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2019-01-06 The Boston Globe

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January 6, 2019
Women in
Iowa wary,
hopeful on
Warren
Concerns persist about
gender double standards
By Jess Bidgood
GLOBE STAFF
SIOUX CITY, Iowa — Elizabeth Warren introduced herself to Iowa voters this weekend as an
Oklahoma-born economic populist willing to
take on billionaires and big banks. She also
wanted voters to know she’s already broken
through one glass ceiling and has her eye on another.
“People told me back in 2012 that Massachusetts would not elect a woman to the United
States Senate. We got organized, we fought
back,” Warren said in the lobby of a theater here.
Warren is leaning in on the gender issue. She
joked on Instagram that women are more “likable” in Amtrak’s quiet car, where loud talking is
not allowed. She evokes Senator Mitch McConnell’s attempted putdown, “nevertheless, she
persisted,” at the end of her stump speeches, and
has scheduled a “conversation with women
leaders” Sunday in a Des Moines suburb.
SUZANNE KREITER/GLOBE STAFF
IOWA, Page A8
Pricey dorms
spur a divide
on campuses
SUSAN GOLDEN
Jerusha Hall has put
everything else on hold as
she searches for her son,
Aksil.
When her son was
late getting back
from a visit with his
dad, Jerusha Hall
wasn’t too worried.
But now she is
searching for them
both in Algeria and
finding mostly
dead ends.
GLOBE STAFF
On a hot Sunday morning in July, Jerusha
Hall walked her 3-year-old son, Aksil, outside
their Salem home to meet his father, who was
more than an hour late picking him up. Aksil
was unhappy. He never liked what they called
“the handoff” and wouldn’t take the bag she
had packed with his swimsuit and water toys.
Malik Benhamza didn’t say what he had
planned for the day, but Hall offered to let
him bring Aksil home a little later than usual
since he had gotten a slow start. He could
drop him off at 6:30 p.m., but no later.
As they climbed into Benhamza’s silver
Hyundai, Aksil looked back sadly at his mother as he waved goodbye.
Six-thirty came and went, but Hall, 44,
wasn’t too worried. Benhamza, her ex-husband who was allowed to see Aksil three days
KIDNAPPING, Page A10
Chill in the pair
Sunday: Clouds and sun.
High: 43-48. Low: 19-24.
Monday: Colder, sunny.
High: 31-36. Low: 26-31.
High tide: 11:15 a.m. 11:52 p.m.
Sunrise: 7:13 Sunset: 4:27
Complete report, A23.
VOL . 295, NO. 6
*
Suggested retail price
$5.00
The Globe music
critics have
turned their ears
to 2019 and
come up with
15 artists you
should hear.
Northeastern, Tufts offer
tiered options that may be
out of reach for some
By Shelley Murphy
11,000
children were
abducted internationally
between 2008 and 2017
from the United States. Many
never come home.
By Deirdre Fernandes
GLOBE STAFF
345
international
kidnapping cases were
At the newest residence hall for Northeastern
University students, kitchens come with stainless
steel appliances and granite countertops. Floorto-ceiling windows bathe rooms in sunshine, and
residents can exercise in a state-of-the-art fitness
center or study by a fireplace in the lobby.
The dorm room has gone upscale.
But when they open this fall, units at LightView Apartments will come at a price, one likely
out of reach for many low-income Northeastern
students or those on financial aid.
Run by a private developer, LightView re-
opened in 2017 by the State
Department.
3,500
More than
inquiries were fielded about
how to prevent international
parental child abduction.
40%
It was a nearly
increase from the year
before.
DORMS, Page A9
What the puffy coat says about us (we’re cold)
Is it a practical way to keep warm, a sign
you’ve given up, or a statement of power?
It can seem
like the
winter
uniform for
women in
Boston, but
what does
wearing a
puffy coat
mean?
SundayArts, N1.
Governor Charlie
Baker visited
businesses
affected by the
explosions in the
Merrimack Valley. Metro, B1.
Globe photographers discuss
their favorite
photos. Globe
Magazine.
C
By Beth Teitell
GLOBE STAFF
ome winter, there seem to
be just two kinds of women in Boston: those who
have succumbed to the
long, dark puffer coat, and
those who are naive enough to think
they can escape its clutches.
But live here long enough, and
you’ll learn that when the frump is
coming for you, it is coming for you.
It came for Nicole Russo the winter after Boston got 110.6 inches of
snow. “I was sitting there in my cute,
shiny silver jacket and I said,
‘Enough is enough,’ ” said Russo, 45,
a Boston hospitality and restaurant
publicist.
It came for Laura Hottleman, 48,
after she got tired of being cold. “I’m
buying it,” Hottleman, the owner of a
massage and chiropractic business
in the Financial District, told herself
several years ago. “You have your
hood on, you pull it tight, and no one
knows who you are anyway.”
DAVID L. RYAN/GLOBE STAFF
COATS, Page A11
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The World
B o s t o n
S u n d a y
JA N UA RY 6 , 2 0 1 9
G l o b e
Taiwan president rejects China’s unification talk
New tone likely
to be noticed
in Washington
By Chris Horton
NEW YORK TIMES
TAIPEI — President Tsai
Ing-wen of Taiwan on Saturday
called for domestic and international support of the island’s
de facto independence, days after China’s leader, Xi Jinping,
warned that unification with
China was inevitable.
“It is impossible for me or, in
my view, any responsible politician in Taiwan to accept President Xi Jinping’s recent remarks without betraying the
trust and the will of the people
of Taiwan,” Tsai said in a briefing for foreign reporters in Taipei, Taiwan’s capital.
“We hope the international
community will pay attention
and combine efforts to speak
out on our behalf,” she said.
Xi’s speech, his first major
address on Taiwan, has given
Tsai a chance to position herself
as the young democracy’s defender, both to the outside
world and to voters who will
decide next year whether she
stays in office. Her party was
battered in local elections in
November, but since Xi’s address, there has been a groundswell of support for her on Taiwan social media and even, to
some degree, in publications
that tend to oppose her.
Tensions between Taiwan
and Beijing, which claims the
self-governing island as part of
C h i n e s e t e r r i t o r y, h a v e
emerged as one of the region’s
flash points. Xi, the most powerful Chinese leader since Mao,
reiterated in his speech that
Beijing would use force if necessary to prevent Taiwan from
seeking formal independence.
Xi has been ramping up
pressure on Tsai’s administration over her refusal to accept
the so-called 1992 consensus —
a vague notion, accepted by
Tsai’s predecessor, that posits
that Taiwan and China are part
of the same country, with each
side allowed its own interpreta-
tion of what that China is.
In his speech, Xi urged Taiwan to avoid a “dead end” and
accept his offer of the “one
country, two systems” framework under which Hong Kong
has operated since Britain returned it to Chinese rule in
1997. But many people in Hong
Kong and elsewhere — not least
in Taiwan, where the situation
is closely watched — believe
that Hong Kong’s promised
freedoms have been eroding
under Xi’s rule.
“I myself expect all of Taiwan’s political parties to clearly
state, ‘We reject “one country,
two systems,” ’ ” Tsai said Saturday. “And there’s no need to talk
about the 1992 consensus anymore, because this term has already been defined by Beijing
as ‘one country, two systems.’ ”
Analysts said Tsai, both Saturday and in a speech Wednesday responding to Xi, had taken an unusually firm, unequivocal posture, marking a shift
away from the cautious ambiguity she had previously deployed, apparently in hopes of
avoiding unnecessary provocations.
Austin Wang, an assistant
professor of political science
at the University of Nevada
Las Vegas who studies Taiwan, said, “Tsai made a huge
shift from not publicly accept-
‘We hope the
international
community will
. . . combine efforts
to speak out on
our behalf.’
TSAI ING-WEN
President of Taiwan
ing the 1992 consensus to directly rejecting it.”
Taiwan’s opposition Kuomintang party, which once ruled
China, moved its government
to the island in 1949, having
lost the civil war to Mao’s Communists. Taiwan is still formal-
ly known as the Republic of
China, the name under which
the Kuomintang governed the
mainland.
The Kuomintang said
Thursday that it was opposed
to Taiwan independence — a
phrase it takes to mean the removal of vestiges of the Republic of China in favor of a Republic of Taiwan.
But even the Kuomintang,
which favors closer relations
with Beijing than does Tsai’s
Democratic Progressive Party,
said after Xi’s speech that a
Hong Kong-style arrangement
would not be supported by
most Taiwanese.
Tsai’s more assertive tone is
likely to be noticed in Washington. The United States broke
ties with Taiwan in 1979 in order to establish full relations
with Beijing. But Taiwan at that
time had been under martial
law for decades, and since it
embraced democracy in the
1990s, many in Washington
have seen it as a like-minded
partner, as well as a bulwark
against China’s influence.
The World
Today
POLAND
Fire kills 5 girls
in ‘escape room’
WARSAW — A faulty heating
system appeared to have
caused a fire at a house in
northern Poland where five
teenage girls died while locked
inside a recreational escape
room that was installed in the
rented dwelling, investigators
said Saturday. Firefighters in
the city of Koszalin found the
bodies of the 15-year-old victims Friday after they extinguished a fire in a room adjacent to the one the girls had entered while celebrating a
birthday. Autopsies showed the
girls died of carbon monoxide
asphyxiation, prosecutors said.
A 26-year-old man employed at
the location was hospitalized
with burns. Players in escape
room games are locked inside a
room or building and must
solve puzzles and find clues
that lead them to the key that
will unlock the door. (AP)
JA PA N
Tuna auction yields
record $3m bid
Troops sent
to protect
US assets
in Congo
The first tuna auction of the
year at Tokyo’s new fish market
set a high bar Saturday after a
restaurant chain paid a record
price — more that $3 million —
for a giant bluefin tuna. The
city’s famed Tsukiji fish market
was relocated to the new space,
in the Toyosu neighborhood,
late last year to make way for
the 2020 Olympics. The market
was well known for its predawn tuna auctions, a tradition
that is continuing at the new
location. The $5.3 billion enclosed, air-conditioned facility
at Toyosu is a far cry from the
grime and grit of Tsukiji, which
served as the city’s main fish
market for 83 years. Saturday’s
high bidder, Kiyoshi Kimura,
the self-styled “King of Tuna,”
runs the Sushi Zanmai chain of
restaurants. (New York Times)
By Mathilde Boussion
ASSOCIATED PRESS
KINSHASA, Congo — On
the eve of the first expected results of Congo’s long-delayed
presidential election, President
Trump said military personnel
had deployed to Central Africa
to protect US assets from possible ‘‘violent demonstrations,’’
while the country’s powerful
Catholic Church warned of a
popular ‘‘uprising’’ if untrue results are announced.
Congo faces what could be
its first democratic, peaceful
transfer of power since independence from Belgium in
1960, but election observers
and the opposition have raised
numerous concerns about voting irregularities as the country
chooses a successor to longtime
President Joseph Kabila.
The first results are expected
on Sunday, and the United
States and the African Union,
among others, have urged Congo to release results that reflect
the true will of the people. The
US has threatened sanctions
against those who undermine
the democratic process. Western election observers were not
invited to watch the vote.
While Congo has been largely calm on and after the Dec. 30
vote, Trump’s letter to House
Speaker Nancy Pelosi said
about 80 military personnel
and ‘‘appropriate combat
equipment’’ had deployed to
nearby Gabon to support the
security of US citizens and staffers and diplomatic facilities.
More will deploy as needed to
Gabon, Congo, or neighboring
Republic of Congo, he wrote.
The US ahead of the vote ordered ‘‘non-emergency’’ government employees and family
members to leave the country.
Congo’s ruling party backs
Kabila’s preferred candidate,
Emmanuel Ramazani Shadary
Leading opposition candidate Martin Fayulu, a businessman and lawmaker, has accused Congolese authorities of
impeding his campaign. His
campaign manager, Pierre
Lumbi, on Saturday accused
the electoral commission of being ‘‘in the process of postponing the publication of the results.’’
At stake is a vast country
rich in the minerals that power
the world’s mobile phones and
laptops, yet desperately underdeveloped. Some 40 million
people were registered to vote,
though at the last minute some
1 million voters were barred as
the electoral commission cited
a deadly Ebola virus outbreak.
Critics said that undermines
the election’s credibility.
The vote took place more
than two years behind schedule, while a court ruled that
Kabila could stay in office until
the vote was held. The delay led
to sometimes deadly protests as
authorities cracked down, and
Shadary is now under European Union sanctions for his role
in the crackdown as interior
minister at the time.
SERBIA
Fifth week of rallies
draws thousands
PHOTOS BY GUILLERMO ARIAS/AFP/GETTY IMAGES
Central American migrants at the El Barretal temporary shelter in Tijuana, Mexico, say that they’ll never go back.
On US border, migrants find community
Mexico moves to
offer alternatives
to immigration
By Paulina Villegas
NEW YORK TIMES
TIJUANA, Mexico — Life in
Tijuana’s largest migrant shelter has begun to take on the familiar rhythms and sounds of
a Central American neighborhood: Early in the morning,
adults rise and get ready to go
to work. Children dress for
school. Mothers gather huge
bundles of dirty clothes for the
day’s wash. Vendors hawk coffee.
“We are getting used to this
life,” said Norma Pérez, 40,
who left Honduras in a migrant caravan bound for the
United States about two
months ago with her 5-yearold son.
For weeks, the y walked
from Central America up to the
Mexican border with the United States, fleeing poverty and
violence. All along the way,
President Trump described the
migrants as a danger, as invaders trying to crash their way into the United States. But they
didn’t stop their trek north.
When they arrived at the
border, Tijuana was not ready
for them. The conditions were
deplorable, and the migrants
were surprised they would not
be able to apply for asylum
right away. Twice, groups of
migrants approached the border fence and were repelled by
border patrol agents using tear
gas and pepper spray.
But now, life for many of
the new arrivals has settled
down.
Mexico’s new president, Andrés Manuel López Obrador,
has begun to make good on
promises to create alternatives
to immigration, and he has
rolled out a plan to increase
wages along the US-Mexico
At El Barretal, the migrants have settled into life’s daily
routines of work, learning, and play.
border.
And the migrants themselves have begun to create a
sense of community in the
shelters here, like the city’s
largest, known as El Barretal.
They said they have no intention of turning back.
Trump “should personally
go to Honduras so he can see
with his own eyes that we simply can’t go back, that there are
no jobs, no companies, nothing,” Pérez said.
So she is settling in at El
Barretal, a concert venue
turned into a shelter where
tents are lined up in orderly
rows on the clean concrete
floor. For the thousands of migrants like her in El Barretal
and 18 other Tijuana shelters,
this is home — for now.
As she waits for her chance
to apply for asylum in the United States, Pérez has decided to
apply for a temporary humanitarian visa in Mexico. That will
let her find a job in Tijuana
and support herself and her
child for as long as necessary,
she said.
Around noon on most days,
English classes start inside a
small white tent with bright
blue carpets covering the con-
crete floor. Puzzle pieces are
spread on tables, along with
drawings and crayons. Posters
with names of colors hang on
the walls.
Darwin Bardales, an 18year-old Honduran, has been
working as a volunteer in the
shelter’s English school.
“It feels good to do something for the others, especially
the kids,” he said. “After all, we
are all in the same vulnerable
situation.”
The children usually take
classes in English and Spanish,
learning to read, to color, and
to eat healthy foods. On Friday,
the classes got a late start: The
arrival of donated teddy bears
and piñatas had the children’s
full attention until a female
voice boomed from the loudspeaker.
“Hello, everybody, it’s your
teacher!” the voice said. “It’s
time for class, kids!”
Adult migrants scattered
around the camp cheered in
response.
Food is cooked and distributed both by private aid
groups and by Mexican marines twice a day — rice, soup,
and sandwiches. It is a barebones existence, but friend-
ships have developed and at
least one wedding took place
in a downtown shelter.
Their first few days in Tijuana in November were chaotic,
and a bitter disappointment,
migrants said.
The Trump administration
had limited the number of asylum applicants that could be
seen in a day, separated parents from their children, sent
troops to patrol the frontier —
and even, starting last month,
shut down the federal government in a bid to get funding for
a border wall.
Housed initially in an openair sports complex, the migrants saw a torrential downpour turn the ground to mud
around their makeshift tents.
Children started to get sick
and adults grew dispirited.
But to many, those hardships felt temporary — and less
threatening than the conditions they had left at home.
And life at El Barretal is a definite step up from those first,
soaking days.
Elisabeth Ponce, 38, was
putting the last touches on her
makeup before she started her
day ’s work. She came from
Honduras and now has a job
inside the shelter, handing out
toiletries, medicine, and other
basic supplies.
She fled Honduras, like so
many others, fearing for her
life after being threatened by
criminal gangs.
Joining the caravan was a
drastic decision: It meant leaving behind her four children
and venturing outside her
countr y for the first time,
knowing she had no one to
help her if she ever got to the
United States.
Now she knows she may
never get the asylum she is applying for, and that crossing illegally is dangerous. But she
remains resolute.
“I am going to try, regardless,” she said.
BELGRADE — Thousands of
people braved snow and freezing temperatures in Serbia’s
capital to turn up for the fifth
week of street protests against
populist President Aleksandar
Vucic. The demonstrators
marched through downtown
Belgrade blowing whistles and
booing and jeering loudly as
they passed the Serbian presidency building Saturday. Some
carried Serbian flags and banners. The demonstrations started after thugs beat up an opposition leader in November, putting pressure on Vucic. (AP)
For the record
R Correction: Because of a reporting error, a story on Page
One of Saturday’s paper about
the sale of products treated
with potentially toxic flame retardants gave an incorrect timeline for product exemptions. If
Governor Charlie Baker signs
the bill, products manufactured
before June 1 will be exempt.
The Globe regrets the error.
The Globe welcomes
information about errors that
call for corrections.
Information may be sent to
comments@globe.com or left in
a message at 617-929-8230.
INDEX
Address.................................... H
Auctions & Antiques............. H8
Automotive............................... J
Bird Sightings......................A23
Books................................... N12
Business............................... B10
Editorials............................... K6
Ideas & Opinion.......................K
Letters.................................... K6
Lottery....................................B2
Magazine.......................... Inside
Metro........................................B
Movies....................................N9
Names.................................. B12
New England Travel............. M5
Obituaries............................ A22
Op-Ed Pages...........................K2
Pets.........................................H8
Sports....................................... C
Sunday Arts............................. N
This Day in History............. A23
Travel.......................................M
TV Listings.............................N8
Weather............................... A23
JA N UA RY 6 , 2 0 1 9
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JA N UA RY 6 , 2 0 1 9
Where should Arabic
be taught in France?
A debate simmers
Minister seeks to
expand lessons
in public schools
By Emma Bubola
NEW YORK TIMES
LASZLO BALOGH/GETTY IMAGES
Demonstrators in Budapest rallied Saturday against legislation introduced by Prime Minister Viktor Orban’s party.
Protesters decry Hungary’s ‘slave law’
Forced overtime
with delayed pay
drives outrage
By Marc Santora
and Benjamin Novak
NEW YORK TIMES
BUDAPEST — Gyula Radics
is not easily angered. When
Prime Minister Viktor Orban
rewrote the constitution to give
his party greater power, he
stayed on the sidelines. When
the party took over state media,
he was silent. And when the
government forced the internationally renowned Central European University out of Hungary, he did not join the protests.
But after Orban pushed
through legislation compelling
employees to work hundreds of
hours of overtime without full
or immediate compensation, he
had enough.
“Orban destroys lives and
families,” Radics said as he prepared to march with thousands
of protesters Saturday afternoon. A 39-year-old steelworker with five children, he traveled from Veszprem, an hour
outside of Budapest.
“This is all we have left,” he
said.
By this, he meant the streets.
Over the past eight years,
Orban has steadily used the instruments of a democratic state
to undermine nearly all checks
on his power.
After a sweeping victory in
April elections, his Fidesz party
again controls two-thirds of the
votes in Parliament, allowing it
to pass any legislation it likes.
Before breaking for winter recess, the party moved quickly to
pass two contentious measures.
One set up a parallel court
system, a move widely condemned as undermining the
rule of law. While legal experts
warned of the profound consequences of ceding control of the
judicial system to a political
party, it was another measure
— compelling workers to work
400 hours of overtime and allowing compensation to be delayed for three years — that fueled the most outrage.
The legislation, branded the
“slave law” by an uncharacteristically united opposition, has
spurred the most sustained protests since Orban entered office
in 2010.
Fidesz leaders were initially
dismissive of the anger.
Balazs Hidveghi, the party’s
director of communications,
families, students, and others,
the crowd cursed Orban as it
marched down Andrassy Boulevard. The street, lined with the
stately mansions that recall the
long-ago days of an empire, was
a sea of banners and signs Saturday.
Ferenc Rabi, president of a
union representing nearly
14,000 miners and industrial
workers, said people who might
have been too intimidated to
march in the past were simply
fed up.
“We have nothing else,” he
said. “Parliament does not listen to us. Fidesz does what it
wants. They control the state.”
While Orban’s grip on power
is secure and his party’s control
of the machinery of government complete, he is also well
‘We have nothing else. Parliament does
not listen to us. Fidesz does what it
wants. They control the state.’
FERENC RABI, a union president
used a familiar tactic as public
anger swelled: Blame George
Soros, the Hungarian-American philanthropist whom Orban has cast as the root of all
evil.
“The pro-migration Soros
network is behind the aggressive protests in Budapest,” Hidveghi said in a video statement
two days after the measure was
passed.
The party’s attitude has only
further enraged those taking to
the streets.
As scores of workers from an
array of unions — including
meatpackers, chemists, teachers, and metalworkers — joined
aware that protests can quickly
take on a life of their own and
prove the undoing of even the
most oppressive political systems.
He himself was once a firebrand, championing the cause
of democracy when Hungary
was under the thumb of the Soviet Union. In 2006, street protests rocked the country and
sent a previous government into a tailspin, fueling the rise of
Orban’s party.
In the last weeks of 2018,
when thousands of protesters
turned out to oppose Orban’s
increasingly dictatorial style,
his own government watched
warily.
Through its control of both
the state news media and most
private news outlets, it censored coverage of the movement, even as it spread from
the capital, Budapest, to the
countryside, where protests are
rare.
In Budapest, authorities allowed marchers to make their
way to the national television
headquarters and took a mostly
hands-off approach. Opposition
lawmakers were assaulted by
private security guards and
forcefully removed from the
headquarters of Hungary ’s
state-run broadcaster after attempting to read a list of demands on air.
For the most part, the police
presence, while large, has been
restrained.
In advance of this weekend’s
protests, the Budapest police
chief ordered a heightened
state of alert, allowing officers
to stop anyone, without suspicion, to check identification
and search personal belongings.
Still, thousands braved
wind, snow, and freezing temperatures Saturday to march
from Heroes Square in central
Budapest to the majestic Parliament building on the banks of
the Danube.
Laszlo Kordas, head of the
Hungarian Trade Union Confederation, which has 150,000
members, said that although
the political class and business
elite had long been able to steer
labor policies in their own direction, previous governments
had never attempted something so brazen.
“This is different now,” Kordas said. “We are preparing for
a strike.”
Avalanche fears close roads in Germany, Austria
By Frank Jordans
ASSOCIATED PRESS
B E R L I N — He av y s n o w
caused travel chaos in parts of
Germany and Austria as authorities closed roads and train
routes because of avalanche
danger and airports reported
weather-related cancellations
Saturday.
Munich Airport, Germany’s
second biggest, said 120 flights
were canceled and others were
delayed while workers cleared
runways of snow and removed
ice from planes.
German police said one person died and two people were
seriously injured when their car
skidded into oncoming traffic
on icy roads near the town of
Bad Toelz.
In Austria, training and the
qualification stage for the annual Four Hills ski jump tournament was canceled after more
than 20 inches of snow fell
overnight.
Authorities closed roads
around Bischofshofen, where
the competition is being held.
Austrian railway company
OeBB said several train connections in the country were suspended due to the avalanche
risk.
Salzburg regional authorities warned against off-trail skiing, adding that ‘‘many large,
several very large avalanches
ROMAINVILLE, France —
Early on Sunday mornings,
Habiba Hatem, 9, prepares her
own breakfast, grabs her flashy
pink school bag, and jumps into
her father’s car — bound for
Arabic lessons at her local
mosque in a suburb north of
Paris.
Colorful sketches of how to
perform ritual washings decorate the walls of the classroom,
along with drawings of butterflies, cars, and carrots, with
their Arabic names underneath.
“Today we are going to do a
dialogue about ‘duyuf’ coming
for dinner,” the teacher tells
Habiba and a dozen other boys
and girls ages 9 to 17, all born
i n Fr a n c e . “ D u y u f m e a n s
guests,” she says, writing the
word on the blackboard.
Habiba’s grandparents came
from Tunisia in the 1960s, and
her father believes it is important that his child stays connected to her roots.
But the public school she attends does not offer Arabic
classes, so she makes the weekly trip to the mosque in Romainville, a part of the SeineSaint-Denis department north
of Paris, which is home to a
large immigrant community.
The Hatem family’s situation is a common one in France.
About 3 million people use
Arabic on a daily basis in
France, making it the country’s
most spoken foreign language,
according to the Culture Ministry. But Arabic is barely taught
in public schools, so mosques
and private associations have
stepped in to address this educational gap.
Now, the government is
growing worried about an increasing number of students
learning Arabic outside the
state’s oversight.
As part of France’s fight
against extremism, the Education Ministry announced in
September a plan to take back
control of Arabic teaching “in
order to provide a secular curriculum rather than the one offered by associations, which
can drift toward radicalization,”
a ministry spokeswoman said.
Jean-Michel Blanquer, the
education minister, says he
wants to give Arabic “prestige,”
as it is “a great literary language.”
The ministry’s plan is causing particular alarm on the political right. Luc Ferry, a former
education minister, suggested
that the measure was tanta-
Fiery Paris protest
met with tear gas
First yellow vest
event of 2019
By Milos Krivokapic
ASSOCIATED PRESS
MATTHIAS SCHRADER/ASSOCIATED PRESS
A ski tourist removed snow from a car in Vilzmoos, Austria, on Saturday.
are likely in the afternoon and
overnight’’ that could affect
roads and rail lines.
Austrian public broadcaster
ORF reported that the small village of St. Johann was evacuated because authorities feared
strong winds could trigger a
large avalanche. Meanwhile,
some 600 residents and tourists
were stuck in the village of
Soelktal following a road closure, the station reported.
Innsbruck airport said ‘‘current weather conditions have
caused major restrictions in air
traffic’’ and urged travelers to
check their flight status before
heading to the airport.
Significant snowfall is forecast for southern Germany,
Austria, and Switzerland in
coming days.
Separately, authorities in
Greece reported travel disruptions due to snowfall in the
north of the country.
mount to allowing Islamism in
public schools.
Nicolas Dupont-Aignan, a
right-wing lawmaker who endorsed Marine Le Pen in the
2017 presidential election, said,
“With the pretext of fighting
against fundamentalism, Blanquer is paving the way to the Islamization of France.”
But many leaders in the Arabic community support the Education Ministry’s plan.
Azzedine Benjemaa, president of the Muslim association
at the mosque where Habiba attends classes, said the public
school classes would be of higher quality than religious ones.
The Quran-based courses at the
mosque, he said, can rely too
heavily on memorization rather
than allowing students to express themselves.
“Our professors have a lot of
passion and good will, but they
are not trained teachers,” Benjemaa said. “They didn’t pass national exams.”
Habiba’s class at the mosque
starts with a prayer. That is not
how lessons begin at the Claude
Monet High School in the 13th
arrondissement of Paris, one of
the few French public schools
offering Arabic.
Here, the teacher opens the
lesson by using LinkedIn to
show students how many jobs
are open to them if they speak
Arabic. One student, Imène, 13,
used to learn Arabic at the
Grand Mosque of Paris but
stopped going once she started
taking classes in her public
middle school.
Marianne Cossé, the school’s
principal, said offering Arabic
prevented families with Arab
origins from sending their children into the hands of people
who could “radicalize” them.
“Offering secular Arabic
classes in public school prevents the language from becoming the hostage of religion
or extremism,” she said.
That position is supported
by a report on the spread of political Islam in France by the Institut Montaigne, a policy research think tank. “Arabic classes have become the best means
for Islamists to attract young
people into their mosques and
schools,” the report states.
But many argue that the
government’s rhetoric around
the new policy sometimes dangerously conflates the Arabic
language, Islam, political Islam,
and religious fundamentalism.
“While the education minister underlines that learning Arabic at school celebrates Arabic
culture and civilization, this decision is mainly taken in the
name of the fight against Islamist radicalization,” said Sarah
Mazouz, a researcher at the
state-run National Center for
Scientific Research.
PARIS — French security
forces fired tear gas and flashbang ammunition at protesters
during a march through picturesque central Paris on Saturday as several thousand supporters of the yellow vest
movement kept up pressure on
President Emmanuel Macron
with the first action of 2019.
A riverboat restaurant
moored below the clashes on
the Left Bank of the Seine River caught fire. Smoke and tear
gas wafted above the Orsay
Museum and the gold dome of
the French Academy as riot police, nearly invisible at the
start, moved front and center
when protesters deviated from
an officially approved path.
Police boats patrolled the
river while beyond the Seine,
motorcycles and a car were set
on fire on the Boulevard Saint
Germain, a main Left Bank
thoroughfare. Riot police and
firefighters moved in, and barricades mounted in the middle
of the wide street also glowed
in orange flames.
The march on the eighth
consecutive Saturday of yellow
vest protests had been dec l a r e d i n a d va n c e a n d a p proved, in contrast to some illegal December demonstrations.
The atmosphere mostly was
calm, but turned when some
protesters tried to cross the river on a pedestrian bridge not
on the official route from City
Hall to the National Assembly,
the lower house of parliament.
Police used clubs and tear gas,
then held the bridge in a standoff while violence broke out.
Confrontations between police and protesters took place
in other cities around France,
with tear gas fired in Bordeaux
and in Rouen. No official figures have been issued for the
number of protesters who
turned out around France or in
Paris. BFMTV, quoting several
police sources, estimated the
number of protesters in the
French capital in midafternoon at 3,500.
Protesters were looking to
breathe new life into the yellow vest movement as numbers of participants fell since
the first Saturday protest in
mid-November. They reiterated their call for Macron, denounced as the president of
the rich, to resign.
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US, Israel to discuss Syria timetable
Bolton to provide
Netanyahu with
drawdown update
By Zeke Miller
ASSOCIATED PRESS
T E L AV I V — T h e W h i t e
House has sent national security adviser John Bolton on a mission to allay Israel’s concerns
about President Trump’s decision to withdraw US troops
from Syria.
The pullout announced before Christmas was initially expected to be completed within
weeks, but the timetable has
slowed as the president acceded
to requests from aides, allies,
and members of Congress for a
more orderly drawdown.
Bolton planned to meet with
Israel’s prime minister, Benjamin Netanyahu, and other offi-
cials on Sunday before traveling
to Turkey. Israeli officials have
expressed alarm that a swift
withdrawal of the roughly
2,000 troops could enable Iran
to expand its influence and
presence in Syria, wracked by a
long civil war and the Islamic
State militancy.
Trump’s move has raised
fears about clearing the way for
a Turkish assault on Kurdish
fighters in Syria who have
fought alongside American
troops against ISIS extremists.
Turkey considers the Kurdish
People’s Protection Units a terrorist group linked to an insurgency within its own borders.
A Trump administration official told reporters traveling
with Bolton that Bolton intended to discuss the pace of the
drawdown, as well as American
troop levels in the region. Bolton was expected to explain
that some US troops based in
Syria to fight ISIS will shift to
Iraq with the same mission and
that some American forces may
remain at a key military outpost in al-Tanf, in southern Syria, to counter growing Iranian
activity in the region.
Bolton also was to convey
the message that the United
States will be ‘‘very supportive’’
of Israeli strikes against Iranian
targets in Syria, according to
the official, who was not authorized to publicly discuss Bolton’s plans before the meetings
and spoke on condition of anonymity to preview the talks.
Bolton warned Syria’s president, Bashar Assad, not to use
the US drawdown as a pretext
to use chemical weapons
against Syrians, saying there is
‘‘no change’’ to the US position
that their use is a ‘‘red line.’’
‘‘We’ve tried twice through
ASSOCIATED PRESS
MOSCOW — Russia’s deputy foreign minister brushed
back suggestions Saturday
that an American being held
in Moscow on suspicion of
spying could be exchanged for
a Russian citizen.
Paul Whelan, a former US
Marine who also holds Canadi-
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an, British, and Irish citizenship, was detained in Moscow
in late December. His arrest
has led to speculation that
Russia could be using him to
bargain for Marina Butina, a
Russian who pleaded guilty to
acting as a foreign agent in the
United States.
But Deputy Foreign Minister Sergei Ryabkov said that
discussing a possible swap involving Whelan and Butina
would be premature because
Whelan hasn’t been formally
charged, according to Russian
news agencies.
‘‘As to the possibility of exchanges of one sort or another,
it’s impossible and incorrect to
consider the question now
when an official charge hasn’t
even been presented,’’ Ryabkov
was quoted as saying by state
news agency RIA-Novosti.
Some Russian news reports
earlier cited unnamed sources
as saying Whelan had been indicted on espionage charges
that carry a possible prison
sentence of 20 years.
Officials haven’t given details of Whelan’s suspected activities and he was initially
identified only as an American. His concurrent Canadian,
British, and Irish citizenships
became known on Friday.
US Ambassador Jon Huntsman Jr. visited Whelan on
Wednesday in Moscow’s Lefortovo Prison, a 130-year-old facility noted for strict conditions. Britain, Canada, and
Ireland have applied for consular access to him.
The Foreign Ministry said
Saturday it was also seeking
information about a Russian
who was arrested Dec. 29 in
Saipan in the Northern Mariana Islands, a United States
commonwealth in the Pacific.
In a statement, the ministry said Sergei Makarenko was
sent to the US state of Florida
after his arrest and it wants
consular access to him.
UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO MEDICINE PHOTOS VIA AP
Daru Smith and Sarah McPharlin each received a heart,
liver, and kidney at University of Chicago Medicine.
Organ recipients have new
lease on life, new friendship
By Amanda Seitz
ASSOCIATED PRESS
CHICAGO — A suburban
Detroit woman and South Side
Chicago man are recovering in
a Chicago hospital following
rare triple transplant surgeries
that gave them the healthy
heart, liver, and kidney each
needed — and a new friendship
they never expected.
University of Chicago Medicine doctors announced Friday
that they successfully completed the triple organ transplants
on Sarah McPharlin, a 29-yearold woman from Grosse Pointe
Woods, Mich., and Daru Smith,
a 29-year-old father from Chicago, within 30 hours of one another.
McPharlin had two transplants canceled earlier in the
year, pushing back her surgery.
‘‘Maybe because it’s only
luck that both of those transplants were supposed to be at
the same time,’’ Nir Uriel, the
director of heart failure, transplant, and mechanical circulatory support for the hospital,
said at a news conference Friday. University of Chicago Medicine has performed the most
heart-liver-kidney transplants
in the world.
Just eight minutes after a
medical team finished Smith’s
liver transplant on Dec. 20, hospital staff learned that donor
o r g a n s w e r e av a i l a b l e f o r
McPharlin. Smith, who finished
surgery that day, became only
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the 16th person in the US to undergo a heart-liver-kidney
transplant and hours later on
Dec. 21 McPharlin became the
17th. Each surgery required a
22-person team, with some
staffers working on both.
Smith and McPharlin, who
had her first heart transplant at
the age of 12, arrived at the Chicago hospital in November. Neither knew they were both seeking a triple transplant when
they first met during pre-therapy sessions ahead of surgery.
The sessions were quiet and patients didn’t share details about
their transplants. But McPharlin’s mother, who quit her job as
a school teacher in Michigan to
be with her daughter for treatment, pried out of Smith that
he was awaiting the same organs as McPharlin.
‘‘It’s been mind-blowing and
amazing, having someone go
through the process with me
gave me more motivation,’’
Smith, a truck driver, said during a video interview at the hospital Friday.
The pair, who are recovering
on the same hospital floor,
share walks and give each other
high-fives when they pass one
another in the hallways. Their
families are already planning a
dinner together in the city once
the two are released and feeling
better. Nurses say they notice a
difference in recovery for the
two compared to other transplant patients, because they
have gone through the same
unusual and debilitating surgery together. McPharlin and
Smith notice too.
‘‘It was so cool to know we
would be able to see each other
progress together,’’ McPharlin,
an occupational therapist, said
Friday. ‘‘It was really cool to see
how Daru was getting up in the
hall and I knew eventually, or
pretty soon, I would be doing
the same.’’
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davis square
the use of military force to demonstrate to the Assad regime
the use of chemical weapons is
not acceptable,’’ Bolton said
while en route to Israel. ‘‘And if
they don’t heed the lessons of
those two strikes, the next one
will be more telling.’’
Trump’s announcement
about the intended troop withdrawal was greeted by surprise
and condemnation from many
US lawmakers and allies, and
prompted the resignation of
Defense Secretary Jim Mattis
and the US special envoy for the
anti-ISIS coalition in protest.
Joining Bolton in Turkey
will be the chairman of the
Joint Chiefs of Staff, General Joseph Dunford. In meetings with
Turkey’s president, Recep Tayyip Erdogan, and other officials, they are expected to warn
against an offensive targeting
the Kurdish fighters in Syria.
Russia says spy suspect
swap talk is premature
By Jim Heintz
Access your Globe account online at bostonglobe.com/subscriber
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JA N UA RY 6 , 2 0 1 9
Shutdown’s toll on science could stretch for years
Pence cites
‘productive’ talks
with staffers
By Alan Blinder
NEW YORK TIMES
One of the first sessions of
the American Meteorological
Society’s annual conference in
Phoenix this weekend seemed
like just the sort to attract plenty of government scientists:
“Building Resilience to Extreme
Political Weather: Advice for
Unpredictable Times.”
But the conference, where
more than 700 federal employees had been expected, will
have few federal scientists in attendance. Many are barred
from participating during the
partial government shutdown,
just one of the numerous consequences for the science community during the capital’s latest
spending standoff.
“It’s a huge opportunity
lost,” said Daniel A. Sobien,
p r e s i d e n t o f t h e Na t i o n a l
Weather Service Employees Organization and a forecaster in
the agency’s office near Tampa,
Fla.
The shutdown, now in its
third week, has emptied some
laboratories across the country,
forced scientists from the field,
upended important scientific
conferences, imperiled the flow
of grant money, and disrupted
careful planning for future
studies, some of which are
time-sensitive.
In Washington on Saturday,
congressional aides met with
White House officials under the
leadership of Vice President
Mike Pence to discuss a resolution to the shutdown. Pence described the session as ‘‘productive’’ on Twitter, although no
breakthrough was reached. The
White House aides and Democratic and Republican staffers
planned to return to the talks
on Sunday.
Meanwhile, the science is on
hold. “We’re not collecting data,” said Leland S. Stone, an area vice president of the International Federation of Professional and Technical Engineers,
which represents many federal
scientists. “And we’re not analyzing the data and we’re not
able to make the advances that
we’re paid to do.”
Stone, who works at a NASA
center in California and studies
how humans perform in challenging conditions, added:
“Most taxpayers don’t want to
pay taxes and not get the progress they’re paying for. Is it the
end of the universe? Is it the
end of America as we know it?
No. But is it pointless? Is it
avoidable?”
The impasse, current and
former officials said, will eventually show in shutdown-size
gaps in data that scientists often collect across generations.
Time-sensitive observations,
which are impossible to recover
or re-create, are going unseen
and unrecorded.
“It’s not just the gap,” said
Sally Jewell, who was secretary
of the interior during the 16day shutdown in 2013. “It’s the
ability to correlate that with a
broader picture of what’s happening environmentally and
Pay raises put on hold
ASSOCIATED PRESS
TASOS KATOPODIS/GETTY IMAGES
Vice President Mike Pence and other administration
officials left a meeting on the partial shutdown.
ecologically. It really does mess
things up.”
The current shutdown has
not affected every part of the
government’s sprawling science
apparatus because some agencies, including the Centers for
Disease Control and Prevention
and the National Institutes of
Health, were entirely or mostly
funded through other legislation. The Department of Energy, which runs the nation’s nuclear laboratories, is similarly
unaffected.
But many other agencies
have closed or slowed down.
The National Oceanic and At-
mospheric Administration,
which includes the National
We a t h e r S e r v i c e , h a s f u r loughed many workers. The
Fish and Wildlife Service’s offices are mostly empty, and the
National Park Service has few
employees on the job. Almost
all employees at the Environmental Protection Agency and
NASA have been furloughed.
Some scientific work has
continued at agencies that were
otherwise mostly closed. NASA,
for instance, is still undertaking
its “tracking, operation, and
support” of the International
Space Station, and the Fish and
WASHINGTON — Federal agencies have been directed to hold off enacting pay
raises for top administration officials during a government shutdown that has
left hundreds of thousands
of federal workers without
pay.
The guidance was issued
Friday in a memo from Margaret Weichert, the acting
director of the Office of Personnel Management.
The raises were the result
of a pay freeze for top federal officials, including the
vice president and cabinet
secretaries, that was on the
verge of expiring because of
the shutdown.
In the memo, Weichert
writes that, ‘‘In the current
Wildlife Service’s shutdown
contingency plan called for
some animal caretakers to report for work.
But rank-and-file scientists
said the shutdown was exacting
a gradual toll that might not be
fully realized for several years,
affecting research, morale, and,
perhaps, the recruitment of
prospective employees.
Current and former government scientists expressed concerns about the fates of environmental maintenance efforts,
like prescribed burns that help
prime habitats and prevent
wildfires, and research projects,
absence of Congressional
guidance,’’ OPM ‘‘believes it
would be prudent for agencies to continue to pay these
senior political officials at
the frozen rate until appropriations legislation is enacted that would clarify the
status of the freeze.’’
White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders had said earlier Friday
that the administration was
‘‘aware of the issue’’ and ‘‘exploring options to prevent
this from being implemented while some federal workers are furloughed.’’
President Trump had also told reporters at a press
conference that he ‘‘might
consider’’ asking Cabinet
secretaries and other top officials to forgo the raises.
such as wildlife counts, that
had been planned from oceans
to tundras. They also worried
about any curtailing of monitoring efforts for diseases.
“A shutdown has these cascading effects on the scientific
work of the organization,” said
Daniel M. Ashe, a former director of the Fish and Wildlife Service. “They’re hard to foresee or
predict right now, but they’re
crippling, really, and they affect
the organization not for three
or four weeks, but for the rest of
the year because of all of this
complex orchestration of field
work.”
In Iowa, women
hopeful, yet wary
about Warren
uIOWA
Continued from Page A1
For many female Democrats
here, it is thrilling to see another woman candidate take the
stump after the disappointment they felt when Hillary
Clinton lost the presidential
election to Donald Trump in
2016. But some of the voters
who have eagerly greeted Warren said they still feel a sense of
anxiety and frustration about
the double standards they believe women politicians face,
despite the gains of the #MeToo movement and the remarkable events of the past
few years.
“It wasn’t in 2016. Is it going to be 2020? 2024?” wondered Elaine Hansen, 55, who
lined up early to see Warren in
Sioux City. As much as she
wants a woman to be presi-
‘She doesn’t mince
words. Some
people aren’t
going to like that
— like men.’
LISA KOCH
Attorney and Warren supporter
dent, Hansen said, “I’m not
sure the culture is going to
change.”
And some of the same voters who embraced Warren’s
willingness to take on maledominated institutions like big
banks and the Trump administration — and wanted to vote
for her because of it — said
they worried those qualities
might turn others off.
“A ny o n e w h o’s a s t r o n g
woman appreciates her directness, her candor,” said Lisa
Koch, 48, an attorney and Warren supporter who attended
the first campaign event in
Council Bluffs. But, Koch added, “I just wonder if it’s going
t o b a c k f i r e s o m e h o w. S h e
doesn’t mince words. Some
people aren’t going to like that
— like men.”
There is reason for optimism among women voters.
They helped power Democratic
gains in the House in the 2018
midterms by electing women
candidates who proudly put
their status as working women, mothers, and wives on dis-
play. The 2020 campaign is already expected to yield a historic field of female
candidates, with senators Kamala Harris, Kirsten Gillibrand, Amy Klobuchar, and
others eyeing the race in addition to Warren.
“Is gender a plus this time? I
think it’s a great thing that we
potentially have four or five
women running,” said Anita
Dunn, a longtime Democratic
strategist. But gender bias,
Dunn added, is “going to be a
challenge, not just for Senator
Warren, but for every one of
the women talking about the
presidency right now.”
Part of the challenge for
women presidential candidates, analysts said, is that the
history of top female presidential candidates is limited to the
loss by Clinton, which was particularly galling to many voters
because Trump was caught on
tape joking about sexually assaulting women.
Jennifer Lawless, a professor of politics at the University
of Virginia, said there remains
a widespread perception that
sexism cost Clinton votes.
“There are going to be a key
group of women out there who
believe we’re still not ready to
elect a woman president, and
there are going to be people
that have a knee-jerk reaction
to Warren and will automatically compare her to Clinton,”
she said.
Warren is attempting to
combat that challenge both directly and subtly. She frequently evokes her 2012 Senate race
against Scott Brown, where she
used to tell girls at campaign
events that she was running
“because that’s what girls do.”
Brown had roundly beaten
Martha Coakley two years earlier and was widely viewed as
an affable Republican. But her
v i c t o r y, Wa r r e n s u g ge s t s ,
proves she knows how to beat
a man.
“We’re used to being compared to any woman that ever
lost an election,” Warren’s campaign said in one e-mail dispatch this week.
Warren is just one of several
female candidates who are
likely to seize on the rush of
protest and anger from women
fueled by Trump and further
fed by the Republicans’ defense of Judge Bre tt Kavanaugh after he was accused
PHOTOS BY SCOTT OLSON/GETTY IMAGES
Senator Elizabeth Warren greeted an overflow crowd Saturday in Storm Lake, Iowa. She also spoke in Sioux City (below).
of sexual assault.
“It’s time for women to go to
Washington and fix our broken
government, and that includes
a woman at the top,” Warren
said in September when she
first announced she was considering running.
Here in Iowa, Warren’s appearances drew lines around
the block and an entourage of
staff and media following her
every move. Her speeches center on her core messages of
economic inequality and corruption — not gender — and
she ties her economic philosophies to a modest upbringing
in Oklahoma.
“I am willing to say to the
rich and powerful, ‘You’ve got
to pony up your fair share,’ ”
Warren said in Sioux City.
She received a rousing reception from Iowans who admire her economic populism,
but also faced questions about
her decision to release results
of a DNA test showing a small
amount of Native American
ancestry.
On Saturday morning, one
voter asked her why she gave
Tr u m p , w h o h a s w i d e l y
mocked Warren’s claims, “fodder to be a bully.”
Warren said she was not
claiming to be “a person of color . . . a citizen of a tribe,” but
rather that she simply needed
to “put it all out there.” Making
a rare mention of Trump on
the stump, Warren said, “I
can’t stop him from hurling racial insults, I don’t have the
power to do that.”
For Katey Namanny, a high
school student from Sioux City,
it was Warren’s ancestry claim,
not her gender, that makes her
skeptical the Massachusetts
Democrat is electable. Namanny noted women have already
shown they can win more votes
than men: “Hillary Clinton
won by 2 or 3 million,” she
said.
Gender dynamics are shifting in Iowa politics, too. Last
fall, voters for the first time
elected a woman governor —
Republican Kim Reynolds —
and first ever female US representatives, Democrats Abby
Finkenauer and Cindy Axne.
“I think that the women’s
march was really sort of a turning point,” said Jennifer Konfrst, elected to the Iowa House
in 2018 after losing two years
earlier. Still, she said, any female candidate will face a double standard.
“Whether or not it makes it
harder for her to win is a question I don’t know the answer
to,” Konfrst said.
Others said Warren this
week reminded them of their
own experiences with sexism.
Candella Foley-Finchem, 45, a
therapist from Glenwood, Iowa, recalled facing gendered
insults when she was awarded
a prestigious scholarship.
“ Pe o p l e w h o c a l l e d m e
‘brassy’ will call her ‘brassy,’ ”
Foley-Finchem said of Warren,
who remains her first choice.
“I don’t have any reservations
about supporting a female candidate, because eventually we
will have a female president.”
Jess Bidgood can be reached at
Jess.Bidgood@globe.com.
Follow her on Twitter
@jessbidgood.
B o s t o n
JA N UA RY 6 , 2 0 1 9
S u n d a y
G l o b e
The Region
A9
Student housing debate over income, inequality
uDORMS
Continued from Page A1
quires an annual lease that
makes it more expensive than
traditional campus housing
with eight-month terms: beginning at $16,008 a year for a
shared room, and $19,068 for a
single, compared to $12,504 for
the most expensive on-campus
shared dorm, and $14,698 for a
single. Meanwhile, students on
full financial aid at Northeastern receive about $15,660 for
room and board, leaving them
far short of LightView’s annual
costs.
“This is luxury-style housing,” said Nick Boyd, 22, a senior at Northeastern studying
electrical engineering and
member of the Northeastern
Housing Justice Coalition.
“They should be building housing at price points that students
across the income spectrum
can afford.”
But Northeastern officials
hail LightView as a major saving because the costs were
shouldered by a private company, one of the first such partnerships between local universities
and developers. The apartments are proving popular
among juniors and seniors;
nearly 85 percent of the 825
beds are already leased.
“This novel approach means
that the university didn’t have
to spend in excess of $100 million to build a new residence
hall,” said Michael Armini,
Northeastern’s senior vice presi d e n t f o r e x t e r n a l a ff a i r s .
“Those funds can now be invested in our core mission of
teaching, research, and providing even more financial aid.”
Across the country, universities facing financial constraints
and pressure to cater to higherincome students are increasingly turning to these private partnerships. Institutions can also
make additional money charging for amenities such as airconditioning, kitchens, and
views of the city.
Critics argue this stratification of university housing
erodes one of the key aspira-
tions of higher education: to
create environments where the
students live with and learn
from peers of diverse backgrounds and incomes and take
those lessons after they graduate into wider society. Instead,
they argue, universities are
building communities of haves
and have-nots, mirroring the
income divides that have split
much of the country in recent
years, sparking conflict and
fraying common bonds.
“There is reason to think it
was an equal experience when
the campus housing was much
more homogenous,” said Kevin
McClure, an assistant professor
at the University of North Carolina Wilmington, who has studied university partnerships
with private developers.
At Tufts University this coming fall, students will no longer
pay a flat rate for housing. Instead, the university is offering
multiple tiers, ranging from
$8,220 to $10,220 for the academ ic year, depe nding on
whether it’s a single, has a
kitchen, is apartment style or
newer construction. Tufts officials said the university is following the example of many
peers, including Boston Univers i t y, B a b s o n C o l l e g e , a n d
George Washington University,
but students on the Medford
campus have been protesting
the move.
“It seems to be classist, with
rich kids staying in the nicer
housing, but the poor kids staying in other housing,” said Mauri Trimmer, 22, a junior anthropology major at Tufts. “We understand the tiered housing is
like the market setup, but a university should be trying to create the best possible world.”
Several area schools are exploring partnerships similar to
Northeastern’s deal with American Campus Communities, an
Austin, Texas-based student
housing developer. ACC built
the $153.4 million LightView
on Northeastern land that it
leases from the school just off
campus on Columbus Avenue.
Suffolk University and the Uni-
A Northeastern
residence hall
run by a private
developer will
open in the fall.
NATHAN KLIMA FOR THE BOSTON GLOBE
versity of Massachusetts Amherst are also in discussions
with ACC. UMass Boston’s first
dormitory, which opened last
fall, was built under a publicprivate partnership.
These partnerships allow
universities to provide more
housing options without taking
on additional debt, McClure
said. The buildings tend to be
close to campus and offer appealing amenities, he said, but
charge slightly higher rents.
And in cases where developers pay the upfront costs and
control the building, they can
dictate rent levels in order to recoup their investments, McClure said.
Students with less money,
McClure added, may be left to
choose between more barebones residence halls or cheaper off-campus housing farther
from campus.
“My fear is what we’re seeing
is a steady uptick in pricing for
housing,” he said. “It’s kind of
an upscaling effect. You start to
create pockets of affluence
around campus that only certain students can take part in it.”
Housing has long been central to the college experience,
with many institutions controlling where and with whom students, particularly freshmen
and sophomores, spend their
out-of-class time.
Some don’t allow students to
choose roommates, to ensure
they mix with peers from a variety of perspectives, places, income levels, and races. Some
schools reserve floors or entire
buildings for students studying
the same subjects, to foster networks and support systems that
can help them succeed academically.
“It’s the informal part of
learning,” said Bob Gonyea, associate director of the Indiana
University Center for Postsecondary Research, who has studied student engagement.
But colleges also need housing that will attract and retain
students, Gonyea said, and that
will make money to help fund
education and services.
“ You want students to be
satisfied, you want to give them
choices. On the other hand, you
want them to learn and have
different experiences,” Gonyea
said. “There’s always been a
tension.”
Tufts officials said they considered the effect on campus
culture and the university’s
mission as they debated switching to tiered housing. But the
university wants to add 600
more beds and update its existing dormitories to entice students back on campus from the
surrounding residential neighborhoods, said James Glaser,
Tufts dean for the school of arts
and sciences.
T he ne w plan would increase housing costs for some
Tufts students anywhere from
$285 to $1,485, depending on
their living arrangement. Tufts
expects that tiered prices, along
with new beds on campus, will
yield millions of dollars more
annually.
The university does plan to
increase financial aid so lowerincome students can access the
pricier units with kitchens and
other amenities, Glaser said.
“We do not want to have a
stratified campus,” he said “We
really do try to make valuesbased decisions; we try to make
financial-based decisions too.”
The variety of housing, universities say, also gives students
more choices. Northeastern’s
options range from traditional
dorms to pricier, apartmentstyle suites with kitchens and
more privacy.
Undergraduate tuition and
fees c urrently run around
$51,000, and food plans vary,
from as little as $445 for a small
block of meals to $7,940 a
school year for the top plan.
The university also provides
$280 million a year in financial
aid, mostly based on need.
“We are creating equity,”
said Robert Reddy, Northeastern dean of student financial
services. “We have housing options that we think are livable,
that aren’t substandard that we
can offer students. . . . Is it any
university’s responsibility in
some senses to subsidize to a
level they [the students] want
to be subsidized at? The business we’re in is to provide access to education and that includes living somewhere, in a
standard that is livable.”
LightView is also an effort
by Northeastern to steer juniors
and seniors away from residential neighborhoods where they
contribute to Boston’s everhigher housing costs.
American Campus Communities consulted with Northeastern on LightView and held
focus groups to determine what
students wanted, said ACC senior vice president Jason Wills.
Early indications are that
ACC succeeded. The building is
nearly full, with only about 120
beds still available, all in the
lower-cost shared rooms, Wills
said.
While the annual cost of
LightView is more expensive
than campus options, on a
monthly basis its rents are comparable and even cheaper than
Northeastern’s, Wills said.
“Our goal is to have the communities full,” he said. “I don’t
think they’re overpriced . . .
We’re very focused on affordability and maintaining occupancy.”
Seth Freedman, a 19-yearold sophomore and chemistry
major, said he and his roommates could get lower-cost
housing in Mission Hill about a
mile from campus. But LightView’s proximity to campus and
association with the university,
its amenities, as well as ACC’s
offer to find someone to rent his
room if he decides to do a semester-long internship outside
Boston next year, were too appealing.
“It’s going to be the nicest
housing that I’ll be living in,”
Freedman said. “It’s just a oney e a r l e as e , s o I d e c i d ed t o
splurge.”
Deirdre Fernandes
can be reached at
deirdre.fernandes@globe.com.
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A10
The Region
B o s t o n
S u n d a y
G l o b e
JA N UA RY 6 , 2 0 1 9
‘He was
taken from
everything
he has ever
known,
without a
single thing
of comfort,
not a stuffed
animal, not
anything,
and for all
my son
knows I
abandoned
him. . . .
He needs to
know I have
not left him.’
JERUSHA HALL
SUZANNE KREITER/GLOBE STAFF
A mother’s quest to find her son
uKIDNAPPING
Continued from Page A1
a week, texted that he was having car trouble.
But as the hours passed with no sign of him,
her fear grew. Around 9:30 p.m, he texted that
his phone was dying. She called the police. They
went to his East Boston apartment, but no one
was home.
The next day, police traced Benhamza’s cellphone to JFK International Airport in New York.
Officers showed up at Hall’s door, sat her down,
and broke the news: Her ex-husband, a native of
Algeria, had boarded a flight to his homeland
with their son. Despite a court order barring either parent from traveling out-of-state with Aksil
without the other’s permission, Benhamza had
obtained an Algerian passport for the boy at the
Algerian Consulate in New York and left the
country.
The FBI launched an investigation, and the
US attorney’s office in Boston charged Benhamza, 33, with international kidnapping.
Six months later, Hall hasn’t seen or heard
from her son. She has run into dead end after
dead end here, and confronted studiously unresponsive officials in Algeria where she has spent
months trying to rally support for her cause and
persuade someone, anyone, of influence to connect her again with Aksil.
The absence of a sense of urgency about the
case is baffling to her: Why would anyone run
cover for a kidnapper? And when she thinks of
her boy, she can’t help but imagine the worst —
that he is hurting and thinks she doesn’t care.
“He was taken from everything he has ever
known, without a single thing of comfort, not a
stuffed animal, not anything, and for all my son
knows I abandoned him,” Hall said during a
Skype interview from Algeria. “I just need to see
my son. He needs to know I have not left him.”
It’s terrifying not knowing where Aksil is living and whether he is OK, she said. She has been
unable to see him, hold him, comfort him, or
even talk to him since her ex-husband took him
away on July 1. She missed his fourth birthday.
Hall’s lawyer, Michael K. Loucks, a former
acting US attorney for Massachusetts who has
taken the case pro bono, said it would be “a simple thing” for Algerian and US officials to allow a
meeting between Hall and her son. But it hasn’t
happened. Diplomatic officials in both countries
appear sympathetic to her plight, but Loucks
said there’s been no urgency and little action.
“It would be so simple to have a meeting in a
police station, and no one is helping to make
that happen,” Hall said. “Nobody.”
Little cooperation
Between 2008 and 2017, 11,000 children
were abducted internationally from the United
States, according to the State Department. Many
never come home.
In 2017, the State Department opened 345
international kidnapping cases and fielded more
than 3,500 inquiries about how to prevent international parental child abduction, a nearly 40
percent increase from the year before.
Aksil’s case is a particularly difficult one. Algeria is not a signatory to the Hague Convention
on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction, an international treaty designed to foster cooperation between governments in returning kidnapped children to their home countries.
With that treaty not in play, the US Justice
Department, at Loucks’s urging, formally asked
the Algerian government for its assistance last
month under a Mutual Legal Assistance Treaty,
which the countries signed two years ago to help
with criminal investigations.
The pact was enacted primarily to support
terrorism investigations, but Loucks said he
hoped it could be invoked to help reunite mother
and son.
The process has been painstaking, glacial. Algerian authorities arranged a meeting on Dec.
17 between a US consular officer and Aksil, described by authorities as a “wellness check.” But
they denied the consular official’s request to let
Hall speak to her son on the phone during the
meeting because Benhamza refused to allow it.
“It’s completely mystifying to me why Algeria
would allow the father to veto the child speaking
with Jerusha after kidnapping him,” said
Loucks, who is also critical of US government officials for not intervening more aggressively. “It’s
almost like she’s being treated as the suspect.”
Benhamza might never have known he had a
son, if not for Hall’s belief that a child needs both
parents in his life.
passports and told not to leave the state with Aksil unless one parent notified the other in advance and provided a detailed itinerary. Benhamza, who holds dual citizenship in France and
Algeria, turned in his French passport, saying it
was his only one, according to Hall.
Benhamza was angry with the custody arrangement and felt wronged, according to Hall.
The FBI later discovered Benhamza had obtained Algerian passports for himself and Aksil
at the Algerian Consulate General in New York
City. The consulate declined to comment. But information provided on its website indicates that
the children of Algerian men are considered citizens of that country, even if they were born in
the United States.
Patricia Apy, a New Jersey attorney who specializes in international family law and has
served as a consultant to the State Department,
said Aksil’s abduction could likely have been prevented if his name had been placed on the “Do
The two began dating in the summer of 2013
when Benhamza, who was born in Algeria and
raised in France, was living and working at Hall’s
parents’ home in Beverly along with other international travelers, according to court records.
He had returned to France when Hall, an architect born and raised in Massachusetts, discovered she was pregnant. She considered what
her son would want and decided he deserved to
know and love his father.
Benhamza told her he wanted to be involved
in his son’s life, and he returned to the United
States. The couple married in 2015, but the marriage soon broke down. They filed for divorce the
following year.
In August 2017, Benhamza was charged with
reckless endangerment after leaving Aksil alone
for about 30 minutes in a hot car while he went
grocery shopping in Chelsea, according to court
filings.
The charge was dismissed after Benhamza attended parenting classes, but the incident hurt
his efforts to win shared custody of Aksil. In February, Essex Probate Judge Frances Giordano
said that Benhamza’s “poor judgment” raised
concerns and awarded Hall sole custody of the
boy. At the same time, the judge found it was an
isolated incident by a loving parent and granted
Benhamza unsupervised visits with his son.
Both parents were ordered to surrender their
Not Depart List,” a registry created as part of a
federal law designed to limit child abductions.
Under the law, judges handling custody cases
can issue an order prohibiting a parent from
leaving the country with a child and ask that the
child’s name be placed on the list.
If a parent tries to board an international
flight with a child who is on the list, the Transportation Security Administration receives an
alert while scanning the child’s passport and
prevents them from boarding.
The list is a powerful tool but is “tremendously underutilized” because most people aren’t
aware of it, according to Apy, who worked on the
2014 legislation with New Jersey Representative
Chris Smith.
“In a case like this, you are playing catchup
because once that child is gone, you are in a position of trying to get enforcement of existing orders in a foreign country,” Apy said.
The 2014 law allows the secretary of state to
seek sanctions against countries that don’t cooperate in the return of abducted children, including the withdrawal of US development, security,
or economic support assistance; the delay or
cancellation of state visits; and the extradition of
parents charged with kidnapping.
“To my knowledge, extradition has been used
once and the other options not at all,” Smith
said. “That’s got to change.”
‘Do Not Depart List’
A life in Algeria
Hall is bracing for a long, lonely battle to be
part of her son’s life. In August, she received a
two-year visa from the same consulate in New
York that issued her son a passport. She spent
three weeks in Algeria during the summer, then
returned in October, but feels she’s gotten nowhere.
She has been living at a women’s shelter in
the capital, Algiers, sharing a dormitory style
apartment building with six other women, some
of whom are escaping abusive relationships.
There’s no running water or laundry facilities, but Hall considers it a sanctuary.
The women are supportive, sympathetic, and
kind.
Hall, who had never been to Algeria, is taking
courses to learn French and the local dialect. She
tries to stay busy by volunteering at a local
school. She e-mails people who might be able to
help, and tries to build relationships with local
officials and diplomats. She visits the US Consulate regularly and even joined a choir so she
could sing at an embassy Christmas party and
maybe chat up some of the guests.
In late September, Algerian authorities told
the US State Department they had located Aksil
in Oran, a coastal city in northwest Algeria,
Loucks said.
Hall is desperate to see him but has been advised against going there. She doesn’t want to do
anything to upset Algerian authorities or make
Benhamza flee again, and traveling in Algeria
can be dangerous.
In November, Hall went to France to meet for
the first time with Benhamza’s parents at their
home in Marseille. Through a translator, she
told them, “My goal is not to hurt Malik or anything, I just want to see my son.”
Benhamza’s mother told her she had spoken
to her son by telephone but had no influence
over him. She was sympathetic and told Hall to
try to work it out with Benhamza, but she
wouldn’t share his address or telephone number.
Hall hired a lawyer in Algeria, but said her efforts to begin legal proceedings seeking custody
or visitation of her son can’t move forward because authorities won’t disclose Benhamza’s address.
“Right now, I can’t officially request a visit
with my son because I have no legal standing
here,” she said. “It’s like I don’t exist.”
In Boston, Loucks, a partner at Skadden,
Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom, is working with a
team of associates to help Hall navigate a seemingly impenetrable legal system half a world
away.
Loucks has written Massachusetts Senators
Elizabeth Warren and Edward Markey and Representative Seth Moulton, describing Hall’s
plight and pleading for help.
Each declined to discuss the case but said in
statements they were concerned about the situation and were working on her behalf.
On Christmas Eve, Hall flew back to the United States. She plans to rent out her Salem duplex
then return to Algeria in about a month. She
hopes to support herself with her rental income
and a job if she’s allowed to work overseas. She
said she’ll stay as long as it takes to get her son
back in her life.
“If I have to stay here forever, that’s what I’m
going to do,” Hall said during a Skype interview
from Algiers last month. “If I have to stay here
and raise him in Algeria, that’s what I’m going to
do. I can’t abandon him. He’s my son.”
Shelley Murphy can be reached at
shelley.murphy@globe.com. Follow her on
Twitter @shelleymurph.
B o s t o n
JA N UA RY 6 , 2 0 1 9
S u n d a y
G l o b e
The Region
A11
What wearing a puffy coat says about us (we’re cold)
uCOATS
presidential exploratory committee.
To the untrained eye — that,
say, of an eighth-grade boy —
every long, dark puffer coat
looks identical.
If it’s not black, it’s brown or
gray or navy. It hits mid-thigh
or at the knee or ankle. And
there’s no mistaking the vibe:
shapeless mom or grandmother.
But any woman who has
shopped for a puffer understands there are tiny style distinctions that take on outsize
importance, which sometimes
allow a woman to think her
coat is — however marginally
— cute: The slightest shaping
at the waist. A faux fur ruff
around the hood. A sophisticat-
Continued from Page A1
It came for Sue Muscato, 48,
after her boyfriend moved in
with her. “There are three reasons a woman doesn’t wear the
coat,” said Muscato, an accountant from Hanson. “She’s single. She’s young. She doesn’t
have self-esteem.”
The city doesn’t keep an official count of black puffy coats.
But here’s one indication of the
garment’s dominance.
“I went to a bat mitzvah recently and there were 20 identical black coats on the rack,”
said Wendy Pierce of
Brookline. It was the same at a
funeral. And at her women-only gym.
“Once, someone took my
black puffy coat with my car
keys in it,” she said. “They
thought it was their own coat.”
Looked at one way, the coat
is just a coat. But clothing carries messages, and as women
increasingly seek to define
their own narratives, even the
practical matter of keeping
warm is swept into the conversation.
Some onlookers see the
puffy coat as a sign the wearer
has given up. That she cares so
little about her appearance she
is willing to appear in public
dressed as a sleeping bag. That
she is one slippery step away
from ceasing to brush her hair.
Or maybe, in fact, the coat
represents the opposite of surrender? A bulky symbol of empowerment, the rightful subject of an Aretha Franklin anthem. P-U-F-F-E-R.
That’s how Allison Mitchell,
35, a fund-raiser from Salem,
sees it. She spent her 20s shivering in fashionable but un-insulated outerwear, choices she
now regrets.
“What my ankle-length
down coat grants me is not just
warmth but freedom,” she said.
“To deprive women of that
kind of freedom and protection
is to permanently limit us in an
already unequal world.
“Too long has misogyny dictated that our looks should be
prioritized over our comfort,”
ed silhouette.
Hard as this may be to believe, sometimes the puffer
coat has problems larger than
even style.
Karen M. McManus, author
of the forthcoming young adult
thriller “Two Can Keep a Secret,” remembers when she
first got an ankle-length puffer
to keep her warm while waiting for the bus near Harvard
Square.
The coat did its job — and
then some.
“As soon as you get inside,
you are way too hot,” she said,
“and you have to rip it off.”
Beth Teitell can be reached at
beth.teitell@globe.com. Follow
her on Twitter @BethTeitell.
PHOTOS BY DAVID L. RYAN/GLOBE STAFF
Looked at one
way, the coat is
just a coat. But
clothing carries
messages, and
as women
increasingly
seek to define
their own
narratives,
even keeping
warm is swept
into the
conversation.
D O N AT E YO U R C A R
Mitchell added.
“In my Land’s End fulllength parka, I am unstoppable
— protected from Boston
winds and the blustering harassment of unsolicited male
attention.”
(Men, it seems, can wear
any coat they want and no one
will say a word. Unless, of
course, it’s a cape.)
But despite its ubiquity,
here’s what the puffy coat is up
against: Even some women
who own one are critics.
“News flash people!” Victoria Vessella, a marketing asso-
ciate at Repsly in Boston, said
in an e-mail to the Globe.
“There is no need for an anklelength puffy coat and snow
boots on a 40 degree day when
there’s no snow on the ground.”
By her own admission, Vessella owns a long, black North
Face down coat.
But, she emphasizes, she
only wears it in “extreme” conditions.
“What’s even more mind
boggling,” Vessella added, “is
the money spent on this unflattering outerwear. The way I see
it, if you have the disposable
income for a . . . Canada Goose
jacket, you are in a position to
dress more elegantly.”
(There’s a lot to say about
Canada Goose and its $1,000plus jackets, but let’s just agree
it is the Donald Trump of coats
— loved, reviled, somehow part
of every conversation — and
move on.)
Here’s another way to measure the coat’s everywhereness:
It was front and center on New
Year’s Eve, worn by Senator
Elizabeth Warren as she stood
outside her Cambridge home
that day to discuss launching a
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B o s t o n
A12
S u n d a y
G l o b e
JA N UA RY 6 , 2 0 1 9
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B o s t o n
JA N UA RY 6 , 2 0 1 9
S u n d a y
G l o b e
The Nation
A13
Calif. utilities seek to pass wildfires’ cost to ratepayers
Devote millions
to lobbying state
lawmakers
By Ivan Penn
NEW YORK TIMES
LOS ANGELES — As California’s deadliest wildfire was consuming the town of Paradise in
November, some of the state’s
top power-company officials
and a dozen legislators were at
an annual retreat at the Fairmont Kea Lani resort on Maui.
In the course of four days, they
discussed wildfires — and how
much responsibility the utilities
deserve for the devastation, if
any.
It is an issue of increasing
urgency as more fires are traced
to equipment owned by California’s investor-owned utilities.
The largest, Pacific Gas and
Electric, could ultimately have
to pay homeowners and others
an estimated $30 billion for
causing fires over the last two
years. The most devastating of
those, the Camp Fire, destroyed
thousands of homes in Paradise
and killed at least 86 people.
Realizing that their potential fire liability is large enough
to bankrupt them, the utility
companies are spending tens of
millions of dollars on lobbying
and campaign contributions.
Their goal: a California law that
would allow them to pass on
the cost of wildfires to their customers in the form of higher
electricity rates. After an earlier
lobbying push, legislators have
already voted to protect the
companies from having to bear
the cost of 2017 fires, and utilities are seeking the same for
2018.
The utility companies acknowledge that they may bear
some responsibility but say not
all of it, because climate change
and development in remote areas have made wildfires more
destructive. In addition, they
argue that electricity rates
w o u ld go u p r e g a r d l e s s o f
whether the state protected
them because investors and
banks could grow wary of lending to California’s energy sector.
But public interest groups
say the utilities are effectively
seeking a bailout for mistakes
made by well-compensated executives. The utilities have been
frequently criticized, for example, for not trimming trees
along power lines. Some policy
experts and lawmakers say it
might be better to break up
PG&E, replace its board and
management, or convert it into
a publicly owned utility.
People on both sides fear
that the state, which prides itself on being a leader in the
fight against climate change,
could be on the cusp of an energy crisis — its second in less
than two decades. In 2000 and
2001, California was roiled by
blackouts, soaring electricity
rates, and the bankruptcy of
PG&E after the state made missteps in deregulating the power
industry.
“There clearly is a great deal
of disruption that would occur,”
said Assemblyman Chris Holden, chairman of the Utilities and
Energy Committee. He was referring to the possibility of a second bankruptcy of PG&E, which
serves 16 million people in central and Northern California.
Just two months before the
Camp Fire, PG&E seemed to
have solved its most pressing
problem: protecting its shareholders from footing the bill for
the 2017 wildfires. On the typical bill of $100 a month, the
company estimates, a customer
would pay an additional $5 for
every $1 billion the utility borrowed to cover damages.
T he companies waged a
multimillion-dollar campaign
to secure that protection. In the
first nine months of 2018, the
three investor-owned utilities
collectively gave $5 million to
the campaigns of state lawmakers, as much as $1 million more
than they had in any full year
since 2011, according to Consumer Watchdog, an advocacy
organization in California.
PG&E stepped up its lobbying effort, too — spending $8.4
million in just the first nine
months of 2018, compared with
$1.6 million in all of 2017 and
$1.1 million in 2016. The company’s spending in the first
three quarters exceeded 2017’s
top spender, Chevron, which
spent $8.2 million that year, according to Consumer Watchdog.
“Money talks in Sacramento,
and big money talks loud
enough to buy a big bailout,”
said Jamie Court, president of
Consumer Watchdog. “There is
no legislator of either party,
even those who don’t take money from the utilities, who
doesn’t worry about bucking
the utilities.”
Consumer groups say the efforts to protect utilities are particularly galling because Californians already pay more for
power than people in other
Western states. The state’s residential electricity prices are between 19 and 40 percent higher
than in neighboring Arizona,
Nevada, and Oregon.
Events like the Maui conference have provided fodder for
the industry’s critics.
The annual event is organized by the California Independent Voter Project, a nonprofit in San Diego that was co-
fou nde d by a former s tate
senator and says it informs the
public about policy issues.
Dan Howle, executive director and chairman of the Voter
Project, said that no lobbying
was permitted and that no specific legislation had been discussed.
But critics describe the event
as part of a broader effort by
businesses, particularly the utilities, to influence lawmakers.
Consumer Watchdog, for example, found that PG&E and the
other two utilities had contributed to the campaigns of between 80 and 90 percent of
state legislators over the last
two years.
A PG&E spokeswoman, said
the company used shareholder
money for political activities
like campaign contributions
and lobbying, as well as tracking and analyzing bills before
the Legislature. The company
declined to discuss its role in
the wildfires.
Now the spotlight is back on
Sacramento and whether lawmakers will vote to protect utilities from the tab for the 2018
fires. PG&E’s financial outlook,
and perhaps its survival, depends on what happens.
PG&E could also be prosecuted. The state attorney general, Xavier Becerra, said in a legal filing at the end of December that he could bring criminal
charges against the company
for its role in the fires if his office uncovered “reckless” conduct by the utility.
In a statement Friday, PG&E
said its board was reviewing the
company’s “structural options,”
searching for new directors,
and consulting experts about
how the utility should prepare
for future wildfires.
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MARCUS YAM/LOS ANGELES TIMES VIA AP
Latrice Radford was consoled at the scene of a shooting at
the Gable House Bowl in Torrance, Calif.
3 killed in shooting
at Calif. bowling alley
By Scott Fain
and Sophia Rosenbaum
ASSOCIATED PRESS
TORRANCE, Calif. — Three
men were fatally shot late Friday and four injured when a
brawl at a popular Los Angelesarea bowling alley and karaoke
bar erupted into gunfire that
had patrons, some children,
running for their lives.
Police in the city of Torrance
responded shortly after midnight to calls of shots fired at
the Gable House Bowl, which
offers bowling, laser tag, and an
arcade. They found seven people with gunshot wounds.
Three men were pronounced dead at the scene and
two were taken to a hospital,
Sergeant Ronald Harris said.
Two other men were struck by
gunfire but ‘‘opted to seek their
own medical attention.’’
Authorities have not identified the victims nor suspects or
released details about what led
to the shooting. But witnesses
said it stemmed from a fight between two large groups.
Dwayne Edwards, 60, of Los
Angeles, said he received a call
from his nephew that his 28year-old son, Astin Edwards,
was one of those killed. His
nephew told him his son was attempting to break up a fight
when a gunman ‘‘just started
unloading.’’
‘‘I’m thinking this is a dream
and I’ll wake up,’’ Edwards told
the Orange County Register.
‘‘He was a good kid. I don’t understand it.’’
A grieving mother told
KABC-7 her 28-year-old son,
Robert Meekins, was also trying to break up the fight and
that Meekins and Astin Edwards were friends.
‘‘ T he y were friends so I
know he probably jumped in
and helped Astin and whoever
he was with . . . but I don’t think
my son deserves to die,’’ Anglean Hubbard said.
‘‘My son was a loving person.
He loved life, he loved his son,
and he loved his family. Nobody
can imagine what I’m going
through right now,’’ Hubbard
said.
The third victim was 20year-old Michael Radford, his
sister Latrice Dumas told the
Torrance Daily Breeze.
‘‘He was happy. He was always a protector,’’ Dumas said.
‘‘That’s how he got into this, he
was trying to protect others.’’
Wes Hamad, a 29-year-old
Torrance resident, was at the
bowling alley with his 13-yearold niece and cousin when he
saw a ‘‘huge fight’’ break out.
Hamad said the brawl, which
lasted about five minutes,
blocked the entrance and spiraled into ‘‘complete chaos.’’
Damone Thomas was in the
karaoke section of the bowling
alley when people ran in saying
there was a shooting. The 30year-old LA resident said his
friend flipped a table to shield
them as they heard gunshots.
Thomas and Hamad said
they had never witnessed any
violence there in the past. But
Hamad said he had stopped going for a while because he heard
someone with a gun was seen
there. ‘‘I definitely won’t be going back anymore,’’ he added.
In a tweet, Senator Kamala
Harris, Democrat of California,
said her heart breaks for the
victims. ‘‘We must do more to
address gun violence,’’ she said.
‘‘Americans should be able to go
to a bowling alley and be safe.’’
After 106 years, with several of our manufactures filing for BANKRUPTCY (Thomasville, Henredon, Drexel Heritage, Harden, Maitland
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B o s t o n
A14
S u n d a y
G l o b e
JA N UA RY 6 , 2 0 1 9
Remembered
SHARE YOUR MEMORIES ON OUR GUEST BOOK AT BOSTON.COM/OBITUARIES
BY CITY AND TOWN
ANDOVER
PERRIER, Julia (Hussey)
ARLINGTON
ALBERT, Jules J.
ALBERTELLI, Eleanor M. (Repetto)
PIERCE, Warren D. Jr.
ASHLAND
JANGI, Dr. Rohit M.
CAMBRIDGE
ALBERT, Jules J.
COOPER PEARLE, Betty
RUSK, Dr. Jeremy W.
FALMOUTH
ANGELOS, William J.
CANTON
MAFFIE, Anthony R.
FRAMINGHAM
FITZPATRICK, Rev. John Patrick
JANGI, Dr. Rohit M.
SISTER PATRICIA ANN LYNCH CSJ,
(SISTER EILEEN FRANCIS)
CHARLESTOWN
DUNCAN, Jane T. (Wojceshonek)
FITZPATRICK, Rev. John Patrick
GRUCHACZ, Paul Michael
JESSO, Mary G.
O’BRIEN, Carol A.
ATTLEBORO
WALKER, Jean E. (Dray)
BEDFORD
WRIGHT, Marguerite F.
BELLINGHAM
FRAINE, Elizabeth P.
HENDERSON, Warren Robert
BELMONT
RUSK, Dr. Jeremy W.
BEVERLY
TOWNSEND, Dorothy R. (McElroy)
BILLERICA
BONFILIO, Lawrence E.
FANTONE, Jeannette (Dennehy)
BOLTON
RUSSO, Phyllis J. (Cullen)
BOSTON
ALBRIGHT, Terry (Keppel)
BURWICK, Stephen D.
CAREY, Sheila
COOPER PEARLE, Betty
DROWN, Celia B.
FERREIRA, Americo
FRAINE, Elizabeth P.
KELETY, Katalin
MARIEB, Elaine Nicpon
MELLOR, Anne M. ((McCallum))
PASQUALE, Joseph A.
RENAGHAN, Leo Mark
WISE, Bart W. Ph.D., J.D.
BRIGHTON
SISTER PATRICIA ANN LYNCH CSJ,
(SISTER EILEEN FRANCIS)
BROCKTON
DROWN, Celia B.
FERREIRA, Americo
FITZPATRICK, Rev. John Patrick
BROOKLINE
CARAVAS, Gertrude S.
CLAY, Claire M. (Devin)
FITZPATRICK, David E.P. MD
KELETY, Katalin
TROTT, Patricia A.
CHELSEA
HARBOUR, John R.
PAGE, James F. Sr.
ROPELEWSKI, Carol Ann
TILLEY, Florence L.
COHASSET
McNULTY, Doris R.
CONCORD
HOWARD, Florence (Burford)
VITI, Marguerite C. (Reise)
DANVERS
TILLEY, Florence L.
VINCENT, Valerie I. (Arntz)
DEDHAM
CASHMAN, Marianne
(McGillicuddy)
MacDONALD, Ronald S.
PERRIER, Julia (Hussey)
PHELAN, James F.
SIMPSON, Donald M.
DENNIS
JOHNSON, Sherrill A.
DORCHESTER
GATULIS, John G.
MELLOR, Anne M. ((McCallum))
TRYBE, Barbrab
DOVER
RIDDELL, Mary (Turner)
DRACUT
MANCINI, Robert F.
DUXBURY
ERIKSEN, Steven E.
EAST BOSTON
ABATE, Vita M. (Capolupo)
DORATO, Anna Caroline (Zirpolo)
HANTON, Maria
PERRIER, Julia (Hussey)
EAST CAMBRIDGE
FERREIRA, Americo
BURLINGTON
FERREIRA, Americo
HARBOUR, John R.
McRAE, Thomas Kenneth
PIERCE, Warren D. Jr.
ROPELEWSKI, Carol Ann
EVERETT
DORATO, Anna Caroline (Zirpolo)
DUNCAN, Jane T. (Wojceshonek)
ERICSON, Kenneth A.
FORD, Ruth E. (Herlihy)
JOHNSON, Sherrill A.
TILLEY, Florence L.
ABATE, Vita M. (Capolupo)
Of Winthrop, formerly of East Boston,
Jan. 5, 2019. Devoted wife of the late
Carlo Abate. Loving mother of Carl
Abate and his wife Carla of Reading, Carol Gambale and her husband
Chucky of Winthrop, and John Abate
of Brockton. Dear sister of Nicola
Capolupo of CA, Pasquale Capolupo
of East Boston, Marianna Cioffi of CT,
Diane Giacalone of West Roxbury, and
the late John Capolupo. Cherished
“Nana” of Charles, Maria, Audra and
Isabella. Great “Nana” of Gabriela, Mia,
Seaghan, Aoife, Audra and Aine.
Visiting Hours: Family and friends
are cordially invited to attend the
visitation from the Ernest P. Caggiano
and Son Funeral Home, 147 Winthrop
St., WINTHROP on Monday, January 7,
2019 from 4:00 to 8:00 PM.The Funeral
will be conducted from the Funeral
home on Tuesday, January 8, 2019 at
9:00 AM, followed by a Funeral Mass
in St. John the Evangelist Church, 320
Winthrop St., Winthrop at 10:00 AM.
Interment to follow the Mass, in the
Woodlawn Cemetery in Everett. For directions or to sign the online guestbook
go to www.caggianofuneralhome.com
Caggiano-O’Maley-Frazier
Winthrop
W.C. CANNIFF & SONS, INC.
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CAMBRIDGE: 583 Mt. Auburn St.
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FOXBOROUGH
THOMAS, Kevin S.
FRANKLIN
BOND, Robert J.
HAMILTON
VINCENT, Valerie I. (Arntz)
HARVARD
RUSSO, Eleanor R. (DiGregorio)
HAVERHILL
HART, Isabel (Andrews)
VINCENT, Valerie I. (Arntz)
HOLYOKE
EAGAN, Laura
HUDSON
RUSSO, Eleanor R. (DiGregorio)
HULL
TROTT, Patricia A.
JAMAICA PLAIN
MIDDLETON, Victoria C.
LENOX
McGRAW, James D.
LEXINGTON
BROADBENT, George S.
REDIKER, Robert H.
WISE, Bart W. Ph.D., J.D.
WRIGHT, Marguerite F.
LINCOLN
COOPER PEARLE, Betty
LYNN
MEAGHER, Anna Theresa
(Clifford)
PAGE, James F. Sr.
TILLEY, Florence L.
LYNNFIELD
FANTONE, Jeannette (Dennehy)
HANTON, Maria
MALDEN
FORD, Ruth E. (Herlihy)
HALEY, Caroline (Hanley)
HANTON, Maria
O’BRIEN, Carol A.
SULLIVAN, Richard Paul
MARSHFIELD
ERIKSEN, Steven E.
GATULIS, John G.
MAYNARD
RUSSO, Phyllis J. (Cullen)
MEDFIELD
BASTANIER, Tatiana
HENDERSON, Warren Robert
ALBERT, Jules J.
Born February 28, 1935 in Grande
Mere, Quebec, Canada, died peacefully at home surrounded by his loving
family. He is survived by his wife
Claire (Mullally) of 61 years, and his
eight children, James Albert and his
wife Kathy of Holyoke, MA, Michelle
Yeomelakis and her husband Paul of
Wilmington, MA, John Albert and
his wife Maureen of Chelmsford, MA,
David Albert and his wife Kathleen of
Reading, MA, Brian Albert and his wife
Lorraine of Canton MA, Denise Dematos and her husband John of Methuen
MA, Keith Albert and his wife Mary Joe
of Reading MA, Kenneth Albert and his
wife Jeanette of Wilmington MA, along
with 18 grandchildren and two greatgrandchildren. He also leaves behind
his sister-in-law Ethel Toner and her
life partner Jerry Leach, nephews Paul
Scott Bobby and Dennis Toner, and
many extended family members and
friends. Jules was a devoted husband,
father, grandfather, great-grandfather,
brother-in-law and uncle. During his
retirement years, Jules enjoyed fishing,
watching the Red Sox, Notre Dame
Football and hockey, and traveling with
his wife throughout New England and
Canada. Jules was a Cambridge firefighter for 34 years, and an active member of the Cambridge firefighter and
police retirement club, and an executive
board member of the Cambridge Fire
Fighters Credit Union. He was the very
proud father of his six sons who are
active police officers and firefighters
in Cambridge and Holyoke Massachusetts, and his two daughters who are
healthcare professionals. Funeral from
the Keefe Funeral Home, 5 Chestnut
St., (adjacent to Saint Agnes’ Church,
Rte 60) ARLINGTON on Wednesday at
10 am, followed by a Funeral Mass in
Saint John’s Church, Mass Ave., North
Cambridge at 11 am. Relatives and
friends invited. Visiting hours Tuesday
from 4-8 pm. Burial in Cambridge Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, please make
donations in the name of Jules Joseph
Albert to the Saint Jude Foundation, or
Mount Auburn Hospital in honor of Dr.
Sarah Slater and Dr. David O’Halloran,
or to the Care Group Parmenter home
care and hospice. To send an online
condolence visit keefefuneralhome.com
CanniffMonuments@aol.com
MEDFORD
ALBERTELLI, Eleanor M. (Repetto)
HALEY, Caroline (Hanley)
TADGELL, Robert E.
WILLIS, Louise M. (Lynch)
MEDWAY
HEZLITT, Judith M.
VINCENT, Valerie I. (Arntz)
MELROSE
CARPENTER, Emilie P. (Pepper)
FORD, Ruth E. (Herlihy)
O’BRIEN, Carol A.
SULLIVAN, Richard Paul
MIDDLEBOROUGH
ANGELOS, William J.
MILTON
PERRIER, Julia (Hussey)
SISTER PATRICIA ANN LYNCH CSJ,
(SISTER EILEEN FRANCIS)
NATICK
RIDDELL, Mary (Turner)
NEEDHAM
BERKOWITZ, Dr. Albert J.
BOND, Robert J.
BRIGGS, Dr. Leon R.
CASHMAN, Marianne
(McGillicuddy)
ERIKSEN, Steven E.
GRUCHACZ, Paul Michael
HENDERSON, Warren Robert
MANCINI, Robert F.
PHELAN, James F.
RIDDELL, Mary (Turner)
SIMPSON, Donald M.
STRAUMANIS, Ruta
NEWTON
BERKOWITZ, Dr. Albert J.
CASHMAN, Marianne
(McGillicuddy)
COOPER PEARLE, Betty
DROWN, Celia B.
FISHER, Fay (Galben)
GRUCHACZ, Paul Michael
MANCINI, Robert F.
RIDDELL, Mary (Turner)
ROSENBERG, Kenneth A.
SCHOEM, Sandra R.
YAJKO, Christine
NORTH ATTLEBOROUGH
WALKER, Jean E. (Dray)
NORTH READING
MEAGHER, Anna Theresa
(Clifford)
NEERGAARD, Edward J.
WILLIS, Louise M. (Lynch)
NORTHAMPTON
MARIEB, Elaine Nicpon
NORWOOD
PHELAN, James F.
ALBERTELLI, Eleanor M.
(Repetto)
Surrounded by the boundless love of
her family, Eleanor died peacefully on
December 27th, 2018, in Newburyport
at the age of 91. Eleanor was born to
the late Alfred and Louise (DiGangi)
Repetto on June 19th, 1927. She was
predeceased by her beloved husband
Dr. Elmo Lawrence Albertelli and her
brother Thayer Taylor. She is survived
by her ten loving children, Lawrence,
Victoria, Chris, Donna, Elissa, Gina,
Dana, Elmo Jr., Maria and Carissa,
along with their devoted spouses and
children. Eleanor is also survived
by and was the adored “Noni” to
11 beautiful grandchildren, Nicole,
Gabrielle, Aria, Mia, Shane, Kristina,
Connor, Liam, Sara, Sean and little Leo.
As a busy mother of ten, and with her
youngest child in school, Elli pursued
a long held dream and went to college
to earn her Bachelor of Arts degree in
Music Education at the University of
Massachusetts in Lowell. She went on
to spend many years as a music teacher
in elementary schools, while also tutoring private voice and piano students in
her home. A gifted musician with an
amazing singing voice that stayed with
her until the end of her life, she could
have gone on to pursue a professional
music career, but chose instead to make
her life with Elmo, the love of her life,
to whom she was married for over
64 years. She was a gourmet cook, a
talented seamstress and an artist. Her
optimism and love of life was inspirational and she always had a smile for
everyone. Her ability to give to all she
encountered was limitless, and her
love was felt and treasured by so many.
Although she lived a blessed life, Elli
will be profoundly missed by her family
and friends, but will live forever in
their hearts. A Celebration of Life Mass
will be held at Saint Agnes Church, 51
Medford Street in Arlington, MA on
Saturday, January 12th at 10:00 a.m.,
followed by the interment of her ashes
at Mount Pleasant Cemetery. Family and friends are invited. In lieu of
flowers, donations can be made to the
Anna Jacques Hospital. You can write
a check made payable to the AJH Community Health Foundation, and mail it
to 25 Highland Avenue, Newburyport,
MA 01950, and in the memo write “In
Memory of Eleanor Albertelli” or you
can donate online at: ajh.org/giving
Honor your loved
one with a photo in
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Ask your funeral director for details.
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to the guestbook at
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WALPOLE
HEZLITT, Judith M.
PHELAN, James F.
THOMAS, Kevin S.
WALKER, Jean E. (Dray)
PEABODY
JOHNSON, Sherrill A.
MONDERER, Phyllis (Kogen)
TILLEY, Florence L.
PITTSFIELD
ROPELEWSKI, Carol Ann
WALTHAM
BONFILIO, Lawrence E.
EAGAN, Laura
RUSSO, Eleanor R. (DiGregorio)
RUSSO, Phyllis J. (Cullen)
VITI, Marguerite C. (Reise)
PLYMOUTH
EAGAN, Laura
QUINCY
DROUGAS, John A.
MELLOR, Anne M. ((McCallum))
TROTT, Patricia A.
WARWICK
McRAE, Thomas Kenneth
READING
HALEY, Caroline (Hanley)
WILLIS, Louise M. (Lynch)
WATERTOWN
RUSSO, Eleanor R. (DiGregorio)
YAJKO, Christine
READVILLE
SIMPSON, Donald M.
WELLESLEY
CASHMAN, Marianne
(McGillicuddy)
GRUCHACZ, Paul Michael
MANCINI, Robert F.
RIDDELL, Mary (Turner)
REVERE
PAGE, James F. Sr.
QUINN, James F.
SULLIVAN, Richard Paul
ROSLINDALE
CAREY, Sheila
FRAINE, Elizabeth P.
SALEM
SILVERMAN, Rosalyn
(Rosenkrantz)
TOWNSEND, Dorothy R. (McElroy)
SALISBURY
ALBERTELLI, Eleanor M. (Repetto)
SAUGUS
FORD, Ruth E. (Herlihy)
SULLIVAN, Richard Paul
SOMERVILLE
QUINN, James F.
SOUTH BOSTON
MELLOR, Anne M. ((McCallum))
PERRIER, Julia (Hussey)
TRYBE, Barbrab
WEYMOUTH
TROTT, Patricia A.
WHITMAN
WALKER, Jean E. (Dray)
STONEHAM
BURKE, Michael J.
FERREIRA, Americo
FORD, Ruth E. (Herlihy)
HALEY, Caroline (Hanley)
NEERGAARD, Edward J.
SIMPSON, Donald M.
WILMINGTON
HIRSCH, Judith Irene
TADGELL, Robert E.
WILLIS, Louise M. (Lynch)
WINCHESTER
BROADBENT, George S.
CARPENTER, Emilie P. (Pepper)
DROUGAS, John A.
HARBOUR, John R.
HART, Isabel (Andrews)
MEAGHER, Anna Theresa
(Clifford)
ROPELEWSKI, Carol Ann
STOUGHTON
ANGELOS, William J.
STOW
HOWARD, Florence (Burford)
SUDBURY
EAGAN, Laura
FITZPATRICK, Rev. John Patrick
WAKEFIELD
BONANNO, Anne M. (Castiglione)
QUINN, James F.
Noted Sculptor
and Artist
Passed away peacefully on Thursday,
December 20, 2018 surrounded by her
loving family following a catastrophic
stroke. A noted sculptor and artist, she
was described by everyone who knew
her as a beautiful and elegant woman
whose creativity extended into every
detail in her life.
Terry was born in 1942, the only
child of Janet and Charles Keppel and
grew up on College Hill in Montrose,
NY. She attended Emma Willard School
and met Dick Albright, her husband,
partner, and muse on the ski slopes in
Stowe, VT. They were married in 1961.
Together they raised three sons, Bear,
Tim and Aaron in Wayland, MA. Each
son moved to San Francisco, met their
wives—Pam, Sarah and Libby, respectively—and moved back to the Boston
area. Terry has eight grandchildren—
Kelsey, Kate, Benjamin, Anna B, John,
Sammy, Grace, and Caroline—who
knew her and loved her as Granny T.
Terry dedicated herself to becoming a fine artist later in life. Following
her completion of a bachelor’s degree
from the Harvard University Extension
School, she enrolled in the Massachusetts College of Art and Design, MassArt, when she was 36 years old.
Over the course of Terry’s career she
was exhibited in galleries and museums
all over Massachusetts, as well as in
New York and Paris. She was an original member of the Boston Sculptors
Gallery and a regular exhibitor at the
Krakow Witkin Gallery in Boston. Most
of Terry’s sculptures evoke forms found
in nature. Her earlier pieces, usually
constructed out of bittersweet vine,
bark or grasses, were large and evocative. Upon seeing some giant gourds
growing out of her friend’s compost
pile on Cape Cod, she developed a new
and unique visual language. She would
grow, harvest and cure the gourds, then
cut and stain the pieces into “shards”
from which she would construct ethereal biomorphic sculptures. In 2015,
Skinner Galleries in Boston held “So
You Know,” a retrospective of her work.
A passionate reader, a spiritual
explorer, and a gracious host, Terry
impacted all whom she touched. Both
in Wayland and in their treasured
home on Great Island, Cape Cod, she
and Dick surrounded themselves with
family and friends, and filled their
world with beauty and grace. Terry will
be profoundly missed.
Services will be held at First Parish
Church in Wayland, MA, on March 9,
2019.
In lieu of flowers, if desired, contributions may be made in Terry’s memory to the MassArt Annual Fund which
provides scholarships to students.
WESTON
BURWICK, Stephen D.
WESTWOOD
BRIGGS, Dr. Leon R.
HENDERSON, Warren Robert
PHELAN, James F.
ROSENBERG, Kenneth A.
VINCENT, Valerie I. (Arntz)
VITI, Marguerite C. (Reise)
SCITUATE
McNULTY, Doris R.
ALBRIGHT, Terry (Keppel)
WEST ROXBURY
CAREY, Sheila
CLAY, Claire M. (Devin)
FRAINE, Elizabeth P.
HENDERSON, Warren Robert
MacDONALD, Ronald S.
SILVERMAN, Rosalyn
(Rosenkrantz)
SIMPSON, Donald M.
WINTHROP
ABATE, Vita M. (Capolupo)
ANGELOS, William J.
Age 80, of Stoughton, unexpectedly
on December 31, 2018. Son of the
late Theodore and Mary (DiGangi)
Angelos, he leaves behind his wife,
Beverly (Kaspar) Angelos of 59 years
and four children, Scott W. Angelos
and his wife Mary (McKay) Angelos,
Mark J. Angelos, Jeffrey S. Angelos
and wife Lisa (Rosenberg) Angelos and
Kimberly Keramati and her husband
Shayan, all of Stoughton. He was the
grandfather of Jacqueline, Jessica and
Tiffany Angelos and Tristan Keramati
and great-grandfather of Dakota. He
was predeceased by his twin sister,
Theresa Leonard and is survived by
his sister, Patricia Marotta and her
husband Ronald of Middleboro and his
brother, Ted “Champ” Angelos and his
wife Barbabra of Falmouth and several
nieces and nephews. He is also survived
by his brother in law Roy Leonard of
Stoughton.
Funeral will be held from the Farley
Funeral Home, 358 Park St. (Rte 27)
STOUGHTON, on Monday, January 7,
2018 at 9 AM, followed by a Funeral
Mass at the Immaculate Conception
Church, Stoughton at 10 AM. Visiting
Hours Sunday from 2-6 PM. Interment
will take place at Evergreen Cemetery,
Stoughton. Donations in Bill’s memory
may be made to the Joslin Diabetes
Clinic, 1 Joslin Way, Boston, 02215 or
to the American Stroke Association,
300 5th Ave, Suite 6, Waltham 02451.
Farley Funeral Home
(781) 344-2676
BASTANIER, Tatiana
Age 101, of Medfield, peacefully, Dec.
21, 2018. Beloved wife of the late
Walter Bastanier; mother of Jeanne
Sullivan and her husband Jim of
Medfield; also survived by grandchildren, Tamara and her husband Rob,
Alexandra “Pandi” and her husband
Tim, Nick and his wife Nancy; and her
cherished great-grandchildren, Annika
and Lukas. Services will be private.
Memorial donations can be made to
New Life Furniture Bank of MA, P.O.
Box 573, Medfield, MA 02052.
Roberts Mitchell Caruso
Funeral Home
WOBURN
DROUGAS, John A.
FITZPATRICK, David E.P. MD
HARBOUR, John R.
HART, Isabel (Andrews)
NEERGAARD, Edward J.
PAGE, James F. Sr.
WORCESTER
BURWICK, Stephen D.
WRENTHAM
KELETY, Katalin
OUT OF STATE
CALIFORNIA
ALBRIGHT, Terry (Keppel)
GILLMAN, Jeanette
RUSK, Dr. Jeremy W.
WISE, Bart W. Ph.D., J.D.
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
ALBRIGHT, Terry (Keppel)
FLORIDA
GATULIS, John G.
HIRSCH, Judith Irene
MARIEB, Elaine Nicpon
PASQUALE, Joseph A.
PIERCE, Warren D. Jr.
ROPELEWSKI, Carol Ann
GEORGIA
SULLIVAN, Richard Paul
MAINE
McRAE, Thomas Kenneth
VITI, Marguerite C. (Reise)
MARYLAND
McRAE, Thomas Kenneth
NEW HAMPSHIRE
BONFILIO, Lawrence E.
DROWN, Celia B.
EAGAN, Laura
FITZPATRICK, David E.P. MD
TADGELL, Robert E.
NEW JERSEY
GRUCHACZ, Paul Michael
NEW YORK
ALBRIGHT, Terry (Keppel)
McRAE, Thomas Kenneth
SCHOEM, Sandra R.
PENNSYLVANIA
ERICSON, Kenneth A.
YAJKO, Christine
RHODE ISLAND
VITI, Marguerite C. (Reise)
OUT OF COUNTRY
CANADA
MacDONALD, Ronald S.
IRELAND
CAREY, Sheila
BERKOWITZ, Dr. Albert J.
“Abbie”
Of Newton, formerly of Needham, on
January 4, 2019. Beloved husband of
Lois (Stocklan) Berkowitz for 65 years.
Devoted father of Marcia Berkowitz
and her husband Marc Cohen, and
Ken Berkowitz and his wife Holly.
Dear grandfather of Ali and Michael
Sganga, Josh Cohen and Alissa Cooper,
Ben Berkowitz, and the late Jacob
Berkowitz. Loving great-grandfather of
Hailey and Jake Sganga. Dear brother
of Ralph Berkowitz, the late Irving
“Isaac” Berkowitz, and the late Ethel
Tobin. Graduate of Hebrew College,
Boston State College, and Boston University. Former Assistant Commissioner
of the Massachusetts Department of
Mental Health. Former Executive Director of the American Association on
Mental Deficiency. Abbie was a retired
psychologist, a life-long member of the
Massachusetts Psychological Association, a 40+ year member of Temple
Beth Shalom, Needham. Services at
Temple Beth Shalom, 670 Highland
Ave., Needham, on Monday, January 7,
2019 at 1:00 pm. Following Interment
at Sharon Memorial Park, memorial
observance will be at his residence until
8 pm, Tuesday 2-8 pm, and will continue Wednesday at the home of Marcia
Berkowitz and Marc Cohen from 2-8
pm. In lieu of flowers, donations may
be made to Cops for Kids with Cancer,
PO Box 850956, Braintree, MA 02185,
Special Olympics MA, 512 Forest St.,
Marlborough, MA 01752 or Temple
Beth Shalom, 670 Highland Ave., Needham, MA 02494.
BONANNO, Anne M.
(Castiglione)
Of Wakefield, Jan. 2. Wife of the
late Joseph C. Bonanno. Mother of
Deborah Bonanno and her partner
James Benedict, and Lisa Blaustein
and her husband Steven. Sister of
Francis Castiglione. Funeral from the
McDonald Funeral Home, 19 Yale Ave.,
WAKEFIELD, on Tuesday at 9:30am,
followed by a Funeral Mass at St.
Florence Church, 47 Butler Ave., Wakefield, at 10:30am. Interment at Forest
Glade Cemetery, in Wakefield. Visitation for relatives and friends at the
Funeral Home on Monday, from 4-7pm.
Expressions of love and sympathy may
be made to the Melrose-Wakefield
Hospital Auxiliary, 585 Lebanon St.,
Melrose, MA 02176. For obit/directions
& guestbook, www.mcdonaldfs.com
Celebrate
their lives
Honor your loved ones
with a photo in the
Boston Globe.
Ask your funeral
director for details.
B o s t o n
JA N UA RY 6 , 2 0 1 9
S u n d a y
G l o b e
A15
Remembered
SHARE YOUR MEMORIES ON OUR GUEST BOOK AT BOSTON.COM/OBITUARIES
BOND, Robert J.
BRIGGS, Dr. Leon R. Jr.
MARIEB, Elaine Nicpon
Internationally-Known Text Book
Author and Philanthropist
T
Of Franklin and West Falmouth, formerly of Needham, passed away Thursday, January 3, 2019. For 58 years, he
was the devoted husband of Dorothy
J. (DesRoches) Bond, with whom he
raised eight children. Born in Chicago,
Illinois, he was the son of the late Robert and Ruth (Fitzgerald) Bond. Bob
was a proud graduate of the College of
the Holy Cross, after which he served in
the United States Navy as an aviator for
five years. He worked for several years
with IBM, and then helped launch
Romac & Associates of Boston (now
KForce), which evolved into a national
franchise. Known for his quick wit and
clever lyrics, Bob wrote and performed
parody songs for the Clover Club of
Boston for nearly three decades. In
addition to his wife, he is survived
by his children, Linda Tyler (Rob),
Leslie Diggins (Kevin), Robert Bond
Jr. (Lourdes), David Bond, Stephanie
Strand (Matthew), Christopher Bond
(Megan), Stacey Malde (Mayur), and
Jeff Bond (Marty). He was the beloved
Grampy of eighteen grandchildren and
four great-grandchildren. He also leaves
his sister Brenda Ambrulevich, and his
brother William Bond, as well as many
other relatives and friends. He was the
brother of the late Ruth Goldeman, M.
Elizabeth Bond, and Patricia Bowler.
The Funeral will be held Tuesday, January 8th, at 9 AM from the O’Neill Funeral Home, 3102 Mendon Road, CUMBERLAND, RI, followed by a Mass of
Christian Burial at 10 AM at Saint John
Vianney Church, 3609 Diamond Hill
Road, Cumberland. Burial will follow at
Saint Mary’s Cemetery, Needham, MA.
Relatives and friends are kindly invited.
Visiting hours are Monday from 4-7 PM
at the O’Neill Funeral Home. In lieu of
flowers, donations to the Alzheimer’s
Association, 309 Waverley Oaks Road,
Waltham, MA 02452 would be greatly
appreciated.
BONFILIO, Lawrence E.
Of Fox Hill Village
Westwood, formerly of
Needham, died January 2,
2019.
He is survived by his loving wife
of 42 years, Leona Britton Briggs;
and his children Roben Selditz and
her husband David of Maine, Leon R
Briggs, III of Florida, Lance Briggs, MD
and his wife Cindy of North Carolina
and Rebecca Chafel, DVM of Illinois,
Lisa Hedrick and her husband Steven
of Holliston, MA and Maribeth Breen
and her husband Jack of Connecticut.
Adored grandfather of Kristen and
Kate Hedrick, Sam and Andrew Briggs,
Kylah and Corey Breen, and Franny
Chafel.
Born in San Diego, CA in 1922. He
is predeceased by his two brothers,
Richard and Thomas; and his first wife,
Nancy Morse Briggs, who died in 1974.
He was a graduate of Harvard College, class of 1944, Harvard School of
Dental Medicine, class of 1948, and
Harvard Medical School, class of 1950.
He received his training in psychiatry
from Stanford University.
He was a veteran of the U.S. Navy,
who served in World War II and the Korean War. He retired as a Naval Captain
after 30 years of active and reserve
service.
He worked as a child psychiatrist for
the Commonwealth of Mass. for many
decades.
Relatives and friends are invited to
attend visiting hours in the Holden,
Dunn and Lawler Funeral Home, 55
High Rock St., WESTWOOD, on Tuesday, January 8th, from 4:00-7:00 p.m.
Funeral from the Holden, Dunn and
Lawler Funeral Home on Wednesday
morning, January 9th, at 9:00 a.m.,
followed by a Mass of Christian Burial
in St. Margaret Mary Church, 845 High
St., Westwood at 10:00 a.m. Interment
immediately following at Needham
Cemetery.
In lieu of flowers, donations may be
made in Dr. Briggs’ memory to the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation cff.org/mass-ri
Holden-Dunn-Lawler
www.hdlfuneralhome.net
BROADBENT, George S.
Age 53, of Manchester, NH, passed
away peacefully on Thursday, December 27, 2018, at his home. He was born
in Waltham, MA on June 25, 1965, a
son of Lawrence Bonfilio and Barbara
(Leclair) Bonfilio. Lawrence was a
graduate of Billerica High School. He
was an avid reader, music lover and
football fanatic. He loved to talk about
football with anyone.
He is survived by his mother,
Barbara Bonfilio and her significant
other, James Cain; his father, Lawrence
Bonfilio and his wife Bernadette; a
sister, Kristin Hamilton and her husband Chris; niece and nephews, Faith,
Matthew, and Nicholas Hamilton;
two stepsisters, Kathleen Lundy and
Christina Kling; and their children,
Liam, Christian, and Andrew Greene
and Samantha Kling.
Calling hours are Wednesday, January 9, 2019, from 9 - 10:30 AM in the
Peabody Funeral Homes and Crematorium, 15 Birch Street, DERRY, NH.
Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated on Wednesday, at 11:00 AM in
St. Thomas Aquinas Church, 26 Crystal
Avenue, Derry. Burial will follow in the
Forest Hill Cemetery, East Derry, NH.
Donations may be made to the Pine
Street Inn, Attn: Shelli Hezekiah, 444
Harrison Avenue, Boston, MA 02118.
Age 85, of Winchester, Jan.
2, 2019. Beloved husband
of the late Catherine C.
(Cushman) Broadbent. Loving father
of Cynthia Ballo of Lexington, David
Broadbent of Arlington, VA, Carol
Stevenson of Winchester, and the late
Drew Broadbent. Devoted grandfather
of Phillip C. Ballo, Julie Ballo and
Brooke Stevenson. Relatives and friends
kindly invited to attend visiting hours
in the Costello Funeral Home, 177
Washington St., WINCHESTER, on
Mon., Jan. 7, from 4-7 PM. A Funeral
Service will be held at the conclusion
of visiting hours in the Funeral Home
at 7PM. Burial is private. Late Veteran
U.S. Air Force.
www.costellofuneralhome.com
BURKE, Michael J.
For more information visit,
www.peabodyfuneralhome.com
Funeral Services
500 Canterbury St.
Boston, MA 02131
617-524-1036
www.stmichaelcemetery.com
CANNIFF MONUMENT
(617) 323-3690
800-439-3690 • 617-876-9110
531 Cummings Highway, Roslindale
583 Mt. Auburn Street, Cambridge
MON-FRI 9-9; SAT 9-5, SUNDAY 12-5
Affordable Cremation
1310 complete
617 782 1000
$
Lehman Reen & McNamara
Funeral Home
www.lehmanreen.com
Serving Greater Boston
January 2. Beloved son of
the late John J. and Marie
F. (McCarthy) Burke.
Loving brother of John J. Burke, Jr. of
Woburn, Stephen P. Burke & wife Lisa
of South Barrington, IL, and Maureen
A. Burke & husband Sean Cashell of
Winchester. Devoted uncle to Kerry,
Brian, Connor, Caitlin, Sean & Michael,
and great uncle to Timothy & Oliver.
Nephew of Charlie McCarthy of
Somerville and Peggy (Burke) Wackrow
of Woburn. Also survived by his cousin
Tony Burke of Co. Westmeath, Ireland,
and countless friends. Funeral from the
McDonald-Finnegan Funeral Home,
322 Main Street, STONEHAM, on
Monday at 8 am followed by a Funeral
Mass in St. Patrick Church, 71 Central
Street, Stoneham at 9 am. Interment,
Lindenwood Cemetery, Stoneham.
Visitation for relatives and friends at
the Funeral Home today, Sunday, 1-4
pm. In lieu of flowers, donations may
be made to Wounded Warrior Project,
PO Box 758517, Topeka, Kansas
66675-8517. For obit/guestbook,
www.mcdonaldfs.com
ime Magazine’s 2016 list of
the “100 Most-Read Female
Writers in College Classes”
included, not surprisingly,
names like Mary Shelley, Virginia Woolf, Jane Austen, and
Toni Morrison. Within this esteemed
group, however—taking spot number
seven—was the less-known but preeminent textbook author, Elaine Nicpon
Marieb.
Dr. Marieb’s effect on teaching and
learning anatomy and physiology has
been profound. Known for her desire
and ability to integrate the student’s
perspective into her teaching, Dr.
Marieb’s textbooks are estimated to be
read in over 3,000 classrooms worldwide, with more than three million
nurses and healthcare professionals
that are practicing today having likely
learned about anatomy and physiology
from that source. Her reach has been
one of global dimensions; however, Dr.
Marieb’s influence has been magnified closer to home—students at both
Florida Gulf Coast University (FGCU)
and Holyoke Community College will
be reminded of Dr. Marieb’s intellect,
her special connection with her students, and her generosity as they study
in the buildings there that are named
in her honor.
Dr. Elaine Nicpon Marieb, PhD,
internationally-known text book author and philanthropist, had a storied
writing career that spanned four
decades. She authored and co-authored
more than 10 best-selling textbooks
and laboratory manuals in anatomy
and physiology, including the undergraduate laboratory manual, “Human
Anatomy and Physiology Laboratory
Manual” and the textbook, “Human
Anatomy & Physiology” by Marieb &
Hoehn. Learning and teaching were
her passions. Dr. Marieb earned a
bachelor’s degree from Westfield State
College in Massachusetts (MA) and a
Master’s degree from Mount Holyoke
College (MA). She began her teaching
career at Springfield College and after
receiving her PhD in zoology from the
University of Massachusetts at Amherst, Dr. Marieb went on to teach at
Holyoke Community College.
Always striving to better understand
the relationship between the study
of the human body and the clinical
aspects of nursing, Dr. Marieb enrolled
in Holyoke Community College’s Associate Degree Nursing program—while
she was teaching—and proudly earned
her nursing degree. She went on to
attain a Bachelor of Science degree in
Nursing from Fitchburg State College,
and a Master of Science degree from
the University of Massachusetts at Amherst (UMass Amherst), with a clinical specialization in gerontology. Dr.
Marieb was also awarded an honorary
doctorate from FGCU.
Dr. Marieb liked to call herself an
“accidental author,” as she had authored only a few academic journal
articles prior to reviewing textbook
manuscripts for Addison Wesley in the
1970s. During that time, Dr. Marieb
decided to write her own laboratory manual, which became the most
widely-used lab manual in colleges and
universities across the country soon
after its publication in 1981.
Dr. Marieb then embarked upon
writing what would become her
magnum opus—her human anatomy
and physiology textbook. Having the
dual roles of student and teacher
gave Marieb special insights into the
foundational knowledge that nurses
needed to master. Armed with this
insight and a clear talent for teaching
and writing, Marieb authored Human
Anatomy & Physiology. The textbook
was published in 1989 and became an
immediate hit with both instructors
and students. As Pearson Editor-inChief, Serina Beauparlant, so aptly
stated, “Elaine, of course, had many
talents including a vision for how to
teach, a talent for writing, a relentless
work ethic—but I think she also had a
special gift for how to connect with the
student. This empathy permeated her
books at a time when textbooks didn’t
have a lot of pedagogy or a strong author voice. Elaine’s textbooks set a new
standard that is still in play, today.”
Dr. Marieb’s love of teaching and
learning lives on through her philanthropy. Her $15 million gift to FGCU,
pledged between 2012 and 2017,
resulted in naming the health building, Marieb Hall, and subsequently,
the Marieb College of Health & Human Services, which provides degree
programs in nursing, athletic training,
occupational therapy, physical therapy,
exercise science, physician assistant
studies, clinical mental health counseling, health administration and social
work, among others. True to her passion to help others, the endowments
benefit both students and teachers.
Dr. Marieb has also generously
funded programs at Holyoke Community College, Mount Holyoke
College, and UMass Amherst. The
science building at Holyoke Community College bears her name. The New
Directions/New Careers programs at
Holyoke Community College provides
funding to a staffed drop-in center,
as well as to scholarships for women
who are either returning to or starting
college. Additionally, at the school, the
Elaine Marieb Faculty Chair for Teaching Excellence is awarded each year to
a faculty member who is recognized
for outstanding classroom teaching.
An endowed fund provides the recipient with a stipend that can be used to
further his or her professional skills. At
Mount Holyoke College, Dr. Marieb has
helped advance research by undergraduate science majors through the E.N.
Marieb Science Research Awards, and
has helped finance the renovation and
updating of one of the
school’s biology labs. UMass Am-
herst has benefited from Dr. Marieb’s
generosity, as well. There, she funded
the reconstruction and instrumentation of a state-of-the-art cytology
research lab, and also underwrote the
university’s Nursing Scholars of the
Future Grant Program, in light of the
severe shortage of nursing faculty.
In 1994, the National Council for
Resource Development, American
Association of Community Colleges,
presented Dr. Marieb with the Benefactor Award, recognizing her ongoing
sponsorship of student scholarships,
faculty teaching awards, and other
academic contributions to Holyoke
Community College.
Dr. Marieb’s philanthropy extended
to other personal interests. An herbarium and laboratory will be named
in her honor at Sarasota’s Marie Selby
Botanical Garden. Not as well-known
were Dr. Marieb’s philanthropic
endeavors to help strengthen early
childhood education by funding the
Children First organization in Sarasota,
Florida. One of their locations, the Dr.
Elaine Marieb Early Learning Center,
bears her name.
Dr. Marieb was an active member of
the Human Anatomy and Physiology
Society (HAPS) and the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). She was also a consultant
for the Benjamin Cummings Interactive Physiology® series.
Born on April 5, 1936 in Northampton, MA, Dr. Marieb grew up on her
family’s farm there. As a teen, she sang
the blues at a local cafe and attended
Smith College. Dr. Marieb died on
December 20th in Naples, FL at the
age of 82.
Dr. Marieb’s comments to FGCU
360 Magazine in 2017 summed up the
important role that education played
in her life, as well as her reason for inspiring others: “Education gave me the
faith and confidence I have in myself,
and I would love to help instill that
faith in students pursuing careers in
health professions. Be diligent in your
studies because only when you are, can
you gain the sense of accomplishment
that brings confidence in yourself.
With confidence and education, you
can change your life.”
A woman of conviction and action,
Dr. Elaine Nicpon Marieb will continue to shape lives through her legacy
as an educator and philanthropist
through the Elaine Nicpon Marieb
Foundation. For more information
on that organization, please contact
info@mariebfoundation.org.
Services will be held at a later date.
Honor a Life
with a death notice announcement in
The Boston Globe and on Boston.com.
Visit Boston.com/DeathNotices or
contact your funeral director.
B o s t o n
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JA N UA RY 6 , 2 0 1 9
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REDIKER, Robert H.
DORATO, Anna Caroline
(Zirpolo)
MIT Scientist Whose Research Led
To LED’s, CD’s And Transmitting
TV By Laser
A
ge 94, born in Brooklyn,
New York and grew up in
Havana, Cuba. In 1941, he
entered MIT, but soon had
his undergraduate years
interrupted by World War II, where he
served in the Army in the Philippines
as a radio repairman. He received his
B.S. Degree in Electrical Engineering
in 1947 and his Ph.D in Physics in
1950 from MIT. In 1951, he became
the 80th employee at MIT’s Lincoln
Laboratory in Lexington where he
worked on circuits, transistor circuits,
transistors, gallium-arsenide transistors (he patented the first p-n junction
in gallium arsenide), and semiconductor lasers.
From 1959 to 1966 he headed the
Applied Solid-State Physics Group, and
in 1966 was appointed to the faculty
rank of Professor of Electrical Engineering at MIT.
In 1962, Dr. Rediker’s team was, if
not the first, one of the first to send a
television picture (the test pattern of
WGBH) by an infrared beam produced
by his Gallium Arsenide Diode. Time
magazine, at the time, said “If you
get upset in the future about having a
thousand TV channels at home it will
be because of these little semiconductors.”
Dr. Rediker published over 100
papers and holds 10 patents. His
1966 patent for the semiconductor
infrared maser is the technology that
enabled the CD player in 1983. His
work in High Efficiency LED’s led to
the LED’s used everywhere today. In
1969, Dr. Rediker was the 11th recipient of the prestigious Sarnoff Award.
CARAVAS, Gertrude S.
“Trudie”
BURWICK, Stephen D.
Dr. Rediker is survived by his loving
wife, Barbara Zenn Rediker, and his
children Richard Rediker and his
wife Gayle of Massachusetts, Donald
Rediker and his wife Jane of California.
Adored grandfather of Rachel, Amy,
Alana, Kristin, and Michael, and great
grandfather to 6.
Visiting Hours: A gathering to
celebrate his life will be held Monday,
January 7 at 2:00 PM Brookhaven at
Lexington,1010 Waltham Street, Lexington, MA.
CARPENTER, Emilie P.
(Pepper)
COOPER PEARLE, Betty
Age 95, of Everett, formerly of East
Boston, passed away on Thursday,
January 3, 2019. Cherished daughter
of the late Sofia (Massa) Zirpolo. Beloved wife of the late Carmine Dorato.
Loving mother of Carmine Dorato Jr.,
AnnMarie DiGregorio and her husband
Frank, and Gerard Dorato. Adored
grandmother of Christina, Daniella,
Nikki, Adrianna, Celeste, Elizabeth,
and Gianni. Great-grandmother of
five. Caring sister of Margie Gennari,
Grace Celeste, Louie, Anthony, Marion,
Richard, and Frank Zirpolo, and the
late Peter, Joseph and John Zirpolo.
Also survived by many loving nieces,
nephews, and cousins. Family and
friends will honor Anna’s life by gathering in Vazza’s “Beechwood” Funeral
Home, 262 Beach St., REVERE on Monday, January 7th from 4PM to 8PM,
and again at 9:30AM Tuesday morning
before leaving in procession to the Immaculate Conception Church in Everett
for a Funeral Mass to be celebrated in
her honor at 11AM. Interment will follow at Woodlawn Cemetery in Everett,
MA. For guestbook and directions
please visit www.vazzafunerals.com
Vazza Funeral Home
Revere 1-800-252-1127
DROUGAS, John A.
Age 76, of Palm Beach Gardens,
Florida, died on Friday, January 4th
at Jupiter Medical Center in Jupiter,
Florida after a brief illness. His wife
of twenty-five years, Barbara (Licht)
Burwick, predeceased him in 1993. He
is survived by his longtime companion, Carolyn (Fox) Phillips, his son,
Michael Jay Burwick and wife Nicole
Greene Burwick of Weston, Charles
Todd Burwick of Detroit, Michigan, and
Kimberly Ann Burwick and husband
Kevin Goodan of Moscow, Idaho, and
grandchildren Rachel, Spencer, Levi
and Henri. He is also survived by his
sister, Marjorie Bernstein, and he
was predeceased by his brother, John
Burwick.
Stephen was born and raised in
Worcester and was a son of Charles and
Dorothy (Lerner) Burwick. He graduated from Worcester Academy, Syracuse
University and Boston University
School of Law where he earned a J.D.
and an LL.M. in Taxation. He joined
the Worcester law firm, Burwick and
Burwick, founded by his father and he
remained with the firm for many years,
and several name changes to Weinstein,
Bernstein and Burwick and later to
Bernstein, Burwick and Tucker before
he retired in 2006, moving to Florida
in 2008. He spent many summers in
Chatham and in Hyannis.
He was a longtime member of
Mount Pleasant Country Club in Boylston and served for many years on its
Board of Governors. He also served for
a number of years on the Board of the
Worcester Jewish Community Center,
and served as its President for several
terms. He was a longtime member
of the Massachusetts and Worcester
County Bar Associations and he was a
Member of the Hyannis Yacht Club for
decades. He was a voracious reader. He
had a great sense of humor. He knew
where he was from and he was always
very proud to hail from Worcester.
During his retirement, he became an
avid golfer and was an active member
of Cape Cod National Country Club in
Brewster and BallenIsles Country Club
in Palm Beach Gardens, Florida. He
had a wide circle of close friends dating
back to his time in Worcester, throughout his years on Cape Cod and later in
the form of numerous and wonderful
friendships in BallenIsles.
Funeral services will be held at 11:00
AM on Tuesday, January 8 in Temple
Emanuel Sinai, 661 Salisbury St.,
Worcester under the director of Richard
Perlman of Miles Funeral Home of
HOLDEN. Burial will be in B’Nai Brith
Cemetery in Worcester.
Immediately following the Interment
Service, a reception will be held until
4PM on Tuesday at Temple Emanuel Sinai with a Minyan Service at 3:30 PM.
On Wednesday, Memorial Observance
will be held 4PM to 8PM at Cyprian
Keyes Golf Club, 284 East Temple
Street in Boylston and separately from
3PM to 9PM on Wednesday, January
9th and Thursday, January10th at the
residence of Michael and Nicole Burwick, 158 Newton Street, Weston, with
a Minyan Service each evening.
Memorial contributions can be
made to The New England Center for
Children, 33 Turnpike Road, Southborough, MA 01772 or to a charity of one’s
choice.
Miles Funeral Home, Holden
508-829-4434
www.milesfuneralhome.com
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your loved ones. Meaningful memorialization
starts when loved ones talk about what
matters most.
Download a free brochure and Have the Talk of
a Lifetime today. It can make the difference of
a lifetime.
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Of Brookline on January 3, 2019.
Loving daughter of the late Kostas and
Maria Caravas. Devoted sister of the
late Helen Schroth. Survived by her
nephew Ferd Schroth and niece Elaine
Schroth both of RI, and grand nephew
and niece, Christopher and Rebecca,
and dear and devoted friends Doreen
McDonnell, Susan and Tiny Kelly and
Shirley Wollman. Funeral from the BellO’Dea Funeral Home, 376 Washington
St., BROOKLINE, Tuesday morning
at 9:30 followed by a Funeral Mass in
St. Mary of the Assumption Church at,
10:30. Relatives and friends are kindly
invited. Visiting hours in the funeral
home on Monday from 4:00–7:00 PM.
Interment St. Joseph Cemetery. Late
member Brookline Lodge of Elks #
886. In lieu of flowers, donations made
to St. Mary’s Building Fund, 5 Linden
Pl., Brookline, MA 02445 would be
appreciated.
CAREY, Sheila
Age 85, of West Roxbury, originally
from Killarney, County Kerry, Ireland.
January 1, 2019. A strong woman of
faith who grew up in Ireland. She was
a resident of Hebrew Rehabilitation
Center in West Roxbury. The care that
they gave Sheila at Hebrew Rehab was
amazing. Her guardian and health care
proxy, Fr. John Carroll, administrator of
St. John Chrysostom Parish, expressed
his gratitude to all the staff for giving
her a quality of life. Fr. John said, “he
loved her simplicity of faith, and the
sincerity in which she relied on her God
and lived her faith. It was a privilege
for me to be her guardian and health
care proxy.” God was the one she had
total trust in, as she said many rosaries
in the course of her day. She had a
personal relationship with her God and
frequently received communion. God
took her home where there is no more
pain or illness, embraced by His loving
presence. Welcome home Sheila!
Beloved daughter of the late John
and Maryanne (O’Connell) Carey. Loving sister of the late Patrick Carey of
Ireland. Sheila emigrated to the United
States and became a citizen in 1970,
in which she was very proud. Sheila
worked as a clerk for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts for more than
25 years.
A Mass of Christian Burial will
be celebrated in St. John Chrysostom Church, 4750 Washington St.,
West Roxbury, on Monday, Jan. 7, at
11:00am. Visitation will be held in the
Church beginning at 10:00am. Relatives and friends are invited to attend.
Interment St. Joseph Cemetery.
Lawler and Crosby Funeral Home
www.lawlerfuneralhome.com
617-323-5600
Of Winchester, Jan. 2, 2019, at age 99.
Beloved wife of the late Windsor S.
Carpenter with whom she shared 58
years of marriage. Devoted mother of
Stephen W. Carpenter of Winchester,
Wayne L. Carpenter and his wife Ann of
Nashua, NH, and David M. Carpenter
and his Fiancee Mary Perkins of Salem,
NH. Cherished grandmother of Lauren
E. Carpenter of Medford. Private family
services will be held in the summer.
Donations in Emilie’s memory may be
made to the Daughters of the American
Revolution, 1776 D St. NW, Washington D.C., 20006. For online tribute:
RobinsonFuneralHome.com.
Robinson Funeral Home
Melrose (781) 665-1900
CASHMAN, Marianne
(McGillicuddy)
Of Needham on Jan 3, 2019. Beloved
wife of Richard T. and loving mother
of Brett and his wife Elizabeth, Devin
and his wife Isabel and Colin and
his wife Tanya. Dear grandmother of
Ryan, Mia and Calvin. Sister of Karen
May, Jane McGillicuddy and Daniel P.
McGillicuddy. Visiting Hours Mon., Jan
7, from and 4-7 PM in Eaton Funeral
Home 1351 Highland Ave., NEEDHAM.
Funeral Mass Tues., Jan 8, at 10 AM St.
Bartholomew Church Needham. For
complete notice and suggested memorials please visit eatonfuneralhomes.com
Eaton Funeral Home
Needham 781-444-0201
CLAY, Claire M. (Devin)
Of West Roxbury, formerly of Brookline
and Roxbury, passed away peacefully,
January 1, 2019. Beloved wife of the
late Robert L. Clay. Devoted mother of
Kathleen M. Bowen and her husband
John J. of Framingham, Regina M.
Johnston and her husband Robert
of Somerville, and the late Janice M.
Clay. Cherished grandmother of Robert
Bowen, Mary Bowen and Maria Clay.
Great-grandmother of Arieya and Ra
Seo. Sister of Francis X. Devin of Northborough and the late Margie, Edward,
Robert, Richard, Mary, and John. Also
survived by many nieces and nephews,
and six Godchildren. Daughter of
the late Edward J. and Hilda (Walsh)
Devin. Funeral from the William J.
Gormley Funeral Home, 2055 Centre
St., WEST ROXBURY, Tuesday, January
8th, at 9 a.m., followed by a Funeral
Mass in Holy Name Church at 10
O’clock. Visiting hours Monday, 6-8
p.m. Relatives and friends invited.
Interment Mt. Benedict Cemetery. In
lieu of flowers, donations may be made
in her memory to Boston Catholic
TV, 34 Chestnut St., Watertown, MA
02472. Late employee of New England
Telephone. Late member St. Aidan’s
Women’s Sodality. For directions and
guestbook www.gormleyfuneral.com
William J. Gormley Funeral Service
617-323-8600
Of New Hartford (NY), passed away on
December 31, 2018 with family at her
bedside. Born on November 10, 1937,
the daughter of Maurice D. Cooper and
Lena Gorin Cooper, granddaughter of
Nehemias Gorin, the founder of the Gorin’s (later Almy’s) chain of department
stores. Betty grew up in Newton (MA)
and she attended Radcliffe College and
the Harvard Graduate School of Education, and in 1959 she married Philip
Pearle. She taught first grade in Lincoln
(MA) for three years and then retired
to become a full-time mother. Betty and
family moved from the Boston area to
Shaker Heights (OH) in 1966 and then
New Hartford (NY) in 1969. She cherished the time she spent traveling on
Phil’s professional leaves for over five
years, in Geneva, Oxford, Cambridge,
Durham, Trieste, and Jerusalem,
where she established households,
made friends, and studied languages,
enabling travel everywhere. She
enjoyed hiking abroad, but especially in
the Adirondacks, and Acadia National
Park. At home in New Hartford she
became involved in Temple Emanu-El
Sisterhood, and took part in local and
national politics. She was a lifelong
learner and studied piano, voice, dance,
calligraphy, math (so that she could tutor children, whom she also tutored in
English), art history (before becoming a
docent at the Munson Williams Proctor
Art Institute) and was an enthusiastic
member of the Utica Public Library’s
book group. Betty never forgot her
Massachusetts roots, and was a proud
member of Red Sox Nation, as well as
a Boston Celtics, and Patriots fan. Betty
is survived by husband Phil, daughter
Laura, and husband Michael, daughter
Wendy, and husband Alan, grandchildren Jessa and Ashton, brother Paul
and wife Carol, sister-in-law Alice, wife
of deceased brother Robert, as well
as numerous beloved cousins, nieces
and nephews. A Memorial Service
will be held at Temple Emanu-El in
Utica (NY) on Tuesday, January 8 at
10:30 am. Visitation will be held prior
to the Service, at the Temple, at 9:30
am. Shiva will be observed on Tuesday
and Wednesday from 4:00-7:30 pm
at the family home. In lieu of flowers,
kindly consider Temple Emanu-El, or
Lutheran Home Foundation, 108 Utica
Rd., Clinton NY 13323, designated to
the Gordon Unit. To offer condolences
please visit bentzfuneralhomes.com
Bentz Funeral Service, Inc.
(315) 724-2731
Share a memory
Or add a condolensece
to the guestbook at
boston.com/obituaries
Age 87, a longtime resident of Winchester, January 2, 2019. Beloved
husband of the late Bertha “Veta”
(Polymenakos) Drougas.
Loving father of Sofia Koutrobis and
her husband John of Quincy, Ernie
Drougas and his wife Vicki of Bourne.
Only surviving sibling of 13. Devoted
grandfather of Nico Drougas, Yanni
Drougas, Panagiota Athinelis and husband Antoni, Katerina DiCristofalo and
husband Justin, Christina Regan and
husband Mike, and Christos Koutrobis
and great-grandfather of John Joseph
DiCristofalo. Relatives and friends are
kindly invited to gather for Visiting
Hours at the Costello Funeral Home,
177 Washington St., WINCHESTER,
on Sunday, Jan. 6th, from 2-6 PM
and again on Monday, at 10:30 AM,
followed by a Funeral Mass in the
Annunciation Greek Orthodox Church,
70 Montvale Ave., Woburn, at 11:30
AM. Burial will follow in Wildwood
Cemetery, Winchester. Late owner of
Randall’s Restaurant in Winchester.
If desired, donations in John’s
memory may be made to the Hellenic
Nursing and Rehabilitation Center,
601 Sherman St., Canton, MA 02021.
www.costellofuneralhome.com
DROWN, Celia B.
Of Farmington, NH died Mon. Dec. 31,
2018 at Wentworth-Douglass Hospital
in Dover, NH, with her daughters by
her side. Celia is survived by her daughters; Jeanne Cosgrove, Patricia Lynch
and husband David, granddaughters;
Krista Boudreau (Gary) and Colleen
Lynch, great-granddaughters; Emma
and Sara Boudreau. She is also survived
by siblings William Curtis, Mary
Alberta O’Neil, and Eleanor Donovan,
and many nieces, and nephews. She
was predeceased by her parents, her
husband Russell, her son James, her
sister Theresa McFadden, brothers;
Francis Curtis, Albert Curtis, and John
Curtis. Relatives and friends are invited
to a Visiting Hour from 9:15 AM 10:15 AM, on Wed., Jan. 9, in the Eaton
& Mackay Funeral Home, 465 Centre
St., NEWTON CORNER, followed by
her Mass of Christian Burial at 10:30
AM in Mary Immaculate of Lourdes
Church, Newton Upper Falls. Interment St. Mary’s Cemetery. If desired,
memorial donations in her name may
be made to your local American Cancer
Society’s Relay for Life relayforlife.org
To share a memory of Celia, please visit
www.eatonfuneralhomes.com
Eaton & Mackay Funeral Home
Newton Corner 617-244-2034
Celebrate their lives
To submit a paid death notice for publication in
The Boston Globe and on Boston.com, contact
your funeral director, visit boston.com/deathnotices or call 617.929.1500. Now offering custom
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To submit an obituary for editorial consideration,
please send the information and a photo by e-mail
to obits@globe.com, or send information by fax
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about a news obituary, pleasecall 617.929.3400.
DUNCAN, Jane T.
(Wojceshonek)
86 years of age, of Charlestown, Jan. 3,
2019. Beloved wife of the late William
B. Duncan. Devoted mother of Michael
Duncan, Patrick Duncan, Stephanie
Guanci, Jessica Duncan, and the late
Scott Duncan. Loving “Nana” to Jason,
Patrick, Paula, Danielle, Lauren, Ross,
the late Michael; and her greatgrandchildren Lily, Jameson, Jonathon,
Tyler, Sarah, Owen, Austin, Nathan and
the late Haleigh. Beloved sister of the
late Nellie Clermont, Sadie Wierzbicki,
Bernard Wojceshonek and Stella
McGuinness. Also many loving nieces
& nephews. Relatives and friends are
invited to attend Jane’s Visiting Hours
on Monday from 4-8 PM, with her
Funeral Service at 6 PM, in The Carr
Funeral Home, 220 Bunker Hill St.,
CHARLESTOWN. Burial is private. In
lieu of flowers, kindly make memorial
donations in Jane’s name to The Gibson
House, 7 Gibson Ave., Dedham, MA
02026. For obituary, directions and
condolences visit: www.carrfuneral.com
EAGAN, Laura
Of Plymouth, January 3, 2019. Wife of
Richard E. Eagan. Mother of Patricia A.
Eagan of Holyoke, Christine M. Eagan
of Waltham, Carol J. Sherrin of Delmar,
NY, and Tracy McGill of Duxbury,
Michael K. Eagan of Sudbury, Richard
E. Eagan Jr. of Duxbury, Thomas W. Eagan of Manhattan, NY, Brian K. Eagan
of Nashua, NH and predeceased by Stephen Grace. She also leaves nine grandchildren and two great-grandchildren.
Sister of the late Richard J. Franz, III
& Robert Franz. Her Funeral Mass will
be held in St. Bonaventure’s Church,
803 State Rd., Plymouth (Manomet), on
Wednesday, at 10:00AM. Interment will
be in Mayflower Cemetery in Duxbury.
Relatives and friends are respectfully
invited. Visiting hours will be held in
the Davis Funeral Home, 373 Court
Street, PLYMOUTH (at Cordage Park),
on Tuesday, from 4:00PM – 7:00PM.
In lieu of flowers, memorial donations
may be made to the Fund for Nature,
Mass Audubon, 208 South Great Rd.,
Lincoln, MA 01773. For more information, or to sign the online guest book,
please visit www.cartmelldavis.com
ERICSON, Kenneth A.
Age 77, of Exeter Twp, Berks Co., PA,
passed away on January 1, 2019 at
Reading Hospital. He was the loving
husband of Marilyn (Hite) Ericson who
survives him. Born in Everett, MA, on
May 20, 1941, he was the son of the late
Karl E. and Ruth E. (Christensen) Ericson. Kenneth was predeceased by his
only brother, Paul G. Ericson. Surviving
in addition to his wife of 52 years, are
his son, David A. Ericson, husband
of Debra A. of Holbrok, MA, his son,
Dennis J. Ericson, husband of Debra M.
of Medfield, MA, three grandchildren,
Kris, Emily, and Karl, and three bonus
grandchildren, Kenneth, Zach, and
Mike, plus three great-grandchildren,
Kris Jr., Holley, and Addison. Kenneth was a graduate of Northeastern
University in Boston, MA. He worked
for an engineering firm in Boston,
before transferring to Worley Parsons,
in Reading, PA as a Project Material
Manager. After retiring, he volunteered
on the local Board of United Way, also
giving time as a driver for Road to
Recovery for American Cancer. Before
leaving his home state, he had been a
25 year member of the So. Shore Viking
Club & Stenkil Lodge #92, in Braintree,
MA. He will be reunited with his
father, mother, and brother, at Forest
Hills Cemetery in Boston. A Memorial
Service will be held Saturday, January
12th at Medfield Baptist Church at 438
Main St., Medfield, 11am-2pm, with
Pastor Jonathan Chechile attending.
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ERIKSEN, Steven E.
FERREIRA, Americo
TOWNSEND, Dorothy R. (McElroy)
Loving Wife, Mother, Grandmother
And Great-Grandmother
B
Of Marshfield, died peacefully on
January 3, after an illness. His wife
of 26 years Sarah, his son Kristoffer
(of Los Alamos, NM), and daughter
Laren (of Madrid, Spain) were with
him at the end. He was preceded in
death by his parents Erik and Gladys,
and his sisters Linda and Karen. In
addition to his wife and children, Steve
is survived by his five grandchildren.
He was 72. Raised in Needham, Steve’s
family spent summers on Standish
Shore in Duxbury, where he met his
first wife Peggy. After graduation from
college, they spent two years working
in Southern California before returning to the South Shore. Once back in
Massachusetts, Steve earned an MBA
from Boston University and a PhD from
MIT in Operations Research. He had
a distinguished teaching career, with
appointments to the faculty of UMassBoston, Northeastern University, and
a 32 year tenure at Babson College in
Wellesley, where he served twice as
chair of the Math and Sciences department. He was recognized many times
for his excellence in teaching. In his
20s, 30s, and 40s, Steve was an avid
runner, competing in 13 marathons,
including six Boston Marathons. For
many years he organized the Marshfield
Road Runners summer youth track
series. He was a longtime member at
Green Harbor Golf Club, where he
was club champion in 1974, and had a
regular Sunday morning tee time. Later
his main passions were spending time
with his wife and love of his life Sarah
and traveling to visit his children and
grandchildren. Steve and Sarah were
regular visitors to Martha’s Vineyard,
preferring to spend their summer vacations in Aquinnah in secluded cottages
with views of the water, and away from
the crowds. His family is planning a
small informal memorial service for the
summer. He will be dearly missed by
all who knew and loved him. For online
guest book please visit the website
macdonaldfuneralhome.com
FANTONE, Jeannette “Jean”
(Dennehy)
Age 93, a longtime resident
of Stoneham, January 5,
2019. Devoted husband of
Adelaide (Medeiros) Ferreira and
beloved father of Mary Anne Ferreira of
Stoneham. Son of the late Antonio and
Palmira (Belo) Muchata. Brother of the
late Mario Belo. Funeral from
Anderson-Bryant Funeral Home, 4
Common St., STONEHAM, Thursday,
January 10th at 9 A.M. followed by a
Funeral Mass at St. Patrick Church, 71
Central St., Stoneham at 10 A.M.
Interment with Military Honors at Pine
Haven Cemetery, Burlington. Visitation
at the Funeral Home, Wednesday, 7-9
P.M. Korean War Army Veteran and
retired employee of Harvard University.
FISHER, Fay (Galben)
Age 88, of Newton, on Friday, January
4, 2019. Beloved wife of the late Melvin
J. Fisher. Devoted mother of Naomi
Fisher of Auburn and Susan J. Fisher
of Worcester. Cherished sister-in-law
of Matthew and Nancy Fisher. Also
survived by many nieces, nephews,
and cousins. Fay enjoyed spending
time with family and friends. She was
a founding member of Temple Beth
Avodah where she loved singing in the
Choir. The synagogue was an integral
part of her life. Services at Temple Beth
Avodah, 45 Puddingstone Lane, Newton, 02459 on Wednesday, January 9 at
11 am. Interment at Sharon Memorial
Park, Sharon. Memorial Observance
at her late residence, Wed., following
Interment until 4 pm, and 7-9 pm and
Thursday 1-4 pm and 7-9 pm. In lieu of
flowers, remembrances may be made
to Temple Beth Avodah or the National
MS Society, P.O. Box 4527, New York,
NY 10163.
Levine Chapels, Brookline
617-277-8300
www.levinechapel.com
FITZPATRICK, David E.P. MD
“Fitzy”
Age 89, of Lynnfield, MA died Friday,
November 30, 2018.
Mrs. Fantone was preceded in death
by her beloved husband, the late Joseph
C. Fantone, Jr., daughter Jeannette Fantone Newton, sister Carolyn Pokorny,
and brothers Paul, Robert, and Edward
Dennehy.
She is survived by four of her five
children: Joseph C. Fantone, III and his
wife Rosalind of Ann Arbor, MI, Stephen D. Fantone and his wife Elizabeth
“Betsy” of Lynnfield, MA, Julia C. Jacobs and her husband Clifford Jacobs of
Billerica, MA, Raymond C. Fantone and
his wife Ann Watson of Blythewood,
SC; and by her son-in-law, Brian
Newton of New Albany, OH. She is also
survived by11 grandchildren and their
spouses: Julia Anne Pritzel and her
husband Dan Pritzel, Joseph C. “Jay”
Fantone IV, Stephen J. Fantone, Dennis W. Fantone and his wife Danielle,
Thomas Newton and his wife Rebekah,
Jeannette Newton, Robert Newton,
Clifford Jacobs, Jr., Michelle Fantone,
Rebecca Fantone, and Erin Jeannette
Fantone. She is also survived by three
great grandchildren: Eliza Jane Pritzel,
Heidi Anne Pritzel, and Josephine
“Josie” Jeannette Fantone.
Her funeral will be held from the
McDonald Funeral Home, 19 Yale Ave.,
WAKEFIELD on Saturday, January 12
at 9 a.m., followed by a Funeral Mass
in Our Lady of the Assumption Church,
corner of Grove and Salem Streets,
Lynnfield at 10 a.m. Interment, Forest
Hill Cemetery, Lynnfield. Visitation for
relatives and friends will be held at the
Funeral Home on Friday, January 11
from 3-7 p.m.
In lieu of flowers, donations to the St.
Francis Catholic School Annual Appeal
are appreciated because they reflect
Jeannette’s strong commitment to
both her Catholic faith and education
and also support her granddaughter
Julia Fantone Pritzel’s work there as
Principal and Educator. The address
is: St. Francis of Assisi Catholic School,
Development Office, 2270 E. Stadium
Boulevard, Ann Arbor, MI 48104.
For obit/guestbook, mcdonaldfs.com
everly Farms – Dorothy R.
(McElroy) Townsend, age
100, passed away peacefully
at her home on Tuesday,
December 18, 2018, surrounded by her family and loved ones.
She was the beloved wife of the late
John Warren Townsend.
Born in Salem, she was the devoted
daughter of the late Peter Jerome and
Ellen T. (Conway) McElroy. She attended the Sisters of Notre Dame de Namur
St. James High School from 1932 to
1936 and then went on to attend the
Katharine Gibbs Secretarial School in
Boston, graduating in 1939.
Dorothy spent eight years working
for the US Federal Government in Boston, MA but the majority of her career
was spent in a labor of love working
alongside her family. For over 45 years,
she worked with her parents and sisters at her father’s store, Peter J. McElroy Package Store in Salem, MA. She
spent over 65 years working first with
her husband of 49 years, and then with
her sons helping to build Townsend
Energy into the company it is today.
Over the course of her career she was
recognized for her contributions to
Townsend Energy and the Industry.
She was named Woman of the Year by
FITZPATRICK, Rev. John
Patrick “Fr. Fitz”
Passed away on Dec. 20, 2018, at the
age of 84. John served as a Priest of
the Archdiocese of Boston at St. Brigid
Parish, Lexington, St. Anselm Parish,
Sudbury, and was the founder of the
Deaf Community Center, Framingham.
He was a retired Air Force Chaplain.
A celebration of John’s life will be held
in the Spring. Memorials in John’s
name may be made to New England
Homes for the Deaf, Danvers, MA,
www.nehd.org. Arrangements made
under the direction of the Edward V.
Sullivan Funeral Home, BURLINGTON.
For obituary & online guestbook see
www.sullivanfuneralhome.net
FORD, Ruth E. (Herlihy)
Of Woburn, Dec. 10. Beloved husband
of the late Martha M. (Donahue)
Fitzpatrick. Loving father of John C.
Fitzpatrick, his wife Kate of New Castle,
NH, and Robert E. Fitzpatrick, his
wife Tracey of Brookline. Dear brother
of Richard A. Fitzpatrick and his wife
Greta, of FL, and the late Eugene J.,
and George D. Fitzpatrick. Cherished
grandfather of Emily and Annie. Relatives and friends are invited to pay their
respects Thurs., Jan. 10 from 4-7 p.m.
at the Lynch-Cantillon Funeral Home,
263 Main Street, WOBURN. Burial will
take place at the convenience of the
family. Remembrances may be made in
Fitzy’s name to the American Cancer
Society, 3 Speen Street, Framingham,
MA 01701.
781 - 933 - 0400
lynch-cantillon.com
Of Melrose, Jan. 3, 2019. Beloved wife
of 61 years to John A. Ford. Devoted
mother of Joan Ford Mongeau and her
husband Peter, Teresa Ford Anastasi
and her husband Peter, Stephen F.
Ford, Thomas Ford all of Melrose and
Mary Ford Glickman and her husband
Randy of Woodbury, CT. Caring sister of
Joseph Herlihy and his wife Marguerite
of Maine, the late Jack Herlihy and his
wife Joanne of Stoneham, & the late
William, Francis & Mary Joan Herlihy.
Also survived by 10 grandchildren and
many nieces and nephews. Visitation will be held at the Gately Funeral
Home, 79 W. Foster St., MELROSE,
on Wednesday, Jan. 9, 2019 from 4-8
PM. Funeral Procession from Gately
Funeral Home on Thursday morning Jan.10 at 8:45 AM, followed by a
Mass of Christian Burial at Incarnation
Church, 425 Upham St., Melrose at 10
AM. Relatives and friends are respectfully invited to attend. Burial at Mount
Calvary Cemetery in Wilton, NH will be
private. Memorial contributions may be
made in Ruth’s name to the Incarnation Church, 429 Upham St., Melrose,
MA 02176. For obituary, directions or
to send a message of condolence visit
www.gatelyfh.com
Gately Funeral Home
781-665-1949
Family Owned Since 1889
FRAINE, Elizabeth P.
(Carroll)
Of Bellingham, MA, formerly of
Roslindale and Somerville, MA, passed
away peacefully at home on January
3rd while surrounded by family after
battling a lengthy illness. Beloved wife
for over 56 years of the late David S.
Fraine, Sr.; Daughter of Daniel and
Henrietta Carroll, devoted mother of
Elizabeth Gulbankian and her husband
Richard of Walpole, David S. Jr. and his
wife Roberta of Titusville, FL, John and
his wife Rose of Edmonds, WA, Gerard
and his wife Gina of Nottingham, NH,
Joseph and his wife Diane of West Roxbury, Denis and his companion Tessa
Garrison of Bellingham, Daniel and his
wife Lesley of Reading, Edward and
his wife Patricia of Bellingham, Patrick
and his wife Deborah of Mattapoisett,
and Christopher and his wife Jessica of
New Bedford. Sister of the late Charles
Carroll and his wife Joanne of Saugus.
Also survived by 26 grandchildren, 8
great-grandchildren, and 11 nieces and
nephews. Strong in her Catholic faith,
Elizabeth “Betty” Fraine was a longtime
parishioner of Sacred Heart Church of
Roslindale. While raising 10 children,
she pursued a career serving the elderly
residents at the HRCA in Roslindale.
Betty enjoyed gardening and reading
and was a talented pianist, whose beautiful music will fill our hearts and souls
for years to come. Safely home, Nana!
We love you!! Funeral from the Robert
J. Lawler & Crosby Funeral Home,
1803 Centre St., WEST ROXBURY on
Tuesday, January 8, at 9:00 am. Funeral
Mass in the Sacred Heart Church, 169
Cummins Highway, Roslindale at 10:00
am. Relatives and friends are kindly
invited to attend. Visiting hours in the
Funeral Home on Monday January 7,
from 4:00 to 8:00 pm. Interment Mt.
Benedict Cemetery, West Roxbury. In
lieu of flowers, donations in memory
of Elizabeth may be made to the
Franciscan Monastery of Saint Clare,
920 Centre Street, Jamaica Plain, MA
02130.
Lawler & Crosby Funeral Home
www.lawlerfuneralhome.com
617-323-5600
Share a special memory
Add a cherished memory or condolence to the
online guestbook at boston.com/obituaries.
the Massachusetts Oil Heat Council in
1994 and a Legend of Oil Heat in 1998
by the New England Fuel Institute.
Dorothy had an incredible 70+
year career; her work ethic was only
surpassed by her love and devotion
to her family. She and her husband
raised four children and lived in Beverly Farms for almost 60 years where
she was a devout parishioner of St.
Margaret Parish. She is survived by
her daughter, Ellen T. Freeman and
her husband Jack of San Antonio, TX;
her son, James P. Townsend and his
wife Carol (Martin) of Beverly Farms,
MA; her son, Mark J. Townsend and
his wife Cindy (McRae) of Wenham,
MA; and her daughter, Mary Lou
Townsend of Salem, MA; nine grandchildren, Kathryn (Freeman) Huey and
her husband Marcus; John Freeman;
Molly Freeman; Timothy Freeman;
David Townsend; Court Townsend;
John Townsend; Brookes Townsend,
and Matthew Townsend; and six
great-grandchildren, Oliva, Ashlyn and
Gavin Huey, and Patton, Brady and
Elin Freeman. She is also survived by
many nieces and nephews and many
dear friends.
She was predeceased by her husband, Warren; her parents, Peter and
Ellen McElroy; her brother, Peter J.
McElroy, Jr.; and sisters, Eleanor R.
McElroy and Mary L. (McElroy) Morris.
A Mass of Christian Burial will be
celebrated on Thursday, January 10,
2019, in St. Margaret’s Church, 672
Hale Street, Beverly Farms, at 11a.m.
Relatives and friends are invited to
attend. Visiting hours will be in the
Campbell Funeral Home, 525 Cabot
Street, BEVERLY, MA, on Wednesday,
January 9, 2019 from 3p.m. - 8p.m.
Interment will be in the Beverly Farms
Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donations
may be made in her memory to St.
Jude Research Hospital at 262 Danny
Thomas Place, Memphis, TN 38105 or
Care Dimensions at 75 Sylvan Street,
Suite B-102, Danvers, MA 01923.
Information, directions, condolences at
campbellfuneral.com
GATULIS, John G.
GRUCHACZ, Paul Michael
Age 66, of Jupiter, FL, formerly of
Marshfield and Dorchester, suddenly,
December 24, 2018.
Beloved and devoted husband of the
late Karen A. (Barrett) Gatulis, with
whom he shared 43 years of marriage. Loving son of the late Joseph,
Sr. and Elizabeth (Sullivan) Gatulis.
Dear brother of Christine Gatulis of
Methuen; Richard Gatulis and his wife
Ann of Whitman; Robert Gatulis and
his wife Maureen of Needham; Laurence Gatulis and his wife Margaret;
Paul Gatulis and his wife Janice; Mary
Blakeslee and her husband Michael,
all of Marshfield; and the late Joseph,
Jr., and James Gatulis. Also survived
by many nieces, nephews, grandnieces
and grandnephews. Jack will be sorely
missed by his siblings, other family
members, and his many friends.
Visiting hours at the Mortimer Peck
Funeral Home, 516 Washington Street,
BRAINTREE, MA, on Saturday, January
12, 2019, from 11:00A.M. to 1:00P.M .
Relatives and friends are kindly invited
to attend. Interment private at a later
date.
Age 55, of Needham, MA, passed away
at home surrounded by family and
friends on January 4th, 2019. Wonderful husband of Donna-Lee (Gargano)
Selland, step-dad to Jennifer, Emily
and Scott Selland, beloved brother
and brother-in-law to Joe and Judy
Gruchacz of Kennesaw, GA, Mark and
Janet Gruchacz of Raleigh, NC, Peter
and Meghan Gruchacz of Short Hills,
NJ, Dave and Diane Green of Dover,
MA, and Neal and Lynn Fowler of Raleigh, NC, and devoted son to the late
Richard and Cathleen (Kane) Gruchacz.
He is also survived by his wonderful
nieces and nephews, Abigail, Ava,
Blaise, Ella, Jack, Mary Louise, Jessica,
and Matt.
Born in Summit, NJ on November
29, 1963, Paul was a 1982 graduate of
Union High School in Union, NJ, where
he was captain of the football and
wrestling teams. Paul received a 4-year
full athletic scholarship to play football
at the University of Connecticut. He
graduated from UConn in 1986 with
a Bachelor of Science from the School
of Business and went on to start his
own Real Estate appraisal businesses,
including White Oak Appraisal Service,
in Hartford, CT, and American Elm
Appraisal Service in Charlestown, MA.
In the following years, he enjoyed living
in San Francisco and Washington D.C.
before settling in Boston, MA in 2004.
Throughout the years, Paul delighted
in being the #1 uncle to his many
nieces and nephews and visited with
them frequently. He loved photography,
history and trivia, reading, and skiing.
He completed three marathons, in
Boston, Los Angeles and Washington
D.C. Paul had many fun times with
treasured friends. He especially enjoyed
tailgating, supporting UConn Football
and the Red Sox, and attending Broadway shows. Paul’s longstanding friendships are a tribute to his caring heart
and how fun he was to be with.
In 2014, Paul and Donna-Lee, high
school friends, re-connected after 35
years. Paul married the love of his life
on July 18, 2015 in Charlestown, MA
and immediately became an irreplaceable part of the family. He was the
best husband to Donna-Lee, and they
enjoyed everything together. From
honeymooning in Italy, to taking long
walks with their three dogs, to Paul
bringing Donna-Lee coffee at work each
day, there was so much love packed in.
Paul made every day special. Paul will
always be remembered for his kindness,
generosity, and willingness to put his
friends and family first. Until his last
day, Paul continued to ask how he could
help others and did everything he could
to make everyone happy.
A Visitation will be held at the
George F. Doherty & Sons Funeral
Home, at 1305 Highland Avenue,
NEEDHAM, on Monday, January 7,
from 4-8 pm. A Service will follow at
11 am on Tuesday, January 8 at Saint
John’s Episcopal Church at 27 Devens
Street, Charlestown. Relatives and
friends kindly invited. Interment in St.
Mary Cemetery, Needham.
In lieu of flowers, donations may
be made to the Paul M. Gruchacz Athletic Scholarship Fund of Union High
School. Make checks payable to Union
Township Education Association. Send
to: UTEA c/o Ann-Margaret Shannon, 2591 Spruce Street, Union, NJ
07083. In memo please note “Paul M.
Gruchacz Athletic Scholarship Fund.”
For online guestbook and directions,
gfdoherty.com
Mortimer N Peck Funeral
Chapels Inc
781-843-0890
GILLMAN, Jeanette
“Shandel”
Passed away Wednesday, December 12,
2018 at home peacefully and surrounded by the love of her son Paul, daughter
Billi, daughter-in-law Debra and granddaughter Mollie. Jeanette was born
in Dorchester to Morris and Gertrude
Roffman, April 19, 1924. Jeanette married her grade school sweetheart Harold “Arkie” Gillman who passed 7 years
prior. Jeanette’s son David Gillman
passed on September 21, 2018. Jeanette
is survived by her daughter Enid Gillman, her son Paul (Debra) Gillman,
her daughter Billi (James) Gillman
Watland, her son-in-law David George,
her grandchildren Geoffrey Gillman,
Zachary Gillman, Mollie Gillman,
and Morisa Watland, her sister-in-law
Lillian Sherman and extended family.
Services have been held.
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WISE, Bart W. Ph.D., J.D.
JANGI, Dr. Rohit M.
Devoted Father and Friend
Age 67, of Ashland, MA passed away
on December 24, 2018, after fighting a
long illness. He is survived by his wife
Rekha (Pujare) Jangi. Father to Sushrut
Jangi and Mohini Jangi Desai. Brother
to Sulabha Gangrediwar and Shrirang
Jangi. He graduated from Bombay
University in 1973, and was a primary
care physician for the last thirty-five
years in the town of Ashland, MA, and
served as Medical Director at Bethany
Health Care Center. Outside of work,
he volunteered for years at Sri Lakshmi
Temple and constructed sets for a local
theater group. He also loved to spend
time gardening, and fishing, and was
a loyal Patriots fan for the last four
decades. He will be remembered for his
kindness, gentle spirit, and devotion
to his patients, friends, and family.
At his request, services were private.
Funeral arrangements are under the
direction of the Norton Funeral Home,
FRAMINGHAM. To leave a message
of condolence or sign the online guestbook, please visit nortonfuneralhome.
com. In lieu of flowers, please consider
a donation to Bethany Health Care
Center, c/o Sister Jacqueline McCarthy,
C.S.J. at 97 Bethany Road, Framingham, MA 01702.
P
assed away on December 30,
2018 at the age of 54 after a
heroic battle against pancreatic cancer. Bart’s courage,
dignity, and grace in the
face of such an oppressive foe was an
inspiration. We will remember him for
his immense love of family and friends,
his scientific nature, his appreciation of
history, basketball, and national parks,
as well as his dry humor. Bart was a
great connector of people; being in his
fold meant being part of a bigger community. His love of music will continue
to fill our home and hearts.
Bart received an undergraduate
degree from the University of Kansas,
a Ph.D. in Biology from Carnegie Mellon University, completed a post-doc
fellowship at the University of Chicago,
and then earned a J.D. from the University of California at Berkeley (Boalt).
He was a patent attorney in the biotech
industry, most recently as SVP of Legal
Affairs at Dicerna Pharmaceuticals.
Bart brought technical precision, along
with broader strategic thinking and an
easy comradery to challenging work.
Bart lived with his family in Alameda, CA for a decade before relocating to
Lexington, MA in 2015. He treasured
friends from many eras of this life and
was proud to settle in New England,
where he loved to be a host and tour
guide.
Bart is survived by his wife, Nancy
and their children, Tucker and Tessa
(Lexington, MA); his mother, Joyce
(Springfield, MO); his sister, Amy
Legge (Raleigh, NC); and countless devoted family and friends. Bart was preceded in death by his father, George.
A service in honor of Bart will be held
on January 12, at 1:00 p.m., at First
Parish Church in Concord, MA. Please,
no flowers; because Bart cared about
health, justice, and nature, we invite
you to honor him with tributes established at the Lustgarten Foundation for
Pancreatic Cancer Research, the ACLU,
and Massachusetts Audubon. Direct
links and invitation for sharing memories are at www.bartwise.com
Norton FUneral Home, Inc.
Framingham, MA
HALEY, Caroline “Fran”
(Hanley)
Of Stoneham, Jan. 4, 2019, at age 94.
Beloved wife of the late William R.
Haley. Devoted mother of Teresa A.
Haley, Thomas R. Haley and his wife
Caryl, Claire M. O’Brien and her
husband Kevin. Loving grandmother of
Brendan D. O’Brien and his wife Kerin,
Colin P. O’Brien, and Joshua T. Haley.
Dear sister of Theresa McMorrow
and her late husband Buddy, Dorothy
Binford and her husband William,
Jean Ahern and her husband John,
Ruth Sughrue and her late husband
Paul, and the late John Hanley and his
surviving wife Julia, Edward
Hanley and his surviving wife Marilyn,
Richard Hanley and his surviving
wife Barbara and James Hanley and
his surviving wife Judy. Daughter of
the late Edward and Bertha (Field)
Hanley. Also survived by many loving
nieces and nephews. A Funeral Service
Celebrating Fran’s Eternal Life will
be held on Wednesday, January 9th,
in the Barile Family Funeral Home,
482 Main St. (RT28), STONEHAM, at
10 a.m. Interment will be Oak Grove
Cemetery, Medford. Family and friends
are kindly invited to gather and share
memories with the family on Tuesday,
January 8th, from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. in
the Funeral Home. Parking attendants
and elevator available. Please consider
donations in memory of Fran to
Hallmark Health VNA and Hospice,
Inc., 178 Savin St., Suite 300, Malden,
MA 02148. For directions or to send a
memorial condolence
barilefuneral.com or www.facebook.
com/BarileFamilyFuneralHome
Barile Family Funeral Home
Celebrating Life-Sharing Memories
781-438-2280
HANTON, Maria
Of Malden, formerly of East Boston,
passed away peacefully on January
4th. Loving daughter of the late Louis
and Margaret (Pessia) Spada. Devoted
mother of Michelle M. Varano and
husband Nick of Lynnfield, and Amy
Hanton of Malden. Dear sister of Attorney Len Spada and wife Liz of Middleton. Cherished grandmother of Nico
and Marina Varano and Alec Gonzalez.
Loving companion of Robert Cavalieri.
Fond aunt of Jacob and Jessica Spada.
Family and friends will honor Maria’s
life by gathering in the Ruggiero Family Memorial Home 971 Saratoga St
(Orient Heights) EAST BOSTON, on
Monday, January 7th, from 4:00 to 8:00
PM, and again on Tuesday at 8:30 AM
before leaving in procession to Sacred
Heart Church Brooks St., East Boston,
for a Funeral Mass in celebrating
Maria’s life at 10:00 AM. Services will
conclude with Maria being laid to rest
in Holy Cross Cemetery. For more info.,
or to send an online condolence, visit
ruggieromh.com
971 Saratoga St. East Boston
617-569-0990 - ruggieromh.com
HARBOUR, John R.
Of Burlington, Retired Custodian at Burlington High
School, after a brief illness,
Jan. 3. Beloved husband of Matilda
“Tilly” (Vozzella). Proud and loving
father of Raymond and Ann both of
Burlington. Brother of the late Barbara
Barden. John is also survived by many
nieces & nephews. A visitation will be
held at the Edward V Sullivan Funeral
Home, 43 Winn St., BURLINGTON
(Exit 34 off Rt. 128/95 Woburn side) on
Monday, Jan. 7, from 4 – 7 p.m. Concluding with Funeral Services at 7 p.m.
Relatives & friends respectfully invited
to attend. Burial will be private. Memorials in John’s name may be made to
the American Lung Association, 1661
Worcester Rd., Suite 301, Framingham,
MA 01701 www.lung.org For directions, obituary & online guestbook see
www.sullivanfuneralhome.net
HART, Isabel (Andrews)
Age 91, longtime Tewksbury resident,
formerly of Winchester and Woburn,
passed on Dec. 24, at Greystone Farm
in Salem, NH. She had a great life.
Worked for the CIA overseas, Arthur D.
Little in Cambridge, Bank of Boston,
International Business Center of New
England and Winchester Chamber of
Commerce. World traveler and woman
of great faith. Wife of the late Stanley
Hart, survived by her children, Carolyn
Hart and husband Mike Johnson and
Russell Hart; sister in-law Colleen
Andrews; beloved grandchildren Alec
Hart, Nathan Hart Johnson, Camille
Hart, and Ian Hart, and blessed with
bonus grandchildren Benjamin Johnson and wife Lindsay and their son Logan, Rebecca Johnson and wife Hollie
Stephenson, and Samuel Johnson and
wife Erin Thurlow; many loving nieces,
nephews and friends from Winchester
and Woburn; sister of the late Carolyn
Andrews, Lyman Andrews and wife
Beatrice and Mark Andrews. Memorial
Service will be Sat., Jan. 12, in the Universalist Unitarian Church of Haverhill,
16 Ashland St., Haverhill, at 11 AM.
In lieu of flowers, contributions to the
UU Church of Haverhill or the First
Congregational Church of Winchester.
Arrangements by Driscoll Funeral
Home, Haverhill. For guestbook, visit
www.driscollcares.com
Driscoll Funeral Home
Haverhill
(978) 374-0000
Honor your loved one with a
photo in The Boston Globe.
Ask your funeral director
for details.
HENDERSON, Dr. Warren
Robert
Age 91, of Raleigh, died on December
22. He was born May 5, 1927 in West
Roxbury, MA, the son of the late John
I. and Elizabeth P. Henderson. Dr.
Henderson grew up in West Roxbury
and attended Boston public schools.
He graduated from the University of
New Hampshire in 1949 with a B.S.
in Horticulture. He attended Harvard
University and received his M.A. in Biology in 1951. He worked for Harvard
University at the Bussey Institute at
Jamaica Plain, MA, in Horticulture and
Radiation Biology from 1951 to 1954.
Dr. Henderson studied at Ohio State
University where he received his Ph.D
in Horticulture in 1959. Following his
Ph.D studies, he joined the faculty of
the North Carolina State University
in the Department of Horticultural
Science, where he spent the rest of his
professional career in teaching and research, proceeding through the ranks to
full professor. He taught courses at the
two year, four year and graduate level.
His research involved the genetics and
breeding of vegetable crops, leading to
the release of several varieties of tomato
and watermelon. These included the
first tomato varieties resistant to southern bacterial wilt, that allowed the
growing of tomatoes in the semi-tropical and warm temperate regions of the
world, thus improving the nutritional
health of countless people around
the world. The genetic studies with
watermelon provided basic information, which aided in the development
of the seedless watermelon industry.
Dr. Henderson co-founded the Cucurbit
Genetics Cooperative, an international
genetics organization. He retired as
Professor Emeritus in 1992. Warren
enjoyed tennis and pitching horseshoes
as a boy. After 50 years he began participating in each again. He competed
in the National Horseshoe Pitchers Association and in the Senior Games. In
the latter, he travelled to various states
competing at the national level, in addition to the annual local and state level.
He enjoyed travel to Europe, and on an
annual basis traveled in the summers to
the Northwest for its climate, scenery
and hiking and to New England to visit
family and friends. Warren is survived
by his dear friend and companion,
Ruth Letvinchik of Raleigh; his sister
Elaine Steeger and husband Charles of
Needham, MA; nephew Dean Steeger
and wife Kathy of Medfield, MA; neice
Carolyn Campbell and husband Jim
Johnson of Bowie, MD; and niece Janet
Steeger of Bellingham, MA. Graveside
service and burial will be at Forest Hills
Cemetery, Forest Hills, MA. Memorial
contributions may be made to the
charity of your choice.
Folsom Funeral Home
www.folsomfuneral.com
Honor your loved ones
Honor your loved ones with a photo in The Boston
Globe. Ask your funeral director for details.
HEZLITT, Judith M.
Of Medway, December 30, 2018, age
66. Judy is survived by the love of her
life, Norman P. DeSalvo, of Medway;
and her brother, Robert Hezlitt and his
wife, Gesina, of Batavia, New York; her
nieces, Rhonda Grammatico and her
husband, Matthew, Rebecca Despard
and her husband, Gregg, and Renee
Breeze and her husband, David; as
well as many friends. Relatives and
friends are kindly invited to attend
Judy’s visiting hours on Monday,
January 7, 2019, from 4 to 7 PM in
the James H. Delaney & Son Funeral
Home, 48 Common Street, WALPOLE.
A Funeral Home Service will be held on
Tuesday, January 8, 2019, at 11:00 AM.
Interment will follow in Terrace Hill
Cemetery in Walpole. In lieu of flowers,
memorial donations may be made to:
The MSPCA, 350 S. Huntington Ave.,
Jamaica Plain, MA 02130.
Delaney Funeral Home
www.delaneyfuneral.com
HIRSCH, Judith Irene “Judi”
Age 72, formerly of Wilmington,
MA, passed away Jan. 2, 2019.
Judi is survived by her loving sister,
Alma; brother, Michael; nephew, Matt
(Lindsay); and great-niece and nephew,
twins Lillian and Hudson. Judi graduated with distinction with a Bachelor’s
degree from Simmons University, a
Master’s degree in electrical engineering from Morse School of Engineering
at the University of Pennsylvania and
an MBA from Boston University. She
had a 40+ year career with HewlettPackard, one of the first women executives in the computer science field. Judi
was a long time activist for LGBTQ
rights and had a great love for Provincetown, MA. A memorial service is being
planned by her family and friends
for the springtime. In lieu of flowers,
donations may be made in her memory
to LGBTQ organizations and/or Simmons University. Online guestbook at
davidcgross.com
David C. Gross Funeral Home
727-381-4911
HOWARD, Florence
(Burford) “Breezie”
JESSO, Mary G.
90 years of age. Of Charlestown January 2, 2019. Beloved daughter of the
late Michael Jesso & Mary (DeCristoforo) Jesso. Devoted sister of Lee
Jesso of Charlestown & the late Phyllis
Perrone & Rocco Jesso. Also many
loving nieces & nephews. Relatives &
friends are invited to attend Mary’s
Visiting Hours on Monday morning
from 9 - 10:30 AM. in The Carr Funeral
Home 220 Bunker Hill St. CHARLESTOWN, followed by her Funeral Mass
in St. Francis De Sales Church at 11
AM. Burial at Holy Cross Cemetery,
Malden. In lieu of flowers, kindly make
a memorial donation in Mary’s name
to St. Francis De Sales Parish Building
Fund, 303 Bunker Hill St. Charlestown,
MA 021239. For obituary, directions &
online condolences, carrfuneral.com
MacDONALD, Ronald S.
Of Dedham, formerly of Prince Edward
Island, passed away at Brigham and
Women’s Hospital after a brief illness
on December 31, 2018. Loving son of
the late Earl and Eileen MacDonald.
Devoted brother of Mary MacDonald,
Linda Dunn and her husband Cletus,
Donelda Bertling and her husband
Bob, Heather Voutour and her partner
John MacEachern, Parker MacDonald
and his wife Brendalee, Wanda MacDougall and her husband John, Bobby
MacDonald, and the late David and
Justin MacDonald. Also left to mourn
are many nieces and nephews who
adored their Uncle Ronnie. All Ronnie’s
friends at Roche Bros., in Boston and
PEI will miss him immensely. He is
also survived by his beloved Patty and
her daughter Kirsten. Visiting hours in
the William J. Gormley Funeral Home,
2055 Centre St., WEST ROXBURY,
Tuesday, January 8th from 3:00 p.m. 7:00 p.m. Relatives and friends kindly
invited. Funeral and burial will be held
on Prince Edward Island. In lieu of
flowers, donations in Ronnie’s memory
may be made to Dedham Youth Baseball, P.O. Box 324, Dedham, MA
02027. For directions and guestbook
www.gormleyfuneral.com
William J. Gormley Funeral Service
617-323-8600
MAFFIE, Anthony R.
JOHNSON, Sherrill A.
Of Everett, on December 31. Beloved
mother of Kurt Gastonguay, Tina
Johnson and Dennis Johnson, Jr. Loving former husband of Dennis Johnson,
Sr. She is survived by her six cherished
grandchildren; and a sister Noreen
Barrasso. A wake Service will be held at
the Salvatore Rocco and Sons Funeral
Home, 331 Main St., EVERETT, on
Wednesday evening, January 9, from
3-6 PM followed by a Memorial Mass
at the Immaculate Conception Church
in Everett, Thursday morning, at 10
AM. Complimentary valet parking on
Wednesday at Main Street entrance.
Donations in Sherrill‘s memory may be
made to the Immaculate Conception
Parish. She is a former teacher at the
Adams School of Everett. Her burial
will be private.
1-877-71-ROCCO
www.roccofuneralhomes.com
Age 22, of Canton, passed away
suddenly Jan. 4. Beloved son of Robert
and Lisa Maffie of Canton. Brother of
Austin Maffie of Canton. Grandson
of Joan O’Brien of Taunton, and the
late Michael and Rosalie Mason. Also
survived by many aunts, uncles, cousins, friends and his 4 legged friends
Bentley and Piper. Visiting Hours at
the Dockray & Thomas Funeral Home,
455 Washington St., CANTON, Monday,
from 4-8 pm. Funeral Mass at St. Gerard Majella Church, Canton, Tuesday
morning at 10 am. Burial private. In
lieu of flowers, donations may be made
in his memory to the Epilepsy Foundation, New England at www.epilepsynewengland.org or to Forever Home
Rescue 106 Adams Street, Medfield,
MA 02052 or at foreverhomerescue.org
For complete obituary and guestbook
see:
dockrayandthomasfuneralhome.com
Dockray & Thomas Funeral Home
(781) 828-0811
KELETY, Katalin “Kathy”
MANCINI, Robert F.
89, of Needham, January
4, 2019. Beloved husband
of Palmira (DelMastro)
Mancini. Visiting Hours on Wednesday,
January 9th from 4-7 pm. Complete
notice to follow on Tuesday.
www.eatonfuneralhomes.com
Eaton Funeral Home
781-444-0201
Age 93, of Stow, and formerly long time
resident of Concord, passed away on
November, 24, 2018. Wife of the late
Stanley Howard. Survived by her sons,
Richard Howard of Punta Gorda, FL,
William Howard of Stow, and Eliot
Howard of Edina, MN. Also survived by
7 grandchildren and 6 great-grandchildren. Family and friends will gather to
honor and remember “Breezie” on Sat.,
January 12, 2019 at 11:00 am, in the
Trinitarian Congregational Church, 54
Walden St., CONCORD with a reception
to follow. Those who wish may make
a donation in “Breeze’s” memory to
Trinitarian Congregational Church or
VNA Hospice and Palliative Care, 199
Rosewood Dr., Suite 180, Danvers,
MA 01923-4539. To share a memory
or offer a condolence visit:
www.concordfuneral.com
Of Brookline and Wrentham, passed
away on New Year’s Day. Kathy was
born in Wels, Austria, in 1945 and a
few years later immigrated to the U.S.
with her parents. She attended Brimmer and May School and graduated
from Sweet Briar College. For over
20 years, she worked for American
Airlines, serving in their Boston,
San Francisco, and New York offices.
More recently, she became a personal
organizer. A Memorial Service will be
held in the spring. In lieu of flowers,
donations may be sent to Dana-Farber
Cancer Institute.
Lehman Reen McNamara
Brighton 617 782 1000
Honor your
loved one’s
memory
with a photo
Ask your funeral director
for details or visit
boston.com/deathnotices
or call 617.929.1500.
Share a memory
Or add a condolensece
to the guestbook at
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Express your sympathy
View The Boston Globe’s complete list of death notices and sign the online guestbook at boston.com/obituaries.
B o s t o n
JA N UA RY 6 , 2 0 1 9
S u n d a y
G l o b e
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Remembered
SHARE YOUR MEMORIES ON OUR GUEST BOOK AT BOSTON.COM/OBITUARIES
MARIEB, Dr. Elaine Nicpon
PhD.
See Enhanced Listing
McGRAW, James D.
(1931-2018) Passed away peacefully at
home on Friday, December 21, 2018
surrounded by his loving family. Like
Theodore Roosevelt’s triumphant “man
in the arena,” he devoted his entire life
to his family, church, business community, and country.
Born in the Dust Bowl town of
Ringling, Oklahoma, during the height
of the Great Depression, Jim knew
what it was like to live among those
trying to cope with adverse economic
circumstances. His sunny disposition
was a product of his loving parents,
Sterling and Ruth, who encouraged
his academic and religious education.
He enrolled in Texas Tech University,
where he earned his Bachelor of Arts
Degree in Philosophy. As a young
man he had aspirations to become a
minister, but the global upheavals of
World War II inspired him to take a
more active role on the international
stage. Toward that end, he pursued his
Master’s Degree in International Affairs
at Columbia University.
Upon graduation from Columbia,
Jim joined the U.S. Navy, serving as
a Lieutenant, assigned to the Naval
Security Station in Washington DC, the
department of the Navy responsible
for Cryptanalysis. During his period
of service, he met Nelda Vaughter, the
woman who would become his wife
and the love of his life for 62 years.
Together they raised three loving and
accomplished daughters, Jenna, Nyna,
and Melinda.
In 1961, the Kennedy Administration formed the United States
Agency for International Development
(USAID), an organization responsible
for administering Socio-economic Aid
to Foreign Countries. A former fellow
Naval Officer recruited Jim to join
USAID. He was stationed in Cyprus,
and then Bangladesh, and was tasked
with setting up capital assistance
programs throughout the region. He,
along with Nelda and their daughters,
traveled extensively throughout Europe,
Asia, and the Middle East, exposing the
family to many cultures, religions, and
traditions. Despite personal danger,
Jim consulted with leaders of war-torn
regions and helped them modernize
their communities amidst harrowing
conditions. The fruits of the irrigation,
electrification, and other infrastructure
projects that Jim helped implement
stand today as testaments to his service.
When his growing reputation for
leadership, as well as his organizational and financial skills reached the
private sector at home, ITT Corporation
recruited Jim for a position in their
treasury department. In 1975, he was
promoted to executive vice president
and treasurer of Sheraton Corporation,
an ITT subsidiary. Jim was an architect
behind Sheraton’s transformation into
a world-class organization, expanding
its hotel management operations, and
property investments throughout North
America, Asia, and Europe. He retired
from Sheraton, but he continued to
engage in Commercial Real Estate
Consulting, and served as Chairman of
the Board of HMI, Inc., a leading travel
awards business.
Jim was an active member in
Episcopal communities and generously
volunteered his time and financial
expertise to non-profit organizations, youth camps, and fund-raising
initiatives. He was a lifelong lover and
patron of the arts. He and Nelda supported the Boston Symphony Orchestra
and ART in Cambridge. After a lifetime
of adventures that took him all over
the world, Jim’s final home was in the
beautiful Berkshires, where he found a
community of friends who shared his
values and sense of purpose.
Throughout his successful business
career, Jim was always an attentive and
loving father and husband and after
that, a doting grandfather and greatgrandfather. His family, friends, and
former business associates will bask in
the memory of his humor, intelligence,
and warm embraces. His character was
his destiny and his unshakable integrity
will continue to be a guiding light for
us all.
He is survived by his wife Nelda;
his children Jenna, Nyna (Malley), and
Melinda (McGraw-Pierson); his sonsin-law Bob Malley, and Steve Pierson;
his grandchildren James Malley, Rachel
Malley, Ian Schlesinger, Alex Schlesinger, and Lucy McGraw-Pierson; his
great-grandchild James Malley Diez;
and many beloved extended family
members.
A Memorial Service will be held at
the Christ Trinity Church in Sheffield,
MA, on January 12, 2019 at 11 am.
In lieu of flowers, contributions in
his memory can be made to The James
McGraw Memorial Fund at Christ Trinity Church,180 Main Street, Sheffield,
MA 01257.
To send remembrances to his family
please go to:
www.finnertyandstevens.com
McNULTY, Doris R.
Age 98, of Cohasset, passed away peacefully on December 25, 2018. Wife of the
late Denis M. McNulty. Mother of Peter
McNulty, David McNulty and Susan
Racette. Memorial Service is planned
for February. For an online guestbook,
please visit mcnamara-sparrell.com
MELLOR, Ann M.
(McCallum)
MONDERER, Phyllis (Kogen)
O’BRIEN, Carol A.
Of Orlando, Florida passed away
Dec. 29, 2018. Mr. Pasquale was born
June 15, 1945 in Boston, Massacusetts
to Enrico and Joan Pasquale. No
services or viewing Please see
DeGusipe.com for more information.
DeGusipe Funeral Home
407-695-CARE(2273)
Cohasset-Norwell
781-383-0200
PERRIER, Julia (Hussey)
McRAE, Thomas Kenneth
Of Burlington, Jan. 2.
Beloved husband of Nancy
(Hollingworth). Proud
father of Sandi McRae Duchesne &
her husband Bob of Hudson, ME, Rick
McRae & his wife Reinhild Steingrover
of Rochester, NY, Jim McRae & his
wife Sue O’Reilly-McRae of Warwick,
and Dave McRae & his wife Sharon of
Columbia, MD. Brother-in-law of Helen
Hollingworth of Natick & Burlington.
Proud grandfather of Hannah, Liam,
Sophia, Marcie, Tess, Dana, and Evan
McRae. Visiting hours will be held at
the Edward V. Sullivan Funeral Home,
43 Winn St., BURLINGTON (Exit 34 off
Rt. 128/95 Woburn side), on Saturday,
Jan. 12, from 3-4 p.m. concluding with
Funeral Services at 4 p.m. Relatives &
friends respectfully invited to attend.
In lieu of flowers, memorials in Tom’s
name may be made to Winchester
Hospital Foundation, Center For Cancer
Care. For directions, obituary & online
guestbook see sullivanfuneralhome.net
MEAGHER, Anna Theresa
(Clifford)
Age 90, of North Reading, formerly of
Winchester, Jan. 2, 2019. Beloved wife
of the late M. James Meagher. Loving
mother of Ellen Meagher of Canton,
Ann Carrette and her husband Michael
of North Reading, Michael Meagher
and his wife Nancy of Amherst, and
Kevin Meagher and his wife Dina of
Saugus. Dear sister of the late Virginia
Thomas. Devoted grandmother of John,
Kathleen and William Rutecki, Katelyn
Jolibert, Meghan Picanco, Michael &
Brandon Carrette, Edward, Joseph and
Philip Meagher, James Meagher and
Jennie Meagher. Also survived by 10
great-grandchildren and many nieces
and nephews. Relatives and friends
are kindly invited to attend visiting
hours at the Costello Funeral Home,
177 Washington St., WINCHESTER, on
Tuesday, Jan. 8 from 4-8PM, and again
on Wed., at 10:00 AM, followed by a
Funeral Mass in St. Mary’s Church, 155
Washington St., Winchester, at 11:00
AM. Burial will follow in Wildwood
Cemetery, Winchester. In lieu of flowers, donations in Anna’s name may be
made to Mystic Valley Elder Services,
300 Commercial St. – Suite 19, Malden,
MA 02148. www.mves.org. Please
specify for Meals-On-Wheels.
www.costellofuneralhome.com
Honor your
loved one’s
memory
with a photo
Ask your funeral director
for details or visit
boston.com/deathnotices
or call 617.929.1500.
PASQUALE, Joseph A.
Age 70, a longtime Quincy resident,
passed away peacefully, Wednesday,
January 2, 2019, in the comfort of her
home, surrounded by her loving family.
Ann was born in Boston, to the late
Wilbur and Dorothy (Duffy) McCallum.
She was raised in Dorchester, and was a
graduate of South Boston High School,
Class of 1966. She had lived in Quincy
for the past fifty years.
She was employed with State Street
Bank & Trust Company for over twentyfive years and had been retired for
many years.
Ann’s passion was her family. She
enjoyed supporting the many activities
and accomplishments of her children
and grandchildren.
Beloved wife for fifty-one years of
Thomas J. Mellor. Devoted mother of
Thomas J. Mellor, Jr. of Weymouth,
Kevin Mellor and his wife Susan of
Quincy, and Shannon Menslage and her
husband Michael of Londonderry, NH.
Loving grandmother of Kayla and
Kaitlyn Mellor; Billy, Shelby, and Matthew Chaisson; Michael and Dylan
Menslage. Dear sister of James
McCallum and his wife Linda of Weymouth, William McCallum and his wife
Cathie of Quincy, Joseph McCallum and
his wife Laurie of North Port, FL, Diane
McNealy and her husband Michael of
Derry, NH, and the late Mary Mooers
and her husband Peter of Milford.
Sister-in-law of Barbara Colarossi and
her late husband Bob of Norwood,
Maureen Mellor of Quincy, Kathy
Mellor of Seattle, Washington, Stephen
Mellor of Quincy, Veronica Harrington
and her husband George of Easton, the
late Eileen Perry and her husband Fred
of Woburn, and the late George Mellor
and his late wife Jane. Ann is also survived by many nieces and nephews, as
well as her loyal companion, Brady.
Funeral from the Sweeney Brothers
Home for Funerals, 1 Independence
Avenue, QUNICY, Wednesday, January
9th at 10 a.m. Funeral Mass in Saint
John the Baptist Church, 44 School
Street, Quincy at 11 a.m. Relatives and
friends are invited to attend. Visiting
hours at the funeral home Tuesday 4–7
p.m. Interment private.
For those who wish, donations in
Ann’s memory may be made to the
New England Center and Home for
Veterans, Advancement Office, 17 Court
Street, P.O. Box 845257, Boston, MA
02284-5257 or www.nechv.org
You are invited to visit
www.thesweeneybrothers.com or call
617-472-6344.
Prominent educator and education
visionary, died Saturday, Jan. 5, 2019.
She was 91, and resided in Peabody,
MA. She was born on June 24, 1927,
the daughter of Samuel & Pauline Kogen. Phyllis Monderer attended Lincoln
and Textile High Schools in New York
City and City College of New York. She
developed and created the Enrichment
Program at Newton South High School,
which for over 25 years, raised awareness by bringing in scores of speakers
from the business world, academia,
media, sports and politics into the
school to present on topics such as
AIDS, teens’ self-esteem, human rights,
the Holocaust, and social and diversity
issues. In 1993 she was the winner of
the Human Rights Award, from the
Newton Human Rights Commission,
that celebrated her belief that individuals can make an impact on society.
Phyllis was a renaissance woman;
an avid participant in politics, a patron
of the theater and the arts. She gave
generously of her time to numerous
volunteer organizations. She was a
member of Temple Isaiah and its Sisterhood. She was a loving wife, mother,
grandmother, and friend. She is survived by her son William Monderer &
his wife Marilyn of Milton, MA, her son
Stewart Monderer & his wife Andrea
of Andover, MA, and her son Eric
Monderer of Palo Alto, CA. She is also
survived by her brother Arnie Kogen &
his wife Sue Kogen of Los Angeles, CA
and her three grandchildren, Sarah,
Jonathan and Jennifer Monderer.
For those who wish, contributions
in Phyllis Monderer’s memory may
be made to American Civil Liberties
Union, 125 Broad Street, New York, NY
10004 or Southern Poverty Law Center,
400 Washington Avenue Montgomery,
AL 36104 or a charity of your choice.
Funeral Services will be held
Monday, January 7, 2019 at 11am at
Westview Cemetery, 520 Bedford St.,
Lexington, MA.
Memorial observance on Monday,
January 7, 2019 from 1pm – 3pm and
5:30pm – 8pm at Stewart Monderer’s
residence.
Levine Chapels, Brookline
617-277-8300
www.levinechapel.com
NEERGAARD, Edward J.
MIDDLETON, Victoria C.
Age 75, of Jamaica Plain, MA, transitioned on January 3, 2019. Loving
mother of Trina (John) Cobb of
Randolph, MA, Dawn Middleton of
Boston, MA, Albert Middleton, Jr.
of Ashland, MA, Dana Middleton of
Germantown, MD, and Trevor (Lynn)
Middleton of Belmont, NH. Dear
grandmother of 14 grandchildren and
4 great-grandchildren. Beloved sister of
Elizabeth Andrews of Cambridge, MA,
Dorathy Allen of Brockton, MA, Joan
Washington of Atlanta, GA, and Susan
Andrews of Anderson, SC. She is also
survived by a loving host of cousins,
nieces, nephews, students, extended
family, and friends to celebrate her life.
Visitation Friday, 10AM, at New Hope
Baptist Church, 1450 River St., Hyde
Park, MA. Celebration of Life Service
to follow. Interment at Oak Lawn
Cemetery, Roslindale, MA. To post a
sympathy message please visit
www.DavisofBoston.com
Of Woburn, January 3.
Beloved husband of 46 years
to Mildred “Millie” (Borella)
Neergaard. Loving father of Stephen C.
Christiansen, his wife Jane of Woburn.
Devoted grandfather of Nico and Sam.
Dear brother of Kenneth Neergaard of
Woburn, Marie Theobald of Stoneham, and the late Harold Neergaard.
Cherished uncle of Linda Robinson,
her husband Ben of Billerica, Kenneth
Neergaard Jr., his wife Carol, John
Neergaard, his wife Lori, all of Woburn,
Nancy Pineau, her husband Leo of
Billerica, Ellie Cagnina, her husband
Bob of Reading, and Mary Elizabeth
Buswell of Freedom, NH. Also survived
by several grand and great- nieces and
nephews. A Funeral will be held from
the Lynch-Cantillon Funeral Home, 263
Main St., WOBURN, on Wed., January
9 at 9 a.m. followed by a Funeral Mass
in St. Charles Church, 280 Main St.,
Woburn, at 10 am. Private Interment
will take place at a later date in Calvary
Cemetery, Winchester. Relatives and
friends are respectfully invited to call
at the Funeral Home, Tuesday from 4-8
p.m. Remembrances may be made in
honor of Edward, to the Wounded Warrior Project, PO Box 758517, Topeka,
Kansas 66675-8517.
Age 80. Lifelong resident of Charlestown. December 28, 2018. Beloved
daughter of the late Gerald T. O’Brien
& Catherine V. (Hayes) O’Brien. Loving
sister of Paul O’Brien & wife Carol of
Malden, Frederic “Buster” O’Brien &
wife Patricia of Mashpee, & the late
Gerald O’Brien, Jr., & Robert O’Brien.
Also survived by many nieces and
nephews. Carol’s funeral services were
private. In lieu of flowers, kindly make
a memorial donation in Carol’s name to
the Charlestown Boy’s & Girl’s Club, 15
Green St., Charlestown, MA 02129. For
obituary & online condolences, please
visit www.carrfuneral.com
PAGE, James F. Sr.
Revere Native,
Navy Vet of
Vietnam, Retired
Area Manager
for U.S. Treasury
Dept.
Of Revere, on Jan. 3rd, following a 9-year battle with
Alzheimer’s Disease, 28
days shy of his 85th birthday. Beloved
husband of 46 years to the late Helen
G. “Tootie” (Snow) Page. Cherished
father of Cynthia A. “Cindy” Page,
Suzanne M. “Suzy” Kioussis & her late
husband, Jorgo, all of Revere, James F.
Page, Jr. & his wife, Kimberley of Lynn
& Dorothy M. Morgan & her husband,
Michael of Revere. He is the adored
grandfather to Christina L. Page of
Revere, Laura M. Cudoni of Woburn,
Samantha P., Nicholas F., Jacqueline
M. & James H. Kioussis, all of Revere,
Joshua H., Matthew J., Jessica E. Page,
all of Lynn, Michael J. & Catherine S.
Morgan, both of Revere. He is also the
dear brother to Edward G. Page, III of
Revere & the late Dorothy Hanlon. Also
lovingly survived by his faithful friend,
Susan Armoian of Wilmington & his
two great-grandchildren, Noah V. Page
& Luigi Maringello. & many nieces,
nephews, grandnieces & grandnephews. Family & friends are invited to
attend the funeral on Tuesday, January
8th, from the Vertuccio & Smith, Home
for Funerals, 773 Broadway (Route
107), REVERE, at 10:00 a.m., followed
by a Funeral Mass in St. Michael the
Archangel Chapel on the Campus of
the Chelsea Soldiers’ Home, 91 Crest
Ave., Chelsea at 11:00 a.m. Interment
will follow immediately at the Massachusetts National Cemetery, Bourne,
scheduled for 1:30 p.m. Visiting Hours
will be held in the Funeral Home on
Monday from 4-8 p.m. Parking is available in the lot left of the funeral home.
Navy Veteran of the Vietnam Conflict.
Retired Area Manager for the Dept.
of the Treasury. Late Member of the
Revere Council K of C, #179. In lieu of
flowers, remembrances may be made to
Patient Activities Fund at Chelsea Soldiers’ Home, 91 Crest Ave., Chelsea, MA
02150. For more information, please
visit vertuccioandsmith.com
Of Milton, formerly of Dedham, January 3, 2019. Beloved wife of Wilfred
“Jake” Perrier. Daughter of the late
John Hussey and Nora (Baker) Hussey.
Sister of Josephine Walsh of Nashua,
NH, Margaret Hussey of South Boston,
and the late Nora Delaney. Aunt of
Cheryl Delaney of East Boston, John
Delaney of Saugus, and Deb Hartigan of
Andover. Great-aunt of Jack Hartigan,
Samantha Delaney, and Nicole Delaney.
Julia’s family would like to thank her
caregiver Maryse Doxy of Stoughton.
Julia worked as a secretary at the VA
Hospital, West Roxbury.
Visiting hours at the George F.
Doherty & Sons Wilson-Cannon Funeral Home, 456 High St., DEDHAM,
Monday, Jan. 7, from 4-8pm. Funeral
service in the funeral home Tuesday,
Jan. 8, at 11am. Relatives and friends
kindly invited. Interment in St. Joseph’s
Cemetery, West Roxbury. In lieu of
flowers, donations may be made in
Julia’s memory to the American Cancer
Society, 30 Speen St., Framingham,
MA 01701. Online and guestbook and
directions at gfdoherty.com
George F. Doherty & Sons
Dedham 781-326-0500
PHELAN, James F.
A lifelong resident of
Norwood, passed away on
January 4, 2019, at the age
of 81. Beloved husband of Letitia
Marilyn (Zambella) Phelan. Devoted
and loving father of Cynthia A. Wagner
and her husband Paul, of Walpole,
Denise M. Phelan of Norwood, James F.
“Jimbo” Phelan and his companion
Mary DeMaio, of Needham, and
Michelle A. Sheehan and her husband
John, of Norwood. Cherished
grandfather of Christopher, Michaela,
Paul, Jack, Matthew, Dana Marie, Sadie,
and Jacob. Son of the late James F. and
Katherine (Costello) Phelan. Visiting
hours will be held on Monday, Jan. 7,
2019, from 1-4pm, at the Kraw-Kornack Funeral Home, 1248 Washington
St., NORWOOD. A funeral home service
will be held on Monday, Jan. 7, 2019 at
4pm, immediately following, the
visiting hours. At the request of the
family, burial will be private. In lieu of
flowers, donations may be made in
James’s name to the Norwood Circle of
Hope Foundation- Dancing With the
Stars - https://www.facebook.com/
NorwoodCOH/. James was a US Army
Veteran. At the conclusion of the
Funeral Home Service, the family
would like to invite everyone to the Old
Colonial Café, 171 Nahatan St.,
Norwood, MA 02062.
kraw-kornackfuneralhome.com
Family Owned and Operated
781-762-0482
Celebrate their lives
781 - 933 - 0400
lynch-cantillon.com
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Honor your loved one with a photo
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JA N UA RY 6 , 2 0 1 9
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PIERCE, Warren D. Jr.
REDIKER, Robert H.
RIDDELL, Mary (Turner)
RUSK, Dr. Jeremy W.
Of Needham, passed away on December 31, 2018, after a courageous
two-year battle with cancer. Beloved
wife of William W. Riddell of Needham
for 52 years. Devoted mother of Katherine Riddell Aultz and her husband
Steven “Adam” of Natick and William
T. Riddell and his wife Georgia Wood of
Haddonfield, NJ. Proud grandmother
of Sarah E. Aultz of Natick and Martin
C. Riddell of Haddonfield, NJ. Beloved
sister of the late Margaret “Peggy” T.
Garbooshian and her surviving husband Harold of Pittsburgh, PA.
Mary was born in Binghamton, NY
on December 11, 1936, to Charles W.
and Margaret “Peggy” C. Turner. She
was a graduate of Binghamton Central
High School, received her bachelor’s
degree from Mount Holyoke College,
and her master’s degree from Framingham State College. Prior to having
children, she taught in the Wellesley
Public Schools. She was active in the
League of Women Voters in Needham,
and supported her children’s and many
others’ love of swimming through 25
years of service to New England Swimming. Her family has fond memories
of many swim meets, Outer Banks and
New Jersey shore vacations, and tins
of perfectly textured Grammy cookies
in Wilmington, DE at extended family
post-Thanksgiving celebrations. She
will be dearly missed.
A celebration of her life is being
planned for the spring, details will
be announced at a later date. In lieu
of flowers, donations can be made to
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, P.O.
Box 849168, Boston, MA 02284 or
www.dana-farber.org/
Of Bel Air, California and Belmont,
Massachusetts, predeceased by his wife
of 61 years, Marianne Childress Rusk;
father to Michelle Rusk, Ian Rusk, and
Kristin Rusk Robinson, their spouses
Mark Jones, Carolann Rusk and Grant
Robinson; and beloved “G-Dad” to six
grandchildren, Alexandra and Samuel
Jones, Heather, Chloe and Aidan Rusk,
and Caleb Robinson. Passed peacefully in Los Angeles after an extended
battle with cancer. Born in Webb City,
Missouri in 1936, one of two sons of
Ralph Rusk and Martha Webb Rusk,
Jeremy graduated in 1954 from Webb
City High School, where he captained
the football team and played center and
forward on the famous 1952-1953 “Big
Eight” basketball teams. He loved to recount how that team from “lowly little
Webb City” beat nearby Joplin three
times and went on to compete for the
state championship. Jeremy was later
inducted into the school’s Hall of Fame
for his academic and athletic accomplishments. While an undergraduate,
Jeremy met and married the love of his
life, Marianne Childress of Harrisonville, Missouri. They both graduated
from Baylor University in 1958. Jeremy
went on to earn his Ph.D. in the history
and philosophy of religion from Harvard University in 1976. In 1971, Jeremy moved his family to England to help
establish Harlaxton College, a study
abroad program housed on the grounds
of a 19th century English manor house
in Lincolnshire County. There he served
as the College’s director and a professor
of philosophy until the family’s return
to the U.S. in 1975. Jeremy had many
wide-ranging interests, from restoring
antique automobiles to writing poetry.
During his retirement, he researched
and authored a historical novel based
on the lives of his Civil War-era ancestors. But his proudest achievement
was serving as the founding director of
Harvard University’s Center for Lifelong
Learning and the Harvard Institute
for Learning in Retirement (HILR)—a
first of its kind program that provides
opportunities for senior citizens to continue their academic pursuits into what
Jeremy liked to refer to as their “third
age.” He believed strongly in the pursuit
of knowledge at all ages and developed
close friendships with many of the
HILR’s early members. Jeremy eventually retired as an administrative dean of
Harvard’s Graduate School of Arts and
Sciences. A visitation will be held in
the Brown & Hickey Funeral Home, 36
Trapelo Rd., BELMONT, Friday, January 11, from 1pm to 2pm. Relatives
and friends kindly invited. Burial will
be private. In lieu of flowers, the family
asks that donations be made to either
the American Cancer Foundation, or
The Alzheimer’s Association. Online
guestbook www.brownandhickey.com
See Enhanced Listing
RUSSO, Eleanor R.
(DiGregorio)
SIMPSON, Donald M.
RENAGHAN, Leo Mark
Of Naples Florida, formerly of Burlington, Jan. 4. Beloved husband of
the late Janet (Proulx). Loving father
of Jeanette Pierce-MacNeil & her
companion Brian Roy of Billerica,
Jennifer Tapley & her husband Gary
of St. Augustine, FL, Warren D, III of
Burlington, William & his wife Mary
of Melrose and John & his fiancée
Kristen Laggis-Pedroli of Hopkinton.
Proud grandfather of Benjamin, Matthew, Will, Catherine, Margaret, Jack,
Harrison & Keira. Brother of Janice
Burke & her late husband Daniel and
their daughter Laura Burke-Maginnis
all of Natick. Brother-in-law of Marie
Cullen & her late husband Leonard of
Woburn. Visiting hours will be held at
the Edward V Sullivan Funeral Home,
43 Winn St., BURLINGTON (Exit 34 off
Rt. 128/95 Woburn side) on Tuesday,
Jan. 8 from 4-8 p.m. Funeral from the
Funeral Home on Wednesday, Jan. 9 at
9 a.m. followed by a Mass of Christian
Burial in St. Malachy’s Church, 99 Bedford St., Burlington at 10 a.m. Burial
to following in Pine Haven Cemetery,
Burlington. In lieu of flowers memorials in Warren’s name may be made to
Care Dimensions Hospice House, 125
Winter St., Lincoln, MA 01773. For
directions, obituary & online guestbook
see www.sullivanfuneralhome.net &
www.saint-malachy.org
QUINN, James F.
Of Wakefield, formerly of
Somerville, Jan 5. Beloved
husband of Maureen A.
(Nazzaro) Quinn. Loving father of Mark
Quinn & wife Kathleen of Wakefield,
Jillian Q. Fleming & husband Tyler of
North Reading, and Michael Quinn &
wife Elizabeth of North Reading.
Brother of William L. Quinn & wife
Mary Jane of Reading, and the late
Walter, Joseph, & Robert Quinn, and
Edith Schrage & Mary Quinn. Loving
“Papa” to Andrew, Emma, Zachary,
Margaux, Owen, Chase & Jackson. Also
survived by his mother-in-law, Angelina
Nazzaro of Revere, many nieces and
nephews. Funeral from the McDonald
Funeral Home, 19 Yale Ave., WAKEFIELD, on Wednesday at 9am followed
by a Funeral Mass in St. Joseph Church,
173 Albion St., Wakefield at 10am.
Interment, Forest Glade Cemetery,
Wakefield. Visitation for relatives and
friends at the Funeral Home on
Tuesday from 4-8pm. For obit/
guestbook, www.mcdonaldfs.com
To submit a paid death
notice for publication in
The Boston Globe and
on Boston.com,
contact your funeral director,
visit boston.com/deathnotices
or call 617.929.1500.
To submit an obituary for
editorial consideration,
please send the information and a photo by e-mail to
obits@globe.com, or
information by fax to
617.929.3186. If you need
further assistance about
a news obituary, please
call 617.929.3400.
To access death notices and
obituaries online, visit
boston.com/obituaries.
Age 75, died on December 31, 2018,
after living 20 months with brain
cancer. He is survived by his beloved
wife, Laurette Dubé, son Leo Aidan
Renaghan and wife Allison Springer,
stepson Olivier Rioux and wife Pei-Hsiu
Chen, and grandchildren Maia and
Eloise Rioux. Mark was the son of the
late Leo Joseph Renaghan and Dorothy
Frances (née Hughes) Renaghan, and
is survived by his siblings and their
families, Joseph Renaghan, Mary Renaghan, Philip Renaghan, and Dorothy
Renaghan, as well as his lifelong best
friend Jack Ryan. He was predeceased
by his siblings: Denis Renaghan, Kevin
Renaghan, Martha Renaghan, and by
his sister-in-law Claire Renaghan. Mark
was born in Somerville, Massachusetts and graduated from Hingham
High School. He spent his childhood
summers in the restaurant industry,
washing dishes and cooking in Boston
and Cape Cod. He earned a Bachelor of
Science in Hotel Management from the
University of Massachusetts Amherst.
After graduation, he served his country
as a U.S. Army Area Studies Intelligence
Specialist in the 66th Military Intelligence Group in Germany. Upon his
return, he completed a Master of Business Administration from Michigan
State University and a Ph.D. in Marketing from Pennsylvania State University.
Among the most influential academic
leaders in the hospitality industry,
Mark (or Leo, as he was known in his
professional life), was on the faculty
at Cornell University’s School of Hotel
Administration for over 35 years, and
served as Associate Dean for Academic
Affairs. He pioneered the introduction
of modern marketing methods in the
hospitality industry around the world
as an international hotel consultant
and he served on the Board of Directors
of Rezidor Hospitality Inc. Mark spent
his life traveling the world for work and
pleasure, spending extensive time in
Europe, Asia, and Australia. A lifelong
learner, Mark continually pursued his
passions for Shakespeare and Wagner.
He was a voracious reader and never
passed an opportunity to relax with a
good book, whether it was a paperback
mystery or a historical biography. A
football player in his youth, Mark took
up hockey as an adult and developed
passions for skiing and tennis during
his later years in Quebec and Florida.
His life was filled with an array of
loving family and friends from around
the world, and Mark took great joy in
making new friends, sharing stories,
and providing advice to all on how to
lead a life well lived. Mark’s life had to
end but his love does not. Per Mark’s
request, a celebration of his life will be
held for friends and family in Montreal
later this year. In lieu of flowers, Mark
and his family have designated three
organizations that were important to
Mark and his family. Mark donated
his brain to Massachusetts General
Hospital for research into his disease,
Glioblastoma Multiforme, and loved
ones may make a gift in Mark’s
memory to support the research of his
medical oncologist, Dr. Isabel Arrillaga, at Mass General (https://giving.
massgeneral.org/donate/ or by mail to
Heidi Bergmeyer, MGH Development,
125 Nashua St., Suite 540, Boston,
MA 02114). Mark spent the last three
peaceful months at the Miriam Boyd
Parlin Hospice Residence in Wayland,
MA , and you may make a gift to
support their work in Mark’s memory
(https://www.mountauburnhospital.
org/locations/caregroup-parmenterhome-care-hospice/). Lastly, Mark was
a passionate about Shakespeare and
attended the Stratford Shakespeare
Festival every year for decades. Friends
and family can continue Mark’s legacy
with a gift of support in his memory
(https://www.stratfordfestival.ca/
SupportUs/CommemorativeGifts or by
mail to: Stratford Theatre Festival, c/o
Cathy Kemp, 55 Queen St., P.O. Box
520, Stratford, Ontario, Canada N5A
6V2). All gifts should be designated in
memory of Leo Mark Renaghan.
Share a memory
Or add a condolensece
to the guestbook at
boston.com/obituaries
George F. Doherty & Sons
Needham 781 444 0687
ROPELEWSKI, Carol Ann
Of Winchester, formerly of Bonita
Springs, FL, Chelsea, MA & Pittsfield,
MA, November 26, 2018. Beloved
spouse of the late Debra Dumas.
Devoted daughter of the late Chester
and Helen (Parda) Ropelewski. Loving
sister of Donna Albano & her husband
Michael of Pittsfield and the late Daniel
Ropelewski. Beloved aunt of Lauren
Albano and the late Daniel Albano,
and great-aunt to Julean. Cherished
niece to Irene Ropelewski. Carol is
survived by many relatives and friends.
A visitation will be held at the Edward
V. Sullivan Funeral Home, 43 Winn St.,
BURLINGTON, on Saturday, January
12, 2019 from 12:00 pm to 1:00 pm,
concluding with a Memorial Service at
1:00 pm. Relatives & friends respectfully invited to attend. Memorials in
Carol’s name may be made to the Best
Friends Animal Society: bestfriends.
org. For obituary and tribute see
www.sullivanfuneralhome.net.
ROSENBERG, Kenneth A.
Of Newton, formerly of Westwood,
MA, passed away on December 28,
2018. Beloved husband of Sylvia
(Haddad) Rosenberg. Devoted father
of Richard Rosenberg and his wife Vivian (Einstein) Rosenberg, and Jeffrey
Rosenberg. Proud grandfather of Sofia
Rosenberg. Kenneth was a certified
public accountant, avid sports fan, and
WWII veteran. Services are private.
Donations in Kenneth’s memory may
be made to Combined Jewish Philanthropies, 126 High St., Boston, MA,
02110.
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tal kofalifetime.org
Of Waltham. January 4, 2019. Wife of
the late John L. Russo, Sr. Mother of
John L. Russo, Jr. (Susanne) of Hudson,
Gregory A. Russo of Deerfield Beach, FL
and Louis D. Russo (Cindy) of Harvard;
sister of the late Egidio, Eldelco and
Albert DiGregorio, Ida Carlson, Clara
Gould and Doris Gallo; also survived
by 9 grandchildren and 7 great-grandchildren; nieces & nephews. Family
and friends will honor and remember
Eleanor’s life by gathering for calling
hours in The Joyce Funeral Home, 245
Main Street (Rte. 20), WALTHAM, on
Monday, January 7th, from 4 to 8 p.m.
and again at 11:30 a.m. on Tuesday
morning, before leaving in procession to Saint Jude Church, 147 Main
Street, Waltham where her Funeral
Mass will be celebrated at 12:30 p.m.
Burial will follow in Mount Auburn
Cemetery, Cambridge. Memorial
donations may be made to Saint Jude
Parish, 147 Main Street, Waltham, MA
02453 or Care Dimensions Hospice,
75 Sylvan Street, Suite B-102, Danvers,
MA 01923. For complete obituary,
guest register and directions please
visit www.joycefuneralhome.com
SCHOEM, Sandra R.
Age 58, passed away in her home
on August 1, 2018. She was born in
Newton, MA, to the late Murray and
Janet (Martin) Schoem. Sandy will
be lovingly remembered by her sister
and brother-in-law Miriam and John
Drachman (Southborough MA), sister
Ruth Hedges (Henderson, NV), Aunt
Lois Martin as well as many nieces,
nephews, great-nieces and
greatnephews, and cousins as well as her
constant companion, her beloved dog
Joey. Sandy graduated Newton South
High School. She continued her education at Northwestern University and
the Kellogg School of Management
at Northwestern University. Sandy
overcame many obstacles to have many
successes in her early career including
marketing positions at Kellogg’s, Maxwell House, Saatchi & Saatchi as well as
being part of an entrepreneurial team
creating software that was acquired by
Monster.com. There will be a private
Memorial Service. The family requests
that donations be made to the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention
or a Charity of your choice.
SILVERMAN, Rosalyn “Roz”
(Rosenkrantz)
RUSSO, Phyllis J. (Cullen)
Of Dedham, January 3,
2019. Beloved husband of
the late Madeline
(Sheehan) Simpson. Devoted father of
Donald L. Simpson of Dedham, Marie
A. Meehan of Stoneham, and Lawrence
J. Simpson of Dedham. Also survived by
3 grandchildren. Donald was a World
War II Veteran in the U.S. Army Air
Corps and a retired employee of
Metropolitan Coal and Oil of Dorchester. He was a member of the Teamsters
Union Local 25.
A visitation will be held in the
George F. Doherty & Sons WilsonCannon Funeral Home, 456 High
St., DEDHAM, Monday, Jan. 7, from
9:30-10:45 a.m. followed by a Funeral
Service in the Funeral Home beginning
at 11:00 a.m. Relatives and friends
kindly invited. Interment in Brookdale
Cemetery, Dedham.
In lieu of flowers, donations may be
made in Donald’s memory, to the Cystic
Fibrosis Foundation, 4550 Montgomery Ave., Suite 1100N, Bethesda, MD
20814. Online guestbook and directions
at gfdoherty.com
George F. Doherty & Sons
Dedham 781-326-0500
SISTER PATRICIA ANN
LYNCH, CSJ, (SISTER
EILEEN FRANCIS)
In her 68th year as a beloved member
of the Sisters of Saint Joseph of Boston,
Wed., January 2, 2019. Devoted daughter of the late Patrick and Hannah
(Heffernan) Lynch, both from Ireland,
and sister of the late Eugene F. Lynch.
Survived by her loving sister, Eileen
(Lynch) Bennett and husband, Paul, her
cherished nephew, nieces, grandnieces,
grandnephews, and her Sisters in the
Congregation. Formerly missioned as a
teacher at Gate of Heaven School, South
Boston; St. Catherine School, Norwood;
St. Patrick School, Natick; Keith Hall
High School, Lowell; and Fontbonne
Academy, Milton. Sister Patricia also
served in the Archdiocese of Boston
Catholic School Office as a member of
the Educational Development Team
for Secondary Schools; as Admissions
Director of Cardinal Spellman High
School, Brockton; and as General
Councilor for the Congregation of Sisters of St. Joseph of Boston. Visiting
Hours at Holy Spirit Chapel, Bethany
Health Care Center, 97 Bethany Road,
Framingham, Mon., January 7, 2019,
9:15 to 10:15 a.m. Prayer Service at
10:15 a.m. followed by the Funeral
Mass and Prayers of Final Commendation at Bethany at 10:30 a.m. Burial:
All will meet at 1:00 p.m. at Main Gate
of New Calvary Cemetery, 800 Harvard
Street, Mattapan, MA. Arrangements
by Norton Funeral Home, FRAMINGHAM. In lieu of flowers, expressions of
sympathy may be made to the Sisters
of Saint Joseph, c/o Mission Advancement, 637 Cambridge Street, Brighton,
MA 02135.
Norton Funeral Home, Inc.
Framingham, MA
Of Bolton, formerly of Waltham.
December 25, 2018. Wife of the late
Raymond F. ‘Red’ Russo. Mother of
Raymond F. Russo, Jr. (Jamie) of
Nashua, NH, Elizabeth J. Fairweather
(Jim) of Maynard and David S. Russo
of Charleston, WV. Grandmother of
Justine Ferriter (Chris) and Jason
Russo, Matthew (Alysha), Amanda and
Danielle Fairweather and Nicholas
Russo; Family and friends will honor
and remember Phyllis’ life by gathering
for calling hours in The Joyce Funeral Home, 245 Main Street (Rte. 20),
WALTHAM on Saturday, April 13th
from 8:30 - 10:00 a.m, before leaving in
procession to Sacred Heart Church, 311
River Street, Waltham where her Funeral Mass will be celebrated at 10:30
a.m. Burial will follow in Mount Feake
Cemetery, Waltham. Memorial donations may be made to American Heart
Association,300 5th Ave, Waltham, MA
02451. For complete obituary, guest
register and directions please visit
www.joycefuneralhome.com
Formerly of Salem and West Roxbury, on Thursday, January 3, 2019.
Beloved wife of the late Milton “Mal”
Silverman. Loving mother of Alan
(Martha) Silverman, Carole Freeman,
Michael (Harriet) Silverman, Diane
(Michael) Silverman Black, David
(Tamar) Silverman, Barry (Kimberly)
Silverman, Robert (Annie) Silverman,
and the late Ronald “Ron” Silverman.
Cherished grandmother of Jeffrey,
Steven, Andrew, Joshua, Wayne, Lindsay, Lauren, Roni, Gabi, Micah, Josef,
Daniel, Sophie, Eli, Sam, and the late
Kenneth, and great-grandmother of
four. Sister of Jordan Rosenkrantz and
the late Charlotte Langer and Marvin
Rosenkrantz. Roz was a dear friend to
many.
Services at the Levine Chapels, 470
Harvard St., BROOKLINE, on Tuesday,
January 8, at 11:30am. Burial in the
David Vichor Cholim Cemetery, 776
Baker St., West Roxbury.
Memorial observance Tuesday only,
beginning at 4pm through 8pm at the
home of Alan & Martha Silverman.
In lieu of flowers, remembrances
may be made to a charity of your
choice.
Levine Chapels, Brookline
617-277-8300
www.levinechapel.com
Celebrate their lives
To submit a paid death notice for publication in
The Boston Globe and on Boston.com, contact
your funeral director, visit boston.com/deathnotices or call 617.929.1500. Now offering custom
headings and enhanced listings.
To submit an obituary for editorial consideration,
please send the information and a photo by e-mail
to obits@globe.com, or send information by fax
to 617.929.3186. If you need further assistance
about a news obituary, pleasecall 617.929.3400.
STRAUMANIS, Ruta
January 2. Daughter of the late Karlis
and Anna Alvine (Broks) Straumanis.
Sister of Astrida S. Ramrath of Needham and the late Skaidrite Anderson.
Also survived by 4 Godchildren Andris,
Anne, Karlis and Olita and nieces and
nephews. Funeral Services will be at the
Latvian Church in Brookline, 58 Irving
Street, on Monday, at 11 am. Relatives
and friends invited. Interment will be
private. In lieu of flowers, donations
can be made to the Latvian Lutheran
Church of Boston or the Museum of the
Occupation of Latvia at
okupacijasmuzejs.lv Guestbook at
mannandrodgers.com
Honor your loved one’s memory
with a photo in The Boston Globe.
Ask your funeral director for details.
B o s t o n
JA N UA RY 6 , 2 0 1 9
S u n d a y
G l o b e
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Remembered
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SULLIVAN, Richard Paul
“Dick” “Sully”
East Boston
Native, 37 year
committed &
active friend of
Bill W.
Formerly of Malden, East Boston &
Revere, in Wakefield at 79 years, following a lengthy illness on December
24th. Devoted father of Coleen Sullivan
Curry & her husband Joseph, Megan
Sullivan Toe & her husband John &
the late Mary Ellen “Molly” Sullivan.
Adored grandfather to Caroline, Violet
& William Curry, all of Atlanta, GA.
Cherished brother of Francis Joseph
Sullivan & his wife Esther of Woburn,
formerly of Melrose, Kathryn M.
Murphy of Saugus & her late husband
John, John L. Sullivan & his late wife
Irene of Ft. Myers, FL. Dear son of
the late Boston Firefighter Francis C.
Sullivan & Mary A. (Cashman) Sullivan.
Also lovingly survived by many nieces,
nephews, grandnieces, grandnephews,
friends & extended family. Family &
friends are invited to attend a Memorial
Visitation on Saturday, January 12th,
in the Vertuccio & Smith, Home for
Funerals, 773 Broadway (Rte. 107)
REVERE, from 9:30 a.m. to 11:00 a.m.,
followed by a Memorial Funeral Mass
at Immaculate Conception Church
(Corner of Beach St. & Winthrop Ave.)
Revere at 11:30 a.m. Interment will be
held privately at Woodlawn Cemetery,
Everett. “Dick” was a committed and
active friend of “Bill W.” with 37 years
of sobriety & a dedication to sponsoring
others. In lieu of flowers, remembrances may be made to the Alzheimer’s
Association, P.O. Box 96011, Washington, DC 20090-6011 or by visiting alz.
org For more information, please visit
vertuccioandsmith.com
To submit a paid death
notice for publication in
The Boston Globe and
on Boston.com,
contact your funeral director,
visit boston.com/deathnotices
or call 617.929.1500.
To submit an obituary for
editorial consideration,
please send the information and a photo by e-mail to
obits@globe.com, or
information by fax to
617.929.3186. If you need
further assistance about
a news obituary, please
call 617.929.3400.
To access death notices and
obituaries online, visit
boston.com/obituaries.
TADGELL, Robert E. “Bob”
Age 89, of Wilmington,
passed away peacefully on
January 4, 2019. Bob was
the beloved husband of Helen (Benner)
Tadgell, devoted father of Heather
T. Rollo & her partner Bruce Rossi
of Medford, and Robert E. Tadgell,
Jr. & his partner Richard E. Pumfrey
of Atkinson, NH. Loving “Grampy”
of Lindsay Anderson & her husband
Cameron, and Allison McCarthy & her
husband Christopher. Cherished son
of the late Alfred and Grace (Dow)
Tadgell, dear brother of the late Ruth,
Alfred, Henry and Richard Tadgell.
Bob is also survived by several nieces
and nephews.
Visiting Hours: At Bob’s request, his
services will be private.
In lieu of flowers, donations in Bob’s
memory may be made to the Children’s
Hospital, Attn: Development Office,
300 Longwood Ave., Boston, MA
02115, Shriner’s Hospitals for Children
- Boston, Attn: Development Office, 51
Blossom St., Boston, MA 02114 or to
St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital,
262 Danny Thomas Place, Memphis,
TN 38105.
Bob proudly served in the United
States Army during the Korean War
and retired from the Banking industry
with State Street Bank in Boston following many years of dedicated service.
Nichols Funeral Home
978-658-4744
www.nicholsfuneralhome.com
THOMAS, Kevin S.
Of Walpole, December 25, 2018, age
53. Beloved husband of Debra (Amos)
Thomas. Loving father of Justin
Thomas and his wife Kate of Foxborough, Paul Segreve of Walpole, Brianna
Segreve of Walpole, and the late Jacklyn
Thomas. Cherished grandfather of
Gracie Vierra, Maddox Thomas, and
Jaxson Kelleher. Devoted son of Arlene
(Aho) Thomas of Walpole, the late
Harry G. Thomas, and the late Greta
(Svenson) Thomas. Brother of Steven
Thomas and his companion, Mary Ann
Pupek of Walpole, Renee Thomas of
Walpole, the late Peter Thomas, and
the late Dennis Thomas. He also leaves
behind two nephews, Michael Thomas
of Colorado Springs, and Scott Thomas
and his wife, Jamie, of Indianapolis,
as well as many nieces, a nephew, and
many friends. Relatives and friends are
kindly invited to attend Kevin’s visitation on Tuesday, January 8, 2019 from
4 to 8 PM in the James H. Delaney &
Son Funeral Home, 48 Common Street,
WALPOLE. Funeral service and Interment will be private. In lieu of flowers,
memorial donations may be made to:
The Jackie Thomas Memorial Scholarship Fund, c/o Sharon Credit Union, 42
Pond Street, Sharon, MA 02067.
Delaney Funeral Home
www.delaneyfuneral.com
Share a memory
Or add a condolensece
to the guestbook at
boston.com/obituaries
TILLEY, Florence L.
VINCENT, Valerie I. (Arntz)
WALKER, Jean E. (Dray)
WISE, Bart W. Ph.D., J.D.
Of Peabody, formerly of Everett and
Chelsea, January 2, 2019, at age 90.
Daughter of the late Andrew and Eliza
M. (Callahan) Tilley. Sister of the late
Evelyn M. Dudley. Sister-in-law of the
late Allen I. Dudley. Loving aunt of 3
nieces, Nancy Lyon and her husband
David, Judy E. Dudley, all of Danvers,
and the late Debbie Carter and her
husband Frank Carter of Tyngsboro.
She is also lovingly survived by 4 greatnephews, David A. Lyon of Peabody,
Steven J. Lyon and his wife Leanne of
Lynn, Christopher P. Lyon of CA, Brian
D. Carter of NH and one great-greatniece, Ryleigh Lyon. Funeral Services
will be conducted in the Carafa Family
Funeral Home, 389 Washington Ave.,
CHELSEA, on Wednesday, January 9,
at 12 Noon. Visitation with the family
will precede the service from 10:00
A.M. - 12 Noon. Services will conclude
with committal prayers at Woodlawn
Cemetery in Everett. Late member of
the First Congregational Church in
Chelsea.
Of Haverhill, formerly of Medway,
Hamilton, and Beverly, Dec 30. Beloved
mother of Robin M. of Haverhill, Peter
C. and his wife Patricia, of Newfields,
NH, and Christopher S. of Danvers.
Loving grandmother of Serena Vincent,
and dear sister of Ronald A. Arntz of
Westwood and Dennis R. Arntz of CA.
Relatives and friends are invited to
attend her graveside service Sat., Jan
12th, 10 am at the Gardens at Gethsemane Cemetery, 670 Baker St., West
Roxbury. In lieu of flowers, donations
to Whiskey Tumbleweed Farm, 1417
Maple Ridge Road, West Burke, VT
05871 (https://www.gofundme.com/
whiskey-tumbleweed-farm-and-rescue),
to honor Valerie’s love of animals would
be appreciated. For obituary, and guest
book please visit website.
Of Attleboro, formerly of Walpole,
December 21, 2018, age 89. Loving
mother of Maureen Baldwin and
her husband Cary of Rutherfordton,
North Carolina, Patricia A. Walker of
Whitman, Thomas W. Walker and his
wife Maureen of North Attleborough,
Cynthia J. Marcoux of Whitman,
Stephen L. Walker and his wife Fara
of Pawtucket, Rhode Island, and the
late Francis C. Walker, Jr. Cherished
grandmother of 12, great-grandmother
of 16, and great-great-grandmother
of 1. Sister of Gilbert D. Williams of
Freedom, Maine. Also survived by numerous nieces, nephews, and extended
family members. Relatives and friends
are kindly invited to attend Jean’s Life
Celebration on Thursday, January 10,
from 4 to 7 PM and Friday, January
11, from 9 to 9:30 AM, in the James
H. Delaney & Son Funeral Home, 48
Common Street, WALPOLE. A Memorial Mass will be celebrated in Blessed
Sacrament Church, 10 Diamond Street,
Walpole, on Friday, January 11 at 10:00
AM. Interment will follow in Saint
Francis Cemetery in Walpole. In lieu of
flowers, memorial donations may be
made to: Community VNA of Attleboro,
10 Emory Street, Attleboro, MA 02703.
See Enhanced Listing
Folsom Funeral Home
www.folsomfuneral.com
VITI, Marguerite C. (Reise)
TOWNSEND, Dorothy R.
(McElroy)
See Enhanced Listing
Delaney Funeral Home
www.delaneyfuneral.com
TROTT, Patricia A.
It is with great sadness that the family
of Patricia A. Trott (formerly Low and
Arsenault), announces her passing after
a brief illness on Friday, December 28,
2018, at the age of 77 years. Pat will be
lovingly remembered by her children,
Linda and Robert, and she joins her
son William, who passed in 2005.
Pat grew up and raised a family in
Brookline, MA and lived in Hull, Quincy, and Weymouth with a few years in
Somersworth, NH. We remember her
sense of humor, her generosity, and her
dedication to her children. Services are
private.
TRYBE, Barbra
Age 69 of Dorchester, after a long
illness on Dec 19, 2018. She was
predeceased by her parents Povilas
“Paul” Trybe and Hildegarde (Danes)
Trybe. She is survived by her cousin,
Stase Jukstiene of Pasvalys, Lithuania,
and many friends. Barbra was proud of
her Lithuanian and German roots and
was an active member of the Knights of
Lithuania and the Boylston Schul Verein in Walpole. Barbra was a congregant of St. Peter’s Lithuanian Church
in South Boston. Barbra was active in
many civic organizations throughout
her adult life, including the Dorchester
Allied Neighborhood Association, the
Dorchester Day Parade Committee, the
Four Corners Action Coalition, which
honored her as a Hidden Hero in 2017,
the Bloomfield Park Neighborhood
Association, the Dorchester Food Coop,
and the Castle Island Association. She
was a member of the Castle Island
Choir and the Archdiocese of Boston
Black Catholic Choir. Early in her career
she worked for the USO and went on to
work for various other organizations.
She was a member of the American
Academy of Professional Coders and
worked for many years at Tufts Medical
Center prior to her retirement. A believer in the power of education, Barbra
was a graduate of UMass Boston. She
was an avid photographer who traveled
widely. She was a staunch supporter of
animal rights. Donations in her name
may be made to St. Peter’s Lithuanian
Church at 75 Flaherty Way, South Boston, 02127. There will be visiting hours
at Casper Funeral Home, 187 Dorchester St, SOUTH BOSTON, Thursday
January 10th from 4 - 7pm. Funeral
Mass at St. Peter’s Lithuanian Church,
Friday at 11am. Interment New Calvary
Cemetery. All are respectfully invited.
For online guestbook please visit
casperfuneralservices.com
WILLIS, Louise M. (Lynch)
Age 92, of Concord, Massachusetts,
formerly of Middletown, Rhode Island,
on Tuesday, January 1, 2019. Beloved
wife of the late Nicholas J. Viti. Cherished mother of Thomas Viti (Lynne) of
Westwood, Stephen Viti of Harpswell,
Maine, and Robert Viti of Waltham. Devoted grandmother of Nicholas (Erin),
William, Jonathan, and Anthony,
and great-grandmother of Revel and
Desmond. Born in Newport, Rhode
Island on April 30, 1926, the daughter
of the late Alvin G. and Edith (Chase)
Reise. Loving sister of the late Edith
Jean (Reise) Guldemond and Alvin G.
Reise, Jr. Burial will be private. All are
invited to a Memorial Service at St.
John’s Episcopal Church, 95 Deerfield
Avenue, Westwood, Massachusetts on
Saturday, February 2, 2019 at 11 AM.
In lieu of flowers, donations may be
made in her memory to St. John’s Episcopal Church or to the charity of your
choice. For online guest book please
visit www.deefuneralhome.com
Age 95, of Reading, formerly of West
Medford, passed away peacefully on
November 17, 2018. Louise was the
beloved wife of the late Robert E. Willis, devoted mother of David T. Willis
& his wife Laurie of North Reading,
the late Robert E. “Robbie” Willis, Jr.,
and Laura E. Willis. Loving “Nanny”
of Anne Louise (Willis) O’Neill & her
husband Conal, Tyler Willis & his wife
Emily, and great-grandson Jack R.
Willis. Cherished daughter of the late
Thomas F. and Ellen (Wall) Lynch dear
sister of the late Eleanor Tibbetts.
Visiting Hours: Family and friends
will gather at the Nichols Funeral
Home, 187 Middlesex Ave. (Rte. 62),
WILMINGTON, on Friday, January
11th at 9:15 a.m., followed by a Mass
of Christian Burial in St. Agnes Parish,
186 Woburn St., Reading at 10:30 a.m.
Interment Oak Grove Cemetery, West
Medford. Visiting Hours will be held at
the Funeral Home on Thursday, January 10th from 2:00-4:00 p.m.
In lieu of flowers, donations in
Louise’s memory may be made to the
Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, 4550 Montgomery Ave., Suite 1100N, Bethesda,
MD 20814.
Dee Funeral Home of Concord
978-369-2030
Caring for families since 1868
Nichols Funeral Home
978-658-4744
www.nicholsfuneralhome.com
WRIGHT, Marguerite F.
(1920-2018) died November 27. Daughter of Ida and Robert Fleming, she was
predeceased by her husband, Kenneth
A. Wright.
Peggy was a gracious lady who
welcomed many to her home. Peg was
active in the Church of Our Redeemer,
DeCordova Museum, Garden Club,
and Cambodian refugee resettlement
in Lexington. She enjoyed pottery and
crafts; with Ken she sailed, skied, and
traveled. A graduate of Mt Holyoke
College, Peg worked in the US Dept. of
State in the 1940s.
Peg is survived by her daughters and
their spouses: Margot (John) Dudley,
Winifred (Richard) McGowan, Amy
Wright (Stanley Kleinsteiber), and
Carolyn Wright; 6 grandchildren and 8
great-grandchildren.
A Celebration of Life will be held at
Church of Our Redeemer, 6 Meriam St.
Lexington, MA on January 26 at 1 pm.
In lieu of flowers, consider donating in Peg’s honor to: Church of Our
Redeemer mission program: www.
our-redeemer.net/mission/; Cary
Memorial Library: www.carylibrary.
org; Lexington Symphony: www.
lexingtonsymphony.org; Carter Center:
www.cartercenter.org
YAJKO, Christine
Age 71, of Watertown, originally from
Natrona Heights, PA, Dec. 22, 2018.
Beloved wife to Anthony Akillian.
Devoted daughter of Walter & Elva
Mae (Brukner) Yajko. Cherished sister
of R. Douglas Yajko. Also survived
by nephews, nieces, cousins, and
dear friends. Family and friends are
welcomed on Monday to the Nardone
Funeral Home, 373 Main St., WATERTOWN from 5-7 PM for visiting hours.
A wake service will be held at 6 PM.
Nardone Funeral Home
(617) 924 - 1113
www.NardoneFuneralHome.com
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Obituaries
Harold Brown, 91, defense secretary in Carter administration
By Robert D. McFadden
NEW YORK TIMES
Harold Brown, a brilliant
scientist who helped develop
America’s nuclear arsenal and
negotiate its first strategic arms
control treaty, and who was
President Jimmy Carter’s defense secretary in an era of rising Soviet challenges, died Friday at his home in Rancho Santa Fe, Calif. He was 91.
His daughter Deborah
Brown confirmed the death.
She said the cause was pancreatic cancer.
As defense secretary from
1977 to 1981, Mr. Brown presided over the most formidable
power in history: legions of intercontinental ballistic missiles
and fleets of world-ranging
bombers and nuclear submarines, with enough warheads to
wipe out Soviet society many
times over. But that was hardly
the question.
In an age that imperiled humanity with nuclear Armageddon, the issue was whether
America could keep pace with
Soviet strategic capabilities,
maintaining the balance of terror — an assurance of mutual
destruction, with hundreds of
millions killed outright — that
had dominated the nuclear
arms race and strategic planning throughout the postwar
era.
In those days, “Dr. Strangelove,” Stanley Kubrick’s 1964
black comedy film about the
doctrine of mutually assured
destruction, shaded debates
over nuclear strategy because
the concept of deterrence was
based on the dubious assumption that if the Russians
launched a surprise nuclear attack, America could survive
and retaliate, devastating Soviet cities and strategic targets,
although millions would die.
“I believe that in the age of
mutual deterrence — and we
are still in the age of mutual deterrence — the superpowers
will behave the way hedgehogs
make love,” Mr. Brown said a
few months after taking office.
GEORGE TAMES/NEW YORK TIMES/FILE 1977
As defense secretary from 1977 to 1981, Mr. Brown, a scientist, served in an era of rising Soviet challenges.
“That is, carefully.”
In retrospect, experts say,
the Carter administration and
Mr. Brown maintained the strategic balance, countering Soviet
aircraft and ballistic innovations by improving land-based
ICBMs, by upgrading B-52 strategic bombers with low-flying
cruise missiles, and by deploying far more submarinelaunched missiles tipped with
MIRVs, or multiple warheads
that split into independent trajectories to hit many targets.
In his cavernous Pentagon
office, behind a 9-foot desk
once used by General John J.
Pershing, Mr. Brown, a softspoken and intensely private
man, often worked alone, ab-
sorbed in his documents,
books, and judgments. He
seemed uncomfortable at briefings and hearings. But colleagues called him a forceful
political infighter who protected his turf and impressed
hawks and doves with his command of facts.
By the time he joined the
Carter administration, Mr.
Brown had played important
roles in the defense establishment for two decades — in nuclear weapons research, in the
development of Polaris missiles, in directing the Pentagon’s multibillion-dollar weapons research program, and in
helping plot strategy for the
Vietnam War as secretary of the
Mrinal Sen, 95, a top Indian
director of socially conscious films
By Neil Genzlinger
NEW YORK TIMES
Mrinal Sen, one of India’s
leading filmmakers and a central figure in the movement
known as parallel cinema, a socially conscious alternative to
splashy Bollywood films, died
Sunday at his home in Kolkata,
India. He was 95.
His son, Kunal, confirmed
the death.
Mr. Sen began making films
in the mid-1950s, exploring soc ie t al di vis ion s an d oth er
themes in movies like “Baishey
Shravana” (“The Wedding Day,”
1960), about a dumpy middleaged man who marries a teenager, and “Akash Kusum” (“In
the Clouds,” 1965), about a
lower-middle-class man who
inflates his credentials to try to
win over a young woman.
In 1969, he earned wide acclaim with “Bhuvan Shome,”
whose title character, a rigid
railroad official, takes a life-altering hunting trip. The movie,
named best feature at India’s
National Film Awards, established Mr. Sen as a major director and is considered a foundational film of what is sometimes called India’s new wave
cinema, whose realism and
small-scale storytelling contrasted with the grandiose fantasies, singing, and dancing of
Bollywood.
In the 1970s, Mr. Sen’s films
showed his Marxist leanings
and his fascination with the
teeming city then known as
Calcutta, now Kolkata. The
1980s brought several of his
movies recognition at Cannes
and other international film
festivals.
Kunal Sen, an artist, said his
father was always exploring.
“He never got too attached
to a particular film, style or
award,” Sen said by e-mail. “He
changed his style completely
after every two or three films,
and was usually fond of his latest film, while getting increasingly indifferent towards his
earlier work.”
Among those noting his
death was President Ram Nath
Kovind of India.
“His penetrating and sensitive portrayal of social realities
made him a fine chronicler of
our times,” Kovind said on
Twitter.
Mrinal Sen was born May
14, 1923, in Faridpur, in what
is now in Bangladesh, to
Dinesh and Sarajubala (Tuli)
Sen. He grew up in Faridpur
and went to Calcutta to attend
Scottish Church College.
‘His penetrating
and sensitive
portrayal of social
realities made him
a fine chronicler of
our times.’
RAM NATH KOVIND,
president of India
He studied physics there but
never finished his degree. Instead he became active in political movements and the Indian
People’s Theater Association, a
cultural affiliate of India’s Communist Party.
He found work as an audio
technician at a studio in the
city.
“My work only involved soldering capacitors and condensers,” he said in an interview in
the earl y 1970 s with Gar y
Crowdus, later the founder of
Cineaste magazine, whose
website published the interview in 2018.
“I didn’t like that job at all,
so I left. But I thought it would
be a good idea to educate myself in the techniques of sound
recording, so I started to read
about it.”
One day in 1943, while doing research in a library, he
pulled out a book on film aesthetics, and thus began his interest in films and filmmaking.
He began writing about
film, and in 1956 he made his
first movie, “Raat Bhore” (“The
Dawn”) — “It was very bad, a
disaster,” he told Crowdus.
T h e n c a m e “ Ne e l A k a s h e r
Neechey ” (“Under the Blue
Sky”) in 1959, followed by “The
Wedding Day.”
Mr. Sen was often grouped
with Satyajit Ray and Ritwik
Ghatak as foundational directors from the Bengal region
who presented alternatives to
Bollywood.
His 1970s films included
three that became known as
the Calcutta Trilogy (“Interview,” “Calcutta ’71,” and “Padatik”), all exploring class
struggle in that city. But by the
end of the decade, his filmmaking had turned more reflective.
“Ek Din Pratidin” (“And
Quiet Rolls the Dawn,” also
known as “One Day Like Another”), which in 1980 became
the first of Mr. Sen’s movies to
play at Cannes, was about a
woman who fails to return
home from work one night,
and the effects of the uncertainty on her family and others.
“I was pointing a finger at
the enemy around us,” Mr. Sen
said in a 2000 interview posted
on Rediff.com, an Indian news
site. “But from ‘Ek Din Pratidin,’ I began a journey of soulsearching. The process of fighting the enemy within began
from there.”
His last movie, “Aamar Bhuvan” (“My Land”), was released
in 2002.
Kunal Sen said he thought
his father had special regard
for his later works.
“He reached international
fame during a phase when he
made overly political films,” he
said. “However, his later films
were more introspective, and I
think in general he was more
proud of this later phase.”
M r. S e n m a r r i e d G i t a
Shome, a theater and film actress, in 1953. She appeared in
several of his movies under the
name Gita Sen. She died in
2017.
Mr. Sen’s son is his only immediate survivor.
Air Force.
Mr. Brown laid the groundwork for talks that produced
the Camp David accords, mediated by Carter and signed by
President Anwar Sadat of Egypt
and Prime Minister Menachem
Begin of Israel in 1978. The accords led to an Israeli-Egyptian
peace treaty in 1979.
In 1980, Mr. Brown helped
plan a failed mission to rescue
American hostages held by Iranians who seized the US Embassy in Tehran in November
1979. Eight US servicemen
were killed in the operation,
and the hostages were not freed
until President Ronald Reagan
took office in January 1981.
Concerned that America’s al-
lies were not sharing enough of
the defense burden, Mr. Brown
repeatedly urged the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, and
Japan and South Korea, to increase military spending, but
with limited success. He had
sharp valedictory words for the
allies: “They need to behave as
if their military security is as
important to them as it is to us.”
Mr. Brown, who had helped
negotiate the SALT I arms control pact signed in 1972 by Nixon and Leonid I. Brezhnev, the
leader of the Soviet Union, also
took part in talks that led to
SALT II, a comprehensive pact
signed by Carter and Brezhnev
in June 1979. It was to sharply
limit missiles and warheads,
and Mr. Brown considered it a
cornerstone of national security
and détente with the Soviet
Union.
It needed only Senate ratification. Mr. Brown, the chief administration advocate for the
treaty, said it would cut military
costs and the risks of nuclear
war. But critics called it unverifiable and argued that the Russians could not be trusted. The
Soviet invasion of Afghanistan
in 1979 killed the treaty ’s
chances, and Carter withdrew
it from consideration. (Washington and Moscow honored its
terms until 1986, when Reagan
accused the Russians of violations and withdrew from it.)
Mr. Brown called the treaty
episode his deepest regret in office. But in an interview with
The New York Times, he spoke
of one satisfying outcome. “I
guess I’m proudest of the fact
that we have remained at peace
these four years,” he said. Carter awarded him the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation’s highest civilian honor.
Harold Brown was born in
New York City on Sept. 19,
1927, the only son of Abraham
Brown, a lawyer, and Gertrude
Cohen Brown. From childhood,
he was considered a genius. At
15, he graduated from the
Bronx High School of Science
with a 99.52 average. At Columbia University, he studied physics and earned three degrees —
a bachelor’s in only two years,
graduating in 1945 with highest honors; a master’s in 1946;
and a doctorate in 1949, when
he was 21.
He married his wife, Colene
D. Mc D o w e l l , i n t h e e a r l y
1950s. They were married until
her death last year.
Since 1990, he had been a
partner at Warburg Pincus, the
New York investment firm. He
served on the boards of many
companies, including Altria,
CBS, IBM, Mattel, and Rand.
He leaves his daughters,
Deborah Brown and Elle n
Brown; a sister, Leila Brennet;
and two grandchildren.
‘The children, caught up in the game, totally forgot the
danger that was lurking around us.’
MR. LOINGER, in a 2002 interview, speaking about playtime on the journey to Switzerland
Georges Loinger, at 108; wartime rescuer
of hundreds of Jewish children in Europe
By Richard Sandomir
NEW YORK TIMES
Georges Loinger, a physical
education teacher in France
who saved hundreds of Jewish
children from deportation to
concentration camps by helping smuggle them into Switzerland, died Dec. 28 at his
home in Paris. He was 108.
His son, Daniel, said he
died after a recent fall.
In the years after the German invasion of France in
1940, Oeuvre Secours aux Enfants, a relief organization
known as OSE, orchestrated
many efforts with the French
Resistance to rescue the sons
and daughters of European
Jews who had been killed or
sent to death camps.
Some children were placed
with French Catholics or sent
to the United States; others
lived in safe houses around
France, where Mr. Loinger,
who was Jewish, ran sports
competitions to maintain the
children’s physical and mental
well-being.
Mr. Loinger was well suited
to his clandestine work. He not
only spoke German fluently,
but with his blond hair and
blue eyes he could also pass as
an Ar yan while smuggling
young Jews.
In spring 1943, as the Germans stepped up their efforts
to kill French Jews, the OSE
gave Mr. Loinger a perilous
mission: spirit the children to
safety in neutral Switzerland.
Over the next year, he was part
of various operations that
saved at least 350 children.
In one elaborate scheme,
which he repeated numerous
times in 1943, he brought the
children by train from Aix-lesBains to the railroad station in
the villa ge of Annemass e,
across the border from Geneva. When they arrived, carrying false identification papers,
the children walked through
doorways affixed by cooperative railroad workers with
signs that said, “This Exit for
Campers” and were fed and
sheltered at a reception center.
Mr. Loinger told the children never to say “OSE.”
A day or two after their arr i v a l i n A n n e m a s s e , M r.
Loinger took the children to a
playing field.
“We happily played until
nightfall,” Mr. Loinger recalled
in an interview in “Rescuing
the Children: A Holocaust
Memoir” (2002), by Vivette
Samuel. “The children, caught
up in the game, totally forgot
the danger that was lurking
around us. Once night had fallen, we walked over to the border, far from any road or path.”
As the group approached
the border, Mr. Loinger was
met by another Resistance
fighter, who helped the children slip through a barbed
wire fence to enter Swiss territory. Once there, they were
met by another fighter, who
took the children to safety.
The operation was helped
by Annemasse’s mayor, Jean
Deffaugt, and Ernest Balthazard, who ran the reception
center. Deffaugt and the Balthazard family have been recognized as righteous gentiles by
Yad Vashem, Israel’s Holocaust
memorial and museum.
During one trip to Annemasse, Mr. Loinger said, his
group of 50 German and Austri an childr en — all give n
French names — were joined
in their railroad car by German soldiers. Although frightened that the children might
inadvertently reveal themselves, Mr. Loinger watched in
amazement as they played
with the soldiers, who gave
them candy.
When the commanding officer asked why Mr. Loinger
was with the children, he devised a response: The children
had been traumatized during
the bombing of their homes
near Marseille, and he was taking them to a rest camp.
The gambit worked. The officer had his soldiers escort the
children off the train, and they
marched, singing, from the
station to the reception center.
“You had to see the soldiers
with their guns and my Jewish
kids!” Mr. Loinger said in an
interview in 2015 with Tribune Juive, an online magazine devoted to Jewish news.
Mr. Loinger crossed to safety i n S w i t z e r l a n d i n A p r i l
1944, along with his wife, Flore (Rosenzweig) Loinger, and
their young sons Daniel and
Guy. But he returned to France
to continue to rescue children.
“He’d tell his wife, ‘Stay safe
in Switzerland, but I still have
work to do,’ ” Tamar NezerLoinger, one of his nieces, said
by phone.
Joseph Urie Loinger was
born on Aug. 29, 1910, in
Strasbourg, France, in the Alsace region near Germany. His
father, Salomon, an immigrant
from Poland, sold furniture.
His mother, Mina (Werzberg)
Loinger, who was born in Romania, was a homemaker.
He grew up in a religious
Jewish family with six siblings
and was active in Zionist activities as Hitler rose to power.
“ ‘Mein Kampf ’ was sold in
bookshops,” he told Tribune
Juive, adding that he had listened to Hitler on the radio declaring his goal of exterminating the Jews.
In addition to his son, Daniel, Mr. Loinger leaves two
grandchildren and a brother,
Charles. Another son, Guy,
died in 2012. A sister, Fanny
(Loinger) Nezer, a nurse who
was also involved in saving
Jewish children, died in 1992.
B o s t o n
JA N UA RY 6 , 2 0 1 9
S u n d a y
G l o b e
Today’s outlook
Boston’s forecast
6 A.M.
NOON
6 P.M.
6 A.M.
Intervals of clouds and
sunshine with winds
gusting past 40 mph as
a storm system moves
away. It will turn sharply colder
at night.
HIGH
43-48
LOW
19-24
NOON
6 P.M.
High pressure will provide a seasonably colder
day with sunshine and
some clouds. Clouds
increasing at night with some
snow arriving later on.
HIGH
31-36
LOW
26-31
6 A.M.
THURSDAY
WEDNESDAY
TUESDAY
MONDAY
TODAY
NOON
6 P.M.
6 A.M.
Considerable clouds and
milder; periods of snow
and rain in the morning
followed by a couple of
showers in the afternoon as it
turns milder.
NOON
6 P.M.
6 A.M.
6 P.M.
For updated New England, national and international forecasts, visit boston.com/weather
For the latest weather forecast for your area, text “w” plus your city or town name (ex: “w hull”)
to BOSTON (267866)
New England forecast
TODAY: Windy in the wake of a storm system. There will
HIGH Even colder air will move be a couple of snow showers across the north with some
36-41 into the region along
sunshine south.
TOMORROW: High pressure will provide a colder
LOW with clouds and some
20-25 sunshine. But, tempera- day with some sunshine. Snow will arrive at night in
most places with a wintry mix far south.
tures will still be slightly above
EXTENDED: A storm system will continue
normal as well.
to bring some snow to northern areas on
Tuesday with a wintry mix across southern areas.
As the storm system
moves away from the
area, plenty of clouds
will linger along with a
flurry or sprinkle in spots. There
may be a mix at night.
HIGH
43-48
LOW
34-39
NOON
A23
HIGH
40-45
LOW
27-32
Map
key
Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.
New England marine forecast
 Marblehead
Wind
Seas Temp
NW 12-25 kts. 2-4 ft. 45/19
 Small craft advisory
 Gale warning  Storm warning
Wind
Seas Temp
 Martha’s
 Boston Harbor NW 12-25 kts. 1-3 ft.
45/20
Vineyard
W 10-20 kts.
3-5 ft.
43/21
 Scituate
44/21
 Nantucket
W 12-25 kts.
2-4 ft.
42/23
 Provincetown NW 20-35 kts. 2-4 ft.
42/22
38/12
NW 12-25 kts. 2-4 ft.
 East Cape
NW 15-25 kts. 2-4 ft.
45/20
 Penobscot Bay NW 15-30 kts. 3-5 ft.
 Buzzards Bay NW 10-20 kts. 2-4 ft.
44/20
 Georges Bank W 20-35 kts.
 Newport, R.I.
45/23
 100 miles south of
Cod Canal
NW 10-20 kts. 2-4 ft.
6-10 ft. 43/31
Nantucket Shoals NW 20-35 kts. 8-12 ft. 49/34
For current Charles River Basin water quality, call (781) 788-0007 or go to http://www.charlesriver.org.
Cities
Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
Forecast high and low temperatures and conditions
Weather codes
● Travel delays
C
F
H
I
Pc
possible
Clouds
Fog
Haze
Ice
Partly Cloudy
 Albany
 Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
 Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
 Boise
 Buffalo
 Burlington VT
 Butte
Charleston SC
Charleston WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Dallas
Death Valley
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
Fairbanks
 Fargo
Fort Myers
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Internat. Falls
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Miami
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
R
Sh
S
Sn
Fl
T
W
Today
41/15
43/25
4/-3
67/46
50/24
71/60
52/26
44/29
36/20
34/8
35/19
69/45
49/35
68/43
40/37
49/39
39/29
67/58
61/49
55/29
44/40
39/28
-24/-32
31/28
76/56
85/69
71/59
46/40
25/23
55/47
55/44
60/51
54/47
62/50
77/65
39/35
35/32
Rain
Showers
Sun
Snow
Flurries
Thunderstorms
Windy
Tomorrow
Pc
R
Pc
S
S
Pc
S
Fl
C
Fl
Sn
S
C
S
C
Pc
C
Pc
C
C
Sh
C
S
Sn
S
S
Pc
Pc
Pc
C
C
C
Pc
Pc
S
C
Pc
26/23 Pc
43/24 Pc
4/0
Pc
67/50 Pc
39/32 Pc
71/50 C
38/34 Pc
41/28 C
37/35 Sn
19/17 Pc
30/4 Sn
69/54 Pc
56/49 C
57/48 Pc
52/36 R
56/46 R
49/42 C
69/43 Pc
62/47 Pc
54/26 S
51/32 Pc
46/38
I
-25/-32 Pc
38/16 C
80/59 S
83/69 S
70/60 C
54/42 R
36/21 Sn
57/35 Pc
56/42 Pc
61/51 Sh
61/50 R
62/48 C
79/66 Pc
48/37 R
41/27 Pc
New Orleans
 New York City
Oklahoma City
Orlando
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
 Portland OR
Raleigh
 Sacramento
 Salt Lake City
San Diego
 San Francisco
Santa Fe
 Seattle
 Spokane
St. Louis
Tampa
Washington
66/50
47/25
61/47
72/52
49/26
57/43
40/24
46/37
65/37
52/48
39/33
63/50
55/51
38/21
47/37
40/28
56/49
71/54
56/33
S
Pc
Pc
S
S
Sh
Pc
R
S
R
Sn
R
R
C
R
C
Pc
S
S
71/57
34/32
63/37
78/56
39/35
64/44
45/41
47/40
52/44
59/53
42/31
65/51
59/55
38/20
46/37
36/22
63/42
76/59
43/38
Pc
Pc
S
S
Pc
S
C
R
Pc
R
C
S
R
Pc
C
C
R
S
Pc
Canada & Mexico
Cancun
Edmonton
Halifax
Mexico City
 Montreal
 Quebec
Toronto
 Vancouver
81/66
27/9
34/19
74/47
32/3
29/-1
33/16
46/36
Pc
Fl
C
Pc
C
C
C
R
80/70
12/-9
20/13
74/42
14/12
11/4
33/31
43/31
Pc
Pc
Pc
Pc
Pc
Pc
Sn
S
49/43
43/35
61/41
54/37
42/39
53/40
43/38
35/25
38/33
49/40
51/42
58/40
57/26
13/8
32/29
Sh
Sh
S
S
Sh
Sh
Sh
C
Sn
S
C
S
S
Pc
Sn
Europe & the Middle East
Amsterdam
Athens
Baghdad
Barcelona
Berlin
Dublin
 Frankfurt
 Helsinki
Istanbul
 Jerusalem
London
Lisbon
Madrid
 Moscow
Oslo
45/40
47/38
65/42
61/39
37/33
50/45
45/37
30/27
41/34
48/37
46/41
58/39
57/26
18/7
33/29
Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2019
Sh
Pc
Pc
S
C
C
Sh
Fl
Pc
Pc
C
S
S
C
Pc
Paris
Rome
 Stockholm
 Tel Aviv
 Vienna
Warsaw
40/36
56/33
37/31
60/49
35/26
24/17
Sh
S
C
Sh
Fl
C
45/43 Sh
53/33 S
36/33 C
61/51 S
32/30 C
25/23 C
91/77
37/15
67/63
90/77
43/16
73/55
65/47
35/18
87/78
73/69
67/63
45/37
Pc
S
C
T
S
S
R
Pc
C
R
R
C
93/75
37/17
69/62
90/76
46/27
79/60
66/45
37/23
87/77
76/71
73/64
49/36
58/45
84/60
90/77
79/55
S
Pc
S
Pc
61/49 Pc
78/59 T
89/77 T
79/57 Pc
90/78
68/48
85/70
84/72
79/67
71/54
92/79
82/70
T
C
T
Pc
C
T
Pc
Sh
91/76 T
66/45 T
79/66 T
84/73 Pc
79/69 C
65/54 Sh
95/80 Pc
90/72 C
Asia & Australia
Bangkok
Beijing
 Hong Kong
 Jakarta
Kabul
Melbourne
New Delhi
Seoul
 Singapore
Sydney
Taipei City
Tokyo
Africa
 Cairo
 Johannesburg
Lagos
Nairobi
South America
Asuncion
Bogota
 Buenos Aires
Caracas
Lima
 Quito
Rio de Janeiro
 Sao Paulo
Central America & Caribbean
Bermuda
Havana
Kingston
Panama City
Saint John
San Jose
 San Juan
71/64
77/64
87/73
89/70
81/74
83/65
85/71
A rare LeConte’s sparrow was spotted
with a vesper sparrow on a farm in
Lakeville on Wednesday. Sightings for
the previously reported painted bunting also continued in a residential
neighborhood in Newtonville until
midweek. The Nantucket Christmas
bird count turned up a slew of unusual
species. A Northern shoveler and two
snow geese were seen at Bartlett’s
Farm, a whimbrel at the Nantucket
Field Station. an American woodcock of
of Coskata Course Way, a great egret
and an Audobon’s Yellow-Rupled Warbler at Madaket, and a white-eyed vireo
at Low Beach.
ºMarlborough: At Hager Pond, there
was a green-winged teal, two Northern
shovelers, three gadwalls, and three
Northern pintails.
ºNorthbridge: At the sewage treatment
plant, there was a winter wren, three
swamp sparrows, three Virginia rails,
and eight field sparrows.
ºNew Bedford: A Eurasian wigeon was
spotted at Riverside Park.
ºSaugus: On Plum Island, there was a
red-shouldered hawk, long-eared owl,
and an American pipit.
ºWest Boylston: A rusty blackbird was
spotted at the Wayland Community
Gardens.
ºSterling: At Sterling Peat, there was a
hoary redpoll.
ºCambridge: At Lusitania Meadow,
there was an orange-crowned warbler.
For more information about bird
sightings or to report bird sightings,
call Mass. Audubon at 781-259-8805 or
go to www.mass audubon.org
C
Pc
Pc
Pc
Pc
Pc
Sh
66/57
82/65
86/73
88/70
81/73
83/64
84/72
Pc
Pc
Pc
Pc
Pc
Pc
Sh
Yesterday’s temperature extremes
High: 113 at Birdsville, Australia
Low: -62 at Delyankir, Russia
BIRD SIGHTINGS
Recent bird sightings as reported to the
Mass. Audubon Society.
S
Pc
Pc
Sh
C
C
Pc
Pc
T
T
Pc
Pc
Almanac
Sunrise
Sunset
Day length
Moonrise
Moonset
Day of year
7:13 a.m.
4:27 p.m.
9:14
7:35 a.m.
5:08 p.m.
6
Mount Washington (4 p.m. yesterday)
Weather
Mostly cloudy
Visibility
80 miles
Wind
west-northwest at 20 m.p.h.
High/low temperature
30/23
Snow depth at 4 p.m.
5.0”
Moon phases
Tides
A.M.
Boston high
Height
Boston low
Height
11:15 11:52
10.3
9.0
5:01 5:37
0.8 -0.2
P.M.
High tides
Old Orchard ME 11:09 11:46
Hampton
Beach NH
11:23
--Plum Island
11:28
--Ipswich
11:08 11:45
High tides
Gloucester
Marblehead
Lynn
Scituate
Plymouth
Cape Cod
Canal East
Cape Cod
Canal West
Falmouth
A.M.
P.M.
11:15
11:15
11:30
11:23
11:25
11:52
11:52
--11:57
11:57
Actual Temperatures
Degree days
Yesterday
Monthly total
Normal to date
Season total
Season normal
Last year to date
10:02 10:38
10:59 11:36
FULL
Jan. 21
LAST
Jan. 27
NEW
Feb. 4
Evening stars cluster. – A. MacRobert
Orion, the brightest constellation, strides upward in the
southeast these evenings. Above it is orange Aldebaran
in the dim, loose Hyades star cluster. Higher up sparkles
the brighter, smaller Pleiades cluster.
Boston snowfall
Yesterday
Total for January
Normal for January
Season total
Season normal
(8 p.m. yesterday)
0.0”
Trace
12.9”
0.2”
43.9”
12:29 12:16
11:54
--8:02 8:20
7:55 8:13
Normal Temperatures
Cool
0
0
0
0
0
0
Jan. readings
Avg. daily high
Avg. daily low
YTD avg. temp.
Actual
46.6
33.4
40.0
Norm.
36.5
23.1
29.8
Record Temperatures
Yesterday’s high 43°
70
2007
Record
high
63
60
50
Normal
high
40
36
30
Normal
low
20
23
10
0
Record
low
-10
-20
Yesterday’s low 39°
6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5
December
Windchill effect
Temperature
40° 35° 30° 25° 20° 15° 10°
m.p.h.
Apparent temperature
5
36 31 25 19 13
7
1
10
34 27 21 15
9
3
-4
32 25 19 13
6
0
-7
15
30 24 17 11
4
-2
-9
20
29 23 16
9
3
-4 -11
25
28 22 15
8
1
-5 -12
30
28 21 14
7
0
-7 -14
35
27 20 13
6
-1
-8 -15
40
P.M.
12:29 12:15
12:29 12:18
11:29
--11:23
---
(valid at 8 p.m. yesterday)
Heat
24
124
176
2001
2160
2126
80
FIRST
Jan. 14
A.M.
Hyannis Port
Chatham
Wellfleet
Provincetown
Nantucket
Harbor
Oak Bluffs
New Bedford
Newport RI
11:08 11:44
Boston’s recent climate
Yesterday
High/low
43/39
Mean
41
Departure from normal+11
Departure for month +48
Departure for year +48
8 p.m. rel. humidity 89%
High tides
January
0.61
0.54
0.33
0.04 0.02
T
-4
1981
0.02
T
0.41 0.38
0.02
0.8"
0.7"
0.6"
0.52
0.5"
0.4"
0.3"
0.2"
0.1"
0.0"
6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5
December
24 Hr. Precipitation (valid at 8 p.m. yesterday)
Yesterday
0.52”
Precip days in January
3
Month to date
0.92”
Norm. month to date 0.55”
January
Year to date
Norm. year to date
0.92”
0.55”
Climate data are compiled from National Weather Service records and are subject to change or correction.
THIS DAY IN HISTORY
Today is Sunday, Jan. 6, the sixth day
of 2019. There are 359 days left in the
year.
ºBirthdays: Country musician Joey,
the CowPolka King (Riders in the
Sky) is 70. Former FBI director Louis
Freeh is 69. Rock singer-musician
Kim Wilson (the Fabulous Thunderbirds) is 68. Singer Jett Williams is
66. Actor-comedian Rowan Atkinson
is 64. World Golf Hall of Famer Nancy
Lopez is 62. Actor Scott Bryce is 61.
Rhythm-and-blues singer Kathy
Sledge is 60. TV chef Nigella Lawson
is 59. Rhythm-and-blues singer Eric
Williams (BLACKstreet) is 59. Movie
director John Singleton is 51. Actor
Aron Eisenberg is 50. Actor Norman
Reedus is 50. TV personality Julie
Chen is 49. Actor Danny Pintauro
(TV: ‘‘Who’s the Boss?”) is 43. Actress
Cristela Alonzo is 40. Actress Rinko
Kikuchi is 38. Actor Eddie Redmayne
is 37. Retired NBA All-Star Gilbert
Arenas is 37. Actress-comedian Kate
McKinnon is 35. Rock singer Alex
Turner (Arctic Monkeys) is 33.
ºIn 1759, George Washington and
Martha Dandridge Custis were married in New Kent County, Virginia.
ºIn 1838, Samuel Morse and Alfred
Vail gave the first successful public
demonstration of their telegraph in
Morristown, N.J.
ºIn 1912, New Mexico became the
47th state.
ºIn 1919, the 26th president of the
United States, Theodore Roosevelt,
died in Oyster Bay, N.Y., at age 60.
ºIn 1941, President Franklin D.
Roosevelt, in his State of the Union
address, outlined a goal of ‘‘Four
Freedoms’’: Freedom of speech and
expression; the freedom of people to
GLOBE STAFF/FILE
Skating rivals Nancy Kerrigan
(right) and Tonya Harding at
practice in Norway for the
Olympics in 1994. On Jan. 6 of
that year Kerrigan was clubbed
on the leg by an assailant at
Detroit’s Cobo Arena; four men,
including the ex-husband of
Harding, went to prison for their
roles in the attack.
worship God in their own way; freedom from want; freedom from fear.
ºIn 1945, George Herbert Walker
Bush married Barbara Pierce at the
First Presbyterian Church in Rye,
N.Y.
ºIn 1968, a surgical team at Stanford
University School of Medicine in Palo
Alto, Calif., led by Dr. Norman Shumway performed the first US adult
heart transplant, placing the heart of
a 43-year-old man in a 54-year-old
patient (the recipient died 15 days
later).
ºIn 1974, year-round daylight saving
time began in the United States on a
trial basis as a fuel-saving measure in
response to the OPEC oil embargo.
ºIn 1993, authorities rescued Jennifer Stolpa and her infant son, Clayton, after Jennifer’s husband, James,
succeeded in reaching help, ending
the family’s eight-day ordeal after becoming lost in the snow-covered Nevada desert. Jazz trumpeter Dizzy
Gillespie, 75, died in Englewood,
N.J.; ballet dancer Rudolf Nureyev
died in suburban Paris at age 54.
ºIn 1994, figure skater Nancy Kerrigan was clubbed on the leg by an assailant at Detroit’s Cobo Arena; four
men, including the ex-husband of
Kerrigan’s rival, Tonya Harding, went
to prison for their roles in the attack.
(Harding pleaded guilty to conspiracy to hinder prosecution, but denied
any advance knowledge about the assault.)
ºIn 1998, in a new bid to expand
health insurance, President Bill Clinton unveiled a proposal to offer Medicare coverage to hundreds of thousands of uninsured Americans between the ages of 55 to 64.
ºIn 2001, with Vice President Al
Gore presiding in his capacity as president of the Senate, Congress formally certified George W. Bush the winner of the bitterly contested 2000
presidential election.
ºIn 2003, Iraqi President Saddam
Hussein accused UN inspectors of engaging in ‘‘intelligence work’’ instead
of searching for suspected nuclear,
chemical, and biological weapons in
his country.
ºIn 2009, Congress opened for business at the dawn of a new Democratic
era with vows to fix the crisis-ridden
economy; Republicans pledged cooperation in Congress as well as with
President-elect Barack Obama — to a
point. Obama vowed to ‘‘bring a longoverdue sense of responsibility and
accountability to Washington’’ and
called the need for budget reform ‘‘an
absolute necessity.’’ Cheryl Holdridge,
one of the original Mouseketeers on
‘‘The Mickey Mouse Club,’’ died in
Santa Monica, Calif., at age 64.
ºIn 2014, the US Supreme Court
stayed a decision by a federal judge
striking down Utah’s ban on same-sex
marriage so that the 10 th Circuit
Court of Appeals in Denver could decide the issue. (In June 2014, the
Court of Appeals overturned the ban;
in October, the US Supreme Court
turned away appeals from five states
seeking to preserve their bans, including Utah.) By a vote of 56-26, the
Senate confirmed Janet Yellen as the
first woman to lead the Federal Reserve. No. 1 Florida State beat No. 2
Auburn 34-31 in the BCS National
Championship Game.
ºLast year, pushing back against a
new book that said his own aides
questioned his competence, President Trump defended his mental fitness in a series of tweets, saying that
he is ‘‘like, really smart’’ and ‘‘a very
stable genius.’’ Japanese air bag maker Takata said it was recalling an additional 3.3 million faulty air bag inflators, expanding the largest automotive recall in US history. About
100 million Americans were faced
with a gusty deep freeze that followed
a whopping East Coast snowstorm;
the wind chill was close to minus 100
on New Hampshire’s Mount Washington.
B o s t o n
A24
S u n d a y
G l o b e
JA N UA RY 6 , 2 0 1 9
Auto Dealer Directory
Herb Chambers Alfa Romeo
of Boston*
Kelly Chrysler*
525 Boston Post Road, Rte 20, Wayland
888-379-9853
alfaromeoofboston.com
353 Broadway, Route 1 North, Lynnfield
781-581-6000
kellyjeepchrysler.net
Herb Chambers Alfa Romeo
of Millbury*
Kelly Jeep, Chrysler, Dodge, Ram
of Methuen*
2 Latti Farm Road, Rte 20, Millbury
877-875-5491
herbchambersalfaromeo.com
978-683-8775
175 Pelham St, Exit 47 on I-93, Methuen
Herb Chambers Honda of Seekonk*
185 Taunton Ave, Rte 44, Seekonk
877-851-3362
herbchambershondaofseekonk.com
Herb Chambers Honda
Westborough*
350 Turnpike Rd, Rte 9, Westborough
877-207-0329
herbchambershondaofwestborough.com
Honda Cars of Boston*
kellyauto.com
100 Broadway, Rte 99, Everett
617-600-6045
hondacarsofboston.com
Herb Chambers Alfa Romeo
of Warwick
1441 Bald Hill Road, Rt. 2, Warwick, RI
401-262-2020
Honda Village*
Best Chrysler, Dodge, Jeep, Ram*
Kelly Alfa Romeo*
520 Colony Place, Plymouth
151 Andover Street, Rte 114, Danvers
978-560-0006
kellyauto.com
508-747-1550
thebestchrysler.com
Herb Chambers Dodge of Danvers*
107 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
371 Washington Street, Newton Corner
888-511-5869
hondavillage.com
540 Lynnway, Rte 1A, Lynn
781-595-5252
shopkellyhonda.com
herbchamberschryslerofdanvers.com
308 Boylston Street, Rte 9, Brookline
855-889-0843
audibrookline.com
Herb Chambers Dodge of Millbury*
2 Latti Farm Rd, Rte 20, Millbury
888-293-8449
Audi Burlington Herb Chambers*
62 Cambridge Street, Rte 3A, Burlington
855-845-0576
audiburlington.com
herbchamberschryslerofmillbury.com
Kelly Jeep, Chrysler, Dodge, Ram
of Methuen*
175 Pelham St, Exit 47 on I-93, Methuen
978-683-8775
735 Southbridge St, Rte 12 & 20, Auburn
888-318-7927
herbchambershyundaiofauburn.com
Mirak Hyundai
1165 Massachusetts Ave, Arlington
781-643-8000
mirakhyundai.com
Herb Chambers INFINITI of Boston*
Herb Chambers Fiat of Danvers*
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877-831-2139
herbchamberschryslerofdanvers.com
Herb Chambers Fiat of Millbury*
2 Latti Farm Road, Rte 20, Millbury
1168 Commonwealth Ave, Boston
866-803-9622
herbchambersbmwofboston.com
877-875-5491
herbchambersfiat.com
Herb Chambers BMW of Sudbury*
128 Boston Post Road, Rte 20, Sudbury
866-483-1828
bmwofsudbury.com
60 Mystic Ave, Medford
855-857-4431
herbchambersinfinitiofboston.com
Herb Chambers INFINITI
of Westborough*
312 Turnpike Rd, Rte 9, Westborough
855-878-9603
herbchambersinfinitiofwestborough.com
Infiniti of Hanover
2060 Washington St, Hanover
781-570-5200
infinitiofhanover.com
Kelly Infiniti*
Colonial Ford of Marlboro
428 Maple St, Marlboro, MA
888-201-6427
155 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
978-774-1000
kellyinfiniti.com
201 Cambridge Rd, Woburn, MA 01801
781-935-7000
colonialcadillacwoburn.com
Colonial Ford of Plymouth
11 Pilgrim Hill Rd, Plymouth, MA
Jaguar Sudbury Herb Chambers*
855-398-6813
83 Boston Post Rd, Rte 20, Sudbury
866-268-7851
jaguarsudbury.com
25 Providence Highway,
Rte 1, “The Automile,” Sharon
877-338-9671
herbchamberslexus.com
Herb Chambers Lincoln Norwood*
1130 Providence Hwy, Rte 1,
“The Automile,” Norwood
855-278-0016
herbchamberslincoln.com
Boch Maserati*
ColonialFord.com
Herb Chambers Maserati of Boston*
527 Boston Post Rd, Rte 20, Wayland
866-622-0180
herbchambersmaserati.com
Herb Chambers Maserati of Warwick
1441 Bald Hill Road, Rt. 2, Warwick, RI
401-262-2020
herbchambersmaseratiofwarwick.com
Kelly Maserati*
151 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
978-560-0007
kellymaserati.com
Herb Chambers, 385 Broadway, Rte 1 N,
Lynnfield
877-337-2442
flagshipmotorcars.com
Herb Chambers, 259 McGrath Highway,
Somerville
800-426-8963
mercedesbenzofboston.com
Mercedes-Benz of Natick*
855-298-1177
Herb Chambers Cadillac-Warwick*
herbchambersfordofbraintree.com
Mercedes-Benz of Shrewsbury*
Herb Chambers Ford-Westborough*
310 Turnpike Rd, Rte 9, Westborough
877-207-6736
Herb Chambers Jeep of Millbury*
Kelly Ford*
2 Latti Farm Rd, Rte 20, Millbury
888-293-8449
herbchamberschryslerofmillbury.com
420 Cabot Street, Rte 1A, Beverly
128 Derby St, Exit 15 off Rte 3, Hingham
800-649-6781
bestchevyusa.com
shopkellyford.com
978-922-0059
Herb Chambers Chevrolet*
Herb Chambers Genesis*
735 Southbridge St, Rte 12 & 20, Auburn
Mirak Chevrolet*
877-287-9139
1125 Massachusetts Ave, Arlington
781-643-8000
mirakchevrolet.com
Kelly Jeep*
353 Broadway, Route 1 North, Lynnfield
781-581-6000
kellyjeepchrysler.net
Kelly Jeep, Chrysler, Dodge, Ram
of Methuen*
175 Pelham St, Exit 47 on I-93, Methuen
978-683-8775
kellyauto.com
Mirak Genesis
781-643-8000
mirakgenesis.com
Best Chrysler, Dodge, Jeep, Ram*
520 Colony Place, Plymouth
508-747-1550
thebestchrysler.com
Herb Chambers Kia of Burlington*
93 Cambridge St, Rte 3A, Burlington
866-271-6366
herbchamberskiaofburlington.com
Lev Kia of Framingham*
Herb Chambers Chrysler-Danvers*
107 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
877-831-2139
herbchamberschryslerofdanvers.com
Herb Chambers Honda in Boston*
1186 Commonwealth Ave, Boston
760 Boston Turnpike Rd, Rte 9,
Shrewsbury
888-551-7134
mercedesbenzofshrewsbury.com
Herb Chambers MINI of Boston*
1168 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston
888-994-1075
herbchambersmini.com
510 Cochituate Rd (Rte 30), Framingham
866-931-3035
levkia.com
Herb Chambers RAM of Danvers*
107 Andover Street, Route 114, Danvers
877-904-0800
herbchamberschryslerofdanvers.com
Herb Chambers RAM of Millbury*
2 Latti Farm Road, Route 20, Millbury
888-293-8449
herbchamberschryslerofmillbury.com
Kelly Jeep, Chrysler, Dodge, Ram
of Methuen*
175 Pelham St, Exit 47 on I-93, Methuen
978-683-8775
kellyauto.com
Rolls-Royce Motorcars of New
England, a Herb Chambers Company*
529 Boston Post Road, Rte 20, Wayland
855-647-4873
herbchambersrollsroyceofnewengland.com
smart center Lynnfield
Herb Chambers, 385 Broadway, Rte 1 N,
Lynnfield
844-222-6929 smartcenterlynnfield.com
smart center Boston
Herb Chambers, 259 McGrath Highway,
Somerville
800-359-6562 smartcenterboston.com
Cityside*
790 Pleasant St, Rte 60, Belmont
781-641-1900
buycitysidesubaru.com
Herb Chambers Toyota of Auburn*
809 Washington Street, Rte 20, Auburn
855-872-6999
herbchamberstoyotaofauburn.com
Herb Chambers Toyota of Boston*
32 Brighton Avenue, Boston
877-884-1866
herbchamberstoyotaofboston.com
Toyota of Braintree*
210 Union St, Exit 17 off Rte 3, Braintree
781-848-9300
toyotaofbraintree.com
Toyota of Wellesley*
Rte 9, Wellesley
781-237-2970
wellesleytoyota.com
Toyota of Watertown*
149 Arsenal St, Watertown
617-926-5200
Colonial Nissan of Medford
104 Mystic Ave, Rte 38, Medford
781-395-5300
nissanofmedford.com
Herb Chambers Nissan
of Westborough*
herbchambersgenesisofauburn.com
1165 Massachusetts Ave, Arlington
75 Otis St @ Rte 9, Westborough
508-618-7032
herbchambersnissanofwestborough.com
Kelly Nissan of Lynnfield*
275 Broadway, Rte 1 North, Lynnfield
781-598-1234
kellynissanoflynnfield.com
Kelly Nissan of Woburn*
95 Cedar St, Exit 36 off I93 & I95, Woburn
781-835-3500
kellynissanofwoburn.com
Colonial Volkswagen of Medford*
340 Mystic Ave, Medford
781-475-5200
vwmedford.com
Kelly Volkswagen*
72 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
978-774-8000
kellyvw.net
Wellesley Volkswagen*
231 Linden St, Wellesley
781-237-3553
buywellesleyvw.com
877-205-0986
herbchambershondainboston.com
Herb Chambers Chrysler-Millbury*
2 Latti Farm Rd, Rte 20, Millbury
888-293-8449
herbchamberschryslerofmillbury.com
107 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
877-904-0800
herbchamberschryslerofdanvers.com
herbchambersfordofwestborough.com
Best Chevrolet*
90 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
877-206-9332
herbchamberschevrolet.com
Herb Chambers Jeep of Danvers*
157 W Central St, Rte 135, Natick
888-920-3507
chambersmotorcarsofnatick.com
Flagship Motorcars of Lynnfield*
75 Granite Street, Rte 37, Braintree
1511 Bald Hill Road, Rte 2, Warwick, RI
877-206-0272
herbchamberscadillacofwarwick.com
Chambers Motorcars of Natick*
2 Late Farm Road, Rte. 20, Millbury
888-904-1654
herbchambersmaseratiofmillbury.com
395 Broadway, Rte 1 N, Lynnfield
866-233-8937
herbchamberscadillaclynnfield.com
Herb Chambers Ford of Braintree*
62 Cambridge St, Rte 3A, Burlington
855-845-0576
porscheofburlington.com
“On The Automile,” Route 1, Norwood
781-769-8800
BochMaserati.com
Herb Chambers, 253 North Main St,
Rte 27, Natick
866-266-3870
mercedesbenzofnatick.com
Herb Chambers Cadillac-Lynnfield*
Herb Chambers Porsche Burlington*
Herb Chambers Lexus of Sharon*
Mercedes-Benz of Boston*
ColonialFordofMarlboro.com
Colonial Cadillac of Woburn
141 Derby Street, Hingham
866-237-9636
herbchamberslexusofhingham.com
Herb Chambers Maserati of Millbury*
Bentley Boston, a Herb Chambers
Company*
Herb Chambers BMW of Boston*
Herb Chambers Lexus of Hingham*
Herb Chambers Hyundai of Auburn*
kellyauto.com
533 Boston Post Road, Rte 20, Wayland
855-647-4873
bentleyboston.com
83 Boston Post Rd, Rt 20, Sudbury
866-258-0054
landroverofsudbury.com
Kelly Honda*
877-831-2139
Audi Brookline Herb Chambers*
Land Rover Sudbury
Herb Chambers*
Herb Chambers Honda Burlington*
33 Cambridge St, Rte 3A, Burlington
877-842-0555
herbchambershondaofburlington.com
Herb Chambers Lamborghini Boston*
531 Boston Post Road, Rte 20, Wayland
855-647-4873
herbchamberslamborghiniboston.com
Herb Chambers Volvo Cars Norwood*
Herb Chambers Porsche of Boston*
1172 Commonwealth Ave, Boston
855-778-1912
herbchambersporscheofboston.com
1120 Providence Hwy, Rte 1,
“On The Automile,” Norwood
888-920-2902
volvocarsnorwood.com
Please call (617) 929-1314 to include your dealership in this directory. *For more information on this dealer, please visit boston.com/cars.
A
LL
W
E
N
Herb Chambers
60 MYSTIC AVE. MEDFORD
Formerly 1198 Commonwealth Ave. Boston
Metro
Business
PAGES B10­11
For breaking news, go to
www.bostonglobe.com/business
Yvonne Abraham
Certainly not
her gender
May I have a word, Elizabeth Warren?
You sure have gotten a lot
of flak over your 2020 presidential ambitions. There
seem to be so many reasons
to write you off — none of
them, of course, even remotely related to the fact
that you’re a woman.
I bet it’s hard to keep straight all the ways
you’ve already failed, Senator, so I’m here to
help. Here is as complete a catalog of your
many faults as my meager real estate will allow. You’re welcome!
First, you started running too soon, going
up against Trump on Twitter, laying groundwork in New Hampshire and elsewhere even
before you were reelected to the Senate. Some
thought that unseemly. You peaked too soon.
Also, you started too late. Some in New
Hampshire are wondering why you haven’t
more slavishly courted them before now.
Voters can’t relate to a Cambridge liberal
like you. Sure, you were born to a family of
modest means in Oklahoma, married young,
scrapped your way through school to become
a teacher, then a lawyer, then an expert and
tireless fighter on behalf of middle class
Americans. But you’ll always be a Harvard
egghead, and ordinary Americans yearn for a
president who is more like them — like a
made-for-TV billionaire with a gilded penthouse on Fifth Avenue who has never voluntarily opened a book. Brilliance is overrated.
You’ve got to be somebody voters want to have
a beer with.
Speaking of which, that video of you drinking beer was super off-putting.
And as others have pointed out, you might
have a likability problem. Yes, you can electrify audiences. And no, being utterly incapable
of human interaction with voters didn’t hurt
Vermont’s Bernie Sanders, one of your likely
opponents. But never mind all of that. You
just seem kind of angry, as if a system rigged
for the rich, and a corruption-stacked administration are things to be upset about. That
kind of passion — it’s unbecoming.
While we’re on angry, you’re too combative
with President Donald Trump. Trying to put
his racist Pocahontas taunts to rest with a
DNA test proving your Native American ancestry was a mistake (on which more later).
Democrats need a nominee who is above the
fray, who won’t stoop to Trump’s level, like
you did. Also, Democrats need a nominee who
will stoop to Trump’s level. Not you.
You may be a Sooner, but you are too much
of a lefty to attract white workers in the Midwest, and independents. Also, you are not
lefty enough: You backed Hillary over Bernie,
and said nice things about capitalism. Everything you say and do alienates some group.
Don’t go off the cuff. Also, why so cautious?
And why so old? I mean, 69 is really getting up there. True, the youngs love Bernie,
who is 77. Trump, 72, speaks like someone
who long ago lost his marbles, yet he is still
beloved. Somehow, age looks better on those
guys. I’m not sure why, but there you have it.
Most importantly, that DNA test result you
rolled out in an elaborate video just before the
midterms: It only intensified the taunting,
and led to criticism from both ends of the political spectrum. It offended some Native
Americans. Also, it did not offend some Native Americans. Anyway, it was a bad move.
And as we all know, presidential candidates
cannot ever come back from bad moves. Well,
I guess Bill Clinton did after the Gennifer
Flowers affair, and Trump became president
after boasting that he’d assaulted women,
among other offenses that would be inexcusable in other hopefuls — say, you.
I could go on, but I’ve run out of space,
and I’m sure you get the message. I’ll concede
that the first contest is over a year away, and
that anything could happen between now and
then. But somebody with your profile — this is
totally not about gender! — becoming viable
isn’t one of them.
You’d make a spectacular president, Senator. If only you were somebody else.
Globe columnist Yvonne Abraham can be
reached at yvonne.abraham@globe.com and
on Twitter @GlobeAbraham
B
B O S T O N S U N DAY G L O B E JA N UA RY 6 , 2 01 9 | B O S T O N G L O B E .C O M / M E T RO
Baker touts Merrimack Valley businesses
Governor promotes companies affected by gas fires
By Laura Crimaldi
GLOBE STAFF
NORTH ANDOVER — Chama Grill in
downtown North Andover entered 2019 having missed out on the Christmas-party business that boosts the restaurant at the end of
the year.
Even though the spot serving all-you-caneat Brazilian barbecue was open in December,
many customers booked their holiday gatherings elsewhere back in September and October
when the restaurant closed for five weeks because of the gas fires and explosions in the
Merrimack Valley.
“The worst part of it is we lost our Christ-
mas business. We couldn’t book any parties,”
said owner Shahram Naghibi, who also had
about a half-dozen workers resign while the
restaurant was closed.
“Now the slow time is coming,” he said.
“Everybody spent their money on Christmas
gifts and there’s no money left for the restaurant at the moment.”
On Saturday afternoon, Governor Charlie
Baker tried to help Naghibi with his predicament, stopping into Chama Grill with Lieutenant Governor Karyn Polito and other staff
members to generate publicity for the business.
MERRIMACK, Page B7
NATHAN KLIMA FOR THE BOSTON GLOBE
Governor Charlie Baker met with Susan Robert of
Frederick’s Pastries in North Andover Saturday.
Beating
victim
recalled
fondly
Family mourns
man found in park
By John Hilliard
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
PHOTOS BY JOHN TLUMACKI/GLOBE STAFF
KINGS
FOR
A DAY
Above: Thamar
Fleranvil (left)
placed a crown
on Valerie Ruiz
during the Three
Kings Day
celebration at
the Connolly
Library in
Jamaica Plain.
Right: A group
of children
listened to a
story. B4
The family of a North Cambridge man who died after a
brutal attack in a public park
Wednesday evening is struggling with the loss of a gentle,
kind man who would never anger anyone, a cousin said Saturday.
Paul Wilson was remembered as someone who would
do anything for others —
whether they were family or
strangers, said Wilson’s cousin,
John Hemmerich, in a phone
interview from his home in California on Saturday.
“Nobody can imagine Paul
making anybody mad. He just
made people happy,” Hemmerich said. “It’s difficult to process. He was just always around
for the good moments of our
lives.”
Wilson, 60, was found unresponsive with severe head trauma in Danehy Park and later
died at a local hospital, accordWILSON, Page B7
INSIDE
Tax collections down
State tax receipts for December missed the monthly
benchmark by more than
half a billion dollars. B2
LEONA BENOIT 1913­2018
A tireless advocate for peace
By Bryan Marquard
GLOBE STAFF
She was born nearly a year before
World War I began, and as wars followed wars Leona Benoit could no
longer stay silent.
“It wasn’t anything I really wanted
to do,” she said of her decision to form
Stoughton Mothers for Peace in 1967,
during the Vietnam War. “I just felt
my conscience wouldn’t let me rest.”
When Mrs. Benoit died at 105
Monday in the Copley at Stoughton
nursing and rehabilitation center, she
may well have been New England’s
oldest peace activist. Surely she was
BENOIT, Page B6
JONATHAN WIGGS/GLOBE STAFF/FILE 2013
Mrs. Benoit could remember celebrating the end of
World War I — when she had just turned 5.
Big donors line up
for Baker’s party
Governor Charlie Baker has taken more
than $1.1 million from corporations, trade
groups, and wealthy individuals to fund his
multiday inaugural
CAPITAL SOURCE party, nearly doubling the haul his
predecessor used for his own second-term celebration.
Donor records filed by Baker’s inaugural
committee on Thursday, the day Baker took
his second oath of office, show the Republican
raised $875,000 in December alone, including
from nearly two dozen who gave up to the
committee’s self-imposed cap of $25,000.
Those so-called max donors include DraftCAPITAL SOURCE, Page B9
GREAT RATE - SAFE AND SECURE.
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B o s t o n
S u n d a y
G l o b e
JA N UA RY 6 , 2 0 1 9
Mass. tax receipts down for December
By Michael P. Norton
STATE HOUSE NEWS SERVICE
Add plunging state tax collections to a list of concerns
that has recently grown to include a volatile stock market,
rising interest rates, and increasing talk about when the
next recession might hit.
Tax receipts for the month
of December alone missed the
monthly benchmark by more
than half a billion dollars, erasing months of above-benchmark collections and leaving
collections $108 million behind their targets midway
through fiscal 2019, according
to data released late Friday by
the Massachusetts Department
of Revenue.
Income tax estimated payments totaled just $121 million
for December, $542 million or
81.7 percent below benchmark
and $575 million or 82.6 percent below December 2017.
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“ We underestimated the
shift of estimated payments
from December into January.
Early indications are that other
states may be having a similar
experience,” Revenue Commissioner Christopher Harding
said in a statement.
Other key categories of receipts such as withholding,
sales, and corporate taxes are
flowing into state coffers near
benchmarks, said Harding,
and estimated payments,
which are not due until Jan.
15, are “likely to be stronger in
January as a result of the shift,”
Harding predicted.
“In prior years, many taxpayers chose to pay in December, to take advantage of the
federal deduction for state taxes,” Harding said. “The 2017
federal tax reform reduced this
incentive to prepay, by placing
a $10,000 limit on the deduction for state and local taxes.”
Suffolk University professor
of economics David Tuerck
said the December numbers,
however disappointing,
“should come as no surprise.”
“After a very strong recovery
in FY 2018, revenue growth is
headed downward, in line with
historical averages,” he said.
Tuerck, the president of the
Beacon Hill Institute, said he
stands by the institute’s prediction that fiscal 2019 tax revenues will grow by 6.6 percent
but also noted the institute’s
projection that tax revenue
growth in fiscal 2020 will slow
to 2.4 percent.
“The December numbers
are just an early indication of
this downward trend,” he said.
Total December collections
were $440 million or 14.6 percent less than collections in
December 2017. Revenue collections of $13.3 billion over
the first six months of fiscal
2019 are $108 million or nearly 1 percent below the year-todate benchmark and $387 million and 3 percent greater than
the same fiscal year-to-date period in 2017.
The original benchmark for
fiscal year 2019 was $28.4 billion, but state officials on New
Year’s Eve, just four days before reporting the huge drop in
December receipts, raised it to
$28.5 billion, citing “current
year-to-date revenues and economic data” and backing off
the books an estimate of $63
million in marijuana tax revenues.
The estimate that collections midway through fiscal
2019 are running $108 million
behind benchmark is based on
the original benchmark, an administration official said.
House minority leader Brad
Jones said on Friday night that
the December revenue drop
“shows that more people are
realizing there are reduced tax
benefits to paying estimates by
the end of December, as the
federal deductibility has been
limited under the 2017 tax law
changes.”
“This absolutely demands
close daily scrutiny moving forward,” said Jones. “It also
means the mid-January numbers may take on a little more
importance than usual, and
the numbers for the month of
January as a whole certainly
will. This should also serve as a
reminder that the Legislature
needs to continue to exercise
fiscal restraint and not use the
recent trend of rising revenues
as an e xc u s e f o r e xcessive
spending increases that could
prove to be “
December is the fifth largest
month of the year for tax collections and revenues for the
month totaled $2.6 billion.
Fiscal 2018 tax collections
of $27.8 billion surged 8.3 percent above fiscal 2017 collections, following several years
in which collections tailed off
during the final six months of
the fiscal year.
Governor Charlie Baker,
who has opposed broad-based
tax hikes while eliminating
budget deficits and building
the state rainy day fund, plans
to file his fiscal 2020 budget
proposal this month. If natural
growth in tax collections
erodes, major investments in
priority areas like education,
health care and transportation
will become more difficult.
State budget writers agreed
Monday to build their fiscal
year 2020 budget plans on the
assumption that tax revenues
will grow by 2.7 percent over
the current fiscal year.
New England
in brief
BOSTON
Man arrested in road­rage incident
A Newton man was arrested Friday around 9:10 a.m. after allegedly attacking an 86-year-old taxi driver in a road-rage incident near Logan International Airport, according to State Police. Nicholas Franco, 66, got out of a 2016 Mercedes and began
arguing with a cab driver stopped at a red light on Harborside
Drive, State Police said. After the driver got out of the cab, Franco pulled off the man’s glasses, pushed him to the ground, and
struck him in the torso before driving away, according to State
Police. The victim was taken to Mass. General Hospital for a
medical evaluation. Franco was arraigned in East Boston District Court Friday afternoon on a charge of assault and battery
on an elderly person, according to Jake Wark, a spokesman for
the Suffolk district attorney’s office. Franco was released and
ordered to return to court Feb. 26, Wark said.
REVERE
Man’s body found under overpass
The body of a man believed to be in his mid-30s was found Saturday under the Route 1 overpass of a busy traffic circle in Revere, the Suffolk district attorney’s office said. The body was
found near an apparent makeshift living space, with blankets
and clothing in the area of Copeland Circle, the office said in a
statement. A driver called 911 around 4 p.m. to report “a person down,” the statement said. State Police, emergency medical
services, and the Revere police and fire departments responded
to the scene. A preliminary examination showed no signs of
physical trauma, he said. The state medical examiner is scheduled to conduct an autopsy to try to determine the cause and
manner of the man’s death, according to the statement.
BURLINGTON
Teen suspected of school vandalism
A teenager was questioned by police Friday and may be
charged after he allegedly spray-painted swastika-like symbols
near an elementary school, according to police. The symbols,
which tagged a stop sign and the brick facade of Pine Glen Elementary School, were “first thought to be incorrectly drawn
swastikas,” police said in a statement. The 17-year-old told authorities it was the logo of the hip-hop musical collective Pro
Era, according to the statement. The teen has previously shared
his appreciation for the group on social media, police said. Other graffiti at the school was found on a door and trash bin, police said. The suspect was identified through surveillance footage, according to the statement.
NORTHAMPTON
Couple died in murder­suicide, DA says
The two people who were found dead Thursday inside a
Northampton home probably died in a murder-suicide, according to the Northwestern district attorney’s office. Nelson Cardona, 26, apparently shot Karina Nieves, 24, and then himself,
the district attorney’s office said in a statement. The state medical examiner will determine the official causes of death. Their
bodies were found inside a Village Hill Road home. The two
were in a long-term relationship and had three children. The
children were not injured and are being cared for, officials said.
The incident is under investigation.
ALFRED, MAINE
Former Mass. priest to be sentenced
A former Massachusetts priest who was convicted of sexually
abusing an altar boy on trips to Maine years ago has been
scheduled for sentencing late this winter. Seventy-six-year-old
Ronald Paquin was found guilty of 11 of 24 counts of gross sexual misconducted in November. The Journal Tribune reported
Paquin is scheduled to be sentenced at York County Superior
Court in Alfred on March 5 with a tentative time of 1 p.m. Two
men testified during Paquin’s trial that they were altar boys
when Paquin invited them on trips in the 1980s and repeatedly
assaulted them. Paquin also spent more than a decade in a
Massachusetts prison for sexually abusing an altar boy in that
state. He was released in 2015 and taken into custody in Maine
in 2017. (AP)
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JA N UA RY 6 , 2 0 1 9
S u n d a y
G l o b e
Metro
We’re all familiar with the concept.
Is the glass half empty or half full? As your banker, we listen as much, if not
more than you, to the experts predicting the future of interest rates.
What we do know is this. Interest rates have risen, but what we don’t know is how
many more rate increases there may soon be. We see many of our customers pulling
money out of the market and going to cash. We see some instability out there, which
may or may not be a sign of what’s to come in 2019.
That’s why we’ve increased our deposit interest rates, especially for folks bringing new
deposits to us . As has been our practice for some time now, we make it easy to bank
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JA N UA RY 6 , 2 0 1 9
Families gather in Jamaica Plain to celebrate Three Kings Day
By Amanda Kaufman
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
JOHN TLUMACKI/GLOBE STAFF
Jacob Mora got a ride on the shoulders of his dad, Joel.
Children wearing shiny
gold crowns clapped their
hands to traditional Puerto Rican songs and danced around
a librar y room in Jamaica
Plain Saturday to celebrate the
arrival of Three Kings Day.
Also known as the Feast of
the Epiphany, the Jan. 6 holiday commemorates the biblical story in which three kings
bring gifts to newborn baby
Jesus. The celebration is popular in Latin American communities, particularly in Puerto
Rico, where people exchange
gifts, sing songs, and eat traditional food.
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T h e H y d e S q u a r e Ta s k
Force, an organization that
aims to expose young people
to Afro-Latin culture and community through art, hosted
the Saturday morning celebration at the Connolly Branch of
the Boston Public Library in
Hyde Square.
Celina Miranda, the group’s
executive director, said the
participants typically walk
down Centre Street as part of a
parrandas, a Puerto Rican tradition in which people knock
on their neighbors’ doors and
invite them to join the group
in song. But because of the
rain, the festivities took place
in the library’s basement with
a performance by Puerto Rican artist Fabiola Mendez and
her band.
Miranda said the festivities
are representative of the organization’s broader push for the
Hyde/Jackson Square neighborhood to gain recognition as
Boston’s Latin Quarter, a goal
that came to fruition in 2015
when the Boston City Council
unanimously voted to award
the neighborhood that title.
“ We have been working
very hard on branding this as
Boston’s Latin Quarter and
part of that is making sure we
preserve those traditions in
the community,” she said. “It
means a lot to make sure we
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NOTICE OF ARREST
United States District Court for the District of
Massachusetts
Case No. C.A. No. 1:18-cv-12499
CASHMAN DREDGING AND
MARINE CONTRACTING, CO., LLC, Plaintiff,
vs.
TUG SQUARE DEAL, and its engines, tackles, apparel, appurtenances, etc., in rem; BARGE AGNES, and its engines,
tackles, apparel, appurtenances, etc., in rem; and DUMP
SCOW TMC 140, and its engines, tackles, apparel, appurtenances, etc., in rem Defendants.
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE THAT THE TUG SQUARE DEAL, and its
engines, tackles, apparel, appurtenances, etc. (“SQUARE
DEAL”), were arrested by the United States Marshal’s Service on December 19, 2018 in order to enforce a maritime
lien.
Monday, January 14th thru Monday, January 21st
OPEN 10:00 AM to 7:00 PM DAILY
175 William F. McClellan Highway - Rte. 1A • East Boston
Persons claiming a right of possession or any ownership
interest in the SQUARE DEAL must file a verified statement
of right or interest with the Clerk of the Court by January
25, 2019, and serve an answer twenty-one (21) days thereafter; otherwise in rem default against the SQUARE DEAL
may be entered and condemnation ordered. Persons having maritime liens or other claims to or against the SQUARE
DEAL must present their claims in accordance with Federal
Rule of Civil Procedure 24.
Plaintiff’s counsel is Michael J. Daly, Esq., Pierce Atwood
LLP, One Financial Plaza, Suite 2600, Providence, Rhode Island, 02903. Telephone: 401-490-3424;
email: mdaly@pierceatwood.com
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Notice of Filing of
Interagency Bank Merger
Act Application
Rockland Trust Company, a
Massachusetts-chartered
commercial bank and trust
company located at 288
Union Street, Rockland, Massachusetts 02370, has filed an
Interagency Bank Merger Act
Application with the Federal
Deposit Insurance Corporation to merge with Blue Hills
Bank, a Massachusetts chartered savings bank located at
1196 River Street, Hyde Park,
Massachusetts 02136, with
Rockland Trust Company the
surviving institution.
Rockland Trust Company currently has 88 branch offices
and Blue Hills Bank currently
has 11 branch offices. In connection with the transaction
Rockland Trust Company proposes to:
Close the Rockland Trust
Company branch offices in
West Roxbury (1905 Centre
Street, West Roxbury, Massachusetts 02132) and Westwood (670 High Street, Westwood, Massachusetts 02090)
and consolidate them into
the Blue Hills Bank branch
offices in West Roxbury (1920
Center Street, West Roxbury,
Massachusetts 02132) and
Westwood (171 University
Avenue, Westwood, Massachusetts 02090); and, to
Close the Blue Hills Bank
Norwood branch office (111
Lenox Street, Norwood, Massachusetts 02062) and consolidate it into the Rockland
Trust
Company
Norwood
branch office (61 Lenox
Street, Norwood, Massachusetts 02062).
Any person wishing to comment on this application may
file his or her comments in
writing with the regional director of the Federal Deposit
Insurance Corporation at the
appropriate FDIC office by
sending them to Marianne
Hatheway, Deputy Regional
Director,
Federal
Deposit
Insurance Corporation, 15
Braintree Hill Office Park,
Suite 200, Braintree, MA
02184-8701, not later than
Friday, January 11, 2019. The
non-confidential portions of
the application are on file at
the appropriate FDIC office
and are available for public
inspection
during
regular
business hours. Photocopies
of the non-confidential portion of the application file
will be made available upon
request.
keep those traditions alive
and this one being a critical
one.”
Matthe w O’Malle y, the
Boston city councilor whose
dis tric t includes Jamaica
Plain, West Roxbur y, and
parts of Roslindale and Roxbury, spearheaded the effort
to designate Jamaica Plain as
Boston’s Latin Quarter.
“It’s important to recognize
that this area is so diverse, so
many folks from Latin America have come to Boston and
grown roots here — business
owners, residents, community
activists,” O’Malley said at the
event, in between conversations with celebrants. “It’s really important to protect that
diversity.”
Fabrina Pena, who is originally from Puerto Rico, said
she drove 40 minutes from
her home in Randolph to attend the celebration with her
two children, 7-year-old Ariana and 3-year-old Alejandro.
Her family celebrates both
holidays, allowing her kids to
open some presents on Christmas and some on Three Kings
Day. Her home is decorated
with three doll-sized figures,
each representing a king, she
said.
“I want [my children] to remember this, to learn, because we’re not back home so
it’s important to keep those
traditions going,” she said.
“Hopefully something sticks.”
Anthony Young-Lemar, 26,
of Mattapan, sat at a table
covered in crayons and paper
scraps and fastened a red paper crown to his head at the
insistence of his 5-year-old
daughter, Chloe.
“We came for the kids to
enjoy the celebration and to
spend time with family,” he
said. “I want my daughter to
feel like a queen.”
Amanda Kaufman can be
reached at amanda.
kaufman@globe.com. Follow
her on Twitter
@amandakauf1.
B o s t o n
JA N UA RY 6 , 2 0 1 9
S u n d a y
G l o b e
Metro
B5
Starts & Stops
BY ADAM VACCARO | TRAFFIC UPDATES ONLINE AT WWW.BOSTON.COM/STARTS
Rural transit scarcity
seen as a rising issue
O
ut in Franklin or Berkshire counties, on the
wide-open roads of rural
Massachusetts, you probably picture cars, pick-up
trucks, and more cars. Just not your
traditional city bus.
Figuring out how to run mass transit over large, sparsely-populated areas
has long been a challenge. But state
and local officials, and some transit
activists, are trying to get the issue
more attention.
Improving transit in rural areas is
one of the many recommendations in
a sweeping report about transportation in Massachusetts, submitted to
Governor Charlie Baker just before the
holidays. But the report noted the difficulty of the task.
“Rural Massachusetts is served
minimally, or not at all, by any passenger transportation mode other than
personally owned vehicles. This disadvantages those people and families
who suffer economic hardships, or
have limitations on their ability to
drive,” the report said. “Many rural
towns have no or minimal bus service,
train service, or access” to Uber and
Lyft, “partly because low population
density makes these options economically unattractive.”
The scarce population does not create much demand beyond the limited
transit routes already operating, said
Chris Dempsey, director of the nonprofit Transportation for Massachusetts.
“You have to make trade-offs in
transit between frequency and service
areas,” he said. “Buses come very infrequently and then it’s very unattractive
to people, because if you miss a bus
you have to wait another two hours for
the next bus.”
While Massachusetts has 15 regional transit agencies, they have long
said they need more money to meet
even basic service levels. In mostly rural Franklin County, for example, activists have pushed to get bus service
to extend into the weekend. The state
Legislature last summer provided
more funding for these bus services,
though the regional agencies must
now apply for the additional money
and show how it will improve service.
In big cities like Boston, public
transportation is seen as a key weapon
in the eternal fight against traffic congestion.
MATTHEW CAVANAUGH FOR THE BOSTON GLOBE/FILE/2013
Passengers boarded a Berkshire Regional Transit Authority bus at
Berkshire Community College in Pittsfield.
But in rural areas, the more urgent
need for transit is driven by demographics, especially a greater number
of elderly people in need of a ride, said
Pat Beaudry, a spokesman for the Pioneer Valley Planning Commission.
“We’re seeing the issue of rural
transportation really rising to the top
recently, which has a lot to do with the
aging demographics of rural Massachusetts in conjunction with a decline
in services and amenities offered in
those communities necessitating further travels than before,” Beaudry
said.
The state has also launched a study
of potential rail service connecting
Pittsfield to Springfield, Worcester,
and Boston — linking the Berkshires
to the state’s three biggest cities,
though Baker administration officials
have warned that there would be big
infrastructure “challenges” to launching such a service.
The report to Baker, meanwhile,
was low on specific solutions, though
hinted at several. It said the state
should install high-quality broadband
Internet in underserved areas, which
would make it easier for ride-hailing
services such as Uber to “supplement” existing bus services.
It also suggested various providers
of transportation — from the regional
bus systems to local councils on aging
— work together on regional transportation plans.
That’s similar to what the Bostoncentric Metropolitan Area Planning
Council is doing for the more sparsely
populated communities northwest of
Boston, such as Lincoln and Stow.
The regional agency is asking companies to submit ideas for a “micro-transit” service, a sort of hybrid between
ride-hailing and public transit that
uses technology and smaller vehicles
to create flexible routes that adjust
based on passenger demand and
pick-up requests. The MAPC is just
considering the idea for now, but
agency officials said such a service
could draw from several existing operators.
“Council on aging shuttles aren’t
always in use. Could they be used regionally for other uses?” said Marjorie
Weinberger, the MAPC’s procurement director. “How can we expand
upon on-demand transportation opportunities that are fully available in
downtown urban districts but less
available further away?”
Adam Vaccaro can be reached at
adam.vaccaro@globe.com. Follow
him on Twitter at @adamtvaccaro.
Celebrations
ENGAGEMENTS
Tamara Greenman
& Daniel Simonds
WEDDINGS
WEDDINGS
Jitka Massolini Horcickova
Robert McKee
Carli Stevenson
Meli Barber
Carli Elaine Stevenson, formerly of New
Hampshire, and Meli Barber were married November
11, 2017 at Trinity Episcopal Church in Indianapolis,
IN. The Reverend Dr. Charles Allen, chaplain at
Butler University, officiated the ceremony. A full
Mass was celebrated, followed by a reception at the
Harrison Center for the Arts, Indianapolis.
Ms. Stevenson was attended by her childhood best
friend, Soher Z. Morsi of Londonderry, NH, and dear
friends from college, Nicholas J. Copanas of New
York City, Daniel Barton of Portland, Maine, Rachel
Cilley of Chelsea, MA, and Elizabeth Wolff of Exeter,
NH.
Robert and Elizabeth McKee
of Wayland, MA are pleased
to announce the marriage of
their son, Rob McKee, to Jitka
Massolini Horcickova of Prague,
Czech Republic. The bride’s
parents are Jitka Horcickova of
Cambridge, United Kingdom, and
Mario Massolini of Brescia, Italy.
Jitka and Rob met at Fenway
Park in May 2017 during a wedding celebration for Mele Hunter
of Somerville. Jitka was Mele’s
maid of honor and Mele returned
the favor in Prague. The best
man was Ryan Nichols of Lynn.
Rob’s brother, Kevin, and Jitka’s
sister, Veronica, were also members of the wedding party.
On the last weekend of August
the couple staged a remarkable
three-day wedding celebration at
Chateau Trnova on the outskirts
of Prague, which was attended
by guests from fourteen countries
and six continents.
Following a honeymoon
in Sicily the couple lives in
Prague with their Bichon Frise
Maggie and Black Labrador
Tipsy. Rob manages U.S. sales
for Socialbakers and Jitka Sales
& Contracts for Czech Airlines
Handling.
Sign the guest book now!
G0000 1 0000F
Visit boston.com/celebrations today!
Ms. Stevenson wore a custom tea-length dress of
champagne silk dupioni with lace detail. Ms. Barber
wore a tea-length ivory lace dress with illusion neckline. Both brides carried bouquets of cream roses and
wheat stalks.
Carli is a graduate of Berwick Academy, South
Berwick, Maine, and the University of New
Hampshire. She is the daughter of Claudia Stevenson
of Hampton, NH, and granddaughter of Dr. and Mrs.
Kenneth Stevenson, also of Hampton. Her mother
works as a nurse at Massachusetts General Hospital.
Meli graduated from the University of Notre Dame
with bachelor’s and master’s degrees in Theology.
She earned her Master’s in Social Work from Indiana
University. She is the daughter of Patricia Barber of
MILESTONES
Toast the happy couple.
Ms. Barber was attended by her best friend, Dr.
Tess Murray-Torres of St. Louis, MO, dear friend
Danielle Davenport of Indianapolis, and her sister
Guinevere Longmeier of Columbus, Ohio.
BIRTHS
Congratulations!
Margaret Blair Karas
Congratulations on your
retirement Dad!
James and Jacqueline Karas
announce the birth of their
first child, a daughter, Margaret
Blair Karas.
We hope you enjoy
everything you’ve worked
so hard for over the past
40 years. Thank you for
teaching us the value of
dedication and hard work.
We are so proud of you!
Love,
Mom, Christine, Jim,
Brian, Lisa, Kevin, Janelle
and Brayden
Margaret arrived at 7:28 PM
on Thursday, November 22,
2018 at South Shore Hospital,
South Weymouth, MA. She
weighed 6 lbs. 9 oz. and
measured 19 inches in length.
The maternal grandparents
are Kurt and Kimberly Bittrolff
of Pembroke, MA.
The paternal grandparents
are Kathy Loiacono of Hull, MA
and the late James Karas Sr. of
Chandler, AZ.
David Leszcynski
Mr. and Mrs. Stanley
Greenman of Oyster Bay, NY
are pleased to announce the
engagement of their daughter
Tamara Britt Greenman to
Daniel Reynolds Simonds, son
of Helena Reynolds Simonds
and the late Daniel Simonds III
of Boston, MA. Ms. Greenman
is a graduate of The Hill School
and Trinity College and works
in real estate. Mr. Simonds
is a graduate of St. Georges
School, Suffolk University, and
The Iowa Writers’ Workshop
at The University of Iowa.
Mr. Simonds is currently
completing the MFA program
at The University of New
Hampshire.
The couple met in
Nantucket, through mutual
friends.
Columbus, Ohio, and the late Thomas Barber. Her
mother is recently retired from the State of Ohio.
Carli is a digital and political communications
specialist, and Meli works in child welfare. The couple resides in Indianapolis.
ENGAGEMENTS
Erica Lane/ Steven Burison
Mr. and Mrs. Peter Lane
of Hingham, MA and Bretton
Woods, NH happily announce
the engagement of their daughter,
Erica Victoria Lane, to Dr. Steven
Burison. Dr. Burison is the son of
Ms. Marie Burison of Worcester,
MA and Mr. Steven Burison of
Derry, NH.
The bride-to-be attended The
American School in Switzerland
and Suffield Academy, Suffield,
CT. She received her BA in
Communications from St.
Lawrence University, Canton, NY
and is employed as a Recruiting
Coordinator at Barton Associates,
Inc., East Longmeadow, MA.
Dr. Burison received his
BS in Biology/PreDental from
The College of the Holy Cross,
Worcester, MA where he was
a proud member of the Men's
NCAA Div. 1 rowing team all
four years. He received his DMD
from Tufts University School of
Dental Medicine and specializes in Family/General dentistry
at Goodman and Fox Dentistry,
Springfield, MA.
The couple currently resides in
Broadbrook, CT.
Metro
B6
B o s t o n
S u n d a y
G l o b e
JA N UA RY 6 , 2 0 1 9
Leona Benoit, 105, of Stoughton, a tireless advocate for peace
uBENOIT
Continued from Page B1
the area’s only antiwar protester who could remember celebrating the Armistice that ended World War I — when she had
just turned 5.
“ War doesn’ t settle anything,” she told the Globe in
2013, just after her 100th birthday. “If it did, we wouldn’t be
having continuous wars. I don’t
know who is right or wrong or
what the problems are, but they
are never going to be solved by
killing.”
Born in 1913, Leona Mahoney grew up during wartime.
Her early memories are of a
sugar shortage and of gathering
with her family around the piano each Sunday evening.
Among the songs that filled the
room was a mournful tune
about peace that her mother
would sing.
Though not yet in school,
young Leona was aware that a
war was being fought far away.
“We didn’t know it like kids
know it today,” she recalled in
the 2013 interview, “but we
knew it was a bad thing.”
And when the Armistice that
ended World War I took effect
Nov. 11, 1918 — on the 11th
hour of the 11th day of the 11th
month — she and her two older
sisters danced in the backyard
of their home in Stoughton
while the whistle blew in town,
heralding the arrival of peace.
In the decades that followed,
she and the world would know
more wartime than peacetime.
Born in Stoughton, Leona
was the third of five children
whose parents were Daniel H.
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Why go to stores who just sell mattresses when you can go
to the experts who make the mattresses?
Mahoney, a train ticket agent,
and Mary Pauline Kelleher.
Leona graduated from Stoughton High School in 1931 and
worked on and off for some 15
years at a woolen mill in town.
During World War II, her
only brother, Daniel H. Mahoney Jr., served in the Army Air
Forces. In 1944, he was flying
over what was then Yugoslavia
when his plane was shot down.
Initially, he was reported missing in action. The Mahoney
family waited until 1949 to receive official word that he had
been killed in action.
Mrs. Benoit’s first marriage
ended in divorce.
In 1946, the year after the
war ended, she went out dancing one night and met Joseph
M. Benoit, an Air Force veteran.
They married in 1948.
His family had also suffered
losses during the war. Two of
his brothers were killed in action, and Mr. Benoit was in a
Nazi prisoner of war camp for
13 months.
Looking back years later,
Mrs. Benoit thought she should
have become a peace activist
then. “I wish I had started after
we dropped the bomb on Japan,” she said in 2013.
“That is the biggest regret of
my life. We didn’t stop what we
were doing. We should have
been outraged,” she said, adding that “it was the worst thing
any country has ever done.”
In 1967, she became the
leader of Stoughton Mothers
for Peace, prompted in part by
concerns about her son, Joseph
Benoit Jr., who was nearing
high school graduation during
the Vietnam War. Though the
organization officially ceased its
work after the war ended, Mrs.
Benoit kept pushing for peace.
JONATHAN WIGGS/GLOBE STAFF/FILE 2013
Though Stoughton Mothers for Peace officially ceased its
work after the Vietnam War, Mrs. Benoit kept pushing.
“I never really stopped,” she
told the Globe.
After all, there was the Gulf
War, which began in 1990,
along with the Iraq War, which
started in 2003. Then there is
the war in Afghanistan, which
was launched in 2001 and outlives Mrs. Benoit.
One day when she was in
her mid-90s — amid the Afghanistan and Iraq wars — she
went to an Army recruiting office and spoke her mind before
being escorted out the door.
“I went in and told them
they looked like nice young
men,” she later recalled, “and
asked if they ever thought . . . to
be part of working for peace.”
L e o n a Ma h o n e y B e n o i t
waged peace from her hometown of Stoughton nearly all
her life, save a few years that
she lived in Florida. She moved
back to Stoughton from Florida
when her husband died in
1982. He had owned a housepainting business and had also
worked at a service station.
Mrs. Benoit “always spoke
with kindness,” her great-niece
Michelle Mello of Somerset
said. “Even though she felt
strongly about peace, and
would call in to the radio station, she did it in a kind way.”
Over the years, Mrs. Benoit
was a regular writer of letters to
newspaper editors. In a 1974
letter the Globe published, she
questioned the practice of firing
weapons at Memorial Day ceremonies to commemorate the
war dead.
“ T h i s s e e m s t o m a ke a s
much sense as it would were we
to drive through the cemetery
in a high-speed motor vehicle
coming to a screeching halt at
the grave of the victim of a traffic accident,” she wrote.
“To stand and shudder” each
year at the retort of rifles, she
added, “indicates how far our
country has progressed as we
near our 200th anniversary.”
In a tribute, Michelle wrote:
“I’ll miss you Aunt Leona. You
were inspiring to everyone who
knew you and taught me so
much about what’s really important in life: kindness, peace,
and love.”
Along with her son, Joseph,
who lives in Stoughton, and Michelle, Mrs. Benoit leaves two
grandchildren and two greatgrandchildren.
Her family will hold visiting
hours beginning at 4 p.m. Tuesday in Farley Funeral Home in
Stoughton. The funeral service
will be private.
Though Mrs. Benoit had also worked for five years as a florist at Purple Statice in Easton,
which her nephew Wayne Robinson founded, she always considered peace activism her primary occupation.
“She wanted people to be at
peace and to be happy. That’s
what she always wanted for us,”
Michelle said. “I think that’s
why she hung around so long.
She was afraid to leave us because of the way the world is.”
Mrs. Benoit believed in the
effectiveness of activism and
dismissed any notion that, for
example, President Richard M.
Nixon deserved credit for stopping the Vietnam War.
“People say Nixon ended the
war. It was the people,” she said
a f t e r h e r 1 0 0 t h b i r t h d a y.
“When enough people got out
in the street and protested, they
ended the war.”
She considered such efforts
to be a task without end.
“I’m just waiting around because I haven’t finished my
work yet,” she told the Brockton
Enterprise for a profile that was
published on Nov. 11, 2017, the
99th anniversary of the Armistice she had welcomed with a
celebratory dance.
Legally blind in her last
years, Mrs. Benoit still made
phone calls, sitting amid peace
posters that her great-grandchildren, great-nieces, and
great-nephews had made.
And at the age of 100, she
told the Globe that through war
after war, her ambitions for
peace endured.
“I never give up hope,” she
said.
Bryan Marquard can be
reached at
bryan.marquard@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter
@BryanMarquard.
Stories you take with you.
Stories that stay with you.
BostonGlobe.com
B o s t o n
JA N UA RY 6 , 2 0 1 9
S u n d a y
G l o b e
Metro
B7
Massport monitoring TSA staffing at Logan during shutdown
By John Hilliard
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
Hundreds of Transportation
Security Administration agents
called out of work across the
country this past week during
the ongoing partial shutdown
of the federal government, but
similar absences haven’t affected Boston’s Logan International
Airport, a state official said Saturday.
The Massachusetts Port Authority is monitoring the situation, said Jennifer Mehigan, an
agency spokeswoman.
ing without pay at John F. Kennedy International Airport in
New York, CNN reported Friday.
Fellow TSA agents, who are
also going without pay, worked
extra hours to cover the staffing
gap, CNN reported.
The partial shutdown came
after President Trump and
Democratic lawmakers failed to
reach a funding agreement for
the government that included
money for a wall along the USMexico border.
Tr u m p h a s p r o m i s e d t o
“We have not seen any staffing issues at Logan so far. Obviously, it’s something we will
keep a close eye on,” Mehigan
said in a phone interview Saturday morning.
TSA employees are among
thousands of essential government workers required to remain on the job without pay
during the partial shutdown,
which began Dec. 22.
But many across the country
have called in sick or otherwise
weren’t able to work, including
up to 170 agents who are work-
build the wall in order to improve border security, a proposal that has been opposed by
Democrats.
Hydrick Thomas, the president of the national TSA worker’s union, told CNN the number of agents not coming into
work will “definitely affect the
flying public.”
On Friday, TSA said in a
statement that the call outs began over the holiday period and
have increased.
The agency said the call outs
are causing “minimal impact”
Getting
back to
business
after fires
and respectful to the traveling
public as they continue the important work necessary to secure the nation’s transportation
systems,” the agency said.
Mehigan said screening
times at Logan have not been
affected.
“If we start to see any issues,
in coordination with our federal partners, we will communicate with the public about what
steps we will take,” she said.
John Hilliard can be reached at
john.hilliard@globe.com.
Victim of beating
‘was always ready to
help someone else’
uWILSON
Hemmerich’s daughter got
married in California, she was
overjoyed that Wilson was
there for the wedding, he said.
“We loved the guy, he was always around for us,” Hemmerich said. “He was someone who
was always ready to help someone else, whether he knew
them or not.”
Wilson graduated from the
University of Massachusetts
Lowell with a degree in music,
but changed course to a career
in computers, Hemmerich said.
But Wilson kept an interest
in music all his life, and enjoyed
attending Boston Pops concerts
with his late father, the Rev.
Charles L. Wilson Sr., who died
last year, Hemmerich said.
Wilson’s travels took him
around the world — and he was
especially fond of Italy, Hemmerich said.
“It was his kind of place:
good food, beautiful architecture and art, good music,” Hemmerich said.
Wilson was single all his life
and had no children. But he
was surrounded by friends and
loved ones, Hemmerich said.
Wilson was raised to be
kind, Hemmerich said. “He just
seemed to be his mom and
dad’s son. That was the way he
lived,” Hemmerich said.
The family is making arra ngemen ts for a fu neral,
which could take place at the
end of January, Hemmerich
said.
“He was a wonderful guy, he
was a friend to many,” Hemmerich said. “He will be missed
terribly.”
Continued from Page B1
uMERRIMACK
Continued from Page B1
The visit was part of an afternoon tour by the Baker administration of restaurants and
stores affected by the Sept. 13
gas disaster and marked the
culmination of inaugural activities for the governor, who was
sworn in for a second four-year
term Thursday.
“Customers need to know
and appreciate that these folks
are up and operating again.
One of the things that happens
when people are closed for a
while is folks change their traditional patterns and they start
going over to places,” Baker said
in an interview in Lawrence,
the last stop on the tour. “Part
of today was creating some
news and some noise around
the fact that these folks are up
and operating.”
Thousands of people were
left without heat or hot water
after an overpressurization of
the gas delivery system sparked
more than 120 fires and explosions in North Andover, Andover, and Lawrence, killing a
teenager and injuring more
than 20 people.
A massive recovery effort
followed, during which more
than 43 miles of underground
pipeline were replaced, and
more than 5,000 new service
lines and 18,000 pieces of
equipment and appliances
were installed, officials have
said. About 20,000 damaged
appliances were removed.
The work to restore heat and
hot water was “substantially
because of the 51,739 employees supporting the screening
process.
“Security effectiveness will
not be compromised and performance standards will not
change,” the statement said.
Screening wait times could
be affected due to the number
of absent agents, the statement
said. As of Friday, those wait
times remain within the agency’s standards, TSA said.
“ TSA is grateful to the
agents who show up to work,
remain focused on the mission
NATHAN KLIMA FOR THE BOSTON GLOBE
Governor Charlie Baker (left) and Lieutenant Governor Karyn Polito at Wine ConneXtion.
completed” on Dec. 12. All but
three businesses affected by the
disaster have reopened, local officials said. Columbia Gas, the
utility responsible for the disaster, has paid nearly $21 million
in business claims, a spokesman said Saturday.
A preliminary investigation
found that an engineer erred in
planning for a construction
project to replace underground
pipelines in South Lawrence by
failing to relocate a critical pressure sensor. When the errant
sensor failed to detect pressure,
the system was overwhelmed
with high-pressure gas, triggering the fires and explosions.
Last Monday, Baker signed a
bill into law that requires a certified professional engineer review projects involving pressurized gas lines. The federal investigation into the disas ter,
however, is on hold because of
the government shutdown.
The Rev. Paul O’Brien, pastor at St. Patrick Church in
Lawrence, said the explosions
and their aftermath triggered
“one trauma after another.”
“People are still often on
edge, filled with anxiety, snapping just from loud noises.
There’s a feeling of, ‘Could the
bottom drop out at any moment?’ Because the bottom sort
of did drop out for a few
months.”
Baker was upbeat during the
tour, buying Girl Scout cookies
from a Brownie troop in Andover and sipping a margarita
at the bar at Casa Blanca, a
Mexican restaurant in Andover
that was closed for nine weeks.
In Lawrence, Joe Chui, owner of Golden House Restaurant,
embraced the governor as he
entered the dining room.
“Thank you, Charlie,” said
Chui, who set out trays of crab
rangoon, chicken fingers, and
scallion pancakes for the governor and his entourage.
Alex Mercedes, whose family runs Jacqueline’s, a Lawrence
grocery store, said in the wake
of the disaster his uncle drove
to New York and purchased
electric appliances so the bodega could reopen quickly and
preserve jobs for their workers.
“ T h e y h av e t o p ay t h e i r
bills,” he said. “We were going
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no work.”
Local officials in the three
communities have tried different initiatives to bring customers back to businesses affected
by the gas fires using $10 million that Columbia Gas set
aside in November.
Some businesses said they’re
still waiting for Columbia Gas
to reimburse them for lost revenue related to the disaster.
Sue Robert, who owns Frederick’s Pastries in North Andover, said the bakery uses electrical appliances and was only
closed for a few days, but business tanked in the next weeks.
She estimated she lost about
$10,000 in sales and filed a
claim with Columbia Gas, but
expects her request won’t be
processed until residential customers are made whole.
“The people and their houses come first,” Robert said. “We
make cake. It’s a luxury.”
ing to the Middlesex district attorney‘s office.
Investigators are working to
determine whether Wilson was
targeted and if a baseball bat
found nearby was used in the
attack.
Officials had no updates on
the investigation Saturday.
C a m b r i d g e p o l i c e h av e
asked that anyone at the park
between 6 and 7 p.m. Wednesday call their anonymous tip
line at 617-349-3359 or emergency communications line at
617-349-3300.
Danehy Park is popular with
residents of the normally quiet
North Cambridge neighborhood, and Wilson frequently
walked through it en route to
his job as a software engineer at
IBM.
Hemmerich said Wilson had
worked at the company for
about 30 years.
Hemmerich said he and Wilson grew up in Massachusetts
— Hemmerich in Winchester,
Wilson in Danvers — and frequently saw each other at family get-togethers and other
events.
Ev e n a f t e r He m m e r i c h
moved to California in 1974,
they remained close: Hemmerich and his family would visit
Wilson and his parents in Danvers. And Wilson, who loved to
travel, would visit Hemmerich’s family, he said.
“He was always the glue in
the family who would be there,”
Hemmerich said. “He was always bringing family together.”
H e m m e r i c h ’s w i f e e x changed messages with Wilson
through Facebook. And when
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B o s t o n
S u n d a y
JA N UA RY 6 , 2 0 1 9
Donors made holiday special
Executive
Director of Globe
Santa Bill
Connolly with
(from right)
Jackie Cunio,
Kelvin Healy,
and Oliver Fahy
of Nixon Peabody
LLP. Connolly
accepted a
donation from
the law firm on
behalf of Globe
Santa.
Santa’s friends
JOSH REYNOLDS FOR THE BOSTON GLOBE
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Cathleen Fioravanti
Our friend, Cyndie Foley
John and Mary Cramer,
John and Mary Santry,
James and Rosana Corkery,
and John and Mary Foy
Family and Friends
Charles Gaffey
Brian and David Herlihy,
their Grampa Gene, and
their Uncle Gene
Grampy and Grammy
Gifford
Sarah Brennan Goodwin
Ma, Dad, Gug, Nana, and
Grampy
Ellen Guillette
Ellen Kelleher Guillette
Thomas C. Dean Jr., James
R. Shepherd Jr., Mark I.
Hamilton
Joe D., Henri, Francois,
Henri, Odile, Madelaine,
Edgar
Peter Hotton
Elizabeth Howard
Jim “The General” Thornton
Sr.
JJ and Maureen
Joanne M. Roche, from Ed,
Ted, Anne, and Joe
My dear, departed older
brother, Duncan Dana Jones
My mother, Antiss Dana
Jones, and my father,
Arthur Morse Jones
My grandmother, Antiss
Weston Dana, and my
uncle, Lawrence Wetherbee
Jones
Our son, Joseph
25.00
50.00
50.00
25.00
100.00
1,000.00
200.00
50.00
50.00
100.00
100.00
100.00
50.00
35.00
250.00
100.00
410.00
20.00
25.00
50.00
100.00
500.00
25.00
50.00
200.00
50.00
200.00
100.00
200.00
500.00
40.00
50.00
100.00
25.00
100.00
25.00
70.00
150.00
25.00
50.00
100.00
100.00
100.00
500.00
50.00
25.00
50.00
200.00
100.00
50.00
50.00
200.00
50.00
50.00
300.00
117.00
250.00
75.00
180.00
300.00
100.00
100.00
1,000.00
100.00
50.00
50.00
25.00
25.00
Alice, Anna, Florence, and
Judy
Phil and Julia
Kasey Marie Fleming
Grandma King
Joseph P. Laflamme
Albert Lennon Jr.
My friend, Linda
Richard and Faith
MacDonald
Steve B. Machado
My son, Steve Machado
Joseph, Joe, Nana Ferrone,
Dan Macone
Donna Marie
Francis Matthews
My parents, John and Anne
McEachern
Dr. Richard McGrail
Catherine Boyd, of Melrose
KR Panicker, TK Sarala Devi,
ED Menon
Oour parents, Matt and Peg
O’Brien and Bert and Lily
Mercer
John, Andrew, Mary, and
Maureen. From Pat and
Mike
Julia — so missed
Edward P. Morse
Mugsley
Nana
Nana Lucy
Our son­in­law, Jeffrey
Palermo. From Jeanne and
Nick
Our mother, Barbara Shea,
you are loved and missed
Our parents
The Meehan family: Mom,
Dad, Phyllis, and Peter
Tom and Catherine Pitoniak
Alfred, Robert, Mark, Al
(Papa) Ricci, and June Ricci
Sarno
Jimmy (James H.) Robinson
II
Rosemary
Tommy, Roland (Bud), and
Eleanor Ruelle
My son, Denis, who loved
Santa
Tony Schwarzeti
Helen and Sid
William J. Theodore
Thomas and Nora Keane
Triscuit
My brother, Capt. Mitchell
A. Kfoury, USAF
Our two sainted labradors,
Cabot and Indiana. Long
may their tails wag!
Marie and Bob Walsh
Rita Watts
Our loved ones: Ma, Daddy,
Rose, Frankie, Chuckie,
Michael, Tommy, George,
Nana and Grandpa Ahern
and family, Nana and
Grandpa Feeley and family,
and our nephew, Michael
Feeley, who we lost this
year
John J. Zani
Today’s total:
100.00
50.00
100.00
35.00
150.00
25.00
25.00
250.00
100.00
50.00
300.00
50.00
25.00
100.00
50.00
500.00
50.00
200.00
100.00
60.00
500.00
25.00
50.00
25.00
20.00
25.00
200.00
50.00
25.00
50.00
100.00
25.00
50.00
100.00
50.00
50.00
300.00
25.00
50.18
200.00
25.00
50.00
50.00
950.00
100.00
$69,345.00
Total thus far
The 5,054 contributions
to the 2018 Globe Santa
Fund published through
Sunday, Jan. 6, total
$811,532.15.
The publication date of
each contribution is
available at
globesanta.org.
The Globe will continue
publishing contribution
lists until all received for
the 2018 campaign are
acknowledged.
* receives matching funds
25.00
100.00
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B o s t o n
JA N UA RY 6 , 2 0 1 9
S u n d a y
G l o b e
Continued from Page B1
Kings; Bank of America; Delaware North, which owns the TD
G a r d e n ; Ha r v a r d P i l g r i m
He al th Care , whe re Bake r
served as CEO; and the Hopkinton-based Dell.
Steve C o n i n e a n d N i ra j
Shah, the co-founders of internet retailer Wayfair, also gave
$25,000 apiece, as did Suffolk
Construction CEO John Fish
and Laura Trust, the owner of
the Newton-based Finagle a Bagel.
Another 16 donors gave
$10,000 last month, including
the Pharmaceutical Research
and Manufacturers of America,
or PhRMA, one of the drug industry’s top trade groups, and
Teamsters Local 25, the powerful Charlestown-based union
that, in a surprise move, endorsed Baker in his reelection
bid last year.
When then-Governor Deval
Patrick celebrated his second
term in 2011, he raised
$660,000 toward his inaugural
events, or less than 60 percent
of Baker’s current $1.1 million
haul.
The total, of course, is still
well shy of what Baker used toward his festivities for his 2014
swearing-in, when he raked in
$2.4 million to fund the most
expensive inaugural celebration
in state history.
B u t o n e - t h i r d o f t h at —
$850,000 in total — actually
flowed in after Baker’s Jan. 8
swearing-in that year, and it’s
possible that the governor’s inaugural haul for this year will
grow after more fund-raising
reports are filed.
The campaign this year has
not provided an estimated budge t , and a spoke sm an was
vague Friday, saying that it expects to spend “enough to cover
all its costs.”
Baker has used this war
chest to bankroll a slate of 17
events, including an inaugural
gala where about 2,000 people
partied at the Museum of Science on Thursday night, plus
receptions at a Springfield restaurant and Worcester’s Union
Station on Friday. The committee also promised $25,000 donors two tickets to a candlelight
dinner.
In addition to having no
statutory limits on donations,
including from corporations —
who otherwise aren’t allowed to
give directly to a political candidate’s account — such inaugural funds aren’t required to disclose how the money is spent.
That has raised red flags with
government watchdogs, who
worry about the influence such
donations can wield.
Baker’s aides have said that
the big-money contributions
wouldn’t afford donors any special access to the administration.
The governor has already returned most of one donation,
after a lobbying firm for a major wind energy project donated $2,500 to his inaugural fund,
nearly 10 times the cap that
Baker had set for lobbyists.
— MATT STOUT
“Our work certainly won’t
change, but I thought it was important that we adopt a modern
and inclusive name for the legislative body of our City,” he
said.
The Board of Aldermen is
made up of 11 elected leaders —
four at large and seven that represent individual wards, according to the city’s website.
Three of the board members
are women.
Ward 7 Alderman Katjana
Ballantyne, who is also the
board’s president, said in a
statement that she’s looking
forward to having a new title in
the New Year.
“I am very happy not to be
called an ‘elder man’ anymore,”
she said.
Once it’s officially enacted,
references to “Aldermen” and
“Alderman” in the City Charter
will become “City Council” and
“City Councilor,” respectively.
“Adopting an inclusive name
for the City’s legislative body is
one small way we can show our
commitment to making Somerville more equitable,” Mayor Jo­
seph Curtatone said in a statement, “and I commend our
soon-to-be Councilors for taking this step.”
— STEVE ANNEAR
Mr. Speaker? Mr. Speaker?
US Representative Joe Ken­
nedy III fell 217 votes shy of becoming the first US House
Speaker from Massachusetts in
decades on Thursday.
Harming his chances might
be the fact that Kennedy wasn’t
actually running for Speaker.
The Newton Democrat didn’t
even vote for himself, and that
the one vote Kennedy did receive was largely a protest
against the inevitable winner.
Indeed, after the US House
clerk called on each newly
sworn-in member of Congress
to cast their choice for Speaker,
Nancy Pelosi received the necessary 218 votes to wield the
gavel.
The Republican caucus voted for their leader, Kevin McCa­
rthy of California, and 15 Democrats choose someone other
than Pelosi. One of the 15,
Conor Lamb of Pennsylvania,
called out “Joe Kennedy the
third” when it was his turn.
Immediately afterward,
Kennedy was shown on camera
smiling and laughing at the gesture. He, after all, voted for
Pelosi, as did all of the Massachusetts delegation, including
Seth Moulton, of Salem, who
had led the opposition to Pelosi
two months ago.
Lamb, who represents areas
just outside Pittsburgh, was not
immediately available for comment on why he picked Kennedy, but he repeatedly promised
in his campaign not to vote for
Pelosi.
Aside from Kennedy, others
who received votes for Speaker
included former Vice President
Joe Biden, US Representative
John Lewis, and US Senator
Tammy Duckworth of Illinois.
“Any time I can tie Joe Biden
in an election is a good day, but
what made today truly special
was watching Nancy Pelosi accept the Speaker’s gavel,” Kennedy responded in a statement.
— JAMES PINDELL
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‘Aldermen’ no longer in
Somerville
It’s not just Somerville’s
Union Square that’s facing
changes.
Officials announced this
week that beginning at the end
of the month, the city’s Board of
Aldermen will take on a new
name: The City Council.
The move comes after Governor Charlie Baker on Tuesday,
Jan. 1, signed a home rule petition submitted by city leaders
requesting the name change.
C h a n g i n g t h e m o n i ke r,
which requires state approval,
was long in the making.
In February last year, Alderman-At-Large William A. White
Jr. — soon-to-be Councilor-AtLarge — submitted a request
that the city do away with what
he and other elected officials
called an antiquated and noninclusive title for the legislative
body.
The request to the state,
which was backed by other
members of the board, followed
in the footsteps of surrounding
communities like Newton.
“It means ‘board of wise old
men,’ or ‘board of patriarchs,’ ”
White told the Globe last year.
“It seems to make sense to
change it to a modern term.”
White said in a statement
Fr i d a y, w h e n t h e c i t y a n nounced the impending changes, that he is glad the state approved the home rule petition.
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Business
B10
B o s t o n
S u n d a y
G l o b e
JA N UA RY 6 , 2 0 1 9
Business
Agenda
MICHELLE SINGLETARY | THE COLOR OF MONEY
Some guidelines for federal workers
A
s they get closer to
missing their first
paycheck of the new
year, many federal
employees are filing for unemployment benefits to tide them
over during the government
shutdown.
Even if a deal is reached
quickly to reopen the shuttered
agencies, workers probably
won’t get a paycheck until midJanuary or later.
So what’s a worker to do?
In Maryland, the total number of federal employees who
filed unemployment claims as
of Jan. 2 was 637, according to
the state’s Department of Labor, Licensing & Regulation.
One of those filers is Zachary
Levine, a 63-year-old physicist
at the National Institute of
Standards and Technology,
who is still awaiting approval
for his claim.
In the past, following previous government shutdowns,
workers were given back pay.
However, Congress isn’t required to do this, so Levine said
he filed for unemployment as a
strategic move to preserve his
savings.
“I’m not a hardship case,”
Levine said. “But I respect the
fact that there are many people
who make less money than I do
and are living paycheck to paycheck.”
During the 2013 government shutdown, which lasted
16 days, Levine also applied for
unemployment. He was ap-
proved, and his benefit was put
on a prepaid Visa card. But his
claim came through just as he
was sent back to work, and the
pay he would have earned had
he not been furloughed was restored.
“I never actually spent any
of the money,” he said. “When
we got back pay, [the state of
Maryland] just took the money
back off the card.”
The Office of Personnel
Management has issued guidance for federal employees who
decide to apply for unemployment insurance. Go to opm.gov
and click the funding-lapse
link, then look for “Unemployment Insurance Resources.”
To apply for unemployment,
you need to contact the state
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where you worked to file a
claim, according to OPM. To
find your state office, go to careeronestop.org. Under the tab
“Local Help at a Glance,” you’ll
see the unemployment-benefits
finder. From there, use the
dropdown menu to find your
state and the information on
how to apply. Before applying, I
suggest you read the unemployment-insurance questions
and answers document that
OPM has posted.
Since the shutdown could
end at any time, it’s possible
your unemployment claim
could be approved just as you
are called back to work and
your pay is retroactively restored. Nonetheless, if you
know you’ll need the money, go
ahead and apply now. Just
make sure that if and when you
get your back pay, you set aside
funds to repay your state.
During the shutdown, you
may also be wondering about
your health benefits. Read
OPM’s “Guidance for Shutdown Furloughs.” Under the
section for benefits, the agency
says employees will continue to
be covered under the Federal
Employees Health Benefits program during a shutdown, even
if an agency does not make premium payments on time. Your
premium payments will still accumulate, and they will be
withheld from your pay once
you return to pay status.
Be careful about picking up
work while furloughed. During
the shutdown, individuals still
remain employees of the federal government, and so certain
outside employment may be
prohibited. OPM says that before taking on an outside job,
employees should consult their
agency’s ethics official.
Michelle Singletary can be
reached at michelle.singletary
@washpost.com.
Monday, Jan. 7
➔ WORKSHOP
Communicate confidently
Learn to speak with confidence at an event hosted by General
Assembly. Participants will learn how to use body language
and other methods to get their message across. Monday,
6:30 to 9:30 p.m., General Assembly Boston, 125 Summer
St., Boston. $60. Register online or go to the business agenda
at bostonglobe.com.
Tuesday, Jan. 8
➔ HACKATHON
Emphasize empathy
Rethink health care with a focus on creating a more empathic
experience. This event is hosted by Boston Design Thinking
Meetup, which encourages thought and innovation. Tuesday,
6 to 8:30 p.m., Blue Cross Blue Shield Massachusetts, 101
Huntington Ave., Boston. Free. Register online or go to the
business agenda at bostonglobe.com.
➔ PANEL
Build revenue
Discuss the best strategy for increasing cash flow at a talk
hosted by The Boston Entrepreneur’s Network, a group for
burgeoning entrepreneurs. Panelists will review ways to
increase sales and answer questions after the event. Tuesday,
6 to 9 p.m., Hill Building, 1 Hampshire St., Cambridge. Free for
members and $10 for non-members. Register online or go to
the business agenda at bostonglobe.com.
Wednesday, Jan. 9
➔ DISCUSSION
Overcome funding challenges
Discover new ways to fund your startup at an event by The
Startup Coalition, a network of established professionals who
want to help smaller Boston companies grow. Speakers will
give an overview of different ways to increase capital.
Wednesday, 6 to 8 p.m., WeWork, 745 Atlantic Ave., Boston.
Free. Register online or go to the business agenda at
bostonglobe.com.
Events of note? E­mail us at agenda@globe.com.
GLADIATOR
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Events of note? E­mail us at agenda@globe.com
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JA N UA RY 6 , 2 0 1 9
B o s t o n
S u n d a y
G l o b e
Business
B11
TA L K I NG P O I N T S
T H E W E E K I N B US I N E S S
LABOR
NATIONAL GRID
AND LOCKED­OUT
WORKERS REACH
A TENTATIVE
AGREEMENT
HEALTH CARE
MAJOR BUSINESS
GROUP WANTS
END TO HEALTH­
CARE FEES
National Grid and the United Steelworkers reached a tentative agreement to end a six-month lockout of 1,250 union
workers, the utility and the union announced late Wednesday
night. Details won’t be released until the members of Locals
12003 and 12012 vote to ratify the agreement on or before
Monday. “We have worked very hard over the last six months
to reach this tentative agreement and we hope to share the
details with our members on Monday,” said John Buonopane,
president of Local 12012, which represents about a third of
the locked-out employees, who work in gas operations and
support positions across eastern Massachusetts. The agreement followed the
resumption of negotiations on
Wednesday. The
utility on Friday
had presented a
revised offer to the
union after several
days of what both
sides called
“lengthy, productive bargaining
sessions.” The
company and the
union had expressed optimism
that an agreement
was in sight but blew past a goal to end the standoff before
Christmas, and then another before the end of the year. Last
Monday, Governor Charlie Baker signed legislation that
would extend unemployment insurance benefits for the
locked-out workers if an agreement was not reached. Their
benefits were set to expire in mid-January, and the legislation
would extend those payments for up to another 26 weeks. A
separate bill that would require National Grid to provide
health insurance to the locked-out workers and deprive the
utility of rate increases and public funds was the subject of an
emotional public hearing in early December.
— KATIE JOHNSTON
A prominent Massachusetts business group is calling for an
immediate end to new fees that cost employers across the
state $300 million last year, noting that Beacon Hill failed to
follow through on its part of a bargain to tame the rising costs
of the state Medicaid program. Governor Charlie Baker proposed the fees and legislators approved them in 2017, requiring employers, over two years, to contribute more toward the
costs of the state program that provides health coverage for
poor and low-income residents. Associated Industries of Massachusetts, a
group representing 4,000 employers, plans to
submit a bill to
the Legislature
this month that
would end the
fees right away
— one year early.
“It feels like the
reason this was
created no longer exists,” said
Richard C. Lord,
chief executive of AIM. “It feels like this [assessment] we can
eliminate in year two.” Much has changed since the Baker administration proposed the fees nearly two years ago, Lord
said. The fees have generated tens of millions more than originally expected. Meanwhile, enrollment in the state Medicaid
program, known as MassHealth, has fallen, and program
costs are not growing as briskly as in previous years. In addition, state tax collections have exceeded targets over the past
several months, putting the state on firmer financial footing.
The fate of the business group’s request is uncertain. The governor’s office and leaders of the House and Senate did not say
whether they would support it.
— PRIYANKA DAYAL MCCLUSKEY
FARMING
For many struggling small farms in Massachusetts, the 2018
federal farm bill could be a game changer. The long-awaited
measure, signed into law last month, removed hemp — the
nonpsychoactive variety of cannabis — from the federal government’s list of controlled substances. The legislation is seen
as an important opportunity to help make small farms financially sustainable — even profitable. Hemp contains cannabidiol, or CBD, a compound that’s popular for its medicinal
properties. CBD oil has gained interest from major food and
beverage giants, cosmetic lines, and even tobacco companies
that want a replacement crop. There are 14 licensed growers
in Massachusetts. The state Department of Agricultural Resources has received 13 applications for license renewal for
2019 and 15 new applications for 2019 licenses. Ricky Baruch, a farmer who owns Seeds of Solidarity in Orange, hopes
to be licensed to grow hemp in 2019. He agrees CBD has
more potential than marijuana. “Only a certain amount of the
population wants to get high,” he said. “But there’s a much
larger market for health and medicine.”
— CHRISTINE GIRAUD
SMALL FARMS IN
MASS. LOOK TO
GROW HEMP
INTERNET
Like many of the small hill towns in northwestern Massachusetts, Charlemont has been waiting years for reliable Internet
access, stuck in an antiquated system of dial-up and DSL that
makes it hard to work remotely, buy stuff online, and access
government services that require online filings. After a generation of hoping someone would build a broadband network
to serve Charlemont’s farthest-flung corners, the community
of about 1,100 people got an offer this year that might have
been the answer to their prayers. Comcast, in exchange for a
subsidy from the state and local governments, was willing to
build connections to nearly all of the town’s homes. Instead,
residents handed the communications giant a collective “No,
thank you.” At a Special Town Meeting on Dec. 6, they voted
to build their own $1.5 million broadband network — at an
added cost of nearly $1 million over the Comcast offer. Charlemont is one of several municipalities in Western Massachusetts puzzling over how to ensure that decisions about connectivity stay in local hands. Some residents are wary of trusting a big company to make decisions about such a crucial
service. — ANDY ROSEN
CHARLEMONT
GOES IT ALONE
WITH BROADBAND
ONLINE TRAVEL
Greater Boston’s two big online travel services, Kayak and
TripAdvisor, could face tough questions from European privacy regulators over claims they share sensitive information
with the giant social network Facebook without their users’
permission. “For most people it’ll come as a big surprise that
an app that doesn’t have anything to
do with Facebook is sending your data
to Facebook,” said Frederike Kaltheuner, a researcher for Privacy International, a British watchdog group that
discovered the data-sharing. Kaltheuner said the practice may be illegal under a new European Union law that requires companies to ask permission
before sharing a user’s data with third
parties. “It’s definitely a violation of the spirit of the law,” she
said. The practice was reported by the Financial Times last
weekend. Kayak did not respond to requests for comment.
TripAdvisor issued a response to the report that promised to
discuss the issue with Privacy International, while downplaying the group’s criticisms. “The technical issues raised by Privacy International are extremely complex, and we respectfully
consider the statements they have made to be somewhat
oversimplified,” the company said. Kaltheuner and her colleagues tested about three dozen popular Android smartphone apps used by millions worldwide. The group found
that about 20 of them, including an app from Needham-based
TripAdvisor, shared some information with Facebook the moment they were launched. Even if the app user didn’t have a
Facebook account, the social network would be notified that
the app was running. Facebook would receive a unique code
to identify the specific phone running the app. By collecting
the data for months or years, Facebook could gain insights into the user’s travel habits. — HIAWATHA BRAY
KAYAK AND
TRIPADVISOR
SHARED USERS’
INFO WITH
FACEBOOK,
REPORT SAYS
A Relationship
You Can Count on
for Years to Come.
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B12
IT’S A THING
A REVIEW OF THE WEEK ONLINE
COLLISION COURSE
I’d like to start the new year by passing on
some sage advice once given to me by my
grandmother, may she rest in peace: Don’t
film yourself attempting to walk around with
a blindfold on just because you saw the characters of some stupid horror movie doing it,
you doorstop. Hmm. You know what? My bad.
I just rechecked my notes and that was actually (the gist of) Netflix’s response to the latest Darwinian self-endangerment viral craze,
the #BirdBoxChallenge, inspired by the
blindfolded cast of “Bird Box,” 2019’s most
meme-fecund film (thus far). They were just a
little nicer about it: “Can’t believe I have to
say this, but: PLEASE DO NOT HURT YOURSELVES WITH THIS BIRD BOX CHALLENGE,”
tweeted the official Netflix account. “No can
do,” said the Internet (again, paraphrasing).
So yeah, sorry about that mix-up. Guess I just
miss my Gram.
FAUXCHELLA
Elsewhere in lemmings, the annual Coachella
music festival was announced, complete with
its now iconically typographically challenged
lineup poster listing every band ever plus a
hologram or two. But more importantly for
those who can’t spare two grand to watch
Mac DeMarco from a quarter mile away (or
would simply prefer their money end up in
different hands), the fake Coachella lineup
memes arrived. Now an anticipated annual
tradition, this year’s selection of poseur posters includes a Disney-themed fest headlined
by Hannah Montana (with Lindsay Lohan fineprinted!); a “Gaychella” featuring
Cher, “Drunk Jessica Simpson,” and “Fergie
(Only Singing Jazz Renditions of the National
Anthem)”; and a particularly surreal one featuring three iterations of Cate Blanchett, “The
Olsen Twins Smoking Cigarettes,” and “Men
apologizing.” Take my money.
IN VIE
S u n d a y
JA N UA RY 6 , 2 0 1 9
Names
W
Why Sandra Oh
and Andy Samberg’s
Golden Globes gig
is going to be epic
RO UL
BR OO KS SP
Meet Clairo
THE CARLISLE NATIVE IS GOING TO SING AT COACHELLA
Claire Cottrill, better known as Clairo, rose
to fame when her breakout single “Pretty Girl”
went viral on YouTube in 2017, amassing more
than 25 million views. The 20-year-old Carlisle
native, who’s been making music since age 13,
performed at farmers’ markets and house
shows at Syracuse University before opening
for Dua Lipa last summer and touring internationally this past fall.
On Thursday, news dropped that Cottrill is
on the schedule for 2019’s Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival, the enormous — and
enormously trendy — music festival held over
two weekends in Indo, Calif.
“It feels insane,” Cottrill wrote of the announcement in an e-mail to the Globe. “Around
this time last year, I was playing shows with
friends from Syracuse and going to class every
day. I had no idea just how much my life would
change in the coming year. I’m forever grateful
that so many people have connected with the
music that I’ve put out, and it’s an honor to be
MONICA SCHIPPER/GETTY IMAGES
Shin Lim, an Acton-Boxborough Regional
High School graduate, won Season 9 of
“America’s Got Talent.”
REPPING HARD
And elsewhere in rowdy mobs, a new superdiverse freshman class of Congress was
sworn into the House of Representatives
(complete with actual swearing), making for
many a celebratory meme on Twitter. But in
true “Dazed and Confused” style, the hazing
from the seniors only made the freshmen
seem that much cooler (even though Parker
Posey and Matthew McConaughey completely owned that movie, but we’re getting off
track). Case in point was a video “leaked” of
New York rep and GOP obsession Alexandria
Ocasio-Cortez (above), showing the then-BU
student dancing across a rooftop in the style
of “The Breakfast Club.” The ploy to discredit
the 29-year-old first-termer royally backfired,
with her dancing receiving Ellen-esque approval across the Internet. Even castmembers
of “The Breakfast Club” thought it made her
look cool. (Not, like, Ally Sheedy cool, because
how could she? God, she’s amazing in that.
Anyway.)
G l o b e
Two local acts to compete
in global ‘Got Talent’
Five Boston area contestants will compete
on NBC’s first-ever “America’s Got Talent: The
Champions,” featuring “Got Talent” franchise
winners from around the globe.
The new midseason spinoff, premiering Jan.
7, boasts something of an Olympics-like vibe,
with a field of 50 past winners, memorable acts
and fan favorites from Scotland to South Africa,
Belgium to Brazil.
Waltham magician and Season 13 “AGT”
winner Shin Lim, and Season 9 favorites, the
Boston-based quartet Sons of Serendip, are
among those battling it out on the first international version of the reality-talent show, hosted
by Terry Crews.
The contestants, including “Britain’s Got
Talent” sensation Susan Boyle, will aim to impress judges Simon Cowell, Heidi Klum, Mel B,
and Howie Mandel.
Since becoming the show’s most recent $1
million winner in September, Lim, 27, headlined the “America’s Got Talent Live” stage
show in Las Vegas before joining “The Illusionists” on Broadway.
“At first I was hesitant [to join ‘Champions’]
because I was exhausted,” the Acton-Boxborough
Regional High School grad said with a chuckle.
able to play Coachella this year. Growing up, I
only dreamt of playing alongside some of the
names on the lineup this year.”
Those artists include headliners Childish
Gambino (Friday, April 12 and 19), Tame Impa­
la (Saturday, April 13 and 20), and Ariana
Grande (Sunday, April 14 and 21). Cottrill also
will perform on the two Sundays, along with
Khalid, Zedd, CHVRCHES, Pusha T, and several
more artists.
Cottrill said she is currently taking time
away from Syracuse to focus on music, but that
she’d like to return to study audio engineering,
with hopes of working at a studio someday.
She has yet to release a full-length album,
but said she’s planning to release new music
this year.
“2018 was the biggest year of my life,” she
wrote, “but I think 2019 will be the year I finally put out the music I’ve always dreamed
about.”
JENNI TODD
“Then I said, you know what? This is such
an amazing opportunity because this show has
never been done before — all the winners from
all over the world, coming together.”
Of course some, such as Boyle and Sons of
Serendip, weren’t winners but show favorites.
Sam Donnelly, “AGT” executive producer,
explained in a written statement that when selecting acts, “we of course looked to previous
winners [but also] acts that resonated exceptionally well . . . such as singer Susan Boyle. . . .
And finally, we wanted to bring back acts that
demonstrated exceptional talent.”
Five years ago, four Boston University alumni — vocalist Micah Christian, pianist and guitarist Cordaro Rodriguez, harpist Mason Mor­
ton, and cellist-composer-vocalist Kendall Ram­
seur — teamed up on a lark to audition for
“AGT,” just weeks before the season started.
The gospel/classical/neo-soul/R&B quartet
Sons of Serendip didn’t win $1 million — but
came close, placing fourth, and became judges’
darlings during the Season 9 run.
The musicians earned a fan following for
their renditions of beautiful songs — tear-jerkers — from Leonard Cohen to Bonnie Raitt.
After they performed Keane’s “Somewhere
Only We Know” for their final performance,
then-judge Howard Stern told them, “You have
pure raw talent.” Then-host Nick Cannon called
them “amazing.”
When it was announced they placed fourth,
Mel B encouraged them: “You now have a platform to do whatever you want.”
The Sons all quit their respective day jobs to
build a band resume.
They performed at the Creative Arts Emmys,
opened for Jay Leno at a Connecticut gig, performed with the Boston Pops and Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra. They released three albums,
charted in the Billboards, toured nationally.
“We’re really, really excited,” said Christian.
“Because when you get off these shows, you say,
‘Oh man, if I could do it all over again . . .’ So to
have the opportunity to go back where it all began, now that we’ve grown so much, is awesome,” said Christian.
“America’s Got Talent: The Champions” premieres Monday, Jan. 7, at 8 p.m. on NBC.
LAUREN DALEY
The Golden Globes, which celebrate
achievements in both film and television, are
often considered the most viewer-anticipated
award show of the season — thanks in no
small part to the free-flowing booze and rather breezy attitude among the stars who attend.
The show hosts are also key to the evening’s success. Tina Fey and Amy Poehler, cohosts from 2013 to 2015, did pretty well,
while recent stints by Ricky Gervais, Jimmy
Fallon, and Seth Meyers got mixed reviews.
But the 76th Golden Globes, which air live
at 8 p.m. Sunday on NBC, may have cracked
the cohost code with the surprising and highly-anticipated pairing of “Killing Eve” star
Sandra Oh and “Brooklyn Nine-Nine” star An­
dy Samberg.
Here are just a few of the reasons why Oh
and Samberg could shape up to be a Golden
Globes success.
The Emmys
When Oh and Samberg walked across the
stage arm-in-arm at the Emmys in September,
viewers were unexpectedly delighted at the
duo’s easy rapport.
“We were supposed to come out here and
read the winner, but instead, I’ve decided to
speak from the heart,” Oh said, before ripping
the envelope in half.
“What?” Samberg asked, alarmed. “Why
did you rip the envelope?”
“I don’t know,” Oh said. “I was in the moment. I got overwhelmed.”
The banter continued, with Oh declaring
that “La La Land” had won, before pivoting to
a high school boyfriend. The jokes were simple and lighthearted, things that could easily
fall flat, but the dynamic between the two
made it work. The audience genuinely
laughed.
Social media is pumped
Social media was quick to jump on the OhSamberg train, with lots of memes cropping
up after the Emmys. The response only intensified after they were named Globe cohosts,
with fans once again surprised and elated.
KEVORK DJANSEZIAN/GETTY IMAGES
Sandra Oh and Andy Samberg at The
Beverly Hilton Hotel on Thursday.
“THIS is going to be good,” Ellen Pompeo,
Oh’s “Grey’s Anatomy” costar, wrote in a
tweet, along with an article announcing the
news.
The era of Oh
Oh will be pulling double-duty at the
Globes, since she’s also a nominee for best
lead actress in a drama for her work as Eve
Polastri in BBC America’s hit, “Killing Eve.”
Since Oh’s return to television, praise has
been pouring in. She’s always had chops, but
“Killing Eve” has allowed viewers to see her
full potential as both a comedic and dramatic
actress.
They’re excited
In the month since Oh and Samberg were
announced as hosts, they’ve shown they’re just
as excited as the viewers, a contrast to the reluctant participant persona that hosts often
take on.
While the Emmys was the first time Oh
and Samberg worked together, a friendship
quickly blossomed and they both jumped at
the opportunity to work together again, according to The Hollywood Reporter.
“Have we learned anything surprising
about each other so far?” Samberg asked toward the end of the interview with THR.
“That we’re co-dependent,” Oh replied.
“That we’re soul mates,” Samberg agreed,
laughing.
“We’re soul mates,” Oh said. “We’re [expletive] co-dependent soul mates.”
LILLIAN BROWN
Bethenny Frankel had another close call with her fish allergy
HART PROBLEMS
Oh and speaking of Ellen DeGeneres, her approval, and her knack for dancing around, the
talk-show host invited Oscar-exiled comedian
Kevin Hart on her program to forgive him for
a fondness in the recent past for particularly
nasty homophobic “jokes” that resulted in
widespread calls for him to drop out as host.
DeGeneres also revealed that she’d made
calls to representatives of the Academy to try
and get him his job back. “I believe in forgiveness,” she posted to Twitter. Twitter, not so
much, with many in the LGBTQ community
wondering why she appeared to be speaking
on their behalf. Ugly stuff. I just hope things
don’t get this messy when Louis C.K. hosts
the Teen Choice Awards.
MICHAEL ANDOR BRODEUR
“Real Housewives” star Bethenny
Frankel says she had another close
call with her fish allergy — this time
when she was getting on a plane.
“Called airline mult x to say I
have fish allergy,” Frankel wrote in
a tweet. “Got on & they’re serving
bass. They couldn’t not serve it they
said. Then they were turning
around which I protested bc it
would delay people. Cabin asked to
not serve it & pilot made announcement to plane. That was fun.”
She did not identify which airline she was flying.
Frankel added the hashtag
#epilife, referring to epinephrine,
the lifesaving medication used to
combat allergic reactions.
A number of Twitter users
reached out, many suggesting flying
privately, to which Frankel replied,
“I am fortunate enough to do that
sometimes, but it is a massive waste
and not environmentally friendly if
doing solo. But I hears ya.”
Some others questioned the severity of Frankel’s allergy.
“Are you so allergic you can’t be
around it now?” Asked one Twitter
user. “Did you ever previously think
of all the nut allergies who fly on
planes?”
“Yes and yes,” Frankel replied.
CRAIG F. WALKER/GLOBE STAFF/FILE 2017
“Always.”
“To clarify: some allergens are
transmitted by touch & air,” Frankel
wrote in another tweet. “Fish is one
& is fatal. The more exposure to
them, the more susceptible. It’s not
like an immunity thing where more
exposure means less susceptible.
It’s opposite. I’ve always kept it quiet but that’s over now.”
The allergen scare comes just
weeks after Frankel, a Boston University alum, went into anaphylactic shock after eating soup. The incident resulted in a two-day stay at
Newton-Wellesley Hospital.
LILLIAN BROWN
TV HIGHLIGHTS
AFC wild card: Chargers-Ravens, 1:05 p.m., CBS
NFC wild card: Eagles-Bears, 4:40 p.m., NBC
NHL: Blackhawks-Penguins, 8 p.m., NBCSN
Listings, C12
Sports
C
B O S T O N S U N DAY G L O BE JAN UA RY 6 , 2 01 9 | B O S T O N G L O B E .C O M / S P O RT S
Dan Shaughnessy
Picking
up the
pieces
Picked-up pieces
while worrying about
the Ravens or Chargers at Foxborough
next weekend . . .
R Things just got
tougher for the Patriots. We were all hoping the hopeless Texans would come to Gillette next weekend, wearing their letterman jackets,
and happy to take their beating. Now
that’s off the table. The Patriots are going to have to earn their annual path
to the AFC Championship game by
beating a tough team at home. The Ravens and Chargers may fold like everyone else in Foxborough, but they come
to New England with less baggage and
a better chance than the Texans. Baltimore has a tough running game, a mobile quarterback, a great defense, and
a coach who will not turn into a puddle at the sight of Bill Belichick. The
Chargers are formidable, perhaps the
most complete team in the AFC, but if
UP NEXT FOR
THE PATRIOTS
Sunday, Jan. 13,
1 p.m., CBS
R The Patriots will
host the winner of
Sunday’s ChargersRavens wild-card
game.
SATURDAY’S
RESULTS
AFC WILD CARD
Colts
21
Texans
7
NFC WILD CARD
Cowboys
24
Seahawks
22
SHAUGHNESSY, Page C11
Tara Sullivan
Gilmore has it
all locked down
Wagner, 27, recalling that his grandfather
often shuttled him to games around the
Bay State in his youth. “Maybe he was
watching out for me, making the puck follow me around, who knows?”
Phelan, said his grandson with the
Spoked B on his chest, was “a Norwood
guy through and through” and was rooting
for him as usual on Tuesday in the Bruins’
4-2 win over Chicago in the Winter Classic.
When Wagner knocked home the 1-0
FOXBOROUGH — Stephon Gilmore
has had so many dominant, lockdown
games this season it’s understandable
Jason McCourty couldn’t initially remember which particular gem included this fourth-quarter exchange between them.
But the events that led up to it, the
series of plays that rendered one wide
receiver invisible and one NFL heavyweight cornerback
standing? Those are indelible.
Further reflection confirmed it was Week 9 against Green
Bay, when the Patriots were able
to beat the Packers in large part
because Gilmore held Davante Adams to 40 yards on six catches.
That Adams had days before described himself as “unguardable”
after turning in three straight
games of at least 130 receiving
yards only highlighted the work
Gilmore was doing.
STEPHON GILMORE
A quiet confidence
So here was McCourty, on the
field, late in the game: “I just said
to him, bro, hands down, you’re the best corner I played
with — this season you’re having, it’s unbelievable.”
And here was Gilmore, barely above a whisper: “Appreciate it. Appreciate you.”
BRUINS, Page C4
SULLIVAN, Page C10
BARRY CHIN/GLOBE STAFF
Zdeno Chara (center) hosts a TD Garden party to celebrate a first-period goal by Chris Wagner (right) on Saturday night.
Breakthrough
Walpole’s Wagner provides offensive boost in victory over Sabres
By Kevin Paul Dupont
GLOBE STAFF
Bruins 2 A mere four days removed
from the pomp and pageantSabres 1 ry of the Winter Classic, the
Bruins staged their workingman’s Wagner
Classic Saturday night in a convincing 2-1
win over the Sabres at TD Garden.
The victory, their fourth in a row, had
Walpole’s Chris Wagner, his Boston accent
as fixed as Old Ironsides in the Harbah,
knocking home one of the two goals and
otherwise owning the Causeway Street
sheet as if he claimed it by eminent domain.
It was a remarkable, bold performance,
particularly around the net, Wagner rolling up a half-dozen shots on goalie Linus
Ullmark in the two periods — more than
triple his average output this season. He
hit, he shot, he scored . . . in all, a fitting
tribute to his maternal grandfather, Jim
Phelan, who passed away Friday morning.
“So this was a special game for me,” said
Sox getting more out of their arms
INSIDE
Miles of smiles
Little-used Wanamaker found his
stride in Celtics’ victory. C3
By Alex Speier
Sunday notes
Basketball, C2
Baseball, C6
GLOBE STAFF
Hockey, C5
Football, C8
BEING DIRECT — BC coach
Jim Christian tries to make
his points during the Eagles’
77-66 loss at No. 10 Virginia
Tech in their ACC opener.
Sports Log, C7
DON PETERSEN/ASSOCIATED PRESS
To understand what the Red Sox pitching
staff has become, and why the team entering
2019 appears to feel comfortable with the
possibility that it can build rather than buy
the back end of the bullpen, it makes sense to
remember what it was: a disaster.
For the years 2014 and ’15, the Red Sox’
combined ERA of 4.17 was sixth-worst in the
majors and fourth-worst in the American
League. In 2015 in particular, the
he’s-(not)-the-ace rotation fell flat on its face,
29
DAYS
Until Red Sox
truck departs
for Fort Myers
with four players acquired in a six-month
span — Joe Kelly, Wade Miley, Justin Masterson, and Rick Porcello — falling flat on their
faces for sizable stretches of what turned out
to be a last-place finish.
Over the last three years, the script has
flipped. In a period of increased offense
around the game from 2016-18, the Red Sox
knocked down their ERA to 3.83, sixth-best in
the majors and third-best in the AL over a
three-year span in which they won the AL
East each season.
RED SOX, Page C7
TISSOT chrono xl .
A 45MM CASE.
OFFICIAL WATCH
AVAILABLE AT US.TISSOTSHOP.COM AND SELECT WATCH AND JEWELRY STORES NATIONWIDE
Sports
C2
B o s t o n
S u n d a y
G l o b e
JA N UA RY 6 , 2 0 1 9
Basketball
Harden worked to make himself into a force
Gary Washburn
I
t’s time to acknowledge that
James Harden is the best offensive player of this generation,
and despite past shortcomings,
playoff disappearances, and
propensity to draw fouls that are more
of a mirage, Harden is unstoppable.
The Rockets guard entered Saturday averaging 33.6 points per game,
and was on a tear, scoring at least 40
points in his previous five games, including 45 against the Celtics on
Dec. 27.
Harden has mastered the pick-androll and one-on-one game, using his
physicality (he’s bigger than you think)
and crafty moves to draw fouls if defenders get too close. If you allow him
to shoot from the 3-point line, he will
demoralize defenses. He’s a 39 percent
3-point shooter, so he’s too good to
leave alone.
He drives around defenders who
play him to shoot the three, and uses
pump fakes and flailing arms to draw
fouls. Harden attempts 11 free throws
per game, and he attempted 17 in the
second half against the Celtics, and 27
in a win over the Grizzlies on New
Year’s Eve.
Harden, 29, had his share of detractors after his flameout in Game 6
of the Western Conference semifinals
in 2017, and reports of him partying
too much during the 2012 NBA Finals
when he was with the Thunder. But he
has continued to work on his game
and has convinced officials to call
fouls, often based on contact he initiates.
“You can’t match up with James, so
it doesn’t matter,” Rockets coach Mike
D’Antoni said. “James is a unique
offensive player, which I don’t think
we’ve seen the likes of.”
D’Antoni and Harden agree that it’s
a tireless work ethic that has allowed
the former third overall pick to develop into an offensive force. Harden always was considered a scorer, but he
has developed into a supreme passer,
especially on the pick-and-roll with
center Clint Capela.
And because of his outside shooting prowess, blended with his
strength, Harden can score pretty
much at any time.
“It’s perfect for our system because
we want threes and layups and foul
shots, and obviously he fills that up,
just the way he can get them,”
D’Antoni said. “He can get a shot at
any time, and it’s a good shot. The
stepback three gets fouled a lot on because it’s so tricky. If they don’t foul
him, then he’s going to make it. So
that’s almost impossible to guard, and
if you do get up there and bite at all,
he’s going to the rim. He’s a great passer, getting guys involved. I don’t think
anybody can figure out what he does,
just because he does it so well.”
Harden is known for his beard and
stylish dressing habits, which may
have overshadowed the improvement
he’s made over the past few years.
“He comes in and does extra work,”
D’Antoni said. “He knew he had to
take his body to one more level up. He
had to get into a better rhythm. He’s
been playing a lot of one-on-one. He’s
been doing a lot of extra work in the
weight room. He’s been putting his
time in. It’s paying dividends.”
Harden’s latest highlight was a
near-impossible 3-point shot in the final seconds to beat the Warriors on
Thursday.
“It’s the work you put in. If you
don’t put the work in, you won’t get
the results,” Harden said. “So those
moves that I was doing on the court, I
was doing yesterday in practice, and
after practice after everybody left. So
you take those shots, you’re confident
in those shots, and those shots will go
in. Sometimes they might not go in.
But mostly they’ll go in and so you
have to keep going and keep working.”
The Rockets entered the season as
the biggest threat to unseat the Warriors in the Western Conference, but
because of injuries, the free agent loss
of Trevor Ariza, and inconsistent play
from veterans, including Harden, they
started 11-14. They then won 11 of
their next 12.
“The only thing I know with us is
the other teams are a lot better this
year,” D’Antoni said. “You don’t have
an easy game in the West, I don’t care
where you go. And the East has gotten
a lot better, and I think teams are adjusting to our style of play, so we have
to figure out other things. Last year we
were hunting people. Nobody thought
we were the best and now people are
hunting us.
“I don’t think it’s anything that we
can’t overcome, but we put ourselves
in a little bit of a hole with injuries and
suspensions. But it’s not even halfway
through the season yet. They don’t
give out the trophy in December. They
give it out in June, we’ll keep working
toward that.”
STRETCH TIME
Nowitzki still
enjoying himself
The Mavericks came to TD Garden
on Friday night, and it’s uncertain
whether it was the final game in Boston for all-time great Dirk Nowitzki,
who is in his 21st season and obviously on the back end of his career. Nowitzki hasn’t announced whether this will
be his final season, but it definitely
could be. And if it is, it will be sad to
see the departure of the original
stretch four.
“The knowledge from the fans,
they’ve seen a lot of great basketball
for a long time,” Nowitzki said of Boston. “Just a great sports town and it’s
always fun competing here, great
crowds against good teams. There’s
not really one special moment or a
special game that stands out, but it’s a
fun atmosphere to play in when you’re
a competitor.”
Nowitzki started all 77 games he
appeared in last season and averaged
12 points on 45.6 percent shooting as
a complement to Harrison Barnes and
Dennis Smith Jr. Ankle surgery has
hampered Nowitzki this season, and
he had played in just nine games entering Friday, averaging 4.6 points.
This Mavericks team, however,
now features rookie sensation Luka
Doncic, considered the heir apparent
to Nowitzki. The two haven’t played
together much, but seeing the 19-yearold swingman dominate has motivated Nowitzki to continue playing.
“I still love competing, still love
helping the guys when I can, just being out there, being with the fellas, going through the daily grind, preparing,
all that stuff is still fun,” Nowitzki said.
“Trying to take the enjoyment out of it,
I’ll never know if this is my last goaround. I’m trying to enjoy the team
meetings, the team-bonding stuff, and
the locker room camaraderie. I’m trying to take as much enjoyment because I know I’m going to miss it one
day.”
Nowitzki, who will turn 41 in June,
has been amazingly durable throughout his career. He was playing 37-38
minutes per game during his prime,
but that has been reduced, and he said
he has paid extra attention to his conditioning.
“It’s less pounding on the court, but
all the stuff you need to do around it,
the massages, the stretching, the
weightlifting, the extra conditioning,
so at the end of the day you’re almost
in the gym longer than back in the
day,” he said. “Back in the day, you
didn’t even stretch. You got back on
the court and you shot for a little bit
and you went right into the game.
Now you get here three hours before
and do all sorts of weird exercises to
get going and get halfway loose. So
that’s sometimes frustrating and challenging, but that’s part of it.”
When Nowitzki entered the NBA in
1998, the power forward position was
still dominated by the likes of Karl Ma­
lone and Charles Barkley, burly men
who barreled to the basket like freight
trains and took years to develop a
midrange game.
Twenty years later, if a power forward can’t stretch the floor, he doesn’t
get on the floor. Nowitzki revolutionized the position.
“I came in at a great time when the
league was starting to change,” he
said. “When I got in, there was still a
lot of one-on-one basketball, a lot of
pounding, two bigs usually and no
[power forwards] could really shoot
that much. The game was changing.
They were putting the zone in, they
were getting rid of the hand-check.
The league was going through a
noticeable change to get away from
’90s basketball, where physical guys
and weightlifting was helping on the
basketball court.
“The league went away from that.
It’s more movement. Everybody can
shoot, pick-and-roll, it’s five guys together. That’s more how I think basketball is supposed to be played. So it’s
been incredible to watch NBA basketball the last 20 years.”
Doncic is the future of the NBA, a
6-foot-7 inch ballhandler, facilitator,
and scorer. He is playing with the confidence and swagger of a rookie, and
because he came straight to the NBA
from Europe (Slovenia) like Nowitzki,
there are natural comparisons.
“He’s been fun to watch, but no-
Carving out a role
After years in the cellar, the Nets are beginning to climb their way back to
respectability. A catalyst for this change has been Spencer Dinwiddie. The
point guard, who is in his third season in Brooklyn, is a force off the bench. In
a win over the Hornets on Dec. 26, according to basketball-reference.com,
Dinwiddie became just the fourth player to record at least 35 points and 10
assists as a reserve.
COMPILED BY MICHAEL GROSSI
PETE MARAVICH
LOU WILLIAMS
HAWKS | NOV. 28, 1973*
CLIPPERS | JAN. 26, 2018
130-106 WIN VS. BRAVES
109-100 WIN AT GRIZZLIES
Points | 42
Minutes | 34
FG made | 12
Points | 40
Assists | 10
FG-FGA | 12-19
FG% | 63.2
Rebounds | 2
Assists | 10
JAMAL CRAWFORD
SPENCER DINWIDDIE
CLIPPERS | JAN. 25, 2014
NETS | DEC. 26, 2018
126-118 WIN AT RAPTORS
134-132 2OT WIN VS. HORNETS
Minutes | 32
Minutes | 41
Points | 37
Points | 37
FG-FGA | 12-23
FG-FGA | 12-29
FG% | 52.2
FG% | 41.4
Rebounds | 3
Rebounds | 2
Assists | 11
Assists | 11
* STATISTICS NOT AVAILABLE FOR MINUTES, FG ATTEMPTS, FG%, AND REBOUNDS
body takes him under his wing,” Nowitzki said. “He’s a confident young kid.
He believes in himself. He’s a millennial, obviously. Their swag’s a little different than when we got into the
league. He felt from Day One he’s going to do this, he belongs here, and
he’s been showing that. He’s got a
great all-around package for a young
player, whether it’s the shot, whether
it’s the floater, reading the pick-androll, he can post up already. I’ve got to
say I’ve never seen this for a 19-yearold as versatile as him.
“He’s been playing consistent ball
for us and he’s a highlight reel waiting
to happen. He’s got a lot of stuff in his
arsenal and he’s been fun to watch.”
With Barnes, Smith, Doncic, and
Jalen Brunson, the Mavericks are loading themselves to be contenders in the
Western Conference after some lean
years. But those lean years allowed
Dallas to draft Smith and Doncic in
consecutive years.
“Obviously, we’ve been through
some tough years the last couple, a lot
after the championship [2011], but
the last couple were extremely tough,”
Nowitzki said. “We feel like we’ve got
some great young guys. Those are
some guys we can build around, they
are 20 years old barely and with Harrison we have some cornerstones we
feel like we can build on and putting
this franchise in the right direction.”
ETC.
Morris merits
consideration
It’s highly unlikely Marcus Morris
will become one of the league’s 24 AllStars when the teams are named later
this month, but he has earned a great
deal of respect with his play this season and his emergence as a team leader with the Celtics.
Morris is averaging career highs in
scoring, rebounding, shooting percentage, 3-point shooting percentage,
and free throw percentage. He has
been the mainstay and has flourished
since entering the starting lineup.
What’s more, his offensive rating is
127 (points per 100 possessions) in his
17 games as a starter, meaning the offense is substantially better with him.
All-Star consideration is probably out
of the question considering the Celtics’
struggles and the depth of NBA talent,
but Morris deserves to be in Charlotte
for the 3-point contest (13th in the
NBA at 43.5 percent) and deserves regard as one of the league’s better
swingmen as he enters free agency.
“The team success depends on a lot
of stuff,” he said. “That’s my main focus is trying to win games for this
team and helping and staying positive.
If I’m an All-Star, I’m an All-Star. If
not, it’s still a bigger goal ahead. I’m
just happy to be able to be consistent
and be able to play this high level I’m
playing at and helping my team.”
Two things have made Morris a
player on the cusp of All-Star consideration. He has become a better 2-point
shooter as well as 3-point shooter,
meaning he’s deadly from midrange.
Morris is shooting a career-best 55.3
percent on 2-pointers and he’s converted a whopping 79 percent of his
layups and dunks.
Morris is also shooting a careerhigh 48.8 percent on shots from 3 to
10 feet. Being so efficient around the
basket has allowed Morris to become
more efficient from the 3-point line.
“Coming into the season, we all
knew that we’ve got guys that can penetrate, that can break down the defender and suck the defense in,” he
said. “Being a great 3-point shooter
would be very beneficial for the team,
and that’s the biggest thing, just spraying it to the spots and it opens up the
game because now guys have to run
me off [the 3-point line], and the difference between me and just a normal
spacing [power forward] is I can put
the ball down, find guys, pass it, get to
the rim, finish at the rim. That’s the
difference between a spacing [power
forward] and versatile [power forward] like myself.”
Morris is likely headed elsewhere
this summer because he is going to demand a hefty raise from the $5.3 million he’s earning. He has gained the respect of those in the Celtics organization, especially coach Brad Stevens.
“Morris makes huge shots for us
and has all year,” Stevens said. “And I
think our whole team is alert to that.
As Kyrie [Irving] is getting doubled
more and teams have to decide what
they’re going to do with a [power forward-guard] pick-and-roll or an action
that involves those two, the minute
they overcommit, [Irving] is looking
for Marcus.
“I never get into the All-Star stuff in
terms of number of people because I
don’t know exactly who he would be
competing against, but he is playing at
an All-Star level from our standpoint,
for sure. He’s been great and the best
part about it is he’s just doing what he
does, it’s not anything more than a guy
to me that’s a really good player that’s
very comfortable in his role.”
Layups
The Suns waived center Eric More­
land this past week, and perhaps under normal circumstances he could be
a Celtics target. Moreland is an athletic big who can protect the rim and
block shots, a player the Celtics could
use with Aron Baynes out for a few
more weeks with a fractured left hand
and Robert Williams recovering from
a strained groin. What’s been evident
over the past few weeks is Daniel
Theis has struggled guarding physical
centers, leaving Al Horford to try to
provide resistance without much
backup. Saturday was the first day
teams could sign players to 10-day
contracts, but the Celtics don’t have a
roster spot open and are still waiting
for the NBA to make a decision on
Jabari Bird’s status before they waive
the former second-round pick. Bird’s
next scheduled court date is Jan. 30,
meaning the Celtics could have to wait
another month minimum before
opening up a roster spot. Privately, the
club does not want to just waive Bird,
paying him his guaranteed salary after
some domestic violence allegations.
Meanwhile, the Celtics still have a twoway contract roster spot remaining
and are being patient with that signing. Former first-round pick Archie
Goodwin, who has played with the
Suns and Nets, has returned from China and joined G-League Maine. Goodwin, a 6-5 swingman, could be a candidate for that two-way slot. He finished with 18 points, 5 rebounds, and
6 assists in his Maine debut Thursday.
Gary Washburn can be reached at
gwashburn@globe.com. Follow him on
Twitter at @GwashburnGlobe.
Material from interviews, wire
services, other beat writers, and league
and team sources was used in this
report.
B o s t o n
JA N UA RY 6 , 2 0 1 9
Fearful Kanter
to skip London
ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES — New York center Enes
Kanter will not travel to London for the Knicks’
upcoming international game because he believes he could be assassinated for his opposition
to Turkish president Recep Tayyip Erdogan.
Kanter announced his plan Friday night after
the Knicks’ 119-112 win over the Lakers. The
Knicks later said Kanter also won’t make the trip
because of a visa issue.
Kanter will stay in New York while the Knicks
travel to face Washington at The O2 arena in
London on Jan. 17. He says he can’t travel anywhere except the United States and Canada because ‘‘there’s a chance I could get killed out
there.’’
‘‘Sadly, I’m not going because of that freaking
lunatic, the Turkish president,’’ Kanter said. ‘‘It’s
pretty sad that all the stuff affects my career and
basketball, because I want to be out there and
help my team win. But just because of the one lunatic guy, one maniac, one dictator, I can’t even
go out there and do my job. It’s pretty sad.’’
Kanter has been a vocal critic of Erdogan for
years, once referring to him as ‘‘the Hitler of our
century.’’ Kanter’s Turkish passport was revoked
in 2017 and an international warrant for his arrest was issued by Turkey.
Kanter is a follower of a US-based Turkish
cleric accused by Turkey’s government of masterminding a failed military coup in 2016.
Kanter said it would be ‘‘easy’’ for an attempt
on his life to be made in London.
‘‘They’ve got a lot of spies there,’’ he added. ‘‘I
think I can get killed there easy. It would be a
very ugly situation.’’
Kanter’s father, Mehmet, was indicted last
year and charged with ‘‘membership in a terror
group.’’ The former professor lost his job after the
failed military coup even though he publicly disavowed his son and his beliefs.
NBA
EASTERN CONFERENCE
ATLANTIC
Toronto
Philadelphia
BOSTON
Brooklyn
New York
W
29
26
23
19
10
L
12
14
15
21
29
Pct. GB Streak Home
.707 —
W1
15­4
.650
2½
W3
17­3
.605
4½
W2
13­5
.475
9½
W 2 10­11
.256 18
W1
4­12
Conf.
18­7
17­11
15­7
13­10
6­22
CENTRAL
Milwaukee
Indiana
Detroit
Chicago
Cleveland
W
27
26
17
10
8
L
11
12
20
29
32
Pct. GB Streak Home
.711 —
L1
18­4
.684
1
W6
14­5
.459
9½
L1
11­9
.256 17½
L3
5­15
.200 20
L9
5­16
Conf.
19­6
20­5
12­16
7­17
7­21
SOUTHEAST
Miami
Charlotte
Orlando
Washington
Atlanta
W
19
18
17
15
11
L
18
20
21
24
27
Pct. GB Streak Home
.514 —
W2
9­11
.474
1½
L2
14­8
.447
2½
L 1 10­11
.385
5
L1
11­7
.289
8½
L3
6­10
Conf.
10­13
17­12
12­10
9­15
8­18
WESTERN CONFERENCE
PACIFIC
*Golden State
LA Clippers
LA Lakers
*Sacramento
Phoenix
W
25
22
21
19
9
L
14
16
18
19
31
Pct. GB Streak Home
.641 —
L1
15­6
.579
2½
W1
12­6
.538
4
L2
13­8
.500
5½
L3
10­9
.225 16½
L5
5­16
Conf.
15­10
17­11
15­12
12­16
5­19
SOUTHWEST
*Houston
San Antonio
Memphis
Dallas
New Orleans
W
22
23
18
18
18
L
15
17
21
21
22
Pct. GB Streak Home
.595 —
W6
13­5
.575
½
W4
17­5
.462
5
L5
10­9
.462
5
L2
15­3
.450
5½
W1
13­6
Conf.
14­11
17­12
12­13
10­16
10­13
NORTHWEST
Denver
Oklahoma City
*Portland
Utah
Minnesota
W
26
25
22
20
18
L
11
13
17
20
21
Pct. GB Streak Home
.703 —
W5
16­3
.658
1½
W3
13­4
.564
5
L1
14­7
.500
7½
W2
8­8
.462
9
W1
13­6
Conf.
16­6
15­11
13­14
12­12
8­15
* — Not including late game
SATURDAY’S RESULTS
Charlotte 110
Toronto 123
Utah 110
at Detroit 105
At San Antonio 108
At Philadelphia 106
Dallas 100
New Orleans 133 at Cleveland 98
at Milwaukee 116
Houston
Memphis 88
at Portland
Golden St.
at Sacramento
SUNDAY’S GAMES
Brooklyn at Chicago
3:30
Washington at Okla. City
Orlando at LA Clippers
3:30
Indiana at Toronto
LA Lakers at Minnesota
3:30
Charlotte at Phoenix
Miami at Atlanta
7
7:30
8
6
FRIDAY’S RESULTS
At BOSTON 114
Dallas 93
Indiana 119 at Chicago 116 (OT)
Utah 117
at Cleveland 91
At Milwaukee 144
Brooklyn 109
at Memphis 100
LA Clippers 121
At Minnesota 120
At Miami 115
Atlanta 112
at Phoenix 111
Orlando 103
New York 119
at LA Lakers 112
Washington 109
Okla. City 111
at Portland 109
76ERS 106, MAV’S 100
DALLAS
FG
FT
Min M­A M­A
Barnes .. 26 2­9 3­4
Mtthws . 24 7­11 0­0
Jordan... 31 4­5 0­0
Smth Jr. 22 1­5 0­0
Doncic... 26 4­16 5­10
Powell... 17 5­6 3­5
Fny­Smt 24 2­8 0­0
Brunson 26 4­14 4­4
Kleber ... 22 3­6 0­0
Brkhoff.. 22 6­8 0­0
Totals .... 38­88 15­23
Reb
O­T
1­5
1­2
2­8
0­1
0­8
2­4
0­2
1­11
2­7
0­1
9­49
A
2
0
5
4
4
1
0
8
0
3
27
F Pt
3 7
5 18
4 8
4 2
1 14
1 13
2 4
0 13
3 6
0 15
23 100
FG%: .432, FT%: .652. 3­pt. goals: 9­
31, .290 (Barnes 0­3, Matthews 4­7,
Smith Jr. 0­1, Doncic 1­8, Finney­Smith
0­3, Brunson 1­3, Kleber 0­1, Broekhoff
3­5). Team rebounds: 7. Team turn­
overs: 15 (15 pts.). Blocks: 3 (Powell 2,
Broekhoff). Turnovers: 15 (Barnes 2,
Jordan 3, Smith Jr., Powell, Finney­
Smith 3, Brunson 2, Broekhoff 3).
Steals: 4 (Doncic 2, Powell, Brunson).
PHILADELPHIA
FG
FT Reb
Min M­A M­A O­T A F Pt
Krkmaz . 28 2­8 2­2 0­6 4 1 7
Bolden .. 29 4­8 3­6 3­9 3 4 11
Embiid... 35 7­17 10­11 0­12 5 4 25
Redick... 34 8­14 2­3 0­2 2 0 20
Smmns . 36 9­17 2­6 4­14 11 2 20
Muscala 15 2­5 0­0 2­3 1 4 4
McCnnll 29 2­5 2­4 0­1 4 2 6
Milton ... 11 2­4 1­1 0­2 0 0 6
Shamet . 24 3­6 0­0 0­1 1 3 7
Totals .... 39­84 22­33 9­50 31 20 106
FG%: .464, FT%: .667. 3­pt. goals: 6­
26, .231 (Korkmaz 1­6, Bolden 0­2, Em­
biid 1­3, Redick 2­6, Muscala 0­3, Mil­
ton 1­2, Shamet 1­4). Team rebounds:
8. Team turnovers: 10 (14 pts.). Blocks:
5 (Bolden 2, Embiid, Milton 2). Turn­
overs: 10 (Bolden, Embiid 2, Redick,
Simmons 4, Muscala, McConnell).
Steals: 7 (Embiid, Redick 2, McConnell
3, Shamet).
Dallas.....................26 25 19 30 — 100
Philadelphia .........31 28 28 19 — 106
A — 20,656 (20,318). T — 2:13. Offi­
cials — Eric Lewis, Dedric Taylor, Ash­
ley Moyer­Gleich.
JAZZ 110, PISTONS 105
UTAH
FG
FT
Min M­A M­A
Favors... 28 3­8 6­7
Ingles .... 33 6­11 2­3
Gobert... 27 4­7 1­4
Rubio..... 30 6­13 5­5
Mitchell 38 10­21 5­6
Udoh ....... 6 1­2 0­0
Crowdr.. 26 1­8 2­3
Korver... 14 3­4 0­0
Exum....... 8 1­1 2­2
Neto ...... 12 2­3 0­0
Sflosha.... 9 2­4 2­2
O'Neale... 8 0­0 0­0
Totals .... 39­82 25­32
Reb
O­T
1­5
0­4
3­11
1­2
0­5
0­1
2­5
0­2
0­2
0­0
0­3
0­2
7­42
G l o b e
Sports
A
3
1
3
4
5
0
3
0
5
0
0
0
24
F Pt
2 13
5 16
4 9
1 18
3 26
1 2
1 4
2 8
0 4
1 4
1 6
2 0
23 110
FG%: .476, FT%: .781. 3­pt. goals: 7­
21, .333 (Favors 1­2, Ingles 2­4, Rubio
1­4, Mitchell 1­3, Crowder 0­4, Korver
2­3, Sefolosha 0­1). Team turnovers: 12
(15 pts.). Blocks: 6 (Favors 2, Ingles,
Gobert, Mitchell, Korver). Turnovers:
12 (Ingles 3, Gobert, Rubio 4, Mitchell 2,
Crowder, Korver). Steals: 12 (Favors,
Ingles, Rubio, Mitchell 3, Crowder 3,
Neto, Sefolosha 2).
DETROIT
FG
FT Reb
Min M­A M­A O­T A F Pt
Bullock.. 39 7­14 0­0 2­3 2 2 19
Griffin.... 39 13­21 5­6 2­10 5 2 34
Drmnd... 38 7­10 1­4 1­18 0 4 15
Brown ... 35 3­7 6­6 0­3 7 3 12
Jackson. 25 4­10 2­2 0­2 3 5 12
Leuer..... 10 0­3 0­0 0­2 0 2 0
Cldern... 23 3­6 0­0 0­1 1 3 7
Kennard 13 1­5 0­0 0­2 0 0 2
Johnson 14 1­5 2­2 0­3 0 2 4
Glloway .. 3 0­1 0­0 0­0 0 0 0
Totals .... 39­82 16­20 5­44 18 23 105
FG%: .476, FT%: .800. 3­pt. goals: 11­
25, .440 (Bullock 5­8, Griffin 3­7, Brown
0­1, Jackson 2­4, Calderón 1­1, Kennard
0­1, Johnson 0­3). Blocks: 2 (Drum­
mond, Johnson). Turnovers: 18 (Bull­
ock 2, Griffin 3, Drummond 3, Brown 4,
Jackson 2, Calderón 2, Johnson 2).
Steals: 7 (Griffin 2, Drummond 3, Ken­
nard, Johnson).
Utah .......................13 35 28 34 — 110
Detroit ...................31 22 25 27 — 105
A — 17,255 (21,000). T — 2:18. Offi­
cials — Tom Washington, Michael
Smith, Phenizee Ransom.
CHARLOTTE
FG
FT Reb
Min M­A M­A O­T
Batum ... 34 4­6 0­0 1­7
Willims.. 34 6­15 1­2 3­6
Biyomb . 30 7­10 2­3 4­12
Graham. 26 3­9 2­2 0­3
Walker .. 33 6­17 7­9 0­4
Gilcrest . 16 2­4 3­4 1­5
Monk..... 22 6­11 2­2 0­3
Hrngmz. 16 3­7 4­4 2­5
Parker... 16 1­2 0­0 1­1
Bridges . 12 1­1 0­0 0­1
Totals .... 39­82 21­26 12­47
A
3
0
0
8
3
2
2
1
3
0
22
F Pt
2 11
2 16
4 16
2 10
2 20
2 7
1 16
1 10
2 2
0 2
18 110
EASTERN CONFERENCE
FG%: .476, FT%: .808. 3­pt. goals: 11­
29, .379 (Batum 3­5, Williams 3­8, Gra­
ham 2­5, Walker 1­6, Monk 2­5). Blocks:
4 (Batum, Williams, Biyombo 2). Turn­
overs: 17 (Batum, Williams 3, Biyombo
2, Walker 5, Monk 3, Parker 3). Steals: 7
(Batum 2, Williams 3, Biyombo 2).
DENVER
FG
FT Reb
Min M­A M­A O­T A F Pt
Hrngmz. 20 0­3 0­0 0­2 0 1 0
Jokic...... 34 16­29 4­5 8­12 6 1 39
Plumlee 19 4­5 0­0 0­3 5 5 8
Murray.. 32 3­13 0­0 0­6 7 2 8
Craig ..... 29 4­7 2­4 1­3 1 4 12
Millsap.. 27 7­14 3­4 4­6 3 1 18
Morris ... 15 2­7 2­2 1­1 1 0 8
Harris.... 26 7­15 0­1 2­6 5 1 17
Beasley. 22 2­4 0­0 0­2 0 3 4
Lyles...... 14 2­5 4­4 1­5 2 1 9
Goodwn .. 1 0­0 0­0 0­0 0 0 0
Lydon...... 1 0­0 0­0 0­0 0 0 0
Totals .... 47­102 15­20 17­46 30 19 123
PELICANS 133, CAVS 98
NEW ORLEANS
FG
FT Reb
Min M­A M­A O­T
Holiday . 27 9­13 0­0 2­5
Randle... 33 8­14 5­5 2­12
Davis ..... 29 6­12 8­10 3­10
Moore ... 27 3­6 3­3 0­1
Payton .. 24 5­8 2­2 0­0
Okafor... 19 3­5 4­4 1­4
Miller..... 23 4­6 2­3 0­1
Frazier .. 20 1­2 0­0 0­1
Hill........... 4 0­0 0­0 0­0
Jackson. 18 3­8 0­0 1­5
Diallo....... 9 2­2 1­2 1­3
Clark ....... 7 3­5 0­0 0­2
Totals .... 47­81 25­29 10­44
A
3
8
3
3
3
1
1
3
0
3
0
1
29
F Pt
1 22
1 22
3 20
0 10
2 13
3 10
2 14
1 3
1 0
3 6
1 5
0 8
18 133
FG%: .580, FT%: .862. 3­pt. goals: 14­
27, .519 (Holiday 4­6, Randle 1­3, Davis
0­2, Moore 1­3, Payton 1­1, Miller 4­5,
Frazier 1­2, Jackson 0­2, Clark 2­3).
Team rebounds: 6. Team turnovers: 15
(26 pts.). Blocks: 7 (Holiday, Davis 2,
Okafor 2, Frazier, Clark). Turnovers: 14
(Randle 2, Davis, Moore 2, Payton 2,
Miller, Frazier 2, Hill, Jackson, Diallo,
Clark). Steals: 13 (Holiday 2, Randle,
Davis 4, Moore 2, Payton 2, Miller,
Jackson).
CLEVELAND
FG
FT Reb
Min M­A M­A O­T A F Pt
Nance.... 26 2­7 2­2 3­6 2 3 6
Osman .. 33 5­12 1­1 0­1 5 5 13
Thmpsn 26 4­8 2­2 2­11 2 4 10
Burks..... 36 2­9 2­2 1­3 6 2 8
Sexton .. 31 5­12 3­4 1­3 2 2 15
Clrkson . 24 8­17 4­5 1­4 3 0 23
McCaw . 17 0­2 0­0 0­1 0 1 0
Frye ....... 20 3­8 0­0 0­0 2 5 8
Jones..... 28 7­13 0­2 2­5 0 1 15
Totals .... 36­88 14­18 10­34 22 23 98
FG%: .409, FT%: .778. 3­pt. goals: 12­
33, .364 (Nance 0­1, Osman 2­4, Burks
2­6, Sexton 2­5, Clarkson 3­6, McCaw
0­2, Frye 2­5, Jones 1­4). Team re­
bounds: 10. Team turnovers: 20 (34
pts.). Blocks: 3 (Thompson, Clarkson,
Frye). Turnovers: 17 (Nance 2, Osman
3, Thompson, Burks, Sexton 3, Clark­
son 2, Frye, Jones 4). Steals: 12 (Nance,
Osman 3, Thompson 2, Burks, Clark­
son, McCaw, Jones 3).
New Orleans ........28 33 37 35 — 133
Cleveland..............26 26 20 26 — 98
A — 19,432 (20,562). T — 2:06. Offi­
cials — Scott Foster, Ben Taylor, Brett
Nansel.
RAPTORS 123, BUCKS 116
TORONTO
FG
FT Reb
Min M­A M­A O­T
Leonard 38 8­16 12­15 0­6
Siakam.. 39 11­15 5­7 2­4
Ibaka..... 36 11­17 2­3 0­9
Green .... 40 5­7 0­0 2­9
VnVleet. 35 6­12 4­4 0­5
Powell... 15 0­5 2­2 0­1
Monroe... 6 0­0 0­0 0­1
Anunby . 17 1­6 0­0 0­2
Wright... 14 0­4 0­0 0­1
Totals .... 42­82 25­31 4­38
A
6
3
5
0
8
4
0
0
2
28
F Pt
1 30
4 30
3 25
2 12
4 21
1 2
1 0
4 3
2 0
22 123
FG%: .512, FT%: .806. 3­pt. goals: 14­
31, .452 (Leonard 2­3, Siakam 3­5, Ibaka
1­3, Green 2­3, VanVleet 5­8, Powell
0­3, Anunoby 1­5, Wright 0­1). Team re­
bounds: 8. Team turnovers: 11 (14
pts.). Blocks: 6 (Siakam 2, Ibaka,
Green, VanVleet, Powell). Turnovers:
11 (Leonard 2, Ibaka 3, Green 2, Powell
2, Monroe, Anunoby). Steals: 9 (Leon­
ard 5, Green, Powell 2, Wright). Techni­
cals: Coach Nurse, 4:01/2nd.
MILWAUKEE
FG
FT Reb
Min M­A M­A O­T A F Pt
Middltn. 32 6­13 0­1 0­2 9 6 14
Antkmp. 40 16­25 8­11 1­18 4 2 43
Lopez .... 24 2­6 0­0 0­2 0 3 5
Bledsoe. 32 4­9 4­5 0­3 8 2 14
Brogdon 33 5­11 4­4 1­3 5 2 15
Brown ... 14 4­7 0­0 0­2 0 2 11
Wilson..... 9 0­1 0­0 1­2 0 1 0
Ilyasova 13 1­5 0­0 1­2 1 1 3
Hill......... 28 2­4 6­6 0­2 1 1 11
Snell ...... 13 0­0 0­0 0­2 1 0 0
Totals .... 40­81 22­27 4­38 29 20 116
FG%: .494, FT%: .815. 3­pt. goals: 14­
37, .378 (Middleton 2­6, Antetokounm­
po 3­5, Lopez 1­4, Bledsoe 2­6, Brogdon
1­4, Brown 3­6, Ilyasova 1­3, Hill 1­3).
Team rebounds: 8. Team turnovers: 16
(20 pts.). Blocks: 2 (Brogdon 2). Turn­
overs: 14 (Middleton, Antetokounmpo
6, Lopez, Bledsoe 3, Wilson, Ilyasova,
Hill). Steals: 9 (Middleton, Antetokoun­
mpo, Bledsoe 2, Brogdon, Wilson,
Ilyasova, Hill 2). Technicals: Lopez,
3:23/3rd, def. 3­second, 7:41/3rd.
Toronto .................27 29 35 32 — 123
Milwaukee............34 23 25 34 — 116
A — 18,028 (17,500). T — 2:14. Offi­
cials — Marc Davis, Matt Boland, Jacyn
Goble.
SPURS 108, GRIZZLIES 88
MEMPHIS
FG
FT Reb
Min M­A M­A O­T
Andrson 29 3­6 1­2 0­4
Jackson. 34 5­8 4­5 2­7
Gasol..... 25 2­9 2­2 2­11
Temple . 30 3­11 0­0 0­2
Conley... 25 7­12 4­4 1­1
Green .... 29 2­8 3­3 2­10
Carter ... 23 2­8 0­0 0­3
Brooks .. 17 6­11 0­1 0­0
Noah ....... 7 0­2 1­2 0­2
Holiday . 21 1­7 0­0 1­2
Rabb........ 1 0­0 0­0 0­0
Totals .... 31­82 15­19 8­42
A
3
1
6
2
3
0
3
1
0
2
0
21
F
2
3
2
2
3
6
4
4
1
2
0
29
Pt
7
15
6
7
21
8
6
15
1
2
0
88
FG%: .378, FT%: .789. 3­pt. goals: 11­
28, .393 (Jackson 1­3, Gasol 0­2, Temple
1­4, Conley 3­5, Green 1­2, Carter 2­5,
Brooks 3­5, Holiday 0­2). Team re­
bounds: 6. Team turnovers: 21 (26
pts.). Blocks: 3 (Anderson 2, Gasol).
Turnovers: 20 (Anderson, Jackson 2,
Gasol 4, Temple 4, Conley, Green 4,
Carter 2, Brooks, Noah). Steals: 12 (An­
derson 2, Jackson 4, Gasol, Temple,
Green, Carter 3). Technicals: Noah,
11:22/2nd.
SAN ANTONIO
FG
FT Reb
Min M­A M­A O­T A F Pt
Gay........ 25 4­12 0­0 1­8 2 1 9
White .... 27 8­9 2­2 1­4 0 3 19
Aldridge 31 5­9 8­10 0­2 7 4 18
Forbes... 30 2­7 2­2 0­1 2 1 7
DRozan . 34 3­10 6­7 1­9 4 2 12
Bertans. 21 1­5 1­2 0­5 2 2 4
Belinelli. 19 2­6 5­5 0­4 1 3 9
Poeltl..... 17 5­5 1­2 0­6 2 3 11
Mills ...... 24 5­6 2­3 0­2 4 0 15
Cnnghm.. 8 1­3 0­0 0­0 1 0 2
Pndxter... 2 0­1 0­0 0­2 1 0 0
Eubanks.. 2 0­0 2­2 0­0 0 0 2
Totals .... 36­73 29­35 3­43 26 19 108
FG%: .493, FT%: .829. 3­pt. goals: 7­
22, .318 (Gay 1­2, White 1­1, Forbes 1­5,
Bertans 1­5, Belinelli 0­3, Mills 3­4, Cun­
ningham 0­1, Pondexter 0­1). Team re­
bounds: 7. Team turnovers: 17 (14
pts.). Blocks: 3 (White, Bertans, Poeltl).
Turnovers: 15 (Gay 2, White 2, Forbes,
DeRozan 5, Belinelli, Poeltl 2, Mills 2).
Steals: 10 (Gay 2, White, Aldridge 2,
Forbes, DeRozan, Bertans 2, Mills).
Technicals: def. 3­second, 1:03/1st,
Coach Popovich, 3:50/2nd.
Memphis...............25 19 22 22 — 88
San Antonio..........27 37 24 20 — 108
A — 18,354 (18,797). T — 2:07. Offi­
cials — James Williams, Curtis Blair,
Jason Goldenberg.
NBA LEADERS
Not including Saturday’s games
SCORING AVERAGE
G FG FT Pts. Avg.
Harden, Hou. ......34 331 318 1142 33.6
Curry, GS.............28 270 132 810 28.9
Davis, NO.............34 353 236 976 28.7
Durant, GS...........39 383 274 1110 28.5
James, LAL..........34 340 180 928 27.3
Leonard, Tor. ......31 294 200 840 27.1
George, Okla.......37 342 191 999 27.0
Embiid, Phi..........37 330 295 997 26.9
Lillard, Por...........39 342 237 1039 26.6
Antknpo, Mil. ......35 341 216 910 26.0
ATLANTIC
*Tampa Bay
Toronto
BOSTON
Buffalo
Montreal
Florida
Detroit
Ottawa
GP
41
41
42
42
42
40
43
42
W
32
27
24
22
22
17
16
15
L OL
7 2
12 2
14 4
14 6
15 5
16 7
20 7
22 5
Pts. ROW
66
29
56
27
52
23
50
19
49
20
41
15
39
14
35
15
GF
174
152
122
120
131
130
122
132
GA
119
113
110
120
132
142
148
167
METROPOLITAN
Washington
Pittsburgh
Columbus
NY Islanders
Carolina
NY Rangers
New Jersey
Philadelphia
GP
40
41
41
40
40
40
40
41
W
24
23
24
23
18
17
16
15
L OL
12 4
12 6
14 3
13 4
17 5
16 7
17 7
20 6
Pts. ROW
52
21
52
22
51
24
50
21
41
17
41
12
39
15
36
13
GF
141
144
135
121
103
114
120
116
GA
119
117
126
107
114
136
134
148
WESTERN CONFERENCE
FG%: .461, FT%: .750. 3­pt. goals: 14­
39, .359 (Hernangómez 0­3, Jokic 3­9,
Murray 2­4, Craig 2­4, Millsap 1­3, Mor­
ris 2­3, Harris 3­8, Beasley 0­2, Lyles
1­3). Blocks: 6 (Jokic, Plumlee 3, Craig,
Beasley). Turnovers: 7 (Hernangómez,
Jokic 2, Murray 2, Millsap 2). Steals: 10
(Jokic 3, Millsap 4, Morris, Harris,
Lyles).
Charlotte...............26 30 28 26 — 110
Denver...................31 27 31 34 — 123
A — 19,861 (19,155). T — 2:12. Offi­
cials — Josh Tiven, Tony Brown, Hay­
woode Workman.
C3
NHL
NUGGETS 123, HORNETS 110
By Greg Beacham
At Denver 123
S u n d a y
ELISE AMENDOLA/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Celtics guard Brad Wanamaker had played just 98 minutes
this season prior to Friday night.
Wanamaker
was prepared
Little­used guard
provided spark
By Adam Himmelsbach
GLOBE STAFF
With 3 minutes, 18 seconds
left in the first quarter of the
Celtics’ game against the Mavericks on Friday night, coach Brad
Stevens turned to the bench and
told guard Brad Wanamaker to
check in for Terry Rozier.
Sure, the Celtics were without
point guard Kyrie Irving, so their
backcourt depth was limited.
But Irving has been sidelined before, and it never resulted in Wanamaker entering an important
game so soon.
In fact, before Friday he’d
played just 98 minutes all season, mostly when a game’s outcome had been decided and
stars were being given rest. So
when Stevens called his number,
Wanamaker was as surprised as
anyone.
“Honestly, I was like, ‘What?
What? What?’ ” Wanamaker
said, smiling. “Nah, but I just
tried to go out there and do the
right thing, make the right plays,
and keep the guys going that
were in there.”
It did not take long for Wanamaker to find a rhythm. After
Dallas sliced the Celtics’ 10-point
first-quarter lead to 3, he calmly
drilled two 3-pointers over the final 38 seconds, helping Boston
take a 34-23 lead to the second
quarter.
Wanamaker finished the 11493 win with 8 points, 4 assists, 3
steals, and 2 rebounds in 22
minutes.
“Oh, man, that was good,”
Celtics guard Marcus Smart said.
“I’m glad. I was ecstatic for him
to see him get in there. That guy,
he comes into practice every day
and he works, not knowing if
he’s going to play or not, but he
comes in with a great and positive attitude every day. So to see
him finally get in there and get
some minutes and get a great
sweat going and actually knocking down shots is something this
team enjoys.”
As a cluster of reporters surrounded Wanamaker after the
game, one asked him what it did
for his confidence as a young
player to hit those two 3-pointe r s s o q u i c k ly. Wan a m ake r
smiled.
“I’m not young,” he said. “I’m
29.”
Yes, Wanamaker is an NBA
rookie, but he spent the past seven years playing professionally
in Europe, most recently for the
Turkish EuroLeague powerhouse Fenerbahce.
Last summer, Wanamaker
passed up a much more lucrative
deal to stay in Europe in order to
chase his NBA dream, as he
signed a one-year, minimum-salary contract with the Celtics for
$838,000.
Wanamaker had seen former
EuroLeague teammate Daniel
Theis make a similar move the
year before and emerge as a consistent contributor for Boston,
and surely he envisioned something similar for himself. But the
Celtics are impossibly deep this
season, and there simply have
not been many opportunities for
Wanamaker.
“It’s challenging,” he said.
“The key word is challenging.
L OL
15 3
13 2
16 4
14 8
17 3
21 7
19 4
Pts. ROW
53
24
52
24
48
22
48
20
43
20
37
15
36
16
GF
131
134
115
144
118
123
110
GA
109
115
111
129
114
156
129
PACIFIC
Calgary
Vegas
*San Jose
Anaheim
Vancouver
*Edmonton
Arizona
*Los Angeles
GP
43
44
42
42
45
40
41
42
W
26
25
22
19
20
19
17
16
L OL
13 4
15 4
13 7
16 7
21 4
18 3
21 3
23 3
Pts. ROW
56
26
54
24
51
22
45
16
44
19
41
18
37
15
35
15
GF
153
133
145
104
128
114
103
94
GA
123
117
133
123
143
127
118
127
SATURDAY’S RESULTS
Buffalo 1
Calgary 3 at Philadelphia 2 (OT)
Minnesota 4
Celtics 114, Mavericks 93
Friday night game
Pt
11
20
12
9
19
6
1
6
9
0
0
93
W
25
25
22
20
20
15
16
At BOSTON 2
Adam Himmelsbach can be
reached at adam.himmelsbach
@globe.com. Follow him on
Twitter @adamhimmelsbach.
Min
Matthews. 30
Barnes ...... 32
Jordan....... 31
Smith ........ 31
Doncic....... 29
Barea ........ 18
Smith ........ 18
Powell....... 17
Harris........ 16
Nowitzki ... 16
Brunson...... 2
Totals........
GP
43
40
42
42
40
43
39
* — Not including late game; ROW — Regulation plus overtime wins
I’m just trying to stay mentally
prepared. I’m getting a lot of
f e e d b a c k f r o m m y f a m i l y,
friends, just saying, ‘Stay ready.’
They’ve seen the story many
times where guys don’t play and
then the second half of the season the coach finally starts calling their number. Tonight was
my turn and he called me and I
just tried to do the best I could
do.”
Smart said it is common for
players with roles as small as
Wanamaker’s to simply blend into the background during practices. They understand where
they stand, so they almost feel
out of place asserting themselves
among their more established
teammates. But Smart said that
has not been the case with Wanamaker this season.
“It’s the opposite with him,”
Smart said. “He’s in the drills.
He’s doing things like he’s playing 30 minutes a night. And
that’s good for him and his confidence. And then for the team,
because as you can see we’re
down a couple of guys, it’s going
to take other guys to step up.”
Irving, who has missed the
last two games after being
scratched in both eyes during
the loss to the Spurs last Monday, is expected to return against
the Nets this Monday. And it is
certainly possible, if not likely,
that Wanamaker will now go
back to waiting for his next
chance. But his performance
against Dallas showed that if it
arrives again, he will probably be
prepared for it.
“You’re really happy for him,”
Stevens said. “This is a guy that
probably turned down a ton of
money overseas to get a chance
to play in the NBA for the first
time. He doesn’t get to play, and
has never been through that before in his life, where he doesn’t
get to play. So you’re really, really
happy for him. That’s one that
the whole team feels good about,
for sure.”
At TD Garden
DALLAS
FG
FT Reb
M­A M­A
O­T A F
4­7
1­2
1­3 2 1
6­12
4­4
0­3 1 0
5­6
2­2 5­15 2 1
4­12
1­1
1­2 3 3
7­16
1­2
1­9 4 1
2­8
2­4
0­4 2 2
0­2
1­2
1­2 0 0
3­8
0­0
2­8 0 0
3­7
2­2
0­1 1 2
0­10
0­0
0­2 0 3
0­0
0­0
0­0 1 0
34­88 14­19 11­49 16 13
CENTRAL
Nashville
Winnipeg
Dallas
Colorado
Minnesota
Chicago
St. Louis
PPG
13.8
18.6
11.0
13.0
19.5
10.9
7.7
8.6
6.6
4.1
5.9
FG%: .386, FT%: .737. 3­pt. goals: 11­44, .250 (Mat­
thews 2­4, Barnes 4­7, Smith 0­5, Doncic 4­8, Barea
0­4, Smith 0­1, Powell 0­3, Harris 1­4, Nowitzki 0­8).
Team rebounds: 8. Team turnovers: 14 (13 pts.).
Blocks: 2 (Jordan 2). Turnovers: 14 (Matthews 3,
Barnes, Smith 2, Doncic 3, Barea 3, Harris, Nowitz­
ki). Steals: 9 (Matthews, Jordan, Smith 3, Smith,
Powell, Harris 2).
BOSTON
FG
FT Reb
Min M­A M­A
O­T A F Pt PPG
Tatum ....... 31 7­21
0­0
1­6 0 2 18 16.1
Brown ....... 27 9­15
1­1
0­2 2 4 21 12.2
Horford..... 25 4­10
0­0
3­8 8 1 10 12.2
Rozier........ 28
2­9
2­2
1­5 7 0
8 8.8
Smart........ 32 6­11
0­0
3­4 3 1 17 7.4
Theis ......... 23
2­4
3­4 1­13 3 2
8 6.8
Hayward... 30 6­15
2­2 4­11 8 2 16 11.2
Wanmkr ... 22
3­6
0­0
0­2 4 1
8 2.9
Ojeleye ..... 17
3­5
1­2
1­2 0 3
8 3.9
Dozier ......... 2
0­0
0­0
0­0 0 0
0 1.8
Yabusele .... 2
0­0
0­0
0­0 0 0
0 1.9
Totals........ 42­96 9­11 14­53 35 16 114
FG%: .438, FT%: .818. 3­pt. goals: 21­45, .467 (Tat­
um 4­11, Brown 2­4, Horford 2­3, Rozier 2­7, Smart
5­8, Theis 1­1, Hayward 2­6, Wanamaker 2­2, Ojel­
eye 1­3). Team rebounds: 5. Team turnovers: 13 (9
pts.). Blocks: 4 (Rozier, Theis 2, Hayward). Turn­
overs: 12 (Tatum 2, Brown, Horford, Smart, Theis 2,
Hayward 2, Wanamaker, Ojeleye 2). Steals: 12 (Tat­
um, Brown 3, Horford 2, Rozier, Smart, Theis, Wana­
maker 3).
Dallas ................................23 28 17 25 —
93
Boston...............................34 24 26 30 — 114
A — 18,624 (18,624). T — 2:05. Officials — Tony
Brothers, Nick Buchert, Brandon Adair.
At Toronto 5
Nashville 4
Columbus 4
at Florida 3 (OT)
NY Islanders 4
at Ottawa 3
Edmonton
Vancouver 0
Tampa Bay
at St. Louis 3
at Los Angeles
at San Jose
at Montreal 1
SUNDAY’S GAMES
Carolina at Ottawa
1
Washington at Detroit
5
New Jersey at Vegas
4
Edmonton at Anaheim
8
NY Rangers at Arizona
4
Chicago at Pittsburgh
8
Dallas at Winnipeg
5
FRIDAY’S RESULTS
At Pittsburgh 4
At Detroit 4
Winnipeg 0
At Colorado 6
NY Rangers 1
Nashville 3 (OT)
New Jersey 3
at Arizona 2 (SO)
At Carolina 4
At Dallas 2
Columbus 2
at Anaheim 2
Vegas 3
Washington 1 (OT)
MATT SLOCUM/ASSOCIATED PRESS
IT’S ALL OVER — The Flyers’ Jordan Weal
hangs his head as the Flames celebrate
their 3-2 win in overtime on Saturday.
FLAMES 3, FLYERS 2
Calgary.....................0
Philadelphia ............1
1
0
1
1
MAPLE LEAFS 5, CANUCKS 0
1 —
0 —
3
2
First period — 1. Philadelphia, San­
heim 4 (Weal, Provorov), 12:10 (pp).
Penalties — Hathaway, Cgy (tripping),
10:59. Ryan, Cgy (delay of game),
15:20.
Second period — 2. Calgary, Gaud­
reau 24 (Monahan, Hanifin), 8:51. Pen­
alties — , Cgy, served by Tkachuk (too
many men on ice), 0:50. Neal, Cgy
(slashing), 7:51. Provorov, Phi (inter­
ference), 7:51. , Cgy, served by Tka­
chuk (too many men on ice), 11:40. Gu­
das, Phi (tripping), 20:00.
Third period — 3. Philadelphia,
Konecny 10, 5:57. 4. Calgary, Tkachuk
19 (Bennett, Hanifin), 15:43. Penalties
— Provorov, Phi (hooking), 6:48.
Overtime — 5. Calgary, Brodie 5
(Tkachuk), 1:59. Penalties — None.
Shots on goal — Calgary 11­10­10­1
— 32. Philadelphia 13­12­9­0 — 34.
Power plays — Calgary 0­2; Philadel­
phia 1­4.
Goalies — Calgary, Rittich 14­4­3 (34
shots­32 saves). Philadelphia, Hart 2­
3­1 (32 shots­29 saves).
Referees — Dan O'Rourke, Dan
O'Halloran. Linesmen — Ryan Gallo­
way, Libor Suchanek.
A — 19,236 (19,543). T — 2:31.
ISLANDERS 4, BLUES 3
NY Islanders................0
St. Louis .......................2
1
0
3 —
1 —
4
3
First period — 1. St. Louis, Schenn 8
(Schwartz, Bouwmeester), 4:11. 2. St.
Louis, Sanford 5 (Dunn, Bozak), 16:37.
Penalties — Ho­Sang, NYI (hooking),
5:08. Fabbri, StL (hooking), 19:16.
Second period — 3. NY Islanders,
Martin 5 (Cizikas, Clutterbuck), 2:25.
Penalties — Fabbri, StL (hooking),
10:01. Pulock, NYI (hooking), 12:12.
Third period — 4. NY Islanders, Eber­
le 8 (Lee, Pelech), 8:27. 5. NY Islanders,
Boychuk 3 (Cizikas), 8:38. 6. NY Island­
ers, Lee 15 (Toews, Mayfield), 15:04. 7.
St. Louis, O'Reilly 16 (Perron, Tarasen­
ko), 18:27. Penalties — Lee, NYI (hi
stick), 3:44. Mayfield, NYI (tripping),
11:14. Pulock, NYI (holding), 19:40.
Shots on goal — NY Islanders 6­2­6 —
14. St. Louis 10­8­14 — 32.
Power plays — NY Islanders 0­2; St.
Louis 0­5.
Goalies — NY Islanders, Lehner 11­
6­3 (32 shots­29 saves). St. Louis, Allen
14­13­4 (14 shots­10 saves).
Referees — Peter MacDougall, Gord
Dwyer. Linesmen — Scott Cherrey,
Mark Shewchyk.
A — 16,801 (19,150). T — 2:30.
JACKETS 4, PANTHERS 3
Columbus ................1
Florida ......................2
1
0
1
1
1 —
0 —
4
3
First period — 1. Columbus, Duclair 9
(Wennberg), 1:37. 2. Florida, Hu­
berdeau 11 (Barkov, Yandle), 13:19. 3.
Florida, Hoffman 20, 18:09. Penalties —
Wideman, Fla (delay of game), 3:27.
Second period — 4. Columbus, An­
derson 15 (Jenner, Murray), 17:04. Pen­
alties — Hoffman, Fla (slashing), 2:15.
Jones, Cls (interference), 18:11.
Third period — 5. Columbus, Dubin­
sky 4, 6:58. 6. Florida, Ekblad 8 (McCa­
nn, Yandle), 17:47. Penalties — Haley,
Fla (roughing), 6:40. Anderson, Cls
(roughing), 6:40.
Overtime — 7. Columbus, Jones 7
(Dubois, Panarin), 0:18. Penalties —
None.
Shots on goal — Columbus 14­11­9­1
— 35. Florida 10­7­13­0 — 30.
Power plays — Columbus 0­2; Flori­
da 0­1.
Goalies — Columbus, Bobrovsky 18­
12­1 (30 shots­27 saves). Florida, Reim­
er 8­7­4 (35 shots­31 saves).
Referees — Jean Hebert, Pierre Lam­
bert. Linesmen — Ryan Daisy, Darren
Gibbs.
A — 15,213 (19,250). T — 2:27.
NHL LEADERS
Not including Saturday’s games
GOAL SCORING
GP
Alex Ovechkin, Wash..............40
Jeff Skinner, Buf.......................41
John Tavares, Tor. ...................40
G. Landeskog, Colo..................42
N. MacKinnon, Colo.................42
David Pastrnak, Bos................41
Cam Atkinson, Colu.................39
Patrik Laine, Win. ....................40
Joe Pavelski, SJ ........................42
Brayden Point, TB....................41
G
30
28
26
25
25
25
24
24
24
24
Vancouver ...................0
Toronto ........................2
0
0
0 —
3 —
0
5
First period — 1. Toronto, Tavares 27
(Rielly, Brown), 8:54. 2. Toronto,
TMoore 1 (Ozhiganov), 14:30. Penalties
— Johnsson, Tor (interference), 19:35.
Second period — None. Penalties —
Gardiner, Tor (tripping), 16:02.
Third period — 3. Toronto, Matthews
20 (Johnsson), 4:45. 4. Toronto, Johns­
son 9 (Matthews), 11:55. 5. Toronto,
Ozhiganov 2 (Matthews, Dermott),
14:49. Penalties — Gardiner, Tor (trip­
ping), 15:50.
Shots on goal — Vancouver 11­8­9 —
28. Toronto 12­12­10 — 34.
Power plays — Vancouver 0­3; To­
ronto 0­0.
Goalies — Vancouver, Markstrom
17­12­3 (34 shots­29 saves). Toronto,
Hutchinson 2­2­2 (28 shots­28 saves).
Referees — Eric Furlatt, TJ Luxmore.
Linesmen — Brian Murphy, Devin Berg.
A — 19,388 (18,819). T — 2:23.
PREDATORS 4, CANADIENS 1
Nashville ......................2
Montreal ......................0
1
1
1 —
0 —
4
1
First period — 1. Nashville, Smith 13
(Subban, Ekholm), 10:44. 2. Nashville,
Ekholm 4 (Grimaldi, Jarnkrok), 19:24.
Penalties — None.
Second period — 3. Montreal, Weber
6 (Kotkaniemi), 12:47. 4. Nashville,
Smith 14 (Subban, Fiala), 13:05. Penal­
ties — Chaput, Mon (interference),
6:42. , Nsh, served by Grimaldi (too
many men on ice), 15:06.
Third period — 5. Nashville, Arvids­
son 12, 19:15 (en). Penalties — Byron,
Mon (tripping), 3:53.
Shots on goal — Nashville 16­11­5 —
32. Montreal 11­9­8 — 28.
Power plays — Nashville 0­2; Mon­
treal 0­1.
Goalies — Nashville, Saros 10­5­1 (28
shots­27 saves). Montreal, Price 16­
11­4 (31 shots­28 saves).
Referees — Tom Chmielewski, Marc
Joannette. Linesmen — Michel Cormi­
er, Steve Miller.
A — 21,302 (21,288). T — 2:29.
WILD 4, SENATORS 3
Minnesota....................0
Ottawa .........................1
3
1
1 —
1 —
4
3
First period — 1. Ottawa, Duchene 17
(Smith), 19:06. Penalties — Duchene,
Ott (hooking), 16:57.
Second period — 2. Minnesota, Spur­
geon 6 (Kunin, Parise), 0:41. 3. Ottawa,
Dzingel 16 (Ryan, DeMelo), 8:08. 4. Min­
nesota, Greenway 7 (Granlund, Staal),
14:10. 5. Minnesota, Spurgeon 7 (Coyle,
Parise), 16:31. Penalties — Lajoie, Ott
(tripping), 1:31. , Min, served by Green­
way (too many men on ice), 3:47. Ryan,
Ott (holding stick), 5:45.
Third period — 6. Minnesota, Parise
19 (Kunin, Coyle), 6:07. 7. Ottawa,
Stone 20 (Ceci, Wolanin), 10:10. Penal­
ties — Koivu, Min (tripping), 19:33.
Shots on goal — Minnesota 8­13­5 —
26. Ottawa 15­4­8 — 27.
Power plays — Minnesota 0­3; Otta­
wa 0­2.
Goalies — Minnesota, Dubnyk 15­
14­3 (27 shots­24 saves). Ottawa, Nils­
son 3­9­1 (26 shots­22 saves).
Referees — Justin St. Pierre, Tim
Peel. Linesmen — Derek Nansen, Jonny
Murray.
A — 14,124 (17,000). T — 2:29.
NHL LEADERS
Not including Saturday’s games
ASSISTS
GP
Nikita Kucherov, TB ................41
Mikko Rantanen, Colo.............42
Blake Wheeler, Win.................40
Mitchell Marner, Tor...............40
Johnny Gaudreau, Calg. .........42
N. MacKinnon, Colo.................42
Connor McDavid, Edm............39
Brent Burns, SJ.........................42
J. Huberdeau, Fla. ....................39
N. Backstrom, Wash................40
Jack Eichel, Buf. .......................40
John Carlson, Wash.................39
Mark Giordano, Calg...............40
Claude Giroux, Phi...................40
Sidney Crosby, Pitt..................38
Artemi Panarin, Colu. .............38
Sam Reinhart, Buf. ..................41
Morgan Rielly, Tor...................40
Evgeni Malkin, Pitt. .................41
Brayden Point, TB....................41
A
49
46
44
40
38
38
38
37
35
34
34
33
33
33
32
31
31
31
30
30
C4
Sports
B o s t o n
S u n d a y
G l o b e
JA N UA RY 6 , 2 0 1 9
Backes connects for goal in his return
By Kevin Paul Dupont
GLOBE STAFF
David Backes’s winter chill
came to an end on Saturday,
the veteran forward back in the
Bruins’ lineup
BRUINS
to face the SaNOTEBOOK bres after completing his
three-game suspension.
Backes, denied the chance
to suit up for Tuesday’s Winter
Classic at Notre Dame, returned with a promotion —
bumped up to right wing on
the second line centered by Da­
vid Krejci.
“I think that [line], fair to
say, is still a work in progress,”
said coach Bruce Cassidy, who
this season has rolled through
more combinations on Krejci’s
line than a Mega Millions computer vendor. “David’s fresh,
coming back, excited to move
up the lineup a little bit.”
Backes scored the Bruins’
second goal in a 2-1 victory, his
fifth of the season.
Backes finished with the
line’s lone point, his fourth goal
this season, finishing a 2-on-1
rush with a snap from the leftwing circle. He collected the
puck deep in his own end, off a
save by Tuukka Rask, then
wired in his shot, opting not to
dish off to Brad Marchand on
the rush.
“It’s a 2-on-1 with March,
and he’s going to take a lot of
attention” said Backes, detail-
ing the scoring play. “Maybe
they were looking at the stat
sheet and see three goals [his
total through 33 prior games]
vs. 15 by Marchy, and they were
trying to play the percentages.”
Jake DeBrusk, a fixture most
of the season with Krejci, often
has ridden on the right wing of
the trio, allowing Cassidy to get
looks at left wing candidates
Danton Heinen, Ryan Donato,
and Joakim Nordstrom, among
others. Ideally, Backes would
seize the role on the right side,
allowing DeBrusk to remain
fixed at his natural position as a
lefthanded shooter on his natural wing.
Krejci, like all righthanded
shots, is more inclined, and no
doubt more comfortable, to
pass to his left wing. That rightleft symbiotic partnership has
been a key to the success of Pa­
trice Bergeron and Marchand
on the No. 1 trio.
To his credit, DeBrusk, now
midway through his second
NHL season, has embraced
whichever wing he has been assigned.
“We’re going to go back to
that,” said Cassidy, noting he
prefers that DeBrusk line up on
the left side with Krejci. “I
think Jake’s fine on the other
side. Some of his better chances
are just footrace . . . so from either side, it’s just a matter of
flipping the puck into that area,
for Krejci or the defenseman.
BARRY CHIN/GLOBE STAFF
Sean Kuraly hits the deck on this hard check of Sabres
defenseman Rasmus Ristolainen during the third period.
Sometimes coming in from
your off wing it’s a little easier
to finish.”
In short, said Cassidy, “it’s
just a little easier for [DeBrusk]
to play [left] side . . . a little easier for everybody . . . so that’s
why we moved him back.”
DeBrusk scored twice, including the winner, in Thursday’s 6-4 victory over Calgary,
and is now 13-3—16 through
33 games. He now has been
back for five games after being
sidelined by a concussion that
he sustained Nov. 26 in Toronto
when a Heinen shot nailed him
on the back of the helmet.
Cassidy late Saturday morning noted the varying strengths
of DeBrusk, Heinen, and Donato at this point in their careers. DeBrusk has been able to
hold steady work with Krejci
because of his ample foot
speed. Speed is the greatest tool
in his kit.
“His pace is a little better
than some of the other guys,”
noted Cassidy. “And I think the
league has gotten faster again.
He’s able to create using his
foot speed. That’s the advantage he has over, say, the Heinens and Donatos. It’s also
where you have seen [Sean]
Kuraly come out of the pack a
little bit lately. I think Sean had
some chances earlier in the
year and didn’t finish them,
and now they are going in a little bit more.”
Nonetheless, Cassidy prefers
to have Kuraly anchor the third
or fourth line, even after the exMiami Ohio standout potted
back-to-back game-winners
over the Sabres and Blackhawks (at South Bend).
“The guys with the higher
pace do it every night,” said
Cassidy.
“It’s hard to score in this
league. Teams defend hard and
if you have foot speed to separate, I think that is the one that
can separate you from one of
the younger guys.”
Donato (5-3—8), added
Cassidy, differentiates himself
on his strength of shot.
“He can literally wire it by
the goalie when he has time
and space,” said the coach.
Finding those opportunities,
said Cassidy, is “still a work in
progress for him.”
Waiting, watching
With Backes back in the batting order, rookie Colby Cave
was a scratch for the first time
since he was called up from
AHL Providence. Steven Kamp­
fer was the healthy scratch
among the defensive corps . . .
Chris Wagner led all shooters
with six shots on net, but three
other Bruins posted five SOGs:
Donato, Torey Krug, and Backes . . . The Bruins won two of
three faceoffs in the first two
periods and finished with a 3528 edge. Bergeron won 13 of 20
and rookie Jakob Forsbacka
Karlsson, looking more comfortable in his overall game,
won 8 of 11 . . . Marchand, held
without a point, led the Bruins
with six hits, only one behind
Buffalo’s Remi Elie . . . Backes’s
goal was initially posted as unassisted, but a late change
awarded Rask an assist . . .
Rask, with wins over Buffalo
and Chicago in his last two
starts, collected a third straight
win for the first time this season. A year ago at this time, he
was in the midst of a torrid 180-2 run . . . Krejci, blanked in
the first four games following
Bergeron’s return from a rib/
collarbone injury, picked up a
pair of assists Thursday . . . Da­
vid Pastrnak, with goals in
back-to-back games (2-2—4 total) went without a point
against Buffalo. Pastrnak
clicked for seven goals over
four consecutive games in October, and then potted five over
a three-game run in early-November.
Kevin Paul Dupont can be
reached at
kevin.dupont@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter
@GlobeKPD.
BARRY CHIN/GLOBE STAFF
Brad Marchand puts everything he has into pushing the Sabres’ Evan Rodrigues off the puck and out of the play during a first-period tussle in the Bruins’ 2-1 victory Saturday night.
Wagner is on target in Bruins’ victory
uBRUINS
Continued from Page C1
lead midway through the first
period Saturday, he was thinking of his granddad during his
goal celebration, his fifth strike
in Black and Gold since joining
the franchise in July as an unrestricted free agent.
“Gave him a little tribute,”
said a smiling Wagner. “He’d
probably be a little upset that I
even acknowledged him, but
. . . yeah, a humble guy and I
am going to miss him a lot.”
David Backes, bumped up
to second-line duty after serving a three-game suspension,
scored the other goal, posting
the Bruins to a 2-0 lead only
2:00 into the second. Tuukka
Rask, denied a shutout when
Rasmus Ristolainen wired one
by his short side with 2:38 left
in the third, finished with 31
saves and ran his personal win
streak to a season-high three
games.
“We played as good as I remember for a long time,” said
Rask, rarely facing a difficult
shot in the first 40 minutes.
“They hung in there, and got
some kind of momentum in the
third period . . . but we hung in
there.”
The win left the Bruins with
52 points for the season and
pushed them 2 points ahead of
the Sabres, who have been
hard on their tail for the No. 3
Bruins 2, Sabres 1
At TD Garden
FIRST PERIOD
Penalty — Buffalo, Elie (interference) 6:32
Boston 1, Buffalo 0 — Wagner 5 (Acciari) 10:10
SECOND PERIOD
Boston 2, Buffalo 0 — Backes 4 2:00
No penalties
THIRD PERIOD
Penalty — Boston, Grzelcyk (hooking) 7:42
Penalty — Buffalo, McCabe (tripping) 12:39
Boston 2, Buffalo 1 — Ristolainen 5 17:22
SCORE BY PERIOD
Buffalo.................................... 0
0
1 —
1
Boston .................................... 1
1
0 —
2
SHOTS BY PERIOD
Buffalo.................................. 10 10
Boston .................................. 13 15
12
13
—
—
32
41
Power plays — Buffalo 0 of 1; Boston 0 of 2.
Goalies — Buffalo, Ullmark 9­2­3 (41 shots­39
saves). Boston, Rask 11­8­2 (32 shots­31 saves).
Referees — Brad Meier, Brian Pochmara. Lines­
men — Steve Barton, Tim Nowak.
Attendance — 17,565 (17,565). Time — 2:31.
spot in the Atlantic Division
and/or a wild-card playoff spot
in the East.
The Sabres were without
their top forward, the injured
Jack Eichel, and it showed,
their offense never quite in
synch.
After running off a franchise-high 10-game win streak,
the Sabres are now 5-8-4 in
their last 17 games. The Bruins, meanwhile, now stand 72-0 in their last nine and look
capable of putting heat on the
Leafs for the second spot in the
East.
Wagner potted his first shot
of the night, only 20 seconds
into the first period, trailing
Sean Kuraly into the slot and
knocking home the rebound after Kuraly landed a sharp wrister.
However, Kuraly also landed an unintentional smack on
Ullmark after falling after his
shot. Ullmark tumbled over,
had little chance of snuffing
out Wagner’s follow-up, and
the officiating crew rightly denied the goal.
It was incidental contact,
but contact nonetheless. Goalies have to have the chance to
stop the puck.
The Bruins challenged the
call, believing (hoping?) Kuraly
had been knocked into Ullmark by a Buffalo defender.
Neither the refs nor NHL HQ
saw it that way.
No goal.
“We figured it was a bit of a
stretch,” said Bruins coach
Bruce Cassidy, explaining why
he challenged. “But listen,
those guys work hard . . . lately,
I can’t figure out some of the
reviews, what stands and what
doesn’t.”
Wagner finally put one on
the board that counted, when
linemate Noel Acciari forced a
turnover in the mid-slot, some
35 feet in front of Ullmark, and
tapped it ahead for Wagner.
Wagner closed slightly and
sniped home a low-slot wrister
for the 1-0 lead.
Backes ripped home the 2-0
lead with 2:00 gone in the second. It was the 35th goal Backes has scored in his 2½ seasons
with the Bruins and perhaps
his most stylish. He lined up
with David Krejci and Jake DeBrusk on the No. 2 line.
“A s a l i n e , w e h a d s o m e
glimmers of brilliance, and
some other plays . . . we got
hemmed in,” said Backes. “Our
prowess, especially with Jake
and Krech, is going into the offensive zone . . . I mean, it’s
Game 1 with those two guys
and I don’t expect it to be magical, but if we stay together, I
only think it will get better.”
Wagner continued to put on
a show throughout the night.
He entered the evening with a
meager 4-3—7 line in his 38
games, landing a total 63 shots
on net, an average of fewer
than two per game.
Overall, he finished with six
shots, landed ever y one of
them on net, and clearly was
guzzling jugs of confidence and
inspiration with every shift.
“ T h at ’s a p re tty spec ial
night,” said Backes, noting
Wagner’s performance in light
of losing his grandfather.
“You couldn’t be more happy for the guy . . . hopefully he
can get some family time now
and bid farewell to his grandfather.”
Kevin Paul Dupont can be
reached at
kevin.dupont@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter
@GlobeKPD.
BARRY CHIN/GLOBE STAFF
Bruins goalie Tuukka Rask (31 saves) gets his glove on this
shot from the Sabres’ Jeff Skinner in the second period.
BARRY CHIN/GLOBE STAFF
Bruins center Ryan Donato reaches out to try to put a
wraparound past Sabres goaltender Linus Ullmark.
B o s t o n
JA N UA RY 6 , 2 0 1 9
S u n d a y
G l o b e
Sports
C5
Hockey
Classic weather has aided game’s cause
Kevin Paul Dupont
500
GOALS
we looked at all of the factors and we
looked at the two teams participating,
we thought it would fit nicely . . . all
factors combined, we thought it
would work.”
Come puck drop in South Bend,
the temperature was 39 degrees, the
same at that hour in Vegas (albeit
10:25 a.m.) in Sin City. Bettman said
he has talked with both Florida franchises about possibly holding a Winter
Classic in the Sunshine State, though
hinted that it likely would mean playing the game at night. Unless, of
course, divine inspiration could make
the trip down from South Bend.
ESPOSITO
400
MIDDLETON
NEELY
CHOICE WORDS
BERGERON
Lites’s comments
blunt but fair
Not likely Jim Lites will be front
and center at the bargaining table
when NHL owners and players get
around to hashing out the next collective bargaining agreement. But man,
the 66-year-old Dallas Stars CEO sure
knows how to get a party started.
Frustrated by his blasé 19-16-3
squad, and the thought of a ninth
playoff DNQ in 11 seasons, Lites last
Friday torched the franchise’s two offensive headliners, Jamie Benn and
ex-Bruin Tyler Seguin, with words
most family-friendly news outlets still
can’t report in print or over the airwaves.
But to paraphrase:
“They are bleeping horse-bleep,”
Lites said, encouraging, in fact courting, the media to report his profanitylaced two-hander. “I don’t know how
else to put it.”
Not a whole lot to unpack here,
folks. This was a calculated ploy by
Lites, and he made clear he did it with
the blessing of club owner Tom Gagli­
ardi. They want better results. They’re
paying for fine sirloin and getting
hamburger. Above all, they want better effort and production from their
two star forwards, who next fall will
be on the books for a combined
$19.35 million, roughly one-quarter of
the Stars’ total payroll. With no
chance of kicking them in the wallet,
Lites went for their most private of
parts — ego, integrity, dignity.
The immediate results: the Stars
went 2-0-1 over their next three, Benn
with a pair of goals and nine shots on
net, and Seguin with a 2-2—4 line and
17 shots. It looks like Lites’s intended
shots hit their marks, but with the entire second half to play, a three-game
test sample really isn’t large enough to
make an accurate, full assessment.
Here in the Hub of Hockey, Harry
Sinden often was salty in his remarks
regarding players and coaches in his
days as Bruins president and GM, but
even Give ’em Hell Harry never went
to Lites’s length. Among Sinden’s best,
when informed Canadian Olympian
Joe Juneau might sign in the Swiss
League instead of with the Bruins after the 1992 Games: “Hope he learns
to yodel.”
Lites speaks for the owner. The guy
who pays the bills has the right to say
what he wants, and in public for all to
hear, if he so wishes. Keep in mind,
Lites was smart enough to attack only
their games, and critiquing play is everyone’s right. It would be far more interesting around the best hockey
league in the world if others took Jungle Jim’s honest approach.
In 2019, the media criticism/scrutiny of the NHL product has been muted. Most of the old-guard reporters
have gone to pasture, be it through
frustration, retirement, buyouts or by
the boot. By and large, particularly in
the 24 US markets, newspapers have
fewer general sports columnists, and
the vast majority of them would rather
wrap both naked hands around raw
uranium than bang out 900-1,000
words about a sport that many of
them rank with bowling and curling
on their list of interests. They don’t
care, and their editors typically care
even less.
To that very point, it was telling
that Lites, amid his crafted tirade, implored reporters, “Write it!”
Amen, Jungle Jim.
For their parts, Benn and Seguin
tiptoed along the high road with their
comments when asked for their reactions. Benn noted he “did not play” for
Lites and correctly said he played for
his teammates. Seguin, whose blend
of play and personality led to his quick
exit in Boston, said he had been unaware how Lites felt and understood
his play needed to improve.
In a true sign of the times, the players’ union responded some 72 hours
BOURQUE
1000
1500
GAMES
2000
300-PLUS GOALS WITH BRUINS
JOHNNY
BUCYK
PHIL
ESPOSITO
RICK
MIDDLETON
RAY
BOURQUE
GOALS
GOALS
GOALS
GOALS
545
459
1,436
402
625
395
CAM
NEELY
PATRICE
BERGERON
GOALS
GOALS
344
GAMES
GAMES
GAMES
881
1,518
GAMES
GAMES
GAMES
0.38
0.73
0.46
0.26
0.66
0.31
GPG
GPG
GPG
525
302
GPG
GPG
987
GPG
Group dynamic
Patrice Bergeron recently became the sixth player in Bruins history to record
300 goals with the team. Bergeron is also one of nine active players who have
scored at least 300 goals with their current franchise (with the Kings' Anze
Kopitar knocking on the door with 299 goals as of Jan. 3).
COMPILED BY SEAN SMITH
700
OVECHKIN
600
500
400
CROSBY
PERRY
STAMKOS
MALKIN
KANE
TOEWS
PAVELSKI
800
GAMES
BERGERON
1000
1200
300-PLUS GOALS WITH CURRENT FRANCHISE
ALEX
OVECHKIN
SIDNEY
CROSBY
EVGENI
MALKIN
STEVEN
STAMKOS
COREY
PERRY
GOALS
GOALS
GOALS
GOALS
GOALS
636
1,041
430
901
383
824
370
704
366
957
GAMES
GAMES
GAMES
GAMES
GAMES
0.61
0.48
0.46
0.53
0.38
GPG
GPG
GPG
GPG
GPG
JOE
PAVELSKI
PATRICK
KANE
JONATHAN
TOEWS
PATRICE
BERGERON
GOALS
GOALS
GOALS
GOALS
341
930
334
863
308
833
302
987
GAMES
GAMES
GAMES
GAMES
0.37
0.39
0.37
0.31
GPG
GPG
later with a statement calling Lites’s
remarks unprofessional.
Not really. More like extreme, raw,
honest, and unequivocal. The whole
product needs more of it. Unless the
day comes when the Stanley Cup is
merely a participation trophy and everyone gets a pat on the back and a
lollipop for the ride home.
If words are too tough, little chance
you’ll win the fight to get to the net.
ETC.
Oilers’ Chiarelli
got what he could
Mounting injuries on the backline,
particularly the costly losses of Oscar
Klefbom and Kris Russell, sent Edmonton GM Peter Chiarelli into a
scramble last weekend, and the exBruins boss netted a pair of back-ofthe-order guys in Alex Petrovic (via
the Panthers) and Brandon Manning
(Blackhawks).
“Not to say we weren’t fishing in
bigger water,” Chiarelli told the Ed-
GPG
Chiarelli’s acquisition of Manning
was extra sticky because it was Manning, then playing for the Flyers, who
drilled Connor McDavid when the
phenom center was a rookie Oiler. McDavid fractured his collarbone on the
dirty smack (labeled “classless” at the
time by McDavid) and missed half the
season.
According to Chiarelli, he previously attempted to acquire Manning in a
deal, and “pulled Connor aside” at the
time to make certain he had no problem with the notion.
McDavid’s response, according to
the GM: “No, he’s a player who would
help us.”
The Oilers, after an initial jump in
the standings under new coach Ken
Hitchcock, had only one win in their
last seven games prior to the deals,
and had allowed 31 goals. Not a formula for staying in the hunt for a playoff spot, and one certain to get
Chiarelli turfed if it continued.
“We felt it was imperative to shore
up our defense right now,” he said.
To get the Manning deal done,
Chiarelli had to give up left wing
Drake Caggiula, the hottest free agent
property coming out of the NCAA
(North Dakota) in the spring of 2016.
Like a lot of kids, his numbers have
yet to come around in the NHL. In 2½
seasons since signing as a free agent,
he had posted but 27 goals and 49
points in 156 games.
Sure, maybe one day Caggiula
morphs into Martin St. Louis, but
don’t bet on it. The Oilers were yielding 40 shots or more per night, and
though better stock might be available
in a few weeks as the Feb. 25 trade
deadline approaches, Petrovic and
Manning were the best Chiarelli could
wring out of a seller’s market.
“These are not top-four defensemen,” he said. “But they’re good, solid
defensemen with experience. They
both defend hard and they both move
well.”
Loose pucks
GOALS
T
he latest iteration of the
Winter Classic was exceptional, as good as it gets on
the two most critical
points: 1. Quality of game;
2. Quality of ice. Frankly, without the
latter, the former is a guaranteed bust.
To top it all off from an event-staging perspective, the thick cloud cover
over South Bend, Ind., never abated.
Without a hint of sunshine from puck
drop to the final second of the Bruins’
4-2 victory on Tuesday, the ice never
softened and TV did not have to contend with the camera wincing that
comes with solar glare.
“Very nice,” NHL commissioner
Gary Bettman said during a betweenperiods chat with the media, “so I
thank Notre Dame for the divine inspiration of cloud cover.”
Had the game been scheduled for
what was a rain-soaked Dec. 31 instead of Jan. 1, Bettman confirmed, it
would have been the first washout in
what is now the NHL’s history of 26
outdoor games. Each of the league’s
outdoor events runs more efficiently,
thanks in large part to a brilliant,
dogged ice crew, and fans (a sellout of
76,000-plus at Notre Dame) continue
to flock to it. The lines at the merchandise kiosks nearly stretched all
the way to Chicago.
Overall, it remains a marketing
sensation, with the league fully recognizing that the day will come when
bad weather sends everyone home
and leaves TV with a three-hour window of New Year’s Day infomercials.
“We’ve been very fortunate with
the weather,” acknowledged Bettman.
“But it is something that we have to
try to account for, but it’s unpredictable. Which I guess at some level
makes this the ultimate reality show.”
Amid all the hard-earned success,
however, there remains the awkward,
ill-fitting placement of the rink itself
within whatever chosen arena. Bad
optics. Such as Gillette in 2016, or any
stadium of, say, 40,000 seats or more,
the sheet got lost in the great outdoors
at Notre Dame. No matter where, the
best seats in the house are still a
stretch when it comes to fans actually
following the action.
That was underscored all the more
at Notre Dame, the iconic stadium
with a lone giant message board/TV
screen (at the end opposite Touchdown Jesus). There’s really no way
around it. A small rink looks like a few
drops of water when poured into the
ocean of a large stadium.
The TV viewing experience is better than being there, though significantly different from standard NHL
fare because of the absence of spectators around the rink’s immediate perimeter. Again, no answer for that
one.
If the demand were there to make
it a pay-per-view event, theoretically
the league could fashion the floor of a
huge arena into a TV studio and ring
the boards with a bowl of bleacher
seats. The visual would be far more
akin to standard TV viewing, though
the noise from a crowd of only
5,000-7,000 might make it feel more
like the ECHL. But TV can work miracles.
The league also announced on
Tuesday, around Bettman’s informal
news conference, that next year’s Winter Classic will be held at the Cotton
Bowl, with the Dallas Stars facing an
opponent yet to be determined. Total
guess here: Vegas. Sure, there are
many NHL franchises within a shorter
commute, but the Golden Knights
continue to be a fascination around
the league. Last year’s Cup finalist also
is playing much better of late, tied for
fourth in the league’s overall standings
as the weekend approached.
On Oct. 26 of next season, the
Flames and Jets also will take it outdoors, in an official NHL game at the
33,000-seat Mosaic Stadium in Regina, Saskatchewan. That one’s a bit curious: small stadium, acting as host to
two teams that began life as expansion
teams in Atlanta. Maybe they’ll play
“Brass Bonanza” when either side
scores a goal? The Whalers’ theme
song, official tune of the disenfranchised.
Regina is about 350 miles from
Winnipeg and 450 from Calgary. The
combined capacity of the NHL rinks
in Winnipeg and Calgary is 34,610. If
everybody makes the trip to Regina,
maybe it works.
“Good stadium,” said Bettman,
asked why Regina worked. “We’re a
little more challenged in the Canadian
market on stadiums. There’s been a
great deal of interest expressed by Regina over the years and they very
much wanted to host the game. When
BUCYK
GPG
monton media after the deals.
Yet another lesson in roster management and building that many fans,
even the more-than-casual observers,
often either don’t understand or refuse to acknowledge. The nature of
business in the new NHL is that rosters are constructed in the offseason,
typically around significant deals into
and out of the June draft, and then the
start of free agency on July 1.
Once the season begins, trades are
the domain of the tire repair shop, as
assortment of plugs and patches and
replacement valves. Oilers fans, and
some media, implored Chiarelli to
find a top-four fix on the back end.
Great idea. Just not reasonable. There
are maybe 90-100 true top-four defensemen across the 31 teams, and typically they are: 1. Pricey; 2. Locked in
with no-trade clauses.
So, what’s a GM to do? Precisely
what we saw in Edmonton: shore up
the blue line with depth guys and try
to stem the bleedout until the varsity
likes of Russell and Klefbom are upright, taking fluids and blocking shots
again.
Alex Ovechkin said his “body needs
a rest” and he’ll skip All-Star Weekend, Jan. 25-26, in San Jose. The
league-mandated penalty for his noshow: a one-game suspension. In other words, Ovechkin gets more of what
he wants, time off. Whatever, I guess.
It’s a fluff event. But when an important voice such as Ovechkin’s is lost at
All-Star events, it hurts the players’
overall case that they’ll do anything
and everything to help grow the game
. . . Received plenty of the expected
criticism here off a column last week
that Sean Kuraly be given a shot as a
top-six winger. The crux of the pushback: He doesn’t have the skill set to
be more than a third- or fourth-line
grinder. Precisely what was being said
about Brad Marchand when he came
aboard in 2009-10 . . . Ex-Boston College winger Cam Atkinson, whose size
and skill set fit the Martin St. Louis
template, is in the thick of a career
season, and recently told NHL.com’s
Dan Rosen he “just kind of fell back in
love” with the game. Atkinson, 5 feet 8
inches and 180 pounds, needed time
on the sideline with a broken foot to
rekindle his playing passion. He’s on a
pace to push 90 points, playing with
linemates Pierre­Luc Dubois and Russian wizard Artemi Panarin in Columbus. Atkinson, who departed the
Heights in 2011 after three NCAA seasons, never has posted more than 35
goals and 62 points . . . Ex-Boston University winger John Hynes, now in his
fourth season behind the Devils’
bench, was handed a multiyear contract extension Thursday by GM Ray
Shero. Hynes is one of three ex-Terriers, along with Mike Sullivan (Penguins) and David Quinn (Rangers),
who are NHL bench bosses. All played
for Jack Parker, who had he the sense
to earn his MBA during his years on
Comm. Ave., could be collecting deep
royalties right now . . . Bit of a belated
thanks, but a good chunk of the winters of my youth, 55-60 years ago, was
spent on a patch of ice on Page Field
in Bedford’s town center. It was the
charge of the Bedford Fire Department, red lights flashing on their
shiny trucks, to make regular stops
there, hoist hoses over snowbanks,
and flood the patch for fresh ice. So,
hat tip to you, gents, for fussing with
the hydrants and pumper trucks.
There was nothing better than being
the first to arrive there on Saturday,
with hockey skates slung over the
shoulder, stick in hand, and a smooth,
fresh sheet mirroring the morning sky.
Kevin Paul Dupont can be reached at
dupont@globe.com. Follow him on
Twitter @GlobeKPD. Material from
interviews, wire services, other beat
writers, and league and team sources
was used in this report.
C6
Sports
B o s t o n
S u n d a y
G l o b e
JA N UA RY 6 , 2 0 1 9
Baseball
Free agent market, trades too slow to develop
Nick Cafardo
I
t’s the first week of January, and
much like last year at this time,
there are many free agents —
more than 200 of them — without teams.
“It’s become the new normal,” said
one American League executive. “It’s
frustrating and I don’t know the answer to it. I’ve heard about deadlines
and things of that nature, and maybe
that’s the way to go. The fact we’ll have
free agency into February and sometimes into March, is just ridiculous. It
shouldn’t take that long to figure
things out. I’m not blaming one side
or the other, but the current situation
doesn’t make any sense to me.”
Nor did it make sense to Dave
Dombrowski, who said as much at the
Winter Meetings last month. Dombrowski called for some type of deadline for signing free agents, and maybe
an offseason trade deadline. These are
things that are expected to be discussed in the months ahead.
One prominent agent said, “I think
the reliance on analytics to identify
players for each respective team has
slowed down the process. One thing
the analytics are doing is pushing the
older players out of the game. The older players are having trouble finding
jobs and are being replaced by younger players whose numbers look better.
Again, what some of the younger GMs
are missing out on is the intangible
things that the older players bring to
the table.”
There are still quality players on
the market. Former Cy Young winner
Dallas Keuchel heads a list of available
starters. Keuchel is a Scott Boras client and they tend to wait longer than
others to sign. Another Boras client,
Gio Gonzalez, would be an attractive
lefthander for the middle or back end
of a rotation. Others who could be
helpful to teams: Edwin Jackson, Jere­
my Hellick­
son, Ervin
Santana, Bar­
tolo Colon,
Wade Miley,
Brett Ander­
son, Clay Bu­
chholz, Marco
Estrada, Doug
ZACH BRITTON
Three-year deal?
Fister, Yovani
Gallardo, Der­
ek Holland, Shelby Miller, Martin Per­
ez, Drew Pomeranz, and James
Shields.
The elite closer market also hasn’t
fully emerged with Craig Kimbrel still
out there. There were multiple reports
Saturday night that Zach Britton had
agreed to a three-year contract worth
$39 million to return to the Yankees,
which, if accurate, would fortify New
York’s bullpen after the loss of David
Robertson. We’ve seen good relievers
such as Robertson, Jeurys Familia, Joe
Kelly, and Andrew Miller sign deals in
the $10 million-$13 million-per-year
range for two or three years, but the 46-year deals for a reliever simply haven’t developed. And we’re not sure
they will for Kimbrel.
While there’s been a lot of speculation that Kimbrel may wind up coming back to the Red Sox, Dombrowski
indicated, “Nothing has changed with
us and Craig.” Dombrowski said in December that he wasn’t going to spend
a lot of money on a reliever.
We suspect there are some relievers
who may get more than a one-year
deal, such as Adam Ottavino, Adam
Warren, Brad Brach, and Bud Norris,
but at some point there will be a rash
of one-year deals. There are still some
good ones out there, which is why
Dombrowski isn’t in a hurry to dive in
and overpay for a reliever he could get
on a one-year deal. Some possibilities
include Greg Holland, Justin Wilson,
Cody Allen, Ryan Madson, Brad Box­
berger, and Shawn Kelley.
Overall, the market still has some
very good positional players and even
All-Star-caliber players. Obviously, the
big two are Bryce Harper and Manny
Machado. The next tier includes AllStar outfielder Nick Markakis. Also
available are former Astros utilityman
Marwin Gonzalez, second basemen DJ
LeMahieu, Jed Lowrie, Brian Dozier,
and Josh Harrison; shortstops Freddy
Galvis and Jose Iglesias; third baseman Mike Moustakas; outfielders A.J.
Pollock, Avisail Garcia, Adam Jones,
and Carlos Gonzalez; and catcher Yas­
mani Grandal.
“I think everyone is looking for a
bargain,” said one prominent agent.
“It’s no different than it’s been in the
past, in my opinion. We as agents always think we can get multiple years
for our players, but it doesn’t work
that way anymore. Sometimes you
have to settle and hope that a good
performance triggers a multiyear deal
the following season. That’s what it’s
come to.”
5-15
RECORD
NOTHING TO LOSE
Yankees did well
to sign Tulowitzki
It may not be a game-changer, but
the signing of Troy Tulowitzki could be
significant for the Yankees as they try
to fill the void at shortstop left by Didi
Gregorius, who had Tommy John surgery and is looking at a projected midseason return. This move could also be
in conjunction with the possibility
that the Yankees sign Manny Macha­
do, who met with them before Christmas and is definitely on their radar.
There’s mutual interest, and it would
be hard to believe the Yankees couldn’t
close the deal unless they’re still in
their frugal phase.
The Yankees were impressed with
Tulowitzki’s workout in Long Beach,
Calif., in December. After review of the
video by their front office and talent
evaluators in the organization, they
decided he was worth the risk.
And there is risk. Not of the financial kind, because the Blue Jays are
paying all of the $38 million remaining on his contract except for the minimum $550,000 the Yankees will pay.
But there’s risk if you’re committing to
Tulowitzki as the Gregorius replacement and then come to find that he
can’t hold up.
Obviously, it’s one thing to watch a
couple of hours of a workout and see
that he’s moving well after recovering
from double-heel surgery. But it’s another to see how he holds up playing
nine innings on a regular basis. They’ll
find out in spring training. There are
enough shortstops looking for jobs,
which means they still can find another guy to at least handle the position
defensively. If worse comes to worst,
they could move Gleyber Torres there,
even though shortstop isn’t his best
position.
Tulowitzki’s injuries have not only
taken a toll on his defense, but his offense has suffered as well. He was never the hitter in Toronto that he was in
Colorado, and it was more than the
Coors Field factor. But if the injuries
were responsible for curtailing his offense, and if he’s finally healthy, would
that offense come back?
What a boost for the Yankees’ lineup, which is already stacked, if that’s
the case.
Tulowitzki was a .299 career hitter
in Colorado. His 162-game average
over his career is .290/28/98 and an
.856 OPS. He made five All-Star teams
and won two Gold Gloves. He’s been
top 10 in WAR five times. He’s 34,
which is getting long in the tooth for a
shortstop, but Tulowitzki, who had
been adamant about playing short, is
now conceding that he’d be willing to
play second base or third base.
The elephant in the room is Machado. The Yankees have hosted Machado, which shows significant interest.
That would create a snowball effect in
which sophomore third baseman
Miguel Andujar and Tulowitzki would
become either the third baseman or
Machado would move there permanently, since he’s a Gold Glove third
baseman but not that caliber at shortstop. If the Yankees couldn’t get proper value for Andujar, they would likely
move him to first base, even though
Luke Voit was a sensation last season.
Apropos of
nothing
1. Red Sox pitching coach Dana Le­
Vangie, along with manager Alex Cora
and trainer Brad Pearson, are heading
to Fort Myers this coming week to
meet with “some of our big guys,” according to LeVangie. Which likely
means Chris Sale, David Price, Rick
Porcello, and Nathan Eovaldi. LeVangie has been busy with Cora and Pearson trying to formulate a commonsense schedule for each of the pitchers. “I’d say I’m about 80 percent sure
about how we’re going to implement
the schedule for our pitchers,” LeVangie said. “It’s fair to say we’ll do what
we did with the pitchers last spring
training again this spring training, but
there’ll be different twists depending
on who it is.” LeVangie wasn’t at liberty to be specific publicly, but suffice to
say we likely won’t see many of the big
names for a while. “We’re going to
take into consideration health, the
number of stressful innings that were
pitched in the postseason, and things
of that nature,” he said. “We won’t be a
prisoner to the spring training sched-
Updates on nine
ALEX
COBB
4.90
ERA
1.41
WHIP
ANDREW
CASHNER
4-15
RECORD
5.29
ERA
1.58
WHIP
DYLAN
BUNDY
8-16
RECORD
5.45
ERA
1.41
WHIP
Mound of trouble
New Orioles manager Brandon Hyde and general manager Mike Elias face a
monumental task in trying to turn around a team that won only 47 games
in 2018. Their first order of business will be overhauling the pitching staff,
which ranked among the worst-performing in the history of the game. The
2018 Orioles were one of only eight teams that finished with an ERA worse
than 5.00, a WHIP of 1.50 or higher, and allowed at least 800 runs and 225
home runs.
COMPILED BY RICHARD McSWEENEY
2000 ASTROS
2018 ORIOLES
72-90
47-115
5.19
ERA
1.50
WHIP
892
Runs
234 5.42
HRs
ERA
1.50
WHIP
907
Runs
236 6.03
HRs
ERA
2002 ROCKIES
ERA
1.50
WHIP
898
Runs
225 5.48
HRs
ERA
1.52
WHIP
869
Runs
HRs
1.70
WHIP
1,028
Runs
237
HRs
1.58
WHIP
930
Runs
239
HRs
1996 TIGERS
53-109
82-80
ERA
234
77-85
2000 ANGELS
5.02
Runs
2000 ROYALS
73-89
5.21
944
72-90
76-86
ERA
WHIP
1999 ROCKIES
2004 REDS
5.21
1.53
228 6.38
HRs
ERA
1.73
WHIP
1,103
Runs
241
HRs
AP PHOTOS
ule. We need to get everyone ready,
but we won’t necessarily have to have
guys ready by a certain date.”
2. Please, no pitch clock. Let’s leave
baseball as one sport with no time issues. Enforce batters being in the box.
That seems to have slipped through
the cracks the last couple of years.
3. The Minnesota Twins lost a great
scout in Mashpee’s Bill Mele, who decided to leave the organization.
4. It’s strange that more organizations don’t emulate the Red Sox, who
have the greatest balance of analytics
and scouting. Many have gone over
the deep end in analytics and shortchanged scouting. Some are trying to
reinvent scouting, combining the analytics and the eyeball of scouting.
Some have turned to video scouting.
5. While the Red Sox were quick to
extend Cora, we haven’t heard much
about Dave Dombrowski’s contract,
which will expire at the end of 2019.
6. Looks like longtime scout Brad
Sloan will take on much of the duties
that Allard Baird had with the Red
Sox. Baird, Dombrowski’s AL adviser
and in the past who had had a hand in
international scouting, took on a vice
president’s job with the Mets, in which
he will oversee scouting and player development. At the moment Dombrowski is not replacing Baird, but
promoting from within. Tony La Russa
is also returning as a vice president
and adviser to Dombrowski.
7. Jim Bowden reported the Nationals’ offer to Bryce Harper was
more than the 10-year, $300 million
reported, and that it was only a first
offer. Always thought Harper might
end up back with the Nationals,
though it wouldn’t surprise if the Phillies and Dodgers come in blazing for
him.
8. At least the White Sox have tried
to tangle with the big boys and have
made Manny Machado an offer, but by
all accounts it’s not in the 10-year
range, but more 7-8 years at about $30
million per year. Apparently not good
enough for Machado.
9. Always been fascinated with the
name Arquimedes(z). The Red Sox
had one named Arquimedez Pozo.
The Mets now have Arquimedes
Caminero.
1. Derek Jeter, chief executive officer, Marlins — According to industry
sources, Jeter is letting his baseball
ops people know that he needs a major league player back in return for
catcher J.T. Realmuto. The feeling is
the Marlins got burned in the Chris­
tian Yelich deal with the Brewers and
they’re going to make sure they get a
young, controllable, proven major
leaguer in a package for the sought-after catcher. The Astros and Braves
seem to be hanging in there on talks
that seem endless.
2. Danny Salazar, RHP, Indians —
He’s almost been forgotten because of
injuries, but Salazar was once part of
that great young core of pitchers
groomed by the Indians. Terry Franco­
na revealed that Salazar will not be
ready for spring training after undergoing season-ending shoulder surgery
in early July. “He’s going to still be in
that rehab mode,” Francona said.
“Then we’ll see as he gets going. We’ve
seen guys come quick. But everybody’s
on their own program. To force it with
somebody doesn’t make a lot of sense.”
3. Felix Hernandez, RHP, Mariners
— Word is King Felix is working hard
to return closer to the pitcher of old in
2019. It’ll be the final year of his contract, which at one time made him the
highest-paid pitcher in the game. Hernandez’s velocity has dipped considerably, but the hope is the wisdom he’s
acquired will make him better than a
back-end starter. Hernandez is scheduled to earn $27.9 million in 2019.
4. Matt Barnes, RHP, Red Sox —
Pitching coach Dana LeVangie thinks
Barnes “has closer stuff. He has swingand-miss ability, he doesn’t give up a
lot of big hits. I give him a lot of credit
in that he fought through an injury
and came back strong for us when it
counted most.” Barnes has seemingly
served his apprenticeship as a setup
man, but that doesn’t necessarily
mean he can be a closer. “I think with
any pitcher, you have to find out if
they can handle it. Until you do, you
don’t know,” LeVangie said.
5. Nicholas Castellanos, RF, Tigers
— People in the game think if the Tigers are serious about dealing him,
this would be the time. “He has definite defensive issues, but he can really
hit.,” said one American League executive. “Teams are certainly aware of
those deficiencies in the field, but as
time goes on, if they become more
glaring it will be tougher to deal him.”
6. Dan Duquette, former GM, Orioles — Now living on Cape Cod, he has
been talking to a couple of teams for a
front-office role. Duquette wasn’t at
liberty to divulge which teams were in
play. He remains hopeful he’ll find the
right role before the winter is over.
Duquette said he doesn’t want to take
any time off and would like to stay employed in the game. He has been GM
of three major league teams — the Expos (1991-94), Red Sox (1994-2002),
and Orioles (2011-2018).
7. Michael Fulmer, RHP, Tigers —
Fulmer’s trade value has likely diminished as he recovers from meniscus
surgery this offseason. The Tigers have
certainly made him available, but now
with the knee rehab teams are likely to
back off until they see a healthier version. Fulmer also had a right elbow
ailment in 2017 after being named AL
Rookie of the Year in 2016.
8. Luke Farrell, RHP, Rangers —
The son of ex-Red Sox manager John
Farrell has become baseball’s traveling
man. The Rangers mark his sixth organization since he was drafted in the
sixth round in 2013 by the Royals out
of Northwestern. He’s also been with
the Angels, Dodgers, Reds, and Cubs.
9. Madison Bumgarner, LHP, Giants — The buzz on Bumgarner getting dealt this offseason has quieted
considerably in recent weeks. It
doesn’t mean Bumgarner won’t get
traded, but does new president of
baseball operations Farhan Zaidi trade
one of the most popular players in San
Francisco as his first big move?
Extra innings
From the Bill Chuck files — “Batting with the bases empty was a stat
that meant something in 2018: The
Sox led the majors, hitting .258 with
the sacks empty in 2018. Of the top
nine teams hitting with the bases
empty last year, the Reds ranked seventh, hitting .248, and were the only
team not to win 90-plus games.” . . .
Happy birthday, Casey Fossum (41).
Nick Cafardo can be reached at
cafardo@globe.com. Follow him on
Twitter @nickcafardo. Material from
interviews, wire services, other beat
writers, and league and team sources
was used in this report.
B o s t o n
JA N UA RY 6 , 2 0 1 9
S u n d a y
G l o b e
Sports
Woodland out in front
Nathan
Eovaldi,
acquired by the
Red Sox from
the Rays in
July, felt like he
improved a lot
in just a few
months in
Boston.
He leads by three
after third round
faced one of the fastest chips on
the course, down the slope toward the Pacific horizon, and
left it 12 short. He made his par
to at least stay in range.
McIlroy spoke earlier in the
week about playing in the last
group six times last year. One of
those was the Masters, the
missing leg of the career Grand
Slam, when he started two
shots behind Patrick Reed and
never challenged. Another was
the Tour Championship, where
he was three behind Tiger
Woods and didn’ t give him
much of a fight.
‘‘I probably pushed a little
too hard, and it didn’t really
work out for me,’’ McIlroy said.
‘‘I just have to go about my business. I didn’t make a bogey today, so I'll make that a goal tomorrow.’’
It still will depend on Woodland, a three-time winner on
the PGA Tour who wants more
victories to show for his improved all-around game. His
only mistake Saturday was
coming up just short of the
green on No. 12 and missing a
5-foot par putt.
Woodland was par t of a
crowded leaderboard Friday
when he pulled away with five
straight birdies. This time, all
he needed was one big putt. He
laughed w hen it dro ppe d,
though he says it had nothing
to do with surprise.
‘‘I just saw somebody’s face
in the background. They
weren’t too happy that the ball
went in, so it made me laugh,’’
he said.
By Doug Ferguson
ASSOCIATED PRESS
JAE C. HONG/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Sox getting more
out of their arms
uRED SOX
Continued from Page C1
Obviously, elite acquisitions have a lot to do
with that improvement. The team spent heavily
in dollars (David Price), prospects (Chris Sale),
or both (Craig Kimbrel) to turn a struggling
pitching staff into a championship-caliber one.
Yet the drastic improvement in results goes
beyond those headline pitchers. Over the last
three years, the Red Sox have helped pitchers
improve at the big league level. They’ve developed their pitching infrastructure — both how
they scout and work with pitchers — to get
more out of their inventory of arms, part of the
reason why they were able to add the finishing
pieces to a championship team last year, and
part of the reason why they feel they are wellpositioned moving forward, regardless of the final shape of their staff.
“We feel like we’re in a good place. I feel like
we’ve come a long way in the last couple years,”
said assistant GM Brian O’Halloran. “It’s systemic.
“Pitching is a constant adjustment. I think
our guys, our coaches, are positioned well. They
have the expertise to figure out how to get the
most out of guys.”
Evidence? Over the last three years, the Sox
have:
R taken stars and helped them get better, as
has been the case with Sale, who has a 2.56 ERA
and 13.2 strikeouts per nine innings with the
Red Sox, improvements from his 3.00 ERA and
10.9 strikeouts per nine with the White Sox;
R molded Ryan Brasier from an obscure,
fastball-dominant international journeyman into a late-innings option who unbalanced hitters
with a well-distributed three-pitch mix;
R found the right mix to turn Matt Barnes —
a promising prospect who had yet to realize his
potential — into a late-innings weapon.
R helped an established late-innings presence, Brad Ziegler, after a trade in 2016 to record a 1.52 ERA and easily the highest strikeout
rate (9.4 per nine innings) of his career.
R and helped Addison Reed, after a midseason trade in 2017, hold hitters to a career-low
.168 average.
While some players have faltered (Carson
Smith, Tyler Thornburg, the 2018 version of
Drew Pomeranz, prospect Henry Owens), for
the most part, there’s been a pattern of improvement among healthy Red Sox big league
pitchers. The most notable example of how the
team’s pitching infrastructure has helped unlock ever greater impact from its arms may have
been the most recent one.
A lot to work with
Last July, the Red Sox landed Nathan Eovaldi in a deal with the Rays, an organization renowned for maximizing the talents of its pitchers. Yet in just three months, he showed improvement during the regular season (a 3.33
ERA) and dominance in October (1.61 ERA in
22‚ innings) that made him one of the most
sought-after pitchers in the market before he returned to Boston on a four-year, $68 million
contract.
“I felt like I improved a lot,” Eovaldi said.
“Coming off Tommy John surgery, it’s like you
have a chance to redevelop how you pitch. I had
some highs and lows with the Rays. When I was
traded to the Red Sox, we were able to get on
that right page and those last two months I was
throwing the ball really well.”
Eovaldi offered a window into how the Red
Sox’ culture of pitcher development has
changed — how the analytics team collaborates
with the coaching staff (particularly pitching
coach Dana LeVangie and VP of pitching development and assistant pitching coach Brian
Bannister) and then ultimately with the pitcher.
In mid-July, the Red Sox met to discuss trade
priorities. LeVangie, who had been a pro scout
before several years as a major league advance
scout, is a valued voice in those conversations
about pitchers, as is Bannister. Both share the
interest of the analytics department in seeing
not just what a pitcher has been, but what he
might become.
Pitchers represent still-moldable balls of clay
rather than fully formed objects. When it became clear that Jacob deGrom wasn’t on the table as an option, LeVangie and other members
of the organization identified Eovaldi as a
prime target, not just for what he’d been doing
in his return from Tommy John but also for
what they believed he might be able to do with
some small tweaks to his delivery and plan of
attack.
“Nate fit the profile for how we could maximize our season and give us a chance to win a
World Series,” said LeVangie. “He was a guy I
felt like there was more in the tank for what
he’d been leading up to that.
“When Nate came to us, Nate’s fastball was
probably not a good swing-and-miss option. It
wasn’t his best pitch. We tried to put all that information together. What does that mean? Does
it mean Nathan can’t throw a fastball?”
C7
Of course not. Eovaldi could easily summon
98-100-mile-per-hour velocity and throw it consistently for strikes. But even with elite velocity,
a number of the righthander’s pitches ended up
in the middle of the strike zone, where they
were vulnerable to homers.
After a bit more than a month with the Sox,
Eovaldi — long praised for his coachability —
was eager to listen to the suggestions of the
coaching staff. LeVangie suggested moving
from the middle of the rubber to the first-base
side, where his cutter more easily swept to the
edge of the plate and off of it as opposed to staying over the middle.
Bannister suggested incorporating a bit
more rock-and-fire, back-to-front movement in
his delivery to become less rotational and to improve his extension on pitches, which permitted
him to elevate his fastball. The Sox encouraged
Eovaldi to make greater use of his curveball,
dropping it at the bottom of the strike zone and
below it to create vertical separation in his
pitches.
In September and October, Eovaldi did all of
that. The righthander deserves enormous credit
for his ability to make a number of changes in
short order — with spectacular results.
KAPALUA, Hawaii — Gary
Woodland made a 65-foot eagle
putt and finished with a birdie
for a 5-under-par 68 to keep his
three-shot lead in the Sentry
Tournament of Champions on
Saturday.
Rory McIlroy briefly caught
him for the lead until the birdies stopped falling. He shot 68
and starts the new year playing
in the final group.
They were tied late in the
third round when McIlroy
missed a good birdie chance on
two par-5s at No. 15 and
No. 18. In the group behind
him, Woodland reached the
front of the 15 th green and
watched his putt up the slope
and into the grain drop for eagle, with the pin still in the
hole.
He holed a 12-foot birdie
putt on the toughest pin position at the 18th — front and
right — to end the day where he
started.
Woodland was at 17-under
202, and would love nothing
better than to secure another
trip to Kapalua in the first tournament of the year.
Marc Leishman, who made
a double bogey in the opening
round and a triple bogey Friday,
limited the damage to only one
bogey. He had a 68 and was well
in range, four shots behind.
Xander Schauffele (68) and
Alex Speier can be reached at
alex.speier@globe.com. Follow him on Twitter
at @alexspeier.
Bryson DeChambeau (70) were
five back.
Woodland learned that his
grandmother in Kansas had
died Friday night. This is a family vacation for most of the
Woodland crew — for Christmas, he flew out 11 relatives.
‘‘She’s been downhill for a
little while now,’’ Woodland
said. ‘‘It’s been tough. And you
try to prepare for that, but you
never really can. Definitely will
have a little extra emotion with
me, but we'll get through it.’’
It was a tough day of work
on the course, as the trade wind
returned stronger than expected. McIlroy managed to get
through it without a bogey. He
had a close call on the 16th,
when he tried to atone for the
missed birdie on the previous
hole by going at the flag and
landing just over the green. He
SportsLog
Instant feedback
“Before we make any transaction, everybody
collaborates on creating more upside for this
player,” said Bannister. “You get it from the analysts upstairs, I’ll make my list of potential
tweaks, Dana and [bullpen coach] Craig Bjornson will put out what they would do, and that is
all out there and everybody is aware of it before
we even make a transaction.
“And then even when you get the player, you
start rearranging the pieces a little bit and trying to fulfill some of those player development
goals, but you’ve also got to figure out what the
player is capable of, what’s comfortable for him,
what ultimately works and what doesn’t.
“But we rarely make a transaction where
we’re just hoping to get the player as is and just
let him do his thing. There’s always a player development layer on top of it with everybody involved.”
Eovaldi provided the latest evidence of how
adjustments can be worth wins to the team and
millions of dollars to the pitcher. He’s also evidence of how the pitching culture around the
team has changed. Players are curious about
data-driven ideas, and so data and information
are now readily available when they ask questions.
In the big leagues, Bannister is in uniform
and in the clubhouse as well as on the field to
talk with pitchers before games. In the minors,
pitching analyst Dave Bush does the same while
visiting different Sox affiliates.
To create immediacy in those conversations,
with Bush and Bannister able to answer player
questions in seconds rather than minutes or
hours, the team (led by analyst Spencer Bingol)
developed the Pitching Evaluation Development Research Optimization (PEDRO) system
— yes, it’s an homage to Pedro Martinez — to
make its pitching database available via mobile
phone. That database, in turn, allows casual,
steady conversations about pitcher mechanics,
location, sequencing, and plans of attack that
are informed by numbers and easily visualized
data.
“I’m big on culture,” said Bannister. “The
more people that speak the language of everyone in the organization, the better off the organization is. That’s been a big part of the last four
years.”
It is a significant part of the team’s planning
for next year. At a time when the bullpen is still
being formed, part of the Red Sox’ comfort in
waiting for the right market conditions on relievers comes from the success they’ve had
working with numerous pitchers in recent
years.
The Red Sox believe they have some flexibility to consider looking beyond pedigree in order
to find late-innings impact from pitchers who
may not have the track record of Kimbrel or David Robertson but who, with a few subtle
tweaks, may be able to help offset the loss of
Kimbrel and Kelly.
That’s not to say the Sox won’t add a highprofile reliever if the terms are right. But the
past three years have convinced them that they
have more options than might have been the
case a few years ago.
“You can’t create physical talent out of thin
air,” said Bannister. “The pitcher or the player
has to have the physical talent to start with.
You’re always limited by that. If you can’t acquire that, you’re not going to create it.
“As I’ve been here for four years, the discussions have become more creative and more diverse as far as coming up with solutions for roster needs. That’s exciting.”
SAM GREENWOOD/GETTY IMAGES
Gary Woodland had a fivebirdie run on Friday.
BC can’t hold back Virginia Tech in ACC
Jordan Chatman led Boston College with 18
points but the Eagles (9-4, 0-1) lost to 10 thranked Virginia Tech, 77-66, in their ACC opener
Saturday in Blacksburg, Va. The Hokies, who got
a game-high 25 points from Nickeil Alexander­
Walker, rallied in the second half after trailing,
32-30, at halftime. Alexander-Walker made 9 of
14 shots from the floor for Virginia Tech (13-1,
2-0), which won its eighth straight game and beat
the Eagles for the fifth straight time.
NU loses heartbreaker
Justin Wright­Foreman (42 points) hit a 3pointer inside half court as the buzzer sounded
and Hofstra (13-3, 3-0) stunned Northeastern,
75-72, in a Colonial Athletic Association matchup
in Hempstead, N.Y. It was Hofstra’s 10th straight
victory, its longest winning streak since 2001.
Brace Bolden led the Huskies (7-8, 1-2) with 17
points and six assists . . . Max Mahoney scored 26
points and grabbed 14 rebounds, Javante McCoy
added 18 points and was perfect from the foul
line as host Boston University (8-7, 1-1 Patriot)
got an 87-80 win over Bucknell (7-7, 1-1), making
10 of 10 free throws in the final 1:32 . . . Saul Phiri
scored 20 points, Pookie Powell added 17 points,
and LaSalle (3-10, 1-0) defeated UMass, 69-60, in
the Atlantic 10 Conference opener in Amherst.
Luwane Pipkins led UMass (7-7, 0-1) with 15
points and seven rebounds . . . Akwasi Yeboah
scored 19 points and Stony Brook (13-3) scored
the last 8 points of the game to turn back host
UMass Lowell (8-8), 75-63, in an American East
Conference opener.
HOCKEY
Finland tops US for junior title
Kaapo Kakko beat Northeastern goalie
Cayden Primeau on a backhander off a rebound
with 1:26 left to give Finland its fifth world junior
hockey title, 3-2, over the United States in Vancouver, British Columbia. Kakko broke a tie after
the US team rallied on goals by Alexander
Chmelevski and Josh Norris in a 1:46 span midway through the third. Ukko­Pekka Luukkonen
made 26 saves for Finland. Primeau stopped 28
shots. Earlier, Russia beat Switzerland, 5-2, to
finish third . . . Craig Pantano had 42 saves for
the visiting Merrimack College men’s team (515-1, 3-9-0 Hockey East) and Chase Gresock
scored the lone goal early in the third period to
end an eight-game winning streak by No. 11
Northeastern (12-4-1, 6-2-1), 1-0 . . . Marc Del
Gaizo had a goal and three assists to lead secondranked UMass (15-3-0) to a 6-1 rout of American
International (8-9-1) in Springfield . . . The thirdranked Northeastern women (13-2-3) scored
three goals in a span of 35 seconds late in the second period to earn a 3-3 tie against No. 5 Clarkson (14-4-1) at the inaugural Friendship Series in
Belfast, Northern Ireland, the first NCAA women’s game to be played outside of North America
. . . Forward Taylor Wenczkowski netted two
goals in the final 15 minutes as host New Hampshire (7-9-4) came from behind to take down
10th-ranked Boston College (13-8-0), 3-2 . . . Junior Carly Jackson made 26 saves and sophomore Michelle Weis scored the game’s lone goal
as host Maine (12-7-1) took a 1-0 win over Boston
University (8-6-5).
BASEBALL
Britton, Yankees reach deal
Zach Britton is staying with the New York
Yankees, agreeing to a $39 million, three-year
contract, a deal that could be worth $53 million
DON PETERSEN/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Jordan Chatman tries to drive around
Virginia Tech’s Kerry Blackshear Jr. during
the first half of their game Saturday.
over four seasons, a person familiar with the negotiations told the Associated Press. The person
spoke on condition of anonymity because the
agreement was subject to a successful physical . . .
The Yankees view Troy Tulowitzki as their starting shortstop until Didi Gregorius returns from
Tommy John surgery this summer. Still, general
manager Brian Cashman would not rule out trying to sign Manny Machado, one of the top free
agents on the market. Cashman also revealed he
has dragged talks to trade Sonny Gray until the
Yankees know CC Sabathia will be ready to pitch
following surgery to implant a stent in an artery
from his heart . . . The New York Mets acquired
outfielder Keon Broxton from the Milwaukee
Brewers, giving them a center field option in addition to Juan Lagares. The Mets sent reliever
Bobby Wahl to the Brewers along with a pair of
minor leaguers, righthanded reliever Adam Hill,
and infielder Felix Valerio . . . The Giants acquired switch-hitting infielder and outfielder
Breyvic Valera from the Orioles for cash, adding
another former Dodgers player that San Francisco president of baseball operations Farhan Zaidi
had in Los Angeles. Valera batted .234 with eight
RBIs while playing in 32 games for the Dodgers
and Orioles last season while also playing for
both clubs’ Triple A affiliates. Valera was traded
to Baltimore in the Machado deal last July 18.
MISCELLANY
Shiffrin ties personal best
Mikaela Shiffrin dominated the first women’s
World Cup slalom of 2019 to match her personalbest winning streak in the discipline with seven
straight victories. The two-time overall champion
built on her big first-run lead to beat Petra Vlho­
va by 1.25 seconds on the icy Crveni Spust course
in Zagreb, Croatia . . . University of California defensive back Bryce Turner died at 19 after being
hospitalized for a medical emergency during a
non-team workout. No cause of death was immediately given. Turner redshirted his first year and
played one game with one tackle this season . . .
Philadelphia 76ers coach Brett Brown denied a
report that Jimmy Butler was disrespectful while
questioning his role in the 76ers offense.
C8
Sports
B o s t o n
S u n d a y
G l o b e
JA N UA RY 6 , 2 0 1 9
Football
And the awards should go to . . .
Ben Volin
N
ow that the NFL regular
season is complete, it’s
time to reveal my choices
for the 2018 awards,
which will officially be
announced the night before the Super
Bowl.
To be clear, I don’t have an official
vote, and this ballot is simply for fun
and debate:
R MVP: Colts QB Andrew Luck.
Runners-up: Chiefs QB Patrick Ma­
homes, Saints QB Drew Brees, Chargers QB Philip Rivers, Seahawks QB
Russell Wilson.
I take the definition of MVP literally — most valuable player, not necessarily the player with the best statistics. And in 2018, the NFL’s most valuable player was Luck, not Mahomes or
Brees or any of the other quarterbacks
whose numbers are better than Luck’s.
The Colts were 4-12 without Luck
last season, and 10-6 with him this
season. Luck and the Colts won nine
of their final 10 games and became
just the third NFL team to make the
playoffs after a 1-5 start. Luck won almost every game he had to over the final two months, including a 24-21
thriller at Houston, a 23-0 win over
Dallas, a huge 28-27 comeback win
over Giants, and a 33-17 win at the Titans in Week 17 that clinched the
Colts’ first playoff berth since 2014.
And Luck did this with a new coach
(Frank Reich), in a new offensive system, and was surrounded by T.Y. Hilton
and a bunch of nobodies (the Colts
only had two Pro Bowlers, tight end
Eric Ebron and guard Quenton Nel­
son). Nobody did more with less than
Luck.
Luck didn’t have the best stats, finishing 11th in passer rating (98.7), but
he was still great. Coming back from a
mysterious shoulder injury, Luck
played in all 16 games, threw for 4,593
yards, and finished second in the NFL
with 39 touchdown passes. The Colts
were the best third-down team in the
NFL, and Luck had three fourth-quarter comebacks and three game-winning drives.
The other candidates are all worthy. Mahomes, the likely winner, had a
phenomenal season. But he joined an
already loaded Chiefs team that had
won two straight AFC West titles before Mahomes took over. Brees was arguably the MVP from September to
November, but the Saints’ offense hit a
wall in December, and they won with
their defense. Rivers had a career year,
but his roster is loaded and he had a
lot more help than Luck did. Wilson is
an awfully tempting choice, but the
Seahawks’ success was largely predicated on them running the ball a ton
and throwing the fewest pass attempts
in the league.
R Offensive Player of the Year: Mahomes.
Runners-up: Rams RB Todd Gur­
ley, Saints RB Alvin Kamara, Cowboys
RB Ezekiel Elliott, Steelers WR Anto­
nio Brown, Texans WR DeAndre Hop­
kins, Chiefs WR Tyreek Hill.
Even in a season with a multitude
of standout performers, Mahomes is
the easy choice. He became just the
third player in NFL history to throw
for 50 touchdowns (Tom Brady, Pey­
ton Manning), and joined Manning as
the only players to do so while also
throwing for 5,000 yards. Mahomes
led all quarterbacks with 8.79 yards
per attempt, was second in passer rating (113.8), and unofficially led the
NFL in highlight-reel throws. Mahomes burst onto the scene like no
other quarterback has since Aaron
Rodgers back in 2008, and is going to
be good for a long, long time.
R Defensive Player of the Year:
Rams DT Aaron Donald.
Runners-up: Chiefs DT Chris
Jones, Texans DE J.J. Watt, Bears OLB
Khalil Mack, Chiefs OLB Dee Ford,
Panthers LB Luke Kuechly, Colts LB
Darius Leonard, Bears S Eddie Jack­
son, Bears CB Kyle Fuller.
Donald should join Lawrence Tay­
lor and Watt as the only back-to-back
winners of this award. Donald led the
NFL with 20½ sacks, an incredible
number for a defensive tackle and 4½
more than anyone else in the league.
He also led the NFL with 25 tackles for
loss, and tied for sixth with four forced
fumbles. Jones, Watt, and Mack were
excellent this season, but Donald was
unquestionably the most disruptive
player in the league.
R Coach of the Year: Texans’ Bill
O’Brien.
Runners-up: Colts’ Reich, Bears’
Matt Nagy, Rams’ Sean McVay, Saints’
Sean Payton, Seahawks’ Pete Carroll,
Chiefs’ Andy Reid.
This is by far the toughest award to
choose, and there is no wrong answer.
Reich and Nagy did incredible jobs in
their first seasons. McVay, Payton, and
Reid guided the best teams. Carroll remade the Seahawks on the fly and got
them back to the playoffs.
But Billy O gets my vote. The Texans became just the sixth team in history to make the playoffs after an 0-3
start. Houston came out of nowhere to
win 11 of its final 13 games and capture the AFC South title. And this was
a team coming off a dreadful 4-12 season, led by a quarterback coming off a
torn ACL who had only played seven
career games, and a pass rusher who
lost his 2017 season to back surgery.
This season represented a remarkable
turnaround by the Texans, and
O’Brien deserves a lot of credit.
R Executive of the Year: Bears GM
Ryan Pace.
Runners-up: Colts GM Chris Bal­
lard, Seahawks GM John Schneider,
Chiefs GM Brett Veach.
Pace hit all the right buttons, pulling off a mega deal for Mack, hitting a
home run with new coach Nagy, and
surrounding quarterback Mitchell
Trubisky with solid free agent additions (Trey Burton, Allen Robinson,
Taylor Gabriel). Trubisky also played a
lot better, and the result was a 12-4 record.
R Comeback Player of the Year:
Luck.
Runners-up: Watson, Watt, Giants
WR Odell Beckham, Redskins RB
Adrian Peterson.
I try to avoid doubling up on
awards, but this one would be a sham
if not given to Luck. No one knew if he
could even throw a football again, but
he came out firing in 2018, and put together an MVP-caliber season. Despite
the uncertainty with his throwing
shoulder, Luck finished second in the
NFL with 639 pass attempts, or 39.9
per game.
R Offensive Rookie of the Year:
Browns QB Baker Mayfield.
Runners-up: Giants RB Saquon
Barkley, Jets QB Sam Darnold, Ravens
QB Lamar Jackson, Broncos RB Phillip
Lindsay, Falcons WR Calvin Ridley,
Browns RB Nick Chubb.
Barkley joined Eric Dickerson and
Edgerrin James as the only rookies
with 2,000 total yards, and he would
win Fantasy Rookie of the Year. But in
real life, Mayfield is the man. He
threw 27 touchdown passes, a rookie
record, went 6-7 as a starter, and injected a ton of life and swagger into
the NFL’s most depressed franchise.
R Defensive Rookie of the Year:
Colts LB Leonard.
Runners up: Broncos DE Bradley
Chubb, Cowboys LB Leighton Vander
Esch, Browns CB Denzel Ward, Chargers S Derwin James, Patriots CB J.C.
Jackson.
Leonard, a second-round pick out
of South Carolina State, was an absolute machine for the Colts’ defense. He
led the league with 163 tackles, added
seven sacks, four forced fumbles, and
eight passes defensed, and helped the
Colts finish fifth in points allowed, after finishing 30th in 2017.
DESHAUN WATSON
TEXANS | 2018* | 11-5 RECORD
4,165
passing yards
Antonio Brown’s temper tantrum
with the Steelers and request to be
traded out of Pittsburgh was the story
of the week, and had fans from New
England to San Francisco dreaming of
acquiring the All-Pro receiver.
But Brown still has three years left
on his contract, and his contract will
likely thwart his desire to get traded.
The Steelers are set to pay Brown
$15.125 million next season (with
$2.5 million due March 17), with a
$22.165 million salary-cap charge. If
the Steelers trade Brown before
March 17, they save that salary, but
they have to carry a $21.12 million
dead-salary cap charge. While the
Steelers would gain $1 million in cap
space, that’s a lot of money to carry for
a player no longer on the team.
The other option would be to trade
Brown after June 1. This would require the Steelers to first pay Brown
$2.5 million in March, then take deadcap charges of $9.5 million in 2019
and about $14 million in 2020.
That’s not completely out of the
realm of possibility, if the Steelers simply want to get rid of Brown and avoid
another Le’Veon Bell type of situation
next season. But the far likelier
scenario is for the Steelers to just sit
back and wait for Brown to report,
and if he doesn’t, they can dock his
pay, suspend him for conduct detrimental, and make his life way more
comp.%
103.1 388
rating
345-505
yards
lost
62
sacks
Merely a hindrance
Quarterback Deshaun Watson, who tore his right ACL last season, has been a
consistent and dangerous playmaker for the Texans, despite a shoddy offensive
line. According to pro-football-reference.com, Watson is one of four players to
throw for at least 3,500 yards and get sacked 60-plus times in a season.
COMPILED BY MICHAEL GROSSI
ETC.
TE Kittle shines
after catch
San Francisco tight end George Kit­
tle accomplished one of the more remarkable feats of the season, leading
players in yards after catch with 881.
This is a stat that is dominated by running backs, representing 10 of the top
14 YAC gainers in the league this year.
Accurate YAC stats only go back to
1992, but Kittle’s 881 yards are second
all time to Marshall Faulk (930 in
1999). Kittle is also the only tight end
to lead the league in yards after catch.
Pro Bowl: Picks don’t always add up
JON KITNA
LIONS | 2006 | 3-13 RECORD
4,208
passing yards
62.4
21-22
TD-INT
comp.%
79.9
rating
372-596
388
yards
lost
63
sacks
Only 28 players are named firstteam All-Pro, while 86 are elected to
the Pro Bowl on the original ballot.
But six players named All-Pro weren’t
chosen for the Pro Bowl: Packers LT
David Bakhtiari, Eagles C Jason Kelce,
Chargers DB Desmond King, Colts LB
Darius Leonard, Chiefs RT Mitchell
Schwartz, and Ravens K Justin Tuck­
er. Clearly, Pro Bowl voters don’t know
how to identify the top offensive linemen.
Glass half­full or empty?
KEN O’BRIEN
JETS | 1985* | 11-5 RECORD
3,888
passing yards
60.9
25-8
TD-INT
comp.%
96.2
rating
297-488
399
yards
lost
62
sacks
Some good news and some bad
news about the popularity of the NFL.
The TV ratings rebounded nicely in
2018, with a 5 percent increase overall
from 2017. Every broadcast window
saw a ratings increase, and 46 of the
top 50 most-watched shows this fall
were NFL games.
But the league’s excellent TV experience continues to detract from its instadium experience. Per the Sports
Business Daily, the NFL’s average attendance of 67,100 was its lowest
since 2011. Business was booming in
Los Angeles, where the Chargers were
up 29 percent from last season and the
Rams were up 14 percent, but the
Redskins were down 19 percent in attendance, while the Buccaneers were
down 9 percent.
Extra points
STAKES ARE HIGH
Dealing Brown
won’t be easy
68.3
26-9
TD-INT
cos, Packers, and Browns. Several other coaches did the same.
What has become clear is that there
really are no sure-thing candidates
this year, and that the eight teams
didn’t really have a full plan when they
fired their previous coaches. They just
knew they wanted to fire their coach,
and they would hopefully find the answer in their interviews.
That process worked well for the
Rams, who hit a home run with Sean
McVay two years ago. And it worked
out horribly for the Cardinals, who
ended up with Steve Wilks last year
and now find themselves looking for a
head coach again this year.
STEVE BEUERLEIN
PANTHERS | 2000 | 7-9 RECORD
3,730
passing yards
60.8
19-18
TD-INT
comp.%
324-533
79.7
rating
331
yards
lost
62
sacks
* MADE PLAYOFFS
difficult.
The Steelers still have most of the
power in this situation, and Brown
knows it, which is why he’s causing
such a fuss now. But the chances of
him getting traded don’t seem likely.
MONEY PLAYERS
Making playoffs
helps bottom line
A couple of facts and figures about
this year’s playoffs:
R Every player makes the same salary in the playoffs, from Tom Brady
down to the 53rd man on the roster.
In the wild-card round, players on the
No. 3- and No. 4-seeded teams earn
$29,000 per game, and players on
wild-card teams earn $27,000.
In the divisional round, all players
make $29,000. It’s $54,000 for players
in the conference championship
games, then $118,000 for players on
the winning Super Bowl team, and
$59,000 on the losing team.
So if a wild-card team wins the Su-
per Bowl, those players will earn
$228,000 for their four games. If the
Patriots win the Super Bowl, their
players will make $201,000 for three
games.
R The NFC is the home team in Super Bowl LIII, and will have its choice
of jerseys. The NFC team will practice
at the Falcons’ training facility and use
their home locker room, which will be
a fun story line if the rival Saints make
the Super Bowl. The AFC team will
practice at Georgia Tech.
THE SEARCH IS ON
Busy week for
prospective hires
The first week of the coach hiring
season has been an interesting one.
The eight teams looking for head
coaches have been casting a wide net,
cycling many of the same candidates
through multiple interviews. The Patriots’ Brian Flores did the NFL version
of speed dating over the weekend, interviewing with the Dolphins, Bron-
Caesars Entertainment became the
first official casino partner of the NFL,
and its casino on the Las Vegas Strip
will host a majority of the events for
the 2020 NFL Draft. It wasn’t long ago
that the NFL barred Tony Romo from
holding a fantasy football convention
in Vegas, and NFL referees still aren’t
allowed to even walk through a casino
. . . The 2018 season wasn’t just a banner one for quarterbacks. This season
set a record for rushing average, with
ballcarriers averaging 4.42 yards per
carry. That’s a not-insignificant increase over the next-best season, 4.29
yards in 2011. This season marked the
fewest rushing attempts per game in
NFL history, but teams chose their
spots better . . . Tom Brady led the NFL
in jersey sales, per the league, which is
pretty incredible. After 19 years, who
doesn’t have a Brady jersey at this
point? A lot of people, apparently . . .
The Broncos had back-to-back losing
seasons for the first time since 197172, and back-to-back double-digit-loss
seasons for the first time since 196667 . . . A wild-card team hasn’t reached
the Super Bowl since the Ravens at the
end of the 2012 season . . . The Dolphins sound like they are going to
dump Ryan Tannehill and his $18.75
million salary next season. They almost certainly will draft another quarterback, but will also look for a bridge
quarterback such as Joe Flacco, Teddy
Bridgewater, or Nick Foles — none of
whom are appreciably better than
Tannehill but will certainly be cheaper.
Quote of the week
“It’s embarrassing as hell.”
— Cardinals GM Steve Keim on
getting the No. 1 draft pick.
Ben Volin can be reached at
ben.volin@globe.com. Follow him on
Twitter @BenVolin. Material from
interviews, wire services, other beat
writers, and league and team sources
was used in this report.
B o s t o n
JA N UA RY 6 , 2 0 1 9
S u n d a y
G l o b e
Sports
C9
NFL playoffs
WILD-CARD WEEKEND
AFC
6. INDIANAPOLIS 21
3. HOUSTON
7
Saturday
NFC
5. LA CHARGERS (12-4) at
4. BALTIMORE (10-6)
Sunday, 1:05 p.m., CBS
Indianapolis at Kansas City, Saturday, Jan. 12, 4:35 p.m., NBC
LA/Baltimore winner at New England, Sunday, Jan. 13, 1:05 p.m., CBS
4. DALLAS 24
5. SEATTLE 22
Saturday
6. PHILADELPHIA (9-7) at
3. CHICAGO (12-4)
Sunday, 4:40 p.m., NBC
Highest NFC seed at Los Angeles Rams, Saturday, Jan. 12, 8:15 p.m., Fox
Lowest NFC seed at New Orleans, Sunday, Jan. 13, 4:40 p.m., Fox
Luck helps Colts breeze past Texans
Indy advances;
top seed KC next
By Kristie Rieken
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Colts 21 HOUSTON — A
year ago at this
Texans 7 t i m e A n d r e w
Luck was at home struggling
with an injured shoulder that
cost him the entire season.
On Saturday, he wrote a happy ending to the latest chapter
of his comeback season, throwing for 222 yards and two
touchdowns as the Indianapolis
Colts raced out to a big lead and
cruised to a 21-7 win over the
Houston Texans in an AFC
wild-card game.
Luck put on a show in his
hometown in a stadium where
he’d attended games throughout childhood and played in
them since high school, throwing for 191 yards and two TDs
before halftime to help the
Colts build a 21-0 lead.
He denied feeling ‘‘at home’’
at NRG Stadium, but admitted
to having warm feelings for the
city he grew up in and where
his grandparents and many
friends still reside.
‘‘But it’s still an away stadium,’’ he said. ‘‘It was very loud,
very energetic, but fun to win,
certainly.’’
Running back Marlon Mack
had 148 yards and a touchdown for Indianapolis, which
advanced to face the top-seeded
Kansas City Chiefs in the divisional round next weekend.
‘‘We know we have an elite
quarterback and we can throw
it for 400 and win when we
have to,’’ Indianapolis coach
Frank Reich said. ‘‘But the margin for error in playoff football
when you try to do it that way is
very thin. When you can win
like this — running the football
and stopping it — that’s just
everything.’’
Houstongave up too many
big plays and couldn’t get anything going in the first half to
fall into the big hole.
Deshaun Watson, who was
sacked an NFL-leading 62
times in the regular season, was
sacked three times and hit eight
more times in a disappointing
playoff debut. He finished with
235 yards passing with a TD
and an interception.
‘‘Just a lack of execution on
our part,’’ Watson said. ‘‘We
didn’ t make plays. I didn’ t
make plays. Communication
was a little off. You just got to
give the Colts the credit.’’
The Colts, who opened the
season 1-5, continued an impressive run by winning their
fifth straight and for the 10th
time in 11 games.
The Texans didn’t score until
rookie Keke Coutee grabbed a
6-yard touchdown pass to cap a
16-play, 89-yard drive that included a fourth-down conversion that cut it to 21-7 with
about 11 minutes left. They led
the NFL with nine comeback
wins this season, but their attempt at a rally ended on their
next possession when Watson’s
pass on fourth and 10 from the
Indianapolis 24 fell short with
four minutes left.
Luck threw for 863 yards
with six touchdowns as the
teams split two meetings in the
regular season. He picked up
right where he left off in this
one, when he found Eric Ebron
on a 6-yard TD pass on their
first drive. That play was set up
by a 38-yard catch by T.Y. Hilton, who had 63 yards receiving
on that drive.
Hilton didn’t have any catches on the next drive, but the
Colts still drove down the field
easily and made it 14-0 on a 2yard run by Mack.
Ho u s t o n w e n t f o r i t o n
fourth and 4 from the Indianapolis 45 on its second possession and Watson was intercepted by Kenny Moore II. It was
Watson’s first interception since
he threw two against the Redskins Nov. 18.
Indianapolis pushed the
lead to 21-0 when Luck connected with Dontrelle Inman
on an 18-yard touchdown pass
in the second quarter.
‘‘It’s very frustrating when
they’re able to execute and get
their job done,’’ J.J. Watt said.
‘‘But you have to overcome it
and you have to find a way to
win.’’
Colts 21, Texans 7
At NRG Stadium, Houston
TEAM STATISTICS
Ind
FIRST DOWNS: Total............................. 26
Rushing ............................................... 10
Passing................................................ 14
Penalties ............................................... 2
RUSHING: Attempts.............................. 35
Net yards gained............................. 200
Average.............................................. 5.7
PASSING: Net yards............................ 222
Attempted .......................................... 32
Completed .......................................... 19
Average.............................................. 6.9
Had intercepted .................................. 1
Sacked­yards lost ............................0­0
TOTAL OFFENSE: Yards ..................... 422
Plays .................................................... 67
Avg. gain per play............................ 6.3
PUNTS: Number....................................... 4
Average............................................ 37.0
PUNT RETURNS: No.­yds...................2­20
KICK RETURNS: No.­yds......................0­0
PENALTIES­yards ...............................2­10
FUMBLES­lost........................................0­0
3D­DOWN EFF. ....................................9­14
4TH­DOWN EFF.....................................0­0
Time of possession..........................31:14
Attendance — 71,798
SCORE BY PERIODS
Indianapolis (11­6)....... 14 7 0
Houston (11­6)................ 0 0 0
—
—
21
7
SCORING SUMMARY
FIRST QUARTER
Indianapolis 7, Houston 0
Eric Ebron 6 yd pass from Andrew Luck (Adam
Vinatieri kick). Drive: 9 plays, 75 yards, 4:28.
Indianapolis 14, Houston 0
Marlon Mack 2 yd run (Adam Vinatieri kick).
Drive: 9 plays, 74 yards, 5:25.
SECOND QUARTER
Indianapolis 21, Houston 0
Dontrelle Inman 18 yd pass from Andrew Luck
(Adam Vinatieri kick). Drive: 7 plays, 65 yards,
3:23.
FOURTH QUARTER
Indianapolis 21, Houston 7
Keke Coutee 6 yd pass from Deshaun Watson
(Ka’imi Fairbairn kick). Drive: 16 plays, 89 yards,
6:13.
INDIANAPOLIS INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
Rushing
Att. Yds. Avg.
Lg
TD
Mack ........................24
148
6.2
29
1
Luck............................8
29
3.6
10
0
Pascal ........................1
14 14.0
14
0
Wilkins.......................2
9
4.5
6
0
Passing
Att. Com.
Luck..........................32
19
ERIC CHRISTIAN SMITH/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Running back Marlon Mack rushed for 148 yards and a touchdown in the Colts’ victory.
Quarterback
Deshaun
Watson passed
for 235 yards
and ran for 76,
but was only
able to get the
Texans’ offense
into the end
zone once.
Their 4th­quarter TDs
lead rally past Seahawks
By Schuyler Dixon
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Cowboys 24 ARLINGTON, Texas —
Ezekiel Elliott rushed for
Seahawks 22 137 yards and the go-
MICHAEL AINSWORTH/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Seahawks linebacker Bobby Wagner
tries to drag down Ezekiel Elliott, who
rushed for 137 yards and a TD.
sneak for what appeared to be a clinching
score before Tyler Lockett’s 53-yard catch
set up a quick Seattle touchdown.
Wilson’s 7-yard scoring pass to J.D.
McKissic got the Seahawks within 4, and
they made it a 2-point game on their second 2-point conversion following an injury
to kicker Sebastian Janikowski.
But the missing kicker left the Seahawks
no good options on an onside kick with
1:18 remaining. Punter Michael Dickson’s
drop kick was caught by Cole Beasley at the
Dallas 31, sealing the first playoff win for
the Cowboys since beating Detroit in the
wild-card round in the 2014 season.
Prescott led a 67-yard drive to put the
Cowboys in front. A 34-yard pass to Amari
Cooper, who had seven catches for 106
Yds.
222
TD
2
Int.
1
Pass receiving
No. Yds.
Hilton......................................5
85
Inman .....................................4
53
Rogers....................................4
46
Ebron......................................3
26
Mack.......................................2
6
Pascal.....................................1
6
Lg
38
21
16
15
6
6
TD
0
1
0
1
0
0
Interceptions
No. Yds.
Moore.....................................1
10
Lg
10
TD
0
Yds.
148
Avg.
37.0
Lg
44
Punt returns
No. Yds.
Rogers....................................2
20
Punting
No.
Sanchez .................................4
Lg
14
TD
0
HOUSTON INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
Rushing
Att. Yds. Avg.
Lg
Watson ......................8
76
9.5
21
Miller..........................5
18
3.6
8
Blue ............................2
8
4.0
4
Foreman ....................1
3
3.0
3
TD
0
0
0
0
Passing
Att. Com.
Watson ....................49
29
Yds.
235
TD
1
Int.
1
Pass receiving
No. Yds.
Coutee..................................11
110
Miller ......................................8
63
Hopkins..................................5
37
Blue.........................................2
11
Akins.......................................2
8
Griffin .....................................1
6
Lg
20
12
13
6
7
6
TD
1
0
0
0
0
0
Interceptions
No. Yds.
Dunn .......................................1
0
Lg
0
TD
0
Yds.
234
Avg.
46.8
Lg
60
Kickoff returns
No. Yds.
Carter .....................................1
26
Lg
26
TD
0
SEATTLE INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
Rushing
Att. Yds. Avg.
Lg
Penny.........................4
29
7.3
28
Carson......................13
20
1.5
5
R.Wilson.....................3
14
4.7
7
Davis ..........................4
10
2.5
3
TD
0
0
1
0
Passing
Att. Com.
R.Wilson...................27
18
Punting
No.
Daniel .....................................5
ERIC CHRISTIAN SMITH/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Elliott, Prescott boost Dallas
ahead touchdown in the fourth quarter,
and the Dallas Cowboys hung on for a 2422 wild-card win over the Seattle Seahawks
on Saturday night.
The playoff win by the Cowboys was the
first for Elliott and quarterback Dak
Prescott on their second try after losing a
divisional game as rookies two years ago.
Dallas will play either the New Orleans
Saints or the Los Angeles Rams in the divisional round next weekend.
The loss ended a run of nine straight victories in playoff openers for the Seahawks.
The Elias Sports Bureau says it was the longest streak in NFL history.
Dallas’s defense, ranked in the top 10
most of the season, mostly kept quarterback Russell Wilson under control and
handed him his first loss in four wild-card
games.
‘‘Our defense was great,’’ Prescott said.
‘‘They keep us in every game.’’
It was the eighth win in nine games for
the Cowboys.
‘‘We had so much confidence coming it
this game and our confidence remains,’’
Prescott said. ‘‘It’s all about the way we
fought . . . I’m proud of my guys.’’
Prescott, the NFL Offensive Rookie of
the Year in 2016 when the Cowboys lost to
Green Bay at home as the top seed in the
NFC, threw for 226 yards and had a 1-yard
0
7
Hou
20
7
13
0
16
105
6.6
217
49
29
4.2
1
3­18
322
68
4.7
5
46.8
0­0
1­26
8­67
0­0
3­13
2­5
28:46
yards, led to Elliott’s 1-yard plunge after an
apparent touchdown by the quarterback
was overturned on replay.
Prescott had a chance to give the Cowboys a 10-point lead, but K.J. Wright made
a juggling interception in the end zone.
Dallas’s defense came through again,
though, forcing a punt and giving Elliott
and Prescott a highlight play apiece on a
drive to Prescott’s 1-yard sneak for a 24-14
lead with 2:08 remaining.
First, Elliott stiff-armed Shaquill Griffin
on a 17-yard run to get inside the 20, then
Prescott scrambled up the middle before a
head-over-heels hit from Tedric Thompson
at the Seattle 1. Prescott scored on the next
play.
Seattle got a double dose of bad news at
halftime when Janikowski missed a 57yard field goal on the final play and injured
his left thigh. He yelled as he grabbed the
back of his leg and limped to the locker
room, unable to return.
Still, the Seahawks took their first lead
basically because the 40-year-old’s injury
forced them to try.
Facing fourth and 5 in Janikowski’s
range from the Dallas 39, Doug Baldwin
made a toe-dragging catch on the sideline
for 22 yards. After Wilson ran 4 yards for a
touchdown, the Seahawks went for 2, pushing the lead to 14-10 on Mike Davis’s run.
But the Cowboys never did lose control
of the Seattle running game after allowing
Chris Carson’s first 100-yard game in a
Week 3 Seattle win that turned the season
for the Seahawks, who finished the regular
season with six wins in seven games.
Carson had just 20 yards on 13 carries.
Wilson was 18 of 27 for 233 yards, with
Lockett getting four catches for 120 yards.
Cowboys 24, Seahawks 22
TOM PENNINGTON/GETTY IMAGES
Dallas’ Amari Cooper had
7 catches for 106 yards.
At AT&T Stadium, Arlington, Texas
TEAM STATISTICS
Sea
FIRST DOWNS: Total................................11
Rushing.....................................................5
Passing .....................................................6
Penalties...................................................0
RUSHING: Attempts .................................24
Net yards gained..................................73
Average .................................................3.0
PASSING: Net yards...............................226
Attempted..............................................27
Completed .............................................18
Average .................................................8.1
Had intercepted......................................0
Sacked­yards lost................................1­7
TOTAL OFFENSE: Yards.........................299
Plays........................................................52
Avg. gain per play...............................5.8
PUNTS: Number..........................................7
Average ...............................................51.4
PUNT RETURNS: No.­yds..................... 3­22
KICK RETURNS: No.­yds. ..................... 1­52
PENALTIES­yards.................................. 5­36
FUMBLES­lost...........................................0­0
3D­DOWN EFF........................................ 2­13
4TH­DOWN EFF. .......................................2­2
Time of possession .............................25:10
Attendance — 94,327
SCORE BY PERIODS
Seattle (10­7).....................0
6
8
Dallas (11­6).......................3
7
0
8
14
—
—
Dal
23
9
11
3
34
164
4.8
216
33
22
6.4
1
1­10
380
68
5.6
5
45.0
6­80
1­15
6­36
0­0
4­11
0­0
34:50
22
24
SCORING SUMMARY
FIRST QUARTER
Dallas 3, Seattle 0
Brett Maher 39 yd FG. Drive: 10 plays, 54 yards,
5:10.
SECOND QUARTER
Seattle 3, Dallas 3
Sebastian Janikowski 27 yd FG. Drive: 6 plays, 69
yards, 2:45.
Seattle 6, Dallas 3
Sebastian Janikowski 42 yd FG. Drive: 6 plays, 28
yards, 1:29.
Dallas 10, Seattle 6
Michael Gallup 11 yd pass from Dak Prescott
(Brett Maher kick). Drive: 7 plays, 75 yards, 1:19.
THIRD QUARTER
Seattle 14, Dallas 10
Russell Wilson 4 yd run (Mike Davis 2pt Rush).
Drive: 9 plays, 44 yards, 5:01.
FOURTH QUARTER
Dallas 17, Seattle 14
Ezekiel Elliott 1 yd run (Brett Maher kick). Drive: 9
plays, 67 yards, 4:31.
Dallas 24, Seattle 14
Dak Prescott 1 yd run (Brett Maher kick). Drive:
11 plays, 63 yards, 5:12.
Dallas 24, Seattle 22
J.D. McKissic 7 yd pass from Russell Wilson (Chris
Carson 2pt Rush). Drive: 6 plays, 75 yards, 0:50.
Yds.
233
TD
1
Int.
0
Pass receiving
No. Yds.
Lockett ...................................4
120
E.Dickson ...............................4
42
Baldwin ..................................3
32
Davis.......................................2
22
McKissic.................................2
13
Carson....................................2
­1
Vannett ..................................1
5
Lg
53
26
22
13
7
7
5
TD
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
Interceptions
No. Yds.
Wright ....................................1
0
Lg
0
TD
0
Yds.
360
Avg.
51.4
Lg
60
Punt returns
No. Yds.
Lockett ...................................3
22
Lg
12
TD
0
Kickoff returns
No. Yds.
Lockett ...................................1
52
Lg
52
TD
0
DALLAS INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
Rushing
Att. Yds. Avg.
Lg
Elliott........................26
137
5.3
44
Prescott .....................6
29
4.8
16
R.Smith ......................1
1
1.0
1
Austin.........................1
­3
­3.0
­3
TD
1
1
0
0
Passing
Att. Com.
Prescott ...................33
22
Punting
No.
M.Dickson..............................7
Yds.
226
TD
1
Int.
1
Pass receiving
No. Yds.
Cooper....................................7
106
Elliott ......................................4
32
Beasley...................................3
28
Jarwin.....................................3
15
Gallup .....................................2
18
Hurns......................................1
14
Austin .....................................1
7
N.Brown .................................1
6
Lg
34
10
14
7
11
14
7
6
TD
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
Yds.
225
Avg.
45.0
Lg
50
Punt returns
No. Yds.
Austin .....................................5
73
Beasley...................................1
7
Lg
51
7
TD
0
0
Kickoff returns
No. Yds.
R.Smith...................................1
15
Lg
15
TD
0
Punting
No.
C.Jones ...................................5
Sports
C10
B o s t o n
S u n d a y
G l o b e
JA N UA RY 6 , 2 0 1 9
NFL playoffs
AFC WILD­CARD GAME: CHARGERS AT RAVENS
Ravens demonstrate defense still matters
By Adam Kilgore
THE WASHINGTON POST
Inside the Baltimore Ravens’
defensive meeting room, a
grease board on the wall doubles as a time capsule of their
season’s darkest moment. Players and coaches met at the conclusion of Baltimore’s bye week,
when the Ravens stood at 4-5,
their coach’s job was in jeopardy, and their defense had yielded an unacceptable 83 points
over the last three games.
‘‘I’m big into goals,’’ defensive coordinator Don Martindale said. ‘‘We’re big into goals.
We sat down and said, ‘OK.
Here’s where we’re at. Here’s
what we need to improve on.
Here’s what we’re good at.’ It’s
open forum in the defensive
meeting room.’’
The Ravens’ defensive players reassessed themselves. They
could still end the season as the
No. 1 defense in the NFL, but
they would have to improve in
key areas, especially the red
zone and protecting leads in the
fourth quarter. Martindale
scrawled the new goals and objectives on the grease board.
Over the course of the final sev-
en weeks, as he saw players
peek at the board, he knew they
would be fine.
As the Ravens retooled their
offense and rode electrifying
rookie quarterback Lamar
Jackson to a division title, they
also leaned on a familiar force
suddenly back in vogue across
the NFL: defense. The Ravens
finished the regular season as
the NFL’s leaders in yards allowed and yards per play, and
they ranked second in points allowed, just four behind the Chicago Bears.
That’s earned them a game
against the fifth-seeded Los Angeles Chargers on Sunday. The
winner heads to Foxborough
next Sunday to take on the Patriots.
While they arrived at their
stinginess in divergent ways,
the Ravens and Bears proved
defense still matters in an NFL
chock-full of pyrotechnic offense. The touchdown pinball
played between the Kansas City
Chiefs and Los Angeles Rams
on Monday night in Week 12
convinced many that the future
of the sport had arrived, and it
would be a contorted, crazed
NICK WASS/ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Ravens led the NFL in yards allowed and yards per play
under defensive coordinator Don Martindale.
version of its previous self.
That night may still represent the future of the NFL, but
not the immediate future.
Through the season’s first 12
weeks, NFL teams scored 24.1
points per game, which put the
league on pace to smash the alltime record. Immediately after
Rams-Chiefs, scoring dropped.
In the season’s final five weeks
teams scored 21.6 per game.
As happens every season,
the colder climate and inclement weather decreased offenses’
firepower. Defenses had more
film to study and more time to
conceive schemes to confront
the innovation on the other side
of the ball.
Baltimore’s defense rose to
the top of the league by eschew-
ing modern strains of defensive
philosophy, particularly the
idea that defenses needed to rely on turnovers and big plays.
The Bears embraced that approach. They led the league in
turnovers, forcing one on 19.5
percent of possessions, the
highest mark since the Bears
and Patriots surpassed 20 percent in 2012.
The Ravens forced turnovers
on 9.5 percent of possessions,
which ranked 24th in the NFL.
For most of the season, they
stopped offenses without having to take the ball away.
‘‘We’re known for defense
here,’’ safety Eric Weddle said.
‘‘We have great coaches and
great players. We know what
we’re doing and know how to
play it. We don’t gamble. We
play sound defense. Over time,
that’s going to be better than
giving up big plays and creating
a turnover here and there.’’
The Ravens’ defense is built
with a mixture of youth and experience at every level — ‘‘a perfect storm,’’ veteran cornerback
Brandon Carr said. Terrell
Suggs, 36, is likely in his final
season in Baltimore, and while
his production has dipped,
teammates insist his ability to
read offenses is a crucial asset.
Weddle, 33, quarterbacks the
defense, while cornerbacks
Jimmy Smith and Carr, both in
their mid-30s, add more experience. The Ravens can afford
those veteran contracts because
they’ve hit in the draft — defensive tackle Michael Pierce, second-year corner Marlon Humphrey, and edge rushers Matthew Judon and Za’Darius
Smith are all on their rookie
deals.
Back on the bye week, the
Ravens had decided they needed to be more aggressive in protecting fourth-quarter leads.
When the Browns needed a
handful of yards to set up a
game-winning field goal last
Sunday, with Baltimore’s postseason chances on the line,
Martindale called four consecutive all-out blitzes.
On the final play, C.J. Mosley
intercepted a desperate pass
and sent the Ravens to the playoffs. They had made it there
with defense, fitting for the
franchise and, in a late-season
twist, for the league itself.
Gilmore has it
all locked down
uSULLIVAN
Continued from Page C1
Stephon Gilmore’s Patriots story
was framed at the outset by expectation, a five-year, $65 million free agent
contract prior to last season representing a break from Bill Belichick’s customary roster-building philosophy,
one built on parsimony, democracy,
and disdain for the star-making machine. But for a defensive-minded
coach who had won multiple titles
with at least one shutdown corner (Ty
Law, Darrelle Revis), the onetime 10th
overall pick of the draft was good
enough to break the mold.
Then Gilmore struggled at the start
of his first New England season, and
when he found himself on the bench
for the second half of an early-season
game, the story threatened to veer toward failure to fill those expectations.
But if 2017 proved to be about
Gilmore’s steady improvement and ultimate justification of the contract
(who can forget his levitating pass
breakup to clinch the AFC Championship game win over Jacksonville?),
t h e n 2 0 1 8 m a ke s y o u w o n d e r i f
Belichick paid him enough.
“He should be considered the best
corner in the game,” linebacker Kyle
Van Noy said.
On Friday, Gilmore was, named
first-team All-Pro. The statistical analysis website Pro Football Focus agreed,
giving Gilmore its best end-of-the-season grade at the position, citing his
league-leading 18 pass breakups and a
forced incompletion percentage of
27.8. Gilmore allowed only one touchdown in New England’s final six
games, and in only five games overall
did he allow more than two completions. He’s the anchor of the back end
of the defense, thriving in a man-toman-heavy scheme that has seen him
shut down the likes of DeAndre Hopkins, Sammy Watkins, Allen Robinson,
Kelvin Benjamin, Stefon Diggs, Robby
Anderson, and Antonio Brown.
Gilmore’s one slip-up — Tennessee’s
Corey Davis’s beat him for 125 yards
and a touchdown in Week 10 — was a
big reason the Patriots were uncompetitive in a 34-10 loss. It was the only
50-plus-yard game a receiver had
against Gilmore this year.
“Best corner in the league,” McCourty said. “That guy understands
what it takes to cover someone. It
sounds so simple, but understanding
routes as you get into it off the line of
scrimmage, understanding the first
few steps he’s going on a nine route
and knowing, ‘I’m going to wedge him
out,’ he just picks up on that stuff so
fast.
“His ability to cover in the nine
route, the straight go route, when you
watch him, he knows. Ball, snap, receiver, and he knows, all right this is
going to be the go ball and he just has
an intuitive ability knowing when
that’s coming. I remember training in
one offseason with Revis and his route
recognition, off the snap, he knew exactly what the route was. When you
watch the best man-to-man corners, it
doesn’t matter what the entire defense
is doing, those guys just know when
they go up against a receiver what that
receiver is doing early on in a route.
“He should be All-Pro. No doubt
about it.”
Most inspections of Gilmore the
player move quickly to Gilmore the
person, and how an even-keeled, comparatively quiet professional bucks the
conventional cornerback mold of being brash, bold, and outspoken. Perhaps it goes back to his high school
days in South Carolina, when he was
tearing up records as a dual-threat
quarterback, surpassing 1,000 yards
both rushing and passing as a senior.
Believing his NFL prospects were not
best served in the pocket, he looked toward college in search of a new position, and on the advice of his dad
Steve, Gilmore took his 6-foot-1-inch,
200-pound, track-trained body to the
secondary. He graduated high school
early, enrolled at South Carolina, and
was a starter by the season opener.
“My dad said I’d be a good corner,”
Gilmore said this past week, while the
Patriots practiced before their playoff
bye, awaiting the result of Sunday’s
Chargers-Ravens wild-card game to
see who they’ll play in next Sunday’s
divisional-round game. “You’re tall,
you can move, you’d be a bigger corner
but you can still move like smaller corners. You could try it. It worked out.”
Master of the understatement, that
guy. Still, in the wake of the team’s win
over the Jets, when he barely let Anderson breathe, Gilmore snuck some
personal recognition in his humble answer to whether he’s the best corner in
the league.
“I don’t like to talk about myself,
you know that,’’ Gilmore said, before
adding, “Film don’t lie.”
No, it doesn’t. The film, and the
book, on Gilmore says test him at your
own peril.
“That’s him. He’s quiet, he’s softspoken, but I think what I love about
watching him, when you get out there
on that football field, he’s quiet but he’s
like a quiet assassin,” McCourty said.
“That’s what we call him. You see it in
games. He’ll be quick to get in a tussle
match with somebody, Steph will talk
a little bit of trash as well as be out
there competing. I think the funnest
thing to watch is how we’ll be on the
walkthrough and he won’t let his guy
catch the ball. He just competes his ass
off. That’s his mind-set.”
Tara Sullivan is a Globe columnist.
She can be reached at
tara.sullivan@globe.com.
SARAH STIER/GETTY IMAGES
Patriot Stephon Gilmore has neutralized many receivers this season, including the Jets’ Robby Anderson.
Broncos, Browns talk to Flores
By Nora Princiotti
GLOBE STAFF
The Broncos and Browns interviewed Patriots de facto defensive coordinator Brian Flores for their head
coaching positions
PATRIOTS
Saturday, one day afNOTEBOOK ter he interviewed for
the same position
with the Dolphins and the Packers.
Flores is, by title, the Patriots’ linebackers coach, but was elevated to a
larger role that includes play-calling
this season after Matt Patricia left for
Detroit.
According to Mike Klis, who covers
the Broncos for Denver’s 9News, the
37-year-old Flores is considered a
“long shot” for that job.
General manager John Elway is
also looking at Bears defensive coordinator Vic Fangio, former Colts coach
Chuck Pagano, Steelers offensive line
coach Mike Munchak, and Rams quarterbacks coach Zac Taylor.
According to the Associated Press,
Browns general manager John Dorsey
and members of the team’s search
committee traveled to Boston on Saturday. Flores was the fifth candidate to
interview with Cleveland.
Sit back and relax
While the Patriots’ coaching staff
has to be on top of the wild-card
games, ready to jump into game-planning action, the players get to watch
the games just like you might.
Center David Andrews said he’d
definitely watch the AFC games, and
probably all four of them this weekend. It’s a way to get ahead on potential future opponents, yes, but it’s also
a chance to sit on the couch and hang.
“I think it’s really important — I
like to just take a deep breath. I don’t
really like to go anywhere, just kind of
relax, stay at home,” Andrews said
Thursday. “I’ll definitely watch most of
the games, if not all of them — definitely the AFC games. Texans-Colts is
Saturday, right? So, that kind of really
determines what’s going to happen for
us, but you never really leave the
game.
“But, it’s nice just to take a deep
breath and really kind of lock in for
these — you’ve got a one-week season
here, so give it all you got.”
Receiver Phillip Dorsett said he’d
sneak in a workout over the bye weekend, but beyond that was ready to relax and hopefully see some exciting
games.
“I will watch the games because I
like football,” Dorsett said. ”Obviously,
I want to know who we’re going to
play, but I’m just going to be watching.”
Most players said they planned on
watching most of the games, though a
few said they wouldn’t be glued. The
bye is both a mental and a physical
break.
“I’ll probably watch half of it,” safety Patrick Chung said Thursday. “I’ll
probably be chilling with my little
man. It’s time for me to get football off
my mind. I’ll be back ready to go Monday.”
Nora Princiotti can be reached at
nora.princiotti@globe.com. Follow her
on Twitter at @NoraPrinciotti.
Patriots in 2018 (11­5)
SEPT. 9
HOU
W, 27­20
SEPT. 16
@JAX
L, 31­20
SEPT. 23
@DET
L, 26­10
SEPT. 30
MIA
W, 38­7
OCT. 4
IND
W, 38­24
OCT. 14
KC
W, 43­40
OCT. 21
@CHI
W, 38­31
OCT. 29
@BUF
W, 25­6
NOV. 4
GB
W, 31­17
NOV. 11
@TEN
L, 34­10
NOV. 25
@NYJ
W, 27­13
DEC. 2
MIN
W, 24­10
DEC. 9
@MIA
L, 34­33
DEC. 16
@PIT
L, 17­10
DEC. 23
BUF
W, 24­12
DEC. 30
NYJ
W, 38­3
JAN. 13
TBA
1:05 p.m.
CBS
B o s t o n
JA N UA RY 6 , 2 0 1 9
S u n d a y
G l o b e
Sports
C11
NFC WILD­CARD GAME: EAGLES AT BEARS
Cohen a bear to contain
Do­it­all back
a hit in Chicago
By Ben Shpigel
THE NEW YORK TIMES
LAKE FOREST, Ill. — During practice last Thursday afternoon, Tarik Cohen caught a
punt. Still clutching the ball, he
proceeded to catch another.
And another. And another. And
another. And another.
And another.
By the end of this wacky experiment, Cohen was cradling
seven balls — one, roughly, for
every role he has with the Chicago Bears.
Cohen is the Bears’ handofftaking, punt-returning, ballcatching, pass-throwing, mismatch-creating, gasp-inducing,
highlight-monopolizing cyborg.
A year after becoming the first
rookie since Gale Sayers, a former Bear, in 1965, to contribute
touchdowns by running, receiving, passing, and punt return,
Cohen has further obliterated
concerns that a 5-foot-6-inch
running back from the humble
Football Championship Subdivision would struggle transitioning to the NFL’s rugged
NFC North.
If the quarterback-wrecking
edge rusher Khalil Mack embodies a defense that has fueled
the Bears’ worst-to-first ascent
— as the NFC ’s third seed,
they’ll face the No. 6-seeded Eagles in the wild-card round Sunday, their first playoff appearance since 2010 — Cohen personifies the offense installed by
the team’s first-year coach, Matt
Nagy: creative, unpredictable
MICHAEL MCGINNIS/AP
Tarik Cohen led the Bears in
catches, yards from scrimmage, and all-purpose yards.
and, at times, downright fun.
He led the team in catches (71),
yards from scrimmage (1,169),
and all-purpose yardage
(1,599), and was voted onto the
All-Pro team as a punt returner.
“He’s got a lot of strengths
and not a lot of weaknesses,”
Nagy said. “Having him be a
part of what we do and what we
scheme is a huge advantage.”
Soon after the Bears hired
Nagy away from Kansas City,
where he served for five seasons
on Andy Reid’s staff, Cohen
heard that las t season the
Chiefs featured three players
who gained more than 1,000
yards. Cohen did not know
when or how he would get the
ball in Chicago, he said, only
that he would.
“Get me the ball and get me
in space,” Cohen said.
That just might be his motto. His 170 touches rank second
on the team, behind Jordan
Howard, the primary rusher. As
a runner, Cohen has the seventh-best breakaway percentage in the NFL, gaining 44.4
percent of his 444 yards on carries of at least 15 yards, according to Pro Football Focus.
The Bears’ vast playbook demands Cohen know entire passing concepts because any week
he could line up at four or five
different spots. His first-year
position coach, Charles London, marveled early on at Cohen’s savvy.
“There’s not really a route —
at running back or receiver —
that he can’ t run in this offense,” London said.
Had North Carolina A&T, a
historically black university, not
offered him a scholarship, who
knows where Cohen would
have ended up? Across his four
seasons at A&T, he rushed for a
Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference record 5,619 yards, the
10 th-most in the history of
what was formerly Division 1A.
But Shawn Gibbs, his position
coach at A&T, said NFL scouts
weren’t convinced.
“ They just tried to poke
holes in everything he did —
like, he’s good, but,” Gibbs said.
It was the Bears’ good fortune that their scout who
prowls the Southeast, Sam
Summerville, attended a historically black college himself. Before even studying Cohen, Summerville admired him as a fan,
watching from afar as he
rushed for 295 yards against Alcorn State.
“Every time I opened my
mouth about him, or every time
a question was asked, they were
like, ‘Do you think this guy can
do this?’ Tarik can do pretty
much everything you ask him
to,” Summerville said.
Picking up playoff pieces
uSHAUGHNESSY
member him as the man who pancaked Boston
College quarterback Anthony Brown early in the
they come to New England, I’m betting on 10-de- BC-Clemson game, knocking Brown out of the
gree temperatures and a fold by the West Coast game. Wilkins is a three-time All-American and
team. Root for the Colts to take out the Chiefs his coach, Dabo Swinney, told the NFL.com,
and deliver the AFC Championship game to its “He’s either going to be the president or he’s going to know him. One of the two.’’ Once the pride
permanent home in Foxborough.
R Sports Lock of the Century: WEEI’s inevita- of Bowditch Field, Wilkins won the William V.
ble and wildly hyped announcement that Kirk Campbell Trophy, given annually to a college
Minihane is returning to the morning show. football star who excels in the classroom and the
community.
May? September? It will happen.
R NESN watchers will be happy to learn that
R Quiz: Who is the Red Sox career leader in inDennis Eckersley has signed on to do more nings pitched? (Answer below)
games next season. Eck will even be making a few
R Bruce Springsteen’s daughter, Jessica, is a
road trips, which he generally avoids. Hope Da- professional equestrian show jumper who just
vid (“I’ve got the trump card now”) Price behaves completed her first season riding for the Miami
on the team charter.
Celtics of the Global Champions League. She is
R The joke of the AFC East continues to be dis- ranked seventh nationally among show jumpers
missed by Patriot fanboys, but it is very real and it and is hoping to compete in the 2020 Olympics in
gives the Patriots an unfair advantage almost ev- Tokyo.
ery season. The Patriots outscored their division
R There was a nice profile of Mrs. Tom Brady
rivals by 110 points in six games this year. In 10 in Friday’s Wall Street Journal’s “Mansion” secother games against real NFL competition, the tion. I learned that Super G aspired to be a volleyPatriots outscored the opposition by 1 point. We ball player when she was younger and was nickacknowledge that the Patriots through the years named Olly, as in Olive Oyl from “Popeye.’’ “My
have beaten all other teams at the same rate they husband, Tom Brady, and I live with our three
beat the Jets, Dolphins, and Bills. But no other children near Boston,’’ Gisele Bundchen told the
team in the NFL gets to go into every season Journal. “It’s very cold in the winters, but this is
knowing that there will be NO competition with- what you do for love. My favorite space is our
in the division. The Patriots have won their divi- barn where I work.’’ Regarding her football IQ,
sion by three or more games in eight of the last Gisele said, “After 12 years, I feel like I could be a
nine seasons. This means that the Jets, Dolphins, ref.’’
and Bills never compete. The Patriots go into evR I have to disagree with esteemed colleague
ery year knowing that none of their division ri- Nick Cafardo, who believes there should be rules
vals are likely to win as many as eight games. limiting defensive shifts in baseball. In my view,
Meanwhile, winning the division is over-reward- it’s up to the offense to figure it out. The defense
ed in the NFL. This explains why the Patriots should be able to position its players anywhere it
could host a playoff game against a team (12-4 wants.
Chargers) that had a better regular season than
R This likely will be the first full NBA season
the Patriots. Nobody else gets to do this. In every since 2000-01 in which no team wins 60 regularother division — save the AFC South — there is season games.
rotation. In every other division, at least three
R The Matt Patricia era in Detroit is off to a
teams have won the division two or more times rough start and he’s not helping with his boorish
since 2002. Not in the AFC East.
behavior.
R Every time I’m
In the AFC East, the Patriots
have 14 titles, the Dolphins one,
tempted to drop a “Carl
the Jets one. The Patriots are
Crawford” on the hand29-1 at home against the Jets,
some head of Gordon
Hayward, he has a game
Dolphins, and Bills over the last
five seasons. The woeful Miami/
like Wednesday’s 35-point
New York/Buffalo trio went an
outburst against the Timaggregate 17-31 this year. Take
berwolves.
R If you have a Patriots
away games vs. one another, the
fan in your life may I sugJets, Bills and Dolphins went 1125. Since 2002 the Jets have had
gest you purchase “The
six coaches, the Bills nine, and
Pats,’’ by Glenn Stout and
the Dolphins 10. In summary,
Richard A. Johnson. It’s
the definitive history of
the Jets, Bills, and Dolphins all
FILE/STAN GROSSFELD/GLOBE STAFF
stink and it is a great advantage
the Boston/New England
to the Patriots to play in a divi- Dwight Evans’s case for admitPatriots.
sion with these bums. Defensive tance to Cooperstown might have
R If I’m Dwight Evans,
I’m storming the gates of
Patriots fans need to stop trying gotten a little stronger.
to dispute this.
Cooperstown asking for a
R Competition, like knowledge, is good. Bay- recount in the wake of the election of Harold
lor’s upset of the UConn women’s basketball Baines. Evans was a better major leaguer than
team (68-57 in Waco on Thursday) is good for the Baines.
women’s game. UConn had won 126 consecutive
R There will be a concert celebrating Jackie
regular-season games, dating to 2014.
Robinson’s 100th birthday at Royce Hall on the
R I have little interest in the Alabama-Clemson campus of UCLA Feb. 5. The late Hall of Famer’s
national championship game Monday other than wife, Rachel, and daughter, Sharon, are planning
to watch Clemson senior defensive lineman to attend.
Christian Wilkins, who seems likely to be selected
R Quiz answer: Tim Wakefield.
in the first round of the NFL Draft this spring. A
native of Springfield, Wilkins played at Framing- Dan Shaughnessy is a Globe columnist. He can be
ham High School in 2010 before transferring to reached at dshaughnessy@globe.com. Follow him
Suffield Academy in Connecticut. You might re- on Twitter @dan_shaughnessy.
Continued from Page C1
RON JENKINS/GETTY IMAGES
Freshman Trevor Lawrence took off with the Clemson QB job and hasn’t looked back.
NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP: ALABAMA VS. CLEMSON, MONDAY, 8 P.M., ESPN
Clemson’s Lawrence
was the choice at QB
By Pete Iacobelli
ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN JOSE, Calif. — The choice was clear for
Clemson coach Dabo Swinney last September
— freshman quarterback Trevor Lawrence deserved to start over well-liked, well-respected
senior Kelly Bryant.
It’s a move that could’ve led to dissension,
in-fighting, and a divided locker room. Instead,
the switch started the second-ranked Tigers on
a glide path to the national championship
game, where they’ll take on defending champion Alabama on Monday night.
‘‘It’s just a situation where [Lawrence] has
been in the game, he has been productive and
to be fair to competition, just like we do at every position, coach [Swinney] decided to name
him the starter,’’ Clemson co-offensive coordinator Tony Elliott said.
Swinney insists the swap, despite Lawrence’s talent, wasn’t made with Alabama in
mind.
‘‘You’ve got to prove that you deserve to be
the starter this year,’’ he said Saturday. ‘‘That’s
just the culture we have.’’
Lawrence’s play has borne that out.
He’s thrown for 2,933 yards with 27 touchdowns and just four interceptions. Clemson
has averaged more than 45 points and 540
yards a game since Lawrence took over against
Syracuse in Game 5.
Swinney said Lawrence never acted like he
didn’t belong, showing a mix of confidence,
poise, and ability that stood out. Swinney realized that last spring when he ‘‘saw how quickly
[Lawrence] processed things, how easy it was
for him,’’ the coach said.
The hard part for Swinney came in September when he elevated Lawrence to starter over
Bryant.
The quarterback selection was a choice
looming since the 6-foot-6-inch, strong-armed,
long-haired Lawrence arrived on campus. Two
experienced reserve passers in Zerrick Cooper
and Tucker Israel transferred in January. Another five-star quarterback, Hunter Johnson,
left in May for Northwestern after going
through spring ball.
Bryant, who went 16-2 as a starter, led
Clemson to the Atlantic Coast Conference title
and the College Football Playoff a season ago.
But he struggled in the Tigers’ passing game
and a poor showing in the 24-6 loss to Alabama
in the Sugar Bowl last year, leaving the door
wide open for speculators to pencil in Lawrence ahead of the popular Bryant this season.
Bryant kept the job at the start of the season
and started Clemson’s first four games until
Swinney knew what he had to do.
‘‘At the end of the day, this is not middle
school,’’ Swinney said in September. ‘‘There’s
tough decisions that have to be made at this
level and you have to do what’s best for the
team.’’
Some programs might not have moved forward unscathed after such a switch. Clemson
All-American defensive tackle Christian
Wilkins never had a doubt the Tigers would remain on track.
‘‘I’m sure a lot of you all would’ve liked more
controversy,’’ Wilkins joked this past week.
‘‘That’s more of a testament to our leadership.
We’ve got a lot of older guys who’ve been
around for a while, just experienced a lot, and
we weren’t going to let that faze us.’’
Wilkins said they all still love and respect
Bryant, who has transferred to Missouri, ‘‘but
we weren’t going to let that stop us.’’
Wilkins, a 6-4, 315-pound senior, went a
long way to calming any locker room concerns
about the switch when he took Lawrence to
breakfast the week of Bryant’s demotion.
Wilkins downplays the meeting — ‘‘I was going
to eat breakfast anyway,’’ he said — but Lawrence believes it gave him instant credibility to
lead a veteran-stocked club.
‘‘It meant a lot,’’ Lawrence said.
Things couldn’t have started worse for Lawrence and the Tigers when the freshman left
with an injury before halftime of his first college start against Syracuse on Sept. 29 and the
Tigers trailed, 23-13, with less than 13 minutes
left. But Clemson rallied with onetime sixthstring passer Chase Brice in the game and tailback Travis Etienne rushing for two TDs down
the stretch of the 27-23 win.
Lawrence threw two touchdown passes in
his next start, a 63-3 win at Wake Forest, and
has not slowed down since.
Swinney is pleased with Lawrence’s progress, but still hurts when thinking about the
quarterback change. Bryant gave his all to the
Tigers during his time there, Swinney said, but
this was simply a football decision.
‘‘I’m not going to apologize for doing my
job,’’ Swinney said.
North Dakota St. wins FCS title
By Stephen Hawkins
ASSOCIATED PRESS
North Dakota St. 38 FRISCO, Texas — Easton Stick ran for three
E. Washington 24 t o u c h d o w n s a n d
threw two quick scoring passes to Darrius Shepherd in a wild start to the second half as North
Dakota State won its record seventh FCS championship with a 38-24 victory over Eastern
Washington on Saturday.
North Dakota State (15-0) has won all seven
of its FCS titles over the past eight seasons.
Stick, who succeeded Carson Wentz as
NDSU’s quarterback, threw for 198 yards and
ran for 121 in his 49th victory to become the
winningest FCS quarterback. Stick leaves with
school records for total yards (11,216), passing
yards (8,693), and 129 total touchdowns (88
passing, 41 rushing).
It also was the last game for Bison coach
Chris Klieman, who now takes over as Kansas
State’s coach after going 69-6 with a recordmatching four FCS titles in his five seasons
since being promoted from defensive coordinator to head coach at NDSU.
Eastern Washington (12-3) got to within 1710 with a 2-yard touchdown on a fake field goal
in the final minute of the first half. Holder and
backup quarterback Gunner Talkington took
the snap and was still on his knee when he shuffled the ball to a sweeping Jayce Gilder, who
dived into the end zone.
Globe staff’s college picks CHAMPIONSHIP
Las Vegas
line
Julian
Benbow
Greg
Lang
Last
6­4
Season
82­48
Clemson
Alabama
Alabama
at Alabama
by 5½
Selections are not against the pointspread.
Craig
Larson
Jim
McBride
Michael
Vega
6­4
7­3
4­6
5­5
94­36
94­36
78­52
83­47
Alabama
Clemson
Clemson
Clemson
C12
Sports
B o s t o n
S u n d a y
G l o b e
JA N UA RY 6 , 2 0 1 9
Scoreboard
Colleges
BASKETBALL
DEBEE TLUMACKI FOR THE GLOBE
Lily Farden is one of three captains for the Nobles hockey team,
all of whom will play at Harvard next season.
HIGH SCHOOL TEAM OF THE WEEK
Nobles determined
to recapture ISL
By Matt MacCormack
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
Fourth in a series in which the
Globe profiles a varsity high
school team from Eastern Massachusetts.
The Noble and Greenough
girls’ hockey team wins the Independent School League title every
year.
Well, almost every year.
The Bulldogs, under the direction of Tom Resor, won at least a
share of the ISL every season from
2000-17. Last season, Nobles fell
just short, with Tabor taking the
crown.
Resor’s team quickly turned
the page, winning the NEPSAC
Division 1 postseason tournament
for its ninth New England prep title since 2000, the year Resor took
over as coach after a long run with
the boys’ program.
This season, Nobles (7-0-2) is
unbeaten. And the team’s three
senior captains — defensemen
Lily Farden and Rose O’Connor,
and forward Courtney Hyland —
will all continue their hockey careers at Harvard.
Here’s five things to know
about Nobles, a prep program
based in Dedham:
A two­way threat
Farden sets the tone for Nobles. In addition to leading the defense, the All-NEPSAC selection
notched 15 goals and 15 assists
last season.
The Hingham teen credits her
offensive success to assistant
coach Steve Cedorchuk, who has
placed an emphasis on getting defensemen involved offensively.
Farden also grew from her experience with the U-18 national
team, which won gold at the 2018
World Championships in Russia.
“[Everyone there is] probably
the best player at their high school
or their club,” Farden said. “It was
really cool to work with them and
compete on such a global stage.”
Youth in action
Here’s the breakdown of the
24-player roster: five seniors,
three juniors, seven sophomores,
seven freshmen, one eighth-grader (forward Cali Cerruti), and one
seventh-grader (goalie Lulu See­
man).
Two-thirds of the roster is comprised of underclassmen. That has
forced Resor and his captains to
simplify their preparation.
“Our goal on the team this year
is to win every battle you’re in,”
said Hyland, “whether that’s a single shift, loose puck or beating an
opponent down the ice for an icing call.”
Road to recovery
Of those young players, two of
the most talented — sophomore
forward Katie Pyne and defenseman Jenna MacDonald — are returning from season-ending injuries a year ago.
Pyne (Cohasset), who played
her freshman season for Division
2 state champion Notre DameHingham, hurt her shoulder last
season but was able to start this
season healthy.
Resor expects her to be among
the team’s leading point producers.
MacDonald (Walpole) suffered
a knee injury in 2017-18, depriving Resor of a defenseman he
called “wonderfully talented.” She
missed out on the first few games
of this season but is back to full
health.
“It takes a little bit to adjust to
the pace of the games and the intensity,” Resor said.
The unsung hero
There’s plenty of talent on the
roster, but Resor says there’s one
player who doesn’t get the credit
she deserves: Maddie Bayard, a
senior forward from Medfield.
“She’ll go into a rink and win
every battle,” Hyland said of her
classmate.
“She really takes pride in being physical in the corners.”
Bayard plans to continue her
hockey career at Division 3 Middlebury College. Bayard is a key
cog for Nobles, even if many of
her teammates will play at D1 colleges.
“A lot of those commitments
are based on potential,” Resor
said. “As a coach you look at the
production of your players, and
she’s up there with the best of
them.”
No lack of motivation
Don’t think for a second that
Nobles’s sustained run of success
breeds complacency.
Despite winning the NEPSAC
tournament last year, many of the
Bulldog skaters viewed losing out
on the ISL regular-season title as a
huge disappointment.
“That was something that the
players were more disappointed
with than I was,” Resor said.
Farden called the lack of ISL
hardware a “heartbreak.” Hyland
took it a step further: The girls
were “devastated.”
You can bet the Bulldogs will
be motivated to finish at the top of
the ISL standings this season.
Matt MacCormack can be reached
at matthew.maccormack
@globe.com.
JOHN CETRINO FOR THE GLOBE
STYLE POINTS — Braintree’s Johnny Harrington celebrates
after scoring his first goal of the season to tie it, 2-2, in the
second period. He was overshadowed by Framingham’s Mike
Tersoni, whose go-ahead goal with 4:03 left keyed a 4-2 win.
MEN
HOW AP TOP 25 FARED
1. Duke beat Clemson, 87­68
3. Tennessee beat Georgia, 96­50
4. Virginia beat 9. Florida St., 65­52
5. Kansas lost to Iowa State, 77­60
6. Nevada lost to New Mexico, 85­58
7. Gonzaga beat Santa Clara, 91­48
8. Michigan St. beat Ohio St., 86­77
10. Virginia Tech beat BC, 77­66
11. Texas Tech beat Kansas St., 63­57
13. Kentucky lost to Alabama, 77­75
15. N. Carolina beat Pittsburgh, 85­60
23. Oklahoma beat Oklahoma St., 74­64
NEW ENGLAND
Babson 64......................................WPI 60
Bentley 84.................................Molloy 71
Binghamton 69.............................UNH 58
Boston University 87........... Bucknell 80
Dean 73...........................So. Vermont 69
Emerson 86..................................Clark 81
Hofstra 75..................... Northeastern 72
Iona 94....................................Fairfield 87
La Salle 69.................................UMass 60
LIU Brooklyn 79........................Bryant 70
Mitchell 74............................Newbury 73
N.E. College 94.............................Elms 80
Rider 72..............................Quinnipiac 67
Sacred Heart 73..........Central Conn. 61
Salem State 100..........Worcester St. 82
Springfield 73.......................Wheaton 56
Stony Brook 75........... UMass­Lowell 63
UCF 65........................................UConn 53
UMBC 61.....................................Maine 52
Vermont 80...............................Albany 51
Villanova 65......................Providence 59
Virginia Tech 77........Boston College 66
Westfield St. 110.......................MCLA 77
OTHER EAST
Adelphi 90.....................................NYIT 48
Army 77................................Lafayette 69
Canisius 70..................................Siena 66
Delaware 77..................................Elon 65
Fairleigh Dick. 79....St. Francis (Pa.) 61
Florida A&M 82......................Howard 72
Manhattan 90.........................Niagara 80
Maryland 77............................Rutgers 63
Monmouth 61................Saint Peter’s 44
NJIT 72...........................Kennesaw St. 52
North Carolina 85.............Pittsburgh 60
Princeton 68................................Penn 65
Robt. Morris 62...........Mt. St. Mary’s 59
St. Francis Brooklyn 66........Wagner 59
St. John’s 97..........Georgetown 94 (OT)
VCU 76...................................Fordham 51
William & Mary 84...................Drexel 66
SOUTH
Alabama 77..........................Kentucky 75
Alabama St. 74............Grambling St. 53
Austin Peay 81.............Morehead St. 67
Belmont 79.............. Tennessee Tech 67
Campbell 72...............Gardner­Webb 61
Cent. Arkansas 73........ SE Louisiana 71
Coppin State 73............Savannah St. 67
Davidson 65........................Duquesne 61
Duke 87..................................Clemson 68
East Carolina 73.................Cincinnati 71
East Tenn. St. 96...........Chattanooga 70
Fla. Atlantic 63..............Middle Tenn. 56
Furman 101..............................Citadel 85
Georgia Tech 92............Wake Forest 79
High Point 51............. Charleston So. 50
Jackson St. 54............Alabama A&M 51
Jacksonville St. 69......Tennessee St. 62
James Madison 69...........Charleston 58
La.­Monroe 85................Arkansas St. 75
Liberty 81....................................FGCU 63
Lipscomb 77....................Jacksonville 74
Louisiana 75...................... Little Rock 61
Marshall 85..........................Charlotte 84
Mississippi 81....................Vanderbilt 71
Morgan St. 66.....Md. Eastern Shore 53
Murray St. 97...................Eastern Ky. 85
N.C. Central 68...........Bethune­Cook. 59
New Orleans 81...... Houston Baptist 76
Norfolk St. 77.................Delaware St. 63
N. Carolina A&T 80....S. Carolina St. 77
North Florida 96..............N. Alabama 67
Northwestern St. 66.....McNeese St. 61
Old Dominion 69............Western Ky. 66
Prairie View A&M 82.....Southern U. 73
Presbyterian 64.............USC Upstate 61
Radford 71..........................Longwood 64
South Alabama 84.........Coastal Car. 77
South Carolina 71....................Florida 69
Tennessee 96......................... Georgia 50
Texas Southern 87.............Alcorn St. 70
Troy 89......................Appalachian St. 85
UAB 84.................... Fla. International 65
UNCG 71.........................................VMI 68
UNCW 67.................................Towson 61
Virginia 65.......................... Florida St. 52
W. Carolina 76......................Samford 69
Winthrop 80.................UNC Asheville 65
Wofford 78...............................Mercer 74
MIDWEST
Akron 56......................... W. Michigan 48
Bowling Green 86.............Kent State 64
Butler 84..............................Creighton 69
Central Mich. 84...........Miami (Ohio) 77
Eastern Ill. 84...............................SIUE 81
Green Bay 90........... Cleveland State 89
Illinois St. 58.......................Evansville 46
Indiana St. 65..........................Bradley 60
Iowa State 77..........................Kansas 60
Loyola Chicago 85.................... Drake 74
Michigan St. 86.................Ohio State 77
No. Illinois 72......................Ohio 66 (OT)
Northern Kentucky 95............Detroit 73
SE Missouri St. 74..............UT Martin 69
So. Illinois 58..............Northern Iowa 51
Syracuse 72.................... Notre Dame 62
UMKC 80......................Chicago State 72
Valparaiso 82..................Missouri St. 66
Wright State 89.....................Oakland 73
Youngstown St. 76...........Milwaukee 51
SOUTHWEST
Arkansas 73.....................Texas A&M 71
Georgia So. 77...............UT Arlington 64
Georgia St. 73.................Texas State 69
Incarnate Word 65................Nicholls 58
Lamar 61..................Texas A&M­C.C. 55
North Texas 65...........Southern Miss 62
Oklahoma 74................Oklahoma St. 64
Oral Roberts 82........Western Illinois 63
Rice 78........................Louisiana Tech 66
Sam Houston St. 71..Abilene Christ. 68
TCU 85........................................Baylor 81
Texas 61........................West Virginia 54
Texas Tech 63...................Kansas St. 57
Tulsa 78.........................South Florida 75
UAPB 64.....................Miss. Valley St. 52
UTSA 67........................................UTEP 63
FAR WEST
Arizona 84...........................Utah 81 (OT)
Arizona St. 83.......................Colorado 61
Gonzaga 91......................Santa Clara 48
Grand Canyon 71....................Seattle 57
Loyola Marymount 76.........Portland 64
Montana St. 84.........Sacramento St. 70
New Mexico 85.......................Nevada 58
No. Arizona 81......................Idaho St. 69
No. Colorado 83.........................Idaho 79
North Dakota 80......................Denver 59
Oregon St. 77..........................Oregon 72
San Francisco 72.............Pepperdine 69
Southern Utah 90...............Weber St. 82
UC Davis 90.....................Holy Names 60
UCLA 98................................California 83
Utah State 79.......................Air Force 62
WOMEN
HOW AP TOP 25 FARED
4. Maryland beat Ohio State, 75­69
17. Gonzaga beat Pacific, 88­65
25. Iowa State beat Kansas, 82­73
NEW ENGLAND
Assumption 75...............................AIC 65
Babson 75....................................Clark 67
Bentley 74..............................LIU Post 59
Binghamton 71.............................UNH 62
Bridgewater St. 56..J. & Wales (R.I.) 41
Bryant 69........................LIU Brooklyn 62
Colby­Sawyer 53...................Thomas 39
Elms 77.......................................Lesley 40
Endicott 58................ Roger Williams 52
Gordon 64................................Nichols 61
Lasell 61...............Maine­Farmington 54
Maine 84.....................................UMBC 44
MIT 67.........................................Smith 54
Pratt 56.............................Pine Manor 48
Regis 49.....................................Becker 37
R.I. College 57...............Plymouth St. 38
Sacred Heart 66..........Central Conn. 61
Salve Regina 62...............Wentworth 53
Southern Maine 48........Keene State 40
St. Anselm 74...... Roberts Wesleyan 62
St. Michael’s 65.....................Daemen 56
St. Thomas Aquinas 67..... So. Conn. 59
Stony Brook 76........... UMass­Lowell 56
UMass­Boston 75...........UMass­Dart. 72
UNew England 63.........Western N.E. 54
URI 66...................................Richmond 60
Vermont 52...............................Albany 39
Wellesley 52...................Coast Guard 47
Westfield St. 117.......................MCLA 63
WPI 49........................Mount Holyoke 26
OTHER EAST
Adelphi 74.........District of Columbia 68
Duquesne 60............St. Bonaventure 54
Howard 74......................Florida A&M 68
Marist 71................................Canisius 66
Niagara 61.........................Manhattan 51
NJIT 66...........................Kennesaw St. 60
Ohio 74......................................Buffalo 71
Penn 66................................Princeton 60
Robt. Morris 70.....Mount St. Mary’s 58
South Florida 63.....................Temple 53
St. Francis (Pa.) 75....Fairleigh Dick. 64
St. Francis Brooklyn 76........Wagner 61
SOUTH
Alabama A&M 58............ Jackson St. 55
Alcorn St. 53.............Texas Southern 52
Austin Peay 81.............Morehead St. 80
Bethune­Cook. 67...........N.C. Central 50
Campbell 51...................Presbyterian 46
FGCU 68....................................Liberty 50
Grambling St. 80............Alabama St. 72
Green Bay 81................No. Kentucky 61
Hampton 74................Charleston So. 66
High Point 87.................USC Upstate 61
Jacksonville 62....................Lipscomb 47
Jacksonville St. 62......Tennessee St. 52
Marshall 63..........................Charlotte 62
Maryland 75...................... Ohio State 69
Md. Eastern Shore 73.....Morgan St. 68
Middle Tenn. 74..............Fla. Atlantic 55
Murray St. 81...................Eastern Ky. 63
Nicholls 86................Incarnate Word 62
Norfolk St. 63.................Delaware St. 50
North Alabama 70....... North Florida 64
N. Carolina A&T 58....S. Carolina St. 44
North Texas 62...........Southern Miss 48
Northwestern St. 82.....McNeese St. 63
Prairie View A&M 55.....Southern U. 54
Radford 60...................UNC Asheville 46
Rice 61........................Louisiana Tech 51
Savannah St. 76............Coppin State 70
SE Louisiana 62........ Cent. Arkansas 53
South Alabama 88.........Coastal Car. 78
Tennessee Tech 77.............. Belmont 72
Texas State 69.................Georgia St. 60
Troy 83......................Appalachian St. 72
Tulane 68.......................East Carolina 57
UAB 83.................... Fla. International 59
SUN
1/6
UCF 68...................................Memphis 55
UT Arlington 74...............Georgia So. 53
VCU 59.........................Saint Joseph’s 40
Western Ky. 75............Old Dominion 60
Winthrop 77.......................Longwood 69
MIDWEST
Central Mich. 94........................Akron 71
Cleveland State 71........................UIC 53
Dayton 84................................La Salle 45
Iowa State 82..........................Kansas 73
Kansas St. 86..................... Oklahoma 56
Kent State 71...................E. Michigan 64
No. Illinois 82................Miami (Ohio) 71
Purdue 71.............................Michigan 70
SIUE 65............................... Eastern Ill. 56
Toledo 65.............................Ball State 58
UMKC 111....................Chicago State 58
UT Martin 80..............SE Missouri St. 73
W. Michigan 84..........Bowling Green 82
Wright State 61................Milwaukee 57
Youngstown St. 70.................... IUPUI 52
SOUTHWEST
Abilene Christ. 91..Sam Houston St. 79
Arkansas St. 64................La.­Monroe 54
Houston Baptist 83...... New Orleans 74
Lamar 76..................Texas A&M­C.C. 58
Little Rock 62................La.­Lafayette 48
Miss. Valley St. 62.....................UAPB 56
Oral Roberts 68........Western Illinois 64
UTEP 73........................................UTSA 60
FAR WEST
Boise St. 69...................San Diego St. 66
BYU 55.................Loyola Marymount 44
Cal St. Fullerton 72.................Hawaii 68
CSUN 73................UC Santa Barbara 65
Denver 87......................North Dakota 66
Fresno St. 66..................Colorado St. 55
Gonzaga 88...............................Pacific 65
Grand Canyon 56....................Seattle 53
Idaho St. 80......................No. Arizona 69
Montana St. 69.........Sacramento St. 53
New Mexico 66.......................Nevada 64
No. Colorado 86.........................Idaho 72
Pepperdine 74....................San Diego 55
Portland St. 78.....................Montana 60
Saint Mary’s 98.....................Portland 91
Santa Clara 71............San Francisco 66
Southern Utah 84...............Weber St. 79
UC Davis 67....................UC Riverside 59
UC Irvine 75...........................Cal Poly 59
Utah State 48.......................Air Force 44
Utah Valley 78..................Bakersfield 70
Wyoming 90................................UNLV 62
Basketball box scores
MEN
Boston University, 87­80
At Boston
BUCKNELL (7­7) — Moore 6­9 4­4 16,
Sestina 10­15 2­2 27, Sotos 2­6 0­1 4,
Toomer 2­3 1­2 6, Mackenzie 8­14 2­2
19, Ellis 0­0 0­0 0, Funk 0­5 0­0 0, Jones
0­1 0­0 0, Newman 0­0 0­2 0, Robertson
0­0 0­0 0, Meeks 3­5 1­2 8. Totals 31­58
10­15 80.
BOSTON UNIVERSITY (8­7) — Tynen
2­3 2­2 7, Scanlon 5­15 0­0 12, Mahoney
12­20 2­3 26, Vilarino 3­4 5­5 11, McCoy
5­11 6­6 18, Mathon 0­2 0­0 0, Harper
1­3 0­0 2, Petcash 1­4 0­0 2, Pascoe 1­1
1­2 4, Hemphill 2­4 0­0 5. Totals 32­67
16­18 87.
Halftime: Boston University, 43­32. 3­
pt. goals: Buck 8­22 (Moore 0­2, Sesti­
na 5­7, Sotos 0­3, Toomer 1­1, Macken­
zie 1­5, Funk 0­2, Jones 0­1, Meeks 1­1),
BU 7­19 (Tynen 1­1, Scanlon 2­6, Mc­
Coy 2­5, Harper 0­1, Petcash 0­2, Pas­
coe 1­1, Hemphill 1­3). Rebounds: Buck
29 (Sestina 9), BU 37 (Mahoney 14). As­
sists: Buck 17 (Sotos 7), BU 17 (Mahon­
ey 4). Fouls: Buck 20, BU 15. A: 841.
Virginia Tech, 77­66
At Blacksburg, Va.
BOSTON COLLEGE (9­4) — Mitchell
0­1 0­0 0, Popovic 4­5 2­2 11, Herren Jr.
0­3 2­2 2, Bowman 4­14 4­4 14, Chat­
man 4­11 10­13 18, Baker Jr. 0­0 0­0 0,
Reyes 0­0 0­0 0, Jar.Hamilton 3­7 1­2 8,
Jai.Hamilton 4­7 1­2 13. Totals 19­48 20­
25 66.
VIRGINIA TECH (13­1) — Blackshear
Jr. 6­7 8­9 20, Bede 1­4 0­0 3, Hill 1­9 2­2
4, Robinson 4­10 4­5 12, Alexander­
Walker 9­14 5­7 25, Wilkins 1­2 0­0 3,
Horne 1­2 2­2 4, Outlaw 2­6 0­0 6. Totals
25­54 21­25 77.
Halftime: Boston College, 32­30. 3­pt.
goals: BC 8­27 (Mitchell 0­1, Popovic
1­1, Herren Jr. 0­3, Bowman 2­8, Chat­
man 0­6, Jar.Hamilton 1­2, Jai.Hamilton
4­6), VaTech 6­22 (Bede 1­3, Hill 0­5,
Robinson 0­2, Alexander­Walker 2­5,
Wilkins 1­1, Outlaw 2­6). Rebounds: BC
25 (Bowman 7), VaTech 39 (Robinson
8). Assists: BC 10 (Bowman 5), VaTech
13 (Robinson 5). Fouls: BC 22, VaTech
18. A: 7,009.
FOOTBALL
MIDWEST
E. Washington 24.. North Dakota St. 38
FCS Playoffs
National Championship
North Dakota St. 38.. Eastern Wash. 24
HOCKEY
MEN
HOW USCHO TOP 20 FARED
1. St. Cloud St. beat Robert Morris, 5­2
2. UMass beat AIC, 6­1
3. Minnesota St. beat Mich. Tech, 4­2
4. Minn.­Duluth lost USA Under­18 4­2
6. Notre Dame lost to Michigan, 4­2
7. Ohio St. beat Michigan St., 6­0
8. Denver beat Wisconsin, 4­3
9. Penn State lost to Minnesota, 4­1
11. Northeastern lost to Merrimack, 1­0
13. North Dakota lost to Canisius, 2­1
14. Union lost to Brown, 6­3
15. Arizona St. played BC
17. Western Mich. played at Air Force
HOCKEY EAST
Merrimack 1...................Northeastern 0
ECAC HOCKEY
Colgate 4................................Princeton 3
Quinnipiac 2...............................Cornell 2
OTHER NEW ENGLAND
Amherst 6.....................................Colby 3
Babson 4....................................... Curry 2
Bentley 3..............................Dartmouth 3
Bowdoin 4...............................Hamilton 1
Brown 6.........................................Union 3
Concordia (Wis.) 4.........Salve Regina 4
Conn. College 1...........Manhattanville 0
Cortland St. 2...............UMass­Boston 1
Holy Cross 5...................... Mercyhurst 4
Nichols 4.....................................Suffolk 2
Norwich 3.................................Endicott 3
Plattsburgh St. 1................ St. Anselm 1
Providence 3...................Miami (Ohio) 3
Stonehill 6................Johnson & Wales 2
Trinity 4...............................Middlebury 0
Tufts 2.................................Bryn Athyn 1
UConn 6........................... St. Lawrence 3
UMass 6............................................ AIC 1
UMass­Dartmouth 3.......Fitchburg St. 2
UNH 5...............................................Yale 5
Wesleyan 5..............................Williams 0
Western N.E. 4...........Framingham St. 3
Westfield St. 6.......................Salem St. 2
Worcester St. 4...............Plymouth St. 1
OTHER EAST
Buffalo St. 6...........................Neumann 2
Canisius 2....................... North Dakota 1
Geneseo St. 4.........................Nazareth 3
Oswego St. 6....................... Canton St. 2
Rensselaer 2.................................Army 1
RIT 2...........................................Niagara 1
St. Cloud St. 5...............Robert Morris 2
WOMEN
HOW USCHO TOP 10 FARED
2. Minnesota beat Minn.­Duluth, 4­3
6. Princeton beat Dartmouth, 5­2
7. Providence lost to Vermont, 5­4
8. Ohio St. lost to Minn.­Whitecaps 3­2
10. BC lost to UNH, 3­2
HOCKEY EAST
Maine 1...............................................BU 0
UConn 6............................... Holy Cross 3
UNH 3..................................................BC 2
Vermont 5...........................Providence 4
ECAC HOCKEY
Princeton 5..........................Dartmouth 2
Quinnipiac 1.............................Harvard 0
OTHER NEW ENGLAND
Buffalo St. 5.....................St. Michael’s 1
Canton St. 4.....................Castleton St. 3
Clarkson 3.......................Northeastern 3
Colby 2...................................Wesleyan 0
Endicott 1.....................Manhattanville 1
Franklin Pierce 6..............Potsdam St. 1
Hamilton 5..................Southern Maine 0
Lindenwood 12...............................Post 0
Middlebury 3...........................Amherst 0
Nichols 6............................N.E. College 0
RIT 2.............................................Brown 0
Sacred Heart 13....................Neumann 4
Salve Regina 4........ Johnson & Wales 0
Trinity 2..........................Conn. College 0
UNew England 5.............Plymouth St. 2
Williams 3................................Bowdoin 0
OTHER EAST
Mercyhurst 1............................Colgate 1
Hockey summaries
MEN
Massachusetts, 6­1
UMass. (15­3­0) ..........2
AIC (8­9­1) ...................0
2
1
2 —
0 —
6
1
Scoring: Mass, George Mika (Kurt
Keats, Marc Del Gaizo) 5:51; Mass, An­
thony Del Gaizo (Bobby Trivigno, Marc
Del Gaizo) 13:29; Mass, Mitchell Chaf­
fee (Jake Gaudet, Marc Del Gaizo) 5:54;
AIC, Shawn McBride (Patrik Demel,
Blake Christensen) 11:01; Mass, Marc
Del Gaizo (John Leonard, Mitchell
Chaffee) 19:21 (pp); Mass, Jacob Prit­
chard (Cale Makar, Philip Lagunov)
3:53; Mass, John Leonard (Philip La­
gunov, Jacob Pritchard) 4:59.
Saves: Mass, Matt Murray 20; AIC,
Zackarias Skog 33.
Y
MON
1/7
TUE
1/8
WED
THU
1/9
1/10
FRI
Y
Y
SAT
1/11
1/12
BYE
MIN
7:00
NESN
BKN
7:30
NBCSB
IND
7:00
NBCSB
Home games shaded
WAS
7:00
NESN
TOR
7:00
NESN
MIA
7:00
TNT*
ORL
7:00
NBCSB*
For updated scores: bostonglobe.com/sports
On the radio, unless noted: Patriots, Bruins, and Celtics, WBZ­FM 98.5; *WROR­FM 105.7
ON THE AIR
PRO BASKETBALL
7:30 p.m. Indiana at Toronto
NBATV
PRO FOOTBALL
1:05 p.m. AFC wild card: LA Chargers at Baltimore CBS
4:40 p.m. NFC wild card: Philadelphia at Chicago
NBC
GOLF
2:30 p.m. PGA: Tournament of Champions
Golf
PRO HOCKEY
5 p.m.
Washington at Detroit
8 p.m.
Chicago at Pittsburgh
NHL
NBCSN
MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
12 p.m.
Xavier at Marquette
1 p.m.
Seton Hall at DePaul
2 p.m.
Geo. Washington at Saint Joseph’s
4 p.m.
Rhode Island at Saint Louis
4 p.m.
Temple at Wichita State
4:30 p.m. Indiana at Michigan
6 p.m.
Memphis at Houston
6 p.m.
Miami at Louisville
8 p.m.
Stanford at USC
Fox
FS1
NBCSN
ESPNU
ESPNews
CBS
ESPNews
ESPNU
ESPNU
WOMEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
12 p.m.
Alabama at South Carolina
12 p.m.
SMU at Cincinnati
12 p.m.
UConn at Houston
1 p.m.
Florida St. at North Carolina
1 p.m.
St. John’s at Butler
2 p.m.
Georgetown at Creighton
2 p.m.
Missouri at Tennessee
2 p.m.
TCU at Oklahoma St.
2 p.m.
Wm. & Mary at Northeastern
3 p.m.
Notre Dame at Georgia Tech
4 p.m.
Texas at West Virginia
ESPNU
ESPN2
CBSSN
NESN+
FS2
CBSSN
ESPN2
ESPNU
NESN
NESN+
ESPN2
BOYS
CAPE & ISLANDS
Nantucket 68.................Sturgis West 45
NONLEAGUE
BB&N 62................................Brewster 45
Lex. Christian 66..... Christ. Heritage 52
Bp. Hendricken 57.....................Burke 47
Charlestown 65............New Bedford 54
GIRLS
Worcester Acad. 69............Deerfield 37
NONLEAGUE
Pomfret 48.........................Governor’s 35
Wareham 63...................Paulo Freire 44
Bp. Feehan 42.................Bp. Fenwick 28
HOCKEY
BOYS
ATLANTIC COAST
Falmouth 10............Dennis­Yarmouth 1
Marshfield 5..........................Sandwich 0
BAY STATE
Brookline 2..........................Weymouth 2
Framingham 4.......................Braintree 2
Natick 4........................................Milton 0
CAPE & ISLANDS
Martha’s Vnyd. 3.................Nantucket 0
CAPE ANN
Lynnfield 3............................Amesbury 0
Masconomet 3.............................Triton 1
N. Reading 4.........................Pentucket 2
CATHOLIC CENTRAL
Arlington Cath. 9..................Matignon 4
Austin Prep 4....................Bp. Fenwick 0
CATHOLIC CONFERENCE
Cath. Memorial 3...................Xaverian 1
St. John’s Prep 7............Malden Cath. 1
COMMONWEALTH
Essex Tech 0......................Shawsheen 0
HOCKOMOCK
Canton 4................................Mansfield 0
Franklin 4................................. Taunton 1
King Philip 10.......................Stoughton 1
North Attleboro 7................. Attleboro 3
Oliver Ames 3..........................Foxboro 0
ISL
Thayer 4......................................Nobles 4
MAYFLOWER
Blue Hills 5........................South Shore 3
Diman 6................................Tri­County 0
MERRIMACK VALLEY/DUAL COUNTY
Acton­Boxboro 5................... Waltham 2
Boston Latin 3....................Tewksbury 2
Chelmsford 1..................Central Cath. 1
Dracut/Tyngsboro 3..........Cambridge 2
Lincoln­Sudbury 6................. Methuen 0
Westford 4................................Billerica 1
MIDDLESEX
Arlington 5................................Woburn 2
Burlington 2.......................Wilmington 1
Melrose 4..............................Stoneham 3
Winchester 4............................Reading 0
NORTHEASTERN
Danvers 4...................................Beverly 1
Gloucester 6................Revere/Malden 2
Lynn Classical/English 9.........Everett 5
Saugus 4..................................Medford 4
Swampscott 4.....................Somerville 2
Winthrop 3........................Marblehead 2
OLD COLONY
Barnstable 3............Bridge.­Raynham 0
PATRIOT
Duxbury 7...................Plymouth South 1
Hanover 6.................................Scituate 3
Plymouth North 4................Pembroke 1
Quincy 5..........................Whit.­Hanson 2
ROY
Shrewsbury 1.......................Algonquin 1
RUSSELL
Hopedale/Millis 5..Assabet/Maynard 3
SOUTH COAST
Gr. New Bedford 5...... O­R/Fairhaven 2
Somerset Berkley 9.......D­R/Seekonk 2
SOUTH SHORE
Norwell 6................................Cohasset 2
Rockland 6.................Hull/Middleboro 3
TRI­VALLEY
Dedham 6............................Bellingham 2
Norwood 2.............................. Holliston 0
Westwood 3.........................Hopkinton 3
NONLEAGUE
Andover 3............................... Hingham 2
Bp. Feehan 5.......................Prout (R.I.) 5
Pope Francis 6............Bp. Hendricken 1
St. George’s 4.......................... Pomfret 1
St. John Paul II 4....................Brockton 3
Watertown 4......................Minuteman 1
Ham.­Wenham 2................Latin Acad. 2
Abp. Williams 6..............St. John’s (S) 1
Newton South 4.....Saint Joseph Prep 1
St. Mary’s 5.....................Newburyport 1
Northeast 4...............St. Peter­Marian 1
Coyle & Cassidy 4..............Dartmouth 3
Upper Cape 2.....Mashpee/Monomoy 1
Marlborough 5....... Groton­Dunstable 2
Nashoba Tech 6......................Gardner 0
Apponequet/Bp. Con. 8...... Bp. Stang 0
Norton 12............................... E. Boston 0
GIRLS
ATLANTIC COAST
Falmouth 4..............Dennis­Yarmouth 2
Sandwich 11........................Marshfield 2
BAY STATE
Braintree 10.....................Framingham 0
Natick 10......................................Milton 2
Weymouth 2....Brook./Newton South 2
HOCKOMOCK
Franklin 8..............................Stoughton 3
Mansf./Fox./O­A 5....................Canton 5
ISL
Brooks 3.......................................Rivers 2
BB&N 3........................................Groton 1
MERRIMACK VALLEY/DUAL COUNTY
Boston Latin 4..........Concord­Carlisle 0
Central Cath. 5.... Cambridge/Somer. 1
Lincoln­Sud. 6.........Wayland/Weston 2
Methuen/Tewks. 4...... A­B/Bromfield 1
Westford/Littleton 6.............Waltham 2
MIDDLESEX
Arlington 3................................Woburn 1
Lexington 5..............................Belmont 1
Stoneham 4..............................Melrose 4
Wilmington 4.......................Burlington 0
NORTHEASTERN
Masconomet/Amesbury/Georgetown/
Newburyport/Triton 2Winthrop/Lynn
Classical/Lynn English 1
Pea./Lynnf./N. Reading 2.....Medford 0
PATRIOT
Duxbury 7.......Plymouth North/South 1
Pembroke 5............ Whit.­Hanson/S­L 3
SEMGHL
Han./Coh. 3.... Bou./Mas./O­R./Ware. 2
Norwell 7..................... Martha’s Vnyd. 0
TRI­VALLEY
Dedham 4............D­S/Bell./Hopkinton 1
Medway/Ash. 3........Medfield/Norton 1
NBA
Sunday
Favorite...............Line .............Underdog
Brooklyn................2 ...........At Chicago
At LA Clippers......7 ................Orlando
At Minnesota...OFF .............LA Lakers
Miami.....................6 ............At Atlanta
At OKC.................10 .........Washington
At Toronto........OFF .................Indiana
At Phoenix.............2 ..............Charlotte
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Sunday
Favorite...............Line .............Underdog
At Dayton...............10 .............Richmond
At Marquette........7½ ...................Xavier
Seton Hall.................2 .............At Depaul
At N’western............8 ...................Illinois
At Michigan.............8 .................Indiana
At St. Joseph’s...14½ ...........Geo. Wash
Nebraska...............3½ .................At Iowa
At Geo. Mason........ 7 ...............St. Bona.
At Wichita St........PK .................Temple
At St. Louis.............. 5 .........................URI
At Louisville..........6½ ................... Miami
At Houston.............10 ..............Memphis
Wisconsin.................2 ..........At Penn St.
At USC...................7½ ...............Stanford
NHL
Sunday
Favorite...........Line Underdog........Line
Carolina...........­156 At Ottawa......+146
At Arizona...... ­127 NY Rangers...+117
At Las Vegas..­235 New Jersey....+215
Washington....­165 At Detroit...... +155
At Winnipeg...­169 Dallas.............+159
At Anaheim....­124 Edmonton......+114
At Pittsburgh. ­245 Chicago..........+225
College Football
Monday National Championship Game
at Santa Clara
Favorite................Pts. .............Underdog
Alabama ­9 ­5{ (58{) Clemson
NFL
Playoffs Sunday
Favorite................Pts. .............Underdog
At Baltimore......... 3 .........La Chargers
At Chicago............6½ .....................Phila.
Transactions
Schools
BASKETBALL
Latest line
NONLEAGUE
Andover 6........................La Salle (R.I.) 2
King Philip 3.............................Ursuline 0
Barnstable 4..... C.C. Tech/Mon./Nau. 0
Auburn 2.................................Oakmont 0
Austin Prep 5.................Longmeadow 1
Shrewsbury 6.....Haver./N. And./Pen. 0
Nobles 2..........................................Kent 1
St. George’s 2..........................Gunnery 1
Notre Dame (H) 5............Marblehead 0
Arlington Cath. 12. N. Quincy/Quincy 5
Westwood 4...........................Norwood 2
SWIMMING
BOYS
HOCKOMOCK
King Philip 88........................ Taunton 64
NONLEAGUE
Natick 100...........................Hopkinton 81
GIRLS
HOCKOMOCK
King Philip 93........................ Taunton 71
WRESTLING
ISL
Belmont Hill 75................Milton Acad. 6
Roxbury Latin 39...............Middlesex 30
NONLEAGUE
Belmont Hill 72..........Avon Old Farms 4
Plymouth South 40......La Salle (R.I.) 25
Watertown 42..Keefe Tech/Ashland 33
Woonsocket (R.I.) 53......Watertown 15
Quincy 36..................................Durfee 21
Watertown 44....................Pentucket 33
Malden Cath. 48...............Cambridge 18
Beverly 54........................... Cambridge 0
Gr. Lowell 70..........................Waltham 6
Nobles 54.................................Weston 18
Hingham 45.................... Oliver Ames 33
Oliver Ames 42...................Sandwich 37
St. John’s Prep 44..........N. Attleboro 21
Taunton 39...............................Quincy 30
Algonquin 48.......................Cambridge 6
St. John’s Prep 52.................Quabbin 10
Gr. Lowell 54..........................Reading 21
Gr. Lowell 60................................Salem 6
St. John’s Prep 61........Bridge.­Rayn. 14
Hingham 54.........................Sandwich 18
Plymouth South 39........N. Attleboro 28
Plymouth South 70.................Quabbin 9
St. John’s Prep 37..........Plymouth S. 24
Watertown 42..................Middleboro 41
Quincy 45..........................Bellingham 24
Brendan Grant Memorial
at Belmont High School
Team results — 1. Dedham, 202; 2.
East Providence (R.I.), 144; 3. Mas­
conomet, 121; 4. Needham, 119; 5.
Newton North, 112.
R For updated scores and highlights,
go to bostonglobe.com/sports/high­
schools.
Golf
TOURNEY OF CHAMPIONS
At Plantation Course at Kapalua
Kapalua, Hawaii
Third Round (Par: 73)
Gary Woodland...67­67­68—202
­17
Rory McIlroy........69­68­68—205
­14
Marc Leishman...68­70­68—206
­13
X. Schauffele.......72­67­68—207
­12
B. DeChambeau..69­68­70—207
­12
Justin Thomas.....67­72­70—209
­10
Kevin Tway..........66­71­72—209
­10
Dustin Johnson... 67­74­69—210
­9
Jon Rahm.............70­71­69—210
­9
Patton Kizzire......69­71­71—211
­8
Paul Casey...........73­71­68—212
­7
Andrew Putnam. 69­73­70—212
­7
Troy Merritt.........73­71­69—213
­6
C. Howell III.........74­70­69—213
­6
Ian Poulter...........71­69­73—213
­6
Cameron Champ 71­68­74—213
­6
Webb Simpson....70­72­72—214
­5
Andrew Landry...69­75­71—215
­4
Brandt Snedeker 75­69­71—215
­4
Jason Day.............69­71­75—215
­4
Scott Piercy.........76­72­69—217
­2
Matt Kuchar........72­73­72—217
­2
Patrick Reed........70­75­72—217
­2
F. Molinari............73­71­73—217
­2
Billy Horschel......72­75­71—218
­1
Keegan Bradley..77­69­72—218
­1
Aaron Wise..........74­71­73—218
­1
Brice Garnett.......73­72­73—218
­1
Ted Potter, Jr...... 75­73­71—219
E
Brooks Koepka....76­70­73—219
E
Bubba Watson....70­79­74—223
+4
Michael Kim........71­72­80—223
+4
Satoshi Kodaira..77­76­73—226
+7
New England players
218 (­1) — Keegan Bradley, Hopkin­
ton, 77­69­72
NBA G-League
SATURDAY’S RESULTS
Delaware 108...................Greensboro 86
Iowa 127...........................Fort Wayne 99
Long Island 126....................Raptors 105
Maine 109...................Grand Rapids 102
Memphis 110.............................Austin 97
Santa Cruz 121........................Texas 116
Windy City 123...................Stockton 114
SUNDAY’S GAMES
Capital City at Westchester.................3
Sioux Falls at Northern Arizona...........5
Wisconsin at Lakeland.......................... 6
Oklahoma City at Iowa..........................7
FRIDAY’S RESULTS
Agua Caliente 112.....Oklahoma City 94
Capital City 122...........Canton 117 (OT)
Fort Wayne 125...............Wisconsin 120
Lakeland 117.................Greensboro 107
Salt Lake City 110..........Sioux Falls 105
Westchester 113..................Raptors 110
Windy City 120............................Erie 118
BASEBALL
Milwaukee (NL): Traded OF Keon
Broxton to the N.Y. Mets for RHPs Bob­
by Wahl and Adam Hill and INF Felix
Valerio.
Pittsburgh (NL): Named David Eck­
stein special assistant/baseball opera­
tions.
St. Louis (NL): Assigned P Ryan
Meisinger outright to Memphis (PCL).
San Francisco (NL): Acquired INF/OF
Breyvic Valera from the Baltimore Ori­
oles for cash.
HOCKEY
Colorado (NHL): Assigned G Joe Can­
nata from Colorado (AHL) to Utah
(ECHL).
Los Angeles (NHL): Assigned F Drake
Rymsha from Ontario (AHL) to Man­
chester (ECHL).
NY Rangers (NHL): Recalled D Vince
Pedrie from Maine (ECHL) to Hartford
(AHL).
St. Louis (NHL): Assigned G Evan
Fitzpatrick to San Antonio (AHL). Re­
called G Jordan Binnington from San
Antonio. Released G Ben Halford from
a professional tryout agreement.
COLLEGE
Iowa: Junior DB back Amani Hooker
will enter the NFL draft.
West Virginia: Named Neal Brown
football coach and signed him to a six­
year contract.
Hockey
AHL
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L OL SL Pts. GF
Charlotte....... 26 8 3 0 55 128
Bridgeport .... 21 11 4 2 48 119
Lehigh Val. ... 19 12 1 2 41 123
WB/Scran. .... 18 15 4 1 41 118
Springfield.... 16 12 4 3 39 124
Hartford ........ 17 15 2 2 38 111
Providence ... 15 16 5 0 35 112
Hershey......... 15 18 0 2 32 90
GA
104
116
109
113
116
115
109
117
North Division
Rochester ..... 22 12 2 0
Syracuse ....... 21 10 2 0
Utica .............. 19 16 2 1
Cleveland...... 17 12 4 1
Toronto ......... 17 13 3 2
Laval .............. 15 16 3 3
Binghamton.. 16 20 3 0
Belleville ....... 16 20 2 0
117
128
119
102
126
99
105
113
105
89
132
111
126
104
138
127
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
Iowa............... 20 8 4 3 47 123
Chicago......... 21 12 3 1 46 133
Gr. Rapids..... 19 12 3 3 44 113
Milwaukee.... 18 12 5 1 42 97
Texas............. 18 11 3 2 41 125
Rockford ....... 15 15 3 4 37 80
San Antonio.. 17 18 1 0 35 93
Manitoba ...... 14 18 2 0 30 80
96
109
113
99
104
105
102
108
Pacific Division
San Jose........ 20 7 1 3
Tucson........... 18 9 3 1
San Diego ..... 16 11 1 3
Colorado ....... 16 13 3 1
Bakersfield ... 16 13 1 1
Stockton........ 15 16 3 0
Ontario .......... 10 15 3 2
81
97
108
107
91
138
125
46
44
41
39
39
36
35
34
44
40
36
36
34
33
25
108
109
111
95
98
120
95
NOTE: Two points are awarded for a
win, one point for an overtime or shoo­
tout loss.
SATURDAY’S RESULTS
Binghamton 3......................Bridgeport 2
Charlotte 6..............................Belleville 3
Chicago 3..........................San Antonio 1
Hartford 3.......................Lehigh Valley 1
Hershey 6....................... Grand Rapids 4
Laval 2...................................Rochester 1
Manitoba 3..........................Texas 2 (SO)
Milwaukee 5...................WB/Scranton 3
San Jose 2..................................Ontario 1
Stockton 7.............................. Colorado 6
Springfield 5.......................Providence 3
Toronto 5................................Syracuse 2
Utica 6....................................Cleveland 2
Tucson....................................Bakersfield
SUNDAY’S GAMES
Utica at Cleveland..................................3
Hartford at Providence.................... 3:05
Lehigh Valley at Springfield............3:05
Charlotte at Toronto..............................4
Iowa at Rockford....................................5
Milwaukee at Hershey...........................5
San Diego at Ontario............................. 6
FRIDAY'S RESULTS
Charlotte 4..............................Belleville 1
Colorado 5..........................Bakersfield 4
Hartford 3............................Springfield 1
Iowa 3......................................Rockford 0
Providence 4..................Lehigh Valley 2
Rochester 3..........................Laval 2 (SO)
San Antonio 3..........................Chicago 0
San Diego 4.............................San Jose 3
Syracuse 3...........................Bridgeport 1
Texas 3...................................Manitoba 1
Toronto 5...........................Binghamton 1
Tucson 7..................................Stockton 5
WB/Scranton 3.....Grand Rapids 2 (SO)
NWHL
SATURDAY’S RESULTS
Buffalo 5...................................BOSTON 0
SUNDAY’S GAME
Metropolitan at Connecticut................1
NEXT SATURDAY’S GAME
Metropolitan at Buffalo....................1:30
Minnesota at BOSTON......................7:30
IIHF JUNIOR CHAMPIONSHIPS
Final
Finland 3..........................................USA 2
Consolation
Russia 5..............................Switzerland 2
Semifinal Results
USA 2............................................Russia 1
Finland 6............................Switzerland 1
ONLINE
3 MANSIONS
ON STORIED
R.I. STREET
UP FOR SALE
H
ALSO INSIDE: HELP WANTED AND CLASSIFIEDS
Address
YOUR REAL ESTATE GUIDE TO BUYING, SELLING, LIVING
B O S T O N SU N DAY G L O B E JAN UA RY 6 , 2 01 9 | R E A L E S TATE . B O S T O N.CO M
IF YOU LIVED HERE, YOU’D BE HOME BY NOW
— AND A
LITTLE
BIT
RICHER
D
rowning in student loans? Tired
of being house poor? Sick of sitting in bottleneck traffic every
day?
Several states and communities are stepping up to attract workers with offers of financial incentives and a
more equitable work/life balance.
Maine wants to pay off
your student loans. Baltimore
will help cover your down payment. And Tulsa will hand over
$10,000 in cash, help pay rent,
and provide a workspace.
Whether it’s a rural area desperate for a workforce, a city trying to attract young professionals,
or a midsize community looking to tap into the remote-worker niche, more places are willing to pay
up to make it happen.
And so far, the plans are working. More than
9,000 people filled out the lengthy application for
the Tulsa Remote program, which will soon be selecting its first grant recipients – all of whom will
Cities, states offer
perks to attract
new residents.
BY J E N N I F E R F E N N L E F F E RTS
G LO B E CO R R E S P O N D E N T
GLOBE STAFF; ADOBE
be full-time remote workers. Vermont, which has
a similar program for remote workers, also has
been inundated with interest.
“When we announced the program, we were
pretty overwhelmed by the reaction,’’ said Ken
Levit, executive director of the Tulsa-based
George Kaiser Family Foundation, a private nonprofit funding the initiative. “We know the interest is enormously high. It has tapped into something out there.’’
He said workers from all over the country and
many overseas applied to relocate to this heartland city of roughly 400,000 known for its arts
and cultural institutions. There is a large pool
from the San Francisco Bay Area, Los Angeles,
New York, Dallas, and about 50 from Massachusetts, he added.
Levit said the foundation had previously provided housing stipends and studio space to artists
and writers. Many of those grant recipients have
remained in Tulsa, leading officials to believe that
there is a “stickiness’’ to the city.
They hope to build upon that program to help
diversify the community and boost the economy,
MOVE, Page H2
HOME OF THE WEEK
Renovated JP condo just steps
from park
listed for $614,000
1 3 1 - 13 3 W I LL I A M S S T., UN I T 1
By John R. Ellement
L
PAT GREENHOUSE/GLOBE STAFF
Gleaming hardwood floors connect the living room to the kitchen, which includes a breakfast bar.
GLOBE STAFF
ike its more famous neighbor — the 485-acre Franklin Park — this Jamaica
Plain three-family has undergone renovations. It recently was transformed into a threeunit condo building that sits behind a
ubiquitous white picket fence.
The first-floor unit benefited from
those renovations. The rectangular
space has recessed lighting, refinished
hardwood, crown molding, and new
energy-efficient windows.
The open floor plan starts with the
living room, the sunlit beneficiary of a
bank of three windows that look out to
Williams Street and a single window
on the side of the house. It also has the
largest chunk of the shared space, as
well as a door leading to the first of two
full baths. This shower-only bath offers
a single white vanity and ceramic tile
on the floor and in the frameless-glass
stall.
The dining area, now occupied by a
circular table for four, is cast in the
light from a bank of three windows.
The kitchen unfolds behind a
breakfast counter topped with sparkling dark granite, a setup that can
easily seat three. The appliances are
HOME OF THE WEEK, Page H2
Address
H2
B o s t o n
S u n d a y
G l o b e
JA N UA RY 6 , 2 0 1 9
Ask...
?
Have a question for our experts:
Send it to Address@globe.com.
Questions are subject to editing.
Bored of the flies: Reader battles porch pests
The Carpenter
ROB ROBILLARD
Answers your questions
about leaks, chips, cracks,
tools, and more.
Q. We have a problem that is frustrating, unsanitary,
and embarrassing. We have a large enclosed porch with
sliding-glass windows, and have guests for dinner on the
porch once or twice a week when the weather is nice.
The porch was built over a dirt foundation and has
painted cedar clapboard on the outside. Since we installed the windows several years ago, we have had an
infestation of flies, beginning as soon as the weather
turns nice. They are smaller than common houseflies.
I have sprayed insecticide, but they return after a day
or two. I prefer not to use chemicals where we eat and
have resorted to vacuuming them up several times a
day. It is not uncommon to get 50 at a time. They are
usually on the windows and screens, and are much
more prevalent on the east end of the porch.
We have the outer perimeter of the house treated annually for ants. I called the pest company and was told
that the issue is that the porch was built on dirt. The
technician said he could spray, but the problem would
reoccur until we covered the dirt with a plastic overlay
and vented the area under the porch.
Have you ever heard of an issue like this? How do I
cover the dirt floor or vent the space without cutting into the siding? Is there a vent designed for this purpose?
Would taking those two steps eliminate the problem?
N.A.
A. I’d love to be a fly on the wall during those dinner
conversations. Just kidding. This is a tough one, so I’ll
break it down into smaller steps.
First, I’d identify the species of fly and research it. I’m
a big fan of the quote from Sun Tzu’s “The Art of War:”
“If you know the enemy and know yourself, you need
not fear the result of a hundred battles.” (Here’s hoping
you don’t go a hundred rounds with these flies.) I recommend capturing a few in a Mason jar and bringing
them to your exterminator.
It’s important to determine why they are under your
porch. Is there a dead animal under there, or do they
simply live in the dirt?
Once you are armed with that information, update
the crawl space. Was your porch a deck that you converted? Your e-mail was missing critical information
such as whether the area under the porch is open to the
outside. If it’s closed off, is there access from the basement? Many older crawl spaces have dirt floors, but
your best bet is a poured-concrete surface.
I’m not a fan of enclosed crawl spaces with wall
vents. The vents are designed to allow outside air in to
circulate. Over time, these vented crawl spaces can develop moisture problems as humid summer air enters
and condenses. Over time, mold grows and the wood
framing rots, which attracts carpenter ants or termites.
The best way to deal with crawl space air is to encapsulate it (seal it off from the outside) and install a dehumidifier or a supply air vent from the HVAC system.
Crawl spaces are difficult places to work and even
more difficult to seal off. If you want to seal off and encapsulate one, I recommend hiring a reputable company that specializes in this type of work.
OK, lets discuss the plastic overlay. If the porch is
open to the outside, like a raised deck, simply cover the
ground under it with 6-mil plastic and gravel. If an unvented crawl space has a dirt floor, my local building
code requires exposed earth to be covered with a continuous vapor retarder with taped seams.
If this area is an enclosed crawl space, the best floor
covering is a 6 mil-plus polyethylene liner with sealed
edges covered with a concrete slab. A polyethylene covering is one of the most effective methods for controlling
moisture and would also keep the flies out. The membrane provides both a vapor retarder and air barrier,
and if covered with a concrete pour, it is very durable.
There are other commercially available products that
can act as a standalone floor covering and are more durable than 6-mil plastic. These liners are typically 12 to
20 mil and are marketed as reinforced crawl space liners. Tuff-Scrim has a white 12-mil antimicrobial extrusion-laminated reinforced film. This product has antimicrobial additives that prevent the growth of bacteria,
fungi, mold, and mildew. Twenty-mil liners are thick
and strong enough for medium to heavy storage, heavy
foot traffic, and coverage with stone.
A standalone concrete slab also will suffice as a membrane, unless the ground under it is very wet.
Steps to create an unvented crawl space
1. Keep the crawl space dry by correcting grading
problems on the exterior so that the land slopes away
from the foundation.
2. Remove rocks and debris from the crawl space
floor, and rake the dirt smooth to prevent your barrier
from tearing.
3. Install a 20-mil polyethylene covering over the
floor, extending up the crawl space walls to within 3
inches of the top. Leave a 3-inch-wide termite-inspection strip at the top of the wall.
4. Attach the top of the vapor barrier to the wall with
horizontal battens secured with masonry fasteners.
5. Seal the seams of the vapor barrier material with a
compatible tape or mastic; many builders use duct mastic embedded in fiberglass mesh tape.
6. Consider pouring a 2- to 3-inch-thick concrete slab
to protect the vapor barrier and make the crawl space
floor higher than the exterior grade.
7. Insulate the interior of the walls and rim joists
with R-5 to R-20 rigid foam, polyisocyanurate foam, or
spray polyurethane foam.
8. Install an exhaust fan or an HVAC register to meet
code requirements for conditioning the crawl space.
9. If the crawl space is subject to water entry, be sure
to slope the floor to a sump equipped with a drain or a
pump.
10. Do not vent baths or dryers into crawl spaces.
11. Do not install condensate drains in crawl spaces.
Rob Robillard is a general contractor, carpenter, editor
of AConcordCarpenter.com, and principal of a
carpentry and renovation business. Send your
questions to homerepair@globe.com or tweet them to
@robertrobillard.
JP condo is
steps from park
uHOME OF THE WEEK
Continued from Page H1
stainless steel, as is the stove exhaust vent, which
lends a contemporary touch to the space. The sink
sits in front of a window, the cabinets are white, and
the backsplash is subway tile with a gray grout.
To the right is a laundry setup with a bank of cabinets and a closet.
At the rear of the home, a door opens to a deck
that is exclusive to this unit.
The bedrooms are reached by a small hallway off
the kitchen. There is a 144-square-foot master bedroom with two windows and a bifold door closet. The
second bedroom, which has a set of windows and an
adequate closet, is staged as an office space.
A master bath with a tub/shower combo and a single white vanity with a dark granite top completes
this home. The cabinet and the granite mimic the
style found in the kitchen. The flooring is ceramic
tile, and the shower surround is tile with an inlay.
The backyard is paved over for parking spaces,
and this unit gets one. If you want to go to the park,
though, you’re only steps away.
The listing agent, Ruth Malkin of William Raveis
Real Estate in Brookline, will host an open house on
Sunday, Jan. 6, from 1:30 to 3 p.m.
Follow John R. Ellement on Twitter @JREbosglobe.
Send listings to homeoftheweek@globe.com. Please
note: We do not feature unfurnished homes and will
not respond to submissions we won’t pursue.
PHOTOS BY PAT GREENHOUSE/GLOBE STAFF
Clockwise from left: The condo is located on the first floor; the kitchen features
white cabinets, dark granite counters, and stainless-steel appliances; the
laundry setup is off the kitchen.
$614,000
Style: Condo
Year built: 1910
Square feet: 1,002
Bedrooms: 2
Baths: 2 full
Sewer/water: Public
Taxes: $7,937 (2018)
Fee: $200 a month (estimated)
See more
View additional photos of this property at
realestate.boston.com.
Relocation programs look to attract remote workers
uMOVE
Continued from Page H1
Levit said. And while the financial incentive may
be what attracts them, Levit hopes Tulsa’s affordability and lifestyle will keep them there.
“Brainstorming over a table, we developed
this idea that there are large numbers of people,
young people who could work anywhere, who
might feel overwhelmed by the cost and hassle of
metropolitan areas on the East Coast, and maybe
we could create a nudge to convince people to
give Tulsa a try,’’ Levit said.
Tulsa’s program is just getting off the ground,
but Baltimore has been offering incentives for
several years, primarily around homeownership.
Live Baltimore is an organization set up to help
potential residents navigate the various financial
incentives funded by the city and employers,
ranging from down payment assistance to home
renovation tax credits.
“Historically, we’re a city that understands the
value of homeowners,’’ said Annie Milli, executive
director of Live Baltimore, which works to recruit
and retain residents. “We as a city recognize that
homeowners are invested in their community
and contribute greatly to their community. Homeownership is a way to stabilize finances and
build wealth, and that’s something our city has
always wanted to support.”
On Jan. 26, Live Baltimore is hosting a trolley
tour, during which participants take a narrated
visit of 10-plus neighborhoods, meet with real es-
tate professionals and community organizations,
sit in on expert-led workshops, and become eligible for $5,000 toward the purchase of a home
anywhere in the city through the Buying Into Baltimore incentive program. It’s a lottery system,
and the percentage of applicants who received an
incentive in fall 2016 was 85 percent. In spring
2016, however, it was 60 percent.
“The programs are very popular,’’ Milli said.
“We see people accessing our resources from almost every state in the United States and overseas, especially people moving from more expensive cities like San Francisco, New York, or Boston.’’
Milli said Baltimore has all the big-city amenities without the high price tag. It offers parkfront homes, history, convenience, and affordability, she said.
“It’s not just that you are living in Baltimore,
you can actually live in Baltimore and do more
than just pay your mortgage, and that’s meaningful,’’ Milli said.
But if urban living isn’t for you, look no further than Vacationland. Maine recently started
offering tax credits to help new residents and recent graduates pay off student loans.
The program was initially offered only to graduates of Maine colleges and universities who remained in the state to work, but it has been expanded to any graduate who moves to Maine,
gets a job, and has student loans.
Nate Wildes, engagement director of Live +
Work in Maine, said the state and employers had
to do something to boost the dwindling workforce. He said the number of people filing for the
credit has skyrocketed since 2015, when the private sector launched Live + Work Maine to help
promote the state program.
“We’re not bribing people, saying here’s 5,000
bucks,’’ Wildes said. “Come to Maine and have
faith that Maine employers will have a quality job
for you. Make your student loan payments, and
at the end of the year after you’ve added value to
the workforce, we will reimburse you all the payments. It’s powerful in that it’s not a huge risk for
the state. It’s money already produced in the
economy.’’
Wildes said 36 million people visit Maine each
year but just 1.2 million live there. He wants to
persuade those visitors to stay year round. In fact,
some employers will pay for the cost of a vacation
if someone decides to move after visiting.
“Thirty-six million come to us because we
have the best product for quality of life,’’ Wildes
said. “We just have to help them connect the dots.
You love your vacation, here’s an opportunity to
love your career at the same time.’’
Vermont also hopes to tap into a group of people looking for a better quality of life. The state is
launching a program in January that will pay remote workers $10,000 over two years to move
there. About 3,000 people have requested information, but there is only enough funding in the
first year to award 25 grants worth $5,000 each.
Joan Goldstein, commissioner of Vermont’s
Department of Economic Development, said the
grants will be awarded on a first-come, firstserved basis. The goal, Goldstein said, is to increase the state’s population and help broaden
the tax base. Remote workers were targeted, she
said, because they are mobile.
“It seems like a small amount, but in a small
state, every little bit counts,’’ she said. “They may
bring other family members, they are spending
money, they are telling their friends about it. It’s a
little bit of a test. If it’s successful, perhaps we can
do it in a bigger way.’’
Tulsa’s program also targets remote workers,
but doesn’t cap the number of awardees. The
funding is provided by a private foundation, so
the money isn’t as limited, Levit said. Tulsa also
has an application process, during which potential residents will be screened and ranked.
Levit said only those applicants who meet the
foundation’s criteria will be selected. He said they
are looking for people who are excited to move,
interested in putting down roots, and looking to
contribute to the community.
“If there are 100 people who are gung-ho
about moving here and will contribute to our
community, then I’d like to try to reach an agreement with 100 people,’’ he said. “We will let the
opportunity drive the budget.’’
Jennifer Fenn Lefferts can be reached at
jflefferts@yahoo.com.
B o s t o n
JA N UA RY 6 , 2 0 1 9
S u n d a y
G l o b e
Address
A Look at Kate Johnson's
South Shore Listings
Kate Johnson
Vice President | Realtor®
'3#0"+0- !-20& * %+0-,/1 ).($2
kate.johnson@compass.com
339.793.0475
Hingham
compass.com
3 Brewer Way
Hingham
Quincy
Weymouth
5 BD | 4 BA | 2 HB | 6,827 SF | $2,799,000
239 Pleasant Street
23 Russell Park
3 Gardner Terrace
5 BD | 2 BA | 1 HB | 3,318 SF | $659,000
3 BD | 1.5 BA | 3,267 SF | $850,000
4 BD | 3 BA | 3 HB | 6,947 SF | $2,099,000
Compass is a licensed real estate broker and abides by Equal Housing Opportunity laws. All material presented herein is intended for informational purposes only. Information is compiled from sources deemed reliable but is subject to errors, omissions, changes in price, condition, sale, or withdrawal without notice.
No statement is made as to the accuracy of any description. All measurements and square footages are approximate. This is not intended to solicit property already listed. Nothing herein shall be construed as legal, accounting or other professional advice outside the realm of real estate brokerage.
STONEBROOK VILLAGE − SOUTHBOROUGH
Another 55+ Community by Capital Group Properties
JANUARY INCENTIVE
CONSIDERABLE PRICE DROP!
Restrictions apply, see agent for details.
OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 12–3
4 Bryant Street, Wakefield MA, offered at $649,900
OPEN HOUSE TODAY 12pm-2pm
• Views of beautiful Lake
Quannapowitt
• Seconds to downtown
Wakefield and its shops
and restaurants
• Private deck
• Two car garage
• Open floor plan
• Hardwoods throughout
• Two bedrooms, each with
en suite bathrooms
• Third floor loft space
• Ample storage
For more information contact Tom Anderson 781-589-7314
Open Floor Plan • Luxurious Finishes
Maintenance Free Living • Generous Builder Incentives
Minutes from Mass Pike Exit 12 and Route 495
$550,905 – $607,950
Flexible Closing Dates
Use 17 Oregon Road, Southborough for GPS Address
Marketed by
Berkshire Realty Group
508-357-2298
H3
H4
Address
B o s t o n
S u n d a y
G l o b e
JA N UA RY 6 , 2 0 1 9
For complete listings, go
to realestate.boston.com
RECENT HOME SALES
BRIGHTON
112­114 Brooks St. Two-family Conventional, built in 1904,
3,100 square feet, 14 rooms,
4 bedrooms, 3 baths, on
4,788-square-foot lot.
$1,000,000
11 Montcalm Ave. One-family
Colonial, built in 1926, 1,224
square feet, 7 rooms, 2 bedrooms, 1 bath, on 2,584square-foot lot. $754,500
101 Nonantum St. Three-family Conventional, built in 1925,
2,068 square feet, 10 rooms,
5 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, on
5,825-square-foot lot.
$750,000
40 S Crescent Circuit Onefamily Cape Cod, built in 1920,
1,190 square feet, 6 rooms, 3
CHARLESTOWN
32 Winthrop St. One-family
Row-Middle, built in 1865,
2,657 square feet, 10 rooms,
4 bedrooms, 3 baths, on
DORCHESTER
7 Hesston Ter Three-family
Decker, built in 1915, 3,528
square feet, 18 rooms, 9 bedrooms, 4.5 baths, on 2,537square-foot lot. $1,220,000
443 Talbot Ave. One-family
Colonial, built in 1900, 2,782
square feet, 9 rooms, 3 bedrooms, 1.5 baths, on 3,732square-foot lot. $755,000
355 Savin Hill Ave. One-family
Colonial, built in 1910, 1,473
square feet, 7 rooms, 4 bedrooms, 1 bath, on 2,600square-foot lot. $675,000
278 Norfolk St. Two-family
Conventional, built in 1900,
2,688 square feet, 9 rooms, 5
bedrooms, 2 baths, on 7,300square-foot lot. $575,000
27 Granite Ave. One-family
Conventional, built in 1900,
1,362 square feet, 8 rooms, 3
bedrooms, 2.5 baths, on
3,840-square-foot lot.
$500,000
16 Merrill St. One-family Colonial, built in 1905, 1,041
square feet, 5 rooms, 2 bedrooms, 1 bath, on 2,179square-foot lot. $202,000
11 Joseph St. Three-family
Conventional, built in 1900,
2,489 square feet, 14 rooms,
7 bedrooms, 3 baths, on
2,170-square-foot lot.
$144,641
EAST BOSTON
174 Princeton St. Two-family
Row-End, built in 1880, 2,246
square feet, 13 rooms, 4 bedrooms, 2 baths, on 2,160square-foot lot. $640,000
845 Saratoga St. #3 Condominium, built in 2007, 1,280
square feet, 5 rooms, 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, on 1,280square-foot lot. $507,000
156 Porter St. #113 Condominium, built in 1910, 875
square feet, 2 rooms, 1 bedroom, 1 bath, on 810-squarefoot lot. $475,000
137­141 Meridian St. #1
Condominium, built in 2003,
1,039 square feet, 4 rooms, 2
bedrooms, 1 bath, on 1,039square-foot lot. $449,000
FENWAY
857 Beacon St. #31 Condominium Row-End, built in
1900, 934 square feet, 4
rooms, 2 bedrooms, 1 bath, on
934-square-foot lot.
AndoveR
miltoN
New Construction - Riverside Woods, (62+ Community). Single level Jensen style home features:
956SF 1BD/1 BA + DEN, open eat-in granite kit w/
center island, spacious owners suite w/walk-in
closet, large den/office, W/D & Private balcony.
There is still time to personalize this home w/your
selections. Starting at $344,995
MILTON WOODS ~ NEW CONSTRUCTION
23 Estate homes bordering the Blue Hills Reservation. Select from 4 home designs with choices for
upgrades to customize your home. Comprehensive Warranty. Starting at $1,400,000. GPS: 150
Unquity Rd. Call to schedule an appointment.
508-925-7231. www.Pulte.com
SE NO
LL W
IN
G
E
US
HO
EN 11-3
P
O
Riverside Woods
459 River Road
978-655-4493
www.pulte.com
LittLeton
o
HHHH open House HHHH
Durkee Farm Estates is a new neighborhood
w/quality built homes from the $700s EZ highway access, walk to MBTA trains. Great town with
great schools! Homes are selling fast, new lots
just released! Visit us today for best selections.
dennis M Page
Re/MAX Partners
978-649-2220
durkeeFarmestates.com
HYDE PARK
NORTH END
62 Alpheus Road One-family
Colonial, built in 1965, 1,470
square feet, 6 rooms, 4 bedrooms, 1.5 baths, on 5,206square-foot lot. $610,000
127 Ruskindale Road Twofamily Conventional, built in
1920, 2,964 square feet, 16
rooms, 11 bedrooms, 4 baths,
on 4,939-square-foot lot.
$600,000
8 Linwood St. One-family Colonial, built in 1910, 1,640
square feet, 8 rooms, 5 bedrooms, 3 baths, on 5,765square-foot lot. $525,000
32 Hillis Road One-family Colonial, built in 1880, 1,488
square feet, 7 rooms, 4 bedrooms, 1 bath, on 4,585square-foot lot. $412,500
53 Gordon Ave. One-family
Bngl/Cottage, built in 1929,
2,254 square feet, 6 rooms, 3
bedrooms, 2 baths, on 5,528square-foot lot. $406,000
11 Ruskindale Road One-family Colonial, built in 1963,
1,275 square feet, 6 rooms, 3
bedrooms, 1.5 baths, on
3,600-square-foot lot.
$350,000
JAMAICA PLAIN
251 Pond St. One-family Tudor, built in 1927, 2,446
square feet, 9 rooms, 4 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, on 7,744square-foot lot. $1,225,000
30 Mozart St. Three-family
Conventional, built in 1920,
3,760 square feet, 14 rooms,
8 bedrooms, 3 baths, on
2,422-square-foot lot.
$1,050,000
509 Centre St. #10 Condominium Free-Standng, built in
1899, 1,785 square feet, 6
rooms, 2 bedrooms, 2.5 baths,
on 1,785-square-foot lot.
$815,000
7­R Greenley Place One-family
Colonial, built in 1920, 1,267
square feet, 6 rooms, 3 bedrooms, 1 bath, on 1,273square-foot lot. $799,000
111­121 Green St. #304
Condominium, built in 2006,
1,085 square feet, 4 rooms, 2
bedrooms, 2 baths, on 1,085square-foot lot. $735,000
4 Driftwood Road One-family
Split Level, built in 1959,
1,429 square feet, 8 rooms, 4
bedrooms, 2.5 baths, on
7,238-square-foot lot.
$675,000
39 Parkton Road #2 Condominium Decker, built in 1905,
1,013 square feet, 5 rooms, 2
bedrooms, 1 bath, on 1,013square-foot lot. $530,000
MATTAPAN
1241­1251 Adams St.
#B406 Condominium, built in
1900, 1,931 square feet, 6
rooms, 2 bedrooms, 2 baths,
on 1,931-square-foot lot.
$875,000
Plymouth
North readiNG
NEW CONSTRUCTION! Move In Ready (55+) LUXURY CONDOS WITH ELEVATOR & GARAGE PARKING (Optional). 1 & 2 BR, Open Floor Plans, Exceptional quality & attention to detail. MODERN
KITCHENS with granite counters & SS appliances,
Master Suites with walk-in closet. IN UNIT LAUNDRY & Private Balcony. Starting in the mid $300’s.
martins landing
GPS: 100 lowell road
978-933-0520
www.pulte.com
84 Prince St. #1C Condominium Row-End, built in 1900,
520 square feet, 3 rooms, 1
bedroom, 1 bath, on 520square-foot lot. $415,000
ROSLINDALE
2­4 Chisholm Lane #1 Condominium, built in 1900, 1,789
square feet, 7 rooms, 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, on 1,789square-foot lot. $620,000
75 Seymour St. #B Condominium, built in 2005, 1,208
square feet, 5 rooms, 2 bedrooms, 1.5 baths, on 1,208square-foot lot. $445,000
27 Sheffield Road #3 Condominium Low-Rise, built in
1910, 1,005 square feet, 6
rooms, 2 bedrooms, 1 bath, on
1,005-square-foot lot.
$444,500
734 Hyde Park Ave. #2 Condominium Decker, built in
1905, 1,114 square feet, 5
rooms, 2 bedrooms, 1 bath, on
1,114-square-foot lot.
$310,000
ROXBURY
537 Massachusetts Ave. #4
Condominium Row-Middle,
built in 1899, 1,159 square
feet, 5 rooms, 2 bedrooms, 1.5
baths, on 1,159-square-foot
lot. $960,000
34 Holborn St. Two-family Two
Family, built in 1910, 2,960
square feet, 12 rooms, 6 bedrooms, 2 baths, on 7,500square-foot lot. $900,000
34­36 Juniper St. #3 Condominium Free-Standng, built in
1905, 1,240 square feet, 6
rooms, 2 bedrooms, 1 bath, on
1,240-square-foot lot.
$410,000
5 Highland Park Ave. #1 Condominium Row-End, built in
1910, 789 square feet, 4
rooms, 1 bedroom, 2 baths, on
789-square-foot lot.
$389,000
SOUTH BOSTON
323 W 4th St. Three-family
Decker, built in 2015, 4,863
square feet, 18 rooms, 6 bedrooms, 4 baths, on 2,585square-foot lot. $2,850,000
19 Thomas Park Three-family
Row-End, built in 1860, 2,627
square feet, 12 rooms, 6 bedrooms, 4.5 baths, on 1,559square-foot lot. $1,170,000
121 Portland St. #804 Condominium. $1,050,000
151 P St. #2 Condominium,
built in 1926, 1,928 square
feet, 7 rooms, 4 bedrooms, 3
baths, on 1,928-square-foot
lot. $999,000
201­203 N St. Two-family Two
Family, built in 1890, 1,810
square feet, 9 rooms, 5 bedrooms, 2 baths, on 1,643square-foot lot. $938,000
212 Dorchester St. One-family
Semi Detachd, built in 1885,
South Weymouth
HHHH open House HHHH
HHHH open House HHHH
Move-In Now! Kensington at The Pinehills. Open
Floor Plan, 1st Floor MBR, S/S Gas Gourmet Kitch,
Spacious Family Room W/Gas FP, Up Loft, Bath &
BR For Guests. Full Basement & 2 Car Garage. Call
About Move In Ready Incentives $551,745
New Construction--Ready Summer 2019! 955 SF
1Bd/1Ba w/ Den in elevator bldg! 42” cabinets,
quartz counter, HW floors, 9’ ceilings, spacious
master bedroom w/ walk-in closet, wooded view,
and just seconds from the commuter rail! $406K
Kensington
33 Summerhouse drive
508-224-5289
www.pulte.com
pen
er o 4!
ent un 10C
S
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Sal tueS -
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62­64 Pleasant Hill Ave. Twofamily Conventional, built in
1935, 3,017 square feet, 12
rooms, 6 bedrooms, 2 baths,
on 4,900-square-foot lot.
$655,000
9­11 Ellison Ave. Two-family
Conventional, built in 1925,
2,726 square feet, 11 rooms,
5 bedrooms, 2 baths, on
5,041-square-foot lot.
$575,000
48­50 Rockdale St. Two-family Two Family, built in 1910,
2,416 square feet, 12 rooms,
6 bedrooms, 2 baths, on
5,000-square-foot lot.
$218,750
Sa
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BOSTON DOWNTOWN
20 Rowes Wharf #609 Condominium Mid-Rise, built in
1987, 1,489 square feet, 5
rooms, 2 bedrooms, 2 baths,
on 1,489-square-foot lot.
$3,200,000
500 Atlantic Ave. #18C Condominium, built in 2006,
1,132 square feet, 4 rooms, 2
bedrooms, 1.5 baths, on
1,132-square-foot lot.
$1,350,000
1 Charles St. S #812 Condominium, built in 2004, 1,235
square feet, 5 rooms, 2 bedrooms, 2 baths, on 1,235square-foot lot. $1,185,000
101 Trowbridge St. Threefamily Colonial, built in 1925,
5,913 square feet, 20 rooms,
8 bedrooms, 5.5 baths, on
9,767-square-foot lot.
$3,535,000
221 Mount Auburn St. #24C
Condominium Condo/Apt, built
in 1960, 1,890 square feet, 6
rooms, 3 bedrooms, 2.5 baths.
$2,200,000
157 Chilton St. Two-family Old
Style, built in 1915, 2,510
square feet, 11 rooms, 4 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, on 4,085square-foot lot. $1,250,000
14 Union St. #3 Condominium
Two Story, built in 1880,
1,630 square feet, 6 rooms, 3
bedrooms, 2 baths.
$1,100,000
98 Reed St. One-family Conventional, built in 1897, 1,104
square feet, 6 rooms, 3 bedrooms, 1.5 baths, on 1,740square-foot lot. $965,000
91 Sherman St. #1 Condominium Free-Standng, built in
1870, 1,213 square feet, 6
rooms, 2 bedrooms, 1.5 baths.
$925,000
33­41 Walden St. #2E Condominium Condo/Apt, built in
1871, 887 square feet, 4
rooms, 2 bedrooms, 1 baths.
$882,000
10 Dana St. #406 Condominium Condo/Apt, built in 1909,
1,045 square feet, 4 rooms, 2
bedrooms, 1 baths. $850,000
2 Earhart St. #129 Condominium Two Story, built in 2006,
948 square feet, 4 rooms, 1
bedroom, 1.5 baths.
$789,000
27 Cambridge Ter #1 Condominium Family Flat, built in
1905, 1,002 square feet, 5
rooms, 2 bedrooms, 1.5 baths.
$745,000
8­12 Museum Way #1225
Condominium Condo/Apt, built
in 1998, 983 square feet, 5
rooms, 2 bedrooms, 2 baths.
$700,000
281 Walden St. #1 Condominium Family Flat, built in 1913,
1,058 square feet, 5 rooms, 2
bedrooms, 1 baths. $697,500
391 Concord Ave. #1 Condominium Family Flat, 903
square feet, 5 rooms, 1 bedroom, 1 baths. $695,000
47 Norris St. #3 Condominium
Family Flat, built in 1907, 890
square feet, 5 rooms, 2 bedrooms, 1 baths. $640,000
10 Jackson St. #10 Condominium Condo/Apt, built in
1903, 661 square feet, 4
rooms, 2 bedrooms, 1 baths.
$520,000
$710,000
111 Gainsborough St. #405
Condominium Row-End, built in
1899, 882 square feet, 4
rooms, 2 bedrooms, 1 bath, on
882-square-foot lot.
$671,000
95 Gainsborough St. #204
Condominium Row-Middle,
built in 1915, 688 square feet,
3 rooms, 1 bedroom, 1 bath,
on 688-square-foot lot.
$650,000
12 Stoneholm St. #426 Condominium, built in 2006, 380
square feet, 2 rooms, 1 bedroom, 1 bath, on 380-squarefoot lot. $440,000
Pulte homes
130 trotter road
781-812-1697
www.pulte.com
South Weymouth
Sudbury
ON
LI E LE
VI V
NG EL
BEACON HILL
34 River St. #2 Condominium,
built in 1889, 510 square feet,
3 rooms, 1 bedroom, 1 bath,
on 510-square-foot lot.
$800,000
34 River St. #4 Condominium,
built in 1889, 978 square feet,
4 rooms, 2 bedrooms, 1 bath,
on 978-square-foot lot.
$717,500
25 Phillips St. #C Condominium Row-End, built in 1885,
651 square feet, 2 rooms, 1
bedroom, 1 bath, on 651square-foot lot. $605,000
CAMBRIDGE
1,385-square-foot lot.
$1,615,000
45 Chestnut St. One-family
Row-Middle, built in 1860,
2,814 square feet, 9 rooms, 4
bedrooms, 1.5 baths, on
1,659-square-foot lot.
$1,575,000
374­398 Bunker Hill St. #211
Condominium, built in 2016,
1,221 square feet, 5 rooms, 2
bedrooms, 2 baths.
$1,210,000
26 Cook St. Two-family Conventional, built in 1830, 2,553
square feet, 10 rooms, 4 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, on 1,575square-foot lot. $1,047,000
69 Elm St. Two-family Conventional, built in 1870, 1,790
square feet, 7 rooms, 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, on 1,470square-foot lot. $1,032,500
2 Lawnwood Place #1 Condominium Row-End, built in
1855, 1,407 square feet, 4
rooms, 2 bedrooms, 1.5 baths.
$880,000
32 Mead St. #3 Condominium
Row-End, built in 1870, 782
square feet, 3 rooms, 1 bedroom, 1 baths. $610,000
M
re ove
ad In
y!
31­33 Commonwealth Ave.
#4 Condominium Row-Middle,
built in 1910, 1,766 square
feet, 4 rooms, 2 bedrooms, 2
baths, on 1,766-square-foot
lot. $2,800,000
383 Beacon St. #C Condominium Row-Middle, built in 1890,
1,873 square feet, 6 rooms, 3
bedrooms, 2 baths, on 1,873square-foot lot. $2,075,000
254 Marlborough St. #1 Condominium Row-Middle, built in
1890, 1,902 square feet, 5
rooms, 2 bedrooms, 2 baths,
on 1,902-square-foot lot.
$2,000,000
398 Beacon St. #3 Condominium Row-Middle, built in 1870,
1,533 square feet, 5 rooms, 2
bedrooms, 2 baths, on 1,533square-foot lot. $1,550,000
29 Cumberland St. #3 Condominium Row-Middle, built in
1899, 855 square feet, 5
rooms, 2 bedrooms, 1 bath, on
855-square-foot lot.
$965,000
64 Commonwealth Ave. #3
Condominium Row-Middle,
built in 1875, 725 square feet,
3 rooms, 1 bedroom, 1 bath,
on 725-square-foot lot.
$869,000
160 Commonwealth Ave.
#615 Condominium Mid-Rise,
built in 1881, 436 square feet,
2 rooms, 1 bedroom, 1 bath,
on 436-square-foot lot.
$522,500
bedrooms, 1.5 baths, on
4,050-square-foot lot.
$585,000
1653 Commonwealth Ave.
#B Condominium Low-Rise,
built in 1890, 1,195 square
feet, 6 rooms, 3 bedrooms, 3
baths, on 1,195-square-foot
lot. $540,000
318 Summit Ave. #7 Condominium Low-Rise, built in
1899, 695 square feet, 4
rooms, 2 bedrooms, 1 bath, on
695-square-foot lot.
$390,000
7 Fairbanks St. #1 Condominium, built in 1910, 970 square
feet, 5 rooms, 2 bedrooms, 1
bath, on 970-square-foot lot.
$355,000
Sa
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BACK BAY
HHHH open House HHHH
New Construction! This amazing 1470 SF home
offers 2 BR/2BA w/ large den, luxurious master
suite, walk-in closet, dining room & more! Onelevel living w/ private, wooded view, just seconds
to the commuter rail. MOVE-IN READY!! $458 K
Pulte homes
130 trotter road
781-812-1697
www.pulte.com
NEW CONSTRUCTION (age 55+) COMMUNITY!
Single level 1600 sq’corner Addison style features
a beautiful granite eat-in kit, sun splashed great
rm w/ private balcony, king sized master suite, lg
guest bdrm & full bath, utility rm with washer/
dryer, all in new secure elevator 4 story building
with underground parking avail. $567,750
highcrest at meadow Walk
781-266-3300
www.pulte.com
1,603 square feet, 8 rooms, 3
bedrooms, 1.5 baths, on
2,297-square-foot lot.
$890,000
553 E 1st St. #2 Condominium, built in 2013, 1,321
square feet, 4 rooms, 2 bedrooms, 2 baths, on 1,321square-foot lot. $835,000
360 W 2nd St. #14 Condominium, built in 2013, 1,110
square feet, 5 rooms, 2 bedrooms, 2 baths, on 1,110square-foot lot. $812,000
219­221 I St. Two-family Semi
Detachd, built in 1900, 1,994
square feet, 9 rooms, 5 bedrooms, 2 baths, on 1,763square-foot lot. $805,000
265 E St. #3 Condominium,
built in 2016, 1,140 square
feet, 4 rooms, 2 bedrooms, 2
baths. $800,000
8 Covington St. #2 Condominium, built in 1911, 1,102
square feet, 4 rooms, 2 bedrooms, 2 baths, on 1,102square-foot lot. $710,000
724 E 7th St. #3 Condominium Decker, built in 1905, 927
square feet, 5 rooms, 2 bedrooms, 1 bath, on 927-squarefoot lot. $644,000
155 I St. #1 Condominium
Row-Middle, built in 1890,
1,166 square feet, 6 rooms, 3
bedrooms, 2.5 baths, on
1,166-square-foot lot.
$510,000
17 Twomey Court #66 Condominium Low-Rise, built in
1946, 490 square feet, 3
rooms, 1 bedroom, 1 bath, on
490-square-foot lot.
$440,000
SOUTH END
8 Dartmouth Place One-family
Row-Middle, built in 1900,
1,995 square feet, 6 rooms, 3
bedrooms, 2.5 baths, on
1,095-square-foot lot.
$3,172,500
119 W Concord St. #2 Condominium, built in 1875, 2,049
square feet, 5 rooms, 3 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, on 2,049square-foot lot. $2,435,000
15 Waltham St. #B606 Condominium Low-Rise, built in
2002, 1,280 square feet, 4
rooms, 2 bedrooms, 2 baths,
on 1,280-square-foot lot.
$1,399,000
529 Columbus Ave. #9 Condominium Row-Middle, built in
1899, 697 square feet, 4
rooms, 2 bedrooms, 1 bath, on
697-square-foot lot.
$739,000
31 Concord Sq #3 Condominium Row-Middle, built in 1890,
683 square feet, 3 rooms, 1
bedroom, 1 bath, on 683square-foot lot. $736,500
43 W Newton St. #B4 Condominium Low-Rise, built in
1910, 784 square feet, 3
rooms, 1 bedroom, 1 bath, on
784-square-foot lot.
$675,000
1411 Washington St. #3 Condominium Mid-Rise, built in
1910, 826 square feet, 4
rooms, 1 bedroom, 1 bath, on
826-square-foot lot.
$610,000
103 E Brookline St. #2 Condominium Low-Rise, built in
1900, 349 square feet, 2
rooms, 1 bedroom, 1 bath, on
349-square-foot lot.
$340,000
144 W Concord St. #2 Condominium Row-Middle, built in
1875, 700 square feet, 4
rooms, 2 bedrooms, 1 bath, on
700-square-foot lot.
$236,059
WEST ROXBURY
3 Bangor Road One-family Colonial, built in 1930, 1,500
square feet, 7 rooms, 3 bedrooms, 1.5 baths, on 4,096square-foot lot. $799,900
9 Bellaire Road One-family Colonial, built in 1935, 1,560
square feet, 8 rooms, 3 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, on 7,286square-foot lot. $725,000
201 Weld St. One-family Colonial, built in 1960, 1,470
square feet, 7 rooms, 4 bedrooms, 1.5 baths, on 5,000square-foot lot. $711,000
20 Tarleton Road One-family
Colonial, built in 1992, 1,864
square feet, 7 rooms, 4 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, on 7,146square-foot lot. $549,000
1431 Centre St. #1 Condominium, built in 1920, 1,407
square feet, 5 rooms, 2 bedrooms, 1 bath, on 1,140square-foot lot. $440,000
4925 Washington St. #406
Condominium Free-Standng,
built in 1925, 567 square feet,
3 rooms, 1 bedroom, 1 bath,
on 567-square-foot lot.
$215,000
57 Broadlawn Park #22 Condominium Low-Rise, built in
1964, 752 square feet, 3
rooms, 1 bedroom, 1 bath, on
752-square-foot lot.
$190,000
These listings are provided by The
Warren Group. Send all comments to
Customerservice@thewarrengroup.com.
B o s t o n
JA N UA RY 6 , 2 0 1 9
S u n d a y
G l o b e
Address
JOIN US FOR A COMPLIMENTARY
HOME BUYING SEMINAR
H5
Join us for a
Home Buyer
Seminar
Sponsored by
Hatter!s Point Condos
GUEST SPEAKERS
Allyson Kreycik
Senior Loan Officer
Guaranteed Rate Mortgage
Kristin Pacelli
Certified Senior Move Manager
The Right Transition LLC
Saturday January 19, 2019
10:00AM—2:00PM
Refreshments will be served
Contact
Christina Mackey at
978-515-7435 or
Christina.Mackey@NEMoves.com
60 Merrimac Street, Amesbury, MA
Visit Our Furnished Model Homes
Open Friday thru Monday 11am to 4pm or
Tuesday by appt. 978-515-7435
HattersPointCondos.com
©2019 Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage. All rights reserved. Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage fully supports the principles of the Fair Housing Act and Equal Opportunity Act.
Open Houses
Visit any of these fine homes this weekend on the specified date(s) and times. Open Houses are on Sunday unless indicated by an asterisk. One asterisk (*) denotes open Saturday and Sunday. Two asterisks (**) - Saturday only.
ADDRESS
PRICE
ANDOVER
36 Crenshaw
$1,300,000
6 Crenshaw
$1,100,000
71 Osgood St
$694,500
8 Howell Dr
$574,900
Francis Drive
$344,995
ARLINGTON
184 Jason St
$1,195,000
18 Chatham St
$699,000
BILLERICA
37 Bridge St #504
$409,900
BOSTON
300 Commerical St #301 $649,000
300 Commerical St #808 $1,200,000
357 Commercial St #718 $1,495,000
357 Commercial St #720 $1,499,000
357 Commerical St #103 $679,000
357 Commerical St #409 $1,625,000
BOSTON,WATERFRONT
343 Commercial St #302 $1,850,000
HOPKINTON
79 Spruce St
$567,000
LEXINGTON
44 Adams St
$2,939,000
LITTLETON
22 Edward Dr
$699,900
Br/Ba
STYLE
BROKER
PHONE
TIMES
3/4.5
2/3.5
3/2.5
3/1.5
1/1
Townhouse
Townhouse
Gambrel
Gambrel
Garden
Cormier Properties
Cormier Properties
Coldwell Banker
Coldwell Banker
Riverside Woods
978-470-0189
978-470-0189
978-475-2201
978-475-2201
978-655-4493
12-3
12-3
2-4
12-2
11-3
4/3.5
3/2
Colonial
Cape
Bowes Real Estate
Bowes Real Estate
781-648-3500
781-648-3500
12-2
12-1:30
3/1.5
Townhouse
Coldwell Banker
978-475-2201
12-2
1/1
2/1
3/2.5
2/2
2/1.5
3/2
Condo
Condo
Condo
Condo
Condo
Condo
CL Properties
CL Properties
CL Properties
CL Properties
CL Properties
CL Properties
617-624-9700
617-624-9700
617-624-9700
617-624-9700
617-624-9700
617-624-9700
12-1
1:30-2:30
1:30-2:30
1:30-2:30
12-1
12-1
2/2
Condo
CL Properties
617-624-9700
12-1
2/2.5
Townhouse
Pulte Homes
508-435-8319
12-2
6/8.5
Farmhouse
Coldwell Banker
781-862-2600
12:30-2
4/2.5
Colonial
Westford Real Estate
978-692-4884
12-2
ADDRESS
NEWBURYPORT
14 Warren St
NORTH ANDOVER
171 French Farm Rd
34 Milk St
350 Greene St # 310
404 Summer St
50 Wild Rose Dr
64 White Birch
NORTH READING
100 Lowell Rd
STONEHAM
426 Main St # 307
SUDBURY
Farmstead Ln
TOPSFIELD
470 Boston Street
WESTWOOD
270 Burgess Ave
WINCHESTER
40 Forest St
PRICE
Br/Ba
STYLE
BROKER
PHONE
TIMES
$469,000
2/1.5
Townhouse
Coldwell Banker
978-475-2201
12-2
$649,000
$625,000
$319,000
$849,900
$749,900
$549,900
4/2.5
4/2.5
2/2.5
4/2.5
4/2.5
4/2.5
Colonial
Gambrel
Condo
Colonial
Gambrel
Colonial
Coldwell Banker
Coldwell Banker
Coldwell Banker
Coldwell Banker
Coldwell Banker
Coldwell Banker
978-475-2201
978-475-2201
978-475-2201
978-475-2201
978-475-2201
978-475-2201
11:30-1:30
1-3
1-3
12-2
12-2
1-3
$352,880
1/1
Condo
Pulte Homes
978-933-0520
11-3
$459,900
2/2
Colonial
C-21 Advance Realty
781-395-2121
12-2
$567,745
2/2
Low-Rise
Pulte Homes
781-266-3300
11-3*
$685,000
2/2.5
Condo
C.P. Berry Homes
978-807-2954
11-4:30*
$713,000
4/2
Single Family
Mark Johnson, BHHS
508-272-1370
1-4
$749,900
3/1.5
Colonial
C-21 Advance Realty
781-395-2121
1-3
$449,900
Custom Home
Berkshire Hathaway
603-434-2377
11-4
$529,900
Chalet
Berkshire Hathaway
603-434-2377
12-4
NEW HAMPSHIRE
LITCHFIELD
1 Horizon Rd
PELHAM
2 Aspen Rd
Get more details about these homes in today’s paper and on boston.com/realestate.
To list open houses in this directory, call 617-929-1500 by Friday at 11:00 A.M.
January 6, 2019
homes
boston.com/
classifieds
REAL ESTATE
RESIDENTIAL
ANDOVER, O.H. Model Sun
12-3, The Legends Tues.-Fri.
10-3., Sat 12-3. Lux. TH’s
on golf crse/up to 4K sf.
2&3br/3.5-4.5BA frm $1.1M
REAL ESTATE
RESIDENTIAL
REAL ESTATE
RESIDENTIAL
REAL ESTATE
RESIDENTIAL
LEXINGTON 12:30-2:00p 44
Adams Just compl’d! Smashing new 6Br, archit dsgnd
Frmhse. Location! $2,939K
COLDWELL BANKER
781-862-2600
NORTH ANDOVER, 1-3.
34 Milk St $625K Beaut 4br
2.5ba Gambrel, great loc!
WINCHESTER, $2,400+ For
sale or rent, Muraco school
district, 3 Br, 1 Ba,1,700 Sq Ft,
Off street parking. Call
781-589-0111
LITTLETON OH Sun, 12 - 2
22 Edward Dr. New Construction 4 bed, 2.5 ba, Col,
in neighborhood, 15K FT lot.
$699,900. Westford Real Estate (978) 692-4884
LUNENBURG, Stunning 12
rm. home w/views, 4BRS, 4.5
baths, firepit and pool in gorgeous setting. $819,000.
Coldwell Banker
Residential Brokerage
978-587-5463 or 840-4014
ANDOVER, 2-4. 71 Osgood
St $694,500 Beaut 3br 2.5ba
cape, open floor plan!
COLDWELL BANKER
978-475-2201
ARLINGTON, 1st OH 12-2
Jason Hgts! Beaut 10rm 4bd
5ba Col mstr ste fin bsmt
gorg yrd $1.195M 184 Jason
Shingle Style Seaside Colonial
with nearby Beach Rights. State of
the Art Chefs Kitchen 6 Bedrooms
5 full and 3 1/2 baths. Move in
ready. Full amenity. In-law suite.
Priv. loc. $2,195,000
Steven White William Raveis
Marblehead
781-690-6433
MARBLEHEAD Open House, 17
State St., Sun.1/6, 12-1pm
ARLINGTON, 1st OH12-1:30
3bd 2ba Cape hdwd built ins
1st flr famrm updt systms yd
3lvl deck $699k 18 Chatham
BILLERICA, 12-2. 37 Bridge
St #504 $409,900 Spacious
3br 1.5ba Twnhme, great loc!
Coldwell Banker 978-4752201
CLINTON OH 01/06 10:00am
- 12:00pm
NORTH ANDOVER, 1-3. 64
White Birch $549,900 Great
4br, 2.5 ba Col, c-d-sac!
WINTHROP, Estate Sale.
Dutch Colonial, 3BR, 1.5BA,
w/ a legal bsmt apt, 2 car gar.
$675K. 617-459-2025
NORTH ANDOVER, 12-2.
404 Summer St. $849,900
Great 4br 2.5ba Col, c-d-sac!
WORCESTER OH 01/06
1:00pm - 3:00pm
Condominium. Spacious and
open floor plan. 2 bedrooms 1
full bathroom. Updated marble
stainless kitchen, newer full
bath, in unit laundry. Impeccable
wide pine floors, high ceilings.
Private deck. 2 car parking.
Historic Downtown. $450,000
Steven White William Raveis
Marblehead
781-690-6433
NORTH ANDOVER 11:301:30. 171 French Farm Rd
$649K. Beaut 4br 2.5ba Col!
NORTH ANDOVER 1-3. 350
Greene St #310. $319K. Great
2br, 2ba Condo open flr pln!
COLDWELL BANKER
978-475-2201
NORTHBOROUGH OH
01/06 1:00pm - 4:00pm
US Treasury Dept. Auction
Tues. 1/15 at 10 AM. 30 D
Mount Ave. Duplex w/2BR,
1.5BA, kitchen, dining area,
living rm, deck, walkout
basement w/rec rm. Will be
sold w/tenant in place. Rental
income: $1500 mo.OPEN: 1-3
Sun 1/6 & 1/13. www.treas.
gov/auctions/treasury/rp
Call 703-273-7373
WORCESTER OH 01/06
10:00am - 12:00pm
US Treasury Dept. Public
Auction. Tues. 1/15 at
10AM. 373 Howard St.
- 4BR/2.5 BA, 2-car gar,
detached multi-car gar.,
pool, on 6 acres. OPEN:
Sun. 1/6 & 1/13 from
1-4PM. 6 other properties
to be offered. Auction Location: Hilton Garden Inn,
Worcester.
www.treas.
gov/auctions/treasury/rp
Call 703-273-7373
STONEHAM, OH 12-2 1st ad
US Treasury Dept. Auction
Tues. 1/15 at 10AM. DUPLEX: 462-464 Coburn Ave.
Ea w/4BR/2BA, deck, 1-car
gar. Both sold w/tenants in
place. rental income: $3100
mo. OPEN: 10-12 Sun 1/6
& 1/13. 6 other properties
to be offered. Auction Site:
Hilton Garden Inn. www.
treas.gov/auctions/treasury/rp
Call 703-273-7373
WORCESTER OH 01/06
10:00am - 12:00pm
Beautiful 2 BR 2 bath Condo
hw $459,9K 426 Main St #307
C21 Advance 781-395-2121
TEWKSBURY, Spacious 2 BR,
1 bath ranch condo end unit
with full basement $269,900.
Also 3 level townhouse with
garage $275,000. Silva RE
978-479-8669
WESTWOOD OH Sun 1-4
NEEDHAM OH 1/12, 1:00pm
- 3:00pm
US Treasury Dept. Auction Tues. 1/15 at 10AM. 63
Prospect St., 2-Unit Duplex.
Ea w2BR, 1BA, kitchen, dining & living rm, office, deck.
Both will be sold w/tenants in
place. Rental income: $2300
mo. OPEN: 10-12 Sun 1/6 &
1/13.
www.treas.gov/auctions/treasury/rp
Call 703-273-7373
WORCESTER OH 01/06
1:00pm - 3:00pm
$713K. 4BR, 2BA, 1 ac flat Lot.
270 Burgess Ave, Mark Johnson, BHHS, 508-272-1370
US Treasury Dept Auction
Tues 1/15 at 10AM. 59 Pleasant St. 2-Unit Duplex w/basement. Unit 1 has 3BR, 1BA,
kitchen w/dining area, living
rm, porch. Unit 2: 5BR, 2BA,
kitchen, dining, living, rec rm.
Both units sold w/tenants
in place. Income: $2900 mo.
www.treas.gov/auctions/
treasury/rp
Call 703-273-7373
Light-filled 4 BR, 3 Baths. Spacious breakfast area. Huge
Kitchen. Master Bath. Easy
access to commuters.
Call KW Bill 781-929-2453
NEWBURYPORT,
12-2. 14
Warren St $469K Charming
2br 1.5ba Twnhme, recent
updates! Coldwell Banker
978-475-2201
APARTMENTS
CENTRAL MA OPPORTUNITY! 33 acres w/comp. permit
for 136 units. Beautiful location, town water and sewer.
$5,576,000.
Coldwell Banker
Residential Brokerage
978-342-0000 or
978-549-4440
SOMERVILLE, Spring Hill
area, prestigious 2br, penthouse, (spectacular views)
all utils. parking, furnished,
new $2250, 617 767-1443
WINCHESTER OH 1-3 1st ad
9 rms 3 BR Colonial new kit
garage $749,9K 40 Forest St.
C21 Advance 781-395-2121
US Treasury Dept. Auction
Tues. 1/15 at 10AM. 149 Barnard Rd. 3BR, 1BA, kitchen,
dining, living, family rm, den,
porch, deck. Walk-out basement w/ 1BR, 1BA, living &
rec rm, kitchen, utility rm,
pool, patio, fence. Will be sold
w/ tenant in place. Rental income: $1500 mo. OPEN: 1-3
Sun 1/6 & 1/13. www.treas.
gov/auctions/treasury/rp
Call 703-273-7373
WINCHESTER, $2,400+ For
sale or rent, Muraco school
district, 3 Br, 1 Ba,1,700 Sq Ft,
Off street parking. Call
781-589-0111
COMMERCIAL &
INDUSTRIAL
TEWKSBURY, Office condos
on Route 38. Two available at
$30K and $40K.
Silva RE 978-479-8669
RENTALS
All real estate advertising in
this newspaper is subject to
the Federal Fair Housing act
of 1968, the Massachusetts
Anti Discrimination Act & the
Boston & Cambridge Fair
Housing Ordinances which
makes it illegal to advertise
any preference, limitation or
discrimination ba sed on
race, color, religion, sex,
handicap, familial status,
national origin, ancestry, age,
children, marital status,
sexual orientation, veterans
status, or source of income
or any intention to make any
such preference, limitation
or discrimination.
This newspaper will not
knowingly accept any
advertising for real estate
which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby
informed that all dwellings
advertised in this newspaper are available on an
equal opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimination
call HUD tollfree at
1-800-669 - 9777. For the
N.E. area call HUD at 617994 - 8335. The toll-free
number for the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.
APARTMENTS
BROOKLINE, 4BR., 2BA apt
for rent now. For further info
617-739-1528; 617-325-9599
boston.com/
classifieds
AUCTIONS
notices
& more
AUCTIONS
AUCTIONS
AUCTIONEERS • APPRAISERS
PAUL E. SAPERSTEIN CO., INC.
COMMERCIAL
NORTH ANDOVER, 12-1:30.
280 Salem St $399,900 Great
2br 1.5ba Antique saltbox!
MARBLEHEAD Open House 5
Bonad Rd. Sun. 1/6, 12-2pm
978-470-0189
Yvon Cormier Construction
www.homesatandover
countryclub.com
ANDOVER, 12-3. 8 Howell
Dr $574,900 In town loc, 3br,
1.5ba gambrel, level lot!
NORTH ANDOVER, 12-2. 50
Wild Rose Dr $749,900 Beaut
4br 2.5ba brick Col, move-in!
LAND
HOUSES FOR
RENT
CHELSEA, Loft living at its
best!
Landlord pays broker fee. Gorgeous, spacious
industrial bi-level condo
at Industrie Lofts has over
1,290 SF living space, shining polished concrete floors,
metallic finishes and 21+
foot ceiling. Modern kitchen
and spa-like bath features a
stand-alone steam shower,
a separate bath tub, and an
in-unit laundry. Includes custom European cabinets w/
granite countertops, stainless
steel appliances, 3 large highend aerial closets, central
heat and AC, heated garage
parking and private balcony.
Enjoy access to a common
3000 SF deck with stunning
360 views. Close to shopping, dining and entertainment. Live close to Boston
without the price tag! This
convenient location is within
minutes of everything. Get to
Boston in 15 minutes via the
new Silver Line. Easy access
to the Seaport. These are
the most amazing modern
lofts in Chelsea! $2,200 per
month. Silva RE, 978-4798669
VACATION
RENTALS
NAPLES, FL 1br/1ba 1st flr
wlk to Vanderbilt beach, conv.
loc, avl Jan to Apr mo./$3500
photos avail. 239-598-1515
SUTTON, NH 4BR Cottage
on Lake, 15 mins from Sunapee Ski area. $2000/mo for
Winter Season. 603-365-5536
Buying
a car this
week?
Check out new
and used car specials
from over 100
local dealers.
144 Centre Street, Holbrook, MA 02343 • Tel: 617-227-6553
www.pesco.com •MA Lic 295, N.H 2508, R.I 9246, VT 057-0002204
SALE @ PUBLIC AUCTION; Re: Surplus Equipment to Needs
SNOW REMOVAL – TREE EQUIP.
Experience Globe.com
(8) DUMPS w/PLOWS - (6) SKID STEERS
(2)CHIPPERS–(3)GRINDERS–MUCHMORE
ONLINE & ONSITE BIDDING
832RaNDOLph ST.(RT 139),aBINGTON,Ma•SaTuRDay,JaNuaRy 12,2019@11aM
Terms: GO TO WWW.PESCO.COM FOR ALL DETAILS.
Mortgagee’s Sale of Real Estate at Public Auction
BARNSTABLE
Single Family Home/ 1.02 Acres
50 INDIaN TRaIL, BaRNSTaBLE (CuMMaquID), Ma • TuES, JaN 22, 2019 aT 11aM
1.02+/- acres of land improved by a 4,718+/-sf colonial style single family home believed to have 12 rooms, 5 bedrms & 4.5
baths w central a/c, gourmet kitchen, tennis court, pergola, patio, porch, & detached 2-car garage. Terms of Sale: A deposit
of $10,000 by certified or bank check required at the time & place of sale & balance within 30 days. All other terms announced
at sale. Neither Auctioneer nor Mortgagee nor Attorney make any representations as to the accuracy of the
information contained herein. Peter T. Kline, Esq, Kline & Sanders, LLP, Newton, MA, Attorney for Mortgagee
MORTGAGEE’S
SALE OF REAL ESTATE
WEDNESDAY JANUARY 9, 2019
3:00 PM - NORTH ATTLEBORO, MA
42 PRATT LANE - DEPOSIT $5,000
FRIDAY JANUARY 11, 2019
10:00 AM - FRAMINGHAM, MA
10 MACOMBER LANE - DEPOSIT $25,000
12:00 PM - EAST BRIDGEWATER, MA
109 WILLOW AVENUE - DEPOSIT $5,000
1:00 PM - WAREHAM, MA
6A-6B LADD AVENUE - DEPOSIT $5,000
1:00 PM - WORCESTER, MA
1014 WEST BOYLSTON STREET - DEPOSIT $5,000
2:00 PM - PLYMOUTH, MA
1 MORTON PARK ROAD - DEPOSIT $5,000
MONDAY JANUARY 14, 2019
11:00 AM - JAMAICA PLAIN, MA
302 SOUTH STREET, UNIT 2 - DEPOSIT $5,000
2:00 PM - NEEDHAM, MA
52 CRANBERRY LANE - DEPOSIT $5,000
TUESDAY JANUARY 15, 2019
1:00 AM - SWANSEA, MA
415 OCEAN GROVE AVENUE - DEPOSIT $5,000
2:00 PM - DARTMOUTH, MA
38 MCCORMICK STREET - DEPOSIT $5,000
TERMS OF SALE: Deposits in the amounts specified above are to be paid by the
purchaser(s) at the time and place of each sale by certified or bank check. All balances
due are to be paid within 30 days of each indivdual sale. Other items, if any, to be
announced at each sale. Call our AUCTION SCHEDULE LINE at (617) 964-1282 for a
list of the current day’s auctions and visit our website www commonwealthauction.com
for continuously updated scheduling information and additional scheduling information.
powered by
(617) 964-0005 • MA Lic. 2235 • www.CommonwealthAuction.com
Mortgagee’s Foreclosure
AUCTIONS
E. SANDWICH (CAPE COD), MA
2 ADJACENT HOMES
to be Offered Individually
405 RT. 6A
House, Cottage & 3-Car Garage
6 JACOBS MEADOW RD.
2-Story House/Barn & 1-Car Garage
Thur., January 17 at 11am On-site
$20,000 cert. deposit PER PROPERTY;
10% due w/in 3 business days; 30 days to close.
Info, Full Terms & More at:
www.JJManning.com
800.521.0111 MA Co. Lic# 3184 • Ref #19-1812-3
Top local employers are looking
for people just like you.
Check out great opportunities in
The Boston Sunday Globe’s
Careers Section.
H6
Address
B o s t o n
S u n d a y
G l o b e
JA N UA RY 6 , 2 0 1 9
Black decor makes a quiet comeback
Dark hue celebrated
as calming to the eye
and ideal for design
By Kim Cook
ASSOCIATED PRESS
There was a time when black
walls were mostly the purview of
goth teens and indie movie theaters.
But the color has been quietly cultivating a broader following among
designers and homeowners who
want a cozy, enveloping ambiance
that’s still got theatrical flair.
Bedrooms, libraries, and bathrooms clad in inky or charcoal tones
can be relaxing retreats. If you’ve got
loads of windows, the color helps
frame exterior views. And if the
space is mostly walls, black creates a
cocoon-like setting that can showcase a collection of objets d’art, vibrantly patterned rugs and furniture,
or meditative warm woods and textures.
Laboratory-white kitchens are also yielding ground to kitchens
dressed in dark hues. Houzz.com editor Mitchell Parker said black is having a moment in the cooking space.
‘‘Our community of homeowners
is embracing a heavy dose of dramatic color with large swaths of black
range hoods, island accent colors,
and full-on, all-black cabinetry,’’
Parker said.
For a kitchen in Brentwood, Calif.,
Shannon Wollack and Brittany
Zwickl of Studio Life/Style wanted to
add a little more punch. ‘‘The kitchen’s all-black palette, infused with a
large slab of black-and-white marble
and bold brass accents, warms and
fills the space without feeling too
heavy,’’ Wollack said.
LG, GE, Kitchenaid, Bosch,
Frigidaire, Smeg, JennAir, and others
are offering suites of charcoal-black
appliances with either a matte or satin smudge-proof finish. And there’s
black cabinetry, countertop gadgets,
and cookery as well.
Designer Mark Zeff and his wife,
Kristen, have a home in East Hampton, N.Y., that celebrates black in several ways. The exterior is half white,
half black. Inside, black serves as a
narrative thread for large design ele-
MIKE SCHWARTZ/STUDIO GILD VIA AP
TOP: Studio Gild
painted the walls of this
Chicago home in
Benjamin Moore’s
“Midnight.” “We wanted
to create a space that’s
calming and cozy,” said
Kristen Ekeland. A
black sideboard from
SABIN adds depth,
texture, and drama.
ADOBE STOCK
AT LEFT: Laboratorywhite kitchens are also
yielding ground to
those that are dressed
in dark hues.
Boston Globe
Mortgage Guide
G
Institution
Wrentham
Co-operative Bank
Commonwealth
Mortgage Lending
Family Federal
Savings
Foxboro Federal
Savings
Institution for
Savings
Premiere Mortgage
Services, Inc.
30 yr APR
4.517%
30yr Fixed APR
4.126%
30yr Fixed APR
4.650%
30yr Fixed APR
4.283%
30yr Fixed APR
4.289%
Rate: 4.500
Points: 0.000
Fees: $320
% Down: 20%
Rate: 4.125
Points: 0.000
Fees: $0
% Down: 20%
Rate: 4.625
Points: 0.000
Fees: $528
% Down: 20%
Rate: 4.250
Points: 0.000
Fees: $644
% Down: 20%
Rate: 4.250
Points: 0.000
Fees: $760
Product
Rate
15 yr fixed
10 yr fixed
30 yr jumbo
We also offer
4.000
3.625
4.625
low fixed
Points
Fees
% Down
APR
0.000
$286 20% 4.026
$260 20% 3.659
0.000
0.000
$907 20% 4.642
rate 10 & 15 year jumbo loans!
30 Yr Fixed
4.500 1.000 $528 20% 4.730
15 Yr Fixed
4.125 0.000 $228 20% 4.390
30 Yr Fixed FTHB 4.375 0.000 $328 20% 4.510
First-time buyers - buy with only 3% down, no-cost PMI & more
15 yr fixed
10 yr fixed
5/1 ARM
30 yr jumbo
3.750
3.750
3.750
4.375
0.000
0.000
0.000
0.000
$644
$680
$680
$680
20%
20%
20%
20%
3.807
3.837
4.785
4.387
4.126%
30yr Fixed APR
% Down: 20%
15 yr fixed
3.625 0.000
$0
20% 3.626
30 yr jumbo
4.500 0.000
$0
20% 4.510
NO CLOSING COST PROGRAMS AVAILABLE!
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK & EVENINGS! SHOP US LAST!
Rate: 4.625
15 yr fixed
4.000 0.000
$1497 20%
4.042
30 yr jumbo
5.000 0.000
$1752 20%
5.025
30yr Fixed APR
% Down: 20%
NMLS# 627361
www.wrenthamcoop.com
508-366-1776
NMLS# 21723
800-439-3339
NMLS# 490998
877-369-3331
NMLS# 644159
MB4305
www.familyfederal.com
www.foxfed.com
978-462-3106
Rate: 4.125
Points: 0.000
Fees: $0
Fees: $1497
508-384-6101
NMLS # / License #
15 yr fixed
3.500 0.000 $760 20% 3.567
10 yr fixed
3.375 0.000 $760 20% 3.472
www.institutionforsavings.com
30 yr jumbo
4.250 0.000 $760 20% 4.259
Portfolio Lender, Rates quoted are for loans up to $2,000,000!
% Down: 20%
Points: 0.000
Phone / Website
15 yr fixed
3.500 0.000
$0 20% 3.501
5yr arm
3.750 0.000
$0 20% 3.751
www.commonwealthloan.com
15yr arm jumbo 3.875 0.000
$0 20% 3.876
Call Jay Cox or apply online at WWW.COMMONWEALTHLOAN.COM
30yr Fixed APR
4.649%
Wellesley Bank
30 yr Fixed
ments, including a floating fireplace,
a stained pinewood wall in the master suite, and a glass wall in the
shower. Punctuation is added with
black cowhide rugs; curvy Bibendum
chairs by Eileen Gray; and Eero
Saarinen Womb Chairs.
‘‘Black has properties that make it
ideal for interior design: It’s calming
to the eye, it’s elegant, and it underscores organic beauty,’’ Mark Zeff
said.
‘‘Some may think white is a more
‘natural’ choice, but it’s actually
much starker in comparison to black
when blended with an environment.
Because of the use of black, our
home appears to hunker down and
stay closer to the earth, like a natural
landmark.’’
Added Kristen Zeff: ‘‘We also like
that black can paradoxically open up
a smaller space when applied as a
paint, to make a room feel much
larger than if white is used. The illusion is achieved by tricking the eye
into not knowing where a room
ends, by disguising the edges.’’
She said they painted pine wood
with Benjamin Moore’s “Black Jack.”
‘‘The grain comes through to develop
a texture that deepens the shade.’’
Kristen Ekeland of Chicago-based
Studio Gild also likes adding black,
using Benjamin Moore’s “Midnight”
in a recent bedroom project. ‘‘We
wanted to create a space that’s calming and cozy. It’s dark, but it has an
ethereal feeling,’’ Ekeland said. Along
with the paint, the designers selected
a black sideboard from SABIN to add
depth and texture.
Dee Schlotter, PPG paint’s senior
color marketing manager, said using
black on feature walls, interior surfaces, and furniture serves as an anchor to neutrals, patterns, and mixed
materials, and provides a solid, classic element in any room while creating a sense of space and quiet.
Her color team liked the hue so
much that it chose “Black Flame” as
PPG’s 2018 Color of the Year. Glidden
picked “Deep Onyx,” another black,
as theirs.
‘‘Black reflects the current state of
rebelliousness and contentiousness
in the world, but it also provides a
feeling of privacy and protection,’’
Schlotter said.
Call for other rates and programs
978-422-2311
NMLS# 1498
MB1498
www.bainmortgage.com
781-235-2550
NMLS# 402247
www.wellesleybank.com
Rate Criteria: The rates and annual percentage rate (APR) are effective as of 1/2/19. All rates, fees and other information are subject to change without notice. RateSeeker, LLC. does not guarantee the accuracy of the information appearing above or the availability of rates
and fees in this table. The institutions appearing in this table pay a fee to appear in this table. Annual percentage rates (APRs) are based on fully indexed rates for adjustable rate mortgages (ARMs). The APR on your specific loan may differ from the sample used. All rates are
quoted on a minimum FICO score of 740. Conventional loans are based on loan amounts of $165,000. Jumbo loans are based on loan amounts of $484,351. Lock Days: 30-60. Points quoted include discount and/or origination. Payments do not include amounts for taxes and
insurance. The APR may increase after consummation and may vary. FHA Mortgages include both UFMIP and MIP fees based on a loan amount of $165,000 with 5% down payment. Points quoted include discount and/or origination. Fees reflect charges relative to the APR.
If your down payment is less than 20% of the home’s value, you will be subject to private mortgage insurance, or PMI. VA Mortgages include funding fees based on a loan amount of $165,000 with 5% down payment. If your down payment is less than 20% of the home’s
value, you will be subject to private mortgage insurance, or PMI. “Call for Rates” means actual rates were not available at press time. To access the NMLS Consumer Access website, please visit www.nmlsconsumeraccess.org. To appear in this table, call 773-320-8492.
B o s t o n
JA N UA RY 6 , 2 0 1 9
jobs
boston.com/monster
EDUCATION
EDUCATION
SOMERVILLE PUBLIC
SCHOOLS
NOW Accepting online applications for the
2019-2020 School Year
Elementary School Principal, K-8
Albert F. Argenziano School
Elementary School Principal, K-8
Arthur D. Healey School
Assistant Principal
Somerville High School – Beacon House
K-12 Supervisor of
Physical Education and Health
Director of Somerville Community Schools
NOW Accepting online applications for the
2018-2019 School Year
Temporary Grades 7/8 Science Teacher
Temporary Special Education Paraprofessionals
To review all opportunities or to submit
an application visit us online at:
http://www.somerville.k12.ma.us/careers
or
http://www.schoolspring.com/jobs?employer=16902
Somerville Public Schools is an Equal Opportunity Employer.
Somerville Public Schools actively seeks applicants with
diverse backgrounds. Grade level and content licensure is
required when applicable. Dual licensure including SPED, ESL,
ELL, or bilingual licensure and/or proficiency in a language or
languages other than English is preferred.
Language Tutor
French, Spanish and
Mandarin Speakers
Immediate openings. P/T
$30/hr. For children’s lang.
program in Littleton, Maynard, Harvard, Framingham,
Natick & other towns. Apply
at www.globalchild.com or
call 978-851-5337.
BUSINESS/
ADMIN
Business Management,
Business Development
Manager
(aka Management Consultant) Manage business development ventures in the
Chinese market. Send resume to: Steve Pepper, Hebrew SeniorLife, 5000 Great
Meadow Rd., Dedham, MA
02026
Executive Director
Executive Director
The mass hire Cape and
Islands workforce Board is
looking for a new Executive
Director (ED). The ED helps
to improve the quality of
the workforce, increases
career opportunities for individuals, and enhances the
productivity of businesses
on the Cape and Islands.
The ED must foster good
relationships
throughout
the community and develop
collaborations between all
workforce
development
partners to achieve common goals. Day to day operations include financial
management, contracting,
record keeping, financial
and programmatic reporting, and managing staff.
Qualifications include a
Bachelor’s Degree in public
or business administration, or similar discipline,
five years in progressively
higher levels of responsibility culminating in a senior
management level position,
grant writing experience, or
an equivalent combination
of education and experience. A working knowledge
of the workforce development system, including local, state, and federal systems is preferred. Strong
interpersonal,
communication, and organizational
skills required. Position is
full-time with some evening and weekend hours
probable; full benefits including Health Care, company matched IRA, EAP, etc.
Please email resume and
cover letter to lindsay@
masshire-capeandisland
swb.com
Massachusetts Institute of
Technology is seeking a
Director of Global
Partnerships
in Cambridge, MA. Candidate must have Master’s
or equivalent degree in
business
administration,
marketing or business development and 2 years of
experience in partnership,
business development or
fundraising on behalf of
international social impact
or non-profit organizations
required; or a Bachelor’s
or equivalent degree in
business
administration,
marketing or business development and 5 years of
relevant experience, including 2 years in partnership,
business development or
fundraising on behalf of
international social impact
or non-profit organizations.
Candidates apply online for
job 16912 at
http://hr.mit.edu/careers.
HEALTHCARE
Sr. Clinical Research
Coordinator
Sr. Clinical Research
Coordinator
wanted in Boston, MA. Coordinate clinical research
studies in the Cancer Center Protocol Office. Must
have Bach deg. in Biology,
Chemistry, Biochemistry, or
rel. scientific field & 3 yrs
exper. in same type of job or
3 yrs exp in clinical research
incl. preparing regulatory
submissions & data collection utilizing the Inform
electronic data capture
system. Stated exper must
incl the following: (1) managing multiple therapeutic
clinical trials; (2) working w/
Microsoft Office apps, incl
Outlook, Excel & Word; (3)
participating in Quality Control & Quality Assurance audits of managed research;
& (4) training & mentoring
junior level staff on clinical
research data mgmt. Mail
resume to Shannon Himber,
CCRP Assoc. Dir., MGH Cancer Center Protocol Office,
101 Merrimac St. Suite 400,
Boston, MA 02114.
BIOTECH/
PHARMA
Shire Human Genetic Therapies Inc. is seeking a
Manager, Regulatory
Strategy CMC
in Lexington, MA to mng
Regulatory Affairs activities for developing global
chemical, mfg & controls
(CMC) strategies for Shire’s
global portfolio of early development programs (IMPD/
CTA/IND), Mktg Apps (NDA,
MAA, BLA, JNDA) & Agency
request for info, post-approval changes or compliance updates. Qualified applicants can apply directly
to the Shire careers page at:
https://jobs.shire.com. Plse
ref job #R0030484.
TECHNOLOGY/
ENGINEERING
Wayfair LLC has multiple
openings for the following
positions in Boston, MA:
Software Engineer III
(SF Product Guidance)
Work closely with product
owners to perform e-commerce software eng. across
multiple platforms; develop
scalable solutions & deploy
changes to production several times a day Design
& devel. PHP & JavaScript
code. Requires: MS in C.S.,
Eng., I.S., or related (willing
to accept foreign ed equiv.)
& 2 yrs of exp performing
PHP & JavaScript design &
development or BS & 5 yrs
of exp.
Apply online at: https://
www.wayfaircareers.com/
jobs/oFy38fw8?lang=en-us
Software Engineer III
(Storefront Engineering/
PPD Sprint Line)
Design
software
architecture, create technical
designs & develop applications in an agile environment to support competitive intelligence & dynamic
pricing. Requires: MS in C.S.,
Eng., I.T., I.S., or related
(willing to accept foreign
edu. equiv.) & 2 yrs of exp.
Performing .NET or Java development, or BS & 5 yrs. of
exp. Apply online at: https://
www.wayfaircareers.com/
jobs/oYx38fwq?lang=en-us
Software Engineer III
(iOS Trust & Conversions)
Design & build UI/UX for
iPhone & iPad apps. Write
iOS, Swift, & Objective C
code. Build user experiences with UI, engaging
animations, & optimal performance. Requires: MS in
C.S., Eng., I.S., or related
(willing to accept foreign
edu. equiv.) & 2 yrs of exp.
performing iOS mobile development, QA & maintenance, or BS & 5 yrs. of exp.
Apply online at: https://
www.wayfaircareers.com/
jobs/oBw38fw2?lang=en-us
Software Engineer III
(Storefront Engineering/
SF Product Details Page)
Lead, mentor, & teach engineers in building web-based
ecommerce
applications,
working with several large
& complex SQL databases.
Requires: MS in C.S., Eng.,
I.S., or related (willing to
accept foreign edu. equiv.)
& 2 yrs of exp. performing
PHP, JavaScript, & SQL web
development, BS & 5 yrs. of
exp. Apply online at: https://
www.wayfaircareers.com/
jobs/o5y38fwy?lang=en-us
Techalpha, LLC has multiple
openings at multiple levels
for the following positions:
Master’s only/equiv.:
QA Analyst
(TAQAA18):
Producing test plans covering functional, acceptance, and performance
test domains; researching, analyzing, and testing
programs.Master’s+1yr/
Bachelor’s+5yrs exp/equiv.
DevOps Engineer I
(TADOEI18):
Java, Jenkins, Maven, Java
Script, Spring, SQL, Linux.
Mail resume with job ID to:
HR, 1500 District Ave, Burlington, MA 01803. Travel
to unanticipated work sites
throughout U.S. Foreign
equiv. accepted.
ENGINEERING
Synopsys, Inc., has an opening in Burlingrton, MA:
Software Engineer, Sr. I:
Develop, integrate & test
proprietary
enterprise
open source governance
software solutions. Req
MS in CS/CE/Info Sys or
rel + 6 mos exp in dvlpg
& intgrtg REST APIs using
Java. Req #20248BR. Multiple Openings. To apply,
send resume with REQ# to:
printads@synopsys.com.
EEO
Employer/Vet/Disabled.
Amazon.com Services, Inc.
– Cambridge, MA.
Hardware Development
Engineer III
Design innovative speaker &
microphone array systems
using state of the art engineering tools & techniques.
Multiple job openings. International and domestic
travel required up to 20%.
Send resume, referencing
AMZ2921 to: Amazon.com,
P.O. Box 81226, Seattle, WA
98108. EOE.
Bus Intelligence Sftwr Dev
Business Intelligence
Software Developer
Sought by EBSCO Publishing in Ipswich, MA. Dvlp
BI solutions to dept stndrds. Ensure repeatable
process for SD. Aply @
www.jobpostingtoday.com
(ref# 49255)
TECHNOLOGY/
ENGINEERING
TECHNOLOGY/
ENGINEERING
S u n d a y
TECHNOLOGY/
ENGINEERING
G l o b e
TECHNOLOGY/
ENGINEERING
TECHNOLOGY/
ENGINEERING
The MathWorks, Inc. leads the market in developing & delivering high performance interactive software products to the
engineering & scientific communities. We have openings the following positions available at our offices in Natick, MA:
Quality Engineer (Job Code 20786) to develop and enhance test infrastructure and automated test suites and conduct hands-on testing of the MATLAB
front-end. Position requires MS or higher (or foreign education equivalent) in
Engineering, Computer Science, Embedded Software, Embedded Systems,
Information Science, Information Systems, or Management Information Systems & no experience, OR BS & five (5) years of experience in job offered or
five (5) years of experience in test infrastructure development.
Software Engineer (Job Code 20787) to design generation solutions for test
management and execution, perform data visualization and scale the core
infrastructure. Position requires MS or higher (or foreign education equivalent) in Engineering, Computer Science, Computer Science and Engineering,
Information Systems, or Mathematics & no experience, OR BS & five (5) years
of experience in job offered or five (5) years of experience writing C++ and
MATLAB scripts to integrate Simulink-based features.
Senior Technical Writer (Job Code 20788) to write user-focused content
that explains MathWorks software used to develop algorithms and deploy
them to embedded systems. Position requires MS (or foreign education equivalent) in Engineering, Computer Science, Mathematics, Physics, or Technical
or Professional Writing & two (2) years of experience in job offered or two
(2) years of experience in technical support or technical writing for MATLAB-based simulation technology, OR PhD & no experience, OR BS & six (6)
years of experience in job offered or six (6) years of experience in technical
support or technical writing for MATLAB-based simulation technology.
Data Warehouse Developer/Analyst (Job Code 20789) to support the development and maintenance of MathWorks data warehousing systems and
data marts. Position requires MS or higher (or foreign education equivalent) in
Engineering, Computer Science, or Information Systems & no experience, OR
BS & five (5) years of experience in job offered or five (5) years of experience
in data warehouse development.
Manager, Engineering Development Group (Job Code 20790) to manage a
technical support team to achieve continuous improvement of service levels.
Position requires MS or higher (or foreign education equivalent) in Engineering
or Computer Science & two (2) years of experience in job offered or two (2)
years of experience in control system design and managing controls engineers, OR BS & six (6) years of experience in job offered or six (6) years of
experience in control system design and managing controls engineers.
Senior Software Engineer (Job Code 20791) to design and develop Installation, Activation, and Licensing technologies for both offline and online usage.
Position requires MS (or foreign education equivalent) in Engineering, Computer Science, Information Technology, Computer Science and Engineering,
Systems Science, or Operations Research & two (2) years of experience in job
offered or two (2) years of experience in end-to-end Java-based application
development, OR PhD & no experience, OR BS & six (6) years of experience in
job offered or six (6) years of experience in end-to-end Java-based application
development.
Data Warehouse Developer/Analyst (Job Code 20793) to profile and analyze large amounts of source data and collaborate with data providers to fill
data gaps and/or to adjust source-system data structures. Position requires
MS or higher (or foreign education equivalent) in Engineering, Computer
Science, or Information Systems & no experience, OR BS & five (5) years of
experience in job offered or five (5) years of experience in data warehouse
development and database modeling.
Software Engineer (Job Code 20794) to design and develop MathWorks’
Licensing technology and improve the quality of the existing code base. Position requires MS or higher (or foreign education equivalent) in Engineering,
Computer Science, or Computer Information Systems & no experience, OR
BS & five (5) years of experience in job offered or five (5) years of experience
programming in C++.
Software Developer (Job Code 20795) to design, implement, and unit test
client-server applications and databases. Position requires MS or higher (or
foreign education equivalent) in Engineering or Computer Science & no experience, OR BS & five (5) years of experience in job offered or five (5) years of
experience developing software tools for a development infrastructure.
Senior Software Engineer (Job Code 20796) to build cutting-edge simulation and automatic code generation capabilities within MathWorks flagship
Simulink platform for SimEvents. Position requires MS (or foreign education
equivalent) in Engineering, Computer Science, Physics, or Mathematics & two
(2) years of experience in job offered or two (2) years of experience simulating
electro-mechanic, communications, or control design automation systems,
OR PhD & no experience, OR BS & six (6) years of experience in job offered or
six (6) years of experience simulating electro-mechanic, communications, or
control design automation systems.
For all positions listed above, interested candidates may search by job code for a complete & detailed listing of job details & requirements and apply online on the Careers Page at www.mathworks.com. The MathWorks, Inc. is an equal opportunity employer. We evaluate qualified applicants without regard to
race, color, religion, sex, national origin, disability, veteran status, and other protected characteristics. MathWorks participates in E-Verify.
Computer/IT
Engineer
for Deloitte & Touche LLP in
Boston, MA to assist with
engagement planning, organizing, budgeting, audit plan
execution, and documentation of audit procedures
performed. Requires: Bachelor’s degree (or higher)
in Comp. Sci., Info. Sys.,
Math, Dec. Sci., Risk Mngt.,
Engg., Bus. Admin., Acctng.
or related field (willing to
accept foreign education
equivalent) plus 18 mos of
Information Technology auditing and risk and controls
experience. Position requires 80% travel. To apply,
visit https://jobs2.deloitte.
com/us/en/ and enter XSFH19FA1218BOB2 in the
“Search jobs” field. No calls
please. “Deloitte” means
Deloitte LLP and its subsidiaries. Please see www.
deloitte.com/us/about for a
detailed description of the
legal structure of Deloitte
LLP and its subsidiaries. Deloitte LLP & its subsidiaries
are equal opportunity employers.
Charter
Communications
Inc (Multiple Openings) in
Andover, MA seeks MS Exchange Eng to dsgn, implement, manage, & provide
eng supp. Req Bach deg
or for equiv, in CS, Comp
App, Eng, IT, or rel & 3 yrs
exp: perform cust migrate
apps from MS Exchange
2010 to Office 365; cust
security apps incl Active
Directory & Air-Watch MDM;
supp single sign on services
using Microsoft ADFS; perform data sync using Azure
AD Connect; dsgn, implement, & supp Skype for Bus;
dev mail flow & content
filter apps use ProofPoint
& Mimecast. Apply online
at www.charter.com, ref
code 231443BR.
Advisory Senior Consultant
Data Analyst
Data Analyst
Sought by Blue Cross Blue
Shield of Massachusetts,
Inc. in Boston, MA. Use sftware for data anlysis. Apply
@
www.jobpostingtoday.
com, Ref #78482.
EMC Corporation (a Dell
Technologies company) is
seeking a
Software Senior Engineer
at our Hopkinton, MA facility to be responsible for
analyzing, designing, programing, debugging and
modifying software application enhancements and/
or new products (including
network and data security
applications) used in local,
networked or Internet-related computer programs.
Develop critical customized
infrastructure for product
development and QE operations. Req. 000474. To be
considered for the opening,
please send resume with
requisition number to: jobs_
dell@dell.com. No phone
calls please. Workforce diversity is an essential part
of Dell’s commitment to
quality and to the future.
We encourage you to apply,
whatever your race, gender, color, religion, national
origin, age, disability, marital
status, sexual orientation or
veteran status.
EMC Corporation (a Dell
Technologies Company) is
seeking a
Software Senior Engineer
at our Hopkinton, MA facility to be responsible for
analyzing, designing, programing, debugging and
modifying software application enhancements and/
or new products (including
frontend and backend) used
in storage software computer programs. Develop
kernel level and device
driver for EMC VNX storage
array using agile methodologies. Req. 000404. To be
considered for the opening,
please send resume with
requisition number to: jobs_
dell@dell.com. No phone
calls please. Workforce diversity is an essential part
of Dell’s commitment to
quality and to the future.
We encourage you to apply,
whatever your race, gender, color, religion, national
origin, age, disability, marital
status, sexual orientation or
veteran status.
EMC Corporation (a Dell
Technologies company) is
seeking an
Advisor, Business
Intelligence
at our Hopkinton, MA facility to analyze and define
business needs and assist
in developing appropriate
solutions.
Consult with
business to identify new
reports or data needs to
support business decisions.
Req. 000112. To be considered for the opening, please
send resume with requisition number to: jobs_dell@
dell.com. No phone calls
please. Workforce diversity
is an essential part of Dell’s
commitment to quality and
to the future. We encourage you to apply, whatever
your race, gender, color,
religion, national origin, age,
disability, marital status,
sexual orientation or veteran status.
EMC Corporation (a Dell
Technologies company) is
seeking an
Advisor, Business
Systems Analyst
at our Southborough, MA
facility with eligibility for
Mobile (Telework) to provide cost effective business systems and applications analysis in support
of the development and
implementation of business applications; includes
evaluation, analysis, documentation of requirements,
translation
into
proper
system requirement specifications and configuration.
Formulate and define systems scope and objectives
based on both end-user
needs and a thorough understanding of business
systems, applications and
industry requirements. Req.
006803. To be considered
for the opening, please
send resume with requisition number to: jobs_dell@
dell.com. No phone calls
please. Workforce diversity
is an essential part of Dell’s
commitment to quality and
to the future. We encourage you to apply, whatever
your race, gender, color,
religion, national origin, age,
disability, marital status,
sexual orientation or veteran status.
MS Exchange Eng.
Eze Castle Software LLC,
d.b.a SS&C EZE, an SS&C
Technologies Inc. Company
seeks a
Senior Software Engineer,
in Boston, MA. 40 hrs/wk.
Min. Reqs: Bachelor’s deg
in CS, Computer Engg or
rltd field or frgn equiv, plus
five (5) yrs of s/w dvlpmt
exp. SKILLS: 5 Yrs of Exp
Req in the Following: Asynchronous & multi-threaded
prgmng, More than one object oriented langs, specifically C# & .Net, WCF (Windows Comm Foundation),
Winforms & WPF (Windows
Presentation Foundation),
Entity Framework & Composition Application Block.
3 Yrs of Exp Req in the Following: Service Oriented &
Web Architectures & Restful APIs. 2 Yrs of Exp Req in
the Following: Agile Dvlpmt
process, Using s/w source
control specifically MS TFS
& Git, Optimization tools
specifically dotTrace & dotMemory or ANTS Memory
Profiler, Crash dump tools
specifically MS WinDbg &
MS Debug Diagnostic. 1
Year of Exp Req in the Following: C++, MS Message
Queuing, Redis, Candidates
must pass a tech test to
be considered for this pos.
Send resume to Aylin Kentkur, 12 Farnsworth St., 6th
Floor, Boston, MA 02210.
IT
Architecture Consultant
(State Street Bank and
Trust Company; Boston,
MA): Be a key member
responsible for the design,
development, deployment
& production support of the
Identity & Access Management (IAM) solutions. Min
req’s: Bach. Deg. or equiv. in
CS, IT, or rel. +5yrs IT experience as an architect implementing identity & access
management solutions in a
complex & diverse environment + add’l skills. State
Street Job ID: R-604164. To
apply to this position, visit
statestreet.com/careers. To
locate this position in our
application page, please
use the KEYWORD search
functionality and insert either the State Street Job ID
or the Location.
Maxima Consulting Inc. has
multiple openings for
Software Professionals
in Boston, MA with exp in:
Software Engineers: Res,
des, dev & maintain backend, middle-tier & frontend
code using Java, J2EE, SOA,
Web Services, HTML, XML,
Servlet, JDBC, JSP, EJB, JNDI,
Collection API’s, Java Multithreading, Oracle Exadata,
SQL, PL/SQL & Scripting lang
w IBM Message Queues,
WebSphere, Rational Appl
Dev, ClearCase & ClearQuest tools. Dev of highly
scalable fin sw comp in
real-time. Impl & optimize
proc of large amount of fin
transaction data in realtime using Linux, Unix &
Core Java. Des db schemas
& queries to store & retrieve
large records of data & perf
tuning using SQL, PL/SQL
on Oracle Exadata. Resolve
perf bottlenecks throughout
the sys both server & client
sides. Send Resume to: HR,
Maxima Consulting Inc., 27
Water St, Wakefield, MA
01880. Ref # MXC 2018-4
Maxima Consulting Inc. has
multiple openings for
Software Solution
Architects
for varying client sites
nationwide w/exp in: Research, des & architect
cloud-based arch & deploy
appls; Migrate server-based
deployment appl to MS
Azure Cloud platform to
achieve scalable appl design; Impl cloud readiness
projects using MS Azure
to convert all workloads to
a PaaS. Des & dev Azure
Resource Manager (ARM)
templates to automate the
deployment proc. Manage
data integration w/ Azure
Data factory to build scalable data flow w/ codeless
UI. Dev & deploy MS Azure
Microservices to encapsulate customer bus scenario.
Des & dev appls in App Services platform using Azure,
Asp. Net API, Cosmos DB,
Azure Table, Azure Blobs, &
Azure SQL. Set up full CI/
CD with Azure Kubernetes
svce & deploy containerized appl. Des & dev SPA
using JavaScript libraries
& frameworks incl Angular
Js, React Js, & Knockout JS.
Appl architecture des, data
structure des for Front-End
appl using Redux-Saga pattern for AMD pattern. Send
Resume to: HR, Maxima
Consulting Inc., 27 Water St,
Wakefield, MA 01880. Ref #
MXC 2019-1
National Instruments Corp.
in Woburn, MA seeks
RF Field Applications and
Systems Engineers
to work closely with specialized sales resources to
drive business initiatives
within the region. Design
configuration of systems
and software architecture.
Master’s + 2 yrs. exp. or
Bachelor’s + 5 yrs. exp.
Must pass technical interview. Up to 10% domestic
travel req. Email resumes to
jobs@ni.com. Put Job code
“ZRFFASE” in subject line &
on resume.
NetScout Systems, Inc.
seeks a
Software Engineer II
in Westford, MA to devlp
network device drivers;
develop, test, validate &
maintain rpms for Fedora
Kernels; prfrm OS/Kernel
optimizations,
prfrmnce
tuning & porting; develop
networking protocol apps &
optimize code for multicore
environ.; design, develop,
document, test, implement
& support device drivers &
modules; develop security
patches for vulnerabilities;
develop virtualization solutions for hardware & infrastructure. Reqs MS+no exp
or BS + 5 yrs exp devlping
networking
protocol-specific apps. Submit resume
to careers@netscout.com
& incl Job Code VV-SEII in
subject line.
Principal Software Engineer
Principal Software Engineer
Sought by The Broad Institute (Cambridge, MA) to
dvlp s/ware products for
biomedical
researchers.
Req. bachelor’s in comp sci
or rltd & 5 yrs exp. min. Mail
resume/cvr ltr to Lynn Walters Rekhi, Sr Imm & Appts,
75 Ames St, Cambridge, MA
02141. Ref #12816J
Quality Assurance Experts
Quality Assurance Experts,
R&D,
Information Technology
in Billerica, MA to impl &
improve validation & qualif
framework appl w IT Gov &
Qual Assur, dev efficient
deliv or qual guidelines for
maint of qual state of valid
SaaS Cloud sols. Trav req:
no more than 4 int’l trips
per year for 1 week duration
per trip. Req. deg in Pharm
Eng, IT, or rel + exp. Send
resumes to EMD Serono,
Inc., 400 Summit Drive, 4th
Fl., Burlington, MA 01803
(Req#185502)
Regional Technical Specialists
Regional
Technical Specialists
– CNA in Westborough, MA
to monitor installed base
Cont Neutron Analyzer using online CRM database,
control inventory of spare
parts & consumable prods
for CNA according to installed base prop, serve as
tech exp & provide training
& guidance to engineers &
cust to support CNA. 30%
dom & 20% int’l travel. Req.
deg in electronic eng or
clos rel + exp. Please send
resumes to Malvern Panalytical, Inc., 117 Flanders Rd,
Westborough, MA 01581
(Attn. C. Tessier).
Research Associate
Research Associate III
Evidera, Inc. seeks a Research Associate III in
Waltham, MA to implement
simulation models (e.g.,
discrete event simulation)
and other decision-analytic
models (e.g., Markov, individual
state-transition,
survival partition) to assess
the cost-effectiveness of
healthcare
interventions.
MS +2 yrs. exp. OR BS + 5
yrs. exp. Research project
implementation exp. req.
0 – 5 % Domestic and International Travel. To apply,
please visit https://www.
evidera.com/careers/over
view/ and search for Job
Reference: Research Associate III – Modeling and
Simulation (Waltham).
Senior SAP Technical
Developer
Senior SAP
Technical Developer
wanted by SeraCare Life
Sciences Inc. in Milford,
MA. Dvlp, dsgn, plan, &
implmt SAP functionality
& other IT systems & solutions using SAP ABAP; support technical aspects for
all SAP modules including
Process Weaver’s SAP shipping solution as well as Dell
Boomi middleware. Perform
reqmts gathering, dvlp &
configure technical specifications, system testing, &
deployment & perform SAP
data mapping, modeling &
integration with external
prgms using SAP EDI/IDOCs.
Reqs: Master’s deg (or foreign equiv deg) in Comp Sci,
Comp Engg, Electronics &
Communication Engg, & 5
yrs of exp in job offd or as
SAP ABAP Consultant OR
a combo of a Bachelor’s
deg (or foreign equiv deg)
in stated fields plus 7 yrs
of stated exp (at least 5 of
which must be post-baccalaureate & progressive
exp); or any suitable combo
of edu, training &/or work
exp. Reqs 5 yrs of exp using
SAP, SAP ABAP Workbench,
& ABAP prgmg in the following areas: User Exits,
BDC & Call-transactions,
SAPScript,
Smart-Forms,
IDOC, BAPI & ALE interfaces. Please apply through
the Career Opportunities
section of our website at
https://www.seracare.com/
en-US/about-us/careers/
career-opportunities/.
SharkNinja Operating LLC in
Needham, MA seeks
Director, Product Design
Engineering
to develop new product
concepts for the Shark
brand, which include vacuum cleaners, steam mops,
hard floor care products,
and garment care products.
Reqs.: Master’s in Product
Design, Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Design or
rltd field (will accept foreign
education equiv.) & 3 yrs.
exp. designing high-volume
consumer products and
leading design and development of complex integrated
assemblies and engineering
systems or, alternatively, a
Bachelor’s plus 5 yrs. exp.
as noted above. Submit resume to SharkNinja Operating LLC, Danielle Benn, 89 A
Street, Suite 100, Needham,
MA 02494.
Software
Member Technical Staff,
Software
(NetApp, Inc. – Waltham,
MA) Design & implement
scalable, robust, & memory
efficient data management
systems software. Requires
a master’s degree or foreign equivalent in computer
engineering,
computer
science, or a related tech
field. Must have the following skill set (evidenced by
graduate-level coursework
or prior experience): software testing; computer network architecture; storage
& networking technologies;
& data structures & algorithms. Mail resume to P.
Reed, Job Code #1473, NetApp, Inc., 1395 Crossman
Ave., Sunnyvale, CA 94089.
Software Engineer
Software Engineer
w/Spotify USA Inc. in
Somerville, MA. Implement
& improve existing Android
features. Work on the s/
ware dvlpmnt lifecycle,
from planning to releasing
apps. Bach (U.S. or foreign
equiv) in Comp Sci, Electrical Engg, or a rel field & 3
yrs of exp as a S/ware
Engineer in an agile environment. Prior work exp
must incl 3 yrs w/ each of
the below: Writing readable,
maintainable, performant
object-oriented Java in a
collaborative environment;
Utilizing understanding of
system design, data structures & algorithms & understand how to apply them to
design pragmatic solutions;
Utilizing understanding of
modern Android dvlpmnt;
Leverage dvlpmnt environments such as Java, C++,
& RxJava as well as testing
tools such as JUnit, Robolectric, Appium, or Espresso
Exp using Android Native
Development Kit (NDK) &
Java Native Interface (JNI);
Implementing custom Android UI components using
Google’s latest best practices; Building wearable
apps using Android Wear
framework; Utilizing understanding of end to end
systems & microservices
using frameworks such as
Ruby on Rails, Java Sprint,
or Node,js; Extending web
services written in Java to
provide data & new functionality in a scalable way; &
Utilizing dvlpmnt tools such
as Android Studio, build systems such as Gradle, TeamCity, & Jenkins, Jira for project mgmt & bug tracking.
Qualified Applicants: Email
resumes to usarecruiters@
spotify.com & ref the job
code itma
TECHNOLOGY
Sapient Corporation has
multiple openings for following positions (various
levels) in Boston, MA &
various, unanticipated sites
throughout the U.S.
Senior Associate Data
Platform (SADP 0106):
Develop, create, and modify
general computer applications.
Product Manager (PM 01/06):
Develop, create, and modify
general computer applications software.
Product Manager
(PM2 01/06):
Conduct
organizational
studies and evaluations,
design systems and procedures, conduct work simplification and measurement
studies.
Senior QA Analyst
(SQAA 01/06):
Develop, create, and modify
general computer applications software.
Manager Technology
(MT 01/06):
Develop, create, and modify
general computer applications software.
Senior Project Manager
(SPM 01/06):
Develop, create, and modify
general computer applications software.
Must
be available to
work on projects at various, unanticipated sites
throughout the U.S.
To
apply, send resume to
NARecruitmentGPM@
sapient.com. Must reference title & code to be considered.
Skillsoft seeks
Software Engineer II Front End UI Developer
in Boston, MA to work on
UI implementation in a CI/
DC environment applying UI
architectural standards and
best practices. Req’s. Bachelor’s in Computer Science
or foreign education equivalent and 3 years of experience in web development
working on front end UI
solutions. Submit resume to
SkillSoft Corporation, Kristin
Kelley, 300 Innovative Way,
Nashua, New Hampshire
03062. Reference Position
Number: SE-FEDGC.
Create your ad
today at
boston.com/
monster
Senior Software Engineer
Senior Software Engineer,
Cloud Email Development
(Multiple Openings)
(Burlington, MA): Collaborate as part of a team for
the devlp. of complex apps.,
incl’g req. analysis, concept
devlp. & dsgn, implmtn &
testing. Write code (Test or
Product) for Sophos Cloud
products. Provide tech.
leadership/mentorship
to
other dvlprs. Resumes to:
Sophos, Inc., Attn: HR, 3 Van
de Graaff Dr, 2nd Fl, Burlington, MA 01803.
Business
PROFESSIONAL
Acronis Management LLC Burlington, MA.
Global Partner Program &
Marketing Business
Operations Mgr.
Perform market research
& analysis to build profitable & sustainable partner
program, to help develop &
transform Acronis Channel
& leverage Acronis partners
as extended sales force to
help accelerate revenue.
Position is based in Burlington, MA office but telecommuting fr. a home ofc
is allowed. Send resume to:
careersamericas@acronis.
com.
Business Analyst II
Business Analyst II
sought by Bright Horizons
Family Solutions in Watertown, MA to analyze Bright
Horizons’ business domain,
document its business processes, and develop business requirements. Reqs:
Master’s (or for. equiv.) +3
yrs exp (or Bachelors, or for.
equiv. +5 yrs exp) incl. 3 yrs
exp working with daycare,
or similar complex scheduling system, that integrate
with Microsoft Dynamics
CRM and AX; among others.
Apply online at: https://jobs.
brighthorizons.com
Audax seeks
Principals
in Boston MA. Execute due
diligence for private equity
acquisitions and take full
command of deal process,
negotiations and deal execution, including identify
key issues; design analysis/
work plans to vet investment thesis; drive capital
structure/financing;
lead
initiatives to improve portfolio companies; communicate with executives at
acquisition targets/portfolio
companies; manage team
of Analysts, Associates, VPs;
contribute to firm-building
activities. Reqs: Bach in
Management,
Economics, Finance, or equiv; 8 yrs
progressive exp in strategic
consulting or investment
banking and private equity,
including 6 yrs developing internal rate of return/
cash multiple return models,
managing/generating
detailed reports/presentations for tracking activity of
private equity portfolio, developing/utilizing complex
financial models, interacting
with limited partners of private equity funds, negotiating purchase/employment/
credit agreements, and
managing third-party providers and 3 yrs leading deal
teams (exp can be gained
concurrently); knowledge
of interacting with limited
partners of private equity
funds, Excel and PowerPoint; extensive travel required. Contact Heather
Ingrando at hingrando@
audaxgroup.com
Software Developer
Software Developer
Sought by EBSCO Publishing in Ipswich, MA. Prov
expertise on sys arch,
dsgn, implntn, testing, dlvy,
and oprtn of intrnl Java
based systems. Apply @
www.jobpostingtoday.com
REF# 58108
Specialists
Applications Specialists
XRD
in Westborough, MA to perf
Sales XRD demos on equip
& software for clients &
in company app lab, prep
analytical routines of quant
analysis of building & geo
matrls & config hardware
for automation proj based
on client needs, perf on-site
cust training on Xray diffraction. 40% dom & 10%
int’l travel (Canada, Mexico
& South America). Req. PhD
geology or clos rel + exp.
Please send resumes to
Malvern Panalytical, Inc.,
117 Flanders Rd, Westborough, MA 01581 (Attn. C.
Tessier).
TECHNOLOGY
Deloitte Consulting LLP
seeks a
Project Delivery
Manager, Customer &
Marketing, Human Services
Transformation
in Boston, MA & various
unanticipated Deloitte office locations & client sites
nationally to design, develop, & implement systems
& processes to capture,
integrate & distribute information in large companies.
Reqts: Bachelor’s degree or
foreign equivalent degree
in Applied Computer Science, Computer Science,
Engineering (any), Information Technology, CIS, MIS
or a related fld. 5 years of
progressively responsible
experience as a Project
Delivery Manager, as a Programmer Analyst, as a Software Engineer or a position
in a related occupation.
80% travel req’d. Telecommuting permitted. To apply,
visit https://jobs2.deloitte.
com/us/en
and
enter
XGGS19FC0119BOB1 in the
“Search jobs” fld.
“Deloitte” means Deloitte
LLP & its subsidiaries.
Please see www.deloitte.
com/us/about for a detailed
description of the legal
structure of Deloitte LLP &
its subsidiaries. Deloitte LLP
& its subsidiaries are equal
opportunity employers.
TECHNOLOGY
EntIT Software LLC is
accepting resumes for the
position of
Systems/
Software Engineer
in Cambridge, MA (Ref.
# ENTMCUXY1). Design,
develop, troubleshoot and
debug software programs
for software enhancements
and new products. Design
enhancements,
updates,
and programming changes
for portions and subsystems of systems software,
including operating systems, compliers, networking, utilities, databases, and
Internet-related tools. Mail
resume to EntIT Software
LLC, 5400 Legacy Drive, MS
H4-1A-01, Plano, TX 75024.
Resume must include Ref. #,
full name, email address &
mailing address. No phone
calls. Must be legally authorized to work in U.S. without
sponsorship. EOE.
Triverus Consulting seeks
Software Development
Engineer
for Woburn, MA location.
Participate in all aspects
of software development
lifecycle; develop reports
& make recommendations
for streamlining existing
reporting
processes; &
represent technical teams
in SDLC for Agile methodologies. Reqs. incl. MS Info
Sci. & Tech or rel. (or for ed
equiv) + 18 mths rel.exp.
Reply: pam.oakes@
triverusconsulting.com.
PROFESSIONAL
Accounting
Audit & Assurance Senior
for Deloitte & Touche LLP in
Boston, MA to work under
the supervision of upper
mgmt. to design audit approaches, conduct field audit engagements, & perform
complex acctng. & auditing
of balance sheets & income
statements. Requires: Bachelor’s degree (or higher)
in Acctng. or related field
(willing to accept foreign
education equivalent) & 1
yr. of acctng. & auditing exp.
in the Technology, Media, &
Telecommunications (TMT)
industry. Must possess:
CPA license or passage of
all 4 parts of CPA examination. Less than 10% travel
outside of normal commuting distance. To apply,
visit https://jobs2.deloitte.
com/us/en/ and enter XSFH19FA1218BOB1 in the
“Search jobs” field. No calls
please. “Deloitte” means
Deloitte LLP and its subsidiaries. Please see www.
deloitte.com/us/about for a
detailed description of the
legal structure of Deloitte
LLP and its subsidiaries. Deloitte LLP & its subsidiaries
are equal opportunity employers.
Business Analyst
Business Analyst
(Boston, MA) - Identify &
analyze production issues
w/ payment & fraud prevention systems. Elaborate
req’d documents for fraud
prevention projects in order
to mitigate fraud exposure,
increasing proactive fraud
detection & improving customer exp. Drive project
lifecycle, collecting req’s,
elaborating documentation,
& managing development
laboratories & relationship
w/ third parties like FICO,
Fiserv, BAE & KPMG. Certify
integration of fraud systems
w/ MasterCard, Visa, &
Apple. Integrate & recommend fraud tools in order
to prevent non-genuine activity, & enhance alert management & loss prevention
to customers & bank. Req’s:
Bachelor’s in Computer Science (will accept two yrs of
exp in position offered or as
Project Manager in lieu of
Bachelor’s degree) plus an
additional two yrs of exp
in position offered or as
Project Manager. Two yrs
of req’d exp must have included implementing mainframe, card, anti-fraud, ATM
& mobile payment projects
for international bank; integrating fraud systems w/
MasterCard, Visa & Apple;
& utilizing Unix, JCL, Cobol,
SQL, Oracle, Java, HTML,
CCS, IBM Mainframe, Javascript, Norkom, BMC, Lynx
& Netreveal. Position is for
roving employee who will
work in various unanticipated locations throughout the
U.S. according to business
need. Mail resume to: Irene
Vincent, Corus Systems &
Consulting, Inc., 745 Atlantic Ave, 8th Fl, Boston, MA
02111.
Business Development Mgr
Business Development
Manager
(Boston, MA) sought by
Software co., with exp. establishing and maintaining
effective and long-lasting
relationships with high-level
executives to increase sale
of tech products. Must have
exp. conducting and directing face-to-face market
research studies and analyzing their findings to develop international business
development
strategies
and marketing campaigns.
No travel or language fluency req. MBA + 6M exp.
in job duties. Please send
resumes by postal mail only
to: Rainer Gawlick, Board
Advisor, think-cell, Inc., 22
Boston Wharf Road, 7th
Floor, Boston, MA 02210.
IT Professionals
IT Professionals:
Mult
openings.
Headquarters: Woburn, MA. Sr
Software
Developers
(ID#794992) mult openings. Gather/analyze proj
reqs, create sw designs.
Design, dev, impl apps/code
w/ Hadoop, rev code. Perform tune processes, supp
testing, id/resolve issues.
Deploy code to prod, perform knowledge transfers/
prod supp. Work w/ Spark,
Hive, HDFS, Unix, Sqoop,
Shell Scripting, Git, Autosys, Putty, Oracle. Sr Technical Business Analysts
(ID#803280) mult openings.
Analyze/id data elements,
source data, conform/provide data views. Doc data
models, create schema,
tables, columns. Dev data
source reqs, prep source
plans, dev load scripts. Create store procedures, code,
map docs, dev Informatica
workflows/mappings. Debug maps, test procedures/
funcs, map data. Create/
execute test plans, fix defects. Prep validate scripts,
rev/record results. Work w/
Hadoop, Hive, SQL Server,
Oracle, SharePoint, Jira,
Nexus, MS Project, PL/SQL,
JavaScript, C##, Unix. Sr
Database Administrators
(ID#820978) mult openings.
Perform SQL database administration/system analysis tasks, supp db apps. Analyze root cause, fix issues.
Monitor dbs, analyze/fix
probs, tune enhances. Resolve db integrity/perform
issues, troubleshoot/monitor Hadoop services. Create dbs/name spaces, add
roles, grant permissions.
Validate services, manage
workloads.
Create/mod
pool memory, admin/supp
SQL dbs. Work with MS SQL
Server, T-SQL, PowerShell,
Oracle, SSMS, SSIS, Cloudera
Mgr, Hue, Impala, Hive. Sr
Database Administrators
(ID#139915) mult openings.
Perform Oracle db security admin, create, clone, revoke db access. Dev roles/
privileges, gen entitlement/
db reports. Create/deploy
scripts, prep profiles/access
lists. Create, sched, monitor backups, automate jobs.
Refresh dbs/schemas, tune
queries. Improve perform,
apply integrity constraints.
Deploy services, create files.
Prep db objects, create triggers. Work w/ Oracle RAC,
Oracle Data Guard, Oracle
Enterprise Manager, Disaster Recovery, EXPDP, Shell
Script, Python Script, SQL,
Linux, Toad, Putty, Remedy,
Control-M. Applies to all
positions: 40 hrs/wk, must
have MS or equiv in Comp
Sci, Electr Eng, or related fld
(will accept BS+5 yrs exp in
lieu of MS) & 1 yr exp (or 1 yr
exp in related occup), must
be willing to travel/relocate
to unanticipated locations
throughout US on short
notice for extend time. Mail
resume w/ID# to: Ms Tuck,
Randstad Technologies, LLC,
PO Box 2993, Woburn, MA
01888-1793.
PROFESSIONAL
H7
PROFESSIONAL
IT Professionals
Senior Product Manager
Mult openings. Headquarters: Woburn, MA. Sr Software Systems Engineers
(ID#607754) mult openings.
Analyze, design, dev, test,
deploy sw services, convert sw/web services to
microservice arch. Dev microservices w/ Spring/Amazon Cloud, impl security process, Swagger for API docs,
Spring JDBC templates. Load
test, deploy microservices,
debug apps. Monitor code,
ensure quality, integrate
codebase. Work w/ Spring
Framework, Spring Boot,
Oracle, Java, J2EE, Tomcat, AWS, SQL, JMeter, Git,
Jenkins, Jira. Sr Software
Dev elope rs(ID#312845)
mult openings. Analyze/
gather reqs, create design
docs. Design/dev UI apps
w/ JSP/JSF, create action
classes. Dev webpages w/
AngularJS/NodeJS, app migrate from Solaris to Linux.
Impl Spring in dev enviros,
dev/deploy apps on TCServer. Work w/ Java, J2EE,
Oracle, Hibernate, PLSQL,
SOAP/REST Web Services.
Sr Software Developers
(ID#294818) mult openings.
Gather reqs, doc tech specs.
Dev flow, web, Java, JMS,
DSP, and UM API services,
install/config webMethods
platforms across enviros.
Work w/ consumer/teams
on enviro configs, troubleshoot connect issues. Supp
infrastruct during UAT/post
prod, impl transact monitor
services, opt installs/configs. Work w/ webMethods
Integration Product Suite,
Java, J2EE, UM Resource
Adapter, Web Services. Applies to all positions: 40
hrs/wk, must have MS or
equiv in Comp Sci, Electr
Eng, or related fld (will accept BS+5 yrs exp in lieu
of MS) & 1 yr exp (or 1 yr
exp in related occup), must
be willing to travel/relocate
to unanticipated locations
throughout US on short
notice for extend time. Mail
resume w/ID# to: Ms Tuck,
Randstad Technologies, LLC,
PO Box 2993, Woburn, MA
01888-1793.
w/Spotify USA Inc. Somerville, MA. Maintain product
roadmap for voice-related
techs, set & prioritize product & tech reqs by working
w/ stakeholders. Coordinate w/ other product &
platform teams to ensure
Spotify conversational interface meets the need of
the entire Spotify ecosystem & external partners.
Bach (U.S. or foreign equiv)
in Comp Sci, Computational
Linguistics, or Engg. 5 yrs of
exp in S/ware Dvlpmnt &
Product Mgmt. Prior work
exp must incl the following: 3 yrs of exp w/: Collaborating w/ product & engg
prof’ls; Collaborating w/ bus
dvlpmnt, & sales & mktg
prof’ls; Utilizing the tech
components that go into a
modern day voice interface,
incl ASR, NLU, entity extraction, & intent fulfillment;
Defining the initial roadmap
& delivering early prototypes; Maintaining product
roadmap (1 yr outlook)
for voice-rel techs, setting & prioritizing product
& tech reqs by working w/
stakeholders; Working w/
research & engg teams to
ensure the best implementation methods & execution
schedules; Defining & mng
training, quality assurance,
& feedback loop to ensure
continuous improvement;
Exp in product dvlpmnt of
ASR tech; Exp in product
dvlpmnt of NLP techy Exp
in product dvlpmnt of machine learning tech; Mng
engg & research teams;
Commercializing at least 1
product from idea inception
to product release to consumer scale (designed for
millions of users); Delivering
& mng a mobile application (app) product; Delivering & mng a service-based
cloud product at consumer
scale exp in info retrieval
tech; Working w/ external
partners to define, create,
& release a joint product;
Working w/ bus customers
to understand product reqs
& explain product features;
& Exp in agile software dvlpmnt practices. Qualified
Applicants: Email resumes
to
usarecruiters@spotify.
com & ref the job code
pema
IT Professionals:
IT Professionals
Senior Product Manager
IT Professionals:
Mult
openings.
Headquarters: Woburn, MA. Sr
Systems Administrators
(ID#658271) mult openings.
Design/implement Splunk
infrastructures,
deployments, applications, reports, alerts & dashboards.
Manage knowledge objects,
decode/debug queries. Impl
soln roadmaps, migrate/
rev data, align capability w/
reqs. Analyze trends, create predict models/outliers,
assess health. Integrate
data, doc arch, design/dev
changes, supp ops. Work w/
Python, Java, Elastic Search,
Logstash, Kibana, REST API,
Hadoop, SQL, XML, HTML,
CSS, Git, Selenium, Jenkins,
Soap, Putty. Sr Software
Developers
(ID#046794)
mult openings. Translate
functional
requirements
& technical specifications,
create designs, execute
performance test strategies. Dev solns for large
data volumes, rev security/perform, dev proj arch.
Make changes, retrieve
data from SQL Server. Automate exports, enhance
report service. Trans output files, ensure scalability.
Prep test plans, fix bugs,
perform maintenance. Work
w/ RSA Archer, .Net, C#,
Archer Script, VS, Jira, IIS,
REST, XML. Applies to all
positions: 40 hrs/wk, must
have MS or equiv in Comp
Sci, Electr Eng, Info Tech, or
related fld (will accept BS+5
yrs exp in lieu of MS) & 1 yr
exp (or 1 yr exp in related
occup), must be willing to
travel/relocate to unanticipated locations throughout
US on short notice for extend time. Mail resume w/
ID# to: Ms Tuck, Randstad
Technologies, LLC, PO Box
2993, Woburn, MA 018881793.
Research Associate II
Sr Business Analysts
Sr Business Analysts
Mult openings. Headquarters: Woburn, MA. Gather
reqs for data quality impl,
ensure quality, dev data
quality rules for Oracle,
Exadata, Teradata, SQL,
Hadoop. Develop DQ frameworks & DQ reports, resolve
db perform issues, id syst/
data quality control points.
Dev quality checks, monitor dbs, create dashboards
w/ Tableau/Ab Initio. Work
w/ Teradata, ETL, Hive, PL/
SQL, MapR. 40 hrs/wk, must
have Masters or equiv in
Comp Sci/Mgmt, Electr
Eng, or related fld (will accept BS+5 yrs exp in lieu of
Masters) & 1 yr exp (or 1 yr
exp in related occup). Must
be willing to travel/relocate
to unanticipated locations
throughout US on short
notice for extend time. Mail
resume w/ ID# 344425: Ms
Tuck, Randstad Technologies, LLC, PO Box 2993, Woburn, MA 01888-1793
stuff
boston.com/
classifieds
Research Associate II –
Basic Research
(Cambridge, MA) for Applied Genetic Technologies
Corporation. Asst biological
& medical scientists in labs
by supporting gene therapy
research projects. Conduct
research incl’g collection of
info on developmt & qualification of viral-based gene
therapy testing to support
IND enabling non-clinical
animal study characterization. Monitor, observe, plan,
execute, & troubleshoot
assays & validate for use
in viral vector raw material
characterization, processing def’n & commercialization activities. Collect,
record, summarize, & analyze experimental data &
interpret results in reports
& summaries of findings,
incl’g SOP writing. Set up,
adjust & maintain lab equipmt & maintain lab function.
Reqmts: MS (or foreign
equiv) in biology, microbiology, biochemistry, virology,
pharmacology, cell biology,
or rel’d biological field. 2 yrs
in any job involving handson biological lab exp. 2 yrs
of biological lab exp must
incl 1 yr working in an industrial or clinical setting.
1 yr exp in academic or
workplace setting perf’g
mammalian cell culture &
evaluating & presenting scientific data, incl’g statistical
analysis & image processing, also req’d. Must also
have 2 yrs of work or handson exp (academic or industrial/clinical) w/the following techniques: molecular
cloning, qPCR, bacterial cell
culture, transfection procedures, protein detection, &
immunoassays. Pre-degree
completion work exp acceptable. <10% domestic
travel req’d. Drug & bkgrnd
checks req’d. Other known
worksite: AGTC office in
Alachua, FL. Send resume
to enovack@agtc.com.
Sr Software Developers
Sr Software Developers
Mult openings. Headquarters: Woburn, MA. Analyze
bus reqs, design tech arch,
dev apps w/ Java/J2EE.
Create sw modules/unit
test scripts, rev code. Dev
automate processes, supp
testing, perform tune sw.
Ensure deadlines met, supp
prod. Work w/ Spring, Maven, Junit, RESTful Web Services, Angular, Jenkins. 40
hrs/wk, must have Masters
or equiv in Comp Sci, Electr
Eng, Info Syst, or related fld
(will accept BS+5 yrs exp
in lieu of Masters) & 1 yr
exp (or 1 yr exp in related
occup). Must be willing to
travel/relocate to unanticipated locations throughout
US on short notice for extend time. Mail resume
w/ ID# 245265: Ms Tuck,
Randstad Technologies, LLC,
PO Box 2993, Woburn, MA
01888-1793.
BOOKS
BOOK: Terror Attack on
Boston Public Water System. Fiction. THE DEVIL
DRIVES by Karen Yochim.
Amazon Kindle.
HOTELRESTAURANT
SUPPLY
MR. SMITH BUYS & SELLS
NEW & USED RESTAURANT
BAR-PIZZA-STORE EQUIPMENT
AT OUR WAREHOUSE
80 MYRTLE ST. NO. QUINCY MA
617-770-1600 - 617-436-8829
WANTED
CASH FOR TOOLS! Hand
or Power. Carpenter, Machinist, Mechanic, Plumber.
Rollaways. 1-800-745-8665
pets
boston.com/
classifieds
DOGS
Urban Designer
Urban Designer
Senior Associate
for Sasaki Associates in
Watertown, MA responsible
for developing, co-leading,
collaborating and advance
conceptual and schematic
designs on urban design
and master planning projects. Reqs: MS degree in
Urban Design, Urban Planning, or Architecture (willing
to accept foreign education
equivalent) + 3 yrs.exp. in
urban design and planning,
requires domestic and international travel 25% of
the time. Submit resume
to Sasaki Associates, Betty
Davidian-Sleiman, 64 Pleasant Street, Watertown, Massachusetts 02472.
AKC ENGLISH BULLDOG
$3500. Certified pedigree
puppies ready for new
homes 1/12/18. 2 females,
5 males. Dam and Sire on
premises. Beautiful babies.
781-241-2187
CAIRN TERRIERS, AKC,
shots, wormed, exc temp.
Also adults avail, will deliver. Call 207-426-8871
Java Developers
Java Developers
sought by Bright Horizons
Family Solutions in Watertown, MA to participate in
Agile Sprint planning sessions, working closely with
business analysts and team
members to analyze requirements, provide design
recommendations for complex systems, and establish
project timelines.
Reqs:
Master’s (or for. equiv.) +3
yrs exp (or Bachelors, or for.
equiv. +5 yrs exp) incl. 3 yrs
exp utilizing MVC Frameworks such as Spring or Hibernate; developing RESTful
web services; among others. Apply online at: https://
jobs.brighthorizons.com.
MINI AUSSIEDOODLES
F1 10-15 lbs vetted $1800
call/text 860-933-7668
BUSINESS
OPPORTUNITIES
USED CAR DEALERSHIP
Leominister, MA. 80 car
lic & lease. Hi traffic. Mod.
facil. $55,000 774-777-5000
S u n d a y
G l o b e
JA N UA RY 6 , 2 0 1 9
SOLD
B o s t o n
SOLD
Address
HIGHEST SALE IN NARRAGANSETT HISTORY*
NARRAGANSETT, RI
2018 HIGHEST SALE IN JAMESTOWN*
JAMESTOWN, RI
45 THULE COVE ROAD
5 COURT STREET
SOLD: $8,200,000
SOLD: $4,200,000WE
ARE JAMESTOWN
2018 HIGHEST SALE IN MIDDLETOWN*
HIGHEST LAND SALE IN NARRAGANSETT HISTORY*
SOLD
SOLD
SOLD
FROM THE RHODE ISLAND COAST TO THE STATE CAPITAL,
LILA DELMAN REAL ESTATE CONTINUED ITS HISTORY OF EXCELLENCE IN 2O18
SOLD
H8
2018 HIGHEST MULTIFAMILY SALE STATEWIDE*
2018 HIGHEST SALE ON BLOCK ISLAND*
MIDDLETOWN, RI
NARRAGANSETT, RI
NEWPORT, RI
BLOCK ISLAND, RI
393 INDIAN AVENUE
83 CLIFF DRIVE
25 OLD BEACH ROAD
1538 CENTER ROAD
SOLD: $4,100,000
SOLD: $3,900,000
SOLD: $3,534,500
SOLD: $3,492,000
NEWPORT
JAMESTOWN
WATCH HILL
NARRAGANSETT
PROVIDENCE
BLOCK ISLAND
* Historic Narragansett sales records based on data maintained by the Rhode Island Association of Realtors since the inception of the current MLS system. This representation is based on information from the Rhode Island State Wide MLS for
the period of January 01, 1993 – December 31, 2018. The MLS does not guarantee and is not in any way responsible for its accuracy. Data maintained by the MLS may not reflect all real estate activity in the market.
Exclusive
vacation deals
at
January 18–20, 2019
Seaport World Trade Center
Traveling does a world of good.
Enjoy vacation deals, cultural performances,
and events for the whole family.
Buy Tickets:
BostonGlobeTravelShow.com
Sponsors
J
BOST ON SUN DAY G L OB E JA N UA RY 6 , 2 01 9 | B OS TO N.COM/ CAR S
ADVERTISERS
SundayAutos
Sunday
Dealer index
ALFA ROMEO
Kelly Alfa Romeo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
CHRYSLER
Kelly Chrysler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
DODGE
2019 Honda
Insight Hybrid
Kelly Dodge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
FORD
Kelly Ford . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
HONDA
Herb Chambers Honda in Boston . . . . . .1
Herb Chambers Honda of Burlington . . . .1
Herb Chambers Honda of Seekonk . . . . .1
Honda Cars of Westborough . . . . . . . . .1
Honda of Plymouth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Kelly Honda . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
HYUNDAI
Tufankjian Hyundai of Plymouth . . . . . . 4
INFINITI
HONDA
By Larry Printz
Kelly Infiniti. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Even the federal government tells you what to do by insisting automakers build cars that meet hundreds of different requirements, and it’s
why cars like the new 2019 Honda Insight Hybrid exist: to meet federal
fuel economy mandates that dictate that an automakers fleet average
54.5 miles per gallon by 2025. But this is one case where being told what’s
good for us is actually good for us.
Slotting between the Civic and Accord, the new Insight doesn’t look
dorky or odd like most other hybrids. Its eloquent elegance is striking.
It’s not merely the best-looking sedan in the Honda line-up; it’s the bestlooking hybrid on the market, wearing a sophistication that was once
common on all Hondas.
Similarly, the Insight delivers enough power to tackle the Pokey Parkway Grand Prix, but not so much as to make a Middle Eastern oil minis-
TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE
JEEP
Doesn’t it seem as if you’re always being told what to do?
When you’re growing up, your parents tell you what to do. So do your
teacher, your preacher, your high school coach, your scout leader, and
any number of authority figures. Then you grow up, only to discover that
your boss and spouse tell you what do. And technology has only made
this worse.
Your computer nags you to upgrade it, your mobile phone hounds you
to answer it, your email demands that you read it, while Alexa chides you
to do your chores. And now, even cars are correcting your behavior by
correcting your driving while scolding you with a flurry of flashing lights
and annoying beeps.
Kelly Jeep. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
MASERATI
Kelly Maserati . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
NISSAN
Kelly Nissan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
HONDA, see inside
RAM
Online
Inside
Kelly RAM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
CHEVROLET EXPANDS THE
COLORADO LINEUP
TOYOTA
Toyota of Braintee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
WHAT THE EXPERTS SAY ABOUT
THE 2019 GENESIS G70
With the Z71 Trail Runner and a
street-focused RST.
Tufankjian Toyota of Braintree . . . . . . . 4
Boston.com/Cars is
your go-to resource
for local car news,
events, and reviews.
Check out our new
and used car specials
curated by our local
dealer network.
Three pros weigh in.
MULTI 1/6/19
Herb Chambers
New 2018 Ho
onda
New 2019 Honda
H
Civic
EX-T SEDAN
Civic
LX SEDAN
Accord
A
LX SEDAN
L
• Automatic
• Apple Carplay
• Moonroof
• Heated Seats
• Turbocharged Engine
• Automatic
• Rearview Camera
• Bluetooth
$
New 2018 Honda
N
88
$
*
$
198
^
Lease
Lease
24
36
or
for
for
Mos.
Mos.
$0 down payment
$2,999 cash or trade down
Model# FC2F6KEW, Stock# 190287, MSRP $21,145
400 Civics Available
• Automatic
• Rearview Camera
138
$
*
228
^
Lease
Lease
24
36
or
for
for
Mos.
Mos.
$0 down payment
$2,999 cash or trade down
Model# FC1F3JJW, Stock# 181630, MSRP $23,395
400 Civics Available
$
138
*
Lease
27
for
Mos.
$2,999 cash or trade down
New 2019 Ho
onda
2019 Honda
• Automatic
• Bluetooth
• Moonroof
• Lane Departure Warninng
• Bluetooth
• Backup Camera
• Leather Seats
• Moonroof
• Heated Front Seats
$
178
Pilot
LX AWD
*
Lease
24
for
Mos.
$2,999 cash or trade down
or
258
$
Lease
for
^
$0 down payment
Model# RW6H3KEW, Stock# 190346, MSRP $26,745,
150 CR-Vs Available
Herb Chambers
Honda in Boston
1186 Commonwealth Avenue
Boston, MA 02134
(877) 534-8992
Herb Chambers
Honda of Burlington
33 Cambridge Street, Route 3A
Burlington, MA 01803
(877) 842-0555
39
Mos.
$
*
358
^
Lease
Lease
39
39
or
Mos.
Mos.
for
for
$2,999 cash or trade down
$0 down payment
Model# YF6H1KEW, Stock# 197784, MSRP $34,345,
200 Pilots Available
Herb Chambers
$0 down payment
298
$
*
$
398
^
Lease
Lease
39
39
or
Mos.
Mos.
for
for
$2,999 cash or trade down
$0 down payment
Model# YK3F5KJNW, Stock# 50150, MSRP $37,765
50 Ridgelines Available
Herb Chambers
Honda of Seekonk
Honda of Westborough
(877) 851-3362
(877) 206-3309
185 Taunton Avenue, Route 44
Seekonk, MA 02771
36
Mos.
RIDGEL
LINE
RTL AWD
278
$
228
^
Model# A078201, Stock# 180545, MSRP $24,460
200 Accords Available
New 2019 Hond
da
CR-V
LX AWD
or
$
Lease
for
350 Turnpike Road, Route 9
Westborough, MA 01581
SALES: Monday-Thursday: 8:30am-9:00pm SERVICE: Monday-Thursday 7:00am-7:00pm,
Friday-Saturday: 8:30am-7:00pm
Friday 7:00am-6:00pm, Saturday 8:00am-5:00pm,
Sunday: 11:00am-5:00pm
Sunday 9:00am-4:00pm
HerbChambersHonda.com
“Herb Chambers Honda of
Burlington is a J.D. Power
2018 Dealer of Excellence
for the Customer Sales
Experience.”
2018
Leases are with 12K miles per year and require bank-approved credit. Security deposit waived. Leases are indicated money down plus 1st payment, acquisition fee, doc fee, sales tax and registration.
Offers only available on in-stock vehicles. Pictures are for illustration purposes only. All leases (except Ridgeline) are through Honda Lease Trust. $0.15 per mile excess for Civic and Accord $0.18
per miles excess for CR-V and Pilot. Ridgeline must finance/lease through Cal automotive certified auto leasing and only applies to MA, NJ, NY and PA residents. $0.35 per mile excess for Ridgeline.
Excludes prior sales. See dealer for details. Actual down payment may vary. Offers expire 1/14/2019.
B o s t o n
J2
S u n d a y
JEEP CHRYSLER DODGE
DODGE
RAM
2
LOCATIONS!
G l o b e
JA N UA RY 6 , 2 0 1 9
MASERATI ALFA ROMEO VOLKSWAGEN
NI
LYNNFIELD • METHUEN
2019 Jeep Cherokee
Limited 4x4
LEASE FOR
99
$
Per Month | 24 MONTHS!
2018 CHRYSLER
300 TOURING AWD
SAVE UP TO
11,000
$
OFF MSRP
$3995 cash or trade down
Stock#: 26618. Vin: 1C4PJMDXXKD363962MSRP: $35,690, N.E.Regional Bonus-$250, Chrysler Capital Finance Rebate -$500, N.E.
Retail Consumer Cash -$2,750 , Kelly Discount -$3,103, Returning
Lessee Rebate -$500 = Buy Price $28,587 Save up to $7,103
2019 JEEP GRAND
CHEROKEE LAREDO 4X4
LEASE FOR
179
$
Per Month | 39 MONTHS!
$3995 cash or trade down
stk# 38757; MSRP:$37040; Chrysler Capital Finance; Rebate :$500
; N.E Retail Consumer Cash:-$1000;Kelly Disc:-$2047; Conquest
Lease Loyalty:-$ 500; BUY FOR: $32993; SAVE UP TO $4047
Stock#: 5457. Vin: 2C3CCARG1JH192427.MSRP: $36,235, Rebate
-$6,000, Kelly Discount -$4,500, Conquest Lease Loyalty -$500, =
Buy Price $25,235 Save up to $11,000
2019 JEEP GRAND
CHEROKEE LAREDO 4X4
LEASE FOR
186
$
Per Month | 36 MONTHS!
$3995 cash or trade down
Stk# 5538 MSRP:$37690; N.E BC Retail Cash:-$250; Chrysler
Capital; Finance Rebate:-$500; Pacifica Bonus:-$ 500; Pacifica Bonus:-$500; N.E Bonus Cash:-$500; Kelly Disc :-$3090; Conquest;
Lease Loyalty:-$500; BUY FOR: $31850; Save up to $5840
*Save amount and lease payment inc PACIFICA Conquest Bonus $1000 must currently own or lease one of these vehicles to qualify Honda Odyssey, Honda Crosstour, Buick Enciave, GM
Arcadia, Nissan Quest, Nissan Murano, Ford Flex, Chevy Traverse, Mazda CX9, Toyota Sienna, Toyota Venza, Kia Sedona **Save amount and lease payment inc Grand Cherokee Conquest
Bonus $1000 must currently own or lease one of these vehicles to qualify Pilot,Pathfinder,Explorer, Highlander, 4Runner, Santa Fe or Touareg*** Includes returning lessee rebate, customers
currently leasing a fca us llc group lease which expires between 4/3/2018 & 4/30/2019 and enters into a new purchase or lease ** Includes conquest lease loyalty rebate, customers currently
leasing a competitive brand and enter into a new purchase or lease. See dealer for details, must finance with Chrysler, leases are 10,000 miles per year, Pacifica is for 5,000 miles per year with
cap cost reduction plus acquisition fee,1st months payment, plates, registration , vaf and tax additional. requires tier 1 credit with lender extra charges may apply at lease end. In stock models
only. Same day transaction. Thanks for looking. You will be pleased! Sale ends 1/7/2019
781.581.6000
Route 1 North, Lynnfield
@
kellyjeepchrysler.net
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Follow us on
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2018 DODGE
CHALLENGER GT AWD
LEASE FOR
99
$
Per Month | 42 MONTHS!
$3995 cash or trade down
*CONDITIONAL REBATES FOR 42 MONTHS W/$3995 DOWN. 10000 MILES PER YEAR. *LEASE PAYMENTS
INCLUDES CONDITIONAL REBATES. TAX, TITLE, REG, ACQUISITION & DOC FEES EXTRA. BASED ON TIER 1
APPROVAL.ZERO DOWN PAYMENT LEASE FOR $319/MO. *CONDITIONAL REBATES FOR 42 MONTHS 10000
MILES PER YEAR. SAVE UP TO $10,630 CONDITIONAL LEASE REBATES & DISCOUNTS.. STOCK#: 20072. VIN:
2C3CDZGG2JH323038. MSRP: $37,330. MODEL CODE: LAEH22. *LEASE PAYMENT INCLUDES $500 CONQUEST
REBATE. BASED ON TIER 1 APPROVAL. *LEASE PAYMENTS INCLUDES CONDITIONAL REBATES. TAX, TITLE, REG,
ACQUISITION & DOC FEES EXTRA .
2019 RAM 1500 CLASSIC
EXPRESS 4X4 QUAD
CAB 6’4 BOX
LEASE FOR
99
$
Per Month | 39 MONTHS!
$3995 cash or trade down
*CONDITIONAL REBATES FOR 39 MONTHS W/$3995 DOWN. 10000 MILES PER YEAR. *TAX, TITLE,
REG, ACQUISITION & DOC FEES EXTRAZERO DOWN PAYMENT LEASE FOR $259/MO. *CONDITIONAL
REBATES FOR 39 MONTHS 10000 MILES PER YEAR. *TAX, TITLE, REG, ACQUISITION & DOC FEES
EXTRA SAVE UP TO $13,609 CONDITIONAL LEASE REBATES & DISCOUNTS.. STOCK#: 30126. VIN:
1C6RR7FGXKS544742. MSRP: $41,085. MODEL CODE: DS6L41. *LEASE PAYMENT INCLUDES $500
CONQUEST & $750 RAM SELECT INV LEASE BONUS CASH. BASED ON TIER 1 APPROVAL. *LEASE
PAYMENTS INCLUDES CONDITIONAL REBATES. TAX, TITLE, REG, ACQUISITION & DOC FEES EXTRA .
Route 1 North, Lynnfield
kellyjeepchrysler.net
LEASE FOR
978.683.8775
Exit 47, I-93, Methuen
kellycdjrofmethuen.com
2018 MASERATI GHIBLI
GRANSPORT SEDAN
Per Month | 39 MONTHS!
$3995 cash or trade down
*CONDITIONAL REBATES FOR 39 MONTHS W/$3995 DOWN. 10000 MILES PER YEAR. *LEASE
PAYMENTS INCLUDES CONDITIONAL REBATES. TAX, TITLE, REG, ACQUISITION & DOC FEES
EXTRA . BASED ON TIER 1 APPROVAL.ZERO DOWN LEASE FOR $325/MO. *CONDITIONAL REBATES
FOR 39 MONTHS 10000 MILES PER YEAR. SAVE UP TO $9,964 CONDITIONAL LEASE REBATES &
DISCOUNTS.. STOCK#: 20044. VIN: 1C4RDJAG9JC456561. MSRP: $37,435. MODEL CODE: WDEL75.
*LEASE PAYMENT INCLUDES $500 CONQUEST.BASED ON TIER 1 APPROVAL. *LEASE PAYMENTS
INCLUDES CONDITIONAL REBATES. TAX, TITLE, REG, ACQUISITION & DOC FEES EXTRA .
Alfa Rosso, 8-Speed Automatic transmission, 2.0 Liter 280
HP Turbocharged I4 Engine, AM/FM Bluetooth Navigation
6.5 Radio, Gloss Red Calipers, and much more!
LEASE FOR
LEASE FOR
Per Month | 39 MONTHS!
$5999 cash or trade down
Stock#: M287491. Vin: ZAM57XSS8J1287491.
MSRP: $83,115..
2018 MASERATI
LEVANTE
2018 DODGE CHARGER
GT AWD
Levante AWD Bianco exterior and Sabbia interior 3.0
Liter Twin Turbo, Premium Package, Blind spot
detection, remote start,Rear kick Sensor, 19’ Poseidon
Wheels, Metallic Roof Rails,
LEASE FOR
239
$
Per Month | 24 MONTHS!
$3995 cash or trade down
*CONDITIONAL REBATES FOR 24 MONTHS W/$3995 DOWN. 10000 MILES PER YEAR. *LEASE PAYMENTS INCLUDES CONDITIONAL REBATES. TAX, TITLE, REG, ACQUISITION & DOC FEES EXTRA.
ZERO DOWN LEASE FOR $325/MO. *CONDITIONAL REBATES FOR 60 MONTHS 10000 MILES PER
YEAR. SAVE UP TO $11,306 CONDITIONAL LEASE REBATES & DISCOUNTS.. STOCK#: 20057. VIN:
2C3CDXJG0JH337825. MSRP: $38,585. MODEL CODE: LDES48. *LEASE PAYMENT INCLUDES $500
CONQUEST REBATE. BASED ON TIER 1 APPROVAL. *LEASE PAYMENTS INCLUDES CONDITIONAL
REBATES. TAX, TITLE, REG, ACQUISITION & DOC FEES EXTRA .
JEEP CHRYSLER
DODGE RAM
978.683.8775
Exit 47, I-93, Methuen
kellycdjrofmethuen.com
2019 ALFA ROMEO
GIULIA AWD
The Ghiblib Gransport comes standard with 345/hp v6 twin turbo engine,
Nav, Bluetooth with sirius Satellite Radio, Skyhook suspension, upgraded 20 inch urano wheels, blind spot detection, sport bumpers with black
gloss finish, Red Brake Calipers, Harmon Kardon Stereo system, apple
Car play 12 way adjustable sport seats, soft close doors, -
219 $549
$
See dealer for details. Must finance with Chrysler Capital. Includes Conquest Lease.Cap cost reduction plus acquisition fee,1st months payment, plates, registration , vaf and tax additional. requires tier 1 credit with lender extra charges may apply at lease end. In stock models only. Same day transaction. Thanks for looking. You will be pleased! Sale ends 1/7/2019
JEEP CHRYSLER
DODGE RAM
781.581.6000
2018 DODGE
DURANGO SXT AWD
349
$
Per Month | 24 MONTHS!
$3999 cash or trade down
Stock#: A604390. MSRP: $43,240
2019 Alfa Romeo
Stelvio AWD
Heated front seats, Heated steering Wheel, 18 inch double
Y-Spoke aluminum wheels, AM/FM BLUE TOOTH
NAVIGATION 6.5 RADIO, GLOSS RED CALIPERS
2019 Volkswagen Jetta S
2018 N
Power Wind
Alloy Wheels
6 Years/72,000 Miles Transferable
p
p
y
Bumper-to-Bumper
Limited Warranty
LEASE FOR
LEASE F
169 $ 7
$
Per Month | 36 MONTHS!
$1295 cash or trade down
Auto.Stock#: 190358. . MSRP: $20,840.
Vin: 3VWC57BU0KM127318
2018 Volkswagen Golf
GTI 2.0T S
Per Month | 3
$2999 cash or
MSRP: $20,360; Kelly Sa
Cond
2018 NIS
Power Liftgate, Backu
Emergency Bra
6 Years/72,000 Miles Transferable
Bumper-to-Bumper Limited Warranty
LEASE FOR
LEASE FOR
LEASE FOR
Per Month | 39 MONTHS!
Per Month | 24 MONTHS!
Per Month | 36 MONTHS!
Stock#: AC40745. MSRP: $45,740
Stock#: 181191. . MSRP: $27,630
Vin: 3VW547AU2JM292184
LEASE F
625 $365 $281 $14
$
$6999 cash or trade down
Stock#: M301389. Vin: ZN661XUA9JX301389.
MSRP: $86,200
Applicable state sales tax, doc, req, acq and first months payment separate. Lease specials through Maserati Capital with Tier 1 credit approval. See dealer for details. *Photos for
illustration purposes. Sale ends 1/7/2019
MASERATI
$3999 cash or trade down
Applicable state sales tax, doc, req, acq and first months payment separate. Extra charges
may apply at lease end. Requires Tier 1 Credit approval with Ally Bank. In stock model only
Customer must qualify for program rules. *MA sales tax, doc, acq., reg, security deposit,
and first months payment are separate. Lease payment reflects conquest cash for customers currently leasing a competitive brand vehicle (non Chrysler, Jeep, Dodge, Ram, FIAT
or Alfa Romeo product) and enter into a new purchase or lease of an eligible model. Extra
charges may apply at lease end. Requires Tier A Credit approval. Sale ends 1/7/2019
$1295 cash or trade down
“6 years/72,000 miles (whichever occurs first) New Vehicle Limited Warranty on MY2018
and newer VW vehicles, excluding e-Golf. See owner’s literature or dealer for warranty
exclusions and limitations.”
Lease = 36/mo 10k/mi with $3995 cash or trade down. Tax, Title,Reg, Lease & Dealer
Fees not included. Price & Payments consist of destination charges and all available
incentives. Sale ends 1/72019
ALFA ROMEO
978.560.0007
978.560.0006
Route 114, Danvers
KellyMaserati.com
978.776.3337
Route 114, Danvers
KellyAlfaRomeo.com
Route 114, Danvers
kelly-vw.com
Per Month | 36
$2999 cash or t
MSRP: $28,955; Kelly Savings -$4,4
Military:$
*On sel
B o s t o n
JA N UA RY 6 , 2 0 1 9
ISSAN
2
NISSAN SENTRA SV
Kelly Nissan of Lynnfield • Kelly Nissan of Woburn
79
$
,
APR
36 MONTHS!
2018 NISSAN MAXIMA S
SSAN ROGUE SV AWD
9
49
6 MONTHS!
trade down
BUY FOR
$
23 990
,
,
APR
APR
Lease selling price of $31,846; MSRP: $33,925; Kelly Savings -$6,335; Buy for $27,590;
Model# 23018 Conditional College Grad/Military:$750; Vin : 5N1Az2Mh6Jn136722
Power Liftgate, Backup Camera, Apple CarPlay, Blind Spot Warning, Auto
Emergency Braking, Bluetooth, Remote Engine Start & more!
up Camera, Apple CarPlay, Blind Spot Warning, Auto
aking, Bluetooth, Remote Engine Start & more!
FOR
,
for 60 Months in
lieu of rebate
$2999 cash or trade down
avings -$547l; Nissan Customer Cash -$1,500; Buy for only $17,280; Model#12118;
ditional College Grad/Military:$500; Vin : 3N1Ab7Ap2Jl636879
27 590
,
Per Month | 36 MONTHS!
for 60 Months in
lieu of rebate
trade down
9
149
BUY FOR
$
LEASE FOR
$
for 60 Months in
lieu of rebate
465; NMAC Finance Cash -$500l Buy for $23,990; Conditional College Grad/
$500; Model# 22218; Vin : Knmat2Mv1Jp610236
9
219
BUY FOR
$
Per Month | 36 MONTHS!!
$2999 cash or trade down
27 590
,
,
APR
for 60 Months in
lieu of rebate
Commercial Vehicles
2019 NISSAN ALTIMA 2.5 S
2018 NISSAN MURANO S AWD
LEASE FOR
,
FORD
LYNNFIELD • WOBURN
FOR
17 280
J3
LOCATIONS!
Nissan Connect Navigation, Apple CarPlay & Android Auto, Backup Camera,
Intelligent Key with Remote Start, Fog Lights, Bluetooth, & more!
BUY FOR
G l o b e
NISSAN NISSAN INFINITI Honda
NISSAN
dows & Locks, Bluetooth, Intelligent Key,
s, Backup Camera, Cruise Control & more!
$
S u n d a y
2019 NISSAN NV 200 S
Power Windows, A/C, Cruise Control,
Rear Door Glass and more!
Forward Collision Warning, Emergency Braking, Apple CarPlay,
8” Color Touch Screen, Remote Engine Start and more!
LEASE FOR
$
169
9
BUY FOR
$
22 871
,
,
APR
Per Month | 36 MONTHS!
for 60 Months in
lieu of rebate
$2999 cash or trade down
Lease selling price of $23,371. MSRP: $25,060; Kelly Savings -$2,189; Model #13119; Conditional $500 College
Grad/Military; Conditional $500 Loyalty Cash; Vin : 1N4Bl4Bv9Kc104252
2018 NISSAN FRONTIER CREW CAB
Power Liftgate, Backup Camera, Apple CarPlay, Blind Spot Warning, Auto
Emergency Braking, Bluetooth, Remote Engine Start & more!
LEASE FOR
$
9
209
BUY FOR
$
26 590
Per Month | 36 MONTHS!
$2999 cash or trade down
,
,
APR
for 60 Months in
lieu of rebate
Lease Selling Price Of $28,749; MSRP: $30,065; Kelly Savings -$3,475; Model# 32018; Buy For $26,590;
Conditional College Grad/Military:$500; Vin : 1N6Ad0Ev5Jn701728
MSRP: $34,775; Kelly Savings -$7,185; Buy For $27,590;Conditional College Grad/Military:$750; Conditional Loyalty Cash
$2,000; Model: 1611 8Vin: 1N4AA6AP9JC394961
lect models. All leases 12,000 miles per year. 1st payment, acq. fee tax, title, reg, admin fees additional Offers include Kelly discount and all available Nissan rebate(s). In stock models only. NMAC credit approval required, 0% APR in lieu of rebates with credit approval. Sale Ends 1/7/2019
BUY FOR
22 158
$
,
LEASE FOR $299 PER MONTH | 42 MONTHS
$2999 cash or trade down
2018 NISSAN NV1500 S V6
Power Windows, Power Locks, Keyless Entry, A/C, Bluetooth,
CD Audio with 5” Display, USB Port, Backup Camera & more!
27 990
$
,
LEASE FOR $429 PER MONTH | 42 MONTHS
$2999 cash or trade down
MSRP: $30,385; Kelly Savings -$2,395; Buy for $27,990; Model# 60118;
Vin: 1N6BF0KM7JN817880.
*On select models. All leases 12,000 miles per year. 1st payment, acq. fee tax, title, reg,
admin fees additional Offers include Kelly discount and all available Nissan rebate(s).
NMAC credit approval required. 0% APR in lieu of all rebates for up to 48 months on most
models. Tier 1 credit approval required. Ends 1/7/2019
2019 HONDA CIVIC LX SEDAN
Keyless Start, Dual Zone A/C, Satellite Radio, Backup
Camera, Premium Sound System, Bluetooth & more!
Automatic, Bluetooth, Backup Camera, Keyless Entry,
Steering Wheel Audio Controls, and more!
LEASE FOR
LEASE FOR
315
$
2018 FORD
FOCUS SE SEDAN
LEASE FOR
89
97
$
$1795 CASH OR TRADE DOWN | 39 MONTHS
Lease selling price of $22,658; MSRP: $23,655; Kelly Savings -$997; Nissan Customer
Cash -$500; Buy for $22,158; Conditional College Grad/Military :$500;
VIN : 3N6CM0KN5KK694445
BUY FOR
2018 INFINITI Q50 3.0T LUXE
$
Per Month | 24 MONTHS!
Per Month | 24 MONTHS!
MSRP: $36,745.. Model code: 91218. 39/months 10k miles.
Requires Tier 1 credit approval through INFINITI Financial
Vin: SJKCH5CR9JA005297.
$2995 cash or trade down
$2999 cash or trade down
Stock#: 190272 MSRP: $21,145.
2 or more available at this price.
Stock#: 9659T. MSRP: $24,845.
ALL NEW 2018 FORD
2019 INFINITI QX60 AWD
2018 HONDA ACCORD LX
3rd Row Seat, Heated Seats, Sunroof, Satellite Radio,
iPod/MP3 Input, Alloy Wheels
Automatic, Back-Up Camera, Turbocharged,
iPod/MP3 Input and more!
F-150 XLT SUPERCREW 4WD
LEASE FOR
LEASE FOR
LEASE FOR
449 159
$
$
Per Month | 24 MONTHS!
$0 CASH OR TRADE DOWN | 39 MONTHS
$2999 cash or trade down
MSRP: $48,595. Model #84619. 10k miles.
Requires Tier 1 credit approval through INFINITI Financial
Vin: 5N1DL0MMXKC520029
Stock#: 182653. MSRP: $24,465
2 or more available at this price.
Leases are 39/months 10000 miles per year. Bank fee, reg/admin fee,
VAF, first months payment not included. Plus applicable state sales tax. No
security deposit. Offer reflects tier 1 credit approval. In stock models only.
*Photos for illustration purposes only. Sale ends 1/7/2019
*Lease plus first months payment. $595 acquisition fee. $397 doc fee. $135 registration
fee. Massachusetts sales tax not included, 6.25% MA Tax.In stock units only. Offer
Ends 1/7/2019
13,000
$
OFF MSRP
Stock#: 9878T. MSRP: $54,795
*On select models. All leases 10,500/K per year, 1st payment, acq. fee, tax, title, reg,
admin fees additional. Security deposit waived. Offers include Kelly discount & all available
Ford Rebate(s). In stock models only. 0% in lieu of rebates. Ford credit approval required.
Sale Ends 1/7/2019
781.598.1234
Route 1 North, Lynnfield
nissanlynnfield.com
Kelly Nissan of Lynnfield
NISSAN OF LYNNFIELD
NISSAN OF WOBURN
781.598.1234
781.835.3500
Route 1 North, Lynnfield
JCT I-93 & 128, WOBURN
nissanlynnfield.com
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781.835.3500
JCT I-93 & 128, WOBURN
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Kelly Nissan of Woburn
INFINITI
Honda
FORD
978.774.1000
781.595.5252
978.922.0059
Route 114, Danvers
540 Lynnway (Rt.1A), Lynn
Route 1A, Beverly
ShopKellyFord.com
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kelly-honda.com
Chevrolet expands the Colorado
lineup with the off-road Z71 Trail
Runner, street-focused RST
By Kevin Barr
NEW YORK DAILY NEWS
HONDA
2019 Insight
HONDA
From D1
ter happy. Honda’s two-motor hybrid system,
similar to the one used in the Accord Hybrid,
employs a 1.5-liter Atkinson-cycle four-cylinder engine and a pair of electric motors. One
motor drives the front wheels while another
produces electricity. The result generates 151
horsepower and 197 pound-feet of torque
while returning an EPA-rated 55 miles per
gallon city, 49 miles per gallon highway, on
base LX and mid grade EX models, 51 miles
per gallon city, 45 miles per gallon highway
on top-level Touring models. In a mix of
heavy-footed suburban and highway driving,
the Insight returned 43 miles per gallon.
Obviously, your mileage will be better if
you listen to the Insight scolding you to drive
efficiently.
Uniquely, the Insight doesn’t use a conventional transmission or a continuously
variable transmission. Instead, a clutch connects the gas engine and electric generator motor to the electric propulsion motor.
This results in power being supplied directly
to the front wheels without a conventional
transmission, saving weight and space.
As with any electric vehicle, throttle response is strong off the line, feeling sprightly,
yet delivering a driveline response. But release your inner Andretti, and/or increase
your speed, and you’ll find the gas engine
starts droning unpleasantly. Once it does,
you’ll find the Insight does not like being
pushed around; smooth gradual inputs are
rewarded. The regenerative braking, which
captures energy during deceleration, is satisfactory, and the amount can be adjusted
through paddles mounted on the steering
wheel.
The Insight offers selectable driving
modes, with Sport providing more punch
thanks to extra battery assist, and the throttle seems more responsive. But it doesn’t
make the Insight a corner carver. Instead,
you’ll find driving it to be akin to a wellengineered mainstream sedan, with a quiet
cabin, roomy interior — even in the rear seat
— and the usual array of technology.
The roominess is especially notable. Unlike other hybrids, engineers placed the
Insight’s hybrid 60-cell lithium ion battery
pack under the rear seats rather than in the
trunk, allowing for a generous 15.1 cubic feet
of cargo space and a folding rear seat back.
What’s also notable is the car’s incredibly low
seating position, which makes getting in and
out of the car a test of core strength.
As you’d expect, the Insight comes with
Honda’s suite of driver assistance and safety
features, which includes Collision Mitigation
Braking, Forward Collision Warning, Lane
Keeping Assist System, Road Departure Mitigation, Lane Departure Warning, Adaptive
Cruise Control, and Traffic Sign Recognition.
Of course, the technology most drivers
care about is the infotainment package. The
bottom line? If you want the larger eight-inch
touchscreen, Android Auto or Apple CarPlay,
you’ll need to pop for the EX or Touring.
Bluetooth and USB ports are offered on all
models. Similar to the system used on the
Honda Accord, there’s a power/volume knob
but no tuning knob, and while user interface looks more sophisticated, in reality it’s
not. And Honda’s infotainment software issues continue, with Apple CarPlay freezing
and the car unable to locate my iPhone 8 via
Bluetooth; it had to be plugged in.
Is it a deal breaker? It depends your priorities. Nevertheless, the third-generation remains the best one Honda has yet produced,
with handsome styling, a beautiful interior
and quiet demeanor that lent it the aura of a
car that belies its price.
And that’s something you’d never say
about a Toyota Prius.
Two special-edition models will soon join
the 2019 Chevrolet Colorado midsize truck
lineup: the Colorado RST and the Colorado
Z71 Trail Runner.
Chevrolet will offer the 2019 Colorado
RST, which stands for “Rally Sport Truck,”
with a handful of exterior upgrades but no
performance-oriented changes. The Colorado RST builds upon the LT trim, with exclusive exterior features such as a “Chevrolet”
lettered front grille design, black body side
moldings, and various black badging on the
tailgate, such as the RST, Colorado, and Chevrolet bowtie logos. The RST also becomes the
first Colorado to come with 20-inch wheels,
which will have a low-gloss black finish.
While Chevrolet states that the Colorado
RST is “street-focused,” the 2019 Colorado
Z71 Trail Runner is definitely geared toward
off-road use. The Z71 Trail Runner adds underbody protection from the range-topping
ZR2 trim, such as rocker protection and aluminum skid plates, while also including a set
of beefy Goodyear Duratrac tires and the lettered front grille.
Of course, the Z71 Trail Runner includes
all of the standard Z71 features, such as the
automatically locking rear differential, 4.10
axle ratio, hill-descent control, front off-road
recovery tow hooks, and an off-road-oriented
suspension.
Both models will be available in either
two-wheel drive (2WD) or four-wheel drive
(4WD). The standard power plant for both
special-edition models is a 2.5-liter four-cylinder with 200 horsepower and 191 poundfeet of torque, which pairs to a six-speed automatic transmission for 2WD models and
an eight-speed automatic for 4WD models.
However, a Chevrolet spokesperson noted
that the vast majority of these special-edition
models will utilize the optional 3.6-liter V6
making 308 horsepower and 275 pound-feet
of torque, while the 2.8-liter four-cylinder
Duramax diesel engine with 186 horsepower
and 369 pound-feet of torque is also available as an option for both. Regardless of
driven wheels, the V6 pairs with an eightspeed automatic transmission and the diesel
engine pairs with a six-speed automatic. The
spokesperson also claims that the Duramax
engine is more likely to be found in the Z71
Trail Runner than the RST, noting that it is a
popular engine for off-roading purposes.
Though pricing and a specific release
date aren’t finalized yet, you can expect to
see both the Colorado RST and the Colorado
Z71 Trail Runner at Chevrolet dealerships in
early 2019.
CHEVROLET
2018 Colorado Z71
B o s t o n
J4
S u n d a y
G l o b e
JA N UA RY 6 , 2 0 1 9
Tufankjian Toyota of Braintree
Exit 17 off Rt. 3 • 210 Union St. Braintree
www.toyotaofbraintree.com • (781) 848-9300
Proud Recipient of
TOYOTA
President’s Award
9 years in a row!
OF
BRAINTREE
A Tufankjian Family Dealership
Over 200 Pre-owned Vehicles to choose from!
3 Floors of Showrooms Indoors!
2019 Toyota Corolla LE
18,599
$
Model #2532
#T38295
up to 60 months
Available in lieu of
rebate.
Exp. 2/4/19
MSRP $20,299
Lease For
142/mo
$
OR
2018 Toyota Rav4 LE 4WD
2019 Toyota Camry LE
3.9%APR
Buy For
’12 • ’13 • ’14 • ’15 • ’16 • ’17 • ’18
‘09 • ‘10 • ‘11 • ‘12 • ‘13 • ‘14 • ‘15 • ‘16 • ‘17
SAVINGS & SELECTION
All New
2019 Toyota Rav4
has arrived!
Model #1852
#T37656
ToyotaOfBraintree
3.9%APR
up to 60 months
Exp. 2/4/19
MSRP $25,534
Buy For
23,745
$
36 mos.
Automatic
Model #4432
#T36845
OR
Lease For
199/mo
$
up to 60 months
Available in lieu of
rebate.
Exp. 2/4/19
MSRP $27,273
Buy For
24,605
$
36 mos.
mos.
36
After $500 Toyota Customer Cash Rebate
3.9%APR
Lease For
179/mo
$
OR
36 mos.
After $1,250 Toyota Customer Cash Rebate
With approved credit. All rebates to dealer. All payments based on 36 month lease, 12,000 miles a year, with $3,199 down. 15 per mile excess. First month payment, taxes, $650 acquisition fee, $349 dealer documentation fee, and registration costs extra. Zero Security Deposit. Subject to credit approval. Offers end 2/4/19. *Advertised prices do not include tax, title, registration and $349 dealer fee. Sale price vehicles must be in stock, see dealer for details. Covers normal factory scheduled service. Plan is 2 years or 25k miles, whichever comes first. New vehicle cannot be part of a rental or commercial fleet, or a livery/taxi vehicle. See participating Toyota dealer for plan details. Valid only in the continental U.S. and Alaska. Roadside Assistance does not include parts and service. 3.9%
financing requires 60 monthly payments of $18.37 per $1,000 borrowed.
Honda of Plymouth
PREOWNED VEHICLE
WARRANTIES
UP
TO 100,000 MILES
OVER
100
PRE-OWNED CARS
A TUFANKJIAN FAMILY DEALERSHIP
IN STOCK
IN A NEW TO YOU
PRE-OWNED VEHICLE
AND SAVE!
GREAT SELECTION OF CARS UNDER $12,000
2011
2009
Honda Accord
EX-L
8,500
$
V6, leather, moonroof.
#190067A
9,987
2015
2017
19,500
$
19,900
2016
31,500
32,999
Loaded! Nav. #PG0985
33,900
Toyota Sienna
LE AWD
20,987
$
24,987
$
7 passenger, only 36k miles. #PG0976
2016
2016
Acura MDX
AWD
Chevy
Silverado 2500
Ext Cab 4x4
34,487
Only 22k miles, 1 owner, clean
carfax. #181140A
35,000
$
$
$
Only 8k miles! #181401B
2015
Honda Pilot
Touring AWD
Ford F-150 XLT
Extended Cab
4x4 STX
$
Turbo, loaded, nav. #PG0951
17,500
$
Low miles, automatic. #PG0986
2014
2018
Volvo XC60 T6
SUV AWD
$
Tech pkg. #PG0992
19,987
$
#PG0908A
2017
Acura MDX
AWD
16,987
$
Wrangler
Sahara
Unlimited
$
Top of the line! Leather,
moonroof, nav. #PG0977A
Moonroof, only 12k miles,
certified. #181514SA
2011
Subaru Forester
Touring
Nissan Rogue
AWD
2 to choose, low miles.
#PG0950
15,000
$
Moonroof, Automatic. #181235A
Nissan
Rogue S AWD
Honda Fit EX
Honda CR-V
EX AWD
$
#181271A
2016
2016
2013
Honda CR-V
EX AWD
Loaded! Nav., rear entertainment,
only 32k miles. #PG0993
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK - MON.-THURS. 8:30am-8pm FRI. 8:30am-7pm SAT. 8:30am-6pm SUN. 11am-5pm
www.HondaOfPlymouth.com
n
ia
Tufankj
OVER
300
Vehicles to
choose from
9 LONG POND ROAD PLYMOUTH, MA 02360
ROUTE 3 EXIT 5 ACROSS FROM HOME DEPOT
Hyundai of Plymouth
Sold New
Here
www.HyundaiOfPlymouth.com
356 Court St. (Rte 3A), Plymouth • 508-746-3100
(508) 927-5300
HUGE New Hyundai Inventory!
Habla Espanol
Pedir Martin´
0%
Financing
Available
on most models
OVER 70 PRE-OWNED VEHICLES STARTING AT $9,997
2019 Hyundai
Tucson Value AWD
NEW
Leases
Starting At
MANAGER’S SPECIAL
MANAGER’S SPECIAL
MANAGER’S SPECIAL
MANAGER’S SPECIAL
2015 Jeep Grand
Cherokee Laredo 4WD
2018 GMC Chevy Express
2500 Cargo Van
2018 Ford F150
Crew Cab XLT 4x4
2018 Ram 1500
Quad Cab 4x4
36 mos.
$256 /mo.
#H3538
Includes ALL fees
and sales tax.
$2,000 down cash or trade, 10K miles per year.
2018 Hyundai
Sonata SEL
NEW
File photo
Under 21k miles. #P2171
Value Priced at
ONLY 1 LEFT! Factory warranty.
#P2193
Last One!
Factory warranty, 3.5 Ecoboost. #P2176
Value Priced at
3.6, under 13k miles. #P2196
Value Priced at
MANAGER’S SPECIAL
MANAGER’S SPECIAL
MANAGER’S SPECIAL
MANAGER’S SPECIAL
2018 Kia Rio
2015 Chrysler
200 Limited
2018 Mitsubishi
Mirage
2015 Jeep Renegade
Trailhawk AWD
Automatic, factory warranty. #P2156
Factory warranty. #P2158
$10,000
$17,900
$23,400
Leases
Starting At
36 mos.
$194 /mo.
#H3072
Includes ALL fees
and sales tax.
$2,000 down cash or trade, 10K miles per year.
Automatic, only 52K miles, factory warranty. #P2187
Value Priced at
$12,500
MSRP
$29,655
$23,997
Only 25k miles, factory warranty.
#P2166
Value Priced at
$13,000
$31,297
Value Priced at
$25,800
Value Priced at
Log onto www.HyundaiOfPlymouth.com to view our entire inventory
Offers are subject to change. Pictures are for illustration purposes only. Leases available only to qualified customers through Hyundai Motors Finance. Not everyone will qualify. 36 month lease with $.20/mi. over 10,000 miles/year, excess wear, and a $400 disposition fee. $0 security deposit. Includes all available rebates to dealer. Contact dealer for details. With approved credit. Plus tax. Not everyone will qualify for all rebates. All applicable rebates
and lease cash to dealer. Offers ends 1/31/2019. Not everyone will qualify for all rebates. All rebates to dealer and with approved credit. Valid only at Hyundai of Plymouth. Contact dealer for details. Only well qualified, credit worthy buyers are eligible. Additional fees may apply at lease end. Subject to factory extension of rebates and incentives. Must qualify for all rebates. **After rebates. Subject to factory extension of rebates & incentives
Ideas
K
NEWS | OPINION | ANALYSIS
B O S T O N S U N DAY G L O B E JAN UA RY 6 , 2 01 9
Background,
left:
Suffragette
Emmeline
Pankhurst is
arrested in
London in
1914.
Background,
right: Hazel
HunkinsHallinan
wears a prosuffrage sash
in Washington
in 1917.
By Linda Rodriguez McRobbie
WIKI COMMONS/ADOBE/GLOBE STAFF
Defiantly pro­woman swag is all the rage, but can fashion really promote social reform?
L
ONG BEFORE THERE were pink protest hats,
or “Notorious RBG” T-shirts celebrating Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg,
women on both sides of the Atlantic were making fashion statements about feminism.
On Dec. 5, 1908, at Royal Albert Hall in
London, David Lloyd George gave a speech that
went on for more than two hours. As he wound down,
it became clear that the Lloyd George — a top official
in Britain’s ruling party and later the prime minister —
was not going to address one of the most pressing issues of the time: Women’s suffrage.
A cry went up: “We want deeds, not words!” Helen
Ogston, a 25-year-old Scottish woman wearing the
green, violet, and white sash of the suffragettes around
her shoulders, flowers in her hair, stood up and excoriated Lloyd George. As Royal Albert Hall guards approached, she pulled out a dog whip and began hitting
the men. They dragged her from the stalls; one of
them, she said later, pushed the lit end of his cigar into
the fleshy inside of her wrist, another repeatedly
punched her in the chest.
Ogston was by now, however, used to this kind of violence — the reason she was carrying the whip in the
first place was for protection, after having been savagely beaten by men leaving suffragette meetings. Women
dressed in the green, violet, and white of the militant
suffragettes could expect to be punched, spat at, or
even sexually assaulted, but they wore the colors anyway.
Today, replicas of the “Votes For Women” badges
that got suffragettes beaten in the streets are for sale in
museum gift shops. And that’s not all: You can buy a
stuffed suffragette bearing a “Votes for Women” placard for your Christmas tree; violet and green “Votes for
Inside
OPINION JEFF JACOBY
The US is not a house.
It doesn’t need a wall.
PERSONALITY DISORDER
Enough about the ‘likability’
test for female candidates K5
By Renée Graham
H
EADING INTO THE new year in the midst of the
government shutdown, President Trump launched a
Twitter barrage to press his case for a multibilliondollar wall on the US-Mexican border — a project
Congress has so far refused to approve. One of his
tweets called attention to Barack and Michelle Obama, who
bought a large home in Washington’s Kalorama district after leaving the White House.
“President and Mrs. Obama built/has a ten foot Wall around
their DC mansion/compound,” Trump posted. “I agree, totally necessary for their safety and security. The US needs the same thing,
slightly larger version!”
As Trump tweets often do, this one got the details wrong. The
Obamas don’t have a “compound,” and their home is not surrounded by a 10-foot wall. Indeed, the front of the house is completely visible from the street.
Still, the president’s argument is clear: Just as the Obamas secure their home from interlopers, the United States should secure
its borders against uninvited migrants.
This is an analogy frequently invoked by immigration restrictionists. Every time you lock the doors of your home to keep your
family and property safe, they say, you demonstrate why America
needs a wall to keep foreigners out. Boston podcaster Chuck
Morse expresses a view held by many: “The building of a wall to
determine who enters the national home of any nation is as logical
JACOBY, K6
FEMINIST SWAG, Page K4
ZUCK’S BIG PROBLEM
Facebook’s behavior demands
tougher regulation K6
By the Editorial Board
IT’S JUMP TIME
Wardrobe advice for
Candidate Warren K5
By Beth Wolfensberger Singer
FILE PHOTO 2017/GETTY IMAGES
People view prototypes of a wall at the US border in Tijuana.
K2
Ideas
BIG IDEAS
IN LITTLE BITES
B o s t o n
S u n d a y
G l o b e
JA N UA RY 6 , 2 0 1 9
Brainiac
OPINION MICHAEL A. COHEN
GOP’s choice:
upset Trump
— or everyone
else?
R
BIG DATA
93%
That’s the proportion of green turtle
hatchlings that could be female by
2100, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Exeter in
England and the Environmental Sciences Center in Portugal. The sex of hatchlings is determined by temperature.
Based on the climate change scenarios
laid out by the Intergovernmental Panel
on Climate Change, researchers expect
76 to 93 percent of hatchlings to be
female by the end of the century. The
“feminization” of the species is just
one of several looming problems for
the green turtle. Researchers say higher temperatures will push incubation
temperatures to near “lethal levels,”
even as rising seas wash away nesting
areas.
— DAVID SCHARFENBERG
50 WORDS
The burly man made his way to a Mystic River bridge, a
huge white bird nestled in his arms. “It was in the road,”
he explained, in answer to our puzzled expressions. Then,
he continued to the other side, returning the errant swan
to the safety of the rippling water.
— MARY JANSIEWICZ
Medford
Have a true story
about Boston you
can tell in exactly
50 words?
Submit yours to
50words@globe.com.
ON SECOND THOUGHT
Recycling is a public good — for plastic, glass and paper, that is. Not so much
for the written word. Just ask Robert
Sternberg. Sternberg, a professor of psychology at Cornell University, has lost
three papers to retraction for reusing his
own previously published text. The most
recent retraction, from last month, involved a 2012 article on “lapses in ethical
reasoning and the great costs they have
had for society,” that appeared in Review
of General Psychology.
To be sure, self-plagiarism, as text recycling is sometimes inelegantly called, isn’t
the worst sin in science and doesn’t rise to
the level of fraud, manipulation of data, or
other misconduct. But critics say authors
who churn out cut and paste papers using
their own archives are intellectual spammers who flood the literature with articles
that have few, if any, novel ideas or words.
— ADAM MARCUS
Retraction Watch
Most Republicans who
survived in November did
so not despite Trump, but
because of him.
ADOBE IMAGES
UNCOMMON KNOWLEDGE | BY KEVIN LEWIS
Holding back the crime
Comparing students in Louisiana who
barely passed to those who barely failed the
exams required for advancing to ninth grade,
researchers found that students who were
kept back, or “retained,” were more likely to
commit violent crime as young adults. “We
calculate that the increase in violent crimes,
driven by grade retention, implies a social
cost between $2.6 million to $18.4 million”
just for this sample.
Eren, O. et al., “The Effect of Grade Reten­
tion on Adult Crime: Evidence from a Test­
Based Promotion Policy,” National Bureau of
Economic Research (December 2018).
Family premiums
Comparing trends across states, researchers found that “on average, state infertility insurance mandates covering in vitro fertilization treatment are associated with a 10-percent reduction in the probability of divorce.
This effect is most pronounced for women in
their 40s, and is concentrated among women with private insurance and college degrees and women without children.”
Cintina, I. & Wu, B., “How Do State Infertili­
ty Insurance Mandates Affect Divorce?” Con­
temporary Economic Policy (forthcoming).
EPUBLICANS IN CONGRESS
can’t quit Donald Trump.
Two months ago, when
Democrats swept the House in
the midterm election, it created
an acute dilemma for GOP members: Either they distance themselves from an increasingly toxic president and risk alienating his rabid supporters, or they firmly embrace him and upset everyone else.
Republicans seem inclined to go with
the latter — just as they have for the past
two years.
Exhibit A of the bind in which Republicans find themselves is the shutdown of the
federal government, now unfolding into its
third week and with no end in sight.
Before Christmas, Republicans were
content to vote on a continuing budget resolution to fund the government and head
home for the holidays.
But then the president threw a tantrum.
Humiliated by attacks from right-wing media that accused him of giving in on his
promise to build a border wall, Trump
drew a line in the sand. In an Oval Office
appearance with Senate Minority Leader
Chuck Schumer and House Speaker Nancy
Pelosi, Trump made clear he would shut
down the government if his demands on
the wall were not met.
With Democrats unwilling to give the
president what he wants, the focus quickly
shifted to Republicans. A bill had already
passed the GOP-led Senate to fund the government. If the House took it up and
passed it into law, Trump would have to
back down — or veto a spending bill agreed
to by his own party’s leaders in Congress.
True to form, House Republicans
showed no willingness to challenge the
president. And so the shutdown began.
On Thursday, with Democrats back in
control of the House, they quickly passed
legislation to reopen the government. But
without money for Trump’s wall, Senate
Republicans are refusing to consider it.
That means we are looking at a government shutdown that could go on for
months. The political incentives on both
sides make a breakthrough hard to achieve.
The president believes that holding firm
on his beloved border wall will energize his
narrow base of supporters, which has been
Trump’s core political strategy since he
took office. For House Democrats, running
teenager’s religiosity, personality, grades, social network, and parental relationships.
Without these controls, Catholic presence
would be positively correlated with marijuana use, “because there are more carefree
parents, irreligious persons, and deviant
peers in Catholic-heavy counties.”
The presence of conservative Protestants
was negatively correlated with marijuana
use, but this didn’t hold up with controls,
such that “we may conclude that unlike the
Catholic moral community, the conservative
Protestant moral community does not independently affect the youths’ marijuana use
behavior.”
Nie, F. & Yang, X., “The Moral Community
Divide: Underage Marijuana Use Across Reli­
gious Contexts,” Journal for the Scientific
Study of Religion (forthcoming).
Paying for the wall
Economists modeled the impact of scrapping the North American Free Trade Agreement (without a replacement) and found that
this “lowers real incomes in the large majority of sectors in all three NAFTA countries, and
that average wages fall in nearly all US congressional districts, and in all Mexican states
and Canadian provinces.” The impact would
nevertheless be uneven, and ironically,
“Trump-voting districts would experience
systematically greater wage decreases,” as
“places that suffer the most from NAFTA import competition are also overwhelmingly
those that export to NAFTA and use NAFTA
intermediates.”
Auer, R. et al., “The Economics and Politics
of Revoking NAFTA,” National Bureau of Eco­
nomic Research (December 2018).
Studs vs. harlots
In a survey of thousands of Americans,
some were asked to think about a close
friend, while others were asked to think
about a mere acquaintance, whose sexual
history they were familiar with. Some were
asked about a male friend/acquaintance,
while others were asked about a female.
Women were evaluated more negatively as
their number of sexual partners increased,
whereas there was no such effect for men,
regardless of the participant’s gender or the
closeness of the relationship.
Marks, M. et al., “The Sexual Double Stan­
dard in the Real World: Evaluations of Sexual­
ly Active Friends and Acquaintances,” Social
Psychology (forthcoming).
No green communion
Analysis of a national representative sample of teenagers from the years before marijuana legalization revealed that they used
marijuana less frequently in counties where
more of the population was Catholic — controlling for county demographics and the
ADOBE
Kevin Lewis is an Ideas columnist. He can be
reached at kevin.lewis.ideas@gmail.com.
against Trump’s obstinacy worked well in
November, and standing up to the president’s wall will surely continue to please
their supporters. They’ve shown zero inclination to give in.
But here we come to the core political
dilemma for Republicans. For GOP senators Cory Gardner of Colorado and Susan
Collins of Maine, both of whom are up for
reelection in 2020, a prolonged shutdown
makes their lives that much more difficult.
Not surprisingly, both have called for the
Senate to get the government open again.
They’ve been joined by a handful of House
Republicans in vulnerable districts. For
other senators who could be facing tough
fights in 2020 — North Carolina’s Thom
Tillis, Iowa’s Joni Ernst, or Martha McSally,
recently appointed to fill John McCain’s
seat in Arizona — the pressure on them to
break with Trump is likely to build.
But most Republicans who survived the
Democratic onslaught in November did so
not despite Trump, but because of him. For
any Republican from a ruby-red state or
district, defying Trump on his border wall
is a recipe for a far-right primary challenge.
These senators and representatives are far
more likely to hold the line.
As the consequences of the shutdown
begin to pile up — federal agencies and
courts being shuttered, tax refunds delayed, national monuments closed — it
could force Republicans and the president
to reconsider. But that could take a while.
GOP members haven’t previously shown
much concern for ensuring a smoothly running federal government.
This is the most pernicious consequence
of polarized politics. With the number of
persuadable voters falling, and with so
many congressional districts carefully
drawn to favor one political party, neither
party has an incentive to compromise and
risk upsetting its most fervent supporters.
For Democrats, that’s not a bad choice.
They have the political wind at their back.
For Republicans, who have watched
their party’s fortunes take one body blow
after another since Trump took office,
keeping their jobs means staying the course
— even if the ship of state is slowly sliding
into the sea.
Michael A. Cohen’s column appears
regularly in the Globe.
JA N UA RY 6 , 2 0 1 9
B o s t o n
S u n d a y
G l o b e
Ideas
MIKE REDDY FOR STAT
How the drug lobby lost
By Nicholas Florko
T
WASHINGTON
HE DRUG INDUSTRY’S storied lobbying group
isn’t accustomed to bad news — and with its small
army of well connected advocates, it’s even less familiar with surprises. For PhRMA, the news last
winter was both.
On Feb. 7, the group’s board — made up of dozens of the
CEOs of major pharmaceutical companies including Amgen,
Johnson & Johnson and Sanofi — was gathered for a meeting
to welcome its new chairman. Suddenly, the gathered crew
had something far more threatening to discuss: Congress had
just laid out a plan to force drugmakers to pay far more into
Medicare — a policy change none of pharma’s lobbyists had
seen coming.
A source familiar with what happened at the meeting described the atmosphere succinctly: panic.
The group — its board members, its 30 internal lobbyists
and its 150 contracted ones — sprung into action, scrambling
to convince Congress not to enact the change. That two-day
blitzkrieg was only the first in a series of sustained campaigns
to find a way to reverse its loss — campaigns that saw the powerful group make concessions on policies it otherwise opposed
and even reach out to would-be adversaries.
But all that maneuvering was for naught. On Tuesday, it became official: A change took effect that will cost the industry
nearly $12 billion over the next 10 years.
“This might well be the biggest political loss that PhRMA
has suffered in a decade,” Harvard government professor Daniel Carpenter told STAT, Boston Globe Media’s health and
medicine news site.
STAT spoke with key members of Congress, congressional
staffers, experts, and lobbyists both within the drug industry
and outside it to piece together the inside story of how the
drug industry finally lost — big — in Washington. This account
underscores, too, just how vulnerable the group, once thought
invincible, has become, as newly empowered Democrats
pledge to work with President Trump to lower drug prices.
PhRMA, whose acronym stands for Pharmaceutical Research
and Manufacturers of America, had failed to fend off a policy
it opposed — despite the vast sums the group spent on lobbying, despite its single-minded, monthslong focus on the issue,
despite its untouchable reputation in Washington.
The defeat, which may signal an erosion in the drug lobby’s
influence, offers a window into how seemingly arcane changes
in laws and regulations carry multibillion-dollar price tags. It’s
also a sign that, when Washington policymakers follow
through on the president’s populist rhetoric, the consequences
for an industry can be profound.
B
ACK IN EARLY February, before the call came, the outlook for PhRMA was relatively sunny.
Sure, Trump had recently derided the drug industry
for “getting away with murder.” But the administrative action
he promised hadn’t come — the regulatory changes coming
out of Health and Human Services under former Secretary
Tom Price were more often favorable to the industry than not.
His replacement, former Eli Lilly executive Alex Azar, seemed
just as friendly. Republicans, the party with which PhRMA has
often enjoyed a cozier relationship, still controlled both the
House and Senate.
Unbeknownst to PhRMA, however, some of those Republicans had been working alongside Democrats for weeks, endeavoring to hammer out a tiny policy change with massive
consequences for the industry.
Slipped into less than half a page of the 250-page bill — the
whole section is only 168 words — the new policy requires
drug makers to pay a larger share of a Medicare beneficiary’s
prescription costs when that person is in something known as
the “donut hole.”
Beneficiaries pay 100 percent of their drug costs until they
meet their deductible, and insurers pick up a portion of the
tab in the initial coverage phase, until someone has spent
about $3,750 in drug costs. Beneficiaries pay even less once
they hit the catastrophic phase, after they’ve spent $5,000. In
between, though, patients, drug makers, and insurers are together responsible.
Before February, drug makers paid 50 percent of those
costs. Now, however, they’ll pay 70 percent — an increase that,
spread across the 43 million people who have Medicare drug
coverage, adds up to billions in extra funding from drugmakers.
The broad outlines for the change — which was also included in President Obama’s 2016 and 2017 budgets — came from
the four most powerful lawmakers in Congress: Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, Minority Leader
Chuck Schumer of New York, then-Speaker Paul Ryan of Wis-
consin and Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi. Staff on all four major health committees, in both chambers, helped draft the
technical legislative language.
There was a conscious effort, several congressional staffers
told STAT, to make sure PhRMA didn’t catch wind of the idea
in the weeks leading up to its rollout. Even the Trump administration knew about the change and managed to keep it quiet,
a senior administration official said.
At the time, the lawmakers considered it a “haircut” for the
industry, a way to make them cough up a little extra cash to
help pay for the rest of the $400 billion budget deal, which
dedicated funds to rebuilding Puerto Rico after Hurricane Maria and fighting the opioid crisis, among a host of other issues.
It’s a time-honored tradition for Congress to turn to industry to help pay for other legislative spending. Hospitals might
see certain Medicare payments dwindle as a “pay-for” for other health priorities. Congress will sometimes buildin a direct
excise tax, like the one it placed on medical devices as a way to
offset other costs in the Affordable Care Act.
But no one — neither PhRMA nor the advocates who so often work against it on drug pricing — expected congressional
Republicans to deliver on an Obama-era priority that would
hurt the drug industry.
Even now, months later, Washington hasn’t coalesced
around a single explanation for McConnell and Ryan’s decision to give pharma that “haircut.” Several sources inside and
outside the government suggested Republicans were fed up
with the industry and ready to send a message that it wasn’t
invincible anymore. Others say Republican staffers didn’t
know quite how big a policy change they were putting forward. Many pointed to the high-pressure budget negotiations
and the need to find something — anything — to pay for February’s spending deal.
“You need a pay-for for your bill, you have [all four congressional leaders] agreeing to it. Why would you give PhRMA a
call to have them screw it up?” one staffer asked. “It’s not like
they’re going to be like, ‘Okay, thank you.’”
Once the policy was out in the public eye, the drama of that
early February board meeting didn’t fade fast. PhRMA was
“twisting every arm, trying to use the influence of their campaign contributions in both parties,” Representative Lloyd
Doggett, a Texas Democrat, one of the most vocal advocates
for lower prescription drug prices in Congress, told STAT in
late December. The group went “berserk,” as one lobbyist for
PhRMA put it.
PhRMA’s members were gobsmacked that the group could
be surprised by such a big change, especially when Republicans were in control. “We pay you guys so much goddamn
money in dues to be our eyes and ears,” a second drug industry
lobbyist griped. “How could you let this happen?”
“It was kind of a watershed moment, [a realization] that we
can no longer rely on a solid red line of support,” the second
drug industry lobbyist added, referring to Republicans.
B
EFORE THE INK was even dry on that February deal,
the industry was formulating a new strategy: an argument that the “haircut” Congress had intended had
shorn off a bit more than anyone expected.
Originally, the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office estimated that the donut hole change would save taxpayers (and
therefore cost drug makers) $7.7 billion. PhRMA’s policy
wonks and actuaries had crunched their own numbers: The
CBO’s estimate was massively off, by more than $4 billion.
(The CBO ultimately admitted its error and agreed with
PhRMA, acknowledging in May that the change will actually
save taxpayers $11.8 billion.)
The group’s new argument, then, was clear: this was a mistake, and Congress should fix it.
“If you make policy for purely budgetary reasons you usually make bad policy, if you do it super fast you usually make it
worse and they did both of those things,” said Doug Holtz
Eakin, president of the American Action Forum, a conservative think tank that is closely aligned with PhRMA.
PhRMA’s first attempt at getting the policy reversed was
quintessentially Washington. All the group had to do was
sneak a few sentences into a 2,000 page, $1.3 trillion spending
bill that Congress was considering in late March. In the parlance of Washington, a “rider” on a “Christmas tree” of a
spending package.
PhRMA played its cards carefully: it focused on Republican
lawmakers like Ryan and McConnell, pressuring them to
plead their case with Democrats like Pelosi and Schumer who
were much less open to the change.
And it tried not to be too greedy: industry pushed to roll
back the percentage it would have to pay from 70 percent to
somewhere between 60 and 64 percent, not to revert all the
way back to the 50 percent it would have been paying before
the February law.
But PhRMA wasn’t so lucky. Democrats didn’t budge, and
Republicans didn’t push it.
Drug industry lobbyists told STAT PhRMA’s asks weren’t
solidified yet — the group never agreed on exactly what percentage, between 60 and 64 percent, it should be asking for.
“It wasn’t ready for prime time,” the second lobbyist said.
Advocates for lower drug prices, too, demanded that a slew
of Democratic drug-pricing priorities be coupled with any rollback to the donut hole change.
Undeterred by its failure in March, PhRMA regrouped and
began to rev up its lobbying machine. By the end of the first
quarter it had already spent nearly $10 million lobbying Congress — a number that would more than double by September,
to $21 million — figures that put it on pace to spend more
than it has ever spent in a single year.
At the center of its new strategy, starting in May 2018: a
clever new legislative proposal to couple the donut hole
change with a more bipartisan and popular Medicare fix and
brand the entire thing as a way to shore up Medicare. That
other, unrelated policy would address a so-called “impending
Medicare cliff” that won’t take effect until 2020.
On Capitol Hill, PhRMA gave the idea an uncontroversial
name: “the alternative proposal.”
PhRMA pushed the idea in radio, digital, and print ads,
too, in health care and politics-focused publications across
Washington and more broadly. One recent report showed that
PhRMA sponsored more than 70 percent of POLITICO’s Pulse
newsletter in 2018.
They recruited allies to press their case, too. A slew of
groups including the National Hispanic Council on Aging, the
National Minority Quality Forum, and even the National
Grange all sent letters to Congress with a message eerily similar to PhRMA’s: fix the Medicare cliff and lower drug makers’
share of donut hole discounts.
And Congress listened — at least, at first. In May, more
than 200 House members — nearly half the body — wrote to
congressional leadership calling for Congress to address both
issues together. Democrats and Republicans sent separate letters but their message was unified: move on PhRMA’s alternative proposal.
The letters put supporters of the February change on high
alert. AARP, which emerged as one of the strongest opponents
to PhRMA on this issue, cut straight to the chase in a letter to
Democrats: “We are very concerned that you recently signed
onto a letter that called for this beneficiary improvement to be
re-visited,” they wrote. Patients for Affordable Drugs also
pushed back, blasting Democrats for supporting “Big Pharma”
its own strongly worded letter.
PhRMA’s last, most serious attempt came in late September, as Congress took up a long-sought legislative package to
address the opioid epidemic.
It was a shockingly Machiavellian move, even for an organization known for its ruthless negotiation tactics. But once
word came from Capitol Hill that PhRMA was hoping to get
its donut hole change looped into the package, advocates
pounced, brandishing the policy as a Big Pharma bailout.
“We all rallied around the same message — singing from
the same song sheet,” Lauren Blair, communications director
for the Coalition for Sustainable Rx Pricing, said.
Soon, top Democrats were also chastising PhRMA for its
tactics. “Leader Pelosi opposes this Republican attempt to hijack a bipartisan effort on opioids funding to ram through a
multi-billion dollar handout to Big Pharma,” Pelosi spokesman
Henry Connelly told The Hill.
Subsequently, PhRMA turned to an unlikely ally: the generics industry, which goes up against its brand counterparts far
more often than it works alongside them. PhRMA said it
would make a deal on a bill favored by generic drugmakers if
they could get Democrats on board with PhRMA’s proposed
donut hole change.
Those negotiations, however, eventually fell apart. PhRMA
never again got so close to getting the fix it so desperately
wanted. Industry lobbyists kept pushing through the fall, suggesting the policy could advance in this way or that, but no
solid effort materialized. It never came up in end-of-year
spending bill negotiations.
There are already signs that PhRMA’s members may be less
willing, in 2019, to let the issue control PhRMA’s agenda. After
all, House Democrats are already readying subpoenas, the
Trump Administration is becoming more antagonistic toward
the industry by the day, and drug companies themselves have
already written the new expense into their balance sheets.
Nicholas Florko is a Washington correspondent for STAT
News, from which this piece is adapted. Lev Facher contributed
reporting.
K3
K4
Ideas
B o s t o n
S u n d a y
G l o b e
JA N UA RY 6 , 2 0 1 9
uFEMINIST SWAG
Continued from Page K1
Women” umbrellas; a “Suffragette Cocktail
tea towel,” featuring a vintage cocktail recipe
— “one suffragette cocktail will convert man
and four will make him wash dishes,” it
reads; an eggcup shaped to resemble Emmeline Pankhurst, a woman whose demand for
“deeds not words” propelled the suffragettes
into acts of arson, assault, hunger strikes,
and sabotage.
The neo-suffragette merchandising is just
the beginning. As feminist leaders decry
President Trump’s court picks and his party’s
legislative and regulatory agenda, American
women can show their solidarity through all
manner of products. Beyond the “Notorious
RBG” swag, there are T-shirts declaring that
“This Is What a Feminist Looks Like” and
tote bags bearing the slogan “Strong Girls
Club.” You can read about “17 Pieces of Feminist Jewelry That’ll Show You’re a Nasty
Woman” and the “Feminist Jewelry to Wear
While You Smash the Patriarchy.” There are
the “Feminist” T-shirts peddled by H&M, the
cheap “Feminist” necklaces sold by Forever
21. There are the independent retailers selling cute sweatshirts that read “Females are
Strong as Hell” and “Empowered Women
Empower Women.” There’s Dior’s $700 “We
Should All Be Feminists” T-shirt, which borrows its slogan from Nigerian writer Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s essay, and Prabal
Garung’s “Girls Just Want to Have Fundamental Rights” T-shirts, a bargain at $195.
Think of something, anything, and the Internet provides. Feminist socks? Of course.
Feminist blankets? Absolutely. Feminist
soap? Why, yes.
The mass-marketing of feminist merchandise raises thorny ethical issues. Critics
note that some fast-fashion retailers that sell
“feminist” T-shirts use production methods
that often rely on women in low-wage, exhausting work. What does it mean that the
male CEO of a self-described “feminist” retailer — one that sells shirts that read “Ask
Before You Grab” and “Let’s Talk About Consent” — fired his staff when they confronted
him about how he had sexually harassed
women in the past? Who benefits from a
runway parade of impish and mostly white
Chanel models carrying placards reading
“Ladies First” and “History is Her Story”? Do
we trivialize the ferocity of Emmeline
Pankhurst and women like her when we eat
soft-boiled eggs out of her head?
The intrinsic merit of an idea or an ideology isn’t the only factor in whether it catches
on, and even the worthiest social-reform
movements still need good marketing to succeed. But the question is whether this wave
of feminist swag is attracting new adherents
or diluting feminism’s “brand.” Is feminism,
the ideology, being crushed under the
weight of feminism, the trend?
A
LOT OF feminist merchandise
comes across Andi Zeisler’s desk.
Zeisler is the co-founder and editorial
director of Bitch Media, which publishes a
FILE PHOTO 2014/GETTY IMAGES
Above: Singer
Beyoncé
performs at the
MTV Video
Music Awards.
Right: Justice
Ruth Bader
Ginsburg works
out in a still
from the film
“RBG.”
Far right:
Suffragette
Helen Ogston
COURTESY MAGNOLIA PICTURES/CNN FILMS
quarterly magazine and produces podcasts.
The organization, which started in the mid1990s as a zine distributed out of the back of
a station wagon, bills itself as “a feminist response to pop culture.”
In an interview, she brings up a $95 Tshirt, by designers Pam & Gela, bearing the
slogan “Feminist Gangsta.” It’s aimed at
someone who thinks “that feminism is cool
and it’s a bad-ass thing to be,” she says. “But
using a term that’s appropriated from black
culture in a specific way makes it dicey.” The
women who started the company might see
themselves as pro-woman, she added, “But
is it serving a larger feminist whole or is this
just capitalizing on a thing that happens to
be hot right now?”
Zeisler examined the glittery, feel-good,
girl power commercialization of feminism in
her 2016 book, “We Were Feminists Once:
From Riot Grrl to Covergirl, the Buying and
Selling of a Political Movement.” She charted
the rise of pop feminism from Beyonce’s
MTV Music Awards performance in 2014,
China’s secrecy
helps nations
hurt themselves
By Ricardo Hausmann
S
ECRETS MAY BE among the most valuable assets that governments have: the
Trojan Horse, the Enigma code, the
Manhattan Project, and surprise attacks
such as Pearl Harbor, the Six-Day War,
and the Yom Kippur War are just a few of the
best-known examples. But in some cases, governments’ desire for secrecy is hard to square with
the national interest — and may even be among
the most dangerous threats to it. The threat is
even greater when the secrecy is prompted by
the less-than-lofty interests of a foreign govern-
ment intent on getting its way.
A case in point is Chinese international development finance. China has become a new and
important player in this area. In principle, China’s massive savings, infrastructure knowhow,
and willingness to lend could be great for developing countries. Alas, as Pakistan, Sri Lanka,
South Africa, Ecuador, and Venezuela have
learned the hard way, Chinese development finance often delivers a corruption-filled sugar
high to the economy, followed by a nasty financial (and sometimes political) hangover.
AFP/GETTY IMAGES
when the queen performed “Flawless”
against the word “Feminist” in brilliant,
glowing white letters taller than her; “almost
overnight,” Zeisler said, feminism was everywhere. “Feminism, so long dismissed as the
realm of the angry, the cynical, the man-hating, and the off-puttingly hairy, was officially
a thing. It was hot. And, perhaps most important, it was sellable,” Zeisler wrote.
On a basic level, this makes sense: Clothing and fashion are part of how we tell other
people who we are. “Clothing is very closely
tied to our self-identity,” explained Carolyn
Mair, a London-based fashion psychologist
and consultant, via email; slogan T-shirts
and accessories with messages broadcast
that identity more clearly. “When clothing
makes our group cohesion explicit, it unites
us with that subgroup and simultaneously
separates us from others.” Still, she notes,
“when wearing a slogan T-shirt is fashionable, it can be worn simply because it’s fashionable without a great deal of thought
about the message.”
As countries confront rising project costs and
try to make sense of what happened and how to
get out of the mess, they find that the financial
terms of their obligations have been contractually shrouded in secrecy. Moreover, the contracts
impose constraints on the ability of borrowers,
such as state-owned enterprises, to make the
terms known to the government, let alone the
public.
This is unfortunate, to say the least, because
controlling the accumulation of debt is one of the
most important things that a government can do
to prevent crises. Many countries have made
headway in shoring up their fiscal policies by
adopting public-finance laws and budgeting
practices to keep deficits under control.
But in some countries, many expenditures become public obligations without ever going
through the standard budget process. How does
this happen?
One recent practice used by both China and
Russia is to lend against future exports, as in the
case of oil in both Ecuador and Venezuela. These
arrangements come in two flavors: outrageous
and beyond belief.
The outrageous version is based on the idea
that this debt is not really debt, but just a prepurchase of oil. This claim is ridiculous, because
debt is any obligation you take on today that you
commit to repay with your future revenue. Moreover, it is not just any old debt; it is debt collateralized by the future stream of exports, which
AFP/GETTY IMAGES
Left: The outside of the Coca Codo Sinclair dam in Ecuador. Right: China’s Xi Jinping welcomes Ecuador’s Lenin Moreno in Beijing.
WIKIMEDIA COMMONS
Moreover, the products that have
emerged from this brave new world of declarative feminism are also increasingly divorced from the actual message of feminism.
“Have you seen the feminist lipstick? That’s
my favorite,” laughed Julianne Escobedo
Shepherd, editor-in-chief of Jezebel. (They’re
not the only ones, but a company in California sells “empowering” lipsticks that come in
shades called “Icon,” “Seeker,” “Explorer,”
and “Warrior.”)
“I understand why women, particularly
women, and people who are new to feminism want to signal that they’re feminists,”
Escobedo Shepherd said. “I understand why
you’d want to wear a shirt that says ‘The Future Is Female.’ But I think in the past few
years, there’s been a conflation of signaling
makes it super-senior debt — more senior than
debt from entities with so-called preferred creditor status, such as the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund. Not counting it as debt
is clearly outrageous.
But it gets worse. The Chinese have used oil
exports to collateralize debt for projects that
have nothing to do with oil, such as the Coca Codo Sinclair dam in Ecuador or Venezuela’s National Development Fund, which has provided
no clue about what happened to Chinese loans of
more than $60 billion. In these cases, the project
loan is repaid not from the future revenues of the
project, but from the future oil revenues that the
country was counting on to pay for all of its obligations, financial or otherwise. As a result, oil
revenues are used to pay for projects that neither
enhanced oil production nor went through the
budget process, thus disrupting the financial stability of both the oil company and the government.
In this context, China’s practice of keeping financing terms secret from the society that is ultimately responsible, and often from that society’s
government, is beyond the pale. Even the terms
of renegotiation are secret, lest other borrowers
use the outcomes as precedent.
I cannot think of a good argument reconciling
secrecy in the context of public financial obligations with the public interest. It is something
that societies should not tolerate.
The fact that the terms of these massive obligations have not leaked to the public reflects how
weak civil society and the press are in these
countries.
Others can help. Credit rating agencies should
demand to see the financing contracts. If the
agencies are rebuffed, the opacity of such practices should be reflected in their ratings. The International Monetary Fund and other multilateral
creditors should condition loans on compliance
with standards of transparency that would prevent this secrecy. The Paris Club of major sovereign creditors should make the disclosure of the
terms of Chinese or Russian loans a condition for
debt restructuring.
Secrecy has a place in government, but not in
international public-sector finance. It is a practice that needs to end before it does even more
harm than it has already caused.
Ricardo Hausmann, a former minister of
planning of Venezuela and former chief
economist of the Inter-American Development
Bank, is Director of the Center for International
Development at Harvard University and a
professor of economics at the Harvard Kennedy
School. This piece is adapted from Project
Syndicate. © 2018 by Project Syndicate.
B o s t o n
JA N UA RY 6 , 2 0 1 9
that you’re a feminist with actually doing
feminism, which involves to me feminist activism, and actually getting out there and
fighting for the rights that we’re losing so
frequently.”
Market-friendly feminism, she argues, is
a distraction at a time when self-declared
feminists ought to be at their angriest; money spent on slogan T-shirts is money that
could be put to better uses. “I’m not interested in the feel-good, signal feminism because
I don’t feel good at this juncture,” she says. “I
think the ‘Future Is Female’ T-shirts. . . really
signify a sleepiness about something we really need to be awake for.”
S
TILL, THE STORY of women’s empowerment has long been tied spiritually to
material consumption and fashion.
Historically, consumer power gave women a
kind of freedom, however hollow, that they
had previously not enjoyed or had lost in the
face of tightening social and gender roles.
From the early 1800s, for example, the rise
of shopping districts, department stores,
and shopping as a pastime allowed middleand upper-class women to leave their homes
without male chaperones and move more
freely out in the world.
In the early 1900s, the suffragettes recognized the power of fashion and image in the
marketplace of ideas. The leaders of Britain’s
suffragettes, the Women’s Social and Political Union, encouraged their members to
wear their best white dresses for the large
scale public rallies, an effort to demonstrate
that it wasn’t just whip-wielding harridans
or frumpy unmarried matrons who wanted
the vote, but beautiful, refined, elegant
women, too. Modern feminists cringe at
such distinctions, but the activists of that era
hoped to counteract the pervasive notion it
was a fringe minority of unwomanly women
who wanted rights.
Even though the ribbons, sashes, and
badges in green, violet, and white were
enough to get some women assaulted, the
suffragettes’ colors proved fashionable.
Where initially suffragette merchandise was
only available at special shops and stalls run
by the Women’s Social and Political Union,
by 1908, you could even buy green, violet,
and white underwear at major London department stores like Liberty and Selfridges.
“The accessories made it exciting,” Rosie
Broadley, curator of the National Portrait
Gallery’s 2018 Votes For Women display,
told The Telegraph. “They seemed like the
latest thing. They made it fashionable to become a suffragette.”
Sound familiar?
Fashion helped make the suffrage movement mainstream in a way that pamphlets
and protests never could. At the same time,
it also established a norm: When you’re demanding your rights, your appearance matters.
Much of today’s feminist swag is aimed at
stylish, conventionally attractive women
who might not wear their politics on their
sleeves in daily life, but would be a lot more
likely to when that sleeve is on a clever Tshirt.
“People have this stereotypical idea of
what a feminist looks like. If you don’t conform to that and you’re wearing a T-shirt
that says ‘Feminist Gangsta’, everyone is going to be like, ‘Oh, that’s so cute!’ But if you
fit the stereotype of a mean, nasty feminist
who is going to cut [someone’s] penis off,
wearing that shirt isn’t cute,” said Zeisler.
Furthermore, she observed, white feminists
have more freedom to wear confrontational
slogans than women of color do. “It is very
difficult,” she said, “for a nonwhite woman
wearing a T-shirt that says ‘I had an abortion’ or that says that ‘I don’t care about your
[expletive] patriarchy.’ ”
T
HE BLOSSOMING OF feminist swag
does coincide with a greater social
commitment to, or at least interest in,
the empowerment of women — a time when
a majority of people around the world agree
that women’s rights are fundamental. According to a 2015 global survey from Pew
Research Center, a median of 65 percent of
women in 38 surveyed nations said that it is
very important that women have equal
rights with men in their societies. Teasing
out the threads of causation and correlation,
however, are difficult.
“I think any time you get a critical mass
of individuals and companies recognizing
that there is monetary value in an idea, an
ideology, it’s fair to assume that people, consumers, whoever, actually have an interest,”
said Zeisler. And selling engagement can
work — feminism and feminist messages are
increasingly part of the “ambient cultural
background,” Zeisler said, “something that
you pick up by osmosis.”
Every movement needs a way to draw in
new members. “There is a really important
place for an entry level,” said Escobedo Shepherd, the Jezebel editor. “I think that feminism’s most radical tenets aren’t necessarily
going to be the gateway for a lot of people.
But I do think that the gateway needs to be a
little bit less connected to capitalism.” Ideally, she said, someone will buy a feminist Tshirt and Google what feminism means and
its history. “That’s the best we can hope for,”
she said.
Merchandising and fashion helped propel women’s rights into the mainstream in
the early 1900s. And now that’s happening
again, at a moment when corporate marketers have grown far more sophisticated at
turning the cultural zeitgeist into profit.
Still, there’s an easy way for anyone to visibly
demonstrate a commitment to feminism —
to proclaim an empowering message to the
world — without dropping $700 on a designer garment, or even $13 on a fast-fashion
version. “Everyone can just DIY their own
feminist T-shirt,” said Escobedo Shepherd.
“Thrift a T-shirt and get a Sharpie.”
Linda Rodriguez McRobbie, a frequent Ideas
contributor, is an American freelance writer
living in London.
S u n d a y
G l o b e
Ideas
K5
OPINION RENÉE GRAHAM
Our future depends
on ‘unlikable’ women
N
ANCY PELOSI IS House speaker
again. She didn’t get there by being likable.
That should inspire every girl
and every woman told that their
“unlikability” is harmful to their goals, whether they want to be class president or president
of the United States.
“How does Elizabeth Warren avoid a Clinton redux — written off as too unlikable before her campaign gets off the ground?”, Politico tweeted one day after the Massachusetts
senator confirmed her presidential ambitions.
And so it begins. That same hoary narrative of “unlikability” that dogged Hillary Clinton through her two presidential campaigns
is chomping at Warren’s heels. Another accomplished woman is judged by her “likability” — whatever that means — instead of her
political ability.
Hillary got pilloried. Women candidates
will get Hillaried.
Of course, all this talk about likability is really about submission. Its veiled message to
women is obvious: Downplay your intelligence, douse your ambitions, and know your
place. And that place is never fighting for
spaces some believe rightfully belong to a
man. This drivel drives Fox News’s Tucker
Carlson, who regularly tells his viewers that
women’s success is detrimental to men.
If only women were likable — silent and
compliant — every little thing would be all
right.
It’s a poisonous old refrain, one that also
took root during Clinton’s first presidential
run in 2008. During a debate, she was asked
to respond to New Hampshire voters who
liked her qualifications, “but are hesitating on
the likability issue.”
Then a New York senator, Clinton looked
as if she’d heard some version of this question
too many times. First she joked, “Well, that
hurts my feelings.” But when she added, “I
don’t think I’m that bad,” a smirking Barack
Obama interjected, “You’re likable enough,
Hillary.”
Whatever Obama’s true intention, his comment sounded more dismissive of Clinton
than the ridiculous question itself. Yet that
whole exchange highlighted issues some have
with women who pursue power. Every time
Clinton ran for higher office, her favorability
ratings plummeted.
It’s common knowledge that women are
criticized for exhibiting behaviors admired in
men. If he’s decisive, she’s pushy; if he’s passionate, she’s too emotional. And this is not
solely a man’s affliction, unless you’ve forgotten the 52 percent of white women who voted
for Trump in 2016. Some of that support was
OPINION BETH WOLFENSBERGER SINGER
Beth Wolfensberger Singer is a Boston-based artist. Her comics appear on her blog ambitionectomy.tumblr.com.
certainly fed by the obsolete idea that leaders
should be male.
When a woman’s likability is publicly questioned, it puts her on the defensive. Often, she
then concocts some version of herself to overcome her perceived unlikability.
Recently, there was Warren having a beer
on Instagram, just as Clinton tipped back a
boilermaker on the campaign trail in 2008.
And just like Clinton, Warren is now being
roasted for inauthenticity. (Side note: How
did alcohol become the universal symbol of
just-folks realness?)
For women, it’s a third rail, one that potential presidential candidates Bernie Sanders,
Joe Biden, and Beto O’Rourke will be spared.
And to think 2018 was dubbed “The Year of
the Woman.”
It’s been more than 40 years since Harvard
professor Laurel Thatcher Ulrich coined the
phrase “well-behaved women seldom make
history.” Sworn in Thursday, the 116th Congress made history with a record 36 women
newly elected to the House during last November’s midterms. There are now more than
100 congresswomen.
Add to that surge of female political prominence the expectation that at least three other women — senators Kamala Harris, Amy
Klobuchar, and Kirsten Gillibrand — are possible contenders for next year’s Democratic
presidential nomination.
None of these women, I imagine, are overly consumed by their likability. They’re focused on helping a nation derailed daily by
the Trump administration. That should also
be the focus of pundits, journalists, and the
rest of us. Stop giving this sexist question of
likability more oxygen than it deserves.
It deserves none.
“No one gives you power,” Pelosi has famously said. “You have to take it from them.”
For years, the California Democrat has been
pestered by questions about her likability,
even within her own party. Meanwhile, all she
has done is become the most powerful woman elected to office in American history.
Twice.
Reducing a woman’s electability to some
inscrutable measure of affability is the political equivalent of a man telling a woman to
smile more. If men were held to such standards, Donald Trump would not be president.
It’s 2019. From the House to (hopefully)
the White House, audacious women are the
future — whether the haters like it or not.
Renée Graham can be reached at
renee.graham@globe.com. Follow her on
Twitter @reneeygraham.
K6
Ideas
B o s t o n
S u n d a y
G l o b e
JA N UA RY 6 , 2 0 1 9
Editorial
Inbox
Lawmakers, stakeholders:
Make Facebook accountable
Thinking globally, acting
warily, on new pipelines
F
or too long Facebook enjoyed the reputation of a benign social network, and its
founder and CEO, Mark Zuckerberg, led a
charmed life — dodging every new revelation about privacy breaches and its role as a
purveyor of propaganda with promises to do better.
But how long can a publicly-traded company
evade serious public scrutiny and its leaders remain
in charge of a corporation whose 2.2 billion users
grow increasingly skeptical of its value? With every
headline, every new report, Facebook has become the
face of corporate greed — ruthless in its willingness
to play favorites among its powerful “partners,” to
abuse the data provided by its users, and to serve as
an enabler of fake news . . . all for a price.
The sins of the social media giant that were exposed in 2018 alone should be enough for lawmakers, Facebook board members, investors, and advertisers to rethink how the company conducts business:
• The Senate Intelligence Committee’s investigation of Russian interference in the 2016 election.
• Company records obtained by The New York
Times showing Facebook shared users’ personal data
with “partners” as huge as Amazon, Microsoft and
Yahoo.
• A British parliamentary investigating committee
that tells a tale of a company willing to shut off the
flow of data to starve possible competitors and play
favorites by sharing data with those on its so-called
“white list” like Airbnb, Netflix, and Lyft.
• At least two serious data breaches in the past six
months — one in September that gave hackers access
to tens of millions of accounts and a second “bug”
disclosed last month that exposed the private photos
of some 6.8 million users to outsiders.
The company still insists, “We’ve never sold people’s data.” But how about bartering or trading with
its “partners”? Or being simply incapable of protecting the accounts of users?
Facebook’s many transgressions go back a decade.
In 2011 the Federal Trade Commission found that as
far back as 2009 the social networking service “deceived consumers by telling them they could keep
their information on Facebook private, and then repeatedly allowing it to be shared and made public.” In
the consent decree that ended that case, Facebook
promised basically not to do it again.
That pledge is now in question.
The FTC opened an investigation last spring into
whether Facebook violated the consent decree – even
as Zuckerberg was insisting under oath to Congress
last April that “every single time you go to share
something on Facebook, whether it’s a photo in Facebook, or a message, every single time, there’s a control right there about who you’re going to be sharing
it [with].”
The Justice Department and the Securities and
Exchange Commission have also opened investigations. The Washington, D.C., attorney general filed
suit against Facebook last month, alleging the firm violated the district’s consumer protection act by allowing an app produced by Cambridge Analytica to improperly collect data from users.
And consumers are beginning to rebel via the
#DeleteFacebook movement and #LogOutFacebook,
a protest by the NAACP “to signify to Facebook that
the data and privacy of its users of color matter more
than its corporate interests.”
The NAACP protest comes in the wake of the Senate Intelligence Committee report, which documented how a Russian troll factory, set up by the now-in-
JACOBY
Continued from Page K1
and as natural as the walls and fences that
enclose our own homes and yards.”
The comparison is seductive. But it
doesn’t stand up to scrutiny.
First and most obviously, homes are private property. Your house is your possession. You have a personal, exclusive right to
occupy it, to bar others from entering it, to
safeguard it with locks and alarms and
fences, and to sell or give it to someone
else. The United States of America is nobody’s possession. It’s a sovereign political
jurisdiction, a commonwealth — not a
chattel that you or anyone else can dispose
of at will. The proprietary authority you
have within your home does not extend to
your neighbor’s home, let alone to the
street and sidewalk outside your door, still
less to the public square downtown or to
the highway that leads out of state. The territory of your neighborhood, your state, or
your country is not something you own.
The analogy collapses in other ways too.
We lock our homes to deter thieves and
others with criminal intent — burglars or
home invaders who want to hurt us. The
Since need for LNG is temporary, new
pipelines would be costly and lasting
PHOTO BY SAUL LOEB/AFP/GETTY IMAGES
Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg
dicted Internet Research Agency, used Facebook and
Instagram to target African-Americans with anti-Hillary Clinton propaganda and voter suppression efforts.
As the sins of Facebook mount, so too do the calls
to “do something” to bring transparency to a world
that remains a mystery to many of the political leaders who would ultimately be charged with reining it
in via regulation and/or litigation. And, let’s not forget that this is a company that spent some $11.6 million in 2017 to lobby Congress and was on target to
spend a similar amount in 2018.
The European Union, now in the process of implementing their General Data Protection Regulations
(GDPR), has been bolder in its regulatory approach
— and far more privacy conscious. The Irish Data
Protection Commission (Facebook’s European headquarters is in Dublin) has already launched an investigation of Facebook data breaches abroad. And because the Europeans are taking this seriously, Facebook could face fines of as much as $1.63 billion.
So, yes, fines and legal penalties can be effective.
But they are also after the fact.
It is the willful disregard and obfuscation engaged
in by Facebook, especially about its information-sharing with “partners,” that cries out for real change —
and a hefty dose of disclosure and regulation.
But it seems unlikely that anything will really
change without a change in leadership. After all,
these many sins were perpetrated on the watch of
Zuckerberg and chief operating officer Sheryl Sandberg. But with Zuckerberg serving as board chair and
owning some 60 percent of Facebook’s voting shares,
it would take a major push by institutional investors
to advance even the modest reform of an independent board chair. Advertisers might also want to
make their voices heard on corporate reform. After
all, if users start dropping out, what are they buying?
By all means, let’s allow those many investigations
here to proceed — and lead at the very least to regulatory reform to protect users’ privacy.
Meanwhile, Facebook users, beware.
odds are that someone who enters your
home in the middle of the night when
you’re sleeping is doing so with malicious
intent. By contrast, foreigners who cross
the US border are overwhelmingly likely to
do so for benign reasons — to better their
lives, not to diminish anyone else’s.
Every burglary causes, on average, a loss
of more than $2,400. According to the FBI,
Americans in 2017 were robbed of an estimated $3.4 billion by thieves who unlawfully entered their homes or offices. But the
aggregate impact of immigration to America, this year and every year, is to make the
nation richer, not poorer. For every 1 percent increase in population due to immigration, calculates Moody’s Analytics, the
US economy expands by 1.15 percent.
Similarly, we lock our houses and businesses to protect ourselves from intruders
whose presence by definition makes us unsafe. A border wall, however, keeps out
people whose presence tends to enhance
law and order. There are exceptions, of
course, but on the whole, higher levels of
undocumented immigration are strongly
associated with lower rates of violent crime
and drug offenses.
There’s another fundamental incompatibility in the house/border analogy. Lock-
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ing your house against strangers deprives
none of your neighbors of their freedom to
welcome visitors. But that’s exactly what a
border wall does. It isn’t only would-be immigrants whose liberty is restricted. By excluding peaceable foreigners who would
otherwise get jobs, purchase goods and services, form friendships, or raise families
with US citizens, militarized border security blatantly interferes in the lives of countless American men and women.
People lock their homes because it helps
keep them safe; it’s a precaution that costs
little and has no downside. Only at the
most superficial level does it resemble the
increasingly impenetrable barriers that
have been put in place to seal America
from foreigners who wish to live and work
among us. No one objects to reasonable
border security, but there is nothing reasonable about turning the border into a
fortress of concrete walls, Predator drones,
and tens of thousands of heavily armed
agents. “Locking the door” makes a bad
immigration policy. It makes an even
worse immigration analogy.
Jeff Jacoby can be reached at
jacoby@globe.com. Follow him on Twitter
@jeff_jacoby.
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Re “How gas demand from Boston changed a faraway island”
(Editorial, Dec. 30): As problematic as it is, US reliance on
Trinidad plays a small role in gas imports. In 2017, 97 percent
of US natural gas imports came from Canada, almost all by
pipeline. Liquefied natural gas from Trinidad was a very distant second, supplying just over 2 percent of US gas imports.
Gas from Trinidad was more important to the United States in
the past, but by 2017, imports from Trinidad had fallen to onesixth of the volume in 2007.
The editorial’s passionate account of the effects of gas production on Trinidad could be placed alongside descriptions of
what fracking does to water supplies and the local environment in general — or contrasted with the effects of coal mining, which are deadly for local health.
Most important, New England’s need for LNG is temporary. By the mid-2020s, planned new renewable investments,
such as a massive buildup of offshore wind, combined with energy efficiency measures, will reduce the demand for electricity from gas. This will make it possible to allocate more gas to
heating during the peak winter months.
Building new pipelines would be ineffective and expensive.
They might not come into service until the mid-2020s or later,
ready for 40 or more years of use, just after the end of the need
for LNG. There would then be immense economic pressure to
use the new pipelines for gas export, encouraging fracking in
the Northeast and/or providing a new opportunity to export
Canadian gas. It would be much better to continue New England’s LNG imports for a few more years, avoiding commitment to new, long-lived, and costly gas pipeline infrastructure.
FRANK ACKERMAN
Principal economist
Synapse Energy Economics
Cambridge
Argument for new pipelines
is questionable
The Dec. 30 editorial “How gas demand from Boston changed
a faraway island” seizes on an environmental justice argument
to continue the paper’s endless drumbeat for more gas pipelines. The editorial argues that Massachusetts environmentalists happily support the import of liquefied natural gas, thereby trashing the island of Trinidad, while simultaneously opposing the construction of new local natural gas pipelines on
environmental grounds.
But the Globe’s perspective is questionable for a number of
reasons. First, it cites Trinidad’s irresponsible environmental
policies. But isn’t a reasonable solution to that problem to require that we import gas only from responsibly run facilities?
Second, the editorial does not mention the worrisome and
well-documented environmental impacts of fracked natural
gas from the Marcellus Shale, which would supply much of the
gas transported by way of new pipelines. And third, contracts
for LNG are relatively short term, as opposed to the decadeslong commitment to fossil fuels that new pipelines involve.
The opposition to new pipelines is far from symbolic. It’s
time for the Globe to reevaluate its position.
ANN BERWICK
Newton
We may well come to rue
the demise of Net neutrality
In Jeff Jacoby’s column “Net neutrality is gone, but the Internet is fine” (Ideas, Dec. 30), he takes the position that the case
is closed for the need for Net neutrality because the Internet is
getting faster. This despite his acknowledgment that Internet
providers can throttle the service given to small-fry websites
and apps that do not pay extra for premium service.
Jacoby seems to miss the point that as applications in the
future grow to require increased transmission of data, ISPs
could throttle Internet traffic regardless of increasing Internet
speed.
STAN FLEISCHMAN
Acton
Jeff Jacoby’s celebration of the demise of Net neutrality is premature. Large companies take two to three years to implement a new strategy. No effect — positive, negative, or unchanged — would be visible this quickly.
CHUCK KOLLARS
Ipswich
Shedding light on world of
cancer treatment for the poor
Re “A double diagnosis” (Page A1, Dec. 30): What a moving
glimpse into the world of cancer treatment for the economically disadvantaged. The protections that many of us take for
granted just aren’t available to the working poor. As a society,
we need to find ways to protect the poorest among us for
many reasons, not least because we never know if we or a
loved one will be in this dire predicament one day. Thank you
for shedding a light on this corner of the world.
EDWIN ANDREWS
Malden
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M
WITH: NEW ENGLAND DESTINATIONS
B O S T O N S U N DAY G L O B E JA N UA RY 6 , 2 01 9 | B O S T O N G L O B E .C O M / T R AV E L
AVOID
I
Christopher Muther
THE CONVENTIONAL
FOR 2019
n Reykjavik they’re dealing
with a 25 percent year-overyear increase in tourists. In
Venice, day-trippers will soon
be charged an entrance fee to
the city. The daily number of
visitors to Machu Picchu is
double what UNESCO
recommends. Barcelona
residents were all but telling
tourists “wish you weren’t
here” in demonstrations targeting overtourism.
The British newspaper the Telegraph even called
on dictionaries to designate “overtourism” as the
2018 word of the year (it lost to “toxic”). It’s time
to give these cities — and many others — a
breather. Apologies if this sounds like Matthew
McConaughey shilling a Lincoln Continental,
but let’s make this the year we shed those
conventional and trite journeys and instead step
into something unique. That means trying on a
new destination for size, perhaps one where the
word overtourism has yet to enter the lexicon.
Like pets patiently waiting for adoption, there
are cities eager to be loved, or at least places that
wouldn’t mind a few additional tourists
occupying hotels and milling about attractions.
Options? Yes indeed. Pack your makeup case
and hatboxes. Here we go.
INSTEAD OF REYKJAVIK TRY . . . BERGEN,
BERGEN, NORWAY
NORWAY
BERGEN TOURIST BOARD
M
ore than 2 million tourists went to Iceland in search of waterfalls, geysers and, allegedly, fermented shark in 2017. That’s quite
an influx for a country with a population under 340,000. Instead of adding to the growing ranks of Reykjavik, try Bergen. The
Norwegian seaside city of 280,000 is a true jewel. It’s a rainy jewel, but a jewel nonetheless. Norway has become a foodie’s
delight with its new Nordic cuisine scene (try Lysverket for an adventurous taste). There are essential things to see in the city, such as
the Floibanen funicular and Bryggen, a row of gabled wooden buildings along the harbor that you’ll spot on most postcards of Bergen.
But much like Reykjavik, Bergen is an ideal jumping off point for exploring nearby nature. You can take a three-hour fjord cruise from
Bergen to Mostraumen, book a tour to Hardanger Fjord, or take the Bergen Line train to explore the mountainous countryside.
INSTEAD OF PARIS TRY . . .
BORDEAUX
T
CHRISTOPHER MUTHER/GLOBE STAFF
INSTEAD OF WELLFLEET TRY . . . GROTON, Conn.
C
ape Cod is lovely. It’s our default summer
playground. But the bottleneck traffic is about
as calming as tax day. Stay with me here
because this may sound slightly crazy, but instead
of heading to the bloated, shark-happy Cape, try
costal Connecticut. The drive from Boston to
Groton is the same as Boston to Wellfleet (in ideal
conditions), but Groton is less congested than the
Cape. Long Island Sound lacks the waves of Cape
beaches, however the water is less biting and the
calmer sea makes it a bit more family friendly.
Because every New England summer vacation
needs rainy day contingencies, the village of Mystic
(technically part of Groton and Stonington) offers
an aquarium, Olde Mistick Village, the Mystic
Seaport Museum, and a pizzeria where a young
Julia Roberts once donned an apron.
MUTHER, Page M4
ourism to Paris dipped after the
November 2015 terrorist attack on the
city. An attack in Nice the following year
didn’t help. But the marketing effort to bring
tourists back to Paris proved a bit too
successful. If the climb in tourists continues,
officials fear they may have to start limiting
access to key attractions. Instead of Paris,
consider Bordeaux. A 2½-hour train ride from
Paris brings you directly to the historic city. It
doesn’t have an Eiffel Tower, but it has an
impressive wine museum that has three stateof-the-art tasting rooms and a store that sells
more than 800 varieties. Best museum gift
shop ever? I’ll say yes. Additionally, there’s a
lively and expansive food scene where chefs
play with local ingredients. You can stay close
to the main monuments, such as Pey-Berland
Tower and Saint-André Cathedral, or day trip
out to the vineyards. There’s no Mona Lisa to
crowd around or Champs-Élysées to stroll, but
Bordeaux has top-notch art museums and a
very large shopping district. On a warm night,
walk along the river or spend time people
watching at Place de la Bourse with a delicious
Bordeaux Canelé cake or two. It’s a good
reminder that Paris isn’t the only city in
France.
M2
Travel
B o s t o n
S u n d a y
G l o b e
JA N UA RY 6 , 2 0 1 9
The Concierge
TIPS FOR TOURING HERE AND ABROAD
NEW LIFE FOR A LANDMARK
PHOTOS BY CHRISTOPHER STICKY
The Belleview Inn (below) features the restored lobby of the landmark Belleview Biltmore Hotel. Above: a guest room at the inn.
By Diane Daniel | Globe correspondent
BELLEAIR, Fla. — While the 35-room Belleview Inn, a
new boutique hotel near Clearwater, is relatively small, its
existence signifies a monumental undertaking.
The inn, now serving as the focal point of Belleview
Place, a gated housing community, is what remains of the
landmark Belleview
Biltmore Hotel. Built in
1897, the 145-room hotel was famous for being a vacation spot for
celebrities, athletes, industrial tycoons, and
US presidents. It was
originally built by businessman Henry Plant,
and later run by his
son, Morton.
After it closed in
2009, the Belleview’s future looked bleak. But developer
Mike Cheezam of JMC Communities decided to preserve its
legacy by saving and restoring the elegant lobby — some
38,000 square feet of the original 820,000-square-foot structure.
The restoration began in late 2016, when the original
lobby building was repositioned — lifted onto rollers, rotated approximately 270 degrees, and moved about 100 yards.
Workers restored the original grand staircase, hardwood
floors, fireplaces, guest room doors, and Tiffany stained
glass — all kept intact from the original building. A nice feature in the new lobby is Mort’s Reading Room, a history
room with displays and information about the Belleview
Hotel legacy, as well as a short video about the restoration
process.
Of course the hotel has been retrofitted with the usual
modern-day amenities, along with a resort-style pool, veranda, and fitness center. Guests of Belleview Inn also will have
access to the nearby Belleview Country Club. As the oldest
course in Florida, it first opened in 1897 and was redesigned
by Donald J. Ross in 1915. Both the inn and country club
are housed within Belleview Place, about a 10-minute drive
from Clearwater Beach.
25 Belleview Blvd., Belleair, 727-441-1774, www.thebelleviewinn.com, rooms from $179.
Diane Daniel can be reached at diane@bydianedaniel.com.
The Belleview Inn’s Tiffany Room.
HERE
EVERYWHERE
HYANNIS DISPLAYS STUDENT ART
Visit Barnstable Town Hall and see
artwork that offers views of Cape Cod’s
Sandy Neck area through the eyes of
local students or reflects their own
personal interests. Works created by
Barnstable High School students will
be on display in Barnstable Town
Hall in Hyannis Jan. 9-Feb. 28. “Infinite Worlds Within This World” features works inspired from a trip to
the Sandy Neck House, a nature camp
in the maritime forest overlooking
the Barnstable Great Marsh. It includes photo collage, mixed-media
painting, acrylic painting, printmaking, and sculpture. Other students create a series of works, called “Individual Concentration,” that help them
each develop their own voice in art.
Free admission. 508-862-4767,
www.artsbarnstable.com
AN EASY WAY TO DO LAUNDRY
Packing light means less stress over
luggage restrictions and fees, and fewer pounds to tote around on your adventures, but it does require creative
packing solutions. Whether you’re hiking into the wilderness or heading to
Europe on a whirlwind adventure,
consider bringing Laundreez, a lightweight (11-ounce) bag with a mesh
lining for washing clothes while on the
go. The sturdy, reusable bag has a
wide opening at the top that lets you
easily load clothes. Then fold over and
buckle the top, just like you would a
dry bag, and add detergent and water
through a wide-mouth opening on the
side. Screw on the cap and start shaking. Then drain and rinse your clothes
and hang them to dry. Laundreez can
double as a dry bag, a waterproof
beach tote, or even a water storage
system. $24.99 with free shipping
through Amazon.com. laundreez.com
GOOD CRAIC AT BOSTON CELTIC FEST
See renowned fiddlers Liz Carroll and
Kevin Henderson, and dozens of talented groups and musicians at Passim’s Boston Celtic Music Festival, Jan.
17-20. The festival, known as BCMFest, features music and dancing from
Irish, Scottish, Cape Breton, and other
Celtic communities at three Harvard
Square venues. The concerts highlight
the different sounds and styles found
in Boston’s Celtic music community
and beyond. Don’t miss the Boston Urban Ceilidh Jan. 18 at the Atrium,
where you can join in Celtic dancing
(no experience necessary) and enjoy
live music. Club Passim and the Sinclair offer more than 12 hours of Celtic
music Jan. 19, including performanc-
Katie McNally and Lilly Pearlman perform
during Passim’s Boston Celtic Music Festival.
MICHAEL MCNALLY
es by Carroll and Henderson during
the BCMFest Nightcap at the Sinclair.
Carroll and Henderson also offer fiddle workshops at the Passim School of
Music Jan. 20. Tickets $10-$25, depending on event. www.passim.org/
bcmfest
THERE
REI BRANCHES OUT
REI Co-op has expanded its gear rental program, enabling you to rent the
latest snowshoes at 70 REI stores
across the country this winter. The coop now provides snowshoes for kids
and adults — rentals are available in
Hingham, Reading, and Framingham
locally — and plans to offer other types
of outdoor gear in the future. This
means you can try out the latest equipment, see what works for you, and
dabble in a new sport without having
to purchase equipment. The company
plans to open New Hampshire’s first
REI Co-op in North Conway in September. REI North Conway will be the
co-op’s first-ever outdoor experience
center, offering gear rentals, high-end
equipment demos, workshops, classes,
and guided outdoor experiences in the
White Mountains. 800-426-4840,
www.rei.com/stores/rentals.html
VIENNA SIGHTSEEING PASS AND APP
Download the new Vienna PASS sightseeing card and you can access more
than 60 of the city’s most popular
tours, attractions, and museums using
your smartphone. Purchase the Vienna PASS online and then download
the free Vienna Guide app, which
works with Apple and Android devices, and lets you download the mobile
pass. Scan your app’s barcode to gain
entry to some of the city’s top attractions, such as the Schönbrunn Zoo,
Leopold Museum, and Spanish
Riding School. You can even skip
the lines at certain popular attractions, including the Imperial
Treasury and the Vienna Giant
Ferris Wheel. The app also
serves as a digital guidebook, offering city maps, handy travel
info, and details on Vienna PASS
attractions — all available without an Internet connection once
you have downloaded it. Available for one, two, three, or six
days; prices start at $67 adults,
$34 ages 6-18. www.viennapass.com
ENDLESS FUN FOR LITTLE TRAVELERS
Keep kids entertained on your travels
with Valtech’s Magna-Tiles, sturdy
plastic shapes with magnets inside
that enable the pieces to stick together
in an endless number of creative ways.
The new 19-piece Magna-Qubix set
comes with three-dimensional cubes,
prisms, and pyramids that measure
just 1-by-1-inch and can tuck into a 1quart travel bag for easy transport.
They’re perfect for building on an airline tray table, at a restaurant, or on a
lap tray in the car seat. The MagnaTiles Clear Colors 48-Piece Deluxe Set
offers a much more extensive variety
of larger shapes, including squares,
triangles, a wheeled chassis, an arch,
and a hinged door, all measuring
about 3 inches. These magnetic pieces
captivate all ages (they’re safe for ages
3 and older), and help foster STEM development through play, helping children boost math, science, and spatial
skills in a fun and imaginative way.
$19.99-$74.50. www.magnatiles.com.
KARI BODNARCHUK
B o s t o n
JA N UA RY 6 , 2 0 1 9
By Sena Desai Gopal
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
NAOSHIMA AND TESHIMA, Japan — It takes a taxi, five
train changes, and a ferry. Only
in Japan, where things run like
clockwork, could this journey
take less than a day. We have
traveled 400 miles — about the
distance from Boston to Washington, D.C. — from the town of
Izunokuni, near Mt. Fujiyama,
to Naoshima, one of a cluster of
islands in the Seto Inland Sea.
Naoshima is one of three
“art islands” in the Seto Sea (the
other two are Teshima and Inujima), housing contemporary
art in museums and outdoors.
We are spending one night on
Naoshima and two on Teshima,
where quirky art and breathtaking scenery greet the few visitors who venture there.
Until the 1990s, these were
rural islands with dwindling
populations because young
people born here moved to the
cities. Then everything changed
when Japan-based Benesse
Holdings, which owns Berlitz
Language Schools, led the rejuvenation. The company houses
its growing art collection here.
Today Naoshima is mecca for
art lovers, who can see works
inside a modern museum and
other buildings, and grand
sculptures scattered over the islands.
From the ferry to Naoshima,
we spot a 13-foot-tall, hollow
red pumpkin on the pier, a creation of pumpkin-obsessed artist Yayoi Kusama. Our children,
10 and 12, run into the pumpkin to peep through the holes
on its surface. A few hundred
yards away is Japanese architect Sou Fujimoto’s “Naoshima
Pavilion,” a geometric structure
made from a net of 250 steel
rods. The children, pretending
they are trapped inside, have to
be coaxed onto the bus to the
hotel.
We drive south to Benesse
House Museum, where we are
staying in one of the six rooms
at the “Oval,” atop a hill reachable only by monorail from the
museum. Floor-to-ceiling windows in our room offer a stunning, panoramic view of the
ocean. We are headed to the
museum for a 10-course kaiseki, a traditional multicourse
meal.
The next morning, taking
the monorail down, we notice
art installations on a secluded
part of the beach, past a wooded area, The island’s brochure
calls them “Shipyard Works,” by
renowned artist Shinro Ohtake.
One, aptly named “Stern With a
Hole,” is shaped like a ship’s
stern and looks like a mesh
with its numerous holes. The
other, “Cut Bow,” is embedded
in the sand like a giant sea shell.
Further up the slope, against
a clear blue sky is “ Three
Squares Vertical Diagonal” —
large metal squares perched on
their corners. The late American kinetic sculptor George
Rickey created these; the
squares move with the slightest
air disturbance, so observers
S u n d a y
G l o b e
Travel
Japan’s art islands: hard to
get to, hard to forget
PHOTOS BY SENA DESAI GOPAL FOR THE BOSTON GLOBE
“Three Squares Vertical
Diagonal” by George Rickey
and Llobet & Pons’ “No One
Wins — Multibasket.”
can experience time’s flow.
The day is perfect for exploring this 5½-square-mile island
— crisp air and not a cloud in
the sky. Armed with the map we
walk to the “Park Area,” where
self-taught Japanese architect
Tadao Ando has designed a
wooden building where tourists
can stay. Scattered in the lawn
in front are colorful artworks
with animal and human motifs
and a little further, another
Kusama pumpkin. This one is
yellow, at the end of the concrete jetty; the mountain ranges
on neighboring Shikoku tower
on the far shore.
After the walking tour, we
pack up to catch the ferry to
Teshima, and pass “Drink a Cup
of Tea,” a Japanese-style blue
metal cup perched on a stone
platform. Artist Kazuo Katase
drew inspiration for this work
after watching a Buddhist Zen
ritual with teacups to evoke
truth-seeking spirits.
Close to the museum is
“Seen/Unseen Known/Unknown,” by the late American
artist Walter de Maria, who
used light for creating intense
psychic experiences. Two granite balls and gold bars are
housed within a concrete structure creating different shadows
as you move, emphasizing the
existence of light. The bars disappear when you stand between the spheres and when
you move a little, one sphere
disappears.
The ferry to Teshima is only
20 minutes, which makes us
wonder if we shouldn’t have
spent another night on Naoshima and done a Teshima day
trip. But we have made the
right decision. We fall in love
with the 5.6-square-mile Teshima island with its terraced rice
fields tucked in forested mountains. Less than 1,000 people
live here in three fishing villages — Ieuraoka, Karato, and
Kou.
There are few tourists and
accommodations are limited.
We had booked a newly-opened
Airbnb in Ieuraoka for two
nights and the owner, Keiko Tada, was waiting at the ferry to
drive us to the house. Tada, an
Emerson College graduate,
gives us tips on how to navigate
the island. She takes us to a renovated traditional Japanese
house on a quiet street.
We explore Ieuraoka in the
calm afternoon silence. Our
first stop is “Needle Factory,” a
closed sewing needle factory
housing a 17-meter hull that lay
neglected for 30 years until
Ohtake, the artist whose work
we had seen on Naoshima, rescued and installed it in the factory. Ohtake combined two
abandoned entities, each carrying its own memories, in a common space.
The only way to get around
Teshima is by foot, on rental bicycles, or on a madly-decorated
“Beautiful Island Bus,” that circles the island all day long. We
take the bus to Karato, where
most of the art is housed; the
ride is several miles on steep,
windy mountain roads.
The bus drops us off by the
ocean, east of Karato, near “Les
Archives du Coeur,” a squat
building that houses heartbeats
of people around the world. In
the “Heart Room,” lights get
brighter and dimmer in sync
with recorded heartbeats. You
can record your own in another
room or listen to the heartbeats
of others in a third room. It is at
once unique and morbid and I
am happy stepping out to enjoy
the view of the ocean.
The sun is going down and
we hop on a bus back to our
house. Near the bus stop we see
six basketball hoops mounted
on a board: another installation, called “No One Wins —
Multibasket.” The children grab
a basketball each and begin
throwing them through the
hoops. Soon, other tourists join
in and the purpose of the art is
revealed — the human ability to
enjoy something with strangers.
Early the next day we explore the charming village of
Karato with its windy streets
and quaint houses. Around a
corner is a breathtaking view of
rice fields disappearing into the
blue ocean. Opposite is a Shinto
shrine with a water tank over
which are several circular iron
hoops. Yes, another art installation, “Particles in the Air,”
where the hoops represent
dancing air particles.
Teshima’s tallest mountain,
Dan Yama, rises from the island’s center and houses “La
Foret de Murmures,” or the
“Whispering Forest.” To get
there, we walk halfway up the
1,100-foot mountain on a dirt
path. In the forest 400 wind
chimes tinkle, creating a different melody every second. Strips
of transparent paper on the
chimes have names of the loved
ones of visitors.
On the way down we stop at
a small eatery hidden behind a
tree thicket. At Shokudoi 101,
lunch is satisfying: bowls of hot
miso soup, rice, steamed vegetables, and tofu seasoned with
togarashi, a Japanese spice
blend. We grab dessert at “Lemon Hotel,” an art installation
doubling as a hotel (only one
double room; reservations have
to be made well in advance).
The hotel is a traditional Japanese home surrounded by fragrant lemon groves. A veranda
of lemon-scented silk sheets billow in the breeze. You can wrap
yourself in the sheets and the
fragrance is divine.
We walk through a bath area
with a tub filled with lemonscented water, into a hallway
with a lemon-yellow phone,
and end up in a tatami room
with fabric dyed in lemon. At
the hotel restaurant, the menu
is all lemon scented — scones,
lemonade, and lemon beer.
Our last stop is the Teshima
Art Museum, a simple, white
concrete shell tucked in verdant
rice fields. The shape represents a water drop and two
large openings in the semicircular ceiling let in all the elements. We sit on the concrete
floor, through which water
drops spring out. It is calming
watching a drop emerge from
the ground and follow a path
determined by how the elements are interacting at that
moment. Signs ask for complete silence but they are unnecessary — the place inspires
quiet and even the children sit
still for half an hour. It is the
end of our trip to these islands
and before we return to the real
world, we have a moment to
think about the grandeur here.
Sena Desai Gopal
can be reached at
sena_desai@yahoo.com
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M3
PREPARE
FOR ARRIVAL
PA R A D I S E I S A S H O R T F L I G H T AWAY
Palm Beach’s best is even more enticing. Our private
beachfront, world-class amenities, gracious service,
and unparalleled seaside glamour will make your stay
unforgettable. We invite you to explore all this iconic
resort has to offer, including the completely renovated
Ocean Course, the ultra-luxurious Flagler Club—
a boutique hotel atop The Breakers, and so much
more. Once you stay, you’ll understand®
Visit thebreakers.com, call 877-882-2937
or consult your travel professional.
Travel
M4
B o s t o n
S u n d a y
G l o b e
JA N UA RY 6 , 2 0 1 9
INSTEAD OF SANTORINI TRY . . .
NAXOS,
NAXOS, GREECE
GREECE
Some new
destinations
for a new year
uMUTHER
Continued from Page M1
W
hen vacationers start plotting trips to Greece, a familiar
pattern emerges. The journey begins with a few days in
Athens, followed by a ferry to the islands. But it’s important to remember that there are islands that exist outside of Santorini and Mykonos. Naxos is the largest island in the Cyclades. It
has mountains, green gorges, and, most importantly, stunning
beaches with perfect sand and clear azure water. Rent a tiny car
and drive the narrow roads (if you’re brave) and you’ll see traditional villages in the hills. This is one of the best-kept secrets in
Greece and I’m slightly reticent to share. There are historic sites
such as the Apollo Temple, plus an old town and port where you
can stroll by mom and pop restaurants displaying the day’s fresh
catch of octopus and squid. It is a magical and criminally undervisited island.
INSTEAD OF VENICE TRY . . .
TIGRE,
TIGRE, BUENOS
BUENOS AIRES
AIRES
V
enice has become the unfortunate and heartbreaking poster
child for overtourism. Photos
of cruise ships ominously looming
over the city are downright chilling.
Nearly 30 million visit the city every
year. So let’s all agree to give poor
Venice a break. Pinky swear this to
me, and listen to a few alternatives.
There are other cities in the world
veined with canals and brimming
with elaborate architecture (Bruges,
Annecy, Fenghuang, Saint Petersburg), but I’m partial to Buenos Aires. Tigre is a town less than an
hour north of Buenos Aires with
shops, Belle Époque mansions, museums, and, yes, lots of canals and
rivers. Sit outside and dine riverside, take a water taxi and explore,
kayak, or go to a posh spa. The area
is a popular weekend escape for Argentines, but it’s so massive that
you’ll have plenty of room to
breathe and enjoy yourself.
YO R K B E AC H
2 0 7. 3 6 3 . 51 1 2
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38
VISIT GREENVILLE
INSTEAD OF CHARLESTON TRY . . . GREENVILLE, S.C.
C
harleston may not be clogged with tourists like Reykjavik or Paris, but I’m looking for an excuse to get Greenville
on this list, so for our purposes we’ll call Charleston the Paris of South Carolina and move forward. Greenville, a
city of 70,000, has culture, nature, and barbecue. I’d call that a triple threat. For those who get homesick for Boston, you can visit Fluor Field, which is modeled after Fenway Park. Fluor even has its own version of the Green Monster. Fans sing Neil Diamond’s “Sweet Caroline” in the middle of the eighth inning (just so you know, the team is called
the Greenville Drive, not the Green Sox). For a petite city, Greenville has a flourishing culinary scene. People magazine
named Greenville one of the 10 hottest foodie cities in the country, with 30 new restaurants opening in 2017. It
ranked number three on National Geographic’s Best Cities in the United States. It has a charming downtown with
great indie stores, plus enough coffee shops to keep you sufficiently fueled during your adventures.
Christopher Muther can be reached at muther@globe.com. Follow him on Twitter @Chris_Muther and on Instagram
@Chris_Muther.
B o s t o n
JA N UA RY 6 , 2 0 1 9
S u n d a y
G l o b e
Travel
M5
New England Travel
PHOTOS BY PAMELA WRIGHT FOR THE BOSTON GLOBE
Five reasons to visit Grafton this winter
Southern Vermont beauty is considered one of the prettiest towns in New England
By Diane Bair and Pamela Wright
‘I
The town may
be best known
as the home of
Grafton Village
Cheese
Company.
GLOBE CORRESPONDENTS
t’s as if we’ve stepped into a ‘White
Christmas’ movie scene,” Chuck
Ward, our traveling companion, said.
“We’ve landed in Pine Tree, and I
swear I just saw Bing Crosby.” Earlier,
he was complaining about winter in
New England, bemoaning the freezing temps, the icy roads, the dirty snow. Now, he
was suggesting we bundle up for a sleigh ride, or
perhaps take a stroll around
town.
We were in Grafton, Vt., a
throwback village with overthe-river-and-through-thewoods charm. Snowflakes
fluttered in lantern-lit light;
evergreens and twinkling
white lights adorned pretty
village homes. There was a
white-steepled church, a
s n o w - b an ke d b a b b l i n g
brook, open fields and
mountains in the distance.
We’d been here in the summer when it’s busy and bright and beautiful, but
think this southern Vermont beauty, considered
one of the prettiest towns in New England, is best
in winter. Here’s why.
Hygge abounds
The slow-paced village is a great place to
sit back, relax, and enjoy the simpler things in
life. Stop by the family-owned Grafton MKT,
overlooking Grafton Common (www.mktgrafton.com), to pick up local products and enjoy a steaming cup of gourmet coffee and homemade cookies. Visit the Grafton Public Library
(www.graftonpubliclibrary.org), located in the elegant 19th-century Butterfield House on Main
Street, to read current magazines, peruse the local, daily Brattleboro Reformer newspaper, and
pick up a new book to read. “It’s the kind of place
that even new visitors to town can stop in and
borrow a book,” says Edward Bank, a longtime
resident and owner of the Gallery North Star located in town. Then, check into the rambling,
historic Grafton Inn (www.graftoninnvermont.com). Established in 1801, it’s one of the
oldest operating inns in the country. Two cozy living rooms have wood-burning fireplaces, and
comfy chairs. Have a drink and dinner in the intimate, wood-paneled Pine Room Tavern, next to a
warm, slow-burning log fire, before settling into
your room, under soft, luxe linens. That’s how to
get your hygge on.
The Mercantile
offers a nice
selection of
high-end
gifts and
accessories.
The great outdoors beckons
Take yourself away from those warm fires and
cozy reading areas for at least a few hours to play
outdoors at the Grafton Trails & Outdoors Center
(www.graftoninnvermont.com/grafton-trails).
More than 2,000 acres of fields and forests are
crisscrossed with 45 kilometers of cross country
and snowshoeing trails that cross bridges, skirt
an icy stream, and circle the historic village.
There’s classic and skate skiing on 15 kilometers
GRAFTON, Page M6
THE VIP LOUNGE | NOAH WEISBERG
All the world’s a stage, but Chicago is home
When he was 12, Noah Weisberg
played Grandpa Joe in a local children’s production of “Charlie and the
Chocolate Factory.” The Northbrook,
Ill., native went on to appear in numerous screen and stage productions,
including four Broadway shows, and
is now back in “Charlie and the Chocolate Factory” — only this time as Willy
Wonka in the national tour, which will
be at the Boston Opera House Jan. 820. “I really love this show and its
message,” Weisberg said in a recent
phone interview from Toronto, where
the show was being performed. “I just
love the character of Charlie, who is at
heart so innocent and has the purest
of intentions. This message — that
honesty wins, that selflessness wins,
that kindness wins, that truthfulness
wins — is a message that needs to be
heard especially now, at this time in
our country . . . but at anytime, really.”
We caught up with Weisberg, who
lives in New York City and Los Angeles, to talk about all things travel.
Favorite vacation destination? Working and living in LA means that my favorite vacation spot is my family
hometown of Chicago. Visiting my
hometown and my family and friends
and favorite restaurants feels like a
true vacation every time.
Favorite food or drink while vacation­
ing? There are three restaurants that I
always visit every time I come to Chicago: Barnaby’s of Northbrook (for
pizza), Buffalo Joe’s in Evanston (for
wings), and Walker Bros., a pancake
house. In my opinion, these are the
best of the best nationwide within
their respective categories. Plus, going
to these places reminds me of my
childhood.
Where would you like to travel to but
haven’t? I’d like to travel to the year
1918 to see what Chicago looked like
then, to be able to stand on the same
ground where future buildings will
stand.
One item you can’t leave home with­
out when traveling? My pillow. Whenever I travel I bring a full-size pillow
with me. Am I 8 years old? Um, yes!
Aisle or window? Window. Extra legroom. Front of the plane. This way I
can take my pillow, lean against the
wall, and get some sleep — and so I
can disturb the person next to me
when I have to use the bathroom 14
times. Oh, and Jet Blue whenever possible.
Favorite childhood travel memory?
Going to Disney World with my mom
and a friend and her mom. We were in
junior high. It was such a great trip.
My friend and I had grown up together, and even though we were teenagers, we were suddenly kids again and
had so much fun. Also, my luggage
was lost, so I got to go shopping for all
new outfits.
Guilty pleasure when traveling?
When you’re in a new place, you have
to try out all of the local foods. It always seems like a good excuse to not
eat as well as we should. I mean, when
will I be back to this place? I just gotta
eat this and try that. And by this and
that, I mean everything!
Best travel tip? Say yes to going on
the trip. There’s always a reason not
to go. We’re always busy with work
or can find an excuse not to take the
trip. And I’ve certainly made these excuses, but every time I go, I’m happy
I did.
JULIET PENNINGTON
M6
Travel
B o s t o n
S u n d a y
G l o b e
Grafton’s at its
best in winter
uGRAFTON
Continued from Page M5
of groomed trails, with 5 kilometers of snowmaking capabilities, and 20 kilometers of
snowshoe trails. There’s also a
maintained fat bike trail network, tubing hill, and sleigh
rides. Equipment rentals and
lessons are also available, and
Saturday afternoon wine and
cheese hikes are held throughout the season.
There’s shopping
Located in a restored 1877
house, the Gallery North Star is
considered one of Vermont’s
premier art galleries (www.gnsgrafton.com). There are six display rooms showcasing some of
New England’s finest and most
established artists, working in a
variety of mediums. Stop in;
owners Edward and Kim Bank
are ultra-friendly and eager to
share their love and knowledge
of Vermont, and hometown
Grafton. If the open flag is flying, take a look in the Jud Hartmann Gallery, featuring western art, including a series of
bronze sculptures of Native
Americans called “The Woodland Tribes of the Northeast —
The Iroquoian and Algonkians.”
The artist spends fall and winter in Grafton, and is open by
chance or appointment, until
Memorial Day. The Mercantile
(www.facebook.com/MercantileGrafton) offers a nice selection of high-end gifts and accessories, including several Vermont-made items, like Simon
Pearce glass and Laura Zindel
pottery. Dover House Antiques
is located in the same historic
building, featuring period
American country furniture
and art.
And quaint
museums
Kids will love the Nature
Museum (www.nature-museum.org), a favorite with local
families. The small space
packs a lot in, with a slew of
hands-on exhibits and programs designed to teach little
ones all about Vermont plants
and wildlife. Pet (gently) the
mounted bobcat when you
walk in the door; watch bees
buzzing in the beehive, and
have the kids dress up as their
favorite animal. There’s also a
variety of guided programs, including outdoor animal tracking and nature walks. Watch as
a blacksmith hammers and
forges traditional wrought iron
products at Small Town Forge
(www.smalltownforge.com), located in the historic circa 1870
town blacksmith shop. The
Turner Hill Interpretive Center,
a stop along Vermont’s African
A m e r i c a n H e r i t a g e Tr a i l
(www.turnerhillgrafton.org),
tells the story of escaped slave
Alec Turner and his family, who
settled in Grafton. Turner built
Journey’s End Farm, now the
595-acre Turner Hill Wildlife
Management Area. You’ll need
to call for an appointment to
visit the Vermont Museum of
Mining & Minerals in winter
(www.vtm3.org), but if you’re a
rockhound, make the call. The
tiny museum has an impressive
collection of gems, minerals,
and rocks from around the
world, including one of the
world’s largest ammonites and
a miniature village made of Vermont marble, granite, and
slate.
TRAVEL TROUBLESHOOTER | CHRISTOPHER ELLIOTT
Great Value Vacations
trip wasn’t so great
Q.
PHOTOS BY PAMELA WRIGHT FOR THE BOSTON GLOBE
It’s cheese­y
The town may be best
known as the home of Grafton
V i l l a g e C h e e s e C o m p a n y,
founded in 1892 by a co-op of
Ve r m o n t d a i r y f a r m e r s
( w w w. g r a f t o n v i l l a g e
cheese.com). The nonprofit
Windham Foundation, which
works to preserve Vermont’s rural life (and also owns several
historic buildings and properties in Grafton, including the
Grafton Inn and Grafton Trails
JA N UA RY 6 , 2 0 1 9
The Nature Museum is a
favorite with local families.
Grafton MKT offers local
products and gourmet
coffee.
& Outdoor Center) restored the
company in the mid-1960s. You
can watch as they produce their
award-winning cheeses, and
purchase some to take home at
the Grafton MKT.
S n o w i n g o u t s i d e? It ’s a
white Christmas in Pine Tree!
You might as well stay another
day, and take that sleigh ride.
Diane Bair and Pamela
Wright can be reached at
bairwright@gmail.com.
My travel companion and I
bought two Groupons for the Greek
Highlights: Athens, Mykonos &
Santorini Upgrade. We purchased an additional two
nights, airfare from St. Louis,
and insurance with Great Value
Vacations. Then my companion
broke her hip and had surgery.
She couldn’t make the trip, and
canceled nearly two months before our scheduled departure.
That gave her tour operator
plenty of time to fill her reservation with another traveler.
We have several issues.
First, it took four phone calls
before Great Value Vacations
canceled her reservation and
provided us with a credit. The
trip cost $2,400 per person, yet
even with the travel protection,
Great Value Vacations would
credit only $1,037, claiming the
difference was for the “shared”
services. We shared only a hotel. But why have insurance if
they’re going to ding you for it?
Great Value Vacations would
not allow me to find a different
travel partner who also would
pay for the trip to utilize the
“shared” service. That way, my
travel companion could get her
full refund, less her insurance
premium. I found out that the
only way to get a full credit less
the premium was if we both
canceled, which we ultimately
did.
I feel I should have been
able to continue with the trip at
no additional cost to me or my
companion. The idea that the
shared portion of the hotel cost
Great Value Vacations $1,200 is
absurd. Can you help me?
LINETTE WARNECKE,
Troy, Ill.
A.
If you had travel
protection, you
should have been
covered for a cancellation. At
least that’s what the average
traveler would assume. But you
had an itinerary with lots of
moving parts, including the
Groupon component and the
Great Value Vacations package
with air, hotel, and insurance.
Great Value Vacations is just
taking the components of your
vacation and bundling them into a package. It still must follow
the individual rules of each
company. So, for example, if
the hotel has set a cancellation
restriction, then Great Value
Vacations must follow it, too. If
an airline doesn’t allow name
changes, then neither does
Great Value Vacations.
The question is: When does
your travel protection policy
kick in? When one person in a
reservation cancels, and that
person has the trip protection,
he or she receives a credit for
all nonshared services. But
when you ran the numbers on
the individual components of
your vacation, you concluded
that Great Value Vacations was
keeping more of your money
than it should have. The company also failed to explain its
math and never bothered to tell
you why trip protection didn’t
cover the losses.
Your travel protection plan,
the terms of which are disclosed on your carrier’s site,
comes with a ton of restrictions. You can cancel for any
reason, but you will receive a
credit only for future travel
equal to the full amount of all
payments made, less any protection costs and fees. Name
changes also are prohibited.
If you’d read these restrictions before your purchase,
would you have changed your
mind? You say you would have.
But the average person
wouldn’t care. No one thinks
they’re going to file a travel protection claim.
I contacted the company on
your behalf, and it cut you and
your travel companion a check
for the full amount you were
due under your travel protection policy.
Christopher Elliott can be
reached at chris@elliott.org.
Exclusive
vacation deals
at
January 18–20, 2019
Seaport World Trade Center
Traveling does a world of good.
Enjoy vacation deals, cultural performances,
and events for the whole family.
Buy Tickets:
BostonGlobeTravelShow.com
Sponsors
SundayArts
N
B O S T O N S U NDAY GL OB E JAN UA RY 6 , 2 01 9 | B O S T O N G L O B E .C O M /A RT S
MUSIC
That sound you hear is 2019
These are the artists who’ll be making some noise in the year ahead
B Y G L O B E COR R ES P O N DE N T S
We’ve put away our year-end best-of lists and finally said goodbye to 2018. After
all that looking back, it’s time to look ahead, to the artists — some old, some new-ish,
some right on the verge of breaking out — whose praises we’ll be singing in 2019.
Here are 15 who Globe music critics are especially excited about.
NEW ARTISTS, N6
PHOTO ILLUSTRATION/PHOTOS FROM GLOBE SERVICES
Ty Burr
MUSIC & ART
Louis C.K.:
This is funny?
Yeah, it’s just comedy.
Unfunny comedy. Sour grapes comedy, bitter and self-pitying. Banal routines about visiting the doctor and rude
teenage daughters mixed up with shockjock tactics like harshing on the Parkland kids and punching down on trans
people.
Yes, Louis C.K. is back on the comedy-club hustings, and we’re supposed to let him know all
is forgiven. Is it out of line to point out that his routines
are getting meaner, angrier, more shrill? That “speaking
the unspeakable” sometimes translates into catering to
the worst impulses and most reactionary portions of
your audience?
Some can forgive C.K. — some already have. In the 48minute audiotape of an unannounced Dec. 16 gig at a
club in Levittown, N.Y., that surfaced on YouTube last
Sunday. The audience roars with laughter at the disgraced comedian’s observations and one-liners, some of
which land and a lot of which don’t. You had to be there,
I guess. You certainly can’t hear the people who aren’t
laughing, You can definitely hear the guy sitting in the
audience near the microphone who howls in delight at
most of the jokes, especially the ones that dump on women. It’s not a good look.
It’s been a little over a year since the career of Louis
C.K. seemingly vanished overnight after revelations that
he had habitually masturbated in front of unwilling or
clearly uncomfortable women. Stories about this misbehavior had been circulating in and outside comedy circles for years, but a New York Times story made it fully
public. Networks like FX and HBO and Netflix dropped
him in response; the release of C.K.’s film “I Love You,
Daddy,” was scrapped.
BURR, Page N5
Hank O’Neal’s ‘happenchance’
Author, photographer, record label owner
(CIA agent, too): It’s a wonderful life
By Mark Feeney
GLOBE STAFF
NEW YORK — Hank O’Neal may be the most interesting person you’ve never heard of.
Himself an accomplished photographer, O’Neal, 78, has been friends with
several of the foremost photographers of the 20th century: from Berenice Abbott (she was maid of honor at his wedding) to André Kertész and Robert
Frank.
For many years the owner of a jazz record label, Chiaroscuro, O’Neal has
been friends with an even more head-spinning array of people in the music
world: from Dizzy Gillespie to Dave Brubeck, to the music executives John
Hammond (they were business partners in the ’80s) and Ahmet Ertegun, to the
classical trumpeter and conductor Gerard Schwarz and the ballerina Allegra
Kent.
“Back in the ’70s, my primary interest
in life, besides making records and takHank O’Neal has reissued his
ing pictures, was chasing ballet dancers,”
1976 book, “A Vision Shared,”
about FSA photographers of
O’Neal says with a post-sheepish smile.
He’s sitting in his office, which has
the ’30s and early ’40s.
O'NEAL, Page N7
ANNIE TRITT FOR THE BOSTON GLOBE
Inside
MOVIES
FRANCO­AMERICAN
CREATIONS
‘The Upside’ is the latest example of
an American remake of a French
film. Mark Feeney looks at
10 pairings that stand out. | N9
BOOKS
TURNING POINT FOR
THE DEMOCRATS
‘Camelot’s End’ revisits the
battle between Jimmy Carter
and Ted Kennedy for the
1980 nomination | N12
B o s t o n
N2
S u n d a y
G l o b e
The Ticket
JA N UA RY 6 , 2 0 1 9
OUR CRITICS’ PICKS FOR THE UPCOMING WEEK
MUSIC
merging so completely into their
subjects’ tales as to almost vanish
completely. Stirring. Through
Jan. 21. Museum of
Fine Arts. 617-267-9300,
www.mfa.org
MURRAY WHYTE
Pop & Rock
NONAME Chicago-born storyteller Fatimah Warner’s 2018 album,
“Room 25,” was one of last year’s
hip-hop standouts, its sun-dappled backing tracks adding extra
warmth to her closely told sliceof-life tales. Jan. 10-11, 8 p.m.
$30 and up. Royale, Boston.
617-338-7699, www.royale
boston.com
EVENTS
Comedy
MYQ KAPLAN A smart comic
with a sweet tooth for puns, Kaplan has a new one-man show,
“All Killing Aside,” that gets its
Boston debut after a run at the
Edinburgh Festival Fringe in July.
It’s a contemplation of kindness
and preserving life, veering from
silly to spiritual. With special
guest J. Smitty. Jan. 6, 8 p.m.
$10. The Comedy Studio, 1 Bow
Market Way #23, Somerville.
617-661-6507, www.thecomedy
studio.com
TYLER CARTER The former vocalist of electro-metallers Issues
has plunged into downer pop
with his recent singles like
“Moonshine” and “Focus,” which
combine the spacious, swirling
beats of trap’n’b with impassioned, twangy vocals. (They’re
ripe to be remixed into next-generation country-radio hits, if anyone’s looking for a sequel to that
Florida Georgia Line/Bebe Rexha
smash.) Jan. 12, 6:30 p.m. $15.
Middle East Downstairs, Cambridge. 617-864-3278,
www.mideastoffers.com
BIG UPS These raucous Brooklyn
punkers head up a power-packed
Saturday night lineup that also
includes sludge-yowlers Kal
Marks and crunch-pop duo
Lilith. Jan. 12, 8:30 p.m. $14,
$12 advance. Great Scott, Allston.
617-566-0914, www.greatscott
boston.com
MAURA JOHNSTON
Folk & World
MILE TWELVE If you want proof
that this Boston-area bluegrass
band is on the rise, you need only
consider their 2017 award as Momentum Band of the Year from
the International Bluegrass Music Association. The quintet is doing a double shift Thursday
night, but if you want to see
them, you’ll have to hit the late
show; the early one is sold out.
Jan. 10, 9:30 p.m. $20. Club Passim, Cambridge. 617-492-7679,
www.passim.org
MATT HANNIGAN/PRATEEK/
THE COACH POTATOES A lineup at this Inman Square room
that taps three varieties of folk
music: acoustic, instrumental fingerstyle guitar from Matt Hannigan; music in the singer-songwriter vein from the uni-named
Prateek; and originals and covers
centered on two-part harmonies
from duo the Coach Potatoes.
Jan. 10, 7:30 p.m. $10. The Lilypad, Cambridge. 617-955-7729,
www.lilypadinman.com
STUART MUNRO
Jazz & Blues
THE GRAY SARGENT QUARTET
The acoustic swing guitar master
is a longtime rhythm player in
Tony Bennett’s band. For this gig
he’ll stretch out with tenor saxophonist Arnie Krakowsky, fellow
Bennett-backer bassist Marshall
Wood, and drummer Jim Gwin.
Jan. 8, 7:30 p.m. $10. Jocko’s
Jazz at the Sahara Club, 34 Bates
St., Methuen. 603-898-1591,
www.jockosjazz.com
JERRY BERGONZI QUINTET
Hosted by Mandorla Music and
Greater Ashmont Main Street,
the Dot Jazz Series kicks off its
latest season with world-class
tenor sax master, composer, and
educator Bergonzi, perhaps best
known for his stint in Dave
Brubeck’s Quartet. With trumpeter Phil Grenadier, keyboardist
Plamen Karadonev, bassist Greg
Loughman, and drummer Austin
McMahon. Jan. 10, 7:30 p.m.
$15. Peabody Hall, Parish of All
Saints, 209 Ashmont St., Dorchester. www.mandorlamusic.net
SETH ROSENBLUM The burning, Boston-based blues guitarist
and vocalist, who’s been called a
younger and rawer version of
Matt Schofield, celebrates his
first full-length release, the forthcoming “Keep on Turning.” With
special guests the Taylors: Sonya
Rae and Ryan. Jan. 12, 7 p.m.
$15-$19. The Burren, 247 Elm
St., Somerville. www.burren.com
KEVIN LOWENTHAL
Classical
BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHES­
TRA English conductor Andrew
Davis leads symphonies by John
Harbison and Ralph Vaughan
Williams, and Italian pianist
MATTHEW J. LEE/GLOBE STAFF
Two Mile Hollow
Prize-winning playwright Leah Nanako Winkler takes satirical aim at what she calls the “white people by the water’’ genre
of theater. In “Two Mile Hollow,’’ secrets spill out when the members of a privileged, dysfunctional white family —
portrayed by actors of color — gather together in order to divvy up their belongings after the clan’s waterfront mansion has
been sold. Directed by Danielle Fauteux Jacques. Pictured (from left): Jasmine Brooks, Paola Ferrer, Mauro Canepa, and
Armando Rivera during a dress rehearsal. Through Jan. 20. Apollinaire Theatre Company. At Chelsea TheatreWorks,
Chelsea. 617-887-2336, www.apollinairetheatre.com DON AUCOIN
Alessio Bax makes his BSO debut
with Mozart’s Piano Concerto No.
24. Symphony Hall. Jan. 10-12.
888-266-1200, www.bso.org
A FAR CRY For this concert,
“Legacy,” Jamaica Plain’s free-flying string orchestra welcomes
Curtis Institute of Music faculty
violinist Pamela Frank, the teacher of multiple players in the ensemble. Music by Mozart, Tchaikovsky, Vivaldi, and Haydn celebrates the bond between teacher
and student and pays a memorial
tribute to Frank’s teacher Shirley
Givens. Jordan Hall. Jan. 11,
8 p.m. 617-553-4887,
www.afarcry.org
FRESH INKLINGS At Inman
Square’s cozy the Lilypad, composer-performers Francine Trester (violin) and Eric Sawyer (piano) present their own duets and
song cycles, with soprano Kristen
Watson. The Lilypad, Cambridge.
Jan. 12, 7:30 p.m. www.lily
padinman.com
ZOË MADONNA
ARTS
Theater
Brodsky, Dawn Kramer, Rebecca
McGowan, and Aysha Upchurch
— explore themes ranging from
history and home to mortality
and searching for a sense of belonging. Jan. 12-26, $13-$26.
Dance Complex, Cambridge.
617-547-9363, www.dance
complex.org
SAND Now based in Boston, interdisciplinary artist Victoria
Lynn Awkward sets her four-person evening-length dance installation in art-filled galleries that
she hopes will bring the audience
more intimately into the experience. She says this iteration of the
work emphasizes diversity “. . . as
sand is made up of a multitude of
grains existing together, while
still upholding the integrity of individuality.” Jan. 11-12, $12-$28.
Abigail Ogilvy Gallery, 460 Harrison Ave., Boston. 508-315-9833,
www.victoriaawkward.com
AMIRAH SACKETT The Chicagobased Muslim B-girl brings her
distinctive style of breaking to the
Winter Yard. Best known for her
striking ensemble dance “We’re
Muslim, Don’t Panic,” Sackett explores her Muslim-American
identity through choreography
that infuses hip-hop movement
with traces of Islamic culture.
Jan. 12, 2 p.m. and 7 p.m.,
$5-$25. Martha’s Vineyard Performing Arts Center, Oak Bluffs.
598-645-9662, www.dancethe
yard.org
KAREN CAMPBELL
Galleries
WILDLIFE FASHION ART SAFA­
RI Peter Morgan and Adam Hinterlang began making animal designs in trendy tones for T-shirts
and purses in 2005. The business
never took off but the art did, as
the duo tumbled into a delirium
of color theory and clay, crafting
large tiled grids. Through Jan. 27.
3S Artspace, 319 Vaughn St.,
Portsmouth, N.H. 603-766-3330,
www.3sarts.org
KIM FALER: GIVE ME YOUR
ANXIETY Faler preserves little
tangled gestures we normally discard or take for granted — grapevines, the chicken scratch on
notes, lists, and Post-its — and
memorializes them in metal.
Paintings on steel, flocked iron
prints, and an electroplated
sculpture consider glory, erosion, and the mundane.
Through Feb. 5. LaMontagne
Gallery, 460 Harrison Ave.
617-487-3512, www.lamontagne
gallery.com
THE WOLVES Sarah DeLappe’s
drama about the interactions
among teenage girls on a suburban soccer team was a Pulitzer
Prize finalist in 2017 — all the
more impressive because it was
DeLappe’s debut play. Among
others, the cast includes Lydia
Barnett-Mulligan (known for her
work with Actors’ Shakespeare
Project), Sarah Elizabeth Bedard
(“Barbecue’’), and Laura Latreille
as a soccer mom. Directed by A.
Nora Long. Jan. 11-Feb. 3. Lyric
Stage Company of Boston. 617585-5678, www.lyricstage.com
WHAT ROUGH BEAST When an
ultra-conservative professor is invited to speak at a university, it
opens up fissures on the campus
that extend to a pair of brothers.
This play by Alice Abracen (“The
Tour’’) is directed by Lelaina Vogel. Jan. 12-19. Underlings Theatre Company. At Boston Playwrights’ Theatre. 866-811-4111,
web.ovationtix.com/trs/
pr/1003683
DON AUCOIN
Dance
CATALYSTS The Dance Complex
showcases the fruits of this rigorous eight-month residency program with a series of concerts beginning next weekend. The four
artists-in-residence — Ali Kenner
SLAVEN VLASIC/GETTY IMAGES
Caitlin Canty
The Vermont-born, Nashville-based singer-songwriter returns
to the area, presumably with a continued focus on her fine
2018 release, “Motel Bouquet,” and this time through she’ll
have the irrepressible Miss Tess and pedal steel man Rich
Hinman helping her make the music. Maine’s Oshima
Brothers open. Jan. 8, 8 p.m. $18-$25. City Winery, Boston.
617-933-8047, www.citywinery.com/boston
STUART MUNRO
MATERIAL LAMENTATIONS:
ART, GRIEF, AND THE LAND
We humans tend to set ourselves
apart from the natural world,
rather than see ourselves as intrinsic to it. Here, nine artists, including Michelle Lougee and Julie Poitras Santos, mourn the consequences of that estrangement,
and find hope. Through Feb. 2.
Kathryn Schultz Gallery, Cambridge Art Association, 25 Lowell
St., Cambridge. 617-876-0246,
www.cambridgeart.org
CATE McQUAID
Museums
KAY SAGE: SERENE SURREAL­
IST Surrealism, like virtually
eveything else of its era, was a
male-dominated affair, a sad fact
that, also like everything else,
surely weakened and narrowed
its output. That being the case,
this exhibition of Sage’s work offers a glimpse of what those
blinders left out. The show recreates the artist’s 1950 exhibition, with its Daliesque nightmarescapes, nearly in full (two of
its 14 original pieces were lost,
one in a fire, one by a collector),
which serves, it seems, as a nice
metaphor for the incomplete
history of which Sage is part.
Through Jan. 13. Williams College Museum of Art, 15 Lawrence
Hall Drive, Suite 2, Williamstown. 413–597–2429, wcma.
williams.edu/kay-sage-serenesurrealist/
NINE MOMENTS FOR NOW
An urgent call “to remember that
democracy, time and memory are
as poetic, unruly and fragile as
body and breath,” as curator Dell
Marie Hamilton wrote, this show
of mostly Boston-based artists
grappling with engrained, systemic racism hit the top 10 of the
year list at Hyperallergic.com,
and it should be on yours, too.
Smart and incisive but never pedantic or preachy, it’s exactly
what this fraught moment demands. Through Jan. 21. Ethelbert Cooper Gallery of African
and African American Art, Harvard University, 102 Mt. Auburn
St., Cambridge. 617-496-5777,
www.coopergalleryhc.org
LOVE STORY To tell the story of
six refugees fleeing persecution
from all parts of the globe, Candice Breitz chose Alec Baldwin
and Julianne Moore to serve as
Cyrano de Bergerac-style surrogates, banking that their celebrity
status would give greater pause
than six otherwise ordinary people suffering extraordinary trauma. Baldwin and Moore give the
performances of their lives, sub-
SAMUEL J. COMROE His material about living with Tourette syndrome made the Los Angeles native a finalist on “America’s Got
Talent” in 2018, but Comroe also
does a lot of observational material about dancing at parties,
marriage proposals, and rudeness. Jan. 10 at 8 p.m.; Jan. 11
at 7:30 p.m.; Jan. 12 at 5 p.m.,
7:30 p.m., and 9:45 p.m.; and
Jan. 13 at 8 p.m. $20-$25. Laugh
Boston, 425 Summer St., Boston.
617-725-2844, www.laugh
boston.com
FORTUNE FEIMSTER Down to
earth and effortlessly funny,
Feimster has been a regular in
projects from Chelsea Handler
and Mindy Kaling, including
playing Colette on “The Mindy
Project” and Sarah Huckabee
Sanders on “Chelsea.” Jan. 11,
7:30 p.m. $27. Wilbur Theatre.
866-448-7849, www.the
wilbur.com
NICK A. ZAINO III
Family
SONGBEAT CIRCLE SongBeat Circle is back for 2019! The song
and drum circle welcomes all,
with no experience necessary, for
an evening of wellness and community. The circle will be run by
an expressive therapist. While
donations are encouraged, the
evening is free and open. Jan. 8,
7:30 p.m.-8:30 p.m. Free. Parish
Hall, First Church in Jamaica
Plan, 6 Eliot St., Jamaica
Plain, facebook.com
SOMERVILLE WINTER FARM­
ERS MARKET If you’re looking to
start the New Year with some local goodies, the Somerville Winter Farmers Market is the place to
go. With over 30 booths full of
New England farmers and producers, spread out over two
floors; the market is sure to satisfy all culinary cravings. Jan. 12,
9:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Free. Somerville
Winter Farmers Market,
191 Highland Ave., Somerville,
www.somwintermarket.org
BEGINNER CHARLESTON LES­
SONS Anyone, even those with
two left feet, can learn the
Charleston with Cambridge’s Free
Dance Studio. The 90-minute
class will cover basic Charleston
footwork; combination steps including tandem Charleston,
cross-hand Charleston, and sailor kicks; authentic Charleston
styling; and more. Jan. 12,
6:30 p.m.-8 p.m. Free. Swing City,
680 Huron Ave., Cambridge,
freedancestudio.wordpress.com
LILLIAN BROWN
MARK YOUR
CALENDAR
Jan. 12 Emo Night at Brighton
Music Hall ticketmaster.com
Jan. 23 Damien Rice at Orpheum
Theatre ticketmaster.com
Jan. 25 King Princess at Royale
Boston ticketmaster.com
Jan. 27 Petal at Brighton Music
Hall ticketmaster.com
Jan. 31 Gryffin at House of
Blues livenation.com
Feb. 1-2 Eric Church at TD Garden ticketmaster.com
Feb. 5 Colin Blunstone at City
Winery citywinery.com
Feb. 7 Galactic at House of
Blues livenation.com
LILLIAN BROWN
JA N UA RY 6 , 2 0 1 9
B o s t o n
S u n d a y
G l o b e
N3
Music
WILL OLIVER/EPA/FILE 2017
SCORE
O
AT THE HARVARD FILM ARCHIVE, SEEING — AND HEARING — BRITAIN
n Jan. 25, the Harvard Film Archive begins Poets of Pandaemonium: The Cinema of Humphrey
Jennings and Derek Jarman, a series surveying two of 20th-century Britain’s outstanding film stylists. The
first night’s screenings include Jennings’s
most musical works, the short documentaries “Listen to Britain” (1942) and “The
Dim Little Island” (1949). Both leverage
their soundtracks into atmospheric impressions of England, during and after
World War II.
Born in 1907, Jennings took time to
find his calling. Abandoning a possible academic career, he worked as a photographer
and theater designer, organized art exhibitions, edited journals. Only in 1934 did he
join the British Post Office’s documentary
film unit — a job he took, friends believed,
solely because he needed money. But film
— and the war — would provide opportunity for his genius to bloom.
Jennings directed a series of documentaries promoting the British war effort,
propaganda made more effective by conscious avoidance of propagandistic techniques. “Listen to Britain” is a radical ex-
ample, eschewing narration for a collage of
everyday sounds and music. A rollicking
dance hall contrasts with uneasy quiet on
the roof, where helmeted sentries watch
for bombers. A group of soldiers sing
“Home on the Range” in a pub; a group of
female workers at their machines sing
along to piped-in music. In a famous sequence, pianist Myra Hess performs a Mozart concerto in the barricaded and barewalled National Gallery of Art, the music
abruptly fading into the clanks and whirs
of a tank-building factory. Jennings, a demanding taskmaster, staged and restaged
supposedly candid scenes to get the poetic, precise effects he wanted. The film’s intricate evocation of wartime England keeping calm and carrying on is powerful.
In comparison, the form and message
of “The Dim Little Island” seem to be fascinatingly at odds. Four monologues — by
cartoonist Osbert Lancaster, naturalist
James Fisher, engineer John Ormston, and
composer Ralph Vaughan Williams — reflect on British history and its postwar status while still insisting that the best is yet
to come. Jennings’s counterpoint of images, though, strikes notes both supportive
and ironic. Vaughan Williams provided the
film’s score, a reworking of the English folk
tune “Dives and Lazarus”: lovely, distinctly
English, but also more than a little elegiac.
(One wonders just how much Jennings put
his own spin on the material; a few years
later, after a magazine mentioned the documentary and Vaughan Williams’s contribution, the composer wrote a letter protesting that he had never heard of the
film.) Jennings was killed in an accident
the year after “The Dim Little Island” was
released, making the film an ambiguous
conclusion rather than an ongoing discussion. His theme remained the same,
though: finding a sense of national identity
and purpose by listening closely.
MATTHEW GUERRIERI
Harvard Film Archive, 24 Quincy St.,
Cambridge, screens “Listen to Britain”
alongside Derek Jarman’s “Blue,” Jan. 25 at
7 p.m.; and at 9 p.m., “The Dim Little Is­
land” with Jarman’s “The Last of England.”
Tickets $9; $7 for non­Harvard students,
Harvard faculty and staff, and seniors.
617­495­4700; library.harvard.edu/film/
index.html
Experience
a taste of Boston.
Experience
Globe.com.
Experience Globe.com
B o s t o n
N4
S u n d a y
G l o b e
JA N UA RY 6 , 2 0 1 9
Theater
This Jack
is a master
of his trade
Director O’Brien reflects on an
exceptionally crowded career,
on Broadway and off
By Don Aucoin
GLOBE STAFF
NEW YORK — After an exceptionally busy lifetime in the
theater, it might be easier to list the plays Jack O’Brien hasn’t
directed, and the stars he hasn’t worked with.
The 79-year-old director’s continuing productivity becomes
a bit more comprehensible when you spend some time with
him, because O’Brien radiates an undimmed passion for his
craft and the energy of a man one-third his age. His production
of “Charlie and the Chocolate Factory,’’ a musical adaptation of
the Roald Dahl children’s novel, is slated to run Jan. 8-20 at the
Boston Opera House.
Stoppard’s “The Coast of Utopia’’ (2007). He’s also had to
weather his share of flops: A
production of “Oldest Living
Confederate Widow Tells All’’
that originated at the Old Globe
and transferred to Broadway in
2003, starring Ellen Burstyn,
closed after just one performance. “Chocolate Factory’’
mostly left New York critics
50 %
UP
TO
O’Brien, who counts such
legends as John Houseman and
Eva Le Gallienne among his
early mentors, spent more than
25 years as artistic director of
San Diego’s respec ted Old
Globe Theatre. When he was in
his mid-60s, he won three Tony
Awards in the span of just five
years, for “Hairspray’’ (2003),
“Henry IV’’ (2004), and Tom
F
F
O
ON
F
sO
100
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Charlie and the Chocolate Factory
Beautiful
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ANNIE TRITT FOR THE BOSTON GLOBE
cold, though it ultimately ran
more than 300 performances
on Broadway.
The tireless O’Brien was at
the helm of the recent Broadway production of “Carousel’’
that featured Jessie Mueller,
Joshua Henry, and Renee Fleming, while also directing the offBroadway production of Stoppard’s “The Hard Problem’’ that
wraps up Sunday. In the past
few years alone, O’Brien has directed “The Front Page,’’ featuring Nathan Lane, John Slattery,
and John Goodman; “It’s Only a
Play,’’ starring Lane, Matthew
Broderick, Megan Mullally, and
Stockard Channing; “Dead Accounts,’’ with Katie Holmes and
Norbert Leo Butz; “The Nance,’’
starring Lane; and “Macbeth,’’
with Ethan Hawke in the title
role. Along the way, he’s also
found time to direct numerous
operas at the Metropolitan Opera and elsewhere.
The Globe spoke with
O’Brien recently in his apartment on Central Park West, a
conversation punctuated by attention-seeking yips from the
Norwich Terriers on whom he
affectionately dotes, Winston
and Coda. Two days after the interview, The New York Times
reported O’Brien had taken on
still another project: He was
chosen to helm a Broadway revival of Arthur Miller’s “All My
Sons’’ when the previous director, Gregory Mosher, quit after
a dispute over the racial composition of the cast with Rebecca
Miller, the playwright’s daughter, who runs her father’s estate.
Q. How did you get involved
with “Charlie and the Chocolate
Factory’’?
A. It was a sort of accident of
fate. Sam Mendes did the original production in London, but
when it came time to transfer it
[to Broadway], he wasn’t available. They called me and they
said would you be interested in
doing it. I said actually I would
be. So I went over to see it. And
it was, he said kindly, slightly
baffling. It was very British. It
was Dickensian, it was very
dark. When I looked at it I
thought this is a very odd sort
of bicameral piece. The first
half is all Charlie; the second
half is all Willy. And never the
twain meet. It just didn’t make
any sense to me. So we started
over. I saw very clearly that Willy had to be in the first act, and
I wanted to start it with “[The]
Candy Man.’’ I thought let’s
start it like a traditional musical. I found a way to make [Willy] spying on his efforts to create this [Golden Ticket] contest, by going incognito into a
little candy store and pretending he was just a clerk. Then
Charlie becomes a kind of version of the sorcerer’s apprentice. [Willy] doesn’t see the kid
for what the kid is until later in
the show.
Q. He meets Charlie early on?
A. It’s like the duke in “Measure
for Measure’’: He’s hiding in
plain sight. He’s allegedly not
been out of the factory in 40
years. He’s not been around
people; he’s just got the OompaLoompas, behind closed doors.
They’re both learning from
each other, in a way.
Q. What do you think accounts
for the hold the story of “Char-
‘I just am so grate­
ful for having the
kind of life that
has given me mu­
sic and musicals
and operas and
new plays and old
plays and rela­
tionships with
magical people. . .’
JACK O’BRIEN, 79-year-old
director, on his life in theater
lie and the Chocolate Factory’’
has had?
A. It’s a moral fable. [Dahl] had
the unique ability to reach
something in people’s consciousness different from a lot
of other writers. He’s an edgy
writer. He’s a dark man. Kids
love that. The critics really
don’t like this piece. And they
never have, in any guise. And
yet the public loves this story.
There’s something primal in us
that has something to do with
the naughty pull of candy, the
mystery of creating something
out of nothing, and of course
the real story, which is imagination.
Q. So you think that Willy and
Charlie connect on the level of
imagination, that neither of
them has let that die?
A. I think that’s true. That’s theater, isn’t it?
Q. Can you talk a little bit about
working with child actors?
A. If you are patient with them,
and you suggest a course of action, they can usually commit
to it without batting an eye. You
may have trouble with technique, with them learning their
lines, with them hitting their
marks, knowing where to stand
so that they’re in the light. But
their imagining, man, it’s a lot
better than ours.
Q. Stoppard, Shakespeare,
“Chocolate Factory’’: Are you
trying consciously to challenge
yourself with different subject
matter, across multiple genres?
A. No. I’m a child of what I
would call a company psychology. I grew up in rep, then I went
to the Globe as artistic director.
If you run a theater, whether
you like it or not, you’re in front
of an enormous amount of
work. Fortunately I have enormous amounts of energy.
Q. When it comes to those hyper-verbal plays by Stoppard,
how do you keep them from being static?
A. I guess because I’m not that
smart. I’m not being modest.
It’s very difficult for me to understand his plays, and he’s extremely patient with me. When
I did “The Invention of Love’’
(2001), I chose to emphasize
the visual. Very often we’re
pulled towards the light, and I
try to get that onto the stage.
Because I think as important as
the mind is and the arguments
are, the passions are equally important. They’re not often written about, but they certainly
must be present.
Q. What do you see as the distinctive quality you bring to a
project?
A. You know, if you’d asked me
this even four or five years ago,
I would have been hard-put. I
think the best directors are not
self-conscious. There are very
self-conscious directors who
CHARLIE AND THE
CHOCOLATE FACTORY
Presented by Broadway
In Boston. At Boston
Opera House, Jan. 8­20.
Tickets from $44.50,
800­982­2787,
www.broadwayin
boston.com
JOAN MARCUS
Henry Boshart as Charlie Bucket in “Charlie and the
Chocolate Factory.”
want you to talk about them,
notice them. I think I’m there to
serve the writer. I try to make
you believe that what you’re
seeing is happening. I’m dealing in truth. And I suppose, late
in life now, if I said what distinguishes my work or what I’m
trying to do, it’s to make it live,
give it heart. Whatever the subject is, if it’s Shakespeare, if it’s
Tom, whatever, I’m looking for
the beating heart within it, and
make you believe that you see it
too.
Q. What at this point in your career does it take to get you to
say yes to a project?
A. [Laughs] This is a great question. There’s two things that do
it for me: If it makes me laugh,
or it makes me tear up, I know I
can do it. If I have neither response, I pass.
Q. You’ve worked with nearly
everybody. What is the key to
working with a star, with a Nathan Lane or someone who is
big in every sense, and with actors generally?
A. I love them, and they know
it. I very often say to a company,
I’m your first audience. I’m
your tryout. I want to help you,
but I don’t want to fingerprint
your work. I don’t want to get
in the way. Acting is an act of
faith. I tell them that. They
can’t hide from me. They must
tell me the truth.
Q. World premieres vs. revivals:
You’ve done lots of both. Tell
me about creating it new vs. reimagining it.
A. They have different excitements, I think. A world premiere, if you get it right, is so
exhilarating because you’re delivering a baby, aren’t you?
With a revival, you’re making
love to somebody else’s wife. So
you decide what it is that you
want to bring to it. They’re very
different, and you handle them
very differently.
Q. Is there a project you’d love
to tackle that you have not yet
tackled?
A. I’ve never done a Tennessee
Williams. Breaks my heart. I
have this big passion to do a
production of “Camino Real’’
because I think it’s a neglected
masterpiece and could conceivably have keys to parts of his
skill that we don’t really understand.
There are things like that
that I keep [saying] “Well I’d
love to have a shot at that.’’ But I
never worked a day in my life,
that’s the truth. I constantly
think that the door’s going to
open and they’re going to come
in and say “You phony, you’ve
been fooling people for the better part of 50 years and we’re
now locking you away.’’ I just
am so grateful for having the
kind of life that has given me
music and musicals and operas
and new plays and old plays
and relationships with magical
people and proximity with
great people like Stoppard and
a range of maddening, insane,
wonderful people. How would
that ever be possible if I weren’t
a director?
Interview was edited and
condensed. Don Aucoin can be
reached at aucoin@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter
@GlobeAucoin
B o s t o n
JA N UA RY 6 , 2 0 1 9
S u n d a y
G l o b e
N5
Comedy
L
ike many others, I
spent a few grudging minutes listening to the recently
leaked recording of
comic Louis C.K.’s now iconically controversial stand-up set
from an unannounced gig last
month in Levittown, N.Y.
It was another of C.K.’s tentative steps back onto the comedy stage after his self- (but
mostly Internet-) imposed
mini-exile following accusations that he masturbated in
front of several non-consenting
women. After just a year out of
the spotlight, he seemed to be
starting from scratch — though
it felt more like scraping.
Weeks after the set, recordings started circulating around
the Internet, trimmed to showcase some select bit from C.K.’s
routine, including tried-andtired whines against the idea of
honoring preferred pronouns
for trans people and nasty jabs
at survivors of the Parkland
school shooting.
“You’re not interesting because you went to a high
school where kids got shot. You
didn’t get shot! You pushed
some fat kid in the way and
now I’ve got to listen to you
talking?”
Discomfort in a stand-up
crowd is standard stuff — some
would argue it’s the point, and
evidence that a comic is performing properly. But listen
through the overcompensating
cackles of a few (male, duh) attendees on the recording and
in the space between
his “jokes” and the pockets of
silence feel more like the meek
courtesy of embarrassment.
And for his part, it was as
though C.K. could smell his
own stink.
“What are you going to do,
take away my birthday? My life
is over. I don’t give a [expletive]."
As expected, and perhaps
even planned, the response on
Twitter came swift and hard
upon C.K.
“Hey Louis CK,” tweeted
CHRIS PIZZELLO/INVISION/AP/FILE
@LARGE | MICHAEL ANDOR BRODEUR
Laugh lines
Louis C.K.’s spectacular return to unfunny
Parkland survivor Aalayah
Eastmond, “since you like making fun of me and other Parkland survivors behind closed
doors, I’m right here if you
want to talk. Just try to keep it
in your pants, ok?” (Which is a
pretty solid joke, actually.)
Elsewhere the narrative of
C.K. as anti-P.C. bad boy was
cultivated among his defenders
(recently emboldened by similar “attacks” against Kevin
Hart and his resistance to apologize for mean-spirited jokes
targeting gay kids), and a par-
allel narrative of C.K. as a
hopelessly self-defeating genius (a la Kanye) was sustained
among half-defenders who just
want to like a joke and not get
in trouble for it.
But for me, a longtime fan
of a significant chunk of C.K.’s
work as a stand-up comedian/
actor/writer/what have you,
his leaked set didn’t seem like
C.K. turning into an old crank,
swinging his cane at the young
people and moaning “kids today.” It felt like he was going
back to his roots.
Who does Louis C.K. think he is?
uBURR
Continued from Page N1
Louis C.K. remains toxic in
the larger entertainment industry and culture, but the maleoriented world of stand-up has
never really left him. After less
than a year in exile, C.K. resurfaced in comedy clubs in August, doing spot gigs, always
unannounced — hopin g , I
guess, that by continuing to Not
Go Away, audiences would let
him back in. And, truth to tell,
it’s working. To a point,
Whenever a fresh C.K. appearance is reported, the public
conversation turns heated. Say
many: How dare he show himself onstage as if he hadn’t done
something seamy and despicable — as if, given enough time,
pleasuring himself as a kind of
weird date move was somethi ng we could jus t forge t
about? His supporters respond,
well, don’t pay to see him, then
— just don’t listen. Which is a
moot point when you’ve gone to
a comedy club expecting not to
see Louis C.K., and there he is.
When maybe you used to think
the guy was funny, maybe even
a genius, but now all that fellow
feeling has been wiped out by
the image of a powerful entertainer getting off by showing
his penis to women with less
clout than he has.
And, right, it’s comedy, say
the fans — meaning it’s only
comedy, so don’t take it so seriously, or it’s sacrosanct-freespeech comedy, so back off,
man. And it’s true: Louis C.K.
has the right to climb onstage
and say whatever he wants.
And people have a right to
laugh at his jokes without
thinking too much about the
matter, while other people have
the right to say, no, you’re not
funny, Louis, you’re disgusting
or sad. You’re not as sympathetic as you think when you complain about losing money or
about a bad year that’s “like
having diarrhea that keeps going.” You’re not being truthful
enough about what you did and
who it affected and why you
might feel compelled in the first
place to whip out your junk in
front of various and sundry
women. I supposed that’s a dis-
cussion for you and your therapist, which I hope for your sake
is happening.
The fans of Louis C.K. — I
admit, I used to be one — want
to position him as some brave
defender of the unspeakable, a
pushback against the hypocrisy
of prudish society. Like he’s
Lenny Bruce. But Louis C.K.
isn’t Lenny Bruce. Honestly,
Lenny Bruce wasn’ t Lenny
Bruce, which you probably
know if you’ve taken the time to
listen to his routines.
There are a lot of
get­off­my­lawn
moments on that
recent club
appearance that
say more about
Louis C.K. than he
may realize.
You know who was Lenny
Bruce? George Carlin. In the
sense that Carlin knocked
down boundaries, took heat for
it, and was profoundly funny in
the bargain. Good lord, I miss
that man, not least for what
he’d have to say to some of the
people offended by Louis C.K.,
to some of the people defending
Louis C.K., and to Louis C.K.
himself. Carlin was an equalopportunity excoriator, and his
rants were grounded by a moralism that had nothing to do
with conventional morality.
Above all, I think Carlin understood that it was possible to be
politically incorrect without being intolerant — that “political
correctness” is in fact what people call empathy who are too
scared, ignorant, or angry to
practice it.
Another person Louis C.K.
doesn’ t sound much like is
Richard Pryor, who looked deep
into his screwed-up actions and
addictions and took full responsibility for them on a stand-up
stage. Who made you ache with
laughter and sorrow at the ways
in which a man can blind himself. No, what Louis C.K. really
sounds like on that Dec. 16 club
tape is an old man, one who
can’t understand why he lost
his perch at the top and who
blames everybody but himself.
Whose comedy once walked a
fascinating line between seeming to practice intolerance and
simultaneously calling attention to it and who now just
finds solace in the first part of
the equation.
There are a lot of get-off-mylawn moments on that recent
club appearance that say more
about Louis C.K. than he may
realize. The routine about the
students at Marjory Stoneman
Douglas High in Parkland, Fla.,
is the one, about halfway in,
that finally made me bail:
“They testify in front of Congress, these kids. What are you
d o i n g ? Yo u ’r e y o u n g , y o u
should be crazy, you should be
unhinged! Not sitting there in a
suit saying, ‘I’m here to tell you.
. .’ [Expletive] you. You’re not
interesting because you went to
a high school where kids got
shot. You didn’t get shot! You
pushed some fat kid in the way
and now I’ve got to listen to you
talking?”
Yep, Louis C.K. has the right
to say such things. And you
have the right to think he’s a
hopeless jackass and to pity an
audience who thinks he’s some
kind of hero.
Ty Burr can be reached at
ty.burr@globe.com. Follow him
on Twitter @tyburr.
Boston’s
best jobs are in
The Boston Sunday Globe.
Check out the
Careers Section of
The Boston Sunday Globe
and choose from thousands
of great jobs with top local
employers.
You can still watch a lot of
early Louis C.K. stand-up sets
on YouTube (many of them
from Boston), and in them,
you don’t see C.K. grappling
with the same existential quandaries (a kind of Seinfeldian
frivolity filtered through a
Freudian darkness) or giving
his audience knowing looks
(somewhere between Eeyore
and the Cheshire Cat). There’s
none of the self-awareness that
we’ve come to associate with
C.K.’s comic brand.
Instead, we see a nervous
brat still finding his voice,
measuring out the appropriate
level of shrill, and firing off a
string of unrelated frustrations
and half-gags, like whining
over not being able to order a
cheeseburger on foot in a
drive-thru, or dealing with discrimination as a redhead. The
jokes are flat; thrown like Frisbees into an audience of sleepy
dogs.
And with his new set, C.K.
seems to be back at square one,
trying to figure out what’s at
the bottom of a laugh. But cen-
tral in his mind seems to be a
conviction that jokes cannot be
woke; that some degree of respect or restraint is actually a
sign of weakness in comedy —
a notion effortlessly countered
by young comics like Jaboukie
Young White (who offered his
own quick Twitter take on
C.K.), Aparna Nancherla (who
masterfully jokes about depression and anxiety), and Cameron Esposito, who, in her recent
special “Rape Jokes,” had this
to say about people (and comics) threatened by the censorship boogeyman of “P.C. culture.”
“It’s not like those people
rail against updated terminology elsewhere in their lives,” she
says. “Never heard one of those
people be like, ‘Nah I don’t use
today’s words about technology. I’m just an old-school guy.
Tell you what, you go home I’ll
send you a phone telegram and
see if you want to come over
and watch the talkies on my
Blockbuster machine and chill.
That’s just how I talk!’ ”
The best comedy has always
sprung from where our differences cross each other — men
and women, kids and adults,
gay and straight, white people
and super white people — and
the most effective comedy navigates these crossings without
ending up in collisions. But
C.K.’s new groove sure feels
more like a rut.
“Any other [a-holes] in the
room?” he asked an audience
back in 1988. “Isn’t it great? It’s
beautiful. If you are one you
should admit it to yourself just
for your own good, ‘cause once
you admit it you can take advantage of it and do anything
the hell you want. Do you ever
look at [a-holes] and wonder
‘Does he know?’ ”
He does. And thanks to his
revelatory new jokes, so do we.
Michael Andor Brodeur
can be reached at
mbrodeur@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter
@MBrodeur.
B o s t o n
N6
S u n d a y
G l o b e
JA N UA RY 6 , 2 0 1 9
Music
Artists to watch — and listen to — in 2019
uNEW ARTISTS
comparing her to Sade (she beautifully
covered “Love Is Stronger Than Pride”
on “Conexão”), but make no mistake,
Mark has a sound all her own that
looks back to traditional R&B while inventively moving forward. As her irresistible tracks “Lose My Cool,” “Way
Back,” and “Love Me Right” attest,
Mark’s moment has arrived. (Ken Capobianco)
Continued from Page N1
DAWN
In the ’00s, this belter was part of two
groups: Pop&B foursome Danity Kane
and Sean “Diddy” Combs’s nu-disco
outfit Diddy-Dirty Money. But once
Dawn Richard went solo in 2011, she
took off like a rocket, blazing a brightly
idiosyncratic trail with genre-melding,
future-minded dance music. “New
Breed” (Jan. 25) continues her experimentation, although it’s rooted in her
past; she takes spiritual and musical
cues from her upbringing in New Orleans on songs like the simmering title
track and the percolating “Dreams and
Converse,” while the stunning “Vultures | Wolves” is a pointed rebuke to
those who have — thankfully, unsuccessfully — stood in her way. (Maura
Johnston)
NORMANI
Fifth Harmony has now been the
launching pad for two bona fide pop
stars: Camila Cabello, who made 2018
her year with a Grammy-nominated
debut disc and two Top 10 singles, and
Normani, who’s about to make 2019
hers. The 22-year-old’s first single as a
soloist, jazz lounge-level smoky Khalid
collab “Love Lies,” was evidence of the
R&B flavor she’s said to be cultivating
for her new album. She’ll release it early this year, likely before opening the
first leg of Ariana Grande’s “Sweetener” world tour (its second stop is at TD
Garden March 20). (Isaac Feldberg)
MERCURY REV
Bobbie Gentry's 1968 sophomore release, “The Delta Sweete,” was a loose
concept album that found her further
exploring the Mississippi Delta life
lurking behind the dinner-table narrative of “Ode to Billie Joe,” the smash hit
that had brought her to the world's attention less than a year before. Fiftyone years later, with the help of a bevy
of Gentry stand-ins, Mercury Rev is refracting that record through its own
interpretive lens with “The Delta
Sweete Revisited” (Feb. 8), reimagining without reinventing the album via
a not quite song-by-song homage that
puts the accent on sweeping strings
and touches of gothic psychedelica.
(Stuart Munro)
PEDRO THE LION
David Bazan carved out a niche for
himself in the fertile Pacific Northwest
indie rock scene of the early 2000s
with methodical, melancholy concept
albums about religious angst and
man’s inhumanity to man (if Death
Cab for Cutie set a collection of Flannery O’Connor stories to music, it
would probably resemble Pedro the Lion’s 2000 release “Winners Never
Quit”). On the three songs we’ve already heard from “Phoenix” (Jan. 18),
the first Pedro the Lion record in 15
years, Bazan turns his observant eye
toward his own childhood, from the
thrill of learning to ride a bike to the
agony of peer pressure-induced bullying. (Terence Cawley)
RAVYN LENAE
Contemporary R&B has seen a surge of
female voices — from Kelela to Nao to
Dawn Richard — boldly blending traditional sources and electronic influences to reimagine the genre, and Chicago’s Ravyn Lenae is following in
their footsteps. The 19-year-old has
grown by leaps over her three EPs,
“Moon Shoes” (2015), “Midnight
Moonlight” (2017), and last year’s superb “Crush,” with slow-burn, pulsing
songs featuring her poetic, personal
lyrics and quirky phrasing. As she
moves out of her teenage years, Lenae
is growing into her voice, which has
hints of Erykah Badu, and the emotional range of her songs is expanding
(adolescent angst yielding to wisdom).
Lenae seems more interested in making daring, challenging music than
chasing the next pop wave, so mainstream acceptance may be elusive at
first, but this is an artist in for the long
haul. (Ken Capobianco)
MAGGIE ROGERS
This Maryland-born singer-songwriter
caused lots of clicking in 2016, when
video of her breakout single, “Alaska,”
bringing Pharrell Williams to tears became a YouTube sensation; in the years
since she has become a fixture on the
festival circuit, with her sweetly genuine stage presence helping sway audiences into singing along with her
hooky, emotionally honest, folk-inspired pop. Her major-label debut,
“Heard It in a Past Life” (Jan. 18), collects “Alaska” and other songs she’s released over the past few years alongside collaborations with pop heavy hitters like Greg Kurstin (Adele, Paul
McCartney) and Rostam Batmanglij
(Solange, Haim). (Maura Johnston)
NONAME/SABA/SMINO
Rising together through Chicago’s
close-knit hip-hop scene, these three —
MIKE POSNER
SHARON VAN ETTEN
The acclaimed singer-songwriter’s
piercing intensity has lost none of its
ability to cut to the bone on “Remind
Me Tomorrow” (Jan. 18), though her
sonic palette has expanded to include
synth-based tunes of triumph (“Comeback Kid”) and foreboding (“Jupiter
4”). Those who fell in love with Van
Etten’s starker stylings will still find
plenty to adore here, with the likes of
“Malibu” and “Stay” holding the same
shiver-inducing power as the acoustic
incantations of albums past. (Terence
Cawley)
EMMA MCINTYRE/GETTY IMAGES FOR KROQ/ENTERCOM
NORMANI
THE DELINES
JASON QUIGLEY
GETTY IMAGES FOR IHEARTMEDIA
KING
PRINCESS
SHARON
VAN
ETTEN
BRYAN BEDDER/GETTY IMAGES FOR SAMSUNG 837
NONAME
SABA
RYAN PFLUGER
SMINO
AFP/GETTY IMAGES
GETTY IMAGES FOR MTV NEWS
all melodic, sharp-tongued wordsmiths — share more than a producer
(ubiquitous Phoelix) and guest spots
on Chance the Rapper tracks. They’ve
forged an out-of-studio friendship, one
that’s suffused appearances on one another’s breakthrough solo projects
with a sense of unaffected joy. When
these three get in the booth, there’s
nothing corporate about it. Recent
near-posse cut “Ace” (off Noname’s
“Room 25,” which she’ll likely play
during sold-out Royale stops Thursday
and Friday) felt something like the
Soulquarians’ breezy second coming.
“3 young GOATs casually reshaping
what popular music will sound like for
the next 20 of them thangs,” they’ve
dubbed themselves on Instagram,
promising a joint project this year. It’s
a lofty claim from three artists who ex-
cel in exceeding expectations. (Isaac
Feldberg)
THE DELINES
A successor of sorts to Portland, Ore.,
band Richmond Fontaine, the Delines’
magnificent debut, “Colfax,” came out
in 2014, followed by what the band
called a “full-length single” a year later,
and then . . . nothing. There was a reason for that full-stop: Amy Boone,
whose weary, barely-hanging-on vocals anchor the band’s sound and
bring Willy Vlautin’s harrowing stories
of the hard-luck and the desperate to
life, was hit by a car in an Austin, Texas, parking lot. “The Imperial” (Jan.
11) — started prior to that accident
and finished upon Boone's recovery —
is a triumphant return of the band’s
riveting, steel-and-horn-fueled coun-
GETTY IMAGES FOR SKULLCANDY
try-soul music. (Stuart Munro)
AMBER MARK
Amber Mark is a pop star waiting to
happen — she just needs to be heard.
The 24-year-old R&B singer-songwriter has already released two diverse,
stellar EPs, 2017’s “3:33am” and “Conexão,” which display the complexity of
her style and vision. The smooth, sultry Mark is a bit out of step with the
raw, confessional, hyper-sexualized direction pop R&B has veered into the
past couple of years, but her sophisticated and often introspective music is
undeniable, and she should break
through to the mainstream when she
releases her full-length debut. Over the
course of her two EPs, she has moved
from the dark edges of grief to a brighter musical direction that has some
MIKE POSNER
It’s been nearly a decade since this
Michigan-born crooner self-released
his first mixtape, establishing himself
as a singer-songwriter who borrows
equally from velvety soul and laid-back
folk. Since then he’s had two self-deprecating hits, 2010’s chugging “Cooler
Than Me” and 2015’s remixed smash
“I Took a Pill In Ibiza,” and co-written
radio staples for the likes of Maroon 5
and Justin Bieber while further developing his own pop-soul chops. “A Real
Good Kid” (Jan. 18) is his third fulllength, and it grapples with love, loss,
and the existential crises endemic to
21st-century life in an unflinching yet
tender way. (Maura Johnston)
KING PRINCESS
The biggest songs by this Brooklynbased singer-songwriter (heartbreaker
“Talia”; sultry “1950,” which got a pivotal signal boost from Harry Styles)
position her as the queer heir to
Lorde’s anthemic dream-pop throne.
Rising on the same social media-assisted tide as Troye Sivan and Hayley Kiyoko, the 20-year-old is likely the
youngest in this new wave of gay pop
torch-bearers, and — with a spring
tour (including a Jan. 25 Royale stop)
and planned new album — is shaping
up to be one of the year’s busiest.
(Isaac Feldberg)
LAMBCHOP
“This (is what i wanted to tell you),”
the title of the latest from Kurt Wagner
and the fluid Nashville aggregation
known as Lambchop, is amusing in its
own right, since one can never be certain exactly what Wagner is wanting to
tell you. What is certain is that Lambchop’s music is always beguiling and
beautiful in its idiosyncrasy, a certainty
that isn’t violated by “This” (March
22), which weds an apparent lyrical
preoccupation with “you” (the pronoun is present not only in the album’s
titular parenthetical, but also in all but
the last of its song titles) to another inimitable Wagner sound collage. (Stuart Munro)
SUMMER WALKER
Summer Walker’s intimate, raw musical approach strips away excess, draws
listeners in close, and refuses to let go.
The Atlanta native relies on emotionally direct lyrics and spare keyboards/
percussion/guitar-dominated tracks.
Her music sounds like she’s whispering in your ear after the bars have
closed, sunrise is approaching, and regret and revelation have set in. Her
2018 debut album, “Last Days of Summer,” is suffused with slow-drip
grooves about conflicted love, sex,
identity, and trust (or lack of it). At
times, Walker’s woozy vibe, syrupy/
slurred phrasing, and honesty echo
early Jhenè Aiko, but Walker owes
more to traditional R&B vocalists, especially when she opens up her sound.
While many of the songs on her debut
were slivers — ideas in search of realization — she will undoubtedly develop her aesthetic and evolve with time.
Right now, she’s a refreshing voice that
commands attention. By late summer,
Walker should be on the pop radar and
making noise. (Ken Capobianco)
CASS MCCOMBS
Though his unique take on cosmic
Americana has earned McCombs no
shortage of critical hosannas, his inscrutable nature (both on record and
in his reluctantly granted interviews)
all but ensures that he’s destined to remain a cult concern — and that fate
seems more than all right with him.
Much of “Tip of the Sphere” (Feb. 8)
evokes the Grateful Dead at their most
mellow and agreeable, but just as the
listener is starting to get comfortable,
something like the bizarre electro-spoken-word of “American Canyon Sutra”
pops up to remind you that McCombs
plays by no one’s rules but his own.
(Terence Cawley)
JA N UA RY 6 , 2 0 1 9
B o s t o n
S u n d a y
G l o b e
Enjoying
the art of
trying
to do it all
uO'NEAL
Continued from Page N1
more books on its shelves than many
small libraries and more recordings
than most small radio stations. On the
walls in the rest of the apartment,
which he shares with his wife, Shelley
Stier, there are enough photographs to
keep a gallery in business. The apartment is in the East Village, a few doors
from the Strand Bookstore and within
walking distance of the Village Vanguard and Blue Note jazz clubs. O’Neal
gets around, but he doesn’t need to go
far to do so.
The author of more than a dozen
books, O’Neal has another half-dozen
on the way. The most recent is a reissue of “A Vision Shared,” his pathbreaking 1976 book on the Farm Security Administration photographers of
the ’30s and early ’40s. The group included Dorothea Lange and Walker
Evans. O’Neal knew him, too.
The new edition is published by
Steidl Verlag, the world’s most prestigious publisher of photography books.
Steidl has also issued a half-dozen volumes on Abbott co-edited by O’Neal
and Ron Kurtz.
“Hank is one of the more interesting people I’ve met in my life,” says
Kurtz, a collector and philanthropist,
in a telephone interview. The MIT Museum’s Kurtz Gallery for Photography
is named for him. “He’s sort of an awshucks guys, a selfless guy, in a way. He
understands how much you can get
done when you don’t give yourself pats
on the back.”
It was writing that brought O’Neal
into contact with Jacqueline Kennedy
Onassis, who edited one of his books.
“She was the real deal: a nice, nice person,” O’Neal says. Nice isn’t the same
as uncritical. O’Neal laughs when he
recalls the time his editor complained
about some copy he’d handed in. “Goddammit, Hank, Caroline could have
written something better than that,
and she’s only 14!”
An even more unlikely connection
is with Ty Cobb, the legendarily mean
baseball Hall of Famer. “ Well, he
wasn’t mean to boys who wrote him
letters,” O’Neal explains. Their correspondence when O’Neal was in his early teens is the subject of one of those
forthcoming books, “Sincerely, Ty
Cobb.” It comes out later this year.
O’Neal, who’s on the boards of the
Jazz Gallery performance venue and
the National Jazz Museum in Harlem,
is also on the honorary founders board
of the Jazz Foundation of America.
Wendy Oxenhorn, the foundation’s executive director and vice chairman, is
a longtime friend.
“The thing that makes Hank great
is his continued child-like curiosity,”
Oxenhorn says in an e-mail. She likens
him to “a walking art gallery that lets
whoever he is gracing get that ‘one
man show’ they always wanted in
whatever format they choose because
the world in his eyes is all Art. He just
keeps walking, to see what he can see.”
O’Neal’s many associations might
make him sound like a real-life Zelig,
t h e Wo o d y A l l e n c h a ra c t e r w h o
seemed to know anyone who was anyone in 20th-century culture. Except
Zelig wasn’t a CIA agent: Yes, O’Neal
served with the agency — as a junior
officer, not a spy — from 1963 to 1976.
He was still on the payroll when he began Chiaroscuro and started hanging
out with Abbott. His CIA training
came in handy the three times he
helped her smuggle gold across the Canadian border.
O’Neal put in a mandatory stint at
Camp Perry, the CIA training facility in
Virginia, more familiarly known as
“The Farm.” “You’d go out and trail
people in Norfolk. Learn how to pick
locks and stuff, how to do a black-border crossing. I remember one night I
was all by myself, playing pool. They
had a wonderful rec room. I realized I
wasn’t alone, and there was [former
CIA director] Allen Dulles.”
The Farm was also where O’Neal
saw his first James Bond movie. “It
cost a quarter,” he recalls.
O’Neal’s star-studded stories might
sound like a severe case of the namedrops. In fact, all those bold-face
names are as naturally a part of his
conversation as the occasional bad
joke and his wheezy laugh. It’s more
that he’s connecting the dots in his life,
much in the way he’s spent nearly half
a century connecting the dots in American culture — introducing Abbott to
Allen Ginsberg (who was photographer at O’Neal’s wedding) or trying to
record Ornette Coleman with Arnett
Cobb (“Hey, they were both Texas horn
players,” O’Neal says with happy
shrug). Few people alive today have
such a widespread set of dots, let alone
ones of such high artistic quality.
“It’s just part of the concentric
thing where one person leads to the
next to the next to the next,” O’Neal
ANNIE TRITT FOR THE BOSTON GLOBE
PHOTOS COURTESY OF HANK O’NEAL
LIBRARY OF CONGRESS
LIBRARY OF CONGRESS
LIBRARY OF CONGRESS
From top: Hank O’Neal in his study; photos of Berenice Abbott (left)
and O’Neal, taken by each other in Maine in 1990; FSA photographs by
Walker Evans (“Roadside Stand near Birmingham, Alabama”),
Dorothea Lange (“Drought refugees from Abilene, Texas, . . .), and
Theo Jung (“Sunday dinner, Jackson, Ohio”).
says with a smile. He smiles a lot. “You
know, it was just a matter of happenchance.”
Might “happenchance” be an East
Texas-ism? O’Neal was born in Kilgore,
near the Louisiana border. For once, a
question vexes him. “I don’t know,” he
frowns. “It’s just a word I use.” He says
this in a slightly reedy voice that still
betrays a bit of Lone Star drawliness.
O’Neal has the easy-as-pie manner
of a country boy, which complements
his city-boy cultural accomplishments.
Named for his father, Harold L .
O’Neal, he was “Hank” from the getgo. His parents didn’t want to call him
“junior,” he explains, “and they wanted
to get a name that sounded like a cowboy.”
When O’Neal was 10, he and his
parents moved to Bloomington, Ind.
Two notable things happened there.
He won a Hawkeye camera in a grocery-story prize drawing, starting him
on the road to photography; and, in
one of the more beguiling bits of Hankian happenchance, he played a cabin
boy in the US premiere of Benjamin
Britten’s opera “Billy Budd.” “The only
time I’ve ever been onstage with music
in my life,” O’Neal says, “other than to
announce a band.”
The family moved to Syracuse, N.Y.,
a year later, when he was 13. O’Neal
got a job in a music store. “I would use
every nickel that I had to buy a jazz record,” he says. “Everything was new at
the same time. Nothing sounded old.”
That eclecticism informed the musical
sensibility that would define the Chiaroscuro roster: grounded in mainstream jazz, but by no means limited
to. The label’s best-selling LP: The
South African pianist Dollar Brand’s
“Capetown Fringe.” The best-selling
CD: Jay McShann and Ralph Sutton’s
“The Last of the Whorehouse Piano
Players.”
“It didn’t seem strange to me to do
[the avant-garde saxophonist] Hamiet
Bluiett one day and [the Dixieland cornetist] Wild Bill Davison the other day.
It was just really good music. It still really is.” Another mark of the label’s
catholicity: More than half of the inductees in the Jazz Hall of Fame recorded for Chiaroscuro at one time or
another.
How did O’Neal come to have a record label? More happenchance. During his CIA service, he met a wealthy
jazz fan named Sherman Fairchild.
Fairchild bankrolled the label, originally called Halcyon, with the pianist
Marian McPartland as third partner.
That was 1969. “The partnership dissolved eventually,” O’Neal explains,
“because Marian was primarily interested in recording Marian, and I was
primarily interested in recording Marian and everybody else.” When Fairchild died, his estate sold the label to
O’Neal for a nominal sum.
A year at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute taught O’Neal he wasn’t cut out
to be an engineer. Happenchance took
him to Syracuse University. A course
on Soviet government brought him to
the attention of a CIA recruiter. When
he learned that he could do his ROTCrequired time in the Army working for
the CIA, that sealed the deal.
O’Neal spent a few years in Washington working as an analyst, then was
sent to New York. This was 1967.
When it’s pointed out that its domestic
activities got the CIA in trouble right
around this time, O’Neal makes a useful distinction. “The covert part, not
the overt part.” Extrovert that he is,
O’Neal was definitely overt.
Its expensiveness made New York
an unpopular posting. O’Neal didn’t
mind. He stayed for three consecutive
three-year tours and finally left the
agency because it wanted to send him
to Pittsburgh.
New York was where happenchance really kicked in. A senior agency administrator who’d once played with
the ’20s jazz legend Bix Beiderbecke
introduced O’Neal to the jazz guitarist
and bandleader Eddie Condon. When
O’Neal moved to New York, Condon
N7
was a neighbor. They decided to do a
book together, O’Neal’s first. “Eddie
was full of fun stories, and we were
having a ball.”
The book’s designer had been a student of Abbott’s. He met Abbot and
bought some prints (always a good
way to endear yourself to a photographer). “She told me if I ever got a real
camera to come up to Maine [where
Abbott lived] and she’d show me how
to use it.” The first lesson did not go
well. “You’ve got to do a damn sight
better than that, buster!” Abbott told
him. But it saw the beginning of a
friendship that would last until Abbott’s death, in 1991. It was a mark of
how much Abbott came to depend on
O’Neal that, yes, she enlisted him
those three times to go with her to
Canada to buy gold and smuggle it
back into the States.
It was Abbott “who put me into
photography in a really serious way,”
O’Neal says. Around this time, he began to take an interest in the work of
the Farm Security Administration
(originally, the Resettlement Administration). The dozen photographers this
small government agency employed
between 1935 and 1943 amassed some
175,000 images documenting social
conditions in America. At least two of
those images are among the most famous in the history of the medium:
Lange’s “Migrant Mother” and Arthur
Rothstein’s photograph of an Oklahoma farmer and his two sons hunched
against a Dust Bowl storm.
Taken as a whole, these photographs are the greatest work of public
art in US history. All of them can be
seen on the Library of Congress website, at www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/fsa/. Having access to them was a
very different story in 1976, when “A
Vision Shared” appeared.
What gives the book its enduring
importance is that O’Neal sought out
nine of the 10 surviving photographers, as well as Lange’s widower and
Ben Shahn’s widow, and had them select the photographs they wanted to
include, write the captions, and tell
him their stories. The one regret
O’Neal has is not including the 12th
photographer, Gordon Parks. “He was
there only for a minute or two,” O’Neal
says, “but he would have given [the
book] greater breadth.”
Kurtz had the idea for the new edition. “When I first saw this book,” he
says, “the images were wonderful but
the reproduction was not. So I suggested it was time for a redo.”
‘The thing that makes
Hank great is his
continued child­like
curiosity. . . . the world
in his eyes is all Art.
He just keeps walking,
to see what he can see ’
WENDY OXENHORN, Jazz
Foundation of America executive
director and vice chairman discussing
Hank O’Neal
What most pleases O’Neal about “A
Vision Shared” is the human element:
The tribute it offers not just to a remarkable body of work but, even
more, to that body of work’s creators.
“It was finding people who’d sort of
been overlooked,” O’Neal says. “The
very best thing about the ‘ Vision
Shared’ book, from a lot of standpoints, is the fact that — not that they
were unknown — but Jack Delano and
Russ Lee and Marion Post Wolcott
started getting shows. Then a zillion
different books followed. If you had a
nickel for every book that had FSA pictures after that you could retire.”
O’Neal says this with a laugh, then gets
serious. “America sometimes has a
problem with recognizing what it really has. And particularly in those years
recognizing people who were no longer young and hot and cool and so
forth.”
O’Neal says something similar
about music. “I made 12 records with
Earl Hines — and I do not have one alternate take. He never made mistakes!
But he hadn’t made a solo record in
forever. When I recorded Mary Lou
Williams, it was her first solo record
since the ’40s,. And these are major
American artists who were being completely ignored because the RCAs and
Columbias of the world —” His voice
trails off. “They wanted to do what was
current and hot or make an R&B record. There’s nothing wrong with that.
But you have to do it all.”
If one thing defines O’Neal’s happenchance journey through the past
half century it’s been just that: an ongoing attempt to do it all, or at least do
it all as regards much of what has been
uniquely American about American
culture and so enhance and enlarge
appreciation of that American uniqueness. If O’Neal ever writes his autobiography, “A Vision Shared” would be
an ideal title, except that it’s already
taken.
Mark Feeney can be reached at
mfeeney@globe.com.
B o s t o n
N8
S u n d a y
G l o b e
JA N UA RY 6 , 2 0 1 9
Television
BUZZSAW | MATTHEW GILBERT
removes the 68 lipomas that line a patient’s arms in the season premiere,
pulling out the little shrimp-like bits
from under the skin, Dr. Lee talks
about how “satisfying” the process is
— for her. She affectionately calls the
lipomas a “litter” of “gremlins” as she
places them on the side table, but let’s
be honest: There’s nothing cute about
the slippery, rubbery monsters she has
released from captivity.
Watching the YouTube video where
Dr. Lee drains all those blackheads
and whiteheads, the strains of the
Beatles’ “I Am the Walrus” rose up into
my consciousness: “Yellow matter custard, dripping from a dead dog’s eye.”
Many claim the most disgusting word
in the English language is “moist,” but
I think I could make a good case for
“discharge.”
‘Dr. Pimple Popper’
is enough to make
your skin crawl
I was minding my
own business over
the holidays, lying on
the couch in a semiconscious state, letting the comforting
puns and punchlines
of some marathon or
another — I think it
was “Sex and the City” — soften my focus, when a difficult commercial
popped my bubble, “popped” being
the key word.
It was an ad for the TLC series “Dr.
Pimple Popper,” and it was not a joke.
For a second, I thought I’d stumbled
onto a fake “Saturday Night Live”
commercial — but I soon had my hand
over my eyes, unable to look at the
very real science-fiction-like nightmare unfolding before me. Yes, there
is a show about removing globules,
pustules, lipomas, boils, cysts, zits,
and pus — a veritable “Macbeth”
witches’ brew of soggy atrocities —
from various body parts. Furthermore,
there’s a solid audience for it, as the
show has just returned for a second
season after last year’s 16-episode first
season, which averaged 2 million
viewers per episode.
Somehow Mr. TV Man managed to
miss even a mention of Dr. Pimple
Popper for over a year.
And it doesn’t seem to be merely a
relaxed audience that just happens to
tune in to watch the ministrations of
the compassionate, burst-loving Dr.
Pimple Popper — also known as Dr.
Sandra Lee, author and owner of a
skin care line. The viewers are simply
gaga for squeezing. On a YouTube video of the doctor removing blackheads
and whiteheads from a man’s face, using a tool to draw out the pudding like
Bavarian crème from a doughnut, the
comments are passionate: “OMG I
wish that I could remove them. . . . I
am like having the best feeling watching this,” says one. “I wanted more I
didn’t want it to end. Great video Dr.
Pimple Popper,” says another. More
than a million people have watched
the clip, and many more millions have
seen her other clips on YouTube,
where she began her video career before TLC called.
Even those viewers who are completely grossed out are enthusiastic, in
the same way horror-movie fans are,
throwing out spelling rules in favor of
emphasis in the comments: “I wanna
watch it cuz it’s satisfying but then I
dont wanna cuz it’s DISGUSTANG.”
Yes indeed, that is the best of all possible words: DISGUSTANG.
The formula and the atmospherics
of “Dr. Pimple Popper” are very much
like those on any makeover or self-improvement reality show, with music
signaling the tension and then the joy
in every case. Each person who comes
to see the doctor is carrying a burden
— of physical pain, and in many cases
of embarrassment severe enough to
keep them from leaving the house. In
her visits with them, Dr. Lee looks at
their bumps and blisters and explains
what they are and how she’ll remove
them to end the torment, torment that
in the season premiere threatens to
end a marriage.
And then: The real action. I’m sure
the feel-good messaging appeals to
viewers, as emotional battles are
fought and often won, but the heart of
the “Dr. Pimple Popper” drama is the
surgery, during which the camera
zooms in for as many details of the
grotesquery as you can take. While she
Sunday January 6, 2019
7:00pm
2
4
7:30pm
8:00pm
8:30pm
WGBH (6:30) Downton
Victoria: Victoria
PBS Abbey HD TV-PG
heads to Scotland.
WBZ 60 Minutes (CC) HD God Friended Me
CBS
HD TV-PG NEW
Reality TV has gotten
absurdly specific, and
apparently there is an
appetite for vivid
images of embedded
detritus being set free
from the body.
So it has come to this. Reality TV
has gotten absurdly specific, and apparently there is an appetite for vivid
images of embedded detritus being set
free from the body. Are we this bored?
This is a time when TV is featuring the
best scripted shows in its history,
when there are always too many good
or better series to catch up on, but still
there is a taste for “Dr. Pimple Popper.”
What can I say. There may well be
legitimate reasons for disapproving of
the series — perhaps because, like
many self-improvement reality shows,
it gives a false sense that fixing one
thing, a pimple, will solve everything.
But for me, the distaste for “Dr. Pimple
Popper” is far simpler. I cry foul. It’s all
DISGUSTANG.
JASON KEMPIN/GETTY IMAGES FOR SHORTY AWARDS
Dr. Sandra Lee, author and owner of a skin care line, is the star of the
TLC series “Dr. Pimple Popper.”
Movies
9:00pm
9:30pm
Victoria: A parental
nightmare. TV-PG
NCIS: Los Ang.: A
terror threat. NEW
Sports
10:00pm 10:30pm 11:00pm 11:30pm
Victoria (CC): Victoria is
threatened. HD TV-PG
Madam Secretary: News
Conclusion. NEW
Sports
Final
News
(CC) HD
Sports
6 WLNE ABC America's Funn.
7
WHDH News
Hollyw.
(CC) HD
Funniest NEW
Extra (CC) HD
TV-PG
News
News
(CC) HD
New Life
Sports
Xtra
NBC Boston
The 76th Annual Golden Globe Awards (CC): Sandra Oh and
Andy Samberg host. Live. TV-14-DL
News
(CC)
Boston
Sports
9 WMUR ABC America's Funn.
10
WBTS (4:30) NFL Playoff
NBC (CC) Live. HD
Funniest NEW
Shark Tank NEW
(10:01) Shark Tank
The 76th Annual Golden Globe Awards (CC): Sandra Oh and
Andy Samberg host. Live. HD TV-14-DL
News
News
(CC)
Person
1st and
10 HD
11
Victoria: Victoria
heads to Scotland.
WCVB America's Funn.: A
ABC forklift accident.
(4:30) NFL Playoff
(CC) Live.
WENH (6:30) Downton
PBS Abbey HD TV-PG
Shark Tank NEW
7News at 9pm (CC)
HD NEW
(10:01) Shark Tank
News HD
(5:00) ★★ Mummy
(1999) TV-PG NEW
AMC
(6:00) ★★★★ Jaws (1975) (CC): A
bloodthirsty shark. HD TV-14
Ancient Aliens (CC) Ancient Aliens (CC) UFO Cover Ups: Secrets Revealed (CC)
HD TV-PG
HD TV-PG NEW
HD TV-14-V NEW
HLN
HSN
ID
Forensic Forensic Death Row (CC) HD Death Row (CC) HD Death Row (CC) HD Death Row (CC) HD
Cold/Fashions TV-G Home Solutions
Diane Gilman TV-G Diane Gilman TV-G Perlier Beauty TV-G
Evil Lives Here (CC)
Evil Lives Here (CC) Evil Lives Here (CC) Evil Lives Here (CC) Lake Erie (CC) HD
TV-14-DLV NEW
HD TV-14-DLV
HD TV-14
HD TV-14
HD TV-14-DLV
IFC
Zero Dark Thirty (2012) (CC): A CIA agent leads a 10-year hunt for Osama Zero
(4:30) ★★★★
Dark
Gladiator TV-MA-LV bin Laden that reveals the cruelty of the War on Terror. HD TV-MA-LSV
HD
Ray Donovan (CC)
TV-MA-LSV
Lifetime
Lifetime Mov.
MSNBC
MTV
National
Geographic
Stalked/Realty
(6:00) Hidden Inten.
Kasie DC (CC) HD
Ridic.
Ridic.
Easter Island (CC)
HD TV-14
Outlander (CC) HD
TV-MA
NatGeoWild
NECN
Ovation
OWN
Wild Japan (CC) HD Wild Japan (CC) HD Wild Korea NEW
Wild Korea NEW
necn News 7Pm
necn News 8PM
necn News 9PM
necn News 10Pm
Heat (1995) (CC): A detective tracks a thief who's crossed his path before. TV-14
Police Women (CC) Police Women (CC) Police Women (CC): Police Women (CC)
HD TV-PG-L
HD TV-14-L
Deb helps a teen.
HD TV-14-L
Oxygen
Paramount
QVC
Science
Sundance
Killer NEW
Bar Rescue TV-PG
Nutrisystem(R)
Strange Evidence
(5:30) ★★★ The
Longest Yard
(6:00) Last Witch
Iron Man 3 (2013) (CC): Iron Man battles a terrorist. HD TV-PG Futurama Futurama
(6:00) Old School
Step Brothers (2008) (CC) HD TV-14-DLSV ★★ Old School: Grown men start a frat.
★★★★ Letter/3 Wives (1948) (CC) TV-PG The Letter: A woman commits a murder.
Age of Innocence
Fiancé NEW
90 Day Fiancé HD NEW
Return to Amish (CC) HD TV-14 NEW
Hunger Games
Hunger Games (2014): Katniss lands in District 13.
Hunger Games (2015) TV-14-V
Haunted House HD My Haunted NEW
FearWood NEW
Haunted NEW
Haunted NEW
Jokers
Jokers
Jokers
Jokers
Jokers
Jokers
Jokers
Jokers
Jokers
Jokers
Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond Two/Half Two/Half King/Qu. King/Qu.
(6:00) Secret/Bees NEW
Bone Collector HD
Secret/Bees (2008) HD TV-PG
Law & Order SVU
Law & Order SVU
Law & Order SVU:
Law & Order SVU
Fifty Shades (2015)
(CC) HD TV-14
(CC) HD TV-14
An athlete is raped. (CC) HD TV-14
HD TV-MA
Love & Hip Hop
Love & Hip Hop
(5:00) ★★ Selena
(6:35) Planes: Fire & Into the Woods (2014) (CC) TV-PG
Law & Order TV-PG Law & Order TV-14 Law & Order TV-14
News
(CC)
NFL Game
NEW
27
WUNI Aquí y ahora HD
TV-G
Mira quien baila (CC) HD
Crónicas (CC) HD
Hablemos Noticiero
Uni HD
36
WSBE Maria's
PBS HD
Antiques Roadshow Globe Trekker: An
Rhode Island LIVE
Gifts are appraised. exploration of beef. (CC) HD
Austin City Lim (CC)
Trombone Shorty.
38
WSBK Castle (CC) HD TVPG-LV
News HD
Big Bang Big Bang
Theory
Theory
44
WGBX Beyond a Year
PBS (2017) HD TV-PG
Antiques Roadshow Twain Prize (CC): Julia LouisPart 1 of 2. HD TV-G Dreyfus is honored. HD TV-14
50
56
WBIN Intervention
WLVI Modern Modern
CW Family
Family
Intervention
Intervention
Supergirl: Nia has a Charmed (CC) HD
TV-PG-LV
powerful dream.
Intervention
News (CC)
64
WNAC Simpsons Bob's
FOX
Burgers
Simpsons Burgers
NEW
News
68
WBPX NCIS: Los Angeles
ION (CC) HD TV-14-LV
NCIS: Los Ang. (CC): Private Eyes (CC)
A Marine is killed.
HD TV-14-LV
NCIS: New Orleans
(CC) HD TV-14-LV
Vicious
Lv/Artists Den (CC)
HD TV-14 HD TV-PG
(10:35)
Seinfeld
NCIS: Los Angeles
(CC) HD TV-14-LSV
Interro. Interro.
Wipeout (CC): The
Tramp-O-Mean.
(11:05)
NFL Game
Seinfeld NEW
NCIS: Los Angeles
(CC) HD TV-14-LV
PREMIUM CABLE
Arizona (2018) (CC): Housing (9:25) The Warrior's Way
(11:05) ★★★ Cabin
(6:00) ★★ Me,
(2010) (CC) HD R
Fever (2002) TV-MA
Myself & (CC) TV-14 crisis desperation. HD NR
(6:53) ★★★ Coal Miner's Daughter (1980) ★★★ Escape From Alcatraz (1979) (CC): (10:54) ★★ Gridiron
Biopic of singer Loretta Lynn. HD PG
Inmates plot a breakout. HD TV-14
Gang (2006) TV-PG
★★ Star Trek Generations (1994) (CC):
★★★ Sky Capt./World (2004) (CC):
(5:45) ★★ Black
Rain (CC) TV-14-LV Picard and Kirk team up. TV-PG
Robots attack 1930s New York. PG
(11:35)
(6:30) Super
(8:10) Clash of the Titans (2010) (CC): A Down a Dark Hall (2018) HD
Fist Fight
Troopers 2 (2018) R hero fights mythical beasts. HD TV-14-LV PG-13 NEW
HBO 2
(8:24)
(6:33)
(7:28) Sopranos
(9:10) Sopranos
(10:10) Sopranos
(11:10) Sopranos
Sopranos (CC) HD TV-MA-LSV Sopranos (CC) HD TV-MA-LSV (CC) HD TV-MA-LSV (CC) HD TV-MA-LSV
Showtime
(6:40) Molly's Game (2017) (CC): A
woman organizes poker games. HD R
Showtime 2
(6:00) American
Assassin (2017) NR
★★★ The Bourne
Ultimatum TV-14-V
Denial (2016): A historian must battle for We Own the Night (2007) (CC): A cop vs.
historical truth when she is sued for libel. a crooked brother in 1988. HD TV-14-V
Starz!
(6:59) Outlander
(CC) HD TV-MA
Outlander (CC) HD
TV-MA NEW
TMC
(6:05) The Debt
(2010) (CC) HD R
★★★★ The Queen (2006) (CC): A study of Marshall (2017) (CC): Biopic of Thurgood
Marshall. HD PG-13
Queen Elizabeth II. HD TV-PG
Comcast
SportsNet
(6:00) The '86
Celtics (CC) HD
SPORTS
Anything Is Possible: Story of the 2008
Celtics (CC) HD
Best of
Football
Quick HD Fix HD
Best of
Football
Quick HD Fix HD
ESPN
SportsCenter (CC)
Live. HD
NFL Primetime (CC) SportsCenter (CC)
Live. HD
Live. HD
SportsCenter (CC)
Live. HD
SCenter w/ SVP
(CC) Live. HD
ESPN Classic
(6:00) Classic Fball
(CC)
Classic College Football (CC): StanfordSouthern California from 2011.
Classic College Football (CC): 2000:
Southern California at Stanford.
ESPN 2
(6:00) College
Wrestling Live. HD
Championship Drive: Countdown to
Kickoff (CC) Live. HD
Road to
the CFB
Golf
NBCSN
NESN
(6:00) PGA Tour Golf: Sentry Tournament of Champions. Live. Golf Central Live.
NHL Live Live. HD
NHL Hockey: Chicago Blackhawks at Pittsburgh Penguins. Live.
C. Moore C. Moore Golf
Spot.
Dining
Red Sox Sports
Sports
FAMILY
T. Drama T. Drama Ranger
Harvey B M. Tyson Burgers Am. Dad Fam. Guy
Stuck/
Stuck/
Cinderella St. (2016): A teen
Coop &
Coop &
Bunk'd
Middle
Middle
wins an audition. TV-PG
Cami
Cami
HD TV-G
PGA Tour Golf
Overtime Classic
Sports
Dirty
Fam. Guy Rick/Mor
Raven's Andi
Home
Mack
Syfy
TBS
TCM
TLC
TNT
Travel
TruTV
TV Land
TV One
USA
(5:45) Toy Story 3 (2010): Toys (8:15) ★★ Home Alone 2: Lost in New York (1992)
escape from a day care. TV-G (CC): A boy meets old adversaries. HD
Henry D. Cousins Alvin/Chipmunks (2007) HD TV-PG
Office
Office
Bubble
Bubble
Butterb. Butterb. Peppa
Peppa
Paw P.
Paw P.
(10:55) ★★★ Nanny
McPhee (CC) TV-PG
Friends
Friends
Paw P.
Bubble
VH-1
WAM
WE
Nickelodeon
Noggin
(11:01) Lone Star
Law (CC) HD TV-14
History
News (CC)
Freeform
(10:01) Crikey!
Irwins HD TV-PG
(7:50) Other Woman (2014) (CC) TV-14
(10:05) Other Woman (2014) (CC) TV-14
Scandalous HD
Steve Hilton NEW
Life/Liberty HD
Scandalous HD
★★ Texas Chainsaw (1974) HD TV-14
Resident Evil (2012) (CC) HD TV-14
Jurassic World (CC): Reborn dinosaurs wreak havoc. Jurassic World (2015) TV-14-LV
One Winter Week (2018) (CC) HD TV-G
Love/Sidelines: An unemployed woman.
Beach.
Beach.
Bahamas Bahamas Island
Island
H. H. Int'l H. H. Int'l
NEW
NEW
Life TV-G NEW
NEW
NEW
HD TV-G NEW
Fam. Guy Rel NEW
NEW
Cartoon
Disney
How Do
NEW
(5:30) Sisters
Fox News Sunday
My Wife My Wife
Pirates/Caribb.
(6:00) Winter Castle
Beach.
Beach.
Simpsons Burgers
NEW
Counterpart (CC)
TV-MA NEW
How Do
NEW
(11:35)
Jaws 3
Fox Movies
Fox News
FUSE
FX
Hallmark
Home &
Garden
WFXT Simpsons Bob's
FOX
Burgers
HD
★★ Jaws 2 (1978): Another great white arrives in
Amity in this sequel. HD TV-14
Q&A
Oren Cass, The
Epic Log Homes
Alaska NEW
Building Off TV-G
Botched HD TV-14
Untold/E.R. TV-14
Guy's Grocery (CC)
HD TV-G
25
Ray Donovan HD
TV-MA-LSV NEW
Crikey! Irwins (CC)
HD TV-PG NEW
(11:04) ★★ The
Scorpion King
Washington This
(6:30) Jack Miles,
Epic Yachts TV-G
Alaska: The NEW
Building Off TV-G
E! Live NEW
Body Bizarre TV-14
Guy's Grocery (CC)
HD TV-G
Paid
Program
HBO
10:00pm 10:30pm 11:00pm 11:30pm
CSPAN
CSPAN 2
Dest. America
Discovery
DIY
E!
Fit & Health
Food
News
Flix
9:30pm
★ Billy Madison (1995) HD TV-PG-DV
Mess With Zohan TV-14-DL
(6:30) ★★ Happy Gilmore
CNN Newsroom HD CNN Newsroom HD Bourdain/Parts HD Bourdain/Parts HD Bourdain/Parts HD
★★★ Knocked Up (2007): Slacker
We're/
(7:25) The Interview (2014) (CC): A plot to kill Kim
Millers
Jong-un ensnares a journalist. HD TV-14
impregnates a TV host. HD TV-MA-LS
Madam Secretary:
Conclusion. NEW
Encore
A&E
Animal Planet Crikey! It's th (CC)
HD TV-PG
9:00pm
BASIC CABLE
★★ The Mummy Returns (2001) (CC): Mummy unravels more
schemes of terror. HD TV-14 NEW
CMT
CNN
Comedy
Central
NCIS: Los Ang.: A
terror threat. NEW
Cinemax
8:30pm
Housewives/Atl.
(CC) HD TV-14
Symphony
Fam. Guy Rel NEW
NEW
8:00pm
Bravo
Victoria: A parental Victoria (CC): Victoria is
nightmare. TV-PG
threatened. HD TV-PG
NCIS: New Orleans
(CC) HD TV-14-LV
7:30pm
★★★ Austin Powers TV-14-DLSV NEW
(5:30) Goldfinger
Austin Powers: Spoof of '60s super spies.
Martin
Martin
(6:00) ★★ Rush
(8:05) ★★ Harlem Nights (1989): In the 1930s two gamblingTV-PG
TV-PG
Hour 3 (2007) TV-14 house proprietors fend off the mob. HD TV-14-DL
WPRI 60 Minutes (CC) HD God Friended Me
CBS
HD TV-PG NEW
HD
7:00pm
Powered by
BBC America
BET
12
Maria's
Specials
Symphony
America's Funn. HD Shark Tank (CC) HD (10:01) Shark Tank
TV-PG NEW
TV-PG NEW
(CC) HD TV-PG-L
5
News
Matthew Gilbert can be reached at
gilbert@globe.com. Follow him on
Twitter @MatthewGilbert.
Road to
the CFB
Counterpart (CC)
TV-MA
HD
Champ. Drive (CC)
HD
Housewives/Atl. HD Married/Med. (CC)
TV-14 NEW
HD TV-14 NEW
Dirty John (CC) HD
TV-14 NEW
Watch
NEW
Real H.
Public Affairs Events
Q&A
After Words
John Prendergast, Fidel
Elaine
Epic Log Homes 2
Epic Log Homes 3
Epic Log Homes
Alaska NEW
Last NEW
Homestead Rescue
Alaska NEW
Building Alaska
Building Alaska
Botched HD TV-14 Botched HD TV-14 Busy Tonight NEW
Untold/E.R. TV-14
Untold/E.R. TV-14
Untold/E.R. TV-PG
Worst Cooks (CC)
Beat Bob Beat Bob Beat Bob Beat Bob
HD TV-G NEW
Perfect Obsess. (2018) (CC) HD TV-14
Mommy's/Angel (2018) (CC) HD TV-14-LV
Headliners NEW
Ridic.
Ridic.
Ridic.
Ridic.
Lost City of (CC) HD
Stonehenge (CC)
NEW
HD
(11:05) Ancient
Aliens HD TV-PG
(10:05) Killer Vacation (2018) HD TV-14-V
Mommy's Little (2016) (CC) HD TV-14-V
Headliners NEW
Dateline Extra HD
Ridic.
Ridic.
Ridiculo Ridic.
Mystery (CC) HD
Stonehenge (CC)
NEW
HD
Wild Japan (CC) HD
This Wk. CEO
Days of Thunder
Police Women (CC)
HD TV-14-LV
In Ice Cold Blood
In Ice Cold Blood
In Ice Cold Blood
Snapped TV-PG
★★★ Shawshank Red. (1994): An innocent man gets life. HD TV-14-LV
★★★ Big
Clever/Creation
Susan Graver Live. Deal: Spotlighting hip-hop artists. Live.
Museum NEW
Museum NEW
Houdini NEW
Myster. Museum
★★ Smokey and the Bandit (1977) (CC): A
(10:15) ★★ Smokey/Bandit:
bootlegger ships beer. TV-PG-LV
Bandit makes another run.
Content Ratings: TV-Y Appropriate for all children; TV-Y7 For children age 7 and older; TV-G General audience; TV-PG Parental guidance suggested; TV-14 May be unsuitable for children under 14;
TV-MA Mature audience only Additional symbols: D Suggestive dialogue; FV Fantasy violence; L Strong language; S Sexual activity; V Violence; HD High-Definition; (CC) Close-Captioned
Love & Hip Hop
Black Ink Crew
(10:06) Big Hero 6 (2014) (CC) TV-G
Law & Order TV-PG Law & Order TV-PG
B o s t o n
JA N UA RY 6 , 2 0 1 9
S u n d a y
G l o b e
N9
Movies
Franco­American screen spaghetti
Breathless (1983), based on Breath­
less (1960)
Jim McBride’s remake of Jean-Luc
Godard’s classic isn’t that bad, actually. Richard Gere plays the role made
famous by Jean-Paul Belmondo. It’s
just that the Godard is a landmark in
movie history, and the McBride . . .
isn’t.
CRITERION COLLECTION
Down and Out in Beverly Hills
Boudu Saved from Drowning
STXFILMS
The Upside
The cinematic strands
can get tangled
whenever Hollywood
decides to remake
a French original
UNIVERSAL - PARAMOUNT
Sorcerer
KINO INTERNATIONAL
The Wages of Fear
AP
The Intouchables
B
By Mark Feeney
GLOBE STAFF
r yan Cranston,
currently the
toast of Broadw a y, i n “ N e t work,” is hoping
to become the
toast of the big
screen with “The
Upside.” The comedy, which costars
Kevin Hart and Nicole Kidman, opens
Jan. 11. Hart plays a recently paroled
convict who’s hired to be the helper of
Cranston’s quadriplegic billionaire.
You’ll be shocked to hear that it’s a
buddy picture.
“Network” is based on the movie of
the same name, Sidney Lumet’s scabrous 1976 satire of television news.
“The Upside” is based on a movie, too.
“The Intouchables” (2011) stars François Cluzet, in the Cranston role, Omar
Sy in Hart’s. A massive hit in France,
it’s the second-highest-grossing
French-made film.
France, the oldest US ally, may be
Hollywood’s, too. “The Upside” is only
the latest example of an American re-
make of a French film. Some of the adaptations have been legendarily embarrassing: “Blame It on Rio” (1984)
is based on “Un moment d’égarement” (1977). Some have been legendarily weird: “The Toy,” based on “Le
Jouet” (1976), has Richard Pryor playi n g a n u n e m p l o y e d m a n w h o ’s
“bought” by a rich man (Jackie Gleason) as a toy for his spoiled son. Most
have been legendarily forgettable:
“Diabolique” (1955, 1996), “The Man
Who Loved Women” (1977, 1983),
“Taxi” (1998, 2004). The list is long —
or longue.
Here are 10 pairings that stand out.
Usually, though not always, they stand
out in a good way.
12 Monkeys
La Jetée
toon character, the skunk Pepé Le Pew.
Algiers (1938), based on Pépé le
Moko (1937)
In the American version, Charles
Boyer plays the title role, a French
criminal who hides out in the Casbah
section of the Algerian city. Jean Gabin
plays him in the original. Boyer never
does utter the deathless line “Come
with me to zee Casbah,” but his character did inspire the Warner Bros. car-
Scarlet Street (1945), based on La
Chienne (1931)
Easily the best one-two punch on
this list. Edward G. Robinson and
Joan Bennett star in Fritz Lang’s
nourish remake of Jean Renoir’s masterly morality tale of a mild-mannered middle-aged man who falls
hard, very hard, for a beautiful
younger woman.
Sorcerer (1977), based on The Wages
of Fear (1953)
Director Henri-Georges Clouzot created a genre of one in “Wages”: an existentialist action thriller. Except that
William Friedkin, in his first movie after “The Exorcist,” made it a genre of
two, with his retelling of this story
about a perilous delivery of nitroglycerine in the South American wilderness.
When first released, “Sorcerer”
flopped. Some now prefer it to “Wages.”
PHILLIP CARUSO/UNIVERSAL CITY STUDIOS
NEW YORKER FILMS
Down and Out in Beverly Hills (1986),
based on Boudu Saved from Drowning
(1932)
Renoir again, this time reimagined
by Paul Mazursky. Nick Nolte is the
vagrant who turns upside down and
inside out the affluent lives of Bette
Midler and Richard Dreyfuss.
Three Men and a Baby (1987), based
on Three Men and a Cradle (1985)
Both titles state the basic fish-outof-bassinet premise. The men in the
American version, a massive hit, are
played by Tom Selleck, Ted Danson,
and Steve Guttenberg. What, if anything, does it signify that where the
American title includes an infant the
French one has a piece of furniture?
And God Created Woman (1988),
based on And God Created Woman
(1955)
Roger Vadim directed both versions. The French original made Brigitte Bardot an international sensation. The remake replaced her with
Rebecca De Mornay. And Vadim did
not create another sensation.
12 Monkeys (1995), based on La Jetée
(1962)
Director Terry Gilliam took Chris
Marker’s astonishing, 28-minute compilation of still photographs and
turned it into a 129-minute feature
that stars Bruce Willis and Brad Pitt.
The latter earned his first Oscar nomination (for best supporting actor).
Marker’s short also inspired the 2015
Syfy series.
The Birdcage (1996), based on La
Cage aux Folles (1978)
Robin Williams and Nathan Lane
star as a gay couple trying to play it
straight when they meet their son’s
prospective in-laws. Better known
than either film, perhaps, is the 1983
Broadway musical “La Cage aux
Folles,” based on the French play the
French film is based on.
Fathers’ Day (1997), based on Les
Compères (1983)
Williams stars again, this time
paired with Billy Crystal. Each is told
by an ex-girlfriend (Nastassja Kinski)
that he’s the father of her son. They
join forces to investigate. Like “The
Upside,” it’s a buddy picture — or, if
you prefer, film d’amitié virile.
Mark Feeney can be reached at
mfeeney@globe.com.
SCENE HERE | LOCAL FILMS, FESTIVALS, AND FACES
Films
from Iran
and films
from all
over
By Loren King
A
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
highlight of every new
year is the Museum of
Fine Arts’s Boston Festi­
val of Films from Iran,
which for many years has
brought varied and compelling works
by contemporary Iranian filmmakers
to local audiences. Running Jan. 17-27,
it opens with writer-director Vahid Jalilvand’s “No Date, No Signature,” an international award winner and Iran’s
entry for best foreign language film for
the 2019 Oscars. It’s a taut, neorealist
tale of guilt and morality in the tradition of groundbreaking Iranian filmmakers Asghar Farhadi and the late
Abbas Kiarostami.
“No Date, No Signature” opens with
a car accident, as forensic pathologist
Dr. Nariman (Amir Aghaee) injures an
8-year-old boy in a minor collision with
a motorcycle driven by the child’s father (Navid Mohammadzadeh). Despite Nariman’s insistence, the boy’s father refuses to seek medical attention.
Later, at the hospital where he works,
Nariman learns that the boy has been
brought in for an autopsy after a suspicious death. A fraught reckoning ensues as Nariman and the boy’s parents
wrestle with anger, responsibility, and
shame.
“No Date, No Signature” won the
best director prize, Mohammadzadeh
took best actor honors, at the Venice
Film Festival in 2017.
Another notable film is Milad Alami’s debut feature, “The Charmer,” a
timely drama/romance/thriller that
deals with the plight of Iranian immigrants. Esmail (Ardalan Esmaili), an
Iranian struggling to remain in Denmark, is on a desperate quest to find a
Danish woman who’ll agree to live with
him before his visa runs out. After a series of failed liaisons, Esmail meets
Sara (Soho Rezanejad), a law student
eager to escape her oppressive Iranian
mother and her mother’s circle of aging
Iranian expatriates. As their relationship deepens, Esmail finds himself in
an increasingly complex entanglement.
This year’s festival presents new
films from Mohammad Rasoulof and
Jafar Panahi, two of Iran’s leading filmmakers, who are barred by the Iranian
government from making films. Rasoulof shot “A Man of Integrity” in secret in
rural northern Iran while an as-yet unexecuted prison sentence hung over his
head. Panahi’s “3 Faces” is the fourth
movie he’s made in defiance of the government’s ban. The film won Panahi
the best screenplay award at last year’s
Cannes Film Festival.
Go to mfa.org.
Not for kids only
The 16th annual Belmont World
Film’s Family Festival: Where Stories
Come Alive! bills itself as a children’s
film festival but the event boasts an impressive lineup of international features, shorts, and live events that will
appeal to all ages. It runs Jan. 18-21 at
the Brattle Theatre, in Cambridge, the
Regent Theatre, in Arlington, and the
Studio Cinema, in Belmont. The festival opens at the Regent with “Right in
the Eye” (“En Plein Dans l’Oeil”), a collage of silent films by legendary early
film pioneer Georges Méliès.
Also featured is the New England
premiere of the acclaimed Brazilian animated film “Tito and the Birds,” one of
25 submissions for the 2019 Oscar in
the animated film category. Directed by
Gabriel Bitar, André Catoto, and Gustavo Steinberg, the film uses oil paintings, digital drawings, and animation
DISTRIBFILMS US
Navid Mohammadzadeh stars in “No Date, No Signature.”
to tell a story about fear in contemporary society and how to overcome it.
Films based on well-regarded children’s books include “Rosie and Moussa” (Jan. 19, the Studio), based on the
Belgian book of that title, by Michael
De Cock and Judith Vanistendael;
“Highway Rat,” an animated film from
the popular book by Julia Donaldson
and Axel Scheffler, and featuring the
voices of British actors David Tennant
and Rob Brydon; and “Jim Button and
Luke the Engine Driver,” from Germany, based on the book by Michael Ende
(“The Neverending Story”). Both
screen Jan. 21, at the Brattle.
Go to belmontworldfilm.org.
Loren King can be reached at
loren.king@comcast.net.
B o s t o n
N10
S u n d a y
G l o b e
JA N UA RY 6 , 2 0 1 9
Presented by
Documentaries
AMAZON STUDIOS
Ebb tide for
common decency
in ‘Human Flow’
By Peter Keough
A
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
s is pointed out in
“Human Flow,” the
documentary by
the Chinese artist
and activist Ai
Weiwei, more people have been
forcibly displaced from their
homes — more than 65 million
— than at any time since the
end of World War II. Where do
they all go, those whom war,
famine, plague, genocide, and
barbarism have uprooted from
their normal lives? With cellphone camera and film crew, Ai
visits 23 of the countries where
this flood of humanity has
flowed and, in most cases,
crashed into barriers of prejudice, fear, and chauvinism.
At first, he shows these refugees from unimaginable trauma being welcomed with compassion and aid. A lighthouse
beams into the early dawn as a
rubber boat overloaded with
people makes its treacherous
passage across the sea. It nears
the beach and the men, women,
and children on board disembark into the surf. They are
greeted by aid workers with
blankets, food, and even applause. Ai himself, in one of his
many low-key appearances in
the film (he is like Michael
Moore if Michael Moore were a
figure of benevolence, wisdom,
and wry humor), offers tea to a
shivering young man from Iraq.
But this welcome proves to
be short-lived, and this place a
brief stopping point on a road
to nowhere. For reasons of
crass politics and mere logistics, European countries (and
the United States) have closed
their borders to those seeking
asylum. That has resulted in the
back-up of thousands of desperate people in the limbo of makeshift camps outside barbedwire fences patrolled by armored vehicles.
On the Greek border with
Macedonia, thousands are
stranded, faced with the option
of returning to the nightmare
they came from or being arrested and deported. The police disperse them with tear gas. Children are overcome. A young
man comforts his older brother
CRAIG F. WALKER/GLOBE STAFF/FILE
Artist and activist Ai
Weiwei shot film of
refugees (top) near a
camp in Greece for his
2017 documentary
“Human Flow.”
who weeps in despair. “Tomorrow we’ ll go to Germany. Or
Turkey,” the younger brother
says. “Just tell me what to do.”
The lucky ones find a place
in a refugee camp, many of
which have been in existence
for generations. The sheer scale
of the crisis is staggering. There
are 2 million displaced persons
in Lebanon alone, a third of its
population. One striking shot
taken high above from a drone
shows a geometric gridwork
like a circuit board. The drone
zooms closer, and hundreds of
antlike figures are visible, then
a desert full of tents as far as the
eye can see. And the individual
stories are heartbreaking: a
man standing in a crude graveyard shows the identity cards of
all his family members who
have perished; a woman with
her back to the camera vomits
into a pail as she recounts the
horror and hopelessness of her
family’s plight.
One of the world’s great artists, Ai might seem at times to
be over-aestheticizing his subject. In one sequence, a tiger
paces in a deep pit — a facile
metaphor, one might think, for
the human multitudes trapped
in the limbo of displacement,
and the younger generations
who might turn their rage and
desperation into radicalized violence.
But his point is subtler. The
tiger, for some reason, had been
smuggled into the Palestinian
territory of Gaza through a tunnel from Egypt. An animal protection agency took it into its
care; and, as a spokesman explains, they managed to coordinate numerous bureaucracies
in many countries to get the tiger safe passage to a preserve in
South Africa. If such barriers
can be overcome for an animal,
as magnificent as it is, the
spokesman suggests, why can’t
the same be done for people?
“Human Flow” screens Jan.
9 at 7:30 p.m. at the Museum of
Fine Arts.
Go to www.mfa.org /
programs/film/human-flow.
Peter Keough can be reached at
petervkeough@gmail.com.
In the heartland, on the bayou, in the swamp, in the limelight
By Peter Keough
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
One of the best films of 2018,
Fred Wiseman’s “Monrovia, In­
diana” may seem a little rosier
than many of the
DOC TALK documentaries
he has made in
his five-decade career. A meticulously observed, precisely edited study of a small farming
community, with its charms,
troubles, characters, and insti-
INFO VALID 1/06/19 ONLY
()
G
5
8
Bargain show times are shown in
parentheses
SIMONS IMAX THEATRE
New England Aquarium, Central Wharf
617-973-5200
Restrictions apply/No Passes
5 8 DIG
Handicapped accessible
www.neaq.org
Stadium Seating
CALL THEATER FOR SHOWTIMES
6
Hearing Impaired
AD
Audio Description
I Rear Window Captioning
DOL Dolby Stereo
DIG Digital Sound
DSS Dolby Surround Sound
K
tutions, the film does not delve
directly into politics and never
touches on the election of President Trump, for whom most
Monrovia’s citizens probably
voted. But that reality lies uneasily below the surface of images of gleaming acres of corn,
listless high school classrooms,
and testy town meetings. In the
end, Monrovia proves to be a
microcosm of much that is awry
in America today.
Descriptive Video Service
The Boston Globe Movie Directory is a paid
advertisement. Listings appear at the sole
discretion of each cinema. Towns may
appear out of alphabetical order so that
listings will remain unbroken from column
to column
ARLINGTON
CAPITOL THEATRE
204 Massachussetts Ave. 781-648-4340
6 I DIG AD
BROOKLINE
COOLIDGE CORNER THEATRE
290 Harvard St. 617-734-2500
5 6
www.coolidge.org
ON THE BASIS OF SEX (PG-13) 11:00, 1:45,
4:00, 7:00, 9:45
IF BEALE STREET COULD TALK (R) 11:15,
2:00, 4:30, 7:15, 9:55
THE FAVOURITE (R) 11:30, 1:30, 3:30,
6:45, 9:30
SHOPLIFTERS (R) 4:15
GREEN BOOK (PG-13) 6:30, 9:15
BOLSHOI BALLET: DON QUIXOTE (2018)
(NR) 10:00
LEXINGTON
LEXINGTON VENUE
www.capitoltheatreusa.com
1794 Massachussetts Ave. 781-861-6161
MARY QUEEN OF SCOTS (R) 1:40, 4:40,
5 DOL DSS
7:25
VICE (R) 12:45, 3:45, 6:30
THE FAVOURITE (R) 4:00, 6:45
RALPH BREAKS THE INTERNET (PG) 1:15
MARY POPPINS RETURNS (PG) 1:00, 4:00,
7:00
THE MULE (R) 1:30, 4:30, 7:15
SPIDER-MAN: INTO THE SPIDER-VERSE
SOMERVILLE
(PG) 1:20, 4:20, 7:20
SOMERVILLE THEATRE
A STAR IS BORN (R) 7:15
55 Davis Square 617-625-5700
5 6 I DIG AD
BOSTON
ARTSEMERSON: PARAMOUNT CENTER
559 Washington St. 617-824-8000
5 8 DOL
www.artsemerson.org
CALL THEATER FOR SHOWTIMES
http://somervilletheatre.com/
AQUAMAN (PG-13) 1:30, 4:30, 7:40
BOHEMIAN RHAPSODY (PG-13) 2:10, 5:10,
8:10
THE FAVOURITE (R) 1:40, 4:40, 7:20
ROMA (R) 1:45, 7:45
VICE (R) 2:00, 5:00, 8:00
WELCOME TO MARWEN (PG-13) 4:45
“Monrovia, Indiana” screens
on Jan 13 at 4:30 and 7:30 p.m.
at the Brattle Theatre.
Go to/www.brattlefilm.org/
2019/01/13/monrovia-indiana
Draining the swamp I
For some they are cute pets,
for others a source of income,
but for most they are an invasive species threatening the
ecosystem of southern Louisiana and spreading to other
parts of the South. The nutria,
rodents the size of a small dog,
with dagger-like orange teeth,
were introduced into the bayou
region from South America
during the Depression by an entrepreneur who wanted to
breed them for their pelts. The
nutria industry boomed, but
when anti-fur activists in the
1980s stifled the market, the
creatures were left on their
own. They proliferated, devoured the plants that protected the land from erosion, and
became an ecological nightmare. Quinn Costello, Chris
Metzler, and Jeff Springer’s
amusing but alarming documentary, “Rodents of Unusual
Size” (2017), is a tale of unintended consequences and unexpected resourcefulness.
“Rodents of Unusual Size”
can be seen on PBS Independent Lens on Jan. 14 at 10 p.m.
Online streaming begins Jan.
15.
Go to www.pbs.org/independentlens/films/rodents-ofunusual-size.
Draining the swamp II
There once was a time when
if politicians said they were going to drain the swamp, they
meant it.
As Randall MacLowry’s dry
but richly informative and alltoo topical documentary “The
Swamp” explains, for years
Florida’s vast Everglades was
regarded as a wasteland, hundreds of square miles of muck
inhabited by alligators, bugs,
and the resolute, indigenous
Seminole tribe, who were driven there by the US Army after
ZIPPORAH FILMS
“Monrovia, Indiana” profiles the small farming community
(Main Street, above). “Rodents of Unusual Size” tells the
story of southern Louisiana’s struggles with nutria (below).
PBS’s “American Experience”
o n Ja n . 1 5 a t 9 p . m . “ T h e
Swamp” will also be available
on DVD from PBS Distribution
and can be purchased at ShopPBS.org. Online viewing begins
on Jan. 16 at PBS.org.
Go to www.pbs.org/wgbh/
americanexperience/films/
swamp.
Portrait of the actress
TILAPIA FILM
being uprooted from their land.
In 1881, however, the entrepreneur Hamilton Disston saw it
as an opportunity — if it could
be drained, it would yield rich
farmland and valuable real estate. The endeavor failed — and
probably killed him.
But others — capitalists,
hucksters, and politicians —
took up the challenge. Dredging, draining, and building levies and canals, they reclaimed
much of the swamp for development, only to see nature, in
the form of rain, drought, and
hurricanes, turn their efforts into calamities. Meanwhile, some
saw the Everglades as the natural wonder it was and sought to
preser ve it , and, amid the
scramble for profits, managed
to create one of America’s greatest national parks.
“The Swamp” can be seen on
The Austrian-born actress
Romy Schneider, the subject of
E m i l y A t e f ’s d o c u d r a m a
“3 Days in Quiberon” (2018),
maintained a career of outstanding artistic achievement
despite personal tragedies, professional frustrations, and the
persistent harassment of a sensationalistic media. She died in
1982, at 43.
Atef focuses her film on an
interview Schneider unwisely
permitted a year before her
death while she was convalescing — or as the film claims, undergoing rehab for alcoholism
— at the resort town of the title
on the coast of Brittany. Despite
her previous bad experiences
with the press, Schneider,
wrenchingly portrayed by Marie Bäumer, allows an in-depth
interview with a callow reporter from the German magazine
Stern. He unscrupulously plies
her with booze (for a rehab facility, this one is pretty lax) and
manipulates her with prying,
sometimes abusive questioning. She accommodates him by
spilling out a tale filled with
more mishaps and tragedies
than found in many of her movies, which include Orson
Welles’s “The Trial” (1962) and
Claude Sautet’s “A Simple Story” (1978).
We learn that her father was
an actor who starred in comedies for Joseph Goebbels under
the Third Reich and her mother
was an actress enamored of
Hitler. With this show-biz background, she broke into the German film scene as a teenager in
a series of frothy films about
Sissi, the future Habsburg Empress Elisabeth. German-speaking audiences identified her
with that role and resented it
when she broke out of the typecasting to play darker, adult
characters.
They also feasted on the tabloid coverage of her private life
— her heartbreaking affair with
the actor Alain Delon, the suicide of her ex-husband Harry
Meyen, a miscarriage, her
drinking, and financial problems brought on by poor judgment and corrupt advisers. In
short, a life not unlike that of
many other women destroyed
by the entertainment industry.
Shot in black and white,
evoking the photos taken by
Schneider’s friend and former
lover Robert Lebeck during the
interview (as well as Edmond
Richard’s stark cinematography
in “The Trial”), the film ends on
a bittersweet note. Not so Schneider’s life. Her 14-year-old
son died in a freak accident
shortly after the interview, and
the circumstances of her own
death, suspected to be suicide,
remain a mystery.
“3 Days in Quiberon”
screens on Jan. 13 at 11 a.m. at
the Coolidge Corner Theatre. It
is being presented by the
Goethe Institute Boston.
Go to www.coolidge.org /
films/3-days-quiberon.
Peter Keough can be reached at
petervkeough@gmail.com.
JA N UA RY 6 , 2 0 1 9
B o s t o n
S u n d a y
G l o b e
N11
The Enthusiast
WHAT TO BUY, WHERE TO EAT, WHAT TO DRINK & MORE
TABLES
OPENINGS, CLOSINGS,
AND CHATTER FROM
THE RESTAURANT SCENE
Closings: It’s been a busy, bittersweet few weeks of notable closings:
L’Espalier in the Back Bay, Shepard in
Cambridge, and Erbaluce in Bay Village each ended 2018 with a final
toast. Now add Towne (900 Boylston
St. at Dalton Street) to the list. The
Back Bay restaurant from the Lyons
Group (Back Bay Social Club, Lucky’s
Lounge, Scampo) has shuttered. A
rep for the restaurant group says that
Towne will reemerge as a new concept to “fit the dining preferences of
the guests who frequent the Back
Bay.” The remade restaurant will debut in the spring.
PHOTOS BY LANE TURNER/GLOBE STAFF
QUICK BITE
A new pita parlor for West Roxbury
What you’re eating You can choose
to “fill it,” “plate it,” or “toss it”: Pick a
protein such as spiced, grilled chicken;
meatballs with lemon and herbs; or
chickpea falafel. Then add it to that
excellent pita with salad and tahini, to
rice with caramelized onions and vegetables, or to a salad with lemony
dressing. (You can also buy bags of pita to go.) There are sides such as
spicy hummus, lentil salad, and roasted cauliflower. A kids’ menu offers
pasta and chicken tenders. For dessert, there’s soft-serve custard.
B Y D EV RA F I R ST
G L O B E S TA F F
Where to Bonapita, a new West Roxbury branch of the quick-service Mediterranean restaurant located downtown.
What for Warm, puffy pita baked in
house and other food from Johnson &
Wales-trained chef Ilan Barniv.
The scene In a space that was once a
burger joint, customers line up at the
counter to order sandwiches, salads,
and rice plates. Staffers dressed in
black dish up ingredients kept warm in
colorful enameled casseroles, adding
pickled turnips and slugs of hot sauce.
In a room outfitted with a Gaines-worthy amount of shiplap and bright red
chairs, families eat together off metal
trays, teenagers on their phones pretending to ignore their parents. A coffee bar along one side displays bags of
Fazenda beans. A group of kids takes
over a communal table festooned with
balloons for a birthday party, as Richard Marx croons that he will be right
here waiting for us over the sound
system. Barniv makes the rounds, introducing himself.
Care for a drink? Offerings include
Spindrift seltzers, fresh-squeezed
mint lemonade, and an array of coffee
drinks. There are smoothies, too.
Overheard Talk of New Year’s resolutions, healthy eating, and the joys of
hot sauce. “Mom, we also want pita,”
a girl calls to a parent making a foray
to the counter for more provisions. A
man takes a bite of his sandwich and
smiles: “The falafel is legit.” “OK, so
what here is vegan?,” a customer asks
the staff. A couple gets up to leave.
“Thank you so much for coming,” Barniv says, and they promise to be back
soon.
75 Spring St., West Roxbury, 978­
224­4030, www.bonapita.com
From top: Owner Ilan Barniv in
Bonapita’s dining area; falafel in a
pita with pickled turnips; a rice
plate with meatballs.
MOVIE STARS
New releases
YYY Border One of 2018’s stranger
and more beguiling movies, a Swedish
drama that backs slowly into fantasy
and folklore. Actress Eva Melander is
remarkable under a heavy layer of
prosthetics as a very homely customs
officer with very unusual gifts. In
Swedish, with subtitles. (110 min., R)
(Ty Burr)
Previously released
YY Aquaman “Justice League” introduced Jason Momoa’s tall-dark-andtatted take on DC’s aquatic superhero
— Aquabro? But none of this solo outing’s other, more faithfully translated
aspects feel as bold. While Momoa’s
Rock-lite swagger is diverting enough,
he could also do with some inspired
complementary touches. There isn’t
enough of that from director James
Wan and costars Amber Heard, Patrick Wilson, and Nicole Kidman.
(143 min., PG-13) (Tom Russo)
YY Bohemian Rhapsody The Freddie
Mercury rock ’n’ roll biopic turns out
to be more fun to think about than actually experience. Rami Malek is mesmerizingly opaque as the singer, but
the movie has weak dialogue, no point
of view, and a nervous approach to
Mercury’s sexuality that comes close to
demonizing it. Good songs, though.
(134 min., PG-13) (Ty Burr)
YY Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of
Grindelwald Eddie Redmayne, Katherine Waterston, Dan Fogler, and Alison Sudol return from the first install-
Openings: The neighborhood near
Symphony Hall has long been a dining
desert, but there is a glimmer of activity in the form of Westland (10 Westland Ave. at Massachusetts Avenue),
an American tavern now serving dinner and cocktails. It’s a comfortingly
familiar menu: roast chicken, steak
frites, oysters, burgers, and plenty of
local beers. They’ll add lunch and
brunch soon.
As if Market Basket could get any
better, the supermarket chain has
opened its first-ever Massachusetts liquor store, MB Spirits. Stock up on
wine, beer, hard alcohol, and bar tools
at the Waltham location (120 Market
Place Drive) — preferably after doing
battle in the grocery aisles.
In Davis Square, Revival Café
(197 Elm St. at Windom Street) has
begun serving coffee, breakfast and
lunch sandwiches, quiche, and pastries in what was once upon a time
Bertucci’s. This location is smaller
than Revival’s Alewife counterpart,
but it has a walk-up window for quick
service. Liza Shirazi (from the former
Crema Café in Harvard Square) and
Steve “Nookie” Postal (Common­
wealth) run both branches.
Devra First can be reached at
devra.first@globe.com. Follow her on Twitter
@devrafirst.
ment in the J.K. Rowling franchise.
They all look a bit bewildered. Jude
Law, as a young Albus Dumbledore, is
on firmer ground. Johnny Depp’s title
baddie is part Billy Idol, part Bond villain. In a good way. (134 min., PG-13)
(Mark Feeney)
YYY Free Solo Remember Tom
Cruise doing a little “Mission: Impossible” R&R years back by rock climbing
without a rope? Try checking out an
entire documentary feature devoted to
climber Alex Honnold’s pursuit of this
mind-boggling sport, notably his bid
to become the first free soloist to scale
Yosemite’s monolithic El Capitan. Go
figure that the year’s most outrageously harrowing action movie turns out
to be from National Geographic.
(100 min., PG-13) (Tom Russo)
YY The Grinch Not only is Benedict
Cumberbatch’s Grinch situationally
not quite the Mean One of the classic
cartoon, the movie also has him playing the character with a light tone that
doesn’t approach Boris Karloff’s
grouchy gravitas. It’s a reworking that
feels unnecessary and uninspired,
even if it’s too genial to be flat-out offputting. (90 min., PG) (Tom Russo)
YY Mary Queen of Scots The twist of
Josie Rourke’s film — only intermittently realized, sadly — is that the historical struggle between Elizabeth I
(Margot Robbie) and Mary Stuart
(Saoirse Ronan) was not queen vs.
queen or Protestant vs. Catholic but
sister vs. sister, and the real rivals were
all those cursed men. The actresses are
fine, the film wobbles unconvincingly.
(124 min., R) (Ty Burr)
YYY½ Ralph Breaks the Inter­
NADIM CARLSEN/NEON
Eero Milonoff and Eva
Melander in “Border.”
net This clever, touching, and dizzyingly animated “Wreck-It Ralph” sequel has a broad vision that addresses
all of the first movie’s under-realized
elements. Visually, the online world
that Ralph (John C. Reilly) and cutiepie pal Vanellope (Sarah Silverman)
are navigating couldn’t be more colorful. Yet their quest to find a crucial arcade game part also has an appealing
narrative. With Gal Gadot and Taraji P.
Henson. (112 min., PG) (Tom Russo)
YYYY Roma From writer-director
Alfonso Cuarón (“Gravity,” “Y Tu Mama Tambien”), a memory play that
feels expansive enough to take in the
universe. The story of a nanny (Yalitza
Aparicio) to a middle-class Mexico
City family in 1970, the film is gorgeously shot, rife with details both
cruel and beautiful, and altogether
marvelous. Please see it in a theater if
you can. In Spanish and Mixtecan,
with subtitles. (135 min., R) (Ty Burr)
REAGAN BYRNE
Finally, new South End tiki bar
Shore Leave (11 William E. Mullins
Way at Harrison Avenue) launches an
in-house sushi parlor, No Relation,
this weekend. Shore Leave’s Colin
Lynch (above) — who did time at elite
sushi destination O Ya — oversees the
nine-seat restaurant-within-a-restaurant. There are 6 p.m. and 8 p.m. seatings, with a 14-course menu that
changes nightly. Buy tickets (starting
at $95 per person) on Tock
(www.exploretock.com).
KARA BASKIN
YYYY Shoplifters A wise little marvel from Japan’s Hirokazu Kore-eda,
about a makeshift clan of con artists
who become a loving family almost in
spite of themselves. As the mother,
Sakura Ando gives one of the year’s
finest performances, but you have to
look closely to see it. Winner of the
Palme d’Or at Cannes. In Japanese,
with subtitles. (121 min., R) (Ty Burr)
YYY½ A Star Is Born The latest version of the unkillable showbiz saga
(filmed before in 1937, 1954, and
1976) has heart, soul, and sinew.
Above all, it has Lady Gaga in the
lead and a grizzled Bradley Cooper opposite her and behind the camera.
The midsection is baggy, but the opening hour is as good as mainstream
moviemaking gets in the 21st century.
(135 min., R) (Ty Burr)
Y½ Vice There’s a good movie to be
made about ex-VP Dick Cheney. This
isn’t it. Writer-director Adam McKay
goes twice as hard on the antic metamovie style that worked well in “The
Big Short,” with exhausting, self-congratulatory results. Christian Bale is
OK as Cheney, but Sam Rockwell is a
hilariously dense George W. Bush.
(132 min., R) (Ty Burr)
Y Welcome to Marwen Virtually
nothing works in this tale of a braindamaged small-town man (Steve
Carell) who finds healing in a miniature backyard WWII village peopled
by fantasy warrior babes. Director
Robert Zemeckis turns a true story into queasy sub-“Forrest Gump” quirk.
Do yourself a favor: Watch the great
2010 doc “Marwencol,” on which this
is based. (116 min., PG-13) (Ty Burr)
N12
Books
B o s t o n
S u n d a y
G l o b e
JA N UA RY 6 , 2 0 1 9
Books
The race
that left
the Dems
in tatters
The battle between Carter
and Kennedy marked
the end of one era
and the start of another
L
B Y J O H N P O WE R S
G L O B E C O R R E S P ON D EN T
ong before Ronald Reagan took office the Democratic Party had been coming unglued. The 1963
assassination of John Kennedy was the first in a
parade of horribles that included the loss of the
“Solid South’’ after the passing of the 1964 Civil
Rights Act, an unpopular Asian war, Lyndon Johnson’s
withdrawal from the 1968 presidential race, the killing of
Robert Kennedy, and the turbulent convention that nominated Hubert Humphrey and led to the election of Richard
Nixon, who went on to swamp George McGovern in 1972
— a South Dakotan who carried Massachusetts but none of
the other 49 states, including his own.
The final fracture to a line of
progressive leadership that
began with FDR was inCAMELOT’S END
cumbent Jimmy Carter’s
Kennedy vs. Carter
1980 loss to Ronald
Reagan, which also
and the Fight that
cost the Democrats
Broke the Democratic
Party
the Senate for the first
time since 1955 and
By Jon Ward
kept them out of the
Twelve, 400 pp., $28
White House for a dozen years until the drought
was broken by Bill Clinton.
In “Camelot’s End’’ political
correspondent Jon Ward provides
a thorough and readable chronicle of how the
bitter primary fight between Carter and Ted Kennedy and
the Democrats’ misplaced nostalgia for the past sabotaged
their future and how their division eerily foreshadowed the
Republicans’ own civil war in 2016 that put Donald Trump
in the White House.
It’s quite likely that Carter would have lost to Reagan
on his own. The untimely confluence of rising inflation,
soaring interest rates, unemployment, energy crisis, Iran
hostage crisis, and the former Georgia governor’s toneWARD, Page N13
GLOBE STAFF PHOTO ILLUSTRATION; UPI PHOTO/FILE 1980
BIBLIOPHILES
Unabridged novels feel rich
after a youth of condensed tales
B Y A MY S U T H E R LA N D | G L O B E C O R R E S P ON D EN T
A
cclaimed novelist and poet Ha Jin turns to biography with his newest book, “The
Banished Immortal: A Life of Li Bai,” which traces the nomadic life of the influential
Tang Dynasty poet. Since moving to the United States from his native China in
1985, Jin has won many awards, including a National Book Award for his novel
“Waiting.” A professor in Boston University’s creative writing program, Jin will
discuss his book at 7 p.m. Jan. 8 at Brookline Booksmith.
JUAN VITA/AFP/GETTY IMAGES
Once the US wanted to build
a highway — not a wall
By Michael Upchurch
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
One giveaway that you’re a geography nerd: You keep obsessing about
the Darien Gap.
What is it about that 60-mile
stretch between Yaviza, Panama, and
Turbo, Colombia, that has resisted
any attempts at road connection for
close to a century? Will there ever be a
time when you can hop in your car in
Prudhoe Bay, Alaska, and drive
straight through to Tierra Del Fuego?
In “The Longest Line on the Map,”
historian Eric Rutkow (“American
Canopy: Trees, Forests, and the Making of a Nation”) chronicles the complex, erratic process by which the governments of the United States, Mexico, Central America, and South
America attempted to build a reliable
Venezuelan migrants walk on the
Pan-American Highway after
clearing their entry to Peru.
land connection between their countries since the mid-19th century. The
initial dream was of stepping onto a
railway platform in New York City and
hearing the conductor call, “All
aboard for Buenos Aires.” So Rutkow
spends the first half of his book detailing the efforts to create a train network that would serve all the Americas.
The first of his transit visionaries
was a controversial figure name Hinton Rowan Helper, a racist abolitionist (one of his arguments for ending
slavery was that “the forced labor of
blacks . . . undercut the economic
prospects of poor southern whites”)
who in 1866, during a brutally rough
boat passage from Buenos Aires to
New York, grew convinced there had
to be a better way of making the trip.
He found himself indulging in “a futuristic reverie that seemed ripped
from the pages of a Jules Verne novel:
a ten-thousand-mile-long hemispherRUTKOW, Page N13
THE
LONGEST
LINE ON
THE MAP:
The United
States,
the Pan­
American
Highway,
and the
Quest to
Link the
Americas
By Eric
Rutkow
Scribner,
438 pp., $30
BOOKS: What are you reading?
JIN: A wonderful translation of Tolstoy’s “Anna Karenina” by the British
scholar Rosamund Bartlett. I also read
a book by an African author, Mia Couto’s “Sleepwalking Land,” which is
quite good. When my students mention a book I read it.
BOOKS: Who are some of the other authors you’ve discovered from your students?
JIN: Last year they mentioned a Canadian author, Wayson Choy. He’s a
wonderful stylist. I read basically all
his books. His best known is the novel
“All That Matters.” He’s written memoirs too.
BOOKS: What are you reading for your
own research?
JIN: I’m working on a novel about a
singer so I’m reading quite a bit of
nonfiction, memoirs — for instance,
“Girl Singer,” an autobiography by
Rosemary Clooney written with June
Barthel, which is very interesting. The
upheaval of Clooney’s personal life
was crazy.
BOOKS: Has your taste in fiction
changed over time?
JIN: Sure because for years I’ve been
reading so much in English. For instance, when you read the Bible in
English it’s a different kind of beauty.
It’s very straightforward. You can’t be
‘When you
read the
Bible in
English
it’s a
different
kind of
beauty.’
ambiguous. In Chinese ambiguity is
often viewed as beauty. It’s a kind of
sick beauty because you can’t be outspoken.
BOOKS: Did you have any books in
your house growing up in China?
JIN: For many years, we had only one
book, “Selected Works of Mao TseTung.” Everyone had a copy of that big
volume. Then in 1971, I bought three
or four books, including [the classics]
Luo Guanzhong’s “Three Kingdoms”
and Shi Nai’an’s “Water Margin.”
BOOKS: Did growing up with no books
affect your relationship with them?
JIN: Absolutely. When I came to the
BIBLIOPHILES, Page N13
JA N UA RY 6 , 2 0 1 9
B o s t o n
S u n d a y
G l o b e
Books
N13
Building
a highway,
not a wall
uRUTKOW
Continued from Page N12
CHIP SOMODEVILLA/GETTY IMAGES/FILE
‘Revolution’ lost in muddled prose
By Annalisa Quinn
N
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
ovelist and poet Wendy
Guerra’s “Revolution
Sunday’’ is a work about
paranoia, authoritarianism, and the impossibility of free
minds under surveillance. But I’ll be
honest. What I will remember most
about it is the pee.
Take a deep breath and read
these sentences aloud: “A golden iridescent string appears like an arrow, the smell of cologne breaks
through the tiles. The magic string
lands and connects me with life: water on water; I wake up and mark
my turf.”
Whether you should read “Revolution Sunday’’ depends on your reaction to that passage. If you found
it lyrical, then this is the book for
you. If you (like me) said, “What?
Ew,” then you should leave now. The
whole thing is like this: Getting high
is “[s]urrenduring to the mystic
smoke.” A bed shared by lovers is an
“immense combat zone . . . splattered with our ardor.”
What could be a restive, paranoid novel about the effects of Cuban state surveillance is marred by a
need for exaggerated poeticism at
all costs, including coherence. “Revolution Sunday’’ should be exciting:
There are gunshots and glamorous
parties, spies and traitors, kidnappings and affairs. At one point, Sting
appears at the narrator ’s door,
clutching an in-flight magazine. But
REVOLUTION SUNDAY
By Wendy Guerra
Translated from the Spanish by
Achy Obejas
Melville House, 191 pp.,
paperback, $16.99
instead the novel feels muted and
muddled.
The narrator, a poet named Cleo,
has spent a year in bed, depressed
over the deaths of her parents in a
mysterious car crash. What finally
rouses her is the need to go to Spain
to collect a literary award. When she
returns she discovers her house has
been bugged. (Guerra similarly
came under surveillance in her
homeland after winning the Bruguera Novel Prize in 2006.)
The men who visit her act like
old friends, but she knows they are
informants. Increasingly she begins
to doubt what she knows about her
parents. Paranoia mounts. “I felt naked and observed in the heart of my
house,” she writes, infected by “the
sickness that is Cuba.”
A partial salvation appears in the
form of Gerónimo, an actor who
shows up at her door wanting to dig
into her family history for a movie.
They begin an affair, under the eyes
of the intelligence services: “Today,
the room is like a baseball stadium
. . . Completely exposed in the box,
we possess each other. And from
there, the public watches the game
without scruples. We are blindfolded and they see it as a drill, emotionless, which is why, in the pocket created by our bodies, everything is
happening as if we were alone.”
T hat private pocke t recalls
George Orwell’s description of totalitarian surveillance in “1984’’:
“Nothing was your own, except the
few cubic centimetres in your skull.”
But, as with Orwell’s centimeters of
free mind, Cleo’s pocket of privacy
proves permeable, and the state invades every aspect of life, no matter
how private. Her house may be full
of microphones, but the “truth is
that the real microphone — after
years of whispering and refraining
from saying what you think — the
real artifact is already inside you.”
Occasional passages such as
these hint at what this novel would
look like if bits of pretty incoherence
weren’t clogging the drains. Guerra
sometimes succeeds in creating a
mood: “I felt as lonely as a dog abandoned on the highway,” Cleo writes
at one point. Stray details can be
captivating: the precise, loving ritual of making Cuban coffee. The way
powerful men wear ratty guerrilla
fatigues to show off their places in
the regime: “Power doesn’t need to
show off its luxury,” she explains.
“What’s truly luxurious is to own a
country and strip it of all style.”
But this plain eloquence is the exception. Take this passage, for instance: “Apocryphal stories and secrets settle on my body, which is a
map, a vital drawing, to guide me on
a lucid tour that travels from feelings to actions and possesses me.” Is
it possible to extract any kind of real
meaning from this, or is it just a big
perfumed cloud?
Difficult prose has to be earned:
There has to be something worthwhile behind it. For instance, this
year’s wonderful Booker Prize-winning novel about paranoia and surveillance in Northern Ireland, Anna
Burns’s “Milkman,’’ is also opaque
and thorny. But there is the sense
that her words have real meaning
and that the reader’s work to find it
is rewarded. So many of Cleo’s
thoughts seem to dissolve like mist:
“ We’re tomorrow. Nobody is in
charge of today, no one prepares for
the transition. Tomorrow is today
and the future doesn’t exist because
those who govern us know they’re
living their own futures now.”
The novel is dotted with Cleo’s
poems, and much of their spirit invades the prose as well. At one
point, Cleo describes wandering
sleepless through a foreign city, experiencing what she calls the “lethargy from which poetry is born.”
Some poets talk about muses, or divine inspiration. Cleo’s starting
point is lethargy. I circled the word
frantically. Finally, something in
“Revolution Sunday’’ seemed to
make complete, perfect sense.
Annalisa Quinn is a freelance
reporter and critic.
Ha Jin and feeling the intensity of a book
uBIBLIOPHILES
Continued from Page N12
States in ’85 [to study at Brandeis
University], I began buying lots of
books at book sales and yard sales
because I thought I would set up a
personal library when I went back
to China. I had 4,000. I rented a
room for them. Then [after Tiananmen Square] I couldn’t go back. A
friend of mine picked up 16 boxes
when she returned to China, and I
dumped the rest. Every week I put a
few boxes on the curb for the trash.
It was a terrible experience.
BOOKS: When you studied English
literature in China which authors
did you read?
JIN: When I was an English major
we read a lot abridged novels in
English, such as Jack London’s “The
Call of the Wild.” His books were
never banned because he was
viewed as proletarian. Basically all
the Charles Dickens we read was
abridged. “Great Expectations” was
just 100 pages long. When you read
the whole novel it’s 600 pages. It’s a
different book with its abundance
and exuberance. The abridged
books were funny books. They were
abridged by Russians, who left in
some Russian words, and the Chi-
nese added Chinese words to explain the English words.
BOOKS: Who were the first American authors who spoke to you?
JIN: We had a graduate seminar in
which we read Faulkner’s “Light in
August,” “Absalom, Absalom,” and
“The Sound and the Fury.” That was
the first time we read full books
rather than abridged versions. With
those we couldn’t see the complete
work so the emotions of the books
were really fragmented. We couldn’t
feel the work. Faulkner was the first
time I could feel the intensity of a
book. I couldn’t understand every-
thing, but I could feel it.
BOOKS: Do books ever make you
laugh or cry?
JIN: Oh yes, there are books that
make me very emotional. When I
read Van Gogh’s “Letters from
Provence” I would cry every time.
But it’s a good feeling. It’s very cathartic.
Follow us on Facebook or Twitter
@GlobeBiblio. Amy Sutherland is
the author, most recently, of
“Rescuing Penny Jane’’ and she can
be reached at
amysutherland@mac.com.
ic railway between North and South America.”
Over the next 60 years, an unwieldy array of governments, investors, surveyors,
engineers, and laborers worked to make
this a reality. Convenience of travel was just
one motive for pursuing this rail connection. Another was the US ambition to supplant Europe as the main facilitator of
trade with South and Central America. The
boosting of a “Pan-American” spirit was
the icing on the cake, especially during periods when Europe was mired in war and
ocean shipping lanes were threatened. At
some point every party involved was gungho to get a rail line between the Americas
completed — to no avail.
One obstacle was that most Central
American countries naturally gave priority
to cross-isthmus transit corridors for exporting their agricultural goods via the Pacific or Atlantic. Others included changes
of policy that came with every change of
US presidential administration and the unpredictable actions of whichever dictators
happened to rule certain Central American
countries at any given time.
Rutkow repeatedly outlines situations
where the United States is on board, the
rulers of all the countries involved give
their go-ahead; money is allocated; and
surveyors hired. Then comes a financial
panic, a military coup, sudden resistance
from lawmakers, or the discovery that the
swampy or mountainous terrain to be traversed is far more impenetrable and disease-ridden than anticipated.
The ambiguity of US motives was a
problem, too. Was an overland connection
down the isthmus really intended to boost
economic growth and hemispheric harmony? Or was it just a way to make the next
US military intervention in some renegade
Central American republic that much easier?
The biggest shift in the agenda came in
the 1920s when it grew apparent that the
automobile age was superseding the railroad era. The idea of a train connection
was dropped. But plotting the future highway’s route, the subject of the book’s second half, still meant navigating “not only a
tropical environment but also the politics
of up to half a dozen foreign countries.”
Rutkow takes you through every intricate permutation of the planning, sometimes to the point of exhaustion. At times
“The Longest Line on the Map” resembles
a relay race, with smart, young, hardy engineers and diplomats thinking they can
tame this infrastructural beast, only to
cede their ground decades later as death,
disease, or sheer weariness overcome
them.
It’s a testament to Rutkow’s skills at distilling information that he keeps the dozens of players clear in your mind as his narrative proceeds. He even delivers some
droll quick-sketch portraits of the variously
ornery, perverse, or valiant characters involved. Back-room deals and international
conferences were 90 percent of the process.
When actual ground is broken or formidable geographical obstacles are overcome,
it’s a hallelujah moment: Look, a road! A
bridge! A tunnel! Some are even paved!
The final irony, Rutkow concludes, is
that the “great imagined hemispheric infrastructure project in the era of President
Donald Trump is no longer a road to connect the Americas but a wall to divide
them. The Pan-American Highway, though
incomplete, remains today a reminder that
it was not always this way. The road is a
monument to a forgotten path.”
Michael Upchurch is the former Seattle
Times book critic.
Carter, Kennedy, and the race that broke the Democrats
uWARD
Continued from Page N12
deaf approach made him the most unpopular chief executive in polling history. The 1976 ascension of the devoutly Baptist peanut farmer owed
much to a post-Watergate desire for
reform and rectitude and also to Carter’s savvy about the redesigned nomination process, which rewarded entering every primary and caucus and
piling up delegates early amid a
crowded field.
Still, Carter defeated Gerald Ford
by barely a percentage point in the
popular tally and his 57-vote margin
in the Electoral College was the smallest in 60 years. When the economy
continued to sink, opportunity beckoned for Kennedy and those who
yearned for a return to the early
1960s. “The Kennedys . . . had become a kind of royal family in exile,”
wrote political columnist Jules Witcover.
Ironically Nixon had assumed that
Kennedy would be his 1972 re-election rival. That possibility disappeared during the summer of 1969
with Chappaquiddick and Kennedy’s
unconvincing explanation of how a
young woman had died in the back
seat of a car that he was driving late at
night.
“It marks the end of Teddy,” Nixon
told chief of staff H.R. Haldeman.
Kennedy opted not to run in both
1972 and 1976, but by 1978 felt he
was ready to take on an uninspiring
incumbent. Hamilton Jordan, Carter’s top political adviser, warned his
colleagues after hearing Kennedy’s
podium-pounding speech at the midterm convention in Memphis that he
was convinced the senator would be
in the race.
Yet a year later Kennedy still didn’t
have an answer for Chappaquiddick
or a reason for a candidacy. “Oh my
God,” CBS interviewer Roger Mudd
thought after two bumbling and baffling sessions with the senator. “He
doesn’t know. He doesn’t know why
he’s running.”
Luckily for Kennedy most of the
nation tuned into the network premiere of “Jaws’’ so missed his disappointing performance just days before
the announcement of his candidacy.
But pundits, political operatives, and
donors did not. It was a misstep that
hobbled the nascent bid.
On the trail, the Massachusetts
senator appeared rusty and unsure of
himself. Verbal stumbles mounted. At
one stop in Iowa Kennedy referred to
“fam farmilies.’’ Small gaffes, but they
eroded the image of the presidential
hopeful viewed as the heir to a shining dynasty.
“One sentence keeps recurring in
my brain: The guy doesn’t want it,”
Globe columnist Ellen Goodman concluded after following Kennedy
around the state, observing that he
was running “dutifully, fatalistically,
unhappily.”
There were also bigger mistakes,
one of the most damaging being Kennedy’s assessment of the deposed
shah of Iran as a despot who’d stolen
“billions from his country.’’ The former ruler had been a US ally, but
more importantly Kennedy’s comments seemed to bolster the Ayatollah
Khomeini and his followers who were
holding American diplomats hostage.
Carter beat Kennedy in Iowa,
crushed him in New Hampshire, and
swept him in