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2019-01-07 Newsday

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| LI EDITION
Monday
Jan. 7, 2019
HI 34° LO 29°
T H E L O N G I S L A N D N E W S PA P E R
PARTLY SUNNY
Golden PENN STATION CONSTRUCTION
Globes
LIRR
COMMUTERS,
BEWARE
PENNSTATIONCONSTRUCTION
LIRRCOMMUTERSBEWARE
NBCUNIVERSAL VIA GETTY IMAGES
Railroadbracesfor
servicedisruptions
asanotherphaseof
renewalprojectbeginstoday
Rami Malek won for his role
in ‘Bohemian Rhapsody.’
‘Rhapsody’ Is
The Champion
A8, A14
Pension
Apprehension
Volatile Wall
Street sparks
concern about
increased
costs, taxes
A2
Railroad braces for service
disruptions as another phase
of renewal project begins today
A3 | UPDATES AT NEWSDAY COM
●
COPYRIGHT 2019, NEWSDAY LLC, LONG ISLAND, VOL. 79, NO. 126
TOP STORIES
A2
Worries over pension
BY MICHAEL GORMLEY
AND SCOTT EIDLER
NEWSDAY, MONDAY, JANUARY 7, 2019
newsday.com
michael.gormley@newsday.com
scott.eidler@newsday.com
ALBANY — The last time
the stock market was roiled by
the volatility that it has been experiencing recently was the beginning of the 2008 recession,
which left the massive state
pension system bruised and
turning to local property taxes
to make up for losses.
Some experts fear that unless
the current stock market settles,
local governments, schools and
their taxpayers could face another increase in employer contributions such as the 37 percent
hike ordered in 2010 by the state
comptroller to offset stock market losses. That translated to
$400 million more from taxpayers statewide in 2012 alone to the
state pension fund.
The state constitution guarantees that the pension of a public
sector worker can’t be reduced
or taken away and so taxpayers
must help make up any losses.
That differs from private-sector
workers with company-provided
pensions, which can be reduced
or eliminated by employers.
The Dow Jones Industrial Average hit 15 historic highs during
2018 fueled by an economic recovery that turned into an expansion and by President Donald
Trump’s tax cuts for corporations and most middle-class families. But high times turned
chaotic: The Standard & Poor’s
500 index was down 9 percent in
December, the worst December
since the Great Depression in
the 1930s, and the Dow ended
the year down 5.6 percent, the
worst performance since 2008.
On Thursday, for example, the
Dow fell 660 points; on Friday it
rose nearly 747 points.
In addition to concerns about
the state pension system, thousands of public workers who
also chose to invest in an additional supplementary retirement
account called the state Deferred Compensation Plan could
lose money because it doesn’t
compensate for Wall Street
losses. Workers who take out
these accounts, which are similar to 401(k) accounts for private
sector workers, defer some of
their wages until they retire,
when they presumably would be
taxed at a lower rate.
“People are very anxious,”
Jerry Laricchiuta, president of
the Civil Service Employees Association said about workers in
the Deferred Compensation
Plan. “Some of these people actually depend on their deferred
compensation as the main tool
of their retirement . . .This is
what they’ve been saving up for
. . I. t really comes down to when
you choose to retire. How’s the
market doing? Did it just kill
you? Did you just lose $20,000 or
did you just gain $20,000?”
In Nassau County alone, there
are 9,750 participants with $1.258
billion in assets at the end of December 2016, according to recent
financial statements. The state
couldn’t provide comparable Suffolk numbers.
For now, state and local government and school district officials are watching the up-anddown market carefully.
The last spike in local government and school district contributions to the pension fund generated more pressure to raise
local property taxes, lay off workers and cut services such as
parks in towns and programs in
schools. Local officials say the
state’s 2 percent cap on the increase in property taxes reduces
their options unless they get voters to override the cap.
Whether that pain is likely to
be repeated, however, won’t be
known until March 31, the end of
the state fiscal year. And experts
agree the stock market could rebound and stabilize over the
next three months.
“Daily, monthly, and even quarterly fluctuations can be nullified by the valuation on March
31,” said David J. Friefel, director
of state studies for the independent Citizens Budget Commission. “Likewise, because contribution rates are based on the
five-year average rate of return,
impacts of changing contribution rates will be gradual, but felt
over a long period of time.”
The view from Wall Street
was similar.
“The most significant question for any pension fund when
The Dow ended the year down 5.6 percent, the worst performance
since 2008. Standard & Poor’s 500 index was down in December.
it comes to their assets is what is
the value of the assets on the
[end] of the fiscal year,” said Douglas Offerman, senior director at
Fitch Ratings, a Wall Street
bond-rating agency.
E.J. McMahon of the fiscally
conservative Empire Center
think tank, said short-term
volatility will have minimal effect, but “a prolonged slump, or
a much sharper stock market
drop — say, losses of 10 percent
more in next three months, persisting through June — would
probably lead to renewed increases in taxpayer costs
within the next year or two.”
“It’s a pretty critical time,” said
Greg Mennis, director of public
sector
retirement
systems
project at the Pew Charitable
Trusts that evaluates state pension systems. “Most experts are
forecasting lower economic
growth than we’ve seen in the
past . . t. he exposure is as high as
it’s ever been.”
“It’s true the New York state
funds are some of the best
funded state pension funds in
the country,” Mennis said of the
fund managed by Comptroller
Thomas DiNapoli. “But at the
same time, the investment strategy of about 50 percent or
more in stocks means that, like
most other funds, they are
going to have to navigate market volatility.”
Later this year, DiNapoli will
have to set the employer pension
payments paid by local governments for 2021, after lowering
rates in 2018 and holding them
flat for 2019 and 2020.
The state comptroller’s office
expects to report a big drop off
in stock investments in its quarterly report in February. But a
bad quarter doesn’t mean a bad
year and the office remains hopeful the pension’s diversified revenue — including real estate and
less volatile bonds — will steady.
“The volatility came as something of a surprise along with the
continued duration of the volatility,” DiNapoli said in an interview. He said while market downturns often precede a recession,
that’s not always the case. He
said about 55 percent to 60 percent of the pension is now invested in stocks.
“Where we stand today, this is
not ’08 or ’09,” DiNapoli said, referring to the beginning of the
most recent recession. “Will it
be by March? I hope not. But
right now, we aren’t talking
about a year like that.”
DiNapoli said federal policy
and Trump’s tweets and other
public statements are part of
what is driving the market, but
‘‘
It really
comes
down to when
you choose to
retire. How’s
the market
doing? Did it
just kill you?
Did you just
lose $20,000
or did you just
gain $20,000?”
— Jerry Laricchiuta,
president of Civil Service
Employees Association
noted that if the Trump administration settles on accord with
China, Wall Street might settle
down.
“The unpredictability of what
comes out of the White House
certainly continues the volatility
of what we are seeing and seems
to be driving the psychology
right now,” DiNapoli said. “But
we go into this in a position of
strength . . .we have full confidence in our asset allocation.”
With Yancey Roy
AP / RICHARD DREW
Volatility in the stock market fuels
concerns for massive state fund
TOP STORIES
COREY SIPKIN
A3
The Long Island Rail Road’s published schedule changes run only through March, but LIRR officials have said similar disruptions likely will last through May.
PENN STARTS TRACK WORK
Riders brace
for latest round
of disruptions
BY ALFONSO A. CASTILLO
alfonso.castillo@newsday.com
THE WORK
STARTING MONDAY
LIRR will run without Penn
Station’s Track 18, which will
undergo repairs. Repairs will
shift to Track 17 and then
Track 16 at end of March.
ADDED SERVICE
LIRR will add two morning
trains and three afternoon/evening trains. Some
trains will have added cars.
TOTAL AFFECTED
In all, six morning trains and
six evening trains will be
rerouted or canceled the
next several weeks.
And many of the planned
service changes are not related to Amtrak’s work, but
rather a separate effort by the
LIRR to relocate some tracks
in Queens to make room for a
portal to the newly bored tunnels connecting the railroad
to Grand Central Terminal as
part of the MTA’s $11.2 billion
East Side Access project. That
project is scheduled for completion in 2022.
Those changes, which will
last until Feb. 1, mostly involve
trains skipping some stops
and/or departing a couple minutes earlier than usual.
Two morning trains on the
Montauk line will terminate
early in Jamaica, rather than
complete their usual trips to
Long Island City. That will
force some Suffolk commuters,
including Lynne Denis, of East
Moriches, to wait 15 minutes or
more at Jamaica for a connecting train.
“People have to go to work.
You can’t just say, ‘Stagger your
hours or take a later train.’ People have baby sitters . . .They
have a life,” Denis said. “It’s
only for a month, but I hope
that they’ll not do this in the future — that they will think
twice.”
NEWSDAY, MONDAY, JANUARY 7, 2019
switches out of service for repairs and upgrades. Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo dubbed the
first phase of the effort “the
summer of hell,” but some service disruptions remained in effect until September 2018,
when Amtrak shifted its work
to mostly overnight hours and
weekends.
“Amtrak’s Penn Station renewal work is critical to the
LIRR’s continued operation to
Manhattan’s West Side, and
needs to be done as quickly as
possible,” LIRR president
Phillip Eng said in a statement
last month. “We appreciate our
customers’ patience as this important infrastructure work
continues.”
Although the railroad’s published schedule changes run
only through March, LIRR officials have said the same, or similar disruptions, likely will last
through May, as Amtrak tackles
other work at Penn.
Amtrak has said it is working
with the LIRR “to minimize service impacts to commuters as
much as possible, and would
like to thank LIRR customers
for their patience and apologize for any inconvenience during these two months.”
“We remain committed to finishing these projects on time,
within budget and safely, with
the goal of improving New
York Penn Station’s infrastructure operations performance
and
reliability,”
Amtrak
spokesman Jason Abrams said.
There are some indications
that Amtrak’s efforts to modernize Penn Station’s aging track infrastructure have made a difference. Through the first 11
months of 2018, LIRR delays
caused by Amtrak, which owns
and maintains Penn Station, fell
by 52 percent compared with
the same period in 2017.
newsday.com
LIRR riders could find their
regular trains more crowded
than usual, diverted to a different location or canceled altogether when the latest round
of construction-related service disruptions begin at Penn
Station on Monday.
As the next phase of Amtrak’s infrastructure renewal
project at Penn Station starts,
the LIRR will operate with
one less track at the Manhattan transit hub for at least the
next three months — restricting the railroad’s capacity to
run trains to and from its
main terminal.
To help ease crowding
while the service changes are
in effect, the LIRR is adding
two morning trains and three
afternoon/evening trains, and
is adding cars to certain trains
to increase seating capacity.
In total, six morning trains
and six evening trains will be
rerouted or canceled the next
several weeks, which could be
a major inconvenience to commuters already reeling from
rough on-time performances
in 2018.
“It’s definitely not comforting,” said Hicksville commuter David Mitzman, whose
5:17 p.m. Port Jefferson branch
train is being combined with
another canceled train —
squeezing many more riders
into each car. “It’s going to be
really bad until they resume
the schedule.”
Amtrak’s work at Penn will
focus on renewing tracks primarily used by the LIRR.
Track 18 is expected to be out
of service for several weeks
beginning Monday, before
work shifts to Track 17 and
then to Track 16 around the
end of March, according to
the LIRR. Amtrak’s renewal efforts have entailed the replacement of all track components,
including concrete ties and
steel rails.
The work marks the return
of the construction-related outages at Penn that began in July
2017, when a series of major infrastructure failures at the century-old station led to Amtrak
taking several tracks and
TOP STORIES
A4
Suspect held in slaying
HARRIS COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE VIA AP
Killing of girl, 7,
wasn’t racially
motivated: cops
The Associated Press
HOUSTON — A black man
was arrested and charged with
murder in the killing of a 7-yearold black girl in a drive-by shooting authorities said Sunday appeared to be a case of mistaken
identity, not a racially motivated
attack, as her family had feared.
Jazmine Barnes’ family had described the gunman in the Dec.
30 slaying as a white man driving
a red pickup and believed race
played a role in the shooting.
But acting on a tip received
by a civil rights activist, the
sheriff’s department zeroed in
instead on Eric Black Jr., 20, a
black man who admitted he
was driving a dark-colored
SUV from which a passenger
Eric Black Jr. says he was driver.
opened fire, authorities said.
Harris County Sheriff Ed
Gonzalez said authorities have
identified the second suspect,
who is also black, but would
not say whether the person was
in custody.>Gonzalez cautioned that authorities were
still investigating, but said: “At
this point, it does not appear
it was related to race.”
Chris Sevilla, Jazmine’s father,
said in a brief phone interview
that he was feeling “a bit of relief
right now” after the arrest.
The shooting took place at a
stoplight while Jazmine, her
mother and three sisters were
on their way to the grocery store.
At a court hearing early Sunday, prosecutors said a confidential source had contacted
the sheriff by email and told
him the killers had “shot the
car by mistake,” thinking the vehicle was someone else’s that
they had seen earlier that
night. Prosecutors did not say
why the killers opened fire.
The sheriff said there was, in
fact, a red truck at a stoplight
just before the shooting, but
the driver did not appear to
have been involved. Gonzalez
said it was dark, the shooting
happened quickly, and the
truck was probably the last
thing seen by Jazmine’s family.
Authorities want to talk to
the person in the red pickup
to get his account of the
crime, Gonzalez said.
Black, who was arrested Saturday afternoon during a traffic
stop, was charged with capital
murder and jailed without bail.
Court records did not list an attorney for him. Prosecutors said
the 9-mm handgun believed
used in the shooting had been
recovered from Black’s home.
During Sunday’s hearing, prosecutors said Jazmine’s mother,
LaPorsha Washington, had
tried to drive to a hospital after
the shooting, but one of her
front tires had been shot out.
After the shooting, a composite sketch of a white man in a
dark hood was widely circulated.
Jazmine’s family and activists
had said the shooting was similar to an unsolved incident in
the area in 2017 in which a gunman described as white shot
into a vehicle carrying at least
two black people.
Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee, a
black Democrat who represents
parts of Houston, said there was
nothing irresponsible about the
early suggestions it was a hate
crime. She said the case had the
positive effect of encouraging
people to discuss race in the U.S.
The girl’s killing prompted an
outpouring of support for her
family from celebrities and ordinary people across the country.
On Saturday, hundreds gathered
at a rally near where the shooting happened, holding balloons,
stuffed animals and signs that
read, “Justice for Jazmine.”
A $100,000 reward, raised in
part by Shaun King, the journalist and activist who received
the tip that helped police, was
offered for information leading
to an arrest.
Houston Mayor Sylvester
Turner said the support
Jazmine’s family received provided law enforcement “with a
sense of urgency and made
Jazmine’s loved ones know they
weren’t alone in their time of
grief. We share their deep sense
of loss and anger,” Turner said.
BY MARK HARRINGTON
NEWSDAY, MONDAY, JANUARY 7, 2019
newsday.com
mark.harrington@newsday.com
LIPA and PSEG Long Island have
agreed to remove 24 tall steel poles
and instead bury the power line along
a busy section of roadway in Eastport
following an outcry from residents
and a lawsuit by Brookhaven Town.
The cost of the makeover could
reach $13.5 million, PSEG said.
Under terms of a settlement, PSEG
will remove the steel poles along a milelong stretch of Eastport Manor Road
from Sunrise Highway south service
road to a LIPA substation on Montauk
Highway. The poles, which are around
80 feet tall and some 9 feet around, are
set in concrete foundations and carry
heavy high-voltage transmission lines.
The poles were placed in spring 2017 on
LIPA rights of way near homes, businesses and a shopping center.
The agreement doesn’t address the
nearly 200 additional steel poles that
remain on a bucolic stretch of County
Road 51 from Eastport to Riverhead in
the pine barrens. Brookhaven Supervisor Edward P. Romaine, who said he
was “happy” about the settlement, nevertheless expressed “concern” about
the remaining poles, which have already been struck at least twice, once
resulting in a traffic fatality.
“We are gravely concerned about
the traffic safety aspect of these poles
being so close to the roadway in what
appears to be a violation of federal
and state highway safety standards,”
Romaine said.
PSEG spokesman David Gaier said
the poles on Route 51 “were placed in
compliance with, and meet all, applicable permitting and regulatory requirements.”
PSEG said removal of the steel poles
on Eastport Manor Road and burying
the power line are expected to be completed in 2020 after “permitting, procurement, engineering studies and design” work. Gaier said the cost, estimated between $9 million and $13.5
million, would not “create an incremental increase for ratepayers,” coming from the utility’s capital budget.
Nearly all LIPA costs are ultimately
paid by ratepayers.
PSEG chief operating officer Dan
Eichhorn said the agreement, reached
after talks with State Sen. Kenneth
LaValle (R-Port Jefferson) and Assemb.
Fred Thiele (I-Sag Harbor), “upholds
NEWSDAY / JOHN PARASKEVAS
Utilities agree to take
down tall steel poles
The steel poles on Eastport Manor Road in Eastport.
our commitment to provide safety, reliability and customer satisfaction.”
PSEG in 2017 had previously agreed
to remove the nearly one-mile stretch
of poles, but withdrew the agreement
after Brookhaven sued.
TOP STORIES
A5
SKELOS AND SON HEAD TO PRISON
To begin 4-year
sentences on
Tuesday after
July convictions
bany. Assembly Speaker Sheldon
Silver, who like Skelos was convicted at a retrial after his initial
conviction was reversed, was
sentenced initially to 12 years,
and later saw that reduced to 7.
Joe Percoco, a top aide to Gov.
Andrew M. Cuomo, was sentenced to 6 years.
The 2018 corruption trial of
former Nassau County Executive Edward Mangano and his
wife, Linda, ended in a mistrial.
The pair are set to be retried
later this month.
Otisville has a total of 824 inmates, with just 116 at the camp
where Dean Skelos will probably
serve his sentence, according to
the Bureau of Prisons website,
which says that Otisville has psychologists available for psychotherapy and also offers services for drug and alcohol abuse
and other emotional problems.
Danbury has a total of 1,049
inmates and houses men and
women, according to the prisons website.
BY NICOLE FULLER
nicole.fuller@newsday.com
His attorney John J. Kenney
said Friday that he had asked for
the Lewisburg placement so
Adam, who in the past has dealt
with substance abuse issues, can
take advantage of programming
there, calling it “the right place
to get treatment.”
JOHN ROCA
Dean Skelos and son Adam leave federal court after a jury found them guilty at their first trial in 2015.
Dean Skelos is likely to serve
his 4-year, 3-month sentence at
the Otisville Correctional Facility, a medium-security federal
prison in upstate Orange County,
according to court records.
Kenney said no request was
made for the father and son,
who are estranged, to serve
their time together.
“Certainly we did not make
any such request,” said Kenney,
of Manhattan. “It’s just not an
appropriate factor to make a request for.”
Adam Skelos said he hasn’t
spoken to his father in many
months. The estrangement
began when his father was offered a plea agreement from the
U.S. Attorney’s office between
the first and second trials, the
younger Skelos said. Dean Skelos turned down the offer and
didn’t tell Adam, he said. And
the tension between father and
son reached a “boiling point”
when Adam, who was adopted
by Dean and his first wife, connected with his birth parents and
didn’t tell Dean.
‘Think about him all the time’
“I think about him all the
time,” Adam said. “I love him to
death. That doesn’t change. I
know this is a horrible experience we’ve gone through, but I
don’t know why it affected us.”
The Bureau of Prisons, which
determines placement of prisoners, said in a statement that the
office “does not release information about an inmate’s designated institution for service of
sentence until the inmate has arrived at the applicable facility.”
Dean Skelos didn’t return a
message seeking comment. His
attorney also did not respond.
Skelos, 70, of Rockville Centre,
who served in the State Legislature for 30 years, was once one
of Long Island’s most influential
public officials. As Senate majority leader starting in 2011, he was
one of the “three men in a room”
— along with the governor and
Assembly speaker — who ran
New York until he was expelled
from the Senate in 2015 upon his
first conviction.
He was again convicted in July
of extortion and conspiracy of
using his power in Albany to
help Adam, 36, of Rockville Centre, who was also convicted, get
jobs and fees worth $300,000
from a developer, a Long Island
medical malpractice insurer and
a Nassau County stormwater
contractor.
Skelos’ conviction was one of
several in recent years involving
top government officials in Al-
The Skeloses were found
guilty on the same charges at
trial in 2015, but the convictions were overturned on appeal due to a jury instructions
error. Dean Skelos, who notably took the stand at the second trial, was sentenced to 5
years in prison and Adam to
6½ years the first go-round.
But after the second conviction, the judge unexpectedly reduced their sentences, saying
that while she wanted to send a
message to Albany politicians,
she thought Adam Skelos had
made great strides toward dealing with his substance abuse
problems.
The judge said she cut Dean
Skelos’ sentence because of his
age and emotional struggles because of the convictions, but
tacked on an additional three
months because she said his testimony at his second trial contained “falsehoods, irrelevancies and mischaracterizations.”
Dean Skelos didn’t stick
around the courthouse for his
son’s sentencing in October
when he was also sentenced earlier that day. In a pre-sentencing
memo, Dean Skelos’ attorney,
Robert Gage, said there was a
“rift” in the relationship.
“I hope we do reconcile,”
said Adam. “I miss him.”
With John Riley
NEWSDAY, MONDAY, JANUARY 7, 2019
Prison placement request
2015 convictions overturned
newsday.com
Former State Senate Majority
Leader Dean Skelos and his son,
Adam, are slated to report to federal prison Tuesday to begin
serving their 4-year sentences
for using Dean’s powerful perch
in state government to shake
down businesses for $300,000 in
jobs and fees for Adam.
The Skeloses, who were both
found guilty of eight counts of
bribery, conspiracy and extortion at their July retrial, are probably headed to separate federal
prisons in different states, according to court records.
U.S. District Judge Kimba
Wood, who presided over the
first Skelos trial in 2015 and the
second trial last year, recommended on Thursday that
Adam Skelos serve his 4-year
stint at the Lewisburg Satellite
Prison Camp in Pennsylvania, a
minimum-security facility, following a request from his attorney.
But Adam Skelos said in an interview Sunday the Federal Bureau of Prisons had assigned him
to serve his time in the low-security prison in Danbury, Connecticut. While he had initially requested Danbury because of its
proximity to Long Island, he
wanted to go to Lewisburg because of a program there that
could possibly reduce the time
he serves. He said he was content with Danbury because it
would be easier for him to visit
with his fiancee and children.
“I’m going to do whatever
they tell me to do; I’m going in
with that mindset,” said Adam
Skelos, the father of four sons
ranging in age from 7 years old
to 1 month old.
TOP STORIES
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Trump would OK
Says he’s firm on
border security
request of $5.6B
BY LAURA FIGUEROA HERNANDEZ
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WASHINGTON — President
Donald Trump, on the 16th day
of the partial government shutdown, said he was willing to
compromise on the composition of his proposed border
wall, favoring steel over concrete, but he is not willing to
lower his $5.6 billion request
for funding.
“They don’t like concrete so
we’ll give them steel,” Trump
said at the White House, referring to Democrats’ opposition
to his proposed wall along the
U.S. and Mexico border.
The president also repeated
that he was “looking” at the possibility of declaring a national
emergency to expedite his demands for the construction of a
southern border wall but did
not answer questions about
how the wall would be financed, if such a declaration
were made from the executive
branch of government.
Trump’s remarks came as
Vice President Mike Pence and
aides to House Speaker Nancy
Pelosi and Senate Minority
Leader Chuck Schumer met for
the second day in row without
reaching a deal that would end
the shutdown.
Before the meeting, Trump
told reporters he didn’t “expect
to have anything happen” at the
session but later described the
talks where no agreement was
reached as “productive.”
“I think we’re going to have
some very serious talks come
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday,”
Trump said before heading to
Camp David for a previously
planned retreat with White
House staff and advisers.
A Democratic official familiar
with Sunday’s negotiation session said no progress was made,
citing the Trump administration’s failure to provide “a full
budget justification” requested a
day earlier by Democrats that
would outline how the money
would be spent. The official said
the White House did not offer
proposed cuts to the Department of Homeland Security bud-
AP PHOTO / ALEX BRANDON
laura.figueroa@newsday.com
Donald Trump repeated Sunday he was “looking” at declaring a national emergency to get the wall.
get that could offset the $5 billion
Trump was seeking.
Lawmakers on both sides of
the aisle, making the Sunday political talk show rounds,
pressed for a quick resolution
to the impasse as national parks
and museums remained shuttered and nearly 800,000 federal employees were working
without pay or furloughed.
Democrats, who now control
the U.S. House, have been urging Trump to sign off on a deal
to reopen the nine impacted
agencies. Democrats insist
Trump and lawmakers can continue to hash out an agreement
on border security funding
once the agencies are opened
and pay is restored.
Asked what Trump would be
willing to offer Democrats in ex-
change for their support, acting
White House Chief of Staff
Mick Mulvaney told NBC’s
“Meet the Press” that Trump’s
willingness to “take a concrete
wall off the table” in favor of
taxpayer funding for “a steel
fence” was a key concession.
Mulvaney told show host
Chuck Todd if Trump “has to
give up a concrete wall, replace
it with a steel fence . . . so that
Democrats can say, ‘See? He’s
not building a wall anymore,’
that should help move us in the
right direction.”
Trump, who last week
tweeted the idea for “An all concrete Wall was NEVER ABANDONED,” told reporters Sunday
he planned on calling “the head
of United States Steel and other
steel companies to have them
come up with a plate or a design”
for the proposed steel barrier.
Asked about the financial
hardships facing workers impacted by the furlough, Trump
said he could “relate.”
“I’m sure the people who are
on the receiving end will make
adjustments, they always do
. . . but many of those people
who won’t be receiving a paycheck, many of those people
agree 100 percent with what
I’m doing,” Trump said.
Several federal employee
unions have sued the Trump administration, arguing that the
shutdown is illegally forcing
hundreds of thousands of federal employees to work without
guaranteed compensation.
Democrats making the Sunday political talk show rounds
TOP STORIES
A7
BY MICHAEL O’KEEFFE
michael.okeeffe@newsday.com
say that about his own government, a government we
elected him to lead. But that is
his position,” Durbin said.
Sen. Lindsey Graham (RS.C.) said on CBS, “There’s a
deal to be had here,” but only
if it includes a wall . . . the
goal is to fix a broken immigration system.”
Rep. Peter King (R-Seaford)
said he was “critical of both
sides here” during an appear-
CHARLES ECKERT
vowed to wage a legal challenge to any effort by Trump
to declare a national emergency on the border, and said
a compromise to open the government seemed far away.
Sen. Dick Durbin (D-Ill.),
the No. 2 ranking Democrat in
the Senate, told CBS’ “Face the
Nation” it was Trump’s “position” to prolong the shutdown.
“It was stunning to hear a
president of the United States
ance on the John Catsimatidis
radio show. “I don’t think you
should shut the government
down over any one issue,”
King said. “It’s a very dangerous precedent to set.” He said
both parties have an obligation to make concessions.
MORE
INSIDE
Contradiction
on Syria
A30
Nassau DA asks
village to delay
its investigation
BY JESSE COBURN
jesse.coburn@newsday.com
The Nassau County district
attorney has asked the Village
of Hempstead not to investigate allegations of corruption
by a trustee and the deputy police chief — both indicted in
November — pending the outcome of the criminal cases
against them.
“In light of these pending
criminal cases, I am requesting
that the Village of Hempstead
refrain from an internal investigation regarding the underlying
criminal matters until the matters are resolved,” District Attorney Madeline Singas wrote
in a Dec. 10 letter to the village.
Hempstead Mayor Don Ryan
provided a copy of the letter to
Newsday.
Village deputy chief Richard
Holland was indicted and
charged with one count of
bribery in the third degree. Village trustee Perry Pettus was indicted on one count of bribery in
the third degree and one count
of official misconduct. Singas alleged in the indictment that Holland paid Pettus to vote to appoint Holland as deputy chief.
Both men pleaded not guilty.
A spokesman for Singas confirmed the office sent the letter
but declined to comment on it.
Ryan said in a statement the
village is complying with the
DA’s request.
“Based on correspondence the
Village recently received from
the Nassau District Attorney’s office asking us to refrain from any
internal investigation concerning these matters, we are cur-
rently not taking any further action,” Ryan said in the statement.
In separate cases, Singas’ office had indicted Pettus in July
and October on charges including four counts of second-degree
grand larceny, 12 counts of firstdegree
falsifying
business
records and one count of conspiracy in the fourth degree. The DA
alleged in part that Pettus had extorted protection payments from
local business owners by threatening to drive them out of business, and that he falsified pay
stubs to obtain a mortgage for a
home. Pettus pleaded not guilty.
A spokesman for Singas’ office declined to say whether
the request for the village to
not investigate is also related to
the earlier indictments.
Pettus and Holland remain in
their posts in the village government. Pettus’ annual salary is
$28,560, and Holland received
$218,600 in total pay from the
village in 2017, Ryan said.
Holland has retained his title
of deputy chief, but his responsibilities have been restricted
to primarily administrative
tasks, Ryan said.
Hempstead Village police officer Randy Stith was indicted
last year for allegedly stealing
more than $6,500 from the fire
department and falsifying a document to become a police officer. He pleaded not guilty. The
village placed Stith on paid administrative leave after his indictment and later assigned him
to administrative duty.
The next court appearance is
Tuesday in Stith’s case and
Jan. 17 in Pettus’ and Holland’s
cases, online court records show.
NEWSDAY, MONDAY, JANUARY 7, 2019
said,” Schumer told reporters
Sunday. “He said, ‘I demand it
my way, $5.6 billion for a concrete wall and the government
could be shut down for months
or even years.’ Everyone, Democrats and Republicans, were
sort of aghast when he said it.”
Schumer said Democrats
are unwilling to trade permanent protections for immigrants brought to the United
States as small children — the
Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals population — in
exchange for funding Trump’s
proposed wall. He said the
president has already rejected
that deal, and the topic was
barely discussed Friday.
“I would much prefer the
symbol of America be the
Statue of Liberty than a wall,”
Schumer said Sunday.
Airport security and ports of
entry have become less safe as a
Chuck Schumer: ‘I was shocked’
\ Video: newsday.com/state
Hempstead Village trustee Perry Pettus, left, and Deputy Police
Chief Richard Holland face November bribery indictments.
newsday.com
More than 50,000 federal
workers and contractors in the
metropolitan area, including
thousands on Long Island, are
not receiving paychecks thanks
to the government shutdown,
Senate Minority Leader Chuck
Schumer said at a news conference in Manhattan on Sunday.
Schumer said more than
16,000 government employees
— a third of the 51,000 federal
workforce in New York City
— and thousands more from
Long Island, New Jersey and
the northern suburbs are facing tough times as a result of
the shutdown over President
Donald Trump’s demands for
funding for a southern border
wall. Thousands of others who
work for federal contractors,
the New York Democrat said,
have also been laid off due to
the impasse between Trump
and congressional Democrats.
“So it’s a pretty good guess
that in the New York metropolitan area, over 50,000 people
are not getting paid because of
this shutdown,” Schumer said.
“That is very bad for them and
their families. They should
not be hostages to President
Trump’s demands.”
Schumer and other congressional leaders met Trump for
about two hours Friday, a meeting he called “unproductive.”
“I was shocked at what he
result of the shutdown, Schumer said, because Transportation Security Administration
and Customs and Border Protection employees are working
without pay. Some have been
unable to go to work because
they don’t have money for commuting expenses, he said.
Commuters who depend on
subways, trains and buses will
also be impacted, Schumer said.
The Metropolitan Transportation Authority — “which has
enough trouble, Lord knows” —
receives about $150 million
monthly from the federal government, Schumer said.
The MTA can go four to six
weeks without those funds,
Schumer said, but will have to
cut service or borrow money,
passing costs to commuters, if
the shutdown is extended.
Thousands of New York taxpayers will not receive refunds
while the government is shut
down, and the 1.5 million New
York City residents enrolled in
the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program and the
400,000 families across the
state that rely on the Women, Infants and Children nutrition
program will not receive benefits, Schumer said. School lunch
and breakfast programs will
also be shut down if the shutdown continues next month.
The Federal Housing Administration is not processing
loans as a result of the shutdown, Schumer added.
HOWARD SCHNAPP
GOV’T SHUTDOWN HURTING 50,000
IN METRO AREA, SCHUMER SAYS
y
a steel wall
TOP STORIES
NEWSDAY, MONDAY, JANUARY 7, 2019
newsday.com
CROWN FOR QUEEN FILM
‘Rhapsody’ and AND THE WINNERS ARE
star Malek take ACTOR, DRAMA
Rami Malek
home awards
‘Bohemian Rhapsody’
rafer.guzman@newsday.com
In an upset, “Bohemian
Rhapsody” triumphed at Sunday night’s Golden Globes,
winning the top award of best
dramatic picture. The widely
panned biopic about the flamboyant rock singer Freddie
Mercury beat “A Star is Born”
and the popular favorite,
“Black Panther.”
Meanwhile, “Green Book”
won three awards, for best
comedy, screenplay and Mahershala Ali as supporting
actor. Ali praised the real-life
figure he played, black musician Don Shirley, who toured
the segregated South in the
early 1960s, as “a brilliant man,
and I just want to thank him for
his passion and virtuosity and
the dignity that he carried himself with.”
Sandra Oh, who became the
first actress of Asian descent
to co-host the Golden Globes
ceremony Sunday, also took
home the award for best actress in a TV drama for the
BBC America series “Killing
Eve.” Oh is the second woman
of Asian descent to ever win
for a leading TV role; Yoko
Shimada won the category
nearly four decades ago, in
1981, for NBC’s “Shogun.”
“There are two people here
tonight that I’m so grateful
that they’re here with me. I’d
like to thank my mother and
my father,” an overwhelmed
Oh said. She also briefly
spoke Korean to them, saying she loves them. “I have
no idea what’s happening,” a
dazed-looking Oh said later.
Regina King won best supporting actress in Barry Jenkins’ literary adaptation “If
Beale Street Could Talk.”
King noted that while the public may be tired of hearing
celebrities “on our soapbox,”
she used her time to promise
that all her future producing
projects would hire 50 percent women. “I just challenge
anyone out there who is in
a position of power, not
ACTOR, MUSICAL OR COMEDY
Christian Bale
‘Vice’
MOTION PICTURE, DRAMA
‘Bohemian Rhapsody’
AP / PAUL DRINKWATER
BY RAFER GUZMÁN
NBCUNIVERSAL VIA GETTY IMAGES / HANDOUT
THE GOLDEN GLOBES
yy
A8
Colorful fashions make
comeback at Globes A14
MORE
INSIDE
ACTRESS, DRAMA
Glenn Close
‘The Wife’
ACTRESS, MUSICAL OR COMEDY
Olivia Colman
‘The Favourite’
MUSICAL OR COMEDY
‘Green Book’
OTHER WINNERS
Supporting actor
Mahershala Ali (above)
‘Green Book’
Supporting Actress
Regina King
‘If Beale Street Could Talk’
Actor, TV drama
Richard Madden
‘Bodyguard’
Actress TV drama
Sandra Oh (above)
‘Killing Eve’
Foreign Language Film
‘Roma’
TV comedy series
‘The Kominsky Method’
TV drama series
‘The Americans’
Actor, TV comedy
Michael Douglas
‘The Kominsky Method’
Actress, TV comedy
Rachel Brosnahan
‘The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel’
Animated Fim
‘Spider-Man: Into the
Spider-Verse’
just in our industry, in all industries, I challenge you to
challenge yourselves and
stand with us in solidarity,”
she said.
The theme was diversity,
with three films with largely
black casts nominated for best
dramatic picture. The ceremony, though, struck a consciously light and breezy tone.
Hosts Oh and Andy Samberg avoided the name of President Donald Trump and tiptoed around potentially explo-
sive subjects. “We’re the only
two people in Hollywood who
haven’t gotten in trouble for
saying something offensive,”
Oh said, and the two hosts
kept it that way, too. They pretend-roasted various celebrities by heaping praise on them
(Oh to Bradley Cooper: “You
are hot!”) and pretend-forced
Jim Carrey — a nominee for
best comedic actor in the
Showtime series “Kidding” —
to move his seat from the
movie-star section to the tele-
vision-star section.
Oh struck a serious note
with a speech to the women
and minority groups in the
room. “I wanted to be here to
look out in this audience and
witness this moment of
change,” she said. “I see you,
all these faces of change. And
now, so will everyone else.”
Lady Gaga, onstage to accept the award for best original song — for “Shallow,”
from “A Star is Born” —
thanked her male co-writers.
“As a woman, it is really hard
to be take seriously as a musician and a songwriter,” she
said. “They lifted me up, they
supported me.”
Even the category of best animated film seemed more culturally significant than usual
when “Spider-Man: Into the
Spider-Verse” won the award.
The film, about an Afro-Hispanic teenager who takes on
the Spidey mantle, has been a
box-office success and a surprise hit with critics.
A9
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LONG ISLAND
A10
A principal’s literary legacy
1,200 autographed
volumes honor
Copiague educator
BY JOIE TYRRELL
NEWSDAY, MONDAY, JANUARY 7, 2019
BARRY SLOAN
Walter M. O’Connell of Nesconset in the lobby of the school named for his father, displaying President Gerald Ford’s signed autobiography.
FAMILY PHOTO
The family of Walter G.
O’Connell is honoring his legacy
in a literary tribute that’s been
signed, sealed and delivered to
the library of the Copiague high
school that bears his name.
Over 16 years, the sons of
O’Connell — the high school’s
first principal when it was established in 1957 — have donated
more than 1,200 books, signed
by 1,177 authors, to the library at
Walter G. O’Connell Copiague
High School. The trove includes books by presidents and
first ladies, as well as authors
such as Harper Lee, Maya Angelou, Caroline Kennedy and
Rep. Peter King (R-Seaford).
O’Connell, who worked in
the district for nearly three
decades, died in April 2007 at
age 89. His sons’ efforts
started before that.
“It was quite an honor to
have the school named for him,
and he did a lot of work establishing the school in the 1950s,”
said his son Walter M. O’Connell, 72, of Nesconset, a graduate of the school and one of
O’Connell’s five surviving sons.
“The family was very grateful
for the honor, and he got to see
it before he died.”
The project began in 2002
with books authored by distinguished Americans. The collection includes books by every
president from Gerald Ford on,
with the exception of Ronald
Reagan. It expanded to other
genres over the years.
Walter M. O’Connell purchases the books and tracks
down the authors, sending a letter explaining the donation and
asking for their signature, then
makes donations periodically
during each school year. In December, he and his brother
Christopher met up at the high
school library for the latest donation of 53 autographed books.
“We all hold Walter G. O’Connell in very high regard. He was
very much of a figure in the district and the community,” said
Superintendent Kathleen Bannon, who has worked in the district for two decades and has
been the top administrator for
BARRY SLOAN
newsday.com
joie.tyrrell@newsday.com
four years. The collection
“makes him live on,” she said.
Every January, selected books
are displayed in the high school’s
main lobby in recognition of the
Jan. 7 birthday of its former principal. This month, the display
case features a portrait of O’Connell surrounded by books, including those signed by Michelle
Obama, the late Gen. H. Norman Schwarzkopf and New
York Mets outfielder and coach
Mookie Wilson, whose inscription reads “In Memory of Great
Man . . . May God continue to
Bless the school and his family.”
“It definitely keeps him in
the limelight,” Bannon said.
Walter G. O’Connell initially
studied at Cathedral College in
Manhattan to be a priest and
later switched to law at Fordham University.
He joined the Marine Corps
in 1942 and served as a mili-
Walter G. O’Connell, for whom
Copiague’s high school is
named. At left, books signed by
Michelle Obama and the late
U.S. Gen. H. Norman
Schwartzkopf Jr.
tary legal counselor until his
discharge with the rank of captain in 1946. While in the service, he met his future wife of
63 years, Mary Murphy. They
settled in Copiague and
reared six sons. Their son
Danny, a Marine, was killed in
Vietnam in 1969 at age 19.
Starting in the early 1950s, he
taught in the Copiague elementary and middle schools. He
helped found Copiague High in
1957 and served as its principal
until 1972. After stepping down
from the post, he was an English teacher, guidance counselor
and dean of students at the
school until he retired in 1979.
The school was renamed Walter G. O’Connell Copiague
High School in 2000.
When the donation effort
began, Walter M. O’Connell
said he had no idea it “would
become what it was.”
Sometimes it can take a
while for a book sent to an author for signing to be returned,
he said, and sometimes he receives more than one copy
back. The longest waiting period, more than nine years, was
for a signed book from Caroline Kennedy. Angelou sent five
copies and former New York
City Mayor Ed Koch sent two.
Some notables, including actors Tony Randall and Burt
Reynolds and Yankees shortstop Hall of Famer Phil Rizzuto, also sent signed photographs.
“For the most part, people
are very cooperative when
you tell them this is for a
school and it is for my dad
who the school is named for,”
O’Connell said.
LONG ISLAND
A11
FAITH, VALOR, GOOSE BUMPS
Retrieval of cross
marks Epiphany
for Port Jeff church
BY VERA CHINESE
Retrieving a wooden cross
from the water during the
Greek Orthodox Epiphany celebration is considered a blessing
and good luck for the year
ahead, but Nick Dimitratos, 14,
had a much simpler reason for
diving into the chilly waters off
Cedar Beach in Mount Sinai on
Sunday.
“It looked kind of fun,” Dimitratos said at the Greek Orthodox Church of the Assumption’s annual event.
Members of the Port Jefferson church gathered along the
shore as Father Demetrios Calogredes read from a jeweled
Gospel and sang holiday songs.
Dimitratos and three other teen
boys waited on the banks of
Mount Sinai Harbor for Calogredes to toss the wooden cross off
a dock, a yearly tradition that
has been carried out there since
the church’s founding in 1959.
Wearing only swim shorts,
the boys swam furiously toward the cross, but 14-year-old
George Franks emerged victorious. A first-time participant,
Franks, of Mount Sinai, said he
chose not to ask the water temperature before his swim.
“I don’t know, and I don’t really want to know,” he said.
The teens were ushered into
a Port Jefferson emergency ser-
JAMES CARBONE
vera.chinese@newsday.com
George Franks, 14, was one of four teens who dove after the cross as part of the Greek Orthodox Church of the Assumption’s celebration.
vices ambulance for a checkup
and a warmup immediately
after, and Dimitratos’ father,
Spiros, wrapped his son in a
fluffy blanket. Emergency workers, who estimated the water at
about 50 degrees, gave the boys
a clean bill of health.
The event, also known as the
Theophany of Our Lord and
Saviour Jesus Christ and meant
to celebrate the baptism of
Jesus in the Jordan River, is
held every year on Jan. 6. It
marks the declaration of Jesus
Christ as humankind’s savior.
The day begins with Mass at
the church, followed by the harbor dive and a feast, Calogredes
said. The cross is tethered with a
long line of string to prevent the
holy object from being carried
to sea in the event the divers
have trouble recovering it.
The dive is open to all, but
participants are usually teenage
boys and girls, the priest said.
With air temperatures in the
mid-40s, this year’s weather
was better than last, when the
wind chill forced a postponement, Calogredes said.
Still, the shivering, barefoot
boys contrasted with the watching parishioners on the windy
beach wearing knit hats and
heavy winter coats.
“They’re very brave,” Calogredes said of the teens. “And
very resilient, too.”
BY JEAN-PAUL SALAMANCA
A developer is requesting a
zoning change at a Riverhead
land parcel that would allow
him to build what he described
as 34 units of workforce housing for young employees at a
nearby regional hospital.
Joseph Manzi, a Rocky Pointbased builder, asked the Riverhead Town Board at its Wednesday work session for permission
to change the zoning for 26 acres
of property on Middle Road east
of Harrison Lane to RB-40 residential zoning, which would
allow for workforce housing to
be built on the property.
Steven Losquadro, Manzi’s
Rocky Point-based attorney,
told the board the property was
currently zoned as RA-40 residential, which does not include
workforce housing’s smaller,
more
affordable
rentals.
Peconic Bay Medical Center
representatives had previously
approached Manzi about using
the property to house young
workers, Losquadro said.
Manzi thought he “could satisfy that need and do it in a way
that wouldn’t dramatically expand the density” and create up
to 34 small units for such workers that “would be much more affordable for the people that need
such housing,” Losquadro said.
Hospital representatives did
not immediately return requests for comment.
Some
board
members
expressed interest in Manzi’s
proposal.
“I agree with you with the
need of the young professionals
coming in with the expansion
of the hospital and the proximity of this both to the hospital
and to shopping,” Councilman
Tim Hubbard said at the meeting. “I really think it’s an ideal
situation, and [the property] is
set back off the road.”
However, Riverhead Supervisor Laura Jens-Smith said she
was worried the zoning change
could create congestion in the
area, which is near busy
Roanoke Avenue.
“Right in that particular area,
there’s more than one parcel
that is RB-40,” Jens-Smith said
Friday. “Even just changing the
zoning there in that little area,
it would increase the density
there incredibly.”
Jens-Smith said Manzi and
Losquadro needed to do some
more fact-finding on the proposal, which had not been formally submitted yet, and come
back to the board at a later date.
NEWSDAY, MONDAY, JANUARY 7, 2019
jeanpaul.salamanca@newsday.com
newsday.com
Builder seeks zoning for rentals near hospital
LONG ISLAND
A12
[
SPINCYCLE
]
GUIDE TO POLITICS AND POLITICIANS
Business insiders
lead government
Temp workers finally paid
Dan
Janison
dan.janison@newsday.com
NEWSDAY, MONDAY, JANUARY 7, 2019
newsday.com
AP / EVAN VUCCI
I
were evenly divided between Democrats and Republicans. Among those
hired was recent board retirees: Betty Manzella, former GOP deputy commissioner and cousin of late Suffolk GOP chairman John
Powell, and Democrat Jean
Griffiths of Miller Place.
But even after the legislature approved the job titles
in
mid-December,
the
checks for the four did not
go out until Jan. 2, according
to board officials. In all, the
county uses a total of 5,199
temporary workers in connection with Election Day,
and officials acknowledged
delays in sending out some
other checks as well. Those
late payments went out just
before the new year.
— Rick Brand
President Donald Trump speaks to reporters about border security
in the White House briefing room last week.
Judge turned law clerk
tapped him as commerce secretary. Ross has drawn scrutiny
from Democrats over his past
holdings in a liquefied-gas shipping company that has done
substantial business with big
Russian and Chinese entities.
Hiring insiders from various
industries seems to fit politically in an administration that
makes deregulation a proud
mantra. That is, nobody would
expect top Trump appointees
in these agencies to hail from a
culture of super-zealous government rule promulgation.
The timeworn revolving
door between private businesses and offices that monitor
them turns for more than Cabinet posts. Charles Rettig, the
commissioner of the Internal
Revenue Service, rose to prominence as a tax lawyer who represented wealthy individuals
and corporations seeking to
avoid paying taxes to federal
and state taxing authorities.
Scott Gottlieb, commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration, had deep and lucrative ties to Big Pharma while
in private business. That said, a
John Czygier, who served
17 years as Suffolk County’s
politically potent surrogate
judge, has gone to work as
the $142,513-a-year principal
law clerk for new state
Supreme Court Justice Marian Tinari, who earlier spent
a decade as his clerk before
she became a judge.
Czygier had to leave the
$208,000-a-year
surrogate
job at year’s end because he
reached the mandatory retirement age of 70 on Election
Day. Before his election, Czygier, of Remsenburg, was a
private
attorney
and
Southampton GOP chairman.
Tinari, 65, wife of Suffolk
Conservative
chairman
Frank Tinari, originally was
slated to be the surrogate
candidate as part of a ninejudge Democratic, Conservative and Independence
Party endorsement agreement, but she later withdrew when Republican Tara
Scully filed petitions to run
a
Democratic
primary
against her. Democrats then
named Family Court Supervising Judge Theresa Whelan, a Democrat, who beat
Scully.
Richard Schaffer, Suffolk
number of consumer advocates
are giving Gottlieb’s job performance positive reviews.
Matt Whitaker, serving as
Trump’s acting attorney general, continues to draw suspicion for having served on the
advisory board of the defunct
World Patent Marketing, which
the Federal Trade Commission
called “a scam that has bilked
thousands of consumers out of
millions of dollars.”
The website OpenSecrets.org in July linked to the profiles
of 164 former lobbyists serving
in the Trump administration.
Eighteen former staffers went
the other way and became lobbyists, it noted.
Trump in 2017 issued an executive order that bars executive
branch employees from lobbying for five years after working
in the administration. The
order forbids former registered
lobbyists in the White House to
deal for two years with areas
they lobbied on.
“Despite this directive,” says
OpenSecrets, “these men and
women made their way
through the revolving door.”
The 1600 is Newsday’s daily inside look at the Trump presidency
READ & SIGN UP AT NEWSDAY.COM/THE1600
RANDEE DADDONA
f President Donald Trump
aimed to avoid the appearance of special-interest
coziness in his executive
branch, you wouldn’t
know it from the pattern of his
appointments.
Acting Defense Secretary
Patrick Shanahan spent 31
years at Boeing, where he became a high-ranking executive.
The corporation supplied the
military with Apache and Chinook helicopters and worked
on the V-22 Osprey tilt-rotor.
Shanahan, the interim successor to Marine Corps Gen.
James Mattis, said through a
spokesman he has recused himself “from participating in matters in which the Boeing Company is a party.”
The Environmental Protection
Agency’s interim director, Andrew Wheeler, worked for one of
the nation’s largest coal-mining
companies and lobbied for
chemical and big-oil interests.
Health and Human Services
Secretary Alex Azar was president of the U.S. division of Eli
Lilly and Company. He served
on the board of the Biotechnology Innovation Organization, a
pharmaceutical lobby.
After Interior Secretary Ryan
Zinke quit under an ethics cloud
last month, David Bernhardt, a
former oil-industry lobbyist, succeeded him. Bernhardt’s exfirm’s clients included Cobalt International Energy and the Independent Petroleum Association
of America.
Wilbur Ross was a widely
known New York-based investor long before Trump
The checks are finally in
the mail for temporary personnel put on at the Suffolk
County Board of Elections
to help meet the crush of
walk-in requests for absentee ballots before Election
Day.
The four temps, who
worked during the week before the election, initially
could not be paid until the
County Legislature formally
created the job titles in
which they worked. Those titles are absentee ballot coordinator, which paid $50 an
hour, and assistant absentee
ballot coordinator, which
paid $25 an hour.
The total cost for the work
was $9,600, according to GOP
elections commissioner Nick
LaLota. As in all Board of
Elections staffing, the slots
John Czygier
Democratic chairman, expressed no concern over
Tinari’s choice of a former
Republican town chairman
and said it was not part of a
cross-endorsement agreement. “It was never mentioned, brought up or discussed,” he said. “I’d be
shocked if it was anything
other than personal.”
He added he did not consider the post a patronage
appointment. “It’s based on
experience and the most important experience is the relationship between a judge
and their law clerk because
the clerk has to know how
to express the judge’s opinions,” Schaffer said.
— Rick Brand
LONG ISLAND
A13
Roosevelt remembered
Long Island Office
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Ceremony on 100th
anniversary of 26th
president’s death
BY TED PHILLIPS
ted.phillips@newsday.com
CORRECTIONS
JOHNNY MILANO
The black iron gates at the
final resting place of Theodore
Roosevelt swung open Sunday
as people gathered in Oyster
Bay Cove to pay their respects
to the 26th president of the
United States on the 100th anniversary of his death.
“Let us thank God for Teddy
Roosevelt, for the man and for all
he has done for our country,”
Deacon James Murphy of St. Edward the Confessor Church,
Syosset, said in an opening
prayer before about 100 people
attending a ceremony at Youngs
Memorial Cemetery. “Let us remember particularly the things
he has overcome in his own life,
the hardships . . . and how he
moved from one position to another position and got better
every step of the way.”
Theodore Roosevelt was a
sickly child whose ailments included severe asthma.
Oyster Bay Town Supervisor
Joseph Saladino placed a
wreath of red, white and blue
flowers before the shared headstone of Theodore Roosevelt
and his second wife, Edith Kermit. Roosevelt was born on
Oct. 27, 1858, and died in his
sleep on Jan. 6, 1919.
“We . . . celebrate President
Roosevelt’s enduring spirit, his
vigor, his tireless approach and
his important motivation to ad-
Boy Scouts and others pay their respects to Theodore Roosevelt at his grave in Oyster Bay Cove.
vance the general welfare of all
citizens, no matter what walk of
life they came from,” Saladino
said during the ceremony.
Roosevelt was also remembered as a supporter of the Boy
Scouts, who led the Pledge of
Allegiance on Sunday. He
served in the leadership of the
Boy Scouts in Oyster Bay and
Nassau County, according to
the National Park Service.
Kevin O’Brien, 55, a retired
New York City civil servant
from East Norwich, came with
his 9-year-old son, Matt, who
wore a Cub Scout uniform.
“We had to stop and pay our
respects,” O’Brien said. “He did
so many things for America.”
Roosevelt created the U.S.
Forest Service during his presidency and preserved about 230
million acres of public land, according to the National Park
Service website.
“He was a great inspiration
for the entire scouting movement across the United States,”
said Mike Flanagan, 62, of
Bayville, commissioner of the
Boy Scout Shelter Rock district.
“It’s hiking boots now, more
than rifles,” Flanagan said.
At Sagamore Hill, Roosevelt’s nearby Oyster Bay
home that is now a national historic site, the flagpole was conspicuously bare.
Because of the federal government shutdown, the Park
Service postponed the opening
of an exhibit, “Theodore Roosevelt, A Man for the Modern
World,” marking the centennial
of Roosevelt’s death, that had
been scheduled for Sunday.
“That, unfortunately, will have
to be postponed indefinitely,”
Virginia Perrell, board member
of the Friends of Sagamore Hill
Perrell, said last week. “It’s a
shame we missed the actual
date” on which Roosevelt died.
A notice posted on the museum door said the area is open
but not fully staffed because
Park Service employees would
not be available to issue permits, collect money, collect
trash, clean restrooms or maintain roadways.
With David M. Schwartz
BY STEFANIE DAZIO
stefanie.dazio@newsday.com
County will begin with the policy forum, aimed at discussions
about the next steps to fight the
opioid epidemic, officials said.
Long Island has been ravaged
by an opioid crisis that’s led to
hundreds of overdose deaths
and thousands of instances
where the drug overdose antidote Narcan was used.
The speakers will include
Malatras, Suffolk Police Chief
of Department Stuart Cameron,
the president of the Mineolabased nonprofit Family and
Children’s Association, the
commissioner of the state’s Office of Alcoholism and Sub-
stance Abuse Services, and a
counselor with the NorthportEast Northport Community
Drug and Alcohol Task Force.
District Attorney Timothy Sini
will be the keynote speaker.
“This forum will cover a broad
range of topics, both about what
has been accomplished so far
and what the challenges are
ahead,” Sini said in a statement.
The event is to be held at the
Kimisis Tis Theotokou Greek Orthodox Church of the Hamptons
in Southampton from 9 a.m. to 1
p.m. It will be live-streamed on
Bellone’s
Facebook
page,
facebook.com/SteveBellone.
1789 America held its first
presidential election as
voters chose electors who, a
month later, selected George
Washington to be the nation’s first chief executive.
1904 TheMarconiInternationalMarineCommunication
CompanyofLondonannouncedthatthetelegraphed
letters“CQD”would serveasa
maritimedistresscall(itwas
laterreplacedwith“SOS”).
1927 Commercial transatlantic telephone service was
inaugurated between New
York and London.
1959 The United States
recognized the new government of Cuba, six days after
Fidel Castro led the overthrow of Fulgencio Batista.
1963 The U.S. Post Office
raised the cost of a first-class
stamp from 4 to 5 cents.
1999 For the second time in
history, an impeached American president went on trial
before the Senate. President
Bill Clinton faced charges of
perjury and obstruction of
justice; he was acquitted.
2015 Masked gunmen
stormed the Paris offices of
Charlie Hebdo, a French
newspaper that had caricatured the Prophet Muhammad, methodically killing 12.
NEWSDAY, MONDAY, JANUARY 7, 2019
Suffolk County and an Albany think tank next month in
Southampton will host a substance abuse and opioid forum
focusing on prevention, treatment and recovery.
The county is working with
the Rockefeller Institute of Government as part of the organization’s policy initiative into combating the opioid crisis, said its
president, Jim Malatras. About
250 people from neighborhood
task forces, medical providers,
community organizations and
schools are expected to attend
the Feb. 6 invitation-only forum.
The think tank’s efforts
began in upstate Sullivan County more than a year ago and
have spread to 10 regions
statewide; Suffolk is the fourth
region and invited the institute
to work with the county.
“We call it research in real
time,” Malatras said. The goal is
to “really try to get at the heart of
the problem” through interviews, data and updated policies.
“Suffolk is interesting to us because it’s so diverse geographically,” he said.
The partnership with Suffolk
THIS DATE IN HISTORY
newsday.com
Forum planned on substance abuse, opioids
Newsday strives for the highest
level of accuracy and fairness and is
committed to promptly correcting
errors. Readers can report problems or concerns about content in
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NEWSDAY, MONDAY, JANUARY 7, 2019
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These were the 30 best albums of 2018
Hues return to
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a year after black
dominated
for Time’s Up
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Melissa McCarthy
A15
newsday.com/music
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EVERY FRIDAY
IN JANUARY
Colton Underwood returns for another shot at love, starring in “The Bachelor.”
New ‘Bachelor’ talks
life, love and no sex
BY FRANK LOVECE
Special to Newsday
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Colton Underwood, star of “The
Bachelor” season 23, premiering
Monday at 8 p.m. on WABC/7, is
gamely addressing the oft-discussed
issue of his virginity.
“I was very open and candid about
my virginity and I think a lot of people maybe misunderstood it, or still
don’t understand why I am a virgin,”
Underwood, a fan-favorite suitor
from “The Bachelorette” season 14,
starring Becca Kufrin, said in a conference call with reporters. “I think
those answers might come out this
season,” he tantalized, but added, “I
don’t know if people will ever be satisfied with the answer because they
just don’t understand who I am yet.”
Underwood, who turns 27 on Jan.
26, lamented his public persona. “Instead of it being ‘Colton Underwood,
Bachelor,’ it’s ‘the virgin Colton Underwood.’ “ That aspect, he stressed, “happens to be a small part of my life.”
He told Newsday one reason he
has not yet found the right woman
was his concentrated focus on football, where after being a standout at
Illinois State he found himself relegated to the practice squads of the
NFL’s Los Angeles Chargers, Philadelphia Eagles and Oakland Raiders
from 2014 to 2016.
Born in Indianapolis, Indiana, and
raised in Washington, Illinois, he currently resides in Colorado near his divorced parents, Scott and Donna,
and says he has been living on his
football savings.
As well, he says, he has spent at
least a year involved with the two primary “Bachelor” shows as well as
“Bachelor in Paradise,” where he was
a star of season five, and he remains
the non-salaried head of his namesake foundation to help those with
cystic fibrosis.
“I always said from the beginning
I’m waiting for the right heart,” reflected Underwood, who dated
Olympic gold-medal gymnast Aly
Raisman for several months from
2016 to 2017. Calling the “Bachelor”
franchise not about marriage per se
but rather about proposals, he nonetheless said he wanted someone “I
can share the rest of my life with . . .
and I think that’s what ‘The Bachelor’ is all about, is trying to find that.”
Without spoiling the outcome, he
said his season “wasn’t the easiest
for me. There were ups and downs
and at times it got really challenging
— it got really hard and it really
pushed me.”
Regardless, he added, he is now
“the happiest I’ve ever been.”
Lucky North Club Members with a
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STAR MAX/IPX / DEMIS MARYANNAKIS
reality check
AIRBONE ALLERGY. “The
Real Housewives of New York
City” star Bethenny Frankel is
calling for airlines to address airborne allergies following an
issue on a recent flight. She underwent emergency hospitalization in December over a potentially fatal fish allergy, spending
two days in an ICU.
“Called airline mult x [multiple times] to say I have fish allergy,” the Skinnygirl brand creator, 48, tweeted Thursday without naming the airline. “Got on
& they’re serving bass. They
couldn’t not serve it they said.
Then they were turning around
which I protested bc it would
delay people. Cabin asked to not
serve it & pilot made announcement to plane. That was fun.
#epilife,” she tagged, referring to
such epinephrine injectors as
EpiPen, used for certain allergicreaction emergencies.
Responding to online commenters, she explained that
“some allergens are transmitted
by touch & air. Fish is one & is
newsday.com/tv
Remembering ‘The Sopranos’
Bethenny Frankel
fatal,” particularly in a closed-air
environment as opposed to a
restaurant. She noted that the
pilot, who did not divert the
flight, “called me out to whole
plane” needlessly, Frankel felt.
As well, she added, “Who …
wants fish on a plane?”
“The good news,” Frankel
tweeted Sunday “is that we now
are shining a light on this & the
airlines won’t be able to ignore it.”
PREMIERES. Monday at 8 p.m.,
Bethpage’s Sal Valentinetti is
back on NBC’s “America’s Got Talent” for the all-star season 13 …
Opposite on ABC, “The BacheADVERTISEMENT
‘Aquaman’ reigns for 3rd week
lor” season 23 features New Yorkers Annie Reardon, 23, a financial
associate, and Sydney Lotuaco, 27,
a dancer, and former New Yorker
Tracy Shapoff, 31, a Los Angeles
wardrobe stylist … at 9 p.m., VH1’s
new “Cartel Crew” follows eight
descendants of narcos in Miami,
Florida … and at 10 on Food,
Giada De Laurentiis hosts the
new baking competition “Winner
Cake All” … Tuesday, Long Island
native Lindsay Lohan wrangles
her high-maintenance hosts on
MTV’s new “Lindsay Lohan’s
Beach Club” at 8 p.m. … Thursday
night at 9, WE bows season four
of “Growing Up Hip Hop,” followed immediately at 10 by a hiphop edition of “Marriage Boot
Camp: Reality Stars” … Friday, a
singing veterinarian’s viral video
lands Dr. Ross Henderson the
new Animal Planet series “Hanging with the Hendersons” at 9
p.m.
RECAPS. “RuPaul’s Drag
Race All Stars” dethroned Latrice Royale (Timothy Wilcots)
… Pablo Lamon and Brooklyn’s
Nini Nguyen exited “Top Chef:
Kentucky” … and “Hell’s
Kitchen” sent Jose DeJesus
back to The Bronx.
ADVERTISEMENT
“Aquaman” is still the champ at the box
office three weeks in, but the high-concept thriller “Escape Room” also drew
some substantial crowds in its debut weekend, The Associated Press reports.
Warner Bros. on Sunday says “Aquaman” has added an estimated $30.7 million
from over 4,000 North American theaters.
That brings its domestic grosses to nearly
$260 million. The DC comics film starring ‘Aquaman’ star
Jason Momoa has had a tidal wave of suc- Jason Momoa
cesses internationally too. Worldwide it
has made $940.7 million.
Even with the slew of holiday releases, Sony’s PG-13 rated
thriller “Escape Room” managed to sneak into second place
in its first weekend in theaters generating an estimated $18
million in ticket sales — double its production budget.
The film stars Taylor Russell, Deborah Ann Woll and
Logan Miller. It got mixed reviews from critics and audiences, but that didn’t seem to matter.
1. Aquaman
2. Escape Room
3. Mary Poppins Returns
4. Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse
5. Bumblebee
6. The Mule
7. Vice
8. Second Act
9. Ralph Breaks the Internet
10. Holmes and Watson
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OUR TOWNS
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REAL-WORLD
Mineola to talk
about pot sites
Board trustees in Mineola
will hold a public hearing
next week to discuss proposed legislation that would
govern where marijuana dispensaries can open.
Trustees are mulling an
amendment that would restrict dispensaries to being
in light manufacturing or industrial districts within the
village. Trustees are also
looking to add language to
village code that defines the
difference between medical
marijuana and marijuana
products.
Mineola joins North
Hempstead Town and two
Nassau County communities looking to regulate marijuana before state officials
move to legalize its recreational use.
North Hempstead has already passed an amendment
limiting where medical marijuana dispensaries can operate, and the town council
also has passed legislation
barring existing medical dispensaries from converting
into retail stores. The town
later this month plans to
pass a ban on the sale of
recreational marijuana.
The meeting is scheduled
at 6:30 p.m. Jan. 16 at Village
Hall. — KHRISTOPHER J. BROOKS
experience
Town partners with tech academy to give students on-the-job training
BY RACHELLE BLIDNER
Auto tech instructor John Mazeika, left, shows Jason Velasquez, 17, of Patchogue, Johnny Bermudez,
17, of Central Islip, and Ronal Marca, 18, of Patchogue, how to check tire tread on an Islip Town vehicle
during an automotive class Friday at Edward J. Milliken Technical Center in Oakdale.
Opportunity knocks
Internship work could include:
\ Repair town cars and boats on
school grounds
\ Shadow town employees
\ Work in the town highway
yards
\ Perform facilities maintenance
with the town employees’
union before proceeding with
the program deal.
“It’s a real progressive opportunity for us to show how government agencies can get together and create value for everybody involved, including
the taxpayer,” Abbate said.
The Milliken Center’s 700
students are already working
on the school campus,
McGrath said. Those in the
auto body and repair programs maintain cars for community members by providing
oil changes, tire changes and
wheel balancing. Students in
the law enforcement program
shadow TSA agents at Long Island MacArthur Airport on a
field trip. Other programs include HVAC, welding and culinary classes.
“What they learn is the skills
to move up and move on,” said
Leah Arnold, director of career
technical and adult education
at Eastern Suffolk BOCES.
NEWSDAY, MONDAY, JANUARY 7, 2019
“Having that real-time exposure to what you think you
want to do, it’s really invaluable,” Supervisor Angie Carpenter said.
The program could also save
taxpayers money, officials said.
The students will not be paid
for the internships, and the
school will charge the town
only for the cost of parts in repairs, officials said. Costs for
wrapping vehicles with town
logos, for example, would be
about $200, down from the
$1,300 typically charged by outside firms, said Arthur Abbate,
town director of labor relations
and personnel.
Abbate noted that he spoke
newsday.com
AP / YORGOS KARAHALIS
NOW ON NEWSDAY.COM
For students in Oakdale, the
method of learning could transition from textbooks to Town
Hall.
Islip Town and Eastern Suffolk BOCES officials said they
are partnering to create an internship program that will give
Eastern Long Island Academy
of Applied Technology students on-the-job training.
Students at the Edward J. Milliken Technical Center in Oakdale will use the trades they are
already learning, such as auto
body and repair, officials said.
The 11th- and 12th-graders
could work in the field at the
town’s highway yards or shadow
Islip employees. Students staying on campus could repair municipal cars and boats.
“It’s such a natural fit of what
we’re teaching and what they
need in the town,” principal
Thomas McGrath said.
The terms of the internship
deal are still being determined, including the number
of students participating and
their exact roles. The program
rolled out Thursday, when officials dropped off an older
town vehicle in Oakdale to
have students repair it.
The deal creates the town’s
only formalized internship program, officials said. About five
or six college students interned
for the town in 2018, mainly
performing clerical work.
The program would also be
the academy’s largest partnering
with a town, school officials said.
Students mainly work with businesses and have previously
partnered with Brookhaven
and Riverhead towns.
The internships could get
students interested in government work and create a pipeline for employment while allowing them to test out future
careers, Islip officials said.
JESSICA ROTKIEWICZ
rachelle.blidner@newsday.com
More on next page
“Pizza,” “LIRR,”
“Lindsay Lohan”:
Check out trigger words
sure to get
LIers talking at
newsday.com/
triggerwords
A17
OUR TOWNS
A18
AroundLI
G RE E N P O R T
NEWSDAY, MONDAY, JANUARY 7, 2019
newsday.com
Greenport Village Trustee
Doug Roberts said he will not
seek a second term on the
board.
Roberts, 43, who was elected
in March 2015 to a four-year
term, said Tuesday he decided
not to run again so he can
focus on his family and expanding his two education-related
businesses.
“I’ve been on the road a lot
this past year, and I probably
missed more meetings than I
should have,” Roberts said. “If I
were to [be on the board]
again, I would want that to be
infrequent, if at all.”
Roberts said he was proud to
have worked on several initiatives, including requiring
short-term rental permits,
increasing the number of village documents accessible
online, and a 2017 resolution
the board adopted declaring
Greenport a “welcoming community.”
Roberts’ seat will be one of
three board positions on the
ballot during the village’s
March 19 election, along with
Greenport Mayor George
Hubbard and Village Trustee
and Deputy Mayor Jack
Martilotta.
Hubbard said that, while he
had disagreed with Roberts on
some issues, he was glad to
have worked with him.
“We butted heads a few
times here or there, but we all
worked together for the betterment of the village,” Hubbard
said.
— JEAN-PAUL SALAMANCA
B RO O KH AV E N
T OW N
Former Mayor Trotta
named to IDA board
Former Bellport mayor
Frank Trotta has been named
to join the board of the
Brookhaven Town Industrial
Development Agency.
Trotta, a magazine publisher
and principal in a familyowned real estate management
company, is to replace developer Mike Kelly, who has
resigned from the board, the
IDA announced in a news
release. Trotta also is vice
chairman of the Suffolk Federal
Credit Union.
MICHAEL OWENS
3 village board jobs
up for grabs in March
Police lineup
ready to roll
Trotta previously served as
chairman of the Brookhaven
Town Board of Zoning Appeals, director of the Suffolk
County Office for the Aging,
and Suffolk County Community College trustee. He was
Bellport mayor for 28 years.
He is the publisher of 50
Plus Life Styles and Fire News,
and serves as chaplain of the
Bellport Fire Department.
The IDA board considers
applications for economic
incentive packages, including
tax breaks and other assistance, from developers planning to build in the town.
— CARL MACGOWAN
I SLI P T OWN
Black History Month
nominations sought
Islip Town officials are
seeking nominations for the
town’s Black History Month
celebration in February.
Officials said they are looking for people who live or
work in the town and have
made “significant contribu-
GARDEN CITY. Some of Nassau’s finest gather, along with hundreds of other
motorcyclists, at the Cradle of Aviation Museum on Sunday for the 16th
Annual WBAB Cold Finger Run to benefit Camp Adventure, a free summer
camp run on Shelter Island for kids with cancer and their siblings.
tions to the community.”
Honorees will be celebrated
at the Feb. 12 town board meeting.
Nominations are due Jan. 16.
Applications can be found at
townofislip-ny.gov, and they
should be emailed to
specialevents@islipny.gov with
a short biography, resumé and
letters of recommendation.
Call 631-595-3500 for more
information. — RACHELLE BLIDNER
GRE AT NECK
PL A ZA
Streetlight contract
awarded; election set
Trustees in Great Neck Plaza
on Wednesday unanimously
approved a three-year streetlight maintenance contract
with Locust Valley-based
Ankers Electric Service.
The $101,815 contract means
the company will perform
maintenance on all village
streetlights from Feb. 1 to Jan.
31, 2022. Ankers won the contract over Queens-based Wels-
bach Electric, which submitted
a $141,552 bid, said Michael
Sweeney, the village’s public
services commissioner.
Sweeney said the village has
contracted with Ankers for
more than nine years and has
been happy with the service.
Trustees approved the contract during their monthly
meeting. Also, trustees approved plans to hold village
elections from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.
March 19 at village hall,
2 Gussack Plaza.
— KHRISTOPHER J. BROOKS
LONG BEAC H
Settlements OKd in
two bicycle accidents
Long Beach City Council
members voted last month to
pay $205,000 in settlements to
two people who were injured
after crashing their bicycles on
city streets.
Council members approved
a $125,000 settlement and an
$80,000 settlement in cases
from 2012 and 2015 during the
Dec. 18 meeting.
The city approved a $125,000
settlement, paid in $33,000
installments to Margaret E.
Trela, who officials said
crashed her bike in a pothole
filled with gravel and sand on
a sidewalk on New York Avenue. Trela made a settlement
demand of $425,000, leading to
an August mediation settlement in which the city agreed
to pay down $125,000 in installments for the next four years
to cover injuries and attorney
fees.
The city also approved an
$80,000 settlement paid to Ben
Lewak, who city officials said
swerved his bike on Park Avenue when he struck a pothole
and crashed, fracturing his
femur. City officials said he
demanded an $800,000 settlement, and a Nassau Supreme
Court recommended a
$425,000 settlement.
Long Beach officials proceeded to trial, where a judge
found the city to be 30 percent
at fault in the crash. The city
agreed to an $80,000 settlement following the trial.
— JOHN ASBURY
OUR TOWNS
OYSTER BAY TOWN
Settled suit to allow
cell tower changes
BY TED PHILLIPS
ted.phillips@newsday.com
Oyster Bay will not require Crown
Castle NG East LLC to obtain permits or
approval for modification or installation
of six cell phone repeaters on the Nassau County right of way within the town
under a settlement in federal court.
The Texas-based company sued the
town in September in U.S. Eastern District Court alleging the town had effectively restricted the modification of five
existing repeaters, known as distributed
antennas system nodes, and the installation of one new node by failing to respond to letters from the company sent
earlier in the year.
The company sent letters to the town
in March and April requesting that the
town either acknowledge that no town
permits or approvals were required to
modify five nodes and install one new
node because they were on the county
right of way, or to begin the approval
process, according to court filings. Neither the town nor its attorneys gave the
company an answer, effectively denying
Crown Castle’s application, the company alleged.
Under the settlement, which was filed
with the court Jan. 2, the town agreed it
would not require permits or approvals
for nodes at specific locations on Cold
Spring Road in Syosset, Central Avenue
in Farmingdale, and Woodbury Road
and Plainview Road in Woodbury.
Oyster Bay spokesman Brian Nevin
said in an email that the land in question
was Nassau County property and “not
under the jurisdiction of the town.”
Crown Castle’s attorney, Robert Gaudioso of Tarrytown-based Snyder & Snyder LLP, said in an email that the company was pleased that “the town acknowledged that it was not entitled to
regulate the placement of wireless
equipment in the county right of way.”
The lawsuit is separate from another
filed in 2017 in federal court by Crown
Castle NG East against Oyster Bay over
restrictions on the placement of cell
phone repeaters on the town’s right of
way. That lawsuit is ongoing.
LINDENHURST
4.6% tax increase proposed
BY DENISE M. BONILLA
denise.bonilla@newsday.com
ADVERTISEMENT
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Bone On Bone?
A19
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newsday.com
Lindenhurst officials are proposing a
4.6 percent tax increase for the new village budget, piercing the tax cap.
The 2019 to 2020 proposed budget
of $14,347,985 is a 6.4 percent increase
over last year’s budget of $13,488,025.
The tax rate would increase from
$18.15 per $100 of assessed value to
$18.99, a 4.6 percent increase. A singlefamily home with an average assessed
value of $4,000 would see a tax increase of about $34.
The village is also proposing a $13 increase in the sanitation fee for a singlefamily house, from $215 to $228. In total,
this would raise all village taxes and
charges by nearly $47 or, 4.9 percent.
The largest line item increase is for
principle and interest on capital leases,
which rises 472 percent from $44,965 to
$257,400. Mayor Mike Lavorata attributed the jump to the village’s new approach with heavy equipment, choosing
to lease for several years and then buy
for $1 rather than outright purchasing.
“It’s much cheaper in the long run,”
he said.
The second largest chunk of increased expenses comes from the fire
department, whose budget would increase by $180,390. The largest part of
this is $102,890 in salaries, which
Lavorata said was due to the hiring of
Advanced Life Support EMTs. The department also has allocated $25,000 as
part of the James Zadroga 9/11 Health
and Compensation Act.
Contractual salaries across departments, as well as the costs of hiring additional part-time code enforcement officers for the weekends, make up the next
largest expense, followed by medical insurance, which rises $94,880 in the proposed budget.
Lavorata said the village had appropriated $190,000 in surplus funds for last
year’s budget but never touched it, so
the village will be using that money this
year. Without this money, he said, the
tax increase would have been 1 to 2 percent higher.
Lavorata said he knows the tax increase may be difficult for some residents, but that poor planning from the
1970s to the 1990s led to some of the expenses the village faces today.
“Thirty years later and I’ve got infrastructure issues, I’ve got fire department equipment that needs to be replaced,” he said. “This year I think we’ll
put ourselves in a really good position
for the future.”
A public hearing on the proposed budget will be held Tuesday at 7:30 p.m. at
Village Hall, 430 S. Wellwood Ave.
ADVERTISEMENT
A20
DEBBY KRENEK Publisher
NEWS
OPINION
“Where there is no vision, the people perish.”
DEBORAH HENLEY Editor, VP
RICHARD ROSEN Managing Editor
EDITORIALS
OPINION
RITA CIOLLI Editor of the Editorial Pages
ELI REYES Deputy Editor
MATT DAVIES
Gov.’s muscle is
needed earlier
Plea deals can counteract
efforts to stop bad drivers
NEWSDAY, MONDAY, JANUARY 7, 2019
newsday.com
L
ong Island’s roads can be dangerous and infuriating. They also
can be very expensive, and for some drivers, a big part of that
cost is traffic tickets. But are those tickets really about making
the roads safer, or just easing the finances of villages, towns and counties that issue them? The answer is both.
There clearly are municipalities that have turned tickets into big revenue sources, and both Suffolk and Nassau counties need the money
they collect from traffic citations, as do some towns and villages. A recent Newsday report estimated that $146 million in traffic court fines
and fees were collected on Long Island in 2017.
But just imagine how many people would drive more recklessly if the inconvenience and cost of such tickets did not hang over their heads.
Red-light camera tickets are levied on vehicle owners regardless of who
is driving, and don’t include points. But the way many municipalities
sometimes handle other tickets — letting people plead guilty to lesser
charges and pay big fines without getting points on their licenses — deceives the state and insurance companies, and protects dangerous drivers.
If you get 11 points or have three speeding convictions in an 18-month period, your driver’s license is normally suspended. And drivers who get
points see insurance rates go up to reflect that they are higher risks.
But when motorists plead to lesser charges, it means no trials. It also
means the state is denied the surcharges it gets for more serious violations, often nearly $100 per offense.
Tickets are not strictly a money grab; they also help keep our streets
safe. But plea deals that induce drivers to pay up and let municipalities
keep all the money while denying the state and insurance companies information about dangerous drivers? They’re just money grabs, and dangerous ones at that.
— The editorial board
NEWSDAY/MATT DAVIES
G
ov. Andrew M. Cuomo’s sudden interest in avoiding a 15-month
shutdown of New York City’s L subway shows what can happen
when he takes charge of what he called a “highly impactful” issue.
Cuomo says all it took was a conversation with a Brooklyn resident
about the L train during last year’s gubernatorial race. In December, he
called experts and went on subway tunnel tours. Three weeks later, he
upended repair plans three years in the making.
We hope his new plan works, but concerns remain. Still, Cuomo’s
leadership and new thinking both outside and inside the Metropolitan
Transportation Authority are welcome and illustrate what’s possible
for the region’s transit system, its problems and its projects.
Cuomo talked Friday of utilizing the thinking and technology of Elon
Musk’s electric-car company, Tesla, to modernize subway signals and
cars. That’s worth a look for the subways and the commuter rails,
though it’s likely easier said than done. And there are other areas ripe
for a larger imagination. For instance, are there outside-the-box ways
to finish the mammoth East Side Access effort to connect the Long Island Rail Road to Grand Central Terminal sooner and less expensively?
Are there new ideas for tackling the leaf residue that affects LIRR
tracks and trains each fall, or for electrifying the branches that run on
diesel, or for bringing full-time service to Belmont Park?
Perhaps, but Cuomo should take a leadership role on big MTA efforts at the start, doing the hard work of collaborating with communities, experts and local officials, rather than swooping in at the end.
And in every case, think differently — but make sure it’s done right.
— The editorial board
\ See more Matt Davies cartoons: newsday.com/matt
LETTERS
Longevity article
lacked explanation
As a statistics maven, I
read Newsday’s Dec. 30
front-page story, “Life expectancy on Long Island,”
with interest.
While most of the article
goes on about commonly
known nongeographical factors that might affect
longevity
(employment,
health, income, etc.), the notion of “where you are from”
was never clearly defined.
Lots of data were given
about longevity in different
locales.
So, if I live 98 years in Montauk, and move to Glen Head
and die there at age 99, does
your data record my death as
a Glen Head or Montauk resident?
If I was born in New York
City and spend 99.9 percent
of my life in Kings Park, and
move back to New York City
and die there after one year,
what is my residency for the
article’s purpose? And if I
spend 50 percent of my life
east of the Meadowbrook
Parkway, and 50 percent
west of the Meadowbrook,
what am I considered? Without the definition, the statistics are impossible to interpret.
Robert Gerver,
Kings Park
Editor’s note: The writer
is a retired high school math
teacher and textbook author.
I found your article about
life expectancy on Long Island to be informative. It was
intriguing to read that there
are vast differences in neighborhoods and life expectancy. I was just wondering at my age of 77, would it
help if I moved?
Martin Blumberg,
Melville
Thank you for the article
detailing where I might live
to shorten my life. Despite
living a thrifty life of debt
aversion while staying well
within my means, it has become apparent that I cannot
afford to live more than 7.5
years beyond retirement. I
look forward to spending my
remaining years in a community where I can peacefully
die before I am taxed into
starvation.
Ann Rita Darcy,
Huntington Station
Ferry service taking
far too long
There is more to “Avoiding
the penalty box” [News, Dec.
31], concerning Glen Cove
missing a deadline to begin
regular ferry service to Manhattan — and risking an
order to repay the Federal
Highway
Administration
$16.6 million in grants.
This money was approved
in 2003 to build a ferry terminal. Glen Cove’s waiting
OPINION
A21
Latest student performance report
glosses over deep district challenges
I
Questions continue about performance of Hempstead schools.
until 2020 is a clear example of
waste, fraud and abuse of federal tax dollars.
Why would local residents
pay a premium fare estimated
to be $45 or more? This would
be significantly higher than
what the Long Island Rail Road
charges for a trip into Manhattan, including a subway transfer.
Previous attempts of private
ferry operators failed because
of insufficient ridership. Any
private operator who bids on
providing service starting in
2020 will be looking for millions in subsidies.
Larry Penner,
Great Neck
Editor’s note: The writer is
a transportation historian.
ter. Another way is to threaten
teachers that unless grades go
up and more students “pass,” a
school could be reorganized
and its jobs placed at risk. Neither of these options improves
student learning. Bierwirth’s report touted the district’s efforts
to have student data “cleaned
up,” but conceded that there
continue to be “significant
problems” with “accuracy and
completeness of student data,
which affected reports to the
State.”
Northport vineyard
has fans, too
Pet store regulations
are needed
A neighbor of the new Del
Vino Vineyards in Northport
wrote that he is upset with the
change in his neighborhood
[“New vineyard angers neighbors,” Letters, Dec. 30].
People resist change, but a vacant, overgrown lot with a deteriorating building facing Norwood Avenue has been replaced by an aesthetically pleasing building and acres of vines.
There is no parking allowed on
Norwood Avenue near the vineyard; the vineyard provides
valet parking.
The vineyard is an asset appreciated by many locals. The letter
writer might want to get to know
Del Vino owner Frederick Giachetti better. I’ve visited Del
Vino a few times since it opened,
and he was always gracious. Try
to enjoy this new asset to our
town, as many of us do.
Frank Wade,
Northport
Regarding the Dec. 19 news
story “Push to regulate Suffolk
pet stores,” I have no sympathy
for pet store owners who claim
that the legislation would overregulate their industry.
According to the Humane Society of the United States, responsible breeders don’t sell
puppies to pet stores because
they want to meet their puppy
buyers in person. The organization says federal inspectors
have found breeders keeping
dogs in deplorable conditions,
housed in wire cages with little
or no medical care, heat or
other necessities. In addition,
the society says the majority of
national breeder clubs’ codes
of ethics prohibit or discourage
members from selling dogs to
pet stores.
The owners of puppy mills
care only about profits, not the
care of the bodies or souls of
these beautiful animals. Adopt
Alan J. Singer is a
professor of
teaching, learning
and technology and
the director of the
social studies
education program at Hofstra
University.
a pet from a shelter or rescue
group.
Jenna Kern-Rugile,
East Northport
The eternal wish of
LIRR riders
Thanks for the blast from the
past — the reprint of your Jan.
1, 1944, edition delivered to subscribers who requested it.
I couldn’t help but notice
that the cartoon on the editorial page was titled “Wouldn’t it
be nice for Christmas?” — and
the wish was for “Improved
LIRR service.”
I guess that proves the adage
“The more things change, the
more they remain the same.” I
just didn’t know whether to
laugh or cry.
Doug Heimowitz,
Jericho
SEND MAIL to letters@newsday.com.
Letters become the property of
Newsday. They will be edited and
may be republished in all media.
NEWSDAY, MONDAY, JANUARY 7, 2019
A ferry arrives at the Glen Cove terminal in July 2017, when limited
service was provided during major track work at Penn Station.
11 targets. How did this miracle
happen? Taylor Raynor, the
newly elected assemblywoman
for the district, is suspicious
about the reported improvement. According to Raynor,
“There have been reports of
fudging numbers and reporting
inaccurate data, and that is
what we would use to determine and track progress.”
One way to quickly “improve” a school’s performance
is to find ways to clear failing
students off your school’s regis-
According to his report,
areas of progress that factored
into the 83 percent grade included “moving to implement”
international baccalaureate programs and offering more Advanced Placement courses in
the high school. Unfortunately,
moving to implement does not
mean a program is in place, and
registering more students in
AP courses does not mean they
can do the work.
Districts are supposed to review the performance of
schools that scored less than 67
percent on their targets. If they
don’t score higher in the
2018-19 school year, those
schools will go back on the notmaking-demonstrable-improvement list. But because Hempstead middle and high schools
scored 83 percent, they will not
be subject to such stringent review.
Shame on the New York
State Education Department.
newsday.com
STEVE PFOST
n his year-end review of
Hempstead schools last
month, Jack Bierwirth, the
district’s state-appointed special adviser, somehow declared
that the district had made “substantial progress” while he acknowledged that it continues to
have inconsistent governance,
poor academic performance
and accounting irregularities.
New York State rates Hempstead High School as “persistently struggling,” and it rates
the Alverta B. Gray Schultz
Middle School as “struggling.”
However, based on Bierwirth’s
review, both schools were credited with having made “demonstrable improvement.” This designation moved them further
from a possible state takeover,
essentially abandoning students to more years of substandard education.
What exactly does “demonstrable improvement” mean? At
the middle school, only 16 percent of seventh-graders and 22
percent of eighth-graders read
at proficiency level. And 14 per-
cent of seventh-graders and 1
percent of eighth-graders
achieved proficiency in math.
At the high school, 44 percent
of the students passed the English Regents exam, 37 percent
passed algebra, 26 percent
passed geometry, 29 percent
passed earth science and 39 percent passed U.S. history.
State education law mandates that “demonstrable improvement” decisions be based
primarily on whether schools
achieved their “progress targets” using their own indicators. The lower the “progress
targets,” the easier it is to
achieve them and get off the list
of schools threatened with receivership. Since the state desperately does not want to take
over schools, 49 out of 52 troubled schools, including Hempstead’s middle and high
schools, were deemed to have
made “demonstrable improvement” in the 2017-18 school
year.
Hempstead schools somehow scored an 83 percent
“demonstrable improvement”
rating, hitting nine of their own
BARRY SLOAN
BY ALAN J. SINGER
OPINION
Make-believe at Hempstead schools
NYC
A22
Worries over
L train change
vin.barone@amny.com
They were on the front lines
defending the MTA’s L train
shutdown to the public. Now
some elected officials say they
feel spurned and are left
scratching their heads.
Skeptical politicians from
Manhattan and Brooklyn are calling for more transparency, oversight and the continued pursuit
of alternative transit options
after Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s surprise announcement last week
that — after nearly three years of
planning — the 15-month shutdown of L service to and through
Manhattan was not necessary to
rehabilitate the Sandy-damaged
Canarsie tunnel.
After a briefing on the developments last week from the
MTA, Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams said he was
left with “more questions than
answers” on the new strategy
— a sentiment expressed by
several elected officials at a
news conference outside the
Lorimer Street subway station
on Sunday.
“This can’t be just simply a
PowerPoint [with] a few graphs
and numbers on the screen,”
said Adams, criticizing the roll-
out of Cuomo’s proposal. “We
need real communications.”
Last month, Cuomo took a
team of engineers under the East
River to re-examine the Canarsie
tunnel. In just three weeks the
team crafted an alternative rehabilitation plan that would require extensive service disruptions on nights and weekends
but would avoid the full service
shutdown that was scheduled to
begin on April 27.
Instead of completely reconstructing the tunnel’s innards,
the MTA is now seeking to
more simply relocate the line’s
power and communications,
“racking” them on shelves in
the tunnel, and deploy a Fiberglass polymer — untested in
train tunnels — to try to fortify
what’s known as the concrete
“bench walls” within.
The governor has called on
the MTA to hold an emergency
board meeting to vote on
whether to pursue the alternate
option. It’s not yet clear when
or if that meeting will happen
before the board’s regular
monthly meeting scheduled for
the end of January. Andrew Albert, a nonvoting member of
the board, said he hadn’t heard
of any plans yet for an emergency meeting.
“I’ve spoken to a few of my
colleagues and everyone has
questions,” Albert said. “Tough
questions.”
But before that happens,
elected officials say they want
details regarding whether the
new method is anything more
than a patch job. They’ve also
requested more public hearings
in addition to the four hearings
the MTA already has promised.
The same officials demand
more information on what will
come of the new alternative
subway service, bus routes, ferries, bike and pedestrian infrastructure that was to be put in
place for the 15-month shutdown — ideas that still have
support from transportation advocates.
Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer said Sunday
the federal government must
delegate an “outside validator”
to decide whether Cuomo’s alternative is legitimate. She also
backed the city’s plan to administer a bus-only “busway”
across most of 14th Street
under which the L runs.
“I like the idea, personally, because I want to see more alternative modes of transportation,
but it has to be discussed,”
Brewer said.
As the head of the city’s Taxi
and Limousine Commission
steps down, professional driver
advocates say officials should be
looking for a new commissioner
with a background in economics
and a focus on policy.
“There’s a serious economic
crisis in this industry, and [the
next chairperson] needs to be interested in policy, not just politics, and care for the workers at
the end of the day,” said Bhiaravi
Desai, the executive director of
the New York Taxi Workers Alliance, which represents 20,000
of the city’s drivers.
The head of the city’s TLC,
Meera Joshi, will step down from
her post in March, the de Blasio
administration announced over
the weekend.
AP / BEBETO MATTHEWS
NEWSDAY, MONDAY, JANUARY 7, 2019
newsday.com
TLC commissioner to step down
Meera Joshi has clashed with
de Blasio. She departs in March.
Joshi, whose policy positions
clashed with the mayor’s, has
headed the department since
2014 and oversaw a tumultuous
period for the driving industry,
as Uber and Lyft flooded the mar-
ket and upended long-held practices of the ride-hailing industry.
In a statement, Joshi said she
left the TLC with “increased accountability, safety, access, modernized taxi regulation, protected drivers and increased
consumer protections.”
Joshi oversaw the department as New York became the
first major city to temporarily
cap the number of e-hail vehicles, and more recently spearheaded first minimum wage for
e-hail drivers.
She also grappled, however,
with a tragic series of driver suicides as e-hails multiplied, decreasing the value of taxi medallions and rattling the economics of the industry.
— VINCENT BARONE
MICHAEL OWENS
BY VINCENT BARONE
NOW Orchard
Beach pavilion
opened in 1936 and
was landmarked by
the city in 2006. So
far, $75 million has
been earmarked for
its restoration.
Plan for
Orchard Beach pavilion re-imagined
as a grand destination and venue
BY LISA L. COLANGELO
lisa.colangelo@amny.com
Orchard Beach is ready to
reclaim its title as the Bronx
Riviera.
The once-grand pavilion,
with its towering colonnades
and vibrant blue tile, is a
beloved relic of a different
time. But in recent years the
deteriorating structure has
been mostly shuttered and
fenced off from the public.
An ambitious, multimilliondollar renovation is designed
to bring the structure back to
life and re-imagine it as a modern-day destination.
“Orchard Beach was everything for someone like me,”
said Bronx Borough President
Ruben Diaz Jr., who has spearheaded the latest effort to refurbish the site and has strong ties
to the crescent-shaped slice of
sand on the Long Island Sound.
“Other than going to Puerto
Rico, we didn’t have the means
to go on vacation.”
Diaz recalled lugging picnic
provisions to the beach for
long family outings. And
learning to drive in the massive Orchard Beach parking
lot was a rite of passage for
Bronx teens, he said.
He has helped cobble to-
NYC
A23
OPEN LETTER TO
NEW YORKERS
FROM AMAZON
BY SHAYE WEAVER
NYC PARKS
shaye.weaver@amny.com
‘Bronx Riviera’
principles.”
“Moses was always interested in quality, not shoddy
stuff,” said Bronx historian
Lloyd Ultan. “They were elegant bathhouses.”
Orchard Beach opened to
the public in 1936. “It was during the opening ceremony that
Bronx Chamber of Commerce
President George Mand declared Orchard Beach ‘The Riviera of the Bronx,’” Ultan said.
Despite being wildly popular, the pavilion and promenade — reportedly one of
Moses’ favorite projects — fell
into decline.
Iris Rodriguez-Rosa, the city
Parks Department’s Bronx commissioner, said she has been
heartened by Diaz’s passion for
the project. She emphasized the
need for the community input.
“I’m very nostalgic,” said Rodriguez-Rosa. “I look at these
old photos of Orchard Beach
and think about an era when
people would come to the
beach all dressed up . . . but
things
change,
cultures
change. We have to try to keep
up with the times.”
Diaz said he hopes fellow lawmakers will find more funds for
much-needed infrastructure improvements on the boardwalk, a
new soccer field, revamped basketball courts and other enhancements to the Orchard
Beach area.
“Think of a ferry stop where
somebody from Coney Island
or Long Island City can come,”
he said. “This is a way for us to
be able to invite people and
connect New Yorkers to see
our Bronx Riviera.”
NEWSDAY, MONDAY, JANUARY 7, 2019
an event on the top tier and
have shops and vendors on the
bottom tier,” Diaz said. “Imagine all of this enclosed in glass
so it can be open year-round.”
Diaz also thinks the adjacent
South Yard area could be a perfect place for Latin jazz concerts and ceremonies.
Orchard Beach was the vision of former city Parks Commissioner Robert Moses, who
created the sunbathers’ haven
in Pelham Bay Park with sand
from the Queens and New Jersey shorelines in the 1930s. It
is the only man-made beach in
the city.
The city’s Landmarks Preservation Commission landmarked the pavilion and promenade in 2006, highlighting its
modern classical style, which
was “influenced by beaux-arts
newsday.com
gether about $75 million from
his office’s budget and from
funds controlled by Mayor Bill
de Blasio, Gov. Andrew
Cuomo, the state Assembly
and the City Council.
That money will go toward
fixing the pavilion, upgrading
the electrical system, opening a
new bathroom and elevator and
adding ramps for easier access
to the beach and promenade.
The project is currently in the
preliminary design phase.
Last month, the city invited
the community to weigh in on
what they would like to see in
the pavilion. Ideas that emerged
involved including a cocktail
and wine bar, concert and dance
floor, community space, retail
and an art gallery.
“I would love to go there
and eat at a restaurant, go to
MICHAEL OWENS
1937 The pavilion and promenade were wildly popular.
In a bid to tackle its opposition, Amazon released an open
letter to New Yorkers on Saturday, listing the benefits of building its massive headquarters in
Long Island City.
In the letter, which was
printed as an advertisement in
the New York Post and the
Daily News, the online retailer
described itself as “your future
neighbors at Amazon” and said
the announcement of the headquarters was the start of “what
we hope will be a long and mutually beneficial partnership between New Yorkers and Amazon.”
The letter runs down what it
says are the “details of the investment,” such as 25,000 new jobs
over 10 years; career training for
locals; some $27 billion in additional tax revenue over the next
25 years, according to the government’s estimates; and, helping
small businesses thrive.
The letter says more than half
the items sold in the Amazon
store are from small and
medium-sized businesses and
that its Web Services branch
helps launch startups. Plus, thousands of new employees will patronize local businesses once the
headquarters opens, they said.
Amazon signs off by promising to partner, listen, learn and
work with New Yorkers going
forward.
The Seattle-based tech giant
announced in November that it
cut a deal with Gov. Andrew M.
Cuomo and Mayor Bill de Blasio
to bring its $2.5 billion, 4 millionsquare-foot campus to Long Island City, but it was quickly met
with protests from locals.
Depending on how many jobs
it creates, the company is set to
receive at least $2.8 billion in incentives from the state and city,
including a Relocation and Employment Assistance Program.
While Long Island City was
chosen, in part, because of its
access to eight subway lines, 13
bus lines, Citi Bike service and
an NYC Ferry landing as well
as its proximity to Kennedy
and LaGuardia airports, locals
are concerned about additional
stress on the subway system,
which is already in need of infrastructure improvements.
HEALTH & SCIENCE
A24
Phone apps may soon monitor teen angst
Rising suicide rates and depression in U.S. teens and
young adults have prompted researchers to ask a provocative
question: Could the same devices that some people blame
for contributing to tech-age
angst also be used to detect it?
The idea has sparked a race
to develop apps that warn of impending mental health crises.
Call it smartphone psychiatry
or child psychology 2.0.
Studies have linked heavy
smartphone use with worsening teen mental health. But as
teens scroll through Instagram
and Snapchat, tap out texts or
watch YouTube videos, they
also leave digital footprints that
might offer clues to their psychological well-being.
Changes in typing speed,
voice tone, word choice and
how often kids stay home could
signal trouble, according to preliminary studies.
There might be as many as
1,000 smartphone “biomarkers”
AP / HAVEN DALEY
The Associated Press
App developers say teens using
smartphones leave digital
footprints that may offer clues
to their psyches.
for depression, said Dr. Thomas
Insel, former head of the National Institute of Mental Health
and now a leader in the smartphone psychiatry movement.
Researchers are testing experimental apps that use artificial intelligence to try to predict depression episodes or potential self-harm.
“We are tracking the equivalent of a heartbeat for the
human brain,” said Dr. Alex
Leow, an app developer and associate professor of psychiatry and
bioengineering at the University
of Illinois’ Chicago campus.
At least, that’s the goal.
There are technical and ethical
kinks to work out — including
privacy issues and making sure
kids grant permission to be
monitored so closely. Developers say proven, commercially
available mood-detecting apps
are likely to be years — but not
decades — away.
“People often feel that these
things are creepy,” because of
the tech industry’s surreptitious tracking of online habits
for commercial purposes, said
University of Oregon psychologist Nick Allen.
Using smartphones as mental
illness detectors would require
informed consent from users to
install an app, “and they could
withdraw permission at any
time,” said Allen, one of the creators of an app that is being
tested on young people who
have attempted suicide.
“The biggest hurdle at the
moment,” Allen said, “is to
learn about what’s the signal
and what’s the noise — what is
in this enormous amount of
data that people accumulate on
their phones that is indicative
of a mental health crisis.”
Depression affects about 3
million U.S. teens, and rates
have climbed in the past
decade. Thirteen percent of 12to 17-year-olds had depression
in 2017, up from 8 percent in
2010, U.S. government data
show. One in 10 college-aged
Americans is affected.
Suicide has risen to the second leading cause of death for
ages 10 to 34. Rates among teen
girls doubled from 2007 to 2015,
climbing to 5 per 100,000. And
among boys, rates jumped 30
percent, to 14 in 100,000.
A recent study suggested a
parallel rise in smartphone use
was likely to have contributed.
People with mental illness
typically get treatment “when
they’re in crisis and very late in
the course of an illness. We
want to have a method to identify the earliest signs,” in an objective way, Insel said.
If smartphones prove to be
accurate mood predictors, developers say the ultimate goal
would be to use them to offer
real-time help, perhaps with automated text messages and
links to help lines, or digital
alerts to parents, doctors or
first responders.
Facebook is already doing
just that with what it calls
“proactive detection.” After a
livestreamed suicide, Facebook
trained its AI systems to flag
certain words or phrases in online posts that could indicate
imminent self-harm. Friends’
comments expressing concern
about the user’s well-being are
part of the equation.
“In the last year, we’ve
helped first responders quickly
reach around 3,500 people globally who needed help,” Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg announced in November. Facebook has not disclosed outcomes of those cases.
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LI BUSINESS
A25
LI BUSINESS
BIZfact
$54,070
Median annual wage
of Long Island’s 830
health technologists
and technicians
Source: State Labor
Department
Carsby
New to Long Island:
monthly services that aim
to compete with sales and leases
SUBSCRIPTION
BY TED STARKEY
Special to Newsday
Monthly subscription services for cars, one of which allows users to swap vehicles as
often as they like, have arrived
on Long Island.
The services compete directly with traditional buying
and leasing.
Volvo is the only current auto
manufacturer with nationwide
subscriptions, having begun service in New York State in the
last few weeks by offering new
vehicles for use. In addition,
Fair, a California-based company that lets subscribers select
from the used-car inventory at
local dealers, arrived on Long Island a few months ago.
“The idea that we have to sign
up for long-term commitments
for anything is sort of becoming
obsolete,” said Scott Painter,
founder and CEO of Fair.
Once a user selects a vehicle,
Fair buys it and charges the subscriber an upfront “start fee”
and then a monthly fee for the
vehicle’s use, maintenance plan
and roadside assistance; insurance can be included for an
extra fee. The user can return
the vehicle at any time, either selecting a new one (and paying a
new start fee) or canceling the
subscription altogether.
When a customer turns in a
vehicle, Fair resells it at auction, a Fair spokesperson said.
A recent check of Fair’s listings found Long Island deals
ranging from $145 a month for a
2013 Honda Fit Sport (with a
$580 start fee) to $1,340 a month
for a 2017 Land Rover SVR
(with a $5,360 start fee).
Volvo has taken a different
approach in its program,
called Care by Volvo, which basically resembles a one-year
lease plan. Rather than offer
all of its models, Volvo instead
offers only subscriptions for
its S60 sedan and XC40 SUV,
and users may change their vehicle after 12 months.
“We found customers in the
buying process . . . found
their options overwhelming,”
said Jim Nichols, Volvo’s product and technology communications manager. “We said OK,
we’re going to take two cars,
we’re going to spec them out
the way the average customer
specs them out, and we’re
going to boil everything down
so then all you have to do is
choose the interior color and
exterior color, and that’s basically it for one flat rate.”
The monthly payment — $750
for the S60 or $700 for the XC40
— gives subscribers the use of
the car, maintenance, tires, windshield wipers, and insurance
through Liberty Mutual.
OPTIONS ON LI
Fair
\ Cars: Used, all makes
\ Swap: As often as you like,
with start fee
\ Monthly fees: $145 and up
\ Includes: Maintenance,
roadside assistance
Care by Volvo
\ Cars: New, Volvo S60 or
XC40
\ Swap: After 12 months
\ Monthly fees: $700-$750
\ Includes: Maintenance,
roadside assistance, insurance
Financial considerations
For comparison, if you
bought the S60 for its starting
list price of $35,800 and financed the full amount with a
60-month loan at 3.11 percent interest, your monthly payment
would be around $645. You’d be
getting equity in the vehicle, but
you’d also be paying separately
for maintenance and insurance.
While Volvo is going all in on
vehicle subscriptions, Patrick
Olsen of Consumer Reports
said most automakers are being
cautious in adopting the subscription model.
“Only Volvo is truly nationwide with their service; everyone else is trying them in test
markets,” he said. “It’s one
thing to spend $10 a month for
the latest in TV; it’s another
thing to spend $600 or more a
month on cars, and I think
they’re trying to see if it scales
up to that price level.”
Benefits for consumers
Olsen does see some benefits for consumers in the subscription model, especially
See CARS on A26
NEWSDAY, MONDAY, JANUARY 7, 2019
Get business
updates and sign up
for the daily business
newsletter.
newsday.com/biz
Volvo is offering the XC40 by subscription, with a $700 monthly fee that covers use of the SUV, maintenance and Liberty Mutual insurance.
newsday.com
Small-business hiring surged
at year-end, with payroll company ADP counting 89,000 new
jobs at its small-business customers.
That was up from a downwardly revised 38,000 in November.
December’s increase was the
biggest gain for small businesses in what was an erratic
year. Hiring was down to an average of 42,000 new jobs each
month of 2018 from the 2017
monthly average of 61,000.
Some of the dip was due to the
fact that businesses have struggled to find candidates for their
open positions. But owners have
also been cautious about hiring,
holding back until they were sure
they had enough new revenue to
justify the added cost and risk.
Hiring was also robust last
month at companies of all
sizes, with 271,000 new jobs,
ADP reported.
And Labor Department figures released Friday showed all
U.S. employers dramatically
stepped up their hiring in December, adding 312,000 jobs.
It was an encouraging display
of strength for an economy in
the midst of a trade war, slowing
global growth and a partial shutdown of the federal government.
Economists warned the robust
hiring may not continue.
“People should not get used to
numbers like the ones we saw
this month,” said Martha Gimbel, director of economic research at the jobs site Indeed.
“Eventually, job growth is going
to start slowing down. ” — AP
AP / MATT ROURKE
HIRING RISES AT
SMALL BUSINESSES
LI BUSINESS
LI BUSINESS
A26
Market volatility hits home
Small businesses
in the building field
see new caution
As the Dow Jones Industrial
Average seesaws and mostly
drops by hundreds of points a
day, Kathy Barnes sees the impact of the volatility on home
builders and general contractors in the St. Louis area.
Barnes, who helps these
small-business owners manage
their projects, says her clients
are worried that the bull market
that gave customers the confidence to do major work on their
homes is at an end. Builders are
investing in fewer properties,
and contractors are handling
smaller-scale renovations.
“People are holding back for
fear of the worst,” Barnes says.
Although the overall economy
and consumer spending have
been strong, some small-business owners, particularly those
who supply big-ticket items and
services like home remodeling,
are feeling the effects of volatility in stocks that has persisted
for much of this year. And some
small companies seeking investors are finding resistance,
even from people who just a few
months ago were willing to put
their money down.
NEWSDAY, MONDAY, JANUARY 7, 2019
newsday.com
Market gyrations for a year
On Friday the Dow rallied to
23,433.16 but was still down from
its record high of 26,828.39
reached Oct. 3, and the S&P 500
was at 2,531.94, down from its
peak at 2,930.75 on Sept. 20. But
the market gyrations started
about a year ago. Investors have
AP / JEFF ROBERSON
The Associated Press
Kathy Barnes of St. Louis says her builder and contractor clients are
worried, investing in fewer properties and handling smaller renovations.
been troubled by the prospect of
slower economic growth in 2019
and concerns including the impact of Trump administration
trade tariffs on U.S. companies.
Government reports on retail
sales and consumer spending
show few signs that consumers
are anxious, and while the Conference Board’s monthly Consumer Confidence Index fell a little over 2 points to 135.7 in November, it was still near its highest point in 18 years. But many
business owners remember the
devastating losses that stocks suffered in 2008 and their impact
on consumer spending.
When consumers start feeling
uneasy or less wealthy, they
forgo or postpone the big discretionary items on their budgets,
says Priya Raghubir, a marketing
professor at New York University’s Stern School of Business.
“Large expenses such as
home renovations, cars — all of
those could be put on hold,”
Raghubir says.
Barnes’ clients are buying
cheaper building materials because of homeowners’ smaller
budgets.
“I’ve seen a tremendous decline when it comes to discretionary items — cabinets, flooring, things that you have some
choice about,” Barnes says. She
also sees general contractors
handling more of the work
themselves instead of using subcontractors, a way to preserve
their profit margins.
Continuing volatility can
lead consumers to spend less
even if they don’t consciously
feel
anxious,
says
Burt
Flickinger, managing director
of Strategic Resource Group, a
consultancy in Manhattan. But
small businesses will notice.
“Even if someone’s a viable
and successful online retailer,
restaurant, salon or service company, their customer counts can
be cut by 25 percent or more
through no fault of their own,”
he says. Flickinger noted stock
market volatility in the past contributed to the collapse of plans
to build big retail projects.
Owners who recall uncertain
times in the market are looking
for signs that their companies
might be affected by current
fluctuations. Mark Ehrhardt,
who owns a moving company
in Brooklyn, says he starts to
see his business slow about six
months after the market becomes turbulent.
“Stock market volatility, and
[economic] downturns tend to
hit the ground level by causing
the general public to sit on
their hands before making
large financial decisions,” says
Ehrhardt, owner of Movers Not
Shakers. Ehrhardt, a stock broker before he went into moving, is prepared to step up his
networking with building managers, mortgage brokers and
title companies if requests
from homeowners start to slip.
The fallout Steve and Bea
Fisher are seeing comes in the
form of investor and supplier
anxiety. Bea Fisher plans to open
a hardware store in a rural part
of Nevada early in 2019. Most of
the people who were excited
about investing in the store a few
months ago have turned hesitant, not returning calls or texts
as they once did. And even an investor who came through last
week was also a little cautious,
asking Fisher, “what are you hearing from other people?”
It’s “not easy when potential
investors watch five or six figures of worth wiped from their
accounts in a single day. It does
affect the conversation. How do I
know? They tell me,” Fisher says.
Suppliers pressing
Fisher also sees a shift in suppliers’ attitudes. A few months
ago they reassured him that
“we’ll give you everything you
need,” but now they’re warning
he’ll need to pay up front.
Jeff Rizzo says he nervously
watches the stock market every
day. Rizzo, who co-owns The
Slumber Yard, the operator of
product review websites, says
“we are 100 percent at the
whim of consumer demand.”
“The more consumers shop,
the more they search for reviews. If consumer spending
dips, we will certainly feel it,”
says Rizzo, whose company is
based in Reno, Nevada.
This has him looking more
cautiously at 2019. The company, which has about 10 employees, is trying to expand.
RETAIL
ROUNDUP
Returns next week.
Read more
columns online.
newsday.com/retailroundup
New car subscription services offer option to buying or leasing
CARS from A25
those who like to get behind
the wheel of different models.
“You’re not committed to
one particular car for a minimum of three years or longer
. . . so it gives you a chance to
try out different cars,” he said.
“If you’re a heavy spender and
you’re trying the Porsche program or the BMW program,
you’re getting into some pretty
cool cars and you get a sense of
which attributes you like and
which one you’d like to stay in
longer or continue to play the
field.”
Volvo’s subscribers are about
10 years younger, on average,
than its traditional buyers,
Nichols said; 95 percent of subscribers are new to the brand.
Fair’s subscribers fall into
three
primary
categories,
Painter said: millennials, “early
adopters” of technology, and
those who drive for ride-hailing
services like Uber and Lyft.
Volvo and Fair declined to
put a reporter in touch with
any local subscribers.
Fair, which in December received $385 million in financing from SoftBank, said it has
20,000 subscribers in 26 cities
in 16 U.S. states since starting
subscriptions in 2017. Volvo
has met its first-year subscription projection in just four
months, according to Nichols,
who would not reveal the
number of subscribers.
Still, others are moving more
slowly on the subscription
model, as Cadillac’s program,
Book, is no longer taking new
subscribers after launching in
2017, while Mercedes-Benz Collection is still in pilot status in
Philadelphia and Nashville, according to a spokesman.
Trend or niche?
It’s impossible to predict if
subscriptions will become a
major way to get vehicles in
the future, or remain more of
a niche product, Olsen said.
“All these automakers are
putting their toe in the water
because they can’t see the bottom,” he said. “It could go either way; it could be a common thing that people do, or,
hey, we tried that, it just
wasn’t perfect for the type of
cars we were trying to sell or
the way we were trying to sell
them.”
LI BUSINESS
A27
SMALL
BUSINESS
Jamie Herzlich
jherzlich@aol.com
L
ate payments cost
small and mid-sized
businesses as much
as $3 trillion annually, according to Atlanta-based Sage.
That translates to one in 10 invoices not paid on time, so taking steps to correct this lag is a
good way for companies to
start the new year.
“Small businesses need to
focus on their accounts receivable, because late payments
can cripple their business,”
says Michelle Dunn of Plymouth, N.H., author of the “Ultimate Credit & Collections
Handbook”
(Entrepreneur
Press; $29.95).
Ripple effects
The ripple effects of late payments can include trouble paying staff and suppliers and de-
layed investment efforts, according Sage, which offers business management solutions
and automated billing software.
Proactive steps
To avoid such problems, businesses should be proactive in
trying to get paid.
One way to do that may be to
offer incentives like a discount
on early payments, Dunn says.
You can even send an annual
summary outlining how much
customers would have saved if
they had taken advantage of the
early-payer discount all year,
she says.
Offering multiple forms of payment also might help avoid tardiness, she says, such as, say, an op-
Up to 10%
Percentage of payments to
small- and mid-sized businesses
that are either never paid or paid
so late that businesses are forced
to write them off as bad debt.
Source: Sage
tion to use a secure payment
page on your website. This helps
customers avoid the hassle of
writing and mailing checks.
Automated reminders that include the link to pay is another
route to take.
Red flags
Certain customers may require you to keep more on top
of them than others, especially
if they’re giving certain warning signs.
One red flag is the customer’s
establishing a “new procedure”
on making payments, says Woodbury collection attorney Don
Hochler, essentially changing
the terms in some way from
what was agreed upon.
Another sign might be the customer’s placing a product order
much larger than prior orders or
not fitting for the time of year,
Hochler says. This could signal
an aim to load up now because
he can’t pay down the line.
Outside expertise
And
THE ISSUE: DEBT
Ending dependence
on your credit cards
MONEYFIX
BY SHERYL NANCE-NASH
Special to Newsday
the
accounts
Setting clear terms
“Establishing clear payment
terms early and getting into a
rhythm with customers can
help build better relationships
from the start and prevent
tougher conversations down
the line,” she says.
She also advises businesses to
take advantage of digital payment methods such as direct
debit and e-invoicing to auto-
THE WEEK AHEAD
mate payments. This makes it
simpler for customers to pay and
enables businesses to automate
discounts for early payments
and penalties for late payments,
which can eliminate difficult conversations and incentivize customers to pay early or on time.
Build rapport
Beyond that, when possible
try establishing a rapport with
your customers, says Richard
Klein, president of RHK Recovery Group, a receivables management and debt collection
agency in Plainview.
“Salespeople need to maintain a relationship with whoever is paying the bills for the
company,” he says. They can
even pop in and say hello now
and again, he says.
If the customer’s late on the
payment, you might send an
email: ‘Hey I’m going to be in
the area today and have the attached invoice that’s due.
Please have a check prepared
for me,’ Klein says. “There’s a
way to do it tactfully,” he says.
For more events, visit newsday.com
MONDAY
FINANCIAL PLANNING
FOR SMALL-BUSINESS OWNERS | Holbrook
Learn about some of the challenges that small
businesses face today, including benefits, health
care, other insurance coverages and more, 7 p.m.,
Sachem Library, 150 Holbrook Rd., free, register,
sachemlibrary.org, 631-588-5024.
TUESDAY
SOUTH SHORE NETWORKING | Freeport
Connect with other businesses, all industries
welcome, 8 a.m., Imperial Diner, 63 W. Merrick
Rd., free, mrgmarketingcorp.com, 516-867-5851.
WEDNESDAY
JOB FAIR | Brentwood
Representatives from more than 20 public and
private Long Island businesses and organizations
meet with you about potential employment,
presented by the Suffolk County Department of
Labor, 1-4 p.m., Brentwood Library, 34 Second
Ave., free, brentwoodnylibrary.org, 631-273-7883.
STARTING A BUSINESS | Hauppauge
A representative from the state Small Business
Development Center discusses how to start and
become a small-business owner, 9:30 a.m., Suffolk
County One-Stop Employment Center, 725 Veterans Memorial Hwy., free, must register in advance,
suffolkcountyny.gov/labor, 631-853-6600.
THURSDAY
BNI NETWORKING | Bohemia
Meadow’s Edge Referral Network meets for
breakfast, new members welcome, 7-8:30 a.m.,
Airport Diner, 3760 Veterans Memorial Hwy., free
for first-time guests, 631-691-2600.
FRANCHISING | Hauppauge
“Making the Right Choice,” obtain successful
franchise career development information and
franchising opportunities, 9:30 a.m., Suffolk
County One Stop Employment Center, 725 Veterans Memorial Hwy., free, must register in advance,
suffolkny.gov/labor, 631-853-6600.
FINANCIAL FITNESS TIPS A-Z | Lindenhurst
Personal finance tips include how to reduce income taxes, control spending, plan for retirement
and ensure you maintain some say in your financial and medical affairs in the event of death or
incapacitation, 7 p.m., Lindenhurst Library, 1 Lee
Ave., free, register, lindenhurstlibrary.org,
631-957-7755.
— GINA TABARUS
SEND NOTICES to Business Calendars,
Newsday Events, 235 Pinelawn Rd., Melville, NY
11747-4250; fax 631-843-2688, or email
events@newsday.com
NEWSDAY, MONDAY, JANUARY 7, 2019
LETIP BUSINESS NETWORKING | Bohemia
New members looking to grow their businesses
are welcome, 7:01-8:31 a.m., Airport Diner, 3760
Veterans Memorial Hwy., no cost for meal, call to
reserve, letipbohemia.com, 631-281-6200.
FREE BUSINESS MENTORING | Elmont
Individual, confidential appointments available,
presented by SCORE, 1, 2 and 3 p.m., Elmont
Memorial Library, 700 Hempstead Tpke., free,
call for an appointment, elmontlibrary.org,
888-433-3632.
newsday.com
I
f anybody tells you habits are
easy to break, don’t believe
them. In the Fidelity Investments New Year Financial Resolutions survey, of the more than
2,000 people polled, 29 percent say
they plan to pay down debt in 2019.
Paying down debt is laudable, but
the bigger goal should be to end
your dependence on credit cards.
Here’s how.
\ Make a commitment: Decide to
control your spending and reserve
credit cards for real emergencies.
“Begin to phase out daily credit card
use from your life,” says Steven Millstein, founder of CreditRepairExpert.org. Acknowledge that it won’t
be easy, but resolve “to stick it out
and see it through,” he says.
\ Look at the numbers: Review
your credit card statement to see
how much interest you’ve paid,
and how long it will take to pay off
your debt if you only pay the
monthly minimum. “These numbers can be eye-opening. Let this
motivate you,” Millstein says.
\ Be proactive about impulses:
Leave credit cards at home. “If
you must return to the store to
purchase something, you’ll think
twice about whether you need or
want it. If leaving the card at
home doesn’t stem purchasing,
cut your cards up!” says Joyce
Blue, a money relationship expert
and owner of Empowering You
Life Enhancement Coaching in
Boise, Idaho. But don’t close your
account, she says: “Doing so
hurts your credit.”
\ Set rules: Rules save you from negotiating with yourself. Set rules,
such as: Don’t open new cards.
“Inner negotiations deplete your
willpower, and the only one who
loses is you,” says Talya MironShatz, CEO of buddynsoul.com, a
personal development site. Consider too, a rule to use cash or debit
cards only.
when
payable person or principal
doesn’t respond to calls or
emails, says Hochler, you may
need to consider engaging a collection agency or attorney.
This could result in losing the
customer, but chances in this scenario are she wouldn’t be a longterm viable customer anyway.
Even if you’re hesitant to pursue unpaid debt for fear of hurting the relationship with the
client, late payments can’t just
be ignored because they can
erode cash flow and profitability over time, says Nicole
Hardin, director of product
management at Sage.
LI BUSINESS
Fresh start: how to get paid on time
LI BUSINESS
LI People
ON THE MOVE
LAW
Lamb & Barnosky in
Melville has announced three
promotions.
Mara N. Harvey of Huntington Station, counsel, promoted
to partner
Moritt Hock & Hamroff in
Garden City has announced
three promotions.
Brett P. Garver of Hewlett,
counsel, promoted to partner
Rachel A. Fernbach of
Roslyn, an associate, promoted
to counsel
Brandi P. Klineberg of Commack, an associate, promoted
to counsel
Matthew J. Mehnert of
Lake Ronkonkoma, counsel,
promoted to partner
Lauren Schnitzer of Smithtown, associate, promoted to
counsel
Newly
promoted,
top, Garver,
left, and
Fernbach; at
left, Klineberg
BOARDS
Lamb &
Barnosky
promotions,
top, Harvey,
left, and
Mehnert; at
left, Schnitzer
Brown & Altman in Melville
has hired two associates.
Brianna Tibett of Smithtown, below left, was a law
school intern at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
in Manhattan.
Literacy Suffolk Inc. in Bellport has elected three new
directors to its board.
Dana Klosner of Oakdale is a
freelance journalist and a
Literacy Suffolk tutor.
Donna Crapanzano of East
Setauket is a clincial assistant
professor at Stony Brook
School of Health Technology
and Management.
Martha G. Maffei of East
Moriches is executive director
of SEPA Mujer Inc. in
Patchogue.
David Pernick of Melville,
below right, was a paralegal at
Danow, McMillan & Panoff in
Manhattan.
NEWSDAY, MONDAY, JANUARY 7, 2019
newsday.com
New directors,
top, Klosner,
left, and
Crapanzano; at
left, Maffei
READ MORE
See who else
has a new position
newsday.com/onthemove
Send submissions
and color headshots to
peopleonthemove@
newsday.com
Samantha
Ruttura of Huntington, president
of Our Rental
Pumps in Farmingdale, has been
elected to the
board of directors of the Long Island Contractors’ Association Inc. in
Hauppauge.
— DIANE DANIELS
A rewards card can
boost your side job
BY MELISSA LAMBARENA
NerdWallet
These days, many people
wear different hats to earn income on the side. You might
clock out of one job and into
the next as a ride-hailing
driver, Airbnb host, Etsy shop
owner or pet sitter.
Such “gig economy” work
can make for a stressful tax
season that eats up your time
(and billable hours) and costs
you potential deductions. A
separate credit card for business purposes can help simplify things and maximize
your income.
Here’s how a regular rewards credit card or a rewards-earning business credit
card can offer value to your
side hustle.
Simplify the paper trail
Using a separate credit card
for your side business can save
hours of sorting personal from
business expenses, and prevent
you from missing valuable deductions. Everything you need
to track is on one spending report. You’ll still need receipts,
but your expenses can easily be
found and backed up.
Harry Campbell, founder of
The Rideshare Guy site and author of “The Rideshare
Guide,” got a business credit
card when he left his day job
and formed a limited liability
company. Previously, as an
aerospace engineer with a
side gig, he tracked business
expenses with receipts and forwarded emails.
“I think it was definitely
more work,” he says. “Most of
the time, it’s kind of easy to forget to do some of that stuff.”
Campbell now blogs full time
and is a ride-hailing driver on
the side.
Whether you get a business
credit card or a regular credit
card for business purposes depends on your goals and expenses.
“If you actually want to do
what you’re doing for the next
two to three years, and you
want to grow, then at some
point you’re going to need
business credit,” says Miguel
Alexander Centeno, partner at
Shared Economy Tax.
Some business credit cards
AP / MATT ROURKE
LI BUSINESS
A28
Using a credit card dedicated to a side hustle can help you
simplify your taxes and keep all business expenses in one place.
take your personal credit
score into consideration, so
you’ll likely need a good credit
score for either option. Whichever you choose, if there’s an
annual fee, make sure the
perks and rewards offset it.
Help with business expenses
Getting started may require out-of-pocket investments. Applying for a separate credit card can snag you
a sign-up bonus or a zero-percent introductory interest
rate that helps defray or finance those costs, and ongoing rewards can maximize
your income if they align
with your spending.
For Nicole Elizabeth, content creator at the blog NElizabeth, a flat-rate business credit
card made sense when she
started her Etsy shop.
Elizabeth earned rewards
on large, one-time investments like her cutting machine, printer and computer
— essentials for making the
stickers she sells on Etsy. She
now earns rewards on recurring expenses such as paper,
ink, toner and blog-related purchases. “I get 1.5 percent back
on everything,” she says.
Her goal is to turn her side
jobs — her blog, YouTube
channel and Etsy shop — into
a personal brand.
“Ultimately, I’d love for my
business to grow and be my
full-time job,” Elizabeth says.
Double-dip on rewards
Whether you’re on the
growth track or simply earning a little extra scratch, look
to your credit card — and beyond — for opportunities.
For ride-hailing drivers, a
credit card that earns a high rewards rate on gas can add up
to hundreds of dollars annually. Before he switched to an
electric car, Campbell was
using his business credit card
to earn 2 points per $1 spent
on gas. But he also maximized
savings by using the Shell Fuel
Rewards program and special
offers from Lyft.
For Airbnb hosts, a rewards
card that earns 5 percent back
on spending categories that
change quarterly could offer a
significant return on any number of purchases to furnish or
spruce up your Airbnb property. But you can also earn additional rewards by shopping with
specific retailers on online shopping portals like Ebates, or via
your credit card’s bonus mall.
For pet sitters, a flat-rate
credit card that earns 2 percent back on all purchases can
offer value at the pet store, or
anywhere else. But you can
also sign up for a pet store’s
loyalty rewards program for
additional discounts.
Combining a rewards credit
card with a rewards program
is another way to tip yourself
with cash back, airline miles
or points.
WEATHER
Watch for updates
throughout the day
Get your town’s latest forecast
at newsday.com/weather
NYC AND LONG ISLAND
H
MA
NH
AT
TA
N
High and low temperatures forecast for today
BRONX
34/31
QUEENS
34/31
BROOKLYN
STATEN ISLAND
JFK
34/32
Today
Sunny, becoming
partly sunny
Highs, 32 34
Tonight
Cloudy, chance of
rain and snow
Lows, 29 32
Tuesday
Mostly cloudy,
chance of rain
49 38
Wednesday
Partly to mostly
cloudy
43 31
Thursday
4
Garden
City
34/31
Cold Spring
Harbor
34/29
SUFFOLK
Port Jefferson
34/29
Islip/MacArthur
34/29
LOCAL FORECAST
LONG ISLAND:::
LONG
ISLAND: Sunny in the
morning, then becoming partly
sunny. Highs in the mid-30s.
Tonight: Cloudy. A chance of rain
with a slight chance of snow
after midnight.
NYC:: Sunny in the morning,
NYC:
then becoming partly sunny.
Highs in the mid-30s. Tonight:
Cloudy. A slight chance of snow
in the evening, then rain likely
with a chance of snow after
midnight.
ON THE WATER
Wind:::
WIND: N winds 15 to 20 kt with
gusts up to 25 kt, to NE 5 to 10 kt
after noon. Tonight: SE winds 5
to 10 kt, to S 15 to 20 kt with
gusts up to 25 kt after midnight.
WAVE HEIGHTS:::
WAVE
HEIGHTS: Seas 2 to 4 ft.
Tonight: Seas 1 ft or less, then 2
to 3 ft after midnight.
TEMPERATURE::: Sandy Hook to
TEMPERATURE:
Sheepshead Bay air: ##,
42 water:
43 North Shore air: ##,
##;
39 water:
42 South Shore air: ##,
50 water:
##;
41
51 East End air: ##,
##;
36 water: ##
VISIBILITY:::
VISIBILITY: 2 miles or less in
rain and snow late.
SUN & MOON
Sunrise today
7:16 a.m.
Sunset today
4:42 p.m.
Sunrise tomorrow
7:16 a.m.
Sunset tomorrow
4:43 p.m.
Moonrise today
8:22 a.m.
Moonset today
6:16 p.m.
MOON PHASES
Full
Jan. 21
Last
Jan. 27
New
Feb. 4
H
Get the forecast
wherever you are
whenever you
want with the
Newsday app.
Southampton
32/29
H
H
EXTREMES
HIGH: McAllen, TX 83°
LOW: Staples, MN 3°
MON.
TUE.
WED.
THU.
FRI.
SAT.
TIDES
ALMANAC
HIGH FOR:
am pm am pm am pm am pm am pm am pm
Islip readings as of 4 p.m.
Amityville
10:48 11:15 11:27 11:56
12:06 12:37 12:45 1:19
1:26 2:01 2:09
YESTERDAY'S TEMPERATURES
10:49 11:15 11:29 11:58
12:11 12:42 12:53 1:28 1:38 2:16 2:25
Bay Shore
High.............................................50
12:33 12:28 1:01 12:45 1:17
1:12 1:41 1:46 2:15 2:27 2:55 3:12 Low.............................................. 37
College Point
Coney Island
8:24 8:51 9:03 9:32 9:42 10:13 10:21 10:55 11:02 11:37 11:45
High last year.............................. 12
East Rockaway In. 8:21 8:48 9:00 9:29 9:39 10:10 10:18 10:52 10:59 11:34 11:42
Low last year................................. 6
7:49 8:16 8:28 8:57 9:07 9:38 9:46 10:20 10:27 11:02 11:10 11:44 Normal high................................ 38
Fire Island Inlet
Normal low................................. 24
Fort Hamilton
8:30 8:57 9:09 9:38 9:48 10:19 10:27 11:01 11:08 11:43 11:51
9:01 9:28 9:40 10:09 10:19 10:50 10:58 11:32 11:39
12:14 12:22 Barometer............................. 29.97
Freeport
11:02 11:35 11:40
12:16 12:19 12:59 1:00 1:44 1:44 2:30 2:32 YESTERDAY'S PRECIPITATION
Greenport
Hempstead Harbor 12:14 12:09 12:42 12:26 12:58 12:53 1:22 1:27 1:56 2:08 2:36 2:53 Islip as of 4 p.m.................. 0.00 in.
8:56 9:23 9:35 10:04 10:14 10:45 10:53 11:27 11:34
12:17 Previous 7 days..........................
0.74 in.
Howard Beach
12:23 12:34 1:00
1:11 1:38 1:50 2:17 2:31 3:00 3:16 Total for the month............ 0.74 in.
Huntington Beach 11:57
Total for the year................ 0.74 in.
Jones Inlet
8:08 8:35 8:47 9:16 9:26 9:57 10:05 10:39 10:46 11:21 11:29
Normal for the year............ 0.72 in.
Mastic Beach
11:55
12:22 12:34 1:03
1:13 1:44 1:52 2:26 2:33 3:08 3:16
11:59
12:25 12:36 1:02
1:13 1:40 1:52 2:19 2:33 3:02 3:18 HEATING DEGREE DAYS
Mattituck Inlet
An estimate of energy needed for heating:
Mill Basin
8:56 9:23 9:35 10:04 10:14 10:45 10:53 11:27 11:34
12:17 each
unit equals a degree that the daily mean
Montauk Point
8:32 8:50 9:00 9:22 9:26 9:54 9:55 10:26 10:28 11:03 11:08 11:44 temperature falls below 65.
7:31 7:58 8:10 8:39 8:49 9:20 9:28 10:02 10:09 10:44 10:52 11:26 Yesterday.................................... 22
Moriches Inlet
New Suffolk
12:18 12:24 12:57 1:02 1:38
1:41 2:21 2:22 3:06 3:06 3:52 3:54 Total for the month................... 145
Nissequogue River 11:51
12:17 12:28 12:54 1:05 1:32 1:44 2:11 2:25 2:54 3:10 Total since July 1..................... 1935
12:02 12:28 12:39 1:05 1:16 1:43 1:55 2:23 2:36 3:05 3:21 Normal since July 1................ 2130
Oyster Bay
Patchogue
11:50
12:17 12:29 12:58 1:08 1:39 1:47 2:21 2:28 3:03 3:11 WIND CHILL (at noon)
Port Jefferson
12:02 12:31 12:42 1:11
1:23 1:51 2:04 2:33 2:48 3:17 3:35 Wind speed was 17 mph.
12:24 12:17 12:49 12:35 1:06 1:03 1:33 1:39 2:07 2:19 2:48 3:04 Actual air temperature was 48°,
Port Washington
10:57 11:30 11:35
12:11 12:14 12:54 12:55 1:39 1:39 2:25 2:27 making it feel like 48° yesterday.
Sag Harbor
8:28 8:55 9:07 9:36 9:46 10:17 10:25 10:59 11:06 11:41 11:49
Sandy Hook
HUMIDITY (at noon)
............... 61%
7:37 8:04 8:16 8:45 8:55 9:26 9:34 10:08 10:15 10:50 10:58 11:32
Shinnecock Inlet
SNOW
TOTALS
9:53 10:22 10:31 11:03 11:10 11:45 11:49
12:27 12:29 1:11
1:13
Spuyten Duyvil
Yesterday.............................. 0.0 in.
SLACK WATER AFTER HIGH TIDE:
Total for the month.............. 0.0 in.
East Rockaway In. 9:33 10:03 10:15 10:45 10:57
11:39 11:27 12:09 12:27 12:57 1:15 Total for the season............. 4.3 in.
Fire Island Inlet
11:05 11:35 12:17
12:29 12:59 1:11 1:41
1:59 2:29 2:47
Jones Inlet
9:48 10:18 10:30 11:00 11:12
11:54 11:42 12:24 12:42 1:12
1:30 PARTICULATES READING
Montauk Point
11:10 11:40 11:46
12:16 12:22 12:52 12:58 1:34 1:40 2:10 2:22 Today...................................... Good
Moriches Inlet
11:03 11:33 12:15
12:27 12:57 1:09 1:39
1:57 2:27 2:45
Shinnecock Inlet
10:0610:36 10:48 11:18 11:30
12:00 12:12 12:42 1:00 1:30 1:48 UV INDEX.......................................2
Last
New
Jan.
27
Feb. 4
Forecasts, graphics and data provided by ©IBM Corporation 1994, 2019
NATIONAL
Albany
26/24 pcldy
Denver
53/25 pcldy
New Orleans
72/55
pcldy
Anchorage
3/-5
pcldy
Des Moines
53/32 pcldy
Omaha
53/32 pcldy
Atlanta
64/50 pcldy
Detroit
45/38 ice
Orlando
76/58 pcldy
Atlantic City
39/32 pcldy
Honolulu
82/73 pcldy
Philadelphia
37/33
cldy
Boston
29/26 pcldy
Indianapolis
54/43 rain
Phoenix
64/43 pcldy
Buffalo
40/36 ice
Kansas City MO
58/35 pcldy
Portland OR
45/38 shwrs
Burlington VT
23/19
pcldy
Las Vegas
56/42 pcldy
Salt Lake City
41/28
snow
Charleston SC
68/52 pcldy
Lexington
61/49
shwrs
San Francisco
59/52 shwrs
Charlotte
55/46 pcldy
Los Angeles
63/51
shwrs
Seattle
45/39 shwrs
Chicago
56/37 rain
Miami
78/66 pcldy
Syracuse
29/28 ice
Cleveland
48/43 shwrs
Minneapolis
41/26
rain
Tampa
76/60 pcldy
Columbus
53/44 shwrs
Mobile
67/53
pcldy
Topeka
58/34 pcldy
Dallas-Ft. Worth
67/45
pcldy
Myrtle Beach
61/52
pcldy
Washington DC
40/37 cldy
FOREIGN
Amsterdam
Ankara
Athens
Baghdad
Bangkok
Beijing
Berlin
Bermuda
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calgary
Cancun
Dublin
48/45
27/12
45/35
60/41
94/76
37/16
42/40
65/57
78/72
62/48
22/8
80/70
52/41
rain
pcldy
rain
sunny
sunny
pcldy
rain
pcldy
rain
sunny
pcldy
rain
cldy
Edmonton
Hong Kong
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kabul
Karachi
Kingston
Lima
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Montreal
14/-5
68/62
50/39
76/60
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NASSAU
A29
NATION
A30
STEVE BLOOM/THE OLYMPIAN VIA AP
Contradiction
on withdrawal
of U.S. troops
Bolton: Leave Syria after IS defeated
NEWSDAY, MONDAY, JANUARY 7, 2019
newsday.com
JERUSALEM — U.S. troops
will not leave northeastern Syria
until Islamic State militants are
defeated and American-allied
Kurdish fighters are protected, a
top White House aide said Sunday, signaling a pause to a withdrawal abruptly announced last
month and initially expected to
be completed within weeks.
While U.S. national security
adviser John Bolton said there is
now no timetable, President
Donald Trump reaffirmed his
commitment to withdrawing
U.S. troops, though he said “we
won’t be finally pulled out until
ISIS is gone.”
Trump had said in his Dec. 19
withdrawal announcement that
U.S. forces “have defeated ISIS
in Syria, my only reason for
being there during the Trump
presidency,” and added in a
video posted to Twitter, “Now
it’s time for our troops to come
back home.”
Bolton said in Israel that the
U.S. would pull out only after its
troops had rooted out what’s left
of IS in Syria and after the administration had reached an agreement with Turkey to protect Kurdish militias who have fought
alongside Americans against the
extremists.
In Washington, Trump told reporters at the White House that
“we are pulling back in Syria.
We’re going to be removing our
troops. I never said we’re doing
it that quickly.” But in that Dec.
19 video, the president said of
the roughly 2,000 U.S. troops in
Syria: “They’re all coming back,
and they’re coming back now.”
And officials said at the time
that while many details were yet
to be finalized, they expected
American forces to be out by
mid-January.
“I think this is the reality setting in that you got to plan this
out,” said U.S. Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.). He told CBS’ “Face
the Nation” that “the bottom
line here is we want to make
sure we get this right, that ISIS
AP PHOTO/CLIFF OWEN
The Associated Press
National security adviser John
Bolton is in Israel.
doesn’t come back. And I applaud the president for re-evaluating what he’s doing. . . . He
has a goal in mind of reducing
our presence. I share that goal.
Let’s just do it smartly.”
Trump’s decision last month
drew widespread criticism from
allies, led to the resignation of
U.S. Defense Secretary Jim Mattis and raised fears over clearing
the way for a Turkish assault on
the Kurdish fighters. Turkey considers the Syrian Kurdish People’s Protection Units, or YPG, a
terrorist group linked to an insurgency within its own borders.
‘There are objectives that we
want to accomplish that condition the withdrawal,” Bolton said
in Jerusalem. “The timetable
flows from the policy decisions
that we need to implement.”
He was to be in Turkey on
Monday, accompanied by the
chairman of the U.S. Joint Chiefs
of Staff Gen. Joseph Dunford, for
talks with government officials.
Bolton said the U.S. has asked
the Kurds to “stand fast now”
and refrain from seeking protection from Russia or Syrian President Bashar al-Assad’s government. “I think they know who
their friends are,” he added,
speaking of the Kurds.
U.S. Rep. Adam Smith, the incoming chairman of the House
Armed Services Committee,
told ABC’s “This Week” that the
conditions raised by Bolton
were “obvious,” and Smith criticized the conflicting messages
from the Trump administration.
Down
and out
Crews worked Sunday to restore power after windstorms
pummeled parts of Washington state and Oregon and left
nearly 300,000 customers without electricity, officials said,
and some could be without power for days.
Accused stalker sent man 159K texts
PHOENIX — A Phoenix
woman accused of stalking a
man met on a dating site and
sending him more than 65,000
text messages apparently sent
more than twice that many.
Jacqueline Ades sent a man
more than 159,000 text messages — some of which were
threatening — over the course
of nearly 10 months, according
to police records the Arizona
Republic obtained via a public
records request. The two went
on a single date.
The man, whose name has
not been released, called the police after he found Ades parked
outside his home in July 2017.
Paradise Valley officers escorted her off his property and
that’s when police say Ades
began threatening the man.
One text read: “I’d make
sushi outta ur kidneys n chopsticks outta ur hand bones.”
In April 2018, Ades was arrested for trespassing inside his
home while he was out of the
country. Ades has pleaded not
guilty to charges of stalking and
criminal trespassing. Her trial
was to begin Feb. 5.
— AP
WEATHER APP ACCUSED OF SELLING PERSONAL DATA
The Associated Press
LOS ANGELES — People relied on the most popular mobile weather app to track forecasts that determined whether
they chose jeans over shorts
and packed a parka or umbrella, but its owners used it to
track their every step and profit
off that information, Los Angeles prosecutors said Friday.
The operator of The
Weather Channel mobile app
misled users who agreed to
share their location information in exchange for personalized forecasts and alerts, and
they instead unwittingly surrendered personal privacy when
the company sold their data to
third parties, City Attorney
Michael Feuer said.
Feuer sued the app’s operator
in Los Angeles County Superior
Court to stop the practice. He
said 80 percent of users agreed
to allow access to their locations
because disclosures on how the
app uses geolocation data were
buried within a 10,000-word privacy policy and not revealed
when they downloaded the app.
“Think how Orwellian it
feels to live in a world where a
private company is tracking potentially every place you go,
every minute of every day,”
Feuer said. “If you want to sacrifice to that company that information, you sure ought to be
doing it with clear advanced notice of what’s at stake.”
A spokesman for IBM Corp.,
which owns the app, said it has always been clear about the use of
location data collected from users
and will vigorously defend its
“fully appropriate” disclosures.
Feuer said the app’s operators, TWC Product and Technology LLC, sold data to at
least a dozen websites for targeted ads and to hedge funds
that used the information to analyze consumer behavior.
The lawsuit seeks to stop the
company from the practice it
calls “unfair and fraudulent”
and seeks penalties of up to
$2,500 for each violation. Any
court decision would only
apply to California.
The Weather Channel app
claims approximately 45 million
users a month, the suit said.
Users who download the free
app are asked whether to allow
access to their location to “get
personalized local weather
data, alerts and forecasts.” It
does not say how the company
benefits from the information.
While disclosures may be included in the privacy policy, state
law says “fine print alone can’t
make good what otherwise has
been made obscure,” Feuer said.
WORLD
Designer of site
in Poland where
5 died is charged
The Associated Press
WARSAW, Poland — Prosecutors in northern Poland detained and brought charges Sunday against the man who designed an escape room entertainment site where five teenage
girls were killed in a fire.
The man, identified only as
Milosz S., was charged with intentionally creating a fire danger and unintentionally causing the deaths of the girls, said
prosecutor
Ryszard
Gasiorowski, adding that the
location’s heating system was
faulty and there was no emergency evacuation route.
A court decision is expected
Monday on prosecutors’ request
that he be held for three months
while the case proceeds.
Firefighters in the city of
Koszalin found the victims’
bodies Friday after they extinguished a fire next to the
locked room. Prosecutors say
a leaky gas container inside a
heater is the most likely cause
of the blaze.
Autopsies showed that the
girls, who were friends from
school, died of carbon monoxide inhalation. A young man
employed there was hospitalized with burns. He was to be
questioned.
Attorneys for the man
charged said he was “deeply
distraught” by the deaths and
has expressed deep condolences to the families before
the prosecutors. They said the
28-year-old denies the charges
Lights, flowers and toys are left outside the escape room entertainment site on Sunday where five
teenage girls died in a fire Friday. Sunday was designated a day of mourning and prayers.
but because of his distress was
not able to answer prosecutors’ questions. If convicted,
he could face up to eight years
in prison.
Earlier Sunday, fire chief
Leszek Suski stressed that the
escape room at a private house
in the city of Koszalin, where
the 15-year-old girls died
locked inside a room celebrating a birthday, had no emergency evacuation route.
They were the first known
deaths in an escape room, a
form of entertainment that has
been growing in Poland over
the past five years.
Players in escape room
games are locked inside a
room or building and must
solve puzzles and find clues
that lead them to the key that
will unlock the door. Regarded
as an intellectual challenge,
the games are highly popular
among teenagers in Poland.
Officials have shut down 13
escape room entertainment
sites for safety flaws and the
prime minister asked people
Sunday to report such lapses
to firefighters and police.
Police chief Jaroslaw Szymczyk said other people had previously posted critical remarks
online about the safety of that
escape room site, but local officials weren’t notified.
During a memorial Mass at
Koszalin Cathedral, Bishop Edward Dajczak identified the
girls by their first names as
Julia, Amelia, Gosia, Karolina
and Wiktoria.
He later led public prayers
in front of the house where
they died.
People left hundreds of
lights, toys and white flowers
by the fence.
Prime Minister Mateusz
Morawiecki, along with Suski
and Szymczyk, spoke after
holding a meeting in which
they discussed with other officials ways of improving safety
at entertainment venues.
Morawiecki called the girls’
deaths an “immense tragedy.”
Congo delays presidential election results
The Associated Press
down after 18 years in power,
had delayed the election for
two years. The postponement
in announcing the winner was
seen by some Congolese as
part of an effort by Kabila’s
party to manipulate the results
in order to claim victory.
The Catholic Church, an influential voice in this heavily
Catholic nation, turned up the
pressure by saying it already
knows there is a clear victor,
based on data compiled by the
church’s 40,000 election observers. Because Congo’s regu-
lations say only the electoral
commission can announce
election results, the church
did not name the winner.
Congo’s ruling party, which
backs Kabila’s preferred candidate, Emmanuel Ramazani
Shadary, called the church’s
statement “irresponsible and
anarchist.” The leading opposition candidate is Martin Fayulu,
a businessman and lawmaker.
This could be Congo’s first
democratic, peaceful transfer
of power since independence
from Belgium in 1960.
NEWSDAY, MONDAY, JANUARY 7, 2019
KINSHASA, Congo —
Congo’s government Sunday
postponed the release of the results of last weekend’s presidential election, fueling suspicions President Joseph Kabila’s ruling party is maneuvering to cling to power.
No new date for announcing
the winner of the Dec. 30 election was given. Electoral officials have compiled 53 percent
of the votes and will not release any information until all
the ballots have been tallied,
said Corneille Nangaa, head of
the electoral commission.
“We handle sensitive data
and have to handle it responsibly,” he said. He asked Congo’s
people to “remain patient.”
“We are aware this process
has always been surrounded
by distrust,” he said, referring
to calls from the Catholic
Church, the African Union,
the U.S. and other diplomats
for the government to announce accurate results.
Kabila, who is stepping
newsday.com
MOSCOW — The brother of
an American man being held in
Moscow on suspicion of spying
is raising the possibility that his
sibling is being used as a pawn
in a potential exchange for a
Russian woman behind bars in
the U.S.
Paul Whelan’s brother told
The Associated Press that he
can’t help but question if the
events are connected.
“You look at what’s going on
and you wonder if this is just a
large game of pieces being
moved around,” David Whelan
told the AP via Skype from
Newmarket, Ontario. “You start
to wonder if all of these things
are connected. But at the same
time, they could just be arbitrary events.”
Asked about the matter by reporters at the White House on
Sunday, President Donald
Trump said: “We’re looking
into that.”
Paul Whelan, a former U.S.
Marine who also holds Canadian, British and Irish citizenship, was detained in Moscow
in late December. His arrest
has led to speculation that Russia could be using him to bargain for a Russian woman who
has pleaded guilty to acting as a
foreign agent in the U.S.
But Russian Deputy Foreign
Minister Sergei Ryabkov said
Saturday that discussing a possible swap involving Whelan and
Maria Butina would be premature because Whelan hasn’t
been formally charged, according to Russian news agencies.
Russian officials haven’t
given details of Whelan’s suspected activities.
Whelan, 48, was discharged
from the Marines for bad conduct. He works as the global security director for a U.S. automobile parts manufacturer and
lives in Michigan. His family
has said he was in Moscow to
attend a wedding.
His brother, David, told the
AP that Whelan loves to travel
and likes to “interact with the
people in the places that he
goes,” but that Whelan would
be too “conspicuous” to be selected as a spy.
David Whelan said his family
had had no direct contact with
Paul and had received no details
about the alleged espionage
charges from either the Russian
or U.S. governments.
— AP
Fatal escape room charges
AP / STR
Brother: Why
U.S. man held
by Russia?
A31
OBITUARIES
A32
NATION
Harold Brown, Carter’s defense secretary
WASHINGTON — Harold
Brown, who as defense secretary in the Carter administration championed cutting-edge
fighting technology during a
tenure that included the failed
rescue of hostages in Iran, has
died at age 91.
Brown died Friday, said the
Rand Corp., the Californiabased think tank which Brown
served as a trustee for more than
35 years. His sister, Leila Brennet, said he died at his home in
Rancho Santa Fe, California.
Brown was a nuclear physicist who led the Pentagon to
modernize its defense systems
with weapons that included precision-guided cruise missiles,
stealth aircraft, advanced satellite surveillance and improved
communications and intelligence systems. He successfully
campaigned to increase the Pentagon budget during his term,
despite skepticism inside the
White House and from
Democrats in Congress.
That turbulent period included the Soviet Union’s invasion of Afghanistan and the Ira-
AP / RON EDMONDS
The Associated Press
Harold Brown faced numerous
obstacles as Pentagon chief.
nian hostage crisis. An effort in
April 1980 to rescue the
hostages failed when one of the
helicopters on the mission
struck a tanker aircraft in eastern Iran and crashed, killing
eight U.S. servicemen.
“I considered the failed rescue attempt my greatest regret
and most painful lesson
learned,” Brown wrote in his
book “Star Spangled Security.”
Brown faced numerous obstacles when he took the job as
Pentagon chief, including pres-
sure to reduce the defense budget both from within the administration and from influential
congressional Democrats.
“When I became secretary of
defense in 1977, the military services, most of all the army,
were disrupted badly by the
Vietnam War. There was general agreement that the Soviet
Union outclassed the West in
conventional military capability, especially in ground forces
in Europe,” he wrote later.
Wary of the growing Soviet
threat, Brown sought to withstand the pressure to cut defense and, gradually, managed
to increase spending.
“The constant Cold War competition raged hot during the
Carter administration and preoccupied me throughout the
four years,” Brown wrote. He
noted later that “the Defense
Department budget in real
terms was 10 to 12 percent
more when we left than when
we came in,” which he said was
not an easy accomplishment.
And he cited the technological advances in defense systems,
especially weapons systems
such as precision-guided cruise
missiles, stealth aircraft and advanced satellite surveillance.
“Some of these came to visible fruition 10 years later during Desert Storm, which reversed Saddam Hussein’s occupation of Kuwait,” he wrote.
“The Carter administration initiated and developed these programs, the Reagan administration paid for their acquisition
in many cases, and the George
H.W. Bush administration employed them.”
The acting defense secretary,
Patrick Shanahan, said in a
statement
Saturday
that
Brown’s “steady leadership piloted our nation through a consequential segment of the Cold
War. His focus on deterrence
through a strong nuclear triad
facilitated long-term peace and
stability in the United States
and Europe.” Shanahan praised
Brown for his “devoted leadership and lifetime of service.”
Brown was born in New York
City on Sept. 19, 1927, attended
public schools and went to Columbia University on an accelerated wartime schedule, receiving an undergraduate degree in
physics in 1945 “when I was not
quite 18,” then going to graduate school at Columbia, receiving a doctorate in physics.
Not long after graduation he
moved to California and went to
work on projects that related to
the development of plutonium.
In 1961, Defense Secretary
Robert McNamara invited him
to be director of defense research and engineering in the
Kennedy administration. In
1965 he became secretary of the
Air Force during the Johnson
administration.
Carter nominated Brown to
be defense secretary in 1977. He
was quickly confirmed and
served throughout Carter’s term.
After leaving the Pentagon,
he remained in Washington,
joining the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies as a visiting
professor and later the university’s Foreign Policy Institute as
chairman. He remained active
in matters of national security.
Carter awarded Brown the
Presidential Medal of Freedom.
President Bill Clinton gave him
the Energy Department’s Enrico Fermi Award for achievement in science and technology.
NATION
Christine McGuire, 92, oldest of the singing sisters
NEWSDAY, MONDAY, JANUARY 7, 2019
Christine McGuire, the oldest of the three McGuire Sisters, whose radio and television
appearances and string of Top
20 hits in the 1950s made them
one of the most popular female
singing groups of their time,
died Dec. 28 in Las Vegas,
where she lived. She was 92.
Her family released a statement confirming the death.
The cause and other details
were not disclosed.
Christine, Dorothy and Phyllis McGuire grew up singing in
the First Church of God in their
hometown of Miamisburg,
Ohio. Their mother, a minister
at the church, encouraged their
interest in singing but would
not allow the sisters to listen to
secular music.
It wasn’t until the late 1940s,
when the sisters were in their
late teens and early 20s, that
they added a few up-tempo pop
tunes to their repertoire and
began to appear as a vocal trio
at veterans’ hospitals, benefits
GETTY IMAGES
newsday.com
The Washington Post
Christine McGuire, Phyllis McGuire and Dorothy McGuire of The
McGuire Sisters in 1997 in Las Vegas.
and other events. They were
discovered by local bandleaders and radio stations in
Cincinnati and Dayton, Ohio,
and became known for their uncanny three-part harmony.
In 1952, the sisters pooled
their savings and traveled to
New York, hoping to audition
for “Arthur Godfrey’s Talent
Scouts.” Godfrey was out of
town, but a chance encounter
led to a two-month engage-
ment on the national radio
broadcast of singer Kate Smith.
When the sisters finally performed for Godfrey, singing
“Mona Lisa,” they won the contest and immediately became
regulars on Godfrey’s top-rated
radio and television shows.
They had their first Top 10 hit
in 1953 with a version of “Goodnight, Sweetheart, Goodnight,”
followed the next year by
“Muskrat Ramble.”
The sisters’ biggest hit, “Sincerely,” was released in 1954
and spent 10 weeks at No. 1 on
the Billboard pop chart. Their
1954 recording of Johnny Mercer’s suavely swinging “Something’s Gotta Give” soared to
No. 5 on the Billboard chart.
The sisters toured constantly, recording a few minor
hits, before striking gold again
in 1958 with “Sugartime.” The
catchy number hit No. 1 and became the McGuire Sisters’ signature tune. At the height of
their fame in the late 1950s,
each sister was earning more
than $1 million a year.
They stopped performing together after a 1968 appearance
on “The Ed Sullivan Show.” In
all, nine of their songs reached
the Billboard Top 20.
In 1985, all three were together at Phyllis’ New York
apartment, and they began to
plan a comeback. “Our harmony
was great,” Christine McGuire
later said, “but it took four
months to get that magic blend.
We really had to work on it.”
After months of rehearsals,
the sisters returned to the concert stage in Las Vegas in 1986.
The performed at the 1989 presidential inauguration of George
H.W. Bush and continued to
make frequent appearances together until 2004.
“There was nothing like that
applause,’’ Christine McGuire
told United Press International
in 1986. “We missed it and we
missed each other.”
Christine McGuire became a
savvy investor in real estate,
restaurants and other businesses and lived for many years
in Las Vegas and Scottsdale, Arizona. She had two sons with
her first husband, Harold
Ashcraft. After their divorce,
she married and divorced John
Teeter, Robert Spain and entertainer Guy Marks. Her fifth husband, David Mudd, died in 2011.
Survivors include a son, several grandchildren and greatgrandchildren and her sister
Phyllis, who lives in Las Vegas
and New York. Dorothy
McGuire died in 2012.
631-843-3162
or visit us at newsday.com/obituaries
CAMPBELL - John T. of Rockville Centre, NY on January 5,
2019. Beloved husband of the
late Suzanne. Loving father of
Alison (John E. III) Appelt and
Andrew Campbell. Dear brother of Leonard, Donald, Clarice
Smith, Albert, Alicia Clinton,
Gerard and the late Phillip. Visitation Tuesday 2-4, 7-9 PM,
Macken Mortuary,
Rockville
Centre Chapel, 52 Clinton Avenue. Funeral Mass St. Agnes
Cathedral, Wednesday 10 AM.
Interment Calverton National
Cemetery, Calverton, NY.
mackenmortuary.com
CAPOBIANCO-Egidio (Edward)
H., age 82, of Old Brookville.
Devoted husband of Josephine.
Loving father of Carmine Marc,
Anthony (Meaghan), Edward
(Mary), Marilena (Jim) Lynch,
and Sandra (Michael) Nightingale. Adoring grandfather of
Edward Jesse, Leah, Benjamin,
Dylan, Anthony, Julia, Sam,
Andrew, Dora, Daniela, Liam,
Dina and Mara. Dear brother of
Leo Capobianco. Also survived
by many nieces and nephews.
Visitation Monday, January 7
from 7-9PM, and Tuesday, January 8 from 3-5PM and 7-9PM
at McLaughlin Kramer Megiel
Funeral Home, 220 Glen
Street, Glen Cove, NY. Funeral
Mass at the Church of St.
Rocco, Wednesday, January 9
at 10:00 AM. Interment East
Hillside Cemetery, Glen Head,
NY. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made for Masses
in his name at the Church of
St. Rocco.
FLEMING - Beatrice D., 74, of
Huntington Station, passed
away peacefully on January 6,
2019. Beloved wife of John.
Loving mother of Michael. Visitation Wednesday 2-4 and 79 PM at M.A. Connell Funeral
Home, 934 New York Avenue,
Huntington Station. A Funeral
Service will be held at the
funeral
home
Wednesday
evening. In lieu of flowers,
memorial donations made to:
American
Kidney
Fund,
kidneyfund.org in Beatrice's
name
would
be
greatly
appreciated by the family.
maconnellfuneralhome.com
newsday.com/obits
STY1X40
Cemetery Plots
PINELAWN Gdn of Normandie
1 plot/2, $3800. 718-530-5810
PINELAWN MEM PARK Grave loc
70 sect 80. Cemetery Cost $7495
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Call or Text 727-204-1380
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NEWSDAY, MONDAY, JANUARY 7, 2019
Think of your loved ones
with an obituary on their life,
accomplishments
and family.
KASS-Irma of North Bellmore,
NY on January 5, 2019 at age
88. Cherished wife of Ira for 67
years. Devoted and loving
mother of Susan, Kathy
(Dave), Janie (Eric) and Scott
(Michelle). Adoring grandmother of Maya, Mikayla, Miller and
Celia. Extraordinarily giving
teachers’ teacher at Hofstra
for 47 years, deeply rooted
in community service, Irma
touched countless lives. Elected to North Bellmore and
Bellmore-Merrick School Districts’ Elementary and High
School Boards from 1980-2004,
Irma/Mom/Grammy is painfully missed for her generously
caring involvement. Funeral
Tuesday, January 8, 2019,
12 PM Gutterman’s Funeral
Home, Rockville Centre, followed by burial at Mt. Ararat
Cemetery, Lindenhurst. Family
will be welcoming visitors at
home 7-9:30 PM Tuesday
through Thursday and Saturday evenings, and Wednesday
2-5 PM. In lieu of flowers,
please
donate
to
the
Alzheimer’s charity of choice.
Sharing
Memories
newsday.com/obits
SHR1X90
newsday.com
A Time To
Remember
GALTERIO - Mary Ann, at 101
years of age, peacefully passed
away January 5th. Beloved
wife of the late Mario V.
Galterio. Loving mother to
Catherine Moran (Terrance),
Vincent (Deborah Pirozzi),
Joanne Giacone (Ronald). Cherished grandmother to Francis,
Genevieve, John, Nicholas and
Katherine. Great grandmother
to
Christopher,
Stephanie,
Marley and Veronica. Mary
was born November 4, 1917 in
Philadelphia, PA to Margaret
and Charles Linn. Mary graduated from the Women’s Medical
College of Philadelphia in 1940.
She was president of her class.
Mary was a captain in the
Army Nurse Corps during
World War II. She was stationed at an evacuation hospital on the South Pacific Island
of New Caledonia off the coast
of Australia. In early 1942,
the Navy desperately needed
nurses and Mary was chosen
to work on the hospital Ship
USS Solace. Mary married
Major Mario V. Galterio in
1946 and they raised their children in Garden City. Mary
worked as a nurse at South
Nassau Communities Hospital.
The couple moved to South
Jamesport in 1980. Mary was
widowed in 1992. Family to receive friends Tuesday 2-4 and
7-9 PM, Tuthill Mangano Funeral Home, 406 East
Main
Street, Riverhead, NY 11901.
Interment Wednesday, 11 AM,
Calverton National Cemetery,
Calverton, NY.
tuthillfh.com
P E L L E G R I N I - Clirio P., of
Floral Park, NY on 1/5/2019.
Devoted husband of Dorothy.
Loving father of Michelle
Pellegrini Longo (Anthony),
Kathleen Erhartic (Phillip),
Lynette Pintauro (Ritchard),
Elizabeth DiSimone (Harry).
Cherished grandfather of 10.
Beloved great-grandfather of
8. Dear brother of Loris Ros.
Beloved uncle to 6 nieces and
nephews. Former president of
the Floral Park/Bellerose Rotary Club. Family and Friends
may call Tuesday 2-5 and
7-9:30 pm at Thomas F Dalton
Funeral Home, 29 Atlantic
Avenue, Floral Park, NY 11001.
Interment Calverton National
Cemetery. In lieu of flowers,
donations in his honor may
be made to The INN
https://the-inn.org/tribute
A33
MEM3X154CL
SPORTS STATS
A34
ON TV & RADIO
FOOTBALL
NY PRO TEAMS THIS WEEK
MON. 1/7
TUE. 1/8
THU. 1/10
FRI. 1/11
AWAY
SUN. 1/13
Vegas
10:00
MSG+
Islanders
7:00
MSG
Islanders
1:00
MSG
Columbus
6:00
MSG
*Carolina
7:00
MSG+
Rangers
7:00
MSG+2
Rangers
1:00
MSG+2
Tampa Bay
7:00
MSG+
y
Portland
10:00
MSG
WED. 1/9
HOME
SAT. 1/12
Gold. State
10:30
MSG
Boston
7:30
YES
Indiana
7:30
ESPN
Atlanta
7:30
YES
Philadelphia
1:00
MSG
Toronto
7:30
YES
RADIO: Rangers ESPN / 1050 | Islanders WRHU / 88.7, WRCN / 103.9 | Knicks WNYM / 970 | Nets
WFAN / 660, 101.9
*-at NYCB Live’s Nassau Coliseum
MORE SPORTS MONDAY
College football Clemson vs. Alabama
8 p.m.
ESPN, ESPN2, ESPNU,
ESPNEWS, ESPN (98.7)
Hockey
St. Louis at Philadelphia
7 p.m.
NHL
Hockey
Soccer
Los Angeles at San Jose
10:30 p.m.
Celta vs. Athletic
2:50 p.m.
NBCSN
beIN
AREA RESULTS
Butler 66....................................St. John’s 45
Elon 77 ..........................................Hofstra 64
WRESTLING
Buffalo 25 .....................................Hofstra 12
NATIONAL RESULTS
MEN’S BASKETBALL
East
Colgate 73 .............................American U. 69
George Washington 70 .........St. Joseph’s 56
Lehigh 89 ..............................Loyola (Md.) 72
Navy 50 ...................................Holy Cross 48
South
Chowan 83 .........................W. Virginia St. 76
George Mason 68 ...........St. Bonaventure 53
Louisville 90 ....................................Miami 73
Midwest
Dayton 72 .................................Richmond 48
DePaul 75 ................................Seton Hall 74
Marquette 70 .................................Xavier 52
Michigan 74 ...................................Indiana 63
N. Dakota St. 85...................Dickinson St. 53
Northwestern 68 ............................Illinois 66
Saint Louis 60 .....................Rhode Island 53
Temple 85 .............OT ............Wichita St. 81
Southwest
Houston 90.................................Memphis 77
WOMEN’S BASKETBALL
East
American U. 76 .............................Colgate 57
Army 69 ................................Loyola (Md.) 57
Boston U. 69 ................................Bucknell 62
James Madison 51..........................Drexel 35
Lafayette 73.............................Holy Cross 63
Lehigh 56 ..........................................Navy 38
NC State 85.......................Boston College 69
Northeastern 88...............William & Mary 74
Providence 67 .............................Villanova 61
Quinnipiac 90............................St. Peter’s 45
Rider 62 .......................................Fairfield 59
Rutgers 74...................................Penn St. 61
Siena 59 .............................................Iona 47
Texas 70 .............................West Virginia 58
Towson 56 .................................Delaware 48
UMass 70 ...............................Saint Louis 66
South
Arkansas 85 ...........................Mississippi 55
Auburn 64 ......................................Florida 56
Clemson 71 ...................................Virginia 65
Columbia 72 ...................................Mercer 68
Davidson 67 .......................George Mason 59
Florida St. 64 .....................North Carolina 63
Georgia 71 ...............................Vanderbilt 64
Hendrix 60 ......................................Centre 58
LSU 63 ....................................Texas A&M 52
Louisville 73 .....................................Duke 51
SUNDAY AT AQUEDUCT
FIRST: 1 Mile, Claiming, 4&Up, Purse: $43,000.
3-Double Deep (M.Franco) ......7.00 3.70 No Tix
2-Rogue Nation (H.Diaz, Jr.) ............4.50 No Tix
6-Dooley (E.Cancel) .................................No Tix
Time — 1:39.45
Cloudy — Muddy
Scratched — Starship Zeus, Regal Quality. Also
Ran — Domain.
$1 Exacta (3-2) $11.90
5-Awesome Adversary (H.Diaz, Jr.) ...........4.60
Time — 1:43.32
Cloudy — Muddy
Also Ran — Dash for Dollars, Tazmonian Devil,
Shock Therapy, My Amanjena, Marble Moon.
$0.5 Pick 5 (3-1/2-3-2-6) $700.25
$0.5Pick 4 (1/2-3-2-6)$222.25 $1 Exacta(6-1) $25.25
$1 Pick 3 (3-2-6) $171 $0.5 Tri (6-1-5) $58.50
$0.1Super(6-1-5-2)$118.90 $1DailyDouble(2-6)$66.75
SECOND: 5 /2 Furlongs, Claiming, 4&Up, Purse:
$36,000.
1-Chateau (J.Lezcano) .................4.00 3.10 2.30
3-Ragnar Lothbrok (A.Worrie).............5.40 3.50
6-Latin Love Bug (M.Luzzi) ........................3.00
Time — 1:04.50
Cloudy — Muddy
Scratched — Takeoff. Also Ran — Thefinalcrazydude, I Love Jaxson.
$1 Daily Double (3-1) $9.10 $1 Exacta (1-3) $11.50
$1 Quinella (1-3) $7.40 $0.1 Super (1-3-6-4) $6.65
$0.5 Trifecta (1-3-6) $16.50
SIXTH: 6 1/2 Furlongs, Claiming, 4&Up F&M,
Purse: $36,000.
3-Sweet August Lady (M.Franco) ....4.40 3.30 2.80
6-Parlapiano (E.Cancel) ......................5.30 3.80
4-Zecha (H.Diaz, Jr.) ...................................4.90
Time — 1:19.86
Cloudy — Muddy
Also Ran — Solitary Gem, Tayler’s the Boss,
Third Card Down, Fingerpaint, She’saprettylady.
$1 Pick 3 (2-6-3) $171.75 $1 Daily Double (6-3) $23.30
$1 Exacta (3-6) $13.30 $0.1 Super (3-6-4-7) $26.55
$0.5 Trifecta (3-6-4) $39
THIRD: 6 1/2 Furlongs, Maiden Claiming, 4&Up,
Purse: $41,000.
3-Siena Magic (D.Davis) .............6.20 3.20 2.60
5-Shanghai Check (K.Carmona)...........2.80 2.30
4-Racing Raven (R.Maragh) ........................2.70
Time — 1:19.41
Cloudy — Muddy
Scratched — Our Honor. Also Ran — Bold Gem,
Alrahaal, Justinspeightofit.
$1 Pick 3 (3-1-3) $26.25 $1 Daily Double (1-3) $8.50
$1 Exacta (3-5) $7.10 $0.1 Super (3-5-4-7) $8.95
$0.5 Trifecta (3-5-4) $9.55
SEVENTH: 6 Furlongs, Allowance Optional Claiming, 3yo F, Purse: $64,000.
1-Quietude (J.Martinez) ......123.00 23.60 10.60
4-My Best Friend (R.Gutierrez) ..........3.20 2.70
5-Stabilize (B.Hernandez) ..........................7.30
Time — 1:13.71
Cloudy — Muddy
Also Ran — Shak’s Hidden Gem, Diamond
Princess, Mary’s Girl.
$1 Pick 3 (6-3-1) $1,102.50
$1 Grand Slam (2/5/6-1/5/6-3/4/6-1) $106.50
$1 Daily Double (3-1) $103.50 $1 Exacta (1-4) $149.25
$0.1 Super (1-4-5-6) $313.70 $0.5 Tri (1-4-5) $515.75
FOURTH: 1 Mile, 3yo, Purse: $60,000.
2-Twelfthofneverland (M.Franco)...14.40 5.00 3.50
6-Durkin’s Call (R.Gutierrez) ..............3.60 3.00
5-Success Hurricane (M.Luzzi)....................4.40
Time — 1:40.81
Cloudy — Muddy
Scratched — Captain Frost. Also Ran — Letzgometz, Classic Czar.
$1 Pick 3 (1-3-2) $65.25 $1 Daily Double (3-2) $29.50
$1 Exacta (2-6) $24.60 $1 Quinella (2-6) $8.60
$0.1 Super (2-6-5-ALL) $8.92 $0.5 Tri (2-6-5) $50.75
EIGHTH: 7 Furlongs, Allowance Optional Claiming, 4&Up, Purse: $67,000.
9-Fiery Opal (E.Rivera) .............13.80 6.20 3.60
1-Speightful Kitten (J.Alvarado) .........5.00 3.90
3-Tribecca (M.Franco) .................................2.90
Time — 1:25.66
Cloudy — Muddy
Also Ran — Sicilia Mike, Horoscope, Playthatfunnymusic, Arthur’s Hope, Retonova, Mascarello.
Pick 6 (3-2-6-3-1-9) 5 Cor. $4,369
$0.5 Pick 5 (2-6-3-1-9) $4,369 $1 Double (1-9) $391.50
$0.5 Pick 4 (6-3-1-9) $9,640.50 $1 Exacta (9-1) $44.75
$1 Pick 3 (3-1-9) $1,634 $0.1 Super (9-1-3-2) $97.70
$0.5 Trifecta (9-1-3) $96.87
WINNER PICKED BY MATTHEWS
Handle: $640,873
Total Handle: $4,432,004
NEWSDAY, MONDAY, JANUARY 7, 2019
newsday.com
1
FIFTH: 1 Mile, 3yo, Maiden Claiming, Purse:
$35,000.
6-Oh K Funnybone (M.Luzzi) .....14.00 6.10 4.60
1-Poker Game (M.Franco)....................3.00 3.00
WILD-CARD PLAYOFFS
Saturday
Indianapolis 21 ...................Houston 7
Dallas 24 ............................Seattle 22
Sunday
L.A. Chargers 23..............Baltimore 17
Philadelphia 16 ..................Chicago 15
DIVISIONAL PLAYOFFS
Saturday, Jan. 12
Indianapolis at Kansas City, 4:35 p.m.
Dallas at L.A. Rams, 8:15 p.m.
Sunday, Jan. 13
Los Angeles Chargers at New England,
1:05 p.m.
Philadelphia at New Orleans, 4:40 p.m.
CONF. CHAMPIONSHIPS
Sunday, Jan. 20
NFC: TBD, 3:05 p.m.
AFC: TBD, 6:40 p.m.
PRO BOWL
Sunday, Jan. 27
At Orlando, Fla.
AFC vs. NFC, 3 p.m.
SUPER BOWL
COLLEGES
WOMEN’S BASKETBALL
NFL PLAYOFFS
Miami 72 ..............................Wake Forest 57
Mississippi St. 86 .......................Kentucky 71
Missouri 66 .............................Tennessee 64
North Greenville 78.......................Furman 74
Notre Dame 76 .....................Georgia Tech 55
Rhodes 64 ..................................Sewanee 57
South Carolina 62 ......................Alabama 59
Syracuse 75 ..........................Virginia Tech 73
Midwest
Cincinnati 69 ....................................SMU 57
Creighton 65 ..........................Georgetown 38
Drake 82 ...................................Illinois St. 64
Illinois 66 .................................Minnesota 62
Indiana 68 .............................Michigan St. 64
Indiana St. 61 .............................S. Illinois 58
Loyola of Chicago 80.................Valparaiso 54
Missouri St. 88..........................Evansville 66
N. Iowa 81 ....................................Bradley 78
Omaha 78 ............................N. Dakota St. 61
South Dakota 105 ................S. Dakota St. 98
Xavier 63 .................................Seton Hall 62
Southwest
Baylor 73 ................................Texas Tech 56
Oklahoma St. 75 ................................TCU 71
UConn 81 .....................................Houston 61
West
Arizona St. 76 ............................Colorado 70
California 66 .........................Southern Cal 59
Oregon 98.........................Washington St. 58
Oregon St. 78.........................Washington 67
Stanford 86 .....................................UCLA 80
Utah 80 .........................................Arizona 64
GOLF
SENTRY TOURNAMENT OF CHAMPIONS
At Kapalua, Hawaii — Par 73
Xander Schauffele $1,300,000 72-67-68-62—269
Gary Woodland $759,000 ..67-67-68-68—270
Justin Thomas $475,000 ..67-72-70-65—274
Dustin Johnson $305,333 .67-74-69-67—277
Marc Leishman $305,333...68-70-68-71—277
Rory McIlroy $305,333.......69-68-68-72—277
Bryson DeChambeau $218,000 69-68-70-71—278
Patton Kizzire $191,000.....69-71-71-68—279
Jon Rahm $191,000 ..........70-71-69-69—279
Webb Simpson $191,000 ...70-72-72-65—279
Cameron Champ $162,500.71-68-74-67—280
Kevin Tway $162,500.........66-71-72-71—280
Jason Day $147,000...........69-71-75-66—281
Charles Howell III $132,00074-70-69-69—282
Andrew Putnam $132,000.69-73-70-70—282
Paul Casey $113,000..........73-71-68-71—283
Troy Merritt $113,000 .......73-71-69-70—283
Ian Poulter $102,000 .........71-69-73-71—284
Brice Garnett $92,333........73-72-73-68—286
Matt Kuchar $92,333 ........72-73-72-69—286
Scott Piercy $92,333..........76-72-69-69—286
Andrew Landry $82,500.....69-75-71-72—287
Brandt Snedeker $82,500 .75-69-71-72—287
Brooks Koepka $78,000 ....76-70-73-69—288
Billy Horschel $74,000 ......72-75-71-72—290
Patrick Reed $74,000 ........70-75-72-73—290
Keegan Bradley $68,250 ...77-69-72-73—291
Francesco Molinari $68,250 73-71-73-74—291
Ted Potter, Jr. $68,250.......75-73-71-72—291
Aaron Wise $68,250 .........74-71-73-73—291
Bubba Watson $65,000 ....70-79-74-69—292
Michael Kim $63,500 ........71-72-80-73—296
Satoshi Kodaira $63,500....77-76-73-70—296
Sunday, Feb. 3
At Atlanta
AFC champion vs. NFC champion, 6:30
p.m.
TENNIS
BRISBANE INTERNATIONAL
At Brisbane, Australia
Men’s Singles — Championship
Kei Nishikori (2), Japan, def. Daniil
Medvedev (4), Russia, 6-4, 3-6, 6-2.
Women’s Singles — Championship
Karolina Pliskova (5), Czech Republic, def.
Lesia Tsurenko, Ukraine, 4-6, 7-5, 6-2.
Men’s Doubles — Championship
Marcus Daniell, New Zealand, and Wesley
Koolhof, Netherlands, def. Rajeev Ram,
United States, and Joe Salisbury (4), Britain,
6-4, 7-6 (6).
ASB CLASSIC
At Auckland, New Zealand
Singles — Championship
Julia Goerges (2), Germany, def. Bianca
Andreescu, Canada, 2-6, 7-5, 6-1.
Doubles — Championship
Eugenie Bouchard, Canada, and Sofia
Kenin, United States, def. Paige Mary Hourigan, New Zealand, and Taylor Townsend,
United States, 1-6, 6-1, 10-7.
SYDNEY INTERNATIONAL
At Sydney
Men’s Singles — First Round
Martin Klizan, Slovakia, def. Alexei Popyrin, Australia, 7-6 (4), 4-6, 7-6 (5).
Jordan Thompson, Australia, def. Adrian
Mannarino, France, 6-3, 6-3.
Men’s Doubles — First Round
Ken and Neal Skupski, Britain, def. Nikola
Mektic, Croatia, and Alexander Peya (3), Austria, 6-3, 6-4.
HISTORY
THIS DATE IN SPORTS
Jan. 7
1961: Detroit’s Dick Lane blocks Sam Baker’s
extra-point kick to save a 17-16 win for the
Lions over the Cleveland Browns in the NFL’s
first Playoff Bowl.
1981: Marcel Dionne of the Los Angeles
Kings scores his 1,000th point with a goal in
a 5-3 triumph over the Hartford Whalers.
1997: Rutgers-Camden snaps its NCAArecord 117-game losing streak with a 77-72
victory over Bloomfield College. The Division
III Pioneers were winless since Jan. 18, 1992.
1999: Luc Robitaille of Los Angeles becomes
the 27th NHL player to reach 500 goals. Robitaille scores in the first and third periods
against goaltender Dwayne Roloson to help
the Kings beat the Buffalo Sabres 4-2.
2008: Second-ranked LSU turns the BCS national championship game into a horrible replay for No. 1 Ohio State. Matt Flynn throws
four touchdown passes in a 38-24 win. LSU
(12-2) becomes the first two-loss team to
play for the title and wins its second BCS
crown in five seasons.
2010: Alabama knocks Texas quarterback
Colt McCoy out of the BCS title game early,
and goes on to a 37-21 victory for the Crimson Tide’s first national title since 1992.
2012: Jarome Iginla scores his 500th career
goal, leading the Calgary Flames to a 3-1 victory over the Minnesota Wild.
2013: Alabama rolls to its second consecutive BCS championship, and third in four seasons, beating No. 1 Notre Dame 42-14 in a
BCS championship game.
Chargers 23, Ravens 17
L.A. Chargers
Baltimore
6 6 0 11 — 23
0 0 3 14 — 17
Q1 LAC: FG Badgley 21, 6:59. Drive: 5
plays, 12 yards, 2:36. L.A. Chargers 3,
Baltimore 0.
LAC: FG Badgley 53, 1:08. Drive: 4
plays, 7 yards, 2:13. Key Play: Rivers 4
pass to Ty.Williams on 3rd-and-7. L.A.
Chargers 6, Baltimore 0.
Q2 LAC: FG Badgley 40, 3:22. Drive: 9
plays, 37 yards, 5:29. Key Plays: Gordon
2 run on 3rd-and-1; Rivers 12 pass to
K.Allen; Rivers 9 pass to Gates on
3rd-and-4. L.A. Chargers 9, Baltimore 0.
LAC: FG Badgley 34, :00. Drive: 12
plays, 58 yards, 1:48. Key Plays: Rivers
5 pass to Gates on 3rd-and-1; Rivers 14
pass to Mi.Williams; Rivers 9 pass to
K.Allen on 3rd-and-7. L.A. Chargers 12,
Baltimore 0.
Q3 BAL: FG Tucker 33, 8:30. Drive: 4 plays,
6 yards, 1:56. L.A. Chargers 12,
Baltimore 3.
Q4 LAC: Gordon 1 run (Mi.Williams pass
from Rivers), 14:44. Drive: 10 plays, 60
yards, 4:38. Key Plays: Rivers 12 pass
to Gates on 3rd-and-9; Rivers 28 pass
to Mi.Williams; Gordon 14 run. L.A.
Chargers 20, Baltimore 3.
LAC: FG Badgley 47, 9:09. Drive: 7 plays,
16 yards, 4:00. Key Plays: M.Humphrey
5-yard illegal use of hands penalty on
3rd-and-8; Rivers 9 run on 3rd-and-8.
L.A. Chargers 23, Baltimore 3.
BAL: Crabtree 31 pass from L.Jackson
(Tucker kick), 6:33. Drive: 8 plays, 75
yards, 2:36. Key Plays: L.Jackson 7 run
on 3rd-and-1; L.Jackson 29 pass to
Snead. L.A. Chargers 23, Baltimore 10.
BAL: Crabtree 7 pass from L.Jackson
(Tucker kick), 1:59. Drive: 12 plays, 80
yards, 2:48. Key Plays: L.Jackson 10
pass to Dixon on 3rd-and-6; L.Jackson 7
run on 3rd-and-1; L.Jackson 39 pass to
Dixon; L.Jackson 9 pass to Andrews.
L.A. Chargers 23, Baltimore 17.
A: 70,432.
First downs ...................
Rushing.......................
Passing ......................
Penalty........................
Third down eff ...............
Fourth down eff .............
Total net yards ...............
Total Plays .................
Avg Gain ....................
Net yards rushing ..........
Rushes ........................
Avg per rush ...............
Net yards passing ..........
Sacked-Yds lost ..........
Gross-Yds passing ......
Completed-Att. ...........
Had Intercepted ..........
Yards-Pass Play ..........
Kickoffs-EndZone-TB .....
Punts-Avg. .....................
Punts blocked. ............
FGs-PATs blocked ..........
Total return yardage ......
Punt Returns .............
Kickoff Returns ..........
Interceptions ..............
Penalties-Yds .................
Fumbles-Lost .................
Time of possession ........
LAC
14
3
8
3
6-17
1-1
243
66
3.7
89
33
2.7
154
1-6
160
22-32
0
4.7
6-0-0
5-35.4
0
1-0
124
4-46
2-78
1-0
5-35
1-1
33:40
Individual Statistics
BAL
11
4
7
0
5-15
2-2
229
59
3.9
90
23
3.9
139
7-55
194
14-29
1
3.9
4-1-1
6-44.7
0
0-0
106
0-0
6-106
0-0
7-41
4-2
26:20
RUSHING: L.A. Chargers, Gordon 17-40,
Ekeler 11-29, Rivers 3-15, Jackson 2-5. Baltimore, Jackson 9-54, Edwards 8-23, Dixon
6-13.
PASSING: L.A. Chargers, Rivers 22-32-0-160.
Baltimore, Jackson 14-29-1-194.
RECEIVING: L.A. Chargers, Allen 4-37,
Gates 4-35, Ekeler 4-14, Benjamin 3-11,
Williams 2-42, Williams 2-9, Green 1-8, Gordon 1-3, Watt 1-1. Baltimore, Dixon 3-53,
Snead 3-50, Andrews 3-31, Crabtree 2-38,
Brown 2-14, Williams 1-8.
PUNT RETURNS: L.A. Chargers, King 4-46.
Baltimore, None.
KICKOFF RETURNS: L.A. Chargers, King
1-72, Benjamin 1-6. Baltimore, Montgomery
6-106.
TACKLES-ASSISTS-SACKS: L.A. Chargers,
Ingram 7-0-2, James 4-0-0, Addae 3-4-0,
Phillips 3-2-0, Hayward 3-1-0, Jenkins 3-0-0,
Jones 2-2-1, King 2-1-1, Nwosu 2-0-1, Bosa
2-0-1, Davis 2-0-0, Rochell 1-1-1, McGill
1-0-0, Square 1-0-0, Philon 1-0-0. Baltimore,
Mosley 7-4-0, Weddle 7-0-0, Smith 7-0-0, Onwuasor 6-1-1, Jefferson 4-3-0, Carr 4-0-0,
Judon 4-0-0, Young 2-0-0, Wormley 2-0-0,
Pierce 1-1-0, Williams 1-1-0, Board 1-0-0,
Urban 1-0-0, Bowser 1-0-0, Suggs 1-0-0,
Smith 1-0-0, Humphrey 1-0-0. Interceptions:
L.A. Chargers, Phillips 1-0. Baltimore, None.
MISSED FIELD GOALS: Baltimore, Tucker
50.
Eagles 16, Bears 15
Philadelphia
Chicago
3 0 7 6 — 16
0 6 0 9 — 15
Q1 PHI: FG Elliott 43, 9:32. Drive: 10 plays,
50 yards, 5:28. Key Plays: Foles 22 pass
to Smallwood; Foles 17 pass to Ertz;
Foles 12 pass to Jeffery on 3rd-and-8.
Philadelphia 3, Chicago 0.
Q2 CHI: FG Parkey 36, 9:38. Drive: 8 plays,
47 yards, 4:43. Key Plays: M.Bennett
15-yard unnecessary roughness penalty
on 3rd-and-5; Trubisky 2 pass to Miller
on 3rd-and-5; Trubisky 19 pass to
Cohen; Trubisky 6 run on 3rd-and-10.
Philadelphia 3, Chicago 3.
CHI: FG Parkey 29, :00. Drive: 13 plays,
78 yards, 2:38. Key Plays: Trubisky 23
pass to Miller; N.Bradham 5-yard illegal
use of hands penalty on 3rd-and-3;
Cunningham 2 run on 3rd-and-3;
Trubisky 12 pass to Gabriel on
3rd-and-3; Howard 12 run on 3rdand-10. Chicago 6, Philadelphia 3.
Q3 PHI: Goedert 10 pass from Foles (Elliott
kick), 5:20. Drive: 7 plays, 83 yards,
4:23. Key Plays: A.Amos 14-yard
unnecessary roughness penalty on
3rd-and-6; Foles 9 pass to Tate on
3rd-and-5; P.Amukamara 33-yard
defensive pass interference penalty.
Philadelphia 10, Chicago 6.
Q4 CHI: FG Parkey 34, 14:13. Drive: 6 plays,
62 yards, 2:20. Key Plays: Trubisky 12
pass to Robinson; Trubisky 45 pass to
Robinson; Trubisky 4 run on 3rd-and-9.
Philadelphia 10, Chicago 9.
CHI: Robinson 22 pass from Trubisky
(pass failed), 9:04. Drive: 6 plays, 80
yards, 2:56. Key Plays: Trubisky 19 pass
to Gabriel; Trubisky 34 pass to Bellamy.
Chicago 15, Philadelphia 10.
PHI: Tate 2 pass from Foles (run failed),
:56. Drive: 12 plays, 60 yards, 3:52. Key
Plays: Foles 15 pass to Jeffery; Foles 10
pass to Goedert; Foles 13 pass to Ertz;
Foles 11 pass to Jeffery on 3rd-and-9.
Philadelphia 16, Chicago 15.
A: 62,462.
PHI
First downs ...................
21
Rushing.......................
2
Passing ......................
17
Penalty .......................
2
Third down eff ...............
6-13
Fourth down eff .............
1-1
Total net yards ...............
300
Total Plays ..................
64
Avg Gain .....................
4.7
Net yards rushing ..........
42
Rushes ........................
23
Avg per rush ...............
1.8
Net yards passing ..........
258
Sacked-Yds lost ..........
1-8
Gross-Yds passing ......
266
Completed-Att. ........... 25-40
Had Intercepted ..........
2
Yards-Pass Play ..........
6.3
Kickoffs-EndZone-TB .... 4-1-1
Punts-Avg. ..................... 5-45.2
Punts blocked. ............
0
FGs-PATs blocked ..........
0-0
Total return yardage .....
34
Punt Returns .............. 1-(minu
Kickoff Returns ..........
2-35
Interceptions ..............
0-0
Penalties-Yds .................
3-25
Fumbles-Lost .................
0-0
Time of possession ....... 30:48
Individual Statistics
CHI
17
3
12
2
5-16
0-0
356
63
5.7
65
18
3.6
291
2-12
303
26-43
0
6.5
4-3-2
6-40.5
0
0-0
65
0-0
3-65
2-0
3-52
0-0
29:12
RUSHING: Philadelphia, Sproles 13-21,
Smallwood 8-20, Adams 1-2, Foles 1-(minus
1). Chicago, Howard 10-35, Gabriel 2-20, Trubisky 3-9, Cunningham 1-2, Cohen 1-0,
Mizzell 1-(minus 1).
PASSING: Philadelphia, Foles 25-40-2-266.
Chicago, Trubisky 26-43-0-303.
RECEIVING: Philadelphia, Jeffery 6-82, Ertz
5-52, Tate 5-46, Agholor 3-32, Goedert 2-20,
Smallwood 2-20, Sproles 2-14. Chicago,
Robinson 10-143, Gabriel 4-37, Miller 3-34,
Cohen 3-27, Shaheen 3-13, Braunecker 2-15,
Bellamy 1-34.
PUNT RETURNS: Philadelphia, Sproles
1-(minus 1). Chicago, None.
KICKOFF RETURNS: Philadelphia, Scott
2-35. Chicago, Bellamy 2-30, Cohen 1-35.
TACKLES-ASSISTS-SACKS: Philadelphia,
Douglas 8-0-0, Bradham 7-0-0, Graham
5-0-0, Maddox 5-0-0, Jenkins 5-0-0, Bennett
3-0-1, Sullivan 3-0-0, Hicks 3-0-0, LeBlanc
3-0-0, Jernigan 1-0-1, Graham 1-0-0, Cox
1-0-0. Chicago, Smith 6-1-0, Trevathan
6-0-0, Amos 5-1-0, Mack 5-1-0, Fuller 5-0-0,
Hicks 3-1-0, Bush 3-0-0, Goldman 2-2-0,
Floyd 2-1-1, McManis 2-1-0. Interceptions:
Philadelphia, None. Chicago, Amos 1-0,
Smith 1-0.
MISSED FIELD GOALS: Chicago, Parkey 43.
SPORTS STATS
HOCKEY
NHL STANDINGS
GF
176
152
122
120
131
130
124
136
GA
124
113
110
120
132
142
151
172
GF
144
147
135
121
108
114
122
116
GA
121
122
126
107
118
141
137
148
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT
Winnipeg ......41 26 13 2
Nashville .......43 25 15 3
Colorado ........42 20 14 8
Dallas ............43 22 17 4
Minnesota ....40 20 17 3
Chicago .........44 16 21 7
St. Louis .......39 16 19 4
Pacific Division
GP W L OT
Calgary ..........43 26 13 4
Vegas ............45 26 15 4
San Jose .......43 23 13 7
Anaheim .......43 19 17 7
Vancouver......45 20 21 4
Edmonton ......42 20 19 3
Arizona .........42 18 21 3
Los Angeles ...43 17 23 3
Pts
54
53
48
48
43
39
36
GF
139
131
144
116
118
128
110
GA
116
109
129
116
114
159
129
Pts
56
56
53
45
44
43
39
37
GF
153
136
150
104
128
118
108
98
GA
123
119
135
127
143
131
118
127
NHL SCHEDULE
Saturday
Islanders 4 .................................St. Louis 3
Calgary 3 ..............OT ..............Philadelphia 2
Minnesota 4 ...................................Ottawa 3
Columbus 4.................OT ................Florida 3
Toronto 5 ...................................Vancouver 0
Nashville 4....................................Montreal 1
Boston 2 .........................................Buffalo 1
Los Angeles 4 .............................Edmonton 0
San Jose 5 ................................Tampa Bay 2
Sunday
Arizona 5 ......................................Rangers 0
Carolina 5 ........................................Ottawa 4
Vegas 3 ....................................New Jersey 2
Washington 3 ..................................Detroit 2
Winnipeg 5 .......................................Dallas 1
Edmonton 4 ..................................Anaheim 0
Chicago 5 ...................................Pittsburgh 3
Monday
Nashville at Toronto, 7 p.m.
St. Louis at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Minnesota at Montreal, 7:30 p.m.
Calgary at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.
Los Angeles at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.
Tuesday
Carolina vs. Islanders, 7 p.m.
Rangers at Vegas, 10 p.m.
[/AGATE]Minnesota at Boston, 7 p.m.
Florida at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m.
New Jersey at Buffalo, 7 p.m.
Philadelphia at Washington, 7:30 p.m.
Columbus at Tampa Bay, 7:30 p.m.
Montreal at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Dallas at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
Colorado at Winnipeg, 8 p.m.
Edmonton at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.
Wednesday
Nashville at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Colorado at Calgary, 9:30 p.m.
Ottawa at Anaheim, 10 p.m.
Hurricanes 5, Senators 4
PENALTIES
1st period: Smith (R) (elbowing), 6:37.
2nd period: Archibald (A) (major-fighting),
7:30; Pionk (R) (cross-checking, served bu
Kreider, major-fighting), 7:30; Kreider (R)
(boarding), 10:02.
3rd period: Crouse (A) (hooking), 13:50.
Shots on goal: Rangers 5-9-9—23. Arizona
17-16-7—40. Power plays: Rangers 0 of 1;
Arizona 1 of 3. Goalies: Rangers, Georgiev
5-6-0 (8 shots-8 saves), Lundqvist 12-11-7
(32-27). Arizona, Kuemper 6-11-3 (23-23). A:
12,396.
Golden Knights 3, Devils 2
New Jersey........................2 0 0 — 2
Vegas ................................1 2 0 — 3
SCORING
1st period: 1, New Jersey, Hischier 12 (Lovejoy, Bratt), 5:06. 2, New Jersey, Lovejoy 1
(Stafford, Zacha), 9:37. 3, Vegas, Reaves 8,
12:30.
2nd period: 4, Vegas, McNabb 1 (Eakin, Carpenter), 11:17. 5, Vegas, Pacioretty 12 (Tuch,
Theodore), 15:46.
3rd period: None.
Shots on goal: New Jersey 11-7-20—38.
Vegas 11-11-6—28. Power plays: New Jersey 0 of 2; Vegas 0 of 2. Goalies: New Jersey,
Kinkaid 13-11-6 (28 shots-25 saves). Vegas,
Subban 2-5-0 (38-36). A: 18,103.
Jets 5, Stars 1
Dallas ................................0 1 0 — 1
Winnipeg ...........................0 2 3 — 5
SCORING
1st period: None.
2nd period: 1, Dallas, Radulov 14 (Seguin,
Klingberg), 1:56 (pp). 2, Winnipeg, Lowry 7
(Perreault, Tanev), 2:56. 3, Winnipeg, Myers
4 (Laine, Little), 18:56.
3rd period: 4, Winnipeg, Connor 14 (Morrissey, Wheeler), 1:15. 5, Winnipeg, Morrissey
5 (Trouba, Scheifele), 16:30 (sh). 6, Winnipeg, Little 7 (Trouba, Roslovic), 19:42 (pp).
Shots on goal: Dallas 9-14-4—27. Winnipeg
13-5-12—30. Power plays: Dallas 1 of 3; Winnipeg 1 of 3. Goalies: Dallas, Bishop 14-10-2
(29 shots-25 saves). Winnipeg, Hellebuyck
18-12-1 (27-26). A: 15,321.
Oilers 4, Ducks 0
Edmonton .........................3 1 0 — 4
Anaheim ...........................0 0 0 — 0
SCORING
1st period: 1, Edmonton, McDavid 24 (Jones,
Kassian), 7:37. 2, Edmonton, Puljujarvi 4 (Nugent-Hopkins, Nurse), 16:05. 3, Edmonton,
Brodziak 4 (Nugent-Hopkins), 19:49 (sh).
2nd period: 4, Edmonton, Draisaitl 23
(Jones), 7:25.
3rd period: None.
Shots on goal: Edmonton 13-6-5—24. Anaheim 14-17-8—39. Power plays: Edmonton 0
of 1; Anaheim 0 of 3. Goalies: Edmonton, Talbot 8-11-2 (39 shots-39 saves). Anaheim,
Gibson 15-13-6 (24-20). A: 17,317.
Blackhawks 5, Penguins 3
Chicago ..............................1 2 2 — 5
Pittsburgh .........................2 1 0 — 3
SCORING
1st period: 1, Pittsburgh, Hornqvist 15
(Malkin, Simon), 2:43. 2, Pittsburgh,
Guentzel 18 (Rust, Letang), 4:33. 3, Chicago,
DeBrincat 19 (Gustafsson, Kane), 16:23 (pp).
2nd period: 4, Chicago, Kunitz 1 (Dahlstrom,
Kruger), 6:46. 5, Pittsburgh, Brassard 7
(Kessel, Pettersson), 9:49. 6, Chicago, Keith
1 (Seabrook, Kane), 16:59.
3rd period: 7, Chicago, Strome 10 (Toews,
Kane), 1:48. 8, Chicago, Toews 17, 19:33.
Shots on goal: Chicago 7-14-10—31. Pittsburgh 12-16-6—34. Power plays: Chicago 1
of 3; Pittsburgh 0 of 3. Goalies: Chicago,
Ward 7-7-4 (34 shots-31 saves). Pittsburgh,
DeSmith 12-7-4 (30-26). A: 18,623.
Atlantic
W
Toronto.....................30
Philadelphia..............26
Boston .....................23
Nets .........................20
Knicks ......................10
Southeast
W
Miami ......................19
Charlotte .................19
Orlando ....................17
Washington .............16
Atlanta ....................12
Central
W
Milwaukee ...............27
Indiana .....................26
Detroit......................17
Chicago.....................10
Cleveland....................8
L
12
14
15
21
29
L
19
20
22
24
27
L
11
13
20
30
32
Pct GB
.714
—
.650
3
.605
5
.488 91/2
.256 181/2
Pct GB
.500
—
1
.487
/2
.436 21/2
.400
4
.308 71/2
Pct GB
.711
—
.667 11/2
.459 91/2
.250
18
.200
20
Southwest
W
Houston ...................22
San Antonio ............23
Memphis .................18
Dallas .......................18
New Orleans ...........18
Northwest
W
Denver......................26
Oklahoma City ........25
Portland ...................23
Utah .........................20
Minnesota ...............19
Pacific
W
Golden State ...........26
LA Clippers...............23
LA Lakers ................21
Sacramento..............19
Phoenix ......................9
L
16
17
21
21
22
L
11
14
17
20
21
L
14
16
19
20
32
Pct GB
.579
—
.575
—
.462 41/2
.462 41/2
.450
5
Pct GB
.703
—
.641
2
.575 41/2
.500 71/2
.475 81/2
Pct GB
.650
—
.590 21/2
.525
5
.487 61/2
.220 171/2
WESTERN CONFERENCE
NBA SCHEDULE
Saturday
Denver 123 ...............................Charlotte 110
Utah 110 ......................................Detroit 105
Philadelphia 106 ............................Dallas 100
New Orleans 133 ......................Cleveland 98
San Antonio 108 .......................Memphis 88
Toronto 123 ...........................Milwaukee 116
Golden State 127 ................Sacramento 123
Portland 110 ..............................Houston 101
Sunday
Nets 117 ..................................Chicago 100
LA Clippers 106 ............................Orlando 96
Minnesota 108 .........................LA Lakers 86
Atlanta 106 ....................................Miami 82
Washington 116 ................Oklahoma City 98
Toronto 121 .................................Indiana 105
Charlotte 119 .............................Phoenix 113
Monday
Nets at Boston, 7:30 p.m.
Knicks at Portland, 10 p.m.
[/AGATE]San Antonio at Detroit, 7 p.m.
Denver at Houston, 8 p.m.
Memphis at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Utah at Milwaukee, 8 p.m.
LA Lakers at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Orlando at Sacramento, 10 p.m.
Tuesday
Knicks at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.
Indiana at Cleveland, 7 p.m.
Washington at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Atlanta at Toronto, 7:30 p.m.
Denver at Miami, 7:30 p.m.
Minnesota at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.
Sacramento at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
Charlotte at LA Clippers, 10:30 p.m.
T’wolves 108, Lakers 86
Lakers
Min FG FT Reb A PF Pts
Hart .............25 3-12 2-2 0-2 2 0 10
Zubac............18 3-6 3-4 2-8 0 1 9
McGee .........15 0-3 2-2 1-2 1 1 2
Ball ..............22 0-4 0-0 0-6 4 2 0
Ingram .........25 5-16 3-5 2-5 1 2 13
Stephenson .27 5-11 4-10 1-5 6 2 14
CaldwellPope22 4-7 0-0 0-0 1 3 9
Chandler ......22 2-4 2-4 5-10 1 1 6
Beasley.........20 5-8 0-0 0-5 1 3 11
Wagner.........18 3-10 1-1 1-5 0 5 8
Mykhailiuk....15 2-5 0-0 0-0 2 0 4
Bonga ............5 0-1 0-0 0-0 1 0 0
Totals ...........240 32-87 17-28 12-48 20 20 86
FG%: .368, FT%: .607. 3PM-A: 5-22, .227 (Hart
2-5, Caldwell-Pope 1-2, Beasley 1-3, Wagner 1-5,
McGee 0-1, Ball 0-2, Mykhailiuk 0-2, Stephenson
0-2). BS: 4 (Ingram 2, Beasley, Wagner). TO: 21
(Beasley 5, Ingram 3, Caldwell-Pope 2, McGee 2,
Stephenson 2, Wagner 2, Zubac 2, Ball, Hart,
Mykhailiuk). STL: 6 (Hart 2, McGee 2, Beasley,
Caldwell-Pope). Tech: coach Lakers (Defensive
three second), 1:47 first; Beasley, 4:19 second.
T’wolves Min FG FT Reb A PF Pts
Gibson .........26 6-8 0-0 3-11 0 3 12
Wiggins .......35 9-23 7-11 1-5 2 2 28
Towns ...........35 11-20 5-5 3-18 3 5 28
Okogie .........34 3-7 1-2 0-2 0 4 8
Teague ..........28 6-13 0-0 0-6 11 2 15
Tolliver..........24 1-2 0-0 0-1 0 5 3
Saric ............21 2-5 1-2 1-1 2 2 6
Jones ...........19 1-6 1-1 0-2 6 1 3
Dieng ...........12 2-4 0-0 0-4 0 3 5
Terrell ............1 0-1 0-0 0-0 0 0 0
Totals ...........240 41-89 15-21 8-50 24 27 108
FG%: .461, FT%: .714. 3PM-A: 11-32, .344
(Teague 3-6, Wiggins 3-10, Dieng 1-1, Saric
1-2, Tolliver 1-2, Okogie 1-4, Towns 1-4, Terrell 0-1, Jones 0-2). BS: 9 (Towns 4, Okogie 3,
Gibson, Wiggins). TO: 14 (Towns 3, Gibson 2,
Okogie 2, Tolliver 2, Wiggins 2, Saric, Teague,
Terrell). STL: 10 (Jones 4, Teague 2, Towns 2,
Dieng, Okogie). Tech: Towns, 4:19 second.
L.A. Lakers ..........19 26 23 18 — 86
Minnesota ..........35 29 19 25 — 108
Hawks 106, Heat 82
Hornets 119, Suns 113
Nets
Min FG FT Reb A PF Pts
Dudley .........19 4-5 0-0 0-0 4 2 10
Kurucs .........19 2-6 0-0 0-5 1 0 6
Allen .............23 6-8 7-9 0-6 0 2 19
Harris ..........20 1-5 0-0 0-3 4 4 2
Russell..........33 10-19 2-2 0-4 5 2 28
Carroll...........30 7-12 3-4 3-4 4 1 20
Napier...........26 6-14 3-4 1-3 3 1 18
Dinwiddie ....25 3-6 1-1 0-0 5 1 7
Davis ...........24 3-4 1-2 2-13 1 3 7
Graham.........15 0-4 0-0 0-0 2 0 0
Totals ...........240 42-83 17-22 6-38 29 16 117
FG%: .506, FT%: .773. 3PM-A: 16-46, .348
(Russell 6-14, Carroll 3-8, Napier 3-9, Dudley
2-3, Kurucs 2-4, Dinwiddie 0-2, Graham 0-2,
Harris 0-4). BS: 3 (Allen 2, Graham). TO: 9
(Harris 3, Dinwiddie 2, Russell 2, Allen, Kurucs). STL: 6 (Carroll, Dinwiddie, Dudley, Kurucs, Napier, Russell). Tech: Kurucs, 00:32
second.
Bulls
Min FG FT Reb A PF Pts
Hutchison .....22 4-10 0-0 1-4 1 0 8
Markkanen ..33 5-11 3-4 0-6 0 2 14
Carter Jr. .....22 2-5 2-2 1-8 1 4 6
Dunn.............33 8-15 0-0 0-4 7 2 16
LaVine .........35 11-17 3-3 1-2 2 1 27
Harrison ......20 0-7 0-0 3-8 3 1 0
Arcidiacono...19 1-3 0-0 0-2 3 1 3
Portis............19 6-11 2-4 3-5 0 1 17
Lopez ............13 3-4 0-0 0-2 0 1 6
Blakeney.......12 0-3 0-0 0-1 1 2 0
Selden ...........3 0-1 1-2 0-0 1 0 1
Felicio ............3 1-1 0-0 1-1 1 0 2
Totals ...........240 41-88 11-15 10-43 20 15 100
FG%: .466, FT%: .733. 3PM-A: 7-18, .389 (Portis 3-4, LaVine 2-2, Arcidiacono 1-2, Markkanen 1-3, Blakeney 0-1, Carter Jr. 0-1, Selden
0-1, Dunn 0-2, Harrison 0-2). BS: 4 (Blakeney, Carter Jr., LaVine, Markkanen). TO: 11
(Dunn 3, Markkanen 2, Carter Jr., Harrison,
Hutchison, LaVine, Lopez, Portis). STL: 6
(Dunn 2, Arcidiacono, Carter Jr., Lopez,
Markkanen). Tech: None.
Nets ....................28 27 33 29 — 117
Chicago ...............21 34 27 18 — 100
Heat
Min FG FT Reb A PF Pts
J.Johnson ....18 3-7 0-0 2-4 3 3 7
McGruder ....22 1-6 1-3 2-3 5 2 3
Whiteside ....20 1-4 0-0 0-4 0 3 2
Richardson ...28 4-11 3-4 0-3 4 2 11
Winslow .......30 6-16 0-3 1-5 3 2 13
Jones Jr. .......29 5-9 4-5 1-3 0 1 14
Adebayo ......26 5-9 2-2 4-6 2 3 12
Wade ............22 3-8 4-7 0-4 3 0 11
Olynyk .........22 3-10 1-3 1-6 1 1 9
T.Johnson .....17 0-7 0-0 1-3 2 0 0
Totals ..........240 31-87 15-27 12-41 23 17 82
FG%: .356, FT%: .556. 3PM-A: 5-34, .147
(Olynyk 2-9, Wade 1-2, J.Johnson 1-3,
Winslow 1-5, Whiteside 0-2, Jones Jr. 0-3,
McGruder 0-3, Richardson 0-3, T.Johnson
0-4). BS: 7 (Adebayo 2, Whiteside 2, McGruder, T.Johnson, Wade). TO: 13 (Olynyk 3,
Whiteside 3, Winslow 2, Adebayo, McGruder, Richardson, T.Johnson, Wade). STL:
11 (Jones Jr. 3, T.Johnson 3, Adebayo 2,
Wade, Whiteside, Winslow). Tech: None.
Hawks
Min FG FT Reb A PF Pts
Bembry ........27 7-11 2-3 0-2 2 4 17
Collins...........27 5-6 3-3 3-13 0 4 13
Dedmon ........26 4-8 1-1 2-11 1 2 9
Huerter.........36 4-16 0-0 2-8 7 2 10
Young ..........30 6-14 4-6 0-2 2 1 19
Hamilton .....23 4-9 0-0 3-8 6 2 9
Carter ..........19 3-6 0-0 1-7 0 3 8
Len ..............19 2-8 0-0 3-7 0 3 4
Lin ...............16 7-9 0-0 0-1 5 0 15
Dorsey ............7 0-1 0-0 0-0 2 1 0
Spellman ........2 0-1 0-0 0-0 0 0 0
Anderson........2 1-2 0-0 0-0 0 0 2
Totals ..........240 43-91 10-13 14-59 25 22 106
FG%: .473, FT%: .769. 3PM-A: 10-24, .417
(Young 3-3, Carter 2-5, Huerter 2-7, Lin 1-1,
Bembry 1-2, Hamilton 1-2, Anderson 0-1,
Len 0-1, Dedmon 0-2). BS: 2 (Collins, Dedmon). TO: 17 (Young 4, Huerter 3, Bembry 2,
Collins 2, Dorsey 2, Hamilton 2, Len, Lin).
STL: 7 (Huerter 3, Carter, Dorsey, Len, Lin).
Tech: None.
Miami ..................16 21 21 24 — 82
Atlanta ...............23 15 41 27 — 106
A: 16,630.
Hornets Min FG FT Reb A PF Pts
Batum .........35 3-7 2-2 0-4 4 3 8
Williams .......34 6-12 2-2 5-7 2 3 16
Biyombo .......21 2-6 2-3 5-8 1 1 6
Graham ........20 2-4 2-2 0-3 3 1 8
Walker .........32 9-20 9-12 0-7 1 2 29
Parker ...........26 9-16 2-2 0-1 6 1 20
Hernangomez .23 8-12 3-7 3-9 4 5 19
Monk ............16 2-8 0-0 0-3 1 1 5
Kidd-Gilchrist15 3-5 1-2 1-2 0 2 7
Mil.Bridges ...12 0-1 1-2 0-2 0 2 1
Totals ..........240 44-91 24-34 14-46 22 21 119
FG%: .484, FT%: .706. 3PM-A: 7-25, .280 (Graham 2-2, Williams 2-5, Walker 2-7, Monk
1-4, Mil.Bridges 0-1, Kidd-Gilchrist 0-1,
Parker 0-1, Batum 0-4). BS: 1 (Williams).
TO: 15 (Hernangomez 3, Kidd-Gilchrist 3,
Walker 3, Graham 2, Parker 2, Batum, Biyombo). STL: 9 (Batum 3, Kidd-Gilchrist 2, Biyombo, Graham, Hernangomez, Williams).
Tech: None.
Suns
Min FG FT Reb A PF Pts
Mik.Bridges ..30 1-6 2-2 1-3 1 2 5
Warren .........37 9-17 2-2 1-5 5 5 23
Ayton ..........31 7-12 5-5 0-9 2 3 19
Booker ..........12 3-7 0-0 0-0 3 1 7
Melton .........26 2-4 0-0 0-7 4 5 5
Jackson ........32 9-13 1-2 1-6 4 2 22
Crawford ......23 6-10 3-3 0-1 2 1 16
Oubre Jr. ......17 2-6 2-2 0-2 1 3 6
Holmes .........16 2-3 2-3 0-3 1 3 6
Okobo ...........12 2-5 0-0 0-0 0 0 4
Totals ..........240 43-83 17-19 3-36 23 25 113
FG%: .518, FT%: .895. 3PM-A: 10-25, .400
(Jackson 3-4, Warren 3-6, Booker 1-2, Crawford 1-2, Melton 1-3, Mik.Bridges 1-4, Okobo
0-2, Oubre Jr. 0-2). BS: 4 (Mik.Bridges 2,
Ayton, Warren). TO: 14 (Crawford 3, Jackson
3, Booker 2, Melton 2, Ayton, Okobo, Oubre
Jr., Warren). STL: 8 (Warren 2, Ayton, Crawford, Holmes, Melton, Mik.Bridges, Okobo).
Tech: None.
Charlotte .............29 28 28 34 — 119
Phoenix ................30 30 21 32 — 113
A: 13,110.
Clippers 106, Magic 96
Magic
Min FG FT Reb A PF Pts
Gordon..........36 5-17 5-8 0-5 1 1 17
Isaac ............26 1-7 0-0 0-1 0 1 2
Vucevic ........32 7-17 0-0 4-24 8 1 16
Augustin ......24 3-6 6-7 0-0 3 0 12
Fournier ........30 5-11 1-2 2-3 2 3 12
Ross .............26 2-8 3-3 1-5 3 5 8
Simmons ......21 2-10 0-0 2-2 4 1 4
Iwundu ........19 3-6 1-2 0-3 1 3 8
Bamba ..........13 3-4 2-3 3-10 0 2 8
Martin ...........1 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0 0
Birch ..............1 0-1 0-0 0-0 1 0 0
Grant .............1 1-1 0-0 0-0 0 0 3
Briscoe ..........1 1-1 3-4 1-1 1 1 6
Totals ...........240 33-89 21-29 13-54 24 18 96
FG%: .371, FT%: .724. 3PM-A: 9-31, .290
(Vucevic 2-5, Gordon 2-7, Briscoe 1-1, Grant
1-1, Fournier 1-2, Iwundu 1-3, Ross 1-4, Augustin 0-2, Simmons 0-2, Isaac 0-4). BS: 7
(Bamba 2, Vucevic 2, Gordon, Isaac, Ross).
TO: 12 (Bamba 3, Vucevic 3, Gordon 2,
Fournier, Isaac, Ross, Simmons). STL: 6 (Augustin 2, Gordon, Isaac, Ross, Simmons).
Tech: None.
Clippers Min FG FT Reb A PF Pts
Gallinari ........32 5-16 1-1 0-5 2 3 13
Harris ..........35 10-21 7-8 0-9 2 2 28
Gortat...........25 4-8 0-0 5-10 6 3 8
Bradley ........25 3-10 0-0 1-2 0 1 7
GlgousAlxnder 23 6-7 0-0 0-2 2 2 13
Beverley ......25 1-3 0-2 1-5 2 4 3
Williams .......24 4-12 7-7 0-4 4 2 17
Harrell .........22 3-7 3-5 1-8 1 0 9
Wallace ........13 1-4 0-0 1-3 1 2 2
Scott ..............7 1-3 0-0 1-4 0 2 2
Motley ............1 2-2 0-0 1-1 0 0 4
Thornwell ......1 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0 0
Totals ...........240 40-93 18-23 11-53 20 21 106
FG%: .430, FT%: .783. 3PM-A: 8-22, .364
(Williams 2-3, Gallinari 2-10, GilgeousAlexander 1-1, Bradley 1-2, Harris 1-2, Beverley 1-3, Scott 0-1). BS: 5 (Harrell 2, Beverley,
Gortat, Harris). TO: 7 (Beverley, GilgeousAlexander, Harrell, Harris, Scott, Wallace,
Williams). STL: 5 (Bradley, Gilgeous-Alexander, Harrell, Harris, Wallace). Tech: None.
Orlando ...............28 19 20 29 — 96
L.A. Clippers .......18 27 25 36 — 106
NBA G LEAGUE
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W
L
Pct
GB
LI Nets .....................16
6 .727
—
Westchester ............16
8 .667
1
Raptors ....................14
9 .609 21/2
Delaware ...................8 13 .381 71/2
Maine ........................8 15 .348 81/2
Saturday
LI Nets 126 ...............................Raptors 105
Memphis 110 ................................Austin 97
Delaware 108 .........................Greensboro 86
Maine 109 .........................Grand Rapids 102
Iowa 127.................................Fort Wayne 99
Windy City 123 ........................Stockton 114
Santa Cruz 121 .............................Texas 116
Sunday
Capital City 90 ......................Westchester 89
Sioux Falls 113 ............Northern Arizona 105
Lakeland 117 ..........................Wisconsin 113
Oklahoma City 134 .........................Iowa 106
Monday
Stockton at Fort Wayne, 7 p.m.
Canton at Memphis, 8 p.m.
South Bay at Rio Grande, 8 p.m.
Wizards 116, Thunder 98
Wizards Min FG FT Reb A PF Pts
Ariza.............32 1-9 2-2 0-7 4 1 4
Green............33 6-14 2-2 3-6 2 3 16
Bryant .........21 6-8 2-3 2-7 1 1 14
Beal .............36 10-27 3-4 3-5 6 4 25
Satoransky ...28 5-10 3-4 1-2 2 2 15
Mahinmi .......24 4-8 1-2 3-10 1 2 9
Porter Jr. .....23 7-17 2-2 0-6 5 1 20
Randle .........17 2-4 3-3 1-4 4 2 7
Dekker ..........16 3-4 0-0 3-8 0 0 6
Brown Jr. ........2 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0 0
Baker ..............2 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0 0
Totals ..........240 44-101 18-22 16-55 25 16 116
FG%: .436, FT%: .818. 3PM-A: 10-37, .270
(Porter Jr. 4-6, Satoransky 2-5, Green 2-6,
Beal 2-10, Mahinmi 0-2, Randle 0-2, Ariza
0-6). BS: 8 (Porter Jr. 3, Mahinmi 2, Ariza,
Beal, Bryant). TO: 9 (Ariza 2, Bryant, Dekker,
Green, Mahinmi, Porter Jr., Randle, Satoransky). STL: 8 (Beal 2, Mahinmi 2, Ariza,
Bryant, Dekker, Green). Tech: None.
Thunder Min FG FT Reb A PF Pts
George..........35 7-18 3-4 1-4 5 2 20
Grant ...........32 7-11 1-1 2-2 1 2 17
Adams ..........31 5-6 2-4 0-8 1 3 12
Ferguson ......33 1-4 2-2 0-3 1 3 5
Westbrook ...37 9-23 2-6 2-15 13 2 22
Noel..............16 1-4 0-0 2-4 0 0 2
Schroder .......16 3-10 2-2 0-1 0 2 9
Patterson ....15 1-4 0-0 0-4 0 0 2
Nader ...........14 4-7 0-0 0-0 0 0 9
Diallo .............4 0-1 0-0 0-0 1 3 0
LuwawuCbrrt .2 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0 0
Totals ..........240 38-88 12-19 7-41 22 17 98
FG%: .432, FT%: .632. 3PM-A: 10-25, .400
(George 3-7, Grant 2-2, Westbrook 2-5,
Nader 1-1, Schroder 1-3, Ferguson 1-4, Patterson 0-3). BS: 3 (Noel, Patterson, Westbrook). TO: 14 (Westbrook 8, George 2,
Schroder 2, Adams, Grant). STL: 8 (Adams 2,
Ferguson 2, George 2, Grant, Nader). Tech:
None.
Washington .........28 26 36 26 — 116
Oklahoma City ....25 25 29 19 — 98
A: 18,203.
Raptors 121, Pacers 105
Pacers
Min FG FT Reb A PF Pts
Bogdanovic ..37 9-18 1-3 2-9 3 2 21
Young ..........32 7-10 0-0 5-9 1 4 14
Sabonis ........30 6-14 4-4 2-11 6 2 16
Collison ........24 5-8 0-0 0-0 5 0 11
Oladipo .........34 6-15 4-5 1-2 3 3 16
Joseph ..........27 3-11 2-2 0-4 0 2 9
McDermott ..17 1-1 0-0 0-0 3 3 2
O’Quinn ........17 3-8 3-4 2-7 3 2 9
Evans ...........15 2-8 1-2 0-1 0 1 5
Leaf ...............1 1-1 0-0 0-1 0 0 2
Holiday ...........1 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0 0
Totals ..........240 43-94 15-20 12-44 24 19 105
FG%: .457, FT%: .750. 3PM-A: 4-17, .235 (Bogdanovic 2-4, Collison 1-1, Joseph 1-2,
O’Quinn 0-1, Young 0-2, Evans 0-3, Oladipo
0-4). BS: 4 (O’Quinn 4). TO: 14 (Young 3,
Evans 2, McDermott 2, Oladipo 2, Sabonis 2,
Collison, Joseph, O’Quinn). STL: 8 (Young 3,
Bogdanovic 2, Joseph 2, Collison). Tech:
None.
Raptors Min FG FT Reb A PF Pts
Green ...........19 5-9 0-0 0-0 1 3 15
Siakam .........26 4-8 4-4 2-10 4 1 12
Ibaka ............22 7-9 2-2 1-6 0 4 18
Lowry ..........31 4-10 2-2 0-3 8 3 12
VanVleet ......34 3-10 5-6 0-2 8 2 12
Powell ..........31 10-12 0-0 0-2 1 3 23
Wright ..........25 4-8 0-0 2-4 6 3 10
Anunoby .......24 2-7 0-0 2-5 1 0 5
Monroe .........21 4-11 3-3 1-9 0 2 11
Boucher ..........1 1-1 0-0 0-0 0 0 3
Brown ............1 0-0 0-0 0-0 1 0 0
Totals ..........240 44-85 16-17 8-41 30 21 121
FG%: .518, FT%: .941. 3PM-A: 17-33, .515
(Green 5-8, Powell 3-3, Ibaka 2-2, Wright
2-2, Lowry 2-6, Boucher 1-1, Anunoby 1-4,
VanVleet 1-6, Siakam 0-1). BS: 4 (Ibaka 2,
Anunoby, Lowry). TO: 15 (Ibaka 5, Lowry 4,
Siakam 3, Anunoby, Green, VanVleet). STL: 9
(Lowry 3, Wright 2, Anunoby, Green, Monroe, Powell). Tech: None.
Indiana .................35 28 21 21 — 105
Toronto ...............37 33 26 25 — 121
A: 19,800.
BETTING LINE
PREGAME.COM LINE
HOME TEAM IN CAPS
NBA
Favorite
Line O/U
Underdog
San Antonio
3
214
DETROIT
1
BOSTON
10 218 /2
Brooklyn
N. ORLEANS
51/2 2131/2
Memphis
MILWAUKEE
51/2 2211/2
Utah
HOUSTON
1
215
Denver
DALLAS
OFF (OFF)
LA Lakers
SACRAMENTO
5
224
Orlando
PORTLAND
111/2 2201/2
Knicks
NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE
Favorite
Line Underdog
Line
TORONTO
OFF Nashville
OFF
PHILADELPHIA -117 St. Louis
+107
MONTREAL
-120 Minnesota
+110
Calgary
-170 CHICAGO
+158
SAN JOSE
-225 Los Angeles
+205
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
National Championship Game
Monday — At Santa Clara, Cal.
Favorite
Line O/U
Underdog
ALABAMA
5 1/2 571/2
Clemson
NFL
Saturday
Favorite
Line O/U
Underdog
KANSAS CITY
51/2 561/2
Indianapolis
Sunday
Favorite
Line O/U
Underdog
NEW ENGLAND 41/2 47
LA Chargers
NEWSDAY, MONDAY, JANUARY 7, 2019
Capitals 3, Red Wings 2
Washington ......................1 0 2 — 3
Detroit ...............................1 1 0 — 2
SCORING
1st period: 1, Washington, Wilson 12
(Kuznetsov), 6:57. 2, Detroit, Mantha 10, 14:08.
2nd period: 3, Detroit, Hronek 3 (Larkin,
Nyquist), 6:48.
3rd period: 4, Washington, Boyd 4 (Connolly,
Ovechkin), 6:19. 5, Washington, Kempny 5
(Kuznetsov, Niskanen), 16:08.
Shots on goal: Washington 13-6-15—34. Detroit 9-10-6—25. Power plays: Washington 0
of 4; Detroit 0 of 3. Goalies: Washington,
Holtby 16-10-2 (25 shots-23 saves). Detroit,
Howard 11-11-5 (34-31). A: 19,515.
SCORING
1st period: 1, Arizona, Garland 4 (EkmanLarsson, Galchenyuk), 7:19 (pp). 2, Arizona,
Kempe 2 (Crouse, Archibald), 9:19.
2nd period: 3, Arizona, Garland 5 (Cousins,
Galchenyuk), 6:34. 4, Arizona, Keller 9
(Stepan, Chychrun), 15:12. 5, Arizona,
Galchenyuk 7 (Goligoski, Oesterle), 16:38.
3rd period: None.
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Nets 117, Bulls 100
newsday.com
Carolina .............................2 2 1 — 5
Ottawa .............................0 4 0 — 4
SCORING
1st period: 1, Carolina, Faulk 3 (Aho, Teravainen), 1:12 (pp). 2, Carolina, McGinn 3,
4:28 (sh).
2nd period: 3, Ottawa, Duchene 18 (Ryan,
Wolanin), 2:32. 4, Carolina, Slavin 4 (Rask),
6:13. 5, Ottawa, Dzingel 17 (Tierney), 12:17
(pp). 6, Carolina, Hamilton 6 (McGinn, Aho),
14:54. 7, Ottawa, Balcers 1 (Boedker, Tierney), 19:12. 8, Ottawa, Pageau 1 (Stone,
DeMelo), 19:20.
3rd period: 9, Carolina, Williams 9 (Faulk, Teravainen), 7:34 (pp).
Shots on goal: Carolina 11-8-10—29. Ottawa
10-19-2—31. Power plays: Carolina 2 of 2; Ottawa 1 of 4. Goalies: Carolina, Mrazek 8-8-2
(31 shots-27 saves). Ottawa, Hogberg 0-2-1
(16-13), Nilsson 3-10-1 (13-11). A: 12,924
Rangers .............................0 0 0 — 0
Arizona ..............................2 3 0 — 5
NBA STANDINGS
y
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts
Tampa Bay.....42 32 8 2 66
Toronto .........41 27 12 2 56
Boston ..........42 24 14 4 52
Buffalo...........42 22 14 6 50
Montreal........42 22 15 5 49
Florida ...........40 17 16 7 41
Detroit ..........44 16 21 7 39
Ottawa .........43 15 23 5 35
Metropolitan Division
GP W L OT Pts
Washington...41 25 12 4 54
Pittsburgh .....42 23 13 6 52
Columbus ......41 24 14 3 51
Islanders........40 23 13 4 50
Carolina .........41 19 17 5 43
Rangers ........41 17 17 7 41
New Jersey ...41 16 18 7 39
Philadelphia ..41 15 20 6 36
BASKETBALL
Coyotes 5, Rangers 0
EASTERN CONFERENCE
A35
HOCKEY
A36
y
Hayes
remains
day-to-day
BY COLIN STEPHENSON
AP / RALPH FRESO
colin.stephenson@newsday.com
Rangers’ Filip Chytil is unable to beat Coyotes’ Darcy Kuemper with this backhand attempt in second period as Alex Goligoski looks on.
It’s getting ugly
Rangers again
lose by five goals;
Lundqvist pulled
BY COLIN STEPHENSON
NEWSDAY, MONDAY, JANUARY 7, 2019
newsday.com
colin.stephenson@newsday.com
GLENDALE, Ariz. — In the
opener of their three-game
western road trip Friday night
in Colorado, the Rangers took
10 penalties, and that was easy
to point to as the biggest reason why they lost in a rout.
On Sunday afternoon in Arizona, they cut the number of
penalties to four, but they still
lost to the struggling Coyotes,
5-0, and goalie Henrik Lundqvist
was pulled for the second
straight start.
The five-goal loss followed a
6-1 loss to the Avalanche, which
followed a 7-2 loss to the Penguins, so the Rangers have been
outscored 18-3 in the last three
games.
Lundqvist, who sat out Friday’s game after being pulled in
the third period of Wednesday’s
loss to the Penguins, was replaced by Alexandar Georgiev
after allowing the fifth goal at
16:38 of the second period Sunday. He stopped 27 of 32 shots.
“We’re just not playing good
enough to win,’’ defenseman
Marc Staal said. “We’re making
it too easy on teams and turning
a lot of pucks over and just doing
things that lose you hockey
games. Right now, we’re doing
that in a big way.’’
The Rangers played for the
second straight game without
center Kevin Hayes, their second-leading
scorer.
The
shutout loss was their third of
the season and they hit the
halfway mark at 17-17-7 after 41
games. Arizona is 18-21-3.
The road trip will end Tuesday in Las Vegas before the
Rangers return for a homeand-home set with the Islanders at the Garden on
Thursday and in Brooklyn on
Saturday afternoon.
In contrast with Friday —
when they had to kill three
penalties in the first period
against the Avalanche, including Cody McLeod’s fiveminute major for boarding —
the Rangers had only one
first-period penalty on Sunday, as Brendan Smith was
SCORECARD
COYOTES
5
:
0
RANGERS
Rangers
at Vegas
TV: MSG+, 10 p.m.
Radio: ESPN (1050)
Tuesday
sent off for elbowing at 6:37.
The Coyotes scored on the
ensuing power play on a netfront deflection by Conor Garland at 7:19. Mario Kempe
scored two minutes later, and
the result was never in much
question after that.
“We’ve just got to get off to
better starts,’’ coach David
Quinn said. “We’re fragile
mentally and physically right
now, the way things are going.
You lose three games like
that, there’s a whole heap of
problems right now, and
we’ve got to address them.
“We had no legs today. We
were clearly the slower team —
they had more jump than we
did. And it wasn’t just a certain
group of guys; it looked like it
was every man. We just didn’t
have any energy. And you can’t
play with no energy in this
league.’’
Left wing Chris Kreider
agreed that after the Rangers
gave up the first goal, it looked
as if they were down by more
than one. He attributed that to
the way things have gone the
last three games.
“The last couple games have
been obviously rough, and giving up a lot [goals],’’ Kreider
said. “And we were quick to get
frustrated tonight, myself included. It’s been a recurring
thing, trying to do too much, instead of just doing our jobs to
the best of our ability.’’
The Coyotes poured it on
with three goals in the second
period — a second net-front deflection by Garland, a wrister
between the pads by Clayton
Keller and a rebound jam-in off
a shot that Lundqvist couldn’t
snare in his catching glove.
After that goal, Quinn pulled
the plug on Lundqvist (12-11-7).
“Listen, we hung him out to
dry too often,’’ Quinn said.
“When you have the puck as
much as they did, it’s tough. It’s
exhausting.’’
GLENDALE, Ariz. —
Kevin Hayes missed his second straight game on Sunday
because of an upper-body injury, one that Rangers coach
David Quinn has termed
“nagging.’’ The team’s second-leading scorer remains
day-to-day.
“He’s got an injury that, it
really all depends on how he
feels when he wakes up,’’
Quinn said of Hayes, who
first suffered the injury when
he crashed hard into the end
boards in the first game the
Rangers played against Arizona, a 4-3 overtime loss at
the Garden on Dec. 14.
Hayes has 10 goals and 23
assists and is second on the
team in scoring behind Mika
Zibanejad (11-23-34).
“It’s really nothing long
term, but hopefully he feels
better tomorrow,’’ Quinn
said.
With Hayes out, Quinn
again used 19-year-old rookie
Filip Chytil as the team’s No. 2
center, playing him between
Mats Zuccarello, who shifted
to left wing, and Ryan Strome,
promoted from the fourth
line.
Vladislav
Namestnikov
dropped to the third line with
Brett Howden and Pavel Buchnevich. Jimmy Vesey played
on the fourth line with Boo
Nieves and Cody McLeod.
\ Smith in, Claesson out
Quinn made one change on
defense, inserting Brendan
Smith in place of Fredrik Claesson. Smith took an untimely elbowing penalty at 6:37 of the
first period that led to the Coyotes’ first goal. Smith did not
play the rest of the period, but
he did take a regular shift in
the second and third and finished with 15:49 of ice time
. . . Defenseman Neal Pionk,
usually the Rangers’ leader in
ice time (22:55 per game coming in), fought Coyotes forward Josh Archibald in the second period and received a
cross-checking minor in addition to the fighting major.
Pionk had 18:49 in ice time . . .
The Rangers are scheduled to
practice in Las Vegas on Monday.
SPORTS
A37
IN BRIEF
y
NBA
T-wolves fire Thibodeau
The Minnesota Timberwolves
on Sunday fired coach Tom Thibodeau, halfway into his third
season that began with turmoil
surrounding Jimmy Butler, who
eventually forced his way out.
Thibodeau, also the president
of basketball operations with full
roster authority, finished 97-107
with the T-wolves, who returned
to the NBA playoffs last spring
after a 13-year absence. The
move was made about an hour
after the team’s 108-86 victory
over the Lakers.
GOLF
JIM MCISAAC
Schauffele (62) passes field
Robin Lehner, who led the NHL in goals-against average at 2.18 entering Sunday, has been a bargain on a one-year, $1.5-million deal.
Lehner MVP for Isles
Goalie has won
seven straight in
surprise season
BY ANDREW GROSS
andrew.gross@newsday.com
Tuesday
Hurricanes
at Islanders
at Nassau Coliseum
TV: MSG+, 7 p.m.
Radio: WRHU (88.7),
WRCN (103.9)
UConn rebounds from loss
Katie Lou Samuelson had 19
points and Napheesa Collier
added 18 as the top-ranked Connecticut women’s basketball
team rebounded from a rare regular-season loss with an 81-61
win over host Houston. UConn
(12-1, 1-0 American) had its
streak of 126 consecutive regular-season wins snapped by No.
8 Baylor on Thursday.
Hofstra falls
Boogie Brozoski had 15 points,
Ana Hernandez Gil had 14, and
E’Lexus Davis had 13 points and
five steals for Hofstra, but visiting Elon pulled away for a 77-64
Colonial Athletic Association
victory. The Pride is 6-8, 0-2.
Michigan stays unbeaten
Charles Matthews scored 16
of his 18 points in the first half
to lead No. 2 Michigan (15-0,
4-0 Big Ten) in a 74-63 men’s
victory over visiting No. 21 Indiana (12-3, 3-1).
NHL
Vegas tops Devils
Max Pacioretty broke a tie
with 4:14 left to help host Vegas
beat the Devils, 3-2.
— AP
NEWSDAY, MONDAY, JANUARY 7, 2019
play, becoming one of coach
Barry Trotz’s most trusted defenders and contributing three
goals and 12 assists, both career highs.
Identity award – Trotz has
relied upon the reunited
fourth line of Casey Cizikas,
Matt Martin and Cal Clutterbuck to set the tone for a detail-oriented,
hard-working
team identity. Cizikas already
has a career-high 10 goals and
Martin had a game-changing
goal on Saturday.
Fountain of youth award –
Fully healthy defenseman
Johnny Boychuk, 34, is Trotz’s
most trusted end-of-game performer.
Need more from – Top-line
right wing Jordan Eberle, a
20-goal scorer the previous five
seasons who has only 18 points.
What to watch for – Eberle,
Anders Lee and Brock Nelson,
who comprise the top line, are
all on expiring contracts. The
trade deadline is Feb. 25. Also,
the continued development in
the second half of defenseman
Devon Toews, 24, and forwards Josh Ho-Sang and
Michael Dal Colle, both 22.
Possible postseason honors
– Lehner, sober after battling alcohol and pill addiction as well
as mental health issues, could
be in line for the Bill Masterton
Memorial Trophy for perseverance. Trotz should be a Jack
Adams candidate as the
league’s top coach, taking a
team that allowed 293 goals last
season (the most in the NHL
since 2007) to a league-low 107
through 40 games. President
and general manager Lou Lamoriello could be an executive of
the year candidate for his roster- and dressing room-fortifying signings of Lehner, Leo Komarov and Valtteri Filppula and
his re-acquisition of Martin, not
to mention hiring Trotz.
COLLEGES
newsday.com
The Islanders will reach the
midway point of their ultra-compelling season when they face
the Hurricanes on Tuesday
night at NYCB Live’s Nassau
Coliseum.
They did not practice on Sunday after extending their winning streak to six games with
Saturday night’s 4-3 comeback
win in St. Louis despite being
outplayed by the Blues.
The victory jumped the Islanders into the Eastern Conference’s first wild-card spot, only
four points behind the Metropolitan Division-leading Capitals (and with a game in hand).
A win on Tuesday would give
the Islanders (23-13-4) their first
seven-game winning streak
since they ended 2013-14 with
three victories and started the
next season with four. They
have not won seven straight in a
single season since a nine-game
streak from Dec. 31, 1989-Jan. 19,
1990.
Some first-half highlights:
Team MVP – A month ago,
goalie Thomas Greiss was the
clear pick. Lately, All-Star center Mathew Barzal, who had a
six-game point streak (eight
goals, three assists) snapped on
Saturday, has been the team’s
best skater.
But there’s no doubt that
goalie Robin Lehner is the pick.
His 29-save performance on Saturday was his seventh straight
win, and he has allowed only 13
goals in his last 10 appearances.
Entering Sunday, he was leading
the NHL with a 2.18 goalsagainst average and was second
with a .927 save percentage.
Quite a bargain on a one-year,
$1.5-million deal.
Most improved – It could be
the whole team, given the dire
preseason predictions for life
after John Tavares. But defenseman Scott Mayfield perhaps
has taken the biggest individual jump in terms of overall
Xander Schauffele tied the
Plantation course record with an
11-under-par 62 to beat Gary
Woodland (68) by one shot with
a 269 total in the Sentry Tournament of Champions in Kapalua,
Hawaii. Schauffele started the
final round five shots out of the
lead and opened with a bogey in
the year-opening event that features only PGA Tour winners
from the previous season.
BASEBALL
A38
BY DAVID LENNON
NEWSDAY, MONDAY, JANUARY 7, 2019
newsday.com
david.lennon@newsday.com
The Mets may not be spending piles of cash in the freeagent market, but they’re certainly burning through stacks
of organizational currency.
That trend continued Sunday
when general manager Brodie
Van Wagenen pulled off two
more trades — and his third in
24 hours — by shipping catcher
Kevin Plawecki to the Indians
for righthander Walker Lockett
and infielder Sam Haggerty as
well as sending three minor-leaguers to the Astros for utility
piece J.D. Davis and infielder
Cody Bohanek.
Once the Mets signed
catcher Wilson Ramos to a
two-year, $19-million deal last
month, the only question left
was who would be the backup,
and now that has been answered. The Mets evidently preferred Travis d’Arnaud’s greater
offensive upside over Plawecki
despite the fact that d’Arnaud is
coming off Tommy John
surgery that limited him to four
games last season.
Plawecki’s days in Flushing appeared to be numbered once the
Mets agreed on a one-year,
$3.5-million deal to bring back
d’Arnaud rather than non-tendering him because of his lengthy injury history. D’Arnaud will turn
30 next month and has never
lived up to what many saw as his
potential, partly because of his inability to stay on the field.
As far as the return for
Plawecki — a former firstround pick (35th overall) from
the 2012 draft — the Mets are
hoping for some much-needed
rotation insurance in Lockett,
who made his major-league
debut last season for the Padres.
Lockett, 24, was 0-3 with a
9.60 ERA in three starts and
one relief appearance for San
Diego. He was named the
Padres’ minor-league pitcher of
the year in 2016 and has a 4.15
ERA in 101 minor-league
games, including 85 starts. The
Indians traded for him in November.
Haggerty, 24, batted .239 with
four homers, 26 stolen bases
and a .753 OPS in 94 games split
between Triple-A Columbus
and Double-A Akron.
In Sunday’s other trade, the
Mets expect Davis, 25, to help
bolster the corner spots, both
infield and outfield, after handling those positions in 66
games for Houston the past
two seasons. He won the PCL
batting title last year, hitting
.342 with 17 homers and a .988
OPS for Triple-A Fresno. Davis
also was the closer for his college team at Cal State Fullerton
and had four strikeouts in 2 2/ 3
relief innings for the Astros.
“J.D. is a versatile offensive
talent,” Van Wagenen said in a
statement. “He’s young, had
success vs. lefties and he’ll
provide depth at the corner
positions.”
The Mets could use more of
a plate presence from the
right side, and Davis has
stung lefties for a .350 average
with 27 homers in 266 at-bats
over his last three minorleague seasons. Sounds like a
Wilmer Flores replacement,
with the ability to play the outfield as well.
Davis, who is out of minorleague options, batted .175
(18-for-103) with one homer in 42
games for the Astros last season.
In the span of 24 hours, Van
Wagenen dealt Plawecki and acquired Davis and outfielder
Keon Broxton, two depth players who cost him a total of six
minor-leaguers,
including
Kevin Plawecki was the odd man out in the Mets’ catching rotation;
J.D. Davis, right, gives the team a righthanded bat off the bench.
Bobby Wahl, the hard-throwing
reliever acquired from the A’s
last season in the Jeurys Familia deal. Davis came at the expense of three younger players
still in the early stages of their
development.
Outfielder Ross Adolph, 22,
was the Mets’ 12th-round pick
in last year’s draft and batted
.276 with 12 triples and seven
homers in 61 games for Class A
Brooklyn. Infielder Luis Santana, 19, hit .348 with four
homers in 53 games for Rookie
League Kingsport. Catcher
Scott Manea, 23, batted .261
with 12 homers in 100 games
for Class A Columbia.
The Mets have invested $49
million this offseason in a pair
of free agents, Familia and
Ramos, and taken on a net cost
of roughly $62.5 million in the
deal for Robinson Cano and
new closer Edwin Diaz.
Rather than continue to
shore up the roster in what is
becoming a buyer’s free-agent
market, Van Wagenen has
dipped into his limited supply
of minor-league chips, dealing
away nine — including a pair
of former first-rounders — in
trades specifically designed to
strengthen the 2019 roster.
AP / ALEX GALLARDO
Sent to Indians
in one of two
deals for depth
JIM MCISAAC
Plawecki
dealt by
busy Mets
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BASKETBALL
y
A40
SURGING NETS
POLISH THEIR
FINISHING ACT
They’re dominant again in 4th quarter
BY GREG LOGAN
newsday.com
NEWSDAY, MONDAY, JANUARY 7, 2019
CHICAGO — The transformed Nets are beginning to
look like legitimate playoff contenders in the Eastern Conference. They won the kind of game
they were supposed to win
against the struggling Bulls, and
they did it in impressive fashion
with a dominant fourth-quarter
performance in a 117-100 victory
Sunday afternoon at United Center.
The win, which was powered
by a 29-18 fourth quarter, was the
third straight and 12th in the past
15 games for the Nets, who
evened their road record at 10-10.
They reached the halfway point
of the season with a 20-21 overall
record that has them in seventh
place in the conference.
During the eight-game losing
streak that dropped the Nets to
8-18, such a run of success was
unimaginable. Asked what he
would have said a month ago if
he had been told the Nets could
reach .500 with a win Monday
night in Boston, Jared Dudley
said, “I would’ve said that we fi-
NETS
117 : 100
AP / NUCCIO DINUZZO
SCORECARD
greg.logan@newsday.com
BULLS
Nets
at Boston
TV: YES, 7:30 p.m.
Radio: WFAN (660, 101.9)
Monday
nally figured it out. We don’t
watch nearly as much film as we
did during that eight-game
streak because now guys hold
each other accountable.
“It’s not even the coaches calling people out; it’s the players
calling other players out on the
floor when it’s a missed assignment. So I’d say that guys finally
looked themselves in the mirror,
bought in, and it all started clicking at the right time.”
That was evident in the fourth
quarter. Earlier in the game, the
Nets let a 12-point second-quarter lead dwindle to a halftime tie.
In the third quarter, they pushed
the lead to 12 again, only to see it
cut in half.
Jarrett Allen, going in for a dunk, shot 6-for-8 and finished with 19 points and six rebounds.
But the Nets lately have
shown increased confidence
when it comes to closing games,
and it was on display when they
opened the fourth quarter with a
16-5 run to gain a 104-87 lead
with 6:26 to play. D’Angelo Russell and Shabazz Napier each
scored five points in that span.
Their lead never dropped below
14 points the rest of the way.
“I think we’ve reached — not
the apex — but we’re getting
close to reaching the principles
and the ideal of the type of basketball we want to play,” coach
Kenny Atkinson said. “We’ve
been at it a long time, myself almost three seasons. I sat back in
my seat today because it was run-
ning by itself and they knew
what to do and they were talking. That’s the ideal scenario for
a coach.”
Russell topped the Nets with
28 points and five assists. DeMarre Carroll continued his hot
streak with 20 points, Jarrett
Allen was a force in the paint
with 19 and Napier added 18. The
Nets’ bench outscored the Bulls’
reserves 52-28.
Zach LaVine had 27 points,
Bobby Portis 17 and Kris Dunn 16
for the Bulls (10-30).
Beating the Bulls, who lost
their fourth straight, may not
seem like a big deal, but putting
them away in the fashion the
Nets did is a sign of progress. It
came on the heels of a similar finish at crunch time Friday in
Memphis.
“We’ve been playing at a good
level,” Russell said. “Just keep
building on it, taking care of
what we’re supposed to take
care of and give ourselves a
chance when the numbers are in
our favor. Our confidence is
high. I don’t think anybody can
tell us anything else.”
Asked how it feels to be seventh in the conference, Russell
said he doesn’t look at the standings. “I know we’ve got Boston
tomorrow,” he said. “That’s all I
really know. It’s good to hear. It’s
good to be talked about, but
we’ve got a lot of games left.”
Lineup including three point guards is working
BY GREG LOGAN
greg.logan@newsday.com
CHICAGO — For the second
straight game, coach Kenny
Atkinson successfully used a
three-point guard lineup featuring D’Angelo Russell, Spencer
Dinwiddie and Shabazz Napier
during key stretches of the Nets’
117-100 win over the Bulls on Sunday afternoon at United Center.
All were on the floor together
in the spurts when the Nets
pushed their lead to 12 points in
the second and third quarters,
but this time Atkinson finished
with Russell and Napier, who had
12 points in the fourth quarter.
“We have so much speed,”
Atkinson said of that lineup.
“What I’m surprised about is
how seamless it is. You would
think you would have three
guards running back to try to get
the ball. But that’s our ideal scenario where we have multiple
ballhandlers and they can play
different positions. They’ve embraced that and seem like they’re
enjoying it. It’s been good for us.”
Russell led the Nets with 28
points and Napier had 20. Dinwiddie scored only seven, but
Atkinson credited his defense
with slowing down Zach LaVine.
In that lineup, DeMarre Carroll moves to power forward.
“It’s great,” said Carroll, who had
20 points. “When you’ve got four
guys out there that can shoot the
three-ball, it’s kind of hard to
guard. Then you’ve got three
other guys that can penetrate, it’s
even more hard to guard.”
When told that Atkinson said
he sat back and let the Nets go on
autopilot at the end, Russell said,
“That’s a heck of a compliment,
especially when you’ve got three
guards out there. Coach calls
them the ‘quarterbacks,’ and we
consider ourselves the best three
quarterbacks in the NBA. We
feel like we all can drive that. For
him to sit back and give us that
leash to do that, everybody is trying to take advantage of it. We’re
winning, so it’s just keeping that
trust.”
BASKETBALL
A41
Knicks chill out before Blazers
BY ANTHONY RIEBER
Monday
Knicks
at Portland
TV: MSG, 10 p.m.
Radio: WNYM (970)
said. “I was too busy hanging out
with the guys in the locker room.
Sometimes you get caught up in
the moment of just feeling good
with the guys. But hell, I’ve got
LeBron’s number.”
In Knox, the Knicks have a
19-year-old star in the making.
He showed his chops at Staples
Center, scoring 14 points a day
after being named Eastern Conference Rookie of the Month for
December.
So what could Knox get from a
conversation with James?
“I think how I look at it is if he
just gets even a little bit from it
— you know, I’m not looking for
this guy to show him, like, the oracle or this is the whole thing of
how you get it done,” Fizdale
said. “But if he can just give him
a nugget that he can take with
him and apply to what he does,
then it’s all worth it.”
As far as speaking to others
around the league, Knox said he
keeps in touch with some of his
many fellow Kentucky players.
He would have liked to have sat
down with James and hopes it
will happen eventually. “He’s
probably got a lot of stuff on his
calendar,” Knox said. “So I didn’t
want to bother him or nothing
like that. I let him live his life.”
Notes & quotes: Frank Ntilikina shed the walking boot on his
sprained left ankle, but he likely
will miss Monday’s game in Portland. Ntilikina was injured late in
the first quarter on Friday . . .
Fizdale said Mitchell Robinson’s
return from a left ankle injury
will have to wait until the team
hosts the Pacers on Friday.
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Kevin Knox scored 14 points
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Knicks snapped an eight-game
losing streak Friday night.
newsday.com
BEAVERTON, Ore. — Athletic greatness was all around
the Knicks on Sunday. Ahead of
Monday night’s game against
the Trail Blazers, the 10-29
squad practiced at the sprawling, ostentatious Nike World
Headquarters.
As they entered the swooshbedazzled campus, the Knicks’
buses passed a huge poster of
Tiger Woods. They originally
were supposed to practice at the
Bo Jackson Fitness Center,
which is near buildings named
after Serena Williams and Sebastian Coe. But the practice was
moved at the last minute to the
“Coach K Building” — aka the
Mike Krzyzewski Fitness Center.
After the practice, coach
David Fizdale was asked if he expects to have a building named
after him someday. “It’ll be a
small building,” he cracked.
The Knicks were in a good
mood, and not just because one
of the team buses post-practice
was headed for the Nike team
store for any player who wanted
to enjoy a shopping spree.
No, the Knicks still were basking in the afterglow of their
119-112 win over the Lakers in Los
Angeles on Friday night. (A couple of free nights in L.A. probably didn’t hurt their moods either. The team didn’t fly to Portland until Sunday morning for a
late-afternoon workout.)
That win came against a Los
Angeles team that was without
its (and Nike’s) star, LeBron
James. Fizdale was an assistant
coach in Miami when James was
there, so he knows The King
well. Fizdale had hoped to facilitate a chat between James and
rookie Kevin Knox, but the timing didn’t work out.
“I never pulled it off,” Fizdale
GETTY IMAGES / HARRY HOW
anthony.rieber@newsday.com
FOOTBALL
A42
THIRD SHOWDOWN FOR
Reigning champ
Bama1-1against
Clemsoninfinal
BY JOSH ROLLER
NEWSDAY, MONDAY, JANUARY 7, 2019
newsday.com
Special to Newsday
SAN JOSE, Calif. — Alabama
and Clemson are about to complete a trilogy that will determine the national championship
for the third time in four seasons
and define the decade of transition from the old Bowl Championship Series to the College Football Playoff.
When the Crimson Tide
(14-0) and the Tigers (14-0)
meet Monday evening at Levi’s
Stadium in Santa Clara, they’ll
be matching up for the fourth
consecutive year in the postseason and for the third time in
the title game.
“I think this sort of has become a little bit like someone
you play in your league because
we have played several years in a
row now,” Nick Saban said.
He will go for a sixth national
title with Alabama — which
would tie former Crimson Tide
coach Paul “Bear” Bryant — and
his seventh overall, which would
be a record. Alabama, the
5 1/ 2-point favorite, is trying to
earn its 18th national crown.
Clemson is seeking its second
championship in three seasons
and third overall. Alabama already has secured its place as the
dominant program in the
decade, with championships in
the 2011, 2012, 2015 and 2017 seasons to follow its first title under
Saban in 2009. Another Clemson
triumph would make the Tigers
the most prominent challenger
in the decade.
“It’s a heavyweight fight,”
Clemson coach Dabo Swinney
said, “but for it to be a true rivalry, we’ve got to win a few.”
Clemson beat Alabama in the
final two years ago after losing it
to the Tide the previous season.
Clemson has the No. 1 scoring
defense in the nation, allowing
12.9 points a game. Alabama’s
scoring average of 47.7 points is
second to Oklahoma. Clemson is
No. 4 in scoring with 44.3 points
per game and Alabama has the
No. 5 defense (16.2).
Alabama will be without three
players who were suspended be-
NATIONAL
CHAMPIONSHIP
Alabama
vs.
Clemson
Monday
TV: ESPN, 8 p.m.
Radio: ESPN (98.7)
fore the semifinal against Oklahoma in the Orange Bowl. Saban
said they violated NCAA rules.
Among them is starting left
guard Deonte Brown. Lester Cotton is expected to take Brown’s
place in the starting lineup, as he
did in the semifinal.
Clemson will be without three
players who were suspended before the Cotton Bowl victory
over Notre Dame after trace
amounts of the banned substance ostarine appeared in a random drug test. Defensive tackle
Dexter Lawrence was the only
starter to be suspended.
“I’m thankful we got Albert
Huggins,” Swinney said of the senior who will take Lawrence’s
place.
The game will complete a circle for Alabama sophomore quarterback Tua Tagovailoa, the Maxwell Award winner and Walter
Camp Player of the Year, who
came off the bench in the second
half to rescue the Tide in the
final against Georgia last January. Tagovailoa’s 41-yard touchdown pass to DeVonta Smith on
the last play of the season transformed a once-obscure backup
into one of the best-known players in the country.
This season Tagovailoa beat
out junior Jalen Hurts, who had
led the Tide to a 26-2 record in
two seasons. “You’ve got to go in
with the mindset that everyone’s
competitors, but at the end of the
day, we can all be friends,” Tagovailoa said.
At the end of the fifth season
under the four-team playoff format, the collective success of the
two most dominant programs
raised a question Sunday: Is another Clemson-Alabama final
good for college football?
“I don’t really get too concerned about a lot of other programs,” Saban said.
Swinney was more blunt:
“I’m not going to apologize for
having a great team.”
TALE OF
Alabama
2018 W-L
14-0
CFP RANK
1
Nick Saban is
going for his
seventh national
title, and sixth at
Alabama.
CONFERENCE
SEC
NICKNAME
Crimson Tide
NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIPS*
17
CFP APPEARANCES (W-L)
5 (6-2)
COACH
Nick Saban
12 years (146-20, .880)
CFP SEMIFINAL
Def. Oklahoma, 45-34
KEY PLAYERS
QB Tua Tagovailoa, So.
RB Damien Harris, Sr.
WR Jerry Jeudy, So.
DT Quinnen Williams, So.
KEY SUSPENDED
PLAYER
LG Deonte Brown, So.
FAMOUS
EX-PLAYER
Joe Namath
FAMOUS
ALUMNI
Justice
Hugo Black
HEISMAN
WINNERS
2-Mark Ingram (2009)
Derrick Henry (2015)
MASCOT
Big Al
FIGHT SONG
“Yea Alabama”
MOTTO
Roll Tide
UNOFFICIAL NICKNAME
T-Town
*Poll era (1936-present)
AP / WILFREDO LEE
FOOTBALL
THE TAPE
Clemson
2018 W-L
14-0
CFP RANK
2
Dabo Swinney
is looking for his
second national
title.
CONFERENCE
ACC
NICKNAME
Tigers
NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIPS*
2
CFP APPEARANCES (W-L)
4 (4-2)
COACH
Dabo Swinney
11 seasons (115-30, .793)
CFP SEMIFINAL
Def. Notre Dame, 30-3
KEY PLAYERS
QB Trevor Lawrence, Fr.
RB Travis Etienne, So.
WR Hunter Renfrow, Sr.
DE Clelin Ferrell, Jr.
KEY SUSPENDED
PLAYER
DT Dexter Lawrence, Jr.
FAMOUS EX-PLAYER
William “Refrigerator” Perry
FAMOUS
ALUMNI
Sen. Strom
Thurmond
FIGHT SONG
“Tiger Rag”
LARGEST VICTORY
Alabama won, 74-7, in 1931
MOTTO
Hold That Tiger
LAST MEETING
Alabama won, 24-6,
in last year’s CFP
semifinals
UNOFFICIAL
NICKNAME
Death Valley
GETTY IMAGES / TOM PENNINGTON
BY AL IANNAZZONE
al.iannazzone@newsday.com
Kris Richard went from celebrating a Cowboys playoff
victory Saturday night to a series of interviews for headcoaching jobs Sunday. The
Jets were one of them.
Richard, who is responsible
for the Cowboys’ defensive
backs and defending against
the passing game, is a hot candidate for NFL coaching vacancies. Richard met with the Jets,
Dolphins and Bucs on Sunday
in Texas.
Richard was the Jets’ fourth
known interview and first with
someone whose focus is defense. The Jets also have sat
down with Chiefs offensive coordinator Eric Bieniemy, former Dolphins coach Adam
Gase and ex-Packers coach
Mike McCarthy.
Things are expected to
heat up as the search for
Todd Bowles’ successor enters its second week. Bowles
was fired Dec. 30 after the
Jets finished 4-12.
While CEO Christopher
Johnson and general manager
Mike Maccagnan are in Texas,
they could interview Baylor
coach Matt Rhule, a former Giants line coach who has drawn
interest from the Jets. Bucs offensive coordinator Todd
Monken is scheduled to interview with the Jets on Tuesday.
Former Colts and Lions
coach Jim Caldwell also is expected to interview with the
Jets at some point.
To this point, the Jets have
not received approval from
USC to interview newly hired
offensive coordinator Kliff
Kingsbury, who previously
was the coach at Texas A&M.
Richard, 39, is considered a
rising young coach. If the Jets
hired him, it would be imperative to bring in an experi-
Kris Richard also met with the
Dolphins and Bucs on Sunday.
enced offensive coordinator
and quarterbacks coach who
would be tasked with developing Sam Darnold.
Richard spent eight years in
Seattle serving under Pete Carroll as the Seahawks’ defensive
backs coach and then defensive coordinator. He also spent
two seasons as a graduate assistant under Carroll at USC before joining him in Seattle.
Richard is in his first season
overseeing the secondary and
defense against the passing
game. Dallas finished sixth in
scoring defense (20.2 points
per game) and seventh in overall defense (329.2 yards).
The Jets are expected to
hire someone with an offensive background who can
help Darnold become the
player the organization believes he can be.
McCarthy has the most experience as an offensive coach
and the best resume of the
available coaches. He also is interviewing for the Browns’
opening.
Except for Richard, all of the
candidates in whom the Jets
have
expressed
interest
climbed the ranks on the offensive side of the ball.
In discussing potential candidates, Johnson said it would
be a “big plus” if he had developed a young quarterback.
Maccagnan said the Jets
would not favor either side of
the ball, but “we want to
make sure they have a plan in
place to try to develop our
young quarterback.”
NEWSDAY, MONDAY, JANUARY 7, 2019
MASCOT
The Tiger
ALL-TIME
MEETINGS
18 (Alabama leads
the series, 14-4)
Defensive backs
coach rising star,
but is he right fit?
newsday.com
HEISMAN
WINNERS
None
Jets one of 3
to interview
’Boys’ Richard
AP
SUPERPOWERS
A43
FOOTBALL
A44
Chargers bolting
‘D’ solves Ravens’
Jackson; up next
is playoff nemesis
BY BOB GLAUBER
NEWSDAY, MONDAY, JANUARY 7, 2019
newsday.com
BALTIMORE — Their improbable journey has taken
them from San Diego to Los Angeles to London to Kansas City
to Baltimore . . . and now to
New England, where the NFL
nomads otherwise known as
the Chargers will get the
chance to vanquish the greatest
NFL team of the century.
Uprooted
from
their
decades-old home in San Diego
before the 2017 season, the
Chargers again showed their
trademark resiliency in hostile
territory amid difficult circumstances on Sunday and earned
a trip to the divisional round of
the AFC playoffs. They beat the
Ravens, 23-17, in a wild-card
matchup and will face the Patriots — who have won five and
played in eight of the last 17
Super Bowls — on Sunday at
Gillette Stadium.
“I think we’re a little more
weathered, in a good way,” said
37-year-old quarterback Philip
Rivers, the only quarterback
from the vaunted 2004 draft
(which also included Eli Manning and Ben Roethlisberger) in
this year’s playoffs. “We’ve been
through a lot. We’ve been all
over the place. We’ve been to
London [for a Week 7 game
against the Titans], we’ve been
everywhere on the road and
we’ve won with defense, kick returns, field goals. There’s no
other way we can win.”
They added another milestone against Baltimore, avenging a 22-10 home loss to the
Ravens on Dec. 22 by executing a
brilliantly conceived game plan.
They did just enough against
the Ravens’ No. 1-ranked defense, with Rivers throwing for
160 yards and setting up four
first-half field goals and Melvin
Gordon’s fourth-quarter TD run.
But it was the Chargers’ defense that found a way to beat
Baltimore’s run-centric offense
and contain 21-year-old rookie
quarterback Lamar Jackson.
The Ravens had averaged 230
AP / CAROLYN KASTER
bob.glauber@newsday.com
Philip Rivers lets out a roar as he walks off the field a winner.
The Chargers, a No. 5 seed at 12-4, improved to 8-1 on the road.
AFC WILD CARD
23 : 17
CHARGERS
RAVENS
AFC
DIVISIONAL
Chargers at Patriots
TV: Ch. 2, 1:05 p.m.
Radio: WFAN (660, 101.9)
Sunday
rushing yards and run for nine
touchdowns in going 6-1 under
Jackson after he took over from
Joe Flacco following Baltimore’s
bye week.
But the Chargers, who went
12-4 in the regular season, used
an unconventional approach on
Sunday, using seven defensive
backs on 58 of 59 snaps. The
Ravens were held to 90 rushing
yards, including 54 by Jackson.
The Chargers built a 23-3
lead with 9:09 left in the fourth
quarter on Michael Badgley’s
fifth field goal before Jackson finally came alive in the passing
game.
He hit Michael Crabtree with
touchdown passes of 31 and 7
yards to get the Ravens to
within 23-17 with 1:59 remaining, but on the Ravens’ final
drive, Jackson was sacked for
the seventh time and fumbled
at the Baltimore 38 with 18 seconds left. The Chargers’ Melvin
Ingram recovered the loose ball
to seal the victory.
“Our defensive coaches, they
game-planned it,” Chargers
coach Anthony Lynn said.
“They got these guys ready to
go, and they had a lot of confidence in that group. They
showed up and showed out.”
“Our coaches did a great job
figuring out what they do, sim-
plifying [the concepts behind
the Ravens’] offense,” defensive
end Isaac Rochell said. “If
you’re watching it as a spectator, somebody who doesn’t
know about the offense, it can
look confusing. But we were
able to figure out what they
were doing and react to it.”
Ravens coach John Harbaugh, who considered going
back to Flacco, said the Ravens
simply weren’t good enough.
“Playoff football is basically
complementary football,” he
said. “You have to put all three
phases together to win it. We
didn’t really do that like we
needed to. It just wasn’t meant
to be.”
Jackson took the blame for the
loss. “We just played like we
didn’t want to be here,” he said,
quickly clarifying that he was the
FOOTBALL
A45
y
to New England
Switch to Flacco
was considered
BY BOB GLAUBER
Lamar Jackson, who had trouble
holding on to the ball all game, is
sacked by Melvin Ingram, one of
seven takedowns by Chargers.
those guys,” Rivers said of the
Patriots. “I’ve got a lot of respect for New England. All we
ask for is a chance.”
That chance will come Sunday, in another unlikely
matchup for an unlikely team.
EPA / ERIK S LESSER
Ravens coach John Harbaugh said he thought about replacing
Lamar Jackson with Joe Flacco but felt rookie gave them best chance.
about that,” Harbaugh said. “Joe
Flacco can still play. Joe’s going
to have a market. A lot of teams
are going to want Joe. He’s special. Joe Flacco is a great talent.
He’s the best quarterback in
the history of the Ravens.”
Harbaugh’s own future is in
question amid recent reports
that some teams — reportedly
Denver and Miami — are considering giving Baltimore draft
picks to hire him away.
“I don’t believe so,” Harbaugh said when asked if there
is any doubt about whether he’ll
remain in Baltimore. “No one
can say what tomorrow is going
to bring. We’ll see what God has
in store. I have every expectation to be here as long as they
want me here, and I believe I’ll
be here.”
Jackson knows he must do
much better than Sunday, when
he admitted he felt out of sorts.
“We played like we didn’t want
to be here. I did [play that way],
not my team,” said Jackson,
who threw for 194 yards and
two touchdowns and ran for 54
yards. He was sacked seven
times and had three fumbles.
He added, “I didn’t play my
game at all, only toward the
end. There are a lot of things I
need to work on.”
Jackson said he was surprised by the Chargers’ defensive deployment of seven defensive backs on all but one play.
“They really didn’t have any
linebackers out there,” he said.
“They had mostly [defensive
backs] in the box for more
speed, but we still should have
executed. That shouldn’t stop
us. We stopped ourselves.”
NEWSDAY, MONDAY, JANUARY 7, 2019
one at fault and not his teammates. “I did, not my team. I feel
like I played poorly.”
The Chargers will face the Patriots in the playoffs for the first
time since the 2007 AFC Championship Game, when the Patriots
beat them, 21-12, at Gillette Stadium. The Chargers also lost to
the Patriots in San Diego, 24-21,
in the 2006 divisional round.
“On some level, I’m a fan of
BALTIMORE — As the
Ravens’ offense continued to
sputter and 21-year-old rookie
quarterback Lamar Jackson continued to stumble, John Harbaugh admitted to thinking
about making a change.
“I can assure you, we were
considering putting Joe [Flacco] in the game and all that kind
of stuff,” the Ravens’ coach said
on Sunday after a 23-17 loss to
the Chargers in an AFC wildcard game. “It was part of the
conversation. We certainly
thought about it, certainly
talked about it with everybody.”
In the end, Harbaugh let Jackson try to work his way out of a
funk that lasted through the
first three quarters. After the
Ravens fell behind 23-3, he finally came alive with two late
touchdown passes and had an
opportunity to drive for the winning score.
His day — and the Ravens’
chances — ended inauspiciously when he fumbled at the
Baltimore 38-yard line with 18
seconds to play. Chargers defensive end Melvin Ingram recovered, and Philip Rivers took a
knee to finish off the Ravens.
“In the end, talk about the
fourth quarter,” Harbaugh said.
“Lamar played really well in
[the] two-minute [offense]. I
don’t think Joe would have
played any better in twominute than Lamar did. Give
Lamar credit for the way he
played in two-minute.”
The game likely will be
Flacco’s last in a Ravens uniform. The one-time Super Bowl
MVP was replaced by Jackson
after an injury and never got the
job back as the rookie went 6-1.
“Lamar is our quarterback
going forward, no question
newsday.com
AP / GAIL BURTON
bob.glauber@newsday.com
FOOTBALL
y
A46
Philly fortunate
Eagles hold on as
kickbouncesoff
upright,crossbar
BY TOM ROCK
NEWSDAY, MONDAY, JANUARY 7, 2019
newsday.com
CHICAGO — If this past
year or so has taught the Eagles
anything, it’s that anything can
happen. And when it does, it’s
usually in their favor.
So even on Sunday night, as
the Bears were lining up to try
a potential winning 43-yard
field goal with 10 seconds left
in an NFC wild-card game at
Soldier Field, the Eagles were
oddly confident.
“Honestly, I had a feeling that
one way or another, we were
going to win that game,” safety
Malcolm Jenkins said. “Something was going to happen in
our favor . . . We’ve been
through so much, it’s hard for
me to not believe things are
going to work out in our favor.”
The magic continued.
The Bears’ Cody Parkey, who
had missed 10 field-goal attempts during the regular season, bounced this one off both
the left upright and the crossbar
before it fell in the end zone, and
the Eagles hung on for a 16-15
win over the third-seeded Bears.
The defending Super Bowl
champion Eagles, who needed to
win their last three games and
get help elsewhere just to get
into the playoffs as the sixth and
final seed in the NFC, will face
the top-seeded Saints in a divisional-round game Sunday.
Parkey’s ill-fated kick was the
rare four-thudder. He made contact with the ball and defensive
lineman
Treyvon
Hester
stretched his left hand in the air
and grazed it just enough to alter
its trajectory. The kick had
plenty of distance, but it hit the
left upright about midway up the
pole. The ball still seemed as if it
had a chance to go through, but it
then plinked off the crossbar and
fell back toward the field of play.
“It’s one of the worst feelings in the world to let your
team down,” Parkey said. “I
feel terrible.”
He said he would be able to
“sleep at night knowing that I
did everything in my power
AP / DAVID BANKS
tom.rock@newsday.com
The relieved and exultant Eagles storm the field after the Bears’ Cody Parkey missed a last-second field-goal attempt.
NFC WILDCARD
EAGLES
16 : 15
BEARS
NFC
DIVISIONAL
Eagles at Saints
TV: Ch. 5, 4:40 p.m.
Radio: WFAN (660, 101.9)
Sunday
this week to make that kick,
and for whatever reason, it hit
the crossbar and the upright.”
The game actually came
down to two critical timeouts
called by Eagles coach Doug
Pederson. The first was just before a fourth-and-goal play
with 1:01 left, when he wanted
to make sure his Eagles, trailing
15-10 at the time, had the right
play for the situation.
In fact, they had called that
play twice after reaching the 1,
but quarterback Nick Foles had
checked out of it to a run based
on the Bears’ defensive look.
“Nick and I, we talked on the
sideline and said, you know,
let’s just run this sprint-out,”
Pederson said.
Philly Nothing-Very-Special.
Other than the execution, anyway. They expected the Bears
to blitz on fourth-and-goal, and
they did. But Foles rolled to his
right, sidearmed a throw under
the oncoming pass rush from
Leonard Floyd and hit Golden
Tate for a 2-yard touchdown
pass that made it 16-15 with 56
seconds left.
“There was pretty much one
option [on the play called], and
that was me,” Tate said. “I did a
decent job of setting [cornerback Sherrick McManis] up and
got open and it was friendly and
Nick threw an absolute dime. If
he throws that ball any farther in
front of me, I can’t get to it, and
any farther behind me, the DB
has a chance to break it up.”
After the Eagles failed on
their two-point attempt, the
Bears’ Tarik Cohen returned
the ensuing kickoff 35 yards to
Chicago’s 42. Mitchell Trubisky
hit Allen Robinson for a
25-yard gain and then an 8-yard
pickup to get to the 25 with 15
seconds remaining. Knowing
that they had a tenuous kicking
situation, the Bears took one
last shot at a touchdown, but
FOOTBALL
A47
SATURDAY
COLTS AT CHIEFS
Ch. 4, 4:35 p.m.
COWBOYS AT RAMS
Ch. 5, 8:15 p.m.
SUNDAY
CHARGERS
AT PATRIOTS
Ch. 2, 1;05 p.m.
EAGLES AT SAINTS
Ch. 5, 4:40 p.m.
BY TOM ROCK
tom.rock@newsday.com
Nick Foles, who managed to keep his composure through early
struggles, was 25-for-40 passing for 266 yards and two TDs.
getting in the huddle, looking
at the guys that I trust, knowing that it’s all on the line for
us and we’re just going to get
the job done.”
Foles was 25-for-40 for 266
yards and two touchdowns but
also threw two first-half interceptions.
His long-term future with the
Eagles is ambiguous. The team
has a $20-million option to keep
him in 2019, something they
may or may not exercise. And
even if they do, Foles can pay
back $2 million to become a free
agent. There is some talk that
the Eagles might try to trade
Foles this offseason.
None of that will happen until
he loses a playoff game for
them. Or, you know, the other
possible ending to this season.
But Foles has said he understands that each of his starts this
postseason could be his last
with the Eagles.
That wasn’t going through his
mind on the field.
“It’s more so when I sit in the
locker room after the game,” he
said. “I always try to take a moment and just sit there and reflect . . . I realize that I am
blessed to be able to wear this
jersey at least one more week. I
get to play with these guys one
more week, I get to be with the
coaches one more week. That’s
something that I really look forward to and am pleased to be a
part of it.”
LOTTERY
Pick 10: 1, 4, 8, 13, 15, 31, 33,
36, 42, 47, 52, 53, 57, 58, 62, 68,
70, 75, 78, 80.
Daily number: 662.
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Take 5: 4, 13, 19, 20, 39.
Midday daily: 874.
Midday Win4: 5340.
Sat. Lotto: 28, 33, 38, 45, 54,
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Fri. Mega Millions: 21, 29, 35,
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Megaplier: 4.
Thur. Cash4Life: 5, 9, 25, 33,
55. Cash Ball: 2.
Sat. Powerball: 3, 7, 15, 27, 69.
Powerball: 19. Power Play: 2.
NEWSDAY, MONDAY, JANUARY 7, 2019
CHICAGO — As he came
into the huddle to call the
fourth-and-goal play that would
decide whether the Eagles continued their playoff run or went
home, Nick Foles said the most
Nick Foles thing possible.
Nothing. He just called the
play.
And then he executed it,
throwing a 2-yard touchdown
pass to a wide receiver who had
just joined the team via trade
midway through the season, to
give the Eagles a 16-15 win over
the Bears in Sunday’s NFC wildcard game at Soldier Field.
The pass to Golden Tate in
the final minute did all the talking for him.
“It’s not like ‘The Replacements’ where you have a good
message there,” Eagles tackle
Lane Johnson said of the business-as-usual tenor of that
make-or-break huddle. “Or ‘Friday Night Lights’ where you say
‘Let’s go, boys! Let’s go finish the
state championship!’ You call
the play and we see if we can
score. That’s it.”
With Foles, the backup quarterback the Eagles have trotted
out each of the past two Decembers to replace Carson Wentz
for a postseason run without
ever losing one of those playoff
games, they always seem able to
do just that. Score. And win.
Nick, as the Eagles’ players
and coaches are fond of saying,
is Nick.
“He’s going to stay calm, he’s
going to stay collected,” coach
Doug Pederson said.
The fact that he did that at the
end of a game in which he
looked not like a Super Bowl
MVP but very pedestrian only
amplified that serenity.
“What I learned on those
stages is just how to calm myself in a chaotic moment
where there is stuff from the
outside world and it’s a ton of
pressure,” Foles said. “Just really simplifying it in my head,
newsday.com
Trubisky’s pass for Anthony
Miller was overthrown in the
end zone.
The Bears had to send
Parkey out for the 43-yard try.
And his kick was . . . good.
Enter the second critical
timeout called by Pederson,
this one just before the snap.
Parkey’s kick on what turned
out to be a practice try almost
was short, but it went through.
Still, he had to do it again.
With some Eagles admittedly
praying, Jenkins said he spent
the timeout yapping at his former teammate across the line
of scrimmage.
“I was talking a lot of trash,”
he said. “I anticipated him missing. Nothing against Cody. I
love him as a former teammate
. . . We knew he had some
struggles and missed a couple
this year.”
He missed this one, too, and
it went the Eagles’ way.
It was the latest example of
Pederson having a penchant for
pushing the proper buttons.
“He’s got a knack for doing
the right thing,” Eagles defensive end Chris Long said.
Things worked out for the Eagles. Of course, over the past
two seasons, just about everything has.
Foles calmly steers win
GETTY IMAGES / JONATHAN DANIEL
DIVISIONAL
PLAYOFFS
y
to remain alive
MONDAY, JAN. 7, 2019
yy
FINAL
CHARGERS’ ‘D’
SMOTHERS
RAVENS
A44-45
More
More NFL
NFL playoff
playoff news
news
at newsday.com/nfl
A44-45
Parkey’s
double-doink
miss sends
Eagles into
divisional
round A46-47
PLAWECKI DEALT TO INDIANS
A38
HALFWAY TO PLAYOFF SPOT
A40
GETTY IMAGES / JONATHAN DANIEL
Bears kicker Cody Parkey reacts
after his 43-yard FG attempt
bounced off an upright and
crossbar, allowing the defending
champion Eagles to escape with a
16-15 NFC wild-card game win.
MONDAY, JAN. 7, 2019
N/Q
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ANTHROPOLOGIE
B4
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B2
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NOW ONLINE
Do those glitzy awards still matter?
newsday.com/entertainment
How families
raise and
cherish their
special kids
Author of ‘Far From the Tree’ hosts screening
of book-based documentary at Cinema Arts
BY RAFER GUZMÁN
R
rafer.guzman@newsday.com
GETTY IMAGES / MATTHEW EISMAN
NEWSDAY, MONDAY, JANUARY 7, 2019
newsday.com
esearching a magazine article on deaf culture in the
early 1990s, writer Andrew Solomon began to feel a
kinship with his subjects. Having grown up gay in the
1970s and ’80s, he recognized the identity gap between
deaf children and their parents, most of whom were
hearing. He saw that these parents were generally unprepared
for the challenge of raising children who didn’t conform to their
expectations. Instinctively, they often forced their children to
adapt to hearing culture, rather than the other way around.
“I was struck by the way deafness was a culture to them,”
Solomon says today, “and not a disability.”
A few years later, when an
acquaintance had a child with
dwarfism, Solomon began working
in earnest on the nonfiction book
that would become “Far From the
Tree: Parents, Children and the
Search for Identity.” It’s a compendium of stories of people with
differences of nearly all kinds —
from autism to Down syndrome to
criminal behavior — and of the
parents who struggled to raise
them. Published in 2012, “Far From
the Tree” won the National Book
Critics Circle Award and then, last
year, became the basis for a docu-
mentary directed by Rachel
Dritzen, an Emmy-winning filmmaker known for her work at PBS’
“Frontline.” Solomon will host a
screening of “Far From the Tree” at
Huntington’s Cinema Arts Centre
on Wednesday. Also in attendance
will be Dr. Michael Wigler, a professor at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory who helped Solomon with his
research into autism.
Like the book, Dritzen’s film
looks at a wide range of subjects.
They include Jack Allnut, a nonspeaking autistic boy who learns to
type out his often-clever and lyrical
Andrew Solomon talks and writes about people with differences of all kinds.
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Emily Perl Kingsley and Jason Kingsley in director Rachel Dretzin’s “Far From
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Solomon’s 2012 nonfiction book, on
which the film is based, won the
National Book Critics Circle Award.
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NEWSDAY, MONDAY, JANUARY 7, 2019
“I intended to look at the resilience of parental love,” he says.
“The family of someone who commits serious crimes has to deal with
something that is completely bewildering and foreign to their system
of values.”
Since the first appearance of “Far
From the Tree,” society’s attitudes
toward minority groups of all
stripes seem to be in flux.
“I would say the country as a
whole is in a crisis of compassion at
the moment,” Solomon says. “The
book is about the value and even
the beauty of lives that look, to you,
to be too broken and too different
to be tolerated.”
PLUS - Taste unlimited samples
from the region’s top breweries
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newsday.com
thoughts; Jason Kingsley, an adult
with Down syndrome who lives
independently with two roommates; and Loini Vivao, an East
Patchogue resident with a rare form
of dwarfism who discovers a sense
of belonging at a Little People of
America convention.
“I expected to find that there
were some parallels between the
experiences of people with different
kinds of differences, but I was surprised at how similar their experiences were,” Solomon says of his
research. “Everyone has to deal
with children who are different in
one way or the other.”
One of the film’s most emotionally challenging cases is that of
Trevor Reese, a Louisiana teenager
sentenced to life in prison for
killing an 8-year-old boy. When
Trevor’s father, Derek Reese, contacted Solomon after reading the
book, the author immediately asked
him to participate in the film. The
Reese family — both parents and
their two other nearly grown children — can be seen phoning Trevor
in prison to include him in family
gatherings.
Although criminals may not
initially seem to be in the same
sphere as, say, those with autism,
Solomon defends his decision to
include Trevor Reese.
This is your destination to find, plan and book a
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A LUXE OPTION
Burberry’s faux shearling
double-breasted oversized
wool blend coat, $2,190 at
burberry.com.
PHOTO GALLERY: Oprah’s favorite things on Amazon
Warm up to a
No need to hibernate:
Cozy, plush jackets are in
BY LISA IRIZARRY
lisa.irizarry@newsday.com
MATCHESFASHION.COM
NEWSDAY, MONDAY, JANUARY 7, 2019
newsday.com
ANTHROPOLOGIE
I
t’s not easy leaving your warm and cozy bed to venture
outside and brave the winter weather, but one new
trend has made that task a whole lot easier: the faux-fur
teddy bear coat.
Teddys — made of faux mohair, shearling, alpaca and
other long- and short-pile fabrics common in toy teddy
bear fur — are trending for those who want to step out in
style without leaving the comfort of their blanket far behind.
It’s a look spotted on a long list of celebrities, including
Heidi Klum, Kim Kardashian, Hailey Baldwin,
Rita Ora and Izabel
Goulart — with some
opting for the $4,000
Max Mara version. But
good news: These
coats can be found at a
wide range of prices
at Long Island stores
and online retailers.
Styles range from
classic long coats, in
single-, doublebreasted and wrap
styles, to bomber
and motorcycle
jackets. Colors
include traditional teddy
bear browns,
whites and
CUDDLE THIS (on the cover)
black as well
This hooded take on the teddy
as reds,
greens, blues bear coat is $160 at
Anthropologie stores and
and pastels.
anthropologie.com.
Debbie
Farber, owner of The Girls
Room women’s clothing store in Woodbury, calls them
“squishy” coats. She’s sold them in her store and says
they’re particularly popular among fashionistas in their
30s.
“I think the teddy bear coat is something that people see
when they walk in and say, ‘Oh my God, I have to have
that!’ ” Farber says. “Women in Manhattan and those who
are really fashion savvy really go for it.”
Carrie Tintle, owner of Crinoline Fashion Boutique in
Greenport, says she sold out of the teddy coats at her store.
“I’m a freak for coats myself and I think they’re [teddys]
really warm and cozy — and in the winter it’s all about
being cozy,” Tintle says.
And it’s the guys women can thank for this one. Teddys
date back to postwar Britain when they were designed to
keep wealthy male motorists warm, and they were later
embraced by the likes of Salvador Dali, who wore his on a
1936 trans-Atlantic trip to New York, and Mick Jagger, who
sported the look in the 1960s.
And though there are still some teddy coats out there for
men, today’s version of the trend is focused on women.
B5
newsday.com/shopping
ASOS
BEARY PINK
Forever 21’s Dawn
Pink Coat, $29.95
at Forever 21
stores and
forever21.com.
Explore LI
teddy bear coat
ELEGANT
SHE-BEAR
J.Crew’s
textured faux
fur coat has
pockets and
comes in soft
blue and pink
hues, $149 at
jcrew.com.
TEDDY TALK
This oversized version from Vila, $119,
is one of many teddy coats (for men
and women) at asos.com.
NEWSDAY / WILLIAM PERLMAN
BEAR HUG
A blazer-styled version on the teddy bear trend, $49.99
at H&M stores.
J. CREW
THE COLOR WILL WARM YOU
Anthropologie’s mango faux fur jacket
puts a color-saturated twist on the
trend, $180 at anthropologie.com.
NEWSDAY, MONDAY, JANUARY 7, 2019
ANTHROPOLOGIE
newsday.com
NEWSDAY / WILLIAM PERLMAN
style
shoptalk
Things to Do
Explore LI
newsday.com/fashion
JAN. 10-12
At Filly’s, shop the Tina di
Martina trunk show, 9:30 a.m.
to 5:30 p.m., with cocktail
dresses and evening gowns for
spring and summer (designer
visits on Thursday and
Saturday). The store is at 1065
Willis Ave., Albertson;
516-739-9090.
JAN. 10-13 »
Mieka in Woodbury Village hosts
the Ysa Makino evening gown
trunk show, 10 a.m.-8 p.m.
Thursday; 10 a.m.-6 p.m.
Friday-Saturday and noon- 5 p.m.
Sunday. The boutique is at 7937
Jericho Tpke., Woodbury;
516-367-8755. Discounts are
offered on show orders and
alterations are included.
Discover new things to do on Long Island. From
shopping to dining, Newsday is your go-to guide for
where to go and what to do around town.
NDTH-
D O N AT E YO U R C A R
Wheels For Wishes
JAN. 12
At Lord & Taylor in Garden City,
get a complimentary Estée
Lauder Re-Nutriv application,
the line’s new age-correcting
cream, when you purchase an
Estée Lauder moisturizer,
10 a.m. to 6 p.m. (appointments
suggested; 516-742-7000, ext.
232). You’ll also receive a gift
with your purchase of $37.50 or
more of any Estée Lauder
product. The store is at 1200
Franklin Ave.
YSA MAKINO
B6
benefiting the local chapters of
* 100% Tax Deductible
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NEWSDAY, MONDAY, JANUARY 7, 2019
newsday.com
* Car Donation Foundation d/b/a Wheels For Wishes. To learn more about our programs or
financial information, call (213) 948-2000 or visit www.wheelsforwishes.org.
NEWSDAY NOTIFICATION
This month, Newsday home delivery and digital subscription
rates will increase and will be rolled out to our subscribers
over the next several months. Periodic rate increases are
required to maintain the highest quality standards that
subscribers expect from Newsday. Newsday is proud to
provide award-winning local, city, and national news to the
Long Island community. Newsday thanks our readers for their
continued support and customer loyalty.
2115294301
MARCY CASTELGRANDE
The Make-A-WishFoundation®
JAN. 17-20
Bridal Reflections in Carle Place presents a
Jenny Yoo Bridesmaids fashion show with
the designer at 7 p.m. Jan. 17. Then,
Jan. 18-20, view the Jenny Yoo Bridesmaids
trunk show featuring the spring 2019
gowns collection. Both events are by
appointment only. The store is at 80
Westbury Ave.; 516-742-7788.
samplesales
NOAH WAXMAN
Find men’s and women’s luxe handmade footwear, plus sweaters, hats, scarves
and more, discounted up to 80 percent off retail, noon-7 p.m. Monday-Friday and
Jan. 14-18, at 41 Perry St., Manhattan; 212-675-1995. Cash and credit cards accepted.
All sales final.
RHONE
Men’s activewear and fitness gear are priced 65 percent below retail, 10 a.m.7 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday and 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday, at 260 Sample Sale, 260 Fifth
Ave., Manhattan; 212-725-5400. Cash and credit cards accepted. All sales are final.
Compiled by Virginia Dunleavy
For more local sales events, go to newsday.com/shopping
kidsday
BY NYAH MEDINA
KIDSDAY ILLUSTRATION / RAELYNN HAYES
Kidsday Reporter
A
your class.
In April, you go to meet the
judges so they can judge your
art. It is nerve-wracking to go
meet the judges, but they are
very nice and kind. They ask
you questions like, “What
supplies did you use? Why did
you think to make this? What
was your inspiration? What
was your favorite piece?”
I am so glad I have the
privilege to be able to do Art
Portfolio and learn new techniques.
My bunny
buddies
BY AULIS CARR-SMITH
Kidsday Reporter
I
have three Holland Lop
bunnies. Their names are
Chocolate Bunny, Moon and
Rose. I named one Moon, and
my sister named another one
Chocolate Bunny because she
thought we were going to get
chocolate bunnies from the
store. My brother named the
last one, Rose.
Unlike most pet bunnies,
these bunnies live outdoors.
They are very friendly and
happy, but looks can be deceiving. They might look like
the cutest pets, but they are a
lot of work, and they make a
big mess. Don’t even get me
started on the smell — horrible!
The Holland Lop bunny is
domesticated and known for
Kidsday reporter
Aulis Carr-Smith
and her Holland
Lop bunny, Moon.
B7
Explore LI
Taking art to the next level
rt Portfolio is an
after-school activity
in our school where
you create art. You can do it
only if you want to work hard,
are ready for a challenge and
have great art skills.
You start Art Portfolio in
November and you do five
pieces of artwork. Three are
your choice, one is a self-portrait, and one is your take on a
well-known artist’s work. You
meet once a week but work on
the projects at home, too. Then
you meet in front of a judge,
who grades your work from 1
to 28.
Art Portfolio is a great way
to learn more about art, artists
and how to present work. It is
a great opportunity to push
your artwork to the limit and
to try new styles. In Art Portfolio, you make new friends and
learn from the other kids in
newsday.com/kidsday
for kids, by kids, mostly
can just bring them
with you.
Holland Lops are
very intelligent and
are always finding
new ways to escape.
Once they ate through
the chicken wire
surrounding their
house and then ran
away! We found them
in our neighbor’s yard,
eating clovers. Rabbits
love to dig. The first
year we got ours, they
ANTHEA CARR
would dig all the time!
being sweet and familyThey’re very smart, so one
friendly. But you’re going to
day I went outside to check
need a lot of free time to
on them and they were gone.
spend with your pets — trainI was crying because they
ing, giving them fresh water
made a big hole that went
and food, cleaning their space
almost 10 feet down! Finally,
and just spending time with
after two days, we found them
them. They are very social
again.
animals, so if you go away for
To find out more about
a week or two, you definitely
Holland Lop bunnies visit
need to get a caretaker, or you rabbitpedia.com/holland-lop
CLASS OF THE WEEK Brittany Crosser’s fifth- and sixth-grade class, OYSTERPONDS ELEMENTARY SCHOOL, Orient
advice
Ask AmyASK
AMY
Amy Dickinson
askamy@amydickinson.com
DAILY BRIDGE CLUB
| By Frank Stewart
West dealer. Both sides vulnerable.
NORTH
♠ Q 10 6
♥ Q953
♦ J 10 6
♣ K86
WEST
EAST
♠ 742
♠ 83
♥ A K 10
♥ J42
♦ A2
♦ KQ984
♣ J9732
♣ Q54
SOUTH
♠ AKJ95
♥ 876
♦ 753
♣ A 10
West
1♣
Pass
North
Pass
2♠
East
1♦
All Pass
East took the queen and king and next led a club.
South won, drew trumps and led toward dummy’s
queen of hearts to get his eighth trick.
SIX TRICKS
The defenders need six tricks, and West can see
two hearts and at least two diamonds. It’s unlikely
that East-West will get two club tricks: South probably
has a high club plus good spades for his vulnerable
overcall. West’s best chance is to get three diamonds,
two hearts ... and a ruff.
At Trick Three, West must take his ace of hearts.
Then he can pitch his 10 of hearts on East’s second
high diamond and get a heart ruff for the setting trick.
DAILY QUESTION
South
1♠
Opening lead — ♥ K
“Binary arithmetic: It’s as easy as 01, 10, 11.”
— graffiti
Beating today’s contract should be easy. West
needs only to count to 110 — or to six if you’re using
base-10 math. Against two spades, West led the king
of hearts, but when East signaled with the deuce,
West shifted to the ace of diamonds. This time East
encouraged with the nine, and West continued with
the deuce.
You hold:
♠742
♥ A K 10
♦A2
♣J9732
You open one club, your partner responds one
spade, you bid 1NT and he jumps to three hearts.
The opponents pass. What do you say?
ANSWER: Partner has at least five spades but
may have only four hearts. Your obligation is to take
a preference, hence bid three spades. It doesn’t
matter that your hearts are stronger; the idea is to
uncover an eight-card trump fit. To persist with 3NT
would be an error.
NEWSDAY, MONDAY, JANUARY 7, 2019
thinks her massive collection of
Beanie Babies will be worth millions
someday.) I’m bitter and resentful.
Two of my siblings married rich. The
others followed in our parents’
footsteps and live hand-to-mouth. If
we cut my parents off, they’ll have
no place to go. If we continue as we
are, our own retirement is at risk.
What do we do?
Not a Retirement Fund
DEAR FUNDERS: You need to
wean your parents away from
being your sole responsibility.
Your local Office on Aging
should be a great resource for
information on services available for low-income seniors.
Your folks will likely qualify
for subsidized housing, SNAP
(food stamps), heating assistance and other programs
designed to keep them safe.
You should decide on an
amount you are able/willing to
spend on them each month,
and — that’s it. If you provide
adequately and they have
subsidized supplemental programs and yet still want more,
you can send them to one of
their other children.
Your next heavy lift will be
to work your way toward forgiveness. Forgiving them will
liberate you.
newsday.com
DEAR AMY: My parents were
raised dirt-poor. They popped out
baby after baby even though they
couldn’t afford to feed or properly
house us. My folks had numerous
opportunities to improve our lot in
life and passed them all over. I
remember spending many winter
nights as a child sobbing under my
scavenged blanket because I was
hungry and freezing because our
wood stove had gone cold. I started
working at 12 and almost every
penny went toward groceries. I
worked all through high school,
worked two jobs to put myself
through college, and got a professional job that paid all my bills and
some to spare. Thirty years later, I’m
married, and our house and cars are
paid off. Though we’re far from rich,
we have everything we need. Now in
their 70s, my parents have nothing.
The shack I was raised in was condemned and my husband and I put
them up in an apartment rather than
see them homeless. They constantly
ask for money for necessities, then
spend it on (what I consider) really
stupid purchases. (My mother still
newsday.com/lifestyle
PEARLS BEFORE SWINE
GARFIELD
Explore LI
B8
DENNIS THE MENACE
JUMPSTART
BABY BLUES
BIZARRO
Ziggy is on vacation.
It will return Jan. 14.
DILBERT
BLONDIE
THE LOCKHORNS
FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE
MUTTS
NEWSDAY, MONDAY, JANUARY 7, 2019
newsday.com
NON SEQUITUR
ZITS
RHYMES WITH
PEANUTS CLASSICS
BIG NATE
PICKLES
WIZARD OF ID
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
H ORANGE
TUNDRA
newsday.com/comics
The Duplex is on vacation. It will return Jan. 14.
B9
DAILY CROSSWORD NOW ONLINE
Do today’s puzzle on your mobile or desktop device at
newsday.com/crossword
B10
Explore LI
NEWSDAY CROSSWORD FOWL TALK by Brad Wilber, Edited by Stanley Newman (stanxwords.com)
ACROSS
Furnish meals for
On the __ (fleeing police)
Boys in the family
Summits
Kemo __
(Lone Ranger, to Tonto)
15 Much-admired celebrity
16 Lose one’s courage
18 Carryall bag
19 Two-year-old
20 Eye part
21 Intense dislike
1
5
8
12
14
23 Polite fellow
24 Cartoon bear or baseball
great Berra
25 Performer in a play
28 Learners in classrooms
32 Make a selection
34 Yale student, informally
35 Sandpaper coating
37 Rollaway beds
38 Highest digits
40Great __ (large dog)
41 Maple or mahogany
42 Singer count in a duet
43 Stroll wearily
45 Absolute rulers,
as of Japan and old Rome
48 Atlantic or Pacific
49 Tehran’s country
50 Take a stroll
52 Superhero pal of Robin
55 Toppled over
56 Strange
59 Right away, in a memo
60 Extreme way to break a habit
SUDOKU
Previous solution:
Just complete the grid so that
each row, column and 3-by-3
box contains the numbers 1
through 9.
63 Window ledge
64 A Great Lake
65 Turn to mush in a blender
66 Event offering bargains
67 Complete collection
68 Brief snoozes
DOWN
True statement
Bounce back, as a sound
Give off
New Year’s Eve mo.
Country bordering Thailand
__ Dhabi (Mideast land)
Protestant who’s
the M in SMU
8 Easy target
9 Aroma
10 Brief letter
11 Gravity-powered snow vehicle
13 Racers gliding on snow
14 Irritated moods
17 Suffix for east or west
22 Ripen, as fruit
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
23 Skin bump caused by fear
24 Christmas season
25 Invoice ID: abbr.
26 Tedious task
27 __ pole (tribal carving)
29 Male choral voice
30 Swap
31 “__ song of sixpence ...”
33 Ways into buildings
36 Typical high schooler
39 “Victory is mine!”
44 Furl for storage, as a poster
46 Historical period
47 Person from Stockholm
51 PC key near the space bar
52 Male choral voice
53 Largest continent
54 Lofty
55 Dart around, as a bee
56 Cajun vegetable
57 Profound
58 Hair colorings
61 Mineral that’s mined
62 Go for a jog
JUMBLE
By David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four
Jumbles, one letter to each
square, to form four ordinary
words.
Find Stanley Newman’s puzzle books at your local bookstore or Amazon.com.
For hints and more, go to stanxwords.com
WORDY GURDY
By Ricky Kane
Every answer is a rhyming pair of words like FAT CAT and
DOUBLE TROUBLE, and they will fit in the letter squares. The
number after the definition tells you how many syllables are in
each word. © United Features Syndicate Inc.
Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the cartoon.
NEWSDAY, MONDAY, JANUARY 7, 2019
newsday.com
Saturday’s answers:
GUEST WOMAN KITTEN POLISH
HIS ATTEMPT TO GIVE UP
CIGARETTES — WENT UP IN
SMOKE
HOROSCOPES BY JERALDINE SAUNDERS
ARIES (Mar 21-Apr. 19): Allow a relationship the time
to progress naturally as being too pushy, argumentative
or demanding could ruin the deal.
TAURUS (Apr. 20-May 20): Maintain a traditional
approach to romance and don’t get in over your head.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20): You may be so busy it
will be hard to get a moment to yourself.
CANCER (June 21-July 22): It is easier to break the ice
when meeting new people if you appear sympathetic.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Discussing a tense issue rationally, without losing your temper, will help clear the air.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Sharing your dreams with a
loved one could reveal common ground.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22.): Your drive and determination put you in prime position to achieve whatever you
set out to do. Romantic flames burn brightly.
Sunday’s answers:
STIGMA
GARISH
MULLET
GOSSIP
FUTURE WORTHY
THE COMPUTER CODER WANTED
HIS LAZY CO-WORKER TO — GET
WITH THE PROGRAM
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Your heart is your
compass but let your mind be your guide.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Remember that
there’s a fine line between true love and lust.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): You could be the
center of a special someone’s rapt attention.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Take a hands-on approach when you are correcting errors and mistakes, or
a snowball effect could ensue.
PISCES (Feb. 19-Mar. 20): A change may suit you.
Shaking up routines with something different could be
the breath of fresh air that wakes you up.
TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS
Publisher Jann Wenner, 73. Singer Kenny Loggins, 71. Journalist Katie Couric, 62. Actor Nicolas Cage, 55. Actor Doug
E. Doug, 49. Actor Jeremy Renner, 48. Rapper Aloe Blacc,
40. Actor Marcus Scribner, 19.
CRYPTOQUOTE
Here’s how to work it: AXYDLBAAXR is LONGFELLOW
One letter stands for another. In this sample, A is used for the
three L’s, X for the two O’s, etc. Single letters, apostrophes, the
length and formation of the words are all hints.
FGCM
VS
WONBOCE
ZKCWWUMAW,
KUQC
—
U
OHBMCE
FUKKUC
JPHMOUMA
VS
FGPKC
NBPHME.
MCKWPM
Saturday’s Cryptoquote: APPRECIATION IS THE HIGHEST
FORM OF PRAYER, FOR IT ACKNOWLEDGES THE PRESENCE OF
GOOD WHEREVER YOU SHINE THE LIGHT OF YOUR THANKFUL
THOUGHTS. — ALAN COHEN
Classifieds
Legal Notice # 21454247
LEGAL NOTICE OF SALE
By virtue of a cancellation by
30 Grace Avenue Apartments
Corp .("Apartment Corporation") of a certain proprietary lease (“Lease”) and the
305 cooperative shares of
the Apartment Corporation
(“Shares”)
allocated
to
Apartment 3E at 30 Grace
Avenue, Great Neck, New
York 11021 (the "Unit") presently held in the name of
Susan Kimchi (“Shareholder”) and based upon Shareholder’s default in the payment of cooperative maintenance, I, William Mannion,
Auctioneer, DCA #796322 or
Matthew D. Mannion, Auctioneer, DCA# 1434494 will sell at
Public Auction to the highest
bidder on the north front
steps, facing Old County
Road, of the Nassau County
Supreme Court at 262 Old
Country Road, Mineola, New
York on Monday, January 14,
2019 at 11:00 a.m. , in the afternoon of that day, the
Shares and Lease allocated
to the Unit. The sale is subject to any prior liens of record, any outstanding maintenance charges, additional
charges, legal fees of the
Apartment Corporation and
expenses of the auction, approval of the Board of Directors of the Apartment Corporation and such other terms
of sale which will be available for review prior to the
start of the auction.
The Apartment Corporation
reserves the right to bid and
to become the purchaser at
the sale and, without deposit
credit against the purchase
price all sums due to it pursuant to the Lease, and to adjourn, delay or terminate the
sale. The purchase price for
the Shares and Lease allocated to the Unit shall be payable by certified or bank
check, as follows: a ten (10%)
percent deposit is required
with the successful bid, payable to “Borah, Goldstein,
Altschuler, Nahins & Goidel,
P.C. as Attorneys” . Cash will
not be accepted, and the balance of the purchase price
shall be payable within thirty
(30) days.
The Unit will be sold AS IS.
Dated: December 18, 2018
Borah, Goldstein, Altschuler,
Nahins & Goidel, P.C.
Attorneys for Apartment Corporation
377 Broadway
New York, New York 10013
(212) 431-1300, ext. 757
Contact: Nehra Kiran Chopra,
Esq.
Legal Notice # 21454231
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE OF
PERSONAL PROPERTY
Notice is hereby given that
the undersigned will sell, to
satisfy lien of the owner, at
public sale by competitive
bidding on [1/16/19] at
[10:00AM] online at www.
StorageAuctions.com at the
Safeguard Storage facility located at:
Safeguard Self Storage
101-09 103rd Ave
Ozone Park, NY 11417
phone: 718-738-4876
The personal goods (including miscellaneous household
goods such as TV’s, appliances, beds, furniture, boxes)
stored therein by the following:
Unit #
Tenant Name
2322M Donna Surujballie
2324M Paul James
2415
Teddy Khan
2616
Yolanda Lawrence
2629
Nicholas Moroz
3126M The Estate Of Rocco
Contrastano
3126M Rocco Contrastano
3212M Balkisoon Singh
3214M The Estate Of Tatiana
B Harvey
3214M Tatiana B Harvey
3217M Safraz Alli
3323
Ryan Khan
3326
Rebecca Reed
3415
Rebecca Reed
3417
Benjamin Ramoutar
3426
Tara Negron
3708
Juan G Smith
Purchases must be paid at
the facility with Credit Card
or Cash. All Purchases must
be complete within 72 hours
of the end of the online auction. A $100.00 cash cleaning
deposit is required until all
items in the unit are removed from the premises
and verified by the manager
on duty. Sale subject to cancellation until the purchase
is completed; company reserves the right to refuse
any online bids.
Auction by
StorageAuctions.com
Phone: (866) 944-8530
Legal Notice # 21455892
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE TO BIDDERS
The Board of Education of
Half Hollow Hills Central
School District of Huntington and Babylon hereby invites the submission of BIDS
on the following items:
BID #18-13: Purchase &
Delivery of a New Ford F550
Bids will be received until
2:00 p.m. on the 18TH of JANat the BusiUARY, 2019,
ness Office, Central Administration Building, 525 Half Hollow Road, Dix Hills, NY
11746; at which time they
will be opened and read.
Specifications and Forms
may be obtained at the same
office.
For the Board of Education
Half Hollow Hills Central
School District Of
Huntington and Babylon
Dix Hills, New York 11746
Per District Clerk
Legal Notice # 21454562
Peter Scalamandre and Sons,
Inc. is soliciting bids for NYS
Certified M/WBE, SDVOB
Firms
Project Central Mall
Location: Jones Beach
Contract No. D005512
Project Bid Date: January 24,
2019
Contract
documents are
available for review at our
main office.
John Califano
PH; 516-686-3000, ext. 255
Fax; 516-868-3943
Legal Notice # 21455175
LEGAL NOTICE
REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the Town of Oyster Bay Department of Parks Request for Proposal (RFP) for Sailing, Recreation and Education Programs at the Oyster Bay Western Waterfront will be received in PDF format electronically, via
email at Westernwaterfrontrfp@Osysterbay-ny.gov not later
than 11:00 A.M. on February 11, 2019.
Detailed specifications and proposal sheets may be obtained
online at http://oysterbaytown.com/doing-business-with-thetown/ and at the office of the Commissioner of the Department of Parks located on the first floor of Town Hall South,
977 Hicksville Road, Massapequa, NY 11758, on and after January 8, 2019 from 9:00 A.M. to 4:30 P.M. Monday – Friday.
JOSEPH S. SALADINO, TOWN SUPERVISOR; JAMES
ALTADONNA JR., TOWN CLERK; JOSEPH G. PINTO, COMMISSIONER OF PARKS.
Dated: January 2, 2019
Legal Notice # 21454032
INC. VILLAGE OF MANORHAVEN
SEALED BIDS FOR REHABILITATION OF
HISTORIC MORGAN’S DOCK - PHASE III-B
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE THAT SEALED PROPOSALS will be received by the Inc. Village of Manorhaven Board of Trustees
at their offices at 33 Manorhaven Blvd., Port Washington,
NY on:
Tuesday, February 5, 2019 at 10 a.m. , at which time they will
be publicly opened and read with the Contract to be awarded
as soon as thereafter as practicable.
BE IT RESOLVED that:
a. All bids shall be in accordance with the specifications, draw
ings, and terms of the proposed contracts;
b. No bids shall be received unless in writing on forms furnish
ed by the Village and unless accompanied by a certified
check or bid bond made payable to the Village of
Manorhaven in an amount not less than five percent (5%)
of the base bid;
c. The Board of Trustees reserves the right to reject any or all
bids and to waive any informality therein;
d. The Village will not accept bids from, or award contracts
to, anyone who can not prove to the complete satisfaction
of the Board of Trustees that he/she has sufficient experi
ence in this type of work and is financially able and organized to successfully carry out the work required
in the specific time period;
e. Plans and specifications will be available and may be obtained at the Village Hall, 33 Manorhaven Blvd, Port Washington, NY, starting January 2, 2019 and thereafter, during
normal Village business hours;
f. A non-refundable fee of $100.00 is required for each CD
of the contract documents; and
g. This information shall be posted and noticed in Manorhaven’s designated locations and local newspapers effective immediately.
Dated: Manorhaven, New York
December 21, 2018
Sharon Natalie Abramski, RMC, CMC
Village Clerk-Treasurer
Legal Notice # 21454927
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE OF
PERSONAL PROPERTY
Notice is hereby given that
the undersigned will sell, to
satisfy lien of the owner, at
public sale by competitive
bidding on [01/16/19] at
[10:00AM] online at www.
StorageAuctions.com at the
Safeguard Storage facility located at:
Safeguard Self Storage
204-04 Jamaica Avenue
Hollis, NY 11423
phone: 718-217-1799
The personal goods (including miscellaneous household
goods such as TV’s, appliances, beds, furniture, boxes)
stored therein by the following:
Unit # Tenant Name
0101 Billy Randle
1322 Guerline Auguste
1503 Imani Williams
2226 Lila McKee
3222 Mary Alexis
4223 Andrea Williams
4308 Eliias Espinoza
4338 Sharlene Valvano
4422 The Estate of Valerie
Scott-Pearson
4424 The Estate of Valerie
Scott-Pearson
Purchases must be paid at
the facility with Credit Card
or Cash. All Purchases must
be complete within 72 hours
of the end of the online auction. A $100.00 cash cleaning
deposit is required until all
items in the unit are removed from the premises
and verified by the manager
on duty. Sale subject to cancellation until the purchase
is completed; company reserves the right to refuse
any online bids.
Auction by
StorageAuctions.com
Phone: (866) 944-8530
Legal Notice # 21456274
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE OF
PERSONAL PROPERTY
Notice is hereby given that
the undersigned will sell, to
satisfy lien of the owner, at
public sale by competitive
bidding on 1/23/18 at 11:00
A M online
at w w w .
StorageAuctions.com at the
Safeguard Storage facility located at:
Safeguard Self Storage
4353 Bronx Boulevard
Bronx, N.Y. 10466
phone: 718-798-3445
The personal items, household goods, boxes, toys, furniture stored therein by the following:
5102 Nigel Durrant; 5116
Christian Mensah; 5201 Stacy Ann Clarke; 5222 Stacy
Ann Clarke; 5227 Ronald
Koestlinger; 5238 Jerome Anderson; 5328 Hilda Gonzalez;
5336 Mellesia Barrett Taylor;
5372 Ziphi Ntuli Carr; 5372
Ziphi Carr Ntuli; 6 2 0 7
Olabode Olukanni; 6403 Shir
ell Thurmond; 7136 Leloutie
Leandre; 8035 Albion Petersen; 8212 Vanda Irvings; 9140
Kaydian Thomas; 9273 Jimmy Borges
Purchases must be paid at
the facility with Credit Card
or Cash. All Purchases must
be complete within 72 hours
of the end of the online auction. A $100.00 cash cleaning
deposit is required until all
items in the unit are removed from the premises
and verified by the manager
on duty. Sale subject to cancellation until the purchase
is completed; company reserves the right to refuse
any online bids.
Auction by
StorageAuctions.com
Phone: (866) 944-8530
Legal Notice # 21456059
SUPREME COURT OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY
OF QUEENS
SUMMONS AND NOTICE Index No. 705988/2018 Borough:
Queens
Block: 15961 Lot: 68 NYCTL 2017-A TRUST AND THE BANK
OF NEW YORK MELLON, AS COLLATERAL AGENT AND CUSTODIAN, Plaintiffs, vs. THE HEIRS-AT-LAW, NEXT OF KIN,
DISTRIBUTEES, EXECUTORS, ADMINISTRATORS, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS,
SUCCESSORS-IN-INTEREST
AND GENERALLY ALL PERSONS HAVING OR CLAIMING UNDER, BY OR THROUGH LINA CASSEUS A/K/A LUIA CASSEUS, BY PURCHASE, INHERITANCE, LIEN OR OTHERWISE
OF ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR INTEREST IN AND TO THE PREMISES DESCRIBED IN THE COMPLAINT HEREIN, AND ALL
CREDITORS THEREOF, AND THE RESPECTIVE HUSBANDS,
OR WIDOWERS OF HERS, IF ANY, ALL OF WHOSE NAMES
AND ADDRESSES ARE UNKNOWN TO PLAINTIFFS; NEW
YORK STATE AFFORDABLE HOUSING CORPORATION; STERLING RESOURCES, LTD.; NEW YORK CITY PARKING VIOLATIONS BUREAU; NEW YORK CITY TRANSIT AUTHORITY
TRANSIT ADJUDICATION BUREAU; NEW YORK CITY ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL BOARD; LIDIE MARIE BONILLA, AS
HEIR AND DISTRIBUTEE OF THE ESTATE OF LINA CASSEUS
A/K/A LUIA CASSEUS
and "JOHN DOE #2" through "JOHN DOE #100," the names
of the last 99 defendants being fictitious, the true names of
said defendants being unknown to plaintiffs, it being intended
to designate fee owners, tenants or occupants of the liened
premises and/or persons or parties having or claiming an interest in or lien upon the liened premises, if the aforesaid individual defendants are living, and if any or all of said individual defendants be dead, their heirs at law, next of kin, distributees,
executors, administrators, trustees, committees, devisees,
legatees, and the assignees, lienors, creditors and successors
in interest of them, and generally all persons having or claiming under, by, through, or against the said defendants named
as a class, of any right, title or interest in or lien upon the
premises described in the complaint herein, Defendants. TO
THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to answer the complaint in the above-entitled foreclosure action, and to serve a copy of your answer on Plaintiffs’
attorney within thirty (30) days after the service of this summons, exclusive of the day of service or within thirty (30)
days after completion of service where service is made in any
other manner than by personal service within the State. The
United States of America, if designated as a defendant in this
action, may answer or appear within sixty (60) days of service hereof. In case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the complaint. Queens County is designated as the
place of trial. The basis of venue is the location of the subject premises.
Dated: November 27, 2018 TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS: The foregoing summons is served upon you by publication, pursuant to an Order of Honorable Bruce M. Balter, a Justice of the Supreme Court, dated December 21, 2018, and filed
with supporting papers in the Queens County Clerk’s Office.
This is an action to foreclose a tax lien covering the property
known as 520A Beach 43rd Street, Far Rockaway, New York
and identified as Block 15961, Lot 68 (the “Tax Parcel”). The
relief sought is the sale of the Tax Parcel at public auction in
satisfaction of the tax lien. In case of your failure to appear,
judgment may be taken against you in the sum of $6,989.71,
together with interest, costs, disbursements and attorneys’
fees of this action, and directing the public sale of the Tax Parcel. PHILLIPS LYTLE LLP Anthony J. Iacchetta Attorneys for
Plaintiffs
NYCTL 2017-A Trust and The Bank of New York Mellon, as Collateral Agent and Custodian 28 East Main Street Suite 1400
Rochester, New York 14614
Telephone No. (585) 758-2110 aiacchetta@phillipslytle.com
Legal Notice # 21452016
UNITY JUBILEE LLC. Notice
of formation of Limited Liability Company ("LLC"). Articles of Organization filed
with SSNY on 10/09/2018.
Office Location: 9 Sunset
Road North, Albertson, New
York 11507. SSNYdesignated
as agent of the LLC upon
whom process against it
may be served. SSNY may
maila copy of any process to
UNITY JUBILEE LLC, 9 Sunset Road North, Albertson,
New York 11507. The LLC is
to be managed by one or
more members. The purpose
is any lawful act under New
York LLC Law.
Legal Notice # 21455834
NOTICE TO BIDDERS
Nassau Community College
will publicly open Sealed
Bids at its Procurement Office Bid Room, Administrative Tower, 4th Floor, One Education Drive, Garden City,
NY 11530 at 2:00 PM on January 25, 2019.
BID No. CY98-012519-1232
Title: REPAIR SERVICE FOR
SAND SPREADERS AND
SNOW PLOWS
All bids must be made on
Nassau Community College
bidding sheets only, subject
to College terms, conditions
and detailed specifications.
Bid sheets may be obtained
at the above address or
downloaded
from
our
website,
www.ncc.edu/aboutncc/
ourpeople/
administration/procurement.
DATED: January 3, 2019
Phillip Cappello
Director of Procurement
Legal Notice # 21456201
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE TO BIDDERS
PLEASE take notice that the
SEALED BID PROPOSALS
will be received and must be
stamped in at the DIVISION
OF PURCHASE AND SUPPLY, Department of General
Services, Town of Oyster
Bay, at it’s office located on
the fourth floor, Town Hall,
West Building, 74 Audrey
Avenue, Oyster Bay, New
York 11771-1592 not later
than 11:00 A.M. (prevailing
time) on JANUARY 30, 2019
following which time bids
will be publicly opened and
read at the Town Hall East
Building, Hearing Room located at 54 Audrey Avenue, Oyster Bay, New York 11771,
and the contract awarded as
soon thereafter as practicable for:
PURCHASE OF AUTOMOTIVE
& MACHINERY PARTS
(O.E.M.) AS SPECIFIED IN
BID PROPOSAL MS 001-19
Detailed specifications and
proposal sheets may be obtained at the Division of Purchase and Supply , located on
the fourth floor, Town Hall
West, 74 Audrey Avenue,
Oyster Bay, New York
11771-1592 on or after
JANUARY 7, 2019
from
9:00 A.M. – 4:45 P.M.,
Monday through Friday.
JOSEPH SALADINO, TOWN
SUPERVISOR;
JAMES
ALTADONNA
JR.,
TOWN
CLERK; ERIC TUMAN, COMMISSIONER, GENERAL SERVICES
Dated: January 4, 2019
NEWSDAY BUY & SELL
Read for savings
Advertise for results!!
631-843-7653(SOLD)
Legal Notice # 21455956
2019 GENERAL TAX NOTICE
TOWN OF NORTH HEMPSTEAD
TOWN HALL ANNEX
MANHASSET NY 11030
The undersigned, Charles Berman, Receiver of Taxes for the
Town of North Hempstead, County of Nassau, State of New
York, hereby gives notice that he has received from the Legislature of the County of Nassau, General Tax Roll with Warrant attached thereto, dated December 31, 2018, for the collection of General Taxes in said Township for the fiscal year
beginning January 1, 2019 and ending December 31, 2019.
The Receiver of Taxes will be in attendance to receive taxes
at: North Hempstead Town Hall Annex, 200 Plandome Road,
Manhasset, New York 11030, beginning Wednesday, January
2, 2019 and each weekday thereafter (Saturdays, Sundays
and Holidays excepted) from 9:00 am to 4:45 pm and on Monday, February 11, 2019, from 9:00 am to 7:00 pm.
Taxes are payable in cash, check, or money order. Thirdparty checks will not be accepted. Uncertified checks will be
accepted subject to collection, and payment made therewith
will not become official until collection has been effected. Persons requesting tax bills must give Section, Block, and Lot
and School District numbers, in accordance with the Nassau
County Tax Map.
PROPERTY TAX RATES BY CLASS
Class 1
Class 2 Class 3
Class 4
NASSAU COUNTY:
General Fund 7.568
3.55
4.92
3.578
(Includes Parks & Recreation)
Environmental Bond Fund
2.378
1.115
1.546
1.124
Storm Water Resources
3.112
1.46
2.023
1.471
Nassau Community College
11.694
5.485
7.602
5.529
Police Headquarters
87.795
29.449
49.337 29.858
Police
92.521
67.782
218.321 87.284
Fire Prevention
3.716
1.743
2.415
1.757
TOWN OF NORTH HEMPSTEAD:
General Fund 21.844
12.053
16.402 11.375
Town Outside Villages/Highway
56.226
24.932
69.276 38.143
DISCOUNTS
If the full year’s tax is paid on or before February 11, 2019,
discount will be allowed on the second-half tax at the rate of
one per centum of the second-half. No discount is allowed for
payment(s) made after February 11, 2019.
PENALTIES
The following scale of penalties is hereby prescribed for neglect to pay County, Town, Highway and Special District Taxes after they have become due and payable:
(1)
First-half tax due and payable January 1, 2019. If
paid on or before February 11, 2019, no penalty. If paid after
February 11, 2019, interest will be added at the rate of one
per centum per month, to be calculated from January 1, 2019
to the first day of the month following the date of payment.
(2)
Second-half tax due July 1, 2019. If paid on or before August 12, 2019, no penalty. If paid after August 12,
2019, interest will be added at the rate of one per centum per
month, to be calculated from July 1, 2019 to the first day of
the month following the date of payment. After August 31,
2019, the 2019 General Tax Roll will be turned over to the Nassau County Treasurer, County Office Building, One West
Street, First Floor, Mineola, NY 11501 and all payments after
that date must be paid at that office.
Dated: January 3, 2019
CHARLES BERMAN
RECEIVER OF TAXES
TOWN OF NORTH HEMPSTEAD
NEWSDAY, MONDAY, JANUARY 7, 2019
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated October 19, 2018, and entered in
the Office of the Clerk of the County of Queens, wherein THE
BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW
YORK SUCCESSOR TRUSTEE TO JPMORGAN CHASE BANK N
.A. AS TRUSTEE FOR THE STRUCTURED ASSET MORTGAGE
INVESTMENTS II TRUST MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES SERIES 2005-AR8 is the Plaintiff and NANDANEE
PARAY, ET AL. are the Defendants. I, the undersigned Referee will sell at public auction at the QUEENS COUNTY
COURTHOUSE, 88-11 SUTPHIN BLVD. COURTROOM #25, JAMAICA, NY 11435, on February 8, 2019 at 10:00AM, premises known as 21-34 HIMROD ST, RIDGEWOOD, NY 11385:
Block 3368, Lot 93:
ALL THAT CERTAIN PLOT, PIECE OR PARCEL OF LAND WITH
THE BUILDING AND IMPROVEMENTS THEREON ERECTED, SITUATE, LYING AND BEING IN THE BOROUGH AND COUNTY OF
QUEENS, CITY AND STATE OF NEW YORK
Premises will be sold subject to provisions of filed Judgment Index # 17151/2010. Neda N. Melamed, Esq. - Referee.
RAS Boriskin, LLC 900 Merchants Concourse, Suite 310,
Westbury, New York 11590, Attorneys for Plaintiff.
Legal Notice # 21456159
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that
the Board of Commissioners
of Oceanside Sanitary District #7 has cancelled the
Special Meeting on Tuesday,
January 8, 2019 at 5:30 p.m.
whose purpose was to enter
into Executive Session to discuss personnel issues. The
meeting was to be held at
the District Offices, 90 Mott
Street, Oceanside, New York
11572.
LEGAL NOTICES
Legal Notice # 21454070
SUPREME COURT OF THE
STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF QUEENS
MTGLQ INVESTORS, L.P.,
V.
PAULINE MORGAN, ET AL.
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated
June 8, 2018, and entered in
the Office of the Clerk of the
County of Queens, wherein
MTGLQ INVESTORS, L.P. is
the Plaintiff and PAULINE
MORGAN, ET AL. are the Defendants. I, the undersigned
Referee will sell at public auction at the QUEENS COUNTY
COURTHOUSE,
88-11
SUTPHIN BLVD., COURTROOM #25, JAMAICA, NY
11435, on February 8, 2019
at 10:00 AM, premises
known as 95-47 115TH
STREET, SOUTH RICHMOND
HILL, NY 11419 Block 9417,
Lot 70:
ALL
THAT
CERTAN
PLOT, PIECE OF PARCEL OF
LAND, WITH THE BUILDINGS
AND IMPROVEMENTS THEREON ERECTED, SITUATE LYING AN BEING IN RICHMOND
HILL, BOROUGH AND COUNTY OF QUEENS, CITY AND
STATE OF NEW YORK
Premises will be sold
subject to provisions of filed
Judgment Index # 021627/
2009. Matthew Vishnick,
Esq. - Referee. RAS Boriskin,
LLC 900 Merchants Concourse, Suite 310, Westbury,
New York 11590, Attorneys
for Plaintiff.
For sale information,
please visit www.auction.
com or call (800) 280-2832.
newsday.com
Legal Notice # 21454226
SUPREME COURT OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK - COUNTY
OF QUEENS
THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON
FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK
SUCCESSOR TRUSTEE TO JPMORGAN
CHASE BANK N.A. AS TRUSTEE FOR
THE STRUCTURED ASSET MORTGAGE
INVESTMENTS II TRUST MORTGAGE
PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES
SERIES 2005-AR8,
V.
NANDANEE PARAY, ET AL.
Legal Notice # 21454305
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE OF
PERSONAL PROPERTY
Notice is hereby given that
the undersigned will sell, to
satisfy lien of the owner, at
public sale by competitive
bidding on 1/16/19 at
10:00AM online at www.
StorageAuctions.com at the
Safeguard Storage facility located at:
Safeguard Self Storage
119-24 Jamaica Avenue
Richmond Hill, NY 11418
phone: 718-441-7602
The personal goods (including miscellaneous household
goods such as TV’s, appliances, beds, furniture, boxes)
stored therein by the following:
Unit # Tenant Name
1019 Terrie Brown
1019 Terrie Lynn Brown
2049 Carlos Carrillo
2062 Rulsy Bazin
4044 Victor Valladres
4044 Victor Manuel Valladares
4058 Tashawna Smith
M4135 Florence Josiah
M5139 Elena Rivera
Purchases must be paid at
the facility with Credit Card
or Cash. All Purchases must
be complete within 72 hours
of the end of the online auction. A $100.00 cash cleaning
deposit is required until all
items in the unit are removed from the premises
and verified by the manager
on duty. Sale subject to cancellation until the purchase
is completed; company reserves the right to refuse
any online bids.
Auction by
StorageAuctions.com
Phone: (866) 944-8530
Explore LI N/Q
Legal Notice # 21446505
Canterbury
Dental Care,
PLLC with SSNY on 11/
09/18. Office: Nassau. SSNY
desg as agent for process &
shall mail to: 15 Canterbury
Rd, Suite A4, Great Neck,
NY, 11021. Any lawful purpose.
B11
To place an ad call 631-843-7653 or visit newsday.com/buy&sell
LEGAL NOTICES
Explore LI N/Q
B12
Legal Notice # 21454273
Peter Scalamandre and Sons,
Inc. is soliciting bids for NYS
Certified M/WBE, SDVOB
Firms
Project SUNY Farmingdale
Parking Lot Phase 2B
Location: Farmingdale
Contract No. FSC 2018-04
Project Bid Date: January 29,
2019
Contract
documents are
available for review at our
main office.
John Califano
PH; 516-686-3000, ext. 255
Fax; 516-868-3943
?
NEWSDAY, MONDAY, JANUARY 7, 2019
newsday.com
Legal Notice # 21454867
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE OF
PERSONAL PROPERTY
Notice is hereby given that
the undersigned will sell,
to satisfy lien of the owner,
at public sale by competitive
bidding on 1/16/19
at
2:00PM online at www.
StorageAuctions.com at the
Safeguard Storage facility located at:
Safeguard Self Storage
115 Empire Boulevard
Brooklyn N.Y. 11225
718-282-6710
The personal goods (including miscellaneous household
goods such as TV’s, appliances, beds, furniture, boxes)
stored therein by the following:
Unit # Tenant Name
0314 Micheal Wiggins
0426 Hisham A Khaleel
1504 Wendy Hamilton
1803 Michael L Wynn
1803 Michael Wynn – Mr Michael
1907 Mark Wright
2103 Michael Edwards
3210 Annica Watt
4214 Margaret Coward-Beers
4214 Margaret Coward Beers
4309 Marvin Applewhite
5111 Ebony King
5332 Jerold S Lewis
5404 Alika Perowza
5506 Pierre Metayer
6205 Suzanna Powell
6205 Suzanne F Powell
6205 Suzanne Powell
Purchases must be paid at
the facility with Credit Card
or Cash. All Purchases must
be complete within 72 hours
of the end of the online auction. A $100.00 cash cleaning
deposit is required until all
items in the unit are removed from the premises
and verified by the manager
on duty. Sale subject to cancellation until the purchase
is completed; company reserves the right to refuse
any online bids.
Auction by
StorageAuctions.com
Phone: (866) 944-8530
Legal Notice # 21454920
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE OF
PERSONAL PROPERTY
Notice is hereby given that
the undersigned will sell, to
satisfy lien of the owner, at
public sale by competitive
bidding on 01/17/2019 at
10:00AM online at www.
StorageAuctions.com at the
Safeguard Storage facility located at:
Safeguard
Self
Storage
#190306 156-01 Liberty Ave,
Jamaica NY 11433 (718)6580102
The personal goods (including miscellaneous household
goods such as TV’s, appliances, beds, furniture, boxes)
stored therein by the following:
Unit Name
1311 PAULINE WALKER
1512 TAHJE ALEXANDER
1615 KIMONE CAMPBELL
2409 CARLIN PORTER JR.
2414 SHEENA STARKEY
2515 DONIQUE LIGHTNER
4214 SHAKEEM BAKER
4324 OMARI RODNEY
4433 CARLIN PORTER
4608 Alsanabani, Akram
5402 PRECIOUS THOMAS
5416 ANAD MARAJ
5508 KEVIN TAGANAJAN
5606 PRISCILLA CRAWFORD
6210 VERNON CHAVIS
Purchases must be paid at
the facility with Credit Card
or Cash. All Purchases must
be complete within 72 hours
of the end of the online auction. A $100.00 cash cleaning
deposit is required until all
items in the unit are removed from the premises
and verified by the manager
on duty. Sale subject to cancellation until the purchase
is completed; company reserves the right to refuse
any online bids.
Auction by
StorageAuctions.com
Phone: (866) 944-8530
Legal Notice # 21454489
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE OF
PERSONAL PROPERTY
Notice is hereby given that
the undersigned will sell, to
satisfy lien of the owner, at
public sale by competitive
bidding on 1/16/19 at
2:00pm online at www.
StorageAuctions.com at the
Safeguard Storage facility located at:
Safeguard Self Storage
1635 Albany Avenue
Brooklyn, NY 11210
phone: 718-434-1754
The personal goods (including miscellaneous household
goods such as TV’s, appliances, beds, furniture, boxes)
stored therein by the following:
Unit #
Tenant Name
0110 BERNELLA HENRY
0119 CHRYSTAL LEE
0209 RON MCGRAW
0209 RONALD MCGRAW
0212 KADRAJ AUDATE
0218 AFIYA DORIS
0312 LATOYA BOBB
0312 LA-TOYA BOBB
0510 SAMANTHA MCARTH
UR
0721 M JOANE PILLARD DESIGN
0721 MARIE JOANE PILLARD
1108 DIMITRY LAGUERRE
1150 JUNE VAZ
1222 DANIEL MILLIONARD
1420 JASON A JOHN
1711 CHESTER L JACOB
1713 MICHELLE WILLIAMS
B306 AUDREY SAMUELS
B517 ANTHONY BROWN
Purchases must be paid at
the facility with Credit Card
or Cash. All Purchases must
be complete within 72 hours
of the end of the online auction. A $100.00 cash cleaning
deposit is required until all
items in the unit are removed from the premises
and verified by the manager
on duty. Sale subject to cancellation until the purchase
is completed; company reserves the right to refuse
any online bids.
Auction by
StorageAuctions.com
Phone: (866) 944-8530
Legal Notice # 21454891
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE OF
PERSONAL PROPERTY
Notice is hereby given that
the undersigned will sell, to
satisfy lien of the owner, at
public sale by competitive
bidding
on
01/16/19at
2:00PM online at www.
StorageAuctions.com at the
Safeguard Storage facility located at:
Safeguard Self Storage
1648 East New York Avenue
Brooklyn, NY 11212
phone: 718-495-6270
The personal goods (including miscellaneous household
goods such as TV’s, appliances, beds, furniture, boxes)
stored therein by the following:
Unit #
Tenant Name
1402
Eartha Simmons
1408
Petery Henry
2342
Celest Hill
3210
Tiffany Gittens
4240
Rashaun Alexis
4343
Teasha Tanner
5314
Christian Jobity
5340
Hiram Josiah
6221
Antoinette Irons
6302
Tieanna N Jones
6334
Deandre Irvin
Purchases must be paid at
the facility with Credit Card
or Cash. All Purchases must
be complete within 72 hours
of the end of the online auction. A $100.00 cash cleaning
deposit is required until all
items in the unit are removed from the premises
and verified by the manager
on duty. Sale subject to cancellation until the purchase
is completed; company reserves the right to refuse
any online bids.
Auction by
StorageAuctions.com
Phone: (866) 944-8530
Legal Notice # 21456183
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the regular Jericho Fire
District Board of Fire Commissioners meetings for the
year 2019 will be held on the
second Thursday and the following Tuesday of each
month at Fire Headquarters,
424 North Broadway, Jericho, N.Y., commencing at
7:30 PM.
By Order of the
Jericho Fire District
Board of Fire Commissioners
Nancy Orlando, District
Secretary,
January 4, 2019
Legal Notice # 21454777
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE OF
PERSONAL PROPERTY
Notice is hereby given that
the undersigned will sell, to
satisfy lien of the owner, at
public sale by competitive
bidding on [01/16/19] at
[10:00AM] online at www.
StorageAuctions.com at the
Safeguard Storage facility located at:
Safeguard Self Storage
2941 Atlantic Avenue
Brooklyn, NY 11207
phone: 718-827-7366
The personal goods (including miscellaneous household
goods such as TV’s, appliances, beds, furniture, boxes)
stored therein by the following:
Unit #
Tenant Name
0313 Belle Avis Joseph
1204 Nathaniel Boone
1314 Momodou B Jallow
1403 Loula Davis
2105 Teresa Linder
2112 Melinda JohnsonWilkenson
2306 Bibi Ramjeet Torres
2409 Carolyn Grant
3125 Daena CunninghamHunte
3408 Arkym Garner
3505 Johny A. Velette
4215 Akintayo Ayorinde
4423 Jackie Defeo
B4516 Helen Hester
Purchases must be paid at
the facility with Credit Card
or Cash. All Purchases must
be complete within 72 hours
of the end of the online auction. A $100.00 cash cleaning
deposit is required until all
items in the unit are removed from the premises
and verified by the manager
on duty. Sale subject to cancellation until the purchase
is completed; company reserves the right to refuse
any online bids.
Auction by
StorageAuctions.com
Phone: (866) 944-8530
Legal Notice # 21454884
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE OF
PERSONAL PROPERTY
Notice is hereby given that
the undersigned will sell, to
satisfy lien of the owner, at
public sale by competitive
bidding on [01/16/19] at
[2:00PM] online at w w w .
StorageAuctions.com at the
Safeguard Storage facility located at:
Safeguard Self Storage
1206 East New York Avenue
Brooklyn NY 11212
phone: 718.363.3360
The personal goods (including miscellaneous household
goods such as TV’s, appliances, beds, furniture, boxes)
stored therein by the following:
Unit #/Tenant Name
0101 Imran Passard; 0203
L i n d a Garland;
0511
Shamicka Mercado; 0517 Philip Thomas; 0602 Anaya
Chung; 1101 James Young;
1123 Skye Devalle; 1123
Skyee Delvalle; 1204 Andrea
Woodruff; 1215 Eranie E Griffith; 1415 Michelle Ramsay;
1504 Elsie Jones; 2307 Gaston Fritz; 2307 The Estate of
Gaston Fritz; 2316 Johan
Paul; 2424 Cheryl-Ann Ferguson; 2519 Edward AlstonMcDuffie; 2520 Dawn Moody
2520 The Estate of Dawn
Moody; 3128 Dalton Grant;
3219 Juan A Alvarez; 3408
Edlyn Fuller; 3419 Thomas
Warren;
4305
Girard
Guillaume; 5311 Joanne
Poulson-Stevenson:
5311
Joanne P Stevenson; 5311
Joanne Poulson Stevenson;
6112 Tashana Lawrence;
6201 Shontayia Fenner; 6201
Shontayia Latoya Fenner;
6207 Quran House; 6211
Desiree D Bryan
Purchases must be paid at
the facility with Credit Card
or Cash. All Purchases must
be complete within 72 hours
of the end of the online auction. A $100.00 cash cleaning
deposit is required until all
items in the unit are removed from the premises
and verified by the manager
on duty. Sale subject to cancellation until the purchase
is completed; company reserves the right to refuse
any online bids.
Auction by StorageAuctions.
com Phone: (866) 944-8530
Legal Notice # 21454935
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE OF
PERSONAL PROPERTY
Notice is hereby given that
the undersigned will sell, to
satisfy lien of the owner, at
public sale by competitive
bidding on 01/16/19 at
2:00PM online at www.
Pets + Livestock
2:00PM online at www.
StorageAuctions.com at the
Safeguard Storage facility located at:
Safeguard Self Storage
629 Utica Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11203
The personal goods (including miscellaneous household
goods such as TV’s, appliances, beds, furniture, boxes)
stored therein by the following:
Unit # Tenant Name
0101 Hurlie C. Miller JR
0121 Phillip Johnson
0216 Crystal King
0235 Werna Estil
0302 Tiyana Riles
0418 Michael Quarry
0421 Hurlie C. Miller JR
0423 Candice Matthew
0428 Dwayne Archer
0434 Sediqua Valme
0449 Jennifer Peart
0624 Carl K Semper
0902 Corliss Taylor
0909 Anna Shpilkovskaya
1022 Luria Joseph
1112 Philbert P Ifill
1112 The Estate of Philbert
P Ifill
1112 The Estate of Philbert
Ifill
1531 Pauline Galloway
1613 Jemeil Defreitas
1641 Janice Wiltshire
1710 Nayale LaFleur
1805 Dave Duncan
1910 Victoria Sellers-Smith
1912 Shellon Gill
2001 Tracy Morales
2144 Muhammad Walker
2303 Yolanda Jones
2316 Lisa Ann Brown
2404 Phillip Simon
2404 Phillip Simons
3103 Thera Choice
3112 Anjaly Bhansali
3116 Jenny Desronvil
3134 Maurice Facey
3143 Gloria Clarke
3410 Randall A Jones
Purchases must be paid at
the facility with Credit Card
or Cash. All Purchases must
be complete within 72 hours
of the end of the online auction. A $100.00 cash cleaning
deposit is required until all
items in the unit are removed from the premises
and verified by the manager
on duty. Sale subject to cancellation until the purchase
is completed; company reserves the right to refuse
any online bids.
Auction by
StorageAuctions.com
Phone: (866) 944-8530
Legal Notice # 21453719
MOM Realty 1 LLC d/b/a/
Men on the Move Self Storage Farmingdale will sell at
public auction under New
York Lien laws for cash only
on Tuesday, JANUARY 15th,
2019, at 12:00 PM and on
such succeeding days and
times as may be necessary
at
1110
Rte.
109,
Farmingdale NY 11735. The
property described as cartons, furniture, office furnishings & supplies, household
goods and other effects belonging to; Robert St. John #
D112, Margaret Alvarez #
F071, Sabir Sohail # D022
Norman Nelson # G036, Helen Minela # F067, Jennifer
Odom # F027
Legal Notice # 21456200
Notice of formation of ALL
ISLAND DOCKBUILDERS LLC
a limited liability company.
Articles of Organization filed
with the Secretary of State
of the State of New York
(SSNY) on October 25, 2018.
Office located in Nassau
County. SSNY has been designated for service of process. SSNY shall mail a copy
of any process served against
the LLC to c/o THE LLC, 684
Miller Avenue, Freeport, NY
11520. Purpose: any lawful
purpose.
To Place A
Notice In Our
Legal Section
Call 631-843-2806
Fax 631-843-3257
E-mail legaladv@newsday.com
COINS
AMERICAN COINS Bought
Gold, silver, proof sets, paying
$11 & up any Silver $1. Private
60yrs exp. Dan 516-816-1711
COLLECTIBLES
AMERICAN FLYER, Lionel,H.O.
Trains, Slot Cars 516-652-0574
• Pet supplies
• Lost
• Groom
• Board
• Sale
• Found
• Adopt
• Train
DOG/CATS FOR SALE
ANTIQUES WANTED - Firearms
Military Items, Swords, Civil
War - WWII. 631-312-2615 or
empiremil@aol.com Pvt.
Find your home
for culinary
masterpieces.
BUYING SPORTS CARDS
Autographs and Comics
Paying Cash. (516) 473-4770\
AKC Breeder Since 1962 PD030
LABRADORS GOLDENS,
CASH FOR RECORDS
Goldendoodle,Cavalier,Cavapoo
Bostons, Pugs, Beagles, Poms,
Schnauzer, Dachshund, Corgie, CD’s, Rock, Jazz, Blues, 50-80’s
+ Coins. I Travel. 203-377-3449
Poodles and Cockapoos
Wheatens, Yorkshires, Maltese,
Havanese, Shih Tzus, Bulldogs,
German Shepherds+Rottweilers HESS Trucks, Tonka, All Toys
Wanted. Pvt. (631) 471-4375
www.sportsmankennels.com
SPORTSMANû 631-727-3550
GERMAN SHEPHERDS 10/15
reg, health cert 631-284-3611
GOLDENDOODLE PUPS Med.
Size, Non shed. 631-676-7332
Goldendoodle Pups, M, F, Shots,
Mini/Standard 516-564-7351
$ I BUY AVIATION ITEMS $
Airlines, Grumman, Etc.
(631) 804 - 5955
TOYS Trains Slot Cars Models
MALTESE PUPS Adorable M/F
Toy/Teacup. Call 718-614-3968 Want Anything in the TOY Field
& Musical Instr. 516-384-4566
POMERANIAN PUPPIES, Shots
health cert. $950. 631-205-4204
ROTTWEILER Pups AKC, Tails
cut, Shots $1200. 631-346 9577
SHELTIE Pups, sable, AKC, M/F
10 wks, 1st shot, wormed, hlth
chk, Ch. Heritage. 516-680-1683
SHIH TZU PUPS Toy & Imperial
Sizes. Call/Text 718-306-4136
CONSTRUCTION
EQUIPMENT
WE BUY USED STORAGE
Containers & Storage Trailers
20ft & 40ft, Top Dollar Paid.
Pvt. Call 6 3 1 - 8 3 1 - 5 7 2 1
YORKIE PUPPIES ALL SIZES
HOME RAISED 718-306-4136
Merchandise
FIREWOOD
FIREPIT / FIREPLACE WOOD,
Cherry, Apple, Hickory Avail.
Nass, Suff & 5 Boro’s. Wood
18" And Under. 516-967-6200
FIREWOOD - ALL HARDWOOD
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GARAGE/TAG SALES
ROCKVILLE CTR 38 ROYAL CT
Sat 1/5, Sun 1/6, Mon 1/7,
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Gay DR, Vintage & Modern
Furn. Curios, Chandelier, Prints,
Paintings, Books, Breweriana,
China, Crystal, Lenox, KPM
Delft, Asst’d Collection, Game
table, All Holiday Items, Fireproof & Lateral files, Loads of
Records, Toys, Dolls, & Games
ANTIQUES
ABBA BUYS Coins, Silver, Art,
Jewelry, Antiques, Trains, Toys
House Contents (631) 433-0820
SEASONED 1 YEAR - 4x8x4
FULL CORDS 1 CORD $160,
2 CORDS $290, 3 CORDS $400.
VINNY @ 631 - 672 - 1745
Guarantee Seasoned Firewood
1/2 CORD $99 1 CORD $150,
2 CORDS $280, 3 CORDS $390,
4 CORDS $480. 631-479-7449
TIMMY’S TIMBER
1 Cord $150.
(4x4x8)
2 Cords $280. 3 Cords $380.
14 Mo Seasoned. 631-838-1825
RECORDS
500 RECORDS, 33 RPMs, from
1950 to 1975. (631) 612-1288
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MANHATTAN
RENTALS
All Manhattan/Bronx Furn Rms
CHEVY 2012 Captiva 68k, V6
Carfax, 2x4, snrf, pristine, warr,
Inspected $7,150 516-297-2277
JEEP 2013 PATRIOT 4x4 loaded,
immac,warr$5995 516 692 3177
JEEP 2008 GRAND CHEROKEE
loaded,$5995warr,516-692-3177
JEEP 2004 GRAND CHEROKEE
4.0L $3,995 warr 516-692-3177
JEEP 2002 Grand Cherokee 4x4
Immac $2995warr 516-692-3177
AUTOS WANTED
COLLECTIBLE CARS
MUSCLE CARS WANTED
1925 -2010 ANY COND. Pvt Col
TEXT PIX or Call 516-721-3951
AUTOS FOR SALE
Atlantic Lexus of 110
-- 2090 Broadhollow Rd -Farmingdale B 516-795-7600
www.atlanticlexus.com
HYUNDAI 2008 Sonata mint
snrf, alloys $4575 631-422-8116
LEXUS of Rockville Centre
-- 700 Sunrise Hwy, RVC, NY -866-539-2755 LexusofRVC.com
û AARDVARK Auto Buyers û
We visit you. Top $$ Paid or
donate/tax ded. 516-VAN-CARS
AUTOS WANTED Dead or Alive
Cash Pd.Free P/U 516-860-6664
CASH FOR ALL CARS, title or
no title. 888-586-5227, yo hablo
espanol, WE COME TO YOU!
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JUNK CARS WANTED
TOP DOLLAR OR
516-497-8898
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JUNK OR NOT - - I WANT UR
NARDY HONDA SMITHTOWN
JUNK - CAR, TRUCK, VAN
559 Jericho Tpke, St. James
Day, Night, Weekends, Holidays
cable/tv,internet,start@$150wk
nardyhonda.com
- 888-532-0122 Serving Nass/Suff over 30 yrs
Move Today! Call 212-368-1132
Reputable
construction
co.
NISSAN 2006 ALTIMA 2.4S mint
based on L.I. looking for APM’s
NASSAU/SUFFOLK
Loaded $3950 631-422-8116
and exp’d Field Supervisors.
FREE PICK UP û 631-304-4944
City exp a plus. Fax resumes to
HOUSES FOR SALE
NISSAN 1993 Sentra Orig own
good gas mi. $900 516-395 6497
WebID 21454812
TOYOTA 2001 CAMRY 180K
Miles $1200 631-624-6974
CONSTRUCTION
CASH PAID
631 - 454 - 1212
Marine
DRIVER - ROUTE POSITIONS
Run Your Own Route
CALLAHEAD Corp.
NO CDL req’d, 4 day work week,
(enjoy 3 days off). Year round,
No lay offs, 100% med, dental,
401K, uniforms, 2 wks paid vac,
raise every 6 months. Will train!
4a-2:30p. SWING Driver $1000/
wk includes $100. weekly bonus
program. ROUTE Driver $900/wk
inclds $100.wkly bonus program,
Plus OT. Apply: Mon-Fri 9a-7p
304 Crossbay Blvd, Queens, NY.
Apply in person, No calls.
WebID 21455186
BELLMORE S. BAYFRONT
Amazing Views, Huge mint w/
extra bldg lot, parklike grounds,
dock/lift, IGP', 5 BR 6 bath,
3 fplcs, $4.950M.
Owner. 516-826-7676
NASSAU/SUFFOLK
FURNISHED ROOM
NEW CAR DEALER
HONDA
HUNTINGTON HONDA
1055 E. Jericho Tpke
LIN D E N H U R S T Furnished
Master Bdrm, TV, Convenient Huntington, NY 631-423-6000
To All. $275/week. Utilities are
Included. Text Anytime. Please
NEWSDAY BUY & SELL
Call After 6pm. 631-296-0485
Read for savings
Advertise for results!!
631-843-7653(SOLD)
Must have clean drivers license.
Must be able to do light plumbing and carpentry. 4 day work
week. $700. per week.
100% Medical & Dental, 401K,
Uniforms, Paid Vacations, Sick
and Holidays. Apply in person:
Mon-Fri betwn 9am-7pm at:
Call-A-Head Corp., 304
Crossbay Blvd, Qns, NY 11693
WebID 21446845
HANDYMAN (M/F)
OFFICE HELP
AAA CAREER
FREE CAREER SEMINAR
$75K-$100K Unlimited Thereafter
Flexible Work Hours & Days
Earned While You Learn
Full Training & Support
CALL TODAY-SPACE LIMITED!
Lindenhurst/W. Islip 631-226-5995
E. Meadow/Lvtwn 516-826-8100
VEHICLE DAMAGE
INSPECTORS F/T
Comp sal, Bonus, great benefits. 401K w/Company match.
Adesa Auctions-631-205-5000
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES
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BUSINESS
OPPORTUNITIES
RouteBrokers.com
Start the NEW YEAR right!!
CarBrite, $539K.....nets $3,000/wk
FREE Rte4Sale List 516-482-8250
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CLspring.Class.4x15
NEWSDAY, MONDAY, JANUARY 7, 2019
REAL ESTATE
BERTRAM 1989 Sportfish 33ft
Cleanest, Low Hours, Turn Key,
Owner retiring - Getting old...
$37,990.
718 - 972 - 6500
newsday.com
For order taking, phones, light
data, commission. Entry, Will
Train! $720.00 per wk. Medical,
dental, 401K, 2wks vacation,
holiday pay. Apply in Person
at: CALLAHEAD CORP.
304 Crossbay Blvd.
Queens, NY 11693
WebID 21446832
Financial
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Uncle Buck HH∂ (Comedy). John Candy, Amy Madigan. An easygoing relative takes care of three children. (PG) Revenge of the Nerds HH∂ (Comedy). Robert Carradine. (12:25)
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Ray Donovan (12:10)
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Dude Bro Party Massacre III (Horror). (12:45)
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The Untouchables HHHH (Crime Drama, 1987). Kevin Costner, Sean Connery. (R)
The Foreigner (1:30)
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All Access
Boxing Claressa Shields vs. Hanna Gabriels. (1:00)
Outlander Jamie and Claire keep secrets. Counterpart “Shadow Puppets”
Out of Time HH∂ (Suspense, 2003). Denzel Washington, Eva Mendes. (PG-13)
Outlander
Counterpart (12:47)
Dragon Blade (Action, 2015). Jackie Chan, John Cusack, Adrien Brody. (R)
(6:05) Away (Drama). Juno Temple. (NR) Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon HHH∂ (Adventure, 2000). Chow Yun-Fat. (PG-13)
The Money Pit HH (Comedy). Tom Hanks, Shelley Long. (PG)
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(6:55) Roman J. Israel, Esq. HH∂ (Crime Drama, 2017). Denzel Washington. (PG-13)
Knight Rider Traffickers acquire assault rifles. Friday Night Lights
Brewster’s Millions HH (Comedy). Richard Pryor, John Candy. (PG) Gung Ho HH∂ (Comedy). Michael Keaton. (PG-13) (12:29)
The Good Shepherd
Open Water 2: Adrift (Suspense, 2006). Susan May Pratt. (R)
The Return H (Suspense, 2006). Sarah Michelle Gellar. (PG-13) Untraceable HH∂ (Suspense). Diane Lane, Billy Burke. (R) (12:13)
(6:51) The Virginian Hired gunfighter.
Winchester ’73 HHH∂ (Western, 1950). James Stewart, Shelley Winters. (NR)
Black Horse Canyon HH∂ (Western). (NR)
The Return of Frank James HH∂ (12:45)
(5:45) Smokey and the Bandit HHH (PG)
Galaxy Quest HHH (Comedy). Tim Allen. Aliens kidnap actors from an old sci-fi TV series. Blazing Saddles HHH (Comedy, 1974). Cleavon Little, Gene Wilder. (R) (12:15)
(6) Woman of the Year HHH∂ (Comedy).
The Music Box (NR) Busy Bodies (NR)
Way Out West HHHH (Comedy). Stan Laurel, Oliver Hardy. (G) Sons of the Desert HHHH (Comedy). (NR)
Tit For Tat (12:15)
(6) The Spanish Prisoner HHH (PG)
The Road HHH (Drama, 2009). Viggo Mortensen, Kodi Smit-McPhee. (R)
The Boys Are Back HH∂ (Comedy-Drama). Clive Owen. (PG-13) The Kite Runner
Johnny Carson
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Three’s Company
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Celebrity Name Game Password Plus
Supermarket Sweep
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Hogan’s Heroes
Carol Burnett
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Family Law A child sues his adoptive parents. The Good Wife Peter’s appeal trial begins.
Cold Case Files Crawlspace.
Murder She Solved “Free to Kill”
Murder She Solved “A Killer Family”
Dog Bounty Hunter
Dog Bounty Hunter
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Cold Case Files Crawlspace.
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Murder She Solved “A Killer Family”
Dog Bounty Hunter
Dog Bounty Hunter
CFP National Championship Dos viejos rivales se enfrentan cuando Alabama (14-0, 8-0 SEC) juegue con Clemson (14-0, 8-0 ACC). (Live)
SportsCenter
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Central Fox (Live)
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Los Cousins: La serie
Los Cousins: La serie
La Familia P. Luche
La Familia P. Luche
El Río (Drama, 2019). (NR)
What to Watch
Big Fish HHH (Drama, 2003). Ewan McGregor, Albert Finney. (PG-13) (12:10)
Seguridad de frontera Seguridad de frontera Seguridad de frontera Seguridad de frontera Prison Break “Pilot”
Caso cerrado: Los más atrevidos
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Championship Drive
Bowl Game
CFP National Championship Clemson vs Alabama.
Bowl Game
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College Football Final
College Football
CFP National Championship Enjoy the natural sounds of the game with the traditional game telecast, sans commentators.
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PBA Bowling Hall of Fame Classic. From Arlington, Texas.
PBC Collection From June 11, 2017.
PBC Countdown
PBC Face to Face
Speak for Yourself with Whitlock and Wiley
(6:30) Red Bull Crashed Ice
Red Bull Crashed Ice
Red Bull Crashed Ice
Mexico Primera Division Soccer
The Legend of Bagger Vance HHH (Drama). Will Smith. A mystical caddy helps an ex-golfer regain his swing. The Legend of Bagger Vance HHH (Drama). Will Smith. A mystical caddy helps an ex-golfer regain his swing.
Intentional Talk
MLB Now
MLB Tonight
Mr. Baseball HH (Comedy). Tom Selleck. Aging New York Yankee gets traded to Japan. MLB Tonight
uSEMA: Battle of the Builders 5
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Overhaulin’ “SEMA Car: Chrysler 300”
RMD Garage “Green Gold”
Connections
Connections
Connections
Connections
Connections
Knicks Pregame
NBA Basketball New York Knicks at Portland Trail Blazers. (12:30)
Formula E
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NY Knicks Pre-Game
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NBA GameTime Live
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Motocross Racing Monster Energy Supercross: Anaheim. From Anaheim, Calif.
NHL Top 10
NHL Hockey Los Angeles Kings at San Jose Sharks. (1:00)
NFL Total Access
NFL Football Teams TBA.
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NHL Hockey St. Louis Blues at Philadelphia Flyers. From Wells Fargo Center in Philadelphia.
Road to the 2019 NHL Winter Classic
NHL Tonight
On the Fly (12:30)
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Mets Classics David Wright returns to the lineup. From Aug. 24, 2015.
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newsday.com/tv
Comedy veterans Sheryl Lee Ralph and Tone Bell find the funny with Nina Dobrev in CBS’ “Fam.”
Dobrev livens up with laughs
BY JAY BOBBIN
Zap2it
A
fter her time on
“The Vampire
Diaries,’’ Nina
Dobrev has earned
the chance to laugh
. . . and to get laughs.
The actress tries something
new by doing comedy in front of
a studio audience in “Fam,’’
which CBS premieres Thursday.
She plays Clem, whose vision of
married life is clouded when her
unpredictable half-sister (Odessa
Adlon, a daughter of “Better
Things’’ star Pamela Adlon)
suddenly arrives to stay — forcing Clem to try to get her fiancé
(Tone Bell) and future in-laws
(Uniondale’s Sheryl Lee Ralph,
Brian Stokes Mitchell) used to
the newcomer and vice versa.
Dobrev allows that it took her
awhile to “get into a groove’’ for
sitcom work. “I had done theater
at my performing-arts high
school, so I knew what that was
like,’’ she says, “but it had been so
long since I was in front of a live
audience that, more than anything, this was about the nerves.
The writers have an idea of what
they want the character to be, but
you have to discover it together.
It’s a very collaborative process.’’
As she adjusted to performing
for spectators again, Dobrev was
grateful to be with a sitcom alum
in Bell (“Disjointed’’) and stage
veterans in Ralph (“Dreamgirls,’’
“Wicked”) and Tony Award
winner Mitchell (“Kiss Me,
Kate’’). “I will be the first to
admit that I did need the guidance,’’ notes Dobrev. “I viewed
this as a second college experience and hung onto every syllable they said. I definitely was a
newbie.’’
While she acknowledges that
the public may not know her
funnier side, Dobrev (whose
30th birthday is the day before
“Fam’s’’ launch) attests that “all
my friends know that I will do
anything for a laugh, in the most
self-deprecating manner. It’s
definitely something that I love,
and I’m glad that I get to showcase it now.’’
Movies including “Flatliners’’
and “Dog Days’’ have been
among Dobrev’s credits since
her six seasons as Elena (and
sometimes also as Katherine)
on “The Vampire Diaries.’’ She
recalls that series with “positive, amazing memories. I
remember having maybe a
disagreement over a scene with
Paul [Wesley] in season 1, and
he looked at me and said, ‘One
day, 10 years from now, you’re
gonna miss me.’ And now that
the show is done, we’re probably closer to each other than
anyone else [from the series].’’
In prepping for “Fam,’’ Dobrev
(who’s also in the upcoming film
“Then Came You’’) visited “The
Big Bang Theory’’ and “Mom’’
and spoke with executive producer Chuck Lorre. She says
she’s eager to do more of her
new show “now that I do have
that taste of a live-audience feel,
and that instant gratification of
laughter in the moment.’’
TV ON DVD
New thriller from the ‘King of horror’
CASTLE ROCK Stephen King
literary lore powers Hulu’s
season-long anthology thriller,
designed to tickle terror fans by
incorporating King touchstones
— Maine settings, characters
(Sheriff Alan Pangborn), concepts (bodies found frozen).
Andre Holland headlines 10
episodes alongside King veterans Bill Skarsgard (“It”), Sissy
Spacek (“Carrie”) and Melanie
Lynskey (“Rose Red”). Cocreators Sam Shaw and Dustin
Thomason break down their
King-inspired mythology in
featurettes. (And in 4K, those
chilly landscapes look luscious.)
List prices: $25 DVD, $30 Bluray+digital, $45 4K+Blu+digital,
Warner.
STRANGER THINGS: SEASON 2
Another cool VHS-styled box
holds this second round of
1980s-set supernatural strangeness. Plus, this time, 4K delivers
both HDR and DTS-HD. (Netflix drops Season 3 on July 4.)
Exclusive to Target: $25
Blu+DVD, $30 4K+Blu, Netflix.
FAMILY GUY 20 GREATEST HITS
Song-and-dance episodes celebrate the animated show’s 20th
anniversary, with new extras.
List price: $30 for 3 DVDs, Fox.
— DIANE WERTS
ABC / RICK ROWELL
THE BACHELOR
(8 p.m., ABC/7)
— Season 23
premiere: Colton
Underwood
discusses the
backlash against
him with Chris
Harrison, and the
30 women arrive,
hoping to make a
good impression.
Guest appearances by Megan
Mullally, Nick
Offerman, Terry
and Rebecca
Crews, Billy Eichner and Fred
Willard.
Former football player Colton Underwood
\
looks for love in “The Bachelor.”
AMERICA’S GOT
TALENT: THE CHAMPIONS (8 p.m., NBC/4) — Comics, singers,
mentalists, a sword swallower, a contortionist and more champions
from around the world compete; fans from all 50 states serve as
new judges; 10 acts perform, and two go through to the finals.
INDEPENDENT LENS: MY COUNTRY NO MORE (10 p.m.,
WNET/13) — Documentary looks at the rise and fall of the North
Dakota oil boom, and a look at the long-term consequences of
short-term approaches to land use.
offthewall
FUNNY FLICKS Need an escapist night Monday? Sundance has a
rad retro triple feature — Burt Reynolds and Jackie Gleason in 1977
road chase “Smokey and the Bandit” (5:45 p.m.), Tim Allen and
Alan Rickman in 1999 trek sendup “Galaxy Quest” (8 p.m.), and
Mel Brooks’ wild 1974 Western satire “Blazing Saddles”
(10:15 p.m.), starring Cleavon Little, Gene Wilder and Madeline
Kahn.
— DIANE WERTS
tvtalk
DAYTIME
CBS THIS MORNING (7 a.m.,
CBS/2) — Malala Yousafzai
KELLY & RYAN (9 a.m., WABC/7)
— Josh Hutcherson
WENDY WILLIAMS (10 a.m.,
WNYW/5, 4 p.m., WWOR/9,
2 a.m., BET) — The Lox
THE REAL (11 a.m., WNYW/5, 5
p.m., WWOR/9) — Vivica A. Fox
DR. PHIL (3 p.m., WCBS/2; 8 p.m.,
WLNY/10/55) — I’m being
electronically harassed
NIGHT
BUSY PHILIPPS (10 P.M., E!) —
William Jackson Harper
COLBERT (11:35 p.m., CBS/2) —
Ethan Hawke
FALLON (11:35 p.m., NBC/4) —
Lindsay Lohan, James Spader
MEYERS (12:35 a.m., NBC/4) —
Chris Hayes
CORDEN (12:35 a.m., CBS/2) —
Adam McKay
Lindsay Lohan joins “Fallon.”
GETTY IMAGES / DAVE J HOGAN
CBS
today’spicks
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