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A proposal for a gallery in a nursing home for artwork by residents

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SUNY FASHION INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
A PROPOSAL FOR A GALLERY IN A NURSING HOME FOR ARTWORK BY
RESIDENTS
SUBMITTED TO THE SCHOOL OF GRADUATE STUDIES
IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE
MASTER OF ARTS IN ART MARKET: PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICES
BY ANNA ZADERMAN
NEW YORK, APRIL 2010
UMI Number: EP72550
All rights reserved
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Abstract
The topic of the paper grew out of past experience and ongoing current employment.
Part I discusses the definition, history, value, and benefits of art therapy. An existing
nursing home will be used as a case study. Part II will provide a general description of the
nursing home, art therapy program and services offered, and funding problems. Special
attention is given to the general demographics of resident artists, and distinguishes
between art therapy artists and professional artists.
Part III is a proposal for the formation of an in-house non-profit gallery specializing
in art therapy art in a designated space at the XYZ Nursing Center. Since the aim is to
establish a model of how art created in an art therapy program can be exhibited within a
nursing home, this gallery will be a pioneer in the field. The establishment of this gallery
is an ideal way to elevate the level of professionalism for nursing home artists.
Part IV presents plans for future expansion of the existing gallery and the opening of
an off-site gallery and studio space. The gallery will provide an opportunity to sell and
exhibit artwork by residents of other nursing homes. Another plan is to form partnerships
with other galleries and loan artwork to traveling shows, and to offer exhibition-planning
guidelines for the benefit of other nursing homes. Finally, an art therapy fair on the
Lower East Side is also planned.
TABLE OF CONTENTS
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
vii
INTRODUCTION
1
PART I. BACKGROUND
2
1. Definition and History of Art Therapy
2. Art Therapy and Outsider Art
3. The Value and Benefits of Art Therapy
PART IL CASE STUDY (THE XYZ NURSING CENTER)
1. General Description
2. Funding Problems for Art Therapy
3. The Art Therapy Program
4. Artists of the XYZ Nursing Center
2
4
6
8
8
9
10
13
PART HI. PROPOSAL FOR A GALLERY IN A NURSING HOME
19
1. Statement of Purpose
2. The Gallery
Product/Service
Marketing Information
Location
Competitive Analysis for Through Our Eyes Gallery
Management
Personnel
3. Funding
19
20
22
23
24
24
25
27
27
PART IV. FUTURE PLANS FOR EXPANSION
1. Opening an OfF-Site Gallery and Studio Space
Networking Opportunities
Annual Art Show Exhibition-Planning Guidelines
2. Art Therapy Fair
3. Funding
v
29
29
30
31
31
32
ENDNOTES
33
BIBLIOGRAPHY
35
APPENDIX 1. Annual Art Shows at the XYZ Nursing Center
2008 Annual Art Show Exhibition List
2007,2008 and 2009 Annual Art Shows Photographic Documentation
Bugle (2009)
38
38
44
47
APPENDIX
2. Artist Demographics and Psychographics
49
APPENDIX
54
3. Competitive Analysis for the Through Our Eyes Gallery
APPENDIX 4. Annual Art Show Exhibition-Planning Guidelines
Annual Art Show Permission Form
vi
56
58
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
I would like to express my appreciation to the many instructors in the Art Market:
Principles and Practices program at the Fashion Institute of Technology who encouraged
me to develop this topic. Rose Polidoro provided valuable assistance in the early stages
and I am much obliged to Dr. Katherine Michaelsen for her genuine interest in my
subject and her guidance with seeing me through the final stage of completion.
The Director of Activities at the XYZ Nursing Centers provided many resources
during extensive interviews and staff development sessions at the XYZ Nursing Center.
In addition, she granted me a permission to base this thesis on many real situations,
interviews and events that occurred at the XYZ Nursing Center. I would also like to take
this opportunity to thank residents of the XYZ Nursing Center for their hard work, open
minds and a sense of optimism.
Last but not least, I am forever grateful to my family for their unconditional support
and understanding during this challenging journey.
1
INTRODUCTION
My interest in this subject grows out of my background, experience and current
employment as a Creative Arts Specialist in the Activities Department at the XYZ
Nursing Center. All materials related to the XYZ Nursing Center, such as the name of the
nursing home and names of residents were changed or withheld due to confidentiality and
in compliance with Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA).
As a Creative Arts Specialist my role is to provide different recreational activities.
Since I have a background in art, I will here exclusively focus on art therapy. Even
though the American Art Therapy Association states that art therapy is expanding, it is
still undervalued and underexposed.1 I believe that it is not given the appropriate credit
that it deserves, and many nursing homes don’t even have art therapy programs.
The purpose of this thesis is to propose to the XYZ Nursing Center the formation of
an in-house non-profit gallery specializing in art therapy art in a designated space.
2
PART I. BACKGROUND
1. Definition and History of Art Therapy
Art therapy is a mental health profession that uses the creative process o f art making
to improve and enhance the physical, mental and emotional well-being of individuals
of all ages. It is based on the belief that the creative process involved in artistic selfexpression helps people to resolve conflicts and problems, develop interpersonal
skills, manage behavior, reduce stress, increase self-esteem and self-awareness, and
achieve insight.2
In 1872, French psychiatrists Auguste Ambroise Tardieu (1818-1879) and Paul-Max
Simon (dates unknown) published a book on symbolism in the artwork of the mentally
ill. This research on the mentally ill at psychiatric institutions played an integral role in
the birth of creative arts therapy.3 In addition, Sigmund Freud and Carl Jung’s theories of
the subconscious and unconscious led the American educator and therapist, Margaret
Naumberg (1890-1933) to incorporate art into her psychotherapy sessions. She believed
that visual symbols are the most natural method of communication. She formed the
Walden School in New York City in 1915 where artwork was used in psychological
counseling. Today, she is considered the founder of art therapy in the United States.4
These art therapy pioneers utilized the psychoanalytic approach that enabled art
therapy patients to express their emotional issues. Walter Morgenthaler (1882-1965), a
psychiatrist at the Waldau Mental Asylum in Switzerland, began to study the work of his
patients. In 1921 he published a monograph on the artwork of his patient, Adolf Wolfli
(1864-1930).
Dr. Hans Prinzhom (1886-1933), a German psychiatrist and art historian, was also
using art therapy for diagnostic purposes at the psychiatric hospital of the University of
3
Heidelberg. In 1922 he published the Artistry o f the Mentally III, a collection of artwork
by his patients.5
In the 1930s Karl Augustus (1893-1990), William Claire (1899-1966) and Charles
Menninger (1862-1953), American psychiatrists, founded the Menninger Clinic and the
Menninger Foundation. This Kansas-based psychiatric hospital progressed as the leader
in art therapy.6
Art therapy became a recognized profession in the 1940s. Other notable art therapists
who emerged in the United States in 1950s and 1960s included Edith Kramer (b.Vienna,
1916) and Hanna Yaxa Kwiatkowska (dates unknown), who worked for the National
Institute of Mental Health in Maryland. Art therapists work in a variety of settings such
as hospitals, clinics, day treatment and senior centers, residencies, adult homes, and
nursing homes. Analysis of the future of art therapy indicates that this field is expanding
and career opportunities continue to grow.
2. Art Therapy and Outsider Art
In 1945, the French artist Jean Dubuffet (1901-1985) became inspired by Walter
Morgenthaler’s collection and collected artwork from French and Swiss psychiatric
institutions. This body of work became known as Art Brut, raw or rough art.7
It wasn’t until 1972 that Art Brut became known as Outsider Art, a term coined by a
British art critic, Roger Cardinal.8 An artist, writer and a gallery owner, Victor Musgrave
wanted to bring Outsider Art to commercial galleries. In 1979, he and Cardinal curated
the Outsiders fo r the Arts Council at the Hayward Gallery, London. After this exhibition
other commercial galleries began to exhibit Outsider Art. In 1981, the Outsider
Collection and Archive was published by Monika Kinley and Victor Musgrave. In 1993
the Outsider Art Fair started with the work of four artists, Henry Darger (1892-1973)
being the most famous one. The fair’s organizers wanted to elevate the status of this work
and find gallery representation for these artists.
Eventually collectors began to show greater interest in the Outsider Art Fair. Some
Outsider artists have achieved commercial success by selling their work in the primary
and secondary art markets. Some have gallery representation at Agora Gallery and Edlin
Gallery in New York City. Some Outsider artists exhibit at The Gallery of Hospital
Audience Inc. (HAI) and the Fountain Gallery.9
There is a blurred line between Outsider artists and art therapy artists due to shared
characteristics. They are often self-taught and some are illiterate and come from humble
beginnings. They lack any preconceived ideas and try not to reference other artists. Both
groups are private by disposition and have the tendency to hide their work.10Some have
cognitive impairment and a history of mental illness. Some are rebellious in nature and
have periods of controlling and obsessive behavior. Some are religious and attend places
of worship on a regular basis. Many also have spiritual beliefs such as Raphael Lonne
(1910-1989) who was convinced that ghosts made him draw. He believed that his work
belonged to the spirits. Henry Darger, on the other hand, was guided by nature (his
majesty) to start drawing and took on the role of a superhero in his art. Another Outsider
artist, Anna Zemankova (1908-1986) was self-taught and only began to draw at the age
of fifty-two.
6
3. The Value and Benefits of Art Therapy
The key benefits of art therapy include self-discovery, personal fulfillment and
empowerment. Since art therapy has cathartic effects, many people are able to respond
and share their experiences more effectively through it. When art therapy patients
participate in art therapy, they receive support and engage in positive social interaction
with peers. Art therapy artists explore their creativity through free association, which
makes them feel alive and useful. They have an opportunity to enhance self-expression
through their artwork.
Art therapy can be used with traditional medicine to treat organic diseases and
conditions. While doctors prescribe medicine, art therapists have the expertise to provide
nononcological care. This refers to therapy without any medical or chemical intervention
and includes creative visualization, sensory stimulation and tactile stimulation to relieve
pain. Art therapy has been proven to support the recovery process through relaxation,
stress and symptom relief.11
Art therapy promotes physiological healing when art therapy artists identify their
problems and deal with emotional distress. In the absence of mental health services which
are increasingly being cut, art therapy provides an alternative, a non-conventional method
of healing. An art therapist improves the quality of lives by providing hope and
inspiration. The experience of painting is therapeutic to art therapy artists as it gives them
a sense of stability.
Art therapy has a significant impact on Hospice patients and research indicates that art
therapy helps them function better. These patients have limited abilities and require
7
room-bound interventions such as “bedscapes,” large reproductions of paintings hanging
above their beds.12
Art therapists provide any necessary adaptations. For instance, they speak loud and
clear for residents with hearing impairments, use magnifying lenses for those with visual
impairments, and describe shapes and objects for residents with cognitive impairments.
Since art therapy artists use their arms, wrists and hands, they sharpen their fine motor
skills. Art therapy helps patients to increase attention span and concentration.
When a patient has a positive experience at a doctor’s office, this person is more
likely to return and refer others. Likewise, art therapy programs in nursing homes will
attract new patients.
8
PART II. CASE STUDY (THE XYZ NURSING CENTER)
1. General Description
There are two types of nursing homes, non-profit and for-profit. Non-profit nursing
homes accept Medicaid and Medicare and might be affiliated with a non-profit
organization such as the Catholic Diocese, for example. The XYZ Nursing Center is a
for-profit nursing home that accepts Medicaid, Medicare, and private pay.
The XYZ Nursing Center is a facility in New York with five hundred residential beds
on twelve floors. Since there are eight floors for long-term care, the majority of residents
are long-term. One of the long-term floors has all private rooms. Another separate floor is
for residents with disruptive behavior due to cognitive impairment or mental illness.
There are two floors for sub-acute and intensive-care residents.
In addition, there are two floors specifically for short-term residents. The average stay
for a short-term resident is two to three weeks in order to receive physical, occupational
or speech therapy. On doctor’s orders or family recommendations, a resident can decide
to stay long-term and will be transferred to a different floor.
There are approximately seven hundred employees. I work in the Activities
Department with eleven staff members. I teach visual arts, and lead multiple group
programs such as reminiscing, creative writing, reading, and current events discussions.
9
2. Funding Problems for Art Therapy
The XYZ Nursing Center receives reimbursements for physical, occupational and
speech therapies from Medicaid and/or Medicare. Even though art therapy falls under
special treatments and procedures, funding is an issue. In contrast to physical,
occupational and speech therapies that receive far greater government funding, Medicaid
and Medicare offer limited reimbursement for art therapy.
Nurses and physicians are more likely to request a consultation for physical,
occupational or speech therapies. Once a resident is approved for either therapy, he/she is
urged to attend therapy sessions. On the other hand, art therapy is merely a
recommendation.
The Activities Department at the XYZ Nursing Center receives additional limited
grant funding from the New York State Department of Health. There is hope that art
therapy might receive larger reimbursement rates but unlike physical and occupational
therapies that are recorded and reimbursed per session, art therapy reimbursement is
offered in a bulk sum per quarter.13
10
3. The Art Therapy Program
When a resident enters the XYZ Nursing Center, I conduct a personal interview and
ask about the resident’s past recreational interests and the expressed desire of new needs.
Then, I provide structural support to residents on selecting preferred activities during
their stay. I create short-term and long-term goals that are reflective of the resident’s
recreational needs.
I review documentation from the Nursing, Social Service and Religious Services
Departments for resident impairments such as sensory, motor or cognitive. As part of a
resident treatment program,14 I work on improving cognitive integration, sensorimotor,
psychosocial skills and psychological components.15
In order to measure a resident’s progress and reach goals, care plans and family case
meetings are scheduled. The interdisciplinary treatment team includes physical,
occupational and speech therapists, social workers, and nurses.
During the art therapy sessions at the XYZ Nursing Center, art therapy artists are
encouraged to express themselves. I teach mixed-media classes where residents produce
work including paintings, drawings, collages, and sculptures. Art materials include paper,
canvas, oaktag, acrylic and tempera paints, watercolors, pencils, charcoal, clay, and found
objects.
Once finished with physical, occupational and speech therapies, many short-term
rehabilitation residents don’t have energy to attend art therapy classes. The Activities
Department has been collaborating with physical and occupational therapists to
11
accommodate short-term residents’ therapy schedules. When they do participate, short­
term residents expect higher quality art programs and services.
Long-term residents also expect professional grade art supplies, frames and mats. As
a result, the Activities Department simply cannot accommodate individual supply
requests as supplies are purchased for the benefit of the entire art therapy group. The
Business Office at the XYZ Nursing Center offers residents a small monthly stipend. If
residents want professional supplies, then they have to purchase supplies at their own
expense or rely on outside sources.
Any artwork created during art therapy sessions is considered property of the XYZ
Nursing Center. Since we do not have a separate gallery, it is unfortunate that we are
forced to give away some artwork or store it in cabinets.
Every year, usually in December, there is an Annual Art Show at the XYZ Nursing
Center (Appendix 1, page 38). This is a year-long curatorial project, co-curated by me
and another Creative Arts Specialist. This is an in-house exhibition featuring artwork
created by residents during an art therapy program. The value of this art therapy program
can be measured by the large number of submissions. The fact that residents are
themselves involved in all aspects of exhibition planning, installation, and de-installation
is a clear advantage over other nursing homes.
In the 2007 Annual Art Show, sixteen residents participated in installation in terms of
layout and design on three mobile cork boards, two pedestals, and three easels. Residents
selected the themes for the exhibition -- Through Our Eyes and Creative Thoughts.
Furthermore, residents documented their progress in artist statements where they
12
discussed the application of medium, and sources of information and techniques
utilized. During the Meet the Artists discussion we highlighted some of the high caliber
work.
In 2008 we outgrew the three boards and added an additional table for ceramics and
portfolios. Due to insufficient space, we had to reduce the number of artwork to fifty
pieces by twenty-five artists. Although I envision the expansion of the Annual Art Show
next year, we still won’t be able to accommodate all submissions.
Despite these successes, at the Resident’s Council meeting (2007), comprised of a
group of elected residents, a social worker and the Ombudsman, some residents
expressed dissatisfaction. Due to the lack of funding, the Activities Department has
inadequate storage space and unprofessional supplies. In addition, as group art therapy
sessions meet only two times weekly for an hour and half, time is also limited. Last but
not least we lack a designated gallery space.
13
4. Artists of the XYZ Nursing Center
In the 1990s, the average long-term resident’s age in a nursing home was 89.
Traditionally, the demographics and psychographics of art therapy artists have reflected
the national statistics. However, during the last two to three years in my art therapy
classes the demographics of artists have been as follows (Appendix 2, page 49):
•
80% in 80-90 age bracket and 20% in 70-80 age bracket;
•
80% female and 20% male;
•
90% from Manhattan and 10% from Queens;
•
80%native English speakers, 10% Italian, and 10% Armenian;
•
50% with multiple impairments, 40% visual impairments, and 10%hearing
impairments;
•
Residents with cognitive impairments are also invited to the art therapy
program.
The psychographics of artists are as follows:
•
100% long-term residents;
•
80% high school graduates and 20% college graduates;
•
30% arts professionals, 30% clerical, 10% managers, 10% writers,and 10%
in other occupations.
14
Prior to nursing home admission, many residents attend to social clubs and adult day
care centers where they create and exhibit their artwork. Many long-term residents need
time to adjust to their new environment.
In the art therapy classes during 2009 we have observed the following demographics
and psychographics:
•
73% female and male 27%;
•
84% native English speakers, more bi-lingual residents, 6% Spanish, 3%
Polish, 2% Greek, 2% French, 1% Italian, 1% Chinese, and 1% Armenian;
•
97% long-term residents and 3% younger, short-term rehabilitation residents.
Some of these short-term residents have a history of diabetes, strokes or heart
conditions. Since the Activities Department receives larger reimbursements from
Medicare and Medicaid for rehabilitation residents, it is our goal to increase the
attendance of short-term residents in our art therapy sessions.
Nursing home artists generally fall into two categories — art therapy artists and
professional artists. Most of the artists at the XYZ Nursing Center fall into the former
category. One art therapy artist, resident U, returned to drawing at the age of eighty-six.
He became inspired by a pinhole camera, a camera without a lens. As illustrated in the
XYZ Nursing Center’s newsletter Bugle the official organ of the Family Council, resident
U created his interpretation of such a camera from a large shoe box collaged with
drawings (Appendix 1, page 41).
As resident U notes, art therapy sometimes enables residents to rediscover their
creative talents: “I haven’t done artwork for the last 35 years. Since I arrived, my wife
15
encouraged me to attend the art classes. My wife and her friends are very impressed
with my work. I am quite surprised that I am able to produce it.” 16
Even though most art therapy artists are unaffected by external ideas, some research
the works of other artists, review techniques and learn art history. I encourage residents to
consult our library for art-related books, magazines, and visual materials.
Some art therapy artists exhibit their work in the Annual Craft Show which is in
December just a week before the Annual Art Show. The proceeds from the sales are
contributed to the Resident’s Council and are used for some projects of the Activities
Department including off-site trips. Unfortunately, this funding is never directly applied
to the Annual Art Show budget. In addition, there is a discrepancy as this practice does
not apply to the Annual Art Show. Artwork is presented for exhibiting purposes only and
never available for sale.
The second category is a group of professional artists who were or are exhibiting.
There are a few who don’t want to be associated with the art therapy artists. Prior to
entering the XYZ Nursing Center, these artists had earned sales. Due to Medicare or
Medicaid reimbursements, the Business Office has to report any earned income to the
government. Some artists have to report income to the Internal Revenue Service when
filing taxes. This means that it becomes difficult for these artists to make sales. The
proceeds from the sale of artwork in outside galleries has to be contributed to the
Resident’s Council.
However, there are some professional artists who earn sales and who do not follow
the appropriate filing procedures. The problem is that there aren’t any written guidelines
in place that establish policies for controlling the sale of artwork in outside galleries or
16
proceeds from sales and property belonging to the XYZ Nursing Center. In addition, the
Activities Department does not receive commissions or gain financially, and spends
money on supplies and instruction provided during the art therapy program.
Since the success of the Outsider Art Fair, there is a growing interest in purchasing
artwork by nursing home residents.17Even when some staff members and visitors express
interest, they can’t purchase the work due to conflict of interest. The professional artists
who are reimbursed by Medicare or Medicaid are encouraged to participate in
exhibitions, contests and competitions without compensation, and apply for grants.
There is an exception for professional artists who pay privately for their living costs.
These artists can make sales, buy art supplies and place materials in outside storage. They
are self-sustaining and benefit from gaining exposure. However, the art therapy program
does benefit from visitors viewing and praising the work of these professional artists.
One of the advantages of being a nursing home artist is having exhibiting
opportunities at galleries that showcase artwork by artists residing in nursing homes.
These include Albany Institute of History and Art (Albany, New York), Wilmer Jennings
Gallery at Kenkeleba House (New York City), African American Museum of Nassau
County (Hemstead, New York), and the West Side Arts Coalition (New York City).
In 20091 worked with resident U on preparing his submission to the Fifth Annual Art
from the Heart Program organized by the Albany Institute of History and Art. This twomonth long exhibition features artists who live in nursing homes across New York State.
The Albany Institute of History and Art is a cultural and educational institute dedicated to
the public service. The organizers were able to sign on corporate sponsors such as
Johnson and Johnson and the First Niagara Bank in Albany.
17
I was happy to learn that the resident’s work was selected in the first round out of
seventy submissions from nursing home residents across New York State. Resident U
was proud to receive a certificate of appreciation. Moreover, his artwork might be
selected for a loan program and might travel to other venues such as legislative offices
and public exhibits across New York State. There is also a possibility of his artwork
being used in various publications.
As mentioned in Bugle, one professional artist, resident H is the star of our art therapy
program and has been exhibiting at commercial galleries such as the Albany Institute of
History and Art, Wilmer Jennings Gallery at Kenkeleba House, and African American
Museum of Nassau County.18
Resident H is a member of the Weusi ("blackness" in Swahili) Artist Collective. This
is a group of Harlem-based artists who are at the forefront of the Black Arts Movement.
He was part of a three-month long exhibition in 2008, Weusi Collective: Resurrection III
at the African American Museum of Nassau County. The mission of this non-profit
museum is to provide events that foster the intellectual development of visitors with an
interest in the African-American art.19
Since his artwork recently sold for as high as $4,000, its commercial value is
established. Resident H has also gained some publicity, exposure and received critical
acclaim. His success has been celebrated in promotional materials such as catalogues,
brochures and Bugle (Appendix 1, page 48).
Prior to coming to the XYZ Nursing Center, yet another resident, resident G exhibited
in several gallery shows in New York City and has won prizes at the Art Students
League. This resident participated in many group shows at the West Side Arts Coalition,
18
a group of visual and performing artists that seeks to bring artists together with the West
Side community in New York City.20 Resident G is currently working on ink on paper
drawings for the next exhibit. We assist this resident with documenting her work and
contacting curators (Appendix 1, page 43).
Except for six venues (Albany Institute of History and Art, African American
Museum of Nassau County, Wilmer Jennings Gallery, West Side Arts Coalition, The
Gallery at HAI, and the Fountain Gallery), exhibiting opportunities for artist residents are
still relatively rare. For this reason, I am offering a proposal to the XYZ Nursing Center
for an in-house gallery space.
19
PART HI. THE PROPOSAL FOR A GALLERY IN A NURSING HOME
1. Statement of Purpose
This proposal is for a 501 (c) (3), a non-profit gallery for art therapy art at the XYZ
Nursing Center.
The aim is to establish a model of how art created in an art therapy program can be
exhibited in a nursing home. The establishment of this gallery is an ideal way to elevate
the level of professionalism for nursing home artists. In a similar manner to a commercial
gallery, my goal is to promote and exhibit artwork by nursing home residents. Artists will
feel a sense of empowerment, self-respect and personal fulfillment. There will be an
effort to build a broader consumer audience which will gain greater appreciation of the
work.
20
2. The Gallery
Through Our Eyes gallery is a non-profit gallery for art therapy art. This name was
suggested by a participant in the 2007 Annual Art Show at the XYZ Nursing Center. It
was the title of an artwork.
The mission of Through Our Eyes gallery is two-fold: to break stereotypes and
misconceptions associated with art therapy and to give artists from nursing homes the
space to exhibit their work. Through Our Eyes gallery will be housed in the current
ceramics studio on the 17th floor of the XYZ Nursing Center. There is an entrance to the
gallery through the common area of the Activities Department. Through Our Eyes gallery
is twenty-seven feet long by eighteen feet wide and by eight feet tall. There are two large
windows with a panoramic view of New York City. There are four overhead lights, and
tile flooring. There are ten cabinets available for storage. There are four elevators and
restrooms conveniently located outside the gallery.
Based on the current demographics of artists in my art therapy classes, the artist
residents will probably be as follows:
•
80% in 80-90 age bracket and 20% in 70-80 age bracket;
•
80% female and 20% male;
•
90% from Manhattan and 10% from Queens;
•
80% native English speakers, 10% Italian, and 10% Armenian;
•
50% with multiple impairments, 40% visual impairments, and 10% hearing
impairments.
The psychographics of artists will be as follows:
•
100% long-term residents;
•
80% high school graduates and 20% college graduates;
•
30% arts professionals, 30% clerical, 10% managers, 10% writers, and 10%
in other occupations.
As the gallery grows, based on recent trends, I anticipate the demographics and
psychographics shifting in the next two to three years:
•
73% female and 27% male;
•
84% native English speakers, 6% Spanish, 3% Polish, 2% Greek, 2% French,
1% Italian, 1% Chinese, and 1% Armenian;
•
97% long-term residents, and 3% younger, short-term rehabilitation residents.
Through Our Eyes gallery will tentatively launch in June 2010 and will be open yearround on Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday from 10:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., and Monday and
Wednesday from 10:30 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Hours may be extended during select weekends
and special events.
Artist residents will be eager to visit the gallery because it offers a positive and
welcoming experience. Through Our Eyes gallery will be a collaborative operation where
artist residents will have an opportunity to be involved in many aspects of running the
gallery including exhibition planning and implementation, installation and de-installation.
There will be four Annual Art Shows of two months duration.
22
Product/Service
Through Our Eyes gallery is housed in the XYZ Nursing Center in New York City.
The gallery accommodates artist residents’ busy lifestyles because it remains open five
days a week and on select weekends.
Through Our Eyes gallery builds on a foundation of quality services, management
and personnel. Art therapists at the XYZ Nursing Center are qualified, some have
Creative Arts Therapist Licensure from New York State or Board certification from the
American Art Therapy Association.
Through Our Eyes gallery features artwork by residents from the XYZ Nursing
Center in all mediums including paintings, drawings, collages, and sculptures. Artist
residents gain a sense of ownership, accomplishment and pride when they install and
disassemble shows of their artwork. Due to various impairments, they are involved to the
degree that they are able to participate.
During the 2010 Annual Art Show, some special events including lectures,
discussions and presentations are planned. We encourage artist residents to exchange
ideas and offer constructive criticism. Visits by friends and family members are highly
encouraged.
23
Marketing Information
Through Our Eyes gallery is under the umbrella of the XYZ Nursing Center, an
existing and established nursing facility with over forty years of experience. Through Our
Eyes gallery provides a professional gallery environment for work created in the in-house
art therapy program at the XYZ Nursing Center. The positive experience at the gallery
offers a home away from the residential rooms.
Since die artist residents reside at the XYZ Nursing Center and artwork is made on
the premises, a visitor has an opportunity to meet the artists. The gallery personnel are
knowledgeable about the artists and their work and offer visitors guided tours of the
gallery.
Visitors will be impressed with:
• gallery’s location on-site in an established nursing home;
• year-round schedule with minimal closures and user-friendly hours;
• professional environment similar to commercial galleries;
• in-house art therapy program and artwork created by artist residents;
• artist residents’ involvement in running the gallery and access to artist
residents and art therapists;
•
personnel with an educational background and experience in art therapy
and art market.
As the gallery grows, there is a potential in the next two to three years for attracting
new artist residents, and younger short-term rehabilitation residents. According to figures
24
published by the New England Journal Study, forty-three percent of people age 65 and
over, will at one time or another occupy a nursing home.21 There are plans to rotate
exhibitions at Through Our Eyes gallery throughout the XYZ Nursing Center.
Location
Through Our Eyes gallery will be located in the current ceramics studio, a four
hundred ninety square foot space on the 17th floor in the XYZ Nursing Center, New
York, on a cross town street. Many galleries and museums, and an auction house are just
a few blocks away. Our visitors have an easy approach to the building on a wide
wheelchair accessible ramp, and four elevators take them directly to the gallery.
Competitive Analysis for Through Our Eyes gallery (Appendix 3, page 24)
The two direct sources of competition are the local nursing homes with art therapy
programs and the Art From the Heart competition. Moreover, two indirect sources of
competition are The Gallery at HAI and the Fountain Gallery in New York.
In comparison to these four places, Through Our Eyes gallery stands out for the
following reasons:
•
location on-site in an established nursing home, on a crosstown street and
in close proximity to galleries, museums, and an auction house;
•
year-round schedule with minimal closures and the user-friendly hours to
accommodate busy residents’ schedules;
• professional environment similar to commercial galleries;
• in-house art therapy program and gallery exclusively specializing in art
therapy artwork created by artist residents;
•
involvement of artist residents in the whole process of running the gallery;
• access to artist residents and art therapists;
• personnel and gallery assistants with educational backgrounds and
experience in art therapy and art market;
• free admission to gallery and special events.
Management
Through Our Eyes gallery will be under the umbrella of the Activities Department at
the XYZ Nursing Center.
The Gallery Director, Anna Zaderman was bom in Moscow, Russia. She attended the
School of Visual Arts in New York City where she earned a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree
in Fine Arts and an Art Education Teaching Certificate in Visual Arts.
She is currently completing the Master of Arts degree in Art Market: Principles and
Practices at the Fashion Institute of Technology, New York City. During her studies, she
trained in all sectors of the art market and was involved in a year-long curatorial group
project organized by the graduating class of 2007. Students were responsible for all
aspects of the art show - choosing the theme, selecting the artists, finding and renting a
space, mounting the show, and designing and producing the catalog, cards, and website.
26
Anna Zaderman is a dedicated professional with a proven reputation and almost ten
years of experience. Professional highlights range from teaching in nursing homes and
public schools in New York. Furthermore, she has built networking opportunities with
other nursing homes in New York. In addition, she has valuable experience working in
Art in General and the Museum of the City of New York.
As a Creative Arts Specialist at the XYZ Nursing Center, her primary responsibilities
include providing visual arts, current events and exercise programs for seventy-two
residents on two long-term residential floors.
At the XYZ Nursing Center she has curated the Annual Art Show (2007-2009), an inhouse exhibition featuring mixed-media artwork created by residents during an art
therapy program. Anna Zaderman’s role is to supervise residents and ensure that
residents themselves create their artwork.
As the Gallery Director, Anna Zaderman will be responsible for day-to-day operation
and will report to the Director of Activities. She will be primarily responsible for
recruiting artist residents, organizing and curating exhibitions, planning and executing
exhibition schedules, public relations, and marketing. She will always be available to
meet the artist residents and work with them on selecting artwork and preparing
supporting documents for exhibitions.
She will collaborate with the Director of Activities to set policies with personnel and
will make personnel decisions within the first few weeks of the gallery’s opening.
27
Personnel
Due to financial constraints, we will be unable to hire outside gallery assistants at this
time. Through Our Eyes gallery will recruit the services of the existing art therapists from
the Activities Department at the XYZ Nursing Center. They have extensive educational
backgrounds and experience in art therapy. Some are registered and Board Certified by
the American Art Therapy Association.
The gallery assistants will work part-time with flexible schedules. We anticipate that
the staff might be required to work longer hours during weekends, evenings, and
installation and de-installation periods. Anna Zaderman will conduct in-house training
sessions on installing and de-installing.
We have a stable roster of existing in-house high school and college volunteers. We
will recruit their services as needed, probably during the Annual Art Show and special
events, and installations and de-installations. In the second year, we plan to hire an
outside full-time gallery assistant.
3. Funding
At present due to financial constraints, I will have to work with the existing operating
budget of the Activities Department at the XYZ Nursing Center. I will incur minimal
costs and rely on in-house resources for the gallery’s infrastructure needs. The existing
funding follows.
28
The XYZ Nursing Center receives limited grant funding from the New York City
Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, New York State Office for the Aging, and
New York Health Facilities Association, and the Foundation for Quality Care. Additional
funding comes from the proceeds of the Annual Craft Show at the XYZ Nursing Center.
Although some professional artists earn sales in outside galleries, the Activities
Department does not gain financially.
The Gallery Director has enlisted the help of the Business Office for accounting
needs* and the Computer Department for electronic equipment rental and website
inquiries. The Facility Management, and Engineering and Environmental Services
Departments will assist with adjustments in the gallery, such as installing an automatic
door, improving climate control and lighting, and adding furniture. The existing space
will be renovated and some extra cabinets and tables will be removed. The Facility
Management Department will also assist during installation and de-installation periods.
29
PART IV. FUTURE PLANS FOR EXPANSION
As the economy improves within the next two to three years, I envision the gallery
growing and funding increasing. The future plans include expanding the existing gallery,
opening another off-site gallery and a studio space, and an art therapy fair. This will
allow the gallery to sell and exhibit work by residents of other nursing homes.
Exhibition-planning guidelines for executing in-house exhibitions will be offered to other
nursing homes.
1. Opening an Off-Site Gallery and Studio Space
Gallery representation might be the only way for many nursing home artists to
receive exposure, achieve sales, and add greater commercial value to the work. In an
effort to cultivate clients, I will outreach to artists who reside in nursing homes
throughout the five boroughs of New York. Since some residents have negative
associations with nursing homes, the off-site gallery will be more welcoming. Unlike
some Chelsea galleries, I will make a special effort to be accessible to visitors with
cognitive impairments, hearing impairments, and visual impairments. The Association of
Artist-Run Galleries in New York City will be a model for this off-site gallery where the
artist residents will be actively involved in running the gallery.
30
I envision adding a studio space and offering art therapy classes. This would be a
clear advantage over other nursing homes that don’t have in-house art therapy programs,
such as the Fountain Gallery.
Networking Opportunities
There will be networking with outside galleries where the professional artists of the
XYZ Nursing Center exhibit. Artwork created during the art therapy program at the XYZ
Nursing Center is considered property of the nursing home. I am hoping that Through
Our Eyes gallery will receive a percentage from sales of artwork by professional artists at
outside galleries.
In order to further enhance the exhibiting schedule, there is a possibility of loaning
artwork to traveling shows at other nursing homes. I would like to propose the work of
Through Our Eyes gallery artists to a traveling exhibition at The Gallery at HAI. Since
The Gallery at HAI gives artists appropriate exposure, I will use its roster of artists as a
resource. The artwork of The Gallery at HAI artists can be found in private and corporate
collections.
Through Our Eyes gallery will also be affiliated with Bread and Roses Gallery of
1199/SEIU, the not-for-profit cultural project for artists of New York's Health and
Human Service Union.
Through Our Eyes gallery would be a co-op based gallery where artists would reach
out to those in the community who are unable to attend. There will be resident-based
31
alliance and support groups. I will assist artists in navigating the art world in terms of
contract preparation.
There will be partnerships with Creative Growth and League Artists Natural Design
(LAND) that works with artists with disabilities. LAND’S founder, Margaret Bodell, was
influential in starting the Outsider Art Fair.
Taking advantage of its convenient location, Through Our Eyes gallery will offer
public tours of nearby venues such as exhibits at other nursing homes, commercial
galleries, and museums.
Annual Art Show Exhibition-Planning Guidelines (Appendix 4, page 56)
Through Our Eyes gallery will offer exhibition-planning guidelines and a sample
permission form to other nursing homes. These guidelines will enable other nursing
homes to highlight their art therapy programs, support existing exhibitions, improve the
structure, and elevate the level of professionalism of future exhibitions. Once the other
nursing homes have an on-going exhibiting schedule, I will propose collaborative shows.
These guidelines will be submitted for publication in nursing home magazines.
2. Art Therapy Fair
Due to the success of the Outsider Art Fair, I also foresee die potential for a fair
specializing in artwork by nursing home residents. The plan is to open this fair in the
Lower East Side in New York City five to six years after the gallery’s opening. During
32
the LES is More exhibition at the Educational Alliance, it became evident to me that the
Lower East Side is becoming an international hub for artists. Even though there are
already many galleries in the area, it is still affordable.
The Outsider Art Fair is a strong model for this proposed fair. I will invite galleries
that are at the forefront of Outsider Art, and hope to attract private collectors and
corporations.
During preview dates, I will invite art therapists to discuss growing trends in the field.
I would like to publish a newsletter featuring galleries participating in the fair along with
artist profiles. Generous percentages of revenue will be re-invested into the gallery’s
operational costs and exhibitions.
3. Funding
Many 501 (c) (3) galleries, including this off-site gallery, have to work twice as hard
to stay afloat due to a limited budget. I realize that I might not even break even during the
first year. Meanwhile, art therapists from nursing homes are actively lobbying for larger
reimbursements from the New York State Department of Health.
33
ENDNOTES
1.The American Art Therapy Association, “Frequently Asked Questions,” The American
Art Therapy Association, http://www.arttherapy.org/faq.htm (accessed June 10,2009). Most information
pertaining to the employment and job outlook of art therapy derived from this website.
2.The American Art Therapy Association, “About Art Therapy,” The American Art Therapy
Association, http://www.arttherapy.org/aboutart.htm (accessed June 10,2009).
3. Cathy Malchiodi, ed., The Art Therapy Sourcebook (New York: McGraw-Hill, 1998), 27.
4. Jacqueline L. Longe, ed., The Gale Encyclopedia o f Nursing and Allied Health, 2nd ed. (Detroit:
Thomson Gale, 2006), 1:214.
5. Thomas Klocke and Elizabeth Marks, eds., The Outside Collection o f Outsider Art: 1980-1990
(New York: Hospital Audiences, Inc., 1990), 8.
6. Jacqueline L. Longe, ed. The Gale Encyclopedia Medicine, 3rd ed. (Detroit: Thomson Gale, 2006),
1:400.
7. Klocke and Marks, eds., The Outside Collection o f Outsider Art: 1980-1990 (New York: Hospital
Audiences, Inc., 1990), 8.
8. Annie Carlano, ed., Vernacular Visionaries: International Outsider Art in Context (New Haven:
Yale University Press, 2003), 10.
9. Klocke and Marks, eds., The Outside Collection o f Outsider Art: 1980-1990 (New York: Hospital
Audiences, Inc., 1990), 8.
10. David Greysmith, Richard Dadd: The Rock and Castle o f Seclusion (New York: Macmillan
Publishing Co, Inc., 1974), 88. Greysmith discusses how an Outsider artist Richard Dadd (1817-1886), felt
removed and isolated from everyday world.
11. Longe, ed. The Gale Encyclopedia Medicine, 3rd ed. (Detroit: Thomson Gale, 2006), 1:400. Most
of the information on the value and benefits of therapy derived from this source.
12. Hospice care is a palliative care for terminally-ill residents who no longer seek treatment.
13. Director of Activities, interview by author, New York, NY, August 2,2009.1 was informed that art
therapists from nursing homes are actively lobbying in Albany, New York for additional funding from the
New York State Department of Health.
14. The XYZ Nursing Center, Initial Assessment Forms (New York: The XYZ Nursing Center, 2009).
The short-term and long-term goals will be part of clinical documentation.
15. The XYZ Nursing Center, Clinical Documentation (New York: The XYZ Nursing Center, 2009).
When writing clinical information, art therapists consider the following components: “Cognitive integration
and cognitive component is the ability to use higher brain functions. Sensorimotor component is the ability
to receive input, process information and produce output Psychosocial skills and psychological
components is the ability to interact in society and to process emotions.”
16. Anna Zaderman and Ms. K, eds., Annual Art Show (New York: XYZ Nursing Center, 2008), 6
and 8.
17. Freck and Elizabeth Marks, eds., Outsider Artists o f Hospital Audience Inc. (New York:
Hospital Audiences, Inc., 1990), 5.
18. Johnny Brandon, “Art Show,” Bugle 29, no. 1 (January-March 2008): 8-9.
19. The African American Museum of Nassau County, “About the Museum,” The African American
Museum of Nassau County, http://aamoflongisland.org/about.htm (accessed June 20,2009). A special
exhibit featuring artists from nursing homes across New York State. Resident H participated in Weusi
Collective, Resurrection III: A Retrospect o f 50 years o f Black Conscientious Movement in Art.
20. The West Side Arts Coalition. “About Us” The West Side Arts Coalition, http://www.wsacny.org
(accessed June 20,2009).
21. Medquest Communications, Inc. “Market Projections. (Forecast of Types of Nursing Home
Patients),” Nursing Homes and Senior Citizen Care, no. 40 (May-June 1991), 7.
35
BIBLIOGRAPHY
Books
Bangs, David H. Jr. The Business Planning Guide, 8th ed. Chicago: Upstart Publishing Company, 1998.
Barone, Kathryn. TRAC: Tools and Resources for Art Collectors: a Business Plan. New York: Fashion
Institute of Technology, 2008.
Blee, Tony and Charles Kaye. The Arts in Healthcare: A Palette o f Possibilities. Philadelphia: Jessica
Kingsley, 1997.
Cherbo, Joni Maya and Vera Zolberg, eds. Outsider Art: Contesting Boundaries in Contemporary Culture.
Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1997.
Greysmith, David. Richard Dadd: The Rock and Castle o f Seclusion. New York: Macmillan Publishing Co.
Inc., 1974.
Kinley, Monika. Outsider Artfrom the Outsider Archive: London. Japan: Kyoto Shoin International Co.,
1989.
Longe, Jacqueline, L. ed. The Gale Encyclopedia Medicine. Vol. 1. 3rd ed. Detroit: Thomson Gale, 2006.
Longe, Jacqueline, L. ed. The Gale Encyclopedia o f Nursing and Allied Health. Vol. 1. 2nd ed. Detroit:
Thomson Gale, 2006.
Macgregor, John M. The Discovery o f the Art o f the Insane, New Jersey: Princeton University Press, 1989.
Malchiodi, Cathy, ed. The Art Therapy Sourcebook. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1998.
Malchiodi, Cathy, ed. Medical Art Therapy with Adults. Philadelphia: Jessica Kingsley, 1999.
Masters, Robert E.L. and Jean Houston. Psychedelic Art. New York: Grove Press, 1968.
Peiry, Lucienne. Art Brut: The Origins o f Outsider Art. Paris: Flannarion, 2001.
Robbins, Arthur. Creative Art Therapy. New York: Brunner/Mazel, 1976.
Russell, Charles, ed. Self-Taught Art: The Culture and Aesthetics o f American Vemicular Art. Jackson:
University Press of Mississippi, 2001.
Thevoz, Michel. L ’Art Brut, Geneve: Editions D’art Albert Skira S.A., 1980.
Turabian, Kate L. A Manualfor Writers o f Research Papers, Theses, and Dissertations, 7th ed. Revised by
Wayne C. Booth, Gregory G. Colomb and Joseph M. Williams and the University of Chicago Press
Editorial Staff Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 2007.
Umberger, Sallie. Sublime Spaces and Visionary Worlds: Built Environments o f Vernacular Artists. New
York: Princeton Architectural Press, Wisconsin: John Michael Kohler Arts Center, 2007.
Wadeson, Harriet. The Dynamics o f Art Psychotherapy. New York: Wiley, 1987.
36
Secondary
Barcella, Laura. “Fountain of Hope.” Time Out New York (2003).
Brandon, Johnny. “Art Show.” Bugle 29, no. 1 (January-March 2008): 8-9.
Brandon, Johnny. “Art Show.” Bugle 30, no. 2 (April-June 2009): 5-6.
Hall, Charlie. “Color of Soul.” Sun Journal (January 2009).
Johnson, Ken. “They Taught Themselves.” The New York Times (February 2009): C27.
Life, Jordan. “Beautiful Minds Turn Pain into Art.” Daily News (2006).
Mila, Andre. “A New Home for die Healing Arts.” Daily News (2000).
Urrutia, Chris. “88 Year Old is Picture of Health.” Queens Tribune (April 2008): 22.
Zimmer, Amy. “Local Artists Call a Town Hall Meeting.” Metro (2007).
Zimmer, Amy. “Need More Landlords that Are Art Supporters, that Understand the Arts.” Metro (2007):
7.
Lectures
Lauren Albrecht, Christina Bolya, Samuel Kho, Caren Leipsic, Anat Reches, Jie Sheng (Lesley), and Anna
Zaderman. “Impossibly Familiar” (Paper presented at the final class of Exhibition and Interpretation:
Theory, Planning and Design, Fashion Institute of Technology, NY, April 25,2007).
Lauren Albrecht, Caren Leipsic and Anna Zaderman. “Chelsea Art Museum Marketing Plan” (Paper
presented at the final class of Marketing Art For-Profit and Not-For-Profit Organizations, Fashion
Institute of Technology, NY, December 19,2005).
Judith Kuspit, PhD.”D.W. Winnicott: Hallucinating Squiggler and Art Therapy” (Lecture, School of
Visual Arts, New York, NY, October 16,2007).
Edwin Ramoran, (Director and Curator of Longwood Arts Program, Bronx New York, Lecture, Fashion
Institute of Technology, New York, NY, September 11,2007).
Interviews by the Author
Jason Bowman, (Coordinator Director of Fountain Gallery, New York, NY, 2007).
Interviews at the XYZ Nursing Center, New York, NY.
Director of Activities, August 2009.
Resident G, December 2008.
Resident H, August 2009.
37
Resident U, December 2007, December 2008 and December 2009.
On-Line Sources
Afiniscape. “Welcome.” The American Therapeutic Recreation. www.//atra-online.com (accessed May 12,
2009).
The African American Museum of Nassau County. “About the Museum.” The African American Museum
of Nassau County, http://aamoflongisland.org/about.htm (accessed June 20,2009).
African American Visual Artists Database. “Resident H.” African American Visual Artists Database.
http.7/aavad.com/artistbibliog.cfin?id=:2747 (accessed June 20,2009).
The American Art Therapy Association. “Frequently Asked Questions.” The American Art Therapy
Association, http://www.arttherapy.org/faq.htm (accessed June 10,2009).
Knick. Net. The Albany Institute of History and Art.
http://www.albanyinstitute.org/news/Art%20from%20the%20Heart.htm (accessed July 25,2009).
Matheis-Kraft, Carol and Carolyn Norrgard. “Therapeutic Recreation (Senior Health Advisor).” Relay
Health, http://www.summitmedicalgroup.com/library/senior_healdi/therapeutic_recreation
(accessed March 5,2009).
The West Side Arts Coalition. “About Us.” The West Side Arts Coalition, http://www.wsacny.org
(accessed June 20,2009).
Exhibition Catalogues
Carlano, Annie, ed. Vernacular Visionaries: International Outsider Art in Context. New Haven: Yale
University Press, 2003. Published in conjunction with the exhibition “Vernacular Visionaries:
International Outsider Art” shown at the Museum of International Folk Art.
Freck, Kevin and Elizabeth Marks, eds. Outsider Artists o f Hospital Audience Inc. (HAI) New York:
Hospital Audiences, Inc., 1996. Published in conjunction with the exhibition “Outsider Artists of HAI”
shown at the Hospital Audiences Inc.
Klocke, Thomas and Elizabeth Marks, eds. The Outside Collection o f Outsider Art: 1980-1990. New York:
Hospital Audiences, Inc., 1990.
Mendelsohn, Gael. The Intuitive Eye: Masterpieces from the Gael and Michael Mendelsohn Collection.
New York: Ricco Maresca Gallery, 2000. Published in conjunction with the exhibition “A World of
Their Own” shown at the Newark Museum.
Tibaldeo, Camille, ed. Fountain Gallery’s Sixth Annual Celebration o f Life Benefit. New York: Fountain
Gallery, 2007. Published in conjunction with the exhibition “Sixth Annual Celebration of Life Benefit”
shown at the Fountain Gallery.
Zaderman, Anna and Ms. K., eds. New York: XYZ Nursing Center, 2008, exhibition list published in
conjunction with the exhibition “Annual Art Show” shown at the XYZ Nursing Center.
38
APPENDIX 1.
2008 Annual Art Show Exhibition List
Curators
Anna Zaderman and Ms. K
1. W1
2. M
Untitled
Oil pastel, colored pencil, #2 pencil, and charcoal on paper.
Artist’s Statement: “I was thinking in my head. I started painting and made this mess.”
3. L
The Well
4. H
Persian Happiness
Watercolor and pencil on paper.
Artist’s Statement: “They are packing to leave.”
5. M
Complicated
Oil pastel, colored pencil, #2 pencil, and charcoal on oaktag.
Artist’s Statement: “Since it took a long time to do, I made something productive. It
reminds me of Picasso’s work. It confuses me.”
6. T
Nice Girl
Oil pastel and colored pencil on paper.
7.1
Irish Eyes are Smiling
Oil pastel and colored pencil on paper.
8. H
9. B
10. H
1Capital letter stands for the first letter of artist resident’s last name.
39
11. V
12. H
Nicole Kidman
Colored pencil and watercolor on paper.
Artist’s Statement: When asked: ”Is this a star? Yes, I took the photograph from a
magazine.”
13. C
Horse and Canoe Both Need a Rest
Paper, acrylic, tempera, and gel medium on canvas.
Artist’s Statement: “It is enraptured and moored in that particular quiet spot. People bathe
and enjoy themselves for the day or before going home, amongst palm trees.”
14. A
15. H
Man with Mower
Colored pencil and watercolor on paper.
Artist’s Statement: “The man fell when he went to mow the lawn. He is happy now. He is
holding a mower. I like the solid colors.”
16. H
Triangles on Parade
Acrylic mid colored pencil on paper.
Artist’s Statement: “This painting is about right-angle triangles fighting for primacy.”
17. D
Rose
Clay and Elmer’s glue on cardboard.
Artist’s Statement: “It means a lot to me because I placed a lot of materials. I created the
frame out of beads.”
18. M
19. H
Pencil and watercolor on paper.
Artist’s Statement: “She has a camera and she is at attention.”
20. J
Landscape Racetrack
Acrylic on canvas.
40
Artist’s Statement: “This is a painting of a horse’s head with the mouth open. The foam is
excreting from the horse’s mouth on this very hot day. A tree and grass form a border. I
chose canvas board because of hard surface and the solid substance of the board. I am
using acrylic because the visibility between grass and border is more obvious. This gives
a painting a perspective view rather than flat. I became inspired by avant-garde artists.
Since the racetrack was destroyed, I wanted to immortalize the horse. As I have
fondness for horses, I thought this painting would be appropriate. Also, it would give me
an opportunity to express my desire for painting. When the paints come together and
form a border, a subliminal effect takes place.”
21. J
Church Hills Downs 2007Kentucky Derby
Acrylic and gel medium on canvas.
Artist’s Statement: “I wanted to capture an outdoor summer scene. Abstract placement of
color gives more seasonal effects than oil painting. The flat paint brings out hue and
tone.”
22. H
Ring Around a Rosie
Acrylic and colored pencil on paper.
Artist’s Statement: “The rose is in the middle and everything is all around. This is based
on a childhood game.”
23. T
24. W
25. J
26. H
French Curls
Acrylic and pencil on paper.
Artist’s Statement: “This painting is based on French curves, etc.”
27. L
Entombment
Colored pencil on paper.
Artist’s Statement: “The stage of a Broadway show is in the background.”
28. H
Guys and Dolls
29. M
41
30. R
31. S
Ebony pencil on paper.
32. P
Lovely Mobile
Clay, ribbon, string, oil pastel, #2 pencil, colored pencil, and Elmer’s glue on plastic
hanger support.
Artist’s Statement: “This is a first time that I did this. Since I have gained appreciation
for this work, this is nice art. It means a lot to me.”
33. D
Rose
Felt, paper, clay, wood beads, colored pencil, and Elmer’s glue on cardboard.
Artist’s Statement: “I used wood and clay. This collage is about a rose.”
34. D
Cloth
Acrylic, yam, clay, #2 pencil, colored pencil, Elmer's glue, and photograph on fabric.
Artist’s Statement: “First I pushed down clay. Then, I painted and glued down
photographs.”
35. P
Calendar
Paper, ribbon, string, acrylic, tempera, blue pen, oil pastel, #2 pencil, colored pencil, and
Elmer’s glue on plastic hanger support.
Artist’s Statement: “This is a beautiful calendar. I drew pictures on paper. Then I glued it
together based on origami design. It was a squirrel. If you get it, it will be nice work. I
did a good job.”
36. D
37. U
A Montage
Artist’s Statement: “A montage is very interesting, it is something different. This
montage was inspired by a pinhole camera. A montage is a combination of many cut­
outs. There are eyes, fish, boats, and grapes.
One of my hobbies was stamp collecting and photography. I became interested in
photography when I visited the New York Botanical Garden and the Brooklyn Botanical
Garden. Other interests included attending opera, ballet, and theater.
I haven’t done work for some 35 years. My late wife was a very sick woman. Now
that I am here, I am back to doing art work. Some of my friends can’t get over my art
work.”
42
38. P
Artist’s Statement: “I think my art is very nice. “
39. M
The Touching Point
Porcelain
Artist’s Statement: “This sculpture symbolizes life itself. It is a path into the unknown.
Every step projects into the other side. The path of the gods and the number eight are
symbols of the parallel forces of the universe, moving in the same direction but always
the same distance apart.
The figure of a naked woman arching over the curving structure symbolizes mother
and human nature. But she is not entering the eternity. She is just lying over the edge of
time. Two circles in number eight represent two parallel worlds.”
40. J
41. G
42. A
43. V
45. U
Landscape and Still Life
Artist’s Statement: “One of the tenants in the Concourse Village in the Bronx was
painting a sign. As he invited me to help him, that was my first experience painting a
sign. I did some interesting work there.
Ever since then, I haven’t done art work for the last 35 years. Since I arrived here, my
wife encouraged me to attend die art classes. My wife and her friends are very impressed
with my work. I am quite surprised that I am able to produce it.”
46. P
Beautiful Shapes o f Art
Watercolor, oil pastel, #2 pencil, and colored pencil on paper.
Artist’s Statement: “I think that these drawings are wonderful. This is beautiful work and
nice to look at. First, I drew various shapes with colored pencils. Then, I painted the
background with watercolors.”
47. G
Imani Tree
Acrylic on canvas.
Artist’s Statement: “I am interested in people seeing the exhibit. My concern is how the
work makes people feel, whether the response is negative or positive. The bottom line is
43
how it makes you feel Responses to his work have been: ’’Stunning.” One viewer even
began singing.”
48. H
Dance at the Umoja Tree
Acrylic on canvas.
49. G
Central Park-The Pond
Oil on canvas.
50. G
Water Towers (Broadway at 78>hStreet)
Oil on canvas.
APPENDIX 1.
2007 Annual Art Show Photographic Documentation
vASVNG&
Residents C (left) and P (right).
4^
2008 Annual Art Show Photographic Documentation
Residents J (top) and M (bottom)
(see 2008 Annual Art Show Exhibition List, page 38).
4^
2009 Annual Art Show Photographic Documentation
47
Bugle (2009)
2008 Annual Art Show
Twenty five artists-in-residence
participated in our 2008 A rt Show,
a year long curatorial project co­
curated by ANNA ZADERMAN
and Ms. K.
Residents produced over fifty
quality mixed media works
including paintings, drawings,
collages, sculptures and ceramics.
ANNA, seen left with resident H and
resident U , supplied us with the
following information._____________
Residents were involved in installation in terms
o f layout and design, and during “M eet the Artist”
discussion, we highlighted some o f the high
caliber work. Resident Artists documented their
progress in statements, discussing the applications
o f medium sources and techniques utilized.
Right, resident U celebrated new
experiences. He became inspired by a pinhole
camera and created a montage for the first time.
This enabled him to discover his creative talents
in a work entitled, “M ontage”.
“I haven’t done art work for the last 35 years”, he told us. He was encouraged by his wife to attend art classes
at X Y Z ; she and her friends were very impressed with his work. “I am quite surprised that I am able to
produce it”, he added.
Residents have wild
imaginations as vividly described
by resident J , left,
in “ Landscape Racetrack”, a
painting o f a horse’s head with its
mouth open, “ A tree and grass
form a border. I chose canvas
board because o f the solid
substance o f the board. I chose
acrylics because the visibility
between grass and border is more
obvious. This gives it a
prospective view rather that flat”.
48
TheAnnual Art Show Creates a great
deal o f interest, especially among visitors
o f X Y Z , who are frequently surprised to
see such an array o f talent on display.
Thanks is due to ANNA ZADERMAN
and Ms. K (seen L. with
resident II ) for their
enthusiasm and ability to work as “talent
spotters” .
Other exhibitors included resident M and,
below, resident II(seen at a “Sing-aLong” with resident G ). ANNA says
doesn’t let anything get in the w ay o f her imagination.
Her work “ Ring Around a Rosie”, she
explains..."the rose is in the middle and
everything else is all around”. This is based
on an old childhood game and in order to
create her specific geom etric shapes, she
utilizes French curves and compasses. Sounds
good to me, resident F.
The success o f the Art show can be partially
attributed to the impact art has 011 residents.
Artists possess raw talent and integrity and
their experimentation 111 medium and solid
level o f execution should be applauded.
Thank you, ANNA, for your art report.
(As a footnote, I should add that XYZ is also home to the highly praised professional artist,
resident H, as he is known 111 the art world, recently had a highly successful exhibit at
the African American Museum o f Nassau county, and his w'ork has appeared at Lincoln Center, The
Schomburg Gallery, Yale University and in the New York Times. J.B.)
CONGRATULATIONS ALL YOU XYZ ARTISTS.
APPENDIX 2.
Artist Demographics and Psychographics During the 2006-2009
Art Therapy Sessions with Anna Zaderman1
1 Age Group
80-90
70-80
Total
Out of 10
8
2
10
Percentages of Total Artists
80%
20%
100%
2 Gender______________________________________________
Female
8
80%
Male
2
20%
Total
10
100%
3 Past Residence
Manhattan
Queens
Total
9
1
10
90%
10%
100%
4 Native Language
English
Armenian
Italian
Total
8
1
1
10
80%
10%
10%
100%
5 Impairments
Multiple2
Visual
Hearing
Total
5
4
I
10
50%
40%
10%
100%
6 Duration of Stay
Long-Term
Short-Term
Total
10
0
10
100%
0%
100%
7 Educational Level
High School
College
Total
8
2
10
80%
20%
100%
8 Previous Occupation
Arts Professional
Clerical
Other
Manager
Writer
Total
3
3
2
1
1
10
30%
30%
20%
10%
10%
100%
1The data was based on interviews with artists, attendance sheets, and face sheets.
2Some residents have hearing impairments and/or visual impairments. Cognitive impairment can be dementia and/or Alzheimer’s.
Percentages of Total Artists
Gender
Age Group
20%
□ Male
B Female
□ 70-80
□ 80-00
80%
Native Language
Past Residence
10%
10%
□ English
□ .Armenian
□ Manhattai
□ Queens
■ Italian
80%
Percentages of Total Artists (Continued)
Impairments
Duratr m of Stay
/
□ Long-Term
□ Short-Term
50%
y
‘
yo%
□ Visual
■I Hearing
i Multiple
10%
100%
Educational Level
Previous Occupation
30%
n High School
□ College
□
□
■
□
□
Arts Professional
Clerical
Manager
Writer
Other
Artist Demographics and Psychographics in All Art Therapy Sessions Groups1
09/08/09
09/01/09
1
2
3
09/15/09
09/10/09
Percentages
42
75.00%
14
25.00%
56
100%
Percentages
41
75.93%
13
24.07%
54
100%
Percentages
37
77.08%
11
22.92%
100%
48
Duration of Stay
Long-Term
Short-Term
Total
47
1
48
97.92%
2.08%
100%
53
3
56
94.64%
5.36%
100%
53
1
54
98.15%
1.85%
100%
55
2
57
Native Language
English
Spanish
Polish
French
Greek
Armenian
Italian
Chinese
Portuguese
Yiddish
Total
40
1
2
1
1
0
1
0
1
1
48
83.33%
2.08%
4.17%
2.08%
2.08%
0.00%
2.08%
0.00%
2.08%
2.08%
100%
45
5
2
1
1
1
0
1
0
0
56
80.36%
8.93%
3.57%
1.79%
1.79%
1.79%
0.00%
1.79%
0.00%
0.00%
100%
47
2
1
2
1
0
1
0
0
0
54
87.04%
3.70%
1.85%
3.70%
1.85%
0.00%
1.85%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
100%
47
3
3
1
1
1
1
0
0
0
57
' These were based on attendance sheets between 09 01/09 and 09/22/09.
09/21/09
Percentages
73.68%
42
26.32%
15
100%
57
Gender
Female
Male
Total
09/22/09
Percentages
28
63.64%
16
36.36%
44
100%
39
16
55
96.49%
3.51%
100%
43
1
44
97.73%
2.27%
100%
54
1
55
98.18%
1.82%
100%
97.18%
2.82%
100%
82.46%
5.26%
5.26%
1.75%
1.75%
1.75%
1.75%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
100%
38
3
0
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
44
86.36%
6.82%
0.00%
47
4
2
0
0
1
0
1
0
0
55
85.45%
7.27%
3.64%
0.00%
0.00%
1.82%
0.00%
1.82%
0.00%
0.00%
100%
84.17%
5.68%
3.08%
1.93%
1.62%
1.27%
0.95%
0.60%
0.35%
0.35%
100%
227%
2.27%
227%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
100%
Percentages Percentages of Total Artists
70.91%
72.71%
27.29%
29.09%
100%
100%
Percentages o f Total Artists
Duration of Stay
Gender
3%
□ Long-Term
■ Short-Term
□ Male
■ Female
97%
Native Language
2% - \
3%
2 %
~
1%
1%
1%
6%
□ English
■ Spanish
■ Polish
□ Greek
□ French
■ Italian
■ Chinese
□ Armeninian
84%
APPENDIX 3.
Competitive Analysis for Through Our Eyes gallery1
Through Our Eyes Gallery
1
Location
On-site in established nursing home, on a cross town street
2
Proximity to Galleries
3
Schedule
In close proximity to many famous galleries, museums, and auction house
Year-round schedule with minimal closures and user-friendly hours that accommodate busy residents’ schedules
4
Professional environment
S
Art Therapy Program
A professional environment similar to commercial gallery
In-house art therapy program and gallery
6
Artwork
Exclusively specializing in art therapy artwork created by artist residents. Art work is original and additional artwork
is accessible for visitors.
7
Artist Involvement
8
Artists and Staff Presence
Artist residents involved in whole process of running the gallery
Access to artist residents and art therapists. As a non-profit gallery, there will be less pressure to sell artwork and
more time to meet the artists. ■
9
Staff
10 Admission
Personnel with educational backgrounds and experience in art therapy and art market (see pages 25-27 for detailed
descriptions)
Free for gallery and special events
1Turn to page 55 for craUhiuatton of each Competitive Analysis category (1-10).
APPENDIX 3.
Competitive Analysis for Through Our Eyes gallery (Continued)
Local Nursing Homes
Art from the Heart competition
The Gallery at HAI
The Fountain Gallery
1
2
Most do not have on-site galleries
Exhibitions are presented at Rice Gallery, 125 Washington
Avenue, Albany, New York 12210
Located in a commercial building in SoHo at 548
Broadway, 3rd Floor, New York, New York 10012.
A project of the Fountain House which
is located a block away at 702 9th
Avenue, New York, New York 10019.
Less conveniently located to galleries
There are only a few galleries in the area and some are not in
walking distance.
Many SoHo galleries but fewer museums
There me only a couple of small
galleries and no museums in vicinity.
Limited Monday-Friday 9 a.m.-8
pjn.
Limited Wednesday-Saturday, 10:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. and
Sunday, 12:00-5:00 p.m., mid Tuesday forpre-registered
groups only, closed on Monday and major holidays.
Limited Tuesday-Saturday, 11 a.m-7
Limited Monday-Saturday, 12-6 p.m. with some
p.m. and Sunday 1-5 p.m. Gallery
extended hours during Outsider Art week. Gallery closed
closed for longer periods during the
for three weeks during die summer.
summer.
Unprofessional presentation on
bulletin boards
Located in a temporary rental gallery
3
5
Some nursing homes do not have art
No in-house art therapy program
therapy programs.
6
Exhibited work created by residents
This competition is for artwork by nursing home residents. A
but difficult to view work due to
visitor can only view the work during the run of exhibitions.
limited hours
7
The Activities Departments usually
responsible for installation
8 A visitor has to travel to residential
floors to meet residents. Most art
therapists unavailable during
activities
9
Some art therapists lack gallery
experience and understanding of art
market.
10 Free for art shows
Often presents exhibitions in outside venues such as bars
Occasional seasonal exhibitions
and lounges.
No in-house art therapy program and
No in-house art therapy program and participants attend
members take classes in outside
off-site art therapy classes
schools
Some artists reside in nursing homes. Artists are regarded
Represents the work of members, some
as Outsider or self-taught rather than art therapy artists. A
reside
in nursing homes.2A visitor
visitor can view die work at The Galleiy at HAI, and
cannot see work firsthand.
during an Annual Self-Taught Week.
Artists not involved and nursing homes submit artwork
The staff are involved in gallery operation, instructors
involved in exhibition planning
No artists or art therapists on location
Members are occasionally present and
To meet the instructors and artists, a visitor has to travel
greet visitors. Most o f them do not
to off-site locations.
work with art therapists
Staff organizes shows
Staff lacks educational background or experience in art therapy
No background or licensure in art therapy
and no experience in market
Small staff with backgrounds in public
relations mid business
Adults-$8, senior citizens and group rates-$6
Free but special events are cosdy
2 Tile Executive Director of the Fountain Gallery stated that he hasn’t reached out to nursing homes.
Charge admission to some special events
56
APPENDIX 4.
Annual Art Show Exhibition-Planning Guidelines
Step 1
6 Months Before Opening
• Start gathering information about artists/art (name, title, size, medium, and artist
statement)
• Start collecting and storing artwork in cabinets
Step 2
3 Months Before Opening
• Continue collecting information about artists/art
• Start collecting permission forms (see sample on page 58)1
• Start a rough exhibition-planning list in Microsoft Excel (placement of the
artwork, artist names, checkboxes for artist statements, and permission forms)
• Start preparing a slide show featuring resident’s work
Step 3
1 Month Before Opening
• Assessment of boards, easels, and stools
• Measurement of boards
• Test artwork on the tables horizontally
• Arrange artwork according to artist and style
• Decide on the placement of the artwork
• Eliminate excess work due to insufficient space
• Number all artwork and gather in numerical order
• Draw a rough layout of the exhibition
• Continue revising the exhibition-planning list, collecting artwork, and artist
information
• Draft budget
Step 4
3 Weeks Before Opening
• Assessment of in-house framing needs and supplies (board papers, mounting
boards, tapes, wires, hooks, mats, and frames, etc.)
• Contact Maintenance Department for additional supplies
• Purchase supplies online (Pearl Paint at www.pearlpaint.com offers extensive
selection of framing supplies and S & S Worldwide at www.ssww.com has
inexpensive exhibition materials)
• Submit the final list of supplies and budget to the Director of Activities
1In compliance with HIPAA you should collect a permission form from every resident for any related
materials (names on artist statements, photographs, and exhibition-planning lists).
57
Step 5
2 Weeks Before Opening
• Begin installation
• Cover the board
• Arrange easels and stools
• Choose titles for the boards with the residents
• Hang the titles on each board
Step 6
1 Week Before Opening
• Continue installation
• Finalize exhibition-planning list
• Finish collecting permission forms and artist/art information
• Create an exhibition list with artist/art information (Appendix 1)
• Create and hang flyers on residential floors and in the lobby
• Distribute flyers to nurses, CNAs, social workers, family members, and residents
• Verbal in-house invitation
Step 7
The Day of Opening
• Reserve seating for staff
• Opening and Meet the Artists discussion
• Distribute the exhibition list
• Photograph the opening and the discussion
Step 8
1 Week After Opening
• Invite staff and present a slide show
• Distribute additional flyers and exhibition lists
• Photograph the slide show
• Continue to market the exhibition
Step 9
1 Month After Opening
• De-installation (encourage artists to participate)
• Return artwork to artists
• Hang work on residential floors and in the rooms
• Collect and store additional work in cabinets
• Submit work with documentation to external art exhibitions venues
• Submit an article along with documentation for the in-house newsletter
58
Annual Art Show Permission Form
Consent to use and publication of artists’ statements and photographs
Artist Resident:
Date:
I hereby consent that artists’ statements and photographs may be used for the purpose of
the Annual Art Show.
I am giving permission to be identified by name, to display my artwork, and to be
photographed.
Signature:
Witness:
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