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DESCRIPTION JP2000049920

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DESCRIPTION JP2000049920
[0001]
FIELD OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates generally to the field of portable
electronic devices with speaker assemblies.
[0002]
BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION Handheld portable electronic devices, such as portable
wireless telephones, use loudspeakers to convert electrical signals into sound waves in the
human audible frequency range of 20 Hertz (Hz) to 20,000 kilohertz (kHz). adopt. The speaker
allows the mobile phone user to hear the other party's voice and other sounds such as dial tones.
The quality of speech expression is an important factor when a consumer purchases a portable
radio. The sound quality of a loudspeaker is determined by its frequency response in the audio
frequency range. Typically, the manufacturer of the loudspeaker presents a defined frequency
response of the loudspeaker when used in a "free field" environment. However, speakers
employed in wireless telephones are rarely used in free sound field environments. Rather, the
user applies the wireless telephone to his ear to hear the sound, and the speaker is close to the
human ear.
[0003]
The goal of acoustic engineers in the wireless telephone field is to choose a combination of
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speakers, enclosures and preconditioning electrical circuitry that provide acceptable sound
quality. Acceptable sound quality is generally a measure of how flat or variable the frequency
response of the speaker is in an environment in the 300 Hz to 4 kHz frequency range. The flatter
the frequency response, ie the less the change, the better the sound quality. The low frequency is
higher or higher than the high frequency, or the increased frequency response is a dull, muddy
sound. On the other hand, a high frequency response with high frequency compared to low
frequency results in high pitch and sharp sound.
[0004]
[0004] For handheld wireless telephones, two types of speaker technology, piezo-electric
speakers and dynamic speakers, are mainstream and both have high free air resonant
frequencies. Both speaker technologies are defined to work with an airtight seal between the
speaker and the human ear. Achieving a hermetic seal requires that the speaker have a hermetic
mount to the hand-held wireless telephone housing, and the wireless telephone housing has a
hermetic coupling where the housing contacts the ear. The connection between the ear and the
housing is achieved by forming a recess in the housing that conforms to the shape of the human
ear. As long as a hermetic seal is maintained, these types of speakers can provide an acceptable
frequency response.
[0005]
As the miniaturization of handheld wireless telephones progresses, the housing is not large
enough to form a recess in the housing surface that accommodates the size of all human ears, so
that the ear and housing are tight for all users. It is difficult to achieve a bond with As a result,
for some users, air leaks between the housing and the ear, resulting in loss or attenuation of the
low frequency response. From various speaker tests, this loss is an average of 13 decibels (dB) at
300 Hz, resulting in a high pitched sound.
[0006]
To further illustrate, FIG. 9 shows a graph 900 of acoustic frequency response curves 902, 904
from a conventional portable radiotelephone utilizing a piezoelectric speaker having a high free
air fundamental resonance frequency. Each acoustic frequency response curve 902, 904 shows
the relationship between the acoustic sound pressure level and the frequency. Specifically, the
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acoustic frequency response curve 902 is obtained when the earcup of a conventional portable
radio telephone is sealed in an artificial ear (IEC-318 type, but not shown). An acoustic frequency
response curve 904 is obtained if the ear cup is not sealed using a leak ring adapter (not shown)
with an artificial ear. As the acoustic frequency response curve 904 shows, a low acoustic
impedance dynamic speaker with unsealed unwanted bass loss is designed to enhance the bass
side of the frequency range and is designed with a housing and It can be used to correct bass loss
due to air leaks with the human ear. However, when such a speaker is mounted with a hermetic
seal between the speaker and the housing, an excessive low frequency increase occurs if a
hermetic seal is formed between the housing and the human ear. So the sound is dull and dull.
Furthermore, there is a large change of about 11 dB between the highest and lowest points in the
frequency response, so the sound quality is poor.
[0007]
To further illustrate, FIG. 10 shows a graph 1000 of acoustic frequency response curves 1002,
1004 from a conventional portable radiotelephone utilizing a low dynamic air loudspeaker with a
free air fundamental resonance frequency. Each acoustic frequency response curve 1002, 1004
shows the relationship between acoustic sound pressure level and frequency. Specifically, the
acoustic frequency curve 1002 is obtained when the ear cup of a conventional portable radio
telephone is sealed in an artificial ear. An acoustic frequency response curve 1004 is obtained if
the leaky ring adapter with artificial ears is not used to seal the earbud cup. As the acoustic
frequency response curve 1002 shows, there is an undesirable bass increase in the sealed state.
[0008]
The size of the small hand-held radio telephone not only affects the seal between the housing and
the human ear, but also affects the size of the enclosure that houses the speaker. Smaller
handheld wireless phones have less space to accommodate the enclosure, and the size of the
enclosure affects the frequency response of the speaker.
[0009]
Accordingly, a speaker assembly for a compact hand-held radio telephone having a limited space
for housing a speaker and a limited size for providing an airtight seal with the human ear There
is a need for a speaker assembly that provides acceptable sound quality.
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[0010]
DETAILED DESCRIPTION A mobile electronic device with a speaker assembly, such as a mobile
wireless telephone, will be described.
The housing is configured to receive at least one of the receiver and the transmitter. The speaker
has a front side acoustically coupled to a first air space in front of an ear placement region of the
housing. The speaker also has a back side acoustically coupled to the second air space. At least a
first passage acoustically couples the first air space to a third air space substantially separated
from the second air space.
[0011]
FIG. 1 shows a perspective view of a portable radiotelephone 100. The portable wireless
telephone 100 is a portable electronic device, and more specifically, a portable electronic device
that performs wireless communication via a radio frequency (RF) signal. The portable
radiotelephone 100 is operable in a cellular telephone system and is generally referred to as a
portable cellular telephone.
[0012]
The portable radio telephone 100 has an upper housing 102 and a lower housing 108 rotatably
connected via a hinge 116. The portable radio telephone 100 has an open position as shown in
FIG. 1 and a closed position as shown in FIG. The direction axis is also shown in FIG. In such a
configuration, the portable wireless telephone 100 is generally referred to as a foldable or
clamshell style telephone. Upper housing 102 and lower housing 108 form a housing for
portable radiotelephone 100. The housing has a receiver and a transmitter (not shown) for RF
communication inside (here, the lower housing 108).
[0013]
Upper housing 102 is formed by front housing portion 104 and back housing portion 106. Front
housing portion 104 forms a barrel 118 of hinge 116. The display lens 126 is on top of the
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upper housing 102 and substantially flush with its surface. A finger recess 128 (optional) is
formed on the surface and left side of the upper housing 102, and a finger recess 130 (optional)
is formed on the surface and right side of the upper housing 102. The upper housing 102 also
has an ear rest area 120 on the surface, where the user's ear is applied to hear the audio signal
from the speaker (not visible in FIGS. 1 and 2). The openings 122 are formed in the surface and
disposed in the ear rest area 120. A plurality of additional openings, such as openings 124, are
formed in the surface within ear rest area 120. (Here, there are four additional openings or slots.
Furthermore, the opening 132 is formed on the left side, and the opening 134 is formed on the
right side. The openings 132 and 134 may also be referred to as slots in the upper housing 102.
[0014]
Similar to the upper housing 102, the lower housing 108 is formed by a front housing portion
110 and a back housing portion 112. A plurality of input keys 136, including conventional
telephone keys (0-9, *, #) and function keys, are exposed on the surface of lower housing 108.
Further, the plurality of input keys 138 are exposed on the left side of the lower housing 108. An
antenna 202 (FIG. 2) is disposed on the upper surface of the lower housing 108. An opening 140
is formed in the bottom of the lower housing 108 to expose the electrical connector 142. A
removable battery cover 114 is removably disposed on the bottom of the lower housing 108 to
hide the battery (not shown in FIGS. 1 and 2). An opening 148 is formed in the surface where the
user's mouth is directed to speak to the microphone (not visible in FIGS. 1 and 2). The finger
recess 144 is formed on the surface and the left side, and the finger recess 146 is formed on the
surface and the right side of the lower housing 108.
[0015]
Upper housing 102 and lower housing 108 are very small and preferably form a housing sized
for entry into handheld and garment pockets. For example, in the present example, the housing
has dimensions of about 83 mm long, 42 mm wide and 26 mm deep (the closed position of FIG.
2). Upper housing 102 and lower housing 108 are made of a durable and somewhat flexible
material, such as polycarbonate.
[0016]
3 and 4 are a top exploded perspective view and a bottom exploded perspective view of the
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upper housing 102, respectively. 3 and 4 will be referred to in combination in the following
description. The upper housing 102 includes a front housing portion 104 and a rear housing
portion 106, a display / display assembly 320, a flexible connector 336, a speaker 342, a magnet
346, a display gasket 348, a speaker gasket 362, a felt 364 and a hinge assembly 370. And a
display lens 126.
[0017]
A speaker assembly is included in the upper housing 102. In the present embodiment, the
speaker 342 is a common telephone earpiece speaker, and the speaker diaphragm (not visible)
attached to the speaker basket (see FIG. 6) and the speaker basket for concealing the speaker
diaphragm And a diaphragm cover (not visible) attached to the The speaker 342 has a plurality
of openings on the surface through the diaphragm cover, and has a plurality of openings on the
back surface through the speaker basket (see FIG. 6). Some of these common telephone earpiece
speakers do not have a diaphragm cover, and some do not have an opening on the speaker
basket.
[0018]
Details of how the upper housing 102 is configured to form a speaker assembly will be
described. The rear housing portion 106 forms a housing shell having an outer surface 302, an
inner surface 304, and a mating perimeter 306 along the wall of the housing shell. The tabs 327,
329 are generally formed along and within the boundary of a portion of the mating perimeter
306 on the left side of the back housing portion 106. Similarly, the tabs 323, 325 are generally
formed along and within the boundary of a portion of the mating perimeter 306 on the right side
of the back housing portion 106.
[0019]
The tabs 312, 314 and the L-shaped tabs 316, 318 are formed along a portion of the mating
perimeter 306 at the top end of the back housing portion 106. L-shaped tabs 308, 310 are
formed along a portion of the left and right mating perimeters 306, respectively. A wall 404 (FIG.
4) is formed in the back housing portion 106 and generally extends outwardly from the inner
surface 304 in the illustrated configuration.
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[0020]
The flexible connector 336, which is actually flexible, includes a conductive pad 340 electrically
coupled to the conductive pads 353, 338 (disposed on the conductive pad 340) through a
conductor (not visible). Display display assembly 320 has a housing with left track 322, 324,
right track 326, 328, and top hole 330, 332. Tracks 322, 326 are formed with catches, while
tracks 324, 328 are not formed. Conductive pads 334 are provided on the surface of the display
assembly 320 and are coupled to the display circuitry via conductors (not visible).
[0021]
The front housing portion 104 forms a housing shell having an inner surface 372, an outer
surface 374, and a mating perimeter 376 along the top of both walls of the housing shell. An Lshaped tab 378 is formed on the left side of the back housing portion 106 near and within the
boundaries of the mating perimeter 376. Similarly, an L-shaped tab 380 is formed on the right
side of the back housing portion 106 near and within the boundaries of the mating perimeter
376. Also, fasteners 382, 384 are formed on the left and right sides, respectively, near and within
the boundaries of the mating perimeter 376. Fasteners 382, 384 generally extend outwardly
from inner surface 372, each forming an opening near inner surface 372. The slots 315 and 317
are formed near the boundary of the fitting outer periphery 376 and on the left side within the
boundary. Similarly, slots 319 and 321 are formed near and within the boundaries of the mating
perimeter 376 on the right side.
[0022]
Openings 122, 124 are formed in the front housing portion 104 and are located in the ear rest
area 120 (FIG. 4). Display window 387 is formed within the bounds of mating perimeter 376.
The slits 388, 390 are formed in the front housing portion 104 adjacent to the display window
387. Pins 392 and 394, pins 397 and 399, and walls 301 and 303 generally extend outwardly
from inner surface 304.
[0023]
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The upper end of the front housing portion 104 forms a wall 305 which generally extends from
the inner surface 372 towards the bottom end of the front housing portion 104. The slots 307,
309 and the slots 311, 313 are formed through the wall 305 in a cavity formed between the wall
305 and the inner surface 372.
[0024]
The display gasket 348 forms a central opening surrounded by the notches 350, 352 and holes
358 on the left and the notches 354, 356 and holes 360 on the right. The felt 364 has holes 366
and 368 on the left and right, respectively. The display lens 126 forms tabs 396, 398 at the
bottom end.
[0025]
The upper housing 102 is assembled as follows. A flexible connector 336 is disposed on the
surface of the display assembly 320 where the conductive pad 353 is soldered to the conductive
pad 334 and between the display assembly 320 and a portion of the conductive pad 340 Provide
an electrical path. Similarly, conductive pad 344 of speaker 342 is soldered to conductive pad
338 of flexible connector 336 to provide an electrical path between speaker 342 and a portion of
conductive pad 340. A portion of the conductive pad 340 is later coupled to an audio circuit (not
shown) disposed in the lower housing 108.
[0026]
The display lens 126 is placed around the mating perimeter 402 (FIG. 4) of the front housing
portion 104 and glued, wherein the tabs 396, 398 are inserted into the slits 388, 390,
respectively. The magnet 346 is disposed on the inner surface 372 (FIG. 3) and is finally fixed by
another member. The felt 364 is disposed on the inner surface 372 so that the pins 397 and 399
are inserted through the holes 366 and 368, respectively. The hinge assembly 370 is loaded
within the barrel 118.
[0027]
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The display gasket 348 is adhered to the inner surface 372 around the display window 387,
where the pins 392, 394 are inserted through the holes 358, 360 respectively. Display display
assembly 320 is disposed on display gasket 348 above display window 387, where fasteners
382, 384 slide along tracks 324, 328, respectively, and L-shaped tabs 378, 380 are outside. And
slide along tracks 322 and 326, respectively, finally locking with the fasteners of tracks 322 and
326, and pins 392 and 394 are inserted through holes 330 and 332, respectively. An adhesive
seal is formed between the display assembly 320 and the display gasket 348. Thus, the display
display assembly 320 is secured to the front housing portion 104 and adhered to the inner
surface 372 around the display window 387.
[0028]
With the display assembly 320, the speaker 342 is between the walls 301 and 303 partially
surrounding the speaker 342 (in circular ribs 802, 804, see FIGS. 7 and 8) It is disposed on the
inner surface 372. Before this, the speaker gasket 362 is glued to the front outer end of the
speaker 342. Thus, the front side of the speaker 342 faces the inner surface 372 and the
opening 122, and is surrounded around the inner surface 372 and the opening 122. The speaker
gasket 362 forms an adhesive seal between the speaker 342 and the inner surface 372. The end
of the flexible connector 336 is inserted through the opening of the barrel 118. FIG. 6 shows a
perspective view of the partially assembled upper housing 102.
[0029]
Next, the front end of the rear housing portion 106 is positioned towards the front end of the
front housing portion 104, with the tabs 312, 314 inserted through the slots 307, 309,
respectively, and L The shaped tabs 316, 318 are inserted through the slots 311, 313,
respectively. The bottom end of the rear housing portion 106 is a front housing until the Lshaped tabs 308, 310 bend outward and slide along the clasps 382, 384, respectively, to clasp in
the openings of the clasps 382, 384. It is inclined towards the bottom end of the part 104. Tabs
323 and 325 are inserted through slots 315 and 317, respectively, and tabs 327 and 329 are
inserted through slots 319 and 321, respectively. Thus, the front housing portion 104 and the
back housing portion 106 are mated together to form the upper housing 102 where the mating
perimeters 306, 376 are mated.
[0030]
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9
FIG. 5 is a cross-sectional view of the upper housing 102 as viewed from line 5--5 'of FIG. FIG. 5
shows an internal cavity 502 formed in the upper housing 102 that is substantially separated
from an internal cavity 504 formed in the upper housing 102. The internal cavities 502, 504 are
also referred to as air spaces formed in the upper housing 102. As shown, the internal cavity 502
is substantially formed by the front housing portion 104, the back housing portion 106, the wall
404, the display display assembly 320, the display gasket 348 and the display lens 126. The
internal cavity 504 is substantially formed by the front housing portion 104, the back housing
portion 106 and the wall 404.
[0031]
FIG. 7 is a perspective view of the front housing portion 104 and the back housing portion 106
and the cutaway portion 700 of a portion of the outer surface 302 assembled (but for clarity, the
other components are not shown). is there. FIG. 8 is a plan view of the upper housing 102,
showing in more detail the wall 404 that helps substantially separate the upper housing 102 into
the internal cavities 502,504.
[0032]
Referring to FIG. 5, FIG. 7 and FIG. 8 in combination, the opening 122 disposed in the ear pad
area 120 reaches the front side of the speaker 342 through the passage. More specifically, the
opening 122 leads to the front side of the speaker diaphragm of the speaker 342 through the
passage (and through the diaphragm cover of the speaker 342). Therefore, sound pressure waves
from the front side of the speaker 342 and the speaker diaphragm are acoustically coupled to the
air space (first air space) formed in front of the ear pad area 120 through the passage having the
opening 122. Ru. The front side of the speaker 342 has an opening formed in a basket (see FIG.
6) that accommodates the speaker diaphragm. Sound pressure waves from the back of the
speaker 342 and the speaker diaphragm are acoustically coupled to the internal cavity 502
(second air space) through the opening of the speaker basket.
[0033]
An opening 124 also located in the ear rest area 120 leads to the internal cavity 504 via a
passage. (The remaining plurality of additional openings also reach the internal cavity 504. )
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Thus, the air space in front of the ear rest area 120 is acoustically coupled to the internal cavity
504 (third air space) via a passage having an opening 124. The openings 132, 134 located
outside the ear rest area 120 also lead to the internal cavity 504 through the passage. Thus, the
internal cavity 504 is acoustically coupled to the open air (the fourth air space), ie the air space
remote from the ear rest area 120.
[0034]
During use of the portable radiotelephone 100, an ear volume (eg, indicated by the dotted line in
FIG. 5) is formed between the earpiece area 120 and the human ear. The ear volume formed by
the complete or partial hermetic seal comprises an air space formed in front of the ear rest area
120. Here, sound pressure waves from the front side of the speaker 342 are acoustically coupled
to the ear volume via a passage having an opening 122. Also, the ear volume is acoustically
coupled to the internal cavity 504 via a passageway having a plurality of additional openings (eg,
openings 124).
[0035]
Still referring to FIG. 7, sound pressure wave flow 810 is the front side of the speaker diaphragm
when an audio signal is generated and an ear volume is formed between ear rest area 120 and
the user's ear. Represents the pressure wave flow from. As shown in sound pressure wave flow
810, the sound pressure wave exits the opening 120 through the passage where it reaches the
ear volume (the first air space in front of the ear rest area 120). Part of the sound pressure wave
goes into the user's ear. Also, a portion of the acoustic pressure wave enters the plurality of other
openings (eg, openings 124) and enters the internal cavity 504 through the passage (and
through the felt 364 not shown in FIG. 7). Then, the sound pressure wave goes out of the upper
housing through the openings 132 and 134 and reaches the open air.
[0036]
Sound pressure wave flow 812 represents the sound pressure wave flow from the back of the
speaker 342 when there is voice. As shown in sound pressure wave flow 812, the sound pressure
wave is directed to the internal cavity 502 from the back side of the speaker diaphragm. The
internal cavity 502 is sized large enough so as not to substantially affect the compliance of the
speaker diaphragm suspension.
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[0037]
FIG. 11 is a graph 100 of acoustic frequency response curves 1102 and 1104 of the portable
radio telephone 100. The graph 1100 is obtained using a method similar to that described for
FIGS. More specifically, the acoustic frequency response curve 1102 was obtained when the
earpiece area 120 was sealed to an artificial ear, and the acoustic frequency response curve
1104 was generated using the leak ring adapter 120. Obtained when not sealing. As the acoustic
frequency response curves 1102 and 1104 show, no substantial bass loss or gain occurs in the
sealed state with the portable radiotelephone 100. The acoustic frequency response curve 1102
is substantially the same as the acoustic frequency response curve 1104. The portable
radiotelephone 100 provides an acoustic frequency response that is substantially independent of
the seal around the earpiece area 120. (Compare these results with the results shown in FIG. 9
and FIG. 10 obtained with the above-mentioned conventional portable radio telephone. 2.)
Generally, the desired frequency response (here, the acoustic frequency response curve 1102) is
achieved by tuning the ear volume, which here acoustically into the inner volume coupled to the
open air It did by combining.
[0038]
The size and number of openings (eg, a plurality of additional openings such as opening 124,
openings 132, 134) may be combined with the length of the passage of these openings, and also
the internal cavity (ie, internal In combination with the volume of the cavity 504), it was chosen
to obtain the desired frequency response (here the acoustic frequency response curve 1102). It
should be noted that the number and size of these openings may be selected in combination with
a felt, screen, mesh, or other suitable material that acoustically resists air flow to obtain the
desired frequency response. I want you to understand. Further, the size and number of openings
(eg, openings 122) leading to the front side of the speaker 342 may be combined with the length
of the passage of these openings to provide felt, screen, mesh, or air for desired frequency
response. It may be selected in combination with other suitable materials that acoustically resist
the flow (eg, felt 364). Furthermore, the size and number of openings on the back side of the
speaker basket may be selected in combination with the volume of the internal cavity (i.e.,
internal cavity 502) to optimize the suspension compliance of the speaker diaphragm. This
combination also optimizes the low frequency performance of the speaker 342. In any of the
above configurations, felt, mesh, screen or other suitable material may be placed in any
passageways and / or internal cavities and also to resist air flow through the openings. , On the
front or back side of the speaker, inside or outside the housing surface.
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[0039]
FIG. 12 is an exploded view of a portion of a portable radiotelephone with speaker assembly
1200 in a first alternative embodiment. Speaker assembly 1200 includes a housing portion
1202, a housing portion 1204 and a speaker 1206. Housing portion 1202 forms a front surface
1208 and a back surface 1210. The surface 1208 has an ear rest area 1212 for applying the
user's ear to hear the sound. Also, the surface 1208 forms a recess. A plurality of openings 1216,
such as openings 1218, are disposed within the recess 1214. A plurality of openings 1220, such
as openings 1222 and openings 1228, are located within the ear rest area 1212 but outside the
recess 1214. The speaker 1206 may be a telephone earpiece speaker and generally includes a
speaker diaphragm and a magnetic motor assembly housed in a basket (not shown in FIG. 12).
Alternatively, the speaker 1206 may be a piezoelectric speaker.
[0040]
In the assembly of the speaker assembly 1200, the speaker 1206 is disposed in the recess 1214
and coupled to a conductor (not shown), which is coupled to the audio circuitry (not shown) of
the portable radiotelephone. Ru. The housing portion 1204 is preferably disposed around the
speaker 1206 and within the recess 1214 in a snug fit for mounting, with the surface of the
housing portion 1204 substantially flush with the surface 1208.
[0041]
FIG. 13 is a cross-sectional view of a portion of the portable radio telephone of FIG. 12 when
assembled. As shown, the plurality of openings 1224 lead to the front side of the speaker 1206,
and the plurality of openings 1207 lead to the front side of the speaker diaphragm 1302 of the
speaker 1206. Accordingly, sound pressure waves from the front side of the speaker 1206 and
the speaker diaphragm 1302 are acoustically coupled to the air space (first air space) in front of
the ear pad area 1212.
[0042]
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13
The plurality of openings 1216 lead to a plurality of passages 1316 formed in the housing
portion 1202. The plurality of passageways 1316 have a plurality of openings 1320 disposed
outside the ear rest area 1212. For example, the opening 1218 leads to a passage 1318 having
an opening 1322. In the present embodiment, the plurality of openings 1320 are disposed on the
back surface 1210. The plurality of openings 1320 lead to the back side of the speaker 1206
through the plurality of passages 1316. Because the basket of the speaker 1206 includes an
opening such as the opening 1314, the plurality of openings 1320 also extend to the back side of
the speaker diaphragm 1302. Accordingly, sound pressure waves from the back of the speaker
1206 and the speaker diaphragm are acoustically coupled to the air space (second air space)
away from the ear pad area 1212. In the present embodiment, this air space is open air as
shown.
[0043]
The plurality of openings 1220 lead to a plurality of passages 1304 formed in the housing
portion 1202. The plurality of passageways 1304 have a plurality of openings 1307 disposed
outside the ear rest area 1212. For example, the opening 1222 leads to a passage 1306 having
an opening 1310 and the opening 1228 leads to a passage 1308 having an opening 1312. In the
present embodiment, the plurality of openings 1307 are disposed on the back surface 1210.
Thus, when an ear volume is formed in front of the ear rest area 1212, the air space in front of
the ear rest area 1212 is acoustically coupled to the air space (third air space) remote from the
ear rest area 1212. Be done. In the present embodiment, this air space is open air as shown.
[0044]
Assuming that an ear volume is formed, the sound pressure wave flow is represented by the
dotted arrow in FIG. Sound pressure waves from the front side of the speaker diaphragm 1302
are generated by the speaker 1206. The sound pressure wave travels through the plurality of
openings 1207 (such as opening 1209) of the speaker 1206 and through the plurality of
openings 1224 (such as the opening 1226) of the housing portion 1204, and the front of the ear
rest area 1212 Reaching the air space of Part of the sound pressure wave goes into the user's
ear. Also, part of the sound pressure wave enters the plurality of passages 1304 (eg, the passages
1306 and 1308) through the plurality of openings 1220 (the openings 1222 and 1228). The
sound pressure wave exits the open air through a plurality of openings 1307 (such as openings
1310, 1312).
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14
[0045]
The sound pressure waves from the back side of the speaker diaphragm 1302 exit the openings
(such as the opening 1314) of the speaker 1206 and, through the small volume (arbitrary)
formed in the housing portion 1202, Move through the passage 1316 (e.g., passage 1318). The
sound pressure wave exits the open air through a plurality of openings 1320 (such as opening
1322) of the housing portion 1202. Preferably, the plurality of passages 1316 extend to meet an
opening (such as opening 1314) on the back side of the speaker basket.
[0046]
Since the open air is not sealed and has an infinitely large volume, the sound pressure waves
emerging through the plurality of openings 1307 are the sound pressure waves emerging
through the plurality of openings 1320. It does not interfere substantially. Sound pressure waves
move more freely in the open air and are prevented from entering the openings from the open
air. Thus, these air spaces can be regarded as being substantially separated from one another.
[0047]
FIG. 14 is a graph 1400 of the acoustic frequency response curves 1402, 1404 of the portable
radio telephone of FIGS. The acoustic frequency response curve 1402 was obtained when the
earpiece area 1212 was sealed to an artificial ear, and the acoustic frequency response curve
1404 was sealed with the earpiece area 1212 utilizing a leak ring adapter. It was obtained when
it was not. As the acoustic frequency response curves 1402, 1404 show, there is no substantial
bass loss or gain in a sealed condition utilizing a portable radio telephone. The portable wireless
telephone provides an acoustic frequency response substantially independent of the seal around
the earpiece area 1212.
[0048]
FIG. 15 shows a graph 1500 of the acoustic frequency response curves 1402, 1502, 1504, 1506
of the portable radio telephone of FIGS. In general, the graph 1500 shows the acoustic effects
that the multiple openings 1220 have in a portable wireless telephone. Each of the acoustic
frequency response curves 1502, 1504, 1506 is for the case where the earpiece area 1212 is
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15
sealed to an artificial ear, but a plurality of openings so that sound pressure waves do not pass so
freely through the upper housing This is obtained when at least a part of the part 1220 (FIG. 12)
is intentionally shut off.
[0049]
The acoustic frequency response curve 1402 (also shown in the graph 140 of FIG. 14) of FIG. 15
is generated when none of the eight plurality of apertures 1220 (see FIG. 12) is blocked. An
acoustic frequency response curve 1506 is generated when three of the eight apertures 1220
are blocked. An acoustic frequency response curve 1504 is generated when six out of eight
apertures 1220 are blocked. An acoustic frequency response curve 1502 is generated when all
eight of the plurality of apertures 1220 are blocked.
[0050]
In general, the desired frequency response (here, the acoustic frequency response curve 1402) is
achieved by tuning the ear volume, which here opens the ear volume through the plurality of
passages 1304. It was done by acoustic coupling. The size and number of openings (eg, the
plurality of openings 1220) were selected to achieve the desired frequency response (here, the
acoustic frequency response curve 1402) in combination with the length of the passage. It
should be noted that the number and size of these openings may be selected in combination with
a felt, screen, mesh, or other suitable material that acoustically resists air flow to achieve the
desired frequency response I want you to understand that. Also, when using the housing portion
1240, the size and number of openings (eg, the plurality of openings 1224) leading to the front
side of the speaker 1206, in combination with the length of the passage of these openings, may
be felt, screen, mesh And may be selected in combination with other suitable materials that
acoustically resist the air flow to achieve the desired response. In addition, the size and number
of the openings (eg, openings 1314) on the back side of the speaker basket are combined with
the volume of the small cavity (optional) for the purpose of optimizing the suspension
compliance of the speaker diaphragm 1302 , In combination with the length and number of the
plurality of passages 1316 and the plurality of openings 1216, 1320, and may be selected in
combination with a felt, screen, mesh or other suitable material. Also, this combination optimizes
the low frequency performance of the speaker 1206. In any of the above configurations, a felt,
screen, mesh or other suitable material may be placed in any passageways and / or internal
cavities and also resist air flow through the openings or passageways As such, it may be disposed
on the front or back side of the speaker, inside or outside the housing surface.
12-04-2019
16
[0051]
FIG. 16 is a cross-sectional view of a portion of a portable radiotelephone with speaker assembly
1600 in a second alternative embodiment. The speaker assembly 1600 has a housing portion
1602 attached to the housing portion 1604, preferably utilizing a suitable method as described
above. The speaker 1606 is disposed between the housing portions 1602 and 1604, has a front
side that is substantially sealed and secured with a spacer 1608. A felt 1612 is disposed between
the speaker 1606 and the housing portion 1604. The internal cavities 1620, 1622 are formed
substantially separated from one another. An opening 1616 formed in the housing portion 1604
and disposed within the ear rest area leads to the internal cavity 1622. An opening 1618 formed
in the housing portion 1602 and located outside the ear pad area (here, on the back of the
portable radio) leads to the internal cavity 1622. The back side of the speaker 1606 is exposed to
the internal cavity 1620. As shown more clearly in the cross-sectional view of FIG. 18, the walls
1802, 1804 and the spacers 1608 help to substantially separate the internal cavity 1620 from
the internal cavity 1622.
[0052]
The portable radio telephone of FIG. 16 operates in the same manner as the above embodiment
and achieves similar effects. Sound pressure waves from the front side of the speaker 1606
travel through the felt 1612 to exit the opening 1614 and to the first air space in front of the ear
pad area. Sound pressure waves from the back of the speaker 1606 travel to the second air
space, the internal cavity 1620. Once the ear volume is formed, a portion of the acoustic pressure
wave in the first air space enters the third air space, the internal cavity 1622, through the
opening 1616. A portion of the sound pressure wave passes through the opening 1618 to open
air, which is the fourth air space.
[0053]
FIG. 17 is a cross-sectional view of a portion of a portable radiotelephone with speaker assembly
1700 in a third alternative embodiment. The speaker assembly 1700 has a housing portion 1702
attached to the housing portion 1704, preferably utilizing a suitable method as described above.
The speaker 1706 is disposed between the housing portions 1702 and 1704, has a front side
that is substantially sealed and secured with a spacer 1708. A felt 1712 is disposed between the
speaker 1706 and the housing portion 1704. The internal cavities 1720, 1722 are formed
12-04-2019
17
substantially separated from one another. The opening 1714 in the ear pad area reaches the
front side of the speaker 1706. Also, the opening 1714 leads to the internal cavity 1722 via a
passage 1715 formed between the spacer 1708 and the housing portion 1704. An opening 1718
formed in the housing portion 1702 and located outside the ear rest area (here, on the back of
the portable radio) leads to the internal cavity 1722. The back side of the speaker 1706 is
exposed to the internal cavity 1720. Opening 1714 is staggered relative to opening 1718.
[0054]
The portable radio telephone of FIG. 17 operates in the same manner as the above embodiment
and achieves the same effect. The sound pressure wave from the front side of the speaker 1706
travels through the felt 1712 and exits the opening 1714 to reach the first air space in front of
the ear pad area. Sound pressure waves from the back of the speaker 1706 travel to the second
air space, the internal cavity 1720. Once the ear volume is formed, a portion of the sound
pressure wave in the first air space enters the third air space internal cavity 1722 via the passage
1715 and the open air (via the opening 1718) Exit 4th Air Space).
[0055]
As illustrated herein, the air space can be formed or provided in a variety of ways in many
different combinations that are readily understood. Air space may be the internal cavity formed
by the housing, open air (achieved by the passage), or a combination of internal cavity and open
air (achieved by the passage from the internal cavity to the open air) May be. If the air space
comprises an internal cavity of the housing, the air spaces are preferably substantially separated
from one another by a separator, such as a wall or any internal assembly.
[0056]
Separation of the air space is important to separate the sound pressure waves emanating from
the front side of the speaker diaphragm from the sound pressure waves emanating from the back
side of the speaker diaphragm, but these two sound pressure waves Phase is out of phase. That
is, it is important to separate the sound pressure wave coming from the back of the speaker
diaphragm from the air space in front of the ear pad area.
12-04-2019
18
[0057]
FIGS. 19-27 are cross-sectional views of a further alternative embodiment of a speaker assembly
positioned proximate to the human ear. In each of the drawings, a typical telephone earpiece is
shown. The air space is represented as AS1, AS2, AS3 and so on. Although each drawing shows
an enclosure having a port or passage in front of the speaker, such an enclosure and passage are
optional. For example, the front side of the speaker may be exposed directly to the ear pad area.
Also, the speaker may not include the diaphragm cover, and may have the speaker diaphragm
exposed in the ear pad area. The passage may be formed with the same thickness as the general
thickness of the housing, or may be of the acoustically required length. In FIGS. 19-22 and 24-25,
the speaker is supported on the gasket and sealed around the gasket. In any of these
embodiments, felt, screen, mesh or other suitable material may be placed in any passageways
and / or internal cavities and also air flow through the openings and / or passageways It may be
disposed on the front or back side of the speaker, inside or outside of the housing surface to
resist.
[0058]
FIG. 19 shows a loudspeaker assembly of a portable electronic device, wherein the housing forms
a first internal cavity and a second internal cavity separated from the first internal cavity. Sound
pressure waves from the front side of the speaker are acoustically coupled to the first air space in
front of the ear pad area via the first passage. Sound pressure waves from the back of the
speaker are acoustically coupled to the first internal cavity (second air space). The first air space
is acoustically coupled to the second internal cavity (third air space) via the second passage.
[0059]
FIG. 20 shows a loudspeaker assembly of a portable electronic device, wherein the housing forms
a first internal cavity and a second internal cavity separated from the first internal cavity. Sound
pressure waves from the front side of the speaker are acoustically coupled to the first air space in
front of the ear pad area via the first passage. Sound pressure waves from the back of the
speaker are acoustically coupled to the first internal cavity (second air space). The first air space
is acoustically coupled to the first internal cavity (third air space) via the second passage. The
second internal cavity is acoustically coupled to the open air (the fourth air space) via the third
passage. This embodiment is a simplified version of the embodiment represented in FIGS. 1-8 and
16-18.
12-04-2019
19
[0060]
FIG. 21 shows a loudspeaker assembly of a portable electronic device, wherein the housing forms
a first internal cavity and a second internal cavity separated from the first internal cavity. Sound
pressure waves from the front side of the speaker are acoustically coupled to the first air space in
front of the ear pad area via the first passage. Sound pressure waves from the back of the
speaker are acoustically coupled to the first internal cavity (second air space). The first internal
cavity is acoustically coupled to the open air (third air space) via the second passage. The first air
space is acoustically coupled to the second internal cavity (the fourth air space) via the third
passage.
[0061]
FIG. 22 shows a loudspeaker assembly of a portable electronic device, wherein the housing forms
a first internal cavity and a second internal cavity separated from the first internal cavity. Sound
pressure waves from the front side of the speaker are acoustically coupled to the first air space in
front of the ear pad area via the first passage. Sound pressure waves from the back of the
speaker are acoustically coupled to the first internal cavity (second air space). The first internal
cavity is acoustically coupled to the open air (third air space) via the second passage. The first air
space is acoustically coupled to the second internal cavity (the fourth air space) via the third
passage. The second internal cavity is acoustically coupled to the open air (fifth air space) via the
fourth passage.
[0062]
FIG. 23 shows a loudspeaker assembly of a portable electronic device having a housing. Sound
pressure waves from the front side of the speaker are acoustically coupled to the first air space in
front of the ear pad area via the first passage. Sound pressure waves from the back of the
speaker are acoustically coupled to the open air (second air space) via the second passage. The
first air space is acoustically coupled to the open air (third air space) via the third passage.
[0063]
12-04-2019
20
FIG. 24 shows a loudspeaker assembly of a portable electronic device, wherein the housing forms
a first internal cavity. Sound pressure waves from the front side of the speaker are acoustically
coupled to the first air space in front of the ear pad area via the first passage. Sound pressure
waves from the back of the speaker are acoustically coupled to the first internal cavity (second
air space). The first air space is acoustically coupled to the open air (third air space) via the
second passage.
[0064]
FIG. 25 shows a loudspeaker assembly of a portable electronic device, wherein the housing forms
a first internal cavity. Sound pressure waves from the front side of the speaker are acoustically
coupled to the first air space in front of the ear pad area via the first passage. Sound pressure
waves from the back of the speaker are acoustically coupled to the first internal cavity (second
air space). The first internal cavity is acoustically coupled to the open air (third air space) via the
second passage. The first air space is acoustically coupled to the open air (third air space) via the
third passage. This embodiment is a simplification of the embodiment shown in FIG. 12 and FIG.
[0065]
FIG. 26 shows a loudspeaker assembly of a portable electronic device, wherein the housing forms
a first internal cavity. Sound pressure waves from the front side of the speaker are acoustically
coupled to the first air space in front of the ear pad area via the first passage. Sound pressure
waves from the back of the speaker are acoustically coupled to the open air (second air space)
via the second passage. The first air space is acoustically coupled to the first internal cavity (third
air space) via the third passage.
[0066]
FIG. 27 shows a loudspeaker assembly of a portable electronic device, wherein the housing forms
a first internal cavity. Sound pressure waves from the front side of the speaker are acoustically
coupled to the first air space in front of the ear pad area via the first passage. Sound pressure
waves from the back of the speaker are acoustically coupled to the open air (second air space)
via the second passage. The first air space is acoustically coupled to the first internal cavity (third
air space) via the second passage. The first internal cavity is acoustically coupled to the open air
12-04-2019
21
(the fourth air space) via the third passage.
[0067]
Because it is important for the portable electronic device to maintain a pleasing appearance,
some of the embodiments described herein are preferred over other embodiments.
[0068]
While specific embodiments of the present invention have been illustrated, modifications are also
possible.
Accordingly, the appended claims are intended to cover all such changes and modifications as fall
within the broad scope of the invention.
[0069]
Brief description of the drawings
[0070]
1 is a perspective view of a portable radio telephone in the open position.
[0071]
2 is a perspective view of the portable radio telephone in the closed position.
[0072]
3 is an exploded view of the back, top, left side of the upper housing of the portable radio
telephone.
[0073]
4 is an exploded view of the front, top, right side of the upper housing.
[0074]
12-04-2019
22
5 is a cross-sectional view of the upper housing as viewed from line 5-5 'in FIG.
[0075]
6 is a perspective view of a partial assembly of the upper housing.
[0076]
7 is a perspective view of a partial assembly of the upper housing with a notch.
[0077]
8 is a plan view of the upper housing.
[0078]
FIG. 9 is a graph showing the acoustic frequency response in the sealed and unsealed states of a
conventional portable radiotelephone utilizing a piezoelectric speaker having a high free space
fundamental resonant frequency.
[0079]
FIG. 10 is a graph showing the acoustic frequency response in a sealed and unsealed state of
another conventional portable radiotelephone utilizing a dynamic speaker having a low free
space fundamental resonance frequency.
[0080]
11 is a graph showing the acoustic frequency response in the sealed and unsealed states of the
portable radio telephone of FIGS. 1-8.
[0081]
12 is an exploded view of a portion of a portable radiotelephone with a speaker assembly in a
first alternative embodiment.
[0082]
13 is a cross-sectional view of a portion of the mobile radio telephone of FIG.
12-04-2019
23
[0083]
14 is a graph showing the acoustic frequency response in the sealed and unsealed states of the
portable radio telephone of FIG. 12 and FIG.
[0084]
15 is a graph showing the acoustic frequency response in the sealed state of the portable radio
telephone of FIG. 12 and FIG.
[0085]
16 is a cross-sectional view of a portion of a portable radiotelephone with a speaker assembly in
a second alternative embodiment.
[0086]
17 is a cross-sectional view of a portion of a portable radiotelephone with a speaker assembly in
a third alternative embodiment.
[0087]
18 is a cross-sectional view of a portion of the mobile radio telephone of FIG.
[0088]
FIG. 19 shows a cross-sectional view of another alternative embodiment of a portable electronic
device with a speaker assembly.
[0089]
FIG. 20 shows a cross-sectional view of another alternative embodiment of a portable electronic
device with a speaker assembly.
[0090]
21 shows a cross-sectional view of another alternative embodiment of a portable electronic
device with a speaker assembly.
[0091]
FIG. 22 shows a cross-sectional view of another alternative embodiment of a portable electronic
12-04-2019
24
device with a speaker assembly.
[0092]
FIG. 23 shows a cross-sectional view of another alternative embodiment of the portable
electronic device with a speaker assembly.
[0093]
FIG. 24 shows a cross-sectional view of another alternative embodiment of a portable electronic
device with a speaker assembly.
[0094]
25 shows a cross-sectional view of another alternative embodiment of a portable electronic
device with a speaker assembly.
[0095]
FIG. 26 shows a cross-sectional view of another alternative embodiment of a portable electronic
device with a speaker assembly.
[0096]
FIG. 27 shows a cross-sectional view of another alternative embodiment of a portable electronic
device with a speaker assembly.
[0097]
Explanation of sign
[0098]
100 Portable wireless telephone 102 Upper housing 104 Front housing part 106 Rear housing
part 108 Lower housing 110 Front housing part 112 Rear housing part 114 Removable battery
cover 116 Hinge 118 Tube 120 Ear rest area 122 Opening 124 Multiple openings (slots) ) 126
display lens 128, 130 finger recess 132, 134 opening (slot) 136, 138 input key 140 opening
142 electrical connector 144, 146 finger recess 148 opening 202 antenna 301, 303, 305 wall
302 outer surface 304 Inner surface 306 Mating outer periphery 307, 309, 311, 313 Slot 308,
310 L-shaped tab 312, 314 Tab 315, 317, 319, 321 Slot 316, 318 L-shaped tab 3 Reference
Signs List 20 display assembly 322, 324, 326, 328 track 323, 325, 327, 329 tab 330, 332 hole
12-04-2019
25
334 conductive pad 336 flexible connector 338 conductive pad 340 conductive pad 342 speaker
346 magnet 348 display gasket 350 , 352, 354, 356 notch 353 conductive pad 358, 360 hole
362 speaker gasket 364 felt 366, 368 hole 370 hinge assembly 372 inner surface 374 outer
surface 376 mating perimeter 378, 380 L shaped tabs 382, 384 fasteners 387 Display window
388, 390 Slit 392, 394, 397, 399 Pin 396, 398 Tab 402 Mating perimeter 404 Wall 502, 504
Internal cavity 802, 804 Circular rib 1 00 Speaker assembly 1202, 1204 Housing part 1206
Speaker 1208 Front 1210 Back 1212 Ear rest area 1214 Recess 1216, 1218, 1220, 1222, 1228
Opening 1302 Speaker diaphragm 1304, 1306, 1308, 1316, 1318 Passage 1307, 1310, 1312,
1314 Opening 1320, 1322 Opening 1600 Speaker assembly 1602, 1604 Housing part 1606
Speaker 1608 Spacer 1612 Felt 1614, 1616, 1618 Opening 1620, 1622 Internal cavity 1700
Speaker assembly 1702, 1704 Housing part 1706 Speaker 1708 Spacer 1712 felt 1715 passage
1714 and 1718 opening 172 0, 1722 Internal cavity 1802, 1804 Wall AS1, AS2, AS3 Air space
12-04-2019
26
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