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Biographical dictionary and résumés of stories of D'Urfé's "Astrée". Part II

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BIOGRAPHICAL DICTIONARY
AND
RESUMES OF STORIES OF D ’U R F ^ S ASTRASt PART II
A Thesis
Presented to
the Faculty of the) Department of French
The University of Southern California
In Partial Fulfillment
of the Requirements for the Degree
Master of Arts
by
FRANCES LUCILLE FOSTER
June 1941
UMI Number: EP57739
All rights reserved
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T h is thesis, w r it t e n by
......................... mN.CES..X.U.CILLK..FQSTSH
r........
u n d e r the d i r e c t i o n o f h .& r. F a c u l t y C o m m i t t e e ,
a n d a p p r o v e d by a l l it s m e m b e r s , has been
presented to a n d accepted by the C o u n c i l on
G ra d u a t e S t u d y a n d Research in p a r t i a l f u l f i l l ­
m e n t o f the re q u ire m e n ts f o r the degree o f
l£ k S T E R ..Q F ...m ? & .
Dean
Secretary
D a te ...
F aculty Com m ittee
C hairm an
BI©GRAPHICAL DICTIONARY
AND
RESUMES OF STORIES OF D*URf £*S ASTREE, FART II
ky
FRANCES LUCILLE FOSTER
1941
BIOGRAPHICAL DICTIONARY
AND
R&IMfe OP STORIES OP D'URF^S ASTREE , PART II
PREFACE
The Astree of Honore" d ’Urfe' is one of the landmarks in
the history of French literature.
It exercised a profound
influence on the literature of the Seventeenth Century.
Because of its importance and because, of the difficulty
encountered in consulting the work, a biographical diction­
ary of the characters and resumes of the stories should
prove helpful to scholars.
I have chosen Part II of the
T
Astree, as Part I has been assigned to another candidate for
the Master’s degree.
Parts IV and V have been treated in a
similar manner by Miss Peevish and Miss Poe, respectively.
In selecting tenses to be used in the biographical diction­
ary,. I have used the present tense for all actions which
take place before the eyes of the reader and the past tense
for recits.
The pluperfect tense refers to actions which
occurred before the story opened.
I wish to express my sincere appreciation to Dr. Lawrence M
Riddle, Dr. Rene Belle', and Professor Adele Jallade, members
of my committee, for their criticisms and helpful suggestions
Frances Lucille Foster
CONTENTS
Page
INTRODUCTION.............................
PART I,
vi
Biographical Dictionary of d*Urf^fs
Astree, Part II •'•••••••...••.... ........ ..
2
PART II, Resumes of Stories of d’Urfe’s Astree,
Part
1.
\2.
3.
II
...........
113
Story of Celid^e, Thamire and Calidon...
113
Story of Palinice and of Circ^ne. .....
115
Story of Parthenop^, Plorice and
Dorinde ..................
116
4.
Story of Damon and Madonte.
.....
5.
Story of Galath^e
6.
Story of Doris and Palemon.............
124
7.
Story of Adraste.........
126
8.
Story of Ursace and Olimfcre.
127
9.
Story of Lindamor...............
128
.........
10.Continuation of the Story of Celid^e....
119
122
129
11.
Story of the Jealousy of Lycidas.......
131
12.
Story of Flacidie.
132
13.
Story of Eudoxe, Valentinian and
Ursace
BIBLIOGRAPHY
........
........
L I F E .........................
...............
134
136
137
INTRODUCTION
The purpose of this thesis is to catalogue the characters
of the Astree, Fart II, and to summarize its stories*1
D ’Urfe*s Astree profoundly influenced the drama of the
Seventeenth Century.
An indication of its influence may
he seen in the following quotation from the Au lecteur
of Auvray’s tragi-comedy Madonte, published in 1631.
Defending his choice of subject, love, Auvray writes:
Tu n fauras point d fargument du
sujet que tout le monde s*est rendu
curieux d ’apprendre par la bouch
d*Astrde, elle a fait de ses avantures, et des amours de ses autres
compagnes la science des Dames
d 1aujourd1huy.
I have listed the plays which have their source in Astrde,
Fart II.
This information was taken from Lancaster,^
Reure,^
and from Magendie. ^
1.
Pierre Cottingnon de la Charnays.—
Madonte, I623.
Its source is Astree, Ft. II, Bk. 6, and Ft. Ill,
Bk. 6.
(See Lancaster, op. cit., I, I84.)
1 D*Urfex, Honore. — L yAstree, Nouvelle Edition par Hugues
Yaganay, Lyon, Masson, 1926. 5 vols.
2 Paris, Sommaville et Courb€\
^ A History of French Dramatic Literature in the Seventeenth
Century, Baltimore, The Johns Hopkins Press, Part I, 1929;
Part II, 1932.
^ La Tie et les CEuvres de Honord' d’Urfe, Paris, Plon-Nourrit,
1910
5
Du Nouveau sur L yAstree, Paris, Champion, 1927.
.
vii
2. Auvray.—
Madonte, (1628) 1631*
The source of this
play is Astr£e, Ph. II, Bk, 6 and Pt. Ill, Bk. 6
and Bk. 12.
3* Ii§L Croix.—
(See Lancaster, pp. cit., I, 295.)
Chimdne, 1629. This play retells the
affair of Pantesmon, Doris, and Palemon in the
Story of Doris, Astree, Pt. II, Bk. 9.
(See
Lancaster, op. cit., I, 336-37.)
4.
de Rayssiguier.—
Tragi-comedie pastorale ou les
amours d*Astree et de Celadon sont meslees h celles
de Diane, de Silvandre, et de Paris, avec les incon­
stances d'Hylas, 1630,
This play is taken from
Astree, Pt. II* Bks. 3 and 5 and 8-10; Pt. Ill,
Bks. 1, 2, and 5; Pt. V, Bks. 6,. 7, 11, and 12.
(See Lancaster, pp. cit., I, 346.)
5.
Mareschal.—
L*InConstance d ’Hylast written ahout 1630,
printed in 1635-
It is taken from Astree, Pt. II,
Bks. 4 and 11; Pt. Ill, Bk. 9; Pt. IV, Bk. 4; and
Pt. V, Bk. 12.
6. de Rayssiguier.—
(See Lancaster, op. cit., I, 432.)
La Celid£e, sous le nom de Calirie,
ou de la Generosity d*Amour, Pt. II, Bks. 1, 2, 11.
(See Lancaster, pp. cit., I, 504.)
7.
Scud^ry.—
Eudoxe,*privilege 1640.
For'a r£cit, the
author used Astree, Pt. II, Bk. 12; for the plot he
used Astree, Pt. V, Bk. 8.
II, 234.)
(See Lancaster, pp. cit.,
viii
8 . ■ Abel de Saincte-Marthe.—
vengee, printed in 1645*
Isidore, ou la Pudi^iW'
(See Reure, op* cit.,
300.)
9.
Grillet de la Tassonerie.—
La Mort de Valentinian
et d*Isidore, privilege 1647, printed in I64S.
It is taken from Astr£e, Pt. II, Bk. 12.
Lancaster, pp. cit.t II, 614-)
(See
PART I
BIOGRAPHICAL DICTIONARY
OF
D fUREEfS ASTREE, PART II
PART I
BIOGRAPHICAL DICTIONARY OP D ’URFE’S ASTREE
PART II
ACACES, king of the Alains, was killed by Constance (II, 11;
474).
>'
ADAMAS is a Grand Druid (II, 1; 12),
Paris (II, 3; 108)*
He is the father of
He is the uncle of Leonide, for whom he
cares as if she were his own daughter (II, 6; 274)*
verses with Celadon about love (II, 2; 78).
He con­
The beauty of love
is divine, he believes; in the first place in importance God
has put ideas, in the second place, reason, and in the last
place, forms (ibid.).
Some vessels receive more divine perfec­
tion than others, yet none is imperfect, as all receive as much,
perfection as they will hold (II, 2; 79)*
Adamas helped Celadon escape from Galathee (II, 7; 273).
He
assured Leonide and Silvie that he would take.full responsibil­
ity for Celadon’s escape (II, 7; 286).
Adamas had been fond of
Celadon’s father (II, 8; 309)*
Adamas learned of Leonide’s meeting with Celadon (II, 8; 310).
He said that love caused Celadon’s father to act similarly (II, ■
8; 311)*
He also told Leonide that she and Celadon were related
(ibid.).
Adamas and Leonide consulted Cleontine and the oracle at
Mont-verdun (II, 8; 313).
Adamas was told to help youth; that if
the youth received his lady, the old age of Adamas would be happy.
ASTREE II
ADAMAS
■3
Adamas now felt a personal interest in helping Celadon (II,
8; 314)*
He visited Celadon and reminded him of his respon­
sibilities to God and mankind (II, 8; 316).
He told him he
resembled his absent daughter Alexis, and asked permission
to visit him (II, 8; 319)*
Adamas and Leonide continued to
visit Celadon and Adamas brought him food.
He advised
Celadon to spend his time in the sacred wood which was near­
by, suggesting that he might carve on the trees or build
articles to embellish the spot (II, 8; 320).
Adamas further
suggested that Celadon build a temple to his goddess Astree
(II, 8; 321).
He explained to Celadon the Gallo-Roman con­
ception of God, the Trinity (II, 8; 323-27).
He also had him
build an altar to The Virgin Who Would Have a Child (II, 8;
327).
When the temple was finished, Adamas brought the laws
of love and the picture of mutual friendship (II, 8; 328).
He painted a copy of Celadon’s portrait of Astree for the
altar (ibid.).
Adamas laughs when Leonide tells him of Celadon’s ’’funeral".
He says that if he were not afraid that Celadon would flee to
a still more savage region, he would tell Astree of Celadon’s
whereabouts (II, 10; 393)*
Adamas promises Celadon to give
him a means whereby he may see Astree every day , without being
seen by her.
He explains that he will receive Celadon disguised
as his daughter Alexis.
Adamas will pretend that Alexis has
been sent home by the druids because she is ill (II, 10; 397)*
ASTKE2S II
ADAMAS
4
He persuades Celadon that Astree will not see Celadon, but
rather Alexis (II, 10; 393).
Instructing Celadon concern­
ing the life of the girl druids, Adamas receives him as his
daughter Alexis (II, 10: 399)Adamas interrupts Celadon.as he is telling the story of
Ursace to Leonide (II, 10; 413)*
When Adamas hears that
Silvie has arrived, he tells Leonide to meet her and not to
mention Celadon.
He says to tell Silvie that Alexis is not
seeing people, as she expects to return to the Carnutes soon
(ibid.).
Adamas is later told a portion of the news which
Leonide has received (II, 10; 427).
When Lycidas is coming to visit the feigned Alexis, Adamas
warns Celadon not to betray his emotion.
He says Celadon
must see the shepherds because they expect it (II, 11; 429).
Adamas accepts the villagers1 invitation to assist in the
sacrifice celebrating the beautiful mistletoe (II, 11; 431).
He entertains Fhocion, Diamis and Tircis, conducting them
and the other shepherds through his house (II, 11:467). When
Hylas mentions the portraits of two women,., which are in a
gallery, Adamas tells their identity and commences the story
of Placidie (II, 11; 467-68).
He shows his hearers portraits
of the leading characters In his story (II, 11; 474).
He
mentions Augustin, describing his religion (II, 11; 433).
When Adamas has finished his story, he invites the shepherds
to spend the night at his home (II, 11; 435).
ASTREE II
ADRASTE
5
ADRASTE, a shepherd, is refused by Doris, who also
refuses Palemon {II, 8: 342-44).
loved by Doris (II, 8; 343)*
Adraste has never been
He and Palemon beg Leonide
and Chrisante to judge their difficulties as love inspires
them (II, 8; 350-51)*
Adraste cannot promise to cease
loving Doris if the judges* decision is against him, but
he promises to leave and never to bother her.
He says his
affection overrules his will to such an extent that he can­
not command himself to die, as Palemon can (II, 8; 351)*
We learn that Adraste has loved Doris from the cradle on
(II, 9; 372).
He has often burst into tears before Doris
and has fallen senseless at her feet.
He thought that the
disdain and mockery which Doris showed him were the results
of her love for Palemon (II, 9; 373)*
He did not seek ven­
geance on Palemon because such an action would have displeased
Doris (ibid*)*
Adraste was not jealous; he served Doris con­
stantly (II, 9; 373-74)*
He felt that, since she no longer
loved Palemon, she should reward Adraste*s perfect love (II,
9; 374).
According to Doris, Adraste declared his love to
her when she was too young to understand its meaning; then
he made a long voyage, and when he returned, her love belonged
to Palemon.
Adraste is loved by Bybliene, according to Doris
(II, 9; 375)*
Hearing Leonide’s judgment, which gives Doris to Palemon,
Adraste falls to the ground senseless.
He is brought back to
consciousness by the entire group of shepherds and shepherdesses.
ASTREE II
AETIUS
6
Seeing Doris and Palemon go away together, Adraste says
that he will pay for their happiness with his tears all
the rest of his life. Then Adraste becomes completely
insane (II, 9; 379)*
AETIUS fought with Thierry and Merovee against Attila.
The army of AEtius formed the center of the line in the
battle in which Attila was defeated (II, 6; 209).
AEtius was the son of Gaudens.
He was chosen by Honorius
to finish the Spanish conquest, which had been started by
Constance (II, 11; 475)•
AEtius drove back the Bourguignons
and made the Francs cross the Rhine.
In Spain he had to
contend with the Vandals, the Su^ves, the Alains, and the
Goths.
He resolved to try to get these tribes to fight each
other (II, 11; 476).
called by Honorius.
Because of his delay, AEtius was re­
AEtius instructed his friend and succes­
sor, Castinus, concerning his plans and the means of carrying
them out.
When he discovered that the emperor suspicioned
him of treason and that his life was in danger, AEtius took
refuge in Pannonie among the Huns and Gepides (II, 11; 477).
Desiring vengeance on Honorius, AEtius told the barbarians
how easy it would be to conquer Italy.
When Honorius died,
AEtius changed his plans and went to Rome, intending to make
himself emperor.
As he feared the faction of Honorius, AEtius
had Jean named emperor and AEtius ruled in Jean’s name (II, 11
479).
AEtius was taken captive by some of Honorius’ partisans
ALARIC-ALCIPPE
ASTREE XI
and was sent to Placidie (II, 11; 480).
7
As his life was
spared by Placidie, AEtius served her son Valentinian
loyally.
He persuaded the Huns and Gepides not to attack,
stopped the siege of Achilla, drove back the Bourguignons
and Francs, and sent Galvion to aid Bretagne against the
Piets (II, 11; 481).
AEtius told the leaders of the various tribes that Attila
would turn on them after Rome was gone (II, 12; 523-24).
He persuaded them to join him against Attila, whom they de­
feated (II, 12; 524).
AEtius, fearing that this huge barbarian
army would now turn on Rome, let Attila escape (II, 12; 525-26).
Entering Rome as a popular conqueror, AEtius aroused the
jealousy of the emperor Valentinian (II, 12; 529).
AEtius was
slain by eunuchs at the emperor's command (II, 12; 533).
ALARIC, king of the Goths, attacked the Roman Empire.
He
obtained a favorable peace treaty from Honorius and retired
across the Alps.
tory.
He was attacked while leaving Roman terri­
He angrily sacked Rome and destroyed the surrounding
country (II, 11; 469).
marry Placidie.
Alaric permitted Prince Ataulfe to
Soon afterwards Alaric died (II, 11; 470).
ALCIPPE, father of Celadon, was so transported by his love
for Amarillis that he acted like a mad man.
Because of his
love he left the fields for the court and was a knight for a
ALEXANDRE-AMIDOR
ASTREE II
long time (II, 8; 311)*
309)*
8
Alcippe was loved by Adamas (II, 8;
Alcippe, Adamas and Lindamor were related (II, 8; 311).
Alcippe did not approve of Celadon’s love for Astree.
He
resolved to make his son leave G-aul and cross the Alps and
visit the great city (II, 10; 401) . He ordered Celadon'to
leave the shepherd’s dress in order to associate with people
of high estate (II, 10; 406).
ALEXANDRE was noted for his liberality (II, 11; 475).
ALEXIS, daughter of Adamas, lives among the girl druids,
where she must remain until she is forty years of age.
She
slightly resembles Celadon (II, 8; 319).
(See also Celadon, who disguises himself as Alexis
II, 10;
398 .)
ALFARANTE became the bride of Amidor, who had wished to
marry Diane (II, 6; 268).
AMARILLIS, beloved of Alcippe.
Love for her transported
Alcippe and made him leave the fields for court life (II, 8; 311).
AMASIS is the mother of Galathde (II, 7; 273).
the mother of Clidaman (II, 7; 283).
She is also
She made Galath^e,accom­
pany her to Marcilly to celebrate Clidaman’s victories (II, 7;
273).
AMIDOR, cousin of Filidas, wished to marry Diane.
Alfarante (II, 6; 268).
He married
Amidor visits the feigned Alexis
(Celadon) with the other shepherds (II, 11; 429).
ANT 10 CHUS-ASPAR
ASTREE II
9
ANTIOCHUS. a captain, was sent by Isdigerde to govern the
child Theodose II, son of Arcadius (II, II; 478),
ARCADIUS, Eastern Emperor, was the brother of Placidie
-.(II, 11; 467-68) , He was the father of Eudoxe (II, 11; 474).
*.
Dyingy Arcadius placed his .son Theodose in charge of Isdigerde,
king of the Persians (II, 11; 477).
ARCINGENTORIX. the father of Dorinde (II, 4,,144).
ARDARIC, king of the Gepides, was conquered by Attila, who
forced him to join his composite forces (II, 12; 511-12).
ARIOBINDE, a great captain, was going to assist Valentinian
to resist the barbarians.
He was called back to Constantinople
by Theodose II, on account of Attila (II, 12; 511).
ARIOVISTE, an ancestor of Florice (II, 4; 137).
ARONTE.had been killed by Lydias because of a woman (II, 10;
423).
ARTABURE, a captain, was sent by Theodose II into Italy to
put down the new emperor Jean (II, 11; 479).
Artabure was ship
wrecked at RaVenne, was imprisoned by Jean, but was rescued by
his son Aspar (II, 11; 480).
ASILA, a great captain, was going to assist Valentinian to
resist the barbarians.
He was called back by Theodose II on
account of Attila (II, 12; 511).
ASPAR. son of Artabure, had the emperor Jean decapitated and
rescued his father Artabure (II, 11; 480).
ASTREE
ASTREE II
10
ASTREE, a shepherdness, still grieves because of the loss of
Celadon (II, 1; 7).
Her only comfort is the constant presence
of her friends Diane and Phillis (II, 1; 8).
Wishing to aid
the new lovers, Astree persuades Diane to give the hair brace­
let to Silvandre rather than to Phillis (II, 3; 91).
She
recognizes the handwriting and style of Celadon when she reads
the letter which Silvandre has dropped (II, 3; 95-97).
She is
anxious to see the place where Silvandre received the letter
in his sleep (II, 3; 99).
When the party is joined by another
group, Astree walks with Tircis (II, 3; 106)*
Astree would certainly have enjoyed hearing Hylas tell of his.
love affairs, but she is anxious to see the place where Silvandre
found the letter from Celadon.
She finally suggests that the
party recommence its journey. .Astree is believed by Hylas never
to have loved (II, 5; 173).
Astree stops and looks at the madrigal which dedicates the
woodland temple to Astree (II, 5; 184).
Hearing the others speak
of her resemblance to the portrait of the goddess Astree, Astree
looks at it astonished (II, 5; 186).
Reading verses of a little
roll of paper found on the altar, Astree recognizes Celadon’s
handwriting and weeps (II, 5; 187).
She even recognizes a cer­
tain line and then an entire sonnet which he has used before
(II, 5; 188-89).
However, Astree is certain that Celadon is dead
and she believes that his spirit has created this temple (II, 3;
189).. She has heard the druids say that unless a tomb is given
to dead persons, they wander about for one hundred years (II, 3;
190).
When Phillis has Astree read Celadon’s oration in which
ASTREE II
ASTREE
11
he asks for rest, Astree decides to give him a tomb (II, 5;
194).
Now that she no longer hopes to hear news of Celadon, Astree
speaks to Silvandre about returning home.
Walking toward the
Temple of the Good Goddess, where she hopes to spend the night,
Astree walks with Silvandre (II, 5; 202).
She encourages him
in his love for Diane, assuring him that there.is no inequality
between them (II, 5; 203).
Astree regrets her coldness to
Celadon, calling it lack of prudence (II, 6; 266).
She encour­
ages Diane to show Silvandre that she loves him, so that he will
not lose all hope (II, 6; 270).
She predicts that Diane’s vanity
in refusing Silvandre will bring her many griefs (II, 6; 271).
Astree told Leonide that Silvandre was a fine shepherd, but
that she should have known Celadon (II, 7; 306)1
Astree, sleeping in the woods with the other shepherdesses, is
perceived by Celadon (II, 8; 329).
Astree nearly faints when
she awakens, believing that she has seen Celadon’s ghost (II, 8;
333)•
Then she reads the letter which Celadon has put into her
bosom.
As he speaks of himself as le reste de Celadon. Astree
and Phillis are. certain that he is dead (II, 8; 333).
Astree and Phillis see Silvandre recite a sonnet to the sleep­
ing Diane and kiss her hand (II, 8; 335-36).
The girls discuss
the love affair of Diane and Silvandre (II, 8; 337).
Astree con­
tends that Diane will never love again (II, 8; 336).
Astree ac­
companies Silvandre, Madonte, and Tersandre to the Temple of the
ASTREE II
ASTROLOGER-ATAULEE
12
Good Goddess to procure materials from Chrisante for Celadon’s
tomb.
Astree is greatly grieved at Celadon’s ’’funeral ser­
vices” (II, 8; 349).
We hear from Paris that Astree is not feeling well (II, 11;
431)•
hear from Lycidas that she is troubled because her
uncle wants her to marry Calidon (II, 11; 433).
Astree would
rather spend her life among the vestals and druids.
She has
asked Lycidas to speak of this matter to Chrisante (II, 11;
453).
Astree encourages Phillis to forgive Lycidas for his
jealousy (II, 11; 463).
Astree is told by Lycidas that ’’Alexis” resembles Celadon
(II, 12; 564).
She is anxious to see "Alexis” and tells Diane
that she hopes to go with ’’Alexis” and become a druid (II, 12;
564-65).
ASTROLOGER, having studied the faces and, hands of Ursace and
Olimbre, predicted that Ursace would find happiness with Eudoxe
and that Olimbre would marry his beloved and become emperor
(II, 12; 557).
He advised Ursace to pretend to commit suicide
and to accompany Olimbre to Africa disguised as a slave (II, 12
558). ..
: .
r
ATAULEE, a Gothic prince, married Placidie (II, 11; 470).
After Alaric’s death, Ataulfe was elected king of the Goths
(ibid.).
He was persuaded by Placidie not to destroy Italy
(II, 11; 471-72).
He made peace with Honorius, but was mur­
dered (II, 11; 472).
ASTREE II
ATTALUS-ATTILA
ATTALUS revolted against Honorius.
13
He was placed in the
Hippodrome by Constance (II, 11; 476).
ATTILA. the cruel warrior, who was finally defeated by
Thierry, Merovee and AEtius.
Most of Attila*s efforts were
against Thierry’s army, which formed the left flank (II, 6;
209).
Attila was prepared to attack Constantinople, but he was
forced by Martian to return to Pannonie (II, 12; 511).
Then
Attila turned to Gaul, forcing the Ostrogoths and the Gepides
to join his composite forces (11, 12; 511-12).
He promised
Thierry, Gondioch, Merovee, and Singiban portions of the
Roman Empire (II, 12; 523).
However, he was confronted by
AEtius, who had rallied many nations to the cause of defeat­
ing Attila.
Attila asked the sacrificateurs about the outcome
of the battle and was told that he would be defeated but that
the principal enemy would be killed (II, 12; 524).
Attila
was defeated and planned to burn himself rather than to fall
into the hands of his enemies (II* 12; 524-25).
However,
Attila was permitted by AEtius to escape (II, 12; 526).
Encouraged by the love of Honorique, who sent him her picture
and by the death of AEtius, Attila attacked Italy (II, 12; 533)
He defeated Valentinian and married Honorique, taking her to
Pannonie.
ATTILE
The night of his wedding, Attila died (II, 12; 535).
(See Attila)
ASTREE II
. AUGUSTE-BLEDA
14
AUGUSTE t great emperor (II, 11; 468).
AUGUSTINt a friend of Boniface, lived in Africa and was
)
famous for his religious doctrine (II, 11; 483).
AUNT OP LEBIANE, a virtuous old woman, came to warn Leriane
when she heard of Ormanthe’s relations with Damon.
Her con­
versation with Leriane took place in Madonte’s room (II, 6;
228).
AUNT OP PARTHBNOPE was with her niece inthe temple
when
Hylas met Parthenope (II, 4; 133)*
B.
BARDS were asked by Thamire to sing for the sick Calidon
(II, 1; 33).
BELBNUS, god of love (II, 8; 313).
BBLLINDE. mother of Diane (II, 7; 292).
BBLXZAR. late brother of Adamas and father of Leonide.
On
his deathbed Belizar had asked Adamas to ca.re for Leonide
(Hi 7; 274).
His tomb is near the home of Adamas (II, 10;
400).
BLEDA, brother of Attila, was killed by treason, by orders
of Attila (II, 12; 511).
BONIFACE-BYBLIENE
ASTREE II
15
BONIFACE, a great captain, who led the African forces, was
feared by AEtius (II, 11; 479) • He was the governor of Africa,
and, as he hated Castlnus and AEtius, he refused to obey
Placidie*s command to return to Rome.
He defeated the army of
Mahortius, which was sent against him by Valentinian.
Boniface
was driven out of Carthage by the next army Valentinian sent,
which was led by Sisulphus.
Fleeing to Mauritanie, Boniface
offered to partition Africa with the Vandal king, Genseric.
Then Boniface was driven by Genseric into the high mountains
(II, 11; 482).
BOURGEOIS, friend of Silvandre, was wealthy.
He lodged the
people Silvandre had rescued from the shipwreck (II, 12; 491)*
BROTHER OF DORIS raised his sister, who lived with him (II,
9; 359)*
He was a very close friend of Pantesmon (ibid.).
BROTHER OF LEOTARIS, cousin of Leriane, hoped to be Leriane’s
heir (II, 6; 252).
trial by combat.
He and Leotaris fought Tersandre in Madonte’
They wished to fight Tersandre one after
another, but Leriane ordered them' to both fight him at once
(II, 6; 256).
When they had nearly defeated Tersandre, the
brothers had to fight the unknown Knight of the Tiger (II, 6;
257)*
The brother of Leotaris was killed by the stranger (II,
6 ; 258).
BYBLIENE. a shepherdess, is in love with Adraste, according
to Doris (II, 9; 375)*
ASTHEE II
CALIDON
16
C.
CALIDON, a shepherd, is seen quarreling and pleading with
Celidee, who is also being bothered by Thamire (II, 1; 24).
The three Join Leonide, Paris and several shepherds and shep­
herdesses (II, 1; 25).
We learn that Calidon, relative of Thamire, fell in love
with Celidee against the command of Thamire (II, 1; 32).
Not
daring to declare his love, Calidon became very ill (II, 1; 33)
The object of his affection was dicovered by a physician, who
felt his pulse while the village shepherdesses visited him (II,
1; 35-36).
Hoping to be granted the hand of Celidee, Calidon
recovered (II, 1; 43)*
However, both Calidon and Thamire were
refused by the indignant Celidee (II, 1; 44).
Calidon argues that his love is divine and irresistible and
that Celidee has never really loved anyone; that she was only
a child when she loved Thamire (II, 2; 49).
Calidon is des­
perately unhappy when the judgment of Leonide is not in his
favor (II, 2; 73).
We learn that Calidon became resigned to the loss of Celidee.
However, the night of her marriage to Thamire, Calidon showed
his displeasure (II, 11; 435).
In a madrigal he said he was
too miserable to live or to die (II, 11; 436).
be consoled by Celidee (II, 11; 436-38).
He refused to
On the way home from
the wedding, Calidon lay down and fainted away (II, 11; 438-39)
ASTREE II
CAPTAIN-C
He was believed to be dead (II, 11; 439).
ASTINUS17
Later he and
Thamire were carried unconscious into the house.
Calidon
regained consciousness and, seeing Thamire*s bloody head,
wished to avenge his uncle’s murder (II, 11; 440).
1#hen
he was told that Thamire had cut his head upon hearing of
Calidon’s death, Calidon tried to slay himself (II, 11;
441). • After Celidee had disfigured herself with a diamond,
Calidon could no longer bear to look at her (II, 11; 450)*
He was cured of his passion for Celidee.
According to the
desires of Thamire and of Phocion, Calidon was supposed to
marry Astree (II, 11; 453).
CAPTAIN was persuaded by Stilicon to charge on Alaric in
Homan territory (II, 11; 469).
CARNUTES, an order of girl druids.
Alexis is among the
Carnutes (II, 8; 319)•
CASTINUS, friend of AEtius, was sent by Honorius to replace
AEtius in the Spanish campaign.
Castinus was instructed by
AEtius concerning his plans and their execution (II, 11; 477).
After the death of Jean, Castinus was captured by Artabure
and became the prisoner of Placidie (II, 11; 4^0).
was spared by Placidie (II, 11; 481).
His life
a s t h £e ii
CELADON
CELADON is a shepherd (II, 2; 80).
with Astrde (II, 7; 276).
of Galathde.
18.
He is madly in love
He has escaped from the hands
Not daring to appear before Astree because
of the commandment she has given him, Celadon has shut him­
self up in a cave (II, 1; 7).
He is
heard by Silvandre con­
versing with the druidAdamas, but he is not recognized by
Silvandre.
Celadon learns from Adamas a theory of divine
perfection in lovers, but Celadon still suffers and still,
believes that his mistress is perfect (II, 2; 80).
Finding
Silvandre asleep in the woods and believing himself near to'
death, Celadon writes a letter addressed to ”the most beauti­
ful and most beloved shepherdess in the universe” and places
it in Silvandre*s hand.
The letter is signed only "the most
unfortunate and most loyal of your servants” (II, 3; 65)*
At Galathde’s court, Celadon was disguised as a nymph,
Lucinde, in order to deceive Amasis (II, 7; 287)*
He was aided
in his escape from Galath^e by Adamas, Silvie, and Leonide.1
Celadon languished in his cave, nourishing himself on grief
(II, 7; 273)*
While he was sleeping near a fountain, his bag
of letters was taken by Leonide, who
thought he was his brother
Lycidas (II, 7; 275)* Celadon awoke
and, retiring into the
thick woods, he talked unhappily to Astree*s portrait, wonder­
ing how he could live apart from Astr6e (II, 7; 276).
He was
desolate when he could not find the bag of letters (II, 7; 277)-
1 A misprint lists Laonice instead of Leonide, p. 273,
line 2U.
ASTREE II
CELADON
19
Celadon was greatly surprised to see Leonide enter his cave
(II, 7; 281).
He refused to he cheered or to he reasonable,
stating that a lover has no will or judgment (II, 7; 283). He
believed that Love would tell Astree where he w a s (II, 7; 284).
He was told that Astree's face was sad (II, 7; 285).
From
Leonide, Celadon heard the story of Galathee and the news of
the shepherds and shepherdesses (II, 7; 285-307).
Celadon
pitied Lycidas for his jealousy, hut said that jealousy comes
only once in a lifetime.
He pitied Diane and Silvandre because
they, once so calm and self-controlled, were stricken with the
malady of love (II, 7; 294).
Astree (II, 7; 307).
Celadon refused to appear before
He told Leonide not to be grieved by his
appearance; that this change was only a‘sign of the rest which
was soon to come.
He refused to change his manner of living,
but permitted Leonide to visit him again (II, 7; 308).
Celadon was saddened by Leonide's repeated visits because he
knew that she loved him and because she interrupted his brood­
ing (II, 8; 310).
He was visited by Adamas (II, 8; 316).
Celadon argued that his love was divine and that therefore h e .
was fulfilling the commands of Heaven (II, 8; 317-13).
He was.
told that he resembled the absent daughter of Adamas (II, 8;
319).
Celadon's physical and mental condition were improved
by the visits and care of Adamas and Leonide.
He.was delighted
when Leonide returned his letters and brought him writing materials.
ASTREE II
CELADON
20
He accepted the suggestion of Adamas that he spend his time
carving and embellishing the sacred wood which was nearby
(II, 8; 320),
At the suggestion of Adamas, Celadon built a
temple to his goddess Astree (II, 8; 327-28).
He let Adamas
take his portrait of Astree to copy it for his altar (II, 8;
328).
Celadon now spent his time adoring the image of Astree
and writing verses, which he placed on the altar.
Celadon rises before sunrise on the morning in which the
shepherds and shepherdesses are sleeping in the woods (II, 8;
329).
He finds Astrde asleep and tries unsuccessfully to
force himself to leave, (II, 8; 329-31).
He writes her a letter,
puts it in her bosom, and kisses her hand and lips (II, 8; 332).
Later, he meditates upon his pleasant vision (II, 10; 394-).
He
tells Leonide and Adamas about having seen Silvandre and Astree
and about the letters he has given them (II, 10; 395).
He could
scarcely believe Leonide’s story about the "funeral” which Astree
and her friends have given Celadon.
For proof, Celadon is shown
his tomb (II, 10; 396).
Celadon is persuaded by Adamas, that if he disguises himself
as Alexis, daughter of Adamas,. Astree will not see Celadon but
rather Alexis (II, 10; 398).
Celadon is dressed as a nymph and
is instructed by Adamas as to the:manner of living of the girl
druids, so that he may answer questions concerning his supposed
past (II, 10; 398-99).
Celadon is received in the house of
ASTREE II
CELADON
21
Adamas as_the druid’s daughter Alexis (II, 10; 399-400).
He
is sad when he sees the places where he was happy with Astree
(II, 10; 400).
He tells Leonide of his past.
We learn that Celadon and Astree sought the most secret
places to hold their meetings.
Sometimes they met in a rock
and left Lycidas or Phillis as sentinel (II, 10; 401).
They
had a tender parting when Celadon was forced by his father to
make a long journey (II, 10; 401-3)*
He carried with him
Astree* s promise, that she would never love anyone but Celadon
(II, 10; 403).
404)*
He was in a terrible storm on a river(II, 10;
He wrote sonnets of love and nature on his journey (II,
10:403-4).
He considered Italy the most beautiful province in
the world (II, 10; 405).
Then Celadon tells the story of Ursace and Olimbre (II, 10;
406)•
Before Celadon had had time to change from his shepherd’s
garb, Celadon saw Ursace, who was wondering whether to live or
to die (II, 10; 406-7).
Then Celadon saw Olimbre prevent Ursace
from killing himself and be wounded in the struggle (II, 10;
408).
Celadon took the dagger away from Ursace and bound up
Olimbre*s wound (II, 10; 409).
Recognizing that Ursace and
Olimbre believed that he was Mercury, Celadon commanded them
to live and hope (II, 10; 410).
He gave Olimbre wine which,
because the patient thought it was divine, cured him of his
weakness (II, 10; 410-11).
(II, 10; 412).
Celadon told Ursace his identity
He had Ursace tell him his story.
CELIDEE
ASTREE II
22
Celadon is about to tell Leonide the story which Ursace
told him, when he is interrupted by the arrival of Adamas
(II, 10; 413).
Celadon starts when he hears that Lycidas
has come to visit the feigned Alexis (II, 11; 429).
When
he overhears Lycidas say that Astree is supposed to marry
Calidon, Celadon changes color and becomes chilled.
He is
assisted to a chair by Hylas, who has fallen in love with
the feigned Alexis (II, 11; 433).
Celadon has never seen
Hylas before, but has heard of his agreable humor.
The
better to disguise himself, Celadon encourages the lovemaking of Hylas (II, 11; 464).
After hearing Adamas recount
the adventures of Placidie, Celadon has Leonide ask Silvandre
to tell the story of Eudoxe (II, 11; 4&4).
Celadon is impa­
tient to see Astree (II, 12; 56$).
✓
CELIDEE, a shepherdess, is seen quarreling with Thamire and
Calidon (II, 1; 24).
She and her companions join Leonide,
Paris and a group of shepherds and shepherdesses (II, 1; 25).
We learn that Celidee was raised near Thamire and was taught
to love him as a child (II, 1; 28-30).
When he tried to marry
her against her will to Calidon and then tried.to take her
back, Celidee was indignant against both men (II, 1; 44). Al­
though Cleontine wished the marriage, Celidee persuaded her
mother not to force her to marry a person whom she detested
(II, 1; 42).
ASTREE
CELIDEE
23
Celidee agrees to abide by Leonide’s decision because she
has been told in a dream that her heart will find rest along
the Lignon (II, 2; 46).
She argues that she has a natural
aversion for Calidon, whom she can never love, and that she
feels she has been outraged by Thamire.
She says that per­
haps Thamire wants her back only to save the.life of another
relative (II, 2; 62-64).
According to Leonide’s decision,
Celidee is to. love Thamire (II, 2; 73).
We learn later than the night of Celidee’s marriage to
Thamire, she was requested by Thamire to speak consolingly
to Calidon, who was brooding while the others danced (II, 11;
436).
Celidee did not succeed in consoling Calidon (II, 11;
437-33).
After Thamire had implored her to love Calidon, plan­
ning to die himself in order to free Celide'e, Celidee said she
knew a way to give both men peace (II, 11; 442).
She asked
to be left alone for three or four nights (II, 11; 443).
Plan­
ning to disfigure herself, Celidee asked her nurse’s mother
for an herb with which to disfigure a neighbor (II, 11; 443-44)
'Celidee was refused by her nurse’s mother.
Celidee tried on
Cleontine’s diamond ring, which is the symbol of her priest­
hood (II | 11; 444)-.
She told Cl eontine that she would like
to be a druid if she were capable, because Thamire and Calidon
were both religious and would not want her then.
Celidee in­
jured her hand with her aunt’s diamond and was told that she
would be scarred for life (II, 11; 445).
After a monologue
ASTREE II
CHAIRMAN -CHRISANTE
24
before her mirror, Celidee cut her face with her aunt’s
diamond (II, 11; 447-48).
Celidee was pleased to find that
Calidon could not bear to look at her after she was dis­
figured (II, 11; 450).
She said that the god Tharamis had
: assured her that Thamire loved Celidee and that Calidon
loved the beauty of Celidee (II, 11; 452).
Celidee was
happy with Thamire, who loved her despite her disfigurement
(II, 11; 453).
CHAIRMAN OF THE COUNCIL OF THE SIX-HUNDRED, questioning
Ursace, learned that Ursace did not wish Olimbre to die and
that the lady of Ursace had not given Ursace permission to
die.
The chairman pronounced the judgment of the council
(II, 12; 556).
CHILDERIC, king of the Francs.;
Merovee.
He was the successor of
He was fond of Clidaman, Lindamor and Guyemants
(II, 10; 418).
CHILD OF OBMANTHB AND DAMON was b o m in Madonte’s bed (II,
6; 249).
Leriane testified that the child belonged toMadonte
and Tersandre (II, 6; 248).
It was given to a nurse at birth
(II, 6; 250).
CHRISANTE has charge of the vestals and girl druids in the
Temple of the Good Goddess at Bonlieu (II, 2; 7U)•
She is a
ASTREE II
OIRCENE-CLEOHTIHE
friend of Astree (II, 8; 339)•
25
She brings the vacie, a priest,
to assist in Celadon’s ”funeral services” (II, 8; 348).
✓
CIRCENE, like Florice and Palinice, is in this country by the
commandment of a god (II, 4; 121).. -
*
*
We learn that Circene was loved by the timid Clorian without
her knowledge (II, 3; 112).
She .was served by Hylas, who re­
cognized her as the girl who sang in the temple (II, 3; 118).
She loved Hylas, but, for the sake of appearances, she preten­
ded to love Clorian (II, 4; 129).
deceiving Clorian (II, 4; 131).
Circene and Hylas enjoyed
Circene was jealous when she
thought that Hylas was Parthenop^’s knight (II, 4; 133).
She
chided Hylas for wearing Parthenop^’s scarf (II, 4; 134).
Circene took it from him and had the valet of Hylas wear it
in Parthenop^’s presence (II,. 4; 135).
Circene would not re­
new her friendship with Hylas, but she was angry when Florice
possessed him more completely than she herself ever had (II, 4;
140) .
Circene and Palinice and Florice amuse Hylas when he sets out
to fetch a writing implement.
They wish to attend Celadon’s
’’funeral services” but arrive too late (II, 8; 355).
CLEOMEHE
(See Cleontine)
CLEONTIHE. aunt of Celidee (II, 11; 446).
Thamire (II, 1; 28).
35).
She lived near
She made a journey with Celidee (II, 1;
Cleontine was delighted with Thamire’s proposal that
Celidee marry Calidon (II, 1; 39).
She told Celidee of the
■ ^
CLIDAMAN-CLIMANTHE
proposal (II, 1; 40).
26
She commanded Celidee to visit Calidon
(II, 1; 42)*
Cleontine, feeling Calidon*s cold hand, after Celidee*s
marriage, started the rumor that Calidon was dead (II, 11;
439)*
Cleontine discouraged Celidee from becoming a druid,
saying that love was stronger than duty or religion.
When
Celidee cut her hand on Cleontine*s diamond, Cleontine told
her that she would be scarred for life (II, 1; 445).
When
she saw her niece covered with blood, Cleontine thought she
had been murdered (II, 11; 448).
Cleontine was the priestess at the oracle of Mont-verdun
which Adamas and Leonide consulted concerning Celadon. Cleon­
tine assisted at the sacrifice of white bulls, entered the
cave, and received the murmuring wind open-mouthed.
Later
she reappeared, hair disheveled, and, in a changed voice,
she offered the oracle (II, 8; 313).
She told Adamas to
help youth; that if the youth received his lady, the old age
of Adamas would be happy (II, 8; 314).
CLIDAMAH is the son of Amasis (II,, 7, 285) . He won vic­
tories in the army of the Francs (II, 7; 273).
He was a
friend of Childeric (II, 10; 418).
CLIMANTHB deceived G-alathee (II, 7; 286).
Adamas (ibid.).
He was hated by
Climanthe*s scheme to aid Polemas to win
Galathee was unsuccessful (II, 7; 292).
ASTREE II
CLODION-CORILAS
2:7
CLODION, kind of the Francs, made some, progress against the
Roman Empire, but was halted near the Rhine by AEtius (II, 11;
481)-.
CLORIAN, brother of Palinice, was in love with Circene, but
was not bold enough to declare his love.
of Hylas (II,' 3; 112).
He became a friend
While Circene was away, Clorian shut
himself up in a high tower and looked away towards the plains
of the Sebusiens, reciting sonnets to the wind (II, 3; 113).
He told Hylas about his undeclared love for Circene (II, 3; 114)*
He asked Hylas to tell Circene of Clorian’s love for her.(II, 3;
116).
Clorian was accepted by the mother of Circene as a suitor
for her daughter’s hand (II, 3; 130).
ceived by Hylas and Circene.
However, Clorian was de­
Clorian carried a Circs' on his
shield in a tourney (II, 3; 131)..
He told Circene about Hylas’s
wearing Parthenope’s scarf (II, 3; 134).
CONSTANCE, a great Roman army captain, married Placidie.
He
conquered the Alains, killing their king Acaces, and conquered
the Su^ves.
He was aided by Walia.
put1down the revolt of Attains.
emperor Honorius.
He returned to Rome, and
He was named ’’Auguste” by the
Constance and Placidie were the parents of
Valentinian and of Honorique (II, 11; 474).
Constance became
ill and died (II, 11; 475).
CORILAS, a shepherd, visits the feigned Alexis (II, 11; 429).
He argues with Hylas about the latter’s sudden resolution to
COUNCIL-DAMON
ASTREE II
28
leave Phillis for the feigned Alexis (Celadon) (II, 11;
464-65)*
COUNCIL OF THE SIX-HUNDRED heard reasons for desiring
suicide and decided whether the reasons were justifiable
or not (II, 12; 552)1
They refused to allow Ursace to die'
without his ladyfs permission and refused to allow Olimbre
to die because his friend Ursace did not wish his death
(II, 12; 556).
D.
DAMON, a relative of Leontidas, served Madonte.
At first
disrespectful, outrageous and violent, he was changed by his
love for Madonte into a model knight (II, 6; 210).
too timid to tell her of his love (II, 6; 211).
He was
He finally
wrote of his love anonymously and had to be persuaded to de­
clare the object and author of the letter (II, 6; 212-14)*
After much persuasion, Damon obtained permission to love and
serve Madonte, providing that it be with respect (II, 6; 216).
Because of Leontidas, the love-letters which Damon and Madonte
exchanged were addressed only to "my brother" or"my sister"
(ibid.).
Damon and Madonte decided to act very friendly to Leriane
so that she would not tell Leontidas of their meetings.
Damon
suspicioned Leriane from the first and knew that she was in
love with him (II, 6; 218).
But, as he could not convince
ASTREE II
DAMON
29
Madonte of the wickedness of Leriane, Damon was obliged to
treat her weil (II, 6; 219).
When he received passionate
love-letters from Leriane, Damon deprived her of all hope and
was now. hated, by Leriane.
these letters (II, 6; 220).
Damon did not tell Madonte of
Damon was present when Madonte
received the letter from Tersandre in the glove (II, 6; 223).
Damon was astonished when Ormanthe caressed him (II, 6; 227)
When he noticed that Madonte treated him rather coldly, he
fled Ormanthe (II, 6; 230).
When he noticed Tersandre*s proud
manner, Damon remembered the letter Madonte had received in
the glove and decided that Leriane had persuaded Madonte to
receive Tersandre’s services and to forget Damon’s love (II,
6; 231-32).
He asked Madonte if she wanted him to die or if
she were only ascertaining how many rigors he could bear.
When he was answered very coldly, Damon wished to kill Ter­
sandre, but feared to displease Madonte and harm her reputa­
tion (II, 6; 232).
Damon learned from Ormanthe how Leriane
had encouraged her to make love to Damon.
Feigning that his horse had hurt its leg, Damon stopped
Madonte on a hunt (II, 6; 233).
He gave Madonte the letters
he had received from Leriane and told of Leriane*s advice to
Ormanthe (II, 6; 234).
He was not assured by Madonte that
she still loved.him, because of the arrival of the hunters.
The next morning Damon arose early and watched Madonte*s
ASTREE II ;
DAUGHTER OF STILICON-DLAMIS 30
doorway, intending to enter when he learned she had arisen
(II, 6; 235).
Damon saw Leriane give Tersandre a ring like
one of Madonte*s.
Leriane claimed that Madonte sent it to
i
.
Tersandre with her love (II , 6; 236)..
Damon loudly cried out
*'
J
-
against Madonte in the temple (II, 6; 237).
of defiance to Tersandre (II, 6; 236).
He sent.a note
Damon won the ensuing
duel, in which both contestants were wounded.
Damon took the
ring from Tersandre*s finger and rode to the bank of a furi­
ous river (II, 6; 239).
Damon ordered Halladin to take a.
letter and the -ring to Madonte and a handkerchief dipped in
his blood to Leriane (II, 6; 240).
Damon raged against Halla­
din for speaking disrespectfully.of Madonte (II, 6; 241). Then
he jumped into the river, pulling with him Halladin, who tried
to save him (ibid.).
Damon was the father of Ormanthe*s child
(II, 6; 245).
(See also Knight of the Tiger.)
DAUGHTER OF STILICON married Honorius (II, 11; 469).
DAUGHTER OF THIERRT married Honoric, prince of the Vandals
(II, 12; 522).
Because Genseric suspicioned her of wanting
to poison him, her nose was cut off and she was sent back to
her father (II, 12; 522-23).
DIAMIS, uncle of Diane, visits the feigned Alexis (II, 11;
429).
DIME
ASTREE II
31
DIAEE, a shepherdness, is a friend of Astree and is served
by Silvandre, supposedly by wager (II, 1; 8).
loved by Paris (II, 1; 11-12).
She is also
Diane tries to cure her sick
lamb and is aided by Silvandre (II, 1; 23).
She makes a ..hair
bracelet for Phillis, but, implored by Silvandre and Astree,
she gives it to Silvandre (II, 3; 91).
She questions Sil­
vandre regarding the letter which he dropped (II, 3; 99). Al­
though she believes that Silvandre*s love-making is genuine,
she tells him that if she believed his words she would not
listen to them (II, 3; 107).
She is grateful to Silvandre
for relinquishing his place by her side to Paris, because all
of the shepherdesses feel obligated to Paris (II, 5; 174).
When she sees the portrait of the goddess Astree in the
shrine, Diane recognizes its resemblance to Astree and calls
the attention of Phillis to it (II, 5; 185).
When Astre'e
recognizes that the papers on the altar are in Celadon’s hand­
writing, Diane interprets it as a sign that Celadon is not
dead (II, 5; 191). . Diane, scrutinizing the falsified Tables
of the Laws of Love, discovers the trick of Hylas (II, 5; 201).
Diane asks Madonte how she happened to come to this country
(II, 6; 207).
Diane says she is especially interested in
Madonte*s story because she has been told that she and Madonte
resemble each other (II, 6; 208).
Diane attempts to console Astree by maintaining a fatalis­
tic attitude towards the death of Celadon (II, 6; 266).
Diane
ASTREE II
DIAKE
32
finds that she is in love with Silvandre (II, 6; 265) i
She
says she probably would have married Eilandre if he had sur­
vived Eilidas and that his memory has kept her insensible to
love (II,. 6; 268).
She admits to Astree, however, that,
while she considers Paris only as a brother, she is in love
with Silvandre (II, 6; 268-69).
Diane is resolved, however,
not to permit Silvandre to serve her, thus punishing both
herself and Silvandre (II, 6; 269). 'She believes that their
love is neither reasonable nor honorable, because Silvandre*s
parentage is unknown and he has no inherited fortune*
Diane’s
declaration is heard by Laonice (II, 6; 271).
Diane did not wish Silvandre to know that she had listened
to his stances, on the World of Love, but her dog ran to Sil­
vandre (II, 7; 303-4).
Diane offers to ask Paris to erect the tomb for Celadon in
his name, in order to preserve Astreefs reputation (II, 8;
339).
When she walks in the woods with Paris and Tircis to
search for a branch for the tomb, Paris, thinking of Diane,
forgets to look for the branch (II, 8; 340).
When he tries
to propose, Diane speaks only of her respect for him and of
reason (II, 8; 341).
She mentions her mother and her uncle '
as guardians of her welfare (II, 8; 341-42).
Diane asks
Phillis not to leave her, in order to prevent Paris from con­
tinuing his proposal (II, 8; 342).
DIS SAMOTKES-DORINDE
ASTREE II
33
Diane reproaches Doris for treating Palemon and Adraste so
cruelly (II, 8; 347)*
Diane tells the three that Leonide
will he glad to hear their story after the "funeral service"
for Celadon (II, 8; 348).
DIS SAMOTHES, ancient colonizer and king of Gaul.
He taught
religion and science (II, 8; 322).
DORINDE, daughter of Arcingentorix (II, 4; 144)*
She was
the object of Teombrefs simulated affection (II, 4; 137).
Then Dorinde was served by Hylas at the suggestion of Florice
(II, 4; 142).
Dorinde was loved by Hylas and by Periandre
at the same time (II, 4; 144)•
Dorinde bought the mirror
which Hylas had prepared for her (II, 4; 146).
She was great­
ly surprised when Periandre broke the mirror and found the
picture of Hylas (II, 4; 149)*
At first angry with Hylas,
she grew to love him passionately (II* 4; 150). Dorinde wrote
Hylas very affectionate letters (II, 4; 153)*
She was furious
with Hylas when Florice returned the letters which Dorinde had
written to Hylas (II, 4; 156).
(II, 4; 138).
However, Dorinde forgave him
Dorinde was given back by Hylas to Periandre
(II, 4; 166-67).
Then, at the demand of Florice, Dorinde was
publicly insulted by Hylas (II, 4; 168).
For vengeance against
Hylas, Dorinde persuaded Periandre to bring her a letter which
Florice had written to Hylas (II, 4; 169).
Dorinde sent the
letter to Teombre, the husband of Florice (II, 4; 170).
ASTREE II
DORIS
34
DORIS, a shepherdess, is bothered by Adraste and Palemon
(II, 8; 342-44).
She disdains both shepherds; she has never
loved Adraste and is determined never to make the mistake of
loving Palemon again (ibid.).
She answers Palemon*s love-
songs in a clever dialogue (II, 8; 345-46).
Then she leaves
him and, avoiding Adraste, Doris meets Diane (II, 8; 346-47).
After attending Celadon’s "funeral services", Doris finally
agrees to tell her story, providing that the shepherds and
herself will never disobey the orders of Leontide and Chrisante (II, 8; 351).
Doris tells her view of the story first
(II, 9; 357).
We learn that Doris has loved Palemon, who loved her (ibid.).
Because Palemon wished it, Doris withdrew from all other
friends.
But she only saw Palemon
(II, 9; 35S).
fora short time every day
As Doris lived withher brother, she could not
avoid seeing her brother’s friends (II, 9; 359).
She told
Palemon that Pantesmon, one of her brother’s friends, was in
love with her (II, 9; 360).
Pant esmon away.
She finally, regretfully, sent
As Pant esmon conjured her by the one she
loved best, to permit him to kiss her goodbye, she felt ob­
liged to permit it.
As Palemon did not appear again, she
sent one of her girl friends to find out the reason (II, 9;
361).
Having received a cold response, Doris cured herself
of her love (II, 9; 362).
When Palemon devotedly reappeared,
Doris thought he was only trying to hurt her again and she
would not receive his friendship (II, 9; 362-63).
ASTREE II
DRIOPE-DRUYS
35
Doris was served from the cradle bn by Adraste (II, 9; 372).*
When Adraste first declared his love to her, Doris was too
young to understand the meaning of love.
When Adraste re­
turned from a long journey, her love already belonged to
Palemon (II, 9; 375)*
Even when Adraste burst into tears
before her and fell senseless at her feet, Doris disdained
and mocked him (II, 9; 373)*
When she ho longer loved Pale­
mon, Doris did not feel obliged to reward Adraste’s love, be­
cause she could not love him.
immune to love (II, 9; 376).
Doris believes that she is now
She coldly argues with Hylas,
who encourages her to accept all of those who love her and
assures her that it is an honor for a girl to have many
lovers.
Doris says that lovers bother girls more than they
profit them.
She says that one lover is one too many (II, 9;
377).
Doris is astonished when Leonide commands her to love Pale­
mon (II, 9; 379).
She is touched with pity when Adraste
falls senseless upon hearing the judgment.
She goes away
with Palemon to Montverdun (ibid.).
DRIOPE, Diane’s dog, was fond of Silvandre and ran to him
when Diane was hidden listening to Silvandre’s stances of
the World of Love (II, 7; 304).
DRUYS was a descendant of Samothe and the istitutor of the
druids (II, 8; 322).
verdun (II, 8; 312).
He discovered the divinity in Mont-
ASTREE II
EUBAGES-EUDOXE,DAUGHTER *
36
E.
EUBAGES were asked by Thamire for auguries and advice con­
cerning Calidon’s malady (II, 1; 33) •
EUDOXE, DAUGHTER was the daughter of Eudoxe and of Theodose
II (II, 12; 492).
She was destined by her father to marry
Valentinian (II, 12; 493)*
She was still a child when Ursace
declared his affection for her.
She said she didn’t wish to
love him if she had to b u m when she didn’t see him, because
she had burned her finger and knew that it caused pain (II,
12; 495)*
When a bee stung Eudoxe on the lip, she finally
permitted Ursace to cure her pain by murmuring magic words
near her lip and sucking the wound (II, 12; 497)*
She would
not permit Ursace to speak of his love (II, 12; 501).
But,
as he had told her that his "Good-day’s" and "Good-night’s"
meant that he was dying of love, she finally told.him that
his "Good-day’s" were heartily received (II, 12; 501-2). Just
before Eudoxe*s marriage to Valentinian, she permitted Ursace
to embrace her (II, 12; 508-9)*
However, she felt that it was
her duty to marry Valentinian (II, 12; 506).- She married
Valentinian and went to Italy with him (II, 12; 510).
When Ursace left for Gaul, Eudoxe, now married, asked him
to always be faithful to her (II, 12; 512).
Eudoxe and Valen­
tinian were the parents of Eudoxe and Placidie (II, 12; 522).
Eudoxe wrote to Ursace, congratulating him for his military
ASTREE II
EUDOXE. DAUGHTER
bravery and asking him to be careful.
37
She used her influence
to make the friend of Ursace, Olimbre, senator (II, 12; 527).
Eudoxe was glad that her daughter Placidie was served by
Olimbre (II, 12; 528).' Eudoxe and Ursace finally persuaded
Isidore to reveal her trouble (II, 12; 530).
Eudoxe refused
to be persuaded by Ursace and Isidore to take vengeance on
t-
Valentinian by giving herself to Ursace (II, 12; 531-32).
Eudoxe was with Ursace at the sacrifice when Valentinian
was assassinated.
She had to flee Rome (II, 12; 538).
She
promised that she would never marry anyone but Ursace and
that if her position would permit, she would marry him (II,
12; 539-40).
However, Eudoxe was captured by Maxime*s men,
and was forced to marry Maxima (II, 12; 540-41).
Ursace after her wedding (II, 12; 542).
She visited
As he did not list
her as one of the most unfortunate persons living, she claimed
that he no longer loved her (II, 12; 542-44)*
She told him
to get well; that she was living to get vengeance against
Maxime (II, 12; 544).
She feigned illness in order not to
have to sleep with Maxime (II, 12; 545).
Eudoxe welcomed the Vandal, G-enserio, to Rome and pro­
claimed him tfAugusten (II, 12; 547).
Suddenly she and her
daughters were taken to Africa by Genseric (II, 12; 548).
She fainted when she believed that Ursace was dead (II, 12;
549).
ASTREE II
EUDOXE, GRANDDAUGHTER-FATHER OF MADONTE
38
EUDOXE. GRANDDAUGHTER was on© of the daughters of Eudoxe
and Valentinian (II, 12; 522).
She accompanied her mother
and Ursace on their flight from Rome after the assassination
of Valentinian (II, 12; 538).
She was taken to Africa by
Genseric (II, 12; 54-8).
EUDOXE. MOTHER was the daughter of the philosopher Leontius
Athenian.
She married Theodose II and they had a daughter
named Eudoxe (II, 12; 492).
EUNUCHS, by Valentinian’s orders, killed AEtius (II, 12;
533).
F.
FARAMOND, leader of the Francs, was driven across the Rhine
by AEtius (II, 11; 476).
FATHER OF FLORICE chided his daughter for making love to
Teombre.
He quickly arranged for the marriage of Florice and
Teombre (II, 4; 159).
He was angry when his daughter pleaded
for time in which to consider the marriage proposal (II, 4;
160).
FATHER OF MADONTE. an Aquitanian leader who commanded the
armies of Thierry in the letter’s absence.
man in Aquitania
(II, 6; 208).
He was the richest
He fought at the right
ASTREE II
FILANDRE -FLEURIAL
39
hand of his king Thierry in the battle against Attila.
Both
Thierry and Madonte’s father were killed in that, battle*
Madonte’s father died when Madonte was onl3r seven or eight
years old*
Torrismonde had:, him buried in the same tomb as
his father Thierry (II, 6; 209).
During his lifetime Madonte’s father was served by the
father of Tersandre (II, 6; 221).
FILANDRE was loved by Diane but is now dead.
been Diane’s husband if he had survived Filidas.
He would have
His memory
has kept Diane insensible, to love (II, 6; 268).
FILIDAS* late ’’husband" of Diane (II, 6; 268).
FLEURIAL* messenger who carried letters from Lindamor to
Leonide and Galathee.
Discovering that Leonide was no longer
at Marcilly, Fleurial gave Galath/e the letters and told her
that he had been commissioned by Leonide to find Lindamor
(II, 10; 414).
Fleurial is afraid to see Leonide for fear
that she is angry with him for having given the letters to
Galathee (II, 10; 420).
Reassured, he tells Leonide that
Lindamor was injured when he received her letter and could
not come at once (II, 10; 422-24).
Attempting to explain how
Lindamor received his injuries, Fleurial gives a jumbled ac­
count of Melandre, Lydias and Ligdamon which makes the nymphs
laugh (II, 10; 423).
He is told not to tell anyone of Linda­
mor’s return (II, 10; 425).
ASTREE II
FLORICE
40
FLORICEt.companion of Circene and Palinice, is in this
region by the command of a god (II, 4; 121).
Florice tells
the story of Palinice and Circene and of Hylas (II, 3; 11019).
‘
:'
.;
• •
We learn that Florice had loved Teombre, who was trying to
make her jealous of Dorinde (II, 4; 137). She met Hylas on
a boat-ride (II, 4; 136)•
loved him (II, 4; 141).
She confessed to Hylas that she
For the sake of appearances, she
advised Hylas to pretend to.love Dorinde (II, 4; 142).
Florice asked Hylas to bring her all letters he received
from Dorinde (II, 4; 151).
Florice took some fervent letters
written by Dorinde out of the pocket of Hylas (II, 4; 152).
Angered, Florice took the letters to Dorinde (II, 4; 154).
Wishing to make Hylas jealous, Florice made love to Teombre
(II, 4; 15S).
Scolded by her parents, Florice had Teombre
mention marriage to them (II, 4 ; 159) . ,Florice was then
forced by her parents to marry Teombre immediately (II, 4;
160).
She wrote imploringly to Hylas (II, 4; 161 and 164).
Weeping, she was married to Teombre (II, 4 ; 165).
tinued her friendship with Hylas, however.
She con­
She persuaded
Hylas to insult Dorinde publicly (II, 4; 167).
When her
letter to Hylas was sent by Dorinde to Teombre, Florice was
forced by her husband to make a journey with him (II, 4; 170).
Florice and Palinice and Circene amuse Hylas when he sets
out to fetch a writing implement.
They wish to attend Cela­
don’s "funeral services," but they arrive too late (II, 8 ; 355).
ASTHEE II
I'OCION-GALATHEE
41
FOCION, uncle of Astr^e, was given a. portrait of Astr^e by
iier father (II, 5; 189).
He visits the feigned Alexis with
the other shepherds (II, 11; :429).
He is the spokesman of
the group, telling Adamas that they are there to rejoice with
him over seeing his daughter again and to invite him to make
the village thanksgiving offerings (II, 11; 430),
Focion says
Astr^e has not been feeling well, but that what she needs is
to be married (II, 11; 431).
He speaks to Astr^e regarding
Calidon (II, 11; 453).
FRIDERICt brother of Torrismonde (II, 12; 526).
FRIENDS OF TERSANDRE told Madonte about Ormanthe*s caresses
to Damon (II, 6; 227).
G.
GAIATHEE is a nymph (II, 7; 266).
Amasis (II, 7; 289).
and 7; 273).
She is the daughter of
She has held Celadon prisoner (II, 1; 7
'Fke day of Celadon*s escape, Galathde had to
‘ follow her mother Amasis to Mareilly to celebrate Clidaman*s
victories (II, 7; 273).
She had to leave so suddenly that
she did not have time to tell the nymphs what they should do
with Celadon (II, 7; 285).
She only had time to tell Leonide
that she and Silvie and Lucinde (Celadon) should follow her
(II, 7; 286).
Galath^e hoped to marry Celadon after the
death of Amasis.
She was glad that he was disguised as a
ASTR^E II
GALATHEE
nymph in order to deceive Amasis (II, 7; 287)•
42
When she
learned of Celadon's escape, Galathde angrily banished
Leonide (II, 7; 273-74 and 287-88).
Galathee was disconso­
late over the fact that she had not -been preferred over a
low shepherdess (II, 7; 289).
She was partially calmed by
Silvie, who assured her that Adamas was entirely to blame
(II, 7; 290-92).
Galathee had Silvie invite Leonide to
return to Mareilly, but the invitation was not accepted
(II, 7; 307).
Galathee was angry with Leonide when she discovered that
she had sent Pleurial to find Lindamor (II, 10; 414-13).
Galathee believed that Leonide had told Lindamor about Cela­
don (II, 10; 415-416).
She believed Leonide had invented •
the ruse of Polemas in order to obtain Celadon for herself.
Galathee was afraid Celadon was in danger of being killed by
Lindamor (II, 10; 416).
She was relieved by Lindamor1s
letter to her, which proved that he was referring to Polemas
(II, 10; 418).
She was not so angry with Leonide for favor­
ing Lindamor as a suitor for the hand of Galathee, when Silvie
told her that Leonide and Lindamor were relatives (II, 10;
419).
Galathee was so bothered by both Lindamor and Polemas, that
she wished each of them to get rid of the other, so that she
and Celadon would be left in peace (II, 10; 419-20).
She
wished Leonide to help her by arousing Lindamor against
ASTKE5E II
Polemas.
GALVION-GENSERIC
43
She told Silvie to tell Leonide that Galathee had
forgotten Celadon and loved Lindamor (II, 10; 420).
Galathde is g r eatly surprised to learn that Celadon is not
in his hamlet (II, 10; 425)*
She is almost persuaded by
Silvie that Leonide’s story of Polemas and Climanthe is true.
She is determined that Leonide shall return (II, 10; 427).
GALVION was sent by AEtius with an army into Bretagne to
defend that land against the Piets (II, 11; 481).
He was
recalled by Valentinian to fight in Africa (II, 11; 483).
GAUDENS, father of AEtius, was killed in Gaule (II, 11;
475).
GENSERIC, leader of the Vandals, was one of the enemies of
AEtius in Spain (II, 11; 476).
He accepted Boniface’s invi­
tation to divide Africe with him.
He drove Boniface into the
mountains and made a peace treaty with Valentinian (II, 11;
482).
However, as soon as the Roman troops had departed from
Africa, Genseric captured Carthage (II, 11; 483).
He became
the friend of Martian, the successor of Theodose II in Con­
stantinople (II, 12; 511).
He had his son Honoric marry the
daughter of the Gothic king Thierry (II, 12; 522).
Suspicion-
ing her of wanting to poison him, Genseric had her nose cut
off and sent her back to her father (II, 12; 522-23).
Genseric
was persuaded by Olimbre to come to Rome (II, 12; 546). Although
ASTHEE II
GIRL DRUIDS-HALLAD IN
44
honorably received at Rome by. Eudoxe, who called him "Auguste,”
Genseric pillaged the city (II, 12; 547).
He took Eudoxe and
her daughters to Africa (II, 12; 548).
GIRL DRUIDS of the Temple of the Good Goddess are. in the
t
charge of Chrisante (II, 2; 74).
They assist in Celadon’s
"funeral service” (II, 8; 348).
They sing a mourning chant
(II, 8; 349).
GIRL FRIEND OF DORIS was sent by Doris to find out why
Palemon no longer visited Doris (II, 9; 36l).
GONDIOCH, king of the Bourguignons, was promised a portion
of the Roman empire by Attila (II, 12; 523).
Because of the
persuasion of AEtius, he joined AEtius against Attila (II, 12;
524).
GROOM OF DAMON was ordered by his master to take the horse
away which Damon pretended had’ injured its leg (II, 6; 233)*
GITHIMANTS was a favorite of Childeric (II, 10; 418).
H.
HALLADIN, servant of Damon, carried Damon’s note of defi­
ance to Tersandre, arranging for the duel (II, 6; 238-39).
He accompanied Damon to the river after the duel (II, 6; 239).
He told Damon that Madonte and Leriane were not worth dying
ASTREE II
HERACLE-HONORIUS
for and should be killed themselves (II, 6; 240).
impertinence, Halladin was chased away.
45
For this
He tried to prevent
Damon from jumping into the river, but was pulled in himself/
and nearly drowned (II, 6; 241)*
He took Damon1s letter and
the ring to Madonte and the bloody handkerchief,to Leriane
and told them the story of Damon1s accident.
He left, shriek­
ing desperately (ibid.).
.HERACLE, eunuch and advisor of Valentinian, persuaded him
to attack Isidore and held her while Valentinian followed his
advice (II, 12; 519-20).
Heracle was scratched, bitten and
kicked by the angry Isidore (II, 12; 520).
When Maxime caused
Heracle to suspicion the conqueror AEtius, Heracle aroused
the suspicions of the emperor and AEtius was killed (II, 12;
532-33).
Heracle was killed by Thrasile and Maxime at the
same time as they killed Valentinian (II, 12; 537).
HESUS, god of war (II, 8; 313).
H0N0RIC, son of Genseric the Vandal king, married the
daughter of Thierry, the’ king of the Goths (II, 12; 522).
H0N0RIUS, brother of Placidie (II, 11; 467-468).
As a youth,
he was in the charge of Stilicon, who had him marry his daugh­
ter (II, 11; 468).
When the Roman Empire was attacked by
Alaric and the Goths, Honorius made a peace treaty with Alaric,
by which Alaric was to settle across the Alps.
After Rome
ASTREE II
HYLAS
46
had been sacked by Alaric, Honorius had Stilicon executed
for treason.(II, 11; 469)*
Aided by his sister Placidie,
Honorius made peace with the Goths.
He received her in tri­
umph when she returned to Rome (II, 11; 473) • As Honorius
had no children, he had his sister Placidie marry a great cap­
tain, Constance (II, 11; 473-74)•
When.Constance, the con­
queror of the Alains and the Sueves, returned to Rome and put
down the revolt of Attalus, Honorius named Constance "Auguste"
(II, 11; 474)-
After the death of Constance, Honorius, influ­
enced by Placidie, chose AEtius to finish the Spanish conquest
(II, 11; 475)*
When AEtius did not immediately conquer the
tribes in Spain, Honorius, suspicioning treason, recalled him.
He sent Castinus to replace AEtius (II, 11; 477)•
Honorius
died just before AEtius was going to take vengeance on him
(II, 11; 479).
HYLAS. the consistently unfaithful lover (II, 3; 110).
He
leaves Laonice to walk with Phillis, on the trip to the Shrine
of Astree (XI, 3; 106).
We learn that Hylas once hid in a temple among the girls. He
was rescued from there by Palinice, a young widow whom he im­
mediately determined to serve (II, 3; 111).
He deliberately
made friends with her brother Clorian and advised him to de­
clare his love to Circene, stating that honor caused women to
pretend to flee lovemaking (II, 3; 112-16).
Hylas agreed to
ASTRIDE II
HYLAS
tell Circene of dorian* s love (II, 3; 116K
47
Recognizing that
Circene was the girl who sang in the temple, Hylas immediately
reminded her of that occurrence and told her that he loved her
(II, 3; '118).
Hylas interrupts Florice who is telling the story and em­
braces her and Palinice and Circene (II, 3; 119)*
But he .
leaves them and accompanies the party to the shrine (II, 4;
123).
Hylas tells the story of his love affairs with Par-
thenopd", Florice, and Dorinde (II, 4; 126).
Defending his
philosophy of unfaithfulness, Hylas says he is consistent in
his love for all beauty.
He believes that those who continue
to love a woman after her beauty has faded, are inconsistent
(II, 4; 127).
Hylas succeeded in making Circene love him.
Making fun of
Clorian, Hylas finally told Circene of his charge.
Then Hylas
encouraged Clorian to appear himself (II, 4; 129).
Hylas and
Circene enjoyed deceiving Clorian.
However, difficulties
arose when, at a tourney, Hylas painted a Siren on his shield.
He had only wished to slightly change the name Circene (II, 4;
132).
Circene, jealous, would not see Hylas.
Then Hylas be­
came acquainted with Parthenope^ in the temple (II, 4; 133).
He fell in love with her and wore her scarf.
When chided
about it by Circene, Hylas, who still loved her more than
Farthenope', explained the use of the Siren (II, 4; 134).
ASTREE II
HYLAS
48
On a boat-ride Hylas met Florice, helped her gather flowers
along the shore, and made love to her more respectfully than
to the others (II, 4; 138-40)*
He wanted to keep the love of
Palinice, Circene and Florice, all at the same time (II, 4;
141).
However, he forsook the others and devoted himself to
Florice until she suggested that, for the sake of appearances,
he pretend to love Dorinde (II, 4; 142).
Hylas proceeded to
love both Florice and Dorinde (II, 4; 143).
He became a very
close friend of Periandre, who was also in love with Dorinde
(II, 4; 144).
Hylas suggested to. Periandre that they see
which was favored by Dorinde and that the other man leave
(II, 4; 145).
Hylas put a portrait of himself inside a
mirror and had it sold to Dorinde (II, 4; 146).
He then told
Periandre that Dorinde loved him so much that she carried his
picture in her mirror, and he told Periandre to break the
mirror (II, 4; 147).
At Florice*s request, Hylas promised to
give her all the letters he received from Dorinde (II, 4; 151)
He kept the most affectionate letters, three of which Florice
found in his pocket (II, 4; 152).
For revenge against Florice
Hylas devoted himself to Dorinde (II, 4; 157).
Although. Hylas hated to lose Florice, Hylas would rather
die than marry her, as he had a horror of this chain.
He pre­
tended to be out of town and not to receive her desperate
letters announcing her approaching marriage (II, 4; 163).
ASTEEF II
HYLAS
49
To keep from fainting the day of her wedding, Hylas had to
take to his bed (II, 4; 165).
Hylas continued his intimacy
with Florice after her marriage with Teombre (II, 4; 167).
Requested by Florice,'Hylas publicly insulted Dorinde, whom
he had given back to Periandre (II, 4; 166-6&). Hylas lost
Florice because Dorinde sent Teombre a letter which Florice
had written to Hylas (II, 4; 170).
Hylas believes that Astree has never loved (II, 5; 173).
He alone will not enter the Shrine to the Goddess Astree
because of the sign which forbids entrance to those who are
not smitten with a holy love (II, 5; 176-77).
Hylas, after
hearing Silvandre read the Twelve Tables of the Laws of Love
accuses Silvandre of giving his own ideas rather than read­
ing what is written (II, 5; 183).
While the rest of the
party is in the woodland temple, Hylas finds a writing im­
plement and changes the Twelve Tables of the Laws of Love to
suit his philosophy of unfaithfulness (II, 5; 194).
He re­
turns the Tables to their proper place and, when the group
returns, he feigns to be asleep (II, 5; 198).
He persuades
Phillis to bring him the Tables of Love and he promises to
abide by their statutes if Silvandre will promise the same
thing (II, 5; 199).
Hylas solemnly reads the Tables of Love
as he has changed them, shows them to Phillis, and finally
to Silvandre (II, 5; 200).
His trick is discovered by Diane
ASTREE II
(II, 5; 201).
HYLAS
50
Hylas is forced by the other shepherds to
erase what he has written and to put in the margin what he
has erased (II, 5; 202).
Mocking Tircis and Silvandre, who contend that a lover is
transformed into his beloved, Hylas says that Silvandre should
dress like Diane (II, 6; 263).
Unconvinced by Silvandre1s
theory of spiritual love, Hylas still loves the body more
than the soul (II, 6; 265).
Hylas goes to fetch a writing implement to be used in
carving Celadon’s tombstone (II, 3; 340).
He does not re­
turn until the "funeral service” is ended, because he has
amused himself with Palinice, Circene and Florice (II, 8;
355)•
He tries to carry Phillis in his arms, but she will
not p e m i t it (II, 8; 357).
Hylas tells Doris that she should receive all of the shep­
herds who love her.
He argues that it is an honor for a
girl to have many lovers (II, 9; 377).
Hylas says that
Leonide’s judgment righteously punished Adraste for his
stupid and imprudent passion.
He believes that Doris should
have been .commanded to love-both Palemon and Adraste and all
would have been happy (II, 9; 380).
Despite Silvandre's
contention that fidelity is an indispensable part of love,
Hylas is certain that he was really in love with all of his
girl friends (II, 9; 382).
He argues that Silvandre’s love
is not perfect, because he loves Diane, who he thinks is
ASTREE II
HYLAS
perfect; thus, there is incongruity in their love.
51
Hylas,
on the other hand, feels that he is the equal of Phillis
(II, 9; 3&3).
contentment.
&e believes that one ioves in order to have
He suggests that the word "unfaithfulness" was
invented by a clever lover who felt herself growing old and
ugly (II, 9; 384).
He says that if we don’t desire what we
possess, then he would rather that Silvandre desire and Hylas
possess (II, 9; 3&6). Hylas explains to Diane and the com­
pany that Silvandre thinks he is changed into Diane and Diane
into Silvandre (II, 9; 3&7).
Hylas becomes angry because the
group will not listen to him as they do to Silvandre (II, 9;
390-91).
Hylas visits the feigned Alexis (Celadon) with the other
shepherds (II, 11; 429).
He falls in love with the feigned
Alexis and serves "her" devotedly (II, 11; 433).
He suddenly
cries out, "It’s all over, Phillis; Farewell." (II, 11; 464).
He argues that love leads him by stepping-3tones to perfect
beauty (II, 11; 465).
He says the gods don’t forbid us to
love them, and why should they be angry if we love what be­
longs to them (II, 11; 467).
When the shepherds make the tour of the home of Adamas,
Hylas immediately notices the portraits of two women (ibid.).
He and the others are told the story of Placidie by Adamas
(II, 11; 468).
After hearing from Silvandre the story of
Eudoxe, Ursace and Valentinian, Hylas says Ursace was crazy
ASTREE II
ISDIGERDE-ISIDORE
to serve Eudoxe all of his life (II, 12; 560).
52
Hylas says he
has seen nothing at the home of Adamas save "Alexis”. He com­
mences to grow jealous when Tircis says that he, too, has seen
nothing there so beautiful as "Alexis".
Hylas and the other
shepherds spend the night at the home of Adamas; (II, 12; 561).
Hylas tells Phillis that he has left her for one who is more
beautiful.
He says he is glad that "Alexis" cannot marry for
many years, because he hates the thought of marriage (II, 12;
562).
He says that he has loved all kinds of women, but never
a druid (II, 12; 562-63).
I.
ISDIGERDE, king of the Persians, was the tutor of Theodose
II, son of Arcadius (II, 11; 477).
Isdigerde sent a captain,
Antiochus, to govern the child (II, 11;.478).
ISIDORE, raised with Eudoxe, was of one of the best Greek
families (II, 12; 493).
Because she knew that Valentinian
could never marry her, she discouraged his affection for her
(II, 12; 494).
She was present at the private meeting of
Eudoxe and Ursace, but, as Isidore hoped that the marriage
plans of Eudoxe and Valentinian might be broken, she left
Eudoxe and Ursace alone (II, 2; 5.07).
After the marriage of
Valentinian and Eudoxe, Isidore accompanied them to Rome (II,
12; 510).
She still refused Valentinian*s attentions.
She
ASTREE II
ISIDORE
53
was willing to marry Maxime 'because he had wealth and posi­
tion.
After her marriage, Isidore refused Valentinian more
rigorously than ever (II, 12; 513)*
When she received a
message asking her to go to the empress and which was accom­
panied by Maxima’s ring, Isidore went unsuspectingly.
She
was taken into a closet in the garden, where Valentinian
. awaited her (II, 12; 514)*
Reminding Valentinian of his
honor and duty as emperor, Isidore persuaded him not to at­
tack her (II, 12; 516-18).
However, because of the influence
of Heracle, who held Isidore down, she was outraged by Valen­
tinian.
Isidore scratched, bit, and kicked the Eunuch,
Heracle (II, 12; 520).
She was even more.angry to learn
that Maxime knew nothing of Valentinian’s plan (II, 12; 521).
She immediately told her husband about Valentinian’s attack,
but to facilitate vengeance, she assured Valentinian that
she had not told him (II, 12; 522).
Isidore, no longer gay, wept when Ursace asked her what
was the matter (II, 12; 529).
She was finally persuaded by
Ursace and Eudoxe to tell her trouble (II, 12; 530).
She
and Ursace tried to persuade Eudoxe to take vengeance on
Valentinian by giving herself to Ursace (II, 12; 531).
Isi- „
dore continually asked Maxime to get vengeance on Valentinian
(II, 12; 532).
When she finally heard of the emperor’s death,
she washed her hands in his blood and died of joy (II, 12;
538).
ASTREE II
JEAN-KNIGHT OF THE TIGER 54
J.
JEAN, who had been the secretary of Honorius, was given the
title of emperor and AEtius ruled in JeanTs name (II, 11; 4-79)*
Jean imprisoned Artabure, who was sent by Theodose II against
Jean.
Jean was decapitated by Artabure’s son Aspar (II, 11;
US0 ) .
JUDGES OF MADONTE heard the witnesses in Madonte’s room.
They were surprised that the live coal did not burn Madonte
(II, 6; 254).
They told the king about it (II, 6; 255).
They
accompanied Madonte at the trial by combat (II, 6; 256).
K.
KNIGHT OF THE TIGER, a stranger, fought for Madonte and Tersandre In the trial by combat (II, 6; 257).
He appeared just
as Tersandre was nearly defeated by Leotaris and his brother
(ibid.).
He killed both of the brothers (II, 6; 256).
He
refused to tell Madonte his name but was willing to conduct
her home if she went immediately (II, 6; 259).
out seeing her again.
He left with­
He sent a peasant to tell her that he
was going to Gergovie and that if he returned one could in­
quire about him at the Mont-d’or (II, 6; 260).
The Knight of the Tiger is loved by Madonte, who has,never
seen his face.
He is being sought-by her and Tersandre (II,
6 ; 261).
(See also Damon)
a s t k Ii
KNIGHTS AND LADIES-LEONIDI 55
II
KNIGHTS AND LADIES accompanied the young Eudoxe to the art
gallery (II, 12; 495)*
They let Eudoxe and'TJrsace' converse
together because they were both so young (II, 12; 496).
>
L.
LADIES were taken by Genseric to Africa*
Some of them
were nearly rescued by TJrsace, who thought Eudoxe was among
them (II, 12; 549).
LAONIC35 is a shepherdess who is a stranger to this region
(II, 3; 105).
Desiring vengeance against Phillis and Sil­
vandre and spying upon all of the shepherds and shepherdess­
es, she walks behind Silvandre and Diane during the first
part of the trip to the Shrine of Astree, listening atten­
tively to their conversation (IX, 3; 106),
She walks with
Tersandre during the last portion of the journey*
She sug­
gests that they walk close to Madonte and Silvandre, but
they can only hear commonplace remarks (II, 5; 175).
Laonice
listens to the conversation of Diane and Astrde In which
Diane admits her love for Silvandre (II, 6; 271).
LEONIDE is a nymph (II, 1; 11).
account of Celadon (II, 1; 18)•
She is fond of Lycidas on
After hearing from Thamire
the difficulties of Celidee, Thamire and Calidon, Leonide
agrees to advise them, providing that they will promise to
ASTREE II
LEONIDE
observe her advice (II, 2; 45).
56
She consults with Paris,
Silvandre and the shepherdesses before giving her judgment
(II, 2; 71)*
Talcing into consideration the various affecA
'
tions, duties and offenses, Leonide orders that Celid^e
should love Thamire (II, 2; 72-73).
To avoid the regrets
and tears of Calidon, she immediately arises and departs
(II, 2; 73).
We learn that Leonide was angrily banished from Galathee1s
presence after Celadon’s escape from Galathee (II, 7; 273-74
and 287-88).
273).^*
Leonide had aided Celadon to escape (II, 7;
She was tired of the bustle of the court and retired
to the home of her uncle Adamas.
She hoped to see Celadon
again, thinking that he would return to Astree• Leonide en­
joyed her friendship with the shepherdesses (II, 7; 274).
One day Leonide found Celadon asleep near a fountain and,
thinking he was Lycidas, she took his little bag of letters
and left (II, 7; 275).
She read the letters and discovered
that they were from Astree to Celadon (II, 7; 278-79).
She
returned to the fountain and followed Celadon’s tracks to
his cave (II, 7; 280).
She tried to cheer him and to reason
with him (II, 7; 281-84).
She told him that Astree looked
sad and would want him near her if she knew he was alive.
Leonide told Celadon the story of Galathee (II, 7; 285).
1 Misprint lists Laonice instead of Leonide, p. 275,
line 24.
ASTREE II
LEONIDE
57
She told him of the love of Paris for Diane and that Diane
told her that she could only love Paris as a brother.
She
told Celadon of the strong friendship between Astree, Diane
and Phillis and of the wager between Phillis and Silvandre,
both of whom served Diane.
She told him of Silvandrers and
Diane’s new affection (II, 7; 292-93)*
She also told him of
the jealousy of Lycidas of Silvandre (II, 7; 294 and 300-5)*
Leonide could not persuade Celadon to appear before Astree
nor to change his manner of living (II, 7; 307-8).
She wept
when she saw him in the light, because- he had changed so much.
Leonide obtained Celadon’s permission to visit him again (II,
7; 308).
She did not wish to return to Marcilly even though
she was invited by Galathee (II, ?; 307).
As Leonide still loved Celadon and still had hopes of his
loving her, she would not tell Astr/e that he was alive (II,
8; 309).
She was grieved, however, by his changed appearance
and obstinacy and decided to tell Adamas about him (II, 8;
309-10).
She visited Celadon every day alone first, but per­
ceiving that her visits saddened him, she told Adamas of his
whereabouts (II, 8; 310).
Leonide was perturbed to learn
from Adamas that she and Celadon were relatives (II, 8; 311)*
Leonide accompanied her uncle to the oracle at Mont-verdun,
of which Cleontine was priestess (II, 8; 313).
Leonide re­
turned Celadon’s letters to him and brought him writing
ASTREE II
materials (II, 8; 320).
LEONIDE
58
She no longer visited the shepherds
so frequently as formerly, claiming that hunting occupied her
(II, 8; 329).
\
.
>
Leonide participates in the "funeral service" which the
shepherds and shepherdesses hold for Celadon (II, 8; 348-49).
She agrees to judge the differences of Doris, Palemon and
Adraste, assisted by Chrisante (II, 8; 351)*
Leonide con­
sults with the shepherdesses and Chrisante, before pronounc­
ing her judgment (II, 9; 376).
Palemon.
She commands that Doris love
After seeing Adraste returned to consciousness, she
and the others leave (II, 9; 379).
After hearing Silvandre
and Hylas discuss the values of faithful and unfaithful love,
Leonide stops the argument, because she is anxious to tell
Adamas about Celadon’s funeral (II, 9; 390).
She conducts
Chrisante and the girl druids back to their temple and returns
to her uncle (II, 9; 391).
She tells Adamas about Celadon’s
"funeral" and suggests that perhaps if Celadon is told that
Astree believes him dead, he will decide to see her (II, 10;
393).
Leonide tells Celadon about the "funeral service" that was
held for him and shows him his tomb (II, 10; 396).
Ifthen
Celadon, disguised as Alexis, comes to live with Adamas,
Leonide encourages him to tell of his travels, in order to
distract him from his worries (II, 10; 339-405).
Leonide
receives Silvie very warmly when the latter visits her at the
ASTREE II
home of Adamas.
LEONTIDAS
59
Leonide hears from Silvie the story of
Lindamor (II, 10; 414).
Then she converses with Fleurial,
whom she has sent to Lindamor with a message (II, 10; 421).
Leonide tells Silvie that she has written Lindamor to return,
mentioning the artifices of Polemas (II, 10; 422).
She
laughs at Fleurial1s jumbled account of the story of Melandre,
Lydias, and Ligdamon (II, 10; 423).
Leonide and Silvie de-,
cide to tell G-alathde the truth concerning Lindamor1s journey,
but to conceal from her the time of his arrival, for fear
that she might tell Polemas (II, 10; 425).
Leonide tells
Adamas a portion of the news she has received (II, 10; 427).
Leonide interrupts the conversation between Lyeidas and
the feigned Alexis. (Celadon) (II, 11; 432).
She has Lycidas
tell her the story of Celidde (II, 11; 435).
Then she urges
him to tell her the story of his jealousy (II, 11; 455).
LEONTIDAS, a favorite of Torrismonde, was the successor of
Madonte*s father in the high military office and became the
guardian of Madonte.
kindly.
Leontidas treated Madonte gently and
He planned to marry her to one of his nephews, whom
he had chosen for his heir (II, 6; 209).
Leontidas soon
noticed Damon’s attempt to serve Madonte and commanded his
ward never to see Damon (II, 6; 211).
Leontidas was in love with some women, who took advantage
of his wealth and had other lovers in secret (II, 6; 216).
ASTREE II
LEOHTIDAS
60
Even Leontidas came to believe that* Damon and’Madonte were
no longer in love, but he was assured the contrary by his
wife.
Leontidas hired Leriane to spy on Madonte (II,. 6;
217).
When Madonte broke down after Damon’s death, Leontidas
reproached Leriane for her lack of care of Madonte.
Hearing
the stories Leriane told of Madonte*s many lovers, Leontidas
was very angry with Madonte (II, 6; 244).
He was told by his
wife and Leriane that Madonte was going to have a child by
Tersandre (II, 6; 243-49).
He was persuaded by the mid-wife
jand by Leriane that the child was Madonte*s.
He was finally
persuaded by his wife and Leriane not to have Madonte burned,
as the law required, but to secure her wealth and shut her up
among the girl druids or vestals (II, 6; 250).
Leontidas was angry when Leriane later told him that Madonte
denied all that had happened.
Leontidas wished to be the
combattant against Madonte in the trial by combat (II, 6;
252).
His wife and Leriane, however, persuaded him to let
Leriane*s cousins be the combattants.
Leontidas asked that
the king punish Madonte (II, 6; 253).
After Madonte*s innocence was revealed, Leontidas was de­
prived of his guardianship, because his wife had asked for
Madonte*s fortune (II, 6; 260).
ASTREE II
LEONTIUS ATHENIEN-LERIANE
61
LEONTIUS ATHENIENt father of Eudoxe, Mother, was a philo­
sopher (II, 12; 492).
LEOTARIS, cousin of Leriane, hoped to he Leriane’s heir (II
6; 252).
He and his brother fought Tersandre in Madonte’s
trial by combat.
They wished to fight him, one after the
other, but Leriane ordered them to both fight him at once (II
6; 256).
When they had defeated Tersandre, the brothers had
to fight the unknown Knight of the. Tiger (II, 6; 257).
When
his brother was killed by the Knight of the Tiger, Leotaris
wished to avenge his death but he too was killed (II, 6; 25&)
LERIANE, an elderly woman, was hired by Leontidas to spy
upon Madonte (II, 6; 217-18).
Leriane showed herself so de­
sirous of pleasing Madonte that Madonte came to love her. Be­
cause of the friendly manner of Damon, Leriane believed that
he was in love with her and she loved him (II, 6; 218).
She
wrote passionate letters to Damon.
Rejected by Damon, Leri­
ane hated him and swore vengeance.
She was afraid that Damon
would show her letters to Leontidas, if she told Leontidas
about Damon (II, 6; 220).
Leriane followed Madonte about like a shadow.
She dis­
covered that Tersandre was in love with Madonte (II, 6; 221).
Leriane encouraged Tersandre to declare his love, assuring
him that no inequality stood between him and Madonte, who,
ASTREE II
LERIANE
she said, was fond of him (II, 6; 222).
Tersandre to give Madonte a letter.
62
Leriane encouraged.
Leriane hid it in a
glove and gave it to Madonte in the presence of Damdn and
others (II, 6; '223).
Leriane pretended to be glad that
Madonte did not read the letter, as she saw that Madonte did
not approve of her action.
Leriane next decided to make Madonte jealous (II, 6; 225).
She scolded her young niece Ormanthe for having no lovers and
threatened to send her home if she did not change (II, 6; 226).
She told Ormanthe that Damon would like to serve her and that
she need not fear favoring him in public, as he intended to
marry her.
Leriane had people tell Madonte of Ormanthe’s
favors to Damon (II, 6; 227).
Leriane had Tersandre tell her
aunt about Ormanthe and had the ensuing conversation between
herself and her aunt take place in Madonte*s room.
Leriane
told Madonte that Damon was in love with Ormanthe (II, 6; 228).
She. advised Madonte to pretend to withdraw from Damon in order
to rekindle his ardor (II, 6; 229).
She then advised Madonte
to make Damon jealous (II, 6; 230).
Leriane suggested favor­
ing Tersandre.
She told Tersandre that Madonte was in love
with him (II, 6; 231).
In Damon’s presence,. Leriane gave Tersandre a ring like one
of Madonte*s and assured him that Madonte sent it to him with
her love (II, 6; 236).
When Leriane heard of Ormanthe*s
ASTREE II
LERIANE
63
pregnancy, she resolved to make Damon believe that the child
was Madonte*s and Tersandre*s.
After Damon’s death, Leriane
still resolved ,to use the child to ruin Madonte (II, 6; 245).
She told Ormanthe to remain in'Madonte’s bed (II, 6; 246).
She told Leontidas and his wife that Madonte was going to
have a child by Tersandre and that, if they had Madonte burned
as the law commanded, they could secure Madonte*s wealth (II,
6; 247-49).
Leriane helped the mid-wife deliver Ormanthe of
the child in Madonte’s bed (II, 6; 249).
She took the child
and the mid-wife to Leontidais and convinced him and his wife
that the child was Madonte’s (II, 6; 249-50).
Flaying for
time, Leriane suggested, pleadingly, that Leontidas and his
wife spare Madonte*s life, securing her wealth and shutting
her up with the girl druids or vestals.
Leriane was then
charged with persuading Madonte to agree (II, 6; .250).
Leri­
ane showed Madonte to the witnesses of Leontidas as the girl
was lying sadly on a couch in her closet (II, 6; 251).
Leriane promised to make her cousins Leotaris and his bro­
ther her heirs (II, 6; 253).
She now told Leontidas and his
wife that Madonte denied what had happened.
She suggested
the trial by combat and offered her cousins as combattants
against Madonte(II, 6; 252).
and to the king (II, 6; 253).
She told her story to the queen
When she heard of Madonte’s
successful trial by fire, Leriane said that some recipe had
ASTREE II
SU
LIGDAMON-LUCINDE
protected her hand (II, 6; 255).
At the trial by combat,
Leriane had her cousins both fight Tersandre at the same
time (II, 6; 256).
Leriane*s wickedness was discovered by the trial by com­
bat and by the confession of Ormanthe (II, 6; 259)*
Leriane
tried to plead not guilty but she was not believed and she
was condemned to death by fire. At the last minute Leriane
confessed, asked Madonte*s pardon, and threwherself into
the fire (II, 6; 260).
LIGDAMON resembled Lydias.
He was taken for Lydias and
died rather than marry the lover of Lydias.
His death sad­
dens Silvie (II, 10; 423).
LINDAMOR was the rival of Polemas for the hand of Galathee
(II, 7; 292).
He was a friend of Ohilderic (II, 10; 416).
He was shocked to read Leonide’s letter telling him to re­
turn and mentioning the artifices of Polemas (II, 10; 421-22).
Lindamor was suffering from battle wounds when he received
the letter and he became gravely ill immediately after re­
ceiving it.
and Polemas.
In his delirium Lindamor named Galath/e, Leonide
He sent Pleurial to Leonide with the message
that Lindamor would soon come (II, 10; 424).
LUCINDB was Celadon dressed as a nymph in order to deceive
JSmasis (II, 7; 236-87).
(See also Celadon)
ASTREE II
LYCIDAS
65
LYCIDAS, a shepherd, is so jealous of Silvandre that he
misinterprets Silvandre’s words and the actions of Phillis
(II, 1; 18-20 and 7; 300-5).
Not being able to bear see­
ing Phillis and Silvandre together, Lycidas leaves the com­
pany of his friends and goes off in the woods by himself
(II, 1; 25).
Watching Phillis, who is listening to Sil­
vandre sing, Lycidas recites a sonnet concerning his jeal­
ousy (II, 7; 299).
Lycidas attends the "funeral services" of his brother Cela­
don.
He offers a special sacrifice (II, 8; 348).
Lycidas
is especially jealous because Phillis and Silvandre walk to­
gether after the funeral (II, 8; 352).
When Phillis tries
to persuade him to remain with the group, Lycidas answers
angrily and leaves (II, 8; 352-53).
We learn that Lycidas sometimes acted as sentinel for Cela­
don and Astree (II, 10; 401).
Lycidas comes to visit the feigned Alexis (Celadon) (II, 11;
429).
He is astonished when he sees the resemblance of the
feigned Alexis to Celadon (II, 11; 431).
He tells "Alexis"
of this resemblance and of his love for his brother.
Lycidas
believes that Diane is not in love and can therefore have
neither happiness nor sorrow (II, 11; 432).
He tells Leonide
that Astree is troubled because her uncle wants her to marry
Calidon (II, 11; 433).
of "Alexis" to Celadon.
He mentions to Leonide the resemblance
He says that if Astrde suffers wrong
ASTHEE II
LYDIAS-LYPANDAS
66
from Calidon, who does not love her, Love is avenging the
death of Celadon (II, 11; 434).
Lycidas says Celidee is
"lost" and tells the story of Celidee (II, 11; 434-35).
He
then tells the story of his own jealousy (II, 11; 455).
We learn that the day of Celadon’s "funeral", Lycidas over­
heard a long conversation between Phillis and Silvandre (II,
11; 458-61).
He.heard Phillis scold Silvandre for not having
avoided her (II, 11; 460).
Then he heard Silvandre declare
his love for Diane (II, 11; 461).
Delighted, Lycidas sudden­
ly made his presence known, throwing himself at the feet of
Phillis (II, 11; 462).
With the help of
Silvandre and Astre'e,
Lycidas was pardoned by Phillis (II, 11; 463).
He tells Phillis and Astr^e that "Alexis" resembles Celadon
(II,. 12; 564).
LYDIAS resembled Ligdamon.
death of Aronte.
Lydias was imprisoned for the
He would have been put to death, but Melandre,
who was in love with him, dressed herself as a man and engaged
in combat for him.
He pursued Melandre after both were set
free (II, 10; 423).
LYPANDAS, a relative of Aronte, held Lydias prisoner at
Calais. ~ After Melandre had engaged in combat and had saved
the life of Lydias, Lypandas had her imprisoned.
Lypandas
himself was imprisoned when Calais was taken by the Francs.
After he found out that Melandre was a lady, Lypandas fell in
love with her and pursued her (II, 10; 423).
ASTREE II
MADONTE
67
M.
MADONTE , a ’’shepherdess” , spends her time strolling about
with Tersandre, Laonice, Hylas, and Tircis, all of whom are
strangers in this region and have no flocks to keep (II, 3;
105)*
Madonte walks with Tersandre,(II, 3; 106).
However,
during the last portion of the journey to the Shrine of
Astr^e, Madonte walks with Silvandre (II, 5; 174).
Madonte
resembles Diane in features, in actions, and in manners of
speaking (II, 5; 174-75)•
Questioned by Diane, Madonte tells
her that her story would be too long and too tiresome.
says she is a lady of high estate (II, 6; 207).
She
Madonte
tells her story in a low voice because she. does not want the
shepherds, especially Tersandre, to hear her (II, 6; 208).
We learn that Madonte was only seven or eight years old
when her father was killed.
For reasons of state, Madonte
was taken out of her mother’s hands and placed in the charge
of her father’s successor, Leontidas.
Madonte was well-
treated by Leontidas, but not by his wife (II, 6; 209).
Made contrary by the command of Leontidas that she was
never to see Damon again, Madonte consciously changed Damon’s
nature.
When she realized that he had changed for her sake,
she loved him more than if he had been perfect originally.
However, she treated him so discreetly that he did not know
that she loved him (II, 6; 211).
Madonte encouraged Damon
to tell her the author and the adressee of the love-letter
ASTREE II
MADONTE
which he showed her (II, 6; 212).
68
However, when she finally
learned that Damon had written the letter to her, she was
greatly surprised and felt that honor commanded her to he
offended.
She called his act treason but partially blamed
herself for having been so cordial to him (II, 6; 214).
Suggesting that Damon should have shown his love only by
showing his respect rather than by bold words, Madonte re­
minded him of her parentage and of her difficult position
(II, 6; 215).
She finally consented to be loved and served
by Damon, provided that it be with respect (II, 6; 216).
Because of Leontidas, the love-letters which Damon and
Madonte exchanged were addressed only to "my brother” or
”my sister” (ibid.).
Madonte and Damon acted very friendly
to Leriane so that she would not tell Leontidas of their
meetings (II, 6; 218).
Madonte refused to be suspicious of
Leriane and insisted that Damon treat Leriane kindly (II, 6;
219).
Madonte had been served by Tersandre but she c onsidered him
only as a servant (II, 6; 221).
She was greatly surprised
to receive a letter from him in a glove.
She received the
glove as a gift from Leriane in the presence of Damon and
others (II, 6; 223).
Madonte admits that Tersandre*s flat­
tery pleased her, but she was ashamed that a person of his
low estate should dare to turn his eyes toward her (II, 6;
224)•
Madonte told Leriane that she destroyed the paper in
ASTRIDE II
MADONTE . 69
the glove without reading it (II, 6; 225).
Madonte was told by friends of. Tersandre about Ormanthe 1s
caresses to Damon,
Comparing the relative beauty and posi­
tion of herself and Ormanthe, Madonte could ;not believe that
Damon preferred Ormanthe to her (II, 6; 227).
Madonte saw
an old aunt of Leriane talking to her and was told by Leriane
that Damon was in love with Ormanthe.
Madonte wept and told
Leriane of her love for Damon (II, 6; 228).
Madonte followed
Leriane*s advice and treated Damon rather coldly.
As this
plan succeeded, causing Damon to flee Ormanthe, Madonte ac­
cepted Leriane*s next piece of advice (II, 6; 230).
To make
Damon jealous, Madonte talked to Tersandre, although she was
ashamed to be seen doing it (II, 6; 231).
very coldly (II, 6; 232).
hunt (II, 6; 233).
She treated Damon
She was accosted by Damon on a
She was given Leriane1s letter to.Damon
and was told of Leriane*s advice to Ormanthe (II, 6; 234).
Madonte was so surprised that she could not answer for some
time.
She wanted to assure Damon that she still loved him,
but she saw the hunters approaching and, fearing to be seen
alone with Damon, she left (II, 6; 235).
The next day Madonte-had resolved to tell Damon the good
news and to break off her friendship with Leriane
sandre.
and Ter­
However, that day she was loudly insulted by Damon
in the temple (II, 6; 237).
Soon she heard from Halladin
the story of the duel and of Damon1s suicide and received
ASTREE II
MADONTE
70
the letter and the ring, similar to her own, which she was
supposed to have given Tersandre,
Overcome with grief, .
«*>-
Madonte went /to bed and nearly lost her sanity (II, 6; 242).
She shrieked against Leriane,
When Madonte recovered her
senses, she asked her nurse what people said of her at court.
She was told that everyone blamed her for the death of Damon
(II, 6; 243).
She was told by Tersandre of the deceit of
Leriane (II, 6; 244).
Advised by her nurse, Madonte pardoned
Tersandre•
After Damon1s accident, Madonte. remained in bed except in
the afternoon, when she shut herself in her closet.
tended to be very ill (II, 6; 245).
She pre­
She had her nurse have a
girl remain in Madonte1s bed and receive messages from Madonte1s
friends (II, 6; 246).
Madonte was seen by Leriane and the wit­
nesses of Leontidas as she lay unhappily on a couch in her
closet (II, 6; 251).
fore the king.
She was seized by soldiers and led be­
There Madonte was accused by Leriane of having
had a child by Tersandre.
Madonte denied it (II, 6; 253).
Be­
fore the judges Madonte held a live coal in her-hand without,
getting burned (II, 6; 254).
by combat.
She was ordered to have a trial
She was grieved by the death of her mother and by
her bad reputation and considered suicide (II, 6; 255).
Madonte was forced to witness her trial by combat (II, 6;
256).
Madonte fell in love with the unknown Knight of the
Tiger, who saved her life and honor (II, 6; 25S-61),
She asked
ASTREE II
MAHORTIUS-MAXIME
71
him to tell her his name and to conduct her to her home, but
she was refused both requests (II, 6; 259-60).
She was told
by a peasant that the knight was going to Gergovie and that,
if he returned, one might inquire about him at Mont-d’or.
Madonte was cleared of. all suspicion by the confessions of
Ormanthe and of Leriane (II, 6; 259-60).
She was given her
liberty (II, 6; 260).
Madonte and Tersandre and Madonte’s nurse set out for the
Mont-d’or.
After her nurse’s death, Madonte met Tircis, Hylas
and Laonice.
Madonte dressed as a shepherdess and accompanied
them to the region of the Lignon (II, 6; 26l).
Madonte still hopes to find the Knight of the Tiger (II, 6;
262 ).
MAHORTIUS. a military leader, was sent by Valentinian to
fight Boniface.
He was defeated by Boniface (II, 11; 462).
MARTIAN, a captain, married Plucheria and was elected emperor.
He was a friend of Genseric, king of the Vandals.
Martian
forced Attila to spare Constantinople (II, 12; 511)*
Martian
refused to help Valentinian against Attila (II, 12; 536).
MAXIME, at Valentinian’s suggestion, married Isidore (II, 12;
513).
He gambled with the emperor Valentinian.
By this means
he lost his money and his ring, which were taken by Valentinian
(II, 12; 514)*
Maxime promised to get vengeance, when Isidore
ASTREE II
MELAMPE
72
told him that Valentinian had attacked her (II, 12; 522)*
He wanted to get rid of AEtius before daring to kill the
emperor Valentinian (II,. 12; 532).
Telling Heracle of the
immense power of AEtius, Maxime aroused the Eunuch’s sus­
picions of AEtius and the emperor promptly had AEtius killed
(II, 12; 532-33).
Upon hearing of Attila’s death, Maxime determined to get
his vengeance upon Valentinian (II, 12; 536).
He counseled
Valentinian not to pay his soldiers and to tax his people
exorbitantly.
He aroused Thrasile, a guard of Valentinian,
against the emperor.
Then Maxime and Thrasile killed Valen­
tinian and Heracle (II, 12; 537).
After the death of Valentinian, Maxime had himself pro­
claimed emperor (II, 12; 536).
He had Eudoxe, Ursace, Olimbre
and the princesses captured (II, 12; 54-0).
to marry him (II, 12; 541).
He forced Eudoxe
Wishing to conquer her by kind­
ness, Maxime permitted Eudoxe to visit Ursace (II, 12;.542).
M'axime told Eudoxe that he had killed Valentinian in order
to marry her (II, 12; 544).
When Genseric entered Rome, Maxime was so frightened that
he fled (II, 12; 546).
He refused to fight a duel with Ursace
and was killed by Ursace (II, 12; 546-47).
MELAMPE, Astree’s dog, is recognized by Diane in the por­
trait of the Goddess Astree in the woodland temple (II, 5;
186).
ASTREE II
MELANDRE -MID-WIFE
MELANDRE was in love with Lydias.
73
She disguised herself
as a man and engaged in a combat to save the life of Lydias.
She was imprisoned by Lypandas, but was freed by the Francs.
She was pursued by the grateful Lydias and. by Lypandas, who
had fallen in love with her (II, 10; 423).
MERCURY, a messenger from Heaven.
Ursace and Olimbre mis­
took Celadon for Mercury (II, 10; 410).
MEROUEE
(See Merovefe) .
IvIEROV^E was, the King of the Francs (II, 10; 41B).
He helped
settle the Francs in their permanent location (II, 11; 483).
He was promised by Attila a portion of the Roman Empire (II,
12; 523).
Because of the persuasions of AEtius, he joined
AEtius against Attila (II, 12; 524).
Merovee’s army formed
the right flank in the battle in which Attila was defeated
(II, 6; 209).
Clidaman fought under Merovee.
“When Merovee
died,.Amasis canceled her celebration over Clidaman’s vic­
tories (II, 7; 307).
MID-WIFE, hired by Leontidas, delivered Ormanthe of her
child in Madonte’s bed (II, 6; 249).
She assured Leontidas
and his wife that the child was Madonte’s (II, 6; 250).
She
testified at Madonte’s trial before the king and queen (II,
6; 254).
After the trial by combat, and after Ormanthe’s
confession, the mid-wife admitted that she had not seen the
face of the girl she attended (II, 6; 260).
ASTREE II
MOTHER OF CEL IDEE-NEPHEW OF LEONTIDAS
74
MOTHER OF CELIDEE promised that her daughter need not
marry a man she detested (II, 1; 42).
MOTHER OF CELIDEE'S NURSE advised Celidde not .to take
vengeance on another girl (II, 11; 444)*
Refusing to give
Celidee an herb with which to disfigure a girl’s face, the
mother of Celidee’s nurse pleaded for time (ibid.).
MOTHER OF CIRCENE approved of her daughter’s marriage to
Clorian, who was wealthy and of good family (II, 4; 130).
MOTHER OF FLORICE, an example of honor and chastity,
chided her daughter severely for making love to Teombre.
The mother and father quickly concluded the marriage ar­
rangements of their daughter and Teombre (II, 4; 159). The
mother was angry when her daughter plead for time in which
to consider the marriage proposal (II, 4; 160).
MOTHER OF MADONTE was deprived of her daughter’s custody
when the child was only seven or eight years old (II, 6;
209).. The mother died when she heard of Madonte’s disgrace
(II, 6; 255).
N.
NEPHEW OF LEONTIDAS, though destined by his uncle to marry
Madonte, did not love her and was not loved by her (II, 6;
210 ).
NICANDEE-OLD KNIGHT
ASTREE II
75
NICANDRE had a disastrous experience after he was refused
by Diane (II, 6; 26S).
NURSE OF MADONTE answered Madonte Vs inquiries concerning
her reputation at court.
She told Madonte that, everyone
blamed her for Damon1s death (II, 6; 243).
She advised
Madonte to listen to Tersandre (II, 6; 244).
vised her to pardon him (II, 6; 245).
Then she ad­
.At Madonte’s request,
she had a girl remain in Madonte’s bed in the afternoon and
receive messages from Madonte*s friends (II, 6; 246).
During the trial by combat, the nurse learned the truth
from Ormanthe concerning the child.
She took Ormanthe with
her and told the queen the story (II, 5; 259).
The nurse
accompanied Madonte and Tersandre in their search for the
Knight of the Tiger.
She died in the Mont-d’or region (II,
6; 261).
NURSE OF ORMANTHE’S CHILD received the baby at birth (II,
6; 250).
She testified at Madonte’s trial (II, 6; 254).
0.
OLD KNIGHT said that the siren on the shield of Hylas
referred to Parthenopd', because one of the classic sirens
was named Parthenop^ (II, 4; 132).
OLD KNIGHT, witnessing for Leontidas and his wife, was
shown Madonte’s room after Ormanthe’s confinement.
He saw
Madonte lying unhappily on a couch in her closet (II, 6;
ASTREE II
250-51).
OLD LADY -OLIMBRE
76
He testified at Madonte*s trial before the king
and queen (II, 6; 254).
OLD LADYt•witnessing for Leontidas and his wife, was
shown Madonte’s room after Ormanthe* s confinement.
She
saw Madonte lying unhappily on a couch in her closet (II,
6; 250-51).
She testified at Madonte’s trial before the
king and queen (II, 6; 254).
OLIMBRE, friend of Ursace.
In Celadon’s presence, Olimbre
prevented Ursace from killing himself with a dagger.
In
saving his friend, Olimbre was wounded in the hand (II, 10;
408).
He tried to persuade Olimbre to kill him before com­
mitting suicide (II, 10; 408-9).
Weak from the loss of
blood, Olimbre bade his friend farewell and fainted.
He
was revived by Ursace and by Celadon, who bound his wound
(II, 10; 409).
Olimbre believed Celadon was Mercury and,
when Celadon gave him wine, Olimbre found strength to walk
(II, 10; 410-11).
He was sure that, with Celadon’s assis­
tance, he and Ursace would find Eudoxe.
Olimbre* s arm was
dressed by a physician, who prescribed rest „(II, 10; 411).
Olimbre and Ursace were rescued from a shipwreck by Sil­
vandre (II, 12; 490-91).
Olimbre was elected senator through the influence of
Eudoxe (II, 12; 527).
He fell in love with Placidie, the
young daughter of Eudoxe (II, 12; 528).
He accompanied
ASTREE II
OLIMBRE
77
TJrsace and Eudoxe and her daughters on their flight from
Rome after Valentinian1s death (II, 12; 53#)*
Olimbre
and Ursace tried to defend Eudoxe and her daughters from
Maxime* s men, but they were both wounded and were unsuc­
cessful (II, 12; 540).
Olimbre told Ursace that Eudoxe
was forced to marry Maximei 'Olimbre prevented Ursace ,
from stabbing himself (II, 12; 541).
He was sent to
Genseric and persuaded him to come"to Rome (II, 12; 546). .
Olimbre remained near Genseric and near Eudoxe (II, 12;
546).
He found Ursace and took him to Rome to be buried
(II, 12; 549).
When Olimbre perceived signs of life in
Ursace, he revived him.
It was then that Olimbre again
prevented Ursace from taking his own life (II, 12; 550).
Olimbre petitioned the Council of the Six-hundred for
permission to kill himself (II, 12; 555).
As Olimbre had
only intended to die in order to accompany his friend
Ursace, he was glad that neither was allowed to die (II,
12; 557).
Following the advice of the astrologer who predicted
happiness for Ursace and Olimbre, Olimbre went to Africa,
accompanied by Ursace, who was disguised as a slave (II,
12; 557-59).
Olimbre sent his servants and,those of
Ursace and the daughters of the old surgeon back to Italy
(II, 12; 559).
ASTREE II
ORMANTHE-PALEMON
ORMANTHE was a young niece of Leriane.
by Leriane for having no lovers.
78
She was scolded
When Leriane threatened
to send her home, Ormanthe, who feared punishment from her
mother, promised to change (II, 6 ; 226).
She was told by
Leriane that Damon would* like to,serve her,and that.she
need not fear favoring him in public, as he intended to
marry her.
227)*•
Ormanthe caressed Damon from then on (II, 6 ;
.She finally told Damon of Leriane’s advice, to her
(II, 6 ; 233).
Obeying Leriane, Ormanthe remained in Madonte’s bed dur­
ing the afternoons (II, ,6 ; 246)..
In that bed she was de­
livered of Damon’s child (II, 6 ; 249).
She ,pret ended to
have made a. visit home (II, .6 ; 251).
During the trial by combat, Ormanthe, having learned
that Madonte would die, confessed that, the child was hers.
She confessed to Madonte’s nurse and then to the queen
(II, 6 ; 259).
Ormanthe was shut up in a comfortable
women’s prison for the rest of her life (II, 6 ; ,26l).
P.
rPALEMON, .a..shepherd, is refused by Doris, as is also
Adraste (II, 8 ; 342-44).
But Palemon has once been loved
by Doris, who resolves that she will never love him again
(II, 8 ; 344)•
As he is forbidden to talk to her, Palemon
sings of his love (II, 8 ; 345).
His couplets are answered
ASTREE II
PALEMON
by Doris forming a clever dialogue (II, 8; 347)*
79
He &as
to wait until after Celadon’s ’’funeral services” (II, 8;
348)*
He and Adraste implore Leonide and Chrisante to
judge their difficulties as love inspires them (II, 8;
350-51)*
Palemon promises to obey the judges’ decisions,
explaining that he can take his.life if the decision is
against him (II, 8; 351)*
We learn that Palemon was in love with Doris and was
loved by her (II, 9; 357)*
Extremely jealous, Palemon
constrained Doris to retire from all of her other friends.
He himself, however, only visited her for a short time
each day (II, 9; 358 and 367)•
He lived savagely in the
mountains, depriving himself of her company for the sake
of her reputation (II, 9; 367)*
When Doris told him that
Pantesmon, one of her brother’s friends, was in love with
her, Palemon finally persuaded her to send Pantesmon away
(II, 9; 360 and 368).
As he still suspicioned that she
loved Pantesmon, Palemon resolved to end his doubts; he
was hidden where he could see but not hear the farewell of
Doris, and Pantesmon (II, 9; 369)*
When Palemon saw Pantes­
mon kiss Doris, he.tried to cure himself of his love for
her (II, 9; 369-70).
Palemon’s love finally brought him
back unconditionally to Doris (II, 9; 370-71)*
He has
never been permitted to tell Doris the reason for his leav­
ing her (II, 9; 371).
ASTREE II
PALINICE-PANTESMON
80'
Palemon, in his response to the story of Doris, argues
that jealousy is a proof of infinite love (II, 9; 365).
Delighted with Leonide’s judgment, which gives him the
love of Doris, Palemon tries confusedly to thank the
nymph.
After Adraste is returned to consciousness,
Palemon leads Doris to Mont-verdun (II, 9; 379).
PALINICE. companion of Circene and Florice, is in the
region of the Lignon because of the command of a god (II,
4 ; 121 ).
Palinice, a young widow who did not intend to remarry,
was the one who rescued Hylas from the temple.
immediately served by Hylas.
She was
At first she was annoyed,
but later she learned to laugh at him (II, 3; 111).
Palinice was one of the party on the boatride, on which
Hylas met Florice (II, 4; 136).
Palinice and Oirc^he and Florice amuse Hylas, when he
sets out to fetch a writing implement.
They wish to at­
tend Celadon’s "funeral services" but arrive too late
( I I , 8; 355).
PANTESMON, a very close friend of the brother of Doris
(II, 9; 359).
He was in love with Doris (II, 9; 360).
When he was sent away by Doris, he agreed to leave but ,
conjured her by the one she loved best to let him kiss
her goodbye.
(II, 9; 361).
He never permitted himself to see her again
ASTREE II
PARIS
PARIS is the son of Adamas (II, 3; 108).
with Diane (II, 1; 12).
SI
He is in love
When visiting the hamlet, Paris
dresses as a shepherd (II, 3; 108).
He entertains Palinice,
Cireene, and Florice by singing a song about Hylas and
Phillis, accompanying himself on a harp (II, 3; 109).
Paris
walks with Diane on the trip to the Shrine of Astree (II, 5;
171)•
He performs the office of druid when the party enters
the temple dedicated to the Goddess Astree (II, 5; 17#).
Paris admitted to Leonide that he loved Diane (II, 7; 29697).
He asked Leonide to spend her afternoons with the shep­
herdesses so that he might accompany her and be near Diane
(II, 7; 297).
Paris, at Diane’s request, erects the tomb for Celadon in
his own name, in order to preserve Astree*s reputation (II,
£; 339).
When he and Diane and Tircis search for a certain
branch for the tomb, Paris can think only of Diane and forgets
to look at branches (II, S; 310).
He tries to make Diane say
that she loves him, but she speaks only of reason and respect
(II, S; 311).
Paris wishes to continue his proposal, but is
hindered by the presence of Phillis and others (II, 8; 312).
Paris conducts the vacie to Celadon’s tomb, thus commencing
the "funeral service" (II, 8; 318).
He walks with Diane after
the service (II, 8; 352).
Paris believes that Celadon is his sister Alexis (II, 10;
399).
He explains that the shepherdesses have not visited
ASTREE II
PARTHENOFE-PERIANDHE
82
,fAlexis” because Astree has not been feeling well (II, 11;
431).
PARTHENOPllf was believed by the old knight and others to be
the lady of Hylas, because one of the ancient sirens was
named Parthenopel
She was greatly surprised that Hylas had
chosen to be her knight without consulting her (II, 4; 132).
She spoke to him in the temple (II, 4; 133).
pleased that Hylas had served her in this way.
She was not dis­
She made only
a little resistance when Hylas took her scarf and wore it (II,
4; 134).
She was so angered at Hylas when his servant wore
her scarf and when she learned that Hylas had given her scarf
to Circ^ne, that she refused to renew her friendship with him
(II, 4; 135).
PEASANT was sent by the Knight of the Tiger with a message
to Madonte (II, 6; 260).
PELION, father of Adamas, had the house built, in which
Adamas now dwells (II, 10; 400).
.PERIANDRE, a young knight, was a friend of Hylas (II, 4;
143).
Periandre also loved Dorinde (II, 4; 144).
Told by
Hylas that Dorinde favored him (Hylas), Periandre followed
the suggestion of Hylas and broke Dorinde’s mirror, finding
a picture of Hylas (II, 4; 148).
He was angry with Dorinde
and believed that she was only feigning to be surprised.
PHILLIS ' 83
ASTREE II
He departed, leaving the way clear for his "friend” Hylas
(II, 4; 149)*
He felt the need of returning to see Dorinde
again and was given her by Hylas (II, 4; 166).
by Dorinde (II, 4; *168).
concerning the mirror.
He was favored
He was told of the deceit of Hylas
At Dorindefs request, Periandre stole
the letter from Hylas which Florice had written him.
Peri­
andre brought it to Dorinde (II, 4; 169).
PHILLIS, a shepherdess, is one of Astree*s closest friends
(II, 1; 8).
She is angry and sorry that Lycidas is jealous
of Silvandre (II, 1; 19-21 and 7; 304).
She pretends to be
angry because Diane, her make-believe mistress, has given a
hair bracelet to her "rival", Silvandre (II, 3; 92).
Phillis
picks up the letter which Silvandre drops and reads it with
Astree.
96).
The girls recognize Celadon’s handwriting (II, 3;
During the trip to the Shrine of Astree, Phillis asks
Hylas, who is serving her, to continue the story of his love
affairs with Palinice, Circ^ne and Florice (II, 4; 125).
Phillis recognizes that the portrait in the woodland temple
is surely of Astree, as even the staff which she carries is
copied in detail (II, 5; 165).
Phillis recognizes that the
verses on the altar are in Celadon’s handwriting (II, 5; 187).
She tells Astree that he must not be dead (II, 5; 189).
Phillis tells Astree not to believe in dreams; that dreams
are merely images of past actions or thoughts, rather than
astr6 j
II
PHILLIS
predictions of the future (II, 8; 333).
84
After Phillis and
Astree read Astr^e’s letter from Celadon, they see Silvandre
recite a sonnet to the sleeping Diane and kiss her hand (II,
8; 335-36).
Phillis and Astree discuss the love affair of
Diane and.Silvandre.. Phillis believes that Silvandre is
capable of making Diane love him, because, she says, when a
lover wants to please, he is a changed person (II, 8; 337).
When Silvandre wishes to walk with Phillis after Celadon’s
’’funeral” , she tries to dodge him, because Lycidas is watch­
ing them (II, 8; 352).
She tries to persuade Lycidas not to
leave the group, but is answered angrily and is made very un­
happy (II, 8; 352-53).
Phillis laughs when Hylas returns
with the writing implement after the ’’funeral” (II, 8; 356).
When Hylas tries to carry Phillis in his arms, she will not
permit it (II, 8; 357).
We learn that Phillis sometimes acted as sentinel for
Celadon and Astree (II, 10; 401).
The day of Celadon’s ’’funeral” Phillis showed Silvandre
that she was angry with him (II, 11; 458).
She was embar­
rassed to learn that Silvandre knew about her affection for
Lycidas and about the latter’s jealousy (II, 11; 459-60).
She scolded. Silvandre for not having avoided her (II, 11;
460).
When Lycidas, 'who had heard the conversation, sudden­
ly appeared, Phillis was astonished (II, 11; 462).
She was
ASTREE II
PHOCION-PLACIDIE, GRANDDAUGHTER
85
persuaded by Silvandre and by Astree to forgive Lycidas for
his jealousy (II, 11; 4-63)*
Phillis laughs when Hylas tells her that he is leaving her
for "Alexis” (Celadon), who, he says, is more beautiful.
Phillis reminds Hylas that Alexis cannot marry for- many years
(II, 12; 562).
BHOCION
(SeePoeion).
PHYSICIAH OP CALIDOH said Calidon’s ailment was caused by
love.
He felt his pulse while the neighboring shepherdesses
visited Calidon (II, 1; 35)•
was in love with Celidee.
Thus he discovered that Calidon
He told Thamire that Calidon. would
die if he were not given Celidee (II, 1; 36).
PHYSICIANS OP THAMIRE dressed his head wound.
They decided
that it would be beneficial for Thamire to see Calidon, whom
Thamire believed was dead (II, 11; 441)•
They dressed Celi-
d^e’s wounded face, but said that she would never regain her
beauty (II, 11; 453).
BLACIDIE, GRANDDAUGHTER was a child of Eudoxe and Talentinian (II, 12; 522).
She was served by Olimbre (II, 12; 528),
She accompanied her mother and Ursace on their flight from
Rome after Talentinian’s assassination (II, 12; 536).
was taken to Africa by Genseric (II, 12; 548).
She
ASTREE II
PLACIDIE, GRANDMOTHER
PLACIDIE, GRANDMOTHER was the daughter of Theodose
11; 467).
86
{II,
When Rome was sacked by Alaric, Placidie married
the Gothic Prince Ataulfe (II, 11; 470).
When Ataulfe be­
came king of the Goths, Placidie persuaded him not to destroy
Italy (II, 11; 471-72).
After Ataulfe was murdered, Placidie,.
who had made friends with army leaders, was still honored as
queen.
She had a friend, Sigeric, elected king.
murdered, she had Walia elected king.
When he was
She helped him fright­
en the Gothic people into desiring peace with Rome.
When
Placidie returned to Rome, she was received in triumph (II,
11; 473).
Placidie married Constance, a Roman army captain.
Placidie
and Constance were the parents of Yalentinian and of Honorique
(II, 11; 474).
When Constance died, Placidie was consoled by
the grief of the entire empire and by her two children.
She
advised Honorius to choose AEtius to finish the Spanish cam­
paign (II, 11; 475).
Angry with her brother Honorius, for
having recalled AEtius, Placidie retired to Constantinople
to the home of her nephew Theodose II (II, 11; 477-78).
She
took her two children, who were accompanied by the children
of several Roman senators and knights.
Among these children
was the young Ursace (II, 11; 478).
After Honorius died, Placidie and her son went to Ravenne.
Aided by Artabure and by partisans of Honorius, Placidie re­
ceived both Castinus and AEtius as prisoners (II, 11; 480).
ASTREE II
PLUCHERIA-PRISCUS
87
She showed mercy on both men, thinking that they would be
useful to Valentinian (II, 11; 48O-8I).
She had Valentinian
send AEtius against all of the tribes in Saul (II, 11; 48I).
When Boniface, governor of Africa, would not obey Placidie*s
command to return to Rome, Placidie had Mahortius sent against
Boniface (II, 11; 482).
Placidie took Valentinian to Constan­
tinople and had him marry Eudoxe, the daughter of Theodose II
(II, 11; 483)-
Placidie died almost immediately following
her return to Italy (II, 11; 484).
PLUCHERIA, sister of Theodose II, married Martian and had
him elected emperor (II, 12; 511).
POLEMAS was a rival of Lindamor for the hand of G-alath^e.
He was worried because of Lindamor*s growing fame in the army
and,because Climanthe*s scheme had not been successful.
When
questioned by Salath^e concerning the ruse, Polemas had feigned
ignorance (II, 7; 292).
According to Silvie, Polemas had evil
designs which he hid only out of fear of Clidaman and Linda­
mor, who were armed and loved by Childeric (II, 10; 418).
PRIAM, a prince of Asia.
If he had* died before the loss of
his city, Priam would have been the greatest prince of Asia,
according to the surgeon of Olimbre (II, 12; 552).
FRISCUS, secretary of Valentinian, described Attila (II, 12;
525).
88
PROXIME-SCIPION
ASTREE II
PROXIME, Roman knight, told Valentinian that, in having
AEtius killed, the emperor had out off his right hand with
his left (II, 12; 533).
R.
ROTEMER, brother of Torrismonde (II, 12;'526).
S.
SACRIEICATEURS were consulted by Attila.
They told him
that he would be defeated in the approaching battle but that
the principal enemy leader would be killed (II, 12; 524).
SAMOTHES
(See Dis Samothes).
SARRONIDES were brought by Thamire.
They visited the sick
Calidon and gave him precepts against boredom and counsel
against sadness (II, 1; 33).
SCHOOL COMPANIONS OF SILVANDRE went swimming with Sil­
vandre (II, 12; 4^7).
(II, 12; 488).
They were halted by a raging storm
One of them saw ships on the horizon.
They
saw two ships wrecked on the rocky shore (II, 12; 489).
spired by the example of Silvandre, his companions saved
several passengers (II, 12; 490).
SCIPION conquered Carthage and added it to the Roman
republic (II, 11; 4S3).
In­
ASTREE II
SERVANT OF URSACE-SILVANDRE
■89
SERVANT OF URSACE, at his master’s command, wrote to
Isidore, thereby getting word to Eudoxe concerning the ill­
ness of Ursace (II, 12; 536).
SERVANTS OF URSACE AND OLIMBRE were sent for by their
masters (II, 12; 553).
They were sent back to Italy by
Olimbre (II, 12; 559).
SIGABAN (See Singiban).
SIGERIC, a Gothic prince and friend of Placidie, was
elected king of the Goths.
He showed too much affection for
Placidie and was murdered by his army (II, 11; 473).
SILVANDRE is violently in love with Diane, although he only
commenced to serve her for a wager (II, 1; &).
He calls out
the clever Echo stances concerning his love (II, 1; 9-11).
Extremely courteous, Silvandre greets Leonide and Paris even
though the presence of his rival, Paris, is not agreeable to
him (II, 1; 12).
He explains to Leonide and Paris that ab­
sence augments love (II, 1; 13).
The consideration of the
virtues, beauty, merits, and reciprocal affection of the
loved one, as projected upon the lover’s memory, strengthens
his affection by reason.
In this consideration, the lover
idealizes the beloved one (II, 1; 13-14).
Silvandre argues
that presence is more dangerous to love than absence.
He
ASTREE II
SILVANDRE
90
says that the lover is either loved, hated, or treated in­
differently: if he is loved, his love wanes from too many
favors; if he is hated, he will he forced to defend himself;
if he is treated indifferently,' he will become discouraged..
v
All of these wounds, Silvandre says, are less severe to the
absent than to the present lover (II, 1; 14).
However, Sil­
vandre cannot force himself to leave Diane, because he is a
human being as well as a philosopher (II, 1; 16-17).
Silvandre teases Lycidas, who is jealous of him, by pre­
tending to make love to Phillis in his presence (II, 1; 2022).
Silvandre cures Diane’s lamb with an herb (II, 1; 23).
After hearing the story of Celidee, Thamire and Calidon, Sil­
vandre wanders alone throughthe woods and worships the moon,
because it has the same name as Diane (II, 2; 74)-
He finds
a young shepherd (Celadon) conversing with a druid (Adamas)
and listens to their conversation without recognizing them
(II, 2; 77)*
Silvandre later falls asleep in the woods and
Celadon puts a letter into his hand (II, 3; 85).
As it is
addressed only to "the most beautiful‘and most beloved shep­
herdess in the universe," Silvandre decides that it must be
for Diane and that his good demon must have written it for
him (II, 3; 86).
Silvandre listens to a conversation between Diane and
Astree (II, 3; 87).
He reveals to them by his words, actions
and changes of color that he truly loves Diane (II,
3; 90).
ASTKEE II
SILVANDRE
91
Aided by Astr^e, Silvandre persuades Diane to give him the
hair bracelet which she is making for Phillis (II, 3; 91).
He torments Phillis by saying that no love remains where jeal­
ousy rules (II, 3; 93).
V/hile Silvandre is aiding Diane to
rise,.'Celadonfs ietter drops from his pocket and is read by
Phillis and Astr^e (II, 3; 95).
on a tree trunk (II, 3*,'98).
Silvandre carves a madrigal
Questioned by Diane, he tells
her how he received the letter and agrees to conduct her and
the others to the place where he received it (II, 3; 99).
Out of respect, Silvandre cedes his place by the side of
Diane to Paris, when the latter joins the excursion to the
Shrine of Astree.
Silvandre enjoys the company of Madonte,
who resembles Diane (II, 5; 174).
Silvandre discovers the
temple of the goddess Astre'e (II, 5; 176).
He interprets to
the remainder of the party the painting of the two little
Loves fighting.
He reads aloud the Twelve Tables of the Laws
of Love (II, 5; 180).
Silvandre is certain that the portrait
in the woodland temple is of Astr/e, as he even recognizes
Astrde’s favorite lamb among the flocks (II, 5; 186).
recognizes Celadon’s handwriting.
He
He tells Tircis of the
love affair of Astree and Celadon (II, 5; 191).
Silvandre readily promises Hylas that he will respect the
Laws of Love as shown on the Twelve Tables (II, 5; 199).
He-
is greatly astonished when he reads them as they have been
ASTKEE II
SILVANDRE
falsified by Hylas (II, 5; 200).
92
When Astree speaks to Sil­
vandre about returning home, he suggests that the girls spend
the night at the Temple of the Good Goddess, which is nearby
(II, 5; 202).
Walking with Astree, Silvandre discusses his
love for Diane and is encouraged by Astree (II, 5; 203). Sil­
vandre leads the party into the thick woods in which he found
the letter from Celadon (II, 5; 204).
He steps on a certain
grass and loses his way in the darkness (ibid.).
He suggests
that they rest under the trees until the moon appears (II, 5;
20$).
Discussing his theories of love with the shepherds, Sil­
vandre tries to explain to Hylas that it is the soul which
loves and that the lover’s soul changes into the soul of the
beloved although his body remains unchanged (II, 6; 264).
Silvandre listens to the conversation between Diane and
Astree.
He is delighted to hear that Diane loves him, but is
grieved when he learns that she will refuse him because of
his lack of known parentage and of inherited fortune (II, 6;
269-71)•
Silvandre sings beautiful stances of the World of
Loveland a sonnet (II, 7; 301-4)*
Silvandre goes to the
temple of the Good Goddess to procure materials for Celadon’s
tomb (II, 8; 339).
He writes Celadon’s epitaph, mentioning
that Love was the cause of his death (II, 8; 349-50).
As
Diane is walking with Paris after Celadon’s ’’funeral” , Sil­
vandre walks with Phillis, in order to make Lycidas more
jealous (II, 8; 352).
ASTREE II
SILVANDRE
93
After hearing the story of Doris, Palemon and Adraste, Sil­
vandre argues with Hylas about faithful love.
Silvandre con­
tends that love is made up of two indispensable parts: extreme
affection and perpetual fidelity (II, 9; 381).
his love is perfect (II, 9; 382).
He claims that
He says that Hylas does not
love Phillis, because he does not think she is perfect.
He
says that Hylas loves himself rather than Phillis (II, 9; 388).
He says that the reward of faithful lovers is like the reward
of the gods, but that the pleasures which Hylas prizes are
like those of animals (II, 9; 389).
Silvandre visits the
feigned Alexis (Celadon) with the other shepherds (II, 11;
429).
We learn that Silvandre laughed because Phillis showed him
that she was angry with him (II, 11; 458).
He told her that
he knew about her affection for Lycidas and about the jealousy
of Lycidas (II, 11; 459-60).
He said that he could not avoid
Phillis because she was always near Diane (II, 11; 460).
fervently confessed his love for Diane (II, 11; 461).
He
Wien
Lycidas, who had heard the conversation, appeared, Silvandre
encouraged Phillis to forgive him (II, 11; 462-63).
Silvandre tells Hylas that, as love is an instinct of nature,
it needs.no apprenticeship.
He asks Hylas if he does not fear
the wrath of Teutates in addressing himself to a person who
belongs to the god (II, 11; 466).
ASTREE II
SILVIE
94
While Adamas is telling the story of Plaeidie, Silvandre
interrupts him, saying that he has met Ursace and Olimhre and
has heard the story of Eudoxe (II, 11; 47#).
After Adamas
has finished, Silvandre tells of his meeting Ursace and
Olimbre (II, 12; 490-91).
Then he tells the story of Eudoxe,
Valentinian and Ursace, as it was told to him by Ursace (II,
12 ; 492 ).
We learn that while Silvandre was in school, he and five or
six companions went swimming (II, 12; 4^7).
by a .raging storm (II, 12; 488).
the rocky coast (II, 12; 489).
They were halted
They saw ships wrecked on
Silvandre saved two women
and two men, inspiring his companions to save others (II, 12;
490).
Silvandre told Ursace how to petition the Council of
the Six-hundred (II, 12; 553-54).
He accompanied Ursace and
Olimbre before the judges (II, 12; 554).
Silvandre wrote the
epitaph on the tomb of the old surgeon of Olimbre (II, 12;
559).
SILVIE is a young nymph (II, 7; 291).
to escape from G'alath^e (II, 7; 273).
She aided Celadon
She expected G-alathee
to be angry, but she was surprised that she sent Leonide
away.
She promised to have Leonide brought back to the
court as soon as possible (II, 7; 288).
Silvie partially
calmed Galath^e, assuring her that Adamas was entirely to
blame and suggesting that, for reasons of diplomacy, Galath^e
ASTREE II
SILVIE
95
should not reveal her wrath to him (II, 7; 290-92). At Galathee’s command, Silvie invited Leonide to return to Marcilly
(II, 7; 307).
When Silvie visits Leonide at the home of Adamas, she is
very heartily received by the nymph.
storyof Lindamor (II, 10; 414).
She tells Leonide the
She believes that Polemas
has evil designs, but that he fears Clidaman and Lindamor,
who are armed and loved by Childeric (II, 10; 418).
Silvie read to Galathde Lindamor*s letter to Leonide (II,
10; 415).
She tried to persuade Galathde that Leonide had
not told Lindamor about Celadon, but rather, about Polemas
(II, 10; 416).
She read to Galath/e Lindamor’s letter to
Galath^e, which proved that he was referring to Polemas (II,
10; 417-18).
Silvie told Galath^e that Leonide favored
Lindamor as a suitor for Galathde because he was her rela­
tive (II, 10; 419).
Silvie was astonished to hear that Gala-
th^e wished Lindamor and Polemas to get rid of each other so
that she would be left in peace with Celadon.
Silvie told
Fleurial not to tell Galath^e the time nor the place of Linda­
mor’s arrival (II, 10; 420).
Silvie and Leonide hear from Pleurial that Lindamor was in­
jured and cannot come immediately (II, 10; 424).
Silvie
laughs as well as Leonide at Pleurial*s jumbled account of
the story of Melandre, Lydias and Ligdamon, although Silvie
is saddened by the reminder of Ligdamon*s death (II, 10; 423).
ASTREE II
SINGIBAN-STILICON
96
Silvie and Leonide decide to tell Galath^e of the reason for
Lindamor*s journey, but to hide from her the time of his re­
turn, for fear that she might tell Polemas (II, 10; 425).
Silvie tells Galath^e that she believes Leonide*s story
concerning Polemas and Climanthe (II, 10; 426).
She says
that on the day Celadon was found, Polemas was seen along
the Lignon (II, 10; 427).
SING-IBAN, king of the Alains, was promised a portion of the
Roman Empire by Attila (II, 12; 523).
Because of the persua­
sion of- AEtius, Singiban joined AEtius against Attila (II,
12; 524).
SISULPHUS, a military leader sent by Valentinian to fight
Boniface, captured Carthage.
After Valentinian had made peace
with the Vandal leader in Africa, Sisulphus and his army were
recalled to Italy (II, 11; 482).
SOLDIERS OF JUSTICE seized Madonte and led her before the
king without any explanation (II, 6 ; 253).
STILICON, who had charge of the youthful Honorius, wanted
to make himself emperor.
(II, 11; 468).
He had his daughter marry Honorius
He was displeased that Honorius had made the
peace treaty with Alaric, who now resided across the Alps.
Stilicon had a foreign captain attack the Gothic army in
ASTREE II
SURGEON OF OLIMBRE-TERSANDRE 97
Roman territory, angering Alaric so much that he sacked Rome.
When Stilicon confessed that this plot originated with him,
he was executed by Honorius (II, 11; 468).
SURGEON OF OLIMBRE dressed his hand and prescribed rest
’(II, 10; 411)-
He counseled Ursace to^consult the Council
of the Six-hundred before taking his life.
The surgeon said
that he intended to ask the Council for permission to kill
himself because he wished to die while he was happy (II, 12;
552).
He was drowned in the shipwreck (II, 12; 553).
T.
TARAMIS, god who foretold the future (II, 8; 313)*
TEOMBRE was met by Hylas on the boatride.
According to
Hylas, Teombre thought that all of the ladies were in love
with him (II, 14; 136).
Teombre wished to rekindle the love
of Florice by feigning to love Dorinde (II, 4; 137).
He was
sought by Florice, who wished to make Hylas jealous (II, 4;
158).
Teombre married Florice (II, 4; 165).
When he received
the note which Florice had written to Hylas, Teombre made his
wife take a trip with him (II, 4; 170).
TERSANDRE has to walk with Laonice during the last portion
of the journey to the Shrine of Astr^e, because Silvandre
has taken his place beside Madonte.
As Tersandre is jealous
ASTREE II
TERSANDRE
98
of Silvandre, he readily agrees to walk near Madonte and
Silvandre (II, 5; 175).
We learn that Tersandre, the son of one of the soldiers of
Madonte’s father, was raised in Madonte’s house (II, 6; 221)*
He served her as a servant, but he was secretly in love with
her and sought her love.
by Leriane (ibid.).
his love for Madonte.
His love for Madonte was perceived
He was encouraged by Leriane to declare
He was assured by Leriane that no
serious inequality stood between him and Madonte and that
Madonte was very fond of him (II, 6; 222).
He was finally
persuaded by Leriane to write a love-letter to Madonte, which
Leriane presented to her in a glove (II, 6; 223).
Tersandre
had his friends tell Madonte about Ormanthe’s favors to Damon
(II, 6; 227).
He told Leriane*s aunt the same story (II, 6;
228).
Because Madonte now talked to him and because Leriane had
assured him that Madonte was in love with him, Tersandre
carried himself proudly (II, 6; 231).
In Damon’s presence,
Tersandre was given a ring like Madonte*s by Leriane, who
said that Madonte sent it with her love (II, 6; 236).
De­
lighted, Tersandre swore to wear it in his tomb- (II, 6; 237).
Challenged by Damon, Tersandre fought a duel in which both
he and Damon were wounded.
Tersandre* s ring was taken from
him by the victorious Damon (II, 6; 239).
recovered from the effects of the duel.
Tersandre soon
He entered Madonte*s
ASTREE II
TEUTATES-THAMIEE
room and begged her forgiveness (II, 6; 243).
99
He told her
of Leriane*s deceit (II, 6; 244).
Tersandre was accused by Leriane of being the father of a
child, purportedly Madonte*s (II, 6; 248).
He fought Leotaris
and his brother in Madonte’s trial by combat (II, 6; 256). .
Tersandre*s horse helped him to fight them.
Tersandre was
wounded and nearly defeated, when he was aided by the unknown
Knight of the Tiger (II, 6; 257).
Tersandre said he would
like to know the knight who aided him.
and her nurse to Mont-d*or.
and Laonice.
He accompanied Madonte
He and Madonte met Tircis, Hylas
They dressed themselves as shepherd and shep­
herdess and came to the Lignon region with them (II, 6; 26l).
TEUTATES, the principal god whom the people worshipped (II,
8; 324).
THAMIRE, a shepherd, is seen quarreling and pleading with
Celid^e, who is also bothered by Calidon (II, 1; 24).
The
three join Leonide, Paris and several shepherds and shepherd­
esses (II, 1; 25).
Thamire tells the story of their diffi­
culties (II, 1; 27).
We learn that Thamire has loved Celid^e, many years his
junior, from her childhood (II, 1; 28).
He taught her to
become accustomed to his lovemaking and she soon grew to
love him (II, 1; 29-30).
When his handsome young relative
ASTREE II
THAMIRE
100
Calidon came to live with him, Thamire made him promise to re­
gard Celidee only as a sister (II, 1; 32).
Thamire was told
by a physician that Calidon would die if he were not given
Celidee (II, 1; 36).
Thamire had an inner struggle in which
he was torn between love and friendship (II, 1; 36-37)• Tha­
mire tried to force Celidee to marry Calidon, addressing him­
self to Cleontine (II, 1; 39).
Cheered by Celidee's refusal
to marry Calidon and by Calidon*s recovery, Thamire explained
to Celidee the reasons for his action and asked her forgive­
ness, but was refused (II, 1; 43)•
After the harangue of Calidon and the response of Celidee,
Thamire delivers his response and throws himself imploringly
at the feet of Celidee (II, 2; 65-71).
Thamire obtains a
favorable judgment from Leonide (II, 2; 72-73).
We learn that the night -of his marriage to Celidee, Thamire
was grieved by the sight of Calidon, who was moaning that he
was too miserable to live or to die.
Thamire had Celidee
speak to Calidon to console him (II, 11; 436).
Hearing rumors
in the night that Calidon was dead, Thamire nearly had heart
failure, but was revived by Celidee (II, 11; 439).
He ran out
to see Calidon and, thinking that he was dead, Thamire fell
and cut his head on a stone.
He and Calidon were carried in­
to the house unconscious (II, 11; 440).
When Thamire regained
consciousness, he was delighted to see that Calidon was alive
(II, 11; 441).
He would gladly die in order to free Celidee,
ASTHtCS II
THARAMIS-THIERRy
if only she would love Calidon (II, 11; 442).
101
Thamire was
sad when Celidee disfigured herself to cure Calidon of his
passion, but Thamire still loved Celidee.
Thamire wants Calidon to marry Astr^e (II, 11; 452).
THARAMIS
(See Taramis) ♦
THEODOSE I, Eastern Emperor, was the father of Placidie,
Honorius and Arcadius (II, 11; 467-68).
THEODOSE II, son of Arcadius, was raised by Isdigerde, King
of the Persians (II, 11; 477).
When Honorius died, Theodose,
disapproving of the new emperor lean, declared his cousin
Valentinian Western Emperor and sent an army into Italy under
the leadership of Artabure (II, 11; 479).
Theodose II was delighted when his daughter Eudoxe married
the emperor Valentinian (II, 11; 483).
He sent an army to
aid Valentinian in resisting the barbarians, but he called it
back because Attila was near Constantinople.
Then Theodose
died of the plague (II, 12; 511).
THIERRY, son of Walia, was king of the Goths.
He was
stopped by AEtius, general, for Rome (II,. 11; 481).’ -Thierry
fought with Merov^e and AEtius against Attila.
His army
formed the left flank in the battle in which Attila was de1*
feated.
, *
Most of the fighting was on Thierry’s side.
Thierry
ASTREE II
THRASILE-TORRISMONDE 102
was served by the father.of Madonte.
of Torrismonde.
Thierry was the father
Thierry was killed in the battle against
Attila (II, 6; 209).
THRASILE, a friend of AEtius.
After the death of AEtius,
Thrasile had charge of Valentinian*s guard.
Aroused by.
Maxime, Thrasile aided Maxime to assassinate Valentinian (II,
12; 537)•
'
TIRCIS is a shepherd (II, 3; 106).
his beloved Cleon (II, 5; 192).
He mourns the death of
He walks with Astree on the
journey to the Shrine of Astree (II, 3; 106).
He tells the
group that when Cleon died, he was told by the druids that
the spirits are unhappy until they have a tomb (II, 5; 192).
Discussing his theories of love with the shepherds and Paris,
Tircis contends that a lover is transformed into his beloved
and thus their desires are one (II, 6; 263).
Tircis visits .
the feigned Alexis (Celadon) with the other shepherds (II,
11; 429).
He tells Hylas that he, too, has seen nothing in
the home of Adamas so beautiful as Alexis (II, 12; 561).
TORRISMONDE, King of Aquitaine and son and successor of
Thierry.
He was so happy that the battle was won, that he
had his father and Madontefs father buried in the same tomb.
Torrismonde permitted his favorite, Leontidas, to become the
guardian of Madonte (II, 6; 209).
Torrismonde, who at first
TWO DAUGHTERS-TWO YOUNG MEN
ASTRIDE II
103
did not have a high opinion of Damon, changed his mind as
Damon1s nature commenced to change (II, 6; 210).
Torris­
monde, accompanied by the queen and the courtiers, went hunt
ing (II, 6; 233)•
He was told by Leriane that Madonte had had a child by
Tersandre.
He was asked by the queen and Leontidas that
Madonte be.punished according to law.
He granted Madonte*s
fortune to the wife of Leontidas (II, 6; 253).
Torrismonde
was more touched by Madonte*s pleas of innocence than was
the queen (II, 6; 2^4).
When told of Madonte’s successful
trial by fire, he had Leriane informed.
However, he was
forced to order a trial by combat (II, 6; 255).
After the
trial by combat, the king heard the confession of Ormanthe
(II, 6; 259).
He commanded that Leriane be thrown into the
fire (II, 6; 260).
TWO DAUGHTERS OP THE SURGEON OF OLIMBRE were cared .for by
Ursace and Olimbre after the death of their father (II, 12;
553).
The girls were rescued from drowning after the ship­
wreck by Silvandre (II, 12; 490).
TWO YOUNG LADIES, who were visiting Dorinde, left when
Periandre arrived (II, 4; 14#).
TWO YOUNG MEN accompanied Ursace and Eudoxe on their
flight from Rome after the murder of Valentinian (II, 12;
53S-39).
T*10 young men cared for the horses (II, 12; 539).
ASTREE II
UNCLE OF DORINDE-URSACE
104
U.
UNCLE OF DORINDE was visited by Dorinde (II, 4; 137).
URSACE was seen by Celadon, wondering whether to live or
to die (II, 10; 406-7).
He raved about his dear Eudoxe, for <
whom he had killed Maxime (II, 10;'407).
As Eudoxe was now
a prisoner, Ursace started to kill himself with a dagger.
He was prevented by his friend Olimbre, whom he wounded with
the dagger in the struggle (II, 10; 408).
Ursace could not
be persuaded by Olimbre to kill him before killing himself.
Ursace was deprived of his dagger by Celadon (II, 10; 409).
He believed Celadon was Mercury and was willing to follow
his advice (II, 10; 410).
Ursace was sure that with Celadon's
assistance he would soon find Eudoxe.
He was astonished to
see Celadon take nourishment (II, 10; 411).
He became pale
when Celadon told him his identity (II, 10; 412).
Celadon his story (II, 10; 413).
He told
Ursace and Olimbre were
rescued after a shipwreck by Silvandre (II, 12; 490-91).
They were lodged by a wealthy bourgeois friend of Silvandre
(II, 12; 491).
Ursace told Silvandre the story of Eudoxe,
Valentinian and Ursace (II, 12; 492).
Ursace, son of a leading Roman knight, accompanied Valen­
tinian and his mother Placidie' to Constantinople (II, 11;
478).
He and Valentinian became inseparable friends. Ursace
fell in love with Eudoxe, who was to marry Valentinian
ASTREE II
URSAC®
(II, 12; 493).
105
While both Ursace and Eudoxe were children,
Ursace declared his love to Eudoxe (II, 12; 495).
When a bee
had stung Eudoxe on the lip, Ursace cured her pain by murmur­
ing magic words near her lip and sucking the wound (II, 12;
497-98).
As she would not permit him to speak of love, Ursace
said that every time he said "Good-day” and "Good-night” to
her, he would be saying that he was dying of love for her (II,
12; 501)*
Ursace pretended to be jealous of Valentinian (II,
12; 503).
lust before the marriage of Eudoxe and Valentinian,
Ursace was permitted to embrace Eudoxe (II, 12; 508-9).
How­
ever, he could not persuade Eudoxe that love was not subject
to duty and that she should not marry Valentinian (II, 12;
506-8).
After the wedding of Eudoxe and Valentinian, Ursace became
ill from his grief (II, 12; 510).
to Rome with Ariobinde’s army.
When he recovered, he went
He took Eudoxe the news of
her father’s death (II, 12; 511).
Then he followed AEtius
in his warfare against Attila (II, 12; 522-24).
During the time that Ursace was in the army, he became a
very good friend of Olimbre (II, 12; 527).
When Ursace re­
turned to Rome, he soon perceived that Isidore was no longer
gay and cheerful (II, 12; 529).
Isidore tell her trouble.
He and Eudoxe finally.made
If anyone but the emperor Valen­
tinian had outraged Isidore, Ursace would have avenged it
(II, 12; 530).
Ursace and Isidore tried to persuade Eudoxe
ASTKEE II
URSACE
106
to take vengeance on Valentinian by giving herself to Ursace
{II, 12; 531).
After Attila1s conquest of Italy, Ursace was sent to demand
aid of Martian.
536).
Ursace became ill in Constantinople (II, 12;
He had a servant write to Isidore, thereby getting
word to Eudoxe concerning the illness of Ursace (ibid.).
Ursace was with Eudoxe at the sacrifice when Valentinian
was assassinated.
Rome (II, 12; 533).
He accompanied Eudoxe when she had to flee
He was happy when Eudoxe promised never .
to marry anyone but Ursace and said that, if her position
would permit, she would marry him (II, 12; 539-40).
He and
Olimbre fought valiantly to save Eudoxe and her daughters
from Maxime* s men, but Ursace and Olimbre were injured and
were unsuccessful (II, 12; 540).
When he heard that Eudoxe
was to be forced to marry Maxime, Ursace wanted to stab him­
self, but was prevented by Olimbre (II, 12; 541).
He was
visited by Eudoxe, who told him to get well and mentioned
getting vengeance against Maxime (II, 12; 542-44).
Ursace
advised Eudoxe to put sulphur smoke on her hands and face in
order to make herself appear ill.
He suggested offering the
empire to Genseric, King of the Vandals (II, 12; 545).
Ursace
sent Olimbre with the invitation to Genseric (II, 12; 546).
Ursace challenged Maxime to a duel, but, as the tyrant fled,
Ursace killed him (II, 12; 546-47).
ASTREE II
VAC IE
107
Ursace amassed a small army and tried to save Eudoxe from
going to Africa with Genseric (II, 12; 548-49).
Ursace was
attempting to rescue the wrong ladies (II, 12; 549).
Ursace
was taken to Italy by Olimbre to be buried, ,but he returned
to consciousness (II, 12; 549-50),
He was prevented from
committing suicide by Olimbre and by Celadon (II, 12; 550-51).
He was advised by the surgeon of Olimbre to consult the Coun­
cil of the' Six-hundred before committing suicide (II, 12;
552).
Ursace and Olimbre cared for the surgeon’s two daugh­
ters after the death of the surgeon (II, 12; 553).
Ursace learned from Silvandre the way to petition the Coun­
cil of the Six-hundred (II, 12; 553-54).
He petitioned the
Council for permission to die (II, 12; 555).
He was told to
get the permission of his lady before taking his life (II,
12; 556).
Ursace was very sorry that he was not allowed to
die (II, 12; 557).
Ursace resolved to follow the advice of the astrologer who
predicted happiness for him and for Olimbre (II, 12; 557-58).
At the astrologer’s suggestion, Ursace pretended to kill him­
self by stabbing and drowning, and accompanied Olimbre to
Africa, disguised as a slave (II, 12; 558-59).
V.
VAC IE makes the daily sacrifices for the hamlet in the
temple of the Good Goddess (II, 8; 347).
He takes charge of
asth^ ii
VALAMER-VALENTINIAN
Celadon’s "funeral services" (II, 8; 347-49).
108
He visits the
feigned Alexis (Celadon) with the shepherds (II, 11; 430).
He describes to Adamas the temple he has found in the woods
dedicated to the gods and to the goddess Astree (ibid.).
He
asks Adamas to assist at the sacrifice celebrating the beauti­
ful mistletoe (II, 11; 431).
VALAMER, King of the Ostrogoths, was conquered by Attila,
who forced him to join his composite force (II, 12; 511-12).
VALENTINIAN, son of Placidie and of Constance, was taken by
his mother to Constantinople to be with his cousin Theodose.
He was accompanied by several children of leading Roman fami­
lies, among whom was Ursace (II, 11; 478).
After the death of Honorius, Valentinian accompanied his
mother to Italy, where, aided by Artabure and by the parti­
sans of Honorius, Valentinian was made emperor (II, 11; 480).
He was faithfully served by the general AEtius (II, 11; 481).
Valentinian sent Mahortius and Sisulphus against Boniface in
Africa.
He made peace with Genseric, the Vandal leader in
Africa, and he recalled Sisulphus (II, 11; 482).
Valentinian
had recalled Galvion from Bretagne to fight in Africa (II,
11; 483).
Despite the fact that Valentinian was destined to marry
Eudoxe, he only pretended to love her (II, 12; 493).
He fell
in love with Isidore, who discouraged his affection (II, 12;
ASTREE II
494)-
VALENTINIAN
109
When Eudoxe was stung by a bee on the lip, Valentinian
suggested that Ursaee cure her pain by magic words (II, 12;
496).
Valentinian married Eudoxe (II, 12; 510)-
As his atten­
tions were still refused by Isidore, Valentinian had Isidore
marry Maxime (II, 12; 513).
As she still refused Valentinian,
he devised a ruse (II, 12; 513-14).
Valentinian sent Isidore
Maxime*s ring, which the latter had lost gambling, accompany­
ing it with a note telling her to come to see the empress.
Valentinian met Isidore in a closet in a garden (II, 12; 514).
He was persuaded by Isidore's pleading not to attack her and
called his eunuch Heracle to take Isidore home (II, 12; 516).
Valentinian was dissuaded from his good intentions by Heracle
and, with the help of the eunuch, Valentinian outraged Isi­
dore (II, 12; 520).
Then he told her that her husband knew
nothing of the affair (II, 12; 521).
Valentinian and Eudoxe were the parents of Eudoxe and
Placidie (II, 12; 522).
After the triumphal return of AEtius,
Valentinian grew jealous of him (II, 12; 529).
As soon as
Valentinian heard the suspicions of Heracle concerning AEtius,
Valentinian had AEtius killed.
Valentinian was very unpopu­
lar after the murder of AEtius (II, 12; 533).
Following
Maxime’s advice, Valentinian did not pay his soldiers and
taxed the people exorbitantly.
He was assassinated at his
table by Thrasile and Maxime (II, 12; 537).
ASTREE II
VALET-WIFE OF,-LEONTIDAS
110
VALET OF HYLAS felt honored to receive the scarf from
Circene and wore it to the home of Parthenop^"(II, 4; 135).
W.
WALIA, a captain of the Goths, was elected king of the
Goths.
To please his people he pretended to prepare for war
against Rome, hut spread rumors that Rome had an infinite
army.
As the Goths became frightened, Walia was able to
make peace with Rome (II, 11; 473).
He aided Placidie’s hus
band, Constance, in his Spanish campaign and was given Aqui­
taine by Rome* (II, 11; 474).
Walia died before the Spanish
campaign of AEtius (II, 11; 476).
Walia was the father of
Thierry (II, 11; 481).
WIFE OF LEONTIDAS treated Madonte cruelly (II, 6; 209).
When even Leontidas believed that Damon and Madonte were no
longer lovers, the wife of Leontidas, ever suspicious, as­
sured Leontidas of the contrary (II, 6; 217).
She accom­
panied the queen in her morning attendance of the sacrifices
in the temple (II, 6; 237).
When Madonte broke down after Damon’s death, the wife of
Leontidas reproached Leriane for her lack of care of Madonte
Hearing the stories Leriane told concerning Madonte’s many
lovers, the wife of Leontidas was even more angry with Ma­
donte than was her husband (II, 6; 244).
She was told by
ASTKEE II
WIFE OF TORRISMONDE
111
Leriane that Madonte was to have a child by Tersandre (II,
6 ; 247).
The wife of Leontidas wanted to secure Madonte1s
wealth (II, 6 ; 248).
She was convinced by Leriane and by
the mid-wife that the child which they showed her was Ma­
donte* s.
She was persuaded by Leriane not to take Madonte*s
life, but only her wealth, shutting Madonte up with the girl
druids or vestals.
She finally persuaded her husband to
agree to this (II, 6 ; 250).
The wife of Leontidas was later told by Leriane that Ma­
donte denied everything (II, 6 ; 252).
She persuaded her
husband not to fight himself but to let Leriane*s cousins
combat Madonte in the trial by combat.
She asked the queen
to be granted Madonte*s wealth and she was granted this re­
quest by the king (II, 6 ; 253)*
WIFE OF TORRISMONDE. Queen of Aquitaine, accompanied her
husband on his hunting trips and was accompanied by her ladies
in waiting (II, 6 ; 233)•
in the temple.
She attended the morning sacrifices
Here also she was a accompanied by the ladies
of the court (II, 6 ; 237)*
She was told by Leriane that Ma­
donte had had a child by Tersandre.
She asked the king to
punish Madonte according to the law (II, 6 ; 253)*
At the
trial by combat, the queen heard the confession of Ormanthe
(II, 6 ; 259).
ASTKEE II
WOMEN-ZEUXIDE
112
WOMEN, friends of Leontidas, took advantage of his wealth
and had other lovers in secret (II, 6 ; 216).
Y.
YOUNG MAN served in the chamber of Lindamor (II, 10; 422).
He told Fleurial the story of Melandre, Lydias and Ligdamon,
and of Lindamor*s having been injured in a battle with the
Neustrians (II, 10; 422-24).
Z.
ZEUXIDE was a famous painter.
He painted the portrait of
Hylas, which the latter put in the mirror for Dorinde (II,
4; 146).
PART II
RESUMES OF STORIES OF D'URFlf'S ASTKEE. PART II
STORY OF CELIDEE, THAMIRE AND CALIDON
Told by Thamire
Thamire, a grown man, loved the neighbor child Celidee and
taught her to love him (II, 1; 28-30).
Tfthen his handsome
young relative, Calidon, came to live with him, he made him
promise to regard Celidee only as a sister (II, 1; 32). Cali­
don, however, loved Celidee secretly and fell very ill (II,
1 ; 32-33)*
The object of his affection was discovered by a
physician who felt his pulse while the village shepherdesses
visited him (II, 1; 35-36).
in order to save Calidon’s life,
Thamire tried to force Celidee to marry Calidon, suggesting
the marriage to Cleontine, with whom Celidee lived (II, 1;
36-39).
Celidee, indignant, persuaded her mother not to
force her to marry a man whom she detested (II, 1; 42).
Cheered by Celidee’sindigant refusal to marry Calidon and
by Calidon’s recovery, Thamire explained his reasons to the
girl and asked her forgiveness (II, 1; 40-43).
Celidee,
however, was indignant with both men (II, 1; 44).
Celidee, Thamire and Calidon all agreed to follow the ad­
vice of the nymph Leonide (II, 2; 45-46).
Cf. Rayssiguier: La C^lidde.
113
After hearing the
ASTKfSE II
CELIDEE, THAMIRE AND CALIDON
1U
harangue of Calidon and the responses of Celidee and Thamire,
Leonide judged that Celidee should love Thamire (II, 2; 4773).
(For a continuation of the Story* of Celidee, see p. 129.)
STORY OF PADINICE AND OF CIRC^NE
Told by Florice
Palinice, who saved Hylas from the temple where he had hid
himself among the girls, was served by him against her will*
At first she was angry with Hylas, but soon she learned to
laugh at him (II, 3\ 111)*
Hylas also deliberately made
friends with her brother Clorian (II, 3; 112).
Clorian was
a timid young man who was afraid to declare his love to
Girc^ne (ibid.).
He finally revealed his passion to Hylas,
who assured him that girls only pretended to flee lovemaking
because of their honor (II, 3; 114-16).
Hylas was persuaded
to declare Clorian*s love to Circ^ne (II, 3; 116).
Recogniz
ing Circ^ne as the girl who had sung in the temple, Hylas
made love to her himself, feigning to Clorian that he was
delivering his message (II, 3; 116).
115
STORY OF PARTHENOPE, FLORICE AND DORINDE1
Told by Hylas
Hylas was loved by Circ^ne, who, for the sake of appear­
ances, pretended to love Clorian (XX, 4; 130)*
Participat­
ing in a tourney, Hylas painted a siren on his shield.
He
only meant to slightly change the name Circene, but he was
believed to be the knight of a girl named Farthehope^ be­
cause one of the ancient sirens bore the name Parthenope^
(II, 4; 131-32).
Coldly received by Circene, who was Jeal­
ous, Hylas met Farthenop^ in the temple (II, 4; 133)*
He
wore the scarf of Parthenope^, who was not displeased that
Hylas was her knight (II, 4; 134)*
Requested by Circene,
Hylas gave the scarf to Circene, who had the valet of Hylas
wear the scarf in Parthenop^*s presence.
Therefore, both
girls were angry at Hylas (II, 4; 135)•
On a boatride, Hylas met Florice, who was angry because
Teombre pretended to be in love with Dorinde (II, 4; 13738 ).
Hylas promptly made love to Florice but wanted to
keep the love of Palinice, Circene and Florice all at the
same time (II, 4; 141)*
However, at the demand of Florice,
1 Cf. Mareschal: L*Inconstance d*Hylas
116
PARTHENOFfif, FLORICE AND DORINDE
ASTR^E II
117
he devoted himself exclusively to her, until she suggested
that, for the sake of appearances, he pretend to love Dorinde
(II, 4; 142},
Then Hylas proceeded to love both Florice and
Dorinde (II, 4; 143)-
He became a very close friend of Peri-
andre, a knight who was also in love with Dorinde (II, 4; 144)*
Assuring Periandre that Dorinde loved him (Hylas) very much,
Hylas had Periandre break Dorinde*s new mirror and find a
picture of Hylas inside of it, which Hylas had placed there
before having the mirror sold to Dorinde (II, 4; 146-47)•
Angered by what he believed was Dorinde*s deception, Periandre
went away (II, 4 ; 149)*
At the request of Florice, Hylas promised to give her all
of the letters he received from Dorinde (II, 4; 151).
He
kept the most affectionate letters, however, three of which
Florice found in his pocket (II, 4; 152).
Angered, Florice
took the letters to Dorinde (II, 4; 154)•
For revenge against
Florice, Hylas devoted himself to Dorinde (II, 4; 157)•
At­
tempting to make Hylas jealous, Florice made love to Teombre,
whom her parents then forced her to marry (II, 4; 156-60).
Florice wrote imploringly to Hylas (II, 4; 161 and 164).
Al­
though he hated to lose Florice, Hylas would rather die than
marry her (II, 4; 163).
Weeping desperately, Florice was
married to Teombre (II, 4; 165).
Periandre (II, 4 ; 166-67).
Hylas gave Dorinde back to
Hylas and Florice continued their
ASTH&E II
PARTHENOPE, FLORICE AND DORINDE
118
intimacy after the marriage of Florice and Teombre (II, 4 ;
167).
Requested by Florice, Hylas publicly insulted Dorinde
(II, 4; 168).
Then he lost Florice because Dorinde sent
Teombre a letter which Florice had written to Hylas. Teombre
consequently forced his wife to make a journey with him (II,
4; 170).
STORY OF DAMON AND MADONTE
Told by Madonte
Madonte was a high-born, wealthy lady of the royal court of
Aquitaine.
For reasons of state, she was in charge of Leonti
das, a favorite of the king, Torrismonde (II, 6 ; 209).
Her
guardian, wishing to marry Madonte to his nephew, forbade her
to see Damon* who wished to serve her.
Madonte tamed Damon’s
wild manner and loved him despite the orders of Leontidas
(II, 6 ; 211).
Leontidas hired an elderly woman, Leriane, to
spy on Madonte (II, 6 ; 217).
The young couple were, kind to
Leriane, so that she would not tell Leontidas of their meet­
ings.
Leriane fell in love with Damon (II, 6 ; 218).
She
wrote him a passionate letter and received such a cold reply
that she swore vengeance on him (II, 6 ; 220).
Leriane first encouraged Tersandre, a servant who secretly
loved Madonte, to declare his love (II, 6 ; 221-23).
resolved to make Madonte jealous (II, 6 ; 225).
Then she
She encour­
aged and commanded her niece, Ormanthe, to favor Damon, as­
suring her that he wished to marry her (II, 6 ; 227).
Then
learning of Madonte’s unhappiness over Damon’s affair with
1
Cf. Pierre Cottignon de la Charnays: Madonte and Auvray:
Madonte.
119
ASTKEE II
DAMON AND MADONTE
120
Ormanthe, Leriane advised Madonte to treat Damon coldly and
to favor Tersandre (II, 6 ; 229-31).
Leriane finally gave
Tersandre a ring, in Damon’s presence, which was like one of
Madonte’s and which Leriane contended Madonte sent him with
her love (II, 6 ; 236).
Damon, raging, insulted Madonte in
the temple and fought a duel with Tersandre (II, 6 ; 237-39).
Tersandre lost the duel and the ring but both contenders were
wounded (II, 6 ; 239).
Damon gave his servant, Halladin,
a
letter and the ring for Madonte and a bloody handkerchief for
Leriane (II, 6 ; 21*0).
Then Damon jumped into a raging river,
pulling with him Halladin, who tried to save him and could
scarcely save himself (II, 6 ; 241).
When Madonte heard Halladin’s report, she nearly lost her
sanity (II, 6 ; 21*2)*
She remained in bed for many days, pre­
tending to be ill (II, 6 ; 21*5)*
In the afternoons Madonte
arose and went into her closet, leaving a girl in her bed to
receive messages from her friends (II, 6 ; 246).
One after­
noon Leriane had Ormanthe delivered of Damon’s child in Ma­
donte’s bed (II, 6 ; 249).
Leriane told Leontidas and, later,
the king and queen, that Madonte had had a child by Tersandre
(II, 6 ; 250-53).
Ihe punishment for such an offense was death
by fire (II, 6 ; 253).
Madonte was tried, but Leriane produced
witnesses who could verify the confinement (II, 6 ; 254).
Ma­
donte successfully underwent a trial by fire, but was condemned
to have a trial by eombat (II, 6 ; 254-55).
DAMON AND MADONTE
ASTREE II
121
Leriane*s cousins, Leotaris and his brother, fought Ter­
sandre (II, 6; 257).
Just as Tersandre was nearly defeated,
the unknown Knight of the Tiger appeared and killed both of
the brothers (II, 6; 257-58)•
He refused to reveal his name
to Madonte, who fell in love with him (II, 6; 259).
Madonte
was cleared of all suspicion by the confessions of Ormanthe
and Leriane (II, 6; 259-60).
Leriane was burned and Ormanthe.
was put in a comfortable women*s prison (II, 6; 260-61). Ma­
donte learned from a peasant that, the Knight of the Tiger was
going to Gergovie and that, if he returned, one might inquire
about him at the Mont-d*or (II, 6; 260).
and Tersandre set out for Mont-d*or.
Madonte, her nurse,
The nurse died in that
region and Madonte met Tireis, Hylas, and Laonice.
them, dressing as a shepherdess (II, 6; 261).
She Joined
Madonte still
hoped to find the Knight of the Tiger, whose face she had
never seen (II, 6; 262).
STOKI OF GALATHEE
Told by Leonide
Galath^e had held Celadon prisoner.
Aided by the druid
Adamas and the nymphs Leonide and Silvie, Celadon escaped
(XI, 7; 273).
The day of his escape Galath^e had to accom­
pany her mother, Amasis, to Marcilly to celebrate Clidaman’s
victories (ibid.).
Galath^e had to leave so suddenly that
she did not have the time to tell the nymphs what they should
do with Celadon (II, 7; 285).
She only had time to tell
Leonide that she and Silvie and Lucinde (Celadon) should fol­
low Galath^e (II, 7; 286).
Galath^e hoped to marry Celadon
after her mother’s death and she was glad that he was dis­
guised as a nymph in order to deceive Amasis (II, 7; 287).
Wien Galathee heard of Celadon’s escape, she angrily ban­
ished Leonide from her presence (II, 7; 273-74).
Galathee
was disconsolate over the fact that Celadon had not pre­
ferred her to a low shepherdess (II, 7; 289).
Adamas had agreed to take all the blame for Celadon’s es­
cape (II, 7; 286).
Silvie partially calmed Galathee, assur­
ing her that Adamas was entirely to blame and suggesting
that, for reasons of diplomacy, Galathee should not reveal
her wrath to him (II, 7; 290-92).
Galathee had Silvie invite
Leonide to return to Marcilly, but Leonide, who preferred
122
ASTKfSE II
GALATH0®
123
the company of the shepherdesses, did not return (II, 7; 307).
Polemas, rival of Lindamor for the hand of Galathee, was
worried because of Lindamor*s growing fame and because Climanthe’s scheme had not been successful.
When*questioned by
Galathee concerning the ruse, Polemas feigned ignorance,
causing Galathee to believe that Leonide had invented the
story (II, 7; 292).
Because of the death of Merov^e, under whom Clidaman was
fighting, Amasis canceled the celebration (II, 7; 307).
STORY OF DORIS AHD PALEMON1
I.
Told by Doris
Doris and Palemon loved each other (II, 9; 357).
Palemon,
who was exceedingly jealous, persuaded Doris to withdraw
from her friends (II, 9; 35&).
But his own daily visit's
to her toecame very short (II, 9; 357).
As Doris lived with
her brother, she could not avoid seeing her brother’s friends
(II, 9; 359).
Doris told Palemon that one of her brother’s
friends, Fantesmon, was in love with her (II, 9; 360)• Pale­
mon persuaded her-to send Pantesmon away.
As Fantesmon con­
jured Doris, by the one she loved best, to permit him to
kiss her ’’goodbye,” she felt obliged to permit it.
mon left and never appeared again (II, 9; 36l).
Pantes­
As Palemon
did not come to visit Doris again, she sent a girl friend to
find out his reason.
62).
She received a cold answer (II, 9; 36l-
Doris finally cured herself of her love for Palemon
(II, 9; 362).
When he finally devotedly reappeared, she
thought that he was only trying to hurt her again and dis­
dained his friendship (II, 9; 362-63).
II.
Told by Palemon
Palemon’s jealousy was the proof of his infinite love (II,
1 Of. La Croix: Chimdne.
124
ASTRjSE II
9; 365)*
DORIS AND PALEMON
125
Palemon deprived himself of the company of Doris
for the sake of her reputation.
mountains (II, 9; 367)*
He lived savagely in the
Suspicioning that Doris loved Pantes
mon, Palemon hid himself where he could see hut not hear the
farewell of Doris and Fantesmon (II, 9; 369).
When he saw
Fantesmon kiss Doris, Palemon tried to cure himself of his
love by absence (II, 9; 369-70).
His love finally brought
him back, unconditionally, to Doris (II, 9; 370-71)*
Deonidefs judgment gave Doris to Palemon (II, 9; 378).
STORY OF ADRASTE
I* Told by Adraste
Adraste loved Doris from infancy on (XI, 9; 372),
He often
burst into tears before her and fell senseless at her feet
(II, 9; 373)*
He was not jealous but served her constantly
without encouragement (II, 9; 373-74).
He thought that her
disdain and mockery of him were results of her love for Falemon (II, 9; 373).
When she no longer loved Palemon, Adraste
felt that his own perfect love should be rewarded (II, 9; 374).
II. Told by Doris
Adraste declared his love to Doris while she was too young
to understand its meaning.
He then made a long voyage and,
when he returned, her love already belonged to Palemon (II,
9; 375).
126
STORY OF URSACE AND OLIMBRE
Told by Celadon
In Italy, Celadon saw Ursaee, who was wondering whether to
live or to die (II, 10; 406).
Ursace loved Eudoxe, the wife
of a Caesar who was now in the hands of a Yandal who was tak­
ing her into the depths of Africa.
Ursace had delivered Rome
and Eudoxe from the tyranny of Maxime (II, 10; 407).
Ursace
was about to stab himself with a dagger when he was prevented
by his friend Olimbre.
In the scuffle, Olimbre*s hand was
wounded (II, 10; 408).
Olimbre unsuccessfully tried to per­
suade Ursace to kill him before killing himself (II, 10; 4089).
Still wishing to kill himself, Ursace was saved by Celadon,
who took the dagger away from him.
Olimbre became weak from
his wound and thought that he was dying.
He was revived by
Ursace and by Celadon, who bound his arm (II, 10; 409).
When Ursace perceived Celadon, he thought that he was Mer­
cury and was anxious to follow his advice.
Celadon, taking
advantage of the error of Ursace, told him to live and hope
(II*, 10; 410).
Celadon gave-Olimbre some wine, which, as
Olimbre thought it was divine, gave him the strength to walk
(II, 10; 410-11).
Finally Celadon confessed his identity to
Ursace (II, 10; 412).
Ursace told Celadon his story (II, 10;
413).
127
STORY OF LiNDAMOR
Told by Silvie and by Fleurial
Fleurial took a letter from Leonide to Lindamor, in which
she asked him to return at once and mentioned the artifice
of Polemas (II, 10; 422).
Lindamor was injured when he re­
ceived this letter and could not return for some time (II,
10; 424).
He had been injured in a battle in which the
Francs defeated the Neustrians (II, 10; 422).
He became
gravely ill after receiving the letter and in his delirium
he raved about Galath^e, Leonide, and Polemas.
He had
Fleurial take letters to Leonide and to Galath^e and planned
to return to them soon (II, 10; 424).
Galath^e wished to
have Lindamor and Polemas get rid of each other so that she
would be left in peace with Celadon [i.e., if he were to
return} (II, 10; 419-20).
She wanted Leonide to return to .
Marcilly to aid her in this scheme (II, 10; 420).
128
CONTINUATION OF THE STORY OF CBLIDlSE
Told by Lycidas
Calidon became resigned to the loss of Celid^e, but the
night of her marriage to Thamire he showed, his displeasure
(II, 11; 435).
Thamire was grieved to hear Galidon moaning
about being too miserable to live or to die (II, 11; 436).
At Thamire*s request, Celid^e tried to console Galidon,
but he was inconsolable (II, 11; 436-36).
Galidon lay down
on the way home from the wedding and fainted away (II, 11;
436-39).
He was believed to be dead.
Hearing rumors of
Galidon*s death, Thamire nearly had heart failure, but was
revived by Celid^e (II, 11; 439).
Thamire then ran out to
see Calidon and, thinking he was dead, he fell and cut his
head on a stone.
Thamire and Calidon were both carried
unconscious into the house (II, 11;. 440).
When Thamire
regained consciousness, he was delighted to see that Cali­
don was alive (II, 11; 441).
Thamire would gladly die in
order to free Celid^e, if only she would love Calidon (II,
11; 442).
Celid^e determined to give both men peace by disfiguring
herself (II, 11; 442-43).
Her nurse’s mother refused to
give her an herb which would disfigure a person (II, 11;
444).
Celid^e learned from Cleontine that a diamond cut
129
ASTHlIrE II
CELID^E
130
would leave a permanent scar (II, 11; 445) •
Celid^e cut her
face with her auntfs diamond (II, 11; 44#)•
Calidon could
not bear to look at Celid^e after her disfigurement (II, 11;
450).
Calidon was cured of his passion for Celid^e but
Thamire still loved her.
(II, 11; 453).
Therefore Celid^e was very happy
STORY OF THE JEALOUSY OF LYCIDAS
Told by Lycidas
Lycidas, who loved Phillis, was jealous of Silvandre (II,
11; 456),
The ordinary conversation which Phillis and Si1-
vandre had because of their wager concerning Diane was the
cause of the jealousy of Lycidas (II, 11;. 455).
from this passion as from a malady.
He suffered
Every word and every
action of Silvandre and of Phillis had a hidden meaning to
the jealous Lycidas (II, 11; 456).
Finally, one day Lycidas overheard a discussion between
Phillis and Silvandre.
11; 4$8).
Phillis was angry with Silvandre (II,
He told her that he knew about her affection for
Lycidas and about the letter’s jealousy (II, 11; 459-60).
Phillis scolded Silvandre for not having avoided her.
Sil­
vandre said that he could not avoid her because she was al­
ways near Diane (II, 11; 460).
He fervently confessed his
love for Diane (II, 11; 461).
Lycidas, delighted with this
news, suddenly made his presence known, falling on his knees
before Phillis (II, 11; 462).
Encouraged by Silvandre and
by Astr^e, Phillis pardoned Lycidas for his jealousy (II,
11; 463).
131
STORY OF PLACIDIE
Told by Adamas
The emperor Theodose I had two sons, Arcadius and Honorius
and a daughter Placidie.
Honorius was in the charge of the
ambitious Stilicon, who had the Prince marry his daughter
(II, 11; 468).
Honorius made a peace treaty with Alaric, by
which the Goths were to settle across the Alps.
Stilicon
had Alaric attacked within Roman territory, thus provoking
him to sack Rome (II, 11; 469).
Placidie married a Gothic
Prince Ataulfe (II, 11; 470).
She persuaded him not to de­
stroy Italy (II, 11; 471-72).
Ataulfe was murdered and
Placidie had her friend Sigeric elected king of the Goths.
Sigeric was also murdered and Placidie had Walia elected
king.
Walia frightened the Goths into desiring peace with
Rome.
When Placidie returned to Rome, she was received in
triumph (II, 11; 473)*
Placidie married Constance; who conquered the Alains and
the Su^ves in Spain.
and was named Auguste.
He put down a revolt against Honorius
Constance and Placidie were the
parents of Honorique and Valentinian (II, 11; 474).
Constance
died and Altius, at the suggestion of Placidie, was sent to
finish the Spanish campaign (II, 11; 475).
Because of the
delay of AEtius, Castinus was sent to replace him and AEtius
132
PLACIDIE
ASTHEE II
133
had to flee to the land of the Huns and Gepides (II, 11;
477).
Placidie took her children and the children of in­
fluential families, including Ursace, to visit her nephew 1
Theodose II in Constantinople (II, 11; 477-78).
AEtius,
desiring vengeance on Honorius, told the barbarians how
easy it would be for them to capture Rome.
When Honorius
died, AEtius returned to Rome and, having Jean elected
puppet-emperor, AEtius ruled.
Theodose II declared Valen-
tinian emperor and sent an army to Italy against Jean (II,
11; 479)*
Jean was killed and Placidie was given AEtius
and Castinus as prisoners (II, 11; 480).
She spared their
lives, thinking that they would be useful to Valentinian.
They were loyal to the emperor after that time (II, 11;
481).
While AEtius kept down the tribes in Gaul, Valen-
tinian had trouble in Africa with Boniface and with the
Vandals (II, 11; 481-82).
Placidie took Valentinian to Constantinople and had him
marry Eudoxe, daughter of Theodose II (II, 11; 483).
Flaci-
die died shortly after her return to Italy (II, 11; 484).
STORY OP BtJDOXE, VALENTINIAN AND URSACE1
Told by Silvandre, as be heard it
from Ursace
Eudoxe and Valentinian were destined by their parents to
marry each other (II, 12; 493).
Valentinian, however, fell
in love with Isidore (II, 12; 494).
Ursace, a friend of
Valentinian, fell in love with Eudoxe (II, 12; 493).
As
Eudoxe would not permit Ursace to speak to her of love, he
assured her that his "Good morning's" and "Good night’s"
meant that he was dying of love for her (II, 12; 501). Final­
ly Eudoxe admitted that she loved Ursace (II, 12; 502).
She
felt that it was her duty to marry Valentinian (II, 12; 506).
Valentinian and Eudoxe were married (II, 12; 510).
tinian had Isidore marry Maxime (II, 12; 513).
Valen­
As Valentin-
ian’s attentions were still refused by Isidore, Valentinian
outraged her by force, with the help of his Eunuch, Heracle
(II, 12; 513-20).
Isidore demanded that Maxime get vengeance
on Valentinian (II, 12; 532).
* Maxime persuaded Valentinian to have AEtius killed, causing
him to suspicion the powerful AEtius (II, 12; 532-33).
Attila attacked Italy (II, 12; 533).
Then
Attila defeated Valen­
tinian and married the emperorfs sister, Honorique, but he
^ Cf. Scud^ry: Eudoxe, Abel de Saincte-Marthe: Isidore, ou
la Fudicit^ veng^e. and Gilet de la Tessonerie: La Mort de
Valentinian et d*Isidore.
134
ASTK^E II
EUDOXE, VALENTINIAN AND URSACE
died the night of his wedding (II, 12; 535).
135
After Attilafs
death, Maxime determined to get his vengeance upon Valentin­
ian (II, 12; 536).
He counseled the emperor not to pay his
soldiers and to tax the people exorbitantly.
Maxime and a
guard; Thrasile, killed Valentinian (II, 12; 537).
Maxime
had himself proclaimed emperor and had Eudoxe and Ursace
captured as they were fleeing Rome (II, 12; 536-40).
Maxime
forced Eudoxe to marry him (II, 12; 541).
Ursace had Eudoxe offer the empire to Genseric, king of
the Vandals (II, 12; 545-46).
Ursace challenged Maxime to
a duel but, as the tyrant fled, Ursace killed him (II, 12;
546-47).
Though Genseric was honorably received at Rome by
Eudoxe, who called him "Auguste,” the Vandal pillaged the
city (II, 12; 547).
He took Eudoxe and her daughters to
Africa with him (II, 12; 546).
Ursace was prevented from killing himself by his friend
Olimbre and by Celadon (II, 12; 550-51).
Ursace and Olimbre
were shipwrecked and were rescued by Silvandre (II, 12; 490).
They petitioned the Council of the Six-hundred for permission
to kill themselves (II, 12; 555).
mission to die (II, 12; 556).
They were refused per­
An astrologer predicted happi­
ness for Ursace and Olimbre (II, 12; 557-56).
Following the
advice of the astrologer, Ursace pretended to kill himself
and then, disguised as a slave, he accompanied Olimbre to
Africa (II, 12; 556-59).
BIBLIOGRAPHY
BIBLIOGRAPHY
Auvray.— Madonte, Paris, Sommaville et Courts, 1631.
(Photostat, The University of Southern California
Library.)
Lancaster, Henry Carrington.— A History of French
Dramatic Literature in the Seventeenth Century,
Baltimore, The Johns Hopkins Press, Part I, 1929;
Part II, 1932.
Magendie, Maurice.—
Champion, 1927.
Du Nouveau sur 1* As tree, Paris,
Peevish, Mary Virginia.— Biographical Dictionary and
R£surahs of Stories of d ’TIrf^*s Astrde, Part IV.
Thesis, The University of Southern California, 1940.
Reure, 0. C .— La Vie et les QEuvres de Honor^ d fUrf£\
Paris, Plon-Nourrit, 1910.
D fUrf^, Honor^.— LVAstr^e. Nouvelle fidition par Hugues
Vaganay, Lyon, Masson, 1926, 5 vols.
136
LIFE
life
I have been requested to include a few details concerning
my life,
I was born in 1917 in Pomona, California, which
is in the heart of the Citrus Belt.
After spending my early
childhood in the towns of Wittier, Upland, Ontario and
Pomona, California, I moved to Los Angeles, where I attended
nd
52
Street Grammar School, John Muir Junior High, and Manual
Arts High School.
My interest in foreign languages was mani­
fest at an early age, when I learned several Chinese words
from a cousin who was a returned missionary.
At that time,
also, my mother taught me the German song, Die Loreiei, and
let me read her German textbook.
I began the study of Span­
ish in Junior High School and was fascinated by it.
At one
time I kept a diary in Spanish.
In the eleventh grade I changed from Spanish to German,
which became my major study in the University of California
at Los Angeles.
In that university I commenced the study of
French, which became my minor subject.
After graduating
from the University of California at Los Angeles in 1939, I
studied French and Education at The University of Southern
California, receiving my General Secondary Teaching Creden­
tial in 1940 and my Master’s Degree in French in 1941.
137
LIFE
138
My practice teaching was done at Polytechnic High School
in Los Angeles.
I taught German I and TV* and German III
and IV and assisted in music classes.
I have always been
especially interested in music, as I sing, play the violin
and the piano, and in dramatics and art.
I believe that
all of these fields may be coordinated in the teaching of
foreign language classes and, to a greater extent, in
foreign language clubs.
Frances Lucille Foster
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