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latimes.com
SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
With a
start at
top, he
risks a
big fall
When Gavin Newsom
becomes governor, he
will inherit a robust
economy — and high
expectations to meet.
By Melanie Mason,
Taryn Luna
and Phil Willon
Stuart W. Palley For The Times
RESIDENTS watch as the Woolsey fire, which soon engulfed the area, approaches homes on Las Trancas Canyon Road on Nov. 9.
From chaos sprang a monster
During the Woolsey fire’s critical first hours, it took second priority
By Jaclyn Cosgrove
It was clear from the beginning that the Woolsey fire
had the potential to be a
monster.
It broke out midafternoon Nov. 8 on Boeing property near the Santa Susana
Pass, fueled by strengthening winds and burning
toward populated areas.
But during the critical
first hours, the Woolsey fire
took second priority.
Ventura County firefighters were already engaged in
a pitched battle with another blaze, the Hill fire, about
15 miles to the west that
had jumped the 101 Freeway
and was threatening hundreds of homes and businesses.
The Woolsey fire was
growing but still far enough
Mel Melcon Los Angeles Times
CAROLINA HEUEL , who lives at the Miramonte Palmeras Tierras com-
plex in Camarillo, prepares to evacuate with her two cats and cockatiel.
from subdivisions that it got
fewer resources from Ventura County.
Neighboring fire agencies
sent some help, but it would
take hours before they
launched an all-out attack at
the fire lines.
These turned out to be
fateful choices in what would
become the most destructive fire in Los Angeles and
Ventura county history.
A Times review of hundreds of pages of public records and several hours of
radio transmissions shows
that first responders on the
front lines of the Woolsey fire
struggled during those first
critical hours, stymied by
communication
breakdowns and a scarcity of air
tanker support, equipment
and firefighters.
The Los Angeles County
[See Woolsey fire, A8]
Teachers aim to ride
a nationwide wave
Union is set to strike,
but dispute in L.A. is
unlike earlier protests.
By Howard Blume
and Sonali Kohli
Nearly a year ago, teachers in West Virginia walked
out, sparking a wave of protests in other states. Now it’s
Los Angeles’ turn.
Barring a last-minute
settlement, teachers are
poised to strike Thursday. A
Isolated
among
Rohingya
refugees
lot is at stake for educators,
their union and the nation’s
second-largest school system.
Leaders of United Teachers Los Angeles paint the approaching job action as the
latest act in an ongoing morality tale: Teachers are heroes in a national mobilization, fighting the good
fight for students and the future of public education.
That narrative casts Los Angeles Unified School District
Supt. Austin Beutner as an
[See Teachers, A13]
Hindu families who
also fled Myanmar
attacks are stranded.
By Vidya Krishnan
Jay L. Clendenin Los Angeles Times
HALLE BERRY , left, Reese Witherspoon and Eva Longoria in black at last
year’s Golden Globes, a visual statement organized by the Time’s Up group.
A balance between party,
politics on the red carpet
Amid #MeToo, a brighter style for 76th Globes
By Amy Kaufman
Marcus Yam Los Angeles Times
SHOOTING I N T O R R ANCE
Three are killed after an apparent dispute at a
bowling alley turns violent. CALIFORNIA, B1
Seeking ‘Justice
for Jazmine’
A slain child’s mother
and hundreds of supporters at a Houston
rally vow the killer will
be caught. NATION, A6
2020 has begun
Elizabeth Warren’s Iowa
visit kicks off presidential cycle. NATION, A12
Weather
Morning rain.
L.A. Basin: 60/51. B10
SACRAMENTO
—
Within an hour of being
elected California’s 40th governor, Gavin Newsom cast
the occasion as not just a
win, but a watershed.
“As Californians, we’ve
been granted the extraordinary opportunity to write
history’s next chapter,” he
told supporters on election
night, with the ornate former Los Angeles Stock Exchange as a backdrop. “And
the extraordinary obligation
to help every Californian
write their own California
story — even from the darkest of circumstances.”
The soaring rhetoric befit
a man who had campaigned
in all-caps and boldface, offering lofty promises to
tackle healthcare, housing
and other obstinate problems facing the state.
Now, he’ll have to deliver.
When Newsom is sworn
in Monday, he’ll do so with
the wind at his back: a robust state economy and
flush budget, a forceful electoral victory and a Capitol
brimming with Democratic
allies. With that good fortune comes great expectations for success, brought on
by Newsom’s “something for
everyone” campaign that
left key constituencies hungry for follow-through.
It can’t get much better
for Newsom, and it’s almost
certain to get worse. An
[See Newsom, A10]
When Debra Messing approached the
E! network on the red carpet at the Golden Globes last year, she had an agenda. It
wasn’t to wax rhapsodic about her “Will &
Grace” costars or show off the beautiful
black gown she was wearing.
She wanted to talk about the new organization she had joined, Time’s Up. She
wanted to express her belief in diversity
and gender parity in the workplace. And
she wanted to call out the very network
she was appearing on for allegedly not
paying its male and female hosts equally.
“I was so shocked to hear that E!
doesn’t believe in paying their female cohosts the same as their male co-hosts,”
Messing said, referring to Catt Sadler, the
anchor who had said a month prior that
she was quitting her job at the network
because of an unfair pay gap.
Giuliana Rancic, the host who was interviewing Messing, tried to move on to
another question. But the moment — and
the dozens of other stars who wore black
to the ceremony, a style choice meant to
signal there was more to talk about in the
#MeToo era than fashion — made clear
that in 2018, the red carpet was no longer
just a place for “mani-cams” and champagne toasts. It had become a new politi[See Globes, A14]
cal pulpit.
KUTUPALONG REFUGEE CAMP, Bangladesh
— In the world’s largest refugee camp, where 1.1 million
Rohingya Muslim refugees
reside, 105 families have been
stranded — caught in a war
that was not theirs.
Unlike the rest of the refugees, these families are Rohingya Hindus — a small minority within a minority that
had lived peacefully for generations in Myanmar’s western Rakhine state alongside
Muslims and members of
the Buddhist majority.
In the violence that engulfed Rakhine beginning in
August 2017 — when Rohingya Muslim militants attacked police checkpoints
and the army responded by
killing or maiming thousands of Muslim civilians —
99 Hindus were killed and
burned in mass graves. The
Hindu villages were at[See Rohingya, A4]
A2
S U N DAY , JA N UA RY 6, 2019
S
LAT IMES. C OM
BACK STORY
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images
REP. ILHAN OMAR of Minnesota, center, is one of the first two Muslim women in Congress, for a total of
three Muslims. The number of Christians in Congress has dropped, but they still make up the vast majority.
Faith in the new Congress
House, Senate have outsized share of Christians despite historic firsts
By Jaweed Kaleem
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IT IS A CELLAR
NOT A VAULT
When the new Congress
convened last week, it included several historic firsts
with its youngest elected
member, its first two Muslim women and its first two
Native American women
among them. Women now
make up about a quarter of
Congress, while the Senate
and House of Representatives together include more
African Americans, Latinos
and Asian Americans than
ever before.
But even as Congress
takes steps toward reflecting the gender and racial
makeup of the country, it
lags significantly behind
when it comes to religion,
according to an analysis
released last week.
Using self-reported
information about the religious affiliations of the 534
members of Congress, the
Pew Research Center found
that about 88% call themselves Christians.
The number is a slight
dip from the 115th Congress,
in which 91% of members
identified as Christians. The
race in North Carolina’s 9th
District has not been certified amid allegations of
electoral fraud, which is
why Pew’s count is one
short of all 535 seats in
Congress.
“While the number of
self-identified Christians in
Congress has ticked down,
Christians as a whole — and
especially Protestants and
Catholics — are still overrepresented in proportion
to their share in the general
public,” Pew’s report said.
“Indeed, the religious makeup of the new, 116th Congress is very different from
that of the United States
population.”
Overall, the U.S. population is about 70% Christian.
People who are atheist,
agnostic or identify with no
religion make up close to
23% of the population, while
Jews, Muslims, Hindus,
Buddhists and other religions together constitute
about 6% of the U.S., according to Pew.
The nonpartisan research group’s report used
data from Roll Call, which
asked members of Congress
which religious group, if any,
they identified with as part
of a larger questionnaire.
Pew did not attempt to
measure how religious
members of Congress are or
how religion influences their
politics.
Here’s how the religious
makeup of Congress breaks
down:
Christians
Data show that Congress
has become slightly less
Christian over the years.
The new Congress has 14
fewer Christians than the
previous one, and 20 fewer
than the Congress that was
in session in 2015 and 2016.
Still, Christians dominate Congress. About 55%
are Protestants, 30% are
Catholics and 15% align
themselves with “unspecified or other” Christian
movements. The latter
group includes those who
said they were Christian,
evangelical Christian, evangelical Protestant or Protestant but did not indicate a
denomination.
By themselves, Protestants make up a majority in
both the House and Senate.
Among them, Pew counted
72 Baptists and 42 Method-
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ists. Among Presbyterians,
Lutherans and Anglicans/
Episcopalians, there were 26
members from each group.
Ten members said they
were Mormons and five
identified as Orthodox
Christian.
And while Christians are
the majority in the Republican and Democratic memberships of Congress, they
overwhelmingly make up
the Republican side. Out of
253 Republicans, only two
are not Christians. Reps.
Lee Zeldin of New York and
David Kustoff of Tennessee
are Jewish.
Not Christians
The increase in nonChristian members of Congress is nearly completely
among Democrats and
independents.
Jewish members make
up the second-largest religious group at 6%. There are
34 Jewish members, an
increase of four. The number is far from its highest; in
1993 there were 51 Jews in
Congress.
Muslims and Hindus
were the next biggest
groups of non-Christians,
with three members from
each faith.
Democratic Reps. Ilhan
Omar of Minnesota and
Rashida Tlaib of Michigan
are the first Muslim women
in Congress. They join
Democratic Rep. Andre
Carson of Indiana. The total
number of Muslims is an
increase of one over the
previous Congress, when
former Democratic Rep.
Keith Ellison of Minnesota
served.
Among Hindus, all three
are returning Democrats.
They are Reps. Ro Khanna
of California, Raja Krish-
namoorthi of Illinois and
Tulsi Gabbard of Hawaii.
There are two Buddhists,
one less than before. That’s
because former Democratic
Rep. Colleen Hanabusa of
Hawaii did not seek reelection and instead ran unsuccessfully for governor. The
Buddhists currently serving
are Rep. Hank Johnson of
Georgia and Sen. Mazie
Hirono of Hawaii, both
Democrats.
Among Unitarian Universalists, there is one more
in the new Congress for a
total of two. Although the
faith has roots in Christianity and some Unitarian
Universalists identify as
Christians, Pew does not
categorize the tradition
under Christianity. Its
members in Congress, both
California Democrats, are
Reps. Ami Bera and Judy
Chu. In a previous CQ Roll
Call survey, Chu did not
answer the religion question.
There is only one person
in Congress that Pew
counted as having no religious affiliation. That is
Democratic Sen. Kyrsten
Sinema of Arizona, who
previously served three
terms in the House.
Democratic Rep. Jared
Huffman of California said
in 2017 that he was a humanist and unsure whether God
exists, but Pew did not
count him as a religiously
unaffiliated member because he declined to state
his religious identity in the
survey.
In addition to Huffman,
17 other members of Congress did not identify their
faith in the questionnaire.
jaweed.kaleem
@latimes.com
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L AT I ME S . CO M
S
SUNDAY , JANUARY 6, 2019
A3
THE WORLD
Pompeo has some explaining to do
In Mideast, he’ll work
for a coalition against
Iran while defending
Trump’s regional
disengagement.
By Tracy Wilkinson
WASHINGTON — For
America’s top diplomat, it
will be a mission like no
other: seeking to build a coalition among U.S. allies
against Iran, while also defending a potentially historic
disengagement of Washington from the Middle East.
Starting this week, Secretary of State Michael R.
Pompeo will swing through
at least eight countries in
eight days, including Egypt,
Saudi Arabia and most of
the Persian Gulf, in a bid to
portray “America as a force
for good in the region,” a senior State Department official said.
His is one of two high-level U.S. officials’ trips to the
region
since
President
Trump abruptly announced
the withdrawal of American
troops from Syria on Dec. 19.
As Pompeo heads to Arab
capitals, a parallel mission
has Trump’s national security advisor, John Bolton,
traveling to Israel and Turkey. Trump himself spent
about 3½ hours on a U.S. air
base near Baghdad visiting
American troops the day after Christmas.
The withdrawal from
Syria, which Trump ordered
against the advice of aides
and without warning allies,
alarmed both Israel and the
United States’ Persian Gulf
allies who, under U.S. urging, have taken steps to unite
in a “maximum pressure”
campaign against Iran.
The removal of American forces is likely to improve Iran’s position and
ease the way for the Islamic
Republic to expand the influence of the militia groups
it backs to within striking
distance of Israel’s border,
U.S. and foreign experts
agree.
Other likely beneficiaries
of a U.S. withdrawal are Russia and Syrian President
Bashar Assad, whose removal from power was a
principal goal of Western involvement in Syria’s eightyear civil war.
Trump seemed to cement his intention to disengage from the region when
he said that Iranians can “do
what they want” in Syria, as
far as he was concerned, describing Syria as a country of
“sand and death.”
Critics from both political parties, as well as former
and current diplomats and
officials, said such comments underlined Trump’s
propensity for making bold,
robust claims, but then not
showing a willingness to
back them up, or do the
work and make the investment necessary to achieve
them.
Trump is trying to
achieve “maximalist objectives with minimal investment,” said Colin Kahl, an
international security expert at Stanford University
and former Obama administration
official,
citing
Trump’s desire to hold Iran
in check even as he scales
back U.S. power in the region.
That complicates Pom-
Leah Mills Pool Photo
TWO WEEKS after Jamal Khashoggi’s slaying, Michael Pompeo had a warm meeting with Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman.
peo’s mission to explain U.S.
intentions and reassure allies about the U.S. commitment to challenge Iran.
“The United States is not
leaving the Middle East,” a
senior State Department official said, calling such suggestions “false narratives.”
“We are not going anywhere.... The policy of maximum pressure on Iran has
not changed,” said the official, one of several who
briefed reporters ahead of
Pompeo’s trip, which starts
Monday, under rules requiring anonymity.
The administration’s recent actions, however, and
especially those of Trump,
have invited skepticism.
“I don’t see how any foreign government or leader
can believe anything said by
any of Trump’s subordinates,” said Charles Stevenson, an associate director of
the foreign policy program
at the Johns Hopkins School
of Advanced International
Studies.
Trump “is missing opportunities to lead,” Stevenson added, “and disengaging to the point that others
are acting ... to determine
the narrative.”
Trump’s desire to disentangle the United States
from conflicts overseas,
along with his disdain for
multilateral institutions like
the United Nations and for
international treaties that
he has abandoned, is in step
with his broader doctrine of
“America first.” Administration officials have repeatedly
denied the slogan means
“America alone,” but their
denials have been needed
because many foreign officials — as well as domestic
critics — see it as precisely
that.
The approach is at its
most stark in the Middle
East, where for the seven
decades following World War
II, U.S. policy has been relatively consistent in seeking
to be the region’s dominant
outside influence, favoring
Israel, but also, in fits and
Delil Souleiman AFP/Getty Images
MARINE Corps vehicles drive in Syria’s Hasakah province on Dec. 21, two days
after President Trump announced the withdrawal of U.S. troops from the nation.
starts, bent on finding a
peaceful solution to the Arab-Israeli conflict and an independent state for a generation of displaced Palestinians.
“The days of American
dominance in the Middle
East are over,” Martin Indyk,
a senior State Department
official in Democratic and
Republican
administrations, said on Twitter shortly
after Trump’s announcement. “All hail Putin, Erdogan (and Khameini),” said
Indyk, a two-time U.S. ambassador to Israel.
He was referring to those
who are seen to have most
benefited from Trump’s
withdrawal decision: Russian President Vladimir
Putin; Turkish President
Recep Tayyip Erdogan, who
is eager to attack U.S.backed Kurdish fighters in
Syria; and Iran’s supreme
leader, Ali Khamenei.
Others who have been
supportive of many of
Trump’s policies and who
are hawkish on Iran are also
concerned that the Islamic
Republic could readily step
in to fill the void left by a U.S.
withdrawal from Syria, as
well as the president’s plans
to sharply reduce the number of American troops in Afghanistan.
“During a time in the
Middle East when Iranian
resolve is on the rise, the U.S.
appears to be slinking away,
drawing down troops, closing consulates, and removing missile defenses,” said
Behnam Ben Taleblu, a research fellow at the Foundation for Defense of Democracies, a conservative advocacy organization in Washington.
“This sends all the wrong
messages to Iran, and worse,
to U.S. partners in the region
like Israel and the GCC,” he
said, referring to the six-nation Gulf Cooperation Council.
Taleblu
and
others
praised the administration’s
reimposition of tough economic sanctions on Iran. The
sanctions had been lifted by
President Obama as part of
the 2015 international Iran
nuclear deal and were reinstated last year when Trump
unilaterally withdrew from
that accord. But, they said,
the sanctions do not go far
enough
in
pressuring
Tehran.
State Department officials, however, insisted that
the “maximum pressure”
campaign continues at full
force and has had a punishing effect on the Iranian
government and its economy. Sanctions have targeted
individual Iranian leaders
and military men as well as
state companies, Iran’s central bank and numerous
third-country parties who
attempt to deal with Iran.
“Our military position
may be changing, but our
overall goals remain the
same,” the official said.
Pompeo’s trip marks his
second to Saudi Arabia
since the Oct. 2 killing of
U.S.-based Saudi journalist
Jamal Khashoggi, which the
CIA concluded was orchestrated by Saudi Crown
Prince Mohammed bin
Salman, a favorite of the
Trump inner circle who is
also the de facto ruler of the
desert kingdom.
In the first trip to Riyadh,
two weeks after Khashoggi
was slain inside the Saudi
Consulate in Istanbul, Turkey, news photos showed
Pompeo laughing and shaking hands with the crown
prince, without a word of
condemnation. Since then
and to much outside criticism, Trump and Pompeo
have indicated they accepted official Saudi explanations that the crown
prince was not involved in
the gruesome slaying.
State Department officials said Friday that they
were not convinced by official Saudi accounts — a departure from previous statements. The official version,
that Khashoggi was killed by
a rogue government hit
squad gone wrong, has not
“yet hit the threshold of
credibility and accountability,” one of the State Department officials said.
Regardless,
Trump’s
high regard for the crown
prince, as well as his decision
to leave Syria, have had the
effect of shoring up autocrats in the region, analysts
say.
The crown prince, something of a pariah in much of
the
world
after
the
Khashoggi killing, has consolidated his power. Assad,
not long ago on the ropes
and facing his demise, is winning his war, with Russia’s
help, and is now being welcomed back into the bosom
of the Arab world.
And Egypt’s President
Abdel Fattah Sisi, a brutal
abuser of human rights, according to numerous independent accounts, is also in
the good graces of Trump,
who has shown much affinity for those to whom democracy is not necessarily a top
priority.
On his second stop, the
State Department official
said, Pompeo will meet with
Sisi in Cairo to reinforce “one
of our longest-standing,
deepest and broadest partnerships.”
tracy.wilkinson
@latimes.com
Twitter: @TracyKWilkinson
Moscow sets aside idea of a swap for U.S. prisoner
The remarks follow
the disclosure of a
Russian’s detention by
American officials.
By Amie Ferris-Rotman
MOSCOW — Russia
downplayed the possibility
of swapping a detained
American held on espionage
charges for a Russian national behind bars in the
United States.
The remarks by Russia’s
Foreign Ministry on Saturday came after the disclosure of the arrest of a Russian citizen in the Northern
Mariana Islands by U.S. officials and his transfer to Florida, deepening the complex-
ity surrounding the mysterious arrest of Paul Whelan, an
American, last month in
Moscow.
An FBI spokeswoman
declined to comment on the
arrest of Dmitry Makarenko
on Dec. 29, which Russia’s
Foreign Ministry disclosed
Saturday.
U.S. court records show
Makarenko, who lives in
Russia, was indicted in Miami in 2017 on charges that
he broke American laws
against exporting military
equipment. He was also
charged with money laundering.
There has been widespread speculation that the
48-year-old Whelan, who
was arrested Dec. 28 under
the relatively broad charge
of espionage with no details
PAUL WHELAN was
arrested last month in
Moscow and accused of
spying, with no details.
on what he is accused of doing, would be exchanged for
a Russian citizen.
“To speak about any kind
of ‘swaps’ [at] this stage is
inappropriate and wrong,”
Russia’s Deputy Foreign
Minister Sergei Rybakov
told the state-run RIA news
agency.
Whelan’s arrest came
weeks after Russian national Maria Butina, 30,
pleaded guilty in a U.S. court
to acting as an agent for the
Kremlin in conspiring with a
senior Russian official to infiltrate conservative American circles ahead of the 2016
presidential campaign.
Whelan’s case, which continues to zigzag as details
about his past emerge, has
further heightened tensions
between Washington and
Moscow: The United States
and Russia are at loggerheads over issues including
election meddling and the
crises in Syria and Ukraine.
Whelan, a Michigan resi-
dent who served in the Marines, was court-martialed
and discharged for trying
to steal thousands of dollars
from the U.S. government.
He also has British, Canadian and Irish citizenships.
The Russian Embassy in
Washington found out about
Makarenko’s detention from
those close to him and not
the U.S. government, violating the Vienna convention of
giving notification within 72
hours of a foreign national’s
arrest.
“This is not the first time
the U.S. does this,” the Foreign Ministry said in a statement. “The United States’
neglect of its international
obligations has become the
norm.”
Four days passed before
Whelan was visited by U.S.
government officials. The
U.S. ambassador to Russia,
Jon Huntsman Jr., met with
him Wednesday in his cell at
a Moscow detention facility.
Neither Washington nor
Moscow has provided a reason for the delay in that
meeting.
Russia’s security services
arrested Whelan when he
was in Moscow on a personal
visit, his family and company have said.
U.S. Secretary of State
Michael R. Pompeo said
Washington would demand
his release if his detention is
deemed
inappropriate,
while London has said its
citizens should not be used
as pawns.
Ferris-Rotman writes for
the Washington Post.
A4
S U N DAY , JA N UA RY 6, 2019
S
LAT IMES. C OM
Rohingya Hindus are refugees as well
[Rohingya, from A1]
tacked by members of a militant group called the
Arakhan Rohingya Salvation Army, or ARSA, that
was also responsible for the
attacks against the police.
Hindus who survived fled
in the only direction they
could: across the Naf River
and
into
Bangladesh’s
sprawling refugee camps
meant for Rohingya Muslims, the very people they
blame for the violence
against them.
Fifteen months into the
crisis, the Hindus’ minority
status has sharpened: While
Rohingya Muslims have categorically rejected a plan
that would repatriate the
refugees, Hindus are ready
to return to Myanmar, a view
that has placed them at
odds with the vast majority
of people in the camps.
In May 2018, the United
Nations struck a deal with
the Myanmar government
under which refugees would
be allowed to return to
Rakhine, although not necessarily to their original villages, many of which have reportedly been razed or occupied by Buddhists. The deal
was widely criticized for not
meeting the Rohingya Muslims’ main demands: a restoration of citizenship rights
that they have been denied
for decades, freedom of
movement and guarantees
of safety.
Within hours, the Hindu
families were packed and
ready to go. But many Muslim refugees protested the
terms by striking from jobs
they hold as teachers, health
workers, translators and
builders in the camps. Human rights group assailed
the plan as unworkable.
The United Nations refugee agency has shelved the
plan — a welcome move for
the majority of refugees, but
one that has pushed the
Hindus to the edge of their
endurance.
“We were told the repatriation process will begin Nov.
11,” said 50-year-old Jushna
Pal, a mother of five. “We
were told to be ready. Our
bags have been packed since
then.”
Muslims make up the
vast majority of the more
than 1 million ethnic Rohingya who once lived in
K M Asad AFP/Getty Images
A HINDU GIRL cleans a temple at a refugee camp. Rohingya Hindus lived peacefully for generations with their Muslim neighbors.
Rakhine. Although many
families trace their ancestry
in Rakhine back several generations, Myanmar — also
known as Burma — regards
Rohingya Muslims as Bangladeshis who migrated
there illegally and has denied them citizenship, freedom of movement and other
basic rights, and frequently
subjected them to statebacked violence. Hindus, by
contrast, still hold citizenship in Myanmar and enjoyed greater rights there.
On Aug. 25, 2017, the same
day that militant attacks on
police checkpoints left 12 officers dead, masked assailants attacked the Hindu village
of
Fakirabad
in
Rakhine’s Maungdaw township. An Amnesty International report found that the
attackers “robbed, bound,
and blindfolded [villagers]
before marching them to the
outskirts of the village,
where they separated the
men from the women and
FOR THE RECORD
Acorn TV: In the Dec. 23
Calendar section, a year-inreview article about the
availability of foreign shows
on American television said
the streaming service Acorn
TV was launched in 2017. It
launched in 2011.
Coachella: In the Jan. 4 Calendar section, a photo caption accompanying an article about the lineup of the
Coachella Valley Music and
Arts Festival in April said
that this year marked the
event’s 25th anniversary. It is
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INDIA
CHINA
BANGLADESH
KUTUPALONG
REFUGEE
CAMP
MYANMAR
Naypyidaw
Rakhine
state
LAOS
THAILAND
Sources: Mapzen, OpenStreetMap
Los Angeles Times
young children.”
The report described the
attackers as members of
ARSA and said they later executed 53 Hindus, starting
with the men. Another 46
Hindus were believed to
have been killed in an attack
in another village, Amnesty
International said.
Far more widespread
massacres occurred in Muslim villages, leading the U.N.
to declare the Myanmar military campaign as a “textbook example of ethnic
cleansing.”
More
than
800,000 Rohingya fled across
the border to Bangladesh,
joining refugees who had
fled earlier rounds of violence and swelling the
populations of the makeshift camps along the southeastern border.
In Bangladesh, the more
than 400 Hindu refugees,
most of them children, live in
a settlement known as
Hindu Camp just outside
one of the 27 refugee settlements that make up the
sprawling Kutupalong and
Balukhali complex. The
Bangladesh
government
segregated the Hindus, who
live under around-the-clock
security in the only camp to
have a constant police presence.
Families living in Hindu
Camp are suspicious of outsiders and cagey with journalists. They detest their
Rohingya Muslim neighbors, blaming them for their
Dibyangshu Sarkar AFP/Getty Images
YOUNG refugees attend class. A deal to repatriate the Rohingya was embraced by
Hindu families but shelved after majority Muslims rejected it as unworkable.
losses, for spawning the
ARSA group and for opposing the repatriation plan.
The animosity is mutual:
Many Rohingya Muslims
accuse Hindus of benefiting
from the violence, alleging
that Hindu families that
stayed behind took property
and livestock that had belonged to Muslims. In September 2017, weeks after the
mass arrivals into the
camps, two Hindus were
killed and nine admitted to
hospitals after violence
broke out between the refugees.
“It is terrifying to live like
this,” said Shishu Sheel, a 32year-old leader in the Hindu
Camp. “We are under threat
because we don’t blame the
Myanmar government for
the violence. It goes against
the testimonies given by Rohingya Muslims.”
Bangladesh’s Refugee,
Relief and Repatriation
Commission, which is responsible for the camps,
said repatriating Hindus
and not Muslims is not an
option.
“We treat all refugees the
same way and will not be prioritizing repatriation of the
Hindu refugees over Rohingya
Muslims,”
said
Shamimul Huq Pavel, the
commission official who
oversees the Hindu Camp.
The Hindu families have
appealed to the Indian government, but so far New
Delhi has provided only humanitarian aid and words of
concern. Prime Minister
Narendra Modi’s government has also taken a tough
line regarding Rohingya
Muslims who fled to India,
describing the estimated
40,000 refugees as a security
threat and deporting a dozen back to Myanmar despite
the threats against them.
Officials in India’s foreign
ministry did not respond to
requests for comment.
Sheel said the Hindu refugees expected more from
Modi, a nationalist whose
party has built a strong voter
base by emphasizing the supremacy of India’s majority
religion.
“India is a land for all Hindus. Mr. Modi is a Hindu.
Why is he not helping us?”
Sheel said.
The Hindu families say
they are growing increasingly desperate and that if
help doesn’t come soon, they
will consider trying to sneak
back across the Naf River
into Myanmar, despite their
fears of leaving their camp
and of being shot or captured at the border by Myanmar soldiers who might mistake them for Muslims.
“We cannot live like this
any longer,” said 35-year-old
refugee Madhuram Pal.
“The Muslim families are being prioritized, but no one is
telling us when we will be
sent back.”
Krishnan is a special
correspondent. Times staff
writer Shashank Bengali
contributed to this report
from Singapore.
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Founded Dec. 4, 1881
Vol. CXXXVIII No. 34
LOS ANGELES TIMES (ISSN 0458-3035)
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CARACAS, Venezuela —
Venezuela’s opposition-controlled congress opened its
first session of the year Saturday, installing a freshfaced leader who struck a
defiant tone and vowed to
take up the battle against socialist President Nicolas
Maduro.
Juan Guaido, 35, assumes the presidency of a
National Assembly stripped
of power by Maduro, whose
government is blamed for
leading the once-wealthy oil
nation into a historic political and humanitarian crisis.
Speaking to legislators,
Guaido named several opposition politicians and opponents of Maduro’s government who have been jailed,
driven into exile or killed. He
said desperation has forced
masses of citizens to flee
abroad looking for work.
“We are under an oppressive system,” he said. “It’s
not just that — it is miserable.”
Federico Parra AFP/Getty Images
INCOMING president of Venezuela’s National As-
sembly Juan Guaido, center, arrives for inauguration.
Tall
and
youthful,
Guaido represents the next
generation of Venezuelan
political opposition, taking
up the assembly’s leadership following 74-year-old
Omar Barboza.
Guaido is an industrial
engineer and former student
leader from the same political party as Leopoldo Lopez,
Venezuela’s most popular
opposition leader, who is
under house arrest. Government opponents consider
him a political prisoner.
Guaido called Maduro a
dictator whose legitimacy
has run out. Venezuela is living a “dark but transitional”
moment of its history, he
said, adding that among its
first acts congress will create
a transitional body to restore constitutional order,
but he offered no details.
He addressed a hall filled
only with opposition lawmakers as the government
loyalists have long boycotted any sessions, saying the
National Assembly has itself
overstepped its authority.
However, roughly 20 foreign diplomats from the
United States, Canada,
Japan, Italy and Germany
attended the assembly’s inaugural session in a show of
solidarity.
It opened days before
Maduro’s inauguration to a
second, six-year term widely
condemned as illegitimate
after he declared victory in
the May 20 election that
many foreign powers considered a sham.
Venezuela’s socialist party boss Diosdado Cabello
said Maduro will be sworn in
on Jan. 10 before the
Supreme Court, which is
stacked with government
loyalists. This defies the
Venezuelan Constitution,
which requires a president
to take the oath before the
National Assembly.
As international pressure mounts, a dozen Latin
American countries and
Canada on Friday urged
Maduro to cede power and
hand it over to congress until
a valid president is elected.
Venezuelan
officials
accuse the coalition of taking orders directly from
President Trump, whom
they frequently accuse of
spearheading an economic
war against Venezuela.
“Those of us here are
fighting every day to restore
democracy,” Guaido said.
“We want the protection of
the rule of law. We want the
Venezuelans to be protected, because we believe in
life.”
S
L AT I ME S . CO M
SUNDAY , JANUARY 6, 2019
A5
‘Yellow vest’ protest turns violent in France
associated press
PARIS — French security
forces fired tear gas and
flash-balls after a march
through picturesque central
Paris went from peaceful to
provocative Saturday as
several thousand protesters
staged the “yellow vest”
movement’s first action of
2019 to keep up pressure on
President Emmanuel Macron.
A riverboat restaurant
moored below the clashes on
the Left Bank of the Seine
River caught fire. Smoke
and tear gas wafted above
the Orsay Museum and the
gold dome of the French
Academy as riot police,
nearly invisible at the start
of
the
demonstration,
moved front and center
when protesters deviated
from an officially approved
path.
Police boats patrolled the
river while beyond the Seine,
motorcycles and a car were
set on fire on the Boulevard
St. Germain, a main Left
Bank thoroughfare. Riot police and firefighters moved
in, and barricades mounted
in the middle of the wide
street also glowed in orange
flames.
Protesters made their
way to the Champs-Elysees
Avenue, the famed boulevard that has been at the
center of previous yellow
vest demonstrations, many
removing their distinctive
vests and mixing with shoppers.
Riot police moved in with
a water cannon to evacuate
the avenue. A line of parked
cars burned on a nearby
street.
In a first, the building
housing the office of the
French government spokesman was attacked. Government spokesman Benjamin
Griveaux was evacuated
from his Left Bank office at
the Ministry for Parliamentary Relations after the front
door of the building was partially destroyed.
“It wasn’t me who was attacked. ... It was the institutions, the democratic form
of government,” Griveaux
said later, explaining on
French television that he
and a half-dozen colleagues
Ian Langsdon EPA/Shutterstock
A BARRICADE thrown together by protesters is set ablaze in Paris during 2019’s first round of “yellow vest” demonstrations in France.
were taken out a back door
while a group attacked the
front door with construction
equipment.
Those who did this “attacked the house of France,”
he said.
It was the first such attack on government property since the yellow vest
movement began weekly
protests eight Saturdays
ago, in mid-November. Protesters have tried to reach
the presidential Elysee Palace, which is protected like a
bunker.
Saturday’s march had
been declared in advance
and approved, in contrast to
some illegal December demonstrations that degenerated into vandalism, looting
and chaos.
The latest protest was a
sort of test of the movement’s staying power after
proposals by Macron to address concerns of the French
who have a hard time making ends meet, including
canceling the fuel tax hikes
at the origin of the protests.
Interior
Minister
Christophe Castaner estimated that about 50,000
people participated in protests around France on Saturday. Police counted some
3,500 protesters in Paris.
The atmosphere was initially calm in the French
capital but turned when
some protesters tried to
cross the river on a pedestrian bridge not on the official
route from City Hall to the
National Assembly, the
lower house of Parliament.
Police used clubs and tear
gas, then held the bridge in a
standoff while violence
broke out.
Video on French TV
showed a man repeatedly
stomping on an officer in riot
gear on the ground and hitting the shield of another officer.
Some
confrontations
took place in other cities
around France, with tear gas
fired in Bordeaux and in
Rouen in Normandy.
Protesters were looking
to breathe new life into the
yellow
vest
movement,
named after the fluorescent
protective gear French motorists must keep in their
cars. The protests were
launched in anger over fuel
tax hikes, but have swelled
with broader anger over
Macron’s economic policies,
deemed to favor the rich.
On Saturday, protesters
reiterated a call for Macron
to resign.
“Resolution
2019:
Demacronize,” read one
sign. “Power to the people,”
read another.
Government spokesman
Griveaux had said Friday
that those still showing up to
protest “want insurrection”
as the movement appears to
wane and radicalize.
He called on the French
people to express their views
during an upcoming “national debate” rather than
by taking to the streets.
Mexico launches economic
stimulus plan on U.S. border
associated press
MEXICO CITY — President Andres Manuel Lopez
Obrador has launched an
ambitious plan to stimulate
economic activity on the
Mexican side of the U.S.Mexico border despite recent U.S. threats to close the
border entirely.
Mexico plans to slash income and corporate taxes to
20% from 30% for 43 municipalities in six states just
south of the U.S., while halving to 8% the value-added
tax in the region. Business
leaders and union representatives have also agreed
to double the minimum
wage along the border, to
176.2 pesos a day, the equivalent of $9.07 at current exchange rates.
Lopez Obrador says the
idea is to stimulate wage and
job
growth.
President
Trump has repeatedly complained that low wages in
Mexico lure jobs from the
U.S.
LOS ANGELES TIMES
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SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
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SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019 WST
LOS ANGELES TIMES
YEAR END
CLEARANCE SALE
VINTAGE GUITARS &
MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS AUCTION
March 15, 2019 | Dallas | Live & Online
CONSIGN NOW TO AMPLIFY YOUR RESULTS!
Barney Kessel’s Circa 1946/47
Gibson ES-350 Sunburst
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Sold for $23,750
1959 Gibson ES-335T Sunburst
Semi-Hollow Body Electric Guitar,
Serial # A29384.
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1952 Gibson Les Paul Goldtop
Solid Body Electric Guitar.
Sold for $13,750
1964 Fender Stratocaster
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Guitar, Serial #L47901.
Sold for $13,750
View all prices realized from our
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For information on our easy consignment process, please call
877-HERITAGE (437-4824)
Aaron Piscopo | Manager, Vintage Guitars & Musical Instruments
| ext. 1273 | AaronP@HA.com
Consignment deadline: January 22
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A7B
A8
SSS
SU N DAY , JA N UA RY 6 , 2 019
L AT I M E S . C O M
Wally Skalij Los Angeles Times
RESIDENT David Hays sprays his neighbor’s house in Malibu as the Woolsey fire approaches on Nov. 9. The Hill fire was the top priority in the critical first hours.
How the Woolsey fire exploded
[Woolsey fire, from A1]
Fire Department sent some
firefighters to the front lines
but decided early on to deploy dozens more several
miles away in the Agoura
Hills area, according to interviews, incident logs and
planning reports obtained
under the California Public
Records Act.
Capt. Tony Imbrenda, an
L.A. County Fire public information officer, said the
department knew the fire
was headed toward L.A.
County and staged four
strike teams — 20 engines
and 88 firefighters total — in
Agoura Hills to assess how
the fire would affect homes
and businesses once it
reached the area.
Imbrenda said the department didn’t send the
strike teams, each comprising five engines and 22 firefighters, directly to the
Woolsey fire line “because
the fire hadn’t crossed into
L.A. County yet. These resources were all set up to
protect L.A. County.”
Imbrenda said sending
the strike teams to the fire
line earlier would not have
made a difference.
“There was no way, no engine, no apparatus, no aircraft in this world that could
have possibly stopped that
fire from making it to L.A.
County,” he said.
The Los Angeles Fire Department, the city’s fire
agency, also sent engines
toward the Woolsey fire, but
its firefighters seemed to
grow frustrated with the
lack of a plan and resources
on the scene, according to
radio transmissions.
Some firefighters said in
radio transmissions they
were hampered by a lack of
water at the Boeing facility
and by poor cellphone service, which forced them to
move the command center
to a Ventura County fire station.
By 5 p.m., the L.A. city
Fire Department had completed a map modeling how
the Woolsey fire would burn,
showing with a high degree
of accuracy its ultimate path
through Bell Canyon, the
Santa Monica Mountains
and Oak Park.
Even as the Woolsey fire
worsened through that first
afternoon and evening, firefighters struggled to get
more boots on the ground.
By 7:30 p.m., the Hill fire was
being battled by 400 personnel while only 150 firefighters
from three agencies were on
the Woolsey fire, according
to incident updates released
by fire officials.
Over the next three days,
the Woolsey fire made a devastating march to the Pacific
Ocean, destroying more
than 1,500 structures from
Oak Park to Malibu, burning
almost 97,000 acres and
killing three people.
The Hill fire, by contrast,
destroyed just four structures and burned 4,500
acres.
A tale of two conflagrations
With attention focused on the immediate threat of the Hill fire, crews on the Woolsey line
struggled in the initial critical hours with communications and scarce resources.
Approximate
origin
Approximate
origin
23
CALIFORNIA
LUTHERAN
UNIVERSITY
Camarillo
101
Hill fire
burn area
Bell
Canyon
Newbury
Park
Hidden
Valley
Thousand
Oaks
Agoura
Hills
VENTURA
COUNTY
101
Calabasas
LOS
ANGELES
COUNTY
Point Mugu
State Park
PARAMOUNT
RANCH
Malibu Creek
State Park
23
Santa Monica
Mountains National
Recreation Area
1
Leo Carrillo
State Park
West
Hills
Woolsey fire
burn area
Monte
Nido
PEPPERDINE
UNIVERSITY
Pacific
Ocean
El Matador
State Beach
1
MALIBU
PIER
Malibu
5 MILES
POINT DUME
Sources: Nextzen, OpenStreetMap, USGS, Cal Fire
Pa u l Du gi nsk i Los Angeles Times
Stuart W. Palley For The Times
MASAO BARROWS evacuates his home at Quinta Vista Drive and East Hillcrest
Drive in Thousand Oaks on Nov. 8 as the Woolsey fire engulfs his neighborhood.
A tale of two fires
The Woolsey fire started
at 2:24 p.m. on the site of the
old Santa Susana test lab
near Simi Valley, with a column of smoke visible on
what was a clear day across
eastern Ventura County.
“Do you have eyes on
where that smoke’s coming
from?” a Ventura County
firefighter asked another
firefighter on his way.
It would take almost 20
minutes for the first unit to
arrive, a Ventura County engine carrying three firefighters, driving from their Simi
Valley station about eight
miles away, according to incident logs and interviews.
When a helicopter from
the Los Angeles County Fire
Department arrived about
2:50 p.m., a crew member estimated the Woolsey fire to
be about five acres with a
rapid rate of spread and
structures threatened. Over
the dispatch, the crew member reported a southeast
wind of about 25 to 30 mph.
The area where the fire
started, at the Santa Susana
Field Laboratory, is located
near the Los Angeles and
Ventura County line in a
“mutual threat zone,” an
area that the Los Angeles
County, Ventura County and
Los Angeles city fire departments have agreed, through
a memorandum of understanding, to defend together
because of the threat a fire
there poses to each agency’s
communities.
Each year, firefighters
from the three departments
train together in the Santa
Susana area to prepare for a
fire. Their most recent training was in June.
The operating plan created and signed by the three
agencies outlines the number of firefighters and
amount of equipment they’ll
each send as part of their ini-
tial attack.
On Nov. 8, as the fire
started burning, the plan
called for Ventura County to
send a full brush response, a
team of firefighters that includes five to six fire engines,
a bulldozer and a helicopter.
Instead, within the first hour
of the fire, Ventura County
sent only two engines and
about 12 firefighters.
That’s because at 2:03
p.m., 21 minutes before the
Woolsey fire started burning, a Ventura County helicopter spotted a fire burning
in Santa Rosa Valley, north
of the 101 between Camarillo
and Newbury Park. This
blaze would be called the
Hill fire.
Soon, there would be two
fires in a county that had already experienced incredible tragedy just 15 hours
earlier — the shooting at the
Borderline Bar and Grill in
Thousand Oaks, where 12
people were shot and killed.
Ventura County officials
say the Hill fire took priority
over the Woolsey fire because it was an immediate
threat to lives and homes.
The Hill fire grew to 100
acres in the first 15 minutes.
It jumped the 101 even
sooner, in 12 minutes, and
when the California Highway Patrol shut down the
freeway, several drivers were
trapped when they tried to
go around the roadblock and
drove directly into the blaze.
Cal State Channel Islands was evacuated.
Calls poured into the
Ventura County dispatch
center from residents who
were older or with disabilities asking for help in evacuating.
Sheriff ’s deputies got
boxed in while trying to
evacuate people and, at least
once, needed helicopters to
make water drops near them
so they could escape.
Ventura County Fire Assistant Chief Dustin Gardner, who oversaw resources
for the Hill and Woolsey
fires, said it was clear that
the Hill fire was initially
more dangerous.
By 4:10 p.m., the Hill fire
hit open space that had
burned in 2013 during an earlier fire. It began to burn
more slowly east of Camarillo and largely stopped sending embers downwind. For
the next several hours, firefighters worked to curtail
other sections of the blaze.
About midnight, as the
Woolsey fire began burning
into Oak Park, the Hill fire
danger
had
subsided
enough that officials started
diverting an army of resources from the blaze to the
Woolsey, Gardner said.
Gardner
remembered
the Hill fire commanders’
concern when he told them
to pull every resource they
could and send it to the
Woolsey fire.
“We still have a 5,000-acre
fire here,” a commander responded.
Gardner said although
they knew the Hill fire could
keep growing, the Woolsey
fire was now threatening human lives.
“From just looking at it, it
looks like the response to the
Woolsey fire was less than
the response to the Hill fire,”
Gardner said. “Put it in a
perspective of managing the
area, of looking at the totality of both fires and doing the
best you can with what you
have at the time you have it.
“There was never any decision made that one fire was
more important, per se, than
another. The decisions were
based on what was best for
the most people with what
we had at the time we were
presented with it,” he added.
Both fires were driven by
the same powerful Santa
Ana winds.
But at least at the beginning, the two fires behaved
differently.
Gardner said the origin
of the Woolsey fire was in an
area with topography that
shielded it from some of the
most powerful wind gusts,
which were blowing at 37
mph when the blaze first began.
This made it spread more
slowly than the Hill fire — at
least at first, Gardner said.
The Woolsey fire grew to 750
acres within its first two
hours, in contrast to the Hill
fire, which officials initially
said scorched 8,000 to 10,000
acres in its first 30 minutes.
Certain details of the first
hour or so of the Woolsey fire
remain a mystery. The fire
began near a Southern California Edison substation
that shortly before had experienced issues, and the
utility has said it is investigating whether its equipment sparked the blaze.
It remains unclear what
role, if any, Boeing’s firefighting and security staff
had in dealing with the fire.
Boeing has a private fire department on site at Santa
Susana Field Laboratory,
according to the California
Department of Toxic Substances Control.
Boeing has repeatedly
declined to answer questions from The Times about
its firefighters’ efforts.
The company did not
provide answers when asked
how many firefighters work
on the grounds, how many
engines they have and what
type of equipment they used
to try to stop the fire.
Instead, the company
said in a statement that its
fire and security personnel
“responded to the fire that
began on Nov. 8 and provided assistance to local municipal and county fire crews
as they responded to the
scene.”
Officials with the Ventura
County Fire Department
said they didn’t remember
seeing or communicating
with any Boeing firefighters.
Los Angeles County Fire
Department officials said in
a statement that they had
“little to no interactions”
with any Boeing firefighters,
as was the case for LAFD.
“I was at the incident
command post,” said LAFD
Deputy Chief Trevor Richmond. “I was there with Ventura County and L.A.
County Fire, and I do not recall seeing anyone from Boeing, and I did not interact
with anyone from Boeing.”
Because of the rocky, hilly
terrain where the blaze
started, aircraft had the potential to play an important
role in fighting the Woolsey
fire, making water and retardant drops on ridges that
ground units could not
reach.
Ventura County had two
helicopters
that
flew
through the night on both
fires. LAFD sent three of its
helicopters capable of flying
at night, but all had returned
from the Woolsey fire by 6:30
p.m. (An agency spokeswoman said the decision to
send the helicopters home
SSS
L AT I M E S . C O M
S U N DAY , JA N UA RY 6 , 2 019
A9
Wally Skalij Los Angeles Times
RICK MULLEN , a firefighter and councilman who at the time was mayor of Malibu, surveys a house ablaze in the city as the Woolsey fire barrels down a hill on Nov. 9.
would have come from the
team managing the fire, not
LAFD.)
L.A. County Fire initially
sent three helicopters; a pair
of Bombardier CL-415 air
tankers that can each hold
1,620 gallons of water — commonly referred to as Super
Scoopers; and an Erickson
Helitanker, which has a
2,650-gallon water tank.
However, once nightfall
hit, their aircraft had limited
effectiveness because of the
high winds gusting over the
region.
“Air attack resources
were severely hampered by
wind on the Woolsey fire,”
L.A. County Fire’s Imbrenda
said in an email. “Once we
have sustained winds of 40
mph, air drops become ineffective. Firehawk helicopters flew in support of
ground operations throughout the night on Nov. 8. All
other air resources were
grounded due to high
winds.”
One of the additional
challenges that the Woolsey
incident commander faced
was getting air tankers.
Whereas helicopters are
primarily used for direct attack, dropping water on active fire, air tankers are often
used to drop pink retardant
along ridges and mountainsides to create or improve
control lines around the fire.
On Nov. 8, air tankers —
which don’t fly at night —
were in high demand, Ventura County’s Gardner said.
The deadly Camp fire had
started in Northern California the same day at 6:33 a.m.,
and officials from all three
fires were calling state emergency leaders asking them
to send help.
Gardner said he was repeatedly on the phone begging the state to send more
tankers, arguing that the
Woolsey fire had the potential to hit Malibu, not realizing how bad the Camp fire
had become.
Within the first hour of
the Hill fire, the incident
commander doubled his order from four to eight air
tankers.
Soon after, a dispatcher
asked him if they could divert one of his fire’s tankers
to the Woolsey fire, which
was potentially going to
threaten homes and businesses in Simi Valley.
“You can divert one of the
air
tankers,”
Ventura
County Fire Assistant Chief
Chad Cook, the Hill fire incident commander, said.
“We’ll keep the rest of them
here.”
About 40 minutes later,
at 3:37 p.m., a dispatcher
told the Hill fire incident
commander two air tankers
and two helitankers would
soon arrive to fight the blaze.
Only a few minutes later, the
Woolsey incident commander was told by a dispatcher
that the region had no more
air tankers it could send, but
that there were multiple
helicopters available.
About an hour later, the
Woolsey incident commander seemed to be frustrated
by his tanker requests going
unfilled.
“I’d like to talk to my
neighboring fire (commander) and see if I can get some
from him,” the Woolsey inci-
appropriate times and that
his department had more
firefighters assigned to the
blaze than he could ever remember.
“Over half our department was allocated to this
fire, which was really unprecedented practice in my
career, and I’ve been here for
30 years,” he said.
But by midnight, the
Woolsey fire had grown more
powerful and was almost impossible to control at 4,000
acres. Fueled by gusts topping 70 mph, the fire burned
homes in Oak Park and
forced thousands to evacuate. By 3 a.m., it was 8,000
acres, and at 5:15 a.m. it
jumped the 101 Freeway and
began its fateful run toward
Malibu.
Gardner, the Ventura
County assistant fire chief,
said he had no issues with
the resources L.A. County
and city fire provided, calling
both agencies “100 percent”
supportive
during
the
Woolsey fire.
Looking back
Katie Falkenberg Los Angeles Times
THE WOOLSEY fire made its march to the Pacific Ocean, destroying more than 1,500 structures from Oak
Park to Malibu, while burning almost 97,000 acres and killing three people. Above, smoke wafts over Malibu.
dent commander told his
aerial coordinator over the
radio at 4:26 p.m.
“Correct, sir,” the aerial
coordinator said. “We’ve
been trying to negotiate resource sharing. We’ll see how
that goes.”
But the Woolsey fire began spreading at a much
faster pace — with far fewer
firefighters on the ground
than were battling the Hill
fire.
Limited resources
With the Ventura County
Fire Department occupied
with the Hill fire, it was going
to be up to neighboring
agencies to help battle the
Woolsey fire.
And the location of the
Woolsey fire seemed to make
mutual aid achievable, with
it burning along the Los Angeles County line not far
from L.A. city and county fire
stations.
The agency to send the
most fire engines in the first
hours of the Woolsey fire was
LAFD.
Richmond, the LAFD’s
Valley bureau commander,
said in an interview that he,
along with other fire leaders
working the Woolsey fire,
discussed early on that they
knew this fire would get serious quickly.
“At the end of the day, the
concern, from my perspective on this incident, is obviously (we’re) looking out for
L.A. city and making sure
that our assets and risks are
protected, and if that means
dropping water on a Ventura
County fire, and it will help
us down the road, that’s
what we’re going to do,”
Richmond said.
Firefighters from LAFD
started streaming in less
than half an hour after the
fire began.
Radio
transmissions
show, soon after they arrived,
the
firefighters
started
placing
hoses
around the fire, giving them
quick access to water, and
assessing the size and direc-
tion of the fire. Within an
hour, 11 fire engines and two
firetrucks had arrived.
Shortly after they arrived, an LAFD firefighter
with Engine 481 asked Engine 28 to drive over and help
them establish a fire line.
But Engine 28 responded
that the winds were shifting
and they needed to stay put.
“There’s no more resources where we’re at,” an
Engine 28 firefighter said.
“Roger that,” the firefighter on Engine 481 responded. “We’ll figure something else out.”
Repeatedly over the next
hour, the crew’s battalion
chief remarked that the fire’s
leaders were still establishing a plan and noted, “We’re
having issues with communications right now.” The
firefighters discussed how,
because of a limited number
of hydrants at the Boeing facility, they had to use trucks
to keep shuttling water to
one another to continue battling the blaze.
L.A. County had about
seven engines staging near
the Boeing gate when the
county’s first strike team arrived about 3:30 p.m. and radioed in seeking orders.
“We’re still coming up
with a game plan,” a fire
leader responded.
Gardner, the Ventura
County assistant chief, said
the plan referenced was fire
leaders’ developing their
control objectives and other
advanced strategic decisions, but that this wouldn’t
have kept firefighters on the
ground from actively fighting the fire.
The LAFD continued to
send more ground troops
than L.A. County into the
zone over the next few hours,
according to state mutual
aid data and incident logs.
Meanwhile, L.A. County
was amassing an army of engines at Fire Station 89 in
Agoura Hills. By 4:33 p.m.,
four strike teams were in
place there.
Imbrenda said the strike
teams were used to assess
neighborhoods
in
L.A.
County that county fire leaders believed would eventually be in the path of the
Woolsey fire. Those assessments were used to create a
firefighting strategy for the
area, he said.
L.A. County’s incident
log, dispatch recordings and
the state mutual aid data reviewed by The Times show
those four strike teams did
not arrive at the Woolsey fire
line until just after 9 p.m. By
then, the fire was approaching Oak Park, which is about
three miles north of Fire Station 89.
At 8:54 p.m., Ventura
County Fire Capt. Jeff Pike,
the Woolsey incident commander,
told
Ventura
County Division Chief John
McNeil over the radio that
fire activity was picking up,
and that he expected the
blaze to reach Oak Park in
about an hour. He said he
wanted five strike teams to
defend Oak Park, according
to radio transmissions.
“It’s my understanding
we might have some L.A.
County resources, staged at
(Fire Station) 89,” Pike said.
“If we could use those resources with the understanding that if L.A. County
gets impacted, we can bump
those resources back into
the L.A. County area.”
About eight minutes later, at about 9:02 p.m., an L.A.
County firefighter radioed to
dispatchers that the four
strike teams from Station 89
were responding to the
blaze.
The county fire department disputes this chronology, insisting the strike
teams arrived hours earlier
than the records indicate,
and that the arrival time reflected in the records was a
data entry error.
But officials did not provide any further documentation of the teams’ exact arrival times.
Imbrenda cautioned The
Times that the radio trans-
missions it reviewed might
not include all tactical communications and that the
broadcast could include erroneous reports from civilians.
Station 89 sits along the
101 Freeway. Radio transmissions indicate that just an
hour after the Woolsey fire
started, one of the L.A.
County battalion chiefs
overseeing the agency’s
Woolsey response wanted to
place firefighters on the 101
to prevent the fire from
jumping the freeway.
His concern was understandable — history has
shown that, once a fire
crosses the freeway, it can
easily make a run for the
beach communities.
Los Angeles County Fire
Chief Daryl L. Osby defended his department’s
tactics, though he stressed
he could not speak to specific actions, including when
the strike teams arrived and
how they were used.
He said it made sense for
firefighters to make a stand
at the 101.
Osby said the decisionmaking focused on protecting lives and property across
the entire region and that
there was no special focus on
areas served by the L.A.
County Fire Department.
“When we have fires in
that area, we’re aware of
the potential of it burning
to the 101 Freeway and then
the potential of it jumping
the 101 Freeway,” he said.
“We were aware of the possibility that it could get to
the 101 Freeway, so we did all
that we could to prevent
that.”
Around midnight, resources were beginning to
flood into the Woolsey zone.
Some came from the Hill
fire, whose danger had lessened. From around midnight to 3 a.m., L.A. County
alone sent about 12 more
strike teams along with 10
more engines.
Osby said he felt the
strike teams arrived at the
As far as the Woolsey fire
moved that first night, the
following day would be much
worse. The fire ate into the
Santa Monica Mountains,
burning 88% of federal parkland. It became 14 miles wide
at one point as it devastated
Malibu neighborhoods.
Veteran firefighters say it
was a once-in-a-lifetime
event.
“In my 30 years of experience, I’ve never seen a fire
that explosive,” LAFD’s
Richmond said. “Seeing how
quickly that fire traveled to
Agoura Hills and Oak Park
and Thousand Oaks and
jumped the freeway the next
morning, and in four hours,
it’s burning kelp beds in the
Pacific Ocean — that’s
pretty incredible.
“This one was the big
one,” he said.
The question officials are
facing now is whether different tactics would have
stopped the fire sooner.
It’s clear that those fighting the fire in those first few
hours didn’t have the resources they thought they
needed, according to radio
transmissions. It’s also clear
that tactics used by fire officials that day limited the
number of firefighters on the
front lines that afternoon
and evening.
At public meetings, some
residents have complained
about a lack of fire resources
and what some claim was a
flawed evacuation strategy.
Both the Los Angeles
County Board of Supervisors and the Malibu City
Council are creating panels
to investigate how the fire
was fought.
Current Malibu Mayor
Jefferson Wagner, who was
injured in a futile attempt to
save his home, put it this
way: “Part of the healing
process includes understanding what happened
and why it happened, and
making improvements for
the future.”
jaclyn.cosgrove
@latimes.com
Times staff writers Paul
Pringle, Matt Stiles and
Richard Winton
contributed to this report.
A10
S
SU N DAY , JA N UA RY 6 , 2 019
L AT I M E S . C O M
Newsom will face risk of falling short
“overnight,” Newsom said
during a December town
hall forum in Fresno.
“It’s a process that will
unfold over a course of
years,” he told reporters after the event. “But I wanted
to set a tone and tenor of expectation, and I’m going to
do my best to meet it. Some
areas I imagine we’ll exceed
it. Some areas we’ll fall
short. And you’ll hold me accountable.”
[Newsom, from A1]
economic contraction, a natural disaster, a rebellion
among Democratic lawmakers — all threaten the incoming governor’s footing.
“All governors have to be
somewhat fatalistic,” said
former Gov. Gray Davis, who
started his term in 1998 riding the dot-com boom and
ended it in 2003 after he was
recalled over the state’s energy crisis. “Your fate is not
entirely in your hands.”
Sharing power with
state Legislature
Allies cautiously
hope he will deliver
California progressives
were euphoric following the
November election and ascent of Newsom, who ran an
unabashedly liberal campaign for the state’s top job.
“Today, California voters
embraced our agenda — for
affordable health care, quality child care, and worker
rights, and they rejected the
politics of division and hate
— in overwhelming numbers,” Roxanne Sanchez,
president of SEIU California, the state’s largest labor
union, said in an election
night statement.
Now, Newsom’s allies are
waiting to see whether his
sweeping vows to build more
houses, protect the environment and expand social
services for the state’s
youngest and oldest will result in investment — in state
dollars and political capital.
Perhaps the one constituency that does not hold
sky-high hopes for the incoming governor is the business community, which harbors fears that his pledges
could explode state spending and require new taxes.
But Newsom has also
cast himself as a friend to industry, pointing to a multimillion-dollar
hospitality
venture as a sign of his entrepreneurial bona fides.
“He’s got legitimate businesses in this state, and I’ve
heard him say more than
once to groups that he was
mindful of how taxes and
regulations can drive up
costs,” said Cassandra Pye,
a political strategist and former deputy chief of staff to
Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger, who succeeded Davis.
Jay L. Clendenin Los Angeles Times
GAVIN NEWSOM, seen speaking at a November rally in Irvine, has tried to tem-
per expectations on healthcare and other promises since he was elected governor.
Expectations are particularly high for what the
governor-elect will do about
healthcare, which Newsom
described on the campaign
trail as an animating passion. He has pledged nothing short of an overhaul,
with goals of expanding coverage, tamping down on
prices and ensuring widespread access. But Newsom
has been publicly coy on
how, exactly, he would
achieve those aims.
The focus on healthcare
earned him the backing of a
varied group of prominent
players in the field, including
healthcare providers, insurance companies and labor
unions worried about cost.
But those supporters have
diametrically opposed views
on what they want to see in a
new healthcare system.
For the California Nurses
Assn., which endorsed Newsom for governor in 2015, the
governor-elect’s swearing-in
means a fresh chance at accomplishing its top priority:
single-payer healthcare.
“We expect the governorelect to deliver on his promise: Medicare for All for all
Californians,” said Stephanie Roberson, the union’s
government relations director.
Newsom sided with the
nurses in their push for 2017
legislation to establish a single-payer system. When Assembly Speaker Anthony
Rendon
(D-Paramount)
tabled the measure, Newsom said he thought the bill
should continue through the
legislative process to fill in
key details, such as how to
pay for it. One legislative estimate pegged the price tag
at around $400 billion.
In a meeting with the
nurses union after the election, Newsom reiterated his
support, Roberson said,
telling the group that he
would sign a Medicare for
All-style bill if it reached his
desk. But Roberson acknowledged that Newsom
has close ties to other
healthcare players — including the physicians’ lobby —
that oppose that approach.
“We’re not Pollyanna-ish
about all of the different
groups and all of the different entities that are speaking to the governor,” Roberson said. “At the end of the
day, the end product is what
he’s committed to — and
that’s single-payer.”
But such a proposal
would face pushback from
another major Newsom
backer, the California Medical Assn.
“The notion that he’s going to come in and do the single-payer thing, that’s where
people need to check themselves,” said Dustin Corcoran, who leads the physicians’ group. “We should
challenge ourselves. We
should be creative. We
should be ambitious — but
anchored in pragmatic reality of what we can get done.”
The price tag, coupled
with a need for cooperation
from the federal government, poses barriers to the
single-payer model, Corcoran said. The doctors lobby
argued last year that the
nurses’ proposal would drive
physicians out of the state or
into retirement, and lead to
longer wait times for appointments and procedures.
Instead, doctors expect the
healthcare conversation in
the Capitol to focus on a
more achievable outcome:
improving access to care.
Should Newsom decide
to pursue an overhaul of
healthcare, it will require a
herculean feat of consensusbuilding — or inevitable disappointment for at least one
faction of supporters.
Since he was elected,
Newsom has tried to temper
expectations on healthcare
and other promises. Californians should not expect
homelessness to be eradicated, the healthcare system’s ills cured and an end to
the
housing
crisis
Newsom secured nearly
62% of the vote in his race
against Republican John
Cox, the largest electoral win
for a California governor
since Earl Warren in 1950. He
racked up commanding
margins in urban hubs such
as Los Angeles and San
Francisco, narrowly led in
the former GOP stronghold
of Orange County and had
respectable — if not outright
majority — showings in the
conservative-leaning Central Valley.
His win overlapped with
victories for liberals up and
down the ballot, resulting in
Democrats building a supermajority — and then some —
in both houses of the state
Legislature.
“The incoming governor
has a mandate,” Pye said.
“He’s got a very good Legislature, but he’s got a long list
of promises to keep.”
All governors must navigate the power-sharing dynamic with the legislative
branch, deciding how proactive they can be in pursuing
their agenda versus reacting
to the cascade of policy proposals from legislators.
“He’ll have to make a decision about when to engage
and when not to engage,”
said Dana Williamson, a former top advisor to Gov. Jerry
Brown. “Both of those are
strategic decisions.”
Brown almost never publicly weighed in on pending
legislation,
Williamson
noted, adding that when he
did, “it was very purposeful.”
The effect was a tightly curated list of priorities that
both voters and lawmakers
could easily grasp.
“If you do too much, you
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your message,” she said.
Still, Williamson said she
expects Newsom to be more
engaged with legislators
than Brown.
Brown was largely seen
as being able to coax or bend
lawmakers to his will, but
legislators are eager to reset
the power dynamic on more
equitable terms.
“The Legislature’s going
to be quite a challenge,”
Brown said in a recent interview. “And it’s going to be a
challenge because, first of
all, I’ve been reasonably successful. And there is inherent tension between the executive and the legislative
[branches].”
And while Brown was the
elder statesman in the Capitol, having served his first
terms as governor decades
ago, now it’s the legislators,
serving under longer term
limits, who collectively have
more experience than the
state’s new chief executive.
“As
[Newsom]
prioritizes, he’s going to have to
negotiate with a Legislature
that is now more powerful
than ever,” said Fabian
Núñez, the former Assembly
speaker. Leaders in both
houses “have years of experience in negotiating budgets
under their belt. Obviously,
Gov. Newsom does not.”
But a Capitol teeming
with Democrats does not
guarantee a glide path for liberal policies. Democratic
victories in more moderate
or conservative areas of the
state were probably a reflection of the national political
dynamic, Davis said, and not
necessarily a mandate for
progressivism.
“A lot of Republican
women decided to vote
Democratic ... because they
couldn’t stand Trump,”
Davis said. “Does that mean
they’re going to vote Democratic the rest of their life?
It’s a mistake to assume they
will.”
One advantage for Newsom: The sheer number of
Democratic votes means
less arm-twisting on tough
bills.
Chris Tapio, a consultant
to business-friendly Democrats in the Legislature, said
[See Newsom, A11]
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[Newsom, from A10]
the dynamic gives members
in swing districts more freedom to lay off tax increases
that might not sit well with
their constituents. But if
progressive lawmakers and
Newsom pull too far left, centrist Democrats may take
heat for the party’s liberal
policies, even if they didn’t
personally endorse the bills.
“Sometimes, regardless
of a legislator’s position,
there’s a guilt by association,” Tapio said.
Pye suggested Newsom’s
best strategy may be to
strike quickly.
In his first months in office, Schwarzenegger delivered a campaign promise to
reduce the vehicle license fee
in California to 0.65%, a move
critics cast as a grievous financial mistake for the
state. He also signed a bill in
his freshman year to overhaul the state’s workers’
compensation system, cutting costs for employers.
Those opposed to the
policies were caught off
guard by how quickly the
plans came together, Pye
said.
“I think there’s something to be said for coming
into office and getting a big
win, and leveraging that moment,” she said. “It helps you
establish yourself with the
Legislature and with interest groups that are floating
around the Capitol. It helps
you garner that press you
need in case you make a run
for national office.”
For his first major policy
proposal, Newsom is moving
to tackle a campaign promise with little political downside and wide support
among California voters.
The governor, who underscored his call for universal
preschool in the final days of
his bid for office, unveiled
last week a nearly $2-billion
proposal to expand access to
early education and childcare programs.
Uncertainty looms
over economy, state
Unlike his predecessor,
Newsom won’t be greeted
with dire fiscal conditions.
He will take office after
nearly a decade of nationwide economic expansion
and with a healthy budget
surplus.
The Legislative Analysts
Office in November declared
that California’s budget outlook is in “remarkably good
S U N DAY , JA N UA RY 6 , 2 019
A11
T H I S Y E A R , S TO P PAY I N G A N E L E C T R I C B I L L , F O R E V E R !
GO SOLAR
Al Seib Los Angeles Times
GOV.-ELECT Gavin Newsom, center, will inherit a
strong economy, but experts also warn of its volatility.
shape,” estimating the state
will see $14.5 billion in extra
revenue, even after it socks
away money in the state’s
rainy day fund.
“It is difficult to overstate
how good the budget’s condition is today,” the report
stated. “By historical standards, this surplus is extraordinary.”
But the report cautioned
that California’s budget conditions can change quickly,
especially if the country
spins into another recession.
In 2000, the state also predicted a massive surplus. Then
the dot-com bust arrived.
Within a year, California
faced a $12.4-billion deficit.
Brown has spent years
prophesying that economic
doom looms on the horizon,
in part to keep spendthrift
Democrats in the Legislature in check and also because history shows an eventual downturn is inevitable.
“What’s out there is darkness. Uncertainty. Decline
and recession,” Brown said
after unveiling his final
budget last year. “So good
luck, baby!”
Christopher Thornberg,
founding partner of Beacon
Economics, is bullish on California’s economic outlook
in the near term, saying all
signs point to continued
growth. But he expects a
mild recession to hit at some
point, saying it will deliver a
devastating gut-punch to
the state budget — even with
$15 billion in state’s reserves
— and Newsom’s ambitious
policy agenda.
“Even with a modest
downturn, you’re going to
have two years of $30-billionplus deficits,” he said. “It’s
going to be a mess.”
California’s overwhelming reliance on personal income tax, including taxes on
capital gains, makes the
state’s revenue stream volatile. The highest earners
provide a lopsided portion of
the state’s personal income
tax revenue, so when they do
well, the state does well.
When their investments
tank, so does the state’s revenue.
Chris Hoene, executive
director of the California
Budget and Policy Center,
said the volatility can be
dealt with if the state’s political leaders have the fiscal
discipline to save money in
good times, when there are
surpluses, knowing that bad
times are inevitable.
“The goal should not be
reducing volatility, because
that means you make the
system less fair,” Hoene said.
“Managing volatility is the
problem. You need people
who will make tough
choices.”
Economic uncertainty
can wreak havoc on a governor’s standing with voters.
“When people feel their
lives are getting better,
they’re happy to support the
incumbent governor. When
they feel the opposite,
they’re happy to oppose
him,” Davis said.
In all, the charmed circumstances under which
Newsom is taking office belie
the difficult road ahead.
“I think this is going to be
as tough as the Dickens,”
Pye said. “This is a really
tough state to run, and we
have a lot of big problems
right now. All of that coupled
with the question of who will
pay for it, you can’t do anything but wish him luck and
pray for him.”
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With Warren in Iowa, 2020 is on
The big-name
Democrat’s visit
signals unofficial start
to the presidential
campaign season.
By Noah Bierman
COUNCIL
BLUFFS,
Iowa — Marylynn Leggio
nodded excitedly as Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth
Warren, pumping her fist
from the small stage in a
cramped room adjoining a
western Iowa bowling alley,
breathlessly excoriated billionaires and lobbyists.
“I’m not ready to commit,
but she was on fire,” said
Leggio, one of 300 people
who made it inside to get a
first look at the newest
Democratic
presidential
candidate. Two hundred
others stood outside waiting
in the cold.
Leggio, a 71-year-old retiree, was shopping early for
a 2020 candidate with her
teenage
granddaughter
Maggie Bashore. She displayed the well-founded
confidence of a resident of
Iowa — the state with the
first presidential nominating contest — that she would
get an opportunity to personally poke and prod every
aspirant in a Democratic
field that could grow to more
than 20 contenders eager to
take on President Trump.
“There are a lot of questions I’d like to ask, but she’ll
be back,” Leggio said.
The Iowa party caucuses
are more than a year away,
but this weekend marked
the unofficial start of the
2020 presidential campaign
season. Warren on Monday
became the first of the bigname candidates to form
a presidential exploratory
committee and then made
an immediate foray to Iowa
on Friday, scheduling five
stops over three days across
the farm state.
Since Warren began
planning to run for president over the last few
months, the national spotlight has been harsh. Like
candidates before her, she’s
Scott Olson Getty Images
SEN. ELIZABETH WARREN of Massachusetts speaks with Iowans who turned out for her appearance
Saturday in Storm Lake, one of five stops she is making over three days in the early-voting state.
counting on the locals here
to discount the skeptics and
make up their own minds.
Critics, including many
Democrats, have questioned whether Warren is
too far to the left, too damaged by the controversy over
her thin claims to Native
American ancestry or incapable of connecting with average Americans.
Her advisors see Iowa,
where candidates audition
before informal groups of
party activists and curious
voters, as an ideal place for
her to prove the detractors
wrong and remind the political class what made her such
a formidable candidate in
the first place.
Eight years ago, she
made a name for herself in
precisely this type of environment — dazzling small
groups of Democratic Party
activists in Massachusetts
house parties when she was
preparing for an eventual
Senate campaign. One moment captured on video,
when she explained why she
thinks
businesses
and
wealthy people should pay
more taxes, went viral and
helped cement her reputation with the party’s left
wing.
Voters who show up to
the early events here tend to
be receptive but noncommittal — and, occasionally,
tough inquisitors.
One woman at a Council
Bluffs event tried to get Warren to oppose legalized abortion, which Warren, long a
strong supporter of abortion
rights, declined to do. Another in Sioux City asked
why she released her DNA
test in October, giving the
president — who calls Warren “Pocahontas” — “more
fodder to be a bully” in mocking her claims to Native
American heritage. Others
asked whether she supports
net neutrality, how she could
win over moderate Republicans who dislike Trump, and
whether she had done
enough in the Senate to justify a White House run.
Warren gamely took selfies with dozens of people at
each event, and kept talking
when the sound system in
Council Buffs conked out for
a few minutes. By Saturday
morning, her voice was
growing hoarse from a head
cold, but she continued to
bounce around the crowd.
She stuck to a rehearsed
answer on the Native American question, repeating that
her background came from
family stories “like a lot of
folks” have in her native
Oklahoma, and that she was
not claiming to be a member
of a tribe or a person of color.
(She had, in fact, previously
listed herself as a minority in
a national law directory,
though a review by the Boston Globe found the issue
was not a factor in her hiring
as a law professor at Harvard University and elsewhere.)
“I’m just gonna put it all
out there,” Warren said of
her law school hiring records
and DNA test, both of which
are now online.
“I can’t stop Donald
Trump from what he’s
gonna do,” she said. “I can’t
stop him from hurling racial
insults.
“But what I can do,” she
added, “is I can be in this
fight for all of our families.”
Warren insisted that she
was glad to get the question.
Yet the issue continues to be
among the sorest points in
her political career. She was
more eager to talk about
other aspects of her biography, including the time her
mother temporarily supported the family with a minimum-wage job, and the inexpensive college education
that did not plunge Warren
into debt.
Though Warren is a senator and a former professor
at the nation’s most elite
university and has written
dense textbooks on bankruptcy law, she salted her
public speeches with tales of
“momma,” “daddy” and
“folks,” frequently highlighting her Oklahoma roots by
dropping consonants at the
end of her words.
“Today, a minimum wage
job in America — full time —
will not keep a momma and a
baby out of poverty and it is
wrong and it is why I’m in
this fight,” she said.
In keeping with her familiar populism, Warren was
also keen to lambaste oil
companies, drug manufacturers and financial giants,
who she said control Washington at the expense of
working Americans.
Many who came to see
Warren four years ago sup-
ported Vermont Sen. Bernie
Sanders, a like-minded independent, for the Democratic
nomination. Some said they
were ready to move on, even
if he enters the race. Though
many voters here are checking out Warren, they are also
mentioning other potential
candidates, including former Vice President Joe Biden, former Rep. Beto
O’Rourke of Texas, Minnesota Sen. Amy Klobuchar,
New Jersey Sen. Cory
Booker and Sen. Kamala
Harris of California.
“We’re hoping to get
some better candidates this
election,”
said
Shauna
Buckingham, a 28-year-old
production supervisor from
Cherokee who came to an
event with her baby, Joshua.
“It wasn’t too impressive
last time around,” said Chad
Jorgensen, her boyfriend.
Though some voters here
lament the seemingly neverending campaign cycle,
there is a thirst among many
Democratic activists to begin the vetting process, given their zeal to defeat
Trump.
“We’re going to pay attention. It’s not going to happen
again,” said Jane Reynolds,
a retiree from Sioux Falls,
bitterly recalling 2016 nominee Hillary Clinton’s loss.
“If we are going to have 20
people, we may as well get
started,” said Jeff Fossum, a
63-year-old retiree who wore
a button that said “It’s
Mueller Time” — using the
beermaker’s logo to evoke
Robert S. Mueller III, the
special counsel investigating Trump associates’ potential role in Russian interference in the 2016 election.
Teri Copple, a 56-year-old
mental health specialist,
said the long primary season
gives voters a chance to see
whether candidates “change
their tempo and how they
handle the long haul” and react to dynamic world events.
“Questions are going to get
harder,” she said. “Emotions
are going to get stronger.”
Warren, known for avoiding impromptu questions
from Senate reporters, is responding to reporters at
most stops here. Her answers, however, are not always responsive. On Friday
night, she refused to say
whether Democrats should
condemn Rep. Rashida
Tlaib, a newly elected Democrat from Michigan who
used profane language in
vowing to impeach Trump.
Warren was more willing
to take an indirect shot at a
couple of wealthy potential
rivals for the Democratic
nomination, Tom Steyer
and Michael R. Boomberg,
who are likely to self-fund
their campaigns should they
run.
“Campaigns should not
be for sale,” she said, arguing
that Democrats should base
their efforts on the grass
roots — “not having billionaires buy these campaigns.”
Political
professionals
expect
Warren’s
move
toward a full-blown presidential run to spark a rush of
competition
in
coming
weeks. She has already hired
some of the most experienced political operatives in
Iowa and has staffers collecting contact information
from the people who have
lined up to see her, to build a
volunteer file.
“She has forced everybody’s hand,” said Mary
Anne Marsh, a Democratic
strategist and former advisor to former senator and
2004 presidential nominee
John F. Kerry. “If I’m Bernie
Sanders at this point, or anyone including Beto, I think
you need to get in sooner
than later. People are looking. People are already talking about it. Elizabeth Warren is traveling.”
Her early start and
Democrats’
anticipated
large field also increases the
chances that candidates will
trade places in its top tier —
much as Trump quickly upended the expected frontrunners in Republicans’
crowded contest four years
ago. Warren was a favorite of
the left then, with people
begging her to run. The enthusiasm seems muted now
that she’s in.
David Axelrod, the longtime political advisor to
President Obama, cautioned against reading too
much into quick judgments
or early setbacks of the candidates.
He said Warren can
sound stilted and inauthentic, and he criticized her handling of the heritage issue.
But, Axelrod added, she
could well become the nominee, given her “genuine
claim to the populist base in
the party that is really second to none.”
noah.bierman
@latimes.com
No shutdown at
Trump hotel site
Federal rangers report
as usual at clock tower
atop the D.C. building.
associated press
WASHINGTON
—
Smithsonian museums are
closed. There are no federal
staffers to answer tourists’
questions at the Lincoln Memorial. And across the
United States, national
parks are cluttered with
trash. Yet despite the federal
government shutdown, a
historic clock tower at the
Trump International Hotel
remained open for its handful of visitors, staffed by
green-clad National Park
Service rangers.
“We’re open!” one National Park Service ranger
declared around lunchtime,
pushing an elevator button
for a lone visitor entering the
site through a side entrance
to ride to the top of the 315foot-high, nearly 120-yearold clock tower in the nation’s capital.
The Trump administra-
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twitter.com/latimes
Alex Brandon Associated Press
THE STAFFING at the Trump hotel site is “unre-
lated to the facility’s tenant,” a spokeswoman said.
tion appears to have gone
out of its way to keep the attraction in the federally
owned building that houses
the Trump hotel open and
staffed with National Park
Service rangers, even as
other federal agencies shut
all but the most essential
services.
Amanda
Osborn,
a
spokeswoman for the General Services Administration, which owns the building and leases it to the
Trump Organization, said in
an email that the shutdown
exemption for the comparatively little-known clock
tower was “unrelated to the
facility’s tenant” — the
Trump
business.
The
agency says the law that put
it in charge of the site obligates it to keep it open, even
as
federal
Washington
closes around it.
But the scene at the modest historic site at the
Trump hotel building, where
rangers often outnumber
visitors, marked the latest
episode in which President
Trump’s business interests
have overlapped with the
work of the federal government, creating at least the
appearance of a conflict of
interest.
A watchdog group, and
frustrated tourists, questioned why a shutdown that
had furloughed hundreds of
thousands of workers and
crippled many agencies was
exempting a site within the
Trump family’s business
empire.
Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington
filed a request with the General Services Administration seeking documents explaining why the tower was
open, how it continues to be
funded and any communications between the agency
and the Trump Organization. “At the very least, this
smells funny,” said Noah
Bookbinder, the group’s executive director.
S
L AT I M E S . C O M
S U N DAY , JA N UA RY 6 , 2 019
A13
L.A. teachers aim to join a nationwide wave
[Teachers, from A1]
untrustworthy
villain,
whose hidden agenda is to
turn over campuses to
profiteers and the private
operators of nonunion charter schools in something
akin to a corporate takeover.
“Although the circumstances in different states
vary, the common theme
across the country is a lack
of investment in public education and the threat from
the aggressive privatization
and charterization movement,” said Alex CaputoPearl, president of UTLA.
Beutner vigorously contests this interpretation,
saying his goal is to make
district-run schools as good
as they can be, to live within
the
district’s
financial
means and even to join with
the union in seeking more
state funding.
The
superintendent
largely has avoided the
ideology of the dispute, but
there certainly are union
critics ready to respond full
force.
“UTLA’s actions are a
last gasp of desperation to
protect a failed status quo
and control the work of
teachers and parents who
want, I think, dramatically
better for their students,”
said Jeanne Allen, of the
Washington,
D.C.-based
Center for Education Reform, which is funded by procharter donors and favors
the use of public funds to
subsidize private-school tuition.
As in other places, the
L.A. teachers union is asking
for a higher wage offer. And
as in some other places, the
union also is seeking more
staffing to make classrooms
less crowded.
The dispute in L.A., however, is not simply a carbon
copy of what happened in
other states. Key differences
could affect the outcome.
The strike would affect
nearly half a million students, their families and
63,000 district employees
and would be the first in
nearly three decades, since a
nine-day walkout in 1989.
Red versus blue
Compared
with
the
teachers who walked out in
other states, Caputo-Pearl
and UTLA would seem to
have a fundamental political
advantage — of red versus
blue. California is a Democrat-dominated, pro-union
state. Other states with
teacher job actions were Republican-dominated or a
center-right shade of purple.
Teacher strikes are illegal in
nearly all the other states
that saw job actions in 2018.
Other labor laws in the red
states also have weakened
the influence of unions.
But mass action can play
out in surprising ways. In the
red states, including Oklahoma, Kentucky and Arizona, teachers were widely perceived by the public as victims of Republican machinations.
In Kentucky, Republican
Gov. Matt Bevin said that
striking teachers would be
responsible for unsuper-
but he emphasizes a strike’s
potential harm.
“This is not a Donald
Trump protest on a Sunday
in Grand Park,” he said.
“This is not a strike against
Walgreens, where people
can go down the street to
CVS instead. This has consequence.”
Union at crossroads
Genaro Molina Los Angeles Times
MEMBERS of United Teachers Los Angeles pick up signs for Thursday’s planned strike after a union meeting
Saturday. The walkout would affect half a million students in the nation’s second-largest school district.
Genaro Molina Los Angeles Times
UNION head Alex Caputo-Pearl, center, says a strike
would be a fight for “racial justice” in L.A. Unified,
where 3 in 4 students are Latino and 8% are black.
vised children being sexually
assaulted, ingesting poison
and beginning to use illegal
drugs. He also accused
teachers of being stupid and
selfish in fighting for higher
pay and against cuts to their
underfunded pensions.
But it turned out that
many Kentuckians identified with the teachers, said
Jeni Bolander, a veteran
high school instructor in
Lexington.
“It’s frustrating how little
teachers make for the education they are required to
get, and most incur student
debt as a result, making second and third jobs necessary,” Bolander said.
Teachers in Kentucky
and elsewhere were able to
take their issues directly to
their states’ capitols, the
source of funding — and, in
the eyes of many, the source
of blame for budget shortfalls that caused suffering
for teachers and students
alike.
In conservative places,
teachers were successfully
fighting for liberal values.
And laws against strikes
turned out not to matter so
much. Teachers enjoyed
such strong public support
that authorities did not dare
enforce the laws.
“They were massive
strikes with an amount of
public support for a strike
that we haven’t seen in a long
time — that’s what made
them work,” said Sylvia A.
Allegretto, an economist
with the Center on Wage and
Employment Dynamics at
UC Berkeley.
Some school district officials subversively supported
the job actions; many districts temporarily closed
down schools.
The red-state strikes
seemed to be part of an antiPresident Trump wave, said
Janelle Scott, a UC Berkeley
associate professor in the
Graduate School of Education.
The “Red for Ed” movement, and the visual of having a mass of mostly women
coming out in a large force
appealed to the wider public, Scott said.
The same could hold in
California, she said. Such a
large walkout, though in a
single district, could build
on the goodwill generated in
other states and put pressure on the Legislature and
incoming Gov. Gavin Newsom to make moves with the
budget or state policy that
would bring teachers back to
their classrooms.
An us-versus-them construct, however, does not
translate readily to California, where unions are among
the state’s most powerful
special interests. Unlike in
some red states, L.A. district
administrators also intend
to keep schools open.
And L.A. teachers must
face off against a district
whose leaders echo their
union’s demand for increased state and federal
funding for schools.
The union leader also is
trying to put forward a complex argument on funding.
While Caputo-Pearl argues
that the state needs to do
much more, he also says that
L.A. Unified is hoarding a
fortune — and that district
leadership is choosing to
starve its schools.
Meanwhile, financial experts brought in by L.A. Unified support the district’s assertion that it faces potential insolvency in two to
three years — even without
meeting most union demands.
“This is where I think the
teachers’ strategy could
backfire. Because you already have a weakened district,” said UCLA education
professor Pedro Noguera.
“The question then is, where
does the money come from?”
Ambitious demands
L.A. Unified teacher salaries tend to be lower than in
nearby areas, although the
district offers the perk of retiree health benefits, which
is rare elsewhere.
The district is offering a
6% raise over the first two
years of a three-year contract. The union wants 6.5%
all at once and a year retroactive, but its demands are
much more sweeping than
pay alone. UTLA also wants
more teachers in order to reduce class sizes, and enough
nurses, librarians and counselors to “fully staff ” schools.
Those are the sort of demands for better pay and resources that teachers have
made in other states. But
UTLA also is using California’s labor-friendly laws to
push further. Union leaders
want the contract to give
teachers more control over
how money is spent at
schools, how much time is
given over to standardized
testing and how space on
district campuses is allocated to charter schools. District
officials
question
whether such demands are
proper bargaining topics
and oppose them almost
universally as interfering
with their management of
the school system.
The union is pushing the
envelope still further in its
strike lead-up, issuing a battle cry against charter
schools and privatization —
a message that CaputoPearl thinks is integral to the
union’s future.
Beutner
views
the
union’s broader goals as an
impediment to resolving differences, and he bristles at
the union’s suggestion that
his real agenda is to undermine public education.
The union has leveled
this charge at him because
Beutner, a businessman,
has no prior experience
managing a school or school
system and because he secured the job with the votes
of a school-board majority
elected with substantial
support from charter-school
backers.
Both sides, of course,
claim to be the true stewards
of students.
Caputo-Pearl says a
strike would be a fight for
“racial justice” in a district
where 3 in 4 students are
Latino and 8% are black.
Regarding the need for
more state funding, Beutner
has spoken in similar terms,
United Teachers Los Angeles is at a crossroads and
could use the boost a successful strike would bring.
For decades, the union
was the most influential
force in the politics of the
school system. But it has
been unable, in recent elections, to match the campaign spending fueled by
wealthy donors who support
charter schools. These privately operated, mostly nonunion schools now serve
about 1 in 5 of all students
enrolled in L.A. public
schools, more than in any
other school system.
The rapid growth of charters has created an alternate
constituency of parents who
support charters and may
resent the dark way the
union casts them.
In 2017, for the first time,
charter-backed candidates
won a majority on the L.A.
Board of Education.
A Supreme Court ruling
last year also has deprived
UTLA, along with other California unions, of the right to
collect fees from all teachers
within its jurisdiction. Union
membership — and the accompanying dues that fuel
campaigns — essentially
have become optional.
Caputo-Pearl and his
team have energized membership in the run-up to a
strike. But maintaining that
spirit could be trickier. And
what happens if the union
falls short of delivering on its
69 pages of demands?
“UTLA has taken such an
uncompromising stance on
its issues that anything less
than a complete capitulation by the district will
seem like a defeat,” said
Mike Antonucci, a columnist
who tracks union activity for
“The 74,” a news site funded
by charter supporters.
Even some allies worry
that the union is pushing too
hard and for too much, and
that a bitter strike could
even push some families to
charter schools.
Caputo-Pearl acknowledges that the stakes are
high, but not just for the
union, he said.
“We’re fighting for highquality public schools in every neighborhood,” he said.
“This is a decisive moment
for public education in Los
Angeles.”
howard.blume
@latimes.com
sonali.kohli
@latimes.com
District loses bid
to limit walkout
L.A. Unified had argued
that a strike would hinder services for disabled
students. CALIFORNIA, B1
A14
SU N DAY , JA N UA RY 6 , 2 019
S
L AT I M E S . C O M
Activism’s place on the red carpet
[Globes, from A1]
But how enduring — and
how complete — will that
transformation be? Last
year, the sober tone seemed
like it might become permanent. Not only was the
Globes carpet a sea of black,
but A-listers such as Meryl
Streep brought activist
leaders as their plus-ones.
The red carpet emphasis on
serious conversation echoed
the social media campaign
to #AskHerMore, begun in
2015 and pushed by actresses including Reese
Witherspoon who said they
wanted to talk about their
work, beliefs and ideas, not
just their clothes.
The political focus continued at the ceremonies. At
the Globes, Oprah Winfrey
gave a powerful speech
about inequality, and acceptance speeches by James
Franco and Aziz Ansari
subsequently inspired women to come forward with
#MeToo stories about those
men. The Screen Actors
Guild Awards enlisted all female presenters, and at the
Academy Awards, Harvey
Weinstein accusers Ashley
Judd, Salma Hayek and
Annabella Sciorra were invited onstage. It was a remarkable run kicked off by
that fusillade of black gowns.
This Sunday, however,
celebrity members of Time’s
Up — the organization that
orchestrated last year’s
somber palette — will be
making a far less dramatic
visual statement.
The group is encouraging
attendees, among them
Constance Wu, Emma Stone
and Laura Dern, to sport
ribbons and bracelets that
say TIMESUPx2, a reference to both the second year
of the coalition and a new
campaign that calls to double the number of women in
workplace leadership positions.
“We do not expect to live
on the red carpet or be
award season-centric,” said
Lisa Borders, who was hired
as the first president and
chief executive of Time’s Up
in October. “Last year, the
Harvey Weinstein story
broke, and the Golden
Globes happened to be one
“They did it!
Our new bathroom
looks fabulous!”
Jay L. Clendenin Los Angeles Times
ACTRESS Missi Pyle wears a black dress and a Time’s Up pin to last year’s Gold-
en Globes. This Sunday, the organization’s visual statements will be more subtle.
of the first award shows
where many of the women
who were deeply engaged
with Time’s Up were going to
be. The Globes are a good
opportunity to get our message out as a distribution
channel, but they are one
night.”
And heading into this
year’s Globes, the mood feels
light again, said designer
Christian Siriano.
“We’re getting such a different reaction this season,”
said Siriano, who dressed
stars including Messing, Angela Bassett and Rachel
Bloom last year. “Every actress is kind of like, ‘I want to
celebrate me.’ There’s for
sure a shift. They’re going for
something big and exciting
and dramatic.”
Last year, E! host Rancic
noted on-air that the network’s
correspondents
would not be asking who
made a celebrity’s outfit but
instead why a star was wear-
ing a certain look.
Siriano said he understood why fashion got short
shrift on red carpets last
year, even though the allblack mandate required him
to make far more custom designs than usual. “The message was bigger and more
powerful, so it was worth all
the effort,” he said.
But this year, “Who are
you wearing?” feels like a
safe question again, according to those at entertainment news programs.
“Stylists
have
gone
through so much effort, and
the designer deserves to be
credited,” said “Extra” cohost Renee Bargh, who will
be on the carpet with Mario
Lopez. “So you can ask that
question, but you follow it up
by talking about what project the star is there to promote. And then you get into
the political nitty-gritty.”
“The truth is, people do
want to know about who ce-
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lebrities are wearing. In the
end, it’s a party,” added Theresa Coffino, one of “Extra’s”
executive producers. “Our
task is to blend that kind of
coverage with the news. Every day, something still
breaks about the movement. Kevin Spacey was
nominated eight times and
won. He could have been
walking this carpet, and instead, the day our coverage
airs [Monday], he will be
walking in front of a judge.
That will come up during the
night.”
Globes co-hosts Sandra
Oh and Andy Samberg have
said they want the evening
to feel celebratory and positive, leaving any political
statements to those individuals inclined to make them.
Borders said there were
no plans for a Time’s Upspecific moment during the
telecast, though the group’s
entertainment affiliate disseminated talking points
about its TIMESUPx2 campaign — as well as the black
or white accessories — to
members before the show.
“Whether it’s the Globes
or any award show, we have
to be consistent and constant — not a huge burst of
energy each time,” she said.
“The message we will be
sharing this time is that
safety in the workplace depends on equity at every level. Entertainers are leading
the charge, but Hollywood is
not the only area where this
problem exists.”
The organization is eager
to foreground its work outside
Hollywood,
which
makes sense, given the
power and privilege enjoyed
by some of its most prominent members and criticisms that even the actresses at the forefront of the
movement have not been the
whistleblowers. (Early silence breakers such as Rose
McGowan, Jessica Barth
and Sciorra are not affiliated
with Time’s Up.)
The more subdued approach could also stem from
a desire not to outshine activists in other less glamorous fields. After last year’s
effort to show solidarity with
women in other industries —
the group helped actresses
such as Streep and Michelle
Williams invite prominent
activist leaders to be their
plus-ones — some critics
suggested that actresses
were using activists as accessories.
Still, politics will remain
in the mix. Ai-jen Poo, executive director of the National
Domestic Workers Alliance
who attended with Streep
last year, will return to the
carpet with director Alfonso
Cuaron; his film, “Roma,” is
about a domestic worker.
And on Sunday, Wu — the
“Fresh Off the Boat” actress
nominated for her turn in
the film “Crazy Rich Asians”
— plans to represent the
“immensely powerful” women who constitute Time’s
Up. Because her ABC sitcom
was “historic in its representation for Asian Americans,”
she said, she has long been
comfortable talking about
more substantive fare on the
red carpet.
“It’s also the kind of question I’ve always been given,
because I’m an Asian American woman. Whereas a white
actor isn’t asked what it’s
like to be a white actor these
days,” she said. “But now I
feel a lot more community
and strength in numbers.
It’s made me feel a little bit
more relaxed, because in the
past, I would speak out
about things when I got frustrated the conversation
wasn’t happening. But now I
know the conversation is
happening, and people
aren’t afraid to speak about
it.”
As for fashion, Wu said
she’s comfortable talking
about her dress — to an extent.
“If it comes from a place
that has to do with appreciation for fashion or expression of your personality or
identity — I think that’s the
right place to come from,”
she said. “But if I ever felt like
my worthiness was being assessed based on how I
looked, I’d shut it down.”
Even if the spirit of the
carpet is more jovial this
year, Borders is hopeful the
public will still recognize
how much change has occurred. She pointed to the
$22 million raised for the
Time’s Up Legal Defense
Fund — a fundraising effort
launched at last year’s
Globes — that has allowed
roughly 90 workplace sexual
misconduct cases to get
underway.
And within Hollywood,
she gave credit to Rotten Tomatoes for expanding its
critics criteria in an effort to
diversify the voices evaluating films, and to film festivals such as Cannes, Toronto and Sundance for
pledging to include more underrepresented groups.
“It has been just one year,
and the progress that has
been generated has, I think,
been extraordinary,” Borders said. “The changes that
are happening may look incremental, but we are going
to reach a tipping point. Diamonds are made over time,
and they take pressure from
all sides to form.”
amy.kaufman@latimes.com
S U N DAY , JA N UA RY 6 , 2 019
S
L AT I M E S . C O M / O P I N I O N
A15
OPINION
EDITORIALS
LETTERS
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
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Jerry Brown’s last day in office
On Monday, he hands power to his
successor. Goodbye, and thanks, to
this one-of-a-kind public servant.
f history concludes that Jerry Brown
was among California’s most important governors — as very likely it will —
that will have much to do with the fact
that he had more time in the job than
any of his counterparts. When he hands
power to Gavin Newsom on Monday, Brown
will have served four terms as governor,
more than anyone else has (or will in the future, unless term limits laws are changed).
The extraordinary length of his tenure,
spanning more than four decades with a 28year break between his second and third
terms, gave Brown a long view that other
governors lacked, and allowed the public
time to catch up to his progressive ideas on
issues such as diversity on the bench, renewable energy and water security. Had he not
returned for another two terms, Brown
might have forever been remembered as
“Gov. Moonbeam,” the hip, young politician
who dated a rock star and had some strange
ideas about harnessing the power of the
sun. Instead, he leaves office as the idiosyncratic but sagacious senior statesmen
whose deep understanding of the state’s
unique political landscape and shrewd tactical skills made him the governor California
needed at this crucial point in its history.
It wasn’t just age that improved him; he
also expanded his political resume between
gubernatorial stints, serving as chairman of
the state Democratic Party, as mayor of
Oakland (which no doubt gave him an appreciation of how state policies and funding
decisions affect real people in their communities) and as California’s attorney general.
Brown was not a perfect governor. He
has blind spots and character flaws, and,
like any public official, he has stumbled on
occasion. Some of his backroom deals, such
as the one he cut with the beverage industry
in 2018 on soda taxes, struck us as cynical.
He paid insufficient attention to certain issues, such as poverty and housing, leaving
them for future governors and legislators to
sort out. He devoted much of his political
capital (and much of the state’s actual capital) over the course of his four terms to a water project and a high-speed rail enterprise
that may have been prescient — but may
also prove quixotic. He vetoed some bills we
thought he should have signed, and signed
others he should have vetoed.
But when taken in full measure, he deserves a heartfelt thanks for leaving the
state in much better condition than when he
found it. There have already been many articles written about his accomplishments, so
we won’t belabor the details, but here are a
few areas in which Brown deserves special
appreciation before he heads off to his Colusa County ranch.
He was a strong and steady champion of
fiscal stability, working diligently to transform the irresponsible culture of budgeting
and spending in Sacramento. With the
economy still growing and an expected $15billion state budget surplus this year, it’s
easy to forget how bleak the financial picture looked in January 2011 when Brown was
sworn in for his third term. Services had
been slashed, and still the state was facing a
$28-billion hole in its operating budget; only
a year and a half earlier, a cover story in the
Economist magazine had declared Califor-
I
nia to be “ungovernable.”
When the Legislature, controlled by his
fellow Democrats, brought him a budget
that he thought relied on gimmicks and
wishful thinking, Brown vetoed it. That set
the tone for the next seven years. In a remarkable political triumph, Brown persuaded voters to vote for a package of temporary tax increases in 2012 (some of which
later became permanent) to close a yawning
deficit and then pushed through Proposition 2 in 2014, reinvigorating the state’s
rainy day fund. Even when the economy rebounded and the state’s finances were back
in the black, Brown never stopped preaching fiscal responsibility, warning that the
next downturn was coming. We hope the
message will not be forgotten.
Brown took important steps to ease the
crisis in the state’s overcrowded prisons
with the “realignment” policy that gave
counties more responsibility for felons; he
followed up with the controversial but important criminal justice reforms in Proposition 57. He also diversified the state’s judicial branch dramatically by appointing a
significant number of women, people of color and non-prosecutors to the bench. That
will reshape the delivery of justice in California for decades to come.
His final gift in the criminal justice arena
was his signature on a bill ending cash bail,
an imperfect but important step toward equity and fairness.
Brown fought for — and signed into law
— the Local Control Funding Formula,
which drove additional dollars to school districts with high concentrations of poverty,
English language learners and foster youth.
He also persuaded legislators to pass a fuel
tax to pay for highway repairs and transportation infrastructure improvements.
And of course Brown stood up to the
bully in Washington, D.C., in his inimitable
way. When President Trump retreated on
climate change and adopted draconian immigration policies, Brown kept California
on the right side of history.
It remains to be seen what will be the future of the high-speed rail project for which
Brown has been an enormous and articulate
proponent since the 1970s. Although he
wasn’t responsible for the 2008 ballot measure that authorized its construction, he remained a resolute champion of the project
even as its price tag soared and public and
political enthusiasm waned. In a 2018 conversation with The Times, Brown said the
project was “in the spirit of the great governors of California” and that to “turn tail and
join with the naysayers” would be a tragedy.
“We’re going to complete it, oh you of little
faith,” he said.
Gov. Brown was a political wheelerdealer and a canny deal-cutter who understood that compromise was at the heart of
politics, but he was also a big-picture
thinker able to articulate a broader vision
for California. Like his father, Gov. Edmund
Brown Sr., who built the University of California system and the state water project,
Jerry Brown fought for a bullet train many
others couldn’t imagine (and many still
can’t), for the multibillion-dollar Delta tunnels, and for laws that put California at the
forefront of the war against climate change.
He saw California as a promised land, capable of anything, progressive in the best
sense of the word.
Thanks for everything, Gov. Brown.
There are many ways to be a good governor.
Yours was the right approach for this state
at this moment in history.
L.A.’s earthquake alert app
don’t kill them, they nurse
them back to health.
Using this approach
would mean that many
more trees would be able to
provide the services your
editorial rightly touts as
important.
Marcia Hanscom
Playa del Rey
The writer is executive
director of the Ballona
Institute.
::
Rich Pedroncelli Associated Press
GOV. JERRY BROWN , on his ranch in Colusa
County, leaves office Monday after four terms.
Brown’s warnings
Re “Reflecting on his legacy, Brown eyes work ahead,”
Jan. 1
I’ve grown up politically with Jerry Brown, first as a
student during his first term as governor, and more
recently as I tracked his status as the “adult in the room.”
Nothing will define his legacy more than his persistent
warnings about climate change. I didn’t always embrace
his climate tactics, but I appreciated his passionate
defense of the scientific consensus and his alarm at the
Trump administration’s environmental sabotage.
Reversing the impacts of climate change will take
more time than Brown had in office, but I’m hoping his
sense of urgency was contagious.
David This
Brea
::
I would submit that
Brown did not get the
credit he deserved for
some of the poor policies
he implemented.
His environmental
agenda and social engineering experiments have
caused California to have
some of the country’s
highest housing costs,
utility rates and fuel prices.
And that is before we talk
about water and the highspeed rail debacle.
As a result, more citizens must rely on the government for support. Factoring in cost of living,
California has the nation’s
highest poverty rate. Lack
of affordable housing as a
result of poor government
policy promoting high
density and restrictive
zoning is not something
that will be easily overcome.
California politicians
are close to breaking the
backs of taxpayers. Hopefully, at some point voters
will wake up to this reality.
Geoffrey B. King
Wasco, Calif.
::
Brown’s reflections in
your article on his career
are provocative, as he
usually is.
We see again his signature style and humanity:
Why are things the way
they are? What changes
can we make to improve
our lives?
As we start a new year,
let us collectively resolve to
likewise question the assumptions around us and
attempt to find policies
and solutions that benefit
us all.
Calvin Naito
Los Angeles
::
ou are now just a smartphone
app away from knowing within
seconds — if you’re lucky, tens of
seconds — when an earthquake
with a magnitude of 5.0 or higher
is about to rattle Los Angeles County.
ShakeAlertLA, an app commissioned by
the city of L.A. for use in the entire county of
Los Angeles, can now be downloaded — for
free! — to Android and Apple devices. A network of ground sensors, operated by the
U.S. Geological Survey, detects the earliest
indications of shaking. The app then sends
an immediate message that an earthquake
is on the way and the kind of shaking to be
expected (light, moderate or severe). It may
not be perfect — there could be false alarms,
or, conversely, failures to detect a quake.
But the technology has been used, mostly
successfully, in other countries and should
work here as well. It is the first such warning
system in the U.S., a tool to help us deal with
the inevitable big one.
Kudos to the L.A. city government for
rolling it out and taking care of the kinks
along the way. When there wasn’t enough
federal money for all the necessary ground
sensors in Southern California, Mayor Eric
Y
Garcetti found $6 million to finish putting
them in. When the city needed $300,000 to
create the technology for the app, it got
grants and hired AT&T.
But shouldn’t there be an alert system
for the rest of California and the West
Coast? The state and federal governments
should be financing the necessary expansion of the ground sensor network. With
sensors in place, other West Coast municipalities or, better yet, the state itself, could
set up quake alert apps. Or there could be
some kind of wireless emergency alert system (like the Amber Alerts) that reaches all
phones unless you opt out. The technology
in the Amber Alert system is too slow right
now to make it useful as an earthquake
warning system. But it could be improved.
And meanwhile, let’s get on with retrofitting buildings to better withstand quakes.
The city made a good start by mandating
retrofitting of vulnerable wood and concrete
structures. But concrete retrofitting is expensive and proceeding at a glacial pace.
Assemblyman Adrin Nazarian (D-North
Hollywood) may re-introduce a 30% seismic
retrofit tax credit that was vetoed in 2015.
That’s an investment worth considering.
Brown defends his
“criminal justice legacy” —
which has spawned a backlash in the form of a 2020
ballot initiative to undo the
governor’s reforms — by
stating: “In my view, [the
initiative is] deeply antiChristian, because it denies redemption. And
redemption is at the heart
of our whole civilization.”
Wrong. The basis of our
civilization is the rule of law
— in other words, law and
order.
Joel Anderson
Studio City
::
As serious as the nose
on your face: Jerry Brown
2020
David Reid
Hollywood
Don’t assume
Trump will run
Re “The looming primary
battle,” editorial, Jan. 3
EXECUTIVE CHAIRMAN Dr. Patrick Soon-Shiong
EXECUTIVE EDITOR Norman Pearlstine
MANAGING EDITOR
Scott Kraft
SENIOR DEPUTY MANAGING EDITOR
Kimi Yoshino
DEPUTY MANAGING EDITORS
Sewell Chan, Colin Crawford, Julia Turner
ASSISTANT MANAGING EDITORS
FOUNDED DECEMBER 4, 1881
Len De Groot, Shelby Grad, Loree Matsui,
Angel Rodriguez, Michael Whitley
Opinion
Nicholas Goldberg EDITOR OF THE EDITORIAL PAGES
Sue Horton OP-ED AND SUNDAY OPINION EDITOR
I am disappointed that
the editorial made no
mention of the concept of
adding new trees and
replacing failed trees with
California native species
and more specifically with
drought-tolerant species
native to our local climate.
These are species that
evolved in and adapted to
our semi-arid conditions.
Moreover, they co-evolved
with other plants and
animals native to this
region. As such, they provide environmental and
ecological services that will
have increasing importance in an ever more
stressful climate.
Susan Klenner
Woodland Hills
The editorial on the
Democratic Party primary
for 2020 makes the same
assumption as just about
every other article on the
subject: President Trump
will run for a second term. I
find this to be unlikely.
First of all, Trump’s life
before he was elected was
so much better. He had
great wealth, a loyal family
and the admiration of
much of the public.
Second, Trump thrives
on praise and disdains
criticism. Aside from the
adulation of his striking
base, the president is
under a daily flood of critical comments.
Third, Trump hates
losing. He must know there
is a chance he will lose in
the general election, if not
in the Republican primaries.
Finally, although he
badly wanted to win in 2016,
I don’t think he really knew
how tough being president
was. One term is enough
for Trump.
Jordan Austin
Port Hueneme
::
I’m reminded of the
George Carlin quote: “In
the U.S., anyone can become president. That’s the
problem.”
To reduce the chance of
a repeat of the improbable
events of the 2016 election, I
suggest both major political parties adopt the following minimum qualifications for anyone wishing to
enter the race.
First, full and complete
disclosure of the previous
five years’ tax returns,
including all supporting
documentation. Second,
an experience requirement
that includes holding a
high-level elected office
such as a governorship or
member of the House or
Senate (no mayors or
county supervisors need
apply).
Note that I am proposing these qualifications for
the two major parties only.
Anyone not meeting these
qualifications would still be
free to form their own party
on whatever terms they
desire.
Doug Peterson
Irvine
Leave our trees
in the ground
Re “The undervalued trees
of L.A.,” editorial, Jan. 2
Thank you for the fine
nod to Los Angeles’ trees
and to the need to pay
them homage through the
city’s budget.
Still, there was a glaring
omission: the regular
practice of allowing tree
removal when proposals
come before the various
government permitting
entities.
In early December,
community groups successfully persuaded the
West L.A. Area Planning
Commission to overturn a
city permit that would have
destroyed 118 trees in the
Del Rey neighborhood.
Had there not also been a
fragile wetland on the site,
it’s possible that our appeal would have failed.
Trees are often eliminated because they are
deemed “diseased.” While
working to protect more
than 1,000 trees at Mariners Village in a county
unincorporated area of
Marina del Rey, we learned
from the president of a
nearby homeowners association that when their
trees are diseased, they
Thank you for the editorial about the value of trees
in Los Angeles, which help
us survive those 115-degree
summer days in the San
Fernando Valley.
We must learn from
other cities, like Seattle,
that find ways to fix sidewalks without felling a
full-grown tree. These
cities employ actual experts and arborists who
find healthy ways to trim
sidewalk trees without
promoting disease and
early death.
The next time you are
out walking, take a look at
the trees in your neighborhood. The next time you go
to a shopping center, take a
look at the trees where you
park. Do they look healthy
to you? Can you picture
your city with fewer trees?
We need to tell our City
Council members and our
mayor how important our
urban forest is to us.
Mary Montes
West Hills
Yes to $2 billion
for children
Re “A boon for ‘First 5’
efforts,” Jan. 3
Reading about Gov.elect Gavin Newsom’s
nearly $2-billion commitment to early childhood
education programs was
the best way to start 2019.
An investment where we
know it does the most good
— in our youngest children
— is simply the best investment we can make for our
future.
Children growing up in
poverty without access to
early childhood education
programs start kindergarten at a significant disadvantage and may never
catch up to their more
affluent peers.
According to Harvard’s
Center on the Developing
Child, more than 1 million
new neural connections are
formed in a baby’s brain
during their first years of
life. A child’s brain is 90%
developed by age 5.
That’s why starting
early is key.
High-quality early
childhood education programs work, and they help
save taxpayer money in the
long run. In fact, Nobel
Prize-winning economist
James Heckman shows the
annual rate of return on
investments can be 13% per
child due to improved
outcomes in education,
health, sociability and
economic productivity.
I encourage California’s
Legislature to support this
element of the state budget
proposal. Every child in
California deserves the
best chance for a bright
future.
Mark K. Shriver
Bethesda, Md.
The writer is senior vice
president for U.S. programs and advocacy at
Save the Children.
HOW TO WRITE TO US
Please send letters to
letters@latimes.com. For
submission guidelines, see
latimes.com/letters or call
1-800-LA TIMES, ext. 74511.
A16
SU N DAY , JA N UA RY 6 , 2 019
SS
L AT I M E S . C O M
OP-ED
Why L.A.
teachers may
have to strike
L.A. Unified has cast its
standoff with the teachers
union as a funding problem.
But it’s a struggle over the
future of public education.
By Alex Caputo-Pearl
T
Zina Saunders For The Times
Women take Congress,
misogynists lash out
VIRGINIA HEFFERNAN
J
ust over a year ago, a writer named Kristen
Roupenian published a short story in the
New Yorker called “Cat Person.” It chronicled
a brief, mediocre romance. At first, it was
hard to say what made the story newsworthy.
Still, just as #MeToo was taking off, “Cat Person” became history’s first viral short story. Something in Roupenian’s tale of Robert and Margot’s
relationship — testy, opportunistic — felt familiar.
And then there was the word mild Robert uses at
their breakup, when he finally believes he has nothing left to lose: “Whore.”
“Cat Person” laid out the ways men can pretend
to tolerance of and even affection for women while
also seething with sexist resentment of their power.
The “Cat Person” parable has been germane
this past week. As the new Congress convenes, with
a record 102 women taking office, a crew of men in
right-wing media and politics seems to believe
they’ve tolerated this whole women-in-power exercise for too long.
They’ve been patient. They’ve been gallant.
They praised Ivanka Trump’s grace. They hattipped Sen. Susan Collins for helping put brother
Brett Kavanaugh on the Supreme Court. They sat
for the #MeToo tedium.
But now, like Robert, they’ve had enough.
On Thursday night, shortly after being sworn in,
freshman Rep. Rashida Tlaib (D-Mich.) boasted
that the new Democratic House majority would “go
in there and impeach” Trump, whom she called by
a commonplace vulgarism beloved of Norman
Mailer and Samuel L. Jackson. She landed the line
to perfection, and her supporters loved it.
Understandably anxious about impeachment,
Republicans decried Tlaib. They pretended not to
mind her political zeal, though; it was her coarseness they took umbrage at. For a woman of color,
and one of the first two Muslim women in Congress,
using a bad word is evidently criminal unseemliness. House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy,
from Bakersfield, huffed and puffed about how
indecorous Tlaib had been and was essentially
laughed off the dais by people reminding him of
Trump’s long record of barnyarding it up.
As of this writing, Tlaib has not apologized for
her impeachment plan — or her vocabulary.
Next on the Women to Hate List is — shocker —
Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez. She’s the newly
minted congresswoman from New York’s 14th
District and, hoo boy, does she make bitter conservatives bitterer.
Having calculated that savaging House Speaker
Nancy Pelosi wasn’t firing up the he-man pitchfork
crowd as much as they had hoped, conservatives
are now trying to smear Ocasio-Cortez as young,
dangerous, naive, stylish and a good dancer. They
also seem unaccountably panicked that she was
once known as Sandy.
To many of the attacks, Ocasio-Cortez has
issued Twitter clap-backs that deftly surface the
barely concealed sexism of her detractors. When
conservatives last week tried to make hay out of a
dance video she made in college, she made another
dance video, chiding the GOP as prigs who hate
women who dance.
To a prominent right-wing troll looking to get a
rise out of her, she earlier tweeted, “Like catcalling,
I don’t owe a response to unsolicited requests from
men with bad intentions. And also like catcalling,
for some reason they feel entitled to one.”
Catcallers and anti-dancing scolds are two sides
of the age-old misogyny coin. What they’re saying
to her, as Ocasio-Cortez well knows, is that she’s
either frigid and won’t respond to their catcalls or a
“whore” because she dances too much.
Ocasio-Cortez’s responses make her detractors
even more furious; no one likes to have his ugly
misogyny brought to light. When Ocasio-Cortez, in
white, stood to vote for Pelosi as House speaker,
Republicans broke all precedent and booed her.
“Don’t hate me cause you ain’t me, fellas,” Ocasio-Cortez tweeted. By turning up the volume on
the Republicans’ terrified sexism, as a digital native does best, she’s made quick work of her haters.
By contrast, the latest attacks on Pelosi are
listless. After seven years of trying to stir up hatred
for the distinguished representative from San
Francisco, conservatives seem to be running out of
steam.
During Pelosi’s swearing-in as the first person to
return to the speakership since 1955, and the first
and only Italian American and first and only woman to hold the post, Pelosi found President Trump
attempting to steal her thunder by staging a hasty
press briefing. Trump’s non-briefing was so desperate-seeming it only made Pelosi’s swearing-in more
formidable — and existentially threatening to the
president.
Finally, Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) announced Monday that she’s entering the 2020 race
for president, and she also got some hazing from
Trump, who often refers to Warren by a racist nickname.
Almost the second some pundits wondered
ridiculously whether affable Warren is “likable”
enough — c’mon, fellas, wouldja want to have a beer
with her at a strip club? — “likability” was flagged
as a moronically sexist metric.
Is the girl nice? Does she use salty language?
Does she dance? Does she refuse to smile and flirt
when you hoot at her?
These moth-eaten virgin-whore tropes have
become self-satirizing. If you think misogyny has
faded since “Mad Men” days, you’re wrong. In fact,
as women pack the halls of power, it seems more
virulent than ever, as conservatives convulse in fear
at losing their old rubrics of control. They lash out
more than Don Draper ever did.
But rather than deafen themselves to the primitive hatred beneath the surface of “likability” and
anti-dance discourse, figures like Ocasio-Cortez
send up the subtext, just as Roupenian did in “Cat
Person.”
Demeaning dancing and texting the word
“whore” to a woman who scares you is, when you
think about it, pretty laughable. And to have the
dynamic laid bare is almost a relief.
No wonder Pelosi is running the House, Warren
is running for president, Tlaib is calling it as she
sees it, and Ocasio-Cortez is dancing. Their enemies are losing strength, while they’re gaining it.
Twitter: @page88
eachers in Los Angeles may be forced to
strike on Thursday.
The Los Angeles
Unified School District
has a record-breaking reserve of
nearly $2 billion that should be
spent on its resource-starved students.
Yet Supt. Austin Beutner, a
multimillionaire with experience in
corporate downsizing but none in
education, argues that the reserve
is already accounted for in future
spending, and that cuts should be
made. He also refuses to talk about
charter school regulations, calling
the issue a “shiny ball” that distracts from the real issues.
District officials have cast the
impasse as a funding problem. But
at its heart, the standoff between
L.A. Unified and United Teachers
Los Angeles is a struggle over the
future of public education.
Consider the conditions within
the district. Class sizes often exceed 45 students in secondary
schools, 35 students in upper elementary grades and 25 students in
lower elementary grades.
The district does not have
nearly enough counselors, psychologists or librarians to give students the support they need, and
80% of schools don’t even have fulltime nurses. Unnecessary standardized testing is pushing the arts
and ethnic studies out of the curriculum.
Parents have little say over how
funding is spent at their schools.
Charter schools, which are operated mostly by corporate chains,
have expanded by 287% over the
last 10 years, draining more than
$600 million from non-charter
schools every year. Salaries for
educators are low compared with
surrounding districts, a significant
disadvantage as L.A. Unified tries
to recruit and retain teachers during a national shortage.
With the vast majority of our
students coming from low-income
neighborhoods of color, there is no
way to describe the persistence of
such conditions other than racial
discrimination.
Working together with parents,
the teachers union has put forward
proposals to address many of these
issues. Over 20 months of negotiations, the district has responded
with inadequate counter-proposals.
Meanwhile, Beutner has moved
ahead with what we believe is his
agenda to dismantle the district.
Through an outside foundation, he
has brought on firms that have led
public school closures and charter
expansion in some districts where
they have worked, from New Orleans to Washington, D.C. This approach, drawn from Wall Street, is
called the “portfolio” model, and it
has been criticized for having a
negative effect on student equity
and parent inclusion.
It is for many of these reasons
that 98% of L.A. Unified’s
educators voted to authorize a
strike. Parents are actively supporting the teachers. There were
many parents among the estimated 50,000 people who attended
the UTLA March for Public Education on Dec. 15.
Beutner has attempted to narrow the issues mainly to salary.
Educators will not be bought off.
We need a host of improvements
for our students.
Beutner has also said that the
district doesn’t have reserves that
will last longer than two to three
years. The reality is that L.A. Unified had a reserve of $1.86 billion at
the end of the 2017-18 school year. Its
latest budget documents show the
reserve growing to $1.97 billion in
the 2018-19 school year.
The district warns about a fiscal
cliff, but its warnings ring hollow.
Three years ago, district officials
projected that the 2017-18 reserve
would be $105 million. They were off
by more than $1.7 billion.
L.A. Unified has also overestimated its spending on books and
other supplies over the last five
years to the tune of hundreds of
millions, meaning more money is
available. The district has also
failed to collect the full amounts
owed by charters that are located
on its campuses.
My colleagues and I agree with
Beutner on at least one thing: The
real long-term solution is for Sacramento to increase statewide
school funding. It is downright
shameful that the richest state in
the country ranks 43rd out of 50
when it comes to per-pupil spending.
We have been working to change
this. Beutner should help by supporting legislation to close the
carried-interest loophole, which
has allowed hedge fund managers
to inappropriately classify income
as capital gains. This could bring
hundreds of millions to schools annually.
He should also build support
among the wealthy for Schools and
Communities First, which closes
the corporate loophole in Proposition 13 and could bring up to
$5 billion in new annual funding to
public schools. This is on the 2020
ballot.
United Teachers Los Angeles’
struggle for a fair contract is just
one part of a broader movement
for students, families and schools.
We will engage in whatever talks
are possible before Thursday to
avert a strike. But for talks to be
successful, the district needs to
commit to improve public schools.
I have taught in Compton and
at Crenshaw High School. I have
been in my own children’s classrooms. And I have visited hundreds of other schools. There is
wonderful promise in the students
at all of our schools. But although
they are surrounded by wealth,
students across the city are not
getting what they deserve.
Enough is enough. Invest in our
students now.
Alex Caputo-Pearl is president
of United Teachers Los Angeles.
He is an LAUSD parent and
previously taught for 22 years in
the Compton and Los Angeles
school districts.
Luis Sinco Los Angeles Times
PROTESTERS at a rally in October called on Supt. Austin
Beutner to increase funding at Los Angeles Unified schools.
S
L AT I M E S . C O M
S U N DAY , JA N UA RY 6 , 2 019
A17
OP-ED
A proposal
for healthier
marriages
Too strong a focus
on the ‘marry me?’
moment may lead
couples to plan the
celebration but not
their life together.
By Susan Shain
or many women in the
United States, a fairy tale
persists: Meet guy, fall in
love with guy, then anxiously await guy’s declaration of said love in a grand gesture
— a spectacular marriage proposal
— accompanied by an overpriced
rock.
In an era of empowerment and
broken glass ceilings, why do so
many of us still want and wait for a
glass slipper? Unlike many other
male-female power dynamics,
women haven’t just accepted that
men will do the asking; we’ve gleefully perpetuated it.
My former boyfriend and I
F
talked about marriage, but only in
that dreamy way that many young
couples do. The decisive moment
was supposed to be a surprise, at
least for me. Otherwise, he didn’t
really love me! Romance, everywhere, would be dead!
When he did propose, I didn’t
know what to say other than yes.
He’s a wonderful man and I was in
love; what other possible answer
could there be to this romantic
moment that I had dreamed of
experiencing?
Dismayed by the prospect of
planning a wedding, I suggested we
drive to Las Vegas. Six hours later,
we were married; six weeks later,
the marriage was annulled. Having
been swept up by passion rather
than pragmatism, we quickly
Blair
Thornley
For The Times
discovered it would never work.
Would honest, unsexy conversations about the details of building a life together have saved us
heartache and embarrassment?
Probably. Would I have considered
such a practical sort of “proposal”
at that point in my life? Probably
not. I wanted a scene and story
worthy of a rom-com.
I was not alone in that desire.
The romantic proposal is so
sought after that some women do
all they can to shape it, while maintaining the fiction that the adoring
and thoughtful man made it all
happen.
Ellen Lamont, a professor of
sociology at Appalachian State
University who is writing a book
about modern courtship, interviewed 38 straight, college-educated, Bay Area women — the sort
who take command of their own
lives in most regards — and found
that nearly all of them had orchestrated their proposals yet told
their friends it was a surprise.
Lamont says women yield to
the cultural narrative that their
fiance must choose them in a
socially sanctioned way, fearing
others will think their relationship
if “less-than if it’s not performed
correctly.”
Most heterosexual couples I
know also painted the broad
strokes of an engagement beforehand, but ultimately left the timeline up to the male. Lamont says
this tradition reifies the continued
disempowerment of women.
“They’re not seen as valid drivers
of their own desires,” she explains.
“It reflects the idea that women
should remain passive, that they
should be chosen rather than be
the choosers.”
Of course, perfectly planned
proposals don’t necessarily spell
doom; plenty of couples follow the
prescribed meet-date-knee-wed
process and still have strong marriages. But when a proposal fit for a
romance novel is of such importance, couples can fall victim to
planning the celebration but not
the life together.
Stephanie Coontz, a marriage
historian and author of “Marriage,
a History: How Love Conquered
Marriage,” says the guy-asks-girl
engagement finds its roots in
economics. “Just as you don’t
normally ask somebody to take
you to dinner, you don’t ask somebody to support you for the rest of
your life,” she explains. “That was
the early sense: You can’t ask a
man to marry you because you’re
asking them to take on that responsibility.”
While she says that was always
“baloney,” because women did
ample work within the home, now
there’s even less reason for the
tradition, because many women
earn money outside the home and
come to the marriage as
equals.
Coontz suggests that the
proposal game reflects the
“glacial weight” of gender
stereotypes and the fact that
“people are trying to find ways of
accommodating the old stereotypes without necessarily living
them.” She also notes that women
haven’t had to face the risk of
rejection — men traditionally are
the ones who ask for a dance or a
date — and may be savoring that
luxury. Whatever the reason, she
says, waiting for a man to prove
something with a romantic proposal isn’t a good way “to start a
modern, egalitarian relationship.”
And yet we wait. And then we
peacock our rings and make predictions for our friends’ engagements — “I bet he’s going to do it in
[insert exotic destination here]” —
setting them up for disappointment if their partners don’t deliver.
I am no exception. I have participated in these rituals over and
over — and will continue to do so,
because I’m delighted for anyone
who’s found love in the way they
chose.
But last year, I told my current
partner I wanted to talk about
marriage. About what it would
look like, when we’d do it, whether
it was necessary. There was no
drama and no diamond; just me
and the man I love, talking. And
then talking again. If we take the
leap, there won’t be a ring or a bent
knee. There will be a mutual decision free from the fanfare of an
Instaworthy proposal.
While it might make for a boring
rom-com, I’m hoping it will form
the basis for a pretty good life.
Susan Shain is a freelance writer.
‘Compromise’ wasn’t always a dirty word
For the sake of American
democracy, politicians
must channel the spirit
of Henry Clay.
By H.W. Brands
ith the House in
the
hands
of
Democrats and
the Senate controlled by Republicans for the next two years, compromise will be essential to the passage of any legislation. But it won’t
come easily. We live in an age in
which compromise is often interpreted as weakness and penalized
at the next election. Our congressional districts, in which most seats
are safe for one party or the other,
reward candidates who appeal to
the most uncompromising elements of their parties. This whole
system has fostered a mind-set that
makes politics war by other means.
It wasn’t always so. In the early
years of the American republic,
compromise was celebrated and rewarded. The story of that time, and
of what happened to the republic
when it ended, can offer sobering
lessons for our current fractious age.
In 1820 the United States confronted its first crisis over slavery.
For decades, slavery had been
broadly viewed as a blight on the republic, its violence and egregious inequality at odds with the ideals of
the Declaration of Independence.
Progress had been made: Slavery
was prohibited in the North, and the
W
Associated Press
“THE Great Compromiser”
import of slaves from Africa had
been outlawed. But, as part of the
bargaining that had made the Constitution ratifiable, states were given the right to choose whether to allow slavery, and the Southern states
still clung to it.
The Constitution, however, was
silent on states not yet admitted to
the Union. When Missouri applied
for admission as a slave state in 1820,
both Northerners and Southerners
saw it as a test of the strength of
their position and of whether slavery would be allowed to expand into
the American West.
Henry Clay of Kentucky, the
speaker of the House, was well positioned to head negotiations. He was
a slaveholder, but one who disliked
the institution and sought its end.
As a Westerner, he couldn’t credibly
be accused by either Northerners or
Southerners of being in the pocket
of the other side.
Clay proceeded to engineer the
Missouri Compromise: Missouri
would enter the Union as a slave
state, but the rest of the West would
be divided into a free North and a
slavery-allowing South. Getting the
compromise through Congress required some clever maneuvering
and one of the finest speeches of
Clay’s illustrious oratorical career.
Many in both the North and the
South were furious, but Clay secured just enough support to let the
nation move on to other matters.
This was the heart of Clay’s
strategy, for he believed that the genius of American self-government
was a knack for muddling through.
If the country could keep from getting hung up or torn apart by any
single issue, it would advance on
other fronts until that issue became
more tractable. Clay was convinced
that the same modernizing forces
that had rendered slavery unprofitable in the North would erode its
support in the South; all that was required was time.
Clay’s skills at compromise were
put to another test in the early 1830s.
South Carolina objected to a tariff
code that benefited Northern manufacturers at the expense of Southern planters. South Carolinians
took steps to nullify the tariff law —
that is, to prevent its enforcement
within their state. Should the federal government insist on enforcing
the law, the South Carolinians said,
they would secede from the Union.
Clay, now in the Senate, once
more stepped into the breach. He
met with John Calhoun, the leader
of the South Carolinians, and brokered a deal whereby the offending
tariff was phased out while the
South Carolinians withdrew their
secession threat. Clay was condemned in the North for yielding to
South Carolina’s blackmail, and in
the South for maintaining the principle of the tariff even as he retreated on its practice. Yet the
Union held.
“The Great Compromiser,” as
Clay was called by this time, had one
more mediating trick up his sleeve.
In 1850, California, suddenly full of
gold-seekers, applied for admission
to the Union as a free state. Southerners dug in their heels, complaining that a free California would tip
the balance in the Senate against
their section. Clay offered them
something they had long desired: a
sterner fugitive slave law, one that
would criminalize the common
Northern practice of assisting
slaves fleeing bondage.
Again Clay was attacked from
both sides. Southerners said he had
doomed them to Northern domination; Northerners declared he was
compelling them to betray their
moral principles. But Clay was unrepentant, and he went to his grave,
two years later, convinced that he
had saved the Union for another
generation.
He was too optimistic. With
Clay’s death, the spirit of compromise that he embodied went out of
American politics. His successors
proved unwilling to acknowledge
the right of their opponents to views
at odds with their own. Abolitionists
pushed harder than ever, even canonizing John Brown for his murderous raid against Harpers Ferry, Virginia. Southerners grew violently
touchy on anything that infringed
their states’ rights, most notably the
right to own slaves.
The 1860 election of Abraham
Lincoln on a Republican platform
opposing the expansion of slavery
triggered the secession of seven
Southern states, followed by another four after Lincoln launched a military campaign against the secessionists. The ensuing war killed
more than 600,000.
Today, one hopes that the country is not on track for anything similar. But the language and culture of
our politics disturbingly echo that
earlier time. Political opponents are
cast as enemies; a winner-take-all
environment treats compromise as
surrender.
Until now, the rift in politics has
been partisan rather than sectional,
rendering geographic separation
unlikely. But if the red states continue to grow redder, and the blue
states bluer, this missing element of
the 1850s recipe for disaster might
be added to the unholy brew that
constitutes much of our political
discourse.
There’s another path. We can
channel the spirit of Henry Clay and
revive the art of honorable compromise. We can acknowledge our opponents’ right to a seat at the table.
We can remember that the reforms
that last are those in which each side
has a say and a stake. We can recall
Clay’s guiding belief: that the fate of
American democracy is more important than success on any transient issue.
H.W. Brands teaches at the
University of Texas at Austin. His
new book is “Heirs of the
Founders: The Epic Rivalry of
Henry Clay, John Calhoun and
Daniel Webster.”
A18
SU N DAY , JA N UA RY 6 , 2 019
S
L AT I M E S . C O M
High court takes up gerrymandering
In North Carolina and
Maryland, officials
were openly partisan
in drawing districts.
By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON — The
Supreme Court will review
highly partisan election
maps drawn by Republicans
in North Carolina and
Democrats in Maryland,
and decide whether such political gerrymandering violates voters’ rights to a fair
election.
In North Carolina, the
state’s Republican leaders
drew the congressional districts to lock in a 10-3 advantage for their candidates,
even when the state’s votes
were evenly split.
In Maryland, Democratic
leaders shifted more than
100,000 voters to transform a
safe Republican district into
a reliably Democratic one.
As a result, seven of its eight
seats are held by Democrats.
The high court agreed
Friday to review the cases.
Rulings, due by June, will
probably
determine
whether there will be legal
checks on the state politicians who will redraw election districts following the
2020 census. The court said
it would hear arguments in
March in two cases: Rucho
vs. Common Cause and
Benisek vs. Lamone.
Partisan gerrymandering is not a new problem, and
the challengers face an uphill fight because of the retirement of Justice Anthony
M. Kennedy. The high court
has never struck down an
election map as unfairly political, but Kennedy — a conservative who sometimes
sided with the court’s liberals — had left the door open
to ruling that an extremely
skewed map might violate
the 1st Amendment.
Last year, the court considered two partisan gerrymander cases — from Wisconsin and Maryland — but
cited procedural grounds for
not issuing definitive rulings.
In the past, Chief Justice
Jacquelyn Martin Associated Press
NONPARTISAN groups against gerrymandering demonstrate outside the U.S. Supreme Court last March.
John G. Roberts Jr. has suggested judges have no role to
play in policing the drawing
of election districts. And
now that Kennedy has been
replaced by the more conservative Justice Brett M.
Kavanaugh, the chief justice
may well have a majority to
rule that drawing voting districts is an inherently political task to be decided solely
by state lawmakers, not
judges.
Such a ruling could backfire on Republicans, however. The GOP won big victories in a 2010 midterm wave
election and took full control
of state governments including those in Pennsylvania,
Ohio, Wisconsin, Michigan
and North Carolina. Republicans used their power to
draw election maps that virtually guaranteed their
party would win about
three-fourths of the seats
throughout the decade.
In 2016, for example,
Pennsylvania, Ohio and
Michigan had 48 seats in the
U.S. House, and they sent 34
Republicans and 14 Democrats to Washington.
But 2020 is a presidential
election year, and Democrats are likely to fare much
better then, building on the
state victories they racked
up in November. If so, Democrats are likely to take as
much advantage as possible
when the election districts
are redrawn with new census data, especially if the
high court gives its approval
to partisan line-drawing.
Critics of partisan gerrymandering say they hope
the high court will end the
practice.
“Voters nationwide are
ready for a ruling from the
Supreme Court that finally
declares that they come
first, not self-interested politicians,” said Paul Smith, a
lawyer for the Campaign Legal Center. “If the Supreme
Court fails to set limits on
this undemocratic practice,
we will see a festival of copycat gerrymandering in 2020
the likes of which the country has never seen before.”
Opponents of partisan
gerrymandering in North
Carolina and Maryland have
unusually strong cases be-
cause the political leaders in
those states candidly admitted they were drawing the
maps for political advantage. But they emphasized
that they were not gerrymandering by race, which
the high court had ruled is
unconstitutional.
“I’m making clear that
our intent is to use the political data we have for partisan
advantage,” said North Carolina state Rep. David Lewis, a Republican, when lawmakers there met in a special session in Raleigh two
years ago to revise the congressional districts.
Lewis announced he
would go as far as possible to
benefit Republicans. “I propose that we draw the maps
to give a partisan advantage
of 10 Republicans and three
Democrats because I do not
believe it’s possible to draw a
map with 11 Republicans and
two Democrats,” he said.
Voters who leaned in favor of Democrats were concentrated in three districts,
while 10 districts were drawn
to give Republicans safe but
not overwhelming margins.
In November, the plan
worked as intended. North
Carolina’s
voters
were
closely split in statewide tallies, with Republicans holding a 51%-49% edge. But the
GOP again won 10 of the 13
House seats — although one
race remains in doubt because of allegations of fraud
in the handling of absentee
ballots.
Lawyers for Common
Cause and the League of
Women Voters had sued, alleging this partisan manipulation of the districts violates the voters’ rights to a
fair election and an equal
vote.
Twice they won before a
three-judge federal district
court, which called the election map discriminatory in
its intent and its effect. The
judges said the politically
tilted map violated the 1st
Amendment because it diluted the votes of some voters based on their political
views, and it denied them
equal protection of the laws.
But the Supreme Court
set aside the first ruling in
June, so this election could
proceed with the GOPdrawn map.
In their appeal, lawyers
for the North Carolina Republicans said there was no
“manageable standard” for
a court to decide when politics play too large a role in
drawing district lines. They
also said voters do not have a
right to “proportional representation” in the number of
seats won based on statewide results.
In past cases, Roberts
has said the Constitution
leaves the redistricting
power to state legislatures.
He has pointed to a provision that says: “The times,
places and manner of holding elections for senators
and representatives shall be
prescribed in each state by
the Legislature.”
Four years ago, he would
have struck down the voterapproved independent commissions in California, Arizona and several other
states on the grounds that
this map-drawing power resided with the state legislatures. But he lost in a 5-4 decision when the now-retired
Kennedy joined the four liberals in a case from Arizona.
The chief justice recently
spoke for the court in overturning an anti-gerrymandering ruling from a threejudge federal court in Wisconsin, but he did so based
on procedural grounds. The
district judges said the state
map was drawn to “entrench” one party in power
for at least a decade. However, Roberts said the plaintiffs who voted in local elections did not have standing
to challenge the statewide
election map.
Last month, the politically drawn map allowed
Wisconsin’s Republicans to
retain a supermajority of 63
of the 99 seats in the state
Assembly, despite winning
only 46% of the statewide
vote. Democrats won the
statewide races in Wisconsin, including for governor
and attorney general, but
the voters’ shift toward the
Democrats had no impact
on political makeup of the
state Legislature.
david.savage@latimes.com
Twitter: DavidGSavage
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S U N D A Y , J A N U A R Y 6 , 2 0 1 9 :: L A T I M E S . C O M / C A L I F O R N I A
Judge rejects
LAUSD’s bid
to bar teachers
from walkout
District argued strike
would hinder services
for disabled students.
By Howard Blume
Photographs by
Marcus Yam Los Angeles Times
PEOPLE EMBRACE outside the police perimeter at Gable House Bowl early Saturday morning in Torrance.
Shooting sparks chaos at
Torrance late-night spot
Witnesses say fight broke out before gunfire left 3 dead
By Ruben Vives,
Courtney Lewis,
Ben Poston
and Cindy Chang
It was a typical Friday
night at Gable House Bowl
in Torrance — people celebrating birthdays, friends
meeting up for a few rounds
of bowling at the end of the
workweek.
Then gunfire erupted.
People scrambled for cover.
When it was over, three
people lay dead inside, including two 28-year-old men
who were best friends. Four
others were injured.
On Saturday morning,
friends and relatives of the
victims huddled in a nearby
parking lot, waiting for the
bodies to be brought out —
and for answers about what
happened.
Torrance police were still
searching for the shooter or
shooters. The bowling alley,
[See Shooting, B6]
LATRICE RADFORD waits outside the bowling alley for word on her brother’s
condition. The coroner’s office later confirmed that Michael Radford was killed.
A federal judge has rejected an attempt by Los Angeles school district officials
to limit or prevent a teachers’ strike.
The
district’s
legal
maneuver was based on its
responsibility under federal
law to provide services to
students with disabilities.
The district is under additional legal restrictions
based on a settlement that is
under the supervision of a
federal judge.
Those combined obligations should have compelled
the court to prevent or limit
a strike, the district argued
in papers filed last week. But
U.S. District Judge Ronald
S.W. Lew disagreed, taking
only one day to issue an order denying the district’s
suit.
The L.A. Unified School
District “is attempting, prematurely, to bring an unrelated party into a longsettled dispute without any
explanation as to how [the
teachers union] would be
legally liable” under the
settlement or special education laws, Lew wrote in his
decision.
The judge acknowledged
that a strike could “burden”
L.A. Unified’s efforts to provide services to students,
but he said the district’s
court filing “is a new and independent claim that would
inject facts and legal issues
that have nothing to do with
claims that were settled …
over fifteen years ago.”
Lew held open the possibility that the district
could file a claim later, but
said it would have to be after
the start of a strike and was
likely to involve a more timeconsuming process.
United Teachers Los Angeles hailed the ruling in a
news release late Friday
night.
“The court’s swift and decisive action shows just how
desperate a move this was,”
said union President Alex
Caputo-Pearl.
The action was a novel
approach, essentially using
legal protections for students under federal law in an
attempt to forestall a strike
carried out under provisions
Fallen officer ‘will always be in our hearts’
Funeral is held for
police corporal killed
in Stanislaus County.
By Brittny Mejia
MODESTO — A sea of
blue lined the pews facing
the flag-draped casket inside CrossPoint Community
Church.
Hundreds of law enforcement officers from across
the country turned out Saturday to pay tribute to Newman Police Cpl. Ronil Singh,
33, who was fatally shot
during a traffic stop in Stanislaus County last month by a
man authorities say was in
the country illegally.
Newman Police Chief
Randy Richardson grew
emotional as he talked
about Singh, his first hire in
2011 in what would become
an 11-officer department.
Singh, born in Fiji, immigrated to the United States
as a teenager in 2003 and was
proud to be an American,
friends and family said.
“He told me he came to
[See Singh, B7]
of state law.
An L.A. Unified spokeswoman said that the judge
did not foreclose all legal
avenues.
“The court decided that
under the applicable court
rules it made more sense for
the claim to be filed as a
separate lawsuit,” said
Shannon Haber.
She did not say whether
the district would do so.
“The district is committed to resolving the contract
issues with UTLA in an amicable manner, but will take
all steps necessary to protect the health, safety, and
educational rights of students with disabilities, as
well as of all students, including the filing of legal actions,” Haber said.
The two sides have
scheduled a last-ditch nego[See L.A. Unified, B6]
Parks
sustain
lasting
damage
As government
shutdown wears on,
wildlife advocates are
growing more fearful
of irreparable harm.
By Javier Panzar
When David Lamfrom
drove into Joshua Tree National Park last week during
the first days of the partial
government shutdown, he
was startled by the chaos.
He saw park visitors hiking off marked trails and
driving their vehicles off
paved roads, trampling and
running over vegetation on
the desert floor.
Lamfrom, the director of
the California desert and national wildlife programs for
the National Parks Conservation Assn., was concerned
about the destruction of the
delicate fungus, bacteria
and rock that make up the
so-called biological soil
crust that plants rely on for
growth.
“Deserts
are
really
unique systems. Plant life is
ancient there,” he said. “The
impacts being caused could
take hundreds of years to recover from.”
As the shutdown of the
federal government drags
into a third week, worries
about the long-term damage
being done to the nation’s
parks and disruptions to
wildlife, including bears, are
growing.
Diane Regas, chief executive of the Trust for Public
Land, a nonprofit park advo[See Shutdown, B7]
New legislators
are hard to miss
California’s seven new
Democratic members
in the House are eager
to make a splash as
they arrive in D.C. B3
Disney to raise
its park prices
The Anaheim resort
expects a surge in
visitor demand when
Star Wars expansion
opens in summer. B4
Stephen Lam Getty Images
LAW ENFORCEMENT officers from across the country fill the pews at CrossPoint Community Church in
Modesto for the funeral of Newman Police Cpl. Ronil Singh, who was shot during a traffic stop last month.
Lottery ...................... B4
Weather .................. B10
B2
SU N DAY , JA N UA RY 6 , 2 019
S
L AT I M E S . C O M
SCIENCE FILE
Putting Holocaust in grim perspective
MELISSA HEALY
In the ledger of evils
perpetrated by humans,
Operation Reinhard holds a
distinct place. Over 21
months starting in March
1942, Nazi forces and their
collaborators rounded up 1.7
million Jews from 393 Polish
towns and ghettos and sent
them in packed rail cars to
three camps in Nazi-occupied Poland — Sobibor,
Treblinka and Belzec.
At these killing centers,
members of Poland’s oncethriving Jewish community
were murdered with such
ruthlessness that, of about
1.5 million Jews who passed
through their gates, 102
survived to bear witness. By
November 1943, when Operation Reinhard ended,
essentially no Polish Jews
were left for the Nazis to kill.
In an effort to capture
the scope and intensity of
genocide, a Tel Aviv University researcher has dissected Operation Reinhard
and found its dark heart.
Biomathematician Lewi
Stone drew upon a painstaking accounting of Nazi
train schedules to analyze
the “kill rate” of Jews between February 1942 and
December 1944. Within
Operation Reinhard’s campaign of murder, he identified a 92-day period that
stands out for its ferocity.
In August, September
and October of 1942, he
calculated, German forces
and their collaborators
killed at least 1.32 million
Jews. That averages out to
14,348 per day, every day.
Virtually all victims were
from Poland and its immediate neighbors.
This concentration of
murders in a three-month
period “likely created substantial confusion among its
victims, and its speed would
have made the possibility of
organized resistance difficult to coordinate in time,”
Stone wrote in a study published last week in the journal Science Advances. “The
massacre was effectively
over before there was time
Siese Veenstra EPA/Shutterstock
RAIL CARS from a former concentration camp rest at a memorial center in the Netherlands in 2015. A schol-
ar has found that at the peak of the Holocaust, the Nazis killed at a rate eclipsing even Rwanda’s 1994 genocide.
for an organized response.”
Stone, also a mathematics professor at RMIT University in Melbourne, Australia, uses authoritative
estimates of the Holocaust’s
toll on Jews — which range
from 5.1 million to 6.2 million
— to reckon that as many as
a quarter of the Nazis’ Jewish victims were murdered
during these three months
of Operation Reinhard.
It appears to have taken
place at roughly the same
time that German forces,
having invaded the Soviet
Union and been thrown
back from the outskirts of
Moscow, were advancing
instead on Stalingrad.
Historians have noted that
around this time, Adolf
Hitler ordered his plan for
the “final solution of the
Jewish question” to be accelerated.
Documents recently
unearthed from United
Nations archives also reveal
that as early as December
1942, the governments of the
United States, Britain and
the Soviet Union were aware
that at least 2 million Jews
had been murdered and an
additional 5 million were at
risk of being killed. Though
they were preparing warcrimes charges against
Hitler and his generals on
the basis of survivors’ reports, the Allied powers did
little to protect or provide
sanctuary to Europe’s Jews.
Operation Reinhard was
launched with the March
1942 opening of the Belzec
death camp near occupied
Poland’s border with modern-day Ukraine. Starting in
late July 1942, Treblinka’s
gas chambers would begin
to kill Jews from the Warsaw
Ghetto. The expanded
death camp of Sobibor
reopened soon after, fulfilling Gestapo chief Heinrich
Himmler’s July 19, 1942,
order that, with few exceptions, all Jews within German-occupied Poland
should be killed by the end
of the year.
An estimated 292,000 of
the 1.32 million who died
during this spasm of violence were killed by shooting squads called Einsatzgruppen. The remainder
were gassed within hours of
arrival at the death camps.
To clarify the rate at
which Jews were murdered
in the course of Operation
Reinhard, Stone turned to
detailed railway schedules
compiled by Israeli historian Yitzakh Arad. These
schedules included data on
480 train deportations to
Sobibor, Belzec and Treblinka carried out by the
German National Railway
during this period.
In an effort to glean the
full extent of the Nazis’
genocidal machine, Stone
then incorporated the welldocumented death tolls
from Auschwitz-Birkenau in
western Poland and from
the Einsatzgruppen, which
were active across the countries that German troops
had entered, including the
Soviet Union.
By December 1942, long
before Operation Reinhard
formally ended, the rate of
train deportations — and of
murders at the three camps
— slowed markedly, Stone
found. The plunging death
rate “simply reflects that
there were very few Jews left
to murder” in occupied
Poland, he wrote. The final
remnants of the Jewish
community in Bialystock
were rounded up in November and December of 1942
and sent to Treblinka.
By mid-July of 1942, the
Nazis began deporting
Dutch Jews to concentration camps and killing centers in Germany and occupied Poland. The Jews of
Norway followed by late
October of 1942.
The remaining Jewish
populations of Europe were
sent to Auschwitz-Birke-
nau, which saw what Stone
called “exceptionally high
kill rates” in 1944, when
Hungarian Jews were sent
there in large numbers.
Some historians have
suggested that the 1994
Rwanda genocide, in which
an estimated 800,000 members of the Tutsi tribe were
murdered by Hutus in a
span of about 100 days,
might have exceeded the
Holocaust in the pace of its
genocidal mayhem. According to Stone’s calculations,
it did not.
During the three most
murderous months of Operation Reinhard, the intensity with which the Nazis
sought to kill Jews was 83%
higher than that seen in
Rwanda’s genocide, Stone
found. In both its extent of
killing and in the expanse of
space over which it unfolded, the Holocaust represents a more extreme manifestation of organized violence against a single
group, he wrote.
Historians, social scientists, policymakers and
journalists “have consistently relied on inaccurate
assessments that greatly
underestimated the Holocaust kill rate during Operation Reinhard,” Stone concluded. “These underestimates have been repeated
for over two decades without substantial criticism, a
pattern that has effectively
rewritten the history of the
Holocaust in a way that
diminishes its historical
standing and the scale of
human life it encompasses.”
The new study is part of
an effort to push scholarship on the Holocaust —
and on the phenomenon of
genocide generally — beyond aggregated numbers
of the dead, and to reveal its
inner dynamics. Understanding the patterns of
violence that lie between a
genocidal event’s beginning
and end points might uncover what factors touch
them off, sustain or accelerate them, or bring them to a
close, Stone suggested.
melissa.healy@latimes.com
S
L AT I M E S . C O M
S U N DAY , JA N UA RY 6 , 2 019
B3
ESSENTIAL POLITICS
POLITICAL ROAD MAP
Newsom’s ties
to Brown are
decades old
JOHN MYERS
It’s unlikely two consecutive California governors have
ever shared the multigenerational family connection that
links Gov.-elect Gavin Newsom to his predecessor, Gov.
Jerry Brown. But beware those looking for something
deep: Any ties that bind together the two Democrats do
so loosely.
“It’s just not a normal political relationship,” Newsom,
who will be sworn in Monday, said in an earlier interview
with The Times.
Brown is a singular figure in California’s modern history, the scion of a political family whose rise in the 1970s
gave way to failed efforts at the presidency and U.S. Senate before an electoral rebirth as a mayor, attorney general and governor. And it was Newsom, then San Francisco mayor, who briefly stood in Brown’s way, launching
an ambitious campaign for the 2010 governor’s race that
fizzled almost a year before the election. But the story
goes back much further: Brown and Newsom are members of a political fraternity that dominated their shared
hometown of San Francisco for much of the 20th century.
Former Gov. Pat Brown, the current governor’s late father, was elected that city’s district attorney in 1943 after a
campaign financed by three friends, including William A.
Newsom II, the governor-elect’s grandfather and son of a
prominent builder and bank investor.
“If they hadn’t agreed to put up $5,000 [each], I
wouldn’t have been a candidate,” Pat Brown said in a 1978
interview for UC Berkeley’s oral history project.
In 1960, Pat Brown’s administration awarded a Squaw
Valley concession contract to the elder Newsom, a deal
panned by a legislative analyst as the state “paying for
everything and getting nothing.”
The two men’s sons grew up alongside each other.
William A. Newsom III, the governor-elect’s father, who
died last month, was a few years older than Jerry Brown.
Both graduated from San Francisco’s St. Ignatius High
School and Bill Newsom once briefly dated Brown’s sister,
the governor told the crowd in a eulogy for her in 2015.
During his first term as governor in 1975, Jerry Brown
appointed Bill Newsom to the Superior Court in Placer
County and then to a state appeals court. The governorelect’s father once recounted how his interest in environmental law and preserving Lake Tahoe had intrigued
Brown. “I went up a couple of times when Gavin was a little boy, and we met with Jerry and talked about things at
the lake,” Bill Newsom said in his oral history interview
with UC Berkeley in 2009.
Decades later, the young Newsom and an older Jerry
Brown ended up on a political collision course. In 2011,
frustrated with Brown’s slow pace for appointing members of an economic commission he chaired as lieutenant
governor, Newsom drafted his own statewide proposal.
Brown, deep into an effort to erase a $27-billion budget
deficit, didn’t look kindly on the effort and grabbed the issue for himself by appointing a statewide jobs czar.
“Looking back, I wish I had a do-over,” Newsom told
The Times last spring. “He’s dealing with triage and solvency. I would approach it differently.”
In the years since, Newsom has praised Brown’s fiscal
philosophy for teaching that “you do not have to be profligate to be progressive,” a mantra to be tested once hundreds of bills — with spending projections sure to run into
the billions of dollars — are sent to his desk by the Legislature. But on Monday, it will be Newsom’s call on what to
do, though few expect Brown — now with plenty of time to
offer advice — to disappear altogether.
At a campaign event last fall, preparing to move to his
Northern California ranch, he said: “I’m only an hour from
Sacramento,” he said. “So, Gavin, do not screw up.”
john.myers@latimes.com
STATE GOVERNMENT
Newsom to appoint two
to economic positions
Gov.-elect Gavin Newsom on Friday announced he will
appoint Julie Su as secretary of the state Labor and Workforce Development Agency and Lenny Mendonca as chief
economic and business advisor and director of the Governor’s Office of Business and Economic Development.
Su, 49, state labor commissioner since 2011,will coordinate the work of several workforce departments in state
government. Mendonca, 57, who’s been co-chairman of
nonprofit California Forward, will lead the office designated as a high-level way to push economic development.
— John Myers
CALIFORNIA LEGISLATURE
David Butow For The Times
REP. KATIE HILL (D-Agua Dulce), in blue, walks to the Capitol on Thursday, the new Congress’ first day.
Hill, one of California’s seven new House members, was elected co-representative of the Democratic freshmen.
California’s freshman class
is hard to miss on the Hill
New representatives
head to Washington
ready to make a
splash in the House.
By Christine Mai-Duc
It was nearly impossible
to ignore California as a new
Congress was sworn in.
There was the moment
House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy of Bakersfield
handed over the gavel to
Speaker Nancy Pelosi of San
Francisco on Thursday. And
the spectacle of the state’s 53
House members filing into
the chamber, some belting
out the old jazz tune “California, Here I Come,” drawing chuckles from the crowd.
Elsewhere on Capitol
Hill, California’s seven new
Democratic members, each
of whom seized control of
Republican-held seats in the
midterms and had never
previously been elected to
public office, commanded
attention of their own. Part
of the biggest cohort in the
largest freshman class in
decades, they could wield
outsize power for first-time
members.
On Thursday morning,
Rep. Katie Hill (D-Agua
Dulce) was trailed by family,
several news cameras and a
boom microphone. Her entourage turned heads as
they barreled through the
hallways of the Longworth
House Office Building, down
the steps and out into the
crisp January air on their
way to the Capitol.
Two passersby in suits
wondered aloud who she
was.
“New member from California. Either Katie Hill or
[Rep.] Katie Porter [DIrvine],” one man said.
Outside, Hill paused to
put on a pearl necklace — a
gift for the occasion from her
mother — over her navy
dress, then stopped for a
photo with members of Indivisible, the progressive
movement that helped
boost her bid for Congress.
A few minutes later, even
more cameras swarmed as
she was peppered with questions about the partial government shutdown and the
Democrats’ plans to act as a
check on the Trump administration. The rising Democratic star, who was elected
co-representative of her
freshman class to the House
majority, punctuated her
answers with a smile.
Earlier that week, she
juggled media interviews
and was asked to fill in for
Pelosi at an afternoon tea reception when the leader was
held up at the White House
with shutdown talks.
But Hill’s first week in
Washington was not without
growing pains. A mattress
intended for her new home
in the capital was twice delivered to California. Her
staff hadn’t yet figured out
how to unlock the desks in
her office, where the only
personal touch was a tiny vial of gold flakes from a park
close to her home near Santa
Clarita, where some accounts say the first California gold was discovered.
Hill said she’s ready for
the work to begin.
“I want to try to actually
bring some new perspectives and restore hope for
people who think our government’s broken and can’t
be fixed,” she said.
Porter, a former law professor, is one of the few single
mothers of young children to
serve in Congress. Her two
sons and daughter, ages 12,
10 and 7, joined their mother
Thursday as they navigated
the throngs of new members
and their families.
Porter’s staff counted off
her children and lined them
up as they moved from taking family portraits in Statuary Hall to the House subway nearby.
“We’ve lost a child,”
Porter called out to an aide,
who went back to retrieve
him. “I’m only down one,”
she said with a smile and a
shrug to passing colleagues
as they waited, issuing a
stern “Hey!” when her other
son began wandering ahead.
For a mother trying to
balance work and family,
seeing Pelosi invite all the
members’ children up to the
dais for her swearing-in as
speaker was a highlight,
Porter said.
“Just to be in that room,
to feel the energy,” she said.
“I think it was a day to really
remember the incredible responsibility that voters have
entrusted me with.”
Rep. Mike Levin (D-San
Juan Capistrano) also had
his two young children in tow
on the House floor Thursday. He intends to fly back to
California every weekend to
spend time with his family
and keep a rigorous schedule of once-a-month town
hall meetings in his district,
the first of which is planned
for the end of January.
Levin, who succeeded
longtime Republican Rep.
Darrell Issa of Vista after he
announced his retirement
last year, has criticized his
predecessor for holding few
town halls with constituents. His campaign promises included greater transparency and accessibility.
“We’re going to do everything we can to engage with
those who are traditionally
not interested in politics,”
Levin told a gathering of
supporters, many of whom
had been regulars at the
weekly protests outside Issa’s office for more than a
year and traveled to Washington to see Levin sworn in.
“I was sent here by all of
you and for all of you to get
the people’s business done,”
he said. “So we need to tell
Donald Trump where he can
put his wall.”
At an open house that
day, Rep. Gil Cisneros (DYorba Linda) mingled with
Court denies bid to block
police transparency law
7
The number of new
Democratic members of
California’s congressional
delegation who were sworn
in Thursday.
LATIMES.COM/ ESSENTIALPOLITICS
>>> Housing podcast: What Minneapolis’
end to single-family zoning means here
>>> Joshua Groban, aide to Gov. Jerry
Brown, sworn in to state Supreme Court
Find these stories on our minute-by-minute newsfeed and
subscribe to the newsletter at latimes.com/essentialpoliticsemail
christine.maiduc
@latimes.com
ESSENTIALS
A new state law allowing public disclosure of internal
investigations of officer shootings and other uses of force,
along with confirmed cases of sexual assault and lying
while on duty, has gone into effect after the California
Supreme Court denied a bid by a law enforcement union
to block it. The San Bernardino County Sheriff ’s Employees’ Benefit Assn. challenged the law last month, asking
the court to decide that it apply only to incidents that occur in 2019 or later. The court Wednesday rejected that request, allowing the public to seek all applicable records.
— Liam Dillon
>>> California Politics Podcast: A final
conversation with Gov. Jerry Brown
more than a dozen family
members and supporters in
his office, its walls still bare.
His parents and in-laws
posed for photos and soaked
in the excitement as Cisneros’ 4-year-old twins, Christopher and Alexander, dressed
in suits and ties, bounced
around the room.
Despite the task ahead,
Cisneros joked that he was
most anxious that day about
his boys rushing up to the
dais uninvited.
“I’m not nervous about
the job or what we have to
do,” he said. “We kind of
came here with an agenda
and what we want to focus
on … and we’ll just go from
there.”
Meanwhile, Rep. Josh
Harder (D-Turlock), who
ousted Republican incumbent Jeff Denham in the
Central Valley, reflected on
the sheer number of new
members who had never run
for or won office before.
“They’re in Congress because they want to make a
difference in their communities and that’s why they ran,
that’s why I ran,” Harder
said in a Facebook Live video late Thursday, recapping his first day on the job.
Eager to get started,
Harder expressed frustration with the pace of change,
a sentiment many of his
classmates seem to share.
A vote on any given issue,
he said, took four or five
time-consuming procedural
votes.
“We have so many problems and issues that we
campaigned on, and if it
takes us five hours or a day
just to get one done, I feel like
we could be doing things a
little bit better.”
His wife, Pam, sat on the
couch beside him. “Are you
going to fix that, Josh?”
“I’m certainly rarin’,”
Harder replied. “Like, let’s
move on, let’s get going.”
Brendan Smialowski AFP/Getty Images
CONGRE SS CONVENE S
House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) walks between mock swearing-in
ceremonies Thursday, the day the 116th Congress began. Pelosi was elected
speaker after her party regained control of the chamber. A hundred new
House members, the largest freshman class in nearly 50 years, were sworn in.
‘Our nation is at
an historic moment. Two
months ago,
the American
people spoke,
and demanded
a new dawn.’
— Rep. Nancy Pelosi
(D-San Francisco),
in remarks after she was elected
speaker of the House.
B4
SU N DAY , JA N UA RY 6 , 2 019
S
L AT I M E S . C O M
CITY & STATE
Disney
to raise
park
prices
Demand is expected
to surge when
Star Wars expansion
opens this summer.
By Hugo Martin
Luis Sinco Los Angeles Times
CLOUDS drift over Surfrider Beach and Malibu Pier on Saturday. A flash-flood watch was issued for the Woolsey and Hill fire burn areas.
Winter storm triggers mudslide
Officials close part of
Pacific Coast Highway
after several vehicles
become trapped.
By Ben Poston
and Javier Panzar
The first major storm of
the new year moved into
Southern California on Saturday night, triggering a
mudslide that shut down a
section of Pacific Coast
Highway and prompted
flash flooding and debris
flows near burn areas in Los
Angeles and Ventura counties.
An automated rain gauge
in the western Santa Monica
Mountains showed nearly
three-quarters of an inch of
rainfall in one hour, the National Weather Service said.
PCH was closed from
Encinal Canyon Road to
west of the Los Angeles
County line because of flooding, the city of Malibu
tweeted. Three vehicles became stuck in the mud
around 7 p.m. where Deer
Creek Road intersects the
highway.
The mud and debris were
about 100 yards wide and up
to 4 feet deep, Ventura
County Fire Capt. Dennis
O’Shea said.
“Some drivers actually
stopped by our fire station
and rang our doorbell to tell
us there was flooding and
people were trapped,” he
said. “Those folks just happened to be in the worst part
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of it, and they just got stuck.”
The highway could be
closed for at least 24 hours.
“The mud is very silty,”
O’Shea said. “It’s quicksandtype mud. It’s super heavy
and dangerous.”
A flash-flood watch was
issued for the burn areas of
the Woolsey and Hill fires,
which burned more than
100,000 acres in November,
destroyed about 1,600 structures and left three dead.
A half-inch to 1 1⁄2 inches
of rainfall was expected
along the coasts and valleys,
with higher amounts possible along south-facing
foothills and mountains,
said Kristen Stewart, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service.
Orange and San Diego
counties are expected to see
a quarter of an inch to 1 inch
of precipitation in some cities over the weekend. The
heaviest rain was expected
to fall overnight, Stewart
said.
Snowfall in the mountain
regions of Los Angeles
County could reach as low as
4,500 feet, Stewart said. High
surf is also predicted from 5
to 8 feet, she said.
Malibu officials have released a map of burn areas
that show where the potential for flooding and mudslides is greatest. The city is
also providing empty sandbags at Malibu-area fire stations and pre-filled sandbags at the Zuma Beach lifeguard headquarters.
In Ventura County, the
city of Oxnard opened a
shelter Saturday evening,
city officials said. The shelter, at the Armory at 351
North K St., opened at 4
p.m.; if the weather improves, the site will close at 9
a.m. Sunday.
Meanwhile, burn areas in
the northern region of the
state appeared to escape
heavy rainfall as the chilly
Pacific
storm
passed
through the area earlier Saturday.
The Bay Area and Northern California saw mostly
light rain, including about a
half-inch in and around Paradise in Butte County, where
the state’s deadliest and
most destructive fire burned
in November, said Steve Anderson, a meteorologist with
the National Weather Service. The Camp fire charred
more than 153,000 acres, destroyed nearly 14,000 homes
and killed 86 people.
But the region seemed to
sidestep another possible
disaster Saturday.
“There are no reports of
flooding. It is pretty light
rain,” Anderson said.
The heaviest rain in the
region — about 2 1⁄4 inches —
fell around the Big Sur coast.
The weather outlook for
the next several weeks indicates above-normal precipitation; in the next months,
the odds are looking good for
above-average rainfall, experts said.
ben.poston@latimes.com
javier.panzar@latimes.com
San Diego proposes migrant shelter
City’s plan would
house asylum seekers
in a former juvenile
detention facility.
By Kate Morrissey
SAN DIEGO — The city
of San Diego has proposed
using a former juvenile detention facility in Alpine
known as Camp Barrett as a
migrant shelter.
The proposal, made Friday in a letter to the state,
comes after nonprofit organizations working to support asylum-seeking families have called repeatedly
for help from local and state
governments.
The San Diego Rapid Response Network established
a temporary shelter after
federal
officials
implemented a policy change that
leaves migrant families with
little assistance in reaching
their final destinations once
they’re released from custody.
That shelter, which operates through private donations and a large network
of volunteers, is at its fifth location since the policy began
in late October and has frequently been at capacity.
Rapid Response is seeking a
shelter that could house up
to 250 people.
Federal immigration officials sometimes drop off asylum seekers at the shelter,
but others are taken to bus
stations around the county.
Monitors call the network’s hotline when migrant
families in need of food and
shelter are left at the stations. Volunteers are then
dispatched to help families
call their sponsors and purchase bus tickets, and to
bring to the shelter those
who don’t get on a bus right
away.
In recent weeks, as releases surpassed available
beds, the shelter has frequently had to use a secondary location as an overflow
space, but that approach is
not sustainable, shelter
leaders have said.
John Gibbins San Diego Union-Tribune
CAMP BARRETT closed last summer. The facility
may need repairs before it can reopen as a shelter.
“We’ve been patching
this thing together minute
by minute,” said Kevin Malone, executive director of
the San Diego Organizing
Project, one of the organizations spearheading the network. “Everyone is really
stretched.”
Volunteers have worked
around the clock, even over
the recent holidays, to ensure that families are
screened, fed and connected
with transportation to their
sponsors’ cities.
A slew of local politicians
are among those who gave
their time in recent weeks,
including Chula Vista Mayor
Mary Salas, Rep. Scott Peters (D-San Diego), state
Sen. Toni Atkins (D-San Diego), Assemblywoman Lorena Gonzalez Fletcher (DSan Diego), San Diego
County Supervisor Greg
Cox, Supervisor-elect Nathan Fletcher and San Diego
City Councilwoman Barbara Bry, according to the
network’s Facebook page.
Even if Camp Barrett is
approved as a shelter, it may
take time before it’s ready to
accept families.
“At this time, this is only a
proposed option,” said Ashley Bailey, spokeswoman for
Mayor Kevin Faulconer.
“There would still need to be
assessments done to the
property and discussions
between all stakeholders
about any necessary adaptations the site would need,
who would be in charge of
operating the facility and
what resources other agencies can provide before anyone can move onto the site.”
Alliance
Healthcare
Foundation has agreed to
fund the endeavor, according to the city’s letter to the
state. The organization did
not respond to a request for
comment.
Camp Barrett, which is
owned by the city of San Diego, closed at the beginning
of last summer after more
than 20 years of housing
boys who were considered
wards of the juvenile court.
Based on a grand jury report
released in the year before
the camp closed, the site
may need considerable work
to reopen as a shelter.
The report called the
camp an “unsuitable, deteriorating and aging facility.”
“The physical condition
of the offices, classrooms
and dormitories is clearly
substandard and in need of
major repairs,” the report
says. “The dormitory buildings are concrete. They are
outfitted with bunk beds
and a common restroom
area with no doors for privacy.”
The camp’s capacity is
125, according to the report.
All of the families helped
by the Rapid Response Network shelter have requested
asylum after crossing the
border, either at ports of entry or illegally. Adults are fitted with ankle monitors, and
each family is given a court
date in the immigration
court closest to their destination city before being
released from federal custody.
In the past, federal immigration officials provided
more assistance to families
before releasing them to
wait for their court hearings.
But that changed in late October, when officials said
they could no longer assist
migrants with connecting to
their sponsors to get bus or
plane tickets because of the
number of arrivals.
The city of San Diego has
been meeting with regional
partners since late November about the issue, Bailey
said.
The city, joined by Chula
Vista, National City and San
Diego County, previously
sent a letter to the state requesting that it open National Guard armories as
migrant shelters, similar to
2016, when an influx of Haitians arrived in San Diego
from Brazil. The Office of
Emergency Services responded that the National
City armory was not able to
be used, and the San Diego
mayor’s office said it has not
yet heard whether other armories might be made available.
At the county level,
Fletcher and Cox also hope
to offer up potential shelter
sites if they can get enough
votes Tuesday.
In addition to authorizing the county to identify potential facilities, they hope
to create a working group
with state and local government officials and immigrant advocates to put together a longer-term plan to
support asylum seekers at
the border.
“Nonprofit and advocacy
groups have performed a heroic task thus far. They
should be applauded for
what they have been able to
pull together,” Fletcher said.
“It’s time for the rest of us to
step up to help them.”
kate.morrissey
@sduniontribune.com
Morrissey writes for the San
Diego Union-Tribune.
Only months before the
opening of its $1-billion Star
Wars expansion, the Disneyland Resort announced
price increases of up to 25%
for daily tickets, annual
passes and parking.
The increases, which
take effect Monday, come
less than a year after the resort adopted price hikes of
up to 18%. Under the latest
increases, the cheapest daily
ticket will be more than $100.
Daily parking prices are rising to $25 from $20 — a 25%
increase.
Disneyland’s annual ritual of charging more is partly
aimed at crowd control, although price hikes in the last
few years have not diminished the throngs at Disneyland and its neighboring
California Adventure Park.
Disneyland expects visitor demand to hit new
heights when it opens its
newest area, dubbed Star
Wars: Galaxy's Edge, this
summer. The 14-acre expansion will feature two attractions, including a ride that
lets visitors pilot the Millennium Falcon, the spaceship
flown by Han Solo in the
“Star Wars” movies.
Park representatives declined to discuss how they
plan to handle the expected
surge of visitors.
“We continue to provide
our guests with a variety of
ticket offerings to meet their
needs, while helping us to
spread visitation, better
manage demand and deliver
a great experience,” Disneyland Resort spokeswoman
Liz Jaeger said.
To help manage the
crowds, the resort adopted
“demand” pricing in 2016,
with lower prices on days
when demand is lower and
higher prices on weekends
and holidays. An analysis by
The Times showed that the
new prices didn’t shorten attraction wait times.
Starting Monday, a oneday, one-park ticket for Disneyland or California Adventure park rises to $104
from $97 for low-demand
days, such as weekdays in
May. That is a 7.2% increase.
Meanwhile, the consumer
price index for the 12-month
period ended in November
rose 2.2%.
A ticket for regular-demand days will rise to $129
from $117, a 10.3% increase.
The price of a ticket on peakdemand days will rise to $149
from $135, a 10.4% increase.
For annual passes, the
least-expensive “Southern
California Select Pass,”
which blocks out all weekends, most of the summer
months as well as a big part
of the fall and winter holidays, will cost $399, up from
$369, or 8.1% more.
Disney representatives
said more days would be
blocked out for most annual
passes in 2019 versus last
year but they declined to be
more specific. Instead, they
directed such queries to the
online block-out calendar.
Based on the latest calendar, 211 days are blocked out
for the next 12 months for
Southern California Select
Pass holders, up from 202
days in the previous 12
months.
For the “Deluxe Pass,”
which includes admission to
both parks on select days,
customers pay $799, up from
$729, a 9.6% increase.
For the most expensive
pass, the “Premier Pass,”
which includes parking, access to both parks and no
block-out days, the price
rose to $1,949 from $1,579, a
23.4% increase.
The MaxPass, a digital
ride-reservation
system
that guests upload to their
smartphones, will be priced
at $15, up from $10, or 50%
more.
hugo.martin@latimes.com
Twitter: @hugomartin
S
L AT I M E S . C O M
S U N DAY , JA N UA RY 6 , 2 019
B5
San Diego set to ban foam containers
Polystyrene, already
targeted by 119 other
California cities, can
damage marine life.
By David Garrick
SAN DIEGO — San Diego may soon join 119 other
California cities in banning
polystyrene food and beverage containers, which have
been blamed for poisoning
fish and other marine life
and damaging the health of
people who eat seafood.
Many restaurants, especially small eateries with one
or two locations, lobbied
against the ban and encouraged the city to focus its efforts instead on recycling
polystyrene, which is commonly called Styrofoam.
A group of polystyrene
manufacturers in November
offered San Diego nearly
$2 million to boost its fledgling polystyrene recycling
program, but the offer was
contingent on the city not
moving forward with the
proposed ban.
The City Council voted 5
to 3 in October in favor of the
ban, but a required second
vote to finalize approval of
the new law was postponed
and is now scheduled for a
public hearing Tuesday.
There has been significant turnover on the ninemember council since the
October vote, with three
members being replaced in
the Nov. 6 election by newcomers Dr. Jen Campbell,
Monica Montgomery and
Vivian Moreno.
All three are progressive
Democrats who say they
strongly support pro-environment legislation and initiatives.
In addition to food containers used by restaurants,
the ban would apply to polystyrene egg cartons, coolers,
ice chests, pool toys, dock
floats and mooring buoys.
Retail stores would be
banned from selling such
products.
The legislation would
also require restaurants to
make plastic utensils and
straws available only upon
request, a provision aimed
K.C. Alfred San Diego Union-Tribune
POLYSTYRENE containers were dropped long ago by most large restaurant chains, but many smaller shops
still use them. San Diego’s proposed ban would make two-year waivers available to those small businesses.
at reducing the amount of
single-use plastic products
in landfills.
A state law that took effect Tuesday requires fullservice restaurants to provide straws only upon request, so part of the city legislation would be redundant.
Nearly all national and
regional restaurant chains
long ago stopped using polystyrene in response to lobbying
by
environmental
groups and backlash from
customers concerned that
the foam isn’t biodegradable.
But many taco shops,
pizza parlors, convenience
stores and other small businesses continue to use foam
products to save money.
Prompted by concerns
about how the ban would affect those businesses, the
legislation includes waivers
of up to two years for businesses with annual gross in-
comes of less than $500,000.
The two-year waivers
would also be available to
businesses that use polystyrene products for which
there is no environmentally
friendly replacement, and
for businesses that have
long-term agreements with
suppliers of polystyrene
products.
If approved Tuesday, the
law would take effect 30 days
later. The legislation, however, stipulates that the ban on
restaurants using polystyrene containers wouldn’t
take effect until 90 days after
the law’s effective date,
which would be mid-May.
The San Diego Regional
Chamber of Commerce and
the California Restaurant
Assn. continue to oppose the
ban. Both groups lobbied
San Diego city officials in
November to consider the
offer from the polystyrene
manufacturers, who call
themselves the American
Chemistry Council.
If San Diego doesn’t
move forward with the ban,
the manufacturers will pay
the city $250,000 to cover the
costs of shipping to Los Angeles all of the polystyrene
that San Diego trash haulers
have been collecting in blue
bins.
San Diego began allowing polystyrene packaging
to be placed in blue recycling
bins in late 2014 and expanded the program to allow polystyrene food packaging in July 2017.
Because there is relatively low demand for recycled polystyrene, the recycling program cost the city
$124,000 in the fiscal year
that ended last June and is
projected to cost the city an
additional $180,000 in the ongoing fiscal year.
The manufacturers are
offering an additional $1.5
million to help the city upgrade its technology to
boost the processing and recycling of polystyrene.
Supporters of the ban,
however, say that recycling
polystyrene is not the answer.
The local chapter of the
Surfrider Foundation says
polystyrene doesn’t biodegrade but instead breaks
down into smaller pieces
that are easily mistaken for
food by marine wildlife.
The 5 Gyres Institute, another environmental group,
says polystyrene products
pollute the world’s oceans.
“Our growing reliance on
disposable plastic to fuel our
‘culture of convenience’ is
not without cost,” Roger
Kube, a policy advisor for the
institute, said last fall.
“Globally, an average of 8
million tons of plastic ends
up in the ocean.”
Though many small
restaurants oppose the ban,
some support it, including
several members of a group
called Business for Good
San Diego.
“The convenience of a
cold soda does not outweigh
the necessity of a healthy
planet,” said Mikey Knab,
chairman of the group. “As
business owners, we need a
level playing field where our
priorities are the long-term
health of our customers and
employees.”
The California Restaurant Assn., however, says
polystyrene products are superior to paper products or
other replacements when it
comes to effectively keeping
coffee, soups and other
products either warm or
cold.
The association also contends San Diego has rushed
approval of the ban, which
was first proposed in May by
Councilman Chris Ward.
They say more analysis is
needed of how it would affect
businesses.
Councilman Chris Cate,
who cast one of the three
votes against the ban in October, said the council
should empathize with the
small businesses that would
be affected by a sharp increase in costs.
Councilwoman Barbara
Bry, who voted in favor of the
ban, said the waivers show
that the city is handling the
ban equitably and fairly.
“At the end of the day, the
little pieces of foam get into
the fish, and that’s not good
for anybody,” she said in November.
If the ban is approved,
fines would start at $200 for a
first offense. The fine would
rise to $350 for a second offense within the same 12month period and to $500 for
a third offense during that
time frame.
It’s not clear how the city
would enforce the ban. The
Environmental Services Department, which handles
trash collection, says three
full-time employees costing
a total of $150,000 a year
would be needed, but money
for those workers hasn’t
been approved by the City
Council.
david.garrick
@sduniontribune.com
Garrick writes for the San
Diego Union-Tribune.
True crime reporting and storytelling at its finest.
A groundbreaking collection from Los Angeles Times reporter,
Christopher Goffard.
B6
S
SU N DAY , JA N UA RY 6 , 2 019
L AT I M E S . C O M
Three shot dead at bowling alley
Marcus Yam Los Angeles Times
PEOPLE WAIT outside Gable House Bowl, where three were killed and four injured in a shooting late Friday.
Torrance police were still searching for the shooter or shooters and could not provide details about a motive.
Hawthorne Blvd.
Crenshaw Blvd.
Del Amo Blvd
Western Ave.
Gable
House
Bowl
405
Prairie Ave.
[Shooting, from B1]
with its distinctive blue sloping roof, has been a popular
nightspot in the quiet suburb for decades.
After finishing a shift as a
maintenance worker Friday
night,
Robert
Meekins
headed to Gable House to
meet Astin Edwards, the
godfather of his 5-year-old
son.
The friends, both 28, were
killed in the shooting.
Meekins, who was from
South L.A., had a contagious smile and loved to
dress stylishly. He had never
been in a gang or in trouble
with the law, relatives said.
“He loved his son. He was
hardworking,” said his aunt,
Carol, who declined to give
her last name. “He was doing
good for himself.”
The family had not yet
broken the news to Meekins’
son.
“I hope they find the
killer, that he turns himself
in,” Carol said. “He took him
away from us and his 5-yearold son. The hardest thing
will be to explain where his
dad is.”
Before leaving the house
that night, Edwards asked
his mother to borrow her car,
recalled his father, Dwayne
Edwards.
Those were the last
words that Astin Edwards,
who worked loading planes
at Los Angeles International
Airport, spoke to his parents.
“He was a good guy. He
wasn’t into no gangbanging,” his father said. “He
helped everyone who asked
him to.”
Latrice Radford was at a
movie when she noticed 25
missed calls on her phone.
Her brother, 20-year-old
Michael Radford, had been
shot.
She rushed to HarborUCLA Medical Center, but
he wasn’t there. At the bowling alley, she was in tears,
waiting for news. The Los
Angeles County coroner’s office later confirmed that
Radford was one of the victims.
On Saturday morning,
Torrance police Sgt. Ronald
Harris could not provide de-
Torrance Blvd.
DEL AMO
FASHION
CENTER
Carson St.
Torrance
mi
ta
1
Carson
223rd St.
Sepu
lv
Lo
110
eda B
lvd.
228th St.
Blv
d.
1 MILE
P aul Du ginski Los Angeles Times
Sources: Nextzen, OpenStreetMap
tails about the events that
led to the shooting or the
weapon used.
“This is an unfortunate
incident, and one shooting is
one too many,” Harris said.
Some witnesses said a
fight broke out before the
shooting, which was reported about 11:55 p.m. at
Edwards family
Meekins family
ASTIN EDWARDS and
ROBERT MEEKINS is
his friend were killed.
survived by a young son.
the
bowling
alley
on
Hawthorne
Boulevard
south of Sepulveda Boulevard.
Edwards, Meekins and
Radford died at the scene.
Two injured men were taken
to a hospital, and two others
opted to seek medical attention on their own.
The scene outside was
chaotic, with an anxious
crowd kept back behind police tape. One man, his white
shirt torn and bloodstained,
had large bandages on his
back. Some looked at photographs to try to identify a
suspect.
Brandon Tyre, 31, was at
the bowling alley celebrating
a friend’s birthday. He was in
the middle of a game, he
said, when a fight erupted,
then gunshots. His brother
was wounded and remained
inside the building, he said.
Jesus Perez of San Pedro
said he heard about four
gunshots and hid inside the
bowling alley’s bar for about
15 minutes before a security
guard escorted him out.
“We heard there was a big
fight before that,” he said.
“We just ran into the bar, and
we just took cover, because
after the fight we heard,
‘Pop! Pop!’ ”
Another witness, who declined to give his name, said
there was a fight, then nine
gunshots.
Gable House opened in
1960 and hosted many professional bowling tournaments in the sport’s heyday.
On Friday and Saturday
nights, a glow-in-the-dark
bowling
event
called
“Rock-n-Glow” runs from
midnight to 3 a.m.
Employees, who would
not give their names because they were not authorized to speak to the media,
said violence at the establishment is rare, though
fights sometimes break out
in the parking lot.
In March 2015, a 27-yearold woman was killed in the
parking lot when a fight escalated into a shooting. The
suspects began shooting as
soon as they pulled into the
lot and never entered the
building, the bowling alley’s
manager said at the time.
ruben.vives@latimes.com
Twitter: @LATvives
courtney.lewis
@latimes.com
Twitter: @sportscourt
ben.poston@latimes.com
Twitter: @bposton
cindy.chang@latimes.com
Twitter: @cindychangla
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Judge denies L.A. Unified’s
bid to limit teachers’ strike
[L.A. Unified, from B1]
tiation session for Monday
morning, tentatively scheduled to take place at City
Hall at the invitation of Mayor Eric Garcetti.
Garcetti told The Times
on Friday that so far he had
not been invited into the
room with the parties but
that he was prepared to participate in any way that
would be helpful.
The contract talks would
be the first since mediation
efforts broke down in early
October.
Many observers see a
strike as almost inevitable.
The district’s legal filing
was based in part on the
terms of a long-running
settlement
called
the
Chanda Smith Modified
Consent Decree. Chanda
Smith was an L.A. student
who received a deficient education, according to a 1993
lawsuit, because she was deprived of services that were
legally required under federal law. District officials ultimately agreed to sweeping
and costly measures to assist all students with disabilities, all under the supervi-
sion of a court-appointed
monitor. That agreement
holds to this day.
For years, L.A. Unified
has tried to get out from
under
the
settlement,
arguing that it has fixed its
problems. Some parents
and advocates have argued
otherwise.
On Thursday, attorneys
for L.A. Unified cited the settlement as reason to limit a
walkout, saying the district
could not satisfy its terms if
employees who work with
disabled students went on
strike. They wanted a court
order to keep those workers
on the job. Such an order
could have affected teachers
as well as nurses, counselors
and psychiatric social workers, who also are part of the
union.
L.A. Unified has about
60,000 disabled students,
more than 12% of overall
enrollment, district officials
said.
The district has offered
teachers a 6% raise spread
over the first two years of a
three-year contract. The
union wants a 6.5% raise
that would take effect all at
once and a year sooner.
But the issues that the
union is pressing for go well
beyond wages. UTLA also is
demanding a significant reduction in class sizes and the
hiring of enough nurses, librarians and counselors to
“fully
staff ”
campuses
across the nation’s secondlargest school system.
Union
leaders
have
framed their activism as a
fight for the future of public
education.
Beutner has said that
some of the union’s proposals are worthy but that, if accepted, they would immediately push the school district
into insolvency.
The
superintendent
wants as narrow a focus as
possible in contract talks.
Unlike the teachers, he
doesn’t want to deliberate
over whether there is too
much standardized testing
or too little control over privately run charter schools
that operate on districtowned campuses.
howard.blume
@latimes.com
Twitter: @howardblume
S
L AT I M E S . C O M
S U N DAY , JA N UA RY 6 , 2 019
B7
Funeral is held for slain police officer
Stephen Lam Getty Images
OFFICERS salute the family of Newman Police Cpl. Ronil Singh before his funeral. He had always wanted to be an officer, his brother said.
the corporal’s 5-month-old
son cooed in his mother’s
arms. A family video showed
the baby’s feet balanced on
his father’s as the two
walked together. Singh had
been teaching his son to
walk and talk.
He was looking forward
to hearing his son call him
“papa.”
brittny.mejia@latimes.com
Twitter: @Brittny_Mejia
To advertise
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Noah Berger Associated Press
THE PROCESSION passes a crowd of well-wishers. Many watching Singh’s
service did not know him but wanted to show their support for law enforcement.
praising Singh’s service and
offering condolences.
At the funeral service,
Reggie Singh recounted
that when his family first got
their television, his older
brother began watching the
reality show “Cops.”
“He always wanted to become [a] law enforcement
[officer] in America,” Reggie
Singh said.
Ronil Singh began his career as a volunteer with the
Modesto Police Department
in 2005. He then worked as a
cadet for the Turlock Police
Department and later as a
reserve deputy for the
Merced County Sheriff ’s
Department.
He was hired by the Newman Police Department in
2011.
“Ronil was very proud to
become a police officer and
deeply loyal to his department,” said Modesto Police
Det. Ra Pouv, a longtime
friend of Singh’s.
Outside the church, blue
bows were tied to lampposts
and trees. The general
public watched the proceedings in a chapel across the
street.
Among them was Gopal
Ramaiya, a family friend
who wore a beanie with a
blue-line flag on it.
Ramaiya’s family is also
from Fiji, and his son is a
Walnut police officer.
“It’s heartbreaking what
happened here,” he said.
Others did not know
Singh but wanted to attend
to show their support and
appreciation for law enforcement.
“My heart really goes out
to them. They’re the ones
who run in when we run out,”
said Barbara Harmony, who
grew teary-eyed as she
spoke. “It’s senseless.”
Inside the church, a tribute video flashed across the
screen, in which Newman
officers and others from
across the county recounted
memories of Singh.
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[Singh, from B1]
this country with one purpose, and that purpose was
to become a police officer,”
Richardson said.
Amid somber reflections
were memories that captured Singh’s jovial spirit
and prompted the room to
break out in laughter.
Singh was able to bring a
smile to the faces of even
those he arrested, Richardson said.
“We will say goodbye today, but you will always be in
our hearts,” the chief said. “I
love you.”
When Singh’s brother,
Reggie, took the stage,
bathed in blue light, he
thanked the officers who
had arrested the suspected
gunman, Gustavo Perez Arriaga, 32, who police said has
known gang ties and had
been arrested twice on suspicion of driving under the
influence.
Police believe Arriaga
was driving drunk when
Singh stopped him in the
early morning hours of
Dec. 26.
Someone had tipped off
the corporal to an intoxicated man in a silver pickup.
A short time later, Singh radioed that he was pulling
over a vehicle.
Minutes later, he called
out “shots fired.” The officers who responded found
Singh had been wounded,
and the driver he stopped
had fled.
The corporal was taken
to a hospital, where he died.
His was the first death in
the line of duty for the Newman Police Department.
The motive in the shooting is not clear.
After a four-day manhunt, authorities arrested
Arriaga in the Lamont,
Calif., area. Police believe he
was trying to flee to his native Mexico.
Arriaga’s
previous
brushes with the law and his
subsequent release by law
enforcement prompted angry comments from Stanislaus County Sheriff Adam
Christianson about Senate
Bill 54, the state’s so-called
sanctuary law. The law,
which took effect in 2018, prohibits state and local police
agencies from notifying federal officials in many cases
when immigrants potentially subject to deportation
are about to be released
from custody.
“This is a criminal illegal
alien with prior criminal activity that should have been
reported to ICE,” Christianson said. “Law enforcement
was prohibited because of
sanctuary laws, and that led
to the encounter with Officer
Singh.”
President Trump, who
has made immigration enforcement one of his top priorities, took to Twitter to
comment on the case: “Time
to get tough on Border Security. Build the Wall!”
Last week, Trump called
Singh’s
wife,
Amanika
“Mika” Chand-Singh, Richardson and Christianson,
Parks sustain long-term damage
was carried out by fellow
visitors.
“It is a delicate balance
between conservation and
recreation,” said Steve Blumenshine, a professor of biology at Fresno State who
spent time in Yosemite last
week. “In a shutdown, we
take that to extremes.”
Regas said advocating
for closing parks completely,
rather than just campgrounds, is “a very unusual
stance” for her organization,
which works to increase access to parks and has donated land to expand them,
including Yosemite National
Park. “But we are not taking
this lightly,” she said in an interview. “This is urgent.”
Whether to shut an area
of a park is up to each park’s
superintendent. He or she
can bar visitors if resources
“vulnerable to destruction,
looting, or other damage”
cannot be adequately protected by the law enforcement officers who remain on
duty during the shutdown,
according to the National
Park Service’s contingency
plan for a lapse in federal
funding.
Campgrounds at Joshua
Tree closed at noon Wednesday, officials said, citing
health and safety concerns
over vault toilets that were
near capacity. The waterless
bathrooms, in which visitors
can relieve themselves into a
sealed container buried
underground, had remained
open. But no workers are
around to pump out the
waste.
Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks went a
step further, closing entirely
to visitors last week.
Meanwhile, an investigation into the Christmas Day
death of a man at Yosemite
is being delayed by the shutdown, National Park Service
spokesman Andrew Munoz
said Friday.
Yosemite officials received a 911 call reporting a
man with a head injury in the
Silver Apron area on the
Merced River above Nevada
Fall and rangers arrived in
less than an hour, Munoz
said. The man was removed
from the water and received
medical treatment, but he
died from his injuries. He
was not in a restricted area.
“We aren’t releasing more
detail because the incident
remains under investigation, which is taking longer
than usual because of the
shutdown,” Munoz said in
an email. “A news release
wasn’t issued because of the
shutdown.”
There also is a new wave
of concern over another perennial issue at Yosemite:
how humans interact with
bears.
The trash that visitors
have left and is piling up
could attract wildlife to
populated areas, increasing
the risk of dangerous encounters.
Munoz said there were
one or two bears active in the
Upper Pines Campground in
Yosemite last week. The
bears did not get any food,
but campers reported bears
pushing on cars and trailers,
and one bear did get into
some trash one night last
week in Yosemite Valley, he
said.
“It is too early to tell what
the long-term impacts may
be,” Munoz said in an email.
“However, bears and other
wildlife becoming habituated to human food and
trash is a huge concern.”
The shutdown is shining
a light on one of the inherent
tensions of the national park
system: how to protect the
ecology of parks while opening them to visitors, said
Jeffrey Jenkins, an assistant
professor of public lands and
protected areas at UC Merced. And without staffers
around to monitor the
parks, that tension can become untenable. “It is
putting an undue burden on
the parks,” he said. “At some
point, it becomes a tragedy
of the commons.”
Lamfrom, the director at
the National Parks Conservation Assn., said the toll
from the shutdown won’t be
known until park staff returns to work.
“We don’t have a true
reckoning of what the impacts are yet,” he said.
javier.panzar@latimes.com
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[Shutdown, from B1]
cacy organization, wrote a
letter to President Trump on
Thursday, calling for the immediate closure of every national park in the country for
the duration of the shutdown to protect visitors and
park resources.
“Allowing access to national parks without taking
care to steward those resources is irresponsible and
could result in irreversible
damage and loss,” she wrote.
Unlike the government
shutdown in 2013, the Trump
administration has kept national parks open with limited staff in place. But, as
bathrooms and other services have become overloaded, more and more
campgrounds are closing at
parks across California on a
largely ad hoc basis.
The latest example is
Death Valley National Park,
where several campsites
closed Friday because of
health and safety concerns
over human waste, trash,
vandalism and damage to
park resources, the park’s
chief of interpretation and
education, Patrick Taylor,
said in a news release.
Reports continue to
trickle in from volunteers
about champagne bottles
left strewn about in Joshua
Tree and human waste piling up on roads leading into
Yosemite. In Texas’ Big
Bend National Park, a hiker
reportedly broke his leg and
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B8
SU N DAY , JA N UA RY 6 , 2 019
S
L AT I M E S . C O M
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S
LOS ANGELES TIMES
SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
B9
OBITUARY NOTICES
Place a paid Notice: latimes.com/placeobituary
Search obituary notice archives: legacy.com/obituaries/latimes
LEBOW, Sanford
FEENEY, Sister Una
Nancy Stewart Walden
May 18, 1928 - December 20, 2018
Nancy Stewart Walden
passed away December
20 at the age of 90. She
was married for 65 years
to Mike Walden, who predeceased her
in February 2017. After graduating
from high school in Champaign, Ill.,
she attended MaryWashington College
for two years before transferring to the
Univ. of Illinois, where she graduated
in 1950. She was a member of the
Kappa Alpha Theta sorority and
active in alumna events in the L.A.
area. Before raising four children, she
worked in the accounting department
of Collegiate Cap & Gown and then as a
stewardess for Ozark Airlines. Moving
to LA in 1966, Nancy was a member
of the Tarzana Cultural Society and
the Braemar Country Club, where she
regularly played tennis paired with
players decades younger than she. She
loved to travel, attending the French
Open, visiting the Great Wall in China,
hiking in Yosemite, and relaxing in
Hawaii.
She is survived by her 4 children:
Nanette Diane Walden of Hidden Hills,
Gregory Stewart Walden of Alexandria,
VA, Julie Ann Creaser of Woodland
Hills, and David Lawrence Walden of
Westminster, CO; and 5 grandchildren:
Conner Weber of Los Angeles, Andrew
Creaser of Sacramento, Aubrey Weber
of Raleigh, NC, Lauren Creaser of San
Diego, and Natalie Creaser of Reno,
Nevada.
In lieu of a memorial service, a
celebration of life will be scheduled for
family and friends.
Bella Magenheim
Bella Magenheim was born in
Izbica, Poland, on May 10, 1921 and
died in Beverly Hills, California, on
December 30, 2018 at the age of 97.
She was a Holocaust survivor. She is
survived by her devoted daughters
Margaret (Michael) and Marlene
(Jeff), grandchildren David, Jason
(Catherine) and Lauren (Mathew), and
great-grandchildren Benjamin and
Mira. Bella was preceded in death by
her beloved husband, Louis. She will
be missed by all that knew and loved
her. Donations in her memory can be
made to Yad Vashem.
DAVIS, Patricia Josephine
September 21, 1944 - December 8, 2018
Patricia Davis died late in the
evening of December 8, 2018, in the
arms of her husband at their home in
Culver City, California. Her children
Stacey and Christian were at her side.
She endured her seven-month struggle
with cancer with the same grace,
dignity, and sense of equanimity she
had exhibited throughout her 53 years
of marriage to her husband Ronald,
whom she met at age seventeen and
married when age twenty in 1965.
Born in Kansas City, Missouri,
Patricia graduated from Avila College
in 1965, later taking graduate courses
at Loyola University in Los Angeles.
Before moving with her husband to
Los Angeles in 1970, she taught in a
public school in Mexico, Missouri, and
worked for several years as a medical
research consultant at the University
of Missouri-Columbia. Her daughter,
Stacey, was born in 1970, followed by
her son, Christian, in 1974. In 1982,
Patricia returned to teaching, taking
a position at St. Anastasia Catholic
School, from where she retired after 28
years in 2011.
Patricia would be embarrassed to
know that her 7th and 8th-grade
students, their parents, and her
colleagues use the words “iconic” and
“legendary” when talking about her
teachingcareer. Patriciaisremembered
as a teacher who promoted respect
and love for grammar precisely done,
penmanship, English composition,
literature, and the arts. Patricia’s
husband and children recall how she
would hunker down with her students’
essays and pore over them for hours in
the evenings and on weekends. For
her, good teaching was not a virtue
but a responsibility. Her commitment
to excellence in education and the
balanced life inspired her children to
become college professors in French
and German history and to emulate
her approach to education and living
in their professional and personal
endeavors.
Patricia was always up for an
adventure with her husband and
children, twice exchanging houses
with a London family and traveling
to Ireland (perhaps her favorite
destination), throughout much of
western Europe, to Russia when it
was still the Soviet Union and China
shortly after the “Tiananmen Square
Massacre.” She also worked many
summers alongside her historian
husband in his Historic Court House
Records Project in Natchez, Mississippi.
She edited his writings, helped in his
research, supervised student interns
(and even local prisoners), and did
much of the organizational work for
the Project in the 1990s. She once
assisted her daughter for four weeks
ANDERSON, Donald E.
in France while Stacey worked on
November 19, 1938 - December 18, 2018
her doctoral dissertation. Lately,
Donald “Don” Edward Anderson, she loved visiting her daughter and
former Senior Vice President of HBO, grandchildren in Tacoma, Washington,
President of Emerge Communications and her son and his family in
and Emerge Magazine, as well as Charlottesville, Virginia – always ready
Senior Advisor to the Chairman & CEO to attend to whatever needed to be
of Time Warner, Inc. passed away on done. She loved creating Halloween
December 18, 2018 in Los Angeles. He costumes and stuffed animals for her
grandchildren, sewing doll clothes,
was 80 years old.
coming up with craft projects and
A memorial “Celebration of Life” working with her grandchildren on
will be held Friday, January 25, 2019, English grammar and composition
9:30 a.m. in the Golden West Galleria whenever they came to Los Angeles,
of Inglewood Park Cemetery, 720 E. which they did every summer and
during Christmas holidays.
Florence Ave., Inglewood, CA
In lieu of flowers, the family asks that
you consider making a contribution
to STRIVE, a nonprofit after school
program for inner-city youth (founded
by Donald E. Anderson, Jr.). 9124 S.
Main Street, LA 90003
BERLIN, Henry
Mount Sinai Memorial Parks Hollywood Hills 800-600-0076
www.mountsinaiparks.org
To place
an obituary ad
please go
online to:
latimes.com/placeobituary
or call
1-800-234-4444
After Patricia retired from teaching
in 2011, she devoted her remaining
years to her art – creating beautiful
oil paintings and multi-colored
quilts, visiting her children and
grandchildren, and taking long walks
every morning with her husband to
their off-the-beaten-path coffee spot
for hot brew and croissants. In the last
weeks of her life, she created exquisite
pieces of art for her family, always
trying to finish one more watercolor
or pencil sketch before her strength
would run its course, many of which,
along with others done over her life,
now adorn the walls of her children’s
homes.
Patricia’s death came as a
devastating shock to her family, and
they will never forget her or get over
their loss. For them, there is no closure
with her death and she will be with
them always as the best partner, mom,
and grandmother possible. In the
words of her grandchildren written
just before Patricia died: “You are the
funniest and smartest grandma ever.”
Surviving Patricia is her husband
Ronald L. F. Davis; her daughter
Stacey Davis with her husband Olivier
Soustelle, and their daughters Elodie
and Clementine; her son Christian
Davis and his wife Michelle Maraffi
and their children, Lillian and Jasper.
Also surviving are Patricia’s older
brother Julian Ominski and his wife
Mary in Kansas City and their three
children and numerous grandchildren
as well her deceased sister’s (Cindy)
daughter (Melissa Bernstein) and son
(Michael Bernstein) and their children
and Patricia’s sister-in-law Cynthia
Radolovich and her husband Gil and
their children and a grandchild.
To honor her life, donations can be
made in Patricia’s name for a memorial
brick on the school playground at
St. Anastasia Catholic Church, 7390
W. Manchester Ave., Los Angeles, CA
90045. “Mrs. Davis”would like that.
RUBIN, Shirley
February 7, 1956 - December 29, 2018
December 25, 1921 - January 2, 2019
June 6, 1924 - December 16, 2018
Sister Una Feeney, SSS, passed into
eternal life on December 29, 2018. She
was born in Dorchester-Boston, MA, on
February 7, 1956. Her family moved
to California in 1960. She attended
Immaculate Heart of Mary Elementary
School and Mater Dei High School in
Santa Ana. She attended Mount St.
Mary’s University and CSUN where
she earned her B.A. in humanities and
religious studies.
Our beloved, Sanford Lebow, passed
away on January 2, 2019 at the age
of 97 in Westlake Village, California.
He is survived by his children Brian
(Patty), Carol and Steven, and his
grandchildren Jeffrey (Jennifer), Ben
(Alejandra), Michael and Matthew.
He was preceded in death by his wife
Shirley, his son Allan, his brothers
Jerome and Robert, and his parents
Joseph and Anna.
He was a graduate of the University
of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana in
Ceramic Engineering. He was an
Engineering Officer in the Navy aboard
an LST in the Pacific during World War
II as part of the Greatest Generation
and received a Bronze Star. He did
concentrated study at the US Naval
Academy at Annapolis in Marine and
Mechanical Engineering and at Penn
State University in Diesel Engineering
before going overseas for three and
one-half years.
Services will be held at 10 a.m on
Sunday, January 6th, at the Pierce
Brothers Valley Oaks Memorial Park in
Westlake Village, California 91362.
In lieu of flowers if you would like to
make a donation in honor of Sanford
Lebow, Please send to:
Attn. Michelle Maer
Jewish Child & Family Services
3145 W. Pratt
Chicago, IL 60645
Shirley (née Linder) was born
in Los Angeles and grew up in the
Miracle Mile area, attending Fairfax
High School. She follows her beloved
Kenneth in death exactly 2 months
from the day he died. They had
recently celebrated their 70th wedding
anniversary surrounded by their
family.
Shirley was a devoted wife and
mother and always encouraged us
to continue learning and use our
imagination. She had a passion for her
work in real estate and was a successful
broker for many years on the Westside.
She had a wonderful sense of humor,
loved to dance, and enjoyed spending
time by the ocean. She was a gourmet
cook but was known to never pass up a
juicy cheeseburger.
She is survived by her son Edward
(Sam) and daughters Lynn and Julie
(Kerry) and will forever be missed.
Sister Una entered the Sisters of
Social Service in 1982 and made her
final profession in 1992. Her ministries
were always dedicated to young people
whom she mentored for the sake of
personal development and maturity
in their search for God. Her ministries
included Regis House Community
Center, pastoral youth ministry at
St. Finbar Parish, Camp Mariastella,
Camp Oliver, Providence High School,
Immaculate Conception/Annunciation
in Arcadia and St. Genevieve
Parish in Panorama City. In each
of these places, her thoughts and
activities concerned the formation of
the youth for their and our future.
Her unique Irish sense of humor
coupled with her mischievous desire
to make others laugh caused all who
knew her to remember this delightful
though surprising part of her nature.
Often, one could not tell from moment
to moment what might be suggested
by Sr. Una – whether it was a joke, a
new idea for work or play or some
other singular project. No one who
knew Sr. Una will ever forget her
personality and her ability to fully live
life.
Sister Una is survived by her sister
Annmarie Peterson (Richard), brothers
Michael Feeney and Patrick Feeney
(Ilah) as well as nieces Sarah Mercado
(Daniel), Brenda Peterson, Maureen
Feeney, Erin Bartolic (Ethan), Morgan
Feeney and Hannah Feeney. Sr. Una’s
family is blessed with great-nieces
Maeve and Talullah Bartolic and greatnephew Sebastian Mercado.
KAUFMAN, Lois K.
June 2, 1936 - November 22, 2018
Beloved wife of Richard, mother of
Jeff and King (Jane), grandmother of
Cal Buster and Daisy Paris-Kaufman.
Memorial service 1/13/2019 2:00
PM, Temple Beth Ohr, La Mirada
KOLOD, Leonard
July 18, 1933 - December 24, 2018
Born to Ruby and Esther Kolod on
July 18, 1933 in Cleveland, Ohio. The
eldest of four children, preceded in
death by brother Daniel and sister
Elaine.
At age 17, Leonard left Cleveland,
where he graduated from Cleveland
Heights High School. He went on to
earn undergraduate and graduate
degrees from UCLA including a juris
doctorate from school of law. It was
in 1953 when he met his soulmate,
Bobbie who was his wife for 65 years.
Len worked as a real estate attorney
in Beverly Hills for 22 years. Thereafter,
he developed and managed his real
estate. Leonard had an avid interest in
everything, especially history, classical
music and motorcycles.
Leonard is survived by his wife
Bobbie, his sister Annette, three
daughters, Judy, Diane and Nancy and
three grandchildren, Brandon, Jake
and Olivia and numerous nieces and
nephews.
A funeral service will be held Friday,
January 11th at 1:00 pm at Hillside
Memorial Park, 6001 W. Centinela
Avenue, Los Angeles.
Len requested casual dress.
In lieu of flowers, memorials may be
made to the Anti-Defamation League.
Services for Sister Una will be held at
Holy Spirit Retreat Center in Encino. An
evening vigil will be held on Thursday,
January 10 at 7:30 p.m. Mass of the
Resurrection will be on Friday, January
11 at 10 a.m. Burial will be at Calvary
Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donations
may be made in Sister Una’s memory to
the Sisters of Social Service, 4316 Lanai
Rd., Encino, CA 91436.
FOGELMAN, Louise Eleanor
November 11, 1929 - December 29, 2018
Louise Eleanor Fogelman (Kleinrock),
89, born in New York, Nov. 11, 1929,
passed away Dec. 29, 2018. She was
preceded in death by her beloved
husband of 67 years, Edward. Her
brother, Robert Kleinrock, predeceased
her as well. She is survived by her
deeply loved children, Mitchell
(Janice), Nancie, Jeffrey (Deborah) and
adored grandson, Dalton. She is also
survived by a niece, great-nieces and
nephews and great-great-nieces and
nephews.
Louise had a wonderful ability to
make anyone feel at ease and to touch
their lives in a positive manner. She
was a genuine and truly caring soul
who was interested in everything
and everyone and if you were lucky
enough to know her, she made you
feel special. Her untiring volunteer
hours included working many years as
a receptionist for the VA office and over
25 years managing the W.V. Jewish
Community Center gift shop. She was
a huge supporter of the City of Hope.
She was a friend, adviser and mother
to countless individuals. She will be
missed; our angel on Earth.
Private services were held January 2
at Mount Sinai.
Donations to your favorite charity
would please her.
FOX, Cary Allan
Mount Sinai Memorial Parks Simi Valley 800-600-0076
www.mountsinaiparks.org
GOTTLIEB, Mary Elizabeth
“Liz”
August 20, 1924 - December 6, 2018
Liz passed away at 94 surrounded by
her family and caregivers. Born to Rev.
John and Mrs Pearl Stephen Gabriel’s,
Liz spent her childhood Pacific
Palisades and her adolescence in San
Diego where she graduated from high
school. In 1943 she married Leonard
Gottlieb with whom she had three
children. They raised the children in
Mar Vista.
Liz was an active member of St Johns
Presbyterian church where she served
as a Ruling Elder and sang for many
years in the church choir.
She also spent much of her life
providing volunteer services to
numerous social, community and
mental health agencies
Liz was predeceased by her husband
Leonard and son Robert. She is survived
by her children Tom (Sonam) and
Mary Lou “Marielle”; grandchildren
Michelle Gottlieb(Nicolas Zumbiehl)
and David Gott (Masha Livhits);
great-grandchildren Julianne and
Jonah Zumbiehl, and Johanna and
Emilia Gott. She is also survived by
daughter- in-law Non Ju Gottlieb
and step grandchildren Tsewang and
Thupten Namgyal, Chimmy KC and
Vadim Kulikov, their spouses and
children.
A memorial service is planned for
January 12 at 3:00 pm at St Johns
Presbyterian Church 11000 National
Blvd. Los Angeles. In lieu of flowers
please make donations in her memory
to Covenant House or Venice High
SchoolAlumni
“Leonard Gottlieb
Scholarship”
KRIBS, Robert Joseph
April 5, 1933 - December 14, 2018
Robert (Bob) was born in Los
Angeles to Lewis and Minerva Kribs.
He attended Loyola High School and
graduated from Loyola University in
Los Angeles in 1954. He served three
years as an Air Force officer, retiring
as a Captain in 1957. The following
year he met the love of his life, Patricia
Poucher, and they were married on
June 27, 1959.
Four children, Gretchen, Michele,
Ken and Mary Catherine, followed
and marked the beginning of a series
of exciting adventures. The girls at
Marlborough, Ken at Curtis and Dunn
Schools. Backpacking and climbing
Mt. Whitney (14,495 ft.). The whole
family in Europe for six weeks one year,
around the world starting in Japan
for six weeks another year. Travel to
Tahiti, Bora Bora and the neighboring
islands, the Caribbean islands and an
East African safari. No one flunked
Geography. Bob was truly blessed with
a family that loved to play together
and it was always the most important
thing in his life.
Bob’s insurance career intensified
when a friend opened a door for him
into off-shore business in the South
Pacific. Over the next 27 years he
and Pat explored a number of the
Fijian, Tongan, Samoan and French
Polynesian Islands while actually
getting some business done along
the way. Bob was eternally grateful to
his friend for enabling these amazing
experiences. The business succeeded
and was sold to a New Zealand
company in 1998. All the while Bob
remained very much involved with
his domestic insurance business,
Oxford Insurance Management, in Los
Angeles. He also served as President
of the Insurance Agents and Brokers
Association of Los Angeles and as a
Director of the California Insurance
Brokers Association.
In 1986 Bob and Pat fell in love
with cruising, sailing on 18 cruises to
various parts of the world including
the Nile and Rhine rivers. Still they
always believed there is no place like
home where they could enjoy being
with their many friends at the Los
Angeles Country Club and the Bel Air
Bay Club.
Bob died at home, surrounded by
family and is survived by his wife
Patricia, daughters Gretchen (Ted)
Bienkowski, Michele Kribs and Mary
Catherine (Karl) Loureiro, grandsons
Keenan and Patrick Kribs and sister
Charlotte (Ed) Pidgeon.
A memorial service will be held on
January 12, 2019 at 11:00 am at Good
Shepherd Church in Beverly Hills. In
lieu of flowers donations may be made
to the St. Vincent De Paul Society at
Good Shepherd Church.
To place
an obituary ad
please go online to:
latimes.com/placeobituary
or call
1-800-234-4444
LOOKNER, Bella (Bangie)
February 10, 1925 - December 3, 2018
Bella (Bangie) Lookner was born
in Boston 93 years ago; one of the
youngest of 11 children. Never
married, she was a wonderful aunt
and was greatly loved by 3 generations
of nieces & nephews around the US:
Boston to Los Angeles, where Bella
resided for many years. Auntie Bangie
was the pied piper of the family always
playing with and adored by all the
children. Her LA family: Alan Eskot;
Barbara Cohen-Wolfe [Larry]; Julie
Payab [David] and Skylar; Rob Cohen
[Christine]; Penny Ritter [Jamie] all
treasured her and will always miss
beloved Auntie Bangie.
Bella said she was honored to be an
aunt and she was so thankful for her
family and the wonderful relationships
she had with them. She was loved by
all.
A reception to be: January 13th.
For more info. please contact a family
member.
MADDOCKS, Helen B.
placeanad.latimes.com/obituaries
In partnership with
Sherry Lee Tabaczynski (aka Sherry
Lee Jones) born 1950 in Los Angeles,
CA , is in heaven, passed October 25,
2018 in Sacramento, CA. To know
Sherry was a pleasure in life and her
family and friends will keep those
memories forever. Sherry’s blended
family with Allen Tabaczynski
1990-2018 loving her 5 wonderful
children, 10 Grandchildren and 2 Great
Grandchildren and friends the most
in life. Sherry is the love of my life...
ADLTF...Your loving husband...Allen
TORIGOE, Harry Satoru
September 20, 1945 - December 25, 2018
Robert J. (Bob) Ryan, 73, passed
away peacefully from diabetes on
Christmas Day at his home in Santa
Monica. He was born in Los Angeles to
Bob Sr. and Katherine Ryan. Bob was
an Occupational Therapist in several
locations in Los Angeles County, and
had friends everywhere he worked.
He is survived by his siblings and
their spouses Tim & Kayo Ryan, Greg
& Pauline Ryan, Kitty Ryan, and Jeff
& Lynelle Ryan, nephews and nieces
and their spouses and children Sean
& Myriam and Kennedy Ryan, Drew
& Lisa Ryan, Josh Ryan and Kristin
Brubaker, Kiki & Tim and Dahl Burger,
Kate Ryan, and Jason Ryan, as well as
former wife Pamela, Aunt Pat Ryan,
and many cousins.
Services will be held at a later
date. The family wants to thank the
residents and staff at Silvercrest
Apartments for their many kindnesses
to our brother. He was a kind and
gentle man who endeared himself to
his neighbors and loved his cats. In lieu
of flowers, please consider a donation
to an animal rescue organization or the
Salvation Army.
SAVAGE, JR., William T.
September 27, 1922 - December 28, 2018
William T. Savage, Jr., passed
peacefully in the company of his
children William T. Savage III and
Nancy Savage. Born in Ripley, TN,
Bill graduated from the University
of Arizona (where he was a proud
Phi Gamma Delta), served in the U.S.
Army, and after the war moved to Los
Angeles. There he met and married
in 1947 Evelyn Straub; their loving
marriage lasted until her passing in
2011.
Bill was a devoted and beloved
husband, father, and grandfather. Even
when working as a business executive,
family was always first. As a member of
the Navy League, he mentored Naval
Sea Cadets. A Mason for more than six
decades, he joined lodges everywhere
he lived. His ability to fix anything and
willingness to help out made him a
popular neighbor and friend.
In addition to his children, he is
survived by granddaughters Claire
Kiechel and Charlotte Kiechel.
A celebration of his life will be held
at a future date.
Torigoe, Harry Satoru (88) passed
away peacefully on December 8, 2018.
He was preceded in death by his
wife, Katherine Yoshie Torigoe and
he is survived by his loving family;
children, Lynn (Thomas) McInally of
UT, Lisa (Jan) Gilbertson and Lance
(Vita) Torigoe; grandchildren, Keiko
and Sean McInally of UT, Cole and
Cade Gilbertson, Matthew Suh and
Royce Torigoe; sisters-in-law, Hatsuko
Torigoe and Nancy Torigoe of HI; also
survived by many nieces, nephews and
other relatives.
Funeral service will be held on
Saturday, January 19, 4:00 pm at Los
Angeles Hompa Hongwanji Buddhist
Temple, 815 E. First St., Los Angeles.
In lieu of flowers, the family requests
donations be made in memory of
Harry to the Gary Sinise Foundation at
garysinisefoundation.org
www.fukuimortuary.com
(213) 626-0441
WOLK, Abe “Bob”
December 4, 1929 - December 21, 2018
Abe (Bob) Wolk, 89, passed away
in Indio, CA, on Dec. 21, 2018. He
was born in Gonzales, Texas, on Dec.
4, 1929. He celebrated 61 years of
marriage to wife, Reva. He leaves 3
grandsons, James, Matthew and Cory,
and 2 children, Mitchell (Gail) and
Marci (Bruce). Services were held
Sunday, December 23, 2018 at Forest
Lawn, Cathedral City, CA.
Cemetery Lots/Crypts
Two Cemetery Lots available, side by
side, located in Forest Lawn, Glendale.
For more info, please contact me by
email at: mgfcontact@gorge.net
WANTED: Graves at Rose Hills, Forest
Lawn & other cemeteries Buy-List-Sell
800-256-7111 Broker
To place an obituary ad
please go online to:
latimes.com/placeobituary
or call
1-800-234-4444
October 7, 1924 - November 16, 2018
Born Helen Louise Beauchamp
in Glendale, CA, to Dr. Curtis & Eva
Beauchamp, she was the fourth
of five children. Living most of her
life in Eagle Rock, and known by
the nicknames Beby, Honey Lou, or
Boppers, she died of natural causes
after a long and fulfilling life. Married
for forty-nine years to Roger S.
Maddocks, until his passing in 1998,
she is survived by her two devoted
sons: Thomas and John Maddocks, and
their wives; seven grandchildren; and
one great-grandchild.
As a classically trained coloratura
soprano, Helen enjoyed using her
musical talent as a choir participant
and soloist at Lake Avenue
Congregational Church in Pasadena.
Her passing marks the end of a
generation and she will be deeply
missed by all who knew her.
A private family memorial will be
held in January.
MAYS , Janet Alice
December 20, 1932 - December 27, 2018
Jan was born in Hollywood
Hospital, Los Angeles, CA. She passed
onto Heaven peacefully at home in
Northridge, CA.
Jan graduated from Beverly Hills
High in 1950, where she met and later
married the love of her life, Bob Mays
on December 22, 1952. They moved to
the San Fernando Valley in 1956, after
Bob’s service in the Air Force, and the
birth of her first two of three children.
She was an unbelievable wife &
mother, homemaker, real estate agent,
and investor. She loved her family,
country western dancing, gardening,
Newport Beach, CA. and especially
walking and caring for her dogs.
She is survived by her beloved
husband of 66 years, Robert E.
Mays; children: Robert M. (Lynn)
Mays, William (Christine) Mays, Lori
(Aaron) Nazar; 5 grandchildren: Amy
Aras, Nicki Olague, Haley Weinrich,
Jana Lance and Sean Nazar; 7 great
grandchildren and one great, great
granddaughter.
Don’t let the story go untold.
Share your loved one’s story.
RYAN, Robert J.
TABACZYNSKI, Sherry Lee
Robert Wesley Jensen
1929 - 2018
Robert W. Jensen died at his home in West
Hollywood on Friday, Sept. 21. He was 89. His long
interest in all the arts and ability to paint the beauty
that surrounded him produced not only individual
paintings and limited edition prints for private
and public collectors around the world, but also
reproductions of many of his works as illustrations
in books, ranging in subject matter from his irst visit
to mainland China to another on youthful athletics
and still another on USC’s Trojan Marching Band.
He also achieved success early in his career in
show business—recordings, television, stage, and
movies--under the stage name Jerry Madison.
Born on a ranch in Central California, Robert
grew up in Carmel surrounded by a loving mother,
brother, aunt, and cousin with only the cousin,
Renée M. Bronson, a concert pianist and piano
instructor, surviving there. In Los Angeles, he is
survived by his companion of sixty years, who was
also his best friend as well as his business partner,
and eventual husband, Keith H. Walker.
A detailed biography and obituary is available
on his web site at RobertWJensen.com, where a
hard cover book on his life is also made available.
His parting words in the book are: “Surrounding
yourself with the beauty that is all around you is
not a luxury, but a necessity. Ignoring beauty is
unforgivable. Seeing, collecting, and recording it
is a valued life achievement.” His always cheerful
outlook was a comfort to all who knew him. He is
already missed and will be forever, but he will live
on in our memories. His ashes were buried at sea
as was his wish.
Share a memory
To sign a guest book please go to
latimes.com/guestbooks
B10
S
SU N DAY , JA N UA RY 6 , 2 019
L AT I M E S . C O M
Today in North America
Morning rain: The storm system that brought rain and mountain snow to the region Saturday is moving
to the east today. Rain will linger early this morning before drier air arrives this afternoon. Snow above
5,000 feet will also come to an end this morning. Another system arriving tonight will bring additional
rain, especially from northern Orange County northward.
Unsettled: Another storm system moving into the Pacific Northwest
will bring areas of heavy rain and mountain snow for the West.
Snow and ice will develop in the northern Plains. Snow showers are
forecast for the interior Northeast region.
5-day forecasts
Pressure:
L
Low
H
High
◗
Today in Southern California
▲
Warm Front
Cold Front
Jet Stream
Trough
High/low temperatures are average forecasts for entire zone.
Today
L.A. Basin
60/51
Valleys
57/48
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Mostly cloudy
Showery
Some sun
Light rain
Sunny
Mostly cloudy
Showery
Some sun
Light rain
Mostly sunny
61/51
68/51
66/50
66/51
Los Angeles Basin:
Lingering showers early,
then mostly cloudy. Mostly
cloudy tonight with
occasional rain.
Valleys/canyons: Isolated
showers early, then some
sun. Mostly cloudy tonight
with light rain, mainly late.
Orange County: Cloudy
Air quality
Beaches
60/53
Mostly cloudy
Showery
Some sun
Light rain
Mostly sunny
59/48
67/47
64/46
66/47
Moderate
Deserts
64/44
Snow
Milder
Partly sunny
Rain
Partly sunny
Clearing
Partly sunny
Partly sunny
Light rain
Partly sunny
this afternoon. Partly
cloudy tonight.
Local mountains: Rain and
high-elevation snow ending
early, then partly sunny.
Light rain tonight.
High desert: Isolated
showers early, then partly
sunny. Some clouds
tonight.
with scattered showers
early, then partial afternoon
sun. Rain in the northern
part of the county tonight.
Ventura/Santa Barbara:
Light rain early, then mostly
cloudy. Mostly cloudy
tonight with rain at times.
San Diego County: Light
rain early, then partly sunny
Good
61/51
67/51
64/49
65/51
Unhealthful for:
Temps
Mountains
38/23
Sensitive people
48/25
50/24
47/23
47/24
–0
0s 10s 20s 30s 40s 50s 60s 70s 80s 90s 100+
Anchorage
4/-3
68/48
71/47
72/49
73/46
Low desert: Isolated
showers early, then partly
sunny. Patchy clouds
tonight.
San Francisco Bay Area:
Windy and wet. Rain will
turn heavy this afternoon
and begin to taper off later
tonight.
All
Rain T-storm Snow Ice
Seattle
47/37
New York
47/24
Las Vegas
55/44
Los Angeles
60/51
Chicago
40/35
Denver
55/29
Not Available
Miami
77/65
South Coast Air Quality Management District forecasts air quality
SANTA
BARBARA CO.
Santa Clarita
56/48
VENTURA CO.
Santa Paula
LOS ANGELES CO.
57/48
Simi Valley
Chatsworth
SAN BERNARDINO CO.
Burbank Monrovia
57/46
57/49
Camarillo
Ventura
58/49
52/45
62/52
60/52
Yucca Valley
Pomona/
UCLA
52/38
Oxnard
San Bernardino
LA Downtown Fairplex
Westlake
Ontario
60/52
61/53
58/46
Woodland
56/45
60/51
Village
58/47
Hills
Whittier
Santa Barbara Co.
56/44
Chino
58/48
Height
Period
Direction
Santa Monica Hills
Riverside
60/46
RIVERSIDE CO.
Fullerton
60/50
3-6’
13 sec WNW
60/53
56/39
62/51
Torrance
Santa Ana
Ventura Co.
61/49
ORANGE CO.
Palm
Hemet
Long
Height
Period
Direction
61/54
Springs
55/37
Irvine
Beach Newport
6-9’
13 sec WNW
60/51
64/44
62/52 Beach
Mission Viejo
Los Angeles Co.
60/52
Temecula
Height
Period
Direction
59/49
Laguna
56/39
5-8’
13 sec WNW
Beach
San
59/50
Clemente
Orange Co.
Surf and sea
58/48
SAN DIEGO CO.
Height
Period
Direction
POINT CONCEPTION TO MEXICO
Oceanside
4-7’
13 sec W
Inner waters: Winds west-northwest at
60/41
10-15 knots. Wind waves 3-10 feet with
San Diego Co.
west swells of 4-6 feet.
Ramona
Escondido
Height
Period
Direction
56/38
59/42
Surf zone: The potential for strong rip
4-7’
13 sec WNW
currents is high at all Southland
Poway
beaches today. High-surf advisories
61/46
remain in effect through early Monday
Ojai
56/46
Santa
Barbara
60/50
Tides
morning.
Station
Morro Bay
Santa Barbara
Ventura
Zuma Beach
Marina del Rey
Hermosa Beach
Cabrillo Beach
Hunt’n. Beach
Newport Beach
Dana Point
San Clemente
Oceanside
Solana Beach
Mission Beach
Avalon
UV index
L.A. Outer Harbor, in feet.
Time
4p
4p
4p
4p
4p
4p
4p
4p
4p
4p
4p
4p
4p
4p
4p
Wind
S6
WSW4
WSW4
WSW4
SSW4
WNW4
WNW4
WNW4
WNW4
W4
W4
WSW3
W4
WNW4
WNW4
Waves
4/12
2/13
2/13
2/13
3/13
3/13
3/13
3/13
3/13
3/13
1/13
1/13
1/13
1/13
3/13
Temp
56/56
60/57
59/57
60/58
60/58
60/58
60/58
61/60
61/58
61/56
61/56
61/58
60/59
60/60
60/56
Wind speed in knots; wave heights in feet/intervals in seconds;
temperatures for sea/air
Today 8:41a
10:30p
Mon. 9:12a
11:04p
6.0 Hi
3.8 Hi
5.8 Hi
3.7 Hi
2:28a
3:57p
3:01a
4:30p
2.2 Lo
-0.7 Lo
2.3 Lo
-0.5 Lo
Minutes to burn for
sensitive people
Las Vegas, 60
Los Angeles, 60
Phoenix, 60
San Francisco, 60
San Diego
63/50
Almanac
Saturday downtown readings
Temperature
Los Angeles Fullerton
Ventura
High/low
58/48
59/48
56/48
High/low a year ago
73/54
75/52
67/56
Normal high/low for date 68/48
68/44
66/44
Record high/date
85/1902 86/2012 83/2015
Record low/date
31/1949 37/2009 33/1973
Precipitation
24-hour total (as of 4 p.m.) 0.15
Trace
0.02
Season total (since Oct. 1)
4.41
3.96
3.06
Last season (Oct. 1 to date) 0.12
0.08
0.06
Season norm (Oct. 1 to date) 4.55
4.48
5.23
Humidity (high/low)
92/46
74/48
79/44
Sun and moon
Today’s rise/set
First Quarter
Jan. 13
Los Angeles County
Sun 6:59a/4:59p
Moon 7:27a/5:47p
Full Moon
Jan. 20
Orange County
Sun 6:58a/4:58p
Moon 7:25a/5:46p
Last Quarter
Jan. 27
Ventura County
Sun 7:04a/5:02p
Moon 7:32a/5:50p
New Moon
Feb. 4
California cities
City
Saturday
Today Monday
Hi Lo Prcp. Hi Lo Hi Lo
Anaheim
Avalon/Catalina
Bakersfield
Barstow
Beaumont
Big Bear Lake
Bishop
Burbank
Camarillo
Chatsworth
Chino
Dana Point
Death Valley
Del Mar
Escondido
Eureka
Fallbrook
Fillmore
Fresno
Fullerton
Hemet
Hesperia
Huntington Beach
Idyllwild
Irvine
L.A. D’ntown/USC
L.A. Int’l. Airport
59
60
62
48
53
40
47
55
60
56
56
57
50
60
56
57
57
57
57
59
54
54
59
47
60
58
58
48
48
43
34
43
30
17
45
44
44
43
44
35
50
45
49
47
40
40
48
47
35
46
34
47
48
48
-----.02
-.02
.03
.04
---.01
.02
.09
-.06
.18
Tr
---.04
-.15
Tr
61
51
59
59
51
38
48
58
62
57
60
58
61
62
59
52
58
57
55
62
55
53
62
41
60
60
60
50
48
52
39
38
23
34
49
52
49
46
49
49
49
42
40
43
46
51
51
37
40
52
34
51
51
52
64
55
64
64
58
48
54
60
62
59
65
61
62
65
65
57
64
60
62
64
62
59
62
49
63
61
61
48
51
50
37
43
25
34
48
53
48
46
49
47
50
46
51
43
48
51
49
42
38
50
38
49
51
51
Houston
71/59
Hesperia
53/40
City
Saturday
Today Monday
Hi Lo Prcp. Hi Lo Hi Lo
Laguna Beach
Lancaster
Long Beach
Mammoth Lakes
Mission Viejo
Monrovia
Monterey
Mt. Wilson
Needles
Newport Beach
Northridge
Oakland
Oceanside
Ojai
Ontario
Oxnard
Palm Springs
Pasadena
Paso Robles
Pomona/Fairplex
Poway
Redding
Rialto
Riverside
xx
51
59
32
57
57
57
45
52
60
56
56
59
55
55
57
59
57
55
57
58
43
55
56
xx
28
49
15
45
48
46
33
39
46
43
42
41
37
45
45
45
48
32
45
42
32
48
43
xx
-.03
Tr
--.16
-Tr
-.07
.11
Tr
.01
Tr
.04
--.27
--.59
-Tr
59
53
62
35
59
52
59
44
61
60
57
56
60
56
58
61
64
57
54
58
61
48
55
56
50
43
52
29
49
45
51
33
45
52
48
49
41
46
47
53
44
49
50
46
46
42
45
39
Forecasts provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. ©2019
61
59
63
44
63
57
62
50
62
62
59
59
64
58
62
60
68
60
60
62
66
51
60
60
50
37
50
27
49
48
53
35
46
50
49
54
42
47
47
51
48
50
49
48
48
48
47
45
City
Saturday
Today Monday
Hi Lo Prcp. Hi Lo Hi Lo
Sacramento
San Bernardino
San Clemente Pier
San Diego
San Francisco
San Gabriel
San Jose
San Luis Obispo
Santa Ana
Santa Barbara
Santa Clarita
Santa Monica Pier
Santa Paula
Santa Rosa
Simi Valley
Tahoe Valley
Temecula
Thousand Oaks
Torrance
UCLA
Van Nuys
Ventura
Whittier Hills
Woodland Hills
Wrightwood
Yorba Linda
Yosemite Valley
52
59
58
61
58
xx
56
57
60
58
53
61
55
55
55
45
58
55
57
58
58
56
57
56
44
58
47
34
41
52
51
49
xx
45
42
49
40
41
51
40
37
46
27
41
46
48
50
45
48
44
41
35
47
29
.12
--Tr
.11
xx
.05
.58
-.73
.01
-.06
.41
.01
.03
-.04
-.10
.06
.02
.02
.17
.01
---
52
56
58
63
55
59
56
58
61
60
56
60
57
53
57
34
56
58
61
60
59
60
60
58
41
59
39
48
45
48
50
51
48
51
53
54
50
48
53
48
43
46
32
39
43
49
52
51
52
50
48
34
49
37
59
61
62
65
59
62
63
61
64
61
59
61
60
58
61
43
62
62
62
61
61
60
62
59
50
62
47
53
47
49
51
55
50
54
51
52
47
47
51
49
52
47
32
43
47
49
51
51
52
49
49
36
48
38
U.S. cities
High 82 in McAllen, Texas
Low –19 in Waverly, Colo.
City
Saturday
Hi Lo Prcp.
Albuquerque
41 19 -Amarillo
74 27 -Anchorage
8 3 -Atlanta
59 44 -Atlantic City
52 42 .07
Austin
73 30 -Baltimore
50 44 .24
Billings
42 28 -Birmingham
61 39 Tr
Boise
35 23 -Boston
43 39 .46
Brownsville
77 43 -Buffalo
36 28 -Burlington, Vt.
38 26 -Casper
45 31 -Charleston, S.C.
63 48 -Charleston, W.Va. 50 40 .30
Charlotte
64 43 -Chicago
52 32 -Cincinnati
52 35 .12
Cleveland
48 28 -Colo. Springs
63 28 -Columbia, S.C.
62 47 -Columbus
51 33 .24
Concord, N.H.
37 26 .03
Dallas/Ft.Worth
70 34 -Denver
60 34 -Des Moines
57 30 -Detroit
50 30 -Duluth
33 24 -El Paso
58 24 -Eugene
44 39 Tr
Fairbanks
-28 -32 -Fargo
32 28 -Flagstaff
46 18 -Grand Junction
27 7 -Grand Rapids
48 25 -Green Bay
47 19 -Hartford
38 35 1.03
Helena
35 17 -Honolulu
82 72 -Houston
72 37 -Indianapolis
54 30 -Jacksonville, Fla. 59 50 -Kansas City
58 31 -Las Vegas
49 37 -Little Rock
62 33 -Louisville
57 37 .03
Medford
54 28 -Memphis
58 37 -Miami
79 71 .01
Milwaukee
56 29 -Minneapolis
47 29 -Nashville
60 36 .01
New Orleans
65 42 -New York
45 43 .50
Oklahoma City
59 28 -Omaha
56 27 -Orlando
70 60 .01
Philadelphia
47 42 .59
Phoenix
67 45 -Pittsburgh
48 34 .36
Portland, Maine
38 26 .10
Portland, Ore.
49 38 Tr
Providence
44 37 1.04
Pueblo
66 18 -Raleigh
61 45 .01
Rapid City
49 30 -Reno
51 23 .01
Richmond
59 47 .05
St. Louis
61 34 -Salt Lake City
32 14 -San Antonio
72 35 -San Juan, P.R.
82 73 .08
Santa Fe
39 13 -Seattle
50 41 --
Today
Hi Lo Sky
43 25
69 35
4 -3
67 46
52 29
71 60
52 26
45 29
64 43
44 29
45 20
79 66
36 20
34 8
43 26
69 45
49 35
68 43
40 35
49 39
39 29
57 29
70 42
43 33
39 10
67 58
55 29
44 40
39 28
28 26
54 37
46 34
-24-32
31 28
34 19
33 24
38 29
33 30
43 17
40 25
85 69
71 59
46 40
69 45
55 47
55 44
62 50
54 47
43 30
62 50
77 65
39 35
35 32
60 47
66 50
47 24
61 47
49 36
72 52
49 26
57 43
40 24
42 12
46 37
46 20
60 28
65 37
44 27
44 37
61 32
56 49
39 33
71 60
85 71
38 21
47 37
R
Cy
Pc
Su
W
Pc
Su
Pc
Pc
Sf
W
Pc
W
Sf
Cy
Su
Cy
Su
Cy
Pc
Cy
Cy
Su
Cy
W
Pc
Cy
Sh
Cy
Pc
R
R
Su
Sn
Sn
Sn
Cy
Cy
W
Pc
Su
Fg
Pc
Su
Cy
Cy
Pc
Pc
R
Pc
Su
Cy
Pc
Pc
Su
W
Pc
Cy
Su
W
R
Pc
Pc
R
W
Cy
Su
Cy
Cy
Su
Pc
Sn
Pc
Sh
Cy
R
Taken at 3 p.m. Saturday
Spokane
Springfield, Mo.
Tallahassee
Tampa
Tucson
Tulsa
Washington, D.C.
Wichita
Yuma
40
64
61
68
71
66
54
61
56
33
29
45
64
40
28
46
27
41
------.08
-.06
40
61
70
71
56
61
56
58
64
28
52
42
54
38
54
33
43
43
Cy
Pc
Su
Su
R
Pc
Su
Cy
Cy
90
46
43
63
82
83
34
46
86
84
63
25
81
44
46
43
46
37
82
93
70
40
55
80
42
84
43
54
90
91
74
36
23
88
72
40
43
88
50
32
35
90
72
54
56
37
46
37
21
36
74
43
36
40
74
78
15
39
61
63
48
16
70
41
37
40
37
26
70
77
67
37
40
58
12
72
36
25
77
73
46
32
17
70
46
30
36
81
27
21
31
74
64
34
37
28
43
30
20
30
-.75
-.04
.06
--.15
----.20
--.02
.62
.05
.02
--.30
-.05
----.01
--.02
.33
-.08
--.07
---.84
.25
---Tr
.45
-.26
85
45
47
65
91
84
37
37
85
80
58
40
81
41
50
47
45
40
77
93
67
41
48
83
43
87
46
57
86
88
74
32
18
87
64
33
40
92
56
36
37
73
67
52
45
33
46
35
23
36
74
40
38
42
77
77
15
33
70
68
45
20
66
38
45
42
37
32
64
74
63
34
37
59
16
73
41
26
74
66
47
3
7
68
45
29
36
79
33
19
31
69
63
40
37
16
36
26
22
31
Pc
Sh
Pc
Pc
Pc
Su
Su
Cy
Ts
R
Su
Cy
Pc
Cy
Cy
Cy
Sh
Cy
Pc
Su
Cy
Pc
W
Pc
Su
Pc
Cy
Su
Su
Pc
Pc
W
Cy
Su
R
Pc
Sh
Pc
Su
Pc
Cy
R
R
Sh
Cy
Cy
R
Sf
Pc
Sn
World
Acapulco
Amsterdam
Athens
Baghdad
Bangkok
Barbados
Beijing
Berlin
Buenos Aires
Cabo San Lucas
Cairo
Calgary
Cancun
Copenhagen
Dublin
Edinburgh
Frankfurt
Geneva
Havana
Ho Chi Minh City
Hong Kong
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kabul
Kingston
London
Madrid
Manila
Mecca
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Mumbai
New Delhi
Oslo
Paris
Rio de Janeiro
Rome
Seoul
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei City
Tehran
Tokyo
Toronto
Vancouver
Vienna
Winnipeg
Zurich
Key: Su sunny; Pc partly cloudy; Cy cloudy; Fg
foggy; Prcp precipitation; Dr drizzle; Hz;hazy
Sh showers; Ts thunderstorms; R rain; Sn snow;
Sf snow flurries; I ice; Rs rain/snow; W windy;
Tr trace. Notes: National extremes are for NWS
stations; excludes Alaska and Hawaii.
Missing data indicated by “xx”.
P EGI YOUNG
Musician created Bridge School with Neil Young
By Randy Lewis
S
inger,
songwriter
and activist Pegi
Young,
who
cofounded the Bridge
School in Northern
California for severely disabled students and their families with her ex-husband,
rock musician Neil Young,
and went on to help create
the annual fundraising concerts that became one of pop
music’s most respected benefit shows, died Tuesday after a yearlong fight with cancer. She was 66.
Her death was announced Wednesday on her
official Facebook page.
For most of the couple’s
36-year
marriage,
Pegi
Young devoted much of her
time and energy to raising
their two children, Ben and
Amber Jean. After Ben was
diagnosed with severe cerebral palsy, she could not
find a school that could provide the kind of services they
wanted for their son, which
led her to co-found the
Bridge School.
To help fund and sustain
it, Neil Young headlined annual Bridge School benefit
shows that attracted a who’s
who of rock, pop, country,
folk, R&B and hip-hop artists year in and year out.
In recent years, however,
Young, who had sometimes
sung backup for her husband, began devoting more
attention to her own musical
endeavors. In 2007, at age 55,
Tony Avelar Associated Press
MUSICIAN AND ACTIVIST
Neil and Pegi Young perform at a 2010 benefit concert for the Bridge School, the
Northern California organization they created for children with disabilities.
she released her debut album, “Pegi Young.”
Her fifth album, “Raw,”
was issued in 2017, and it
largely tracked the brutal
emotions she experienced
with the breakup of her marriage after Neil Young filed
for divorce in 2014. He had
telegraphed their troubled
relationship on his 2010 album, “Le Noise,” in the song
“Love and War”: “The saddest thing in the whole wide
world is to break the heart of
your lover / I made a mistake
and I did it again and we
struggle to recover.”
He started a new relationship with actress and activist Daryl Hannah, whom
he married last year. Pegi
Young kept the Northern
California ranch they’d
shared since the late 1970s,
and Neil Young moved back
to Southern California. After
their split, the Bridge School
benefit concerts went on hiatus.
“At the time I wrote
[‘Raw’], my life had been
turned upside down,” she
told The Times when the album was released. “I didn’t
want to mince words….
‘Rollercoaster’ would be the
operative word.
“In the immediate aftermath of the separation I just
wrote and wrote and wrote,”
Young said. “And wrote and
wrote and wrote. Thank God
I had that as an outlet.”
Other song titles carried
the theme through: “A
Thousand Tears,” “Trying
to Live My Life Without You”
and ”Too Little, Too Late.”
She teamed with some of
Neil Young’s longtime collaborators, including steel
guitarist Ben Keith, who
died in 2010, and bassist Rick
Rosas, who died in 2014.
During an L.A. show she
played a few months after
the divorce filing, Young told
an audience at the Mint,
“What do you do when you
get dumped after 36 years?
You just start over.”
In fact, with other players
including Muscle Shoals,
Ala., keyboardist Spooner
Oldham, Young named her
band the Survivors and continued recording and touring periodically.
Although she was not a
formally schooled singer or
instrumentalist,
Young
prized authentic emotion in
her music.
“Be authentic, be true,
sing what’s in your heart,”
she said after “Raw” was released. “It’s not about making it perfect, it’s about letting it be real, sometimes
raw and flawed, as long as it’s
true.”
The split was an unexpected turn of events for the
California native, who met
Neil Young in the mid 1970s
and became his second wife,
after his first marriage to actress Carrie Snodgress
ended in divorce after four
years in 1975.
“One woman captivated
Neil Young like no other,” biographer Jimmy McDonough wrote.
“Pegi is the inspiration
for some of Young’s most intense ballads,” McDonough
wrote, citing “Such a Woman,” “Once an Angel” and
“Unknown Legend,” “which
is perhaps the most empa-
thetic portrait of a woman
he’s ever created.”
Neil Young lauded her to
McDonough during their interviews for the book, saying, “I got a great wife. She’s
just a beautiful, beautiful
woman.”
In a post on its website,
the Bridge School praised
Young for her vision and
dedication.
“The Bridge School family is saddened by the loss of
our friend and co-founder,
Pegi Young. Her vision has
changed the lives of children
worldwide and we will do our
best to continue her mission.
Please keep us and her family in your thoughts and
prayers as we keep the
dream alive.”
Young is survived by her
two children and a grandson, Ronan. Her daughter,
Amber Jean, periodically
shared photos of her son
with her mother and father
on her Instagram page.
randy.lewis@latimes.com
War Casualties
TOTAL U.S. DEATHS*
In and around Iraq: 4,565
Afghanistan: 2,283
Other locations: 131
* Includes military and
Department of Defenseemployed civilian personnel
killed in action and in
nonhostile circumstances as
of Friday.
Source: Department of Defense
C
BuSINESS
S U N D A Y , J A N U A R Y 6 , 2 0 1 9 :: L A T I M E S . C O M / B U S I N E S S
Court
victory
could
lead to
big loss
MICHAEL HILTZIK
Gary Coronado Los Angeles Times
C1 in Marina del Rey offers a new way of living by primarily catering to young professionals who seek luxury digs but not high rents.
Just don’t call this a dorm
‘Co-living’ units give millennials a posh housing alternative with maid
service, ‘curated’ furnishings, and communal bathrooms and kitchens
By Roger Vincent
The first step into a posh new
apartment building near Marina
del Rey feels like a mistake.
There’s no lobby — instead the
door opens to a lounge and
kitchen.
The idea is to encourage mingling, which is part of the appeal of
a building where tenants have
their own bedrooms but share
common areas with people they
don’t know.
But this is not your typical L.A.
roommate situation. The bedrooms are spacious, the living
rooms are furnished — and the
residents are often selected by the
landlord.
Welcome to “co-living” in a
time of sky-high rents.
The shared economy has
transformed how we get around,
how we travel, who sits next to us
at the office and, now, with whom
we share our private spaces.
Real estate developers like California Landmark Group, which
owns apartment building C1, are
pioneering a new way of living by
primarily catering to young professionals and creative types who
enjoy luxury digs but can’t swing
the rent in desirable neighborhoods such as the Marina.
And while stretching out on a
sofa with a stranger may strike
many as unusual, it is not much of
a leap to people already comfortable with Uber and Airbnb, said
Ken Kahan, founder of the Los Angeles-based development company.
“People get in other people’s
cars and sleep in other people’s
bed’s,” he said. “This is a natural
Photographs by
Myung J. Chun Los Angeles Times
A LIVING ROOM in a Node bungalow in Echo Park. Not all of
the units, which start at $2,850, are co-living.
THE KITCHEN of a Node bungalow. Each of the Echo Park
units looks as if it was tricked out for a lifestyle magazine shoot.
expansion of the housing market
in the shared economy.”
Co-living has the benefit of offering renters in search of social
connection the chance to bond
with new acquaintances in similar
situations, but its fundamental
appeal may be economic.
Individual tenants at C1 pay at
least $2,000 a month in the nearly
$40-million building, which just
opened. But that’s still cheaper
than comparative singles in the
neighborhood and $600 less than
conventional studios also available for rent in the complex.
Typically, a co-living renter has
a private bedroom and can spring
for a private bathroom, but shares
the kitchen, living room and other
communal spaces. Units are furnished — sometimes at an Instagram-worthy level — and the rent
usually includes services that aren’t covered in other apartments,
such as utilities and Wi-Fi.
C1 even offers Netflix and maid
services to head off squabbles over
whose turn it is to vacuum the
floor and scrub the sink.
Co-living complexes have
grown fairly common in European
cities such as Berlin, London and
Dublin, Kahan said, and are now
springing up in New York, Seattle,
San Francisco, Los Angeles and
other American urban areas.
They come in different iterations. Some companies contract
with landlords to refit entire
buildings or carve up individual
units so that a two-bedroom
might fit additional tenants who
squeeze into bunk beds or live in a
partitioned living room.
Developers such as Kahan are
[See ‘Co-living,’ C6]
Fast-food
companies
accused of
nickel-anddiming their
workers
through wage
theft? That’s
become almost a dogbites-man story in today’s
workplace environment.
The same companies forcing the workers to bring
their claims in arbitration
rather than taking them to
court? Ditto.
But here’s a story about
a fast-food company that
appears to have outsmarted
itself in fending off thousands of wage-theft claims.
The company is Newport
Beach-based Chipotle
Mexican Grill, which owns
more than 2,300 restaurants
spanning the U.S.
Chipotle has been fighting claims of wage theft
lodged in federal court by
current and former workers
since July 2013, with the
army of plaintiffs having
grown to about 10,000
strong. Back in August, the
company won a major victory by persuading a federal
judge in Denver to eject
more than 2,800 of those
workers from the court
proceedings because they
had signed an agreement to
bring their claims only via
arbitration.
But was it really a victory? As a result of the
judge’s ruling, Chipotle
could be facing thousands of
individual arbitration cases
across the country, almost
all the expenses of which it
may have to shoulder itself
— potentially tens of thousands of dollars per case.
Already 150 arbitrations
have been filed by workers.
“We didn’t ask for this,”
says Kent Williams, a Minnesota attorney representing hundreds of plaintiffs.
“Chipotle asked for it.”
Now Chipotle is squealing for mercy. In November,
the company pleaded that
the tide of arbitrations
could cause it “irreparable
harm” and asked Judge
John L. Kane of Denver, who
is presiding over the federal
case, to suspend the filings
— and also to disqualify
Williams and other attorneys involved in the lawsuit
from representing any of the
workers in arbitration.
Kane denied both
motions as merely the latest
in a series of maneuvers by
the company to throw sand
in the gears of justice.
“Chipotle’s attempts to
delay and obfuscate the
[See Hiltzik, C5]
Cannabis tours take guests to some unique local joints
Forget homes of stars.
These jaunts visit pot
growers, bong makers.
By Hugo Martin
In Napa and Sonoma,
tour bus operators ferry
oenophiles between tasting
rooms and vineyards. In
Hollywood and environs,
they shepherd the starstruck past the homes of the
rich and famous.
Now they’re giving customers a mind-expanding
look at one of Los Angeles’
burgeoning industries: pot.
Since recreational use of
marijuana became legal a
year ago, a pot tourism business has emerged, taking
visitors behind the scenes of
California’s estimated $7-bil-
lion cannabis industry.
“Every other day it seems
another tour company is
popping up,” said Lauren
Jones, who owns Weedology,
a cannabis tour company
based in Los Angeles. “It’s
like a gold rush.”
Each pot tour company
has its own points of interest, generally including a
grow facility, a bong maker
or accessory retailers and a
marijuana
dispensary,
where visitors can get jointrolling lessons. Expect product discounts but not freebies. And some tours allow
smoking on board, for those
so inclined.
Tours are priced between
$40 and $200 a person, depending on the length of the
trip, the stops and other features.
Starting this month,
L.A.-based Green Tours is
adding an itinerary that includes a pot-smoking session with weed-loving ’70s
movie
legend
Tommy
Chong. That tour is priced at
$149 a person, owner Gene
Grozovskiy said.
Grozovskiy’s
father
thought his son was nuts
when he announced plans to
quit his full-time job as a patient placement coordinator
at a large Los Angeles hospital to start a marijuana tour
company.
“At first Pops was like,
‘You want to do what kind of
tours?’ ” Grozovskiy, 35, recalled. “He thought I was
just being silly.”
Other tour company
owners also come with respectable credentials and
want to hop on what they see
as a profitable future in recreational cannabis.
[See Cannabis, C7]
Myung J. Chun Los Angeles Times
GUESTS Eric Hackett, Rose Sarpong and Katt O’Flaherty snap photos of the
flowering room at California Compassionate Care Network in North Hollywood.
C2
SU N DAY , JA N UA RY 6 , 2 019
S
L AT I M E S . C O M / B U S I N E S S
PERSONAL FINANCE
MONEY TALK
A full-time job
may be best bet
for healthcare
If Obamacare goes
away, coverage could
be harder to get.
By Liz Weston
Dear Liz: I am 25 and work
two part-time jobs, neither
of which offers health insurance. Once I’m 26, I will no
longer be able to remain on
my parents’ policy. Do I
need a full-time job to receive health benefits, or do I
have other options?
Stuart W. Palley For the Washington Post
SAVING ISN’T possible with four kids and mounting healthcare costs, said Sol Smith, chair of liberal arts at a
college of art and design in Orange County. For some households, even brief income lapses could spell disaster.
With ‘no way out,’ many
live paycheck to paycheck
By Danielle Paquette
“Inescapable.”
“It’s a constant stressor.”
“I see no way out.”
What do professors, real
estate agents, farmers, business executives, computer
programmers and store
clerks have in common?
They’re not immune to
the harsh reality of living
paycheck to paycheck, according to dozens of people
who responded to a Washington Post inquiry on Twitter.
They’re millennials, Gen
Xers and baby boomers.
They work in big cities and
rural towns. They’ve tried to
save — but rent, child care,
student loans and medical
bills get in the way.
National data on the paycheck-to-paycheck experience is flimsy, but a recent
report from the Federal Reserve spotlights the prevalence of extra-tight budgets:
4 in 10 adults say they
couldn’t produce $400 in an
emergency without sliding
into debt or selling something, according to the 2017
figures.
The partial government
shutdown, which began Dec.
22 and is temporarily halting
pay for some 800,000 federal
workers, has touched off a
heated discussion on Twitter about what it means to
get by in the U.S. (President
Trump warned this closure
could “last a very long time”
if Congress doesn’t meet his
demands for billions of dol-
lars for a wall on the U.S.Mexico border.)
Even brief income lapses
can spell disaster for some
households.
“My husband is a Park
Ranger in the Great Smoky
Mountains National Park,
and he had to sign his furlough papers,” one woman
tweeted. “We have a 4 yr. old
and a 4-month-old, and we
don’t know when his next
check will come. Mortgage is
due, Christmas 2 days
away.”
These and other #ShutdownStories took off online
after Rep. Scott Perry (RPa.) suggested last week
that a gap in wages wouldn’t
be so bad.
“Who’s living that they’re
not going to make it to the
next paycheck?” he asked
reporters, adding that most
of those affected would qualify for back pay.
According to economists:
A lot of people.
“It’s astronomical what
people need just to make it
month to month,” said Heidi
Shierholz, a former chief
economist at the Department of Labor who now
studies how middle-class
families spend their wages
at the Economic Policy Institute, a Washington think
tank funded by foundations
and unions. “Given the high
cost of transportation, housing, healthcare…. There is
often no wriggle room.”
About 2,000 custodians,
security guards, housekeepers and other federal building workers are losing mon-
ey this holiday season because of the shutdown, according to 32BJ SEIU, an
East Coast labor union —
and because such staffers
are employed by contractors, they won’t be eligible
for makeup checks.
“My supervisor told me
we won’t be getting paid,”
one State Department
cleaner told the Washington
Post, “so my bills won’t be
getting paid.”
Beyond the federal labor
sphere, workers across a variety of professions struggle
to make ends meet.
Sol Smith, chair of liberal
arts at a college of art and
design in Orange County,
said he landed his job after
earning three degrees. But
with four daughters and
mounting healthcare costs,
he said, saving isn’t possible.
“I see no way out,” he
wrote in an email to the Post.
“I am 40, have built a strong
career, have 17 years experience, and if something were
to happen to me, my wife and
kids would be homeless
within a year when my life insurance ran out.”
Lani Harrison, 43, said
she and her software engineer husband have trouble
buying groceries after paying the $2,249 rent on their
two-bedroom Los Angeles
apartment. They’re raising
three young kids and rely on
her husband’s income, she
said. Her work as a certified
car seat installer earns her
$40 per appointment, but
the work isn’t steady.
“Each month, we have to
stretch his paycheck to
make things work,” she said.
“We really don’t have any
savings. Many months we go
under.”
Dillon Holt, a housekeeping assistant at a Nashville
hotel, said he’s down to one
piece of chicken in his freezer. His checking account
often hovers around zero,
and he is unable to put away
any money for the future or
an emergency.
“I make $12.50, work 40 to
50 hours a week,” he said. “I
still don’t have a savings account.”
Emily Webb, 38, said she
works full time as an arts administrator in Columbus,
Ohio, and waits tables on the
side. Staying afloat each
month, she said, is a precarious dance.
“It’s a scramble at the end
of a paycheck to deposit my
tips and make sure none of
my automatic payments
bounce,” said Webb, who has
a master’s degree but cannot make her student loan
payments.
She’s grateful to work in
her field, though, and loves
her job. One big financial
boost, she said, awaits her at
the end of 2019.
“I can finally pay off my 9year-old car,” Webb said.
“The plastic part of the back
bumper was slowly sliding
off the back of it. I got rearended by an uninsured
driver two years ago, so I reattached it with zip ties.”
Paquette writes for the
Washington Post.
Answer: You currently have
other options, but you may
still want to look for a fulltime job that offers this
important benefit.
Although a Texas judge
ruled the Affordable Care
Act unconstitutional, the
law giving people access to
health insurance remains in
effect while legal challenges
play out. You can start your
search for coverage at
www.healthcare.gov. The
open enrollment period for
most people has ended, but
some states including California have extended the
deadline to Jan. 15. In addition, you would qualify for a
“special enrollment” period
once you turn 26 and lose
eligibility for coverage on a
parent’s plan.
If the ACA does go away,
health insurance may become harder to qualify for
and more expensive. Group
health insurance through
an employer may become
your best option.
Options for high
debt, low income
Dear Liz: I’m 87 and drowning in debt, owing more than
$21,000 with an income of
$23,000 from Social Security
and two small pensions. I
don’t like the idea of debt
consolidation but is that
better than bankruptcy? My
only asset is a 2003 car.
Answer: Debt consolidation
merely replaces one type of
debt (say, credit cards) with
another, typically a personal
loan. You are unlikely to
qualify for such a loan and
even if you did, your situation wouldn’t improve much
if at all because your debt is
so large relative to your
income.
You may be confusing
debt consolidation with
debt settlement, which is
where you or someone you
hire tries to settle debts for
less than what you owe.
Debt settlement can take
years and may not result in
much savings, since the
forgiven debt is considered
taxable income and hiring a
debt settlement company
can cost thousands of dollars. In addition, people in
the debt settlement process
risk being sued by creditors.
Bankruptcy is typically a
better option because it
costs less, is completed
more quickly and ends the
threat of lawsuits.
You may not need to file
for bankruptcy, however, if
you’re “judgment proof,”
which means that even if
you stop paying your creditors and they successfully
sue you, the creditors
wouldn’t be able to collect
on those judgments. That’s
typically the case when
someone’s income comes
from protected sources,
such as Social Security and
certain pensions, and they
don’t have any assets a
creditor can seize.
Please consult a bankruptcy attorney. You can get
a referral from the National
Assn. of Consumer Bankruptcy Attorneys at
www.nacba.org.
Get help planning
for retirement
Dear Liz: I am about to
retire and have had to make
some very important decisions: How should I receive
my company pension, when
should we start taking
Social Security, should we
convert some IRAs to
Roths, how to best cover our
healthcare needs and what
the best ways are to manage
our tax bill. I think we are
OK and on track, but I
worry about people who ...
have not studied these
issues trying to make similar decisions.
Answer: You’re quite right
that retirement involves a
number of complex choices,
many of which are irreversible. It’s easy to make
the wrong decisions, even if
you do have a college degree
and think you know what
you’re doing.
Everyone approaching
retirement should realize
that they don’t know what
they don’t know, and if
possible seek out an expert,
objective second opinion on
their retirement plans to
ensure they’re making the
best possible choices.
Liz Weston, certified
financial planner, is a
personal finance columnist
for NerdWallet. Questions
may be sent to her at 3940
Laurel Canyon, No. 238,
Studio City, CA 91604, or by
using the “Contact” form at
asklizweston.com.
Distributed by No More Red
Inc.
Volatility driving investors back to traditional havens
More are parking
funds in government
bonds and gold ‘to
wait for some clarity.’
By Samuel Potter
and Eddie van der Walt
The remarkable thing
about recent yen performance may not be the almost
4% surge against the dollar
Thursday but the fact the
currency had just clocked its
best month in about two
years.
That statistic also applies to gold, whose spot
price jumped 5% in December, the largest gain since
January 2017. Both assets
have continued to climb this
year; as of Friday, gold was
trading at $1,285.40 an
ounce. Meanwhile, bonds of
G-7 governments had their
best December in a decade,
according to a Bank of
America Merrill Lynch index.
Put simply, traditional
havens are back.
The same myriad drivers
bedeviling equity investors
in 2019 are sending them to
safety. While the trade war is
Matthias Schrader Associated Press
IN DECEMBER , gold’s spot price jumped 5%, its largest gain since January 2017.
Meanwhile, bonds of G-7 governments had their best December in a decade.
showing up in real-world
data, it’s cropping up in company earnings too, as evidenced by Apple Inc.’s guidance cut Wednesday. At the
same time, Federal Reserve
tightening is sapping liquidity and in the process reigniting volatility in markets. Idiosyncratic risks from the
likes of Brexit and Italy’s
budget squabble with the
European Union are merely
compounding the mood —
and adding fuel to the haven
trade.
“There are so many worries to investors at the moment — global economic
slowdown, China, U.S. shut-
down, Brexit, political risk,”
Charles St-Arnaud, an investment strategist at Lombard Odier Asset Management in London, said in an
email. “On top of that,
performance has been weak
and volatility has increased
for most asset classes. So it
is understandable that
some investors are going to
safer havens to wait for some
clarity.”
Apple’s gloomy update,
which it blamed on weaker
China demand, was cited by
some as a factor in the yen’s
wild jump.
The currency appears to
have more upside potential
— it’s among the most undervalued in the G-10 against
the dollar, based on the Organization for Economic Cooperation
and
Development’s purchasing power
parity measure. That’s a
contrast with 2011, when the
yen was overvalued by about
30% according to the same
gauge.
Sentiment toward gold
also brightened in mid-October, when money managers abandoned their
record net-short position
against the metal as the outlook for the dollar deteriorated. Since then, investors
have piled into exchangetraded funds backed by bullion, which have amassed 126
tons of metal worth $5.2 billion in 60 sessions — the biggest increase over a comparable period in more than 18
months.
A paring of expectations
for rate hikes has also con-
tributed to demand, as gold
typically falls during periods
of monetary tightening
because it’s a non-interest
bearing asset.
Benchmark U.S. Treasury yields — which move in
the opposite direction of
prices — have dropped almost 70 basis points since
early November as fears of
slowing American growth
are compounded by trade
concerns and the partial
government shutdown over
President Trump’s border
wall plans.
The iShares 20-year
Treasury exchange-traded
fund, ticker TLT, saw a
record
one-day
inflow
Wednesday. More than $1.1
billion poured into the fund,
which invests in longerdated U.S. bonds.
“Safe havens should continue to outperform this
year as a slowdown in the
U.S. prompts the Fed to end
its tightening cycle in the
middle of the year and China’s economy continues to
lose momentum,” Simona
Gambarini, an economist at
Capital Economics in London, said by email.
Potter and Van der Walt
write for Bloomberg.
S U N DAY , JA N UA RY 6 , 2 019
S
L AT I M E S . C O M / B U S I N E S S
C3
HOW I MADE IT: JEN GOTCH
‘Fun and happiness’ — and a message
needed.”
Ban.do co-founder is
focused on building a
lifestyle brand. She
also advocates for
mental health.
Mentors, and buyers: Six
years ago, the entrepreneurs sold Ban.do to Todd
and Kim Ferrier, who run
Lifeguard Press, a stationery and gift company that
has produced and distributed products for licensed
brands and artists such as
Kate Spade, Lilly Pulitzer
and Jonathan Adler. “Todd
especially became a huge
mentor for me in business,”
Gotch said, “because really
at that point, we had a ‘business,’ but it was really very
small and it was more of a
creative outlet than anything else.”
By Ronald D. White
The gig: Jen Gotch, 47, is
co-founder and chief creative officer for Ban.do, a
10-year-old lifestyle brand
that, as Gotch describes it,
“sits at the intersection of
fun and happiness.” The Los
Angeles company, which
employs about 30 people,
designs clothes, accessories
and gifts, among other
things. Products change
often and can range from
$3.95 for enamel pins and
luggage tags to $279 for pink
roller skates by Moxi, one of
the third-party brands
carried on Bando.com.
Ban.do’s own products can
be found at more than 3,000
department stores and
boutiques around the world
in addition to the company’s
website.
Advocacy: Mental health
advocacy is very important
to Gotch. To that end, the
company launched a collection of nameplate necklaces
with jeweler Iconery that
proclaim not a name or an
astrology sign but a mental
health issue such as anxiety
or depression. The necklaces, which cost $48 apiece,
have been a top seller, and
net proceeds go to a nonprofit called Bring Change
to Mind, which promotes
discussion and education
about mental health. “It’s
been really very exciting for
us and personally very
fulfilling for me,” she said.
Finding her way: Gotch
obtained degrees in English
and philosophy from Florida State University, graduating in 1993, but from there
she struggled to find her
niche. After three years of
Latin with a goal of becoming a lawyer, Gotch decided
Creative space: After the
sale, Gotch was able to focus
more on what interested her
most. “It wasn’t about not
wanting to run the company, but when we sold, the
support that was brought in
allowed me to lean into the
creative side even more, and
that is certainly where I am
most comfortable.”
Jess Isaac Career Contessa
JEN GOTCH , co-founder and chief creative officer of Ban.do, has taken a circuitous route to the right career.
that path was not for her. “I
didn’t feel any camaraderie
with the people in those
classes,” Gotch said. She
wound up taking a few
temporary jobs. “That let
me know I did not want to
be a temp,” Gotch said.
Undiagnosed: Mental
health issues have been an
important theme in Gotch’s
life, one that hit home with a
serious episode not long
after graduation, when she
was 23 and living in Atlanta.
“I had my first experience
with bipolar when I was 7,”
Gotch said. “I just didn’t
have a name for anything
that was going on until I was
23. I had experience with
depression, anxiety. It was
undiagnosed.”
Meaningful bottom: Many
people would have considered the timing horrible.
Gotch looks back on it in a
far different way. “Every
step along the way is a step
in the right direction,”
Gotch said. “I think losing it
enough where I had to go
home and deal with it and
actually get really low set me
on a really great course for
the rest of my life.”
Getting to ‘normal’: The
New York native’s business
life had to develop alongside
her search for the right
mental health professional
and the correct medications. “I think the idea that
something for depression is
a happy pill is absolutely not
what it’s supposed to be.
The first time I got on something that worked, I just felt
normal,” Gotch said. “I
pair, both stylists, scoured
swap meets and estate sales
for their original inspirations. “It was all hair accessories,” Gotch said. “Some
of them were like combs
with flowers on them, some
were headbands, some were
wire halos.”
think I probably went from
age 23 to 31 before I actually
got the right combination of
medications.”
The big clue: It was when
she went to work for Bmovie king Roger Corman
in the late 1990s that something began to click. From
set design, she went into
prop styling. “More than
anything else, I was beginning to create a personal
aesthetic,” Gotch said. “It
was about understanding
how to execute on an idea
that was in my head and
turn it into something that
other people could experience.”
Help wanted: A little more
than three years into the
business, Gotch said, the
company had reached
about $200,000 a year in
sales; the fact that neither
Gotch nor Coulter had
training or experience in
running a business was
showing. “I didn’t really
have a lot of people around
me that were in the business
field,” Gotch said of those
early years. “And I didn’t
really know how to ask for
help or what help we
Starting small: With just
$300 each, Gotch and cofounder Jamie Coulter
started Ban.do in 2008. The
TRAVEL BRIEFCASE
Hilton shifts into damage-control mode
A black man says he
was racially profiled
in a DoubleTree lobby
in Portland, Ore.
By Hugo Martin
A recent incident at the
DoubleTree by Hilton in
Portland, Ore., has put one
of the nation’s largest hospitality companies in damagerepair mode to quell a controversy before it hurts the
business’ bottom line.
In December, an African
American man who was
staying at the hotel was
talking on his cellphone
in the lobby when a hotel
employee accused him of
trespassing and called
local police to remove the
man.
The incident made national news, illustrated by
video that the guest, Jermaine Massey, captured on
his phone while he was
being told to leave. Massey
accused the hotel of targeting him because of his race.
Hilton Hotels & Resorts,
one of the world’s largest
hospitality companies,
issued a statement through
its DoubleTree by Hilton
Twitter account saying the
hotel brand has “zero tolerance for racism.” It said the
independent operator of the
Portland hotel had fired two
employees “involved in the
mistreatment of Mr. Massey
and is working with Diversity & Inclusion experts.”
The damage could be
substantial if business
travel managers decide to
stop booking employees in
that hotel chain.
DoubleTree was among
the top 10 hotel brands
named on business expense
reports in the third quarter
of 2018, according to Certify,
a travel and expense reportprocessing company based
in Portland, Maine.
Dan Hill, chief executive
of Hill Impact, a crisis management firm in Washington, D.C., said companies
embroiled in such scandals
must demonstrate to the
public that they are reexamining their mission statements and company culture
if they hope to repair the
damage.
Jerome Adamstein Los Angeles Times
A DOUBLETREE by Hilton in Portland, Ore., fired
two employees over a racial profiling incident. Above
is a DoubleTree hotel in downtown Los Angeles.
“There is no quick fix,” he
said. “There is no tweet or
statement they can put out
to fix this. It’s going to take
time and consistent action.”
Judging by the thousands of angry comments
posted on Twitter about the
hotel, Hill is right.
“@Marriott I’m ready to
be in committed relationship with you and you only,”
a woman from Washington,
D.C., wrote on Twitter,
referring to Hilton’s rival,
Marriott International.
“@HiltonHotels, it’s over,
forever.”
Frontier attendants
told to keep the tip
To generate extra revenue, low-cost airlines have
experimented with several
money-making ideas, such
as charging to print boarding passes and promoting
credit card memberships
during the flights.
Frontier Airlines is trying something new to generate extra money for the
carrier’s flight attendants:
tips they don’t have to
share.
At the Denver-based,
low-cost carrier, passengers
who order food and drinks
from a digital tablet on the
plane have the option of
giving the flight attendant a
tip.
Since the digital tablets
were introduced three years
ago, flight attendants have
had to share the tips from
the sales with their fellow
flight attendants on the
plane. But as of Jan. 1, flight
attendants can keep the tips
they make from those sales.
The change was made at
the request of flight attendants, Frontier spokesman
Jonathan Freed said.
But the Assn. of Flight
Attendants International,
representing 50,000 flight
attendants at 20 airlines,
including Frontier, opposes
tipping, saying flight attendants are responsible for
safety and security on the
plane and their service
shouldn’t be based on how
much a passenger tips
them.
The group also accused
Frontier of using the potential tip revenue to undermine contract negotiations
with the union.
“Regardless of the tip
issue, Frontier Airlines
needs to step up and pay
aviation’s first responders a
wage that recognizes their
critical safety role onboard,”
union President Sara Nelson said.
Freed pushed back,
saying, “We view tips as
additional compensation
over and above flight attendants’ contractual
wages.”
Industry experts say no
other U.S. carrier gives
passengers the ability to tip
flight attendants, and they
don’t expect other airlines
to follow Frontier’s lead.
United gives kittens
and puppies the boot
United Airlines is tightening up the rules on flying
with emotional support
animals, part of an industry
crackdown on passengers
who take advantage of the
laws for fliers with disabilities.
Starting Monday, United
Airlines won’t allow emotional support animals on
flights more than eight
hours long and won’t accept
kittens or puppies under 4
months of age on any flight,
regardless of the length of
the flight.
In addition, United Airlines will allow only dogs and
cats as emotional support
animals and will accept
dogs, cats and miniature
horses as service animals,
which have training to assist
passengers with physical
disabilities.
United said it would
honor reservations made
before Jan. 3 under the
previous animal rules.
United’s new policy is
similar to Delta Air Lines’
rules regarding animals
announced last month. In
September, Southwest
Airlines adopted a new
policy that allows only dogs
and cats as emotional support animals and only if they
are restrained by a leash or
kept in a carrier.
The new rules are an
effort by airlines to deal with
a surge in passengers bringing animals on flights in the
last few years.
The federal Air Carrier
Access Act says airlines
must allow animals to travel
with passengers with disabilities, without charge.
But airlines say it is far
too easy for fliers to get
documentation from a
medical professional declaring that a pet is an emotional support animal that
is needed to accompany a
flier.
Some fliers are just trying to avoid paying animal
transport fees and don’t
need emotional support,
airlines say.
hugo.martin@latimes.com
Twitter: @hugomartin
Advice: Know your customers, Gotch said. In Ban.do’s
case, that means generally
youngish shoppers (women
18 to 34) attracted to a product mix that leans toward
colorful, sparkly, snarky and
nostalgic. “When you’re a
smaller business, you lead a
lot of the decision-making
for your customer. As you
grow, you learn about who
you’ve attracted. You understand their likes and dislikes
and what they respond to.
And in order to fortify that
relationship, you have to
listen to them.”
Media platforms: To connect with customers, Gotch
spends a lot of time on podcasts and on social media,
where she has more than
225,000 followers. “I act as
the primary brand ambassador, using platforms like
my podcast, speaking engagements, my Instagram
and my upcoming book to
raise awareness about
mental health, about
Ban.do and me personally.
It’s sort of an autobiographical podcast about my
dealings with mental health
and creative entrepreneurship.” Gotch’s podcast,
“I’m okay … sometimes,”
can be found on Girlboss.com. “With me it’s hard to
tell a business story without
a little bit of mental health
just because they’re very
intermingled.”
ron.white@latimes.com
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Savings Update
Should I name beneiciaries for my bank accounts?
When most people think about designating who’ll inherit
their inancial assets when they die, preparing a will comes
immediately to mind. But for deposit accounts, naming a
beneiciary can more easily and cost effectively transfer your
funds to a new owner.
which can be costly, lengthy and burdened with paperwork.
Instead, beneiciary designations override any will and are
easily settled, at no cost. The beneiciary simply has to
provide the inancial institution with proof of identity and a
certiied copy of your death certiicate.
Most banks and credit unions allow you to name one or
more beneiciaries for any checking, savings, money market
or certiicate of deposit account. The legal term for this is
“payable on death”, and you might see it referred to as POD.
Beneiciaries can also be designated for U.S. savings bonds.
Naming beneiciaries can be done immediately upon opening
a bank account, via the signature card. But if you neglect to
do this at the outset, you can always add a POD designee
later. You’re also free to remove and change beneiciaries any
time you like, though a new signature card will be required
with each change.
When you specify a beneiciary, you still retain all ownership
and rights associated with that account as long as you live. Naming beneiciaries for your deposit accounts is one
But when you die, the beneiciary becomes eligible to take way to provide a gift to those who inherit your assets, as
possession of those funds as their own.
it signiicantly reduces the paperwork, time and energy
necessary to make the transfers. But be sure to periodically
The advantage is that POD designations prevent those funds review your various designations to ensure they remain up to
from entering the probate process of settling your estate, date with your current preferences.
Rate Criteria: Rates effective as of 01/02/19 and may change without notice. RateSeeker, LLC. does not guarantee the accuracy of the information appearing above
or the availability of rates in this table. Banks, Thrifts and credit unions pay to advertise in this guide. NA means rates are not available or not offered at the time rates
were surveyed. All institutions are FDIC or NCUA insured. Yields represent annual percentage yield (APY) paid by participating institutions. Rates may change after
the account is opened. Fees may reduce the earnings on the account. A penalty may be imposed for early withdrawal. To appear in this table, call 773-320-8492.
SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019 WST
S
Employment
Collectibles and
Memorabilia
Buying Vintage
Comic Books
ACCOUNTING
BOOKKEEPER/OFFICE
MANAGER Van Nuys CPA
firm seeks a seasoned
bookkeeper to manage office, phones, data entry,
bookkeeping, etc. Prefer
someone with CPA firm experience. Email resume to:
hlhpycpa@msn.com
Paying Cash for Vintage
Comics from Pre-1975, Books
with cover prices of .20 cents
or less
Will & Eric 866-461-0640
Royalty Audit Senior: (El
Segundo, CA) Analyze, interpret & apply specific royalty
contract language or statutory licenses to royalty stmts
to determine whether there
are any unreported royalties. Manipulate large data
files by creating pivot tables,
filter & other sorting in order
to perform specific tests to
determine (i) unlicensed
compositions (ii) rate errors
(iii) whether there are any
unreported sales & whether
reporting of digital & physical distribution is complete
(iv) royalties due for pending
& unmatched (v) whether
Investment
there are any incorrect offsets of returns against royalOpportunities
ties due. (vi) whether there
is any improper cross collateralization for return of CD
product against digital sales
(vii) whether negative digital units reported reduced
Real Estate investors looking
reported royalties against
for prop. in LA area. 15-30%
units w/ the same ISRC number (viii) whether there are
return. Available inventory.
any royalty underreportings
562-254-5471
for promotional sales, export sales & other distribution channels (ix) whether all
record labels have reported
royalties (x) whether any
royalty recoveries from audits of digital srvcs provider
have been properly distributed (xi) whether there are
Retail Stores for
any excess reserves held
Lease
under the 9-month regulations or GAAP regulations.
Req Bachelor’s in Acctg w/ 2
Rental Store
City of Hawthorne: store yr rltd exp. Apply to: Prager
on busy Blvd. 6,750’ e-mail: Metis CPAs, LLC. 2381 Rosecrans Ave, Ste 350, El Segunelib2626@yahoo.com
do, CA 90245. Attn: HR.
Investors
Wanted
ACCOUNTING
KPMG LLP, Senior Associate,
SALT (Mult. Positions), Los
Angeles, CA. Assist multistate companies w/ state &
local tax issues, incl. compliance, advising, planning,
&
controversies. Req’ts incl.:
HOMES FOR SALE
Bach’s deg or foreign equiv.
in Accounting, Taxation, Economics, or rel. field + 3 yrs
of rel. work exp. Apply online
at http://us-jobs.kpmg.
Including Hollywood
com/careers/SearchResults
& type req #39279 in the
Hermosa Hills
keyword search box. Please
New listing! Least expen- contact us-hrscatsadmin@
sive home. 2/1. Lush Yard. kpmg.com if you have dif$1.175K AGT 310-991-0929
ficulty applying. If offered
employment, must have legal right to work in the U.S.
Out of State
EOE. KPMG offers a comprecompensation and
Hawaii | New Homes hensive
benefits package. No phone
$15K moves you in!
calls or agencies please.
www.alohaainahomes.com KPMG, an equal opportunity
employer/disability/
veteran. KPMG maintains a
drug-free workplace. © 2018
KPMG LLP, a Delaware limited liability partnership and
the U.S. member firm of the
KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated
with KPMG International
Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. All
rights reserved.
LOS ANGELES TIMES
Employment
Employment
Systems Analyst to define
solutions in Oracle Demantra/VCP/EBS to suppt decision making. Reqs: BS in CS/
Engrg + 5 yrs exp impl enterprise apps & Oracle Value
Chain Plan’g prod. Ed/Exp
must incl: Demand mgmt,
supply plan’g, sales & ops
plan’g, & trade mgmt & settlement; Oracle Demantra
Value Chain Planning, Oracle
EBS, & rptg sys; Oracle AIM/
OUM standards; Oracle VCP
app Setup & Config; Data
conversion & conf rm pilot
wkshop; Prod suppt of Demantra & Oracle apps in adherence to SLA guidelines;
SOP; & Oracle & Microsoft
tools incl PL/SQL prog, SQL,
Toad, MS Office, MS Projects,
MS Visio, & SQL Dvlpr. Worksite: Los Angeles, CA. Mail
resume to T Williams, The
Wonderful Company LLC,
11444 W. Olympic Blvd., Los
Angeles, CA 90064. Principals only/No calls/EOE
Assistant Buyer:
Assist
in buying products for co.;
prepare POs. Req: AA/AS
in Econ., Bus. Admin., or Finance Mail resume: Shims
Bargain, Inc. 2600 S Soto St.
Los Angeles, CA 90058
Intern 4 (Architectural Intern) Zimmer Gunsul Frasca
Architects LLP – Los Angeles,
CA – Multiple Openings.
Review shop drawings submittals, completed reports,
plans, estimates and calculations for technical and
design intent compliance,
and issue modifications to
documentation. Along with
Project Manager, interface
with clients to understand
and develop program and
design. Develop Project
Specifications for new structures or renovation projects
applying knowledge of basic
structural and site design,
construction
procedures,
zoning and building codes,
and building materials.
15% domestic travel may
be required, depending on
project needs. Apply online
at https://www.zgf.com/careers/, job #2018-1115P.
FOR SALE
DOWNTOWN/
METROPOLITAN
Int’l Trade Treaty Attorney for Roy Legal Group,
Northridge, CA. Fulltime.
Min reqs: 3yrs exp, JD/LLB,
CA bar admission. Perform
analysis of US&foreign trade
law- emphasis in LATAM.
Representation in complex
litigation involving intn’l
trade treaties (NAFTA) in
Federal, appellate, and
state crt& US CBP. Conduct
M&As due diligence. Draft
provisions&advise
clients
on structuring loans&other
credit facilities&products;
legal
compliance.
CV
to:tammy.roylegalgroup@
gmail.com
AUTOMOTIVE
Technician Boulevard Automotive needs exp techs.
2+ yrs exp, clean drug, DMV
and background. Med, dent,
401k. Contact Frank Martinez 562-492-1000
Vocational Schools
PHLEBOTOMY
CLASS
Allied Professional Institute
562-808-2152
www.apiedu.net
Employment
ACCOUNTING
Staff Accountant for FuseFX: Analyze fin. data assess
conformance
w/accting
principles & audit reports
maintain fin. records & report on fin. activities Bach
in accountancy any admin
or mngmt or rel. 12 mo exp
as Staff Accountant, Accountant or rel. occup incl prep
of work papers for auditors/
ensuring compl w/audit
reports & tax credit filings.
Job in Sherman Oaks. Apply:
jobs@fusefx.com
ACCOUNTING
Accounting Manager East-B
Corp, wholesale of beauty
products, City of Industry,
CA, is seeking an Accounting
Manager. Full Time. Master’s
degree in Accountancy.
Contact Shengfeng Chen,
President,
Staff Accountant. Req’d:
eastb@eastbcorps.com.
Bachelor’s in Acct., Bus.
Econ., Bus. Admin., or related. Mail Resume: Yoon Han
Senior Accountant City of Kim & Associates, APC 2954
Industry, CA: Review&adjust W 8th St. Suite 101, Los Anacctg entries to ensure ac- geles, CA 90005
curacy to reporting; Monitor acctg data changes
for authenticity&integrity; Market Research Analyst.
Rsrch&advise mngt about Req’d: Bachelor’s in Bus. Adtax issues & tax stratgs; Rev min, Int’l Trade, or related.
fin’l rprts for accuracy; Rec- Jobsite: Whittier, CA. Mail
oncile fin’l stmts&propse Resume: H Mart Logistics
acctg soltns for bus. cont- Inc. 300 Chubb Ave. Lyndnuos imprvmnt. Reqs: MS hurst, NJ 07071
in Acctg; 6-mos of acctg exp
as Acctnt, Acctnt Intern, or
rltd occup. Employer accepts internship during college. Send resumes: Larry Li,
China United Transport, Inc.,
19885 Harrison Ave, City of
Industry, CA 91789. Job ref:
1001.
Rentals Vacation
Surfside – For Lease. Steps to the Sand! 3 bed/2 Bath.
$3500/mo. Call for showing:
Chuck Buscemi
(562) 592-9826 Agt.
HOW TO PLACE AN AD
Self-service 24/7:
latimes.com/placead
Contact us by phone 24/7:
800-234-4444
ADVERTISING POLICIES
For Los Angeles Times advertising terms
and conditions go to:
http://www.tronc.com/ad-io-terms/
Bookkeeper: Apply by mail
to Jun Chang CPA & Associates, AC, 19520 Nordhoff St.,
#16, Northridge, CA 91324,
attn. President
Business Names
Assistant Pastor: f/t; Nonprofit Christian church;
conduct pastoral activities;
Master of Divinity or Related;
Resume: Ever Green Korean
Mission Church @ 6952 Van
Nuys Blvd., Van Nuys, CA
91405
Asst Coach for pro League
of Legends team.18mos
exp
req’d.
Jobsite:
LosAngeles,CA.Send
resumes to:Cloud9 Esports,
Inc.,ATTN:LCS-AC,2720 Neilson Wy #5697 Santa Monica,
CA 90405
Computer/IT:
NCR Corporation seeks f/t Service
Delivery Engineer in Aliso
Viejo, CA to work w/Product Dev & Production Ops
to deliver & support Connected Payments/NCR SaaS
offerings. Req’s Bachelor’s
degree or frgn equiv degree
in Software Engg, Comp Sci
or closely rel tech fld +4 yrs
software dev exp. P/t telecommuting available. Refs
req’d. Send resume: Candice.
Austin@ncr.com, ref req:
R0073940 Service Delivery
Engineer.
Enterprise Solutions Architect Integration Engineer for L.A. Care in Los
Angeles,CA to design and
build Service-Oriented Architecture. Reqs.: BS degree
(or foreign edu. equiv.) in
CS, IT or closely related & 7
yrs. exp. in job or as software
eng. designing and implementing Oracle SOA suite,
JAVA JSP applications, ORACLE/PL/SQL, and SQL Server
Batch processes. CV to L.A.
Care, Attn: J.Torres, 1055 W
7th St., 7th Fl. LA, CA 90017.
Phillips-Medisize Costa
Mesa, LLC (a Molex Company) seeks Operational
Excellence Leaders for Costa
Mesa, CA loc to identify &
improve outcomes of manufacturing & operational
processes, lead process
improvements to improve
efficiencies, reduce cost, &
increase customer satisfaction by implementing &
managing lean tools, systems & principles. Master’s
in Operations Research/Eng/
related field +2yrs exp OR
Master’s in Marketing/related field +3yrs exp OR Bachelor’s in Marketing/related
field +6yrs exp OR Bachelor’s
in Operations Research/Eng/
related field +5yrs exp req’d.
Skills Req’d: Exp leading &
driving successful multiple
large-scale process improvement projects & teams w/
quantifiable direct bottom
line financial impact; acting
as a driver & change leader
for all teams (from production floor to mgmt) by applying Lean tools (SMED, VSM,
5S, Kanban, Kaizen, KPIs, JIT)
in a manufacturing environment to lead & train a culture of excellence; analyzing
manufacturing layouts, stat
modeling (using SAS, R, SQL,
Python, SPSS), quant&fin
analysis, customer DB mgmt
& market testing; driving process improvement
through cross functional
team leadership throughout
manufacturing facility (supply chain, production planning, operations leadership,
eng, technical support, quality); presenting complex stat
concepts in easy to understand way. Send resume to:
MLXjobs@kochind.com,
Ref: SP
COMPUTER
Software Engineer – Design & implement SW apps
& high-perf scalable RESTbased APIs to drive our websites, mobile apps & partner
integrations. Reqs: MS+4 yrs
OR BS+6 yrs. Jobsite: Santa
Monica, CA. Mail resume to:
TrueCar, Inc., Attn: M.Haas /
Re: SE, 120 Broadway, STE
200, Santa Monica, CA
COMPUTER
Software Engineers Soft. 90401.
Engs: At our Thousand Oaks,
CA office, with Riverbed’s CONSTRUCTION
WiFi Aps project, the goal of PROJECT ENGINEER (GEOwhich is to allow Riverbed TECHNICAL CONSTRUCWiFi Aps to be sold for use by TION) sought by Condonthe federal government, en- Johnson & Associates, Inc.
sure Riverbed’s compliance in Los Angeles, CA. Develop
with FIPS (Federal Informa- ground improvement detion Processing Standards) signs for settlement & perby reviewing encryption meation control. Req MS in
algorithms and other com- Geotechnical Engrg, Civil Enponents of the technology grg or rel + 2 yrs of geotechfor full compliance with gov- nical engrg or rel exp. Send
ernment regulations. Send resume to: Katie Condon /
resume w/Job#18K to T. Pul- Re: PE, Condon-Johnson &
lagurla @ Riverbed Technol- Associates, Inc., 480 Roland
ogy, 680 Folsom St., 6th Fl., Wy., Ste. 200, Oakland, CA
94621.
San Francisco, CA 94107.
Sr Business Intelligence
Developer for L.A. Care in
Los Angeles, CA to create &
support standard & ad hoc
reports for IT & Sr Business
Management;
Translate
functional & technical specs
into reporting designs. Req.:
Bachelor’s in CS, Eng., Statistics, Math, Business Systems
or related (or foreign educ.
equiv.) & 5 yrs exp. as BI Developer or Master’s & 3 yrs.
Resume to L.A. Care, ATTN:
J. Torres, 1055 W 7th Street,
7th Floor, Los Angeles, CA
90017 reference job title.
Business Names
Fictitious Business Name Statement NO.: 2018 287566
The following person is doing business as:
Fictitious Business Name(s) California Times / Cal
Times 2300 E Imperial Hwy, El Segundo, CA 90245.
Registered Owner (S): Nantmedia Holdings, LLC
2300 E Imperial Hwy, El Segundo, CA 90245. Business
is conducted by: a Limited Liability Company. The
registrant commenced to transact business under
the fictitious business name or names listed above
on 11/14/2018. I declare that all information in
this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who
declares as true information which he or she knows
to be false is guilty of a crime) REGISTRANT/CORP/
LLC NAME: Nantmedia Holdings, LLC. Signature: Jeff
Crawford. This statement was filed with the County
Clerk of Los Angeles County on 11/14/2018. NOTICEin accordance with subdivision (a)of section 17920 A
Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the
end of five years from the date on which it was filed
in the office of the County Clerk except, as provided
in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires
40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the
statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a
change in the residence address of a registered owner.
A new fictitious business name statement must be
filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement
does not of itself authorize the use in this state of
fictitious business name in violation of the rights
of another under federal state or common law (see
section 14411 et seq. Business and Professions code).
Dean C Logan, Los Angeles County Clerk. BY: T. Tran,
Deputy. Published 12/12/2018, 12/16/18, 12/23/18,
12/30/18, 1/6/19.
Legal Notices
Employment
Legal Notices
LEGAL NOTICE: If you were a member of AutoZone’s
Rewards Program in California and had a $20 Reward
and/or Reward Credit expire, a class action lawsuit
may affect your rights.
This Notice was authorized by the Superior Court of
California, Los Angeles County, in Hughes et al. v. AutoZone Parts, Inc. et al., Case No. BC631080.
Who is Included? The Court has certified two subclasses generally consisting of persons enrolled in the most
common version of AutoZone’s Rewards Program in
California at the time AutoZone changed the program
and who had $20 Reward(s) and/or Reward Credit(s)
deemed expired and lost. The detailed Notice available at www.AZRewardsLitigation.com defines these
Subclasses more precisely.
What is this Case About? This case alleges that AutoZone breached contractual and legal duties to
members of its Rewards Program by representing that
they would earn a $20 Reward when they made 5 purchases of $20 or more, then changing the program to
add time limits to earn and redeem Rewards, which resulted in members losing Rewards and Rewards Credits. It seeks compensation on behalf of the Subclasses
and certain injunctive relief. AutoZone denies any
wrongdoing, and has asserted numerous defenses.
AutoZone contends that it has, at all times, complied
with California law and acted in accordance with the
terms and conditions of the Rewards Program.
CUSTOMER
Service
Phone Agents
Sherman Oaks, CA
Caine & Weiner has openings for energetic phone
agents to work PT or FT
in its Sherman Oaks location. All shifts available.
Must have solid communication skills. Competitive wages and flexible
hours.
Please contact HR
Department at Caine &
Weiner E-mail hr@caineweiner.com or call 818
251-1733
Employment
Employment
Graphic Designer (Torrance, CA) Design graphics
for website, mobile app and
user interface. Bachelor’s
in graphics/digital design
related. Resume to: Credit
Card Services, Inc. 21281 S.
Western Ave, Torrance, CA
90501
Donor and Surrogacy Project Manager (Diamond Bar,
CA). Establish sales & mktg
strategies for IVY surrogacy
to help infertile families.
Master in Bus. Admin, or rltd
field. 12 mos working exp
in promoting medical products or srvcs. Proven knowl
of human anatomy, nursing
& embryology. Be able to
take multiple tasks & work in
an agile envrmt. Apply to On
The Road Inc., 680 Brea Canyon Rd, Ste 288, Diamond
Bar, CA 91789.
Senior Game Designer:
2 yrs exp in game design.
Mail resume to: Night School
Studio, LLC, Attn: HR, 1800 S.
Brand Blvd. #208, Glendale,
CA 91204.
Product
Management
Director w/ Oportun, Inc.
(Irvine, CA): Plan, direct, coord activities & lead crossfunctional dvlpmnt teams to
dvlp & deliver digital lending
platform. Rqmts incl MS deg
+ 2 yrs exp. For full details on
all rqmts & how to apply, visit https://wp.me/PatWHX-O
CPA Exam Instructor (City
of Industry, CA) Teach and
tutor students as a class, in
small groups, and one-toone on CPA exam; Design
and develop lesson plans,
curriculum content and delivery methods; Test, grade
and score students’ performance periodically; Manage
schedules and goals, and
monitor and analyze progress of students. Master of
Accounting. Passed all the
US CPA exams or hold CPA license in a US state. Send res.
with salary req. to: Hongjing
International
Education
USA, Inc., 17800 Castleton
St, Ste 358, City of Industry,
CA 91748
Data Engineer – Source,
analyze & validate automotive data by performing data
modeling & structuring,
architecting & aggregating
data. Reqs: MS+1 yr. Jobsite:
Santa Monica, CA. Mail resume to: TrueCar, Inc., Attn:
M.Haas/Ref: DE2, 120 Broadway, STE 200, Santa Monica,
Management:
AlixPartCA 90401.
ners, LLC (Los Angeles, CA)
seeks Senior Vice President,
Hyperloop Technologies, Enterprise
Improvement
Inc. seeks for its Los Ange- w/ Master’s in Business Adles facilities a Mechanical ministration,
Accounting,
Design Engineer to design & or Finance and 1 yr. of exp.
develop Hyperloop Propul- in management consulting,
sion System. Qualified appli- strategy analysis, or business
cants mail resume (no calls/ analysis (or BS+5). Must have
emails) to attn.: HR, 2159 some work experience in
Bay Street, Los Angeles, CA each of the following:
90021
1) Developing global sourcing strategies across commodities categories includProduct Engineer 2 sought ing identifying, vetting and
by Skyworks Solutions, Inc. evaluating vendors and
in Newbury Park, CA: Work- products; 2) Leading client
ing as a core team member capability building workof the product/test engg shops for procurement and
team to bring Skyworks’ RF sourcing functions including
integrated solutions such as data analysis, negotiation
PAMiD, MMMBPA & FEMiD, skills and supply market reinto high volume manufac- search; 3) Designing global
turing. Responsible for char- purchasing organization for
acterization, ATE & probe clients including acting as
data analysis. Must have company representative to
unrestricted right to work establish foreign office and
in U.S. Mail all resumes to recruiting and training loAngela Ho, Skyworks, 5221 cal talent. Up to 80% travel
California Ave., Irvine, CA required;
telecommuting
92617. Must reference job permitted. This position
code CA0618TD.
qualifies for the AlixPartners
employee referral program.
Send cover letter and resume to
klongo@alixpartners.com.
Project Engineer (Multiple No calls. EOE.
Openings) work under general supervision to provide
construction management Manager, Product Marketexpertise for large scale ing Define product posiconstruction projects. Re- tioning of new assessment
quire Master’s degree in Civil & intervention software for
Engineering, Construction ADHD. Review, evaluate
Engineering or Construc- competitive analysis. Estabtion Management. Job site & lish pricing strategy; conInterview: Los Angeles, CA. duct focus group research.
Mail your resume to Hatha- Analyze market size; recomway Dinwiddie Construction mend go to market strategy.
Company at 275 Battery St. Cognitive Leap, 177 E. ColoSte. 300, San Francisco, CA rado Blvd. #200, Pasadena,
94111. Attn: hr@hdcco.com CA 91105. Send resume to
info@cognitiveleap.com
QA Automation Engineer
sought by Stamps.com Inc.
in El Segundo, CA to support
the architecting and building process of testing frameworks for both iOS, web
based and non-web based
products. Send resume to:
Sean Wolpin, Stamps.com
DESIGNER GRAPHIC Cre- Inc., 1990 E. Grand Ave., El
Segundo,
CA 90245.
ate fashion graphics; retail
signage, color layout, composition. Require Bachelor Sales Engineer (Torrance,
in Studio Art or Graphic De- CA) Sell UV LED products ussign & 6 months in job or as ing sophisticated engineerStudio Artist. Mail resume to: ing knowledge. Bachelor’s in
HR, Fornia Apparel Inc, 703 E ceramic chemical engineering related. Resume to: IrtroGardena Blvd, Gardena, CA
nix Inc. 20900 Normandie
90248
Ave, Bldg B, Torrance, CA
90502
Graphic Designer (Torrance, CA) Design graphics
for website, mobile app and
user interface. Bachelor’s
in graphics/digital design
related. Resume to: Credit FINANCE
Card Services, Inc. 21281 S. Corporate Controller. DeWestern Ave, Torrance, CA sign/implement/maintain
90501
processes to enable GAAPcompliant financial reporting; create and maintain inGRAPHIC
DESIGNER— ternal controls. Mail resume:
COMMERCE, CA 90040— Cypress Creek Renewables,
SAMSON
PHARMACEUTI- LLC, 3402 Pico Blvd., Santa
CALS requires a candidate to Monica, CA 90405
create and produce digital
assets and design materials
for pharmaceutical products
including emails, packaging,
logos, banners, advertising
and marketing materials,
and misc promotional materials. Optimize all products
to be in line with branding
For more info, call
and marketing strategies.
818-238-5000 or visit
Requires a bachelor’s degree
www.burbank
or equivalent in Graphic Deca.gov/jobs
sign. Send resume to kassir
jay@gmail.com.
CITY OF BURBANK
Sr. App Lead Mgr (Culver
City, CA) –Monitor/dvlp/
integrate/enhance apps ID
& IAM, Single Sign-On, ID
Admin/Governance,
2FA,
SailPoint, SAP, Peoplesoft,
Workday in Windows/Linux.
Review design specs/svc
perform measures. Dvlp migration plans as apps age
out. . Approve schedules/
status/maintain activities.
Supv. on-off/shore resources
40 hrs/wk. Req: MS CmptrSc,
Engrg or foreign equiv +2
yrs of post-bach exp in job
offrd or IAM. Mail resume
to: Sony Pictures Entertainment, Attn: Morita 130A,
10202 W. Washington Blvd,
Culver City, CA 90232, Ref:
SRAPPMGR02.
Principals
only. US work auth req’d if
hired. EOE.
Employment
Criteo seeks Analytics (AX)
Project Mgr to lead Program
Mgmt Office for AX team &
manage AX projects. Travel
to NYC 1 wk/2 months; Palo
Alto 1 wk/6 months; Paris
1 wk/qtr.; & London 1 wk/
yr. REQ: Bachelor’s in Data
Science & AX, BizAdmin, or
closely related & 2 yrs exp
as Data Analyst in online ad
industry w/ 2 yrs concurrent exp conducting statistical analyses to measure
confidence in A/B testing
for campaign optimization, incremental value, &
product implementation;
designing & automating
Tableau reports to compare
performance on products;
developing automated reports using R and Python to
deliver insights on performance; & w/ using Hive, SQL,
& Google Analytics. LOC:
Culver City, CA. Send cvr ltr,
CV, slry rqmt & ref to K. Leggio, 325 Lytton Ave, Ste 300,
Palo Alto, CA 94301.
Rehabilitation Manager
(Long Beach CA)
Manage people w/ physical
or developmental disabilities live independently. Help
clients overcome personal,
social, or psych effects of
disabilities on employment.
Evaluate clients’ abilities,
interests, exp, skills, health
& educ, dvlp treatment plan
in consultation w/ doctors,
therapists & psychologists.
Arrange services such as
med care or career training.
Help clients live & work independently. Maintain records,
monitor progress, adjust
rehab plan as necessary.
Rqmts: Bachelor”s in rehab
or phy therapy or foreign
equiv. + 5 yrs exp in above
duties or as rehab specialist
or PT. 40 hrs/wk. Mail c.v. to:
Angel Connection Nursing
Services, 4401 Atlantic Ave,
#405, Long Beach, CA 90807,
Attn: Laila Dominguez, HR
mgr.
E-Commerce Marketing
& Operations Specialist.
Mng cmpny E-Commerce
bus, prdct logistics & online mrktng. Reqs: 2 yrs
exp in job offered or rltd
position. Skills/knwldge in
E-Commerce & B2B data
interchange. 40hrs/wk. Job/
Intvw Site: Santa Monica,
CA Send Resume to: Mayer
M and J, Inc. dba Video and
Audio Center at kelly@
videoandaudiocenter.com
Office Clerk: f/t; Perform
clerical duty; High School
Diploma or equivalent; Resume: Peace International
Mission @ 3944 Wilshire
Blvd., #2, LA, CA 90010
OFFICE SUPERVISOR sought
by Twentieth Century Fox
Film Corporation in Los Angeles, CA. Manage official
communications coming in
and out of the office of the
President/CEO. Full details
& rqmts@ www.21cfcareers.
com. Job # R10006809
Staff Physician I sought by
Cedars-Sinai Medical Center,
to work in Los Angeles, CA.
M.D. plus graduate medical
training in Anesthesiology,
Adult Cardiothoracic Anesthesia, and Anesthesia Critical Care Medicine. License or
elig. In CA. Send CV to: Alex
Young, Sr. HR Compliance
Specialist, 8700 Beverly Boulevard, PACT, Suite 700, Los
Angeles, CA 90048
Instructional Design Manager (The Boston Consulting Group Inc. - Los Angeles,
California): Lead the development of live, online, and
distance learning content
and training materials, to
both support Practice Areas
and expand coverage of key
professional skills within the
LAB platform. Requires Master’s degree in education, instructional design, business
administration,
management or related field (willing
to accept foreign education
equivalent) plus 3 years of
exp designing and developing instructional materials
and leading instructional
design projects on management consulting skills or
within a management consulting setting. Alternatively,
will accept Bachelor’s degree in academic disciplines
previously noted and 5 years
of exp designing and developing instructional materials and leading instructional
design projects on management consulting skills or
within a management consulting setting. Domestic/
international travel based
on client/company need.
Send resume to LB_IDM@
bcg.com.
Professional League of
Legends Player. 12mos
exp req’d. Multiple positions
open.
Jobsite:
LosAngeles,CA.Send
resumes to:Cloud9 Esports,
Inc.,ATTN:LCS-PP,2720 Neilson Wy #5697 Santa Monica,
CA 90405.
PSYCHIATRIST
PSYCHIATRIC AIDE Will
monitor patient behavior;
restrain violent patients.
Work along a team of doctors to provide a safe environment for patients with
mental issues.
8:30 am to 5:30 pm Monday
thru Friday. Reqs. 2 yrs of
exp. as psychiatric aide.
If interested contact: Karoline D Nechushtan at Reconnect Psychological Services
881 Alma Real Drive, Suite
311, Pacific Palisades, CA
90272
Tel 310-7136739
International
Strategic
Research Manager. Cndct
mrkt rsrch studies to dtrmn
mrkt ptntl of flm, tv, ad, &
int’l media prdcts in intrntnl mrkts & Span speaking
terrorities, incl U.S. hspnc
mrkts. Reqs: Master’s in
Mrktng, Comm, or Bus Admin w/ crswrk in stats, cnsmr
insights, tech dev, & glbl
initiatives or glbl mrkng + 2
yrs exp in job offered or rltd
psn in mrkt rsrch, mrktng,
or dev in the entertainment
industry. Skills/knwldge in
MS Word, Excl, & PwrPnt,
XLSTAT, stats tools incl correlation & regression analys,
mrkt rsrch mthds, & mrktng
cncpts incl brnd hlth, brnd
positioning, & cstmr satisfaction. Little trvl. 40hrs/wk.
Job/Intvw Site: Los Angeles,
CA Send Resume to: Screen
Engine-ASI LLC at hrjobs@
screenengineasi.com
By David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form six ordinary words.
GAITMS
SPOGSI
GRIHAS
FRUUET
LUTEML
Administrative Assistant
Dance Color, Inc. in Tarzana, CA needs a candidate w. 2 yrs of
Admin Assistant exp, to plan, organize, & conduct daily admin
duties. Direct clerical staff if needed. Preparing correspondence,
receiving vendors, arranging conference calls, & scheduling
meetings. Assist in ordering office supplies, invoicing, answer
phones, prepare statistical reports using MS Word & MS Excel. Update vendor records; receive payments; update manager’s daily/
wkly/mtly schedules using MS Access as required. Organize &
maintain office files & documents. Exp or training using MS Excel,
MS Word, Email, Performing internet research. Send Resume to:
dancecolorinc@gmail.com or Fax: 818-600-8595.
CONCEPT LEADER sought
by Panda Express LLC in
Rosemead, CA. Review
the operations of existing
Hibachi-San
restaurants
and Yogurtland stores, and
any new openings. Periodic
domestic and international
travel required. Send Resumes to: Emily Kao, Panda
Express LLC at 1683 Walnut
Grove Avenue, Rosemead,
CA 91770
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
LABORER
ASSISTANT
Employment
TRYHOW
Download the free JUST JUMBLE app • Follow us on Twitter @PlayJumble
C4
©2019 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
All Rights Reserved.
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
PRINT YOUR ANSWER IN THE CIRCLES BELOW
It’s nice to have someone
else do the go-go-going
sometimes.
What are Your Options? To stay in this litigation, do
nothing. To exclude yourself, send a signed request
using the words “Exclusion Request” to Exclusions, AutoZone Litigation, c/o Postlethwaite & Netterville, P.O.
Box 82565 Baton Rouge, LA 70884 or
info@AZRewardsLitigation.com. Your request must be
sent by February 26, 2019. A judgment in the lawsuit,
whether favorable or not, will bind all class members
who do not request exclusion. If you do not request
exclusion, you may enter an appearance through your
own attorney.
How Do You Get More Information? This Notice is only
a summary. To obtain a detailed Notice and additional
information, visit www.AZRewardsLitigation.com.
Para mas información, visita
www.AZRewardsLitigation.com/ESP.
DO NOT CONTACT THE COURT.
Hectic. Busy. Unpredictable. As a mom of two young boys, Christina’s days can be described a lot of ways. For
her, there’s no greater relief than seeing an LBT bus operator pull up right on schedule. Next stop: total relaxation. When you drive with LBT, you’re doing more than picking up and dropping off. You’re connecting with
thousands of residents every day and making the community stronger.
Everyone has their reason to ride. All they need is someone in the driver’s seat.
To advertise your pets, log on to
latimes.com/advertiser/category/pets
Dogs
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more
Apply in person at 1963 E. Anaheim St., Long Beach, CA 90813 or
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Long Beach Transit. Be The Connection.
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S U N DAY , JA N UA RY 6 , 2 019
C5
Chipotle may have outsmarted itself
[Hiltzik, from C1]
claims of the Arbitration
Plaintiffs,” he declared, “are
unseemly.” He described the
company’s strategy as
“congesting the federal
courts with countless appeals to prolong arbitration
proceedings.” Those activities make a mockery of the
supposed superiority of
arbitration over lawsuits, its
purported efficiency.
As we’ve reported, forced
arbitration clauses are a
scourge whenever they pit
powerful parties, such as
corporations, against the
relatively powerless, such as
employees or consumers:
The big players are almost
invariably favored by a
venue that was designed for
their benefit.
That’s why it was considered a victory for civil rights
in 2014 when President
Obama signed an executive
order banning companies
with federal contracts
worth more than $1 million
from forcing workplace
discrimination, sexual
assault or sexual harassment complaints into arbitration. The Consumer
Financial Protection Bureau also had implemented
a rule barring banks and
credit card companies from
writing mandatory arbitration clauses into their consumer agreements, starting
this year.
You probably know the
punchline: The Trump
administration and Republican Congress have overturned both regulations, as
gifts to workplace harassers
and Wall Street bankers.
That brings us back to
Chipotle. Long ago, its
wage-theft case turned into
one of those that try judges’
patience in a big way. In
August 2015, Judge Kane
observed that federal court
technicalities and Chipotle’s
inclination to file repeated
motions over points he
already had decided had
rendered its procedural
history “tortuous, and
uniquely so.” He tried then
to “put a stop to the procedural folderol and get this
case on track,” since the
workers’ wage claims already had been filed “for
more than two years with-
Andrew Renneisen Getty Images
BECAUSE of its own legal maneuvers, Chipotle may have to defend against hundreds, even thousands, of arbitration claims across the U.S.
out ever getting out of the
gate.” But the folderol has
continued.
The employees’ allegations are simple enough.
They say Chipotle restaurant managers systematically required them to work
unpaid duty through methods that included clocking
them out before their shifts
ended. The company’s time
clocks also were configured
to reset once a day, typically
at 12:30 a.m., automatically
clocking out any employees
who were still on the job.
The plaintiffs’ claims for
back pay range from about
$100 to several thousand
dollars, Williams says.
The case was working
toward class-action certification until sometime in
2015, when Chipotle revealed
that it had instituted an
arbitration provision for
new hires starting in August
2014.
Chipotle almost certainly thought its arbitration provision would function as a moat against
worker claims. The provi-
sion requires employees
with work-related legal
complaints to bring them
only as individuals, not in
class or collective actions,
and only in front of arbitrators, not in court. It also
requires that the arbitrations take place in the
county of the last Chipotle
restaurant where the employee worked.
As is typical with arbitration clauses, many workers
don’t even recall signing it.
The clause was buried
among documents for new
hires that could be accessed
only through Chipotle’s
online portal, which allowed
the workers to click their
“agreement” without having
to read it. If they didn’t
agree, they couldn’t start
employment.
Chipotle declined to
comment on the case except
to assert that it reached an
agreement with the plaintiffs’ lawyers weeks ago to
“temporarily delay arbitrations.” Williams says that’s
flatly untrue: “We have no
such agreement,” he told
me, adding that Chipotle
unilaterally has been preventing the arbitrations
from going ahead by failing
to pay its $1,100 share of the
filing fee for each case. (The
claimants are on the hook
for the remaining $400 of the
fee.)
Whether the arbitration
clause was enforceable
against the Chipotle workers remained an open question until last May. As reported by Dave Jamieson of
the Huffington Post, who
has followed the Chipotle
case assiduously, that’s
when the Supreme Court
ruled 5 to 4 in a case titled
Epic Systems vs. Lewis that
employers could require
workers to accept arbitration as a condition of employment. Judge Kane said
he had no choice but to
sever the 2,814 plaintiffs who
had signed the agreement,
and send their cases to
arbitrators.
Normally, that would put
an end to most of those
cases, as it’s almost impossible for individuals to find
Employment
Advertising Supplement
CAREER ADVICE
Resolutions are helpful, but be
honest about implementation
M
elony Smith is not a big fan of
New Year’s resolutions. “I just
don’t think people are realistic
when they sit down and write a
list of the five or 10 things they
want to accomplish in the year ahead,” says Smith,
a careet coach. “That’s usually because people
don’t write resolutions, they write goals. And
those are two different things.”
Smith believes that that’s why many people
decide against running New Year’s resolutions
in the first place. “They treat their resolutions as
if they are tangible goals,” she says. “But a good
list of resolutions shouldn’t be a list of where you
want to be but instead it should be a list of how
you want to get there.”
For example, Smith says you shouldn’t list a
resolution to become a manager by the end of the
year. Instead, you should list the behaviors and
strategies that you can put into place in 2017 to
put yourself in a position to become a manager.
“A resolution list is based on what you resolve to
do as an individual, not the rewards you’ll receive
if you begin to embody those behaviors.”
Practical matters
Dakota Green, from Los Angeles, dropped out
of a LinkedIn group recently because her online
peers were creating a common list of resolutions
that she considered to be a bit misguided.
“Everything was about getting a bonus or a huge
increase in salary and I thought to myself ‘how is
this helpful when it’s so obvious?’ Of course we
all want more money. I was hoping for something
more practical, maybe goals I could set for myself
that would help me stay motivated or help me find
new ways to be creative,” Green says.
So Green decided to make her own set of
resolutions. “I’m not generally a resolution type
of person but I am a list person. I make lists for
myself each night for the day ahead and I’m
actually pretty good about sticking to those lists so
I figured that a New Year’s resolution list might
actually work for me,” she says.
One day, Green says she went out with her
manager and two co-workers for an impromptu
lunch and they discussed the things they wanted
to accomplish in the year ahead. “It wasn’t really
a formal business lunch,” she says. “We all go out
to eat together at least once a week but for some
reason, this time we really talked about work,
which usually doesn’t happen.”
Green and her co-workers decided to have lunch
the next day to continue their talk.
“We took things a step further by offering each
other some advice. Talking about what our goals
were and then taking some time to actually list
some of the things we needed to do to get to those
goals was kind of an eye-opener,” Green says.
“You always set these expectations for yourself
but you don’t necessarily fill in the blanks about
how to get there.”
Input wanted
Smith says most people make resolutions based
on their perceptions, so it’s helpful to learn if
those perceptions are grounded in reality. “You
may think that your work needs to be more
creative but your co-workers may think that your
creativity is already strong,” she says. “Maybe
they’d like it if you were a bit more organized.
You need to take their perceptions and balance
them with your own.”
Green says the conversations with her
co-workers practically mirrored Smith’s advice. “I
would mention things I thought needed work and
then everyone tells me that they considered those
things to be my strengths,” she says. “I mentioned
how I needed to come up with more ideas but
everyone said my ideas were great. It’s just that
I rarely provided a blueprint on how those ideas
could be put into practice.”
That was an immediate game-changed. “They
were right. Give me a legal pad or a blank screen
on a computer and I can come up with at least
25 strong ideas,” says Green. “Can I provide two
examples on how those ideas might work? Maybe,
if you really push me, but I certainly wouldn’t
do it for 25. So that conversation turned into
a resolution: Try to make sure each idea had a
concrete example of how it could be executed.”
Outside the office
Not all resolutions are based on behavior in the
workplace. Some may have their roots in behavior
at home. “I found myself incredibly groggy this
past year and realized that I had become sort of
addicted to binge-watching a lot of TV,” says
James Laskowki, from Chicago. “I would read
about something on Netflix or Amazon and I
would stay up till two or three in the morning
until I watched every episode. Problem was that I
still had to get up for work every day at six to get
my kids ready and off to school. So when you’re
cutting down your sleep by three or four hours at
night, it’s going to impact your job. One of my
resolutions is to get more sleep because it became
pretty obvious that my own performance at work
was suffering because of what I was doing at
home.”
— Marco Buscaglia, Careers
EG-Sr Software Engineer
needed by AT&T Services,
Inc. in El Segundo, CA to be
responsible for the overall
delivery process of a software application or service,
including design, development, testing, deployment,
production application support, & maintenance with a
focus on automation. Apply
at http://att.jobs/, select JOB
SEARCH & APPLY & select
Search by Requisition Number at the left bottom of the
page & enter JOB NUMBER:
1858151.
EG-Sr Software Engineer
needed by AT&T Services,
Inc. in El Segundo, CA to be
responsible for the overall
delivery process of a software application or service,
including design, development, testing, deployment,
production application support, & maintenance with a
focus on automation. Apply
at http://att.jobs/, select JOB
SEARCH & APPLY & select
Search by Requisition Number at the left bottom of the
page & enter JOB NUMBER:
1858151.
lawyers willing to bother
litigating claims worth a few
hundred or thousands of
bucks in arbitration.
But because Williams
and his colleagues already
had launched their class
action in federal court before Chipotle disclosed that
it had instituted the arbitration agreement, those plaintiffs already had access to
representation. Williams
says he’s been retained by
about 700 of the arbitration
claimants already.
That prospect appears
to be the motivation behind
Chipotle’s motion to disqualify Williams and his
colleagues from representing the plaintiffs in arbitration. Chipotle argued that
the lawyers breached their
ethical bounds by signing
up clients they knew were
subject to the arbitration
clause, and therefore
shouldn’t be permitted to
benefit financially by keeping those clients.
Judge Kane dismissed
the motion out of hand.
When the plaintiffs were
Employment
Silk Software Corporation (Jobsite: Irvine, CA)
seeks a Technical Solution
Architect to develop, test,
integrate functions between
e-commerce platform & ERP
systems. Mail resume & ad
copy to HR Mngr., Silk Software Corp. 15440 Laguna
Canyon Rd., Ste. 210, Irvine,
CA 92618
SOFTWARE
DEVELOPER
Provide design b’prints and
archit for inv’est mgmnt
domain apps. Use .NET
fr’work, C# , Tibco EMS, Git
and Bamboo, etc. SOFTWARE DEVELOPER. Design of
c’plex distrib/micro-service
platf. Use Java, JMS, JAX-RS,
Spring, Hibernate, .Net, C#,
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signed up, he ruled, the
enforceability of the arbitration clause was still in dispute, and he wasn’t inclined
to interfere with the plaintiffs’ choice of counsel —
especially since the motion
looks like a “veiled” effort to
“delay and frustrate arbitration proceedings” for the
workers.
So the bottom line is that
Chipotle may have to defend
against hundreds, even
thousands, of arbitration
claims in counties slathered
over the United States like a
jalapeno salsa on its signature burritos.
It could be a situation in
which a big player finds that
wanting to have things both
ways — forcing its workers
into arbitration, and then
monkeying with the arbitration cases themselves —
explodes in its face.
Keep up to date with
Michael Hiltzik. Follow
@hiltzikm on Twitter, see
his Facebook page, or email
michael.hiltzik
@latimes.com.
Employment
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Please reference job # below:
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for various Google projects.
#1615.34635 Exp Incl: C++,
Java, Javascript, or Python;
distrib sys or algorithms;
machine learning models; &
Big Data or stat analysis.
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Employment
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Don’t overlook these interviewing tips
1. Be presentable
Wear a suit that fits, and don’t cut
corners when it comes to ironing or drycleaning, says leadership development
professional and author Monique
Honaman. “I knew one guy who was
in such a rush the day of his interview
that he only ironed the front of his shirt.
Later, during the course of his interview
day, it was hot and he was encouraged
to remove his jacket and get more
comfortable and it was clear that he had
cut corners and only ironed the front!
He was very embarrassed,” Honaman
says.
Also, while you should always wear
deodorant, try to avoid perfumes and
colognes. You never know who will
be allergic or just downright averse to
your scent. “A hiring manager once
told me a story of how he didn’t select
an incredibly well-qualified candidate
for a role because she wore the same
perfume as his ex-wife,” says executive
consultant Danielle Beauparlant Moser.
“He said she walked in the room and his
only thought was how to get her out of
his office as quickly as possible.”
2. Know whom you’re meeting with
“Know the name of the interviewer so
that you can ask for that person at the
receptionist’s desk,” advises executive
coaching expert Cheryl Palmer. “It’s
embarrassing when the receptionist
asks, ‘Who are you here to see?’
and you can’t remember. Have this
information either in your head or write
yourself a note that you refer to prior
to arriving in the waiting area,” Palmer
adds.
3. Interview starts immediately
“Most people would never think of
the receptionist as being an interviewer,
but it’s true,” Palmer says. “It’s fairly
common that the receptionist will
report back to the hiring manager how
candidates behaved in the waiting
area. Don’t be remembered as the
one who spoke disrespectfully to the
receptionist.”
4. Make proper eye contact
“One of the most obvious mistakes
interviewees make is with eye contact,
and it costs a lot of people a lot of
jobs,” says career author Barry Maher.
“Eye contact is simple. Any given eye
contact should last about five seconds at
a time. And if there’s one interviewer,
make eye contact with him or her about
40 to 60 percent of the time.”
9 to 5
C6
SU N DAY , JA N UA RY 6 , 2 019
S
L AT I M E S . C O M / B U S I N E S S
‘Co-living’ a posh alternative for urbanites
[‘Co-living,’ from C1]
taking the next step: building from the ground up and
foreseeing a time when coliving is a new property category, like assisting living
complexes designed to serve
the growing numbers of
wealthy seniors.
A portfolio of buildings in
an established property
class can get funded by
banks, purchased by pension funds and even securitized in real estate investment trusts.
For now, though, co-living is still in its infancy and is
considered somewhat experimental. But if the small
developments emerging in
trendy housing markets like
Marina del Rey, Venice and
Echo Park succeed, more
will probably follow.
Another co-living housing developer, Anil Khera,
sees a link between co-living
and the upmarket student
housing complexes that
have sprung up around campuses in recent years. Those
have formed an established
new property category that
is a leap beyond the spartan
dormitories and crackerbox apartments of college
students a generation ago.
Complexes near USC
and UC Irvine, for instance,
offer such luxuries as 24hour fitness centers, tanning booths, billiards, barbecues, and resort-style
pools with cabanas. Furnished units come with
granite countertops, bigscreen HD television sets
and ice makers.
“You have millennials
who have grown up in pretty
fancy purpose-built apartments,” Khera said, and are
unaccustomed to “slumming it” in old, unfurnished
units once out of school.
Co-living, he said, is the
next step for graduates facing steep rents in desirable
urban neighborhoods. The
median rent for a vacant
apartment in Los Angeles,
San Diego and San Francisco is one-third higher
than it was in 2012. In November it hit $2,554 in Los
Angeles, according to Zillow.
Khera, a former executive at global private equity
real estate firm Blackstone,
in 2016 founded a co-living
company called Node as it
became apparent that millennials valued travel, memorable events and friendships over possessions.
“The aspiration for the
new generation growing up
globally connected on Instagram is about experiences
and connections,” he said.
“That’s the stuff that’s cool.”
Promotional materials
for Node’s new Echo Park
outpost boast that its two
1920s-vintage
bungalow
court complexes are “Instagram ready,” featuring “curated” furnished interiors
with designer kitchens that
include retro-looking Smeg
Italian refrigerators that retail for about $2,000.
The effect is indeed one of
an apartment — each unit
looks different — tricked out
for a lifestyle magazine
shoot, beyond the tastes and
means of ordinary apartment dwellers left to their
own decorating impulses.
“Our concept is like creating a SOHO House to live
in,” said Khera, referring to a
chain of members-only coworking clubs for people in
creative fields known for
chic interiors and sophis-
Photographs by
THE C1 BUILDING , which recently opened in Marina del Rey, offers fitness
equipment, maid service and many other communal amenities.
THE SUNROOM in a Node unit. The notion of co-living is hardly new, a housing
expert says, but there may be a market for the upscale version of it emerging now.
ticated dining options.
Node, based in London,
looks to convert old housing
representative of the historic architectural style of its
locale, such as a brownstone
in Brooklyn, a 200-year-old
Georgian Square housing
complex in Dublin and the
bungalow courts in Los Angeles.
Not all of the Echo Park
units, which start at $2,850,
are co-living. Many of them
are meant for a single person
or a couple. The close quar-
ters of the bungalow court
layout instill an aura of community, however, and Node
envisions residents interacting with the encouragement
of a “community curator”
who will help people find
roommates and arrange
group events such as concerts and cookouts.
The notion of co-living is
hardly new, housing expert
Richard K. Green said, but
there may be a market for
the upscale version of it
emerging now.
“A hundred years ago,
people commonly lived in
boarding houses, sharing a
kitchen and a bathroom
down the hall,” said Green,
director of the USC Lusk
Center for Real Estate.
The country is wealthier
now and people are less accustomed to cohabitating
with non-relatives, but the
market is still potentially
vast — about 16% of adults
live with non-relatives such
as roommates, Green said.
Still, it remains to be seen
& BY APPOINTMENT DIRECTORY
Sherman Oaks
Open Sunday 1-4
3949 Oakfield Drive
3/4
Coldwell Banker / Barry Dantagnan
Gary Coronado Los Angeles Times
CO-LIVING is an “expansion of the housing market in the shared economy,” developer Ken Kahan says.
whether the emerging co-living luxury model will generate substantial demand.
“Whether people will want to
live this way in large numbers, I don’t know,” Green
said.
Even Kahan of California
Landmark, who funded C1
without institutional money,
is taking baby steps. Only
about 20% of the 68 units at
the Marina del Rey complex
are co-living; the rest are traditional singles and multibedrooms.
Green said small-scale
tests of the concept, such as
the projects emerging today,
could attract venture capital, and “if it works you have
an IPO and go from there.”
Starcity, one of the country’s largest co-living providers and the manager of
California Landmark’s C1
building, is betting that
there is a big niche it can
profitably fill as housing
costs rise in job-rich urban
centers.
Starcity Chief Executive
Jon Dishotsky launched the
company in 2016 in San Francisco, where it developed its
first co-living building, after
polling young middle-income urbanites about how
they were dealing with high
housing costs.
The majority, he found,
coped one of three ways: by
commuting long distances
from cheaper neighborhoods, by squeezing into
small apartments with multiple roommates, or by
spending as much as 70% of
their income on rent. There
was no solution on the supply side of the equation to a
“hair on fire” situation on the
demand side, he said.
Starcity’s portfolio already has expanded to 300
units owned or managed,
and it expects be operating
500 more units this year. An
additional
3,000
are
planned, mostly in San
Francisco and Los Angeles
County, Dishotsky said.
The co-housing model
has proved profitable for the
company, because there is a
large pool of renters who
cannot afford market rates
but are willing to squeeze
into shared units for a break
on the rent. In Venice and
near Marina del Rey,
monthly Starcity rents will
be in the low-$2,000 range
compared with about $3,000
for a nice studio apartment
in the area.
Aside from the recent college graduates or other
young people early in their
careers who view co-living as
a “lily pad” to land on before
working their way up to
more expensive, conventional housing, the model attracts a second group,
Dishotsky said.
He calls them “restarters” — people 30 to 50
who might be coming out of
a divorce or are otherwise
launching a second act in
their lives. “Maybe they had
a house and a family and
want to be taken care of instead of taking care of other
people.”
With either type, one of
the challenges for managers
of co-living arrangements is
raising the probability that
the tenants will get along.
The renters tend to be a
self-selecting group adaptable to harmonious group
living, developers say, but
they reserve the authority to
relocate people who aren’t
getting along to other units
or to eject troublemakers.
Activity directors who work
for the owners try to smooth
disputes before they get
problematic.
Co-living developers also
do what they can to minimize disagreements among
tenants by providing services such as housekeeping
that can be a point of conflict. And with a few taps on a
phone app, residents at C1
can get stress-reducing
services for a fee, such as
having staff walk their dogs
or tidy up their bedrooms
“because a special someone
is coming over,” Dishotsky
said.
A resident of Starcity’s
Venice property, Jen McConnell, likes the residence’s
online community messaging system where people
check in with one another
and find out about group
events such as meditation,
tea tasting and a trivia contest. It’s provided by Slack,
the popular service that is
displacing email in many offices.
The Chicago-based financial advisor in her 30s
wanted to stay near the
beach during her stay of a
few months and was attracted to the communal nature of the three-floor Venice
complex in part because she
has few friends in town. She
likes the neighborhood and
the rooftop deck with ocean
views.
“It’s maybe for people
who are really focused on the
location and the community,” she said.
The next frontier may be
providing co-living beyond
the current model aimed primarily at single adults by
bringing more parents with
children into the fold.
“We’re trying to figure out
how to do this for families,”
Dishotsky said, such as providing more spaces conducive to youngsters’ play
and rooms for relatives and
nannies.
“There is a generational
shift,” said the developer,
who at 34 is an older millennial. “Do I need a house with
a white picket fence? Maybe
not.”
roger.vincent
@latimes.com
Twitter: @rogervincent
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S
L AT I M E S . C O M / B U S I N E S S
S U N DAY , JA N UA RY 6 , 2 019
C7
Cannabis tours visit growers and bong makers
[Cannabis, from C1]
Jones, who works as a resources specialist at Los Angeles Unified School District, launched Weedology
tours in February as a parttime gig that she hopes can
eventually grow to a fulltime job.
Ed Legarda is a tech-industry consultant who
started Green Line Trips in
January. It primarily offers
tours on the weekends, but
he hopes it will expand to
daily operation.
Cannabis tourism also
has caught on in other
places where weed is legal,
such as Colorado and Nevada. It’s part of myriad ancillary businesses that make
up the marijuana industry,
including compliance consultants, cannabis testing
labs, ultraviolet lighting installers, security firms and
transportation services.
The National Cannabis
Industry Assn., a trade
group based in Colorado,
has nearly 2,000 business
members, with about 60% to
70% of those companies providing services that don’t involve selling marijuana,
spokesman Morgan Fox
said.
“We have seen an explosion of businesses related to
cannabis,” he said.
Nationwide, the sale of
cannabis directly or indirectly employed an estimated 170,000 full-time workers in 2017, according to a
study by Arcview Group, an
Oakland-based firm for investors in the marijuana industry.
That number is expected
to grow to more than 467,000
full-time workers in 2022, the
firm estimates.
A tour with Green Tours
on a Saturday afternoon in
December started at a parking lot next to the Universal
City metro station. The
guests, mostly journalists
wanting to know more about
the tour, loaded into a black
Mercedes-Benz van.
The tour was led by a
young, gregarious guide,
Ryan Lance, who stood in
the front of the van, explaining the schedule and recounting the legal history of
cannabis in the U.S. Reggae
music videos blasted from
an
overhead
television
Patrick T. Fallon For The Times
COMEDIAN and cannabis rights activist Tommy Chong on the roof of his home in Pacific Palisades in 2017.
screen.
Guests were not allowed
to smoke cannabis in the van
to avoid putting the driver
under the influence. Other
tour companies, such as
Green Line Trips, allow
smoking in the van because
the cab in those vehicles is
separated from the passenger area.
The first stop for Green
Tours was a grow facility and
dispensary on Vineland
Boulevard in North Hollywood called MMD, run by
Michael Ashbel, a former
real estate agent, and his
brother Steve, the former coowner of an adult day-care
facility.
The Ashbel brothers led
guests to a large upstairs
room where small pot
plants, no more than 2 feet
tall, grew from hydroponic
containers, nourished 24
hours a day by halogen and
UV lights.
Next, the group was escorted to another expansive
room where marijuana
plants grew 4 to 5 feet high.
The lighting, the temperature and even the breezes
from electric fans were
monitored around the clock.
In this room, the grow
managers trick the plants
into thinking that their life
cycle is ending by reducing
the lighting to only 12 hours a
day. This prompts the plants
to begin to flower, producing
buds with sticky resin
glands, or trichomes, that
contain the psychoactive ingredients that create the euphoric high for people who
smoke or ingest it.
Once the plants are
heavy with buds, the
branches are cut and hung
upside down in another
room so they can dry and
cure before a team of men
and women use tiny pruning
shears to harvest the buds.
Most of the plants produced by MMD are a variation of the popular strain of
cannabis called OG Skywalker or OG Kush, which is
known for its high tetrahydrocannabinol
(THC)
content, Ashbel said.
After visiting the dispensary, where guests are offered discounts on cannabis
products and accessories,
the van headed along
Tampa Avenue in Reseda to
American Made Glass, a
small manufacturer of glass
pipes and bongs.
In the small, cluttered
shop owned by Pazit Tsoar,
the tour guests watched
glass blower Ivan Dominguez make a three-chamber
water bong using a large
lathe that spun long glass
tubes while he wielded a
blowtorch to heat and shape
the glass.
Across the street from
the glass company, the
guests visited the company’s retail outlet, which was
crowded with shelves lined
with bongs and pipes in the
shapes of horses, pigs, parrots, pandas, rocket ships
and monsters, among other
designs.
After a tour of the store,
the guests were invited to a
picnic table in a backyard
area behind the outlet for
lessons in joint rolling, with
mounds of oregano substituted for real marijuana.
The day ended with a jointrolling contest, with the winner awarded airtight glass
jars with the Green Tours
logo emblazoned on the outside, perfect for storing mar-
ijuana.
One of the biggest surprises for cannabis tour operators is that the customers
haven’t been limited to
young, pot-loving locals.
Instead, a majority of
people booking tours are
out-of-town baby boomers
who are bored with the typical sightseeing excursions.
Entrepreneurs interested in
jumping into the cannabis
business are also frequent
cannabis tour guests.
“Our demographics are
totally different than we expected,” said Grozovskiy,
noting that he recently gave
a tour to a group of UCLA
doctors who wanted to learn
more about cannabis.
Carol Mulligan, a retired
pharmacy employee from
Merritt Island, Fla., and her
husband, Bob, a retired investment advisor, took a
cannabis tour with Green
Tours about five months ago
during a Los Angeles stop on
a road trip in their recreational vehicle.
“I took it because I was
curious,” Carol Mulligan
said. “It was something new
to do.”
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hugo.martin@latimes.com
Twitter: @hugomartin
LA Times
Mortgage Guide
Institution
The couple didn’t buy
any cannabis products, even
though tour guests get a discount. But Mulligan said she
was tempted to buy a water
pipe — an unusual souvenir
to share with the folks back
home.
“I wanted to because they
were so unique,” she said.
Like many pot-related
businesses, cannabis tour
operators have faced unique
challenges.
Cannabis tour companies have had to draw customers without the help of
established travel booking
websites, such as Expedia,
which are reluctant to accept ads for any cannabisrelated business — even if
they don’t actually sell marijuana.
“Because of the challenging landscape with varied
and inconsistent laws related to cannabis throughout the United States, Expedia currently does not list
cannabis-related tours or
activities,” an Expedia representative said in a statement.
As a result, tour operators say they are relying
on distributing pamphlets,
word-of-mouth advertising
or European-based travel
sites that have more liberal
policies toward pot-related
businesses.
Getyourguide.com, an
online travel site based in
Berlin, advertises Green
Tours, but the site’s managers say they will add other
cannabis tours only after
they are evaluated and proven to be legitimate tours.
“We don’t have any issue
putting up these cannabis
tours as long as they are not
directly advertising the sale
of cannabis,” said Andy
Hunter, destination manager for Getyourguide.com
in California and Nevada.
Another advertising alternative for cannabis tours
has been Groupon, the online marketplace for discounted goods and services.
Legarda of Green Line
Trips said his business was
struggling until he began to
advertise on Groupon.
“It went on Groupon,” he
said, “and sales took off.”
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Savings Update
Top 3 reasons mortgage applications are denied
It’s estimated that about 1 of every 8 mortgage applications But a decent score isn’t enough on its own. Lenders also want
is denied. And the vast majority are rejected for one of three to see a suficient length and breadth of credit history, meaning
someone with a single credit card on their report, opened in the
reasons.
last year or two, won’t give the lender ample evidence to predict
According to a Federal Reserve study of 2015 mortgage your payment behavior.
application data, the No. 1 factor behind mortgage denials is
failing the lender’s debt-to-income (DTI) ratio test. This calculation The third most common reason for denial is a problem with the
indicates what proportion of your monthly income is allocated to property’s price. If the appraisal inds the price is signiicantly
higher than the home’s fair market value, the lender won’t be
recurring debts, including your new mortgage payment.
willing to fund the originally requested mortgage amount. This
If the sum of your monthly payments to credit cards, car loans, often happens in bidding war situations, where the price is driven
student loans and your new mortgage totals $3,000, and your high enough that the winner actually becomes a loser in inalizing
monthly gross income is $6,000, your DTI would be 50 percent. the mortgage.
But lenders want to see that ratio at 45 percent or lower, so
All of these problems can be solved by the applicant either over
exceeding it will likely get your application stamped “Denied”.
time or by choosing a different property. But being aware of these
Almost as common in triggering rejections is an inadequate credit factors in advance may save you from being rejected in the irst
score or history. If your score is too low, that’s an obvious red lag. place.
Rate Criteria: The rates and annual percentage rate (APR) are effective as of 01/02/19. All rates, fees and other information are subject to change without notice. RateSeeker, LLC. does not guarantee the accuracy of the information appearing above or the availability of
rates and fees in this table. The institutions appearing in this table pay a fee to appear in this table. Annual percentage rates (APRs) are based on fully indexed rates for adjustable rate mortgages (ARMs). The APR on your specific loan may differ from the sample used.
All rates are quoted on a minimum FICO score of 740. Conventional loans are based on loan amounts of $165,000. Jumbo loans are based on loan amounts of $484,351. Lock Days: 30-60. Points quoted include discount and/or origination. Payments do not include
amounts for taxes and insurance. The APR may increase after consummation and may vary. FHA Mortgages include both UFMIP and MIP fees based on a loan amount of $165,000 with 5% down payment. Points quoted include discount and/or origination. Fees reflect
charges relative to the APR. If your down payment is less than 20% of the home’s value, you will be subject to private mortgage insurance, or PMI. VA Mortgages include funding fees based on a loan amount of $165,000 with 5% down payment. If your down payment
is less than 20% of the home’s value, you will be subject to private mortgage insurance, or PMI. Stated income loans may have a higher interest rate, more points or more fees than other products requiring documentation. The fees set forth for each advertisement
above may be charged to open the Licensed by the Department of Business Oversight under the California Residential Mortgage Lending Act, (BA) indicates Licensed Mortgage Banker, NYS Banking Dept., (BR) indicates Registered Mortgage Broker, NYS
Banking Dept., (loans arranged through third parties). “Call for Rates” means actual rates were not available at press time. To access the NMLS Consumer Access website, please visit www.nmlsconsumeraccess.org. To appear in this table, call 773-320-8492.
C8
SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
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D
SPORTS
S U N D A Y , J A N U A R Y 6 , 2 0 1 9 :: L A T I M E S . C O M / S P O R T S
Fair or
foul, he
is most
valuable
NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP GAME
1 Alabama
vs. 2 Clemson
LEVI’S STADIUM | SANTA CLARA | MONDAY, 5 P.M. TV: ESPN
Harden’s heroics (and
ability to get to the
line) have Rockets hot
on Warriors’ heels.
DAN WOIKE
ON THE NBA
OAKLAND — Before
James Harden made an
impossibly difficult shot last
week to stun the Golden
State Warriors at Oracle
Arena, before he reminded
everyone why he’s the NBA’s
most valuable player, before
he rebuked anyone griping
about his free-throw hunting, he had to get ready to
play.
The pregame routine —
one that begins with him
wearing his full sweats,
hood pulled tightly over his
head — is almost completed
before tipoff. He’s done
dancing with center Clint
Capela. He’s stripped off the
sweats. He’s ready to ball.
There’s just one last
thing to do.
As Harden jogs onto the
middle of the court, he turns
right and heads for the
basket opposite the Rockets’ bench. Without slowing
down, he jumps directly into
the padded base of the
basket.
It won’t be the last time
he goes looking for contact.
Harden’s on pace to
shoot more than 900 free
throws this season — and if
he gets there, it’ll be just the
third time in the last 25
[See Woike, D8]
Marcio Jose Sanchez AP
JAMES HARDEN says
he’s “the total package,”
and he’s not wrong.
Wilfredo Lee Associated Press
ALABAMA QUARTERBACK Tua Tagovailoa celebrates after a victory over Oklahoma in the Orange Bowl that put the Crimson Tide
in the national championship game Monday. Tagovailoa became a star when he came off the bench in last year’s title game.
Almost a poi-to-Troy story
When the Tide roll,
these guys are only
along for the ride
If not for his family,
Tagovailoa could
have been at USC
BILL PLASCHKE
By David Wharton
SAN JOSE — The arena floor that
houses the CFP national championship media day is arranged like
the cliques in a high school cafeteria.
The stars and important
coaches sit on stages. The rest of
the offense, defense, special teams
and coaching staff are given their
groups of tables.
The big names attract all the cameras and
microphones. The lesser names are surrounded
by notebooks and tape recorders.
For Alabama on Saturday at SAP Center,
there was one group that sat alone.
Their table was full, but empty. Their table
was in the middle of the room, but completely
invisible.
The eight young men
[See Plaschke, D11]
SAN JOSE — Squint your eyes until that
crimson jersey turns a slightly darker shade of
cardinal. Imagine those white pants becoming
gold.
With top-ranked Alabama playing for the national championship Monday night, USC fans
can be forgiven for daydreaming about what
might have been.
What if quarterback Tua Tagovailoa had
stepped off the plane in Los Angeles, instead of
continuing east to Tuscaloosa, when he left high
school in Hawaii? What if the big, strong-armed
sophomore had guided the Trojans’ offense this
season?
“Our team was USC growing up,” he says. “I
used to be No. 11 because of Matt Leinart. He was
a lefty, as well.”
Back in 2016, when [See Tagovailoa, D11]
‘New world’ for
most Chargers
Players remain confident despite
lack of playoff experience on roster
By Jeff Miller
BALTIMORE — This
won’t be Isaac Rochell’s first
playoff game for the Chargers.
But it should be the first
in which he doesn’t play both
ways.
His NFL employers are
unlikely to use the young defensive lineman as a fullback
and a tight end Sunday
against Baltimore.
That’s what happened
when the Eagle’s Landing
Christian Academy Chargers beat Prince Avenue
Christian in 2012 to win the
Georgia Class A private
schools state championship.
Sunday’s
quick-turnaround rematch against the
Ravens — Baltimore beat
the Chargers 22-10 just two
weeks ago in Carson — will
be Rochell’s first playoff appearance since that 33-0
prep victory.
“I anticipate there being
[See Chargers, D4]
Thearon W. Henderson Getty Images
SOME ALABAMA walk-ons are sure
coach Nick Saban doesn’t know them.
NFL PLAYOFFS
WILD-CARD ROUND
<<< SATURDAY’S RESULTS >>>
Indianapolis 21
Houston 7
Dallas 24
Seattle 22
NEXT: No. 6 seed Indianapolis
will face No. 1 Kansas City
NEXT: No. 4 seed Dallas will face
No. 1 New Orleans or No. 2 Rams
Luck guides Colts to an
early advantage and a
victory on the road. D5
Prescott leads Cowboys, as
Seahawks are hurt by the
loss of their kicker. D3
<<< TODAY’S GAMES >>>
Ron Jenkins Associated Press
CHARGERS AT
BALTIMORE
10 a.m., Channel 2
PHILADELPHIA AT
CHICAGO
1:30 p.m., Channel 4
THE ’B OYS ARE BACK
Quarterback Dak Prescott is fired up as Dallas
picks up its first postseason victory in four years.
TISSOT chrono xl .
LOS ANGELES LAKERS
special edition.
OFFICIAL WATCH
OFFICIAL WATCH
OF THE LOS ANGELES LAKERS
AVAILABLE AT US.TISSOTSHOP.COM AND SELECT WATCH AND JEWELRY STORES NATIONWIDE
D2
S
SU N DAY , JA N UA RY 6 , 2 019
L AT I M E S . C O M / S P O RT S
PRO CALENDAR
SUN.
6
MON.
7
TUE.
8
WED.
9
THU.
10
NEXT: SATURDAY VS. TBD, 5:15 P.M., CH. 11*
Dodgers need to get on the
ball and sign Harper already
RAMS
times as much as it did when
Alex Rodriguez signed a
then-record 10-year, $252million contract with the
Texas Rangers in 2000.
Whereas teams such as
the Washington Nationals,
Philadelphia Phillies and
Chicago White Sox have
made public their interest in
Harper, the Dodgers have
remained secretive about
their intentions. That has
been their standard mode of
operation in their four-plus
years with Andrew Friedman
as president of baseball
operations.
Only in this particular
case, there shouldn’t be any
questions about whether the
Dodgers are pursuing Harper. They absolutely should be.
Anything less would be an
insult to the fans who have
made the Dodgers the major
league leaders in home attendance in each of the last
six years. The fans have
tolerated escalating ticket
prices. Many of them can’t
watch the team on television
because of the broadcasting
deal that guaranteed the
franchise more than $8 billion. They accepted the
team’s plan to reduce payroll
last year, even if it resulted in
the lack of firepower necessary to compete against the
Boston Red Sox in the World
Series. And they have responded to the trade of their
beloved Puig by taking a
wait-and-see approach.
The Dodgers have rewarded their customers for
their loyalty, first by taking
DYLAN HERNANDEZ
CHARGERS
LAKERS
at
Baltimore*
10 a.m.
Channel 2
at
Minnesota
12:30
SpecSN
DETROIT
7:30
SpecSN, ESPN
at Dallas
5:30
SpecSN
at Denver
6
Prime
CHARLOTTE
7:30
Prime
ORLANDO
12:30
Prime
CLIPPERS
OTTAWA
7:30
FSW
at San Jose
7:30
NBCSN
KINGS
EDMONTON
5
Prime
OTTAWA
7
Prime
DUCKS
Shade denotes home game; *NFL playoffs
TODAY ON THE AIR
TIME
EVENT
BASKETBALL
12:30 p.m. Orlando at Clippers
ON THE AIR
12:30 p.m. Lakers at Minnesota
4:30 p.m. Indiana at Toronto
BOWLING
8 a.m.
PBA, Hall of Fame Classic
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
9 a.m.
Xavier at Marquette
9 a.m.
Women, Southern Methodist at Cincinnati
9 a.m.
Richmond at Dayton
9 a.m.
Women, Connecticut at Houston
9 a.m.
Women, Alabama at South Carolina
10 a.m.
Women, Baylor at Texas Tech
10 a.m.
Illinois at Northwestern
10 a.m.
Women, Auburn at Florida
10 a.m.
Seton Hall at DePaul
10 a.m.
Women, St. John’s at Butler
11 a.m.
Women, Missouri at Tennessee
11 a.m.
George Washington at St. Joseph’s
11 a.m.
Women, Georgetown at Creighton
11 a.m.
Women, Texas Christian at Oklahoma State
11 a.m.
Women, Arizona at Utah
Noon
Women, Notre Dame at Georgia Tech
Noon
Women, Arkansas at Mississippi
1 p.m.
Women, Texas at West Virginia
1 p.m.
Temple at Wichita State
1 p.m.
St. Bonaventure at George Mason
1 p.m.
Rhode Island at St. Louis
1 p.m.
Women, UCLA at Stanford
1:30 p.m. Indiana at Michigan
2 p.m.
Women, Kentucky at Mississippi State
2:30 p.m. Nebraska at Iowa
3 p.m.
Memphis at Houston
3 p.m.
Miami at Louisville
3 p.m.
Women, Washington State at Oregon
3 p.m.
Women, USC at California
4:30 p.m. Wisconsin at Penn State
5 p.m.
Stanford at USC
COLLEGE WRESTLING
12:15 p.m. Rutgers at Minnesota
3 p.m.
North Carolina State at Ohio State
GOLF
3 p.m.
PGA Tour, Sentry Tournament of Champions, final
round
HOCKEY
2 p.m.
Washington at Detroit
5 p.m.
Edmonton at Ducks
5 p.m.
Chicago at Pittsburgh
HORSE RACING
Noon
Trackside Live! Santa Anita
3:30 p.m. Trackside Live! Santa Ynez
4:30 p.m. Trackside Live! Santa Anita
5 p.m.
The Quarters featuring Los Alamitos
PRO FOOTBALL
10 a.m.
Chargers at Baltimore
1:30 p.m. Philadelphia at Chicago
RUBGY
7 a.m.
Premiership, Wasps vs. Northampton
SOCCER
7 a.m.
Spain, Sevilla vs. Atletico Madrid
9:15 a.m. Spain, Real Madrid vs. Real Sociedad
9:30 a.m. Mexico, Pumas UNAM vs. Veracruz
9:30 a.m. Portugal, Benfica vs. Rio Ave
11:30 a.m. Spain, Getafe vs. Barcelona
Noon
Portugal, Braga vs. Boavista
1:30 p.m. Mexico, Lobos BUAP vs. Santos Laguna
TENNIS
3 p.m.
Center Court, Auckland-ATP, Sydney-ATP/WTA and
Hobart-WTA, early round
TV: Prime
R: 570, 1220
TV: SpecSN
R: 710, 1330
TV: NBATV
TV: FS1
TV: 11
TV: ESPN2
TV: NBCSN
TV: CBSSN
TV: ESPNU
TV: FSW
TV: Big Ten
TV: SEC
TV: FS1
TV: FS2
TV: ESPN2
TV: NBCSN
TV: CBSSN
TV: ESPNU
TV: Pac-12
TV: FSW
TV: SEC
TV: ESPN2
TV: ESPNews
TV: NBCSN
TV: ESPNU
TV: Pac-12
TV: 2
TV: SEC
TV: Big Ten
TV: ESPNews
TV: ESPNU
TV: Pac-12
TV: Pac-12LA
TV: Big Ten
TV: ESPNU R: 710
TV: Big Ten
TV: ESPN2
TV: Golf
TV: NHL
TV: Prime R: 830
TV: NBCSN
TV: TVG
TV: TVG
TV: TVG
TV: TVG
TV: 2 R: 640, 980
TV: 4
TV: NBCSN
TV: beIN1, beINES
TV: beIN1, beINES
TV: KMEX, UDN
TV: GOLTV
TV: beIN1, beINES
TV: GOLTV
TV: ESPND, UDN
TV: Tennis
Because of
their relative
frugality last
year, the
Dodgers will
be penalized
as first-time
offenders if
their payroll
for next season exceeds the luxury-tax
threshold. And because they
traded Yasiel Puig and Matt
Kemp to the Cincinnati Reds,
they can take on another
outfielder.
So where’s Bryce Harper?
The Dodgers would be a
better team with Harper in
their lineup. They would be a
more interesting team. They
would have the star attraction this star-driven city
demands.
So, again, where’s Bryce
Harper?
With five weeks or so left
until the start of spring training, the former National
League most valuable player
remains a free agent. The
free-agent market’s other
prize, Manny Machado, is
also unsigned.
The reason is that the
homogeneity of thought
across front offices has created nearly an entire league
of risk-averse teams that are
reluctant to offer long-term
contracts to even a couple of
26-year-old franchise cornerstones. The teams are counting on their fans to not notice
the sport generates nearly $10
billion annually, almost three
Carolyn Kaster Associated Press
THE DODGERS have
remained quiet about
their intentions with free
agent Bryce Harper.
on hundreds of millions of
dollars in player salaries in
the early stages of the
Guggenheim Baseball Management’s ownership, then
by reaching the World Series
in each of the last two years.
But if the fans are continuing
to do their part, it’s crucial for
the franchise to do so as well.
A start would be to stop
pretending the luxury-tax
threshold is an impenetrable
barrier that prevents the
team from doing what it
should. Anyway, didn’t they
stay under the limit last year
so they could go over it this
year?
The slow-moving markets
for Harper and Machado are
further evidence the teams
are beating the players in the
public relations arena.
Teams have convinced their
fans that players rarely live
up to long-term contracts.
Only this is a matter of perspective. The reality is that if
star players were paid what
they were really worth, they
would earn considerably
more on an annual basis.
Contracts are lengthened as
a means of deferring compensation.
Of course, that’s not what
the fans see. When they see a
player in his mid- to late-30s
getting $25 million, they think
he’s stealing money, when in
reality he probably should
have already collected that
$25 million on top of whatever
he made as a 30-year-old at
the height of his powers. So if
the Dodgers are looking for a
shorter deal, that’s fine. But
they should be prepared to
pay accordingly.
The degree to which the
Dodgers pursue Harper will
say a lot about where they are
headed as a franchise. At the
moment, they have a worse
team than they had last year.
Not making a serious effort to
acquire Harper or some
other frontline player will be
an indication they are ceasing to be what they were in
recent years, a team that
combines financial might
with the insights cultivated
by its analytics department.
That would be shameful.
Their fans have behaved like
fans in a major market. The
franchise has to behave like
it’s from one too.
dylan.hernandez@latimes.com
Twitter: @dylanohernandez
For Galaxy, offseason success
can no longer afford the
mistakes of the last two seasons, when it spent more than
$2.5 million to bring in players
such as Michael Ciani, Joao
Pedro, Jermaine Jones and
Jorgen Skjelvik, all of whom
disappointed.
“You learn from all the
experiences that we’ve had,”
Klein said.
Te Kloese returns to MLS
from the Mexican soccer
federation, where he ran the
national team program.
Before that he was in charge
of the federation’s youth
national teams, ran scouting
or player development departments for two Mexican
league clubs and was soccer
director for Chivas USA,
helping that team to four
consecutive playoff appearances.
He is highly regarded for
his work in youth development — he saw Mexico win
a U-17 World Cup and an
Olympic title — expertise the
Galaxy will need as they
continue efforts to link the
first team with Galaxy II,
their USL affiliate, and their
academy program.
“With the great investment that the Galaxy [have]
in their academy and in their
second team, there should be
a real development project,”
Te Kloese said. “Far from
being an academy, it should
be a project that really develops players. Because there’s
potential, there’s talent.”
The Galaxy also have to
give that talent a chance to
play. The team was stung last
fall by the departures of U-20
national team players Uly
Llanez and Alex Mendez, who
left in part because they saw
no clear path to the first
team.
“The only thing to attract
these players and keep these
players is if they feel that
there’s an opportunity,” Te
Kloese said.
KEVIN BAXTER
ON SOCCER
Chris Klein slid behind a
heavy wooden table, folded
his hands on top and grinned.
The last 26 months have
been rough for the Galaxy’s
president, who has gone
through four coaches, two
years without a playoff berth
and 30 losses, a franchise
record for consecutive seasons. Minutes earlier he had
presided over a news conference in which he introduced
the two men he looks upon to
be the team’s saviors: Dennis
te Kloese, the new general
manager, and Guillermo
Barros Schelotto, the new
coach.
The gloomy clouds, it
seems, are parting, giving
Klein reason to smile.
“We have a lot of work to
do,” he said. “But the optimism is real. A fresh perspective in bringing these guys in
to lead it is something I’m
certainly encouraged by.”
He’s encouraged, too, by
the re-signing of Zlatan
Ibrahimovic to a one-year,
$7.2-million contract, the
richest in MLS history, as well
as the decision of Dominic
Kinnear, the Galaxy’s caretaker coach at the end of last
season, to return as part of
Schelotto’s staff. Some deft
offseason shuffling has allowed the Galaxy to return 10
starters while banking $1
million.
“We are feeling very positive,” echoed Dan Beckerman, chief executive officer of
the team’s parent company,
entertainment giant AEG.
“We have a lot of the right
pieces in place, on the field
and off.”
Most important is the fact
that the pieces seem to fit
together, something that
hasn’t always been the case
with the Galaxy. The team
Schelotto, who won an
MLS Cup as a player with the
Columbus Crew, comes to the
Galaxy from Argentine superclub Boca Juniors, which he
coached to consecutive
Primera Division titles and a
berth in last year’s Copa
Libertadores final. Before
that, he took Lanus to a Copa
Sudamericana title in his first
coaching stop.
He is a proponent of attractive, attacking soccer
and, like Te Kloese, believes in
young players (six of the 11
starters he fielded in the last
Copa Libertadores game
were younger than 26).
“To appoint Guillermo,
that was a huge point. In the
two jobs he had in Argentina,
he’s been open to that,” Te
Kloese said.
The Galaxy talked to
other candidates and were
close to hiring former Portland Timbers coach Caleb
Porter, but Schelotto was
always Te Kloese’s first
choice. So when Boca Juniors
announced in mid-December
that they would not be extending Schelotto’s contract,
Te Kloese pounced, closing
the deal in less than two
weeks.
“I do feel like we found the
right people,” Beckerman
said. “Dennis has a top-tobottom vision and philosophy, and his first priority was
hiring the head coach. Now he
will turn his attention to
building out the rest of the
structure. The important
thing is that we get the structure right, from the academy
to Galaxy II to the first team.”
With only two weeks until
the opening of training camp,
there’s much left undone.
Ibrahimovic’s contract requires a designated-player
tag, one the Galaxy will have
to create by trading, releasing
or renegotiating the contract
of one of their three current
DPs — Romain Alessandrini,
Jonathan dos Santos or Gio
dos Santos.
“What that’s going to look
like we genuinely don’t know
yet,” Klein said.
In addition, Te Kloese
must hire a full-time academy
director, something the
Galaxy have been without for
two years, and fill out a thin
scouting department that
shrunk further last week
when top scout Kurt Schmid
was named technical director
for David Beckham’s fledgling team in Miami.
Te Kloese also wants to
reorient the Galaxy’s scouting philosophy toward Latin
America, both to take advantage of the contacts he and
Schelotto have in the region
and to further explore what
has been an attractive market
for MLS clubs in recent years.
The Galaxy were the only
MLS team without a South
American player last season.
“I have a lot of work to do,”
Te Kloese said. “And to be
honest, I think that was part
of the decision to come here.
There’s a whole lot of things
in place, there’s a whole lot of
resources, there’s a lot of
pieces to the puzzle that
already are here.
“But there’s also a few
pieces missing and a few
pieces a little bit out of place.”
Most of the missing pieces
are on the backline. Behind a
team-high 22 scores from
Ibrahimovic, the Galaxy were
third in the league with 66
goals last season. But they
also gave up 64, fifth most in
MLS.
“We need additions there,”
Klein said of the defense.
That’s just a minor detail.
Now that the dark clouds
have parted, a rosier big
picture has come into focus
and Klein is enjoying the view.
“The future,” Klein promised, “looks bright for us.”
kevin.baxter@latimes.com
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S
L AT I M E S . C O M / S P O RT S
D3
S U N DAY , JA N UA RY 6 , 2 019
They’ve done
a Super Bowl
run, so listen
By Gary Klein
Tom Pennington Getty Images
EZEKIEL ELLIOTT, fighting off Seattle cornerback Shaquill Griffin for extra yards in the fourth quarter,
rushed for 137 yards and a touchdown in 26 carries as the Cowboys advanced to the divisional round.
Cowboys’ draw is winner
Prescott makes key
play in the fourth
quarter as Seahawks’
rally comes up short.
DALLAS 24
SEATTLE 22
By Sam Farmer
ARLINGTON, Texas —
Call it the Cowboys cartwheel.
In one glorious, headover-heels moment, Dallas
Cowboys quarterback Dak
Prescott launched his team
into the second round of the
NFL playoffs for the first
time in four years.
On third-and-14 from the
Seattle 17 late in the fourth
quarter Saturday, Prescott
ran a gutsy quarterback
draw up the middle and was
stopped a yard shy of the end
zone, flipping forward as he
fought for more yardage. He
would plunge into the end
zone on the next snap, giving
Dallas a lead it would never
relinquish in a 24-22 victory
over the Seahawks.
“Somehow, some way, he
was going to figure this thing
out for us,” Cowboys coach
Jason Garrett said of
Prescott, whose dramatic
tumble evoked memories of
Denver’s John Elway helicoptering into the end zone
in the Super Bowl.
“When it’s third-and-14,
you don’t really anticipate
making that.”
The Cowboys’ secondround opponent hinges on
the outcome of Sunday’s
game between Philadelphia
and Chicago.
If the Bears win, they will
play the Rams in the divisional round, and the Cowboys will play at New Orleans. If the Eagles pull off the
upset, they will play at the
Saints, and the Cowboys will
face the Rams.
Prescott said he doesn’t
have a preference, and he’s
simply happy to be moving
forward. But he conceded it
would be fun to face the
Saints — a team the Cowboys beat last month — in
his home state of Louisiana.
As for his spectacular run
up the middle Saturday
night, Prescott shrugged
about it when asked.
“When we call any play,
they’re all designed to get
touchdowns,” he said. “We
don’t necessarily say, ‘Oh,
this is a five-yard play.’ But
when coach called that play,
I don’t know if we expected it
to go 16, but everybody just
did their job. Guys got on a
body, made some blocks,
and allowed me some running space to get down there
close to the end zone.”
Meanwhile, the wheels
came off the Seahawks’ topranked ground game. Despite their dogged insistence
to keep running the ball,
they gained only 73 yards
that way, less than half their
160-yard average.
Of course, a stifling Dallas defense had a lot to do
with that, one drawn up by
coordinator Kris Richard,
the former USC player who
learned under Pete Carroll
in Seattle.
Prescott’s
touchdown
put the Cowboys up by 10
with 2:14 to play, and in a
game in which both clubs
struggled to find an offensive
rhythm, that would seem to
be enough. But Russell Wilson connected on a 53-yard
pass that set up a seven-yard
touchdown toss with 1:22
left. A conversion run cut the
Dallas lead to two.
But that was it for the
Seahawks, whose pooch onside kick attempt was recov-
ered by the Cowboys. Two
kneel-downs by Prescott
and he had his first postseason victory.
It was also the first for
Ezekiel Elliott, who led all
rushers with 137 yards in 26
carries, and for Cowboys receiver Amari Cooper, who
had a game-high nine
catches for 106 yards.
The Cowboys dominated
the time of possession,
34:50-25:10, and successfully
played keep-away from the
more experienced Seahawks,
delighting
the
packed house at AT&T Stadium.
Dallas led at the half, 10-6,
having scored the game’s
only touchdown on an 11yard reception by rookie
Michael Gallup with 24 seconds to play.
Thanks to a big return
and a couple of completions,
the Seahawks were able to
make a last-gasp attempt to
narrow the deficit, but
Sebastian Janikowski’s 57yard field goal attempt
sailed wide as time expired.
It would have been his longest field goal of the season,
and he came up clutching his
left hamstring before hobbling off the field.
Turns out, Janikowski
was done for the game, and
that hurt the Seahawks,
particularly on their final
onside kick attempt.
The most brutal injury of
the half was far worse than
that. Cowboys receiver Allen
Hurns suffered a gruesome
leg injury as he was tackled
after a catch, his foot twisting in an unnatural way. The
game was stopped for several minutes as he was
carted off the field.
“When you see a guy like
that go down, it hurts,”
Prescott said. “It hurts a lot,
just to see how nasty that
was.… It was very unfortu-
McCarthy
interviews
for Jets’
coaching
position
John Elway, the Denver
Broncos general manager,
flew to Boston to interview
New England Patriots linebackers coach and defensive
play caller Brian Flores
Cowboys 24, Seahawks 22
Seattle...................................0 6 8 8—22
Dallas....................................3 7 0 14—24
First Quarter
Dal—FG Maher 39, 9:50.
Second Quarter
Sea—FG Janikowski 27, 7:03.
Sea—FG Janikowski 42, 1:43.
Dal—Gallup 11 pass from Prescott (Maher kick), :24.
Third Quarter
Sea—R.Wilson 4 run (Davis run), 1:59.
Fourth Quarter
Dal—Elliott 1 run (Maher kick), 12:28.
Dal—Prescott 1 run (Maher kick), 2:08.
Sea—McKissic 7 pass from R.Wilson (Carson run),
1:18.
Attendance—94,327.
STATISTICS
TEAM
Sea
Dal
First downs ...................................11
23
Total Net Yards .............................299
380
Rushes-yards ............................24-73
34-164
Passing.......................................226
216
Punt Returns ..............................3-22
6-80
Kickoff Returns ...........................1-52
1-15
Interceptions Ret...........................1-0
0-0
Comp-Att-Int..........................18-27-0
22-33-1
Sacked-Yards Lost .........................1-7
1-10
Punts .....................................7-51.4
5-45.0
Fumbles-Lost................................0-0
0-0
Penalties-Yards ...........................5-36
6-36
Time of Possession ....................25:10
34:50
Individual Leaders
RUSHING: Seattle, Penny 4-29, Carson 13-20, R.Wilson 3-14, Davis 4-10. Dallas, Elliott 26-137, Prescott
6-29, R.Smith 1-1, Austin 1-(minus 3).
PASSING: Seattle, R.Wilson 18-27-0-233. Dallas,
Prescott 22-33-1-226.
RECEIVING: Seattle, Lockett 4-120, E.Dickson 4-42,
Baldwin 3-32, Davis 2-22, McKissic 2-13, Carson 2(minus 1), Vannett 1-5. Dallas, Cooper 7-106, Elliott 432, Beasley 3-28, Jarwin 3-15, Gallup 2-18, Hurns 1-14,
Austin 1-7, N.Brown 1-6.
FIELD GOALS MISSED: Seattle, Janikowski 57. Dallas, Maher 58.
four Rams who’ve played
in the Super Bowl.
later, with Wade Phillips —
now the Rams’ defensive coordinator — overseeing a
dominant defense, they defeated the Carolina Panthers.
Intensity changes in the
playoffs, said Talib, who
made five tackles and broke
up two passes in the Broncos’ Super Bowl victory.
“Football, period, cranks
up,” he said, adding that it
doesn’t matter “if it’s your
first time or second time. …
Everything’s going to go a little bit faster, and your margin of error’s got to be that
much better.”
Anderson played on the
Broncos’ special teams in
2013 and got a couple carries
in the Super Bowl. In 2015, he
started in the Super Bowl
and rushed for 90 yards and
one touchdown in 23 carries.
“It’s the same game
you’ve been playing all year,”
he said of the playoffs. “It’s
just a little bit picked up, and
hopefully there’s a lot of juice
left in everybody to make a
run.”
Cooks, a fifth-year pro,
went to the Super Bowl last
season with the Patriots. He
had a combined nine receptions for 132 yards in playoff
victories over the Tennessee
Titans and Jacksonville Jaguars. He had one catch for 23
yards in the Super Bowl
against the Eagles but suffered a concussion on that
early second-quarter gain
and was sidelined for the
rest of the Patriots’ 41-33
loss.
Eliminating mental errors, penalties and other
mistakes is paramount for
making a playoff run, Cooks
said.
“You’ve just got to focus,”
he said, “and do the little
things right.”
Talib, Anderson, Shields
and Cooks will continue to
lead by example. But they
also are available for advice
if less-experienced teammates seek them out.
“All I can do is offer my experience as much as I can,”
Anderson said. “But just
looking at it, I think they’re
fine.
“I think they’re hungry. I
think we’re ready, for sure.”
gary.klein@latimes.com
Twitter: @latimesklein
Bears are back in hunt
SAM FARMER
ON THE NFL
associated press
Broncos talk to
Patriots’ Flores
sam.farmer@latimes.com
Twitter: @LATimesfarmer
Gary Coronado Los Angeles Times
SAM SHIELDS is one of
PHILADELPHIA AT CHICAGO TODAY, 1:30 P.M. PST, CH. 4
AROUND THE LEAGUE
Mike McCarthy completed an interview for the
vacant New York Jets coaching job, the team announced
Saturday.
McCarthy, 55, was fired
by the Green Bay Packers in
early December with four
games to play. He had a 12577-2 regular-season record in
13 seasons and 10-8 in the
postseason, including a Super Bowl victory over Pittsburgh to cap the 2010 season.
The Jets fired Todd
Bowles after the season finale.
nate.”
Seattle relied heavily on
the run early in the game yet
couldn’t get much traction.
The Seahawks failed to collect a first down until Wilson
connected with tight end Ed
Dickson with 9:13 to play in
the second quarter.
Wilson had minus-8
yards passing in the first
quarter. According to ESPN,
that was the fewest yards by
a quarterback in a single
quarter of a playoff game
since Quincy Carter had minus-8 for Dallas in a 2003
wild-card game.
It was that kind of night
for the Seahawks. One the
Cowboys won’t soon forget.
They were signed for
their skill sets, not necessarily for their Super Bowl experience. But as the Rams gear
up for an NFC divisional
playoff game, they can turn
to four players who were
part of teams that made a
Super Bowl run.
Cornerback Aqib Talib
and running back C.J. Anderson did it twice with the
Denver Broncos. Cornerback Sam Shields did it with
the Green Bay Packers, and
receiver Brandin Cooks with
the New England Patriots.
All said eliminating mistakes was the key to advancing through the playoffs to
the Super Bowl.
“That’s how you get
there,” Talib said.
Anderson added another
element: “The football gods
must be on your side,” he
said.
That wasn’t the case for
the Rams last season in their
first playoff appearance
since 2004. In a wild-card defeat to Atlanta, return man
Blake Countess muffed a
punt and the Falcons recovered. Former Rams kick returner Pharoh Cooper also
fumbled a kickoff.
The Rams know they
must avoid those types of
miscues in their divisionalround game Saturday at the
Coliseum.
The Rams are seeded
second in the NFC playoffs
behind the New Orleans
Saints and will play the highest-seeded team remaining
after this weekend’s wildcard games. The fourthseeded Dallas Cowboys beat
the fifth-seeded Seattle Seahawks on Saturday, and the
third-seeded Chicago Bears
play host to the sixth-seeded
Philadelphia Eagles on Sunday.
The Rams need wins in
the divisional-round game
and the NFC championship
game to advance to the Super Bowl on Feb. 3 in Atlanta.
Shields was a Packers
rookie in 2010, when the team
won three playoff games on
the road and defeated the
Pittsburgh Steelers in the
Super Bowl.
“When you get to the
playoffs ... it’s everybody being on the same page, no
mistakes and putting your
game to another notch,” said
Shields, who intercepted
two passes and forced a fumble in the NFC championship game against the
Bears.
Talib, an 11th-year veteran, and Anderson, a sixthyear pro, played on Broncos
teams that advanced to the
Super Bowl in the 2013 and
2015 seasons.
In 2013, the Broncos suffered a rout by the Seahawks
in the Super Bowl. Two years
Jack Dempsey Associated Press
JOHN ELWAY has a New England assistant among
candidates for the Broncos’ head coaching vacancy.
about the team’s head
coaching vacancy.
Flores, 37, played linebacker at Boston College
and broke into the NFL in
the Patriots’ scouting department in 2004. He moved
onto Bill Belichick’s coaching staff in 2008.
Elway fired Vance Joseph
on Monday.
Saints’ Allen meets
with Dolphins
Dennis Allen, the defensive coordinator of the New
Orleans Saints, met with the
Miami Dolphins about their
head coaching job.
Miami is seeking a replacement for Adam Gase,
fired Monday after three
seasons.
Allen was 8-28 as coach of
the Oakland Raiders before.
He was fired four games into
the 2014 season.
Etc.
San Francisco 49ers safety Antone Exum Jr. was
fined $53,482 by the NFL for
unnecessary roughness on a
hit on Rams receiver Robert
Woods last Sunday. ... Miami’s Kiko Alonso and Robert
Quinn were docked $10,026
each for unnecessary roughness, and Buffalo’s Jordan
Mills was fined $13,369 for
unsportsmanlike conduct
after they were ejected for
their roles in a skirmish between the teams last Sunday.
The Chicago Bears are
back.
Back in the playoffs for
the first time since 2010.
Back in the Super Bowl
hunt with a team that has
won nine of its last 10 games.
And back to relevance with
a team that went 7-1 at home
this season after going 7-17
at Soldier Field during the
previous three seasons.
The Bears’ first task:
stopping the Philadelphia
Eagles from going back to
back.
The defending Super
Bowl champions play at
Chicago on Sunday, with
Nick Foles looking to make
another forehead-slapping
run through the postseason.
Replacing the injured Carson Wentz, Foles did the
unthinkable last season,
leading the Eagles to their
first Lombardi Trophy and
earning Super Bowl mostvaluable-player honors.
He’s 3-1 in the postseason
for his career.
Chicago, which has a
leading defensive-player-ofthe-year candidate in linebacker Khalil Mack, led the
NFL in takeaways (36) and
interceptions (27), and tied
for third in sacks (50).
In the clear
This season marks the
30th anniversary of the “Fog
Bowl,” the 1988 playoff game
between Philadelphia and
Chicago, when Soldier Field
was so shrouded in peasoup fog that fans in the
stands couldn’t see what
was happening on the field
for much of the game. Chicago wound up winning
20-12.
“I remember looking to
the left side of the field and
we thought the stadium was
on fire because it was that
thick and was billowing over
the side of the wall,” former
Eagles linebacker Mike
Reichenbach recalled in an
interview with the Associated Press.
“It was like a horror
movie. It engulfed the stadium in no time.”
home.”
The Bears started thirdyear backup Deon Bush in
the last two games with
Jackson injured.
By the numbers
How teams compare
statistically. All stats are
per-game averages, except
for sacks and turnover
differential, which is for the
season (league rank in
parentheses):
PHI
CHI
Points scored
22.9 (18)
26.3 (9)
Points allowed
21.8 (12)
17.7 (1)
Pass offense
267.2 (7) 222.8 (21)
Rush offense
98.1 (28) 121.1 (11)
Pass defense
269.2 (30)
219.7 (7)
Rush defense
96.9 (7)
80.0 (1)
Sacks
Penalty yards
Turnovers
44 (T8)
50 (3)
53.2 (9)
49.8 (6)
-6 (25)
+12 (3)
Safety dance
All-Pro Chicago safety
Eddie Jackson was listed as
questionable Friday because of a right ankle injury,
and the Bears won’t make a
determination on him until
game day.
He’s a key component
to that smothering defense.
Coach Matt Nagy said
it’s possible the Bears will
play Jackson even if he isn’t
100% “because it’s win or go
Sam Farmer’s pick
Foles has some magic to
him, and he’s tough enough
to battle through the chest
soreness from last week, but
Chicago’s defense figures to
dictate this one. The Bears
have a young and inconsistent quarterback, but they
can run it when they need
to.
BEARS 17, EAGLES 13
D4
SS
SU N DAY , JA N UA RY 6 , 2 019
L AT I M E S . C O M / S P O RT S
NFL PLAYOFFS: AFC WILD-CARD ROUND
Chargers opt to keep Henry inactive
the starter in Week 11, Baltimore easily has been the
NFL’s best running team, averaging 229.6 yards per
game. The Chargers held
Jackson to 39 yards rushing
and the Ravens to 159 during
the teams’ Week 16 meeting
in Carson.
“They say, ‘Stop us,’ ”
Lynn said. “You know what
they’re going to do. But you
still have to play disciplined
and sound football because
you play 11 on 11 with the
quarterback’s versatility.”
The Chargers already will
be
without
linebacker
Jatavis Brown, who suffered
a season-ending ankle injury
last weekend. Hayes Pullard
figures to fill in for Brown.
Mebane, a starting
defensive tackle, also
could be unavailable
for Sunday’s game.
By Jeff Miller
BALTIMORE — The
Chargers chose not to activate Hunter Henry, meaning
he will be unavailable Sunday for their wild-card playoff game.
The tight end missed the
regular season after tearing
the anterior cruciate ligament in his right knee in
May. Henry has been rehabilitating for months and in
recent weeks increased the
intensity of his workouts
with the idea he could possibly return in the postseason.
Despite Henry’s progress, the Chargers decided
he would not come back
against Baltimore.
In his first two NFL seasons, Henry proved to be a
reliable target and capable
blocker, both of which could
have helped Sunday. In 29
career games, he has 81 receptions for 1,057 yards and
12 touchdowns.
The Chargers also are
preparing to play without
starting defensive tackle
Etc.
Robert Gauthier Los Angeles Times
THE CHARGERS’ Hunter Henry, shown sprinting before a Dec. 22 game, missed the regular season while
rehabilitating his right knee. The team hoped the tight end would be ready for the wild-card game.
Brandon Mebane. His official designation for the game
remained “doubtful” Saturday.
Mebane has been away
from the team in order to be
with his infant daughter,
Makenna, who is battling a
rare chromosome disorder.
Born in November with
Trisomy 13, she is in the
neonatal intensive care unit
at Children’s Hospital and
Medical Center in Omaha.
His absence could be particularly notable because of
Baltimore’s run-heavy offense. He had six tackles and
played more than half of the
defensive snaps against the
Ravens in Week 16.
“We are counting on our
defensive line big,” coach
Anthony
Lynn
said.
“They’re going to have to get
off blocks and make plays.”
Since rookie quarterback
Lamar Jackson took over as
Among the Chargers
making their postseason debuts Sunday will be veteran
center Mike Pouncey. During his seven years with Miami, the Dolphins made the
playoffs only once, and he
was hurt that season .…The
Ravens haven’t hosted a
playoff game since 2012 .…
Tight end Antonio Gates
has two touchdown receptions in his career against
the Ravens. Both came in
2007.
jeff.miller@latimes.com
Twitter: @JeffMillerLAT
Ravens are familiar opponent
HOW THEY MATCH UP
CHARGERS
(12-4)
AT BALTIMORE
(10-6)
[Chargers, from D1]
a little more adrenaline,”
said Rochell, who, at 23, is in
his second NFL season. “I’m
human. I do know it’s a playoff game. I know it’s more important.”
Nearly three-quarters of
the players on the Chargers’
projected active roster Sunday will be making their professional postseason debuts.
The group includes running back Melvin Gordon,
wide receiver Mike Williams,
and defensive backs Derwin
James, Adrian Phillips and
Desmond King, whose play
this season earned each AllPro recognition.
That’s a lot of inexperience entering a game forecast to be edgy and tight, a
game in which even the
slightest difference could
make the ultimate difference.
Before kickoff, it’s impossible to measure how much
— or even if at all — this will
affect the game.
It also needs to be noted
that the Ravens, though
more experienced this time
of year, also have plenty
of first-timers, including
Lamar Jackson, who, one
day short of his 22nd birthday, is about to become the
youngest quarterback to
start an NFL postseason
game.
“It’s important for the
guys who have been in it not
to make it sound frightening
or anything crazy,” Philip
Rivers said. “I mean, it’s
what you dream about
playing in the offseason. In
spring and during training
camp, you’re excited about
this time.”
Rivers will be making his
10th playoff start and trying
to even his record at 5-5. He’s
37 and the age gap between
the two starting quarterbacks will be the third-largest ever in the NFL playoffs.
Unlike the game last
month, the Chargers anticipate having versatile, pacechanging running back
Austin Ekeler this time.
In that Dec. 22 loss, they
struggled running the ball,
extending drives and neutralizing the Ravens’ aggressive, downhill defense.
Ekeler, who has been limited in practice because of a
groin injury, could be part of
the solution to all three
problems.
Then again, his most recent playoff appearance also
came in high school, in Col-
When Chargers have the ball
In each of the last three games, the Chargers’ initial
possession ended in a Philip Rivers interception.
One of those went to Baltimore cornerback Brandon
Carr, setting up a field goal in the Ravens’ 22-10 victory 15
days ago. Rivers took the blame, saying all three were
poor passes. Offensive coordinator Ken Whisenhunt said
the fault should be equally shared by all parties involved.
Regardless, the Chargers must take better care of the ball
in this rematch. So good at protecting the ball this season,
they had nine turnovers and were minus-four in takeaways over the final three weeks of the regular season.
They also will need to establish some semblance of a
running game against a Baltimore defense that ranked
No. 1 in yards allowed and No. 4 in yards rushing permitted. Chicago’s defense was the only one that gave up fewer
points. In the teams’ first meeting, the Chargers gained
only 51 yards on the ground in 16 attempts. Melvin Gordon
had 41 of those yards, his second-worst single-game performance of 2018. Rivers just matched his second-best
passer rating (105.5) for a season. The Ravens’ 80.6 defensive passer rating was second in the NFL, behind the
Bears’ 72.9.
When Ravens have the ball
The history of the NFL doesn’t include many stories
about a team making a quarterback change and then
immediately beginning a surge toward the top of the
standings because of a newfound rushing attack. But
that’s the tale of 2018 Ravens, who used a time-swallowing
ground game to help win six of seven to close the regular
season as the AFC North champions. Rookie quarterback
Lamar Jackson has provided a spark that was missing
before Joe Flacco was injured in a loss to Pittsburgh in
Week 9. Jackson finished the regular season with 695
yards on 147 rushes. That total was second on the team,
behind another rookie, Gus Edwards (718). The Ravens
have the NFL’s No. 2 rushing attack — they easily would
have been No. 1 had Jackson started all season — and
amassed the second most yards on the ground in franchise history. The Chargers were ninth-best at stopping
the run and tied for fifth in red-zone defense, suggesting
this could be a bruising game, especially the nearer Baltimore gets to the end zone. All that being said, the Ravens’
winning touchdown last month against the Chargers
came on a 68-yard pass, Jackson to tight end Mark Andrews.
When they kick
The closest thing to a playoff game that Chargers rookie
placekicker Michael Badgley has played in recently was
the 2017 ACC championship. His Miami Hurricanes lost to
Clemson that day 38-3. Badgley made one of two kicks. So
there’s that. Baltimore boasts the most accurate kicker in
NFL history, Justin Tucker. He made 35 for 39 field-goal
attempts in the regular season, the misses coming from 53
and 65 yards. Two of his kicks were blocked. How consistent is Tucker? He just scored a franchise-record 141
points for the third consecutive season.
Jeff Miller’s prediction
The NFL is such a 50-50 league, the games so routinely
decided by a few plays being made or not made, that
common sense says the Chargers should win this time
after the Ravens won two weeks ago. Simple percentages.
But this might be the most difficult matchup the Chargers could have drawn. They never looked comfortable
against Baltimore in Week 16 and at times appeared overwhelmed. This game should be low-scoring and defensive,
which leans things in favor of the home team.
RAVENS 20, CHARGERS 19
Ed Zurga Associated Press
THE CHARGERS’ Isaac Rochell, shown sacking Patrick Mahomes of the Chiefs,
said he is treating the wild-card game against Baltimore like any other contest.
Injury report
Final injury reports for the NFL wild-card playoffs games
were submitted to the league office Friday:
CHARGERS: OUT — Linebacker Jatavis Brown (ankle).
DOUBTFUL — Defensive tackle Brandon Mebane (not injury
related). QUESTIONABLE — Running back Austin Ekeler
(groin).
RAVENS: QUESTIONABLE — Guard Alex Lewis (shoulder),
wide receiver Chris Moore (shoulder, hip), cornerback Tavon
Young (groin).
orado six years ago, when
Eaton High lost in the second round and Ekeler fumbled “like five times” because the game was staged
in a snowstorm.
“We’ve had good energy
all year, and I think that’s
why we’ve had such a successful regular season,”
Chargers offensive coordinator Ken Whisenhunt said.
“But it’s different in the playoffs. It’s a new world for some
of them.”
Experienced in January
or not, the Chargers are convinced they’ve been calloused by overcoming foreboding deficits, worthy opponents and rabid noise to
win seven of eight road
games this season.
They will enter M&T
Bank Stadium and its anticipated insanity knowing
they’ve already won at Seattle, Pittsburgh and Kansas
City. Baltimore can be no
more menacing than what
they’ve already encoun-
tered.
The Ravens will show up
knowing they too have won
at Pittsburgh and against
the Chargers on the road.
They also are aware that
only two late fourth-down
conversions by Kansas City
prevented them from winning at Arrowhead Stadium
a month ago.
What’s more, Baltimore
basically has been in the
playoffs for at least a couple
of weeks now. The Ravens,
who ended the regular season on a 6-1 run, needed to
win their final two games
just to reach this point.
“It’s funny,” Rivers said.
“Two weeks ago, we were the
hottest team in football and
the front-runners. And now
it seems like the scenario is
all flipped. Who knows? We’ll
find out.”
We’ll also discover how
the proximity of the teams’
last meeting will influence
this matchup, the celebrated adjustments always
present in this sport on display so soon.
Baltimore coach John
Harbaugh called the situation “almost kind of like a
doubleheader.” Rivers said
it’s as if the Chargers and
Ravens have been in a “13day halftime.”
Whatever the Chargers
concoct, the offense will have
to give Rivers and his fellow
playmakers more time to
make plays than it did two
weeks ago.
Rivers was visibly battered after that game, and
that’s not a reference to the
season-worst statistics he
compiled in pretty much every significant category.
“They brought the fight
to us,” Chargers coach Anthony Lynn said. “We’ve got
to do a better job of handling
that.”
No matter what happens
Sunday, all that lack of experience for the Chargers is
guaranteed to be gone by
day’s end.
By treating the franchise’s biggest game since
January 2014 as just another
date in October, they believe
they’ll be ready.
“If the approach is the
same, the feeling shouldn’t
be that different,” Rochell
said. “If you come out here
[in practice] and focus on
the same things you’ve been
focusing on all year, when
the game comes you’re not
stressed.”
jeff.miller@latimes.com
Twitter: @JeffMillerLAT
CHARGERS RESULTS
WEEK 1
WEEK 2
WEEK 3
WEEK 4
WEEK 5
WEEK 6
WEEK 7
Sept. 9
Sept. 16
Sept. 23
Sept. 30
Oct. 7
Oct. 14
Oct. 21
KC
38
LAC
28
LAC
31
BUF
20
LAR
35
LAC
23
LAC
29
SF
27
LAC
26
OAK
10
LAC
38
CLE
14
LAC
20
TEN
19
Loss
0-1
H: 0-1
Win
1-1
A: 1-0
Loss
1-2
A: 1-1
Win
2-2
H: 1-1
Win
3-2
H: 2-1
Win
4-2
A: 2-1
WEEK 8
OFF
WEEK 9
WEEK 10
WEEK 11
WEEK 12
WEEK 13
WEEK 14
WEEK 15
WEEK 16
WEEK 17
Nov. 4
Nov. 11
Nov. 18
Nov. 25
Dec. 2
Dec. 9
Dec. 13
Dec. 22
Dec. 30
LAC
25
SEA
17
LAC
20
OAK
6
DEN
23
LAC
22
LAC
45
ARI
10
LAC
33
PIT
30
LAC
26
CIN
21
LAC
29
KC
28
BAL
22
LAC
10
LAC
23
DEN
9
Win
6-2
A: 3-1
Win
7-2
A: 4-1
Loss
7-3
H: 3-2
Win
8-3
H: 4-2
Win
9-3
A: 5-1
Win
10-3
H: 5-2
Win
11-3
A: 6-1
Loss
11-4
H: 5-3
Win
12-4
A: 7-1
(London)
Win
5-2
H: 3-1
SS
L AT I M E S . C O M / S P O RT S
S U N DAY , JA N UA RY 6 , 2 019
D5
CHARGERS AT BALTIMORE
TODAY, 10 A.M. PST, CH. 2
Stage is set for a
Rivers rebound
game vs. Ravens
SAM FARMER
ON THE NFL
Once more. With feeling.
The Chargers will get a
second chance Sunday
against the Baltimore
Ravens, a team that embarrassed them a few weeks ago
in Carson.
Baltimore won that Dec.
22 game 22-10, handing the
Chargers their lowest point
total of the season, limiting
the Chargers to 198 yards of
offense and sacking Philip
Rivers four times.
The Ravens, under firstyear defensive coordinator
Don Martindale, allowed an
NFL-low 292.2 yards per
game.
That’s familiar territory
for a Baltimore team that
has had a top-10 defense in
eight of coach John Harbaugh’s 11 seasons.
“They just never let you
get comfortable as an offense. It’s always something
trying to keep you off balance,” Rivers said of the
Ravens.
“It’s going to be back and
forth. There will be times
where we pick everything up
just right and do everything
just right. There will be
other times where we’re
going to have to, again,
manage all those things that
they do so well.”
Youth is served
Age is just a number to
Baltimore’s Lamar Jackson, who has just seven NFL
starts to his name and will
be the youngest quarterback in league history to
start a postseason game.
“I was 21 all year, so this is
just another game for me,”
said Jackson, who turns 22
on Monday.
The 2016 Heisman Trophy winner from Louisville
has sparked a Ravens revival, helping his team to
victory in six of seven games
as well as an AFC North
title. And, the way he sees it,
he’s not done.
“That win, I can taste it,”
he said. “It's like Thanksgiving — you know, that food,
sweet potato pie. I’m trying
to taste that victory for my
birthday.”
By the numbers
How teams compare
statistically. All stats are
per-game averages, except
for sacks and turnover
differential, which is for the
season (league rank in
parentheses):
LAC
BAL
Points scored
26.8 (T6)
24.3 (13)
Points allowed
20.6 (8)
17.9 (2)
Pass offense
255.6 (10) 222.4 (22)
Rush offense
117.1 (15)
152.6 (2)
Pass defense
227.9 (9)
210.0 (5)
Rush defense
105.8 (9)
82.9 (4)
38 (T19)
43 (T11)
60.4 (23)
58.8 (16)
+1 (T15)
-3 (22)
Sacks
Penalty yards
Turnovers
Sam Farmer’s pick
It’s so difficult to beat a
team twice in rapid succession, and the Chargers were
uncharacteristically awful
in their first game against
Baltimore.
Taking nothing from
that Ravens defense, but
Rivers will be better this
time around.
CHARGERS 23, RAVENS 21
Robert Gauthier Los Angeles Times
LAMAR JACKSON will become the youngest
quarterback in league history to start in the playoffs.
Eric Christian Smith Associated Press
INDIANAPOLIS COLTS cornerback Kenny Moore runs downfield after making an interception against the
Houston Texans in an AFC wild-card playoff game. The Colts will face Kansas City in the divisional round.
Luck, Colts start quickly,
cruise past the Texans
Indianapolis builds a
21-0 lead on way to
advancing to AFC
divisional round.
INDIANAPOLIS 21
HOUSTON 7
associated press
HOUSTON — A year ago
at this time Andrew Luck
was at home struggling with
an injured shoulder that
cost him the entire season.
On Saturday he wrote a
happy ending to the latest
chapter of his comeback season, throwing for 222 yards
and two touchdowns and
the Indianapolis Colts raced
out to a big lead and cruised
to a 21-7 win over the Houston Texans in a wild-card
game.
Luck put on a show in his
hometown in a stadium
where he’d attended games
throughout childhood and
played in them since high
school, throwing for 191
yards and two touchdowns
before halftime to help the
Colts (11-6) build a 21-0 lead.
He denied feeling “at
home” at NRG Stadium, but
admitted to having warm
feelings for the city he grew
up in and where his grandparents and many friends
still reside.
“But it’s still an away stadium,” he said. “It was very
loud, very energetic, but fun
to win, certainly.”
Running back Marlon
Mack had 148 yards and a
touchdown for Indianapolis,
which advances to face the
top-seeded Kansas City
Chiefs in the divisional
round next weekend.
“We know we have an elite
quarterback and we can
throw it for 400 and win when
we have to,” Indianapolis
coach Frank Reich said.
“But the margin for error
in playoff football when you
try to do it that way is very
thin. When you can win like
this — running the football
and stopping it — that’s just
everything.”
Houston (11-6), which
overcame a 0-3 start to win
the AFC South, gave up too
many big plays and couldn’t
get anything going on offense in the first half to fall
into the huge hole.
They led the NFL with
nine comeback wins this
season, but their attempt at
a rally ended on their next
possession when Watson’s
pass on fourth and 10 from
the Indianapolis 24 fell short
with about four minutes left.
Colts 21, Texans 7
Indianapolis..........................14 7 0 0—21
Houston .................................0 0 0 7— 7
First Quarter
Ind—Ebron 6 pass from Luck (Vinatieri kick), 10:32.
Ind—Mack 2 run (Vinatieri kick), 4:03.
Second Quarter
Ind—Inman 18 pass from Luck (Vinatieri kick), 6:24.
Fourth Quarter
Hou—Coutee 6 pass from Watson (Fairbairn kick),
10:57.
Attendance—71,798.
STATISTICS
TEAM
Ind
Hou
First downs ...................................26
20
Total Net Yards .............................422
322
Rushes-yards ..........................35-200
16-105
Passing.......................................222
217
Punt Returns ..............................2-20
0-0
Kickoff Returns .............................0-0
1-26
Interceptions Ret. ........................1-10
1-0
Comp-Att-Int..........................19-32-1
29-49-1
Sacked-Yards Lost .........................0-0
3-18
Punts .....................................4-37.0
5-46.8
Fumbles-Lost................................0-0
0-0
Penalties-Yards ...........................2-10
8-67
Time of Possession ....................31:14
28:46
Individual Leaders
RUSHING: Indianapolis, Mack 24-148, Luck 8-29,
Pascal 1-14, Wilkins 2-9. Houston, Watson 8-76, Miller
5-18, Blue 2-8, Foreman 1-3.
PASSING: Indianapolis, Luck 19-32-1-222. Houston,
Watson 29-49-1-235.
RECEIVING: Indianapolis, Hilton 5-85, Inman 4-53,
Rogers 4-46, Ebron 3-26, Mack 2-6, Pascal 1-6. Houston, Coutee 11-110, Miller 8-63, Hopkins 5-37, Blue 211, Akins 2-8, Griffin 1-6.
FIELD GOALS MISSED: None.
NHL STANDINGS
Kings strike early, down Oilers
EASTERN CONFERENCE
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Pacific
Calgary
Vegas
San Jose
DUCKS
Vancouver
Edmonton
Arizona
KINGS
Central
Nashville
Winnipeg
Dallas
Colorado
Minnesota
Chicago
St. Louis
KINGS 4
EDMONTON 0
By Curtis Zupke
Anze Kopitar wasn’t
aware that teammate Jonathan Quick reached a milestone too until the trainers
told him after the horn
sounded.
Kopitar made his way
back on the ice to retrieve
the puck, a gesture often reserved for first goals or wins.
But it was fitting for two of
the Kings’ franchise players
on a night of symbolic symmetry: Quick got his 300th career win and Kopitar his
300th goal in a 4-0 win against
the Edmonton Oilers at Staples Center.
The two have been
through two Stanley Cup
championships
together
and the struggles of this season. Quick has never publicly cared for personal
achievements but, coupled
with Kopitar’s, referred to
their journeys Saturday.
“We’ve obviously been
through a lot,” Quick said.
“Ups and downs.”
Quick, in his 575th game,
needed just 16 saves to become the second fastest
American-born goalie to
reach the 300-win mark.
Ryan Miller accomplished it
in 566 games.
Quick was largely helpless against the Tampa Bay
Lightning’s power play in a
6-2 loss Thursday but he
faced only 10 shots in the first
two periods, although, one of
them was a reach-back save
on Connor McDavid’s try in
the second period.
“It’s great for Quickie,”
Kopitar said. “He’s, in my
mind, the best goalie in the
world. It’s very comforting to
have him back there and a
privilege to play in front of
him.”
Deshaun Watson, who
was sacked an NFL-leading
62 times in the regular season, was sacked three times
and hit eight more times in a
disappointing playoff debut.
He finished with 235 yards
passing with a touchdown
and an interception.
“Just a lack of execution
on our part,” Watson said.
“We didn’t make plays. I
didn’t make plays. Communication was a little off. You
just got to give the Colts the
credit.”
The Colts, who opened
the season 1-5, continued an
impressive run by winning
their fifth straight and for
the 10th time in 11 games.
It was another good
game in a splendid season
for Luck.
He threw for 4,593 yards
and 39 touchdowns in the
regular season after missing
all of 2017 with a shoulder injury.
The Texans didn’t score
until rookie Keke Coutee
grabbed a six-yard touchdown pass to cap a 16-play,
89-yard drive that included a
fourth-down
conversion
that cut it to 21-7 with about
11 minutes left.
W
26
25
23
19
20
19
17
17
W
25
25
22
20
20
15
16
L
13
15
13
16
21
19
21
23
L
15
13
16
14
17
21
19
OL
4
4
7
7
4
3
3
3
OL
3
2
4
8
3
7
4
Pts
56
54
53
45
44
41
37
37
Pts
53
52
48
48
43
37
36
GF
153
133
150
104
128
114
103
98
GF
131
134
115
144
118
123
110
GA
123
117
135
123
143
131
118
127
GA
109
115
111
129
114
156
129
Note: Overtime or shootout losses worth one point.
Metropolitan
Washington
Pittsburgh
Columbus
NY Islanders
Carolina
NY Rangers
New Jersey
Philadelphia
Atlantic
Tampa Bay
Toronto
Boston
Buffalo
Montreal
Florida
Detroit
Ottawa
W
24
23
24
23
18
17
16
15
W
32
27
24
22
22
17
16
15
L
12
12
14
13
17
16
17
20
L
8
12
14
14
15
16
20
22
OL
4
6
3
4
5
7
7
6
OL
2
2
4
6
5
7
7
5
Pts
52
52
51
50
41
41
39
36
Pts
66
56
52
50
49
41
39
35
GF
141
144
135
121
103
114
120
116
GF
176
152
122
120
131
130
122
132
GA
119
117
126
107
114
136
134
148
GA
124
113
110
120
132
142
148
167
RESULTS
Mark J. Terrill Associated Press
BRENDAN LEIPSIC of the Kings tries to get a shot past Edmonton goalie Cam
Talbot in the second period Saturday. Talbot replaced starter Mikko Koskinen.
Kopitar became the fifth
Kings player to score 300
goals, on a pretty snap shot
in the third period for his 10th
goal this season, a mark he
reached in his 23rd game last
season.
“I was hoping it was going
to come a little earlier than
that,” Kopitar said. “But hey,
it’s here. I’m pretty proud of
that.”
Everything else fell into
place as the Kings cleansed
their palate from the Tampa
Bay loss with goals by Kyle
Clifford, Tyler Toffoli and
Jeff Carter in the opening 14
minutes. Carter’s wrist shot
to the upper left corner of the
net made it 3-0 on eight
shots and prompted Edmonton to remove goalie
Mikko Koskinen for Cam
Talbot. Toffoli put a forehand past Koskinen for his
second goal since Nov. 17.
Drew Doughty kept the
puck in the zone, and he also
sprung Clifford down the
right wing before Clifford
slipped a shot through Koskinen.
Carter made an open-ice
hit on McDavid to trigger
brief tempers, but that was
the most resistance the
Kings faced all night, a ’90sthemed night in which photos of the Kings players as
adolescents were shown on
the video board. An amusing
one of Kopitar in a Speedo
swimsuit prompted the funniest line of the night.
Said Kopitar, “It was
probably the last time I had
a six pack.”
Luff scratched
Matt Luff was scratched
for the first time in 25 games.
Luff is the team’s third-leading goal scorer but has received scant playing time
late in games recently after
an initial scoring flurry upon
his last recall.
“It looks like I’m playing a
little bit without the confi-
dence I had,” Luff said.
“When I came up, I was getting those looks and the
goals. But the thing for me
was just moving my feet, and
if I’m not playing a lot of minutes and getting under 10
[minutes a game], I think I
need to be a good [fourth]
line player defensively.”
curtis.zupke@latimes.com
Twitter: @curtiszupke
KINGS 4, OILERS 0
Edmonton ................................0
KINGS .....................................3
0
0
0 — 0
1 — 4
FIRST PERIOD: 1. KINGS, Clifford 6 (Forbort, Doughty), 3:15. 2. KINGS, Toffoli 7 (Doughty), 9:35. 3. KINGS,
Carter 8 (Muzzin, Leipsic), 13:57. Penalties—None.
SECOND PERIOD: Scoring—None. Pen.—Chiasson,
EDM, (slashing), 9:09. Walker, KINGS, (interference),
14:05. Petrovic, EDM, (holding stick), 18:52.
THIRD PERIOD: 4. KINGS, Kopitar 10 (Brown, Kovalchuk), 10:15. Penalties—Carter, KINGS, (tripping),
5:38. Muzzin, KINGS, (interference), 12:51. Leipsic,
KINGS, (slashing), 16:17. Lucic, EDM, served by Puljujarvi, (slashing), 16:17. Lucic, EDM, (cross-checking),
16:17. Lucic, EDM, misconduct (misconduct), 16:17.
Toffoli, KINGS, (slashing), 16:43. Nurse, EDM, (slashing), 16:43.
SHOTS ON GOAL: Edm. 3-7-6—16. KINGS 9-9-5—23.
Power-play conversions—Edm. 0 of 3. KINGS 0 of 3.
GOALIES: Edm., Talbot 7-11-2 (15 shots-14 saves),
Koskinen 12-8-1 (8-5). KINGS, Quick 7-10-2 (16-16).
Att—18,230 (18,230). T—2:29.
AT KINGS 4
EDMONTON 0
CALGARY 3
AT PHILADELPHIA 2 (OT)
AT BOSTON 2
BUFFALO 1
MINNESOTA 4
AT OTTAWA 3
AT TORONTO 5
VANCOUVER 0
NASHVILLE 4
AT MONTREAL 1
COLUMBUS 4
AT FLORIDA 3 (OT)
N.Y. ISLANDERS 4
AT ST. LOUIS 3
AT SAN JOSE 5
TAMPA BAY 2
Jeff Carter, Tyler Toffoli and Kyle Clifford scored in the first
period and Jonathan Quick made 16 saves.
TJ Brodie scored 1:59 into overtime after the Flames’
Matthew Tkachuk tied it with 4:17 left in regulation.
Chris Wagner and David Backes scored, Tuukka Rask
stopped 31 shots and the Bruins won their fourth straight.
Jared Spurgeon’s two goals helped Wild go 2-0 on a fourgame trip and hand Senators their seventh loss in a row.
Michael Hutchinson had his first shutout in more than two
years and Auston Matthews had a goal and two assists.
Craig Smith scored two goals and Juuse Saros stopped
27 shots in place of Pekka Rinne.
Seth Jones scored 18 seconds into overtime and the Blue
Jackets won for the seventh time in nine games.
Jordan Eberle and Johnny Boychuk scored 11 seconds
apart in the third period as the Islanders rallied.
Evander Kane scored twice, including on a power play in
the second period, for the Sharks. Kane has 14 goals.
For complete NHL summaries, go to latimes.com/sports/scores
TODAY’S GAMES
Edmonton at DUCKS, 5 p.m.
NY Rangers at Arizona, 1 p.m.
Washington at Detroit, 2 p.m.
Chicago at Pittsburgh, 5 p.m.
Carolina at Ottawa, 10 a.m.
New Jersey at Vegas, 1 p.m.
Dallas at Winnipeg, 2 p.m.
DUCKS TONIGHT
VS. EDMONTON
When: 5
On the air: TV: Prime Ticket; Radio: 830
Update: Ducks prospect Maxime Comtois played with a
separated shoulder during the world junior championships
and will be out for about two weeks. Comtois, 19, captained
Canada to the quarterfinals. The second-round pick in 2017
has played 10 games for the Ducks this season.
D6
S U N DAY , JA N UA RY 6 , 2 019
S
L AT I M E S . C O M / S P O RT S
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Bruins rely on speed
and pressure in rout
Bartow maximizes
team’s athleticism as
UCLA moves to 2-0
post-Alford.
UCLA 98
CALIFORNIA 83
By Ben Bolch
Katharine Lotze Getty Images
MOSES BROWN (1) goes up to block a shot from Cal’s Matt Bradley during the
second half Saturday. UCLA has become more aggressive on defense.
There was a theme to
everything UCLA did in its
first week under Murry Bartow, from meetings to film sessions to two-a-day practices
that were a blur of activity.
“All we’ve talked about,”
Bartow said, “is speed.”
Bartow sized up his team
after taking over for the dismissed Steve Alford on an interim basis and saw one that
should be maximizing its
length and athleticism. He decided the Bruins would trap
more on defense and feature a
more attacking style on offense.
A swift turnaround has ensued, UCLA’s 98-83 victory
over California on Saturday at
Pauley Pavilion providing further evidence that the Bruins
just might be able to salvage
their season.
No one is penciling UCLA
in for the NCAA tournament
after back-to-back victories
over projected Pac-12 Conference weaklings, but all key indicators are pointed upward
for a team that recently lost at
home to mid-majors Belmont
and Liberty.
“When you give great players confidence,” Bruins guard
Jules Bernard said, “you never
know what they can do. We
can take this thing really far.”
The Bruins forced a flurry
of turnovers in the first half
against Cal and unearthed
more freshman finds in
Bernard and David Singleton
on the way to improving to 9-6
overall and 2-0 in the Pac-12.
UCLA is also finding new
ways to spread the fun, forward Kris Wilkes’ 18 points
leading a season-high six
players in double-figure scoring. The Bruins had five players in double figures in their
first game under Bartow, after
never reaching that threshold
once in 13 games this season
under Alford.
“We’re all like brothers,”
UCLA center Moses Brown
said after collecting 16 points
and nine rebounds, “so you
see your best friend score a
UCLA next
Thursday at Oregon, 6
p.m., Matthew Knight
Arena, ESPN — What was
expected to be an epic
interior duel between
UCLA’s Moses Brown and
Oregon’s Bol Bol will be
dialed down a notch after
Bol was lost for the season
because of foot surgery.
— Ben Bolch
point, you get happy.”
Wilkes was so excited
afterward that he ran over to
slap hands with Bartow before the coach could exchange
pleasantries with Cal players
and coaches in the handshake
line.
UCLA has revived its offense in two games under Bartow, averaging 95 points on
52.3% shooting. In its previous
four games under Alford — all
losses — the Bruins averaged
65 points and 41.6% shooting.
A big part of the scoring
surge has been a more aggressive defense that has increasingly trapped in the backcourt. UCLA forced 14 turnovers in the first half against
Cal (5-9, 0-2), leading to 14
points and saving the Bruins
after a sluggish start in which
they trailed by as many as seven points.
Two
freshmen
also
sparked UCLA, sustaining a
recent uptick in playing time
and production.
Singleton scored all of his
career-high 14 points in the
first half, earning the “Sniper”
nickname Bartow had given
him by making five of seven
shots within the flow of the offense. The second half featured a breakthrough by
Bernard, who scored nine of
his 12 points while making
three of five three-point attempts.
“This pace, I guess, fits our
playing style a little bit more,”
Bernard said when asked
about his and Singleton’s increased contributions. “We’re
active scorers, we like to get
the ball out and run and get
quick buckets, so when we
have that sort of freedom, we
play more like ourselves and
that means we produce
more.”
Unlike his predecessor,
Bartow has shown he’s unafraid to use the bench as a
motivator. Bartow yanked
Brown only 92 seconds into
the game after the 7-foot-2
freshman had a layup
blocked, committed a foul and
couldn’t convert a lob.
“We just got him to the
bench,” Bartow said, “and
loved him up a little bit and
got him back into the game
fairly quickly.”
Brown rebounded to score
14 points and grab seven rebounds in the second half.
It was hardly a perfect
showing for the Bruins. They
committed 22 turnovers and
missed more than a handful of
point-blank shots while
playing out of control at times,
all reminders of what had
gone wrong earlier this season.
The difference was the
payoff from all that extra
practice and newfound cohesiveness. UCLA practiced
twice on Tuesday, Wednesday
and Friday and lifted weights
every day, a hardened approach leading to a softer
landing.
“Deep down none of us
knew that that was us, it was
not us at all,” Bernard said of
the team’s ragged play before
last week. “We’re much better
than that and we knew that.”
ben.bolch@latimes.com
Twitter: @latbbolch
UCLA 98, CALIFORNIA 83
CALIFORNIA
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Anticevich .........17 4-7 0-0 2-3 1 2 9
Gordon .............16 1-6 2-2 1-6 0 2 4
Vanover.............29 4-9 2-2 1-4 0 1 10
Bradley .............34 5-11 5-7 1-3 5 3 15
Harris-Dyson......11 1-2 0-0 0-1 2 5 2
McNeill .............37 8-16 4-4 0-1 0 3 23
Sueing..............36 5-12 8-8 2-9 1 3 18
Kelly.................11 1-5 0-2 4-5 0 5 2
Davis..................9 0-1 0-0 0-1 0 1 0
Totals
29-69 21-25 11-33 9 25 83
Shooting: Field goals, 42.0%; free throws, 84.0%
Three-point goals: 4-20 (McNeill 3-7, Anticevich 1-1, Gordon
0-2, Bradley 0-3, Vanover 0-3, Sueing 0-4). Team Rebounds: 3.
Team Turnovers: 18 (19 PTS). Blocked Shots: 4 (Anticevich, Harris-Dyson, Kelly, Vanover). Turnovers: 18 (Bradley 4, Anticevich 3,
McNeill 3, Davis 2, Sueing 2, Gordon, Harris-Dyson, Kelly,
Vanover). Steals: 17 (McNeill 7, Anticevich 3, Bradley 3, Gordon,
Kelly, Sueing, Vanover). Technical Fouls: None.
UCLA
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Brown...............22 7-10 2-6
5-9 0 3 16
Ali....................23 4-7 1-1
2-5 1 3 11
Hands ..............26 2-8 2-2
0-2 6 1 6
Smith ...............26 3-6 9-10 1-5 2 3 15
Wilkes ..............29 7-16 4-4
2-5 3 2 18
Singleton ..........24 5-7 1-2
0-1 2 0 14
Hill...................18 2-2 2-2
1-5 1 2 6
Bernard ............14 4-8 0-1
0-2 2 2 12
Riley.................12 0-0 0-0
0-4 1 3 0
Nwuba................2 0-0 0-2
1-1 0 0 0
Olesinski.............2 0-0 0-0
0-1 0 0 0
Stong .................1 0-0 0-0
0-0 0 0 0
Dodson...............1 0-0 0-0
0-1 0 0 0
Totals
34-64 21-30 12-41 18 19 98
Shooting: Field goals, 53.1%; free throws, 70.0%
Three-point goals: 9-23 (Bernard 4-7, Singleton 3-4, Ali 2-3,
Smith 0-1, Hands 0-4, Wilkes 0-4). Team Rebounds: 1. Team
Turnovers: 22 (24 PTS). Blocked Shots: 3 (Brown 2, Wilkes).
Turnovers: 22 (Brown 5, Hands 5, Smith 3, Wilkes 3, Ali 2,
Bernard 2, Hill, Singleton). Steals: 10 (Smith 3, Hands 2, Ali,
Bernard, Olesinski, Singleton, Wilkes). Technical Fouls: None.
California
42 41— 83
UCLA
50 48— 98
A—9,045 (13,800).
Boatwright, Rakocevic become frontcourt leaders
Minutes after they combined for 46 points in USC’s
victory over California on
Thursday night, Nick Rakocevic and Bennie Boatwright
shared knowing smiles and
pounded their fists in solidarity.
Boatwright, a senior forward, had stopped an answer
short in the postgame news
conference and pivoted to a
thought he had to get off his
chest about Rakocevic, who
had a career-high 27 points in
the Trojans’ Pac-12 Conference opener.
“Excuse me,” Boatwright
said, “but Nick had a heck of a
game. Rebounding, scoring …
he had one silly [technical
foul], but other than that, it
was an all-around game.”
Boatwright scored 19
points, continuing an encouraging trajectory as USC (8-6,
1-0 in Pac-12), which welcomes Stanford (7-6, 0-1) to
Galen Center on Sunday
night. After a slow start to the
season that mirrored that of
his team, Boatwright has av-
STANDINGS
PAC-12 ROUNDUP
Senior forward and
junior center give
USC a tandem that
works well together.
By J. Brady McCollough
TEAM
Arizona
UCLA
Washington
Oregon State
USC
Arizona State
Utah
Oregon
Stanford
Washington State
Colorado
California
Conf.
W L
2 0
2 0
1 0
1 0
1 0
1 1
1 1
0 1
0 1
0 1
0 2
0 2
Overall
W L
11 4
9 6
10 4
9 4
8 6
10 4
7 7
9 5
7 6
7 7
9 5
5 9
SATURDAY’S RESULTS
UCLA 98, California 83
Arizona 84, Utah 81 (OT)
Arizona State 83, Colorado 61
Oregon State 77, Oregon 72
Washington 85, Washington State 67
TODAY’S GAME
Stanford at USC ............................... 5 p.m.
WEDNESDAY’S GAMES
Arizona State at California ................. 6 p.m.
Arizona at Stanford ........................... 8 p.m.
THURSDAY’S GAMES
UCLA at Oregon ............................... 6 p.m.
USC at Oregon State ......................... 8 p.m.
Washington State at Colorado ............ 6 p.m.
Washington at Utah .......................... 7 p.m.
eraged 17.4 points and 7.3 rebounds in his last four outings.
For this injury-depleted
USC team to gain momentum in conference play, Rakocevic and Boatwright will
have to lead the way and play
major minutes on the inside.
Boatwright’s versatility will
allow the Trojans to move
him to small forward as well
as to make up for the fact that
they don’t have a scholarship
guard available on the bench.
Rakocevic, a junior center,
got plenty of help from point
guard Derryck Thornton on
the pick and roll Thursday
night, but he also was set up
by Boatwright for easy bas-
kets a couple of times.
Boatwright’s skills allow USC
to use some high-low action
with Rakocevic, which can be
extremely tough to defend for
more traditional big men.
“Me and Bo talk about it a
lot,” Rakocevic said. “Whenever we get a chance to, we
want to play two-man game
or whatever we have to do.
Because, him being 6-10 and
being as versatile as he is, it
makes it easier to play with
him. And guys who are that
big aren’t comfortable in a
pick-and-roll coverage with
two bigs. It’s easy for us to get
the high-lows, and he’s a
great passer. We’ve been together three years, and it’s
just been key.”
When coach Andy Enfield
looks at what makes the Trojans team tick, it’s a simple
matter. The Trojans led the
Pac-12 in assists last season
and lead the league again. If
USC plays unselfishly and
moves the ball in an effort to
find the best shot, more often
than not, Rakocevic and
Boatwright will be the beneficiaries.
“We’ve had 24, 20 and 21
assists the last three games,”
Enfield said. “We have to
share the basketball and stop
taking contested jump shots,
and when our guys do, our assist totals go up. It’s a big
point of emphasis.”
TONIGHT
VS. STANFORD
When: 5
Where: Galen Center
On the air: TV: ESPNU;
Radio: 710 AM (ESPNLA)
Update: The Cardinal are
coming off a 92-70 loss at
UCLA on Thursday. Stanford
is led by sophomore forward
KZ Okpala, who averages 17
points. USC will likely be
without point guard Elijah
Weaver (ankle) and wings
Kevin Porter Jr. (thigh
bruise) and Charles O’Bannon Jr. (finger), leaving the
Trojans with no scholarship
guards on the bench.
brady.mccollough@latimes.com
Arizona outlasts Utah in OT
associated press
Arizona escaped with an
84-81 overtime victory over
Utah on Saturday at Tucson, an outcome that had a
lot to do with who wasn’t
playing at the end.
“One of the keys to us
winning was Sedrick Barefield fouling out,” coach
Sean Miller said. “Fouling
him out really changed the
game down the stretch and
in overtime.”
Barefield
scored
26
points, including five threepoint baskets, but fouled out
with 1 minute 44 seconds to
play.
“He’s a tremendous player,” Miller said. “If he didn’t
foul out, he would have
crossed the 30 threshold
again.”
Brandon
Randolph
scored six points in overtime
for the Wildcats (11-4, 2-0
Pac-12 Conference) and finished with 21. Chase Jeter
had 21 points and 13 rebounds.
Donnie Tillman scored 21
points for the Utes (7-7, 1-1),
who are 1-13 against Arizona
since joining the Pac-12.
Neither team could build
a significant lead in a game
that had 12 lead changes and
15 ties.
“Our guys battled and it
was a heck of a college
basketball game,” coach
Larry Krystowiak said.
at Arizona State 83, Colorado 61: Romello White
scored 19 points, Luguentz
Dort had 14 and the Sun
Devils (10-4, 1-1) jumped on
the Buffaloes (9-4, 0-2) from
the start.
The Sun Devils moved
the ball well and shot 57%.
They smothered the Buffaloes early with an aggressive 2-3 zone.
Arizona State led by 18
points after the first half and
held Colorado to 33% shooting overall.
Oregon State 77, at Oregon 72: Tres Tinkle scored 28
points and the Beavers held
off the Pac-12 preseason favorites.
Tinkle led the Beavers
(9-4) to their first road win in
a conference opener in 26
years.
The Ducks (9-5) led four
times after trailing by 18
points early in the second
half.
Zach Reichle’s two free
throws put the Beavers up
73-72 with 47 seconds left as
they scored the last six
points on free throws.
Freshman Louis King led
Oregon with 17 points and 10
rebounds.
at Washington 85, Washington State 67: David Crisp
scored 23 points, Jaylen
Nowell scored 20 and the
Huskies (10-4) turned it on in
second half in the conference opener for the teams.
CJ Elleby led the Cougars
with 26 points.
Rick Scuteri Associated Press
ARIZONA’S Brandon Randolph drives to the basket
in the second half between Utah’s Timmy Allen (20)
and Novak Topalovic as Donnie Tillman (3) looks on.
S
L AT I M E S . C O M / S P O RT S
S U N DAY , JA N UA RY 6 , 2 019
D7
TOP 25 ROUNDUP
Iowa State upsets Kansas
associated press
Top 25 scores
Iowa State served notice
that it’s a Big 12 contender
again after an ugly rebuild
last season.
Marial Shayok scored 24
points as the Cyclones
routed No. 5 Kansas 77-60 on
Saturday for their most lopsided victory over the Jayhawks in 46 years.
Freshman Tyrese Haliburton made four threepointers and scored 14
points for Iowa State (12-2,
2-0), which opened Big 12
play with back-to-back wins
for the first time since 2015. It
was the Cyclones’ fifth consecutive victory overall.
Kansas (12-2, 1-1) committed a season-high 24
turnovers in its worst loss to
Iowa State since an 89-65
blowout in Lawrence in 1973.
“They’re the standard in
our league and the team
we’re all trying to catch,” Cyclones coach Steve Prohm
said. “It’s a great win. I loved
the way they competed.”
Despite getting outrebounded 41-26, Iowa State
made surprisingly easy work
of Kansas in part by shooting nine of 13 on thre-pointers in the second half.
“We were awful. But they
were good,” Kansas coach
Bill Self said. “They manhandled us.”
Quentin Grimes scored
19 points for Kansas, includ-
No. 1 Duke
Clemson
87
68
No. 3 Tennessee
Georgia
96
50
No. 4 Virginia
No. 9 Florida State
65
52
Iowa State
No. 5 Kansas
77
60
New Mexico
No. 6 Nevada
85
58
No. 7 Gonzaga
Santa Clara
91
48
No. 8 Michigan State
No. 14 Ohio State
86
77
No. 10 Virginia Tech
Boston College
77
66
No. 11 Texas Tech
Kansas State
63
57
Alabama
No. 13 Kentucky
77
75
No. 15 North Carolina
Pittsburgh
85
60
No. 23 Oklahoma
Oklahoma State
74
64
ing 14 straight for the Jayhawks in one stretch.
at No. 3 Tennessee 96,
Georgia 50: Jordan Bowden
scored 20 points off the
bench as Volunteers opened
SEC play with their 17th
straight home win. Tennessee (12-1, 1-0) , which led by as
many as 49 points, recorded
the most lopsided win in this
series’ 156-game history.
those points as the Hokies
took a 43-36 lead and never
trailed again.
at No. 4 Virginia 65, Florida State 52: The Cavaliers,
who lead the nation in scoring defense (51.4), limited
Florida State to just 15 field
goals and continued their
best start to a season since
the 2014-15 team won its first
19 games. Kyle Guy scored 21
points and Braxton Key
added 20 for Virginia (13-0,
1-0 ACC), which led by as
many as 29 before the Seminoles (12-2, 0-1) rallied.
at No. 11 Texas Tech 63,
Kansas State 57: Davide
Moretti scored a career-high
19 points and Matt Mooney
added 14 for the Red Raiders
(13-1, 2-0 Big 12). The Wildcats (10-4, 0-2 Big 12) erased
most a 34-19 halftime deficit
and pulled within 43-42, but
Moretti scored the game’s
next seven points to help
Texas Tech pull away.
No. 8 Michigan State 86,
at No. 14 Ohio State 77: Cassius Winston scored 18 of his
25 points in the second half
and Nick Ward had 21 for the
Spartans (13-2, 4-0 Big Ten),
who won their eighth consecutive game. Michigan
State hit 13 of 17 shots from
the floor and scored 50
points after the Buckeyes
(12-2, 2-1) had taken a 43-36
lead into halftime.
No. 10 Virginia Tech 77,
Boston College 66: Nickeil
Alexander-Walker scored a
game-high 25 points on nineof-14 shooting for the Hokies
(13-1, 2-0 ACC), who rallied
for their eighth straight victory. Boston College (9-4,
0-1) led early in the second
half but Virginia Tech took
control with an 11-0 run. Alexander-Walker scored six of
at Alabama 77, No. 13
Kentucky 75: Tevin Mack
made six first-half threepointers and finished with 22
points for Alabama (10-3, 1-0
SEC), which held on for its
fifth straight win. The Wildcats (10-3, 0-1) surged back
from an 11-point deficit and
had possession of the ball in
the final seconds, but Tyler
Herro missed a three-pointer as time expired.
No. 15 North Carolina 85,
at Pittsburgh 60: Tar Heels
guard Cameron Johnson,
who grew up in the Pittsburgh suburbs and spent
three seasons with the Panthers, made his first three
shots on his way to 15 points
and nine rebounds against
his former school. Coby
White led the Tar Heels (11-3,
1-0 ACC) with 22 points and
Luke Maye added 17 points
and 11 rebounds.
Charlie Neibergall Associated Press
IOWA STATE’S Talen Horton-Tucker tries to drive
past Kansas defender Dedric Lawson.
SOUTHLAND
MEN
at Loyola Marymount 76, Portland 64: Joe Quintana scored
a career-high 19 points, Mattias Markusson had a doubledouble with 17 points and 10 rebounds, and the Lions (13-3, 1-1
West Coast Conference) defeated the Pilots (7-9, 0-1).
San Francisco 72, at Pepperdine 69: Charles Minlend scored
21 points and Frankie Ferrari hit a three-pointer with 14.2 seconds left to help the Dons (14-2, 2-0 West Coast Conference)
beat the Waves (8-8, 1-1).
Yale 94, at Cal State Northridge 90 (OT): Blake Reynolds
and Jordan Bruner each scored 18 points to lead the Bulldogs
(9-3) past the Matadors (6-10), who were led by Lamine
Diane’s 35 points and 15 rebounds. Terrell Gomez scored 23
points for Northridge.
at Long Beach State 124, Bethesda 52: Bryan Alberts made
nine three-pointers and scored a career-high 35 points to
lead the 49ers (6-10) to a rout of the NCCAA-member Flames.
Texas Rio Grande Valley 81, at Cal Baptist 74: Tyson Smith
had 21 points, Terry Winn III scored 20 points and the Vaqueros (9-8, 1-0) rallied to beat the Lancers (9-6, 1-1) to win
their Western Athletic Conference opener.
WOMEN TODAY
UCLA at No. 6 Stanford ...........................................................1 p.m.
USC at No. 18 California .......................................................... 3 p.m.
HORSE RACING
Gunmetal Gray
takes first race
in Derby chase
By John Cherwa
Rob Carr Getty Images
VICTOR ESPINOZA celebrates after completing the Triple Crown run on American Pharoah in 20016.
Espinoza back in saddle
After being paralyzed in fall, jockey is almost ready for return to racing
By John Cherwa
Jockey Victor Espinoza
couldn’t contain his smile, his
infectious laugh punctuating
many of his sentences. He was
back Saturday where he felt
most comfortable, where the
Hall of Fame jockey is
revered, where most of the
well wishers were just glad to
see him walking.
In the early morning at
Santa Anita, Espinoza got on
a horse for the first time since
July 22 when his mount,
Bobby Abu Dhabi, broke
down during a workout at Del
Mar, leaving the horse dead
and Espinoza temporarily
paralyzed. He worked St. Joe
Bay five furlongs for trainer
John Sadler. There were 102
horses that worked that distance Saturday morning; Espinoza’s ride was the third
fastest.
He also made the walk
from the barns to Clocker’s
Corner for the first time in
more than five months, being
stopped every few feet with
hellos, handshakes and hugs.
Victor Espinoza is back, almost.
“He’ll probably work
horses next weekend, and
then we’ll make a decision
about when to start taking
calls,” said Brian Beach, his
agent. Espinoza still has to be
cleared by his doctors before
he can return to riding fulltime. His next appointment
isn’t until the end of the
month.
Espinoza’s road back from
a fractured C3 vertebra has
not been easy, and many
times, he wasn’t sure he
would make it. But, for the 46year-old jockey, he’s still reflecting on how just a few minutes could have changed
everything.
‘Normally, when I
hit the ground ... I
know where it
hurts. You feel the
pain. But this time
I had no pain and
I’m thinking,
“What’s going
on?” ’
—Victor Espinoza
The morning of the accident, trainer Peter Miller
texted Beach at 5 a.m. asking
if Espinoza would work
stakes horse Bobby Abu
Dhabi at 9 a.m. Espinoza had
ridden the horse in his last
four races. Normally, workouts, especially of good
horses, are set up a few days in
advance. But not this time.
Espinoza didn’t see a text
from Beach until 8:30 a.m.,
leaving little time to get to the
track. If Espinoza had seen
the message 10 minutes later,
his last five months would
have been very different.
“If I’ve ever regretted
something in life, it was my regret to hurry up and go work
that horse for Peter Miller,”
Espinoza said. “I didn’t know
who I was working until I got
to the barn, and when I saw it
was Bobby Abu Dhabi, I got a
bad feeling, because I knew
that horse wasn’t doing that
great. But you just go out
there and hope that nothing
happens.
“It’s tough for a jockey to
be in that position, but how
can you say no at that point?
You just have to pray and
hope for the best and that
nothing serious happens. But
the minute when I was going
down, I thought, ‘I knew it.’
Probably, that’s what was
meant for me, but who
knows? If it wasn’t me on the
horse, maybe it would have
been worse for the next person riding.”
The necropsy on Bobby
Abu Dhabi showed that the
horse initially broke his right
front sesamoid and fell so
hard that it also broke his
neck, killing him almost instantly.
“When I went down, I
didn’t feel anything,” Espinoza said. “It was like, I
really can’t move my body. It
started to hit me right away.
I’ve never had that feeling before. Normally, when I hit the
ground, I move around and I
know where it hurts. You feel
the pain. But this time I had
no pain and I’m thinking,
‘What’s going on?’ ”
Espinoza’s paralysis was
temporary and the subsequent recovery excruciating.
“It was the hardest thing I
ever experienced,” Espinoza
said. “There were many times
when I thought, maybe I just
wasn’t going to come back.
And I was OK with that because I was thankful enough
that I was able to walk. When I
started, I could only walk 10
feet and if I walked 20, I would
be tired.”
Even Beach wasn’t sure if
Espinoza still had a riding career in front of him.
“I would talk to him on the
phone,” Beach said. “And
some days I could tell he was a
little less optimistic if his rehabilitation wasn’t going well.
Then, he changed therapists,
and everything started to
turn the corner. We took him
to a hand specialist, and
whatever happened, it unlocked everything, and he
could turn his neck and do
more with his arm.”
Espinoza can do more
than that now and plans to
make some life changes.
“I learned a lot about life,”
Espinoza said. “Before, I
probably took it for granted.
Before, I was just dedicating
myself to work and not doing
other things in life. This accident really woke me up. I
could have died, and what
would it have meant to everything I have done? Nothing.
“I need to do more things
that I really want to do. … If I
want to go on vacation, then, I
need to take off and go. The
races are going to be here forever, but we’re not.”
Espinoza rode trainer Bob
Baffert’s first Triple Crown
winner American Pharoah,
and Espinoza said Baffert has
promised him his first winner
when he comes back.
“I’m waiting for it,” Espinoza said with a laugh. “The
time is getting closer. Baffert
is always good to me and always finds me the right horse.
When the time is right, he’ll
have the right horse for me.”
Baffert agrees.
“That’s right,” Baffert said
to making that promise. “I’ve
got to put him on a good one,
maybe find him a homebred
[with less ownership say so].”
Espinoza has made many
lasting friends through the
years.
“[Owners Kosta and Pete
Hronis] and John [Sadler]
and Baffert, and his wife, Jill,
they are always there for me,”
Espinoza said. “It was good to
have their support when I
needed them. They know
when they need me, I’m there
to help them out.”
The time when he can answer that call is nearing.
sports@latimes.com
Everyone had pretty
much conceded the first
Kentucky Derby points race
to one of Bob Baffert deep
stable of 3-year-olds. And, in
fact, his latest prized colt,
Coliseum, had a lot to do
with who won Saturday’s
Grade 3 $100,000 Sham
Stakes at Santa Anita.
Just not in a way that was
expected.
Gunmetal Gray, a talented colt who last ran fifth
in the Breeders’ Cup Juvenile, entered the stretch
sixth in the seven-horse field
and accelerated down the
lane to win the one-mile race
by a widening length.
All the expectations were
on Coliseum, who was bet
down to 60 cents on the dollar, but he turned out to be a
bad actor in only his second
lifetime race. He was fractious in the paddock walking
ring, often rearing up on two
hooves. Then once the race
started, things didn’t get any
better.
“Coliseum seemed to slip
and really veer right [out of
the gate],” said Mike Smith,
who rode Gunmetal Gray.
“When he did that, he caught
me in behind for a couple
jumps, which really got me
out of position. Then, Coliseum got up there and made
the pace move the second
quarter, which I was comfortable with, so I knew it
was going to set up for a
horse that would finish and
it did.”
Gunmetal Gray paid
$9.40, $4.80 and $3.40 as the
second favorite. Sueno was
second, Much Better finished third, followed by Gray
Magician, Easy Shot, Coliseum and Savagery.
Winning trainer and
part-owner Jerry Hollendorfer has always thought
highly of the colt, a $225,000
purchase, even though he
had won only one of his four
races.
“He sat back there and
bided his time and got a big
trip coming around and ran
[the other horses] down.”
Hollendorfer said. “We’ve
been running him in some
pretty tough spots, [but
now] he’s been home for a
while and training well here
the last two months.”
Hollendorfer said he has
a lot of options for the colt’s
next race, although he didn’t
specify what they were.
In
Saturday’s
other
graded stakes, favored Next
Shares won by the slimmest
of noses in the Grade 2
$200,000 San Gabriel Stakes
for older horses going 11⁄8
miles on the turf. Cleopatra’s
Strike was second and Liam
The Charmer was third.
Next Shares paid $5.20, $3.60
and $2.80 for trainer Richard
Benoit Photo
GUNMETAL GRAY and
jockey Mike Smith rally
to win the Sham Stakes.
Baltas. Jockey Geovanni
Franco was substituting for
Joel Rosario, who was sick
and taken off all his mounts
Saturday.
Eclipse Awards
The finalists for the
Eclipse Awards were announced Saturday with few
surprises. As expected, the
three finalists for horse of
the year were Justify, who
should also win the 3-yearold male award; Accelerate,
who should win the older
male horse award; and
Monomoy Girl, who should
win the 3-year-old filly
award.
Justify and Accelerate
were based at Santa Anita.
Justify was retired after becoming the 13th winner of
the Triple Crown. Accelerate
will run one more time in the
Pegasus World Cup before
retiring at the end of January. He also won the Breeders’ Cup Classic.
Baffert has won the
Eclipse Award for top
trainer four times, last in
2015. He’s a finalist this year
along with East Coastbased Steve Asmussen and
Chad Brown. Baffert trains
six Eclipse Award-nominated horses representing
eight entries: Justify (horse
of the year, 3-year-old male),
Marley’s Freedom (older
dirt female, female sprinter), Game Winner (2-yearold male), Improbable (2year-old male), McKinzie (3year-old male) and Abel
Tasman (older dirt female).
Other Southern California-based nominees include: Bellafina (2-year-old
female), City Of Light (older
dirt male), Unique Bella
(older dirt female), Roy H
(male sprinter), Stormy Liberal (male sprinter, male
turf horse).
Bellafina runs at Santa
Anita on Sunday in the
Grade 2 $200,000 Santa Ynez
Stakes over seven furlongs.
In other human nominations, Smith is up for the
jockey Eclipse Award and
Kosta and Pete Hronis in the
ownership category.
The winners will be announced Jan. 24.
sports@latimes.com
D8
SU N DAY , JA N UA RY 6 , 2 019
S
L AT I M E S . C O M / S P O RT S
INSIDE THE NBA
Butler challenge not Harden wreaking his havoc
FASTBREAK
only one for 76ers
The Philadelphia 76ers entered the season as one of the most interesting teams in
the NBA, nearly earning a trip to the Eastern Conference finals a year ago with two of
the league’s biggest young stars who were
only going to get better.
Ben Simmons and Joel Embiid had
pulled the 76ers out of the depths of a
painful rebuild, and they were one of the
favorites to make a run at the NBA Finals
this season.
But there were murmurs that everything
wasn’t OK, that personality conflicts between the team’s top two stars would threaten their championship future. An earlyseason trade for Jimmy Butler, an offensive
and defensive star who left a wake of bad
feelings in Chicago and Minnesota, made
things even more complicated.
Last week, Philadelphia coach Brett
Brown said that getting his team’s players
on the same page was the challenge occupying the biggest space in his brain.
“What’s most, by a mile, lately on my
mind, is the growth of a team and the cohesion and the ability to share in someone
else’s success — and the ability to communicate candidly. To coexist. That’s all I care
about,” Brown said.
“We’re coming together. We have a new
opportunity. And you just don’t click your
heels and [say] ‘You’re going to throw
Jimmy Butler in and everyone is going to be
playing the same way and the same style.’ It
just don’t work like that. My job is to grow a
team.
“Playing together is what’s always, by a
long shot, most on my mind.”
But how together are the 76ers?
Wednesday against the Clippers, Simmons whacked Embiid in the face when
the two players tried to chase down a rebound, with Embiid visibly frustrated by
the play. And Friday, ESPN reported that
Butler challenged Brown during a film
session on how the 76ers’ offense is structured.
With Philadelphia, Butler is attempting
13.9 shots per game, the fewest he’s taken
since his third season in the NBA. His rebounding and assist numbers also are
down.
“The thing that’s easy is that he’s a talent
and he’s a competitor. He thinks like we try
to think defensively. So, the fit is natural,”
Brown said of Butler. “The challenge is
obvious. The ecosystem of Joel and Ben
Simmons and JJ Redick, integrating all that
together, is the challenge.”
The 76ers traded their top two role players, Dario Saric and Robert Covington, to
get Butler, who almost certainly will opt out
of his contract to become an unrestricted
free agent this summer.
There’s a tight timetable to keep Philadelphia on the level of Milwaukee, Toronto,
Boston and Indiana, and there’s no guarantee that Butler and the 76ers are a long-term
match.
[Woike, from D1]
seasons someone has shot more
than 900. The other two,
Shaquille O’Neal and Dwight
Howard, were notoriously bad
free-throw shooters who were
routinely fouled intentionally.
Harden, an 85% career freethrow shooter, is anything but.
It’s a massive part of Harden’s offensive arsenal, one that
has the NBA under siege. Houston is the hottest team, entering
Saturday having won 11 of its
last 12 with Harden averaging
40.1 points during the stretch —
a chunk of which has come with
Chris Paul sidelined because of
a hamstring injury.
Harden’s making shots with
the highest degrees of difficulty,
like a figure skater who does
only quadruple axels.
After scoring 44 against the
Warriors, Harden dismissed
anyone wasting time talking
about his trips to the foul line.
Against Golden State — and
this uniquely applies to him —
he shot only nine free throws.
“I’ve got the total package. I
get to the basket aggressively. I
shoot my shot. Don’t foul me on
my jump shot and we won’t have
anything to talk about. It’s as
simple as that,” Harden said.
“They talk too much about the
fouls and not enough about the
greatness of what I’m doing out
there on the court. That’s what
we need to focus on.”
But that’s not where the
focus is with Harden, not when
the foul-hunting has become a
primary weapon of his offensive
game. Opposing players and
coaches respect his craftiness —
sometimes begrudgingly — and
style of play.
Clippers coach Doc Rivers
said Harden is the greatest
one-on-one player in NBA history. Philadelphia guard JJ
Redick said Harden’s step-back
three-point shot — he’s made
nearly four times as many of
them as anyone else in the
league — is basketball’s most
difficult shot to defend. Golden
State coach Steve Kerr said
Harden has changed basketball
forever.
“You don’t,” Houston coach
Mike D’Antoni said of guarding
Harden when he’s attempting
difficult shots. “You can’t. You
might as well give up.
“You can’t guard him unless
you foul him and they don’t call
it. That’d be the only way.”
There’s an element of defeatism that creeps into the minds
of opponents tasked with
guarding Harden, especially
when it comes to his ability to
manipulate his way into fouls —
something he does two ways.
The most prominent and
respected way is by combining
incredible dribbling ability with
amazing hand strength, letting
him tease defenders into thinking they can get a steal.
“He shows you the ball. As a
defender, it looks really good.
And then he snatches it away
and you’re reaching for a wrist
instead of the ball most of the
time,” Warriors guard Klay
Thompson said. “It looks like
it’s right there for you and then
he moves it really quickly and
you have all wrist before you
know it.”
It’s the basketball version of
taping a $100 bill to a string and
then pulling it away as soon as
someone grabs at it.
“His forearms, his hands —
that’s a big part of it, his ability
David J. Phillip Associated Press
JAMES HARDEN of Houston has a preternatural ability to draw fouls against teams, in-
cluding the Golden State Warriors, sometimes even when there’s no contact on the play.
‘They talk too much
about the fouls and
not enough about
the greatness of
what I’m doing out
there on the court.’
— James Harden,
on critics who claim he’s gifted too
many free throws by the officials
to absorb contact in a bunch of
different ways,” Redick said.
“Because he’s strong, it allows
him to do that tease. Most guys
would be hesitant to stick the
ball out like that because they’d
get it ripped a few times. But
he’s not because he’s so strong.”
It’s not basketball in the
purest sense — the original idea
is to score in the flow of action,
not at the foul line — but it’s
hard not to respect his ability in
drawing these fouls.
Thompson wasn’t sure if
everyone respects Harden’s
knack to draw fouls but acknowledged “it gets results.”
“And his scoring numbers
are incredible. It’s almost like
BEST GAME EVER
Steve Dykes Associated Press
JIMMY BUTLER reportedly chal-
lenged his coach over his offensive role.
Rivers makes himself at home
Former Clippers guard Austin Rivers
has landed in Houston, and with Chris Paul
and Eric Gordon injured, Rivers has had an
immediate influence.
Washington traded Rivers to Phoenix as
part of the deal for Trevor Ariza, and the
Suns immediately reached a buyout agreement, making Rivers a free agent.
Rivers said he chose Houston over Golden State, Orlando, Memphis and Milwaukee.
In his first five games with the Rockets,
Rivers averaged 12 points, 3.2 rebounds and
3.2 assists, a natural fit in the team’s isolation-based offense.
“I don’t know where he came from,”
James Harden joked. “He fits in well with
what we’re trying to do.”
Tip-ins
After missing out on Rivers, Memphis
traded for Chicago guard Justin Holiday.
The former Studio City Campbell Hall star
was one of the better available low-cost
players who are strong on offense and defense. Holiday could be the first part of a
massive Bulls sell-off that might also include center Robin Lopez and forward
Bobby Portis. … Clippers two-way player
Angel Delgado set a G-League record with
30 rebounds Friday night.
— Dan Woike
Dan Woike asked NBA players to tell us
about the best game in their basketball
career. This week: P.J. Tucker.
May 24, 2018: Game 5 of
Western Conference
finals; Houston 98, Golden State 94.
42 minutes, eight points,
nine rebounds
“What do you mean by
best? Is it numbers?”
asked P.J. Tucker, one of
P.J. Tucker
the NBA’s best role players, a brick house on defense and a knockdown three-point shooter from the corners.
He defined his “best” as the best moment he
felt as a player. The high was followed by two
losses, but they didn’t spoil the memory.
“It was Game 5, beating the Warriors. We
had won three and had to just win one out of
the last two. The energy of our team … I just
had never been around a team that was so
complete with everything and every piece
and everyone hitting on all cylinders. It was
just this feeling of a real team and camaraderie. More than anything, just that feeling of a
team, I’ve never felt anything like that
playing basketball. I don’t remember how my
game even was. That’s how I know. I don’t
remember my numbers — and it doesn’t
matter. How we were as a team? That’s all
that matters. I don’t remember who had a
good game, who played well or who played
bad. I don’t remember any of that. We won.
It’s that feeling, as a player who wants to win
and be a leader, that kind of stuff … It’s the
hardest thing in the world to get that.”
you have to because of the results. His production is incredible.”
There are other types of fouls
he draws, where he makes it
look like he’s being fouled more
than he is, that aren’t for everyone.
Kerr said part of the challenge in guarding Harden is
that he’ll get foul calls that can
take a defender out of his game.
“You have to have, somehow,
the emotional stability to deal
with a couple of really bad calls
because there are some fouls
that happen in the game when
you’re playing against him that
just seem sort of insane — the
kind of fouls that would maybe
start a fight in a pickup game,”
Kerr said. “Like you’re guarding
him, he grabs your arm and it’s
a foul on you. You look at the
refs like, ‘You’ve got to be kidding.’
“It’s all part of his genius,
that he creates this illusion that
he’s being fouled when he’s
actually fouling you.”
When you pair that with
Harden’s ball-dominant style, it
leads to a bunch of players
standing around, which can be
frustrating. Rivers said it’s just
another edge to Harden’s game.
“He’s just clever. I don’t think
he gets enough credit for his IQ.
To do what he does and to draw
those fouls, you have to be brilliantly smart,” Rivers said. “He
doesn’t get enough credit for
that. A lot of it doesn’t have to
do with athleticism or strength.
That’s him being smarter than
whoever is guarding him every
night and that’s rare.”
Harden’s style isn’t for everyone. There’s his flopping. Rockets possessions seem to start
and end with his methodical
dribbling. Add to that Harden’s
seemingly endless trips to the
free-throw line — he shot 27 in a
game against Memphis last
week.
He doesn’t care. Harden
didn’t need to hunt for fouls to
decimate the Warriors at Oracle
Arena, to score 44 points on
whomever Golden State sent
his way, to split Draymond
Green and Thompson for a
game-winning three-point shot
in overtime. None of it slowed
him down, not while he’s playing
the best basketball of his life.
“They’re a team that’s very
versatile. Defensively, they
throw multiple guys at you,”
Harden said. “And for me, nothing changes.”
dan.woike@latimes.com
LEAGUE LEADERS
Through Friday
SCORING AVERAGE
Player, Team
Harden, HOU ......................
Curry, GOL ..........................
Davis, NOR .........................
Durant, GOL .......................
James, LAKERS ...................
Leonard, TOR ......................
George, OKC .......................
Embiid, PHL .......................
Lillard, POR ........................
Antetokounmpo, MIL ............
Booker, PHX .......................
Walker, CHA .......................
Griffin, DET .........................
Beal, WAS ..........................
LaVine, CHI ........................
Irving, BOS .........................
DeRozan, SAN ....................
Towns, MIN .........................
Thompson, GOL ..................
Westbrook, OKC ..................
Holiday, NOR ......................
Harris, CLIPPERS .................
McCollum, POR ...................
Wall, WAS ..........................
Hardaway Jr., NYK ................
Vucevic, ORL .......................
Oladipo, IND ......................
Conley, MEM .......................
Hield, SAC .........................
Mitchell, UTA ......................
Randle, NOR ......................
Aldridge, SAN .....................
Gallinari, CLIPPERS ..............
Doncic, DAL .......................
Butler, PHL .........................
Rose, MIN ..........................
Murray, DEN .......................
Barnes, DAL .......................
Richardson, MIA ..................
Warren, PHX .......................
Williams, CLIPPERS .............
Kuzma, LAKERS ..................
Redick, PHL ........................
Jokic, DEN ..........................
Russell, BRO ......................
Fox, SAC ............................
Middleton, MIL ....................
Dinwiddie, BRO ...................
Capela, HOU ......................
G
34
28
34
39
34
31
37
37
39
35
30
37
35
39
33
34
39
39
39
30
39
38
38
32
36
37
27
37
38
35
38
39
37
37
31
32
36
34
36
34
34
38
39
36
39
38
35
40
37
FG
331
270
353
383
340
294
342
330
342
341
269
324
293
346
274
298
338
311
322
246
313
296
312
245
239
314
201
252
289
262
283
312
218
237
209
236
258
215
230
241
198
265
239
244
276
248
217
227
278
FIELD GOAL PERCENTAGE
FT
318
132
236
274
180
200
191
295
237
216
156
171
202
146
171
99
207
170
81
107
126
127
94
122
168
83
84
164
68
107
169
151
204
159
130
83
97
109
112
82
182
99
121
129
63
146
102
161
85
Pts
1142
810
976
1110
928
840
999
997
1039
910
763
941
869
931
777
786
890
860
824
632
816
793
790
663
743
753
546
747
766
701
758
777
727
722
591
604
677
631
666
629
623
696
712
656
708
686
628
697
641
Avg
33.6
28.9
28.7
28.5
27.3
27.1
27.0
26.9
26.6
26.0
25.4
25.4
24.8
23.9
23.5
23.1
22.8
22.1
21.1
21.1
20.9
20.9
20.8
20.7
20.6
20.4
20.2
20.2
20.2
20.0
19.9
19.9
19.6
19.5
19.1
18.9
18.8
18.6
18.5
18.5
18.3
18.3
18.3
18.2
18.2
18.1
17.9
17.4
17.3
Player, Team
Gobert, UTA
Jordan, DAL
Capela, HOU
Sabonis, IND
Harrell, CLIPPERS
McGee, LAKERS
Ayton, PHX
Favors, UTA
Adams, OKC
Antetokounmpo, MIL
Allen, BRO
Simmons, PHL
Siakam, TOR
Valanciunas, TOR
Collins, ATL
Gibson, MIN
Randle, NOR
Thompson, CLE
FG
221
156
278
212
233
172
295
170
238
341
168
246
225
149
167
166
283
149
FGA
333
243
437
336
370
281
486
285
403
580
291
427
391
259
292
297
521
275
REBOUNDS PER GAME
Pct
.664
.642
.636
.631
.630
.612
.607
.596
.591
.588
.577
.576
.575
.575
.572
.559
.543
.542
3-POINT FG PERCENTAGE
Player, Team
Curry, POR
Harris, BRO
Bertans, SAN
Rose, MIN
Gallinari, CLIPPERS
Bogdanovic, IND
Curry, GOL
Cook, GOL
Warren, PHX
Morris, DEN
Forbes, SAN
Bjelica, SAC
3FG 3FGA Pct
43
87 .494
92 187 .492
66 136 .485
49 106 .462
87 191 .455
75 167 .449
138 309 .447
42
95 .442
65 148 .439
42
96 .438
85 195 .436
61 140 .436
FREE THROW PERCENTAGE
Player, Team
Brogdon, MIL
Gallinari, CLIPPERS
Durant, GOL
Curry, GOL
Green, WAS
Redick, PHL
Williams, CLIPPERS
Saric, MIN
Hayward, BOS
Augustin, ORL
Lillard, POR
Hood, CLE
Caldwell-Pope, LAKERS
Harris, CLIPPERS
Morris, BOS
FT
63
204
274
132
80
121
182
61
69
86
237
76
74
127
74
FTA
64
222
300
145
88
134
202
68
77
96
265
85
83
143
84
Pct
.984
.919
.913
.910
.909
.903
.901
.897
.896
.896
.894
.894
.892
.888
.881
Player, Team
Drummond, DET
Jordan, DAL
Embiid, PHL
Davis, NOR
Whiteside, MIA
Capela, HOU
Antetokounmpo, MIL
Gobert, UTA
Towns, MIN
Vucevic, ORL
Thompson, CLE
Westbrook, OKC
Ayton, PHX
Kanter, NYK
Nurkic, POR
G
36
38
37
34
32
37
35
39
39
37
29
30
40
39
39
Off
195
119
89
114
126
186
84
139
129
95
139
39
130
154
137
Def
341
419
413
340
289
285
353
339
347
338
189
286
300
265
269
Tot
536
538
502
454
415
471
437
478
476
433
328
325
430
419
406
Avg
14.9
14.2
13.6
13.4
13.0
12.7
12.5
12.3
12.2
11.7
11.3
10.8
10.8
10.7
10.4
ASSISTS PER GAME
Player, Team
Westbrook, OKC
Lowry, TOR
Wall, WAS
Harden, HOU
Holiday, NOR
Simmons, PHL
Jokic, DEN
Fox, SAC
Young, ATL
James, LAKERS
Booker, PHX
G
30
30
32
34
39
38
36
38
38
34
30
AST Avg
300 10.0
294 9.8
279 8.7
291 8.6
333 8.5
299 7.9
273 7.6
287 7.6
285 7.5
243 7.1
212 7.1
STEALS PER GAME
Player, Team
Westbrook, OKC
George, OKC
Covington, MIN
Harden, HOU
Butler, PHL
Smart, BOS
Oladipo, IND
Holiday, MEM
G
30
37
35
34
31
38
27
38
STL
80
83
74
70
63
70
49
67
Avg
2.67
2.24
2.11
2.06
2.03
1.84
1.81
1.76
BLK
103
90
81
80
81
71
70
73
Avg
2.78
2.65
2.53
2.50
2.08
1.92
1.89
1.87
BLOCKS PER GAME
Player, Team
Turner, IND
Davis, NOR
Whiteside, MIA
McGee, LAKERS
Gobert, UTA
Capela, HOU
Embiid, PHL
Towns, MIN
G
37
34
32
32
39
37
37
39
S
L AT I M E S . C O M / S P O RT S
S U N DAY , JA N UA RY 6 , 2 019
D9
NBA
LAKERS REPORT
STANDINGS
Standings have been arranged to reflect how the teams will be determined for the playoffs. Teams are ranked 1-15 by record. Division
standing no longer has any bearing on the rankings. The top eight
teams in each conference make the playoffs, and the top-seeded
team would play the eighth-seeded team, the seventh team would
play the second, etc. Head-to-head competition is the first of several
tiebreakers, followed by conference record. (Western Conference divisions: S-Southwest; P-Pacific; N-Northwest; Eastern Conference
divisions: A-Atlantic; C-Central; S-Southeast).
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Team
1. Denver
2. Oklahoma City
3. Golden State
4. CLIPPERS
4. Houston
6. Portland
6. San Antonio
8. LAKERS
9. Utah
10. Sacramento
11. Dallas
11. Memphis
11. Minnesota
14. New Orleans
15. Phoenix
W
26
25
26
22
22
23
23
21
20
19
18
18
18
18
9
L
11
13
14
16
16
17
17
18
20
20
21
21
21
22
31
PCT
.703
.658
.650
.579
.579
.575
.575
.538
GB L10
8-2
11⁄2 7-3
11⁄2 6-4
41⁄2 5-5
41⁄2 8-2
41⁄2 6-4
41⁄2 8-2
6
3-7
.500 11⁄2
.487 2
.462 3
.462 3
.462 3
.450 31⁄2
.225 121⁄2
6-4
3-7
3-7
2-8
5-5
3-7
3-7
Rk.
N1
N2
P1
P2
S1
N3
S2
P3
N4
P4
S4
S3
N5
S5
P5
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Team
1. Milwaukee
2. Toronto
3. Indiana
4. Philadelphia
5. Boston
6. Miami
7. Brooklyn
8. Charlotte
W
27
29
26
26
23
19
19
18
L
11
12
12
14
15
18
21
20
PCT
.711
.707
.684
.650
.605
.514
.475
.474
GB L10 Rk.
1
⁄2 8-2 C1
6-4 A1
11⁄2 8-2 C2
21⁄2 7-3 A2
41⁄2 5-5 A3
8
8-2 S1
91⁄2 7-3 A4
91⁄2 4-6 S2
9. Detroit
10. Orlando
11. Washington
12. Atlanta
13. Chicago
13. New York
15. Cleveland
17
17
15
11
10
10
8
20
21
24
27
29
29
32
.459
⁄2
.447 1
.385 31⁄2
.289 7
.256 81⁄2
.256 81⁄2
.200 11
1
3-7
4-6
4-6
5-5
4-6
2-8
1-9
C3
S3
S4
S5
C4
A5
C5
TODAY’S GAMES
Favorite
Line Underdog
at Minnesota
OFF LAKERS
at CLIPPERS
7 Orlando
Brooklyn
2 at Chicago
Miami
6 at Atlanta
at Oklahoma City 10 Washington
at Toronto
OFF Indiana
at Phoenix
2 Charlotte
Time
12:30 p.m.
12:30 p.m.
12:30 p.m.
3 p.m.
4 p.m.
4:30 p.m.
5 p.m.
RESULTS
Raptors overcome
Antetokounmpo’s 43
TORONTO 123
MILWAUKEE 116
Kawhi Leonard and Pascal
Siakam each scored 30 points, with
Siakam setting a career high, and
the Toronto Raptors beat the host
Milwaukee Bucks 123-116 on Saturday night in a matchup of the top
two teams in the standings.
Serge Ibaka added 25 points
and nine rebounds, Fred VanVleet
had 21 points and Danny Green 12
points and nine rebounds for the
Raptors, who withstood the Bucks’
comeback in the fourth.
“What helped us was the beginning of that third quarter,” Leonard said. “We came out in the first
two minutes playing well, getting
stops, getting some open looks.”
Giannis Antetokounmpo had
43 points and 18 rebounds for Milwaukee, which had won its last five.
“We kind of let up the second
quarter,” Eric Bledsoe said.
at Portland 110, Houston 101: Jusuf
Nurkic had 25 points and 15 rebounds, and the Trail Blazers
snapped James Harden’s 40-point
streak at five games and the Rockets’ six-game winning streak.
Harden finished with 38 points.
Golden State 127, at Sacramento
123: Stephen Curry scored 20 of his
42 points in the fourth quarter and
had 10 three-pointers, and the Warriors rallied to sweep the Kings.
Kevin Durant added 29 points,
nine assists and five rebounds. The
teams combined for a record 41
threes, with Sacramento’s 20 a
franchise best.
at Denver 123, Charlotte 110:
Nikola Jokic scored a season-high
39 points with 12 rebounds, six assists and three steals as the
Nuggets won their 10th straight at
home. At 26-11, they’re off to the
best NBA start in team history.
at Philadelphia 106, Dallas 100:
Joel Embiid had 25 points and 12
rebounds, including two key free
throws, and Ben Simmons added
20 points, 14 rebounds and 11 assists as the 76ers improved to 17-3
at home. Jimmy Butler missed a
second straight game due to an upper respiratory infection.
Utah 110, at Detroit 105: Donovan
Mitchell scored 24 of his 26 points
in the second half, and the Jazz rallied from 18 down. Blake Griffin
scored 34 points for the Pistons.
at San Antonio 108, Memphis 88:
Derrick White scored 19 points and
the Spurs handed the Grizzlies
their fifth straight loss.
New Orleans 133, Cleveland 98:
Jrue Holiday and Julius Randle
both scored 22 points and Anthony
Davis had 20 points and 10 rebounds as the Pelicans handed the
Cavaliers their ninth straight loss.
— associated press
Looking for leaders,
Stephenson steps up
By Dan Woike
The Lakers’ locker room
after Friday’s night loss to
the New York Knicks was
sullen, players frustrated by
a loss to one of the worst
clubs in the NBA.
Josh Hart’s voice was
barely a whisper as he talked
about the Lakers’ young
players being in new roles
with so many teammates injured. Brandon Ingram
talked about being comfortable only when his team is
winning. Lonzo Ball lamented how the Lakers kept
losing the same way.
The Lakers needed some
fire, some presence to reassure them that a loss to a bad
team can be offset by an unexpected win over a great
one.
Enter Lance Stephenson, the air-guitar-strumming, fancy-pass-throwing
reserve swingman.
“I’ve got to pick it up. I’ll
put it all on me,” Stephenson
said. “I’ve got to be that veteran, that leader to my
teammates and get them going. That’s how we can get
these games.”
It’s
admirable
of
Stephenson, who averages
only 15 minutes a game, to
volunteer to take on a bigger
role (and the blame that
comes with it). It’s also a reminder of how dire things
are in Lakerland, with LeBron James, Rajon Rondo
and Kyle Kuzma sidelined.
Things could get better in
the next 24 hours. Kuzma,
who hasn’t played since the
first half of Wednesday’s loss
to Oklahoma City because of
a back injury, traveled with
the team to Minnesota, a
sign he could be back Sunday against the Timber-
Gary Coronado Los Angeles Times
LANCE STEPHENSON
averages just 15 minutes
but is ready to lead.
wolves.
That doesn’t address the
need for leadership, which
will exist as long as James
and Rondo are in street
clothes instead of uniforms.
“It’s up to other people to
step up and lead, and guys
are doing it. We just have to
do more of it,” coach Luke
Walton said. “It’s great when
things are going well, and
the challenge is when we hit
dry spells or other teams get
hot. That’s when it starts
getting quiet. And that’s
when we need it the most.
That’s when we need five
guys huddling up on the
court, talking about what
happened on the last play,
what’s going to happen on
the next play — being in the
moment of playing.”
Fourth-quarter
follies frustrating
Walton was particularly
frustrated with the Lakers’
play in the fourth quarter
Friday, when they squandered a six-point lead, unraveling down the stretch.
“Until we accept that the
team is the most important
thing ...” he said. “And I can’t
tell if it’s because we’re missing open shots and we’re
missing open layups, if you
will, that we stop trusting
each other. But the ball was
moving beautifully when we
built up our lead, and then
we got to the fourth and we
had a couple possessions of
nice ball movement and
then once shots didn’t go in,
guys start trying to do it on
their own. And that’s not a
recipe for us to win.”
Walton was asked if he
thought Ingram was trying
to score too much. Ingram
took a season-high 21 shots
for the second consecutive
game Friday night.
“We want Brandon staying aggressive, and it’s just a
matter of fine-tuning that
aggression when he playmakes. I mean, he had some
beautiful passes early in the
game, then he gets in a
rhythm and we want him
looking to score,” Walton
said. “There also is that balance of being aggressive and
being a playmaker for us; he
knows that’s what we need
out of him.”
TODAY
AT MINNESOTA
When: 12:30 p.m. PST
On the air: TV: Spectrum
SportsNet; Radio: 710, 1330
Update: The Timberwolves
(18-21) are 5-5 since Dec. 17,
when they ended a fourgame losing streak that sent
them spiraling below .500.
The Lakers (21-18) have split
two games against Minnesota this season, with the
home team winning each
time by four points.
dan.woike@latimes.com
Gilgeous-Alexander gets
shut down by this ‘wall’
By Andrew Greif
Before he left Phoenix’s
arena and boarded the Clippers’ flight home Friday
night,
Shai
GilgeousAlexander took bottle after
bottle of Gatorade out of a
locker-room
refrigerator
and stuffed them into a plastic bag.
The contents of his extra
carry-on went to veteran
teammates who assigned
Gilgeous-Alexander
the
kind of “rookie duty” that is
typical for the league’s newest members.
The menial tasks are simply a reminder: GilgeousAlexander might be a starting point guard who has impressed teammates and
opponents alike for a
smooth, advanced game,
but he’s still a rookie.
He could have fooled
many earlier this season, averaging 10.9 points, 3.5 rebounds and 3.1 assists with a
plus-4.0 rating through 21
games. He drew kudos from
All-Stars such as Kevin Durant and Damian Lillard,
collecting more praise than
bottles of Gatorade.
Recently, though, Gilgeous-Alexander
hasn’t
been able to escape another
rookie rite: fatigue.
“He’s playing hard, he’s
working on his game, he’s
doing all the right things,
but he has struggled,” coach
Doc Rivers said. “He needs
help. He doesn’t know his
way out of the woods yet.
That’s what we’re here for.”
Gilgeous-Alexander is
averaging nearly four less
minutes in his last 12 games
and he has a minus-6.8 rating in that span while grabbing nearly half as many rebounds. Foul trouble has
been a nagging issue. His accuracy on mid-range pull-up
jump shots has improved
while his accuracy has declined on catch-and-shoot
attempts, both inside and
behind the three-point arc.
“I’ve obviously had a little
bit of success, but I’ve also
had moments like this in my
career,” Gilgeous-Alexander
said. “I know how to get
through them and I know I
will.”
When it comes to the socalled rookie wall, Phoenix
coach Igor Kokoskov is
something of an authority,
as his Suns team starts three
Eric Gay Associated Press
ROOKIE Shai Gilgeous-
Alexander has slowed
down after a good start.
rookies. (Kokoskov is a firsttime head coach, as well.)
Though the length of the
NBA season plays a factor —
Gilgeous-Alexander has already played one more game
this season than he did all of
his freshman year at Kentucky — a rookie’s biggest
adjustment is mental more
than physical.
“You focus on one team,
one game and then you give
everything you have and
guess what? It’s a back-toback, following day you’ve
got to play an even better
team,” Kokoskov said.
How does he know when
a rookie has reached the
“wall”?
“When guys don’t show
up,” he said. “They have a
couple good games and then
you feel like you check the
minutes and you’re not sure
a guy played.”
The Clippers believe
strongly
in
GilgeousAlexander
but
haven’t
treated him with kid gloves,
as they’ve waited for his adjustments to click. Rivers
wants the guard to drive
“downhill” toward the rim
more often and play better
defense.
At 6-foot-6, GilgeousAlexander’s length once allowed him to stay in front of
opposing guards on defense,
but now they’re getting
around him both on the ball
and in weakside situations.
“It’s tough in his position,” center Montrezl Harrell said. “We’re asking a
rookie to come out here and
be the starting point guard
for us, but it’s a man’s game,
you just got to shape up and
learn it really quickly. It’s not
like we’re asking him to do
anything crazy.
“We’re not just telling him
to go out there and hold his
guy to not scoring the ball
completely, but I mean we’ve
got to give a little resistance
on the defensive end.”
Gilgeous-Alexander
hears all of this and takes it
in. His willingness to absorb
others’ advice helped quicken his transition into the
league, coaches said. They
just hope it won’t make him
second-guess himself during times of struggle.
“I don’t remember being
a rookie because that was a
long time ago,” Rivers said,
“but I do remember getting a
lot of advice and there are
nights where it’s like, ‘Geez,
would everybody just shut
up?’
“Every second, you see
someone is talking to Shai.”
Gilgeous-Alexander
called his lone season at
Kentucky, where the Wildcats play under constant
scrutiny, excellent preparation for this moment.
“So many eyeballs, so
many people watching you,
criticizing,” he said. “I just
try not to worry about it.”
The Clippers, who remain in the playoff race
nearly at the season’s midway point, are counting on it.
Right now, pushing through
the “wall” is GilgeousAlexander’s most important
rookie duty.
TODAY
VS. ORLANDO
When: 12:30 p.m.
On Air: TV: Prime Ticket;
Radio: 570, 1330.
Update: Clippers backup
guard Milos Teodosic will
miss Sunday’s game as he
continues to recover from
tendinitis in a knee, according to a source not authorized to speak publicly. Teodosic traveled with the team
to Phoenix and underwent
treatment with the team’s
medical staff instead of
watching from the bench …
G League call-up Johnathan
Motley played for the first
time this season, checking in
with 29 seconds remaining
against Phoenix. … The Clippers’ Jan. 18 home game
against Golden State will be
broadcast by ESPN.
andrew.greif@latimes.com
BOX SCORES
Raptors 123, Bucks 116
Trail Blazers 110, Rockets 101
TORONTO
HOUSTON
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Leonard......38 8-16 12-15 0-6 6 1 30
Siakam ......38 11-15 5-7 2-4 3 4 30
Ibaka .........35 11-17 2-3 0-9 5 3 25
Green.........40 5-7 0-0 2-9 0 2 12
VanVleet .....35 6-12 4-4 0-5 8 4 21
Anunoby.....16 1-6 0-0 0-2 0 4 3
Powell ........15 0-5 2-2 0-1 4 1 2
Wright ........13 0-4 0-0 0-1 2 2 0
Monroe ........5 0-0 0-0 0-1 0 1 0
Totals
42-82 25-31 4-38 28 22 123
Shooting: Field goals, 51.2%; free throws,
80.6%
Three-point goals: 14-31 (VanVleet 5-8, Siakam
3-5, Green 2-3, Leonard 2-3, Ibaka 1-3, Anunoby
1-5, Wright 0-1, Powell 0-3). Team Rebounds: 8.
Team Turnovers: 11 (14 PTS). Blocked Shots: 6
(Siakam 2, Green, Ibaka, Powell, VanVleet). Turnovers: 11 (Ibaka 3, Green 2, Leonard 2, Powell 2,
Anunoby, Monroe). Steals: 9 (Leonard 5, Powell 2,
Green, Wright). Technical Fouls: coach Nick Nurse,
4:01 second.
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
House Jr. ....26 3-6 0-0 0-4 0 0 7
Tucker ........33 0-1 0-0 1-4 2 5 0
Capela .......34 5-8 3-4 8-21 2 1 13
Harden.......36 13-35 7-7 0-5 7 4 38
Rivers.........42 8-15 0-0 0-1 1 5 21
Green.........28 6-10 0-0 1-2 0 3 13
Knight ........13 3-7 0-1 0-0 0 0 7
Nene..........13 0-0 0-0 0-3 1 3 0
Ennis III......11 1-2 0-0 0-0 0 1 2
Totals
39-84 10-12 10-40 13 22 101
Shooting: Field goals, 46.4%; free throws,
83.3%
Three-point goals: 13-38 (Rivers 5-10, Harden
5-17, Knight 1-2, House Jr. 1-3, Green 1-5, Ennis III
0-1). Team Rebounds: 4. Team Turnovers: 12 (17
PTS). Blocked Shots: 5 (Capela 2, Green, Harden,
House Jr.). Turnovers: 12 (Harden 7, Green 3,
Capela, Rivers). Steals: 6 (House Jr. 2, Tucker 2,
Harden, Nene). Technical Fouls: Harden, 3:44 first.
MILWAUKEE
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Antetknmpo 39 16-25 8-11 1-18 4 2 43
Middleton ...32 6-13 0-1 0-2 9 6 14
Lopez.........24 2-6 0-0 0-2 0 3 5
Bledsoe......32 4-9 4-5 0-3 8 2 14
Brogdon .....33 5-11 4-4 1-3 5 2 15
Hill ............28 2-4 6-6 0-2 1 1 11
S.Brown......14 4-7 0-0 0-2 0 2 11
Ilyasova ......13 1-5 0-0 1-2 1 1 3
Snell..........13 0-0 0-0 0-2 1 0 0
Wilson .........8 0-1 0-0 1-2 0 1 0
Totals
40-81 22-27 4-38 29 20 116
Shooting: Field goals, 49.4%; free throws,
81.5%
Three-point goals: 14-37 (Antetokounmpo 3-5,
S.Brown 3-6, Bledsoe 2-6, Middleton 2-6, Hill 1-3,
Ilyasova 1-3, Brogdon 1-4, Lopez 1-4). Team Rebounds: 8. Team Turnovers: 14 (20 PTS). Blocked
Shots: 2 (Brogdon 2). Turnovers: 14 (Antetokounmpo 6, Bledsoe 3, Hill, Ilyasova, Lopez, Middleton,
Wilson). Steals: 9 (Bledsoe 2, Hill 2, Antetokounmpo, Brogdon, Ilyasova, Middleton, Wilson). Technical Fouls: coach Bucks (Defensive three second), 7:41 third
Toronto
27 29 35 32— 123
Milwaukee
34 23 25 34— 116
A—18,028. T—2:14. O—Jacyn Goble, Marc
Davis, Matt Boland
Jazz 110, Pistons 105
UTAH
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Favors ........28 3-8 6-7 1-5 3 2 13
Ingles.........32 6-11 2-3 0-4 1 5 16
Gobert .......26 4-7 1-4 3-11 3 4 9
Mitchell ......38 10-21 5-6 0-5 5 3 26
Rubio.........29 6-13 5-5 1-2 4 1 18
Crowder......25 1-8 2-3 2-5 3 1 4
Korver ........14 3-4 0-0 0-2 0 2 8
Neto ..........12 2-3 0-0 0-0 0 1 4
Sefolosha .....8 2-4 2-2 0-3 0 1 6
O’Neale........8 0-0 0-0 0-2 0 2 0
Exum ...........8 1-1 2-2 0-2 5 0 4
Udoh ...........6 1-2 0-0 0-1 0 1 2
Totals
39-82 25-32 7-42 24 23 110
Shooting: Field goals, 47.6%; free throws, 78.1%
Three-point goals: 7-21 (Korver 2-3, Ingles 2-4,
Favors 1-2, Mitchell 1-3, Rubio 1-4, Sefolosha 0-1,
Crowder 0-4). Team Rebounds: 7. Team Turnovers:
12 (15 PTS). Blocked Shots: 6 (Favors 2, Gobert,
Ingles, Korver, Mitchell). Turnovers: 12 (Rubio 4, Ingles 3, Mitchell 2, Crowder, Gobert, Korver). Steals:
12 (Crowder 3, Mitchell 3, Sefolosha 2, Favors, Ingles, Neto, Rubio). Technical Fouls: coach Jazz (Defensive three second), 4:29 third.
DETROIT
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Bullock.......39 7-14 0-0 2-3 2 2 19
Griffin.........39 13-21 5-6 2-10 5 2 34
Drummond .37 7-10 1-4 1-18 0 4 15
Brown ........34 3-7 6-6 0-3 7 3 12
Jackson......25 4-10 2-2 0-2 3 5 12
Calderon.....22 3-6 0-0 0-1 1 3 7
Johnson......14 1-5 2-2 0-3 0 2 4
Kennard .....13 1-5 0-0 0-2 0 0 2
Leuer .........10 0-3 0-0 0-2 0 2 0
Galloway.......3 0-1 0-0 0-0 0 0 0
Totals
39-82 16-20 5-44 18 23 105
Shooting: Field goals, 47.6%; free throws,
80.0%
Three-point goals: 11-25 (Bullock 5-8, Griffin
3-7, Jackson 2-4, Calderon 1-1, Brown 0-1, Kennard
0-1, Johnson 0-3). Team Rebounds: 4. Team Turnovers: 18 (25 PTS). Blocked Shots: 2 (Drummond,
Johnson). Turnovers: 18 (Brown 4, Drummond 3,
Griffin 3, Bullock 2, Calderon 2, Jackson 2, Johnson
2). Steals: 7 (Drummond 3, Griffin 2, Johnson, Kennard). Technical Fouls: None.
Utah
13 35 28 34— 110
Detroit
31 22 25 27— 105
A—17,255. T—2:18. O—Tom
Michael Smith, Phenizee Ransom
Washington,
PORTLAND
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Aminu ........29 3-6 0-0 4-8 2 2 7
Turner.........30 6-11 2-2 2-3 4 3 14
Nurkic ........31 11-18 3-6 6-15 3 1 25
Lillard ........36 5-15 5-6 1-5 12 1 17
McCollum ...40 9-21 3-4 0-4 4 0 24
Curry .........22 2-6 0-0 1-1 0 0 5
Layman ......21 3-7 2-2 0-2 0 1 9
Leonard......14 1-4 0-0 1-6 2 2 2
Collins........13 3-6 0-0 2-3 0 1 7
Totals
43-94 15-20 17-47 27 11 110
Shooting: Field goals, 45.7%; free throws,
75.0%
Three-point goals: 9-28 (McCollum 3-8, Lillard
2-5, Collins 1-1, Aminu 1-2, Curry 1-4, Layman 1-4,
Leonard 0-1, Turner 0-3). Team Rebounds: 12.
Team Turnovers: 9 (9 PTS). Blocked Shots: 2 (Curry,
Turner). Turnovers: 9 (Lillard 4, Aminu 2, Curry 2,
Leonard). Steals: 7 (Lillard 2, Aminu, Curry, Layman, McCollum, Turner). Technical Fouls: coach
Trail Blazers (Defensive three second), 4:43 second.
Houston
30 16 31 24— 101
Portland
30 29 27 24— 110
A—19,577. T—2:05. O—Mark Ayotte, Justin Van
Duyne, Mike Callahan
Spurs 108, Grizzlies 88
MEMPHIS
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Anderson....28 3-6 1-2 0-4 3 2 7
Jackson Jr. ..33 5-8 4-5 2-7 1 3 15
M.Gasol......25 2-9 2-2 2-11 6 2 6
Conley........25 7-12 4-4 1-1 3 3 21
Temple .......29 3-11 0-0 0-2 2 2 7
Green.........29 2-8 3-3 2-10 0 6 8
Carter ........22 2-8 0-0 0-3 3 4 6
Holiday.......20 1-7 0-0 1-2 2 2 2
Brooks .......16 6-11 0-1 0-0 1 4 15
Noah ...........6 0-2 1-2 0-2 0 1 1
Rabb ...........0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0 0
Totals
31-82 15-19 8-42 21 29 88
Shooting: Field goals, 37.8%; free throws,
78.9%
Three-point goals: 11-28 (Brooks 3-5, Conley
3-5, Carter 2-5, Green 1-2, Jackson Jr. 1-3, Temple
1-4, M.Gasol 0-2, Holiday 0-2). Team Rebounds:
6. Team Turnovers: 20 (26 PTS). Blocked Shots: 3
(Anderson 2, M.Gasol). Turnovers: 20 (Green 4,
M.Gasol 4, Temple 4, Carter 2, Jackson Jr. 2, Anderson, Brooks, Conley, Noah). Steals: 12 (Jackson
Jr. 4, Carter 3, Anderson 2, Green, M.Gasol, Temple). Technical Fouls: Noah, 11:22 second.
SAN ANTONIO
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Gay............24 4-12 0-0
1-8 2 1 9
White .........27 8-9 2-2
1-4 0 3 19
Aldridge......30 5-9 8-10 0-2 7 4 18
DeRozan.....34 3-10 6-7
1-9 4 2 12
Forbes........30 2-7 2-2
0-1 2 1 7
Mills ..........23 5-6 2-3
0-2 4 0 15
Bertans ......21 1-5 1-2
0-5 2 2 4
Belinelli......19 2-6 5-5
0-4 1 3 9
Poeltl .........17 5-5 1-2
0-6 2 3 11
Cunningham..7 1-3 0-0
0-0 1 0 2
Eubanks .......2 0-0 2-2
0-0 0 0 2
Pondexter .....2 0-1 0-0
0-2 1 0 0
Totals
36-73 29-35 3-43 26 19 108
Shooting: Field goals, 49.3%; free throws,
82.9%
Three-point goals: 7-22 (Mills 3-4, White 1-1,
Gay 1-2, Bertans 1-5, Forbes 1-5, Cunningham 0-1,
Pondexter 0-1, Belinelli 0-3). Team Rebounds: 7.
Team Turnovers: 15 (14 PTS). Blocked Shots: 3
(Bertans, Poeltl, White). Turnovers: 15 (DeRozan 5,
Gay 2, Mills 2, Poeltl 2, White 2, Belinelli, Forbes).
Steals: 10 (Aldridge 2, Bertans 2, Gay 2, DeRozan,
Forbes, Mills, White). Technical Fouls: coach Spurs
(Defensive three second), 1:03 first
Memphis
25 19 22 22— 88
San Antonio
27 37 24 20— 108
A—18,354. T—2:07. O—James Williams, Jason
Goldenberg, Curtis Blair
Warriors 127, Kings 123
76ers 106, Mavericks 100
GOLDEN STATE
DALLAS
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Durant........38 11-20 4-5 0-5 9 2 29
Green.........31 5-7 1-1 1-7 7 4 12
Looney .......23 2-2 1-1 4-7 3 3 5
Curry .........38 14-26 4-4 0-5 2 2 42
Thompson...39 8-15 1-2 2-4 2 2 20
Iguodala.....25 3-9 0-0 0-6 3 0 7
Jerebko ......13 1-5 0-0 3-8 0 2 2
Cook............9 3-6 1-1 0-2 1 1 10
Bell .............7 0-1 0-0 1-2 0 0 0
McKinnie ......7 0-2 0-0 1-1 2 0 0
Livingston .....3 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0 0
Totals
47-93 12-14 12-47 29 16 127
Shooting: Field goals, 50.5%; free throws,
85.7%
Three-point goals: 21-47 (Curry 10-20, Cook
3-4, Thompson 3-6, Durant 3-7, Green 1-2, Iguodala 1-5, McKinnie 0-1, Jerebko 0-2). Team Rebounds: 5. Team Turnovers: 13 (29 PTS). Blocked
Shots: 8 (Durant 2, Green 2, Looney 2, Iguodala,
Thompson). Turnovers: 13 (Curry 6, Green 3, Durant, Iguodala, McKinnie, Thompson). Steals: 5
(Curry 2, Green, Jerebko, Thompson). Technical
Fouls: coach Warriors (Defensive three second),
1:54 first.
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Barnes .......26 2-9 3-4 1-5 2 3 7
Matthews....24 7-11 0-0 1-2 0 5 18
Jordan........30 4-5 0-0 2-8 5 4 8
Doncic .......26 4-16 5-10 0-8 4 1 14
Smith Jr. .....22 1-5 0-0 0-1 4 4 2
Brunson .....25 4-14 4-4 1-11 8 0 13
Finny-Smith.23 2-8 0-0 0-2 0 2 4
Kleber ........21 3-6 0-0 2-7 0 3 6
Broekhoff....21 6-8 0-0 0-1 3 0 15
Powell ........17 5-6 3-5 2-4 1 1 13
Totals
38-88 15-23 9-49 27 23 100
Shooting: Field goals, 43.2%; free throws,
65.2%
Three-point goals: 9-31 (Matthews 4-7,
Broekhoff 3-5, Brunson 1-3, Doncic 1-8, Kleber
0-1, Smith Jr. 0-1, Barnes 0-3, Finney-Smith 0-3).
Team Rebounds: 7. Team Turnovers: 15 (15 PTS).
Blocked Shots: 3 (Powell 2, Broekhoff). Turnovers:
15 (Broekhoff 3, Finney-Smith 3, Jordan 3, Barnes
2, Brunson 2, Powell, Smith Jr.). Steals: 4 (Doncic
2, Brunson, Powell). Technical Fouls: None.
PHILADELPHIA
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Bolden .......29 4-8 3-6 3-9 3 4 11
Korkmaz .....27 2-8 2-2 0-6 4 1 7
Embiid .......34 7-17 10-11 0-12 5 4 25
Redick........33 8-14 2-3 0-2 2 0 20
Simmons ....35 9-17 2-6 4-14 11 2 20
McConnell ..29 2-5 2-4 0-1 4 2 6
Shamet ......23 3-6 0-0 0-1 1 3 7
Muscala .....15 2-5 0-0 2-3 1 4 4
Milton ........10 2-4 1-1 0-2 0 0 6
Totals
39-84 22-33 9-50 31 20 106
Shooting: Field goals, 46.4%; free throws,
66.7%
Three-point goals: 6-26 (Redick 2-6, Milton
1-2, Embiid 1-3, Shamet 1-4, Korkmaz 1-6, Bolden
0-2, Muscala 0-3). Team Rebounds: 8. Team Turnovers: 10 (14 PTS). Blocked Shots: 5 (Bolden 2,
Milton 2, Embiid). Turnovers: 10 (Simmons 4, Embiid 2, Bolden, McConnell, Muscala, Redick).
Steals: 7 (McConnell 3, Redick 2, Embiid,
Shamet). Technical Fouls: None.
Dallas
26 25 19 30— 100
Philadelphia
31 28 28 19— 106
A—20,656. T—2:13. O—Dedric Taylor, Eric Lewis, Ashley Moyer-Gleich
Pelicans 133, Cavaliers 98
SACRAMENTO
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Bjelica........32 5-9 0-0 5-9 3 3 12
Bogdanovic .34 5-17 4-5 0-6 7 1 17
Cauley-Stein31 6-13 2-4 5-13 6 3 14
Fox ............31 3-12 2-2 0-0 7 1 8
Hield..........34 12-21 0-0 3-5 4 4 32
Jackson......34 10-14 3-3 0-5 1 1 28
Ferrell ........16 2-4 0-0 0-1 3 2 5
Giles III ......12 1-4 0-0 1-4 3 1 2
McLemore...11 2-3 0-0 0-0 0 2 5
Totals
46-97 11-14 14-43 34 18 123
Shooting: Field goals, 47.4%; free throws,
78.6%
Three-point goals: 20-36 (Hield 8-13, Jackson
5-7, Bogdanovic 3-8, Bjelica 2-2, Ferrell 1-1,
McLemore 1-2, Fox 0-3). Team Rebounds: 7. Team
Turnovers: 8 (10 PTS). Blocked Shots: 0. Turnovers:
8 (Fox 2, Bjelica, Bogdanovic, Cauley-Stein, Ferrell, Jackson, McLemore). Steals: 12 (Bogdanovic
3, Bjelica 2, Cauley-Stein 2, Fox 2, Ferrell, Jackson, McLemore). Technical Fouls: None.
Golden State
43 27 26 31— 127
Sacramento
29 40 34 20— 123
A—17,583. T—2:06. O—Courtney Kirkland, JB
DeRosa, Karl Lane
NEW ORLEANS
Nuggets 123, Hornets 110
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Holiday.......26 9-13 0-0 2-5 3 1 22
Randle .......32 8-14 5-5 2-12 8 1 22
Davis .........28 6-12 8-10 3-10 3 3 20
Moore ........27 3-6 3-3 0-1 3 0 10
Payton........23 5-8 2-2 0-0 3 2 13
Miller .........22 4-6 2-3 0-1 1 2 14
Frazier........19 1-2 0-0 0-1 3 1 3
Okafor........19 3-5 4-4 1-4 1 3 10
Jackson......18 3-8 0-0 1-5 3 3 6
Diallo...........8 2-2 1-2 1-3 0 1 5
Clark............7 3-5 0-0 0-2 1 0 8
Hill ..............4 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 1 0
Totals
47-81 25-29 10-44 29 18 133
Shooting: Field goals, 58.0%; free throws, 86.2%
Three-point goals: 14-27 (Miller 4-5, Holiday 4-6,
Clark 2-3, Payton 1-1, Frazier 1-2, Moore 1-3, Randle
1-3, Davis 0-2, Jackson 0-2). Team Rebounds: 6.
Team Turnovers: 14 (28 PTS). Blocked Shots: 7
(Davis 2, Okafor 2, Clark, Frazier, Holiday). Turnovers: 14 (Frazier 2, Moore 2, Payton 2, Randle 2,
Clark, Davis, Diallo, Hill, Jackson, Miller). Steals: 13
(Davis 4, Holiday 2, Moore 2, Payton 2, Jackson,
Miller, Randle). Technical Fouls: Okafor, 2:44 fourth.
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Batum........33 4-6 0-0 1-7 3 2 11
Williams .....34 6-15 1-2 3-6 0 2 16
Biyombo .....30 7-10 2-3 4-12 0 4 16
Graham......26 3-9 2-2 0-3 8 2 10
Walker........33 6-17 7-9 0-4 3 2 20
Monk .........22 6-11 2-2 0-3 2 1 16
Parker ........16 1-2 0-0 1-1 3 2 2
Kdd-Glchrst.16 2-4 3-4 1-5 2 2 7
W.Hrnangmz 15 3-7 4-4 2-5 1 1 10
Bridges.......12 1-1 0-0 0-1 0 0 2
Totals
39-82 21-26 12-47 22 18 110
Shooting: Field goals, 47.6%; free throws, 80.8%
Three-point goals: 11-29 (Batum 3-5, Williams
3-8, Graham 2-5, Monk 2-5, Walker 1-6). Team Rebounds: 8. Team Turnovers: 17 (27 PTS). Blocked
Shots: 4 (Biyombo 2, Batum, Williams). Turnovers:
17 (Walker 5, Monk 3, Parker 3, Williams 3, Biyombo
2, Batum). Steals: 7 (Williams 3, Batum 2, Biyombo
2). Technical Fouls: None.
CHARLOTTE
DENVER
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Nance Jr. ....25 2-7 2-2 3-6 2 3 6
Osman .......32 5-12 1-1 0-1 5 5 13
Thompson...26 4-8 2-2 2-11 2 4 10
Burks .........35 2-9 2-2 1-3 6 2 8
Sexton .......30 5-12 3-4 1-3 2 2 15
Jones .........27 7-13 0-2 2-5 0 1 15
Clarkson .....24 8-17 4-5 1-4 3 0 23
Frye ...........19 3-8 0-0 0-0 2 5 8
McCaw .......16 0-2 0-0 0-1 0 1 0
Totals
36-88 14-18 10-34 22 23 98
Shooting: Field goals, 40.9%; free throws, 77.8%
Three-point goals: 12-33 (Clarkson 3-6, Osman
2-4, Frye 2-5, Sexton 2-5, Burks 2-6, Jones 1-4,
Nance Jr. 0-1, McCaw 0-2). Team Rebounds: 10.
Team Turnovers: 17 (34 PTS). Blocked Shots: 3
(Clarkson, Frye, Thompson). Turnovers: 17 (Jones 4,
Osman 3, Sexton 3, Clarkson 2, Nance Jr. 2, Burks,
Frye, Thompson). Steals: 12 (Jones 3, Osman 3,
Thompson 2, Burks, Clarkson, McCaw, Nance Jr.).
Technical Fouls: Jones, 2:44 fourth.
New Orleans
28 33 37 35— 133
Cleveland
26 26 20 26— 98
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
J.Hrnangmz .19 0-3 0-0 0-2 0 1 0
Jokic ..........34 16-29 4-5 8-12 6 1 39
Plumlee......19 4-5 0-0 0-3 5 5 8
Craig..........28 4-7 2-4 1-3 1 4 12
Murray .......31 3-13 0-0 0-6 7 2 8
Millsap.......27 7-14 3-4 4-6 3 1 18
Harris.........25 7-15 0-1 2-6 5 1 17
Beasley ......22 2-4 0-0 0-2 0 3 4
Morris ........15 2-7 2-2 1-1 1 0 8
Lyles..........14 2-5 4-4 1-5 2 1 9
Goodwin.......0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0 0
Lydon ..........0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0 0
Totals
47-102 15-20 17-46 30 19 123
Shooting: Field goals, 46.1%; free throws, 75.0%
Three-point goals: 14-39 (Harris 3-8, Jokic 3-9,
Morris 2-3, Craig 2-4, Murray 2-4, Lyles 1-3, Millsap
1-3, Beasley 0-2, J.Hernangomez 0-3). Team Rebounds: 7. Team Turnovers: 7 (3 PTS). Blocked
Shots: 6 (Plumlee 3, Beasley, Craig, Jokic). Turnovers: 7 (Jokic 2, Millsap 2, Murray 2, J.Hernangomez). Steals: 10 (Millsap 4, Jokic 3, Harris, Lyles,
Morris). Technical Fouls: None.
Charlotte
26 30 28 26— 110
Denver
31 27 31 34— 123
A—19,432. T—2:06. O—Scott Foster, Brett
Nansel, Ben Taylor
A—19,861. T—2:12. O—Tony Brown, Haywoode
Workman, Josh Tiven
CLEVELAND
D10
SU N DAY , JA N UA RY 6 , 2 019
SS
L AT I M E S . C O M / S P O RT S
THE DAY IN SPORTS
U.S. falls in world junior hockey final
Bosco, was 19. There was no cause
of death immediately given.
associated press
Kaapo Kakko scored with 1:26
left to give Finland its fifth world
junior hockey title, 3-2 over the
United States on Saturday night.
Kakko broke a tie after the
United States rallied on goals by
Alexander Chmelevski and Josh
Norris in a 1:46 span midway
through the third.
Jesse Ylonen opened the scoring on a power play in the second
period, and Otto Latvala made it
2-0 in the third before the U.S. began the rally. Ukko-Pekka Luukkonen made 26 saves for Finland, and
Cayden Primeau stopped 28 shots
for the U.S.
Finland also won titles in 1987,
1998, 2014 and 2016. The U.S. won
the last of its four titles in 2017.
In the third-place game, Kirill
Slepets had a hat trick and Russia
beat Switzerland 5-2.
The four coaches for this
month’s NHL All-Star Game will
be Paul Maurice of Winnipeg, Todd
Reirden of Washington, Jon
Cooper of Tampa Bay and Bill Peters of Calgary. Each of the teams is
a division leader — Winnipeg (Central), Washington (Metropolitan),
Tampa Bay (Atlantic) and Calgary
(Pacific). The NHL All-Star Weekend is Jan. 25-26 in San Jose. The
three-game tournament is played
in a three-on-three format with
teams from each division.
West Virginia hired Troy’s Neal
Brown on a six-year, $19.05-million
contract to coach the Mountaineers. Brown replaces Dana Holgorsen, who took the coaching job
in Houston. ... Washington State
running back James Williams and
Iowa junior defensive back Amani
Hooker announced they will enter
the NFL draft.
New York Knicks center Enes
Kanter will not travel to London
for the team’s upcoming international game because he believes he
could be assassinated for his opposition to Turkish President Recep
Tayyip Erdogan.
ETC.
Federer, Switzerland
take Hopman Cup
Jeffrey McWhorter Associated Press
WITH HIS 49TH VICTORY Saturday, North Dakota State’s
Easton Stick became the winningest FCS quarterback.
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
North Dakota State
wins seventh title
North Dakota State quarterback Easton Stick ran for three
touchdowns and threw for two
more as the Bison beat Eastern
Washington 38-24 for their record
seventh FCS title, the fourth in five
years with Chris Klieman as head
coach before he takes over at Kansas State.
“It was a special journey — 15-0,
end it with a national championship. The story’s complete,” said
Klieman, who had a 69-6 record.
“That’s something that movies are
made out of, dreams are made out
of, books are written about.”
Stick threw for 198 yards in his
49th victory to become the winningest FCS quarterback.
California defensive back Bryce
Turner died after being hospitalized for a medical emergency during a non-team workout. Turner,
who attended Bellflower St. John
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
SOUTHLAND
UCLA 98, California 83
Loyola Marymount 76, Portland 64
San Francisco 72, Pepperdine 69
Boise St. 88, San Diego St. 64
Long Beach St. 124, Bethesda 52
Rio Grande 79, Cal Baptist 74
Cal St. Bakersfield 73, Utah Valley 71
Yale 94, Cal St. Northridge 90, OT
San Diego 73, Pacific 64
San Francisco St. 88, Cal St. L.A. 79
Vanguard 84, Arizona Christian 72
WEST
Arizona 84, Utah 81, OT
Arizona St. 83, Colorado 61
Oregon St. 77, Oregon 72
Washington 85, Washington St. 67
UC Davis 90, Holy Names 60
Grand Canyon 71, Seattle 57
Gonzaga 91, Santa Clara 48
Fresno St. 78, Colorado St. 67
Nevada Las Vegas 68, Wyoming 56
St. Mary’s 88, BYU 66
EAST
Army 77, Lafayette 69
Baruch 81, Medgar Evers 59
Binghamton 69, New Hampshire 58
Boston U. 87, Bucknell 80
Canisius 70, Siena 66
Central Florida 65, Connecticut 53
Concordia (N.Y.) 69, Goldey Beacom 65
Delaware 77, Elon 65
Dominican (NY) 92, Chestnut Hill 74
Fairleigh Dickinson 79, St. Francis (Pa.) 61
Farmingdale 94, Mount St. Mary (NY) 71
Hobart 89, Ithaca 86
Hofstra 75, Northeastern 72
Iona 94, Fairfield 87
LIU Brooklyn 79, Bryant 70
La Salle 69, UMass 60
Manhattan 90, Niagara 80
Maryland 77, Rutgers 63
Monmouth (NJ) 61, St. Peter’s 44
NJIT 72, Kennesaw St. 52
North Carolina 85, Pittsburgh 60
Nyack 84, Wilmington (Del.) 79
Old Westbury 88, Sarah Lawrence 81, OT
Princeton 68, Penn 65, OT
Rider 72, Quinnipiac 67
Robert Morris 62, Mount St. Mary’s 59
Sacred Heart 73, CCSU 61
St. Francis Brooklyn 66, Wagner 59
St. John’s 97, Georgetown 94, OT
Stony Brook 75, Mass.-Lowell 63
UMBC 61, Maine 52
UNC Wilmington 67, Towson 61
VCU 76, Fordham 51
Vermont 80, Albany (NY) 51
Villanova 65, Providence 59
William & Mary 84, Drexel 66
SOUTH
Alabama 77, Kentucky 75
Ala. Birmingham 84, Fla. International 65
Alabama St. 74, Grambling St. 53
Asbury 81, Ohio Christian 60
Austin Peay 81, Morehead St. 67
Belmont 79, Tennessee Tech 67
Bryan 88, Tenn. Wesleyan 86, OT
Campbell 72, Gardner-Webb 61
Catawba 81, Carson-Newman 64
C. Arkansas 73, SE Louisiana 71
Clark Atlanta 74, Lane 72
Coppin St. 73, Savannah St. 67
Cumberland (Tenn.) 77, Lindsey Wilson 70
Davidson 65, Duquesne 61
Duke 87, Clemson 68
E. Tenn. St. 96, Chattanooga 70
East Carolina 73, Cincinnati 71
Fla. Atlantic 63, Middle Tennessee 56
Florida A&M 82, Howard 72
Furman 101, The Citadel 85
Georgetown (Ky.) 69, Campbellsville 67
Georgia Tech 92, Wake Forest 79
High Point 51, Charleston Southern 50
Indiana-East 80, Alice Lloyd 74
Jackson St. 54, Alabama A&M 51, OT
Jacksonville St. 69, Tennessee St. 62
James Madison 69, Coll. of Charleston 58
Lee 70, Christian Brothers 55
Liberty 81, Florida Gulf Coast 63
Lincoln Memorial 115, Newberry 84
Lipscomb 77, Jacksonville 74
Louisiana Lafayette 75, Ark. Little Rock 61
Louisiana Monroe 85, Arkansas St. 75
Marshall 85, Charlotte 84
Martin Methodist 65, Faulkner 61
Mississippi 81, Vanderbilt 71
Morgan St. 66, Md.-Eastern Shore 53
Murray St. 97, E. Kentucky 85
N.C. A&T 80, S.C. State 77, OT
N.C. Central 68, Bethune-Cookman 59
New Orleans 81, Houston Baptist 76
Norfolk St. 77, Delaware St. 63
North Florida 96, North Alabama 67
Northwestern St. 66, McNeese St. 61
Old Dominion 69, W. Kentucky 66
Prairie View 82, Southern U. 73
Presbyterian 64, S.C. Upstate 61
Radford 71, Longwood 64
South Alabama 84, Coastal Carolina 77, 2OT
South Carolina 71, Florida 69
Tennessee 96, Georgia 50
Texas Southern 87, Alcorn St. 70
Thomas More 100, Miami (Ohio)-Hamilton 63
Troy 89, Appalachian St. 85
UNC Greensboro 71, VMI 68
Union (Tenn.) 76, Ala.-Huntsville 70
Virginia 65, Florida St. 52
Virginia Tech 77, Boston College 66
W. Carolina 76, Samford 69
Winthrop 80, UNC Asheville 65
Wofford 78, Mercer 74
MIDWEST
Akron 56, W. Michigan 48
Albion 76, Adrian 66
Alma 67, Calvin 66
Aquinas 77, Northwestern Ohio 72
Augsburg 88, St. Mary’s (Minn.) 56
Bethany Lutheran 97, Wis. Superior 84
Bowling Green 86, Kent St. 64
Butler 84, Creighton 69
Carthage 78, Millikin 54
C. Michigan 84, Miami (Ohio) 77
Concordia (Moor.) 61, St. Olaf 57
Concordia (Wis.) 81, Marian (Wis.) 61
Davenport 87, Ferris St. 72
E. Illinois 84, SIU-Edwardsville 81, OT
Green Bay 90, Cleveland St. 89
Gustavus 69, Carleton 61
Hope 87, Kalamazoo 65
Illinois College 73, Beloit 70
Illinois St. 58, Evansville 46
Illinois Tech 81, Lakeland 72
Ind.-South Bend 82, Cardinal Stritch 68
Indiana St. 65, Bradley 60
Iowa St. 77, Kansas 60
Lake Superior St. 85, Grand Valley St. 72
Lawrence 60, Monmouth (Ill.) 56
Loyola of Chicago 85, Drake 74
Madonna 71, Concordia (Mich.) 69
Maranatha Baptist 62, Martin Luther 53
Michigan St. 86, Ohio St. 77
Michigan-Dearborn 84, Indiana Tech 69
Milwaukee Engineering 81, Edgewood 77
Berdych 6-4, 3-6, 6-3. Agut upset
No. 1 seed Novak Djokovic a day
earlier. ... Lesia Tsurenko advanced to the Brisbane International final by upsetting Naomi
Osaka 6-2, 6-4. She will face Karolina Pliskova in Sunday’s final.
Kei Nishikori advanced to the
men’s final by defeating Jeremy
Chardy 6-2, 6-2. Nishikori will face
Daniil Medvedev.
Minn. St. Mankato 90, Mary 83
Minn. St. Moorhead 99, Upper Iowa 95, OT
Minn. Crookston 96, Minn. Duluth 88
Minn. Morris 100, North Central (Minn.) 85
Minot St. 88, Concordia (St.P.) 75
N. Illinois 72, Ohio 66, OT
N. Kentucky 95, Detroit 73
Northern St. (SD) 79, Winona St. 68
Northland 79, Crown (Minn.) 76
Northwestern (Minn.) 81, St. Scholastica 75
Purdue-Northwest 88, Northwood (Mich.) 84
Ripon 111, Grinnell 109
S. Illinois 58, N. Iowa 51
SE Missouri 74, UT Martin 69, OT
Siena Heights 79, Rochester (Mich.) 71
Sioux Falls 77, Augustana (SD) 73
St. Cloud St. 107, Bemidji St. 101, 2OT
St. John’s (Minn.) 92, Macalester 50
St. Norbert 93, Cornell (Iowa) 82
St. Thomas (Minn.) 80, Hamline 58
Syracuse 72, Notre Dame 62
Mo. Kansas City 80, Chicago St. 72
Valley City St. 69, Viterbo 55
Valparaiso 82, Missouri St. 66
Wayne (Mich.) 67, Michigan Tech 54
Wayne (Neb.) 75, SW Minnesota St. 68
Wis. Eau Claire 69, Wis. Whitewater 65
Wis. La Crosse 80, Wis. Platteville 76
Wis. Oshkosh 77, Wis. Stout 75
Wis. Stevens Pt. 88, Wis. River Falls 68
Wright St. 89, Oakland 73
Youngstown St. 76, Milwaukee 51
SOUTHWEST
Ark. Pine Bluff 64, Miss. Valley St. 52
Arkansas 73, Texas A&M 71
Georgia Southern 77, Texas Arlington 64
Georgia St. 73, Texas St. 69
Incarnate Word 65, Nicholls 58
Lamar 61, Texas A&M CC 55
North Texas 65, Southern Miss. 62
Oklahoma 74, Oklahoma St. 64
Oral Roberts 82, W. Illinois 63
Rice 78, Louisiana Tech 66
Sam Houston St. 71, Abilene Christian 68
TCU 85, Baylor 81
Texas Tech 63, Kansas St. 57
Tulsa 78, South Florida 75
UTSA 67, UTEP 63
ROCKIES
N. Colorado 83, Idaho 79, OT
North Dakota 80, Denver 59
Montana St. 84, Sacramento St. 70
New Mexico 85, Nevada 58
Portland St. 77, Montana 74, OT
N. Arizona 81, Idaho St. 69
S. Utah 90, Weber St. 82, OT
Utah St. 79, Air Force 62
WOMEN
AP TOP 25
No. 4 Maryland 75, Ohio St. 69
No. 17 Gonzaga 83, Pacific 63
No. 25 Iowa St. 82, Kansas 73
SOUTHLAND
BYU 55, Loyola Marymount 44
Boise St. 69, San Diego St. 66
Cal St. Northridge 73, UC Santa Barbara 65
UC Davis 67, UC Riverside 59
UC Irvine 75, Cal Poly 59
Utah Valley 78, Cal St. Bakersfield 70
Pepperdine 74, San Diego 55
Cal St. Fullerton 72, Hawaii 68
San Francisco St. 87, Cal St. L.A. 85
Biola 45, Notre Dame de Namur 42
Arizona Christian 69, Vanguard 45
WEST
Gonzaga 88, Pacific 65
Grand Canyon 55, Seattle 53
Idaho St. 80, N. Arizona 69
New Mexico 66, Nevada 64
St. Mary’s 98, Portland 91
Santa Clara 71, San Francisco 66
Montana St. 69, Sacramento St. 53
EAST
Binghamton 71, New Hampshire 62
Bryant 69, LIU Brooklyn 62
Duquesne 60, St. Bonaventure 54
Fordham 50, George Washington 38
Maine 84, UMBC 44
Marist 71, Canisius 66
NJIT 66, Kennesaw St. 60
Niagara 61, Manhattan 51
Ohio 74, Buffalo 71
Penn 66, Princeton 60
Robert Morris 70, Mount St. Mary’s 58
Sacred Heart 66, CCSU 61
South Florida 63, Temple 53
St. Francis (Pa.) 75, Fairleigh Dickinson 64
St. Francis Brooklyn 76, Wagner 61
Stony Brook 76, Mass. Lowell 56
Vermont 52, Albany (NY) 39
SOUTH
Alabama A&M 58, Jackson St. 55
Ala. Birmingham 83, Fla. International 59
Alcorn St. 53, Texas Southern 52
Austin Peay 81, Morehead St. 80
Bethune-Cookman 67, NC Central 50
Campbell 51, Presbyterian 46
Central Florida 68, Memphis 55
Florida Gulf Coast 68, Liberty 50
Grambling St. 80, Alabama St. 72
Green Bay 81, N. Kentucky 61
Hampton 74, Charleston Southern 66
High Point 87, S.C. Upstate 61
Howard 74, Florida A&M 68
Jacksonville 62, Lipscomb 47
Jacksonville St. 62, Tennessee St. 52
Marshall 63, Charlotte 62
Maryland 75, Ohio St. 69
Md. Eastern Shore 73, Morgan St. 68
Middle Tennessee 74, FAU 55
Murray St. 81, E. Kentucky 63
N.C. A&T 58, S.C. State 44
Nicholls 86, Incarnate Word 62
Norfolk St. 63, Delaware St. 50
North Alabama 70, North Florida 64
North Texas 62, Southern Miss. 48
Northwestern St. 82, McNeese St. 63
Prairie View 55, Southern U. 54
Radford 60, UNC-Asheville 46
Rhode Island 66, Richmond 60
Rice 61, Louisiana Tech 51
SE Louisiana 62, C. Arkansas 53
Savannah St. 76, Coppin St. 70
South Alabama 88, Coastal Carolina 78
Tennessee Tech 77, Belmont 72
Texas St. 69, Georgia St. 60
Texas Arlington 74, Georgia Southern 53
Troy 83, Appalachian St. 72
Tulane 68, East Carolina 57
VCU 59, Saint Joseph’s 40
W. Kentucky 75, Old Dominion 60
Winthrop 77, Longwood 69
MIDWEST
C. Michigan 94, Akron 71
Cleveland St. 71, Ill.-Chicago 53
Dayton 84, La Salle 45
Iowa St. 82, Kansas 73
Mo. Kansas City 111, Chicago St. 58
Kansas St. 86, Oklahoma 56
Kent St. 71, E. Michigan 64
N. Illinois 82, Miami (Ohio) 71
Purdue 71, Michigan 70
Rio Grande 60, California Baptist 56
SIU-Edwardsville 65, E. Illinois 56
Tenn. Martin 80, SE Missouri 73
Toledo 65, Ball St. 58
W. Michigan 84, Bowling Green 82
Wright St. 61, Milwaukee 57
Youngstown St. 70, IUPUI 52
SOUTHWEST
Abilene Christian 91, Sam Houston St. 79
Ark. Little Rock 62, Louisiana Lafayette 48
Arkansas St. 64, Louisiana-Monroe 54
Houston Baptist 83, New Orleans 74
Lamar 76, Texas A&M-CC 58
Miss. Valley St. 62, Ark.-Pine Bluff 56
Oral Roberts 68, W. Illinois 64
UTEP 73, UTSA 60
ROCKIES
Wyoming 90, UNLV 62
Utah St. 48, Air Force 44
Fresno St. 66, Colorado St. 55
S. Utah 84, Weber St. 79
Portland St. 78, Montana 60
N. Colorado 86, Idaho 72
Denver 87, North Dakota 66
BOX SCORES
Pac-12
Friday’s Results
UCLA 84, Califoornia 79, OT
UCLA—Drummer 5-6 4-6 14, Onyenwere 12-22
2-2 29, Burke 7-14 5-6 19, Corsaro 1-7 1-2 4,
Dean 3-12 2-2 8, Miller 1-6 0-0 2, Horvat 3-6 1-2
8, Smith 0-1 0-0 0, Totals 32-74 15-20 84.
CALIFORNIA—Anigwe 11-17 10-13 32, Brown
1-5 4-4 6, Caldwell 2-7 0-0 4, Smith 4-8 0-0 9,
Thomas 5-10 4-4 16, Styles 0-0 0-0 0, West 1-3
2-2 4, Forbes 3-8 0-0 8, Totals 27-58 20-23 79.
UCLA ....................17 25 11 18 13—84
California................16 16 23 16 8—79
A—2,107.
Stanford 72, USC 64
USC—Jones 4-7 0-0 8, Tapley 3-6 1-2 7, Aaron
1-8 0-0 3, Moore 2-12 0-1 5, Moore 4-12 4-6 13,
Archer 2-3 0-1 4, Overbeck 4-5 2-3 10, Wallace
2-5 0-0 5, Caldwell 4-11 0-0 9, Totals 26-69 7-13
64.
STANFORD—Fingall 1-2 0-0 2, Hull 3-7 0-0 7,
Smith 8-21 0-0 19, Carrington 4-13 6-9 14,
Williams 8-18 2-3 22, Jerome 0-1 0-0 0, Coffee
2-3 2-2 6, Brown 1-2 0-0 2, Wilson 0-0 0-0 0,
Totals 27-67 10-14 72.
USC .............................19 14 14 17—64
Stanford .......................17 14 23 18—72
A—2,557.
HOCKEY
WORLD JUNIOR TOURNAMENT
At Vancouver
Championship
Finland 3, United States 2
Third-Place Game
Russia 5, Switzerland 2
COLLEGE
FOOTBALL
FCS PLAYOFFS
Saturday’s Result
Championship
At Frisco, Texas
North Dakota State 38, Eastern Washington 24
N. Dakota St. 38,
E. Washington 24
E. Washington................0 10 7 7—24
N. Dakota St................10 7 14 7—38
First Quarter
NDSU—FG Pedersen 36, 6:50.
NDSU—Stick 10 run (Pedersen kick), 1:47.
Second Quarter
EWU—FG Alcobendas 40, 13:49.
NDSU—Stick 4 run (Pedersen kick), 8:00.
EWU—Gilder 2 pass from Talkington (Alcobendas kick), 0:27.
Third Quarter
NDSU—Shepherd 23 pass from Stick (Pedersen kick), 11:52.
EWU—McPherson 75 run (Alcobendas kick),
11:40.
NDSU—Shepherd 78 pass from Stick (Pedersen kick), 10:44.
Fourth Quarter
EWU—Barriere 5 run (Alcobendas kick), 2:19.
NDSU—Stick 46 run (Pedersen kick), 1:16.
STATISTICS
EWU
NDSU
First downs ..........................15
23
Rushes-yards.................33-157
54-290
Passing .............................200
198
Comp-Att-Int ................14-26-2
13-19-2
Return Yards ........................49
31
Punts-Avg. .....................5-45.2
3-38.3
Fumbles-Lost ......................2-1
1-0
Penalty-Yards.....................8-60
8-61
Time of Possession...........19:55
40:05
Individual Leaders
RUSHING: E. Washington, S. McPherson 18158, A. Custer Jr. 2-11, E. Barriere 9-10, J.
Williams 1-(minus 1), D. Merritt 1-(minus 2), D.
Dorton 1-(minus 9), G. Talkington 1-(minus 10).
N. Dakota St., E. Stick 18-121, T. Brooks 9-82, L.
Dunn 19-61, S. Wilson 4-20, D. Williams 1-5, A.
Cofield 1-3.
PASSING: E. Washington, E. Barriere 13-25-2198, G. Talkington 1-1-0-2. N. Dakota St., E. Stick
13-19-2-198.
RECEIVING—E. Washington, N. Webster 4-92,
J. Gilder 3-37, T. Limu-Jones 1-34, T. Grady 2-19,
J. Williams 1-9, J. Edwards IV 1-8, D. Dorton 1-1,
A. Custer Jr. 1-0. N. Dakota St., D. Shepherd 5125, D. Freeman 3-26, N. Jenson 3-24, L. Dunn
2-23.
Left-hander Zach Britton
agreed to a $39-million, three-year
contract with the New York Yankees, according to reports. ... The
New York Mets acquired outfielder
Keon Broxton from Milwaukee for
reliever Bobby Wahl and a pair of
minor leaguers.
Roger Federer won the Hopman Cup for a record third time after defending champion Switzerland beat Germany 2-1.
Switzerland took its fourth Cup
title overall when Federer and Belinda Bencic beat Alexander
Zverev and Angelique Kerber 4-0,
1-4, 4-3 (4) in the Fast4 format in the
mixed doubles decider.
In the men’s singles, Federer defeated Zverev 6-4, 6-2.
Gary Woodland finished with a
five-under 68 to keep his three-shot
lead in the Sentry Tournament of
Champions in Hawaii. Rory McIlroy is in second, one shot ahead of
Marc Leishman.
Top-seeded Kevin Anderson
recovered from 5-2 down in the decisive tiebreaker to beat Ivo
Karlovic 7-6 (4), 6-7 (2), 7-6 (5) in
the Maharashtra (India) Open final. ... Roberto Bautista Agut won
the Qatar Open by beating Tomas
American Mikaela Shiffrin
dominated the first women’s World
Cup slalom of 2019 to match her
personal best winning streak in the
discipline with seven straight wins.
GOLF
TENNIS
TRANSACTIONS
$6.5-MILLION TOURNAMENT OF CHAMPIONS
At Kapalua, Hawaii—Par 73
Plantation Course at Kapalua—7,518 yards
54-Hole Scores
Gary Woodland ..............67-67-68—202 -17
Rory McIlroy...................69-68-68—205 -14
Marc Leishman...............68-70-68—206 -13
Xander Schauffele...........72-67-68—207 -12
Bryson DeChambeau.......69-68-70—207 -12
Justin Thomas ................67-72-70—209 -10
Kevin Tway .....................66-71-72—209 -10
Dustin Johnson...............67-74-69—210 -9
Jon Rahm......................70-71-69—210 -9
Patton Kizzire .................69-71-71—211 -8
Paul Casey ....................73-71-68—212 -7
Andrew Putnam ..............69-73-70—212 -7
Troy Merritt ....................73-71-69—213 -6
Charles Howell III............74-70-69—213 -6
Ian Poulter.....................71-69-73—213 -6
Cameron Champ ............71-68-74—213 -6
Webb Simpson...............70-72-72—214 -5
Andrew Landry ...............69-75-71—215 -4
Brandt Snedeker.............75-69-71—215 -4
Jason Day .....................69-71-75—215 -4
Scott Piercy ...................76-72-69—217 -2
Matt Kuchar...................72-73-72—217 -2
Patrick Reed ..................70-75-72—217 -2
Francesco Molinari..........73-71-73—217 -2
Billy Horschel.................72-75-71—218 -1
Keegan Bradley ..............77-69-72—218 -1
Aaron Wise....................74-71-73—218 -1
Brice Garnett .................73-72-73—218 -1
Ted Potter, Jr. .................75-73-71—219 E
Brooks Koepka...............76-70-73—219 E
Bubba Watson ...............70-79-74—223 +4
Michael Kim ..................71-72-80—223 +4
Satoshi Kodaira..............77-76-73—226 +7
$1.5-MILLION BRISBANE INTERNATIONAL
At Brisbane, Australia
Surface: Hard-Outdoor
MEN’S SINGLES (semifinals)—Kei Nishikori
(2), Japan, d. Jeremy Chardy, France, 6-2, 6-2;
Daniil Medvedev (4), Russia, d. Jo-Wilfried
Tsonga, France, 7-6 (6), 6-2.
WOMEN’S SINGLES (semifinals)—Lesia
Tsurenko, Ukraine, d. Naomi Osaka (2), Japan,
6-2, 6-4; Karolina Pliskova (5), Czech Republic,
d. Donna Vekic, Croatia, 6-3, 6-4.
WOMEN’S DOUBLES (final)—Nicole Melichar,
and Kveta Peschke (3), Czech Republic, d. Chan
Hao-ching-Latisha Chan (4), Taiwan, 6-1, 6-1.
$1.195-MILLION EXXONMOBILE OPEN
At Doha, Qatar
Surface: Hard-Outdoor
SINGLES (final)—Roberto Bautista Agut (7),
Spain, d. Tomas Berdych, Czech Republic, 6-4,
3-6, 6-3.
$750,000 SHENZHEN OPEN
At Shenzhen, China
Surface: Hard-Outdoor
SINGLES (semifinals)—Alison Riske d. Vera
Zvonareva, Russia, 6-0, 1-0 retired; Aryna Sabalenka (1), Belarus, d. Wang Yafan, China, 6-2,
6-1.
(Final)—Sabalenka d. Riske, 4-6, 7-6 (2),
6-3.
DOUBLES (final)—Peng Shuai-Zhaoxuan Yang
(2), China, d. Duan Yingying, China-Renata Voracova, Czech Republic, 6-4, 6-3.
$501,345 TATA OPEN MAHARASHTRA
At Pune, India
Surface: Hard-Outdoor
SINGLES (final)—Kevin Anderson (1), South
Africa, d. Ivo Karlovic, Croatia, 7-6 (4), 6-7 (2),
7-6 (5).
DOUBLES (final)—Rohan Bopanna-Divij Sharan (1), India, d. Luke Bambridge-Jonny O'Mara,
Britain, 6-3, 6-4.
$226,750 ASB CLASSIC
At Auckland, New Zealand
Surface: Hard-Outdoor
SINGLES (semifinals)—Julia Goerges (2), Germany, d. Viktoria Kuzmova, Slovakia, 6-1, 7-6
(6); Bianca Andreescu, Canada, d. Hsieh Su-wei
(3), Taiwan, 6-3, 6-3.
DOUBLES (semifinals)—Paige Mary Hourigan,
New Zealand, and Taylor Townsend, d. Kirsten
Flipkens, Belgium-Johanna Larsson (2), Sweden, 6-3, 7-5.
BASEBALL
Milwaukee—Traded outfielder Keon Broxton
to the N.Y. Mets for pitchers Bobby Wahl and Adam Hill, and infielder Felix Valerio.
Pittsburgh—Hired David Eckstein as special
assistant/baseball operations.
St. Louis—Assigned pitcher Ryan Meisinger
outright to Memphis (PCL).
San Francisco—Acquired infielder-outfielder
Breyvic Valera from Baltimore for cash.
HOCKEY
Kings—Assigned forward Drake Rymsha from
Ontario (AHL) to Manchester (ECHL).
St. Louis—Assigned goaltender Evan
Fitzpatrick to San Antonio (AHL); called up goaltender Jordan Binnington from San Antonio; released goaltender Ben Halford from a professional tryout agreement.
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
West Virginia—Hired Neal Brown as coach
and signed him to a six-year contract.
PRO FOOTBALL
NFL PLAYOFFS
Wild-Card Games
Saturday’s Results
Indianapolis 21, Houston 7
Dallas 24, Seattle 22
Today’s Schedule
CHARGERS at Baltimore, 10 a.m. (CBS)
Philadelphia at Chicago, 1:45 p.m. (NBC)
COLLEGE
VOLLEYBALL
MEN
Nonconference
UCLA d. UC San Diego 25-20, 25-13, 23-25,
25-19
NOTES
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
Iowa—Announced that junior defensive back
Amani Hooker will enter the NFL draft.
THE ODDS
College Basketball
Favorite
at USC
at Dayton
at Marquette
Seton Hall
at Northwestern
at Michigan
at St. Joseph’s
Nebraska
at Geo. Mason
at Wichita St.
at St. Louis
at Louisville
at Houston
Wisconsin
Line
71⁄2
10
71⁄2
2
8
8
141⁄2
31⁄2
7
PK
5
61⁄2
10
2
Underdog
Stanford
Richmond
Xavier
at DePaul
Illinois
Indiana
Geo. Wash.
at Iowa
St. Bonavent.
Temple
Rhode Island
Miami
Memphis
at Penn St.
College Football
National Championship Game (Mon.)
At Santa Clara
Favorite
Line (O/U)
Underdog
Alabama
51⁄2 (581⁄2)
Clemson
Pro Football Playoffs
Today’s Wild-Card Games
Favorite
Line (O/U)
Underdog
at Baltimore
3 (411⁄2)
CHARGERS
1
1
at Chicago
6 ⁄2 (41 ⁄2)
Philadelphia
Updates at Pregame.com
—Associated Press
SOCCER
INTERNATIONAL
SPAIN
La Liga
Valladolid 0, Rayo Vallecano 1
Alaves 2, Valencia 1
Huesca 2, Betis 1
SANTA ANITA RESULTS
Copyright 2019 by Equibase Co. Eighth day of 61-day meet.
1067 FIRST RACE. 1 mile turf. Claiming. 4-year-olds and
up. Claiming price $35,000. Purse $33,000.
P# Horse
Jockey
Win Place Show
5 Invasion Looming Blanc
14.60 7.20 5.00
3 Incredible Luck Payeras
4.80 3.20
8 Encumbered
Gutierrez
3.20
8 Also Ran: Van Cortlandt, Hey Sequoia, Union Rebel, Camino De Estrella, Iron Alex.
8 Time: 23.86, 48.39, 1.13.06, 1.25.18, 1.37.54. Cloudy &
Firm. Trainer: Charles S. Treece. Owner: Andrews, Andy and
Martindale, Ken.
8 Scratched: none.
8 Exotics: $2 Roulette (BLACK) paid $3.00, $1 Exacta (5-3)
paid $46.80, 10-Cent Superfecta (5-3-8-1) paid $81.32, $1
Super High Five (5-3-8-1-2) paid $5,617.60, 50-Cent Trifecta
(5-3-8) paid $88.10.
1068 SECOND RACE. 1 mile. Maiden claiming. Fillies.
3-year-olds. Claiming prices $50,000-$40,000. Purse
$32,000.
P# Horse
Jockey
Win Place Show
2 Super Klaus
Cruz
20.20 7.00 4.40
3 True Validity
Atzeni
2.60 2.20
4 Queen Of Track Fuentes
2.80
8 Also Ran: American Falls, Palm d’Oro, Fabulous Star, Lily
Con.
8 Time: 23.90, 48.40, 1.13.98, 1.28.04, 1.43.25. Cloudy &
Fast. Trainer: Victor L. Garcia. Owner: Victor Garcia.
8 Scratched: none.
8 Exotics: $2 Roulette (BLACK) paid $12.60, $2 Daily Double
(5-2) paid $264.80, $1 Exacta (2-3) paid $26.60, 10-Cent
Superfecta (2-3-4-7) paid $37.84, $1 Super High Five (2-34-7-6) paid $1,950.90, 50-Cent Trifecta (2-3-4) paid
$34.70.
1069 THIRD RACE. 11⁄8 miles turf. Maiden claiming.
4-year-olds and up. Claiming prices $50,000-$40,000.
Purse $32,000.
P# Horse
Jockey
Win Place Show
7 Falcone
Desormux 7.60 3.20 2.80
3 Aussie Fox
Van Dyke
2.80 2.20
5 Reckless Gravity Bejarano
4.40
8 Also Ran: Mo Bob (IRE), Super Classic, Tastemaker, Brioso,
Rare Journey.
8 Time: 23.99, 49.47, 1.14.20, 1.39.03, 1.51.06. Cloudy &
Firm. Trainer: J. Keith Desormeaux. Owner: Brad Allshouse.
8 Scratched: none.
8 Exotics: $2 Roulette (BLACK) paid $5.20, $2 Daily Double
(2-7) paid $133.80, $1 Exacta (7-3) paid $10.80, 10-Cent
Superfecta (7-3-5-6) paid $10.84, $1 Super High Five (7-3-56-8) paid $657.00, 50-Cent Trifecta (7-3-5) paid $22.10,
50-Cent Pick Three (5-2-7) paid $234.30.
1070 FOURTH RACE. 6 furlongs. Claiming. 4-year-olds
and up. Claiming prices $25,000-$22,500. Purse
$25,000.
P# Horse
Jockey
Win Place Show
6 Spa Shackalacka Figueroa 15.40 5.60 3.60
8 Kidmon
Talamo
2.80 2.40
3 Vin. Hollywood Fuentes
3.60
8 Also Ran: Cayate, Bear Chum (AUS), Schulace, Duke Of
Fallbrook, From The Distance.
8 Time: 22.35, 45.71, 58.26, 1.11.42. Cloudy & Fast. Trainer:
Philip D’Amato. Owner: ERJ Racing, LLC, Madaket Stables LLC
and Kenney, Dave.
8 Scratched: none.
8 Exotics: $2 Roulette (RED) paid $3.60, $2 Daily Double
(7-6) paid $56.20, $1 Exacta (6-8) paid $18.60, 10-Cent
Superfecta (6-8-3-2) paid $21.48, $1 Super High Five (6-8-32-5) paid $371.00, 50-Cent Trifecta (6-8-3) paid $40.40,
50-Cent Pick Three (2-7-6) paid $225.30.
1071 FIFTH RACE. About 61⁄2 furlongs turf. Maiden
special weight. 3-year-olds. Purse $55,000.
P# Horse
Jockey
Win Place Show
1 Stubbins
Prat
8.40 4.60 4.20
5 My Mandate
Van Dyke
7.20 6.00
14 Mountain Spirit Smith
9.00
8 Also Ran: Parsimony, Muralist, Kichiro, Volubile, Light Of The
World, Hackberry, Mutineer, Secret Courier, Sensuous.
8 Time: 22.04, 44.69, 1.07.58, 1.13.64. Cloudy & Firm.
Trainer: Doug F. O’Neill. Owner: McShane Racing, LLC.
8 Scratched: Loud Mouth, Palaleo.
8 Exotics: $2 Roulette (RED) paid $5.20, $2 Daily Double
(6-1) paid $63.40, $1 Exacta (1-5) paid $28.10, 10-Cent Superfecta (1-5-14-9) paid $195.31, 50-Cent Trifecta (1-5-14)
paid $256.10, $1 X-5 Super High Five (1-5-14-9-6) , X-5 Super High Five Carryover $1,630, 50-Cent Pick Three (7-6-1)
paid $62.60, 50-Cent Pick Four (2-7-6-1) 4 correct paid
$1,003.20, 50-Cent Pick Five (5-2-7-6-1) 5 correct paid
$19,792.65.
1072 SIXTH RACE. 61⁄2 furlongs. Allowance. 4-year-olds
and up. Purse $57,000.
P# Horse
Jockey
Win Place Show
7 Spokane Eagle Van Dyke
9.40 4.40 3.40
6 Coil Me Home
Bejarano
5.80 3.60
1 Goren
Figueroa
6.80
8 Also Ran: Best Two Minutes, Cool Bobby, Zatter.
8 Time: 22.57, 45.53, 1.09.60, 1.16.30. Cloudy & Fast.
Trainer: Peter Miller. Owner: Rockingham Ranch and David A
Bernsen LLC.
8 Scratched: Sir Samson.
8 Exotics: $2 Roulette (BLACK) paid $3.00, $2 Daily Double
(1-7) paid $43.80, $1 Exacta (7-6) paid $18.20, 10-Cent Superfecta (7-6-1-5) paid $52.61, 50-Cent Trifecta (7-6-1) paid
$66.30, 50-Cent Pick Three (6-1-7) paid $104.75.
1073 SEVENTH RACE. 11⁄8 miles turf. San Gabriel
Stakes. 4-year-olds and up. Purse $200,000.
P# Horse
Jockey
Win Place Show
7 Next Shares
Franco
5.20 3.60 2.80
3 Cleopatra’s Strike Prat
5.80 4.20
1 Liam the Charmer Desormux
3.20
8 Also Ran: Chicago Style, Platinum Warrior (IRE), Flamboyant (FR), Arms Runner, Oscar Dominguez (IRE), Big Bend.
8 Time: 24.09, 48.36, 1.12.46, 1.36.44, 1.48.61. Cloudy &
Firm. Trainer: Richard Baltas. Owner: Iavarone, Michael,
Iavarone, Jules, McClanahan, Jerry, Dunn, Christopher T.,
Marasa, William, Robers.
8 Scratched: Big Score.
8 Exotics: $2 Roulette (RED) paid $2.60, $2 Daily Double
(7-7) paid $26.00, $1 Exacta (7-3) paid $15.30, 10-Cent
Superfecta (7-3-1-5) paid $14.46, $1 Super High Five (7-3-15-2) paid $840.50, 50-Cent Trifecta (7-3-1) paid $23.75,
50-Cent Pick Three (1-7-7) paid $38.70.
1074 EIGHTH RACE. 11⁄16 miles. Allowance. 4-year-olds
and up. Purse $57,000.
P# Horse
Jockey
Win Place Show
7 Popular Kid
Desormux 8.60 4.20 2.80
9 Kylemore
Figueroa
3.80 3.00
5 The Big Train
Prat
3.20
8 Also Ran: Show Me Da Lute, Mongolian Groom, Lord Guinness, Extrordinary Jerry, Jamminwithbrandon, Liberty Park.
8 Time: 24.04, 47.82, 1.12.06, 1.37.83, 1.44.49. Cloudy &
Fast. Trainer: Jerry Hollendorfer. Owner: All Schlaich Stables
LLC, Gatto Racing, LLC, Hollendorfer, LLC, Team Green, LLC
and Cahill, James.
8 Scratched: none.
8 Exotics: $2 Roulette (RED) paid $4.20, $2 Daily Double
(7-7) paid $23.80, $1 Exacta (7-9) paid $15.50, 10-Cent
Superfecta (7-9-5-6) paid $28.42, $1 Super High Five (7-95-6-1) paid $400.30, 50-Cent Trifecta (7-9-5) paid $25.80,
50-Cent Pick Three (7-7-7) paid $27.45.
1075 NINTH RACE. 1 mile. Sham Stakes. 3-year-olds.
Purse $100,000.
P# Horse
Jockey
Win Place Show
6 Gunmetal Gray Smith
9.40 4.80 3.40
1 Sueno
Desormux
9.60 5.20
7 Much Better
Van Dyke
5.00
8 Also Ran: Gray Magician, Easy Shot, Coliseum, Savagery.
8 Time: 23.46, 46.95, 1.11.64, 1.24.86, 1.38.96. Cloudy &
Fast. Trainer: Jerry Hollendorfer. Owner: Hollendorfer, LLC,
Pearl Racing and West Point Thoroughbreds.
8 Scratched: none.
8 Exotics: $2 Roulette (BLACK) paid $7.80, $2 Daily Double
(7-6) paid $39.40, $1 Exacta (6-1) paid $45.20, 10-Cent
Superfecta (6-1-7-2) paid $58.67, 50-Cent Trifecta (6-1-7)
paid $105.90, $1 X-5 Super High Five (6-1-7-2-4) , X-5 Super
High Five Carryover $10,371, 50-Cent Pick Three (7-7-6) paid
$20.85.
1076 TENTH RACE. 1 mile. Maiden claiming. 4-year-olds
and up. Claiming price $20,000. Purse $20,000.
P# Horse
Jockey
Win Place Show
10 Derby Factor
Delgadillo 26.60 9.60 4.20
3 Bitter Ring Home Prat
6.20 3.40
7 Getaloadofthis
Franco
2.80
8 Also Ran: When Jesus Walked, Starship Chewy, Violent Affair, Bless His Heart, Sergio, Dude’s Dude.
8 Time: 23.32, 46.70, 1.12.52, 1.26.83, 1.41.44. Cloudy &
Fast. Trainer: Ruben Gomez. Owner: Derby, Susan and Folgner,
Gary.
8 Scratched: Brahms Forest, Malibu Magic, Paul’s Diva.
8 Exotics: $2 Roulette (BLACK) paid $3.80, $2 Daily Double
(6-10) paid $214.00, $1 Exacta (10-3) paid $80.10, 10-Cent
Superfecta (10-3-7-8) paid $372.58, $1 Super High Five (103-7-8-1) , Super High Five Carryover $27,108, 50-Cent Trifecta (10-3-7) paid $129.00, $2 Consolation Double (6-5)
paid $7.60, 50-Cent Pick Three (7-6-10) paid $278.75, 50Cent Consolation Pick Three (7-6-5) paid $9.50, 50-Cent Pick
Four (7/8-7-6-10) 420 tickets with 4 correct paid $1,433.50,
50-Cent Pick Five (7-7/8-7-6-10) 53 tickets with 5 correct
paid $8,830.50, 20-Cent Pick Six Jackpot (1-7-7/8-7-6-10)
21 tickets with 6 correct paid $9,459.96, Pick Six Jackpot
Carryover $532,695.
ATTENDANCE/MUTUEL HANDLE
On-track attendance-8,262. Mutuel handle-$1,445,388
Inter-track attendance-N/A. Mutuel handle-$2,234,743
Out-of-state attendance-N/A. Mutuel handle-$9,406,835
Total attendance-8,262. Mutuel handle-$13,086,966
SANTA ANITA ENTRIES
Ninth day of a 61-day thoroughbred meet.
1077 FIRST RACE (12:30 p.m.) 51⁄2 furlongs. Maiden
claiming. 4-year-olds and up. Claiming prices
$50,000-$40,000. State bred. Purse $32,000.
PR
Horse (PP)
Jockey,Wt
Odds
8009 Sir Eddie,1
T Baze,124
9-5
....
Spicy Vibration,2
H Figueroa,X119
7-2
8102 Iron Curtain,3
A Quinonez,122
4-1
....
Centaurus Rule,5
L Fuentes,XX115
5-1
9030 Desert Movie,7
R Fuentes,124
5-1
9030 Midnight Bandit,4 J Rosario,124
5-1
9061 Levi’s Saint James,6 A Delgadillo,122
30-1
1078 SECOND RACE. 1 mile. Allowance. Fillies and
mares. 4-year-olds and up. Purse $57,000.
PR
Horse (PP)
Jockey,Wt
Odds
9029 Queen Bee To You,8 F Prat,124
3-1
9029 Starr Of Quality,2
T Pereira,124
7-2
(8124) Sauce On Side,5
J Rosario,122
4-1
(9036) Withholding Info,4 J Talamo,122
4-1
(9045) Arctic Roll (GB),3
T Baze,124
6-1
8037 Convince,6
M Gutierrez,124
8-1
8124 Mongolian Humor,7 G Franco,122
10-1
(8094) Sweet Treat,1
H Figueroa,X117
12-1
1079 THIRD RACE. 6 furlongs. Maiden claiming. Fillies.
3-year-olds. Claiming prices $50,000-$40,000. Purse
$32,000.
PR
9044
8008
9044
....
9044
....
5268
Horse (PP)
So Gucci,5
Equal Measure,7
Acadia Fleet,4
Miss Fia,2
Discrete Stevie B,3
Tick Tock,6
Point Received,1
Jockey,Wt
R Fuentes,122
J Rosario,122
A Espinoza,X117
A Delgadillo,120
L Fuentes,XX115
H Figueroa,X117
E Payeras,120
Odds
2-1
5-2
7-2
4-1
8-1
8-1
30-1
1080 FOURTH RACE. 1 mile. Maiden claiming. Fillies.
3-year-olds. Claiming price $30,000. Purse $23,000.
PR
9044
9066
9066
7108
9053
9053
9028
Horse (PP)
Thanks,5
Blueberry Princess,7
Awepollonia,4
Had Enough K P,1
Depende De Ti,2
RedsSacredAppeal,6
West Way Dreams,3
Jockey,Wt
E Roman,122
D Sanchez,122
F Martinez,122
T Baze,122
A Quinonez,122
E Flores,122
E Payeras,122
Odds
2-1
5-2
7-2
7-2
8-1
15-1
15-1
9070
(3313)
1040
9038
(9025)
Spirit Mission,2
Frankie Machine,4
Platinum Equity,9
Royal Seeker,5
Spend It,8
T Baze,124
I Puglisi,124
R Fuentes,124
L Fuentes,XX117
M Pedroza,124
8-1
10-1
10-1
10-1
10-1
1082 SIXTH RACE. 61⁄2 furlongs. Allowance. Fillies and
mares. 4-year-olds and up. Purse $57,000.
PR
(8070)
7167
8076
8093
5087
(7177)
8049
3070
1032
Horse (PP)
Bashful,4
Princess Roi,9
Tyfosha,3
Batiquitos,7
Loving Lynda,5
No Wine Untasted,8
Nice Ice,2
Trustini,1
Copy Begone,6
Jockey,Wt
M Smith,124
R Bejarano,124
M Gutierrez,124
M Pedroza,124
F Prat,124
G Franco,122
T Pereira,124
D Van Dyke,122
E Roman,124
Odds
5-2
7-2
5-1
6-1
6-1
6-1
10-1
12-1
20-1
1081 FIFTH RACE. 1 mile. Claiming. 4-year-olds and up.
Claiming price $12,500. Purse $18,000.
1083 SEVENTH RACE. 1 mile. Allowance optional
claiming. 4-year-olds and up. Claiming price $62,500.
Purse $59,000.
PR
8073
1040
9070
8122
9070
PR
(7204)
(8069)
(6059)
7173
(8090)
Horse (PP)
Original Intent,6
Ayacara (GB),1
Typhoon Harry,7
Builder,3
Gryffindor,10
Jockey,Wt
J Rosario,124
E Maldonado,124
H Figueroa,X119
E Flores,124
E Payeras,124
Odds
7-2
4-1
5-1
8-1
8-1
Horse (PP)
Surfing Star,3
El Huerfano,4
Super Sol,2
All Out Blitz,9
Kershaw,6
Jockey,Wt
G Franco,124
F Prat,122
J Talamo,122
T Baze,122
H Figueroa,X117
Odds
5-2
3-1
4-1
6-1
6-1
8078
(8116)
8016
9012
Air Vice Marshal,7
Magic Musketier,5
Pepe Tono,8
Clear The Mine,1
M Smith,122
K Desormeaux,124
A Delgadillo,124
L Fuentes,XX115
10-1
12-1
12-1
20-1
1084 EIGHTH RACE. 7 furlongs. Santa Ynez Stakes.
Fillies. 3-year-olds. Purse $200,000.
PR
(7018)
9023
5130
9023
....
Horse (PP)
Bellafina,2
Mother Mother,1
Reflect,5
Sold It,3
Tomlin,4
Jockey,Wt
F Prat,124
D Van Dyke,120
K Desormeaux,120
M Gutierrez,120
T Baze,120
Odds
4-5
9-5
6-1
8-1
8-1
1085 NINTH RACE. 6 furlongs. Claiming. Fillies and
mares. 4-year-olds and up. Claiming prices
$16,000-$14,000. Purse $22,000.
PR
8124
(9002)
9022
8124
9049
2501
9049
1050
8081
(9034)
Horse (PP)
Vallestina,9
Miss Unusual,10
Christy Jackson,3
Pied N True,4
Baby Ice,7
Rizzi’s Honors,5
Just Be Held,6
Lea’s Reward,2
Creative Spark,1
Quizlet,8
Jockey,Wt
T Baze,124
H Figueroa,X119
J Rosario,122
L Fuentes,XX117
A Espinoza,X119
T Pereira,124
J Talamo,124
E Flores,122
M Donoe,XXX112
E Payeras,122
Odds
3-1
4-1
5-1
5-1
6-1
6-1
8-1
15-1
30-1
30-1
SS
L AT I M E S . C O M / S P O RT S
S U N DAY , JA N UA RY 6 , 2 019
D11
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
Sorry, Trojans fans, but
he’s staying at Alabama
USC gets
two 5-star
receivers
By J. Brady McCollough
[Tagovailoa, from D1]
Tagovailoa was a prized
recruit out of Hawaii, there
were whispers about him “silently committing” to the Trojans. He acknowledges being
“pretty close to going to SC.”
But something happened
when Alabama turned up the
recruiting heat that spring.
Two years later, Tagovailoa has raised the Crimson
Tide offense to a new level. At
a school where quarterbacks
have often fallen into the category of game-manager, he has
become a game-changer.
And some people in Southern California might still wonder about his change of heart.
::
To understand Tagovialoa’s choice, you must first
understand the dynamics
that exist within his family. He
throws left-handed because
that is what his father wanted.
Once a defensive lineman,
Galu Tagovailoa raised his
son to be a passer from the age
of 3 or 4.
“I guess he felt like he was
the only lefty in our family, and
he wanted one of his kids, I
guess, to be a lefty, as well,”
Tua says. “I kick with my
right, I write with my right, I
eat with my right. The only
thing I do is throw, shoot with
my left.”
Polynesian families tend to
be close, with children honoring their parents. It cannot
be discounted when Galu
characterizes Tua’s recruiting
process as “a family decision
… it was what made his family
happy.”
At Saint Louis School in
Honolulu, Tagovailoa was
ranked as the No. 1 prospect in
the state and No. 57 in the nation. There was speculation
he might follow another local
player, Marcus Mariota, to Oregon, but the Ducks never
showed much interest.
So USC and Alabama
ended up on his short list,
along with UCLA, Mississippi
and Texas A&M.
The Trojans figured they
had an inside shot at landing
the 6-1, 210-pound prospect,
with then-coach Steve Sarkisian flying across the Pacific
Ocean to deliver a scholarship
offer.
“Definitely,” Galu says.
“USC was always in the running.”
But not much later, in the
middle of the 2015 season,
Sarkisian was fired. If the
abrupt change startled the
Tagovailoas, an equally significant chain of events began
unfolding to the east.
At the end of the regular
season, Alabama defensive
coordinator Kirby Smart accepted the head coaching job
at Georgia, which prompted
blue-chip recruit Jake Fromm
to flip from the Crimson Tide
to the Bulldogs.
Just that quickly, Alabama
needed a quarterback and
shifted its focus to Tagovailoa.
Why did the Crimson Tide
ultimately prevail? That remains the subject of various
theories and murmurs.
Defensive
coordinator
Tosh Lupoi insists it was simple: Tagovailoa wanted to play
for a program that had won
three of the previous five national championships.
“Tua had his goals set on
what he wanted to accomplish,” Lupoi says. “When you
put those things out on the table, it’s an obvious choice.”
Tagovailoa sidesteps the
question, suggesting that a reporter ask his father.
“It was more so a family decision to come to [Alabama]
and it’s one of those things
where it’s cultural,” he says.
“So it’s what my parents
wanted more than what I
wanted, you know?”
His family prefers to answer in terms of a deep, religious conviction.
“We thought USC was the
biggest stage, but Alabama is
even bigger,” Galu says. “It
was a platform … to utilize our
faith and praise our Lord and
Savior Jesus Christ.”
Whatever the reason,
Tagovailoa committed to the
Crimson Tide as a junior. But
even then, USC had a chance.
::
Those early days weren’t
idyllic for an island kid
plunked down in Tuscaloosa.
The weather was hardly
tropical, the practices could
be brutal and Tagovailoa
didn’t like being stuck behind
starter Jalen Hurts as the 2017
season approached. Rumors
of a transfer began to circulate.
His family had already settled on moving to Alabama to
be close to him. Galu remembers a telephone call that began with his son asking: “Do
you think USC still has that
scholarship open?”
“Tua, you’re not serious,
are you?”
“No, Dad, I’m joking.”
But Tagovailoa later told a
Hawaiian television crew that
he might have left if not for the
2018 championship game,
when Alabama coach Nick
Saban pulled him off the
bench and he ended up leading the team to victory over
Georgia with a long touchdown pass in overtime.
Those 30 minutes turned
the freshman into a star.
“Everything changed,” he
says. “Just the way people
look at you, the way people
treat you.”
Last summer, Saban kept
insisting the quarterback job
was wide open, that Tagovailoa would have to earn the
spot, but the outcome seemed
inevitable.
The only real surprise?
The way Tagovailoa quickly
changed things at Alabama,
taking command of an offense
that had played second-fiddle
to the defense, transforming it
into a juggernaut that averages more than 527 yards and
47 points.
Watching from afar, Clemson defensive lineman Christian Wilkins thought to himself that Tagovailoa was a different kind of player.
“The throws he can make
are really quite special,”
Wilkins says. “I ain’t seen too
many quarterbacks that can
really make throws like that,
the College Football Playoff
semifinals.
Clemson defensive coordinator Brent Venables lists the
attributes that make him special: an accurate arm, a knack
for moving around the pocket
and the quickness to escape
when plays break down.
Tagovailoa has also mastered the run-pass option, he
says, faking the handoff, then
turning and firing a pinpoint
throw in the other direction.
“I mean, who does that?”
Venables asks. “ ‘Nobody’ is
the answer. Other than him.”
The championship gives
Tagovailoa another chance to
showcase his talents on the
sport’s biggest stage, against
a Clemson defense that ranks
among the best in a slew of
statistical categories.
Not much more than a year
after his darkest days, he
seems confident and happy.
There are no more doubts
about choosing Alabama, and
no more thoughts about the
school he left behind.
“It worked out great,” he
says.
Well, it did for him. USC
fans watching Monday night’s
game might not agree.
The late movement that
USC coach Clay Helton hoped
for with his 2019 recruiting
class started to come to fruition Saturday when five-star
wide receivers Bru McCoy of
Santa Ana Mater Dei and Kyle
Ford of Orange Lutheran
committed to the Trojans
during the U.S. Army AllAmerican Bowl in San Antonio.
McCoy, rated the nation’s
No. 1 athlete by 247Sports,
had silently signed a letter of
intent to attend USC during
the early signing period in December. With the national
stage Saturday, he officially
announced his decision, picking the Trojans over Texas.
Ford, rated the nation’s
No. 5 receiver, chose hometown USC over Washington,
Oregon, Michigan and Colorado.
The additions of McCoy
and Ford vaulted USC to 13th
in the 247Sports Composite
team rankings for 2019, placing them ahead of Ohio State,
Notre Dame, Tennessee, Florida State and Pac-12 rivals
Washington and Stanford.
As expected, USC did not
pick up a commitment from
four-star cornerback Chris
Steele of St. John Bosco, who
originally committed to the
Trojans but announced his
decision to attend Florida on
Saturday.
With McCoy and Ford
picking USC, the Trojans will
boast one of the most talented
wide receiver groups in the
nation in 2019. They will join
Michael Pittman Jr., Tyler
Vaughns, Velus Jones Jr.,
Amon-ra St. Brown and Devon Williams in new offensive
coordinator Kliff Kingsbury’s
“Air Raid” scheme.
Since being hired in early
December, Kingsbury has
been emphasizing to McCoy
and Ford that there will be
enough balls to go around to
make all the wide receivers in
his system happy.
david.wharton@latimes.com
Twitter: @LAtimesWharton
brady.mccollough@latimes.com
Twitter: @BradyMcCollough
Kevin C. Cox Getty Images
THE EARLY DAYS at Alabama were far from ideal
for Tua Tagovailoa, but that has all changed now.
man, with poise throughout
the game.”
::
There isn’t much that USC
can say about the matter.
The assistant who led the
effort to woo Tagovailoa,
Marques Tuiasosopo, is now
at California, where a spokesman says he is unavailable for
comment. The Trojans have
moved on, placing their hopes
on the shoulders of another
promising young passer.
JT Daniels struggled as a
freshman this fall, ranking
71st in passing efficiency with
14 touchdowns against 10 interceptions. Those numbers
pale in comparison to what is
happening at Alabama.
In his first season as a
starter — albeit surrounded
by a better team — Tagovailoa
just missed winning the Heisman Trophy, passing for 3,671
yards and 41 touchdowns
while limiting his interceptions to four. His efficiency
rating of 205.2 is tops in the nation.
The Southeastern Conference championship game
against Georgia turned ugly
— an injured ankle forced him
to the sideline, leaving Hurts
to spark a rally — things improved against Oklahoma in
As Tide roll, they only watch
[Plaschke, from D1]
sitting there play, but they
don’t play. They are wearing
soft white Alabama sweatsuits like everyone else, but
they have organized themselves differently, not by
position, but by status, by
their shared hope in the clear
reality of no hope.
“We don’t sit together by
position, we sit together by
who we are, because we have
to have each other’s backs,”
safety Andrew Heath said.
“We’re the walk-ons.”
This is not the first story
trumpeting the resilience of
nonscholarship players in a
star-driven college sports
world. But considering Monday will be Alabama’s fourth
consecutive CFP championship game — it’s third
against Clemson — the role
takes on new context.
Is there any walk-on more
buried than those at a school
experiencing a run of perhaps
the greatest and deepest
scholarship players in college
football history?
“I hang around my coach,
he never calls my name, then
we run into the tunnel and
wait for next week,” tight end
Hayden Huckabee said.
Can any place offer these
practice players less realgame hope than a dynasty
where seemingly every regular is a five-star prospect?
“In situations where we’re
up by a comfortable margin,
the walk-ons flock to the
coaches like, ‘We’re here, you
don’t really need those fivestar athletes right now, give
us some reps,’ ” receiver
Connor Adams said. “I’ve
actually thought about asking the coach to put me in. My
mom tries to get me to say it.
But I just can’t say it.”
Granted, Alabama has
produced one of football’s
greatest walk-on stories, and
it could haunt them again
Monday — Clemson coach
Dabo Swinney began his
college football career as a
walk-on receiver with the
Crimson Tide in 1989.
But the recruiting landscape has changed, the best
players all flock to the best
place, and in Tuscaloosa, the
deck has never been more
stacked against the guys at
the end of the bench.
“When we play against the
starters, it’s like first-graders
playing for fun against thirdgraders who can kick their
butts,” Heath said.
Whatever it is, the eight
kids at this table are among
the 30 or so listed Alabama
walk-ons who pay the school’s
cost of attendance — around
$25,000 in-state and $43,000
out-of-state — for an unique
opportunity to get steamrolled.
The table is nonetheless a
happy group. The players say
the team treats them well,
like any other scholarship
players except for those
pesky tuition and housing
bills. They eat in the same
dining hall, share the same
locker room and are awarded
the same championship
rings. Though they look like
regular students compared
with the Alabama stars, they
say they don’t feel any different.
But, they admit, it can be
hard.
Some were listed on Saturday’s media day roster.
Others were embarrassingly
not.
“I’ve got to be on there,”
said Heath, poring over my
wrinkled handout with a
laugh. “No. I’m not. Man,
that’s just rude.”
Some wonder whether
legendary coach Nick Saban
knows who they are. Others
are pretty sure he does not.
“Yeah, we’ve never met,
and he probably doesn’t even
know who I am,” said Huckabee, who is also not on the
roster for media day.
Some think they will
eventually get into a game.
Most accept the fact that they
will not. They don’t deal in
Rudy. They deal in reality.
“I’m looking forward for a
chance to play one day … but I
probably won’t,” Heath said.
“I think they’ll call my number if a lot of important people get hurt, and I get a lot
better.”
So they don’t play, but
they suit up, so they get all the
social benefits of being a
player, right? Well, sort of.
“When I walk around with
my football backpack, people
realize I’m with the team,”
Heath said. “But they don’t
think I’m a player, they think
I’m an equipment manager.”
They arrived here from all
different places, with all
different circumstances, the
only common thread being
that some folks thought they
were crazy.
Some were invited walkons, others just showed up.
Heath actually joined the
team after an open tryout
during the winter of his freshman year. Yes, the greatest
college football program of
our generation actually holds
open tryouts.
“My freshman year I’m in
the student section, now I’m
on the sideline, that’s quite
the upgrade,” Heath said.
The upgrade is evident on
Saturday home games and
playoff games, when the
walk-ons run on to the field
with the team, warm up in
front of thousands, then
storm the field afterward in
celebration as their parents
watch with pride.
“His dad watches the
game, I watch my son,” said
Susan Heath, Andrew’s
mother, who makes the 90mile drive from Pell City, Ala.,
to Tuscaloosa for the home
games. “I can tell you exactly
where he’s at, what he’s doing,
the entire game. ... I’m honored to do it.”
The walk-ons agree that
the real honor, while not
monetary, is rich with a sense
of belonging to something
special.
“Even when it looks like
you will never play, the reward
is, you buy into the team, you
buy out of yourself,” junior
tight end Giles Amos said.
“You put yourself into something that’s greater than you.
There’s something good in
that.”
But if that moment does
come? Amos is the only one of
the eight walk-ons at this
table who knows the feeling.
In his third year in the
program, it finally happened
this season in the final minutes of Alabama’s 56-14 victory over Louisiana Lafayette.
Somebody called his
name. He ran onto the field.
For four plays — he counted
— the tight end threw the
biggest blocks of his life.
“I’m like, all right, ‘Let’s do
this,’ ” he said.
Afterward, he stripped off
his gloves and cleats and
carried them back to his
Tuscaloosa apartment,
where today they sit, retired,
on a shelf.
“One day, they’ll be there
for my children,” he said.
“They’ll know I was there.”
The Alabama walk-ons
are sometimes invisible, often
overlooked, but always there
and, for them, that is enough.
bill.plaschke@latimes.com
ARRIVE EARLY,
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Photo: K.C. Alfred, San Diego Union-Tribune, SEPT. 23, 2018
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CALENDAR
S U N D A Y , J A N U A R Y 6 , 2 0 1 9 :: L A T I M E S . C O M / C A L E N D A R
Comic
cops aim
to please
on NBC
By Yvonne Villarreal
In a fitting setup even he
couldn’t have written, “Brooklyn
Nine-Nine” co-creator Dan Goor
was in the bathroom when he got
the call that Fox had canceled the
comedy after five seasons.
There had been rumblings
about the fate of the show, but as
Goor will tell you, there’s always
talk like that these days unless a
show is a mega hit. But this time,
Goor’s agent was cautioning that
cancellation was a real probability:
“It was the first time anyone had
seriously ever used that word.”
So when the call came in on
Thursday, May 10 — a day and date
Goor won’t soon forget — any usual
phone protocols were out the window: “I was like, ‘You know what?
I’m going to take this call. I’m not
going to give them the courtesy of
not being in the bathroom,” Goor
says wryly with a bit of hindsight.
The oddball workplace comedy
about a ragtag group of NYPD officers became another TV casualty
unable to fend off growing trends in
TV’s modern era. It never pulled in
stellar enough ratings — its fifth
season averaged around 2.7 million
viewers with delayed viewing over a
week factored in — and Fox didn’t
have an ownership stake in the
show at a time when TV networks
push to own as much of their content as possible. (The comedy is
owned and produced by Universal
Television, the studio arm of NBC.)
That was the story for 31 hours.
But by late Friday night,
through a combination of network
musical chairs and a Twitter uproar fueled by stunned fans — including the powerhouse likes of
Guillermo del Toro, Lin-Manuel
Miranda and Mark Hamill —
“Brooklyn Nine-Nine” became the
latest example of how a cancellation verdict in today’s TV isn’t always the death knell it used to be.
When it returns for its sixth season on Thursday, it will start its
second life on a new network — one
that originally passed on the comedy during its inception in 2012:
NBC.
[See ‘Brooklyn,’ E13]
Marcus Yam Los Angeles Times
“ROMA” writer-director Alfonso Cuarón visits the lobby of the Teatro Metropolitan, formerly a cinema he visited in his youth.
A PLACE IN
HIS HEART
Alfonso Cuarón relives his boyhood in Roma. Walk along.
BY CAROLINA A. MIRANDA >>> MEXICO CITY — When the Cine Metropolitan opened on Avenida
Independencia in Mexico City in 1943, it was one of those spare-no-expense architectural extravaganzas that reveal why movie theaters were once referred to as “palaces.” The broad Art Deco facade featured an illuminated marquee topped by a city skyline. The interiors channeled 18th century France,
with a marble-lined foyer and grand staircase inspired, in part, by the chapel at Versailles. It was a
building that was all crisp Modernism on the outside, buttery ancien régime within. ¶ By the time Alfonso Cuarón started seeing movies there in the 1970s, the Metropolitan had lost some of its luster. Like
many movie palaces of the early 20th century, it had evolved into a working-class movie house where
you could go see a slightly out-of-date thriller for cheap. ¶ The Cine Metropolitan has since become
the Teatro Metropolitan, a live music venue. But it is nonetheless a place that the Mexican film director
has returned to over the course of his career. It was at this theater that he held the Mexican premiere of
his 2001 film “Y Tu Mamá También,” the coming-of-age road picture that put him on the international
cinematic map. Fifteen years later, he returned to shoot key scenes for “Roma,” the family drama inspired by his own upbringing that has earned him several Golden Globe nominations and a heap of Oscars buzz. ¶ And on this cool December morning, Cuarón stands once more before the Metropolitan,
hair tousled, clutching a warm cup of tea. He recalls a trip to the theater as a youth to see “The Poseidon
Explosion,” a 1973 film whose principal claim to fame was a title that was easily [See Cuarón. E10]
Kirk McKoy Los Angeles Times
ETHAN HAWKE takes on
varied, challenging roles.
Surprise,
it’s Ethan
Hawke
JUSTIN CHANG
FILM CRITIC
In “First Reformed,” Ethan
Hawke almost never raises his
voice. His character, the Rev. Ernst
Toller, is a former Army chaplain
who leads a small Protestant
church in upstate New York, where
he delivers sermons that are notably devoid of fire or brimstone. He
speaks in a gravelly rasp of a voice,
hushed and solemn, signaling the
depth of his spiritual convictions
but also the despair that has recently overwhelmed them.
Life has dealt Toller a series of
blows: a dead son, a failed marriage, a cancer diagnosis. But
Hawke’s grave, understated performance suggests that the character’s malaise may have a more
mysterious origin. The actor’s
handsome face is unusually pale
and gaunt, his brow corrugated
with worry.
[See Hawke, E6]
E2
SU N DAY , JA N UA RY 6 , 2 019
L AT I M E S . C O M / CA L E N DA R
FEEDBACK
4 GOLDEN GLOBE AWARD NOMINATIONS
®
including
DRAMA
BEST PICTUREE
OF THE YEAR
BEST DIRECTOR Spike Lee
4 CRITICS’ CHOICE AWARDS NOMINATIONS including
BEST PICTURE OF THE YEAR
BEST DIRECTOR Spike Lee
“SPIKE LEE’S GREATEST FILM.
THE IMPASSIONED WORK OF A CINEMA GIANT.”
Cameron Cottrill For The Times
So hard to let them go
Regarding “Year in Review: Touch a Book, Fall in Love”
by novelist Janet Fitch [Dec. 23]: The books in my life are
like pages in my scrapbook, each with its own memories —
and I learned this the hard way. After years of packing and
carting my books everywhere I moved, I’d finally had
enough and donated them all to the Prison Library Project.
“They’re all available at the library if I ever want to reread
them,” I told myself. (Within 24 hours, I bought back
several of them.) And since then, when I am doing one of
my favorite things — talking about books with a friend —
and start to get up to grab the book, I feel such a loss when
I realize it’s gone. The books we read throughout our lives
become our friends, companions, teachers and mentors.
We need to keep them close because they are family.
Eileen Valentino Flaxman, Claremont
Peter Travers, ROLLING STONE
“
”
“
”
AWARDSWATCH
SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE
“
”
“
”
THE TIMES
THE TELEGRAPH
“THE MOVIE OF THE YEAR. THE SINGLE MOST EFFECTIVE
PIECE OF ART ABOUT OUR CURRENT POLITICAL MOMENT.”
Zach Baron, GQ
Giving intimacy
careful attention
Regarding “Touching
Moments” by Ashley Lee
[Jan. 2]: Excellent article on
intimacy and sex scene
coaches/choreographers. It
surprised me that there are
mainstream TV, film and
stage directors and producers who haven’t fully incorporated these professionals
in every production involving touching of this sort.
The women you interviewed
are a thoughtful, impressive
group.
Tim Silvestre
Pacific Palisades
On the same
page as Obama
Regarding “Quick Takes:
Obama Lists His Favorites”
[Dec. 29]: Former President
Barack Obama picked a
sleeper of a film (“The
Rider”) as one of his favorite
films of 2018, and so do I.
Some might think a lowbudget movie about a young
rodeo rider is something
they’ve seen before, but the
level of reality and tension
that director Chloé Zhao
captures by telling her
untrained actor’s own true
story — one of submission to
excruciating pain in redeveloping his broken body contrasted against his deep
understanding of an animal
who refuses to submit to the
rider’s training — had me
lassoed tight to my seat
with my mouth open and
heart beating. I’m also
knocked out that I share the
feeling that we (#44 and me)
pick this as a year’s best.
Jules Brenner
Hollywood
He didn’t bring
them together
A
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ATTENTION GUILD MEMBERS: Your membership may admit you (+ guest) to see BLACKkKLANSMAN,
Monday thru Thursday. Please check with the theatre for their policy, which varies by location.
In his review of “Stan &
Ollie” [“Sweet, Final Shuffle
of a Beloved Duo,” Dec. 28],
Gary Goldstein reports an
assertion made in the film
that studio head Hal Roach
was responsible for teaming
Laurel & Hardy. This assertion is false. The man
responsible for introducing
Laurel to Hardy and suggesting their partnership
was director Leo McCarey.
The rest is history. Hal
Roach did try to take credit,
however.
Mark Richman
Sherman Oaks
What’s behind
this ‘Queen’?
Regarding Jen Yamato’s
article “Writers Give a
Queen Her Due” about the
movie “Mary Queen of
Scots” [Dec. 22]: Not one
word about Antonia Fraser’s definitive biography
“Mary Queen of Scots” or
the 1971 movie “Mary, Queen
of Scots,” starring Vanessa
Redgrave? How about the
word “remake”?
Alexa Smith Maxwell
Los Angeles
Editor’s note: The 2018 film
“Mary Queen of Scots” is not
a remake of the 1971 film, nor
is it based on the 1969 biography. The screenplay was
adapted from the book
“Queen of Scots: The True
Life of Mary Stuart” by John
Guy.
Keep up the
good film work
Regarding “Showstopper: A Playlist that Paints a
Picture” [The Envelope:
Dec. 27]: Another excellent
perspective on the movies
and the makers of 2018.
Michael Ordoña’s
playlist of music from
the year and the pics for
best adapted screenplay are
some of the highlights
in this continuing excellent
coverage of the film industry.
Wayne Johnson
Santa Monica
Make it easier
to listen, please
Regarding “Listen up:
It’s 2018’s Replay List” [Dec.
26]: Why not add links for a
Spotify or Pandora (Daily)
playlist in the online version?
Much of the current
music you write about is
unfamiliar to me (66 years
old), and I am frequently
curious.
Still, hunting down such
is somewhat tedious, so a
playlist link would be very
handy.
Richard Olsen
Pacific Grove
Same name, not
the same awards?
Regarding “Worthy Star
Turns” [Jan. 1]: Actresses
today insist on being called
“actors.” With that in mind,
why does the system continue to give a best actress
award?
If they want true equality, it should be Brad Pitt
versus Jennifer Garner.
Everyone competes on
equal footing for the same
prize.
Edward Foster
Tryon, N.C.
latimes.com
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S U N DAY , JA N UA RY 6 , 2 019
L AT I M E S . C O M / CA L E N DA R
E3
SUNDAY CALENDAR
TRACING
A SERIES
OF
‘EVENTS’
THE
ELEGANT
ROLES OF
VANESSA
REDGRAVE
THE IMDB FILES,
E8
TELEVISION, E12
THE SUNDAY CONVERSATION
UNDERRATED
Change the narrative
“Wanderlust”: Misrepresented in its Netflix trailer
as a British sex romp about
a couple opening their relationship, this show was
quietly one of the most
affecting and raw dramas of
2018. While the series’ Steven
Mackintosh and Toni Collette are navigating the
occasional awkwardness of
long-term monogamy, the
story is far more invested in
deeply rooted trauma and
intimacy issues through
story lines that reverberate
across the show’s many
sharply drawn characters.
But the fulcrum remains the
ever-excellent “Hereditary”
star Collette, who remains
unmatched in expressing
hours of dialogue using her
face alone.
By Meredith Blake
NEW YORK — Nazanin Boniadi
has what may be the juiciest role —
make that roles — of her career in
“Counterpart,” a science-fictioninfused espionage thriller now in its
second season on Starz.
The drama, costarring Oscar
winner J.K. Simmons, relies on a
bold premise: an alternate version
of the world was created in the waning days of the Cold War.
Now covert operatives travel between “Prime” and “Alpha” worlds
through a portal in — where else? —
Berlin. (Think of it as “The Spy Who
Came in From the Cold” meets
“Sliding Doors.”) Boniadi plays
Clare, a particularly zealous agent
who sneaks across the border and
— spoiler alert — assumes her doppelgänger’s identity.
Despite its outré concept, the
series, created by Justin Marks, is
rich with “metaphors and allegories of what’s going on today,”
says Boniadi, who is excited by its
sociopolitical themes.
Born in Iran and raised in London, the UC Irvine graduate has
fought to bring attention to human
rights abuses in her native country
through work with Amnesty International USA and the Council on
Foreign Relations.
“I always say as an actor you get
to portray the human condition,”
she says, “but as an activist you get
to change the human condition.”
“Homeland,” in which she
played a hijab-wearing CIA analyst
who challenges the agency’s latent
Islamaphobia, “was the first time I
got to talk about current affairs and
foreign policy in connection to my
work.” Her upcoming projects are
just as culturally relevant: In addition to “Counterpart,” she’ll be seen
with Dev Patel and Armie Hammer
in “Hotel Mumbai,” about the 2008
terror attack on the Taj Hotel in
Mumbai, and in Jay Roach’s untitled film about Roger Ailes.
Clare is such a layered character.
What’s it like to play her?
I’m Middle Eastern; the last
thing I want to do is play a villain.
It’s such a cliché. When I got the
role, my hesitation was always
that, essentially, she’s a terrorist.
She’s been brainwashed and indoctrinated to go out and kill people who she thinks are the other. I
auditioned for this role and it was
open to all ethnicities. My initial
conversation with Justin was,
“Please don’t change the name.” I
don’t want her to all of a sudden be
named “Fatima.” And he said, “I
have no intention of doing that.
There are people who look like you
whose names are Clare.” She is a
multifaceted woman indoctrinated
to do bad things. And I love the
idea that if you can learn to hate,
surely you can also learn to love.
That’s her journey in Season 2: Can
she shed herself of this brainwashing and indoctrination? Essentially she’s leaving a cult.
So is the colorblind nature of the
part a departure for you?
I found myself being at the top
of producers’ and studios’ list for
Middle Eastern roles, which is a
beautiful position to be in, but it
does cage you in as an actor. Most
Caucasian actors, they don’t lead
with their ethnicity, they’re just
playing a human being. So with
minority actors, it is a struggle. I
find [“Counterpart”] refreshing
after the last few projects, consecutively playing Adnan Salif on
“Scandal,” Fara Sherazi on
“Homeland” and even Esther in
“Ben-Hur” — all Middle Eastern.
How does “Hotel Mumbai” fit into
that?
For me, it’s an interesting commentary on socioeconomic divides,
because you’re throwing people in
like my character [a wealthy, Muslim British-Iranian woman], who
was raised with a golden spoon in
her mouth and has never had to
fight for anything in her life, with
people who live in the slums. And
when you’re in that situation,
money, religion, race, ethnicity,
language don’t separate us. Bullets
don’t discriminate.
The fate of the “Hotel Mumbai”
film was uncertain following the
collapse of the Weinstein Co. That
must have been frustrating.
When someone does something
truly horrible, there are direct
Club Nouveau’s “Why You
Treat Me So Bad?”: Led by
Lupita Nyong’o and Winston Duke, the new trailer
for Jordan Peele’s “Get Out”
follow-up “Us” was among
the scariest surprises of the
holidays, and a key aspect
was its haunting use of the
mid-’90s hip-hop classic “I
Got Five On It” by Luniz. As
welcome a throwback as the
song is — to say nothing for
how effectively its hook
telegraphs a sense of dread
— those notes came from
this 1987 hit, which was a
soundtrack favorite for the
rocky teenage relationships
of its day. Puff Daddy and
Ashanti later sampled it too,
but only Peele will turn it
into the stuff of nightmares.
OVERRATED
Kent Nishimura Los Angeles Times
NAZANIN BONIADI embraces the complexities of her character on Starz’s “Counterpart.”
victims but there are also peripheral victims who suffered in the
sense that they lost their careers,
they had their films tank because
of this. It’s really livelihoods at
stake — collateral damage. We’re
lucky we found [distributor]
Bleecker Street and have a second
chance, but I imagine that didn’t
happen for a lot of films.
How do you balance paying your
bills and bearing the burden of
representation?
I had the blessing and privilege
of being on “Homeland.” The show
gets criticized, but I found how
they treated my character to be
very delicate. I wanted to make
sure that after that I went into
something that was equally layered. I was offered a lot of roles that
were very one-dimensional, and I
said no. As an actor you want to
make money and you want to have
momentum, but I’ve always been
an advocate for thinking long term
as opposed to the instant gratification of “I’m working!” How about
just finding the right project that
resonates with your heart and your
creativity?
I had to audition for “Counterpart” while on location in Australia
shooting “Hotel Mumbai.” I had
my reservations culturally about
what was involved with the role.
There was a nudity clause, there
was kissing a woman for the first
time. And immediately the first
thing my mind went to was, “What
will the Persian community
think?” But then I realized, this is
what I do for a living. Now I look
back and I think I can’t imagine
having turned this job down. It
really is the most therapeutic role.
How so?
I think it’s very self-explanatory.
Hopefully, people will just understand sometimes there are personal traumas that you don’t ever talk
about publicly but you pour it into
your work. There are things that
have happened in my personal life
that I don’t feel comfortable publicly discussing, but I found a way to
through this show and this role —
it’s catharsis. There’s a trajectory
for this character that mirrors
mine. I’ve never been an assassin
or a terrorist, but this idea of shedding indoctrination and finding
out who you are for me is a strong
one. It has been extremely therapeutic for me to be able to put it
out into the world through my art
as opposed to openly discussing it.
Are you referring to your past
experience with Scientology?
[Boniadi reportedly left the organization.]
I’d rather not say. Some things
we just talk about through art.
Let’s talk then about how your
family’s decision to leave Iran
informed your advocate work?
I was born in the direct aftermath of the revolution in Iran. I
was 20 days old when my parents
fled. They didn’t want to raise their
daughter in a social, legal and
political climate that was growing
increasingly oppressive toward
women. Women were protesting
against compulsory hijab at the
time in the hundreds of thousands.
They were being imprisoned and
lashed and beaten and forced into
submission. My parents fled to
London and became political
refugees. They led a very comfortable life [in Iran] and they were
forced to accept menial jobs. When
I see people suffering or disenfranchised or having their rights taken
away from them, I feel compelled to
want to speak on their behalf.
Have you ever visited Iran?
I went to Iran when I was 13. I
was walking down the street with
my uncle — my mother’s brother.
My mom was walking behind us
and we were stopped by a member
of the plainclothes militia. He said,
“Can you show me your marriage
certificate?” I was 13, my uncle was
45. He thought [my uncle] was
walking with his wife. It was just
heartbreaking. It was so foreign to
me. And now I’m persona non
grata, so I definitely can’t go back.
My friend, who’s a brilliant
human rights lawyer, and I wrote a
Washington Post op-ed because we
wanted to shine a light on what’s
happening in Iran. Eleven months
of protests and it’s getting no news
coverage. These women are the
Rosa Parkses of Iran; they’re protesting against compulsory hijab
at great personal costs. I feel like
what’s happening with the #MeToo movement, Time’s Up and the
Women’s March in the U.S. and the
anti-compulsory hijab is not a
coincidence. They may not be
organized under the same banner,
but it really is a global awakening of
women’s rights. We owe it to them
to include them in our movement.
What was it like to grow up in
exile?
My father has never been back
to Iran in 39 years. My mother was
just back once with me; now she
can’t go back to because of me. Her
brother, my uncle, has Stage 4 lung
cancer. Because of the travel ban,
it’s very hard for him to come here.
The Iranian government kills
dissidents; they imprison and
torture people who are outspoken
against them. So it’s a hard thing
for me to think about the Iranians
who have relatives inside Iran.
They’ll die without seeing them,
and that breaks my heart. That
should be a basic human right, to
travel, to be with your loved ones.
Any regime, politician that deprives you of family is corrupt.
meredith.blake@latimes.com
Woodstock at 50: To ensure
no generation feels its music
could be as significant as
the long-gone magic of the
1960s, Live Nation announced it will stage another concert celebrating all
that happened decades ago
at Max Yasgur’s farm in
Bethel, N.Y. No lineup has
been revealed, but given
grim promises of “bespoke
performance areas” and
“TED-style talks,” this
concert seems bent on
offering three days of peace
and music at a goldenanniversary pace. An overabundance of oldies nostalgia plagued the Heroes of
Woodstock tour in 2009. And
remember the debacle that
was Woodstock ’99?
The Louis C.K. heel-turn:
We had hints over the past
few months, but we didn’t
know what the comeback
for this disgraced comic
would look like until new
material from a recent set
leaked online last week. Now
we know that rather than
the self-lacerating “honest”
comedy that led him toward
his own FX series, his standup persona has embraced
shallow bitterness and a
tinge of bigotry that presents as “edgy” but is really
just more mean than funny.
The good news is he’s now
found a new core audience
of similarly aggrieved men
to buy tickets. The bad news
— for him — is the rest of us
can go back to our lives.
— Chris Barton
E4
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Photographs by
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CODY ZIGLAR, left, Tawny Newsome and Andrew Ti record an episode of the podcast “Yo, Is This Racist?”
AUDIOSPHERE
At first, no one got it
Earwolf has become one of
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Conan O’Brien to its stable.
By Andy Hermann
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When Scott Aukerman and Jeff Ullrich came up with the idea of launching
a podcasting network in 2010, it was a
tough sell. Their connections in the
worlds of television and stand-up comedy barely knew what podcasts were,
let alone understood the appeal of
bundling a whole bunch of them together.
“We would get laughed out the
door,” Aukerman says of some of their
early meetings at talent agencies like
CAA. “People really didn’t get it at the
time.”
Eight years later, their network,
Earwolf, is one of the most successful
producers of comedy podcasts in the
business, with 35 shows that are collectively downloaded more than 14 million
times a month. Anchored by Aukerman’s own long-running “Comedy
Bang! Bang!,” Earwolf is now the podcasting home of an enviable roster of
talent that includes Paul F. Tompkins,
Michael Ian Black, Cameron Esposito,
W. Kamau Bell, Hari Kondabolu and
Gilbert Gottfried.
Recently, Earwolf raised its profile
even further by welcoming Conan
O’Brien into the fold. His long-form interview show, “Conan O’Brien Needs a
Friend,” is “our biggest show already,”
according to the network’s executive
producer, Colin Anderson.
Aukerman, a veteran of improv and
sketch comedy who cut his teeth as a
writer and occasional performer on
HBO’s ’90s cult favorite “Mr. Show,”
got into podcasting more or less by
chance. In 2009, a friend at radio station Indie 103.1, which had just left the
FM dial and gone internet-only, said
the station was looking for people
“who wanted to do shows for free,”
Aukerman remembers with a laugh.
Figuring it was a good way to promote
his weekly alt-comedy showcase at the
Upright Citizens Brigade Theatre, he
jumped at the chance.
Within a year, Aukerman’s radio
show, “Comedy Death-Ray,” had more
than 20,000 listeners each week.
Hardly anyone listened live; instead,
they were downloading the podcast
version, which Indie 103.1 let him archive on his own website. “And it just
kind of kept growing,” he says.
Ullrich approached Aukerman as a
fan of the show; the two wanted to work
together but weren’t sure how, until
Ullrich suggested, almost offhandedly,
that they start a podcast network.
“The ambition of it really appealed to
me,” Aukerman says, noting that he
had long been one of the few performers in the L.A. comedy scene who actually enjoyed the logistics of booking
venues, renting equipment and promoting shows. Comedians, he explains, “pretty much want to just come
into a room, do their thing and then
leave. That was what I’d found at the
UCB Theatre. So that was what we
tried to base our network on.”
Ullrich and Aukerman set up their
first recording studio in a tiny office
space in Hollywood next to a marijuana dispensary. Besides “Comedy
Death-Ray” — later renamed “Comedy Bang! Bang!” — their first show was
“Sklarbro Country,” a tongue-in-cheek
sports program hosted by brothers
Randy and Jason Sklar. Comedian
Paul Scheer was another early joiner;
Aukerman recalls him coming up with
the premise and format of “How Did
This Get Made?,” his hilarious evisceration of famously bad films, on the
spot at a Christmas party at actor Ed
Helms’ house.
“But most people took a pass on it,”
Aukerman says. “They didn’t really see
what podcasting was at the time or
what it was going to be.”
Today, Earwolf is still based in Hollywood but occupies several thousand
square feet on the second floor of a
gleaming, modern office complex just
COLIN ANDERSON is executive producer at comedy podcasting net-
work Earwolf. Behind him are posters of the various podcasts.
SLIP-ON SHOES painted with portraits of Earwolf podcast hosts is
the work of podcast fan Charlie Malta who goes by “Guice Mann.”
off the 101 Freeway. In 2015, the network
and its sister company, a podcast ad
sales service called Midroll, were acquired by media giant Scripps. After
the sale, Ullrich exited the company; in
June 2018, Earwolf upgraded to better
recording studios and more spacious
digs.
Visitors to Earwolf ’s new headquarters are greeted by a wall display
of logos for some of the network’s most
popular shows: Matt Besser’s “Improv4Humans,” the Real Housewives
recap “Bitch Sesh,” Cameron Esposito’s “Queery” and one of Earwolf ’s
unlikeliest hits, “Hollywood Handbook.” Co-hosts Sean Clements and
Hayes Davenport satirize their own
network’s most popular format — a
mix of long-form interviews and character-driven improv sketches — by
trading showbiz in-jokes, meta-comedy and off-topic tangents with their
guests, who are frequently drawn from
the ranks of Earwolf ’s other shows (a
popular tactic at the network for crosspromoting its podcasts and strengthening its brand).
“It’s satirizing [Hollywood] personalities and talk shows and just really
bad conversations,” Clements explains. “But it’s done kind of dry and
straight, so you could easily just mistake it for a really bad conversation or
talk show.”
“It’s not the most welcoming show,”
Davenport adds. “We’ve heard that it
takes 15 to 20 episodes for people to
really get the show, which from a marketing perspective is not ideal.”
The appeal of other Earwolf shows
is more immediate. On a recent Monday afternoon, co-hosts Andrew Ti and
Tawny Newsome sit down with their
producer, Cody “Zig” Ziglar, and a
guest, Dave Holmes — the co-host of
another Earwolf show, “Homophilia”
— to record an episode of “Yo, Is This
Racist?” Together they field voicemails from listeners on a variety of
race-related subjects, from the racist
undertones of tiki culture to the etiquette of covering up offensive tattoos.
Newsome, a comedian, actress and
musician with an easy air on the mic,
came aboard last year and provides a
snappy comic foil to the wordier Ti,
who created the podcast based on his
Tumblr blog of the same name.
“Why aren’t Nazis better at having
tough names?” she quips at one point,
during a discussion of YouTube personality PewDiePie’s recurring use of
anti-Semitic humor.
“The new Nazi aesthetic is, ‘Who,
me?’ ” Ti replies, in an innocent, singsong tone.
“Yo, Is This Racist?” is one of Earwolf ’s longest-running shows — it recently released its 1,000th episode —
but is emblematic of the network’s
growing efforts to diversify beyond its
roots in what Anderson unabashedly
calls “straight white male improv comedy.” Since joining Earwolf in 2016, after
stints at BBC Radio and rival podcast
network Maximum Fun, Anderson has
helped launch several LGBTQ shows,
including “Homophilia,” “Queery” and
“Getting Curious,” featuring “Queer
Eye’s” Jonathan Van Ness. Now he has
his sights set on other demographics
that remain underrepresented in the
world of comedy podcasting.
“What we’re trying to do now is find
ways of bringing in [more] people of
color and more women,” says Anderson. Aukerman agrees: “We want to say
[to our audience], ‘Hey, here’s women
and people of color who have a similar
sensibility that you’re also gonna like.’”
Inevitably, as the podcasting industry grows, Earwolf will have to keep
pace with its competitors by landing
more A-list talent like O’Brien. But
Aukerman is hopeful that doing so
won’t detract from the network’s more
homegrown success stories like “Hollywood Handbook” and “Yo, Is This
Racist?”
“That’s the great thing about podcasting — hopefully, it’s not the movie
business yet,” he says. “People just
really respond to the content, and
that’s where hopefully podcasting
won’t be eclipsed by stars coming in.”
And the stars will keep coming —
especially if Anderson has any say in
the matter. Watching O’Brien sing the
praises of podcasting to big-name
guests like Adam Sandler and Kristen
Bell, Anderson says he only half-kiddingly has thought, “We need to be slipping business cards to these guys.”
calendar@latimes.com
LOS ANGELES TIMES
SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
“ THE BEST
PICTURE
OF THE YEAR.
Alfonso Cuarón’s masterpiece.
Breathtaking and life-giving.”
3 NEW YORK FILM CRITICS
CIRCLE AWARDS
2 LOS ANGELES FILM CRITICS
ASSOCIATION AWARDS
RICHARD LAWSON,
5 CHICAGO FILM CRITICS
ASSOCIATION AWARDS
“ONE
OF THE BEST MOVIES
’VE EVER SEEN.
I
Yalitza Aparicio’s performance dominates
3 SAN FRANCISCO FILM
CRITICS CIRCLE AWARDS
every moment she’s on screen.”
4 WASHINGTON DC AREA
FILM CRITICS ASSOC. AWARDS
JOE MORGENSTERN,
3 NEW YORK FILM CRITICS
ONLINE AWARDS
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Ethan Hawke, so surprising
[Hawke, from E1]
His eyes, so often alive with excitement, peer out with cold resignation at something dreadful on the
horizon.
Why has God fallen both deaf
and silent? Toller finds a troubling,
infuriating answer when he meets
a radical environmental activist,
Michael (Philip Ettinger), spreading his own gospel of panic at
Earth’s rapidly accelerating decline. Toller tries to counsel
Michael, but it is Michael who
counsels him: Taking up the
younger man’s cause, the priest becomes a political radical and a spiritual rebel, embarking on a lonely
descent into physical violence and
moral chaos.
It sounds preposterous on paper, a grim psychological study
couched in pulpy B-movie extremes. But on screen it is entirely
persuasive, thanks to the unswerving conviction and artistry of its
writer-director, Paul Schrader,
who treats his protagonist as both
an avatar of retribution and a man
in the grip of a dangerous obsession.
You are drawn into Toller’s
story by a steady, unblinking camera that quickens your pulse even
as it encourages your contemplation. And you are held there by the
mesmerizing clarity and intelligence of Hawke’s performance,
which suggests that the most powerful epiphanies may also be the
subtlest.
Possibly too subtle. Although
the 48-year-old Hawke has won
best actor prizes from several
groups this season, including the
Los Angeles Film Critics Assn. and
the New York Film Critics Circle,
he was conspicuously not nominated for a Screen Actors Guild
Award or a Golden Globe, both key
Oscar precursors. It’s easy to see
why. This isn’t the kind of acting
that calls attention to itself, that
bowls you over with bravura feats
of vocal distortion and prosthetic
wizardry, and I say this with all due
respect to Dick Cheney. (Sorry, I
mean Christian Bale.)
If there is any way to measure
Hawke’s triumph in “First Reformed,” it might be the sheer
number of people I’ve heard praise
his performance before quickly
noting, “And I’ve never been an
Ethan Hawke fan.” As someone
who’s been an Ethan Hawke fan for
a while, I certainly get that some
are simply allergic to his appeal,
more irritated than charmed by his
combo of movie-star good looks
and indie-darling ambitions.
A24
IN “FIRST REFORMED,” Ethan Hawke portrays a pastor experiencing a crisis of faith. Amanda Seyfried is a parishioner in need.
Built on solid ground
Still, I can’t help but feel that
anyone who was caught completely off-guard, who didn’t suspect that he had this kind of greatness in him, simply hasn’t been
paying attention. “First Reformed”
gives us the latest in a string of remarkable Hawke performances,
following the subtle explorations of
midlife discontent in “Before Midnight” (2013) and “Boyhood” (2014)
and the biographical transformations of “Born to Be Blue” (2015)
and “Maudie” (2017). It is, I would
propose, the culmination of the
richest, most accomplished and
surprising career of any actor now
working in American movies.
“Before Midnight,” of course, is
the third entry in Richard Linklater’s series starring Hawke and
Julie Delpy as Jesse and Céline,
whose walking-and-talking love
story began with 1995’s “Before
Sunrise” and continued with 2004’s
“Before Sunset.” More than his attention-grabbing roles as a sensitive prep-school student in “Dead
Poets Society” (1989) and that
surly dreamboat Troy Dyer in “Reality Bites” (1994), it was Jesse who
announced himself as the quintessential Hawke character: the
charmingly outspoken know-it-all,
ardently romantic, philosophical
and a bit of a blowhard. You rolled
your eyes so hard at Jesse you
didn’t even notice him deftly
sweeping you off your feet.
“Before Sunrise” affirmed
Hawke’s determination to look beyond the obvious. Rather than
hewing to a more conventional
movie-star path, he seized the opportunity to work with independent-minded directors, Linklater
more frequently than any other,
who would tease out his sharpest
dimensions as an actor and refuse
to treat him as just another pretty
face.
There were missteps along the
way, like “Great Expectations”
(1998) and “Snow Falling on
Cedars” (1999), in which the actor’s
magnetism tilted into inertia. But
he steadily found his groove
through trial and error, plus a willingness to risk and experiment.
The 2000s brought Michael
Almereyda’s inventive modernization of “Hamlet,” in which Hawke
played the title role as a mopey,
knit-cap-wearing Manhattan hipster, tossing off his soliloquies in
what you might call guy-ambic
pentameter. It was a daring interpretation that invited ridicule and
Robert Zuckerman Warner Bros Pictures
FOR 2001’s “Training Day,” Hawke earned his first Oscar nomination. His officer was in a sweat.
flirted with self-pity, but by the end
it made acute emotional and dramatic sense.
It’s not considered high praise
to describe an actor’s screen presence as “hard-working,” the notion
being that any display of strain is
antithetical to the assurance that
defines great acting. But Hawke’s
Oscar-nominated performance in
“Training Day” is memorable, in
part, because both the character
and the actor let you see them
sweat. As a rookie cop, the anxious
but stubbornly principled foil to
Denzel Washington’s charismatic
villain, Hawke made the character’s struggle his own and pushed
his way to greatness. He similarly
held his own opposite Philip Seymour Hoffman in the 2007 crime
drama “Before the Devil Knows
You’re Dead,” cast as a man even
more hopelessly in over his head.
It may have taken Hawke a
while to hit his stride, but the past
five years have amounted to nothing short of a midcareer renaissance. And even if we were to pass
over the lovely two features he directed, “Seymour: An Introduction” (2015) and “Blaze” (2018), it’s a
phase that seems both astonishingly rich and mystifyingly unsung.
Not many moviegoers saw him
play the jazz trumpeter Chet
Baker in “Born to Be Blue,” but it
was an exquisite piece of acting,
brilliant in its technique and
aching in its vulnerability. He followed that with “Maudie,” giving
startlingly abrasive life to Everett
Lewis, the husband of the folk artist Maud Lewis (Sally Hawkins).
Hawke took this foul-tempered
lout and turned him into the notso-better half of a tough but surprisingly tender love story.
Not exactly Céline and Jesse, to
be sure. The “Before” movies may
always feel like Hawke’s signature
achievement, not least because the
actor co-wrote two of them with
Linklater and Delpy, and thus had
a hand in shaping his character. In
watching Jesse grow older on
screen, we got to watch Hawke
grow older too, and it was undeniably poignant to see this callow
young dreamer brought down to
earth, his high spirits gradually
eroded by the doubts, regrets and
compromises of middle age.
Something similar plays out in
Linklater’s other great temporal
experiment, “Boyhood,” with
Hawke as a divorced dad struggling, over the course of 12 fleeting
years, to do right by his kids. You
could pair it with the recent “Juliet,
Naked,” starring Hawke as a
washed-up ’90s indie rocker coming to grips with his relational
shortcomings. It was a touching,
cheekily self-effacing turn: Here
was Hawke the brash, unstoppable
Gen-X icon, now a father and
(gulp) grandfather, doing his best
to muddle through and make
amends.
Hawke has appeared in his
share of commercial genre movies
too, though it’s telling that the
most successful ones have been
low-budget hits like “Sinister”
(2012) and “The Purge” (2013). A
major studio juggernaut is likely
not in his future. He suggested as
much in an August interview with
the Film Stage, in which he took a
jab at the proliferation of Hollywood superhero movies and how
they had skewed the audience’s
definitions of excellence.
He conceded that the much-acclaimed “Logan” (2017) was “a
great superhero movie” but argued
that it wasn’t a great movie in its
own right: “It’s not Bresson. It’s not
Bergman. But they talk about it
like it is.” My own superhero fatigue compelled me to nod in
agreement but also in appreciation: Wasn’t this, after all, another
quintessential Hawke performance? The passionate outspokenness, the fierce defense of cultural
literacy, the principled separation
of himself from the industry he had
so often regarded from an outsider’s perspective.
Many dismissed Hawke’s remarks as pretentious, but with regard to Robert Bresson and Ingmar Bergman, they could hardly
accuse him of not knowing of what
he spoke. “First Reformed” is,
among other things, a rich tapestry
of cinematic reference points, the
most significant of which are Bresson’s “Diary of a Country Priest”
(1951) and Bergman’s “Winter
Light” (1963), each a masterpiece
about a small-town clergyman
struggling with his flock. There are
shades of “Winter Light’s” Gunnar
Björnstrand in Ernst Toller: the
grim resignation, the frosty mien,
the difficulty mustering real faith
or compassion.
But it’s especially fascinating to
consider Hawke’s performance
through the eyes of Bresson, a filmmaker who sought a rigorous purity of emotion in every frame. To
that end, he cast nonprofessional
actors and ran them through multiple takes, as many as were required to drain any hint of artifice
from a performance.
Hawke, of course, is a professional actor, a skilled technician
and a world-famous celebrity;
there is only so far he can disappear into any given role. When you
first see him in “First Reformed,”
you’re struck by how different he
looks, with his haunted air, his
black robes and clean-shaven face,
absent the designer stubble that
has seemed to cling to him since
“Reality Bites.” There’s no mirth in
his expression or swagger in his
gait; he seems to have emptied
himself out.
But there is more going on here
than an actor submitting to an austere makeover or being cast successfully against type. (The role of
a sincere, thoughtful, authentically
doubt-ridden man of God is such a
rarity in American movies, you
have to wonder exactly whose type
he might be.) The key to Hawke’s
performance is that it feels even
more wrenching, more truthful,
when seen in light of his past work,
which is to say the emotional history we bring with us to every new
performance by an actor we love.
All about the art
Art, Hawke has noted, is his
true religion, which gives him a fascinating kinship with the role he’s
playing. I suspect he can identify
with a man whose place of work
and worship is regarded as an insignificant relic, one that draws a
mere fraction of the congregation
that attends the wealthy megachurch nearby. But Toller’s connections to that mega-church matter, and they make him a rare voice
of integrity and accountability
within a powerful, far-reaching and
frequently corrupt establishment.
Toller has lost a son, a choice
that feels like a devastating inversion of the cool-dad roles Hawke
has played over the years. And
there’s one moment when you
might swear you could see Hawke
the determined, know-it-all truth
teller spring rudely to life, when
Toller confronts his employer
(Cedric Kyles) and, in a rare moment of preachiness, accuses the
church of ignoring the dangers of
climate change and abandoning its
stewardship of God’s creation.
Toller doesn’t pretend to have
all the answers, but like any
thinker, or any artist, he knows
there’s value in asking the questions, in pushing past the boundaries of what’s comfortable. The
most thrilling revelation of “First
Reformed” is that in playing a man
who is utterly lost, Ethan Hawke
the actor has never seemed more
completely found.
justin.chang@latimes.com
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SU N DAY , JA N UA RY 6 , 2 019
L AT I M E S . C O M / CA L E N DA R
THE IMDB FILES VANESSA REDGRAVE
An actress of such deep impact
The Internet Movie Database is
one of the most popular websites
for tracking the work of actors,
filmmakers and others in the movie and TV world. We’ve asked some
actors to look at their own IMDB
page and comment on some of
their best-known roles.
By Emily Zemler
Vanessa Redgrave has crafted
an impressive career since beginning as a theater actress in the
1960s. Redgrave, 81, has starred in
everything from massive blockbusters like “Mission: Impossible”
to period dramas like “Howards
End,” accumulating Oscars, Emmys and Golden Globes along the
way.
She continues to perform on the
stage (she’s currently in “The Inheritance” in London) and is interested in projects that give her the
opportunity to work with “intelligent” directors, a trait she considers of highest importance in her
collaborators.
Redgrave’s latest film, “The Aspern Papers,” opening Friday, is an
adaptation of Henry James’ novella and also stars her daughter Joely Richardson (in the role Redgrave played in a 1984 London
stage revival). Being part of the
film offered Redgrave an opportunity to revisit the story from a new
angle in a new role. “I hadn’t played
the part before,” she notes. “I
didn’t know the character before,
and it’s quite a different thing seeing other actresses play a role than
playing it yourself.”
Here Redgrave looks back on
some of her most pivotal projects,
including “Atonement,” “Howards
End” and “Julia,” as well as some of
her more fun movies, like “Letters
to Juliet.”
20th Century Fox / Getty Images
VANESSA REDGRAVE, left, calls the 1977 movie “Julia,” in which she costarred with Jane Fonda, “a master class in filmmaking.”
‘The Aspern Papers’
Juliana Bordereau (2018)
“I first came across this story
when my father [Michael Redgrave] wrote a play [in 1959, based
on the novel]. I thought it was a
terrific play, and then I convinced
some West End producers to do it
with me, and I got Christopher
Reeve to play the American writer
and another wonderful actress
called Wendy Hiller. That was a big
success here in London, and I
always retained a love for that
story. It’s even more remarkable
that it’s based on true events. This
is a huge, rich bed filled with compost and plants of different generations, which I’ve been involved
with. Joely got me involved with
this production, which was directed by Julian Landais, and I
was so interested because I’d
played Miss Tina in two theater
productions. So I fell for it, and I’m
very glad I did.”
‘Call the Midwife’
Mature Jennifer Worth
(2012-2018)
“I hugely admire the producers,
Pippa Harris and Rosemary Tricklebank. Their attention to detail in
the social history of giving birth is
terrific.”
‘Letters to Juliet’
Claire (2010)
“This studio film is really delightful. Amanda Seyfried is a
Cohen Media Group
IN “THE ASPERN PAPERS,” Redgrave costars as Juliana
Bordereau. “I always retained a love for that story,” she says.
‘Atonement’
Older Briony (2007)
“Ian McEwan is a great writer,
and it’s a great novel. And, as
always, the director was important. Saoirse Ronan played the
younger version of my character
and she’s a superb actress. Joe
Wright is an extremely remarkable
director and young man. It was
WINNER
deal from him. I feel very lucky
that I’ve been in more than one of
his films. Merchant Ivory were a
phenomenon that I weep for, and
‘Howards End’ was, of course, a
Merchant Ivory film. So you had
E.M. Forster, the greatest English
writer of the 20th century, and
Ismail [Merchant] and James and
a fantastic cast. This is a bunch of
superlatives that was absolutely
so real.”
‘Mission: Impossible’
‘Julia’
Max (1996)
Julia (1977)
“The reason I wanted to be part
of this is very simple and can be
answered in one sentence: It
showed a British villain. That’s
what made me really want to do it.
It’s fun to play a British villain,
because there’s a lot of them, but
no one makes films about them.
Or they weren’t at that time.”
“I treasure the days I spent
with [director] Fred [Zinnemann], both before and during
and after we made this film. I
could write or speak for a long,
long time about Fred as a director
and as a man. I will tell you about
his words to me and Jane Fonda
the evening before we shot our
scene in the cafe. The scene was
not a long one, and it was very, very
well written by Alvin Sargent. Fred
told both Jane and me to make as
many cuts in our individual texts
as we could. The next morning, we
gave Fred our cuts, which the
script supervisor made notes of.
As far as I remember, Fred accepted both Jane’s and my cuts.
Then we filmed the scene — very
little discussion. In his final edit
with Walter Murch, Fred cut the
scene to something like the barest
minimum. All this was — and still
is — for me, a master class in filmmaking.”
‘Howards End’
exciting working with him. He’s
very intelligent in his thoughts,
about his scenes, how to direct
spatially. There’s a lot more to the
work of a director — at least the
great ones — than most people
who love film think. His choices of
rhythms and movements were
amazing. When I find a director
who is not only extremely aware, I
really connect.”
darling to work with. And I had the
good chance to get married [onscreen] to my true-life husband,
Franco Nero.”
Steven Spielberg’s studios. I
adored Mimi Leder — a very intelligent woman and a very warmhearted director. I also admired
Téa Leoni. It is sad and strange to
reflect on the fact that in the year
we filmed this story, I thought of
the film as belonging to the science-fiction genre of cinema. These
last few years, we have seen our
abuse of nature and the Earth
result in terrifying tidal waves.”
‘Deep Impact’
Robin Lerner (1998)
“I auditioned for this film at
Ruth Wilcox (1992)
“It’s one of the best novels in
the English language that has ever
been written. That was the first
thing. It wasn’t the first time I
worked with James Ivory — the
first time was ‘The Bostonians’ —
and he’s a very intelligent director.
I prize intelligence. It’s very rare.
Apart from the sheer expertise of
knowing how to make a film —
which is very important and something very few directors have —
James Ivory is an outstanding
director. ... He’s unerring in his
choices, and I’ve learned a great
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SU N DAY , JA N UA RY 6 , 2 019
L AT I M E S . C O M / CA L E N DA R
Photographs by
Marcus Yam Los Angeles Times
THIS HOME in Mexico City’s Roma neighborhood lent its exterior to depictions of Alfonso Cuarón’s childhood house. His youth in the area is the basis for “Roma.”
Roaming through boyhood
[Cuarón. from E1]
confused with “The Poseidon Adventure,” the hit U.S. disaster flick
from the previous year. “It ended
up being a Romanian film about a
boat called Poseidon,” he says with
a shrug. “I remember I got bored.”
Cuarón steps briskly into the
auditorium. “Come inside,” he
says. “Inside is where we shot some
scenes.”
The stage is framed by a set of
Neoclassical columns whose capitals were once daubed with 23-karat gold. “Cinemas were like this,”
he says reverently. “When I was a
kid I would love to arrive 10 to 15
minutes before the beginning of
the movie to see the curtain opening slowly and the expectation of
what you are going to see next.”
The Metropolitan has played a
significant role not only in
Cuarón’s life but in the life of his
lead character in “Roma.”
It is at this theater that Cleo, a
young indigenous woman working
for a family in Mexico City, experiences a sequence of fateful moments. It is a place of intimacy
where she and her lover steal kisses
in the back row as a group of fugitive comedians evade clumsy Nazis
on screen. It is also a place of uncertainty, where, sitting by herself, she
watches the credits roll as she
hopes that her lover will return in
the wake of difficult news.
Cuarón points at rows of seats
and the proscenium in the distance. “We were here and we shot
here,” he says, depositing himself
into a seat. “But we had to change
to 1970s seats — these are modern
seats.”
The Roma of old
If “Roma” is a story of family in
all of its complicated manifestations, it is also the story of Mexico
City in the 1970s — specifically, Colonia Roma, the neighborhood
that Cuarón inhabited as a youth, a
world away from today’s Roma,
subject of breathless food stories
and Mexico-is-the-new-Berlin articles about the art scene.
Roma was one of those early
20th century neighborhoods that
aspired to the European — in the
words of historian Enrique De
Anda, an attempt “to make of
Mexico, the Vienna or Paris of the
Americas.” The northern half was
grander, in a late 19th century,
Beaux Arts way. The southern half,
Roma Sur, where Cuarón’s family
lived, was more Modern and residential. By the ’70s, the neighborhood was fraying in parts, referred
to in jest as “Colonia Roña,” the director remembers. “It’s like a scab.”
Roma was comfortably middle
class — but a world away from the
wealthy residential power centers
of Polanco and El Pedregal to the
east.
For Mexico, it was a difficult era
generally, a time when the system
of one-party rule by the Institutional Revolutionary Party (known
as the PRI) was at its repressive
peak. Following the government
massacre of an untold number of
student protesters at Tlatelolco in
1968 — the time frame of “Roma,”
which takes place in 1970 and ’71 —
was a forbidding political period.
“It was very claustrophobic,”
says Cuarón of the era. “Even as a
child — and I had an idyllic childhood, I was living in a middle-class
bubble — it was a feeling of fear.”
In one scene in “Roma,” the
boys in the family casually discuss
an incident in which a soldier casu-
CUARÓN visits the lobby at Teatro Metropolitan, a boyhood haunt. He shot movie scenes there.
ally shot a boy who threw a water
balloon at a military jeep. Later in
the movie, Cuarón weaves in the
story of El Halconazo, a massacre
of student protesters by paramilitaries during the feast of Corpus
Christi in 1971.
It was a time when even culture
was suspect — especially rock music. Avándaro, a Woodstock-style
concert held at a racetrack on the
outskirts of Mexico City in September 1971 was described as “sexual
degeneracy, filth, hair and blood”
in one media dispatch. “It was debauchery! Debauchery going on!”
says Cuarón, mocking the hysterical tone of the news coverage.
“They felt that all of these young
people together was dangerous.”
For the director, film provided a
vital escape. When he was a teenager, Cuarón made it a mission to a
watch a movie in every Mexico City
theater. There was Cine Estadio,
with its buoyant Modernist sign
and a going rate of 4 pesos for a
double feature. A few blocks away
beckoned the old Cine Gloria, with
its bright sign and its threadbare
seats. Farther north was El Cine
México, where in the mid-1970s he
and a friend turned up for a screening of “Más Negro que la Noche”
(“Blacker Than Night”), a lowbudget Mexican horror movie involving several doomed hotties
and a possessed black cat. Cuarón
never got to see the end of the picture. About two-thirds of the way
through, the friend produced an
actual black cat from his backpack
and released it from his balcony
seat into the theater below.
“It was amazing the amount of
shouting going on,” Cuarón recalls
with a laugh. “I didn’t go to the
movies with that guy again!”
Cuarón can’t be entirely sure if
he made it to every last theater in
the Mexican capital — “I think I
achieved it,” he says confidently. If
not, his obsessive devotion to the
movies brought him awfully close.
Film also serves as an escape
hatch from realities both political
and domestic in “Roma.”
In one scene, the family heads to
the cinema to watch John Sturges’
1969 space thriller “Marooned.” In
another, Cleo nestles in with her
love interest before “La Grande
Vardouille,”
French
director
Gérard Oury’s 1966 comedic escape caper — a film about escape
for characters seeking their own.
A childhood rebuilt
Making “Roma” required Cuarón not only to reconstruct the
physical Mexico of the ’70s, but it
compelled him to reconstruct social and political circumstances
that, as a white, middle-class man,
he’d been privileged to ignore: the
physical isolation of serving as livein help, the round-the-clock schedule, the classism and racism, the
grief a woman quietly holds in a
world where los patrones always
come first.
If Mexico was a place plagued
by a sense of isolation and repression in the 1970s, the conditions for
a character like Cleo were magnified. (The character, played by Yalitza Aparicio, is based on the director’s real-life nanny, Liboria
Rodriguez, an indigenous woman
of Mixtec origin who lived with the
family from the time Cuarón was
an infant.) Cleo’s world, to a large
degree, is confined to the four walls
of the house she inhabits and
maintains — but of which she is not
fully a part.
“The house is pretty much a
character,” Cuarón says. “It’s a
house that is pretty big but still a
bit claustrophobic. … You have the
parakeets that are in a cage, you
have a dog that longs to get out.
The house is always containing
everything.”
The house is based on Cuarón’s
own home as a boy: a Modern 1930s
structure that bears elements of
Art Deco but also of Latin American colonial design: namely, an impassive, almost unwelcome facade
that conceals a pleasant dwelling
and interior courtyard within.
It’s a design that functions as a
microcosm of Mexican society:
“You have the spaces that are defined by hierarchy, class,” Cuarón
says.
The family’s dwelling is roomy
and dappled with light; the narrow
spots allotted to the housekeepers
are not. The family’s living room is
graced by a wide, curving staircase; the steps that Cleo takes to
the roof do the laundry (by hand)
are rickety metal. The children inhabit their own spacious bed-
rooms; Cleo and her fellow housekeeper, Adela, share a tiny cell off
the patio, which also harbors ironing and laundry. If the family’s
spaces channel a certain middleclass,
intellectual
aspiration
toward modernity, the staff ’s quarters evoke the feudal.
Moreover, the home’s principal
spaces are ones that Cleo occupies
only furtively.
“She’s always silent except in
the kitchen or in her room,” Cuarón
says. “She is silent except for si, no,
yes. Then she goes into the kitchen
and she talks and she’s a person.”
The one space that housekeeper and family do share is the
internal patio. In “Roma,” that
space is also the place to which the
family relegates the dog and into
which their absentee dad wedges
his oversize Ford Galaxy.
“It’s our social spaces,” says
Cuarón. “Our social spaces, they’re
supposed to be common ground,
but who really takes care of them?”
Cuarón was determined to
shoot “Roma” not on sets but in
real-deal architecture from the era
so that the feel of Mexico City — of
Colonia Roma — could imbue every frame.
“The marching orders at the beginning was that everything was
going to be shot in the place where
the actions took place,” he explains
enthusiastically.
“Then reality hit.” He sighs.
The interiors of the house he
grew up in had been remodeled beyond recognition, so he settled for a
similar home in a nearby colonia.
The exteriors, however, he shot on
the same block his family inhabited in the 1970s: Calle Tepeji has
changed little in the intervening
decades. It is still solidly middle
class. And it is still lined with the
Midcentury Modern and Art Deco
homes that were popular in Mexico
in the post-Revolution era — designs that served as symbols of
progress and enlightenment.
On a late morning, after my interview with Cuarón, I visit the
street. The windows at No. 21,
where the director lived as a boy,
are open. A housekeeper is mopping the floors.
Throughout “Roma,” Cuarón
employs architecture in symbolic
ways.
There is a pan of the gritty
rooftop where Cleo spends hours
doing laundry, a world away from
the family’s comfortable quarters
just below. On a visit to a hacienda
owned by friends of the family she
works for, Cleo descends a staircase that leads from the world of
los patrones (the owners) to a hidden party for the workers below.
When Señora Sofía (played by
Marina de Tavira) drives Cleo to a
doctor’s appointment at the medical center in Mexico City, the camera comes to rest on a broad bas relief created by esteemed Mexican
artist José Chávez Morado in 1958.
The piece (which still stands) is a
study of Mexican medicine
through the ages, with a pair of
panels, at left, that celebrate indigenous medicine. The venerative
treatment outside could not be
more at odds with the reality inside: a hospital where workingclass (and, therefore, largely indigenous) women endure the pains of
labor in chilly, cavernous rooms.
It is architecture that speaks to
what Cuarón sees as the hypocrisies of the country’s political leaders.
“There was a constant bombardment of ideology, the nacionalismo revolucionario [revolutionary nationalism] of the PRI
with these ideas about what mexicanismo was,” he recalls. “It’s a
pride about our indigenous roots,
but the indigenous community is
completely ignored and marginalized.”
It’s really all about love
We step out of the Metropolitan
into the hazy Mexico City daylight.
Cuarón is, these days, highly recognizable in Mexico City — his face
materializing on television talk
shows and on magazine covers on
newsstands. An elderly gentleman
approaches with hand extended.
“Un orgullo para México,” he says.
“The pride of Mexico.”
As we walk down Avenida Independencia to his waiting car,
Cuarón makes it clear that
“Roma,” ultimately, isn’t just about
symbols. It is profoundly personal.
“I’m talking,” he says, “about one of
the humans or one of the people
that I love the most.”
He refers to Libo, the nickname
he employs for Rodriguez, the
woman who raised him, whose life
served as the basis for Cleo’s story,
and to whom he dedicates his film.
“It was a whole reconsideration,” Cuarón says. “Not only seeing all of these layers of her but, inevitably, the immense pain that it
gave me that I had never stopped
to consider those things — and in
someone that I love.”
Years of “endless conversations” with Rodriguez led to
“Roma,” says Cuarón, conversations in which they covered subjects both life-changing and mundane — like what she did with her
Sundays off, the one day a week
that belonged entirely to her.
Most weekends, that day would
consist of a sandwich with friends,
a visit to the park and a jaunt to the
Metropolitan for a movie.
“I would ask her, ‘Which kind of
movies?’ ” recalls Cuarón. “And she
would
say,
‘Whatever
was
playing.’ ”
In the darkened hall of the Cine
Metropolitan, as the curtain came
up over the screen, she too found
her escape.
carolina.miranda@latimes.com
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E11
E12
SU N DAY , JA N UA RY 6 , 2 019
L AT I M E S . C O M / CA L E N DA R
TELEVISION
Making a superior ‘Series’
Director Barry Sonnenfeld
on the Netflix adaptation
of ‘Unfortunate Events’
and its film predecessor.
ROBERT LLOYD
TELEVISION CRITIC
Believe me when I tell you that
one of the great works of television
art — yes, art — over the last two
years is the Netflix adaptation of “A
Series of Unfortunate Events,” 13
alliteratively titled volumes of suspense, adventure, terror, love, obsession, satire, absurdity and vocabulary lessons written by Daniel
Handler under the name Lemony
Snicket. (Snicket is also the story’s
narrator, and a quasi-character
just outside it, driven like the Ancient Mariner to relate his tale.)
The third and final season began
streaming on New Year’s Day.
The series concerns the Baudelaire orphans — Violet (who invents things), Klaus (who reads
and retains a great deal) and
Sunny (a baby with a talent for biting) — and the menacing Count
Olaf, whose great dream is to separate them from their inheritance
and throughout the series assumes disguises only the children
see through. Horrible things happen, mostly. The first three novels
were adapted for the big screen in
2004, with Jim Carrey as Olaf. It
was a disappointment to this fan of
the books and, I assume, others as
no further films arrived to continue
the tale.
It turns out the series was just
waiting for the age of streaming
television. Where the film compressed three books into less than
two hours, the television version,
which began in 2017 and stars Neil
Patrick Harris, has adapted each
at two-part feature length, filling
out and refining the novels’ mythology. Most important, it has
Barry Sonnenfeld (“Get Shorty,”
“Men in Black,” “The Tick,” “Pushing Daisies”) as show-runner,
executive producer and primary
director, not to mention Handler
writing the screenplays. It feels definitive and looks fantastic.
Both Sonnenfeld and Handler
were originally involved in the movie; both were let go from it. Sonnenfeld, with whom I spoke recently by
phone from Telluride, Colo., where
he has a home, calls their history
bringing the novels to the screen a
“series of unfortunate events that
ended well.” The series, he says,
has been “the best experience I’ve
ever had working in the film or television business.”
Joseph Lederer Netf lix
DIRECTOR Barry Sonenfeld, left, and star Neil Patrick Harris, in Olaf costume and makeup, on the set of “Unfortunate Events.”
viewed a lot of twins, but they just
didn’t look right. And Presley
[Smith] had the right look and the
right personality. We took a
chance and decided we’d go with
one baby, which is always hard to
do, and she turned out great.
She turned into a good little
actress.
I know! In the third season
she’s saying words. When she says
to Mr. Poe [the incompetent executor of the Baudelaire estate,
played by K. Todd Freeman], “I
despise you,” it’s just … fantastic.
Where does your history with ‘A
Series of Unfortunate Events’
begin?
I had read the books to my
daughter, Chloe, when she was a
kid, and at some point she moved
on and I didn’t. I would say the
second half of the series I read
without her. What attracted me to
the books was that they posit that
children are capable and smart,
and all adults, whether they mean
well or are villains, are equally
ineffectual and horrible — which
could have described my parents.
They meant well, but they were
horrible.
Tell me about working with
Daniel Handler.
Daniel’s really funny and really
dry; we have a similar dark sense
of humor. He has a much bigger
vocabulary than I do. We both felt
the movie was more overproduced
[relative to] what we wanted to do
on the show. I went to Netflix and
said, “I want to shoot this show
entirely on the stage; I want everything to be controlled, from the
skies, to the colors, to the water.”
We didn’t want a huge, loud production; we wanted something
that was much more intimate. It’s
dry, it’s flat. The comedy is never
meant to be jokey so much as
allowing the audience to find the
joke. We don’t try to sugarcoat
things — people die in the show.
This isn’t to say good or bad, but
it’s the opposite of a Disney show.
It’s not bright, it’s not colorful, it’s
not sing-songy, it’s not happy. It’s
dark, it’s dreary. The palette is very
restricted.
The other thing we wanted was
that Lemony should be an onscreen narrator. I thought the
character was not served well by
the movie — which was basically
Jude Law at a typewriter. [Our
Lemony] would never be in the
same chronological time as the
action, but he was telling the story
and could be physically in the
scenes. That was a huge plus. And
even though I had worked with
[Patrick] Warburton on “The
Tick” and “Men in Black II” and
“Big Trouble,” he was actually
Daniel’s idea for Lemony. He
brings so much to the show emotionally and tonally; he can say
really funny things without you
ever thinking, “This guy’s trying to
be funny.”
Eike Schroter Netf lix
USMAN ALLY , from left, Neil Patrick Harris and Lucy Punch as the villains , respectively, the
Hook-Handed Man, Count Olaf and Esmé Squalor in Netflix’s “A Series of Unfortunate Events.”
But that character is also so sad.
He’s so wounded.
He’s incredibly sad, he’s incredibly wounded, and one of the
things that makes me cry every
time I see the third season is the
resolution of Warburton’s character. We don’t want to give that
away, but I will say it so bookends
the three seasons — it was not in
the books, but it feels like it was
always supposed to be that way. I
think what we’ve managed to do,
while still remaining mysterious
and subtle and never spoon-feeding information, is to fill out a lot of
questions that were never resolved
in the books and resolve them in
an organic way that feels like, “I
remember that.” Without becoming overly commercial or wrapping
everything up, I think our ending
ultimately is more satisfying.
How did you settle on Neil
Patrick Harris for Count Olaf?
Neil was also Daniel’s idea.
What’s funny about that is soon
after I had the meeting with Netflix — I hadn’t been hired yet, but I
felt the meeting went very well —
my wife and child and I were having Thanksgiving with Kelly Ripa
and Mark Consuelos in Manhattan, and among the guests were
Neil and his husband, David
Burtka, and their kids. And I sat
opposite Neil, and I said, “Hey,
Neil, we’ve never met and I think
you’d be great in a show I can’t tell
you anything about because I
don’t have the job yet, but if I get
the job, I’d love for you to be ... the
guy.” And then I got the job and we
were discussing who would play
Olaf and Daniel said, “What about
Neil Patrick Harris?” I said, “Perfect, I’ve recently met him and
offered him the job.”
He’s extraordinary. Not only is
he playing Count Olaf, but he’s
playing Count Olaf playing
Shirley, Captain Sham, whatever
— and he’s brilliant, and so funny
and smart. He wore a different
cologne as each character; you
always knew when he was coming
onstage ’cause you could smell the
over-cologned Neil Patrick Harris
as the stage door opened.
What about him made you feel he
was right?
Part of it was that he feels
equally at home in television, in
movies and onstage; he could be
stylized, he could be big, but he
would always be real — real and
theatrical at the same time is hard
to find. And Olaf ’s character is all
over the place; he’s got to be really
mean and really funny and sort of
a failure but a threat. The first
episode we ever did, “The Bad
Beginning,” there’s a scene early
on where Olaf slaps Klaus across
the face; we did several takes and
Neil kept trying to show remorse. I
said, “Neil, we’ve got to do one
where there’s no remorse.” And
Neil said, “Well, I feel bad about
that, I just hit the kid.” I said, “Olaf
is a buffoon, but our heroes are
only as heroic as our villain is
villainous, and this is one of the
few chances we have to say to the
audience, and to the Baudelaire
kids, this guy’s dangerous.”
Was it hard casting the
Baudelaire children?
Yes and no. I had worked with
Malina Weissman on a movie
called “Nine Lives,” and she totally
got my direction, which is always,
“Flatter, faster.” I find if actors talk
really quickly, it doesn’t give them
time to act, and I hate to watch
acting onscreen. In fact, my wife
always has to sit to my right and
hold my right arm down so I can’t
wave at the screen to make them
talk faster. I only got through half
an episode of “Mad Men” ’cause I
couldn’t believe they were allowed
to talk so slowly. So Malina was
easy, because I knew she could be
flat and fast and not like a kid
actor.
What’s really hard is to find
male actors because there seem to
be fewer boys who want to go into
acting, and often when they do,
they want to sort of overact. We
had a really hard time finding
Klaus; Louis Hynes put himself on
tape in London — he’s British. He
had never acted before except an
occasional school play or something, and we flew him from London to L.A. and worked with Malina and Louis for about an hour
and decided at the very last minute — we were heavily into building
sets — that he was our guy. And
then Sunny was hard; we inter-
The show is very stylized but very
human and emotional at the
same time; can you talk about the
relationship of something that
looks quite unreal and fantastic
and at the same time gets right to
matters of the heart?
I think it’s specific to my personality. Or my tone. Whether it
was “Pushing Daisies” or “Addams
Family” or “Men in Black,” I love to
create specific worlds yet not let
the viewer feel they’re outside of
the world; I like to invite them in.
This sounds technical, but I think
the fact that I use very wide angle
lenses makes a really big difference. On the one hand, wide angle
lenses are very stylized, but it also
means the camera is near the
actor. I think the audience feels
they’re there in the scene and
therefore more emotionally engaged. It’s the opposite of what, for
instance, Tony and Ridley Scott
do, and did; they always use very,
very, very long lenses, telephoto
lenses, and their shows are very
beautiful. But somehow the audience unconsciously knows they’re
far away, that they’re observing
the scene as opposed to participating in it.
Do you have a picture of your
audience?
Netflix gives us no information.
I have no idea who’s watching the
show. I have no idea what percentage of the people watching the
show have read the books. I had no
idea if we should have more action,
or more comedy, or they all love
Mr. Poe, we need more of that — no
idea. They’re fantastic to work
with, they were so supportive and
so great, but they just don’t give
the filmmakers any information
about how well the show’s doing,
not doing, who’s watching.
Is it freeing in any way not to have
to think about that?
No. I’m a commercial director
— I want to please the audience. I
want to please them on my terms,
but if I knew that 80% of the audience said, “We want more action,”
we would have found a way.
If everyone had said, “We want
more Presley” — well, of course
they’d want more Presley. It’s not a
bad thing to know who your
audience is.
robert.lloyd@latimes.com
Twitter: @LATimesTVLloyd
S U N DAY , JA N UA RY 6 , 2 019
L AT I M E S . C O M / CA L E N DA R
Photographs by
E13
Jay L. Clendenin Los Angeles Times
DAN GOOR , left, co-creator of “Brooklyn Nine-Nine,” and cast member Andy Samberg are united in making their comedy’s switch to new home NBC seamless.
Comic cops aim to please
[‘Brooklyn,’ from E1]
It’s just after 11 a.m. on a day in
early November and production is
underway at the show’s precinct
set at the CBS Studio Center lot in
Studio City. One would be forgiven
for thinking those fraught days in
May were a weird fever dream.
The show’s ensemble cast
members — Andy Samberg, Melissa Fumero, Stephanie Beatriz,
Terry Crews, Joe Lo Truglio, Andre
Braugher, Dirk Blocker and Joel
McKinnon Miller — are back at it,
gathered in the precinct’s briefing
room as their characters learn
about a new he said/she said case in
what will be the show’s #MeToo episode. Beatriz, making her TV directorial debut, shuffles in and out
of the scene as her character, Det.
Rosa Diaz, while also reviewing
footage. At the same time, Samberg is coming up with ad-libs for
the final beats of the scene — suffice to say, when you have the group
talking about a broken male sex organ, things get colorful and absurd.
ALONG with the usual hilarity, a new season of “Brooklyn Nine-Nine” features a #MeToo episode.
Real life or trippin’?
Off-camera, when the topic of
the show’s summer fiasco is
brought up, it’s clear that “Brooklyn Nine-Nine’s” boomerang from
death is still a bundle of confusion,
sadness and ultimate joy.
For Samberg, who is also an
executive producer on the show, it
resulted in some pretty funny text
chains: “I have two texts in a row
from people a few hours apart
where they go, ‘Dude, I’m so sorry,’
to, ‘Never mind, congratulations.’ ”
“It was so surreal,” is how Crews
(Sgt. Terrance “Terry” Jeffords),
describes the situation. “I’ve had a
rental car stolen. That’s the only
thing I can really compare it to. I
was like: ‘What is happening? Is
this real life or am I trippin’?’ ”
Now back in the swing of things,
Fumero, who plays Sgt. Amy Santiago, says there are moments
when it feels a bit like a do-over —
pointing out how NBC’s social media team has been working overtime to promote the show’s move
to the network. Adding to the display of confidence, Samberg is cohosting Sunday’s Golden Globe
Awards, alongside “Killing Eve’s”
Sandra Oh, on the network.
“It’s almost like we’re a new
show,” Fumero says, “but we’ve
been doing it for so long. I’m definitely trying to check myself more
to be just really present and enjoy it
because who knows? Who knows
how much longer we have?”
So what to do in the meantime?
“We want to make sure people
who like the show still really like it,”
Samberg says. “As far as ratings
and all that other stuff, it’s completely out of our control. All we can
do is show up for press, make the
show as good as we possibly can
and hope that everyone keeps
watching it.”
Goor realizes there will be a lot
of attention on how the show performs when it makes its NBC debut. But, he says, all he has control
over is to keep making the show
that fans rallied hard to save.
“I don’t wanna let people down,”
he says. “What NBC has said, and
what our philosophy has been, is
just to keep doing what we’re doing, to make more of the same
show. At the point at which we were
THE CAST of “Brooklyn Nine-Nine” gathers in Studio City in advance of its debut on NBC. Foreground: Stephanie Beatriz, Andy Samberg, center, and Joe Lo Truglio. Terry Crews, from left,
Chelsea Peretti, Andre Braugher, Melissa Fumero, Joel McKinnon Miller and Dirk Blocker.
picked up by NBC, we’d made 112
episodes. So we know how to make
those shows and that’s what we’re
continuing to do … we still have
budgets and production realities,
so it’s not like we could suddenly
start shooting an episode in Australia … although, if Australia
wants us to come there and pays
for it, we’d love to.”
So yes, a #MeToo episode in
keeping with the show’s practice of
occasionally taking on topical issues with its brand of comedy is on
the docket. Goor says the writers
are also considering a refugee or
undocumented episode.
But that’s not to say the show
isn’t evolving. Chelsea Peretti, who
plays caustic administrative assistant Gina Linetti, will not appear as a series regular in the new
season. And the show will play outside the bounds of its traditional
format, with an episode set entirely
in a crime scene. And of course, the
show also has the marriage between Amy and Jake to consider after last season’s wedding finale.
“We’re not really forcing anything with them,” Goor says. “They
have the kinds of hiccups and conversations that newlyweds have.
There’s not necessarily a special
arc for them.”
Crime with a twist
Created by “Parks and Recreation” vets Mike Schur and Goor,
“Brooklyn Nine-Nine” was developed as an antidote of sorts to the
high-stakes cop dramas that are
fixtures of prime-time. It centers
on Samberg’s Det. Jake Peralta, a
goof who is also really good at his
job, but audiences have also connected with his co-workers, in all
their nutty and eccentric glory.
It made its debut on Fox to decent ratings in fall 2013. In a show of
confidence, the series nabbed the
plum post-Super Bowl slot in its
freshman outing — that season
also yielded two Golden Globe
awards (TV series, comedy or musical and actor in a comedy for
Samberg). But it never drew a
broad audience and scheduling
moves didn’t help. With Fox trimming its programming lineup this
season, particularly among live-action comedies, to make room for its
NFL deal for “Thursday Night
Football” — gobbling up more than
30 hours of network time — “Brooklyn Nine-Nine” got dumped.
But the thing about TV these
days is there are plenty of other fish
in the sea.
A show being canned by one
network and rescued by another,
while still rare, is not new. But the
chances for a show beating death
are more likely today with more
outlets clamoring for content and
the premium on loyal audiences —
particularly for streaming services
that aren’t as reliant on ratings and
traditional TV advertising. (“Lucifer,” another Fox casualty from last
season with a devoted fan base, is
headed to Netflix this year.)
For Goor, the most eye-opening
aftershock of the whole ordeal was
seeing fans galvanize. He always
knew the show had fans — many of
which watch episodes online —
but, he says, when you’re on the air
for a long time, you can lose sight of
what exactly that means. The
show’s cancellation elicited a
strong reaction online and within
two hours of the news both “Brook-
lyn Nine-Nine” and “Brooklyn 99”
were trending on Twitter, with fans
pushing for the show to be saved.
“There wasn’t an occasion for
people to rally,” Goor says. “But
with this occasion — getting canceled — so many people came forward, in America and all around
the world, and it was really like the
most heartwarming and wonderful part of the whole thing. My wife
was like, ‘Best-case scenario, they
don’t pick up the show, you get to
see your family again, and you get
to know people liked it.”
But there was another bestcase scenario: a reprieve. There
was a scramble by Universal Television to find “Brooklyn NineNine” another home, with Netflix,
Hulu (its streaming home) and
TBS (the basic cable home to the
show’s reruns) in the mix as suitors. In the end, keeping the show all
in the family and moving it to NBC
was the more profitable move for
the network and studio’s parent
company, Comcast.
And it brings another Schur
comedy into NBC’s fold, joining
“The Good Place” and the upcoming “Abby’s.” It’s also a homecoming for Samberg, who was a cast
member on “Saturday Night Live”
for six seasons.
“It feels like this is a very familial
piece for us,” says Tracey Pakosta,
who co-heads the network’s
scripted programming and helped
develop the comedy. “Now that we
have it, we’re so excited it’s here. It
almost feels like it’s always been
part of the network.”
Former NBC entertainment
chief Bob Greenblatt, who left his
perch at the network last fall, said
at the time of the show’s save: “Ever
since we sold this show to Fox I’ve
regretted letting it get away, and
it’s high time it came back to its
rightful home.”
With it all said and done, Samberg says there’s no bitterness
toward Fox.
“They were the ones who picked
us up when NBC didn’t initially, so
they gave us a great, huge initial
push. They put us on after the Super Bowl, and it was a really nice
time there and the show exists because of that,” he says. “I have
nothing bad to say.”
As for Goor, if there’s a lesson to
be learned by the whole thing, and
he says there are many, two spring
easily to mind.
“Lesson 1, as Mike Schur has always said, our job is just to put
down our head and make the best
show we can make and not worry
about the externals and those
things take care of themselves
when you make the best show you
can make.”
And lesson 2?
“This was not a learning kind of
lesson but a verification of a lesson:
More people might like your show
or respond to your show or be
moved by this thing that you’ve
created than you know and so you
can’t just judge your success by the
metric of the overnight rating or
whatever. There are deeper ways in
which a show can be appreciated.”
So maybe in the grand scheme
of things, that bathroom call
wasn’t so terrible.
yvonne.villarreal@latimes.com
Twitter: @villarrealy
E14
SU N DAY , JA N UA RY 6 , 2 019
L AT I M E S . C O M / CA L E N DA R
THE GUIDE
Creed Bratton
MOVIES
Openings
Compiled by Kevin Crust
and Matt Cooper
F R I DAY
Against the Clock A former CIA operative investigates after her husband, a
CIA recruit, is injured. With Dianna
Agron, Andy Garcia, Justin Bartha,
James Frain. Written and directed by
and co-starring Mark Polish. NR.
Alone in the Dead of Night A tormented art student faces horrors
while at home in her apartment. With
Katie O’Hagan. Written by Matty
Castano, Kristine Castano. Directed
by Matty Castano. (1:35) NR.
Anthem of a Teenage Prophet A teen
isolates himself are foretelling his
best friend’s death. With Cameron
Monaghan, Peyton List, Grayson Gabriel, Juliette Lewis. Written by
Joshua Close, Andy Matic, Elisha
Matic; based on a novel by Joanne
Proulx. Directed by Robin Hays.
(1:25) NR.
Ashes in the Snow When her family is
deported to Siberia by Stalin during
WWII, a teenager is sustained by her
passion for art. With Bel Powley, Martin Wallstrom. Written by Ben York
Jones; based on a novel by Ruta
Sepetys. Directed by Marius Markevicius. (1:38) NR.
The Aspern Papers An editor travels
to 19th-century Italy seeking love letters written by a famous poet in this
adaptation of Henry James’ novella.
With Jonathan Rhys-Meyers, Joely
Richardson, Vanessa Redgrave. Written by Julien Landais, Jean Pavans,
Hannah Bhuiya. Directed by Landais.
(1:30) R.
Buffalo Boys Two Javanese brothers
forced to flee to the American West as
children return home to avenge the
murder of their father, the sultan.
With Yoshi Sudarso, Ario Bayu. Written by Mike Wiluan, Raymond Lee,
Rayya Makarim. Directed by Wiluan.
In Indonesian and English with English subtitles. (1:42) NR.
A Dog’s Way Home A canine travels
400 miles to reunite with her human.
With Ashley Judd, Jonah Hauer-King,
Alexandra Shipp, Wes Studi, Edward
James Olmos and the voice of Bryce
Dallas Howard. Written by W. Bruce
Cameron, Cathryn Michon; based on
the book by Cameron. Directed by
Charles Martin Smith. (1:36) PG.
James Dittiger Sony Pictures
and social climber in director Stanley
Kubrick’s visually ravishing 1975 film
version of Thackeray’s 19th-century
novel. American Cinematheque, Aero
Theatre, 1328 Montana Ave., Santa
Monica. Thu., 7:30 p.m. $12. www.a
mericancinemathequecalendar.com.
The Helen Borgers Theatre, 4250 Atlantic Blvd., Long Beach. Fri.-Sat., 8
p.m.; next Sun., 2 p.m.; ends Jan. 20.
$12.50. (562) 997-1494.
Trump in Space A future descendant
of the current president tries to find
humanity a new home among the
stars in this musical sci-fi satire. The
Second City Hollywood Studio Theatre. 6560 Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood.
Fri., 8 p.m.; ends April 26. $12. (323)
464-8542.
Pine Flat
The Broad Museum presents an off-site screening of Sharon
Lockhart’s 16mm art film from 2005,
inspired by the L.A.-based artist’s
portraits of children in a rural California town. REDCAT, 631 W. 2nd St.,
L.A. Sat., 3 p.m. $12. www.redcat.org.
Twelfth Night, or What You Will Theatre Palisades stages Shakespeare’s
romantic farce about twins separated
by a shipwreck. The Pierson Playhouse, 941 Temescal Canyon Road,
Pacific Palisades. Fri.-Sat. 8 p.m.;
next Sun. 2 p.m.; ends Feb. 17. $20, $22.
(310) 454-1970.
Lesbian Love in Shorts A selection of
lesbian-themed short films from the
2018 festival circuit. Los Angeles
LGBT Center’s Renberg Theatre, 1125
N. McCadden Pl., Hollywood. Sat., 7
p.m. $30, $50. www.lalgbtcenter.org.
Wild & Scenic Film Festival Twohour showcase features short films
about nature. Warner Grand Theatre,
478 W. 6th St., San Pedro. Next Sun., 4
p.m. $10, $15. www.pvplc.org.
The Diary of Anne Frank A predominately Latinx cast performs a stage
adaptation of the true story of a
young Jewish girl and her family hiding from the Nazis in an Amsterdam
attic during WWII. The Dorie Theatre
at The Complex, 6476 Santa Monica
Blvd., L.A. Sat., 8 p.m.; next Sun., 3
p.m.; ends Feb. 24. $30, $35. (800) 8383006.
THEATER
I Go Somewhere Else Return engagement of Inda Craig-Galván’s drama
about a young woman’s relationship
with her deeply troubled mother. Atwater Village Theatre, 3269 Casitas
Ave., L.A. Sat., 8 p.m.; next Sun., 4
p.m.; ends Jan. 27. $25, $30. (800) 8383006.
Capsule review by Charles
McNulty (C.M.). Compiled
by Matt Cooper.
Openings
Solofest 2019 Seventh-annual show-
seven friends play a game at a dinner
party in this comedy. With Belén
Rueda, Eduard Fernández. Written
by Jorge Guerricaechevarría, Álex de
la Iglesia. Directed by de la Iglesia. In
Spanish with English subtitles. (1:37)
NR.
case features solo writer-performers
from around the world. Whitefire
Theatre, 13500 Ventura Blvd., Sherman Oaks. Various dates and times;
now through March 15. $15-$30.
www.whitefiretheatre.com.
Independence, The True Story of Dr.
Mary Walker Kathie Barnes portrays
the Civil War surgeon, women’s rights
advocate and Congressional Medal of
Honor winner; part of “Portraits of
Humanity 2, a Solo Series.” Theatre
West, 3333 Cahuenga Blvd., L.A. Sat.,
8 p.m. $25. (323) 851-7977.
Hear Word! Naija Woman Talk True
A scientist resorts to extreme measures after losing his family
in a car crash. With Keanu Reeves, Alice Eve, Emily Alyn Lind. Written by
Chad St. John; story by Stephen
Hamel. Directed Jeffrey Nachmanoff.
(1:47) PG-13.
Nigerian women shares stories of
struggle and triumph in this ensemble work; part of the Off Center
Festival. Segerstrom Center for the
Arts, Samueli Theater, 600 Town Center Drive, Costa Mesa. Thu.-Sat., 8
p.m. $25. (714) 556-2787.
Rust Creek
The Manor — Murder and Madness
at Greystone Theatre 40 presents the
A young woman faces a
terrifying ordeal in the backwoods of
Kentucky. With Hermione Corfield,
Jay Paulson. Written by Julie Lipson;
story by Stu Pollard. Directed by Jen
McGowan. (1:48) R.
Sgt. Will Gardner Max Martini wrote,
directed and stars in this drama
about a troubled Iraq War veteran
who undertakes a cross-country journey. With Dermot Mulroney, Elisabeth Röhm, Robert Patrick, Lily
Rabe, Gary Sinise. (2:05) NR.
Tall Tales A traveling cricket finds adventure in this animated tale. With
the voices of Kate Mara, Justin Long.
Written by Antoon Krings, Arnaud
Delelande, Christel Gonnard; based
on a book by Krings. Directed by
Krings, Delelande. (1:28) PG.
The Upside A paralyzed billionaire
hires an ex-con to be his caretaker.
With Bryan Cranston, Kevin Hart,
Nicole Kidman. Written by Jon Hartmere; based on the 2011 French film
“The
Intouchables”
by
Éric
Toldedano and Olivier Nakache. Directed by Neil Burger. (2:05) PG-13.
Events and revivals
Compiled by Matt Cooper
LACMA Tuesday Matinees Elvis
Presley plays a singing ex-con who
gets a shot at stardom in the 1957 vehicle “Jailhouse Rock.” Los Angeles
County Museum of Art, Bing Theater,
5905 Wilshire Blvd., L.A. Tue., 1 p.m.
$2, $4. www.lacma.org.
Barry Lyndon
Ryan O’Neal stars as
the titular 18th-century Irish rogue
ROYAL
West L.A.
for original short plays. Little Fish
Theatre, 777 Centre St., San Pedro.
Thu.-Sat., 8 p.m.; ends Feb. 3. $15-$28.
(310) 512-6030.
FOR
MOVIES AND
SHOWTIMES
(310)4775581
John Adams tries
to persuade the other Founding Fathers to sign the Declaration of Independence in Sherman Edwards’
Tony-winning tale. La Mirada Theatre for the Performing Arts, 14900 La
Mirada Blvd., La Mirada. Sat., 8 p.m.;
next Sun., 2 p.m.; ends Feb. 3. $15-$84;
discounts available. (562) 944-9801.
of the hit 1980s-90s sitcom returns;
with Jackie Beat, Sherry Vine, Sam
Pancake, Drew Droege and special
guest Alec Mapa. Cavern Club Theater, 1920 Hyperion Ave., L.A. Fri.-Sat.,
8 and 10 p.m.; next Sun., 7 and 9 p.m;
ends Jan. 20. $35. (800) 838-3006.
Smart Love An MIT student brings a
surprise home with him in the West
Coast premiere of Brian Letscher’s
comedy about artificial intelligence.
Pacific Resident Theatre, 703 Venice
Blvd., Venice. Sat., 8 p.m.; next Sun., 3
p.m.; ends Feb. 3. $25-$34; discounts
available. (310) 822-8392.
Jocasta: A Tragedy The Ghost Road
Company stages Brian Weir’s darkly
comic update of the Greek myth of
Oedipus. The Broadwater Main
Stage, 6322 Santa Monica Blvd., Hollywood. Fri.-Sat., 8 p.m.; next Sun., 7
p.m.; ends Feb. 10. $25. (310) 281-8341.
Stockholm A couple’s relationship
unravels in the West Coast premiere
of Bryony Lavery’s drama set in the
Swedish capital; presented by Triptych Theatre Group. The Pico Playhouse, 10508 W. Pico Blvd., West L.A.
Sat.-next Sun., 8 p.m.; ends Jan. 28.
$25, $35. (800) 838-3006.
Mamma Mia
Hit romantic musical
based around the songs of the
Swedish pop group ABBA. Cupcake
Theater, 11020 Magnolia Blvd., North
Hollywood. Fri., 8 p.m.; Sat., 2 and 7
p.m.; next Sun., 4 p.m.; ends March 3.
$39-$79. www.cupcaketheater.com.
Sherlock Holmes and the Final Problem The famous detective faces off
To All the Lights in the Windows
against his archnemesis, Prof. Moriarty, in Long Beach Shakespeare
Company’s radio-style presentation
of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s thriller.
Chris Haas’ new comedy set in a Philadelphia mental institution. Loft Ensemble Theater, 13442 Ventura Blvd.,
Sherman Oaks. Sat., 8 p.m.; next
310.478 .3836
1332 Second Street
Santa Monica
www.LAEMMLE.com
AHRYA FINE ARTS
TOWN CENTER
8556 Wilshire Blvd.
17200 Ventura Blvd.
Beverly Hills
THE FAVOURITE E 1:30 PM 4:20 PM
7:10 PM 10:10 PM
WON’T YOU BE MY NEIGHBOR? C
1:20 PM 4:20 PM
STAN & OLLIE B 10:40 AM 1:30 PM
4:20 PM 7:10 PM 10:00 PM
AT ETERNITY’S GATE C 1:10 PM 7:30 PM
GREEN BOOK C 1:00 PM 4:00 PM
7:00 PM 10:00 PM
HOLMES & WATSON C 10:20 AM
1:00 PM 3:10 PM 5:20 PM 7:40 PM 10:00 PM
VICE E 10:00 AM 1:10 PM 4:10 PM
7:10 PM 10:10 PM
MARY POPPINS RETURNS B 10:30 AM
1:10 PM 4:00 PM 7:00 PM 10:00 PM
THE GUILTY E 10:40 AM 1:00 PM
3:10 PM 5:20 PM 7:40 PM 10:00 PM
VICE E 10:10 AM 1:10 PM 4:10 PM
THE RIDER E 4:40 PM 10:00 PM
LIFEBOAT 10:30 AM
CAPERNAUM E 10:00 AM 1:40 PM 7:30 PM
SHORT FILM PROGRAM I BLACK
SHEEP; 10:00 AM
BEN IS BACK E 4:50 PM 10:15 PM
GLENDALE
IF BEALE STREET COULD TALK E 10:30 AM
1:40 PM 4:30 PM 7:20 PM 10:10 PM
MARY QUEEN OF SCOTS E 10:20 AM
1:20 PM 4:20 PM 7:20 PM 10:15 PM
Glendale
450 W. 2nd Street
Sun., 7 p.m.; ends Feb. 17. $20. (818)
616-3150.
Driving Miss Daisy Michael Learned
(“The Waltons”) stars in Alfred
Uhry’s decades-spanning Pulitzer
Prize-winning drama about a Jewish
woman and her black chauffeur in the
South. Laguna Playhouse, 606 Laguna Canyon Road, Laguna Beach.
Next Sun., 5:30 p.m.; ends Jan. 27. $55$85. (949) 497-2787.
Classical
Compiled by Matt Cooper.
An Angelic Twelfth Night Jouyssance
Early Music Ensemble performs vocal
works from the 12th century to the
17th century. St. Luke’s Episcopal
Church, 112 S. California Ave., Monrovia. Sun., 4 p.m. $15-$25. (213) 5339922.
Mehta’s Brahms Former LA Phil mu-
Writerperformer Ivy Jones’ solo show about
a veteran actress forced to change her
stage name; part of “Portraits of Humanity 2, a Solo Series.” Theatre
West, 3333 Cahuenga Blvd., L.A. Next
Sun., 7 p.m. $25. (323) 851-7977.
sic director Zubin Mehta leads the orchestra in Brahms’ Symphony No. 4
plus Concerto for Violin and Cello featuring violinist Pinchas Zukerman
and cellist Amanda Forsyth. Walt Disney Concert Hall, 111 S. Grand Ave.,
L.A. Sun., 2 p.m. $69-$207. (323) 8502000.
Story Pirates Musical sketch comedy
Camerata Pacifica
Have You Met Miss Jones?
show geared especially for toddlers;
for ages 5 and up. Wallis Annenberg
Center for the Performing Arts,
Promenade Terrace, 9390 N. Santa
Monica Blvd., Beverly Hills. Next
Sun., 11 a.m. Free. (310) 746-4000.
Critics’ Choices
Dear Evan Hansen Under the aerodynamic direction of Michael Greif, this
beautifully acted touring production
of Tony-winning musical reveals the
true reason the show has become
such a cultural phenomenon: It’s one
of the most evocative portraits of the
inner turmoil of adolescence ever put
on stage. The book by Steven Levenson and the score by Benj Pasek and
Justin Paul capture not only the emotional challenges of those arduous adolescent years but also the moral
tests we sometimes flunk as we fumble toward adult graduation in this
rich tale about a high school outcast
who becomes under false pretenses a
social media hero. Ben Levi Ross, a
20-year-old actor who grew up in
Santa Monica, is bound for the theatrical big-time with his searing performance as Evan. (C.M.) Segerstrom
Hall, Segerstrom Center for the Arts,
600 Town Center Drive, Costa Mesa.
Sun., next Sun., 1 and 6:30 p.m.; Tue.Fri., 7:30 p.m.; Sat., 2 and 7:30 p.m.;
ends Jan. 13. $35.75 and up. (714) 5562787.
MUSIC
Picks are by Todd Martens
(T.M) and Randall
Roberts (R.R).
Jeff Tweedy With Wilco on a temporary break from recording new music
— a hiatus expected to end in 2019 —
band architect Jeff Tweedy has been
using time away on more personal endeavors. In late 2018 he issued a biography, “Let's Go (So We Can Get
Back): A Memoir of Recording and
Discording with Wilco, Etc,” which
takes a humorous and earnest look at
his personal and musical travails as
well as the intimate solo effort
“Warm.” A rather calm affair, sonically “Warm” sees Tweedy digging
into his alt-country roots, and the
work recalls the thoughtful arrangements of a Gram Parsons or a Chris
Hillman. Yet don’t think “Warm” is
simply a sedate album, as Tweedy’s
lyrics see the artist ruminating on life
and death with more than a bit of sarcasm. At one point he envisions his
own funeral. While most works see
Tweedy showcasing his raspy, goodnatured vocals, he’s still the leader of
one of America’s more ambitious rock
bands, so don’t be shocked when
things get aggressive and full of fuzzy
atmospheres. Largo, 366 N. La Cienega, West Hollywood. Sun.-Mon. $50
(T.M.) www.largo-la.com
GALLERIES
Capsule reviews by Leah
Ollman (L.O.). Compiled
by Matt Cooper.
Critics’ Choices
Edmund de Waal: -one way or other-
Chamber music
by Beethoven, Mozart and Poulenc.
The Huntington, Rothenberg Hall,
1151 Oxford Road, San Marino. Tue.,
7:30 p.m. Also at Zipper Hall, the Colburn School, 200 S. Grand Ave., L.A.
Thu., 8 p.m.; UC Santa Barbara,
Hahn Hall, 1070 Fairway Road, Santa
Barbara. Fri., 7:30 p.m.; and Museum
of Ventura County, 100 E. Main St.,
Ventura. Next Sun., 3 p.m. $58. (805)
884-8410.
The Schindler House has hosted conversations among luminaries in the
arts since it was built in 1921-22. De
Waal’s intervention makes direct conversation with the house and fulfills in
a fresh, poetic way Schindler’s aim to
design a site for synergy. (L.O.) MAK
Center at the Schindler House, 835 N.
Kings Road, West Hollywood. Ends
Sun. (323) 651-1510.
Dvorák Masterworks Members of the
ative 48-minute single channel video
at the heart of this exhibition presents like a slide show. Images appear
in side-by-side pairs, changing every
few seconds. Each image is a partial
page of the New York Times — a fragment of an ad, a corner of a photograph, half an article. The format proposes a relationship between the
pairs and the mind scrambles for
traction, observing itself in the act of
making meaning. Pio Pico, 3311 E. Pico
Blvd., L.A. Through Feb. 17. Closed
Sun.-Mon. (323) 645-5955.
LA Phil play folk-inspired chamber
music by Dvorák, plus Penderecki’s
Duo Concertante for violin and
contrabass. Walt Disney Concert
Hall, 111 S. Grand Ave., L.A. Tue., 8
p.m. $20-$60. (323) 850-2000.
Adams & Glass
John Adams leads
the LA Phil and singer Angélique
Kidjo in the world premiere of Philip
Glass’ Symphony No. 12, “Lodger,”
based on music by David Bowie and
Brian Eno; program also includes
Gabriella Smith’s “Tumblebird Contrails,” and Adams’ “Grand Pianola
Music” featuring pianists Marc-André Hamelin and Orli Shaham. Walt
Disney Concert Hall, 111 S. Grand
Ave., L.A. Thu.-Fri., ,8 p.m.; next Sun.,
2 p.m. $20-$174. (323) 850-2000.
Pacific Symphony
Conductor David
Danzmayr leads the orchestra in Prokofiev’s Symphony No. 7, Mussorgsky’s “Night on Bald Mountain,”
and Chopin’s Piano Concerto featuring pianist Gabriela Martinez. Segerstrom Center for the Arts, Renée and
Henry Segerstrom Concert Hall, 600
Town Center Drive, Costa Mesa.
Thu.-Sat., 8 p.m. $30 and up. (714) 7555799.
Nadia Sirota: Living Music Live! with
wild Up The viola player joins the
Pop
Traveling exhibit spotlights a WWII-era
underground rocket factory in Nazi
Germany that was built by and run on
slave labor. Los Angeles Museum of
the Holocaust, 100 S. The Grove
Drive, L.A. Starts next Sun.; ends
April 5. Open seven days. Free. (323)
651-3704.
Jennifer Bolande: The Composition
of Decomposition The subtly provoc-
DANCE
Compiled by Matt Cooper
maybe
Berlin-based choreographer
and dancer Shade Théret presents
this site-specific work in collaboration with the artist Lukas Panek; part
of the third annual “Dance at the
Odyssey” festival. Odyssey Theatre,
2055 S. Sepulveda Blvd., West L.A.
Sun., 2 p.m. $25. (310) 477-2055.
Hubbard Street Dance Chicago &
Third Coast Percussion The en-
L.A.-based contemporary music ensemble for an exploration of the
works of composers Caroline Shaw
and Andrew Norman. CAP UCLA at
The Theatre at Ace Hotel DTLA, 929
S. Broadway, L.A. Sat., 8 p.m. $29–$59.
(310) 825-2101.
sembles join forces for a program that
includes West Coast premieres by
Emma Portner and Teddy Forance.
Wallis Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts, Bram Goldsmith Theater, 9390 N. Santa Monica Blvd., Beverly Hills. Thu.-Sat., 7:30 p.m. $35$105. (310) 746-4000.
Martin Chalifour and Mak Grgic Duo
Be Seen This work from Acts of Mat-
Violinist and LA Phil concertmaster
Chalifour and guitarist Grgic perform
works by Bartók, Paganini, Piazzolla
and more. Private residence, address
provided to ticket holders, L.A. Sat.,
7:30 p.m. $100. (424) 272-1559.
ter artistic director Rebecca Lemme
examines the lives of those on the
margins of society; part of the third
annual “Dance at the Odyssey” festival. Odyssey Theatre, 2055 S. Sepulveda Blvd., West L.A. Fri.-Sat., 8 p.m.;
next Sun., 2 p.m. $25. (310) 477-2055.
Le Salon de Musiques The intimate
chamber-music series presents “Russian Nostalgia,” a program of works
for voice, strings and piano by
Tchaikovsky, Rachmaninoff and Paul
Juon. Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, 5th
Floor Salon, 135 N. Grand Ave., L.A.
Next Sun., 4 p.m. $45, $85. (310) 4980257.
Notorious RBG in Song
Composersoprano Patrice Michaels celebrates
her mother-in-law, Supreme Court
Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, in the
West Coast premiere of this jazzmeets-classical dramatic concert;
suitable for ages 10 and up. Skirball
Cultural Center, 2701 N. Sepulveda
Blvd., L.A. Next Sun., 7:30 p.m. $30.
(310) 440-4500.
The Great Tamer: A Work by Dimitris
Papaioannou CAP UCLA presents
the U.S. premiere of this surrealist
dance-theater work that explores the
mysteries of existence. Royce Hall,
UCLA, 10745 Dickson Court, Westwood. Fri., 8 p.m. $29-$79. (310) 8252101.
I fall, I flow, I melt L.A. Dance Project
presents the U.S. premiere of company founder Benjamin Millepied’s
full-length work, staged in the round
and set to music by Bach and David
Lang performed by violinist Etienne
Gara. L.A. Dance Project Studios,
2245 E. Washington Blvd., L.A. Sat.next Sun., 8 p.m.; ends Jan. 20. $40.
(213) 622-5995.
On or off the Strip,
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VICE E 10:00 AM 1:00 PM 4:10 PM
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CLOSED CAPTION
artist’s earliest work includes rarely
seen paintings and drawings. Frederick R. Weisman Museum, Pepperdine
University, 24255 Pacific Coast Highway, Malibu. Starts Sat.; ends March
31. Closed Mon. Free. (310) 506-4851.
MUSIC HALL
CLAREMONT
WHO WILL WRITE OUR HISTORY 1:00 PM
3:10 PM 5:20 PM 9:55 PM
BARGAIN IN ( )
Richard Diebenkorn: Beginnings,
1942–1955 Survey of the American
THE FAVOURITE E 10:00 AM 1:00 PM
4:00 PM 7:00 PM 10:00 PM
4:15 PM 7:20 PM 10:15 PM
OF FATHERS AND SONS 11:00 AM
forty objects include works by Laura
Andreson, Robert Arneson and others. American Museum of Ceramic
Art, 399 N. Garey Ave., Pomona.
Opens Sat.; ends April 17. Closed
Mon.-Tue. $5, $7; 12 and under, free.
(909) 865-3146.
THE MULE E 10:20 AM 1:50 PM 4:40 PM
7:30 PM 10:15 PM
7:20 PM 10:15 PM
4:00 PM 7:00 PM 10:00 PM
Lasting Impressions: Selections
from the Scripps College Permanent
Collection Exhibition of more than
4:00 PM 7:00 PM 10:00 PM
CHARM CITY 10:00 AM
207 N. Maryland Ave
Openings
VICE E 10:00 AM 1:10 PM 4:10 PM
No. Hollywood
OF FATHERS AND SONS 11:00 AM
THE WIFE E 1:50 PM 7:20 PM
MARY QUEEN OF SCOTS E 1:20 PM
SIMMBA I SP; 5:15 PM 8:30 PM
NoHo 7
5240 Lankershim Blvd.
SHIRKERS 10:00 AM
Pasadena
Encino
BLACKKKLANSMAN E 7:00 PM 9:55 PM
MARY QUEEN OF SCOTS E 1:30 PM
4:30 PM 7:30 PM 10:15 PM
Capsule review by Leah
Ollman (L.O.). Compiled
by Matt Cooper.
TAFRAID
NO
OF SUBTITLES
BOY ERASED E 4:00 PM
PLAYHOUSE
673 E. Colorado Blvd.
1776 The Musical
Golden Girlz The drag-show send-up
VOX LUX E 9:55 PM
CALL THEATRE
Natural Shocks Four local companies
perform staged readings of Lauren
Gunderson’s darkly comic fable as
part of the “FemFest” series; with
Fountain Theatre (Jan. 12-13), Rogue
Machine (Jan. 19-20), Echo Theater
Company (Jan. 26-27) and Lower
Depth Theatre Ensemble (Feb. 2-3).
The Fountain Theatre, 5060 Fountain
Ave., L.A. Sat., 8 p.m.; next Sun., 2
p.m. $20. (323) 663-1525.
Pick of the Vine 17th annual showcase
MONICA
11523 Santa Monica Blvd.
salute the Tony-winning composer
whose credits include “Hello, Dolly!”
and “La Cage aux Folles.” Irvine Barclay Theatre, 4242 Campus Drive,
Irvine. Sat, 8 p.m. $40-$100. (949) 8544646.
return of Kathrine Bates’ immersive
site-specific mystery drama, inspired
by actual events. Greystone Mansion,
905 Loma Vista Drive, Beverly Hills.
Thu.-Fri., 6 p.m.; Sat.-next Sun., 1
p.m.; ends Jan. 27. $65; advance reservations required. (310) 364-3606.
TM
Info Line
Jerry Herman: The Broadway Legacy
Concert Musical-theater veterans
MUSEUMS
Dora: Discovery and Despair
A CANINE travels 400 miles in “A Dog’s Way Home,” which opens Friday.
Perfect Strangers Secrets spill when
Replicas
Those who know the
actor — or the TV character — Creed
Bratton likely recognize him through
his role on the NBC sitcom “The Office,” where he was promoted from
being an uncredited extra to a key
employee whose mysterious, drugand cult-addled backstory he offered
in brief, often worrisome recollections. “You know, a human can go on
living for several hours after being decapitated,” his character confidently
states in one episode. Elsewhere, the
shady paper salesman and scuba diving enthusiast offers insight on the
quality of heroin made by the Taliban,
advises on finding inexpensive worms
and implies that he’s living under an
assumed name. Remarkably, the real
Bratton backstory is nearly as wild —
if less incriminating. A lifelong musician and actor who grew up in Northern California, he migrated to Los Angeles in the mid-1960s and soon joined
Sunset Strip hit-makers the Grass
Roots. He’s performing in support of
the recently released “While the
Young Punks Dance,” a rather
thoughtful folk record. Troubadour,
9081 Santa Monica Blvd., West Hollywood. Sat. $25. (R.R.) www.trouba
dour.com
A PRIVATE WAR E 1:30 PM 4:20 PM
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1:00 PM 4:00 PM 7:00 PM 10:00 PM
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L AT I M E S . C O M / CA L E N DA R
E15
HOME THEATER
NEW RELEASES
‘Monsters’
likely to
spark talk
By Noel Murray
New on Blu-ray
Monsters and Men
Universal DVD, $22.98; Blu-ray, $29.98;
also available on VOD
In a year filled with thoughtful,
pointed films about the state of
race relations in America, writerdirector Reinaldo Marcus Green’s
fine feature filmmaking debut flew
under the radar after drawing buzz
at Sundance. Inspired by multiple
recent news stories, the movie follows three characters, each affected by the police shooting of an
unarmed black man. John David
Washington plays a cop torn between his loyalty to the force and
his sense of right and wrong, while
Kelvin Harrison Jr. plays a star
high school athlete considering
protesting the shooting and Anthony Ramos is a family man and
beloved community leader who
captured the whole incident on his
phone. With its unusual narrative
structure and its nuanced take on
hot-button issues, “Monsters and
Men” is an impressive first film for
Green and ought to find more of an
audience — and spark good conversations around the living room
— now that it’s available to watch
at home.
Neon
ANTHONY Ramos, left, is the witness of police brutality and John David Washington plays a conflicted cop in “Monsters and Men.”
and adds Asian spice.
Special features: A bonus Green
short film
TV set of the week
VOD
Castle Rock:
The Complete First Season
Buffalo Boys
Available Friday
Indonesian
writer-director
Mike Wiluan tries something bold
for his feature filmmaking debut,
making a kind of “Eastern western.” Set mostly on the island of
Java circa 1860 — during a time of
Dutch colonial rule — the film is
about brothers Jamar (Ario Bayu)
and Suwo (Yoshi Sudarso), who return home from America and find
themselves on a mission of revenge
against the vicious Capt. Van
Trach (Reinout Bussemaker).
Mixing historical drama, slow-mo
gunfights and balletic martial
arts stunts, “Buffalo Boys”
takes familiar elements of pulp
Warner Bros. DVD, $24.98; Blu-ray,
$29.98; $44.98; also available on VOD
Horror author Stephen King
has often used the same fictional
place-names across different
books and has dropped references
to characters and events from
story to story. This TV series tightens King’s loose shared universe,
telling an original tale set in the
writer’s world of extra-dimensional monsters and murderous
compulsions. In Season 1’s 10 episodes, a lawyer (André Holland)
returns home to Maine to investigate a mysterious convict at Shawshank Penitentiary (Bill Skarsgård) and to help his mentally de-
8 pm
By Matt Cooper
CBS
ABC
We have an Inca-ling where they might
find the “Lost City of Machu Picchu” in this
special. 9 p.m. National Geographic Channel
KCAL
FOX
Byron Cohen FXX
“YOU’RE THE WORST” returns for a
fifth and final season on FXX. With
Aya Cash and Chris Geere.
“Nova” attempts to untangle the concept
of quantum entanglement in the episode
“Einstein’s Quantum Riddle.” 9 p.m. KOCE
The new six-part series “The Dictator’s
Playbook” examines the tactics used by
such rulers as Kim Il Sung, Benito Mussolini
and Saddam Hussein. 10 p.m. KOCE
UNI
KOCE
KDOC
KLCS
A&E
AMC
ANP
BBC
BET
Wedding bells are breaking up that old
gang of mine as the salty rom-com “You’re
the Worst” begins its fifth and final season.
With Chris Geere, Aya Cash, Desmin Borges
and Kether Donohue. 10 p.m. FXX
TUESDAY
THURSDAY
Disn
Felicity Jones and “Crazy Rich Asians’ ”
Constance Wu are among the thespians talking shop in new episodes of “Variety Studio:
Actors on Actors.” 7 and 7:30 p.m. KOCE;
also 7, 7:30 and 8 p.m. Thu.
You can’t keep a good cop comedy down.
Canceled by Fox, “Brooklyn Nine-Nine” is
back on a new network. With Andy Samberg
and Andre Braugher. 9 p.m. NBC
E!
Bravo
CMT
CNN
Com
Disc
ESPN
Food
FNC
“The Vampire Diaries’ ” Nina Dobrev is
keeping it all in the “Fam” in this new sitcom.
With Gary Cole, Tone Bell, Sheryl Lee Ralph,
Brian Stokes Mitchell and Odessa Adlon.
9:30 p.m. CBS
Free
FRIDAY
IFC
Callie (Maia Mitchell) and Mariana
(Cierra Ramirez) from “The Fosters” are almost all grown up in the new spin-off “Good
Trouble.” 8 p.m. Freeform
Richard Dreyfuss and Chevy Chase get
“The Last Laugh” in this comedy about a
has-been comic and his former manager on
the comeback trail. Any time, Netflix
Women reconnect with others who inspired them to fight for women’s rights in the
season finale of “We’ll Meet Again.” Ann
Curry hosts. 9 p.m. KOCE
Everything you always wanted to know
about “Sex Education” but were afraid to
ask is revealed in this new Britcom. With Asa
Butterfield and Gillian Anderson. Any time,
Netflix
The truth may be in there in “Project
Blue Book,” a new series inspired by the U.S.
Air Force’s secret investigation into the UFO
phenomenon in the 1950s and ’60s. With
“Game of Thrones’ ” Aidan Gillen as Dr. J.
Allen Hynek. 10 p.m. History Channel
Lang Lang, the pianist so nice they
named him twice, has a part to play in “The
Cleveland Orchestra Centennial Celebration” on a new “Great Performances.”
9 p.m. KOCE
FX
Hall
HGTV
Hist
Life
MSN
MTV
NGC
Nick
OWN
Para
Sund
Syfy
TBS
TCM
TLC
TNT
Toon
SATURDAY
Travel
Hallmark and chill with the romantic TVmovie sequel “One Winter Proposal.” With
Jack Turner and Taylor Cole. 8 p.m. Hallmark Channel
Tru
WGN
David Attenborough comes face-to-face
with a prehistoric ichthyosaur — don’t
worry, it’s only a fossil — in “Attenborough
and the Sea Dragon” on a new “Nature.”
8 p.m. KOCE
Sandra Bullock and Cate Blanchett assemble an all-star crew to pull off a heist at
N.Y.C.’s super-exclusive Met Gala in the 2018
spin-off “Ocean’s 8.” Anne Hathaway,
Helena Bonham Carter, Mindy Kaling,
Sarah Paulson, Rihanna and Awkwafina
also star. 8 p.m. HBO
The 1980s-set sitcom “The Goldbergs”
begets a 1990s-set spinoff, “Schooled.” With
Tim Meadows, Bryan Callen and AJ
Michalka. 8:30 p.m. ABC
A woman dealing with her father’s sudden death finds her problems have multiplied in the new thriller “My Mother’s Split
Personalities.” 8 p.m. Lifetime
WEDNESDAY
Three more to see
24 Frames
Criterion DVD, $29.95; Blu-ray, $39.95
Let the Corpses Tan
The final film from the late Iranian master Abbas Kiarostami —
completed posthumously by his
son Ahmad — is one of his simplest
and most beautiful. As the title implies, “24 Frames” consists of twodozen static shots, immersing
viewers in spare, peaceful landscapes. Kiarostami doesn’t just
drop a camera artlessly in the
wilderness. These images are pre-
Kino Lorber DVD, $29.95; Blu-ray,
$34.95; also available on VOD
8:30
God Friended Me (TVPG)
Funniest Home Videos (N) Å
News (N) Å
The Simpsons Bob’s Burgers
(TV14) (N) Å (TVPG) (N) Å
Big Bang Å
Big Bang Å
KVCR Lawrence Welk Show (TVG) Å
KCET Father Brown (TVPG) Å
See what happened when the North Dakota oil boom went bust in the documentary
“My Country No More” on a new “Independent Lens.” 10 p.m. KOCE
The new special “USS Indianapolis: The
Final Chapter” updates the story of the U.S.
Navy heavy cruiser sunk by a Japanese sub in
1945 after delivering the atomic bomb that
was later dropped on Hiroshima during
WWII. 10 p.m. KOCE
From the archives
9 pm
mid90s
Lionsgate DVD, $19.98; Blu-ray, $24.99;
also available on VOD
Time Freak
Lionsgate DVD, $19.98; Blu-ray, $21.99;
also available on VOD
calendar@latimes.com
Sports News Movies (N) New Å Closed Captioning
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NCIS: Los Angeles (TV14) The Madam Secretary (TV14) Eliz- News (N) Å
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EPIX
HBO
Show
Shark Tank (TVPG) (N) Å
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Family Guy
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News (N) Å Sports Central Joel Osteen
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Sunday Sports
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Mira quien baila All Stars
Victoria (TVPG) The King
Big Bang Å
Big Bang Å
Seinfeld Å
Seinfeld Å
Modern Family
California Gold California Gold The Test (TVPG) Å
Experience Å
Miss Fisher’s Murder Mysteries Vera (TVPG) Å
Crónicas: Historias que hacen Noticias 34 (N)
Victoria (TVPG) The Luxury Victoria (TVPG) Christmas Special. Albert
Over the Water. Å
of Conscience. Å
MyNt
MONDAY
“Game of Thrones” creator George R.R.
Martin, first of his name, learns about his
family history on the season premiere of
“Finding Your Roots With Henry Louis
Gates, Jr.” 8 p.m. KOCE
Special features: Interviews and a
short documentary
abeth confronts a governor
team investigates a terror
threat when the chief of lo- over the state’s new policy of
gistics for a weapons station separating immigrants from
collapses on the job. (N) Å their children. (N) Å
NBC The 76th Annual Golden Globe Awards (TV14) Awards ceremony celebrating the best in TV News (N) Å
and film; Sandra Oh and Andy Samberg host. Å
KTLA Supergirl (TVPG) Å
Charmed (TVPG) Å
News (N) Å Sports (10:45) News (N) Å
“The Dude” gets his due when Jeff
Bridges collects the Cecil B. DeMille Award
at the “The 76th Annual Golden Globe
Awards.” Sandra Oh and Andy Samberg
host. 5 and 8 p.m. NBC
Former NFL player and “Bachelorette”
also-ran Colton Underwood gets to be “The
Bachelor” this time around in a new season
of the competition. 8 p.m. ABC
Special features: Featurettes
Miles’ latest friend suggestion was adopted as a baby
after being dropped off at a
church. (N) Å
SUNDAY
The spin-off “America’s Got Talent: The
Champions” has contestants from “AGT”
franchises around the world going head-tohead. Terry Crews hosts. 8 p.m. NBC
cisely composed, then manipulated digitally to control the pace of
movement within the frame. The
result is something strikingly different, from a filmmaker who kept
experimenting with the medium
all the way to the end.
Sunday Prime-Time TV
TV THI S W EEK
The Clemson Tigers take on the Crimson
Tide of Alabama for the “College Football
Playoff National Championship.” From
Levi’s Stadium in Santa Clara, Calif. 5 p.m.
ESPN; split-screen coverage, ESPN2
teriorating adoptive mother (the
incredible Sissy Spacek). The
show doesn’t spare the scares; but
as with the best of King’s work it’s
really more about ordinary people
haunted by bad memories and lingering regrets.
seeks the Christmas joy of his youth. Å
Crocodile Dundee ››› (1986) Paul Hogan. (PG-13)
Family Guy Å Family Guy Å Seinfeld Å
Good Work: Masters (TVG) Å Film School Å On Story Å
Global Spirit (TVG) Å
Scully: World
The Mummy Returns ›› (2001) Brendan Fraser, Rachel Weisz. (PG-13) Å
Scorpion King
Jaws ›››› (1975) (6) (PG) Jaws 2 ›› (1978) Roy Scheider, Lorraine Gary. (PG) Å
Crikey! It’s the Irwins (TVPG) Lone Star Law
How Do AniCrikey! It’s the Irwins SwimHow Do AniRace to Save the Platypus. (TV14)
ming With Manta Rays. (N) mals … (N) Å mals … (N)
Austin Powers: International Man of Mystery ›› (1997) Å
Austin Powers: International Man of Mystery
Harlem Nights ›› (1989) Eddie Murphy, Richard Pryor. (8:05) (R)
Martin (TVPG)
Housewives: Atlanta (N) Å
Married to Medicine (N) Å
Dirty John (TV14) (N) Å
What Happens
Movie (6:30) Billy Madison › (1995) Adam Sandler. (PG-13) Å
You Don’t Mess With the Zohan
Anthony Bourdain (TVPG) Å Anthony Bourdain (TVPG) Å Anthony Bourdain (TVPG) Å Newsroom (N)
The Interview ›› (2014) James Franco. (7:25) (R) Å
Knocked Up ››› (2007) Seth Rogen. (R) Å
Alaska: Last Frontier (N) Å
Alaska: Last Frontier (N) Å
The Last Alaskans (TVPG) (N) Homestead
A Cinderella Story: If the Shoe Fits (2016) (PG) Coop & Cami Coop & Cami Bunk’d (TVG) Raven’s Home
Busy Tonight Live (N) Å
Botched (TV14) Å
Botched (TV14) Å
Botched Å
SportsCenter (N) Å
SportsCenter Å
NFL PrimeTime
Guy’s Grocery Games (TVG)
Worst Cooks in America (TVG) Beat Bobby Å Beat Bobby Å Beat Bobby Å
Objectified Å
Next Revolution: Steve Hilton
Life, Liberty & Levin Å
Fox News Sun.
Home Alone 2: Lost in New York ›› (1992) Macaulay Culkin, Joe Pesci. (8:15) (PG) Å
Nanny McPhee
Jurassic World ›› (2015) Chris Pratt, Bryce Dallas Howard. (PG-13) Å
Jurassic World ›› (2015)
One Winter Weekend (2018) Taylor Cole, Jack Turner. Å
Love on the Sidelines (2016) Emily Kinney. Å
Beach Bargain Beach Bargain Bahamas Life Bahamas Life Island Life (N) Island Life (N) House Hunters
Ancient Aliens: Declassified (N) UFO Cover Ups: Secrets Revealed (TV14) (N) Å
Ancient Aliens
Zero Dark Thirty ››› (2012) Jessica Chastain. Elite operatives hunt Osama bin Laden. (R) Å
His Perfect Obsession (2018) Arianne Zucker. Å
Killer Vacation (2018) (10:05) Å
Dateline (TVPG) Å
Dateline (TVPG) Å
Lockup: Tulsa Å
Dateline Å
Ridiculousness Ridiculousness Ridiculousness Ridiculousness Ridiculousness Ridiculousness Ridiculousness
Stonehenge Decoded: Secrets Lost City of Machu Picchu (N) Mystery Skeletons-Sahara
Stonehenge
Alvin and the Chipmunks ›› (2007) Jason Lee. (PG) Å
The Office Å The Office Å Friends Å
Police Women of Maricopa Å Police Women of Maricopa Å Police Women of Maricopa Å Police Women
The Shawshank Redemption ›››› (1994) Tim Robbins, Morgan Freeman. (R) Å
Smokey and the Bandit ››› (1977) Burt Reynolds. (PG) Å Smokey and the Bandit II ›› (1980) (10:15)
Iron Man 3 ››› (2013) Robert Downey Jr., Gwyneth Paltrow. (PG-13) Å
Futurama Å
Step Brothers ›› (2008) Will Ferrell, John C. Reilly. (R) Å Old School ›› (2003) Luke Wilson. (R) Å
The Letter ››› (1940) (7)
Dr. Mabuse, the Gambler ›››› (1922) Rudolf Klein-Rogge. Colossal Youth
90 Day Fiancé (TVPG) (N)
Return to Amish (TV14) (N)
Hunger Games: Mockingjay, Part 1 ››› (2014) Jennifer Lawrence. (PG-13) Hunger Games: Mockingjay
Ranger Smith H. Birdman
Mike Tyson
Bob’s Burgers American Dad Family Guy Å Family Guy Å
My Haunted House (TV14)
Fear the Woods (TVPG) (N)
Haunted Case Files (N)
Haunted Case
Jokers Å
Jokers Å
Jokers Å
Jokers Å
Jokers Å
Jokers Å
Jokers Å
Raymond Å
Raymond Å
Raymond Å
Raymond Å
2 1/2 Men Å 2 1/2 Men Å King of Queens
Law & Order: SVU (TV14) Å Law & Order: SVU (TV14) Å Law & Order: SVU (TV14) Å Fifty Shades Å
Love & Hip Hop Miami (TV14) Love & Hip Hop (TV14) Å
Love & Hip Hop (TV14) Å
Ink: Chicago
Live Free or Die Hard ››› (2007) Bruce Willis, Justin Long. (PG-13) Å
Person-Interest
Arizona (2018) Danny McBride. Å
The Warrior’s Way ›› (2010) Jang Dong Gun. (R) (9:25) Å
Coal Miner’s Daughter (6:53) Escape From Alcatraz ››› (1979) Clint Eastwood. (PG) Å Gridiron Gang
Jack Reacher: Never Go Back Berlin Station (TVMA) (N) Å Berlin Station (TVMA) Å
Death Wish ›
Clash of the Titans ›› (2010) Sam Worthington. Perseus,
Down a Dark Hall (2018) AnnaSophia Robb,
son of Zeus, embarks on a journey. (8:10) (PG-13) Å
Uma Thurman. (PG-13) Å
Molly’s Game ››› (2017)
Ray Donovan (TVMA) Mac
Ray Donovan (TVMA) Mac
The Bourne
Ultimatum
Outlander (TVMA) Jamie and Counterpart
Jessica Chastain. (6:40) (R) faces a difficult decision. (N) faces a difficult decision. Å
Starz
Outlander (TVMA) Jamie and Counterpart (TVMA) A new
Claire keep secrets. (N) Å
revelation. (N) Å
Claire keep secrets. Å
TMC
The Queen ››› (2006) Helen Mirren. (PG-13) Å
Marshall ››› (2017) (PG-13) Å
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E16
SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
M
LOS ANGELES TIMES
IGINAL MOTION PICTURE SOUNDTRACK
THE HATE U GIVE
ARLISSA
“‘We Won’t Move’ leaves behind a feeling
that’s hard to shake.” - IndieWire
“The soulful ballad has got ‘Oscar nominee’
written all over it.” - NOW Toronto
F
ARTS&BOOKS
S U N D A Y , J A N U A R Y 6 , 2 0 1 9 :: L A T I M E S . C O M / C A L E N D A R
Julie Bennett For The Times
RUBBERBAND OG tours the National Memorial for Peace and Justice, a tribute to the victims of lynching in the United States, in his hometown of Montgomery, Ala.
CULTURAL DIVIDE
ROUGH RHYMES
Alabama rapper Rubberband OG contends with a brutal hometown legacy
BY JEFFREY FLEISHMAN >>> MONTGOMERY, ALA. — The leaves
were yellow and plum, the clouds thin in the sky, when Cortez
Oates, known as the rapper Rubberband OG, walked amid
suspended rusted steel blocks carved with the names of those who
came before. Malcolm Wright. Lynched. 07/09/1949. Chickasaw
County, Mississippi. The names went on and on, leading Oates
deeper into America’s violent legacy of racism, shunting aside the
sun in memory of the broken, battered and burned. ¶ Light as a
whisper, scrawled in tattoos, Oates, whose songs bristle with
guns, medallions and money, stopped beneath a row of blocks.
They hung from an open-air roof as if the stilled feet of dead men.
He stood in the quiet, on this hill above Montgomery, once busy
with slave traders and the clatter of chains, and said: “Nothing’s
changed. The Ku Klux Klan wore white bed sheets, and now
they’re wearing police uniforms.” ¶ The National Memorial for
Peace and Justice lists the names of more than 4,000 African
American men, women and children lynched between 1877 and
1950. Unfolding over 6 acres, the
[See Rubberband OG, F4]
BOOK REVIEW
Japan through wide-angle lens
By Sharon Mizota
An elongated, lumpy form seems suspended, like a flayed body twisting in the
wind. One fears to find a head dangling at its
tip, but the form ends in a gnarled, blackened mass instead. “Nagasaki, Bottle
Melted and Deformed” was taken by Japanese photographer Tomatsu Shomei in 1961.
It is both a document and a metaphor for an
atomic atrocity most Americans can’t begin
to comprehend.
It’s the type of image one expects to find
in Lena Fritsch’s copiously illustrated
“Ravens & Red Lipstick: Japanese Photography Since 1945.” A broad survey for Western audiences, the book also dips into less
familiar territory. Both neophytes and
those familiar with Japanese photography
are likely to discover something unexpected.
“Ravens” includes many still life, landscape, conceptual and abstract works by
the likes of Sugimoto Hiroshi, Kawauchi
Rinko, Ishiuchi Miyako and others. (Fritsch
respects traditional Japanese name order,
last name first,
[See ‘Ravens,’ F8]
The many
viewpoints of
Danai Gurira
By Emily Zemler
©Araki Nobuyoshi / Yoshiko Isshiki Office, Tokyo
PHOTOGRAPHS such as Araki Nobuyoshi’s “Sachin and His Brother Mabo”
from 1964 are in “Ravens & Red Lipstick: Japanese Photography Since 1945.”
LONDON — Despite the towering success of “Black Panther” and “The Walking
Dead,” Danai Gurira, the actress, is steadfastly holding onto her alternate identity:
Danai Gurira, the writer.
Gurira, whose plays grapple with cultural identity and her heritage as a Zimbabwean and an American, recently opened
her 2012 “The Convert” at London’s Young
Vic, with “Black Panther” costar Letitia
Wright in the lead role. The play, which
Gurira calls “something I deeply needed,” is
set in colonial Zimbabwe in 1896 and reflects
on the period solely from the African perspective, with no white characters on the
stage. In this version, directed by Ola Ince,
the story unfolds in the round with sparse,
stylized sets that bring even greater drama
to the narrative.
That’s just one of
[See Gurira, F3]
F2
SU N DAY , JA N UA RY 6 , 2 019
L AT I M E S . C O M / CA L E N DA R
ARTS & BOOKS
A ROAD
TRIP FOR
ANOTHER
AGE
HE’S ON
A SOUTH
L.A. ROLL
CALIFORNIA
SOUNDS, F5
BOOK REVIEW, F6
THEATER
REVIEW
ON VIEW
Accent
on the
journey
toward
true self
F. Kathleen Foley
Photographs by
Sara Gernsbacher Parrasch Heijnen Gallery, Los Angeles
SARA Gernsbacher’s silicone sculptures, such as “Up Arms Center in 3,” don’t take up a lot of space but make use of that emptiness.
See what is missing
selected edges and cuts sleeve-size holes in
others. The resulting shapes vaguely resemble
flowers, garments, limbs, easels and
architectural elements.
Gernsbacher then loops together three or
four shapes and pins the casual composition to
the wall, where it droops, like a coat thrown
over a chair or a decorative garland that has
fallen to the floor and been trampled.
All of her works look limp and dirty, as if
they have been scraped from a downtown
sidewalk. The sense of exhaustion is palpable
and poignant, suggesting the kind of weariness
you feel in your bones.
Pie-in-the-sky idealism is nowhere to be
found. The same goes for saccharine
sentimentality. But ennui does not win out.
What you get instead is a no-nonsense
assessment of art’s place in life: an intimate
endeavor that flies under the radar of everyday
attentiveness, a sotto voce communiqué whose
meanings get under your skin.
By David Pagel
If you like your art big, bold and aggressive,
you’ll probably think that L.A. artist Sara
Gernsbacher’s seven body-scaled works fail to
hold the walls on which they hang. And that
they make the large main space at Parrasch
Heijnen Gallery feel hollowed out, even empty.
You would not be wrong.
But you’d miss the supple strength — and
silent power — of Gernsbacher’s scrappy
sculptures.
Emptiness, and the sense that something is
missing — either lost or stolen — is intrinsic to
Gernsbacher’s exhibition “Threefold Body,” on
view through Jan. 19 at the Boyle Heights
gallery. Each of its quietly compassionate
pieces takes its place in a world of suffering and
sorrow, both obvious and immeasurable.
Gernsbacher makes her irregularly shaped
forms by puddling pigmented silicone onto her
studio floor and letting it dry into skin-like
sections. She spray-paints some areas, trims
“SHAPE IS Your Touch” by Gernsbacher.
calendar@latimes.com
An ebullient woman
bounds onstage, chattering
in French so voluble it
makes you want to go back
in time to those high-school
foreign-language lessons
and pay more attention.
This is Sophie (Corinne
Shor), and she has a French
accent so thick you could
cut it with a baguette knife.
Full of bonhomie, joie de
vivre and those other
French phrases meaning
pure pleasure in life, she has
deplaned in Minneapolis,
shortly before the onset of a
hard winter.
It doesn’t take long for
Sophie to confide her very
open secret to the audience,
whom she invites to become
her “confidantes” throughout the brief, rollicking,
poignant “I Am Sophie,” a
solo show directed by Susan
Angelo now at Pacific Resident Theatre in Venice.
It seems that the very
French, oh-so-ooh-la-la
Sophie is actually Kate, a
Minnesotan born and bred,
complete with flat accent
and droning intonation.
Kate gravitated to Paris a
couple of years earlier and
returned as the extravagant, lively, irresistible
Sophie — whom she adamantly insists is the person
she intends to be, now and
forever.
A recent “Saturday
Night Live” sketch touched
on commonalities of things
universally detested, including youth who studied
abroad and returned home
with the accents of their
host countries. Make no
mistake: Sophie’s transformation is no mere affectation but a deep, conscious
choice that, as we later
learn, keeps the drab, sad
reality of her actual self at
bay.
But as others react with
negativity and dismay, most
painfully Sophie-nee-Kate’s
cancer-stricken father,
Shor’s play touches upon
timely issues of what it
means to transition into
one’s authentic self despite
facing opprobrium from
society and loved ones.
Sophie has been called
home to run the family
business during her father’s
decline and, as loss follows,
Shor’s initially comic play
deepens into a harrowing
portrait of personal grief.
The overriding problem
of the play is that Shor’s
intriguing central premise is
presented so reiteratively
that even the lighter-thanair, delightful Sophie wears
thin on occasion. Still,
Sophie’s pursuit of identity
is no narcissistic exercise.
It’s a fascinating journey
into what constitutes an
individual, and how one is
defined not only by society
but in one’s innermost self.
calendar@latimes.com
Pacific Resident Theatre
CORINNE SHOR in “I
Am Sophie” at Pacific
Resident Theatre.
S U N DAY , JA N UA RY 6 , 2 019
L AT I M E S . C O M / CA L E N DA R
F3
THEATER
Christopher L Proctor For The Times
ACTRESS and playwright Danai Gurira at the Young Vic Theatre in London, where her 2012 work “The Convert” is being staged. It’s set in 1896 colonial Zimbabwe.
She writes new viewpoints
[Gurira, from F1]
several Gurira plays onstage
around the world. Her 2015 “Familiar” is playing at Chicago’s Steppenwolf, and another production
of “Familiar” will open at San Diego’s Old Globe on Jan. 26.
Gurira remains busy in Hollywood too. Her “Black Panther”
character, Okoye, is likely to return
in
next
year’s
“Avengers:
Endgame,” and she is adapting
Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s”
Americanah” into a miniseries
starring Lupita Nyong’o. The playwright, actress and now Goodwill
Ambassador for UN Women took a
few days to fly in for the opening of
“The Convert” in London, where
she sat down to discuss the production, her career and why onscreen representation is essential
for people of color.
Have your plays been performed
in London?
This play has been done at the
Gate, which also did “Eclipsed” —
which Letitia was in as the lead
role. I didn’t work with her too
much with “Eclipsed.” I came in
for a few days for that one, but I
couldn’t get back to watch a performance. So I got to know her a
little bit then, but not as much as I
did during “Black Panther.” At
this point, we have a shorthand
with each other for many things.
that just by telling an excellent
story excellently was deeply heartening. And I think it was a first.
Can that help change
representation in Hollywood?
Let me take out my crystal ball!
But one can hope this is about
climate and not weather. That’s
what I keep saying. It’s about a
shift that’s happening because
that’s how it should be. There has
been an openness that has prevailed around these types of stories being told, absolutely. We’ve
seen some higher ups in this industry speak really powerfully
around how you do what makes
sense, and that means you tell a
variety of stories from a variety of
perspectives and you tell them
with authenticity.
Marc Brenner
PAAPA ESSIEDU and Letitia Wright costar in “The Convert,” told from an African point of view.
Did you have say in her casting in
this production?
Yes, in the sense that it was
very much something [Young Vic
Artistic Director] Kwame [KweiArmah] thought of immediately. I
was in love with the idea.
What was driving you when you
wrote “The Convert”?
Where is the history of my
people told from our perspective
on the screen or on the stage?
Where is our experience of the
colonial impact and assault? And
who would I have been if I’d been
born 150 years ago and what journey would I have trekked?
A lot of those questions were at
the fore. I grew up in a British
colony, in Zimbabwe, when it was a
young ex-colony. It was very much
a British schooling system, and I
was taught very little about the
land I was living on.
I left Zimbabwe and came to
the United States for university,
and in liberal arts colleges, you’re
allowed to start thinking about,
“Who are my people? Who am I?
What's our history?” And start to
really explore that in a way that’s
necessary for your own journey.
And I think it’s even necessary for
the Brits, quite honestly. Their
history doesn’t seem to involve
those who were colonized, in how
it’s assessed. So it is exciting for
me to see this play performed in
front of a British audience.
Do you write plays to offer new
perspectives?
I guess they are new, but for me,
they’re just me. They’re perspectives from my people, who are
often the ones marginalized and
Film Frame / Marvel Studios
Gene Page AMC
GURIRA first turned (and cut off) heads as the
GURIRA plays the warrior general Okoye, head
katana-wielding Michonne on “Walking Dead.”
of Wakandan armed forces, in “Black Panther.”
underrepresented or misrepresented. So it really is about, “Can I
explore another angle of humanity
that hasn’t been represented?” It’s
the other-ized perspective. That’s
what I do. People say, “Oh, it’s
political.” But it’s not political. It’s
my people. It gets other-ized, and
that’s the thing I’m aiming to
obliterate. Or, at least, to provoke
another understanding.
Are you writing new plays?
Right now, I’ve been focused on
writing for the screen. I’ve been
very involved in the plays I already
have created. I’ve been involved in
their various productions. I’m
constantly connected to productions, but in terms of writing, my
writing right now is for the screen.
But that doesn’t mean it’s not
going to be for the stage as well. It’s
just not what I’m doing right now,
which is an important step for me
because I’ve had a burden on my
heart for a long time to put these
types of characters on the screen.
How are you feeling about the
appreciation for “Black Panther”
and how those characters that
were brought to the screen?
It’s been deeply nourishing.
And more so than we could have
been anticipated or expected. We
definitely put all our heart and
soul into it. We were seeking the
most authentic, the most truthful,
the most alive, the most connected
version of the story we could all
tell. And the beauty was that was a
collective perspective. It was
deeply rooted in Ryan [Coogler],
but it wasn’t just Ryan. It was all of
us. He put around him an amazing
team that enhanced that core that
he brought. We were able to work
as a great unit. And Marvel was
great in embracing that we were
coming in with this whole other
perspective and deep desire to say
many things in an African language. They allowed us to feel like
collaborators, as, of course, did
Ryan. So as a result, we all feel a
collective ownership, which is
really special.
Does that make the SAG nomination for outstanding performance
by a cast even more validating?
Yeah. It’s beautiful. It’s really
cool. I just saw that list of all of us
and I was like, “That’s really beautiful.”
Before “Black Panther,” do you
think there had been a depiction
of Africa in a film that’s as
positive and progressive?
I don’t think so. I really don’t
think so. That’s what drove me to
start writing. Like, “This cannot
be the way my people are portrayed in a cinematic form.” For
me, it was theater at the time —
that’s my medium. It was really
that dearth. Every time I saw a
film — and not all — there were
many interpretations of the continent I found really disturbing and
limited and from a perspective
that wasn’t ours. To all the ways in
which “Black Panther” counters
Do you remember feeling
reflected in movies, TV and
theater as a kid?
No, I did not feel like I was being
reflected. As a kid, that’s when you
figure out how you envision yourself. You see yourself as Other as a
child because you don’t have the
vocabulary nor the world view or
the understanding of global history and all the dynamics of racial
oppression to understand that it’s
not as it should be. So as a child,
you’re really being indoctrinated
with the idea that you’re not it.
You’re not of the right thing, and
these are the people who are. And
that’s what’s really scary about not
giving children representation.
They absorb those images. But it’s
so unnecessary. We don’t actually
have to put children through that.
It’s really easy to give them representations of self, whatever color
they are.
Do you ever imagine adapting
“The Convert” for the screen and
bringing those characters to a
broader audience?
I do have an idea for how “The
Convert” could transform into
something more long-form. …
What was happening during the
whole scramble-for-Africa time
period has never been truly and
fully explored from the African
perspective. And certainly not
from the African female perspective. So the idea of seeing that
coming to pass and using “The
Convert” as the base is something
I’ve had an interest in for a while.
It’s in the file of things planned.
Do you have a lot of things
planned?
Yeah, I do. I have lots of ideas.
It’s so funny when people approach me with ideas I’m like,
“OK, let me get through a couple of
the ones I have first.” I have a lot of
things I want to get to. It’s about
what’s sitting most prominently
on my heart at that time. It’s about
how my life is shaping up in that
moment. It’s about the partners
and collaborators who have been
themselves available at that moment. That fuels what direction I
take next.
calendar@latimes.com
F4
SU N DAY , JA N UA RY 6 , 2 019
L AT I M E S . C O M / CA L E N DA R
POP MUSIC
Rough rhymes in Alabama
[Rubberband OG, from F1]
memorial, which opened in late
April, is a sparse and powerful
architecture of reckoning, a hushed yet blistering cry against the nation’s most grievous sins. It is not
far from the Rev. Martin Luther
King Jr.’s house and the bus stop
where Rosa Parks waited in defiance.
Rubberband OG knew inklings
of this past. But growing up with
hustlers, crack dealers and cops,
who every Tuesday and Thursday
raided the Tulane Court housing
project, he had different concerns,
like scraping up a dollar or two and
heading to Church’s Chicken on
the corner to buy a leg or a thigh.
The other day, Rubberband OG,
27, who drives a white Escalade and
is one of the South’s rising rappers,
passed his old neighborhood. It
was rebuilt and prettier but still
Section 8.
He stopped a couple of hundred
yards away at the small, white clapboard home of King, now a museum beyond a magnolia tree on
Jackson Street.
“Never went inside,” he said.
“Not in the whole time you were
growing up?”
“We had other things on our
mind,” he said. “Beating the system. Watching for police. We were
broke, looking out for ourselves.
But looking at it now means a lot.”
The legacy of Malcolm Wright,
the perseverance and eloquence of
King and the hectic, musical life of
Rubberband OG play in eerie reverie on these streets. In a time of
Black Lives Matter, police shootings of men of color, emboldened
white supremacists and a president who incites cultural divisions,
racism in America is subtle and
glaring, written in history books
and exclaimed tweets, shaping immigration policies, university admissions and how a man like Rubberband OG navigates a world beyond the bounds of his beat patterns and lyrics.
The lives of African Americans
resonated through film and art in
2018, notably Spike Lee’s “BlacKkKlansman,”
Barry
Jenkins’
adaptation of James Baldwin’s “If
Beale
Street
Could
Talk,”
Kendrick Lamar’s Pulitzer Prize
and Michelle Obama’s bestselling
memoir, “Becoming.” The era of
Jim Crow’s systemic racism is long
gone, but there are disturbing imbalances. Blacks make up about
13% of the U.S population but account for roughly 40% of the incarcerated population, according to
the Prison Policy Initiative. The
median household income in
Montgomery, a predominantly
black city, was $46,545 in 2017, or
more than $10,000 below the national median.
“With all the civil rights history
in this city, you’d think things
would have changed more,” said
Jroc Bell, who grew up with Rubberband OG and is now one of his
posse. “But we’re still struggling.
You can’t find a job that pays $15 an
hour. Back when we were growing
up, if your friend got killed, you
cried and got over it. Rubberband
is speaking to what’s really happening. The poverty and hustling.
The shootings and drug selling
that’s going on not just in Mont-
Julie Bennett For The Times
“IT REFLECTS reality,” says rapper Rubberband OG of his songs that expose the violence in his Alabama hometown and beyond.
gomery but all over the world.”
Rubberband OG settled into
the front seat and drove on, every
corner raising a memory, like lightning scattering sparrows. Getti.
Booger. Rachat. The names hit the
air like verse. Two cousins and one
friend gunned down in recent
years.
Rubberband OG is accustomed
to gunfire and funeral hymns. He
was shot at in a recent drive-by,
blurring and ducking while doing a
Facebook livestream. Many of his
songs, including “Bout That Life”
and “2019 (Freestyle),” are rife with
guns, flaunted money, misogyny
and young men of vengeance. They
don’t glorify violence so much as
lay bare the starkness of lives
caught in a sequestered world of
cruel codes and unforgiving pecking orders. They snap and swagger
but beneath their staccato loops
are echoes of desperation. The
lyrics startle in their venom.
“If he runs shoot him in the
back . . . eat him like a
snack.”
“I want see the [man’s]
mama cry.”
It’s true and it’s him, but it’s not
all of him. “Every positive song I do
gets overlooked,” he said. “So I rap
about what they want to hear, and
what they want to hear is the violence and stuff like that. It reflects
reality. Most times these songs get
played in a club, and when you’re in
a club you’re drinking and feeling
good. So you want to hear stuff
about money because you bought
yourself something good to wear
for that night. You feel like money
when you got your little outfit on.
The violence, I don’t know it’s
crazy. It’s what we see.”
Rubberband OG wrote “Keep
Your Head Up” as homage to his
single mother, who worked three
jobs after his father disappeared
when he was 4. The soon-to-be-released song “Why Lord?” examines
the deaths of his cousins and
friend, tying existential questions
to faith and loss. His voice softens
when he talks about these songs.
The hard edge of him, the one in
videos draped in jewelry and brandishing weapons, loses its sharp-
ness and he appears as if a man
looking for answers to things big
and small: “My grandmother is
deaf. I never heard her talk. What
would she sound like?”
He can seem at one with the air,
tapered jeans, wrapped in a winter
coat, his mother’s name, Kathy,
blooming on his neck. Rubberband
is a nickname for how he held his
money; OG, less the slang “original
gangster,” in him means old soul or
something close to it, the way his
spirit resides in a moment, how he
glides through a crowd.
His friends say he composes all
the time — he must have 300 songs
written down or waiting like angels
and bad men in his head. He
started when he was 9, etching rivers of words in school books. His
mom bought him a beat machine
when he was 12. The world takes
shape when he writes, its colors
and darkness, its ways of escape.
Inspired as a boy by Tupac, and later by Gucci Mane and Young Jeezy,
he wants to be as big as Jay-Z.
“OG speaks the truth,” said
Martez Ligon, another member of
the posse. “He was born to tell it.”
He dropped out of school in the
11th grade. He smoked weed and
kept close to his eastside crew. He
later found a job making headrests
at a Hyundai factory but lost it
when he didn’t show up one day,
which still bothers him. He liked
the work and felt he was unfairly let
go. With a savings of $1,300, he
made his first hit, “Go Crazy,”
catching the attention of DJs and
Think It’s A Game Records. The
boys of his youth have grown into
men with him. They often hang out
at Ligon’s house, playing video
games, talking shows, forking food
from a skillet.
“I started seeing myself on
YouTube and thought this could
work,” said Rubberband OG, who
has performed across the South.
“But now that I have a name, people I don’t know might want to injure me. I’m on videos with money,
jewelry, and now people I don’t
know don’t like me either. I like to
stay gone. Away from the city. People outside the city treat you better
than the city where you’re from.”
The Bible and prison are full of
[See Rubberband OG, F5]
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He’s on
a South
L.A. roll
By Randall Roberts
‘Victory Lap
(feat. Stacey Barthe)’
Nipsey Hussle
(Atlantic)
Bob Miller Getty Images
THE NATIONAL Memorial For Peace and Justice includes a sculpture by Kwame Akoto-Bamfo.
[Rubberband OG, from F4]
men cast out from their homes.
They hold too harsh a mirror, make
a place see its demons. Rubberband OG quit going to church a
while ago, but he still prays. His
mother taught him. He is at once a
twist of poetry and an unsettling
statistic. He’s the kind of young
man conservatives hold up to signify what’s morally wrong with society. He has four children — a 9year-old son, a 2-year-old daughter
and two 1-year-old daughters —
from four women. He is not married.
“It wasn’t the right thing to do,”
he said. “I was living fast, but that’s
all changed.” He stayed quiet. Listened to traffic. Moved on.
“If you’re a black man and aren’t
going to college or into the NBA,
NFL or rap, it’s like: What else you
going to do?” he said. “You’re
scared to unbuckle your seat belt
because a cop thinks you’re reaching for a gun.” In his song, “If Something Happen,” he imagines his
death, divvying up cars and money,
leaving love and other things to his
mom and kids, and taking away the
belief that “I’m still gonna be a legend in the hood.”
DJ Solo, a sage of Montgomery’s music world, who recently mixed the Eagles’ “Hotel
California” with Chris Brown’s
“Deuces,” said Rubberband OG
embodies the rawness of Southern
hip-hop. “He’s bringing a conscientiousness to street life,” Solo said.
“He’s saying, ‘I went through it so
you don’t have to.’ He’s authentic.
His brain is fast. His albums are
like stories.”
Solo sat before a few computer
screens; his voice sounded like one
you hear on the radio at 2 a.m.,
telling you about Miles Davis or
Charlie Parker. Smooth, a little
smoky. The room across the hall
was stacked with vinyl and turntables. He recalled the music from
back in the day, the time of blackand-white TV, fire hoses and police
dogs; the era when King ended his
march from Selma below the steps
of the state capitol in Montgomery,
where a statue of Jefferson Davis,
the president of the Confederacy,
still stands.
“I don’t think enough musicians
today are bringing awareness to
what used to be,” he said. “They’re
not showing our history here. History is becoming memory. It
shouldn’t. I hate that you have to
remember where you came from.”
The ticket-takers and guards at
the National Memorial for Peace
and Justice knew Rubberband
OG. They smiled and nodded. He
stepped through the metal detector and into the history DJ Solo
talked about, the past that when
you see it, like the sculpture of a
man in chains, makes you think it’s
alive. Skin cut, dignity unbroken,
the man in chains stared at Rubberband OG. He stared back. Centuries fell away. Wind blew across
the autumn grass, fading, until the
air carried no sound. He walked on
through rows of blocks — more
than 800 Corten steel monuments
— etched with names.
They subsumed him.
“Look at this,” said Torrey
Davone, a DJ and Rubberband
OG’s manager.
Henry Smith, 17, was lynched in
Paris, Texas, in 1893 before a mob of
10,000 people.
“Ten thousand people,” Davone
said. “It’s like they thought it was
entertainment. You can’t understand the magnitude of it until you
stand here.”
The monuments were suspended, some low, some high.
Davone and Rubberband OG
seemed lost among them, the kind
of encompassing loss a man must
have felt being bound and led to a
tree by a crowd with a rope.
“Racism is still here,” said
Davone. “It’s politics and power
now.” They walked on. Read.
Caleb Gadly was lynched in
Bowling Green, Kentucky, in 1894
for walking behind the wife of his
white employer.
Sun slanted across the monuments, brightness mixed with
shadows. Rubberband OG stayed
quiet. A man so quick with rhymes
and the spin of syllables, he wondered how to fit words to such a
thing.
The South Los Angeles rapper
and roller rink owner earned his lap
in 2018, and in his new video, he
documents the celebratory moment(s). The clip for the title track
from his critically acclaimed 2018
album “Victory Lap” finds the selfdescribed “Slauson Boy” zipping
across water, spliff in hand on the
bow of a boat, and elsewhere roaming a South L.A. residential neighborhood.
As he does so, Hussle raps of
“downtown diamond district jewelers” asking for his business. He
recalls how he “flew to Cancun,
smoking Cubans on the boat / And
docked at Tulum just to smoke.”
Other snapshot moments? “Listening to music at the Mayan ruins / True devotion on the bluest
ocean, cruising.”
‘Forewarn EP’
Sana Shenai
(Leaving)
The Bandcamp notes on this
seriously synthetic debut record
describes its members Jimmy
Tamborello and Mitchell Brown as
“masters of reel-time tape tangling, live looping, seriously slippery synthesizers, fantastic field
recordings, tantalizing textures,
sequenced sentience and plenty o'
pedals.” It’s true.
Tamborello is best known as
half of synth-pop legends the Postal Service. Others refer to him as
Dntel, whose oft-melodic digital
dance numbers have scored the
L.A. beat scene for nearly as long as
it has existed. He and fellow
Dublab DJ-musician Brown (a.k.a.
Nanny Cantaloupe) travel on a
journey to the center of the circuit
board as Sana Shenai. There, deep
within the darkness, waves of digitized hiss maneuver through measures laced with uneven beats,
scattered thumps and menacing
hums. This introductory EP was
issued in early December; a forthcoming full-length album has been
promised for 2019.
‘Away We Go’
Bad Suns
(Epitaph)
Across the first few bars of
“Away We Go,” fans of Bruce
Springsteen might be forgiven for
wondering whether he and his
band had dropped a new song.
Driven by a piano melody that’s
pure Boss, that opening suggestion, though, is short-lived. The
Woodland Hills-born Bad Suns
quickly guide the three-minute
rock song into post-punk territory
as singer Christo Bowman
declares that he needs “some kind
of reaction” and “a little compassion.”
Depending on the circumstances, that’s not too much to ask,
and the band’s new video finds
them rocking through a screamalong anthem that argues their
case. With a soaring chorus and a
solid string of chords, the song
moves with sharpened confidence.
Recently signed to L.A. punk label
Epitaph after issuing two albums
for Vagrant, the band has been
teasing news of its third studio album, which is likely to arrive in the
coming year.
randall.roberts@latimes.com
Twitter: @liledit
jeffrey.fleishman@latimes.com
About this series
This story is the fourth in a series
of occasional articles by Jeffrey
Fleishman about cultural touchstones reflecting the tumultuous
political times across America.
Rowan Daly
BAD SUNS’ “Away We Go” is post-punk with a hint of the Boss.
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BOOK REVIEW
Road trip in the apocalypse
Sweden’s Simon Stålenhag turns his inventive eye on the U.S. landscape to arrive at ‘The Electric State’
By Liz Ohanesian
The Electric State
Simon Stålenhag
Skybound Books; 144 pp., $35
While sitting outside a Marina
del Rey coffee shop on a recent
afternoon, Swedish sci-fi artist and
author Simon Stålenhag shares
the unlikely source of his inspiration: “It started with Nirvana,” he
says. “I wanted to do a science fiction thing where Nirvana makes
sense.”
His alternative-universe graphic novel “The Electric State” follows a young woman and a robot
traveling along highways familiar
to California road-trippers. But in
Stålenhag’s dystopian world set in
1997, our region is called Pacifica,
and the country has been ravaged
by drone war. A VR-like technology
has also zapped the life from users.
Yet it’s also a world where rock
bands like Nirvana and the Beatles
have existed and where recognizable corporate logos, like Longs
Drugs, dot the landscape alongside fictional brands.
Known for narrative art that
mixes realistic landscapes with
20th century nostalgia and science
fiction elements, Stålenhag has
amassed a cult following and critical acclaim for his inventive and
captivating work. He even crowdfunded his book projects through
Kickstarter campaigns, which
brought his digitally distributed
artwork into the analog world.
“The Electric State” was released in late 2018 through Skybound Books — the imprint
formed by “Walking Dead” creator
Robert Kirkman’s Skybound Entertainment — and Simon &
Schuster’s Atria Books. Yet interest around Stålenhag’s works has
been growing; the Russo brothers
— the sibling director duo who recently made “Avengers: Infinity
War” — landed the film rights for
the book in late 2017. In addition to
“The Electric State” deal, Amazon
has ordered a first season of “Tales
From the Loop,” another graphic
project based on Stålenhag’s earlier sci-fi art.
Stålenhag had been in Los Angeles with his wife for the past few
months for what he describes as a
“nice work-cation.” He has book
signings scheduled and has been
taking meetings. He’s also working
on a new story.
While his earlier art was steeped
in his native Sweden, Stålenhag
looked to the U.S. for “The Electric
State.” The book is dystopian ’90s
at its most bleak. It’s the gloom of
“Twin Peaks” and the detached alienation of Nirvana’s “Nevermind”
with a plot that reads like “The XFiles”-meets-“The
Lawnmower
Man.” It takes readers from the
Mojave Desert and up through the
Sierra Nevada mountains before
heading toward the Northern California coast.
“I think the first idea I had was,
what if Kurt Cobain went on a road
trip?” he says. In a way, that stuck
for a bit. While working on the
book, he referred to the protagonist as “Negative Creep,” after a
song on Nirvana’s debut album,
“Bleach,” before settling on the
name Michelle.
When “The Electric State” was
just a germ of an idea, Stålenhag
hit California’s roads with his wife
and his mom. They traveled from
San Francisco to Los Angeles, then
headed to the desert. They ventured into the tiny town of Bishop
and into the vast expanses of Yosemite. Stålenhag’s mom drove
while he took pictures from the
front seat. Some of the potential location shots weren’t usable —
“Everything from Monterey and
south was just too sunny and
pretty,” he says — but Northern
California was perfect. It reminded
him of “The X-Files,” one of his inspirations for the book.
“I guess I’m a very emotional
artist,” Stålenhag says. “It takes a
while before I intellectualize what
I’m going to do.” The inspiration,
he says, always comes from his
childhood. From there, he tries to
figure out why those inspirations
trigger certain feelings. It’s a process he describes as similar to dowsing for water. He’ll make playlists
on Spotify that reflect the era he’s
trying to capture. He’ll take photos, then begin sketching over
them. Once he has a few images,
he’ll share them on Twitter to see if
others connect in the same way.
In the process of making “The
Electric State,” Stålenhag used social media to ask readers about
places that existed in the ’90s, like
the chain drugstores and markets
that pop up in the background. He
shared some of the art as works in
progress and says a lot of people
commented that one design
looked a lot like a Dalek, the villainous alien beings from “Doctor
Simon Stalenhag
SIMON STÅLENHAG’S illustrations in his graphic novel “The Electric State” imagine a bleak world destroyed by a drone war.
Simon Stalenhag
A YOUNG woman and her robot set off on a cross-country trip across a ravaged and pop culture-filled landscape in “Electric State.”
Katie Falkenberg Los Angeles Times
ARTIST and author Stålenhag is known for mixing science fiction elements with realistic settings.
Who.” Stålenhag had never seen
the famed British sci-fi series, but
changed the design.
The full project can be quite immersive. Stålenhag is also an electronic musician whose ambient
compositions are tied to his visual
art and writing. For “The Electric
State,” he made a corresponding
soundtrack album. (His most recent album, “Music for DOS,” was
made with now-vintage gear that
he learned to use as an adolescent.
It was released last summer.)
“The Electric State’s” protagonist, Michelle, is inspired by
Stålenhag’s older brother and sister. His brother was a Nirvana fan,
while his sister listened to the band
REM. They passed the teen pop
culture of the era down to Stålenhag. Michelle’s own protective,
nurturing relationship with her
younger brother is also inspired by
the elder siblings. “My parents divorced when I was 10, so I guess the
last four or five years of their marriage was pretty bad,” says
Stålenhag, born in 1984. “My siblings, to some extent, took care of
me and were kind of the adults for a
while.” He adds that he wanted to
make his book “about that kind of
love that you have for your siblings,” while incorporating the pop
culture elements of the 1990s.
That mix of science fiction and
real world pop-culture nostalgia is
instantly compelling, but there are
layers to “The Electric State” that
take the story beyond surface value. Michelle’s journey is told in the
first person with frequent use of
flashbacks to her life before she left
home for Pacifica. The war is technically over, but the aftermath has
been marred by its own strain of
chaos. In a way, it is an extremely
American story, bringing together
themes like the intersection of war
and technology; fire-and-brimstone religion and its effect on
LGBT youth; families separated
by great physical distance while
being a part of the same country.
And yet, there’s a universality to
the story.
Michelle may be young, but she
has already suffered profound loss
multiple times. She has been let
down by life in ways that are extreme but relatable to many. “The
emotional apocalypse has already
happened to her, so when it actually starts happening around her,
she’s already adapted,” Stålenhag
says. “She’s a very good survivor.”
It’s a story that’s not bogged
down with details; the minutia of
1990s California probably wouldn’t
have worked anyhow. “I didn’t
want to write about local, specific
stuff because that would feel
wrong,” says Stålenhag. “Those
kinds of things, you can’t really research, you have to live them.”
Instead, he tapped into his own
teenage emotions and let it evolve.
“I just trusted that people are
the same,” says Stålenhag.
Ohanesian is a Los Angeles arts
and culture journalist.
S U N DAY , JA N UA RY 6 , 2 019
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F7
BOOK REVIEW
Bard of our messy modern lives
John Kenney’s new novel ‘Talk to Me’ and his ‘Love Poems for Married People’ share a darkly funny slant
By Stuart Miller
John Kenney had a busy 2018.
The Brooklyn resident is married
with two young children and is a
freelance copywriter for a major ad
agency. But this year, he was also
putting the finishing touches on his
second novel, “Talk to Me” (out
Jan. 15). And in his spare time, he
wrote “Love Poems for Married
People,” which came out Monday.
While Kenney’s first novel,
“Truth in Advertising,” sprang
from his years in that field, “Talk to
Me” is more ambitious in scope,
tracking the downfall of a network
news anchor whose personal and
professional life simultaneously
collapse thanks to his self-absorbed missteps and today’s rapidly changing media environment.
By contrast, “Love Poems” offers quick and mordantly witty dissections of every little thing in a
marriage, particularly in the arenas of communication and intimacy. The book has recently been
optioned by Ryan Reynolds’ production company. “I’m stunned,
thrilled and flattered that Ryan
and his team like the book,” Kenney
says. “As my wife said, ‘That’s
amazing, considering that the poems aren’t that good.’ ”
Modest and affable, Kenney was
readily amenable to changing our
interview spot on a recent afternoon when his chosen pub was too
noisy. Then Kenney took it in stride
when he led us to his backup, a “quiet bakery” where the interview was
disrupted by a child throwing an
epic tantrum and then by an employee seemingly dropping every
metal object in the place. “It’s like
doing an interview in a bowling alley,” he joked.
You wrote “Valentine’s Day
Poems for Married People” for
the New Yorker a few years ago.
How did it become a book?
In June, I was at a Penguin
Random House cocktail reception
and my editor introduced me to
someone there who said, “I loved
that. We should do a book.” The
following week my editor said she
would need a draft Aug. 1. I asked
how many poems, and she said 70
or 75.
I was about to go on a TV
commercial shoot in Spain, and I
was editing the novel and, you
know, trying to stay married. I
wrote them in a sprint. I wrote
more than 75 but a lot were quite
terrible. Fortunately, those did not
make the book. My wife is a
spectacular writer and editor. She
made these a lot better. I ran
everything by her; if it makes her
laugh, it’s good.
Are your poems dark-yet-funny
or funny-yet-dark?
Oh, gosh. I hope they’re darkly
funny. I’m a fan of marriage, and
I’m happily married. But marriage
is bizarre and difficult. It can be
wonderful, but wonderful is not
funny. I want the poems to be as
ridiculous as possible, but they are
based in a truth. A friend said the
best way to describe his marriage
is by saying, “What time is it?” It
could be an awesome day or a
terrible day, and it all could change
in 10 minutes. That’s what makes it
interesting.
Rick Knief
JOHN KENNEY turned a New Yorker piece into “Love Poems for Married People,” coming out two weeks before his second novel.
don’t want to be judged on my
worst day. Haven’t you ever come
across someone you didn’t like,
and then you learn they just got
horrible news or were in the
middle of a divorce, and when you
give them a chance, you find you
like them?
The book is also about this
reckoning for white male
privilege. I’m not talking about
#MeToo, about the Les Moonves
type of sociopathic, predatory
people. This is about screaming at
someone, about using power and
privilege against a weaker person.
G.P. Putnam's Sons
You have a line in “Truth in
Advertising” where [the main
character] Fin says he likes funny
poems and ...
Really?
You don’t remember that? I
thought that was a reference to
yourself.
No, prior to writing these for
the New Yorker, I’d never done this
before. Please know I would never
reference myself. As someone who
is the fifth of six boys, I would have
been beaten senseless for doing
that.
Your first novel obviously came
from your work experience. With
“Talk to Me,” were you drawn
first to write about these
G.P. Putnam's Sons
characters or the ideas about
media and social media that the
book tackles?
Certainly I’m fascinated by the
media, but it was the characters. I
have a daughter — she will be 10 —
and we’re really close. But
parenting can be hard, so I got to
wondering what happens if you
don’t throw yourself into it. There
was this idea of putting a huge job
and money and prestige ahead of
being the best father for his
daughter.
Absent fathers were an issue in
your first novel too.
You’ve talked to my therapist.
I find characters that are
complicated, and initially maybe
not so likable, very interesting. I
“Truth in Advertising” was
first-person, but this time you
switched to third. Why?
I liked the voice of Fin in my
first book and felt I could run a
marathon with that. But for this
book I wanted a much wider lens,
so we can see so many different
things instead of limiting it to one
perspective.
Did you think about Howard
Beale while writing about a
troubled news anchor?
It would have been impossible
not to. It’s one of my favorite
movies. I pay homage by
including a reference to
“Network” in a scene at a party. So
of course it was an influence, but I
didn’t want a “mad man” as my
character.
Neither the nightly news nor the
more modern media and social
media come across particularly
well in “Talk to Me.”
The nightly news has become is
a redundant outdated thing. By
the time it’s on, we know
everything already. But also, these
men and women live in a bubble
world, where they become part of
the story. It takes a very strong
character to not let that go to your
head, to not become center of the
world and take people around you
for granted.
Social media is still early days;
it’s just a few thousand days old.
It’s the Wild West. What’s going to
be interesting is what it becomes.
It has the power to become a
democratic force. Look at the
Arab Spring or #MeToo
movement; that doesn’t happen 30
years ago with a letter to the
editor. I’m by no means against it.
But in its current form, it is often
really brutal; it’s the cool kid table
in the lunchroom.
George Saunders once said his
only regret is not being kinder in
his youth. I just find kindness so
beautiful and powerful and
heart-stopping. I don’t know if
today is a crueler time — we’ve
done a pretty good job as a society
over the millennia of being unkind
— but we’ve never lived in a time
with this speed and constant
barrage of shockingly unkind,
unempathetic behavior. All it
takes sometimes is someone
reaching across the divide. And
the book asks, “What is the quality
of mercy?” Not just from a societal
point but within a family.
Miller is the co-author of “The
Other Islands of New York City”
Booker winner triumphs over troubles
By A.N. Devers
Milkman
Anna Burns
Graywolf Press: 360 pp., $16
There were two separate narratives in the United Kingdom after
the announcement that Anna
Burns’ novel “Milkman” had won
the 2018 Booker Prize.
Firstly, the win elevated Anna
Burns as a folk hero, as a result of
her thanking in “Milkman’s” acknowledgments the food banks
and social services she used after
completing her manuscript while
waiting to sell the novel ( rejected
several times before it was published). In the following interviews
and profiles about her win, she
shared that she had a back injury
and struggled to make ends meet
and was writing under extreme financial constraints, so she needed
to draw on government support.
Her comments were applauded
but also also fueled debate and
drew criticism on the internet and
social media that she had taken advantage of a system. These criticisms were beat back, the evidence
being quite clear she made the best
use of the help she received in writing “Milkman.” She was triumphant and is now beloved, at
least, in the literary community.
The second narrative is focused
on the book itself, which has not altogether been accepted with the
same amount of triumph, although
it certainly should be, not only for
her status as the first writer from
Northern Ireland to win the prize
but for an accomplished book presenting an ordinary, unnamed 18year-old girl’s perspective of her life
unintentionally ensnared by the
politics and forces of the Troubles
— Northern Ireland’s complicated
and destructive ethno-conflict
that pitted neighbors and communities against each other and divided a nation into factions and
mini-factions in the late 20th century.
Instead, the book has been met
with careful appreciation and lots
of not particularly kind words in reviews stating that it is “eccentric,”
“odd,” “difficult” and “complicated” — all meant to suggest it is a
hard read. The book has also been
called “relentlessly internalized”
and “baffling.”
Don’t let this do anything but
persuade you to read and absorb it.
The difficulty is only in settling into
a fresh voice and style that are
dense, yes, but would not work in
any other format. A novel with the
setting of Northern Ireland in the
late 20th century should not be an
“easy” read. It would be a dishonest book and a failure. There is too
much to contend with.
In an unnamed town and in an
unnamed country, our narrator,
the Middle Sister, is doing the best
she can to contend with other people’s desires and wants for her life.
Young women don’t culturally belong only to themselves, even if
they want, but are subject still to
the desires of their parents, families, boyfriends, older siblings,
churches and communities.
They want her to stop walking
around town with her nose in a
book, to which she asks, “Are you
saying it’s okay for him to go
around with Semtex but not okay
for me to read ‘Jane Eyre’ in public?” Her habit has drawn the attention of a man referred to as
Milkman, a senior member of the
paramilitary whom everyone
warns her about. But, she explains,
he is not her boyfriend or lover. He
is her stalker, her nemesis and her
nightmare. Milkman won’t leave
her alone, even threatening to kill
the man she cares for — who is
named only as her “maybe
boyfriend.”
She is trying to lay low, steer
clear of the sectarian strife around
her, but her withdrawn nature is
startling to just about everyone
around her. Everyone else is deeply
involved in side-taking, judgment
and policing each other’s behavior
as friends, neighbors and enemies
are killed, vanished or punished for
being on the right or wrong side of
things. No one believes that she
isn’t involved with the Milkman.
Even her best friend, whom she finally entrusts with her secret that
the Milkman is upending and
threatening her life, only berates
her for walking while reading too
much, bringing all of this scrutiny
on herself, being different from everyone else.
Graywolf Press
“Milkman” is a deft and triumphant work of considerable intelligence and importance.
It is a deeply feminist work, a
compelling and significant look at
how the regular life of a young
woman is intimately used for personal and political gain. And it is
told originally. The voice isn’t so
much eccentric and odd as strong
and unique and honest — yes, the
narration is like none you’ve read.
That alone is its triumph. Readers,
perhaps, should be willing to do a
little work to discover an important book, the gift of reading never
came with the promise of it being
always “easy.” And you can’t help
but wonder if this is gendered criti-
cism. Would it receive this criticism
of being too hard if it was written by
a man? “Milkman’s” critical reception is a little too much like subliminally delivered advice women receive throughout life to dumb
themselves down to be better liked
by the masses.
The other triumph of “Milkman” is our narrator’s presentation of the troubles of being a woman — not just in a violent society
torn apart by what is essentially a
form of war. The sexism and violence against our narrator are not
unfamiliar and not unique to
Northern Ireland’s conflict; they
are universal and resonant in the
daily lives of women. Her observations and reflections of the storm
swirling around her are smart,
darkly funny, grim and real.
Middle Sister is a force. She is a
modern heroine. She is blisteringly
observant of necessary truths
about the state of a woman’s life
and attempt to find her own
agency. So what that her internalized narration is unsettling and unfamiliar at first? The reader should
treasure the invitation to follow
along with her brilliant train of
thought.
She’s not difficult at all.
Devers is an arts journalist and
editor. Her first book, “Train,”
comes out this year from
Bloomsbury. She is founder of the
Second Shelf, a rare book business
and literary journal focusing on
the writing of women.
F8
SU N DAY , JA N UA RY 6 , 2 019
L AT I M E S . C O M / CA L E N DA R
BOOK REVIEW
BESTSELLERS
LOS ANGELE S TIME S
JAN. 6, 2019
Fiction
weeks
on list
1. There There by Tommy Orange
(Knopf: $25.95) A powerful tale of
contemporary Native American
life.
©Hosoe Eikoh Akio Nagasawa Gallery / Publishing
HOSOE EIKOH’S “Ordeal by Roses (Barakei) No. 6” from 1961. Photographs from many genres are seen in “Ravens & Red Lipstick.”
Japan represents itself
[‘Ravens’ from F1]
throughout.) But I found myself
paying particular attention to images of the body. This may reflect
Fritsch’s biases: she also wrote
“The Body as a Screen: Japanese
Art Photography of the 1990s.” It
also likely reflects my own perspective as a Japanese American raised
with a paucity of images of Asians.
In suburban California in the 1970s
and ’80s, Asian people appeared
only occasionally in the media, and
when they did (with the exception
of Connie Chung), they were usually sexpots, war casualties, effeminate villains or bumbling foreigners. When you don’t see yourself in
culture, you feel unimportant, then
angry. Things have improved a little since then, but I am always on
guard for any whiff of stereotype.
So I raise an eyebrow when confronted with a book like “Ravens,”
in which a Western author purports to represent Japanese culture and, by extension, people.
Fritsch is curator of modern
and contemporary art at Oxford
University’s Ashmolean Museum,
a Japanese photography specialist, and a translator, but her effort
comes on the heels of many egregious misrepresentations. I appreciated her reflections on her relationship to Japanese culture,
which she describes as shifting between a “ ‘Western’ distant position, and a ‘Japanese’ proximal
perspective.” And she is careful to
set “Ravens” apart from earlier
publications that made overly simplistic assumptions. For example,
an author once asserted that because they take their shoes off indoors, Japanese people have a
“more natural relationship with
the feet.” (Insert eye-roll here.) Although her references to Japanese
history are often glancing, Fritsch
situates her subjects within actual
historical and social movements
rather than reductive Western
imaginings. That effort should not
be remarkable, but it is.
Fritsch’s in-between position is
reflected in the book’s design,
which intersperses her informative, accessible history with transcriptions of 25 interviews she conducted with many of the artists.
This approach allows their voices
to percolate throughout, presenting varied, personal points of view.
I am heartened by this mixture,
and by Fritsch’s acknowledgement
of her own position as a proximal
outsider. The book not only provides rich, multivalent context for
its arresting images, but also hope
for more nuanced understandings
of traditions not our own.
“Ravens” begins in the postWWII period, in which photography served primarily as a documentary medium, recording the
devastation of the war as well as
the resilience of survivors. Hayashi
Tadahiko’s “Orphaned street children smoking” from 1946 is a heartbreaker. Two dirty children sit on
the pavement. One smokes a cigarette, the other is clothed only in a
tattered breechcloth. By contrast,
Domon Ken’s “Mr. and Mrs.
Kotani: Survivors of the Atomic
Bomb” from 1957 depicts parents
and a chubby baby, smiling widely
despite the scars that dapple Mr.
Kotani’s face. Such images reflect a
desire to look unflinchingly but
with deep humanity at the traumas of war — the physical destruction, the abject poverty, the rending of social and familial ties — and
especially the effects of the atomic
bombs. They’re a far cry from the
prim studio portraiture that dominated prewar Japanese photography.
In the 1960s and ’70s, more expressive and subjective ap-
26
2. The Friend by Sigrid Nunez
(Riverhead: $25) A grieving
woman’s obsession with a Great
Dane left by her late friend.
5
3. The Reckoning by John Grisham
(Doubleday: $29.95) A respected
World War II hero guns down the
local pastor inside a church in
Mississippi.
9
4. Circe by Madeline Miller (Little,
Brown: $27) A retelling of the
story of Circe, who draws the
wrath of both men and gods.
29
5. Diary of a Wimpy Kid: Meltdown
by Jeff Kinney (Amulet: $13.95)
An epic snowball fight continues
the Wimpy Kid series.
8
6. Killing Commendatore by Haruki
Murakami (Knopf: $30) A painter
leaves Tokyo and, at a mountain
retreat of a more famous artist,
enters a surreal world.
11
7. Fire & Blood by George R. R.
Martin (Bantam: $35) The first
volume of a two-part history of
the Targaryens in Westeros.
5
8. My Year of Rest and Relaxation
by Ottessa Moshfegh (Penguin
Press: $26) A New Yorker deals
with depression, relationships
and an inept therapist.
21
9. A Gentleman in Moscow by Amor 115
Towles (Viking: $27) In 1922, a
Russian count is sentenced to
house arrest in a grand hotel for
the rest of his life.
10. My Sister, the Serial Killer by
Oyinkan Braithwaite (Doubleday:
$22.95) A nurse with a flair for
cleaning helps cover up her
sister’s habit of killing her
boyfriends.
1
Nonfiction
1. Becoming by Michelle Obama
(Crown: $32.35) The former first
lady recounts her childhood in
Chicago, meeting Barack and
their years in the White House.
7
2. Educated by Tara Westover
(Random House: $28) A young
woman raised without schooling
by survivalists describes her path
to Cambridge University.
43
3. The Library Book by Susan
Orlean (Simon & Schuster: $15)
The story of the 1986 fire at the
Los Angeles Public Library.
10
4. Leadership: In Turbulent Times
by Doris Kearns Goodwin (Simon
& Schuster: $30) Lessons
learned from four presidents
dealing with major crisis in
private and in the life of the
country.
12
5. How to Change Your Mind by
Michael Pollan (Penguin Press:
$28) A personal account of how
psychedelics may help the
mentally ill.
21
6. Brief Answers to the Big
Questions by Stephen Hawking
(Bantam: $25) Final thoughts on
the biggest questions facing
humankind from the late scientist
and mathematician.
9
7. Atlas Obscura: An Explorer's
Guide to the World's Hidden
Wonders by Joshua Foer & Dylan
Thuras (Workman: $35) A
celebration of 700 of the world’s
most curious places.
26
8. Beastie Boys Book by Michael
Diamond and Adam Horovitz
(Spiegel & Grau: $50) An
intimate 600- page look into the
New York trio who went from
hardcore punk to hip hop
stardom.
5
9. Always look on the Bright Side of
Life by Eric Idle (Crown
Archetype: $27) The unexpected
stardom of the founding member
of Monty Python.
2
10. The Fifth Risk by Michael Lewis
(Norton: $26.95) The
consequences of the willful
ignorance of Trump appointees.
11
PAPERBACKS
Fiction
©Takano Ryudai Yumiko Chiba Associates, Tokyo
TAKANO RYUDAI’S “Long Hair Nesting on a Pink Cloth” from 2002 is included in the book.
Ravens & Red Lipstick
Japanese Photography Since 1945
Lena Fritsch
Thames and Hudson: 288 pp., $50
Thames & Hudson
proaches emerged, most visible in
the West through the work of
Moriyama Daido and Araki
Nobuyoshi. These photographers’
gritty, dynamic visions arose amid
widespread upheavals and protests against the ongoing U.S. military presence in Japan. They were
also influenced by Western photographers like William Klein who
used unusual angles and out-of-focus shots to document city life.
Like Araki, Fukase Masahisa
used photography in a diaristic
way, often photographing his wife,
Yoko, daily. When they divorced,
lonesome black ravens became his
dominant motif. Identifying with
the stark desolation that the birds
evoked, Fukase wrote that he had
“become a raven with a camera.”
From there, the book jumps
ahead to 1990s “Girls’ Photogra-
phy,” which emerged at the nexus
of photo booth snapshots and
kawaii (“cute”) culture à la Hello
Kitty. As photographic technology
became more accessible, young
women used the medium to define
themselves in the face of the maledominated Japanese photography
scene.
Still, this effort cut both ways.
“Girls’ Photography” practitioners
were sought after as models and
entertainment figures, but this
popularity made them seem more
like a marketing trend than a serious artistic movement. Nagashima
Yurie’s edgy self-portraits kick
against this tendency. “Self-Portrait (Family #26)” from 1993 depicts her family of four in their living room in a traditional portrait
pose — mother and father seated
in front, children kneeling behind
— all of them naked. The work is
both an irreverent reworking of the
family portrait and a feminist gesture that presents the body for
what it is rather than for the (typically male) desires projected upon
it. Works like this aligned with the
1990s girl power and riot grrrl
movements.
The final chapter is titled simply “Contemporary Japanese Photography” and reflects trends as
varied as those found globally. One
standout is Takano Ryudai’s portrait of a winsome, only partly
clothed young man from 2001. The
sexually charged image not only
upends the dominance of the female nude, but harks back to
wakashu, the faded Japanese artistic tradition of beautiful male
figures, desirable to both women
and men. In his interview, Takano
relates how, before Western incursions, there was no difference between heterosexual and homosexual love in Japan. His work brings
renewed attention to the male
body as an object of sexual desire,
reflected in the increased popularity of fashion among Japanese
men in the early 2000s. However,
because of a 1907 Japanese Penal
Code, he has often had to censor
his work, cutting or covering areas
where a penis is visible.
“Ravens” is refreshing because
it allows these subtleties of ideation and reception to bubble up,
even in a book that covers more
than 70 years of photography. This
is because of Fritsch’s even-handed approach, one that allows for
other voices and resists centering
itself. I’m sure there are experts
who will quibble with her choices
but the book gives me hope. In the
realm of art, at least, perhaps we
are moving toward a more respectful, circumspect discourse, where
it might be possible to recognize
oneself through the lens of another.
Mizota is an art critic and archivist
whose writing appears regularly in
the Los Angeles Times.
1.The Milkman by Anna Burns ($16)
2.Less by Andrew Sean Greer ($15.99)
3.My Brilliant Friend by Elena Ferrante
($17)
4.Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine
by Gail Honeyman ($16)
5.Crazy Rich Asians by Kevin Kwan ($15)
Nonfiction
1.Sapiens by Yuval Norah Harari
($22.99)
2.Devotion by Patti Smith ($9.95)
3.Architectural Guidebook to Los
Angeles by Robert Winter ($45)
4.Killers of the Flower Moon by David
Grann ($16.95)
5.You Are a Badass by Jen Sincero ($16)
Rankings are based on chain
results and a weekly poll of 125
Southland bookstores.
For an extended list:
www.latimes.com/books
latimes.com
/books
Craving more?
Join us online for the latest book
news from Los Angeles and the
larger literary world.
L
SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
TRAVEL
TRAVEL
Elyse Butler
ONCE THE LAVA STOPPED
See what has changed on the island of Hawaii since Kilauea erupted last year. Hawaii Volcanoes
National Park has been dramatically altered, and there’s a new museum about volcanism. Homes and
roads were destroyed, but the above black sand beach in Isaac Hale Beach Park was created. L4-5
L2
SU N DAY , JA N UA RY 6 , 2 019
L AT I M E S . C O M / T R AV E L
BEFORE YOU GO
NEED TO KNOW
Changes ahead for hot
spots, hotels in Vegas
The 1,504-room Hard Rock Hotel & Casino two miles
east of the Strip at Harmon Avenue and Paradise Road in
Las Vegas will close for about four months later this year
and will reemerge as a Virgin Hotel in 2020.
Dates for the transformation are unknown.
Virgin Hotels operates lodgings in San Francisco and
Chicago, and more are planned.
The Joint, the Hard Rock’s popular music venue, will
remain but will be upgraded and may be renamed. Rehab,
the Hard Rock’s five-acre party pool area, closed in October and is to be redeveloped before the 2020 reopening.
No decisions have yet been made about which restaurants and bars the new Virgin Hotel will partner with.
Vegas won’t be without the Hard Rock name. The
Hard Rock Cafe Las Vegas, unrelated to the hotel, stands
at a separate location at 3771 S. Las Vegas Blvd.
Meanwhile, Eataly, the grand Italian marketplace
that opened a branch last year in Los Angeles, has opened
in the Park MGM in Las Vegas.
It has seven specialty food counters, two restaurants,
three bars, a chef ’s demonstration table and a “kitchen of
the market” concept that lets customers eat in or take
away. The marketplace is aiming to stay open, in some
parts, 24 hours a day.
And in parking/resort fee news, the Cosmopolitan of
Las Vegas has stopped charging guests up to $10 a night to
park at the hotel-resort, but it also plans to increase its
daily resort fee from $35 to $39 plus tax. The new fee went
into effect last week.
In July, Wynn Encore modified its parking costs. Visitors who spend $50 at the resort, whether it’s on food,
drinks, gambling, shopping or shows, received free parking.
— Jay Jones
Distant Lands now online only
Distant Lands, a Pasadena travel shop that has sold
books, maps and accessories and staged programs by
writers since 1989, has closed its bricks-and-mortar store.
The shop will continue as a web-based retailer at
distantlands.com, specializing in travel-related books,
luggage and other travel tools. Susan Hickman, the Distant Lands travel agent, will continue to offer services
through the website, using the email susan@distant
lands.com.
— Christopher Reynolds
Shutdown affects national parks
The organization that handles reservations at national parks campgrounds has asked campers to hold off
on securing their spots during the partial federal government shutdown.
The Recreation.gov website said the reservation
“might not be honored” because the park is not staffed.
The program can’t advise travelers which parks and forest are open or closed, said Rick DeLappe, program manager and National Park Service employee.
The parks stayed open at first once the shutdown began, but as the days went on some were closed because of
safety and health concerns.
Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks have
closed completely.
Other parks are partly open, but issues with restrooms have led to sanitation problems. At Joshua Tree
National Park, some campgrounds were closed because
the vault toilets needed to be pumped out and no workers
were available to do so.
Trash has also begun piling up, raising concerns in
such parks as Yosemite that bears may be attracted to the
garbage and increase the possibility of dangerous human-bear interactions.
As of the Travel section’s deadline Friday, the shutdown continued.
— Times staff
DMV
CALIFORNIA’S Real ID driver’s license has bear and star in the top right instead of “Federal limits apply.”
ON THE SPOT CATHARINE HAMM
Real ID hits a bump, but ...
Just when we thought it was safe to stop writing about Real ID, along comes a bump in the
road. ¶ How big a bump? Depends on your perspective. It’s a bit of news that got buried
in the holiday rush, so if you already know this, please turn to our fabulous stories on Death
Valley (Page L3), the island of Hawaii (Page L5) and big cruises versus little cruises (Page
L6). ¶ Otherwise, pay attention, because if you read about what’s happened without a
full consumer-friendly explanation, you are apt to panic.
OK, so what happened?
Should I panic?
The Department of
Homeland Security has
said that California’s Real
ID licenses do not meet the
standards for licenses that
are supposed to be more
secure. And no, you should
not panic.
ID I just got is invalid?
No. And your Real ID
license does not have to be
reissued if it is good for five
years. If you were an early
adopter, as I was, and your
license expires before that
2020 date, you probably will
need to show a second form
of ID verifying your identity
when you renew.
How did this happen?
The short answer is
miscommunication between DHS and the Department of Motor Vehicles.
What if I haven’t applied
yet?
If you haven’t applied
yet and you’re doing so
beginning or after April 1,
you will need two kinds of
residence verification. Here
is what the DMV says constitutes verification (lat.ms/
RealIDChecklist), but
please check back before
applying because the DMV
is scrambling to make this
fix. Right now, its online
information requiring
one form of residence
verification applies to
anyone applying before
April 1.
Why should I care about
this?
Because California has
issued 2.3 million of these
licenses.
But I don’t need a Real ID
to drive, do I?
No, you do not. If you
choose not to get one, your
license will say, “Federal
limits apply.” You need one
only if you want to use
that form of identification
to board a domestic flight
beginning Oct. 1, 2020,
or to enter a federal facility.
What is Real ID anyway?
And why the big deal?
The 9/11 Commission
issued recommendations to
make identification more
Does that mean the Real
secure, which became law
in 2005. You’ll need a Real
ID — a federally compliant
driver’s license — or another acceptable form of ID
(lat.ms/OtherFormsofID) —
to present to airport
security to board an airplane beginning Oct. 1, 2020.
It is a big deal, because if
you show up on Oct. 1, 2020,
expecting to use your
noncompliant driver’s
license to board a domestic
flight, you won’t be getting
on.
Does Real ID replace a
passport?
No. If you are traveling
internationally, you will still
need a passport.
Why not just use a passport
for all security needs?
You may, and there are
other forms of identification
that also will work. You can
see them at lat.ms/Other
FormsofID. I don’t like
carrying my passport when
I’m traveling domestically.
(When I am traveling internationally, I keep it on my
person, thanks to a tanktop undergarment with a
zippered compartment. It’s
not the most convenient
way to carry ID, but it is
pretty secure.)
Doesn’t this latest misstep
speak volumes about the
DMV?
That debate is better
left for the dinner table or
wherever you argue or
place blame for the current
state of affairs.
But you should know
that California is not the
only one that’s having this
problem. Wisconsin, which
has issued 2.1 million licenses, is too and will need a
solution as well.
What’s important for
travelers is that changes are
coming, and there are
changes to the changes.
When are you going to stop
writing about Real ID?
No time soon. Certainly
not before Oct. 1, 2020. How
will I know when to stop? I
promise to stop when a
month goes by and I don’t
get an email that says, “I’m
flying to Paris. So with this
Real ID I don’t need a
passport, right?” (Answer:
Wrong. You do need a
passport, and if you knew
that, you can stop reading
now.)
Have a travel question or
dilemma? Write to
travel@latimes.com. We
regret we cannot answer
every inquiry.
For the record
A Dec. 30 article reported that the Jackie Robinson
Museum in New York City would open in spring 2019. It is
expected to open in December.
FEEDBACK
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We enjoyed the resolution in the Dec. 23 On the
Spot column (“New Year,
New Ways Ahead,” by Catharine Hamm) about not
arriving too early when you
travel. We likewise leave
plenty of time, as we have to
drive about 125 miles over
three freeways. We can easily
imagine a minor problem
turning into a missed flight.
We would rather sit in
the terminal waiting for a
flight than sit in traffic,
picturing our flight boarding
without us, taking off and
arriving at our destination
with our empty seats. So
we allow plenty of time to
start our journey, sometimes too much.
On our last trip, we encountered clear sailing all
the way to LAX and made
our way to check-in about
five hours early. We joined
a long line at the counter,
eventually creeping to the
head. Too early: The agent
would not let us check in,
nor would he accept our
bags. We found one restaurant on this side of the security gate and enjoyed a meal
while counting the time
until we could line up again.
Still, we allow a lot of
time to arrive at the
airport and take care of
business. We just see it as
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Didier Marti Getty Images
AUCKLAND, New Zealand, spreads out from atop Mt. Eden. It’s a nation of sur-
prises — among them laundry rooms for hotel guests and a tip-free mentality.
part of traveling.
Dave Middleton
and Kathy Hudgins
Rancho Mirage
Kiwi surprises
We just returned from a
three-week trip to New Zealand. We tried not to overpack; we figured on finding
a public laundromat at
some point.
We were pleasantly surprised to find that several
hotels had a small laundry
room with tokens available
from the front desk for just
a couple dollars, detergent
included.
Another pleasant discovery in New Zealand was that
tips were not expected or
even encouraged. We were
reminded a few times by the
locals that good service was
a matter of pride in one’s job
and not dependent on tips.
Lasse Poulsen
Aliso Viejo
World’s wonders
Thanks for excavating
the glowing memories of the
strange and wonderful travel
books of John L. Stoddard
(“A World Traveler by Proxy,”
Departure Points, by Lori
Erickson, Dec. 23). I also
rode on those magic carpets
to exotic lands. My father
was a construction worker
and he sometimes brought
home books that were
being thrown away from
demolished buildings.
Among them was a box
of Stoddard’s books, as
Erickson described them,
smelling of mold but charged
with wonder. I treasured
those images of faraway
people and places, and
they planted my life-long
interest in journeys of selfdiscovery. The world is full
of interesting connections,
as you point out.
Well done.
Chris Vogler
Playa del Rey
How to reach us
Phone:
(213) 237-5000
Email:
travel@latimes.com
Mailing address: Los
Angeles Times,
2300 E. Imperial Highway
El Segundo, CA 90245
Subscription services:
(800) 252-9141
S U N DAY , JA N UA RY 6 , 2 019
L AT I M E S . C O M / T R AV E L
L3
YOUR WEEKEND
WHAT’S UP
Do yoga,
dine well
By Sara Cagle
Free next weekend? Get
busy with goat yoga,
woodworking or mobile
museums.
Los Angeles
Cross a few items off your
L.A. restaurant bucket
list during DineL.A.
More than 400 restaurants, including Wolfgang Puck at Hotel
Bel-Air and Night +
Market Sahm in Venice,
are participating in
the two-week event
with tasting menus and
lunch and dinner
specials. View menus
and book reservations
online.
When: Jan. 11-25
Cost, info: Expect to
spend $15 or more for
lunch and $29 or more for
dinner. Family-friendly.
No dogs. lat.ms/DineLA
Encino
A Faery Hunt’s “The
King of the Fairies” is an
interactive musical
quest to find the true
king of the fairies, hidden
among the trees at Los
Encinos State Historic
Park. Wear your finest
wings and carry your
wands.
When: 10:30 a.m. Jan. 12
Xanterra Travel Collection
THE INN AT DEATH VALLEY has updated its 66 rooms and added 22 casitas and 500 palm trees. It has a spring-fed pool too.
ESCAPE TO DEATH VALLEY
AN OASIS REFRESHED
AND SO REFRESHING
BY SHARON BOORSTIN >>> Death Valley is less than a five-hour drive from Los Angeles, but it is as desolate as a planet in
a galaxy far, far away. That’s why in 1977, for the first “Star Wars” movie, George Lucas shot some scenes here. Today,
“Star Wars” fanboys take selfies at the film locations even in summer when the temperature tops 110 degrees. On a cool
fall day, my husband, Paul, and I set out for the largest, hottest and driest national park in the contiguous U.S. for
another reason: to visit the rebirth of its beloved historic hotel, the newly refurbished Inn at Death Valley. (The park
and its private concessions are open despite the partial government shutdown.) The tab for two: $424 per night for the
room, $200 per day for food, plus taxes, resort fees and gas.
THE BED
The Inn at Death Valley,
opened in 1927 as the Furnace Creek Inn, is the jewel
in a 338-acre resort complex
that includes the more
casual Ranch at Death
Valley, campgrounds,
restaurants, a spa, golf
course and more. After an
18-month $100-million renovation, the complex lives up
to its new name: the Oasis
at Death Valley. We stayed
in one of the 66 elegantly
updated rooms at the inn,
which retains its original
California Mission style
down to the thick stone
walls, homey fireplaces and
vibrant tile work. What’s
new are 22 spacious onebedroom casitas and nearly
500 palm trees. I took a
refreshing swim in the warm
spring-fed pool, just as
Hollywood stars Clark
Gable and Carole Lombard
did on their honeymoon.
THE FOOD
For breakfast in the dining
room, we savored chi-
Inn at Death Valley,
the Oasis at Death
Valley, Death Valley
National Park, Highway 190, Death Valley;
(800) 236-7916, oasisat
deathvalley.com
Cost, info: $12.50. Family-friendly. Dogs OK.
(818) 324-6802,
afaeryhunt.com
Arcadia
Learn how to make a
whimsical whirligig in
the first class of the Los
Angeles County Arboretum and Botanic Garden’s Beauty of Wood
Demonstrations series.
An expert from Rockler
Woodworking and
Hardware will teach you
how to fashion the spinning craft for your patio
or garden.
When: 1:30 p.m. Jan. 12
Cost, info: Free with
arboretum admission.
Family-friendly. No dogs.
(626) 821-4623, lat.ms/
beautyofwood
Los Angeles
Browse more than 15
libraries on wheels and
other portable exhibits
at the Los Angeles Central Library’s first Mobile
Museum Fair. Local
participants include the
African American Museum of Miniatures, the
California Sneaker Museum, the Feminist
Library on Wheels, LACMA’s art-workshop
program and more.
When: 1 p.m. Jan. 13
Paul Boorstin
IT’S WORTH getting up early to watch the dramatic sunrise at Zabriskie Point.
laquiles with queso fresco
and a side of the inn’s legendarily luscious date bread.
One evening we ventured to
the Ranch’s Last Kind
Words Saloon for dinner.
With its colorful Old West
décor, it was a lively place to
share meaty barbecue baby
back ribs with prickly pear
barbecue sauce.
THE FIND
We reached a new low at
Badwater Basin, but in a
good way. At 282 feet below
sea level, the barren salt flat
is the lowest point in North
America. We walked onto
the vast expanse, bent over
in what felt like a gale-force
wind. When we asked a
passing park ranger how
strong it was, he chuckled.
“That’s not a wind,” he said.
“In Death Valley, we call
anything less than 80 mph a
‘breeze.’ ”
Cost, info: Free. Familyfriendly. No dogs. (213)
228-7500, lat.ms/
mobilemuseumfair
THE LESSON LEARNED
The beauty of Death Valley
is most astounding at sunrise and sunset, what photographers call “magic
hour.” Make sure you’re in
the right place at the right
time for both. At Zabriskie
Point, the rising sun threw a
spotlight on Manly Beacon,
a crooked spire rising out of
the badlands, turning its
washed-out sand color to
gold. At the Artists Palette
viewpoint, the rays of the
setting sun revealed bands
of red, blue and green in the
mineral-rich hills.
Thousand Oaks
You may have tried
child’s pose, but have
you ever done it with a
small animal on your
back? You can stretch
and socialize with five
miniature goats at the
Cabra Farmhouse’s
outdoor goat yoga class
in Thousand Oaks.
After class, you can
sample fresh goat cheese
and whey bread, shop for
goat-milk skincare
products and meet Prosciutto the pig. Bring
your own yoga mat and
sunscreen.
When: 2 p.m. Jan. 13
Cost, info: $35. Familyfriendly. No dogs. (805)
551-8601, lat.ms/1000Oaks
goatyoga
CALIFORNIA BUCKET LIST
PLENTY OF ROOM FOR
ALL THINGS ABLOOM
Why: There’s a wonderful cognitive dissonance in feeling as though you’re in
the tropics and knowing you’re in San Francisco. That’s daily life in Golden
Gate Park’s Conservatory of Flowers.
What: This glass-and-wood beauty was supposed to become part of an estate belonging to wealthy businessman James Lick. His death in 1876 ended
the idea of a grand greenhouse, and it sat until a group of San Franciscans,
including Leland Stanford and Charles Crocker, bought it and donated it to
the city. It opened in 1879. At least one explosion, a fire and a windstorm have
damaged it, although it survived the 1906 earthquake unscathed. Today the
conservatory is thought to be the largest such structure in the world, and on
days when the sun is out, it seems like a gleaming white symbol of tenacity.
Info: Conservatory of Flowers, Golden Gate Park, San Francisco; conserva
toryofflowers.org. $9 for adults, $6 for seniors 65 and older and youth 12-17, $3
for children 5-11 and free for children 4 and younger.
— Catharine Hamm
Medioimages / Photodisc / Getty Images
THE CONSERVATORY OF FLOWERS in San Francisco’s Golden
Gate Park is a beautiful, gleaming white temple to all things floral.
Note: Always check
before you go because
weather or other factors
can affect events.
Children should always
be accompanied by an
adult. Assume that dogs
must be on a leash.
To suggest an event
that’s cool and close to
home, email
travel@latimes.com at
least four weeks before
the event. Events should
be within driving
distance of Los Angeles.
They may be free, or they
may charge admission.
Please specify whether
the event is suitable for
families.
L4
SU N DAY , JA N UA RY 6 , 2 019
L AT I M E S . C O M / T R AV E L
YOUNG PEOPLE play in a tree at the new black sand beach at Isaac Hale Beach Park, also known as Pohoiki, on the island of Hawaii. It was formed after hot molten lava
VISITORS see the beach’s lava wall, where the flow stopped.
THERE ARE PONDS to swim in at the newly created beach, but know that swimming in the ocean is
WHERE LAVA MET
The eruption of Kilauea
destroyed homes and roads
but created a new beach.
It’s already a popular spot.
By Christine Hitt
PAHOA, Hawaii — The eightmile-long river of lava that poured
down the slopes of Kilauea volcano
on the island of Hawaii last spring
destroyed nearly everything in its
path — roads, houses and cars. It
upended lives and the tourism industry, scaring away about $480
million in business.
But part of what it left behind
offers a glimmer of hope for the battered land and economy: a new
black sand beach.
In early December, I visited the
island to see what the destructive
lava flow had done to the largest of
the Hawaiian Islands and to visit
the newly formed crescent beach at
Isaac Hale Beach Park, also known
as Pohoiki.
When the lava flowed down the
slopes of Kilauea’s Lower East Rift
Zone, many people assumed the
beach park would be destroyed, but
the lava stopped 230 feet from the
boat ramp and emptied into the
sea. Instead of destroying Pohoiki,
it created a black sand beach, two
new surf breaks and three new thermal ponds.
As I drove the narrow, two-lane
highway known as the Red Road
(Hawaii 137) around the rocky
coastline of lower Puna, I was reminded that this wild, tropical terrain at the base of Kilauea is unlike
anywhere else in the islands.
Until recently, many visitors
came here by land or sea hoping to
catch a glimpse of molten lava.
Now they are coming to see not
what was destroyed but what was
created.
Gathering place
This isn’t the first time a black
sand beach has been produced during Kilauea’s 35 years of ongoing
eruptions, nor is it the only one
born of last year’s eruption, but it is
the largest black sand beach created in the islands in recent times.
When word got out there was
now a black sand beach at Pohoiki,
visitors and residents hiked over a
rugged lava field to be among the
first to see it.
Leomana Turalde, a native
Hawaiian, traveled from Hilo with
his younger brother and his daughter. The creation of a beach was a
lesson for them, he said, about
Hawaiian culture.
“I tell them Hawaiian language
and culture lives through the chant
and the dances and the songs that
we have, so if we don’t go out and experience things and record them
and take note and just be the first
here, then how do [they] expect the
tradition that we carry to continue
on?” he said.
Pohoiki has served the community as a family gathering place for
generations. “When the lava was
coming down, a lot of the community was sharing memories about certain spots,” Turalde said. “Those
areas are gone, but it’s exciting for
us now that we have this new beach
Pacific Ocean
270
If you go
19
Hawaii
19
Hilo
KailuaKona
130
200
Pahoa
Isaac Hale Beach Park, 13-101
Kalapana-Kapoho Road, Pahoa;
lat.ms/isaachalestatepark. Open
9 a.m.-6 p.m. daily. No drinking
water. No camping.
KILAUEA
137
11
20 MILES
Kauai
ISAAC HALE
BEACH PARK
HAWAII
Oahu
Molokai
Honolulu
Maui
Pacific Ocean
100 MILES
Sources: Mapzen, OpenStreetMap
Los Angeles Times
… a huge black sand beach we
didn’t have before.”
How this beach came to be begins with hot lava and cold water,
said Tina Neal, scientist in charge
at the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, which has temporarily
relocated to Hilo from Hawaii Volcanoes National Park.
“Hot molten lava interacting
with cold ocean water produces explosions,” Neal said. “Part of that is
wave action breaking up the new
lava. All of that produces a source of
sand, and that sand is carried by
the ocean current down the coastline to the places where it will naturally accumulate.”
The long, wide beach is gorgeous, shaped like a crescent moon.
The sand is a mix of textures, from
fine grains to small, rough rocks,
which, in time, will be ground down
S U N DAY , JA N UA RY 6 , 2 019
L AT I M E S . C O M / T R AV E L
Photographs by
L5
Christine Hitt
THIS BOARDWALK is part of the Sulphur Banks Trail, near the visitors center at Hawaii
Volcanoes National Park. The trail had been closed because of the eruption but reopened.
HOW ERUPTION
REMAKES HAWAII
Since last year’s disaster,
some things on the island
have reopened — and
many things are different.
By Christine Hitt
Photographs by
Elyse Butler
from Kilauea explosively met cold ocean water and formed sand.
The island of Hawaii was created by five volcanoes. In 2018, one
of them seemed intent on destroying parts of it.
Kilauea, which has been erupting continually since 1983 at a volcanic cone called Puu Oo Crater,
threw a geological tantrum in the
spring that buried hundreds of
houses and covered roads in a remote location on the east side of
the island.
It also created a cloak of vog
(volcanic smog) that fouled the
air, dulled the skies and scared
away scores of tourists and,
with them, nearly a half-billion
dollars.
And then the eight-mile-long
lava flow stopped, and the earthquakes, one of which registered
6.9, subsided.
Hawaii Volcanoes National
Park, country roads and state
parks have reopened, and visitors
are starting to return, drawn, in
part, by good airfares and room
availability.
Here are some ways the island
has changed.
The volcano and lava
discouraged because of strong currents and a dangerous shore break.
WATER
by the waves.
The landscape reminded me of
long-lost Kaimu Beach about 11
miles away near Kalapana. Its
black sand was framed by a backdrop of palm trees and was thought
to be Hawaii’s most photographed
black sand beach until it was overrun by lava in 1990. A new, smaller
beach exists in its place.
Blessings and offerings
I walked from one end of the
beach to the other, my feet crunching in the sand. People of all ages
were swimming in the largest of the
newly created ponds, formed when
the black sand beach surrounded
the once popular Pohoiki Boat
Ramp, used to launch small craft.
It’s unknown whether the
Hawaii State Department of Land
and Natural Resources will dredge
the sand blocking the boat ramp,
but for now, the place has become a
popular swimming hole.
Swimming in the ocean here
isn’t advised because of the strong
currents and dangerous shore
break, but that doesn’t deter the
handful of surfers who find a thrill
in a new spot.
Meanwhile, on the day of my visit, a kahu (priest) blessed the beach
with prayers and Hawaiian oli
(chants) and led a procession of
cultural offerings.
Men, women and children lined
up to leave leis and wrapped ti-leaf
bundles on the beach as a sign of respect and gratitude.
“Those in the audience that
have been tremendously hurt by
the lava, this is a … way that gives
you a lot of feeling of goodness,”
Hawaii County Mayor Harry Kim
told the crowd.
“I ask all of us to take care of this
place. It is a special place to a lot of
people.”
Like other beaches, this one is at
the mercy of erosion from the surf
and other changes wrought by
time. But as history has shown in
this land ruled by Kilauea, change
can come all too quickly, so it’s best
to make memories now and cherish
the time it’s here.
travel@latimes.com
On April 30, the floor of Puu Oo
Crater collapsed. Its lava lake as
well as the one in Halemaumau
Crater drained, sending the lava
underground to the volcano’s
eastern flank. Twenty-four fissures then ruptured, spewing
fountains of lava. Earthquakes at
the summit became a daily occurrence.
Several black sand beaches
were created out of the lava flows.
The largest one, at Isaac Hale
Beach Park, now attracts hundreds of visitors a day.
The activity produced, in the
words of one U.S. Geological Survey scientist, a visually spectacular landscape and a story to
match.
“I feel like it’s still an incredible
visitor destination,” said Tina
Neal, scientist in charge at USGS
Hawaiian Volcano Observatory,
established in 1912 to study active
volcanoes and earthquakes in
Hawaii.
Among the benefits of the cessation: The vog is nearly gone, and
as a result, the entire island is enjoying blue skies that haven’t been
this clear in decades.
Although you can no longer see
lava up close or glowing from a
distance, that doesn’t mean you
will never have a chance. Kilauea
will erupt again.
Changes at the park
The 505-square-mile Hawaii
Volcanoes National Park, shaken
by a series of strong earthquakes,
was closed early May to late
September. It’s now back on its
24-hours-a-day schedule. (The
park is accessible during the
government’s partial shutdown,
but some services may be curtailed.)
“We’re so excited to be open
again, to have our visitors back
again and to share what is basically a new park, and that’s been a
defining quality of this park since
we were founded 102 years ago,”
said Jessica Ferracane, the park’s
public affairs specialist. “When
you’re home to two active volca-
HALEMAUMAU CRATER at Hawaii Volcanoes National Park
has grown, and the lava lake that was once inside it is gone.
But some sites are
unavailable
Still closed within Hawaii
Volcanoes National Park:
8 Iliahi Trail
8 Byron Ledge Trail
8 Waldron Ledge
8 Kilauea Iki Trail
8 Mauna Iki Trail
8 Thurston Lava Tube
8 Crater Rim Drive west of
Kilauea Military Camp and west
of Keanakakoi Overlook
8 Most of Crater Rim Trail
(except for the area between
Volcano House and Kilauea
Military Camp)
8 Most of the Kau Desert Trail
(except for Hawaii 11 to the
Footprints Shelter)
noes, Kilauea and Mauna Loa,
they’re constantly reshaping
what we do and how we respond
to it.”
The most dramatic changes
are the loss of Halemaumau’s lava
lake and the quadrupling in size of
its crater. In some places, it’s 2,000
feet deep, almost 10 times its previous depth.
Most of the park’s facilities and
trails are now open, such as the
popular Steam Vents Trail, Sulphur Banks Trail, Devastation
Trail, Puu Loa Petroglyphs Trail,
the back-country trails and Chain
of Craters Road to the Holei Sea
Arch.
Also open is the historic Volcano House, which sustained minor damage and was closed for repairs. “We got very lucky,” said
Orin McCann, the general manager.
The hotel reopened in October,
but it’s still easy to get a room or
restaurant reservation. Diningroom walk-ins are still being accommodated, but the expected
increase in business may put an
end to that.
The Namakanipaio campgrounds and cabins, outside the
national park, are expected to reopen this month. Guests will find
several upgrades, including landscaping, new electronic locks on
all cabins, fresh gravel and new
grills.
Several trails, roads and overlooks are still closed (see sidebar),
and there is no timeline for their
reopening. Ongoing assessments
are being made, and the national
park doesn’t want to rush them.
The Thomas A. Jaggar Museum, which suffered severe structural damage, is also closed, and
its future is undecided. This mu-
seum of volcanology, named for
the founder of the Hawaiian
Volcanoes Observatory, also
displayed artifacts and offers cultural exhibits.
Meanwhile, visitors can discover new sights that were revealed by the 2018 eruption.
For instance, the best closeup
view of the enlarged Halemaumau Crater is now from a nearly
mile-long hike to Keanakakoi
Crater, off Crater Rim Drive.
That section of road, closed
when the crater erupted in 2008,
has been open to hikers and bicyclists since 2011. It now has cracks
in the road from recent earthquakes. If you look closely, you’ll
see where a part of the closed road
fell into the crater.
“That’s kind of the new thing to
go and see,” Ferracane said. “Visitors always ask us what’s new and
what can we see since there’s no
lava. Well, go see the road to nowhere.”
A new museum
Many of the historic items
from the Jaggar Museum are in
storage, except for some on loan
to the Pahoa Lava Zone Museum
(15-2962 Pahoa Village Road, Pahoa; donations accepted), which
opened in December.
On display are artworks by the
late Herb Kane illustrating the
history and culture of the Hawaiian and Polynesian islands, and a
few exhibit props explaining the
geology of beaches and magma
chambers.
Alongside the Jaggar Museum
items are its own displays of photos and videos from the 2018 eruption, geological specimens of Pele’s hair (thin strands of volcanic
glass) and Pele’s tears (solidified
lava droplets) and even a beehive
that was turned to stone.
“We’re trying to help guide visitors through the history of the geology of the island with a focus on
the 2014 and 2018 eruptions, so history and cultural aspects are explained as well as a step-by-step
guide of the May eruptions,” said
Amedeo Markoff, promotions
chair for the Mainstreet Pahoa
Assn. and gallery owner of Puna
Gallery and Gift Emporium.
Markoff says a new cultural
park will open this month in Pahoa, where visitors can get a
deeper understanding of the volcanoes’ cultural significance.
There will be Hawaiian games,
hula, canoe carvers and storytellers. Visitors can stop by the
museum to learn more.
travel@latimes.com
Twitter: @latimestravel
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L AT I M E S . C O M / T R AV E L
THE CONCIERGE
TOURS &
CRUISES
GEO QUIZ
Ceuta, which is on
Morocco’s Mediterranean coast, is an
exclave of which
European country?
ECUADOR
Horseback
vacation in
the Andes
* Portugal
* Spain
* France
Ride through the Ecuadorean Andes on an eight-day
tour on horseback that
passes through some of the
country’s most scenic and
biologically diverse areas.
The seven-night Surtrek
itinerary includes a walking
tour in Quito, the capital;
rides to Ambato, known as
the city of flowers and fruit;
and villages such as Simiatug, Salinas de Bolívar and
Guaranda. The trails, which
are appropriate for intermediate riders, include the Inca,
where participants will ride
about six hours on the main
route that once linked Quito
with Cuzco, Peru.
Answer below. Source:
National Geographic Bee
TIPSHEET
Beaches
that swim
under radar
By Mary Forgione
Online travel agency
FlightNetwork asked more
than 1,000 travel professionals where to find the world’s
most untouched beaches.
These topped the list of 50.
Iceland
Dates: Available year-round.
Rosemary McClure
LINDBLAD’S new National Geographic Venture prepares to sail out of the Port of Long Beach.
CRUISE NEWS
Tourists usually take a dip in
the Blue Lagoon’s naturally
hot waters. Less well known
is a black-sand beach with
clear-blue waters at the base
of Vestrahorn Mountain on
the southeast coast. When
waters are calm, you can
snap a reflection of the
mountains or, if you’re lucky,
the Northern Lights.
Info: lat.ms/vestrahorn
When small is beautiful
A more intimate ship allows
passengers to get up close
with nature. Just don’t expect
a wave pool or stage show.
Greece
To get to Agiofarago Beach
on the southwest coast of
Crete, you have to cross a
gorge ringed by steep walls
on foot (or take a boat). Your
reward: a fine pebble beach,
azure waters and cliffs you
can climb for wide-angle
views.
Info: lat.ms/agiofarago
Oregon
You can easily walk to Haystack Rock and other rock
formations along the four
miles of Cannon Beach.
There are tide pools to explore, but keep walking to a
waterfall and sea caves at
Hug Point about three miles
south.
Info: cannonbeach.org
Australia
Here’s the catch with Wineglass Bay on the east coast of
Tasmania not far from
Hobart: You have to walk
about 2 1⁄2 hours to what
many guides promise is an
empty beach with epic scenery. White sand at the base
of pink and gray granite
mountains provides the
backdrop to a stretch of
sparkling water where you
can swim and sea kayak.
Info: lat.ms/wineglassbay
Portugal
The absence of hotels,
restaurants and shops at
Malhao Beach in the Algarve
region make this one of the
more natural beaches. Golden sand and rock formations
jutting into the ocean are the
stars of this coastal stretch.
Take time to explore the
cliffs.
Info: lat.ms/malhaobeach
South Africa
Coffee Bay, a stretch of land
in the country’s Eastern
Coast province, attracts
backpackers and others to
its dark-rock cliffs and white
sand beaches.
Info: lat.ms/coffeebay
By Rosemary McClure
The sun was smoldering on the
horizon when I boarded Lindblad
Expeditions’ new National Geographic Venture. The vessel had sailed
into the Port of Long Beach that warm
December day on its maiden voyage,
and I was able to catch a look before it
sailed off into the sunset.
New ships stop occasionally at
Southland ports; I visited Norwegian
Cruise Line’s Bliss when it stopped
last year at the Port of Los Angeles on
a maiden cruise.
The two ships are the yin and yang
of cruising: Both are beautiful, but
they are very different.
Bliss has 20 decks and 2,220 staterooms and can carry 4,000 passengers.
A racetrack curves around its top
deck, and passengers can dine at eight
venues.
Venture has four decks and 50
staterooms and can carry 100 cruisers.
Passengers can participate in yoga on
the top deck and dine in a single cafeteria on the lower deck.
Despite Venture’s lack of frills, Ken
Carlson wouldn’t trade that vessel for
a cruise on a mega-ship.
“I’ve tried big ships. I swore I’d never do it again,” said Carlson, a Santa
Monica filmmaker who participated
in Venture’s maiden voyage.
Robert Cameron, a Venture cruiser
from Los Feliz, agreed. “I’m not a fan of
big ships,” he said. “I took a cruise to
Alaska on a ship with 1,200 people. It’s
just not for me. They’re more focused
on entertainment and amenities.”
But big ships have fans who are
GEO QUIZ ANSWER:
nificantly more expensive, often double or triple the price of a larger cruiseship fare. You probably won’t find the
kind of bargains available on megaships: no $500 cruises to Alaska or
$300 weekend jaunts to Ensenada,
Mexico.
Crowds: On a small ship, you won’t
have to wait 10 minutes for an elevator
when the evening stage show ends. On
the flip side, there won’t be a stage
show and the ship may not have an elevator.
Entertainment: Don’t expect orchestras or aerialists on a small ship.
You’re more likely to gather each night
in the lounge for lectures by naturalists and photo tips.
Dining: A big ship may have more
than 10 places to eat and drink; on a
small ship there probably will be only a
couple. But you may get to go ashore
in far-flung places for a bonfire and
barbecue on the beach.
Activities: You won’t find climbing
walls, mini-golf, laser tag or wave pools
on a small ship. In fact, you may not
find a pool at all. But you will go snorkeling, hiking and kayaking in beautiful places. Big ships are destinations
in themselves; small ships are a means
to get to wild destinations.
Ambience: On a big ship, you may
not see the same person twice. On a
small one, you’re more likely to make
friends with people who have similar
nature-loving interests.
“It’s like going to camp, making
friends and bonding over shared experiences away from the world,” said
Cameron, whose 13-day Venture
cruise took him to the waters of Mexico’s Baja and included intense whalewatching experiences.
“We were literally eye to eye with
humpbacks,” he said. “It was one of
the best days of my life.”
travel@latimes.com
Twitter: @latimestravel
DEAL OF THE WEEK
Cruise the Yangtze
in 2-for-1 luxury
Victoria Cruises is offering 2-for-1
prices on three- and four-night sailings on China’s Yangtze River. The
least expensive trips cost as little as
$285 per person in February.
Info: Surtrek, lat.ms/horse
backridingtour
— Rosemary McClure
NAMIBIA
Desert safari
Explore Namibia, known for
its wildlife and huge desert
dunes, on a 13-day journey
with Palm Desert’s Living
Desert Travel Club. Among
highlights will be a visit to
Etosha National Park, where
travelers can wait near a
sprawling watering hole for
lions, elephants, springboks
and other animals to stop for
a drink. The trip also will
include a visit to the Cheetah
Conservation Fund’s center
near Otjiwarongo; the organization is a Living Desert
conservation partner. Bushwalking and game drives are
also on the itinerary. The trip
is limited to 16 participants.
Dates: June 11-23
Price: From $5,695 per person, double occupancy. Includes accommodations,
most meals, transportation
and activities. International
airfare not included.
Info: The Living Desert Zoo
and Gardens, (760) 340-4954,
livingdesert.org/travel
— Rosemary McClure
MOROCCO
Berber women
Wild Women Expeditions
takes a deep dive into Morocco on new tours that focus
on Berber women and their
culture. The female-only
10-day tour, Medina to Mountains of Northern Morocco,
begins in Casablanca with a
tour of the Hassan Il Mosque,
one of the largest in the
world, then travels to Fez and
its medina, a UNESCO World
Heritage site, and Moulay
Idrissa, the oldest town in
Morocco. The tour concludes
in Marrakech, where participants will have lunch at a
women’s cooperative and
visit Majorelle Gardens. A
15-day tour is also available.
Dates: Sept. 1-10
The deal: Regular prices start at
$480 per person. The deal requires
travelers to buy a $90 excursion, also
at 2-for-1 pricing. You may choose
from a Three Gorges Dam tour, a
sampan excursion or a tour of landmarks. You must reserve by Feb. 28 to
get 2-for-1 prices.
Info: (800) 348-8084, VictoriaCruises
.com
— Mary Forgione
Spain
equally devoted and enjoy the entertainment — and the value they offer.
Kathy Hamada became a fan of
large ships when 11 members of her
family celebrated her parents’ 50th
wedding anniversary on a weeklong
cruise to Alaska on Holland America
Line. Hamada lives in Houston, but
the rest of the family is in Southern
California.
“It was a great way for us to travel
as a group,” she said. “We had a
planned mealtime together, but during the day everyone could go off and
do what they wanted. My parents
liked the casino, and the kids had
many diversions to keep them busy.”
Small-ship travel is all about nature, photography and capturing experiential moments in wild places
around the world. Lindblad is the
granddaddy of this form of travel, having pioneered it a half-century ago.
Chief Executive Sven Lindblad
was all smiles when I met him on
board in December. Venture is the
company’s second new build, and he’s
proud of the ship.
“It’s comfortable, nimble, and with
massive amounts of glass, our guests
will constantly be connected to the
outside world,” he said. “We are delighted with the way she came out.”
His timing is excellent: Small-ship
sailing is growing in popularity, with
an increasing number of competitors
offering trips to places such as Baja,
the Galápagos Islands, Antarctica
and Alaska. Hurtigruten and Ponant
have beefed up their fleets to appeal to
that growing market, and other
brands will launch small ships or adventure yachts in the next two years.
Which type of cruising is best for
you? Small and large ships offer fundamentally different experiences and
attract different types of travelers.
Here’s a look at some of the ways they
vary:
Prices: Small ships usually are sig-
Prices: From $3,200 per
person, double occupancy.
Includes accommodations,
meals, use of a horse, guide
service, saddlebags and
other gear. Tours can be
customized for novice and
expert riders.
Price: From $3,495 per person. Includes nine nights’
accommodations, all meals,
private vehicle and driver,
English-speaking female
guide and airport transfers.
Victoria Cruises
VICTORIA Cruises’ latest offering lets you choose from a selection
of three- to four-night tours along the Yangtze River in China.
Info: Wild Women Expeditions, (888) 993-1222, lat.ms
/northernmorocco
— Anne Harnagel
AIRFARES
ATLANTA
CHICAGO
DENVER
HONOLULU
LAS VEGAS NEW YORK/NEWARK, N.J.
LAX
$332
$254
$256
$377
$98
SNA
341
318
266
502
122
PHOENIX
SAN FRANCISCO
SEATTLE
WASHINGTON, D.C.
$368
$96
$94
$166
$336
357
166
118
172
353
BUR
345
294
367
421
146
371
167
128
176
353
LGB
348
318
284
397
119
351
186
116
164
363
ONT
343
303
245
520
192
349
167
141
160
379
INT’L
AUCKLAND, NEW ZEALAND*
CABO SAN LUCAS, MEXICO
LONDON*
PARIS*
SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA*
TOKYO*
VANCOUVER, CANADA
$958-$1,421
$260
$659-$1,169
$721-$1,167
$825-$1,503
$808-$981
$208
LAX
Restricted round-trip airfares are researched on Thursday, the day before the Travel section goes to press. Fares change daily, and availability is not assured. Fares, which may involve a change of
planes, are for airlines serving Los Angeles International (LAX), Orange County/John Wayne (SNA), Hollywood Burbank (BUR), Long Beach (LGB) and Ontario (ONT). Domestic fares and international airfares include taxes and fees. *These international fares vary because of differing fuel surcharges on different airlines. Sources: Sabre reservation system, airlines and Web.
$348 TO LIHUE,
KAUAI
Fare: $348 round trip, including all taxes and fees,
from LAX to Lihue on
Kauai, on Hawaiian Airlines.
Restrictions: Subject to
availability. For travel Mondays through Thursdays
beginning Wednesday
through March 13. You must
buy your ticket by Tuesday.
Info: (800) 367-5320, hawai
ianairlines.com
Source: Airfarewatchdog
.com
SUNDAY COMICS
DILBERT
By Scott Adams
DOONESBURY By Garry Trudeau
GET FUZZY By Darby Conley
PEARLS BEFORE SWINE By Stephan Pastis
LA CUCARACHA By Lalo Alcaraz
H
JANUARY 6, 2019
H2
SU N DAY , JA N UA RY 6 , 2 019
MUTTS By Patrick McDonnell
L AT I M E S . C O M
BLONDIE
By Dean Young
& John Marshall
ZITS By Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman
BABY BLUES By Rick Kirkman and Jerry Scott
MARMADUKE
By Brad & Paul Anderson
PRICKLY CITY By Scott Stantis
S U N DAY , JA N UA RY 6 , 2 019
L AT I M E S . C O M
ASK AMY
Dear Amy: Would you address the alienation that bereaved parents feel this time
of year?
We lost our only child and
lost many close relationships
because it was too uncomfortable for people to be
around us.
I understand that they
worry about saying the
wrong thing, but I’ve never
felt this alone in my entire 46
years.
Please remind your readers that most bereaved parents just want you to remember their child and to know
that they are not forgotten.
Left Behind
Dear Left Behind: I applaud your bravery in writing
to me, and I think your question will be widely shared
and discussed. Thank you
for highlighting the invisible
wounds so many of us carry.
No, your child should not
be forgotten. No, you should
not be ignored. I hope you
can get to a point where your
happier memories can sit
alongside your grief.
I also hope you will reach
out to someone close to you
to say, “I’m feeling alone. I
need to remember my child.
Can we talk?”
Send questions to Amy
Dickinson by email to
askamy@amydickinson
.com.
But is it
Art?
Edited by Rich Norris
and Joyce Nichols
Lewis
By Garry Morse
ACROSS
1 Ohm reciprocal
8 With 123-Across,
speaker of the quip
14 Hybrid tableware
19 Black Sea country
20 Poke holes in, as a
lawn
21 Judge of the Yankees
22 Start of a quip
23 Beauty goddesses
24 Crunchy snack
25 Big Apple restaurateur
26 Chef's amts.
28 Dexterity
30 "Wedding Bell Blues"
soloist Marilyn
32 Org. with an Acid Rain
Program
35 Three before kappa
36 Quip, part 2
45 Monotony metaphor
46 Heads of the Sorbonne
47 Sticker
48 Evil Luthor
49 Bring out
52 NYC line that stops at
Yankee Stadium,
familiarly
53 Truce
55 Quip, part 3
58 Glee club member
59 Expected results
60 "— so you!"
61 Out of shape
62 Boise's st.
65 Email afterthoughts
66 Quip, part 4
Last week’s solution:
“Calling Forth”
HOROSCOPE
Holiday Mathis
Aries (March 21-April 19):
If you haven’t laughed yet,
the day hasn’t really taken
off.
Taurus (April 20-May 20):
Today’s unexpected things
will, in retrospect, seem designed just for your delight.
Gemini (May 21-June 21):
There was a problem. You
tried a solution, and the first
try worked. But is it really the
best way?
Cancer (June 22-July 22):
Redemption — if you’re
meditatively inclined, this is
the word that will carry you
far into your soul today.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22): The
uncomfortable rub between
you and another person or
circumstance is just an external sign pointing to the
real battleground, which is
inside your mind.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22):
You use the power of your
feelings as motivation instead of seeing them as faults
or obstacles to success.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23):
You teach people how to
treat you. You care for yourself, and others pick up on
the cues.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 21):
You’re a deep person who
feels things acutely and
thinks further into life than
most people. Yet you have a
desire to get to new levels.
Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec.
21): As people mature, they
learn different modes of
speaking. Success depends
on using the right style at the
right time.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan.
19): There’s a sense of yearning alive in you. What might
happen if you were to make
your desire known?
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb.
18): You’re having a hard time
feeling like yourself in a current group situation.
Pisces (Feb. 19-March
20): When the passenger inside your head is in a dark,
negative mood, get up and
change seats.
Today’s birthday (Jan.
6): You’re not a role, a religion or a philosophical embodiment. As you interact
with the world without the
added pressures of self-definition, you will live unselfconsciously and become
more realized than you’ve
ever been. Capricorn and Pisces adore you. Your lucky
numbers: 8, 24, 33, 28 and 42.
Holiday Mathis writes
her column for Creators
Syndicate Inc. The
horoscope should be
read for entertainment.
CHESS
68 Short alias?
71 European carrier
72 Kilauea Point National
Wildlife Refuge
denizen
74 Safari beast
75 Maestro Ozawa
77 Shrek creator William
79 Quip, part 5
85 "My mom's gonna kill
me!"
87 Air traffic mgmt.
group
88 Arts section regular
89 —-fi
90 Frayed
91 Either of two hearth
borders?
93 Altar constellation
94 Quip, part 6
99 Rhyming boxer
100 Work with thread
101 Calrissian of "Star
Wars" films
102 Putting out
106 Laker or Raptor,
briefly
109 Bass-baritone Simon
113 Trolley sound
114 Lowest points
117 End of the quip
119 "War of the Worlds"
target
120 Play areas
121 Entered stealthily,
perhaps
122 — tie
123 See 8-Across
124 Letters-to-the-editor
writers
57
62
63
64
66
67
68
69
70
73
74
75
76
78
79
80
81
82
83
—City: computer game
Refuse to bargain
Separate
Lethargy cause
Pain reliever
Daiquiri liquor
DDE opponent
Cooking show title
word
Barely open
Köln cooler
Free
Mariner's home
"Lord, is —?": Matthew
Matchless one's
question
Many a political party
Giant in nonstick pans
Call from the curb
Six-sided state
Country name that
includes its own
abbreviation
84 Permanent mark
86 "Splish Splash"
singer
92 Con artist, often
95 Jeers
96 Street shader
97 City east of El Paso
98 How uncut grass goes
102 "Law & Order: SVU"
actor
103 Sandwich side
104 Indian garment
105 Work on, as a bone
107 Buddy, in slang
108 No. 2
110 Bit of defiance, in
slang
111 Gulf States prince
112 "Last four"
ID verifiers
115 Sea-Tac abbr.
116 Agnus —
118 Oil-rich fed.
Tribune Content Agency © 2019
DOWN
1 Indian titles
2 State admitted to the
Union after Texas
3 Hosp. "room"
4 400+ million of them
are produced daily
5 Draw in
6 Insignificant point
7 Príncipe's island
partner
8 Droops
9 Former ACC Cavalier
rival
10 Old-fashioned editing
tool
11 Little sucker?
12 Seine summer
13 Loch with a legend
14 Circus security
15 Outcast
16 One may be left in a
copier: Abbr.
17 — IRA
Bill Cornwall
Mankind’s admiration of
champions probably predates written history. Remarkably, even when a person’s own ambitions for titles
are blunted, high interest remains in those others who
end up in the winner’s circle.
As a result, the profitable
sports entertainment industry focuses its attention and
cameras on covering multitudes of championships.
No exception, chess has
filled its world with champions at every level and of every
kind. Local clubs, cities,
counties, regions, and countries provide countless competitions to produce their
proud title-holders.
On the largest scale, the
International Chess Federation sponsors events for almost every conceivable category and geographical area.
Glancing back at some of
FIDE’s contributions just
last year is quite revealing. In
March, eight chosen superGrandmasters clashed in
Berlin to determine who
would be the next official
challenger for the classical
chess world champion.
The next month in Albania, 387 boys and girls from
40 countries vied for titles in
their divisions of the World
Schools Chess Championship.
Further
youth
events followed: the World
Cadet in Belarus, the World
Junior for the Disabled in the
U.S., the World Junior in Turkey, and the World Youth in
Greece.
Countries vied with each
other in the World Team Ch.
in Germany and the World
Chess Olympiad in Georgia.
Swedish GM Tiger Persson
played one of the most amusingly entertaining games of
the year at the Olympiad,
earning him the overall brilliancy prize. See this column’s game. With queens
and rooks still on the board,
he allowed his king to be
chased out into the open
(moves 28-29). It headed
deep into enemy territory to
help its queen set up a sacrificial mating attack (30-35).
18 One in a sailor's
repertoire
27 Dressy pasta?
29 Creepy looks
31 Fast sailing ships
33 Subjects of many
online videos
34 Balkan capital
36 Geographical measure
37 Think (over)
38 Elec., e.g.
39 Mount Olympus VIP
40 Town line sign abbr.
41 1950s tennis great Lew
42 Dior creations
43 Shakespearean title
city
44 Applies, as pressure
50 Whse. unit
51 Chain with syrup
choices
54 Shortest mo.
56 Eng. ship title
H3
Jan. 6, 2019
Position No. 4554: White
mates in two.
Position No. 4553: 1.Kg1! Hint:
White mates next with: cxd7,
c7, g5 or gxf5.
Look at these clever variations: 31...Qf5+ 32.Kh6 Qc5
(32...Rc1 33.Qxf8+ Kxf8
34.Re8 mate) 33.Qf6 Qxe3+
34.Rf4; 33...Kg8 34.Kh6;
34...fxg6
35.Re7+
Kg8
36.Bd5+ Rf7 37.Re8+ Kg7
38.Rxf7 mate.
Topping off the year in
November was the overall
World Classical Chess title
match. Champion Magnus
Carlsen of Norway defended
his crown against American
Challenger Fabiano Caruana. An extremely close encounter, the classical 12game portion consisted of all
draws. Carlsen simply dominated, though, in the speedier tie-break games. This was
his third successful defense
since becoming the Champion in 2013.
Game of the week
Persson, Tiger-Laurusas, Tomas
Chess Olympiad
Batumi, Georgia
1.Nf3 d5 2.g3 Nf6 3.Bg2 g6
4.c4 c6 5.b3 Bg7 6.Bb2 0–0 7.0–0
a5 8.Nc3 Ne4 9.Na4 Bxb2 10.Nxb2
Nd7 11.d3 Nef6 12.d4 b6 13.Rc1 Bb7
14.Nd3 Rc8 15.Nfe5 Nxe5 16.dxe5
Nd7 17.Qd2 dxc4 18.Rxc4 Nxe5
19.Rh4 h5 20.Rd1 Nxd3 21.Qh6
Qd6 22.Rxd3 Qf6 23.Be4 Ba6
24.Re3 Qg7 25.Qg5 Rcd8 26.Qxe7
Rd1+ 27.Kg2 Qa1 28.Bxc6 Rg1+
29.Kf3 Qf1 30.Kf4 Qxf2+ 31.Kg5
Kg7 32.Rf4 Qxh2 33.Qf6+ Kh7
34.Qxg6+! Kh8 35.Kh6!! 1–0
ccsknight@bellsouth.net
POKER
Chad Holloway
There are two ways to
make three of a kind. You can
either make a set or trips.
The former happens when
you hold a pocket pair and
find a third on the board,
while the latter is when
there’s a pair on the board
and you having a matching
card in your hand.
Let’s talk about a hand
where someone flopped a set
and managed to not go
broke. It happened in November at the $1,100-buy-in
Mid-States Poker Tour Denver Poker Open main eventin
Black Hawk, Colo.
In Level 9 (blinds of 400800 with an ante of 100),
World Series of Poker bracelet winner John “Kasino
Krime” Beauprez raised to
2,000 in early position with
pocket jacks. The player in
the cutoff seat called, Tye
Rogers came along from the
big blind, and the flop came
down Q♣ J♠ 3♥. Rogers
checked, Beauprez continued for 3,800, and the player
in the cutoff seat got out of
the way. Rogers called and
then checked for the second
time on the 9♦ turn. Beauprez bet again, this time
SUDOKU
John
Beauprez’s
hand
Flop
5,200, and Rogers woke up
with a check-raise to 15,200.
Beauprez just called, and
the 7♣ completed the board
on the river. Rogers jammed
for 39,000, and Beauprez,
who had just a bit less, gave it
some thought before laying
down his set. How did he do
it? By thinking through the
hand — Beauprez had to put
his opponent on a straight —
and following the evidence.
For instance, take the
preflop action. Rogers called
out of the big blind, meaning
he likely held something like
a small pocket pair, two paint
cards, or hands with a 10 such
as J-10, 10-9, 10-8, etc. One
hand Beauprez could rule
out was pocket queens. How
so? Because Rogers probably would have three-bet
such a strong hand preflop.
When Rogers checkraised the turn, he was advertising that he either had a
Turn
River
made hand, like K-10 or 10-8
for a straight, or some sort of
semi-bluff, like a pair with an
open-ended straight draw.
Beauprez could have pushed
back, but by just calling, he
opened the door for his opponent to value-bet worse
hands on the river. If his opponent checked, Beauprez
could comfortably bet.
On the river, Rogers went
for the big payday by moving
all in. A lot of players would
have called if they were in
Beauprez’s shoes, but the
WSOP champ thought better of it. He likely deduced
that Rogers was on the
tighter side and wouldn’t
bluff the river with a missed
draw, in which case putting
him on a straight seemed like
a logical deduction.
Holloway is a 2013 World
Series of Poker bracelet
winner.
H4
SU N DAY , JA N UA RY 6 , 2 019
IN THE BLEACHERS By Steve Moore
CANDORVILLE By Darrin Bell
FRAZZ By Jef Mallett
L AT I M E S . C O M
NON SEQUITUR By Wiley
LOS ANGELES TIMES
SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
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Panel Bed
PLUS!
SPECIAL
FINANCING§
PLUS!
‡‡
Reg. Price $899.99
76499
3
6
18
YEARS
YEARS
MONTHS
SPECIAL
FINANCING§
SPECIAL
FINANCING§
PLUS!
or
INCLUDES 15% OFF. ‡‡
11
$
%
%
‡‡
%
‡‡
SPECIAL
FINANCING§
Sommerford Queen
Panel Bed
PLUS!
15
20
25
30
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
%
Includes headboard, footboard and rails.
$
5
YEARS
PLUS!
144499
$
PLUS!
‡‡
or
INCLUDES 15% OFF. ‡‡
SPECIAL
FINANCING§
PLUS!
18
MONTHS
SPECIAL
FINANCING§
PLUS!
%
15
20
25
30
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
Reg. Price $1699.99
PER MONTH FOR
72 MONTHS.‡
3
YEARS
SPECIAL
FINANCING§
%
Includes headboard, footboard and rails.
‡‡
5
YEARS
21
$
%
‡‡
%
‡‡
‡‡
PER MONTH FOR
72 MONTHS.‡
YOUR CHOICE!
Tonnari or Maylyn
TV Stands
Reg. Price $999.99
84999
$
12
$
INCLUDES 15% OFF. ‡‡
or
6
YEARS
SPECIAL
FINANCING§
PLUS!
PER MONTH FOR
72 MONTHS.‡
5
YEARS
SPECIAL
FINANCING§
PLUS!
3
YEARS
SPECIAL
FINANCING§
PLUS!
18
MONTHS
SPECIAL
FINANCING§
PLUS!
%
15
20
25
30
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
%
Tonnari
‡‡
%
‡‡
%
‡‡
‡‡
Maylyn
COMING SOON TO EL CAJON!
#1 IN CALIFORNIA, #1 IN AMERICA,
55 LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU!
NOW
HIRING!
Sales
Associates
Get it
Today!
No Credit
Needed!
BAKERSFIELD
8915 Rosedale Hwy
Bakersield, CA 93312
661-588-7953
facebook.com/AshleyHSBakersfield
BURBANK
East of the 5
Exit Burbank Blvd
401 N. 1st St
Burbank, CA 91502
818-840-5620
facebook.com/AshleyHSBurbank
CANOGA PARK
21301 Victory Blvd.
Canoga Park, CA 91303
747-226-6026
facebook.com/AshleyHSCanogaPark
COLTON
Exit Mt. Vernon Ave.
855 Ashley Way
Colton, CA 92324
909-433-5303
facebook.com/AshleyHSColton
Follow us at
@AshleyHomeStoreWest
COLTON
CLEARANCE CENTER
1601 Ashley Way
Colton, CA 92324
909-433-5300
Mon. - Sun. 9am - 5:30pm
LONG BEACH
West of the 605 in Long Beach
Towne Center
7410 Carson Blvd
Long Beach, CA 90808
562-766-2050
facebook.com/AshleyHSColtonClearance Center
facebook.com/AshleyHSLongBeach
FOUNTAIN VALLEY
Just East of 405 Fwy
18060 Euclid St
Fountain Valley, CA 92708
714-549-3200
LOS ANGELES
South of the 10,
Exit Convention Center
1810 S Broadway
Los Angeles, CA 90015
213-745-2980
facebook.com/AshleyHSFountainValley
facebook.com/AshleyHSLosAngeles
MURRIETA
25125 Madison Ave
Murrieta, CA 92562
951-894-7988
facebook.com/AshleyHSMurrieta
NORTHRIDGE
Just East of the
Northridge Mall
9301 Tampa Ave, Ste 1401
Northridge, CA 91324
818-717-1740
facebook.com/AshleyHSNorthridge
facebook.com/AshleyHSHawthorne
LOS ANGELES
In the Venice Crossroads
Shopping Center
8985 Venice Blvd., Suite A-3
Los Angeles, CA 90034
310-596-4335
OXNARD
Located in the
Market Place at Oxnard
Shopping Center
1721 E Ventura Blvd
Oxnard, CA 93036
805-981-0284
facebook.com/AshleyHSWestLosAngeles
facebook.com/AshleyHSOxnard
LAGUNA HILLS
Just North of
the Laguna Hills Mall
24001 El Toro Rd
Laguna Hills, CA 92653
949-461-0829
MONTCLAIR
Located South
of Montclair Plaza
5055 S. Montclair Plaza Ln
Montclair, CA 91763
909-625-4420
PALMDALE
Across from the AV Mall
39626 10th St West
Palmdale, CA 93551
661-225-9410
facebook.com/AshleyHSLagunaHills
facebook.com/AshleyHSMontclair
HAWTHORNE
East of 405, Rosecrans Exit
14600 Ocean Gate Ave
Hawthorne, CA 90250
310-349-2083
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK: Monday - Sunday 10am - 9pm
PALM DESERT
Desert Gateway Plaza
34740 Monterey Ave
Palm Desert, CA 92211
760-202-3052
facebook.com/AshleyHSPalmDesert
SAN DIEGO
7770 Miramar Road
San Diego, CA 92126
858-408-1701
facebook.com/AshleyHSSanDiego
SAN MARCOS
1050 Los Vallecitos Blvd
San Marcos, CA 92069
760-539-4663
facebook.com/AshleyHSSanMarcos
SANTA ANA
Located in the
Westield MainPlace Mall
2800 N Main St., #2100
Santa Ana, CA 92705
714-558-5300
facebook.com/AshleyHSSantaAna
facebook.com/AshleyHSPalmdale
“Se Habla Español”
SANTA CLARITA
Center Point Market Place
Across From Sam’s Club
and Super Walmart
26520 Carl Boyer Dr
Santa Clarita, CA 91350
661-284-7200
facebook.com/AshleyHSSantaClarita
VICTORVILLE
North of Victor Valley Mall
12704 Amargosa Rd
Victorville, CA 92392
760-261-5386
facebook.com/AshleyHSVictorville
WEST COVINA
Located in the
Eastland Shopping Center
2753 E Eastland Ctr Dr #2050
West Covina, CA 91791
626-938-1480
facebook.com/AshleyHSWestCovina
YORBA LINDA
Just North of Fwy 91
22705 Savi Ranch Pkwy
Yorba Linda, CA 92887
714-363-9900
facebook.com/AshleyHSYorbaLinda
www.AshleyHomeStore.com
*Offer applies only to single-receipt qualifying purchases. Ashley HomeStore does not require a down payment, however, sales tax and delivery charges are due at time of purchase if the purchase is made with your Ashley Advantage™ Credit Card.
No interest will be charged on promo purchase and equal monthly payments are required equal to initial promo purchase amount divided equally by the number of months in promo period until promo is paid in full. The equal monthly payment will
be rounded to the next highest whole dollar and may be higher than the minimum payment that would be required if the purchase was a non-promotional purchase. Regular account terms apply to non-promotional purchases. For new accounts:
Purchase APR is 29.99%; Minimum Interest Charge is $2. Existing cardholders should see their credit card agreement for their applicable terms. Promotional purchases of merchandise will be charged to account when merchandise is delivered. Subject
to credit approval. ‡Monthly payment shown is equal to the purchase price, excluding taxes and delivery, divided by the number of months in the promo period, rounded to the next highest whole dollar, and only applies to the selected financing option
shown. If you make your payments by the due date each month, the monthly payment shown should allow you to pay off this purchase within the promo period if this balance is the only balance on your account during the promo period. If you have
other balances on your account, this monthly payment will be added to the minimum payment applicable to those balances.
††Ashley HomeStore does not require a down payment, however, sales tax and delivery charges are due at time of purchase if the purchase is made with your Ashley Advantage™ Credit Card. Offer applies only to single-receipt qualifying
purchases. No interest will be charged on the promo purchase if you pay the promo purchase amount in full within 18 Months. If you do not, interest will be charged on the promo purchase from the purchase date. Depending on purchase amount,
promotion length and payment allocation, the required minimum monthly payments may or may not pay off purchase by end of promotional period. Regular account terms apply to non-promotional purchases and, after promotion ends, to
promotional balance. For new accounts: Purchase APR is 29.99%; Minimum Interest Charge is $2. Existing cardholders should see their credit card agreement for their applicable terms. Promotional purchases of merchandise will be charged to
account when merchandise is delivered. Subject to credit approval.
§Subject to credit approval. Minimum monthly payments required. See store for details.
‡‡Previous purchases excluded. Cannot be combined with any other promotion or discount. Discount ofers exclude Tempur-Pedic®, Stearns & Foster® and Sealy Posturepedic Hybrid™ mattress sets, loor models, clearance items, sales tax, furniture
protection plans, warranty, delivery fee, Manager’s Special pricing, Advertised Special pricing, and 14 Piece Packages and cannot be combined with inancing specials. Efective 1/1/2018, all mattress and box springs are subject to a $10.50 per unit CA
recycling fee. SEE STORE FOR DETAILS. Stoneledge Furniture LLC. many times has multiple ofers, promotions, discounts and inancing specials occurring at the same time; these are allowed to only be used either/or and not both or combined with each
other. Although every precaution is taken, errors in price and/or speciication may occur in print. We reserve the right to correct any such errors. Picture may not represent item exactly as shown, advertised items may not be on display at all locations.
Some restrictions may apply. Available only at participating locations. ±Leather Match upholstery features top-grain leather in the seating areas and skillfully matched vinyl everywhere else. Ashley HomeStores are independently owned and operated.
©2019 Ashley HomeStores, Ltd. Promotional Start Date: December 27, 2018. Expires: January 14, 2019.
LOS ANGELES TIMES
SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
SA1
HARBOR FREIGHT TOOLS
Quality Tools at Ridiculously Low Prices
DOLLAR DAY
PLUS HUNDREDS OF UNADVERTISED DOLLAR DAY SPECIALS
SUPER COUPON
SUPER COUPON
SUPER COUPON
4-1/2" GRINDING WHEEL
FOR METAL
20%
SUPER COUPON
PICKUP AND
REACH TOOL
Customer Rating
Customer Rating
1
$
DIABLO
SAVE 93%
4
$ 47
COMPARE TO
COMPARE TO
ITEM 61152
39677/61448 shown
MODEL: DBD045250701F
$
ARCMATE
2
$ 99
15
MODEL: 32S
SAVE 84%
*894473090018*
894473090018
*894473140018*
894473140018
LIMIT 7 - Coupon valid through 3/16/19*
LIMIT 8 - Coupon valid through 3/16/19*
LIMIT 7 - Coupon valid through 3/16/19*
SUPER COUPON
5" JUMBO
ALUMINUM HOOK
SUPER COUPON
6 PIECE DETAIL
BRUSH SET
Customer Rating
4-1/2", 36 GRIT
FLAP DISC
Customer Rating
1
$
SAVE 66%
COMPARE TO
TOOL SHOP
FREE
• 144 Lumens
• Magnetic Base
1
2
$ 99
4
1
LIMIT 9 - Coupon valid through 3/16/19*
SUPER COUPON
11" CABLE TIES
PACK OF 100
SUPER COUPON
200 LUMENS LED
SUPER BRIGHT
FLIP LIGHT
7 FT. 4" x 9 FT. 6"
ALL PURPOSE/WEATHER
RESISTANT TARP
Customer Rating
3
$
Customer Rating
YOUR
CHOICE
4
$ 98
2
SAVE 50%
6
PROMIER MODEL: SW-SWITCH-12/24
COMPARE TO
$ 98
BLUE HAWK
MODEL: BG8X10-Y
$
COMPARE TO
2
$ 99
SUPER COUPON 16 OZ. HAMMERS
9
*894542220018*
894542220018
LIMIT 7 - Coupon valid through 3/16/19*
LIMIT 7 - Coupon valid through 3/16/19*
SUPER COUPON
WITH FIBERGLASS
Customer Rating HANDLE
3
4
SAVE 69%
$ 99
*894536760018*
894536760018
LIMIT 7 - Coupon valid through 3/16/19*
ANY PURCHASE
4" MAGNETIC
PARTS HOLDER
ITEM 64189
64723/63922 shown
ITEM 69121
69129/69137
69249/69115
877 shown
$
$
Customer Rating
$ 49
9 SGY-CT25
UTILITECH MODEL:
*894530570018*
894530570018
FREE
ITEM 61500
67639 shown
*894526440018*
894526440018
COMPARE TO
SUPER COUPON
MODEL: DW8306
LIMIT 7 - Coupon valid through 3/16/19*
SAVE 79%
Cannot be used with other discounts or prior purchases. Original coupon must be presented.
Valid through 3/16/19 while supplies last. Limit 1 FREE GIFT per customer per day.
$ 98
DEWALT
*894517450018*
894517450018
ITEM 69404
60266/34636
*894482760018*
894482760018
8
COMPARE TO
LIMIT 7 - Coupon valid through 3/16/19*
WHITE
MODEL: FT-LOW1424-1
3
$ 96
COMPARE TO
LINCOLN ELECTRIC MODEL: KH590
*894505670018*
894505670018
ITEM 69405
60277/34637 shown
UTILITECH
$ 97
3
SAVE 74% SAVE 88%
$ 99
ITEM 69526
62616/93610 shown
$ 99
Color may vary. Do not use to
support human weight.
MODEL: 92645
BLACK
COMPARE TO
1 $1
$ 99
SUPER COUPON
ANY PURCHASE
ULTRA BRIGHT
LED PORTABLE
WORK LIGHT/
FLASHLIGHT
Customer Rating
$
ITEM 60342
92077 shown
SUPER COUPON
SUPER COUPON
AMMO DRY BOX
Customer Rating
Customer Rating
MECHANIC'S
GLOVES
CLAW
ITEM 60714/47872
60715/69006
• Non-Marring Base
• Stainless Steel
RIP
5
$ 99
MODEL: 11194
YOUR
CHOICE
COMPARE TO
ITEM 62535/90566 shown
KOBALT
9
$ 98
*894485650018*
894485650018
Cannot be used with other discounts or prior purchases. Original coupon must be presented.
Valid through 3/16/19 while supplies last. Limit 1 FREE GIFT per customer per day.
3
SUPER COUPON
COMPARE TO
9
$ 99
4
$ 99
FREE
18" X 12"
MOVER'S DOLLY
5
SAVE
54%
$ 99
COMPARE TO
VALEO
$ 02
11
MODEL: 25521
ITEM 62432, 64178,
64179, 62426, 62433,
62429, 62434, 62428 shown
*894567110018*
894567110018
*894569150018*
894569150018
LIMIT 7 - Coupon valid through 3/16/19*
LIMIT 8 - Coupon valid through 3/16/19*
LIMIT 7 - Coupon valid through 3/16/19*
SUPER COUPON
SAVE $ 99
59% 6
RANGEMAXX
MODEL: 1312-92
*894557320018*
*
8945
894557320018
4
$
$
SAVE 69%
MODEL: 62742
5
$
ITEM 63135
61451 shown
ITEM 61262
69005/47873 shown
Hardware sold
separately.
TITAN
ITEM 46805/62242
68974 shown
MODEL: 1964747
*872606070018*
872606070018
SUPER COUPON
Limit 1 coupon per customer per day. Save 20% on any 1 item purchased. *Cannot be used with other discount,
coupon or any of the following items or brands: Inside Track Club membership, Extended Service Plan, gift card,
open box item, 3 day Parking Lot Sale item, compressors, floor jacks, safes, saw mills, storage cabinets, chests
or carts, trailers, trencher/backhoe, welders, Admiral, Ames, Bauer, Cobra, CoverPro, Daytona, Diamondback,
Earthquake, Fischer, Hercules, Icon, Jupiter, Lynxx, Poulan, Predator, Tailgator, Viking, Vulcan, Zurich.
Not valid on prior purchases. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 3/16/19.
COMPARE TO
6
IRWIN
*894481560018*
894481560018
WITH
1
$ 99
$ 49
COMPARE TO
ITEM 61413
94870/62176 shown
ANY
SINGLE
ITEM*
ITEM 60566
63601/63991
64005/63878
69567/67227 shown
1
$
1
$
1
SAVE 77%
$ 99
OFF
WITH
4" RATCHET
BAR CLAMP/
SPREADER
Customer Rating
SUPER COUPON SOLAR ROPE LIGHT
SUPER COUPON
Customer Rating
Customer Rating
4-1/2" ANGLE
GRINDER
Customer Rating
ANY PURCHASE
WITH
ITEM 63941
64625/62533
68353 shown
MOVING
BLANKET
ITEM 61899/63095
63096/63097/63098
60497/93888 shown
5
$ 13
VALUE
SAVE 54% 10
$
• 40" x 50"
• Double-Stitched
• Cotton Filler
ITEM 63959
COMPARE TO
$
BUFFALO
TOOLS
99
8
$
9
$
SAVE 69%
COMPARE TO
1765
$
HAMPTON
BAY
MODEL: HDFDOLLY
2997
SAVE
65%
12
99
$
MODEL: 82056-055SR
ITEM 69645
95578/60625 shown
$
COMPARE TO
PERFORMAX
10
$
2899
MODEL: 2411-1
*894504620018*
894504620018
*894581310018*
894581310018
*894582500018*
894582500018
*894584910018*
894584910018
Cannot be used with other discounts or prior purchases. Original coupon must be presented.
Valid through 3/16/19 while supplies last. Limit 1 FREE GIFT per customer per day.
LIMIT 7 - Coupon valid through 3/16/19*
LIMIT 6 - Coupon valid through 3/16/19*
LIMIT 5 - Coupon valid through 3/16/19*
10" SLIDING
COMPOUND
MITER SAW
130 PIECE TOOL KIT
WITH CASE
Customer Rating
SAE AND
METRIC
Customer Rating
38
$
Blade sold
separately.
ITEM 61972 $
61971 shown
12499 NOW
99
SAVE $99
COMPARE TO
KOBALT
$
199
$99
ITEM 68998
64080/64263
63248/63091 shown
COMPARE TO
NOW
99
$29
HDX
$
6639
MODEL: H137HOS
MODEL: SM2507LW
69
SAVE 54%
8750 MAX. STARTING/
RAPID PUMP ® 3 TON STEEL
HEAVY DUTY FLOOR JACK
Customer Rating 7000 RUNNING( WATTS)
13 HP 420 CC
GAS GENERATOR
• Electric start
with recoil back up*
Customer Rating
ITEM 63086
68530/63085 shown
ITEM 68525
63087/63088
CALIFORNIA ONLY
NOW
$
SAVE $60
135647593
POWERBUILT MODEL:
COMPARE TO
$
27
99
NOW
59999
$
LIFTS FROM
5" TO 18-1/4"
HONDA
$
2,599
MODEL: EB6500X1AT
$529
SAVE $2,069
*Wheel kit and battery sold separately.
*894585830018*
894585830018
*894593810018*
894593810018
*894594860018*
894594860018
*894600440018*
894600440018
LIMIT 4 - Coupon valid through 3/16/19*
LIMIT 5 - Coupon valid through 3/16/19*
LIMIT 5 - Coupon valid through 3/16/19*
LIMIT 3 - Coupon valid through 3/16/19*
6351-3F54T-LAT2-000479
BUENA PARK &
WHITTIER
ITEM 69667/68740 shown
A
B
ICE
YOUR CHO
$9999
SAVE $70
DEWALT 169
*894602690018*
894602690018
COMPARE TO $
99
MODEL: DWFP55126
LIMIT 5 - Coupon valid through 3/16/19*
CARSON (310) 719-2206
LA MIRADA (714) 562-0417
850 E. DEL AMO BLVD.
14345 FIRESTONE BLVD.
3660 E.FOOTHILL BLVD.
COVINA (626) 858-8493
LA PUENTE (626) 917-0390
PICO RIVERA (562) 801-0369
PASADENA (626) 304-9272
440 W. ARROW HWY.
1291 N. HACIENDA BLVD.
CULVER CITY (310) 313-1173
8500 WHITTIER BLVD.
LAKEWOOD (562) 425-1780
SAN DIMAS (909) 394-2071
4545 SEPULVEDA BLVD., STE. A
4171 WOODRUFF AVE.
1007 W. ARROW HWY.
DOWNEY (562) 803-1205
LOMITA (310) 326-7942
TORRANCE (310) 370-0860
12056 LAKEWOOD BLVD.
2040 PACIFIC COAST HWY., STE. B
4310 ARTESIA BLVD.
HUNTINGTON PARK (323) 587-1489
LYNWOOD (323) 569-1930
5952 PACIFIC BLVD.
10690 LONG BEACH BLVD.
LA HABRA (562) 266-1241
NORTH HOLLYWOOD (818) 754-1752
250 N. HARBOR BLVD.
6020 LANKERSHIM BLVD.
Coupons Can Be Used In-Store and at HarborFreight.com
*Original coupon only. No use on prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase or without original receipt. Valid through 3/16/19.
ITEM 62511/62894/68149
62380/67696 shown
STORE LOCATIONS NEAR YOU
VISIT OUR NEW STORE
NOW
OPEN
OIL-FREE AIR COMPRESSOR
Customer Rating
99 $11899
COMPARE TO
ITEM 64260
64261/64265
69227/62116
64875/62584
68048 shown
A 6 GALLON, 1.5 HP, 150 PSI
B 8 GALLON, 2 HP, 125 PSI
OIL-LUBE AIR COMPRESSOR
• Precision welded
construction
• Weighs 74 lbs.
$7499 87
1499
$
At Harbor Freight Tools, the “Compare to” price means that the specified comparison, which is an item with
the same or similar function, was advertised for sale at or above the “Compare to” price by another national
retailer in the U.S. within the past 90 days. Prices advertised by others may vary by location. No other meaning
of “Compare to” should be implied. For more information, go to HarborFreight.com or see store associate.
SA2
SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
LOS ANGELES TIMES
Customer Rating
44" x 22" DOUBLE BANK
EXTRA DEEP CABINETS
47999
$
ICE
YOUR CHO
• 14,000 cu. in. of storage
• 2600 lb. capacity
• Weighs 291 lbs.
COMPARE TO
SNAP-ON
$
$449
99
20 VOLT LITHIUM
CORDLESS
1/2" COMPACT DRILL/
DRIVER KIT
BLUE
ITEM 64444
64445/64446 shown
Customer Rating
ITEM 64281
64134/64133 shown
COMPARE TO
ITEM 64441
64442/64443 shown
RYOBI
*894610000018*
894610000018
2,605 SAVE $2,155
MODEL: KRA4813FPB0
$
99
$64
7499
$
MODEL: P1811
*894615640018*
894615640018
LIMIT 3 - Coupon valid through 3/16/19*
NOW 9
9
99
SAVE $34
BLACK
• Boom extends from
36-1/4" to 50-1/4"
• Crane height adjusts
from 82" to 94"
NOW
• 450 in. lbs.
of torque
RED
1 TON CAPACITY
FOLDABLE
SHOP
CRANE
Customer Rating
SAVE
$70
LIMIT 5 - Coupon valid through 3/16/19*
$
COMPARE TO
ITEM 64754
63531 shown
17999
$
ITEM 69512
61858/69445 shown
IRONTON
*894619260018*
894619260018
19999
MODEL: 46218
LIMIT 4 - Coupon valid through 3/16/19*
Voted Best Winches
2500 LB. ELECTRIC
WINCH WITH WIRELESS
REMOTE CONTROL
$
SUPERWINCH
99
MODEL: 1125220
*894622080018*
$
894622080018
6999
LIMIT 5 - Coupon valid through 3/16/19*
NOW
$49
Customer Rating
ITEM 60581
3418/60653 shown
99
$229
NOW
• Weighs 14.3 lbs.
• 11-1/8" L x 4-1/2" H
18999
Customer Rating
HIGH DEF. 720P RESOLUTION
61297/63476
61258 shown
COMPARE TO
2/10/50 AMP, 12 VOLT
BATTERY CHARGER/
ENGINE STARTER
4 CHANNEL WIRELESS
SURVEILLANCE SYSTEM
WITH 2 CAMERAS
Customer Rating ITEM 61840
SAVE
$140
• Night vision
*894624630018*
894624630018
ITEM 63842
COMPARE TO
24999
ALC
$
OBD2 CODE READER
WITH ABS/SRS/
Customer Rating FixAssist® ZR13
$
COMPARE TO
$
Snap-on
34999
894626820018
MODEL: ALC-AWS3266
LIMIT 5 - Coupon valid through 3/16/19*
Customer Rating
BLUE-POINT
$
MODEL: EECR3A
209
MODEL EQ38RXT-12V
• 60 ft. lbs. torque
• Variable speed: 0-170 RPM
SAVE
$139 $
12999
SNAP-ON
$
95
239
99
MODEL: CTR761CDB
*894633110018*
894633110018
*894637840018*
894637840018
LIMIT 3 - Coupon valid through 3/16/19*
LIMIT 5 - Coupon valid through 3/16/19*
DIRECT-LIFT
NOW
99
$9 9
799
NOW
39999
*894639650018*
894639650018
LIMIT 3 - Coupon valid through 3/16/19*
*894638560018*
894638560018
19999
$
SAVE $315
• Lift range: 7" to 29-1/2"
• Weighs 269 lbs.
ITEM 69904/68892 shown
COMPARE TO
NORTHSTAR
99
$1 74
205
99
ITEM 63054 COMPARE TO $
62858 shown SHELTER LOGIC MODEL: 23522
Customer Rating
1"-3"
INTAKE AND
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ITEM 56160
63405 shown
KLUTCH
9
9
15
$
$
51999
9
18999
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ITEM 63806
$129
• 30-170 Amps DC
• Duty cycle: 20% @ 110 Amps
ITEM 61888/68885 shown
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POWER-FEED DRAIN
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9 $38999
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ATE TOOLS
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88
ITEM 63056/60405
90984/63094/63150/63057/61524 shown
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• Compact V-twin design HORIZONTAL SHAFT
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99
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$
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ITEM 63330
63774/61553 shown
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5997
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ITEM 69857
93431 shown
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2
93687/63147 shown
99
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4
$ 98
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$
7-1/4", 12 AMP
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• Mounts easily
ITEM 62502
64778/97181 shown
ITEM
63126/93686
61569/63127 shown
NOW
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TOOL HOLDER
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MALE
Dust bag
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4" x 36" BELT/
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ITEM 61199/65489
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14
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ITEM 63290
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COLEMAN MODEL:11
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98
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ITEM 47902/61328
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JANUARY BLOWOUT SALE
FRIDAY
JAN. 11
*Original coupon only. No use on prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase or without original receipt. Valid through 3/16/19.
SATURDAY
JAN. 12
SUNDAY
JAN. 13
Save
UP
TO
93%
LOS ANGELES TIMES
SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
*Limited to stock on hand. Not to be combined with other promotional discounts in effect.
JANUARY 2-9, 2019
Save on more than 7,500
top quality vitamin and
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#%$!"
PS1
PS2
SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
Green Bell Peppers or
Cucumbers
Organic
Red Bunched Beets
In-Shell
Pistachios
Roasted salted or unsalted
LOS ANGELES TIMES
$
2 1
for
98
All-Natural Boneless Skinless
Chicken Tenders or Thighs
No enhancers or sodium based solutions added!
¢
ea.
$ 99
5
Honeycrisp
or Pink Lad
lb.
Grape Toma
French Van
Honey Alm
$ 99
1
lb.
Value pack
Sale prices valid
LOS ANGELES TIMES
SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
Blueberries
p
dy Apples
98
$ 98
¢
lb.
3
Red Cherries
$ 98
atoes
nilla or
mond Granola
1
ea.
$ 79
2
lb.
Tender, sweet and easy to cook, 60/80 ct. Previously frozen
lb.
88
Navel Oranges
25
Dried Fruit
¢
lb.
off
6
lb.
ea.
$
Bartle! Pears
Organic
Hass Avocados
%
regular retail
excludes prepackaged items
Select varieties
$ 99
Wild Natural Bay Scallops
98
¢
Deluxe Trail Mix
Raw, roasted salted or unsalted
All-Natural 100% Grass-Fed
Ground Beef
No hormones or antibiotics added, ever!
2 1
lbs.
for
98
¢
ea.
$ 99
3
lb.
$ 99
3
lb.
Value pack
January 2 – 9, 2019 in all Los Angeles area locations.
15732
PS3
PS4
SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2019
LOS ANGELES TIMES
Caveman, Larabar, Nugo Slim,
Think Thin or Wolo Bars
Good Belly, Primal Kitchen,
Quest, RXBar or Zing Bars
Select varieties, 1.24-2.1 oz.
Select varieties, 1.34-2.12 oz.
99
$
¢
45
for
ea.
Plus, SAVE 10% when you buy a full, unopened case (10-16 ct.) from the above brands.
Essentia
Water
Almond Breeze
Almondmilk
1.5 ltr.
Select varieties,
64 fl. oz.
Sprouts Organic
Frozen Fruit
Bragg Organic
Apple Cider
Vinegar
Select varieties, 10 oz.
Select varieties,
32 fl. oz.
23
Sprouts Organic
Almond Bu"er
26
Sprouts Organic
Beans
Sprouts Organic
Rice or Corn Cakes
Select varieties, 12 oz.
Select varieties,
15.5 oz.
Select varieties,
15-16 ct.
4
Save up to $4.29
Sprouts Organic
Broth Concentrate
or Bone Broth
Select varieties,
2.54-32 oz.
$ 99
ea.
$ 99
ea.
Sprouts
Coconut Water
Sprouts Organic
Maple Syrup
Select varieties,
24.3 fl. oz.
32 fl. oz.
$
25
for
+CRV
Mountain High
Yoghurt
Select varieties,
32 oz.
$
25
for
99
2
7
$
$ 99
ea.
$
for
+CRV
for
¢
ea.
Everyday low price
Sprouts
Organic
Raw Honey
99
¢
ea.
Sprouts Organic
Kombucha
Select varieties, 16 fl. oz.
48 oz.
$
13
99
ea.
Vital Farms
Pasture-Raised
Alfresco Eggs
Large, grade A, doz.
$ 99
ea.
4
$
$
99
ea.
24
Suja
Juices
Enlightened
Ice Cream or
Novelties
12
Select varieties,
12-15.2 fl. oz.
of equal or lesser value +CRV
Save up to $3.99
for
+CRV
Select varieties,
14-16 fl. oz.
Save up to $5.99
Sale prices valid January 2 – 9, 2019 in all Los Angeles area locations.
For store hours or to find a location near you, visit sprouts.com
#%$!"
Plus
HAPPY
NEW
YEAR!
Make it healthy with
JILLIAN MICHAELS
p. 4
Bublé
michael
on his SON’S CANCER, his
CELEB CRUSH and LOVE SONGS
© PARADE Publications 2018. All rights reserved.
S C OT
T ’S
HAPPY
NEW
YEAR
WITH
Walter Scott Asks
ANDERSON
COOPER!
Cooper, 51, has been hosting CNN’s New
Year’s Eve Live since 2002, and this year
he is back with his good buddy Andy
Cohen, 50, as his co-host to ring in 2019
from New York City’s Times Square. Here
are ive things you might not know about
the Emmy-winning anchor of Anderson
Cooper 360°.
He contracted malaria
as a teenager backpacking in Central
Africa and spent time
in a hospital
in Kenya.
1
Cooper made his
irst TV appearance at age 3
with mom Gloria
Vanderbilt on The
Tonight Show
Starring Johnny
Carson.
James
Rachelle Lefevre vs.
Kelsey Grammer
Under the Dome and Twilight star
Lefevre, 39, suits up to play attorney Madeline
Scott, a woman who years ago was wrongfully
convicted of committing murder, in the new TV
drama Proven Innocent (Feb. 15 on Fox). Now
she leads an underdog criminal defense team
committed to reopening investigations to exonerate other innocents who were found guilty.
Her character will be squaring off against a
tough-as-nails state’s attorney played by Emmywinning actor Grammer, 63.
Neil Patrick Harris: More
Unfortunate Events
3
Even though Cooper
and his mom are close,
he says he won’t inherit
any of the Vanderbilt
fortune.
4
2
Cooper interned
for two summers
at the CIA.
5 He was once
a model and
worked for
designers Calvin
Klein and Ralph
Lauren.
Harris will ring in the New Year
with the third and inal season
of Netlix’s A Series of Unfortunate Events (Jan. 1). The tale
of orphans whose deviously evil
uncle Count Olaf (Harris) desperately wants to get his hands on
their inheritance is based on the
novels of Lemony Snicket. “The
last book of the series is called
The End,” says Harris, 45. “And
it ends appropriately.”
E M A I L Y O U R Q U E S T I O N S F O R WA LT E R S C O T T T O P E R S O N A L I T Y @ PA R A D E . C O M
SPADER
The Emmy-winning Boston Legal star,
58, resumes the role of Raymond “Red”
Reddington when NBC’s The Blacklist
returns for its sixth season with a twonight premiere (Jan. 3 and 4). After a
major twist in the season five finale, the
audience will wonder all the
more who Red really is and
why he is so involved in the
life of FBI agent Elizabeth
Keen, played by Megan
Boone. (Spoiler from season
five: He’s not her father!)
Going into season six, Red is still an enigma.
What makes him special to play? There are
so many opposites in him at any given moment. It’s a constant dance. That’s what allows
for surprise within the stories and within the
revelations about him.
Why do you love acting? Stories have illed
my head since I can remember. I’ve always
been an avid reader. I love stories, and I love
make-believe.
Something that you’re good at besides acting? The thing that I’m maybe best at is living
life. I enjoy my life immensely. I’m very lucky
to have a wonderful wife [Leslie Stefanson]
who I cherish, and so I try and do my best
at that, and that’s inclusive of family, friends,
your own feeling of well-being and work.
What do you do in your downtime? I play a
great stereo. Much to my chagrin, I must say,
I never mastered a musical instrument. I wish
I had. I do love jazz, along with many other
kinds of music.
What happens when he runs out of money?
Go to Parade.com/spader to ind out.
CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: TAYLOR HILL/FILMMAGIC/GETTY IMAGES; JEAN WHITESIDE/FOX; RODRIGO VAZ/WIREIMAGE/GETTY IMAGES; CHARLEY GALLAY/NBC; WILL HART/NBC/NBCU PHOTO BANK VIA GETTY
IMAGES; PAUL DRINKWATER/NBC/NBCU PHOTO BANK VIA GETTY IMAGES; NETFLIX; PAUL ZIMMERMAN/WIREIMAGE/GETTY IMAGES; ROY ROCHLIN/FILMMAGIC/GETTY IMAGES; ISTOCK (2); NBC/NBCU PHOTO BANK
ER
WALT
2 | DECEMBER 30, 2018
© PARADE Publications 2018. All rights reserved.
ADVERTISEMENT
Plain Old Baking Soda a Drugstore in a Box
by James Victor
Medical science recognizes the
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© PARADE Publications 2018. All rights reserved.
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t 44, The Biggest Loser’s Jillian
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enough to tote everyday
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the gym habit easier.
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Go to Parade.com/michaels to find out what’s on her workout playlist.
MICHAELS BY TIBRINA HOBSON/GETTY IMAGES
Nutrient-rich snacks can “help fight
free radicals that can disrupt cell membranes, which not only age your skin
and hair but also damage the interior
lining of your blood vessels, leading
to a higher risk of heart disease and
stroke,” Michaels says. A few of her
faves: Nuttzo Organic Chocolate
Power Fuel, $14, nuttzo.com;
Elemental Dark Chocolate + Peanut
Butter Superfood Seedbar, 12 for
$29, elemental-raw.com; and Country
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At just 2.8 lbs, the Inogen One G4 is the
ultralight portable oxygen concentratorr
you have been waiting for. The Inogen
One G4 is approximately half the size
of the Inogen One G3.
MKT-P0057
4 | DECEMBER 30, 2018
© PARADE Publications 2018. All rights reserved.
PHOTO BY ANTONIS ACHILLEOS; PROP STYLIST KAY E. CLARK; FOOD STYLIST MARGARET MONROE DICKEY; EXCERPTED FROM MARTINA’S
KITCHEN MIX BY MARTINA MCBRIDE. COPYRIGHT © 2018 OXMOOR HOUSE. REPRINTED WITH PERMISSION FROM TIME INC. BOOKS,
A DIVISION OF MEREDITH CORPORATION. NEW YORK, NY. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
Eats
MARTINA MCBRIDE’S
What America
CELEBRITY CHEF
BOWL OF COMFORT
erfect for a winter night, this creamy spin on tortilla soup comes from countrymusic icon Martina McBride. It’s featured along with riffs on other classics in
her new cookbook, Martina’s Kitchen Mix: My Recipe Playlist for Real Life.
P
CREAMY CHICKEN TORTILLA SOUP
Save room for dessert! Go to
Parade.com/mcbride for her Peanut
Butter–Krispie Cookies recipe.
Masa harina is the flour used to make
corn tortillas. You can find it in the Latin
foods aisle at most supermarkets, or
substitute finely ground corn tortillas.
Preheat oven to 350˚F. Season 1¼ lb
boneless, skinless chicken breasts
with 1 tsp kosher salt and ½ tsp black
pepper. Place in a greased 11-by-7-inch
pepper
baking dish. Pour 1 cup chicken broth
over top; cover. Bake 45 minutes or until
done. Remove chicken, reserving cooking liquid. Shred meat with 2 forks.
Heat 1 Tbsp canola oil in a large
Dutch oven over medium-high. Add
1 medium yellow onion, chopped,
and 1 jalapeño, seeded and chopped;
cook 3 minutes. Add 3 garlic cloves,
chopped; cook 30 seconds, stirring
constantly. Add 3 cups chicken broth,
reserved cooking liquid, 1 tsp chile powder, 1 tsp ground cumin, 1 tsp paprika
and 1 (14.5-ounce) can tomatoes with
diced green chiles, undrained.
Whisk together 1/3 cup masa harina
and 11/3 cups milk until blended. Stir into
soup. Cook over medium-high, stirring
frequently, 10 minutes or until mixture
boils and thickens. Stir in chicken, 1 (15-oz)
can black beans, rinsed and drained,
1 (16-oz) can pinto beans, rinsed and
drained, and 1 cup fresh or frozen corn.
Reduce heat to low. Stir in 2/3 cup heavy
cream and 1/3 cup sour cream. If desired,
serve with additional sour cream, diced
avocado, shredded Mexican blend
cheese and lime wedges. Serves 8.
© PARADE Publications 2018. All rights reserved.
Bublé
michael
IS IN LOVE WITH LOVE
After a family crisis, the award-winning singer is back with a
‘Love’-ly new album and a bright new view on life.
m
By Amy Spencer
ichael Bublé is a holiday kind of guy. “I’m
really sentimental,” says the Canadian crooner.
He can’t help it: Growing up, when the holidays hit, his parents went all out.
For New Year’s Eve, his mom and dad would wake up
Bublé and his two sisters, open the door to the
street and let them all bang pots and pans at midnight. For Christmas, they’d put up the lights early
and play Bing Crosby’s Merry Christmas album for
a month and a half.
He’s especially grateful for that—Crosby playing
on regular rotation is one reason “why my soul is so,
so connected to the Great American Songbook,”
he says. he holidays literally led him to the successful career he has today.
Bublé has won four Grammy awards for his
music, sold more than 60 million records worldwide and
released a multiplatinum-selling Christmas album, Christmas,
in 2011. Last month, he dropped his 10th studio album, ♥
(pronounced “love”), a collection of romantic standards.
So if you heard a rumor about his retirement? It’s not true.
A recent newspaper story inaccurately relected a time when
he had stepped back from his career in 2016 to care for his
young son, Noah, who was diagnosed with liver cancer and
is now completely healthy and cancer-free. “I would never
say that,” he says, shaking his head. Instead, he’s more excited
about his work than ever.
Bublé, 43, in jeans and a black leather jacket, is a ball of
energy as he chats with Parade in Los Angeles—warm,
funny and talkative. He currently lives between his Canadian
6 | DECEMBER 30, 2018
© PARADE Publications 2018. All rights reserved.
What Would You Do for Someone You Love?
EVERYTHING.
BECAUSE LOVE HAS NO LIMITS.
Detoxification, Residential & Outpatient Treatment
WavelengthsRecovery.com | 888-505-2581
© PARADE Publications 2018. All rights reserved.
CALL US ANYTIME, FROM ANYWHERE
888-505-2581
ADDICTION IS NOT YOUR FAULT.
RECREATE YOUR LIFE.
Heal your body.
Addiction and alcohol detoxification must be handled with the utmost care.
Incidental medical and therapeutic services are provided, under the
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We work together.
Our residential treatment homes are operated with awake staff, 24-hours per day.
A compact schedule of daily activities and programs ensure a structured
environment is established and a strong foundation is built. Participants work with
Wavelengths highly skilled Licensed and Certified Clinicians.
Every life has a waking moment.
WavelengthsRecovery.com
888-505-2581
© PARADE Publications 2018. All rights reserved.
24 HOURS A DAY, 7 DAYS A WEEK
Wavelengths Recovery earned the Behavioral
Health accreditation from The Joint Commission, the premier
healthcare quality improvement and accrediting body in the nation.
ONE LIFE AT
A TIME.
You cannot become who
you need to be by
remaining who you are.
Detoxification, Residential & Outpatient Treatment
Please share this message with someone you love
© PARADE Publications 2018. All rights reserved.
hometown and a home in Argentina with
his wife of seven years, Argentine actress
Luisana Lopilato, 31, and their three kids:
sons Noah, 5, and Elias, 2, and their new
daughter, Vida, 5 months.
Big Kid
When he gets revved up about what he loves
most—his music and his family—he is as
giddy as a kid, and he knows it. And he’s
amazed, he says, at how much being a dad
has changed his perspective on life. “I was
looking at my three kids and thinking”—he
leans in close, whispering—"Oh, my God, this
is how much my parents loved me.”
Bublé was born in Burnaby, British Columbia, to “crazy-young” parents who were 19
when they had him. His father, Lewis,
was a salmon isherman who went on
to become president of a credit union
and eventually Bublé’s business partner.
hey’re co-owners of the Vancouver
Giants ice hockey team. His
mother, Amber, worked in a
Safeway as a cashier before staying home to raise Bublé and his
two younger sisters, Brandee,
who grew up to write children’s
books, and Crystal, an actress.
He had a beautiful childhood, he says, on a street
where he remembers shooting hockey pucks when it got
cold enough for the roads to ice over, his
mom calling him home for dinner every
night and his grandparents coming over
with treats from the local Dairy Queen. “I
think we were kept really innocent,” he says.
“hat is really what I wanna protect for my
kids.” When he was recently riding past his
parents’ house on a scooter with his wife, he
took in the scent and sight of his old neighborhood, “and I said, ‘God, Lu, I really just
want my kids to feel this. I want them to feel
what I felt.’ ”
It led Bublé to move back to that same
neighborhood and build a house across from
his old elementary school—complete with
his own ice hockey rink.
hough the young Bublé once had dreams
of hockey as a career, he followed his passion
toward singing instead. He started performing at nightclubs as a teenager, took singing
lessons and entered talent contests, all of
which led to his self-titled major-label debut
album in 2003. hat set him of on a career
of recording jazz standards and writing his
own songs, including “Everything” and the
endlessly singable “Haven’t Met You Yet,” his
2009 No. 1 Grammy-nominated single.
Love Wins
“I was looking at my kids
and thinking, ‘Oh, my God,
this is how much my parents
loved me.’”
In 2008, after performing a show in Buenos
Aires, Bublé met Lopilato at a party and
fell for her instantly, featuring her in his
“Haven’t Met You Yet” video. Culturally,
they’re very diferent, but this attraction
of opposites works. “I’m very Canadian,
so everything’s very structured. It’s rules
and discipline and politeness,” he says. Her
Argentine side is much looser, “and a little
crazier.” He laughs. But “I think it’s a perfect
mix, ’cause we live in both places.” hey married in 2011 and two years later had Noah.
But in 2016, their happy life was turned
upside down when they were socked with
the news of Noah’s liver cancer.
continued on page 8
HIS FAVORITE THINGS
What I’m reading “I read
the same book
over and over
again: The
Power of Now:
A Guide to
Spiritual Enlightenment by
Eckhart Tolle.”
Favorite snack “I’m a
savory guy, I love crisps.
And in Canada, we have
ketchup chips and they’re
delicious.”
Last movie I watched
“Sicario 2. I just couldn’t stop
watching it. It was amazing.”
Favorite ’80s song “How
can I choose? [Then he sings]
‘Nothin’ I can do . . . a total
eclipse of the heart.’”
Always in the fridge “Hot
banana peppers. They’re
kinda tangy.”
COVER PHOTO BY EVAAN KHERAJ; LEFT: RICK MADONIK/TORONTO STAR VIA GETTY IMAGES; RIGHT: MICHAEL BUBLE INSTAGRAM;
ISTOCK; AF ARCHIVE/ALAMY
Best movie to watch
with his kids “My
favorite of all time is The
Gruffalo. It’s a beautiful
ilm. We love it.”
Fast-food binge “Fatburger. I ate
one the other day that was three
patties. It was so huge that I could
barely stuff it in my mouth.”
Pop culture crush “I love Will Ferrell in the deepest way. I met him,
and he was the guy that you hope
he would be—the most beautiful,
funny, endearing guy.”
DECEMBER 30, 2018 | 7
© PARADE Publications 2018. All rights reserved.
Magnetic Anti-Arthritis Therapy Gloves Help
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from page 7
As soon as they found out, “I
pushed everything aside,” Bublé
says. He and his whole family
picked up their lives and moved
into the same house—“all 20 of
us,” he says—to pitch in through
the 18 months of Noah’s cancer
treatments. “How would it not affect me in every possible way?” He
emphasizes every word: “Nothing
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Bublé says son Noah’s recovery
from liver cancer gave him “faith in
humanity again.”
will ever be the same. It has an
impact on every moment of my
life—and it will, forever.”
Now that Noah is healthy,
Bublé is hoping he can create a
new narrative for his family and
leave that one behind. Yes, he says,
that unthinkable experience has
everything to do with who he is
today, “but at the same time, I want
him to be able to move past it,
you know?” Still, he was so moved
by the immense support people
showed him during those difficult
two years, “I really wanted to put
something positive and beautiful
ICONIC/GC IMAGES/GETTY IMAGES
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8 | DECEMBER 30, 2018
Satisfaction Guaranteed or Return For Your Money Back
© PARADE Publications 2018. All rights reserved.
back into this world.” Maybe even
something that could help others
through hard times, the way they
helped him. “Because, man, that
compassion, that sense of love . . .”
he says, “I think it gave me faith in
humanity again.”
On his new album, Bublé sings
his own versions of famous standards, including “When I Fall in
Love,” “My Funny Valentine” and
“La Vie en Rose,” as well as an
original, “Forever Now,” that Bublé
penned about parenthood.
He was inspired to make the
album because, well, he loves singing about love. He chose the theme
because love is the most inclusive
thing there is. “It doesn’t seem to
matter where we’re from,” he says.
“Black, white, gay, straight, rich,
poor, young, old—we’re either in it,
out of it, looking for it, needing it,
missing it, wanting it.” He admits
he was hesitant about the title at
irst, wondering, “Is it called Heart
Emoji Michael Bublé? Eggplant
Emoji Michael Bublé? I’m not really
technologically savvy, and I could
not tell you how to ind that on
your computer.”
A Homebody
at Heart
Frankly, home is where his heart
is—his crazy, family-illed home.
“Just a really loud Italian, Argentinian, Spanish and English family,
ripping through the house,” he says.
Which is why, as good as it feels
to be in the studio and performing
again, Bublé intends to keep his
work in check. “If I’m gonna be
away from my kids, it’s gonna matter.” hese days, his kids love wrestling, drawing, dancing and putting
on shows. And they’re sure to pick
continued on page 10
DECEMBER 30, 2018 | 9
© PARADE Publications 2018. All rights reserved.
“
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from page 9
up Bublé’s love of sports: In his
downtime, he plays football, soccer, golf and ice hockey, along with
fantasy football and fantasy hockey.
“I’m really competitive,” he says.
“I would play a game night every
night!” He simply lives for a house
full of family, including his sisters
and their kids. “I don’t think we
laugh, ever, as hard as we do than
when it’s just all of us together.”
True to his intentions, he’s also
passing along the family traditions
from his own childhood, the ones
that make him so sentimental today: “Every Friday night, the kids
are invited into the bed to watch
a movie and eat junk food—very
Canadian junk food,” he says.
“Cheezies, they’re the best.” And,
of course, he loves the holidays:
His family celebrates Canadian
Thanksgiving, American Thanksgiving, the Argentine holiday of
Three Kings Day and Christmas.
Like his mother did for him, this
year he took his kids to see houses
with lights and Santa at the mall.
And he put on Bing Crosby and
Darlene Love—but “no, I don’t get
played at Christmas,” he says. “I
hear it enough doing the Christmas shopping!”
His New Year’s Eve tradition
changes every year. Some years he
bangs those pots and pans with
his kids, some years he performs
and this year he’ll be attending a
friend’s wedding when the clock
strikes midnight. But as he looks
toward 2019, his wish for the year
is staying the same: “Just let my
family be healthy,” he says. “Everything else is gravy.”
Go to Parade.com/buble to find
out why he doesn’t consider
himself a romantic.
10 | DECEMBER 30, 2018
*Little to no out of pocket cost with primary and secondary insurances. Co-pays and deductibles apply. Not afiliated with Medicare.
Before and after images of spinal decompression represents the application of spinal traction applied to the lower back. Individual results may vary.
© PARADE Publications 2018. All rights reserved.
Easier is better with a Jitterbug.
Ask Marilyn
No contracts
No cancellation fees
By Marilyn vos Savant
I've noticed that emergency
rooms aren't busy during the day
on weekdays, but in the evening
and on weekends, they are often
nearly full! Is this perhaps related
to peak times for traffic accidents or alcohol consumption?
Plans as low as
What’s unique about this number: 8,549,176,320?
—Loren Booda, Arlington, Va.
Have fun, readers! The answer
appears below Numbrix.
Send questions to
marilyn @ parade.com
Numbrix
®
Complete 1 to 81 so the
numbers follow a horizontal or
vertical path—no diagonals.
5
7
27
33
3
35
39
17
45
73
55
79
81
65
61
Plans with
data as low as
48
New and improved simplified menu
Large, 5.5” screen
Long-lasting battery
Voice Typing makes texting easy
Mobile Internet access
5Star® Service for emergency help, 24/7
Built-in 13MP camera with flash
EASY From the creators of the original,
easy-to-use cell phone comes the Jitterbug®
Flip and the all-new Jitterbug Smart2. Both
phones have large screens, simple menus
and powerful speakers. The Jitterbug Flip is
the easy-to-use cell phone that is perfect for
staying connected to family and friends.
The new Jitterbug Smart2 is the simplest
smartphone ever for anyone who wants to
text, email, get directions, and browse the
Internet with ease.
SAFE Turn your Jitterbug Flip or Jitterbug
Smart2 into a personal safety device with our
exclusive 5Star Service. In any uncertain or
unsafe situation, simply press the 5Star button
and our highly-trained Urgent Response
Agents will confirm your location, evaluate
your situation and get you the help you need.
AFFORDABLE Talk plans for both phones
start as low as $1499 per month with data
plans for the Jitterbug Smart2 as low as just
$ 49
2 per month. With all GreatCall® plans,
there are no contracts to sign, ever, and no
cancellation fees. Plus, coverage is powered
by the nation’s largest and most dependable
wireless network.
Friendly customer service representatives are
happy to help you figure out which phone is
best for you. Ask about our new Unlimited Plan!
To order or learn more, call 1- 800-650-4349 and get a FREE Car Charger, a $25 value!
Nationwide
coverage
Visit Parade.com/numbrix for more
Marilyn vos Savant Numbrix puzzles
and today’s solution.
Available at:
It comprises all the digits from zero
through nine in alphabetical order.
DECEMBER 30, 2018 | 11
Large screen and big buttons
Simple menu with YES/NO navigation
Powerful speaker
Long-lasting battery
Built-in camera with flash
Reading magnifier with LED flashlight
5Star button for emergency help, 24/7
17
$
57
Answer:
$
month*
—Jeremy Johns, Reston, Va.
Contrary to popular theories, the
main reason is that doctors' offices
are open during the day on weekdays, and patients try to visit their
doctors rather than an emergency
room, if possible!
1499
All-New
No contracts
No cancellation fees
Free U.S.-based customer
service and tech support
No hidden
monthly fees
Keep your current
phone number
For more information,
visit greatcall.com/Easy
*
Monthly fees do not include government taxes or assessment surcharges and are subject to change. Plans and services may require purchase of a GreatCall device and a one-time
setup fee of $35. 5Star or 9-1-1 calls can be made only when cellular service is available. 5Star Service tracks an approximate location of the device when the device is turned on and
connected to the network. GreatCall does not guarantee an exact location. Car charger will be mailed to customer after the device is activated. Jitterbug, GreatCall and 5Star are
registered trademarks of GreatCall, Inc. Copyright ©2018 GreatCall, Inc.
© PARADE Publications 2018. All rights reserved.
BANANAS
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answer that question for you every time!
The one cleaning tip you can’t live
without. You’ll always have a clean
house if you follow this advice.
You want to get rid of the clutter, but
yard sales are so much work! How to
move the stuff out without the hassle
of a sale ... and you still make money!
Have the power company pay you!
You heard right! The secret program
that rewards you with money.
Avoid identity theft and scams.
Surprising information exposes the
one crook you’d never suspect!
Clear clogged drains with this
3-ingredient drain opener. Won’t damage pipes, either!
Pay less for groceries! Money-saving
tips could save you as much as $1,000
a year!
Six simple steps that can save you up
to $700 a year on utilities!
Look for this before giving your credit
card number online.
15 surprising businesses that offer
senior discounts. The downside? They
won’t give you the lower price unless
you ask!
You can end most unwanted telephone
sales calls by doing this one easy thing.
If they keep calling, there are 6 ways to
make them wish they’d never dialed
your number!
One 3-minute thing you can do can
save you more than $1,000 a year.
That’s like getting paid $54 an hour for
your time!
Never ever pay full price for anything.
Experts reveal the secret to finding the
lowest price on thousands of products.
The simple, inexpensive part in your
water heater you should be replacing
every 3 or 4 years ... and it’ll make
your heater last years longer!
Would you like an extra $300 ... $500
... even $1000 a month? 17 moneymakers you can do in your spare time
— and 3 you shouldn’t waste your
time on.
Don’t leave home without these 10
essential items to keep in your car.
Could prevent a major disaster!
Mailbox clogged by unwanted
catalogs? Surefire way to stay off their
mailing lists for good!
7 ways to clean your house quicker ...
use the extra time to do, well,
anything else!
The source of most of the dust in your
home. And how you can reduce it!
You could save more money on your
power and water bill than you think!
Use these 12 simple tips to put the
most cash back in your pocket.
6 ways to thwart parking lot thieves.
They won’t be breaking into your car!
Eat like a king — save like a pauper!
8 tips to dine out in style without
spending a fortune.
9 smart ways to stop ID thieves dead
in their tracks.
Security secrets! Avoiding identity
theft, scams, rip-offs, and other money
cheats.
Don’t waste money on an expensive
bug zapper to keep mosquitoes out of
your yard. Do this for free instead.
Junk mail — get rid of it quickly and
easily with this one easy step.
Learn all these amazing secrets and
more. To order a copy, just return this
notice with your name and address
and a check for $12.99 plus $3.00
shipping and handling to: FC&A, Dept.
K3-4796, 103 Clover Green, Peachtree
City, GA 30269. We will send you
a copy of Uncommon Solutions
to Common Everyday Problems:
Household How-Tos, Fix-Its, and
Money-Savers.
You get a no-time-limit guarantee of
satisfaction or your money back.
You must cut out and return this
notice with your order. Copies will not
be accepted!
IMPORTANT — FREE
GIFT OFFER EXPIRES
FEBRUARY 4, 2019
All orders mailed by February 4,
2019 will receive a free gift, The Little
Book of Big Savings for Seniors,
guaranteed. Order right away!
©FC&A 2018
www.CanDoWhat.com
© PARADE Publications 2018. All rights reserved.
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