Free use of iPads.
Above ALL 6 FREE* offer applies to select balcony staterooms & above.
4-Night Bahamas
from Miami, FL
from $399* pp.
4-Night Bermuda
from New York, NY
from $429* pp.
4-Night Cuba
from Miami, FL
from $469* pp.
7-Night Alaska
from Seattle, WA
from $799* pp.
7-Night Europe
from Barcelona
from $799* pp.
7-Night Bahamas
from New York, NY
from $699* pp.
7-Night Hawaii
from Honolulu, HI
from $1,429* pp.
10-Night Caribbean
from New York, NY
from $959* pp.
*Rates shown above are based on the lowest fared interior stateroom and / or sailaway fares. Upgrade to a balcony
,+2+%-..0 .- 21.(% +. -%&%!(% +"% $)88 1%/%3+ .$ 4.-7%#!2/ *-)!,% 6!/%', 5ALL 6 FREE” offer. Restrictions apply.
Visit www.DirectLineCruises.com/newsday
Call toll-free for a FREE Brochure & Reservations
1-8
6 6-4 91-13 0 9
ww w. Di r ect Li neCr ui ses. com
*Rates and offers shown above apply to select sailings / staterooms and are subject to availability. Taxes and fees are additional.
Norwegian’s “ALL 6 Free” is not applicable with sailaway fares in category IX, OX, BX or MX staterooms. Available on select
dates.
2145072301
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
HAWAIIAN AIRLINES’
PLUMERIA LOUNGE
ESCAPE LOUNGE
newsday.com
LOCATIONS More than 45 in 31 airports
worldwide.
DAY PASS $59
AMENITIES Beverages and light
snacks, bar service, high-speed Wi-Fi,
agent assistance with reservations,
seat assignments and electronic
ticketing.
ON THE MENU Pastries, bagels, salad
bar, soups, fresh vegetables with dip.
Larger lounges offer full breakfast,
lunch and dinner buffets.
LITTLE EXTRAS Free use of color
printers. Private “phone booths” with
speakerphones at some locations.
IF YOU LOVE IT Purchase a membership within 30 days of purchasing a
day pass and United will waive the $50
initiation fee.
LOCATIONS In U.S. airports, including
Atlanta Hartsfield-Jackson; Boston;
Baltimore-Washington Thurgood
Marshall; Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky; Dallas-Fort Worth; Las Vegas’
McCarran; Orlando; Phoenix Sky
Harbor; Pittsburgh; Seattle; and San
Jose. In Britain at London’s Gatwick
and Heathrow airports.
DAY PASS $40
AMENITIES Snacks, bottled water, soft
drinks and alcoholic beverages,
(including beer, wine and liquor), free
Wi-Fi, charging ports, TV and
workstations with desktop PCs. Some
locations offer shower facilities.
LITTLE EXTRAS Unlike other airline
lounges, the Club allows guests to get
food from an airport restaurant and
bring it in.
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travel
newsday.com/travel
Europe off the beaten path
Hidden gems
await in Italy,
Portugal, Ireland
BY RICK STEVES
Tribute Content Agency
I
n my early days as a
guidebook writer,
Europe’s undiscovered
nooks and undeveloped
crannies held the most
appeal for me — and they still
do. But with ever more sophisticated travelers armed with
enough time and money to see
the Europe of their dreams,
places I “discovered” a few
decades ago are now suffering
from Back Door congestion.
Given that, I’ve come to treasure even more those destinations that still have the feeling of
a world apart. Away from the
tourist fray, these special spots
are backwaters in the best sense
of the word, each with its own
genuine charm.
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
newsday.com
It typically takes a little extra
effort to reach such places, but
the reward is considerable.
Gimmelwald, a remote and
impossibly idyllic village high in
the Swiss Alps, is a classic
example. Parking your car in the
valley floor and riding the cable
car up is like going through a
looking glass.
Your car shrinks, your
stomach flip-flops, you look
over the valley as if suspended
from a hang glider. Then,
suddenly, the cable-car doors
slide open and you’re deposited
into another world. It’s a place
where the air is clean and sharp;
where the only noises are bees,
bugs and birds pursuing alpine
flowers; where men sucking
gnome-like pipes are busy
chopping firewood.
Or take Aero Island. Few
visitors to Scandinavia even
notice this sleepy 6-by-22-mile
island on Denmark’s southern
edge (it’s four hours by train
from Copenhagen). The main
town, Aeroskobing, is like a
village in a bottle, where you can
wander down cobbled lanes
right out of the 1680s, when the
town was the wealthy home port
of commercial sailing ships.
COZY TAKEN TO EXTREMES
What is there to do in this
time-passed place? Not much.
RICK STEVES’ EUROPE / DOMINIC ARIZONA BONUCCELLI
EXTRA EFFORT, BIG REWARDS
A pedestrian bridge is all that connects the hilltop village of Civita di Bagnoregio to the rest of central Italy.
Wander the town, pedal a rented
bike, enjoy a picnic dinner out
on the island’s spit as the late
summer sun sets. It’s a perfect
Danish scene that takes “cozy”
to enjoyable extremes.
Portugal’s beachy south coast
is well discovered now, but one
bit of old magic still glitters
quietly in the sun: Salema. This
longtime fishing village is at the
end of a small road that’s only
recently been paved. There are a
dozen or so restaurants, a few
hotels and endless summer sun.
Most important, it has a long,
broad, gorgeous beach, luxurious with powder-fine sand.
These days, Salema is just
barely a fishing village, with
only six or eight working
boats. At night, you’ll see
evenly spaced lights bobbing
on the horizon: Those are the
fishermen, out in search of
squid, sardines and octopuses.
The catch that flops into the
boats is bound for the market
and maybe onto your beachfront dinner plate.
BLEAK AND BEAUTIFUL
Far to the north, off Ireland’s
jagged west coast, the Aran
Islands confront the wild
Atlantic with stubborn grit.
Bleak and beautiful Inishmore,
the largest, is nine miles of
weather-beaten rock with one
town. Inhabitants eke out a
simple livelihood from a mean
sea and less than six inches of
topsoil.
Tourism is a true boon to the
tough economy of the starkly
beautiful island, which has one
must-see sight: Dun Aengus.
This Iron Age stone fortress
hangs spectacularly and
precariously on the edge of a
sheer cliff. Even at the height
of tourist season (especially if
you come early or late in the
day), you can be alone here,
high above the crashing
Atlantic, feeling like the
westernmost person in Europe.
Little Civita di Bagnoregio
(an hour north of Rome) is
definitely a world apart, teetering atop a pinnacle in a vast
canyon. To reach this Italian
hill town, you leave your car
behind, walk across an elevated path, pass through a cut
in the rock made by Etruscans
2,500 years ago and head
under a 12th century arch.
Inside the gate, the charms
of Civita are subtle. There are
no lists of attractions,
orientation tours or museum
hours. It’s just Italy. The warm
stone walls glow, and each
stairway is an invitation to take
out a sketch pad or camera.
Take a seat on the church steps
and observe the scene.
With crowds becoming a
problem across the continent,
sampling such “world apart”
destinations is a smart way to
experience Europe. They may
be quieter and less flashy than
the blockbuster sites, but these
little gems are guaranteed to
create enduring travel
memories.
fanfare
Hate to Fly?
By Jeraldine Saunders
ARIES (March 21-April 19) Pleasure
comes before business. Social interactions
might come more naturally than trying to
make headway with work or career matters
in the week to come. A close companion
knows how to make you smile.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Romance goes
into full bloom. Favorable circumstances
may help a relationship reach a whole new
level of understanding. Your personal charm
and magnetism make it easy to have your
way this week.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Keep it to
yourself. Be friendly and courteous with
those you encounter but avoid giving away
too much personal information. Passion and
conviction can rally others to join your
cause in the week ahead.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Logic falls to
the wayside. You may find the going easier
if you go with your gut instinct rather than
trying to compute all the facts. Be sure to
give a romantic partner all the time he or
she deserves this week.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) Stick with
what works. This is not the week to test
radical new ideas because if you rock the
boat you may create headaches. Focus your
attention on activities that inspire and bring
enjoyment in the week ahead.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) Don’t
beat a dead horse. Agree to disagree as
constantly trying to change someone’s
mind will just have you running in endless
circles. Put the needs of family and friends
above all else this week.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) Do your own
thing. You will be at your best when you
think and act independently, so you may
want to choose your own path in the week
ahead. This could be an ideal time to make
changes or upgrades.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Seize the
opportunity. Stay alert in the week ahead as
you may have a chance to make the big
move you desire. Buying a new outfit or
trying a different hairstyle could provide
some much-needed confidence.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Keep it simple.
Overanalyzing a situation could make things
more difficult than they need to be. Stick
with tried and true methods in the week
ahead as you may find the latest time
saving technique to be confusing.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) The sky
belongs to the stars. You’ll feel like a star
this week as your popularity will put you in
high demand in both business and romantic
venues. If you have need of a favor, you’ll
likely get it with ease.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Say it like you
mean it. Being too subtle about your intentions may leave those around you confused
about what you want. Get right to the point,
without being contentious, and you’ll avoid
unnecessary mistakes.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) Have it your
way. Your personality and charm will have
others eating out of the palm of your hand
and make you the center of attention as the
week unfolds. Meeting new people may be
worth your while.
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Comedian Rowan Atkinson, 64
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2145593301
Classifieds
To place an ad call 631-843-7653 or visit newsday.com/buy&sell
AUTOS WANTED
« « « « « « « « « « « « « « « « « « « « « « « « « « «
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«
«
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« « « « « « « « « « « « « « « « « « « « « « « « « « «
JUNK CARS WANTED
TOP DOLLAR OR
516-497-8898
HELP WANTED
«
«
«
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JUNK OR NOT - - I WANT UR
• Loans/Insurance
• Cars for sale
• Service / Equipment
• Four wheel drive
• Motorcycles
• Collectibles
• Sports cars
• Trucks
• RV’s
COLLECTIBLE CARS
MUSCLE CARS WANTED
1925 -2010 ANY COND. Pvt Col
TEXT PIX or Call 516-721-3951
AUTOS FOR SALE
Atlantic Lexus of 110
-- 2090 Broadhollow Rd -Farmingdale B 516-795-7600
www.atlanticlexus.com
HYUNDAI 2008 Sonata mint
snrf, alloys $4575 631-422-8116
JUNK - CAR, TRUCK, VAN
Day, Night, Weekends, Holidays
Serving Nass/Suff over 30 yrs
CASH PAID
FREE PICK UP û 631-304-4944
Marine
BOATS FOR SALE
OVER 26
BERTRAM 1989 Sportfish 33ft
Cleanest, Low Hours, Turn Key,
Owner retiring - Getting old...
$37,990.
718 - 972 - 6500
Employment
LEXUS of Rockville Centre
-- 700 Sunrise Hwy, RVC, NY -866-539-2755 LexusofRVC.com
NARDY HONDA SMITHTOWN
559 Jericho Tpke, St. James
nardyhonda.com - 888-532-0122
NISSAN 2006 ALTIMA 2.4S mint
Loaded $3950 631-422-8116
NISSAN 1993 Sentra Orig own
good gas mi. $900 516-395 6497
TOYOTA 2001 CAMRY 180K
Miles $1200 631-624-6974
SPORTS CARS
MAZDA 2015 Miata 6Spd Grand
Touring, Hard Retractable Roof,
Gray, Like New, Only 4,500 mls!
Garaged, $20,500. 631-981-1146
MUSTANG 2011 V6, 6spd, 25k
orig, mint $13,5 631-921-1825
SPORT UTILITY
VEHICLES
CHEVY 2012 Captiva 68k, V6
Carfax, 2x4, snrf, pristine, warr,
Inspected $7,150 516-297-2277
JEEP 2013 PATRIOT 4x4 loaded,
immac,warr$5995 516 692 3177
JEEP 2008 GRAND CHEROKEE
loaded,$5995warr,516-692-3177
JEEP 2004 GRAND CHEROKEE
4.0L $3,995 warr 516-692-3177
AUTOS WANTED
û AARDVARK Auto Buyers û
AUTOS WANTED Dead or Alive
Cash Pd.Free P/U 516-860-6664
CASH FOR ALL CARS, title or
no title. 888-586-5227, yo hablo
espanol, WE COME TO YOU!
NEW CAR DEALER
HONDA
HUNTINGTON HONDA
1055 E. Jericho Tpke
Huntington, NY 631-423-6000
EDUCATIONAL
OPPORTUNITIES
HELP WANTED
WEB ID: ND489558
CONSTRUCTION
Reputable
construction
co.
based on L.I. looking for APM’s
and exp’d Field Supervisors.
City exp a plus. Fax resumes to
631 - 454 - 1212
WebID 21454812
DRIVER - ROUTE POSITIONS
Run Your Own Route
CALLAHEAD Corp.
NO CDL req’d, 4 day work week,
(enjoy 3 days off). Year round,
No lay offs, 100% med, dental,
401K, uniforms, 2 wks paid vac,
raise every 6 months. Will train!
4a-2:30p. SWING Driver $1000/
wk includes $100. weekly bonus
program. ROUTE Driver $900/wk
inclds $100.wkly bonus program,
Plus OT. Apply: Mon-Fri 9a-7p
304 Crossbay Blvd, Queens, NY.
Apply in person, No calls.
WebID 21455186
VEHICLE DAMAGE
INSPECTORS F/T
Comp sal, Bonus, great benefits. 401K w/Company match.
Must have clean drivers license. Adesa Auctions-631-205-5000
Must be able to do light plumbing and carpentry. 4 day work
week. $700. per week.
100% Medical & Dental, 401K,
Uniforms, Paid Vacations, Sick
and Holidays. Apply in person:
TAX SENIOR for Deloitte Tax
Mon-Fri betwn 9am-7pm at:
LLP in Jericho, NY to assist
Call-A-Head Corp., 304
Crossbay Blvd, Qns, NY 11693 companies w/ national, state &
local & int’l tax structures &
WebID 21446845
align the tax function w/ bus.
LANDSCAPER
F/T objectives. Requires: Bachelor’s
Bridgehampton, NY M-F, 8A-5P, degree (or higher) in Acctng.,
2 yrs exp. trim, mow ,edge, Fin., or related field (willing to
prune w/tools. Fax res. Attn Mr. accept foreign education equivLopez 631-234-0058 or mail: Even alent) & 18 mths. of exp. proGreen, 8 Huntington Crossway, viding tax planning services or
preparing & reviewing client
Bridgehampton NY 11962
work papers & tax returns.
To apply, visit https://jobs2.
deloitte.com/us/en/ and enter
in
the
For order taking, phones, light XSFH19FT1218LNI2
data, commission. Entry, Will “Search jobs” field. No calls
“Deloitte”
means
Train! $720.00 per wk. Medical, please.
dental, 401K, 2wks vacation, Deloitte LLP and its subsidiaholiday pay. Apply in Person ries. Please see www.deloitte.
com/us/about for a detailed deat: CALLAHEAD CORP.
scription of the legal structure
304 Crossbay Blvd.
of Deloitte LLP and its subsidQueens, NY 11693
iaries. Deloitte LLP & its subWebID 21446832
sidiaries are equal opportunity
REAL ESTATE
AAA CAREER employers.
HANDYMAN (M/F)
BANK/FINANCIAL
OFFICE HELP
HEALTHCARE
FREE CAREER SEMINAR
$75K-$100K Unlimited Thereafter
Flexible Work Hours & Days
Earned While You Learn
Full Training & Support
CALL TODAY-SPACE LIMITED!
Lindenhurst/W. Islip 631-226-5995
E. Meadow/Lvtwn 516-826-8100
BARN WORKER NEEDED
Mattituck farm, MUST be
exp with horses, feeding, cleanMineola defense PI Law Firm.
ing & familure w/farm equip.
Please call Tom 631-872-4004 9:30am - 5:30pm M-F. Clerical,
typing, and data entry duties.
Bnfts include 401K, health, &
Email resume with
To view all legal notices transitchek.
sal reqs to: adgrlaw@gmail.com
online please visit us at
WebID 21456318
RECEPTIONIST
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PSYCHOLOGIST P/T
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Syosset & Babylon locations.
Email CV: ail5an2ab9@aol.com
WebID 21456241
NEWSDAY BUY & SELL
Read for savings
Advertise for results!!
631-843-7653(SOLD)
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SEE NEWSDAY’S BUY & SELL
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classifieds
Administrative Vacancy Available July 1, 2019
ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENT
for INSTRUCTION
The Assistant Superintendent for Instruction will partner with the Superintendent to provide
instructional leadership to develop and support outstanding and innovative educational programs
and services for all students.
Candidates should possess the following qualifications:
n A rich educational background with at least 5 years of experience as a building principal and/or central
office administrator
n An articulate communicator and good listener who possesses the ability to express a clear point of view
both verbally and in writing
n Proficiency in the management of all facets of personnel matters and functions for certified staff
n An experienced and visionary educational leader with high expectations and knowledge of how to
collaborate to ensure a high-quality education for all students
n A demonstrable record in ensuring academic and social equity for all students
n A demonstrable commitment to staff and student wellness
n A track record of accuracy, detail, and both personal and professional integrity
n A creative problem-solver and thinker who inspires others and instills confidence in all constituencies
n Extensive knowledge & experience in pedagogy and innovative student programming
n Flexible in responding to the daily demands of a changeable job and committed to the effective and
successful completion of tasks
n Ability to collaborate to implement the educational goals and objectives of a high performing school
district
n Appropriate NY State certification as a School District Administrator or School District Leader SDA/SDL.
Doctorate preferred
Diverse candidates are highly encouraged to apply
Salary is competitive and commensurate with experience.
Application deadline: January 18, 2019
Dr. Peter Giarrizzo, Superintendent of Schools
On-Line Application Required: www.olasjobs.org/longisland
www.northshoreschools.org
EOE
ISLAND PARK UFSD
ISLAND
PARK UFSD
Island Park, Long Island, New York
SCHOOL BUS DRIVERS
Civil Service Positions
Civil Service Positions
(Part-Time Substitutes - On Will Call/As Needed Basis)
Qualifications:
• NYS Commercial Driver’s License, Class B or C with
appropriate passenger endorsement, Req’d
• Must pass a NYS DMV Physician’s Examination
• Must pass pre-employment US DOT drug screen
& random drug screenings thereafter
• Must pass NYS Education Dept. Phys. Perf. Test
• Must pass fingerprint and background check
by NYS Dept of Criminal Justice Services
& review by US FBI
Salary: $18.28 - $34.00/hr.
CLEANER
(Substitutes - On Will Call/As Needed Basis)
• All PT Sub cleaners have opportunity to join
the Employee’s Retirement System
• Applicants must be approved by Civil Service and
obtain fingerprint clearance from NYS Education Dept.
Salary: $15.09 - $16.50/hr.
SCHOOL MONITORS
FT classroom positions to assist students
with special needs
Hours: 8:30 AM - 3:30 PM • Salary: $12.00 - $18.50/hr.
PT school monitors to assist students
in the cafeteria
Hours: 11:00 AM - 2:00 PM • Salary: $12.00 - $18.50/hr.
All school monitors have opportunity to join
the Employees’ Retirement System
P/T CASHIER
Anticipated Provisional Civil Service Position
For School Cafeteria
Work cash register using district’s software program
(Point of Sale System), received cash, makes change
accurately and quickly, issues free lunch tickets, prepares daily sales reports, collects and counts money,
prepares deposit slips and receipts. Will Train.
Hours: 11:00 AM - 2:00 PM • Salary: $16.00 - $16.50/hr.
Must be able to pass the NCCS Cashier Exam
If interested, submit letter of interest by 1/16/2019 to
Dr. Rosmarie Bovino, Superintendent
FAX (516) 431-7550 (No emails accepted)
Equal Opportunity Employer
A Service of Nassau BOCES
Assistant Bus Dispatcher
Anticipated Provisional
Civil Service Position For
Transportation Department
• Must meet all requirements of Article 19-A
• NY State Commercial Driver’s License with
School Bus and Passenger Endorsement
• Relevant Bus Routing and Bus Dispatching
Experience Required
• Opportunity to join the Employees’
Retirement System,Individual Health
Insurance and Holiday pay
Salary: TBD
Responsibilities Include:
• Development of Bus Routes with
Transfinder Software
• Development of Schedules for School Trips
using School Dude – Trip Direct
• Assistance to Dispatcher
Substitute Teachers
Elementary and Middle Schools
Qualifications:
• NYS Teaching Certification required
• Experience Preferred
• Teacher Subs have opportunity to join
Teachers’ Retirement System
Salary:
$100 per day 1st 19 days
$105 per day beginning 20th day
If interested, submit letter
of interest and resume to
Dr. Rosmarie Bovino, Superintendent
By January 14, 2019 (Noon)
FAX (516) 431-7550
(No emails accepted)
Equal Opportunity Employer
A Service of Nassau BOCES
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
We visit you. Top $$ Paid or
donate/tax ded. 516-VAN-CARS
NOTICE:
Federal and State law make it unlawful
for employers and employment agencies
to advertise prospective employment
where the job is limited as to age, race,
creed, religion, color, national origin,
sex, disability, genetic disposition or
carrier status or marital status unless
based upon a bona fide occupational
qualification (BFOQ). Newsday does
not knowingly accept advertising in
violation of these laws. When you
suspect employment discrimination,
call the NYC Commission of Human
Rights Hotline at 212-306-7500, or the
Nassau County Commission on Human
Rights at 516-571-3662 or the Suffolk
County Commission on Human Rights at
631-853-5480.
LONG BEACH
PUBLIC SCHOOLS
SENIOR TAX ACCOUNTANT:
Systemax Inc., Port Washington, NY Review/prepare various
federal, state, and local tax returns and schedules; review
and prepare 5471, 8865 & 8858
forms and Subpart F income/
form 1118 foreign tax credit
calculations; prepare federal
and state tax extension payments and compute quarterly
tax installment requirements;
coordinate with domestic and
foreign subsidiaries to ensure
timely, efficient and accurate
reporting of data required to
complete all tax filings; review/
prepare the income tax provisions under the principles of
FAS 109 including current and
deferred provision. Assess need
for valuation allowances where
applicable; assist with the analysis of all tax-related general
ledger accounts to establish adequate tax accounting accruals,
payables, deferred taxes and
tax reserves that support the
company’s tax position in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles; assist
with the financial statement
tax footnote disclosures; assist
in resolving federal and state
and local tax audits; review
compiled documentation, research and prepare written
memoranda in response to IRS
and state and local audit information requests and development of audit plan and strategies; monitor and resolve all
notices from state and local
sources; research federal, state
and local jurisdiction tax matters and accounting issues;
transfer pricing compliance, including assisting with the preparation of annual transfer pricing documentation; handle vendor request W-9 and 1099 tax
related information; and ensure
timely tax calendar filings and
payments. Five years of experience in job offered req’d. CPA
license req’d. Bachelor’s degree
in Accounting req’d.
E-mail
resumes
to
recruiting@
systemax.com
The North Shore District, a small educational community of five schools on the north
coast of Long Island NY, serves a rich mix of students whose academic performance
is consistently high by area and national standards.
newsday.com
JEEP 2002 Grand Cherokee 4x4
Immac $2995warr 516-692-3177
• Career opportunities
• Career services
• Help wanted
• Financial/Banking
• Retail & Sales
• Education careers
• Instruction / Schools
Ask about putting
your ad on
newsday.com
CLERICAL
CIVIL SERVICE EXAMS
***************
All positions require
applications to the
Civil Service office
by January 11, 2019
by 5pm. Tests will be
administered
on March 2, 2019.
* SECRETARY I
* ACCOUNT CLERK
* BOOKKEEPER
***************
For more specific
information go to
www.longbeachny.gov
and click on the
Civil Service/Employment.
Civil Service exams for the
Long Beach Public Schools
are the only valid lists
used for employment
within the District.
Long Beach Public Schools
cannot use Nassau County
Civil Service lists.(EOE)
HELP WANTED
C23
Fanfare N
Automotive
NORTH SHORE SCHOOL DISTRICT
THESE PRICES & PAYMENTS ARE ONLY AVAILABLE AT ONE OF THESE 3 LOCATIONS!
WEEKEND SPECIALS!
Fanfare N
C24
OPEN 7 DAYS WEEK! SALES HOURS:
M-F 9-9, SAT. 9-6, SUN. 11-6
CHEVROLET OPEN 7 DAYS WEEK! SALES HOURS:
220 North Franklin Street | Hempstead MillenniumChevrolet.com
1350 Sunrise Highway | Bay Shore AtlanticChevy.com
1-833-785-6462
M-F 9-9, SAT. 9-6, SUN. 11-6
1-844-299-9053
OVER 50 AVAILABLE AT THIS PRICE OR PAYMENTS!
MSRP ............................................................................................-$27,680
FACTORY REBATE ........................................................................-$1,500
BRAND NEW 2019 CHEVROLET FINANCE THROUGH GM FINANCIAL..............................................$1,000
EQUINOX ATLANTIC/HUNTINGTON/MILLENNIUMDISCOUNT . . . . . . . . . . . . .-$3,203
LEASE CONQUEST REBATE ..............................................................-$1,500
( Must be currently leasing 2008 or newer
NON-GM Vehicle transferable in household)
!
& READY TO ROLL
Excludes tax, tags & title
FINANCE FOR
OVER 50 IN STOCK
Automatic Transmisison, 1.5 Liter Turbo 4 CYL, Power Windows, Power Locks, Air Conditioning, Bluetooth Ready, OnStar, Remote Keyless Entry, Push Button Start
ONLY $995 DOWN PAYMENT!
20477
$
2019
ALL-WHEEL
DRIVE
OR
ONLY $1,995 DOWN PAYMENT!
OVER 50 AVAILABLE AT THIS PRICE OR PAYMENTS! MSRP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .-$33,795
FACTORY REBATE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .-$750
TRAVERSE ATLANTIC/HUNTINGTON/MILLENNIUMDISCOUNT ................-$3,768
8 PASSENGER SEATING LEASE CONQUEST REBATE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .-$1,500
( Must be currently leasing 2008 or newer
NON-GM Vehicle transferable in household)
Excludes tax, tags & title
FINANCE FOR
Automatic Transmission, V6, Power Windows & Locks,
Rear Camera, Alloy Wheels, Remote Keyless Entry,
OnStar w/4G LTE, Dual Front & Side Impact Air Bags
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
newsday.com
ONLY $995 DOWN PAYMENT!
27777
$
2019
ALL-WHEEL
DRIVE
OR
ONLY $1,995 DOWN PAYMENT!
3RD ROW
SEATING
REAR
Lease per month/24 Month Due at inception: $995 down plus $209
Lease per month/24 Month Due at inception: $1,995 Down plus
1st mos. payment Total $1,204 plus tax & tags. Purchase option BACK-UP
$189 1st mos. payment Total $2,184 plus tax & tags. Purchase opCAMERA
$22,981 - 10K Miles per yr. MSRP $33,795
OR
tion $23,983 - 10K Miles per yr. MSRP $35,795
OVER 15 AVAILABLE AT THIS PRICE OR PAYMENTS! MSRP......................................................................................-$52,195
FACTORYREBATE............................................................................................................-$750
BRAND NEW 20
1
9CHEVROLET FINANCETHROUGHGMFINANCIAL ..............................................................................$1,500
ATLANTIC/HUNTINGTON/MILLENNIUMDISCOUNT ........-$5,168
TAHOE LEASE
LOYALTY REBATE ..........................................................-$2,000
Automatic Transmission, 4x4 Package,
(Mustbecurrently leasingaChevyBuickorGMCVehicle transferable in household)
A/C, Dual Front Air
Bags, Rear Defogger,
Premium High-Output
AM/FM Stereo, Alloy
Wheels, Power Windows, Power Locks, 8
Passenger Seating.
FINANCE FOR
Excludes tax, tags & title
42777
$
OR
OPEN 7 DAYS WEEK! SALES HOURS:
M-F 9-9, SAT. 9-6, SUN. 11-6
1-844-252-3291
1072 East Jericho Turnpike Huntington Chevroletofhuntington.com
OVER 30 AVAILABLE AT THIS PRICE OR PAYMENTS! MSRP ..................................................................................................-$22,195
FACTORYREBATE ..................................................................................-$3,250
FINANCETHROUGHGMFINANCIAL
........................................................$750
TRAX ATLANTIC/HUNTINGTON/MILLENNIUMDISCOUNT
...........-$2,918
LEASELOYALTYREBATE ........................................................................-$2,500
( Must be currently leasing 2008 or newer GM Vehicle transferable in household)
BRAND NEW 201
9
CHEVROLET
FINANCE FOR
Automatic Transmission, 4 CYL Turbo Engine, Power Windows, Power Locks, Bluetooth Ready, OnStar with 4G LTE
Excludes tax, tags & title
12777
$
OR
2019 ONLY $1,995 DOWN PAYMENT!
$0 DOWN PAYMENT!
ALL-WHEEL
DRIVE
TURBO
ENGINE
Lease per month/24 Month Due at inception: $995 Down plus
Lease per month/24 Month Due at inception: $1,995 down plus Lease per month/24 Month Due at inception: $0 down plus
$94 1st mos. payment Total $1,089 plus tax & tags. Purchase POWER $79 1st mos. payment Total $2,074 plus tax & tags. Purchase op- $941stmos.paymentTotal$94plustax&tags.PurchaseopSEAT
option $18,269 - 10K Miles per yr. MSRP $27,680
tion $19,097 - 10K Miles per yr. MSRP $29,380
OR
OR
tion $13,983 - 10K Miles per yr. MSRP $22,195
BRAND NEW RE-DESIGNED 2019 CHEVROLET
SUNDAY 11AM-6PM
MONDAY 9AM-9PM
ALLOY
WHEELS
Lease per month/24 Month Due at inception: $1,995 down
TURBO plus
$39 1st mos. payment Total $2,034 plus tax & tags. PurENGINE chase option $14,991 - 10K Miles per yr. MSRP $23,795
OVER 10 AVAILABLE AT THIS PRICE OR PAYMENTS! MSRP................................................................................................-$37,295
FACTORYREBATE..................................................................................-$500
BRAND NEW 20
1
9CHEVROLET
COLORADO ATLANTIC/HUNTINGTON/MILLENNIUMDISCOUNT.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .-$3,818
CREW CAB LEASECONQUESTREBATE ................................................................-$1,500
( Must be currently leasing 2008 or newer
4X4
NON-GM Vehicle transferable in household)
LT
FINANCE FOR
3
1
477
2019
Automatic Transmission, V6, 4x4 Package, Power Windows & Locks, Trailering
Package, OnStar & XM Radio
ONLY $995 DOWN PAYMENT!
Excludes tax, tags & title
$
OR
ONLY $1,995 DOWN PAYMENT!
‘Z71’
Lease per month/36 Month Due at inception: $995 down plus
$244 1st mos. payment Total $1,239 plus tax & tags. Purchase
OR
option $25,861, 10K Miles per yr. MSRP $37,295
4X4
TRAILERING
PACKAGE
Lease per month/36 Month Due at inception: $1,995 down
plus $229 1st mos. payment Total $2,224 plus tax & tags. Purchase option $27,102 - 10K Miles per yr. MSRP $39,120
OVER 15 AVAILABLE AT THIS PRICE OR PAYMENTS! MSRP......................................................................................-$54,895
FACTORYREBATE........................................................................................................-$2,250
BRAND NEW 20
1
9CHEVROLET FINANCETHROUGHGMFINANCIAL ..............................................................................$1,500
ATLANTIC/HUNTINGTON/MILLENNIUMDISCOUNT ........-$5,368
SUBURBAN LEASE
LOYALTY REBATE ..........................................................-$2,000
Automatic Transmission, 4x4 Package,
(Mustbecurrently leasingaChevyBuickorGMCVehicle transferable in household)
A/C, Dual Front Air
Bags, Rear Defogger,
Premium High-Output
AM/FM Stereo, Alloy
Wheels, Power Windows, Power Locks, 8
Passenger Seating.
FINANCE FOR
Excludes tax, tags & title
43777
$
OR
2019 TAHOE 4X4
2019 SUBURBAN 4X4
Lease per month/36 Month Due at inception: $2,495 down plus $369 1st mos. paymentTotal $2,864 plus tax & tags. Purchase option $31,317, 10K Miles per yr.
Lease per month/36 Month Due at inception: $2,495 down plus $394 1st mos. paymentTotal $2,899 plus tax & tags. Purchase option $32,937, 10K Miles per yr.
• 4WD
• 8 PASSENGER SEATING
• KEYLESS ENTRY
• ALLOY WHEELS • 4WD
• TRAILERING
• 8 PASSENGER SEATING
PACKAGE
• KEYLESS ENTRY
• ALLOY WHEELS
• TRAILERING
PACKAGE
On Leases:AtTerm End Either ReturnVehicle With 10k, Miles PerYear Or Pay 25¢ Each Additional Mile Or PurchaseVehicle At Stated Amount. All Offers ApprovedWith A+Tier Approval( 800+ Auto Fico )With GM Financial except on Colorado thru people federal credit union.Responsible For Excess Mileage,Wear AndTear, $950 Acquisition Fees, Repairs And Maintenance.On Finances:Tax & MV fees
additional. Customer responsible at term end:Deposition Fee of $395 ( waived with the purchase of another GM vehicle ).Must present ad at time of signing.All offers with approved credit. Offers available on in-stock units only.Prior deals excluded.Advertised discount offers cannot be combined with other offers.All rebates Included, including Lease conquest ( Tahoe, Suburban & Trax ) :on All Buy’s and
Leases:Currently Lease Loyalty must be though USB, Ally, GMF.All rebates are taxable.Tax paid by consumer and then rebates assigned to dealer. Not all customers wil qualify for advertised specials.Must take same day delivery. On Financing offers must have excellent credit (750+ credit score).Resident restrictions may apply.see dealer for details.Ad expires 01-07-2019.© 2019 JMC
2145615501
Merchandise
COLLECTIBLES
ANTIQUES WANTED - Firearms
Military Items, Swords, Civil
War - WWII. 631-312-2615 or
empiremil@aol.com Pvt.
BUYING SPORTS CARDS
• Auctions
• Home furnishings
• Miscellaneous
GARAGE/TAG SALES
Hewlett Neck A RED TAG SALE
CASH FOR RECORDS
CD’s, Rock, Jazz, Blues, 50-80’s
+ Coins. I Travel. 203-377-3449
BASEBALL CARDS WANTED
Looking for Tobacco Cards, T206,
Cracker Jack, 1920s-1950s, Topps,
Bowman, T205, Private Collector
Please call Jamie 516-592-0885
HESS Trucks, Tonka, All Toys
Wanted. Pvt. (631) 471-4375
$ I BUY AVIATION ITEMS $
5 Barr Rd. Fri 1/4, Sun 1/6, 10-3
Airlines, Grumman, Etc.
Hi-End Meticulous Home: art,
(631) 804 - 5955
antiques, framed Persian tapestries, lighting, BR furn, custom draperies, clothes, vintage
gold leaf parlor sets, farm style Want Anything in the TOY Field
& Musical Instr. 516-384-4566
tbl, cost jewelry, collectibles+
TOYS Trains Slot Cars Models
LEVITTOWN 50 Woodpecker Ln
Sat 1/5 & Sun 1/6 10-4pm
Packed w/ Toys, Star Wars,
Star Trek, Jwlry Cllctn, More!
MISS SPIFFY SALES
NEW HYDE PARK - Sellout!
CONSTRUCTION
EQUIPMENT
WE BUY USED STORAGE
Containers & Storage Trailers
20ft & 40ft, Top Dollar Paid.
Pvt. Call 6 3 1 - 8 3 1 - 5 7 2 1
7 Lincoln Ave. Saturday 1/5,
FIREWOOD
9:30-4:30pm. Full Contrents.
Mohogany Dressers, 1940 China
Set, Ethan Allen BR Set, LR/DR FIREPIT / FIREPLACE WOOD,
Furniture, Sectional LR Couch,
Cherry, Apple, Hickory Avail.
Lamps, Antique Hall Table,
Nass, Suff & 5 Boro’s. Wood
Glasssware, Old Life Magazines 18" And Under. 516-967-6200
Tools, Much More- All Welcome
FIREWOOD - ALL HARDWOOD
N WOODMERE 791 South Gate
SEASONED 1 YEAR - 4x8x4
DR. Sat 1/5, Sun 1/6, 10-4pm.
Furn, Football Collect, Perfect FULL CORDS 1 CORD $160,
2 CORDS $290, 3 CORDS $400.
Cond. 347-250-GABY ( 4229 )
VINNY @ 631 - 672 - 1745
ROCKVILLE CTR 38 ROYAL CT
Sat 1/5, Sun 1/6, Mon 1/7,
10-5 Exquisite home Berkey &
Gay DR, Vintage & Modern
Furn. Curios, Chandelier, Prints,
Paintings, Books, Breweriana,
China, Crystal, Lenox, KPM
Delft, Asst’d Collection, Game
table, All Holiday Items, Fireproof & Lateral files, Loads of
Records, Toys, Dolls, & Games
SANDS POINT FullofSurpriZes
Sunday 1/6, 10-4pm
28 Forest Dr. (11050)
Estate/Demolition Sale
70’s Burlwood Dining table + 8
chrs, fine art, granite slabs,
kitch cabinets, fireplace, doors
etc, sconses, loads of decorative, spiral staircase, lighting,
electronics and builtins + more..
Guarantee Seasoned Firewood
1/2 CORD $99 1 CORD $150,
2 CORDS $280, 3 CORDS $390,
4 CORDS $480. 631-479-7449
TIMMY’S TIMBER
1 Cord $150.
(4x4x8)
2 Cords $280. 3 Cords $380.
14 Mo Seasoned. 631-838-1825
RECORDS
500 RECORDS, 33 RPMs, from
1950 to 1975. (631) 612-1288
Pets + Livestock
VALLEY STREAM 75 Riverdale
Rd. Sat 1/5, 10-4. Sun 1/6, 10-3.
All Must Go. Kitchen appl’s,e tc
WOODMERE TAG SALE
"" DIAMOND TAG SALES ""
558 Barnard Ave. Sun 1/6, 11-4.
Furn, collectibles, Hsehold, rugs
costume jewelry, lighting + +
ANTIQUES
ABBA BUYS Coins, Silver, Art,
Jewelry, Antiques, Trains, Toys
House Contents (631) 433-0820
ALL THINGS OPTICAL
Cameras, Telescopes, Transits
Microscopes 631-235-2995
• Pet supplies
• Lost
• Groom
• Board
• Sale
• Found
• Adopt
• Train
DOG/CATS FOR SALE
AKC Breeder Since 1962 PD030
LABRADORS GOLDENS,
$ MILITARY ITEMS WANTED$
SPORTSMANû 631-727-3550
COLLECTIBLES
AMERICAN FLYER, Lionel,H.O.
Trains, Slot Cars 516-652-0574
NEWSDAY BUY & SELL
Read for savings
Advertise for results!!
631-843-7653(SOLD)
Legal Notice # 21454273
Peter Scalamandre and Sons,
Inc. is soliciting bids for NYS
Certified M/WBE, SDVOB
Firms
Project SUNY Farmingdale
Parking Lot Phase 2B
Location: Farmingdale
Contract No. FSC 2018-04
Project Bid Date: January 29,
2019
Contract
documents are
available for review at our
main office.
John Califano
PH; 516-686-3000, ext. 255
Fax; 516-868-3943
Legal Notice # 21454362
4 CUT DEVELOPMENT, LLC,
Art. of Org. filed in USVI
3/6/18, under name 4CUT
LANDSCAPING, LLC. App.
for Auth. filed NY DOS 7/
19/118, Nass. Co. S/S C/O
Michael D. Smith P.O. Box
631, St. Thomas, USVI,
00804.
USVI
Registered
Agent: Michael D. Smith #10
Bonne Experance, Charlotte
Amalie,St.Thomas,USVI
00802. Authorized officer in
USVI: Office of the USVI Lt.
Governor, Charotte Amaie,
St. Thomas, USVI 08002.
Legal Notice # 21454854
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE OF
PERSONAL PROPERTY
Notice is hereby given that
the undersigned intends to
sell the personal property described below to satisfy lien
of the owner.
Undersigned will sell items
at Public Auction by competitive bidding on 01/15/19 at
10:00 a.m. online at www.
Storageauction.com Where
said property has been stored and which are located at:
Safeguard
Self
Storage
#190105 45 Hempstead Turnpike West Hempstead, NY
11552 (516)-538-4511
The personal goods (including miscellaneous household
goods such as TV’s, appliances, beds, furniture, boxes)
stored therein by the following:
Unit
Name
0122 Paul C Davis; 0403 Marcia R Benjamin; 0445 Kenny
Torres; 0466 Crystal D
Loadholt; 0609 Moses Jr. E
Vann; 0710 Leroy J Matthews; 1203 Luis Rojas; 2102
Amanda Guilty; 2224 Akeya
P e n c e a l ; 2 4 0 1
Jacqueline A Robertson;
2429 Gloria D Davis; 2431
Sharne G Wolfolk; 2523 Lawrence Sutton; 1403 Diane L
Robertson.
Purchases must be paid at
the time with Credit Card or
Cash. All purchases are sold
within 72 hours of the time
of sale. A $100 Cash Clean
up Deposit is required until
all items in the unit are removed from the premises
and verified by manager on
duty. Sale subject to cancellation up to the time of sale,
company reserves the right
to refuse any bids.
Auction by StorageAuctions.
com
Phone (866) 944-8530
Legal Notice # 21454361
BOP NETWORK LLC, Cert of
Formation filed in DE 6/
19/18, App. for Auth. filed
NY DOS 6/21/118, Nass. Co.
S/S C/O The LLC 1776 E.
Jericho Tpke., Ste.1, Huntington, NY 11743. DE Agent: Diversified Corporate Services
508 Main St. Wilmington, DE
19804. Authorized officer in
DE is: DE Sec. of State,
Townsend Bldg. Federal St.
Dover, DE 19901.
Legal Notice # 21454874
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE OF
PERSONAL PROPERTY
Notice is hereby given that
the undersigned will sell, to
satisfy lien of the owner, at
public sale by competitive
bidding on [01/15/18] at
[11:00 AM] online at www.
StorageAuctions.com at the
Safeguard Storage facility located at:
Safeguard Self Storage
1176 Broadway
Hewlett, NY 11758
The personal goods stored
therein by the following:
Unit # Tenant Name
0917 Kevin S Brunson; 1307
Danny Rolnick; 1324 Denise U
Uriri-Luke; 1324 Denise UririLuke; 2221 Ronald P Swede
2221 Ron Swede
Purchases must be paid at
the facility with Credit Card
or Cash. All Purchases must
be complete within 72 hours
of the end of the online auction. A $100.00 cash cleaning
deposit is required until all
items in the unit are removed from the premises
and verified by the manager
on duty. Sale subject to cancellation until the purchase
is completed; company reserves the right to refuse
any online bids.
Auction by StorageAuctions.
com
Phone: (866) 944-8530
Legal Notice # 21455864
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE OF
PERSONAL PROPERTY
Notice is hereby given that
the undersigned will sell, to
satisfy lien of the owner, at
public sale by competitive
bidding on 01/15/2019 at
12:00 PM online at w w w .
StorageAuctions.com at the
Safeguard Storage facility located at:
Safeguard Self Storage
6000 Sunrise Highway
Massapequa
New
York
11758
The personal goods stored
therein by the following:
Unit # Tenant Name
1330 Aurelia Z. Monia; 1512
Kaitlyn T. Emory; 2605 Donald
J Shremshock; 3351 Deidra
Gither
Purchases must be paid at
the facility with Credit Card
or Cash. All Purchases must
be complete within 72 hours
of the end of the online auction. A $100.00 cash cleaning
deposit is required until all
items in the unit are removed from the premises
and verified by the manager
on duty. Sale subject to cancellation until the purchase
is completed; company reserves the right to refuse
any online bids.
Auction by StorageAuctions.
com
Phone: (866) 944-8530
Legal Notice # 21456109
GK&M PROPERTIES LLC,
Arts. of Org. filed with the
SSNY on 10/24/2018. Office
loc: Nassau County. SSNY
has been designated as
agent upon whom process
against the LLC may be
served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 571 Irving
St., Westbury, NY 11590.
Reg Agent: Marco T. Garcia,
571 Irving St., Westbury, NY
11590. Purpose: Any Lawful
Purpose.
DID YOU KNOW THAT YOU
CAN SEE NEWSDAY’S BUY &
SELL ADS ON THE INTERNET?
www.newsday.com/classifieds
Legal Notice # 21446439
Milltown Management LLC,
Arts of Org. filed with Sec.
of State of NY (SSNY) 10/
10/2018. Cty: Nassau. SSNY
desig. as agent upon whom
process against may be
served & shall mail process
to 375 North Broadway, Ste.
311, Jericho, NY 11753. General Purpose.
Legal Notice # 21446842
Daisy Cottage Properties
LLC, Arts of Org. filed with
Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) 1
1/7/2018. Cty: Nassau. SSNY
desig. as agent upon whom
process against may be
served & shall mail process
to 650 Lincoln Place, West
Hempstead, NY 11552. General Purpose.
Legal Notice # 21446864
SAK 549, LLC, Arts of Org.
filed with Sec. of State of
NY (SSNY) 10/12/2018. Cty:
Nassau. SSNY desig. as
agent upon whom process
against may be served &
shall mail process to 39
Caumsett
Woods
Lane,
Woodbury, NY 11797. General Purpose.
Legal Notice # 21446897
Luxe Residences International LLC, Arts of Org. filed
with Sec. of State of NY
(SSNY) 11/29/2018. Cty:
Nassau. SSNY desig. as
agent upon whom process
against may be served &
shall mail process to 3 Birchwood Court, #3E, Mineola,
NY 11501. General Purpose.
Legal Notice # 21446902
Jessica Poster M.D., PLLC,
Arts of Org. filed with Sec.
of State of NY (SSNY) 11/
28/2018. Cty: Nassau. SSNY
desig. as agent upon whom
process against may be
served & shall mail process
to 244 Fifth Ave., Ste. J-272,
NY, NY 10001. Purpose: Medicine.
Legal Notice # 21446907
Professional Piercing LLC,
Arts of Org. filed with Sec.
of State of NY (SSNY) 11/
28/2018. Cty: Nassau. SSNY
desig. as agent upon whom
process against may be
served & shall mail process
1400 Wantagh Ave., Ste.
209, Wantagh, NY 11793.
General Purpose.
Legal Notice # 21448585
4117 Turnpike Hempstead
LLC, Arts of Org. filed with
Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) 1
1/13/2018. Cty: Nassau.
SSNY desig. as agent upon
whom process against may
be served & shall mail process to 4117-4123 Hempstead
Tpke., Bethpage, NY 11714.
General Purpose.
Legal Notice # 21450571
KAE Family Holdings, LLC,
Arts of Org. filed with Sec.
of State of NY (SSNY) 12/
11/2018. Cty: Nassau. SSNY
desig. as agent upon whom
process against may be
served & shall mail process
to Marc Rothschild, 12 Rugby Rd., Roslyn Heights, NY
11577. General Purpose.
Legal Notice # 21450576
WS 50 LLC, Arts of Org. filed
with Sec. of State of NY
(SSNY) 11/6/2018. Cty: Nassau. SSNY desig. as agent
upon whom process against
may be served & shall mail
process to Louis J. Pappas,
39 Mohring Bay Court,
Bayville, NY 11709. General
Purpose.
Legal Notice # 21453269
Hillcrest Capital LLC with
SSNY on 10/23/18. Office:
Nassau. SSNY desg as agent
for process & shall mail to:
5503 Cedarhurst Ave,
Cedarhurst, NY, 11516. Any
lawful purpose.
Legal Notice # 21453338
Steven A Cocheo, LLC, Arts
of Org. filed with Sec. of
State of NY (SSNY) 11/
27/2018. Cty: Nassau. SSNY
desig. as agent upon whom
process against may be
served & shall mail process
to 306 North Michigan Ave.,
North
Massapequa,
NY
11758. General Purpose.
Legal Notice # 21453341
Waystair Capital LLC, Arts
of Org. filed with Sec. of
State of NY (SSNY) 10/
29/2018. Cty: Nassau. SSNY
desig. as agent upon whom
process against may be
served & shall mail process
to
177
Ocean
Ave.,
Massapequa, NY 11758. General Purpose.
Legal Notice # 21446191
47 Wilmington LLC, Arts of
Org. filed with Sec. of State
of NY (SSNY) 11/20/2018.
Cty: Nassau. SSNY desig. as
agent upon whom process
against may be served &
shall mail process to 1326
Harbor Rd., Hewlett, NY
11557. General Purpose.
Legal Notice # 21446202
Williams Garden Tools LLC,
Arts of Org. filed with Sec.
of State of NY (SSNY) 9/
27/2018. Cty: Nassau. SSNY
desig. as agent upon whom
process against may be
served & shall mail process
to 273 Merrick Rd., Lynbrook,
NY 11563. General Purpose.
Legal Notice # 21448558
Eli & Eli Assets LLC, Arts of
Org. filed with Sec. of State
of NY (SSNY) 12/5/2018.
Cty: Nassau. SSNY desig. as
agent upon whom process
against may be served &
shall mail process to 16 Martin Ct., Great Neck, NY
11024. General Purpose.
Legal Notice # 21454347
GOLDEN PATH LLC, Art. of
Org. filed NY DOS 11/15/18,
Nass. Co. S/S C/O The LLC
10 Briar La., Great Neck, NY
11024. To engage in any lawful act or activity. Perpetual
existence. Full indemnification.
Legal Notice # 21454350
BLUE LION USA LLC, Art. of
Org. filed NY DOS 11/15/18,
Nass. Co. S/S C/O The LLC
10 Briar La., Great Neck, NY
11024. To engage in any lawful act or activity. Perpetual
existence. Full indemnification.
Legal Notice # 21454354
A AND S DESIGNERS WORKROOM LLC, Art.of Org. filed
NY DOS 9/10/18, Nass. Co.
S/S C/O The LLC 134 Cleveland Ave., Rockville Centre,
NY 11570. To engage in any
lawful act or activity.
Perpetual existence. Managed by 1 or more Managers.
Full indemnification.
Legal Notice # 21446509
Flights To Go LLC with SSNY
on 11/15/18. Office: Nassau.
SSNY desg as agent for process & shall mail to: 24 Steamboat Rd, Great Neck, NY,
11024. Any lawful purpose.
Legal Notice # 21454358
JH ELMONT LINDEN LLC,
Art. of Org. filed NY DOS 6
/20/18, Nass. Co. S/S C/O
The LLC 90 Bedell Ave.,
Hempstead, NY 11550. To engage in any lawful act or activity. Perpetual existence.
Full indemnification.
Legal Notice # 21454360
3607 BAYVIEW ST LLC, Art.
of Org. filed NY DOS 10/
1/18, Nass. Co. S/S C/O The
LLC 3607 Bayview St.,
Seaford, NY 11783. To engage in any lawful act or activity. Perpetual existence.
Full indemnification.
Legal Notice # 21455695
117 Oak LLC Arts of Org.
filed SSNY 10/23/18. Office:
Nassau Co. SSNY design
agent of LLC upon whom
process may be served &
mail to 2201 Jericho Tpke
New Hyde Park, NY 11040
General Purpose
Legal Notice # 21455722
Hill Lane Developers LLC
Arts of Org. filed SSNY 12/
24/18. Office: Nassau Co.
SSNY design agent of LLC
upon whom process may be
served & mail to 10 Mineola
Ave Fl 2 Roslyn Heights, NY
11577 General Purpose
Legal Notice # 21455730
Bancroft Estate Holdings
LLC Arts of Org. filed SSNY
12/24/18. Office: Nassau Co.
SSNY design agent of LLC
upon whom process may be
served & mail to 10 Mineola
Ave Fl 2 Roslyn Heights, NY
11577 General Purpose
Legal Notice # 21455740
393 Robbins St LLC Arts of
Org. filed SSNY 7/13/17. Office: Nassau Co. SSNY design agent of LLC upon
whom process may be
served & mail to 63 Choir Ln
Westbury, NY 11590 General
Purpose
Legal Notice # 21454356
ENCORE STAGING SOLULegal Notice # 21455948
TIONS LLC, Art. of Org. filed
62 Kings LLC, Arts of Org.
NY DOS 7/20/18, Nass. Co.
filed with Sec. of State of
S/S C/O The LLC 90 Bedell
NY (SSNY) 12/19/2018. Cty:
Ave., Hempstead, NY 11550.
Nassau. SSNY desig. as
To engage in any lawful act
agent upon whom process
or activity. Perpetual exisagainst may be served &
tence. Full indemnification.
shall mail process to 64
Highwood Rd., Oyster Bay,
Legal Notice # 21456131
NY 11771. General Purpose.
Mijo Construction LLC, Arts
of Org. filed with Sec. of
Legal Notice # 21455983
State of NY (SSNY) 1/
T.T. Assisi LLC, Arts of Org.
3/2019. Cty: Nassau. SSNY
filed with Sec. of State of
desig. as agent upon whom
NY (SSNY) 11/13/2018. Cty:
process against may be
Nassau. SSNY desig. as
served & shall mail process
agent upon whom process
to 629 Park Ave., West
against may be served &
Hempstead, NY 11552. Genershall mail process to 7 Bitteral Purpose.
sweet Ln., Glen Cove, NY
11542. General Purpose.
Legal Notice # 21456151
Maka Holding LLC, Arts of
Legal Notice # 21456168
Org. filed with Sec. of State
Briteshows, LLC, Arts of
of NY (SSNY) 12/26/2018.
Org. filed with Sec. of State
Cty: Nassau. SSNY desig. as
of NY (SSNY) 1/3/2019. Cty:
agent upon whom process
Nassau. SSNY desig. as
against may be served &
agent upon whom process
shall mail process to Christoagainst may be served &
pher H. Blundin, 139 Skunks
shall mail process to 2 Pond
Misery Rd., Locust Valley,
View Dr., Oyster Bay, NY
NY 11560. General Purpose.
11771. General Purpose.
Legal Notice # 21456162
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a public hearing pursuant to Title 1 of Article 18-A of the New York State General Municipal
Law will be held by the Town of Hempstead Industrial
Development Agency on the 22nd day of January, 2019, at
9:30 a.m., local time, at Hempstead Town Hall, Room 234A,
350 Front Street, Hempstead, New York, 11550 in connection
with the following matters:
AvalonBay Communities, Inc., a Maryland business corporation authorized to transact business in the State of New
York, on behalf of itself and/or the principals of AvalonBay
Communities, Inc. and/or an entity formed or to be formed on
behalf of the foregoing (the “Company ”), has applied to the
Town of Hempstead Industrial Development Agency (the
“Agency ”) to enter into a transaction in which the Agency will
assist in the acquisition of an approximately 11.6 acre parcel
of land located at Sheridan Place and Island Parkway, Town of
Hempstead, Nassau County, New York (the “Land ”), the construction and equipping of an approximately 266,267 square
foot apartment complex containing approximately 172 units
(to be a mixture of 1-bedroom, 2-bedroom and 3-bedroom luxury apartments) located thereon (the “Improvements ” and
“Equipment ”; and, together with the Land, the “Facility ”), to
be used by the Company as a waterfront rental community
(the “Project ”). The Facility will be initially owned, operated
and/or managed by the Company.
The Agency contemplates that it will provide financial assistance to the Company in the form of exemptions from sales
and use taxes and abatement of real property taxes, consistent with the policies of the Agency
A representative of the Agency will, at the above-stated time
and place, hear and accept written comments from all persons with views in favor of or opposed to either the proposed
financial assistance to the Company or the location or nature
of the Facility. At the hearing, all persons will have the opportunity to review the application for financial assistance filed
by the Company with the Agency and an analysis of the costs
and benefits of the proposed Facility.
Dated: January 6, 2019
TOWN OF HEMPSTEAD INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT AGENCY
By:mFrederick E. Parola
Title: Chief Executive Officer
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
$ OLD WATCHES WANTED $
Legal Notice # 21454241
THE STERLING WEALTH
GROUP, LLC, Arts. of Org.
filed with the SSNY on 12
/27/2018. Office loc: Nassau
County. SSNY has been designated as agent upon whom
process against the LLC may
be served. SSNY shall mail
process to: The LLC, 48
South Service Rd Ste 400,
Melville, NY 11174. Reg
Agent: Deanna Filosa, 48
South Service Rd Ste 400,
Melville, NY 11174. Purpose:
Any Lawful Purpose.
Legal Notice # 21454344
144 HILLSIDE LLC, Art.of
Org. filed NY DOS 12/17/18,
Nass.Co. S/S C/O The LLC
450
Northern
Blvd.,
Greenvale, NY 11548. To engage in any lawful act or activity. Perpetual existence.
Full indemnification.
Legal Notice # 21446197
All County Spray Foam Solutions, LLC, Arts of Org. filed
with Sec. of State of NY
(SSNY) 11/19/2018. Cty:
Nassau. SSNY desig. as
agent upon whom process
against may be served &
shall mail process to 604
Wateredge Ave., Baldwin,
NY 11510. General Purpose.
Legal Notice # 21446830
Robell Construction Management, LLC, Arts of Org. filed
with Sec. of State of NY
(SSNY) 10/11/2018. Cty:
Nassau. SSNY desig. as
agent upon whom process
against may be served &
shall mail process to Robyn
D’Amico, 2059 Merrick Rd.,
Merrick, NY 11566. General
Purpose.
Legal Notice # 21448629
A RAVEN’S PATH LLC. Art.
of Org. filed with the SSNY
on 09/21/18. Office: Nassau
County. SSNY designated as
agent of the LLC upon whom
process against it may be
served. SSNY shall mail copy
of process to the LLC, 3672
Wadena Street Seaford, NY
11783 . Purpose: Any lawful
purpose.
Legal Notice # 21449020
GORIS TRUCKING, LLC, Arts.
of Org. filed with the SSNY
on 12/05/2018. Office loc:
Nassau County. SSNY has
been designated as agent
upon whom process against
the LLC may be served.
SSNY shall mail process to:
Jeffrie A. Goris Espinal, 880
Washington Street, Baldwin,
NY 11510. Purpose: Any Lawful Purpose.
Legal Notice # 21449081
LAR FORTUNE GROUP LLC,
Arts. of Org. filed with the
SSNY on 12/07/2018. Office
loc: Nassau County. SSNY
has been designated as
agent upon whom process
against the LLC may be
served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 117 State
Street, Westbury, NY 11590.
Purpose: Any Lawful Purpose.
Legal Notice # 21452746
Formation of Wrenrose LLC
filed with the Secy. of State
of NY (SSNY) on 12/5/18.
Office loc.: Nassau County.
SSNY designated as agent of
LLC upon whom process
against it may be served.
The address SSNY shall mail
process to Meredith Randall,
51 Hawthorne Pl., Manhasset, NY 11030. Purpose:
Any lawful activity.
Legal Notice # 21453221
LI GASTRO MANAGEMENT
SERVICES, LLC, Arts. of Org.
filed with the SSNY on 12/
10/2018. Office loc: Nassau
County. SSNY has been designated as agent upon whom
process against the LLC may
be served. SSNY shall mail
process to: The LLC, 106
Charles Lindbergh Blvd, Ste
B, Uniondale, NY 11553. Purpose: Any Lawful Purpose.
Legal Notice # 21453238
PM PEDIATRICS REALTY CARNEY, LLC, Arts. of Org.
filed with the SSNY on 12/
18/2018. Office loc: Nassau
County. SSNY has been designated as agent upon whom
process against the LLC may
be served. SSNY shall mail
process to: The LLC, One Hollow Lane, Ste 301, Lake Success, NY 11042. Purpose:
Any Lawful Purpose.
Legal Notice # 21455685
Notice of formation of Glorious Temptations, LLC. Articles of Organization filed
with the Secretary of State
of New York SSNY on 12/
17/2018. Office location: Nassau County. SSNY is designated for service of process.
SSNY shall mail copy of any
process served against the
LLC 2988 Lee Place, Bellmore
NY 11710. Purpose: any lawful purpose.
Legal Notice # 21455793
Notice of Formation of Saint
Marks Apartments LLC Arts.
of Org. filed with Secy. of
State of NY (SSNY) on 11/
05/2018. Office location: Nassau Co. SSNY designated as
agent of LLC upon whom
process against it may be
served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, _190 Somerset Dr. Massapequa, NY
11758 Purpose: any lawful
purpose.
newsday.com
CASH $$ For Comics, Coins,
Silver, Jewelry, Arts, Military Goldendoodle,Cavalier,Cavapoo
items, Sports mem, House con- Bostons, Pugs, Beagles, Poms,
tents, Antiques 631- 463-6274
Schnauzer, Dachshund, Corgie,
Poodles and Cockapoos
Wheatens, Yorkshires, Maltese,
Flightjackets, uniforms, pins, Havanese, Shih Tzus, Bulldogs,
medals, swords, photos, flags, German Shepherds+Rottweilers
bayonets,
knives,
helmets,
patches. All wars 631-804-5955
www.sportsmankennels.com
OLD Radios, Hi-Fi, Phonographs
Phones, Toys, Books, Posters, GERMAN SHEPHERDS 10/15
reg, health cert 631-284-3611
Paper, Wanted. 718-281-0504
GOLDENDOODLE PUPS Med.
Size, Non shed. 631-676-7332
Working or Not. Pvt collector. Goldendoodle Pups, M, F, Shots,
(631) 804 - 5955
Mini/Standard 516-564-7351
POMERANIAN PUPPIES, Shots
health cert. $950. 631-205-4204
COINS
ROTTWEILER Pups AKC, Tails
cut, Shots $1200. 631-346 9577
AMERICAN COINS Bought
Gold, silver, proof sets, paying SHELTIE Pups, sable, AKC, M/F
$11 & up any Silver $1. Private 10 wks, 1st shot, wormed, hlth
60yrs exp. Dan 516-816-1711
chk, Ch. Heritage. 516-680-1683
Legal Notice # 21446732
WITHOUT CONTRAST, LLC,
Arts. of Org. filed with the
SSNY on 11/30/2018. Office
loc: Nassau County. SSNY
has been designated as
agent upon whom process
against the LLC may be
served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 30 Commercial Ct., Plainview, NY 11803.
Purpose: Any Lawful Purpose.
Legal Notice # 21453241
PM PEDIATRICS REALTY BELLEROSE, LLC, Arts. of
Org. filed with the SSNY on
12/18/2018. Office loc: Nassau County. SSNY has been
designated as agent upon
whom process against the
LLC may be served. SSNY
shall mail process to: The
LLC, One Hollow Lane, Ste
301, Lake Success, NY
11042. Purpose: Any Lawful
Purpose.
C25
Fanfare N
Autographs and Comics
Paying Cash. (516) 473-4770\
Legal Notice # 21442716
Notice of formation of Finer
Fitness LLC. Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of New York
(SSNY) on September 24,
2018. Office location: Nassau County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom
process against the LLC may
be served. SSNY shall mail
process to: Finer Fitness LLC
to 151 Atlantic Ave Garden
City Park New York 11040.
Purpose: Any lawful purpose
LEGAL NOTICES
C26
sundaytv
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uNEW
O - Optimum S - Spectrum F - Fios
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O S F
7:00
7:30
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“Ready Player Two”
Miles turns to his dad for help.
u60 Minutes
uGod Friended Me
9:30
10:00
10:30
“The Sound of Silence” uMadam Secretary “Family Separation: Part uCBS 2 News at 11P
A terror threat is suspected.
2” Elizabeth battles a U.S. governor.
11:30
uCBS 2 News
2 2 2
WNBC
4 4 4
(4:30) NFL Football Philadelphia Eagles at
Chicago Bears. (Live)
uThe 76th Annual Golden Globe Awards
WNYW
5 5 5
The Simpsons “Heart- Bob’s Burgers
break Hotel”
uThe Simpsons
WABC
7 7 7
America’s Funniest Home Videos Work mishaps; bird antics.
uAmerica’s Funniest Home Videos
WWOR
9 9 9
Modern Family “Find- Modern Family “Basing Fizbo”
ketball!”
The Big Bang Theory
The Big Bang Theory
The Big Bang Theory
Wolowitz gets jealous. “The Psychic Vortex”
WPIX
11 11 11
blackish “Charlie in
Charge”
WNET
13 13 13
Victoria on Masterpiece “Faith, Hope & Charity” Victoria on Masterpiece “The King Over the Wa- Victoria on Masterpiece “The Luxury of Con- Victoria on Masterpiece “Christmas Special” Victoria is threatened Joe Bonamassa-Blues
Queen hears about the famine in Ireland. ter” Victoria flees to Scottish Highlands.
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by a relative.
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WE
WEATH
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57 86 130
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24 15 102
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50 45 190
166 51 163
77 70 109
79 226 110
172 135 168
27 66 120
51 24 196
106 43 117
26 44 118
66 50 164
40 10 53
159 109 191
160 134 129
184 295 160
191 84 240
30 64 166
47 40 128
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138 - 798
45 62 140
179 179 187
23 14 103
53 20 186 120 210
12 - 180 173 145
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41 36 54
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38 16 50
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MetroFocus
“Mad
About the Toy”
der anesthesia.
Celebrating the best in TV and film.
uBob’s Burgers
People un-
blackish “Chop Shop” Supergirl “Bunker Hill” Nia has a dream
about Agent Liberty.
uFamily Guy
“Hefty
Shades of Gray”
uRel
“Mom” Rel
sees a therapist.
uShark Tank
A cold brew coffee kit.
uNews 4 NY at 11
uFox 5 News at 10
Fox 5 Sports Extra
uNews 4 NY
In Depth With Graham Raw Travel “The
Bensinger
Heart of Seoul”
Shark Tank Line of “manscaping” products.
uEyewitness News at 11
The Big Bang Theory
Modern Family “Pig
Moon Rising”
Modern Family “Five
Minutes”
Dateline “Poison” A mysterious illness
kills a woman.
Charmed “Kappa Spirit” Macy receives a
cryptic message.
uPIX11 News at Ten
Sunday Sports Rewind Seinfeld “The Letter” Seinfeld “The Parking
Space”
Great Performances “Tony Bennett and Diana Krall: Love Is Here 70s Soul Superstars (My Music) Motown, R&B, soul and disco artists.
to Stay” Honoring George and Ira Gershwin.
Profiles “Bill Medley” On Story
A Day’s Work
Her Big Idea
Neighborhood Slice
Music Voyager
Bare Feet In NYC
WNYE 25 22 25 25 Asian American Life
NCIS: Los Angeles “Brimstone”
Private Eyes “Now You See Her...”
NCIS: Los Angeles A petty officer dies.
WPXN 31 3 31 31 NCIS: Los Angeles Tracking a serial killer.
uWLNY News at 9PM
2 Broke Girls
Mike & Molly
Mike & Molly
Regrow Hair Today!
Judge Judy
WLNY 55 10 55 510 2 Broke Girls
newsday.com
11:00
uNCIS: Los Angeles
MOVIES
WCBS
WLIW 21 21 21 21
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
SPORTS
Victor Borge: 100 Years
of Music
NHK Special: Jared Diamond’s Rise
NCIS: Los Angeles “Past Lives”
Family Guy
Family Guy
(5) The Mummy HH∂ (Adventure). (PG-13) The Mummy Returns HH∂ (Adventure). Brendan Fraser, Rachel Weisz. Two evil forces pursue the son of adventurer Rick O’Connell. (PG-13) The Scorpion King HH (Adventure). (1:00)
World War II: Witness to War
World War II: Witness to War
World War II: Witness to War “Pearl Harbor” World War II: Witness to War
World War II: Witness to War
uCrikey! It’s the Irwins
uHow Do Animals Do uHow Do Animals Do Crikey! It’s the Irwins
Crikey! It’s the Irwins
Lone Star Law A festival attracts thousands.
(5:30) Goldfinger HHHH (Action). (PG)
Austin Powers: International Man of Mystery HH∂ (Comedy). Mike Myers. (PG-13)
Austin Powers: International Man of Mystery HH∂ (Comedy). Mike Myers. (PG-13)
(6) Rush Hour 3 H∂ (Action). Jackie Chan. Harlem Nights HH (Comedy, 1989). Eddie Murphy, Richard Pryor. Two 1930s nightclub owners turn the tables on a crime boss. (R) Martin
Martin
(6:30) Lee Daniels’ The Butler HHH (Historical Drama). Forest Whitaker. A White House butler serves many presidents over the years. The Great Debaters HHH (Docudrama). Denzel Washington, Forest Whitaker. (PG-13) (1:25)
uThe Real Housewives of Atlanta
uMarried to Medicine Damon defends himself. uDirty John Debra tries to move forward. uWatch What
Housewives-Atlanta
The Real Housewives of Atlanta
Sunday Mass from St. Agnes Cathedral
Real Food
Convinced
CFN News
Rome Reports
Catholic Perspectives CHS Presents-Health Joyful Mysteries
You Don’t Mess With the Zohan HH (Comedy). Adam Sandler. (1:00)
(6:30) Happy Gilmore HH (Comedy). Adam Sandler. (PG-13)
Billy Madison H∂ (Comedy, 1995). Adam Sandler, Darren McGavin. (PG-13)
Shark Tank
Deal or No Deal “Ice Cream Dreams”
Undercover Boss “Associa”
Shark Tank
Deal or No Deal “Southern Charm”
uCNN Newsroom With Ana Cabrera
uCNN Newsroom
Anthony Bourdain: Parts Unknown
Anthony Bourdain: Parts Unknown “Vietnam” Anthony Bourdain: Parts Unknown
We’re the Millers HH The Interview HH (Comedy). James Franco, Seth Rogen. The CIA recruits a tabloid-TV host to kill Kim Jong Un. (R) Knocked Up HHH (Romance-Comedy, 2007). Seth Rogen, Katherine Heigl. (R) (12:40)
Man v. Food
Man v. Food
The Best Thing I Ever Ate
The Best Thing I Ever Ate “Sweet Stuff”
Food Paradise The extra-cheesiest delights. Food Paradise “Super Sandwiches”
uQ & A “Keach Hagey” Author Keach Hagey. Public Affairs Events
(6:30) Washington This Week
Q & A “Keach Hagey” Author Keach Hagey.
Jack Miles, God in
Oren Cass, The Once and Future Worker Author Oren Cass.
After Words Author Louise Shelley.
John Prendergast, Fidel Bafilemba
Elaine Pagels, Why Religion
Epic Log Homes
Epic Log Homes
Epic Log Homes
Epic Yachts Superyachts are floating hotels. Epic Log Homes
uAlaska: The Last Frontier Exposed
uAlaska: The Last Frontier
uAlaska: The Last Frontier
uThe Last Alaskans “Hard Choices”
Homestead Rescue “Poisoned”
u(6:00) E! Live From the Red Carpet
Botched “Bigger Isn’t Breast”
Botched An Irish model wants larger breasts. Botched A bodybuilder’s deflated breast. uBusy Tonight Live: Golden Globes
Lou Dobbs Tonight
Wall Street
WSJ at Large
Strange Inheritance
Strange Inheritance
Sunday Morning Futures-Maria Bartiromo
Lou Dobbs Tonight
uFOX News Sunday With Chris Wallace
uOBJECTified
uThe Next Revolution With Steve Hilton
uLife, Liberty & Levin
OBJECTified
uWorst Cooks in America “The Perfect Bird” Beat Bobby Flay
Beat Bobby Flay
Beat Bobby Flay
Beat Bobby Flay
Guy’s Grocery Games
Guy’s Grocery Games
Jurassic World HH∂ (Adventure). Chris Pratt. Man-made dinosaurs go on a rampage at an island resort. (PG-13) Jurassic World HH∂ (Adventure). Chris Pratt. (PG-13) (1:00)
Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse
The Simpsons
The Simpsons
Nerve HH∂ (Suspense, 2016). Emma Roberts, Dave Franco, Juliette Lewis. (PG-13) Nerve HH∂ (Suspense, 2016). Emma Roberts, Dave Franco, Juliette Lewis. (PG-13)
Mountain Men Jason tackles a river giant. Mountain Men Tom hits the jackpot.
Mountain Men “Hunter and Hunted”
Mountain Men Marty targets a wolf pack. Mountain Men “Birthright”
uFlea Market Flip
Flea Market Flip
Flea Market Flip
Flea Market Flip
Flea Market Flip
Flea Market Flip
Flea Market Flip
Flea Market Flip
Flea Market Flip
Flea Market Flip
(6) Winter Castle (Romance). Emilie Ullerup. One Winter Weekend (Romance, 2018). Taylor Cole, Jack Turner, Rukiya Bernard. (NR) Love on the Sidelines (Romance, 2016). Emily Kinney, John Reardon. (NR)
uBeachfront Bargain
uBeachfront Bargain
uBahamas Life
uBahamas Life
uIsland Life
uIsland Life
Beachfront Bargain
Beachfront Bargain
Hunters Int’l
Hunters Int’l
uAncient Aliens: Declassified
uUFO Cover Ups: Secrets Revealed Potential dangers of revealing UFOs.
Ancient Aliens (12:03)
Ancient Aliens Investigating crop circles.
uThe Lake Erie Murders “High School Horror” Evil Lives Here “I Invited Him In”
Evil Lives Here “The Last Blanco”
Evil Lives Here “Something Wasn’t Right” uEvil Lives Here “Let Her Rot”
92nd Street Y
Public Affairs
Public Affairs
Jewish Film Festival
Culture
Muzika
Week In Review
Frenemies
Killer Vacation (Suspense, 2018). Alexa Havins, Jacob Young. (NR) (12:01)
(6) Stalked by a Reality Star (Suspense). (NR) His Perfect Obsession (Suspense, 2018). Arianne Zucker, Ali Skovbye. (NR)
Married ... With
Three’s Company
Three’s Company
Three’s Company
Three’s Company “Jack the Ripper”
Three’s Company
Three’s Company
Three’s Company
Three’s Company
uKasie DC
uKasie DC
The Speaker: Nancy Pelosi
Dateline “Secrets on Hot Springs Drive” Dateline “Secrets on Hot Springs Drive”
Ridiculousness
Ridiculousness
Ridiculousness
Ridiculousness
Ridiculousness
Ridiculousness
Ridiculousness
Ridiculousness
Ridiculousness
Ridiculousness
Rock Block
Rock Block
Rock Block
Rock Block
Rock Block
uNews 12 Long Island News 12 Long Island
News 12 Long Island
News 12 Long Island
News 12 Long Island
News 12 Long Island
News 12 Long Island
News 12 Long Island
News 12 Long Island
News 12 Long Island
Police Women of Maricopa County
Police Women of Maricopa County
Police Women of Maricopa County
Police Women of Maricopa County
Police Women of Maricopa County
uKiller Couples “Allen Prue & Patricia Prue” In Ice Cold Blood “Jealousy’s a Killer”
In Ice Cold Blood “Sex, Swingers and Death” In Ice Cold Blood Murder of a happy retiree. Snapped “Marcela Whaley”
Bar Rescue “Bar Over Troubled Water”
The Shawshank Redemption HHHH (Drama, 1994). Tim Robbins, Morgan Freeman. An innocent man goes to a Maine penitentiary for life in 1947. (R) Big HHH∂ (PG) (2:00)
uHoudini’s Last Secrets “The Torture Escape” Mysteries at the Museum
Mysteries at the Museum
Mysteries at the Museum
Mysteries at the Museum
uEight Days That Made Rome
Air Disasters The crash over the Red Sea. uAir Disasters A plane crashes in Egypt.
Aerial America “Man-Made Marvels”
Air Disasters A plane crashes in Egypt.
Iron Man 3 HHH (Action, 2013). Robert Downey Jr., Gwyneth Paltrow. A powerful enemy tests Tony Stark’s true mettle. (PG-13) Futurama
Futurama
(6) The Last Witch Hunter HH (Fantasy).
(6) Old School HH∂ (Comedy). Luke Wilson. Step Brothers HH∂ (Comedy, 2008). Will Ferrell, John C. Reilly, Richard Jenkins. (R) Old School HH∂ (Comedy, 2003). Luke Wilson, Will Ferrell, Vince Vaughn. (R)
u(6:00) 90 Day Fiancé
u90 Day Fiancé “Tell All, Part 1” The couples meet in a dramatic showdown.
uReturn to Amish “Stay Amish or Go English?” Mary learns her fate.
(5) The Hunger Games: Catching Fire HHH
The Hunger Games: Mockingjay, Part 1 HHH (Science Fiction). Jennifer Lawrence, Josh Hutcherson. (PG-13)
The Hunger Games: Mockingjay, Part 2 HHH (Science Fiction). (1:30)
uFear the Woods “Legend of Mothman”
uHaunted Case Files “No Place Like Home” Haunted Case Files “A Demon Unleashed”
My Haunted House
My Haunted House
Impractical Jokers
Impractical Jokers
Impractical Jokers
Impractical Jokers
Impractical Jokers
Impractical Jokers
Impractical Jokers
Impractical Jokers
Impractical Jokers
Impractical Jokers
(6:30) The Secret Life of Bees HH∂ (Drama). Queen Latifah, Dakota Fanning. (PG-13) The Bone Collector HH∂ (Suspense). Denzel Washington. A paralyzed detective guides the hunt for a serial killer. (R) Secret of Bees
Home Improvement
Home Improvement
Home Improvement
Home Improvement
Home Improvement
Home Improvement
Home Improvement
Home Improvement
Whose Line Is It?
Whose Line Is It?
Law & Order: Special Victims Unit
Law & Order: Special Victims Unit
Law & Order: Special Victims Unit
Law & Order: Special Victims Unit
Fifty Shades of Grey HH (Romance). (1:32)
(5) Selena HHH (Biography). Jennifer Lopez. Love & Hip Hop Miami
Love & Hip Hop “Triggers”
Love & Hip Hop Safaree breaks the internet. Black Ink Crew: Chicago “9MAG Is Forever”
(6:30) Hellboy II: The Golden Army HHH (Action). Ron Perlman, Selma Blair. (PG-13)
Aliens HHHH (Science Fiction, 1986). Sigourney Weaver, Carrie Henn. Space Marines battle an army of deadly monsters. (R)
Law & Order An attempted assassination. Law & Order Shooter hits reputable doctor. Law & Order A man suffers a brutal assault. Law & Order “Faccia a Faccia”
Law & Order Divorce leads to stabbing.
uHighway Thru Hell “Heavy Recall”
uHighway Thru Hell “A Mighty Winter”
uTrapped Physical and psychological pain. Highway Thru Hell “Heavy Recall”
Highway Thru Hell “A Mighty Winter”
Cops
Cops
Cops A suspect flees. Cops
Cops
Cops
Cops
Cops
Live Free or Die Hard HHH (Action). (2:00)
O S F
7:00
7:30
8:00
8:30
M A I N L Y
9:00
M O V I E S
9:30
10:00
10:30
11:00
11:30
AMC
BSTZ
FLIX
FXM
HALLMV
HBO
HBO2
HBOC
HBOSG
HBOZ
IFC
MAX
MMAX
REELZ
SHO
SHOB
SHOS
SHOT
SHOX
STZ
STZC
STZENC
STZENCL
STZENS
STZENW
SUND
TCM
TMC
43 54 231
344 583 344
397 - 390
190 632 232
193 629 239
301 511 400
302 512 402
303 515 408
310 513 404
304 516 410
83 81 234
371 531 420
372 532 422
177 128 692
321 551 366
323 225 371
330 553 367
322 552 369
331 554 373
341 581 340
347 585 346
351 602 350
354 605 352
352 606 356
353 607 354
192 94 235
97 82 230
391 571 385
ANT
BUZZR
COZI TV
METV
STR
Coach
1141260465 Coach
Password Plus
95 - 487 Password Plus
Frasier
1091245460 Frasier
M*A*S*H
33 1239503 M*A*S*H
112 - 483 The Closer A man wearing a wire is shot.
N O S T A L G I A
My Two Dads
My Two Dads
Growing Pains
Growing Pains
Password Plus
Password Plus
Card Sharks
Card Sharks
Frasier
Frasier
Frasier
Frasier
Columbo “Murder in Malibu” Murder of a famous novelist.
The Division “Play Ball”
Strong Medicine “Drug Interactions”
S P A N I S H
L A N G U A G E
C27
Fanfare N
PREMIERES
Jaws 2 HH∂ (Suspense). Roy Scheider. Tourist town and police chief dread huge white shark at beach. (PG) Jaws 3 H∂ (1:55)
(6) Jaws HHHH (Suspense, 1975). Roy Scheider, Robert Shaw. (PG)
13 Sins HH (Horror, 2014). Mark Webber, Ron Perlman. (R)
Belly H Nas. (1:13)
Tyler Perry’s I Can Do Bad All By Myself
X-Men: The Last Stand HH∂ (Action). Hugh Jackman, Patrick Stewart. (PG-13)
(5:45) Black Rain HHH (Crime Drama). (R) Star Trek Generations HH∂ (Science Fiction). Patrick Stewart, William Shatner. (PG) Sky Captain and the World of Tomorrow HHH (Adventure). Gwyneth Paltrow. (PG)
(5:30) Sisters HH∂ (Comedy). (R)
The Other Woman HH (Romance-Comedy). Cameron Diaz, Leslie Mann. (PG-13)
The Other Woman HH (Romance-Comedy). Cameron Diaz, Leslie Mann. (PG-13) (12:20)
Christmas at Grand Valley (Romance, 2018). Brennan Elliott, Danica McKellar. (NR)
Finding Christmas (Romance-Comedy, 2013). JT Hodges, Tricia Helfer, Mark Lutz. (NR) Angel of Christmas (Romance). (NR) (1:00)
(6:30) Super Troopers 2 HH (Comedy). (R) Clash of the Titans HH (Fantasy, 2010). Sam Worthington, Liam Neeson. (PG-13)
Down a Dark Hall (Horror). AnnaSophia Robb, Uma Thurman. (PG-13) Fist Fight HH (1:10)
(6:33) The Sopranos The Sopranos Jackie Jr. receives a warning. The Sopranos
The Sopranos “Pine Barrens”
The Sopranos “Amour Fou”
The Sopranos “The Army of One” (12:15)
(6:15) The Hangover HHH (Comedy). (R)
Get Him to the Greek HHH (Comedy, 2010). Jonah Hill, Russell Brand. (R)
Liar Liar HH∂ (Comedy). Jim Carrey, Maura Tierney. (PG-13)
Spies Like Us (1:15)
(6:40) It HHH (Horror, 2017). Jaeden Lieberher, Jeremy Ray Taylor, Sophia Lillis. (R) Man on Fire HH∂ (Crime Drama). Denzel Washington. A bodyguard takes revenge on a girl’s kidnappers. (R) Fargo (R) (1:10)
(5:15) Inception
U.S. Marshals HH (Action). Tommy Lee Jones. Sam Gerard gets caught up in another fugitive case. (PG-13) Anchorman: The Legend of Ron Burgundy HHH (Comedy).
Cooties (R) (1:05)
Zero Dark Thirty (R)
(4:30) Gladiator HHH∂ (Historical Drama). Zero Dark Thirty HHH∂ (Drama, 2012). Jessica Chastain, Jason Clarke, Joel Edgerton. Elite operatives hunt Osama bin Laden. (R)
Arizona (Comedy). Danny McBride, Rosemarie DeWitt. (NR)
The Warrior’s Way HH (Action, 2010). Jang Dong Gun. (R)
Cabin Fever HH∂ (Horror). (R) (12:40)
(6) Me, Myself & Irene H∂ (Comedy). (R)
(6:45) Legend HHH (Crime Drama, 2015). Tom Hardy, Emily Browning. (R)
Steve Jobs HHH∂ (Biography, 2015). Michael Fassbender, Kate Winslet. (R)
Dunkirk HHH∂ (War). (PG-13) (12:55)
uJudy Garland: Her Final Days
uElizabeth Taylor: Her Final Days
uMarilyn Monroe: Her Final Days
Judy Garland: Her Final Days
Elizabeth Taylor: Her Final Days
uRay Donovan Mac faces a difficult decision. Ray Donovan Mac faces a difficult decision. The Bourne Ultimatum HHH (PG-13) (1:00)
(6:40) Molly’s Game HHH (Biography, 2017). Jessica Chastain, Idris Elba. (R)
(6:30) Book of Shadows: Blair Witch 2 H (R) Re-Animator HHH (Horror). Jeffrey Combs, Bruce Abbott. (NR) The House on Sorority Row HH∂ (Horror). Kathryn McNeil. (R)
The Scarehouse (Action). (NR) (12:30)
Planes, Trains and Automobiles HHH∂ (Comedy). Steve Martin.
Closer HHH (Drama). Julia Roberts. Four people grapple with love and betrayal. (R) Frida HHH (Biography). Salma Hayek, Alfred Molina. (R) (12:35)
Denial HHH (Drama). Rachel Weisz. A historian accuses a writer of denying the Holocaust. We Own the Night HH∂ (Crime Drama, 2007). Joaquin Phoenix, Mark Wahlberg. (R)
(6) American Assassin HH (Action). (R)
(5:30) 8 Mile HHH
All Access
Crank HH∂ (Action, 2006). Jason Statham, Amy Smart. (R)
Snatch HHH (Comedy-Drama, 2000). Benicio Del Toro. (R)
Trainspotting HHH∂ (R) (1:00)
(6:59) Outlander “The Birds & The Bees” uOutlander Jamie and Claire keep secrets. uCounterpart “Shadow Puppets”
Outlander Jamie and Claire keep secrets. Counterpart “Shadow Puppets”
Passengers HH (Suspense, 2008). Anne Hathaway. (PG-13)
Novitiate (R) (1:42)
(6:29) Bel Canto (Suspense). Julianne Moore. The Orphanage HHH (Suspense, 2007). Belén Rueda, Fernando Cayo. (R)
Gridiron Gang HH∂ (Crime Drama). (1:04)
(6:53) Coal Miner’s Daughter HHH∂ (Biography). Sissy Spacek, Tommy Lee Jones. (PG) Escape From Alcatraz HHH (Suspense). Clint Eastwood, Patrick McGoohan. (PG)
Stand and Deliver HHH (Drama). Edward James Olmos, Lou Diamond Phillips. (PG)
Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me HHH (Comedy).
Nighthawks HHH (Suspense). Sylvester Stallone. (R) (12:21)
(6:52) Wall Street HHH (Drama, 1987). Michael Douglas, Charlie Sheen. (R)
Dying of the Light H∂ (Action). Nicolas Cage, Anton Yelchin. (R) The Black Dahlia HH∂ (Mystery). Josh Hartnett. (R) (12:43)
Lonesome Dove “The Plains” Gus reunites with an old flame.
Lonesome Dove “Return” Gus is injured during an Indian attack. Lawman HHH (Western). Burt Lancaster, Robert Ryan. (R) (12:08)
(5:30) The Longest Yard HHH∂ (R)
Smokey and the Bandit HHH (Comedy, 1977). Burt Reynolds, Sally Field. (PG)
Smokey and the Bandit II HH (Comedy). Burt Reynolds, Jackie Gleason. (PG) (12:45)
(5:30) The Age of Innocence HHH∂ (PG)
A Letter to Three Wives HHHH (Drama, 1949). Jeanne Crain, Linda Darnell. (NR)
The Letter HHH∂ (Drama). Bette Davis. An accused murderess is blackmailed. (NR)
(6:05) The Debt HHH (Drama). (R)
The Queen HHH∂ (Biography, 2006). Helen Mirren, Michael Sheen. (PG-13)
Marshall HHH (Historical Drama, 2017). Chadwick Boseman, Josh Gad. (PG-13)
Johnny Carson Billy Crystal; Charles Nelson Reilly; Merie Earle. Coach
Press Your Luck
Press Your Luck
Password Plus
Password Plus
The Office
The Office
Talk Stoop
Talk Stoop
Touched by an Angel
Night Gallery
Night Gallery
Family Law “Sex, Lies and the Internet”
The Good Wife “Infamy”
Intervention “Ashley”
Intervention “Leslie”
Intervention “Coley” Crystal-meth addition. Real Interrogations
Real Interrogations
WFUT2 41 6 41 517 Intervention “Laney”
uNoticiero 47
Titulares y Más
WNJU 47 16 47 512 Pain & Gain HH (Acción). Mark Wahlberg, Ed Harris. Físicoculturistas de Florida atrapados en red de extorsión. (R) Fast & Furious HH (Acción). Vin Diesel, Paul Walker. (PG-13)
Intervention “Ashley”
Intervention “Leslie”
Intervention “Coley” Crystal-meth addition. Real Interrogations
Real Interrogations
WFTY 67 17 - - Intervention “Laney”
Fútbol Picante
SportsCenter (Live) (12:30)
ESPNSP 227 - 1520 Béisbol Liga Mexicana del Pacífico Juego 5 (de ser necesario). Juego 5 de la serie de playoffs. Desde Jalisco. (Live)
uNFLeros Toda la NFL con sabor latino.
Central Fox (Live)
Fox Gol México (Live)
FSESP
228 4421521 Fútbol Mexicano Primera División
Los Cousins: La serie
Nosotros los guapos
Nosotros los guapos
Vecinos
Vecinos
GALA
73 69 274 Los Cousins: La serie
Clash of the Titans HH (Fantasía, 2010). Sam Worthington, Liam Neeson. (PG-13)
Down a Dark Hall (Terror). AnnaSophia Robb, Uma Thurman. (PG-13) Fist Fight HH (1:10)
HBOL
305 517 412 (6:30) Super Troopers 2 HH (Comedia).
uLarrymania Larry viaja a Texas.
Escuela para maridos “Reconfirmación”
Larrymania La despedida de Kenia.
Larrymania La despedida de Kenia.
MUN2
227 42 775 La Frontera “Camión de Marihuana”
S P O R T S
SportsCenter
NFL PrimeTime
SportsCenter
SportsCenter
SportsCenter With Scott Van Pelt (12:30)
College Wrestling
Championship Drive
Football
Football
Championship Drive (1:00)
(6) College Football From Nov. 4, 1995.
College Football From Oct. 29, 2011.
College Football From Oct. 21, 2000.
Boxing
PBC Collection
PBC Face to Face
PBC Countdown
PBA Bowling Hall of Fame Classic. From Arlington, Texas.
College Basketball Xavier at Marquette. (1:00)
Bundesliga Season Ticket
Formula E: Str
Formula E: Str
PBC Face to Face
PBC Countdown
Boxing Premier Boxing Champions.
(6) PGA Tour Golf Sentry Tournament of Champions, Final Round. From Kapalua Resort Plantation Course in Kapalua, Hawaii. Golf Central
PGA Golf
(6) MLB Network Presents
Legends Never Die: The Sandlot Story
The Sandlot HH∂ (Children’s, 1993). Thomas Guiry, Mike Vitar, Patrick Renna. (PG) Legends Never Die: The Sandlot Story
FantomWorks “Buyer Beware”
Inside West Coast Customs
Vegas Rat Rods Iron-worker themed rat rod. Vegas Rat Rods
Vegas Rat Rods Steve pushes his crew.
NHL Hockey New York Rangers at Arizona Coyotes. From Gila River Arena in Glendale, Ariz. Rangers Postgame
Connections
Connections
NHL Hockey
Connections
Connections
MSG Shorts
World Poker Tour WPT Montreal - Part 1.
Red Bull Cliff Diving
NHL Hockey New Jersey Devils at Vegas Golden Knights.
NBA Pregame
NBA Basketball Indiana Pacers at Toronto Raptors. From Scotiabank Arena in Toronto.
NBA TV Postgame Show
NBA GameTime
NHL Live
NHL Hockey Chicago Blackhawks at Pittsburgh Penguins. From PPG Paints Arena in Pittsburgh.
NHL Overtime
NHL:WintClass
NFL GameDay High.
NFL GameDay High.
NFL GameDay Prime
NFL Football Philadelphia Eagles at Chicago Bears.
NFL GameDay Prime
NHL Hockey: Capitals at Red Wings
Top Shelf
2019 IIHF World Junior Championship Gold Medal Game: Teams TBA.
On the Fly
(6) Mets Classics First interleague game between Mets and Yankees.
Broadway Boxing
SportsNite
SportsNite
(6:30) Women’s College Basketball Florida State at North Carolina. Women’s College Basketball Notre Dame at Georgia Tech.
CenterStage
Moments of Glory
DFC
DIS
DISJR
DXD
FREE
HBOF
NIK
NIKJR
NGEO
NGEOW
NTOON
PBSK
SHOFZ
STZENF
TNIK
TOON
TVL
Lottery Changed My Life
Lottery Changed My Life
Suddenly Rich “High School Riches”
Lottery Changed My Life
120 22 259 Lottery Changed My Life
Stuck in the Middle
A Cinderella Story: If the Shoe Fits (Fantasy). Sofia Carson. (PG)
Coop & Cami
Coop & Cami
Bunk’d
Raven’s Home
Andi Mack
125 49 250 Stuck in the Middle
Vampirina
Fancy Nancy
Vampirina
Muppet Babies
Puppy Dog Pals
PJ Masks
PJ Masks
Vampirina
Muppet Babies
126 254 260 Puppy Dog Pals
uMarvel’s Avengers
uMarvel’s Avengers
Pokémon: Sun
Big Hero 6
DuckTales
Milo Murphy’s Law
DuckTales
127 60 251 Beyblade Burst Turbo Yo-Kai Watch
49 38 199 (5:45) Toy Story 3 HHH∂ (Children’s). (G) Home Alone 2: Lost in New York HH∂ (Children’s). Macaulay Culkin. Kevin ends up in New York when he boards the wrong plane. (PG) Nanny McPhee HH∂ (Children’s). (1:00)
The LEGO Batman Movie HHH∂ (Children’s). Voices of Will Arnett, Michael Cera. (PG) Mighty Joe Young HH∂ (Children’s). Charlize Theron. (PG) (12:20)
311 514 406 Shrek 2 HHH (Children’s, 2004). Voices of Mike Myers. (PG)
Cousins for Life
Alvin and the Chipmunks HH (Children’s, 2007). Jason Lee, David Cross. (PG)
The Office
The Office “Fire”
Friends
Friends
121 6 252 Henry Danger
Bubble Guppies
Butterbean’s Café
Butterbean’s Café
Peppa Pig
Peppa Pig
PAW Patrol
PAW Patrol
PAW Patrol
Bubble Guppies
123 257 256 Bubble Guppies
uLost City of Machu Picchu
uMystery Skeletons of the Sahara
Stonehenge Decoded: Secrets Revealed
Stonehenge Decoded: Secrets Revealed
162 65 121 Easter Island Unsolved
uWild Korea “Return to the Wild”
uWild Korea “Life at the Borderlands”
Wild Japan
Wild Japan
158 130 132 Wild Japan
Alvinnn!!! and
Odd Parents
Odd Parents
Odd Parents
Odd Parents
SpongeBob
SpongeBob
SpongeBob
SpongeBob
122 262 254 Alvinnn!!! and
Daniel Tiger
Daniel Tiger
Pinkalicious
1311275472 Odd Squad: The Movie (Children’s). Dalila Bela, Anna Cathcart. (NR) Odd Squad: The Movie (Children’s). Dalila Bela, Anna Cathcart. (NR) Sesame Street
Hey Arnold! The Movie HH (Children’s). Voices of Spencer Klein. The Wild Thornberrys Movie HH∂ (Children’s)., Tom Kane (PG)
Maid in Manhattan HH (PG-13) (1:00)
325 558 380 (6) Remember the Titans HHH (Drama).
Into the Woods HHH (Musical, 2014). Meryl Streep, Emily Blunt, James Corden. (PG) Big Hero 6 HHH∂ (Children’s, 2014). Voices of Ryan Potter, Scott Adsit. (PG)
356 608 362 (6:35) Planes: Fire & Rescue HH (PG)
iCarly
Game Shakers
Game Shakers
Rufus (Children’s). Jace Norman. (NR)
Double Dare
Double Dare
Rugrats
Rugrats (12:02)
124 263 255 iCarly
Total Drama Island
Ranger Smith
Harvey Birdman
Mike Tyson Mysteries Bob’s Burgers
American Dad
Family Guy
Family Guy
Rick and Morty
128 61 257 Total Drama Island
Everybody Raymond
Everybody Raymond
Everybody Raymond
Everybody Raymond
Everybody Raymond
Two and a Half Men
Two and a Half Men
The King of Queens
The King of Queens
34 85 241 Everybody Raymond
F A M I L Y
/
C H I L D R E N
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
36 28 70
211 29 74
237 303 72
213 400 83
214 456 84
224 405 93
222 306 86
150 403 631
71 27 78
204 48 80
148 308 89
212 314 90
219 310 88
223 312 87
202 26 77
201 53 76
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travel
newsday.com/travel
globetrotter
ALAMY
ancienttreasures
New mega-museum
set to open in 2020
ALAMY / ZACH HOLMES
O
A good winter escape for nature lovers: Crossing a cable bridge in Costa Rica’s Monte Verde cloud forest.
familyfour
Make memories this winter
W
2
hen it comes to making travel
plans, the options can be
overwhelming. Four intrepid
family travel experts add to the mix
with their top picks for a memorable
winter season adventure.
1
GO FOR A GREEK GETAWAY
“People tend to stay close to
home with kids. But I firmly believe
in opening their hearts and minds
early with farther-flung travel,” says
Becca Hensley, a parent and travel
writer. “You’ll manage to relax, spoil
yourself and hang with the family in
style if you book a villa with Greekowned White Key Villas.” Hensley
says the villas “come with outstanding
staff support, VIP experiences and
special treats for children.”
INFO whitekeyvillas.com;
beccahensley.com
CHILL IN QUEBEC CITY
“Most Canadians seem to enjoy
winter — even celebrate it,”
observes Rainer Jenss, founder and
CEO of the Family Travel Association,
an organization that advocates for
travel as an important part of every
child’s education. “Winter Carnival,
held every year in early February, has
what every kid loves: parades, snow
sculptures, shows, skating and plenty
of hot chocolate.”
INFO quebecregion.com/en;
familytravel.org
3
WINTER ON THE RANCH
Vista Verde, a luxury Colorado
guest ranch, is a winter wonderland
for families with kids of all ages, advises
Nancy Schretter, founder and managing
editor of the Family Travel Network.
“There are so many fun things to do
there — from snow tubing and crosscountry skiing to snowmobiling, snowshoeing and fat tire biking in the snow.
They also have a great kids program.”
INFO vistaverde.com;
familytravelnetwork.com
4
CONSIDER COSTA RICA
“This Central American country
is safe and easy to negotiate even
for those who do not speak Spanish,”
says LiLing Pang, co-founder and CEO
of Trekaroo, an independent family
travel community. “In a week, you could
be bird watching and zip-lining in the
Monte Verde cloud forest, surfing and
boogie boarding along the white sand
beaches of the Guanacaste region, and
watching playful monkeys and sloths in
the rain forest.”
INFO visitcostarica.com; trekaroo.com
— FamilyTravel.com (TNS)
n the Giza Plateau outside Cairo,
thousands of Egyptians are laboring in the shadow of the pyramids to
erect a monument worthy of the
pharaohs.
The Grand Egyptian Museum has
been under construction for well over
a decade and is intended to showcase
Egypt’s ancient treasures. A soft opening planned for this year was scrapped
in favor of a more triumphant inauguration in 2020. Costs have soared from an
initial $650 million to well over $1
billion. The museum is a series of
towering concrete halls that will eventually hold some 50,000 artifacts,
including the famed mask of Tutankhamen — King Tut — and other
treasures currently housed in the
century-old Egyptian Museum in
Cairo.
The site will also include a cinema,
shops, restaurants and a boutique hotel.
INFO nwsdy.li/giza
— AP
magicvalue
Disney World’s new
4-park, 4-day plan
W
alt Disney World will start
selling a ticket that allows
buyers to enter each of its theme
parks for one day apiece. Its total
price of $340 breaks down to $85 per
day.
The deal — dubbed the 4-Park
Magic Value Ticket — will go on sale
Jan. 18, and the tickets must be used by
March 1. It works for one day of admission to Magic Kingdom, one day at
Epcot, one day at Disney’s Hollywood
Studios and one day at Disney’s
Animal Kingdom. Tickets can be used
to enter each theme park only once.
There will also be versions of the
new 4-Park pass for specific time
periods later in 2019. The 4-Park
Magic Select Tickets cost $356 ($89
per day), while the 4-Park Magic
Summer Ticket is $380 ($95 per day).
INFO disneyworld.com/parkmagic
— Orlando Sentinel (TNS)
SUNDAY, JAN. 6, 2019
EN
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FINAL DAYS
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OUR MOST POPULAR OFFER IS BACK. HURRY IN BEFORE WE SELL OUT!
ENDS 1/8
Up to a $699 value—FREE
1
KING
QUEEN
OR
FOR THE PRICE OF A
FOR THE PRICE OF A
2
Minimum purchase of $3999 with your Mattress Firm credit card. 72 equal monthly payments required.
WAS $497 SAVE $100
OR
NO CREDIT NEEDED
See store for details.
FIRM
QUEEN MATTRESS
NOW $497
WAS $597 SAVE $100
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MEMORY FOAM
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0% APR FOR 6 YEARS*
QUEEN
TWIN
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OR
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SALE
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TOP MATTRESS
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PILLOW TOP MATTRESS
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KING WAS $1099
KING WAS $1299
KING WAS $1299
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
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NOW $449
NOW $549
& more.
NOW $699
NOW $799
NOW $699
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NOW $799
NOW $799
NOW $999
D9
DS
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E 1/8
FREE ADJUSTABLE BASE
UP TO A $699 VALUE - FREE
OR
KING MATTRESS. QUEEN PRICE.
QUEEN MATTRESS. TWIN PRICE.
ALL
BRANDS ON
SALE
FIRM MATTRESS
PLUSH MATTRESS
HYBRID PLUSH MATTRESS
QUEEN WAS $597
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KING WAS $897
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PLUSH MATTRESS
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FIRM MATTRESS
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SOFT MATTRESS
MEDIUM MATTRESS
FIRM MATTRESS
$
QUEEN WAS $700
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PLUSH MATTRESS
LUXURY FIRM MATTRESS
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FIRM MATTRESS
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CUSHION FIRM MATTRESS
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QUEEN WAS $1599
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$
$
KING WAS $1999
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$
0% APR FOR 6 YEARS*
Minimum purchase of $3999 with your Mattress Firm credit card. 72 equal monthly payments required.
KING WAS $1499
$
$
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QUEEN WAS $449
NOW 249
$
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
PILLOW TOP MATTRESS
$
OR
QUEEN WAS $2099
NOW $1799
KING WAS $2599
NOW $2099
NO CREDIT NEEDED
See store for details.
1-800-MAT-FIRM | MATTRESSFIRM.COM
0% APR: 6 years* with a minimum purchase of $3999, 5 years* with a minimum purchase of $2799, 4 years* with a minimum purchase of $1999, 3 years* with a minimum purchase of $1299, 2 years* with a minimum purchase of $999 on your Mattress Firm credit card. 72, 60, 48, 36 or 24 equal
monthly payments required. *Offer valid 1/2/1-1/8/19 and applies only to single-receipt qualifying purchases. No interest will be charged on promo purchase and equal monthly payments are required equal to initial promo purchase amount divided equally by the number of months in promo
period until promo is paid in full. The equal monthly payment will be rounded to the next highest whole dollar and may be higher than the minimum payment that would be required if the purchase was a non-promotional purchase. Regular account terms apply to non-promotional purchases.
Down payment equal to sales tax and delivery required. For new accounts: Purchase APR is 29.99%; Minimum Interest Charge is $2. Existing cardholders should see their credit card agreement for their applicable terms. Subject to credit approval. 1. Free Adjustable Base Offer: Offer valid 1/2/11/8/19. Receive a free Head Up 50 adjustable base (up to a $699 value) with select mattress purchases of $599 and above. Free adjustable base offer valid on same-size mattress purchased. Split king or split California king base purchases consist of 2 bases. For split king or split California king
purchases consumer will receive one free adjustable base with promotion, with second base at regular price. Free adjustable base offer valid to complete mattress set, has no cash value and cannot be used as credit. Offer not valid on previous purchases, floor models, clearance items or Final
Markdown. Other exclusions may apply. Price of adjustable base (up to $699) will be deducted from refund if mattress is returned for a refund. Cannot be combined with any other offer. Limited quantities available; offer valid while supplies last. See store for complete details. 2. Get select king-sized
mattresses for the price of a queen-sized mattress. Or get select queen-sized mattresses for the price of a twin-sized mattress. Savings applied to our low price. Savings vary by mattress set and model (max savings up to $600). Product selection may vary by store. Offer not valid on previous
purchases, floor models, clearance items or Final Markdown. Other exclusions may apply. Cannot be combined with any other offer. Limited quantities available; offer valid 1/2/1-1/8/19 or while supplies last. See store for complete details. In-store dollar savings range from $50-$699. We invite
you to ask about any individual prices. Product and selection may vary from store to store. Photography is for illustration purposes only and may not reflect actual product. Mattress Firm, Inc. strives for accuracy in our advertising, but errors in pricing and/or photography may occur. Mattress Firm
reserves the right to correct any such errors. Store hours may vary by location. Unless otherwise indicated, offers valid 1/2/1-1/8/19 or while supplies last at your local Mattress Firm. See store for complete details.
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EXERCISE YOUR
M I ND
Get clued in with Newsday’s new interactive daily
crossword puzzles presented by Stan Newman.
Check for errors
as you play
Reveal answers
if you’re stuck
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
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NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
D14
Quote Acrostic
BY MAX FRANKEL / EDITED BY LINDA AND CHARLES PRESTON
Sudoku
Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box
contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively.
Kids Sudoku
Jumble
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
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THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
By David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Newsday Crossword
SEEKING NEWSDAY CROSSWORD BLOGGERS
For more information, contact Stan Newman at
NewsdayXwordBlog@gmail.com.
A CENTURY AGO (What happened in 1919)
BY S.N. / EDITED BY STANLEY NEWMAN (stanxwords.com)
75 Purposes
76 Berry from palms
77 Teachers’ org.
78 Rebel leader at
the 1919 Battle of
Juárez
82 Empty talk
83 Erstwhile
Heathrow lander
85 Talk-show group
86 Coated with
chrome, say
87 Grand Ole __
88 Star in Cygnus
89 Erstwhile
Heathrow lander
90 Impertinent
93 One with no hope
94 Lefty
98 Treaty-signing site
of 1919
100 Babe Ruth’s 1919
league-leading
homer count
102 Part of QED
103 Lasso loop
104 Grand Bahama,
for instance
105 66 Across
servings
106 Proscribed thing
107 CNN medical
reporter
108 Piercing tools
109 Latin explanation
opener
DOWN
1 Sound-minded
2 Cafeteria carrier
3 Actress Russo
4 Casts a spell on
5 Disbursements
6 Stationed (in)
7 CIA operatives
8 Cry of disapproval
9 Come to terms
about
10 Somewhat dry,
in wine-speak
11 Draw forth
12 Major silents star
13 Eroded
14 Hilton alternative
15 Golf magazine staple
16 Traveled by bus or
bike
17 Elevator innovator
18 Traveled
24 Bard comedy title
starter
26 Episode’s second
showing
29 Pull to pieces
32 Foundation
donation
33 “Speak up!”
34 Cloudless
35 Carousel carving
36 Asian nation
that declared
independence
in 1919
By Stanley Newman
IN OTHER WORDS
There is only one common uncapitalized word that
contains the consecutive letters YRT.
What is it?
INITIAL REACTION
Identify the well-known proverb from the first
letters in each of its words.
B. C. B. C.
NATIONAL TREASURE
Using the letters in BELGIUM, we were able to
form five common uncapitalized five-letter words.
Can you find them all?
Contact Newsday puzzle editor Stanley Newman at
StanXwords@aol.com or write him at P.O. Box 69, Massapequa
Park, NY 11762. Please enclose a self-addressed, stamped
envelope if you would like a reply. You can do this week’s
crossword puzzle online at newsday.com/crossword and find
hints and other useful information at stanxwords.com
PUZZLE BOOKS: Find Stanley Newman’s books at your local
bookstore or Amazon.com.
SCRABBLEgrams
DIRECTIONS: Make a 2- to 7-letter word from the letters in
each row. Add points of each word, using scoring directions
at right. 7-letter words get 50-point bonus. "Blanks" used
as any letter have no point value.
SCRABBLEgrams is a registered trademark of Hasbro in the US and
Canada. ©2018 Hasbro. Distributed by Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All rights reserved.
Last week’s answers can be
found on the next page.
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
45 New Haven
student
46 Measures
of work
47 Timely benefit
48 Major nuisance
49 Minor anomaly
50 Hardwood tree
51 Prohibition
legislation
enacted in 1919
55 Still in contention
56 Back-wheel
connector
58 Subatomic
particle
59 Dinesen’s real
surname
60 Meddlesome
61 Cooked for too
long
62 Celebrity elite
63 Induced
improperly
65 Assumed name
66 Unpretentious
pub
69 Can’t find
70 Thoroughbred
racing coup first
achieved in 1919
72 Have a lapse
73 Dollar sums, for
short
74 Den __,
Netherlands
D15
newsday.com
ACROSS
1 Throat bug, for
short
6 Woodcutter
Ali __
10 Painter of ballet
scenes
15 Front of a ship
19 Basketball
venue
20 Wide-eyed
21 Writer Wharton
22 Mechanical
learning
23 First woman in
the House of
Commons (1919)
25 Home of The
Thinker, which
opened in 1919
27 Mask cutouts
28 Novelist Segal
30 Makeup exam
31 Ancient, in a
1/1 song
32 Formation fliers
33 Indian attire
34 Repetitive cries
37 Disposed (to)
38 Awaited instead
of sleeping
42 Top-level
dwellings
43 National Park
established in
1919
37 Ordinary
writing
38 Cinema counter
purchase
39 Toon debuting
in 1919
40 Greenish hue
41 Approach
maturity
43 “Awesome!”
44 To pieces
47 How some
chocolate is sold
49 Supreme joy
51 Florist’s
accessories
52 Supply what’s
needed to
53 Of hearing
54 Performance in
un ballet
55 Calibrate
57 Choir attire
59 Gusts of air
61 Bounty captain
62 Allure in the air
63 Bugs Bunny’s
voice
64 Bard tragedy title
starter
65 In __ against
time
66 Barbecue
hardware
67 Give an address
68 Was 60 Across
70 Driving Miss
Daisy Oscar
winner
71 Novelist Carr
74 Being a
nuisance to
76 Spider or scorpion
78 Family nickname
79 Water far from
land
80 Wind-powered
spinner
81 Disinclination
to act
82 Symbols of
Australia
84 Admits, informally
86 Look sulky
88 Old-time
“accomplish”
89 Dog biscuit
shapes
90 Common Swedish
name
91 First-century
despot
92 Land on the
Caspian
93 Far-from-gourmet
fare
94 Dispose of
for cash
95 Needle producer
96 “Farm” animals
97 Novelist
Nathanael
99 Teammate of
the Babe
101 GPS reading
Stan’s
Brain Games
Last Week’s Puzzle Solutions
Newsday Crossword
Sudoku
Kids Sudoku
(Puzzles can be found on pages 14-15)
Stan’s Brain Games
TELEPHONE TRIOS
Answer: RATTLER,
REPTILE, SERPENT
TWO BY FOURS
Answer: VAIN, IOTA
SCRABBLEgrams
WHO’S WHAT WHERE?
Answer: Fleming
TV Jumble
Besides WINSTON CHURCHILL (23 Across),
other two-time Time Persons of the Year who
were not U.S. presidents: Joseph Stalin (1939,
1942), George Marshall (1943, 1947), Deng
Xiaoping (1978, 1985), Mikhail Gorbachev
(1987, 1989) and the American soldier (1950,
2003). With a land area of 8.1 square miles,
NAURU (9 Down) is the third-smallest country,
larger than only Vatican City and Monaco.
OUR PROMISES.
YOUR PEACE OF MIND.
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READER PHOTOS
“The inspiration for my plate
was the video game The Sims.
I started playing the game
with my younger son a long
time ago (we still play today).
The Sims is a simulation of
daily activities of one or more
virtual people (Sims) in a
suburban household near a
fictional city. Sul Sul is ‘simlish,’
a fictional language used by
Sims, for hello and goodbye,”
said Maria Olson of Port
Jefferson Station.
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NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
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NOW ON NEWSDAY.COM
CATCHING THE SUN. Danielle Leef was able to capture this rare reflected sun halo after sunrise Dec. 9 at Mill Creek in Water Mill.
”I often go out in the mornings to photograph sunrises, always hoping to catch an epic one,” she said.
Photo by Danielle Leef of Southampton
Winter’s wonders
P
Over the decades, many
memorable films have
been filmed or set here,
and we’re not just talking
about “The Amityville
Horror.” See
our list of movies with
Long Island
connections that
made it to the
Academy’s red carpet at
newsday.com/movies
atience is a virtue, they say. For
amateur photographer Gerry
Corrigan of Rockville Centre,
it’s also a technique.
“I wait for periods of activity from the birds, and it seems to be a
behavior pattern of waterfowl to — with
some regularity — fly in a flock away
from and back to their lake of choice,”
Corrigan said. “This happens very suddenly and unpredictably, and a photographer has to be ready and quick to capture these graceful and evocative scenes
that last only a few seconds.”
In this array of photos, we give you
a lasting look at the “few seconds”
captured by Corrigan and other Long
Islanders.
— ROSEMARY OLANDER, LI LIFE EDITOR
PATIENCE REWARDED. Gerry Corrigan said he patiently waited to capture this image
of Canada geese in late November. Corrigan said he finds watching birds in flight
“liberating and transcendent . . . with an archangelic quality.”
Photo by Gerry Corrigan of Rockville Centre
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Bilello, 4, chose to help volunteers with the Atlantic Marine Conservation Society pick up trash
at the beach at Hallock State Park Preserve in Northville on Dec. 27, said his mom, Angela.
Photo by Angela Bilello of Mattituck
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Christine Catalano
photographed
leaves and berries in
November at the
Seatuck National
Wildlife Refuge in
Islip. Catalano said
she likes going there
because “it’s local
and has lots of
different habitats.”
The retired graphic
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NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
NOT A BIRD OR A PLANE. A paraglider taking off from Cedar Beach and Overlook
Beach caught the eye of Carole Neidich-Ryder on Dec. 9. “The idea that a person can do
this . . . is almost like having a superpower,” she said.
Photo by Carole Neidich-Ryder of Garden City
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COVERSTORY
SAGAMORE HILL NATIONAL HISTORIC SITE
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
newsday.com
LI LIFE N1
E4
TR in 1916; he was president from
1901 to 1909.
‘The Colonel’ makes
Remembering President Theodore Roosevelt on the centennial of his death
BY BILL BLEYER
Special to Newsday
E
ver since remaking himself as a 12-year-old — when he
undertook a strenuous program of exercise to overcome a
sickly, asthmatic childhood — Theodore Roosevelt had
projected an aura of strength, vitality and invincibility.
But by late 1918, the reality
was far different: At the age of
60, the former president was
aging rapidly and in failing
health. The end of his remarkably crowded life would come
early the following year.
News of TR’s death on Jan. 6,
1919, reverberated across the
COVERSTORY
E5
newsday.com/lilife
SAGAMORE HILL NATIONAL HISTORIC SITE
LI LIFE N1
Pallbearers carry the coffin of “Colonel” Roosevelt, as he
preferred to be known, to its final resting place in Youngs
Memorial Cemetery in Oyster Bay Cove.
ON THE COVER Theodore
Roosevelt at Sagamore Hill in
Cove Neck, where he died on
Jan. 6, 1919, at age 60.
Roosevelt.” “A common reaction
among the millions of Americans who had imagined him to
be indestructible, and headed
again for the presidency, was a
sense of shock . . . ”
Indeed, said Susan Sarna,
museum curator at Roosevelt’s
former home, Sagamore Hill
National Historic Site in Cove
Neck, “Even in the last couple
of months of his life, when his
health was declining rapidly,
there were still people who
were rallying behind him to run
for president again.
“He was such a major world
figure who had accomplished so
much and left the country in
such a good state that the American public was deeply affected
by his passing,” added Sarna,
who with her staff has prepared
a new exhibit on Roosevelt and
his legacy timed to the centennial of his death.
The beginning of the end for
the 26th president stemmed
from his need for excitement
after leaving the White House
after 7 1/ 2 years in 1909. Having
come in second to Democrat
Woodrow Wilson but outpolling Republican incumbent
William Howard Taft as the
third-party Progressive candi-
date seeking to regain the
presidency in 1912, Roosevelt
came up with an adventure
that would take his mind off
politics and provide him with
what he called his “last chance
to be a boy.”
But the proponent of the
“Strenuous Life” would pay a
steep price in 1913-14 for serv-
See COVER STORY on E6
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
nation and around the world
because he still was the most
well-known and popular man
on the planet a decade after
leaving the White House,
Edmund Morris, author of a
three-volume biography of TR,
told Newsday.
“The news of the colonel’s
death . . . spread around the
world with extraordinary swiftness,” Morris writes in “Colonel
The death mask and hand mold of Roosevelt are on display at the
Sagamore Hill National Historic Site in Cove Neck.
newsday.com
last stand on LI
STEVE PFOST
BETTMANN ARCHIVE / GETTY IMAGES
Roosevelt and his family at Sagamore Hill at Christmastime in 1916.
COVERSTORY
LI LIFE N1
E6
Last days
of ‘the
old lion’
Their father’s health continued to decline, exacerbated by
his concern for the safety of his
children. Already blind in his
left eye from an injury in 1904
while boxing at the White
House, in February 1918 he was
admitted to Roosevelt Hospital
in New York for surgery on
abscesses in his thigh and ears.
Inflammation developed in the
left inner ear, prompting fears
that the “Colonel,” as he preferred to be addressed since the
Rough Rider days, might not
survive.
But the fever broke and TR
went home in early March.
Theodore and his wife, Edith,
continued to fret over the wellbeing of their four sons. First
Quentin developed a severe
case of pneumonia. Then
Archie was hit by shrapnel that
injured his left leg and broke an
arm. Ted was gassed and later
wounded in the leg.
For the first time in his life,
TR’s sleep was troubled.
“I wake up in the middle of
the night, wondering if the boys
The funeral for former President Theodore Roosevelt on Jan. 8, 1919, at Christ Episcopal Church in Oyster Bay.
SAGAMORE HILL NATIONAL HISTORIC SITE
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
newsday.com
CONCERN FOR HIS CHILDREN
KEYSTONE VIEW CO. / LIBRARY OF CONGRESS
ing as co-commander of an
800-mile expedition to map the
River of Doubt, an Amazon
River tributary in Brazil
renamed Rio Roosevelt in his
honor. Still suffering fevers from
his time in Cuba leading the
Rough Riders during the Spanish-American War, Roosevelt
became so ill during the fourmonth expedition that he
begged his son Kermit to leave
him behind. TR survived but his
health never rebounded.
When the United States
entered World War I in 1917, the
four Roosevelt sons volunteered. Ted and Archie served
as officers under the American
commander in France, Gen.
John J. Pershing, while Kermit
secured a staff position with the
British in Mesopotamia (now
Iraq). The youngest child,
Quentin, 19, enlisted in the
Army’s air wing and after his
pilot training on Long Island at
Hazelhurst Field — later
renamed Roosevelt Field in his
honor — shipped out for
Europe.
AP
COVER STORY from E4
Theodore Roosevelt’s coffin, draped in the flag he loved, is carried
into Christ Episcopal Church in Oyster Bay.
Children place flowers at the grave of Theodore Roosevelt, circa
1920. The 26th president was buried 26 steps up the hillside.
are alright, and thinking how I
could tell their mother if anything happened,” he told a
friend. Roosevelt returned from
a speaking trip in June 1918 with
a high fever and erysipelas, a
skin infection, in his left foot.
In July 1918, Lt. Quentin Roosevelt shot down his first
Roosevelt told Thompson that
“something has happened to
one of the boys. It can’t be Ted
or Archie, for both are recovering from wounds. It’s not
Kermit, since he’s not at the
moment in the danger zone so
it must be Quentin. His mother
must not be told until there is
German airplane. Ten days later,
the Colonel was in the Library
when Associated Press reporter
Phil Thompson came to the
house with a censored cablegram sent to the New York Sun
that read “watch Sagamore Hill
for . . .”
Asked what it meant,
no hope left.”
Thompson returned to
Sagamore Hill the next morning
and told Roosevelt on the
piazza that he had verified that
Quentin’s plane had been
attacked by two German
fighters and shot down behind
enemy lines.
COVERSTORY
newsday.com/lilife
LIBRARY OF CONGRESS
S
Edith Roosevelt, who was married to TR
for 32 years, in 1935; she died in 1948.
The former president circa 1917, the year his
four sons volunteered to fight in WWI.
LIBRARY OF CONGRESS / KERMIT ROOSEVELT
TR, center, during a scientific expedition to Brazil in 1913-14 that took a huge and lasting toll on his health.
“But Mrs. Roosevelt!” TR
gasped. “How am I going to
break it to her?”
He went inside and a halfhour later handed Thompson a
brief statement: “Quentin’s
mother and I are very glad that
he got to the front and had a
chance to render some service
to his country, and show the
stuff that was in him before his
fate befell him.”
Yet Roosevelt’s spirit was
crushed by the death of the
child most like him.
“Quentin’s death shook him
greatly,” Edith wrote to Kermit.
“I can see how constantly he
thinks of him. . . . Sad thoughts
of what Quentin would’ve
counted for in the future.”
TR had also entered his sixth
decade suffering from crippling
attacks of rheumatism. By early
November, one foot was so
swollen he could not wear a
shoe. Three physicians who
attended him at Sagamore Hill
ordered bed rest.
When he ignored them and
traveled into Oyster Bay to vote
Nov. 5, he felt even worse. Six
days later, he returned to Roosevelt Hospital in Manhattan
See COVER STORY on E8
— BILL BLEYER
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
Quentin, 19, Roosevelt’s
youngest, during military
training in Mineola in 1917. He
was killed in action the next year.
newsday.com
SAGAMORE HILL NATIONAL HISTORIC SITE
Roosevelt holds a baby as his wife, Edith,
and other family members look on.
SAGAMORE HILL NATIONAL HISTORIC SITE
LIBRARY OF CONGRESS
SAGAMORE HILL NATIONAL HISTORIC SITE
A stereo card image of Roosevelt’s grave in Oyster Bay Cove.
agamore Hill’s new
exhibit, “Theodore
Roosevelt, A Man for
the Modern World,” was
prepared for the centennial of
TR’s death, but it doesn’t
dwell on that event.
“The exhibit is really a
celebration of Theodore
Roosevelt’s legacy tied in
with the changes in the world
with technology and how
that affected his ability to do
his job as successfully as he
did,” said Susan Sarna, Sagamore Hill’s museum curator.
“We already have an
entire exhibit on Theodore
Roosevelt from his birth to
his death, so we figured we
needed to bring in a new
twist, which is that Theodore
Roosevelt was the first modern president. He was the
first president to be able to
leave the country while in
office to go to Panama because the communications
and transportation had
become so sophisticated.”
The exhibit showcases
documents, photographs and
many never-before-seen
artifacts. These include family
sporting equipment and the
license plate from the Roosevelts’ automobile.
The objects relating to TR’s
passing are plaster and
bronze death masks and a
plaster cast of TR’s right
hand — purchased in 2015
from the sculptor’s collection
by the Friends of Sagamore
Hill — along with an original
watercolor of the funeral
painted by Navy Lt. Cmdr. H.
Reuterdahl and published in
The Outlook magazine.
Familiar artifacts from the
Roosevelts’ home will be on
display: an etched silver
ceremonial cup given to TR
and his wife, Edith, after their
trip to see construction of the
Panama Canal. The installation will include rarely seen
historic films with footage
from various periods of
Roosevelt’s life, including
international travel.
WHEN I WHERE The exhibit is scheduled through
2019 at Sagamore Hill’s Old
Orchard Museum, but with
the U.S. government shutdown affecting national parks,
visitors should call ahead.
INFO 516-922-4788,
nps.gov/sahi.
LI LIFE N1
Celebrating
TR’s legacy
E7
COVERSTORY
LI LIFE N1
E8
newsday.com/lilife
The end
of TR’s
vital life
Former President William Howard Taft, front right, who succeeded Roosevelt, was among the dignitaries at the funeral.
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
On the first Sunday of the
year, Jan. 5, Roosevelt remained
in bed reading aloud to his wife
or listening while she read,
writing to Kermit or just relaxing. TR worked for 11 hours on a
magazine article and newspaper
editorial. Friends who came to
the house were informed the
Colonel was too weak to see
them.
When Edith finished playing
solitaire at the table beside TR’s
bed around 10 o’clock,
Roosevelt asked his wife to help
him sit up because he felt as if
his heart or lungs were about to
stop working. Edith called for
the nurse staying with the
family, and she sent for a local
doctor. The nurse gave him
morphine so he could sleep
through the night.
About midnight, valet James
Amos arrived to help watch
Roosevelt during the night and
helped put him to bed in the
Gate Room. Amos turned off
the light and napped in front of
the fire. Edith came in to look at
her husband around 12:30 a.m.
and 2 a.m.
SAGAMORE HILL NATIONAL HISTORIC SITE
newsday.com
READING AND RELAXING
The New York Tribune announced Roosevelt’s death on its front page
on Jan. 7, 1919. The former president was mourned worldwide.
At 4 o’clock, the nurse woke
Edith and told her TR had
stopped breathing. Rushing to
her husband of 32 years, she
leaned over him and exclaimed,
“Theodore, darling!” Edith
wrote in her diary that he had
stopped breathing and “had a
sweet, sound sleep.”
Theodore Roosevelt had died
from an embolism at the age of
60. Archie cabled his brothers
with a terse message: “The old
lion is dead.”
Sculptor James E. Fraser, who
had previously sculpted
Roosevelt’s bust for the U.S.
Capitol, arrived at Sagamore
Hill to take plaster casts of
Roosevelt’s face and hands.
Fraser applied grease to the
deceased president’s face and
hands and layered cloth bandages dipped in plaster over
them to form molds. When they
had dried, Fraser removed them
and took them to his studio in
Connecticut. The artist cast a
bronze version of the death
mask and presented it to Edith
Roosevelt, who kept it in the
North Room.
Roosevelt’s coffin, draped
with Rough Rider flags, lay in
the North Room before his
funeral Jan. 8. Quentin’s favorite
prayer was read, and the cortège
headed to Christ Church in
Oyster Bay, where 500 mourners waited. Among them were
former president William
Howard Taft, future President
Warren G. Harding, Vice President Thomas Marshall and New
York Gov. Al Smith.
Susan Sarna,
museum
curator at the
Sagamore Hill
National
Historic Site,
holds a death
cast of
Roosevelt’s
right hand.
CHUCK FADELY
for treatment of inflammatory
rheumatism, contracted in
Brazil, and abscesses. Edith
remained at his hospital bedside
for 44 days.
Roosevelt returned home on
Christmas Day, still weak and
suffering from vertigo from
inflammation in the inner ear.
Three of the children — Alice,
Ethel and Archie — were waiting with Christmas dinner. In
the following days, TR ate
breakfast in bed but was able to
come downstairs for lunch and
then lay on the sofa in the
library, reading and dictating
letters.
On Dec. 29 and 30, Edith took
her husband for an hour’s drive
that seemed to improve his
condition. But rainy weather on
New Year’s Day 1919 again gave
him severe pain in his leg and
hand.
He began to spend most of
his time upstairs on the sofa in
the Gate Room, which faced
south and was the warmest
space in the house.
SAGAMORE HILL NATIONAL HISTORIC SITE
COVER STORY from E6
Following the custom of the
era for widows, Edith had remained behind at Sagamore Hill
with her daughters and other
Roosevelt women to read
through the funeral service that
would be given at the church.
From the church, the procession retraced its route east
toward Cove Neck. It stopped at
Youngs Memorial Cemetery in
Oyster Bay Cove. There the 26th
president was buried 26 steps up
the hillside, a short distance
from his beloved Sagamore Hill.
E9
LI LIFE N1
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ONFAITH
E10
T
he religious season continues
through Jan. 6 for Christians
who celebrate the Feast of the
Epiphany. This week’s clergy
discuss the meaning of the
religious observance also known as the
Feast of the Three Kings or, less formally, Little Christmas.
T
he Epiphany celebrates joy and
wonder. Most people know the
carol, “The 12 Days of Christmas.”
Those 12 days run from Christmas to
the eve of the Epiphany. In the Catholic
tradition, the joy we feel in many of our
great celebrations cannot be confined
to a single day. Instead we celebrate for
a whole week until the day we call the
“octave.” Christmas is a good example.
Catholics celebrate Jesus’ birth from
Dec. 25 to Jan. 1, as if each day were still
Christmas Day.
So joyful is the celebration of Jesus’
birth that a tradition grew up of celebrating the “12 days” of Christmas —
from Christmas Day until the eve of the
Epiphany. Then on the Epiphany, our
Christmas joy is reignited as we celebrate the visit of the wise men (the
Magi) from the east following a star.
How wonderful it is that the Christ
child is adored not only by the shepherds in the neighborhood of his birth
but by men from afar who recognize his
birth from the appearance of a star!
How filled with surprise and wonder
Mary and Joseph must have been to
receive these guests bearing gifts fit for
a newborn king. How entranced down
TODAY
HISPANIC FELLOWSHIP
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
newsday.com
SAG HARBOR: Take part in Bible teachings, music and
service in Spanish, 5:30 p.m., Hamptons Christian Fellowship, 2837 Noyac Rd., free, more information at
631-725-4155 or cbchamptons.com.
C.S. LEWIS’ SPACE TRILOGY: A CHRISTIAN
VISION OF SCIENCE FICTION
HUNTINGTON: Prof. JosephJordan explores how British
writer and lay theologian C.S. Lewis (Nov. 29, 1898-Nov. 22,
1963) wove his Christian vision into entertaining science fiction,
2 p.m., library at Seminary of the Immaculate Conception
library, 440 West Neck Rd., free, includes refreshments, more
information at 631-423-0483, ext. 141, or icseminary.edu.
EPIPHANY DAY SERVICE
EAST MEADOW: The Divine Liturgy for the Feast of
Theophany (Epiphany) will be celebrated (in English),
SUBMIT NOTICES ONLINE three weeks in
advance at newsday.com/submitevents. Look
for “faith” in the “community” folder. When
registered users of newsday.com submit an event
online, it goes into our database with top priority.
Upload photos and videos, too.
STEVEN LEVINE
The Rev. Msgr. Francis J. Maniscalco
Pastor, St. Thomas the Apostle R.C. Church,
West Hempstead
James Barnum
Francis J. Maniscalco
ADOMAKO AMAN PHOTOGRAPHY
Special to Newsday
CNS / PAUL HARING
LI LIFE N1
BY JIM MERRITT
Leandra T. Lambert
ASKING THE CLERGY
What is the significance
of celebrating the Epiphany?
the ages have been both young and old
when, on the Epiphany, the statues of
these three Magi, now traditionally
dressed like kings, are added to the
manger scene (not to mention their
camel!).
The word “epiphany” means “manifestation.” On this feast, we are filled
with wonder and joy that God’s love is
manifested to all people everywhere.
The Rev. James Barnum
Pastor, Bellmore Presbyterian Church
A
t a recent Christmas party at a dear
friend’s home, I was among 15
professional friends — mostly doctors
and nurses, and a few in law and technology. I asked them a question before
calendarwatch
9:30-11 a.m. Holy Trinity Orthodox Church, East Meadow,
369 Green Ave., free, more information at 516-483-3649 or
htocem.org.
SUNDAY COMMUNION SERVICE
MOUNT SINAI: Time for quiet reflection, a Scripture
reading, a homily and the Sacrament of Communion,
weekly, Mt. Sinai Congregational United Church of Christ,
233 N. Country Rd., free, 631-473-1582, msucc.org.
THE WEEK AHEAD
CATHOLICS RETURNING HOME
SAYVILLE: These sessions are for Catholics who have left
the active practice of their faith and are seeking answers to
questions about returning, 7:30 p.m. six consecutive
Mondays, St. Lawrence the Martyr Church, 27 Handsome
Ave., free, 631-589-3160, stlawrencesayville.org.
ESTHER CIRCLE
BAYPORT: Join this new Bible study for women on
women of the Bible, starting with Eve, 1-2:30 p.m. each
second Tuesday of the month, Classroom 4, United
Methodist Church of Bayport, 482 Middle Rd., free,
631-472-0770, bayportumc.org.
SPIRITUALITY, A JOURNEY TO WELLNESS
WITH KEN CORBIN
EAST NORTHPORT: Join pastoral minister, chaplain and
offering grace: “What does Epiphany
mean?”
Here are some of their answers: new
birth; awakening; I do not know; a fresh
new appreciation of life; shedding the
old shackles of the past; my divorce
from my first husband; my time as a
caterpillar has expired; the surrender to
the “Ah-ha” moment.
Epiphany, or “appearance/manifestation” via Three Kings’ Day, is a Christian feast day that celebrates the revelation of God incarnate as Jesus Christ,
especially to the gentile nations. You
can read its story in the Gospel of
Matthew (2:1-12) in the Bible, although
there is no mention of three Magi or
kings, only that three gifts were given:
gold, frankincense and myrrh to honor
licensed clinical social worker Ken Corbin to explore and
discuss the difference between religion and spirituality and
how one can lead to the other, 2-3:30 p.m. Thursday,
Elwood Library, 1929 Jericho Tpke., free, registration
required, 631-499-3722, elwoodlibrary.org.
HALLELUJAH! TRIBUTE TO THE MUSIC
AND POETRY OF LEONARD COHEN
GLEN COVE: Special musical Shabbat service celebrating
legendary poet and singer-songwriter Leonard Cohen, 7
p.m. Friday, Congregation Tifereth Israel, 40 Hill St., free,
includes refreshments, more information at 516-676-5080
or ctionline.org.
BOOK CLUB
PATCHOGUE: This month’s featured title is “I Can Only
Imagine: A Memoir,” by Bart Millard, award-winning
recording artist and lead singer of MercyMe, 10:30
a.m.-noon Saturday, Congregational Church of Patchogue,
95 E. Main St., free, more information at 631-821-2255 or
prcli.org.
CONTEMPORARY WORSHIP SERVICE
ISLIP TERRACE: Special, bimonthly service featuring
contemporary worship and music, all are welcome, 7 p.m.,
each second and fourth Saturday of the month, Christ
Lutheran Church of Islip Terrace, 117 Carleton Ave., free,
631-581-1710, christlutheranit.org.
Compiled by Ann Donahue-Smukler
the Christ child.
The celebration is about going to a
house of worship, as we will do here at
the Bellmore Presbyterian Church, as
we conclude the season of Christmas
with Holy Communion, celebrating the
very presence of Jesus among us.
The Rev. Leandra T. Lambert
Curate, St. Luke’s Episcopal Church,
East Hampton
T
he Feast of the Epiphany begins
another season within the church’s
calendar year during which liturgical
readings center on God manifested in
the person of Jesus Christ. The word
epiphany means to “manifest” or “reveal” or “show.”
On the Feast of the Epiphany, the
Wise Men, or Magi, arrive bearing gifts
and present the Christ child with gold
(recognizing him as king), frankincense
(recognizing him as a priest) and myrrh
(an anointing oil for burial). (Matthew
2:1-12)
The gospels are filled with narratives
in which Christ is revealed as our Lord
and Savior. Other examples include
Jesus’ first miracle of turning water into
wine at a wedding (John 2:1-11) and
Jesus’ own declaration in the synagogue
that he is anointed and fulfilling
prophecy (Luke 4:14-21). At the Jordan
River, John the Baptist publicly affirmed that Jesus would baptize with
the Holy Spirit. God also declares that
Jesus is the Beloved Son of God. (Luke
3:15-17, 21-22)
Above all, we have the teachings of
Jesus to love our enemies, to do good
and to not judge (Luke 6:27-38). These
narratives, whether read individually or
taken together, reveal and celebrate the
great care with which God came to us,
taught and loved.
Talk on East End Jews
K
arl Grossman, an investigative
reporter and journalism professor whose Jewish roots on
Long Island go back more than
100 years, speaks about the history of Jews on the East End. Part
of his talk touches on the Jewish
temples on the East End, including the oldest synagogue on Long
Island, Temple Adas Israel in Sag
Harbor; the Jewish Center of the
Hamptons in East Hampton;
Congregation Tifereth Israel in
Greenport; the North Fork Reform Synagogue in Cutchogue;
the Conservative Synagogue of
the Hamptons in Bridgehampton;
and Temple Israel in Riverhead.
WHEN | WHERE 1 p.m. Thursday,
Rogers Memorial Library, 91
Coopers Farm Rd., Southampton
INFO 631-283-0774, ext. 523,
myrml.org
ADMISSION Free, must reserve
ONFAITH
GODSQUAD
Retiring After 39 Years
Our Doors Will Be Closing on January 25th
Large Selection of Cocktail Dresses,
Formal Gowns & Cruise Wear
Custom Alterations
Hurry In For Best Selection!
Must Liquidate Inventory!
ISLES FASHIONS BOUTIQUE
1031 Oyster Bay Road, East Norwich, NY 11732
(Intersection of 106N & 25Aacross from Rothmann’s Steak House)
516-922-3030/516-592-7800
Store Hours: Monday-Sunday 10AM - 5PM
2145534301
ONE DAY ONLY!
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 23
10AM – 6PM
Vacations, Staycations, Special Discounts
and Incredible Deals!
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
SEND QUESTIONS AND COMMENTS to Newsday, 235 Pinelawn Rd., Melville, NY 11747-4226,
or email godsquadquestion@aol.com
ENTIRE STORE 50- 85% OFF
EVERYTHING MUST GO!!!
newsday.com
am 71 and I just became an orloved one, then you tell them a
phan.
story.
My dad, Sol, died in 2007 at age
Many of my congregants wrote to
90, and now Mom has died at age 97. comfort me and told me of how
Rosalie died Dec. 14, before the
they would watch Mom sit in the
Sabbath. At that moment I became
front row listening to me preach.
an orphan.
They said she looked elegant and
I have been thinking that the
proud. Pride is easy, but I honestly
Bible speaks about caring for ordon’t know what elegance really
phans often (Psalm 146:9; Exodus
means and yet Mom was surely
22:22; Deuteronomy 16:14, 10:18, 24:17, elegant. She was poor her entire life,
27:19; Isaiah 1:17), and yet many
but she was elegant. I have been
orphans are not poor and therefore
wondering how she managed eleneed no special care. Still, the Bible
gance on such a tight budget. Now I
commands us to
realize that elealways care for
gance is not a meaorphans. Now I
sure of wealth, but
understand why.
rather a measure of
Rabbi Marc Gellman
These are the
satisfaction. Mom
things that compaswas satisfied with
sionate people have done for me
her lot and not jealous of others.
and said to me in the days since
This is the secret of elegance. It is
Mom’s passing that fulfill the bibliright there in the first verse of the
cal commandment to care for the
23rd Psalm, which is mistranslated
orphan. These suggestions may help as, “The Lord is my shepherd; I
you comfort your newly orphaned
shall not want.” The word for
friends as they helped me be com“want” is not there in the Hebrew
forted in what is now, and for some
version. The word that is there is
time into the future, my broken
the word for “lack.” So the verse
time.
should be translated from the He\ Don’t tell an orphan (or any other
brew as, “The Lord is my shepherd;
person who has just lost a loved
I shall not lack.” God does not promone) “Don’t worry, everything will
ise us the fulfillment of our every
be OK.” The point of death is that it
desire. Rather, God promises us that
is forever and that it makes many
we lack nothing we need to live a
things in your life that were once
fulfilling, compassionate life right
OK, suddenly not OK. The task of
now. Mom no doubt wanted things,
grief work is to find a new way to
but she felt that she lacked nothing.
live a complete and joyous life while That is elegance.
knowing that a big part of your joy
\ Mention heaven. Of the many
has vanished from your life forever.
messages of condolence I have
I found that the best greeting from
already received about Mom’s
consolers was, “May God comfort
passing, the only message that
you.” The greeting “I am so sorry
mentioned the hope that Mom’s
for your loss” is not bad, but it is a
soul would rest in heaven was from
bit odd to issue an apology (I am so
my Catholic friend Michael. God
sorry) when in fact you are not
how I wish that Jews would feel
apologizing for anything. The main
more comfortable mentioning
thing is to accept the gravity of grief heaven, or in our version, “The
and not trivialize it by saying that
World to Come” (Heb: Olam
everything will be OK. Since Mom
Habah). Telling me that I have so
died, there are things that are perma- many memories of Mom only
nently not OK.
makes her passing harder for me.
\ Ask the mourner you are trying
Believing that death is not the end
to comfort to tell you a story about
of her soul gives me true hope. The
their loved one who has died. I
message that death is not the end
know that I love stories and I love
of us is the essential belief of every
to talk, so asking me to tell a story
single religion on Earth. Affirming
is easy for me. But for every
that belief always is important.
mourner, a comforter who is sinAffirming that belief is essential
cerely interested in learning more
when the grave of your mother is
about your loved one is far dearer
still fresh.
than a comforter who focuses on
Dear Mom, may your soul rest in
you or the death or the future. If
peace in the Olam Habah with Dad
the mourner is too broken to tell
among the holy and the righteous
you a story, and if you knew their
. . . and the elegant.
GOING OUT OF
BUSINESS SALE
LI LIFE N1
Finding consolation
after losing Mom
I
E11
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GO TO: newsdaytravelexpo.com
Newsday subscribers use promo code: GETAWAY19
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LIGARDENS
Holiday plants keep giving
in a mix composed of equal
parts houseplant potting mix,
coarse sand and perlite.
From April through June,
keep plants indoors in indirect
sunlight and water frequently.
Include African violet fertilizer
at half strength with every
second watering.
During July and August,
move the plant outdoors to a
bright, sunny location and allow
the soil to remain fairly dry to
promote the development of
buds.
Rinse and repeat, as they say.
While we’re on the subject of
holiday plant care, let’s talk a bit
about poinsettias.
Many folks ditch these holiday staples after their “flowers”
fade (they’re actually not flowers but rather colorful modified
leaves called bracts — but let’s
call them flowers here because
everyone else does). Nevertheless, poinsettias can be kept for
years with proper care. Again,
however, holiday rewards don’t
come easily.
If you have these beauties in
your home right now, provide
water and sunlight until they
stop blooming. When the
flowers fade, allow the
plants to dry out.
When they have
entered dormancy, lay
plants on their sides
in a cool, dark place,
such as an unheated
cellar, until April.
Check on them
periodically; if the
woody stems start
to shrivel, mist
them with water,
though this may not
be necessary.
In April, move the plants
back into the main part of
the house, trim about 2
inches from the end of each
stem, place by a sunny
GARDEN
DETECTIVE
Jessica Damiano
jessica.damiano@newsday.com
DEAR WALTER: First of all —
congratulations! Keeping a
houseplant, especially a finicky
one like Christmas cactus
(Schlumbergera bridgesii), thriving for 40 years is deserving of
some serious green-thumb
respect.
You obviously already know
this, but to illustrate for other
readers — and provide instruction for those new to this rodeo
this year, the plants can be a bit
tricky. General care guidelines
require that from September
through December, the plant is
kept in a 50- to 65-degree environment, receiving only minimal water and misting twice a
week. To force blooms for the
holidays, plants need to be kept
in complete darkness from
5 p.m. to 8 a.m. daily for eight to
10 weeks before desired bloom
time, which typically falls on
Christmas.
When buds form, the plant
should be moved to a sunny
location in the main part of the
house and regular watering
should be resumed. Do not
move the plant — even slightly
— after this time. Seriously,
don’t even rotate the pot. Blossoms will drop at the slightest
provocation.
In March, on alternate years,
plants should be repotted into
the next size container, planted
GETTY IMAGES / ISTOCKPHOTO
newsday.com
DEAR JESSICA: My Christmas
cactuses are almost in full bloom.
Both plants are about 40 years old
and are in need of repotting and
new soil. Any help on how to and
when to do this would be greatly
appreciated.
— Walter Paluch, Copiague
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
newsday.com/lilife
A potted calla lily can be
coddled through an LI winter.
window and water regularly,
keeping soil moist but never
soggy.
Around Memorial Day, you
can move them outdoors — or
continue to keep them as houseplants over the summer. Either
way, fertilize once a month with
one teaspoon per gallon of a
complete (20-20-20) fertilizer
product.
Around Labor Day, check for
insects, picking any off by hand
or rinsing the plants with a
gentle stream of water to remove them, and bring plants
indoors. If they’re already indoors, continue to provide the
same care. Place by a
sunny window, and
water and fertilize monthly.
Poinsettias
do best if
tempera-
tures are kept between 70 and
75 degrees during the day and
60 to 65 degrees at night.
To form buds, poinsettias
require a period during
which they are deprived of
light for about 15 hours each
day. So, for 40 days beginning
on Oct. 1, keep them in a
very bright, sunny spot from
8 a.m. to 5 p.m. every day,
then move them into complete darkness from 5 p.m. to
8 a.m. (A closet is perfect for
this.) Do not skip this,
even for one night, or buds
may not form. This is not for
the lazy — or faint of heart.
But again, keep your eye on
the reward.
By Nov. 10, you should notice
bracts taking on a reddish hue.
From this point on, keep plants
in the main part of the house
around the clock and continue
to water and fertilize. You
should be seeing red (or white)
in time for the holidays, and can
bask in the glory of self-satisfaction, plus save a few bucks on
new plants.
The Christmas cactus is
a popular winter
holiday blooming plant.
123RF.COM
LI LIFE N1
E12
Nurturing a calla lily through the winter
DEAR JESSICA: I received a calla
lily as a gift in the spring. I
planted it in a clay pot with other
flowers. I’m wondering if rather
than digging it up, I can move the
pot into my garage to protect it
from a possible harsh winter and
hope it will re-bloom next year,
and if so what care do I need to
give it?
— T. Wallace, Ridge
DEAR T: Yes, calla lilies certainly can be overwintered
indoors if growing in a pot.
When the last blooms fade,
bring the potted plant indoors.
Stop watering, but apply a
potassium-rich fertilizer just
once. After the leaves die back,
move the plant into a dark,
cool (but not freezing) spot in
the house, like a basement or
attached garage. Move the
plant back into a sunny part of
the house in early spring, and
resume watering. You can set it
back outdoors after the danger
of frost has passed, but acclimate it gradually by leaving it
outdoors for increasing periods
over the course of several days.
NOW ONLINE
Get more gardening
advice from Jessica
Damiano
newsday.com/gardendetective
weekly planner
Garden City
Tinkertoy:
Build Your Imagination
Visitors can explore a
walk-in replica of the iconic
canister, create their own
designs in an open play area,
experiment with renewable
energy and water filtration
and take part in a special
scavenger hunt; open to all
ages. The Classic Toy
Museum in Burlingame,
California, says Tinkertoys
were created in 1914 by
Charles Pajeau, who was
inspired by children playing
with pencils, sticks and
empty spools of thread.
WHEN | WHERE
10 a.m.-5 p.m.,
Long Island Children’s
Museum, 11 Davis Ave., off
Charles Lindbergh Boulevard
INFO 516-224-5800,
licm.org
ADMISSION Free with
museum admission ($14, $13
ages 65 and older)
TOP THINGS
TO DO
THIS WEEK
Compiled by Lynn Petry
1
‘Frozen’ turns on the
warm and fuzzy
INFO 516-231-4848,
nycblive.com
ADMISSION $30 and up, $15
parking
I
t’s the perfect snowstorm of
dazzling skating, special effects
and music for this year’s Disney
on Ice production at NYCB Live’s
Nassau Coliseum. The characters
from “Frozen” give the Coliseum a
wintry feel when Anna sets out to
find her sister, Elsa, 7 p.m.
Thursday and Friday; 11 a.m., 3 and
7 p.m. Saturday; and noon and
4 p.m. next Sunday.
Long Beach
Syosset
newsday.com
TURN THE PAGE
FOR THE NEXT 9
cheap eats
Price doesn’t always equate to quality, and our food staff is always on the hunt for a top-notch
meal that comes with a reasonable price tag.
newsday.com/restaurants
YVONNE ALBINOWSKI
newsday.com GUIDE OF THE WEEK
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
FELD ENTERTAINMENT / DISNEY / TIM PANNELL
A Journey Around
the World
Eranga and Prianga, natives
of Sri Lanka who now live in
New York, present songs
from many lands, including
tunes in Hebrew, Spanish,
Italian, Greek, Hawaiian and
English.
WHEN | WHERE 2 p.m.,
Long Beach Library,
111 W. Park Ave.
INFO 516-432-7201,
longbeachlibrary.org
ADMISSION Free
COMMUNITY CALENDAR
ON BACK PAGE
LI LIFE N1
10
TODAY IN
N. HEMPSTEAD
& OYSTER BAY
A Tribute to the
Timeless Music of the
Great American Songbook
Vintage Bliss pays
tribute to iconic artists;
part of the Distinguished
Artists Concert Series.
WHEN | WHERE 1 p.m.,
Syosset Library,
225 S. Oyster Bay Rd.
INFO 516-921-7161,
syossetlibrary.org
ADMISSION Free
E13
Newsday
SUNDAY, JAN. 6, 2019
PULLOUT SECTION
10TOPTHINGSTO
E14
LI LIFE N1
2
All aboard
for a model
train show
The Winter Model
Train Show and
Exhibition, sponsored
by the Great South
Bay Model Rail Road
Club, is open at the
Freeport Recreation
Center from 10 a.m. to
4 p.m. next Sunday.
You’ll find operating
layouts in all major
scales, along with door
prizes and raffles for
train sets.
INFO 516-378-9594
ADMISSION $7, free
younger than 12
HOWARD SCHNAPP
3
8
GETTY IMAGES / KEVIN WINTER
Bring tots and older children to Tilles
Center to see the Mermaid Theatre of
Nova Scotia, Canada, perform with
black light and puppetry three stories
by children’s writer Eric Carle,
including “The Very Hungry
Caterpillar.” The event is aimed at kids
pre-k and older, 10:30 a.m. Friday and
2 p.m. Saturday.
INFO 516-299-3100, tillescenter.org
ADMISSION $15 to $45
MARGO ELLEN GESSER
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
newsday.com
6
See a triple bill of
beloved children’s
stories
7
Listen to a distinct voice
Take in the smooth vocals of rhythm-and-blues artist Aaron
Neville, 8 p.m. Friday. He makes a stop at Landmark on Main
Street in Port Washington for an “intimate” show with keyboardist
Michael Goods. Hear songs from his latest release, “Apache,” with
words straight from the poetry journal Neville began keeping in
the 1970s.
INFO 516-767-1384, landmarkonmainstreet.org
ADMISSION $60 to $80
Find a doll
a home
Shirley Temple
will be represented by
antique dolls done up
in her likeness, dating
to the 1930s, and for
sale. The Patchogue
Doll Fanciers Club
hosts the show
featuring more than
40 dealers, 10 a.m. to
4 p.m. next Sunday at
the Radisson Hotel
Hauppauge. Find
antique-to-modern
dolls, along with
American Girl,
Barbies, Madame
Alexander and Ginny
dolls, as well as doll
clothes, toys and
accessories.
INFO 631-981-9332,
dollsmagazine.com
ADMISSION $7, free
for kids 12 and
younger accompanied
by a paying adult
Get
into
Law
Netflix ser
“Making a
NYCB The
Saturday. H
S. Rudolf a
account of
filming of t
life.
INFO 516thetheatre
ADMISSIO
GETTY IMAGES/ISTOCKPHOTO / SAMINALEO
ODOTHISWEEK
4
Join author Andrew
Solomon for a
screening of his film
9
Catch the classic film ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’
THERE’S MORE ONLINE
Photos ▪ Videos ▪ Events ▪ Guides
newsday.com
E15
5
Root for
the home
team
North battles South
when the New York
Islanders take on the
Carolina Hurricanes
at 7 p.m. Tuesday.
This is another
chance to see the
Isles at NYCB Live’s
Nassau Coliseum.
INFO 516-231-4848,
nycblive.com
ADMISSION $18
and up, $20 parking
Meet author Andrew Solomon at a
screening of the documentary
adaptation of his bestselling book
“Far From the Tree,” 7 p.m.
Wednesday at Cinema Arts Centre
in Huntington. The book and
documentary examine the
experiences of families in which
parents and children are profoundly
different from one another in a
variety of ways. After the film, take
part in a panel discussion with
Solomon and molecular biologist
Michael Wigler of Cold Spring
Harbor Laboratory.
INFO 631-423-7610,
cinemaartscentre.org
ADMISSION $16
AMAZON.COM
wyers from the true-crime
ries “The Staircase” and
a Murderer” speak at the
eatre at Westbury, 8 p.m.
Hear defense attorneys David
and Jerry Buting give an
f their experiences during
the cases they handled in real
KATHLEEN MALONE-VAN DYKE
et an insight
o true crimes
MARY VOEGELE
As part of its Classic Film Series, the Patchogue Theatre presents “To
Kill a Mockingbird” (1962), the courtroom drama starring Gregory
Peck as lawyer Atticus Finch, at 7 p.m. Wednesday. Alfred Hitchcock’s “To
Catch a Thief,” starring Cary Grant and Grace Kelly, is up next, with a
screening Feb. 6.
INFO 631-207-1313, patchoguetheatre.org
ADMISSION $15, $12 children
CHAD KAMENSHINE
GETTY IMAGES / UNIVERSAL HISTORY ARCHIVE
-247-5200,
eatwestbury.com
ION $35 and up
10
Hear vocal harmonies
It’s cool to be old school, nothing wrong with throwback, street-corner
harmonies. Catch The Doo Wop Project, 7 p.m. next Sunday at The
Paramount in Huntington when singers take the stage with a program tracing
doo-wop’s history and its influence on modern-day hits.
INFO 631-673-7300, paramountny.com
ADMISSION Tickets start at $39.50
COMMUNITYCALENDAR
LI LIFE N1
E16
During
“Marilyn
Monroe: The
Girl, the
Woman, the
Legend,” pop
culture lecturer
Marilyn
Carminio gives
a visual
presentation of
Marilyn
Monroe
through her
own words,
her movies
and those who
knew her,
2 p.m.
Thursday,
Syosset
Library.
SUNDAY
Bellmore
MONDAY
Mineola
Weeknight Meal Makeover
Was your New Year’s resolution to
have a healthier diet for you and
your family? Start the New Year
off with tips and tricks for getting
healthy meals on the table without
spending hours in the kitchen.
WHEN | WHERE 7 p.m.,
Mineola Memorial Library,
195 Marcellus Rd.
INFO 516-746-8488, ext. 2,
mineolalibrary.info
ADMISSION Free, registration
required
Plainview
The Nuremberg Trials
Saul Fathi discusses what occurred
during the Nuremberg Trials, a
series of 13 trials carried out in
Nuremberg, Germany between
1945 and 1949 to bring Nazi war
criminals to justice.
WHEN | WHERE 7 p.m.,
Plainview-Old Bethpage Library,
999 Old Country Rd.
INFO 516-938-0077, poblib.org
ADMISSION Free
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
newsday.com
TUESDAY
Bayville
Bayville Book Club
Explore the book “The Wife”
by Meg Wolitzer. For too long,
Joan Castleman has played the
role of supportive wife, turning a
blind eye to husband Joe’s
misdemeanors, subjugating her
talents and quietly being the
keystone of his success.
WHEN | WHERE 1:30 p.m.,
Bayville Free Library, 34 School St.
INFO 516-628-2765
ADMISSION Free
Glen Cove
Tax Grievance program
Learn about the numbers behind
NEWSDAY / TOM MAGUIRE
Art Reception:
Turning the Page
Meet with artist Kyle Horne,
whose artwork will be on display
this month.
WHEN | WHERE 2 p.m.,
Bellmore Library,
2288 Bedford Ave.
INFO 516-785-2990,
bellmorelibrary.org
ADMISSION Free
your tax bill, what the county is
looking at in determining fair
market value and what it isn’t.
WHEN | WHERE 7 p.m., Glen
Cove Library, 4 Glen Cove Ave.
INFO 516-676-2130,
glencovelibrary.org
ADMISSION Free
and the Immortal Charge Up San
Juan Hill” by Mark Lee Gardner.
WHEN | WHERE 7:30 p.m.,
Syosset Library,
225 S. Oyster Bay Rd.
INFO 516-921-7161,
syossetlibrary.org
ADMISSION Free
Plainview
Woodbury
Author appearance
Sara Merwin, master of public
health, and Dr. Karen Friedman
discuss their book, “The Informed
Patient: A Complete Guide to a
Hospital Stay”; books will be
available for purchase and signing.
WHEN | WHERE 2 p.m.,
Plainview-Old Bethpage Library,
999 Old Country Rd.
INFO 516-938-0077, poblib.org
ADMISSION Free
Book Chat
Anna Katsavos leads a discussion
of Pulitzer Prize-winning “Less,” by
Andrew Sean Greer, about a
struggling author who goes on a
world tour to avoid a wedding.
WHEN | WHERE 1 p.m.,
Plainview-Old Bethpage Library,
999 Old Country Rd.
INFO 516-938-0077, poblib.org
ADMISSION Free
Port Washington
Chess
Play a game of chess.
WHEN | WHERE 2:30 p.m., Port
Washington Library, 1 Library Dr.
INFO 516-883-4400, pwpl.org
ADMISSION Free
Syosset
Book discussion
Explore “Rough Riders: Theodore
Roosevelt, His Cowboy Regiment,
Painting demonstration
with Suburban Art League
Paul Elsen gives an oil painting
demonstration on how to copy a
masterpiece.
WHEN | WHERE 8-10 p.m.,
Syosset-Woodbury Community
Park, 7800 Jericho Tpke.
INFO 516-491-1136,
suburanartleague.org
ADMISSION Free
WEDNESDAY
Glen Cove
Women’s self-defense class
Grand master Gene Perceval’s
safety and self-defense class is
designed to help women
effectively learn how to handle
sexual assault or sexual
harassment.
WHEN | WHERE 7 p.m., Glen
Cove Library, 4 Glen Cove Ave.
INFO 516-676-2130,
glencovelibrary.org
ADMISSION Free, register
Plainview
Alzheimer’s Disease and
Dementia Caregiver Resources
The Parker Jewish Institute’s
Caregiver Ambassador Program is
designed to assist caregivers of
adults with Alzheimer’s disease or
other dementias in accessing the
many services and resources
available to them and their loved
one.
WHEN | WHERE 11 a.m.-noon,
Plainview-Old Bethpage Library,
999 Old Country Rd.
INFO 516-938-0077, poblib.org
ADMISSION Free, register
THURSDAY
Oyster Bay
Lecture: Neck Pain
Physical therapist, Danny Davids
discusses this common malady.
WHEN | WHERE 11:15 a.m.,
Life Enrichment Center
at Oyster Bay, 45 E. Main St.
INFO 516-922-1770,
lifeenrichmentcenteroysterbay.org
ADMISSION Free
Plainview
Cover to Cover Book Club
Explore the classic “The Old Man
and the Sea” by Ernest Hemingway, led by Gretchen Browne and
Susan Feuer.
WHEN | WHERE 10:30 a.m.,
Plainview-Old Bethpage Library,
999 Old Country Rd.
INFO 516-938-0077, poblib.org
ADMISSION Free
‘Bartolomé Estebán Murillo
and the Golden Age of Spain’
Art historian and educator Ines
Powell discusses 17th century
Sevillian painter Bartolomé
Estebán Murillo.
WHEN | WHERE 2 p.m.,
Plainview-Old Bethpage Library,
999 Old Country Rd.
INFO 516-938-0077, poblib.org
ADMISSION Free
Syosset
‘Marilyn Monroe: The Girl,
the Woman, the Legend’
Pop culture lecturer Marilyn
Carminio gives a presentation on
the story of Marilyn Monroe
through her own words, her
movies and those who knew her.
WHEN | WHERE 2 p.m.,
Syosset Library,
225 S. Oyster Bay Rd.
INFO 516-921-7161,
syossetlibrary.org
ADMISSION Free
Massapequa Park
Cyber Security
Learn proactive steps you can take
to prevent being victimized.
THE WEEK OF
JAN. 6
WHEN | WHERE 7 p.m., Massapequa Library, Bar Harbour
Branch, 40 Harbor Lane
INFO 516-799-0770,
massapequalibrary.org
ADMISSION Free, register
FRIDAY
Elmont
Celebrating Italian Singers
with Peter J. LaRosa
Celebrate with some of your
favorites through the years. Listen
to the best from Frank Sinatra,
Tony Bennett, Jerry Vale, Paul
Anka, Bocelli and Al Martino.
WHEN | WHERE 12:30 p.m.,
Elmont Memorial Library,
700 Hempstead Tpke.
INFO 516-354-5280,
elmontlibrary.org
ADMISSION Free
SATURDAY
Mineola
Long Island Harmonizers
Enjoy an afternoon of a cappella
harmony with the Long Island
Harmonizers, Nassau Mid-Island
Chapter of the Barbershop Harmony Society. They will sing a
variety of songs from an extensive
song list, most of which were
written between 1890 and 1940.
WHEN | WHERE 2 p.m.,
Mineola Memorial Library,
195 Marcellus Rd.
INFO 516-746-8488
ADMISSION Free
Plainview
Concert
Jaycee Driesen brings her unique
interpretation of the music of
legendary divas, including Barbra
Streisand, Shirley Bassey and Bette
Middler.
WHEN | WHERE 8 p.m.,
Plainview-Old Bethpage Library,
999 Old Country Rd.
INFO 516-938-0077, poblib.org
ADMISSION Free
Port Washington
Next Chapter
Join this current-events discussion
group.
WHEN | WHERE 10 a.m., Port
Washington Library, 1 Library Dr.
INFO 516-883-4400, pwpl.org
ADMISSION Free
Compiled by Darlene Gein
SUBMIT EVENTS Registered newsday.com users can submit to
newsday.com/shareit notices of LI events three weeks ahead.
Upload photos, news releases, videos!
LISCHOOLS
newsday.com/education
E17
NOTEBOOK
N
With the onset of the internet
and social media, students
have been able to easily and
efficiently share ideas and
ignite conversations in areas of
academic importance. For
example, with current internet
accessibility, students can
discuss possible solutions to
assigned
projects
and study
together
for upcoming exams.
In addition, portable devices
have made
note-taking exponentially
easier in
class. When I began to use my
iPad to take notes, I was able
to write down much more
information in much less time.
In the past, when I took handwritten notes, I found myself
scrambling to keep up with the
pace of the lecture. Constantly
having to scribble out misspellings and take out new
pieces of loose leaf made my
note-taking extremely inefficient.
However, for students taking
notes on a tablet or laptop,
there is always the risk of the
technology serving as a distraction. Often I have found myself
tempted to play games rather
than to pay attention in class.
So, I would advise anyone
taking notes digitally in class
to avoid distractions on their
devices and to instead concentrate on the lecture, as it might
be really important in the
future.
MEREDITH KASS, 17
Senior, Kellenberg Memorial High
School, Uniondale
At Kellenberg Memorial
High School, where I am a
senior, we use iPads in all of
our classes. We take notes
using a program called Notability, iBooks for our textbooks
and eBackPack to track assignments and
manage
our class
schedule.
In my
Latin class,
we use a
program
called
Quizlets to
help us
review for
exams and
to build
our vocabulary. The iPad
makes it really easy to communicate and share information
with teachers and classmates.
Technology is a terrific way of
interacting with our environment and has been a positive
experience for me in high
school. However, I think we
have to remember the importance of face-to-face communi-
cation. Connecting with our
peers in a real-life setting is
still extremely important.
Social media can sometimes
provide a distorted view of the
world. If we use iPads for most
of the school day, then we need
to turn them off so we can
enjoy other school activities
like sports and clubs. It’s a
great way to “give it a rest.”
MATTHEW CARLINSKY, 14
Freshman, Oyster Bay High
School
The technology I consider
the most useful and productive
to learning is/are school computer labs (classrooms with
computers at every seat). I feel
these are better than mobile
devices because they are easier
to navigate and they can even
run certain programs mobile
electronics can’t. The classroom
computers
are great
for looking
up important information for
school
projects,
making
citations,
fact checking, and
just making writing assignments easier
in general! In my English class
right now, we’re typing an
essay on computers for these
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
DANIEL FLYER, 16
Junior, Roslyn High School
Technology has connected
students in a way that was
unimaginable 20 years ago.
Seventh-grade students in Honors Earth Science at J.W. Dodd Middle School, in the Freeport district,
work on Chromebook computers as teacher Vanessa Vidalon uses a smartboard during class on Nov. 1.
ALLISON LIN, 17
Senior, Syosset High School
With the onset of digital
technology and the ensuing
prevalence of it in our society,
classrooms, schools and, most
importantly, students are beginning to become entrenched in
the now “digital age.” At the
federal
schooling
level,
students
are taking
notes on
Chromebooks,
watching
presentations on
classroom
Smartboards,
enjoying the luxury of free
wireless printing. These additions to the educational society
have proved the most useful to
learning; they increase efficiency with faster note-taking,
more attentive students
(thanks to enrapturing Smartboard images).
On a personal level, the new
accessibility of wireless printing has revolutionized studying
for me. Being able to readily
print practice quizzes and
work sheets enables me to
simulate the actual exam situation. This technique especially
helped me in preparation for
my AP Biology exams or just
daily studying, as I print Quizlets with ease.
We’re deeply seated in the
technological era. It’s hard to
imagine the limit of our potential. It’s hard to imagine we
have one. While technology is
beautifully tempting, we, even
as students, must keep in mind
the technological singularity. It
is coming. And we, as the next
generation, as the future of our
society, will be ones to experience or prevent it.
newsday.com
SYDNEY BRETT, 17
Senior, Long Beach High School
Technology has many benefits in all aspects of daily living, including education. As a
person with dyslexia, I can
personally say that the use of
technology has had a positive
effect on my education. Because of my dyslexia, sometimes it takes me longer to
understand specific subject
matters; however I eventually
always grasp the materials! I
have benefited in
many
subjects,
including
reading,
writing
and math,
with the
use of
technology. Specifically, I
have found
the app and website the Learning Ally to be very helpful as
they offer books on tape,
which helps me have a better
understanding of the material
being taught. I benefit from the
use of a calculator, and like
most people spell check. I
think that technology in education helps students, especially
those who have learning challenges, to level the playing
field and allow them to demonstrate their true abilities! I
would recommend to younger
students to take advantage of
all the technology and equipment inside and outside of
school that is available as it
will help make you a successful student.
exact reasons, as doing so is
more efficient than not having
the use of technology for this
assignment. Advice and/or
caution I have for other students regarding tech use has to
do with how easy it can be to
get distracted by looking up
non-related things that may
cross your mind as you work.
It is important to use self-discipline to prevent yourself from
getting sidetracked. This may
take some practice!
NEWSDAY / J. CONRAD WILLIAMS JR.
ewsday asked students
highlighted in the LI
Schools page “Way to
Go!” feature to respond to this
question: “What technology do
you consider the most useful
and productive to learning?
Please give an example of how
technology made a difference to
you in a classroom setting or
with a specific academic subject. In addition, what advice
and/or caution do you have for
other students regarding tech
use?”
LI LIFE N1
Students weigh in on tech’s pros and cons
LICELEBRATIONS
LI LIFE N1
E18
newsday.com/lilife
LOVE STORY
He came to her rescue at a singles bar
said, “Let’s keep it going and
see what happens.”
I was assigned to the destroyer USS Wilkinson based
in Newport, Rhode Island,
where I served as yeoman. We
sailed up and down the Eastern Seaboard testing sonar.
I was fortunate that most of
my time in the service allowed
me to have weekend leaves
about every other month.
While on leave in June 1968,
I proposed to Sue at my parents’ luncheonette, the former
Soda Spa in Port Washington. I
secretly placed the diamond
engagement ring between two
slices of toast on her breakfast
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
newsday.com
plate of scrambled eggs.
Our wedding was Oct. 5,
1968, at the Fresh Meadows
Jewish Center in Queens. We
spent our honeymoon in Las
Vegas, San Francisco and Los
Angeles. I was honorably discharged in December, and we
moved to Forest Hills, Queens.
In 1971, I began a career in
the natural vitamin supplement industry. Sue continued
teaching kindergarten, first
and second grade at CS 6 until
WEINSTEIN FAMILY
In June 1967, I was at Jet Set,
a singles bar I often went to in
Manhattan. At one point, I
noticed a woman being harassed by another young man.
She looked very uncomfortable, and I decided to step in
and rescue her.
I walked over and, since I
didn’t know her, I made up a
name and said, “Sarah, I have
to speak to you.” She realized
what I was trying to do and
said, “OK.”
We walked outside together.
After she thanked me, I asked
for her number. She replied,
“Why not ask your friend?”
and pointed to one of my
buddies she happened to know.
Her name was Sue Freinhar.
My friend gave me her number, and I called her the next
week. We arranged a double
date on June 17, at the Sheep
Meadow in Central Park, for a
free concert given by Barbra
Streisand. I brought a blanket
along with a picnic dinner and
wine.
Sue was 21, and I was 22. She
lived in Fresh Meadows,
Queens, and I lived in neighboring Bayside. She taught a kindergarten class at CS 6 in the
Bronx and was working on her
master’s degree in education at
Queens College that she received in 1971. I graduated from
C.W. Post in Brookville and had
recently enlisted in the Navy.
We went on a few more
dates before I received my
active-duty papers in July. This
was during the Vietnam crisis,
and I thought it would end our
relationship. It did not. Sue
WEINSTEIN FAMILY
Bob Weinstein of Syosset
recalls the evening he met his
future wife, Sue.
Sue and Bob Weinstein of Syosset celebrated their 50th wedding
anniversary in October. The couple met at a Manhattan singles bar
in 1967 and were married a year later.
1976, when my company relocated to California.
We moved back to New York
in 1980 and bought our home
in Syosset. We have two daughters and five grandchildren.
Sue has worked as a part-time
saleswoman at Mieka Boutique
in Woodbury for the past 34
years, making other women
look as beautiful as she does.
I had my own vitamin supplement company from 1980 to
1994. I sold it and began work-
ing for Futurebiotics, a nutritional supplement manufacturer in Hauppauge where I
am vice president of sales.
To celebrate our 50th anniversary in October, we took a
trip to Iceland with friends and
had a romantic dinner for two
at Per Se in Manhattan.
We are so blessed and fortunate. Sue is the warmest, most
giving and nicest person I
know. She is the love of my life.
— WITH VIRGINIA DUNLEAVY
TELL US ABOUT HOW YOU MET. Access the online form at newsday.com/lilovestory — or send an anecdote
along with your phone number and a photo to Love Story, Newsday, 235 Pinelawn Rd., Melville, NY 11747-4250; or
email dunleavy@newsday.com, or call Virginia Dunleavy at 631-843-2923. Publication is not guaranteed. Photos
cannot be returned and may be used in other publications affiliated with Newsday.
REUNIONS
DIVISION AVENUE HIGH SCHOOL
1979 (LEVITTOWN). A 40-year reunion
is at 7 p.m. Oct. 5 at the American Legion
Hall Levittown; $60 and includes DJ, food,
beer, wine, soda, coffee and cake. For more
info, email dahs79reunion@gmail.com.
DOMINICAN COMMERCIAL HIGH
SCHOOL 1969. A reunion is planned for
2019. For more info, email Jean Foley Heath
at docjph@yahoo.com or 631-786-8968.
GENERAL DOUGLAS MACARTHUR
HIGH SCHOOL 1969. A 50-year reunion
is July 27 at the Long Island Marriott,
Uniondale. Email Howard Savlick at
shj419@aol.com.
HICKSVILLE HIGH SCHOOL 1969. A
50-year reunion is 7-11 p.m. Sept. 21 at the
Hicksville Knights of Columbus. Email
HicksvilleHigh1969@gmail.com or visit
Facebook page Hicksville High School (NY)
Class of 1969 for more information.
KELLENBERG MEMORIAL HIGH
SCHOOL 1999, 2004, 2009, 2014. A
multiclass reunion is June 22 at the school.
Mass is at 6 p.m., followed by a private
cocktail party from 7 to 10 p.m. Visit
kellenberg.org/alumni or contact the Alumni
Office at 516-292-0200, ext. 396, or
alumni@kellenberg.org.
LINDENHURST HIGH SCHOOL 1969. A
50-year reunion is 6-10 p.m. July 27 at
Captain Bills, Bay Shore. Additional events
on July 26. Call Vinny Boccio at
631-745-6816 for more information.
LOCUST VALLEY HIGH SCHOOL 1969.
A 50-year reunion is Oct. 26 at the Locust
Valley Inn. Gathering at Wall’s Wharf in
Bayville Oct. 25 and brunch Oct. 27 at
Barney’s Corner. Visit Facebook page or
email Maryann Blockis-Ward at
mward11051@yahoo.com.
MOLLOY COLLEGE (ROCKVILLE
CENTRE) 1968. A 50-year reunion is June
1 on the Rockville Centre campus. Email
Mary Jane Reilly, director of Alumni Relations, at mreilly@molloy.edu for more
information.
NORTH BABYLON HIGH SCHOOL. A
50-year reunion is Oct. 19 at Captain Bills,
Bay Shore. Visit Facebook page North
Babylon Class of 1969 50th reunion for
more information.
OUR LADY OF MERCY ACADEMY
(SYOSSET). A reunion for all classes is Oct.
19. Festivities include luncheon at the
Mansion at the Oyster Bay Golf Course,
followed by school tours at OLMA and
Mass in the Chapel at 5 p.m. Call the
Advancement Office at 516-921-1047, ext.
117, email pdilollo@olma.org or visit
olma.org for more information.
Compiled by Darlene Gein
SUBMIT DETAILS to Darlene Gein
at 631-843-2076 or email
darlene.gein@newsday.com.
LICELEBRATIONS
CARMEN “ABUELITA” FIGUEAS
was born Dec. 27, 1918, in
Puerto Rico. She later moved to
West Islip. She married Juan
Serrano and had three children,
Maria, Juanita and Junior (now
deceased). Carmen was widowed in 1990 after 35 years of
marriage. She has three siblings,
13 grandchildren, 29 greatgrandchildren, seven greatgreat grandchildren and one
great-great-great-grandchild.
Carmen has lived in Orlando,
Florida, for the past 27 years.
She celebrated her birthday at
Bahama Breeze with family.
Compiled by Darlene Gein
BADAMO FAMILY
LOZITO FAMILY
ROXANNE JOHNSON
NANCY BARBANELL
SEYMOUR BARBANELL was
born Dec. 21, 1918, and grew up
in the Bronx. He is a veteran
who served in the Army during World War II. After returning, he became a salesman,
selling office and stationery
supplies for Radio Center
Stationery. He met his wife,
Sylvia, on a blind date. They
had three children and moved
to West Hempstead in 1957.
Seymour was widowed after 67
years of marriage. He has five
grandchildren and nine greatgrandchildren. He attributes
his longevity to eating fish,
poultry, vegetables and fruit.
ANNIVERSARIES
60th
50th
ROSEMARIE AND NICK LOZITO
of Oceanside were wed Oct. 19,
1958. They met in 1956 in the
West Village. At the time, Nick
was on leave, serving in the
Navy on the USS Roosevelt for
two years. Nick is a retired
tractor trailer driver for Pepsi,
and RoseMarie is a homemaker. They have two children
and three grandchildren. They
celebrated with family at
Bryant & Cooper in Roslyn.
BARBARA AND JOSEPH
BADAMO of East Northport
were wed Dec. 14, 1968, at Holy
Spirit Roman Catholic Church
in New Hyde Park. They were
high school sweethearts. Joe
retired from the Nassau
County Police Department
after 20 years. They have two
sons. They celebrated with a
trip to the Dominican Republic.
Compiled by Diane Daniels
A Hearing Aid that
can do all this?
LET US ANNOUNCE your anniversary of 25 or more years, wedding
(within one year), or birthday of 100
years or more.
To submit anniversaries, call
Diane Daniels at 631-843-2922,
send email to diane.daniels@
newsday.com or mail to
Anniversaries, Newsday, 235
Pinelawn Rd., Melville, NY
11747-4226.
To submit weddings or
birthdays, call Darlene Gein at
631-843-2076, send email to
darlene.gein@newsday.com or mail
to Celebrations, 235 Pinelawn Rd.,
Melville, NY 11747-4226.
When mailing information for any
of these events, include a phone
number and current photo (color
preferred) with names in a corner on
back. Photos sent by email should
be a separate JPEG attachment and
not pasted into text; photos must
include the name of owner of the
photo as well as permission to
publish it in Newsday.
Newsday will try to print all
notices, however publication is not
guaranteed. Photos cannot be
returned and may be used in other
Newsday-affiliated publications.
E19
LI LIFE N1
CENTENARIANS
newsday.com/lilife
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NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
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OURTOWNS
WINNERS
DAVID M. GRILL
Partner
STEVEN SKIENA
Professor
SIMON DONALDSON
Professor
MAUREEN BOYLE
Sales attendant
D
S
S
M
newsday.com
avid M. Grill of
Melville has
been named a fellow
of the Construction
Lawyers Society of
America based on his
“excellence and accomplishments in
construction law and closely related
specialties, as well as superior ethical
reputation,” the organization said. Grill
is a partner in the Commercial Litigation, Construction and Real Estate,
Zoning & Land Use practice groups at
Uniondale-based law firm Rivkin
Radler, which he joined in 2011. He also
is a supporter of the Hineni organization, a nonprofit with a focus on Jewish
unity, social and spiritual concerns.
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
newsday.com/lilife
Compiled by Michael R. Ebert
teven Skiena of
Setauket has been
named a fellow of
the American Association for the Advancement of Science for his “distinguished contributions to the fields of algorithms and
data science,” the organization said.
Skiena is a distinguished teaching professor in the Department of Computer
Science at Stony Brook University,
where he has worked for 30 years. He
also is director of the university’s Institute for AI-Driven Discovery and Innovation in the College of Engineering
and Applied Sciences.
imon Donaldson
of Stony Brook
has received the 2019
Oswald Veblen Prize
in Geometry from
the American Mathematical Society for his “outstanding
research work in geometry or topology,” the organization said. Donaldson
is a professor in the Department of
Mathematics at Stony Brook University,
which he joined in 2014, and is a permanent member of the university’s Simons
Center for Geometry and Physics. He
also is a Fields Medal recipient and a
fellow of the American Mathematical
Society.
aureen Boyle of
East Northport
has received the
Vocational Achievement Award from the
nonprofit Adults and
Children with Learning and Developmental Disabilities for her “professional
accomplishments in the workplace,” the
organization said. Boyle is a fitting
room and sales attendant at Old Navy
in Commack, where she has worked for
seven years. She was honored in the fall
during the nonprofit’s 33rd Annual
Employment Recognition Breakfast.
NOMINATE A WINNER Email information about the accomplishment or honor to
winners@newsday.com, or mail to Winners, Newsday, 235 Pinelawn Rd., Melville, NY
11747-4250. Include photo by mail or JPEG by email; color is preferred. Photos will not be returned.
SENIORS
VETERANS
SENIOR SOFTBALL PLAYERS NEEDED
DIX HILLS: Those older than 60 play indoors for fun,
9 a.m.-noon Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays and
Fridays, F-14 Sports Complex, 246 N. Main St., Sayville,
call Gary at 631-724-0666.
MAKING MEMORIES
COLD SPRING HARBOR: A craft-based program for
visitors living with dementia and their care partners,
explore the museum, create something to take home,
includes light refreshments, 2-3 p.m. Monday, The
Whaling Museum and Education Center, 301 Main St.
(Rte. 25A), $12 for senior-and-caregiver pair, register,
cshwhalingmuseum.org, 631-367-3418, ext. 10.
ESTATE PLANNING 101
CUTCHOGUE: Learn how to structure an estate plan
for yourself or a loved one, 6:30 p.m. Monday,
Cutchogue-New Suffolk Library, 27550 Main Rd., free,
register, cutchoguelibrary.org, 631-734-6360.
HOW GOOD POSTURE HABITS
HELP PREVENT BACK PAIN
PORT JEFFERSON STATION: Learn about proper
posture and the role exercise plays in helping alleviate
pain and lowering the risk of falling, 10-11:30 a.m.
Tuesday, Comsewogue Library, 170 Terryville Rd., free,
631-928-1212, cpl.suffolk.lib.ny.us.
SENIOR SECOND WEDNESDAY
HUNTINGTON: Free or discounted admission,
docent-led tours of the current exhibition and musical
performances, exhibition at 2 p.m., groups and
individuals welcome, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Wednesday,
Heckscher Museum of Art, 2 Prime Ave., free for 62
and older, half-price for all others, heckscher.org,
631-351-3250.
WRITING OUR STORIES
MASSAPEQUA PARK: Instructor-led writing
workshop for seniors, all are welcome, 1 p.m. Thursday, Massapequa Library, Bar Harbour Branch, 40
Harbor Lane, free, 516-799-0770.
DIET AND INFLAMMATION
LONG BEACH: A registered dietitian explains the role
inflammation plays in chronic diseases and shares tips
AMERICAN LEGION MEETINGS
BABYLON: Post 94, 8 p.m. Monday, 22 Grove Place,
631-669-0094.
GREENLAWN: Post 1244, 8 p.m. Wednesday, Knights
of Columbus, 24 Boulevard Ave., 631-673-8704.
MALVERNE: Post 44, 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, 240
Franklin Ave., 516-599-8645.
PORT JEFFERSON STATION: Post 432, 7:30 p.m.
Wednesday, 432 Hallock Ave., 631-473-9774.
WEST ISLIP: Post 1738, 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, 340 Union
Blvd., 631-422-1738.
AMVETS MEETINGS
BOHEMIA: Post 1174, 7 p.m. Wednesday, Joseph
Kovarik American Legion Post 1146, 826 Hubal St.,
631-255-1233.
EAST ISLIP: Post 18, 8 p.m. Wednesday, 141 Carleton
Ave., 631-581-6913.
ST. JAMES: Post 55, 9:30 a.m. Saturday, 460 Lake Ave.,
631-559-9374.
AUXILIARY OF AMERICAN LEGION
PORT JEFFERSON STATION: Wilson Ritch Post 432,
7 p.m. Tuesday, 432 Hallock Ave., 631-473-9774.
WEST BABYLON: Post 1634, 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, 10
Bruce St., 631-669-3931.
CATHOLIC WAR VETERANS’ MEETING
CENTEREACH: 10 a.m. Saturday, Assumption of the
Blessed Virgin Mary Parish, Crown Acres Road and
Chestnut Street, 631-588-3423.
VETERANS OF FOREIGN WARS MEETINGS
EAST MEADOW: Post 2736, 7:30 p.m. Monday,
American Legion Post 1082, 294 Bellmore Rd.,
516-599-5380.
EAST ROCKAWAY: Post 3350, 7:15 p.m. Tuesday, 164
Main St., 516-887-8170.
AP
LI LIFE N1
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WIRED DOWN WEDNESDAY
WEST BABYLON: Need help with an
electronic device? Bring your iPad,
e-reader, laptop, smartphone or
tablet (no troubleshooting or fixing
software problems), 6:30-8 p.m.
Wednesday, West Babylon Public
Library, 211 Rte. 109, 631-669-5445.
for shopping and meals to incorporate with a healthy
lifestyle, 2 p.m. Thursday, Long Beach Library, 111 W.
Park Ave., free, longbeachlibrary.org, 516-432-7201.
FORT SALONGA SENIOR CITIZENS CLUB
SMITHTOWN: Open to 60 and older, socialize, enjoy
luncheons, parties and trips, noon Thursday, Smithtown Landing Country Club, 495 Landing Ave., free for
first-time guests, 631-542-7592.
KNIT AND NOSH
WESTHAMPTON BEACH: Work through a guided
project with a knitting expert, learn the craft, experienced knitters also welcome, 10:30 a.m.-noon
Saturdays, Westhampton Free Library, 7 Library Ave.,
free, register, refreshments, westhamptonlibrary.net,
631-288-3335.
Compiled by Gina Tabarus
FARMINGDALE: Post 516, 8:30 p.m. Tuesday, 635
Main St., 516-293-4645.
GLEN COVE: James Erwin Donahue Post 347, bring
DD214, 7 p.m. Tuesday, 15 Hill St., 516-676-9641.
LYNBROOK: Howard-Lathrop Post 2307, 7 p.m.
Tuesday, 235 Merrick Rd., 516-599-8846.
PLAINVIEW: Post 5942, 8 p.m. Tuesday, 1221 Old
Country Rd., 516-433-5303.
VETERANS’ HOUSING ASSISTANCE
AMITYVILLE: Geared toward veterans who are
homeless or on the verge of homelessness. Support
Services for Veterans’ Families assists with housing,
employment and benefits and may be able to provide
time-limited payments to third parties for rentals or
utilities, 631-227-0777.
VETERANS’ HOUSING PROGRAM
BAY SHORE: United Veterans’ Beacon House manages
and supports 34 housing locations throughout Nassau
and Suffolk counties providing safe, clean, structured
living environments to veterans in need, call
631-665-1571 for information and appointments.
WALLS OF HONOR
EAST MEADOW: The Nassau County Veterans’
Monument Fund, a nonprofit organization, offers all
veterans, living and deceased, a place on its Walls of
Honor in Veterans Plaza in Eisenhower Park,
516-804-5802.
WOMEN IN THE MILITARY
VALLEY STREAM: Designed to bring women in the
military together, share experiences, assist each other in
obtaining the benefits available, providing resources
they require and empower them as they return to
civilian life; assistance includes housing, child-care
services, job/skills training programs, medical coverage,
counseling programs, visit womeninthemilitary.net or
call 516-800-1000 for additional information.
Compiled by Gina Tabarus
SUBMIT A PHOTO for a Veterans or Seniors event by mail or email. Include full names, caption
details and the photographer’s name. Photos sent by email should be a separate JPEG attachment and not pasted into text. Email to events@newsday.com, or mail to Newsday Events, 235
Pinelawn Rd., Melville, NY 11747-4250. Photos become Newsday property for use in all media.
OURTOWNS
Unless specified, meetings are at Town Hall
East, 54 Audrey Ave.
Reports from county or village police,
Dec. 13-20
ALBERTSON
PLANNING
ADVISORY BOARD
7 p.m. Jan. 17
\ A delivered package was stolen from the
doorstep of a home on Hampton Avenue on
Dec. 14.
ZONING BOARD
TOWN BOARD
BETHPAGE
FLOWER HILL
BOARD OF TRUSTEES
ZONING BOARD
\ Food was stolen from ShopRite on
Hempstead Turnpike Dec. 19.
TOWN BOARD
7 p.m. Jan. 8
10 a.m. Jan. 9
7:30 p.m. Jan. 7, Village Hall,
1 Bonnie Heights Rd., Manhasset
MANHASSET PARK
DISTRICT BOARD
OF COMMISSIONERS
6:15 p.m. Jan. 14, district office,
62 Manhasset Ave.
MANORHAVEN
ZONING BOARD
7 p.m. Jan. 15, Village Hall,
33 Manorhaven Blvd.
MINEOLA
BOARD OF TRUSTEES
6:30 p.m. Jan. 16, Village Hall,
55 Washington Ave.
MUNSEY PARK
BOARD OF TRUSTEES
7:30 p.m. Jan. 9, Village Hall,
1777 Northern Blvd.
NORTH HILLS
ARCHITECTURAL
REVIEW BOARD
7:30 p.m. Jan. 8,
Village Hall, 1 Shelter Rock Rd.
10 a.m. Jan. 8
7 p.m. Jan. 10
BROOKVILLE
TRUSTEES
7 p.m. Jan. 22, AHRC, administration
building, 189 Wheatley Rd., Brookville
CENTRE ISLAND
TRUSTEES
6:30 p.m. Jan. 9, Village Hall,
Centre Island Road
FARMINGDALE
BOARD OF FIRE
COMMISSIONERS
8 p.m. Jan. 24, Village Hall, 361 Main St.
FARMINGDALE
TRUSTEES
CARLE PLACE
\ A delivered package was stolen from the
porch of a home on Garden Avenue Dec. 15.
GREAT NECK
\ Money was stolen from a vehicle at BMW
of Bayside Service Center on East Shore Road
Dec. 18.
HICKSVILLE
\ A passenger window was broken on a
vehicle parked at Ikea at the Broadway Mall
Dec. 16.
\ A delivered package was stolen from the
porch of a home on Terry Street Dec. 18.
7:30 p.m. Jan. 7, Village Hall, 361 Main St.
MANHASSET
FARMINGDALE
ZONING BOARD
\ A 58-year-old man from Brooklyn was
arrested at Macy’s on Northern Boulevard Dec.
17 and charged with shoplifting.
MASSAPEQUA
FIRE DISTRICT
NEW CASSEL
MASSAPEQUA PARK
TRUSTEES
NORTH NEW HYDE PARK
8 p.m. Jan. 17, Village Hall, 361 Main St.
8 p.m. Jan. 14, firehouse,
1 Brooklyn Ave.
\ Delivered packages were stolen from the
doorstep of a home on Sylvester Street Dec. 17.
NORTH HILLS
PLANNING BOARD
8 p.m. Jan. 14, Village Hall,
151 Front St.
\ A 51-year-old man from Elmont was
arrested at Stop & Shop on Hillside Avenue
Dec. 19 and charged with shoplifting.
WESTBURY
PLANDOME
BOARD OF TRUSTEES
MASSAPEQUA PARK
ZONING BOARD
8 p.m. Jan. 23, Village Hall,
151 Front St.
7:30 p.m. Jan. 9, Village Hall,
1 Shelter Rock Rd.
7:30 p.m. Jan. 8, Village Hall, 65 South Dr.
PLANDOME HEIGHTS
BOARD OF TRUSTEES
8 p.m. Jan. 7, Village Hall,
37 Orchard St., Manhasset
PLANDOME MANOR
BOARD OF TRUSTEES
8 p.m. Jan. 15,
55 Manhasset Ave., Manhasset
ROSLYN
BOARD OF TRUSTEES
8 p.m. Jan. 15, Village Hall
8 p.m. Jan. 10, Village Hall
ZONING BOARD
8 p.m. Jan. 7, Village Hall
ROSLYN HISTORIC
DISTRICT BOARD
8 p.m. Jan. 16, Village Hall,
1200 Old Northern Blvd.
ROSLYN ESTATES
BOARD OF TRUSTEES
7:30 p.m. Jan. 14, Village Hall, 25 The Tulips
Compiled by Diane Daniels
OYSTER BAY COVE
TRUSTEES
8 p.m. Jan. 15, East Woods School,
Yellow Cote Road
SEA CLIFF
ZONING BOARD
WILLISTON PARK
8 p.m. Jan. 15, Village Hall,
Sea Cliff Avenue
\ Headphones were stolen from an unlocked
vehicle on Liberty Avenue Dec. 19.
SYOSSET LIBRARY
BOARD OF TRUSTEES
WOODBURY
Public meeting, 6:30 p.m. Jan. 8,
225 S. Oyster Bay Rd.
CITY OF
GLEN COVE
Unless specified, meetings are at City Hall,
9 Glen St.
CITY COUNCIL
7:30 p.m. Jan. 8
PLANNING BOARD
8 p.m. Jan. 15
ZONING BOARD
7:30 p.m. Jan. 17
Compiled by Diane Daniels
\ A 60-year-old woman from Plainview was
arrested at Stop & Shop on Jericho Turnpike
Dec. 17 and charged with shoplifting.
ELSEWHERE
EAST MEADOW
\ A 31-year-old woman from Hicksville was
arrested at Walmart on Hempstead Turnpike
Dec. 17 and charged with shoplifting.
\ A delivered package was stolen from the
doorstep of a home at Heritage Square
Apartments on Newbridge Road Dec. 16.
ELMONT
\ A delivered package was stolen from the
porch of a home on Melrose Street Dec. 17.
Crime Stoppers and the
Nassau County Police Department are looking for the
person wanted in connection with an identity theft
incident in Rockville Centre.
According to police, at
6:19 a.m. on July 31, 2018, the
suspect used a stolen credit
card at the CVS Pharmacy at
598 Merrick Rd.
Anyone with information
about this crime can call
Crime Stoppers at
800-244-8477 or text NCCS
plus your tip to CRIMES
(274637).
\ A 35-year-old man from Jamaica, Queens,
was arrested at Marshall’s on Hempstead
Turnpike Dec. 14 and charged with shoplifting.
FARMINGDALE
\ Lotion was stolen from an unlocked vehicle
parked on Soma Place Dec. 19.
GARDEN CITY
\ A 46-year-old man from Hempstead was
arrested at Ulta Beauty in Roosevelt Field Dec.
14 and charged with shoplifting.
\ A 29-year-old man from East Meadow was
arrested at Macy’s in Roosevelt Field Dec. 13
and charged with shoplifting.
\ Clothing was stolen from H&M in Roosevelt Field Dec. 15.
\ A 57-year-old woman from Cedarhurst was
arrested at J.C. Penney in Roosevelt Field Dec.
13 and charged with shoplifting.
LAWRENCE
\ A 42-year-old woman from Brooklyn was
arrested at Costco on Rockaway Turnpike Dec.
18 and charged with shoplifting.
LEVITTOWN
\ A 58-year-old man from Hempstead was
arrested at The Home Depot on Hempstead
Turnpike Dec. 13 and charged with shoplifting.
MASSAPEQUA
\ Clothing was stolen from Kids Foot Locker
in Westfield Sunrise Dec. 15.
\ A 60-year-old woman from Seaford was
arrested at Dress Barn on Sunrise Highway
Dec. 16 and charged with shoplifting.
This man is being sought
regarding a stolen credit card
used for purchases at CVS
Pharmacy in Rockville Centre.
When calling or texting,
refer to Crime Stoppers Unit
Case 319-18.
All calls and texts will be
kept confidential.
Nassau County Crime
Stoppers offers up to $5,000
for information that leads to
an arrest.
MERRICK
\ A 19-year-old woman from Freeport was
arrested on Merrick Road and Dobson Avenue
Dec. 16 and charged with possession of
marijuana.
\ Money was stolen from an unlocked
vehicle on City Avenue Dec. 14.
NORTH AMITYVILLE
\ Four batteries were stolen from an AT&T
cell tower site on Broadway Dec. 14.
NORTH LAWRENCE
\ A 46-year-old man from Far Rockaway
was arrested at a store on Rockaway Turnpike
Dec. 14 and charged with shoplifting.
OCEANSIDE
\ A 55-year-old woman from Bayside,
Queens, was arrested at Kohl’s on Long Beach
Road Dec. 13 and charged with shoplifting.
\ A wallet was stolen from a vehicle on Long
Beach Road Dec. 13.
\ A 35-year-old woman from Long Beach
was arrested at Kohl’s on Long Beach Road
Dec. 18 and charged with shoplifting.
ROOSEVELT
\ An 18-year-old woman from Westbury was
arrested on Gilbert Place and Woods Avenue
Dec. 19 and charged with possession of
marijuana.
UNIONDALE
\ Delivered packages were stolen from a
home on Hawthorne Avenue Dec. 14.
Compiled by Sabrina Monroe
TO HELP SOLVE these crimes, call Crime Stoppers at 800-244-TIPS
(800-244-8477) in Nassau. All calls will be kept confidential. There is a cash
reward of up to $5,000 for information leading to an arrest.
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
ROSLYN
PLANNING BOARD
6 p.m. Jan. 15, Portledge School,
355 Duck Pond Rd., Locust Valley
Stolen card
used at CVS
in Rockville
Centre
newsday.com
Meetings are at Village Hall,
1200 Old Northern Blvd.
MATINECOCK
TRUSTEES
\ A 33-year-old woman from Massapequa
was arrested at Century 21 department store
on Old Country Road Dec. 15 and charged with
shoplifting.
\ A 56-year-old man from Baldwin was
arrested at Saks Off 5th Ave. on Old Country
Road Dec. 15 and charged with shoplifting.
\ A 28-year-old man from Hempstead was
arrested on Ellison Avenue and Jericho
Turnpike Dec. 17 and charged with possession
of marijuana.
WANTED
NASSAU COUNTY POLICE DEPARTMENT
Meetings are at Town Hall,
220 Plandome Rd., Manhasset
OYSTER BAY
E21
LI LIFE N1
POLICE BEAT
TOWN HALL AGENDAS
NORTH
HEMPSTEAD
newsday.com/lilife
ACT2
act two N1
E22
GOOD TO KNOW
ASK
Take steps to avoid winter flakes
THE
Can wife
receive spousal
benefits at 61?
BY TREVA LIND
The Spokesman-Review (TNS)
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
newsday.com
ABOUT THAT BATHING
Consider the length, frequency and
temperature in the shower along with
the type of cleanser because many
deodorant soaps contribute to stripping body oils.
Dermatologists suggest shorter
showers, perhaps on alternate days,
and using gentle cleaners. Area dermatologists say people report good results with Cetaphil, Aveeno and Dove
products. If you’re OK with it, also try
lukewarm water, Werschler said.
“With your skin, its natural moisturizing factor is this cholesterol-derived
fatty acid substance, and the longer
and hotter shower strips more of that
out of the skin,” he said.
“When you get in the shower at
comfortable temperature, instead of
turning it up incrementally, maybe try
to turn it down a little bit, to where
it’s not uncomfortable.”
Unless your job involves grease and
grime, or being in mud, you don’t need
daily use of soap over the entire body,
Werschler said. He suggests applying
mild soap only where needed, such as
arm pits and the groin area.
“You don’t need to literally suds up
the rest of the body,” he said. “Those
other areas aren’t really dirty and the
rinsing effect is sufficient.
“A bath is actually better for your
TNS / DREAMSTIME / ANTONIO GUILLEM
C
racks appear on the heels or
near fingernails. Hands, arms
and legs feel drier, flakier. Yeah,
winter and skin don’t get along well.
In part, the fault lies in spending
more time indoors around forced-air
central heating. Another culprit is the
pull of hot showers when outdoor
temperatures fall. But that creature
comfort strips the body’s natural oils,
say Spokane, Washington-area dermatology experts.
“In the colder weather, people do
set themselves up for dry skin in part
because they like to take longer and
hotter showers,” said Dr. Phil Werschler of Spokane Dermatology Clinic.
“That sort of stimulates the drying
effect and compounds the dryness
that also occurs in the colder and
drier weather.”
Dr. Drew Reese, with MultiCare
Rockwood Dermatology Center, said
people also spend a lot more time
around heat sources.
“A lot of it . . . is we have our
heaters on and we have our wood
stoves on, while we’re sitting in the
house,” Reese said. “The air is being
dried out by heat.”
And outdoors, windy and cold, dry
weather can chap lips and skin.
There are preventive steps to avoid
dry skin issues.
Trapping moisture with hand lotion helps combat the drying effects of winter.
skin. Bath water is not stripping away
the oil from skin like a shower does,
because running water is more effective at removing oil on skin.”
In the bathtub, he suggests using
Neutrogena Rainbath or Aveeno
Oatmeal Bath.
MOISTURIZERS HELP
Use moisturizers to hydrate skin
and use them often.
“My mantra is whatever you’ll put
on, use it,” Reese said. “Sometimes,
the greasier the better. With moisturizers, we tend to neglect that until it’s
too late.”
After bathing, gently pat the skin
partially dry with a towel, without
rubbing. A bath oil or moisturizer
then can be rubbed into moist skin.
People who have more sensitive
skin often avoid moisturizers that
contain fragrances or chemicals.
“The most lightly textured moisturizers are typically what we recommend for men,” said Werschler, who
added that many men aren’t good
about moisturizing.
“In large part, it’s not cultural for a
man typically to moisturize, and
moisturizer tends to gunk up in body
hair. I think most women will moisturize a lot of times because it’s part of
their daily regimen.”
Zelda Swain, a Valley Dermatology
nurse practitioner, said people tell her
that use of a serum product seems to
penetrate the skin better as a moisturizing step.
For hands and feet, “I like urea,” she
said. “It’s available over the counter,
and it’s very effective for cracked
heels.”
Moisturizers come in various thicknesses, Werschler said, from lotions
and creams to thick ointments.
“The thicker and heavier ones you
might use that for dried, cracked skin
around the heels,” Werschler said.
“They’re also messier and aren’t
designed to be absorbed. They form
more of a barrier.”
If you have cracked heels or dry
fingertips, Werschler has another tip.
Apply a thick moisturizer, then wear
cotton ankle socks and cotton gloves
to prevent rubbing the moisturizer off
while resting. He often suggests that
patients buy thin cotton sewing
gloves.
WEAR PROTECTION
Use gloves indoors for cleaning and
mittens or gloves outdoors as much
as possible — including if you’re
using tools outdoors or working in
the yard.
“Simply wearing gloves is a good
idea, even just a light pair of gloves
will help to hold moisture in the
skin,” Werschler said. “The skin is
what we call an evaporative organ.
. . . If you decrease evaporation,
you’ll have less dryness.”
USE A HUMIDIFIER
Werschler recommends using a
humidifier in the bedroom.
“You’re in the bedroom seven to 10
hours, so a small humidifier is not
real expensive,” he said. “With the
steam, that raises the relative humidity in your bedroom, so you close the
door and that kind of traps the humidity. Your skin will dry out less. It’s a
simple, easy fix.”
EXPERT
Lynn Brenner
You write about Social Security scenarios
where the husband is usually the higher
earner. I’m five years younger than my
husband, and I was the higher wage
earner. If he applies for Social Security at
66, can I apply for a spousal benefit?
And when I reach age 70, can I switch to
my own full benefit?
Unfortunately, it sounds as if the
answer is no — not because you’re a
higher-earning wife, but because the
option you describe is unavailable to
people born after Jan. 1, 1954.
Social Security rules apply equally to
both spouses, regardless of who earned
more. But the most generous options
are available only to people who don’t
apply for Social Security until their full
retirement age. This produces the
optimal outcome when the older
spouse — typically the husband —
earned more.
You must be at least 62 to apply for
Social Security retirement benefits,
whether it’s the spousal benefit or your
own; and you can’t apply for a spousal
benefit until your spouse applies for
Social Security. (Note: Different rules
govern Social Security survivor benefits.)
But you must meet two additional
requirements to file the restricted
application you describe — i.e., an
application for your spousal benefit
alone, reserving your own for later.
1. You must be at your full retirement
age. (If you’re younger, you’re deemed
to be applying for all the benefits to
which you’re entitled, and you receive
an amount equal to the largest of them.)
2. You cannot have been born after
Jan. 1, 1954. The restricted application
isn’t an option for younger people. If
you’re five years younger than your
husband, and he isn’t yet 66, you don’t
make that cutoff.
THE BOTTOM LINE
The most generous Social Security
options are only available to older
applicants.
MORE INFORMATION
\ nwsdy.li/ssarestriction
\ ssa.gov/planners/retire/claiming.html
TO ASK THE EXPERT Send questions to Ask
the Expert/Act 2, Newsday Newsroom, 235
Pinelawn Rd., Melville, NY 11747, or email
act2@newsday.com. Include your name, address
and phone numbers. Questions can be answered
only in this column. Advice is offered as general
guidance. Check with your own consultants for
your specific needs.
What’s with
all those
robocalls?
E26
newsday.com/act2
Time to right the ships
E23
act two N1
act2
THECOLUMN
Jack Pesso is fixing
his model collection
damaged in Sandy
BY ARLENE GROSS
Special to Newsday
P
owerful storms wreak
havoc on people’s lives,
forcing them to pick up
the pieces and gradually
move on.
That’s certainly true for
Jack Pesso, whose handcrafted collection of model ships was damaged in
October 2012 in the aftermath of
superstorm Sandy.
“That storm took away my life,” he
said of his seven-decade-long hobby
and passion for building exquisite
replicas of the Titanic, the USS Constitution and other notable seafaring
vessels.
Six years later, Pesso is slowly
putting back together the pieces of
his ships, his workshop and his life.
See CRAFT on E24
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
Jack Pesso’s collection of model ships, and the tools of his craft, were damaged in superstorm Sandy. \ Video: newsday.com/act2
On the night of Oct. 29, 2012, the
Pessos were tucked in for a typical,
quiet and creative evening: Evelyn
was working on a watercolor painting
in her studio on the home’s lower
level; Jack was in his workshop, a
room away, putting finishing touches
on Sovereign of the Seas, an English
Royal Navy warship. They weren’t
terribly concerned about the approaching hurricane since they’d never been
personally impacted by past storms.
“I turned to her and said, ‘Everything is perfect. I don’t want for
anything,’ ” recalled Jack, 83.
“There was so much inner peace,”
said Evelyn, 82.
Suddenly, the spell was broken as
water seeped in about 7 o’clock that
evening and began filling the entire
lower level of their Oceanside home
as superstorm Sandy hit Long Island.
The couple frantically tried to salvage anything they could from the
rising water that would eventually
reach a depth of 3 feet and halfway
up the stairs to the first floor.
Despite their efforts, more than
half of Jack’s tools, many collected
from around the world, were rusted,
and exotic woods amassed over 40
newsday.com
YVONNE ALBINOWSKI
AN ARTISAN IN ROUGH SEAS
ACT2
act two N1
E24
Rebuilding a model
ship collection
CRAFT from E23
years from lumberyards and
museum restorations were
ruined.
After the storm, workers
moved his three dozen intricately crafted ships, ranging
from 18 inches to 4 feet long, to
higher ground and in the
process about half were damaged.
“It took a piece of my heart
out. So many hours of work
and so many tools were damaged,” Jack said, adding that he
didn’t have the heart to throw
away anything, even the
rusted, unusable implements.
While their house near
Middle Bay Country Club was
being restored, the Pessos
lived in a hotel for a year. Since
they’ve returned home, Jack
has begun the laborious
process of repairing the broken
masts and rethreading broken
rigs, gradually restoring the
creations so dear to him. To
date, none have been completely restored.
when in reality he couldn’t get
himself “off the chair!”
In reality, Pesso doesn’t
actually enjoy being at sea.
“Every time we went on
someone’s yacht or boat, he
had to get off,” exclaimed
Evelyn. “He was so bored.”
JACK’S TIPS
FOR GETTING
STARTED
For those interested in model
shipbuilding, Jack Pesso offers
this advice:
● Go to various retail
model ship catalogs to see
if there’s anything you’d like
to build. Pesso recommends
modelexpo-online.com.
● Since catalogs list ships
by category of skill level,
from novice to expert, search
for ships at the level that’s
appropriate for you.
● There’s no need to set up
a workshop or separate
workspace. “Some people build
smaller ships right at their
kitchen tables,” Pesso noted.
● For a set of tools, Pesso
recommends micromark.com.
ATTENTION TO DETAILS
— ARLENE GROSS
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
It was a three-day family rail
trip to California that set the
young Jack Pesso on a lifelong
passion for building miniature
replicas of ships.
During most of train ride,
the then-10-year-old was immersed in building The Southern Belle from a model ship kit
his sister had given him to pass
the time. Right from the start,
Pesso said, he liked “the ability
to work with his hands and the
way it kept me intrigued.”
Three years later, Pesso
contracted polio and was temporarily paralyzed. During the
yearlong convalescence that
followed in his Long Beach
home, Pesso whiled away the
days building ships from the
kits his dad bought him.
“All of a sudden, I had this
crazy romance for shipbuilding,” he said.
Creating these exotic-looking ships with storied histories
inspired the young man’s imagination. “I built them because I
felt like I was on the ship,” he
said. “I’m not a boat lover, but I
loved fantasizing about being
on ships.”
PHOTOS BY YVONNE ALBINOWSKI
newsday.com
ILLNESS BREEDS PASSION
Tools in Jack Pesso’s
Oceanside studio, where,
as his son Mark Pesso
said, “everything had a
place and had a cubby.”
Though he was physically
disabled, teenage Jack’s fantasies really took shape.
“I’d see myself running
around the ship, flying from
rope to rope,” he quipped,
Three to four hours a night
several nights a week Pesso,
who retired 20 years ago from
running jewelry and other
retail shops, can be found in
his workshop creating, tinkering and fixing. If he’s not building a ship, he could be crafting
a Lilliputian Ford Model T,
stagecoach, carousel or even a
dollhouse.
“My world is a miniature
world,” he said.
Years ago, Pesso attended
model shipbuilding clubs
where people would discuss
their work and give one another pointers.
“But for the most part, it’s a
dying art,” Pesso mused.
Starting with a set of a ship’s
blueprints from the Model Expo
catalog, Pesso studies sketches
of the ship. He also peruses
Peter Goodwin’s “Nelson’s
Ships: A Comprehensive History of the Ships In Which He
Served” and other naval history
books to learn what battles a
ship fought in, its weaponry,
weight and commissions, all
details that help him in designing and constructing a model.
The Sovereign of the Seas,
he learned, has an ironic history: It was faster and had
better armor than any ship.
“It was virtually indestructible. And then a cook burned
it down,” he said.
Once he’s done recreating an
exact replica of a historic ship,
Pesso adds his own touches —
an extra flag here, another
deckhand there, or perhaps fine
inlaid wood on a pirate ship.
“Pirate ships don’t have that,
but I thought they should,” he
said of his tendency to take
“artistic license.”
Every step in the process is
exacting, from embossing and
nailing down the wood slats to
creating the patina of age on
the deck, Jack said.
“You can buy slat wood for
Jack Pesso works on Sovereign
of the Seas in his Oceanside
studio, which was devastated by
superstorm Sandy.
$3, and you can’t tell the difference,” Pesso explained. “But
that’s cheating,”
Forgoing shortcuts, like
pre-tapered masts, Pesso
prefers instead to taper the
masts with a drill, a two-hour
undertaking for each one.
“If I work on a ship religiously, it will take a year or
two years,” he noted, adding
that using shortcuts could
reduce a year’s worth of work
to three months. Just making
one ship seat, which he torches,
hollows out and drills teeny
holes into to simulate wormwood, could take six hours.
“It doesn’t make sense, but I
do it for my own gratification.
I make it look like it’s worn,”
he said.
Every step along the way,
from tightening and wetting
the nylon thread for rigging to
using workable hinges on the
cannon doors rather than
gluing them shut, to preserving
the wood with linseed oil — as
is the practice with real ships
— is painstakingly, albeit,
lovingly done.
Explaining his obsession
with perfection, Pesso said,
“You have to be a little wacky.
Sometimes I feel like gluing it
and calling it a day, but then
what’s the point of doing that?”
A FAMILY APPRECIATION
Despite his abundant talent,
Pesso said he’s never exhibited
his work because he doesn’t
want to be a showoff.
Still, he is not immune to the
adoration of his family, which
includes two sons and a daughter, seven grandchildren and
three great-grandchildren.
Recalling her father showing
her what he was up to in his
workshop, Beth Ginsburg said,
“There would be blueprints on
the walls behind him, and watching them come to life was absolutely incredible. The workmanship always amazed me. I remember going down in my
footie pajamas and just being
completely intrigued.”
Calling her dad the most
creative person she knows,
Ginsburg, 59, of Philadelphia,
said, “It’s such a genius the way
he does it.”
Ginsburg’s son, Yaacov, 27,
ACT2
E25
act two N1
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NDACTIVATE3X154
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
Mark recently reached for the
toolbox his dad gave him years ago to
build an indoor basketball court.
“To this day, I still use all those
tools for all the things that I do
around the house,” Mark said. “When
I was putting up the basketball court
for my daughter, as I was making it, I
was so thankful that I had gotten and
learned how to use them from my
father.”
Another son, Victor Pesso, 55, of
Brooklyn, sees the model ships as a
metaphor, “for a fascinating life, for
the voyage my dad has taken in his
lifetime.”
Working as a project manager to
rebuild Poile Zedek, a synagogue
that burned down in New Brunswick, New Jersey, three years ago,
Victor channeled his father’s efforts
years ago to help relocate a synagogue for Evelyn’s father’s rabbi
from Queens to a Brooklyn community through extensive planning and
generous donations. “I take a lot of
inspiration that my goal in rebuilding that synagogue is very similar to
the kinds of things that my father
has done,” Victor said.
Ignoring her husband’s protestations of modesty, Evelyn praised the
man and his talents.
“Everything that he does is amazing
to me,” said his mate of 60 years. “He
is beyond . . . His work is beautiful.”
newsday.com
who is in dental school, always loved
spending time in the shop with his
grandfather, helping him work on
chess pieces and a dollhouse.
Pesso proudly explained that at
dental school, Yaacov was once again
working with the very familiar instruments — explorers, picks and pliers
— that they used together.
“Today he’s using the same tools to
make a living,” Pesso remarked.
Over the years, too, Jack Pesso’s
skills have been put to household use.
When anything broke in her home,
Ginsburg recalled her children saying,
“ ‘Papu will fix it. Papu can fix anything,’ ” using the name they call him.
In fact, “Papu” fixed the Ginsburgs’
several-1,000-year-old bowl, which
dates to the Bronze Age and was
purchased at an Israeli antique store,
that had broken in transit into about a
dozen pieces, by filling the cracks
with a mixture of clay, sawdust and
glue, so that the seams were virtually
undetectable.
Calling his dad “incredible at building things,” Mark Pesso, 54, of White
Plains, said his father’s workshop,
“was his happy place. His shop was so
meticulous, where everything had a
place and had a cubby, and it was
marked and it was labeled. That’s
always been his place where he’s been
able to escape all the pressures of life
itself.”
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THECOLUMN
act two N1
E26
What’s Inside The
Newsday App?
Let peace and quiet
ringintheNewYear
D
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NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
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NDAPPALERTS3X154
on’t hang up.
Rudely admonished, I go rogue.
Phone smacks cradle. Aftershocks measured in Montreal.
When will the robo-solicitors learn
that telling a wary householder to remain on the line likely will prompt an
equal and opposite reaction consistent
with Newton’s Third Law of Physics?
From all over come the unwanted
calls — from Brentwood and Southampton on Long Island, from Auburn, New
York, and Sun Valley, California; from
Boykins, Virginia, and Hartland, Michigan; from San Francisco and Houston
and Warrior, Alabama, and Wakefield,
Rhode Island. From everywhere.
Don’t hang up:
We have important information
about your credit card account.
We have important information
about chronic pain.
We have important information
about your free Caribbean vacation.
We have important information
about your tax returns.
Robocalls are so prevalent that the
Federal Trade Commission a few years
ago held a contest challenging cybergeeks to find a solution.
Two triumphant nerds pocketed
$25,000 for inventing a system that
sends calls directly to what is known as
a “honeypot” — that is, a data collection system overseen by investigators
and researchers who, I guess, intend to
do something useful. Name of the
government enterprise? “Robocalls:
Humanity Strikes Back.”
But humanity is not always so innocent. Sometimes there are real people
on the other end of the line.
“Hi, I’m Alex the chimney guy.”
“Hi, I’m Randy calling about your
computer.”
“Hi, I’m Lou the fixer-upper.”
I’m partial to humans, to tell the truth
— regular folks trying to make a living
or pitching one noble cause or another.
It’s hard to get really steamed at
someone who wants to protect the
ozone layer, or save the Arctic fox, or
help victims of tsunamis or even the
tireless political types pleading for just
one more contribution to assure victory.
Most difficult to endure are the
nightly interruptions that bring nary a
whisper, no matter how often you
haplessly mutter “Hello? Hello? Hello?”
Experts warn that these calls —
often computerized — can be particularly pernicious and set up the recipient for a second contact during which
some rascal suggests that, just to get
acquainted, you reveal your bank balance and account number.
I have a hunch that there is another category, too, involving harried minimum
Fred
Bruning
bruning@optonline.net
wage workers forced to place so many
calls at the same time that they couldn’t
possibly manage them all. To those folks,
I hope you find better jobs in 2019.
All of this is mentioned by way of
asking whatever happened to peace and
quiet?
No doubt you can remember those
days — blissful by comparison — when
the phone rang seldom and calls were
more apt to be from the photo shop
saying your snapshots were ready or
from your spendthrift kid at State U.
complaining she can’t survive on an
austerity budget.
Now domestic tranquility is shattered what seems every 15 minutes.
Nothing stops the assault — not the
holidays (Christmas Eve, New Year’s
Eve, included), stock market jitters,
government shutdown, climate change
or, in the case of our family, two auto
mishaps in one recent week. Nothing.
When a solicitor called on the day
Penny Marshall died, I had the urge to
say: Have you no shame? The world just
lost Laverne. Can’t we quit hustling back
and knee braces for just a few hours?
There is a larger issue.
Much has been said about our connected society — the idea that, thanks
to modern technology, we are never
really alone or out of touch.
Accordingly, if there are goods to
sell, or ideas to peddle, the purveyors
are going to be unrelenting in their
efforts to clear the shelves or make
their case. They will find you. In Digital America, there is no place to hide.
But there are always trade-offs in life,
no?
If you like to stream “The Crown” on
Netflix, or ask your phone for directions to that new taqueria hiding in
some Jericho Turnpike strip mall, you
might as well accept the world as it is.
On the one hand, you get Queen
Elizabeth. On the other, there’s a robotic voice warning you’ll soon be in
jail for tax fraud unless you grab your
credit card quickly.
It’s an Info Age package deal with little
to protect us — and that includes “no
call” lists, which are observed, and enforced, with the same fervor as speed
limits on the Long Island Expressway.
So, friends, in conclusion, let me say
that the dilemma we face is increasing
daily and . . . oops, just a second,
please. Sorry, have to split. We’ll continue another time. Someone’s on the
line from Sun Valley.
E27
act two N1
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OCEANSIDE
LARGE SPLIT 4 bdrms, 2 bths. M/D w/prop
permits. SAM 516-350-4670 SANDY 516-426-0703
NEW
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$279,000
FREEPORT
NDRE-
$1,930,000
BROOKLYN
CLASSIC VICTORIAN with original details!
GREAT OPPORTUNITY 3 bdrm, 2 bath. No
flood. MARSHA 516-445-9797 SANDY 516-426-0703 5 bdrms, bsmnt, 2 car gar. JULIE 516-650-9455
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
GORGEOUS 3 bdrm, 2 bth split w/open bay
views. CORY 516375-7727 JULIE 516-650-9455
$739,000
OCEANSIDE
newsday.com
$695,000
OCEANSIDE
NEW
N1
F4
(516) 623-2298
3151 Hewlett Ave.
Merrick, NY 11566
Listing Price: $929,000
Agents and Brokers: to find out more call 631-843-2430
For additional details contact: 516-623-2298
Search web ID: 3084682 on newsdayhomes.com
Featured Broker Listings
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
newsday.com
NASSAU
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2145401801
F5
N1
Institution
Sperry Federal
Credit Union
30 yr APR
4.570%
30yr Fixed
APR
4.310%
Teachers Federal
Credit Union
30yr Fixed
APR
4.467%
Bethpage Federal
Credit Union
Fairview
Mortgage Corp (BR)
Island Federal
Credit Union
NEFCU
30yr Fixed
APR
Rate
Points
Fees
% Down
APR
15 yr fixed
4.000 0.000 $1350
20%
4.120
Points: 0.000
10/1 ARM
3.875 0.000 $1900
20%
4.517
Fees: $1350
10/1 Jumbo Arm 4.125 0.000 $1900
20%
4.607
% Down: 20%
Buy with just a 5% down payment. No fee equity loans available.
Rate: 4.250
15-yr Fixed
3.625 0.000
$1306
20%
3.730
Points: 0.000
5/1-yr ARM
3.250 0.000
$1306
20%
4.790
Fees: $1306
10/1-yr ARM 3.750 0.000
$1306
20%
4.510
% Down: 20%
NO CLOSING COST OPTIONS ON FIXED & ARM MORTGAGES UP TO $484,350
Rate: 4.375
5/1 ARM Conforming 3.500 0.000
$1768
20%
4.663
Points: 0.000
FHA 30 Year Conforming 4.250 0.000
$3932 3.5%
5.069
Fees: $1768
30-Year Jumbo Conf Purch 4.625 0.000
$1768
4.660
% Down: 25%
FREE 60-DAY LOCK | FHA-INSURED LOANS–LOW DOWN PAYMENT OPTIONS
25%
15 yr fixed
4.000 0.000 $1,250 20% 4.047
Points: 0.000
WE ARE LOCAL, CALL TODAY FOR A FREE QUOTE
Fees: $750
DEBT CONSOLIDATION, PURCHASE, CONVENTIONAL, FHA, VA, REVERSE
% Down: 20% CASH OUT your homes equity today before rates rise again
4.583%
4.522%
Rate: 4.250
30yr Fixed
APR
Product
Rate: 4.500
Rate: 4.500
Points: 0.000
15 yr fixed
3.875
0.000
$1322
20%
3.991
10 yr fixed
3.750
0.000
$1322
20%
3.917
30yr Fixed
APR
Fees: $1322
4.440%
Rate: 4.375
7/1 No-Bank-Closing-Cost ARM 3.500
0.000
$835
20% 4.603
Points: 0.250
30 yr fixed jumbo 4.625
0.000
$0
20% 4.636
30yr Fixed
APR
30yr Fixed
APR
% Down: 20%
Fees: $848
% Down: 20%
Rate: 4.125
Phone / Website
516-873-7171
NMLS# 433848
631-595-0794
NMLS# 401530
www.sperryfcu.org
www.TeachersFCU.org
855-445-8850
NMLS# 449104
www.lovebethpage.com
516-541-6700
NMLS# 67909
631-851-1100
NMLS# 423148
888-763-2446
NMLS# 543667
800-401-9091
NMLS# 17609
LIC# 5936
www.fairviewmc.com
www.islandfcu.com
Refundable lock in; 15 Yr Special 3.750%Rate/3.866%APR
Apply within minutes using our new online application.
NMLS # / License #
www.myNEFCU.org
No bank closing cost options. No junk fees.
15 yr fixed
3.625 0.000
$575
20%
3.684
Points: 0.000
Specialize in: Invest Prop * LLCs * Co-ops * FHA * VA * Open Late/All Weekend
Fees: $575
126 W. Lancaster Avenue * Wayne * PA 19087 * Registered Mortgage Broker
% Down: 20%
Registered Mortgage Broker - NYS Dept of Financial Services
LIC #: 208444
www.pricefinancial.net
CALL SALES DEPARTMENT @ 773-320-8492
Rate Criteria: The rates and annual percentage rate (APR) are effective as of 1/2/19. All rates, fees and other information are subject to change without notice. RateSeeker, LLC. does not guarantee the accuracy of the information appearing above or the
availability of rates and fees in this table. The institutions appearing in this table pay a fee to appear in this table. The fees set forth for each advertisement above may be charged to open the plan (A) Mortgage Banker, (B) Mortgage Broker, (C) Bank,
(D) S & L, (E) Credit Union, (BA) indicates Licensed Mortgage Banker, NYS Department of Financial Services, (BR) indicates Registered Mortgage Broker, NYS Department of Financial Services, (loans arranged through third parties). Annual percentage
rates (APRs) are based on fully indexed rates for adjustable rate mortgages (ARMs). The APR on your specific loan may differ from the sample used. All rates are quoted on a minimum FICO score of 740. Conventional loans are based on loan amounts
of $165,000. Jumbo loans are based on loan amounts of $484,351. Lock Days: 30-60. Points quoted include discount and/or origination. Payments do not include amounts for taxes and insurance. The APR may increase after consummation and may
vary. FHA Mortgages include both UFMIP and MIP fees based on a loan amount of $165,000 with 5% down payment. Points quoted include discount and/or origination. Fees reflect charges relative to the APR. If your down payment is less than 20% of
the home’s value, you will be subject to private mortgage insurance, or PMI. VA Mortgages include funding fees based on a loan amount of $165,000 with 5% down payment. If your down payment is less than 20% of the home’s value, you will be
subject to private mortgage insurance, or PMI. “Call for Rates” means actual rates were not available at press time. To access the NMLS Consumer Access website, please visit www.nmlsconsumeraccess.org. To appear in this table, call 773-320-8492.
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS FEATURE,
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4.150%
Price Financial
30 yr Fixed
F6
Real Estate Classifieds
N1
To place an ad call 631-843-7653 or visit newsday.com/buy&sell
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Fair Housing Agency for the 5 Boros of
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Commission of Human Rights Hotline at
212-306-7500.
QUEENS HOUSES
FOR RENT
FLORAL PARK 4BR 2.5 Baths
D/W, W/D/, New Gas Boiler,
drvwy, Near All. $2800/month
Utils not incl. 718--413-8575
NASSAU/SUFFOLK
HOUSES FOR SALE
Commercial
INDUSTRIAL
• Stores
• Office space
• Professional offices
• Comercial property
• Industrial property
Find your home
for culinary
masterpieces.
INVESTMENT
PROPERTY
SEAFORD
3597-3603 Merrick Rd
$1,275,000
Owner: 516-223-6200
4 STORES
HOME & COMMERCIAL GALLERY
To place an ad, visit newsday.com/homegallery
(Deadline Wednesday at ! pm; may vary during holiday weeks.)
Open House Sun 11-1pm
Open House Sun 2-4pm
New Rochelle, NY 4 Upland Rd
$889,000
Immaculate 5BR 3.5BA Tudor. Completely Renovated Lrg
Foyer New Oak Flrs, Living area w/wood Fplc, Kit w/gorgeous
quartz countertops .www. rexhomes.com/listing/4-upland-rd
Blanca Marsh Weinstock
855-342-4739
REX Real Estate
Web # BORM1
New York, NY 120 Greenich St 8H
$760,000
Stunning 1BR 1BA Apt. Downtown LR is spacious lrg windows, hi ceilings. Kit SS Aplc built in Microwave. $589mo
maint. www.rexhomes.com/listing/120-greenwich-st-apt
Blanca Marsh Weinstock
855-342-4739
REX Real Estate
Web # BORO1
Open House Sat 1-4pm
NET $79,000
Financial
Smithtown, NY 65 Parnell Dr
$449,000
Charming 3BR 1.5Bth on .25acre Open Concept Living &
Dining area, EIK w/storage & access to yard. Fin Bsmt w/half
bath & Bar area. www.rexhomes.com/listing/65-parnell-dr
Blanca Marsh Weinstock
855-342-4739
REX Real Estate
Web # BORL1
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES
“Newsday does not endorse
any business opportunity
offered in these columns.
It is suggested that you
consult an attorney for
any business transactions.”
Southampton, NY 41 & 45 Middle Pond Road
$100,000
Bankruptcy AUCTION 1/17: .73 & .90 Acre Lots - Sold Individually. Price Represents Deposit Required to Bid on Each
Property & Not the Asking Price.
Maltz Auctions
516-349-7022
MaltzAuctions.com
Web # BORD1
Visit us 24/7 at Newsday.com/homegallery
2145542001
Find your home for
new beginnings.
BUSINESS
OPPORTUNITIES
LANDSCAPING BUSINESS FOR
SALE. Over 20yrs in business
w/Great Route! 140 Accounts
(Nassau County) Incl all landscaping equip, 1 truck & trailer
Call For Details: 516-567-2240
BELLMORE S. BAYFRONT
Amazing Views, Huge mint w/ RESTAURANT 149 Nassau Blvd
extra bldg lot, parklike grounds,
dock/lift, IGP', 5 BR 6 bath,
3 fplcs, $4.950M.
W. Hempstead
LL: 516-223-6200
Owner. 516-826-7676
RouteBrokers.com
NASSAU/SUFFOLK
Start the NEW YEAR right!!
CarBrite, $539K.....nets $3,000/wk
FURNISHED ROOM
FREE Rte4Sale List 516-482-8250
LIN D E N H U R S T Furnished
Master Bdrm, TV, Convenient
To All. $275/week. Utilities are
Included. Text Anytime. Please
Call After 6pm. 631-296-0485
USE IN PLACE. NO EQUIPMENT!
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
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F7
ALBERTSON
HEWLETT NECK
0-9s Blk Ross Ln
HICKSVILLE
20s Blk Berry Pl
90s Blk Netherwood Dr
$635,000
$680,000
2090s Blk Ambrose Ct
30s Blk Parkview Pl
720s Blk William St
$520,000
$480,000
$542,500
INWOOD
0-9s Blk 6 St
10s Blk Sound Beach Rd
$275,000
$270,000
KINGS POINT
BALDWIN
BAYVILLE
BELLMORE
10s Blk Flower St
30s Blk August Ln
70s Blk Thorman Ave
$392,998
$630,000
$285,000
60s Blk Healy Ave
$480,000
ISLAND PK
20s Blk Lorraine Rd
0-9s Blk Fleetwood Ct
2050s Blk Lakeview Rd
2480s Blk Bellmore Ave
410s Blk Linden St
$295,000
$335,000
$420,000
LAUREL HOLLOW
10s Blk William St
20s Blk Corona Dr
70s Blk Broadway
$565,000
$450,000
$539,016
LEVITTOWN
BETHPAGE
BROOKVILLE
20s Blk Tappentown Ln
CEDARHURST
$1,960,000
$1,835,000
110s Blk Harrison St
$1,400,000
$1,269,000
$657,000
MASSAPEQUA
10s Blk Jackson Ave
140s Blk Emporia Ave
1740s Blk Atherton Ave
$561,467
$200,000
$469,000
0-9s Blk Fairview Rd
10s Blk Heathstone Ct
70s Blk Cedar Dr
$640,000
$471,870
$480,000
MERRICK
140s Blk Landau Ave
210s Blk Lowell Ave
$621,000
$666,500
MINEOLA
30s Blk Woodland Rd
$864,000
1070s Blk Theodora St
70s Blk Fendale St
960s Blk Plane Ave
$425,000
$526,199
$507,000
100s Blk Suffolk St
20s Blk Rosedale Ave
30s Blk Seaman Ave W
$220,000
$430,000
$205,800
10s Blk Huntington Rd
150s Blk Hampton Rd
70s Blk Jackson St
$875,000
$1,660,000
$754,000
0-9s Blk Hilldale Rd
10s Blk Harbor Hill Rd
70s Blk Seaman Rd
$440,000
$630,000
$500,000
120s Blk Glenwood Rd
$525,000
10s Blk Baker Hill Rd
110s Blk Udall Dr
40s Blk Park Cir
$900,000
$730,000
$950,000
40s Blk Gateway Dr
$1,275,000
GLEN COVE
GLENWOOD LNDG
GREAT NECK
GREAT NECK ESTS
HEMPSTEAD
10s Blk Brown Ave
130s Blk Cruikshank Ave
60s Blk Surrey Ln
$285,000
$170,000
$200,000
1540s Blk Moffitt Ave
$565,000
HEWLETT
20s Blk Tain Dr
60s Blk Highland Ter
MANHASSET
140s Blk Waverly Ave
GARDEN CITY
RUSSELL GARDENS
$575,000
$550,000
FREEPORT
0-9s Blk Belmont Dr S
20s Blk Flower Ln
30s Blk Ambrose Ave
860s Blk Oyster Bay Rd
FRANKLIN SQ
ROSLYN HGHTS
THOMASTON
MANORHAVEN
FLOWER HILL
CENTERPORT
120s Blk Grenada Ave
210s Blk Elmwood Ave
90s Blk Pennsylvania Ave
$690,000
$418,000
MALVERNE
FLORAL PARK
$224,757
$535,478
$350,000
ROOSEVELT
310s Blk Broadway
80s Blk Marshall Ave
$389,000
$590,000
$610,000
FARMINGDALE
CENTEREACH
SYOSSET
180s Blk Wickshire Dr
260s Blk Bernice Dr
440s Blk Sussex Rd
ELMONT
$925,000
$405,000
$1,400,000
$566,000
$250,000
$570,000
LYNBROOK
EAST ROCKAWAY
10s Blk Derby Rd
20s Blk Vernon Ave
50s Blk Fountain Ave
ROCKVILLE CNTR
100s Blk Hudson St E
650s Blk Shore Rd
90s Blk Broadway W
$850,000
$1,155,000
4010s Blk Alken Ave
$485,000
$400,000
$605,000
$194,091
90s Blk Yale St
$575,000
WOODMERE
OCEANSIDE
2520s Blk Southard Ave
3400s Blk Lawrence Ave
570s Blk Patten Ave
$345,667
$197,500
$825,000
0-9s Blk Pheasant Hill Ln
$950,000
OLD BROOKVILLE
OYSTER BAY
10s Blk Sherwood Gate
$1,270,000
60s Blk Woodland Dr
$1,358,000
10s Blk Eileen Ave
40s Blk Grohmans Ln
50s Blk Sherman Ave
$350,000
$888,888
$580,000
20s Blk Inwood Ave
$635,000
OYSTER BAY COVE
PLAINVIEW
POINT LOOKOUT
$273,000
$430,000
$161,000
0-9s Blk Northcote Cres
410s Blk Madison St
930s Blk Brush Hollow Rd
$1,370,000
$1,300,000
0-9s Blk Mallard Path
0-9s Blk Lyons Ln
50s Blk Federal Ln
$445,000
$386,000
$715,000
70s Blk Wynn Ct
520s Blk Dorado Ct
$488,000
$275,000
110s Blk Cedar St
420s Blk White Star Ave
640s Blk Euclid Ave
WOODBURY
NORTH HILLS
0-9s Blk Dolphin Dr
300s Blk Waldo St
DIX HILLS
$1,402,100
$709,000
$624,000
$675,000
COPIAGUE
$406,000
$995,000
20s Blk Kensett Rd
10s Blk Center Dr
310s Blk Lowell Ave
80s Blk Lahey St
$390,000
$1,005,508
$429,900
20s Blk Dock Ln
3380s Blk Bunker Ave
$528,000
$831,506
10s Blk Dorothea St
20s Blk Long House Way
50s Blk Marvin Ln
DEER PARK
WEST HEMPSTEAD
WESTBURY
WILLISTON PK
20s Blk Winthrop Dr
1010s Blk Dartmouth Ln
340s Blk Howard Ave
980s Blk Benton St
$875,000
AMAGANSETT
30s Blk Talkhouse Walk
AMITYVILLE
CORAM
100s Blk Old Pasture Rd
850s Blk Alvahs Ln
$420,000
110s Blk American Blvd
210s Blk Commercial Blvd
350s Blk Whipple St
$250,000
$240,885
$335,000
270s Blk Shelter Rd
70s Blk Richmond Blvd
$320,000
$232,000
0-9s Blk Edwards St
130s Blk Huguenot Dr
20s Blk Shore Dr
$249,000
$130,000
$262,682
SHIRLEY
560s Blk Dogwood Ln
$350,000
SHOREHAM
30s Blk West Ln
810s Blk Blue Ridge Dr
$423,054
$189,950
SMITHTOWN
1050s Blk Savoy Dr
20s Blk Threepence Dr
450s Blk Old Country Rd
$560,000
$768,000
$500,000
SOUND BEACH
0-9s Blk Flores Ln
180s Blk Fairview Ave
$180,000
$160,580
0-9s Blk Grandview Blvd
140s Blk Radio Ave
60s Blk Toledo St
$330,000
$231,058
$332,000
480s Blk Woodscreek Ct
$425,000
10s Blk Sunken Valley Dr
30s Blk Chelsea Dr
$665,500
$346,000
STONY BROOK
130s Blk Jefferson Ave
$370,000
THE BRANCH
160s Blk Bay Shore Rd
480s Blk French Ave
$277,070
$390,000
W BABYLON
$350,000
W ISLIP
$650,000
110s Blk Cuba Hill Rd
$475,000
$539,000
$380,000
$336,000
$240,000
$155,500
$225,000
$170,000
$305,000
150s Blk Church Rd
10s Blk Wren Dr
270s Blk Gloria Blvd
80s Blk Southern Blvd
100s Blk Magnolia Dr
50s Blk King Rd
10s Blk Sawyer St
160s Blk Southaven Ave
250s Blk Hawthorne St
$515,000
HAUPPAUGE
$415,000
$295,000
$350,000
$418,000
$105,000
MASTIC
$2,850,000
$578,125
0-9s Blk Goose Neck Ln
300s Blk Howell Ave
910s Blk Roanoke Ave
10s Blk Florence Dr
420s Blk Village Cir
MANORVILLE
180s Blk Evergreen Rd
$412,500
$622,500
$219,000
$125,000
$330,000
$360,000
$410,000
$175,000
150s Blk Waterhole Rd
0-9s Blk Hampton Rd
10s Blk Columbine Ave
0-9s Blk Canarsie Trail
160s Blk Falmouth Ct
30s Blk Cedar Dr
10s Blk Carlson Rd
20s Blk Lakeside Dr
80s Blk Lakewood Ave
LAKE RONKONKOMA
N AMITYVILLE
3650s Blk Bay Shore Rd
$1,600,000
RONKONKOMA
$230,000
$400,000
HAMPTON BAYS
10s Blk Quogo Neck Ln
ROCKY POINT
110s Blk Woodycrest Dr
40s Blk Arlene St
GREENPORT
$315,000
$205,000
$329,900
$330,000
$405,000
MT SINAI
GREENLAWN
$350,000
0-9s Blk Kool Pl
100s Blk Glen Hollow Dr
30s Blk Nadine Ln
PORT JEFFERSON STA
10s Blk Lido Blvd
40s Blk Twisting Dr
LAKE GROVE
$535,000
$425,000
$820,000
30s Blk Sea Court Ln
$518,000
$749,000
$425,000
20s Blk Holmes Ave
10s Blk Oak St
5890s Blk Indian Neck Ln
PORT JEFFERSON
0-9s Blk Lawrence Rd
10s Blk Terri Dr
40s Blk Juniper Rd
MORICHES
GREAT RIVER
$540,000
RIVERHEAD
$500,000
$718,000
$440,000
FLANDERS
110s Blk Middlesex Ave
PECONIC
1030s Blk Peconic Bay Blvd $385,000
KINGS PARK
0-9s Blk Stephanie Ln
10s Blk Darmey Ln
310s Blk Erik Dr
$270,000
$688,250
70s Blk 7 St
$430,000
JAMESPORT
$355,000
$527,948
$155,000
220s Blk Spur Dr
40s Blk Girard Ave
BRENTWOOD
30s Blk 9 St
ISLIP TERR
0-9s Blk Glenwood St
10s Blk David Way
800s Blk Ocean Ave
E PATCHOGUE
FIREPLACE
BOHEMIA
RIDGE
$415,000
$470,000
$374,400
EASTPORT
$335,000
$415,000
0-9s Blk Allerton Ave
10s Blk Carlson Ln
410s Blk 4 St
E NORTHPORT
$1,340,000
20s Blk Hill St
QUOGUE
30s Blk Richmond St
ISLIP
$370,000
$600,000
$518,000
BLUE POINT
$515,000
$359,000
$255,000
0-9s Blk Brushwood Ct
60s Blk Shinnecock Ln
E ISLIP
E SETAUKET
0-9s Blk General Mclean Dr $470,000
610s Blk Bourdois Ave
$185,000
20s Blk Craig Dr
40s Blk 17 St
80s Blk 10 Ave
HUNTINGTON STA
$1,749,000
20s Blk Woodrow Pky
BELLPORT
$327,000
$980,000
$725,000
0-9s Blk Old Hollow Ln
FARMINGVILLE
BAYPORT
10s Blk Croley St
20s Blk Fairchild St
70s Blk Old Field Rd
HUNTINGTON
$1,145,000
$675,000
$978,500
$593,500
$440,000
BAY SHORE
$565,000
$369,000
10s Blk Scenic View Ct
30s Blk Lincoln Ave
50s Blk Fox Ln
E HAMPTON
OAKDALE
130s Blk Bishop Ln
210s Blk Central Ave
$340,000
$425,000
$520,000
10s Blk Jefferson Rd
30s Blk Turner Pl
BABYLON
$470,000
$1,475,000
HOLBROOK
110s Blk 6 St
200s Blk 22 St
70s Blk Westwood Ave
$740,000
$1,366,000
$999,500
SUFFOLK
$320,000
$357,000
$1,154,000
$461,000
$818,000
$535,000
WANTAGH
$1,160,000
$609,000
40s Blk Pine Dr
COMMACK
20s Blk Sprague Dr
670s Blk Flanders Dr
90s Blk Sobro Ave
VALLEY STREAM
150s Blk Evelyn Rd
1660s Blk John St
0-9s Blk Hazel St
110s Blk Root Ave
COLD SPRING HARBOR
CUTCHOGUE
$490,000
$612,000
$850,000
NEW HYDE PARK
140s Blk Centershore Rd
270s Blk Main St
CENTRAL ISLIP
$529,000
$578,855
10s Blk Alfred Rd W
1810s Blk Roberta Ln
40s Blk Park Ave E
N MERRICK
$777,888
$392,000
$124,294
$1,030,000
$445,000
$815,000
$380,000
$550,000
$585,000
10s Blk Garden Ln
20s Blk Valiant Dr
50s Blk Wood Rd
270s Blk Arcadia Ave
860s Blk James Pl
150s Blk Block Blvd
30s Blk Andrews Dr
1420s Blk Little Neck Ave
2430s Blk Hamilton Ave
970s Blk Mark Dr
$365,000
$360,000
10s Blk St George Rd
UNIONDALE
$3,072,500
0-9s Blk Christopher Dr
60s Blk Ocean Ave
$810,000
$1,300,000
$695,000
$315,000
$620,000
$490,000
N BELLMORE
CENTER MORICHES
0-9s Blk Walker Ave
30s Blk Convent Rd
50s Blk Calvin Ave
10s Blk Jefferson Pl
420s Blk Queens Ave N
80s Blk Toronto Ave
MUTTONTOWN
$980,000
$1,050,000
$635,000
MUNSEY PARK
$1,350,000
$690,000
10s Blk Glenola Ave
SEAFORD
70s Blk Juniper Rd
MASSAPEQUA PK
90s Blk Norris Ln
$600,000
$890,000
$1,129,000
SEA CLIFF
LONG BEACH
BRIDGEHAMPTON
10s Blk Shore Dr W
30s Blk Bayles Ave N
70s Blk Beacon Hill Rd
$549,000
$380,000
$762,124
10s Blk Midland Rd
90s Blk Magnolia Ln
EAST NORWICH
PORT WASHINGTON
0-9s Blk Fiddler Ln
150s Blk Wadsworth Ave
90s Blk Spring Ln
$650,000
EAST MEADOW
$150,000
$1,868,500
0-9s Blk Woodfield Ct
LAWRENCE
420s Blk Rugby Rd
EAST HILLS
$1,978,250
MASTIC BEACH
MATTITUCK
MEDFORD
MELVILLE
MIDDLE ISLAND
MILLER PLACE
N BABYLON
N LINDENHURST
100s Blk Bedell St
N SEA
0-9s Blk Millicent Dr
2540s Blk Deerfield Rd
$2,100,000
$1,500,000
NESCONSET
0-9s Blk Tiffany Way
40s Blk Empress Pines Dr
NORTHPORT
0-9s Blk Carll Ct
20s Blk Tanager Ln
NOYACK
$654,000
$540,000
$1,150,000
$298,295
1560s Blk Sag Harbor Tpke
$650,000
SAGAPONACK
0-9s Blk Sagg Rd
$1,850,000
SAYVILLE
270s Blk Wyandanch Rd
$235,000
10s Blk Mallard Ave
160s Blk Boyle Rd
50s Blk Oakdale Ave
$375,000
$209,814
$182,500
150s Blk Ferry Rd
$540,000
120s Blk Bay Rd
30s Blk Ranch Dr
80s Blk Maple Ave
$100,000
$277,617
$185,000
10s Blk John St
$360,000
0-9s Blk South Ave
50s Blk Rose St
$475,000
$599,000
130s Blk Shore Dr
60s Blk Hempstead Dr
$183,500
$175,000
380s Blk North Sea Rd
$370,000
1050s Blk Long Creek Dr
650s Blk Bayview Rd
$443,700
$350,000
80s Blk Woodbine Dr
$660,000
1000s Blk Drew Ct
230s Blk Lincoln Ave
$369,000
$370,000
0-9s Blk Blueberry Ln
30s Blk Knolls Dr
$540,000
$339,000
20s Blk Village Way
$440,000
100s Blk 14 Ave
730s Blk 10 St
$399,000
$315,000
SELDEN
SHELTER ISLAND
SOUTHAMPTON
SOUTHOLD
SPRINGS
ST JAMES
100s Blk Tahlulah Ln
200s Blk Norma Ave
620s Blk Keith Ln
WESTHAMPTON BEACH
40s Blk Sunset Ln
WHEATLEY HGHTS
$1,325,000
$340,000
$495,000
$665,000
20s Blk Main Ave
$394,750
60s Blk Lincoln Ave
$266,000
WYANDANCH
YAPHANK
20s Blk Hancock Commons $284,500
newsday.com
2145404701
new beginnings
Whether you’re
looking to rent,
buy or sell,
nobody knows
Long Island real
estate like we do.
newsdayhomes.com
2132800901
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
YOUR HOME FOR
N1
NASSAU
N1
F8
331 Convent Ave. New York
$2,900,000 Web# 3071303
Franklin Square O: 516.354.6500
Call For Appointment
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231 73rd St. Brooklyn
$1,658,888 Web# 3066228
Franklin Square O: 516.354.6500
Open House Sunday 12:00-1:30 PM
Open House Sunday 12:00-2:00 PM
Open House Sunday 1:00-3:00 PM
Open House Sunday 1:30-3:00 PM
Open House Sunday 2:30-4:00 PM
Open House Sunday 12:00-2:00 PM
87 Searingtown N Rd. Albertson
$750,000 Web# 1332578
Franklin Square O: 516.354.6500
24 East Blvd. E. Rockaway
$599,000 Web# 3071928
Franklin Square O: 516.354.6500
596 Jennings Ave. W. Hempstead
$569,000 Web# 3056721
Franklin Square O: 516.354.6500
Call For Appointment
Open House Sunday 11:30-1:00 PM
Open House Sunday 12:30-2:00 PM
Open House Sunday 11:30-1:00 PM
Open House Sunday 12:00-2:00 PM
676 Patterson Ave. Franklin Square
$521,500 Web# 3085217
Franklin Square O: 516.354.6500
Call For Appointment
116-42 141st St. Jamaica
$475,000 Web# 3061910
Franklin Square O: 516.354.6500
Open House Sunday 12:00-2:00 PM
Open House Sunday 1:00-3:00 PM
Call For Appointment
Open House Sunday 12:00-2:00 PM
Open House Sunday 3:00-5:00 PM
132-26 83rd St. Ozone Park
$558,000 Web# 3083580
Franklin Square O: 516.354.6500
newsday.com
253 Denton Ave. Lynbrook
$599,000 Web# 3080233
Franklin Square O: 516.354.6500
115 Beverly Rd. Massapequa
$786,000 Web# 3088823
Franklin Square O: 516.354.6500
15 White St. Valley Stream
$535,000 Web# 3082518
Franklin Square O: 516.354.6500
Open House Sunday 12:00-2:00 PM
NEWSDAY, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
346 S Dorchester Rd. Garden City S
$668,000 Web# 3062979
Franklin Square O: 516.354.6500
425 Emory Rd. Mineola
$849,000 Web# 3087260
Franklin Square O: 516.354.6500
748 Home St. Elmont
$479,900 Web# 3072845
Franklin Square O: 516.354.6500
562 Kirkby Rd. Elmont
$479,000 Web# 3052454
Franklin Square O: 516.354.6500
1201 G St. Valley Stream
$560,000 Web# 3087766
Franklin Square O: 516.354.6500
399 W Merrick Rd. Freeport
$429,000 Web# 3080540
Franklin Square O: 516.354.6500
46 Vine St. Lynbrook
$559,000 Web# 3044606
Franklin Square O: 516.354.6500
25 Russell St. Lynbrook
$479,900 Web# 3078129
Franklin Square O: 516.354.6500
1373 Gardiner Dr. Bay Shore
$429,000 Web# 1332181
Franklin Square O: 516.354.6500
Office: 390 Franklin Avenue
Franklin Square, NY 11010
516.354.6500
2145441101
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